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129697 





THC T&NT OF 
TH&JKY 

A COLLECTION s^POEMS ABOUT 
ANIMALS LAREAND SMALL 




NEW YORK 



MCMLVIII 



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TO 

BETTY 
ONCE FOUR, NOW ELEVEN 



FOREWORD 

THIS collection was begun when Betty was four and I was 
seven or so years younger than I am now. Now that Betty is 
eleven and I'm, oh, so much older, we are for this is as much 
her book as mine happy to give to you this collection of 
animal poems we have enjoyed together. 

The subject animals, all kinds, even some that never 
were is so interesting and the poems so keenly delightful, 
we think, that we just had to share them with you. 

We hope you like them. 

March i> JOHN EDMUND BREWTON 

I 937 BETTY BREWTON 




CONTENTS 



FOREWORD 



Circus Cavalcade 
CIRCUS PARADE 
A CIRCUS GARLAND 

Parade 

The Performing Seal 

Gunga 

Equestrienne 

Epilogue 
THE CIRCUS 
AT THE CIRCUS 

The Elephants 

Bare-back Rider 

The Seals 
HOLDING HANDS 
CIRCUS 
THE DAY OF THE CIRCUS 

HORSE 
OUR CIRCUS 

/ Went Down to the Zoo 
SERIOUS OMISSION 
LION 

THE ELEPHANT 
THE ELEPHANT 
CAMEL 

THE PLAINT OF THE CAMEL 
THE MONKEYS 
EXCUSE Us, ANIMALS IN THE 
Zoo 



James S. Tippett 
Rachel Field 



PAGE 

vii 



3 
4 



Elizabeth Madox Roberts 6 
Dorothy Aldis 7 



Lenore M. Link 8 

Eleanor Farjeon 9 

Thomas Augustine Daly 10 

Laura Lee Randall 1 1 



JohnFarrar 15 

Mary Britton Miller 15 

Herbert Asquith 16 

Hilaire Belloc 17 

Mary Britton Miller 17 

Charles Edward Carryl 18 

Edith Osborne Thompson 19 

Annette Wynne 20 



Animals Never Seen in Circus or Zoo 



MERRY-Go-RoUND 

ANIMAL CRACKERS 
THE TEAPOT DRAGON 
TEMPLE BAR 
TRAFALGAR SQUARE 
THE DUEL 

The Animal Store 
THE ANIMAL STORE 
PEOPLE BUY A LOT OF 

THINGS 
SHOP WINDOWS 

Let's Pretend 
WILD BEASTS 
LIONS RUNNING OVER THE 

GREEN 

RADIATOR LIONS 
SATURDAY TOWELS 
THE RACE 
THE BEAR HUNT 
SITTING HERE 
AT NIGHT 

In Fairyland 

TIMOTHY 

THE COCK 

THE CUCKOO 

THE CANARY 

AN EXPLANATION OF THE 
GRASSHOPPER 

THE ELF AND THE DOR- 
MOUSE 

WHERE THE BEE SUCKS 

FAIRY AEROPLANES 

THE FAIRY FROCK 

SPIDER WEBS 



Rachel Field 
Christopher Morley 
Rupert Sargent Holland 
Rose Fyleman 
Rose Fyleman 
Eugene Field 



Rachel Field 

Annette Wynne 
Rose Fyleman 



Evaleen Stein 

Annette Wynne 
Dorothy Aldis 
Lysbeth Boyd Bone 
Aileen Fisher 
Margaret Widdemer 
Elizabeth Coatsworth 
Anne Blackwell Payne 



Rose Fyleman 
Rose Fyleman 
Rose Fyleman 
Rose Fyleman 

Vachel Lindsay 

Oliver Herford 
William Shakespeare 
Anne Blackwell Payne 
Katharine Morse 
James S. Tippett 



PAGE 

23 
23 
24 
25 
26 

2? 

31 

3 1 
32 

35 

35 
36 
37 
38 
38 

39 
40 



43 
43 
44 
45 

45 

46 
46 
47 
47 
48 



Beneath Man's Wings 
IN THE BARNYARD 
FAMILIAR FRIENDS 
THE MILK-CART PONY 
HORSE 

NICHOLAS NYE 
STOPPING BY WOODS ON A 

SNOWY EVENING 
THE Cow 
THE Cow 
THE MILK JUG 
THE PASTURE 
WHEN THE Cows COME 

HOME 

MILKING TIME 
ON THE GRASSY BANKS 
THE SHEEP 
THE LAMB 
CHANTICLEER 
THE CHICKENS 
THE HENS 
MRS. PECK-PIGEON 
SWIMMING 
DUCKS' DITTY 
DUCKS AT DAWN 

Playmates 
IF ONLY . . . 
MY AIREDALE DOG 
THE HAIRY DOG 
BINGO HAS AN ENEMY 
MY DOG 
CAT 
A DIRGE FOR A RIGHTEOUS 

KITTEN 

THE LOOKING-GLASS PUSSY 
CAT 
THE MYSTERIOUS CAT 



PAGE 

Dorothy Aldis 5 1 

James S. Tippett 5 1 

Eleanor Farjeon 52 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 53 

Walter de la Mare 54 

Robert Frost 55 

Ann Taylor 56 

Robert Louis Stevenson 57 

Oliver Herford 57 

Robert Frost 58 

Christina G. Rossetti 58 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 59 

Christina G. Rossetti 59 

Ann Taylor 60 

WiUiam Blake 6 1 

John Farrar 61 

Author Unknown 62 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 63 

Eleanor Farjeon 64 

Clinton Scollard 64 

Kenneth Grahame 65 

James S. Tippett 66 



Rose Fyleman 69 

W. L. Mason 70 

Herbert Asquith 70 

Rose Fyleman 71 

John Kendrick Bangs 71 

Dorothy W. Baruch 73 

Vachel Lindsay 74 

Margaret Widdemer 75 

Mary Britton Miller 76 

Vachel Lindsay 77 
xi] 



RABBITS 

THE LITTLE TURTLE 
ABOUT ANIMALS 
A Boy AND A PUP 

'Feathered, Friends 
TIME TO RISE 
THE WOODPECKER 
THE WOODPECKER 
THE SNOW-BIRD 
THE SECRET 
ROBIN REDBREAST 
THE OWL 
THE EAGLE 
THE SANDPIPER 
THE SEA GULL 

Singing Wings 
BE LIKE THE BIRD 
THE BLACKBIRD 
THE RIVALS 
RED-TOP AND TIMOTHY 
WHY READ A BOOK? 
ANSWER TO A CHILD'S 

QUESTION 
WILD GEESE 
JESTER BEE 

Frail Wings 

WHITE BUTTERFLIES 
BUTTERFLY 
FLIES 

GREEN MOTH 
MOTH MILLER 
A BEE SETS SAIL 
THE TAX-GATHERER 
FIREFLY 
FIREFLIES 



PAGE 

Dorothy W. Baruch 78 

Vachel Lindsay 79 

Hilda Conkling 79 

Arthur Guiterman 80 



Robert Louis Stevenson 83 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 83 

John Banister Tabb 83 

Frank Dempster Sherman 84 

Author Unknown 84 

William Allingham 85 

Alfred Tennyson 86 

Alfred Tennyson 87 

Celia Thaxter 87 

Leroy F. Jackson 88 



Victor Hugo 91 

Humbert Wolfe 91 

James Stephens 92 

Lucy Larcom 92 

Colette M. Burns 94 

Samuel Taylor Coleridge 94 

Celia Thaxter 95 

Frank Dempster Sherman 96 



Algernon Charles Swinburne 99 

John Banister Tabb 99 

Dorothy Aldis 99 

Winifred Welles 1 00 

Aileen Fisher 100 

Katharine Morse 101 

John Banister Tabb 101 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 102 

Carolyn Hall 102 
[xii] 



FIREFLIES 

THE FIRE-FLY 

THE HUMBLE BUMBLE BEE 

Little Folks in the Grass 
LITTLE FOLKS IN THE GRASS 
GRASSHOPPER GREEN 
THE GRASSHOPPERS 
SPLINTER 

BROWN AND FURRY 
THE TIRED CATERPILLAR 

In the Garden 
OLD SHELLOVER 
LITTLE SNAIL 
THE SNAIL 
THE SNAIL'S DREAM 
A FRIEND IN THE GARDEN 
THE WORM 
THE WORM 
A BIRD 

Little Furry Creatures 
THE RABBIT 

LITTLE CHARLIE CHIPMUNK 
THE SQUIRREL 
FABLE 
FIVE EYES 

A CHINESE NURSERY RHYME 
THE MOUSE 

THE CITY MOUSE AND THE 
GARDEN MOUSE 

On Fours 

UNSTOOPING 

I WONDER IF THE LION 

KNOWS 

THE BROWN BEAR 
THE WOLF 



[xiii] 



PAGE 

Grace Wilson Coplen 103 
John Banister Tabb 103 

Vachel Lindsay 104 



Annette Wynne 107 

Author Unknown 107 

Dorothy Aldis 108 

Carl Sandburg 109 

Christina G. Rossetti I IO 

Author Unknown no 



Walter de la Mare 113 

Hilda Conkling 113 

Grace Hazard Conkling 1 14 

Oliver Herford 114 

Juliana Horatia Ewing 115 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 116 

Ralph Bergengren 117 

Emily Dickinson 1 18 



Elizabeth Madox Roberts 121 

Helen Cowles Lecron 12 1 

Author Unknown 122 

Ralph Waldo Emerson 123 

Walter de la Mare 124 

I. T. Headland (trans,) 124 

Elizabeth Coatsworth 125 

Christina G. Rossetti 126 



Walter de la Mare 129 

Annette Wynne 129 

Mary Austin " 130 

Georgia Roberts Durston 13? 



PAGE 



THERE ARE No WOLVES IN 

ENGLAND Now 
THE WOLVES 
THE HIPPOPOTAMUS 
LONE DOG 

Animal Fancies 

UNDER THE TENT OF THE 

SKY 

WIND-WOLVES 
WIND Is A CAT 
SILVER SHEEP 
THE MOON-SHEEP 
THE PLEIADS 
WHAT GRANDPA MOUSE 

SAID 

WHITE HORSES 
HORSES OF THE SEA 
SHELL CASTLES 
THE OLD HORSE IN THE 

CITY 

THE LIZARD 
A MODERN DRAGON 

Animal Fun 
THE SHIP OF Rio 
THE LION 
THE LION 
THE HIPPOPOTAMUS 
THE YAK 

Two LITTLE KTTTENS 
KITTY CAUGHT A HORNET 
THE THREE LITTLE 

KITTENS 

THE LITTLE KITTENS 
VIEWPOINTS 
AN INCONVENIENCE 
AN INSECTARIAN 



Rose Fyleman 132 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 132 

Georgia Roberts Durston 133 

Irene Rutherford McLeod 134 



Rowena Bastin Bennett 
William D. Sargent 
Ethel Romig Fuller 
Anne Blackwell Payne 
Christopher Morley 
John Banister Tabb 

Vachel Lindsay 
Winifred Howard 
Christina G. Rossetti 
Rowena Bastin Bennett 

Vachel Lindsay 
Abbie Farwell Brown 
Rowena Bastin Bennett 



Walter de la Mare 
Hilaire Belloc 
Vachel Lindsay 
Hilaire BeUoc 
Hilaire Belloc 
Author Unknown 
Leroy F. Jackson 



Author Unknown 
Eliza Lee Follen 
Arthur Guiterman 
John Banister Tabb 
John Banister Tabb 
xiv } 



137 
138 
138 
139 
140 
140 

141 
142 
142 

143 

144 

H5 
146 



149 
149 
150 
150 
150 



152 
154 
154 
155 
155 



THE PUZZLED CENTIPEDE 

FROGS AT SCHOOL 

How TO TELL THE WILD 
ANIMALS 

THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 

THE OWL AND THE PUSSY- 
CAT 

THE WONDERFUL MEADOW 

THE MONKEYS AND THE 
CROCODILE 

THE CROCODILE 

THE DINKEY-BIRD 

Hurt No Living Thing 
A LINNET IN A GILDED CAGE 
Trr FOR TAT 
STUPIDITY STREET 
THE BELLS OF HEAVEN 
HOPPING FROG 
LITTLE THINGS 
THE SNARE 
THE BROWN THRUSH 
A ROBIN REDBREAST 

Come Holidays 
MEETING THE EASTER 

BUNNY 

A THANKSGIVING FABLE 
FOR CHRISTMAS 
SANTA CLAUS AND THE 

MOUSE 

A CHRISTMAS FOLK-SONG 
THE BARN 



Author Unknown 
George Cooper 

Carolyn Wells 
Lewis Carroll 

Edward Lear 
Olive A. Wadsworth 

Laura E. Richards 
Laura E. Richards 
Eugene Field 



PAGE 

155 
156 

157 
159 

1 60 
161 

163 
164 
164 



Christina G. Rossetti 169 

Walter de la Mare 169 

Ralph Hodgson 170 

Ralph Hodgson 170 

Christina G. Rossetti 171 

James Stephens 171 

James Stephens 172 

Lucy Larcom 172 

William Blake 174 



Rowena Bastin Bennett 177 

Oliver Herford 177 

Dorothy Aldis 178 

Emflie Poulsson 178 

Lizette Woodworth Reese 1 80 

Elizabeth Coatsworth 181 



Sleepy Songs 
SLUMBER SONG 
THE SLEEPY SONG 



Louis V. Ledoux 185 

Josephine Daskam Bacon 185 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 
INDEX OF AUTHORS 
INDEX OF TITLES 
INDEX OF FIRST LINES 



PAGE 

i8 7 

193 
196 

20 1 




[xvi] 



UNDER THE TENT OF THE SKY 




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CIRCUS PARADE 

Here it comes! Here it comes! 
I can hear the music playing; 
I can hear the beating drums. 

On parade! On parade! 
Gaily plumed a horse and rider 
Lead the circus cavalcade. 

Knights in armor with their banners 

Calmly riding by ; 

Horses hung with velvet trappings, 

Stepping proudly high; 

Circus wagons slowly clanking, 

Drawn by six horse teams, 

Red and gold and set with mirrors 

Where the sunlight gleams; 

Yawning lions in their cages 5 

Polar bear with swinging head; 

Restless tiger pacing pacing 

Back and forth with noiseless tread: 

Horses snorting and cavorting 

With wild yelling cowboy bands; 

Dressed-up monkeys riding ponies, 

Bowing as we dap our hands; 

Herds of elephants and camels, 

Marching one by one; 

Troops of painted downs advancing, 

Playing tricks, and making fun. 

At the end the steam calliope 
Comes playing all too soon, 
Saying the parade is over 
As it pipes its wildest tune. 

James S, Tifpett 

[3] 



A CIRCUS GARLAND 

Parade 

This is the day the circus comes 
With blare of brass, with beating drums, 
And clashing cymbals, and with roar 
Of wild beasts never heard before 
Within town limits. Spick and span 
Will shine each gilded cage and van 5 
Cockades at every horse's head 
Will nod, and riders dressed in red 
Or blue trot by. There will be floats 
In shapes like dragons, thrones and boats, 
And clowns on stilts 5 freaks big and small, 
Till leisurely and last of all 
Camels and elephants will pass 
Beneath our elms, along our grass. 




The Performing Seal 

Who is so proud 
As not to feel 
A secret awe 
Before a seal 
That keeps such sleek 
And wet repose 
While twirling candles 
On his nose? 

[4] 



Gunga 

With wrinkled hide and great frayed ears, 
Gunga, the elephant, appears. 
Colored like city smoke he goes 
As gingerly on blunted toes 
As if he held the earth in trust 
And feared to hurt the very dust. 

Equestrienne 

See, they are clearing the sawdust course 

For the girl in pink on the milk-white horse. 

Her spangles twinkle 5 his pale flanks shine, 

Every hair of his tail is fine 

And bright as a comet's 5 his mane blows free. 

And she points a toe and bends a knee, 

And while his hoofbeats fall like rain 

Over and over and over again. 

And nothing that moves on land or sea 

Will seem so beautiful to me 

As the girl in pink on the milk-white horse 

Cantering over the sawdust course. 

Epilogue 

Nothing now to mark the spot 
But a littered vacant lot 5 
Sawdust in a heap, and there 
Where the ring was, grass worn bare 
In a circle, scuffed and brown, 
And a paper hoop the clown 
Made his little dog jump through, 
And a pygmy pony-shoe. 

Rachel Field 



THE CIRCUS 

Friday came and the circus was there, 
And Mother said that the twins and I 
And Charles and Clarence and all of us 
Could go out and see the parade go by. 

And there were wagons with pictures on, 
And you never could guess what they had inside, 
Nobody could guess, for the doors were shut, 
And there was a dog that a monkey could ride. 

A man on the top of a sort of cart 
Was dapping his hands and making a talk. 
And the elephant came he can step pretty far 
It made us laugh to see him walk. 

Three beautiful ladies came riding by, 
And each one had on a golden dress, 
And each one had a golden whip. 
They were queens of Sheba, I guess. 

A big wild man was in a cage, 
And he had some snakes going over his feet 
And somebody said "He eats them alive! " 
But I didn't see him eat. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



[6] 



AT THE CIRCUS 

The Elephants 

With their trunks the elephants 
Hold hands in a long row 
Their little eyes so quick and wise, 
Their feet so big and slow. 
They climb on top of things and then, 
When they are told, climb down again. 



Bare-back Rider 

There isn't a prettier sight, I think, 

Than a pony that's white and a lady that's pink: 

The pony so frisky and stepping so high, 

The lady so smiling as they go by, 

The lady so tip-toe on her toes, 

The pony, his bridle dressed up with a rose, 

The lady and pony both liking to be 

Riding around for the world to see. 



The Seals 

The seals all flap 
Their shining flips 
And bounce balls on 
Their nosey tips, 
And beat a drum. 
And catch a bar, 
And wriggle with 
How pleased they are. 

Dorothy Aldis 

[7] 



HOLDING HANDS 

Elephants walking 
Along the trails 

Are holding hands 
By holding tails. 

Trunks and tails 
Are handy things 

When elephants 'walk 
In Circus rings. 

Elephants work 
And elephants play 

And elephants walk 
And feel so gay. 

And when they walk 
It never fails 

They're holding hands 
By holding tails. 

Lenore A. Link 



[8] 



CIRCUS 

The brass band blares, 

The naphtha flares, 

The sawdust smells, 

Showmen ring bells, 

And oh! right into the circus-ring 

Conies such a lovely, lovely thing, 

A milk-white pony with flying tress, 

And a beautiful lady, 

A beautiful lady, 

A beautiful lady in a pink dress! 

The red-and-white clown 

For joy tumbles down, 

Like a pink rose 

Round she goes 

On her tip-toes 

With the pony under 

And then, oh, wonder! 

The pony his milk-white tresses droops, 

And the beautiful lady, 

The beautiful lady, 

Flies like a bird through the paper hoops! 

The red-and-white clown for joy falls dead. 

Then he waggles his feet and stands on his head, 

And the little boys on the twopenny seats 

Scream with laughter and suck their sweets. 

Eleanor Farfeon 



[9] 



THE DAY OF THE CIRCUS HORSE 

It was a fiery circus horse 

That ramped and stamped and neighed, 
Till every creature in its course 

Fled, frightened and dismayed. 
The chickens on the roadway's edge 

Arose and flapped their wings, 
And making for the sheltering hedge 

Flew off like crazy things. 

Nor iron gates nor fences barred 

That mettled steed's career. 
It galloped right across our yard 

And filled us all with fear 5 
And when it tossed its head and ran 

Straight through the pantry door, 
Cook almost dropped her frying-pan 

Upon the kitchen floor! 

It neighed and pranced and wheeled about 

And scampered off, but then 
We scarcely saw the creature out 

When it was in again. 
And so throughout the livelong day 

Through house and yard and street, 
That charger held its fearsome way 

And only stopped to eat. 



[10] 



But when, at dusk, a little lame, 

It slowly climbed the stairs, 
Behold! a gentle lady came 

And made it say its prayers. 
Now, what a wondrous change you see! 

? Sh! Come and take a peep 
Here lies, as tame as tame can be, 

A little boy, asleep! 

Thomas Augustine Daly 



OUR CIRCUS 

We had a circus in our shed 
(Admission, three new pins a head) 
And every girl and boy I know 
Is talking yet about our show. 

They laughed so hard at Fatty Brown 
When he came out to be the clown, 
That all the neighbors ran to see 
Whatever such a noise could be, 

Our tin-pan and mouth-organ band 
Played tunes that sounded simply grand 5 
We had a truly sawdust ring, 
Pink lemonade, 'n everything. 

The big menagerie was nice: 

Three cats, one dog, and five white mice, 

A parrot that Bill's uncle lent 5 

All underneath a bedspread tent. 



Then Ned and Buster took a sheet 
That covered them from head to feet 
And made a horse that kicked and pranced 
And when it heard the band, it danced. 

And Sally Ann was "Bareback Queen"! 
No finer rider could be seen} 
She stood right up, and looked so proud, 
But kissed her hand to all the crowd. 

We took some chalk blue, green, and red 
And made a "Tattooed Man" of Fred 5 
Jim juggled lighted cigarettes, 
And Tom turned double somersets. 

