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Full text of "Unfired foods and hygienic dietetics for prophylactic (preventative) feeding and therapeutic (remedial) feeding ..."

NFffiED 



AND 



Tropho-Therapy 



DREWS 



UNFIRED FOOD 

AND 

HYGIENIC DIETETICS 



URAL 
IY, 

ITY 



Prophylactic (P***) Feeding 

AN D 

Therapeutic (^^^o Feeding 



(Treats on Food in the Cause, Prevention and Cure of Disease.) 



By QEOROE J. DREWS, 

"ALIMENTATIONIS DOCTOR 



Contains 36O Recipes for 
Health Drinks, Uncooked Soups, 

Fruit, Flower and Vegetable Salads, 

Unbaked Breads and ' 'Brawnfoods,' r 

Unfired Pies and Wedding Cake, 

DIRECTIONS FOR CURING EVERT COMMON DISEASE 

Including Botanical Description and Complete Analyses of 

Every Natural Food, and Advice for Economical 

City and Cottage Gardening. 



PUBLISHED BY GEORGE J. DREWS, A. D. 

35 MARION COURT _. . 

u- Price $2.00 



E 



Copyright, 1909, by 

GEORGE J. DREWS 



Main 1S>' 





LIBRARY of CONGRESS I 
Two Copies Received 
APK 17 



\ ft /\ 



J*f th<m frut 



not 

( cApologits to Shakespeare* ) 



268430 



DEDICATION 



This Book is dedicated 
to the 

MOTHERS 

of a better race, 

to the 

NURSES 

of healthier families, 

to 

Reformers, 

World Promoters, 

Saviors 

and all who would enjoy 
to the fullest extent, 

The Prime Pleasures of Life 

i. e. / Moral and Spiritual growth \ 
f and refinement ) 

V and Social Usefulness / 

realized, only throu 

A SOUND BODY 

with a sane mind 

which must be supported 

with 
Natural Food. 



PREFACE 



The author with an ambition to know in order to disseminate the 
esoteric truths of life, studied theology ; but he could not be creed-bound 
and so he went on studying science and the various other religious cults 
and philosophies until he found a religious philosophy based on the 
absolute sciences. 

The combined studies of chemistry, medicine, dietetics, anatomy, 
physiology and psychology revealed the one great fact that cooked food 
is not man's natural food and that it is the cause of ninety per cent of 
all diseases of the body and mind. He also found by inductive reasoning 
and proof that physical and mental diseases afflict the spirit and that a 
diseased spirit, in turn retards the progress of the soul. Thus hef con- 
nected the prime cause with the ultimate effect. "Cooked food retards 
human evolution by causing physical, mental, moral, ethical and social 
diseases." 

Now he adopted the natural diet but found himself in trouble on all 
sides. He found that he could not relish the natural flavor of many 
wholesome foods with his perverted taste, but by persistent efforts he 
finally found a remedy in combining the proper foods. His research 
into the chemistry of food suggested the possibility of natural remedies. 
The previous studies had also revealed the fact that drugs are only 
palliative in their nature ; that they can not cure any disease nor remove 
the cause; but that they merely change the symptoms by introducing a 
new disturbance. The patient himself must remove the cause and supply 
the proper elements in the form of food with which Nature, only, can do 
the curing and healing. Natural Food Remedies now became the sub- 
ject of his studies, investigations and experiments; for he realized that 
the world needs light on that subject and so he filed his notes to be com- 
piled into book form. The following recipes are the result of the author's 
experiments during the last four years. Many of them are condensed 
into one from five to ten original and different recipes which can be 
judged from their inclusiveness. Every recipe so elaborated was tested 



and retested in all its possible variations and these tests were personally 
eaten by the author and his devoted "nurse" (former cook) to note their 
wholesomeness and their therapeutic and prophylactic values. No time 
or expense was spared in gathering, corroborating and proving the prac- 
tical information given in this book. 

Henry Lindlahr, M. D., D. O., president of The Lindlahr College 
of Nature Cure and Osteopathy, has read and revised the manuscripts 
of Food Therapeutics and Food Prophylactics. 

B. C. Peterson, G. M., O. O. M., president of the Society of the Veri- 
tans, has read and corrected the manuscripts of the Promiscuous 
Subjects. 

Mr. Carl Cropp, botanist and secretary and treasurer of Vaughan's 
Seed Store in Chicago, has read and corrected the manuscripts of Ali- 
mentary Botany. 

Mrs Mada Blasse, M. D. (Homoepath) has kindly corrected the proof 
sheets. 

This book will cause many people to ask for detailed information 
or advice for personal application of natural food for better health or 
the cure of disease. The author will be pleased to answer such questions 
when accompanied by stamps to pay for stationery and mailing. 



Let it be understood 

that this book 
is written for those who 

"EAT TO LIVE" 

and to 

CURE 

those who 

LIVE TO EAT. 



It is useless to study 

ASTRONOMY 

without a foundation 
in rational 

GASTRONOMY 



INTRODUCTION 



Cheer up sisters and brothers and rejoice with me for I 
have found the key that unlocks the door to physical, mental, 
moral and spiritual salvation and I will tell you how to use 
that key if you will but listen. 

Those who are seeking for absolute health, longevity and 
refinement should understand that 

THE BODY, MIND, SPIRIT AND SOUL ARE ABSO 
LUTELY INTERDEPENDENT 

Hence there is no sane mind, no spiritual perfection and no 
salvation of the soul without a healthy body. Therefore the 
attainment of health is the first step toward the salvation 
(evolution) of the soul. A healthy body can only be built and 
maintained with Nature's perfect (unperverted and unfired) 
food, pure water, fresh air, sunshine, exercise, restful sleep 
and a serene mental attitude savored with lofty aspirations. 

It has been the earnest aim of the author to reintroduce a 
natural health-sustaining, disease-resisting, disease-eliminat- 
ing, brazvn and brain-building diet consistent with the present 
state of human evolution, civilization and refinement. A diet 
which shall promote further evolutionary progress on all the 
planes of body, mind, spirit and soul. A diet physiologically 
and financially economical, artistic, inviting and delicious. All 
logical minds will agree with me that this can only be ac- 
complished by feeding on natural food which contains all the 
elements for building a healthy body and which promotes all 
the natural functions of life. 

Here it must be understood that cooked food is not natural 
because its chemical constitution is changed (perverted) by the 

11 



destructive power of the applied high temperature. The sun 
energy (galama) is dissipated. The volatile essences are ex- 
ploded. The tonic elements (organic salts) have been freed, 
mineralized and neutralized. The proteids are coagulated. The 
starches are rendered so soluble that they enter the circulation 
undigested. The atomic arrangement of sugar is rendered in- 
congenial. And the oils are fused. Therefore cooked food 
readily ferments and decays in the alimentary canal; besides, 
its consistency does not give the proper exercise to the organs 
of cominution, digestion and absorption ; and it has a tendency 
to puzzle, confuse and pervert the alimentary functions thus 
laying the foundation for disease. 

Natural unfired food promotes all natural functions of the 
body. With natural foods, only, can be laid the foundation for 
the maintenance of a truly healthful and beautiful body, spirit 
and soul. By means of the natural tonic, detoxicating and 
eliminating elements in unfired food can Nature keep the body 
clean, cure all diseases of body and mind and eradicate immoral 
tendencies. It is unnatural food which interferes with the 
natural metabolism of the system, which hinders and perverts 
natural growth, which retards recuperation and reconstuction, 
which produces anaemia and atonicity, which promotes dis- 
orderly proliferation, which causes abnormal craving and in- 
ebriety and which causes directly or indirectly nearly all the 
physical, mental and moral diseases and pains which ignorant, 
misinformed, deluded, ensnared and perverted humanity is heir 
to. Every attempt to impove on natural foodt by artificial 
means results in an absolute failure it cannot be done. 

Every unnatural thing or action in the realm of nature has 
inherent the cause of its own destruction. Hence for every in- 
fection and malf action nature has an acute reaction (crisis) 
which results in salvation for those who obey her laws ; but in- 
terfere with that acute reaction by means of medicine or 
surgery, and it may disappear only to reappear in a later 
chronic or fatal reaction. "Interference perpetuates both good 
and evil" hence "Resist not evil." 

There is a "Beneficent Design" in tmperverted Nature, but 
also a malefic design in perverted and artificial Nature. 

12 



Materia Panacea 

Natural food, fresh water and live air in connection with 
plenty of sunshine, exercise and rest, is the only reliable "Mate- 
ria Panacea/' 

No matter how civilized or infinitely refined man may be- 
come, Natural Food can always be served invitingly, tempt- 
ingly, beautifully and artistically without changing its whole- 
some chemical constitution. All natural food keeps pace with 
man in the progress of evolution and refinement, both by nat- 
ural and human selection. 

The hydropath, heliopath, aeropath, osteopath and homeo- 
path can guarantee no permanent health, after they have as- 
sisted Nature to effect a cure, unless the patient will persist to 
feed on natural food and obey other hygienic laws. R. T. Trail, 
M. D. says. "Poisoning a person with drugs, because he is im- 
pure, is like casting out devils through Beelzebub, the prince of 
devils." The "Diagnosis from the Iris of Eye" proves that 
drugs are the irritant poisons which produce chronic diseases. 



13 



If 



Natural Health 

Perfect Health, 
Physical and Spiritual Beauty, 

Immunity from Disease, 

Prophylactic (preventive) Feeding 

Therapeutic {remedial} Feeding 

or 

Nature Cure 

does not interest you 
lay this book aside 

and cater 
to your perverted appetite 

with your 
favorite predigested food 

which is 

so tempting, 

so sweet in the mouth, 

so artificially beautiful, 

so easy to gulp, 

so smooth to swallow, 

so stimulating, 

so fashionable- 

but wait 
sooner or later 

Nature will impose her penalty 
which will cost you 

ease, 

valuable time 

and in doctor bills 

many times the price of this book 

if not 
the lease to your physical tenement 

"A Stitch in Time 
Saves Nine." 



Man's Natural Food 

The natural food of all animals is that food which appeals to their in- 
dividual instinctive sense of alimentation and to which their tastebuds and 
digestive organs are adapted. Man's tastes are perverted by unnatural 
food and he pays the penalty submissively. 

Man's natural foods are 

The Fruits, 
The succulent Herbs and Roots, 

The Nuts and 
The Cereals, 

which, in their natural (unfired) form 
appeal to his 

UNPERVERTED SENSE 

OF ALIMENTATION. 

Nature has supplied ample variety for each season to delight the senses 
and prevent monotony. Foods whose chemical constitution is changed by 
roasting, cooking, baking, fermentation, preserving, pickling and refining, 
are not natural and therefore cannot support and maintain health indefi- 
nitely. Every attempt to improve natural food by artificial means results 
in a failure. Animals have been fed on approximate foods, scientifically 
combined, and they died sooner than by starvation. 

" Dainty and Artistic ways of serving Natural 
Food has a Usefulness beyond its Aesthetic Value. " 



15 



The Food 

as prescribed in this book, 
in combination with 

Sunshine 

Fresh Air 
Exercise and 
Restful Sleep 

will promote and maintain 

Physical 

Mental 

,-- , , v Health 

Moral and 

Spiritual 
with which 

Beauty 

is concomitant 

Natural food will build up and restore youthful 

Vitality, Vim, Snap, Celerity, Strength, Endurance, 

Courage, Willpower and Resistance. 



16 



Unfired Food 

can not produce disease 

because it contains no 
Inorganic Sugar 

Glucose 
Soluble Starch 

and 

Partly decomposed Protein 
to saturate the blood 

neither 

Inorganic Salts 
to irritate the nervesr 

nor 
does it readily ferment 

or decay 

in the alimentary canal 
to produce toxic elements. 

Unfired Foods 

properly selected 

scientifically combined 

and 

judiciously administered 
have harmless medicinal properties 

and 

true remedial value 
for curing nearly all diseases 

by supplying 

the proper saline elements 

in the organic form. 

17 



Natural Foods 

do, not only, prevent 

and cure diseases 

but they also, 

often, awaken 

dormant chronic diseases 

(which gnaw at the core of life) 

to an active crisis 
in order to 

defeat them 

and 

expel them 

When this happens the "Nature Cure" is triumphant 
and the patient has nothing to fear but to help it along. 



Unfired 



Herbs and Roots with Nuts 
can not ferment 
in the stomach 

nor 

clog, cake and rot 

in the intestines. 

Their wholesome organic salts 

are absorbed 

and 

their cellulose 
stimulates normal peristalsis" 

( intestinal activity ) 

In the Unfired Diet one requires only about half the 
food material that is required in the cooked diet for the 
same physical exertion. 



