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Full text of "Undergraduate programs; catalog"

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University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign 



1987-89 

Undergraduate 

Programs 



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Information contained herein is for informational purposes only and is subject to change without 

notice. Individual departments and units should be contacted for further information. Courses, faculty 

assignments, prerequisites, graduation or completion requirements, standards, tuition and fees, and 

programs may be changed from time to time. Courses are not necessarily offered each semester or 

each year. The University retains the exclusive right to judge academic proficiency and may decline to 

award any degree, certificate, or other evidence of successful completion of a program, curriculum, or 

course of instruction based thereupon. While some academic programs are designed for the purpose 

of qualifying students for registration, certification, or licensure in a profession, successful completion 

of any such program in no way assures registration, certification, or licensure by an agency not the 

University of Illinois. 



University of Illinois administrative offices at Urbana-Champaign are open daily 

from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, but 

not Saturdays, Sundays, or all-campus holidays which are indicated in the 

University Calendar. 

An information center, available to visitors to the campus, is located in the 

north entrance lobby of the lllini Union. The center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 

8:00 p.m. daily, including Saturdays and Sundays when classes are in session. 

Small group information sessions about the campus are available at the 

Campus Visitors Center in Levis Faculty Center, 919 West Illinois Street; 

visitors are welcome between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, 

excluding campus holidays. 



The policy of the University of Illinois is to comply fully with applicable federal and state 

nondiscrimination and equal opportunity laws, orders, and regulations. The University of Illinois will 

not discriminate in its programs and activities against any person because of race, color, religion, sex, 

national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, handicap, unfavorable discharge from the military, or 

status as a disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam era. This nondiscrimination policy applies to 

admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in University programs and activities. 

For additional information on the equal opportunity and affirmative action policies of the University, 

please contact on the Urbana-Champaign campus: William A. Savage, Assistant Chancellor and 

Director of Affirmative Action, Swanlund Administration Building, 601 East John Street, Champaign, IL 

61820(217) 333-0574. 






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87-89 
*grams 

A-CHAMPAIGN 



(217) 333-1000 



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BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

EX-OFFICIO MEMBER 

James R. Thompson, Governor of Illinois, Springfield 

ELECTED MEMBERS 
1983-89 

George W. Howard III, President of the Board, Mount Vernon 
William D. Forsyth, Jr., Springfield 
Albert N. Logan, Chicago 

1985-91 

Susan Gravenhorst, Lake Forest 
Ralph Hahn, Springfield 
Ann Smith, Chicago 

1987-93 

Judith Ann Calder, Chicago 
Nina T. Shepherd, Winnetka 
Charles P. Wolff, Elgin 

In addition to the above, there are two nonvoting student members elected annually. 

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATORS 

Stanley O. Ikenberry, President of the University 
Morton W. Weir, Vice-President for Academic Affairs 
Craig Bazzani, Vice-President for Business and Finance 

CAMPUS ADMINISTRATORS 

Thomas E. Everhart, Chancellor 

Robert M. Berdahl, Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs 
Donald F. Wendel, Vice-Chancellor for Administrative Affairs 
Judith S. Liebman, Acting Vice-Chancellor for Research 
Stanley R. Levy, Vice-Chancellor for Student Affairs 



Undergraduate Programs, 1987-89, is published by the Office of Public Affairs/Office of 
Publications, 24 East Green Street, Suite 17. The photographs on pages iii, 8, 94, and 
322 were taken by Mary Creswell, Office of Public Affairs/News Bureau. 






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CONTENTS 

How to Use This Catalog 1 

Introduction 2 

Calendar 5 

General Information 7 

ADMISSION 9 

PRECOLLEGE PROGRAMS 32 

SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 34 

STUDENT SERVICES 45 

STUDENT COSTS 50 

FINANCIAL AID 59 

GRADING SYSTEM AND OTHER REGULATIONS 69 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AND HONORS 74 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 81 

COUNCIL ON TEACHER EDUCATION 87 



Colleges and Other Academic Units 93 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 95 

COLLEGE OF APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 130 

INSTITUTE OF AVIATION 1 41 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 144 

COLLEGE OF COMMUNICATIONS 153 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 160 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 175 

COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 207 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 234 

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LIBRARY AND INFORMATION SCIENCE 314 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 315 

COLLEGE OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 317 

Appendices 323 

Appendix A: Academic Deans and Directors of the Colleges, 

Schools, and Institutes 323 

Appendix B: Teaching Faculty by College and Department 323 

Appendix C: Course Abbreviations Used in Curricular Listings 344 

Appendix D: University of Illinois Regulations Governing the 

Determination of Residency Status for Admission 

and Assessment of Student Tuition 346 

Index 351 

Where to write or telephone 

for further Information Inside back cover 




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How to Use This Catalog 

This catalog provides general information about the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
(UIUC) and detailed information about the programs of study offered by eight undergraduate 
colleges, the School of Social Work, the Institute of Aviation, and the College of Veterinary 
Medicine. Separate catalogs are published for the Graduate College and the College of Law 
at Urbana-Champaign and for the University of Illinois at Chicago. They are available from 
addresses on the inside back cover. 

This catalog has two major pans. The first part, General Information, provides information 
about admission, precollege programs, special opportunities, student services, student costs, 
financial aid, the grading system and other regulations, graduation requirements and honors, 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, and the Council on Teacher Education. The second pan, 
Colleges and Other Academic Units, has separate sections for each of the undergraduate 
colleges, the Institute of Aviation, and the College of Veterinary Medicine, which detail their 
curricula, special academic programs, specific requirements for graduation, honors programs, 
and other information. 

Persons who are unfamiliar with the University may find it helpful to refer first to the 
Introduction for a general description of the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

Publications that supplement this catalog, and that are available from the Office of Admissions 
and Records at the address on the inside back cover, are: semester and summer session 
Timetables, which list courses offered each term, class meeting times, registration instructions, 
and tuition and fee charges; the Courses Catalog, which lists courses offered and provides a 
brief description of their content, credit hours, and enrollment requirements; and the Code 
on Campus Affairs and Regulations Applying to All Students, which contains administrative, 
academic, and conduct regulations. This latter publication is available at 177 Administration 
Building and by request from the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Additional information about the University is available by telephoning the campus — (217) 
333-1000 — and asking the operator for the proper telephone extension. 



The lllini Union 



Introduction 



The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was founded in 1867 as a state-supported, 
land grant institution with a three-fold mission of teaching, research, and public service. During 
its history, the University has earned a reputation as an institution of international stature. It 
is recognized for the high quality of its academic programs and the outstanding facilities and 
resources it makes available to students and faculty. Scholars and educators rank it among a 
select group of the world's great universities. 

THE CAMPUS 

Located in the adjoining cities of Urbana-Champaign (pop. 100,000), approximately 130 miles 
south of Chicago, the University and its surrounding communities offer a cultural and recreational 
environment ideally suited to the work of a major research institution. 

Close proximity by air, rail, bus, or car to Chicago and ready access to major cities on both 
coasts through daily flights to and from the University's Willard Airport make it possible to 
maintain the close contact with major cultural centers that are essential to the intellectual life 
of an international university. 

The University is a residential campus of classrooms, laboratories, libraries, residence halls, 
and recreational and cultural facilities with 200 major buildings on the central campus of 705 
acres. Nearby are the University's 1,493-acre Willard Airport, Robert Allerton Park, the 
campus's 1,768-acre nature and conference center, and 2,400 acres of agricultural land, as well 
as 3,700 acres of farmland elsewhere in Illinois which are used by the College of Agriculture 
as experimental fields. 

Nearly every facility on campus is accessible to the physically disabled, and the University's 
programs and services for the disabled have served as a model worldwide. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

Eight undergraduate colleges and one school offer 150 programs of study leading to a 
baccalaureate degree. They are th6 Colleges of Agriculture, Applied Life Studies, Commerce 
and Business Administration, Communications, Education, Engineering, Fine and Applied Arts, 
and Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the School of Social Work. A certificate program is offered 
by the Institute of Aviation. Postbaccalaureate students study in more than 100 fields through 
the Graduate College and in professional programs through the Colleges of Law, Medicine, 
and Veterinary Medicine. National surveys consistently rank the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign among the top ten institutions in many fields of study with several colleges and 
departments ranked among the top five. 

STUDENT BODY 

There are approximately 36,000 students and 10,800 faculty and staff members in the University 
community. Some 27,000 undergraduates (55 percent men, 45 percent women) typically from 
every state in the nation and some 100 foreign countries, enroll each year; 96 percent of the 
undergraduates are Illinois residents. Minority students comprise about 13 percent of the total 
enrollment. 

Undergraduate education is strongly emphasized, and admissions are very competitive. The 
median ACT composite score of entering freshmen is 27, and more than 25 percent of these 
students ranked in the top 3 percent of their high school class. The majority of transfer 
students enter the University with a 4.0 grade-point average (A = 5.0). 

Annually approximately 100 freshmen are selected to join the Campus Honors Program as 
Chancellor's Scholars. The program fosters close, collaborative relationships between top 
students and distinguished faculty through special honors sections, faculty mentors, and summer 
research opportunities. 

Most undergraduate students receive a baccalaureate degree after four years, and many go 
on to advanced study in the humanities, the sciences, the social sciences, and various professional 
fields. Typically, 80 percent of graduates who apply to law school are accepted; 65 percent 
are accepted to medical school. 



FACULTY 

Scores of faculty are members ot the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National 
Academy of Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering. Seven scientists received the 
National Medal of Science while on the faculty. Professor Emeritus John Bardeen won the 
Nobel Prize in physics twice — the only person ever to do so. Twenty-six faculty members 
have received the Presidential Young Investigators Award, established by Congress to support 
research by faculty members near the beginning of their academic careers. 

FACILITIES 

The University's library is the third largest academic library in the nation with more than 7 
million bound volumes and over 11 million total items. There are 38 departmental libraries 
across the campus, in addition to the main Library and the Undergraduate Library. 

Two premier scientific supercomputing centers, the Center for Supercomputing Research 
and Development and the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, have established 
the University as a recognized world leader in the fields of supercomputing architecture, design, 
and applications. The centers are the natural extension of the University's pioneering role in 
the computer field. PLATO, which was developed at the University, is the largest computer- 
based instructional system in the world, and the $12.5 milion Project EXCEL, funded by IBM, 
has created innovative models of computer-based instruction for undergraduate education. 

Planning and construction continues on the Arnold O. and Mabel M. Beckman Institute for 
Advanced Science and Technology. The campus received a $40 million gift from alumnus 
Arnold O. Beckman and a matching gift of S10 million from the State of Illinois to establish 
the interdisciplinary institute which will bring together researchers in the biological and physical 
sciences in quest of pioneering discoveries in human and artificial intelligence. The Beckman 
gift is believed to be the largest ever from an individual to a public university. 

The campus is a major midwestern center for the arts. Krannert Center for the Performing 
Arts, designed by alumnus Max Abramovitz, architect of New York City's Lincoln Center, is 
a magnificent showcase for music, theatre, opera, and dance. Ellie McGrath, education editor 
of Time magazine described Krannert as "arguably the best performing arts facilities in the 
nation." The facility has four indoor theatres, an open air amphitheatre, and five major rehearsal 
rooms. It is a major performance outlet for students in professional training programs in the 
arts as well as an entertainment complex. More than 350 performances are presented there 
each year. 

There are three museums: the Krannert Art Museum, second only to the Art Institute of 
Chicago in size and value of collections among public museums in Illinois; the World Heritage 
Museum, housing collections of artifacts from cities and civilizations from all pans of the 
world; and the Museum of Natural History, which has displays on early man, flowering and 
nonflowering fossil plants, stuffed animals, and over 400,000 research specimens. 

The Illini Union is a common meeting place for students, faculty, staff, and visitors to eat, 
play, study, and relax. It contains cafeteria and dining facilities, guest rooms, art galleries, 
reading and television rooms, billiards and electronic game rooms, bowling lanes, ticket and 
check cashing counter, alumni offices, and a paperback book sales center. 

The University's Intramural-Physical Education Building is one of the world's largest structures 
for college-university intramural sports and recreational activities. 

The Assembly Hall holds the distinction of being the world's second largest edge-support 
dome. It has a permanent seating capacity of 16,000, and is used for Big Ten basketball games, 
touring companies, concerts, conventions, convocations, and other activities. 

Memorial Stadium, with a seating capacity of 76,000, is home for the Fighting Illini football 
and track and field events. 

Willard Airport services commercial, general, and private aviation, and houses the Institute 
of Aviation. Located six miles southwest of campus, the airport is also a center for research, 
education, and military aviation. The University of Illinois holds the only Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) Airman Examining (Pilot) Agency Certificate in the country, which permits 
it to issue pilot certificates and ratings to its graduates on behalf of the FAA. 



COURSES AND CLASS SIZE 

Over 4,000 courses are available although some may not be offered every semester. About 73 
percent of all class sections have fewer than thirty students; 49 percent have fewer than twenty. 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

The campus has an academic calendar of two sixteen-week semesters and one eight-week 
summer session. A three-week program of intensive instruction called Intersession is held 
between the spring semester and the eight-week summer session. The fall semester begins in 
late August and ends in mid-December; the spring semester begins in mid-January and ends in 
mid-May. The summer session extends from early June to early August. Classes are taught on 
an 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. schedule; a few evening classes are conducted primarily for graduate 
students. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

One of the distinct advantages of a large university is that students with varying interests can 
find many avenues from expression. At the Urbana-Champaign campus, there are some 750 
registered student organizations. 

Approximately 25 percent of the undergraduate student body are actively affiliated with the 
Greek system, the largest fraternity and sorority system in the nation with fifty fraternities and 
twenty-five sororities. 

All three branches of the Armed Services have ROTC units on campus. 

Students have the opportunity to participate in performances by eleven different choral 
groups, five bands plus the Marching Illini, three orchestras, five jazz bands, innumerable small 
ensembles, and even a Russian-style balalaika orchestra. Illinois Opera Theatre stages four full- 
length grand operas plus several one-act operas each year. 

Athletics provide another avenue of enjoyment outside the classroom. The campus intramural 
program is the largest in the nation with three-fourths of all students participating. 

The campus is a member of the Big Ten Intercollegiate Conference, and in recent years its 
athletic programs have achieved national stature in a number of men's and women's sports. 
The Fighting Illini, in blue and orange, sponsors eleven men's teams and eight women's teams. 
Men's intercollegiate sports include baseball, basketball, cross-country, fencing, football, golf, 
gymnastics, swimming/diving, tennis, track, and wrestling. The women's program includes 
basketball, cross-country, golf, gymnastics, swimming/diving, tennis, track, and volleyball. 

CAMPUS VISITORS CENTER 

Prospective students and parents are invited to visit the campus and participate in small group 
information sessions at the Campus Visitors Center. The center is open between 9:00 a.m. and 
4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, excluding campus holidays. Presentations are made by 
Admissions and Records staff, and arrangements can be made to meet with admissions 
counselors, and representatives from specific academic units and the offices of financial aid and 
housing. The Campus Visitors Center is located in the Levis Faculty Center, 919 West Illinois 
Street, one block west of Lincoln Avenue in Urbana. 

Student-conducted tours of the campus are available when classes are in session and weather 
permits. Reservations are recommended and may be made by calling the Campus Visitors 
Center, (217) 333-0824. 



Calendar 



Spring Semester 1987 

Jan. 21, Wed. -Jan. 22, Thurs., 

5:00 p.m On-campus registration 

Jan. 26, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction begins 

Mar. 14, Sat., 1:00 p.m. -Mar. 22, Sun. Spring vacation 

Mar. 20, Fri Spring recess (all-campus holiday) 

Mar. 23, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction resumes 

May 1 3, Wed Instruction ends 

May 14, Thurs Reading day 

May 15, Fri. -May 22, Fri Final examinations 

May 24, Sun Commencement 

Intersession 1987 

May 25, Mon Memorial Day (all-campus holiday) 

May 26, Tues Instruction begins 

Eight-Week Summer Session 1987 

June 11, Thurs. -June 12, Fri., noon . . . On-campus registration 

June 15, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction begins 

July 3, Fri . Independence Day (all-campus 

holiday) 

July 13, Mon Beginning of second four-week term 

Aug. 5, Wed Instruction ends 

Aug. 6, Thurs Reading day 

Aug. 7, Fri. -Aug. 8, Sat Final examinations 

Fall Semester 1987 

Aug. 24, Mon. -Aug. 25, Tues On-campus registration 

Aug. 27, Thurs Instruction begins 

Sept. 7, Mon Labor Day (all-campus holiday) 

Nov. 25, Wed. (5:00 p.m.)- 

Nov. 29, Sun Thanksgiving vacation 

Nov. 26, Thurs. -Nov. 27, Fri Thanksgiving (all-campus holidays) 

Nov. 30, Mon Instruction resumes 

Dec. 1 1 , Fri Instruction ends 

Dec. 1 2, Sat Reading day 

Dec. 14, Mon. -Dec. 19, Sat Final examinations 

Spring Semester 1988 

Jan. 1 8, Mon Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday 

(all-campus holiday) 

Jan. 20, Wed. -Jan. 21 , Thurs On-campus registration 

Jan. 25, Mon Instruction begins 

Mar. 26, Sat. (1:00 p.m.)- 

Apr. 3, Sun Spring vacation 

Apr. 1 , Fri Spring recess (all-campus holiday) 

Apr. 4, Mon Instruction resumes 

May 1 1 , Wed Instruction ends 

May 1 2, Thurs Reading day 

May 13, Fri. -May 20, Fri Final examinations 

May 22, Sun Commencement 

Intersession 1988 

May 23, Mon Instruction begins 

May 30, Mon Memorial Day (all-campus holiday) 



Eight- Week Summer Session 1988 

June 9, Thurs.-June 10, Fri. (noon) — On-campus registration 

June 13, Mon Instruction begins 

July 4, Mon Independence Day (all-campus holiday) 

July 1 1 , Mon Beginning of second four-week session 

Aug. 3, Wed Instruction ends 

Aug. 4, Thurs Reading day 

Aug. 5, Fri. -Aug. 6, Sat Final examinations 

Fall Semester 1988 

Aug. 22, Mon.-Aug. 23, 

lues,. 5:00 p.m On-campus registration 

Aug. 25, Thurs., 7:00 a.m Instruction begins 

Sept. 5, Mon Labor Day (all-campus holiday) 

Nov. 23, Wed., 5:00 p.m.- 

Nov. 27, Sun Thanksgiving vacation 

Nov. 24, Thurs.-Nov. 25, Fri Thanksgiving (all-campus holidays) 

Nov. 28, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction resumes 

Dec. 9, Fri Instruction ends 

Dec. 1 0, Sat Reading day 

Dec. 12, Mon.-Dec. 17, Sat Final examinations 

Spring Semester 1989 

Jan. 16, Mon Martin Luther King, Jr. Birthday 

(all-campus holiday) 
Jan. 18, Wed.-Jan. 19, 

Thurs., 5:00 p.m On-campus registration 

Jan. 23, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction begins 

Mar. 18, Sat., 1:00 p.m.- 

Mar. 26, Sun Spring vacation 

Mar. 24, Fri Spring recess (all-campus holiday) 

Mar. 27, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction resumes 

May 1 0, Wed Instruction ends 

May 1 1 , Thurs Reading day 

May 12, Fri.-May 19, Fri Final examinations 

May 21 , Sun Commencement 

Intersession 1989 

May 22, Mon Instruction begins 

May 29, Mon Memorial Day (all-campus holiday) 

Eight- Week Summer Session 1989 

June 8, Thurs.-June 9, Fri., 

12:00 noon On-campus registration 

June 12, Mon., 7:00 a.m Instruction begins 

July 4, Tues Independence Day (all-campus 

holiday) 

July 1 0, Mon Beginning of second four-week session 

Aug. 2, Wed Instruction ends 

Aug. 3, Thurs Reading day 

Aug. 4, Fri.-Aug. 5, Sat Final examinations 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



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Admission 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY 9 

ADMISSIONS CHART: COLLEGES AND CURRICULA 10 

COLLEGE OF LAW 15 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 15 

SPECIAL ADMISSIONS POLICY 19 

ADMISSION OR READMISSION DENIED BECAUSE OF MISCONDUCT .... 19 

ADMISSION OF BEGINNING FRESHMEN 19 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER APPLICANTS 21 

READMISSION 24 

OTHER CATEGORIES OF ADMISSION 25 

SUMMER SESSION 26 

INTERSESSION 27 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 28 

LISTENERS OR VISITORS 28 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 28 

ADMISSION OF FOREIGN STUDENTS 29 



Since the information in this two-year catalog is subject to change, prospective applicants 
should contact the Office of Admissions and Records at the address on the inside back cover 
for admission requirements and applications for a specific term. 

Admission counselors in 177 Administration Building are available for consultation on 
weekdays, excluding campus holidays, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:00 noon and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Appointments are recommended and can be made by calling (217) 333-0302. The Campus 
Visitor's Center offers campus tours and informational sessions for prospective students and 
their families. (See page 4.) 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

More than 150 programs of study — called curricula, fields of concentration, options, or 
majors — are available to undergraduate students as indicated in the Admissions Chan that 
follows this section. Detailed information about these programs appears in the college sections 
of this catalog. 

In addition to degree programs offered in the college, preprofessional education is offered 
in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for advertising, dentistry, journalism, law, medical 
dietetics, medical laboratory sciences, medical record administration, medicine, nursing, oc- 
cupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, social work, and veterinary medicine. 

Five of the colleges — Agriculture, Applied Life Studies, Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
and Fine and Applied Arts — offer teacher education curricula. 

The Urbana-Champaign campus is organized primarily to assist the full-time student, one 
who is enrolled for at least 12 hours of credit each semester. Most students are required to 
register for at least 15 or 16 semester hours (four or five courses) each semester, but a reduced 
load may be authorized by their college because of special circumstances. 

Enrollment as a nondegree student is limited in the spring and fall semesters. University 
employees and residents of the community who wish to enroll in courses that are offered, only 



Quadrangle with the lllini Union in the background. 



10 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



at the University are given priority for nondegree enrollment. There is no restriction on the 
number of nondegree students who may attend the eight-week summer session. 

Since admission to each college and curriculum is carefully monitored to assure that no 
more students are enrolled than the faculty and facilities can support, applicants may apply 
for admission to only one of the eight undergraduate colleges, the School of Social Work, or 
the Institute of Aviation, and may designate only one curriculum choice. 

The applicant's choice of college and curriculum is particularly important because admission 
requirements differ by college and curriculum, and, once admitted, course requirements for 
students differ by college and curriculum. 

Beginning freshmen who are undecided about an educational major in a particular college 
may want to apply for the core curriculum in the College of Agriculture, the unassigned 
curriculum in the College of Commerce and Business Administration, the general education 
curriculum in the College of Education, or the general curriculum in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences. Students in these curricula do not have to declare a degree program until 
the end of their sophomore year. 

Because of enrollment restrictions, beginning freshmen are required to remain in the college 
to which they have been admitted for at least two semesters of full-time study in the prescribed 
freshman program to which admitted. Transfer students are obligated to remain in the college, 
and possibly the curriculum to which admitted, for at least the first semester of enrollment. 
Students on campus who wish to transfer to another college must meet the accepting college's 
admission requirements and compete for any available spaces. Due to enrollment controls, 
transfer to some programs is very competitive. For example, the College of Commerce and 
Business Administration and the College of Engineering will consider only transfer students 
with 60 hours of prerequisite course work. For unusual and extenuating circumstances, college 
offices will consider individual requests to transfer from one college to another after one 
semester in residence. 

ADMISSIONS CHART: COLLEGES AND CURRICULA 

(A listing of undergraduate curricula available to beginning freshmen and transfer 
students) 

Specific high school subjects, indicated as Patterns I, II, III, IV, V, and VI in the Admissions 
Chart and described on pages 16 and 17, are required of all beginning freshman applicants, 
transfer applicants with fewer than 30 semester hours of transferable baccalaureate credit by 
their desired date of entry, and all applicants to the College of Fine and Applied Arts. 

The minimum transfer grade-point average is 3.25 (A = 5.0) for all curricula, but higher 
grade-point averages are required for admission and/or continuation in certain curricula as 
indicated in the Admissions Chart or the college sections of this catalog. Applicants for teacher 
education curricula should refer to page 87. 

General requirements for admission are found on page 15. 



College of Agriculture 

Applicants for admission may be required to submit a statement of professional interest in the 
curriculum for which admission is desired. 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN I (See page 17) 

Agricultural communications (options in advertising, news-editorial, and broadcast journalism) 

Agricultural industries 

Agricultural science (a four-year program for students desiring preparation for graduate study or 

professional work in animal, plant, or soil science; agricultural economics; agricultural law; or rural 

sociology; and a five-year program for students enrolled in the combined agricultural science and 

agricultural engineering program) Minimum grade-point averages for transfer students are found on 

page 98. 

Core curriculum — For beginning freshman applicants who have not decided on a specific curriculum. 

Transfer students with 45 or more semester hours at time of enrollment must indicate one of the 

following majors: 

Agricultural economics (options in farm management, agricultural marketing, general agricultural 

economics, and rural sociology) 
Agricultural mechanization (industrial and equipment operations options) 
Agronomy (options in agronomy, crops, soils, and crop protection) 



ADMISSION 11 



Animal science (general animal science, companion animal biology, and industrial options) 

Dairy science 

General agriculture 

Horticulture 

Food industry 

Food science 

Forestry (options in forest science and wood products industries) 

Vocational home economics education 

Human resources and family studies (options in human development and family ecology, consumer 

economics, foods in business, foods and nutrition, general home economics, dietetics, institution 

management, textiles and apparel, and marketing of textiles and apparel). Students may also combine 

advertising, journalism, and business with human resources and family studies. Refer to pages 106 

and 125. 

Interior design 

Ornamental horticulture 

Restaurant management 

Soil science 

Agricultural education 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN IV (See page 17) 

Combined agricultural science-agricultural engineering (five-year program with the first three years 
taken in the College of Agriculture) Refer to pages 108, 111, and 112. 

College of Applied Life Studies 

ALL CURRICULA REQUIRE HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN I (See page 17) 
Health and safety studies (options in community health education and health planning and admin- 
istration) 

Leisure studies (options in outdoor recreation planning and management, program management, 
and therapeutic recreation) 

Physical education (options in bioscience; curriculum and instruction— for certification to teach in 
public schools; personalized area of concentration; and social science of sport). Refer to page 87 
for teacher education requirements. 

Institute of Aviation (Certificate Program) 

A personal interview and special aptitude test are required for all curricula. A Federal Aviation 
Administration physical examination is required before the first solo flight. 

ALL CURRICULA REQUIRE HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN I (See page 17) 

Aircraft systems 

Avionics (aviation electronics) All students must have completed one year of community college 

electronics course work before transferring to the institute for a year of aviation specialty courses. 

Contact the Institute of Aviation, University of Illinois-Willard Airport, Savoy, IL 61 874, before applying. 

Professional pilot 

Combined professional pilot/aircraft systems 

College of Commerce and Business Administration 

ALL CURRICULA REQUIRE HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN VI (See page 17) 
Curriculum unassigned (For students who have not selected a degree program. Selection should 
be made by the end of the sophomore year.) 

The first two years of work in all fields in commerce and business administration are almost the 
same. Students later concentrate in one of the following curricula: 
Accountancy 
Business administration 
Economics 
Finance 

College of Communications 

Freshmen are not admitted to this college. Applicants must have completed 60 semester hours of 
transferable credit by the desired term of entry and are required to submit letters of career intent, 
accounts of media experience, and other evidence of interest in communications. The minimum 
admission grade-point average is 4.0 (A = 5.0), but applicants with a lower average will be considered 
if they demonstrate strong career motivation and aptitude and if spaces are available. Refer to page 
154. 



12 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Advertising 
Journalism 

Broadcast journalism 
News-editorial 
Media Studies 

College of Education 

Teacher education curricula also are offered in the Colleges of Agriculture, Applied Life Studies, Fine 
and Applied Arts, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

The minimum transfer grade-point average is 3.5 (A = 5.0) for the College of Education. Refer to 
pages 87 to 91 for teacher education requirements. 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN VI (See page 17) 

Early childhood education (preparation for teaching kindergarten through the ninth grade with a 

special focus on kindergarten and the primary grades) 

Education general (for beginning freshmen and sophomores who are uncommitted to a specific 

teaching program or who have chosen a teaching field that requires junior standing) 

Elementary education 

CURRICULA OPEN ONLY TO STUDENTS WITH JUNIOR STANDING (60 SEMESTER 

HOURS OR MORE) AT TIME OF ENROLLMENT 

Business education (areas of specialization in accounting-bookkeeping, data processing, economics, 

marketing and distributive education, and secretarial-office practice) 

Curriculum preparatory to high school teaching (with specialties in teaching English, general science, 

life science, mathematics, physical science, and social studies) 

Curriculum for preparation of teachers of moderately and severely handicapped persons (designed 

to prepare classroom teachers for the instruction of moderately and severely handicapped persons) 

Satisfactory experience in working with the handicapped is a prerequisite for admission to the 

teaching of moderately and severely handicapped curriculum; admission usually is made for the fall 

semester only; refer to page 173. 

Technical education specialties (preparation to teach a specialty at one or more school levels — 

secondary, technical institute, junior college, or industrial training program — with such specialties 

as electronics, machine tools, avionics, machine tool drafting, architectural drafting, and construction, 

as well as industrial arts) It is suggested that applicants obtain technical preparation and experience 

in their area of specialization prior to admission and consult with an adviser in the department. 

College of Engineering 

It is highly recommended that the two years of science required for admission be chemistry and 
physics. Students entering curricula without satisfactory proficiency in chemistry are required to take 
Chemistry 100 and receive no credit toward graduation. Also, the initial physics sequence assumes 
familiarity with such ideas as the vector nature of forces, simple calorimetry, and simple geometrical 
optics. Transfer applicants must have sixty semester hours of transferable credit by the term of 
enrollment, including required freshman and sophomore sequences in calculus, calculus-based 
physics, and chemistry. 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN IV (See page 17) 
Aeronautical and astronautical engineering 

Agricultural engineering (options in electric power and processing, farm structures, food engineering, 
power and machinery, and soil and water) A combined five-year agricultural engineering-agricultural 
science program also is offered. Refer to pages 108, 111, and 112. 
Ceramic engineering 

Civil engineering (areas of specialization: structures and structural materials, soil mechanics and 
foundation engineering, environmental engineering, construction engineering and management, hy- 
draulic and hydrosystems engineering, photogrammetric and geodetic engineering, transportation 
systems, and engineering systems) 
Computer engineering 
Computer science 
Electrical engineering 

Engineering mechanics (for students interested in research and development in engineering) 
Engineering physics (including preparation for employment in industrial physics and for graduate 
studies in physics and allied technical fields) Minimum transfer average is 3.5 (A = 5.0). Refer to 
page 198. 

General engineering (fields of concentration in engineering administration, engineering marketing, 
environmental quality, computer science, and mining and geological engineering) 
Industrial engineering 
Mechanical engineering 



ADMISSION 13 



Metallurgical engineering 
Nuclear engineering 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN VI (See page 17) 

Combined five-year engineering-liberal arts and sciences program Freshmen apply to the College 
of Engineering. Applicants must satisfy College of Engineering and College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences admission requirements. Refer to pages 178 to 179 and 238. 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN VI 

Architectural studies This curriculum requires three and one-half years of mathematics as part of 
Pattern VI. Architecture transfer applicants must have completed one year of college calculus and 
analytic geometry and one year of western civilization. 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN I (See page 17) 

Art and design Minimum grade-point averages for admission and continuation in the art and design 
curricula are found on page 214. 

General curriculum All freshmen desiring art and design curricula enter the general curriculum except 
those entering the history of art curriculum. Freshmen who complete one year in the general 
curriculum and transfer students with 30 or more semester hours must select one of the following 
degree curricula. Applicants to either the graphic design or the industrial design programs are 
required to satisfy a portfolio review. 

Art education 

Crafts (ceramic or metal emphasis) 

Graphic design 

Industrial design 

Painting 

Sculpture 

Dance Qualifying audition required. Refer to pages 18 and 221. 
Landscape architecture 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN II (See page 17) 

History of art 

Music All music curricula require an audition and/or interview. (Refer to pages 18 and 224.) 
History of music 
Instrumental music 
Music composition 
Voice 

Music education for prospective teachers (Refer to pages 18 and 224 regarding auditions, and 
pages 87 to 91 regarding teacher education requirements.) 

Theatre Preadmission auditions or interviews required. 

Freshman program (Students are enrolled in this program for one year before they may qualify for 

one of the following theatre options.) Refer to pages 18 and 229. 

Applied theatre 

Professional studio in acting 

Professional studio in design and technology 

Urban and regional planning Freshmen applicants must submit a statement of professional interest. 
Transfer students must have completed 30 semester hours of acceptable undergraduate college 
work. 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Because there are a number of differences between the minimum requirements for admission and 
the strong recommendations, students should refer to the section on LAS admission requirements 
on page 236. 

CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN VI (See page 17) 

Sciences and letters curriculum The sciences and letters curriculum comprises all of the traditional 
programs in the liberal arts and sciences. The curriculum requires study in depth in one field of 
concentration, as well as substantial breadth in a number of areas. Fields of concentration to which 
students may apply for admission are: 



14 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Actuarial science 

Anthropology 

Asian studies 

Astronomy 

Chemistry 

Classics (including Greek, Latin, and 

classical civilization) 
Comparative literature 
Economics 
English 
Finance 
French 
Geography 
Geology 
Germanic languages and literature 

(including Scandinavian Studies) 
History 
History of art 
Humanities (options in American 

civilization, cinema studies, history and 

philosophy of science, medieval 

civilization, Renaissance studies) 
Italian 
Latin American studies 
SPECIALIZED CURRICULA 

Speech and hearing science program for the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Teacher education (secondary) in fields of biology, chemistry, computer science, earth science, 
English, French, German, Latin, mathematics, physics, Russian, social studies, Spanish, and speech. 
Refer to page 87 for teacher education requirements. 

Combined sciences and letters-education program for mathematics teachers Minimum transfer 
grade-point average is 3.75 with 4.0 (A = 5.0) in mathematics courses. 
OTHER PROGRAMS 

General The general curriculum is not a degree program, but rather a program and advising center 
for freshman and sophomore students who desire a liberal arts education but who have not decided 
upon a specific field. 

Preprofessional education Preprofessional admission requirements for the Colleges of Communi- 
cations, Law, Veterinary Medicine, Associated Health Professions, Dentistry, Medicine, and Nursing 
may be completed in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The college does not offer separate 
preprofessional degree programs. Suggested programs for preprofessional study are: 



Life sciences (options in anatomical 

sciences; bioengineering; biophysics; 

ecology and ethology; entomology; 

general biology; honors biology; 

microbiology; physiology; plant biology) 
Linguistics 
Mathematics 

Mathematics and computer science 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political science 
Portuguese 
Psychology 
Religious studies 
Rhetoric 
Russian 

Russian and East European studies 
Sociology 
Spanish 

Speech and hearing science 
Speech communication 
Statistics 



Professional Program 


LAS Suggested Program 


Dentistry 

Medical laboratory sciences 
Medical record administration 
Nutrition and medical dietetics 
Physical therapy 


Sciences and letters curriculum with life sciences as con- 
centration 


Medicine 
Law 


Sciences and letters curriculum with any concentration 


Veterinary medicine 


Sciences and letters curriculum with a concentration within 
biological or physical sciences 


Communications 


General curriculum, prejournalism 


Nursing 

Occupational therapy 
Pharmacy 
Social work 


General curriculum 



CURRICULA REQUIRING HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECT PATTERN VI (Admission to the 
following curricula requires three and one-half years of mathematics; see page 17) 

Biochemistry Refer to page 284. 

Chemical engineering Refer to page 285. 

Chemistry Minimum transfer grade-point average is 3.5 (A = 5.0). 

Geology Refer to page 287. 

Physics Refer to page 287. 

Combined engineering-liberal arts and sciences five-year program See pages 178 to 179 and 238. 



ADMISSION 15 



School of Social Work 

Beginning freshmen are not admitted. Since a student must have 45 semester hours to be eligible 
to enter the School of Social Work, the beginning freshman applicant is advised to enroll in the 
general curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the first 45 semester hours and 
then attempt to transfer. 

Students may apply for admission after completion of 30 semester hours of college work, but they 
must have completed 45 semester hours of transferable credit by the desired term of entry. 

A grade-point average of at least 3.75 (A = 5.0) and evidence of interest in a professional career 
in social work are required. Applicants with less than a 3.75 grade-point average will be considered 
on an individual basis if they demonstrate strong career motivation and aptitude. See page 315. 
Social work 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

The College of Law admits beginning students only in August. Minimum admission requirements 
are a bachelor's degree from an accredited four-year college or university, a minimum grade- 
point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) in all course work taken, and a satisfactory score on the Law 
School Admission Test. Other subjective criteria also may be used. 

The College of Law has no specific prelegal course requirements for admission, but a basic 
course in accounting is strongly recommended. Prelegal education for students interested in 
the profession of law is on pages 14 and 236. 

Additional information and admission applications are available from the College of Law, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 209 Law Building, 504 East Pennsylvania Avenue, 
Champaign, IL 61820. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants seeking exceptions to these general requirements should pursue special admissions 
as outlined on page 19. 

Age 

Applicants must be at least fifteen years of age by the date of desired enrollment. 

High School Graduation 

To be approved for admission, applicants must be graduates of a regionally accredited high 
school, or a school in Illinois recognized by the state superintendent of education, or a school 
elsewhere with a rating equivalent to full recognition. Graduates of other secondary schools 
and nongraduates of secondary schools may be admitted under the provisions for use of the 
General Educational Development Tests. 

General Educational Development Tests (GED). The achievement of satisfactory scores on the 
General Educational Development Test is acceptable in lieu of graduation from an accredited 
high school. This test alone will not fulfill all of the college preparatory subject requirements. 

A standard score of 35 on each of the five tests and an average standard score of 45 on all 
five tests are the minimum scores needed to provide the following high school credit: 9 
semesters of English, 8 semesters of social studies, 7 semesters of general science, and 6 
semesters of miscellaneous. This is a total of 24 semesters (12 units) of college preparatory 
subject matter and a total of 30 semesters (15 units) of high school credit. To be eligible to 
take these tests, applicants must be eighteen years of age or have been out of school for at 
least one year. Additional information is available upon request from the Office of Admissions 
and Records. 

To be used in lieu of a high school graduation, transcripts showing GED scores should be 
sent by the testing center to the Office of Admissions and Records. 

High School Credits 

Applicants for admission to all curricula must present a total of at least 15 units of acceptable 
secondary school work. Graduates of schools organized as three-year senior high schools, 
including grades ten, eleven, and twelve, must have at least 12 units in the senior high school. 
Credit earned prior to grade nine is acceptable if the transcript of credit, certified by the senior 
high school, shows the credit as high school credit from grade eight. A unit course of study 



16 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



in the secondary school is a course covering an academic year and including not less than the 
equivalent of 120 sixty-minute hours of classroom work. Two hours of work requiring little 
or no preparation outside the class are considered as equivalent to 1 hour of prepared classroom 
work. Fractional units of the value of less than one-half are not accepted. Not less than 1 
unit of work is accepted in a foreign language, elementary algebra, plane geometry, physics, 
chemistry, or biology. The required 15 units must include the following: 

1. Three units of English are required. Work offered to meet this requirement should be 
composed of studies in language, composition, and literature, and require practice in 
expository writing in all such work. 

2. One unit each in algebra and plane geometry is required. General mathematics, college 
preparatory mathematics, or other courses in mathematics may be accepted in lieu of algebra 
and plane geometry, or more advanced courses, in cases where the content of the course 
is essentially the same as that ordinarily included in the required course, as determined by 
the Department of Mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. When 
such courses are not equivalent to the prescribed algebra and plane geometry or more 
advanced courses, they will be accepted as elective credit. 

3. The college preparatory subjects prescribed in the pattern specified for the curriculum which 
the applicant desires to enter are presented in Table 1. Acceptable college preparatory 
subjects are those defined in paragraphs 1 and 2 of this section and foreign language, 
sciences, and social studies as described for the patterns. 

4. Since the number of college preparatory units for all curricula is less than the 15 required 
for admission, each applicant must present elective units selected from any of the high 
school subjects which are accepted by an accredited school toward its diploma and which 
meet the standards for accrediting. Courses in such fields as agriculture, art, commerce, 
general science, home economics, industrial arts, and music are accepted as elective units 
for admission. 

College Preparatory Subject Requirements 

Admission to each college and curriculum requires that applicants complete a specific number 
of units in certain college preparatory high school subjects (see High School Credits on page 
15. 

The subjects required differ depending upon the college and curriculum selected by the 
applicant. There are six different patterns, or combinations of subjects, designated by Roman 
numerals I, II, III, IV, V, and VI in Table 1. Only patterns I, II, IV, and VI are currently used. 
Applicants must have the courses under the "Required" column or their application will be 
denied. The majority of successful applicants exceed the minimum course requirements and 
have strong college preparatory backgrounds. 

For transfer applicants who will have completed 30 or more semester hours of transferable 
college credit by the date of enrollment at the Urbana-Champaign campus, the subject pattern 
requirements are waived, except for admission to the College of Fine and Applied Arts. The 
subject patterns required for admission to each college and curriculum are listed in the 
Admissions Chart beginning on page 10. 

A specific subject requirement may be waived under extenuating circumstances for otherwise 
well-qualified applicants. An applicant or high school seeking a waiver of the subject pattern 
requirement or a review of rank-in-class because of the applicant's high admission test scores 
and exceptionally strong competition in college preparatory classwork should state the rationale 
for requesting such action using the Background Statement section of the application. 

Additional Admission Requirements 

A few colleges and curricula have admission requirements in addition to the regular academic 
standards. Instructions on how to fulfill these additional requirements are forwarded to students 
soon after their applications are received. Students should be aware that additional time is 
required to process applications for admission to curricula with additional admission 
requirements. Students denied on the basis of additional admission requirements may find all 
admission spaces taken in alternative programs at the time of notification. Thus, such 
applicants should apply early and may also wish to apply to other institutions. The following 
chart indicates the colleges and curricula with additional admission requirements. 



ADMISSION 



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18 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Colleges and Curricula 



Special Requirements 



College of Agriculture 
Institute of Aviation 
College of Communications 
College of Education 

Teaching of moderately and severely 

handicapped children 
College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Dance 

Graphic design 

Industrial design 

Music 

Theatre 

Urban and regional planning 
School of Social Work 



Professional interest statement 
Personal interview and aptitude test 
Additional background information 

Additional background information 

Qualifying audition 

Portfolio review 

Portfolio review 

Qualifying audition 

Qualifying audition or interview 

Professional interest statement 

Additional background information 



English Competency 

Minimum requirements for competence in English apply to all University students. Applicants 
for admission may complete minimum requirements for competence in English by certifying 
that the following requirements have been fulfilled in a country where English is the primary 
language and in a school where English is the primary language of instruction: 
Undergraduate college applicants. Graduation with credit for 3 units, or the equivalent, of 
English from a secondary school; or successful completion of a minimum of two academic 
years of full-time study at the secondary school or collegiate level immediately prior to the 
proposed date of enrollment in the University. 

Graduate and professional college applicants. Completion of at least two academic years of 
full-time study within five years of the proposed date of enrollment in the University. 

For applicants who do not meet the above requirements, evidence can be provided by 
achieving a satisfactory score on a test of competence in English. The test(s) to be used and 
the minimum score(s) shall be subject to approval by the University Committee on Admissions 
with the advice of the University's Technical Committee on Testing. This requirement may be 
waived upon agreement by the director of admissions and records and the dean of the college 
concerned, if evidence of competence in English presented by the applicant clearly justifies 
such action. 



Physical Examination 

New students may be required to present evidence of satisfactory physical and mental health 
to the director of health services. Admitted applicants will receive a Student Health Report 
form which they may use to report pertinent medical data to the director of the campus 
Health Service. If students will be under the age of eighteen at the time they enroll, their 
parents must sign a medical authorization for them to receive care at the McKinley Health 
Center. Upon the advice of a health service physician, admission, readmission, or registration 
of a student may be denied until the student is cleared by the McKinley Health Center. 

Students transferring from the University of Illinois at Chicago should request that their 
health report forms be transferred by their health center to McKinley Health Center. 

Military personnel may have these forms completed by a base physician. 

TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL 

New and readmitted students are encouraged to present evidence of freedom from tuberculosis 
at the McKinley Health Center. All new international students are required to complete a 
tuberculosis screening at the health center before completing registration. 

Evidence of freedom from tuberculosis is established by presentation of a University of 
Illinois or public health agency certificate dated within the previous twelve months or by 
undergoing the application of a tuberculin skin test at the McKinley Health Center during on- 
campus registration with a negative interpretation by the health service 48 to 72 hours after 
application. Persons who have a positive reading to this test should have a chest x-ray at the 
health center. Persons with a history of positive reaction to the tuberculosis skin test will not 
be skin-tested but will be offered a chest x-ray. (If a chest x-ray was done within the previous 



ADMISSION 19 



three months, no new chest x-ray may be made.) Additionally, if the skin test reading is 
positive, the student will be asked to schedule an appointment to review his or her health 
history. 

SPECIAL ADMISSIONS POLICY 

An applicant who is not otherwise eligible, and for whom evidence clearly establishes (1) 
qualifications to do satisfactory work and (2) extenuating circumstances judged worthy of 
special consideration, may have his or her application reviewed and may be admitted with the 
approval of the director of admissions and records and the dean of the college concerned. 

For experimental and special programs which provide academic support services, space may 
be reserved for applicants of different qualifications, not to exceed ten percent of the entering 
freshman class of the previous fall term on the campus concerned. 

Appeals for special consideration after denial of admission are generally unsuccessful since 
admission spaces usually have been filled by that time. 

ADMISSION OR READMISSION DENIED BECAUSE OF MISCONDUCT 

The University reserves the right to deny admission or readmission to any person because of 
previous misconduct which may substantially affect the interest of the University, or to admit 
or readmit such a person on an appropriate disciplinary status. The admission or readmission 
of such a person will not be approved or denied until his or her case has been heard by the 
appropriate disciplinary committee. This applies to a person not now enrolled in the University 
who might apply for admission or readmission, or to a person who has preenrolled whether 
or not he or she has paid a deposit. A favorable action of the appropriate disciplinary committee 
does not abrogate the right of any dean or director to deny admission or readmission on the 
basis of scholarship. 

ADMISSION OF BEGINNING FRESHMEN 

Deadline dates for filing complete applications for admission or readmission are given in the 
following and other application calendars. These deadline dates apply as long as space remains 
available in the desired curriculum. Applicants claiming exceptional circumstances which 
justify special consideration, including reasonable accommodation of applicants' religious 
beliefs, observances, and practices, should appeal in writing to the director of admissions and 
records for an extension of filing deadline dates. Only rarely, however, are spaces available 
by these late dates, and applicants are encouraged to apply during the periods indicated in 
the application calendars. 

A beginning freshman applicant is one who applies for admission while attending high school, 
regardless of the amount of college credit earned, or one who has graduated from high school 
but completed fewer than 12 semester hours or 18 quarter hours of transferable college 
classroom credit by the desired term of entry. High school midyear graduates planning to 
attend a collegiate institution before admission to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
for the fall term should apply as beginning freshmen during their last fall term in high school. 
Such applicants are admitted on the basis of high school credentials and test results and may 
complete more than 12 semester hours of transferable college classroom credit at another 
institution before enrollment at Urbana-Champaign. 

Application Calendar: Freshman Applicants 

Filing Period Notification Time 

Spring Freshmen Applicants: 

Sept. 25-Nov. 1 All applicants for spring admission December 

Nov. 1-Jan. 1 Applications taken on space-available basis; contact the Approximately 

Office of Admissions and Records for openings. four weeks after 

filing 



20 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Fall Freshmen Applicants: 



Oct. 1-Nov. 1 Very well qualified applicants will receive early notification November 

if they apply by November 1. "Very well qualified" is 
defined in the application materials. 

Oct. 1-Jan. 1 It is expected that applications for all colleges will be December-March 

considered during this period. Applicants will be informed 
of the status of their application beginning in late Decem- 
ber. 
The status categories are: 

a. Admit — Competitively eligible applicants will be noti- 
fied on an ongoing basis beginning in December. 

b. Delayed decision — Applicants whose applications must 
be held for competitive consideration, depending upon 
space available, will be notified of final decision by 
March 15. 

c. Denial — Denied applicants will be notified as soon as 
a decision is made in order to allow them to pursue 
alternatives. 

November 15 Priority Filing Date — Applications completed by this date 
may have the advantage when spaces are limited and 
applicants with equal qualifications are being reviewed. 

Jan. -July Applications taken on space-available basis; contact the Admission decisions 

Office of Admissions and Records for openings. made monthly 

If admission is still possible, applications accepted for admission within a month of registration may 
require late registration and a $15 late registration fee (amount subject to change). 

Requirements 

Admission of beginning freshmen applicants will be based on the completion of specific high 
school subjects and on a combination of high school percentile rank and admission test score. 
Those approved for admission must have at least a one-in-two (50 percent) chance of achieving 
a 3.0 (C) average for one or more terms of the first academic year on the campus. 

If the number of qualified applicants to a college or curriculum falls short of the admission 
quota, those whose chances of achieving a 3.0 average are between a one-in-four and a one- 
in-two chance may be admitted, provided the campus has made provision to help such applicants 
improve their chances for success. If the number of qualified applicants to a college or 
curriculum exceeds the admission quota, those best qualified will be admitted. "Best qualified" 
will be determined by a combination of high school percentile rank and admission test score. 
In determining the admission of those applicants near the boundary of the competitive applicant 
pool, additional criteria may be considered. These additional factors are described in the 
Background Statement section below. 

In addition to all other requirements for admission, nonresidents should rank in the top 
quarter of their high school class. If the admission quota exceeds the number of qualified 
applicants, nonresidents may be admitted on the same basis as residents; if the number of 
qualified applicants exceeds the admission quota, preference may be given to residents of 
Illinois. 

To assist prospective applicants in assessing their opportunities for admission, academic 
guidelines based on previous years' admissions decisions are published annually in the application 
materials. They are guidelines only. Final admission standards depend upon the number and 
qualifications of applicants to each program. 

ADMISSIONS TEST INFORMATION 

Beginning freshman applicants, regardless of rank in class or length of time out of school, are 
required to submit an admission test score, either the assessment administered by the American 
College Testing (ACT) program, or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) of the College Board. 
Applicants will not complete their admission requirements until scores are received by the 
Office of Admissions and Records in the form of an official score report sent directly from 
the testing agency concerned. Complete information concerning the test, the dates of test 
administration, and the location of testing centers may be obtained from high school counselors 
or by writing the appropriate testing agency: American College Testing, Box 168, Iowa City, 
I A 52240 or College Board, 45 Columbus Avenue, New York, NY 10023-6917. 



ADMISSION 21 



The highest ACT composite score or SAT total score (from a single test session) that is on 
file will be used when the admission decision is made. Prospective applicants are urged to 
complete an admission test in the spring of their junior year in high school. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

Beginning freshmen applicants should submit admission applications through their high school. 
The documents needed to complete an application are listed on page 28. 

BACKGROUND STATEMENT 

Objective academic qualifications will be the major factors considered in admissions decisions. 
The Office of Admissions and Records attempts to identify those applicants whose class rank 
and admission test scores or transfer grade-point averages may underpredict their likelihood 
of success, or those whose admission would add diversity to the educational and social 
environment of the campus. 

Applicants who believe their academic credentials do not adequately reflect their potential 
may complete the Background Statement on the application. Unless applicants are close to 
meeting the guidelines published for the college to which they are applying, the Background 
Statement may have little impact on their admission decision. Students who attend a highly 
selective high school for which a profile may not be on file with the Office of Admissions and 
Records are urged to have their counselor attach their school profile to their transcript and to 
request a review through the Background Statement. Among the factors which the Office of 
Admissions and Records may consider in making decisions are whether the applicant (1) has 
a physical handicap; (2) had a health problem which significantly affected, for a period of time, 
an otherwise exceptionally good academic record; (3) is from an economically disadvantaged 
environment; (4) is of an age group or has a cultural or ethnic background that will add 
diversity to this campus; (5) has completed the most rigorous selection of courses available in 
the high school; or, (6) has performed at a level which has brought state or national recognition 
in a specific field of endeavor. 

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER APPLICANTS 

A transfer applicant is one who has (1) completed a minimum of 12 semester or 18 quarter 
hours of transferable college classroom credit by the desired term of entry, and (2) who does 
not meet the definition of a beginning freshman or a readmission applicant. 

Policy 

Admission of transfer applicants will be based on a combination of hours and content of 
transferable credit and transfer grade-point average. The minimum transfer grade-point average 
is 3.25 (C = 3.0); some curricula require a higher grade-point average. (See the Admissions 
Chan, pages 10 to 15.) To assist prospective applicants in assessing their opportunities for 
admission, transfer grade-point average guidelines are published annually in the application 
materials. These are guidelines only. The final standards will depend upon the number and 
qualifications of the applicants to each program. If the number of qualified applicants to a 
college or curriculum exceeds the admission quota, those best qualified will be approved. "Best 
qualified" will be determined by a combination of hours and content of transferable credit 
and transfer grade-point average. In determining the admission of those applicants near the 
boundary of the competitive applicant pool, additional criteria may be considered. These 
additional factors are described in the Background Statement section on page 21. Applicants 
who have had a significant break in their pursuit of an education and can demonstrate an 
improved academic performance, or applicants for whom relocation from the Champaign- 
Urbana community would present a major hardship, may wish to address these factors in the 
Background Statement section of the application for admission. 

Eligibility of transfer applicants with fewer than 30 semester hours of graded transferable 
classroom credit is based upon (a) high school percentile rank and ACT or SAT test scores 
and (b) grade-point average and content of transferable courses attempted. 

If the number of qualified applicants exceeds the admission quota, priority may be given to 
residents of Illinois. In addition, when applications from Illinois residents with similar qualifi- 
cations are being considered, priority may be given to those applicants whose curriculum choice 



22 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



is not available at the institutions from which they apply. Lower-division transfer applicants 
may be restricted when campus space is limited. 

Grade-point averages are calculated on the basis of all transferable courses attempted for 
which grades are assigned and for which grade-point values can be determined. When a course 
is repeated, the grade-point average is computed using both grades and all hours for the course. 
Incomplete grades are accepted as defined by the initiating institution. Grades in other course 
work completed, such as technical courses similar in content and level to courses taught at 
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, may be used in the evaluation for admission 
upon request of the college to which a student seeks admission. 

Since the grade-point average used to establish admission qualifications is based on all 
transferable course work attempted, applicants from institutions with "forgiveness" grading 
policies (those which delete grades for course work attempted) may find their opportunities 
for admission limited to special admission. If they are admitted and register, a transfer grade- 
point average may not be recorded on their University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign record 
since the grading policies of the transfer institutions and this campus are not comparable. 

Application Documents 

The documents needed to complete an application are listed on pages 28 and 29. 

Application Calendar: Transfer Applicants 

Filing Period Notification Time 

Spring Transfer Applicants: 

Sept. 25-Nov. 1 All applicants for spring December 

Nov. 1-Jan. 1 Applications taken on space-available basis; contact the Approximately 
Office of Admissions and Records for openings. four weeks 

after filing 

Fall Transfer Applicants: 

Feb. 1-Mar. 15 Applications for all colleges will be considered during this Mid-April 

period. 

Mar. 15-Aug. 1 Applications taken on space-available basis; contact the Admission decisions 

Office of Admissions and Records for openings. made monthly 

STUDENTS DROPPED OR PLACED ON PROBATION FOR DISCIPLINARY REASONS 

Petitions for admission of transfer students who are on disciplinary probation or who have 
been dropped from a previous collegiate institution for disciplinary reasons must be approved 
by the appropriate subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Student Discipline. (See Admission 
or Readmission Denied Because of Misconduct on page 19.) 

Acceptance of Credit from Other Collegiate Institutions 

Credit may be accepted for advance standing from another accredited university or college. 
Accepted credit will be based on our evaluation of the primary transcript of record of each 
institution attended. Duplicate credit will be counted in the grade-point average but excluded 
from hours earned. A student who has passed a course at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign may not be given credit for the same course taken elsewhere. 

POLICY FOR THE ACCEPTANCE OF TRADITIONAL TRANSFER CREDIT 

1. Admission of transfer students to the University of Illinois is based only on the transfer 
course work which is similar in nature, content, and level to that offered by the University 
of Illinois. Such courses are normally referred to as transfer or college-parallel work. Other 
course work completed, such as technical courses similar in content and level to courses 
taught at the University, will be used in evaluation for admission only upon the request of 
the dean of the college to which the student seeks admission. 

2. Transfer credit, as defined above, will be accepted at full value for admission purposes on 
transfer to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign if earned in: 

a. colleges and universities which offer degree programs that are comparable to programs 
offered by the University of Illinois and (i) are members of or hold Candidate for 



ADMISSION 23 



Accreditation status from the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools or 
other regional accrediting association, or (ii) are accredited by another accrediting agency 
which is a member of the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA). 
b. Illinois public community colleges which are neither members of nor holders of Candidate 
for Accreditation from the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, but 
which are approved and recognized by the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB) for 
a period of time not to exceed five years from the date on which the college registers 
its first class after achieving ICCB recognition. 

3. Certain colleges and universities do not meet the specifications in 2 above, but have been 
assigned a status by the University Committee on Admissions which permits credit to be 
accepted on a provisional basis for admissions purposes on transfer to the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Transfer credit, as defined in 1 above, from such colleges 
and universities is accepted only on a deferred basis to be validated by satisfactory completion 
of additional work in residence. Validation through satisfactory work in residence may be 
accomplished by earning at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or other fully 
accredited 1 college or university, at least a 3.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average (higher if 
prescribed by the curriculum the student wishes to enter) in the first 12 to 30 semester (18 
to 45 quarter) hours completed following transfer. 

4. Credit, as specified in 1 above, transferred from an approved 1 community or junior college 
is limited only by the provision that the student must earn at least 60 semester or 90 quarter 
hours required for the degree at the University or at any other approved 1 four-year college 
or university after attaining junior standing, except that the student must meet the residence 
requirements that apply to all students for a degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign. When a school or college within the University requires three years of 
preprofessional college credit for admission, at least the last 30 semester or 45 quarter 
hours must be taken in an approved 1 four-year collegiate institution. 

5. In all cases, the precise amount of transfer credit which is applicable toward a particular 
degree will be determined by the University college and department concerned. 

POLICY FOR THE ACCEPTANCE OF NONTRADITIONAL TRANSFER CREDIT 

Acceptance of credit awarded on bases other than collegiate classroom experiences will be 
considered for transfer admissions purposes as follows: 

1 . Test credit for admission as transfer credit. Students presenting test credit awarded elsewhere, 
or test scores for admission or transfer credit purposes, will have that credit evaluated 
against cut-off scores established for those examinations on the UIUC campus. Official score 
reports should be submitted to the Office of Admissions and Records along with the 
application for admission to the University. Students presenting test credit for which (A) no 
UIUC campus policy exists, or (B) campus cut-off scores indicate no credit will be awarded, 
may still be granted transfer credit if the student 

a. is transferring at least 12 graded classroom semester hours of acceptable college-level 
graded classroom course work from the institution or single campus in a multicampus 
institution which awarded the credit by examination, and 

b. has successfully completed advanced classroom course work at the institution awarding 
the test credit in a course that is acceptable under UIUC transfer credit policies and 
which can be considered as a sequential continuation of the material covered in the test. 

After admission, students not awarded credit via this policy may attempt UIUC departmental 
proficiency examinations to receive credit in those areas in which they claim competence. 

2. Credit for military training. The completion of military service in the U.S. Armed Forces, 
including basic or recruit training of six months or more, is accepted for advanced standing 
credit of 4 semester hours of basic military science on presentation of evidence of honorable 
discharge or transfer to the reserve component. Candidates for graduation who are still in 
military service are entitled to the same credit. Credit in military science may also be granted 
for other training completed in the service that is acceptable as the equivalent of ROTC 
courses at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Such credit may be used for 
admissions purposes. 

3. Credit for education in the armed forces. The U.S. Armed Forces Institute (USAFI) was an 



Colleges and universities meeting one or more of the specifications as listed in 2. 



24 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



educational program which existed prior to May, 1974. The University considers for 
advanced standing credit those USAFI courses of college level for which the student has 
passed the appropriate USAFI end-of-course test or examination. Marine Corps Institute 
courses also will be considered on the same basis. The University may consider for advanced 
standing credit work completed in the Air Force, Army, Coast Guard, Marine Corps, and 
Navy specialized and technical schools. Criteria to determine acceptability include: 

a. the specific degree requirements of the program of application, 

b. similarity to courses at the campus of application, and 

c. recommendation of the American Council on Education in the Guide to the Evaluation 
of Educational Experience in the Armed Services. 

All criteria are subject to the recommendations of the college to which the student seeks 
admission and the department which teaches similar course work. 

Credit earned in the College Training Programs of the Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, 
and Navy, which functioned during World War II, is accepted on the same basis as other 
credits from the colleges and universities where such credits were completed. 

4. Credit earned in academic courses sponsored by noncollegiate organizations, such as 
business, industry, and labor, not recognized by the April, 1977, Board of Trustees Policy. 
Credit earned in such courses is not accepted. Such credit may be evaluated for potential 
advanced standing in a specific degree program after admission and registration; and this 
credit shall be subject to validation by proficiency examination or successful completion of 
advanced course work. Hours of this type of credit may be reduced from that shown by 
the originating agency. Criteria to determine acceptability for advanced standing include: 

a. the specific degree requirements of the program of enrollment, 

b. similarity to courses on this campus, and 

c. recommendations of the American Council on Education in A Guide to Educational 
Programs in Noncollegiate Organizations. 

All criteria are subject to the recommendations of the appropriate college and department 
that offers similar courses. 

5. Credit for experiential learning. Experiential learning credits are not accepted for transfer 
admissions purposes. A student who believes himself or herself to be knowledgeable in a 
specific course may be granted credit through established proficiency procedures by the 
college of enrollment and department offering similar courses after admission and registration. 

University of Illinois at Chicago Transfers 

Undergraduate transfer students between the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Urbana- 
Champaign campus may be admitted to undergraduate programs on the opposite campus for 
which spaces are available for transfers from other colleges and universities, provided they 
meet the requirements of the program on the opposite campus for admission of on-campus 
transfers. Generally, admission opportunities are better in all curricula if applicants have junior 
standing (60 semester hours or 90 quarter hours). To be assured consideration as an intercampus 
transfer, students currently enrolled at the Chicago campus should apply for transfer consid- 
eration for the spring term between September 25 and November 1, and for the summer or 
fall terms between February 1 and March 15. Intercampus transfers do not pay the $25 
application fee, but they must submit all application documents required of transfer applicants 
from other institutions. 

Applicants are encouraged to go to the Chicago Office of Admissions and Records where 
copies of official credentials will be enclosed with their application and where current enrollment 
can be verified so that the application fee can be waived. 

READMISSION 

A readmission applicant is one who has previously registered on the campus as an undergraduate 
degree candidate and (a) earned credit but not a degree or (b) withdrew prior to earning credit 
and has not subsequently attended any other collegiate institution from which transfer credit 
is acceptable for admission. 

Applications for readmission are usually accepted until near registration time. Transcripts 
must be sent directly from all institutions attended since the last term attended on this campus. 
Readmission to the same academic program will be approved for applicants whose records 



ADMISSION 25 



are not encumbered and who (a) left the campus in good or probationary academic standing, 
(b) left any other campus subsequently attended in good academic and disciplinary standing, 
and (c) apply on or before November 1 for spring and March 15 for fall. Applicants must 
submit a letter of petition if they (a) left on drop status, (b) left on probation and are seeking 
readmission to a different academic program, or (c) were placed on "must petition" status by 
their college. 

Policy 

The following policy statements apply to readmission applicants: 

— Applicants who desire readmission to a college other than the college in which they were 
previously enrolled may be readmitted only with the approval of the colleges concerned. 

— Clearance by the McKinley health service is required for the readmission of former students 
who are encumbered for medical reasons. 

— Clearance by the Business Affairs Office is required for the readmission of former students 
who are in debt to the University. 

Application Documents 

For information regarding application documents see page 28. 

OTHER CATEGORIES OF ADMISSION 
Second Bachelor's Degree Applicants 

Second bachelor's degree applicants must meet the same requirements for admission as transfer 
applicants for the first degree. In addition, they are required to submit a petition indicating 
the reasons for their choice of program and campus, which must be approved by the director 
of admissions and records and the dean of the college concerned. Where space in a college 
or curriculum is inadequate, priority will be given to applicants seeking their first degree. 

Nondegree Applicants 

Nondegree admission and enrollment are restricted to participants in special programs and to 
those with nondegree educational objectives which cannot be met at another institution. 
Permanent residents of the Champaign-Urbana area are given priority for nondegree admission. 

Nondegree applicants must choose one of the two campus enrollment options: 
Summer session attendance only — Summer session only does not allow enrollment for the 
fall or spring term; application for admission is necessary to be considered for the academic- 
year enrollment pattern. 
Academic year — Fall and spring semesters with summers optional. 

Applicants holding a bachelor's degree who desire to take any 300-level course for graduate 
credit or any 400-level course must apply for graduate nondegree status, regardless of the level 
of other courses in which they desire to enroll. Graduate applicants should complete the 
"Combined Application for Admission or Readmission to the Graduate College and Application 
for Graduate Appointment." 

Prospective undergraduate nondegree applicants should specifically request the Undergraduate 
Nondegree Admission Application Folder. 

Applicants for the academic year with no prior credit at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign must submit a transcript showing their highest level of academic achievement. 

Applicants who have earned prior credit at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
must submit a transcript showing course work completed since last enrollment at this campus, 
if any. 

Nondegree students are subject to the following restrictions: 

— Nondegree undergraduate students are assessed tuition at the upper-division rate. 

— Course enrollment requires the approval of the department offering the course and the 
college of enrollment at the beginning of each semester. 

— The college has the privilege of terminating a continuing nondegree student's enrollment 
before the student's registration for any term. 



26 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



— Enrollment is limited to part-time status (less than 12 credit hours of course work in any 
semester). 

— Nondegree students are ineligible for advance enrollment and registration by mail. 

— Registration for the fall or spring term is not permitted until the fourth day of classes. The 
late registration fine will be waived for undergraduate nondegree students registering the 
fourth and fifth days of classes. 

— Registration after the fifth day of classes requires the written approval of the dean of the 
college of enrollment. 

— The same grading system is applicable to both degree and nondegree students. Credit earned 
on nondegree status will not be applicable to a degree except by subsequent admission to 
degree status. 

— Undergraduates admitted for summer session only will not be permitted to register for 400- 
level courses or for graduate credit in 300-level courses. Students who wish to obtain 
graduate credit for courses taken on nondegree status must apply through the Graduate 
College. 

— To be considered for degree-status enrollment, nondegree-status students must reapply for 
admission. 

— Nondegree students admitted to a college for summer to continue in the fall have the 
option of registering for summer and continuing in the fall, or registering initially for fall. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The Urbana-Champaign campus conducts an eight-week summer session offering undergraduate 
courses for both degree and nondegree candidates. 

Continuing Students 

Undergraduate students who completed the immediately preceding spring semester at Urbana- 
Champaign and who are eligible to continue in the same college need not apply for admission 
to the summer session. Registration materials for the summer session are produced automatically 
for them. 

Undergraduate students enrolled at Urbana-Champaign who were dropped for academic 
reasons at the end of the spring semester and who desire to continue in the following summer 
session only as nondegree candidates need not apply for admission to the summer session. 
They need to be released by their former college to the dean of the summer session who must 
approve their enrollment. Students wishing reinstatement to a degree program for the following 
fall semester must petition the college of desired enrollment. No application is necessary. 

Students dropped for academic reasons at the end of the spring semester who seek 
reinstatement to the same or a different college for the following summer session need not 
apply. They need to petition the dean of the college of desired enrollment for reinstatement. 
If reinstated, successful completion of the summer session will allow continuation in the fall 
semester. 

Undergraduate students whose last enrollment at Urbana-Champaign was the fall semester 
preceding the summer session or earlier must reapply for admission. 

Candidates for Degrees 

Freshman, transfer, or readmission applicants who wish to be admitted to the summer session 
and to continue as degree candidates in the fall semester must meet the same admission 
requirements as students applying for the fall semester. Such applicants should indicate on the 
application form that they are applying for admission in June to continue in the fall. Detailed 
admission requirements and application procedures for undergraduates are contained in each 
application packet. 

Applicants for summer to continue in the fall should be aware that fall-term admission 
spaces have been filled in most academic programs long in advance of the summer session 
only application deadline. Information on programs open for admission can be obtained from 
the Office of Admissions and Records. 



ADMISSION 27 



Nondegree Students 

This section deals only with admission to the eight-week summer term as a nondegree student. 

Approval ot admission or readmission as a nondegree student to the summer session only 
does not allow enrollment in the fall or spring. Students who were admitted to the summer 
session only as nondegree students and who later wish to enter one of the colleges of the 
University as degree or nondegree students must apply for admission in the usual manner and 
satisfy requirements in effect at the time of application. Persons admitted as nondegree 
undergraduate students to the summer session only are not assigned to any college or curriculum. 

Undergraduate nondegree applicants for admission to the summer session only may be 
approved by the director of admissions and records or by the Summer Session Office under 
one of the following conditions: 

— High school graduates who qualify for admission under minimum rank-test score combi- 
nation requirements, but who were not admitted under competitive rank-test score com- 
bination requirements in effect for the fall semester, may be admitted as nondegree students 
for the summer session only. 

These minimum rank-test score requirements (known as campus minimums) are available 
from the Office of Admissions and Records the September preceding the summer term for 
which admission is sought. 

— Former University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign students who have not graduated from 
the University may be admitted as nondegree candidates if approved by the director of 
admissions and records through release from their former college. Students on drop or 
probationary status must petition the Summer Session Office for admission as nondegree 
candidates. If approved, they will be admitted on probation for that one summer session 
only. 

— Undergraduate students enrolled in other institutions may enroll in the summer session as 
nondegree candidates if they are eligible to return to the collegiate institution last attended. 

— Other persons, eighteen years of age or over, who have never attended a collegiate institution 
but who give evidence that they possess the requisite background and ability to pursue 
profitably courses for which they are qualified, may enroll in the summer session as nondegree 
candidates. 

Students who have been approved for admission in the fall semester will be authorized to 
begin in the immediately preceding summer session if they notify the Office of Admissions and 
Records of their intent to enroll in the summer session. 

APPLICATION DATE 

All applicants for admission as nondegree candidates to the summer session only may submit 
an application on or after March 1. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

All nondegree candidate applicants must submit: 

— A completed admission application form. This form is available from and should be returned 
with the required supporting credentials to the Office of Admissions and Records. 

— A S25 check or money order, payable to the University of Illinois, in payment of the 
nonrefundable application fee. (See page 54.) 

— A list of the specific course work desired. 

CREDENTIALS REQUIRED OF CERTAIN APPLICANTS 

High school graduates (see first category under nondegree admission requirements on page 27) 
may be required to submit an official high school transcript received from the high school 
showing rank in graduating class, and an official report of the admission test score (ACT or 
SAT) sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from the testing agency concerned. 

Teachers may be requested to submit a statement attesting to their employment. 

Students enrolled at other collegiate institutions may be requested to submit a statement of 
eligibility to return to the institution concerned. 

INTERSESSION 

Intersession, a three-week program of intensive instruction in certain credit courses, is conducted 
between the spring semester and the eight-week summer session. Admission requirements, 



28 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



application procedures, and a listing of Intersession courses are given in the Summer Session 
Timetable. 

Persons eligible to register for Intersession courses are: 

— Students registered in the immediately preceding spring semester. 

— New students who have been admitted to the current summer session. 

— Students eligible to register in the current summer session. 

— Students who have successfully completed Intersession in the previous year. 
Additional information and Intersession applications are available from the Office of 

Admissions and Records at the address on the inside back cover. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Correspondence courses are open to applicants who can meet University entrance requirements 
and who are in good standing at the last school attended, and to persons eighteen years of 
age or over whose applications are approved by the head of Guided Individual Study. Applications 
from students who have been dropped from the University of Illinois or any other collegiate 
institution will be considered only upon the recommendation of the authorities of the campus 
or institution from which the student was dropped. For further information, write to Guided 
Individual Study, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 Illini Hall, 725 South Wright 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

LISTENERS OR VISITORS 

Students enrolled at the Urbana-Champaign campus who desire to attend a class as listeners 
or visitors must obtain the written permission of the instructor of the class and the approval 
of the dean of their college. Persons who have never been registered students at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus must obtain the required approval from the dean of the college in which 
the course is offered. Former students not currently registered must obtain approval of the 
dean of the college in which they were last registered. Former students are not permitted to 
attend classes as visitors while on dropped status. 

— Visitors are not permitted in laboratory, military, physical education (other than theory), or 
studio classes. 

— Persons registered for a full program of courses (12 semester hours or 3 units) may visit 
other courses without additional charges. 

— Persons not registered or registered for less than a full program are charged a $15 visitor's 
fee for each course attended. 

— The visitor's fee is waived for persons sixty-five years of age or older. 

— Students holding scholarships, tuition waivers, or staff appointments generally may audit 
University courses without charge. 

For additional information, contact the Office of Admissions and Records. 

APPLICATION DOCUMENTS 

All credentials presented for admission or readmission become the permanent property of the 
University and are not subsequently released to the student or to another individual or 
institution. Credentials are not held for reconsideration of admission to subsequent terms. 

All Applicants 

Applicants for admission must submit: 

— A completed admission application form. Admission application forms are available from 
the Office of Admissions and Records at the address on the inside back cover. 

— A $25 ($35 for international students) check or money order (amount subject to change), 
payable to the University of Illinois, in payment of the nonrefundable application processing 
fee. The University is not responsible for cash sent through the mail. Students readmitted 
as degree candidates and direct transfer applicants from the University of Illinois at Chicago 
are exempt from payment of this fee. Refer to Application Fee and the exemptions on 
pages 54 and 55. 

In addition, applicants must submit, or have submitted, all the credentials listed below for 
their appropriate category of admission. 



ADMISSION 29 



Freshman Applicants 

Freshman applicants should submit applications through their high schools. All freshmen (see 
definition on page 19) must submit: 

— A completed admission application; and 

— An official high school transcript sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records 
from the high school showing the following: 

Course work completed; 
The date of the applicant's graduation; 

The applicant's numerical rank in and size of his or her graduating class. Since it is the 
policy of the University to accept for admission the academically best qualified of applicants 
competing for limited spaces, the University needs an objective measure of academic 
qualification which is comparable to measures used by other high schools. Descriptive 
statements are generally not comparable from school to school and probably will work to 
the applicant's disadvantage unless accompanied by a numerical class rank. Therefore, high 
school personnel are urged to provide a numerical class rank or substitute ranking. Students 
from three-year senior high schools should request that certification of work taken in the 
ninth grade be included on or with the transcript. (See page 15.) Eighth-grade work for 
high school credit also should be included; and 

— An official report of their admission test score (ACT or SAT) sent directly to the Office of 
Admissions and Records from the testing agency. (See Admissions Test Information on page 
20.) 

Freshman applicants who have completed some college-level course work should ask that 
a transcript of that work be sent directly from the collegiate institution attended before 
enrollment. 

Transfer Applicants 

All transfer students (see definition on page 21) must submit: 

— A completed admission application; and 

— An official high school transcript received directly from the high school of graduation; and 

— Official transcript(s) of all college work attempted sent directly to the Office of Admissions 
and Records from the institution(s) attended. 

Transfer students with less than 30 semester hours of graded transferable classroom credit 
at the time of submission of the application must submit ACT or SAT test scores sent directly 
from the testing company and rank in high school class sent directly to the Office of Admissions 
and Records from the high school. 

Readmission Applicants 

All readmission students (see definition on page 24) must submit: 

— A completed admission application; and 

— An official transcript sent directly to the Office of Admissions and Records from each 
collegiate institution at which course work was attempted since last attendance at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus, if applicable. 

ADMISSION OF FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The Office of Admissions and Records is authorized to decide which students shall be classified 
as foreign according to the following definition: A person who is a citizen or permanent 
resident alien of a country or political area other than the United States and has a residence 
outside the United States to which he or she expects to return and either is, or proposes to 
be, a temporary alien in the United States for educational purposes is classified as a foreign 
student. For admission purposes, refugees-parolees and conditional entrants are classified as 
foreign and shall meet all requirements imposed upon foreign students except for the certification 
of financial resources. 



30 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Admission Requirements 

Admission is competitive, and preference is given to applicants who are judged to have the 
best potential for academic success at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Minimum 
requirements for admission are: 

— Satisfaction of University minimum requirements in terms of age, high school graduation, 
high school units, and health; and the minimum requirements in terms of high school 
subjects prescribed for admission to a particular college and curriculum. (See General 
Requirements for Admission on page 15.) 

— Satisfaction of the requirement for admission to any curriculum for which an additional 
requirement is indicated — such as an interview, aptitude test, or audition. (See page 16.) 

— Satisfaction of the University requirement for English competency. (See English Competency 
Requirement below.) 

— Adequate financial resources. (See Financial Verification Requirement on page 30.) 

ENGLISH COMPETENCY REQUIREMENT 

Evidence of English proficiency is required of students who request consideration for admission. 

This evidence is provided by a satisfactory score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language 

(TOEFL). Applicants are exempt from this test if they have fulfilled one of the following 

requirements in a country where English is the primary language and in a school where English 

is the primary language of instruction: 

Undergraduate college applicants. Graduation with credit for 3 units, or the equivalent, of 

English from a secondary school; or successful completion of a minimum of two academic 

years of full-time study at the secondary school or collegiate level immediately prior to the 

proposed date of enrollment in the University. 

Graduate and professional college applicants. Completion of at least two academic years of 

full-time study within five years of the proposed date of enrollment in the University. 

The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) is administered several times each year 
at many locations throughout the world. To make arrangements to take the TOEFL, write 
directly to the TOEFL Application Office, Box 899-R, Princeton, NJ 08541, U.S.A., or contact 
the nearest U.S. embassy, consulate, or U.S. Information Service office. Applicants who have 
already taken the TOEFL should request the TOEFL office to send their scores to the Office 
of Admissions and Records immediately. For admission purposes, TOEFL scores are valid for 
only two years prior to the proposed term of entry. If the TOEFL score is acceptable but 
indicates the need for further English study, a placement test will be required upon arrival at 
the University. On the basis of the placement test scores, applicants may be required to enroll 
in noncredit English courses and to take a reduced academic load. 

In cases where TOEFL testing dates are not available prior to the desired term of entry, the 
University will arrange for substitution of the test given by the English Language Institute 
(ELI), Testing and Certification Division of the University of Michigan. Complete instructions 
to arrange for the ELI examination will be provided by the Office of Admissions and Records 
to each applicant for whom it is required. Final admission status is determined after the test 
results have been received. 

The minimum cut-off score on the TOEFL is 520, and 84 on the ELI. The English requirement 
for graduation is explained on page 78. 

FINANCIAL VERIFICATION REQUIREMENT 

In order to determine eligibility for a Certificate of Visa Eligibility (Form 1-20 or IAP-66), it is 
necessary for foreign applicants to submit complete and accurate information regarding their 
source of financial support. This information is required in compliance with regulations of the 
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. Current information and certification also are 
required of foreign applicants transferring from institutions within the United States. Financial 
resources must be documented for the entire length of time required to earn a degree. Expenses 
for the 1986-87 academic year were estimated at $12,490, excluding summer session tuition 
and fees. These figures are subject to change without notice and are expected to increase 
yearly. Current estimated expenses may be obtained by writing to the Office of Admissions 
and Records. 

Prospective students who cannot document the availability of sufficient resources will be 
denied admission. 



ADMISSION 31 



University financial aid funds are extremely limited and are available only to applicants in 
specific exchange programs. Individual requests for financial aid cannot be considered. 

Application Dates 

Undergraduate applicants are urged to submit admission applications and supporting documents 
(TOEFL, transcripts, and financial certification) approximately one year prior to the desired 
term of entry. Competition is extremely keen, and late applicants jeopardize their opportunity 
for admission. To have the best chance for admission, summer and fall applicants should 
submit applications and all supporting credentials no later than November 15 of the preceding 
year. Fall and summer applicants may compete for a limited number of spaces if their 
applications and supporting documents are received by February 15. Applicants for spring are 
urged to submit complete applications one year in advance; the absolute deadline for spring 
application is November 1 immediately preceding the spring semester. Complete applications 
will be considered as they are received until all spaces have been filled. Admission decisions 
will be announced in writing to the applicant as soon as they are available. 

Additional information and application materials are available from the Office of Admissions 
and Records at the address on the inside back cover. 

Application Documents 

All foreign applicants must submit: 

— An Application for Undergraduate Admission for Applicants from Other Countries. 

— A $35 (U.S.) nonrefundable application fee (amount subject to change) in the form of a 
check or money order payable to the University of Illinois. The check must indicate that 
the bank has an affiliate bank in the United States. (See page 54.) 

— Official records for at least the last four years of secondary school study and/or any 
postsecondary or university-level work completed or attempted. 

All records must list subjects taken, grades earned, or examination results (including those 
passed or failed in each subject); and all diplomas and certificates awarded. Official translations 
must be attached to these records if they are in a language other than English. All credentials 
must be certified by an officer of the educational institution attended or by the U.S. embassy 
or consulate. Applicants attending U.S. or Canadian schools should have credentials submitted 
directly by the school. Notarized copies of credentials do not fulfill official certification 
requirements. 

A list of all courses in progress, including recently completed course work which is not 
listed on the transcript, must also be included on the application. When possible, applicants 
must have school officials provide a statement of their rank in class. This statement should 
indicate applicants' performance relative to the performance of other members of their 
secondary or postsecondary school class. Applicants to some fields may be required to 
submit additional materials, such as background information and aptitude test results, or 
to participate in auditions. These items will be requested by the Office of Admissions and 
Records when needed and will be required only for applicants satisfying all other admission 
criteria. 

— The results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the English Language 
Institute (ELI) test, if required, as indicated on pages 29 and 30. 

— Declaration and certification of finances as required of all foreign students. 



Precollege Programs 

PROGRAMS FOR FRESHMEN 32 

PROGRAMS FOR TRANSFER AND READMITTED STUDENTS 33 

PARENTS' PROGRAM 33 

PROGRAMS FOR FRESHMEN 

Freshman applicants accepting admission for the fall semester are strongly encouraged to 
participate in the Precollege Programs. The Precollege Programs include placement testing and 
academic orientation and advance enrollment for fall classes during June and July. The 
Information for Admitted Students brochure, which fully explains the programs, is sent to 
each admitted applicant. Freshmen entering in the fall semester who do not participate in the 
placement testing program and summer orientation/advance enrollment program must complete 
their required testing, academic advising, and class scheduling during the week immediately 
preceding the start of classes. Information about activities for new students is sent to all 
students before their arrival on campus. 

Precollege Programs are not available for freshmen entering the University during the spring 
semester; they must complete required testing, academic advising, and registration during the 
week immediately preceding the start of classes. 

Testing 

During March, April, and May, beginning freshmen who have been admitted to the fall semester 
come to either the Urbana-Champaign campus or the University Center of the University of 
Illinois at Chicago campus to participate in a one-day program of required testing. The tests 
that must be taken during this one day on campus are: the Rhetoric Essay Test and placement 
tests in mathematics, chemistry, and foreign languages. These placement tests must be taken 
by admitted students if they had these subjects in high school but have not received college 
credit for them, and if they intend to pursue these subjects either as required or elective 
courses at the University. 

Students who live outside of Illinois and more than 250 miles from Champaign-Urbana have 
the option of completing their testing as part of a two-day program during summer advance 
enrollment. Such students should consult the Information for Admitted Students brochure for 
additional information about the schedule and arrangements for their on-campus summer 
sessions. 

Freshmen students who fail to complete all required spring testing will be assessed a $25 
late fee (amount subject to change) to take the tests immediately preceding the start of classes 
if they are residents of Illinois and their Notice of Admission to the University is dated prior 
to May 1. 

Placement tests are designed to help determine which course a student is best prepared to 
begin with in a particular subject area. Several introductory-level courses are generally available 
to students in each subject area. It is to a student's advantage to enroll in a course which is 
neither too difficult nor too easy relative to his or her high school preparation. Placement test 
scores are used for initial placement and are not recorded on the student's official academic 
record. Requirements for placement testing vary by college and curriculum. The Information 
for Admitted Students brochure contains a full description of required and optional testing. 

Academic Advising and Orientation/Advance Enrollment 

Students who have completed the testing required by their college of enrollment may participate 
in the orientation/advance enrollment program conducted at the Urbana-Champaign campus 
in June and July. During the one day that students are on campus for this program, they meet 
with an academic adviser who assists them in selecting a schedule of courses for the fall 
semester which satisfies college and curriculum degree requirements. 

Since the results on the placement tests are used by the colleges and academic departments 
concerned to evaluate students' achievement levels and to assist them in arranging their class 
schedules, freshmen must complete all testing required by their colleges before they can 



PRECOLLEGE PROGRAMS 33 



participate in the summer program. Students whose colleges have no required testing may 
participate in the summer program without completing the spring testing program. 

Beginning freshmen who participate in the summer orientation/advance enrollment program 
have top priority in the scheduling of course requests for the fall semester. Interested students 
also have the opportunity to audition for band and choral organizations on the day of their 
advance enrollment. 

PROGRAMS FOR TRANSFER AND READMITTED STUDENTS 

New transfer and readmitted students have the opportunity to advance enroll during the 
summer for the fall semester. These students receive details of the advance enrollment program 
in the Information for Admitted Students brochure mailed with their Notice of Admission. 

PARENTS' PROGRAM 

Parents are cordially invited to accompany their son or daughter on the day of advance 
enrollment and to participate in the informational meetings. 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

Questions concerning the Precollege Programs should be referred to: 

Precollege Coordinator 

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 

10 Administration Building 

506 South Wright Street 

Urbana, IL 61801 

Telephone: (217) 333-6427 



Special Opportunities 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 34 

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMINATIONS 37 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 37 

COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 38 

CAMPUS HONORS PROGRAM 38 

EDMUND J. JAMES UNDERGRADUATE HONORS PROGRAMS 39 

TRANSITION PROGRAM 40 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM 42 

SERVICES FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISABLED 43 

COURSE ATTENDANCE BY ILLINOIS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 43 

EARLY ADMISSION PROGRAM 44 

DELAYED ADMISSION 44 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT 44 

STUDY AWAY FROM CAMPUS 44 



Because of the comprehensive nature of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
arrangements for superior students differ among the various colleges and departments. Generally 
speaking, superior students are able to enter special courses or special sections of courses as 
freshmen and sophomores and are encouraged as juniors and seniors to participate in special 
programs for majors offered by the many departments. For details of these arrangements, see 
the descriptions in the college sections of this catalog. 

Policies and procedures regarding placement and proficiency examinations, the College-Level 
Examination Program (CLEP), and the Advanced Placement Program are published in the 
current edition of the brochure, Placement and Proficiency Examinations, available at college 
offices or by writing to the Measurement and Evaluation Division, Office of Instructional and 
Management Services, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 307 Engineering Hall, 1308 
West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, telephone (217) 333-3490. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM 

The Advanced Placement Program, administered by the College Entrance Examination Board, 
is designed for high school students who are about to enter college and wish to demonstrate 
their readiness for courses more advanced than those usually studied in the freshman year. 
Advanced classes are offered in many high schools in one or more of the following subjects: 
art history, art studio, English language and composition, English literature and composition, 
French language, French literature, German language, German literature, Latin, Spanish language, 
Spanish literature, biology, chemistry, mathematics (calculus), physics, music literature, music 
theory, and social studies (American history and European history). There is a national 
examination in each subject, administered in May by the Educational Testing Service, which 
is designed to measure the competence of students in terms of the point at which college 
study in that subject should begin. The University encourages high schools and their outstanding 
students to participate in this program. 

Examinations are prepared and graded by national committees of high school and college 
teachers. They are graded on the following scale: 5, high honors; 4, honors; 3, creditable; 2, 
pass; and 1, fail. Grade reports are sent to the universities each student specifies at the time 
of the examination. Each department within the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 35 



has the option of granting, or not granting, college credit and advanced placement on the basis 
of the board's grade. 

Transfer students should refer to the Policy for the Acceptance of Nontraditional Credit 
on page 23 for the policy on accepting credit earned through the Advanced Placement Program. 

Specific credit recommendations for beginning freshmen at the Urbana-Champaign campus 
are listed below. Assignment of credit in specific courses is dependent upon policies established 
by the individual department and the college and is subject to change upon annual review. 

Art 

Art history 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for An 111 and An 112 (8 semester hours). 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 and below. 

Art studio 

Portfolios must be submitted to the School of An and Design for an evaluation in all studio 



Computer Science 

Computer science 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for Computer Science 121 (4 semester hours). 

Scores of 2 received credit for Computer Science 105 (3 semester hours). 

English 

English language and composition 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for Rhetoric 105 (4 semester hours and exemption from the 

University rhetoric requirement). 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

English literature and composition 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for English 103 (3 semester hours) and credit for Rhetoric 

105 (4 semester hours and exemption from the University rhetoric requirement). 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 and 2. 

Foreign Languages 

French language 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for French 205 and French 207 (6 semester hours). 
Scores of 3 receive credit for French 205 (3 semester hours). 
Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 

French literature 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for French 210 and French 207 (6 semester hours). 
Scores of 3 receive credit for French 210 (3 semester hours). 
Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 

German language 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for German 211 (3 semester hours). 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 

German literature 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for German 231 (3 semester hours). 
Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 

Latin 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit and placement as follows: 

Vergil examination: 3 semester hours of Latin credit and placement in Latin 201. 

Lyric examination: 3 semester hours of credit for Latin 201 and placement in Latin 202. 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 



36 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Spanish language 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for Spanish 209 (3 semester hours). 
Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 or below. 

Spanish literature 

Credit will be awarded for scores of 5 and 4 for Spanish 200 (2 semester hours). 
Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 or below. 

Mathematics and Natural Sciences 

Biology 

Scores of 5 receive credit for Biology 110 and Biology 111 (10 semester hours). 

Scores of 4 receive credit for Biology 100 (3 semester hours) and Biology 102 (3 semester 

hours). 

Scores of 3 receive credit for Biology 100 (3 semester hours) and placement in Biology 102 or 

103. 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 

Chemistry 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive general chemistry lecture credit (6 semester hours) and placement in 

Chemistry 122 or 123. 

Scores of 3 receive general chemistry lecture credit (3 semester hours) and placement in 

Chemistry 102 or 109. Students should take the departmental general chemistry proficiency 

examination. 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 2. 

Mathematics 

Calculus AB 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for Mathematics 120 (5 semester hours) and placement in 
Mathematics 132. 

Calculus BC 

Scores of 5, 4, and 3 receive credit for Mathematics 120 (5 semester hours) and Mathematics 

132 (3 semester hours) and placement in Mathematics 242. 

Scores of 2 receive credit for Mathematics 120 (5 semester hours) and placement in Mathematics 

132. 

Physics 

Physics B 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for Physics 101 and Physics 102 (10 semester hours). 

Scores of 3 make students eligible to enroll in Physics 101 or take a proficiency examination 

for that course. If an A or B grade is earned in the course or on the proficiency examination, 

credit will be awarded for Physics 101 and Physics 102 (10 semester hours). 

Scores of 2 make students eligible to take proficiency examinations in Physics 101, 102, 106, 

or 108. 

Physics C 

Scores of 5 and 4 will receive credit as follows: 

Part I — Mechanics: Physics 106 (4 semester hours). 

Part II — Electricity and Magnetism: Physics 107 (4 semester hours). 

Scores of 3 are handled as follows: 

Part I — Students may take a proficiency examination for Physics 106 or enroll in that course. 

Part II — Students may take a proficiency examination for Physics 107 or enroll in that course. 

Scores of 2 in Part I or Part II make students eligible, with the approval of the department, 

to take proficiency examinations in Physics 101, 102, 106, 107, or 108. 

For additional information or to arrange to take a departmental proficiency examination, 
students should go to 233 Loomis Laboratory of Physics. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 37 



Music 

Music literature 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for Music 110 (2 semester hours). 

c red it will not be awarded for scores of 3 or below. 

Music theory 

Credit will not be awarded for any scores. 

Social Studies 

American history 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for History 151 and History 152 (8 semester hours). 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 or below. 

European history 

Scores of 5 and 4 receive credit for History 111 and History 112 (8 semester hours). 

Credit will not be awarded for scores of 3 or below. 

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE EXAMINATIONS 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will award credit on the basis of scores from 
several International Baccalaureate Examinations: anthropology, biology, chemistry, classics 
(Latin and Greek), economics, French, German, history, and philosophy. Those wishing to have 
such examination scores evaluated should request their high school to forward an official score 
transcript to the Division of Measurement and Evaluation, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 307 Engineering Hall, 1308 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 

Proficiency examinations are offered in most courses open to freshmen and sophomores. A 
student may take proficiency examinations in more advanced undergraduate courses on 
recommendation of the head or chairperson of the department and approval of the dean of 
the student's college. Departmental proficiency exams are administered in unscheduled individual 
sessions or scheduled group sessions during the semester. Departmental offices can provide 
information regarding test date, place of administration, type of examination, and references 
that might be used when preparing for examinations. Course descriptions and prerequisites are 
listed in the Courses Catalog. (See the inside back cover of this publication for locations 
where the Courses Catalog may be obtained.) Proficiency examinations are generally given 
without cost to the student, but a fee may be charged to defray the cost of proficiency 
examinations prepared by agencies outside the University. 

All regulations governing proficiency examinations will be applied in the context that the 
University must reasonably accommodate students' religious beliefs, observances, and practices 
in regard to scheduling of proficiency examinations if the student informs the person responsible 
for the scheduling of such examinations of the conflict within one week after being informed 
of the examination schedule. Any student may appeal an adverse decision. 

An enrolled undergraduate student who passes a proficiency examination is given credit 
toward graduation for the amount regularly allowed in the course (1) if it does not duplicate 
credit counted for admission to the University or credit earned through some other testing 
program and (2) if it is acceptable in the student's curriculum. No official record is made of 
failures in these examinations, but some departments may keep records to prohibit the student 
from retaking the examinations. General campus policy information regarding proficiency 
examinations can be found in the Code on Campus Affairs and Regulations Applying to All 
Students. 

Transfer students should consult page 22 for the policy on acceptance of proficiency credit 
for admission purposes. 

Course credit is not awarded on the basis of the Proficiency Examination Program (PEP) 
administered by the American College Testing Program (ACT). 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 

This program exists for the purpose of awarding proficiency credit, or otherwise recognizing 
college level competence, achieved outside the college classroom. Two types of tests are 
available: (1) general examinations cover the broad content of a study which might be expected 
to be covered by several introductory level courses and (2) subject matter examinations cover 
the specific content of a single college course. Credit can be earned and will be recognized by 
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for some CLEP General Examinations, but 
credit is not awarded for any of the CLEP Subject Matter Examinations. 

Most students must fulfill general education requirements for degree purposes in four areas: 
humanities, social science/history, biological science, and physical science. CLEP General 
Examinations in Humanities, Social Science and History, and Natural Sciences (subtests in 
biological science and physical science) can be used to earn a waiver of the corresponding 
general education requirement, or a part of it, and to earn degree credit. Credit is not awarded 
by the University for scores from the CLEP General Examinations in English Composition or 
Mathematics. CLEP tests provide an opportunity for students to demonstrate knowledge in a 
general subject matter area which is as thorough as that required of a graduate who has not 
majored in that particular area. General education requirements are designed to ensure that 
graduates of the University are generalists as well as specialists. The University recognizes that 
this general knowledge may have been acquired by entering students through high school 
work, independent study, extracurricular reading, projects, or work experience. CLEP General 
Examination scores can be used to earn 3 or 6 credit hours and waiver of all or part of the 
requirement in each of the four general education areas. College policies vary in terms of the 
tests that are acceptable for earning credit and waiver, and in terms of the scores required for 
partial or complete waiver of a requirement. 

Students may take CLEP exams at any CLEP National Testing Center designated by the 
Educational Testing Service (ETS), Box 966, Princeton, NJ 08540. Official score reports should 
be sent by ETS to Coordinator, Placement and Proficiency Testing, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign, 307 Engineering Hall, 1308 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801. Locations 
of CLEP National Testing Centers and test administration dates may be obtained by writing 
to ETS, or by inquiring at most college and high school counseling offices. 

CLEP test scores earned by Urbana-Champaign beginning freshmen, including students with 
less than 12 semester hours of transferable classsroom credit attempted at other collegiate 
institutions, are evaluated for credit according to norms established for the campus. Transfer 
students should refer to the Policy for the Acceptance of Nontraditional Transfer Credit on 
page 23 for the policy on accepting credit earned through CLEP examinations. 

CLEP examination scores reported by the Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education 
Support (DANTES) testing centers will be evaluated against the same criteria which are applied 
to continuing UIUC students. 

CAMPUS HONORS PROGRAM 

The Campus Honors Program offers special challenges and opportunities to some of the most 
talented and highly motivated of the University's students. The program, under the sponsorship 
of the vice-chancellor for academic affairs, is designed to foster close, collaborative relationships 
between top students and distinguished faculty. This collaboration occurs through the small 
classes which characterize the program, through a faculty mentor system for sharing academic 
and research interests, and through the many informal contacts encouraged by the program's 
co-curricular offerings. The consistent aim is to encourage breadth and excellence from the 
outset of the student's college career, and to encourage close interaction with role models 
who are at the cutting edge of their academic disciplines. 

Students in the Campus Honors Program are designated "Chancellor's Scholars," and this 
designation will appear on their transcript. Students who meet program requirements will 
continue as Chancellor's Scholars during their entire undergraduate career. Students admitted 
to the Honors Program may enroll in any undergraduate curriculum and are encouraged to 
participate in the specialized honors programs established at the college and departmental 
levels. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 39 



Courses 

Two types of honors courses are offered: honors sections of regular courses and special honors 
seminars. These courses cover a wide range of disciplines and are intended to satisfy some of 
the general education requirements of each college. The courses are designed especially for 
students in the Campus Honors Program and are taught by some of the University's most 
outstanding faculty. To ensure close faculty supervision and maximum student-faculty inter- 
action, small class sizes are maintained. 

During the junior and senior years, students will concentrate on courses within their major 
department. However, cross disciplinary interactions will be fostered by special seminars that 
focus on the major issues facing society today. 

Faculty Mentors 

Each honors student is assigned a faculty mentor from the student's major field of interest. 
The mentors introduce students to the intellectual standards, methodologies, and historical 
development of their chosen academic discipline, and they provide advice and guidance about 
utilizing the vast academic resources of the University. Ideally the same faculty mentor works 
closely with the student through all four years, including planning for advanced study or a 
career. However, the Honors Program will accommodate students who wish to change their 
major or want to have a faculty mentor from a different discipline. 

Special Opportunities 

Other opportunities and resources provided by the program include: 

— Special formal and informal interactions with distinguished scholars and performing artists 
provided through seminars, receptions, brown bag lunches, and dress rehearsals at Krannert 
Center for the Performing Arts. 

— Special tours of the University of Illinois Library, Krannert Art Museum, supercomputing 
centers, and other specialized facilities. 

— Honors House, a centrally located honors student center with a lounge, seminar, and 
meeting rooms. 

— Priority registration for classes. 

— Opportunities for participation in ongoing faculty research. 

— Small grants to fund student research projects. 

— Access to personal computers as well as a specialized PLATO notesfile (a University- 
developed interactive computer environment). 

— Graduate-status access to the University of Illinois Library, the third largest academic library 
in the United States. 

For additional information or to obtain an application form, contact: Campus Honors 
Program, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1205 West Oregon Street, Urbana, Illinois 
61801; (217) 244-0922. For full consideration, completed applications should be received by 
February 1 for admission the following fall. 