We had tall stilts and flying rings 
And lots and lots of other things 
And every boy and girl I know 
Said yes, it was a dandy show! 

Laura Lee Randall 









"7 f 7 





d&Ljri ta tfu ^Lao 



SERIOUS OMISSION 

I know that there are dragons, 
St. George's, Jason's, too, 
And many modern dragons 
With scales of green and blue 5 

But though Pve been there many times 
And carefully looked through, 
I can't find a dragon 
In the cages at the zoo! 

John Farrar 

LION 

Lion, you were once the King 

Of every single living thing, 

In forests where the wild beasts prey 

Upon each other night and day, 

Your fearful roaring used to make 

All God's other creatures quake, 

When in the jungle with a rush 

You crashed through trees and underbrush: 

But now you're prisoned in the Zoo, 

And nobody's afraid of you. 

You've thrown yourself upon the floor 

Too sorrowful to even roar, 

Lying in the dust, instead 

Of holding high your kingly head 

O lion, you were made to be 

Proud, majestic, wild and free j 

Jungle, forest, gkde and fen 

You will never see again. 

Rest your poor head upon the floor 

Try to sleep a little more. 

Mary Britton Millet 



THE ELEPHANT 

Here comes the elephant 
Swaying along 
With his cargo of children 
All singing a song: 
To the tinkle o laughter 
He goes on his way, 
And his cargo of children 
Have crowned him with may. 
His legs are in leather 
And padded his toes : 
He can root up an oak 
With a whisk of his nose: 
With a wave of his trunk 
And a turn of his chin 
He can pull down a house, 
Or pick up a pin. 
Beneath his gray forehead 
A little eye peers j 
Of what is he thinking 
Between those wide ears? 
Of what does he think? 
If he wishes to tease, 
He could twirl his keeper 
Over the trees : 
If he were not kind, 
He could play cup and ball 
With Robert and Helen, 
And Uncle Paul: 
But that gray forehead, 
Those crinkled ears, 
Have learned to be kind 
In a hundred years : 
[16] 



And so with the children 
He goes on his way 
To the tinkle of laughter 
And crowned with the may. 

Herbert Asquith 

THE ELEPHANT 

When people call this beast to mind, 
They marvel more and more 

At such a little tail behind. 
So LARGE a trunk before. 

Hilaire Belloc 

CAMEL 

O camel in the zoo, 
You don't do any of the things 
They tell me that you used to do 
In Egypt, and in other lands, 
Carrying potentates and kings 
Across the burning desert sands 
With gorgeous trappings made of blue 
And scarlet silks to cover you. 

Your humps are carried on your back 
Just the way they always were, 
You thrust your old head up and hack, 
And make your neck go in and out, 
And spill the foam upon your fur, 
And writhe and jerk and rear about, 
But kneel no more upon the sands 
To mount the kings of eastern lands. 

Mary Britten Miller 

[17] 



THE PLAINT OF THE CAMEL 

Canary-birds feed on sugar and seed, 

Parrots have crackers to crunch ; 
And as for the poodles, they tell me the noodles 
Have chickens and cream for their lunch. 
But there's never a question 
About MY digestion 
ANYTHING does for me! 

Cats, you're aware, can repose in a chair, 

Chickens can roost upon rails $ 
Puppies are able to sleep in a stable, 
And oysters can slumber in pails. 
And no one supposes 
A poor Camel dozes 
ANY PLACE does for me! 

Lambs are enclosed where it's never exposed, 

Coops are constructed for hensj 
Kittens are treated to houses well heated, 
And pigs are protected by pens. 
But a Camel comes handy 
Wherever it's sandy 
ANYWHERE does for me! 

People would laugh if you rode a giraffe, 

Or mounted the back of an ox; 
It's nobody's habit to ride on a rabbit, 
Or try to bestraddle a fox. 
But as for a Camel, he's 
Ridden by families 
ANY LOAD does for me! 



A snake is as round as a hole in the ground, 

And weasels are wavy and sleek 5 
And no alligator could ever be straighter 
Than lizards that live in a creek, 
But a Camel's all lumpy 
And bumpy and humpy 
ANY SHAPE does for me! 

Charles Edward Carry I 



THE MONKEYS 

Sing a song of monkeys 
A jolly bunch of monkeys! 
Leaping, swinging in their cages 
Looking wise as ancient sages, 
Nonchalant and care free manner 
Nibbling peanut or banana, 
Every day is just another 
To a monkey or his brother. 

Sing a song of monkeys, 
Happy, merry monkeys, 
If you're ever tired or blue 
I can tell you what to do ! 
Let the monkeys at the Zoo 
Make a monkey out of you! 

Edith Qsborne Thompson 



[19] 



EXCUSE US, ANIMALS IN THE ZOO 

Excuse us, Animals in the Zoo, 
Pm sure we're very rude to you; 
Into your private house we stare 
And never ask you if you care 5 
And never ask you if you mind. 
Perhaps we really are not kindj 
I think it must be hard to stay 
And have folks looking in all day, 
I wouldn't like my house that way. 

Excuse us, Animals in the Zoo, 

Pm sure we're very rude to you; 

Suppose you all to our house came 

And stared at us and called our name. 

I hardly think we'd like it at all 

In a house that didn't have a wall. 

No wonder you pace up and down the floor 

And growl a little or even roar 

Pm sure if 'twere we, we'd growl much more. 

Excuse us, Animals in the Zoo, 
I'm sure we're very rude to you. 

Annette Wynne 



ho] 



ANTMALc/ 3 NEVER 
SEEN IN CIRCUS OR 

ZOO 





urzdk Pi&u&s uriJJi cnanq-e 
' r~* n _L P $ fi 
L, I^p^harub6 pink ana o 

and ti&rw tfocd ' TWWL UK 
In ci/uxM pas*cud& &t goo I 

' FuM. 



MERRY-GO-ROUND 

Purple horses with orange manes, 

Elephants pink and blue, 
Tigers and lions that never were seen 

In circus parade or zoo! 
Bring out your money and choose your steed, 

And prance to delightsome sound. 
What fun if the world would turn some day 

Into a Merry-Go-Round! 

Rachel Field 



ANIMAL CRACKERS 

Animal crackers, and cocoa to drink, 

That is the finest of suppers, I think 5 

When I'm grown up and can have what I please 

I think I shall always insist upon these. 

What do you choose when you're offered a treat? 
When Mother says, "What would you like best to eat?" 
Is it waffles and syrup, or cinnamon toast? 
It's cocoa and animals that I love the most I 

The kitchen's the cosiest place that I know: 
The kettle is singing, the stove is aglow, 
And there in the twilight, how jolly to see 
The cocoa and animals waiting for me. 



Daddy and Mother dine later in state. 
With Mary to cook for them, Susan to wait $ 
But they don't have nearly as much fun as I 
Who eat in the kitchen with Nurse standing byj 
And Daddy once said, he would like to be me 
Having cocoa and animals once more for tea! 

Christopher Morley 



THE TEAPOT DRAGON 

There's a dragon on our teapot, 

With a long and crinkly tail, 
His claws are like a pincer-bug, 

His wings are like a sail $ 

His tongue is always sticking out, 

And so I used to think 
He must be very hungry, or 

He wanted tea to drink. 

But once when Mother wasn't round 

I dipped my fingers in, 
And when I pulled them out I found 

I'd blistered all the skin. 

Now when I see the dragon crawl 

Around our china pot, 
I know he's burned his tongue because 

The water is so hot. 

Rupert Sargent Holland 



TEMPLE BAR 

London's full of statues 

Some of them are kings. 
And some of them are gentlemen 

Who just did clever things $ 
And some of them have horses. 

Some only sit or stand, 
And some are rather queerly dressed, 

And some are very grand. 

But what y oh y what did the dragon do 
That he was given a statue too? 

His wings are long and pointed, 

He's got a lot of scales, 
He's very like St. George's 

And those in fairy tales j 
He looks a little haughty, 

His tail is in the air; 
But nobody can tell me 

The reason he is there. 

Though dragons in the stories 

Were as bad as they could be 
And people had to kill them 

To set Princesses free, 
I'm sure he was a good one, 

But they haven't put his name, 
And not a word about him, 

And I think it is a shame. 

And I msh so much y so much that I knew 
What the dragon did really do. 

Rose Fyleman 



TRAFALGAR SQUARE 

Nelson's on a column 

Such a high, high place 
That only birds that fly there 
Or airmen who go by there 

Could ever see his face. 

The lions at the bottom, 

They guard him night and dayj 

Their manes are fine and frilly, 

But it does seem rather silly 
That they're so far away. 

If ever he should need them 

They wouldn't be much goodj 
They're kind and wise and solemn, 
But they'd never climb that column 
I don't see how they could. 

Rose Fyleman 




THE DUEL 

The gingham dog and the calico cat 

Side by side on the table sat 5 

>T was half-past twelve, and (what do you think! ) 

Nor one nor t* other had slept a wink! 

The old Dutch clock and the Chinese plate 
Appeared to know as sure as fate 
There was going to be a terrible spat. 
(/ wasrft there ; I simply state 
What was told, to me by the Chinese $late!) 

The gingham dog went "bow-wow-wow! J> 
And the calico cat replied "mee-ow!" 
The air was littered, an hour or so, 
With bits of gingham and calico, 

While the old Dutch clock in the chimney-place 
Up with its hands before its face, 
For it always dreaded a family row! 

(Now mind,: Pm only telling you 

What the old Dutch clock declares is true!) 

The Chinese plate looked very blue, 
And wailed, "Oh, dear! what shall we do!" 
But the gingham dog and the calico cat 
Wallowed this way and tumbled that, 
Employing every tooth and claw 
In the awf idlest way you ever saw 
And, oh! how the gingham and calico flew! 
(Dorft fancy I exaggerate 
I got my news from the Chinese plate!) 



Next morning, where the two had sat 
They found no trace of dog or catj 
And some folks think unto this day 
That burglars stole that pair away! 
But the truth about the cat and pup 
Is this: they ate each other up! 
Now what do you really think of that! 

( The old Dutch clock it told me so y 
And that is how I came to kno<w^) 

Eugene Field 







AL STOR 




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THE ANIMAL STORE 

If I had a hundred dollars to spend, 

Or maybe a little more, 
I'd hurry as fast as my legs would go 

Straight to the animal store. 

I wouldn't say, "How much for this or that?" 

"What kind of a dog is he?" 
I'd buy as many as rolled an eye, 

Or wagged a tail at me! 

I'd take the hound with the drooping ears 

That sits by himself alone 5 
Cockers and Cairns and wobbly pups 

For to be my very own. 

I might buy a parrot all red and green, 

And the monkey I saw before, 
If I had a hundred dollars to spend, 

Or maybe a little more. 

Rachel Field 

PEOPLE BUY A LOT OF THINGS 

People buy a lot of things 
Carts and balls and nails and rings, 
But I would buy a bird that sings. 

T would buy a bird that sings and let it sing for me, 
And let it sing of flying things and mating in a tree, 
And then I'd open wide the cage, and set the singer free. 

Annette Wynne 

[30 



SHOP WINDOWS 

Mother likes the frocks and hats 
And pretty stuffs and coloured mats. 

Daddy never, never looks 

At anything but pipes and books. 

Auntie's fond of chains and rings 
And all the sparkly diamond things. 

Richard likes machines the best 5 
He doesn't care about the rest. 

Nannie always loves to stop 
In front of every single shop. 

But I don't want to wait for a minute 
Till we get to the one with the puppy dogs in it. 

Rose Fyleman 




[3*] 



WILD BEASTS 

I will be a lion 

And you shall be a bear. 
And each of us will have a den 

Beneath a nursery chair; 
And you must growl and growl and growl, 

And I will roar and roar, 
And then why, then you'll growl again, 

And I will roar some more! 

Evaleen Stein 



LIONS RUNNING OVER THE GREEN 

Lions running over the green, 

Fiercest of creatures that ever were seen, 

Chasing Tom and Dick and Sue 

I hope they won't be caught, don't you? 

The lions chase them through the gate, 
But Sue cries out: CC O lions, wait, 
My shoe's untied!" One lion then 
Ties the lacing up again. 

And after that the chase goes on 
Until the afternoon is gone 
The fiercest creatures ever seen, 
Lions running over the green ! 

Annette Wynne 



[35] 



RADIATOR LIONS 

George lives in an apartment and 
His mother will not let 
Him keep a dog or polliwog 
Or rabbit for a pet. 

So he has Radiator Lions. 

(The parlor is the xoo.) 

They love to fight but will not bite 

Unless he tells them to. 

And days when it is very cold 

And he can't go outdoors 

They glower and they lower and they 

Crouch upon all fours. 

And roar most awful roarings and 
Gurgle loud and mad. 

Up their noses water goeses 

That?s what makes them bad. 

But he loves Radiator Lions! 
He's glad, although they're wild, 
He hasn't dogs and polliwogs 
Like any other child! 

D or o thy JL Idis 



[36] 



SATURDAY TOWELS 

Under the bed 
Away upstairs, 
I like to pretend 
Is a den for bears. 

It's cool up there 
When the yard is hot, 
Sometimes it's dusty 
And sometimes it's not. 

So I lie very still 
Hardly breathing at all 
Till I hear black shoes 
Coming down the hall, 

Till Mary brings in 
The Saturday towels. 
Then I scramble out 
With the awfullest yowls. 

With the awfullest, awfullest 
Sort of a roar, 
And she drops the towels 
And runs for the door. 

Then I laugh and I laugh, 
For, don't you see, 
She thinks it's a bear, 
But it's only Me! 

Lysbeth Boyd Borie 



[37] 



THE RACE 

My tricycle's a camel 
With thickly padded feet. 

My wagon is a charger 
That clatters down the street. 

I'd like to ride them both at once 
To see which one would beat ! 

Aileen Fisher 



THE BEAR HUNT 

I played I was two polar bears 
Who lived inside a cave of chairs, 

And Brother was the hunter-man 
'Who tried to shoot us "when we ran. 

The ten-pins made good bones to gnaw, 
I held them down beneath my paw. 

Of course, I had to kill him quick 
Before he shot me with his stick. 

So all the cave fell down, you see, 
On Brother and the bones and me 

So then he said he wouldn't play 
But it was tea-time, anyway! 

MLargaret Widdemer 

[38] 



SITTING HERE 

Sitting here 
In our usual chairs 
It's pleasant to think 
Of polar bears, 

Of polar bears 

Amid ice-floes, 

Dog sleds, and flat-faced 

Eskimos. 

It's pleasant to think, 
On the other hand, 
Of monkeys who live 
In a tropical land, 

And chatter and peer 
At the forest floor 
Where elephants stamp 
And lions roar. 

As high as the strong-winged 
Eagles fly 

Our little thoughts climb 
To pierce the sky. 

And deep in the sea 
As fishes sink 
A child may go 
If a child will think. 



[39] 



High and low 
And far and wide 
Swift and nimble 
A thought will ride, 

But what it brings back 
At the saddle bow, 
Only the mind that sent it 
Will know. 

Elizabeth Coatsworth 



AT NIGHT 

When I go to bed at night 
The darkness is a bear. 
He crouches in the corner, 
Or hides behind a chair j 
The one who tells me stories 
She does not know he's there. 

But when she kisses me good-night, 
And darkness starts to creep 
Across the floor, why, then I see 
It's just a woolly sheep, 
That nibbles at my rugs awhile 
Before we go to sleep. 

Anne Blackwell Payne 



[40] 



IN 
FAIRYLAND 




, , , Q 



TIMOTHY 

My cat Timothy who has such lovely eyes 

Is really not a cat at all 5 it's only a disguise. 

A witch cast a spell on him a long time since 

And changed him to a pussy-cat j but once he was a Prince. 

On warm clear nights when a big moon is out 
He steps into the garden and never turns about, 
But walks down the path with his quiet proud air 
He knows that the fairies are waiting out there. 

The fairies go a-dancing, a-dancing in a ring, 
He sits in the middle with a crown like a king, 
High on a throne in the middle of the grass, 
And the fairies stop capering to curtsey as they pass. 

Some day, some day when the spell is done 

He will be a Prince again. Won't that be fun? 

He will come to seek me and kiss my lily hand 

And take me on his foaming steed to reign in fairyland. 

Rose Fyleman 

THE COCK 

The kindly cock is the fairies' friend, 

He warns them when their revels must end$ 

He never forgets to give the word, 

For the cock is a thoroughly punctual bird 

And since he grieves that he never can fly, 
Like all the other birds, up in the sky, 
The fairies put him now and again 
High on a church for a weather-vane. 
[43] 



Little for sun or for rain he cares j 
He turns about with the proudest airs 
And chuckles with joy as the clouds go past 
To think he is up in the sky at last. 

Rose Fyleman 



THE CUCKOO 

The cuckoo is a tell-tale, 

A mischief -making bird 5 
He flies to East, he flies to West 
And whispers into every nest 

The wicked things he's heard j 
He loves to spread his naughty lies, 
He laughs about it as he flies ; 
"Cuckoo," he cries, "cuckoo, cuckoo, 

It's true, it's true." 

And when the fairies catch him 

His busy wings they dock, 
They shut him up for evermore 
(He may not go beyond the door) 

Inside a wooden clock; 
Inside a wooden clock he cowers 
And has to tell the proper hours 
"Cuckoo," he cries, "cuckoo, cuckoo, 

It's true, it's true." 

Rose Fyleman 



[44] 



THE CANARY 

He used to be a fairy once, 

A little singing fairy 5 
He would not work, he would not play, 
He only sat and sang all day 

So now he's a canary. 

They sent him out of fairyland, 

They sent him here to me 
The day that I was six years old 5 
His little house of shining gold 

Hangs in the nursery. 

He's taught me lots of lovely things 

I never should have guessed 5 
He's told me what they say and do 
(They all have wings it's really true) 
And how the Queen is dressed, 

He flits about the house at night 

A little lonely fairy j 
But nobody is there to see, 
And no one knows excepting me 

He's not a real canary. _ RQM 



emat 




AN EXPLANATION OF THE GRASSHOPPER 

The Grasshopper, the Grasshopper, 

I will explain to you: 
He is the Brownies' racehorse, 

The fairies' Kangaroo. _ Vachel 

[451 



THE ELF AND THE DORMOUSE 

Under a toadstool crept a wee Elf, 
Out of the rain to shelter himself. 

Under the toadstool, sound asleep, 
Sat a big Dormouse all in a heap. 

Trembled the wee Elf, frightened, and yet 
Fearing to fly away lest he get wet. 

To the next shelter maybe a mile! 
Sudden the wee Elf smiled a wee smile, 

Tugged till the toadstool toppled in two. 
Holding it over him, gaily he flew. 

Soon he was safe home, dry as could be. 

Soon woke the Dormouse "Good gracious me! 

c <Where is my toadstool?" loud he lamented. 
And that's how umbrellas first were invented. 

Oliver Herford 



WHERE THE BEE SUCKS 

Where the bee sucks, there suck I : 

In a cowslip's bell I lie 5 
There I couch when owls do cry. 
On the bat's back I do fly 
After summer merrily 5 

Merrily, merrily shall I live now, 

Under the blossom that hangs on the bough. 

William Shakespeare 

[46] 



FAIRY AEROPLANES 

The fairies, too, have aeroplanes, 

Xo carry them about, 

That swoop, and soar, and dart, and dip, 

And circle in and out. 

So when their little wings are tired, 
They summon one of these, 
And sail above the garden beds 
Or anywhere they please. 

The fairies' aeroplanes are safe 
And never do capsize, 
They're very beautiful and gay, 
Because they're butterflies. 

Anna Blackwoell 



THE FAIRY FROCK 

It's primrose petals for a gown, 

For sempstress spiders three, 

It's gossamer and thistledown 

To make my frock for me. 

Then hie thee straight to cobbler toad 

Beneath the hornbeam tree 

Beyond the turning of the road 

To shape my shoes for me. 

Then put a dewdrop in my hair, 

Fetch me my cobweb shawl, 

And call my cricket coach and pair 

To drive me to the ball! 

Katharine I^Lorse 

[47] 



SPIDER WEBS 

The spiders were busy last night. 
From every fence and tree 
They hung- their lacy webs 
For all the world to see. 

The mist was busy too 3 

In the stillness of the night 

It strung the spider webs with pearls 

To catch the morning light. 

One spider wove a web 
Like frost on a window pane} 
Another one spun a single thread 
That looks like a jeweled chain. 

JVIotionless hang the webs, 
By the quiet sunbeams kissed 5 
A. fairy world was made last night 
By the spiders and the mist. 

James S. 



[48] 



BENEAT 









^[ cr out tcrfe&dtA& fauino tfainfij* 
%/>Oi^~ &. *~A^keneatA/iM 

P driMramCaffin. 



IN THE BARNYARD 

In the barnyard chickens walk, 
They jerk their heads and peck and talk. 
While yellow ducklings run around 
Like butter balls upon the ground. 
And some geese, tremendous proud. 
Point their noses at a cloud. 

"Dorothy Aldis 



FAMILIAR FRIENDS 

The horses, the pigs, 
And the chickens, 
The turkeys, the ducks, 
And the sheep! 
I can see all my friends 
From my window 
As soon as I waken 
From sleep. 