Why 



are the cook 

and the drug doctor 

good friends? 

(Esuaceb eht kooc syal eht noitadnuof rof esaesid 

dna nehw esaesid si detrats eht rotcod spaer 

eht tif eneb ot kcauq no tL) 



19 



IGNORANCE AND SENSE 

Don't boast of the disagreeable things you can eat nor dis- 
play your ignorance in boasting of your health, retained in spite 
of eating unnatural foods, for you know not when Nature will 
call you to time. All natural food is relished by the unper- 
verted palate as it comes from the hand of Nature. 

Eat natural food to maintain and increase your physical 
and spiritual health and avoid all food which ensnares the ap- 
petite with artificial flavors and chemically changed consistency. 

Don't rely on the likes and dislikes of your perverted setise 
of taste for selecting wholesome food nor blame the natural 
food when it painfully stirs up the filth in your system in order 
to displace it and eliminate it. 

. DIGESTIVE FLUIDS 

Every natural food with an unchanged natural flavor as it 
comes in contact with the taste buds in the process of comminu- 
tion, stimulates the secretion of a special combination of digest- 
ive fluids which are bet adapted to digest the food tasted. 
Cooking changes the flavor of foods and thus the new flavor be- 
comes misleading to the function of secreting digestive fluids. 



DISCHARGE THE COOK who knows only how to tickle, 
surprise and delight a perverted palate at the expense of health 
and 

HIRE A NURSE who knows how to combine and serve 
natural, health-sustaining foods in a dainty way. 



PARENTS ! if you knew that every drug has an acute effect and also an oppo- 
site chronic effect which produces a drug disease later on; and provided you have 
the future welfare of your children at heart, would you not deem it extremely 
criminal to have them drugged? ? 

Vaccination is the method employed to transmit, perpetuate and preserve the 
pox, syphilis and other infectious germs for future generations. 

20 



Never Allow a Doctor 

or any one else 
to suppress an acute disease 

with drugs 

unless the patient is willing 
to take the consequences 

of worse diseases 

that may follow 

later on 
as a return of the former disease 

in a chronic form 
or as a result of the poisonous drug. 



21 



For the sake of humanity! 

Never Take 

(or advise to take) 
a drug or medicine 
prescribed by an 

Allopathic Doctor 

unless you are willing to 
suffer the awful consequences 

of drug poisoning 
in future months or years. 

It is a proven fact that allopathic drugs either palliate by paralyzing 
the sense of pain or suppress the eliminating and healing activities by the 
introduction of a drug disease which in most cases turns out to be vastly worse 
than the disease suppressed. The poor, ignorant and helpless victims of 
some allopathic doctors are drugged for a half dozen or more (drug) diseases 
following one another until the patients are so full of virulent poisons that 
they are hopeless and then are pronounced incurable. Such allopathic 
doctors ought to be listed among criminals. Secondary and Tertiary Syphilis 
followed by paresis (softening of the brain) is the result of the mercurial 
drugs and salves used by allopathic specialists for men and women. They 
scare the patient with all kinds of dangers and guarantee quick cures, but they 
are not responsible for the effect of their drugs a year or five later. 



22 



A King Can Eat Nothing Better 
and a Beggar Nothing Cheaper 

than 

Natural Food 

for it is the 
Healthiest for the Rich 

and 

Cheapest for the Poor 
and can be served 

in such artistic 

and attractive manner 

as to become the dignity 

of the most refined 

and so simple 

as not to puzzle 

the most lowly 

without detracting 

from its quality 

or deliciousness. 



In what respect does 

cooked food differ 

from a hen? 

(Ssenkcis sehctah eno eht, 
snekcihc sehctah rehto eht dna.) 



From Cause to Effect 

Unnatural Food 

produces 

:,: A Sick Body :,: 

develops 

:,: An Unsound Mind :,: 

makes 

:,: A Foul Character :,: 

results in 

:,: A Ruined Reputation :,: 

involves 

An Unhappy Soul 



24 



PAIN'S SOLILOQUY. 

By C. J. Buell, President Minnesota Health League. 



I. 

I am Pain most people hate me, 
Think me cruel, call me heartless, 
Study ways to bribe and fool me, 
Try by every means to slay me, 

Dope themselves with anaesthetics, 
Fill themselves with patent nostrums, 
Call the doctor with his poisons, 
Seek the Christian Science healer, 

Beat the tom-tom of the savage, 
Build the altar, burn the incense, 
Seek to sate the wrath of devils, 
Pray to saints, and Gods, and angels; 

Not to cure the ills within them, 
Not to cleanse and purify them, 
Just to calm the pain that hurts them, 
Just to kill the guide that warns them. 

II. 

Pain am I, but when you know me, 
When you once have learned my secret, 
How I come to help and bless you, 
Warn you, guide you, teach and lead you, 

When you know my loving nature, 
How at first I gently twinge you, 
Lightly twinge you as a warning, 
Hoping thus, by kind reminder, 
You will hear my voice and listen 

Sure am I that when you know me, 
You will gladly then embrace me, 
Call me friend and give me welcome, 
Call me friend and ask my message. 

III. 

This the message I would bring you, 
This the reason for my visit, 
This the warning I would give you, 
This the secret I would teach you: 



When you learn to live as Nature 
In her great and boundless mercy, 
In her tender, loving kindness, 
In her 'wisdom and her goodness 
Meant that men should live and labor 

When you learn to shun the by-ways 
Leading off to vicious habits, 
When you learn to keep your body 
Strong and clean and pure and active, 

Give it work in right proportion, 
Give it air, and food, and water, 
Fit to build its every member, 
Fit to nourish every function, 

When you teach your mind and spirit 
Pure and noble thoughts to harbor, 
Drive out fear, and hate, and malice, 
Cherish love and kindly motive, 

When you learn these things I've told 

you, 
W hen you know them, when you do 

them, 

Then I will depart and leave you, 
Then no more will Pain be needed. 

IV. 

This is, then, the truth I bring you, 
That I hurt you but to warn you, 
Not to harm you but to heal you, 
That I come to guide and teach you. 

I am God's most blessed angel, 
Sent to point the way to virtue, 
Sent to teach the noblest manhood, 
Sent to fill the mind with wisdom, ' 
Sent to rouse the soul to action. 

V. 

Love me, trust me, heed my message; 
I will bring you peace and bless you ! 



As Published in the Nature Cure Magazine. 



Most people go to greater expense and take more pains to 
make themselves ill than it will ever cost to keep well. 



25 



HUMAN PERVERSITY 

Some people are so perversely civilized, so "would be" 
aristocratic, so imaginarily refined, so "goody-goody" man- 
nered and so ridiculously delicate and dainty-mouthed that they 
dare not, and often cannot, eat natural foods ; that natural foods 
choke them and that, even their ignorantly trained stomach re- 
volts against natural foods. In this perversity, however, they 
are perfectly willing to be a fashionable sarcophag or necrop- 
hag (carrion eater) ; they are proud to be fashionably sick and 
pay a fashionable doctor and they have the wonderful courage 
to swallow the customary, most nauseating drugs irrespective 
of the dangerous after effects the expected cure may lead to. 
Unfortunately there are some good but uninformed people who 
would be true to themselves. These try natural foods with 
such suspicious fear of eating poison that they involuntarily 
arouse a reactionary and sympathetic revolt of the stomach, and 
others feel imaginary effects of poison and then they are sure 
that they cannot eat natural foods. Oh what idiosyncrasies ! 
Where is the will to be reasonably v _ consistent with Nature? 



NATURAL FOOD 

The man that feeds on nuts and grains, 
Crisp herbs and roots, sweet fruit and water, 

Knows little of disease and pains 
And of the many ills that bother, 

His body well, his brain is clear. 

His soul is full of every goodness. 
He lives a life that knows no fear 

Of Nature's' roughs, revenge and rudeness. 

His passions are in harmony 
With spirit, soul and better senses. 

In consequence Morality 
Accuses him of no offenses. 

Tobacco, coffee, meat and beer 
And salt and pepper, wine and whisky, 

Are words that harshly grate his ear; 
He knows their use is low and risky. 

26 



95 Per Cent of 
Indigestion 

is due to 

Fermentable Foods. 
Green Herb and Nut Salads 

or 

Root and Nut Salads, 
as prescribed under salads, 

can not ferment, 

are not delayed in the stomach 

or intestines, 

and therefore they do not produce 
gases or a sour stomach. 

Do not blame the Salads if you combine them with 
other inconsistent food material or cooked or baked 
foods at one setting. 

The unfired cellulose ( fibre ) of herbs and roots aids 
digestion and stimulates peristalsis; whereas cooked 
cellulose retards digestion, aids fermentation and con- 
stipates. 

The harder the fibre of palatable herbs or roots the 
better for the stomach and intestines. 



HUMAN PROGRESS 

Only those can reach the Olympian heights of human excellence 
and human perfection who will get out of the ruts of perverted habits, 
who will cease to be their neighbors' apes who will not be moved by 
the ridicule of the ignorant, who will seek to replace belief, faith and 
lazy credulity by proven knowledge, who will learn the truth from 
every source and demonstrate it; who will take counsel and hints 
from the wise and reason for themselves ; who will always practice the 
best they know and thus live an exalted example to the world, and 
who will teach tne truth to those who are willing to learn for self- 
improvement. The foundation to all reform is a natural, health sus- 
taining diet. 

HUMAN APES 

Many good people who have not yet evoluted far beyond the ape will 
not be able to take advantage of the natural health diet until they can 
ape someone else, until it becomes a fad or until they are forced by dis- 
ease, pain and misery. Don't be prejudiced by your perverted senses 
or by hearsay, but use your reason and find out for yourself. Don't hire 
the minister to think for you but develope your own brains by using 
them. Take a hint from the wise and improve it yourself. 

BE SELF-MADE 
Cultivate the best habits and practice self-mastery. 



Cooked Potatoes 

and 

Baked Bread 

are the 

backsliders 

delusional 

t 

and 
snary 

refuge. 



UNFIRED AND FIRED FOOD COMPARED 

PROTEIDS 



ADVANTAGEOUS FOOD 

Unfired nuts and legumes neu- 
tralize and absorb the acids of the 
stomach and prevent stomach fer- 
mentation. They do not endanger 
the system with proteid poisoning, 
since the gastric juices determine 
the quantity of their protein re- 
quired and to be absorbed. Unfired 
protein has a wholesome chemical 
constitution after it is digested and 
absorbed. 



DISADVANTAGEOUS FOOD 

Cooked and baked legumes and 
nuts have lost their alkaline ac- 
tivity and tend to putrid fermenta- 
tion in the stomach and are sure 
to decay in the intestines and the 
resulting gases are the cause of 
auto-intoxication (self poisoning) 
and constipation. The portion ab- 
sorbed is chemically so abnormal 
that it generally breaks down into 
destructive poisons and uric acid. 



OILS 



The oils in unfired nuts and 
cereals are soluble and emulsifiable 
in the gastric juices. 



.Baking and roasting fuses the 
oils and renders them harder to 
digest and emulsify. Fused oils 
are hard on the liver. 
SUGAR 



Unfired fruit sugar can not be 
improved as it is sundigested and 
ready for immediate absorption. It 
is Nature's harmless stimulant and 
it readily transforms into glycogen 
(a muscle lubricant). Sweet, fresh 
and dried fruits, St. Johns bread, 
sweet-root, su^ar-cane, piths, fresh 
maple- juice and honey are whole- 
some sweets. Honey is the only 
harmless concentrated sugar. 



All cooked szveets are unwhole- 
some because their sugar molecule 
is rendered inorganic. Cane sugar 
and candy irritates the walls of the 
alimentary canal and gives rise to 
a profuse How of mucus and thus 
initiates stomach catarrh. Cooked 
szveets and preserves retard stom- 
ach digestion and help to ferment 
the foods eaten with them. All 
cooked sugar absorbed into the 
circulation becomes a burden to 
the liver before it can be utilized. 
STARCHES 



Unfired starch as it comes from 
the hand of Nature in cereals and 
roots is in the most perfect form 
for food. Ceareals are best eaten 
dry to insure proper ensalivation to 
initiate perfect digestion. With 



Cooked and predigested starch 
is changed into soluble starch and 
glucose. In this unnatural form it 
is too freely absorbed and thus it 
oversaturates the blood. This con- 
dition compels an overdraft on the 



unfired starch the saliva and small oxygen in the blood and then it 



intestines can regulate the quantity 
required to be changed into sugar 
for absorption. The refused por- 
tion of unfired starch does not be- 
come injurious to the system as it 
does not readily ferment or decay. 



burdens the organs of respiration. 
When the stomach and intestines 
refuse to absorb this unnatural 
starch it then ferments and causes 
as much trouble in another way. 
Cooked starch is too much predis- 
posed to ferment and decay. 