EDMUND J. JAMES UNDERGRADUATE HONORS PROGRAMS 

Undergraduate Honors Programs, named for one of the University's distinguished presidents, 
Edmund J. James, provide a number of special curricular opportunities to academically talented 
undergraduate students. Designation by the University as a James Scholar recognizes students 
of extraordinary ability and achievement. It entitles students to certain academic privileges, 
including the extended use of library facilities, and charges them with the responsibility for 
seeking sustained intellectual achievement throughout their undergraduate careers. James Scholar 
honors students are characterized by outstanding academic records; high general aptitudes for 
college work; and reputations for seriousness of purpose, persistence, and self-discipline in 
educational endeavors. 

Students electing to participate in the program may enroll in any undergraduate curriculum; 
unusual academic arrangements are open to James Scholar honor students in all courses of 
study. These arrangements include provision of honors courses and sections, special seminars, 
and interdisciplinary colloquia. In addition, James Scholars are encouraged to pursue individual 
scholarly interests through independent study and research projects. Administrative coordination 



40 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



of all undergraduate honors programs is currently conducted by the Office of Admissions and 
Records. 

There is no monetary award associated with the designation, and students who need financial 
assistance should apply to the Office of Student Financial Aids. 

Nomination Procedures 

Academic requirements for participation in the program are determined by the respective 
colleges. Undergraduates in most colleges may "self-nominate" into the program provided the 
decision is based on prior achievement, on high school and college faculty or administrative 
advice, and is accomplished prior to the terminal dates set for entry into academic programs 
leading to an honors degree. Entering students, above a predetermined college selection index, 
are automatically admitted as James Scholar Designates in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. (See page 237 for further information regarding James Scholar honors students in 
Liberal Arts and Sciences.) Students may elect to leave the program or may be removed for 
failure to meet standards of academic performance in the various colleges. 

During summer advance enrollment, freshmen in most colleges will receive additional 
information regarding specific college programs leading to an honors degree. At that time, in 
consultation with their advisers, students may self-nominate into the program and select an 
honors course or plan other honors activities. 

Although the honors program in each college varies in detail, incoming freshmen electing 
to undertake an honors program will enter the University as James Scholar Designates. After 
completion of a period on campus, each designated record will be reviewed by his or her 
college. He or she then will be invited to continue as a full James Scholar honors student or 
advised to drop from the program on the basis of criteria developed by each college. Resident 
and transfer students wishing to self-nominate into the program should inquire at their college 
offices. 

James Scholar Recognition 

Successful performance for one year as a James Scholar honors student is recognized and 
recorded on the student's University record as Edmund J. James Scholar (year). 

Specific inquiries regarding the honors program of a particular college may be addressed to 
the college office in care of the honors dean. General information about campuswide honors 
recognition is available from the Campus Visitors Center, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 919 West Illinois Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Honors Credit Learning Agreements 

It is not expected that James Scholar honors students will take a full schedule of special 
courses; however, an average of at least one honors activity each semester is considered normal. 
To encourage sustained, independent, intellectual activity by superior students, the campuswide 
Honors Credit Learning Agreement Program enables students to earn officially recognized 
honors credit in regular undergraduate courses. This is accomplished by learning agreements 
between students and their instructors whereby students undertake special course-related 
projects. Upon successful completion of a project, students are awarded transcript-designated 
honors credit for a course. Forms for initiation of honors credit learning agreements are 
available in the college offices. Note: This program is currently under review and may undergo 
minor changes in the future. 

TRANSITION PROGRAM 
General Description 

The Transition Program is a campus-sponsored academic support program designed to provide 
assistance to students admitted to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, but who 
have academic weaknesses that could place them "at risk" if they were permitted to enter the 
University without such assistance. Such students are admitted to the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences' General Curriculum through the Transition Program, where they may remain 
and receive developmental academic support for a period of up to two academic years. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 41 



An admission space is reserved in the curriculum selected by each student in his or her 
application. It the student's performance is satisfactory in the Transition Program, he or she 
is then permitted to transfer to that curriculum. While the majority of students enrolled 
through the Transition Program will remain in the program through the end of the sophomore 
year, as is the case with most General Curriculum students, transfer can occur earlier if the 
individual student meets the same requirements as other students pursuing the desired curriculum. 

Through the Transition Program students are provided with: 

— Intensive academic advising and personal career counseling. 

— The opportunity to enroll in support-based sections of existing courses. 

— Tutoring, diagnostic testing, developmental skills enhancement, enrichment activities, and 
other assistance as required. 

The Summer Bridge Component 

A subgroup of the students selected for admission through the Transition Program also is 
provided with the opportunity to participate in the Summer Bridge Component, a seven-week 
summer session program sponsored by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This program 
engages the students in intensive coursework in mathematics, writing, and basic skills devel- 
opment and, at the same time, orients them to the University and campus living. 

Each Summer Bridge Component participant receives institutional financial assistance to 
cover the cost of tuition, room, board, and books. In addition, with the exception of students 
who will participate in intercollegiate athletics and who are not eligible for such added financial 
assistance under National Collegiate Athletic Association regulations, each participant will 
receive a stipend consisting of a modest weekly living allowance and a lump-sum payment at 
the end of the summer session, if he or she has successfull completed the program and is 
eligible to continue enrollment in the Transition Program in the fall. 

Selection of Students and Admission to the Program 

Only those students who officially apply to the University in the prescribed manner and who 
meet established campus and program deadlines for application will be considered for admission 
through the Transition Program. The final decision on which students will be admitted to the 
campus through the Transition Program is the joint responsibility of the director of admissions 
and records and the directors) of the Transition Program, acting on behalf of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

General criteria to be employed in the selection of students for the Transition Program are 
as follows: 

— If an applicant has a score of 15 or below on either the ACT 1 English or ACT Mathematics 
subtest areas, admission will be granted only through the Transition Program unless there 
is strong evidence that participation in the program is not necessary for the applicant's 
success. 

— If an applicant has a score of 12 or below on either the ACT English or ACT Mathematics 
subtest areas, or if an applicant has a score of 15 or below on both ACT English and ACT 
Mathematics, participation in the Summer Bridge Component of the Transition Program 
will be required unless there is strong evidence that participation in the Summer Bridge 
Component is not necessary for the applicant's success. Eligibility of Summer Bridge 
Component participants to continue fall enrollment is contingent upon acceptable academic 
performance in the summer program and recommendation by the directors) of the Transition 
Program. 

— Other applicants may be invited or required to participate in the Transition Program or the 
Summer Bridge Component if, in the judgment of the director of admissions and the 
directors) of the Transition Program, such participation is necessary for the applicant's 
success at the University. 



1 SAT equivalents: 15 ACT English = 320 SAT Verbal 

15 ACT Mathematics = 380 SAT Quantitative 

12 ACT English = 270 SAT Verbal 

12 ACT Mathematics = 350 SAT Quantitative 



42 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Additional Information 

Additional information about the Transition Program may be obtained by contacting the office 
ot the director of the Transition Program, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 270 Lincoln 
I [til, 702 South Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801, telephone (217) 333-1705. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES PROGRAM 
General Nature and Purpose 

The Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) is designed to help provide a college education 
to persons who historically have been excluded from postsecondary education for a variety of 
reasons. 

Students in the program, as do many other students, receive financial support from federal 
loans and grants, Illinois State Scholarship Commission Monetary Awards, and University 
tuition waivers. They also contribute toward their expenses through family contributions, 
summer and part-time employment, and personal loans. Supportive services for the program 
are provided by federal and University funds. 

Through the Educational Opportunities Program, the University is attempting to: 

— Admit students who otherwise might not be able to undertake a college-level program at 
a major educational institution and assist them in completing a baccalaureate degree. 
Participants receive the same benefits as other students and additional support if required. 

— Increase the number of students from underrepresented ethnic minority groups on campus. 

— Develop educational programs and policies, both academic and administrative, that will 
assist and support EOP students and which may well benefit all students. 

— Provide students not in EOP the vital cultural and social experience of meeting, living with, 
and learning from students from other cultures. 

— Add ethnic diversity to the campus. 

— Provide and disseminate to other educational institutions and agencies information that will 
increase their ability to deal with educational and sociological programs of students from 
nontraditional backgrounds. 

— Provide information on securing financial aid, student employment, and post-graduate 
opportunities for program participants. 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the Educational Opportunities Program is limited to applicants from Illinois who 
are educationally or economically disadvantaged and who fall into one of the following 
categories: 

— Beginning freshmen who meet the high school subject-pattern requirement and the high 
school rank and test score combination prescribed for the college and curriculum of their 
choice. 

— Students not meeting the stated academic requirements may be considered for special 
admission if both the dean of the college concerned and the director of admissions and 
records (or their designated representatives) concur. 

Equivalent SAT verbal and mathematics scores are acceptable in lieu of the composite ACT 
score. It should be noted that in some curricula, such as the performing arts and aviation, 
additional requirements must be met. (See pages 16 and 18.) 

Supportive Services 

Supportive services are available to help EOP students meet a wide range of needs as follows: 

— Extensive academic advising, taking into consideration students' past educational achieve- 
ments, test results, ability, and interests. The optimal class schedules and course selections 
are determined by students in consultation with a special academic adviser in each college. 

— Specially designed course offerings, including basic courses in rhetoric, mathematics, and 
psychology and special class sections in existing courses. 

— A Reading and Study Methods Clinic and Writing Laboratory to help improve reading, 
writing, and study skills. 

— A tutoring system conducted by faculty and students to help EOP students effectively 
approach and master subject content. 



SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 43 



— An office with specially trained staff to provide academic, social, personal, financial, and 
career assistance and general counseling. 

— Precollege orientation programs to help students have a greater awareness of the programs 
and services available at the University. 

Application 

Applicants for participation in the Educational Opportunities Program must submit complete 
admission applications and arrange for their high school transcripts and test scores to be sent 
to the Office of Admissions and Records. They must also complete a Financial Need Analysis 
Form, indicating a desire to be considered for the Illinois State Scholarship Commission 
Monetary Award, the Pell Grant, and University Aid. 

Application forms and additional information about the program may be obtained from the 
Office of Admissions and Records. 

SERVICES FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISABLED 

The design of the campus and the programming of the Division of Rehabilitation-Education 
Services affords students with physical disabilities full access to all campus academic and 
extracurricular programs. Division services are available to students with all causes and 
manifestations of physical disability: paraplegics, quadriplegics, persons with cerebral palsy, the 
visually and hearing impaired, and many others. Services include physical therapy and functional 
training; counseling; transportation; occupational therapy and prosthetics; textbook braille, 
tape, and reader service; medical services; and many others. An extensive program of recreation 
and sports is also available. The division works closely with the Housing Division and the 
student to arrange appropriate housing. 

Prospective students are urged to contact the division to request information about services 
and how to arrange for them, and are strongly encouraged to visit campus and the Division 
of Rehabilitation-Education Services well in advance of enrollment to plan for their needs. 

COURSE ATTENDANCE BY ILLINOIS HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

Qualified Illinois high school students are permitted, while in high school, to attend University 
classes for college credit. They may also enroll for college credit in correspondence and 
extramural courses offered by the University. 

To qualify for high school and on-campus University concurrent enrollment, students must 
be recommended by their high school principals and have approximately a 4.5 (A = 5.0) grade- 
point average. Each case is considered on an individual basis. Students are assessed tuition at 
the regular nondegree student rates. 

Courses taken by these students involve work over and above the secondary school curriculum. 
Grades and course credits will appear on their permanent University records and on official 
transcripts. If these students enter the University after high school graduation, the courses, if 
applicable, will be credited toward University graduation. 

Students applying for on-campus admission or readmission under this program should be 
prepared to submit the following materials upon request: 

— A S25 check or money order payable to the University of Illinois for the nonrefundable 
application fee. 

— An application for admission or readmission to the University (not required of students 
enrolled under this plan in the immediately preceding semester or summer session). 

— An official copy of the student's high school transcript covering all work completed in high 
school and courses in progress, together with ACT or SAT test scores if available. Acceptance 
under this program does not guarantee later acceptance as a degree candidate. 

Information and applications for this program may be obtained from the Office of Admissions 
and Records at the address on the inside back cover. A separate undergraduate admission 
application is required if a student desires to attend the University after high school graduation 
or under the Early Admission Program described in the following section. 

Students interested in correspondence study should request an application form from Guided 
Individual Study, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 104 Illini Hall, 725 South Wright 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820. It is suggested that students begin correspondence study to 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



coincide with the start of a fall or spring semester at the University. Applications should be 
submitted before the beginning of a semester. For the summer months, applications should be 
submitted by the middle of May. 

EARLY ADMISSION PROGRAM 

Under the Early Admission Program, high school students meeting competitive admission 
requirements except receipt of a high school diploma may be enrolled in the University after 
their junior year. This may reduce the length of the combined high school and college education 
by one year. Although each application is treated as a special admissions case, prospective 
students must have completed their junior high school year, have earned approximately 15 
units toward a high school diploma, be in good academic standing, be recommended by high 
school staff who are able to evaluate their work, and meet competitive admission standards. 
Those accepted in the program are enrolled in regular four-year curricula and treated as first- 
year students. 

Students interested in this program may apply for admission no sooner than January preceding 
the fall term of planned entry so applications can include complete information about the 
student's fall semester. However, applications should be completed as soon as possible after 
January 1. 

For complete information, contact the Office of Admissions and Records at the address on 
the inside back cover of this catalog. 

DELAYED ADMISSION 

Persons approved for admission may request that their admission be delayed for a maximum 
of one year to participate in nonacademic pursuits. Applicants who wish to consider this 
alternative should request further information from the Office of Admissions and Records at 
the time they accept an admission offer since the program is limited. 

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT 

Students at Parkland College and the Urbana-Champaign Campus 

Students in good academic standing at Parkland College and at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign may concurrently enroll in courses offered by the opposite institution if 
such courses are not available at the student's primary campus. Approval for concurrent 
enrollment must be obtained from the dean of students at Parkland College and the concerned 
college office at the University campus. 

Concurrent enrollees are part-time nondegree students who pay the tuition and fees regularly 
assessed at each institution in accordance with the amount of work taken. The application fee 
is waived. 

STUDY AWAY FROM CAMPUS 

The University permits students who have been enrolled on campus for at least a semester or 
summer session, with the approval of their adviser and the appropriate departmental and 
college offices, to undertake independent study away from campus, in the United States or 
abroad. 

Colleges and departments may establish variable credit courses that permit students to 
continue enrollment in the University while studying away from campus upon payment of an 
appropriate fee. Final determination of credit is made by the department and college concerned. 

Overseas study programs offered by each college are described in the individual college 
sections of this catalog. 



Student Services 



INFORMATION SERVICES 45 

COUNSELING SERVICES 45 

CAREER SERVICES 45 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 46 

SPECIALIZED SERVICES 46 

AIDS FOR IMPROVING ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE 47 

MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES 47 

HOUSING 48 

ILLINI UNION 49 

INFORMATION SERVICES 
Student Assistance Center 

The Srudent Assistance Center in the lobby of the Fred H. Turner Student Services Building 
(333-INFO) answers questions and offers information about the University. If a student does 
not know exactly where to find help, the center will refer the student to the proper department. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 
Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center is located on the second floor of the Fred H. Turner Student Services 
Building (333-3704). Clinical and counseling psychologists provide a variety of services addressing 
students' vocational, academic, personal, and interpersonal problems. Services include workshops 
on specific topics such as test anxiety, time management, and stress reduction; reading and 
study methods classes; individual, couple, and group counseling; and consultative services to 
University departments and staff. 

Student Services 

Staff in the Office of the Dean of Students at 130 Fred H. Turner Student Services Building 
(333-0050) provide general-services counseling to all students. Special counselors are available 
for students enrolled in the Educational Opportunities Program. This office also administers 
the emergency loan program and the Emergency Dean Service, to provide students counseling 
and assistance 24 hours a day in personal crises. 

Student Financial Aid 

Staff on the fourth floor of the Fred H. Turner Student Services Building (333-0100) provide 
information on the five main types of student financial aid administered by the University: 
scholarships, grants, loans, employment, and veterans' educational benefits. Employment 
counseling also is available to all students whether or not they have applied for financial aid. 
For a more complete description of student financial aid programs and services, see page 59 
of this catalog. 

CAREER SERVICES 

Career Development and Placement 

The Career Development and Placement Center in 310 Fred H. Turner Student Services Building 
(333-0820) provides students a wide range of career-related services, including individual and 
group counseling, assistance on job search efforts, general informational services, and help in 
identifying postgraduate employment opportunities. A Job Vacancy Bulletin is published 
biweekly to inform job seekers of available openings nationwide. The 2,000 volume Career 



46 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Resource Center has occupational literature and directory information, job search aids, 
government career information, and special interest resources to assist women and minorities 
with career and life planning. Each year, the office sponsors many on-campus career seminars 
of interest to the University community. Staff here also maintain permanent credentials/ 
recommendation files for students registering for this service. 

Health Professions Information 

The Health Professions Office at 710 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana (333-7079) provides advising 
and career counseling for students interested in dentistry, medicine, osteopathic medicine, 
optometry, pharmacy, and podiatry. This office maintains a complete collection of catalogs 
from U.S. health professional schools as well as information on foreign schools. A faculty 
evaluation service is provided for the prehealth professional major. Counselors are available 
on an appointment basis to advise students on the preprofessional curriculum and help them 
apply to professional schools. 

Counseling Center 

The center, located on the second floor of the Fred H. Turner Student Services Building 
(333-3704), offers group and individual counseling to help students select fields of concentration 
and careers. Through review of test results and counseling sessions, students can obtain 
information about their abilities, interests, and values. 

College Placement Offices 

Individual colleges and departments on campus sponsor their own job placement programs for 
majors. These offices provide employment counseling and job search training. Each office 
makes arrangements for employer representatives to conduct interviews on campus, and some 
departments furnish individual and group resume services. 

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 
Registered Student Organizations 

This office at 110 Fred H. Turner Student Services Building (333-7060) is the headquarters for 
registered student organizations. Information is available on over 600 student organizations, 
representing a wide variety of professional, social, recreational, athletic, and religious interests. 

Illini Union Board 

This organization, more commonly known as IUB, provides and directs cultural, educational, 
social, and recreational programs of an all-campus nature. Events such as the annual Dad's 
Day and Mom's Day celebrations and the Homecoming Court Program are coordinated by 
IUB, along with concerts, films, lectures, and vacation trips through the Travel Center. IUB 
also sponsors the Block I football cheering section, Quad Day, Activity Day, the spring and 
fall musicals, and publishes the Illinibook. The IUB office is located at 284 Illini Union 
(333-3660). 

SPECIALIZED SERVICES 
Educational Opportunity Program 

Students who enter the University of Illinois under the auspices of the Educational Opportunities 
Program (EOP) are eligible for extensive academic services through this office, located at 130 
Fred H. Turner Student Services Building (333-0054). Participants with academic need may 
receive individual or small-group tutorial assistance in most disciplines. The EOP staff provides 
academic, financial, career counseling, and study skills assistance for all EOP students. 

International Student Affairs 

The Office of International Student Affairs, 510 East Daniel Street (333-1303), orients inter- 
national students to study and life in the United States and at UIUC. The staff offers counseling 



STUDENT SERVICES 47 



on ■ varief) of problems and issuei documents tor maintaining student itatui \Mth the U.S. 

Immigration Service and with the student's government or sponsors. 

Veterans Affairs 

The Office of Veterans Affairs in 420 Fred H. Turner Srudenr Services Building (333-0100) 
administers the GI Bill Educational Benefits Program and other veterans affairs programs. 

Women's Resources and Services 

Services primarily tor women students are administered at 346 Fred H. Turner Student Services 
Building (333-3137). Special programs include Women's Wheels, a rape prevention ride service; 
the Illini Symposia for Women; a Women's Resource Directory; Verdell Frazier Young awards 
for women who are continuing interrupted educations; and a library of materials of concern 
to women. Staff have general information especially for traditional-age and reentry-age women 
students. 

AIDS FOR IMPROVING ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE 
Counseling Center 

The center, located on the second floor of the Fred H. Turner Student Services Building, offers 
a noncredit, nongraded Reading and Study Methods course and a walk-in Learning Assistance 
Center. The course is designed to improve reading speed and comprehension and general study 
skills. Courses are taught in small groups with individual training provided when necessary. A 
nominal fee is charged. The walk-in Learning Assistance Center aims at more isolated study 
skill problems, is more self-oriented, and is free. 

Writing Laboratory 

Rhetoric 103 (Writing Laboratory) is open to any Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) 
student in conjunction with regular rhetoric courses. Rhetoric 103 is designed primarily as an 
adjunct to Rhet. 104, 105, and Sp. Com. Ill, 112. A student may enroll on his or her own 
initiative, be placed in the course on the basis of test scores, or be referred by a rhetoric 
instructor. 

The tutorial meets weekly and the student receives 1 semester hour of credit on a satisfactory/ 
unsatisfactory basis. The tutorial is devoted to individual writing problems and may be repeated 
for a total of 2 semester hours of credit. 

Supportive Instruction 

Academic assistance is available to students in the Educational Opportunities Program (EOP) 
as described on page 42. Some departments have established revised courses and/or sections 
in existing courses for this purpose, and a faculty and student tutoring system has been 
developed. The program offers supplemental instruction and intensive reviews for several 
courses. 

MEDICAL AND HEALTH SERVICES 

Students registered in University courses for residence credit at the Urbana-Champaign campus 
are assessed a Hospital-Medical-Surgical Insurance Fee. 

Health Center 

The nonwaivable fee supports the medical services available to students at the McKinley 
Health Center. Dependents are not eligible for care at the health center unless they are also 
enrolled students at the Urbana-Champaign campus. There are four basic types of care available 
at the McKinley Health Center: routine office care, care for injuries or acute illnesses, mental 
health care, and health education. 

Health center physicians are available for general medical care and advice while the student 
is on campus. They are experienced clinicians, certified in primary care specialties. Students 
may consult the health center physician of their choice in his or her office by appointment. 



48 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Care is equal to that offered by a private, general physician. A wide range of diagnostic tests 
is available to the health center physician, including laboratory procedures, x-ray examinations, 
and electrocardiograms. A limited pharmacy provides drugs for students when they are under 
the care of a health center physician. 

McKinley Health Center is fully accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of 
Hospitals as an ambulatory care facility. 

A physician is available 24 hours a day to provide after-hours care to students or employees 
injured on the job. 

The student is encouraged to become involved in health education and positive lifestyle 
change while on campus. 

HOUSING 

Housing for students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is provided in University 
residence halls, fraternities, sororities, private residence halls and homes, and cooperative 
houses. 

Present regulations require that all single undergraduate men and women students live for 
the entire academic year in housing which is certified by the University, unless the student 
reaches the age of twenty-one or achieves 30 semester hours of earned academic credit by 
August 15 of the academic year. 

Housing which is certified includes University residence halls, fraternities and sororities, and 
privately owned housing which meets University standards. Within this system, there is a wide 
range of rates and services offered. 

Information about housing is presented in greater detail in a brochure which is mailed to 
each student with the Notice of Admission to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
If additional information is needed, the student may write to the Housing Information Office, 
2 Fred H. Turner Student Services Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

Students are encouraged to visit the Housing Information Office to discuss housing arrange- 
ments with a housing consultant. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m.to noon and 1:00 p.m. to 
5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on all-campus holidays. 

University Residence Halls 

Approximately 9,000 men and women live in twenty-one University residence halls. Any single 
undergraduate student qualified to enter the University may apply for residence hall accom- 
modations. Room assignments are made in accordance with the University of Illinois policy 
on nondiscrimination. 

University residence halls are located at points convenient to most areas of the main campus. 
Individual halls accommodate from 55 to 660 students, largely in double and triple rooms. 
Residence halls offer a room-and-board plan with twenty meals served each week, but room- 
only contracts are available in two halls. 

A University residence hall contract is sent to each student who is accepted for admission. 
The completed contract should be returned promptly if the student desires accommodations 
in a University residence hall. 

Privately Owned Certified Housing 

Privately owned houses accommodating from five to sixty students are available and conveniently 
located near campus. Some offer room and board; others provide a room only or a room with 
kitchen privileges. Other houses offer a cooperative work plan. Privately owned residence halls, 
ranging from large, coeducational room and board halls to small, supervised, suite-living 
arrangements, are also available. All meet health, fire, safety, and educational requirements. 

A list of these accommodations is available from the Housing Information Office, 2 Fred 
H. Turner Student Services Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. Students and 
parents visiting the campus to make housing arrangements are encouraged to consult the staff 
at this office. 

Sororities 

Membership in sororities is by invitation. Invitations are issued following formal and/or 
informal rush functions. In most cases, upper-class students pledged by sororities move into 



STUDENT SERVICES 49 



the chapter house of their choice at the beginning of the following year. Freshmen pledged 
to sororities move into the house as room is available, often during the sophomore year. 

The majoi formal rush occurs in the tall, with informal rush periods continuously through 
the winter and spring. The dates for the rush periods and a description of the kinds of rush 
tatty be obtained bv writing the Panhellenic Council, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
274 Illmi Union, 1401 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Fraternities 

There are fifty-four nationally affiliated fraternities with approximately 3,000 members at the 
Urbana-Champaign campus. Fifty fraternities have living accommodations for most of their 
members, with an average occupancy of fifty men. The opportunity for membership in a 
fraternity exists whether the student lives in a fraternity house or not. Costs for room and 
board in fraternity houses vary, but are not significantly greater than those in other housing 
facilities. 

Membership in fraternities is by invitation. Invitations are issued following formal and/or 
informal rush functions. The Interfratemity Council mails packets of rush information to men 
upon their acceptance to the University. 

Rush periods occur throughout the fall and spring semesters. Additional information on 
fraternities may be obtained from the Interfratemity Council, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 274 Illini Union, 1401 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Housing for Student Families 

There are approximately 1,000 University-owned apartments, some of which are available to 
undergraduate students. There are also a variety of privately owned housing facilities in the 
community. An application for University-owned apartments can be obtained by writing to the 
Family Housing Office, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1841 Orchard Place, Urbana, 
IL 61801 or to the Housing Information Office. 

A listing of privately owned furnished and unfurnished apartments with rental rates, etc. is 
available for review in the Housing Information Office, 2 Fred H. Turner Student Services 
Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

Generally, March 15 to July 1 and November 1 to December 15 are considered the most 
desirable times to visit the campus to arrange for apartment accommodations for the first and 
second semesters, respectively. 

University Policy on Nondiscrimination in Housing 

In the rental of housing which is University-owned or University-certified, or of uncertified 
housing (apartments, uninspected rooming houses, etc.) which is listed with the Housing 
Information Office, the University of Illinois policy on nondiscrimination shall be followed. 
The University makes every effort to assure that accepted listings include only those owners 
or managers who comply fully with its nondiscriminatory housing policy. 

If anyone has any reason to believe that an owner or manager of certified housing or any 
other listed housing has illegally discriminated against an individual, this information should 
be communicated directly to the Housing Discrimination Committee, in care of 2 Fred H. 
Turner Student Services Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

ILLINI UNION 

Located in the middle of campus, the Illini Union is a center of services and activities for the 
entire University community, serving students, faculty, staff, alumni, and visitors since 1941. 

Within the union are five different food services, including a twenty-four-hour vending room 
and a sweet shop, twenty bowling lanes, twenty-one billiards tables, video games, and a ticket 
box office. The union also offers free check cashing, TV rooms, an art gallery, three study 
lounges, a campus information desk, and a book center. Other services include ninety guest 
rooms, a University lost-and-found, checkrooms, the travel center, and special facilities for 
presentations, short-courses, conferences, and meetings sponsored by University departments. 



Student Costs 



STUDENT EXPENSES 50 

TUITION AND FEES 50 

LATE REGISTRATION 51 

FLIGHT TRAINING COURSES 51 

RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION FOR ADMISSION 

AND TUITION ASSESSMENT 51 

INSTALLMENT PLAN FOR PAYING TUITION, FEES, 

AND HOUSING CHARGES 51 

REFUNDS 53 

EXEMPTIONS AND WAIVERS OF TUITION AND FEES 54 

STUDENT EXPENSES 

Tuition, fees, and housing charges for the 1987-88 and 1988-89 academic years were not 
available when this catalog was published. An undergraduate student budget for the 1986-87 
academic year is shown in Table 2. Although student expenses are expected to increase, this 
budget can be used for planning purposes. 

Information about tuition and fee charges for a current academic term, including charges 
for flight instruction and special programs, waivers and exemptions, and refunds, is available 
from the Fee Assessment Section, Window 25, 100 Administration Building, (217) 333-0210. 

Table 2: Estimated Undergraduate Student Expenses for the 1986-87 
Academic Year 

(Average expenses for single, undergraduate students are shown below. This budget covers a 
full program of study for two semesters exclusive of such items as recreation and major articles 
of clothing.) 

f^Z,s ^residents 

Tuition (freshmen and sophomores) $1,406* $4,218* 

Fees 572 572 

Textbooks and other school supplies 340 340 

Meals and housing (includes double room and board residence hall 

charges of $3,010, provision for Sunday evening meals and meals 

during fall and spring registration that are not included in University 

residence hall rates, and $16 Residence Hall Association dues) 3,236 3,236 

Travel allowance 350 350 

Personal expenses (clothing maintenance, personal care at a moderate 

level) 1,076 1,076 

Total: Two semesters $6,980 $9,792 



* An additional $246 for tuition must be added for juniors and seniors who are Illinois residents, 
and $738 must be added for juniors and seniors who are not residents of Illinois. An additional $315 
travel allowance must be provided for students from states not adjacent to Illinois. 

TUITION AND FEES 

Tuition and fees for undergraduate students who were enrolled on campus in spring 1987 are 
shown in Table 3, page 52. Charges are assessed on the basis of the students' college of 
enrollment (undergraduate, graduate, or professional); their classification as residents or non- 
residents of Illinois; and their credit range — determined by the total number of semester hours 
or graduate units for which they are registered. There is also a tuition differential for upper 
and lower division undergraduate students. 



STUDENT COSTS 51 



Undergraduate credit is counted in semester hours. Credit for graduate work is counted in 
units. For fee assessment purposes, 1 unit equals 4 semester hours. A full-time undergraduate 
student is one who is registered for 12 or more semester hours of credit. 

The Service Fee supports operation of certain campus facilities such as the Illini Union, Fred 
H. Turner Student Services Building, Assembly Hall, and the Intramural Physical Education 
Building. The Health Insurance Fee covers the cost of the University Student Health Insurance 
Program that provides worldwide hospital, medical, and surgical insurance coverage. The 
Health Service Fee provides health care and limited prescription service at the campus Health 
Center and helps support the Counseling Center. 

Students are also assessed: 

— $4 each semester for SEAL (Students for Equal Access to Learning) to supplement existing 
financial aid for needy students. A refund is available upon request during the seventh and 
eighth weeks of instruction in a semester for students not desiring to participate. 

— $4 each semester and summer session for SORF (Student Organization Resource Fee) to 
help support the Student Legal Service and the programs and services of registered student 
organizations. Refunds are available upon request during the fifth and sixth weeks of 
instruction in a semester and summer session. 

— $1 each semester to support the Student Government Association (SGA). This is a 
nonrefundable fee. 

LATE REGISTRATION 

Students who register after on-campus registration in any semester, including University staff 
and persons who submitted admission applications too late to be processed before on-campus 
registration, must pay a Late Registration Fine of $15 (amount subject to change). (This fine 
is not covered by scholarships or tuition waivers. It may be waived under exceptional 
circumstances upon petition to the Director of Admissions and Records. The petition form is 
available from the Fee Assessment Section, Window 25, 100 Administration Building.) 

FLIGHT TRAINING COURSES 

In addition to the regular tuition and fees, students taking flight training pay: 

Avi. 101 — Private Pilot $1,500 

Avi. 1 02 — Orientation Refresher 900 

Avi. 120 — Private Pilot, II 1,932 

Avi. 121 — Private Pilot, MA 1,023 

Avi. 1 30 — Commercial-Instrument, I 1 ,692 

Avi. 140 — Commercial-Instrument, II 1,817 

Avi. 200 — Commercial-Instrument, III 1 ,960 

Avi. 210 — Commercial-Instrument, IV 1,923 

Avi. 220 — Flight Instructor 1,518 

Avi. 222 — Instrument Flight Instructor 916 

Avi. 224 — All-attitude Orientation 830 

Avi. 280 — Special Rating (Multiengine Land) 1 ,070 

Avi. 291 — Special Ratings and/or Specialized Flight 1 ,260 

(These fees are subject to change and are not covered by scholarships or tuition and fee 
waivers.) 

RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION FOR ADMISSION 
AND TUITION ASSESSMENT 

The residence classification of applicants for admission is determined on the basis of the 
information given on their applications and other credentials. Eligibility for admission to the 
University is determined and tuition assessed in accordance with this decision. 

Persons who take exception to the residency status assigned to them should refer to Paragraph 
13 of the residency regulations on page 345, Appendix D. 

INSTALLMENT PLAN FOR PAYING TUITION, FEES, 
AND HOUSING CHARGES 

Students enrolled on campus may pay tuition and fees, single student residence hall charges, 
and flight instruction fees on an installment plan. This plan is not available to students registered 



52 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Table 3: Undergraduate Tuition and Fees for Spring Semester 1987 



SEMESTER 



Full Program 



Partial Programs 



(Subject to change) 



Range I 

12 semester 
hours and above 

or 
3 units and above 



Undergraduate Illinois Non- 

(Freshmen & Sophomores) resident resident 

Tuition $ 703 $2,109 

Fees* 286 286 

TOTAL $ 989 $2,395 

Undergraduate 

(Juniors, Seniors 
& Nondegree) 

Tuition $ 826 $2,478 

Fees* 286 286 

TOTAL $1,112 $2,764 

*Fees 

(All students) 

Service fee $144 

Health insurance fee 44 

Health service fee 89 

SEAL 4 

SORF 4 

SGA 1_ 

TOTAL $286 



Range II 

Above 5 but less 

than 12 semester 

hours 

or 

Above 1 1 /4 but 

less than 3 units 



Illinois Non- 
resident resident 
$474 $1,422 
286 286 
$760 $1,708 



$556 $1 ,668 

286 286 

$842 $1 ,954 



$144 

44 

89 

4 

4 

1_ 

$286 



Range III 

Above through 
5 semester hours 

or 

Above through 

1 1 /4 units 



Illinois Non- 
resident resident 
$244 $ 732 



249 249 

$493 $ 981 



855 
249 



$285 
249 
$534 $1,104 



$107 

44 

89 

4 

4 

1 



$249 



EIGHT-WEEK 
SUMMER SESSION 



Full Program 



Partial Programs 



(Subject to change) 



Range I 

6 semester hours 
and above 

or 

1 1 /2 units 

and above 



Undergraduate Illinois Non- 

(Freshmen & Sophomores) resident resident 

Tuition $352 $1 ,056 

Service fee 72 72 

Health insurance fee 44 44 

Health service fee 89 89 

SORF 4 4 

TOTAL $561 $1 ,265 

Undergraduate 

(Juniors, Seniors, 
& Nondegree) 

Tuition $413 $1,239 

Service fee 72 72 

Health insurance fee 44 44 

Health service fee 89 89 

SORF 4 4 

TOTAL $622 $1 ,448 



Range II 

Above 2V2 but 

less than 6 
semester hours 

or 

Above % but less 

than IV2 units 



Illinois Non- 
resident resident 
$237 $71 1 



72 

44 

89 

4 

$446 



$278 

72 

44 

89 

4 



72 

44 

89 

4 



$920 



$ 834 

72 

44 

89 

4 



$487 $1,043 



Range III 

Above through 

2Vz semester 

hours 

or 

Above through 

% unit 



Illinois Non- 
resident resident 
$122 $366 




$334 $620 



* Note: Further information about tuition and fees for Graduate, Law, Medical, and Veterinary Medicine 
students; Intersession; off-campus courses; flight training; Executive MBA Program; and tuition and 
fee exemptions is available from the Registration Services Office, Window 25, 100 Administration 
Building; telephone (217) 333-0210. 



STUDENT COSTS 53 



in extramural, correspondence, and intercession courses, or to students for whom this privilege 
has been denied. 

Under the installment plan, semester charges are collected in three installments. The first is 
payable during the first ten days of instruction, and the remaining ones are payable in each of 
the two following months. Approximately one-half of the summer session charges must be 
paid during the first seven days of instruction with the remainder due during the following 
month. There is a finance charge of 1 percent of the amount deferred, or a minimum charge 
of $2 — whichever is greater — when charges are paid in installments (amount subject to change). 

Students who pay their accounts on the installment plan and later withdraw from the 
University, or reduce their registration to a lower credit range after the established refund 
deadline date, are liable for the full amount of tuition and fees assessed. 

Installment payments are delinquent on the first day of the month following the date that 
payment is due. A delinquent service charge of 1 percent per month or a minimum monthly 
charge of $1, whichever is greater, is added to delinquent accounts (amount subject to change). 
The delinquent service charge is applied to all items charged to the student account and for 
which payment is delinquent. 

Students who are in debt to the University at the end of any academic term may not be 
permitted to register in the University again. They are not entitled to receive diplomas or 
official statements or transcripts of credits until either the indebtedness has been paid or 
suitable arrangements for payment have been made, unless either there is pending a bankruptcy 
petition of the student seeking a discharge of all such indebtedness or all such indebtedness 
has been discharged. 

REFUNDS 

Cancellation of Registration 

Individuals who sign and return a registration agreement and later decide not to attend the 
University may cancel their registration before the first day of classes. 

If a request to cancel registration is received in the Office of Admissions and Records by 
5:00 p.m. on the last day of on-campus registration, a student's registration agreement will be 
cancelled and tuition and fees will not be charged. 

Students who have not attended any classes, or received any student services, may cancel 
their registration agreement up to 5:00 p.m. on the first day of classes in a term if they obtain 
the approval of their college. To be relieved of their obligation to pay tuition and fees, they 
must surrender their permanent I.D. card and/or the individualized validation label that 
accompanies their Registration Statement of Charges and Aid. These items must be returned 
immediately to the Fee Assessment Section, Window 25, 100 Administration Building, or by 
mail addressed to the Office of Admissions and Records. 

Once students have attended a class, they may not cancel their registration agreement. If 
they leave the University, they must officially withdraw from the University. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students who have been charged tuition and/or fees and later withdraw from the University 
during the refund period are assessed a nonrefundable charge in the amount of one-half of 
the service fee plus the Health Insurance Fee and the Health Service Fee (rounded if necessary 
to the next higher even dollar) or $30, whichever is greater. They continue to be covered by 
the health insurance program and are eligible to receive McKinley Health Center services, if 
fees for insurance and health services were paid, until the first day of on-campus registration 
for the next term. Use of intramural recreation facilities also is permitted. Students who have 
been exempted from the payment of these fees will have the nonrefundable charge reduced 
by the amount of the appropriate fee(s). 
Refund periods are as follows: 

— In a semester, twelve-week term, or eleven-week summer law program, full refund, except 
for the nonrefundable charge, during the first ten days of instruction; no refund thereafter; 

— In an eight-week summer session, full refund, except for the nonrefundable charge, during 
the first seven days of instruction; no refund thereafter; and 

— For University terms of different lengths, refund periods are determined proportionately in 
accordance with the above principles. 



54 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



In case of extenuating circumstances, such as medically documented serious illness or injury, 
exceptions to these refund periods may be made by the director of admissions and records. 
The petition form to request a refund is available at Windows 25 or 27, 100 Administration 
Building. 

Reduction of Program 

Students who paid tuition and/or fees and later reduce their registration to a lower credit 
range, as indicated in Table 3, receive a full refund of the difference in tuition and fees specified 
for the ranges if the change is made during the periods designated above for withdrawal from 
the University. Thereafter, no refund is allowed. 

EXEMPTIONS AND WAIVERS OF TUITION AND FEES 

Appearing below are the waivers and exemptions available to students and the conditions 
under which they are granted. 

Unless otherwise exempted by Board of Trustees authorization, the payment of tuition and 
fees is required of academic employees of the University or allied agencies under appointment 
for less than 25 percent of full-time services, and of nonacademic employees under appointment 
for less than 50 percent of full-time services. 

For tuition and fees assessment purposes, a staff appointment must be to an established 
position for a specific amount of time and a salary commensurate with the percentage of time 
required, and it must require service for not less than three-fourths of the academic term. 
Note: A term is defined as running from the first day of registration through the last day of 
final examinations. Three-fourths of a term is defined as ninety-one days in a semester and 
forty-one days during the eight-week summer session. Staff tuition and fees privileges do not 
apply to students employed on an hourly basis in either an academic or nonacademic capacity, 
or to persons on leave without pay. 

University employees appointed to established civil service positions whose rates of pay are 
determined by negotiation, prevailing rates, and union affiliation are not considered as paid on 
an hourly basis and are entitled to the same tuition and fees privileges accorded to other staff 
members under the regulations. 

Students who resign their staff appointment, or whose appointment is cancelled before 
rendering service for at least three-fourths of the term, become subject to the full amount of 
the appropriate tuition and fees for that term unless they withdraw from University classes at 
the same time or before the appointment becomes void, or they file a clearance form for 
graduation within one week following the resignation date. 

Students holding appointments, either as employees or as fellows, to the close of the second 
semester, and for whom tuition and/or the service fee have been provided by exemption or 
waiver, are entitled to the same exemption of tuition and/or the service fee for the summer 
session or term immediately following, providing they hold no appointments during that 
summer session or term. 

Tuition and fee waivers are not granted for the Executive MBA Program or other self- 
supporting programs. 

Application Fee 

Applicants for admission must submit a $25 ($35 for international applicants) application fee 
(amount subject to change) to help defray processing costs. The fee is nonrefundable to 
applicants approved for admission and to denied applicants who submit complete or partial 
applications prior to the date all admission spaces are filled in the college and curriculum of 
their choice. Application fees will be returned to persons applying for admission to curricula 
that were closed to further admission or to programs not being offered. 
Exempt from payment of the application fee are: 

— Readmission applicants who are applying for a degree program if their last enrollment at 
the Urbana-Champaign campus was as an undergraduate degree candidate. 

— Readmission applicants to the Graduate College who are applying to a graduate degree 
program in which they were enrolled within five years preceding the date of application. 

— Faculty and academic/professional staff members and persons retired from the academic 
staff. 



STUDENT COSTS 55 



— Permanent nonacademic employees of the University and other institutions and agencies 
under the University Civil Service System who have been assigned to established permanent 
and continuous nonacademic positions and who are employed for at least 50 percent of 
full time. 

— Staff members of certain specifically identified related agencies who are authorized tuition 
and/or service fee waivers. 

— Summer-session-only graduate degree applicants after their first registration for on-campus 
work. 

— Students registered at the University of Illinois at Chicago who wish to enroll at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus for the summer session only. 

Waivers of the application fee are authorized for: 

— Applicants who, because of extreme financial hardship, cannot meet the cost of the fee. In 
general, evidence of extreme financial hardship is a family income at or below the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics low standard family budget or the receipt of a testing waiver from the 
American College Testing Program or the College Entrance Examination Board. Applicants 
presently attending another collegiate institution may provide evidence of the financial 
package received at that institution. 

— Applicants under approved foreign exchange programs in which the University participates, 
such as the Latin American Scholarship Program of American Universities (LASPAU) and 
the African Scholarship Program of American Universities (ASPAU), and foreign students 
participating in approved exchange programs where the waiver of fees is reciprocal. 

— Intercampus transfers at the same level: undergraduate to undergraduate or graduate to 
graduate. 

— Applicants requesting a change in admission consideration from one campus of the University 
of Illinois to another for the same level and term. This would include applicants denied 
admission on one campus as well as applicants wishing to cancel admission or admission 
consideration on one campus for similar consideration on another campus. Students applying 
simultaneously to two campuses must pay the application fee at each campus. Undergraduate 
students applying for admission to a professional or graduate college on either of the two 
campuses must pay the application fee. 

— Students from other universities participating in the Committee on Institutional Cooperation 
(CIC) program by taking courses at the University of Illinois. 

— Persons who are applying for ClC-supported fellowships to study at a CIC member institution. 

— Graduate and professional applicants whose entry is advanced or delayed by action of their 
major departments are not required to pay a second application fee. 

— University of Illinois students applying for work on a second campus as concurrent registrants, 
and non-University of Illinois students applying as concurrent registrants from another 
institution with which the University has a reciprocal agreement, and students who have 
been concurrent enrollees the immediately preceding term and who plan to return to their 
primary campus the following term. 

— Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive assignment of practice teachers, or 
who receive assignment of students meeting the clinical experience requirement in teacher 
education, or who cooperate in research projects related to teacher education, cooperating 
librarians, school-nurse teachers, social welfare field supervisors, recreation field supervisors, 
health and education field supervisors, speech pathology supervisors, and physicians partic- 
ipating without salary in the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Urbana-Champaign. 

— Students on leave-of-absence status on re-entry. 

Waiver of Tuition 

Tuition is waived for: 

— All faculty and academic professional employees (excluding graduate assistants) of the 
University on appointment for at least 25 percent of full-time service, provided the 
appointments require service for not less than three-fourths of a term. This waiver also 
applies to staff members of certain specifically identified related agencies whose positions 
are considered equivalent to academic positions of the University. 

— Graduate teaching and research assistants of the University on appointment for at least 25 
percent but not more than 67 percent of full-time service, if approved for a waiver by their 
sponsoring unit and no tuition and fees payments are available from an outside agency. 



56 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Their appointments must require service for not less than three-fourths of the term. Those 
on appointment for 68 percent or more of full-time service pay tuition at the in-state rate 
and are eligible for waiver of the service fee only. Caution: Assistantship appointments are 
cumulative. For example, if a person holds two appointments, a 25-percent and a 50-percent 
assistantship appointment, he or she is ineligible for a tuition waiver. 

— Academic staff members emeriti. 

— Holders of tuition waiver scholarships. 

— Holders of graduate tuition and fee waivers awarded by the Graduate College. 

— Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors which provide payments to cover the 
total cost of instruction. 

— Cooperating teachers and administrators who receive an assignment of practice teachers, or 
who receive assignment of students meeting the clinical experience requirement in teacher 
education curricula, or who cooperate in research projects related to teacher education, are 
exempted for one semester, quarter, or summer session for each semester, quarter, or 
equivalent of service rendered within two consecutive semesters. The exemption shall apply 
to the semester, quarter, or summer session of registration as designated by the student that 
is concurrent with, or following, the term of service, but must be applied no later than one 
calendar year from the end of the term of service. Concurrent registration on more than 
one campus of the University or in University extramural courses constitutes one semester, 
quarter, or session of eligibility for exemption. A similar waiver is authorized for cooperating 
librarians, school-nurse teachers, social welfare field supervisors, developmental child-care 
field supervisors, recreation field supervisors, health and education field supervisors, speech 
pathology supervisors, educational psychology supervisors, and physicians who participate 
without salary in the instructional program of the University of Illinois College of Medicine 
at Urbana-Champaign. 

— Nonacademic employees of the University, of other institutions and agencies under the 
University Civil Service System, and of certain specifically identified related agencies in status 
appointments or in appointments designed to qualify for status in an established class (e.g., 
trainee, intern) for at least 50 percent of full-time services who register in regular University 
courses not to exceed: 

• Six credit hours or two courses in a semester or quarter if on full-time appointment, 

• Four credit hours if on a 75-percent to 99-percent time appointment, or 

• Three credit hours if on a 50- to 74-percent time appointment, provided that they (1) 
meet conditions and eligibility for admission as prescribed by the Office of Admissions and 
Records, (2) are not students as defined in Civil Service Rule 7.7c, and (3) have approval 
by their employing departments of enrollment and of a makeup schedule to cover any time 
in course attendance during their regular work schedule. 

The waiver of tuition also applies to any additional hours of registration by employees 
which keep them within the same fee assessment credit range. Employees whose total 
registration is in a higher range than that authorized by their tuition waiver pay only the 
difference between the waiver authorization and the higher range in which their total 
registration places them. 

— Nonacademic employees in a status, learner, trainee, apprentice, or provisional appointment 
may enroll without payment of tuition in regular courses directly related to their University 
employment not to exceed 10 credit hours per semester provided they have made application 
and received prior approval for enrollment as required by procedures issued by the director 
of nonacademic personnel and set forth in Policy and Rules — Nonacademic. 

Waiver of the Nonresident Portion of Tuition 

Nonresident portion of tuition is waived for: 

— All staff members (academic, administrative, or permanent nonacademic) on appointment 
for at least 25 percent of full-time services with the University or with specifically identified 
related agencies, provided the appointment requires service for not less than three-fourths 
of the term. 

— The faculties of state-supported institutions of higher education in Illinois holding appoint- 
ments of at least one-quarter time, provided the appointment requires service for not less 
than three-fourths of the term. 

— The teaching and professional staff in the private and public elementary and secondary 



STUDENT COSTS 57 



schools in Illinois, such as counselors, school psychologists, school social workers, librarians, 
and administrators who hold such an appointment at least one-quarter time, and for not 
less than three-fourths of the term. 

— The spouses and dependent children of all staff members (academic, administrative, or 
nonacademic) on appointment with the University or allied agencies for at least 25 percent 
full-time service, and of those listed in the second item above. (Dependent children are 
those who qualify as dependents for federal income tax purposes.) 

— The spouses and dependent children of fellows and trainees who are employed as teaching 
assistants to the fullest extent permitted by their fellowship appointment. 

— Persons actively serving in one of the armed forces of the United States who are stationed 
and present in the state of Illinois in connection with that service and their spouses and 
dependent children, as long as the military person remains stationed, present, and living in 
this state. 

Service Fee Waivers 

The service fee is waived, or exempted, for: 

— Academic staff members of the University (except graduate assistants) and certain specifically 
identified, related agencies who qualify for tuition waivers. 

— Graduate teaching and research assistants of the University on appointment for at least 25 
percent of full-time service for not less than three-fourths of the term, if approved for this 
waiver by their sponsoring unit and no tuition and fees payments are available from an 
outside agency. 

— Holders of graduate tuition and fee waivers awarded by the Graduate College. 

— Students registered in absentia. 

— Students registered in approved off-campus and study abroad courses. 

— Students registered as participants in the high school concurrent enrollment program. 

— Holders of grants or contracts from outside sponsors that provide payments to cover the 
total cost of instruction if this fee is charged to contract or grant funds. 

— Cooperating teachers and administrators. (See Waiver of Tuition on page 55.) 

— Academic staff members emeriti. 

— Nonacademic employees of the University exempted from tuition as specified in the last 
two categories under Waiver of Tuition. 

Health Service and Student Insurance Fees 

Students totally exempt from payment of the Student Insurance Fee and the Health Service 
Fee, and therefore not eligible for these benefits and services, are: 

— Persons registered for doctoral thesis research in absentia. 

— Persons registered in off-campus courses and study abroad courses for zero credit. (If 
registered for more than zero credit, they are required to pay the insurance fee.) 

— Students registered as participants in the high school concurrent enrollment program. 

— University employees registered at the request of their departments in zero credit courses 
especially established to improve their work. 

— Staff members who are registered as students and who are eligible for the mandatory State 
of Illinois Employees Insurance Program. 

— Staff members of certain specifically identified related agencies who are eligible automatically 
to receive hospital-medical coverage as an employee benefit at the cost of the employing 
agency. 

Cooperating teachers and administrators and certain field supervisors are exempt from 
payment of the Health Service Fee (see Waiver of Tuition on page 55). All other students 
enrolled on campus must pay the Health Service Fee unless they have a fellowship or grant 
that specifically pays for it. 

Student Health Insurance 

The University Board of Trustees requires all students to be covered by health insurance 
through either a program provided by the University or one determined to be equivalent to 
that offered by the University. 

All students are assessed an insurance fee to cover the cost of the Student Comprehensive 



58 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Health Insurance Program. This fee may be waived for students who present evidence of 
equivalent insurance coverage and complete a petition for exemption from the insurance fee. 
EXEMPTION MUST BE REQUESTED IN PERSON. 

Evidence of equivalent insurance may be established by the student's insurance policy or an 
identification card with a brochure outlining the benefits of the program. Military personnel 
and their dependents need only their military identification cards. Letters from employers, 
insurance companies, or agents will be accepted if they are on company letterhead stationery 
and are signed by a company official giving the name of the insurance company and defining 
the scope of the insurance coverage of the student. 

To qualify for an exemption, a student must present satisfactory evidence of insurance and 
complete an exemption petition at one of the following locations: 

— the Insurance Station at the Armory during on-campus registration, 

— the Insurance Station at the Post-Registration Service Center in the Illini Union (fall and 
spring semesters), or 

— the Student Insurance Office, Room 228, 505 East Green Street, Champaign (during the 
summer session and following the semester post-registration periods). 

Items mailed to the Student Insurance Office or included in payments made by mail will be 
returned to the sender without action. Such items must be resubmitted by the student in 
person within the stated deadline. 

Requests for exemption must be made in person within the first ten days of instruction 
during a semester or within the first seven days in the eight-week summer sessin. 

Once waived, the exemption is continuous, and it is the student's responsibility to request 
reinstatement in the Health Insurance Program. Reinstatement may be requested at any time 
but is subject to approval of the student's Statement of Medical History. 

Married students may purchase insurance for a spouse and/or children by paying an additional 
premium. A brochure explaining insurance benefits and possible coverage during periods that 
students are not enrolled is available from the Student Insurance Office, Room 228, 505 East 
Green Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 



Financial Aid 



THE APPLICATION PROCESS 59 

SOURCES OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 60 

EMPLOYMENT: A FORM OF SELF-HELP FINANCIAL AID 61 

STUDENT LOANS: ANOTHER FORM OF SELF-HELP ASSISTANCE 62 

SPECIALIZED AID PROGRAMS 65 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS 68 



Financial aid programs are designed to provide assistance to students who otherwise would 
not be able to pursue a postsecondary education. A basic principle of most aid programs is 
that parents and students pay for an education according to their capability. Student financial 
aid programs, therefore, are designed to supplement — not replace — a family's contribution. 

Even with relatively low tuition and fee charges, the cost of a college education still can be 
a financial burden for many families. (Estimated expenses for an undergraduate student at the 
University appear in Table 2 on page 50.) 

No student, however, should fail to apply for admission because his or her family feel they 
are unable to pay the full costs of a college education. The Office of Student Financial Aid at 
the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, adhering to the principle that applicants must 
demonstrate financial need, administers several financial aid programs. If the family's resources 
are determined insufficient to meet necessary educational expenses, financial aid in the form 
of loans, employment, grants, and/or scholarships usually can be made available. 

The major sources of aid are federal and state government programs in addition to funds 
administered by the University. There also are funds for which a student applies directly to an 
awarding agency. 

Personnel in the Office of Student Financial Aid are available to those needing information 
on financial assistance. Office hours: Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to noon; 1:00 to 5:00 
p.m., except on all-campus holidays. Address: Fourth floor, Fred H. Turner Student Services 
Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. Telephone: (217) 333-0100. 

THE APPLICATION PROCESS 

To receive University-awarded aid, students must be enrolled full time: at least 12 undergraduate 
credit hours or 3 graduate units. {Note: Students in veterinary medicine who do not have a 
bachelor's degree should follow the steps prescribed for undergraduate students.) 

UNDERGRADUATE ILLINOIS RESIDENTS 

— Complete a need-analysis document. The Family Financial Statement (FFS) published by 
American College Testing (ACT) is preferred, but the Financial Aid Form (FAF) published 
by the College Scholarship Service (CSS) is acceptable. 

— Apply for an Illinois State Scholarship Commission (ISSC) Monetary Award and a Pell 
Grant. ] A separate application is not necessary. The need-analysis document provides an 
opportunity for applicants to release information to these state and federal programs. 

UNDERGRADUATE NONRESIDENT 

— Complete a need-analysis document. The Family Financial Statement (FFS) published by 
American College Testing (ACT) is preferred, but the Financial Aid Form (FAF) published 
by the College Scholarship Service (CSS) is acceptable. 

— Apply for a Pell Grant. 1 A separate application is not necessary. The need-analysis document 
provides an opportunity for applicants to release information to this federal program. 



'All Pell Grant applicants receive a Student Aid Report that indicates whether or not they 
will receive a grant. An eligible student will receive at least a three-page report; all copies must 
be submitted to the Office of Student Financial Aid. A student who is ineligible for a Pell 
Grant will receive fewer copies; one copy must be submitted to the Office of Student Financial 
Aid. 



60 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



GRADUATE/PROFESSIONAL RESIDENT OR NONRESIDENT 

— Complete a need-analysis document. The Family Financial Statement (FFS) published by 
American College Testing (ACT) is preferred, but the Financial Aid Form (FAF) published 
by College Scholarship Service (CSS) is acceptable. 

— To apply for tuition-fee waivers, fellowships, assistantships, or traineeships, students should 
contact their prospective academic department. 

The Office of Student Financial Aid offers very limited scholarships for students in the 
Graduate College. Graduate, law, and veterinary medicine students may be offered low interest, 
long-term loans; they may also receive an employment award under the College Work-Study 
program. 

Additional information on financial aid is available in the Graduate Programs catalog and 
the College of Law catalog. 

Transfer, Incoming Graduate, Readmitted Students 

Transfer and graduate students and students who have been readmitted to the University and 
wish to apply for financial aid must provide financial aid transcripts for each institution they 
have attended. Even students who have not received aid previously must provide this information 
before being considered for future assistance. Forms can be obtained from the Office of 
Student Financial Aid. 
Independent Students 

Applicants who want to apply as independent students must indicate on either the Family 
Financial Statement or the Financial Aid Form the conditions under which they qualify. Further 
documentation may be requested by the Office of Student Financial Aid. 

How to Obtain Need Analysis Documents 

The Family Financial Statement or Financial Aid Form is available from high school and 
community college counselors. The need analysis document, additional financial aid information, 
and an optional Supplemental Scholarship Information Form are in applications packets available 
from the Office of Student Financial Aid, Fourth Floor, Fred H. Turner Student Services 
Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

Application Dates 

Students seeking financial assistance through the University are encouraged to apply early. 
When forms become available, they should be submitted for the next academic year as soon 
after January 1 as possible. 

The deadline date for first priority processing and equal consideration of financial aid 
applications is mid-March, prior to the academic year for which aid is desired. 

Applications completed after mid-March will be considered according to the availability of 
funds. 

SOURCES OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 

Several types of financial aid are available. Since the University's funds are limited, students 
should seek assistance provided by national, state, and local organizations. A few awards are 
made on the basis of scholastic achievement, while others carry different or additional criteria. 

Scholarships 

Most scholarships require high scholastic achievement, but financial need is an additional 
criterion. Students do not apply for a specific scholarship. Recipients are determined from 
information supplied by all aid applicants on the FFS ( or FAF) and the Supplemental Scholarship 
Information Form in order to distribute funds as extensively and equitably as possible. 

In addition to scholarships administered by the Office of Student Financial Aid, numerous 
agencies, organizations, and businesses provide funds to students in specific curricula. These 
outside agencies, organizations, and businesses contact individual departments or units for 
nominations of potentially eligible recipients. Students may wish to contact the departments 
in which they are enrolled or have been accepted for admission for further information. 



FINANCIAL AID 61 



Federal and State Grant Programs 

PELL GRANT 

A major source of financial assistance for undergraduate students at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus is the federally funded Pell Grant program. Awards ranged from $200 to $2,100 in 
the 1986-8" academic year. 

As indicated in The Application Process section (see page 59), the Pell Grant Student Aid 
Report is an integral part of financial aid awarded at Urbana-Champaign. While Pell Grant 
eligibility does not determine eligibility for other financial aid, students must demonstrate that 
they have applied for federal funds before receiving assistance from the University's more 
limited resources. 

ILLINOIS STATE SCHOLARSHIP COMMISSION (ISSC) MONETARY AWARD 

The Illinois State Scholarship Commission monetary award is another major source of grant 
assistance to undergraduate Illinois residents attending colleges and universities in the state. 
Ranging from $200 to $2,200 to be applied toward tuition and fee charges, this award is 
granted on the basis of demonstrated financial need. 

Note: The ISSC also administers a State Scholar Program which recognizes scholastic achieve- 
ment. It is not necessary for a student to be named a State Scholar to be eligible for a monetary 
award, nor does receiving such recognition guarantee eligibility for a monetary award. 

However, the Merit Recognition Scholarship provides a $500 award to each student in the 
top 10 percent of his or her graduating class. The scholarship is awarded for the freshman 
year of study and is renewable at the sophomore level. 

A recently established fund, the Congressional Teacher Scholarship Program, provides awards 
of varying amounts for students enrolled full time in teacher education curricula. Recipients 
must have graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school classes. 

Grants Awarded by the Student Financial Aid Office 

Awards from two grant programs are made by the Office of Student Financial Aid staff at 
Urbana-Champaign. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) is a federally funded grant program 
distinct from the Pell Grant (above). The federal government annually provides postsecondary 
institutions with allocations from which awards are made. The maximum amount a student 
may receive during an academic year is $2,000. At Urbana-Champaign during 1986-87, awards 
ranged from $200 to $1,500. 

Students for Equal Access to Learning (SEAL) grant is a program funded jointly by voluntary 
student contributions and matching funds provided by the state through the Illinois State 
Scholarship Commission. Students at Urbana-Champaign initiated this program by referendum 
in 1970 and have reaffirmed it every four years since. SEAL grants are awarded in accordance 
with rules prescribed by the Illinois State Scholarship Commission. During academic year 1986- 
87, SEAL awards ranged from $200 to $1,000. 

Students do not apply directly for either of these grants. Recipients are selected from those 
who have completed the need analysis document and applied to required state and federal 
programs. (See The Application Process, page 59.) 

EMPLOYMENT: A FORM OF SELF-HELP FINANCIAL AID 

The Office of Student Financial Aid provides assistance to any University student seeking part- 
time work. Staff counselors will assist students even if they have not applied for University- 
administered aid. Employment counseling is available from 9:00 a.m. to noon and from 1:00 
to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, except on all-campus holidays. 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign employs several thousand part-time student 
workers in offices, libraries, laboratories, farms, and food service units; each year, these student 
employees earn more than $7.5 million. In addition, many students work in the community. 

Hourly wages for student workers vary according to the type of work and responsibility 
involved. Most jobs require from ten to twenty hours of work per week. Earnings can 
approximate 20 to 30 percent of a student's college expenses. 

Students in curricula in which laboratory periods occupy most of the daytime hours generally 



62 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



find food service work at mealtimes, or temporary odd jobs before or after regular University 
hours, are most convenient. Students in other curricula, by arranging class schedules to have 
consecutive hours free each day for working, may improve their employment opportunities. 
Job opportunities requiring advanced skills, knowledge, or experience offer excellent pan-time, 
career-related opportunities to University students. 

Campus Employment: College Work-Study 

The University of Illinois participates in College Work-Study (CWS), a federal financial aid 
program that helps colleges and universities provide jobs for students. To participate in the 
College Work-Study program, a student must receive a CWS award as pan of a financial aid 
offer from the Office of Student Financial Aid. 

As with other awards made by the Office of Student Financial Aid, a student does not apply 
specifically for College Work-Study assistance. All aid applicants receive consideration for 
College Work-Study awards as well as for scholarships, grants, and loans. 

A College Work-Study recipient must check with the Office of Student Financial Aid to 
obtain assistance in job placement. This should be done at the beginning of the academic 
term. 

Most students in the CWS program work on campus. 

Student Employment on Campus and in the Community 

Most students who work during the school term do not secure jobs through the College 
Work-Study program. Without a financial aid award, students who wish to work part-time 
may apply for positions through regular University employment (on-campus jobs) or through 
the Job Development Program (off-campus jobs in the Champaign-Urbana area). 

STUDENT LOANS: ANOTHER FORM OF SELF-HELP ASSISTANCE 
Low-Interest Loans Awarded by the University 

The Office of Student Financial Aid offers loans to students who demonstrate financial need. 
All applicants for University aid are considered for University-funded long-term loans, but a 
student does not apply for a specific loan fund. The Office of Student Financial Aid, acting 
for the University of Illinois as lender, determines who is eligible and the source and amount 
of the loan. 

These loans normally carry an interest rate of 5 percent, and repayment is deferred until 
after the borrower ceases to be at least a half-time student. 

Besides the University of Illinois Long-Term Loan program, Urbana-Champaign students also 
participate in the federally funded Perkins Loan Program (formerly National Direct Student 
Loan). These loans carry a 5 percent interest rate, and payment is deferred until nine months 
after the borrower ceases to be a full-time student. Health Professions Student Loans, available 
to veterinary medicine students, carry a 9 percent interest rate with repayment beginning 12 
months after the borrower leaves school. 

Guaranteed Student Loan Program 

For students attending college at least half-time, the federal government has encouraged state 
governments to operate guaranteed long-term loan programs in conjunction with commercial 
lenders. This encouragement is an interest subsidy: the federal government pays the interest to 
the lender until the borrower must begin to repay the loan. In addition, the government pays 
a supplemental subsidy to match the prevailing interest rate of conventional loans. 

While the federal government, the state, and private corporations subsidize and guarantee 
these loan programs, the student obtains the loan from a participating lending institution — 
bank, savings and loan association, or credit union. A student should contact the lending 
institution for additional information and a loan application. 

General Terms of Long-Term Loan Programs 

Students who contemplate borrowing money for educational purposes should consider carefully 
the general terms and repayment requirements of the loan programs listed below. For specific 
terms pertaining to any loan program, a borrower always should read the conditions which 



FINANCIAL AID 63 



appear on the promissory note and question any provisions that seem unclear. Note: The 
interest rates and minimum repayment amounts for all loan programs indicated below were 
the prevailing figures at the time of publication. When obtaining any loan, a borrower should 
be aware of the interest being charged and the repayment requirements at the time of signing 
a repayment note. 

PERKINS LOANS (NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOAN) 

Aggregate maximum: $9,000 for undergraduates. 

Interest rate: 5 percent per year simple interest on the unpaid principal balance; begins with 

the first repayment. 

Forgiveness: In some cases. Contact the Student Loan Office, 125 Administration Building. 

Begtn repayment: Nine months after ceasing to be at least a half-time student. 

Deferments: Up to three years for military service, Peace Corps, Vista, and for period of return 

to full-time student status; contact the Student Loan Office for other possible deferment 

categories. 

Minimum repayment: S30 plus interest per month or amount needed to repay principal and 

interest in ten years. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LONG-TERM LOAN 

Aggregate maximum: $6,000 for undergraduates. 

Interest rate: 5 percent per year simple interest on the unpaid principal balance, with some 

exceptions; begins with first repayment. 

Forgiveness: None; cosigner required. 

Begin repayment: Six months after ceasing to be at least a half-time student. 

Deferments: By arrangement with the Student Loan Office, 125 Administration Building. 

Minimum repayment: $30 plus interest per month or amount needed to repay principal and 

interest in ten years. 

GUARANTEED STUDENT LOANS 

Illinois Guaranteed Loan; United Student Aid Fund Loan; Higher Education Assistance 

Foundation; other state-guaranteed loan programs. 

Aggregate maximum: Ranges from $17,250 for undergraduate students to $54,750 for graduate 

students including amount borrowed for undergraduate work. 

Interest rate: 8 or 9 percent per year simple interest on the unpaid principal balance; begins 

with first repayment; rate is currently 8 percent for students who have not borrowed previously. 

Forgiveness: None. 

Begin repayment: Varies; usually six months after ceasing to be at least a half-time student 

Deferments: Vary; usually up to three years for military service, Vista, Peace Corps, and for 

period of return to full-time student status. 

Minimum repayment: Varies; usually $50 per month plus interest or amount required to repay 

principal and interest in ten years. The Illinois Guaranteed Loan must be repaid on a five-year 

repayment schedule, but, at the lender's discretion, an additional five-year extension may be 

granted. 

SUPPLEMENTAL LOANS TO STUDENTS AND PARENTS 

Two other loan programs are available directly from a lending institution such as a bank, 
savings and loan association, or credit union. 

For dependent undergraduate students, parents or legal guardians may obtain up to $4,000 
per academic year. The maximum aggregate that can be borrowed for each undergraduate 
student is $20,000. Interest varies and begins to accrue as soon as the loan is obtained with 
repayment beginning within 60 days. 

For independent students, another supplemental loan program is available. Undergraduate 
students may borrow up to $3,000 per academic year up to an aggregate of $15,000 which 
includes any Guaranteed Student Loans undergraduate borrowers may have. 

Graduate and professional students may borrow up to $4,000 per academic year up to an 
aggregate of $20,000. For graduate and professional students, the aggregate maximum does 
not include any Guaranteed Student Loans borrowed. 

Interest begins to accrue as soon as the loan is obtained and is payable during the deferment 



64 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



period, but student borrowers may have repayments on the principal deferred until 30 days 
after leaving school permanently. 

More information, including repayment provisions and schedules, is available from lending 
institutions. 

Approximate Monthly Payments Required by Loan Programs 

Monthly repayment schedules under various loan programs are somewhat comparable; variances 
occur depending upon the length of time allowed to repay the entire loan amount and the 
interest charged. The monthly payments given below are approximations to help potential 
borrowers estimate the monthly obligation they will incur should they participate in a particular 
loan program. 

PERKINS LOANS; UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LONG-TERM LOAN 

A borrower has up to ten years to repay either of these loans, with a minimum monthly 
repayment of $30 plus 5 percent per year simple interest. A student borrowing $5,000 and 
taking the full 120 months to repay the loan would make monthly payments of $42 plus 
interest. Since interest is charged only on the unpaid balance, the first payment of $62.83 
(including principal and interest) is the highest amount scheduled to be charged in any month. 

ILLINOIS GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM; HIGHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE 
FOUNDATION; UNITED STUDENT AID FUND LOAN PROGRAM; OTHER STATE 
GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAMS 

Each of these loan programs carries a simple interest rate of 8 or 9 percent per year. Under 
the Illinois Guaranteed Loan Program, the borrower has up to five years to repay the loan, 
but at the lender's discretion, an extension of up to a total of ten years may be granted. Other 
programs also allow the borrower up to ten years to repay with a minimum monthly payment 
of $50. A student borrowing $5,000 and taking sixty months to repay an Illinois Guaranteed 
Loan would make monthly payments of $103 including interest; a student borrowing $10,000 
and paying over sixty months would repay at $207 per month including interest. 

Emergency Short-Term and Intermediate Loans 

In emergencies, to meet educational expenses, students may borrow up to $100 for up to sixty 
days or until the last day of instruction for the semester, whichever comes first. In order to 
make more money available to a maximum number of students, applicants should borrow as 
little as is necessary for as short a period of time as possible. A service fee of $2 is charged 
for short-term loans. There is a 12 percent interest charge on overdue loans. 

Intermediate loans in amounts not to exceed $200 may be made, if funds are available, to 
help meet the special financial needs of students who can demonstrate evidence of interrupted 
cash flow during an academic year and who can also demonstrate evidence of being able to 
completely repay the loan during the semester. A service charge of $6 is charged for intermediate 
loans. There is a 12 percent interest charge on overdue loans. 

A special provision permits graduating seniors and graduate students to borrow up to $250 
to meet expenses for employment interviews. An applicant must show evidence that the 
prospective employer will reimburse the recipient for such expenses. 

Students who are U.S. citizens should apply in person to the Dean of Students Office, 130 
Fred H. Turner Student Services Building. International students (noncitizens who are not in 
the United States as permanent residents) should contact the Office of International Student 
Affairs, for information. 

Loan Repayment: Whose Responsibility? 

Any recipient of a student loan, except for the Supplemental Loan for Parents, must recognize 
that such a loan is a debt incurred by the student, not the parents. The responsibility for 
understanding the conditions and regulations of the loan process, as well as the repayment 
schedule, rests with the student borrower. Additional information on the Perkins Loans program 
or the University Long-Term Loan program as well as loan indebtedness is available in the 
Office of Student Financial Aid. Applications and additional information on guaranteed loan 
programs are available from lending institutions. Emergency short-term and intermediate loan 



FINANCIAL AID 65 



information in available in the Dean of Students Office, 130 Fred H. Turner Student Services 

Building. 

SPECIALIZED AID PROGRAMS 

Although most financial aid award guidelines for Urbana-Champaign students are determined 
by the Office of Student Financial Aid, some aid programs are administered by groups or 
agencies to which the student applies directly. These are in addition to the two major grant 
programs described earlier: Pell Grant and Illinois State Scholarship Commission monetary 
award. 

Programs for Veterans 

ILLINOIS VETERANS SCHOLARSHIPS 

An Illinois statute provides a scholarship for each veteran who has served honorably in the 
armed forces of the United States, provided certain eligibility requirements are met. 
Value: The cost of resident tuition and fees for a period of time that is equivalent to four 
calendar years of full-time enrollment, including summer terms. For information regarding 
eligibility duration, students should contact the Office of Student Financial Aid. Undergraduate 
veterans should apply first for Illinois State Scholarship Commission monetary awards that can 
pay fees as well as tuition (see page 61). 

Scope: Any state-supported college, university, or Class 1 community college in Illinois. 
Eligibility: A veteran who served in the armed forces; was discharged after August 11, 1967; 
and had at least one year of active service. He or she must have been honorably discharged 
(or separated) from such service or received a discharge for medical reasons directly connected 
with active service. 

Upon entering active service, he or she must have been a resident of Illinois or a student at 
one of the state-supported colleges, universities, or Class 1 community colleges in Illinois. 

In addition to one of the requirements above, the veteran must have returned to Illinois 
within six months after leaving the armed forces. Former Illinois residents who left the state 
prior to entering the service should contact the Office of Student Financial Aid regarding their 
possible eligibility. 

Members currently serving in the armed forces also are entitled to an Illinois Veterans 
Scholarship provided they have served at least one year and would be qualified for the 
scholarship if discharged. 
How to Apply: Contact the Office of Student Financial Aid. 

OTHER VETERANS EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS 

Students seeking information regarding veterans' educational benefits should contact the veterans 
affairs staff in the Office of Student Financial Aid, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
Fourth floor, Fred H. Turner Student Services Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 
61820. 

Other Specialized Scholarship and Grant Programs 

TUITION WAIVERS 

Several of the following scholarship programs provide tuition waivers or cover tuition costs. 
Note: A full Illinois State Scholarship Commission monetary award covers both tuition and 
fees. 

ATHLETIC GRANTS-IN-AID 

Certain fields of athletic activity have been approved for grants-in-aid. These fields are baseball, 
basketball, cross-country, football, golf, gymnastics, swimming, tennis, track, and volleyball. 
Application should be made to the Director of Athletics, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 112 Assembly Hall, 1802 South First Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

FRED S. BAILEY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Value: Varies. 

Scope: Applicable only to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 



66 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Eligibility: Men and women students in any program of study are eligible to apply. Awards 
are based on financial need, character, and superior scholarship. 

How to Apply: Contact the University Young Men's Christian Association, 1001 South Wright 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

AVERY BRUNDAGE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Avery Brundage, honorary president of the International Olympic Committee and an alumnus 

of the University, established this fund to recognize and assist University of Illinois students 

who are both academically gifted and exceptional amateur athletes. 

Value: Can vary; $1,100 to each recipient in 1986-87; available to graduate and undergraduate 

students; renewable. 

Scope: May be used at either of the two campuses of the University of Illinois. 

Eligibility: Selection made by a University committee; judged on the basis of scholastic records, 

participation in amateur athletics, and personal recommendation. 

How to Apply: Obtain applications from the Office of Student Financial Aid. Applications 

become available by mid-November and must be submitted by the end of February for the 

next academic year. 

CHILDREN OF VETERANS SCHOLARSHIPS 

The University of Illinois may award three scholarships per year in each county: one to a child 

of a veteran of World War II; one to a child of a veteran who served at any time during the 

Korean conflict between June 25, 1950, and January 31, 1955; and one to a child of a veteran 

who served at any time during the Vietnam conflict between January 1, 1961, and May 7, 

1975. 

Value: Waiver of tuition (but not fees) for four years. Applicants with financial need also should 

apply for the Illinois State Scholarship Commission monetary award which can cover fees as 

well as tuition (see page 61). 

Scope: May be used in any course of study at either of the two campuses of the University 

of Illinois. 

Eligibility: Candidate and veteran parent must be residents of Illinois and of the county where 

the application is made. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of ACT scores with preference 

given to candidates whose veteran parent is deceased or disabled. Children of veterans may 

compete even if they have completed college work at the University of Illinois or any other 

college. 

How to Apply: Applications are available from the Office of Student Financial Aid or 

superintendents of Educational Service Regions October 1 through March 15 for the next 

academic year. 

GENERAL ASSEMBLY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Value: Waiver of tuition (but not fees) for varying continuous periods of time, not to exceed 

four years. 

Scope: Each member of the General Assembly of Illinois may award one to four scholarships 

each year applicable only to the University of Illinois and one to four each year applicable to 

any other state-supported college or university. 

Eligibility: Recipient must reside in the district represented by the nominating legislator. 

How to Apply: Contact a member of the General Assembly who represents the district in 

which you reside. 

ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS 

Value: Cost of resident tuition and fees for one semester. Renewable. 

Scope: May be used at any Illinois public or private institution. Part-time and full-time students 

eligible. 

Eligibility: Teacher Shortage Scholarship: Must train in areas of teacher shortage and take a 

teaching position after program completion. Women and Minorities in Administration: Must 

train in approved administrative certification programs. Program available to women, blacks, 

Hispanics, Asian Americans, American Indians and Alaskan Natives. 

How to Apply: Applications available from the Office of Student Financial Aid. 



FINANCIAL AID 67 



ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN AND FAMILY SERVICES ASSISTANCE 

Value: Cost of resident tuition and fees for four years. The department also will provide 

maintenance and payment of school expenses to supplement the student's earnings and other 

resources. 

Scope: Any state-supported college or university in Illinois. Only the maintenance allowance 

can be furnished if the student attends a private institution. 

Eligibility: Recipients must be under the guardianship of the Illinois Department of Children 

and Family Services. 

How to Apply: Contact local caseworker or Illinois Department of Children and Family 

Services, One North Old State Capitol Plaza, Springfield, IL 62706. 

ILLINOIS NATIONAL GUARD/NAVAL MILITIA SCHOLARSHIPS 

Value: Cost of tuition for not more than the equivalent of four years of full-time enrollment. 

Scope: Can be used at any state-supported university or community college in Illinois. 

Eligibility: Must currently be an enlisted member or officer — captain or below — who has 

served for at least one year in the Illinois National Guard/Naval Militia prior to receiving 

educational benefits. 

How to Apply: Obtain application from any Illinois National Guard Armory or Naval Militia 

Unit, Office of Student Financial Aid, or the Illinois State Scholarship Commission. Return 

completed application to the Illinois State Scholarship Commission, 106 Wilmot Road, Deerfield, 

IL 60015. 

ILLINOIS RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS SCHOLARSHIPS 

Value: Waiver of cost of resident tuition (but not fees) while the recipient is enrolled in an 

ROTC program. 

Scope: May be used in any course of study at any state-supported college or university in 

Illinois which offers one or more ROTC programs. 

Eligibility: Must be an Illinois resident; enrolled in a university or college; and in the Army, 

Navy, or Air Force ROTC. Students may apply after a minimum of one semester of ROTC. 

If awarded, scholarships are retroactive to the beginning of the school year. Students may 

enter from an Illinois community college and must have completed all possible work at the 

community college. 

Obligation: Military obligation is not incurred by acceptance of this scholarship at the freshman 

and sophomore levels. 

How to Apply: Application forms are available at each ROTC unit. (See also the Army, Navy, 

and Air Force Reserve Officers' Training Corps sections in this catalog for federal scholarship 

opportunities.) 

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION SERVICES 

Value: Vanes; based on need. Time covered varies according to individual needs and program 

requirements. 

Scope: May be used at any postsecondary school. 

Eligibility: Recipient must have a disability that is a handicap to employment. 

How to Apply: Illinois residents should contact the State of Illinois Department of Vocational 

Rehabilitation, 1207 South Oak, Room 102, Champaign, IL 61820. Students from other states 

should contact their state Department of Rehabilitation Services. 

SPECIAL TEACHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE 

Value: Waiver of resident tuition (but not fees) for four calendar years. 

Scope: May be used at any Illinois state-supported college or university. Two hundred fifty 

scholarships are awarded at large throughout the state each year. 

Eligibility: Candidate must be a recent graduate of an Illinois high school in the upper half of 

his or her graduating class or must hold a valid Illinois Teacher's Certificate. 

Obligation: Recipient must agree to take courses in preparation for teaching and, upon 

graduation or termination of enrollment, teach in a recognized public, private, or parochial 

school in Illinois for at least two of the five years immediately following graduation or 

termination. 

How to Apply: Recent high school graduates should contact their high school principal. 



68 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Holders of an Illinois Teacher's Certificate may obtain further information and applications 
from their local superintendent of Educational Service Region. 

VERDELL FRAZIER YOUNG AWARDS 

Value: Varies; most awards range from $100 to $500. 

Scope: Applicable only to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Eligibility: For women who have experienced an interruption in their academic careers; 

preference to those with an interruption of at least two years. 

How to Apply: Contact the Office for Women's Resources and Services, 346 Fred H. Turner 

Student Services Building, 610 East John Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS 

Many scholarship programs operate independently of any college or university, and recipients 
usually are free to attend the schools of their choice. 

Each year University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign undergraduates receive approximately 
SlVi million in such awards. College and University department heads can provide information 
on awards relating to a particular course of study. In addition, high school and community 
college counselors can advise students of various scholarship programs and can suggest 
publications that describe financial aid programs and application procedures. 



Grading System and 
Other Regulations 



GRADING SYSTEM 69 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 71 

TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 71 

STUDENT RECORDS POLICY 72 

FALSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS 72 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 72 

STUDENTS IN DEBT TO THE UNIVERSITY 73 

AUTOMOBILES, MOTORCYCLES, MOTOR SCOOTERS, 

MOTOR-DRIVEN BICYCLES, AND BICYCLES 73 



Academic, administrative, and conduct regulations are published in the Code on Campus 
Affairs and Regulations Applying to All Students. Students are responsible for complying with 
these regulations of the University, and those of the colleges and departments from which they 
take courses. This publication is available to students during on-campus registration, at the 
campus Student Assistance Center in the Fred H. Turner Student Services Building, in 177 
Administration Building, and at the Post-Registration Service Center in the Illini Union. A copy 
may also be obtained by writing to the Office of Admissions and Records. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

Faculty members have the responsibility to provide the University with an individual evaluation 
of the work of each student in their classes. Final course grades are entered on the student's 
permanent University record at the close of each semester, term, or session. The University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign uses the following grading system. 

Courses in All Colleges Except the College of Law 

A = excellent; B = good; C = fair; D = poor (lowest passing grade); E = failure, including 
courses dropped for academic irregularities; Ab = absent from the final examination without 
an acceptable excuse (counts as a failure). If a student is absent from a final examination and 
it is clear that taking that examination could not have resulted in a passing grade for the 
course, a grade of E may be given instead of Ab. Plus and minus signs are not authorized with 
these grades. In addition to the above grades, instructors in the College of Law are authorized 
to assign grades of B+ and C+. 

Computation of Scholastic Averages 

For numerical computation of scholastic averages, the following values are designated: A = 
5.0; B+ = 4.5; B = 4.0; C+ = 3.5; C = 3.0; D = 2.0; E and Ab = 1.0. 

UNIFORM METHOD FOR CALCULATION 

A uniform method for calculating undergraduate grade-point averages has been established for 
all undergraduate colleges on the Urbana-Champaign campus. These averages are calculated 
on the basis of all courses attempted for which grades and credits are assigned and which 
carry credit in accordance with the Courses Catalog. Since courses offered by the religious 
foundations on or near the Urbana-Champaign campus are not official University courses and 
are not included in the Courses Catalog, the grades earned in such courses will not be included 
in the calculation of any grade-point averages. Grades of S, U, CR, NC, and Pass are reported 
on the official University transcript but are not included in the grade-point averages since grade- 
points are not assigned to these letter grades. This method of calculation is used to determine 



70 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



honors, probation and drop status, financial aid and scholastic awards, and transfer between 
colleges on this campus. 

For the purpose of computing a grade-point average for graduation, only the grades received 
in those courses counting toward the degree, including grades in repeated courses, are included 
in the average. (See Grade-Point Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree on page 76.) 

For the special method used to determine eligibility for transfer into the University, refer to 
the transfer admission policy on page 21. 

Other Symbols in Use (Not Included in Computation of Averages) 

W — Approved withdrawal without credit. 

EX — Temporarily excused. Approved extension of time to complete the final examination 
or other requirements of the course. Applies to both undergraduate and graduate 
students. Entitles the student to an examination later without fee, or additional time 
to complete other requirements of the course. 

Only the dean of the student's college may authorize such an extension of time in 
individual cases. A grade of EX which is not removed by the end of the first eight 
weeks of instruction in the next semester in which the student is enrolled in an 
undergraduate college on the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University automat- 
ically becomes a grade of E. If the student receiving an excused grade does not 
reenroll on the Urbana-Champaign campus, the excused grade, if not removed, 
becomes an E after one calendar year. 

CR — Credit earned. To be used only in courses taken under the credit-no credit grading 
option. (Instructors report the usual letter grades. Grades of A, B, and C will 
automatically be converted to CR.) 
IP — Course in progress. 
MISS — Missing grade. Instructor has failed to submit a grade for the student. 

NC — No credit earned. To be used only in courses taken under the credit-no credit grading 
option. (Instructors report the usual letter grades. Grades of D, E, or Ab will 
automatically be converted to NC.) 

DF — Grade temporarily deferred. To be used only in those thesis, research, and special 
problems courses extending over more than one semester which are taken by graduate 
students as preparation for the thesis and by undergraduate students in satisfaction 
of the requirements for graduation with honors, and in other approved courses which 
extend over more than one semester. 

Requests for use of the DF grade in courses which extend over more than one 
semester, and therefore require postponement of the final grade report, must be 
submitted in writing by the executive officer of the department offering the course 
to the dean of the appropriate college for concurrence. A current list of courses 
which have received such approval is maintained in the Office of Admissions and 
Records. 
S — Satisfactory, and 

U — Unsatisfactory. To be used only as final grades in graduate thesis research courses, in 
graduate and undergraduate courses given for zero credit, and in other courses which 
have been specifically approved by the head or the chairperson of the department 
concerned, with concurrence of the appropriate college dean. A current list of courses 
that have received such approval is maintained in the Office of Admissions and 
Records. 
PASS — To be used only in courses passed by special or proficiency examinations. A minimum 
grade of C is required to pass. 

Credit-No Credit Grading Option 

This credit-no credit grading option is designed to encourage student exploration into areas 
of academic interest which they might otherwise avoid for fear of poor grades. All students 
considering this option are cautioned that many graduate and professional schools consider 
applicants whose transcripts bear a significant number of nongrade symbols less favorably than 
those whose transcripts contain none or very few. Likewise, in computing a preadmission 



GRADING SYSTEM AND OTHER REGULATIONS 71 



grade-point average, some of these schools may convert the NC symbol to a failing grade 
since they do not know whether the actual grade was a D, E, or Ab. 

A full-time undergraduate student in good academic standing (not on probation) may, with 
the approval of his or her adviser, take a maximum of two courses each semester under the 
credit-no credit grading option. Part-time students may take one course each semester under 
this option. Summer session students may take one course under the credit-no credit option. 

A maximum of 18 semester hours earned under the credit-no credit grading option may be 
applied toward a baccalaureate degree at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University. A 
correspondence course taken on a credit-no credit basis will be included in the 18 semester 
hour maximum credit-no credit limit allowed. 

Any lower or upper division course may be chosen under the credit-no credit option except 
courses used to satisfy the University's general education requirements, or in courses designated 
by name or area by the major department for satisfying the major or field of concentration, 
or those specifically required by name by the college for graduation. In cases of subsequent 
change of major or field of concentration, courses previously taken under the credit-no credit 
option in the new field may qualify for meeting major requirements. 

Undergraduate students must exercise the credit-no credit option for a course taken in 
residence only during on-campus registration, within the first eight weeks of instruction in a 
semester, during the first four weeks of an eight-week course taught in a fall or spring semester, 
or during registration or within the first four weeks of instruction during the summer session. 
Students may elect to return to the regular grade option by filing an amended request within 
the first eight weeks of instruction in a semester, within the first four weeks of instruction in 
an eight-week course taught during a semester, or within the first four weeks of instruction 
during the summer session. The credit-no credit option form must be properly approved and 
deposited in the college office. 

Instructors are not informed of those students in their classes who are taking work under 
the credit-no credit option, and they report the usual letter grades at the end of the course. 
These grades are automatically converted to CR or NC. Grades of C or better are required in 
order to earn credit. Credit-no credit courses are not counted toward the grade-point average 
but are included as part of the total credit hours. Final grades of CR or NC (for credit or no 
credit) are recorded on the student's permanent academic record and subsequently will not be 
changed to letter grades. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Classification of undergraduate students is made by the Office of Admissions and Records 
based upon the number of credit hours earned. Classification for registration, certification, and 
assessment purposes is based on the following scale: 

Freshman standing 0-29.9 hours 

Sophomore standing 30-59.9 hours 

Junior standing 60-89.9 hours 

Senior standing 90 or more hours 

TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORDS 

Former and currently enrolled students who have paid their University charges are entitled to 
receive, upon written request, a transcript of their academic records. Upon graduation or 
withdrawal from the University, students with outstanding loans are not issued a transcript 
until they have completed an exit interview with the Office of Business Affairs. Each transcript 
includes a student's entire academic record to date and current academic status. Partial 
transcripts are not issued. 

The charge for transcripts is $2 per copy. For written certification of attendance, degrees, 
or other data, the charge is $1 per copy. For same-day service, available only if requested in 
person, S5 is charged for the first transcript or certification and the regular fee for extra copies 
ordered at the same time. 

No charge is made if the request for a transcript is accompanied by a Teacher's Certification 
form. Transcripts of records for purposes of admission to the University of Illinois at Chicago 
are issued without charge. 

Telephone requests for transcripts cannot be honored. Transcripts are released only by 



72 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



written request to whomever students or former students designate. Written requests accom- 
panied by a check or money order made payable to the University of Illinois should be sent 
to the Office of Admissions and Records (see the inside back cover for address information). 

STUDENT RECORDS POLICY 

It is University policy to comply fully with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1974 as amended. Guidelines and regulations for discharge of the University's obligation under 
this act are contained in the Code on Campus Affairs and Regulations Applying to All 
Students, which is available to students at 177 Administration Building and by request from 
the Office of Admissions and Records. 
Under these guidelines: 

— Students have the right to inspect their educational records. 

— Certain student records may be released only with the prior consent of the student. 

— Certain student records can be released with or without the student's consent. 

— Under certain conditions, parents may be granted access to a student's record with or 
without the student's consent. 

— Procedures exist for students to challenge the contents of their educational records. 

— The University may release without the student's consent information that appears in student 
directories and publications which are available to the public except when requested by a 
student to suppress this information. Forms for suppressing this information are available 
during on-campus registration and at the Post-Registration Service Center in the Illini Union. 
They must be completed within the first five days of classes in a semester. Each request 
will be in force until the first day of classes of the following semester. 

For currently enrolled students, directory information includes the student's name; addresses; 
telephone numbers; college, curriculum, and major field of study; class level; date of birth; 
dates of attendance and full- or part-time status; eligibility for membership in registered 
University honoraries; degrees, honors, and certificates received or anticipated; weight and 
height for athletic team members; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; 
and institutions previously attended. 

For former students, directory information includes the student's name; date of birth; last 
known addresses and telephone numbers; college, curriculum, and major field of study; dates 
of attendance and full- or part-time status; class level; honors; certificates or degrees earned 
at the University and the date(s) conferred; weight and height for athletic team members; 
participation in officially recognized activities and sports; and institutions previously attended. 

FALSIFICATION OF DOCUMENTS 

Any student who, for purposes of fraud or misrepresentation, falsifies, forges, defaces, alters, 
or mutilates in any manner any official University document or representation thereof may be 
subject to discipline. Some examples of official documents are identification cards, program 
request forms, receipts, transcripts of credits, library documents, etc. 

Any applicant who knowingly withholds information or gives false information on an 
application for admission or readmission may become ineligible for admission to the University 
or may be subject to discipline. 

Any student who knowingly withholds information or gives false information in any document 
or materials submitted to any member or agent of the University may be subject to discipline. 

IDENTIFICATION CARDS 

New students are issued a permanent photo identification card which is validated for every 
subsequent term in which they register; the I.D. card remains the property of the University. 
This I.D. card must be retained by students while they are registered at the University. Students 
who alter or intentionally mutilate a University I.D. card, who use the I.D. card of another, 
or who allow their own I.D. card to be used by another may be subject to discipline. 

A charge of $17, payable at the I.D. Center, Window 27, 100 Administration Building, is 
made for replacing each lost, mutilated, confiscated, or stolen photo I.D. card. A charge of $1 
is made for the replacement of each lost, mutilated, confiscated, or stolen I.D. validation label. 

An identification card for student spouses is available without cost at the I.D. Center. 



GRADING SYSTEM AND OTHER REGULATIONS 73 



STUDENTS IN DEBT TO THE UNIVERSITY 

A penalty of $10 is assessed tor each check students present to the University which is returned 
for insufficient funds or other reasons. Additional penalties, including dismissal from the 
University, may be imposed on students who permit their University accounts to become 
delinquent or who issue checks that are returned to the University unpaid. 

Students who are in debt ro the University at the end of any academic term may not be 
permitted to register in the University again. They are not entitled to receive their diplomas, 
official statements, or transcripts of credits until the indebtedness has been paid or suitable 
arrangements for payment have been made unless there are pending bankruptcy petitions of 
the students seeking a discharge of all such indebtedness or if all such indebtedness has been 
discharged. 

AUTOMOBILES, MOTORCYCLES, MOTOR SCOOTERS, 
MOTOR-DRIVEN BICYCLES, AND BICYCLES 

All students, their spouses, and dependent children with valid vehicle operator permits to 
operate automobiles, motorcycles, motor scooters, and motorbikes in Illinois may operate 
them on the Urbana-Champaign campus, provided they comply with University and state 
regulations. Public parking facilities are extremely limited near the campus. Unless students 
register their cars with the University, there is little opportunity for them to park near the 
campus when classes are in session or overnight. By registering their motor vehicles with the 
University ($5 fee per year), students may park or store their vehicles either in some University 
parking lots or on some University streets. Permits to park or store cars in University rental 
lots cost $24 per academic year. 

Bicycles provide the best transportation on campus since bike paths connect the major 
buildings on campus. All student bicycles must be registered; there is no fee for this registration. 

Information about the operation of motor vehicles and bicycles by students is available from 
the Division of Campus Parking, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 505 East Green 
Street, Champaign, IL 61820, telephone (217) 333-7217. 



Graduation Requirements 
and Honors 

BACHELOR'S DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES CONFERRED 74 

GRADE-POINT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 76 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 76 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 77 

ENGLISH REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION 78 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES 78 

RELIGIOUS FOUNDATION COURSES 78 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTRAMURAL COURSES 78 

THESES 79 

UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT FOR SERVICE AND EDUCATION 

IN THE ARMED FORCES 79 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 79 

UNIVERSITY HONORS 79 

PHI KAPPA PHI 80 

THE DEAN'S LIST 80 

BACHELOR'S DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES CONFERRED 

Candidates for a bachelor's degree must meet University requirements with respect to registration, 
residence, general education, English, and the minimum scholarship requirements of their 
college or division; must pass the subjects prescribed in their curriculum; and must conform 
to the requirements of that curriculum in regard to electives and the total number of hours 
required for graduation. 

The Senate Committee on Student Discipline has the right to withhold the conferral of a 
degree. When dismissal from the University is a possibility because of a disciplinary infraction, 
the conferral of the degree is withheld until the disciplinary action has been resolved. 

Bachelor's Degrees 

Baccalaureate degrees conferred at the Urbana-Champaign campus with the minimum number 
of hours required for graduation are listed below. 

Minimum 
Semester Hours 
Required for 
Undergraduate College Graduation 

College of Agriculture 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Agricultural Education (B.S. in Agriculture) 130 

Agriculture 1 26 

Food Industry 130 

Food Science 130 

Forestry 126 

Home Economics Education 130 

Human Resources and Family Studies 126 

Interior Design 120 

Ornamental Horticulture 130 

Restaurant Management 126 

Soil Science 126 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AND HONORS 75 



College of Applied Life Studies 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Health and Safety Studies 128 

Leisure Studies 126 

Physical Education 128 

College of Commerce and Business Administration 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Accountancy 124 

Business Administration 124 

Economics 124 

Finance 124 

College of Communications 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Advertising 124 

Journalism 124 

Media Studies 1 24 

College of Education 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Business Education 1 26 

Early Childhood Education 124 

Elementary Education 1 24 

Occupational and Practical Arts Education 128 

Secondary Education 120 

Special Education 1 24 

College of Engineering 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering 134 

Agricultural Engineering 128 

Ceramic Engineering 132 

Civil Engineering 129 

Computer Engineering 128 

Computer Science 122 

Electrical Engineering 128 

Engineering Mechanics 128 

Engineering Physics 128 

General Engineering 127 

Industrial Engineering 130 

Mechanical Engineering 130 

Metallurgical Engineering 128 

Nuclear Engineering 127 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) in 

Art Education 130 

Crafts 122 

Dance 1 30 

Graphic Design 122 

History of Art 122 

Industrial Design 1 22 

Painting 1 22 

Sculpture 1 22 

Theater 128 

Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (B.L.A.) 128 

Bachelor of Music (B.Mus.) 130 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Architectural Studies 127 

Music Education 130 

Bachelor of Arts in Urban Planning (B.A.U.P.) 120 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) in 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 120 

Teaching of English 128 

Teaching of French 1 20 

Teaching of German 1 20 

Teaching of Latin 120 

Teaching of Russian 1 23 

Teaching of Social Studies 120 

Teaching of Spanish 123 

Teaching of Speech 132 

Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in 

Biochemistry 120 



76 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Chemical Engineering 129 

Chemistry 120 

Geology 126 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 1 20 

Physics 1 26 

Speech and Hearing Science 128 

Teaching of Biology 125 

Teaching of Chemistry 130 

Teaching of Computer Science 1 20 

Teaching of Earth Science 131 

Teaching of Mathematics 120 

Teaching of Physics 132 

School of Social Work 

Bachelor of Social Work 120 

Certificates 

Certificates are conferred upon completion of each of the curricula listed below. Candidates 
for a certificate must meet the general requirements of the University with respect to registration 
and minimum scholarship requirements; successfully complete all prescribed subjects and special 
requirements for their curriculum; and conform to the requirement regarding electives and 
hours required for graduation. 

Semester Hours 
Required for 
Undergraduate Curriculum Certification 

Institute of Aviation 

Aircraft Systems 76 

Avionics 69 

Professional Pilot 65 

Combined Professional Pilot/Aircraft Systems 98 

GRADE-POINT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

All candidates for a degree must have at least a 3.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average on all 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign credits counted for graduation requirements and at 
least a 3.0 grade-point average on the combined transfer and University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign credits counted for graduation requirements. Certain colleges have established 
higher scholastic graduation requirements for specific curricula. (Grades in courses taken at the 
other campus of the University are counted as transferred.) 

Where a course has been repeated, both the original and subsequent grades are included in 
the average if the course is acceptable toward graduation, but the credit is counted only once. 
An original failing grade is not removed from the student's record for a course subsequently 
passed by special examination. 

Students who do not meet the requirements stated above may graduate if they have the 
minimum grade-point average calculated by either of the following alternate methods: 

— Exclude courses in which grades of D or E have been recorded not to exceed a total of 
10 semester hours completed prior to the last 30 hours of work completed at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and counted for graduation requirements, or, 

— A grade-point average of no less than 3.1 for the last 60 semester hours of work counted 
for graduation requirements and completed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
except in those curricula where a higher scholastic graduation requirement is specified. 

Each college office, on request, will inform students regarding the scholarship regulations of 
that college. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 
First Bachelor's Degree 

In addition to specifc courses and scholastic average requirements, each candidate for a 
bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must spend either the 
first three years earning not less than 90 semester hours or the last year (two semesters, or the 
equivalent) earning not less than 30 semester hours in residence at the Urbana-Champaign 
campus, uninterrupted by any work in another institution. Only those courses that are applicable 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AND HONORS 77 



toward dM degree sought may be counted in satisfying the above minimum requirement!. 

(Either three twelve-week terms or four eight-week sessions are the equivalent of two semesters. 

Concurrent attendance .it the University of Illinois at Urbana-( hampaign and another 
collegiate institution does not interrupt the residence requirement for graduation. 