The cat on the fence 

Is out walking. 

The geese have gone down 

For a swim. 

The pony comes trotting 

Right up to the gate 5 

He knows I have candy 

For him. 



[51] 



The cows in the pasture 

Are switching 

Their tails to keep off 

The flies. 

And the old mother dog 

Has come out in the yard 

With five pups to give me 

A surprise, 

James S. Tippett 



THE MILK-CART PONY 

The milk-cart pony in the street 
Is spotted white and brown, 

He frisks his mane, he kicks his feet, 
And rattles through the town. 

His milk-cans glitter in the sun, 
His harness clinks and rings, 

The milk-cart pony on the run 
Must think of lively things. 

Perhaps he thinks of circus-tents 

And ladies in top hats, 
And orange-peel and sawdust scents, 

And clowns and acrobats. 

Perhaps he thinks of Derby Day 
With crowds upon the course 

All shouting loud Hip hip hooray! 
Here comes the winning horse! 



[Sal 



Perhaps he thinks o Dartymoor 

Where he was once a child. 
And on the purple-heather floor 

The ponies still run wild. 

Well, nobody knows what he thinks, 

This little skewbald clown, 
Who bears our night and morning drinks 

So noisily through town! 

Eleanor Farjeon 



HORSE 

His bridle hung around the post 3 

The sun and the leaves made spots come down; 

I looked close at him through the fence 5 

The post was drab and he was brown. 

His nose was long and hard and still, 
And on his lip were specks like chalk. 
But once he opened up his eyes, 
And he began to talk. 

He didn't talk out with his mouth $ 
He didn't talk with words or noise. 
The talk was there along his nose; 
It seemed and then it was. 

He said the day was hot and slow, 
And he said he didn't like the flies; 
They made him have to shake his skin, 
And they got drowned in his eyes. 

[53] 



He said that drab was just about 
The same as brown, but he was not 
A post, he said, to hold a fence. 
"I'm horse," he said, "that's what!" 

And then he shut his eyes again. 
As still as they had been before. 
He said for me to run along 
And not to bother him any more. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



NICHOLAS NYE 

Thistle and darnel and dock grew there, 
And a bush, in the corner, of may, 

On the orchard wall I used to sprawl, 
In the blaming heat of the day 5 

Half asleep and half awake, 

While the birds went twittering by, 

And nobody there my lone to share 
But Nicholas Nye. 

Nicholas Nye was lean and grey, 

Lame of a leg and old, 
More than a score of donkey's years 

He had seen since he was foaled 3 
He munched the thistles, purple and spiked, 

"Would sometimes stoop and sigh, 
And turn to his head, as if he said, 
"Poor Nicholas Nye!" 



[54] 



Alone with his shadows he'd drowse in the meadow, 

Lazily swinging his tail, 
At break of day he used to bray, 

Not much too hearty and hale 5 
But a wonderful gumption was under his skin, 

And a clear calm light in his eye, 
And once in a while: he'd smile: 
Would Nicholas Nye. 

Seem to be smiling at me, he would, 
From his bush, in the corner, of may, 

Bony and ownerless, widowed and worn, 
Knobble-kneed, lonely and grey 5 

And over the grass would seem to pass 
'Neath the deep dark blue of the sky, 

Something much better than words between me 
And Nicholas Nye. 

But dusk would come in the apple boughs, 

The green of the glow-worm shine, 
The birds in nest would crouch to rest, 

And home I'd trudge to mine; 
And there, in the moonlight, dark with dew, 

Asking not wherefore nor why, 
Would brood like a ghost, and as still as a post, 
Old Nicholas Nye. 

Walter de la Mare 



STOPPING BY WOODS ON A SNOWY EVENING 

Whose woods these are I think I know. 
His house is in the village though ; 
He will not see me stopping here 
To watch his woods fill up with snow. 
[55] 



The little horse must think it queer 
To stop without a farmhouse near 
Between the woods and f roxen lake 
The darkest evening of the year. 

He gives his harness bells a shake 
To ask if there is some mistake. 
The only other sound's the sweep 
Of easy wind and downy flake. 

The woods are lovely, dark and deep. 
But I have promises to keep, 
And miles to go before I sleep, 
And miles to go before I sleep. 

Robert Frost 



THE COW 

Thank you, pretty cow, that made 
Pleasant milk to soak my bread, 
Every day and every night, 
Warm, and fresh, and sweet, and white. 

IDo not chew the hemlock rank, 
Growing on the weedy bank 5 
But the yellow cowslips eat, 
They will make it very sweet. 

"Where the purple violet grows, 
Where the bubbling water flows, 
Where the grass is fresh and fine, 
Pretty cow, go there and dine. 

Awn Taylor 

[56] 



THE COW 

The friendly cow all red and white, 

I love with all my heart: 
She gives me cream with all her might, 

To eat with apple-tart. 

She wanders lowing here and there. 

And yet she cannot stray, 
All in the pleasant open air, 

The pleasant light of day; 

And blown by all the winds that pass 
And wet with all the showers, 

She walks among the meadow grass 
And eats the meadow flowers. 

Robert Louis Stevenson 



THE MILK JUG 
(The Kitten Speaks) 

The Gentle Milk Jug blue and white 

I love with all my soul, 
She pours herself with all her might 

To fill my breakfast bowl. 

All day she sits upon the shelf, 
She does not jump or climb 
She only waits to pour herself 

When 'tis my supper-time. 

* 

[57] 



And when the Jug is empty quite, 

I shall not mew in vain. 
The Friendly Cow, all red and white, 

Will fill her up again. 

Oliver Herford 



THE PASTURE 

Pm going out to clean the pasture spring; 
I'll only stop to rake the leaves away 
(And wait to watch the water clear, I may) : 
I sha'n't be gone long. You come too. 

Pm going out to fetch the little calf 
That's standing by the mother. It's so young 
It totters when she licks it with her tongue. 
I sha'n't be gone long. You come too. 

Rob erf Frost 



WHEN THE COWS COME HOME 

When the cows come home the milk is coming, 
Honey's made while the bees are humming $ 
Duck and drake on the rushy lake, 
And the deer live safe in the breezy brake 5 
And timid, funny, brisk little bunny 
Winks his nose and sits all sunny. 

Christina G. Rossetti 



[58] 



MILKING TIME 

When supper time is almost come, 
But not quite here, I cannot wait, 
And so I take my china mug 
And go down by the milking gate. 

The cow is always eating shucks 
And spilling off the little silk. 
Her purple eyes are big and soft 
She always smells like milk. 

And Father takes my mug from me, 
And then he makes the stream come out. 
I see it going in my mug 
And foaming all about. 

And when it's piling very high, 

And when some little streams commence 

To run and drip along the sides, 

He hands it to me through the fence. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



ON THE GRASSY BANKS 

On the grassy banks 
Lambkins at their pranks 5 
Woolly sisters, woolly brothers, 

Jumping off their feet, 
While their woolly mothers 

Watch by them and bleat. 

Christina G. Rossetti 

[59] 



THE SHEEP 

Lazy sheep, pray tell me why 
In the pleasant field you lie, 
Eating grass and daisies white 
From the morning till the night? 
Everything can something do 5 
But what kind of use are you? 

Nay, my little master, nay, 
Do not serve me so, I pray. 
Don't you see the wool that grows 
On my back to make you clothes? 
Cold, and very cold, you'd get, 
[ I did not give you it. 

True, it seems a pleasant thing 
To nip the daisies in the spring ; 
But many chilly nights I pass 
On the cold and dewy grass, 
Or pick a scanty dinner, where 
All the common's brown and bare. 

Then the farmer comes at last, 

When the merry spring is past, 

Cuts my woolly coat away, 

To warm you in the winter's day: 

Little master, this is why 

In the pleasant fields I lie. 

Ann Taylor 



[6oj 



THE LAMB 

Little Lamb, who made thee? 

Dost thou know who made thee? 
Gave thee life, and bid thee feed, 
By the stream and o'er the mead; 
Gave thee clothing of delight, 
Softest clothing, woolly, bright j 
Gave thee such a tender voice, 
Making all the vales rejoice? 

Little Lamb, who made thee? 

Dost thou know who made thee? 

Little Lamb, I'll tell thee, 

Little Lamb, I'll tell thee: 
He is called by thy name, 
For He calls Himself a Lamb. 
He is meek, and He is mildj 
He became a little child. 
I a child, and thou a lamb, 
We are called by His name. 

Little Lamb, God bless thee! 

Little Lamb, God bless thee! 

William Blake 



CHANTICLEER 

High and proud on the barnyard fence 
Walks rooster in the morning. 
He shakes his comb, he shakes his tail 
And gives his daily warning. 



[61] 



"Get up, you lazy boys and girls, 
It's time you should be dressing!" 
I wonder if he keeps a clock, 
Or if he's only guessing. 

John Farrar 



THE CHICKENS 

Said the first little chicken, 
With a queer little squirm, 

"I wish I could find 
A fat little worm." 

Said the next little chicken, 
With an odd little shrug, 

"I wish I could find 
A fat little slug." 

Said the third little chicken, 
With a sharp little squeal, 

"I wish I could find 
Some nice yellow meal." 

Said the fourth little chicken, 
With a small sigh of grief, 

"I wish I could find 
A little green leaf." 

Said the fifth little chicken, 
With a faint little moan, 

"I wish I could find 
A wee gravel stone." 

[62] 



"Now, see here/' said the mother, 
From the green garden patch } 

"If you want any breakfast, 
Just come here and scratch." 

Author Unknown 



THE HENS 

The night was coming very fast; 
It reached the gate as I ran past* 

The pigeons had gone to the tower of the church 
And all the hens were on their perch. 

Up in the barn, and I thought I heard 
A piece of a little purring word. 

I stopped inside, waiting and staying, 
To try to hear what the hens were saying. 

They were asking something, that was plain, 
Asking it over and over again* 

One of them moved and turned around, 
Her feathers made a ruffled sound^ 

A ruffled sound, like a bushful of birds, 
And she said her little asking words. 

She pushed her head close into her wing, 
But nothing answered anything. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



MRS. PECK-PIGEON 

Mrs. Peck-Pigeon 

Is picking for bread, 

Bob-bob-bob 

Goes her little round head. 

Tame as a pussy-cat 

In the street, 

Step-step-step 

Go her little red feet. 

With her little red feet 

And her little round head, 

Mrs. Peck-Pigeon 

Goes picking for bread. 

Eleanor Farjeon 

SWIMMING 

When all the days are hot and long 
And robin bird has ceased his song, 
I go swimming every day 
And have the finest kind of play. 

Pve learned to dive and I can float 
As easily as does a boat 5 
I splash and plunge and laugh and shout 
Till Daddy tells me to come out. 

It's much too soon 5 Pd like to cry 
For I can see the ducks go by, 
And Daddy Duck how I love him 
He lets his children swim and swim! 

I feel that I would be in luck 
If I could only be a duck! 

Clinton Scollard 

[64] 



DUCKS 5 DITTY 

All along the backwater, 
Through the rushes tall, 
Ducks are a-dabbling, 
Up tails all! 

Ducks' tails, drakes' tails, 
Yellow feet a-quiver, 
Yellow bills all out o sight 
Busy in the river! 

Slushy green undergrowth 
Where the roach swim 
Here we keep our larder, 
Cool and full and dim. 

Everyone for what he likes! 
We like to be 
Heads down, tails up, 
Dabbling free! 

High in the blue above 
Swifts whirl and call 
We are down a-dabbling, 
Up tails all ! 

Kenneth Grahame 



DUCKS AT DAWN 

"Quack! Quack!" 
Said seven ducks at dawn 
While night dew 
Glimmered on the lawn. 

"Quack! Quack!" they said. 
"It's time to eat* 
We'll go hunt mushrooms 
For a treat." 

And in the light 
Of early dawn 
I saw them chasing 
On the lawn. 

They sought their treat 
With hungry quacks 
And marked the dew 
AVith criss-cross tracks. 

They ate the mushrooms 
One by one 
And quacked to greet 
The rising sun. 

But in my bed 
I settled back 
And slept to tunes 
Of "Quack! Quack! Quack!" 
James S. 



[66 } 



PLAYMATES 



//O 
// 3t would he alt the same to him. 




IF ONLY . . . 

If only I'd some money, 

I'd buy a jolly boat 
And get a pair o sea boots 

And a furry sort of coat, 
A case or two of salted beef 

And a seaman's wooden chest, 
And I'd sail away to the North Pole, 
Or I'd sail away to the South Pole, 

Whichever I thought was best. 

I'd get up very early 

Xhey wouldn't see me go 
Jimmy would be with me 

But no one else would know. 
Dogs are very useful, 

And I couldn't part with Jim, 
And whether I went to the North Pole, 
Or whether I went to the South Pole, 

It would be all the same to him. 

Perhaps we'd see a mountain 

Xhat no one else had seen j 
Perhaps we'd find a country 

Where no one else had been. 
Suppose we climbed an iceberg 

And saw the midnight sun! . . . 
Oh, whether we went to the North Pole, 
Or whether we went to the South Pole, 

WOULDN'T it all be fun? 

Rose Fyleman 



MY AIREDALE DOG 

I have a funny Airedale dog, 

He's just about my size, 
With such a serious-looking face, 

And eyes that seem so wise. 

He looks as if he'd like to laugh, 
But yet his long, straight muzzle 

Gives him a kind of solemn look 
He surely is a puzzle. 

And he is just as full of tricks 

As any dog could be, 
And we have mighty jolly times 

Because he plays with me, 

And never tries to bite or snap; 

He doesn't even whine, 
And that is why my Airedale dog 

Is such a friend of mine. 

W. L. Mason 



THE HAIRY DOG 

My dog's so furry I've not seen 
His face for years and years: 
His eyes are buried out of sight, 
I only guess his ears. 

When people ask me for his breed, 
I do not know or care: 
He has the beauty of them all 
Hidden beneath his hair. 

Herbert Asquith 

[70] 



BINGO HAS AN ENEMY 

Bingo is kind and friendly, 

A gentleman right to the core, 
But he can't bear rats 
And he hates all cats 

And the fuzzy brown dog next door. 

There's a nice little girl who lives there, 
But they glare at us more and more; 

So we never can call, 

And the cause of it all 

Is the fuzzy brown dog next door. 

Bingo is limping a little 

And one of his ears is sore, 
He's rather a fright, 
But, oh, what a sight 

Is the fuzzy brown dog next door! 

Rose Fyleman 



MY DOG 

I have no dog, but it must be 

Somewhere there's one belongs to me 

A little chap with wagging tail, 

And dark brown eyes that never quail, 

But look you through, and through, and through. 

With love unspeakable, but true. 



Somewhere it must be, I opine, 
There is a little dog of mine 
With cold black nose that sniffs around 
In search of what things may be found 
In pocket, or some nook hard by 
Where I have hid them from his eye. 

Somewhere my doggie pulls and tugs 
The fringes of rebellious rugs, 
Or with the mischief of the pup 
Chews all my shoes and slippers up, 
And when he's done it to the core 
With eyes all eager pleads for more. 

Somewhere upon his hinder legs 

My little doggie sits and begs, 

And in a wistful minor tone 

Pleads for the pleasures of the bone 

I pray it be his owner's whim 

To yield, and grant the same to him. 

Somewhere a little dog doth wait, 

It may be by some garden-gate, 

With eyes alert and tail attent 

You know the kind of tail that's meant 

With stores of yelps of glad delight 

To bid me welcome home at night. 

Somewhere a little dog is seen, 
His nose two shaggy paws between, 
Flat on his stomach, one eye shut 
Held fast in dreamy slumber, but 
The other open, ready for 
His master coming through the door. 

John Kendrick Bangs 



CAT 

My cat 
Is quiet. 

She moves without a sound. 

Sometimes she stretches herself high and curving 

On tiptoe. 

Sometimes she crouches low 

And creeping. 

Sometimes she rubs herself against a chair. 
And there 

"With a miew and a miew 

And a purrrr purrrr purrrr 

She curls up 

And goes to sleep. 

My cat 

Lives through a black hole 
Under the house. 
So one day I 
Crawled in after her. 
And it was dark 
And I sat 
And didn't know 
Where to go. 
And then 
Two yellow-white 
Round little lights 

Came moving . . . moving . . toward me. 
And there 

With a mievo and a miew 
And a purrrr purrrr purrrr 
My cat 

Rubbed, soft, against me. 

[73] 



And I knew 

The lights 

WERE MY CAT'S EYES 

In the dark. 

Dorothy W. Baruch 



A DIRGE FOR A RIGHTEOUS KITTEN 

Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong. 

Here lies a kitten good, who kept 

A kitten's proper place. 

He stole no pantry eatables, 

Nor scratched the baby's face. 

He let the alley-cats alone. 

He had no yowling voice. 

His shirt was always laundried well, 

He freed the house of mice. 

Until his death he had not caused 

His little mistress tears, 

He wore his ribbon prettily, 

He washed behind his ears. 

Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong. 

Vachel Lindsay 




[74] 



THE LOOKING-GLASS PUSSY 
(The Kitten Speaks) 

Back behind the mirror is another pussy-cat 
With bows and whiskers just like mine, and just as gray and 
fat 

She peeps around and looks at me when I peep in at her. 
And looks as pleased as possible each time she hears me purr. 

She pats her paws against the glass when I pat mine there 

tooj 
But she won't come and play with me, no matter how I mew! 

One day I thought Pd catch her when I didn't see her the^e; 
(She couldn't see me either I was down behind a chair! ) 

I crept behind the furniture and slid along the wall 
And ran behind the mirror and she wasn't there at all! 

But when I bounced around the frame as sudden as could be 
That tricky little cat was there a-looking out at me! 

Margaret Widdemer 



[75] 



CAT 

The black cat yawns, 
Opens her jaws, 
Stretches her legs, 
And shows her claws. 

Then she gets up 
And stands on four 
Long stiff legs 
And yawns some more. 

She shows her sharp teeth, 
She stretches her lip, 
Her slice of a tongue 
Turns up at the tip. 

Lifting herself 
On her delicate toes, 
She arches her back 
As high as it goes. 

She lets herself down 
With particular care, 
And pads away 

her tail in the air. 

Mary Britton NLiller 



(76] 



THE MYSTERIOUS CAT 

I saw a proud, mysterious cat, 
I saw a proud, mysterious cat. 
Too proud to catch a mouse or rat 
Mew, mew, mew. 

But catnip she would eat, and purr, 
But catnip she would eat, and purr. 
And goldfish she did much prefer 
Mew, mew, mew. 

I saw a cat 'twas but a dream, 

I saw a cat 'twas but a dream, 

Who scorned the slave that brought her cream 

Mew, mew, mew. 

Unless the slave were dressed in style, 
Unless the slave were dressed in style, 
And knelt before her all the while 
Mew, mew, mew. 

Did you ever hear o a thing like that? 
Did you ever hear of a thing like that? 
Did you ever hear of a thing like that? 
Oh, what a proud mysterious cat. 
Oh, what a proud mysterious cat. 
Oh, what a proud mysterious cat. 
Mew. . . . mew. . . . mew. 

Vachel Lindsay 



[77] 



RABBITS 

My two white rabbits 
Chase each other 
With humping, bumping backs. 
They go hopping, hopping, 
And their long ears 

Go flopping, flopping. 
And they 
Make faces 
"With their noses 
Up and down. 

Today 

I went inside their fence 

To play rabbit with them. 

And in one corner 

Under a loose bush 

I saw something shivering the leaves. 

And I pushed 

And looked. 

And I found 

There 
In a hole 

In the ground 

Three baby rabbits 
Hidden away. 

And they 

Made faces 

"With their noses 

Up and down. 

Dorothy W. Bewitch 



THE LITTLE TURTLE 

There was a little turtle. 
He lived in a box. 
He swam in a puddle. 
He climbed on the rocks. 

He snapped at a mosquito. 
He snapped at a flea. 
He snapped at a minnow. 
And he snapped at me. 

He caught the mosquito. 
He caught the flea. 
He caught the minnow. 
But he didn't catch me. 

Vachel Lindsay 

ABOUT ANIMALS 

Animals are my friends and my kin and my playfellows 5 

They love me as I love them. 

I have a feeling for them I cannot express . . . 

It burns in my heart. 

I make thoughts about them to keep in my mind. 

I warm the cold, help the hurt, play with the frolicsome} 

I laugh to see two puppies playing 

And I wonder which is which! 

General is a dog with blue-black eyes 5 

They shine . . . there is a love comes from them 3 

He is filled with joy when he guards me; 

His eyes try to speak. 

I see his mind through them 

When he asks me to say things for him as well as I can 

Because he has no words. 

Hilda Conkling 

[79] 



A BOY AND A PUP 

The boy 'wears a grin, 
A scratch on his chin, 
A wind-rumpled thatch, 
A visible patch, 
A cheek like a rose, 
A frecklesome nose. 

The pup, though he may 
Be tawny as hay, 
Is blithe as a song 5 
He gambols along 
And waves to each friend 
A wagglesome end. 

With whistle and bark 
They're off for a lark 5 
According to whim, 
A hunt or a swim, 
A tramp or a run 
Or any old fun. 

They don't care a jot 
If school keeps or not, 
When anything's up, 

The boy and the pup 

That duo of j oy, 
A pup and a boy! 