29 



CHLOROPHYLL 



ADVANTAGEOUS FOOD 

Uncooked green herbs are most 
valuable for their chloraphyll, 
which is related to the proteids 
and has similar virtues. It is espe- 
cially useful in preventing intes- 
tinal fermentation. 

CELLULOSE 



DISADVANTAGEOUS FOOD 

Cooked chlorophyll has lost its 
chemical virtues and counts only 
as bulk. 



Every natural food has its re- 
quired proportion of cellulose or 
indigestible fibre. Cellulose helps to 
grind and emulsify the food in the 
intestines. By means of the cel- 
lulose the intestines are better able 
to move and transport the food ma- 
terial. It develops the peristaltic 
muscles by giving them resistance 
and also stimulates the peristaltic 
activity. Last but not least, it elimi- 
nates waste poisons from the intes- 
tinal canal by absorbing the pois- 
ons and carrying them along. Herbs 
and roots uncooked contain the 
most useful cellulose and that in 
the outer coating of cereals must 
not be forgotten. 



Cooked cellulose has lost most of 
its intended usefulness. Cooking 
renders the cellulose either too soft, 
slippery, gummy or fused. Such 
cellulose tends to produce constipa- 
tion by binding the fecal matter. 
Cellulose is often so zvell cooked 
that it readily undergoes fermenta- 
tion and decay. Cooked foods gen- 
erally promote the very unfavor- 
able conditions which are prevented 
by unfired foods. 



The organic salts in unfired 
foods are as important as all the 
other food elements combined. 
They constitute tissue bases, oxi- 
dizing agents, acid , binders and 
eliminating agents. They are Na- 
ture's tonic elements. Upon them 
depends the healthy construction 
of every tissue and cell in the 
human body. Salad herbs are the 
richest in organic salts and next in 
order come roots and fruits. 



SALINE MATTER 

Cooking changes the most im- 
portant organic salts into inorganic 
forms. The boiling fluids which 
contain a rich solution of the un- 
organised salts are generally cast 
away. Any artificial heat greater 
than that supplied by the sun tends 
to change and break up the atomic 
arrangement of the organic mole- 
cule and generally frees and neu- 



tralises the most important basic at- 
oms. All unorganised salts become 
irritants in the human body. 

CONCLUSION 



All unfired fruits, herbs, roots, 
nuts and cereals that appeal to 
man's unperverted senses of ali- 
mentation are natural and whole- 
some foods. 



All foods that are cooked, baked, 
roasted, pickled and spiced are, cer- 
tainly, not natural and ahvays tend 
to be unwholesome. 



30 



HOW TO BEGIN THE UNFIRED DIET 

Through hundreds of years of an unnatural (cooked) diet man's 
sense of alimentation has become so perverted that this sense is no 
longer a reliable guide in selecting natural health sustaining food. The 
same diet has also perverted the sense of taste and the use of condi- 
ments has so blinded the tastebuds that the delicate flavors of natural 
foods are unrelishable, insipid and repulsive. The young child is still 
closer to nature. The author has seen many children who horrified their 
parents by eating uncooked potatoes like apples and several of them 
were whipped and spanked for this natural inclination. 

In the attempt to "return to nature" it is best to begin with such 
foods as are not commonly cooked. The beginner may select from 
the fresh and dried fruits, the nuts the sweet salad herbs and tender 
roots and flaked or ground cereals. Many of these natural foods may 
be so combined that when they are chewed together their flavors blend 
in the saliva into a new and surprisingly delicious taste. The fol- 
lowing combinations are a few favorite examples : 

Chopped pecans and seedless rasins mixed into flaked wheat. 

Chopped cabbage and chopped peanuts dressed with honey. 

Thin pineapple slices sandwiched between lettuce. 

Oatmeal combined with chopped peanuts and chipped dates. 

Lettuce and grated cocoanut. 

Oatmeal, seedless rasins and grated cocoanut. 

Chipped apples, sliced bananas and walnut meats mixed. 

Two or three peanuts chewed together with each bite of radishes. 

Chopped celery mixed with pignolias or grated cocoanut. 

Grated sweet potatoes, chopped cabbage and chopped almonds 
dressed with honey. 

Sliced tomatoes and pecan halves dressed with honey. 

Scotch oatmeal mixed with flaked pignolias and chipped figs. 

For proportional combinations see the regular recipes. 

COMMON OR INFORMAL HEALTH DINNERS 

An- every day unceremonious dinner served at home or at a 
restaurant should consist of three or four courses only. 

THE FIRST COURSE. 

An uncooked soup, 
A health drink, or 
A ten or twelve ounce section of a cantaloupe or watermelon. 

THE SECOND COURSE. 

A fruit salad, 

An herbal salad, or 

A salad pie. 

THE THIRD COURSE. 
A brown food. 

Two ounces of unfired wafers, with nut butter. 
Three ounces of unbaked bread or cake. 

31 



THE FOURTH COURSE. 

A small dessert of 
Fruit, 3 or 4 ounces, 
Fruit sauce whip or mousse, or 
One ounce of cereal confection or carobs. 
These courses may be spread at once or served in succession. 

A BANQUET MENU 

Served in 8 Courses. 

COURSE ONE 

Serve only one of the following dishes : 

An apple cut into eight sections and arranged to represent a lotus. 
An orange with the peeling turned down to represent a flower. 
A banana stuffed with a few nuts and peeling replaced. 

COURSE TWO. 

Serve about one ounce of one of the following foods for nibblers: 
Pecan meats, carobs, chufas, dried olives (one-half ounce). 

COURSE THREE. 

Serve one of the following health drinks : 

A lemonade. Orangeade. Fruit frappee. Tamarade. Rhubarbade. 
Fresh cider. Fresh grape juice. Near-milk. 

COURSE FOUR. 

Serve according to the convenience of the season : 
A fruit salad, an herbal salad, a salad pie or a flower salad. 

COURSE FIVE. 

Serve a small dish of cereal foods as neatly as you can prepare them : 
Brownfood. Honey flakes. Evaporated fruit flakes. Pound cake. 
Fruit bread. 

COURSE SIX. 
This course is optional. 

Lentil surprise salad (small dish). One ounce of either lemon, 
cottage cheese, horseradish, cheese, cranberry savory cheese or cereal 
confections. 

COURSE SEVEN. 

Serve a small dish of the following preparations for dessert : 
Banana mousse. Berry sauce. Apple sauce. Plain dessert. 

COURSE FINALE. 

Serve the fmgerbowl. 

When so many courses are served each individual dish must be 
comparatively small. A menu of six courses is long enough for most 
festive occasions. 

82 




W. V. Abbott, Photographer. 
A DINNER, 

Consisting of a Soup, a Salad, a Brawnfocd, Nibblers and Fruit. 

THE RECIPES 

This book will prove its real value to the nurse and the 
student in the novel and self explaining presentation of every 
recipe. The plan of arranging the ingredients of the recipes 
in a left marginal, boldfaced column will save the nurse the 
time wasted in reading the recipe five or ten times, will save 
her the trouble and energy wasted in learning the recipe or in 
underscoring the ingredients. These recipes need, only, to be 
read once and thereafter a glance at the boldfaced column tells 
the whole story. There is an other advantage to be gained 
from the column of weights ; and that is it will guide the nurse 
to prepare only the quantity of material required and it also 
gives the student an idea of the quantity a dish should contain. 
It will save a wasting of materials both in the school and at 
home. All guessing is done away with in the exactness of 
weights and therefore the nurse must be provided with an 
ounce platform scale. There are many recipes that allow a 
lage latitude for variation and substitution, but here it must be 
understood that the first ingredient in a line following the 
weight is to be preferred the first time if it is on hand. 

33 



The nurse need not, necessarily, always use the scales for in 
a short time she will become so expert that she can tell the 
weight of any food material at sight. The recipes are classified 
in the order in which they should be served in a course dinner. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

It is not always necessary to weigh the ingredients for a 
recipe when the weight of a measure is known. A standard 
cup holds one-half pint or eight ounces liquid material. To be 
accurate, dry materials should be leveled off. Meals should 
not be pressed tight. The standard cup holds six ounces whole 
wheat, rye, hulless barley and peas; five ounces peanuts, corn, 
hulled oats, cornmeal and raisins; four ounces wheat, rye and 
barley meal and three and one-half ounces flaked peanuts. 

An even spoonful is understood, unless "heaping" is speci- 
fied. A tablespoon of liquid material is a half ounce, and of 
cereal meal is one-fourth ounce. A heaping spoonful of cereal 
meal or of flaked peanuts is a half ounce. Three teaspoons 
make one tablespoon. All the honey that adheres to a teaspoon 
is a half ounce. A medium closed handful of peanuts is about 
an ounce. 



COMMERCIAL SNARES 

Are you ignorant enough to be the victim of commercial snares? Did you ever 
think of the commercial value of this suggestion, printed on a blotting paper: 
( Yours for a Clear Head I ? But this means if your head is clear take bromo-zeltzer 
( Bromo Zeltzer > and burden your brain; for bromo-zeltzer shows its 
irritating effect in the region of the brain in the iris of the eye. Everybody has read 
{ Malt-Marrow ) "Endorsed by Uncle Sam," "In Accordance With the Pure Food 
) Malt-Sinew \ Law" and "Guaranteed Under the Food and Drug Act." These 
are a few of the innumerable commercial truthless suggestions which catch the 
ignorant, the credulous and those who pay the doctor to think for them. 

34 



HEALTH DRINKS 

The best and most natural health drink is pure crystalline water. 
Sometimes, however, it happens that the water may be contaminated 
with miasma and here is where lemon juice and other fruit juices and 
also rhubarb juice are of great value, as they are nature's sterilizers. 
The cocoanut milk is also a powerful sterilizer aside from its nutri- 
tiousness. Fruit juices are furthermore, useful in water for their 
relished flavors and for their harmless stimulant sugars. Drinks 
flavored or mixed with fresh herbal juices are called Saline Drinks. 
These drinks are of inestimable value to the sick and convalescent. 
They do not burden the stomach and yet furnish those purifying and 
tonic salts. When drinks contain some wholesome food element in 
dilute form they are called food drinks. These are often very useful. 
No one should indulge in drinks right after a meal for they, then, dilute 
the gastric juices and disturb stomach digestion. Drinks at the 
temperature of the body and even a little warmer will prove to be 
most cooling in the end. 

The best time to drink is three hours after a meal up to half an 
hour before the .next meal. There is an advantage in drinking thirty 
minutes before a meal, i. e., the liquid then entering the stomach be- 
comes saturated with the gastric juices and then becomes an aid in 
the digestion of the following meal. Do not indulge in the drinks 
served at the soda fountain, for those drinks often, yes, too often, con- 
tain inorganic poisons for stimulation. Above all, beware of those 
drinks that are said to be refreshing. Yes, only refreshing. Ice cold 
drinks inflame the stomach and thereby cause an unnatural, unquench- 
able thirst. Why tea, coffee, chocolate, beer and fresh milk are not 
wholesome drinks is explained under "Promiscuous Subjects. " The 
following recipes are intended to be served in an 8 oz. cu,p or glass. 

FRUIT FRAPPEE 

With a table fork and in a shallow dish, macerate 

and beat to a creamy consistency 
2 oz. Banana, Strawberries, large Plums or other soft fruit. 

Then put the beaten pulp into a cup, add 
5 oz. Water and beat with a rotary beater until even. When 

the fruit is tart add 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. Larger quantities of 

fruit pulp may be made liquid by beating the pulp 

with the rotary beater after the fruit is macerated. 

35 



36 UNFIRFD FOOD 

LEMONADE 

Put into a glass 

% oz. Lemon Juice (2 spoonful), 
Yz oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and fill up with 
Cold Water. Stir it well and serve. 

ORANGEADE 

Put into a glass 
2 oz. Orange juice ( l / cup), 
l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and fill it up with 
Cold water. Stir it well and serve. 



TAMARADE 

Soak 

1 oz. Tamarinds in 

2 oz. Water until they are soft and then beat the soft pulp 

until it is all liquid. Take out the hard parts and 
add 

oz. Water and 

oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Beat it well and serve. 