C redit earned through the Advanced Placement Program is included in the first 90 semester 
hours and is not considered as interrupting residence. 

Credit allowed toward graduation for completion of courses of study offered by the religious 
foundations located in Urbana-Champaign is not counted as interrupting residence or counted 
toward satisfying minimum residence requirements for graduation. 

Attendance at another institution under the CIC Program or participation in the University 
of Illinois foreign study programs or the Study away from Campus Programs for which students 
are registered in Urbana-Champaign courses does not interrupt residence, and credits earned 
through these programs are counted as residence credit toward graduation, provided that 
within the last two years of study at least 30 semester hours have been earned in courses taken 
on the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

Transfer students from junior colleges must, after attaining junior standing, earn at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign or any other approved four-year institution at least 
60 semester hours acceptable toward their degree, in addition to meeting the usual residence 
requirement for a degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Students transferring from the University of Illinois at Chicago to Urbana-Champaign as 
candidates for degrees must satisfy the residence and academic requirements for graduation 
established for the curriculum entered on the Urbana-Champaign campus. Since the campuses 
do not have identical academic programs, students who are contemplating a transfer should 
consult with the college to which they expect to transfer. 

A student attending as a "visitor only" is not considered a "student in residence." 

A student who requests that the residence requirement for graduation be waived must submit 
a petition to the dean of his or her college, who will take action on the petition. 

A person who wishes to obtain a degree in a given semester but is not eligible to take 
courses that semester on the Urbana-Champaign campus without applying for readmission 
must apply to the director of admissions and records for readmission for the purpose of 
obtaining a degree. Students who are on drop status may not graduate until they have been 
readmitted to their college. 

Second Bachelor's Degree 

A student who has received one bachelor's degree may be permitted to receive a second 
bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign provided all specified 
requirements for both degrees are fully met and the curriculum offered for the second degree 
includes at least the final 30 semester hours which are earned in residence at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus and not counted for the other degree. 

The second bachelor's degree may be earned either concurrently with or subsequent to the 
first degree. 

Candidates for a second bachelor's degree must meet the same residence requirements as 
for the first degree. 

Only those courses that are acceptable toward the degree sought may be counted in satisfying 
the above minimum requirements. This includes the 30 additional hours required for the 
second degree. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

A minimum of 6 hours each in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences is 
required for graduation in all undergraduate curricula. Approved courses should be distributed 
over at least three years. Upon request, individual colleges will provide students with the 
general education requirements for their curriculum and the list of courses acceptable for this 
purpose. 



78 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ENGLISH REQUIREMENT FOR GRADUATION 

Satisfactory proficiency in the use of English is a requirement for all undergraduate degrees 
awarded at the Urbana-Champaign campus of the University. This proficiency can be certified 
by the satisfactory completion of a one-semester, 4-hour course of either Rhetoric 105 or 108 
or by the satisfactory completion of the two-semester, 6-hour sequence of Speech Commu- 
nication 111 and 112 (Verbal Communication). 

If the academic credentials of a transfer student do not indicate fulfillment of course work 
equivalent to the University of Illinois English graduation requirement, the student may be 
administered the English Placement Test (EPT) or the Transfer Writing Examination. 

Under certain conditions, students may satisfy the English requirement for graduation through 
satisfactory completion of courses offered by the Division of English as a Second Language 
(ESL). Satisfactory completion of ESL courses (ESL 114-ESL 115) satisfies the English graduation 
requirement. Evidence that a student is eligible to enroll in these courses is established by a 
satisfactory score on the English Placement Test, a test of oral and written English administered 
by the Division of English as a Second Language. On the basis of this test, the student will 
be enrolled in the course or courses appropriate to his or her English needs. 

If a student's score on the EPT is higher than the proficiency level of students in ESL 115, 
that student must take the Transfer Writing Examination offered by the Department of English. 

Those students whose deficiency in English requires that they take one or more of the ESL 
noncredit courses (ESL 109, ESL 110, and ESL 111) are not allowed to register for a full 
academic program and must complete their noncredit requirements before enrolling in the ESL 
114-115 sequence. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES 

Except as prohibited or limited by the established policy of the student's college, credit in 
University foreign language courses taken to remove high school entrance deficiencies may, at 
the discretion of the college, be counted in the total hours required for graduation and be 
accepted in partial or complete satisfaction of the foreign language requirement for the degree. 
Normally no more than 10 hours of proficiency credit for the study of a single foreign 
language at the elementary and intermediate level shall be counted for graduation in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Additional credit may be granted for advanced courses 
emphasizing literature and language structure rather than communicative competence in the 
language. 

RELIGIOUS FOUNDATION COURSES 

Courses of study offered by the religious foundations located in Urbana-Champaign that have 
been approved by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Committee on Courses and Curricula 
are accepted for credit by the University provided the student is currently registered in University 
courses. Registration in these courses is limited to students of sophomore standing or above 
who are currently registered on campus in University courses and must be approved in advance 
by the dean of the student's college. Grades in these courses are not included in the student's 
all-University scholastic average, and the courses are not counted as interrupting residence or 
toward satisfying minimum residence requirements for graduation. 

A maximum of 10 semester hours of credit in religious foundation courses may, with the 
approval of the dean of the college concerned, be counted toward graduation. 

The above credit limitations and other restrictions apply to religious foundation courses 
only and not to courses offered by the University of Illinois Program in Religious Studies. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTRAMURAL COURSES 

After matriculation, students may count toward their degree, with the approval of the dean 
of their college, as many as 60 semester hours of credit earned in extramural and/or 
correspondence study, provided: 

— They complete all the remaining requirements for the degree in residence at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, or 

— They present acceptable residence credit for work done elsewhere and complete the 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS AND HONORS 79 



requirement! needed fat their degree in residence at the University. In all cases, the senior 
year (two semesters ot not less than JO semester hours) must be done in residence at the 
Univexsit] ol Illinois at Urbana-( hampaign. 

Students who have completed their rirst three years in residence at the University of Illinois 
.it Urbana c hampaign, earning a minimum of 90 semester hours, may do all or part of their 
senior year in correspondence or extramural study, subject to meeting all the requirements for 
their degree. 

Credit for correspondence work taken with fully accredited institutions may be allowed, 
but only on approval of the dean of the student's college. 

THESES 

If a thesis is to be submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a bachelor's degree, 
the subject must be announced by the end of the sixth week of instruction in the first semester 
of the student's senior year. The work must be done under the direction of a professor in the 
department concerned and must be applicable to the curriculum in which a degree is expected. 
A maximum of 10 hours of credit in thesis work may be counted toward a bachelor's degree. 

UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT FOR SERVICE AND EDUCATION 
IN THE ARMED FORCES 

The University grants registered students college credit for certain training and experience in 
the armed forces of the United States. The student who completes military service in the U.S. 
Air Force, Army, Marine Corps, Navy, or Coast Guard, including basic or recruit training of 
six months or more, is awarded 4 semester hours credit in basic military science upon 
presentation of evidence on form DD-214 of honorable discharge or transfer to the reserve 
component. 

Correspondence courses for which the student has passed the end-of-course test or exami- 
nation prepared by the United States Armed Forces Institute that are baccalaureate-oriented 
and which correspond in level and content to courses offered at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign are recognized for credit. 

Credit recommendations in the Guide to the Evaluation of Education Experiences in the 
Armed Forces (published by the American Council on Education) for military service school 
training will be considered for transfer credit as follows: (1) credit will be granted for college- 
level baccalaureate-oriented training and education, (2) vocational credit related to the student's 
curriculum choice will be referred for consideration to the dean of the college in which the 
student is enrolled, and (3) duplicate credit will be deleted. Applicability of military credit 
toward a particular degree is determined by the dean of the college. Additional information 
may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Recognition for superior academic achievement is given by the University and by the colleges 
and departments. Honors activities are under the general supervision of the Office of Admissions 
and Records, affiliated with national and regional honors education organizations such as the 
National Collegiate Honors Council and the Honors Council for the Illinois Region. 

Each college, with the approval of the Urbana-Champaign Senate and the Board of Trustees, 
prescribes the conditions under which degree candidates may be recommended for graduation 
with honors. These distinctions are noted on the student's diploma, permanent University 
record, and official transcripts of credits. Detailed information concerning the requirements for 
graduation with honors is included in the sections of this catalog applying to the individual 
colleges and departments. 

UNIVERSITY HONORS 

Continuous academic achievement is recognized by inscribing the student's name on a Bronze 
Tablet that hangs on a wall of the Main Library. To qualify, undergraduate students must: 
— Have at least a 4.5 (A = 5.0) cumulative grade-point average for all work taken at the 
University through the academic term prior to their graduation, and 



80 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



— Rank, on the basis of their cumulative grade-point average (including UIUC and transfer 
work, if any) through the academic term prior to their graduation, in the top 3 percent of 
the students in their college graduating class. 

Transfer students, in addition to meeting the general rules for qualification, must satisfy two 
additional requirements: they must have cumulative University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
grade-point averages as high as the lowest ones listed for students in their college who qualify 
on the basis of having completed all of their work at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign; they must earn 40 or more semester hours at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign through the academic term prior to their graduation. 

For the purpose of this award, college graduating class means all students receiving bachelor's 
degrees from the same University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign college between July 1 of 
each year and June 30 of the next. 

For the purpose of this award, academic term prior to graduation means: for August 
graduates, the preceding spring semester; for October graduates, the preceding spring semester; 
for January graduates, the preceding summer session; for May graduates, the preceding fall 
semester. The list will be determined each year following the availability of grades for the fall 
semester. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

The national honor society of Phi Kappa Phi recognizes and encourages superior scholarship 
in all academic disciplines. To be eligible, juniors (72-89 letter-graded hours) must have a 
minimum cumulative grade-point average of 4.75 and a scholastic rank in the upper 5 percent 
of the junior class; seniors (90 or more graded hours) must have a minimum cumulative grade- 
point average of 4.5 and a scholastic rank in the upper 10 percent of the senior class. 

Invitations to membership are mailed to all eligible juniors and seniors and an initiation 
program is held near the end of each semester. 

THE DEAN'S LIST 

The names of undergraduates who have achieved a grade-point average for a given semester 
in the top 20 percent of their college class will be included on a list prepared for the dean of 
the college. (In the College of Fine and Applied Arts, the names of eligible undergraduates 
who have achieved a grade-point average for a given semester in the top 20 percent of all 
students in their curriculum will be listed.) This list is publicized within the University and is 
sent to news agencies throughout the state. Names of James Scholars are preceded by an 
ampersand (8c). 

To be eligible for Dean's List recognition, students must complete successfully 14 academic 
semester hours of which at least 12 must be taken for letter grade (A, B, C, D, E, Ab). Only 
grades in hand at the time the list is compiled will be considered in determining eligibility 
unless it can be established the final grade average will be above the minimum required 
regardless of the grade eventually received; students with EX, DF, or missing grades will be 
added as soon as letter grades are received and eligibility can be determined. Credits earned 
during the semester through proficiency, CLEP, and advanced placement examinations may not 
be counted toward the 14 semester hour requirement. 

Individual colleges may modify the above criteria, and interested students should contact 
their college offices for further information. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has different eligibility requirements that are given 
in detail in the LAS Student Handbook. 



Reserve Officers' Training Corps 

ARMY ROTC 81 

NAVAL ROTC 82 

AIR FORCE ROTC 84 

ARMY ROTC 

Military training has been given at the Urbana-Champaign campus since the University opened 
in 1868. Originally mandatory for all male undergraduates under the land-grant charter, the 
program became entirely voluntary in 1964. The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps is open 
to all university students, regardless of their academic major or level. 

Program Description 

The Army Reserve Officers' Training Corps is an elective program which provides adventure 
training, leadership experiences, and financial support to participating students. This is done 
through a consecutive series of elective courses, leadership laboratories, and field trips designed 
to prepare young men and women for leadership positions as officers in the United States 
Army. The leadership principles and management techniques presented, however, are equally 
applicable to success in any field. Financial support is provided by both state and federal 
scholarships. 

Leadership Training 

Classroom theory and practical application is presented in the following areas: motivation, 
decision making, leadership, followership, planning and organizing, meeting management, 
influencing others, public speaking, and teaching. 

Adventure Training 

Training in mountaineering techniques (rappelling), land navigation, survival, rifle marksmanship, 
and waterborne operar.ons is given to every student. Selected students are given the opportunity 
to attend the Army parachute school, arctic operations school, helicopter operations school, 
or Ranger school. 

Financial Support 

There are two scholarship programs which provide support to Army ROTC students. Federal 
Scholarships are competitive scholarships available for four, three, or two years (depending on 
application time) and provide funds for tuition, books, fees, and a monthly support allowance. 
Illinois State Scholarships are also available and provide a waiver of all tuition costs. For 
additional scholarship information, see page 67. Over half of all Army ROTC students receive 
a scholarship of one type or the other. All third and fourth year cadets receive S100 per month 
while in the ROTC program. 

Career Opportunities 

The training and instruction is designed to prepare students to serve as officers in the U.S. 
Army. This may be full-time on active duty or part-time with the Army Reserve or National 
Guard. Service with the reserve forces allows pursuit of a civilian career while simultaneously 
serving the country as an officer. Approximately one-half of Army ROTC graduates pursue 
civilian careers and have discovered that their ROTC leadership training is an invaluable tool 
for success. 

Program Options 

Four year — the student attends one military science course each semester. 

Three and one-half year — the student takes rwo military science courses during the first 

semester, then one course each semester thereafter. 

Three year — the student takes two military science courses per semester during the first year, 

then one course each semester thereafter. 



82 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Two year — those students with prior military experience (junior ROTC, prior military service) 
may skip the first two years of Army ROTC and go right into the last two years. Also, students 
who are interested in the program, but were not involved in ROTC during their first two years 
of college may join during their last two years by attending a six-week basic camp during the 
summer. Attendance at this camp, for which the student receives over $600, is normally 
scheduled prior to the beginning of the last two years of ROTC, but may be scheduled between 
the third and fourth year. 

Academic Program 

The first and second year educational program in military science consists of Mil. S. Ill, 113, 
121, and 123. These one-hour courses are designed to give students a basic understanding of 
the national defense establishment, the role of the U.S. Army, military tactics, and military 
related skills. 

The third and fourth years of military science, consisting of Mil. S. 231, 233, 241, and 243 
are designed to develop the skills and attitudes vital to assuming leadership positions. 

A leadership laboratory is required with each academic course. The leadership laboratory is 
one hour per week for the first two years and two hours per week the last two years. Instruction 
is provided in military skills in a framework that provides maximum opportunities to develop 
each student's self-confidence, decisiveness, and leadership potential. 

Additional Information 

For additional information regarding any of these programs, contact the Professor of Military 
Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 113 Armory, 505 East Armory Avenue, 
Champaign, IL 61820, telephone: (217) 333-1550. 

NAVAL ROTC 

The Naval ROTC Program is a professional educational opportunity in which students can 
earn a regular or a reserve commission in the United States Navy or Marine Corps while 
pursuing a baccalaureate degree. This professional foundation is then developed and broadened 
during active service as a commissioned officer after graduation and commissioning. Students 
may be enrolled in either the Navy Scholarship Program or the Navy College Program 
(nonscholarship). There are four-year programs for entering freshmen and two-year programs 
for students who have already completed part of their college education. 

For scholarship students, no military obligation is incurred until the beginning of the 
sophomore year. College program students incur their military obligation at the commencement 
of their junior year. Naval science courses are also open to any student, upon consent of the 
Naval Science Department, even though not enrolled in either of these programs. 

Four- Year, Navy-Marine Scholarship Program 

The Navy-Marine Scholarship Program provides students with full tuition, fees, books, and a 
tax-free subsistence pay (currently $100 per month) for up to four years. Students in good 
standing and enrolled in a degree program which requires longer than four years to complete 
may apply for fifth year scholarship benefits with agreement to serve additional active service 
after commissioning or may take a leave of absence of up to a year to finish their baccalaureate 
degree. Upon graduation, scholarship students are commissioned in the regular U.S. Navy or 
U.S. Marine Corps and serve four years on active duty. Newly commissioned officers who 
qualify have the opportunity to continue their education toward an advanced degree. 

Scholarship selection in national competition is based on the applicant's Scholastic Aptitude 
Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT) Program score, high school and college records, 
aptitude for naval service as judged by interviews, and by prescribed physical qualifications. 

Scholarship students have an opportunity during the summer to practice what they have 
learned in the classroom. Three summer training periods of approximately four to six weeks 
each are taken by the students either at sea aboard a U.S. Navy vessel, at a naval air station, 
squadron, or amphibious base, or on board a nuclear submarine. Students who choose to 
enter the U.S. Marine Corps spend their last summer training period at the Marine Corps 
Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Virginia. 



RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 83 



Four- Year, Navy-Marine College Program 

Navy-Marine College Program students receive all required uniforms and naval science textbooks 
while enrolled, and a subsistence allowance (currently $100 per month) during their junior and 
senior years. It their degree program requires longer than four years to complete, they may 
apply for fifth year benefits of subsistence pay with agreement of additional active service after 
commissioning or may take a leave of absence of up to a year to finish their baccalaureate 
degree. Upon graduation, college program students are commissioned in the U.S. Naval or U.S. 
Marine Corps Reserve and serve three of their six-year reserve obligation on active duty. 

A student may apply for admission to the college program through the professor of naval 
science, who makes the final selection. This selection is based on academic, physical, and 
military aptitude criteria. College program students also attend one summer training session, 
usually after their junior year. 

College program students are eligible to be selected for the scholarship program through 
recommendation of the professor of naval science and decision by the chief of naval education 
and training. These students are also eligible to receive an Illinois State ROTC Scholarship (if 
a resident of this state) after at least one semester in the college program. These scholarships 
are awarded annually on a competitive basis and cover tuition only. 

Two-Year College Program 

This program provides a student with all required uniforms, naval science textbooks, and 
subsistence pay (currently $100 per month). Applicants should have two remaining years of 
study at the Urbana-Champaign campus. During the summer prior to their junior year, students 
attend a six-week course of military instruction at the Naval Science Institute, Newport, Rhode 
Island. Transportation costs and a salary are paid to the students. After successful completion, 
they join their contemporaries in the college program and are also eligible for appointment to 
scholarship status, background and academic performance providing. College program students 
participate in a four- to six-week summer at-sea training period between their junior and senior 
years, as do their scholarship counterparts. 

Two-Year Scholarship Program 

Acceptance into the NROTC Two-Year Scholarship Program training option guarantees a 
student a two-year NROTC scholarship. Summer training and other benefits, as well as NROTC 
training during the junior and senior years, are the same as that for the college and nuclear 
power two-year programs. Qualifications for this option include at least one year each of 
calculus and physics, with a C average or better. Overall GPA should be C or better with a 
preferred major of mathematics, chemistry, physics, or engineering. 

State Navy ROTC Scholarship 

For information regarding the state Navy ROTC scholarships, see page 67. 

Requirements 

In addition to mental, physical, and aptitude requirements, NROTC students must: 

— Be citizens of the United States (women are eligible to apply for NROTC). 

— Be seventeen years of age by September 1 of the year commencing enrollment and not 
more than twenty-one years of age by that date (those contemplating a bachelor's degree 
that requires five years to complete must be less than twenty years of age on June 30 of 
that year). If under eighteen, they must have the consent of their parents. Scholarship 
students must be less than twenty-five years of age on June 30 of the calendar year in which 
they are commissioned. College program students must meet identical requirements except 
that they must be less than twenty-seven-and-a-half years of age on June 30 of the calendar 
year in which commissioned. 

— Have no moral obligations or personal convictions that will prevent them from executing 
the oath of office. 

NROTC students have a two-hour laboratory course, N.S. 100, each week for which there 
is no credit, and also take the following naval science and University academic courses. 



84 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

N.S. 111 — Naval Orientation 2 N.S. 112 — Naval Ship Systems I 3 

SECOND YEAR 

N.S. 121 — Naval Ship Systems II 3 N.S. 124 — Sea Power and 

Maritime Affairs 2 

THIRD YEAR (NAVY) 

N.S. 231 — Naval Operations N.S. 232 — Naval Operations 
and Navigation I 3 and Navigation II 3 

THIRD YEAR (MARINE) 

Hist. 281 — War, Military Institutions, Hist. 282 — War, Military Institutions, 

and Society to 1815 3 and Society since 1815 3 

N.S. 291 — Evolution of Warfare 3 

FOURTH YEAR (NAVY) 

N.S. 241 — Naval Leadership N.S. 242 — Naval Leadership 
and Management I or 2 and Management II 2 

B. Adm. 210/247 — Management and 
Organizational Behavior 3 

FOURTH YEAR (MARINE) 

N.S. 293 — History of Amphibious 
Warfare 3 

Each scholarship student's degree program must also include the following University courses 
(not required for Marine Corps option students): 

SEMESTERS 

Calculus 2 

Physics 2 

Foreign language 1 

Nontechnical curriculum scholarship students must also complete two technical electives, 
in addition to the requirements above, in physical science, chemistry, advanced mathematics, 
computer science, statistics, advanced physics, or other disciplines approved by the professor 
of naval science. 

Marine option students are to complete one semester of political science as directed by the 
Marine Option Instructor. 

College program (nonscholarship) students, who are not governed by federal scholarship 
requirements, must complete two semesters of college mathematics and physical science (one 
from each category) as a prerequisite to commissioning. 

Additional Information 

Further information regarding Naval ROTC may be obtained in person from or by writing to 
the Professor of Naval Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 236 Armory, 505 
East Armory Street, Champaign, IL 61820, telephone (217) 333-1061/1062/0187. 

AIR FORCE ROTC 

The Air Force ROTC program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offers the 
opportunity of a professional training program for those college men and women who desire 
to serve in the U.S. Air Force as commissioned officers. Air Force ROTC (AFROTC) offers 
both a four-year and two-year program leading to a commission as an Air Force officer. Four- 
year program students complete both the General Military Course and the Professional Officer 
Course. Two-year students complete only the Professional Officer Course. 

General Military Course (GMC) 

The first- and second-year educational program in Air Force Aerospace Studies consists of 
A.F.A.S. Ill, 112, 121, and 122. These one-hour courses are designed to give students basic 
information on world military systems and the role of the U.S. Air Force in the defense of 
the free world. All required A.F.A.S. textbooks and uniforms are provided free. The GMC is 
open to all students at the University of Illinois without advance application and does not 
obligate students to the Air Force in any way. 



RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS 85 



Field Training 

A1KOU Field Training is offered during the nimmei months ar selected Air Force bases 
throughout the United States. Students in the four-year program participate in four weeks of 
held training, usuall) between their sophomore and junior years. Students applying for entry 
into the two -year program must successfully complete six weeks of field training prior to 
enrollment in the Professional Officer Course. The Air Force pays all expenses associated with 
field training. 

The major areas of study in the four-week field training program include junior officer 
training, aircraft and air crew orientation, career orientation, survival training, base functions 
and Air Force environment, and physical training. The major areas of study included in the 
six-week field training program are essentially the same as those conducted at four-week field 
training plus the General Military Course including leadership laboratory. 

Professional Officer Course (POC) 

The third and fourth years of Air Force Aerospace Studies instruction, consisting of A.F.A.S. 
231, 232, 241, and 242 are designed to develop skills and attitudes vital to the career professional 
officer. Students completing the POC are commissioned as officers in the United States Air 
Force upon college graduation. All students in the POC receive a nontaxable subsistence 
allowance of S100 per month during the two-semester academic year. Students wanting to 
enter the POC in nonflying categories should apply early in the spring semester in order to 
begin this course of study in the following fall semester. Students applying for pilot or navigator 
categories should apply in the fall semester the year prior to entering the POC. Final selection 
of students rests with the professor of aerospace studies. Each member of the POC must: 

— Be a citizen of the United States. 

— Be a full-time student in the University. 

— Have at least two years remaining at the University as an undergraduate and/or graduate 
student upon entry to the program. 

— Pass an Air Force physical exam. 

— Be able to complete all requirements for commissioning before reaching age 26 l h for flying 
candidates or age 30 for nonflying candidates. 

— Complete summer field training. 

— Achieve qualifying scores on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

— Complete Rhetoric 105 or its equivalent prior to POC entry. 

— Execute a written agreement with the U.S. government to complete the POC, attend summer 
field training at the time specified, accept a reserve commission in the U.S. Air Force upon 
graduation, and to serve four years on active duty after graduation. Pilot candidates agree 
to serve eight years and navigators five years active duty after completion of flying training. 

— Enlist in the Air Force Obligated Reserve Section; this enlistment is terminated upon 
acceptance of a commission. 

— Possess and maintain a quality grade-point average meeting the requirements of the student's 
college. 

— Not be a conscientious objector. 

Leadership Laboratory 

Leadership Laboratory (A.F.A.S. 102) is required with each academic course in both the GMC 
and the POC. Instruction is conducted within the framework of an organized cadet corps with 
a progression of experiences designed to develop each student's leadership potential. Leadership 
Laboratory involves a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and ceremonies, career 
opportunities in the Air Force, and the life and work of an Air Force junior officer. Students 
develop their leadership potential in a practical, supervised laboratory, which typically includes 
field trips to Air Force installations throughout the U.S. 

AFROTC College Scholarship Program 

This program provides scholarships to selected students through participation in the Air Force 
ROTC. During their participation in AFROTC at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
students receive $100 per month along with paid tuition, fees, laboratory expenses, and required 
textbooks. 



86 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



In order to be eligible for this scholarship, students must: 

— Be citizens of the United States. 

— Be at least seventeen years of age on the date of enrollment and under twenty-five years of 
age on June 30 of the estimated year of commissioning. 

— Pass a physical exam administered by a physician of the United States Air Force. 

— Be selected by a board of Air Force officers. 

— Have no moral objections or personal convictions that will prevent bearing arms and 
supporting and defending the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign 
and domestic. Applicants must not be conscientious objectors. 

— Achieve a qualifying score on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test. 

— Maintain a quality grade-point average. 

— Complete at least one course in a foreign language before commissioning. 

— Enlist in the Air Force Reserve. This enlistment is terminated once commissioned as a 
second lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force. 

— Execute a written contract with the U.S. government agreeing to complete the AFROTC 
program, to attend summer field training at the specified time, to accept a reserve commission 
in the Air Force upon graduation, and to serve four years on active duty after graduation. 

High school students should apply for this scholarship late in their junior year or early in 
their senior year. High school students may get applications by asking their guidance counselor 
or by writing or telephoning the University of Illinois AFROTC detachment at (217) 333-1927. 
Completed applications must be received no later than December 1 of the year before the 
student intends to enter college. 

For students already enrolled in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3V2-, 3-, 
2V2-, and 2-year scholarships are available. Applications can be submitted through the AFROTC 
Administration Office, 223 Armory. 

STATE AIR FORCE ROTC SCHOLARSHIPS 

For information regarding State of Illinois AFROTC Scholarships, see page 67. 

Additional Information 

Further inquiry concerning the AFROTC program at the University should be directed to 
AFROTC, Detachment 190, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 223 Armory, 505 East 
Armory Avenue, Champaign, IL 61820. 



Council on Teacher Education 

TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 87 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 88 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION IN TEACHER EDUCATION 88 

STUDENT TEACHING 89 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 89 

EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT 91 



Five colleges of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign offer bachelor's degree programs 
in teacher education. These five colleges are the Colleges of Agriculture, Applied Life Studies, 
Education, Fine and Applied Arts, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. The Council on Teacher 
Education is responsible for the coordination of teacher education curricula at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus and for liaison between the campus and state certification authorities. The 
offices of the council are located in 130 Education Building. 

Students may consult their teacher education adviser or the certification officer of the Council 
on Teacher Education, 130 Education Building, for additional information concerning academic 
regulations and other policies affecting teacher education. Consult the executive director of 
the council for information concerning the "Grievance Policy and Procedure for Students in 
Teacher and Administrative Certification Programs under the Purview of the Council on Teacher 
Education." 

TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 

Students seeking certification must complete the requirements of their chosen curriculum and 
the Council on Teacher Education. Teacher education curricula and the colleges which offer 
them are listed below. All teacher education curricula have been approved by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) through 1991 and by the Illinois 
State Board of Education through 1986. Extension of State Board approval through 1996 is 
pending until completion of the mandated tenth year review. 

Students are advised that certification requirements may be altered at any time by the State 
Teacher Certification Board or the legislature. In such cases, students may be compelled to 
satisfy the new requirements to qualify for the University's recommendation for certification. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE PAGE 

Agricultural education 109 Vocational home economics 127 

COLLEGE OF APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 

Physical education: curriculum 

and instruction 137 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Business education 168 Life science 165 

Early childhood education 170 Mathematics 165 

Education of moderately and se- Physical science 166 

verely handicapped persons 173 Social studies 167 

Elementary education 171 Technical education specialties 172 

English 163 

General science 164 

COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

Art education 215 Music education 228 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Biology 290 Latin 296 

Chemistry 291 Mathematics 298 

Computer science 292 Physics 300 

Earth science 293 Russian 297 

English 293 Social studies 301 

French 295 Spanish 297 

German 296 Speech 302 



88 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



If the chosen curriculum requires a second teaching field, it must be selected from the list 
of approved teacher education minors below. In the presence of compelling circumstances, 
students may consult with appropriate faculty to propose unique minors. Such proposals and 
their rationale must be submitted by petition for the college's approval. Students should be 
aware that the state recognizes minor teaching fields which are not listed below, and does not 
recognize some which are. Students in curricula which do not require a minor and students 
seeking to complete more than one minor may obtain information about state minimum 
requirements from the certification officer of the Council on Teacher Education, 130 Education 
Building. 

Teacher Education Minors 

Accountancy 151 Italian 304 

Adult and continuing education 168 Journalism 159 

Art education 216 Latin 304 

Biology 305 Library science 314 

Chemistry 305 Mathematics 305 

Cinema studies 307 Physical education 140 

Computer science 304 Physical science 306 

Earth science 305 Physics 306 

Economics 151 Portuguese 304 

English 302 Psychology 306 

English as a second language 303 Rhetoric 303 

French 303 Russian 304 

General science 306 Social studies 306 

Geography 306 Spanish 304 

German 303 Speech 303 

Health education 134 Urban studies 233 

History 306 Women's studies 307 

Instructional applications of 

computers 168 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants to teacher education curricula must meet the admission requirements of the colleges 
and departments offering the chosen curricula. General admission requirements are presented 
in the Admissions Chart which begins on page 10. Students whose cumulative grade-point 
average is less than the stated minimum may apply for admission but will be considered 
individually on a petition basis if enrollment vacanices exist in the college and curriculum to 
which admission is being sought. If admitted, such students may be placed on provisional 
status by the Council on Teacher Education. 

In compliance with recent state legislation, all students entering teacher education programs 
must demonstrate basic proficiency in reading, mathematics, and language arts. Failure to meet 
this requirement will jeopardize the student's enrollment in a teacher education curriculum. 
Compliance with this mandate is monitored by the Council on Teacher Education. Students 
should consult their adviser or the certification officer for further information. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTINUATION IN TEACHER EDUCATION 

To be eligible for continuation in teacher education, candidates must have a University of 
Illinois and cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) or higher. In addition, candidates 
must meet grade-point requirements specific to their programs. The Council on Teacher 
Education reviews each student's academic progress every semester. Students who do not meet 
the grade-point average criterion will receive a warning letter from the council advising them 
that their entry into student teaching and their receiving a recommendation from the University 
for certification are at risk. Students will be directed lo their college dean for more information. 
In addition, students are screened just prior to student teaching and just after its completion 
by committees of faculty who assess the overall record of their performance in the program. 
It is common knowledge that teaching effectiveness is influenced not only by academic 
proficiency, but also by the personal characteristics and health of the teacher. Recognizing the 
importance of these personal factors, program faculty take them into account in making 
judgments of students' progress in the program. In addition, counseling and medical services 
are available for all students. Students wishing additional information regarding these services 



COUNCIL ON TEACHER EDUCATION 89 



may make An appointment by calling the director of student teaching of the Council on Teacher 
Education (217) 333-4898, or by visiting 130 Education Building. 

Since it is essential that counseling and medical services be offered as soon as the need 
becomes apparent, teacher education advisers and faculty are asked to participate in this effort. 
Staff members are invited to recommend for assistance or examination any students about 
whom concern is felt. Students who are recommended for assistance or examination will 
receive a written request to make an appointment to discuss matters in which a counselor or 
physician may be of assistance. Students who receive a letter of this nature must respond to 
the request as a requirement of the Council on Teacher Education. Failure to respond will 
jeopardize the continuation of students in teacher education. During the appointment, students 
will be informed of the services available on this campus. The use of these services will usually 
be optional. In exceptional cases, however, students may be required to satisfactorily complete 
a mental health or physical examination with one of the campus services. Such referrals are 
mandatory for students who wish to continue in teacher education. 

STUDENT TEACHING 

Students should apply for tentative student teaching assignments on completion of 55 semester 
hours of credit. Student teaching application forms may be obtained from the appropriate student 
teaching office. (Referral to the appropriate office may be obtained by contacting the central 
Office of Student Teaching, 130 Education Building, 333-4898.) Normally, after earning 55 semester 
hours, each eligible student will receive an invitation to apply for a student teaching assignment. 
Students who are eligible to apply for assignment, but who have not received an invitation to 
do so, should contact the appropriate office of student teaching early in the fall semester. Students 
who will not be on campus during the fall semester, but who expect to enroll in educational 
practice (student teaching) during the next school year, should secure application forms from 
their office of student teaching before they leave campus. The latest date for any currently 
enrolled, eligible student to apply for a student teaching assignment for the next academic year 
is the end of the second week in December. Students who apply after this date cannot be 
guaranteed a student teaching assignment during the next academic year. 

On completion of 75 or more semester hours, students who have submitted an application 
will receive student teaching assignments pending verification that they: (1) have completed 
methods courses and 100 hours of early field experience, (2) have a University of Illinois and 
cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) or higher, (3) have the minimum grade-point 
average required for their program, and (4) have received recommendations for placement in 
student teaching from the appropriate faculty committee. 

Only those students officially registered in teacher education curricula are eligible for student 
teaching. Students who are on academic or disciplinary probation will not be permitted to 
student teach. The Council on Teacher Education reserves the right to deny student teaching 
placement to students whose performance in course work or in early field experiences has 
been judged to be unsatisfactory by professional standards, including scholarship, ethics, and 
responsibility, as determined by faculty and staff in consultation with cooperating school 
personnel. Satisfactory performance is not based solely on grades. 

Students in teacher education should anticipate and plan for student teaching assignments 
off campus. For most students, an additional expense will be incurred during the semester in 
which student teaching is scheduled. Only a limited number of student teaching assignments 
are available in the vicinity of the campus. Students will be assigned to local schools as student 
teachers only in cases of special need. In such cases, attempts will be made to place students 
locally; however, this is not always possible due to the limited number of available sites. 

Students who wish to complete student teaching through another university, yet receive a 
University of Illinois degree and recommendation for certification, must secure the prior 
approval of their adviser, college, and the Council on Teacher Education via petition. 

TEACHER CERTIFICATION 
General Requirements 

A student who completes all the course work and other requirements in a program approved 
for purposes of certification by the Illinois State Board of Education is entitled to receive the 



90 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



recommendation of the University for the appropriate certificate providing the candidate: (1) 
is a U.S. citizen (or has filed a Declaration of Intention to become a citizen), is of good 
character, good health, and is at least nineteen years of age; (2) is recommended for certification 
by his or her program coordinator or department chair based on criteria approved by the 
council; (3) has a University of Illinois and cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) or 
higher; and (4) has the minimum grade-point average required in his or her program. 

Please note that, although a student may be denied recommendation for certification, he or 
she may be granted a degree. A student who believes that his or her recommendation for 
certification has been withheld unjustly may seek redress through the grievance policies 
established by the Council on Teacher Education. A copy of the policy and the allied procedures 
may be obtained from the executive director of the Council on Teacher Education, 130 
Education Building. 

Students who enroll in advanced foreign language, chemistry, or mathematics courses as a 
result of performance on a placement examination are often eligible to receive prerequisite 
credit for teacher certification purposes only. Those who are qualified to receive prerequisite 
credit, and who have declared one of these areas as their major or minor, should consult their 
teacher education adviser prior to graduation. 

Special Education Requirement 

Section 21-2a of The School Code of Illinois requires that all individuals applying for teacher 
certification after September 1, 1981, successfully complete course work which includes 
"instruction on the psychology of the exceptional child, the identification of the exceptional 
child . . . and methods of instruction for the exceptional child, including, but not limited to 
the learning disabled . . ." Students should contact their advisers to determine the appropriate 
course or courses to fulfill this requirement. 

Teacher Certification Examinations 

Effective July 1, 1988, all applicants for certification as teachers, school administrators, and 
school service personnel must pass examinations offered by the Illinois State Board of Education 
as a condition for certification. Applicants must pass an examination in basic skills (reading, 
writing, grammar and mathematics) and a separate examination in their major area. For further 
information, contact the certification officer of the Council on Teacher Education at (217) 333- 
7195. 

Application Information 

Questions concerning teacher certification should be directed to the Council on Teacher 
Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 130 Education Building, 1310 South 
Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820, telephone (217) 333-7195. 

Students who wish to teach in the city of Chicago should write to the Department of 
Personnel, 1819 West Pershing Road, Chicago, IL 60609. Individuals who intend to teach in 
Chicago are urged to apply for both an Illinois and Chicago certificate. After July 1, 1988, 
Chicago will no longer maintain separate certification. Individuals teaching in the city will need 
to be state certified. 

Time Limit on Certification 

Because certification requirements are subject to change due to new mandates from the Illinois 
State Teacher Certification Board and the Illinois General Assembly, the University of Illinois 
is not able to guarantee a recommendation for certification to those who apply for certification 
later than one year after graduation from an approved program. Students completing approved 
programs are urged to apply for certification during their last term on campus. 

Background Investigation on Applicants for Employment 

All applicants for employment in a school district in Illinois are required to authorize the 
employing school district to initiate a criminal background check. School districts may employ 
persons only after a background check has been initiated and may not knowingly employ a 
person who has been convicted of a felony or attempting to commit certain offenses enumerated 



COUNCIL ON TEACHER EDUCATION 91 



in The School Code of Illinois, Although the University of Illinois plays no role in this criminal 
background check, students planning to teach in Illinois should be aware of this legislated 
requirement. 

EDUCATIONAL PLACEMENT 

The University's Educational Placement Office assists in the placement and career planning of 
students .\nd alumni who are seeking education-related employment in schools, colleges and 
universities, state and federal agencies, and other settings. Services offered include the following: 
(1) the storage and distribution of educational placement files for individuals who have 
completed at least one course in any department or college at the University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign; (2) the publication of a weekly Job Vacancy Bulletin, which lists over 
18,000 job vacancies sent to the office annually; (3) placement counselors who are available 
by appointment to provide career information and guidance to individuals and groups; (4) 
seminars on topics related to the job search in education; (5) a career information center 
containing information about careers in education; and (6) on-campus interviews with school 
and college recruiters from Illinois and other states. Individuals seeking education-related 
employment information — students, faculty, administrators, alumni, and others — are welcome 
to call (217) 333-0740, write, or visit the Educational Placement Office, 140 Education Building. 



COLLEGES AND 
OTHER ACADEMIC UNITS 



College of Agriculture 
(Including School of Human 
Resources and Family Studies) 

104 Mumford //.;//. 1301 West Gregory Drive, Vrbana, IL 61801 

DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES, AND CURRICULA 96 

SCHOOL OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES 97 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 98 

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION 98 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 98 

STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC PROGRESS 98 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 99 

CURRICULA 99 



Situated in one of the world's richest agricultural regions, the College of 
Agriculture provides an ideal setting for professional education and career 
preparation in the agricultural and food sciences. As the land-grant agricultural 
institution for the State of Illinois, the college traces its heritage of public 
service to the enrollment of the first agriculture student at the Illinois 
Industrial University in 1868. Undergraduate students in agriculture can 
choose from among thirty-two curricula, majors, and study options in eight 
college departments, with more than 350 courses available in a broad range 
of agricultural and agriculture-related disciplines. Individualized programs of 
study may be designed to meet the student's particular educational needs, 
academic interests, and career goals. 

Extensive farms, field sites, experimental and demonstration plots, green- 
houses, laboratories, and other educational and research facilities are con- 
veniently located on the Urbana-Champaign campus, affording excellent 
opportunities for agriculture students to gain "hands on" experience in their 
particular areas of study. The college maintains a large collection of books, 
periodicals, audiovisuals, and other educational resources in its Agriculture 
Library; and microcomputers, data-processing equipment, and a campus- 
wide mainframe computer system also are available to supplement and enrich 
classroom studies. 

The College of Agriculture is nationally and internationally recognized for 
its distinguished faculty, innovative programs of study, and pioneering 
achievements in teaching, basic and applied research, extension education, 
and international agriculture. Under the long-range Food for Century III 
program for food-production research, the college has received nearly $60 
million since 1978 for the construction of ultramodern laboratories, class- 
rooms, greenhouses, and field facilities in the agricultural and food sciences. 
State-of-the-art equipment and laboratories are available for studies in such 
"high tech" areas as genetic engineering of plant and animal species, plant 

English Building 



96 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



molecular biology, plant tissue and cell culture, biomass production and 
utilization, alternative fuels and energy sources, post-harvest technology, 
environmental management, and computer applications to agriculture and 
the food industry. Agriculture faculty members combine extensive profes- 
sional background in their respective areas of specialization with additional 
experience in business, industry, government, and higher education. 

The School of Human Resources and Family Studies, which is a major 
component in the College of Agriculture, offers career preparation and pro- 
fessional or preprofessional education in several biological, physical, and 
social science fields. The school traces its long history of education and 
public service to the establishment of the nation's first university home 
economics curriculum in 1873. Undergraduate students enrolled in the school 
can choose from 13 curricula or study options and more than 125 courses 
available in five program areas: Foods and Nutrition; Family and Consumer 
Economics; Human Development and Family Ecology; Textiles, Apparel, and 
Interior Design; and Home Economics Education. Excellent laboratory 
facilities, classrooms, computing and data-processing equipment, and library 
resources are centrally located in Bevier Hall and the Child Development 
Laboratory, providing opportunities for both theoretical training and practical 
experience. The school's faculty members have received numerous recogni- 
tions and awards for outstanding achievements in education and research 
and are dedicated to high-quality undergraduate instruction. 

DEPARTMENTS, OFFICES, AND CURRICULA 
Agriculture 

The Office of Agricultural Communications and Extension Education offers courses in agri- 
cultural communications media and methods, information program planning, rural-urban 
communications, teaching of college-level agriculture, extension education, extension com- 
munications management, and other topics. Students in the agricultural communications 
curriculum prepare for careers in agricultural writing and editing, radio and television broad- 
casting, advertising and marketing communications, public relations, and photography. Students 
in extension education prepare for careers in the Cooperative Extension Service. 

The Department of Agricultural Economics offers courses in farm management, rural real 
estate appraisal, land and natural resource products, commodity futures markets, agribusiness 
management, agricultural and food policy, statistics and quantitative analysis, international 
agricultural development and trade, rural sociology, agricultural law, and farm taxation. 

The Department of Agricultural Engineering offers courses in agricultural engineering and 
agricultural mechanization which cover the principles of engineering as applied to agriculture, 
including problems in the areas of soil and water control, farm buildings and housing, field 
machinery, tractors, crop and food processing, and farmstead mechanization. Instruction in 
farm shop practices and techniques is offered. 

The Department of Agronomy offers courses in both crops and soils. Instruction includes 
courses in plant breeding and genetics; crop evaluation; crop protection; production and 
evaluation of cereals, corn, soybeans, and forage crops; crop physiology; design of field 
experiments; weeds and their control; the origin and development of soils; land appraisals; soil 
conservation; soil chemistry; soil physics; soil fertility and fertilizer use; soil management; and 
soil microbiology. A special option in crop protection is available to students interested in a 
broad comprehensive approach to controlling diseases, weeds, and insects, plus managing 
cultural practices to maximize yields. 

The Department of Animal Sciences offers courses in the areas of animal evaluation, behavior, 
genetics, nutrition, physiology and meat science, and other courses related to the application 
of scientific principles to animal agriculture. Courses involve studies with beef and dairy cattle, 



AGRICULTURE 97 



horses, poultry, sheep, twine, and companion animals. The major is available with options in 
general animal science, industrial animal science, or companion animal biology. 

The Department of Food Science offers courses in the application of biology, engineering, 
chemistry, physics, microbiology, and nutrition to the processing, formulation, packaging, and 
distribution of food. Two undergraduate curricula, food science and food industry, are offered. 

The Department of Forestry curriculum offers options in forest science and wood products. 
The forest science option prepares students for all phases of the management of forest properties 
(private or public, large or small) for the production of valuable wood products and for 
watershed protection, wildlife habitat, recreational enjoyment, or other benefits. The wood 
products option is concerned with the properties of wood as a raw material and its manufacture 
into useful products. 

Courses in the Department of Horticulture provide instruction in pomology, vegetable crops, 
floriculture and ornamental horticulture, turf and landscape horticulture, and in subjects 
common to all these divisions, such as plant propagation, plant genetics, plant materials, plant 
anatomy and morphology, and the physiology and ecology of horticulture plants, as well as 
special problems in experimental horticulture. 

The courses offered by the Department of Plant Pathology are designed to prepare students 
for graduate work in plant pathology and to provide supplementary training for students 
specializing in related fields such as agronomy, food science, forestry, horticulture, and plant 
protection. 

A program of agricultural education is offered jointly by the College of Agriculture and the 
College of Education. Students may follow one or more of the five specialty options — 
agricultural production, agricultural mechanization, agricultural supply and products, horticul- 
ture, and agricultural resources and forestry. Upon successful completion of an option in the 
curriculum in agricultural education, students are qualified for an Illinois secondary teaching 
certificate and for employment in the Cooperative Extension Service and in many agri-business 
fields. 

SCHOOL OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES 

The School of Human Resources and Family Studes is in the College of Agriculture. At the 
time it was established in 1974, the school incorporated the former Deparment of Home 
Economics which had been in existence since 1874. Today, the school contains four divisions 
and the Home Economics Education Unit. The divisions and the programs offered by each 
are: 

Family and Consumer Economics — Consumer Economics, General Home Economics 
Foods and Nutrition — Dietetics, Foods and Nutrition, Foods in Business, Institution Man- 
agement, Restaurant Management 
Human Development and Family Ecology — Human Development and Family Ecology 
Textiles, Clothing, and Interior Design — Textiles and Apparel, Marketing of Textiles and 

Apparel, Interior Design 
Vocational Home Economics Education Unit — Home Economics Education 

The unique focus of the school is the study, within an interdisciplinary context, of vital 
issues affecting the health and well-being of individuals and families. The mission of the school 
is to generate and provide knowledge so that people may both shape and achieve the greatest 
benefits from their environment under conditions of continuing social, economic, physical, 
biological, and technological change. 

The mission is accomplished by (1) identifying critical problems of concern to individuals 
and families at local, state, national, and international levels; (2) generating knowledge through 
basic and applied research to help individuals and families live more healthy, productive, and 
personally satisfying lives; (3) preparing individuals for professional positions and leadership in 
the public and private sectors; and (4) providing educational programs to families through the 
Cooperative Extension Service. The school's mission is reflected in and accomplished by the 
teaching, research, and extension programs of its faculty in the four divisions and in the Home 
Economics Education Unit. 



98 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Besides meeting the general admission requirements of the University, students entering the 
College of Agriculture as freshmen must have taken, prior to entry, the subjects prescribed in 
the Admissions Chart on page 10. It is highly recommended that prospective students take 
four units of English and one or more additional units of mathematics beyond algebra and 
plane geometry. At least two and preferably three units of science are desirable (biology, 
chemistry, and physics), and two units of social science are recommended. 

Applicants for freshman admission are evaluated on the basis of their ACT score and high 
school percentile rank. A portion of the applicants are required to submit a Professional 
Interest Statement as well. Detailed information may be obtained in the Admissions Information 
brochure contained in the admission application packet. 

Applicants who have earned 60 semester hours of baccalaureate credit at another institution 
may be considered for transfer admission. Such applicants are evaluated on the basis of their 
transfer grade-point average. Transfer applicants into the Agricultural Science curriculum need 
a 4.00 transfer grade-point average while applicants to Agricultural Education, Home Economics 
Education, and Soil Science curriculum require a 3.5 minimum. In recent years, applicants to 
all other curricula have been admitted at the 3.25 campus minimum level for transfer students. 

SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION 

The College of Agriculture recognizes entering students who have outstanding scholastic records 
with nonfinancial need-based scholarship assistance. Entering freshmen are eligible to compete 
for $2,500 Jonathan Baldwin Turner Scholarships. Students who rank in the upper 10 percent 
of their high school class at the end of the junior year or who have an ACT composite score 
of 26 or better are encouraged to submit a scholarship application. Interviews are conducted 
between the junior and senior year in high school. Transfer students with the most outstanding 
academic records at their institution of previous attendance are recognized each year with $500 
transfer student scholarships. Additional information and application forms for both programs 
may be obtained from the Office of Resident Instruction, 104 Mumford Hall, 1301 West 
Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Additional scholarships within the college, to recognize academic merit, are awarded to 
continuing students based on their record earned at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign. See page 59 for a description of financial assistance available based on demonstrated 
financial need. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The number of hours required for graduation varies between 120 and 130 for all curricula 
within the college beginning on page 74. Included in the total must be all courses prescribed 
in the given curriculum and a sufficient number of electives to obtain the total number. Students 
should consult the Agriculture or Human Resources and Family Studies Student Handbooks 
for a listing of credit restrictions which apply in evaluating elective credits toward graduation. 

Students who have transferred to the University from other educational institutions and who 
are candidates for a Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Agriculture must complete 
at least half of the required Agriculture or Human Resources and Family Studies semester 
hours in residence. Transfer students from a four-year college must also complete their senior 
year, not less than 30 semester hours, in residence at the University. Transfers from a community 
college must complete at least 60 semester hours at a senior college and at least the last 30 
semester hours at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Each candidate for graduation must have a grade-point average of not less than 3.0 (A = 
5.0), including grades in courses transferred from other institutions, and a grade-point average 
of not less than 3.0 in all courses taken at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

In addition to maintaining prescribed academic performance levels, students in the College of 
Agriculture are also expected to make progress in courses required in the student's academic 
major. Each student is required to have at least one College of Agriculture course in the 



AGRICULTURE 99 



program each semester, except where the specific curriculum does not make that desirable. 
Students not complying will In- encumbered from additional enrollment. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

All University students must demonstrate proficiency in the use of English (see page 18). All 
College of Agriculture students must complete a minimum number of hours in natural sciences, 
humanities, and social sciences. In many of the curricula, the requirements for these three 
areas are fulfilled by completing courses prescribed for the curriculum. Where specific courses 
are not prescribed, students select from a group of courses that have been identified by the 
College of Agriculture as fulfilling the requirements. Listed below are examples of departments 
offering courses in the various categories. Students should consult the Agriculture or Human 
Resources and Family Studies Student Handbooks for the listings of specific courses which 
will fulfill the College of Agriculture requirement in each area. 
Natural Sciences: 

Physical: Chemistry, geology', mathematics, physics 

Biological: Biology, microbiology, physiology 
Social Sciences: Economics, history, psychology, political science, sociology 
Humanities: Art, literature, music, philosophy 

Course Placement: Mathematics, Chemistry, English 

All students admitted to the College of Agriculture are required to complete mathematics, 
chemistry, and English placement tests during the precollege testing program. 
Mathematics: Students in a curriculum with a mathematics requirement begin in Mathematics 
111 or 112 (Algebra) unless exemption is obtained based on performance on the Mathematics 
Placement Test. Such students may begin in Math. 120 (Calculus) or 124 (Finite Math). 
Chemistry: To take Chemistry 101, a student must have a satisfactory score on the Chemistry 
Placement Test and an exemption from, or credit in, Math. Ill or 112; students who have 
not had high school chemistry, or who do not score high enough on the Chemistry Placement 
Test, must take Chemistry 100 before taking Chemistry 101. 

English: Minimum English requirements in most College of Agriculture curricula include a 
semester of composition and a semester of public speaking. Students may fulfill the requirements 
by completing Rhetoric 105 — Principles of Composition and Speech Communication 101 — 
Principles of Effective Speaking; or Speech Communication 111 and 112 — Verbal Commu- 



Curricula 

CORE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This is a core curriculum in that it provides for a common core program for the first two 
years. Students who desire an agricultural curricula but who are uncertain as to a specific major 
are encouraged to select this curricula. All core students must select a major by the start of 
their junior year. The core curriculum is similar to the first two years of the program for 
students majoring in Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Mechanization, Agronomy, Animal 
Science, Dairy Science, General Agriculture, and Horticulture. Students interested in a specialized 
agricultural curricula (see page 106 through page 118) are encouraged to enter directly into 
that program as freshmen. 

The core program includes a foundation of general education courses. In addition, the 
student must choose from among several introductory agriculture courses. These are used to 
fulfill a graduation requirement but also provide an excellent opportunity for students to 
explore the various curricular options within the college in preparation for selecting a specific 
major. 

Upon completion of all requirements of this curriculum, with an approved major and a 
minimum of 126 hours of credit, the student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Agriculture. 



100 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Prescribed Courses hours 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition (see English, page 99) 4 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society 1 1 

Agriculture core courses: Three as listed below and as required for student's major 9-10 

Biological sciences: Two or more of the following areas as required by the student's major: 
PI. Bio. 100 — Plant Biology; or Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, and Mcbio. 101 

— Introductory Experimental Microbiology; or Biol. 104 — Animal Biology 8-9 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry (see Chemistry, page 99) 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: organic chemical 

studies 4 

Math. 111 — Algebra, or Math. 112 — College Algebra, or exemption by Mathematics 

Placement Test 5-3-0 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry, or Math. 124 — Introductory Analysis for Social Scientists; 
or one course from computer science or statistics as required for student's major; or 

exemption from Math. 1 14 by the Mathematics Placement Test 0-4 

Econ 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Social science courses (see page 99) 6 

Humanities courses (see page 99) 6 

1 Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society, 1 hour, is required for entering freshmen only. Transfer 
students are exempt. 

Agriculture Core Courses 

In addition to Agr. 100, one course from three of the four areas listed below must be completed 
by each student in this curriculum. 

HOURS 

Agricultural economics 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Agricultural mechanization and food science 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture, or F.S. 101 — Food in Modern 

Society 3 

Animal sciences 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science, or D.S. 100 — Introduction to Dairy 

Production 4-3 

Plant and soil sciences 

Soils 101 — Introductory Soils, or Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science, or For. 

101 — Introduction to Forestry, or Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 4-3 

First- Year Program 

Courses must be chosen from those listed on page 99 and must include one agriculture core course 
each semester in addition to Agr. 100. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 Agricultural core course 3-4 

Agricultural core course 3-4 Biological science 4-5 

Bioiogical science 4 Chemistry 4 

Mathematics or chemistry 2-5 Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Rhet. 105 — Composition 4 Speaking 3 

Total 14-18 Total 14-16 

SECOND YEAR 

The student will, in consultation with an adviser, select from those courses listed as prescribed and 
appropriate to his or her intended major in this curriculum. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

For the third and fourth years, see the requirements of the approved major. In addition to the 
prescribed courses listed above, the requirements include completion of: (1) All prescribed courses 
listed for the major. (2) Additional courses as required to give 40 hours in agriculture. (3) Sufficient 
open electives to bring the total hours to 126. 

Major in Agricultural Economics (Including Rural Sociology) 

The major and options in agricultural economics are to prepare students for employment in 
positions requiring economic decision making in agriculture and related occupations, for 
effective rural group leadership, and for graduate work. In declaring a major in agricultural 
economics, each student is required to choose one of the following options: farm management, 



AGRICULTURE 101 



agricultural marketing, general agricultural economics, or rural sociology. For common core 
requirements, sec C ore Curriculum in Agriculture on page 99. 

FARM MANAGEMENT OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag Ec. 324 — Decision Making for Farm Operators 2-3 

Ag. Ec. 325 — Economics of Agricultural Production, Ag. Ed. 223 — Farm Business 

Accounting and Organization, or Ag. Ec. 312 — Rural Real Estate Appraisal 3 

Soils 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Additional agricultural economics courses 7-8 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I, or a 

course in statistics 3-4 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two departments (see page 99). Must include Econ. 101 — 

Introduction to Economics, and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 9 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

AGRICULTURAL MARKETING OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Six hours from the following: 

Ag. Ec. 331 — Grain Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 332 — Livestock and Meat Marketing 3 

Ag. Ec. 335 — Food Marketing 4 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Additional agricultural economics courses 8 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two departments (see page 99). Must include Econ. 101 — 

Introduction to Economics, and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 9 

Prescribed nonagriculture courses 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting 1 3 

One course from speech communications, journalism, or business and technical writing 2-3 

Statistics 3-4 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

GENERAL AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Nine hours from the following: 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agrucultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 261 — Agricultural Economic Statistics 3 

Ag. Ec. 302 — Agricultural Finance 3 

Ag. Ec. 303 — Agricultural Law 3 

Ag. Ec. 305 — Agricultural Policies and Programs 3 

Ag. Ec. 318 — Land Economics 3 

Ag. Ec. 342 — Agricultural Prices 3 

Additional agricultural economics course 8 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two departments (see page 99). Must include Econ. 

101 — Introduction to Economics, and Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 9 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I, or a 

course in statistics 3 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

RURAL SOCIOLOGY OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

R. Soc. 277 — Rural Social Change 3 

R. Soc 346 — Energy, Environment, and Society 3 

Additional rural sociology or agricultural economics courses 11 

Elective courses m agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: 9 hours from two departments (see page 99). Must include Econ. 101 — 

Introduction to Economics, and 2 approved 200- or 300-level sociology courses 9 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 



102 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Major in Agricultural Mechanization — Industrial Option 

For students who are interested in emphasis in the areas of farm structures, conservation, farm 
power and farm machinery, in preparation for work with service organizations, retail dealers, 
power suppliers, contractors, or farm management companies. 

For common core requirements, see Core Curriculum in Agriculture on page 99. Other 
courses required for this major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 3 

Ag. M. 299 — Agricultural Mechanization Seminar 1 

Soils 1 01 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Fifteen hours from the following: 

Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Construction Technology; Ag. M. 201 — 
Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metal Work; Ag. M. 221 — Farm Power and 
Machinery Management; Ag. M. 241 — Farm Tractor Power; Ag. M. 252 — Mechanics 
of Soil and Water Conservation; Ag. M. 272 — Farm Buildings; Ag. M. 281 — Grain 
Drying, Handling, and Storage; Ag. M. 300 — Special Problems; Ag. M. 331 — Farm 
Machinery Technology; Ag. M. 333 — Agricultural Chemical Application Systems; Ag. M. 
361 — Development and Function of Family Housing; Ag. M. 372 — Livestock Waste 
Management; Ag. M. 381 — Electro-Mechanical Agricultural Systems 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments (see page 99) including Econ. 

101 — Introduction to Economics 9 

Other prescribed courses: 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting 1 3 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and Sound) 5 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics (Light, Electricity, and Magnetism) if Chem. 102 is not taken . . .5 
Fifteen hours from the following: 
Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management; B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing; B. 
Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior; B. Adm. 212 — Retail Manage- 
ment; B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to Management, or Psych. 245 — Industrial Organi- 
zational Psychology; B. Adm. 249 — Human Relations, or B. Adm. 321 — Industrial Social 
Systems; B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business Law; B. Adm. 351 — Personnel 
Administration; B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication; B.&T.W. 271 
— Sales Writing; B.&T.W. 272 — Report Writing; Sp. Com. 211 — Business and 
Professional Speaking 

A course in statistics 3 

A course in digital computer methods 3 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Major in Agricultural Mechanization — Equipment Operations Option 

This option is for students who desire to specialize in the problems of equipment and plant 
operations. Graduates would work as contractors, confinement livestock housing operators, 
processing plant operators, field foremen for corporation farms, or as farm operators. 

For common core requirements of this major, see page 99. Other courses required for this 
major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 3 

Ag. M. 221 — Farm Power and Machinery Management 4 

Ag. M. 299 — Seminar 1 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Soils 1 01 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Twelve hours from the following agricultural mechanization courses: 
Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanization Shop: Construction Technology; Ag. M. 201 — 
Agricultural Mechanization Shop: Electrical and Metalwork; Ag. M. 241 — Farm Tractor 
Power; Ag. M. 252 — Mechanics of Soil and Water Conservation; Ag. M. 272 — Farm 
Buildings; Ag. M. 281 — Grain Drying, Handling, and Storage; Ag. M. 300 — Special 
Problems; Ag. M. 331 — Farm Machinery Technology; Ag. M. 333 — Agricultural Chemical 
Application Systems; Ag. M. 361 — Development and Function of Family Housing; Ag. M. 
372 — Livestock Waste Management; Ag. M. 381 — Electro-Mechanical Agricultural Systems 



AGRICULTURE 103 



Twelve hours from the following production and management courses: 
Aq. E. 203 — Farm Taxation; Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products; Ag. Ec. 
302 — Financing Agriculture; Aq. Ec. 303 — Agricultural Law; Ag. Ec. 324 — Decision 
Making for Farm Operators; Ag. Ec. 325 — Economics of Agricultural Production; Soils 303 
— Soil Fertility and Fertilizers; Agron. 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures; An. S. 307 — 
Environmental Aspects of Animal Management; Hort. 242 — Vegetable Crop Production 

Agriculture hours must total a minimum of. 40 

Humanities: (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours in the social sciences from two departments, including 

Econ 101 (see page 99) 9 

Other prescribed courses: 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting 1 3 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry (unless exempt by Mathematics Placement Test) 2 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics (Mechanics, Heat, and Sound) 5 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Up to 8 hours of free elective credit will be allowed for vocational skills courses taken at 
community colleges in the subject matter areas of surveying, carpentry, welding, engine analysis 
and overhaul, power trains, hydraulics, and electro-mechanical systems. Students who lack 
these skills are advised to complete such courses at another institution, or to gain such skills 
through practical experience. Concurrent enrollment may be arranged at the discretion of the 
dean of the college. 

Major in Agronomy 

Students wishing to major in agronomy select one of four specializations: crops, soils, agronomy, 
or crop protection. For those who may later desire to pursue graduate work, adequate training 
may be obtained by suitable choices of electives within the framework of this major or in the 
agricultural science or soil science curricula. Numerous employment opportunities exist in 
various agricultural industries for students who wish to major in the agricultural industries 
curriculum with emphasis in agronomy and to have an adviser in agronomy. 

For common core requirements of this major, see page 99. Other courses required for this 
major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Soils 1 01 — Introductory Soils 4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Agron. 290 — Undergraduate Agronomy Seminar 1 

Elective courses in agronomy 1 18 

Crops 

Agron. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

Agron. 318 — Crop Growth and Production 3 

Agron. 319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 3 

Agron. 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures 3 

Agron. 323 — Principles of Plant Breeding 4 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

Agron. 330— Plant Physiology 3 

Agron. 350 — Crops and Man 3 

Soils 

Soils 301 — Soil Survey, with Emphasis on Illinois Soils 3 

Soils 302 — Soil Testing Practicum 2-3 

Soils 303 — Soil Fertility 3 

Soils 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

Soils 305 — Biochemical Processes in Soil and Water Environment 3 

Soils 307 — Soil Chemistry 3 

Soils 308 — Physics of the Plant Environment 4 

Soils 31 1 — Laboratory Method for Soils Analysis 3 

Soils 31 3 — Soil Mineral Analysis 4 

Crop protection 

Agron. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics, or Agron. 330 — Plant Physiology 3 

Soils 301 — Soil Survey with Emphasis on Illinois Soils, or Soils 303 — Soil Fertility and 

Fertilizers 3 

Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

Hort. 242 — Vegetable Crop Production, or Hort. 261 — Small Fruit and Viticulture 

Science, or Hort. 262 — Tree Fruit Science 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

PI. Pa. 305 — Plant Disease Development and Control, or PI. Pa. 377 — Diseases of 
Field Crops 3 



104 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 1 01 — Introduction 

to Economics (see page 99) 9 

Other prescribed courses 
Geol. 101 — An Introduction to the Study of the Earth, or Geol. 107 — General Geology I 

(all options) 4 

Crop protection only 
Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry and Chem. 134 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry Laboratory 5 

Entom. 120 — Introductory Applied Entomology 3 

Entom. 319 — Fundamentals of Insect Control 4 

Speech, journalism, or business and technical writing course 2-3 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

1 Crops option requires 12 hours from agronomy-crops and 6 hours from agronomy-soils. Soils 
option requires 12 hours from agronomy-soils and 6 hours from agronomy-crops. Agronomy option 
requires 18 hours of agronomy, with a minimum of 6 hours each from crops and soils. Crop protection 
requires all courses as specified. 

Major in Animal Science 

The general animal science option is for students interested in preparing for work in the fields 
of animal feeding and nutrition, animal breeding and genetics, animal production, or related 
fields of the livestock and poultry industry. The industrial animal science option is designed 
to provide students with preparation in biological management, business management, envi- 
ronmental science, finance, and production economics for a career in large-scale, food-animal 
production. The companion animal biology option is for students who are primarily interested 
in activities associated with the companion animal industry or in gaining a basic knowledge of 
biological management and training of animals used in recreational activities. For common 
core requirements of this major, see page 99. 

GENERAL ANIMAL SCIENCE OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science 4 

An. S. 1 10 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

An. S. 202 — Domestic Animal Physiology 4 

An. S. 209 — Meat Animal and Carcass Evaluation, or An. S. 309 — Meat Science 3-4 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Two of the following: 

An. S. 301 — Beef Production 3 

An. S. 302 — Sheep Science 3-4 

An. S. 303 — Pork Production 3 

An. S. 304 — Poultry Management . 3-4 

Two of the following: 
Soils 101 — Introductory Soils; An. S. 231 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction, 
Lactation, and Growth; An. S. 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement; An. S. 307 — 
Environmental Aspects of Animal Management; An. S. 310 — Genetics of Domestic 
Animals; An. S. 320 — Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of Ruminants; An. S. 331 — 
Physiology of Reproduction in Domestic Animals; An. S. 332 — Livestock and Meat 
Marketing. 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 1 01 — Introduction 

to Economics (see page 99) 9 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental Micro- 
biology, or Mcbio. 200 — Microbiology and Mcbio. 201 — Experimental Microbiology 5 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

INDUSTRIAL ANIMAL SCIENCE OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science 4 

An. S. 1 1 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

An. S. 202 — Domestic Animal Physiology 4 

An. S. 209 — Meat Animal and Carcass Evaluation 3 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

An. S. 231 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction, Lactation, and Growth, or 331 — 

Physiology of Reproduction in Domestic Animals 3 

An. S. 301 — Beef Production or An. S. 302 — Sheep Science 3-4 

An. S. 303 — Pork Production or An. S. 304 — Poultry Management 3-4 

An. S. 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal Management 3 



AGRICULTURE 105 



Ag. M. 272 — Farm Buildings 3 

Ag. M. 281 — Grain Drying, Handling, and Storage 3 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 302 — Agricultural Finance 3 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 1 01 — Introduction 

to Economics (see page 99) 9 

Accy 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental Micro- 
biology, or Mcbio. 200 — Microbiology and Mcbio. 201 — Experimental Microbiology 5-8 

C.S. 105 — Introduction to Computers and Their Application to Business and Commerce 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior, or B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to 

Management 3 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

COMPANION ANIMAL BIOLOGY OPTION HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science 4 

An. S. 1 10 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

An. S. 202 — Domestic Animal Physiology 4 

An. S. 206 — Light Horse Management 3 

An. S. 207 — Companion Animal Management 3 

An. S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

An. S. 231 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction, Lactation, and Growth 3 

An. S. 299 — Seminar 1 

An. S. 307 — Environmental Aspects of Animal Management 3 

An. S. 346 — Animal Behavior, or An. S. 203 — Behavior of Domestic Animals 3 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture to a minimum of 40 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments in the social sciences, including 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics (see page 99) 9 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental Micro- 
biology, or Mcbio. 200 — Microbiology and Mcbio. 201 — Expermental Microbiology 5-8 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Major in Dairy Science 

The purpose of the major in dairy science is to provide training for students planning careers 
as dairy farm operators and managers, as field representatives for milk plants, breed associations, 
feed companies, and governmental agencies, as control technicians or salespersons for feed 
manufacturers, as laboratory and field technicians in artificial insemination, and as breeding 
consultants. 

In addition, this major provides a foundation for advanced study in preparation for careers 
as college teachers, research scientists in experiment stations and industry, and as extension 
specialists. 

For common core requirements of this major, see page 99. Other courses required for this 
major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 
Twenty hours from the following: 
Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management; D.S. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics; D.S. 203 — 
Behavior of Domestic Animals; D.S. 204 — Dairy Cattle Evaluation; D.S. 221 — Animal 
Nutrition; D.S. 231 — Comparative Physiology of Reproduction, Lactation, and Growth; 
D.S. 301 — Dairy Herd Management; D.S. 305 — Genetics and Animal Improvement; 
D.S. 308 — Physiology of Lactation; D.S. 316 — Population Genetics; D.S. 317 — 
Quantitative Genetics; D.S. 320 — Nutrition and Digestive Physiology of Ruminants; D.S. 
331 — Physiology of Reproduction in Domestic Animals; D.S. 340 — Introduction to 
Applied Statistics; D.S. 345 — Statistical Methods; D.S. 350 — World Animal Agriculture; 
D.S. 385 — Gastrointestinal and Methanogenic Microbial Fermentations 

Elective courses in agriculture at the 200 and 300 level 10 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities and social sciences: An approved 6 hours in the humanities and a minimum of 9 
hours from two departments in the social sciences including Econ. 101 — Introduction to 

Economics (see page 99) 15 

Speech communication, journalism, or business and technical writing elective 2-3 

Minimum of 9 hours from at least two of the following areas: 
Accy. 200 or 201; biochemistry; biology; 1 chemistry; computer science; ecology, ethology, 



106 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



and evolution; entomology; geology; mathematics; 1 microbiology; 1 physics; Physl. 103, or 
any 200- or 300-level physiology course; plant biology 1 
Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

1 Beyond minimum curriculum requirements. 

Major in General Agriculture 

This major is for students who are interested in a broad basic training in agriculture, rather 
than in specialization within a departmental field of work. Areas for which such training is 
suited include production agriculture, agricultural extension, agricultural services, and others. 

Students should refer to A Handbook for Agriculture Students and Advisers for suggested 
courses and programs of study for training in these areas within this major. 

For common core requirements of this major, see page 99. Other courses required for this 
major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed course in agriculture 

Soils 1 01 — Introductory Soils 4 

In addition to core courses in agriculture, at least 3 hours of credit in each of the following 
departments: Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineerina (Agricultural Mechanization), 

Agronomy (in addition to Soils 101), Animal Science, Dairy Science, Horticulture 18 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 50 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Social sciences: A minimum of 9 hours from two departments including Econ. 1 01 — Introduction 

to Economics (see page 99) 9 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

Major in Horticulture 

This major is for students who desire a basic general knowledge of horticulture. Emphasis is 
placed on the basic plant sciences to give a general background for the specialized phases of 
horticulture, particularly those concerned with the production of food crops, such as fruits 
and vegetables for fresh market and processing. 

Students who are interested in ornamental plants should consult the Ornamental Horticulture 
curriculum (see page 116). 

For common core requirements, see page 99. Other courses required in this major are: 

HOURS 

Prescribed courses in agriculture 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture 3 

Soils 1 01 — Introductory Soils 4 

Entom. 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 3 

F.S. 1 01 — Food in Modern Society 3 

Hort. 100 — Introduction to Horticulture 3 

Hort. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics 3 

Hort. 221 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 242 — Commercial Vegetable Production 3 

Hort. 261 — Small Fruit and Viticulture Science 3 

Hort. 262 — Tree Fruit Science 3 

Hort. 321 — Floricultural Physiology, or Hort. 345 — Growth and Development of Horticultural 
Crops 4 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

Additional horticulture courses, except Hort. 125 — Survey of Landscape Horticulture; Hort. 
190 — Home Vegetable Gardening; and Hort. 233 — Floriculture for the Home 6 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Humanities and social sciences: An approved 6 hours in the humanities. A minimum of 9 
hours from two departments in the social sciences, including Econ. 101 — Introduction to 
Economics (see page 99) 15 

Other prescribed courses: 
PI. Bio. 234 — Form and Function of Flowering Plants 3 

Core courses and open electives to bring total hours to 126 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is designed for students who wish to pursue careers in the combined fields of 
agriculture and communications. It seeks to prepare them for work as professionals in agricultural 



AGRICULTURE 107 



writing, editing, and publishing; public relations; advertising; radio and television broadcasting; 
photography; and related activities. The College of Agriculture and the College of Commu- 
nications offer this curriculum cooperatively. It allows the planning of study programs closely 
related to the students interests in one of three communications options: news-editorial, 
advertising, or broadcast journalism. 

Upon completion of the curriculum requirements and a minimum of 126 hours of credit, 
the student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society ... .1 Agriculture core course 3-4 

Agriculture core course (see page 99) 3 Chem. 100 — Introductory Chemistry 2 

Biological science course 1 4-5 Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Math. 1 1 1 — Algebra, or Math. 1 12 — Speaking 3 

College Algebra; or exemption 3-5 Biological science course 4-5 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition Elective 2-3 

(see English, page 99) 3-4 Total 15-17 

Total 14-18 

SECOND YEAR 

Agriculture core course 3-4 Agriculture elective 3 

Ag. Com. 114 — Agricultural Com- Ag. Com. 214 — Agricultural Com- 
munications Media and Methods 2 3 munications Strategy 3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 Humanities course (see page 99) 3 

Physical science 3 3-4 Social science course 3 

Social science 4 3 Open electives 4-6 

Total 16-18 Total 16-18 



1 Two of the following are required in this curriculum: PI. Bio. 100 — Plant Biology; or Biol. 104 

— Animal Biology; or Mcbio. 100 and 101 — Introductory Microbiology and Introductory Experimental 
Microbiology. 

2 A minimum of 35 hours of agriculture courses is required, including Ag. Com. 310 — Information 
for Agriculture; and Ag. Com. 290 — Professional Seminar. At least 10 of the 35 hours must be in 
agriculture electives other than agricultural communications, with at least 8 hours at the 200-300 
level. 

3 A minimum of 10 hours is required from astronomy, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, computer 
science, geology, mathematics, physics, or specified statistics courses. Math. 111 or 112 and Chem. 
100 cannot be included in the 10 hours. 

4 A minimum of 15 hours required, including Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics; Psych. 100 

— Introduction to Psychology; and Pol. Sci. 150 — American Government. 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Students complete requirements in the Agriculture, Physical Science, Social Science, and Humanities 
areas along with a minimum 20-hour Communications requirement selected from one of the following 
options: 

Advertising Option HOURS 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Adv. 381 — Advertising Research Methods 3 

Adv. 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy and Tactics 3 

Adv. 383 — Advertising Media Strategy and Tactics 3 

Adv. 391 — Advertising Management: Planning 3 

Adv. 392 — Advertising Management: Strategv and Tactics 3 

Electives in communications to complete the 20-hour requirement. 

News-Editorial Option HOURS 

Journ. 204 — Typography 3 

Journ. 350 — Reporting I 4 

Journ. 370 — News Editing 4 

One course from the following: 

Journ. 217 — History of Communications; Journ. 218 — Communications and Public Opinion; 

Journ. 220 — Communications and Popular Culture; Journ. 231 — Mass Communication in a 

Democratic Society; Journ. 241 — Law and Communications; Journ. 251 — Social Aspects of 

Mass Communications 
One course from the following: 

Journ. 326 — Magazine Article Writing; Journ. 330 — Magazine Editing; Journ. 372 — Broadcast 

Newswriting and Gathering; Journ. 380 — Reporting II 

Electives in communications to complete the 20-hour requirement. 



108 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Broadcast Journalism Option 

Journ. 241 — Law and Communications 3 

Journ. 350 — Reporting I 4 

Journ. 362 — Broadcast News Production 4 

Journ. 372 — Broadcast Newswriting and Gathering 4 

Journ. 382 — Broadcast News Editing 4 

Electives in communications to complete the 20-hour requirement. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

This curriculum, outlined on page 112, is administered in the College of Engineering. 
Requirements for the first year are the same as in other engineering curricula. Courses in 
agricultural engineering begin in the third semester. In the third year, the student chooses 
technical electives for specialization in one of the following: processing, structures and 
environment, power and machinery, or soil and water. A specialization in food engineering is 
also available (see page 189). 

For the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering, 
and of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

Students may obtain bachelor's degrees in both agricultural engineering and agriculture in five 
years by choosing the curriculum in agricultural science, option 3, on page 112. Students 
following the five-year program enroll in the College of Agriculture for their first three years 
of work and then transfer to the College of Engineering for the last two years. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL INDUSTRIES 
For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum closely parallels the requirements of the core curriculum in agriculture with 
the additional requirement for a minimum of 27 hours of commerce and business courses. It 
is designed to prepare students for careers in industries that service or are related to agriculture. 
This includes businesses involved in providing the farm firm with production inputs including 
those involved in financing agricultural operations. Opportunities also include firms involved 
in marketing food and other products produced on farms through local, intermediate, wholesale, 
and retail outlets. Upon completion of the curriculum requirements and a minimum of 126 
hours of credit, the student is awarded the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society ... .1 Agriculture core course 3-4 

Agriculture core course (see page 99) 3-4 Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 111 — Algebra, or Math. 112 Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry, or 

— College Algebra (see Math. Math. 124 — Introductory Analysis 

page 99) 5-3 for Social Scientists I 2-3 

Natural science course (see page 99) 3-5 Natural science course 3-5 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition (see Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective 

English, page 99) 4 Speaking 3 

Total 15-17 Total 15-17 

SECOND YEAR 

Agriculture core course 3-4 Agriculture elective 3 

Business course (see page 99) 3 Business courses 6 

Humanities course (see page 99) 3 Journalism, business and technical writing, 

Natural science course 3-5 speech communication, or elective 2-3 

Social science course (see page 99) 3 Econ. 101 — Principles of Economics 4 

Total 15-17 Total 15-16 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The general requirements, in addition to the courses listed for the first two years, include completion 
of: (1) a minimum of 27 hours of business courses from those listed, (2) agriculture electives to bring 
total agriculture to 35 hours, (3) an approved 6 hours in the humanities (see page 99), (4) a minimum 
of 9 hours of approved social science courses, other than economics and Fin. 150 (see page 99), 
(5) sufficient open electives to bring the total hours to 126. See Agriculture Student Handbook for 
groups of suggested electives based on student's specific career interests. 



AGRICULTURE 109 



Natural Science Courses Group 

In addition to the chemistry and mathematics courses listed for the first two years, each student 

must complete three courses from the following: 

HOURS 

PI. Bio. 100 — Plant Biology, or Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 4-3 

Chem. 102 or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry 4 

Geol. 101 — An Introduction to the Study of the Earth, or Geol. 107 — General Geology I 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry, or Math. 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists 

I. or analytic geometry 4-5 

Biol. 104 — Animal Biology, or Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Business Courses Group 

Each student in this curriculum must take a minimum of 27 hours to include: 

HOURS 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Econ. 300 — Intermediate Microeconomic Theory 3 

One or more courses from each of the following: 

Fin. 254 — An Introduction to Business Financial Management, or Ag. Ec. 302 — Financing 
Agriculture 3 

B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to Management, or B. Adm. 210 — Management and 
Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing, or Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products, 

or Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Two courses from: 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting 1 3 

Computer science 3 

Statistics 3-4 

Two courses elected from: accountancy, advertising, business administration, economics, or 

finance 6 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

The purpose of this curriculum is to prepare students to teach vocational agriculture in 
secondary schools and community colleges, and to work in the Cooperative Extension Service 
and in many agribusiness areas. In addition to the training outlined in this curriculum, the 
Illinois State Plan calls for a minimum of one year or 2,000 hours of employment experience 
in agriculture for those who choose to be certified as secondary school agriculture instructors. 
A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. For teacher education requirements 
applicable to all curricula, see the section on teacher education beginning on page 87. 

General Education Requirements 

COMMUNICATIONS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or Rhet. 105 or 108, and Sp. Com. 101 6-7 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biol. 104 — Animal Biology 4 

Math. 1 1 1 or 1 1 2 — College algebra, or exemption by placement test 3-5 

PI. Bio. 100 — Plant Biology 4 

Chem. 101 and 102 or 103 — General Chemistry including Organic 8 

Total 19-21 

HUMANITIES 

Approved courses (see page 99) 6 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Psych. 1 00 — General Psychology 3 

Electives 6-8 

For students interested in secondary education certification, these electives must be selected 
to fulfill certification requirements in political science and U.S. history. The course in political 
science must include instruction on the constitutions of Illinois and the United States. 
Total 13-15 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 3 



110 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Professional Education Courses hours 

Ed. Psy. 21 1 — Educational Psychology 3 

Ed. Pr. 150 — School and Community Experiences 2 

E.P.S. 201 — Foundations of American Education 3 

Vo. Tec. 101 — Nature of the Teaching Profession 2 

Vo. Tec. 240 — Principles of Vocational and Technical Education 2 

Vo. Tec. 275 — Pre-Student Teaching in Agricultural Education 2-3 

Vo. Tec. 276 — Student Teaching in Vocational Agriculture 8 

Vo. Tec. 277 — Programs and Procedures in Agricultural Education 5 

Total 27-28 

Prescribed Courses in Agriculture 

CORE COURSES HOURS 

Agr. 1 00 — Agriculture in Modern Society 1 

Ag. Ec. 100 — Introductory Agricultural Economics 3 

Ag. M. 100 — Engineering Applications in Agriculture, or 

Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Construction Technology 3 

Soils 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Total 11 

Approved Options 

Each student must select one of the following five options. The prescribed agriculture courses 
and elective agriculture courses must total 40 hours, including the 1 1 hours listed above, 
and must include a minimum of 20 hours of 200- and 300-level courses 29 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OPTION HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products, or Ag. Ec. elective 300-level courses 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metalwork 3 

Agricultural mechanization elective 200-level course 3-4 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

An. S. or D.S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Animal science or dairy science elective 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

AGRICULTURAL SUPPLY AND PRODUCTS OPTION HOURS 

Ag. Ec. 220 — Farm Management 3-4 

Ag. Ec. 230 — Marketing of Agricultural Products 3 

Ag. Ec. 338 — Agribusiness Management 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metalwork 3 

Agron. 121 — Principles of Field Crop Science 4 

Soils 303 — Soil Fertility and Fertilizers, or Agron. 326 — Weeds and Their Control 3 

An. S. or D.S. 221 — Animal Nutrition 4 

Hort. 225 — Ornamental Gardening, or Hort. 233 — Floriculture for the Home 3 

Nonagriculture courses: 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

AGRICULTURAL MECHANIZATION OPTION HOURS 

Ag. M. 200 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Construction Technology 3 

Ag. M. 201 — Agricultural Mechanics Shop: Electrical and Metalwork 3 

Agricultural mechanization electives — 200- and 300-level courses excluding Ag. M. 361 10 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science or An. S. 207 — Companion Animal Manage- 
ment 3-4 

HORTICULTURE OPTION HOURS 

An. S. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science or An. S. 207 — Companion Animal Manage- 
ment 3-4 

Entom. 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

Nine hours from: Hort. 125, 201, 202, 221, 226, 233, 236, 242, 251, 261, 262 9 

AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES AND FORESTRY OPTION HOURS 

Soils 304 — Soil Management and Conservation 3 

An. Sci. 100 — Introduction to Animal Science or An. Sci. 207 — Companion Animal 

Management 3-4 

Entom. 120 — Introduction to Applied Entomology 3 

For. 101 — General Forestry 3 



AGRICULTURE 111 



For. 220 — Dendrology 4 

For. 253 — Forest Economics or For. 260 — Forest Land Policy and Administration or For. 

319 — Environment and Plant Ecosystems 3 

Hort. 100 — Introductory Horticulture 3 

R. Soc. 270 — Population Issues or R. Soc. 277 — Rural Social Change 3 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

This curriculum is especially designed tor students who plan to do graduate study in agricultural 

holds or those who wish to engage in professional work requiring more science, mathematics, 

or engineering than is included in the core curriculum in agriculture. The flexibility of the 

options provides an opportunity for planning individual programs of study under the supervision 

ot a racult) adviser qualified in the student's special field of interest. 

Option 1. For students desiring preparation for graduate study or professional work in animal, 

plant, or soil science. 

Option 2. For students desiring preparation for graduate study or professional work in the 

fields included in agricultural economics, agricultural law, and rural sociology. 

Option 3. For students enrolled in the five-year, combined agricultural science and agricultural 

engineering program. 

To be eligible for admission to the curriculum, students entering as freshmen must meet the 
minimum selection index as determined by high school rank and test scores. Students entering 
as transfers must have a scholastic grade-point average in their collegiate work of not less than 
4.00 for options 1 and 2 and 3.25 for option 3 in terms of the grading system of the University 
of Illinois (A = 5.0). Once enrolled, all students in options 1 and 2 must maintain an average 
of at least 4.00, and those in option 3 must maintain at least 3.00 for both their University of 
Illinois and cumulative average to remain in and graduate from the curriculum. A summary of 
the minimum requirements for all three options follows. 

OPTIONS 

1 AND 3 OPTION 2 
MINIMUM MINIMUM 

Summary hours hours 

General University requirements (Rhet. 105) 4 4 

Group I: College of Agriculture courses (15 of the 30 hours must be at the 

200 and 300 level) 30 30 

In option 3, a maximum of 15 hours of agricultural engineering and 
agricultural mechanization courses may be credited toward the degree in 
agriculture. 

Group II: Humanities (see page 99) 6 6 

Group III: Social sciences (see page 99) 9 16 

In option 2, at least 8 hours in economics must be included. 
In option 2. a minimum of 54 hours must be completed in groups III, IV, 
and V, combined, including the minimum hours indicated for each group. 
Group IV: Biological science (biology; ecology, ethology, and evolution; 

entomology; microbiology; physiology; plant biology; zoology) 10 6 

In options 1 and 3, a total of 45 hours in groups IV and V, with a minimum 
of 10 hours in each must be completed. 

In option 2, a minimum of 54 hours must be completed in groups III, IV, 
and V, combined, including the minimum hours indicated for each group. 
Group V: Physical science (biochemistry, chemistry, computer science, ge- 
ology, mathematics, physics) and approved courses in statistics 10 16 

In options 1 and 3, a total of 45 hours in groups IV and V, with a minimum 

of 10 hours in each, must be completed. 

In option 3, T.A.M. 145 and 212 may be counted toward group V 

In option 2, a minimum of 54 hours must be completed in groups III, IV, 

and V combined, including the minimum hours indicated for each group. 

Electives (unrestricted) 32 32 

Total required for graduation 126 126 

Sample Program: Options 1 and 2 

Students in both options follow a first-year program closely related to the core curriculum as 
outlined on page 99 of this catalog. The programs for the second, third, and fourth years are 
planned in consultation with the student's faculty adviser consistent with the student's career 
objectives and the curriculum requirements summarized on pages 99 and 100. Courses suggested 



112 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



to prepare students for admission to graduate study in various areas are included in the 
Agriculture Student Handbook. A total of 126 hours is required for graduation. 



Option 3. Sample Program. Five-Year Combined Program in 
Agricultural Science and Agricultural Engineering for the Degrees of 
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and Bachelor of Science in 
Engineering 

Students enroll in the College of Agriculture for the first three years and then transfer to the 
College of Engineering for the last two years. The suggested program of study that follows 
fulfills graduation requirements for both the Colleges of Agriculture and Engineering. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 

Math. 1 12 — College Algebra 1 3 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry 1 2 

Rhet. 105 — Composition 2 4 

Biological science elective 35 4 

Humanities or social science elective 6 3 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 1 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

G.E. 193 — Special Problem 

Agriculture science elective 45 4 

Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

Ag. E. 126 — Engineering in Agriculture 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 1 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225 — Introduction Matrix Theory 2 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 
Total 17 



THIRD YEAR 

Agriculture science elective 45 4 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations 

and Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave, 

motion, sound, light, modern physics) 4 

T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics II 

(Dynamics) 3 

Humanities or social science elective 2 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, Group I 7 3 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

E.E. 220 or E.E. 260 — Circuit Analysis 3 

Agriculture science elective 45 3 

Humanities or social science elective 6 3 

Total 16 



FIFTH YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, Group II 7 3 

Technical elective 7 3 

Agriculture science elective 45 4 

Biological science elective 35 2 

Humanities or social science elective 6 3 

Total 15 

Total 158 



T.A.M. 150 — Analytic Mechanics 
(Statics), or T.A.M. 152 — Engi- 
neering Mechanics I (Statics) 2-3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 6 4 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several Variables . . .3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

electricity, magnetism) 4 

Total 16-17 



Ag. E. 127 — Production Systems in 

Agriculture 3 

Biological science elective 35 4 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Solids 3 

C.E. 261 — Introduction to Structural 
Engineering or M.E. 220 — Mechanics 

of Machinery 7 3 

Biological science elective 2 3 

Total 16 



Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, Group I 7 3 

Ag. E. 298 — Seminar 1 

M. E. 209 — Thermodynamics & Heat 

Transfer 3 

Agriculture science elective 45 3 

Humanities or social science elective 6 3 

Free elective 8 3 

Total 16 



Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, Group II 7 3 

Ag. E. 299 — Undergraduate Thesis 2 

Technical elective 7 3 

Free elective 8 5-6 

Total 13-14 



1 Students with three or four years of high school mathematics, including trigonometry, and a 
satisfactory grade on the Mathematics Placement Tests, may take Math. 120 the first semester. If 
Math. 120 is taken the first semester and the student has received a satisfactory score on the 
Chemistry Placement Test, Chem. 101 may also be taken the first semester. 

2 Sp. Comm. 111 and 112, 3 hours each, may be substituted for Rhet. 105, and is recommended. 



AGRICULTURE 113 



3 Ten hours of biological sciences are required (biology, ecology, ethology, and evolution, entomology, 
microbiology, plant biology, physiology, and zoology)." 5 

4 Fifteen hours of agricultural sciences other than agricultural engineering and agricultural mechanics 
are required. Recommend Agron. 121, Soils 101, and Agr. Ec. 220. 5 

5 To meet engineering degree requirements, 12 hours of the biological and agricultural sciences 
(footnotes 3 and 4) must be chosen from the following: At least 8 hours from Agron. 121, 322, 326; 
An. S. 307; Biol. 100, 101, 104, Entom. 120; Geol. 101, 250; Mcbio. 100; PI. Bio. 100; and Soils 101, 
308; the remainder from: Ag. Ec. 220. 324, 325; Ag. M. 200, 201. 

6 Fourteen hours of social sciences and humanities are required in addition to Econ. 101. An 
approved 6-hour sequence in both social science and humanities is required to meet College of 
Engineering requirements. Since the list of courses that the Colleges of Engineering and of Agriculture 
accept for the humanities and social science requirements varies, students should be careful to 
select those which are acceptable to both colleges. (Note: history is a humanities in engineering, a 
social science in agriculture). 

7 Each student must have 18 to 20 hours of technical electives selected from the following: (1) 
C.E. 261 or ME. 220; (2) two courses from agricultural engineering technical electives, Group I, and 
two courses from Group II; and (3) additional courses from other technical electives. 

8 Sufficient open electives to total the minimum curriculum requirement of 1 58 hours. All requirements 
of the combined curriculum (as outlined) must be completed to satisfy the requirements for both 
degrees. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING TECHNICAL ELECTIVES HOURS 

Group I 

Ag. E. 236 — Machine Characteristics and Mechanisms 3 

Ag. E. 256 — Surveying Agricultural and Forest Lands 3 

Ag. E. 287 — Environmental Control for Plants and Animals 3 

Ag. E. 311 — Instrumentation and Measurements 3-4 

Ag. E. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics 4 

Group II 

Ag. E. 277 — Design of Agricultural Structures 3 

Ag. E. 336 — Design of Agricultural Machinery 3 

Ag. E. 346 — Tractors and Prime Movers 3 

Ag. E. 356 — Soil and Conservation Structures 3 

Ag. E. 357 — Land Drainage 3 

Ag. E. 387 — Agricultural Process Engineering 3 

OTHER TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

A student may choose any course that satisfies the College of Engineering requirements for 
technical electives. Students desiring to specialize in a specific area of agricultural engineering 
may use the following lists as a guide in choosing their technical electives. 

Electric Power and Processing HOURS Power and Machinery HOURS 

Ag. E. 236 3 Ag. E. 236 3 

Ag. E. 287 3 Ag. E. 31 1 3 or 4 

Ag. E. 31 1 3 or 4 Ag. E. 336 3 

Ag. E. 336 3 Ag. E. 340 3 

Ag. E. 340 3 Ag. E. 346 3 

Ag. E. 387 3 M.E. 270 4 

Chem. 323 4 M.E. 231 3 

M.E. 213 3 

M.E. 307 3 

Structures and Environment Soil and Water 

Ag. E. 277 3 Ag. E. 256 2 

Ag. E. 287 3 Ag. E. 277 3 

Ag. E. 31 1 3 or 4 Ag. E. 287 3 

Ag. E. 340 3 Ag. E. 31 1 3 or 4 

Ag. E. 387 3 Ag. E. 340 3 

C.E. 214 2 Ag. E. 356 3 

C.E. 262 3 Ag. E. 357 3 

C.E. 263 3 C.E. 255 3 

C.E. 264 3 C.E. 264 3 

C.E. 280 3 

CURRICULUM IN FOOD INDUSTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Food Industry 

The food industry' curriculum is more flexible than the Food Science curriculum and is designed 
to provide the student with training in preparation for a career in the food industry in business 



114 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



administration, engineering, production, processing, quality control, and public health. A 
minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biological Science 1 4 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 114 — Trigonometry 2 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of 

Effective Speaking 3 

Social science (see page 99) 3 

Total 16 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

Math. 111 — Algebra or exemption 

(see Mathematics, page 99) 5 

Rhetoric 105 — Composition (see 

English, page 99) 4 

Humanities (see page 99) 3 

Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 2 

F.S. 260 — Raw Materials for Processing ... .4 
Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

F.S. 213 — Food Analysis 1 4 

F.S. 214 — Food Chemistry 3 

Humanities 3 

Social science 3 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting. . . .3 
Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

F.S. 301 — Food Processing I 5 

Electives 12 

Total 17 



Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry .3 

F.S. 202 — Sensory Evaluation of Food 3 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics 5 

Social science 3 

Elective 2 3 

Total 17 



F.S. 363 — Engineering for Food Processing .3 
Mcbio. 311 —Food and Industrial 

Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 312 — Techniques of Applied 

Microbiology 2 

Electives 8 

Total 16 



F.S. 302 — Food Processing II 5 

F.S. 206 — Inspection Trip 1 

F.S. 332 — Sanitation in Food Processing. . . .2 

Electives 5-8 

Total 16 



1 May be Biol. 104 or 110 or PI. Bio. 100 or Physl. 103. 

2 Open electives to include a specialized 15-hour group of courses selected by the student and 
adviser to meet specific career objectives. Examples include courses in business, engineering, and 
agriculture production. At least 6 hours must be at the 200- and 300-level. 



CURRICULUM IN FOOD SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science In Food Science 

This program is designed for students who wish to be trained in the scientific aspects of food 
processing, quality control, research, and product development for employment in the food 
industry, governmental agencies, and educational institutions. This curriculum also provides 
the scientific background for graduate study in food processing, food chemistry, food micro- 
biology, and nutritional science. A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biological science 1 4 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of 

Effective Speaking 3 

Total 16 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 

F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 3 

Math. 112 — College Algebra (see 

Mathematics, page 99) 3 

Math. 114 — Trigonometry 2 

Rhet. 105 — Composition (see English, 

page 99) 4 

Social sciences (see page 99) 3 

Total 16 



AGRICULTURE 



115 



SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics 5 

F.S 260 — Raw Materials for Processing ... 4 
Total 16 



Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 
Chem. 134 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry Laboratory 2 

F.S. 202 — Sensory Evaluation of Food 3 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 2 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics 5 

Total 18 



THIRD YEAR 

F.S. 213 — Food Analysis 1 4 

F.S. 314 — Food Chemistry and Nutrition I . . .4 

Statistics 2 3 

Humanities (see page 99) 3 

Total 14 



F.S. 315 — Food Chemistry and Nutrition II. . .4 
F.S. 363 — Engineering for Food Processing .3 
Mcbio. 311 — Food and Industrial 

Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 312 — Techniques of Applied 

Microbiology 2 

Social science 3 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 

F.S 301 — Food Processing I 5 

Humanities 3 

Social science 3 

Electives 6 

Total 17 



F.S. 206 — Inspection Trip 1 

F.S. 302 — Food Processing II 5 

F.S. 332 — Sanitation in Food 

Processing 2 

Electives 8 



Total 



15 



1 May be Biol. 104 or 110, or PI. Bio. 100, or Physl. 103. 

2 A minimum of 3 hours credit in one of the following statistics courses is required: Math. 161, 
Econ. 171, Econ. 172, Psych. 223, Agron. 340, or Ag. Ec. 261. 



CURRICULUM IN FORESTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry 

The curriculum in forestry consists of two options. The Forest Science Option prepares students 
for positions involving management of natural resources, particularly those associated with 
forests and forest land including environmental quality and ecology. The Wood Products 
Industries Option prepares students for positions in public or private wood research or in the 
wood-using industries. Students learn the basic anatomical, physical, chemical, and strength 
properties of wood as related to the use of wood. Graduates may qualify for employment in 
a wide range of fields with public agencies or private industry. A minimum of 126 hours of 
credit, including 8 hours earned in summer field study, is required for graduation. 

A summer field study of seven weeks is required for all students, usually between the second 
and third year. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 

PI. Bio. 100 — Plant Biology 4 

Math. 112 — College Algebra (see 

Mathematics, page 99) 3 

Math. 1 14 — Trigonometry 2 

Rhet. 105 — Composition (see English, 

page 99) 4 

Humanities (see page 99) 3 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biol. 104 — Animal Biology 4 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

For. 101 — General Forestry 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of 

Effective Speaking 3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Total 18 



SECOND YEAR 

Geol. 101 — Principles of Geology 4 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics (mechanics, 

heat, and sound) 5 

For. 220 — Dendrology 4 

Humanities 3 

Total 16 



Soils 101 — Introduction to Soils 4 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Phycs. 102 — General Physics (light, 

electricity, and magnetism) 5 

Chem. 102 or 103 — General Chemistry 4 

Total 18 



116 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SUMMER FIELD STUDIES HOURS 

For. 201 — Wildland Recreation 1 

For. 21 1 — Forest Ecology 2 

For. 221 — Forest Measurements 2 

For. 231 — Wood Utilization 1 1 

For. 281 — Introduction to Forest 

Resource Management 2 

Total 8 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The course of study for the third and fourth years follows the option selected and is planned in 
consultation with the student's faculty adviser. 

Forest Science Option 

The following courses are required: 

HOURS 

For. 213 — Silviculture 3 

For. 232 — Wood Utilization II, For. 236 — Physical Properties of Wood and Wood-Base 

Materials, or For. 271 — Wood Anatomy and Identification 3 

For. 253 — Forest Economics 3 

For. 282 — Forest Management 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology, 1 or Entom. 120 — Introduction to Applied 

Entomology 3-4 

For. 316 — Advanced Forest Ecology 3 

For. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics, or Ag. Ec. 261 — Agricultural Economic Statistics, 

or For. 321 — Forest Biometrics 3-4 

Additional elective courses must be completed to bring the total hours for graduation to 126. 
Students are encouraged to consult the Agriculture Student Handbook for a list of recommended 
electives. 

1 If PI. Pa. 204 is used to fulfill requirements, students must also enroll in PI. Pa. 312 — Diseases 
of Urban Trees (1 hour) or PI. Pa. 314 — Diseases of Forest Trees (1 hour). 

Wood Products Industries Option 

The following courses are required: 

For. 232 — Wood Utilization II; For. 236 — Physical Properties of Wood and Wood-Base Materials; 
For. 253 — Forest Economics; For. 271 — Wood Anatomy and Identification; For. 273 — Adhesives 
and Laminates; For. 340 — Introduction to Applied Statistics, or Ag. Econ. 261 — Agricultural 
Economic Statistics; For. 372 — Mechanical Properties of Wood and Wood-Base Materials. 