Arthur Guiterman 



[80] 



RRIENDa/ 3 




TIME TO RISE 

A birdie with a yellow bill 
Hopped upon the window sill, 
Cocked his shining eye and said: 
"Ain't you 'shamed, you sleepy-head!" 

Robert Louis Stevenson 



THE WOODPECKER 

The woodpecker pecked out a little round hole 
And made him a house in the telephone pole. 

One day when I watched he poked out his head. 
And he had on a hood and a collar of red. 

When the streams of rain pour out of the sky, 
And the sparkles of lightning go flashing by, 

And the big, big wheels of thunder roll, 
He can snuggle back in the telephone pole. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



THE WOODPECKER 

The wizard of the woods is hej 

For in his daily round, 
Where'er he finds a rotting tree, 

He makes the timber sound. 

John Banister Tabb 



THE SNOW-BIRD 

When all the ground with snow is white, 

The merry snow-bird comes, 
And hops about with great delight 

To find the scattered crumbs. 

How glad he seems to get to eat 

A piece of cake or bread! 
He wears no shoes upon his feet, 

Nor hat upon his head* 

But happiest is he, I know, 

Because no cage with bars 
Keeps him from walking on the snow 

And printing it with stars. 

Frank Dempster Sherman 



THE SECRET 

We have a secret, just we three, 
The robin, and I, and the sweet cherry-tree 5 
The bird told the tree, and the tree told me, 
And nobody knows it but just us three, 

But of course the robin knows it best, 
Because he built the I shan't tell the rest 5 
And laid the four little something in it 
Pm afraid I shall tell it every minute. 

But if the tree and the robin don't peep, 
I'll try my best the secret to keep 5 
Though I know when the little birds fly about 
Then the whole secret will be out. 

Author Unknotxm 



ROBIN REDBREAST 

A Child's Song 

Good-bye, good-bye to Summer! 

For Summer's nearly done 5 
The garden smiling faintly, 

Cool breezes in the sunj 
Our Thrushes now are silent, 

Our Swallows flown away 
But Robin's here. In coat o brown, 

With ruddy breast-knot gay. 
Robin, Robin Redbreast, 

O Robin dear! 
Robin singing sweetly 

In the falling of the yean 

Bright yellow, red, and orange, 

The leaves come down in hosts 3 
The trees are Indian Princes, 

But soon they'll turn to Ghosts 5 
The scanty pears and apples 

Hang russet on the bough, 
It's Autumn, Autumn, Autumn late, 

'Twill soon be Winter now. 
Robin, Robin Redbreast, 

O Robin dear! 
And welaway! my Robin, 

For pinching times are near. 



[85] 



The fireside for the Cricket, 

The wheatstack for the Mouse, 
When trembling night-winds whistle 

And moan all round the house; 
The frosty ways like iron, 

The branches plumed with snow 
Alas! in Winter, dead and dark, 

Where can poor Robin go? 
Robin, Robin Redbreast, 

Robb dear! 
And a crumb of bread for Robin, 

His little heart to cheer. 

William Allingham 



THE OWL 

When cats run home and light is come, 

And dew is cold upon the ground, 
And the far-off stream is dumb, 
And the whirring sail goes round, 
And the whirring sail goes round; 
Alone and warming his five wits, 
The white owl in the belfry sits. 

When merry milkmaids click the latch, 

And rarely smells the new-mown hay, 
And the cock hath sung beneath the thatch 
Twice or thrice his roundelay, 
Twice or thrice his roundelay; 
Alone and warming his five wits, 
The white owl in the belfry sits. 

Alfred Temyson 

[86] 



THE EAGLE 

Fragment 

He clasps the crag with crooked hands 5 
Close to the sun in lonely lands, 
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands, 

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls j 
He watches from his mountain walls, 
And like a thunderbolt he falls. 

Alfred Tennyson 

THE SANDPIPER 

Across the narrow beach we flit, 

One little sandpiper and Ij 
And fast I gather, bit by bit, 

The scattered driftwood bleached and dry. 
The wild waves reach their hands for it, 

The wild wind raves, the tide runs high, 
As up and down the beach we flit, 

One little sandpiper and I. 

Above our heads the sullen clouds 

Scud black and swift across the sky; 
Like silent ghosts in misty shrouds 

Stand out the white light-houses high. 
Almost as far as eye can reach 

I see the close-reefed vessels fly, 
As fast we flit along the beach, 

One little sandpiper and I. 



I watch him as he skims along 

Uttering his sweet and mournful cry; 
He starts not at my fitful song, 

Or flash of fluttering drapery. 
He has no thought of any wrong 5 

He scans me with a fearless eye. 
Stanch friends are we, well tried and strong, 

The little sandpiper and I. 

Comrade, where wilt thou be tonight 

When the loosed storm breaks furiously? 
My driftwood fire will burn so bright ! 

To what warm shelter canst thou fly? 
I do not fear for thee, though wroth 

The tempest rushes through the sky: 
For are we not God's children both, 

Thou, little sandpiper, and I? 

Celia Thaxter 



THE SEA GULL 

I watched the pretty, white sea gull 
Come riding into townj 
The waves came up when he came up, 
Went down when he went down. 

Leroy F. Jackson 



[881 



SNGNG 




srona 
Tjjnns, auxzy 'd llmr. 



BE LIKE THE BIRD 

Be like the bird, who 

Halting in his flight 

On limb too slight 

Feels it give way beneath him, 

Yet sings 

Knowing he hath wings. 

Victor Hugo 



THE BLACKBIRD 

In the far corner 
close by the swings, 
every morning 
a blackbird sings. 

His bilPs so yellow, 
his coat's so black, 
that he makes a fellow 
whistle back. 

Ann, my daughter, 
thinks that he 
sings for us two 
especially. 

Humbert Wolfe 



THE RIVALS 

I heard a bird at dawn 
Singing sweetly on a tree, 
That the dew was on the lawn. 
And the wind was on the lea 5 
But I didn't listen to him, 
For he didn't sing to me. 

I didn't listen to him, 
For he didn't sing to me 
That the dew was on the lawn 
And the wind was on the lea! 
I was singing at the time, 
Just as prettily as he! 

I was singing all the time, 

Just as prettily as he, 

About the dew upon the lawn, 

And the wind upon the lea! 

So I didn't listen to him, 

As he sang upon a tree! 

James 



RED-TOJP AND TIMOTHY 

Red-Top and Timothy 

Come here in the springy 
Light spears out o emerald sheaths 

E very wh ere they swing. 
Harmless little soldiers, 

On the field they play, 
Nodding plumes and crossing blades 

All the livelong day. 

[ 



Timothy and Red-Top 

Bring their music-band; 
Some with scarlet epaulettes 

Strutting stiff and grand; 
Some in sky-blue jackets; 

Some in vests of pink: 
Red and white their leader's coat, 

Restless Bob-o'-link! 

Red-Top's airy feathers 

Tremble to his notes, 
In themselves an orchestra; 

Then a thousand throats 
Set the winds a-laughing, 

While the saucy thing 
Anywhere, on spike or spear, 

Sways himself to sing. 

Red-Top and Timothy 

Have a mortal foe; 
There's a giant with a scythe 

Comes and lays them low; 
Shuts them in barn-prisons; 

Spares not even Sweet Clover: 
Bob-o'-link leads off his band, 

Now the campaign's over. 

Lucy L,arcom 



[93] 



WHY READ A BOOK? 

Why read a book when there are birds 

Printing clear and breezy words 

Upon the clouds' white pages? When 

A busy robin and a wren 

Are syllables of ecstasy? 

A line of swallows on a tree, 

Or wire, is a sentence, long 

And sweeping* A flying flock's a strong 

Paragraph, while in the air 

Is quilled elaborately a rare 

Illumined manuscript in gold 

And green. And say what book can hold 

More fascination and delight 

Than birds in migratory flight? 

Colette M. Burns 



ANSWER TO A CHILD'S QUESTION 

Do you ask what the birds say? The sparrow, the dove. 

The linnet, and thrush say, "I love and I love!" 

In the winter they're silent the wind is so strong j 

What it says, I don't know, but it sings a loud song. 

But green leaves and blossoms, and sunny warm weather, 

And singing, and loving all come back together. 

But the lark is so brimful of gladness and love, 

The green fields below him, the blue sky above, 

That he sings, and he sings; and forever sings he 

"I love my Love, and my Love loves me! " 

Samuel Taylor Coleridge 



[94] 



WILD GEESE 

The wind blows, the sun shines, the birds sing loud, 
The blue, blue sky is flecked with fleecy dappled cloud, 
Over earth's rejoicing fields the children dance and sing, 
And the frogs pipe in chorus, "It is spring! It is spring!" 

The grass comes, the flower laughs where lately lay the 

snow, 

O'er the breezy hill-top hoarsely calls the crow, 
By the flowing river the alder catkins swing, 
And the sweet song sparrow cries, "Spring! It is spring!" 

Hark, what a clamor goes winging through the sky! 
Look, children! Listen to the sound so wild and high! 
Like a peal of broken bells, kling, klang, kling, 
Far and high the wild geese cry, "Spring! It is spring!" 

Bear the winter off with you, O wild geese dear! 
Carry all the cold away, far away from here; 
Chase the snow into the north, O strong of heart and wing, 
While we share the robin's rapture, crying, "Spring! It is 
spring!" 

Celia Thaxter 



[95] 



JESTER BEE 

The garden is a royal court 

Whose jester is the bee. 
And with his wit and merry sport 

He fills the place with glee. 

He sings love ditties to the Rose 

Who is the queen of all. 
To princess Lily up he goes 

And whispers she is tall. 

He pulls prince Pansy by the ear j 

He does all sorts of things 
That are ridiculous and queer 

But all the while he sings. 

He does not seem to think it wrong 

Such liberties to take. 
And they who love his happy song 

Forgive him for its sake. 

And when at last the royal clown 

Takes off his jester's mask, 
He seriously sits him down 

Before his honey task. 

Then to himself he sings away, 

And here's the burden true: 
"Oh, sweet are all my hours of play, 

And sweet my honey, too! " 

Frank Dempster Sherman 



[96] 



FRAIL WINGS 






t/iatux scanx can 



WHITE BUTTERFLIES 

Fly, white butterflies, out to sea, 
Frail, pale wings for the wind to try, 
Small white wings that we scarce can see, 
Fly! 

Some fly light as a laugh of glee, 
Some fly soft as a long, low sigh; 
All to the haven where each would be, 
Fly! 

Algernon Charles Swinburne 



BUTTERFLY 

Butterfly, Butterfly, sipping the sand, 
Have you forgotten the flowers of the land? 
Or are you so sated with honey and dew 
That sand-filtered water tastes better to you? 

John Banister Tabb 



FLIES 

Flies walk on ceilings 
And straight up the walls 
Not even the littlest 
Fly ever falls. 

And I am quite certain 
If 7 were a fly 
I'd leave my home and go 
Walk on the sky. 

Dorothy Aldis 

[99] 



GREEN MOTH 

The night the green moth came for me, 
A creamy moon poured down the hill, 
The meadow seemed a silver sea, 
Small pearls were hung in every tree, 
And all so still, so still. 

He floated in on my white bed, 

A strange and soundless fellow. 
I saw the horns wave on his head, 

He stepped across my pillow 
In tiny ermine boots, and spread 

His cape of green and yellow. 

He came so close that I could see 

His golden eyes, and sweet and chill, 

His faint breath wavered over me. 

"Come Child, my Beautiful," said he, 
And all so still, so still. 

Winifred Welles 



MOTH MILLER 

The timid little night moth 
That hovers near our light 
Has silver dust upon his wings 
And tiny flecks of white, 

And if you would look closely 
There's flour upon his clothes: 
But that is just because he is 

A MILLER ... I Suppose. 

Aileen Fisher 



A BEE SETS SAIL 

The wind blows east, the wind blows storm, 
And yet this very hour 
I saw a bumblebee embark 
In frigate o a flower 5 

An admiral in epaulets, 
He strode the scented deck 
And in the teeth of tossing gales 
He rode without a wreck. 

More valorous adventurer 

I never hope to see, 

Though mariners be gallant men, 

Than that same bumblebee. 

Katharine Morse 



THE TAX-GATHERER 

"And pray, who are you?" 
Said the violet blue 
To the Bee, with surprise 
At his wonderful size, 
In her eye-glass of dew. 

"I, Madam," quoth he, 
"Am a publican Bee, 
Collecting the tax 
On honey and wax. 
Have you nothing for me?" 

John Banister Tabb 

[101] 



FIREFLY 

A Song 

A little light is going by, 
Is going up to see the sky, 
A little light with wings. 

I never could have thought of it, 
To have a little bug all lit 
And made to go on wings. 

ILUxabeth Madox Roberts 



FIREFLIES 

Little lamps of the dusk, 

You fly low and gold 
When the summer evening 

Starts to unfold 
So that all the insects, 

Now, before you pass, 
Will have light to see by 

Undressing in the grass. 

But when night has flowered, 

Little lamps agleam, 
You fly over treetops 

Following a dream. 
Men wonder from their windows 

That a firefly goes so far 
They do not know your longing 

To be a shooting star. 

Carolyn Hall 



FIREFLIES 

I like to chase the fireflies, 

Chase them to and fro j 
I like to watch them dart about, 

Their little lamps aglow. 

In the evening's twilight dim 

I follow them about ; 
I often think I have one caught, 

And then his light goes out. 

I cannot tell just where he is 

Until he winks, you see, 
Then far away I see his light, 

He's played a joke on me. 

Grace Wilson Coplen 



THE FIRE-FLY 

"Are you flying through the night 

Looking where to find me?" 
"Nay, I travel with a light 

For the folks behind me." 

John Banister Tabb 



[ 103 ] 



THE HUMBLE BUMBLE BEE 

The weather-man has promised snow and sleet. 
Now bumble bee where will you warm your feet? 
"Beside the Sangamon a hollow oak 
Has been my winter wigwam 5 'tis the cloak 
That shields the Indian fairies and their king: 
They sleep on mouse-hides in a rainbow ring 
Of bees in war-paint, crouched in thick array 
Who scare the cut-worms and the ants away. 
I lead those braves, commanding them to kneel 
And buzz, as on their wings I put my heel. 
In winter, fairyland belongs to me. 
In summer Pm a humble bumble bee." 

Vachel Lindsay 



t 104 ] 



LITTLE FOLKS 

I GRASS 





LITTLE FOLKS IN THE GRASS 

In the grass 

A thousand little people pass, 

And all about a myriad little eyes look out, 

For there are houses every side 

Where the little folks abide, 

Where the little folks take tea 

On a grass blade near a tree; 

Where they hold their Sabbath meetings, 

Pass each other, giving greetings, 

So remember when you pass 

Through the grass 5 

Little folks are everywhere 5 

Walk quite softly, take great care 

Lest you hurt them unaware, 

Lest the giant that is YOU 

Pull a house down with his shoe, 

Pull a house down, roof and all, 

Killing children, great and small j 

So the wee eyes look at you 

As you walk the meadows through, 

So remember when you pass 

Through the grass! 

Annette Wynne 



GRASSHOPPER GREEN 

Grasshopper green is a comical chap 5 
He lives on the best of fare. 

Bright little trousers, jacket, and cap, 
These are his summer wear. 



Out in the meadow he loves to go, 

Playing away in the sunj 
It's hopperty, skipperty, high and low, 

Summer's the time for fun. 

Grasshopper green has a quaint little house j 

It's under the hedge so gay. 
Grandmother Spider, as still as a mouse, 

Watches him over the way. 
Gladly he's calling the children, I know, 

Out in the beautiful sunj 
It's hopperty, skipperty, high and low, 

Summer's the time for fun. 

Author Unknown 



THE GRASSHOPPERS 

High 
Up 

Over the top 
Of feathery grasses the 
Grasshoppers hop. 
They won't eat their suppers 5 
They will not obey 
Their grasshopper mothers 
And fathers, who say: 
"Listen, my children, 
This must be stopped 
Now is the time your last 
Hop should be hopped; 
So come eat your suppers 
And go to your beds " 
But the little green grasshoppers 
Shake their green heads. 
[108] 



"No, 

No " 

The naughty ones say, 

"All we have time to do 

Now is to play. 

If we want supper we'll 

Nip at a fly 

Or nibble a blueberry 

As we go byj 

I we feel sleepy we'll 

Close our eyes tight 

And snoozle away in a 

Harebell all night. 

But not 

Now. 

Now we must hop. 

And nobody, 

NOBODY, 

Can make us stop." 

Dorothy Aldis 



SPLINTER 

The voice of the last cricket 

across the first frost 

is one kind of good-by. 

It is so thin a splinter of singing. 

Carl Sandburg 



[ 109] 



BROWN AND FURRY 

Brown and furry 

Caterpillar in a hurry 

Take your walk 

To the shady leaf, or stalk, 

Or what not, 

Which may be the chosen spot. 

No toad spy you, 

Hovering bird of prey pass by youj 

Spin and die, 

To live again a butterfly. 

Christina G. Rossetti 



THE TIRED CATERPILLAR 

A tired caterpillar went to sleep one day 
In a snug little cradle of silken gray. 
And he said, as he softly curled up in his nest, 
"Oh, crawling was pleasant, but rest is best." 

He slept through the winter long and cold, 
All tightly up in his blanket rolled, 
And at last he awoke on a warm spring day 
To find that winter had gone away. 

He awoke to find he had golden wings, 
And no longer need crawl over sticks and things. 
"Oh, the earth is nice," said the glad butterfly, 
"But the sky is best, when we learn to fly!" 

Author Unknown 



[no] 



IN THE 
GARDEN 




OLD SHELLOVER 

"Come!" said Old Shellover. 

"What?" says Creep. 

"The horny old Gardener's fast asleep 5 

The fat cock Thrush 

To his nest has gone, 

And the dew shines bright 

In the rising Moon 5 

Old Sallie Worm from her hole doth peep j 

Come!" said Old Shellover, 

"Ah! "said Creep. 

Walter de la Mare 



LITTLE SNAIL 

I saw a little snail 

Come down the garden walk. 

He wagged his head this way . . that way . . . 

Like a clown in a circus. 

He looked from side to side 

As though he were from a different country. 

I have always said he carries his house on his back . . . 

To-day in the rain 

I saw that it was his umbrella! 

Hilda ConkUng 



THE SNAIL 

The snail is very odd and slow. 
He has his mind made up to go 
The longest way to anywhere 
And will not let you steer him there. 

Today I met one in the grass 
And hadn't time to watch him pass, 
But coming back at sunset, I 
Discovered him still traveling by. 

The grass-blades grew so thick and tall 
I asked him why he climbed them all, 
And told him I had sometimes found 
The shortest way was going 'round. 

He was not easy to persuade, 
To judge by any sign he made, 
And when I lectured him some more 
Went in his house and shut the door. 

Grace Hazard Conkling 



THE SNAIL'S DREAM 

A snail who had a way, it seems, 

Of dreaming very curious dreams, 

Once dream't he was you'll never guess! 

The Lightning Limited Express ! 

Oliver Herford 



A FRIEND IN THE GARDEN 

He is not John the gardener, 

And yet the whole day long 
Employs himself most usefully 

The flower-beds among. 

He is not Tom the pussy-cat; 

And yet the other day. 
With stealthy stride and glistening eye, 

He crept upon his prey. 

He is not Dash, the dear old dog, 

And yet, perhaps, if you 
Took pains with him and petted him, 

You'd come to love him too. 

He's not a blackbird, though he chirps. 

And though he once was black; 
And now he wears a loose, grey coat, 

All wrinkled on the back. 

He's got a very dirty face, 

And very shining eyes! 
He sometimes comes and sits indoors; 

He looks and p'r'aps is wise. 

But in a sunny flower-bed 

He has his fixed abode; 
He eats the things that eat my plants 

He is a friendly TOAD. 

Juliana Horatia Ewing 



[115] 



THE WORM 

Dickie found a broken spade 
And said he'd dig himself a well 5 
And then Charles took a piece of tin, 
And I was digging with a shell. 

Then Will said he would dig one too. 
We shaped them out and made them wide, 
And I dug up a piece of clod 
That had a little worm inside. 

We watched him pucker up himself 
And stretch himself to walk away. 
He tried to go inside the dirt, 
But Dickie made him wait and stay. 

His shining skin was soft and wet. 
I poked him once to see him squirm. 
And then Will said, "I wonder if 
He knows that he's a worm." 

And then we sat back on our feet 
And wondered for a little bit. 
And we forgot to dig our wells 
A while, and tried to answer it. 

And while we tried to find it out, 
He puckered in a little wad, 
And then he stretched himself again 
And went back home inside the clod. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



THE WORM 

When the earth is turned in spring 
Xhe worms are fat as anything. 

And birds come flying all around 

To eat the worms right off the ground. 

They like worms just as much as I 
Like bread and milk and apple pie. 

And once, when I was very young, 
I put a worm right on my tongue. 

I didn*t like the taste a bit, 
And so I didn't swallow it. 

But oh, it makes my Mother squirm 
Because she thinks I ate that worm! 




A BIRD 

A bird came down the walk: 
He did not know I saw 5 
He bit an angle- worm in halves 
And ate the fellow, raw. 