This is a wholesome and tonic beverage. It re- 
sembles fresh grape juice and may be used in its 
place all the year round. It is an advisable sub- 
stitute for coffee and tea. It is recommended in 
bacterial diseases. 



HERBADE 

Soak in a cup of Water, for one or two hours 
Y\ oz. Spearmint, mint, Fennel, Florence, Thyme or Savory 
leaves. Use less if the dried herbs are fresh and 
strong. Strain the infusion and stir into it. 
Y* oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. 

Herbade promotes elimination through the kid- 
neys. Cooked tea burdens the kidneys. 



HEALTH DRINKS 37 

RHUBARBADE 
3 oz. Rhubarb juice, extracted by grating the fresh stems, 

cut in two inch lengths. 

2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful), beat into the juice, and add 
oz. Cold Water (or warm if desired). 



NUT TEA 

Place into a cup 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked as fine as possible and fill 

the cup nearly full with 

Tepid Water (not boiling hot) and stir well.. At your 
option add 

2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or 

4 oz. Lemon Juice (teaspoonful) or both. This is a delici- 
ous and nutritious substitute for tea and coffee. 

TONIC DRINK 

Mix 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice (4 spoonful), 
i oz. Beet juice, extracted from grated beets or Swiss chard 

leafstalks, 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 

oz. Water, cold or warm, and serve. 

For convalescents with a weak stomach I know no 
better remedy. 

NUT EMULSION 

Mix and rub into a butter 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked very fine and 
l / 2 oz. Water. Mix into this butter, little by little 
6 oz. Water, beat it briskly with a rotary eggbeater and pour 
it through a large tea strainer. Stir it when it 
clogs the strainer. Add to this emulsion, at your 
option, 

l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve in a glass with a tea- 
spoon or rye straw. 



38 UNFIRED FOOD 

CELERY DRINK 
i oz. Fresh Green Celery leaves and stems chopped fine. 

Put this in a mortar or cup, add 

}/2 oz. Water and mash the juice out with a pestle, then add 
6 oz. Water and let it stand half an hour or over night. Just 

before serving add 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). 

SUGARCANE DRINK 

Soak 

1 oz. Flax seed in 

% cup Water one hour and stir every ten minutes. Mean- 
while run shelled sugarcane piths through an 
Enterprise Juicer. Strain the clear flaxwater into 
a glass and add 

2 oz. Sugarcane juice (4 spoonful). If the glass is not full 

add water, stir and serve. 

This is a delicious, refreshing and tonic drink, es- 
pecially to be recommended to convalescents who 
need the available organic mineral elements it con- 
tains to rejuvenate their wornout system. 

IMITATION BUTTERMILK 

Put into a cup 

y 2 oz. Flaxseed and add 

6 oz. Water. Beat it briskly with a rotary eggbeater every 
ten minutes during one hour. Meanwhile mix and 
rub together 

3/4 oz. Lemon juice (3 teaspoonfuls) and 
i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked very fine or twice. Let 
this stand 15 minutes or so; then add to it the 
above flaxseed fluid and beat it very briskly with 
the rotary beater. Now pour it through a large 
tea strainer, stir to prevent clogging, and serve 
in a glass with a teaspoon or rye straw. This is 
cooling in summer and refreshing in winter. 



HEALTH DRINKS 39 

NEAR BUTTERMILK 

Soak in a cup % full of water 

i oz. Flax seed and beat it about every ten minutes during 
the course of one hour with a rotary eggbeater. 
Before beating the last time fill the cup nearly full 
with water and then let the seed settle. Mean- 
while mix and rub into a cream 

1 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked exceedingly fine and 

2 oz. Rhubarb Juice. Put this cream into a cup and add 
oz. Rhubarb Juice and beat it briskly with a rotary beater 

and then add 

oz. Flaxseed fluid and beat it again briskly. Now pour 
it through a large tea strainer, stirring the while, 
to keep it from clogging. Serve in a glass with 
a teaspoon or rye straw. At your option you may 
add a half ounce honey (teaspoonful). 

NEAR MILK 

Near-milk is prepared like near-buttermilk, with the excep- 
tion that in place of the rhubarb juice only pure water or 
orange juice is used. This milk is wholesome, delicious, appe- 
tizing, cooling and refreshing. All the infectious diseases, such 
as consumption, lumpjaw and several fevers which may be 
transmitted to man in cows milk are barred out of near-milk. 

LEMONIZED MILK 

Into a cup containing 
6 oz. Sweet milk pour 

y 4 oz. Lemon juice (of half a lemon) and quickly beat it 
briskly with a rotary eggbeater for two minutes 
to prevent it from curdling in lumps. This milk 
is acid sterilized. It is more wholesome for 
weaned children and adult convalescents than 
warm or sweet milk. Milk is not advised in the 
natural diet, but if it must be used let it be "lemon- 
ized" milk. 



40 UNFIRED FOOD 

INVALIDS TONIC BEER 

Mix together 
3 oz. Powdered Sweetroot and 

i oz. Powdered Hop flowers. Take a loose heaping tea- 
spoonful of the mixture to a cup of water stir- 
let it stand fifteen minutes or less stir again 
strain and serve. This unbrewed beer contains 
the full value of organic salts and organic sugar 
and so can in no wise be compared with the 
brewed and fermented or commercial beer. 
}/2 oz. Powdered Sassafras bark may be added to the above to 
impart the flavor of root beer. 



SUMMER SO'UPS 41 



SOUPS 

The words soup and supper are an evolution from the words sip 
and sup, all of which imply the taking of liquid food in small portions 
at a time. Since a soup generally contains some solid food in minced 
form, the word soup indirectly means, a liquid food to be eaten and 
chewed. The spoon was invented for this kind of food. In some parts 
of this country and Europe it is customary to eat soup at the last or 
evening meal. The soups prescribed below are in accord with the laws 
of evolution, the habits of civilization and especially with natural 
hygienics. Every liquid food, water included, which is to be a part of 
a course dinner should always be carefully ensalivated and tasted with 
attention. Since the flow of the various gastric juices depends upon 
the flavors perceived and tasted by the tastebuds it is absolutely neces- 
sary that the ingredients of the soup should be consistent with all the 
dishes of the menu. If the menu predominates in tree fruits, let the 
soup be flavored with tree fruits ; but if the menu predominates in 
herbs and roots, then let the soup be, likewise, flavored with herbal 
fruits, herbs and roots or let it be made up entirely of the juices of 
herbal fruits. Always serve the soup as the first course of a dinner 
for hygienic reasons. It is also best to serve the driest dish last to 
prevent overeating. A soup should generally consist of eight ounces or 
a cupful of liquid food. 

PINEAPPLE SOUP 

Beat together 

3 oz. Pineapple grated (i. e. pulp and juice), and 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Let it stand 15 min. and 
add 

4 oz. Tomato minced or Cucumber grated and 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). Beat 
well and serve. 

MINCED TOMATO SOUP 

Beat well together 
6 l / 2 oz. Tomatoes, peeled with a very sharp knife and chipped 

into small bits, 

l /2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced very fine and 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) or both 
as preferred and serve. 



UNFIRED FOOD 




MACERATING TOMATO FOR SOUP. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP 

Mix and beat together 

6 oz. Tomato, peeled with a sharp knife, chipped and macer- 
ated with a fork, 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked, 
% oz. Parsley, Celery, Chives or other savory herbs minced 

and 
}/ 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) and serve 




GRATING A CUCUMBER FOR SOUP. 

CUCUMBER SOUP 

Use 

oz. Cucumber juice and pulp, and prepare like "Rhubarb 
Soup." Peel and grate a 7 in. green or ripe cucum- 
ber and strain out only the seed, if large and hard, 
and ungrated chunks. The grated pulp adds to the 
body of the soup and its healthfulness. 



SUMMER SOUPS 



43 




EXTRACTING RHUBARB-JUICE BY GRATING THE STALKS. 

RHUBARB SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 

y* oz. Rhubarb Juice, extracted by grating the fresh stalks 
cut in 2 in. lengths, 

V 2 oz. Rolled Wheat or Oatmeal and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked very tine. Mix these and 
let it stand 15 min. or longer and just before serv- 
ing add 

: /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful or i oz. Olive Oil (2 spoonfuls). 
Beat with an aluminum spoon and serve with an 
aluminum teaspoon. Other spoons form poisonous 
oxids 



PANACEA SOUP 

Rub together 

2 oz. Rhubarb or Pineapple juice and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked, then add 

2 oz. Cucumber peeled and grated, 

2 oz. Tomato peeled and macerated with a fork, 
J/2 oz. Assorted Savory Herbs minced and 
l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). 
well and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. 



Beat 



44 UNFIRED FOOD 

OATMEAL FRUIT SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 

6 l /2 oz. Grape juice extracted by pressing ripe grapes through 
a juicer, 

1 oz. Oatmeal or Rolled Wheat and 

l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Beat these together and let it 
soak five minutes or more before serving. Use an 
aluminum teaspoon. This soup is very delicious 
and self digesting. 

COCOANUT MILK SOUP 

Mix and beat together 
3 oz. Cocoanut milk, 

2 oz. Green Corn grated off the cob, Radishes or Kohl-rabi 

grated, 

2 l / 2 oz. Rhubarb or Cucumber juice and 
l /2 oz. Chives or Parsley minced and serve with an aluminum 

teaspoon. If it must be improved add 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). 

FLOWER SOUP 

Mix and beat together 
5 */2 oz. Young Cucumbers peeled and grated, Tomatoes peeled 

and macerated or Rhubarb juice, 
i oz. Nasturtium Flowers Hyacinth, Bean Flowers or 

Dandelion Flowers minced, 
l /\ oz. Parsley minced, 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and at option 
]/2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) and 
serve. 

SAVORY SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 
7 oz. Tomato juice and pulp, 
y 2 oz. Parsley or other savory herbs minced and 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Beat the oil well into the stock 
and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. 



SUMMER SOUPS 45 

CREAM OF SORREL SOUP 

(Broad leaved) 
Mix and beat together 

2 oz. Sorrell leaves cut into shreds and minced, 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked, 

oz. Parsley or other savory herbs minced, 

oz. Tomatoes, peeled, chipped and macerated with a fork 

or Cucumber grated and 

l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) and serve with an aluminum tea- 
spoon. 

CREAM OF SWEET CORN SOUP 

Take 

2 oz. Young Sweet Corn pulp grated off the cob, 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked, 
5 oz. Cucumber or Tomato juice and 

54 oz. Parsley, Celery or other savory herbs minced. Beat 
these together and let it stand half an hour or so 
before serving. At option 
i/ 



'2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) may be added. 



CREAM OF CELERIAC SOUP 

Take 
5 oz. Rhubarb juice, Cucumber juice or Tomato juice and 

pulp and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked very fine. Beat these to- 
gether and add 
T 4 oz. Thyme, Majoram, or Parsley, or all mixed, minced as 

fine as possible, 

i oz. Celeriac, Carrot, Parsnip, Beet or Turnip grated and 
l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Serve 
with an aluminum teaspoon. 

CREAM OF PEA SOUP 

Prepare like "Cream of Celeriac Soup" and in place of 
Celeriac use 

i oz. Tender Green Peas or Lima Beans flaked like the nuts, 
but not quite as fine. 



46 UNFIRED FOOD 

SAVORY CREAM SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 
oz. Rhubarb, or Cucumber juice, 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 
y 2 oz. Savory herbs minced such as Chives, Taragon, Pars- 
ley, Celery, Thyme, Majoram, Onion tops and 
Leek. Beat and let the flavor diffuse and just be- 
fore serving add 

l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) or both 
as preferred. 

BROWN OATMEAL SOUP 

Soak for one hour or more 
2 oz. Oatmeal or Rolled Wheat in 
i oz. Blood Beet Juice and prepare like Rhubarb Soup. 

Grate a 3 oz. beet and strain the juice through a 

colander. 

CRANBERRY AND BEET OR PUMPKIN SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 

i oz. Cranberries chopped very fine and mashed with a 
wooden potato masher to free all the juice, 

i oz. Blood Beet, Pumpkin, Squash or Vegetable Marrow 
grated and 

i oz. Peanuts flaked or y> oz. Rolled Wheat. Rub these to- 
gether and let it blend, then add 

5 oz. Cucumber grated, Tomato macerated or in Winter 
Tepid Water and 

<2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Beat 
well and serve. 

BANANA SOUP 

To 
4 oz. Rhubarb juice add 

y 2 oz. Banana macerated to liquidity, 

i oz. Peanuts flaked and if desired 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Stir to mix and serve. 