Additional elective courses must be completed to bring the total hours for graduation to 126. At 
least 15 of the elective hours must be from a group of prescribed, restricted electives in such areas 
as accountancy, business administration, chemistry, finance, forestry, and mathematics. Consult the 
Agriculture Student Handbook for the complete list. 

CURRICULUM IN ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Ornamental Horticulture 

This curriculum prepares students for careers in the production, marketing, and use of ornamental 
crops; in teaching, research, or other related professional activities; or in business serving or 
related to ornamental horticulture. Areas of specialization include landscape horticulture; flower 
shop and garden center management; nursery crops management; floriculture crops production; 
and turfgrass management. 

Career opportunities include production of flowers and ornamental plants in greenhouses 
and nurseries; flower shop management and floral designing, landscape design and contracting, 
park and golf course management; sales representatives and technicians with horticultural firms; 
employment with state or federal governmental agencies or institutions as teachers, researchers, 
horticultural advisers, crop inspectors, etc.; consultants; and writers. Students are encouraged 
to acquire practical experience through employment in ornamental horticultural establishments. 

A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. 



AGRICULTURE 117 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 Chem. 101 — General Chemistry (see 

PI Bio. 100 — Plant Biology 4 Chemistry, page 99) 4 

Course from group I 0-3 Course from group I 3 

Hort. 100 — Introduction to Horticulture 3 Entom. 101 — Introduction to Applied 

Math. 1 1 1 — Algebra, or Math. 1 1 2 — Col- Entomology 3 

lege Algebra (see Mathematics, page 99). 3-5 Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

Sp. Com. 111 — Verbal Communi- ' Sp. Com. 112 — Verbal Communication 3 

cation (see English, page 99) 3 Total 15 

Total 15-18 

SECOND YEAR 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Soils 101 — Introductory Soils 4 

Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: Courses from groups I and II 6 

Organic Chemical Studies 4 Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Courses from groups I and II 8-9 Elective 3 

Elective 3-4 Total 17 

Total 15-17 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The third and fourth years to be devoted to the fulfillment of the group requirements listed below. 

Group Requirements 

GROUP I: HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES HOURS 

An approved 6 hours in the humanities and a minimum of 9 hours from two departments in 
the social sciences (including Econ. 101) 15 

GROUP II: PRESCRIBED HORTICULTURE AND SUPPORTING COURSES 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

PI. Bio. 260 — Introductory Plant Taxonomy, or PI. Bio. 366 — Field Botany 3-5 

Hort. 100 — Introduction to Horticulture 3 

Hort. 201 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental Plants I 3 

Hort. 202 — Identification and Use of Woody Ornamental Plants II 3 

Hort. 221 — Plant Propagation 3 

Hort. 226 — Bedding Plant Production, Use and Identification 3 

PI. Pa. 204 — Introductory Plant Pathology 3 

Total 24-26 

GROUP III: HORTICULTURE ELECTIVE COURSES 

Minimum of 15 hours to be selected from the following: 

Hort. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics; Hort. 122 — Greenhouse Management; Hort. 210 — Home 
Grounds Planning and Design; Hort. 211 — Home Grounds Development and Construction; Hort. 
212 — Landscape Contracting; Hort. 223 — Floricultural Crops Production I; Hort. 224 — Floricultural 
Crops Production II; Hort. 227 — Indoor Plant Culture, Use and Identification; Hort. 230 — Herbaceous 
Perennials, Identification and Use; Hort. 231 — Floral Design I; Hort. 232 — Flower Shop Management 
and Floral Design II; Hort. 234 — Nursery Management; Hort. 236 — Turfgrass Management; Hort. 
242 — Commercial Vegetable Production; Hort. 251 — Arboriculture; Hort. 261 — Small Fruit and 
Viticulture Science; Hort. 262 — Tree Fruit Science; Hort. 300 — Special Problems (maximum of 5 
hours); Hort. 321 — Floricultural Physiology; Hort. 322 — Plant Nutrition; Hort. 323 — Principles of 
Plant Breeding; Hort. 336 — Perennial Grass Ecosystems; Hort. 345 — Growth and Development 
of Horticultural Crops. 

GROUP IV: AREA OF SPECIALIZATION COURSES 

An additional 15 hours consistent with the student's specific career interest is selected in consultation 
with the faculty adviser from an extensive list of prescribed courses. Included are courses in such 
areas as accountancy, agricultural economics, agronomy, art, business administration, chemistry, 
computer science, plant biology, and plant pathology. A complete listing of acceptable courses 
appears in the Agriculture Student Handbook. 

CURRICULUM IN SOIL SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Soil Science 

This curriculum is especially designed for students who plan to engage in professional work 
requiring more soil science, mathematics, chemistry, and physics than is included in the core 
curriculum in agriculture, or for students who plan to do graduate study in soil science. The 
curriculum in soil science also prepares the student for positions dealing with the management 
of natural resources, particularly those involving agricultural, forest, or range soils, and including 
the effect of land use on environmental quality. 



118 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Agr. 100 — Agriculture in Modern Society. . . .1 Agron. 121 — Principles of Field 

Rhet. 105 — Composition (see English, Crop Science 4 

page 99) 4 Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Math. 112 — College Algebra (see Speaking 3 

Mathematics, page 99) 3 Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 114 — Trigonometry 2 Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Soils 101 — Introduction to Soils 4 Geometry 5 

Social science (see page 99) 3 Total 16 

Total 17 

SECOND YEAR 

PI. Bio. 100 — Plant Biology 4 Geol. 107 — General Geology 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 Chem. 122 — Elementary Quantitative 

Phycs. 101 — General Physics 5 Analysis 4 

Humanities (see page 99) 3 Phycs. 102 — General Physics 5 

Total 16 Econ. 101 — Principles of Economics 4 

Total 17 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

Courses are chosen in consultation with the student's adviser and must include the following: 
Prescribed Courses in Agriculture 

Agron. 330 — Plant Physiology 3 

Soils 301 — Soil Survey with Emphasis on Illinois Soils 3 

Elective Courses in Soils 15 

Soils 302 — Soil Testing Practicum; Soils 303 — Soil Fertility and Fertilizers; Soils 304 — Soil 
Management and Conservation; Soils 305 — Biochemical Processes in Soil and Water Environments; 
Soils 307 — Soil Chemistry; Soils 308 — Physics of the Plant Environment; Soils 311 — Laboratory 
Methods for Soil Research; Soils 313 — Soil Mineral Analysis. 

Elective Courses in Agronomy 6 

Agron. 110 — Plant and Animal Genetics; Agron. 318 — Crop Growth and Production; Agron. 319 
— Environment and Plant Ecosystems; Agron. 322 — Forage Crops and Pastures; Agron. 326 — 
Weeds and Their Control 

Elective courses in agriculture to bring total agriculture courses to a minimum of 40 

Additional humanities courses (see page 99) to bring total to 6 

Additional social sciences courses (see page 99) to bring total to 9 

Other prescribed courses: 

Microbiology 100 — Introductory Microbiology and Microbiology 101 — Introductory Experi- 
mental Microbiology 5 

Chemistry 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 

Open electives to bring total hours to 126 

PROGRAM IN PREPROFESSIONAL VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Most students wishing to complete the preprofessional requirements for veterinary medicine 
in the College of Agriculture follow Option I of the Agricultural Science curriculum, or the 
Animal Science or Dairy Science major. 

Because of the competition for admission, students should plan a bachelors degree program 
that will prepare them for a career alternative should admission to the professional program 
not be obtained. Recently there have been two to three qualified applicants for each space 
available in the entering class in veterinary medicine. The mean grade-point average of admitted 
students was slightly above 4.50 (A = 5.0). Specific information about veterinary medicine, 
including admission requirements, can be found on page 317. 

CURRICULUM IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES 
For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Human Resources and Family Studies 

This four-year curriculum in the School of Human Resources and Family Studies, College of 
Agriculture, is designed for students who want to pursue careers in one of the home economics- 
oriented professions. The human resources and family studies curriculum combines a liberal 
arts education with the study of various ecological subsystems as they affect and are affected 
by individuals and families. The 120-130 hours required for graduation include prescribed 
courses of which at least 28 hours must be in human resources and family studies selected 
according to the requirements for one of the following options: Consumer Economics, Dietetics, 
Foods and Nutrition, Foods in Business, General Home Economics, Human Development and 



AGRICULTURE 119 



Famil) Ecology, Institution Management, Marketing o( Textiles and Apparel, and Textiles and 

Apparel. 

Students preparing to work professionally in the Held of interior design should follow the 
interior design curriculum (page 125). Those preparing for managerial positions in restaurants 
and other commercial food service units should meet the requirements specified ill the curriculum 
in restaurant management (page 126) or the Institution Management Option (page 123). 

The following number of hours in the designated areas of study and certain specific courses 
listed below are required in all options of the School of Human Resources And Family Studies 
curriculum. 

HOURS 

Basic disciplines — Design, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, to include a 

minimum of: 40-58 

Art and design (studio course) 2-3 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Natural sciences (see page 99) to include: 12 

Physical science (minimum 3 hours) 

and biological science (minimum 3 hours); 

see option listings for specific science requirements for each option 
Social sciences to include at least one course in principles of economics and one in psychology 

(see page 99) 9 

Human resources and family studies (home economics) 28-44 

Math. 1 1 1 or 1 1 2, or exemption by Mathematics Placement Test 0-5 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Sp. Com. 111 and 112 4-6 

Other option requirements 0-24 

Electives, to bring total to 1 20 or 1 30 1 1 -52 

The suggested program for the first two years of the curriculum, shown in detail below, 
provides a foundation for the various fields of concentration and allows some variation 
according to the personal and career objectives of individual students. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

H.R.F.S. 100 — Contemporary Issues Art and design 2-3 

in Human Res. and Family Studies 1 H.R.F.S. course(s) 3 

H.R.F.S. course 3 Humanities 3 

Math. 111 — Algebra, or Math. Natural science 3-4 

1 12 — College Algebra 3-5 Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology ... .3 Effective Speaking or 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition, or Sp. Com. Sp. Com. 112 — Verbal Communications. . .3 

111 — Verbal Communications 3-4 Total 14-16 

Total 15-16 

SECOND YEAR 

H.R.F.S. course 3 H.R.F.S. course 3 

Humanities 3 Natural and/or social sciences 3-7 

Natural and/or social sciences 3-7 Other curriculum or option requirements ... 6-8 

Other curriculum or option requirements ... 3-5 Humanities 0-3 

Total 16-17 Total 16-17 

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS 

The programs for the third and fourth years are largely determined by the option selected, and must 
be planned in consultation with the student's faculty adviser. The options are described below. 
Students should declare an option no later than the second semester of the sophomore year. Human 
resources and family studies courses as prescribed by the option, plus three H.R.F.S. courses from 
outside the option area, must total a minimum of 28 hours. Areas are: family and consumer economics, 
human development and family ecology; foods and nutrition; interior design; and textiles and apparel. 
(Prescribed courses in the general option include at least one course from each of the five areas.) 

Consumer Economics 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

F.A.C.E. 1 70 — Consumer Economics 3 

FACE. 270 — Family Financial Management 3 

F.A.C.E. 313 — Economics of Consumption 3 

F.A.C.E. 370 — Family Economics 3 

F.A.C.E. 371 — The Family as a Consuming Unit 3 

H.D.F.E. 210 — Comparative Family Organizations 3 

Six additional hours selected from: F.A.C.E. 373 — Family Resource Management; F.A.C.E. 

361 — Development and Function of Family Housing; F.A.C.E. 375 — Home Equipment; 

F.A.C.E. 379 — Problems in Family, Consumer, and Consumption Economics. 



120 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Two additional H.R.F.S. courses to be chosen from outside the Family and Consumer Economics 
Division. 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art and design — Studio course 2-3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Econ. 301 — Intermediate Macro-economic Theory 3 

Math. 1 24 — Finite Mathematics 3 

Math. 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists 4 

Pol. Sci. 150 — American Government 3 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Natural Sciences electives, including one biological science (see page 99) 6 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 6 

Basic discipline 1 electives to bring total to 40 

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Chem. 100 — Introductory Chemistry or exemption 2 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising, or B.A. 337 — Promotion Management 3 

Ag. Com. 114 — Agriculture Communications Media and Methods 3 

B.A. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

Econ. 1 72 — Economic Statistics 1 3 

Open electives to bring total to 120 

1 Basic disciplines are art and design, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. 

Dietetics 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

F.N. 131 — Food Management 3 

F.N. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

F.N. 231 — Science of Foods 3 

F.N. 240 — Quantity Food Production and Service 3-5 

F.N. 320 — Diet in Disease 3 

F.N. 324 — Biochemical Aspects of Human Nutrition 3 

F.N. 345 — Institution and Restaurant Management: Food Purchasing and Equipment 

Selection 3 

F.N. 350 — Institution and Restaurant Management: Organization and Administration 4 

One course selected from: F.N. 322 — Nutrition through Life Cycle, F.N. 330 — Experimental 

Foods, F.N. 355 — Specialized Quantity Food Production and Management, or Accy. 200 

— Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

Three additional H.R.F.S. courses chosen from areas other than foods, nutrition, or institution 

management 6-12 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art and design studio course 2-3 

Chem. 1 01 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 1 02 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 122 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis, or Chem. 123 — Quantitative Analysis 3 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 

Chem. 134 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 

Bioch. 350 — General Biochemistry, or Bioch. 352 — General Biochemistry I, and Bioch. 353 

— General Biochemistry II 3-8 

Bioch. 355 — Biochemistry Laboratory 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 6 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 5 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology, or Biol. 110 — Principles of Biology I and 

Biol. Ill — Principles of Biology II 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. i 03 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Social sciences electives (see page 99) 3 

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior, or B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to 
Management 3 

B. Adm. 321 — Individual Benavior in Organizations, B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration, 
or Psych. 245 — Industrial Psychology 3 

Ed. Psy. 21 1 — Educational Psychology 3 



AGRICULTURE 121 



Statistics 1 3 

Total 126 



1 Select from Econ. 171. 172; Psych. 233. 235; Soc. 185. 385; Agron. 340; Math. 161; Ed. Psy. 
390 

Foods and Nutrition 

PRESCRIBED COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

F.N. 131 — Food Management 3 

F.N. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

F.N. 231 — Science of Food 3 

FN. 324 — Biochemical Aspects of Human Nutrition 3 

FN. 330 — Experimental Foods 3 

Three additional hours from FN. 240 — Quantity Food Production and Service, FN. 320 — 
Diet in Disease, FN. 321 — Experimental Nutrition, FN. 322 — Physical Growth and Nutrition, 

or FN. 331 — Problems in Foods 2-3 

Additional H.R.F.S. courses, including three courses chosen from areas other than foods, 
nutrition, or institution management. 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art and design studio course 2-3 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 1 02 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 122 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis, or Chem. 123 — Quantitative Analysis 3 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 

Chem. 134 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 2 

Bioch. 350 — General Biochemistry, or Bioch. 352 — General Biochemistry I, and Bioch. 353 

— General Biochemistry II 3-8 

Bioch. 355 — Biochemistry Laboratory 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 6 

Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry 2 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry 5 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 5 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology, or Biol. 110 — Principles of Biology I and 

Biol. Ill — Principles of Biology II 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Social sciences electives (see page 99) 3 

Statistics 1 3 

Open electives to bring total to 1 26 

1 Select from Econ. 171, 172; Psych. 233, 235; Soc. 185, 385; Agron. 340; Math. 161, Ed. Psy. 
390. 

Foods in Business 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

FN. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

FN. 131 — Food Management 3 

FN. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

FN. 231 — Science of Food 3 

FN. 330 — Experimental Foods 3 

Six hours from: F.N. 326 — Presentations: Principles and Techniques, F.N. 331 — Problems 

in Foods, or F.A.C.E. 375 — Home Equipment 6 

Additional H.R.F.S. courses, including three courses chosen from areas other than foods, 

nutrition, or institution management. 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES 1 HOURS 

Art and design studio course 2-3 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: Organic Chemical 

Studies 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 6 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 5 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 



122 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Social sciences elective (see page 99) 3 

Basic discipline electives to bring total to 40 

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communications 3 

B.&T.W. 271 — Sales Writing, B.&T.W. 272 — Report Writing, or Sp. Com. 230 — Interpersonal 

Communications 3 

F.S. 260 — Raw Materials for Processing, or Ag. Econ. 335 — Food Marketing 4 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Statistics^ 3 

Twelve hours from: Accy. 200; Adv. 281* Com.' 214^ 240, 300, 320; B. Adm. 200, 206, 210, 

212, 247; F.A.C.E. 313, 370, 371; FN. 202, 204, 250, 322; F.S. 314, 315; Journ. 223, 326; 

Comm. 261; Sp. Com. 211, 221; a micro-computer course. 
Open electives to bring total to 126 

1 Basic disciplines are art (design), humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. 

2 Select from Econ. 171, 172; Psych. 233, 235; Soc. 185, 385; Agron. 340; Math. 161; Ed. Psy. 
390. 

General Home Economics 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

F.A.C.E. 170 — Consumer Economics 3 

F.A.C.E. 270 — Family Financial Management 3 

F.N. 1 20 — Contemporary Nutrition 3 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

H.D.F.E. 105 — Introduction to Human Development 3 

H.D.F.E. 110 — Introduction to Family Ecology 3 

I.D. 160 — Residential Environments 3 

T.A. 183 — Consumer Textiles 3 

Additional electives in H.R.F.S., including a minimum of 12 hours at the 200-300 level, with at 
least two courses at the 300 level, to bring total to 45 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art & D 1 85 — Design 3 

Chem. 1 01 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: Organic Chemical 

Studies 4 

Econ. 1 01 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 3 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Soc. 1 00 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Basic discipline 1 electives to bring total to 40 

Open electives to bring total to 126 

1 Basic disciplines are art and design, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. 

Human Development and Family Ecology 

PRESCRIBED COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

FN. 120 — Contemporary Nutrition 3 

H.D.F.E. 105 — Introduction to Human Development 3 

H.D.F.E. 106 — Observation and Assessment of Human Development 3 

H.D.F.E. 202 — Child Development Methods and Experience, or H.D.F.E. 310 — Contemporary 

American Family 3-4 

H.D.F.E. 203 — Infancy and Early Development, or H.D.F.E. 214 — Introduction to Aging, or 

H.D.F.E. 316 — Adolescence, or H.D.F.E. 370 — Family Conflict Management 3-4 

H.D.F.E. 210 — Comparative Family Organization 3 

H.D.F.E. 301 — Issues in Socialization and Development 3 

Additional H.R.F.S. courses, including two courses chosen from areas other than human 

development and family ecology, to bring total to 28 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Anth. 103 — Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 4 

Art and design studio course 2-3 

Biological sciences: genetics and one other (see page 99) 5-8 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 6 



AGRICULTURE 123 



Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Physical sciences electees (see page 99) 3 

Psych 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Social sciences electives (see page 99) 6 

Sociology, or rural sociology 3 

Open electives to bring total to 120 

Institution Management 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

F.N. 131 — Food Management 3 

FN. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

FN. 231 — Science of Foods 3 

FN. 240 — Quantity Food Production and Service 3-5 

FN. 330 — Experimental Foods 3 

F.N. 345 — Institution and Restaurant Management: Food Purchasing and Equipment Selection . .3 

FN. 350 — Institution and Restaurant Management: Organization and Administration 4 

FN. 355 — Specialized Quantity Food Production and Management 3 

Three additional courses chosen from areas other than foods, nutrition, or institution man- 
agement 6-12 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art and design 2-3 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: Organic Chemical 

Studies 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 6 

Mcbio. 100 — Introduction to Microbiology, and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 5 

Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Basic discipline 1 electives to bring total to 40 

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting, 1 3 

Accy. 202 — Principles of Accounting, II 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior, or B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to 

Management 3 

B. Adm. 321 — Individual Behavior in Organizations, B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration, 

or Psych. 245 — Industrial Psychology 3 

Econ. 341 — Economics of the Labor Market, or Econ. 343 — Unions, Bargaining, and Public 

Policy 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Statistics 2 3 

Total 126 



1 Basic disciplines are art and design, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. 

2 Select from Econ. 171, 172; Psych. 233, 235; Soc. 185, 385; Agron. 340; Math. 161; Ed. Psy. 
390. 

Marketing of Textiles and Apparel 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

T.A. 184 — Apparel Design and Selection 3 

T.A. 182 — Apparel Production Analysis 3 

T.A. 1 83 — Consumer Textiles 3 

T.A. 295 — Textile and Apparel Marketing 3 

T.A. 296 — Administrative Retailing 3 

T.A. 395 — Concepts and Cases in Retailing 3 

Nine hours chosen from: T.A. 250 — Textile and Apparel Practicum, T.A. 280 — Household 
Textiles, T.A. 281 — Retailing of Home and Apparel Accessories. T.A. 284 — Costume 
Design, T.A. 285 — History of Costume. T.A. 286 — Clothing Design: Flat Pattern, T.A. 287 
— Dress and Human Behavior, T.A. 350 — Textile and Apparel Business Practicum, T.A. 
380 — Advanced Textiles, T.A. 386 — Apparel Design: Draping, or T.A. 388 — Problems 

in Textiles and Apparel 9 

Two additional H.R.FS. courses in areas other than textiles, and interior design. 



124 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art Hi. 115 — Art Appreciation, or Art Hi. 116 — Masterpieces of Art 3 

Art & D. 1 85 — Design 3 

Art & D. 1 86 — Design 3 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: Organic Chemical 

Studies 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Econ. 313 or F.A.C.E. 313 — Economics of Consumption 3 

Humanities electives (see page 99) 3-4 

Math. 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists 4 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology, and Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology, or Physl. 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4-5 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Psych. 201 — Introduction to Social Psychology 3 

Soc. 1 00 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting, or Accy. 101 and 105 — Principles of Accounting 

I and II 3-6 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 21 2 — Retail Management 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Econ. 1 72 — Economic Statistics 3 

Open electives to bring total to 120 

Textiles and Apparel 

COURSES IN HUMAN RESOURCES AND FAMILY STUDIES HOURS 

T.A. 182 — Apparel Production Analysis 3 

T.A. 183 — Consumer Textiles 3 

T.A. 184 — Introduction to Apparel Design 3 

T.A. 190 — Cross-Cultural Analysis of Dress 3 

T.A. 295 — Textile and Apparel Marketing 3 

Fifteen hours selected from: T.A. 250 — Textile and Apparel Business Internship; T.A. 280 — 

Household Textiles; T.A. 281 — Non-textile Accessories; T.A. 284 — Apparel Design for 

the Market; T.A. 285 — History of Costume; T.A. 286 — Apparel Design: Flat Pattern; T.A. 

287 — Dress and Human Behavior; T.A. 291 — Thesis; T.A. 380 — Advanced Textiles; T.A. 

385 — History of Textiles; T.A. 388 — Problems in Textiles and Clothing 
Additional H.R.F.S. courses, including three courses in areas other than textiles and 

apparel 15 

BASIC DISCIPLINE COURSES HOURS 

Art Hi. 115 — Art Appreciation, or Art Hi. 116 — Masterpieces of Art, or Art Hi. 1 1 1 — Ancient 

and Medieval Art, and Art Hi. 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art 1 3 

Art & D. 185 — Design, or Art G.P. 119 — Design 1 3 

Chem. 1 01 — General Chemistry 4 

Chem. 102— General Chemistry, or Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: Organic Chemical 

Studies 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Humanities electives 3 

Biological science with lab 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, or Psych. 103 — Introduction to Experimental 

Psychology 3-4 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Psych. 201 , or Soc. 201 — Introduction to Social Psychology 3 

Basic discipline 2 electives to bring total to 40 

Open electives to bring total to 1 20 

OTHER REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

Statistics 3 3 

Total required hours 120 

1 If taken, no additional humanities required. 

2 Basic disciplines are art and design, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences. 

3 Select from Econ. 171, 172; Soc. 185; Psych. 233, 234, 235; Agron. 340. 



AGRICULTURE 



125 



CURRICULUM IN INTERIOR DESIGN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Interior Design 

The interior design curriculum is tor those students wishing to work professionally in the Held 

ot interior design, i mphasis is on creating optima] human environments through interioi space 

planning .md environmental design. Graduates are employed by interior design and space 

planning studios, department And retail furniture stores, and county cooperative extension and 
urban renewal resource offices. 

The L20 credit hours required tor graduation include 24 credit hours in professional interior 
design courses, 12 to 14 credit hours in other human resources and family studies courses, 28 
credit hours in art, 40 to 42 credit hours in liberal arts, and 24 to 36 credit hours in electives. 

Suggested Sequence of Courses 

Field trips are required. Estimated cost: $30 each trip. 

Two summers' experience, of a minimum of eight weeks each, or equivalent, in the interior 
design field is recommended and should be completed before registering in I.D. 378. This 
experience normally should come at the end of the second and third years. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

H.R.F.S. 100 — Contemporary Issues in 

Human Resources and Family Studies 3 

I.D. 160 — Residential Environments 3 

I.D. 161 — Introduction to Interior Design ... .3 
Math. 111 — Algebra, or Math. 112 — 

College Algebra 3-5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition, 

or Rhet. 108 — Forms of Composition 4 

Total 16-18 

SECOND YEAR 

Art G.P. 121 — Drawing Theory 2 

Art G.P. 118 — Drawing, II 3 

Art Hi. 111 — Introduction to Ancient and 

Medieval Art 4 

Natural science elective 4 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology ... .3 
Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

I.D. 260 — Interiors and Furniture I 3 

I.D. 262 — Interior Design Studio, II 3 

Art elective 3 2 

Natural science elective 4 

H.R.F.S. elective 3 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

T.A. 183 — Consumer Textiles 1 3 

Art G.P. 117 — Drawing, 1 3 

Art G.P. 119 — Design, 1 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective 

Speaking 3 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Total 15 



Art G.P 120 — Design II 3 

Art G.P 122 — Drawing Theory 2 

Art Hi. 112 — Introduction to Renaissance 

and Medieval Art 4 

T.A. 280 — Textiles for Interiors 3 

H.R.F.S. elective 2 3 

Total 15 



I.D. 261 — Interiors and Furniture II 3 

I.D. 263 — Interior Design Studio III 3 

Anthropology (Cultural) 4 

Art elective 2 

Open elective 3 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 

Restricted I.D. elective 4 3 

Econ. 101 — Intro, to Economics 4 

H.R.F.S. elective 3 

Open electives 6 

Total 16 

Total hours required 120 



Restricted I.D. elective 3 

Open electives 12 

Total 15 



1 Prerequisite is high school chemistry of Chem. 100. Students not having high school chemistry 
should substitute natural science requirement. 

2 Minimum of three courses in textiles and apparel, family and consumer economics, foods and 
nutrition, or human development and family ecology. 

3 To be chosen from Art G.P 132, Art PA. 141. 142, 201. 

4 To be chosen from I.D. 250, 360, 361, 378, 380. 



Concentration in Journalism for Human Resources and Family Studies 
Majors 

Students may wish to combine a Human Resources and Family Studies option with courses in 
journalism. For students interested in combining journalism, advertising, and broadcast- 
journalism with one of the programs of study in the School of Human Resources and Family 



126 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Studies, a program of 20 hours of courses offered by the College of Communications is 
recommended by that college and the school. A journalism concentration combined with one 
of the options can further enhance a student's employment opportunities in business, industry, 
and government. 



CURRICULUM IN RESTAURANT MANAGEMENT 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Restaurant Management 

The curriculum in restaurant management prepares students for managerial positions in 
restaurants and other commercial food service units. It also gives them basic training for work 
as purchasing agents, kitchen equipment and layout specialists, food inspectors, and other 
allied occupations. A total of 126 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

Two summers (a minimum of eight weeks each), or equivalent, of practical restaurant 
experience are required and must be completed before registering in F.N. 355. This experience 
normally should come at the end of the second and third years. 



FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Contemporary Issues in 

1 



FIRST YEAR 

H.R.F.S. 100 - 

Human Resources and Family Studies I 
Math. 111 — Algebra, or Math. 

1 12 — College Algebra 3-5 

Chem. 100 — Intro. Chem. (see 

Chemistry, page 99) 2 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, 

or Psych. 103 — Introduction to 

Experimental Psychology 3-4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 

(see English, page 99) 4 

F.N. 120 — Contemporary Nutrition 3 

Total 16-19 

SECOND YEAR 

An. Sc. 109 — Meat Purch. 

and Preparation 2 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry or 

Chem. 103 — General Chemistry: 

Organic Chemical Studies 4 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

F.N. 131 — Food Management 3 

Humanities (see page 99) 3 

Total 16 

Summer experience — 8 weeks 

THIRD YEAR 

Accy. 202 — Principles of Accountancy II ... .3 
F.N. 240 — Quantity Food Production 

and Service 3-5 

F.N. 345 — Institution and Restaurant 

Management: Food Purchasing 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

Econ. 240 — Labor Problems 3 

Total 15-17 

Summer experience — 8 weeks, or 

F.N. 250 — Food Nutrition Internship 

FOURTH YEAR 

B. Adm. 321 — Individual Behavior in 
Organizations, B. Adm. 351 — 
Personnel Administration, or Psych. 245 
— Industrial Organizational Psychology ... .3 

H.R.F.S. elective 3 

Open electives 19 

Total 15 

Total hours 126 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Mcbio. 100 and 101 — Introduction 

to Microbiology and Introduction 

to Experimental Microbiology 5 

Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of 

Effective Speaking 3 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and 

Preparation 3 

Total 18 



Econ. 172 — Economic Statistics 1 3 

Accy. 201 — Principles of Accountancy 1 3 

F.N. 231 — Science of Foods 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative 

Communication 3 

Humanities elective 3 

Total 15 



B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational 
Behavior, or B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to 

Management 3 

B. Adm. 261 — Summary of Business 

Law 3 

H.R.F.S. elective 3 

Open electives 6 

Total 15 



F.N. 350 — Institution and Restaurant 

Management: Organization and 

Administration 4 

FN. 355 — Specialized Quantity Food 

Production and Management 4 

Open electives 9 

Total 17 



AGRICULTURE 127 



CURRICULUM IN VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Education 

The purpose of this curriculum is to prepare students to teach home economics to youth and 
adults in both school and nonschool settings. Students may choose one of the following areas: 
I. General Home Economics Education 
II. Human Development and Child Care Occupations 

III. Foods and Nutrition and Food Service Occupations 

IV. Textiles and Clothing and Related Occupations 

V. Interior Design and Equipment and Related Occupations 
VI. Consumer Education and Home Management 
VII. Teaching Home Economics in Nonschool Settings 

A minimum of 1 30 semester hours is required for graduation. For teacher education requirements 
applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

General Education — Required in Areas l-VII hours 

American government (Areas l-VI only) 3 

Art & D. 185 or an acceptable alternative 2-3 

Art & D. 186 (Areas I. IV, V only) 3 

Chem. 101 4 

Chem. 1 02 or 1 03 4 

Econ. 1 01 4 

Humanities (see page 99) 6 

Math. 1 1 1 or 1 1 2 (or exemption) 5-3 or 

Mcbio. 100, 101 5 

Physical education and/or health education (Areas l-VI only) 3 

Physl. 1 03 — Introductory Human Physiology 4 

Psych. 1 00 or 1 03 3 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 and Sp. Com. 101 or 1 41 (or Sp. Com. 1 1 1 and 112) 7-6 

U.S. History (Areas l-VI only) 3-4 

Total 50-58 

Professional Education — Required in Areas l-VI hours 

Ed. Psy. 211 3 

EPS. 201 3 

Vo. Tec. 1 01 , 240, and 278 7 

Se. Ed. 241 3 

Ed. Pr. 1 50 and 242 5 

Vo. Tec. 309, or Sp. Ed. 307, or acceptable alternative 3-4 

Total 29 

Professional Education — Required in Area VII hours 

Ed. Psy. 211 3 

Vo. Tec. 101 and 152 4 

Vo. Tec. 240 and 278 5 

Sec. Ed. 241 3 

A.H.C.E. 362 4 

EPS. 201 3 

Vo. Tec. 252 8 

Total 30 

Human Resources and Family Studies Courses (Home Economics) 

The student may choose one of the following six areas. For Area I (General), requirements include 
44 or 45 hours of specific home economics courses. Areas II through VI are specialized programs 
which require at least 36 hours in home economics with at least 6 hours at the 300 level. At least 
18 hours in H.R.F.S. courses must be taken at the 200- to 300-level. 

AREA I: GENERAL HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 1 HOURS 

H.D.F.E. 105 — Introduction to Human Development 3 

H.D.F.E. 106 — Observation and Assessment of Behavior, or H.D.F.E. 202 — Child Development 

Methods and Experiences 4 

F.N. 120 — Contemporary Nutrition 3 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 3 

F.N. 131 — Food Management 3 

I.D. 160 — Residential Environments 3 

T.A. 1 83 — Consumer Textiles 3 



128 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



T.A. 184 — Apparel Design and Selection 2 

H.D.F.E. 110 — Introduction to Family Ecology, or H.D.F.E. 215 — Courtship and Marriage 3 

F.N. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 3 

F.N. 231 — Science of Foods 3 

F.A.C.E. 270 — Family Financial Management 3 

F.A.C.E. 373 — Family Resource Management 3 

H.D.F.E. 214 — Introduction to Aging, or H.D.F.E. 304 — Gerontology, or alternative 3 

Six hours from: 

H.D.F.E. 301 — Issues in Socialization and Development; H.D.F.E. 304 — Gerontology; 

H.D.F.E. 310 — Contemporary American Family; H.D.F.E. 315 — Critical Transitions in 

Families 
F.N. 322 — Physical Growth and Nutrition 
F.N. 330 — Experimental Foods 
F.A.C.E. 313 — Economics of Consumption 
F.A.C.E. 361 — Development and Function of Family Housing 
F.A.C.E. 370 — Family Economics 
F.A.C.E. 371 — The Family as a Consuming Unit 
F.A.C.E. 375 — Home Equipment 
T.A. 380 — Advanced Textiles 
T.A. 386 — Apparel Design and Draping 
Minimum total 47 

AREA II: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND CHILD CARE OCCUPATIONS 1 

Minimum of 12 hours in child and family, including basic courses in human development (e.g., H.D.F.E. 

105 and 106) and in the family (e.g., H.D.F.E. 210) 
Minimum of 6 hours in foods and nutrition 
Minimum of 6 hours in one of the following specializations: 

Housing and interior design 

Home management, family economics, and equipment 

Textiles and apparel 

H.R.F.S. electives, 12 to 21 hours (for minimum of 36 hours) 

AREA III: FOODS AND NUTRITION AND FOOD SERVICE OCCUPATIONS 1 

Foods and nutrition courses: 

F.N. 120 — Contemporary Nutrition 

F.N. 130 — Food Selection and Preparation 

F.N. 131 — Food Management 

F.N. 220 — Principles of Nutrition 

F.N. 231 — Science of Food 

F.N. 240 — Quantity Food Production and Service 
At least one of the following: 

F.N. 322 — Physical Growth and Nutrition 

FN. 330 — Experimental Foods 

F.N. 345 — Institution and Restaurant Management: Food Purchasing and Equipment Selection 

FN. 350 — Institution and Restaurant Management: Organization and Administration 
Minimum of 6 hours eac/7 in two of the following specializations: 

Child and family 

Housing and interior design 

Home management, family economics, and equipment 

Textiles and apparel 
H.R.F.S. elective, 7 to 15 hours (for minimum of 36 hours) 

AREA IV: TEXTILES AND APPAREL AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS 1 

Minimum of 12 hours in textiles and apparel courses 

Minimum of 6 hours each in two of the following specializations: 

Child and family 

Housing and interior design 

Home management, family economics, and equipment 

Foods and nutrition 
H.R.F.S. electives, 12 to 21 hours (for minimum of 36 hours) 

AREA V: HOUSING, INTERIOR DESIGN, EQUIPMENT, AND RELATED OCCUPATIONS 1 

Minimum of 14 hours from the following: 
I.D. 160 — Residential Environments 
I.D. 161 — Interior Design Studio I 
T.A. 183 — Consumer Textiles 
I.D. 260 — Interiors and Furniture I 
I.D. 261 — Interiors and Furniture II 
I.D. 262 — Interior Design 
T.A. 280 — Household Textiles 

F.A.C.E. 361 — Development and Function of Family Housing 
F.A.C.E. 375 — Home Equipment 



AGRICULTURE 129 



ID 378 — Problems in Interior Design 

FACE. 378 — Problems m Management, Equipment, and Housing 
Minimum of 6 hours each in two of the following specializations: 

Child and family 

Home management, family economics, and equipment 

Foods and nutrition 

Textiles and apparel 
H.R.F.S. electives, 10 to 19 hours (for minimum of 36 hours) 

AREA VI: CONSUMER EDUCATION AND HOME MANAGEMENT 1 

Minimum of 12 hours from the following: 

FACE. 170 — Consumer Economics 

F.A.C.E. 270 — Family Financial Management 

F.A.C.E. 313 — Economics of Consumption 

F.A.C.E. 370 — Family Economics 

F.A.C.E. 371 — The Family as a Consuming Unit 

F.A.C.E. 373 — Family Resource Management 

F.A.C.E. 375 — Household Equipment 

F.A.C.E. 379 — Problems in Family and Consumption Economics 
Minimum of 6 hours each in two of the following specializations: 

Child and family 

Housing and interior design 

Foods and nutrition 

Textiles and apparel 
Human Resources and Family Studies electives, 12 to 21 hours (for minimum total of 36 hours) 

AREA VII: TEACHING HOME ECONOMICS IN NONSCHOOL SETTINGS 

Minimum of three courses from F.N. 130, 131, 220, 231, 320, 322 

Minimum of three courses from F.A.C.E. 170, 175, 270, 361, 371, 373, 375 

Minimum of three courses from H.D.F.E. 105, 106, 110, 202, 214, 215, 301, 304, 315 

Minimum of three courses from I.D. 160, T.A. 183, 184, 280, 281, 286, 380 

Above H.R.F.S. courses must total a minimum of 42 hours 

At least 18 hours must be at the 200-300 level including two courses at the 300 level. 

1 At least 8 semester hours are required for authorization to teach specialized semester courses 
in any home economics area; e.g., to teach a semester course in child development for high school 
students would require 8 hours of preparation in child or human development. 



College of Applied Life Studies 

108 Huff Hall, 1206 South Fourth Street, Champaign, 1L 61820 

DEPARTMENTS 130 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 132 

HONORS PROGRAMS 132 

CURRICULA 132 



The College of Applied Life Studies prepares men and women for scientific 
and professional careers in fields associated with the promotion of human 
health and well-being. 

The three academic departments offer the Bachelor of Science, Master of 
Science, and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the areas of study outlined 
below. In addition to career opportunities in such fields as health planning 
and administration, gerontology, sports medicine, commercial recreation, 
community health education, rehabilitation, corporate physical fitness, and 
therapeutic recreation, certain programs may serve as a first step toward 
careers in medicine, business, and journalism, among others. 

A distinguished faculty has kept each of the academic departments at or 
near the top of all recent national rankings. The college will continue to 
provide exciting educational opportunities in research, teaching, and service 
leading to a wider range of career options. 

DEPARTMENTS 

The college includes three academic departments, Health and Safety Studies, Leisure Studies, 
and Physical Education. 

— Average class size: 21. 

— Advising services are available in each of the academic units to assist in career selection 
and development of appropriate courses of study. 

— Flexible curricula with numerous options are offered by all of the academic departments. 

— Honors programs are available for outstanding students. 

— Practicum experiences are required within all departmental curricula. Quality placements 
are available throughout the United States and around the world. 

— Study abroad programs are available in Germany. 

— Students have access to the nation's third largest academic library, including an excellent 
college library, reference service, interlibrary loan system, and term paper counseling. 

The college also includes two service divisions, Campus Recreation and Rehabilitation- 
Education Services. 

— Students, faculty, and staff may use the services provided by the Division of Campus 
Recreation, including the diverse facilities available at the Intramural-Physical Education 
(IMPE) Building (indoor/outdoor swimming pools, racquetball courts, four gymnasia, etc.). 

— Students with physical or sensory impairments may use the services available at the 
Rehabilitation-Education Center, including orientation, mobility, and reader services for 
students who are visually impaired, and physical therapy, wheelchair sports, and other 
programs designed to give the physically or sensory impaired the skills they need to become 
independent and productive members of society. 

In addition, there is an interdisciplinary research institute, the Institute for Child Behavior 
and Development (ICBD). 

— ICBD has established a national reputation for its work in the following areas: gerontology, 
motivation, psychopharmocology, school achievement assessment, and text anxiety in schools. 
The institute is in the process of expanding its mission to embrace research studies that 
cover the entire human lifespan. 



APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 131 



Health and Safety Studies 

Community Health Education. Examining the relationship between community health and 
educational interventions including the process of assisting people to adopt and maintain 
healthful practices, lifestyles, and decision-making skills. This curriculum prepares the student 
for roles at all levels of government as well as in health agencies, hospitals, business, and 
industry. 

Health Planning and Administration. Understanding factors which affect the health status of 
people and the health care delivery process. Prepares the student for entry-level positions in 
planning and administration of health programs in health care facilities and related government 
agencies. 

Leisure Studies 

Outdoor Recreation Planning and Management. Development of a resource-based approach 

related to the delivery of leisure services and recreational uses of natural resource lands. Career 

opportunities include employment with the forest service, park service, state parks, environmental 

education centers, and outdoor education programs. 

Program Management. Preparation for the design, implementation, and management of leisure 

services and delivery systems. Includes career opportunities in public recreation systems, 

commercial agencies, voluntary agencies, and the armed forces. 

Therapeutic Recreation. Delivery of leisure services to individuals with physical, mental, 

emotional, or social disabilities. Prepares students to work in clinical and treatment settings, 

long-term health care facilities, residential institutions, and community-based recreation agencies. 

Physical Education 

Athletic Training Emphasis. Approved by the National Athletic Trainers Association and 

designed for students interested in athletic training as a career or as an adjunct to a career. 

Including extensive practicum as a student trainer, Athletic Training Emphasis is taken in 

conjunction with a concentration in another area of physical education. 

Bioscience. Scientific analysis of human movement. Career opportunities include employment 

in the health care and physical fitness industries. 

Coaching Endorsement. Available to all students interested in coaching preparation in addition 

to State of Illinois teaching certification at the elementary or secondary level. 

Curriculum and Instruction in Physical Education. Preparation for the teaching of human 

movement in a variety of settings. May lead to State of Illinois certification in physical education, 

grades kindergarten to 6 or grades 6 to 12. 

Personalized Concentration in Physical Education. Opportunity to design and follow an 

individualized course of study with greater flexibility (both depth and breadth) than other 

concentrations within the physical education curriculum. Allows students with multiple academic 

interests to span more than one established area of concentration while focusing on a specific 

educational goal. 

Social Science of Sport. Primarily concerned with the effect of social and political organization, 

cultural aspects, and social relationships on human motor behavior. Prepares students for 

advanced study or employment in physical education and sport organizations. 

Admission Requirements 

Minimum requirements for consideration for admission are three years of English, one year 

of algebra, and one year of geometry. However, beginning freshmen will be at a disadvantage 

if they have not completed at least one year of high school biology and high school chemistry. 

Recommended courses: 

English: college preparatory, four years 

Mathematics: algebra, two years; geometry, one year; trigonometry, one semester; advanced 

mathematics, one semester 
Foreign language: two years 
Science: biology, one year; chemistry, one year 
Social studies: two years 



132 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Once the high school course work requirements are fulfilled, qualifications for admission 
are primarily determined by a combination of class rank at the end of the junior year with 
the highest test score (SAT or ACT) on file at the time of the admission decision. These two 
factors are used to predict an applicant's likelihood of academic success, and one may help 
to offset the other. For example, an applicant may compensate for a lower test score with a 
higher class rank. 

Transfer applicants must have attained junior standing (60 semester hours of transferable 
credit) by their desired date of entry. Lower-division transfer students (less than 60 semester 
hours) must petition for admission. Admission is competitive, based upon cumulative grade- 
point average. The campus-wide minimum is 3.25 (5.0 = A). 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

International Exchange Program in Germany 

The College of Applied Life Studies offers juniors a two-semester program in physical education, 
health education, and recreation at the Deutsche Sporthochschule in Germany. Full credit is 
received for participation in the program and overall costs are slightly less than a year at a 
comparable U.S. institution. Interested students should contact the Department of Physical 
Education, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 155 Freer Hall, 906 South Goodwin 
Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

Graduation from the College of Applied Life Studies with any honors designation requires that 
a student must have attained at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign a specific 
minimum cumulative grade-point average based on a minimum of 55 semester hours. 

Bronze Tablet (See page 79) 

Highest Honors, 4.75 to 5.0 

High Honors, 4.50 to 4.74 

Honors, 4.25 to 4.499 



Curricula 

CURRICULUM IN HEALTH AND SAFETY STUDIES 

The Department of Health and Safety Studies offers a Bachelor of Science degree in two 
options: Community Health Education and Health Planning and Administration. 1 While all 
options require 128 hours for graduation, each is individualized to its own speciality. 

Students selecting the options in Community Health Education or Health Planning and 
Administration are required to complete a field work course during their junior or senior year. 

Individuals pursuing a degree in Health and Safety Studies are interested in promoting the 
health of people and their communities through program planning, implementation, and 
evaluation. Health and safety specialists are employed in a variety of settings, including schools, 
community agencies, industries, and clinics. For further information about the field of Health 
and Safety Studies, contact the Department of Health and Safety Studies, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, 117 Huff Hall, 1206 South Fourth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

General Education Requirements 

COMMUNICATION ARTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

Advanced writing course* 3 

Speech performance course* 3 

HUMANITIES 

Electives 6 



1 The concentration in School Health Education will not be offered during 1985-87. See the 
Department of Health and Safety Studies, 117 Huff Hall, for further information. 



APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 133 



MATHEMATICS 

College Algebra — Math. 111 (5) or 112 (3) 3-5 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Chemistry 4 

Functional Human Anatomy 5 

Human Genetics 3 

Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Microbiology 3 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Introduction to Psychology 3 

Introduction to Sociology 3 

Statistics 3 

To be selected with adviser 3-4 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ACTIVITY COURSES 

Electives 4 



* To be selected with adviser. 

Professional Core Requirements 

H.S.S. 100 — Professional Seminar 

H.S.S. 1 1 — Introduction to Public Health 3 

H.S.S. 1 50 — Health and Modern Life 3 

H.S.S. 181 — First Aid 2 

H.S. 283 — Concepts of Disease Prevention (2) or 

H.S.S. 374 — General Epidemiology (4) 2-4 

H.S.S. 288 — The Secondary School Health Education Program 4 

H.S.S. 390 — Public Health Education 3 

H.S.S. 280 — Safety Education 3 

Total 20-22 

Areas of Concentration 

An area of concentration will be determined by the sophomore year. The areas of concentration 
are Community Health Education and Health Planning and Administration. 1 Specific require- 
ments for each option are described in the following sections. 

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION HOURS 

General education requirements 54-57 

Professional core requirements 20-22 

H.S.S. 206 — Human Sexuality 2 

H.S.S. 289 — Community Health Education Internship 8 

H.S.S. 303 — Delivery of Health Care: Problems and Perspectives 3 

H.S.S. 391 — Health Data Analysis 3 

H.S.S. 393 — Drug Abuse Education 2 

FN. 120 — Contemporary Nutrition 3 

Total 21 

Correlate Area #1 15 

Electives 13-18 

Total hours required for graduation 128 

HEALTH PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION HOURS 

General education requirements 54-57 

Professional core requirements 20-22 

H.S.S. 290 — Health Planning and Administration Internship 8 

H.S.S. 303 — Delivery of Health Care: Problems and Perspectives 3 

H.S.S. 391 — Health Data Analysis 3 

H.S.S. 397 — Health Planning 2 

H.S.S. 398 — Health Administration 3 

Total 19 

Correlate Area #2 18 



1 The concentration in School Health Education will not be offered during 1985-87. See the 
Department of Health and Safety Studies, 117 Huff Hall, for further information. 



134 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Electives 12-17 

Total hours required for graduation 128 

Correlate Areas 

Each student completes a correlate area that is a planned program of courses taken primarily 
outside the department, designed to be supportive of the area of concentration. The correlate 
area may serve as a minor field of study or may prepare the student for advanced study. 

CORRELATE AREA #1 (COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION) HOURS 

Select a minimum of 6 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

communication 6 

Select a minimum of 3 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

health care delivery 3 

Select a minimum of 3 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

organization and leadership 3 

Select a minimum of 3 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

community problems 3 

Total 15 

CORRELATE AREA #2 (HEALTH PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION) 

Select a minimum of 6 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

administration and organization 6 

Select a minimum of 6 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

planning 6 

Select a minimum of 3 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

accounting and economics 3 

Select a minimum of 3 hours from the departmentally approved list of courses related to 

marketing and communications 3 

Total 18 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN HEALTH EDUCATION 

This program is designed for students enrolled in a teacher education curriculum other than 
in the Department of Health and Safety Studies. 

HOURS 

H.S.S. 1 10 — Introduction to Public Health 3 

H.S.S. 150 — Health and Modern Life 3 

H.S.S. 181 — First Aid 2 

H.S.S. 285 — Sex Education for Teachers* 4 

H.S.S. 288 — The Secondary School Health Education Program 4 

H.S.S. 392 — Health and Safety Education in the Elementary Schools 3 

H.S.S. 393 — Drug Abuse Education 2 

Electives 2-3 

Total 23-24 

* Will not be offered during 1985-87 but is available through Guided Individual Studies: H.S.S. 285 
— Sex Education for Teachers. 

See departmental office for further information regarding availability of courses. 

CURRICULUM IN LEISURE STUDIES 

The curriculum in leisure studies prepares students to design, manage, and deliver leisure 
services to a variety of populations through diverse agency settings. A broad general education 
is emphasized and complemented with a core of professional courses. Students may select 
from three options: 

1. Outdoor recreation planning and management for students desiring to work in national and 
state park departments, 

2. Program management, which prepares students to manage leisure programs in public or 
private agencies, and 

3. Therapeutic recreation for students desiring to design and deliver leisure programs to disabled 
populations. 

All options require 126 credit hours for graduation and the completion of the Professional 
Laboratory Experience Program. 



APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 135 



Professional Laboratory Experience Program 

All students in the Department of Leisure Studies must satisfactorily complete the Professional 
laboratory Exp e rien ce Program prior to graduation. The program is designed to augment 
formal classroom instruction with active experiential learning under the guidance of an agency- 
based supervisor. The program consists of two courses: Lei. St. 280 — Orientation to Practicum, 
and Lei. St. 284 — Leisure Studies Practicum. 

Students must have achieved senior standing to enroll in the Professional Laboratory 
Experie n ce Program, have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0, and be in good 
standing with the University. Depending on the option selected by the student, other specific 
course prerequisites may need to be fulfilled prior to being accepted into the Professional 
Laboratory Experience Program. The college statement on supervised field experience applies 
to all students participating in the Professional Laboratory Experience Program. 

Practicum Related Courses 

Students should register for Lei. St. 280 — Orientation to Practicum after achieving junior 
standing. As a part of this course, students must document that they have completed a minimum 
of 320 hours of actual field work experience in a leisure service agency in a face-to-face service 
delivery capacity. During this course, students will make final arrangements for completing Lei. 
St. 284 — Leisure Studies Practicum. 

The practicum may be taken only after the student has achieved senior standing (90 completed 
semester hours), satisfactorily completed Lei. St. 280, and fulfilled other option prerequisites. 
The professional field practicum is designed to give the student guided professional experience 
prior to graduation. Lei. St. 284 can only be taken in agencies which have been approved and 
contracted for this program. The practicum includes a minimum of 640 clock hours of 
experience in a nonpaid, internship-type position. No more than 40 hours per week may be 
applied to this total. 

The last day for a student to apply for placement into a practicum for an academic semester 
is Friday of the third week of the preceding academic semester. Students will be cleared for 
placement by their academic adviser and must then make application to the coordinator of 
the Professional Laboratory Experience Program for a practicum assignment. 

Students who are on academic or disciplinary probation or who are on dropped status are 
not eligible for completing a practicum during the semester in which the probationary or 
dropped status is in effect and are not permitted to engage in practicum activities. 

Students should anticipate and plan for off-campus assignments during the semester in which 
they will be taking their practicum. Only a limited number of assignments for practicums are 
available in the vicinity of campus. It is not currently possible to arrange local assignments for 
all whose need would justify such an assignment. For most students, an additional expense 
will be incurred during the semester in which the practicum is taken. 

General Education Requirements 

VERBAL COMMUNICATION HOURS 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking, of Sp. Com. 113 — Group Discussion and 
Conference Leadership 3 

WRITTEN COMMUNICATION 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition, or Rhet. 108 — Forms of Communication 4 

Rhet. 133 — Principles of Composition, or Rhet. 143 — Intermediate Expository Writing 3 

ACCOUNTING OR ECONOMICS OR MATHEMATICS OR STATISTICS 3 

Students in the Program Management Option who select Correlate #4 should select Econ. 
101. 

ACTIVITY COURSES 4 

NATURAL SCIENCE 8-9 

Students in Therapeutic Recreation Option must select Physl. 103 and Physl. 234 



136 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 15 

Students in the Therapeutic Recreation Option and Program Management Option must select 
Psych. 100, 103, or 105 and additional social science electives 

HUMANITIES 

F.A.A. 250 — Arts and Leisure 3 

Humanities electives 8 

Total 51-52 

Professional Core Requirements hours 

Lei. St. 100 — Introduction to Leisure Studies 3 

Lei. St. 110 — Foundations for Delivery of Leisure Service 2 

Lei. St. 130 — Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 2 

Lei. St. 210 — Theories and Methods of Supervision 3 

Lei. St. 280 — Orientation to Practicum 

Lei. St. 284 — Leisure Studies Practicum 12 

Lei. St. 290 — Research in Leisure Studies 3 

Lei. St. 310 — Introduction to Administration 3 

Total 28 

Areas of Concentration 

OUTDOOR RECREATION PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT OPTION HOURS 

General Education Requirements 51-52 

Professional Core Requirements 28 

Lei. St. 141 — Introduction to Outdoor Recreation 3 

Lei. St. 240 — Operation and Maintenance of Parks 3 

Lei. St. 241 — Outdoor Recreation Consortium 2 

Lei. St. 340 — Outdoor Recreation Management 3 

Lei. St. 341 — Recreational Use of Public Lands 3 

Total 14 

Correlate Area #1 12 

Electives 20-21 

Total hours required for graduation 126 

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OPTION HOURS 

General Education Requirements 51-52 

Professional Core Requirements 28 

Lei. St. 200 — Leadership in Leisure Delivery Systems 3 

Lei. St. 215 — Recreation Program Development 3 

Lei. St. 274 — Urban Leisure Systems 3 

Lei. St. 315 — Play Theories and Their Implications (2-4) 3 

Lei. St. 332 — Program Design and Evaluation in Recreation 3 

Total 15 

Correlate Area #2 or #4 12 

Electives 1 9-20 

Total hours required for graduation 126 

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION OPTION HOURS 

General Education Requirements 52 

Professional Core Requirements 28 

Lei. St. 230 — Clinical Aspects of Therapeutic Recreation 4 

Lei. St. 232 — Principles of Therapeutic Recreation 3 

Lei. St. 239 — Seminar in Therapeutic Recreation 3 

Lei. St. 331 — Facilitation Techniques and Leisure Education 3 

Lei. St. 332 — Program Design and Evaluation in Recreation 3 

Select one of the following courses 3 

Lei. St. 231 — Leisure and the Aging 

Lei. St. 233 — Recreation for the Physically Disabled 

Lei. St. 234 — Recreation for the Mentally III and Emotionally Disturbed 

Lei. St. 235 — Recreation for the Developmental^ Disabled 

Total 17 

Correlate Area #3 11 

Electives 18 

Total hours required for graduation 126 



APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 137 



Correlate Areas 

Correlate areas arc planned programs of courses taken outside the department which arc 
designed to support the student's area oi concentration. 

CORRELATE AREA #1: OUTDOOR RECREATION PLANNING 

AND MANAGEMENT OPTION HOURS 

LA 226 — Principles of Park Design 2 

For. 301 — Forest Recreation 2 

Env. St. 283 — Introductory Ecology for Educators, 

or E.E.E. 105 — The Ecosystem Concept 3 

To be selected with adviser 5 

Total 12 

CORRELATE AREA #2: PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OPTION 

H. Ed. 181 — First Aid 2 

LA. 226 — Principles of Park Design 2 

For. 301 — Forest Recreation 2 

To be selected with adviser 6 

Total 12 

CORRELATE AREA #3: THERAPEUTIC RECREATION OPTION 

H. Ed. 181 — First Aid • 2 

Sp. Ed. 1 17 — Exceptional Children 3 

P.E. 355 — Kinesiology 3 

Psych. 238 — Abnormal Psychology 3 

Total 11 

CORRELATE AREA #4: PROGRAM MANAGEMENT OPTION 

Select any four of the following courses for a total of 12 semester hours: 

Accy. 201 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to Management 3 

C.S. 105 — Introduction to Computers and Their Application to Business and 

Commerce 3 

To be selected with adviser 3 

Total 12 

Minor in Leisure Studies for Non-Leisure Studies Majors hours 

Lei. St. 100 — Introduction to Leisure Studies 3 

Lei. St. 110 — Foundations for Delivery of Leisure Services 2 

Lei. St. 200 — Leadership in Leisure Delivery Systems 3 

Lei. St. 210 — Theories and Methods of Supervision 3 

Lei. St. 215 — Recreation Program Development 3 

Select any two of the following: 

Lei. St. 130 — Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation 2 

Lei. St. 140 — Principles of Camping 3 

Lei. St. 141 — Introduction to Outdoor Recreation 3 

L.A. 226 — Principles of Park Design 2 

Total 18-20 

CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

This curriculum is designed to (1) provide knowledge and understanding for human movement 
and sport careers in either public or private agencies, and (2) allow students to develop a 
program of studies, in consultation with an adviser, that will provide a foundation for graduate 
study in physical education. The 128 hours required for graduation include prescribed courses 
for all students as well as requirements determined by the various areas of concentration and 
electives selected by the student. 

The first two years of this curriculum provide a foundation for the various areas of 
concentration, as well as allowing some variation according to the interests of individual 
students. The course for the third and fourth year are largely determined by the area of 
concentration selected. 

The Department of Physical Education offers a Coaching Endorsement to all University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign students, regardless of degree program. Students who desire 
certification as a teacher or athletic trainer can satisfy the necessary requirements by appropriate 



138 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



selection of courses within the area of concentration and correlate areas. For teacher certification 
requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

For further information on these and other rapidly growing fields, contact the Undergraduate 
Academic Adviser, Department of Physical Education, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 131 Freer Hall, 906 South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

General Education Requirements for All Students* 

COMMUNICATION ARTS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or Rhet. 105 or 108 and a speech performance elective 6-7 

Communication arts elective 6-7 

Total 13 

HUMANITIES 

Total 9 

MATHEMATICS 

Two courses: Math. 1 1 1 or above 5-8 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Functional Human Anatomy 5 

Total 9 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Total 9 

ELECTIVES 

Must be selected from the five areas listed above or foreign languages 9-12 

Total 57 

* See the undergraduate academic adviser for teacher certification requirements. 

Professional Core Requirements for All Students hours 

P.E. 130 — Analysis and Performance of Basic Movement Skills 2 

P.E. 1 31 — Movement Skills: Fitness 

P.E. 132 — Movement Skills: Swimming 

P.E. 133 — Movement Skills: Dance 

P.E. 134 — Movement Skills: Gymnastics 

P.E. 135 — Movement Skills: Field Activities 

P.E. 136 — Movement Skills: Racquet Activities 

P.E. 140 — Social Scientific Bases of Sport 3 

P.E. 150 — Bioscientific Foundation of Human Movement 3 

P.E. 160 — Physical Education as a Profession 2 

P.E. 161 — Principles of Motor Skill Acquisition 3 

P.E. 255 — Kinesiology 3 

P.E. 280 — Principles of Evaluation and Assessment 3 

Total 25 



Areas of Concentration 

In addition to the professional core requirements for all students, each student will declare in 
consultation with the academic adviser, an area of concentration within physical education no 
later than the first semester of the junior year. The areas of concentration are: bioscience, 
curriculum and instruction, social science of sport, and personalized area of concentration. 

BIOSCIENCE 

P.E. 285 — Supervised Experiences in Physical Education Research (3) or P.E. 287 — 

Supervised Experiences in Agency Setting (3) 3 

P.E. 352 — Physiology of Physical Activity 3 

P.E. 355 — Cinematographical Techniques of Sport Analysis (3) or P.E. 356 — Electromy- 
ographic Kinesiology (3) 3 

P.E. 354 — Growth and Physical Development of Children 3 

Select 6 hours from the departmental approved list of bioscience courses 6 

Total 18 



APPLIED LIFE STUDIES 139 



CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION* 

P.E 262 — Motor Development in Childhood (3) or 

RE. 354 — Growth and Physical Development of Children (3) 3 

P.E. 263 — Curriculum Development in Physical Education 3 

P.E. 267 — Adapted Physical Education 3 

P.E. 273 — Instructional Strategies in Physical Education 3 

P.E. 286 — Supervised Experiences in the Common Schools 3 

Select 3 hours from the departmental approved list of curriculum and instruction courses 3 

Total 18 

' Students desiring to be certified to teach in the public schools must select this area of concentration. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE OF SPORT HOURS 

P.E. 244 — Anthropology of Play (3) or 

P.E. 247 — Introduction to Sport Psychology (3) 3 

P.E. 249 — Sport and Modern Society 3 

P.E. 285 — Supervised Experiences in Physical Education Research (3) or 

P.E. 287 — Supervised Experiences in Agency Setting (3) 3 

P.E. 349 — Sociology of Sport 2 or 4 

Select 5 to 7 hours from the departmental approved list of social science of 

sport courses 3 

Total 18 

Personalized Area of Concentration (PAC) 

The Personalized Area of Concentration provides the student with an opportunity to design 
and follow an individualized series of courses stressing greater flexibility (depth and breadth) 
than that available in the Bioscience, Curriculum and Instruction, or Social Science of Sport 
areas of concentration. PAC will allow students whose academic interests span more than one 
established area of concentration to design a program of study not presently available through 
the other areas of concentration. 

In accordance with department regulations concerning the development and approval of 
PACs, the student will develop a series of physical education courses (at least 18 hours of 
credit) designed to complement a specific educational goal. Interested students should contact 
the Undergraduate Academic Adviser, Department of Physical Education, 131 Freer Hall, 906 
South Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Correlate Areas 

Each student will complete a correlate area that is a plan of study designed to support the 
area of concentration. These courses must be taken from outside the Department of Physical 
Education. The correlate area may serve as a minor field of study, may satisfy teacher education 
requirements, or may prepare the student for advanced study. 

CORRELATE AREA #1 

The student will develop, in consultation with the academic adviser, a series of courses (at 
least 18 semester hours) designed to support the area of concentration. These courses will be 
approved by a departmental faculty committee charged with this responsibility. 

CORRELATE AREA #2 (TEACHER CERTIFICATION K-12)* HOURS 

E.P.S. 201 — Foundations of American Education 3 

Ed. Psy. 236 — Child Development for Elementary Teachers (3) 

Ed. Psy. 21 1 — Educational Psychology (3) 3 

El. Ed. 233 — Classroom Programs in Childhood Education (2) 

Se. Ed. 240 — Principles of Secondary Education (2) 2 

Ed. Pr. 238 — Educational Practice in Special Fields in Elementary School 8 

Ed. Pr. 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 8 

Total 24 

* Students desiring to be certified to teach in the public schools must select this area of concentration. 

CORRELATE AREA #3 (TEACHER CERTIFICATION 6-12)* HOURS 

E.P.S. 201 — Foundations of American Education 3 

Ed. Psy. 21 1 — Educational Psychology (3) 3 

Se. Ed. 240 — Principles of Secondary Education 2 

Ed. Pr. 238 — Educational Practice for Special Fields m Elementary Schools 8 



140 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Ed. Pr. 242 — Educational Practice in Secondary Education 8 

Total 24 

* Students desiring to be certified to teach in the public schools must select this area of concentration. 

Electives 4-10 

Grand total 1 28 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

This program is designed for students enrolled in a teacher education curriculum other than 
in the Department of Physical Education. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

RE. 130 — Analysis and Performance of Basic Movement Skills 2 

P.E. 150 — Bioscientific Foundations of Human Movement 3 

RE. 1 61 — Principles of Motor Skill Acquisition 3 

P.E. 263 — Physical Education Curriculum 3 

P.E. 267 — Adapted Physical Education 3 

P.E. 273 — Instructional Strategies in Physical Education 3 

P.E. 131-136 — Movement skills 

Select at least one course from each of the three areas below to total 5 hours 5 

1 . Dance and/or rhythmic activities 

2. Individual-dual activities 

3. Team sports 

Total 22 



Institute of Aviation 

WiOard Airport, One Airport Roads Savoy, II. 61H74 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 141 

CURRICULA 142 



The Institute of Aviation is responsible for the promotion and correlation 
of education and research activities related to aviation at the University. Its 
director has the advice and assistance of an executive committee. The 
institute holds Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airman Examining 
(Pilot) Agency Certificate Number 1, which permits it to issue pilot certificates 
and ratings to its graduates on behalf of the FAA. A Professional Pilot 
curriculum includes training from the private pilot to the airline-transport 
pilot level. 

The Aircraft Systems curriculum prepares students for the FAA mechanic 
certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings. An Avionics curriculum, 
with the first year at Parkland College and the second at the Institute of 
Aviation, is also available. 

The student who wishes to become a professional pilot may also elect 
the Professional Pilot/Aircraft Systems curriculum which permits substitution 
of flight courses for specified maintenance courses in each semester of the 
Aircraft Systems curriculum, permitting the student to work toward the 
commercial certificate. 

Normally, new freshmen are accepted for admission only in August. 
However, a few students are accepted for the spring semester. Intra-University 
transfer to the Institute of Aviation may be accomplished as space permits. 

Graduating institute students may transfer to any degree-granting division 
of the University to complete requirements for a degree in that division. 
This may require from three to five additional semesters. A non-Institute of 
Aviation student may elect flight courses with the permission of his or her 
department. 

Special fees ranging from $916 to $1,960 are charged for a course involving 
flight training in addition to the estimated costs listed in Table 2 on page 
50. These fees are subject to change as operating costs rise. 

The institute's Aviation Research Laboratory conducts interdisciplinary 
research in many areas related to flight problems. The institute manages 
W'illard Airport, located six miles southwest of the Urbana-Champaign 
campus. The airport also provides the University and the community with 
excellent air transportation facilities. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants musr meet general University requirements as well as those specified by the Institute 
of Aviation listed in the Admissions Chan on page 11. Additional units in physics, mathematics, 
and the social sciences are recommended. 



142 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Curricula 



PROFESSIONAL PILOT CURRICULUM 1 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 101 — Private Pilot I 3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Hist. 111 — History of Western Civili- 
zation to 1815, or Hist. 151 — History 

of the United States to 1877 4 

Sp. Com. 111 — Verbal Communication 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 17 



SECOND YEAR 

Avi. 130 — Commercial-Instrument I 3 

Math 134 — Calculus for Social Scientists I . .4 

Humanities elective 3 

Free electives 6 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 120 — Private Pilot II 3 

Math 125 — Elementary Linear 

Algebra with Applications 3 

Hist. 112 — History of Western Civili- 
zation, 1815 to the Present, or Hist. 
152 — History of the United States, 

1877 to the Present 4 

Sp. Com. 112 — Verbal Communication 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 16 

Avi. 140 — Commercial-Instrument II 3 

C.S. 105 — Introduction to Computers 
and Their Application to Business and 

Commerce 3 

Humanities electives 4 

Free electives 6 

Total 16 



1 Other elective options are available. Students interested in a B.A. or B.S. degree in addition to 
their aviation curriculum should explore options combining this curriculum with curricula in Business 
Administration, Agricultural Economics, Education, Journalism, Psychology, etc. A brochure listing 
sample programs is available from the Institute of Aviation upon request. 
Note the following: 

Hist. 111 and 112, or Hist. 151 and 152 should be chosen. 

Humanities electives should be chosen to comply with University general education requirements. 

Two additional flight courses, Avi. 200 and Avi. 210, are required to complete requirements for the 

commercial certificate with instrument rating. 



AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 142 — Reciprocating Powerplant 

Theory 3 

Avi. 143 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes I 3 

Avi. 144 — Turbine Powerplant Theory 3 

Avi. 145 — Basic Aircraft Electrical Systems. .3 

Avi. 154 — Powerplant Systems II 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 
or Rhet. 1 08 — Forms of Composition 

of Sp. Com. 111/112 Sequence 1 4 

Total 19 

SECOND YEAR 

Avi. 163 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes III 3 

Avi. 165 — Aircraft Fabricating Processes I. . .4 
Avi. 167 — Aircraft Fabricating Processes II . .2 

Avi. 169 — Aircraft Systems 1 4 

Avi. 170 — Aircraft Systems II 5 

Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 147 — Introduction to Federal 

Aviation Regulations 3 

Avi. 152 — Aircraft Powerplant 

Electrical Systems 4 

Avi. 153 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes II 2 

Avi. 155 — Aerodynamics and Load Planning 3 

Avi. 156 — Powerplant Systems III 3 

G.E. 105 — Elements of Drawing 3 

Total 3 18 



Avi. 157 — Powerplant Conditioning 

and Testing 7 

Avi. 159 — Powerplant Maintenance and 

Inspection Systems 3 

Avi. 172 — Aircraft Systems III 3 

Avi. 174 — Aircraft Assembly and Inspection .5 
Avi. 179 - Airframe Maintenance and 

Inspection Systems 3 

Total 3 21 



AVIATION 



143 



COMBINED PROFESSIONAL PILOT/AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS 
CURRICULUM 2 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 101 — Private Pilot I 3 

Avi 142 — Reciprocating Powerplant 

Theory 3 

Avi 143 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes I 3 

Avi. 144 — Turbine Powerplant Theory 3 

Avi. 145 — Basic Aircraft Electrical 

Systems 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 

or Rhet. 108 — Forms of Composition 

or Sp. Com. 111/112 Sequence 1 4 

Total 19 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Avi. 120 — Private Pilot II 3 

Avi. 147 — Introduction to Federal 

Aviation Regulations 3 

Avi. 152 — Aircraft Powerplant 

Electrical Systems 4 

Avi. 153 — Aircraft Materials 

and Processes II 2 

Avi. 155 — Aerodynamics and Load 

Planning 3 

Avi. 156 — Powrplant Systems III 3 

Total 3 18 



SECOND YEAR 4 

Avi. 130 — Commercial-Instrument I 3 

Avi. 154 — Powerplant Systems II 3 

Avi. 163 — Aircraft Materials and 

Processes III 3 

Avi. 165 — Aircraft Fabricating 

Processes 1 4 

Avi. 167 — Aircraft Fabricating 

Processes II 2 

Total 15 



Avi. 140 — Commercial-Instrument II 3 

Avi. 157 — Powerplant Conditioning 

and Testing 7 

Avi. 159 — Powerplant Maintenance and 

Inspection Systems 3 

G.E. 105 — Elements of Drawing 3 

Total 3 16 



THIRD YEAR 

Avi. 200 — Commercial-Instrument III 5 

Avi. 169 — Aircraft Systems 1 4 

Avi. 170 — Aircraft Systems II 5 

Total 14 



Avi. 210 — Commercial-Instrument IV 5 

Avi. 172 — Aircraft Systems III 3 

Avi. 174 — Aircraft Assembly and Inspection .5 
Avi. 179 — Airframe Maintenance and 

Inspection Systems 3 

Total 16 



1 Select from Rhet. or Sp. Com. sequence based on career/degree objectives. 

2 Students register in curriculum in aircraft systems. 

3 Students who prefer to attend summer sessions are encouraged to obtain college requirements 
in math, science, and electives, or may obtain additional flight courses at the institute. 

4 Students may qualify to test for FAA Powerplant Mechanic certification at the end of the second 
year. 

Note: Students planning to transfer to a baccalaureate program should work with an adviser 
to select up to 22 hours of degree-oriented electives while at the institute. 



AVIONICS 

FIRST YEAR (PARKLAND) 

FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Elt. 150 — Introduction to Electronics 2 

Elt. 151 — Network Analysis I 3 

Elt. 171 — Basic Electronic Circuits 3 

Math. 134 — Technical Mathematics II 3 

Enq. 100 — Composition Workshop or 

Eng 101 — Composition 1 3 

Avi. 100 — Introduction to Aviation 3 

Total 17 

SECOND YEAR (INSTITUTE OF AVIATION) 

Avi. 165 — Aircraft Fabricating Processes. . . .4 
Avi. 181 — Aircraft Communication 

Systems 5 

Avi. 182 — Aircraft Navigation Systems 5 

Total 14 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Elt. 173 — Digital Electronics 3 

Elt. 175 — Systems Maintenance 4 

Elt. 178 — Radio Transmitting Systems 4 

Elt. 291 — Electronic Amplifiers and Devices .5 
Eng. 102 — Composition II or Spe. 101 

— Introductory Speech Communication ... .3 
Total 19 

Avi. 170 — Aircraft Systems II 5 

Avi. 183 — Aircraft Pulse Systems 5 

Avi. 185 — Aircraft Flight Control Systems . . .5 

Avi. 290 — Advanced Topics in Avionics 4 

Total 19 



College of Commerce and 
Business Administration 

214 David Kinky Hall, 1407 West Gregory Drive, Vrbana, IL 61801 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 144 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 144 

HONORS PROGRAMS 1 45 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 145 

GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 145 

MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT 146 

CURRICULA 146 



The purpose of the College of Commerce and Business Administration is to 
provide educational experience that will help students develop their poten- 
tialities for leadership and service in business, in government, and in teaching 
and research. The undergraduate curricula provide a study of the basic 
aspects of business and preparation for careers in fields such as accounting, 
business management, banking, insurance, and marketing. Students should, 
however expect to serve an apprenticeship in the fields they enter if they 
aspire to higher positions. 

The curricula, leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in one of the 
various degree programs in business and economics, are based on four years 
of college work. Students are required to elect courses in other colleges of 
the University including mathematics, rhetoric, literature, speech, and the 
social sciences and to secure as liberal an education as possible to avoid the 
narrowing effects of overspecialization. Through a cooperative arrangement 
with the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, students in that college may 
major in economics or finance. 

The College of Commerce and Business Administration offers graduate 
and professional programs to students with a bachelor's degree in one of 
the areas of business and economics, or in a nonbusiness area such as liberal 
arts, science, or engineering. Detailed information on graduate programs may 
be obtained from the Graduate College. 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

Undergraduate instruction in the College of Commerce and Business Administration is organized 
under the Departments of Accountancy, Business Administration, Economics, and Finance. 
Each of these departments offers courses that provide a field of concentration a student may 
elect. These curricula lead to Bachelor of Science degrees in one of the various fields of study 
in the college and are designed to encourage each student to fully develop his or her intellectual 
capacity. Each curriculum introduces the students to each major subject area in the college 
and provides them with the opportunity to major in the area of their choice. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Applicants must meet general University requirements as well as those specified by the College 
of Commerce and Business Administration listed in the Admissions Chart on page 11. 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 145 



Students transferring from other colleges will not be excused from the entrance requirements 

unless the) have demonstrated proficiency in the areas m which they are deficient. 
Mathematics Placement Test 

Students without college credit in algebra are required to take the Mathematics Placement 
Test before registering in the college. The results of the test are used to place students in 
Math. Ill or 1 12 or to exempt them from college algebra and allow them to enroll in Math. 
L25 or equivalent which is required for graduation. 

The student who enters with college credit in algebra may proceed directly to courses 
beyond college algebra required by the college for graduation. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 
Honors at Graduation 

Honors awarded to superior students at graduation are designated on the diploma as follows: 
for graduation with Honors, a minimum grade-point average of 4.25 (A = 5.0) in all courses 
accepted toward the student's degree; for graduation with High Honors, a minimum grade- 
point average of 4.5 in all courses accepted toward the degree; and for graduation with Highest 
Honors, a minimum grade-point average of 4.75 in all courses accepted toward the degree. 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

For information regarding the James Scholar Program, see page 39. 

Dean's List 

For information regarding the Dean's List, see page 80. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students in the College of Commerce and Business Administration who meet the University's 
requirements with reference to registration, residence, and fees, and who maintain satisfactory 
scholastic records in the college, are awarded degrees appropriate to their curricula. 

Each candidate for a degree must have a 3.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average or above for all 
courses counted toward graduation, a 3.0 grade-point average or above for all courses taken 
at this University, and a 3.0 grade-point average or above for all courses taken in the field of 
concentration. 

Each student may select only one major field of concentration. 

Continuing students advance enroll for the following semester in November and April of 
each academic year. New students may advance enroll during the summer for each fall semester. 
Information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records, University of Illinois 
at Urbana-Champaign, 177 Administration Building, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Faculty advisers are available during the registration period each semester to help students 
plan their academic programs. 

Students are responsible for meeting the requirements for graduation. Therefore, students 
should familiarize themselves with the requirements listed in this catalog and should refer to 
them each time they plan their program. 

GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete at least one sequence from each of the following lists. The following 
regulations apply: 

— The behavioral science sequence (list 2) should be started not later than the sophomore 
year. Business administration majors must select the sequence of Psych. 100 and 201. 

— Two or more courses in the general education sequences (lists 1 through 4) must be selected 
from 200- and 300-level courses. 

— Substitution of other courses in the listed sequences must be approved by one of the deans 
in the Undergraduate Office, College of Commerce and Business Administration, University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 214 David Kinley Hall, Urbana, IL 61801. 



146 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



— General education sequence courses and the advanced rhetoric course may be taken under 
the credit-no credit option. 

LIST 1: FOREIGN LANGUAGE, HUMANITIES, NATURAL SCIENCE 

Art 116, Music 130, 131 Geol. 101,102 

Art 111, 112, and Music 113 or 115 Math. 242, or 244 or 245, and anv 300-level 

Astr. 101, 102 or 140 and 141 course (excluding 305, 306, and 307) 

Biol. 100 or 101 and 102 or 103 Phil.: at least 6 hours 

Chem. 107, 108 Phycs. 101, 102 

Chem. 101, 102 Phycs. 106, 107 

Entom. 118, Physl. 103 

Foreign language: 8-hour sequence in any 

language (intermediate or above) 
Geog. 102, 103 

LIST 2: BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE 

Anth. 103, 260 Soc. 100 and one 200- or 300-level course in 

Psych. 100 and a 200- or 300-level course in sociology 

psychology (Psych. 201 recommended) (Students majoring in business administration 

must select Psych. 100 and 201.) 

LIST 3: HISTORY OR POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political science: any two courses of 3 or more History: any two courses of 3 or more hours 
hours each. each 

LIST 4: LITERATURE 

Six hours of literature 

MATHEMATICS REQUIREMENT 

Any of the following sequences meet the College of Commerce and Business Administration 
requirement: Math. 135 (5 semester hours); Math. 120, 132 (8 semester hours); Math. 125, 
134 (7 semester hours). 

New students at this time need only select which mathematics sequence to enter. Decisions 
on how far to go in a sequence can be made later as the student gains experience and firms 
up career objectives. 

The most appropriate mathematics sequence for a student depends on his or her background, 
interest, motivation, and objectives. Background can be evaluated in terms of mathematics 
courses already completed and the student's score on the Mathematics Placement Test. Interest, 
motivation, and objectives must be determined by the student. Three basic sequences are open 
to the student. They are: 

— Math. 135. A demanding course requiring a previous analytical geometry course. Should be 
chosen by students whose interests and objectives require strong mathematics. 

— Math. 120, 132. This sequence is appropriate for students whose background is good but 
who have not had analytical geometry or who feel a somewhat less demanding sequence 
is preferable. 

— Math. 125, 134. This sequence provides the student with a good background, but since the 
pace is slower it may not sufficiently challenge the very good or previously well-prepared 
student. 

Curricula 

Normally, students must register for not less than 12 hours or more than 18 hours in each 
semester. Students should take mathematics, economics, and accountancy courses in the 
semesters indicated in the sample schedule of courses. The computer science course must be 
taken during the first year. A required course that is failed must be repeated the following 
semester. 

A student with less than 30 hours of credit is required to have his program for the semester 
approved by a faculty adviser. 

Up to 4 hours of credit in basic physical education may be counted in the 124 hours 
necessary for graduation. Physical education grades are counted in the graduation grade-point 
average. 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 147 



UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 1 4 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Business and technical writing or advanced rhetoric (above Rhet. 108) 3 

Sp. Com. 101 — Principles of Effective Speaking 3 

General education sequences: 

List 1 — Foreign language, humanities, mathematics, natural science 8 

List 2 — Behavioral science 6 

List 3 — History or political science 6 

List 4 — Literature 6 

BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS 

Accy. 201 . 202 — Principles of Accounting 6 . 

B. Adm. 200 — Legal Environment of Business 3 

B. Adm. 210* — Management and Organizational Behavior 3- 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3. 

B. Adm. 389 — Business Policy 3 

C.S. 105 — Introduction to Computers 3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Econ. 172, 173 — Quantitative Methods 6 

Fin. 254 — Business Financial Management 3' 

Math. 125, 134 — Introductory Analysis for Social Scientists 2 7 

MAJOR 

Courses to yield a total of 1 8-24 

ELECTIVES 3 

To yield a total of 124 

1 Sp. Com. 111 and 112 may be substituted for Rhet. 105 or 108 and Sp. Com. 101. 

2 Math. 135. or Math. 120 and 132 may be substituted for Math. 125 and 134. (See college 
mathematics requirement on page 146.) 

3 All general education requirements (except Sp. Com. 101) and all electives may be taken under 
the credit-no credit option. Business administration majors may not take Psych. 201 under the 
credit-no credit option. 



SAMPLE SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Econ. 101 4 Math. 1 34 4 

Math. 125 3 Sp. Com. 101 3 

C.S. 105 3 General education sequence 9 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 Total 16 

Total 14 

SECOND YEAR 

Accy. 201 3 Accy. 202 3 

Econ. 172 3 Econ. 173 3 

Adv. Rhet 3 General education sequence 6 

General education sequence list 1, 3, 4 7 Major or elective 3 

Total 16 Total 15 

THIRD YEAR 

Fin. 254 3 B. Adm. 200 3 

B. Adm. 210* 3 Major and electives 9 

B. Adm. 202 3 General education sequence 4 

Major or elective 3 Total 16 

General education sequence 4 

Total 16 



'NOTE: This course includes limited voluntary participation as a subject in experiments. 



148 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FOURTH YEAR 

Major and electives 13 Major and electives 13 

General education sequence 3 B. Adm. 389 3 

Total 16 Total 16 

CURRICULUM IN ACCOUNTANCY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Accountancy 

In economically advanced societies, accounting plays an increasingly important role. As 
organizations and societies grow in size and complexity, there is a growing need for relevant 
and reliable quantitative information about their progress and status. This information is an 
important aid to business managers, investors, and others in (1) planning decisions regarding 
the use of resources (financial, physical, and human); (2) controlling decisions regarding actions 
to accomplish the plans; and (3) evaluating decisions regarding the actual peformance. The 
accountant assists in identifying the information appropriate for a particular decision, participates 
in the accumulation of this information, and is responsible for reporting and interpreting it. 
The providing of such information is important to those who manage economic activity as 
well as to those interested in the results. Accountants perform this function in both business 
and nonbusiness organizations. 

Closely allied to accounting are the fields of information systems, auditing, and taxation. 
Each field requires additional education. Accountants who specialize in information systems 
are concerned with the design and control of the system that provides the information. 
Accountants who specialize in auditing are concerned with verifying the propriety of the 
information and may attest to its reliability in reports accompanying those issued by management 
of their accountability for the use of resources. Accountants who specialize in taxation assist 
in tax planning, return preparation, and the development of regulations. These accountants 
may be employed internally by an organization, by a governmental unit, or by an independent 
public accounting firm. 

Study in accountancy is offered in seven areas: financial accounting, managerial accounting, 
international accounting, not-for-profit accounting, taxation, information systems, and auditing. 
Courses are available in each of these areas at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. 

Minimum requirements for the Bachelor of Science degree in Accountancy are: Accy. 211, 
Accy. 221, Accy. 311, Accy. 331, Econ. 300, and three additional accountancy courses. Accy. 
199, up to 4 hours, may count as one course. Additional credit in Accy. 199 will be allowed 
only with the permission of the department head. 

Econ. 300 and accountancy courses may not be taken on a credit-no credit basis. A limit 
of 33 hours of accountancy courses may be counted toward the Bachelor of Science in 
Accountancy degree. 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 

The Department of Business Administration offers five separate undergraduate programs: 
marketing, organizational administration, production, management science, and industrial 
distribution management. Marketing encompasses those business activities directly related to 
the process of placing meaningful assortments of goods and services in the hands of the 
consumer. The marketing student is concerned with the efficient performance of marketing 
activities and with their effective coordination with the other operations of the firm. Organi- 
zational administration is concerned primarily with the effective utilization of human resources 
within the business organization. Attention is focused on the organization as a social system 
and the forces that affect this system such as the behavior of individuals and groups, economic 
conditions, and technology. The study of production is concerned primarily with the efficient 
utilization of the organization's material resources. Attention is focused on the design and 
improvement of productive capacity and the coordination of the production process with other 
system activities. 

Management science is concerned with mathematics underlying management decision making. 
Attention is given to statistics, various optimization techniques, and other forms of mathematical 
modeling. The Industrial Distribution Management Program stresses the distribution and 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 149 



logbtki function in the industrial sector ot the economy with particular reference to the 
industrial distributor. Problems in the management ot industrial distribution businesses, both 
as suppliers to .\nd customers ot manufacturers .\nd other businesses, receive special attention. 
Requirements tor the degree are: B. Adm. 321 — Industrial Social Systems I, or B. Adm. 
)22 — Croup Processes m the Organization, or B. Adm. 323, Organizational Design and 
Environment; B. Adm. 2^4 — Operations Research; B. Adm. 389 — Business Policy; any 200- 
or 300-level economics course; and one ot the following concentrations. 

MARKETING 

A student must take B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research, and B. Adm. 344 — consumer 

behavior, plus one ot the following courses: 

B. Adm. 212 — Principles of Retailing 

Adv. 383 — Advertising Media Strategy and Tactics 

B. Adm. 337 — Promotion Management 

B. Adm. 352 — Pricing Policies 

B. Adm 360 — Marketing to Business and Government 

B. Adm. 370 — International Marketing 

B. Adm. 380 — Management Science in Marketing 

ORGANIZATIONAL ADMINISTRATION 

A student must take four courses from the following list, three of which must be B. Adm. 

321, 322, 323, or 351: 

B. Adm. 321 — Individual Behavior in Organizations 

B. Adm. 322 — Group Processes in the Organization 

B. Adm. 323 — Organizational Design and Environment 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration 

L.I. P.. 345 — Economics of Human Resources 

Pol. S. 361 — Introduction to Public Administration 

Pol. S. 362 — Administrative Organization and Policy Development 

Psych. 355 — Industrial Social Psychology 

Psych. 357 — Psychology of Industrial Relations 

Soc. 318 — Industry and Society 

Soc. 359 — The Social Psychology of Organization 

PRODUCTION 

A student must take B. Adm. 314 — Production, and B. Adm. 315 — Management in 

Manufacturing, plus one of the following courses: 

Accy. 366 — Managerial Accounting and Quantitative Techniques 

B. Adm. 323 — Organizational Design and Environment 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration 

Psych. 258 — Human Factors in Man-Machine Systems 

Psych. 356 — Human Performance and Engineering Psychology 

MANAGEMENT SCIENCE 

A student may satisfy this option by taking any three courses approved in advance by the 

department head. Recommended sequences among the mathematics courses are 315, 357; 315, 

383; 361 or 363, 366. Selected courses include: 

B. Adm. 373 — Business Information Systems 

B. Adm. 380 — Advanced Marketing Management 

Accy. 366 — Managerial Accounting and Quantitative Techniques 

Math. 315 — Linear Transformations and Matrices 

Math. 357 — Mathematical Models in the Social Sciences 

Math. 361 — Introduction to Probability Theory I 

Math. 363 — Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Probability I 

Math. 364 — Introduction to Mathematical Statistics and Probability II 

Math. 366 — Introduction to Probability Theory II 

Math. 383 — Linear Programming 

INDUSTRIAL DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT 

A student must take the following courses: 

B. Adm. 199 — Industrial Purchasing (to be renumbered as BA 213) 

B. Adm. 294 — Practicum in Industrial Distribution Management* (taken during summer of junior 

year) 
B. Adm. 295 — Senior Seminar in Industrial Distribution 
B Adm. 314 — Production 
B. Adm. 315 — Management in Manufacturing 



150 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



B. Adm. 360 — Marketing to Business and Government 
G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 
Phycs. 140 — Practical Physics 

In addition, students must take any two of the following courses: 

**Accy. 266 — Cost Accounting 

**B. Adm. 320 — Market Research 

B. Adm. 345 — Small Business Consulting 

**B. Adm. 346 — Entrepreneurship: Small Business Formation 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Management 

**B. Adm. 352 — Pricing Policies 

B. Adm. 391 — Introduction to Management Information Systems 

B. Adm. 392 — Information Organization for Management Information Systems 

B. Adm. 393 — Management Information System Development 

**Econ. 384 — Economics of Transportation 

"Fin. 281 — Short-Run Financial Management 

Fin. 357 — Financing Small Business 

**I.E. 335 — Industrial Quality Control 

Psych. 245 — Industrial Organizational Psychology 

Sp. Com. 211 — Business & Professional Speaking 

Sp. Com. 230 — Interpersonal Communication 



* Although only one summer practicum is required, it is recommended that students participate in 
two. 
" Strongly recommended. 

Students wishing to concentrate in production or management science are advised (not 
required) to fulfill the college mathematics requirement with Math. 120, 132; Math. 135, 245; 
or Math. 125, 134, 241 (special section). 

Students must select Psych. 100 and 201 from list 2. 

B. Adm. 389 should be taken after all requirements in the concentration have been satisfied. 

Courses used to fulfill major requirements may not be taken on a credit-no credit basis. 

Beyond the required courses for the business core and major, no more than 12 of the 28 
elective hours can be selected from business administration, accountancy, or finance. 

CURRICULUM IN ECONOMICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Economics 

Economics has been described as the study of how people use limited resources to produce 
various commodities and to distribute them to members of society for their consumption. 
Accordingly, the economist is concerned with what is produced, how goods and services are 
distributed, the organization of industries, the labor supply and its use, international trade, the 
production and distribution of national income and wealth, government finance, and the use 
and conservation of land and natural resources. 

The student majoring in economics establishes a core of knowledge by taking courses in 
intermediate theory and statistics. The student may then specialize by selecting course work 
in areas such as taxation and government finance, international economics, economic history, 
labor economics, economic development, urban and regional economics, quantitative eco- 
nomics, government and economics activity, or transportation economics. 

An economics major is well prepared for a broad range of professional careers. Economics 
provides excellent training for further study in an M.B.A., or law program, or graduate work 
in areas such as economics, planning and administration, or policy studies. Career opportunities 
include management positions in business, industry, and government; teaching or administrative 
positions in colleges or universities; and research positions in private or public institutions. 

Requirements for the degree include Economics 300-301 and 12 additional hours in 
economics. Students with strong math backgrounds or interest in further work in economics 
are advised (but not required) to fulfill the college mathematics requirement with Math. 120- 
132 or Math. 135 and to take additional training in courses such as Math. 242 or 245 and 
315. 

CURRICULUM IN FINANCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Finance 

The field of finance is primarily concerned with the acquisition of capital funds for business, 
public, or personal use. A new business, for example, must secure sufficient funds to initiate 



COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 151 



rod maintain operations until the cash thm from sales is great enough to maintain capital 

requirements. Established businesses seek financial advice when considering the purchase <>t 

new equipment, the selection of I new plant location, or the expansion of present facilities, 
Business policy decisions which result in changes in the capital structure of the business are 
oi special importance to finance. 

A student who majors in finance may specialize in finance, investment, and banking; insurance 
AUiS risk management; or real estate and urban land economics. 

As the study ot finance is designed to provide the student with both the theoretical 
background and the analytical tools required to make effective judgments in finance, many 
students select careers in business financial management, commercial or investment banking, 
government finance, insurance, or real estate. 

One of the following concentrations is required for the degree. 

BUSINESS FINANCE, INVESTMENTS, AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND MARKETS 
AREA 

Econ. 300 or 301 

Four of Fin. 235. 237, 238. 252, 258, 280, 281, 354, 357 

One of: Accy. 211, 221; Bus. Adm. 274, 320, 337; Econ. 255, 328, 372 

INSURANCE AND RISK MANAGEMENT AREA 

Fin. 260 

Four of Fin. 262, 360, 363, 370, 371 

One of: Accy. 251; Econ. 301, 315; Fin. 294, 295; Math. 371, 372 

REAL ESTATE AND URBAN ECONOMICS AREA 

Fin. 264 

Four of: Fin. 365, 366, 367, 368, 369 

One of: Accy. 251; Agr. Econ. 312, 318; Arch. 379; C.E. 318; Econ. 300, 360; Fin. 371 ; 1 Geog. 366, 
383; U.P. 31 5. 2 (Other courses in urban and regional planning may be used with the consent of 
the student's adviser and the Department of Urban and Regional Planning.) 



1 Fin. 367 and 371 should be taken if the student is planning to use the real estate major as a 
basis for taking the real estate brokerage examinations for a state license. Fin. 264 will satisfy the 
requirements for the salesman's license examination. 

* Other courses in urban planning are available with the consent of the student's adviser and the 
Department of Urban and Regional Planning. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ACCOUNTANCY 
FOR NONCOMMERCE MAJORS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Accy. 201 — Principles of Accounting I 3 

Accy. 202 — Principles of Accounting II 3 

Accy. 21 1 — Intermediate Accounting 3 

C.S. 1 05 or 1 06 — Computer Science 3 

Vo. Tec. 271 — Techniques and Curriculum Development for Teaching Data Processing and 

Office Machines 3 

Electives in accounting, business administration or computer science* 9 

Total 24 

* All electives must be approved by an adviser in the Division of Business Education. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ECONOMICS 
EDUCATION FOR NONCOMMERCE MAJORS 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Econ. 313 — Economics of Consumption, or FA. C.E. 271 — Home Management 2-3 

Fin. 150 — Money, Credit, and Banking, or Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance, or Fin. 260 — 

Economics of Insurance 3 

Electives 11 

Total 20-21 

ELECTIVES 

Econ. 214 — Government Finance and Taxation 3 

Econ. 240 — Labor Problems 3 



152 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Econ. 255 — Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Fin. 150 — Money, Credit, and Banking 3 

Fin. 231 — Investment Principles 3 

Fin. 257 — Corporation Finance 3 

Fin. 260 — Economics of Insurance 3 

F.A.C.E. 271 — Home Management 2 



College of Communications 

119 Gregory Hall, 810 South Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 153 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 1 54 

HONORS PROGRAMS 1 54 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 155 

UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 156 

CURRICULA 157 



For students with two years of college and a commitment to a career in 
communications, the College of Communications offers an additional two 
years of education leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Advertising, 
in Journalism, and in Media Studies. 

Through its educational programs, the college aims at giving students in 
advertising and journalism professional competence in their chosen fields of 
communications. At the same time, it seeks to help them acquire a solid 
background in the social sciences and humanities. Its premise is that students 
need an understanding of people and the world they live in if they are to 
communicate effectively through print and broadcast media. 

Through its media studies program, the college aims at giving students 
the opportunity to study, analyze, and critique modern communications 
media, again based on a firm foundation in the social sciences and humanities. 

The college has modern equipment and facilities for teaching future 
communications workers — newsrooms, a photographic darkroom, a ty- 
pography laboratory, an advertising layout laboratory, an audio laboratory, 
and a video laboratory. Students also use the facilities of the community 
CATV studio for laboratory instruction. The Communications Library is 
generally recognized as one of the best in the nation. The college maintains 
a job placement service for its graduates. 

The college is also the supervising administrative unit for the University 
Broadcasting Division and the Institute of Communications Research. 

Instruction in journalism at the University was begun in 1902 as part of 
the courses in rhetoric and was organized as a division of the Department 
of English in 1916. The School of Journalism was established in 1927 as a 
separate unit. In 1950, it became the School of Journalism and Communi- 
cations with divisions of journalism, advertising, and radio, the last of which 
later added instruction in television. In 1957, the school was elevated to 
college status. Two years later the college's three divisions were redesignated 
departments. The present name — College of Communications — was 
adopted in 1968. 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

Through irs two academic departments, the college offers professional education in three 
sequences which have been accredited by the American Council on Education for Journalism 
— advertising, news-editorial, and broadcast journalism. 

The Department of Advertising supervises work in the advertising curriculum for students 



154 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



expecting to enter advertising agencies or the advertising departments of communications 
media, industrial organizations, or retail stores. The department aims to educate analytical, 
flexible, and creative professionals who are able to deal with current and future advertising 
problems. 

The Department of Journalism seeks to prepare students for varied and long-term careers 
in print and electronic journalism. The primary professional aim of the news-editorial sequence 
is to train public affairs reporters by providing them with the skills, knowledge, and understanding 
required of successful journalists. The broadcast journalism sequence aims to prepare broadly 
educated professionals who will eventually assume decision-making and leadership roles. 

The media studies curriculum, a nonprofessional program supervised by the dean of the 
college, is designed to give students concentrated formal academic study in the development 
of the communications media and their underlying technologies. 

The Departments of Advertising and Journalism offer graduate programs leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science in Advertising and in Journalism. The college offers an 
interdisciplinary program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy in Communications under the 
direction of the Institute of Communications Research. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

For admission to the College of Communications, a student must complete 60 semester hours 
of acceptable undergraduate college work and present a grade-point average of at least 4.0 (A 
= 5.0) and evidence of interest in a professional career in communications. The competitive 
G.P.A. in recent years has been higher. Applicants with less than a 4.0 may be considered if 
they demonstrate strong career motivation and aptitude, provided spaces are available. 

Since they must have junior standing to be eligible to enter the College of Communications, 
students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are advised to register as freshmen 
and sophomores in the prejournalism curriculum of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
and to follow a broad general-education program. Students at other institutions should follow 
similar programs. 

Although there is no formal preadvertising or prejournalism program, a recommended 
program for each college curriculum for the first two years is available in the college office. 
These programs include basic courses in economics, English, history, philosophy, sociology, 
and anthropology, as well as courses satisfying the University's general education requirements. 
Students who do not have a reasonable degree of typing ability must acquire this skill before 
entering the college as it is required in all curricula. A basic course in computer science also 
would be useful. 

Students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign should make arrangements at the 
college office to apply for transfer into the college before the advance enrollment period in 
the semester in which they will earn junior standing. Junior standing is necessary for students 
to take most courses offered by the College of Communications. 

Students completing their freshman and sophomore studies at institutions other than the 
University of Illinois are strongly advised to defer courses in advertising, journalism, and 
communications until enrolled in the College of Communications. Students must take all of 
their required communications courses in the College of Communications. They may be 
permitted to transfer up to 9 hours of elective communications courses taken elsewhere, 
provided they take an equivalent number of additional hours in advanced social studies, arts, 
and sciences beyond the 20 semester hours required for graduation from the college. 

The college does not recommend that students with more than 90 hours enter any of its 
undergraduate programs. The programs are set up on a four-semester basis. In certain cases it 
is possible to complete the requirements of its curricula in three semesters if prerequisites in 
sequential courses can be met. The college does not accept students who have already received 
a bachelor's degree as candidates for a second bachelor's degree. Instead, it recommends that 
such students enter one of its graduate programs. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 
Edmund J. James Scholars 

The College of Communications does not have a college honors program. However, students 
who transfer into the College of Communications from another college on the Urbana- 



COMMUNICATIONS 155 



t_ hampaign campus tnd W* Jaincs Scholars in their previous colleges at the time of transfer 
will continue to be listed as Jama Scholars in the College of Communications through the 
end of their first spring semester in the college. If they have a cumulative average of 4.5 (A = 
u that time, they will be certified as James Scholars for the academic year and continued 
una Scholars through the next academic year when their records will be reviewed for 
certification. Any student whose cumulative average falls below 4.5 will not be certified and 
will be removed from the James Scholars listing. Designation as James Scholars is available 
only to those students who were previously so designated. 