And then he drank a dew 

From a convenient grass. 

And then hopped sidewise to the wall 

Xo let a beetle pass. 

Emily Dickinson 



LITTLE FURRY 




LL -e sa 



sat dawn c&xvz wPuLM, ^could^wi, 



THE RABBIT 

When they said the time to hide was mine, 
I hid back under a thick grape vine. 

And while I was still for the time to pass, 
A little gray thing came out of the grass. 

He hopped his way through the melon bed 
And sat down close by a cabbage head. 

He sat down close where I could see, 
And his big still eyes looked hard at me, 

His big eyes bursting out of the rim, 
And I looked back very hard at him. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



LITTLE CHARLIE CHIPMUNK 

Little Charlie Chipmunk was a talker. Mercy me! 
He chattered after breakfast and he chattered after tea! 
He chattered to his father and he chattered to his mother! 
He chattered to his sister and he chattered to his brother! 
He chattered till his family was almost driven wild 
Oh, little Charlie Chipmunk was a very tiresome child! 

Helen Cowles Lecron 



THE SQUIRREL 

Whisky, frisky, 
Hippity hop, 
Up he goes 
To the tree top! 

Whirly, twirly, 
Round and round, 
Down he scampers 
To the ground. 

Furly, curly 
What a tail! 
Tall as a feather 
Broad as a sail! 

Where's his supper? 
In the shell, 
Snappity, crackity, 
Out it fell! 

Author Unknown 



FABLE 

The mountain and the squirrel 

Had a quarrel, 

And the former called the latter, "Little Prig"} 

Bun replied, 

"You are doubtless very big; 

But all sorts of things and weather 

Must be taken in together, 

To make up a year 

And a sphere. 

And I think it no disgrace 

To occupy my place. 

I Pm not so large as you, 

You are not so small as I, 

And not half so spry. 

I'll not deny you make 

A very pretty squirrel track 5 

Talents differ; all is well and wisely put 3 

If I cannot carry forests on my back, 

Neither can you crack a nut." 

Waldo Emerson 



FIVE EYES 

In Hans' old Mill his three black cats 
Watch the bins for the thieving rats. 
Whisker and claw, they crouch in the night, 
Their five eyes smouldering green and bright: 
Squeaks from the flour sacks, squeaks from where 
The cold wind stirs on the empty stair, 
Squeaking and scampering, everywhere. 
Then down they pounce, now in, now out, 
At whisking tail, and sniffing snout 5 
While lean old Hans he snores away 
Till peep of light at break of dayj 
Then up he climbs to his creaking mill, 
Out come his cats all grey with meal 
Jekkel, and Jessup, and one-eyed Jill. 

Walter de la Mare 



A CHINESE NURSERY RHYME 

He ran up the candlestick, 

The little mousey brown, 
To steal and eat tallow, 

And he couldn't get down. 
He called for his grandma, 

But his grandma was in town; 
So he doubled up into a wheel 

And rolled himself down. 

Trans, by 7. T. Headland 



[124] 



THE MOUSE 

I heard a mouse 
Bitterly complaining 
In a crack of moonlight 
Aslant on the floor 

"Little ,1 ask 

And that little is not granted. 

There are few crumbs 

In this world any more. 

"The bread-box is tin 
And I cannot get in. 

"The jam's in a jar 
My teeth cannot mar. 

"The cheese sits by itself 
On the pantry shelf 

"All night I run 
Searching and seeking, 
All night I run 
About on the floor. 

"Moonlight is there 

And a bare place for dancing, 

But no little feast 

Is spread any more." 

Elizabeth Coatsworth 



THE CITY MOUSE AND THE GARDEN MOUSE 

The city mouse lives in a house 5 
The garden mouse lives in a bower, 

He's friendly with the frogs and toads, 
And sees the pretty plants in flower. 

The city mouse eats bread and cheese ; 
The garden mouse eats what he can 5 

We will not grudge him seeds and stalks, 
Poor little timid furry man, 

Christina G. Rossetti 



ON FOURe/ 3 




u 

/ our on hjU ^oanr ttuJLian 

reajcLr witfi ttu sur 



UNSTOOPING 

Low on his fours the Lion 

Treads with the surly Bear; 
But Men straight upward from the dust 

Walk with their heads in air 5 
The free sweet winds of heaven, 

The sunlight from on high 
Beat on their clear bright cheeks and brows 

As they go striding by 5 
The doors of all their houses 

They arch so they may go, 
Uplifted o'er the four-feet beasts, 

Unstooping, to and fro. 

Walter de la Mare 



I WONDER IF THE LION KNOWS 

I wonder if the lion knows 

That people are afraid 
To meet him when for walks he goes 

Beneath the jungle shade , 
And when they scream and run away, 
O, does he laugh at their dismay? 
And does he say with head tossed high: 
"How 'terribully' fierce am I"? 

I'd like to know 

If this is soj 

But if I met a lion some day 

I would not ask, I'd run away, 

For surely it is not a treat 

To meet a lion on the street! 

Annette Wynne 
[ 129 ] 



THE BROWN BEAR 

Now the wild bees that hive in the rocks 

Are winding their horns, elfin shrill, 

And hark, at the pine tree the woodpecker knocks, 

And the speckled grouse pipes on the hill. 

Now the adder's dull brood wakes to run. 

Now the sap mounts abundant and good, 

And the brown bear has turned with his side to the sun 

In his lair in the depth of the wood 

Old Honey-Paw wakes in the wood. 

"Oh, a little more slumber," says he, 

"And a little more turning to sleep," 

But he feels the spring fervor that hurries the bee 

And the hunger that makes the trout leap 5 

So he ambles by thicket and trail, 

So he noses the tender young shoots, 

In the spring of year at the sign of the quail 

The brown bear goes digging for roots 

For sappy and succulent roots. 

Oh, as still goes the wolf on his quest 

As the spotted snake glides through the rocks, 

And the deer and the sheep count the lightest foot best, 

And slinking and sly trots the fox. 

But fleet-foot and light-foot will stay, 

And fawns by their mothers will quail 

At the saplings that snap and the thickets that sway 

When Honey-Paw takes to the trail 

When he shuffles and grunts on the trail. 



[ 130] 



He has gathered the ground squirrel's hoard, 

He has rifled the store of the bees, 

He has caught the young trout at the shoals o the ford 

And stripped the wild plums from the trees 3 

So robbing and ranging he goes, 

And the right to his pillage makes good 

Till he rounds out the year at the first of the snows 

In his lair in the depth of the wood 

Old Honey-Paw sleeps in the wood. 

Mary Austin 



THE WOLF 

When the pale moon hides and the wild wind wails, 
And over the tree-tops the nighthawk sails, 
The gray wolf sits on the world's far rim, 
And howls: and it seems to comfort him. 

The wolf is a lonely soul, you see, 
No beast in the wood, nor bird in the tree, 
But shuns his path 5 in the windy gloom 
They give him plenty, and plenty of room. 

So he sits with his long, lean face to the sky 
Watching the ragged clouds go by. 
There in the night, alone, apart, 
Singing the song of his lone, wild heart. 

Far away, on the world's dark rim 
He howls, and it seems to comfort him. 

Georgia Roberts Durston 



THERE ARE NO WOLVES IN ENGLAND NOW 

There are no wolves in England now, nor any grizzly bears j 
You could not meet them after dark upon the attic stairs. 

When Nanna goes to fetch the tea there is no need at all 
To leave the nursery door ajar in case you want to call. 

And mother says, in fairy tales, those bits are never true 
That tell you all the dreadful deeds that wicked fairies do. 

And wouldn't it be silly for a great big girl like me 
T'> be the leastest bit afraid of things that couldn't be? 

Rose Fyleman 



THE WOLVES 

When Grandmother Polly had married and gone, 
But before her father had given her Clem, 
Or Joe, or Sandy, or Evaline 
Before he had given her any of them y 

She used to live in a far-away place, 
In a little cabin that was her home, 
And all around were bushes and trees, 
And the wolves could come. 

At night they ran down out of the rocks 
And bristled up their trembly fur. 
They came and howled by Polly's door 
And showed their little white teeth at her. 

Elizabeth Madox Roberts 



THE HIPPOPOTAMUS 

In the squdgy river, 

Down the oozely bank, 
Where the ripples shiver, 

And the reeds are rank. 

Where the purple Kippo 

Makes an awful fuss, 
Lives the hip-hip-hippo 

Hippo-pot-a-mus ! 

Broad his back and steady ; 

Broad and flat his nose 5 
Sharp and keen and ready 

Little eyes are those. 

You would think him dreaming 

Where the mud is deep. 
It is only seeming 

He is not asleep. 

Better not disturb him, 

There'd be an awful fuss 
If you touched the Hippo, 

Hippo-pot-a-mus. 

Georgia Roberts Durston 



LONE DOG 

Pm a lean dog, a keen dog, a wild dog, and lone 5 

Pm a rough dog, a tough dog, hunting on my own; 

Pm a bad dog, a mad dog, teasing silly sheep 5 

I love to sit and bay the moon, to keep fat souls from sleep. 

Pll never be a lap dog, licking dirty feet, 

A sleek dog, a meek dog, cringing for my meat, 

Not for me the fireside, the well-filled plate, 

But shut door, and sharp stone, and cuff and kick and hate. 

Not for me the other dogs, running by my side, 
Some have run a short while, but none of them would bide. 
O mine is still the lone trail, the hard trail, the best, 
Wide wind, the wild stars, and hunger of the quest! 

Irene Rutherford, McLeod 



ANIMAL 

I 




- 
Jfu, 



rcusi, 
\Jhai U s 



, u a rn&u<u,-grajy h&M 
JLk a silver shoe ; 
c^ roofi 

tAe. usAo& rdoki through. 



ro 



UNDER THE TENT OF THE SKY 

The wind cracked his whip, 

The storm flashed a gun, 

And the animal-clouds marched one by one 

Under the tent of the sky. 

There were elephants, blue. 

And shaggy white bears, 

And dozens and dozens of prancing gray mares 

With their beautiful heads held high. 

There were soft-footed panthers 

And ostriches, fluffy, 

And a great hippopotamus, purple and puffy, 

Who wallowed in mud-colored mist. 

There were small curly dogs 

And camels with humps 

And a wrinkled rhinoceros, all over bumps, 

With a horn as big as your fist. 

There was even a lion 

Bedecked with a mane 

Who growled so loud that he turned into rain 

And tumbled to earth with a sigh. 

The wind cracked his whip 

And out came the sun 

And the animal-clouds passed one by one 

Out of the tent of the sky. 

Rowena Bastitt Bennett 



[ 137] 



WIND-WOLVES 

Do you hear the cry as the pack goes by, 
The wind-wolves hunting across the sky? 
Hear them tongue it, keen and clear, 
Hot on the flanks of the flying deer! 

Across the forest, mere, and plain, 
Their hunting howl goes up again! 
All night they'll follow the ghostly trail, 
All night we'll hear their phantom wail, 

For tonight the wind-wolf pack holds sway 
From Pegasus Square to the Milky Way, 
And the frightened bands of cloud-deer flee 
In scattered groups of two and three. 

William D. Sargent 



WIND IS A CAT 

Wind is a cat 

That prowls at night, 
Now in a valley, 

Now on a height, 

Pouncing on houses 
Till folks in their beds 

Draw all the covers 
Over their heads. 

It sings to the moon, 

It scratches at doors; 
It lashes its tail 

Around chimneys and roars. 



It daws at the clouds 
Till it fringes their silk, 

It laps up the dawn 
Like a saucer of milk 5 

Then, chasing the stars 

To the tops of the firs. 
Curls down for a nap 

And purrs and purrs. 

Ethel Romig Fullei 



SILVER SHEEP 

The sun's a bright-haired shepherd boy, 
Who drives the stars away ; 
Beyond the far blue meadows 
He shuts them up by day. 

At six or seven or eight o'clock, 
Over the bars they leap 
The rams with horns of silver, 
The little silver sheep. 

And while the shepherd takes a nap 
Behind a hill, near-by, 
They roam the dusky pasture 
And graze upon the sky. 

Anne Blackwell Payne 



[ 129 1 



THE MOON-SHEEP 

The moon seems like a docile sheep, 
She pastures while all people sleep j 
But sometimes, when she goes astray, 
She wanders ail alone by day. 

Up in the clear blue morning air 
We are surprised to see her there, 
Grazing in her woolly white, 
Waiting the return o night. 

When dusk lets down the meadow bars 
She greets again her lambs, the stars! 

Christopher JMLorley 



THE PLEIADS 

"Who are ye with clustered light, 

Little Sisters seven?" 
"Crickets, chirping all the night 

On the hearth of heaven." 

John Banister Tabb 



[ 140] 



WHAT GRANDPA MOUSE SAID 

The moon's a holy owl-queen. 
She keeps them in a jar 
Under her arm till evening, 
Then sallies forth to war. 

She pours the owls upon us. 
They hoot with horrid noise 
And eat the naughty mousie-girls 
And wicked mousie-boys. 

So climb the moonvine every night 
And to the owl-queen pray: 
Leave good green cheese by moonlit trees 
For her to take away. 

And never squeak, my children. 
Nor gnaw the smoke-house door: 
The owl-queen then will love us 
And send her birds no more. 

Vachel Lindsay 



WHITE HORSES 

Little White Horses are out on the sea, 

Bridled with rainbows and speckled with foam, 
Laden with presents for you and for mej 
Mermaids and fairies are riding them home! 

Gold from the sun; 

Diamonds rare 

Made from dew 

And frosty airj 

Veils of mist, 

Soft and white, 

Rose and silver, 

Shimmering, bright 5 

Sweetest perfumes, 

Coloured shells, 

Lilting music, 

Fairy bells: 

Fairies and mermaids are bringing them home 
On Little White Horses all speckled with foam. 

Winifred Howard 



HORSES OF THE SEA 

The horses of the sea 

Rear a foaming crest, 
But the horses of the knd 

Serve us the best. 

The horses of the land 

Munch corn and clover, 
While the foaming sea-horses 
Toss and turn over. 

Christina G. Rossetti 
[142] 




SHELL CASXLES 

A. sea shell is a castle 

"Where a million echoes roam, 

A wee castle, 

Sea castle, 
Tossed up by the foam 5 

A wee creature's 

Sea creature's 
Long deserted home. 

I I were very tiny, 

I should walk those winding halls 
And listen to the voices 

In the pink and pearly walls $ 
And each mysterious echo 

"Would tell me salty tales 
O the phosphorescent fishes 
And the white-winged ship that sails 

On the sea's brim 

Round the earth's rim 
Xo the lilting of the gales j 

Of the sea horse 

That's a wee horse 
And frolics in the sea 

'Neath the coral 

White and sorrel 
That is the mermaids' tree 5 

[ 143 3 



And grazes on the seaweed 
And the sea anemone j 
But my ears cannot distinguish 
The words it sings to me, 
The sea shell, 
The wee shell, 
I hold so reverently, 
And I only hear a whisper 

Like the ghost voice of the sea. 

Rowena Bastin Bennett 



THE OLD HORSE IN THE CITY 

The moon's a peck of corn. It lies 
Heaped up for me to eat. 
I wish that I might climb the path 
And taste that supper sweet. 

Men feed me straw and scanty grain 
And beat me till I'm sore. 
Some day I'll break the halter-rope 
And smash the stable-door, 

Run down the street and mount the hill 

Just as the corn appears. 

I've seen it rise at certain times 

For years and years and years. 

Vachel Lindsay 



[ 144] 



THE LIZARD 

The Lizard is a funny thing. 

He has a snaky head, 
A snaky tail beside, and yet 

He is a quad-ru-ped. 

He has a little lightning tongue 

With which he snaps the flies, 
And yes, there is a funny look 

About his fiery eyes! 

I think he was a Dragon once, 

With great big pointed wings, 
And wicked jaws and wicked claws, 

And teeth and scales and things. 

I think a Hero sought him out, 

And fought an awful fight, 
Then changed the Dragon by a spell 

Into this helpless mite. 

I like to watch the Lizard bask. 

But oh! Suppose some day 
The Dragon should change back again, 

How fast I'd run away! 

Abbie Farwell Brown 



[145] 



A MODERN DRAGON 

A train is a dragon that roars through the dark. 
He wriggles his tail as he sends up a spark. 
He pierces the night with his one yellow eye, 
And all the earth trembles when he rushes by. 

Rowena Eastin Bennett 



ANIMAL FUN 




THE SHIP OF RIO 

There was a ship of Rio 

Sailed out into the blue, 
And nine and ninety monkeys 

Were all her jovial crew. 
From bo'sun to the cabin boy. 

From quarter to caboose, 
There weren't a stitch of calico 

To breech 'em tight or loose 5 
From spar to deck, from deck to keel, 

From barnacle to shroud, 
There weren't one pair of reach-me-downs 

To all that jabbering crowd. 
But wasn't it a gladsome sight, 

When roared the deep-sea gales, 
To see them reef her fore and aft, 

A-swinging by their tails ! 
Oh, wasn't it a gladsome sight, 

When glassy calm did come, 
To see them squatting tailor-wise 

Around a keg of rum! 
Oh, wasn't it a gladsome sight, 

When in she sailed to land, 
To see them all a-scampering skip 

For nuts across the sand! 

Walter de la Mare 

THE LION 

The Lion, the Lion, he dwells in the waste, 

He has a big head and a very small waist $ 

But his shoulders are stark, and his jaws they are grim, 

And a good little child will not play with him. 

Hilaire Belloc 

[ H9] 



THE LION 

The Lion is a kingly beast. 
He likes a Hindu for a feast. 
And if no Hindu he can get, 
The lion-family is upset. 

He cuffs his wife and bites her ears 
Till she is nearly moved to tears. 
Then some explorer finds the den 
And all is family peace again. 

Vachel Lindsay 

THE HIPPOPOTAMUS 

I shoot the Hippopotamus with bullets made of platinum, 
Because if I use leaden ones his hide is sure to flatten 'em. 

Hilaire Belloc 

THE YAK 

As a friend to the children commend me the Yak. 

You will find it exactly the thing: 
It will carry and fetch, you can ride on its back, 

Or lead it about with a string. 

The Tartar who dwells on the plains of Thibet 

(A desolate region of snow) 
Has for centuries made it a nursery pet, 

And surely the Tartar should know! 

Then tell your papa where the Yak can be got, 

And if he is awfully rich 
He will buy you the creature or else he will not. 

(I cannot be positive which.) 

Hilaire Belloc 



TWO LITTLE KITTENS 

Two little kittens, one stormy night. 

Began to quarrel and then to fight ; 
One had a mouse, and the other had none, 

And that's the way the quarrel begun. 

"I'll have that mouse," said the bigger cat. 

"You'll have that mouse? We'll see about that! " 
"I will have that mouse," said the eldest son. 

"You shan't have that mouse," said the little one, 

I told you before, 'twas a stormy night, 

When these two little kittens began to fight ; 

The old woman seized her sweeping broom, 

And swept the two kittens right out of the room. 

The ground was covered with frost and snow, 
And the two little kittens had nowhere to go; 

So they laid themselves down on the mat by the door, 
While the old woman finished sweeping the floor. 

Then they crept in, as quiet as mice, 

All wet with snow, and as cold as ice; 
For they found it was better, that stormy night, 

To lie down and sleep, than to quarrel and fight. 

Author Unknown 



KITTY CAUGHT A HORNET 

Kitty caught a hornet, 
Put it in a cage, 
Fed it burs and buttermilk, 
Got it in a rage; 



Gave it lots of lettuce leaves, 
Ice and smelling salts, 
Whistled it a lively tune 
And it began to waltej 
Gave it batting for a bed, 
Snug and warm and deep, 
Fanned it with a feather 
And it went off to sleep. 

Leroy F. Jackson 



THE THREE LITTLE KITTENS 

Three little kittens lost their mittens 5 
And they began to cry, 

"Oh, mother dear, 

We very much fear 
That we have lost our mittens." 

"Lost your mittens! 

You naughty kittens! 
Then you shall have no pie!" 

"Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow." 

"No, you shall have no pie.' 5 

The three little kittens found their mittens 5 
And they began to cry, 

"Oh, mother dear, 

See here, see here ! 
See, we have found our mittens! " 

"Put on your mittens, 

You silly kittens, 



[15*] 



And you may have some pie." 

"Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r, 
Oh, let us have the pie! 

Purr-r, purr-r, purr-r." 

The three little kittens put on their mittens, 
And soon ate up the piej 
"Oh, mother dear, 
We greatly fear 

That we have soiled our mittens!" 
"Soiled your mittens! 
You naughty kittens!" 
Then they began to sigh, 

"Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow." 

The three little kittens washed their mittens, 
And hung them out to dryj 
"Oh, mother dear, 
Do you not hear 

That we have washed our mittens?" 
" Washed your mittens! 
Oh, you're good kittens! 
But I smell a rat close by 5 

Hush, hush! Mee-ow, mee-ow." 
"We smell a rat close by, 

"Mee-ow, mee-ow, mee-ow." 

Author Unknown 



[153] 



THE LITTLE KITTENS 

"Where are you going, my little kittens?" 
"We are going to town to get us some mittens." 

"What! Mittens for kittens! 