SUMMER SOUPS 47 

STRAWBERRY SOUP 

To 

5 oz. Cucumber grated add 
2 oz. Strawberries macerated and 

1 oz. Peanuts flaked. Mix and serve. 

COCOANUT MILK SOUP, No. 2 

To 

4 oz. Cucumber grated add 
2 oz. Banana macerated and 

2 oz. Cocoanut milk. Stir to mix and serve. 



48 UNFIRED FOOD 



WINTER SOUPS 

All the soups in which tepid water is used are intended for winter 
or whenever rhubarb, cucumbers or tomatoes can not be had. It is 
always best to let the water come to a boil and then allowed to cool 
until it is below scalding temperature before it should be used. In 
order that the soup may not cool off too much in winter the soup 
bowl (consisting of heavy china), should be dipped into boiling water 
before the soup is filled into it. Heavy china holds the temperature 
better than thin porcelain. 

HASTY SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 
Y* oz. Chipped Onion, minced Parsley, grated Celeriac or 

Parsley root, chopped Cabbage or *4 z - grated 

Horse Radish, 
% oz. Grated Carrot, Sweet Potato, Turnip or Parsnip and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. When all is ready fill the 

bowl with 

Tepid Water, stir and serve immediately. A heaping 
teaspoonful is about a half ounce. 

CRANBERRY SOUP 

Take 

2 oz. Cranberries, chop them fine in a chopping bowl, press 

all the juice out with a wooden potato masher and 
add 

i oz. Peanuts flaked or ^ oz. Oatmeal and 
YZ oz. Parsley-root grated. Rub all these together and let it 

stand 30 minutes. Then mix into it 
4 oz. Tepid Water and 

Y* oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful), beat well 
and serve. 



WINTER SOUPS 49 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP 

Mix and mash together with a wooden potato masher 
i oz. Pecans or Peanuts flaked, 
1 1/2 oz. Celery stalks or Cabbage chopped fine and 

Teaspoon Caraway seed ground and let it soak a 

while. Put this into a bowl and mix into it 
5 oz. Tepid Water (not scalding hot) and, if desired, 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) and 
serve. 

ROOT SOUPS 
Beat together 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked 
1 1 /2 oz. Celeriac, Parsley root, Parsnip, Turnip, Sweet Potato, 

Carrot or Beet grated. 

l / 2 Teaspoon Caraway seed ground, Dried Savory-herb 
leaves powdered or a pinch of Cinnamon powdered, 
5 oz. Tepid Water, not scalding, and 

l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) as pre- 
ferred and serve in a bowl heated in boiling water. 

COCOANUT MILK SOUP 

Take 

i oz. Dried Currants, chop and soak them 4 to 6 hours in 
3/^ oz. Tepid Water. Then add 
l /2 oz. Rolled Wheat or Oatmeal and 

3 oz. Cocoanut milk (1-3 cup). Warm till tepid but no 
hotter and serve in a bowl heated in boiling water. 
Masticate well. 
One cocoanut has from 5 to 7 oz. milk. 

LOCUST CREAM SOUP 

Mix and. beat together 
i oz. Locust Bread grated, 
i oz. Pignolias flaked and 
6 oz. Tepid Water and serve in a warm bowl. The locust 

bread will be softer if soaked an hour in i oz. 

water, yet every soup should contain something to 

employ the teeth. 



So UNFIRED FOOD 

BANANA CREAM SOUP 

Rub together 
y 2 oz. Lemon juice and 
i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Let it blend a while 

and beat into it 

i l /2 oz. Bananas macerated or Apple grated and 
l /2 Teaspoon Annis seed ground (optional). Then add 

5 oz. Tepid Water and as preferred 

l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Serve 
in a boullion cup heated in boiling water. 

APPLE CREAM SOUP 
\y 2 oz. Tart Apple grated 

i oz. Pignolias flaked, beaten to a cream, and 
l /2 Teaspoon Fennel seed (optional). Let it blend a 

while and add 

oz. Tepid Water, not scalding. Beat and serve in a bowl 
heated in boiling water, 

OATMEAL SOUP 

Rub together 
oz. Lemon juice and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Let it blend a while and 

add 

2 oz. Oatmeal, Rolled Wheat or Rye, 
oz. Tepid Water, not scalding, and 

oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Beat 
well and serve in a bowl heated in boiling water. 

CREAM OF FIG SOUP 

Take 

1 oz. Dried Figs, mince and soak them 4 to 6 hours in 

2 oz. Tepid Water. Then add to this 
i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked 

^ Teaspoon Fennel or Anise seed ground (optional) and 
4 oz. Tepid Water, not scalding. Beat and serve in a bowl 
heated in boiling water. 

TART CREAM OF PRUNE SOUP 

Is made like Cream of Fig Soup 



\V1NTKR SOUPS 51 

CREAM OF PUMPKIN SOUP 

For this soup take 

i l /2 oz. Cranberry butter or Lemon cheese (see under But- 
ter), 

*4 Teaspoon Caraway seed ground. 
i l / 2 oz. Pumpkin or Squash grated and 

5 oz. Water, boiled, but used below the scalding tem- 
perature. Beat it even and serve in a bowl or 
boullion cup heated in boiling water. 

l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) may be 
added as preferred. 



INVALID S CLABBER SOUP 

Put into a soup bowl 

i oz. Chopped Spinach, lettuce, celery or cabbage and 
i oz. Grated Carrot, parsnip, turnip, beet or potato and add 
6 oz. Churned Thick Milk or buttermilk stir well and serve. 
This food, well masticated, will quickly restore an emaciated 
or starved bod'y since it contains the most acceptable form of 
concentrated protein, for adults, combined with the required 
organic binding-salts of the vegetables. This dish should be 
eaten only once a day to prevent too rapid increase of weight. 
It must be avoided during a healing crisis and during any 
eliminative operation of the system. It should be only used 
after the system has conquered disease or after a successful 
fast. Forget it when the required results are obtained. 



UNFIRED FOOD 



PREPARATION OF SALAD HERBS AND ROOTS 

For the sake of the young student of dietetics it is necessary 
to say a few words as to cleaning and preparing herbs and 
roots for the table. All roots which have no perceptible or 
objectionable skin like the carrot and parsnip need, only, to be 
scrubbed, with a brush, rinsed and dried for table use. Such 
roots as have a smooth and tender skin like the young radish 
should be washed and dried. Young sweet potatoes and arti- 
chokes need only a scrubbing and rinsing but old ones may be 
scraped. The Irish potato is best peeled because (next to the 
skin is a repulsive volatile element which may irritate the 
olfactory nerves, of some people, so as to produce a headache. 

Turnips and kohl-rabies which have a hard fibrous rind 
must be peeled. The inner protected leaves of a cabbage head 
need no rinsing. Nasturtium leaves are generally so clean that 




CHOPPING HERBS. 




MINCING HERBS. 



SALADS 



53 



they can not be washed cleaner. Young linden leaves and 
sassafras leaves are clean unless they are picked from very low 
bushes. Lettuce and all other salad herbs which are exposed 
to sand and dust must be rinsed in several waters to make sure 
that there is no sand left on them. The tender stems of young 
lettuce should not be discarded but since the pockets at the base 
of the leaves are generally washed in with sand they should 
always be picked apart. 





CHOPPING (WHITTLING) SWISS CHARD STALKS. 
ROCKING THE DOUBLE CHOPPING-KNIFE. 

There is nothing more disagreeable in a salad than to be 
so unfortunate as to bite on a grain of sand; therefore the 
nurse should take extra precaution to prevent its presence. 





DRYING HERBS AFTER WASHING. 



Salad herbs which are intended to be chopped and combined 
with nuts and dressings must contain no water left on them 
from rinsing. Such water makes the salad taste insipid and 



54 UNFIRED FOOD 

sloppy. The best way to dry salad herbs is as follows : Lay 
the wet herbs, leaf by leaf, on a towel, kept for this purpose, 
and roll it up from one end and then wring it gently to let 
the towel absorb the water. Very young cucumbers need only 
be washed but those which are longer than three or four inches 
should be peeled very thinly. 

Tomatoes for salad need not be peeled but those for soups 
should be peeled just as thinly as possible with an extra sharp 
knife in order that the pulp can be better macerated. This is 
enough for general directions. The special directions are given 
in each recipe. 



COMBINATION SALADS AND THEIR VALUE 

Everybody knows that the highly evoluted and civilized ear 
is more pleased with a harmonious combination of sounds than 
with a simple sound. A display of harmonious colors is pleas- 
ing and restful to the cultivated eye. In like manner the taste 
bud and olfactory nerves respond with greater satisfaction to 
a harmonious combination of flavors. The most important rea- 




A GARNISHED SALAD. 

son for combining consistent food materials is to give the sys- 
tem a larger scope of needed food and tonic elements. Foods 
that are extremely concentrated and those that are very dilute 
are combined to strike a happy and wholesome medium. 



SALADS 55 

Tender, succulent and crisp materials are best left coarse 
to give the teeth a chance to usefulness. Hard and tough ma- 
terial is best reduced to a corresponding fineness by grating 
to save unnecessary waste of time and energy. These ex- 
tremes are then combined to produce a medium condition. A 
combination of chopped cabbage, chipped onion, grated sweet 
potato and flaked nuts is an example. A good combination will 
give a healthy exercise to every function of the alimentary 
canal The following recipes are so computed that they in- 
dicate the weight of the proper quantity for one dish of the 
respective materials. The nurse must therefore, multiply the 
weights by the number of dishes to be served. 

Substitution of Savories 

In the following recipes none but wholesome and beneficial 
savory herbs are used as flavoring admixtures. The following 
herbs are most commonly known and used. Green celery 
leaves, parsley, dill, leek, onion tops, onions, chives, mint, sum- 
mer savory, thyme, basil, majoram, rosmary and sage. Should 
it happen that any one of these, prescribed in the selected recipe, 
should be wanting or out of season the nurse may use her 
judgment in selecting a substitute. Should it be known that 
the flavor of certain herbs are disliked the nurse may substitute 
them with such as are relished. The nurse who understands 
the principle of natural nutrition can make many changes and 
improvements to suit the tastes of those who are to dine. 

Substitution of Vegetables, Fruits and Nuts 

Wherever in the following recipes substitution is indicated 
by naming two or more vegetables, two or more fruits or two 
or more kinds of nuts following the weight of that portion of 
the recipe, it is intended that the nurse should take the indi- 
cated weight either of the second or third named ingredient 
when the first is not on hand or is not desired. Thus the in- 
tended dish can be varied without changing the quantity or 



56 UNFIRED FOOD 

weight of material. Substitution is always indicated by the 
word "or." When the word "and" is used to connect two or 
more ingredients, it is intended that the nurse should select 
her favorite two or more (not necessarily all) of the named in- 
gredients but that the total weight of all she selects should 
be no more than what is indicated in the column of weights. 
The ingenious nurse should bear in mind that many of the fol- 
lowing recipes may be used as practical models for new com- 
binations. 

Substitution of Oil Dressings 

Whenever olive oil is not on hand or is too expensive then 
the nurse may substitute cotton-seed oil, sunflower-seed oil, 
peanut oil or cocoanut oil. Oils which have been sterilized or 
subjected to high temperatures in the process of separation are 
hygienically inferior to those which have been extracted by a 
cold process. 

Optional Ingredients 

It is left to the good judgment of the nurse to either omit 
or use optional ingredients. They are often required to make 
the dish palatable to those whose tastes are not yet normal. 

APRIL SALAD 

l / 2 oz. Asparagus tips sliced crosswise as thin as a knife blade, 
y 2 oz. Dock leaves or Dandelion cut into fine shreds or 

chopped, 

y 2 oz. Artichokes or Parsnips cubed or chopped and 
i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias, Walnuts or other - nuts chopped. 

Toss these together and mix into it 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 

APRIL SALAD 

y 2 oz. Artichokes, cubed or chopped, 
l / 2 oz. Asparagus, sliced very fine, 
l / 2 oz. Dandelion chopped and 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked or Cocoanut grated. Mix 
these well into one another and serve. 



APRIL SALADS 57 

DOCK SALAD 

iJ/2 oz. Dock leaves and tender stems cut into shreds and 

chopped quite fine, 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or other Nuts chopped, and 
] /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) or both. 
Mix all well together and serve. Dock is avail- 
able April 1 5th to June iSth. If raised in a 
garden and not allowed to run to seed it will grow 
tender leaves all Summer and Fall. 
This is a blood tonic being rich in organic iron 
and other organic salts. 