Dean's List 

To be eligible for Dean's List recognition, students must rank in the top 20 percent of their 
respective classes and must successfully complete 14 academic hours of which at least 12 hours 
must be traditionally graded hours (excluding course work graded pass-fail, credit-no credit, 
satisfactory unsatisfactory, excused, or deferred) and excluding grades and hours in basic 
physical education courses and religious foundation courses. 

Honors at Graduation 

For graduation with Honors, a student must have been named to the Dean's List of the College 
of Communications for at least three semesters while enrolled in the College of Communications, 
must rank in the upper 20 percent of the student's graduation class, and must have earned a 
minimum grade-point average of 4.50 in all courses taken after admission to the College of 
Communications. For graduation with High Honors, a student must have been named to the 
Dean's List of the College of Communications for at least three semesters, must rank in the 
upper 10 percent of the student's graduation class, and must have earned a minimum grade- 
point average of 4.70 in all courses taken after admission to the College of Communications. 
For graduation with Highest Honors, a student must have been named to the Dean's List of 
the College of Communications for at least three semesters, must rank in the upper 5 percent 
of the student's graduation class, and must have earned a minimum grade-point average of 
4.80 in all courses taken after admission to the College of Communications. 

Kappa Tau Alpha 

Each year, scholastically high-ranking undergraduate and graduate students in the College of 
Communications are considered for membership in Kappa Tau Alpha, national honorary society 
in journalism. The society was founded to recognize and promote scholarship in advertising, 
journalism, and broadcasting. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

The college offers programs of study leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Advertising, 

Journalism, or Media Studies. To meet the degree requirements, all students must satisfy general 

University requirements as to registration, residence, scholarship, and fees. They must complete 

the rhetoric requirement and approved sequences in the humanities, social sciences, and natural 

sciences as listed under University General Education Requirements on page 156. All students 

must also fulfill the following general requirements of the College of Communications: 

— Complete a total of 124 semester hours of course credit. Basic physical education activity 

courses and basic courses in military, naval, or air force science may not be counted toward 

this total although such credits may be counted toward meeting the admission requirement 

of 60 semester hours. No more than a total of 12 hours earned in undergraduate open 

seminars (199 courses), in independent study courses outside the college, and in other 

experimental courses may be counted toward the degrees offered by the college. Students 

in the college may enroll in one such course for a maximum of 4 hours credit in any 

semester with the consent of the head of the student's major department. The same policy 

is applied to credit for internships in fields other than communications with the additional 

requirement that such courses must also be approved by the dean of the college. While 

the college encourages its students to hold internships in the communications field, particularly 

in the summer between the junior and senior years, it does not allow academic credit 



156 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



toward the degree for such experience alone. Credit granted by other institutions for 
internships is not accepted. 

— Complete not less than 30 hours but not more than 36 hours in courses offered by the 
college in advertising, communications, and journalism. Undergraduate courses cross-listed 
with advertising or journalism courses are considered college course offerings. Undergraduate 
communications courses cross-listed only with departments outside the college are not 
counted as college offerings except Comm. 322. 

— Complete not less than 20 hours in advanced (200- and 300-level) courses at the University 
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the social studies, arts, and sciences approved by the 
faculty. The human resources and family studies minor may be substituted for the requirement 
of 20 hours in advanced social studies, arts, and sciences by advertising and journalism 
majors. 

— Complete the specific requirements of one of the curricula offered by the college as listed 
below. 

— Earn a grade-point average of 3.0 (A = 5.0) in all courses presented for the degree. In 
addition, students must earn a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average for all courses taken 
while registered in the college. 

UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

To be graduated from the College of Communications, students must satisfy the University 
General Education Requirements which include completion of the rhetoric requirement and a 
minimum of 6 hours each in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. The sequences 
and courses below have been approved by the college. A student may not use sequences from 
any one department to satisfy the requirement in more than one of these areas. 

Any substitution of sequences or courses must be approved by the dean of the college. 
However, any sequence or combination of courses approved to fulfill these requirements by 
another college at the Urbana-Champaign campus will be accepted by the College of 
Communications with the exceptions stated below. 

The college will waive the requirements in any of the following three areas if the student's 
performance in the College Level Examination Program earned such a waiver in the student's 
previous college. However, only CLEP hours earned in the social sciences and humanities, up 
to a maximum of 12 hours, will be allowed toward the graduation requirement of 124 hours. 
CLEP credit hours earned in the natural sciences (including mathematics) and rhetoric will not 
be allowed. 

Humanities 

Any of the following sequences or combinations from the same department: 
Art Hi. 101, 110, 111, 112, 115, 116; CI. Civ. 120, 131, 132; C. Lit. 141, 142; Engl. 101, 102, 103, 
104, 106, 115, 116, 118, 120, 198; Hist. 131, 132, 181, 182; Human. 141, 142; Music 130, 131, 133; 
Phil. 101, 102, 105, 110. 

Social Sciences 

Any of the following sequences or combinations from the same department: 

Anth. 102, 103; Econ. 101, 236, 240, 245, 255; Geog. 101, 104, 105; Hist. 111, 112, 151, 152; Pol. 

S. 100, 150; Psych. 100, 201, 216, 238, 245, 250; Soc. 100, 131. 

Natural Sciences 

To satisfy this requirement, students must select at least 6 hours of courses from either the 
life sciences, physical sciences, or mathematics. Combinations of life science courses with 
physical science or mathematics are not accepted. Any of the following sequences in the life 
sciences: 

Biol. 100 or 101 and 102 or 103, or a combination of six hours from the following list: Anth. 143, 
Biol. 100 or 101; PI. Bio. 100, 102; E.E.E. 105; Entom. 118; G. & D. 106, 107; Mcbio. 113; Physl. 
103; Psych. 103, 217, 230; or any of the following sequences in the physical sciences: Astr. 101, 
102, 140, 141; Geog. 102, 103; Geol. 101, 102, 142, 143; or any 6 hours of chemistry, except Chem. 
100, or physics; or any 6 hours in mathematics, exclusive of Math. 101, 104, 111, 112, 114, 116, 
and 161. 

Statistics courses and computer science courses may not be used to satisfy the natural science 



COMMUNICATIONS 157 



requirement It is recommended that students in the advertising curriculum use- mathematia 

to vuist> the natural science requirement; those- in the journalism and media studies curricula 
use either life or physical sciences to satisfy this requirement. 

Curricula 

CURRICULUM IN ADVERTISING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Advertising 

To be graduated from the advertising curriculum, a student must meet the general University 
and college requirements for the degree listed on pages 153 and 154 and must complete the 
following courses: 

HOURS 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Adv. 381 — Advertising Research Methods 3 

Adv. 382 — Advertising Creative Strategy and Tactics 3 

Adv. 383 — Advertising Media Strategy and Tactics 3 

Adv. 391 — Advertising Management: Planning 3 

Adv. 392 — Advertising Management: Strategy and Tactics 3 

Adv. 393 — Advertising in Contemporary Society 3 

Journ. 217 — History of Communications; Journ. 218 — Communications and Public Opinion; 
Journ. 220 — Communications and Popular Culture; Journ. 231 — Mass Communications 
in a Democratic Society; Journ. 241 — Law and Communications; or Journ. 251 — Social 

Aspects of Mass Communications (a minimum of two courses from this list) 6 

Advertising or journalism electives 3 

Total 30 

A specified course or courses in statistical methods 1 3-6 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 2 3 

Psych. 100 — Introduction to Psychology, Soc. 100 — Introduction to Sociology, or Anth. 103 

— Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (any two of these three courses) 6-7 

Math. 111 or 1 1 2, or equivalent 3-5 



1 Currently acceptable courses: Ed. Psych. 390 2 ; Econ. 171; Econ. 172 & 173; and Psych. 235. 2 

2 These courses may be credited toward the college requirement of 20 hours of advanced social 
studies, arts, and sciences. 

CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism 

News-Editorial Sequence 

To be graduated from the news-editorial sequence of the Department of Journalism, a student 
must meet the general University and college requirements for the degree listed on pages 153 
and 154 and must complete the following courses: 

HOURS 

Journ. 350 — Reporting I 4 

Journ. 360 — Graphic Arts 4 

Journ. 370 — News Editing 4 

Journ. 380 — Reporting II 4 

Journ. 241 — Law and Communications 3 

Journ. 217 — History of Communications; Journ. 218 — Communications and Public Opinion; 
Journ. 220 — Communications and Popular Culture; Journ. 231 — Mass Communications 
in a Democratic Society; or Journ. 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications (a 

minimum of one course from this list) 3 

Advertising or journalism electives 8 

Total 30 

At least 6 hours of credit in each of the following areas: economics, English or American 
literature, history, philosophy, political science, and sociology or anthropology 1 36 

1 Courses taken in these fields to fulfill the college requirement of 20 hours of advanced social 
studies, arts, and sciences may be used toward fulfilling these departmental requirements as may 
lower division courses or sequences in these fields taken anytime during the student's four years. 
Undergraduate seminar courses (199) and hours earned through CLEP may not be used to fulfill 
these departmental requirements. 



158 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Broadcast Journalism Sequence 

To be graduated from the broadcast journalism sequence of the Department of Journalism, a 
student must meet the general University and college requirements for a degree listed on pages 
153 and 154 and must complete the following courses: 

HOURS 

Journ. 350 — Reporting I 4 

Journ. 362 — Broadcast News Production 4 

Journ. 372 — Broadcast News Writing and Gathering 4 

Journ. 382 — Broadcast News Editing 4 

Journ. 241 — Law and Communications 3 

Journ. 217 — History of Communications; Journ. 218 — Communications and Public Opinion; 
Journ. 220 — Communications and Popular Culture; Journ. 231 — Mass Communications 
in a Democratic Society; Journ. 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications (a minimum 

of one course from this list) 3 

Advertising or journalism electives 8 

Total 30 

At least 6 hours of credit in each of six of the following areas: economics, English or American 
literature, history, natural science, philosophy, political science, and sociology or anthro- 
pology 1 36 

At least four courses in each of two department-approved areas of specialization 1 12-14 

1 Courses taken in these areas to fulfill the college requirement of 20 hours of advanced social 
studies, arts, and sciences may be used toward fulfilling these departmental requirements as may 
lower division course or sequences in these areas taken any time during the students four years. 
Natural science may be either life science or physical science, but not mathematics, to satisfy this 
departmental requirement. Besides the above areas, specializations may include, for example, 
agricultural economics, labor relations, urban planning, finance, and rural sociology. Undergraduate 
seminar courses (199) and hours earned through CLEP may not be used to fulfill these departmental 
requirements. 

CURRICULUM IN MEDIA STUDIES 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Media Studies 

To be graduated from the media studies curriculum, a student must meet the general University 
and college requirements for the degree listed on page 154 and must complete the following 
courses: 

HOURS 

Comm. 101 — Social and Cultural Foundations of Mass Media 1 (3) 

Comm. 217 — History of Communications 3 

Comm. 231 — Mass Communications in a Democratic Society 3 

Comm. 251 — Social Aspects of Mass Communications 3 

Comm. 261 — American Broadcasting and Telecommunications 3 

Comm. 264 — Economics of Communications 3 

Comm. 362 — Telecommunications Management 3 

College of Communications electives from list below 12 

At least four elective courses totaling at least 12 hours up to a maximum of six courses 
totaling no more than 18 hours must be chosen from the following list: Adv. 281 — 
Introduction to Advertising; Comm. 218 — Communications and Public Opinion; Comm. 220 
— Communications and Popular Culture; Comm. 241 — Law and Communications; Comm. 
310 — Media Ethics; Comm. 322 — Politics and the Media; Comm. 366 — Film as Business; 
Journ. 223 — Photojournalism; Journ. 350 — Reporting I; Comm. 361 — Telecommunications 
Programming; Comm. 368 — Legal and Policy Issues in Telecommunications. 

Total 30 

C.S. 106 — Introduction to Computers for the Nontechnical Major 3 

At least 20 hours of advanced (200- and 300-level) credits in one or two areas outside of the 
College of Communications, such as economics, management, political science, sociology, 
psychology, literature, philosophy, physics, or engineering 2 20 

1 Required but does not count toward the 30-36 hours for the major. 

2 Fulfills the college requirement of 20 hours of advanced level social studies, arts, and sciences. 

MINORS 

Students in the College of Communications are not required to complete a minor. Students in 
advertising or journalism with special interests in home economics may elect to follow a special 
minor as listed below. The home economics minor may be substituted for the college 
requirement of 20 hours of advanced social studies, arts, and sciences. 



COMMUNICATIONS 159 



For students not enrolled in the College of Communications, the college offers only one 
approved special minor, a minor in the teaching of journalism for students in teacher education. 
Other students are cautioned against attempting to follow a minor or cognate in communications 
even if approved by their major departments. Enrollment in many courses offered by the 
college is restricted to majors in one of the college's curricula. In all college courses, enrollment 
priority is given to students enrolled in the College of Communications. 

Minor in Human Resources and Family Studies 

For a minor in human resources and family studies (home economics), the student must 
complete a minimum of 20 hours in courses offered by the School of Human Resources and 
Family Studies. The 20 hours completed in this area may be substituted for the 20 hours of 
advanced social studies, arts, and sciences required by the college for graduation. However, 
all students in the news-editorial and broadcast journalism sequences must satisfy the depart- 
mental requirements of at least 6 hours each in history, political science, philosophy, economics, 
sociology or anthropology, and English or American literature. These courses may be taken at 
the lower- or upper-division level. 

It is recommended that students select a concentration of courses from one of five H.R.F.S. 
areas (Family and Consumer Economics, Foods and Nutrition, Human Development and Family 
Ecology, Interior Design, or Textiles and Apparel) and select electives in other areas to total 
20 hours. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

This minor is specifically for students in teacher education programs. It requires a minimum 
of 18 hours in communications courses. In addition to three required courses with a total of 
11 hours of credit, a minimum of 7 additional hours must be chosen from a selected group 
of electives. Students are also required to take at least 7 hours of rhetoric, for a total of 25 
hours. 

REQUIRED COURSES HOURS 

Typography 3 

Newswriting 4 

News editing 4 

Electives in advertising, journalism, and communications 7 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One of the following: Engl. 381 , Rhet. 133, or Rhet. 143 3 

Total 25 

ELECTIVES 

Introduction to advertising 3 

Advanced reporting 4 

Photojournalism 3 

Magazine article writing 3 

American broadcasting and telecommunications 3 

Others may be chosen in consultation with the adviser. 



College of Education 

120 Education Building, 1310 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 161 

HONORS PROGRAMS 161 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 161 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 162 

CURRICULA 162 



The College of Education of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
offers undergraduate degree programs in four of the seven departments 
within the college. The departments which offer undergraduate degree 
programs, and the programs offered by each, are given below. 

The Department of Vocational and Technical Education offers degree 
programs in industrial education and business education. Students interested 
in industrial education are typically encouraged to obtain academic and 
technical preparation in their area of specialization prior to admission. The 
department also has a program for the training of teachers in nonschool 
settings. Students who elect this option are not eligible for State of Illinois 
certification by entitlement. 

The Department of Secondary Education offers degree programs in the 
following teaching specialties: English, mathematics, social studies, general 
science, physical sciences, and life sciences. Only students who have earned 
at least 60 semester hours are considered for admission to secondary education 
curricula in the College of Education. 

The Department of Special Education offers an undergraduate degree 
program preparatory to the teaching of moderately and severely handicapped 
persons. This program is able to accommodate only a small number of 
juniors and seniors. Applicants to this program must complete special 
admissions procedures. 

The Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education offers 
degree programs in elementary education and early childhood education. 

In addition to these degree programs, Education General is a two-year 
curriculum in the College of Education available to students who have 
completed fewer than 60 semester hours. It is designed to accommodate 
students who are uncertain about the specific degree program they wish to 
pursue in the College of Education and students who have not completed 
the 60 hours required to qualify for admission to curricula in the college 
for which junior standing is an admission requirement. 

In addition to offering undergraduate degree programs in education, the 
College of Education, under the auspices of the Council on Teacher 
Education, cooperates with four other colleges on the Urbana-Champaign 
campus to provide courses in professional education to undergraduate 
students who are preparing for careers in teaching and special educational 
services. 

The College of Education also offers graduate degree programs. Detailed 



EDUCATION 161 



information concerning graduate programs in education may be obtained in 
L20 Education Building. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The curricula in technical education specialties, education general, early childhood education, 
and elementary education admit beginning freshmen. (Admission requirements for these 
programs are given on the Admissions Chart on page 12.) Junior standing, at least 60 semester 
hours of baccalaureate-oriented course work attained at an accredited institution of higher 
learning, is required for admission to the programs in business education, special education, 
and secondary education. 

A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) is required to be considered 
for admission to the College of Education in good standing. A student whose cumulative 
average is below 3.5 may be considered individually, on a petition basis, if enrollment vacancies 
exist in the curriculum to which admission is being sought. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 
Honors at Graduation 

Eligibility for graduation with honors is established on the fulfillment of residence and scholastic 
requirements. Residence requirements for graduation with honors are fulfilled under any of 
the following conditions: 

— Meeting University residence requirements for graduation. Furthermore, at least 54 of the 
final 60 semester hours of credit must have been earned in residence at Urbana-Champaign. 
Credit for courses which is not included in the grade-point average does not count toward 
residency. 

— Obtaining waiver of University residence requirements by petition to the undergraduate 
office, 120 Education Building, and earning at least 54 of the last 60 semester hours of 
credit, excluding credit for courses which are not included in computation of the grade- 
point average, through resident study at Urbana-Champaign. 

— Meeting University residence requirements and having completed all but 15 hours in resident 
study at Urbana-Champaign. 

— Having completed the first 90 semester hours in residence and all or part of the senior year 
in an approved program at another institution for a University of Illinois degree. 

A student who achieves the required scholastic average in all education courses and in all 
work presented for graduation (excluding credit for courses not included in the computation 
of the grade-point average), with education and graduation averages computed separately, may 
be recommended for honors as follows: Honors, minimum education and graduation scholastic 
grade-point averages of 4.50 (A = 5.0); High Honors, minimum education and graduation 
scholastic grade-point averages of 4.75; Highest Honors, minimum education and graduation 
scholastic grade-point averages of 4.75 and rank within the top 5 percent of those education 
students graduating within the period. 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

For information concerning the James Scholar Program, see page 39. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Each undergraduate student in the College of Education must meet the University requirements 
(pages 74 to 80) and the requirements of the Council on Teacher Education (pages 87 to 91) 
for graduation. Students in all curricula must meet the course and academic credit requirements 
of their curricula with satisfactory scholastic averages. Educational practice (student teaching), 
which is required of all undergraduates in teacher education, must be completed at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 

Students in need of additional information concerning regulations and requirements of the 
College of Education should consult their academic advisers or the office of the Assistant Dean 
for Admissions and Records, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 120 Education 
Building, 1310 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 



162 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



For additional requirements pertaining to certification, please refer to the section on the 
Council on Teacher Education, pages 87 to 91. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

In order to meet the University requirements in general education, each candidate for a degree 
in the College of Education must complete at least 6 semester hours of credit in each of three 
areas — humanities, sciences, and social sciences. In certain curricula, additional credit in these 
areas are required. These requirements are generally fulfilled by course work offered by the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

HUMANITIES 

The humanities are concerned with the appreciation of the life of humans: their ideas and 
values expressed in literature and languages, art forms (dance, music, and painting), a past 
record of those ideas reflected by experiences and events (history), and an organization and 
ordering of thought and knowledge (philosophy). 

SCIENCES 

The sciences are concerned with the observation, identification, description, experimental 
investigation, and theoretical explanation of phenomena that deal with matter, energy, and 
their interrelations. Disciplines may include, but are not limited to, biology, chemistry, ecology, 
mathematics, physics, and physiology. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

The social sciences are concerned with the orderly investigation of individual and group 
behavior. Disciplines may include, but are not limited to, anthropology, economics, history, 
political science, and sociology. 



Curricula 

EDUCATION GENERAL 

Education General is a two-year curriculum available to students in the College of Education 
who have completed fewer than 60 semester hours. It has been designed to accommodate 
students who are uncertain about the specific degree program they wish to enter in the College 
of Education and students who have not completed the 60 hours required to qualify for 
admission to curricula in the college for which junior standing is an admission requirement, 
e.g., secondary education, special education. Students in Education General are required to 
pursue a program of study which includes the course requirements common to all undergraduate 
programs in the College of Education and the requirements for continuation established by 
the University and the College of Education. Students must transfer out of Education General 
during the term in which they will complete their sixtieth semester hour in order to obtain a 
bachelor's degree. 

Recommended Program 

FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 or Sp. Com. 111 3-4 Speech performance elective 

Psych. 100 4 or Sp. Com. 112 3 

Educ. 111 1 1 Educ. 112 1 1 

Science elective 3 Basic physical education activity 2 1 

Hist. 1 51 or 1 52 4 Science elective 3 

Total 15-16 Pol. S. 150 3 

Electives 4 

Total 15 



EDUCATION 163 



THIRD SEMESTER HOURS FOURTH SEMESTER HOURS 

Humanities elective 3 Humanities elective 3 

EPS 201 3 Ed. Psy. 236 or 21 1 3 

Basic physical education activity 2 1 Educ. 1 14 1 1 

Educ. 1 1 3 1 2 Electives 8 

Electives 6 Total 15 

Total 15 



1 These education courses are required for students in the Education General program. 

2 Students may substitute a health course for all or part of the 3-hour requirement in basic physical 
education activities. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO HIGH SCHOOL TEACHING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education 

The following requirements in general education are common to all secondary education 
specialties. For requirements in addition to those below, refer to pages 87 to 91 for teacher 
education requirements applicable to all curricula. 

It is essential that students consult appropriate teacher education advisers in the selection 
of specific courses and in the overall planning of degree programs. 

A minimum of 120 hours of credit, excluding basic military, is required for graduation. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112. or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 and a 

speech performance elective 6-7 

Humanities 1 6 

Natural sciences 1 .6 

History of the United States (Hist.' 151. 152, 260, 261 ,' 262) '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.3-4 

American government (Pol. S. 150) 3 

General psychology 3 

Health and/or basic physical education activities 3 

Total 30-32 

1 Courses in the humanities and natural sciences may be selected from the disciplines listed on 
page 160. If the teaching major or minor area of specialization includes courses in these subjects, 
they also may be applied toward general education requirements. The social science requirement is 
fulfilled by the courses in U.S. history and American government. 

Specialty in English 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Fundamentals of Reading Techniques (Se. Ed. 336) 3 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools (Sp. Ed. 218) 1 

Total 29-32 

REQUIREMENTS FOR BOTH OPTIONS 

Literature for the high school or library materials for young adults (Engl. 385 or Lib. S. 304) 3 

Oral interpretation (Sp. Com. 141) 3 

OPTION A: TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR IN ENGLISH 

Introduction to Shakespeare (Engl. 118, 318, 319) 3 

Survey of American literature, or equivalent (Engl. 255, 256) 6 

Survey of English literature, or equivalent (Engl. 209, 210) 6 

Descriptive English Grammar (Engl. 302) 3 

Theory and Practice of Written Composition (Engl. 381) 3 

English electives 11 

Six of these hours must be in courses restricted to advanced undergraduates. It is recommended 
that electives be chosen from English offerings in literary genres, world and/or classical literature, 
literary criticism, contemporary literature, backgrounds to literature, rhetoric, and linguistics. 
Total 32 



164 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR OR SUPPORTING AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Students selecting the teacher education major in English (Option A) must (1) complete one of the 
teacher education minors listed on page 88, or (2) complete at least three courses in each of two 
areas of concentration, or (3) complete at least two courses in each of three areas of concentration. 
The areas of concentration are language and communications; language performance, oral and 
written; humanities and philosophy; methods and theories of critical processes; world and classical 
literatures; and the teaching of components of English. Courses for the areas of concentration must 
be elected in consultation with the adviser. Students selecting the teacher education major in literature 
(Option B) must complete the approved teacher education minor in rhetoric or the approved teacher 
education minor in the teaching of English as a second language. 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 

OPTION B: TEACHER EDUCATION MAJOR IN LITERATURE 

Poetry, drama, fiction, or honors seminar (Engl. 101, 102, 103) 6 

Introduction to Shakespeare (Engl. 118, 318, 319) 3-6 

Literary Criticism (Engl. 215 or 277) 3 

Survey of American literature (Engl. 255, 256) 6 

Survey of English literature (Engl. 209, 210) 6 

Advanced English electives 5-8 

Total 29-35 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN RHETORIC 

See pages 88 and 303. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE 

See pages 88 and 303. 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credit, at least 120 

Specialty in General Science 

In order to remain in good academic standing in the program, a student must satisfy the 
following requirements (in addition to those requirements applicable to all teacher education 
curricula): (1) a student must have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) University of Illinois and cumulative 
grade-point average to remain in the curriculum and (2) a student must also have at least a 
3.0 University of Illinois and cumulative average in all attempts at science/mathematics courses 
taken at the University and elsewhere in order to remain in the curriculum. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4-5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools (Sp. Ed. 218) 1 

Total 26-30 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES 

General physics (Phycs. 101, 102 or 106, 107, 108) 10-12 

General chemistry (Chem. 101, 102 or 107, 108, 109, 110) 8-10 

Life science (Biol. 110, 111) 10 

Descriptive statistics or educational measurement 3-4 

Two of the following: 

General astronomy or descriptive astronomy (Astr. 101 and 102, or 210) 3-8 

Physical geography 4 

Physical geology 4 

ELECTIVES 

Additional electives in science and courses related to science teaching must be chosen in consultation 
with an adviser and must be taken to bring the total of such work to approximately 70 semester 



EDUCATION 165 



hours, including 15 semester hours of 200- and/or 300-level courses in sciences, exclusive of those 
listed immediately above. The completion of a teacher education minor in either biology or mathematics 
is recommended. 1 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 



1 Courses related to science teaching may include mathematics, computer science, history of 
science, philosophy of science, anthropology, experimental psychology, physical geography, and 
science education, exclusive of education courses specifically required. 

Specialty in Life Science 

In order to remain in good academic standing in the program, a student must satisfy the 
following requirements (in addition to those requirements applicable to all teacher education 
curricula): (1) a student must have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) University of Illinois and cumulative 
grade-point average to remain in the curriculum and (2) a student must also have at least a 
3.0 University of Illinois and cumulative average in all attempts at science/mathematics courses 
taken at the University and elsewhere in order to remain in the curriculum. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4-5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools (Sp. Ed. 218) 1 

Total 26-30 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES 

General physics (Phycs. 101, 102 or 106, 107, 108) 10-12 

General chemistry (Chem. 101, 102 or 107, 108, 109, 110) 8-10 

Life science (Biol. 110, 111) 10 

Descriptive statistics or educational measurement 3-4 

Organic chemistry 5 

Physiology (experimental, including laboratory) 5 

Microbiology (including laboratory") 6 

Genetics 4 

Vertebrate or invertebrate zoology 3-5 

Ecology 3-5 

Plant biology (advanced level) 3-5 

ELECTIVES 

Additional electives in science and courses related to science teaching must be taken to bring the 
total of such work to approximately 70 semester hours, and must be selected in consultation with 
an adviser. The completion of a teacher education minor in mathematics or one of the physical 
sciences is recommended. 2 



TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 



1 Microbiology laboratory may be taken for 3 to 5 hours credit. The minimum required for teacher 
education is 3 hours. Students with particular interest in microbiology may take additional hours. 

2 Courses related to science teaching may include mathematics, history of science, philosophy of 
science, anthropology, experimental psychology, physical geography, and science education exclusive 
of the education courses specifically required. 

Specialty in Mathematics 

In order to remain in good academic standing in the program, a student must satisfy the 
following requirements (in addition to those requirements applicable to all teacher education 
curricula): (1) a student may not receive more than 5 hours with grades of C or below in the 
calculus sequence; (2) a student must maintain a 3.5 (A = 5.0) grade-point average in mathematics 



166 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



courses beyond calculus, and (3) a student must maintain a 3.5 University of Illinois and 
cumulative grade-point average to remain in the program. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 1 

Secondary Education in the united States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 1 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Micro-teaching (Se. Ed. 239) or 15 clock hours of tutorial experience of mathematics tutoring 

in an approved mathematics tutorial program 0-2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools (Sp. Ed. 218) 1 

Total 23-28 

REQUIRED COURSES 

Calculus and analytic geometry 10-11 

Topics in Geometry (Math. 302) 3 

Linear algebra (Math. 225, 315, or 318) 2-3 

Real analysis (Math. 344 or 347) 3 

Abstract algebra (Math. 317) 3 

Probability-statistics (Math. 263/Stat. 210, Math. 361/Stat. 351, or Math. 363/Stat. 310) 3-4 

Computer science (C.S. 101 or 105 or 121) 3-4 

Each student must also select at least three additional courses (9 hours) from the field lists 

below. This selection must include courses from at least two different field lists 9 

Geometry-topology: 303, 323, 332 

Analysis: 247, 306, 341 or 345, 346 or 348, 384 

Algebra: 305, 313, 319, 353, 383 

Probability-statistics: 364, 368, 369 
With the approval of the adviser, topics courses such as Math. 351 may be used in the field list 
most appropriate to the content of a particular offering of that course. 
Total hours in mathematics and computer science 36-40 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 

Specialty in Physical Science 

In order to remain in good academic standing in the program, a student must satisfy the 
following requirements (in addition to those requirements applicable to all teacher education 
curricula): (1) a student must have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) University of Illinois and cumulative 
grade-point average to remain in the curriculum and (2) a student must also have at least a 
3.0 University of Illinois and cumulative average in all attempts at science/mathematics courses 
taken at the University and elsewhere in order to remain in the curriculum. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 211) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4-5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools (Sp. Ed. 218) 1 

Total 26-30 

REQUIRED CORE COURSES 

General physics (Phycs. 101, 102 or 106, 107, 108) 10-12 

General chemistry (Chem. 101, 102 or 107, 108, 109, 110) 8-10 

Life science (Biol. 110, 111) 10 

Descriptive statistics or educational measurement 3-4 

One of the following options must be completed: 



EDUCATION 167 



OPTION A: CHEMISTRY 

Twenty-two to 24 hours in chemistry beyond the core courses. For more detailed information, refer 
to the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Chemistry on page 291. Additional electives in 
science and courses related to science teaching must be chosen in consultation with an adviser and 
must be taken to bring the total of such work to approximately 70 semester hours. The completion 
of a teacher education minor in mathematics, physics, or biology is recommended. 1 

OPTION B: PHYSICS 

Nineteen hours in physics beyond the core courses. For more detailed information, refer to the 
Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Physics on page 300. Additional electives in science and 
courses related to science teaching must be taken to bring the total of such work to approximately 
70 semester hours. The completion of a teacher education minor in either mathematics or chemistry 
is recommended. 1 

OPTION C: EARTH SCIENCE 

Thirty-two hours in earth science beyond the core courses. For more detailed information, refer to 
the Curriculum Preparatory to the Teaching of Earth Science on page 293. Additional electives in 
science and courses related to science teaching must be taken to bring the total of such work to 
approximately 70 semester hours. The completion of a teacher education minor in biology, mathe- 
matics, or one of the physical sciences is recommended. 1 

TOTAL 

Including general education and professional education credits, at least 120 



1 Courses related to science teaching may include mathematics, history of science, computer 
science, philosophy of science, anthropology, experimental psychology, physical geography, and 
science education, exclusive of education courses specifically required. 

Specialty in Social Studies 

This specialty offers preparation for teachers of courses in history, sociology, economics, 
political science, geography, and general social studies. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 3 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 8 

Exceptional Students in Secondary Schools (Sp. Ed. 218) 1 

Total 28 

Two arrangements are provided for completing the major and minor requirements: 

Option A requires a social studies major of 41 hours and a minor of 20 to 24 hours in an 
approved teaching field outside the social studies (English, a foreign language, mathematics, 
etc.)- The major under option A consists of two parts: (1) 20 hours in history, and (2) 21 hours 
in anthropology, economics, cultural geography, political science, and sociology chosen in 
consultation with an adviser and distributed to provide one course in each of four fields and 
some concentration in two of the fields. 

Option B requires a social studies major of 36 hours and a minor of 20 hours which is also 
within the social studies field. The major under option B consists of two parts: (1) 16 to 21 
hours in history and (2) 15 to 20 hours in anthropology, economics, cultural geography, political 
science, and sociology distributed to provide courses in three of the five fields. The 20-hour 
minor is taken entirely in one of the areas of anthropology, economics, geography, political 
science, or sociology which has not been included in the major. 

The choice of options will be selected in consultation with an adviser. Under each option, 
at least one survey course in American history and one course in American government is 
required. 



168 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ADULT 
AND CONTINUING EDUCATION 

The purpose of this minor is to offer students a course of study to increase their competence 
as teachers of adults and to open avenues for expanded career options for those planning to 
be teachers. This is not a field in which one can be certified for elementary or secondary 
teaching in Illinois. Students should consult with the continuing education adviser, 333 Education 
Building, before electing to take this minor. 

HOURS 

Adult Learning and Development (A.H.C.E. 362) 4 

Continuing Education General Seminar (A.H.C.E. 380) 4 

Instructional Design (A.H.C.E. 363) 4 

Electives (for the selection of electives, students must have prior approval of the adult and 

continuing education adviser, 276 Education Building) 6 

Total 18 

APPROVED NONTEACHING MINOR 1 

INSTRUCTIONAL APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTERS 

A minimum of 18 hours, including the following, is required. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE HOURS 

Introduction to computer programming (C.S. 101, 102, 103, 105, or 121) 3-4 

Advanced or machine-level programming (C.S. 221 or C.S. 300) 3 

Advanced computer science elective 2 3 

Total 9-10 

INSTRUCTIONAL APPLICATIONS OF COMPUTERS 

Introduction to instructional applications of computers (Se. Ed. 317) 4 

Instructional applications in subject fields (Se. Ed. 356; Se. Ed. 399, sections 

AC1, AC2, or AC3; Human. 382; or Mus. 210) 2-4 

Practicum in instructional applications (Se. Ed. 199) 3 

ELECTIVE 

A thesis project (Se. Ed. 249) 3 

Total 18-24 

Students enrolled in this minor may do practice teaching in schools having computer resources for 
instructional applications. 

1 This is not a subject field to be taught but is an additional resource to assist the teacher in the 
instruction of a teacher education major. Please consult an adviser concerning this. 

2 A computer science elective chosen from among the general areas of programming, numerical 
analyses, structure and logic, theory of computation, hardware, or applications of computing. 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Education 

All students complete requirements as outlined in prescribed courses in business education, 
general education, professional education, one or more areas of specialization, and general 
electives. Admission is limited to students who have completed a minimum of 60 semester 
hours and who meet competitive grade-point average requirements. Students must complete 
the requirements of one area of specialization.* Students may also complete a second area of 
specialization or one of the approved teacher education minors. Students must complete 100 
hours of early field experience before student teaching. A minimum of 126 hours of credit is 
required for graduation, excluding basic military. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or Rhet. 108 and a 

speech performance elective 6-7 

Humanities (two approved courses) 1 6 

* Although not a requirement for graduation (in terms of credit hours), a minimum of 2,000 
hours of employment experience is required in the occupational specialty to be taught. 



EDUCATION 169 



Introduction to psychology 3 

Natural science (two approved courses) 1 6 

Health and/or basic physical education electives 3 

United States history or American government 3-4 

Social science elective 3 

Statistics (Math. 1 61 , Econ. 1 71 , or Econ. 1 72) 3 

Calculus 4-5 

Electives 2-5 

Total 42 

1 Courses in the natural sciences and humanities may be selected from the disciplines listed on 
page 162. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Nature of the Teaching Profession (Vo. Tec. 101) 2 

Principles of Vocational and Technical Education (Vo. Tec. 240) 2 

Curriculum Modification and Individualized Instruction (Vo. Tec. 392) 2-4 

Technique and Curriculum Development for Teaching Data Processing and Office Machines 

(Vo. Tec. 271 ) 3 

Teaching Exceptional Students (Vo. Tec./Sp. Ed. 309 or Sp. Ed. 307) 3-4 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 8 

Total 31-34 

FOUNDATION COURSES IN BUSINESS HOURS 

Principles of Accounting I and II (Accy. 201 and 202) 6 

Introduction to Economics (Econ. 101) 4 

Business and Administrative Communication (B. & T.W. 251) 3 

Legal Environment of Business (B. Adm. 200) 3 

Consumer education (course approved by adviser) 3 

Computer science (C.S. 1 05 or 1 06) 3 

Total 22 

Areas of Specialization 

ACCOUNTING-BOOKKEEPING HOURS 

Intermediate Accounting (Accy. 211) 3 

Cost Accounting (Accy. 221 ) 3 

Management and Organizational Behavior (B. Adm. 210 or 247) 3 

Business related electives chosen with the approval of the adviser 9 

Total 18 

ECONOMICS 

Economic Statistics II (Econ. 1 73) 3 

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (Econ. 300) 3 

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (Econ. 301) 3 

Business related electives chosen with the approval of the adviser 6-9 

Select three of the five courses listed 9 

Introduction to Public Finance (Econ. 214) 

Labor Problems (Econ. 240) 

Comparative Economic Systems (Econ. 255) 

Economics of Consumption (Econ. 313) 

Introduction to Business Financial Management (Fin. 254) 
Total 24-27 

MARKETING AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

Principles of Marketing (B. Adm. 202) 3 

Principles of Retailing (B. Adm. 212) 3 

Promotion Management (B. Adm. 337) 3 

Cooperative Vocational and Technical Education Programs (Vo. Tec. 382) 4 

Business related electives chosen with the approval of the adviser 6 

Total 19 

SECRETARIAL-OFFICE PRACTICE 1 

Cooperative Vocational and Technical Education Programs (Vo. Tec. 382) 4 

Management and Organizational Behavior (B. Adm. 210 or 247) 3 

Business related electives chosen with the approval of the adviser 12 

Total 19 



170 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Electives to bring total hours to 126. Elective hours must be in business, vocational education, 
or other areas chosen in consultation with the adviser. 



1 Students who wish to teach in special fields requiring essential competencies in an applied area 
such as typing, shorthand, or office machines must obtain an acceptable level of proficiency prior 
to enrollment in the program, or outline a plan whereby these skills may be obtained prior to 
enrollment in student teaching. Proficiency levels are validated by the business education faculty 
through examination. 

CURRICULUM IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education 

This program leads to a standard Illinois K-9 certificate with special focus on teaching in the 
nursery school and kindergarten-primary grades. A minimum of 124 semester hours of credit, 
excluding basic military, is necessary for graduation under this curriculum. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

This program is currently under revision. Please consult the program adviser for current 
degree requirements. 

LANGUAGE ARTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a performance-based speech communication course, or Rhet. 108 and a 

performance-based speech communication course, or Sp. Com. 111 and 112 6-7 

Literature 6 

Children's literature (El. Ed. 367) 3 

Total 15-16 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social science elective courses approved by adviser 6-8 

History of the United States (Hist. 151, 152, 260, 261, 262) 3-4 

American government (Pol. S. 150) 3 

Total 12-15 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Biological science 6-8 

Physical science (mathematics not acceptable) 6-8 

Total 12-16 

FINE ARTS 

Music for early childhood education (Music 240, 249) 6 

Art for the elementary school (Art Ed. 203, 205) 6 

Total 12 

HUMANITIES 

May be fulfilled with literature courses above 6 

MATHEMATICS 

Including content and methods (Math. 202) 5 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Introduction to psychology 3 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health or physical education for the elementary school (PE. 269 or H.S.S. 225 or 312) 3 

Basic physical education activities 2 

Total 5 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Child Development for Elementary Teachers (Ed. Psy. 236) 3 

Fundamentals of Nursery-Kindergarten Education (El. Ed. 234) 3 

Principles and Practices in Early Childhood Education (El. Ed. 321) 3 

Parent involvement techniques for teachers (El. Ed. 322, H.D.F.E. 210, or Anth. 210) 3 

Pediatrics and nutrition (H.D.F.E. 305, El. Ed. 305, or FN. 120) 3 

Educational practice for special fields — early childhood education (Ed. Prac. 238) 3 

Theory and Process in Elementary School Teaching (El. Ed. 237) 5 

Teaching of Language Arts in the Elementary School (El. Ed. 360) 3 

Fundamentals of Reading Techniques (El. Ed. 370) 3 



EDUCATION 171 



Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (El. Ed. 345) 3 

Science in the Elementary School (El. Ed. 341 ) 3 

Educational Practice in Elementary Education (Ed. Prac. 232) 8 

Principles, Problems, and Issues in Elementary and Early Childhood Education (El. Ed. 230) 3 

Total 49 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total (with above requirements) of 124 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education 

A minimum of 124 semester hours, excluding basic military, is neccessary for graduation under 
this curriculum. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

This program is currently under revision. Please consult the program adviser for current 
degree requirements. 

LANGUAGE ARTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 and a performance-based speech communication course, or Rhet. 108 and a 

performance-based speech communication course, or Sp. Com. 111 and 112 6-7 

Literature 6 

Children's literature (El. Ed. 367) 3 

Total 15-16 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social science elective courses approved by adviser 6-8 

History of the United States (Hist. 151, 152, 260, 261, 262) 3-4 

American government (Pol. S. 1 50) 3 

Cultural geography 3-4 

Total 15-19 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Biological science 6-8 

Physical science (mathematics not acceptable) 6-8 

Total 12-16 

FINE ARTS 

Music for elementary teachers (Music 240, 241) 6 

Art in the elementary grades (Art Ed. 203, 205) 6 

Total 12 

HUMANITIES 

May be fulfilled with literature courses above 6 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics for elementary teachers (Math. 202, 203) 8 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Introduction to psychology 3 

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Health or physical education for the elementary school (PE. 269 or H.S.S. 312) 3 

Health and/or basic physical education activities 2 

Total 5 

ACADEMIC AREA OF CONCENTRATION 

At least 12 hours (6 of which must be above the 100 level) in one of the specific disciplines approved 
by the Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education within these broad fields of study: 
social sciences, natural sciences and mathematics, humanities, and fine arts. All 12 hours must be 
in addition to any other requirements of the Curriculum Preparatory to Elementary School Teaching. 
Contact the departmental office for a list of currently approved disciplines. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Child Development for Elementary Teachers (Ed. Psy. 236) 3 



172 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Theory and Process in Elementary School Teaching (El. Ed. 237) 5 

Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School (El. Ed. 345) 3 

Science in the Elementary School (El. Ed. 341) 3 

The Teaching of Language Arts in the Elementary School (El. Ed. 360) 3 

Fundamentals of Reading Techniques (El. Ed. 370) 3 

Educational Practice in Elementary Education (Ed. Pr. 232) 8 

Principles, Problems, and Issues in Elementary and Early Childhood Education (El. Ed. 230) 3 

Total 34 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total (with above requirements) of 124 

CURRICULUM IN TECHNICAL EDUCATION SPECIALTIES 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Occupational and Practical Arts Education 

The curriculum outlined below requires a minimum of 128 hours for graduation (excluding 
basic military science) and provides options for preparing for two types of roles in education. 

Option A is designed for those persons preparing to obtain certification to teach in public 
schools including secondary area vocational centers and high schools or junior high schools. 
Examples of technical specialties commonly taught at these levels include ornamental horti- 
culture and programs in industrial arts or vocational-industrial education in fields such as 
automotive/power, metalworking, drafting, woodworking, and electricity/electronics. 

Option B prepares persons for educational roles in settings where public school certification 
is not necessary: for example, community colleges, adult vocational programs, business and 
industry, or governmental agencies. Examples of technical specialties commonly taught and/ 
or directed in these settings include fields such as police science, fire science, and industrial 
technologies (automotive, electronics, construction, metalworking, aviation). 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula leading to public school 
certification, see pages 87 to 91. 

Students seeking public school certification must complete 100 contact hours of supervised 
observation and participation experience prior to teaching. 

Fifty contact hours of supervised observation and participation experiences must be completed 
by students pursuing Option B prior to the educational internship. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or Rhet. 105 and a speech communication performance elective, or 

Rhet. 108 and a speech communication performance elective 6-7 

General psychology 3 

Natural sciences 1 6-8 

Humanities 1 6-8 

History of the United States (Hist. 151 or 152) or Pol. S. 150 3-4 

Social science elective 3 

Health and/or basic physical education activities 3 

Total 30-36 

1 Courses in the humanities and natural sciences may be selected from the disciplines listed on 
page 162. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL TECHNICAL 
EDUCATION SPECIALTIES 

History and philosophy of education (E.RS. 201) 3 

Principles of occupational and practical arts education 2-6 

Psychology of teaching and learning (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Methods of teaching 3 

Pre-educational practice or pre-educational internship experiences 3 

Curriculum development where required or elective approved by adviser 3-4 

Teaching Exceptional Students (Option A) (Votec./Sp. Ed. 309 or Sp. Ed. 307) 3-4 

Educational practice (Option A) or Educational internship (Option B) 5-8 

Total 22-34 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION SPECIALTY REQUIREMENTS 

The technical education specialties curriculum provides the opportunity for planning individual 
programs of study under the supervision of a faculty adviser in the student's special field(s) of 
interest. Examples of specific programs are on file with the Department of Vocational and 
Technical Education to aid in program planning. 



EDUCATION 173 



\ ,k!i Rodent will develop .1 pattern oi courses in one or more technical specialties and 

supporting courses comprised of at least 48 semester hours. 

SUPERVISED OCCUPATIONAL EXPERIENCE 

Cooperative arrangements have been made by the University for supervised occupational 
expe r ience of technical education specialty students while employed in selected employment 
locations. This program is designed tor students preparing to become certified vocational or 
technical specialty instructors, for students preparing for employment in training departments 
maintained b) business or industrial organizations, or for students preparing to be teachers of 
selected occupations. Students may accumulate up to 17 semester hours of credit through 
registration in Vo. Tec. 189 — Supervised Occupational Experience. 

Cooperative arrangements have been established with some community colleges whereby 
registration in this program may be accomplished after completion of the freshman year. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO TEACHING MODERATELY 
AND SEVERELY HANDICAPPED PERSONS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Special Education 

This two-year curriculum is designed to prepare students to teach students with moderate and 
severe handicaps. Applicants must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5 (A = 
5.0), have prior experience' with moderately and severely handicapped persons, and have 
attained junior standing (at least 60 semester hours of baccalaureate credit) upon enrollment 
in the program. A minimum of 124 hours of credit, excluding basic military, is required for 
graduation. 

To allow completion of degree requirements within two years, applicants must have earned 
60 hours and must have fulfilled all or most of the following general education and preferably 
some of the professional education requirements prior to enrollment. Admission is made by 
formal application during the spring semester of the sophomore year. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula leading to public school 
certification, see pages 87 to 91. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Composition and speech performance (e.g., Sp. Com. 1 1 1 and 1 12, or Rhet. 105 and a speech 

performance course, or Rhet. 108 and a speech performance course) 6-7 

Biological science 2 6 

Physical science 2 6 

American history or American national government 3-4 

Social science electives 6 

Humanities 2 6 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Mathematics or statistics 3-4 

Child development 3 

Introduction to psychology 3 

General education electives to bring total to 60 12-15 

2 Courses in the humanities and natural sciences may be selected from those disciplines listed on 
page 162. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

History and/or Philosophy of Education (E.PS. 201, 300, 301, 302, 305, or 309) 3 

School and Community Experience (Ed. Pr. 150, Section MSH) 4 

Educational Practice in the Education of Exceptional Children (Ed. Pr. 220, Section MSH, 

Secondary focus) 6 

Instructional Design (Ed. Psy. 363) 4 

Introduction to Systematic Instruction (Sp. Ed. 336) 4 

Total 21 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Recreation for the Physically Disabled (Leist. 233) 3 

Development of Spoken Language (Sp. H.S. 383) 3 

Language Disorders in Children (Sp. H.S. 386) 3 

1 Applicants may contact the Department of Special Education for further information, if 
needed, on the prior experience requirement. 



174 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Educational Practice in Education of Exceptional Children (Ed. Pr. 220, Section MSH, Elementary 

focus) 8 

Exceptional Children (Sp. Ed. 1 17) 3 

Psychology and Education of the Mentally Handicapped (Sp. Ed. 322) 3 

Tests and Measurement in Special Education (Sp. Ed. 324) 2 

Behavior Analysis for Teachers (Sp. Ed. 335) 3 

Curriculum Development and Classroom Organization for Students with Moderate and Severe 

Handicaps (Sp. Ed. 337) 4 

Teaming with Parents and Staff: Communication, Training, and Cooperation (Sp. Ed. 338) 2 

Vocational Training for Mentally Retarded Adolescents and Adults (Sp. Ed. 345) 3 

Total 37 

ELECTIVES 

To yield a total (with above requirements) of 124 



College of Engineering 

Engineering Wall 1 108 West Green Street, Urbana, 11. 61801 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 175 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 176 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 178 

HONORS PROGRAMS 185 

ELECTIVES 1 86 

CURRICULA 187 



The College of Engineering prepares men and women for professional careers 
in engineering and for responsible positions of a technical and semitechnical 
character in industry, commerce, education, and government. The college 
provides training in the mathematical and physical sciences and their appli- 
cation to a broad spectrum of technological and social requirements of 
society. The engineering curricula, though widely varied and specialized, are 
built on a general foundation of scientific theory applicable to many different 
fields. Work in the classroom and laboratory is brought into sharper focus 
by practical problems that the student solves by methods similar to those 
of practicing engineers. 

While each student pursues a curriculum chosen to meet his or her own 
career goals, all students take certain common courses. Basic courses in 
mathematics, chemistry, physics, rhetoric, and computer science are required 
in the first two years. Although the curricula are progressively specialized in 
the third and fourth years, each student is required to take some courses 
outside his or her chosen field. 

Nontechnical courses are included in each curriculum; they may be required 
or elective. Many nontechnical courses satisfy the broad objectives of the 
humanities and social sciences requirements of the engineering curricula — 
making the student keenly aware of the urgent problems of society and 
developing a deeper appreciation of man's cultural achievements. The hu- 
manities and social sciences courses are usually drawn from the liberal arts 
and sciences, economics, and approved courses in fine and applied arts. 
Students who wish a broader cultural background should consider a combined 
engineering-liberal arts and sciences program; see page 178. 

The Engineering Library, on the first three floors of Engineering Hall, is 
a major resource center for students of all curricula. It contains the reference 
books, periodicals, catalogs, and technical publications that students need 
constantly, and also provides for general reading and private research. 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

The College of Engineering includes the Departments of Aeronautical and Astronautical 
Engineering, Ceramic Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, General Engineering, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Metallurgy and 
Mining Engineering, Nuclear Engineering, Physics, and Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. 
The undergraduate curricula described later in this section are administered by these units. 
The work in chemical engineering is administered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 



176 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



The curriculum in agricultural engineering is administered jointly by the Colleges of Agriculture 
and Engineering. 

The ABET listing of the programs of the College of Engineering, required by the Engineering 
Accreditation Commission, is: Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering bdC [1950]; 1 Agri- 
cultural Engineering bdC [1950]; Ceramic Engineering bdC [1936]; Chemical Engineering bdC 
[1936]; Civil Engineering bdC [1936]; Computer Engineering bdC [1978]; Electrical Engineering 
bdC [1936]; Engineering Mechanics bdC [I960]; General Engineering bdC [1936]; Industrial 
Engineering bdC [I960]; Mechanical Engineering bdC [1936]; Metallurgical Engineering bdC 
[1936]; and Nuclear Engineering bdC [1978]. 

Each student entering the College of Engineering declares his or her choice of a curriculum. 
All first-year students follow the common program for freshmen shown below. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 
Entering Freshmen 

Students seeking admission to the College of Engineering who are recent high school graduates 
or who have earned less than 12 semester hours of credit at other collegiate institutions are 
classified as new freshmen and must meet the entrance requirements to the College of 
Engineering that are specified for new freshmen. (See the Admissions Chart on page 12.) 
Students are admitted to the college on a best-qualified basis as determined by ACT composite 
scores and high school percentile ranks supplied on high school transcripts. 

Although new freshmen take a common, or similar, program (shown below), they are asked 
to choose a curriculum in which they wish to study. Freshmen may change their curriculum 
of study at their own request at specified times during their freshman year of study. Since the 
program of study is essentially the same for all freshman students, such changes can be made 
without loss of credit toward graduation. 

The Mathematics Placement Test is required of all freshman students entering the College 
of Engineering, and they are urged to take the examination during the spring testing period 
prior to enrollment. 

The Chemistry Placement Test is required of all entering freshmen who will take freshman 
chemistry during their first year. This examination will be used to place a student in a 
background course for engineers, Chem. 100, or in the normal beginning course for engineers, 
Chem. 101. Students with a superior background in chemistry may take the Chemistry Proficiency 
Test which, if passed, would place them in Chem. 102 and grant them 3 hours proficiency 
credit for Chem. 101; the additional 1 hour must be made up as a free elective. Students 
having CEEB advanced placement credit in mathematics, chemistry, or physics (see pages 34 
and 36) will receive credit toward graduation and will be placed in advanced course work 
consistent with their academic preparation. 

COMMON FIRST-YEAR PROGRAM HOURS 

Engineering lectures 

Chemistry 1 6-8 

Mathematics 2 8-10 

Physics 4 

Rhetoric 4 

Engineering electives 0-6 

Electives 3-6 

Total 31-36 

1 The normal freshman chemistry sequence is Chem. 101 and 102. 

2 Entering freshmen who do not pass the Mathematics Placement Test will take Math. 112 and 
114 or 116. 

Transfer Students 

The College of Engineering admits qualified transfer students from both junior and senior 
colleges and has worked closely with these schools in Illinois to implement pre-engineering 
programs. 

Students may complete the first two years of study in other accredited institutions and 

1 b = bachelor's degree, basic level accreditation; d = day; C = co-op feature meeting special 
requirements of the ABET criteria 



ENGINEERING 177 



transfer to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign with little or no loss of credit 
provided they follow a program similar to the one in the College of Engineering. Following 
is a suggested list of courses which should be completed in the first two years prior to transfer. 
A range ot hours is given in each of these course work areas, as the major concern is that 
students have an adequate coverage of basic subject matter rather than specific numbers of 
hours in given areas. The range is given for students who may be attending schools on either 
the quarter-hour or semester-hour system. 

RANGE OF HOURS 

SUGGESTED PRE-ENGINEERING COURSES Quarter Hours Semester Hours 

Freshman chemistry 10-15 6-10 

General physics (taught using calculus) 12-18 8-12 

English (rhetoric and composition) 6-9 4-6 

Mathematics (total mathematics credits) 20-24 15-17 

Calculus or calculus and analytic geometry 16-20 12-14 

Differential equations 3-4 3 

Engineering graphics (mechanical drawing 

and/or descriptive geometry) 4-6 3-4 

Applied mechanics — statics 3-4 2-3 

Applied mechanics — dynamics 3-6 2-3 

Computer science (FORTRAN programming) 3-4 3 

RANGE OF HOURS 
OTHER COURSES Quarter Hours Semester Hours 

Social sciences and humanities Varies Varies 

Statistics 4 3 

Students should complete as many of the suggested courses as possible and select additional 
course work from those listed as Other Courses above to complete full-time study programs. 
Normally, a student will complete all of the suggested courses and 8 to 10 additional semester 
hours of course work. This additional course work may include social sciences and humanities 
electives, but could include work in computer science or advanced mathematics. 

Before selecting social sciences and humanities electives, students should familiarize themselves 
with the elective requirements of the college listed on 181 through 183. Students seeking 
transfer to the college must have a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.50 (A = 5.0) 
to apply, but competitive standards for admission are usually higher than the 3.5 level. 

Students may transfer to the college for the fall, spring, or summer session provided the 
students have met competitive GPA cutoffs and have completed 60 or more semester hours 
of work. Transfer students are expected to have also completed the basic mathematics (through 
calculus), physics, and chemistry sequences in the 60 or more semester hours required for 
transfer. Transfer students starting their studies in the fall semester are also allowed to advance 
enroll during the preceding summer. Students are informed of this opportunity after they are 
admitted. Questions are invited concerning this procedure. 

A few sophomore-level technical courses, such as E.E. 260, M.E. 220, and C.E. 195, may 
not be offered by most community colleges. However, junior-level transfer students can usually 
arrange their programs here so that all technical requirements can be completed in a four- 
semester period on this campus if they wish to do so. If the number of hours remaining to 
complete a degree requires more than four semesters, the student may enroll for an additional 
summer session or semester. 

Students transferring to the College of Engineering are encouraged to write to the Office of 
the Associate Dean, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 207 Engineering Hall, 1308 
West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801, or to the head of the department to which they wish 
to transfer, at any time they desire guidance in the selection of courses. It is recommended 
that a student complete all sequences in mathematics, physics, and chemistry at one institution 
in order to maintain proper continuity. In cases where this is not possible, a student may enroll 
in a summer session to make up deficiencies. 

Transfer students are not required to take freshman guidance examinations, or any other 
examinations, to qualify for admission to the College of Engineering; but all other admission 
regulations apply to them. Transfer students should consult Admission of Transfer Students 
on page 21 for general information concerning transfer to the University of Illinois at Urbana- 



178 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Champaign, and students from community colleges should note especially the rules regarding 
community colleges on pages 22 through 23. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Combined Engineering-Liberal Arts and Sciences Program 

A five-year program of study permits a student to earn a Bachelor of Science degree in a field 
of engineering from the College of Engineering and a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Science 
degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

This program affords students the opportunity to prepare for careers of an interdisciplinary 
nature. By selecting an appropriate liberal arts and sciences major in combination with the 
desired engineering curriculum, it is possible for students to qualify for new and unique careers 
in industry, business, or government. Students who desire a broader background than it is 
possible to provide in the four-year engineering curricula can develop a program that includes 
a well-rounded cultural education in addition to an engineering specialty. Each student must 
file an approved program with the engineering college office and with the liberal arts and 
sciences college office. 

Advisers in both colleges assist in planning a program of study to meet the needs and 
requirements for both degrees. Most combinations of engineering and liberal arts curricula 
may be completed in ten semesters, provided the student does not have deficiencies in the 
entrance requirements of either college. 

Most engineering curricula can be combined with one of a variety of liberal arts and sciences 
majors including languages, social sciences, humanities, speech communication, and philosophy. 
This combined program operates under the following conditions: 

— Students entering the program must meet admission requirements for both colleges. (See 
the Admissions Chart on pages 12, 13, and 14.) 

— A student who starts in the program and decides to transfer from it is subject to the existing 
graduation requirements of the college of his or her choice. 

— The degrees of Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences are awarded simultaneously. No student in the combined 
program is permitted to receive a degree from either college before the completion of the 
entire program. 

— Participants are required to complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences foreign 
language graduation requirement. Also, an approved sequence of courses in the biological 
sciences is required. 

— Students electing advanced ROTC or NROTC are required to meet these commitments in 
addition to the combined program as outlined. 

— Students having 75 or more hours of transfer credit are not advised to enter this program 
since they cannot ordinarily complete it in five years. 

— Students transferring from other colleges and universities must plan to complete at least 
one year in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Urbana-Champaign and one year in 
the College of Engineering at Urbana-Champaign in order to satisfy residence requirements 
if both degrees are to be granted here. Other students should plan to spend a minimum of 
two years in each college. 

— Students are expected to maintain at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) grade-point average to be accepted 
or continued in the program. A higher grade-point average may be required in the future. 

During the first year, students are enrolled in the common freshman program for engineers 
which is taken in the College of Engineering. (See page 176.) Students are enrolled in the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for the second and third years and in the College of 
Engineering for the fourth and fifth years. A typical combined program follows. 

SECOND YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Biological science 4 Biological science 4 

Calculus and analytic geometry 5 Language 4 

Humanities or social sciences 4 Liberal arts and sciences major 3 

Language 4 Physics (heat, electricity, and magnetism) 4 

Total 17 Total 15 



ENGINEERING 



179 



THIRD YEAR 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Language 4 

Liberal arts and sciences major 6 

Physics (wave motion, sound, light, and 

modern physics) 4 

Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

Engineering subjects 15 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Total 19 



FIFTH YEAR 

Engineering subjects 



Engineering subjects .6-8 

Humanities or social sciences 4 

Language 4 

Liberal arts and sciences major 3 

Total 17-19 



Engineering subjects 11 



15-17 Engineering subjects 18 



It may be necessary to adjust the above program to allow the student to take more hours 
in the L.A.S. program. 

For further information about this program, students should write to the Office of the 
Associate Dean in either the College of Engineering or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 



Affiliations with Other Liberal Arts Colleges 

Through a program of affiliation between the College of Engineering and a number of liberal 
arts colleges, students may enroll in a five-year program and earn a bachelor's degree from 
one of these colleges and at the same time earn a bachelor's degree in engineering from the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In general, students spend the first three years at 
the liberal arts college and the final two years at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 
At the time of transfer, students must meet competitive transfer admission requirements. 

Increasing numbers of engineering graduates enter leadership roles in industry' and government 
and require a greater understanding of the impact of technology on society. The five-year 
program encourages a student to develop a broad understanding of the social sciences and 
humanities while he or she strives for excellence in technical studies. These affiliations have 
the added benefit of allowing the student to take his or her preengineenng studies at a liberal 
arts school chosen on the basis of geographical location, prestige, religious principles, family 
circumstances, or other personal reasons. 

Colleges affiliated with the College of Engineering are: 
Adrian College Elmhurst College Knox College 

Adrian, Michigan Elmhurst, Illinois Galesburg, Illinois 



Anderson College 
Anderson, Indiana 

Augustana College 
Rock Island, Illinois 

Beloit College 
Beloit, Wisconsin 

Butler University 
Indianapolis, Indiana 

Carthage College 
Kenosha, Wisconsin 

DePaul University- 
Chicago, Illinois 

Eastern Illinois University 
Charleston, Illinois 



Grace College 
Winona Lake, Indiana 

Greenville College 
Greenville, Illinois 

Illinois Benedictine College 
Lisle, Illinois 
(formerly St. 

Procopius College) 

Illinois College 
Jacksonville, Illinois 

Illinois State University- 
Normal, Illinois 

Illinois Wesleyan University 
Bloomington, Illinois 



Lewis University 
Lockport, Illinois 

Loras College 
Dubuque, Iowa 

Loyola University of Chicago 
Chicago, Illinois 

MacMurray College 
Jacksonville, Illinois 

McKendree College 
Lebanon, Illinois 

Millikin University 
Decatur, Illinois 

Monmouth College 
Monmouth, Illinois 



180 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



North Central College 
Naperville, Illinois 

Northern Illinois University 
DeKalb, Illinois 

Olivet Nazarene College 
Kankakee, Illinois 



Rockford College 
Rockford, Illinois 

Saint Ambrose College 
Davenport, Iowa 

Saint Joseph's College 
Rensselaer, Indiana 

Wartburg College 
Waverly, Iowa 



Western Illinois University 
Macomb, Illinois 

Wheaton College 
Wheaton, Illinois 

Yankton College 
Yankton, South Dakota 



Cooperative Engineering Education Program 

A five-year program in cooperative engineering education is available to students in all curricula 
in the college. Students in the program alternate periods of attendance at the University with 
periods of employment in industry or government. The employment, which is an essential 
element in the educational process, is with the same company each work period and is related 
to the student's field of study. These assignments increase in difficulty and responsibility with 
each succeeding period off campus. A list of participating employers may be obtained by 
writing to the Cooperative Engineering Director, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 
207 Engineering Hall, 1308 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Students wishing to join the program must first enroll in the College of Engineering at the 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. If accepted by a participating employer, freshmen 
will have their first off-campus educational assignment scheduled during the summer following 
their freshman year or they will attend the summer session and have their first off-campus 
assignment during the fall semester following their freshman year. Typical schedules are 
illustrated in a co-op brochure available from the cooperative engineering office. 

Sophomores and advanced undergraduates are eligible for the program, which will still 
require five years to complete, but they will have fewer off-campus assignments. 

Students enrolled in the cooperative education program are registered in the University and 
are considered full-time students for the entire five years required by the program. Appropriate 
entries indicating participation in the co-op program are entered on the student's official 
transcript each semester and summer that he or she is enrolled. Upon successful completion 
of the program, the student is awarded a certificate signed by the dean of the college and the 
off-campus co-op coordinator, in addition to receiving the regular diploma awarded for 
completing the degree requirements. 

College Option in Bioengineering 

Bioengineering is a broad, interdisciplinary field that brings together engineering, biology, and 
medicine to create new techniques, new devices, and new understanding of living systems to 
improve the quality of human life. Its practice ranges from the fundamental study of the 
behavior of biological materials to the design and development of medical instruments. 

Any of the existing engineering curricula can provide a good foundation for work in 
bioengineering. However, the engineering undergraduate needs additional education in the 
biologically oriented sciences to obtain a strong background for bioengineering. With such a 
background, the student should be able to progress rapidly on the graduate level in any branch 
of bioengineering. In industry, the graduate will be competent to handle engineering tasks 
related to biology. 

The courses shown below have been selected specifically for the undergraduate engineering 
student. There are three possible alternatives which can be selected to meet the individual 
student's plans, designated A, B, and C. The listing of bioengineering courses is not complete, 
but represents examples of courses which are currently available. An additional course in 
organic chemistry would be required for entrance to most medical schools. A minimum of 16 
hours is required for the option. To obtain recognition for the bioengineering option, students 
must register in the Office of the Associate Dean, 207 Engineering Hall. 



ENGINEERING 181 



ALTERNATIVES 
BIOLOGY CORE ABC 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 3 3 3 

Physl 103 — Introduction to Human Physiology 4 

Physl. 301 — General Physiology 1 3 3 3 

Physl 302 — Experimental Animal Physiology 3 

Physl. 303 — General Physiology Laboratory 1 2 2 2 

Physl 304 — Experimental Physiology Laboratory 2 2 2 

VB 316 — Veterinary Physiology 4 

Mammalian physiology laboratory 3 1-2 

Total hours for the biology core 13-14 14 13 

1 Biology prerequisites will be waived by the instructor for advanced engineering students. 

2 Engineering students taking core B are not required to take Physl. 302 because Physl. 103 is 
taken. 

3 Several possible courses; consultation with bioengineering adviser required. 

BIOENGINEERING AND RELATED COURSES (ONE OR MORE) HOURS 

Bioen. 120 — Introduction to Bioengineering 1 

Bioen. 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar 0-4 

Bioen. 270 — Individual Study 0-4 

Bioen. 306 — Veterinary Orthopedic Mechanics (same as VB. 306) 3 

Bioen. 308 — Implant Materials for Medical Applications 3 

Bioen. 314 — Biomedical Instrumentation (same as E.E. 314) 3 

Bioen. 315 — Biomedical Instrumentation (lab) (same as E.E. 315) 2 

Bioen. 370— Special Topics in Bioengineering (various sections cover separate courses which 

may change each semester) 0-4 

Bioen. 375 — Modeling of Biological Systems (same as E.E. 375) 3 

Chem. 323 — Applied Electronics for Scientists 4 

E.E. 373 — Engineering Acoustics 3 

E.E. 374 — Ultrasonic Techniques 3 

Enq. H. 297 — Honors Projects in Bioengineering 1-4 

G.E. 293 — Special Topics in Biomechanics 1 

I.E. 305 — Principles of Ergonomics (same as Physl. 305) 4 

Nuc. E. 241 — Introduction to Radiation Protection 3 

Nuc. E. 341 — Principles of Radiation Protection 4 

Other departmental specialties related to bioengineering (taken as electives) 3-4 

College Option in Polymer Science and Engineering 

Polymer science and engineering is a broad interdisciplinary field bringing together various 
aspects of chemistry, physics, and engineering for the understanding, development, and 
application of the materials science of polymers. Many of the existing engineering curricula 
provide a good foundation for work in polymer science and engineering. However, the 
undergraduate needs additional courses specifically dealing with the science and engineering of 
large molecules. With such a background, the student should be able to progress rapidly in 
industry or on the graduate level. In addition to those students specifically desiring a career in 
polymers, this option can also be valuable to students interested in the development, design, 
and applications of materials in general. 

The courses listed below have been selected specifically to give an undergraduate student a 
strong background in polymer science and engineering. A minimum of 8 courses is required, 
several of which the student would normally take to satisfy the requirements of the basic 
degree. To obtain recognition for the polymer science and engineering option, students must 
register in the Office of the Associate Dean, 207 Engineering Hall. The student should also 
consult a member of the Polymer Group faculty when considering the option and deciding 
on a program. 

CORE COURSES 

Met E. 375 — Introduction to Polymers, or Chem. E. 392 — Polymer Engineering and Science 
Met. E. 378 — Characterization Laboratory 1 
M.E. 355 — Polymer Processing 

THERMODYNAMICS (One of the Following) 

Met. E. 314 — Metallurgical Thermodynamics 

M.E. 205 — Thermodynamics 

Phycs. 361 — Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics 

Chem. E. 370 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 



182 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Cer. E. 245 — Physical Chemistry for Engineers, and Cer. E. 307 — Thermal and Mechanical 

Properties of Ceramics 
Chem. 342 — Physical Chemistry 1, and Chem. 344 — Physical Chemistry 2 

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of Solids 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (One of the Following) 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic Chemistry 
Chem. 136 — Basic Organic Chemistry 

RELATED COURSES (At Least Two of the Following) 2 

Met. E. 299a — Structure and Properties of Polymers 

Met. E. 299b — Polymer Viscosity 

T.A.M. 328 — Mechanical Behavior of Composite Materials 

Cer. E. 398a — Chemistry of Polymeric Materials 

Cer. E. 398b — Polymer Surfaces and Colloid Physics 

Chem. E. 387 — Applied Chemical Kinetics and Catalysis 

Phycs. 350 — Biomolecular Physics 

Phycs. 389 — Introduction to Solid-State Physics 

Chem. 336 — Organic Chemistry 

Chem. 337 — Organic Chemistry 

T.A.M. 321 — Advanced Mechanics of Deformable Bodies 

M.E. 346 — Design and Materials 

1 Although this is the desired course, one of the following would also be acceptable. 
M.E. 233 — Materials Laboratory 

Met. E. 371 and 373 — Physical Metallurgy Laboratory I and II 

Chem. 134 — Elementary Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

Chem. 181 — Structure and Synthetics 

Bioen. 308 — Implant Materials for Medical Applications 

Chem. E. 374 — Chemical Engineering Laboratory 

Cer. E. 202, 311, 314 — Ceramics laboratory courses 

2 Other polymer-related courses may be substituted upon petition. 

College Option in Manufacturing Engineering 

A manufacturing engineering option is being developed that will include a college-wide 
integrated manufacturing engineering education laboratory facility. This option will be comprised 
of course work specifically designed to meet the broad multidisciplinary needs of manufacturing 
engineering. 

Courses currently under development include: Introduction to Manufacturing Systems 
Engineering; Modeling and Simulating Methods: Information Management; Decision-making 
and Control in Manufacturing Systems; Interfacing Methods; and Processing and Handling of 
Materials. 

The option will also draw on a large base of established and emerging courses that are pan 
of the existing disciplinary patterns across the College of Engineering. Further information is 
available in 207 Engineering Hall. 

Thesis 

A senior of high standing in any curriculum, with the approval of the department concerned, 
may substitute for one or more technical courses an investigation of a special subject and 
write a thesis. 

Curriculum Modification 

Students interested in modifying their curriculum may do so by checking with their department 
and advisers to determine the petition procedures for making curriculum modifications. 

Special Curricula 

Students of high scholastic achievement, with exceptional aptitudes and interests in special 
fields of engineering and their application, may be permitted to vary the course content of the 
standard curriculum in order to emphasize some phases not included or not encompassed by 
the usual course substitution and selection of electives. These unwritten curricula, however, 



ENGINEERING 183 



include all the fundamental courses of the standard curricula, the variations being made mainly 
in the so-called applicator)- portions of the standard curricula of the college. The program of 
study of each student permitted to take such a special curriculum must be approved by a 
committee of the college, in consultation with the head of the department in which the student 
is registered, and with a faculty member of the college. This faculty member automatically 
becomes the student's adviser in charge of registration and other matters pertaining to the 
approved program. 

Advanced ROTC Training Combined with Engineering 

Students in the College of Engineering may elect to participate in the Reserve Officers' Training 
Program and earn a commission in the United States Army Reserve, United States Air Force 
Reserve, or the United States Naval Reserve. A commission is awarded simultaneously with 
the awarding of the Bachelor of Science degree in an engineering field. Participation in these 
programs is limited to students who apply and are selected by the Army, Air Force, or Navy 
units at the University. A monthly stipend is paid to those selected for advanced military 
training. 

These programs require from one to three summer camps or cruises as well as the earning 
of a specified number of credits in advanced military courses. Credits earned appear in all 
academic averages computed by the College of Engineering. Basic military (first 4 hours of 
freshman or sophomore course work) does not count toward graduation. Certain curricula 
may use only a limited number of these credits in fulfillment of graduation requirements. 
Students should plan on taking nine semesters to obtain both a bachelor's degree in engineering 
and a commission in the ROTC program. For further information on these programs, write 
directly to the Professor of Military Science, the Professor of Aerospace Studies, or the 
Professor of Naval Science. (See pages 81 through 86.) 

Exchange Scholarships at Munich and Darmstadt, West Germany 

The College of Engineering has exchange scholarships with the Technical University in Munich, 
West Germany, and the Technische Hochschule Darmstadt in Darmstadt, West Germany. Under 
the terms of the scholarship, two University of Illinois students are given tuition scholarships 
at the Technical University in Munich and two are given scholarships at the Technische 
Hochschule Darmstadt. Stipends to cover living expenses for the year are included in the 
Munich program. Students selected by the Technical University in Munich and by the Technische 
Hochschule Darmstadt receive tuition scholarships at the University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign. Equivalent cash stipends are awarded to the Munich students. Students are 
responsible for their own transportation expenses. 

Students eligible for study at the Technical University in Munich must be enrolled in one 
of the following curricula: civil engineering, electrical engineering, industrial engineering, 
mechanical engineering, metallurgical engineering, nuclear engineering, or engineering physics. 
Students eligible for study at the Technische Hochschule Darmstadt must be enrolled in one 
of the following curricula: civil engineering, chemical engineering, computer science, electrical 
engineering, industrial engineering, mechanical engineering, or physics. It is expected that the 
full year's study abroad will be used toward graduation in the student's curriculum at Urbana- 
Champaign. 

To participate in the programs, a student must have completed Ger. 104 or the equivalent 
(additional courses in German are recommended) and have finished his or her sophomore 
studies in engineering at the Urbana-Champaign campus. In addition, the student must be an 
outstanding scholar who will be an excellent representative of the University of Illinois and 
must be a U.S. citizen. 

The programs are under the general administration of the Engineering College Honors 
Council, although a recipient need not be an honors student if he or she has an outstanding 
undergraduate record. 

On-the-Job Training in Foreign Countries 

IAESTE (International Association for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience) is 
a private, nonprofit organization which enables students of engineering, architecture, and the 
sciences to obtain on-the-job training in foreign countries. Any student, undergraduate or 



184 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



graduate, who is enrolled in good standing at the University and who has completed at least 
the sophomore year of study may apply. Generally, the maintenance allowance is adequate to 
cover living expenses while in training but does not cover transportation costs. Further 
information about these opportunities may be obtained from the College of Engineering. 

International Minor in Engineering 

Many College of Engineering graduates will be involved in international activities during their 
professional careers. In anticipation of such involvement, the college offers an opportunity for 
students to complete an International Minor in any of the regular degree programs offered. 
More than 95 percent of the engineering students have had language training in high school, 
and this program allows them to continue their studies in related areas. The requirements for 
the completion of the International Minor are as follows. The student must: 

— complete all degree requirements in the student's selected engineering discipline; 

— complete foreign language studies in a language of a chosen geographical area (language 
level required will vary with the geographical area selected); 

— complete a minimum of 21 hours of cultural or language studies related to the geographical 
area of concentration; nine hours must be other than language credit and include one or 
more 300-level courses; 

— complete a period of involvement in a work period, a study period, an internship, or other 
form of involvement of at least eight weeks in the geographical area of concentration. 

Students will be expected to select a specific geographical area for concentration which will 
be recognized in the designation of the minor such as International Minor — Latin American 
Studies. Course work selected for the minor must be approved by the Office of the Associate 
Dean, 207 Engineering Hall. A list of suggested courses is available from that office. 

Through its association with the International Association for the Exchange of Students for 
Technical Experience (IAESTE), the college can assist students in gaining some work oppor- 
tunities in other countries and also in participating in educational exchange programs at 
institutions in other countries that will assist the student in meeting the "period of involvement." 
Students having foreign language backgrounds prior to entering the college will normally be 
able to complete the program in four academic years. Those not having this background, or 
taking a year of study in a foreign institution, may take four-and-one-half to five years. 

French Educational Exchange Program 

Six College of Engineering students may participate in this French exchange program annually 
with two at each of these universities: 

Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, Nancy 

Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees, Paris 

Universite de Technologie de Compiegne, Compiegne 

Each student should be a junior and should have credit for at least the equivalent of Fr. 104. 
One or two semesters is available to each student with tuition and certain academic-related 
expenses provided. 

Summer Exchange Program in China 

To introduce College of Engineering students to Chinese culture and language, this program 
was developed with Nanjing University; the first exchange occurred in the summer of 1986. 
One or two other locations are being considered for future exchanges. This opportunity is 
mainly to learn about the people of China during a nine-week period, to study the language, 
and to work in a limited way with technology aspects. Two weeks are set aside for travel to 
interesting places. A five-credit course in Chinese is required prior to departing. Lodging, meals, 
and medical care are provided. 

Other Study Abroad Exchange Programs 

Many exchange programs with educational institutions throughout the world are available for 
engineering students on this campus. The College of Engineering works closely with the Study 
Abroad Office in developing programs of study in which course credits can be transferred to 
this campus. The College of Engineering is planning future programs with Japan (Konan and 



ENGINEERING 185 



Nihon Universities), Colombia (University of the Andes), Brazil (Pontificia Universidade), and 
Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, and other institutions in foreign countries. Further information 
about these programs may he obtained from the College of Engineering. 

Elmendorf World Citizenship Travel Awards 

An alumnus of the College of Engineering, Edward Elmendorf, established a fund to encourage 
engineering students to seek an understanding of the responsibilities of world citizenship. 
Engineering students traveling abroad as pan of the educational programs sponsored by the 
College of Engineering are eligible for some financial aid. These funds do have certain 
requirements for qualification. Further information about these travel awards may be obtained 
from the College of Engineering. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 
Honors at Graduation 

Honors awarded at graduation to superior students are designated on the diploma as Honors, 
High Honors, or Highest Honors. Students receive the designation Honors if they have a 
cumulative University of Illinois grade-point average of at least 4.5, and High Honors if they 
have at least a 4.8 grade-point average at graduation (A = 5.0). Highest Honors may be awarded 
to any student eligible for High Honors upon recommendation of his or her department. The 
criteria used by departments in selecting individuals for Highest Honors recognition include 
outstanding performance in course work and in supplementary activities of an academic and/ 
or professional nature. Ordinarily, the basis for such a citation requires completion of an 
undergraduate thesis or a special project of superior quality. 

Tau Beta Pi 

Tau Beta Pi is a national engineering honor society which recognizes students, alumni, and 
engineers for outstanding academic achievements and exemplary character. The Alpha chapter 
at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign was founded in 1897 and is the fifth oldest 
chapter of Tau Beta Pi. In addition to scholastic recognition, members participate in a wide 
range of activities which serve the chapter, the College of Engineering, and the community. 
The scholastic requirement for membership in Tau Beta Pi is that juniors must be in the upper 
eighth of their graduating class and seniors must be in the upper fifth of their graduating class. 

Edmund J. James Scholars 

The honors program in engineering is a pan of the University James Scholar Program established 
to recognize and develop the talents of academically outstanding students. Engineering students 
in this program are known as James Scholars in Engineering. Each is assigned to an honors 
adviser, and receives special consideration in the selection of a course program to meet specific 
needs. Students may apply for the program during summer advanced enrollment or at the 
beginning of any semester. 

New freshmen are eligible to enter the program if they meet two of the following three 
requirements: (1) rank in the top 10 percent of their high school graduating class; (2) have an 
ACT subscore in mathematics of 34 or better; (3) have an ACT composite score of 31 or 
better. To be eligible for admission and continuation in the James Scholar Program in engineering, 
all other students' cumulative grade-point averages shall be 4.5 or better for juniors and seniors 
and 4.3 or better for sophomores. Transfer students, with a superior transfer record, may be 
accepted into the program on request, and the completion of one normal semester in engineering 
with a grade-point average commensurate with the requirement for their class. 

Good standing in the James Scholar Program requires panicipation in special honors work 
for a majority of the semesters in which a student is in residence. 

Dean's List 

See reference to the Dean's List on page 80. 



186 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

ELECTIVES 

Humanities and Social Sciences Electives 

Eighteen hours of humanities and social sciences are required (in addition to rhetoric), including 
one sequence in the humanities and one in the social sciences. The two sequences cannot be 
in the same department. A sequence is defined as any combination of at least 6 hours of 
approved courses (see list below) taught by a single, nonengineering department, or any of the 
interdisciplinary sequences listed on page 186. Additional courses to complete the 18 hours 
must also be drawn from the lists of approved courses. All seminars (including 199), honors 
courses, thesis courses, and individual study are excluded except as specifically approved. 

Students may obtain credit from different academic sources, i.e., residential instruction, CLEP, 
advanced placement tests, and transfer credits. Credit in any specific subject may be used 
toward degree requirements only once. Because of the variety of sources available for social 
science and humanities electives, students may receive duplicate credit in specific courses, such 
as American history. Students should be aware that such duplication can not be used toward 
degree requirements. 

APPROVED COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES 

African Studies — all courses 

Arch. — 210, 310-316 

Art, Hist, of — all 101 through 250 

Art Education — 140 

As. St. — all courses except 350 

CI. Civ. — all courses except 100, 101, and 382 

Communications — 307, 308, 319 

C. Lit. — all courses 

Engl. — all courses except business and technical writing courses, rhetoric and composition courses, 
and Engl. 302, 381, 385 

Foreign languages — all foreign languages except English, the student's native language(s), and 
closely related languages. All courses based on the results of the student's language placement 
examination with the following limitations: (1) the student may not be placed lower than the high 
school achievement level for credit (e.g., four years of high school language may allow credit for 
103 and 104) and (2) students may earn proficiency credit for 103, 104, or higher by examination 
subject to the limits of rule (1). 

Foreign literature in translation — all courses (check listings under appropriate language) 

Hist. — all courses except 191-199 and 290 and 293 

Human. — all courses except 382 

Math. — 339 

Music — 100-104, 130-135, 202, 203, 213, 214, 310-317, 327, 334, 335, 337 

Phil. — all courses except 102, 202, 353, 354 

Phycs. — 319 

Relst. — all courses 

S.T.S. — 201, 260 

Sp. Com. — 177, 178, 210, 213, 254, 308, 315, 317, 319, 332, 350, 387 

Theat. — 110, 263, 320 

INTERDISCIPLINARY SEQUENCES IN THE HUMANITIES 

Art, Hist, of 111 and any of Arch. 310-312 
Art, Hist, of 112 and any of Arch. 313-316 
Music 113 and 115, Hist, of Art 115 

APPROVED COURSES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Ag. Ec. — 301, 318, 352-354 

Anth. — all courses except 143, 240, 246, 300, 307, 318, 324, 337, 340-347, 351-356, 364, 365, 394 

Comm. — all courses except 307, 308, 319 

Econ. — all courses except 171-173, 374, 375 

E.P.S. — 300-305, 310, 315, 385 

Env. St. — 236 

G.E. — 220 

Geog. — all courses except 102, 185, 271-277, 304, 305, 308, 315, 370-378 

Joum. — 114, 214, 217-220, 231, 241, 251 

L.I.R. — all courses except 347, 360 

L.A. — 214 

L ^ g{ 295 

Ling. — all courses except 191, 200, 201, 202, 300, 301, 305-307, 375, 376, 386, 388, 389 
Min. E. — 302 

Pol. S. — all courses except 270, 359, 366, 390 

p S y C h. — 100, 103, 105, 158, 201, 205, 216, 224, 238, 239, 245, 248, 250, 261, 318, 323-325, 337, 
348, 352-355, 357, 359, 360, 362, 365, 371, 373 



ENGINEERING 187 



S.T.S. — 202 

Soc. — all courses except 185, 246, 332, 385-388 

Sp. Comm. — 335 

U.P. — 101, 260, 301. 302, 360 

INTERDISCIPLINARY SEQUENCES IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Econ. 101 and Min. E. 302 
Econ. 101 and Env. St. 236 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

Each engineering curriculum offers some elective opportunities which may be specified as 
technical or nontechnical. All technical elective courses must be selected in accordance with 
departmental requirements. 

Technical electives generally include 200- and 300-level courses in engineering, mathematics, 
and the natural sciences. 

Free Electives 

These electives are selected at the prerogative of the student except as noted below. 

Credit will not be allowed for courses of a remedial nature, such as mathematics below 
analytic geometry or basic military training. No more than 3 semester hours of physical 
education course work (basic level, i.e., activity courses) may be used as free electives nor may 
they be applied toward degree requirements. No more than 4 hours of religious foundations 
courses or 6 hours of advanced military science courses may be used as free electives. 

Total transfer credit in required basic courses in mathematics (through integral calculus), 
physics, rhetoric, freshman chemistry, computer science, and engineering graphics may be used 
for free electives only if the credit covers topics beyond those in equivalent courses at the 
University of Illinois. Further restrictions on the acceptance of transfer credit for free electives 
may be imposed by the departments with the approval of the associate dean. 

Credit-No Credit Option 

The credit-no credit grade option is available for students wanting to explore areas of academic 
interest which they might otherwise avoid for fear of poor grades. All students considering 
this option are cautioned that many graduate and professional schools consider applicants 
whose transcripts bear a significant number of nongrade symbols less favorably than those 
whose transcripts contain none or very few. Conditions under which students may take courses 
on a credit-no credit basis are outlined in the booklet Code on Undergraduate Affairs 
distributed to all students. 

Curricula 

CURRICULUM IN AERONAUTICAL AND ASTRONAUTICAL 

ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering 

This curriculum provides a strong fundamental background in engineering and applied science 
with emphasis on aircraft and space flight engineering. The program is designee! to give the 
student a basic engineering education applicable to related engineering disciplines including 
graduate study. The curriculum offers courses in related areas such as air pollution and energy 
sources. Up to 15 hours of free and technical electives can be used to provide a diversified 
program of study. 

Tne curriculum requires 134 hours for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 Geometry II 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 Humanities of social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 Total 17 



188 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry III 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 156 — Analytical Mechanics 5 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 



THIRD YEAR 

A.A.E. 212 — Aerodynamics 1 4 

A.A.E. 224 — Flight Structures 1 4 

A.A.E. 254 — Aerospace Systems I 4 

Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Elective 2 3 

Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

A.A.E. 260 — Aerospace Laboratory I 2 

A.A.E. 292 — Seminar 1 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Electives 2 10 

Total 16 



C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Applications to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

M.E. 205 — Thermodynamics 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 

Physics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 

A.A.E. 213 — Aerodynamics II 4 

A.A.E. 225 — Flight Structures II 4 

A.A.E. 233 — Aircraft Propulsion 3 

A.A.E. 255 — Aerospace Systems II 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 18 



A.A.E. 241 — Aerospace Design 3 

A.A.E. 261 — Aerospace Laboratory II 2 

Electives 2 11 

Total 16 



1 Of the 134 hours required for graduation, 18 must be in social sciences and humanities. These 
requirements are discussed on pages 186 and 187. 

1 Twenty-four hours of elective credits are required for graduation. These electives must contain 
at least 6 hours from list A below and 3 hours from list B. In addition, credit is required in at least 
one 300-level aeronautical and astronautical engineering course. Six hours of electives are free 
electives. The remaining are technical electives. 
A: E.E. 220, 229, 244, 260, 340; Phycs. 331, 333. 
B: Met. E. 334; Phycs. 383. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Engineering 

Agricultural engineering is the application of engineering principles to solutions of problems 
in agriculture. Efficient agricultural production depends on sophisticated systems of men, 
equipment, processes, and natural resources. Agricultural engineers are involved in the design 
of systems which include mechanization of animal and crop production, soil moisture control, 
crop and food processing, materials handling, and structures for storage and shelter. Important 
design constraints are economics, conservation of materials and energy, safety, and environmental 
quality. Graduates are employed by industry and government in research, education, manufac- 
turing, and applications. A five-year, dual degree in both engineering and agriculture is available 
(see pages 108, 111, and 112). By choice of electives, a student may direct his or her program 
toward specialization in power and machinery, soil and water, structures and environment, 
electric power and processing, or food engineering. Individual programs are checked by 
departmental advisers to insure that ABET requirements are met for any chosen specialization. 



Specialization in Power and Machinery, Soil and Water, Structures 
and Environment, or Electric Power and Processing 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Enq. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics 3 

G.E. 193 — Special Problem 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

(Mechanics) 4 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective 1 3-4 

Total 16-17 



ENGINEERING 



189 



SECOND YEAR 

Ag. E. 126 — Engineering in Agriculture 4 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several Variables. . .3 
Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers for 

Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

T.A.M. 150 or T.A.M. 152 — Statics 2 or 3 

Total 16-17 

THIRD YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, group I 3 3 

E.E. 220 or E.E. 260 — Circuit Analysis 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Solids 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 2 4 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective 1 4-3 

Total 17-16 



Ag. E. 127 — Production Systems in 

Agriculture 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations 

and Orthogonal Functions 3 

Econ. 101 — Elements of Economics 2 4 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 
T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics, II 

(Dynamics) 3 

Total 17 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, group I 3 3 

Ag. E. 298 — Undergraduate Seminar 1 

C.E. 261 — Introduction to Structural 

Engineering or M.E. 220 — 

Mechanics of Machinery 3 

M.E. 209 — Thermodynamics and 

Heat Transfer 3 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Total 14 



FOURTH YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, group II 3 3 

Humanities or social science electives 2 6 

Technical elective 3 4-3 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective 1 3 

Total 16-15 

Total hours for degree 128 



Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, group II 3 3 

Ag. E. 299 — Undergraduate Thesis 2 

Biological and agricultural sciences 

elective 1 3 

Humanities or social sciences electives 2 4 

Free elective 3 

Total 15 



1 Students must complete 12 to 15 hours from biological and agricultural sciences electives. 

2 Students must complete Econ. 101 and 14 additional hours of humanities and social sciences 
from approved college list. 

3 Each student must have 18 to 20 hours of technical electives, selected from the following: (1) 
C.E. 261, or M.E. 220; (2) two courses from agricultural engineering technical electives, group I, and 
two courses from group II; and (3) additional courses from other technical electives. 

Biological and Agricultural Sciences Electives 

The 12 to 15 hours of biological and agricultural sciences are to be chosen as follows: 

At least eight hours from: The remainder from: 

Agron. 121, 322, 326 Ag. Ec. 220, 324, 325 

An. S. 307 Ag. M. 200, 201 

Biol. 100, 101, 104 

Entom. 120 

Geol. 101, 250 

Mcbio. 100 

PI. Bio. 100 

Soils 101, 308 



Specialization in Food Engineering 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics 3 

G.E. 193 — Special Problems 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 
F.S. 101 — Food in Modern Society 

or free elective 3 

Total 16 



190 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SECOND YEAR 

Mcbio. 100 — Introductory Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 101 — Introductory Experimental 

Microbiology 2 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several Variables . . .3 
Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 2 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry 3 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

Ch.E. 261 — Introduction to Chemical 

Engineering 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers for 

Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics 

of Solids 3 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering 

or E.E. 260 — Networks I 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 4 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Agricultural engineering technical 

elective 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 2 

F.S. 301 — Food Processing I 5 

Ch.E. 371 — Fluid Mechanics and 

Heat Transfer 4 

Ag. E. 31 1 — Instrumentation and 

Measurements 3 

Total 17 

Total hours for degree 132 

1 Students must complete Econ. 101 and 14 additional hours of humanities and social sciences 
from approved college list. 



Math. 345 — Differential Equations 

and Orthagonal Functions 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 2 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 4 

F.S. 214 — Survey of Food Chemistry 

or free elective 3 

Total 16 



Ch.E. 370 — Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 3 

Ag. E. 298 — Undergraduate Seminar 1 

M.E. 220 — Mechanics of Machinery 3 

Mcbio. 311 — Food and Industrial 

Microbiology 3 

Mcbio. 312 — Techniques of Applied 

Microbiology 2 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 4 

Total 16 



Agricultural engineering technical 

elective, group II 3 

Econ. 101 — Elements of Economics 4 

F.S. 302 — Food Processing II 5 

Ch.E. 373 — Mass Transfer Operations 4 

Ag. E. 299 — Undergraduate Thesis 2 

Total 18 



Agricultural Engineering Technical Electives 

GROUP I GROUP II 



Ag. E. 236 
Ag. E. 256 
Ag. E. 287 
Ag. E. 311 
Ag. E. 340 



Ag. E. 
Ag. E. 
Ag. E. 
Ag. E. 
Ag. E. 
Ag. E. 



277 
336 
346 
356 
357 
387 



Other Technical Electives 

A student may choose any course which satisfies the college requirements for technical electives. 
Students desiring to specialize in a specific area of agricultural engineering may use the 
following lists as a guide in choosing their technical electives. 



POWER AND MACHINERY 

Ag. E. 236 
Ag. E. 311 
Ag. E. 336 
Ag. E. 340 
Ag. E. 346 
M.E. 231 
M.E. 270 



ELECTRIC POWER AND PROCESSING 

Ag. E. 236 
Ag. E. 287 
Ag. E. 311 
Ag. E. 336 
Ag. E. 340 
Ag. E. 387 
Chem. 323 
M.E. 213 
M.E. 307 



ENGINEERING 



191 



SOIL AND WATER 



STRUCTURES AND ENVIRONMENT 



Aq 


E 256 


Aq. 


E. 277 


Aq. 


E 287 


Aq. 


E. 311 


Aq. 


E. 340 


Aq. 


E 356 


Aq. 


E. 357 


C.E 


. 255 


C.E 


. 264 


C.E 


. 280 



Aq. 


E. 277 


Aq. 


E 287 


Aq. 


E. 311 


Aq. 


E. 340 


Aq. 


E. 387 


C.E 


. 214 


C.E 


. 262 


C.E 


. 263 


C.E 


. 264 



CURRICULUM IN CERAMIC ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Ceramic Engineering 

Ceramic Engineering is one of the principal fields dealing with materials — their properties, 
behavior, and applications. Some of the ceramic products originate with naturally occurring 
minerals, while others require the synthesis of specific compounds in order to obtain the 
desired properties. Major industries such as electronics, steel, glass, aerospace, and construction 
depend heavily upon ceramic materials and their unique properties, especially at high temper- 
atures. The ceramic engineering curriculum provides a strong background in engineering and 
applied science with emphasis on understanding material properties and processes. By choice 
of electives, a student may direct his or her program toward greater emphasis on electronics, 
bioengineering, glass, or high-temperature materials. 
The curriculum requires 132 hours for graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Enq. 100 — Enqineerinq Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Enqineerinq Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Cer. E. 201 — Ceramic Crystal Chemistry ... .3 
Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry III 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Maqnetism) 4 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Enqineerinq 

and Physical Science 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

Cer. E. 205 — Phase Equilibria in 

Ceramic Systems 3 

Cer. E. 314 — Chemistry and Technoloqy 

of Glass 3 

Technical elective 3 

Cer. E. 245 — Physical Chemistry for 

Enqineers or equivalent 2 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Solids 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Enqineerinq 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Ceramic enqineerinq electives 2 6 

Cer. E. 307 — Thermal and Mechanical 

Properties of Ceramic Materials 3 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



Cer. E. 202 — Ceramic Materials and 

Processes 3 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthoqonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Liqht, and 

Modern Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 

Cer. E. 208 — Thermal Processing 3 

Cer. E. 216 — Rate Processes in 

Ceramic Engineering 3 

Ceramic engineering elective 2 3 

Technical elective 3 

Chemistry or physics elective 2 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 18 



Electrical applications elective 2 3 

Free electives 6 

Ceramic engineering elective 2 3 

Technical elective 4 

Total 16 



1 Consult the college list of approved courses beginning on page 186. 

2 Consult departmental adviser for list of approved courses. 



192 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

This curriculum is administered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. (See page 285.) 

CURRICULUM IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

The civil engineering curriculum provides a systematic, integrated foundation in the physical 
and engineering sciences and mathematics, thereby permitting the rational development of 
engineering methods as applied to the planning, design, and construction of bridges, buildings, 
dams and other hydraulic structures, transportation facilities, environmental engineering systems 
and facilities, surveying and mapping systems, and other civil engineering projects. The flexibility 
of the curriculum permits a student to pursue either a broad program representing most of 
the principal areas of civil engineering or a more specialized program in one or more technical 
specialty areas. 

The curriculum requires 129 hours for graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Econ. 101 — Elements of Economics 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

C.E. 195 — Introduction to Civil 

Engineering 1 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry III 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 152 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics) 3 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Introductory technical courses 1 6 

Humanities or social sciences elective 2 .3 

Advanced mathematics 3 3 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Introductory technical courses 1 3 

Technical electives 4 9 

Humanities or social sciences elective 2 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 18 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

(Mechanics) 4 

Total 15 



C.E. 292 — Design and Planning of Civil 
Engineering Systems 3 

C.E. 293 — Stochastic Concepts in Civil 
Engineering 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 
Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 
Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 212 — Analytical Mechanics 
(Dynamics) 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 
Solids 3 

Total 16 



Introductory technical courses 1 9 

Technical elective 4 3 

Humanities or social sciences electives 2 5 

Total 17 



Technical electives 4 9 

Humanities and social sciences elective 2 3 

Free elective 3 

C.E. 295 — Professional Practice 

Total 15 



1 Each student must take at least six of the nine introductory courses in the several technical 
specialty areas in civil engineering as shown in Introductory Technical Courses, below. 

2 Each student is required to select 18 hours from the college-approved list of humanities and 
social sciences, including Econ. 101. (See pages 186 and 187.) 

3 Each student must select at least one course (3 hours) of advanced mathematics, at the 300 
level as approved by the department. 

4 Twenty-one hours (20 hours if C.E. 201 is selected as an introductory technical course) of 
technical courses must be selected, with the approval of the department, to define a coherent 
program. 



Introductory Technical Courses hours 

C.E. 201 — Engineering Surveying 4 

C.E. 216 — Construction Engineering 3 



ENGINEERING 193 



CE 220 — Materials for Transportation Facilities, or 3 

C.E. 230 — Introduction to Transportation Engineering 3 

CE 241 — Water Quality and Water Pollution 3 

C.E. 255 — Introduction to Hydrosystems Engineering 3 

CE. 261 — Fundamentals of Structural Engineering 3 

C.E. 280 — Foundation Engineering 3 

Geol. 250 — Geology for Engineers 3 

T.A.M. 224 — Behavior of Materials 3 

Technical Specialty Areas 

At least 39 semester hours of introductory technical courses and technical electives must be 

selected, with departmental consultation and approval, to develop a coherent program in one 

or more of the following technical specialty areas: 

Construction Engineering Photogrammetric and 

Environmental Engineering Geodetic Engineering 

Geotechnical Engineering Structural Engineering 

Hydraulic Engineering Transportation Engineering 

CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering 

The program in computer engineering is administered by and is pan of the offerings of the 
Department of Electrical Engineering. 

The following suggested curriculum indicates one way in which the student may satisfy in 
eight semesters the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering. 