Do kittens wear mittens? 
Who ever saw little kittens with mittens?" 

" Where are you going, my little cat?" 
"I am going to town to get me a hat." 

"What! A hat for a cat! 

A cat get a hat! 
Who ever saw a cat with a hat?" 

"Where are you going, my little pig?" 
"I am going to town to get me a wig." 

"What! A wig for a pig! 

A pig in a wig! 
Who ever saw a pig in a wig?" 

Eliza Lee Fallen 



VIEWPOINTS 

Head-downward hung the bat $ 
He looked on field and town. 

"It's plain," he chittered, "that 
The world is upside-down ! " 

"How funny! " laughed the pup $ 

"But then, it isn't true. 
The world is rightside-up ; 

What's upside-down, is you! 

Arthur Guiterman 



AN INCONVENIENCE 

To his cousin the Bat 
Squeaked the envious Rat, 
"How fine to be able to fly! " 
Tittered she, "Leather wings 
Are convenient things 5 
But nothing to sit on have I." 

John Banister Tabb 



AN INSECTARIAN 

"I cannot wash my dog, 55 she said, 
"Nor touch him with a comb, 

For fear the fleas upon him bred 
May find no other home." 

John Banister Tabb 



THE PUZZLED CENTIPEDE 

A centipede was happy quite, 

Until a frog in fun 

Said, "Pray, which leg comes after which?" 

This raised her mind to such a pitch, 

She lay distracted in the ditch 

Considering how to run. 

Author Unkno e uon 



[155] 



FROGS AT SCHOOL 

Twenty froggies went to school 
Down beside a rushy pool; 
Twenty little coats of green, 
Twenty vests all white and clean. 

"We must be in time," said they, 
"First we study, then we play; 
That is how we keep the rule, 
When we froggies go to school." 

Master Bullfrog, grave and stern, 
Called the classes in their turn 5 
Taught them how to nobly strive, 
Likewise how to leap and dive. 

From his seat upon a log, 

Showed them how to say, "Ker-chog! " 

Also how to dodge a blow 

From the sticks which bad boys throw. 

Twenty froggies grew up fastj 
Bullfrogs they became at last. 
Not one dunce was in the lot, 
Not one lesson they forgot. 

Polished in a high degree, 
As each froggy ought to be, 
Now they sit on other logs, 
Teaching other little frogs. 

George Cooper 



HOW TO TELL THE WILD ANIMALS 

If ever you should go by chance 

To jungles in the East; 
And if there should to you advance 

A large and tawny beast, 
If he roars at you as you're dyin' 
You'll know it is the Asian Lion. 

Or if sometime when roaming round, 
A noble wild beast greets you, 

With black stripes on a yellow ground, 
Just notice if he eats you. 

This simple rule may help you learn 

The Bengal Tiger to discern. 

If strolling forth, a beast you view, 
Whose hide with spots is peppered, 

As soon as he has lept on you, 
You'll know it is the Leopard. 

'Twill do no good to roar with pain, 

He'll only lep and lep again. 

If when you're walking round your yard, 
You meet a creature there, 

Who hugs you very, very hard, 
Be sure it is the Bear. 

If you have any doubt, I guess 

He'll give you just one more caress. 



Though to distinguish beasts o prey 

A novice might nonplus, 
The Crocodiles you always may 

Tell from Hyenas thus: 
Hyenas come with merry smiles 5 
But if they weep, they're Crocodiles. 

The true Chameleon is small, 

A lizard sort of thing j 
He hasn't any ears at all, 

And not a single wing. 
If there is nothing on the tree, 
3 Tis the Chameleon you see. 

Carolyn Wells 



1 158 



THE LOBSTER QUADRILLE 

"Will you walk a little faster?" said a whiting to a snail, 
"There's a porpoise close behind us, and he's treading on my 

tail. 

See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance! 
They are waiting on the shingle, will you come and join 

the dance? 
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join 

the dance? 
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you join 

the dance? 

"You can really have no notion how delightful it will be 
When they take us up and throw us, with the lobsters, out 

to sea!" 
But the snail replied, "Too far! Too far!" and gave a look 

askance, 
Said he thanked the whiting kindly, but he would not join 

the dance. 
Would not, could not, would not, could not, would not 

join the dance, 
Would not, could not, would not, could not, could not 

join the dance. 

"What matters it how far we go?" his scaly friend replied, 
"There is another shore, you know, upon the other side. 
The further off from England the nearer is to France 5 
Then turn not pale, beloved "snail, but come and join the 

dance. 
Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, will you join 

the dance? - 

Will you, won't you, will you, won't you, won't you job 
the dance?" 

Lewis Carroll 

[159] 



THE OWL AND THE PUSSY-CAT 

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea 

In a beautiful pea-green boat 5 
They took some honey, and plenty of money 

Wrapped up in a five-pound note. 
The Owl looked up to the stars above, 

And sang to a small guitar, 
"O, lovely Pussy! O, Pussy, my love, 

What a beautiful Pussy you are, 
You are, 
You are! 
What a beautiful Pussy you are!" 

Pussy said to the Owl, "You elegant fowl! 

How charmingly sweet you sing! 
Oh! let us be married} too long we have tarried: 

But what shall we do for a ring? " 
They sailed away, for a year and a day, 

To the land where the bong-tree grows 5 
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood 

With a ring at the end of his nose, 
His nose, 
His nose, 
With a ring at the end of his nose. 



"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling 
Your ring?" Said the Piggy, "I will." 

So they took it away, and were married next day 
By the Turkey who lives on the hill. 



[160] 



They dined on mince and slices of quince. 

Which they ate with a runcible spoon, 
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand, 
They danced by the light of the moon, 
The moon. 
The moon, 
They danced by the light of the moon. 

Edward Lear 



THE WONDERFUL MEADOW 

Over in the meadow, in the sand, in the sun, 
Lived an old Mother-Toad and her little toady one. 
"Leap," said the mamma. "I'll leap," said the one, 
And she leaped with her mamma in the sand, in the sun. 

Over in the meadow, where the water runs blue, 
Lived an old Mother-Fish and her little fishes two. 
"Swim," said the mamma. "We'll swim," said the two, 
And they swam and they danced in the water so blue. 

Over in the meadow, in the old apple-tree, 
Lived a Mother-Bluebird and her little birdies three. 
"Sing," said the mamma. "We'll sing," said the three, 
And they sang their sweet songs in the old apple-tree. 

Over in the meadow, in the reeds on the shore, 
Lived a Mother-Muskrat and her little rattles four. 
"Dive," said the mamma. "We'll dive," said the four. 
And they dove every day, 'mid the reeds on the shore. 

Over in the meadow, in their snug little hive, 
Lived a Mother-Honeybee, and the little bees were five. 
"Buzz," said the mamma. "We'll buzz," said the five. 
And they buzzed and made honey in their busy little hive, 

[161! 



Over in the meadow, in a nest built of sticks, 

Lived a black Mother-Crow and her little blackies six. 

"Caw," said the mamma. "We'll caw," said the six, 

And they cawed and they cawed in their nest built of sticks. 

Over in the meadow, in the calm summer even, 
Lived a Mother-Firefly, and her little flies were seven. 
"Shine," said the mamma. "We'll shine," said the seven, 
And they shone like the stars, in the calm summer even. 

Over in the meadow, on an old mossy gate, 
Lived a Mother-Lizard, and her little lizards eight. 
"Bask," said the mamma. "We'll bask," said the eight, 
And they basked in the sun on the old mossy gate. 

Over in the meadow, where the clear waters shine, 
Lived a Mother-Bullfrog, and her little f roggies nine. 
"Croak," said the mamma. "We'll croak," said the nine, 
And they croaked every night where the clear waters shine. 

Over in the meadow, in her sly little den, 
Lived a Mother-Spider, and her little spiders ten. 
"Spin," said the mamma. "We'll spin," said the ten, 
And they spun their lace webs in their little sly den. 

Over in the meadow, where the grass is soft and even, 
Lived a Mother-Cricket and her little ones eleven. 
"Chirp," said the mamma. "We'll chirp," said the eleven, 
And they chirped and they chirped where the grass is soft 
and even. 

Over in the meadow, where the men dig and delve, 
Lived an old Mother-Ant and her little anties twelve. 
"Toil," said the mamma. "We'll toil," said the twelve, 
And they toiled every day where the men dig and delve. 

Olive A. Wadsworth 
[162] 



THE MONKEYS AND THE CROCODILE 

Five little monkeys 

Swinging from a tree 5 
Teasing Uncle Crocodile, 

Merry as can be. 
Swinging high, swinging low, 

Swinging left and right: 
"Dear Uncle Crocodile, 

Come and take a bite!" 

Five little monkeys 

Swinging in the air; 
Heads up, tails up, 

Little do they care. 
Swinging up, swinging down, 

Swinging far and near: 
"Poor Uncle Crocodile, 

Are n't you hungry, dear?" 

Four little monkeys 

Sitting in the tree 5 
Heads down, tails down, 

Dreary as can be. 
Weeping loud, weeping low ? 

Crying to each other: 
"Wicked Uncle Crocodile, 

To gobble up our brother!" 

Laura E. Richards 



THE CROCODILE 

"Why does the crocodile weep. Mamma? 

Why does the crocodile weep? 
He has a sorrow, dear my child 5 
It makes him sad, it makes him wild 3 

He cannot be a 



He cannot wag a woolly tail, 

He cannot say, "Ba! ba!" 
He cannot jump, nor flimp nor flump, 

Nor gallop off afar. 

Be sorry for the crocodile, 

But don't go very near; 
Howe'er he bawl, whatever befall, 

Don't try to dry his tear! 

Laura E. Richards 



THE DINKEY-BIRD 

In an ocean, 'way out yonder 

(As all sapient people know), 
Is the land of Wonder-Wander, 

Whither children love to go 5 
It's their playing, romping, swinging, 

That give great joy to me 
While the Dinkey-Bird goes singing 

In the amf alula tree] 

There the gum-drops grow like cherries, 

And taffy's thick as peas 
Caramels you pick like berries 

When, and where, and how you please 5 

[ 164] 



Big red sugar-plums are clinging 
To the cliffs beside that sea 

Where the Dinkey-Bird is singing 
In the amfalula tree. 

So when children shout and scamper 

And make merry all the day, 
When there's naught to put a damper 

To the ardor of their playj 
When I hear their laughter ringing. 

Then Pm sure as sure can be 
That the Dinkey-Bird is singing 

In the amfalula tree. 

For the Dinkey-Bird's bravuras 

And staccatos are so sweet 
His roulades, appoggiaturas, 

And robustos so complete, 
That the youth of every nation 

Be they near or far away 
Have especial delectation 

In that gladsome roundelay. 

Their eyes grow bright and brighter 

Their lungs begin to crow, 
Their hearts get light and lighter, 

And their cheeks are all aglow 5 
For an echo cometh bringing 

The news to all and me, 
That the Dinkey-Bird is singing 

In the amfalula tree. 



Pm sure you like to go there 

To see your feathered friend 
And so many goodies grow there 

You would like to comprehend! 
Speed, little dreams, your winging 

To that land across the sea 
Where the Dinkey-Bird is singing 

In the amj alula tree! 

Eugene Field 



[166] 




ruor LuuLno iJuruj : 

^udJ^ ^ 

9V&T cruck&t chirpjiruj cJiMrliu 

War qrassh&pnju* jcrlLqrd o? I^ap 9 
Ckr*. i f'_ _ __ 7 / _ / / lio , 



unsig, 

P 



r 
wo 



r gr 
c ?Yoi 



yncd, noi 
UJOISTU iJiai 

Chruicna &.Ro3JjzU 



A LINNET IN A GILDED CAGE 

A linnet in a gilded cage, 

A linnet on a bough, 
In frosty winter one might doubt 

Which bird is luckier now. 

But let the trees burst out in leaf, 
And nests be on the bough, 

Which linnet is the luckier bird, 
Oh who could doubt it now? 

Christina G. Rossetti 



TIT FOR TAT 

Have you been catching of fish, Tom Noddy? 

Have you snared a weeping hare? 
Have you whistled, "No Nunny," and gunned a poor bunny, 

Or a blinded bird of the air? 

Have you trod like a murderer through the green woods. 
Through the dewy deep dingles and glooms, 

While every small creature screamed shrill to Dame Nature, 
"He comes and he comes!"? 

Wonder I very much do, Tom Noddy, 

If ever, when you are a-roam, 
An Ogre from space will stoop a lean face, 

And lug you home: 

Lug you home over his fence, Tom Noddy, 

Of thorn-stocks nine yards high, 
With your bent knees strung round his old iron gun 

And your head dan-dangling by: 



And hang you up stiff on a hook, Tom Noddy, 

From a stone-cold pantry shelf, 
Whence your eyes will glare in an empty stare, 

Till you are cooked yourself! 

Walter de la Mare 

STUPIDITY STREET 

I saw with open eyes 
Singing birds sweet 
Sold in the shops 
For the people to eat, 
Sold in the shops of 
Stupidity Street. 

I saw in vision 
The worm in the wheat, 
And in the shops nothing 
For people to eat 5 
Nothing for sale in 
Stupidity Street. 

Ral^ph Hodgson 

THE BELLS OF HEAVEN 

'Twould ring the bells of Heaven 
The wildest peal for years, 
If Parson lost his senses 
And people came to theirs, 
And he and they together 
Knelt down with angry prayers 
For tamed and shabby tigers 
And dancing dogs and bears, 
And wretched, blind pit ponies, 
And little hunted hares. 

Ral^ph Hodgson 



HOPPING FROG 

Hopping frog, hop here and be seen, 

I'll not pelt you with stick or stone: 
Your cap is laced and your coat is green 5 

Good-bye, we'll let each other alone. 

Plodding toad, plod here and be looked at. 
You the finger of scorn is crooked at: 
But though you're lumpish, you're harmless tooj 
You won't hurt me, and I won't hurt you. 

Christina G. Rossetti 



LITTLE THINGS 

Little things, that run, and quail, 
And die, in silence and despair! 

Little things, that fight, and fail, 
And fall, on sea, and earth, and air! 

All trapped and frightened little things, 
The mouse, the coney, hear our prayer! 

As we forgive those done to us, 

The lamb, the linnet, and the hare 

Forgive us all our trespasses, 
Little creatures, everywhere! 

James Stephens 



THE SNARE 

I hear a sudden cry of pain! 
There is a rabbit in a snare: 
Now I hear the cry again, 
But I cannot tell from where. 

But I cannot tell from where 
He is calling out for aid! 
Crying on the frightened air, 
Making everything afraid! 

Making everything afraid! 
Wrinkling up his little face! 
As he cries again for aid 5 
And I cannot find the place! 

And I cannot find the place 
Where his paw is in the snare! 
Little One! Oh, Little One! 
I am searching everywhere! 

James Stephens 



THE BROWN THRUSH 

There's a merry brown thrush sitting up in the tree. 

"He's singing to me! He's singing to me! " 
And what does he say, little girl, little boy? 

"O, the world's running over with joy! 

Don't you hear? Don't you see? 

Hush! Look! In my tree 
I'm as happy as happy can be! " 



And the brown thrush keeps singing, "A nest do you see 3 
And five eggs, hid by me in the juniper-tree? 

Don't meddle! don't touch! little girl, little boy, 
Or the world will lose some of its joy! 
Now Pm glad! Now I'm free! 
And I always shall be, 

If you never bring sorrow to me." 

So the merry brown thrush sings away in the tree, 

To you and to me, to you and to me; 
And he sings all the day, little girl, little boy, 
"O, the world's running over with joy! 
But long it won't be, 

Don't you know? don't you see? 
Unless we are as good as can be?" 

Lucy Larcom 



[173] 



A ROBIN REDBREAST 

A Robin Redbreast in a cage 
Puts all Heaven in a rage. . . . 

A Starling wounded in the wing, 
A Cherubim does cease to sing. . . . 

The wild Deer wandering here and there 
Keeps the Human Soul from care. . . . 

He who shall hurt the little Wren 
Shall never be beloved by Men. . . . 

The wanton Boy that kills the Fly 
Shall feel the Spider's enmity. . . . 

Kill not the Moth nor Butterfly, 

For the Last Judgment draweth nigh j 

The Beggar's Dog and Widow's Cat, 
Feed them, and thou wilt grow fat. . . , 

To see a World in a Grain of Sand, 
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower, 
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand, 
And Eternity in an hour. 

William Blake 



[174] 












*WrszUr dajufard$unmiF<^ and daw oj spring and^oll 9 
JornaAa tb caJ!eridar,mu a^ 

o/nrudi& W&ruu 



MEETING THE EASTER BUNNY 

On Easter morn at early dawn 

before the cocks were crowing, 
I met a bob-tail bunnykin 

and asked where he was going, 
" 3 Tis in the house and out the house 

a-tipsy, tipsy-toeing, 
'Tis round the house and 'bout the house 

a-lightly I am going." 
"But what is that of every hue 

you carry in your basket?" 
" 'Tis eggs of gold and eggs of blue 5 

I wonder that you ask it. 
'Tis chocolate eggs and bonbon eggs 

and eggs of red and gray, 
For every child in every house 

on bonny Easter Day." 
He perked his ears and winked his eye 

and twitched his little nose; 
He shook his tail what tail he had 

and stood up on his toes. 
"I must be gone before the sunj 

the east is growing gray; 
'Tis almost time for bells to chime." 

So he hippety-hopped away. 

Rowena Eastin Bennett 



A THANKSGIVING FABLE 

It was a hungry pussy cat, 

Upon Thanksgiving morn, 
And she watched a thankful little mouse 

That ate an ear of corn. 



"If I ate that thankful little mouse, 

How thankful he should be. 
When he has made a meal himself 

To make a meal for me! 

"Then with his thanks for having fed, 

And his thanks for feeding me, 
With all his thankfulness inside, 

How thankful I shall be! 

Thus "mewsed" the hungry pussy cat, 

Upon Thanksgiving Day; 
But the little mouse had overheard 

And declined (with thanks) to stay. 

Oliver Herford 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

I want a Puppy Dog 
Not made of wool. 
I want a Kitty Cat 
I don't have to wind. 
I want a Nanny Goat 
I don't have to pull 5 
And I want an Elephant 
Can sit DOWN behind. 

Dorothy Aldis 



SANTA CLAUS AND THE MOUSE 

One Christmas eve, when Santa Claus 

Came to a certain house, 
To fill the children's stockings there, 

He found a little mouse. 



"A merry Christmas, little friend/' 

Said Santa, good and kind. 
"The same to you, sir," said the mouse; 

"I thought you wouldn't mind 

"If I should stay awake to-night 
And watch you for a while." 

"You're very welcome, little mouse," 
Said Santa, with a smile. 

And then he filled the stockings up 
Before the mouse could wink 

From toe to top, from top to toe, 
There wasn't left a chink. 

"Now, they won't hold another thing/' 
Said Santa Claus, with pride, 

A twinkle came in mouse's eyes, 
But humbly he replied: 

"It's not polite to contradict 

Your pardon I implore 
But in the fullest stocking there 

I could put one thing more." 

"Oh, ho!" laughed Santa, "silly mouse! 

Don't I know how to pack? 
By filling stockings all these years, 

I should have learned the knack." 

And then he took the stocking down 
From where it hung so high, 

And said: "Now put in one thing more 5 
I give you leave to try." 

[179] 



The mousie chuckled to himself, 

And then he softly stole 
Right to the stocking's crowded toe 

And gnawed a little hole! 

"Now, if you please, good Santa Claus, 

Pve put in one thing more; 
For you will own that little hole 

Was not in there before." 

How Santa Claus did laugh and laugh! 

And then he gaily spoke: 
"Well! you shall have a Christmas cheese 

For that nice little ioke." 

If you don't think this story true, 

Why! I can show to you 
The very stocking with the hole 

The little mouse gnawed through. 

Emlie Poulsson 



A CHRISTMAS FOLK-SONG 

The little Jesus came to town 5 
The wind blew up, the wind blew down j 
Out in the street the wind was bold; 
Now who would house Him from the cold? 

Then opened wide a stable door, 
Fair were the rushes on the floor j 
The Ox put forth a horned head: 
"Come, Little Lord, here make Thy bed." 

[180] 



Up rose the Sheep were folded near: 
"Thou Lamb of God, come, enter here." 
He entered there to rush and reed, 
Who was the Lamb of God indeed. 

The little Jesus came to townj 

With ox and sheep He laid Him down; 

Peace to the byre, peace to the fold, 

For that they housed Him from the cold! 

Lizette Woodworth Reese 



THE BARN 

"I am tired of this barn," said the colt, 

"And every day it snows. 
Outside, there's no grass any more 

And icicles grow on my nose. 
I am tired of hearing the cows 

Breathing and talking together, 
Pm sick of the clucking of hens, 

I hate stables and winter weather." 

"Hush! little colt," said the mare, 

"And a story I will tell 
Of a barn like this one of ours 

And the things that there befell. 
It was weather much like this 

And the beasts stood as we stand now 
In the warm, good dark of the barn 

A horse and an ass and a cow." 