DOCK SALAD 
i oz. Dock leaves and tender stems cut into shreds, then chop 

quite fine, add 
i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias flaked or Cocoanut grated, mix and 

serve. 

ASPARAGUS SALAD 

i oz. Tender Asparagus tips sliced as fine as possible, 
l /2 oz. Chives, Onion tips or Oxalis leaves and leaf stems 

chopped and 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias, Walnuts, Almonds or other nut- 
meats chopped. Mix into these 

}/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) and 
serve 

DANDELION SALAD 
i l / 2 oz. Dandelion leaves (and hearts) cut into shreds and 

chopped crosswise. Mix this with 

i oz. Cocoanut, grated, Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or 
other Nutmeats chopped and serve. When 
chopped nuts are used. 

l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) may be 
added to advantage. 



S 8 UNFIRED FOOD 

ASPARAGUS IN NUT CREAM 
\y 2 oz. Asparagus tips, cut as thin as a knife blade. Use 

tender tips only. 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts, flaked, 
i oz. Rhubarb juice. Mix these and beat until creamy. 

Just before serving add 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) ; mix again and serve. Serve 
without honey if preferred or replace it with Olive 
Oil. 

LENTILS IN NUT CREAM 

1 oz. Lentils soaked over night, rinsed, and dried in a towel, 
YZ oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice. Mix these and beat it to a creamy con- 

sistency and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. 
For variety add 
YZ oz. Honey (teaspoonful) just before serving. 

DANDELION SALAD 

\Y* oz - Dandelion leaves cut into shreds and chopped cross- 
wise. 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias, Walnut or Pecan chopped and 
YZ oz. Honey (teaspoon). Mix these well and to give it 

smoothness acjd 
Y 2 Olive Oil (spoonful). 

DOCK IN NUT CREAM 

1 oz. Dock leaves, cut into fine shreds, 
i oz. Peanuts, flaked. 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice, extracted by grating the fresh stems cut 

in 2 in. lengths. Mix and beat these into a creamy 
consistency and serve garnished. 
If it must be improved. 

YZ oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) may be 
added. 



APRIL SALADS 59 

ASPARAGUS SALAD 

i V 2 oz. Asparagus tips cut as thin as a knife blade ; use tender 

tips only; 

i oz. Pignolias or peanuts chopped, 
*/2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) and 
l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix all well and serve. 

PAN TONIC SALAD 

Mix together several or as many as you can get 
of the following herbs. 

Sour Dock leaves, 

Dandelion leaves and flowers, 

Sour knotweed, 

Young Woodbine shoots, 

Young Linden leaves, sparingly, 

Shepherds Purse, 

Nasturtium leaves and flowers, 

Curled , Upland , or Water Cress, 

Broad leaved or Sheep Sorrel, 

Oxalis or Woodsorrel, 

Cheese leaves, 

Corn Salad, 

White Mustard leaves, 

Plantain, 

Winter Cress, 

Salad Burnet, 

Gumbo Pods or leaves, 

Spinach, 

Parsley and Celery and 

Esculent Roots, 

Mix, according to the flavors, 
i to 2 oz. Of your Selection minced, with 
i oz. Nutmeats flaked, Cocoanut grated or 2 oz. of the 

salad dressings. 



60 UNFIRED FOOD 

ARTICHOKE SALAD 

i l / 2 oz. Artichokes, washed, cubed or chopped, 
y 2 oz. Onion minced and 

I oz. Pignolias flaked or chopped or Cocoanut grated. Mix 
these well and serve. 



MAY SALAD 
i oz. Lettuce cut into fine shreds, 

1 oz. Dandelion leaves cut into shreds and chopped cross- 

wise, 
> oz. Oxalis leaves and leaf stems chopped, 

2 oz. Radishes cubed or chopped and 

1 oz. Nuts, your choice, chopped. Toss all together and mix 

into it 

2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 

/2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) then garnish and serve. 

DANDELION FLOWER SALAD 
2 oz. Dandelion Flowers cut fine. Lay a bunch of flowers 

on the board and cut thin slices from the bunch 

cutting each flower through several times. Use 

the stems also, 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Toss 

these well together and serve garnished with a 

flower or two. 

This is a delicious dish. Dandelions blossom a 

second time in September and October. 

OXALIS SALAD 

j/4 oz. Oxalis leaves and leaf stems cut very fine and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or Cocoanut grated. Toss 
these together and garnish with a few flowers. It 
has a delicious flavor of its own with cocoanut. 



MAY SALADS 61 

LETTUCE AND COCOANUT SALAD 

Mix 
z l /2 oz. Lettuce cut into shreds and these cut again with 

1 oz. Cocoanut grated and drip over it 

2 oz. Cocoanut Milk. Serve with a teaspoon. 

DANDELION SALAD WITH OIL 

2 oz. Dandelion leaves cut into very fine shreds, 

1 oz. Peanuts or other nuts chopped and 

} /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Mix the oil well into the salad, 
garnish and serve 

COMBINATION SALAD 

2 oz. Lettuce cut into shreds and then chopped crosswise, 
J4 z - Chives or Onion Tips cut fine, 

y 2 oz. Curled Garden Cress cut fine and 

1 oz. Pignolias (or other nuts) flaked. Toss and mix the 

nuts well into the salad and pour over it 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice. Serve it thus or beat it till the nuts be- 

come creamy. 

DELICIOUS LETTUCE SALAD 

2 oz. Lettuce, cut into shreds and these cut again a few 

times, 

y 2 oz. Onion tops cut quite fine and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated. Mix the cocoanut well into the salad 

and pour over it 
i or 2 oz. Cocoanut Milk. Serve with a teaspoon. 

RADISH SALAD 

Mix 

i}/ 2 oz. Radishes cubed or chopped with 
l /2 oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or other nuts chopped or flaked. 
For black or other very hot radishes use one whole 
ounce of nuts. Garnish with a few thin slices. 



62 UNFIRED FOOD 

HONIG ZALAT 

3 oz. Lettuce cut into fine shreds and dressed with 
T /2 oz. Honey ^teaspoonful). Serve with fork and teaspoon. 

LINDEN SALAD 

*/2 oz. Young Linden Leaves cut into shreds and minced and 
YI, oz. Peanuts (or other nuts) flaked. Toss these together 
and serve. 

RADISH PUDDING 
2 oz. Radishes, grated, 
y 2 oz. Savory herbs, minced 
^2 teaspoon Caraway seed ground, 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix and rub these to the 
proper consistency and serve on a lettuce leaf or 
otherwise garnished. 

HOT SALAD 
i l / 2 oz. Lettuce cut into shreds, 

1 oz. Mustard leaves, shredded and chopped 
l /4 oz. Onion Tops cut fine, 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice (4 spoonful), 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 

>2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Mix and mingle all together 
and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. Chopped 
nuts will reduce the pungency of this salad. 

LETTUCE DRESSED 
2 */2 oz. Lettuce, torn into shreds, dressed with 

2 oz. Dressing for vegetables. See under dressings. 

SHEPHERD'S PURSE SALAD 

May be prepared and served like Dock Salad. 
Available all May until it blossoms. 



MAY SALADS 63 

YARROW IN NUT CREAM 

i oz. Young Yarrow leaves, cut on a chopping board as fine 
as possible, 

1 oz. Peanuts flaked, and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice. Beat these until it is creamy, then add 

and mix into it 

V 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 
]/2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Serve only on request and with 

an aluminum teaspoon. 



YARROW AND NUT SALAD 
i oz. Young Yarrow leaves whittled very fine and 
i oz. Peanuts flaked. Mix these and serve on a lettuce leaf 
only on request. This salad is a proof of the value 
nuts in the combination with harsh, hot and bitter 
herbs. 

DEUTSCHER ZALAT 

3 oz. Lettuce cut into shreds and these cut again or chopped, 
1-3 oz. Onion tops or chives cut fine and 
2 oz. Rhubarb juice. Toss the juice into the salad and pour 

over it 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Mix the oil well into the salad 
and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. 



MUSTARD SALAD 

i oz. Mustard leaves and tender stalks cut and chopped, 
Z oz. Dandelion Flowers minced or other sweet herbs, 
i oz. Peanuts flaked and 

(See page 173) Mix and beat to a 
creamy consistency and serve with an aluminum 
teaspoon. 
* oz. Honey may be added at your option. 



64 UNFIRED FOOD 

MUSTARD SALAD 

i oz. White Mustard leaves cut into shreds and chopped fine. 
y 2 oz. Dandelion Flowers minced if on hand and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated. Mix garnish with a dandelion 

flower and serve. 
i oz. Cocoanut milk added improves the flavor. 

PLANTAIN SALAD 

i y 2 oz. Plantain cut into shreds and minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix and serve or, with 
your favorite nuts chopped, you may add 






> oz. Honey (teaspoonful). 



JUNE SALAD 

\y> oz. Lettuce cut into shreds and chopped crosswise, 
i oz. Dandelion leaves cut into shreds and chopped, 
l /4 oz. Taragon or other savory herbs minced. 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice. Mix these and beat until it is creamy 

and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. One-half 
ounce of olive oil or honey may be added if desired. 

DANDELION FLOWER AND LETTUCE SALAD 
1 1 / 2 oz. Lettuce cut into shreds and these cut crosswise, 

i oz. Dandelion Flowers and scapes, cut so that each flower 

is sliced crosswise several times and 

i oz. Pignolias flaked or Cocoanut grated. Toss these into 
one another, garnish with a whole flower and 
serve. 

LETTUCE AND CRESS SALAD 
2 oz. Lettuce cut into shreds and chopped 
i oz. Curled Garden Cress chopped fine and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix 

these garnish and serve. 



JUNE SALADS 65 

CURLED GARDEN CRESS SALAD 
I oz. Cress cut fine, thus Lay a bunch on a chopping board 

and cut off thin slices, thus mincing it. Mix into 

this 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Peanuts, Pignolias flaked or other 

nuts chopped. 

Those who like the flavor of cress may use \y 2 oz. 

to the above amount of nuts. 

CURLED GARDEN CRESS SALAD 
iy 2 oz. Cress. Chop it quite fine and let it stand 15 minutes or 

so to let the pungency evaporate, and add 
YZ oz. Peanuts chopped, 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 

% oz. Olive Oil (teaspoonful). Mix these till all the cress is 
dressed, garnish and serve. 

RHUBARB CREAM SALAD 

2 oz. Spinach, Plantain, Corn Salad, White Mustard, Curled 
, Upland or Water Cress, Nasturitum leaves, 
Parsley or Celery cut into shreds and chopped, 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix and stir these until 

creamy and at your option add 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). 

SORREL SALAD 
i oz. Sorrel leaves and juicy leafstems cut into shreds and 

chopped 

y 2 oz. Onion Tops, Parsley or Celery minced and 
i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias flaked, Cocoanut grated or mixed 
nuts chopped. Mix these and serve; (or) - - but 
when chopped nuts ar used. 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful), Olive Oil (spoonful) or both may 
be added. 



66 UNFIRED FOOD 

LENTIL SALAD 

I oz. Lentils soaked over night, rinsed and dried in a towel. 
l*/2 oz. Lettuce, cut into shreds and chopped 
*4 oz. Savory herbs minced, and 

1/2 oz. Honey, (teaspoonful). Mix the honey well into the 
salad and serve. 

LETTUCE AND PARSLEY SALAD 
l*/2 oz. Lettuce, cut into shreds and cut again and 

1 oz. Parsley cut and minced.. Toss these together and 

serve with 

2 oz. Honeyole dressing. (See Dressings). 

BIRD S NEST SALAD 
2 oz. Lettuce, Endive or Cabbage cut into fine shreds or I oz. 

Curled ,Upland or Water Cress, nasturtium or 

Parsley chopped and mixed with 
I oz. Cocoanut grated, Peanuts, Pignolias or Almonds flaked. 

Put this in a "dish, form a nest and fill it with 
I oz. (2 or 3) Radishes or rounded Carrots. 

KOHL-RABI SALAD 
i l / 2 oz. Kohl-rabi diced or chopped, 

y 2 oz. Onion Tops, Oxalis or one ounce Lettuce minced and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or other 
nutmeats chopped. Toss these into one another 
and serve 

, With the chopped nuts 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) may be 
used. 

RADISH AND BEAN SALAD 
I oz. Radishes, Kohl-rabi or Carrot diced. 
i oz. String-beans sliced as thin as possible and 
I oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or Almonds flaked or Cocoanut 
grated. Toss these together and serve. 