To qualify for registration in the electrical engineering courses specified in the first semester 
of the junior year of the curriculum in computer engineering, a student must have a combined 
grade-point average of 3.25 (A = 5.0) in the mathematics, physics, computer science, and 
electrical engineering courses which are required in the freshman and sophomore years of the 
curriculum. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 3 

Geometry I 5 Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 (Mechanics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 Humanities or social sciences elective 1 5 

Total 16 Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 121 — Introduction to Computer E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineeering 

Science 2 4 Laboratory I 2 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several Variables . . .3 E.E. 260 — Introduction to Circuit Analysis . . .3 
Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, E.E. 290 — Introduction to Computer 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 Engineering 3 

Electives 1 5 Math. 340 — Differential Equations with 

Total 16 Linear Algebra, or Math. 345 — 

Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 

Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

Electives 1 1 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

E.E. 249 — Digital Systems Laboratory 2 E.E. 229 — Introduction to Electro- 

E.E. 291 — On-Line Computing or C.S. 221 — magnetic Fields 3 

Machine Level Programming 3 Math. 361 — Introduction to Probability 

E.E. 340 — Solid State Electronic Devices . . .3 Theory I or E.E. 313 — 

E.E. 319 — Applied Modern Algebra 3 Probabilistic Methods of Signal 

E.E. 309 — Circuit, Signal, and System and System Analysis 3 

Analysis 4 E.E. /C.S. /Math. 391 — Switching Theory 3 

Elective 1 1 E.E. 342 — Electronic Circuits 3 

Total 16 Electives 1 4 

Total 16 



194 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FOURTH YEAR 

Electives 1 16 Electives 1 16 



1 Fifty-one hours of electives to be selected by the student in consultation with his or her adviser, 
apportioned as follows: 

— Twenty-seven hours of technical electives as follows: 

Eighteen hours (not including other requirements) must be chosen from a departmentally 
approved list of technical courses for the computer engineering program. Nine hours may be 
chosen from other technical areas. 

— Eighteen hours of humanities and social sciences from the college-approved list. (See page 
186.) 

— Six hours of free electives, to be selected in accordance with the regulations of the college. 

2 The alternate for C.S. 121 is C.S. 101 and 10, instead of 9, hours of electives from other technical 
areas. 

CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer Science 

This curriculum is offered by the Department of Computer Science for students seeking a 
broad and deep knowledge of the theory, design, and application of digital computers and 
information processing techinques. The first two years are spent on basic work in mathematics, 
physics, and an introduction to the fundamental areas of computer science — computing, 
programming, the organization of digital machines, hardware, numerical analysis, and theory 
of computation. The third year completes the work in basic computer science and requires 
electives to broaden the background of the student. During the fourth year, the student is 
encouraged to deepen his or her understanding of topics in which he or she has particular 
interest and ability. 

To qualify for registration in the computer science courses specified in the first semester of 
the junior year, a student must have a combined grade-point average of 3.25 (A = 5.0) in the 
mathematics, physics, and computer science courses which are required in the freshman and 
sophomore years. 

The curriculum requires 122 hours for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 3 

Geometry I 5 Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

Electives 6 (Mechanics) 4 

Total 15 Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total 15 

SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 121 — Introduction to Computer Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Programming 4 Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern 

Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytic Physics) 4 

Geometry III 3 C.S. 264 — Introduction to the Structure 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, and Logic of Digital Computers 1 3 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 C.S. 221 — Machine-Level Programming 3 

Electives 5 Electives 6 

Total 16 Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

C.S. 273 — Introduction to Theory C.S. 257 — Introduction to Numerical 

of Computation 3 Analysis 3 

C.S. 225 — Data Structures 3 C.S. 281 — Introduction to Computer 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 Circuits 2 3 

Electives 7 Math. 361 — Introduction to Probability 

Total 15 Theory I 3 

Electives 6 

Total 15 



ENGINEERING 195 



FOURTH YEAR 

Electives 15 Electives 15 



1 It is strongly recommended that C.S. 265 — Logic Design Laboratory with Integrated Circuits, 2 
hours, be taken concurrently with (or following) C.S. 264. 

2 It is strongly recommended that C.S. 282 — Digital Circuits Laboratory, 1 hour, be taken 
concurrently with (or following) C.S. 281. 

Electives 

The computer science curriculum contains 60 semester hours of electives. These electives are 
chosen by the student according to the following requirements: 

— Eighteen hours must be selected in the humanities and social sciences areas as specified by 
the college requirements on pages 186 through 187. 

— At least one course must be selected from each of the following five groups: 



GROUP 1 


GROUP II 


GROUP III 


GROUP IV 


GROUP \ 


Math. 341 


C.S. 313 


C.S. 311 


C.S. 331 


C.S. 335 


Math. 345 


C.S. 373 


C.S. 318 


C.S. 333 


C.S. 381 


C.S. 355 


C.S. 375 


C.S. 323 


C.S. 337 


C.S. 384 


C.S. 358 


C.S. 383 


C.S. 325 


C.S. 338 


C.S. 385 


C.S. 359 




C.S. 327 


C.S. 339 
C.S. 363 
C.S. 364 
C.S. 391 


C.S. 386 
C.S. 389 



— Twelve semester hours must consist of a goal-directed sequence of courses directed toward 
a study of a specific problem area related to computer use. This sequence must be approved 
by the student's adviser. 

— A total of 15 semester hours is designated as free electives. 

CURRICULUM IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 

The following suggested curriculum indicates one way in which the student may satisfy in 
eight semesters the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. 

To qualify for registration in the electrical engineering courses specified in the first semester 
of the junior year of the curriculum in electrical engineering, a student must have a combined 
grade-point average of 3.25 (A = 5.0) in the mathematics, physics, computer science, and 
electrical engineering courses which are required in the freshman and sophomore years of the 
curriculum. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 3 

Geometry I 5 Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 (Mechanics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 Humanities or social sciences elective 1 5 

Total 16 Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers E.E. 260 — Introduction to Circuit Analysis . . .3 
for Application to Engineering E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineering 
and Physical Science 3 Laboratory I 2 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several E.E. 290 — Introduction to Computer 
Variables 3 Engineering 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 Orthogonal Functions 3 

Electives 1 6 Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 

Total 16 Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

Elective 1 1 

Total 16 



196 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THIRD YEAR 

E.E. 229 — Introduction to Electromagmetic 

Fields 3 

E.E. 340 — Solid State Electronic Devices . . .3 
E.E. 309 — Circuit, Signal, and System 

Analysis 4 

Electives 1 6 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

Electives 1 



E.E. 245 — Electrical Engineering 

Laboratory II 2 

E.E. 342 — Electronic Circuits 3 

E.E. 350 — Lines, Fields, and Waves 3 

Electives 1 8 

Total 16 



.16 Electives 1 



.16 



1 Sixty-one hours of electives are to be selected by the student, in consultation with his or her 
adviser, apportioned as follows: 

— Thirty-seven hours of technical electives as follows: 

Sixteen semester hours of electrical engineering courses to be selected from a departmentally 
approved list. The courses selected to meet the preceding requirement must include at least 
two from a departmentally approved list of advanced electrical engineering laboratory courses 
and at least one of the following three courses: E.E. 313, 330, or 344. 

Twenty-one semester hours of technical electives to be selected from a departmentally 
approved list, at least 12 of which must be in areas outside electrical engineering and not more 
than nine hours may be 100- or 200-level courses. The courses used to satisfy this requirement 
must include one course from a list of departmentally approved non-E.E. science electives and 
one course from a departmentally approved list of 300-level mathematics courses. 

— Eighteen hours of humanities and social sciences from the college-approved list. (See page 
186.) 

— Six semester hours of free electives, to be selected in accordance with the regulations of the 
college. 

CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering Mechanics 

This curriculum, offered by the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, is intended 
primarily for students interested in research and development, a general area in engineering 
employing many engineers in industry, private laboratories, and government organizations. 
Because of the diversity of modern research and development problems — especially in newly 
emerging areas such as energy engineering, ocean engineering, space technology, and computer- 
based design — the curriculum is organized around a core that emphasizes a broad education 
covering, in depth, the basic areas of science and engineering mechanics which are fundamental 
to all branches of engineering. In addition, five secondary field options — engineering science, 
experimental mechanics, computer applications, materials engineering (plastics, metals, and 
other engineering structural materials), and biomechanics — allow the student to concentrate 
on areas of special interest. Any student with special interests and/or educational goals may 
modify the curriculum by petition with the approval of the department and the College of 
Engineering. The program also provides excellent preparation for graduate study in many 
different engineering disciplines. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 



Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Enq. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several 

Variables 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 152 — Engineering Mechanics I 

(Statics) 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 
Math. 225 — Introductory 

Matrix Theory 2 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 

Math. 345 or 341 — Differential 

Equations 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 

Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics II 

(Dynamics) 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Solids 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



ENGINEERING 



197 



THIRD YEAR 

E E 260 — Introduction to Circuit 

Analysis 3 

T.A.M. 224 — Behavior of Materials 4 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 

Math 343 or 247 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

T.A.M. 293 — Research and Design Project . .2 
T.A.M. 392 — Design and Analysis in 

Engineering Practice 3 

T.A.M. 351 — Fundamental Concepts of 

Deformable Body Mechanics 3 

Secondary field elective 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Free elective 2 

Total 16 



ME 205 — Thermodynamics 3 

Secondary field elective 3 

Secondary field elective 2 or 3 

Technical elective 2 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Free elective 0-1 

Total 15 



T.A.M. 294 — Research and Design Project . .4 

Secondary field elective 3 

Secondary field elective 3 

Technical elective 2 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 16 



1 The list of courses approved by the College of Engineering should be consulted. 

2 The list of technical courses approved by the College of Engineering should be consulted. 



Secondary Field Options 

The secondary field options consist of 14 or 15 hours of engineering and engineering-related 
courses, as indicated below for the six options. In the junior year, each student prepares a 
program of study in consultation with a faculty adviser. An appropriate amount of design and 
engineering science must be included in each program. Substitutions for specific courses in an 
option can be made in order to meet the particular needs of a student. The program of study 
is then submitted to the chief adviser of the department for approval. 

EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS 



MATERIALS ENGINEERING (Polymers 
and Composites) 

E.E. (any 300-level) or 

M.E. 261 or Chem. 323 3 

T.A.M. 324 — Flow and Fracture of Solids . . .3 
T.A.M. 328 — Mechanical Behavior of 

Composite Materials 3 

Met. E. 375 — Introduction to Polymers 3 

M.E. 393 or T.A.M. 393 — Polymers 3 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry 3 2 

Met. E. 378 — Polymer Characterization 

Laboratory 3 2 

Additional course from polymer science 

and engineering option list 3 2 

BIOMECHANICS 

E.E. (any 300-level) or 

M.E. 261 or Chem. 323 3 

Chem. 131 — Elementary Organic 

Chemistry 3 

Physl. 301 — General Physiology 3 

Physl. 303 — General Physiology 

Laboratory 2 

Additional college bioengineering 

biology core courses 3 

Other college bioengineering biology 

core courses 1 or 2 3 

Bioengineering or related courses 0-4 3 

ENGINEERING SCIENCE 

E.E. (any 300-level) or 

M.E. 261 or Chem. 323 3 

T.A.M. (any 300-level) 8 

Math, (any 300-level) 3 

1 The list of technical courses approved by the College of Engineering should be consulted 

a Required for the polymer science and engineering option in engineering, but not for the materials 

engineering (polymers and composites) option in engineering mechanics. 

^Required for the bioengineering option in engineering, but not for the biomechanics option in 

engineering mechanics. 



M.E. 261 — Instrumentation or 

Chem. 323 — Applied Electronics 3 or 4 

T.A.M. 326 — Experimental Stress Analysis . .3 

T.A.M. (any 300-level) 6 

Technical elective 1 2 or 1 

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 

E.E. (any 300-level) or 

M.E. 261 or Chem. 323 3 

C.S. 257 — Introduction to Numerical 

Analysis 3 

C.S. 358 — Numerical Analysis or 

C.S. 360 — Minicomputers 3 

C S. (any 300-level) or 

M.E. 345 — Finite Element Analysis 3 

T.A.M. (any 300-level) 3 

MATERIALS ENGINEERING (Metals) 

E.E. (any 300-level) or 

M.E. 261 or Chem. 323 3 

T.A.M. 324 — Flow and Fracture of Solids . . .3 

Met. E. 301. 316, or 387 — Metallurgy 3 

M.E. 393 or T.A.M. 393 — Polymers 3 

T.A.M. (any 300-level) 3 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM IN ENGINEERING PHYSICS* 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics 

This curriculum provides broad, thorough training in fundamental physics and mathematics to 
prepare students for graduate study in physics or related fields and for research and development 
positions in industrial or government laboratories. For the first two years, the curriculum 
follows essentially the common engineering program. In the last two years, the emphasis is on 
advanced courses in physics and mathematics, but there is a liberal allowance of electives. 

When registering for advanced undergraduate courses in physics, students continuing in or 
transferring to this curriculum must have a grade-point average of 3.5 (A = 5.0) in all University 
subjects exclusive of military science, physical education, and band, and a combined grade- 
point average of 3.5 in all courses in mathematics and physics taken prior to such registration. 
Transfer students must have a corresponding record in the institution from which they have 
transferred and must maintain such status at the University. 

The illustrative program that follows shows the requirements to be completed in four years. 
However, many students take these courses in a different order. Students with adequate high 
school mathematics prerequisites should begin Phycs. 106 the first semester. The program 
includes 39 hours of electives, 18 of which must be chosen from the college approved list of 
humanities and social sciences electives (see page 186). The remaining 21 hours include 6 hours 
of free electives and 16 hours of technical or nontechnical electives, of which at least 6 hours 
must be nontechnical and at least 4 technical. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 1 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

G.E. 193 — Special Problems 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition or 

Rhet. 108 — Forms of Composition 2 4 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 1 4 

Humanities or social sciences electives .... 3-6 
Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 
Total 14-17 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytical 

Geometry III 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Phycs. 210 — Special Relativity 2 

Humanities or social sciences elective 4 .... 3-6 
C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Total 14-17 



Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 
Orthogonal Functions 3 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 
Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

Phycs. 331 — Intermediate Electricity 
and Mechanics 5 

Humanities or social sciences electives 4 ... 3-6 

Total 15-18 



THIRD YEAR 

Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Phycs. 332 — Classical Mechanics 4 

Phycs. 371 — Light 4 

Humanities or social sciences electives 4 ... 3-6 
Total 14-17 



Phycs. 333 — Electromagnetic Fields 5 

Phycs. 343 — Electronic Circuits I 6 5 

Phycs. 386 — Atomic Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics 1 4 

Electives 4 - 5 2-4 

Total 16-18 



* See also programs in LAS physics (see page 287) and LAS science and letters concentration 
in physics (see page 274). 



ENGINEERING 



199 



FOURTH YEAR 

Phycs. 344 — Electronic Circuits II or Electives 4 14-18 

Phycs. 303 — Modern Experimental 

Physics 5 

Phycs 361 — Thermodynamics and 

Statistical Mechanics 4 

Phycs. 387 — Atomic Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics II 4 

Electives 4 3-6 

Total 16-19 

1 Chem. 1 07, 1 09, and 1 08, 110 may be substituted for Chem. 1 01 and 1 02 by students who desire 
a more rigorous chemistry sequence. 

2 Sp. Com. 111 and 112 fulfill the graduation requirement in rhetoric. The extra 2 hours may be 
applied to nontechnical electives or to free electives. 

•*Math. 341 and 342 may replace Math. 345. Extra hours count as technical electives. 

4 See paragraph above on elective distribution. 

5 Advanced military courses, foreign languages, and any 100- to 300-level nontechnical course, 
including some biology, may be used as nontechnical electives. Physical education, band, and skill 
courses may be used only as free electives. 

6 Students wishing to emphasize electrical engineering may take E.E. 342 or other suitable electrical 
engineering sequence. 

Applied Physics Options 

In consultation with his or her adviser, a student may elect an applied physics option. These 

options involve subjects related to physics that are of an applied nature and allow the student 

to focus on a specialized area. A student must register for an option in the Physics Undergraduate 

Record Office, where a list of approved courses is available. Planning for the option should 

begin during the sophomore year. Courses in these options may be taken under the various 

elective categories, or they may be substituted for certain advanced physics courses approved 

by the adviser. The college requirement of 18 hours of social sciences and humanities must 

be met. The options are as follows: 

Applied Nuclear Physics Optical Physics and Lasers 

Bioengineering (see page 180) Physical Electronics 

Fluids and Plasmas Systems Analysis and Control Theory 



CURRICULUM IN GENERAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in General Engineering 

The general engineering curriculum provides a comprehensive program in the basic sciences, 
engineering sciences, and in project design, together with specialized training in an approved 
secondary* field. The secondary field may be selected from the areas shown below or from any 
other cohesive field of study approved by the department. Other fields selected in the past 
include law, mathematics, bioengineering, oceanography, meteorology, and technical writing. 
The program is centered around a strong core in mathematics, theoretical and applied mechanics, 
basic electronics, thermodynamics, and interdisciplinary design. 
The curriculum requires 127 hours for graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Enq. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.t. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 
for Application to Engineering and 
Physical Science 3 

Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytic 
Geometry III 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 
Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 150 — Analytical Mechanics 
(Statics) 2 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Humanities and social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave 

Motion, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 
T.A.M. 212 — Engineering Mechanics 

II (Dynamics) 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Solids 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



200 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THIRD YEAR 

G.E. 221 — Introduction to General E.E. 244 — Electrical Engineering 

Engineering Design 3 Laboratory I 2 

G.E. 222 — Analysis of Dynamic Systems. . . .3 G.E. 232 — Engineering Analysis 4 

G.E. 288 — Economic Analysis for G.E. 234 — General Engineering 

Engineering Decision Making 3 Laboratory 3 

E.E. 260 — Networks I 3 M.E. 205 — Thermodynamics 3 

Secondary field elective 3 Secondary field elective 3 

Total 15 Humanities or social sciences elective 1 2 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

G.E. 241 — Component Design 4 G.E. 242 — Project Design 3 

G.E. 292 — Engineering Law 3 G.E. 291 — General Engineering Seminar ... .0 

T.A.M. 235 — Fluid Mechanics 4 Technical elective 3 

Secondary field elective 3 Secondary field elective 3 

Free elective 3 Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 Free elective 3 

Total 15 



1 Students must complete at least one elective sequence of at least 6 hours in both the social 
sciences and the humanities. (See page 186.) 

Suggested Fields of Concentration 

ENGINEERING ADMINISTRATION HOURS 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 314 — Production 3 

B. Adm. 315 — Management in Manufacturing 3 

B. Adm. 321 — Individual Behavior in Organizations 3 

B. Adm. 323 — Organizational Design and Environment 3 

B. Adm. 351 — Personnel Administration 3 

Fin. 254 — An Introduction to Business Financial Management 3 

G.E. 334 — Introduction to Reliability Engineering 3 

G.E. 392 — Legal Problems in Engineering Design 3 

I.E. 238 — Analysis of Data 3 

I.E. 335 — Industrial Quality Control 3 

I.E. 373 — Production Planning and Control 3 

I.E. 386 — Operations Research II 3-4 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

ENGINEERING MARKETING 

Accy. 200 — Fundamentals of Accounting 3 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing, or B. Adm. 272 — Industrial Selling 3 

B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research 3 

B. Adm. 337 — Promotion Management 3 

B. Adm. 344 — Consumer Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 360 — Marketing Logistics 3 

G.E. 392 — Legal Problems in Engineering Design 3 

I.E. 238 — Analysis of Data 3 

Psych. 245 — Industrial Organizational Psychology 3 

B.&T.W. 251 — Business and Administrative Communication 3 

ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 

C.E. 241 — Air and Water Quality 3 

C.E. 340 — Physical Principles of Environmental Engineering Processes 3 

C.E. 341 — Air Resources Management 2 

C.E. 342 — Water Quality Control Processes 3 

C.E. 343 — Chemical Principles of Environmental Engineering Processes 3-4 

C.E. 344 — Solid Wastes Management 4 

C.E. 345 — Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling 3 

C.E. 346 — Biological Principles of Environmental Engineering Processes 3 

C.E. 347 — Ecology 3 

C.E. 349 — Air Resources Engineering 3 

M.E. 303 — Applied Combustion 3 

Env. St. 331 — Toxic Substances in the Environment 2 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Any computer science course beyond C.S. 101. 

G.E. 293 — Section C, Computer Graphics in Engineering 3 



ENGINEERING 201 



MINING AND GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING 

CE 201 — Engineering Surveying 1 4 

CE 280 — Introduction to Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering 3 

CE. 284 — Geotechnical Engineering 3 

CE. 383 — Soil Mechanics and Soil Properties 4 

CE. 384 — Applied Soil Mechanics 4 

Geol 107 — General Geology I 1 4 

Geol. 108 — General Geology II 1 4 

Geol 250 — Geology for Engineers 3 

Geol. 31 1 — Structural Geology 4 

Geol. 321 — Principles of Stratigraphy 4 

Geol 332 — Mineralogy-Petrology 4 

I.E. 238 — Analysis of Data 3 

I.E. 357 — Safety Engineering 3 

Math. 343 — Advanced Calculus 3 

Any mining engineering course 1-4 

CONTROL SYSTEMS 

CS. 221 — Machine-Level Programming 3 

CS. 225 — Data Structures 3 

E.E. 386 — Control Systems 4 

E.E. 390 — Introduction to Optimization 3 

G.E. 324 — Digital Control of Dynamic Systems 3 

Math. 361 — Introduction to Probability Theory I 3 

M.E. 312 — Modern Control Theory 4 

M.E. 313 — Computer Control of Mechanical Engineering Systems 3 

M.E. 388 — Industrial Control Systems 3 

ROBOTICS 

CS. 346 — Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning 3 

CS. 347 — Knowledge-based Programming 3 

CS. 375 — Automata, Formal Languages, and Computational Complexity 3 

E.E. 291 — On-Line Computing 3 

E.E. 348 — Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 3 

E.E. 375 — Modeling of Bio-Systems 3-4 

E.E. 390 — Introduction to Optimization 3 

G.E. 324 — Digital Control of Dynamic Systems 3 

G.E. 334 — Introduction to Reliability Engineering 3 

G.E. 393 — Introduction to Robotics 3-4 

G.E. 393L — Robotics Laboratory 3 

M.E. 285 — Analysis of Manufacturing Processes 3 

M.E. 313 — Computer Control of Mechanical Engineering Systems 3 

M.E. 342 — Kinematic Analysis and Synthesis 4 

M.E. 343 — Dynamics of Machinery 3 

M.E. 375 — Introduction to Bionics 3 



These courses are required in the mining engineering option. These hours will count as the 
secondary field, and 6 additional hours will be substituted for other courses with the approval of the 
adviser. 



CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering 

Industrial engineering is concerned with the design, improvement, and installation of integrated 
systems of people, materials, and equipment, drawing upon specialized knowledge and skill in 
the mathematical, physical, and social sciences together with the principles and methods of 
engineering analysis and design, to specify, predict, and evaluate the results to be obtained 
from such systems. Industrial engineers are in demand by a wide variety of industries ranging 
from metalworking through electrical, chemical, pharmaceutical, and food processing. Today 
industrial engineers are also in demand in nonindustnal organizations such as those engaged 
in distribution, utilities, health care, financial services, environmental control, and information 
services. 

The curriculum requires 130 hours for graduation. 



202 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total 16 

SECOND YEAR 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several 

Variables 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

I.E. 238 — Analysis of Data 3 

I.E. 248/Psych. 258 — Human Factors 

in Human-Machine Systems 3 

I.E. 385 — Operations Research I 3 

M.E. 231 — Processing and Structure 

of Materials 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix 

Theory 2 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations 

and Orthogonal Functions 3 

M.E. 209 — Thermodynamics and 

Heat Transfer 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 

Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

Solids 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



E.E. 260 — Introduction to Circuit 

Analysis 3 

I.E. 203 — Engineering Economics 4 

I.E. 232 — Methods-Time Analysis 3 

I.E. 291 — Seminar 

I.E. 386 — Operations Research II 3 

M.E. 285 — Analysis of Manufacturing 

Processes 3 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

I.E. 335 — Industrial Quality Control 3 

I.E. 363 — Facilities Planning 

and Design 3 

I.E. 373 — Production Planning 

and Control 3 

Technical elective 2 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 18 



I.E. 370 — Industrial Engineering 

Design Laboratory 3 

Technical elective 2 6 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Free elective 3 

Total 15 



1 A total of 18 hours of humanities and social sciences electives is required, one course of which 
must be economics. (See page 186.) 



list. 



Nine hours of technical electives are required and must be chosen from a departmentally approved 



CURRICULUM IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

Mechanical engineering is concerned with the theory of conversion and transmission of energy 
and the practical use of power processes; the kinematic, dynamic, and strength and wear 
considerations as well as the technological and economic aspects in the development, design, 
and use of machines and processes; the analysis, synthesis, and control of entire engineering 
systems; and the organizational and management problems confronting the mechanical engineer. 
The curriculum requires 130 hours for graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Eng. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

(Mechanics) 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 



ENGINEERING 



203 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 

Math 242 — Calculus of Several 

Variables 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

E.E. 260 — Introduction to Circuit Analysis . . .3 

M.E. 205 — Thermodynamics 3 

M.E. 211 — Introductory Gas Dynamics 3 

M.E. 240 — Modeling and Analysis of 

Dynamic Systems 4 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

M.E. 232 — Behavior of Materials in 

Service 2 

M.E. 261 — Introduction to Instrumen- 
tation, Measurement, and Control 

Fundamentals 4 3 

M.E. 285 — Analysis of Manufacturing 

Processes 3 

M.E. 304 — Energy Conversion Systems ... .3 

Technical elective" 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 17 



Math. 345 — Differential Equations and 

Orthogonal Functions 3 

M.E. 220 — Mechanics of Machinery 3 

Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 

Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics 

of Solids 3 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Total 16 



M.E. 213 — Heat Transfer 3 

M.E. 231 — Processing and Structure 

of Materials 4 

M.E. 270 — Analysis and Design of 

Machines 4 

M.E. 291 — Seminar 

Humanities or social sciences elective 1 3 

Free elective 3 

TotaJ 17 

Mechanical Engineering Systems 3 3 

M.E. 250 — Thermal Science Laboratory 4 . . . .3 

Free elective 3 

Technical electives 2 6 

Total 15 



1 A total of 18 hours of humanities and social sciences electives is required, one course of which 
must be economics. (See page 186.) 

2 Nine hours of technical electives are required and must be chosen from a departmentally approved 
list. 

3 Mechanical engineering systems to be chosen from M.E. 323, 335, 341, 388; I.E. 336, 350; and 
other courses approved by the department. 

4 M.E. 261 and M.E. 250 can be alternated with M.E. 250 taken first and followed by M.E. 261. 



CURRICULUM IN METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Metallurgical Engineering 

The program in metallurgical engineering emphasizes physical metallurgy and permits the 
student, by appropriate selection of elective courses, to emphasize engineering metallurgy, 
polymers, metal physics, or some other well-defined career objective. The basic core of physical 
metallurgy principles is treated in the sequence Met. E. 370-373, and this may be taken by 
students from other curricula who wish to obtain a strong foundation in the principles of 
physical metallurgy. 

The curriculum requires 128 hours for graduation. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 



Chem. 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Enq. 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E. 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Principles of Composition 4 

Total . . 1 16 



Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics (Mechanics) . .4 

Humanities or social sciences electives 1 4 

Total 15 



204 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 225 — Introductory Matrix Theory 2 Math. 345 — Differential Equations 

Math. 242 — Calculus and Analytic and Orthogonal Functions 3 

Geometry III 3 Phycs. 108 — General Physics (Wave Motion, 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, Sound, Light, and Modern Physics) 4 

Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics of 

T.A.M. 154 — Analytical Mechanics Solids 3 

(Statics and Dynamics) 4 C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

Elective 1 3 for Application to Engineering 

Total 16 and Physical Science 3 

Elective 1 3 

Total 16 

THIRD YEAR 

Met. E. 370 — Physical Metallurgy 1 3 Met. E. 372 — Physical Metallurgy II 3 

Met. E. 371 — Physical Metallurgy Met. E. 373 — Physical Metallurgy 

Laboratory I 3 Laboratory II 3 

Met. E. 310 — Crystallography and Electives 1 10 

Diffraction 4 Total 16 

Met. E. 314 — Metallurgical Thermodynamics 3 

Elective 1 3 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

E.E. 220 — Basic Electrical Engineering 3 Electives 1 16 

Met. E. 296 — Metallurgical Seminar 2 Total 16 

Met. E. 316 — Mechanical Metallurgy 3 

Met. E. 318 — Physics of Metals 3 

Electives 1 6 

Total 17 



1 All students are required to satisfy the college requirement of 18 hours in the social sciences 
and humanities (page 186). Six hours of electives are free to be selected by the student. A minimum 
of 9 hours is to be selected from among these departmental electives: Met. E. 299, 301, 306, 307, 
312, 317, 375, 376, 378, 386, 389. A minimum of 6 hours of technical electives are to be taken 
outside the department. A liberal interpretation of technical elective will be taken, and may include 
such courses that satisfy a carefully thought-out career plan presented by the student to his or her 
adviser. 

CURRICULUM IN MINING ENGINEERING 

See General Engineering, on pages 199, 200, and 201, for undergraduate curriculum. 

CURRICULUM IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering 

The curriculum in nuclear engineering provides students comprehensive study in basic sciences, 
basic engineering, the social sciences and humanities, and technical areas specific to nuclear 
engineering. It also provides a large, flexible selection of both technical and free electives 
which enable the student to emphasize breadth and/or depth of study. Thus, the curriculum 
not only prepares the B.S. graduate to enter directly into a wide variety of careers in nuclear 
engineering, but also to continue formal education at the graduate level. 

Nuclear engineering is a branch of engineering primarily related to the development and 
utilization of nuclear energy sources. These include: (1) the continued application of fission 
reactors as central electric power plant thermal sources; (2) the longer term development of 
fusion reactors for electric power generation; and (3) the use of radiation sources in such areas 
as materials, biological systems, medical treatment, and industrial instrumentation. 

The curriculum during the first two years provides a strong foundation in basic sciences 
(physics, mathematics, and chemistry) and an introduction to basic electric circuits and to 
digital computer utilization. Taking these courses during this time in the program provides the 
student added flexibility in choosing technical elective courses. 

The curriculum requires 127 hours for graduation. 



ENGINEERING 



205 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem 101 — General Chemistry 4 

Enq 100 — Engineering Lecture 

G.E 103 — Engineering Graphics I 3 

Math 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry I 5 

Rhet. 105 — Rhetoric 4 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 102 — General Chemistry 4 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225 — Introduction to Matrix Theory. . .2 

Phycs. 106 — General Physics 4 

Elective in social sciences 

and humanities 1 2 

Nuc. E. 197 — Nuclear Energy and Its Uses 2 .1 
Total 16 



SECOND YEAR 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several 

Variations 3 

Phycs. 107 — General Physics 4 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers 

for Application to Engineering 

and Physical Science 3 

Elective in social sciences and 

humanities, 1 free, 3 or nuclear 

engineering 4 2-3 

Econ. 101 — Introduction to Economics 4 

Total 16-17 

THIRD YEAR 

ME. 205 — Thermodynamics 3 

Nuc. E. 346 — Modern Physics for 

Nuclear Engineers 3 

T.A.M. 221 — Elementary Mechanics 

of Solids 3 

Advanced mathematics 3 

Elective in social sciences and 

humanities 1 3 

Total 15 



FOURTH YEAR 

Elective in nuclear engineering 4 3 

Technical electives 6 6 

Nuc. E. 352 — Advanced Nuclear 

Engineering Laboratory 1 

Nuc. E. 358 — Design in Nuclear 

Engineering 3 

Elective in social sciences and 

humanities, 1 or free 3 3 

Total 16 



Phycs. 108 — General Physics 4 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations 3 

T.A.M. 154 — Statics and Dynamics 4 

E.E. 260 — Introduction to Circuit Analysis . . .3 
Elective in social sciences and 

humanities, 1 free, 3 or nuclear 

engineering 4 2-3 

Total 16-17 



Nuc. E. 347 — Introduction to Nuclear 

Engineering 4 

Technical electives 6 3 

Elective in social sciences and 

humanities 1 3 

Nuc. E. 351 — Nuclear Engineering 

Laboratory 3 

M.E. 211 — Introduction to Gas 

Dynamics 3 

Total 16 



Elective in nuclear engineering 4 3 

Technical electives 6 6 

Electives in social sciences and 

humanities, 1 or free 3 6 

Total 15 



1 All students are required to satisfy the college requirements of 18 hours in the social sciences 
and humanities. Included in this group should be Econ. 101. 

2 This is not a required course, but it is recommended that Nuc. E. 197 be taken in the freshman 
or sophomore year. 

3 Six hours of electives are free to be selected by the student. 

4 A student is required to take a minimum of 9 hours selected from the following nuclear engineering 
electives (at least 6 hours are to be at the 300 level): Nuc. E. 197 — Nuclear Energy and Its Uses 
(1); Nuc. E. 241 — Introduction to Radiation Protection (2); Nuc. E. 243 — Radiation Protection 
Laboratory (1); Nuc. E. 290 — Special Topics (1 to 4); Nuc. E. 295 — Special Problems (1 to 4); 
Nuc. E. 312 — Nuclear Power Economics and Fuel Management (3); Nuc. E. 321 — Introduction to 
Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion (4); Nuc. E. 331 — Material Science in Nuclear Engineering (3); 
Nuc. E. 341 — Nuclear Radiation Protection (3); Nuc. E. 342 — Radioactive Waste Management (2); 
Nuc. E. 352 — Advanced Nuclear Engineering Laboratory (1 to 3); Nuc. E. 355 — Reactor Statics 
and Dynamics (3); Nuc. E. 357 — Nuclear Reactor Safeguards (3); Nuc. E. 388 — Nuclear Ceramics 
(3). and Nuc. E. 390 — Intermediate Special Topics (1 to 4). 

5 Students are required to take a minimum of one 3-hour advanced mathematics course in the 
300 series in addition to Math. 345. 

6 A student is required to select 15 hours of technical electives, as specified in the college-approved 
list on page 187. 



206 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Note: Students are required to have a specific area of specialization. This is accomplished by 
careful selection of technical electives and nuclear engineering electives to provide a minimum 
of three courses in the specialized area of study. Examples of such areas are power, materials, 
radiation protection and application, thermal-hydraulics, fusion, and plasma engineering. A 
student who has selected an area of specialization may elect to substitute a more appropriate 
course for those specified as required in the above listing in order to begin a sequence. Course 
substitution must have as high a caliber and content as that being replaced. 



College of Fine and Applied Arts 

116 Architecture Building, 60S East Lorado Tafi Drive, Vrbana, 1L 61H01 

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM 208 

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 208 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BANDS 208 

LIBRARIES 208 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 209 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 209 

HONORS PROGRAM 209 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 210 

ELECTIVES AND GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE 

REQUIREMENTS 210 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 212 

SCHOOL OF ART AND DESIGN 214 

DEPARTMENT OF DANCE 221 

DEPARTMENT OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 223 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 224 

DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE 229 

DEPARTMENT OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING 232 



The College of Fine and Applied Arts prepares men and women for 
professional work by offering programs in architecture, art and design, dance, 
landscape architecture, music, theatre, and urban and regional planning. Both 
freshmen and transfer students are admitted to these curricula. In each 
curriculum certain basic courses, professional courses, and general education 
requirements including a minimum approved sequence of 6 semester hours 
each in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, must be 
completed in order to qualify for the specific baccalaureate degree offered. 

For development beyond the undergraduate programs in these areas of 
study, the departments of the college offer graduate curricula leading to 
advanced professional degrees through the Graduate College. 

For students enrolled in other colleges and schools of the University of 
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the College of Fine and Applied Arts offers 
introductory courses designed to increase aesthetic appreciation and devel- 
opment and to portray the role of the arts in civilization. Participation in 
University Bands is available, and applied music courses are also available. 

To serve the total academic community and all citizens in the state of 
Illinois, the college features the arts by exhibitions, concerts, lectures, 
performances, demonstrations, and conferences within the areas of architec- 
ture, art, dance, landscape architecture, music, theatre, and urban and regional 



208 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



planning. Many outstanding professionals and works in these fields are 
brought to the University campus. 

In addition to the teaching divisions, the College of Fine and Applied Arts 
includes the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, the Krannert Art 
Museum, The University of Illinois Bands, the Bureau of Urban and Regional 
Planning Research, and the Small Homes Council-Building Research Council. 

KRANNERT ART MUSEUM 

The museum exhibits art objects from its extensive collections, which date from ancient Egypt 
to our own times. In addition, it schedules a full program of changing exhibitions. These bring 
to the campus a wide variety of historic and contemporary works of art. 

KRANNERT CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 

The Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, which opened in 1969, is a remarkable four- 
theatre, performing arts complex with spaces for instruction, rehearsal, and performance in 
theatre, opera, dance, and music. The Foellinger Great Hall, seating 2,200, is designed for 
large-scale musical events. The Festival Theatre, with 1,000 seats, is for opera, dance, and 
other musical stage productions. The Colwell Playhouse seats 700 and is the home of the 
Illinois Repertory Theatre. The Studio Theatre, seating 150, is for experimental productions. 
An outdoor amphitheatre, rehearsal rooms, offices, dressing rooms, technical shops, and 
underground parking on two levels for 650 cars complete this monumental facility. The major 
donors of the center were Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Krannert of Indianapolis. 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS BANDS 

The University Bands are organized into the Symphonic Band, the Symphonic Band II, the 
First and Second Concert Bands, the Clarinet Choir, the Brass Band, the Marching Band, and 
the Basketball Band. Membership in these organizations is determined by audition, and 
assignments are made according to proficiency and instrumentation needs. 

The bands play numerous concerts on the campus. The Symphonic Band also appears at 
the National Music Educators Conventions and in many Illinois and other midwestern cities. 
In addition, the bands furnish music for Commencement, convocations, athletic events, military 
ceremonies, and other occasions. 

The University owns a large library of band music in addition to the John Philip Sousa 
Memorial Library. These collections comprise one of the largest and finest libraries of band 
music in the world. 

The symphonic bands maintain complete symphonic instrumentations for the study and 
performance of all types of band literature while the concert bands maintain the instrumentation 
of the standard band. Promotions to the symphonic bands may be made directly from any of 
the three concert bands. 

One hour of credit per semester is offered for participation in band. This credit may be 
used as School of Music ensemble credit and is available as elective credit in other colleges. 

The following individuals are involved in the teaching of band students: James Keene, Gary 
Smith, James Hile, and Eldon Oyen. 

LIBRARIES 

Students in the college have at their disposal outstanding library resources. In addition to the 
general Library, one of this country's great university collections, there are specialized libraries 
serving the needs of specific fields. The Ricker Library of Architecture and Art contains more 
than 49,000 books (with almost 50,000 in the same fields in the main University Library), 
33,000 photographs, and 9,400 clippings. 

The City Planning and Landscape Architecture Library houses some 20,000 volumes of 
current interest, while more than 100,000 related volumes are in the University Library. 

The School of Music Library, located in the Music Building, contains over 750,000 items. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 209 



These include introductory, instructive, research, and reference materials including books, 
editions <>t music, recordings, manuscripts, microfilm, w^ other nonhook materials. 

DEPARTMENTS AND CURRICULA 

The College of Fine and Applied Arts consists of the Departments of Dance, Landscape 
Architecture, Theatre, and Urban and Regional Planning with the Bureau of Urban and Regional 
Planning Research; the Schools of Architecture, Art and Design, and Music; the University 
Bands; the Small Homes Council-Building Research Council; the Krannert Art Museum; and 
the Krannert (enter for the Performing Arts. The specific functions of each department or 
school and the undergraduate curricula are described on the following pages. 

All departments in the College of Fine and Applied Arts reserve the right to retain, exhibit, 
and reproduce the works submitted by students for credit in any course. 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 
Individual Study Program 

All curricula offered by the College of Fine and Applied Arts are designed to develop 
professional competence in the specific area of studies noted on the degree. Therefore, an 
individual study program must ensure this professional development. 

A qualified student who has specific professional goals which are not met by the curricular 
offerings of the college may request an individual program of studies selected from courses 
offered by the University. Such a program must include the basic courses prerequisite for 
advanced study, requirements of the University for graduation, general education sequences 
and requirements of the college, and professional course work which will ensure the competence 
expected for the particular degree. 

To obtain approval for an individual study program, the student must submit his or her 
proposal in writing during the sophomore or junior year. The proposal should contain an 
outline of the complete program of course work as well as an explanation of the professional 
goal desired. It should be discussed with and submitted to an approved representative of the 
appropriate department or school concerned with the degree who will then forward the 
proposal through the executive officer of the department or school for recommendation to 
the college office. Final consideration and notification of the action taken on the proposal will 
be made by the college office. 

Study Abroad 

The college provides the opportunity for students to obtain campus credit for foreign study 
and/or travel for a period of from one semester to one calendar year. Students must submit 
a detailed proposal of plans for such study and/or travel for approval by their appropriate 
departmental committee and by the associate dean of the college prior to such study abroad. 
If approved, students register and retain their status as University students and may continue 
their student health insurance as if they continued to study at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

HONORS PROGRAM 
Honors at Graduation 

At graduation, the College of Fine and Applied Arts grants honors to superior students. To be 
eligible, students must have completed a minimum of four semesters of work or 65 hours of 
credit in residence at the Urbana-Champaign campus. 

For the degree with Honors, the student must have a grade-point average of 4.25 (A = 5.0) 
or better in all courses used for graduation and be in the upper 25 percent of those receiving 
that particular degree; for the degree with High Honors, a grade-point average of 4.5 or better 
and be in the upper 15 percent; and for the degree with Highest Honors, a grade-point average 
of 4.75 or better and be in the upper 6 percent. Credit earned at other institutions and 
transferred to the University of Illinois is used in computing the student's average. Credit 
earned at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must be of at least the level required 
for the degree with Honors. 



210 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who meet the general University requirements with reference to registration, residence, 
scholarship, fees, rhetoric, and general education requirements, and who maintain a satisfactory 
record, receive degrees appropriate to the curriculum completed. Refer to the specific depart- 
mental and curricular requirements listed on the following pages. In addition, students must 
complete the required senior courses in their major field of study in residence at the Urbana- 
Champaign campus. 

ELECTIVES AND GENERAL EDUCATION SEQUENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Electives specified in any curriculum in the College of Fine and Applied Arts must be chosen 
from the lists which follow. Single courses specified in the sequence lists or more advanced 
courses for which they are prerequisites may also be used as electives. 

General Education Sequence Requirements 

To comply with the general education sequence requirements, each student in the College of 
Fine and Applied Arts must have a minimum of 6 semester hours in one department or in an 
approved sequence from different departments in each of the following three areas: the 
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences (life or physical sciences). 

1. A student may not use courses in his or her major area to satisfy a sequence requirement. 

2. Basic foreign language courses, rhetoric, and speech requirements, L.A.S. 110 and 210, or 
courses numbered 199 may not be used to fulfill the sequence requirements. 

3. Foreign language which is used in lieu of, or duplicates, high school entrance requirements 
will not be accepted as elective credit, nor will the first semester of any other foreign 
language be accepted without completion of the second semester. 

4. A maximum of 6 hours credit in Rhet. 103, 104, 105, and 108 may be applied toward the 
degree. E.S.L. 114 and 115 will apply toward the degree. 

5. Approval to use any course or sequence not contained in the listings must be requested by 
written petition to the Office of the Associate Dean of the college prior to registration in 
the substitute course or courses. Approval of an adviser or instructor only is not acceptable. 

HUMANITIES SEQUENCES (6 semester hours) 

African studies — 210 plus either Hist. 215 or Anth. 315 

Anthropology — 169, 315, 329 

Architecture — 210, 310-317 (not for architecture, art, landscape architecture, or urban and regional 

planning majors) 
Art history — all courses (not for architecture, art, landscape architecture, or urban and regional 

planning majors) 
Asian studies — all courses, except introductory and intermediate language courses 
Classics — all courses, excluding CI. Civ. 100; Grk. 101-112, 200-202; Lat. 101-114 
Comparative literature — all courses 
Dance — 340, 341 (not for dance majors) 

English — all courses, excluding rhetoric, business and technical writing, and E.S.L. courses 
French — all courses, excluding 100-114, 217, 270, 313, 314 
German — all courses, excluding 101-124, 153, 211, 212, 382 
History— 111, 112, 131, 132, 151, 152, 181, 182, 247, 248, 307, 308, 324, 381-384 
Humanities — all courses 

Italian — all courses, except 101-104, 209, 211, 212 
Linguistics — 300-305, 309, 338, 340 

Arabic — 305 

Hindi — 308 

Hebrew — 307, 308, 31 1 
Music — 1 1 3, 1 30, 1 31 , 1 33, 21 3, 21 4, 31 0-31 5, 31 7 (not for music majors) 
Philosophy — all courses, except those listed in physical and social science areas 
Portuguese — all courses, except 101-104, 211, 212 

Religious studies — all courses, except 111, 112, 200, and those listed in social science area 
Russian — all courses, except 101-104, 211-214, 280, 303, 304, 307, 308, 313, 314 
Scandinavian — all courses, except 101-104 
Slavic — 319, 380, 381 

Spanish — all courses, except 101-104, 114, 122-124, 209, 211, 215, 217, 225, 280, 351, 352, 371 
Speech communications — 141, 142, 177, 178, 207, 213, 243, 308, 315, 319, 320, 322, 342, 344, 

345, 387 
Theatre — 110, 353, 354, 361, 362 (not for theatre majors) 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 211 



SOCIAL SCIENCE SEQUENCES (6 semester hours) 

African studies — 222, 325 

Anthropology — all courses, except those listed in life science 

Economics — all courses 

Family and consumer economics — 170, 313 

Geography — all courses, except those listed in life and physical science areas 

Hstory— 111, 112, 131, 132, 151, 152, 211, 212, 215, 216, 253, 254, 260-262, 307, 308, 379-384, 

386 
Linguistics — 225, 307, 325, 350, 370 
Philosophy— 106, 107, 280, 336, 375, 377 
Political science — all courses 

Political science — 150, plus Hist. 151, 152 or 260, 261, or 262 
Psychology — all courses, except those listed in life sciences 
Religious studies — 229, 304, 328, 363 
Sociology — all courses, except 246 
Speech communications— 113, 221, 230, 254, 321, 335 

NATURAL SCIENCE SEQUENCES (6 semester hours) 

Physical sciences 

Astronomy — all courses 

Biochemistry — all courses 

Chemical engineering — all courses 

Chemistry — all courses 

Geography — 102, 103, 303 

Geology — all courses 

Mathematics — all courses, excluding 101, 111, 202, 203, 305-307 (cannot duplicate high school 
entrance regardless of course placement by examination or curriculum requirements or prereq- 
uisites) 

Philosophy — 202, 339 

Physics — all courses 
Life sciences (any 6 hours may be from more than one department) 

Anatomical Science — all courses 

Anthropology— 143, 240, 246, 337, 340-347, 356 

Biology — all courses; 100, 101 recommended 

Ecology, ethology, evolution — all courses; 105, 143 recommended 

Entomology — all courses; 118 recommended 

Foods and nutrition — 120, 220 

Genetics and development — all courses 

Geography — 214, 305 

Microbiology — all courses; 113 recommended 

Physiology — all courses; 103 recommended 

Plant biology — all courses; 100, 234, 260 recommended 

Psychology— 103, 211, 217, 230, 246, 342, 347 

Sociology — 246, with a course in the life sciences totaling 6 hours or more 

ELECTIVE AREAS 

Electives specified in any curriculum in the College of Fine and Applied Arts must be chosen 
from the list which follows. Single courses specified in the general education sequence lists or 
more advanced courses for which they are prerequisites may also be used as electives. Always 
check prerequisite requirements when registering for these courses. 
Air Force aerospace studies, military science, and naval science — advanced courses only (maximum 

of 6 hours) 
Anthropology 

Architecture — 210, 310-317 (no courses usable as electives for architecture and art majors) 
Art — all courses specified for nonmajors, and all art history courses (none usable for art and 

architecture majors except by petition) 
African studies 
Asian studies 
Astronomy 

Bands — up to 3 hours (not for music majors) 
Chemistry 
Classics 

Comparative literature 
Computer science 
Dance — especially 101, 102, 107, 108, 131, 150, 331, 340, 341, 3 hours maximum studio courses 

to apply as elective credit (none for dance majors) 
Ecology, ethology, evolution 
Economics 

English — including advanced rhetoric, and business and technical writing 
Family and consumer economics 
Foods and nutrition — 120, 220 
French 1 



212 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Geography 

Geology 

Germanic language and literatures 1 

Health education 

History 

Human development and family ecology 

Humanities 

Labor and industrial relations 

Landscape architecture — (not for landscape architecture majors) 

Latin American studies 

L.A.S. — 110 and 210 by petition only (maximum of 6 hours) 

Library sciences 

Life sciences 

Linguistics 

Mathematics 1 

Music — especially 100-104, 113, 130, 131 (instrumental courses: 2 maximum; ensembles including 

bands: 3 maximum) (not for music majors) 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political science 

Physical education — (activity courses maximum of 3 hours) 
Psychology 
Religious studies 
Slavic languages and literature 
Social sciences 
Sociology 

Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese 
Speech communications 

Theatre — especially 110, 281 (not for theatre majors) 
Urban planning — (not for urban and regional planning or architecture majors) 

1 Cannot duplicate high school entrance or curricular requirements or prerequisites regardless of 
course placement by exam. 

SPECIFIC ELECTIVE COURSES 

The following list of courses available as electives offers specialized areas of knowledge not 

found in previous lists. These courses have obvious professional values to many in fine and 

applied arts: other courses may simply be personally informative or significant. No more than 

9 hours of courses in any one of these areas should be taken. 

Accountancy— 101, 105, 201 

Advertising — 281 

Agricultural economics — 100 

Agronomy— 121, 350 

Business administration — 202, 210, 247, 261, 323, 337, 344 

Civil engineering — 216, 230 

Communications — 220, 251 

Electrical engineering — 271, 272, 288 

General engineering — 200 and 300 level 

Finance — 264 

E.P.S. — 300, 305 

Journalism — 220, 251 

Mechanical and industrial engineering — all courses 

PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES 

Professional electives as specified in any curriculum are: 

1 . Courses offered by the student's department, and 

2. Technical or related courses which will aid in the development of a student's professional goal 
and which are approved by the student's department and college. 

School of Architecture 

Architecture is concerned with shaping man's environment for the achievement of human 
purposes. In accomplishing this, an architect has the responsibility to direct his or her professional 
effort to contribute to the physical, psychological, and social well-being of man. 

The education of an architect must stimulate sensitivity and understanding of human needs 
and must develop the ability to satisfy those needs through the design of the built environment. 
The educational process focuses on the nature of problems, methodologies in problem solving, 
relevant information and creative skills, and the development of the student's intellectual and 
judgmental capabilities. This process is framed within a curriculum which specifically emphasizes 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 213 



an ■ WMCnCM of the significance of architectural history and an understanding of architectural 

design, structural design, environmental technology, building construction techniques, and the 
administrative .\n<\ communication process necessary for implementation of building projects. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS IN ARCHITECTURE 

The School of Architecture offers a tour-year undergraduate preprofessional curriculum leading 
to the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies degree. The two-year graduate program 
leads to the professional degree. Master of Architecture. 

The undergraduate curriculum provides the fundamentals of a professional education, the 
base upon which advanced professional education can build and further an acquisition of 
knowledge appropriate to many roles in architecture, planning, and the construction industry. 

Students who have received the Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies degree or an 
equivalent degree from another university, and who meet all requirements for admission to 
the graduate curriculum, may apply for admission to the Graduate College in that curriculum. 
Students with a rive-year Bachelor of Architecture degree may make similar application for 
admission at the second-year level in the graduate curriculum. The graduate curriculum provides 
advanced professional education, and, in addition, the opportunity for specialization. The 
University recommends attainment of the Master of Architecture degree to students whose 
goals include establishment of professional standing. The Master of Architecture degree 
program is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. For details of the 
graduate curriculum, please refer to the Graduate Programs catalog, University of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign. 

School facilities are limited, and preference will be given to the best qualified applicants 
until quotas are filled at both the undergraduate and graduate levels of the program. 

Since 1967, the School of Architecture has operated a one-year overseas program in Versailles, 
France which is open to qualified students on a priority basis. Course offerings there parallel 
those available to students on the Urbana-Champaign campus but stress the European context. 

The School of Architecture occupies drafting rooms, lecture rooms, and offices in the 
Architecture Building, Flagg Hall, and Noble Hall. The Ricker Library of Architecture and 
An is located in the Architecture Building. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE ^Ji 
For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies 

In this curriculum, normal progress is imperative. A student failing to complete any required 
course more than one semester later than the time designated in the curriculum is prohibited 
from progressive registration in architectural courses until the deficiency is corrected. To 
continue at the sophomore level and beyond, a student must have a cumulative grade-point 
average of 3.25 for all University course work attempted (A = 5.0). For the Bachelor of Science 
in Architectural Studies degree, 127 semester hours are required. 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Hist. 1 1 1 — History of Western Hist. 1 12L^- History of Western 

""CTvTTTzation to 1660 4 — etvflization, 1660 to the Present 4 

Social science sequence 3 Social science sequence 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 3 

Geometry I 5 Art G.P. 187 — Drawing 2 

Total 16 C.S. 102 — Introduction to Digital 

Computing 3 

Total 15 

SECOND YEAR 

Arch. 171 — Arch. Design 1 3 Arch. 172 — Arch. Design II 3 

Arch. 210 — Introduction to History Arch. 232 — Construction of Buildings 4 

of Architecture 3 Art G.P. 189 — Art Experiences 2 

Arch. 231 — Anatomy of Buildings 4 Elective 2 6 

Art G.P 188 — Watercolor 2 Total 15 

Elective 2 3 

Total 15 












b^-^' 



214 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THIRD YEAR 



Arch. 271 — Arch. Design III 3 Arch. 272 — Arch. Design IV 3 

Arch. History (Arch. 310, 311 or 312) 3 Arch. History (Arch. 313 or 314) 3 

Arch. 251 — Statics and Dynamics 4 Arch. 252 — Strengths of Materials 

U.P. 101 — Planning of Cities and Regions and Design Applications 4 

(or approved urban studies substitute) 1 ... .3 Elective 2 6 

Elective* 3 Total 16 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Arch. 371 — Arch. Design V 6 Arch. 372 — Arch. Design and 

Arch. 241 — Environmental Technology I 4 Construction Documentation 6 

Arch. 351 — Theory and Design of * Arch. 242 — Environmental Technology II ... .4 

Metal Structures 4 Arch. 352 — Theory and Design of 

Elective 2 3 Reinforced Concrete 4 

Total 17 Arch. History (Arch. 315, 316, or 318) 3 

Total 17 



1 Approval by School of Architecture. 

2 General education electives are any courses in the approved college list: minimum of 12, maximum 
of 21 hours. Professional electives are courses in architecture and related professional disciplines 
approved by the School of Architecture: no minimum, maximum of 9 hours. 



School of Art and Design 



The School of Art and Design offers Bachelors of Fine Arts degrees in art education, crafts, 
graphic design, the history of art, industrial design, painting, and sculpture. The first year of 
each curriculum is basic and cultural. Specialization begins in the second year. 

First-year students who wish to concentrate in the history of art will be admitted into the 
history of art curriculum. All other first-year students will be admitted to the general curriculum 
in art and design. After completing one year in the general program, students must select one 
of the more specialized art and design curricula. 

Courses in the history and appreciation of art and certain courses in studio work are open 
to students from other colleges of the University. 

A field of concentration in art history is also offered in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. (See page 246.) 

Courses in cinematography, photography, and printmaking are offered at introductory, 
advanced, and graduate levels. 

The degree of Master of Arts is offered with a major in either art history or art education. 
The degree of Master of Fine Arts in Art and Design is offered with majors in ceramics, glass, 
graphic design, industrial design, metals, painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. 
The degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the History of Art is offered jointly by the School of 
Art and Design and the School of Architecture. The degree of Doctor of Education in Art 
Education is offered jointly by the School of Art and Design and the College of Education. 
All graduate degrees are offered under the regulations of the Graduate College. 

The school's administrative offices are in the Art and Design Building at 408 East Peabody 
Drive, Champaign, IL 61820. The school occupies studios, drafting rooms, classrooms, and 
offices in eighteen different University buildings. 

PORTFOLIO AND MINIMUM GRADE REQUIREMENTS 

A portfolio review may be required for placement in all art and design courses beyond the 
entry level of the Foundation Program. After completing the Foundation Program, students 
who meet or exceed minimum grade requirements listed below must apply for admission to 
one of the Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree curricula. Higher than minimum grade-point 
averages may be required due to the limits of faculty and facilities. In addition to minimum 
grade requirements, some B.F.A. curricula select students by portfolio review near the end of 
the Foundation year. Minimum grade-point averages are: 

The Foundation Program, Crafts, Graphic Design, History of Art, Painting, and Sculpture 3.25 

Art Education, Industrial Design, and Graphic Design 3.50 

Individual Study Programs 4.00 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 215 



FOUNDATION PROGRAM FOR ALL ART AND DESIGN CURRICULA 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Art Hi. 111 — Ancient and Medieval Art 4 Art Hi. 112 — Renaissance and Modern Art . .4 

Art G.P 113 — Orientation to Art Art G.P. 1 18 — Drawing 3 

Art G.P. 1 17 — Drawing 3 Art G.P 120 — Design 3 

Art GP. 1 19 — Design 3 Electives 6 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 Total 16 

Elective 2 

Total 16 

This first-year requirement is included in all art and design curricula which follow. 

CURRICULUM IN ART EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education 1 

A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

The curriculum in art education prepares students for positions as teachers of an in the 
public schools, grades K through 12. The program places emphasis on methods, materials, 
processes, and practice teaching in Illinois schools. Upon completion, graduates are eligible 
for the Standard Special Certificate as defined by the Illinois State Teacher Certification Board. 

For teacher education requirements applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or Rhet. 105 or 108 and a speech communication performance 

elective 6-7 

General psychology 3 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in one of the natural sciences 6 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in one of the humanities 6 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 3 

History of the United States 3 

Physical and/or health education 3 

Total 30-31 

ART HISTORY 

Introduction of ancient and medieval art 4 

Introduction to Renaissance and modern art 4 

Advanced art history (200- or 300-level) 3 

Total 11 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Orientation to art 

Drawing I, II 6 

Design I, II 6 

Life drawing I, II 4 

Painting Composition I, II 4 

Total 20 

ART EDUCATION 

Art education laboratory 4 

Practicum in teaching art 4 

Art curriculum and practicum in the elementary grades 3 

Organization of public school art programs 3 

Total 14 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 2 

Foundations of American education 2 

Psychology of teaching and learning 3 

Professional seminar in art education 4 

Educational practice 10 

Total 19 

ELECTIVES 

Art electives 3 21 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 6 

General or professional electives 8-9 

Total 35-36 



216 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



1 Students are advised that certification requirements may be altered at any time by the State 
Teacher Certification Board or the legislature. In such cases, students must satisfy the new 
requirements to qualify for the University's Recommendation for Certification. 

? Art education courses are applicable to professional education requirements for teacher certifi- 
cation. 

3 A minimum of 8 semester hours is required in one of the following areas of specialization: 
sculpture, painting, ceramics, glass, jewelry and metalworking, photography, or printmaking. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN ART EDUCATION 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Required courses in drawing and design must precede all other course work in the minor area: 

HOURS 

Art & D. 1 07 — Elementary Drawing 2 

Art & D. 185 — Design 2 

Subtotal 4 

Elect six hours from the following courses: 

Art & D. 105 — Introduction to Watercolor Painting 2 

Art & D. 106 — Introduction to Oil Painting 2 

Art & D. 1 50 — Beginning Sculpture 2 

Art Cr. 1 60 — Jewelry I 2 

Art Cr. 170 — Ceramics 1 2 

Subtotal 6 

ART EDUCATION 

Art Ed. 204 — Art Education Laboratory 2 

Art Ed. 206 — Practicum in Teaching Art 4 

Art Ed. 207 — Art Curriculum Development and Practicum in the Elementary Grades 3 

Subtotal 9 

HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF ART 

Elect two from the following three courses: 

Art & D. 140 — Introduction to Art 3 

Art Hi. 1 1 5 — Art Appreciation 3 

Art Hi. 1 1 6 — Masterpieces of Art 3 

Subtotal 6 

Total 25 

CURRICULUM IN CRAFTS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Crafts 

The curriculum in crafts emphasizes professional training for the development of the self- 
sustaining craftsman, the teacher of crafts, and the designer-craftsman in industry. The curriculum 
provides a choice of three areas of concentration: ceramics, glass working, and metal working. 
The emphasis within these areas of concentration is on the development of individual design 
capabilities and perceptions and upon the mastery of comprehensive technical skills. In 
conjunction with these individual areas of emphasis, each student is given experience in other 
craft media. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the follow ; -.g areas: humanities, natural sciences, 

and social sciences 18 

Electives (see college list of approved electives) 14-18 

Total 36-40 

ART HISTORY 

Art Hi. 111 and 112 — Introduction to the History of Art 14 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 217 



GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art G.P. 1 13 — Orientation to Art and Design 

Art G.P. 117 and 1 18 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art G.P. 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Art ID 133 and 134 — Design Workshop I and II 4 

Art Pa. 1 25 and 1 26 — Life Drawing I and II 4 

Total 20 

ART ELECTIVES 12-14 

PROFESSIONAL ELECTIVES 12-14 

CRAFTS 

Art Cr. 160 — Jewelry I and Art Cr. 170 — Ceramics I plus major sequence in ceramics or 
metal and 3 or 4 hours in allied crafts courses 25-26 

CURRICULUM IN GRAPHIC DESIGN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Graphic Design 

The curriculum in graphic design prepares the student for entrance into the professional practice 
in visual communications. Studio work encompasses typography, image making, production 
techniques, and the process of communication planning. 
A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 — English Composition 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, natural sciences, 

and social sciences 18 

Total 22 

ART HISTORY 

Art Hi. 1 1 1 — Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art 4 

Art Hi. 112 — Introduction to Renaissance and Modern Art 4 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art G.P. 1 13 — Orientation to Art and Design 

Art G.P. 1 1 7 and 1 1 8 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art G.P. 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Total 12 

GRAPHIC DESIGN 

Art G.D. 100 — Design History Survey 3 

Art G.D. 120 — Visual Organization 3 

Art G.D. 1 30 — Production 3 

Art G.D. 1 40 — Typography 3 

Art G.D. 21 — Photo/Graphics 3 

Art G.D. 220 — Image Making 3 

Art G.D. 230 — Methodology 3 

Art G.D. 240 — Advanced Typography 3 

Art G.D. 370 — Advanced Graphic Design 1 3 

Art G.D. 380 — Advanced Graphic Design II 3 

Total 30 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 20-24 

Professional and art electives 20-24 

Total 44 

CURRICULUM IN THE HISTORY OF ART 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in the History of Art 

The curriculum in the history of an offers a broad cultural education which unites academic 
and studio training. The curriculum provides sound preparation for the graduate study required 
for museum work or teaching at the college level. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 



218 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — English Composition 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, social 

science, natural science 18 

Electives (see college list of approved electives) 1 28-46 

Supportive electives: In addition to the general education requirements a minimum of 6 hours 
chosen with the consent of the adviser in one of the following areas: ancient and modern 

literature, anthropology, classics, history, or philosophy 6 

Total 56-74 

SUPPORTING REQUIREMENTS IN ART 

Art Hi. 111 and 1 1 2 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Art G.P. 113 — Orientation to Art and Design 

Art G.P. 117 and 118 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art G.P. 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Art electives 10-16 

Total 30-36 

ADVANCED ART HISTORY 

Advanced art history 1 8-36 

Total 18-36 

1 One foreign language through the 104 level or equivalent is required. French or German is 
strongly recommended. 

CURRICULUM IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Industrial Design 

The curriculum in industrial design provides education in three-dimensional design for pro- 
duction, to meet the needs of people and their environment. Emphasis is placed on the 
awareness of the market demand for design, cognizance of methods and materials of production 
and their relative costs, creation of designs which are in visual harmony with their environment 
and which are satisfying to the consumer, and responsiveness to the changes in technology and 
cultural patterns. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 — English Composition 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours plus a 3-hour elective in the social sciences 9 

One approved sequence of 6 hours plus a 3-hour elective in the humanities 9 

One approved sequence of 8 hours in one of the natural sciences 8 

Total 30 

ART HISTORY 

Art Hi. 1 1 1 — Introduction to Ancient and Medieval Art 4 

Art Hi. 112 — Introduction to Renaissance and Modern Art 4 

Art I.D. 210 — History of Furniture and Interior Design 3 

Advanced art or architecture history 3 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art G.P. 1 13 — Orientation to Art and Design 

Art G.P. 1 1 7 and 1 1 8 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art G.P. 1 1 9 and 1 20 — Design I and II 6 

Art G.P. 121 and 122 — Drawing Theory I and II 4 

Art G.D. 1 20 — Visual Organization 3 

Total 19 

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN 

Art I.D. 1 33 — Design Workshop 2 

Art I.D. 134 — Introduction to Industrial Design 3 

Art I.D. 175 — Design Management and Methods 2 

Art I.D. 271 and 272 — Materials and Processes I and II 6 

Art I.D. 275 and 276 — Industrial Design I and II 6 

Art I.D. 277 and 278 — Advanced Industrial Design 8 

Art I.D. 280 — Professional Practices 2 

Total 29 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 219 



ELECTIVES 

Technical electives from approved list, minimum 6 

Art electives 6-10 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 11-15 

Total 27 

Technical Electives hours 

Adv. 281 — Introduction to Advertising 3 

Any approved advertising course other than Adv. 199 

Arch. 251 — Statics and Dynamics 4 

Arch. 252 — Strength of Materials and Design Applications 4 

Arch. 323 — Social and Behavioral Factors for Design 3 

Any approved 200-level architecture course 

B. Adm. 202 — Principles of Marketing 3 

B. Adm. 210 — Management and Organizational Behavior, or B. Adm. 247 — Introduction to 

Management 3 

B. Adm. 320 — Marketing Research 3 

B. Adm. 344 — Buyer Behavior 3 

B. Adm. 346 — Entrepreneurship: Small Business Formation 4 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to Computers for Application to Engineering and Physical Science 3 

C.S. 103 — Introduction to Computers and Their Application to Social and Behavioral Science . . .3 

L.A. 213 — People, Land, and Environment 2-3 

Phycs. 140 — Practical Physics: How Things Work 3 

Phycs. 141 — Special Problems (with Phycs. 140) 1 

Phycs. 150 — Physics and the Modern World 3 

Phycs. 151 — Special Problems (optional with Phycs. 150) 1 

I.E. 305 — Principles of Ergonomics (listed also as Physl. 305 and P.E. 305) 4 

Psych. 258 — Human Factors in Human-Machine Systems 3 

Psych. 356 — Human Performance and Engineering Psychology 3 

Any approved 200-level engineering course 

CURRICULUM IN PAINTING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting 

The curriculum in painting provides extensive training in preparation for professional practice 
as an artist. 

The first year is devoted primarily to the study of design, composition, and the acquisition 
of both representational and abstract drawing skills. The second year concentrates on introducing 
the student to beginning painting skills and techniques with further studies in drawing and 
composition. The last two years are devoted to the development of individual creative expression 
in painting and other media. 

When followed by a program leading to a degree of Master of Fine Arts in Painting, this 
curriculum is recommended as preparation for teaching painting and drawing and related 
subjects at the college level. 

A total of 122 hours is required for this degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or 1 08 4 

One approved sequence of 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, social sciences, 

and natural sciences 18 

Total 22 

ART HISTORY 

Art Hi. 111 and 1 1 2 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art G P. 1 1 3 — Orientation to Art and Design 

Art G.P. 117 and 1 1 8 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art G. P. 1 1 9 and 1 20 — Design I and II 6 

Art Pa. 1 25 and 1 26 — Life Drawing I and II 4 

Art Pa. 225 and 226 — Intermediate Drawing 4 

Total 20 



220 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



PAINTING 

The student must complete twelve courses in painting and composition to a minimum of 30 hours. 
Qualified students are encouraged to arrange special projects in conjunction with advisers. Painting 
and composition courses presently include: 

Art Pa. 141 and 142 — Beginning Painting I and II 4 

Art Pa. 143 and 144 — Painting Composition I and II 4 

Art Pa. 231 and 232 — Intermediate Composition 6 

Art Pa. 233 and 234 — Advanced Composition 6 

Art Pa. 243 and 244 — Figure Painting 4 

Art Pa. 245 and 246 — Advanced Painting and Drawing 6 

Total 30 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 14-18 

Professional electives (including one course in printmaking) 18-22 

Total 36 

CURRICULUM IN SCULPTURE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Sculpture 

The curriculum in sculpture provides a broad and solid foundation in the fundamental 
disciplines of drawing, design, and painting, including both traditional and contemporary 
concepts. The learning of the time-honored techniques of sculpture such as modeling and 
carving is required, and experimentation with welding, metal casting, and plastics is fostered. 
The student is encouraged to experience a wide range of materials, techniques, methods, and 
styles. 

A total of 122 semester hours is required for the degree. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

One approved sequence of at least 6 hours in each of the following areas: humanities, natural 

sciences, and social sciences 18 

Total 22 

HISTORY OF ART 

Art Hi. 1 1 1 and 1 12 — Introduction to the History of Art 8 

Advanced art history 6 

Total 14 

GENERAL ART AND DESIGN 

Art G.P. 1 1 3 — Orientation to Art and Design 

Art G.P. 117 and 118 — Drawing I and II 6 

Art G.P. 119 and 120 — Design I and II 6 

Art Pa. 125 and 126 — Life Drawing I and II 4 

Art Pa. 141 and 142 — Beginning Painting I and II 4 

Art Cr. 160 — Jewelry I 2 

Art Cr. 170 — Ceramics 1 2 

Total 24 

SCULPTURE 

The professional student must complete ten courses in sculpture to a minimum of 24 hours. Qualified 
students are encouraged to arrange special projects in conjunction with advisers. Sculpture courses 
presently include: 

Art Sc. 151 and 152 — Sculpture I and II 4 

Art Sc. 253 and 254 — Intermediate Sculpture 4 

Art Sc. 255 and 256 — Sculpture Materials and Techniques 6 

Art Sc. 257 and 258 — Advanced Sculpture 4 

Art Sc. 259 and 260 — Advanced Sculpture Materials and Techniques 6 

Total 24 

ELECTIVES 

General electives (see college list of approved electives) 20-24 

Professional electives 14-18 

Total 38 






FINE AND APPLIED / ,TS 221 



Department of Dance 



The Department of DuiCC is an autonomous unit in the College of Fine and Applied Arts, 
and, as such, is unique within the state. The resident dance faculty of four full-time and five 
part-time members is augmented by visiting artists-in-residence on a continual basis. There are 
approximately tony undergraduate and twelve graduate students enrolled in the major program. 
The teaching staff also includes graduate teaching assistants who teach classes in modern, 
ballet, and jazz for nondance majors. Over 700 students are enrolled in these classes. 

The program focus at the graduate and undergraduate levels is on professional preparation 
of performers, choreographers, and studio teachers. Two degree programs are offered, leading 
to the Bachelor of Fine Arts and Master of Fine Arts degrees. The department is primarily a 
modern dance department in terms of technical, choreographic, and performance focus. Ballet 
is offered as an integral component of training; classes in jazz and tap are also included in the 
major curriculum. Admission is by audition. 

The Department of Dance is located in the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts and 
utilizes the exceptional performing and production resources of the center. Five department 
concerts per year are produced in the theatres of the Krannert center, including two concerts 
of student choreography. Numerous opportunities for performance exist with the Illinois Dance 
Theatre, in faculty and student concerts, and in musical and opera productions in the center. 

CURRICULUM IN DANCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance 

The B.F.A. curriculum in dance is an intensive program of study for the dedicated student, 
offering concentration in the areas of technique, composition, and performance. The curriculum 
also includes requirements in production, improvisation, music theory and literature for dance, 
history, theory and philosophy, notation or movement theories, and repertory. Electives may 
be taken in ballet, modern, tap, and jazz; advanced improvisation; Labanotation, accompaniment; 
choreographer-composer workshop; and independent study. 

Program requirements include core daily technique classes consisting of three modern and 
two ballet classes per week each semester in residence plus elective technique classes for a 
minimum of one additional credit hour per semester. Technique placement is assigned by the 
faculty, and majors must achieve the advanced technical level in modern or ballet for a 
minimum of two semesters prior to graduation. The improvisation/composition sequence 
consists of a minimum of 8 hours of studio courses culminating in the performance of a senior 
choreographic project. A minimum of 6 hours of credit is required in performance/repertory 
courses. The curriculum includes up to 23 hours of professional electives which may be taken 
in professional dance courses and/or related arts and sciences. 

Evaluation of majors is an ongoing process. Continued enrollment in the program is contingent 
upon satisfactory performance. Students are expected to maintain a minimum 3.75 grade-point 
average in all professional course work and a 4.0 cumulative average in studio classes in order 
to remain in good standing in the department. 

It is possible for transfer students to complete degree requirements in a three-year period 
contingent upon prior completion of general education requirements and the fulfillment of the 
advanced technique requirement for two semesters prior to graduation. 

A total of 130 hours is required for this degree. 

GENERAL EDUCATION HOURS 

Rhet. 1 05 or equivalent 4-6 

Humanities sequence 1 6 

Social science sequence 1 6 

Natural science sequence 9 

Physl. 103 

Physl. 234 
Total 25-27 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN DANCE 

Technique (minimum) 34 

Dance 160/166 (3), 260/266 (3), 360/366 (3) 

Four credit hours per semester. 

To include core technique classes each semester in residence, consisting of three modern 



222 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



and two ballet classes per week (3 hours credit), plus elective technique courses for a 

minimum of 1 additional credit hour per semester. 
Improvisation 2 

Dance 162 — Improvisation I 

Dance 163 — Improvisation II 
Composition 6 

Dance 164 — Beginning Composition 

Dance 264 — Intermediate Composition 

Dance 365 — Advanced Composition 
Production 4 

Dance 131/331 — Production Practicum (1 hour per lab for a total of 4 hours) 
Music for dance 6 

Dance 168 — Music Theory and Practice for Dance 

Dance 269 — Music Literature for Dance 

Dance education 2-3 

One of the following: 

Dance 243 — Creative Dance for Children 

Dance 351 — Independent Teaching Project 
Orientation to dance 2 

Dance 150 — Orientation to Dance 
Dance history 6 

Dance 340 — History of the Dance I 

Dance 341 — History of the Dance II 
Repertory and performance 6 

Dance 130/330 — Performance Practicum (1-2 hours per dance) 

Dance 335 — Dance Repertory Workshop (up to 4 hours) 

A total of 6 hours is required; at least 2 hours must be taken in 335. 
Theory and philosophy of dance 3 

Dance 346 — Theory and Philosophy of Dance 
Theories of movements/notation 3 

One of the following: 

Dance 345 (3) Theories and Fundamentals of Movement 

Dance 347 (3 hours), Labanotation I 
Total 74-75 

ELECTIVES 2 28-33 

Recommended: 
Additional courses in ballet and modern technique: 160, 166, 260, 266, 360, 366 (up to 16 

additional hours may be counted toward degree requirements) (per course) 1-2 

Dance 130 — Performance Practicum 3 (per dance) 1 

Dance 250 — Dance Forms (including jazz and tap) (per course) 1 

Dance 328 — Choreographer-Composer Workshop 2 

Dance 330 and 335 — Performance and repertory courses 3 (per dance) 1-2 

Dance 348 — Labanotation II 3 

Dance 351 — Independent Study and Special Topics (Up to) 8 

Dance 363 — Improvisation III 1 

Dance 369 — Accompaniment for Dance 1 

Art & D. 140 — Introduction to Art 4 3 

Art & D. 180 — Introduction to Cinematography 4 3 

Music 158 — Group Piano for Non-Music Majors 4 2 

Music 181 — Voice 4 2-3 

Theat. 170 — Fundamentals of Acting 4 3 

Theat. 175 — Improvisation in Acting* 4 

Theat. 291 — Costume Design for Dance 2 

Theat. 332 — Stage Management 4 

Theat. 340 — Lighting Design for Dance 4 

Theat. 355 — History and Development of American Musical Theatre 3 

Theat. 372 — Introduction to Theatre Management 3 

1 Humanities and social science sequence: see College of Fine and Applied Arts approved 
sequences. 

2 A minimum of 10 hours of electives must be in the area of general electives (see College of Fine 
and Applied Arts approved list). A minimum of 5 hours must be in the area of professional electives. 
It is strongly recommended that dance majors consider professional electives outside the dance 
area itself. 

3 A maximum of 16 hours may be accumulated toward degree requirements in the Dance 130/ 
330/335 courses. 

4 These courses will also fulfill the Fine and Applied Arts general electives requirements for dance 
majors. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



223 



Department of Landscape Architecture 

The Department of I andscapc Architecture offers a tour-year undergraduate curriculum leading 
to the professional degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture and a graduate curriculum 
leading to the Master of Landscape Architecture. 

The undergraduate curriculum is a balanced program of technical, design, and general 
education courses which equip the student with the necessary skills for professional practice 
in private offices or public agencies. The graduate curriculum offers advanced work and 
opportunities for specialization in selected areas toward potential careers in teaching, public 
service, or private practice. 

Departmental headquarters and the library are located in Mumford Hall. Classrooms, studios, 
and offices are located in Mumford Hall and in 1203, 1205, and 1205V2 West Nevada Street, 
Urbana. 



CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 
For the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture 

This curriculum requires 128 semester hours of credit for graduation. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

L.A. 101 — Introduction to 

Landscape Architecture 2 

L.A. 180 — General Drafting and Graphics . . .2 

Geog. 103 — Earth's Physical System 3 4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Elective (general education sequence) 1 3 

Total 15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

L.A. 181 — Visual Communications 3 

PI. Bio. 102 — Plant Biology 3 

Math. 116 — Algebra and Trigonometry, 

or Math. 114 — Plane Trigonometry 2-5 

Elective (general education sequence) 1 3 

L.A. 214 — History of Landscape 

Architecture 3 

Total 14-17 



SECOND YEAR 

L.A. 133 — Landscape Design 5 

L.A. 150 — Landscape Surveys 3 

Supporting elective 2 3 

Elective (general education sequence) 1 3 

U.P. 101 — Planning Cities and Regions 3 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

L.A. 235 — Recreational and 

Community Design 5 

L.A. 243 — Site Engineering 4 

L.A. 251 — Plant Materials and Design I 4 

Supporting elective 2 3 

Total 16 



L.A. 134 — Site Design 5 

L.A. 142 — Landform Design 

and Construction 3 

Elective (general education sequence) 1 3 

Supporting elective 2 6 

Total 17 



L.A. 236 — Design Workshops I 5 

L.A. 244 — Site Construction 4 

L.A. 252 — Plant Materials and Design II 4 

Supporting elective 3 

Total 16 



FOURTH YEAR 

L.A. 253 — Planting Design 4 

L.A. 382 — Visual Communications II 3 

L.A. 337 — Regional Landscape Design 5 

Elective 2 4 

Total 16 



L.A. 246 — Professional Practice 1 

L.A. 338 — Design Workshops II 5 

Supporting elective 2 3 

Electives 5-8 

Total 14-17 



1 A minimum of 6 credit hours of approved sequence courses is required in each of the areas of 
humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences for a minimum of 18 credit hours (see College of 
Fine and Applied Arts-approved general education sequences). 

2 A minimum total of 18 credit hours of professionally related courses selected from the recom- 
mended list of supporting electives is required, with a minimum of 3 credit hours in each of the 
categories of history, communications, techniques, and environment. 

3 PI. Bio. 102 or Geog. 103 may be used as one of the two natural science (6 hours) sequence 
courses with the appropriate subsequent course (see College of Fine and Applied Arts-approved 
general education sequences). 

A student must have and maintain a minimum 3.5 cumulative University of Illinois grade-point 
average and a minimum 3.5 grade-point average in all required landscape architecture courses 
to continue beyond the sophomore-level design year. 



224 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



School of Music 

All applicants for music curricula are required to satisfy a qualifying audition in the major 
performance area prior to approval for admission. In addition, applicants for music composition 
or history of music programs are required to submit original scores or other pertinent writings 
to substantiate their ability to pursue work in their chosen program of studies. Auditions are 
held on designated dates during the academic year. 

Applicants who cannot appear in person may submit tape recordings and other required 
materials, but all are urged to complete the requirement as early as possible to expedite 
approval for admission. Each applicant must write to the director of the School of Music, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3034 Music Building, 1114 West Nevada Street, 
Urbana, IL 61801, specifying his or her major performance area and curriculum, to make 
specific audition arrangements. 

The School of Music offers a curriculum in music, with five options leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Music, and a curriculum in music education with six areas of specialization, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education. A student enrolled in any 
applied music curriculum pursues throughout the four years of his or her course a major 
applied subject (such as piano, voice) in which two thirty-minute lessons a week are taken; 
and a minor or secondary applied subject for two years during which one thirty-minute lesson 
a week is taken. Students in composition and history of music must complete 16 hours in the 
major applied music subject. Public performance is a definite part of the training in applied 
music, and all students, when sufficiently advanced, are required to participate in student 
programs. As part of the requirements for the Bachelor of Music degree in applied music and 
composition, senior students must present a satisfactory public recital. Also available is an 
open-studies curriculum for students with other specialized musical interests, admission to 
which requires the recommendation of the School of Music faculty and approval by the 
College of Fine and Applied Arts. Requirements for the program may be obtained from the 
director of the School of Music. 

A program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with a field of concentration in music is offered to qualified students. (See page 265.) Although 
students in this program are encouraged to pursue all phases of the study of music, including 
applied music (subject to appropriate auditioning procedures), the emphasis is on historical, 
cultural, and theoretical aspects of music rather than on professional training. 

Applied music and courses in the history, theory, and appreciation of music are open to all 
qualified students in the University. 

Graduate courses leading to the degree of Master of Music, Master of Science in Music 
Education, Advanced Certificate in Music Education, Doctor of Education in Music Education, 
Doctor of Philosophy in Musicology, and Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition, Choral 
Music, and Performance and Literature are offered under the regulations of the Graduate 
College. 

The University Orchestras, University Bands, choral ensembles, jazz bands, and New Music 
Ensemble are open to qualified students from any college. The Oratorio Society, University 
Chorus, Opera Chorus, and certain other ensembles are also open to members of the faculty 
and staff and residents of the community who are admitted by audition or by permission of 
the respective conductors. All undergraduate music majors are required to enroll in at least 
one conducted ensemble each semester in residence. Students majoring in piano or organ may 
count up to 4 semesters of chamber music and/or accompanying toward the total requirement. 
A student may register for a maximum of two such courses concurrently and may use a 
maximum of 10 semester hours of ensemble credit to apply toward his or her degree. 

The faculty and students of the School of Music present approximately 350 concerts and 
recitals throughout the year. Faculty artists and student ensembles are available for off-campus 
performances through the Office of Continuing Education and Public Service in Music, 608 
South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

The School of Music occupies the Music Building, Tina Weedon Smith Memorial Hall, and 
space in the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. The facilities are equipped extensively 
with classrooms, studios, practice rooms, experimental-electronic music laboratories, musical 
instruments and audio equipment, and several auditoria designed for public recitals and concerts. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



225 



CURRICULUM IN MUSIC 

For the degree of Bachelor of Music 

This curriculum requires 130 semester hours of credit for graduation. 

The general education sequence requirements in the humanities, social sciences, and natural 
sciences and elective must be met from the college elective and general education sequence 
lists starting on page 210. 

Instrumental Music Major 

The instrumental mj|or may be taken in piano, organ, harpsichord, violin, viola, violoncello, 
string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, bassoon, euphonium, saxophone, cornet or trumpet, french 
horn, trombone, tuba, percussion, or harp. 

A student enrolled in this program takes two applied subjects, one a major (32 hours) and 
the other a minor (8 hours). 

Juniors and seniors must present satisfactory public recitals as pan of the requirements for 
the Bachelor of Music degree. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Major applied music subject 5 4 

Minor applied music subject 2 

Music 101 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice 1 3 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108. or Sp. Com. 111 — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Total 14-15 

SECOND YEAR 

Major applied music subject 4 4 

Minor applied music subject 2 

Music 103 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice III 3 

Music 108 — Aural Skills II 1 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 

Foreign language 4 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

History of music 1 3 

Major applied music subject 4 4 

Theory of music 3 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives 6 

Total 17 

FOURTH YEAR 

Major applied music subject 4 4 

Music 330 or 331 — Applied Music 

Pedagogy or Piano Pedagogy I 

(piano and string majors only) 2 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 3 

Electives or professional electives 6 

Total 16 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Major applied music subject 4 4 

Minor applied music subject 2 

Music 102 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice II 3 

Music 107 — Aural Skills I 1 

Elective or Sp. Com. 112 — Verbal 

Communication 2-3 

Elective 2 

Total 14-15 

Major applied music subject 4 4 

Minor applied music subject 2 

Music 104 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice IV 3 

Music 109 — Aural Skills III 1 

Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

Foreign language 4 

Total 17 



History of music 1 3 

Major applied music subject 4 4 

Theory of music 3 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives 6 

Total 17 



Major applied music subject 4 4 

Music 330 or 332 — Applied Music 

Pedagogy or Piano Pedagogy II 

(piano and string majors only) 2 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives 5 

Electives or professional electives 5 

Total 17 



1 To be chosen from Music 310, 311. 312, 313, 314, 315, 317, 333, 334, 335, 336, or 337. 

2 String majors will register into Music 330; piano majors will register into Music 331 and 332. 

3 The music theory requirement for the junior year is to be satisfied by Music 300 and 308, 3 
hours each, or by Music 308, 6 hours, with each semester devoted to a specifically listed topic. 

4 String majors would register for Music 269 concurrently with the major applied music subject (3 
hours), a minimum of 6 semester hours to be required in fulfillment of degree requirements. 

5 Concurrent registration in Music 250 is required for all students who register for Music 183-186 
and 383-386 



Music Composition Major 

Within this program, major emphasis may be placed on the theory of music. Necessary course 
adjustments require approval of the theory division. 



226 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Seniors must present a satisfactory recital of original compositions as part of the requirements 
for the Bachelor of Music degree. If the major is theory, an advanced project determined and 
approved by the theory division is required. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music 1 2 

Music 101 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice 1 3 

Music 106 — Beginning Composition 2 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Sp. Com. 111 — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Elective 3 

Total 15-16 

SECOND YEAR 

Applied music 2 

Music 103 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice III 3 

Music 206 3 — Intermediate Composition 2 

Music 204 3 — Compositional Problems: 

Serial Techniques 2 

Music 108 — Aural Skills II 1 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 

French, German, or Italian 4 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

Applied music 2 

History of music 2 3 

Music 200 — Instrumentation I 2 

Theory of music 3 3 

Music 306 3 — Composition 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 4 

Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

Applied music 2 

Music 302 — Music Acoustics 3 

Music 306 3 — Composition 3 

Music 320 3 — Proseminar 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Electives 6 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music 2 

Music 102 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice II 3 

Music 107 — Aural Skills I 1 

Elective or Sp. Com. 112 — Verbal 

Communication 3-4 

Elective 3 

Music 106 — Beginning Composition 2 

Total 14-15 

Applied music 2 

Music 104 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice IV 3 

Music 2o6 3 — Intermediate Composition 2 

Music 205 3 — Compositional Problems: 

Technological and Visual Aspects 2 

Music 109 — Aural Skills III 1 

Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

French, German, or Italian 4 

Total 17 

Applied music 2 

History of music 2 3 

Music 201 — Instrumentation II 2 

Theory of music 3 3 

Music 306 3 — Composition 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 4 

Total 18 

Applied music 2 

Music 306 3 — Composition 3 

Music 320 3 — Proseminar 2 

Music 315 — Music of the 

Twentieth Century 3 

Music ensemble 1 

Elective 4 

Elective or professional elective 2 

Total 17 



1 Whether or not piano has been the applied music subject, the student must acquire a thorough 
practical knowledge of the pianoforte. 

2 To be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317, 333, 334, 335, 336, or 337. 

3 The music theory requirement for the junior year may be satisfied by two courses chosen from 
Music 300, 307, and 308 (308 may be repeated). If the curricular emphasis is in music theory, the 
following will apply: sophomores will take only two composition courses chosen from Music 204, 
205, or 206 (206 may be repeated) and 4 or 6 hours in electives; juniors will take Music 300, 307, 
and two semesters of 308 (Music 306 will not be required); seniors will take Music 229, 301, 305, 
and a 300-level music history course (Music 306 and 320 will not be required.). 



History of Music Major 

The curriculum in the history of music offers a broad cultural education which unites academic 
and musical training. It provides sound preparation for the graduate study required for research 
and teaching in musicology or ethnomusicology. 

Whether or not piano has been the applied music subject, the student must demonstrate 
reasonable facility in piano by the end of the sophomore year. 

Seniors, working with an adviser, must complete a satisfactory thesis as part of the requirement 
for the Bachelor of Music degree. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 



227 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music 2 

Music 101 3 

Music 110 2 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Sp. Comm. 111 4-3 

General education sequence 1 3 

Elective 2 

Total 16-15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Applied music 2 

Music 102 3 

Music 107 1 

Elective or Sp. Comm. 112 2-3 

General education sequence 1 3 

Elective 3 

Total 14-15 



SECOND YEAR 

Applied music 2 

Music ensemble 1 

Music 103 3 

Music 108 1 

Music 213 3 

French or German 2 4 

General education sequence 1 3 

Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

Applied music 2 

History of music 3 3 

Music 300 3 

French or German 2 4 

Literature 4 3 

General education sequence 1 3 

Total 18 



Applied music. . 
Music ensemble 

Music 104 

Music 109 

Music 214 

French or German 2 
General education sequence 1 
Total 



Applied music 2 

History of music 3 3 

Music 308 3 

French or German 2 4 

Literature 4 3 

General education sequence 1 3 

Total 18 



FOURTH YEAR 

Applied music 2 

Music ensemble 1 

History of music 3 3 

Music 229 — Thesis 2 

Music theory 5 2-3 

History 6 3 

Elective 1-2 

Total 15-16 



Applied music 2 

Music ensemble 1 

History of music 3 3 

Music 229 — Thesis 2 

Music theory 5 2-3 

History 6 3 

Elective 1-2 

Total 15-16 



1 A minimum of 6 hours each in the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences is 
required for graduation. See the section on Electives and General Education Sequence Requirements 
for the College of Fine and Applied Arts. 

2 Two years in one language are required except with special permission of adviser. 

3 Third- and fourth-year music history courses are to be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 
314, 315, 317, 318, 319, 333, 334, 335, 336, 337; however, a minimum of two courses must be 
chosen from Music 310 through 315. 

4 May not be used to satisfy general education sequence. 

5 To be chosen from Music 306, 307, 308. 

6 May not be used to satisfy general education sequence. 

Voice Major 

The major applied-music subject throughout the course includes work in vocal diction as well 
as private lessons in voice. At least 8 hours each in Italian, French, and German are required 
for the voice major. A student who has not completed two years of one of these languages 
in high school should begin his or her study of languages during the freshman year. 

Juniors and seniors must present satisfactory public recitals as part of the requirement for 
the Bachelor of Music degree. 



FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Music 101 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice 1 3 

Music 110 — Basic Music Literature 2 

Music 166 — English Diction, or Music 

167 — Italian Diction 1 

Piano 2 

Music 1 81 — Voice 3 

Rhet. 105 or 108, or Sp. Com. 111 — 

Verbal Communication 3-4 

Total 14-15 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Music 102 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice II 3 

Music 107 — Aural Skills I 1 

Music 166 — English Diction, or Music 

167 — Italian Diction 1 

Piano 2 

Music 181 — Voice 3 

Elective or Sp. Com. 113 — Verbal 

Communication 2-3 

Elective 2 

Total 14-15 



228 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SECOND YEAR 

Music 103 — Fundamentals of Music Music 104 — Fundamentals of Music 

Theory and Practice III 3 Theory and Practice IV 3 

Music 108 — Aural Skills II 1 Music 109 — Aural Skills III 1 

Music 168 — German Diction, or Music Music 168 — German Diction, or Music 

169 — French Diction 1 169 — French Diction 1 

Piano 2 Piano 2 

Music 181 — Voice 3 Music 181 — Voice 3 

Music 213 — History of Music I 3 Music 214 — History of Music II 3 

Foreign language 4 Foreign language 4 

Total 17 Total 17 

THIRD YEAR 

History of music 1 3 History of music 1 3 

Music ensemble 1 Music ensemble 1 

Theory of music 2 3 Theory of music 2 3 

Music 366 — Vocal Repertoire I 1 Music 367 — Vocal Repertoire II 1 

Music 381 — Voice 3 Music 381 — Voice 3 

Foreign language 4 Foreign language 4 

Elective 3 Elective 3 

Total 18 Total 18 

FOURTH YEAR 

Music ensemble 1 Music ensemble 1 

Music 330 — Applied Music Pedagogy 2 Music 330 — Applied Music Pedagogy 2 

Music 381 — Voice 3 Music 381 — Voice 3 

Electives 6 Electives 6 

Electives or professional electives 4 Elective or professional elective 3 

Total 16 Total 15 



1 To be chosen from Music 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317, 333, 334, 335, 336, or 337. 

2 The music theory requirement for the junior year is to be satisfied by Music 300 and 308, 3 
hours each, or by Music 308, 6 hours, with each semester devoted to a specifically listed topic. 

CURRICULUM IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education 1 

A minimum of 130 hours of credit is required for graduation. This curriculum prepares its 
graduates for teaching music in grades K through 12. For teacher education requirements 
applicable to all curricula, see pages 87 to 91. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COMPONENT HOURS 

Verbal communication (Sp. Comm. 111 and 112 plus American or English literature, or Rhet. 

105 or 108, a performance-based speech course, plus American or English literature) 9 

Psychology 3 

Approved natural science sequence 6 

Approved humanities sequence 6 

Approved social science sequence 6 

Physical education activities and/or health 3 

Total 33 

PROFESSIONAL AND/OR GENERAL ELECTIVES 13 

BASIC MUSICIANSHIP COMPONENT 

Applied major 12 

Music theory, sightsinging, & eartraining 15 

Music history and literature 8 

Ensembles 4 

Total 39 

EDUCATION COMPONENT 

History and/or philosophy of education 2 

Child growth and development 3 

Total 5 

PROFESSIONAL COMPONENT 40 

Students must select one of the areas of professional specialization, which include Choral Special- 
ization, Comprehensive Preparation, Elementary-General Specialization, Instrumental Specialization, 
Piano Pedagogy Specialization, and String Specialization. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 229 



EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE 2 

Introduction to teaching 2 

Techniques of teaching 3 

Preclinical experiences 2 

Student teaching 3 8-16 

Total 15 

1 Students are advised that certification requirements may be altered at any time by the State 
Teacher Certification Board or the legislature. In such cases, students may be compelled to satisfy 
the new requirements to qualify for the University's Recommendation for Certification. 

2 If public school certification is not desired, the student selects 13 hours in consultation with his 
or her adviser, 7 hours of which must be from the student's applied major, music theory, or music 
history. 

3 Only 8 hours of student teaching apply toward the 130 hours needed for graduation. 



Department of Theatre 



The curricular options in the Department of Theatre provide intensive and extensive preparation 
for the rigorous demands of a professional career in the theatre. A strong commitment to 
work in the theatre and a realistic understanding of its intellectual, aesthetic, and physical 
requirements is therefore necessary in students who enter the department's program. 

Before acceptance in the undergraduate programs in theatre, applicants must participate in 
Preadmission Clinics, which take place in the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts on five 
or more weekends of each year. The clinics afford the faculty an opportunity to explain the 
nature of the study programs and to audition or interview candidates for admission. Those 
interested in studying acting prepare a four-minute audition, composed of at least two pieces 
from dramatic works; those interested in design, management, directing, technical theatre, or 
playwriting present a portfolio of previously accomplished work in theatrical production. 

Three study curricula, or options, are offered after the satisfactory completion of the first- 
year program required of all students. The Applied Theatre Curriculum is meant for students 
in general theatre studies and for students who intend to pursue advanced professional training 
in directing, children's theatre, playwriting, theatre history, and criticism. The programs in 
acting and in theatre design, technology, and management are meant for those students who, 
in the judgment of the faculty, are ready to master those specialties in an intensive undergraduate 
program. 

The Department of Theatre is one of the resident producing organizations of the Krannert 
Center for the Performing Arts, in which it presents fourteen productions annually during the 
regular academic year and a repertory season in the summer. The theatres and workshops of 
the Krannert Center serve as laboratories for theatre students, who have the opportunity to 
learn and to work alongside an outstanding staff of theatre professionals in preparing 
performances in theatre, opera, dance, and Kabuki. 

CURRICULUM IN THEATRE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre 

A minimum of 128 hours of credit is required for the degree. 

First- Year Program for All Theatre Curricula 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Theat. 106 — Basic Practice 1 6 Theat. 107 — Basic Practice II 6 

Theat. 108 — Basic Practice Lab 2 Theat. 108 — Basic Practice Lab 2 

Theat. 109 — Dramatic Form/Content 3 Theat. 110 — Literature of Modern 

Rhet 1 05 or 1 08 — Composition 4 Theatre 3 

General education sequence 3 General education sequence 6 

Total 18 Total 17 

Students who satisfactorily complete this program will, in consultation with the theatre faculty, 
determine the appropriate registration in one of the three curricula which follow. 

Applied Theatre Curriculum 

Students wishing to prepare for advanced professional training in directing, playwriting, or 
children's theatre (Option A) or general studies or history and criticism (Option B) will study 



230 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



in the curriculum after satisfactorily completing the first-year program. They must be admitted 
to the curriculum by the faculty director of a particular option and file with the department 
a program of study which shows how they will meet the general and specific requirements of 
the option. Requirements include: (a) residence at the University during the last 60 hours of 
the program and (b) enrollment for at least 6 hours in department courses during each semester 
of residence. The specific course requirements of each option must be completed (see below). 
Students in both options will complete satisfactorily the production assignments made by the 
Illinois Repertory Theatre. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhetoric 4 

General education sequences 

Natural science sequence 6 

Humanities sequence 6 

Social science sequence 6 

General electives 16 

General and/or professional electives 35-37 

Total 73-75 

REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

For all options: 
Specified first-year theatre courses (see first-year program) 22 

Option A: Directing, Playwriting, or Children's Theatre 

Theat. 175 — Improvisation in Acting 4 

Theat. 176 — Relationships in Acting 4 

Theat. 1 99 — Playwriting 3 

Theat. 281 — Directing: Script Preparation 3 

Theat. 332 — Stage Management 2 

Theat. 353 or 354 — Creative Dramatics for Children, or Theatre for the Child Audience 3 

Theat. 361 , 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms I, II 8 

Theat. 381 — Directing: Rehearsal, or Theat. 375 — Acting the Period Play (twice) 6 

Total 33 

Option B: General Studies or History/Criticism 

Theat. 175 — Improvisation in Acting 4 

Theat. 176 — Relationships in Acting 4 

Theat. 1 99 — Playwriting 3 

Theat. 281 — Directing: Script Preparation 3 

Theat. 300 — Practicum II 3 

Theat. 353 or 354 — Creative Dramatics for Children, or Theatre for the Child Audience 3 

Theat. 361 , 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms I, II 8 

Theat. 291 , 292 — Individual Topics 4 

Total 32 

Note: Total hours in theatre courses can vary with faculty approval since certain offerings 
provide variable credit, e.g., practicum, internship. 

Professional Studio in Acting 

Students intending careers as professional actors are selected by audition for the Professional 
Studio in Acting after successful completion of the first-year program for all theatre curricula 
or its equivalent. Criteria for selection include potential for professional-calibre performance, 
commitment to theatre, the necessary discipline for intensive study, and agreement to complete 
the three-year curriculum. 