[181] 



"And sheep?" asked the colt. "Yes, sheep, 

And a pig and a goat and a hen. 
All o the beasts of the barnyard, 

The usual servants of men. 
And into their midst came a Lady, 

And she was as cold as death, 
But the animals leaned above her 

And made her warm with their breath. 

"There was her Baby born 

And laid to sleep in the hay, 
While music flooded the rafters 

And the barn was as light as day, 
And angels and kings and shepherds 

Came to worship the Babe from afar, 
But we looked at Him first of all creatures 

By the bright, strange light of a star!" 

Elfczab&th Coatsworth 



SLUMBER SONG 

Drowsily come the sheep 
From the place where the pastures be, 
By a dusty lane 
To the fold again, 
First one, and then two, and three: 

First one, then two, by the paths of sleep 
Drowsily come the sheep. 

Drowsily come the sheep, 
And the shepherd is singing low: 
Up to eight and nine 
In an endless line, 
They come, and then in they go. 

First eight, then nine, by the paths of sleep 
Drowsily come the sheep. 

Drowsily come the sheep 
And they pass through the sheepfold door; 
After one comes two, 
After one comes two, 
Comes two, and then three and four. 

First one, then two, by the paths of sleep, 
Drowsily come the sheep. 

Louis V. Ledoux 



THE SLEEPY SONG 

As soon as the fire burns red and low, 
And the house up-stairs is still, 
She sings me a queer little sleepy song, 
Of sheep that go over a hill. 
[r8 5 ] 



The good little sheep run quick and soft, 
Their colors are gray and white : 
They follow their leader nose to tail, 
For they must be home by night. 

And one slips over and one comes next. 
And one runs after behind. 
The gray one's nose at the white one's tail, 
The top of the hill they find. 

And when they get to the top of the hill 
They quietly slip away, 
But one runs over and one comes next 
Their colors are white and gray. 

And over they go, and over they go, 
And over the top of the hill, 
The good little sheep run quick and soft, 
And the house up-stairs is still. 

And one slips over and one comes next, 
The good little, gray little sheep! 
I watch how the fire burns red and low, 
And she says that I fall asleep. 

Josephine Daskam Bacon 



[186] 




ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

For permission to reprint the poems included in Under the Tent of the 
S&y appreciation is expressed to the following publishers and authors: 

G. Bell & Sons, Ltd., London, for "A Friend in the Garden," from 
Verses for Children by Juliana Horatia Ewing. 

Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Massachusetts, for "Santa Glaus 
and the Mouse," from In the Child's World by Emilie Poulsson. 

Child Life Magazine-, copyright Rand McNally ani Company, and the 
authors for "Kitty Caught a Hornet," and "The Sea Gull," by Leroy F. 
Jackson ; "My Airedale Dog," by W. L. Mason ; "Our Circus," by Laura 
Lee Randall; and "Swimming," by Clinton Scollard. 

Coward-McCann, Inc., New York, for "The Mouse," from Comfass 
Rose by Elizabeth Coatsworth. 

Dodd, Mead & Company, Inc., New York, for "How to Tell the Wild 
Animals," from Baubles by Carolyn Wells. 

Doublcday, Doran & Company, Inc., New York, for "The Animal 
Store," from Taxis end Toadstools by Rachel Field (Copyright, 1926, by 
Doublcday, Doran & Company, Inc.) ; "The Cock," and "The Cuckoo," 
from Fairies and Chimneys by Rose Fyteman (Copyright, 1920, by Double- 
day, Doran & Company, Inc.) j "Thert Are No Wolves in England Now," 
and lines from "The Visit," from The Fairy Green by Rose Fyleman 
(Copyright, 1923, by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc.); "Bingo Has 
an Enemy," "If Only . . . ," "Shop Windows," "Temple Bar," and 
"Trafalgar Square," from Gay Go Up by Rose Fyleman (Copyright, 1929, 
1930, by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc.); "The Canary," and 
"Timothy," from The Fairy Flute by Rose Fyleman (Copyright, 1923, 
by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc.) ; "Animal Crackers," and "The 
Moon-Sheep," from Songs for a Little House by Christopher Morley 
(Copyright, 1917, by Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc.); and "The 
Blackbird," from Kensington Gardens by Humbert Wolfe (Reprinted by 
permission from Doubleday, Doran & Company, Inc.). 

Gerald Duckworth & Company, Ltd., London, for "The Elephant," 
"The Hippopotamus," "The Lion," and "The Yak," from The Bad 
Child's Book of Beasts by Hilaire Belloc. 



E. P. Dutton & Company, Inc., New York, for one line from "At the 
Zoo," from When We Were Very Young by A. A. Milne and for "Robin 
Redbreast," from Poems and Prophesies by William Blake, in Everyman's 
Library, 

Follett Publishing Company, Chicago, for "Meeting the Easter Bunny," 
"A Modern Dragon," "The Rain," "Shell Castles," and "Under the Tent 
of the Sky," from Around a Toadstool Table by Rowena Bastin Bennett. 

Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc., New York, for "The Day of the 
Circus Horse," from Selected Poems of T. A. Daly (Copyright, 1936, by 
Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc.) j "Splinter," from Good Morning, 
America by Carl Sandburg (Copyright, 1928, by Carl Sandburg. By per- 
mission of Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc.) ; "The Bear Hunt," and 
"The Looking-Glass Pussy," from Little Girl and Boy Land by Margaret 
Widdemer (Copyright, 1924, by Harcourt, Brace and Company, Inc.). 

Harper & Brothers, New York, for "Viewpoints," from The Light 
Guitar and "The Boy and the Pup," from The Laughing Muse by Arthur 
Guiterman; "White Butterflies," by Charles Algernon Swinburne; "Famil- 
iar Friends," from / Spend the Summer by James S. Tippett; "Circus 
Parade," "Ducks at Dawn," "Spider Webs," and lines from "Let's Pre- 
tend," from A World to Know by James S. Tippett. 

Henry Holt & Company, New York, for "Five Eyes," "Nicholas Nye," 
"Old Shellover," "The Ship of Rio," "Tit for Tat," and "Unstoop- 
ing," from Collected Poems 1901-1918 by Walter de la Mare; "The 
Pasture," and "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," from Collected 
Poems of Robert Frost. 

Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, for "The Brown Bear," from The 
Children Sing in the Far West by Mary Austin; "The Lizard," from 
Songs of Sixpence by Abbie Farwell Brown; "The Plaint of the Camel," 
from Davy and the Goblin by Charles Edward Carryl ; "Fable," from The 
Poetical Works of Ralph Waldo Emerson} "The Brown Thrush," and 
"Red Top and Timothy," from The Poetical Works of Lucy Larcom; 
"Jester Bee," and "The Snow-Bird," from Little-Folk Lyrics by Frank 
Dempster Sherman; and "The Sandpiper," and "Wild Geese," from Stories 
and Poems for Children by Celia Thaxter. Each of these selections is used 
by permission of, and by arrangement with, Houghton Mifflin Company, 

Alfred A. Knopf, Inc., New York, for "The Snail," from Flying Fish 
by Grace Hazard Conkling. 

J. B. Lippincott Company, Philadelphia, for "Saturday Towels," from 
Poems for Peter by Lysbeth Boyd Borie. 

Little, Brown & Company, Boston, for "The Worm," from Jane, 
Josef h, and John by Ralph Bergengren, an Atlantic Monthly Press publica- 
tion; "A Bird Came Down the Walk," from The Poems of Emily Dickin- 
son, Centenary Edition, edited by Martha Dickinson Bianchi and Alfred 

[188] 



Leete Hampson; "The Crocodile," and "The Monkeys and the Croco- 
dile," from Tirra Lirra: Rhymes Old emd New by Laura E. Richards. 

Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Company, Boston, for "Wild Beasts," from 
Child Bongs of Cheer by Evaleen Stein, and "The Little Kittens," from 
Little Songs by Eliza Lee Follen. 

Robert M. McBride & Company, New York, for "Moth Miller," and 
"The Race," from The Coffee-Pot Face by Aileen Fisher. 

The Macmillan Company, New York, for "Robin Redbreast," from 
Robin Redbreast and Other Poems by William Allingham; "The Ele- 
phant," and "The Hairy Dog," from Pillicock Hill by Herbert Asquithj 
"My Dog," from foothills of Parnassus by John Kendrick Bangs; "A Cir- 
cus Garland," from Branches Green and "Merry-Go-Round," from The 
Pointed People by Rachel Field; "A Chinese Nursery Rhyme," from 
Home Life in China by Isaac Headland; "The Bells of Heaven," and 
"Stupidity Street," from Poems by Ralph Hodgson; "A Dirge for a 
Righteous Kitten," "An Explanation of the Grasshopper," "The Lion," 
"The Little Turtle," "The Mysterious Cat," "The Old Horse in the 
City," "The Humble Bumble Bee," and "What Grandpa Mouse Said," 
from Collected Poems by Vachel Lindsay; "Camel," "Cat," and "Lion," 
from Menagerie by Mary Britton Miller ; "Brown and Furry," "The City 
Mouse and the Garden Mouse," "Hopping Frog," "Horses of the Sea," 
"Hurt No Living Thing," "A Linnet in a Gilded Cage," "On the Grassy 
Banko " and "When the Cows Come Home," from Sing-Song by Christina 
G. Rnssetti; "Little Things," "The Rivals," and "The Snare," from Col- 
l/cted Poems by James Stephens; "Green Moth," from Skipping Along 
Alone by Winifred Welles. 

Macrae Smith Company, Philadelphia, for "The Teapot Dragon," from 
Jill Round Our House by Rupert Sargent Holland. 

Minton, Balch and Company, New York, for "Flies," and "Radiator 
Lions," from Everything and Anything; "For Christmas," and "The 
Grasshoppers," from Here, There and Everywhere; and "At The Circus," 
and "In the Barnyard," from Hof, Skip and Jumf by Dorothy Aldis. 

Thomas Bird Mosher, Portland, Maine, for "A Christmas Folk-Song,** 
from 'A Wayside Lute by Lizette Woodworth Reese. 

The New York Times, New York, for "Why Read a Book?" by 
Colette M. Burns. 

Oxford University Press, London, for "White Horses," from Out of 
the Everywhere by Winifred Howard. 

St. Nicholas Magazine, New York, for "Holding Hands," by Lenore 
M. Link; and "The Monkeys," by Edith Osborn Thompson, 

Scholastic Corporation, New York, for "Wind-Wolves," by William D. 
Sargent from Saplings, 1926 series. 

Charles Scribner>s Sons, New York, for "The Sleepy Song," from 

[189! 



Poems by Josephine Daskam Bacon; "The Dinkey Bird," and "The Duel," 
from The Poems of Eugene Field; "Ducks 5 Ditty," from The Wind in 
the Willow by Kenneth Grahame; "The Elf and the Dormouse," from 
Artful Antics; "The Milk Jug," from The Kitten's Garden of Verses, 
"The Snail's Dream," from The Bashful Earthquake, and "A Thanks- 
giving Fable," by Oliver Herford; "The Cow," and "Time to Rise," 
from A Child?* Garden of Verses by Robert Louis Stevenson. 

Frederick A. Stokes Company, New York, for "Little Snail," from 
Poems by a Little Girl by Hilda Conkling (Copyright, 1920, by Frederick 
A. Stokes Company); "About Animals," from Shoes of the Wind by 
Hilda Conkling (Copyright, 1922, by Frederick A. Stokes Company); 
"Circus," from Joan's Door by Eleanor Farjeon (Copyright, 1926, by 
Frederick A. Stokes Company) ; "The Milk-cart Pony," and "Mrs. Peck- 
Pigeon," from Over the Garden Wall by Eleanor Farjeon (Copyright, 
*933> by Eleanor Farjeon); "Excuse Us, Animals in the Zoo," from All 
through the Year by Annette Wynne (Copyright, 1932, by Annette 
Wynne); "I Wonder If the Lion Knows," "Lions Running over the 
Green," "Little Folks in the Grass," "People Buy a Lot of Things," from 
For Days and Days: A Year-round Treasury of Verse for Children by 
Annette Wynne (Copyright, 1919, by Frederick A. Stokes Company), 
'Little Charlie Chipmunk" from Animal Etiquette Book by Helen 
Cowles Le Cross (Copyright, 1926, by Frederick A. Stokes Company), 
*nd for "The Cow," and "The Sheep," from The "Original Poems" and 
Others by Ann Taylor. 

The Viking Press, Inc., New York, for "Lone Dog," from Songs to 
Save a Soul, by Irene Rutherford McLeod (Copyright, 1919, by B. W. 
Heubsch, Inc.); "The Circus," "Firefly," "The Hens," "Horse," "Milk- 
ing Time," "The Rabbit," "The Wolves," "The Woodpecker," and "The 
Worm," from Under the Tree by Elizabeth Madox Roberts (Copyright, 
1922 and 1930). 

Frederick Warne & Co., Inc., New York, for "The Owl and the Pussy 
Cat" by Edward Lear. 

The Yale Review, New Haven, Connecticut, for lines from "Go to the 
Barn with a Lantern," by Robert P. Tristram Coffin. 

Yale University Press, New Haven, Connecticut, for "Chanticleer," and 
"Serious Omission," from Songs for Parents by John Farrar. 

Elizabeth Coatsworth and the New York Herald Tribune for "The 
Barn." 

Elizabeth Coatsworth and Story Parade for "Sitting Here." 

Georgia Roberts Durston for "The Hippopotamus," and "The Wolf." 

Ethel Romig Fuller and Willett, Clark & Company, Chicago, for 
"Wind Is a Cat," from White Peaks and Green. 

[190] 



Louis V. Lcdoux for "Slumber Song." 

Dr. Francis A. Litz for "The Bluebeard," "Butterfly," "The Firefly," 
"An Inconvenience," "An Insectarian," "The Pleiads," "The Tax- 
Gatherer," and "The Woodpecker," from The Poetry of Fathe,* Tabb. 

Irene M. Mason and Child Life Magazine for "My Airedale Dog," 
by W. L. Mason, reprinted from Child Life Magazine; copyright Rand 
McNally and Company. 

Katharine D, Morse for "A Bee Sets Sail," and "The Fairy Frock," 
from A Gate of Cedar. 

Anne Blackwell Payne for "Fairy Aeroplanes," and "Silver Sheep"; 
and the author and the New York Sun for "At Night," by Anne Blackwell 
Payne. 

Virginia Rice for "Cat," and "Rabbits," from / Like Animals by Dorothy 
Baruch, published by Harper & Brotheis, New York. 



INDEX OF AUTHORS 



ALDIS, DOROTHY 

At the Circus, 7 

Flies, 99 

For Chnstmas, 178 

Tn the Barnyard, 51 

Radiator Lions, 36 

The Grasshoppers, 108 
ALLINGHAM, WILLIAM 

Robin Redbreast, 85 
AsQurrn, HERBERT 

The Elephant, 16 

The Hairy Dog, 70 
AUSTIN, MARY 

The Brown Bear, 130 
AUTHOR UNKOWN 

Grasshopper Giccn, 107 

The Chickens, 62 

The Puzzled Centipede, 155 

The Seciet, 84 

The Squincl, 122 

The Thtce Little Kittens, 152 

The Tued Caterpillar, no 

Two Little Kittens, 151 

BACON, JOSEPHINE DASKAM 

The Sleepy Song, 185 
BANGS, JOHN KENDRICK 

My Dog, 71 
BARUCH, DOROTHY W. 

Cat, 73 

Rabbits, 78 
BKI.LOC, HILAIRE 

The Elephant, 17 

The Hippopotamus, 150 

The Lion, 149 

The Yak, 150 
BKNNETT, ROWKNA BASTIN 

A Modern Dragon, 146 

Meeting the Easter Bunny, 177 

Shell Castles, 143 

Under the Tent of the Sky, 137 



[ 193] 



BFRGENGREN, RALPH 

The Worm, 117 
BLAKE, WILLIAM 

A Robin Redbieast, 174 

The Lamb, 61 
BORIE, LYSBETH BOYD 

Saturday Towels, 37 
BROWN, ABBIE FARWELL 

The Lizaid, 145 
BURNS, COLETTE M. 

Why Read a Book? 94 

CARROLL, LEWIS 

The Lobster Qundrille, 159 
CARRYL, CHARLES EDWARD 

The Plaint of the Camel, 18 
COATSWORTII, ELIZABETH 

The Barn, 181 

The Mouse, 125 

Sitting Here, 39 
COLERIDGE, SAMUEL TAYLOR 

Answer to a Child's Question, 94 
CONKLING, GRACE HAZARD 

The Snail, 114 
CONKLING, HILDA 

About Animals, 79 

Little Snail, 113 
COOPER, GEORGE 

Frogs at School, 156 
COPLEN, GRACE WILSON 

Fneflies, 103 

DALY, THOMAS AUGUSTINE 

The Day of the Circus Horse, 10 
DE LA MARE, WALTER 

Five Eyes, 124 

Nicholas Nye, 54 

Old Shellover, 113 

The Ship of Rio, 149 

Tit for Tat, 169 

Unstooping, 129 



DICKINSON, EMILY 

A Bird, 118 
DURSTON, GEORGIA ROBERTS 

The Hippopotamus, 133 

The Wolf, 131 

EMERSON, RALPH WALDO 

Fable, 123 
EWING, JULIANA HORATIA 

A Fiiend in the Garden, 115 

FARJEON, ELEANOR 

Circus, 9 

Mrs. Peck-Pigeon, 64 

The Milk-cart Pony, 52 
FARRAR, Jo HI* 

Chanticleer, 61 

Serious Omission, 15 
FIELD, EUGENE 

The Dinkey-bird, 164 

The Duel, 27 
FIELD, RACHEL 

A Circus Garland, 4 

Merry-Go-Round, 23 

The Animal Store, 31 
FISHER, AILEEN 

Moth Miller, 100 

The Race, 38 
POLLEN, ELIZA LEE 

The Little Kittens, 154 
FROST, ROBERT 

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Eve- 
ning, 55 

The Pasture, 58 
FULLER, ETHEL ROMIG 

Wind Is a Cat, 138 
FYLEMAN, ROSE 

Bingo Has an Enemy, 71 

If Only . . ,69 

Shop Windows, 32 

Temple Bar, 25 

The Canary, 45 

The Cock, 43 

The Cuckoo, 44 

There Are No Wolves in England 
Now, 132 

Timothy, 43 

Trafalgar Square, 26 

GRAHAME, KENNETH 

Ducks' Ditty, 65 
GUITERMAN, ARTHUR 

A Boy and a Pup, 80 

Viewpoints, 154 



HALL, CAROLYN 

Fireflies, 102 
HEADLAND, I. T. (translator) 

A Chinese Nuisery Rhyme, 124 
HERFORD, OLIVER 

A Thanksgiving Fable, 177 

The Elf and the Dormouse, 46 

The Milk Jug, 57 

The Snail's Dream, 114 
HODGSON, RALPH 

Stupidity Street, 170 

The Bells of Heaven, 170 
HOLLAND, RUPERT SARGENT 

The Teapot Dragon, 24 
HOWARD, WINIFRED 

White Horses, 142 
HUGO, VICTOR 

Be Like the Bird, 91 

JACKSON, LEROY F 

Kitty Caught a Hornet, 151 
The Sea Gull, 88 

LARCOM, LUCY 

Red-Top and Timothy, 92 

The Brown Thiush, 172 
LEAR, EDWARD 

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat, 160 
LECRON, HELEN COWLES 

Little Charlie Chipmunk, 121 
LEDOUX, Louis V. 

Slumber Song, 185 
LINDSAY, VACHEL 

A Dirge for a Righteous Kitten, 74 

An Explanation of the Giasshopper, 45 

The Humble Bumble Bee, 104 

The Lion, 150 

The Little Turtle, 79 

The Mysterious Cat, 77 

The Old Horse in the City, 144 

What Grandpa Mouse Said, 141 
LINK, LENORE M. 

Holding Hands, 8 

MCLEOD, IRENE RUTHERFORD 

Lone Dog, 134 
MASON, W. L. 

My Airedale Dog, 70 
MILLER, MARY BRITTON 

Camel, 17 

Cat, 76 

Lion, 15 



MORLEY, CHRISTOPHER 
Animal Crackers, 23 
The Moon-sheep, 140 

MORSI), KVTIIAIIINF 

A Bee Sets Sail, 101 
The Fairy Fiock, 47 

PAYNF, ANN*. Bi ACKWI 1 1 

At Night, 40 

Fairy Aeioplanes, 47 

Silvei Sheep, 139 
POULSSON, EMU IK 

Santa CLius and the Mouoe, 178 

RANHAIL, LAURA Lr* 

Our Ciicua, ii 
RFFSE, LIZITFE WOOIHVORIH 

A Christmas Folk-song, 180 
RICHARDS, LAURA E. 

The Ciocodile, 164 

The Monkeys and the Ciocodile, 163 
ROBFRTS, ELIZABITH MADOX 

Firefly, 102 

Horse, 53 

Milking Time, 59 

The Circus, 6 

The Hens, 63 

The Rabbit, 121 

The Wolves, 132 

The Woodpecker, 83 

The Woim, 116 
ROSSETTI, CHRISTINA G. 