JUNE SALADS 67 

GREEN PEAS IN NUT CREAM 
i l / 2 oz. Tender Peas, whole 
l / 2 oz. Savory herbs, minced 

1 oz. Peanuts (or other nuts) flaked and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice, extracted by grating the fresh stems 

cut in 2 in. lengths. Mix and beat these to the 
proper consistency and serve with an aluminum 
teaspoon. 

SELECTED SWEET SALAD 

I oz. Lettuce cut into fine shreds, 

i oz. Bean-pods, (green or wax) sliced no thicker than a 

knife blade, 

y> oz. Onion tops cut like the pods. 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful), mix all well together and serve. 

SPINACH SALAD 

i oz. Spinach cut into shreds and chopped and 
l /2 oz. Onion chipped, Chives, Onion tops, or Leek chopped or 
Parsley or Celery minced and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or Cocoanut grated. Mix 

these and serve or, for a delightful variation, 
drip over it. 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice or Cocoanut milk or a mixture of both 

(4 spoonful). 



JULY SALAD 

I oz. Young Sweet Corn sliced, off the cob, 
i oz. Lettuce, Endive, nasturtium leaves, Sorrel or Cabbage 
cut into shreds and chopped and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Mixed Nuts chopped. Mix into these 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) and chip 
over it 

2 oz. Tomatoes, 



68 UNFIRED FOOD 

JULY SALAD 
i oz. Lettuce, Endive, Nasturtium Leaves, Chicory leaves or 

Sorrel cut into shreds and chopped crosswise, 
i oz. Cucumber or Summer Squash chipped, 
i oz. Tomato or Pineapple chipped, 
1/2 oz. Parsley, Celery or other savory herbs minced, 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or other nuts chopped and 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). Mix 
all together and serve. 

GREEN SALAD DRESSED WITH BANANA PULP 

Whittle and chop. 

3 oz. Lettuce, Endive, Corn salad, Mallow (cheeses), Dande- 
lion or Chicory, and mix it with 

1 oz. Cocoanut grated or other nuts chopped and 

2 oz. Banana pulp macerated and beaten to a creamy con- 

sistency. Garnish with 
i oz. Banana slices or Tomato chips and serve. 

RADISH SALAD 

i oz. Radishes cubed or chopped to size of corn, 
y 2 oz. Cabbage, Celery or Oxalis minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Toss together and serve 
on lettuce or endive. 

SELECTED SALAD 

i oz. Young Sweet Corn sliced off the cob with a sharp 

knife, 
i oz. Crisp Cabbage, Lettuce, Upland, Cress or Sorrel cut 

into shreds and chopped and 

}/4 oz. Onion, Parsley or other savory herbs minced and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Peanuts flaked or mixed nuts 

chopped. Mix these, garnish and serve or at your 

option chip over it 

i or 2 oz. Tomato or cucumber, or drip over it 
I oz. Cocoanut milk. 



JULY SALADS 69 

NASTURTIUM FLOWER SALAD 

i l / 2 oz. Nasturtium Flowers cut into shreds with their pedi- 
cels, and 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, or Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. 
Toss these together and serve garnished with a 
few whole flowers. 
This is a delicious relish. 

i oz. Cocoanut Milk may be poured over the salad to ad- 
vantage. Lettuce cut equally fine may be added 
to supply the scarcity of the flowers. 

PINEAPPLE AND TOMATO SALAD 

2 l / 2 oz. Pineapple, sliced and 

2 l / 2 oz. Tomatoes, Sliced. Toss the slices just enough to 

mingle them and drip over them 
l /2 oz. Honey ( teaspoon ful). Serve with a fruit- fork. 

STUFFED CANTALOUPE 

Fill the natural cavity of a 

5 oz. Half Cantaloupe with the following mixture 
l / 2 oz. Parsley, Celery or Oxalis, minced and 

1 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. 

SIMPLE SALAD 

2 oz. Young Sweet Corn or White Corn, sliced off the cob, 

Wax or green Be'an pods sliced or chopped, or 
broad leaved or curled Endive cut into shreds and 
chopped, mixed with 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or any 
nutmeats chopped. With the chopped nuts may 
be added 

l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoon ful). Do not 
let it stand long with honey or oil as it hardens 
the salad. 



70 UNFIRED FOOD 

PINEAPPLE AND CELERY SALAD 
i l / 2 oz. Ripe Pineapple shredded 
\]/ 2 oz. Blanched Celery, chopped. 
i oz. Walnut meats chopped and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the honey into the salad 
and serve. 

SPINACH-BEET SALAD 

]/2 oz. Spinach-beet leaves cut into shreds and chopped, 

l /4 oz. Savory herbs minced or Onion chopped and 

y 2 oz. Peanuts chopped. Mix these well with 

*4 oz. Olive Oil (teaspoonful) and serve. At another dinner 

when serving the same dish add and mix into it 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). 

TOMATO CREAM SALAD 
2 oz. Tomato, chipped 
2 oz. Radishes, Kohl-rabi, Carrot or Eggplant, cut into small 

dice or Sweet Corn sliced off the cob. 
y 2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Beat these together till 

somewhat creamy and serve. 

YOUNG PEA SALAD 

2 oz. Young Peas or Young Lima Beans chopped, 
I oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked very fine and 

i oz. Rhubarb juice. Mix and beat till creamy then add 
y> oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). Mix 
'"again and serve. 

YOUNG PEA SALAD 

\y 2 oz. Young Peas, 
y 2 oz. Oxalis leaves and leaf stems cut very fine or other 

savory herbs minced and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix these and then add 
y^ oz. Olive Oil (teaspoonful). Mix again and serve. 



JULY SALADS 71 

MOCK SAUERKRAUT 
3 oz. Crisp Cabbage shredded and chopped 
l / 2 Teaspoon Caraway seed ground. 
2 oz. Rhubarb juice, extracted by grating the fresh stems 

cut in 2 inch lengths, 

YZ oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the liquid well into the 
slaw and serve with an aluminum teaspoon. 

BUTTERED VEGETABLES 

2 to 3 oz. Kohl-rabi, Carrot, Egg Plant, Turnip, Parsnip, 
Squash, Pumpkin, Sweet Potato or Potato cut 
into neat slices and spread with an equal thick- 
ness and weight of, your favorite. 
Butter or Cheese as given under that heading. 
Cranberry or Savorv butter combines well with 
all. 

GRATED CARROT SALAD 

i l /2 oz. Carrot grated and 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias or Peanuts flaked, mixed 
well is a palatable dish. 

SELECTED VEGE-FRUIT SALAD 

i oz. Pineapple sliced or chipped, 

i oz. Tomato sliced or chipped, 

i oz. Cucumber sliced or chipped and 

1 oz. Celery stalks sliced as thin as possible. Serve with any 

2 oz. Dressing for vegetables. See under dressings. 

VEGETABLE PUDDING 
i oz. Kohl-rabi or Young Carrots grated, 
i oz. Celery stalks, green or blanched, 
i oz. Pignolias or other nut meats chopped and 
l /> oz. Honey (teaspoonful.) Mix these well and serve imme- 
diately. This tastes like apple salad. 



72 UNFIRED FOOD 

MOCK ASPARAGUS SALAD 
i oz. Swiss Chard leaf stems, cut crosswise into very thin 

slices, 
YZ oz. Onion sliced or cubed, 

1 oz. Peanuts or other nuts chopped and 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Mix the oil well into the salad 

and serve. For variety add 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). 

CELERY SALAD 
2 oz. Green Celery leaves and stalks chopped and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix these and serve or, 

if on hand, drip over it 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice. 

WATERMELON 

Serve a 
2 Ib. Watermelon section in a plate with a knife and fork. 

SUPAWN 

Slit or score the rows of a young Sweet Corn or 
White Corn ear with a sharp knife and press the 
pulp out by drawing the back of a knife over the 
rows or grate the ear on a coarse grater. 

2 oz. Green Corn Pulp, 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or Almonds flaked, soft nut meats 

chopped or Cocoanut grated and 

y 2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced. Mix and stir these into a 
' pudding and serve. 

SYLVAN SALAD 

(Oleri Silvestris) 
Combine 

2 or 3 oz. Wild herbs chopped, according to their flavor, with 
i oz. Nuts, chopped or flaked, or dress them with oil, 
honey or herbal fruits and serve. 



JULY SALADS 73 

PINEAPPLE AND TOMATO SALAD 

2 oz. Pineapple sliced or chipped and 

2 oz. Tomato sliced or chipped, served with 

2 oz. Dressing for either fruits or vegetables. 

WATER LILY SALAD 

Combine 

4 Water lilies, chopped, 
i oz. Hollyhock and other flowers with 
i oz. Cocoanut grated or pignolias flaked or chopped and 
serve. 



AUGUST SALAD 

YI oz. Nasturtium Flowers cut into shreds, 

Y* oz. Nasturtium Leaves cut into shreds and minced and 

Y2 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Toss these together and 

chip over it 
2 oz. Tomato. 

POTATO AND TOMATO SALAD 

i oz. Potatoes sliced and chopped or diced, 

1 oz. Peanuts or other nuts chopped, 
Y\ oz. Parsley or Celery leaves minced 

2 oz. Tomatoes chipped and 

YZ oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Mingle 
these well and serve. 

TOMATO AND CUCUMBER SANDWICHED SALAD 

3 oz. Cucumber, peeled and sliced, 

3 oz. Tomato sliced and 

i oz. Nutmeats flaked. Put a layer of flaked nut on each slice 

of cucumber and cover them with a slice of tomato. 

Arrange the sandwiches artistically on lettuce, 

endive or parsley and serve. 



74 UNFIRED FOOD 

STUFFED TOMATO 

Cut a 

6 or 8 oz. Tomato in two then cut out part of the central pith 
and reserve it for caping. Now scrape out the 
partition walls, seeds and juice and mix this with 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 
y 2 oz. Celery or Parsley minced. Refill the halves with 
this mixture, cover with, the piths reversed and 
serve. 

MOCK SAUERKRAUT 
i l / 2 oz. Crisp Cabbage, sliced, 

y 2 oz. Onion, sliced. Put these in a chopping bowl and chop 
fine, then add 

1 oz. Cocoanut, grated, 

]/ 2 Teaspoon Caraway seed, and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice, extracted by grating the fresh stems 

cut in 2 in. lengths. Mix the juice well into the 
slaw and let it stand 15 minutes or so. Then 
mix again and serve or add 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) just before serving if desired. 

PEA AND TOMATO SALAD 
i oz. Fresh Young Peas and 

1 oz. Sweet Nutmeats chopped together. Add to this 
y 2 oz. Parsley or other savory herbs minced and 

2 oz. Tomato chipped. Toss these into one another and 

serve. 

For a change you may add 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). 

CUCUMBER AND FLOWER SALAD 

y 2 oz. Nasturtium or Hyacinth Bean Flowers chopped and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated. Toss these together and chip over it. 

3 oz. Cucumber. Mix it a little and serve. 



AUGUST SALADS 75 

BEET RELISH 

1 oz. Beet, 

Y-2 oz. Onion, both sliced very thin, not thicker than the blade 

of a knife, 
1/2 Teaspoon Caraway seed, mix and pour over this 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice, extracted by grating the fresh stems 

cut in 2 inch lengths, let it soak over night or 8 
hours in a cool place and just before serving add 
1/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) stir until the honey is dissolved 
and serve. 

POTATO CREAM SALAD 

2 oz. Potato, peeled, sliced, chopped, 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked, 

T 4 oz. Savory herbs minced or l /2 oz. Onion chipped, 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice. Mix and stir until the nut becomes 

quite creamy and serve. 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) may be added to suit the taste. 

YOUNG PEA AND TOMATO SALAD 

1 oz. Young Peas whole or chopped, 

2 oz. Tomato chipped and 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix and stir it lightly 
to a creamy consistency so as not to mash the 
tomato chips. 

YZ oz. Parsley or Celery minced may be added to vary the 
flavor. 

SWEET, CORN SALAD 

2.y 2 oz. Green Sweet Corn sliced off the cob with a sharp 
knife and the remaining pulp scraped out with 
the back of the knife and 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked, Cocoanuts grated or other 
nuts chopped. Mix these and serve on an endive 
or lettuce leaf. 



76 UNFIRED FOOD 

CUCUMBER SALAD 
2,1/2 oz. Cucumber chipped or cubed 
1/2 oz. Onion, Onion tops, Celery or Parsley minced and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated or Pigriolias flaked. Toss these to- 
gether and serve. 
This is a wholesome and remedial relish. 