Each semester the acting studio member will be required to complete satisfactorily production 
crew assignments with the Illinois Repertory Theatre. It is assumed that the student will 
audition for Illinois Repertory Theatre productions and play one role each semester if cast. 
The student must be cast in at least one production each year to continue in the Professional 
Studio in Acting. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhetoric 4 

General education sequences 

Natural science sequence 6 

Humanities sequence 6 

Social science sequence 6 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 231 



General electives 12 

General and/or professional electives 16 

Total 50 

REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

Specified first-year theatre courses (see first-year program) 22 

Theat. 151 — Acting Studio I: Improvisation 8 

Theat. 152 — Acting Studio II: One-Act Plays 8 

Theat. 253 — Acting Studio III: Musical Theatre 8 

Theat. 254 — Acting Studio IV: Modern U.S. Drama 8 

Theat. 255 — Acting Studio V: Shakespeare 8 

Theat. 256 — Actinq Studio VI: Acting for the Camera 8 

Theat. 361 , 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms I, II 8 

Total 78 

Division of Design, Technology, and Management 

Students intending careers in professional theatre design, technology, or management are 
selected for the Division of Design, Technology, and Management at the sophomore level. To 
be accepted into this curriculum, a candidate must have completed the first-year program or 
its equivalent. Criteria for selection to, and continuance in, the division include significant 
artistic progress, potential for professional calibre work, commitment to theatre, and the 
necessary discipline for intensive study and practice. In each semester, the student will be 
required to complete satisfactorily production assignments with the Illinois Repertory Theatre. 

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhetoric 4 

General education sequences 

Natural science sequence 6 

Humanities 6 

Social science sequence 6 

General electives 9 

General and/or professional electives (Art 121, 122 recommended) 21-36 

Total 52-67 

REQUIRED THEATRE CREDITS 

For all options: 

Specified first-year theatre courses (see first-year program) 22 

Theat. 361 , 362 — Development of Theatrical Forms I, II 8 

Scene Design Option 

Theat. 225, 226, 325, 326, 327, 328 — Scene Design I, VI 22 

Theat. 223 — Stage Mechanics I 4 

Theat. 231 — Stage Lighting Practice 3 

Theat. 245 — Introduction to Costume Design 3 

Theat. 335 — History of Decor for the Stage 3 

Theat. 336 — History of Scene Design 3 

Theat. 337 — Scene Painting Techniques 2 

Theat. 338 — Rendering Techniques for the Stage 2 

Theat. 339 — Property Design 2 

Total 44 

Costume Design and Construction Option 

Theat. 242 — Introduction to Costume Patterning 3 

Theat. 245 — Introduction to Costume Design 3 

Theat. 231 — Stage Lighting Practice 3 

Theat. 322 — Scene Design for Nonmaiors 3 

Theat. 335 — History of Decor for the Stage 3 

Theat. 342 — Costume Patterning 3 

Theat. 345, 346 — Costume History for the Stage I, II 8 

Theat. 347 — Costume Rendering 3 

Theat. 227, 228 — Senior Projects in Design I, II 12 

Total 41 

Theatre Technology Option 

Theat. 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar 6 

Theat. 21 — Stage Electronics 3 

Theat. 223 — Stage Mechanics I 4 

Theat. 224 — Stage Mechanics II 4 

Theat. 225 — Scene Design 1 3 

Theat. 230 — Technical Direction 2 



232 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Theat. 231 — Stage Lighting I 3 

Theat. 233 — Stage Drafting I 4 

Theat. 310 — Theatre Planning 3 

Theat. 323 — Stage Mechanics III 2 

Theat. 324 — Stage Mechanics IV 2 

Theat. 331 — Theatre Sound 3 

Theat. 332 — Stage Management 4 

Theat. 337 — Scene Painting 2 

Theat. 340 — Lighting Design for Dance 3 

Total 48 

Stage and Theatre Management Option 

Theat. 1 00 — Practicum I 3 

Theat. 230 — Technical Direction 2 

Theat. 231 — Stage Lighting Practice 3 

Theat. 281 — Direction: Script Preparation 3 

Theat. 322 — Scene Design for Nonmajors 3 

Theat. 332 — Stage Management 4 

Theat. 345, 356 — Costume History for the Stage I, II 8 

Theat. 372 — Introduction to Theatre Management 3 

Total 29 



Department of Urban and Regional Planning 

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning offers a program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in Urban Planning. Urban planning gives practical expression to human values. 
Its aim is to sustain and enhance the quality of life in cities and regions, to create the good 
society. Therefore, in addition to special technical skills, each student is helped to acquire a 
broad liberal education that leads to an understanding of the natural and social environments, 
their problems, and their potentialities for enriching human life. Pathways in undergraduate 
planning education lead to diverse careers through professional employment or graduate study 
in urban planning or related professions. 

For freshman admission to the Department of Urban and Regional Planning, a student must 
complete high school requirements listed on page 13. A transfer student will be admitted with 
30 or more semester hours of acceptable undergraduate college work with an earned grade- 
point average of at least 4.0 (A = 5.0). Applicants not meeting these requirements will be 
considered in special cases. 

The department's administrative offices are at 1003 West Nevada Street, Urbana. Classrooms 
and workshop space are located at 907, 909, and 1001 West Nevada Street and 901 West 
Illinois Street. The City Planning and Landscape Architecture Library is in Mumford Hall. 

The Department of Urban and Regional Planning also offers a program of graduate studies 
leading to the Master of Urban Planning degree, joint degree programs with a Master of 
Architecture or a Juris Doctor degree, and the Ph.D. in Regional Planning. The Bureau of 
Urban and Regional Planning Research, a unit within the department, provides a vehicle for 
the involvement of both faculty and students in a wide range of research projects, continuing 
education programs, community service activities, and publication projects. 

CURRICULUM IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING 
For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Urban Planning 

A total of 120 hours is required for this degree. 

FIRST AND SECOND YEARS 

Minimum of 60 hours, consisting of the following: 

Rhet. 105 or equivalent. 

A two-course sequence (6 semester hours minimum) each in the humanities, natural sciences, and 
social sciences. 

An introductory course each in economics, sociology, and political science. 

Appropriate electives with no more than 20 semester hours in any one discipline, including the 
above. 



FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 233 



THIRD YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

U.p. 101 — Planning of Cities U.P. 247 — Planning Workshop I 6 

and Regions 3 Urban planning elective 2 3 

UP 260 — Urban Social Problems and Urban studies elective 3 3 

Planning, or UP. 240 — Land Use General elective 4 3 

Planning Process 3 Total 15 

Quantitative methods 1 3 

Urban planning elective 2 3 

Urban studies elective 3 3 

Total 15 

FOURTH YEAR 

Urban planning electives 2 6 U.P. 301 — Development of American 

Urban studies electives 3 6 Planning Thought, or U.P. 304 — 

General elective 4 3 Urban Planning Theory 3 

Total 15 Urban planning electives* 6 

Urban studies elective 3 3 

General elective 4 3 

Total 15 



1 Soc. 185 or other statistics course, subject to approval of departmental adviser. 

2 Eighteen hours of elective courses within the Department of Urban and Regional Planning are 
to be selected from, but not limited to, the list below: 

U.P. 199 — Undergraduate Open Seminar 1-5 

U.P. 230 — Introduction to Transportation 3 

U.P. 290 — Planning Internship 0-6 

U.P. 297 — Special Problems 2-6 

U.P. 303 — Urban Structure and Functions 3 

U.P. 307 — Managing Urban Development 3 

U.P. 308 — Law and Planning Implementation 3 

U.P. 312 — Graphics and Communication for Planners 3 

U.P. 315 — Legal Basis for Governmental Planning 3 

U.P. 316 — Planning Analysis 3 

U.P. 320 — Planning for Historic Preservation 3 

U.P. 326 — Urban Design and Planning Methods 3 

U.P. 332 — Introduction to Transportation Planning 3 

U.P. 345 — Urban Economic Development and Fiscal Packaging 3 

U.P. 350 — Survey of Regional Planning 3 

U.P. 360 — Introduction to Social Planning 3 

U.P. 374 — Neighborhood Planning 3 

U.P. 394 — Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning 3 

U.P. 3XX — Planning Workshop (such as U.P. 327, U.P. 337, U.P. 347, U.P. 348, U.P. 358, 

U.P. 377, U.P. 378) 6 

3 Fifteen hours of urban studies elective courses are required, in addition to introductory courses 
listed under the first two years, with approval of departmental adviser. (Suggested urban studies 
courses include, but are not limited to, Arch. 317, 318, 323, 379; Econ. 360; Fin. 264, 365; Geog. 
204, 277, 373, 378, 383, 384, 385; Pol. S. 250, 305, 306, 353, 361; Soc. 223, 225, 275, 276. Additional 
urban planning courses, in excess of the 33 hours required, may be applied toward the urban studies 
requirement.) 

4 General electives as needed to complete the total hours required are to be selected from the 
approved college list. Excess urban planning and/or urban studies courses may be applied toward 
this requirement. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR IN URBAN STUDIES 

Students electing the urban studies minor must consult with the head of the Department of 
Urban and Regional Planning. 

A minimum of 21 hours of course work in urban and regional planning and urban studies 
(approved urban studies courses listed above) is required for the completion of this minor. 
Two courses must be selected from the following: U.P. 301, U.P. 304, U.P. 360 (or equivalents 
should these courses be unavailable in a given year). 



College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences 

270 Lincoln Hall, 702 South Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 

DEGREE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 235 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 236 

ADVISING 236 

HONORS PROGRAMS 237 

SPECIAL DEGREE OPPORTUNITIES 238 

STUDY ABROAD 239 

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 241 

CURRICULA 241 

CURRICULUM IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS: GENERAL 

REQUIREMENTS 241 

SCIENCES AND LETTERS CONCENTRATIONS 245 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 284 

SPECIALIZED CURRICULA 284 

TEACHER EDUCATION CURRICULA 289 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINORS 302 

JOINT DEGREE PROGRAMS 307 

PREPROFESSIONAL HEALTH PROGRAMS 308 

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATION 313 



The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has four missions: scholarly inquiry 
and the generation of knowledge, preparation of individuals for an array of 
careers and professions, service to the public, and the provision of the 
intellectual core of the University. The college shares the first three missions 
with professional schools and other colleges on this campus, but the last 
mission is uniquely the responsibility of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. Fulfillment of that responsibility yields a diversified college uniquely 
valuable in contributing to the development of broadly educated individuals 
committed to or characterized by open inquiry, critical thinking, effective 
communication, and responsiveness to the needs of individuals and society. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the largest individual college 
within a university setting in the state of Illinois. The college offers sixty- 
nine undergraduate and ninety-four graduate degree-granting programs and 
enrolls over 40 percent of the undergraduates on this campus. The college 
serves the entire campus by providing a full range of required general 
education and service courses in basic disciplines. 

Students in the college are expected to understand the content and develop 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



235 



skills in areas that reflect the overall purpose of the college: fluency and 
facility in English; literacy in at least one foreign language; broad exposure 
to a number of different disciplines; and intensive study in one discipline 
(or an interdisciplinary program). Students have a wide choice of courses to 
satisfy these requirements; however, ultimately they must plan a diverse and 
intensive program of study, prepare for an occupational/professional and 
intellectual future, and develop that clarity and range of mind which is the 
goal of educated people. 



DEGREE PROGRAMS AVAILABLE 

The following degree programs are available in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 
Sciences and Letters Curriculum. The Sciences and Letters Curriculum comprises all of the 
traditional programs in the liberal arts and sciences. The curriculum requires in-depth study in 
one field of concentration as well as substantial experience in a number of other areas. A 
description of the components of the curriculum may be found beginning on page 242. The 
fields of concentration are: 



Actuarial science 

Anthropology 

Art history 

Asian studies 

Astronomy 

Chemistry 

Classics (including Greek and Latin) 

Comparative literature 

Economics 

English 

Finance 

French 

Geography 

Geology 

Germanic languages and literature (including 

Scandinavian studies) 
History 
Humanities — Options in American civilization, 

cinema studies, history and philosophy of 

science, medieval civilization, Renaissance 

studies 
Individual Plans of Study (IPS) 
Italian 
Latin American studies 



Life sciences — Options in anatomical sciences; 

bioengineering; biophysics; ecology, ethology, 

and evolution; entomology; general biology; 

honors biology; microbiology; physiology; plant 

biology 
Linguistics 
Mathematics 

Mathematics and computer science 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political science 
Portuguese 
Psychology 
Religious studies 
Rhetoric 
Russian 

Russian and East European studies 
Sociology 
Spanish 

Speech and hearing science 
Speech communication 
Statistics 



Specialized Curricula. Specialized curricula are prescriptive programs that are offered as 

preprofessional study or preparation for graduate pursuits. These curricula include the teacher 

education curricula that lead to bachelor's degrees and state certificates for teaching. Although 

many of the general college requirements are similar to those in the sciences and letters 

concentrations, there are slight variations among them. The curricula are: 

Biochemistry 

Chemical engineering 

Chemistry 

Geology 

Physics 

Speech and hearing science (B.S.) 

TEACHER EDUCATION (Secondary) 

Biology Latin 

Chemistry Mathematics 

Computer science Physics 

Earth science Russian 

English Social studies 

French Spanish 

German Speech 
Combined Sciences and Letters-Teaching of Mathematics 



236 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

The general admission requirements and procedures of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 
are outlined in the admissions section (see page 13). These requirements were established to 
enable students admitted here to make the most effective use of the facilities of the University. 
The requirements should ensure that entering students have the capability of completing a 
degree program successfully. 

While the admissions patterns or high school subjects required for admission are necessary 
for the student to be able to compete successfully at this University, there are several other 
strong recommendations for high school subject requirements. All prospective freshmen are 
encouraged to seek a broad preparation in their secondary school program. Students should 
continue electing academic subjects in their senior year; in particular, students are encouraged 
to elect four full years of English in high school. Although mathematics is not required in all 
programs in the college, many programs do require that students take some mathematics; thus 
high school students should elect at least two years of algebra, one year of geometry, and one 
year of college preparatory mathematics. A solid foundation in mathematics will assist a student 
in taking full advantage of educational opportunities at the University. Some knowledge of 
science is necessary in our technology-oriented society; students should elect at least two years 
of laboratory science in high school. Successful completion of four years of a single foreign 
language in secondary school will satisfy the college foreign language degree requirement; thus 
students will find it advantageous to include as much foreign language in their secondary 
school program as possible. 

Prospective students should note that the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has increased 
the requirements in the high school subject patterns for admission beginning with admissions 
for spring 1986. The admissions section (see page 13) reflects current admissions requirements. 

ADVISING 

Academic advising is a critical resource for students in developing a program of study. Especially 
on a large campus, a continuing, committed association with a faculty member can be a 
valuable and rewarding part of the student's educational experience. Advisers are available to 
aid students in choosing a field of concentration, planning for career choices, and selecting 
courses for each semester. All students in degree programs in the college do have academic 
advisers available in their major department. In addition, the assistant and associate deans in 
the college assist students in handling a variety of problems and questions. 

In order to simplify minor changes in course selections, students who have successfully 
completed at least 30 semester hours of course work and who understand college/university 
requirements may choose courses without obtaining approval from an academic adviser unless 
informed otherwise by the college. Students do need to obtain approval from an adviser for 
a number of arrangements, including a formal plan of study for concentration and the election 
of the credit-no credit grading option. Students may be requested by the college office to 
obtain adviser's/dean's approval for all course changes under certain circumstances. It is very 
important for advanced students to confer with an adviser on a regular basis; therefore, the 
college encourages all students to consult with their academic adviser at least once each year. 

One particular resource for students of the college who have not decided on a plan of study 
is the General Curriculum. The General Curriculum is an advising center for students who 
want to investigate a variety of subjects before selecting a major or who have decided on a 
program that requires transfer at a sophomore or junior level. General Curriculum is not a 
degree program and does not serve as a formal program of study. Entering freshmen and 
continuing students with less than 45 semester hours may elect to enter the General Curriculum 
and may remain in the program until they complete 56 academic semester hours. The office 
provides individual advising; group orientation sessions; and printed materials describing fields 
of concentration, curricula, and many career opportunities. Students in the General Curriculum 
are LAS students and must follow LAS policies and regulations. The General Curriculum office 
serves as the college office for students in the program. 

Another special resource in the college is qualified advising for students who are interested 
in law school. An assistant dean in the college office (270 Lincoln Hall) counsels students who 
have declared a pre-law interest. All such students are encouraged to consult the pre-law 
adviser. Students preparing for law school may elect any field of concentration; they need not 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 237 



consider themselves restricted in a choice of degree program. To assist students planning pre- 
law programs, a faculty committee in the college has prepared a handbook for students on 
prelaw advising. For further information, contact the pre-law adviser at 270 Lincoln Hall. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 
Dean's List 

Each semester, students are recognized by the college for placement on the Dean's List. Those 
students are eligible who meet the following criteria and are in the top 20 percent of their 
classes. Students must carry at least 9 hours of traditionally graded courses to be eligible. 
Course work graded credit-no credit, satisfactory-unsatisfactory, or course work taken for 
graduate credit is excluded from the 9 hour minimum. Students with work graded Excused or 
Deferred are not considered for the Dean's List until grades have been submitted for that 
work. These students should notify the honors dean when such work is complete if they 
expect to be placed on the Dean's List. 

James Scholar Program 

The official honors program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is called the Edmund 
J. James Scholar Program. This program allows students with exceptional ability to pursue a 
rigorous academic course of study and provides the opportunity for those students to meet 
with faculty who are particularly interested in honors programs. There are honors advisers 
available in the respective departments and an honors dean in the college office. James Scholars 
register in some special honors courses, sections, seminars, and colloquia; they may also arrange 
individualized honors credit agreements for specific courses. James Scholars have open access 
to the University Library' stacks (ordinarily open only to graduate students and faculty); such 
access to library stacks is particularly helpful for students involved in independent study and/ 
or undergraduate research projects. James Scholars also have their program requests scheduled 
early to minimize conflicts in getting honors courses. 

Any qualified LAS student may become a James Scholar Designate or Nominee. Entering 
freshmen who are in the top 15 percent of the admitted class are invited immediately into the 
program as James Scholar Designates. Continuing students in the college must maintain a 
cumulative grade-point average of 4.5 and must complete two honors courses during the 
academic year. In order to remain in the program as a James Scholar Nominee, students must 
satisfy the requirements for continuing students. Official certification of James Scholar standing 
is made at the end of the academic year (upon completion of these requirements). 

Further information about the James Scholar program is available from the college office, 
270 Lincoln Hall. 

Rogers Merit Scholar Program 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has established the Robert W. Rogers Merit Scholarship 
program for highly qualified freshmen. Those freshmen chosen as Robert W. Rogers Scholars 
may enroll in any curriculum in the college and are awarded $1,000 for the year; the award 
may be renewed for the sophomore year if the student maintains at least a 4.5 (A = 5.0) 
grade-point average. After an initial review of all admitted freshmen is made, those with the 
highest qualifications are invited to apply. The selection of Rogers Scholars is made by a faculty 
panel and based on exceptional scholastic achievement, high performance on either the ACT 
or SAT examination, and evidence of leadership in the school or community. No more than 
ten new awards are made each year. 

Cohn Scholar Program 

The Cohn Scholar Program provides intellectual and financial support for a small group of 
highly qualified freshmen concentrating in the humanities. Cohn Scholars participate in a special 
freshman-year program. Typical activities during the year include tutorials, seminars, and 
orientation in the use of University facilities. Students are given opportunities for meeting with 
both faculty and students with similar interests; they are also assigned a special honors adviser 
for the program and for academic advising. Students are selected for the program by a faculty 
committee on the basis of an application, high school class rank, and performance in a 



238 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



competitive entrance examination (ACT or SAT). Inquiries should be addressed to the School 
of Humanities, 112 English Building, 608 South Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Honors at Graduation 

College honors at graduation is awarded on the basis of academic excellence and satisfaction 
of one of the following: (1) successful completion of 25 hours of honors courses (or of work 
on honors learning agreements); (2) successful completion of 35 hours of 300-level course 
work; or (3) earning departmental distinction. Provided that one of the requirements above is 
satisfied, the award of college honors is made according to the following ranges: cum laude 
if the college grade-point average places a student in the top 12 percent of the graduating class 
but not in the top 7 percent; magna cum laude if the college grade-point average places a 
student in the top 7 percent of the graduating class but not in the top 3 percent; and summa 
cum laude if the college grade-point average places a student in the top 3 percent of the 
graduating class. 

Departmental Distinction 

Students who have shown exceptional competence in one or more areas of study may earn 
distinction in their field(s) of concentration or curriculum. Criteria for awarding distinction are 
established by the departments. Students interested in working for distinction should consult 
their honors adviser early in their junior year. Specific information about requirements is 
available from the departmental and curriculum advisers. Generally, in addition to meeting the 
scholastic requirements and the minimum requirements for a concentration, a student graduating 
with departmental distinction must satisfy at least one of the following requirements: (1) 
presentation of an acceptable thesis; (2) satisfactory performance on a comprehensive exami- 
nation prepared by the major department; or (3) completion of a special course of study of at 
least 4 semester hours approved by the major department. 

A student who has completed a curriculum in teacher education and has shown superior 
ability in that area may be recommended for distinction in the teacher education program. 
Information about requirements may be obtained from the adviser in the area of specialization. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Invitations for membership into Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest honor society, are sent to 
outstanding students in Liberal Arts and Sciences each April. Eligibility requires rank in the 
top 10 percent of seniors in LAS as well as a minimum number of graded hours and appropriate 
course distribution. Precise criteria and detailed information may be obtained from the chapter 
secretary, Professor Mary Lee Spence, Department History, 300B Gregory Hall, 810 South 
Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (217) 333-4145. 

Awards 

There are a number of prizes and awards available to outstanding students in certain areas of 
the college. Departments will generally notify students of the possibility of such an award; 
however, students interested may obtain a current list of the awards available from the college 
office, 270 Lincoln Hall. 

SPECIAL DEGREE OPPORTUNITIES 
Combined LAS/Engineering Program 

For a number of years, the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Engineering have jointly 
sponsored a five-year program leading to a B.A. or B.S. degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences 
and a B.S. degree in a field of Engineering. The program allows motivated students to obtain 
professional engineering education combined with a broad liberal arts background. The program, 
not intended to eliminate any graduation requirements of either college, requires students to 
complete all degree requirements of both colleges. 

Freshmen normally apply for entrance to the program through the College of Engineering, 
but students who have applied to and been accepted by the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences may be able to enter the program. All students must meet the entrance requirements 
of both colleges. In addition, they may be required to meet the intercollegiate transfer 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 239 



requirements of both colleges. Further information about the program m.n be found on pages 
178 and 179. 

Individual Plans of Study 

Individual Plans of Stud) J PS) is a concentration in the sciences and letters curriculum. Students 
who qualif) tor IPS ma) design their own special concentration from University course offerings. 
Interested students should contact the adviser for the program in the General Curriculum 
Office, 912 South Fifth Street, Champaign, IL 61820. Also see page 262 for a further description. 

Combined Degree Programs with Commerce 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences together with the College of Commerce and Business 
Administration offers two joint-degree programs that lead to the degrees of B.A./B.S. in Liberal 
Arts and Sciences and M.A.S. or M.B.A. Each program takes five years to complete. These 
programs allow students to seek master's programs in accounting or business administration 
while providing students the broad opportunities unique to a liberal arts program. For further 
description, see page 307. Students interested in these opportunities should contact the LAS 
office, 270 Lincoln Hall, for additional information and advising. 

SPECIAL OPPORTUNITIES 
Study Abroad 

Many students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences find that they can benefit from a 
semester or year's study in a foreign country. To facilitate such study abroad, the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences sponsors a number of special study abroad programs and provides 
for student participation in these and other programs. There are three general categories of 
programs: (1) a program enabling students to study at an approved foreign institution of their 
choice; (2) special study abroad programs sponsored by units of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences; and (3) participation in cooperative programs sponsored by other universities or 
groups of universities. 

LAS STUDY ABROAD 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences supports the Study Abroad Office to aid students 
who plan to study at an approved foreign institution or in a program of their choice other 
than those offered by departments within the college itself. The option is open not only to 
students in LAS, but also to students in other colleges within the University. A student's 
program for study abroad must have prior approval from the major department, the student's 
college, and the Study Abroad Office. Final determination of appropriate credit is made upon 
the student's completion of the work after returning to campus. 

Students register in LAS 299 for hours per semester and may earn a maximum of 30 
semester hours per academic year or 36 semester hours for the academic year, including 
summer study. 

Interested students should contact the Study Abroad Office, University of Illinois at Urbana- 
Champaign, 306 Coble Hall, 801 South Wright Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 

YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN JAPAN 

In cooperation with several other universities, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign 
offers a year abroad program in Japan at the Konan-Illinois Center on the campus of Konan 
University in Kobe, located in western Japan near Osaka and Kyoto. Students participating in 
the program receive an intensive introduction to Japanese language, culture, and society by 
combining classroom and independent study, home stay with a Japanese family, and opportunities 
for field trips and personal travel. The program is open to any student in good standing at the 
University. No prior knowledge of Japanese is required. Students from other colleges and 
universities as well as beginning graduate students may participate in the program. 

Interested students should contact the Konan-Illinois Program Coordinator, 310 Coble Hall, 
801 South Wright Street, Champaign, IL 61820. 



240 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN FRANCE 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the Department of French sponsor a year abroad 
program in France. The nine months of study at the University of Dijon include a preliminary 
program emphasizing the French language. In addition to a study of French language and 
literature, students may include other subjects in their program. All courses are taught by 
French professors. The program is open to any student with at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) university 
grade-point average and a 3.5 grade-point average in French. Participation in the program is 
not limited to students concentrating in French, although any student accepted for the program 
should have completed several courses beyond the intermediate level (French 104 or equivalent). 
Interested students should contact Professor Gabriel Savignon, Department of French, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2090 Foreign Languages Building, 707 South 
Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN AUSTRIA 

In cooperation with the Department of Germanic Languages and Literature, the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences sponsors a year abroad program in Austria in Baden and Vienna. In 
addition to courses in language, literature, education, sciences, and civilization at the Paeda- 
gogische Akademie in Baden, students may elect courses at institutions in Vienna. Participants 
in the program should have at least a 3.75 (A = 5.0) University grade-point average, including 
a 4.0 grade-point average in German courses. Students accepted into the program should have 
a language proficiency beyond the intermediate level (i.e., German 211 or its equivalent), 
although students need not be German concentrators. 

Interested students should contact the Austria-Illinois Exchange Program, Department of 
Germanic Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3072 Foreign 
Languages Building, 707 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM IN SPAIN 

In cooperation with the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences sponsors a year abroad program in Spain. After orientation sessions at 
Barcelona and Madrid, students in the program study for two semesters at the University of 
Barcelona. Participants in the program should have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) University grade- 
point average and at least a 4.0 grade-point average in Spanish courses. Students accepted into 
the program must have completed the intermediate level in Spanish (Spanish 104 or its 
equivalent). At least one year's study in language and literature beyond the intermediate level 
is desirable for students to benefit fully from the program. The program is designed for juniors 
concentrating in Spanish or the teaching of Spanish; however, seniors or well-qualified 
sophomores in Spanish and students studying in other areas may apply. 

Interested students should contact the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, 
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4080 Foreign Languages Building, 707 South 
Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

COOPERATIVE PROGRAMS ABROAD 

Russian Language Study at Leningrad State University. The University of Illinois participates 
in the cooperative Russian language program at Leningrad State University under the auspices 
of the Council on International Educational Exchange (CIEE). The program consists of one 
or two semesters of study or one summer session. Students in the program study Russian 
language and literature, and classes are conducted in Russian by the university faculty. All 
students must have facility in the language, but the program is not limited to students 
concentrating in Russian. 

Interested students should obtain details and applications from the Department of Slavic 
Languages and Literatures, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 3092 Foreign Languages 
Building, 707 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Spanish Summer Program in Mexico. The University of Illinois participates in the eight-week 
summer program of Spanish at the Universidad Veca Cruzana, sponsored by the Committee 
on Institutional Cooperation (CIC). Students should be in good academic standing and have 
at least a 4.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average in Spanish. Students accepted in the program 
should have the equivalent of third-year, college-level competence in Spanish. 

Interested students should obtain further information from the Department of Spanish, 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 241 



Italian, and Portuguese, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 4080 Foreign languages 

Building, 707 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, II. 61801. 

Interdisciplinary Programs 

A number of opportunities tor interdisciplinary study are available in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, and a number of units in the college are devoted to the interdisciplinary 
Stud] oi various areas cultures or subjects. Some of these units sponsor interdisciplinary fields 
of concentration; others do not have formal concentrations, but faculty do assist students in 
planning programs appropriate to individual needs. 

There are three area studies degree programs in the college: East Asian and Pacific Studies, 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and Russian and East European Studies. Descriptions 
of those concentrations may be found in the section with degree requirements for those 
concentrations. (See the section beginning on page 245.) 

The Center for African Studies, the Afro-American Academic Program, and the Office of 
Women's Studies do not have formal degree programs; however, the units have or are developing 
interdisciplinary minors and assist students interested in those subjects, in addition to coordi- 
nating research efforts in those areas. 

CENTER FOR AFRICAN STUDIES 

The Center for African Studies is concerned with all aspects of African affairs and cultures. 
The program sponsors instruction in African languages and culture, offering a number of 
African studies courses each semester. An undergraduate field of concentration in African 
studies can be arranged through Individual Plans of Study (IPS). Support for graduate students 
and arrangements for field experiences in Africa are also concerns of the center. The Center 
for African Studies is located at 1208 West California Street, Room 101, Urbana, IL 61801. 

AFRO-AMERICAN ACADEMIC PROGRAM 

The Afro-American Academic Program offers an interdisciplinary approach to the experiences 
of Blacks throughout the Americas. The program sponsors a core set of courses in Afro- 
American studies along with a variety of courses each semester. In addition, many courses in 
Afro-American studies are taught by other departments in the college. The Afro-American 
Studies Office is located at 1204 West Oregon Street, Urbana, IL 61801. 

OFFICE OF WOMEN'S STUDIES 

The Office of Women's Studies offers several core courses and coordinates appropriate courses 
offered by many other departments. The unit sponsors an interdisciplinary minor for students 
in the Sciences and Letters Curriculum and a teacher education minor for students completing 
a degree program in teacher education and who wish to be able to teach women's studies in 
the schools. (See page 307.) The office also advises students who wish to develop a women's 
studies concentration through Individual Plans of Study (IPS). The Office of Women's Studies 
is located at 304 Stiven House, 708 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801. 

Curricula 

CURRICULUM IN SCIENCES AND LETTERS: 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Students completing this curriculum receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science in Liberal Arts and Sciences, depending on the student's concentration. As of fall 1986, 
concentrators in the physical sciences, geography, life sciences, mathematics, psychology, and 
speech and hearing science may elect either the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science without regard to the student's specific program of study within the concentration. 
Students in any of the other concentrations receive the Bachelor of Arts degree. However, it 
is expected that by fall 1987, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will have completed 
revisions to make the various concentrations degree-specific; i.e., students completing a given 
concentration receive the degree specified for that concentration. Students entering the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences in fall 1987 or later and electing one of the concentrations in the 
physical sciences, life sciences, or mathematics will receive the Bachelor of Science degree. 



242 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Students in any of the other concentrations, except for geography and psychology, will receive 
the Bachelor of Arts degree. Students in geography of psychology should consult their 
departmental adviser concerning any revision(s) for their concentration and the effective dates 
of such revision(s). 

Components of the Curriculum 

The sciences and letters curriculum consists of several distinct parts, all of which are considered 
by the college to be necessary for a liberal education. Below is an outline of the components 
of the degree program. A detailed discussion of each component follows. 



REQUIREMENT 

ENGLISH 
FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE 

GENERAL 
EDUCATION 

Area I 



Area 



FIELD OF 
CONCENTRATION 



ADVANCED 
HOURS 

ELECTIVES 



RESIDENCY 



EXPLANATION 

Rhet. 105 or Sp. Com. 111-112 or equivalent required. 
Completion of the fourth semester or equivalent of a language 
is required. (Completion of 4 years of a single language in high 
school satisfies this requirement.) 

Ten courses (at least 30 hours), including at least 5 in Area I 
(generally subjects in the arts and social sciences) and at least 
5 in Area II (generally subjects related to the sciences). 
Literature and the arts 1-2 courses 
Historical and philosophical perspectives 1-2 courses 
Social perspectives 1-2 courses 
Non-Western cultures and traditions "Lcourse 

Minimum of J 
Physical science 
Biological science 
Behavioral science 
Mathematics 
Science & society 

Minimum of 5 courses 
See requirements of concentrations beginning on page 245. 
Normally, courses for the concentration must be chosen in 
consultation with the departmental adviser. A C average in the 
concentration is required for graduation. 
The courses for the degree program must include at least 21 
hours of courses designated as advanced (i.e., all 300-level 
courses and a few specially designated 200-level courses). 
Courses freely chosen (and not counting towards completion 
of the requirements above) subject only to the restriction that 
no more than 24 hours may be outside LAS. 

First 90 hours or last 30 hours on this campus. Last 60 hours 
at a 4-year school. At least 12 advanced hours in the core for 
the field of concentration must be taken on this campus. 



HOURS 

4-6 
0-16 

30 



Minimum of 5 


courses 


1-2 


courses 


1-2 


courses 


1-2 


courses 


0-2 


courses 


0-1 


course 



40-60 
(normally) 



Enough to 

total at 

least 120 

hours 



TOTAL FOR THE DEGREE At least 120 hours 

English Composition Requirement 

The ability to write effectively is a cornerstone of a liberal education. All students in the 
sciences and letters curriculum must satisfy the campus rhetoric requirement. See page 78 for 
a statement of the requirement. Students are strongly encouraged to include additional writing 
courses in their program whenever possible. 



Foreign Language Requirement 

All students in the sciences and letters curriculum are expected to learn a foreign language in 
their undergraduate program. A minimum expectation is that students obtain a knowledge 
equivalent to the completion of the fourth semester of college study in a language. Some 
programs may require additional study or the study of a specific language. Students planning 
on graduate study may wish to consult the department of intended graduate study about 
language requirements for the graduate program. This may dictate the student's choice of 
language in his or her undergraduate work. 

The foreign language requirement may be met in any of the following ways: 

1. Satisfactory completion of four years of the same foreign language in high school; 

2. Satisfactory completion of the fourth semester level of a language in college; 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 243 



3. Satisfactory completion of the third semester level in each of two languages by any 
combination of high school and college work; 

4. Satisfactory performance at the fourth semester level in a language proficiency examination 
approved by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the appropriate department. 

General Education 

A primary role of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is expressed through its general 
education requirements. In contrast to the occupational objectives of professional colleges, the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences expects breadth as well as depth. Graduates of the college 
are expected to obtain an understanding of the ways in which knowledge is acquired and used 
in a variety of fields. Although it is not reasonable to require extensive knowledge of all areas 
of human inquiry, graduates must have some acquaintance with literature and the arts, history, 
philosophical inquiry, and the insights and techniques of the social sciences. In a constantly 
changing world, graduates must have some understanding of cultures and traditions different 
from their own. In a technology-oriented society, it is necessary to be acquainted with the 
aims and methods of the sciences, to recognize their accomplishments, and to appreciate the 
problems posed by technological advances. 

In the final analysis, the worth of one's education can be determined by the nature and the 
quality of the varied judgments one makes throughout life. In this sense, general education is 
a useful counterbalance to specialized education and also a complement to it. General education 
is a process, not simply a list of categories or required courses. Unlike specialized, or professional, 
education, which serve valuable but limited purposes, general education should serve a person 
and society in other ways — less conspicuous but equally important. 

Students are therefore required to complete broadly distributed course work in two general 
areas — one in the arts and social sciences, the other in mathematics and the sciences. At 
least ten courses must be taken, five in Area I (arts and social sciences) and five in Area II 
(mathematics and science). The specific list of the distribution of courses is given in Components 
of the Curriculum, page 242. A list of courses approved for each of the general education 
categories is published by the college and is available in the LAS Student Handbook. 

The general education categories and their purposes may be described as follows: 
Literature and the Arts. To provide some familiarity with the literary and visual or performing 

arts as aesthetic or creative achievements. 
Historical and Philosophical Perspectives. To enlarge students' understanding of the past and 

thus to provide an important perspective on the present; to enable students to understand 

major philosophical issues that confront human beings. 
Social Perspectives. To provide students with an understanding of social contexts and institutions. 
Non-Western Cultures and Traditions. To expand students' understanding of the values and 

traditions of people from different cultures. 
Biological Sciences. To consider the structure and function of life forms, their ecological or 

their evolutionary relationships, and their importance to the human community. 
Physical Sciences. To convey an understanding of the substance and investigative approach of 

the physical sciences. Courses need not be highly specialized, but should have sufficient 

depth so that students comprehend major aspects of the physical world and are conversant 

with the nature of scientific inquiry. 
Behavioral Sciences. To acquaint students with the study of individual human behavior. 
Mathematics. To study a substantial mathematical endeavor or to explore the scientific and 

humanistic import of mathematics. 
Science and Society. To explore the evolution and application of particular sciences and/or 

technologies together with their social and cultural implications. 

Students are urged to consult with their advisers regarding the choice of courses to complement 
their programs and to meet educational objectives. Some of the approved courses have 
prerequisites. Students should note the following: 

— The credit-no credit option may not be used for courses that satisfy general education 
requirements. 

— There are no limits on the number of courses from a single department that may be used 
to satisfy the requirements. 

— Courses taken to satisfy a field of concentration requirement may also be used to satisfy 
general education requirements provided they are on current general education lists. 



244 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



— A student who successfully completes a CLEP general examination using University of 
Illinois standards will receive a waiver of the requirement and, in certain cases, credit. See 
the LAS Student Handbook for details. 

Students who receive college credit for Advanced Placement (CEEB) work will find that 
some course credit will generally apply toward the relevant requirement. For example, English 
Literature Advanced Placement scores of 4 or 5 will provide 3 semester hours of credit in 
English 103 and, therefore, count toward the requirement for literature and the arts. See page 
34 for current credit policies for Advanced Placement Examinations. 

Similarly, proficiency credit received through a department's own testing program may be 
used to satisfy general education requirements. 

Students planning to study in a specialized curriculum or in a teacher education curriculum 
will be subject to the requirements as indicated elsewhere in this catalog rather than the above 
requirements. 

Field of Concentration 

All students in the sciences and letters curriculum are expected to study a single discipline in 
some depth. This portion of the student's program is called the field of concentration. A field 
of concentration consists of approximately 40 to 60 hours of course work designated by the 
department and approved by the faculty of the college. Most concentrations are divided into 
two portions: the core (course work within the department) and the cognate (course work 
related to the concentration but not within the department of the concentration). All but 12 
to 20 hours in the concentration will be in the core. The concentrations not divided into core 
and cognate are the interdisciplinary concentrations (e.g., the area studies concentrations and 
the humanities concentration). It is expected that at least one-half of the course work for a 
field of concentration should be chosen from courses numbered 200 and above. 

There are thirty-nine concentrations from which students may choose, and a number of 
concentrations have multiple options within the concentration. A complete list of concentrations 
available may be found on page 235. The field of concentration should be chosen no later 
than the beginning of the junior year. Most concentrations require that students choose their 
courses in consultation with a faculty adviser. Students should plan to discuss their concentration 
with a faculty adviser early in the junior year. In most cases, students will be expected to 
submit to the college a written list of courses for their field of concentration (called the 
concentration plan) prior to the beginning of their sixth semester. 

Since the field of concentration is a required portion of the sciences and letters curriculum, 
students must take all course work for the minimum requirements of the concentration for a 
traditional letter grade (or on the satisfactory-unsatisfactory basis). The credit-no credit grading 
option may not be used for courses in the concentration. 

The satisfactory completion of a field of concentration requires not only the completion of 
a stated amount of course work, but also requires that the student earn at least a C average 
in courses for the field of concentration. In order to graduate, a student should earn at least 
a 3.0 average in all courses that are included in the field of concentration average and taken 
on this campus and at least a 3.0 average in all courses that are included in the field of 
concentation average and taken here and elsewhere. Consult the department or the college 
office for a list of courses included in the field of concentration average for a specific 
concentration. 

All students are expected to complete a minimum amount of advanced course work for 
their field of concentration on this campus. Specifically, students normally complete on this 
campus at least 12 hours of advanced core course work (course work within the department) 
in the field of concentration. 1 



1 Students who entered LAS prior to fall 1984 should consult the college office for information 
regarding this requirement. 

Advanced Hours Requirement 

A liberal arts program requires study in a number of areas (general education requirements) 
and study in some depth. Thus all students are expected to complete a minimum portion of 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 245 



their undergraduate program in courses rhat presume some prior knowledge of the discipline. 
C (Nines .ire considered advanced it they presume such prior knowledge as indicated by the 
course number (300 or above), by the prerequisites necessary tor enrollment in the course, or 
b) the quality and depth of work expected of students in the course. All students in the 
Sciences and I etters Curriculum are expected to complete at least 21 hours of courses designated 
.is advanced bj the college in order to graduate. All such courses must be taken at a 
baccalaureate-granting institution. Courses designated as advanced are those courses numbered 
300 or above and those 200-level courses that are specially designated as advanced. A list of 
such advanced 200-level courses may be found in the LAS Student Handbook. 

Electives 

One of the special features of a liberal arts program is that most fields of concentration allow 
time in the student's program for a number of courses chosen freely from among the University's 
offerings. These courses, called electives, may be used to broaden preparation for professional 
study, to complement the liberal arts component of the program with courses specifically 
designed to prepare for business and career opportunities, or to explore additional areas of 
interest. In addition to all courses used to fulfill the minimum graduation requirements of the 
college (rhetoric, foreign language, general education, and field of concentration), students may 
use as electives any course sponsored by a unit in the college or by a unit sponsoring a field 
of concentration in the college and up to 24 hours of courses offered by departments and 
schools in other colleges on campus. 

Specifically, a student following a field of concentration may use as electives: 

1. Courses offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; 

2. Courses offered by departments and schools in other colleges of the University that sponsor 
fields of concentration in LAS [art (excluding applied art courses), computer science, 
economics, finance, music (excluding applied music courses), or physics]; and 

3. A maximum of 24 hours (to be counted toward graduation) of courses not included in (1) 
or (2) above. Examples of courses in this category are accounting, business administration, 
engineering, applied an courses, and applied music courses. 

Undergraduate students of high academic standing within 10 semester hours of a bachelor's 
degree may be given the privilege of electing courses in the Graduate College for graduate 
credit with the consent of the dean of that college. Students with senior standing may petition 
the Graduate College for permission to elect graduate courses for undergraduate credit. In 
either case, the student must have a 4.0 average or higher in courses taken beyond the 
sophomore level. Interested students should first consult the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. 

Residency 

Students must satisfy the University residency requirement for graduation (page 76). They must 
complete on this campus, uninterrupted by work elsewhere, either the first three years (at least 
90 hours of course work) or the last year (at least 30 hours). The hours must be applicable 
toward the degree sought. In addition, all students must earn 60 hours of course work at a 
four-year (baccalaureate-granting) institution after any work at a community college. Students 
in the sciences and letters curriculum are expected to earn at least 12 hours of advanced 
courses in their core for the field of concentration on this campus (page 244.) 

Total Hours 

A total of 120 semester hours, excluding more than 4 hours of basic physical education and 
excluding most military training, is required for graduation in the sciences and letters curriculum. 

SCIENCES AND LETTERS CONCENTRATIONS 
Actuarial Science 

This concentration is sponsored by the Department of Mathematics. See page 270. 



246 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Anthropology 

Anthropology courses: 28 hours (including 102-103 or 110) 
Cognate courses: 12 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Anthropology, which views human behavior and society (both past and present) in a cross- 
cultural perspective, combines scientific and humanistic interests in a modern social science 
framework. It consists of biological anthropology (human genetics and evolution and the 
zoological order of primates), archaeology (the prehistory of cultures and the origins and 
growth of human technology), sociocultural anthropology (the comparative study of social 
structures and institutions from simple hunter-gatherer to complex urban settings), and 
anthropological linguistics (the comparative study of languages and communications). Although 
they should strive for a topical and geographic balance, undergraduates may specialize in one 
of these four branches, and they may also study some world culture area intensively through 
an area studies program. Anthropology is an appropriate field of concentration for those 
seeking a general liberal education, for those preparing for professional study and careers in 
law, medicine, or commerce, and for those planning further graduate study in anthropology. 
Professional anthropologists work as research scientists and teachers in museums, universities, 
and archaeological surveys or as staff members in government agencies, social service programs, 
and business firms where international understanding or human and social concerns are 
important. 

The 28 hours in anthropology must include either Anth. 110 or the 102-103 sequence but 
not both. At least 12 hours in anthropology must be advanced (Anth 291, or 293, or any 300- 
level course) and at least 6 of the cognate hours must be in 200- and 300-level courses. 
Students are strongly urged to take Anth. 220, 230, 240, and 270. A balance among courses 
in the subdisciplines (archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural and social anthropology, 
and linguistics) is highly recommended. Students must take all 12 cognate hours either within 
the School of Humanities or the School of Life Sciences, or within the Departments of 
Economics, Geology, Mathematics, and Psychology, or in the social sciences. All students 
should discuss their selection of anthropology and cognate courses with a departmental adviser. 
Modifications of these requirements can be worked out between the student and adviser and, 
with the approval of the head of the department, will be submitted to the college office to 
establish individual requirements for a field of concentration in anthropology. 
Departmental Distinction. To be eligible for distinction, a student must maintain a 4.6 average 
in 32 hours of anthropology courses, including Anth. 293 and/or 291, and submit a thesis for 
judgment by the departmental honors board. 

Art History 

Art history courses: 32 hours (including 111-112) 

Cognate courses: 15 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Like the other humanities, the history of art as an undergraduate area of concentration offers 
an enrichment of and a preparation for life, rather than training for a specific occupation. The 
concentrator who goes on to graduate work in the field can look forward primarily to becoming 
a teacher of the subject, to membership on the staff of a museum, or to employment in a 
commercial art gallery. 

Working in consultation with the undergraduate adviser for art history, each concentrator 
will design a program of study that satisfies the requirements listed below. Students who wish 
to take a considerable number of studio courses as part of their concentration should enroll 
in the History of Art Option offered by the School of Art and Design within the College of 
Fine and Applied Arts. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. Courses in the history of art and architecture. Art Hi. Ill and 112 and, in addition, at 
least 24 hours of art history at the 200- and 300-level, including one three-hour course in 
each of the following areas: (a) Ancient and Medieval art; (b) Renaissance, Baroque, and 
Rococo art; (c) Late Eighteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth Century art; and (d) African, 
Asian, Oceanic, and Pre-Columbian art. 

Courses in the history of architecture, excluding Arch. 210, may be used with the approval 
of the adviser for as many as 12 hours in meeting the 24-hour requirement. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 247 



2. Foreign language. French or German is most strongly recommended for fulfilling the foreign 
language requirement; however, other languages may be used with the approval of the 
adviser as the needs of the student's program dictate. Students who have decided to make 
the history of Oriental art their major study in undergraduate and graduate work would be 
well advised to satisfy the requirement with Chinese or Japanese rather than with a European 
language. 

3. Cognates. At least 15 hours of courses at the 200- and 300-level in cognate areas chosen 
with the approval of the adviser must be completed. Although the Program in Art History 
allows considerable latitude in the selection of such courses, they should be chosen with 
the goal of enhancing the student's understanding of the cultural context within which 
works of art and architecture have been created. Recent practice suggests that cognate 
courses will most commonly be drawn from such fields as anthropology, classics, history, 
literature, music and dance history, philosophy, psychology, and religious studies. 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible, students must earn a high grade-point average and 
complete at least 4 semester hours of independent research. See the undergraduate adviser for 
details. 

Asian Studies 1 

Requirements: At least 40 hours. 

This program, sponsored by the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, permits either a 
single geographical regional focus (East Asia; South Asia; Southeast Asia; the Middle East) in 
an integrated language and area, or general area program; or a language-literature-linguistics 
specialization; or a program of cross-cultural studies. While individual programs of study must 
be approved by the director of the center or by an adviser designated by the director, the 
following general information and statements of requirements will assist students in planning 
programs of study. 

The area of concentration in Asian studies consists of a minimum of 40 semester hours of 
course work selected from three of four discipline distribution categories: humanities, social 
sciences, language-literature-linguistics, related courses and fields. A complete list of approved 
courses is available from the center. Students must designate one of these categories as a 
primary concentration with a minimum of 20 hours of course work, a secondary category 
with a minimum of 12 hours of course work, and a tertiary category with a minimum of 8 
hours of course work. The category "related courses and fields" may not be offered as a 
primary concentration. Courses offered within each category should be distributed over several 
disciplines. Students selecting language-literature-linguistics as their primary discipline-distri- 
bution may not include the first-year level of their language of specialization in the 20-hour 
minimum. 

Departmental Distinction. Students must maintain a 4.25 cumulative grade-point average and 
a 4.5 grade-point average in Asian Studies, complete two 300-level (or 400-level) nonlanguage 
courses in Asian Studies beyond minimal concentration requirements, and receive the endorse- 
ment of the faculty adviser and the honors committee. Candidates are advised to consult the 
faculty adviser about all details at the beginning of their senior year. 



I A revision of this program not reflected in the statement below was pending approval at 
the date of publication. Students entering August 1987 or later should consult the Center for 
East Asian and Pacific Studies regarding requirements. 

Astronomy 

Astronomy courses: 18 hours (300-level astronomy/physics courses) 

Cognates/prerequisites: 3 or 8 hours of introductory astronomy, 12 hours of general physics, and 

II (or 10) hours of calculus 

The field of concentration in astronomy demands both a broad and an in-depth exploration 
into astronomy and allied disciplines, rather than focusing on one relatively limited area of 
the subject. Specific programs of study for individual students must be designed and periodically 
updated through mutual discussions between students and their academic advisers. Students 
should note sequential prerequisites for courses. 



248 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



REQUIREMENTS 

The basic concentration consists of a minimum of 44 hours distributed as follows: 

1. Astr. 101 and 102, or 210; 

2. Math. 120, 132, and 242 or equivalent; 

3. Phycs. 106, 107, and 108; 

4. A minimum of 18 hours in 300-level astronomy and physics courses (excluding Phycs. 319), 
of which at least 10 hours must be in astronomy courses. 

Additional courses recommended for concentrators, especially those intending to pursue 
graduate study in astronomy, include: Math. 343, 345; Phycs. 331, 332, 333, 361, 386, and 
387. 

Departmental Distinction. A student concentrating in astronomy may earn distinction by 
attaining a minimum grade-point average of 4.5 in 300-level astronomy and physics courses. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry courses: 30 hours (including general chemistry) 

Cognate/prerequisites: 11 (or 10) hours of calculus and 10 or 12 hours of general physics 

Students may specialize in chemistry by following either (1) the chemistry curriculum (leading 
to the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry) or (2) the chemistry concentration in the sciences 
and letters curriculum (leading to the degree Bachelor of Science — or Arts — in Liberal Arts 
and Sciences). The chemistry curriculum is a rigorous, specialized program suitable for those 
planning careers in chemistry. It meets the professional standards prescribed by the American 
Chemical Society. The requirements are detailed on page 286. In contrast, although the 
chemistry concentration in the sciences and letters curriculum (requirements described below) 
is used by some students planning chemistry careers, it is more often chosen by students 
wishing to obtain a chemistry background for use in related fields. Some students who change 
their fields to chemistry after their freshman year will find the chemistry concentration 
requirements most compatible with their preparation. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete at least 30 hours in chemistry and biochemistry, excluding Chem. 100, 
103, 122, and 199. These must include Chem. 340 or 342 and two other 300-level courses, at 
least one of them outside physical chemistry. Transfer credit in chemistry must be approved 
by the adviser to be included in the 30 hours. Mathematics through Math. 242 or 245 and 
physics through Phycs. 102 or 108 also must be completed. 

Sequence of Courses. Students who desire thorough training in the fundamentals of chemistry 
should select the following courses: Basic courses — Chem. 107 and 109, 108 and 110, 136 
and 181, 336, 342 and 383, 344 and 385, 315; Specialized courses — advanced offerings 
selected from biochemistry; chemical engineering; and analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical 
chemistry. Students whose Chemistry Placement Test scores do not qualify them for registration 
in Chem. 107 may substitute the alternate sequence Chem. 101, 102, and 123 for Chem. 107- 
110. Students majoring in other disciplines having limited chemistry requirements should seek 
advice from their departmental advisers. 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible, a student must have an overall grade-point average 
of at least 4.0 and must register in a senior thesis course (Chem. 292 or Biochem. 292). 
Recommendations for distinction are based on the quality of the thesis work and the grade- 
point average. See the honors adviser for details. 

Cooperative Education Program. Students accepted into the Chemistry Cooperative Education 
Program spend alternate periods of attendance at the University with periods of employment 
in industry or government. Transcript recognition is given as well as a certificate of participation 
at graduation. Additional information and applications are available in the School of Chemical 
Sciences Placement and Advising Office, 107 Noyes Laboratory, 505 S. Mathews Avenue, 
Urbana, IL 61801. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 249 



Classics 

Classics courses: 24-32 hours (depending on option chosen) 
Cognate courses: 20 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Studying the languages and culture of ancient Greece and Rome is useful for students seeking 
a broad education in the liberal arts or preparing for graduate study in one of the many fields 
of Classical, Medieval, or Renaissance scholarship. Within the general requirements of the 
concentration, the Department of the Classics can offer individual programs designed to meet 
the needs and interests of each student. Close interaction between faculty and students, 
individual attention, tutorial instruction, opportunity for study abroad in Greece and Italy, and 
unmatched resources in the Classics Library and the collections of ancient an and other objects 
from classical antiquity in the museums on campus provide unique advantages for the pursuit 
of classical studies. 

Concentrators in classics may choose one of the following options and take an additional 
20 hours of cognate courses. 

1. Classical Civilization (including classical archaeology): Twenty-four hours of Classical 
Civilization courses (excluding Classical Civilization 100), 6 of which must be at the 300- 
level. 

2. Latin Option: Twenty-four hours of Latin — excluding Latin 101, 102, 103, 105 — and 
including Latin 311 and at least 6 additional hours at the 300-level. 

3. Greek Option: Twenty-eight hours of Greek — including Greek 311 and 6 additional hours 
at the 300-level. 

4. Classics Option: Thirty-two hours: Greek 201, 202, 311; Latin 201, 202, 311; at least 6 
additional hours each in Greek and in Latin at the 300-level. 

Cognate Courses. Twenty hours in appropriate courses from two or more of the following 
subjects: anthropology, architecture, an, classical civilization (not approved for Option 1), 
comparative literature, English, foreign languages, Greek (not approved for Options 3 or 4), 
history, Latin (not approved for Options 2 or 4), linguistics, philosophy, political science, 
religious studies, speech communication, and theatre. Concentrators must plan their programs 
in consultation with a departmental adviser. 

Note: Concentrators choosing the Classical Civilization Option are advised, though not required, 
ro satisfy the college foreign language requirement with one of the classical languages. 
Departmental Distinction. Students seeking departmental distinction must have at least a 4.5 
average in relevant courses and should consult with a member of the department's honors 
committee at the earliest opportunity. 

Comparative Literature 

Comparative literature courses: 15 hours 

Literature courses: 24 hours 

Cognate courses: 9 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Students who elect comparative literature as a field of concentration must complete 48 semester 
hours in the courses indicated below, at least 15 hours being in courses numbered 300 or 
above. Besides knowing English, students must have sufficient linguistic skills in at least one 
foreign language to participate in 200- and 300-level literature courses offered by the various 
foreign language and literature departments. 

As soon as students are contemplating choosing comparative literature as a field of 
concentration, they should consult the faculty adviser, who will assist them in selecting 
appropriate courses that will be especially helpful as preparation for the advanced comparative 
literature training beginning with the junior year. Courses in classical civilization and in literature 
(particularly courses dealing with works from several countries) are especially recommended 
at relatively early stages of study. An ample selection of such courses at the 100 and 200 levels 
exists in the various literature departments. 

The distribution of course work allows for considerable flexibility. It must include: 

1. At least 15 hours in comparative literature courses, including C. Lit. 201 and C. Lit. 202. 
The remaining hours should be selected from different types of courses: e.g., 141, 142, 351, 
361, 371. 

2. At least 15 hours in one literature in the original language (ancient or modern, including 



250 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Far Eastern and African), 12 of which are at the 200 level or above, studied in depth and 
in its historical development. (Normally this is the primary literature of the student's 
educational background.) 

3. At least 9 hours at the 200 level or above in a second literature in the original language. 
With the assistance of the adviser, these courses should be carefully chosen so as to correlate 
meaningfully with the student's primary literature. Students may center their interest on 
cultural periods such as medieval, renaissance, neo-classical and enlightenment, or modern 
(nineteenth and twentieth centuries), or on genres, relations, or critical theory. 1 

4. At least 12 hours of literature courses used for (1), (2), or (3) above must be at the 300 
level or approved for advanced hours in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

5. At least 9 hours in any single national literature or several, including comparative literature; 
or in other humanistic fields, e.g., history, philosophy, speech, art, music, psychology, 
sociology, theatre, anthropology, and Asian studies. Since some of the courses in these 
subjects are more suitable than others to balance a student's individual program of 
concentration in comparative literature, students must follow the guidelines given to them 
by their adviser. 

6. Western civilization: C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours) or Hist. 111-112 (8 hours); these sequences 
may be used to satisfy the requirements, respectively, of Group 1 or Group 5 above. 
Beginning students in comparative literature are strongly urged to take the 141-142 sequence. 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible for distinction, a student must have at least a 4.5 
cumulative grade-point average and 4.75 in departmental courses, complete a senior thesis (C. 
Lit. 293), and receive the approval of the departmental honors committee. The departmental 
honors committee will determine the level of distinction to be awarded. 



1 If one of the literatures studied is English, students who plan to continue in a graduate 
program in comparative literature will be expected to acquire a reading knowledge of a second 
foreign language (i.e., one foreign language for the B.A., two foreign languages for the M.A., 
three foreign languages for the Ph.D.). 

Computer Science (Mathematics and Computer Science) 1 

Computer science courses: 25 hours (including CS 121) 
Mathematics courses: 31-33 hours (including calculus) 

This field of concentration is jointly sponsored by the Departments of Mathematics and 
Computer Science. It is designed to prepare students for professional or graduate work in 
mathematics and computer science. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. Mathematics and computer science core requirements: (32-33 hours) 

Math. 120, 132, 242, or 135 and 245, or equivalent (calculus) 10-11 

Math. 247 {intermediate analysis) 3 

CS. 121, 225 (software core courses) 7 

CS. 257 (numerical analysis) 3 

CS. 273 (theory of computation) 3 

CS. 221 (machine-level programming) 3 

CS. 264 (introduction to the structure and logic of digital computers) 3 

2. 300-level mathematics and computer science requirements: (24-25 hours) 
Students must elect at least eight 300-level mathematics and computer science courses, 
including one from each of the following groups: 

Group I: Math. 361 or Stat. 310/Math. 363 (probability— statistics) 
Group II: Math. 312, 317 (algebra and discrete mathematics) 
Group III: Math. 315, 318 (matrices and linear algebra) 
Group IV: Math. 341, 346, 384 (applied analysis) 
Group V: Math. 344, 347 (real variables) 

Group VI: Math. 314, Math./CS. 373, Math./CS. 375, CS. 376, Math. 377 (foundations 
of computer science) 

1 This statement reflects a revision of the program which was pending final approval at the 
date of publication. It is expected that the approval will be final for fall 1987. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 251 



Group VII: C.S. 323, 325 (software) 

Group VIII: C.S. 355, 358, 359 (numerical analysis) 

NOTES 

— Students who transfer into this field of concentration after having taken a 100-level computer 
science course other than C.S. 121 should take C.S. 122 in lieu of C.S. 121. All other 
students in this field of concentration must take C.S. 121. 

— A student taking a cross-listed course in this field of concentration may designate it either 
as mathematics or computer science. 

Departmental Distinction. Students interested in attaining departmental distinction in mathe- 
matics and computer science should consult with the honors adviser for program requirements 
early in their junior year. 

Economics 

Economics and statistics courses: 21 hours of economics, including Econ. 101, 300, and 301; and 

6 hours of statistics (Econ. 172 and 173 or equivalent). 
Cognate courses: Mathematics through at least a first course in calculus, and 18 hours in courses 

related to major interest in economics 

Economics is a social science that studies the problems caused by scarcity and how individuals, 
institutions, and societies may deal with these problems. Economics shares common interests 
with business-oriented disciplines, such as finance and business administration. Economists 
frequently require quantitative skills, such as calculus and statistics, to derive economic principles 
that are useful in forming policies designed to solve economic problems. 

REQUIREMENTS 

The field of concentration in economics requires course work in three areas. For further 
information, see the Economics Bulletin available in the office of undergraduate studies of the 
department. The requirements are: 

1. Economics and Statistics: At least 21 hours of economics, including Econ. 101, 300, and 
301 (but excluding Econ. 199, 294, 295, and 299); and 6 hours of statistics (Econ. 172 and 
173 or equivalent). 

2. Mathematics: Minimum requirement is Math. 125-134 or equivalent. (See Economics 
Bulletin.) Additional mathematics courses are recommended. 

3. Cognate: At least 18 hours in courses outside economics but related to student's major 
interest in economics. (See Economics Bulletin for examples.) Except for special cases noted 
in the bulletin, at least 12 of the 18 hours must be in a single discipline and at the 200- 
level or above. 

Departmental Distinction. A student must have an overall grade-point average of at least 4.25 
and at least 4.50 in economics; complete a research project (e.g., complete Econ. 294-295 or 
299); and be recommended by a faculty research adviser. 

English (Concentrations in English and Rhetoric) 
English 

English courses: 30 hours 

Cognate courses: 6-8 hours of Western civilization, and 12-14 hours chosen in consultation with an 
adviser, for a total of 20 hours 

The study of English and American literature is the study of traditions, masterpieces, and 
critical theory and practice. Students who concentrate in English have many options in planning 
a field of study, but the basic program is designed to accommodate students who seek to 
broaden their familiarity with our literature, to intensify their language skills for personal and 
professional reasons, and to learn more about literature's relationship to the other arts, history, 
philosophy, psychology, and the modern languages. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete the following: 

1. English courses. Thirty hours, distributed as follows: Engl. 101, Introduction to Poetry (It 
is strongly recommended that this course be taken prior to advanced courses in the 



252 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



concentration.); three survey courses (Engl. 209, British Literature to 1800; Engl. 210, British 
Literature from 1800 to present; Engl. 255, American Literature to 1870); a 300-level 
Shakespeare course; and at least one course from each of the following five groups: 
Group I: (British literature to 1800) Engl. 202, 204, 206, 315, 316, 321, 326, 327, 328, 329 
Group II: (British literature after 1800) Engl. 207, 240, 247, 331, 334, 335, 341, 342 
Group III: (American literature) Engl. 249, 250, 256, 259, 260, 347, 350, 351 
Group IV: (Major author other than Shakespeare) Engl. 311, 323, 343, 355 
Group V: (Theme, mode, genre, and interdisciplinary approaches) Engl. 215, 241, 242, 243, 
244, 245, 246, 248, 249, 250, 273, 275, 280, 281, 284, 361, 362, 365, 366, 367, 368, 375, 
383, 387 

No single course can be used to fulfill the requirement of more than one group and at 
least 9 hours (excluding the course in Shakespeare) must be at the 300 level. 

2. Cognate courses. Twenty hours. These hours will consist of: (A) Western Civilization. All 
students will complete either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). (B) 
Twelve to 14 additional hours within one of three options: (1) an approved sequence in 
one field other than rhetoric; (2) an approved sequence in two fields; (3) a topical cognate, 
comprising courses from three or more fields and combined into an intellectually or 
professionally coherent study. English concentrators often arrange cognates in history, 
political science, economics, philosophy, art, comparative literature, psychology, and cinema 
studies. Possibilities for topical cognates include: 

a. Premedical: Chemistry, biology, biochemistry, and physics courses from the approved 
premedical sequence. 

b. Precommerce: Economics, finance, accountancy, and business administration courses 
selected in consultation with an academic adviser and with a clear professional objective 
in mind. 

c. Medieval studies: Courses such as Hist. 173, 204, 304, 307; Relst. 121; Arch. 311, 312; 
Art Hi. Ill, 322, 323, 324; Ital. 309, 333. 

d. Asian studies: Courses chosen from Chin. 203-204, 207-208, Japan. 203-204, 205-206, 
301-306, as well as from Asian studies. 

e. Cinema studies: Courses such as Art Hi. 256; Fr. 288; Human. 261-262, 361; Germ. 390; 
Slavic 319; Sp. Com. 207. 

3. Special recommendations. 

a. Students interested in the departmental honors program should consult the English 
Advising Office. 

b. Students interested in the English teacher-training program must consult with the teacher- 
training adviser, preferably by the middle of the sophomore year. Requirements for the 
teacher-training program differ from requirements for the regular field of concentration. 

c. Students planning to enter graduate school should elect as many 300-level courses as 
possible, including a course in either Chaucer or Milton and a course in the history or 
structure of the English language. Further, these students should consult the specific 
requirements of the graduate schools they plan to enter. 

Departmental Distinction. Students interested in graduating with distinction or high distinction 
must enter the honors program with at least a 4.25 grade-point average, complete three honors 
seminars, and write a senior honors essay. To be considered for highest distinction, a student 
must take an additional 3 hours and complete a senior honors thesis. Levels of distinction are 
assigned by the honors committee on the basis of grade-point average, work in English courses 
and in honors seminars, and the readers' evaluations of the honors essay or honors thesis. 
Interested students should consult the departmental honors adviser for details. 

Rhetoric 

Rhetoric courses: 12 hours 

English courses: 12 hours of English and American literature 

Cognate courses: 6-8 hours of Western civilization and 12-14 chosen in consultation with an adviser, 
for a total of 20 hours 

The advanced rhetoric program permits a student to work in one or more of three disciplines: 
poetry, fiction, and/or exposition. Except for the tutorial Rhet. 355, all courses are taught as 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 253 



workshops In .1 veteran faculty consisting largely of producing writers. The program provides 
excellent preparation tor graduate work in writing. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete the following: 

1. At least one course in expository writing selected from Rhet. 143 or 227. 

2. Nine additional hours of rhetoric selected from Rhet. 143, 144, 145, 205, 227, 305, 306, 
355. 

3. One course in Shakespeare (Engl. 318 or 319). 

4. Nine additional hours of English and American literature selected from 200- and 300-level 
English courses. 

5. Journ. 326 may be counted toward the concentration with an adviser's permission. 

6. An additional 20 hours of cognate course work selected in consultation with an adviser. 
As pan of the cognate courses, all rhetoric concentrators will satisfy the Western civilization 
general education requirement by completing either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141- 
142 (6 hours); all remaining courses in the cognate should be in one discipline or be related 
to each other by topic, time period, or area. 

Departmental Distinction. Students must enter the honors program with a 4.2 grade-point 
average and complete two English honors seminars and a significant writing project in Rhet. 
355. Levels of distinction are assigned by the honors committee based on work in rhetoric 
courses and honors seminars and on the readers' evaluations of the writing project. Interested 
students should consult the departmental adviser for details. 

Finance 

Finance courses: 24 hours 

Cognate courses: 26 hours (as specified below) 

The field of finance is concerned with the acquisition of funds and the determination of the 
use of funds by a business or an individual. In this process, an important aspect is the valuation 
of assets, both financial and real. Specific areas of finance include the acquisition and use of 
funds by businesses (business finance), the valuation of financial assets (investments), the financial 
environment and participants (money and banking), the valuation and financing of real properties 
(real estate), and an assessment of risks and programs to insure against risk (insurance and risk 
management). 

REQUIREMENTS 

Students must complete the following: 

1. At least 24 hours of finance courses including: 

a. Finance 254 

b. Seven additional finance courses: Current recommendations of courses in each program 
area within finance are available in the department office. 

2. At least 26 hours of cognate courses including: 

a. Accy. 201, 202 

b. Math. 120 or 134 

c. C.S. 105 

d. Econ. 101, 172, 173 

e. At least 3 hours from the following courses: Current recommendations of courses in 
each program area within finance are available in the department office. 

Accy. 211, 221, 251 

Arch. 379 

B. Adm. 200, 202, 210, 261, 274, 321 

C.E. 318 

Econ. (any course numbered above 101, excluding Econ. 172 and 173) 

Geog. 366, 383 

I.E. 335, 357, 358 

Math, (any course numbered beyond Math. 120, excluding Math. 134) 

Additional courses may be substituted upon the approval of a finance adviser. 



254 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



NOTES 

1. Fin. 254 has as a prerequisite Accy. 200 or 202 and as a concurrent prerequisite Econ. 172. 
Therefore, the cognate work in accounting (Accy. 201, 202) and mathematics (Math. 134) 
should be taken in the sophomore year. 

2. Econ. 101 should be taken in the freshman year. 

Sample Programs. The specific finance and cognate courses to be selected depend upon the 
student's interest in a particular area of finance. Programs are available in the following areas: 
general finance, business finance, insurance, investments, financial institutions and money 
markets, real estate, and risk management. It is not necessary to choose one specific program 
area. Finance concentrators seeking advice about the specific finance and cognate courses to 
take should consult with their advisers. 

Departmental Distinction. Departmental distinction will be awarded on the basis of the grade- 
point average. 

French 

French courses: 44-47 hours (beyond the 100-level) 

Cognate courses: 6-8 hours of Western civilization and 12-15 hours (chosen in consultation with an 
adviser) 

REQUIREMENTS 

Fr. 205 or 206; 207; 209; 210 or their equivalent; plus 32 to 35 hours in French beyond these 
courses. These 32 to 35 hours may not include 100-level courses, 270, 280, and must include 
courses as outlined below; Fr. 199 may be included if approved by an adviser. 

Twelve to 15 hours in courses are to be chosen from other departments or programs. 
Option I — French Studies 

1. Four courses in French language and linguistics, including Fr. 314. 

2. Four courses in French literature: two courses in French literature prior to 1800 and two 
courses in French literature from 1800 to present. 

3. Three additional courses in French civilization, French film, French language and linguistics, 
French literature, or francophone studies. 

4. Fr. 290: Major tutorial in French language, literature, and civilization. 

5. Twelve to 15 hours in other departments chosen with the approval of the option adviser. 

6. Western civilization: Hist. 111-112, or C. Lit. 141-142. 
Option II — French Commercial Studies 

1. Five courses in French language and linguistics, including Fr. 314, 319, and 320. 

2. Four courses in French civilization, French literature, or francophone studies. 

3. Fr. 385 and 386. 

4. An approved cognate of at least 15 hours in business administration, finance, and/or 
economics in consultation with option adviser. 

5. Western civilization: Hist. 111-112, or C. Lit. 141-142. 

Note: Consult an adviser concerning mathematics and economics courses appropriate for the 

fulfillment of LAS general education requirements. 

Year Abroad Program. See page 240. 

Departmental Distinction. A student must have at least a 4.5 cumulative average, complete a 

senior thesis (Fr. 292), and complete two additional advanced level courses in French or in the 

cognate. Consult the honors adviser for details. 

Geography 

Geography courses: 27-33 hours, with at least 40 hours in the concentration 
Cognate courses: 12-28 hours 

Students in geography must complete both the core courses in geography and one of the seven 
options, for a total of at least 40 hours in the concentration. 

Students who elect one of the options in general human and physical geography, urban and 
social geography, historical and regional studies, or economic geography are encouraged to 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 255 



include Math. 124, 134 finite mathematics and calculus for social scientists) as pan of their 
undergraduate programs, either as electives or as pan of the Area II general education 
requirements. The options in physical environment, natural resource evaluation, and spatial 
graphics and analysis have specific mathematics requirements as listed below. 

CORE IN GEOGRAPHY (15-16 hours) 

1. Students must elect three introductory geography courses chosen from physical geography 
(Geog. 102, 103) and human geography (Geog. 101, 104, 105). 

2. Geog. 271 (Spatial Analysis) is required. 

3. Students are strongly encouraged to elect Geog. 373 (cartography). 

4. All students are encouraged to elect techniques courses as pan of their program. The 
techniques courses include Geog. 185, 272, 273, 277, 290 (spatial programming), 370, 373, 
374, J75, 177, 378. 

OPTIONS 

1. General human and physical geography 

a. Geography courses: At least 6 hours of physical geography and 6 hours of human 
geography to be selected from 200- and 300-level courses, excluding Geog. 210. 

b. Cognate courses: Twelve hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, from the 
following: agronomy; agricultural economics; anthropology; biology; civil engineering; 
ecology, ethology, and evolution; forestry; geology; history; landscape architecture; plant 
biology; political science; psychology; sociology; urban and regional planning. 

c. At least 40 hours total in the concentration, including the core. 

2. Urban and social geography 

a. Geography courses: Twelve hours chosen from Geog. 110, 204, 205, 284, 290, 294, 314, 
325, 326, 365, 366, 380, 383, 384, 385, 386, 387. 

b. Cognate courses: Twelve hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, from the 
following: agricultural economics, anthropology, communications, economics, history, 
landscape architecture, political science, psychology, sociology, urban and regional 
planning. 

c. At least 40 hours in the concentration, including the core. 

3. The physical environment (the Earth's land and biota) 

a. Geography courses: Twelve hours chosen from 200- and 300-level physical geography 
courses (Geog. 203, 272, 303, 304, 305, 307, 308). Students may choose geomorphologic 
and biogeographic processes. 

b. Supporting courses: Math. 120. Students in geomorphology must elect Phycs. 101; 
students in soils geomorphology must elect Chem. 101-102. These courses may be used 
as pan of the Area II general education requirements. 

c. Cognate courses: Nine to 12 hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, of courses 
in agronomy; atmospheric sciences; biology; civil engineering; ecology, ethology, and 
evolution; forestry; geology; and plant biology. 

d. At least 46 hours total in the concentration, including the core courses. 

4. Historical and regional studies 

a. Geography courses: Twelve hours chosen from Geog. 110, 204, 224, 272, 290, 314, 323, 
325, 326, 327, 331, 332, 342, 353, 355, 361, 380, 381, 382, 383. Students may choose 
historical geography, historic preservation, or the geography of a continental region. 

b. Students specializing in the study of a foreign area should select an appropriate language 
in fulfilling the foreign language requirement. 

c. Cognate courses: Twelve to 15 hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, of courses 
in African, Latin American, Russian and East European, or West European area studies; 
American civilization; or from architecture, history, landscape architecture, and urban 
and regional planning. 

d. At least 40 hours in the concentration, including the core courses. 

5. Natural resources evaluation 

a. Geography courses: Nine hours chosen from Geog. 203, 214, 303, 304, 305, 308, 314, 
361, 363, 367; and 6 to 8 hours from the geographic technique courses (Geog. 277, 290 
[spatial programming], 370, 373, 374, 375, 377, 378). 



256 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



b. Supporting courses: Chem. 101-102; Math. 124, 134. Also Econ. 101 should be included. 
These courses may be used as part of the Area I (Econ. 101) and Area II (Chem. 101, 
102 and Math. 124, 134) general education requirements. 

c. Cognate courses: Six to 9 hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, of courses in 
agronomy; biology; civil engineering; ecology, ethology, and evolution; forestry; geology; 
plant biology. 

d. At least 44 hours in the concentration, including the core courses. 

6. Economic geography 

a. Geography courses: Fifteen to 17 hours, of which 9 hours normally will be chosen from 
Geog. 205, 290, 314, 361, 363, 365, 366, and 383; and 6 to 8 hours from the geographic 
technique courses (Geog. 185, 277, 290 [spatial programming], 370, 371, 374, 375, 377, 
378, 387). 

b. Supporting course: Econ. 101. 

c. Cognate courses: Twelve to 15 hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, of courses 
in agricultural economics; civil engineering; economics (includes Econ. 101); finance; 
political science; sociology; and urban and regional planning. 

d. At least 42 hours in the concentration, including the core courses. 

7. Spatial graphics and analysis 

a. Geography courses: Fifteen hours, of which 9 to 12 will normally be chosen from 
geographic techniques (Geog. 185, 277, 290 [spatial programming], 370, 373, 374, 375, 
377, 378), and the remaining from 200- and 300-level courses. 

b. Supporting courses: Math. 112 and 114; also, Math. 124 and 134 are strongly recom- 
mended. Math. 124 and 134 may be used as part of the Area II general education 
requirements. 

c. Cognate courses: Twelve to 15 hours, chosen in consultation with the adviser, of courses 
in art and design; civil engineering; communications; computer science; general engineering; 
landscape architecture; mathematics; and urban and regional planning. 

d. At least 47 hours total in the concentration, including the core courses. 
Departmental Distinction: All students concentrating in geography who have maintained a 
University grade-point average of 4.25 and who satisfactorily complete an independent project 
(Geog. 291) in their senior year will be eligible to graduate with distinction in geography. 
Students should consult their adviser about distinction requirements as soon as they enter the 
field of concentration — no later than the end of their junior year. 

Geology 

Geology courses: 28 hours 

Cognate courses: 31-33 hours (as specified below) 

This field of concentration is designed for students who want a more flexible course of study 
than is provided by the curriculum in geology (see page 287). The program is designed mainly 
for those wishing to obtain a reasonably liberal education and/or a background in geology 
for use in fields such as business, environmental science and technology, mineral economics, 
regional planning, journalism, law, sales, or library science. It will not prepare a student for 
graduate work in the geological sciences unless the student selects a plan of courses in 
background mathematics, chemistry, and physics fully comparable to that in the curriculum in 
geology. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Prerequisites — Geol. 107, 108, ' qualification for Math. 120 or 135 and for Chem. 101 or 
107. 



1 Students planning to concentrate in geology should take Geol. 107-108; students who 
decide to concentrate in geology after taking Geol. 101 or 102 must take an additional 4 hours 
of 100-level work excluding Geol. 142 and 143. Geol. 107 or 108 is strongly recommended 
to complete the total of 8 hours of 100-level work; see a departmental adviser. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 257 



1. Geology. Twenty hours including: Geol. 332 (4), Gcol. 320 or 321 (4), Geol. 317 (8), and 
an additional 300-level course (4). 

2. Cognate course work. Thirty-one hours including: Math. 120 or 135 (5), Chem. 101, or 
107 and 109 (4 or 5), Phycs. 101 or 106 (5 or 4), life science (6), and an additional 12 
hours to be approved by a departmental adviser (12). 

Departmental Distinction. Students who maintain a grade-point average of at least 4.5 in all 
geology courses and 4.0 in all other science and mathematics courses and who complete an 
acceptable honors thesis, including at least 4 hours credit in Geol. 293, are recommended for 
graduation with distinction. 

Germanic Languages and Literatures 

German courses: 29 hours (beyond the 100-level); 12 hours beyond the 100-level for Scandinavian 
Cognate courses: 20-26 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser); 33 hours for Scandinavian. 
These hours include 6-8 hours of Western civilization. 

A concentration in German serves to develop fluency in one of the leading languages of science, 
industry, and intellectual culture; familiarity with principles governing the structure of our 
Indo-European family of languages and of languages generally; insight into the use of language 
in literary expression and portrayal; and knowledge of the culture that finds expression through 
this language and its literature. The departmental concentration in Scandinavian provides 
substantially the same advantages. The following options are offered within this field of 
concentration: 

Language and literature. Designed as a traditional study of German, providing students with 
a balanced knowledge of German language, literature, and civilization. 

1. Twenty-nine hours in German, including 211, 212, 231, 232, 301, 302, 311, 312, 320, 365. 

2. Twenty hours of cognate course work (A) Western civilization: All students will complete 
either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). (B) Twelve to 14 additional 
hours of course work outside of German language and literature selected in consultation 
with an adviser. 

German literature in the European context. Designed to expand the students' view of literature 
by acquiring a broad knowledge of German, drawing on courses offered by other literature 
departments, and exploring the relationship of literature to the arts, history, politics, and 
culture. 

1. Same as number 1 above. 

2. Twenty hours of cognate course work (A) Western civilization: All students will complete 
either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). (B) Twelve to 14 additional 
hours outside of German language and literature selected in consultation with an adviser. 
The study of other literatures in their original language is recommended. 

Language studies. Designed to acquaint students with the structure and development of 
Germanic languages. 

1. Twenty-nine hours in German, including 211, 212, 231, 232, 301, 302, 311, 312, 320, 365. 

2. Twenty-four to 26 hours of cognate course work (A) Western civilization: All students will 
complete either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). (B) At least 18 
additional hours, including Gmc. 367, Scan. 101 and 102, Ling. 300 and one additional 
linguistics course, and Engl. 303. 

Modern German studies. Designed to provide students an understanding of present-day 
civilization and culture in German-speaking countries of Central Europe. 

1. Twenty-nine hours in German, including 211, 212, 231, 232, 301, 302, 320, 365, and two 
of the following: 330, 331, 332, 335, 390. 

2. Twenty hours of cognate course work (A) Western civilization: All students will complete 
either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). (B) Twelve to 14 additional 
hours outside of German language and literature. This course work may be fulfilled in the 
departmental study program in Baden, Austria, or in an approved program in another 
German-speaking country, or on campus. 

German and commercial studies. Designed to provide students with an understanding of the 
language and customs of the business world in German-speaking countries, together with 
cognate study of international affairs and commerce, especially trade with Europe. 
1. Twenty-nine hours in German, including 211, 212, 220, 221, 231, 301, 302, 303, 320, 365. 



258 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



2. Twenty hours of cognate work (A) Western civilization: All students will complete either 
Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). (B) Twelve to 14 additional hours 
outside of German language and literatures selected in consultation with the major adviser. 
These cognate hours are usually selected from business administration, finance, and/or 
economics, occasionally also from political science and geography. 

Scandinavian studies. Designed for students who will be able to spend a year abroad studying 

in Scandinavia. 

1. Twelve hours in Scandinavian beyond Scan. 101-104. Scandinavian courses in translation 
are acceptable. 

2. Twenty-four hours of study abroad in Scandinavian through an approved L.A.S. 299 program 
(in, e.g., language, literature, history, art, political science, or linguistics). Nine additional 
hours of cognate work outside of Scandinavian studies must be selected in consultation 
with an adviser; these hours will include the Western civilization requirement that is satisfied 
by completing either Hist. 111-112 (8 hours) or C. Lit. 141-142 (6 hours). 

Year Abroad Program. See page 240. 

Departmental Distinction. Concentrators in the Department of Germanic Languages and 

Literatures are urged to consult the departmental honors adviser by the second semester of 

their junior year for information pertaining to senior honors work and honors awards in the 

department. 

History 

History courses: 30-34 hours (including 100-level survey sequence[s]) 
Cognate courses: 20 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Students in the history concentration should acquire a broad background from the study of 
the human experience in different cultures and time periods. A wide distribution of courses is 
therefore advisable; this is especially true for those who wish to enter teaching, government 
service, or professional schools for law, social work, museum and library science, business 
administration, or labor and industrial relations. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. A prerequisite to the advanced work in history is one freshman-sophomore survey sequence 
(Hist. 111-112, 131-132, 151-152, 168 and 170, 173-174, 175-176, or 181-182). 

2. A second freshman-sophomore sequence may also be offered, but at least 18 of the required 
hours of history courses must be at the 200- and 300-level. 

3. One of the courses, at any level, must be in a premodern period of history. 

4. The history courses must include at least 12 hours in an area of specialization and at least 
6 hours in a second area. The following areas may be selected: anciertt, medieval, and 
Renaissance (Europe); modern Europe since 1500 (including Russia); the United States and 
Latin America; Africa and the Near and Middle East; South, Southeast, East Asia. With the 
approval of the departmental adviser and in consultation with a sponsoring professor, a 
student may develop before the beginning of the senior year a special topical, geographical, 
or chronological area of concentration (for example, prelaw, Latin American studies, the 
world from 1789 to 1914). 

5. Hist. 298 must be taken as part of the 30-34 hours requirement. The prerequisite for the 
course is 14 hours in history, 6 of them at the 200- or 300-level. 

6. At least 20 hours of cognate courses must be taken outside the History Department. Students 
who have not had Hist. 111-112 must take Comp. Lit. 141-142 as pan of their cognate to 
satisfy the western civilization requirement. Twelve of the 20 hours in cognate courses must 
be at the 200- and 300-level. Traditional areas for cognates are: ancient and modern 
languages (excluding the first-year elementary courses and also excluding the second-year 
courses if those courses are being used to fulfill the language requirement in the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences), anthropology, art history, classical archaeology and civilization, 
economics, English, American and comparative literature, geography, library science, music 
history, philosophy, political science, psychology, religious studies, and sociology. Nonhistory 
courses chosen from the multidisciplinary fields of women's studies, African studies, Asian 
studies, Latin American studies, Russian language and area studies, medieval civilization, 
Renaissance civilization, American civilization, and cinema studies are also accepted as 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 259 



cognates it they meet the criteria of relevance and academic level. History of science students 
and premedical and predental students may offer cognate work in the physical and life 
sciences. All cognate courses should be related by time, area, and/or topic to the area of 
concentration and are subject to the approval of the history department adviser. 
For details on the field of concentration in history and the honors program, see the adviser 

in 300 Gregory Hall. 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible, a student must have at least a 4.5 grade-point average, 

complete a senior thesis, and receive the approval of an examining committee. The examining 

committee will determine the level of distinction to be awarded. 

Humanities 

Requirements: At least 45-51 hours 

The School of Humanities is an association of humanities departments in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences and, in cooperation, the College of Fine and Applied Arts. In addition to 
their own concentrations, these departments have developed an interdisciplinary program of 
study, sponsored by the School of Humanities, which encompasses several distinct programs 
designed to acquaint students in a coherent manner with topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. 
At present, the field of concentration in humanities includes program options in: American 
civilization, cinema studies, history and philosophy of science, medieval civilization, and 
Renaissance studies. Since the school is unable to sponsor options in all specialties or topics 
of humanistic study, students whose interests do not coincide with one of the specific options 
are encouraged to consult with the school office and to consider developing their own program 
through the Individual Plans of Study concentration. Enrollment in the field of concentration 
in humanities requires a declaration of one of the options. 

Each option of the field of concentration in humanities is supervised by a committee of 
faculty whose own scholarship and educational interests have involved them in interdisciplinary 
teaching and research. An adviser for students is available in each option and is responsible 
for approving students' plans of study. Action on matters other than course selection is taken 
by the committee. 

CONCENTRATION 

Enrollment in a field of concentration requires the following: 

1. Elect one of the options offered within the concentration in humanities and file an option 
declaration with the School of Humanities office no later than the end of the first semester 
of the junior year. Students who do not begin work on option requirements by their junior 
year will be at a disadvantage. 

2. Select specific courses counted toward completion of an option with the advice and approval 
of the option adviser. Any coherent program is acceptable, subject to specific option 
requirements developed in consultation with the option adviser. 

3. For the elected option, complete the stated minimum number of hours (which will be at 
least 45 hours) in courses applicable toward the concentration and in accord with the 
distribution requirements listed below (a, b, and c); at least 25 hours must be at the 200- 
and 300-level. Note: Some course selections may require prerequisite courses. Total hours 
will most likely be in excess of the 45-hour minimum; however, most students will complete 
two or perhaps three college general education distribution requirements in the process. 

a. Elect and complete in consultation with an adviser at least 36 hours of topically oriented 
course work with at least 6 hours in each of three different departments or programs. 

b. Complete a junior seminar and tutorial of at least 3 hours in the elected option. 

c. Complete a senior seminar and tutorial or senior thesis of at least 3 hours as specified 
in the elected option. 

OPTIONS 

American civilization. This option offers a comprehensive introduction to the study of American 

civilization primarily through the study of art, history, literature, philosophy, and the social 

sciences. 

Requirements (48 hours) 

a. Two introductory courses of at least 3 hours each chosen with approval of the option 



260 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



adviser; the introductory courses should provide a broad overview of the development 
of American culture, e.g., Human. 141 and 142. 

b. At least 9 additional hours selected from among the following: Engl. 249, 255, 259, 260, 
347, 350, 351, and 362. 

c. At least 9 additional hours selected from among the following: Hist. 260-262, 354-360, 
362-364, 367-374. 

d. At least 6 hours selected from among the following: Arch. 315 and 316; An Hi. 346, 
350, and 351; Phil. 313, 316, 323. 

e. At least 12 additional hours selected in consultation with the option adviser from courses 
offered in the departments of anthropology, economics, geography, political science, and 
sociology. 

f. Substitutions for any of the above specific courses may be permitted with the approval 
of the option adviser. 

g. At least 3 hours in the Junior Tutorial and Seminar (Human. 297). 
h. At least 3 hours in the Senior Tutorial and Seminar (Human. 298). 

Cinema studies. This option offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of film from 
various literary, cultural, and social perspectives. The emphasis is on developing methods and 
skills of critical interpretation, but students are also encouraged to acquire basic competence 
in the technical aspects of filmmaking by completing at least one course in cinematography. 
The option's underlying aim is to enrich the individual by exposure to the most significant 
patterns, philosophies, and artifacts of history and of narrative and dramatic expression. 

Requirements (51 hours) 

a. Acquire a knowledge of at least one foreign language sufficient to the student's program 
in film studies. In most cases, this requirement will exceed the college foreign language 
requirement by 6 semester hours of study. The language and the level of proficiency will 
be determined in consultation with the option adviser. 

b. An introductory course: Engl. 104. 

c. A two-semester general survey of world film: Human. 261 and 262. 

d. A course in film theory and criticism: Human. 361. 

e. At least one course in filmmaking: Art Ci. 180, 280, or 380, or equivalent. 

f. Substitutions for specific courses listed above will be approved by the option adviser only 
in exceptional cases. 

g. At least 18 additional hours in film courses offered in individual departments in the School 
of Humanities. At least 9 of these hours must be in courses offered in foreign language 
departments, and at least two languages must be represented in the total. 

h. At least 12 additional hours of cinema-related courses in one or more of the following 
general fields: aesthetics, art or architectural history, communications, criticism, cultural 
anthropology, foreign language studies, linguistics, literature (fiction and/or drama), modern 
history, music, philosophy, photography, theatre. Specific courses and sequences in these 
fields are to be approved at the discretion of the option adviser, except that courses 
eligible to satisfy requirement (g) may not be approved under requirement (h). 
i. Three hours in the Junior Tutorial and Seminar (Human. 297). This course will involve 
an independent research project in a field of cinema defined by the student and the 
submission of a substantial piece of writing growing out of this research, 
j. Three hours in the Senior Tutorial and Seminar (Human. 298). This course will involve 
the completion of a significant paper somewhat comparable to a senior honors thesis. 
History and philosophy of science. This option is designed to allow students to combine the 
study of science (including mathematics), the history of science, and the philosophy of science 
in an integrated program. Within the framework of specific requirements, individual programs 
of study will be designed to fit the student's particular interests. 
Requirements (45 hours) 

a. At least 15 hours from among the following with at least 6 hours in Group I and 6 hours 
in Group II. 

Group I: Phil. 270, 317, 318, 319, and 371. 

Group II: Hist. 247, 248, 249, and 338; Chem. 390; Psych. 360. Substitutions for the 
above specific courses may be permitted with the approval of the option adviser. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 261 



b. At least 24 hours of course work in a single discipline selected from the following: 
biolog>; ecology, ethology, and evolution; entomology; genetics and development; micro- 
biology physiology; plant biology; astronomy; biochemistry; chemistry; chemical engi- 
neering; geology; mathematics; or physics. In consultation with the option adviser, a 
student may design an interdepartmental program of science courses; in this case, at least 
6 of the 24 hours must be at the 300 level. 

\t least 3 hours in the Junior Tutorial and Seminar (Human. 297). 
d. At least 3 hours in the Senior Tutorial and Seminar (Human. 298). 
Medieval civilization. This option is intended to introduce students to medieval culture, 
provide them with a sense of periods, names, ideas, and movements in sequence, and thus give 
them a synoptic view of the field. Students whose interests are primarily literary should consult 
with an adviser in comparative literature or one of the language and literature departments. 
The required courses are designed to encourage students to read medieval texts, insofar as 
practical, in the manner that a medieval university student would have read them. In addition, 
a certain amount of training in the reading and interpretation of medieval documents and in 
the study of Latin and the medieval vernacular languages will bring students closer to the 
thought of the period. 
Requirements (45 hours) 

a. Acquire a reading knowledge of a foreign language relevant to the student's interests in 
medieval civilization. In most instances, this requirement will coincide with the college 
foreign language requirement. The language should be selected in consultation with the 
option adviser. 

b. Two introductory courses of at least 3 hours each selected in consultation with the 
option adviser. 

c. Complete two advanced-level topically oriented courses of at least 3 hours each selected 
in consultation with the option adviser. Selected courses should focus on a topic central 
to medieval civilization and should emphasize the international cultural and social unity 
of medieval civilization; sample topics include medieval vernacular literatures, mythology, 
the Bible and medieval exegesis, iconography, paleography and the medieval book, 
cosmography, geography in the Middle Ages, or the influence of Islam. Departmental 
courses, such as Hist. 331 or 332, and CI. Civ./Sp. Com. 315, or special topics courses, 
such as Human. 295, may be used to complete this requirement; but courses must be 
selected with the adviser's approval. 

d. Complete 27 hours of medieval-related course work selected in consultation with the 
option adviser from the departments of an, history, literature, music, philosophy, and 
religious studies. 

e. Complete at least 3 hours of the Junior Seminar and Tutorial (Human. 297). The medieval 
civilization topic of Human. 297 will require an ability to read primary and secondary- 
sources in a foreign language. 

f. Complete at least 3 hours of the Senior Thesis (Human. 292). The thesis should ordinarily 
be in one of the following areas: an, medieval Latin literature, vernacular literature, 
liturgy and worship, philosophy and theology, history, or science. 

Renaissance studies. This option incorporates course work in the Renaissance and related 
periods and places an emphasis on independent study and the completion of research papers 
in the junior and senior years. 

Requirements (45 hours 

a. Complete a minimum of 15 hours of Renaissance-related course work in a single discipline 
at the 200- and 300-level from among the following: an, history, literature, or music. 

b. Complete at least 24 hours of Renaissance-related course work in the following areas 
with at least one course in each: an, history, music, philosophy, and literature. At least 
one of these courses must be in classical literature or culture. 

c. Acquire a reading knowledge of a foreign language relevant to the student's interests in 
Renaissance study, selected in consultation with the option adviser. 

d. Complete at least 3 hours in the Junior Seminar and Tutorial (Human. 297), which will 
lead to the completion of a research paper that demonstrates an ability to initiate and 
complete a thorough study of a topic on the Renaissance. The successful completion of 
this paper is a prerequisite to the Senior Seminar and Tutorial. 



262 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



e. Complete at least 3 hours in the Senior Seminar and Tutorial (Human. 298), which will 
lead to the completion of a significant research paper. 
Departmental Distinction. To be eligible for graduation with distinction, students must have 
a college grade-point average of 4.5 and an option grade-point average of 4.75 and must 
complete an additional one-semester course or independent study or thesis. See the option 
adviser for details. 

Individual Plans of Study (IPS) 

Students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences may choose any of the 69 different 
undergraduate degree programs offered within the college. These fields of concentration and 
specialized curricula, each with its own pattern of requirements and electives, are continuously 
reviewed by the sponsoring departments and the college and revised as needed. At the same 
time, it is not possible to anticipate or specify all possible undergraduate fields of study. So, 
in order to encourage the growth of new academic disciplines, the college sponsors the 
experimental concentration — the Individual Plans of Study Program. IPS, initiated in 1971, 
allows the student to create an original concentration more appropriate for the individual's 
educational needs and characterized by a unique pattern of upper-level courses with a new 
academic direction. 

The development of an IPS program begins with the student's perception that a more 
appropriate field of study could exist beyond the present fields of concentration. Consulting 
with the secretary of the IPS Advisory Committee and with faculty members in related fields 
will soon establish whether or not an original concentration is appropriate. Then, with the 
cooperation of one or more faculty members who consent to serve as advisers for this IPS 
program, an IPS field of concentration is planned and justified as carefully as if this were a 
departmental concentration. Although an IPS program is usually interdisciplinary, combining 
courses from several departments and even colleges, the IPS program is part of the Sciences 
and Letters Curriculum. Thus students are required to satisfy the sciences and letters requirements 
of rhetoric, general education foreign language, and advanced hours; they must also complete 
at least 120 semester hours and satisfy the residency requirement. 

Once an IPS program is formulated, the student and adviser make formal application to the 
IPS Advisory Committee, which evaluates and decides whether a proposed IPS program is 
appropriate for the aims of both the student and the college. 

Students interested in IPS are encouraged to inquire at 912 South Fifth Street, Champaign, 
IL 61820 (333-4710), as early as possible in their sophomore year. In all cases, IPS programs 
must be initiated and approved before the end of the student's junior year. 
Departmental Distinction: To graduate with distinction, a student must (1) have a cumulative 
grade-point average of at least 4.25 (A = 5.0), and (2) successfully complete a project that has 
been approved by the IPS Advisory Committee. Further information on requirements for 
graduation with distinction may be obtained from the secretary of the IPS Advisory Committee. 

Italian 

This concentration is sponsored by the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese. See 
page 281. 

Latin American Studies 

Requirements: At least 42 hours 

A concentration in Latin American studies provides an integrated exploration of a major world 
area. Depending upon the student's interests and career aspirations, individual programs of 
study are designed in close consultation with a faculty adviser appointed by the director of 
the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Study programs should be planned with 
both an areal or regional focus (e.g., Brazil, the Andean countries) and a disciplinary or topical 
focus. A disciplinary focus may be limited to one field (e.g., economics, literature) or may be 
broader in scope (e.g., social science, humanities); a topical focus would include study in depth 
of subjects such as population or economic development. All study programs should reflect 
an integrative, cross-disciplinary approach, and courses must be taken in at least three disciplines. 
Students are also expected to demonstrate a substantial command of Spanish or Portuguese. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 263 



This requirement may be satisfied by talcing an approved sequence of courses in either language 
or by passing I proficiency examination. Although not a requirement, students concentrating 
in I atm American studies are urged to include, during the summer or regular academic year, 
a period of foreign residence and study in their program. 

REQUIREMENTS 

The field of concentration itself consists of a minimum of 42 semester hours of course work 
as follows: 

1. Primary focus (20 hours) 

2. Secondary focus (10 hours) 

3. Two courses in Spanish or Portuguese composition or conversation (5 to 6 hours) beyond 
the level specified by the LAS language requirement, or the equivalent as demonstrated by 
special examination 

4. Two semesters in Advanced Special Topics, L.A. St. 295 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible, a student must achieve at least a 4.5 grade-point 
average in the field of concentration, complete a senior thesis, and receive the approval of the 
center's Research Committee. 

Life Sciences 

(Including Anatomical Sciences; Bioengineering; Biophysics; Biology General; Biology 
Honors; Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution; Entomology; Microbiology; Physiology; and 
Plant Biology) 

Requirements for all options: 38-42 hours as given below. (Advanced and additional requirements 

vary according to option.) 
Mathematics: 5 hours of calculus 

Chemistry: 13-15 hours of chemistry through organic chemistry 
Biology: 10 hours of introductory biology 
Physics: 10-12 hours of general physics 

The School of Life Sciences departments have cooperated in developing a field of concentration 
in life sciences with a number of different options suitable for students with different educational 
objectives. Because of the interdependency of the biology subdisciplines and their reliance on 
the physical sciences, all undergraduates in this field are required to have a strong background 
in cognate sciences and broad exposure to biological materials, phenomena, and principles. 
Students who do not begin mathematics and chemistry in their freshman year generally will 
be at a disadvantage. In the advanced biological areas, students are expected to gain experience 
with living systems at the molecular, cellular, organismic, population, and community levels. 
The ways of achieving this training differ by option. 
Notes 

1. Each student is required to complete all requirements of an elected option to satisfy the 
requirements of the life sciences field of concentration. 

2. A student majoring or concentrating in an undergraduate program in the School of Life 
Sciences may not apply toward graduation more than 15 hours of 100-level life science 
courses (including cross-listed courses on this campus and courses transferred from other 
institutions). 