A Linnet in a Gilded Cage, 169 

Brown and Furty, no 

Hopping Frog, 171 

Horses of the Sea, 142 

On the Giassy Banks, 59 

The City Mouse and the Gaicten 
Mouse, 126 

When the Cows Come Home, 58 



SANDBURG, CARL 

Splinter, 109 
SARGENT, WILLIAM D. 

Wind-wolves, 138 
SCOLLARH, CLINTON 

Swimming) 64 
SHAKESPEARE, WILLIAM 

Where the Bee Sucks, 46 
SHERMAN, FRANK DEMPSTER 

Jester Bee, 96 

The Snow-bird, 84 
STEIN, EVALEEN 

Wild Beasts, 35 



STEPHENS, JAMES 

Little Things, 171 

The Rivals, 92 

The Snare, 172 
STEVENSON, ROBERT Louis 

The Cow, 57 

Time to Rise, 83 
SWINBURNE, ALGERNON CHARLEC 

White Butterflies, 99 

TABS, JOHN BANISTER 

An Inconvenience, 1^5 

An Insectarian, 155 

Butterfly, 99 

The Fire-fly, 103 

The Pleiads, 140 

The Tax-gatherer, 101 

The Woodpecker, 83 
TAYLOR, ANN 

The Cow, 56 

The Sheep, 60 
TENNYSON, ALFRED 

The Eagle, 87 

The Owl, 86 
THAJCTER, CELIA 

The Sandpiper, 87 

Wild Geese, 95 
THOMPSON, EDHH OSBORNE 

The Monkeys, 19 
TIPPCTT, JAM*S S 

Circus Parade, 3 

Ducks at Dawn, 66 

Familiar Friends, 51 

Spider Webs, 48 



WADSWORTH, OLIVE A. 

The Wonderful Meadow, 161 

WELLES, WINIFRED 
Giecn Moth, loo 

WELLS, CAROLYN 

How to Tell the Wild Animals 157 

WIDDEMER, MARGARET 
The Bear Hunt, 38 
The Looking-glass Pussy, 75 

WOLFE, HUMBERT 
The Blackbird, 91 

WYNNE, ANNETTE 

Excuse Us, Animals m the Zoo, 20 
I Wonder If the Lion Knows, 129 
Lions Running over the Green, 35 
Little Folks in the Giass, 107 
People Buy a Lot of Things 31 

[195] 



INDEX OF TITLES 



About Animals, by Hilda Conkhng .... . 79 

Animal Crackers, by Christopher Morley 23 

Animal Store, The, by Rachel Field .31 

Answer to a Child's Question, by Samuel Taylor Coleridge . 94 

At Night, by Anne Blackwell Payne . . 40 

At the Circus, by Dorothy Aldis . 7 

Barn, The, by Elizabeth Coatsworth . . , . 181 

Bear Hunt, The, by Margaret Widdemcr .... . . . 38 

Be Like the Bird, by Victor Hugo . . . . , . ,91 

Bee Sets Sail, A, by Katharine Morse ... . . . , , . i i 

Bells of Heaven, The, by Ralph Hodgson , , 170 

Bingo Has an Enemy, by Rose Fyleman ... . . . 71 

Bird, A, by Emily Dickinson 1 18 

Blackbird, The, by Humbert Wolfe ... 91 

Boy and a Pup, A, by Arthur Gmterman . 80 

Brown and Furry, by Christina G. Rossetti . ... no 

Brown Bear, The, by Mary Austin 130 

Brown Thrush, The, by Lucy Larcom . .... 172 

Butterfly, by John Banister Tabb ... ^ 

Camel, by Mary Britton Miller , 7 

Canary, The, by Rose Fyleman . ^ 

Cat, by Dorothy W. Baruch .... , 73 

Cat, by Mary Britton Miller .... 7 $ 

Chanticleer, by John Farrar fa 

Chickens, The, Author Unknown , , 62 

Chinese Nursery Rhyme, A, by I T Headland (translate) , . , i H 

Christmas Folk-song, A, by Lizette Woodworth Reese . jg 

Circus, by Eleanor Far j eon . . o 

Circus, The, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts . 6 

Circus Garland, A, by Rachel Field ^ 

Circus Parade, by James S< Tippett ,','.' ^ 

City Mouse and the Garden Mouse, The, by Chiistina G Rossetti ' .' U 6 

Cock, The, by Rose Fyleman " 

Cow, The, by Ann Taylor ! c6 

Cow, The, by Robert Louis Stevenson , , - 7 

Crocodile, The, by Laura E. Richaids , ... l6 ' 

Cuckoo, The, by Rose Fyleman , " ' ] * 

Day of the Circus Horse, The, by Thomas Augustine 

[196] 



Pmkey-bird, The, by Eugene Field , ... . . 164 

Dirge for a Righteous Kitten, A, by Vachel Lindsay ... ... 74 

Ducks at Dawn, by James S. Tippett 66 

Ducks' Ditty, by Kenneth Grahame 6$ 

Duel, The, by Eugene Field 27 

Eagle, The, by Alfred Tennyson 8 7 

Elephant, The, by Heibert Asquith ^ 

Elephant, The, by Hilahe Bclloc .... I7 

Elf and the Doi mouse, The, by Oliver Heiford 46 

Excuse Us, Animals in the Zoo, by Annette Wynne 20 

Explanation of the Giasshoppcr, An, by Vachel Lindsay ...... 45 

Fable, by Ralph Waldo Emerson 123 

Faiiy Aeroplanes, by Anne Blackwcll Payne 47 

Fairy Fiock, The, by Katharine Morse 47 

Familiar Friends, by James S. Tippett 51 

FircfUes, by Carolyn Hall I 02 

Fireflies, by Grace Wilson Coplen . . '. 103 

Fitefly, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts 102 

Fire-fly, The, by John Banister Tabb .... 103 

Five Eyes, by Walter de la Marc ... .... ... 124 

Flies, by Dorothy Aldis 99 

For Christmas, by Dorothy Aldis ... 178 

Friend in the Garden, A, by Juliana Horatia Ewing 11$ 

Frogs at School, by George Cooper . . 156 

Grasshopper Green, Author Unknown 107 

Grasshoppers, The, by Dorothy Aldis 108 

Green Moth, by Winified Welles xoo 

Hairy Dog, The, by Herbert Astjuith 70 

Hens, The, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts 63 

Hippopotamus, The, by Georgia Roberts Durston 133 

Hippopotamus, The, by Ililanc Bclloc .... 150 

Holding Hands, by Lenore M. Link 8 

Hopping Frog, by Christina G. Rossetti 171 

Horse, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts 53 

Horses of the Sea, by Christina G. Rossetti .... .... 142 

How to Tell the Wild Animals, by Carolyn Wells 157 

Humble Bumble Bee, The, by Vachel Lindsay 104 

I Wonder If the Lion Knows, by Annette Wynne 129 

If Only . . . , by Rose Fylcman ... 69 

In the Barnyard, by Dorothy Aldis 5 1 

Inconvenience, An, by John Banister Tabb 15 5 

Inscctarian, An, by John Banister Tabb i$S 

Jester Bcc, by Frank Dempster Shciman 96 

Kitty Caught a Hornet, by Lcroy F. Jackson i$i 

Lamb, The, by William Blake 6* 

Linnet in a Gilded Cage, A, by Chmtina G. Rossetti 169 



Lion, by Mary Bntton Miller ...... ... i$ 

Lion, The, by Hilaire Belloc ............ '49 

Lion, The, by Vachel Lindsay ............ l $ 

Lions Running over the Green, by Annette Wynne ....... 35 

Little Charlie Chipmunk, by Helen Cowles Lecron ....... 121 

Little Folks in the Grass, by Annette Wynne ......... 107 

Little Kittens, The, by Eliza Lee Pollen . ..... ( *54 

Little Snail, by Hilda Conkling ............ "3 

Little Things, by James Stephens ............ *7* 

Little Turtle, The, by Vachel Lindsay .... ..... 79 

Lizard, The, by Abbie Farwell Brown ..... ..... H* 

Lobster Quadrille, The, by Lewis Carroll .... ..... i$9 

Lone Dog, by Irene Rutherfoid McLeod ..... .... 134 

Looking-glass Pussy, The, by Margaret Widdemer ...... 75 

Meeting the Easter Bunny, by Rowena Bastin Bennett ....... *77 

Merry-Go-Round, by Rachel Field ..... ..... *3 

Milk-cart Pony, The, by Eleanor Farjeon ... .... 52 

Milk Jug, The, by Oliver Herford ..... ..... 57 

Milking Time, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts . ..... 59 

Modern Dragon, A, by Rowena Bastin Bennett . .... 146 

Monkeys, The, by Edith Osborn Thompson ... .... 19 

Monkeys and the Crocodile, The, by Laura E. Richards ...... 163 

Moon-sheep, The, by Christopher Morley .... ..... 140 

Moth Miller, by Aileen Fisher ............ 100 

Mouse, The, by Elizabeth Coatsworth ........... 125 

Mrs. Peck-Pigeon, by Eleanor Farjeon ......... 64 

My Airedale Dog, by W. L. Mason . ...... * . 70 

My Dog, by John Kendrick Bangs .... ...... 71 

Mysterious Cat, The, by Vachel Lindsay .......... 77 

Nicholas Nye, by Walter de la Maie ..... ... 54 

Old Horse in the City, The, by Vachel Lindsay . ..... 144 

Old Shellover, by Walter de la Mare . . ........ 113 

On the Grassy Banks, by Christina G Rossetti ......... $9 

Our Circus, by Laura Lee Randall ... ...... II 

Owl, The, by Alfred Tennyson .... ....... 86 

Owl and the Pussy-Cat, The, by Edward Lear ........ 160 

Pasture, The, by Robert Frost ............ 58 

People Buy a Lot of Things, by Annette Wynne ........ 31 

Plaint of the Camel, The, by Charles Edward Carryl ....... i 

Pleiads, The, by John Banister Tabb ........... 140 

Puzzled Centipede, The, Author Unknown ....... . 155 

Rabbit, The, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts .......... 121 

Rabbits, by Dorothy W. Baruch ............ 78 

Race, The, by Aileen Fisher ............. 38 

Radiator Lions, by Dorothy Aldis ............ 3$ 

Red-Top and Timothy, by Lucy Larcom .......... 92 

Rivals, The, by James Stephens ............ g z 

Robin Redbreast, by William Allingham .......... 8$ 

Robin Redbreast, A, by William Blake 



[198] 



Sandpiper, The, by Celia Thaxter 87 

Santa Claus and the Mouse, by Emilie Poulsson 178 

Saturday Towels, by Lysbeth Boyd Bone . . .... 37 

Sea Gull, The, by Leroy F Jackson . . 88 

Secret, The, Author Unknown 84 

Serious Omission, by John Fariar . . l $ 

Sheep, The, by Ann Taylor . .... 60 

Shell Castles, by Rowena Bastm Bennett ... 14 . 3 

Ship of Rio, The, by Walter de la Mare . . . . . 149 

Shop Windows, by Rose Fyleman . . . 32 

Silver Sheep, by Anne Blackwell Payne I39 

Sitting Here, by Elizabeth Coatsworth . . . ... 39 

Sleepy Song, The, by Josephine Daskam Karon . . . . 185 

Slumber Song, by Louis V Ledoux ... , . . . 181, 

Snail, The, by Grace Hazaid Conkling .... . .114 

Snail's Dream, The, by Olivet Herfoid . . . .114. 

Snaie, The, by James Stephens ij z 

Snow-bird, The, by Frank Dempstei Sherman .... ... 84. 

Spider Webs, by James S Tippett .48 

Splinter, by Carl Sandbuig . .109 

Squirrel, The, Author Unknown .122 

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening, by Robert Fiosi . 55 

Stupidity Street, by Ralph Hodgson . 170 

Swimming, by Clinton Scollard .... . . .64 

Tax-gatherer, The, by John Banister Tabb . . . 101 

Teapot Dragon, The, by Rupeit Saigcnt Holland . . . 24 

Temple Bar, by Rose Fyleman ... 25 

Thanksgiving Fable, A, by Oliver Ifoiioid .... . . 177 

Theic Aic No Wolves in England Now, by Rose Fyleman . .132 

Three Little Kittens, The, Author Unknown . . . 152, 

Time to Rise, by Robert Louis Stevenson .... ... -83 

Timothy, by Rose Fylcnun . . . -43 

Tiicd Caterpillar, The, Author Unknown ... . .no 

Trt for Tat, by Walter de la Mare . .169 

Trafalgar Square, by Rose Fyleman .... . . .26 

Two Little Kittens, Author Unknown .... . ..,.151 

Under the Tent of the Sky, by Rowcna Bastin. Bennett . . . 137 

Unstooping, by Walter de la Mare .... ... .129 

Viewpoints, by Arthur Guiterman 1 54 

What Grandpa Mouse Said, by Vachel Lindsay 141 

When the Cows Come Home, by Christina G. Rossetti 58 

Where the Bee Sucks, by William Shakespeare 46 

White Butterflies, by Algernon Charles Swinburne .... ... 99 

White Horses, by Winifred Howard 142 

Why Read a Book? by Colette M. Burns ... . .... 94 

Wild Beasts, by Evaleen Stern 35 

Wild Geese, by Cclia Thaxter 95 

Wind Is a Cat, by Ethel Romig Fuller 138 

Wind-wolves, by William Sargent 138 



Wolf, The, by Georgia Roberts Durston 131 

Wolves, The, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts 132 

Wonderful Meadow, The, by Olive A. Wadsworth 161 

Woodpecker, The, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts 83 

Woodpecker, The, by Joha Banister Tabb 83 

Worm, The, by Ralph Bergengren 117 

Worm, The, by Elizabeth Madox Roberts u6 



Yak, The, by Hilaire Belloc 




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INDEX OF FIRST LINES 

A bird came down the walk 118 

A birdie with a yellow bill . . 83 

A centipede was happy quite 155 

A linnet in a gilded cage 169 

A little light is going by 102 

A Robin Redbreast in a cage 174 

A sea shell is a castle 143 

A snail who had a way, it seems 114 

A tired caterpillar went to sleep one cLiy ... no 

A tram is a dragon that roars through the dark 146 

Across the narrow beach we flit 87 

All along the backwater 65 

"And pray, who are you?" . . 101 

Animal crackers, and cocoa to drink 23 

Animals are my friends and my kin and my playfellows 79 

"Are you flying through the night" 103 

As a friend to the childien commend me the Yak i$o 

As soon as the fire burns red and low 185 

Back behind the mirror is another pussy-cat 75 

Be like the bird, who 91 

Bingo is kind and friendly . Jl 

Brown and furry no 

Butteifly, Butterfly, sipping the sand 99 

Canary-birds feed on sugar and seed . . 18 

"Cornel" said Old Shellovcr "3 

Dickie found a broken spade xi6 

Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong 74 

Do you ask what the birds say? The spairow, the dove 94 

Do you hear the cry as the pack goes by 138 

Dioweily come the sheep *8$ 

Elephants walking 8 

Excuse us, Animals in the Zoo 20 

Five little monkeys l6 3 

Flies walk on ceilings 99 

Fly, white butterflies, out to ica 99 

Friday came and the circus was there 



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George lives in an apartment and ... . 36 

Good-bye, good-bye to Summer I .... 85 

Grasshopper green is a comical chap 107 

Have you been catching of fish, Tom Noddy? . 169 

He clasps the crag with crooked hands 87 

He is not John the gardener 1x5 

He ran up the candlestick . . 124 

He used to be a faiiy once 45 

Head-downward hung the bat ... 154 

Here comes the elephant 16 

Here it comes' Here it comes! . . 3 

High 108 

High and proud on the barnyard fence 61 

His bridle hung around the post 53 

Hopping frog, hop here and be seen .. 171 

"I am tired of this barn," said the colt 181 

"I cannot wash my dog," she said .. 155 

I have a funny Airedale dog . 70 

I have no dog, but it must be . 71 

I hear a sudden cry of pain' .172 

I heard a bird at dawn 92 

I heard a mouse 125 

I know that there are dragons . 15 

I like to chase the fireflies 103 

I played I was two polar bears jg 

I saw a little snail ...113 

I saw a proud, mysterious cat 77 

I saw with open eyes .... 170 

I shoot the Hippopotamus with bullets made of platinum 150 

I want a Puppy Dog I7 g 

I watched the pretty, white sea gull gg 

Jt will be a lion 35 

I wonder if the lion knows . , . , 129 

If ever you should go by chance j.^7 

If I had a hundred dollars to spend .... 3 t 

If only I'd some money 5^ 

I'm a lean dog, a keen dog, a wild dog, and lone 134, 

I'm going out to clean the pasture spring tg 

In an ocean, 'way out yonder j^ 

In Hans' old Mill his three black cats .... 12 * 

In the barnyard chickens walk ^ 

In the far corner Q i 

In the squdgy river ' " 173 

It's primrose petals for a gown ! ! 47 

It was a fiery circus horse ' ' zo 

It was a hungry pussy cat ' ! ! 177 

Kitty caught a hornet ^ 



Lazy sheep, pray tell me why 
Lion, you were once the King 

[ 2O2 ] 



Lions running over the green 35 

Little Chailie Chipmunk was a talker. Mercy Me! 121 

Little Lamb, who made thec? 61 

Little lamps of the dusk 102 

Little things, that run, and quail 172 

Little White Horses are out on the sea 142 

London's full of statues 25 

Low on his fours the Lion 129 

Mother likes the frocks and hats 32 

Mrs. Peck-Pigeon 64 

My cat 73 

My cat Timothy who has such lovely eyes 43 

My dog's so furry I've not seen 70 

My tricycle's a camel 38 

My two white inbbits 78 

Nelson's on a column 26 

Nothing now to maik the spot .... 5 

Now the wild bees that hive in the rocks 130 

camel in the zoo 17 

On Easter morn nt early dawn * .... 177 

On the grassy banks 59 

One Christmas eve, when Santa Claus . . 178 

Over in the meadow, in the sand, in the sun 161 

People buy a lot of things 31 

Purple horses with oiange manc^ 23 

"Quack, Quack 1" 66 

Red-Top and Timothy 92 

Said the first little chicken 62 

See, they are clearing the sawdust course 5 

Sing a song of monkeys 19 

Sitting here 39 

Thank you, pretty cow, that maile 56 

The black cat yawns 76 

The boy wears a grin 80 

The brass band blares 9 

The city mouse lives in a house ... 126 

The cuckoo is a tell-tale 44 

The fairies, too, have aeroplanes 47 

The friendly cow all red and white -57 

The garden is a royal court 96 

The Gentle Milk Jug blue and white 57 

The gingham dog and the calico cat 27 

The Grasshopper, the Grasshopper . 45 

The horses of the sea H 2 

The horses, the pigs 5* 



203 ] 



The kindly cock is the fairies' friend 4-3 

The little Jesus came to town I 

The Lion is a kingly beast !$<> 

The Lion, the Lion, he dwells in the waste *49 

The Lizard is a funny thing *45 

The milk-cart pony in the street 5 2 

The moon seems like a docile sheep HO 

The moon's a holy owl-queen H 1 

The moon's a peck of corn. It lies H4 

The mountain and the squirrel ... *23 

The night the green moth came for me . loo 

The night was coming very fast 63 

The Owl and the Pussy-Cat went to sea . 160 

The seals all flap ...... 7 

The snail is very odd and slow 1*4 

The spiders were busy last night 48 

The sun's a bright-haired shepherd boy 139 

The timid little night moth loo 

The voice of the last cricket 109 

The weather-man has promised snow and sleet 104 

The wind blows east, the wmd blows storm ... . loi 

The wind blows, the sun shines, the birds sing loud . .... 9 ^ 

The wind cracked his whip 1^7 

The wizard of the woods is he 83 

The woodpecker pecked out a little round hole 83 

There are no wolves in England now, nor any grizzly bears 132 

There isn't a prettier sight, I think 7 

There's a dragon on our teapot 24 

There's a merry brown thrush sitting up in the tree 172 

There was a little turtle 79 

There was a ship of Rio 149 

This is the day the circus comes 4 

Thistle and darnel and dock grew there . 54 

Three little kittens lost their mittens 152 

To his cousin the Bat 155 

Twenty froggies went to school X56 

Two httle kittens, one stormy night 151 

Twould ring the bells of Heaven 170 

Under a toadstool crept a wee Elf ... 46 

Under the bed 37 

We had a circus in our shed n 

We have a secret, just we three 84 

When all the days are hot and long 64 

When all the giound with snow is white .84 

When cats run home and light is come 86 

When Grandmother Polly had married and gone 132 

When I go to bed at night 4 O 

When people call this beast to mind 17 

When supper time is almost come , ^ 

When the cows come home the milk is coming 58 

When the earth is turned m spring 1x7 

[204] 



When the pale moon hides and the wild wind wails 131 

When they said the time to hide was mine 121 

"Where arc you going, my little kittens ? " 1 54 

Where the bee sucks, there suck I 46 

Whisky, frisky . 122 

"Who are ye with clustered light 140 

Who is so proud 4 

Whose woods these are I think I know 55 

Why does the crocodile weep, Mamma? 164 

Why read a book when there are birds 94 

"Will you walk a little faster?" said a whiting to a snail 159 

Wind is a cat 138 

With their trunks the elephants . J 

With wrinkled hide and great frayed ears 5 




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