ANATOMICAL SCIENCES OPTION 

Life science courses: at least 23 hours (200- and 300-level courses) 
Basic science courses: 38-42 hours and 3 additional hours of calculus 
Cognate courses: 3 hours of biochemistry 

This option, administered by the Department of Anatomical Sciences, is intended to provide 
broad undergraduate training for students specifically interested in the structural makeup of 
animals at the cellular, tissue, organ, and organismic levels. Emphasis will be placed on structure 
as related to function. Students who choose this option will be prepared to pursue a course 
of studies for an advanced degree in the biological sciences, or for entry into technical 
occupations in research, industry, and health services. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120 and 132 

2. Chem. 101 and 102 or Chem. 107, 108, 109, and 110; Chem. 131 and 134 



264 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



3. Bioch. 350 (or Bioch. 352 and 353) 

4. Biol. 110 and 111 (or Biol. 151, 251, and 351) 

5. Phycs. 101 and 102 or Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 

6. Physl. 301, 302, and either 303 or 304 

7. Anat. 234 (Functional Human Anatomy) or E.E.E. 232 (Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy) 

8. Anat. 319 (Vertebrate Histology) 

9. At least one additional course from each of the following groups: 

Group I: Cells Group II: Tissues and Organs 

Biol. 210 Anat. 290 

Biol. 305 Anth. 356 

G.&D. 307 Anth. 394 

Sp. H.S. 375 

Sp. H.S. 376 

G.&D. 211 

Physl. 312 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible for departmental distinction, students must complete 
a senior thesis and be recommended by their faculty adviser. See the undergraduate adviser 
for details. 

BIOENGINEERING OPTION 

Life science courses: 10 hours (300-level courses) 

Basic science courses: 38-42 hours and 1 1 additional hours of mathematics 

Bioengineering/engineering courses: minimum 15 hours 

Administered by the Department of Physiology and Biophysics, the bioengineering option 
represents a broad, interdisciplinary field that brings together engineering, biology, and medicine 
to study basic biological phenomena and to create new techniques and devices to deal with 
specific medical problems. Its practice ranges from the fundamental study of the behavior of 
biological materials to the development of medical instruments. 

Students in this option must obtain a strong background in mathematics, physics, and 
chemistry in addition to the biological sciences. A number of engineering course sequences 
are also required. Students with specific career objectives in mind should consult with their 
adviser as early as possible to choose appropriate courses. 

Courses, in addition to those listed below, may be required for entrance into medical school 
or for graduate programs in engineering or the life sciences. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120, 132, 242, and 345 or 135, 245 and 345 

2. Chem. 107-109, Chem. 108-110, and Chem. 131 and 134 

3. Biol. 110 and 111 (or approved equivalent) 

4. Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 

5. Physl. 301-303 and 302-304 

6. Five engineering and bioengineering courses (two or more of the following sequences): 

Systems and modeling: (E.E. 260, E.E. 309, Bioen./E.E. 375) or approved systems sequence 

Bioinstrumentation: E.E. 260, E.E. 244, Bioen./E.E. 314, 315 

Biomaterials: Bioen. 308 

Transport phenomena: Bioen. 370/T.A.M. 393 or Bioen. 370C/M.E. 393 

Ultrasonics: E.E. 373, 374 

Radiobiology: Physl. 331 

Computer programming: C.S. 101 

Image processing: Bioen. 370D 

Recommended Cognate Study 

Physiology, biophysics, advanced engineering or physics courses, biochemistry, physical chemistry. 
Departmental Distinction. In addition to the above requirements, candidates must: enroll in 
Bioengineering 270 and, working with a Bioengineering faculty adviser, prepare a report based 
on laboratory or library research. This report will be submitted to a committee that will 
recommend the level of distinction. 

BIOLOGY GENERAL OPTION 1 

Life science courses: 21 hours (200- and 300-level courses) 
Basic science courses: 38-42 hours 



This statement reflects a revision which was pending final approval at the date of publication. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 265 



This option provides maximum flexibility by allowing the student to design his or her own 
program. In selecting courses at the 200- and 300-level, the student should strike a balance 
between breadth end specialization. Students electing this option, therefore, must discuss these 
matters with their adviser and complete an approved field of concentration (FOC) plan in the 
school office before the end of the second semester of their junior year. The study plan may 
be revised with adviser approval. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120 or 135 

2. ( hem. 101 and 102 or Chem. 107-109 and 108-110; Chem. 131 and 134 or Chem. 136 
and 181 

3. Biol. 110 and 111 

4. Phycs. 101 and 102; or Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 

5. Twenty-one additional hours in life sciences at the 200 and 300 level, including two field 
or laboratory courses. At least one course in each of the following four areas must be 
taken to fulfill the 21 hours required. These courses are to be selected in consultation with 
an adviser. 

1. Population biology-ecology-ethology 

2. Physiology-immunology 

3. Genetics 

4. Developmental morphology and anatomy 

Special topics courses (Anat. 290, E.E.E. 290, Entom. 290, G.&D. 290, Mcbio. 290, Physl. 

290, PI. Bio. 290) will not satisfy the 21 hour requirement. 
Recommended Cognate Study. Students are encouraged to elect individual study (Anat. 290, 
E.E.E. 290, Entom. 290, G.&D. 290, Mcbio. 290, Physl. 290, PI. Bio. 290); additional calculus, 
statistics, and/or computer science; or biochemistry. 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible for distinction, a student must maintain a minimum 
grade-point average of at least 4.0, register with the Biology Distinction Committee early in 
the senior year, and submit a report of an independent study project (290 or 292 rubric) one 
month prior to graduation for approval by the Biology Distinction Committee. 

BIOLOGY HONORS OPTION 

Life science courses: 14 hours (300-level courses) 

Basic science courses: 38-42 hours, 6 additional hours of calculus, 3-4 hours of statistics 

Cognate courses: 8 hours of biochemistry 

This option, administered by the Biology Honors Committee, is designed for superior students 
wishing to pursue an intensive introductory biology program and, concurrently, to gain a strong 
background in the physical sciences. The option provides preparation suitable for graduate 
and professional training in biology. 
Requirements 

1. Admission by interview in spring of freshman year 

2. Math. 242 

3. Chem. 107-109, 108-110, and 136-181 or 101 and 102 and 136/181 1 

4. Biol. 151, 251, and 351 (instead of 110 and 111) 2 

5. Phycs. 106, 107, 108 

6. An approved 200- or 300-level course in statistics 3 

7. Bioch. 350 and 355 or Bioch. 352 and 353 and 355 

8. Ten hours of 300-level life sciences courses (other than Biol. 351 and 371), two of which 
may be in undergraduate research (290 and 292 rubrics) 

9. Students must consult with their biology honors adviser at least once a semester 

1 The former sequence is recommended, and preference will be given on admission to 
students following it. 

2 Continuation in the biology honors option requires a grade of B or better in each of these 
courses. 

1 Biol. 371, Agron. 340, or Stat. 210/Math. 263, Stat. 310/Math. 363, or Math. 361/Stat. 
351 are recommended, as is additional training in statistics. Suitable sequences for those taking 
more than a single course are Biol. 371, 373; Agron. 340, 440; and Stat. 310-311 /Math. 363- 
364. 



266 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Recommended Cognate Study. A course in computer science (C.S. 101 or 121) is strongly 

recommended. 

Departmental Distinction. In addition to the above requirements, candidates for distinction 

must: 

1. Consult with the biology honors adviser early in their junior year, 

2. Complete an undergraduate research project, and 

3. Present an acceptable written report on the research to the Biology Distinction Committee 
one month prior to graduation. 

Notes: No 100-level course in life sciences (other than Biol. 123 and 151) is acceptable. 
Advisers may not make any substitutions or other changes in the above requirements. 
Credit is not ordinarily given for 200-level life science courses (except Biol. 251 and independent 
study courses). 

BIOPHYSICS OPTION 

Life science courses: 5-6 hours of biophysics 

Basic science courses: 38-42 hours, 9 additional hours of mathematics 

Advanced science courses: 12 hours 

This option, administered by the Biophysics Division of the Department of Physiology and 
Biophysics, is designed for the student who wishes a strong background in the physical sciences 
and mathematics but is basically interested in the life sciences. It is designed to provide 
guidelines as to which physical and life science courses especially complement each other. 
Because of the many possible course choices available, it is important that students within this 
option consult their option adviser throughout the entire undergraduate program. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120, 132, 242, and 345 

2. Chem. 107, 108, 109, and HO, 1 Chem. 131 and 134, or Chem. 136 and 181 

3. Biol. 110 and 111; or equivalent 1 

4. Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 1 

5. Bioph. 301 and one of 302, 320, 332, or 354 

6. Twelve additional hours of 200- or 300-level work in offerings from life sciences, chemistry, 
biochemistry, physics, mathematics, or bioengineering 

Recommendations. Advanced undergraduate courses highly recommended include: 

1. Biochemistry [Bioch. 350 (Lecture) and 355 (Lab)] 

2. Electromagnetic theory (Phycs. 331 and 333) 

3. Kinetic theory, thermodynamics, and statistical mechanics (Chem. 344; or Phycs. 361) 

4. Genetics (Biol. 210) 

5. Atomic physics (Chem. 342 or Phycs. 383) 

6. Physical chemistry of macromolecules (Chem. 346) 

The above listing of recommended courses is not intended to be limiting. The student should 
consult his or her faculty adviser about other advanced undergraduate cognate courses which 
may be taken toward fulfillment of the option requirement. 

Recommendations for Distinction. To earn distinction in the biophysics option, the candidate 
must enroll in Bioph. 290 and, working with a biophysics faculty adviser, prepare a report 
based on theoretical or experimental research. This report will be submitted to a committee 
that will recommend the level of distinction to the faculty. 



1 Students with alternative introductory sequences may petition for substitution. 

ECOLOGY, ETHOLOGY, AND EVOLUTION OPTION 

Life science courses: 20 hours (200- and 300-level) 
Basic science courses: 38-42 hours 

This option, administered by the Department of Ecology, Ethology, and Evolution, is intended 
to provide undergraduate training for life science concentrators who have a special interest in 
the closely related areas of animal ecology, behavior, and evolution. Students following this 
option will be prepared to pursue advance degrees in ecology, ethology, and evolution or to 
compete for jobs in zoos, governmental agencies (such as departments of conservation and 
environmental protection agencies), environmental consulting firms, and pest management firms. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 267 



Because of the broad scope of this option and the numerous relevant courses, specific course 
requirements are tew. The student, in consultation with an option adviser, should develop a 
program in biology with cognate study in geology, geography, psychology, and related areas. 
Suggested course work for specialized programs can be obtained from the department. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120 or 135 

2. Chem. 101 and 102 or Chem. 107-109 and 108-110; Chem. 131 and 134 or Chem. 136 
and 181 

3. Biol. 110 and 111 

4. Phvcs. 101 and 102; or Phvcs. 106, 107, and 108 

5. E.E.E. 212, E.E.E. 301, E.E.E. 346, and Biol. 210 

6. At least 5 additional life science hours at the 200-level or above, chosen in consultation 
with an adviser 

Recommended Cognate Study. Courses in statistics (Biol. 371) and computer science (C.S. 103) 
and biochemistry (Bioch. 350). 

Departmental Distinction. To be eligible for distinction, a student must maintain at least a 4.0 
grade-point average (4.25 in option requirements), complete a research project, including at 
least two hours of E.E.E. 290, and submit an acceptable research report. 

ENTOMOLOGY OPTION 

Life science courses: 20 hours (200- and 300-level courses) 
Basic science courses: 38-42 hours and 3-4 hours of statistics 

This option is intended to provide undergraduate training to life science concentrators who 
are interested in careers in entomology in an academic, governmental, or industrial setting. 
Opportunities are provided within the option for students to obtain a broad science background 
for advanced work and to obtain exposure to a wide variety of entomological specializations. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120 or 135 

2. Chem. 101 and 102 or Chem. 107-109 and 108-110; Chem. 131 and 134 or Chem. 136 
and 181 

3. Biol. 110 and 111 

4. Phycs. 101 and 102; or Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 

5. Entom. 301 and 302 plus one additional 300-level entomology course 

6. A course in statistics 

7. Eleven hours of additional life science courses chosen in consultation with an entomology 
adviser 

Recommended Cognate Study. Undergraduate research (Entom. 290) directed by a member of 
the Department of Entomology. 

Departmental Distinction. Candidates must maintain a 4.0 grade-point average overall (4.5 in 
the entomology option) and complete an undergraduate thesis based on a project agreed upon 
with the departmental adviser (minimum of 4 hours credit in Entom. 290). The Departmental 
Distinction Committee shall, upon approval of the thesis, determine the level of distinction. 
See the adviser for details at the beginning of the junior year. 

GENETICS AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY OPTION 

This option will be discontinued. Students in the option as of fall 1986 may continue in the 
option, but students will not be admitted to the option after fall 1986. Students interested in 
genetics and development should consult the Life Sciences Advising Office (393 Morrill Hall) 
for advice on which of the options in this concentration would be most appropriate to their 
individual interests. Study in genetics continues to be available through the various options in 
the life sciences concentration. 

MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 

Life science courses: 25 hours (200- and 300-level courses) 

Basic science courses: 38-42 hours, and 3-4 hours of additional mathematics 

Cognate courses: 6 hours of biochemistry/chemistry 

This option is intended to provide a strong educational background in microbiology and its 



268 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



supporting disciplines. Students satisfying the requirements of the microbiology option may 
expect to be well prepared for additional study toward higher degrees or for entry into a wide 
variety of technical occupations, including research, health services, and industrial or agricultural 
activities. Students may design their study programs to extend their experience in genetics or 
other areas of biology, in biochemistry or other areas of chemistry, or in the social and 
economic aspects of microbiology. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120 and one of the following: Math. 132 or 161, or Biol. 371, or C.S. 101 

2. Chem. 101 and 102 or Chem. 107-109 and 108-110; Chem. 131 and 134 

3. Biol. 110 and 111 

4. Bioch. 350 or Bioch. 352 and 353 

5. Bioch. 355 (preferable) or Chem. 122 

6. Phycs. 101 and 102 or Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 

7. Biol. 210 

8. Mcbio. 200 and 201 

9. At least 15 hours of 300-level microbiology courses, including at least one course from 
each of the following groups and at least one laboratory course: 

Group I: Mcbio. 316, 330, 331 

Group II: Mcbio. 309, 327, 351 

Group III: Mcbio. 311, 312, 326, 328 
Recommended Cognate Study. Independent laboratory study (Mcbio. 290). 
Departmental Distinction. In addition to the above requirements, candidates for distinction 
must submit a satisfactory senior research thesis (Mcbio. 292) and maintain a minimum grade- 
point average of 4.5 (A = 5.0) when fulfilling all the requirements. Contact the microbiology 
undergraduate adviser at the midpoint of the junior year. The department recognizes a single 
level of distinction. 

PHYSIOLOGY OPTION 

Life science courses: 23 hours minimum (200- and 300-level courses) 
Basic science courses: 38-42 hours and 6 additional hours of calculus 
Cognate courses: 3 hours of biochemistry 

Physiology is a subdivision of experimental biology which is concerned with the analysis of 
function in living cells or organisms with particularly strong emphasis on regulation and 
integration. Specialities within the field include subjects related to behavior (integrative 
neurophysiology), the relations of lower organisms with their environment (comparative 
physiology or physiological zoology), the relations of the human species with its environment 
(ergonomics and human physiology), interrelations between and functioning of organ systems 
in the whole organism (mammalian physiology), and the fundamental molecular and cellular 
mechanisms of life (cell physiology and biophysics). 

Numerous choices must be made amongst the physical sciences, physiology, and related 
areas of biology. Therefore, it is essential that a student concentrating in physiology consult 
with his or her adviser as early as possible and at frequent intervals. In addition to offering 
counsel for making these choices, the adviser is also the proper person to approve any 
substitutions in the following curriculum. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120, 132 and 242 or 135 and 245 or equivalent 

2. Chem. 107-109 and Chem. 108-110 (101 and 102 acceptable); Chem. 131 and 134 

3. Bioch. 350 or Bioch. 352-353 

4. Biol. 110 and 111 (or approved equivalent) 

5. At least one year of physics (Phycs. 101-102 acceptable; Phycs. 106, 107, 108 recommended) 

6. Biol. 210 (or approved equivalent) 

7. Physl. 301 and 302; Physl. 303 and 304 (Physl. 290 research, Bioch. 355, or another 
laboratory course in physiology may be substituted for either 303 or 304, but not both) 

8. A minimum of 9 additional advanced hours in physiology or biophysics chosen from the 
following: 

Biophysics: 301, 302, 354 
Physiology: 312, 316, 331, 341 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 269 



Recommended Cognate Study. The following courses arc recommended for cognate study: 
Bcbmrioral biology: Biol. 303j E.E.E, 212, 340, 346, 347, J50, J53, J54? GAD. 304; Psych. 

210, 217, 120, 143 
Cclluhr mtd mokadmt biology. Biol. 303, 324; Chem. 346; G.&D. 213, 307, 309, 312; Mcbio. 
. £6, *30, 331; Phycs. 350; PL Bio. 335 
amismic biology: Biol. J03, 324; Bioen. 375; E.E.E. 232, 340; Entom. 301; G.&cD. 211, 

»4, J09, 112; Psych. 210; PI. Bio. 330, 345. 
Quantitative biology: Biol. 371, 372, 373; Bioen. 308, 314, 315, 375; Chem. 346; G.E. 222; 

Phycs. 350; Psych. 320 
Departmental Distinction. Candidates for distinction must enroll in Physl. 290 and, working 
with a departmental adviser, prepare a report based on laboratory or library research. This 
report will be submitted to a committee which will recommend the level of distinction. 

PLANT BIOLOGY OPTION 

Life science courses: at least 21 hours of 200- and 300-level courses 

Basic science courses: 38-42 hours 

Cognate courses: 10 hours chosen in consultation with an adviser 

This option provides training for students who seek a broad plant science background in 
preparation for advanced work in plant biology or applied plant sciences. It provides opportunity 
for study of a wide variety of basic and applied specializations. 
Requirements 

1. Math. 120 or 135 

2. Chem. 101 and 102 or Chem. 107-109 and 108-110; and Chem. 131-134 

3. PI. Bio. 100 and an additional lecture-lab course in life sciences, or Biol. 110-111 

4. Phycs. 101 and 102; or Phycs. 106, 107 and 108 

5. Plant taxonomy (PI. Bio. 260), genetics (Biol. 210), plant physiology (PI. Bio. 330), plant 
morphology (PI. Bio. 304), and plant ecology (PI. Bio. 381) 

6. Individual study (PI. Bio. 290 or 292) during the junior or senior year 

7. Required cognate study: At least 10 hours of additional courses selected in consultation 
with a faculty adviser from the following: agronomy, biochemistry, biology, chemistry, 
entomology, forestry, geography, geology, horticulture, mathematics, microbiology, physics, 
physiology, and plant pathology. Other cognate fields may be considered through consultation 
with the individual faculty adviser. 

Departmental Distinction. A student must maintain an average of 4.25 overall and 4.5 in life 
science courses and complete a senior thesis. See the adviser (by the junior year) for details. 

Linguistics 

Linguistics courses: 30 hours 

Cognate courses: 6-8 hours of western civilization, plus 14 hours (chosen in consultation with an 
adviser) 

The Department of Linguistics offers undergraduate instruction of two types. 

1. General linguistics courses have two purposes: they arc intended to prepare students for 
various careers in which the scientific study of language is of significance; they are, 
furthermore, the basis for continued professional training toward the M.A. and Ph.D. 
degrees in this field. 

2. Non-Western language courses are offered regularly in Arabic, Hebrew, Hindi, Persian, and 
various African languages (Hausa, Lingala, Swahili, Wolof). One language, Hebrew, may be 
taken as an option of the field of concentration (see option 2 below). 

REQUIREMENTS: OPTION 1 — GENERAL LINGUISTICS 

Core Courses: Thirty hours, including Ling. 200, 225, 300, 301, and 302. The remaining core 

courses are to be selected from among other 200- and 300-level courses. Students are expected 

to take two additional courses in each of two special areas of linguistics, such as psycholinguistics, 

applied linguistics, sociolinguistics, mathematical and computational linguistics, non-Western 

language structure, and area linguistics (African, classics, Far Eastern, Gemanic, Indo-European, 

romance, Semitic, Slavic, South Asian). 

Cognate Studies: Fourteen hours, in linguistically relevant courses in any one or more of the 



270 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



following disciplines: anthropology, classics, computer science, English, English as a second 
language, French, Germanic, philosophy, psychology, Slavic, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, 
speech and hearing science, and speech communication. In addition, students are encouraged 
to take two years of a second foreign language in addition to the language used to satisfy the 
college foreign language requirement. This second language may be either a Western or non- 
Western language. Each student's program, including the selection of the special areas and 
second language credit, is to be worked out in consultation with the departmental adviser. 
Western Civilization: Six to eight hours of western civilization (Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141- 
142). 

REQUIREMENTS: OPTION 2 — HEBREW LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS 

This option provides the student with a broad knowledge of the Hebrew language, both 
modern and biblical, as well as with introductory training in general linguistics. 

Core Courses: Thirty hours, including Ling. 200 and one other course in linguistics; Hebr. 305, 
306, 307, 308; 8 hours of biblical Hebrew, chosen from Hebr. 205, 206, 210, 311. All 
substitutions must be approved by the coordinator of the option. 

Cognate Studies: Fourteen hours, which should constitute a coherent program complementing 
the concentration in Hebrew language and linguistics. Possible cognates include Jewish culture 
and society, biblical literature, anthropology, classics, and the study of additional languages. 
The program of cognate studies will be planned by the student in conjunction with the Hebrew 
language coordinator. 

Western Civilization: Six to eight hours of western civilization (Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141- 
142). 

Departmental Distinction: Candidates for the degree with Distinction must register their 
candidacy with their adviser no later than the beginning of the second semester of the junior 
year. The student must achieve a grade-point average of at least 4.4 (A = 5.0) for the required 
30 hours in linguistics including at least 4 hours credit for individual study. For graduation 
with High or Highest Distinction, the same minimum requirements apply, plus the submission 
of a senior honors thesis to be submitted to the Department of Linguistics by the first day of 
the month preceding the month of graduation. 

Mathematics (Concentrations in actuarial science, mathematics, and 
mathematics and computer science) 
Actuarial Science 

Mathematics courses: 18 hours (300-level courses) 

Finance courses: 12 hours 

Cognates/prerequisites: 10-11 hours of calculus and 3-4 hours of computer science 

The field of concentration is designed to prepare students to enter the actuarial profession. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. Calculus through Math. 242 or 245, or equivalent 

2. C.S. 101, 105, or 121, or equivalent 

3. Math. 310, 311, 369, 370 (or Math./C.S. 257) 

4. Math./Stat. 308, 309 

5. Math. 371, and either 372 or one of: Math. 313, 318, 344 or 347, 358, 365, 368, 376, 384; 
C.S. 221, 225, 300. (Replacement for Math. 372 needs adviser approval.) 

6. Four finance courses chosen from Fin. 235, 237, 254, 260, 262, 360, 363, 370, and 371. 
Students should consult an adviser in selecting the courses. 

7. Students are urged to elect Accy. 200 or 201, or B. Adm. 261 in their junior or senior year 
Departmental Distinction. To qualify for Distinction, the student must take Math. 372, have 
a grade-point average in mathematics courses of at least 4.25, and pass one actuarial society 
examination. To qualify for High or Highest Distinction, the student must pass two exams, 
with Highest Distinction going to those whose grade-point average in mathematics is at least 
4.75. Finance courses may also be given consideration in close decisions. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 271 



Mathematics 

Mathematics courses: 24-30 hours beyond calculus 

Cognates/prerequisites: 10 or 11 hours of calculus, 3 or 4 hours of computer science, and 8-10 
hours chosen in consultation with an adviser 

Mathematics is a broad discipline that contains a range of areas of specialization within it. 
The required courses in Part I provide fundamental background for mathematics in general. 
The options in Part II indicate several directions that can be taken in mathematics. Also see 
the fields of concentration in actuarial science, mathematics and computer science, and statistics, 
and the curriculum in the teaching of mathematics. 

An entering student in mathematics should have academic preparation to enroll in Math. 
120 during the first semester. Admission to Math. 120 requires a passing grade on the 
Mathematics Placement Test. Students should attain at least a 3.5 average in calculus courses 
if they expect to complete the advanced courses in the program successfully. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Part I: The following are required of all students: 

1. Calculus through Math. 242, 245, or equivalent 

2. Computer science (C.S. 101 or 121) 

3. Intermediate analysis (Math. 247) 

4. Abstract algebra (Math. 317) 

5. Linear algebra (Math. 315 or 318) 

6. Real analysis (Math. 344 or 347) 

7. Probability-statistics (Math. 361/Stat. 351 or Math. 363/Stat. 310) 
Part II: In addition, one of the following options must be completed: 

Option 1: Graduate Preparatory. This option is for students who intend to continue their 
studies in graduate school. Different areas of mathematics can be emphasized. For example, 
students who have an interest in physical applications should take differential equations (Math. 
341, 342) and cognate courses in physics. Students interested in discrete mathematics should 
take combinatorial analysis (Math. 313) and graph theory (Math. 312). Other areas are also 
possible. 

1. Math. 318 and 347 should be chosen in Part I 

2. Math. 348 and either Math. 323 or 332 

3. Two additional mathematics courses numbered 290 or higher 

4. At least 8 hours in a cognate subject 

Option 2: Operations Research. This option is for students interested in management science, 
industrial planning, and related areas. This option also provides excellent preparation for 
graduate study in business administration, economics, or industrial engineering. 

1. Math./C.S. 257 

2. Math. 363/Stat. 310 should be taken in Part I, and either Math. 364/Stat. 311 or Math. 
369/Stat. 320 

3. Math. 383 and 384 

4. Either Math. 312 or 313 

5. At least 8 hours in economics, business administration, and industrial engineering 
Option 3: Theory of Computation. This option is for students interested in the theoretical 
aspects of computer science. This option prepares students for graduate study in mathematics 
or computer science or for work in computer industries. 

1. Nine hours of computer science beyond C.S. 121, including C.S. 273 

2. Math. 319, Math./C.S. 373, and Math./C.S. 375 

3. One additional course chosen from Math. 312, 313, 314, 377, 383, 384 

Option 4: General Mathematics. This option permits emphasis in a variety of directions. Choice 
of mathematics courses and related cognate courses can provide preparation for work in 
economics, geology, psychology, physics, and many other fields in business, industry, and 
government. 

1. Three additional courses in mathematics numbered 290 or higher 

2. At least 10 hours in a cognate subject 



272 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Departmental Distinction. Distinction will be awarded on the basis of selection of 300-level 
courses in mathematics and grade-point average. 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

This concentration is sponsored jointly by the Departments of Mathematics and Computer 
Science. See page 250. 

Music 

Music courses: 37-41 hours (excluding keyboard skills requirement) 
Cognate courses: 11-12 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

The field of concentration in music is designed for students whose academic interests are 
broader or more compelling than can be accommodated within the several FAA music programs 
(page 224). This program, which incorporates a high degree of flexibility beyond the core of 
required courses, is not professionally oriented, but can prepare the way for graduate study in 
music theory, composition, or the various branches of musicology. 

REQUIREMENTS 

All students in the music concentration must complete or proficiency the following core of 
courses for a total of 29 to 31 credit hours: 
Music 101-104, 107-109, and one 300-level music theory course; 
Music 110, 213-214, and one 300-level musicology course. 

All students in the concentration must, in addition, possess or acquire some mastery of 
keyboard skills, which may be demonstrated by successfully completing Music 160-161, or 
through an appropriate audition. (Students who wish to pursue studies in applied music are 
required to satisfy the instrumental or vocal qualifying audition designed for students outside 
the School of Music; credits earned in applied music beyond the keyboard requirement stated 
above are generally considered elective.) Students in this program may not use hours from 
Music 100 toward the minimum 120 hours for graduation. Normally, students begin the study 
of music theory with Music 101. 

The remainder of the program, consisting of at least 8 to 9 additional hours of upper-level 
music courses and 11 to 12 hours of cognate work in other fields, is planned by the student 
with the help of a departmental adviser of his or her choice, subject to the approval of the 
departmental advising chairperson. Three general options are available in the music concentra- 
tion: music history, ethnomusicology, and music theory/composition. The choice of courses 
within these options may vary considerably according to the interests of the student. The 
following models illustrate the types of programs recommended but specify neither absolute 
requirements nor limitations. 
Music History Option 

1. With emphasis on medieval / Renaissance music. 

a. Music 307, 308 and either 310 or 311. 

b. Cognate courses chosen from Hist. Ill, 112, 203, 204, 304, 305 (or 332 and 333); 
A course in medieval or Renaissance literature (e.g., Engl. 202, 204, C. Lit. 204); 
Art Hi. Ill; 

Lat. 101, 102. 

2. With emphasis on music since the Renaissance. 

a. Music 308, 313, 314, 315. 

b. Cognate courses chosen from Hist. Ill, 112, 309, 310 (or 312, 313), 324; 
Engl. 206 and 207; 

Art Hi. 112. 
Ethnomusicology Option 

1. With emphasis on American Indian cultures. 

a. Music 308, 317 (6 hours) and one additional course from the series 310-315. 

b. Cognate courses chosen from Anth. 103, 230, 331, 332 (or 333 or 361); 
Relst. 363; 

Hist. 151, 152. 

2. With emphasis on India and Middle Eastern culture. 

a. Music 308, 317 (6 hours) and one additional course from the series 310-315. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 273 



b. Cognate courses chosen from Anth. 103, 230, and 368. 
v With emphasis on African and Afro American cultures. 

a. Music 308, 317 (6 hours) and one additional course from the series 310-315. 

b. Cognate courses chosen from Anth. 103, 230, and 261; 

One sequence in Afro-American history such as Anth. 367 and Hist. 215 or Hist. 253- 
254. 
Music Theory/Composition Option 

1. With emphasis on music theory. 

a. Music courses chosen from Music 300-309. 

b. Cognate courses chosen to include Math. 118; 

One course in English composition (e.g., Rhet. 133 or equivalent); 

One course in philosophy with emphasis on aesthetics (e.g., Phil. 101, 102, 105, or 323). 

2. With emphasis on composition. 

a. Music 106, 204-206, 306. 

b. Cognate courses chosen to include Math. 118; 

One course in English composition (e.g., Rhet. 133 or equivalent); 

One course in philosophy with emphasis on aesthetics (e.g., Phil 101, 102, 105, or 323). 
Departmental Distinction. Students interested in attaining departmental distinction should 
consult with the honors adviser no later than the second semester of their junior year. In order 
to be eligible for departmental distinction, a student must have a cumulative grade-point 
average of 4.4 or above (at the end of the sixth semester) and must complete 4 hours of Music 
229 — Thesis and Advanced Undergraduate Honors in Music. Distinction will be recommended 
at the discretion of the faculty after an evaluation of the student's overall record and the 
completed thesis. 



Philosophy 

Requirements: 44 hours, including 
Philosophy courses: At least 23 hours 
Cognate courses: At least 12 hours 
Western civilization sequence: 6-8 hours as listed 



Philosophy is the oldest, broadest, and most fundamental form of inquiry. Some philosophical 
questions have to do with the understanding of ourselves and whatever else there may be. 
Others concern the nature of different forms of knowledge and experience. And others have 
to do with ethical issues and problems of value. The study of philosophy is one of the most 
important elements in a good liberal education. Philosophical training is also very useful in 
that it improves one's ability to think clearly and to construct, analyze, and criticize arguments 
of any kind. 

REQUIREMENTS 

The concentration in philosophy involves taking a minimum of 44 hours of philosophy and 
cognate course work and consists of four parts: (1) the core philosophy courses (14 hours); (2) 
a cognate program, involving at least 12 hours of course work in some other department(s); 
(3) a Western civilization sequence (6-8 hours); and (4) at least 9 hours of further course work 
in philosophy beyond the 100 level, including at least two additional 300-level courses. 

1. Core philosophy courses. If possible, concentrators should take these courses prior to their 
senior year. 

a. Either Phil. 102 (Logic and Reasoning) or Phil. 202 (Symbolic Logic). Students planning 
graduate work in philosophy should take 202. 

b. Phil. 203 (Ancient Philosophy). 

c. Phil. 206 (Early Modern Philosophy). 

d. Phil. 321 (Ethics and Value Theory). 

2. Cognate course work. A concentrator may select either of two types of cognate program 
and should work out a specific program of the type chosen with the help and approval of 
a department adviser. 

Option I: Intensive study in another discipline. This comprises a minimum of 12 hours of 

course work, normally beyond the 100-level, in one other discipline. 

Option II: A special program of study built around a unifying theme or topic. This will 



274 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



involve a minimum of 12 hours of course work outside of philosophy in one or more other 
discipline(s), normally beyond the 100-level, together with one or more philosophy course(s) 
related to the theme or topic. The program may focus upon an historical period, a certain 
subject (e.g., language, politics, science, religion, art), or a particular philosophical problem, 
with outside course work in appropriate disciplines. 

3. Western civilization sequence. To ensure that they have a general knowledge of western 
civilization, all students in philosophy must take an approved two-semester sequence in 
western civilization — currently either Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141-142. 

4. Further course work. The remainder of a student's concentration is planned by the student 
with the help and approval of an adviser. It may include additional cognate courses but 
must enable the student to satisfy the requirement of a total of at least 9 hours of course 
work in philosophy beyond the 100-level (including at least two 300-level courses) in 
addition to the core courses. 

Departmental Distinction. Concentrators may become eligible for graduation with distinction 
in philosophy in two ways: by pursuing either the thesis option or the course work option. (1) 
The thesis option involves taking a total of at least 28 hours of course work in philosophy 
and writing a thesis. (2) The course work option involves taking at least 35 hours of course 
work in philosophy and accumulating a grade-point average in all philosophy courses taken 
of at least 4.5. Further information is available in the department office. 

Physics 

Physics courses: 20 hours (200- or 300-level courses) 

Cognates/prerequisites: 11 (or 10) hours of calculus, 12 hours of general physics, and 20 hours 
(chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

This field of concentration allows students maximum flexibility to develop scientifically oriented 
careers in fields requiring a physics background. See also the Engineering Physics, LAS Physics, 
and LAS Teaching of Physics curricula. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. General physics and calculus satisfied by the sequence Phycs. 106, 107, and 108, or equivalent, 
together with the sequence Math. 120, 132, and 242, or equivalent. 

2. Twenty hours of 200- or 300-level physics courses including Phycs. 210, 331, 332, 333, and 
excluding Phycs. 319. 

3. Twenty additional hours of courses oriented toward physical science selected with depart- 
mental approval from the following areas, with at least two courses in each area chosen: 
astronomy, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, computer science, various branches of engi- 
neering, environmental sciences (see departmental office for listing), geology, life sciences, 
mathematics, philosophy, social sciences, and education oriented toward the teaching of 
science. 

Departmental Distinction. Same as those listed under the curriculum in physics. See page 287. 

Political Science 

Political science courses: 27 hours (including Pol. S. 150) 
Cognate courses: 20 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

The Department of Political Science encourages students to acquire a broad understanding of 
political science and to pursue in depth selected subfields of the discipline. To accomplish 
these objectives, the department provides courses of study that introduce students to the 
discipline and to its principal fields. Among these are American government, politics, and 
administration; comparative government, politics, and administration; international relations, 
organization, and foreign policy; normative theory; and political behavior and empirical theory. 
Cognate courses are an integral part of the program and should be selected with a view toward 
building a coherent selection adapted to the student's particular needs. 

REQUIREMENTS 

The field of concentration in political science requires 47 hours. Of these, 27 hours must be 
within the Department of Political Science. They must include the following: 
1. Pol. S. 150 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 275 



2. Any three of the courses Pol. S. 100, 240, 260, 270, 280 

3. At least four courses at the 300 level. (Most 300-level courses will require as a prerequisite 
the appropriate 200-level course [or, in the case of American politics courses, 150] or 
consent of instructor.) Up to 6 hours of credit in Pol. S. 299 may be substituted for 300- 
level credit. Pol. S. 296 counts for this purpose as a 300-level course. 

Not more than 6 hours of individual study courses in political science may be included in 
the field of concentration. Pol. S. 293 is reserved for those seniors doing honors theses for 
distinction in political science and may not be counted in the 47-hour minimum required for 
the field of concentration. 

Outside the department, at least 20 cognate hours are required in a field or fields to be 
selected in conjunction with the student's adviser. Cognate courses should complement subfield 
concentrations in political science chosen by the student. At least 12 of these 20 hours must 
be at the 200-level or above. 

Departmental Distinction. Concentrators earn distinction in political science with a 4.25 grade- 
point average in political science courses that must include 4 hours of Pol. S. 293 (senior 
honors thesis). See departmental academic adviser for details. 

Portuguese 

This concentration is sponsored by the Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese. See 
page 281. 

Psychology 

Psychology courses: 32 hours (including an introductory course) 
Cognate courses: 12 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Psychology is the scientific study of human and animal behavior. Psychologists study behavior 
in systems ranging from single cells to the individual person, from small groups to communities. 
Psychologists strive to describe behavior and to understand its underlying biological and social 
mechanisms. This enterprise, designed to better understand human behavior, accumulates 
knowledge that can help solve problems faced by individuals and by communities. 

Some specializations in psychology: 
Biological psychology is the study of the biological mechanisms underlying behavior. Biological 
psychologists generally are interested in the brain and the nervous system, in the endocrine 
system, and in other organismic processes. 

Clinical psychology is the study of problems encountered by individuals, groups, and families 
— especially problems involving psychopathology. Clinical psychologists are interested in the 
application of psychological knowledge and techniques for the alleviation of these problems. 
Community psychology is the study of social processes and problems of groups, organizations, 
and neighborhoods, and the development and evaluation of progress for social change and 
social policy based on psychological understanding. 

Developmental psychology is the study of intellectual development, emerging personality, the 
acquisition of language, as well as psychophysiological and social development processes as 
individuals develop from birth through old age. 

Engineering psychology uses scientific study to develop an understanding of human behavior, 
and to improve the efficiency of interactions between humans and machines. 
Experimental psychology is the study of basic behavioral and cognitive processes, including 
learning, memory, perception, attention, problem solving, motivation, and psycholinguistics. 
Measurement and mathematical psychology specialists develop mathematical models of 
psychological processes and devise methods for quantitative representation and analysis of data 
about behavior. These are used in the study of differences between individuals in ability, 
personality, preferences, and other psychological phenomena. 

Personality psychology focuses on individual behavior. It is the study of ways to understand 
and describe an individual's behavior and to predict an individual's future behavior. 
Personnel psychology is the application of techniques of assessment, prediction, and intervention 
to areas of human resources in organizations, including, but not limited to, standard personnel 
selection and training, attitude assessments and interventions, and program evaluations. 



276 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Social psychology is the study of attitudes, social perception and cognition, interpersonal 
relations, interpersonal interactions, and social and cultural factors affecting human behavior. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Core Requirements. A minimum of 32 hours in psychology including 12 hours of advanced 

courses. Advanced courses in psychology include 291, 293, 294, 297, 298, and all 300-level 

courses. 

1. Introductory course in psychology (100, 103, or 105). 

2. Statistics for psychologists (235 or equivalent). 

3. Two courses from the following: Psych. 210 (Mind and the Brain), 217 (Comparative 
Psychology), 224 (Cognitive Psychology), 230 (Perception and Sensory Processes), 248 
(Learning and Memory), 258 (Human Factors in Human-Machine Systems). 

4. Two courses from 201 (Social Psychology), 216 (Child Psychology), 238 (Abnormal Psy- 
chology), 245 (Industrial Psychology), 250 (Psychology of Personality). 

5. A course in psychology research methods which may be satisfied by any course listed below 
with an asterisk or by Psychology 211 or 231. 

6. One course from each of the following 300-level groups: 

a. Biological and experimental psychology: Psych. 311*, 313, 314, 315, 320, 324, 325, 326, 
329, 330*, 331*, 342, 345*, 347*, 348, 356, 360. 

b. Industrial, measurement, and social psychology: Psych. 332*, 333*, 335, 352, 353, 354, 
355, 357, 358, 359, 371, 373, 375, 390*. 

c. Developmental, personality and social ecology, and clinical psychology: Psych. 318, 323, 
336, 337, 350*, 362, 363*, 365, 368, 380. 

Note: A course may be used to fulfill both the research methods requirement and a specific 
group requirement. 

Cognate Requirements. A minimum of 12 hours is required in course work outside of 
psychology that will complement the core program. These courses must be approved by an 
academic adviser. 

UNDERGRADUATE AREAS OF EMPHASIS 

A number of emphases within the field of concentration in psychology are designed for students 
who are seeking a general liberal arts degree, an applied degree, or a degree that will provide 
a solid academic background in preparation for graduate education in psychology and related 
fields. Lists of the required and suggested courses are available from the Psychology Under- 
graduate Advising Office. 

General psychology is designed for students interested in a broad liberal arts education with 
psychology as a focal area and for students who plan to attend a graduate or professional 
school in fields other than psychology. Examples of these specializations include premedicine, 
prelaw, and preparation for graduate work in fields such as social work, business administration, 
and labor relations. 

Applied psychology is for students interested in learning skills necessary for jobs in certain 
service areas that require a bachelor's degree only. The following programs are available: 

1 . The Mental Health Workers Program is designed to develop knowledgeable and experimental 
mental health practitioners capable of providing direct services to clients as well as supervise 
lower-level staff in the implementation of treatment programs. Training includes a core of 
general and mental health-related psychology courses and a series of field placements. 

2. The Developmental Child Care Program is designed to prepare specialists who will be 
working with children, including children with special needs such as those who are maltreated, 
hospitalized, and delayed in physical and/or mental development, and children with problems 
in social/emotional adjustment. 

Graduate preparatory in psychology is designed mainly to provide students with a solid 
academic background that will prepare them for graduate education in a number of psychology 
specializations. Career opportunities in these specializations vary as does the required level of 
graduate school training. While a doctorate is needed for most areas of academic psychology, 
a master's degree is sufficient for careers in many applied psychology fields such as Personnel 
Psychology, Measurement Psychology, and Engineering Psychology. 

A Combined Engineering-Liberal Arts and Sciences Five-year Program leading to bachelor's 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 277 



degrees from both colleges (see page 238) is available with a psychology concentration. 
Piycholog) ind cognate courses, including allied courses in personnel psychology, are combined 
with the Student's engineering curriculum to provide a specialization in engineering psychology. 
Tailored to complement the engineering curriculum, this program can be of potential benefit 
to the student's engineering career or used as the foundation for graduate training in engineering 
psychology. An engineering psychology program might include Psych. 103, 158, 230, 235, 245, 
248, 258, 301, J56, J57, and 330 or 390. 

Departmental Distinction. Graduation with departmental distinction requires successful com- 
pletion of the department's undergraduate honors program. This program is a three-semester 
pattern of courses designed to offer promising undergraduates an opportunity to do sustained 
scholarly work in a specific research project, culminating in the preparation of a bachelor's 
thesis. Consult the Undergraduate Advisory Office for details. 

ACADEMIC ADVISING 

The Psychology Undergraduate Advising Office is open to help students choose patterns of 
courses relevant to the various concentration options and specializations, as well as to help 
students explore graduate school, professional school, and career options. Advising is done by 
the faculty and a staff of academic counselors. 

A Psychology Student Information Center (PSI Center), staffed by student volunteers, provides 
student-to-student information about various department and community educational oppor- 
tunities, career and graduate school planning, and related information. 

Religious Studies 

Religious studies courses: 24 hours (minimum) 

Cognate courses: 6-8 hours of Western civilization, together with sufficient courses to total at least 
48 hours for the concentration 

The first area below, Religion and Culture, is designed for students seeking a broad liberal arts 
education with a focus in religious studies. Persons thinking of the ministry or rabbinate are 
encouraged to consider this area seriously. It should be recognized that the high number of 
hours involved amounts to offering more than the usual guidance in the choice of electives. 

The last five areas are designed especially for students thinking about graduate work in one 
of the traditional areas of religious studies. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Core Courses (eight courses) 

1. Rel. St. 110 — Comparative perspectives 

2. Rel. St. 201, 202 — Biblical studies 

3. Rel. St. 104 or 122 — Asian religion 

4. Rel. St. 102 or 230 — Critical perspectives 

5. Rel. St. 120 (or 121 or 130) — Judaism or Christianity (chosen in consultation with the 
undergraduate adviser) 

6. Western civilization requirement — Hist. Ill and 112 or C. Lit. 141 and 142 

Area of Specialization (eight to ten courses). 

The following programs are examples of acceptable patterns for a concentration in religious 
studies. Any coherent program worked out in consultation with an adviser is permitted. A 
careful use of independent studies courses (Rel. St. 290) is also encouraged for the development 
of suitable concentrations. 
Religion and Culture (ten courses) 

1 . Two semesters of an appropriate language (e.g., Greek, Hebrew, Chinese, or German) chosen 
in consultation with the undergraduate adviser. 

2. Religious studies — three courses (200-level or higher). 

3. Cognate courses — five related courses (three beyond the 100-level) in the social sciences 
(anthropology, psychology, sociology); arts; and humanities, with at least one course in each 
category. 

Philosophy of Religion (eight courses) 

1. Religious studies — four courses (200-level or higher, including 362). 



278 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



2. Cognate courses — four courses (three over the 100-level) in philosophy. 
Western Religion (eight courses) 

1. Two semesters of an appropriate language (e.g., Greek, Hebrew, Latin or German) chosen 
in consultation with the undergraduate adviser. 

2. Religious studies — three courses (200-level or higher) including one course in Islam. 

3. Cognate courses — three related courses (all over the 100-level) in the history, literature, 
and art of the Western cultural traditions. 

Asian Religions (ten courses) 

1. Language — four courses (e.g., Chinese, Japanese, or Sanskrit). 

2. Religious studies — three courses (200-level or higher) in Asian religions. 

3. Cognate courses — three courses (two over the 100-level) in either the East Asian or South 
Asian areas. 

Biblical Studies (nine courses) 

1. Language — four courses (Hebrew or Greek). 

2. Religious studies — two courses (200-level or higher) in the area of biblical studies. 

3. Cognate courses — three related courses (all over the 100-level). 
Judaica (ten courses) 

1. Language — four courses (Hebrew, classical or modern). 

2. Religious studies — three courses (200-level or higher) in Judaica. 

3. Cognate courses — three related courses (all over the 100-level). 

Advanced Hours Requirement. Students must elect, as a part of their area of concentration, 
a minimum of 12 hours in 300-level courses or in 200-level courses approved specifically for 
advanced hours credit. 

Departmental Distinction. Distinction in the program is granted on the basis of excellence in 
religious studies demonstrated in course work and a senior thesis written in the context of 
Rel. St. 293. The final determination of Distinction is by vote of the faculty of the Religious 
Studies Program. 

Rhetoric 

This concentration is sponsored by the Department of English. See page 252. 

Russian 

Russian courses: 30 hours (beyond the 100-level) 

Cognate courses: 20 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser), including 6-8 hours of Western 
civilization 

Russian is spoken by some 250 million people and is used by many more in the USSR and 
the countries of Eastern Europe. Russian is now second only to English as the language of 
science, and it is also the language of one of the world's great literatures. Persons trained in 
Russian normally find employment in teaching, government service, journalism, and in research 
in many areas. Many students majoring in other fields find it useful to learn Russian as a 
valuable research tool. 

The field of concentration in Russian consists of at least 50 hours distributed as follows: 

1. At least 15 semester hours of Russian language from the following courses: Russ. 211, 212, 
213, 214, 290, 303, 304, 313, 314. Six hours must be at the 300-level. 

2. At least 15 semester hours of Russian literature and linguistics from the following courses: 
Russ. 215, 216, 217, 222, 225, 307, 308, 315, 317, 324, 335, 337, 338, 360, 370, and 375. 
Russ. 215, 216, and either 315 or 317 are required. Students concentrating in Russian will 
be required to read pans of the required material for courses on literature in translation in 
the original. 

3. At least 20 semester hours of cognate courses distributed as follows — 6-8 hours of Western 
civilization (either Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141-142) and one of the following: 

a. Twelve to 14 hours of courses at the 200- or 300-level in a single language other than 
Russian. 

b. Twelve to 14 semester hours of courses in European literature. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 279 



c. Russ. 113, 114, Hist. 219. and an> t\so of the following courses: Anth. 381; Econ. 357; 
Geog. 353; Hist. 320, 321, 325, 326, 327, 328; Pol. S. 335, 383; Slav. 319 (cinema); Soc. 
350. 

d. Twelve to 14 hours of intellectually or professionally coherent combination of courses 
approved by the departmental adviser. 

Departmental Distinction. Upon graduation, concentrators must have a grade-point average of 
at least 4.30 in departmental courses to qualify for the various levels of distinction and must 
take Russ. 293 (Senior Honors Thesis). By the second semester of their junior year, potential 
candidates are urged to see the departmental adviser for further details. 

Russian and East European Studies 

Requirements: 56 hours (minimum) 

Two specializations are offered: one in Russian language and area studies and another that 
broadly focuses on Eastern Europe as well as Russia and the U.S.S.R. The aim of each 
specialization is to provide the student with (a) a base in one discipline that will permit him 
or her, without much additional work, to qualify for graduate study; (b) an interdisciplinary 
focus on the geographic area selected; and (c) a start toward the language training needed for 
the area chosen. 

SPECIALIZATION IN RUSSIAN LANGUAGE AND AREA STUDIES 

1. At least 16 hours of Russian language courses or equivalent proficiency are required. This 
requirement may be met by completing Russ. 104. Persons contemplating graduate work in 
this field are advised to learn as much Russian as soon as possible during their undergraduate 
years. 

2. At least 20 hours in courses that focus on Russia or the Soviet Union are required, including 
at least one course from each of three departments other than the department used for 
component (3). Although some of the courses used to count under (2) may be from the 
same discipline as those under (3), any one course can be counted in only one category 
rather than in both. Courses currently being offered that focus entirely on Russia and the 
U.S.S.R. include: Anth. 381, 382; Econ. 357; Geog. 353; Hist. 219, 320, 321, 326, 327, 328; 
Pol. S. 335, 383; Russ. 113, 114, 115, 116, 199, 222, 225, 315, 317, 324, 335, 337, 338, 
360, 370; Soc. 350. Others may be counted with permission of the center director. 

3. At least 20 hours in a single discipline are required. Among those disciplines that are most 
commonly used with this specialization are anthropology, economics, geography, history, 
political science, Russian, and sociology. Among disciplines also used are business admin- 
istration, education, English, fine arts, French, German, journalism, linguistics, mathematics, 
philosophy, psychology, and various natural sciences. Others are permitted. If a foreign 
language is used for this component, 20 hours must be taken beyond the introductory 
courses (i.e., normally the first two years, or the 101-104 sequence). Students are expected 
to obtain the advice of a faculty member in their chosen discipline to help in the planning 
of this pan of their program. 

SPECIALIZATION IN EAST EUROPEAN AND RUSSIAN STUDIES 

1. At least 16 hours (normally two college years) or equivalent proficiency in one approved 
language (usually Russian), plus at least two semesters or equivalent proficiency in a second 
approved language are required. Approved languages are languages used to a significant 
extent in Eastern Europe or the Soviet Union or for the study of those areas. The choice 
is to be made in consultation with the center director, who will take into account the 
student's educational goals. Professional work in these areas usually requires extensive 
language training. 

2. At least 20 hours in courses focusing on Eastern Europe as well as Russia are required. (See 
2 above.) Courses especially recommended also include: Hist. 329, 330; Pol. 345, 346; Pol. 
S. 346; Slav. 319; Ukr. 398. 

3. At least 20 hours in a single discipline are required. See (3) above. 

Among the East European languages offered in addition to Russian are Bulgarian, Czech, 
Hungarian, Polish, Rumanian, Turkish, Serbo-Croatian, and Ukrainian. Others, such as Latvian, 



280 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Lithuanian, Macedonian, Modern Greek, Slovenian, and Uzbek, may be studied under special 
arrangements, including those provided by the center. 

Additional Courses. In addition to courses that deal wholly with Eastern Europe or the USSR 
and are mentioned under both specializations, there are many others devoted to Russia and 
Eastern Europe that are normally taught by faculty members who have some knowledge of 
East European languages. They may be counted toward the above specializations if the center 
director approves. In cases where only a small fraction of a course deals with Russia or Eastern 
Europe, partial credit toward specialization requirements may be given. Students may consult 
the center director for further information on such courses. 

Departmental Distinction. Students who hope to qualify for distinction in the field sponsored 
by this center should consult with the center director at the beginning of the junior year or 
earlier to prepare a suitable plan. This plan will usually include the writing of a substantial 
research paper in consultation with a faculty member of the center. 

Sociology 

Sociology courses: 30 hours (including Soc. 100) 

Cognate courses: 12 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser) 

Sociology is concerned with the explanation of human social behavior. Its scope is broad, 
from the social forces shaping changes in entire societies and even the world as a whole, to 
social relations among individuals. In studying phenomena ranging from wars and revolutions 
to love and family structure, sociologists develop theories and conduct research to obtain a 
greater understanding of the social processes that shape our lives. 

REQUIREMENTS 

The field of concentration requires at least 42 hours, of which 30 are in the Department of 

Sociology and 12 (the cognate) are outside the department. The sociology hours include a core 

of four required courses: 

The introductory course (Soc. 100) o 

Sociological theory (Soc. 200) -j- 

Social statistics (Soc. 185) 

Survey research methods (Soc. 281 or 381) 

For the remaining 18 hours of sociology, concentrators may choose general sociology, taking 

various courses, or they may choose an area of specialization. An area of specialization allows 

students to focus their sociology studies toward their interests and goals. In each area of 

specialization, the 18 hours must include at least two courses from a specified list (available 

from the Department of Sociology office). 

The areas of specialization are: 
Criminology Pre-law 

Family and Community Social Psychology 

Health and Medicine Science and Technology 

Industry, Work, and Occupations Research Methods/Social Statistics 

International Studies Social Service and Government 

Population Studies 

Examples of requirements for two areas of specialization follow. Suggested patterns of both 
sociology and cognate courses recommended for other specializations may be obtained from 
the Department of Sociology office. 

Health and Medicine. Recommended for students interested in medical and health-related 
professions. Students must take at least two of the following: Soc. 264, 333, 337, 338, and 
339. Approved cognate courses may be chosen from among the following: anthropology, health 
and safety studies, psychology, social work, and life sciences. 

Criminology. Recommended for students interested in professions related to the criminal justice 
system. Students must take at least two of the following: Soc. 231, 317, 324, 331, and 358. 
Cognate courses may be chosen from political science, psychology, and related fields. 
Cognates. Cognates are designed to expand the student's education in social science or to help 
prepare for professional school or a career. All cognate courses are taken outside the Department 
of Sociology. A student may have a cognate in one department, such as psychology, economics, 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 281 



history or statistics. Alternatively, he or she may assemble a cognate from courses related to 

a profession, such as law, social work, business, or medicine. 

Advising. Concentrators should see a departmental adviser at least once a year to choose 

sociology courses, to develop a cognate, and to monitor progress. 

Departmental Distinction. To graduate with distinction, a student must have a grade-point 

a\erage of at least 4.5 and must complete a senior honors thesis. See an undergraduate adviser 

for det.uU. 

Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese 

Spanish. Italian, or Portuguese courses: 26-27 hours (depending on concentration) 
Cognate courses: 15-18 hours (chosen in consultation with an adviser, total of 44 hours, plus 6-8 
hours of Western civilization) 

SPANISH 

The field of concentration requires 44 hours distributed as follows: 

1. At least 27 hours in Spanish courses beyond the 100-level, of which the following (or 
equivalent) must be included: Span. 200, 209, 211, 217, 232, 233, 240, 241, 242, 298 and 
at least one course at the 300-level. Graduate-level courses (for example, 405, 417, 424, 
432, and 453) may be open to undergraduates with the consent of the instructor and the 
Graduate College. 

2. At least 15 to 17 hours, chosen in consultation with an adviser, in one related area (or a 
combination with no less than 8 hours each) to complete the required 44 hours. Possible 
cognate areas are: any of the other modern or ancient languages and literatures that are 
appropriate to individual interests; humanities (comparative literature, comparative religion, 
linguistics, philosophy); social sciences (anthropology, geography, history, Latin American 
studies, political science, sociology); education; fine arts; journalism. Other possibilities can 
be approved in individual cases. 

3. Western civilization: Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141-142. 
Year Abroad Program: See page 240. 

ITALIAN 

The field of concentration requires 44 hours distributed as follows: 

1. At least 26 hours in Italian courses beyond the prerequisites of Ital. 101-104, chosen from 
Ital. 209, 211, 212, 221, 309, 321, 322, 331, 333, or another 300-level course. Ital. 199, 
290, and 293 may be included with the approval of the undergraduate adviser of Italian 
and the course instructor. Students are advised that graduate-level courses (for example, 
451, 452, and 462) may be open to them with the consent of the instructor and the 
Graduate College. 

2. At least 15 to 18 hours, chosen in consultation with an adviser, in one related area (or a 
combination of two or three, with no fewer than 8 hours in each) to complete the required 
44 hours. There is a wide choice in cognate courses since the student's interests may vary 
from Italian language and literature to international banking, law, art history, music, or 
painting. The following are possible cognate areas: any of the other modern or ancient 
languages and literatures which may be appropriate to individual interests; humanities 
(comparative literature, comparative religion, linguistics, philosophy); social sciences (an- 
thropology, geography, history, Latin American studies, political science, sociology); edu- 
cation; fine and applied arts (architecture, art history, fine arts); journalism. Other possibilities 
can be approved in individual cases. 

3. Western civilization: Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141-142. 

PORTUGUESE 

The field of concentration requires 44 hours distributed as follows: 

1. At least 26 hours in Portuguese courses beyond the prerequisites of Port. 101-104, including 
Port. 212, 222, 301-304, and 362. Port. 199 and 290 may be included with the approval 
of the undergraduate adviser for Portuguese and the course instructor. Students are advised 
that graduate-level courses (for example, 407, 462, and 491) may also be open to them 
with the consent of the instructor and the Graduate College. 

2. At least 15 to 18 hours, chosen in consultation with an adviser, in one related area (or no 



282 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



fewer than 8 hours in each of two) to complete the required 44 hours. There is a wide 
choice of cognate courses since the student's interests may vary from Iberian literature to 
animal husbandry in Angola and urbanology in Brazil. The following are possible cognate 
areas: any of the other modern or ancient languages and literatures that may be appropriate 
to individual interests; humanities (comparative literature, comparative religion, linguistics, 
philosophy); social sciences (anthropology, geography, history, Latin American studies, 
political science, sociology); education; fine and applied arts (architecture, art history, fine 
arts); journalism. Other possibilities can be approved in individual cases. 
3. Western civilization: Hist. 111-112 or C. Lit. 141-142. 

Departmental Distinction. To be considered for departmental distinction, students must maintain 
a 4.5 grade-point average and must complete the appropriate senior thesis course. Prospective 
candidates should consult with the honors adviser by the beginning of their senior year to 
name a thesis director. Departmental distinction is determined through consultation between 
the thesis director and the honors adviser. 

Speech and Hearing Science 

Speech and Hearing courses: 30 hours, as specified below 
Cognate courses: 24 hours, chosen in consultation with an adviser 

This field provides a broad background in the biological, behavioral, linguistic, and social 
foundations of human communication. Students who have a particular interest in the general 
area of speech, language, or hearing may use this field of concentration primarily as a liberal 
arts background with the intent of pursuing graduate education in speech and hearing or in a 
related field. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. Thirty hours of speech and hearing science, to include Sp. H.S. 102, 301, 375, 376, 378, 
383, 385, and 390. 

2. Twenty-four hours of courses selected with departmental approval in any of the following 
departments: computer science, electrical engineering, linguistics, mathematics, physics, 
physiology, psychology, and speech communication. 

Note: Students may use up to 6 hours of Sp. H.S. 290 as free electives toward the bachelor's 
degree. 

Departmental Distinction. To graduate with distinction, a student must have an overall grade- 
point average of at least 4.25 (A = 5.0) and 4.5 in speech and hearing courses, and must 
register in the honors course (Sp. H.S. 291) for 4 hours credit. Additional information for 
graduation with distinction is available in the department office. 

Speech Communication 

Speech communication courses: 29-36 hours 

Cognate courses: 12-19 hours approved by an adviser (for a total of 48 hours in the concentration) 

Speech communication embraces various studies of the use of language and speech for social 
purposes. Concentration in the field serves many students as preprofessional education and 
others as the core of a liberal education. The curriculum reflects concern for the theory, 
practice, and criticism of communication in varied settings: interpersonal interaction, public 
discourse, group and organizational communication, and some literary and artistic forms. The 
Department of Speech Communication offers two options within its field of concentration: 
rhetorical and communication theory, and interpretation. The field of concentration consists 
of a minimum of 48 hours distributed as follows. 

1. A minimum of 29 hours in courses in speech communication, at least 15 of which must 
be at the 200-level or above. 

2. A minimum of 12 hours in cognate courses chosen from departments or programs whose 
offerings are appropriate to the option selected. Students must obtain the approval of a 
speech communication adviser for their programs of courses. 

3. A minimum of 7 additional hours in speech communication or cognate courses selected in 
consultation with an adviser. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 283 



RHETORICAL AND COMMUNICATION THEORY OPTION 

This option provides ■ broad acquaintance with theory, practice, and criticism in rhetorical 

and communication theory. 

Requirements. The student must take at least one speech communication course from each 
of the following areas: 

1. Interpersonal and small group communication: Sp. Com. 113, 211, 230, 313, 332, 335. 

2. Persuasion and social influence: Sp. Com. 213, 221, 223, 320, 321, 324. 

3. Rhetorical theory: Sp. Com. 102, 210, 315, 317, 322. 

4. c nticism of public discourse: Sp. Com. 177, 252, 253, 254, 323, 350, 353. 

Additional hours in speech communication and in cognate fields will be chosen in consultation 
with, and with the approval of, a departmental adviser. The resulting program may be distributed 
among the four areas listed above, or it may be a specialized program organized around a 
theme or topic. 

INTERPRETATION OPTION 
Requirements. 

1. The student must take Sp. Com. 141, 142, 161, 243, 255, 342, 344, and 345. 

2. The student must elect at least 18 hours in literature courses approved by a speech 
communication adviser. These should include a course in Shakespeare, a course in American 
literature, a course in English literature before 1800, and a course in English literature from 
1800 to present. 

3. Additional hours in speech communication and in cognate fields will be chosen in consultation 
with, and with the approval of, a speech communication adviser. 

Departmental Distinction. Superior students are encouraged to consult the departmental honors 
adviser about requirements and opportunities for participation in the departmental honors 
program. 

Statistics 

Statistics and mathematics courses: 10-17 hours of calculus and elementary course work, and 18- 

24 hours of 300-level courses 
Cognate courses: 12 hours of approved courses in an area of statistical application 

Statistics is the science of modeling, summarizing, and analyzing data, and of using mathematics 
and computing tools to make predictions and decisions in the face of uncertainty. Statistical 
ideas are applicable in any area involving quantitative measurement and in almost every area 
of scholarly pursuit. The field of concentration is designed to provide students with an 
understanding of the concepts of statistical inference and a familiarity with the methods of 
applied statistical analysis. It can be used as preparation for a career in business, industry, or 
government, or as a preparation for further graduate study in statistics or in a related area. 

REQUIREMENTS 1 

1. Calculus through Math. 242 or 245 or equivalent. 

2. Math. 315 or 318. 

3. Math. 247 or 343 {advanced calculus). 

4. Stat. 310 and 311 {statistical inference 111). 

5. Stat. 324 or 325 {linear models). 

6. Three courses chosen from the following lists, at least two of which must be from list (a): 

a. Other statistics courses: Stat. 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, or Math. 366, or the course in 
(5) not used for requirement (5). 

b. Preparation for post-graduate study: Math. 346 or 348, Math. 344 or 347. 

7. A working knowledge of a programming language (satisfied, for instance, by C.S. 101, or 
105, or 121). 

8. Cognate: At least 12 hours in a secondary subject where statistical methods are applicable. 
No more than 6 of these hours may be in courses emphasizing statistical methods. Course 
selection must have adviser approval. 

1 It is strongly recommended that Stat. 100 be taken during the freshman or sophomore 
year as an early introduction to statistical ideas. Highly prepared students who are able to take 
Stat. 310 before the junior year should not take Stat. 100. 



284 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Departmental Distinction: Distinction will be awarded on the basis of the selection of 300- 
level courses in statistics and the grade-point average in required courses. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS 
Interdisciplinary Minor in Women's Studies 

The Office of Women's Studies will offer an interdisciplinary minor, as a supplement to the 
regular field of concentration, for students enrolled in a concentration in the Sciences and 
Letters Curriculum in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

The dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences will verify in writing that the student 
has completed the program on the recommendation of the director of Women's Studies and 
completion of the following requirements. 

REQUIREMENTS 

1. Twenty-four hours in Women's Studies courses, including 

a. W.S. Ill — American Women in Change: An Introduction 

b. W.S. 112 — Introduction to Women's Studies in the Social Sciences 

c. Eighteen hours in other Women's Studies courses (see the Office of Women's Studies for 
a list of acceptable courses), with nine hours in advanced courses (i.e., 300-level or 
designated 200-level) and nine hours in courses offered by or crosslisted in Women's 
Studies. 

2. A minimum grade-point average of 3.75 (A = 5.0) is required for completion of this program. 
The eighteen hours selected by students for the women's studies minor should form a coherent 
program of study. This program must be approved by the Office of Women's Studies. 



Specialized Curricula 



CURRICULUM IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry 

A total of at least 120 semester hours of course work as outlined below, with a 3.0 (A ■ 5.0) 
academic grade-point average or better is required for graduation. In addition, in order to 
graduate, students must attain a 3.0 average in the chemistry, biochemistry, mathematics, 
physics, and advanced electives in life science courses specified in this curriculum. All proposals 
for substitutions must be approved by the faculty adviser. This curriculum is intended for those 
students who desire a rigorous education in chemistry, biochemistry, and the life sciences, but 
whose career objectives require sufficient flexibility to obtain proficiency in other areas as well. 
The departmental distinction program is intended for exceptional students who intend to 
enter graduate school or a highly technical academic, government, or industrial research 
laboratory after completion of their undergraduate studies. 

REQUIREMENTS 1 HOURS 

Chem. 107, 108, 109, 110, 131, 134, 336, and one year of physical chemistry (340 and 346, 

or 342 and 344) 26 

Biocrj. 352, 353, 355 12 

Math. 120, 132, 242, or equivalent 11 

Phycs. 101, 102 or 106, 107, 108 10-12 

Advanced electives in life sciences (300-level) 6 

Foreign language — see the Sciences and Letters Curriculum requirements on page 242 for 

ways the requirement may be satisfied 0-16 

Rhetoric (4 hours), humanities (6 hours), and social sciences (6 hours) 16 

Technical and/or nontechnical electives, not including any credit in satisfaction of the above 

requirements, to obtain a total of 120 semester hours 21-39 

Minimum total 120 

1 Certain courses may be substituted for those listed. For example, Chem. 101, 102, 123 may be 
substituted for the Chem. 107, 108, 109, 110 sequence with the approval of an adviser. 

Departmental Distinction. In addition to the above requirements, students must satisfy the 

following: 

1. Earn at least a 4.0 (A = 5.0) grade-point average. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



285 



2. Complete 10 hours of Bioch. 1^1 in addition to the minimum 120 hours required for the 

degree. 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 

The chemical engineering curriculum is arranged in a flexible manner to permit students to 
use their elective hours and to substitute courses to arrange programs incorporating various 
specific areas of chemical engineering or interdisciplinary areas. For example, sequences can be 
set up in conjunction with the student's adviser to emphasize environmental engineering, 
engineering practice, computer science or many other options. It will be advantageous to 
students to plan their course sequences with an adviser as early in their academic careers as 
possible. 

Students entering without adequate preparation in mathematics and chemistry may find it 
difficult to complete the chemical engineering curriculum in four years. A typical program, 
including all required courses and electives, is shown below. Individual students may vary the 
order in which the various courses are taken to suit their individual needs. However, care 
must be exercised in scheduling to insure that necessary course prerequisites are met. 

A total of 129 hours is required for graduation, as shown below. 

Students in the curriculum of chemical engineering must maintain a 3.5 general average, 
excluding military training, in order to be accepted by the department as juniors and seniors. 
Departmental Distinction. Students are recommended for departmental distinction on the basis 
of grade-point average and work presented in Ch. E. 292 (Senior Thesis) or 390 (Projects). 

FIRST YEAR FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 



Chem. 107 1 — General Chemistry 3 

Chem. 109 — General Chemistry Lab 2 

Math. 120 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry 5 

Rhet. 105 or 108 — Composition 4 

Elective 2 3 3 

Total 17 



SECOND YEAR 

Ch. E. 261 — Introduction to Chemical 

Engineering 3 

Chem. 136 — Organic Chemistry 3 

Chem. 181 — Structure and Synthesis 2 

Math. 242 — Calculus of Several 
Variables 3 

Physcs. 107 — General Physics (Heat, 
Electricity, and Magnetism) 4 

Total 15 



THIRD YEAR 

Ch. E. 371 — Fluid Mechanics and 

Heat Transfer 4 

Chem. 342 — Physical Chemistry 4 

Chem. 383 — Dynamics and Structure 2 

Electives 2 6 6 

Total 16 

FOURTH YEAR 

Ch. E. 389 — Chemical Process 

Control and Dynamics 3 

Ch. E. 374 — Chemical Engineering 

Laboratory 3 

Ch. E. 381 — Chemical Rate Processes 

and Reactor Design 2 

Electives 2 6 9 

Total 17 



Chem. 108 — General Chemistry 3 

Chem. 110 — General Chemistry Lab 2 

Math. 132 — Calculus and Analytic 

Geometry II 3 

Math. 225" — Introductory Matrix Theory ... .2 
Phycs. 106 — General Physics 

(Mechanics) 4 

Ch. E. 161 — The Chemical Engineering 

Profession 1 

Total 15 



Ch. E. 370 — Chemical Engineering 

Thermodynamics 3 

Chem. 336 s — Organic Chemistry 3 

C.S. 101 — Introduction to 

Automatic Digital Computing 3 

Physcs. 108 — General Physics 

(Wave, Motion, Sound, Light, 

and Modern Physics) 4 

Math. 345 — Differential Equations 

and Orthogonal Functions 3 

Total 16 



Ch. E. 373 — Mass Transfer 

Operations 4 

Chem. 344 — Physical Chemistry 4 

Chem. 385 — Chemical Fundamentals 4 

Electives 26 4 

Total 16 



Ch. E. 390 — Chemical Engineering 
Projects 2 

Ch. E. 377 — Synthesis and Design 
of Chemical Systems 3 

Electives 26 12 

Total 17 



1 Students who do not place into Chem. 107, or who do not satisfy the mathematics prerequisite 
for Chem. 107, may substitute the sequence Chem. 101, 102, 123 for Chem. 107, 108, 109, 110. 



286 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



2 Sixteen hours of approved social sciences and humanities electives are required. This must 
include a sequence of at least 6 hours in social sciences and a sequence of at least 6 hours in 
humanities. A sequence is usually interpreted to mean any combination of approved coures taught 
by the same department. Students should consult their departmental adviser for a current list of 
courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement. 

3 One year of college credit in one foreign language is required. Two units of high school credit 
in one foreign language are equivalent to one year of college credit. 

4 Students may substitute Math. 315 for Math. 225. Students electing to do so should be certain 
they have the prerequisites for Math. 315. 

5 Bioch. 350 may be substituted for Chem. 336. 

6 Students must take at least 18 hours of technical electives in fields such as chemical engineering 
science. These must include at least 5 hours of chemical engineering electives plus at least 3 
additional hours of 300-level electives (or Ch. E. 292). Students should consult their departmental 
advisers for a current list of courses that may be used to satisfy this requirement. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 

The curriculum in chemistry affords more thorough technical training than is required of 
students who make chemistry their concentration in the sciences and letters curriculum 
described on page 248. 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry, completion of each of the seven 
categories of requirements (A through G) listed below is required for graduation. The typical 
program of courses required to satisfy these categories totals 128 to 134 hours. Graduation 
requires a grade-point average of at least a 3.0 (A = 5.0) overall and a 3.0 average in courses 
for requirements (A)-(D) are required for graduation. At least 120 hours is required for 
graduation. The Department of Chemistry will supply upon request a brochure showing 
recommended semester-by-semester programs for the completion of the curriculum. 

Each graduate of the chemistry curriculum is certified to the American Chemical Society as 
having met its specifications for the professional education in chemistry. 
Departmental Distinction. Students qualify for graduation with distinction by exhibiting superior 
performance in both course work and in senior thesis research. 

REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

A. Core chemistry: Chem. 107, 108, 109, 110, 1 136, 181, 315, 336, 342, 344, 383, 385 35 2 

B. Basic mathematics: Math. 120, 132, and 242; or 135 and 245 11 2 

C. Basic physics: Phycs. 106, 107, and 108 12 2 

D. Additional technical requirements: At least 24 hours to include the following: 24 

1 . Required chemistry/biochemistry — at least 1 hours of 300-level chemistry/biochemistry, 
including 4 hours of lab. 

2. Required mathematics — Math. 340 or 388; or one of the following combinations: 225 
with either 343 or 345 or 31 5 with either 343 or 345. 

3. Strongly recommended: computer science, at least 3 hours. 

4. Strongly recommended: research — Chem. or Bioch. 292. This will reduce the amount 
of laboratory work required in the 10 hours of 300-level chemistry/biochemistry from 4 
to 2 hours. 

5. Others as needed to complete the 24 hour minimum chosen from Chem. 199 (3 hours 
maximum); Biol. 151; Math. 249 or higher; 200- or 300-level courses in chemistry, 
chemical engineering, life sciences, and/or physics. Certain other technical electives, 
including engineering courses, may be included with the approval of the chair of the 
advising committee. 

E. Nontechnical requirements 1 6-1 8 2 

1 . Foreign language — Two high school units or 2 semesters of college work in a single 
language. 

2. Rhet. 105 or 108 or Sp. Com. 111 and 112. 

3. Humanities, at least 6 hours. 

4. Social science, at least 6 hours. 

F. Free electives: At least 32 of these hours must not include credit in satisfaction of categories 
A through E nor be in preparation for categories A through C. For example, Chem. 100 
and Math. 112, 114, or 116 may not be included in the first 32 hours. No first-year foreign 
language courses count toward this category unless it is a different language from the one 

used for the foreign language requirement 32 

G. Total hours, at least 120 

1 Chem. 101, 102, and 123 may be substituted for Chem. 107, 108, 109, and 110. 

2 Hours given are those normally needed to meet the specified requirements. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 287 



Cooperative Education Program in Chemistry 

See Chem is t r y, under Sciences and Letters Concentrations, on page 248. 

CURRICULUM IN GEOLOGY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Geology 

The curriculum in geology is recommended for students who plan to enter graduate study in 
geology and become professional geologists. It offers more training in geology and basic science 
than is required of students who make geology their field of concentration in the sciences and 
letters curriculum in liberal arts and sciences. Requirements for the field of concentration in 
geology are described on page 256. 

After the completion of 60 semester hours of college or university credit, a student must 
have and maintain thereafter a grade-point average of at least 3.5 (A = 5.0) in all subjects, 
excluding military training, and a grade-point average of at least 3.5 in science and mathematics 
courses required in the curriculum. These requirements apply to all the academic work done 
by a student, including any transfer credit from other institutions. Students with transfer credit 
must also maintain an average of at least 3.5 in all subjects and in sciences and mathematics 
taken at this campus. 

A total of 126 semester hours of credit is required for graduation. The Department of 
Geology will supply upon request a Guide for Geology Undergraduates giving more information 
about the curriculum. 

REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Geol. 107\ 108 1 , 311, 317 2 , 320, 321, 332, and 335 36 

At least 8 hours from Geol. 301 , 309, 336, 338, 350, and 360 8 

Math. 120, 132, 242, 225 13 

Chem. 101, 102; or 107, 108, 109, 110 8 or 10 

Phycs. 106, 107 (108 recommended in addition); or 101, 102 8 or 10 

PI. Bio. 100 and Biol. 104; or Biol. 110 and 111. Substitutions require approval of adviser . .8 or 10 
At least one course in a cognate subject such as mathematics, chemistry, physics (including 
Phycs. 108), life sciences, engineering, computer science, and statistics. Approval of adviser 
required. If the cognate course is in mathematics, chemistry, physics, or life sciences, it 

must be beyond the level of the required courses enumerated above 3-4 

Rhet. 105 or 108 (4 hours); approved sequences in humanities (6 hours) and social science 

(6 hours) 16 

Foreign language — See the sciences and letters curriculum foreign language requirements 
for ways in which the requirement may be satisfied. German, Russian, or French is 

recommended 0-16 

Electives, not including any credit in satisfaction of the above requirements and not including 
any courses taken preparatory to the science or mathematics requirement described above. 
Recommended areas include geology, mathematics, chemistry, physics, life science, engi- 
neering, computer science, statistics 3-29 

Total 126 

1 Students planning to follow the curriculum in geology should take Geol. 107 and 108. Students 
who decide to follow the curriculum in geology after first taking Geol. 101 should enroll in Geol. 108; 
students who decide to follow the curriculum in geology after first taking Geol. 102 should enroll in 
Geol. 107. The combination of Geol. 101 and 102 will be accepted as a substitute for the sequence 
Geol. 107 and 108, but students should be aware that these courses are not intended for science 
majors. Geol. 142 and 143 cannot be used as a substitute for Geol. 107 and 108, and credit in these 
courses does not count in the total hours of credit required in the curriculum. 

2 Geol. 317 is a summer field course taught off campus. 

Departmental Distinction. Students who maintain a grade-point average of at least 4.5 in all 
geology courses and 4.0 in all other science and mathematics courses, and who complete an 
acceptable honors thesis including at least 4 hours credit in Geol. 293, are recommended for 
graduation with distinction. 

CURRICULUM IN PHYSICS 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physics 

The curriculum in physics is recommended for students who plan to enter graduate study in 
physics or who wish to enter government or industrial laboratory research positions upon 
attaining the bachelor's degree (see also the Engineering Physics, Sciences and Letters Concen- 
tration in Physics, and Teaching of Physics curricula). 



288 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



A minimum of 126 hours of credit is required for graduation. To be permitted to register 
in advanced physics or mathematics courses in this curriculum, a student must have a grade- 
point average of at least 3.5 (A = 5.0) in all subjects excluding military science and a grade- 
point average of at least 3.5 in all courses completed in physics and mathematics. 

Entering freshmen normally take mathematics, chemistry, a foreign language, and either 
rhetoric or an elective in the first semester and begin physics in the second semester. Students 
with advanced placement in mathematics should start physics in the first semester. Suggested 
four-year schedules are available in the physics undergraduate records office. 

REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Chem. 101, 102 (Chem. 107, 108, 109, and 110 may be substituted by students who desire a 
more rigorous sequence.) 8 

Math. 120, 132, 242, or equivalent and Math. 343, 345 (Students with insufficient background 
may need to take Math. 112/114 before Math. 120, but receive no credit toward the 
degree) 17 

Phycs. 106, 107, 108, 210, 331, 332, 333, 386, 387, and one course chosen from Phycs. 303, 
343, 361 , 365, 371 , 382, 389 40 

Rhet. 105 or 108 4 

General education [Courses chosen to meet the old (four-part) general education requirements 
of the Sciences and Letters Curriculum except that students offering 1 unit or more of 
biology for admission may substitute additional courses in humanities or social science for 
the biological science requirement. Students may request permission to substitute the new 
Sciences and Letters general education requirements.] 1 18 

Foreign language (A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language: German, French, or 
Russian is recommended. See the Sciences and Letters Curriculum foreign language 
requirement on page 235 for ways in which this may be satisfied.) 16 

Free electives (Students are advised to include 6-8 hours of physics and 3-6 hours of 
mathematics among their electives.) 23 

Total 126 

Departmental Distinction. Graduation with distinction is awarded to students who complete 
8 additional hours of 300- or 400-level physics courses or advanced courses in closely related 
technical subjects, such as nuclear engineering, solid-state electronics, astrophysics, and who 
have attained cumulative grade-point averages as follows: Distinction, 4.2; High Distinction, 
4.5; Highest Distinction, 4.8. 

1 At the date of publication, a revision of the general education requirements for this program was 
pending final approval. Students entering August 1987 or later should consult the adviser regarding 
requirements. 

CURRICULUM IN SPEECH AND HEARING SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Speech and Hearing Science 

The curriculum in speech and hearing science is a preprofessional degree program for those 
individuals who plan to work as speech-language pathologists and audiologists in clinical or 
school settings. The curriculum is designed to prepare students to enter professional training 
at the graduate level in any major graduate program in speech/language pathology or audiology. 
Students who desire certification for work in the public schools can fulfill certification 
requirements by meeting entrance requirements for the Graduate College and completing the 
Master of Science degree. To qualify for registration in courses specified for the first semester 
of the senior year, the student must have a grade-point average of no less than 3.75 (A = 5.0). 
The degree requires at least 128 hours, excluding military training. 

For those not wishing to pursue teacher certification or a clinical program, please refer to 
the field of concentration in Speech and Hearing Science on page 282. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or Rhet. 105 and Sp. Com. 101, or Rhet. 108 and Sp. Com. 101 6-7 

Biological science, including Anat. 234 1 6-8 

Physical science 6-8 

History of the United States 2 3 

American government (state and federal constitutions) 2 3 

Foreign language (see sciences and letters requirements for ways this may be met) 0-16 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Humanities 6 

Total 33-54 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 289 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 

For students planning to pursue the school speech and hearing program the following are 
recommended. 

HOURS 

Exceptional children 3-6 

Classroom problems in childhood education and special education 3 

Mental and educational measurement of exceptional children 3 

Total 9-12 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR HOURS 

Psychology and linguistics: 

statistical thinking in psychology (Psych. 235) 5 

Child psychology or child development (Psych. 216 or E. Psych. 236) 3 

Psychology of personality or abnormal psychology (Psych. 250 or 238) 3 

Psychology of learning or cognitive psychology (Psych. 248 or 224) 3 

Introduction to language science (Ling. 200) 3 

Total 17 

Speech and hearing science: 

Voice and articulation (Sp. H.S. 105) 2 

Survey of historical and professional aspects of speech pathology and audiology 2 

General phonetics (Sp. H.S. 301) 3 

Speech science (Sp. H.S. 375-376) 8 

Development of spoken language (Sp. H.S. 383) 3 

Hearing science (5p. H.S. 3*8] 3 

Speech pathology (Sp. H.S. 385, 388) 6 

Language disorders in children (Sp. H.S. 386) 3 

Appraisal in speech pathology (Sp. H.S. 389) 3 

Introduction to hearing disorders and audiometry (Sp. H.S. 390) 4 

Aural rehabilitation (Sp. H.S. 393) 3 

Basic principles in speech pathology (Sp. H.S. 387) and practicum or practicum in audiology 
(Sp. H.S. 398) 3-5 

Total 48-50 



1 At the date of publication, a revision was pending to delete Anat. 234 as a requirement of the 
curriculum, while maintaining a biological science requirement of 6-8 hours. 

2 Students not planning to fulfill teacher certification requirements for the school speech and 
hearing science program by completing the Master of Science degree may substitute an approved 
social science sequence for history of the United States and American government. 

Recommended Elective Areas. These include psychology, education, physiology, linguistics, 
psycholinguistics, special education, and education of the deaf. 

Departmental Distinction. To graduate with distinction, students must have at least a 4.25 
cumulative grade-point average and a 4.5 grade-point average in speech and hearing courses 
and must complete one of the following: 

1. Four hours of Sp. H.S. 291 (in addition to the minimum hours required for the degree) and 
receive faculty recommendations, or 

2. a comprehensive written and/or oral examination. 

Detailed statements of requirements, as well as requirements for graduation with High 
Distinction and Highest Distinction, are available in the department office. 

Teacher Education Curricula 

This section contains a description of the requirements for programs leading to the bachelor's 
degree in teacher education. More detailed information pertaining to specific course requirements 
for each area of specialization is provided by faculty advisers. It is essential that students fulfill 
the specific course requirements of their program in order to be eligible for the bachelor's 
degree in teacher education. Only through regular communication with the teacher education 
adviser may students be assured of the appropriateness of their semester program. Students are 
advised that certification requirements may be altered at any time by the State Teacher 
Certification Board or by the legislature. In such cases, students may be compelled to satisfy 
the new requirements to qualify for the University's recommendation for certification. Also 
see Council on Teacher Education on page 87 for information pertinent to all teacher education 
curricula. 

General education requirements of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences must be fulfilled 
by students pursuing teacher education curricula in that college. If the requirements of the 



290 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



teaching major satisfy the general education requirements in an area, they will be noted in the 
curriculum statement. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, Rhet. 108 and a speech 

performance elective 6-7 

Natural sciences 6-8 

History of the United States (Hist. 151, 152) 3-4 

American government (Pol. S. 150) 3 

General psychology 3 1 

Foreign language 16 

Health and/or basic physical education activities 3 

Humanities 6 

Total 46-50 

1 At the date of publication, a revision was being planned for general psychology, that may increase 
the hours from 3 to 4. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF BIOLOGY 
For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Biology 

While this curriculum is primarily designed for students preparing to teach biology, it also 
permits the breadth of work in the sciences required for teaching general science. A minimum 
of 125 hours is necessary for graduation. In addition, a student must have at least a 3.5 (A = 
5.0) cumulative and U.I. grade-point average to remain in the curriculum. A student must also 
maintain at least a 3.0 average in all attempts at science/mathematics courses taken at the 
University of Illinois in order to remain in the curriculum. 

Exemptions will be granted in language and mathematics, depending upon the student's high 
school experience. While students are no longer required to complete a teacher education 
minor, those desiring a minor must select it from the list on page 88. The requirements for 
the minor in general science are fulfilled by those completing this curriculum. 
Departmental Distinction. To graduate with distinction the student must meet the following 
requirements: (1) have at least a 4.5 grade-point average for all work completed and (2) present 
a letter from his or her student teaching evaluator as evidence of excellent performance in 
student teaching capacity. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Forty to 42 hours in general education courses. (See above.) The requirements of the major satisfy 
the natural sciences requirement. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 1 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4-5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Total 25-29 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Mathematics 

College algebra and trigonometry 5 

Statistics 3-4 

Chemistry 

General 8-10 

Organic 5 

Physics 10 

Biology 

General 10 

Advanced (200- and 300-level courses or equivalent) 

Genetics 4 

Microbiology 6-8 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 291 



Animal or plant physiology 5-6 

Invertebrate biology 3-5 

Vertebrate biology 3-5 

Plant biology 3-5 

Environmental biology 3-5 

Total 68-82 

1 At the date of publication, professional education requirements were being revised to include a 
course in special education. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF CHEMISTRY 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Chemistry 

This curriculum is designed to prepare the student to teach physical science with a major in 
chemistry and a second teaching field in physics or mathematics. A minimum of 130 hours of 
credit is required for graduation. In addition, a student must have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) 
cumulative and U.I. grade-point average to remain in the curriculum. A student must also 
maintain at least a 3.0 average in all attempts at science/mathematics courses taken at the 
University of Illinois in order to remain in the curriculum. 

Students may elect a second teaching field in either mathematics or physics. Regardless of 
the second teaching field, the curriculum requires the completion of the general physics 
sequence, including Phycs. 107, and one year of calculus. The second teaching field in 
mathematics shall consist of 8 hours of 300-level mathematics or 6 hours of 300-level 
mathematics beyond the calculus sequence and either Math. 225 or 263. ' The second teaching 
field in physics shall consist of 6 hours of 300-level physics beyond the elementary courses. 
Departmental Distinction. Students in this curriculum may earn Distinction, High Distinction, 
or Highest Distinction in the Teaching of Chemistry. Distinction is awarded on the basis of 
performance in student teaching and academic achievement. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Fifty to 52 hours in general education courses. (See page 290.) Requirements of the major satisfy 
the natural sciences requirement. A minimum of 6 hours of humanities are required in addition to 
courses required for teacher certification. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 2 HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 211) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4-5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Total 25-29 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

The sequence of chemistry courses chosen by the student is somewhat flexible and depends upon 
previous educational experience as well as other factors. The following two sequences of chemistry 
courses are recommended. The first is the less rigorous program and might be followed by a student 
whose high school background is not particularly strong. The second is similar to that followed by 
students in the chemistry curriculum. An intermediate program involving other courses may be chosen 
with the consent of the departmental adviser; but, in all cases, the course program should include 
a course in physical chemistry and two additional courses at the 300-level, and at least 30 hours of 
chemistry (excluding Chem. 100). 

SUGGESTED SEQUENCES 

First Sequence 

General chemistry 8 

Elementary quantitative analysis 3 

1 Students seeking certification to teach mathematics should consult the certification officer of the 
Urbana Council on Teacher Education regarding current state requirements. 

2 Professional education requirements were being revised at the date of publication. Consult the 
adviser for information. 



292 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



Basic organic chemistry and structure and synthesis (Chem. 136, 181) 5 

Physical chemistry 5 

Additional chemistry 11 

Total 32 

Second Sequence 

General chemistry 10 

Organic chemistry 6 

Structure and synthesis (Chem. 181) 2 

Inorganic chemistry (Chem. 315) 3 

Physical chemistry 6 

Dynamics, structure, and physical methods (Chem. 383) 2 

Additional chemistry 3 

Total 32 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Computer Science 

The program offers training for teaching computer science in the schools. A minimum of 120 
hours is required for graduation. It is strongly recommended that persons electing the Computer 
Science teacher-education major also elect an approved teaching minor in mathematics. 
Departmental Distinction. Students interested in attaining departmental distinction should 
consult with the honors adviser for program requirements early in their junior year. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty to 42 hours of general education courses. (See page 290.) The requirements of the teaching 
major satisfy the natural science requirement. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 1 HOURS 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 1 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 1 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Total 22-25 

1 At the date of publication, professional education requirements were being revised to include a 
course in special education. 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Computer science (programming) 10 

Introduction to Computer Programming (C.S. 121) 

Machine-level Programming (C.S. 221) 

Data Structures (C.S. 225) 
Computer science (elective concentration areas) 1 

At least 12 semester hours chosen from among 200- and 300-level C.S. courses, with at least 

six semester hours at the 300-level 12 

Instructional applications of computers (C.S. 317 or 316) 3-4 

Goal-directed sequence in applications of computing 12 

Course program planned on an individual basis to reflect interests/strengths in disciplines 

experiencing significant applications of computers (e.g., business, economics, science, 

instructional applications, administrative data processing) 2 

Calculus through Math. 242 or equivalent 10-11 

Total 47-49 

1 Sample list of suitable C.S. electives: Programming — C.S. 323, 325, 326, 327, 310, 311, 318; 
Logic design and computer architecture — C.S. 264, 265, 331, 333, 337, 338, 339, 363, 364, 391; 
Numerical analysis — C.S. 257, 355, 358, 359; Theory — C.S. 273, 313, 373, 375; Hardware — C.S. 
281, 282, 335, 381, 384, 385, 386, 389; General — C.S. 296, 297, 397. 

2 Such a sequence should be selected in consultation with, and must be approved by, the student's 
adviser. Some may require additional background or prerequisites, in which case the student is urged 
also to consult with the departments offering the courses in question. 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 293 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF 
EARTH SCIENCE 

For the degree of Bachelor of Science in the Teaching of Earth Science 
This curriculum is designed for students preparing to teach earth science as their major area 
of specialization. Students in this curriculum are required to complete a teaching minor in 
biology, chemistry, general science, mathematics, or physical science. 

Including general and professional education requirements, the courses outlined below total 
1 31 to 151 hours; the minimum number of hours for graduation is 131. Students must complete 
30 hours of advanced courses. In addition, a student must have at least a 3.5 (A = 5.0) 
cumulative and U.I. grade-point average to remain in the curriculum. A student must also 
maintain at least a 3.0 average in all attempts at science/mathematics courses taken at the 
University of Illinois in order to remain in the curriculum. 
Departmental Distinction. See the geology concentration for requirements. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty to 42 hours in general education courses. (See page 290.) Requirements for the major satisfy 
the natural science requirement. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS' 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 21 1) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4-5 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Total 25-29 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR HOURS 

Earth sciences 

General geology 8 

Minerals and rocks (Geol. 332) 4 

Paleontology or stratigraphy (Geol. 320 or 321) 4 

Regional field study (Geol. 115) 2 

Physical geography (meteorology and climatology) 4 

General astronomy 2 (Astr. 210) 3 

Electives 3 8 

Supporting sciences (may fulfill, in part, the teacher education minor) 

General chemistry 4 

Mathematics 4 2-5 

Principles of biology 5 

General physics (Phycs. 101) 5 

Total 49-52 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Students in this curriculum are required to complete one of the following teacher education minors: 
biology; chemistry; general science; mathematics; or physical science. (See pages 87 to 91.) 

1 At the date of publication, professional education requirements were being revised to include a 
course in special education. 

2 Students who do not take a year of physics should take descriptive astronomy. 

3 A minimum of 8 additional hours in earth science is required. Recommended courses are 
introductory soils, oceanography, advanced physical geography, or geomorphology, and other 
appropriate advanced courses in agronomy, astronomy, geology, and geography. 

Mathematics through trigonometry is required. Calculus and analytic geometry are recommended 
for all students. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of English 

A minimum of 128 hours is required for graduation in this curriculum. Students are required 
to complete one teaching minor or to fulfill requirements for an alternative to a minor. Students 



294 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



who elect the Teacher Education Major in Literature must complete the Teacher Education 
Minor in Rhetoric or in English as a Second Language. 

Departmental Distinction. Distinction will be awarded on the basis of grade-point average and 
satisfactory completion of honors, individual study, and honors thesis courses. See the English 
Education Adviser for a detailed statement of the requirements. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Forty-three to 47 hours in general education courses. (See page 290.) The humanities requirement 
is fulfilled through major teaching field courses. Students in this curriculum must also complete a 
course in oral interpretation of literature (3 hours). 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 1 HOURS 

Preliminary Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 209) 

Introduction to the Teaching of Secondary School Subjects (Se. Ed. 101) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Teaching (Se. Ed. 219) 2 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Microteaching: Practice in Teaching Techniques (Se. Ed. 239) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 2 

Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy. 211) 3 

Foundations of American Education (E.PS. 201) 3 

Fundamentals of Reading Techniques (Se. Ed. 336) 3 

Techniques of Teaching in the Secondary Schools (Se. Ed. 241) 4 

Educational Practice in Secondary Education (Ed. Pr. 242) 5-8 

Total 28-31 

REQUIREMENTS OF THE MAJOR 

Option 1 : Teacher Education Major in English 

Engl. 101 and one of the following: 102 or 103 or 198 6-7 

Shakespeare 3 

Survey of American literature 6 

Survey of English literature 6 

Literary criticism (Engl. 215) 3 

Engl. 302 — Descriptive English Grammar 3 

Engl. 301 — Introduction to the Study of the English Language, or Engl. 303 — Historical 

Introduction to the English Language 3 

Engl. 381 — Theory and Practice of Written Composition 3 

Engl. 385 — Literature for the High School 3 

Advanced electives in literature 6 

Total 42-43 

Any approved teacher education minor (see page 88) or an approved alternative to a minor 
(see an adviser for details) 18-30 

Option 2: Teacher Education Major in Literature 

Available only with the Teacher Education Minor in Rhetoric or in English as a Second Language. 

A minimum of 6 hours chosen from Engl. 101, 102, 103, and 198 6-7 

Shakespeare 3 

Survey of American literature 6 

Survey of English literature 6 

Literary criticism (Engl. 215) 3 

Engl. 385 — Literature for the High School 3 

Advanced electives in literature 9 

Total 36-37 

1 At the date of publication, professional education requirements were being revised to include a 
course in special education. 

CURRICULA PREPARATORY TO TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers curricula for the preparation of teachers of 
French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. Teacher education minors are also available in 
these languages and in Italian and Portuguese. A supplementary program, substituted for the 
normally required teacher education minor, is available for those students who plan to teach 
a foreign language in an elementary school as well as in a secondary school. See page 298. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS HOURS 

Rhetoric and speech (any one of the three options listed) 6-7 

Sp. Com. 111 and 112, or 

Rhet. 105 and a speech performance elective, or 

Rhet. 108 and a speech performance elective 
Biological or physical science (any approved sequence) 6-8 



LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 295 



History of the United States (Hist. 151 or 152) 3-4 

American government (Pol. S. 150) 3 

General psychology (Psych. 100 or 103) 3 1 

Health and/or physical education 3 

Total 24-28 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 2 

Introduction to Foreign Language Education (Human. 279) 3 

Secondary Education in the United States (Se. Ed. 240) 2 

Field Experience in Secondary Education (Se. Ed. 229) 3 1-2 

Foundations of American Education (E.P.S. 201) 3 

Parateachmg 4 2 

Psychology of Teaching and Learning (Ed. Psy. 211) 3 

Educational Practice (student teaching ) (Ed. Pr. 242) 8 

Total 22-23 

1 At the date of publication, a revision was being planned for general psychology that may increase 
the hours from 3 to 4. 

2 Students are required to satisfy the requirements of House Bill 150 regarding special education. 
See the teacher training adviser for details. 

3 At the discretion of the faculty adviser, a student may take School and Community Experiences 
(Ed. Pr. 150) in lieu of (or in addition to) Se. Ed. 229. 

4 Students are required to complete Fr. 270, Ger. 270, Lat. 270, Russ. 270, or Span. 270 depending 
on their area of concentration. 

CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF FRENCH 

For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of French 

A minimum of 120 hours is required for graduation. 

Departmental Distinction. A student must have a minimum of 4.5 cumulative grade-point 
average, including a "satisfactory" in practice teaching; complete two additional advanced-level 
courses in French or the teaching minor; and a senior thesis (Fr. 292) and provide two letters 
of recommendation as evidence of exceptional teaching. Consult the teacher education adviser 
for details. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Twenty-four to 28 hours in general education courses. (See pages 294 and 295.) The humanities 
requirement and the college foreign language requirement are fulfilled by the requirements of the 
major. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Twenty-two to 23 hours in professional education courses. (See above.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: FRENCH HOURS 

Elementary French (Fr. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate French (Fr. 133-134 or equivalent) 8 

French literature (Fr. 209-210 or equivalent) 6 

Oral French (Fr. 205-206-217 or equivalent) 10 

French composition (Fr. 207 or equivalent) 3 

French civilization (Fr. 335-336 or equivalent) 6 

Teachers' course (Fr. 280 or equivalent). This course will count as part of the professional 
education requirements for certification purposes. Normally taken during the student teaching 

semester 4 

French electives selected from among advanced-level courses in French civilization, language, 

and/or literature 5 

Total 1 50 

Note: French Study Abroad (Fr. 299) is strongly recommended. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Students in this curriculum are required to complete a teacher education minor. See page 88 for a 
list of approved minors. See page 298 for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to teach 
French in both elementary and secondary schools. 

1 The total of 50 hours may be reduced by as much as 16 hours through prerequisite credit for 
work equivalent to Fr. 101-104 taken in secondary school. 



296 UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



CURRICULUM PREPARATORY TO THE TEACHING OF GERMAN 
For the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the Teaching of German 

A minimum of 120 hours of credit is required for graduation. 

Departmental Distinction. Students should consult their adviser by the second semester of 

their junior year for information pertaining to seminar honors work and honors awards in the 

department. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Twenty-four to 28 hours in general education courses. (See pages 294 and 295.) The humanities 
requirement and the college foreign language requirement are fulfilled by the requirements of the 
major. 

PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS 

Twenty-two to 23 hours in professional education courses. (See page 295.) 

TEACHING AREA OF CONCENTRATION: GERMAN HOURS 

Elementary German (Ger. 101-102 or equivalent) 8 

Intermediate German (Ger. 103-104 or equivalent) 8 

German conversation and writing (Ger. 211-212 or equivalent) 6 

Introduction to German literature (Ger. 231-232 or equivalent) 6 

Teachers' course (Ger. 280 or equivalent. This course will count as part of the professional 

education requirements for certification purposes.) 4 

Advanced conversation, composition, and syntax (Ger. 301 or equivalent) 3 

Advanced conversation (Ger. 302 or equivalent) 1 

History of German civilization (Ger. 320 or equivalent) 4 

Modern German Poetry (Ger. 330) or The German Novelle (Ger. 331) or German Drama (Ger. 

332) or Literature and Culture of the Geman Democratic Republic (Ger. 335) 3 

Structure of the German language (Ger. 365 or equivalent) 3 

German elective 3 

Total 1 49 

Note: German Study Abroad (Ger. 299) is strongly recommended. 

TEACHER EDUCATION MINOR 

Students in this curriculum are required to complete a teacher education minor. See page 88 for a 
list of approved minors. See page 298 for requirements to be fulfilled by those planning to teach 
German in both elementary and secondary schools. 

1 The total of 49 hours may be reduced by as much as 16 hours through prerequisite cr