PIGNOLIA POTATO SALAD 

2 oz. Potatoes, peeled, sliced and chopped 

i oz. Pignolias flaked, mix and spread on a lettuce leaf then 
sprinkle over it 

i oz. Rhubarb juice and serve. 

This dish will relieve and cure Kidney troubles 
when all cooked starches are avoided. 

SANDWICHED TOMATO 

Cut into 6 slices a 
6 oz. Tomato. Then mix 

1/2 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked with 

J4 oz. Parsley, Celery or other Savory herbs minced. Spread 
the mixture over three slices and cover them with 
the remaining three slices. Lay the sandwiches 
artistically on Parsley or lettuce and serve. 

VARIETY SALAD 
1/2. oz. Bean-pods or Young Peas, 
1/2 oz. Potato 
y 2 oz. Carrot or Beet, 

1/2 oz. Onion or Celery all chopped to the size of corn and 
i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked or other Nutmtats 
chopped. Toss all together and serve 
With the chopped nuts 
1/2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) may be added. 



AUGUST SALADS 77 

SWEET CORN AND TOMATO SALAD 
I oz. Green Sweet Corn sliced off the cob with a sharp 

knife, 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or other nuts chopped and 
2 or 3 oz. Tomato chipped. Toss these into one another, 
garnish and serve. 

TOMATO AND CUCUMBERSALAD 
2 oz. Tomato sliced or chipped and 
2 oz. Cucumber sliced or chipped, served with a 
2 oz. Dressing for vegetables. 

Pineapple and Cucumber Salad may be served 

like the above. 

SWEET CORN SALAD 

2^ oz. Young Sweet Corn sliced off the cob and the yellow 

embryos scraped out with the back of the knife, 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias -or Peanuts flaked or 

chopped. Mix these well! and garnish with an 

esculent flower. 

SELECTED SALAD 

i oz. Cauliflower, Kohl-rabi or White Turnips chopped, 

i oz. Sweet Corn sliced of the cob, 

y 2 oz. Celery, Parsley, Upland Cress, Nasturtium leaves, 
Broad-leaved Sorrel or Oxalis minced and 

i oz. Peanuts or mixed nuts chopped. Mix into these 
y 2 oz. Honey ( teaspoon ful) and 
l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 

PIMPINELLA SALAD 

i oz. Pimpinella leaves minced, 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 

2 oz. Tomato chipped. Mix and rub these to a pudding and 

serve or stuff into 
i or 2 Sweet Peppers. 



78 UNFIRED FOOD 

NASTURTIUM FLOWER AND SWEET CORN SALAD 
i l / 2 oz. Young Sweet Corn sliced off the cob, 
j/2 oz. Nasturtium Flowers cut into shreds and 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Toss 
these into one another and serve. The yellow 
pips at the base of the corn are most nutritious. 
Scrape these out with the back of the knife. Use 
pedicels of the nasturtium flowers also. 

CAULIFLOWER GARDEN SALAD 

Make a bed of 
l / 2 oz. Endive, Chicory, Parsley or Celery cut into shreds and 

chopped 
l /2 oz. Upland Cress, Water Cress or Nasturtium leaves 

minced and 

i oz. Peanuts or other nuts chopped. Mix these with 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) (or 

both) and plant into this artistically 

1 oz. Tender Cauliflower Tips. 

GREEN TOMATO AND CRESS SALAD 

2 oz. Green Tomato chipped, 

i oz. Upland or Water Cress or Nasturtium Leaves cut into 

shreds and minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or chopped. Toss these 

together and serve or when the nuts are chopped 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) may be 

added. 

POTATO AND CARROT SALAD 
i oz. Potato chopped, 
i oz. Carrot grated, 
J4 oz. Parsley or Celery minced and 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or Almond flaked. Mix these 
loosely and serve. 



AUGUST SALADS 79 

TONIC SALAD 

Run through the food mill 
i oz. Tender Beet or Turnip, 
i oz. Crisp Cabbage or Kohl-rabi and 
i oz. Young Carrot, Celery Root, Parsnip or Salisfy. Stir 

together with 
i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias flaked or other nuts 'chopped and 

serve. When chopped nuts are used add 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) if you 

desire. 

SQUASH SALAD 

3 oz. Summer Squash or Vegetable Marrow cut into dice 
and 

1 oz. Pignolias, Almonds or Peanuts flaked. Mix these and 

serve or impprove it by dripping over it 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice (4 spoonfuls). 



TOMATO SUPAWN 
2 oz. Tomato chipped 
y 2 oz. Carrot or Sweet Potato grated 
l / 2 oz. Black Walnuts or other nut meats chopped 
l /2 oz. Parsley minced and 

i oz. Young Sweet Corn sliced off the cob or Young Peas 
chopped. Stir these to a pudding and serve. 

ICE-PLANT SALAD 

(of Mesembrianthemum) 
Mix 
3 or 4 oz. Ice-plant, chopped with 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and rub or macerate 

enough to moisten the nuts, and then add 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). 



8o UNFIRED FOOD 

SEPTEMBER SALAD 
YZ oz. Cabbage cut into shreds and chopped or Celery stalks 

diced, 
}/2 oz. Carrots' or Potatoes diced, or Young Lima beans 

chopped, 

1 oz. Peanuts or other nuts chopped, 

2 oz. Tomatoes or Husk Tomatoes chipped and 

y* oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) or both. 
Mingle all well and serve. 

SEPTEMBER SALAD 

y<2. oz. Nasturtium Leaves or Upland Cress cut into shreds 

and minced, 

y 2 oz. Oxalis leaves and leaf stalks or Parsley minced, 
i oz. Young Sweet Corn or White Corn sliced off the cob 

and 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix 
these well and serve or at your option drip over it 

1 oz. Cocoanut Milk (2 spoonful) and cover it with 

2 oz. Tomato Chips. 

SEPTEMBER SALAD 
i oz. Endive, Chicory or broad leaved dandelion cut into 

shreds and chopped crosswise, 
y? oz. Oxalis, Celery y Broad Leaved Sorrel, Parsley, Upland 

Cress or Nasturtium leaves minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Toss these together and 
garnish with Nasturtium Flowers. 

CHICORY SALAD 
i l /2 oz. Chicory leaves or Endive cut into shreds and chopped 

and 

I oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. These tossed together 
make a palatable salad if the dandelion flavor is 
relished. 



SEPTEMBER SALADS 81 

SEPTEMBER SALAD 
}/2 oz. Broad Leaved Sorrel or Oxalis cut into shreds and 

minced, 
Y? oz. Celery, Parsley or Endive with a sprig of Thyme or 

Savory minced, 

i oz. Young Lima Beans chopped or Eggplant diced, 
i oz. Pignolias, Peanuts or other nut meats chopped and 
*/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) or both. 
Mix the oil or honey well into the salad and serve. 

GREEN TOMATO AND POTATO SALAD 
i l /2 oz. Potato or Sweet Potato diced or chopped, 

i oz. Green Tomato or Sweet Pepper chipped, 
l / 2 oz. Celery or Parsley minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or other nut meats chopped. Mix all to- 
gether and serve. If it must be improved add 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). This 
is a relish till frost. 

SELECTED SALAD 

y 2 oz. Carrot, chopped and 

l / 2 oz. Turnip or Kohl-rabi chopped to the size of corn. Mix 

these with 
i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked or chopped and spread over 

this 
i oz. Green Sweet Corn sliced off the cob with a sharp 

knife and serve. With the chopped nuts 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil may be added. 

LIMA BEAN AND PUMPKIN SALAD 
i oz. Young Lima Beans chopped 
i oz. Squash or Pumpkin chopped or cubed 
y 2 oz. Onion, Parsley or Sweet Pepper chopped and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Toss these together and 
serve. 



82 UNFIRED FOOD 

SELECTED SALAD 

i oz. Egg-plant chipped or chopped, 
YZ oz. Onion, Celery or Sweet Pepper chopped and 

i oz. Nut Meats chopped. Mix these with 
}/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Cover 

this with 

i oz. Cucumber slices and cover these with 
i oz. Tomato slices and serve. This may be improved by 
sprinkling a teaspoonful of flaked Pignolias on 
the cucumbers before covering with the tomatoes. 

VEGE-FRUIT SALAD 

Cut small Cantaloupes or Muskmelons in halves, scrape 
out the pulp leaving the rind whole and refill with the follow- 
ing mixture. 

2 oz. Muskmelon or Cantaloupe pulp, 
I oz. Tomato minced and 
i oz. Nut Meats flaked. Serve with a teaspoon. 

SALAD WITH HONEY 

i l /> oz. Endive or Chicory cut into shreds and chopped cross- 
wise, 

l / 2 oz. Oxalis, Parsley or Broad Leaved Sorrel minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or any other nut chopped. Toss these to- 
gether and mix into it 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Toss again, garnish and serve. 

SELECTED SALAD 

1 oz. Upland Cress or Nasturtium Leaves cut into shreds 

chopped and 

l / 2 oz. Peanuts flaked or Cocoanut grated. Toss these to- 
gether and chip over it 

2 oz. Cucumber and 
i oz. Tomato. 



SEPTEMBER SALADS 83 

PARSLEY AND TOMATO SALAD 

I oz. Parsley chopped fine and 
y 2 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Toss these together and 

chip over it 
3 oz. Tomatoes. Garnish with an esculent flower and serve, 

CELERY AND HUSK TOMATO SALAD 

1 oz. Celery steins and leaves chopped and 

y 2 oz. Pignolias flaked. Toss these together and cover with 

2 oz. Husk Tomatoes halved and serve. 

SELECTED SALAD 
i oz. Endive cut into shreds and chopped crosswise, 

1 oz. Cabbage shredded and chopped and 

y 2 oz. Peanuts flaked. Mix these and chip over it 

2 oz. Cucumber and add 

l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Now toss it all to mix and 
serve. 

OXALIS SALAD 

i l /2 oz. Oxalis leaves and leaf stems cut very fine and 
i oz. Peanuts or other nuts chopped. Toss these together 

and mix into it 

l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Then drip over it 
l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful), toss, garnish and serve. 

LIMA BEAN SALAD 
l /2 oz. Green Lima Beans, 

y 2 oz. Carrot, sliced and 

i oz. Squash or Pumpkin sliced. Put all together into a 
chopping bowl and chop quite fine ; then add 

1 oz. Peanuts (or other nuts) flaked. Toss the nut into the 

slaw and serve. 

The above may also be served as a cream salad 

by adding 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice, 

l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and beat to the proper consistency. 



84 UNFIRED FOOD 

NUT CREAM SLAW 
I oz. Potato, peeled, sliced, 
I oz. Cabbage, shredded, 

l /2 oz. Onion, sliced. Put all these in a chopping bowl and 
chop till fine, then add 

1 oz. Peanuts or other nuts flaked. 
^2 Teaspoonful caraway seed and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice or cucumber juice, produced by grating 

either. Mix and beat all together to a creamy 
consistency and serve. 

Any two vegetables on hand may be used to make 
this slaw. 

ONION SALAD 

1 oz. Onion chipped very small or chopped, 

2 oz. Geen or Ripe Tomato chipped or Potato grated or i 

ounce Oxalis or Sorrel minced and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix or rub these to- 
gether and then add and mix it, if desired, 
YZ oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 

This salad is relished by those with a cold stomach 
and when eaten by them in response to natural 
craving will leave no onion odor in the breath. 



STUFFED SWEET PEPPERS 
i l / 2 oz. Sweet Potato grated, 

^2 oz. Celery, Parsley, Oxalis or Sorrel minced or Cran- 
berries chopped and 
I oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix these well and stuff 

it into a large 

2,y 2 oz. Sweet Pepper or two small ones after the seed core 
is cut out. Replace the core end and serve. 
If the stuffed pod is narrow and long it can be 
sliced and the slices may then be neatly arranged. 



SEPTEMBER SALADS 85 

SELECTED SALAD 

y 2 oz. Sorrel leaves and stalks cut into shreds and chopped 
l /2 oz. Chicory or Endive cut into shreds and chopped, 
]/2 oz. Parsley minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix these well and serve. 

LIMA BEAN PUDDING 
i oz. Young Lima Beans chopped or flaked 
i oz. Celeriac, Parsley Root, Parsnip, Carrot or Squash 

grated, 

I oz. Peanuts flaked, 
I oz. Cranberries chopped and macerated or Rhubarb juice 

and, at option, 

Y-2. oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Beat 
all together and serve. 



OCTOBER SALAD 

i oz. ori l / 2 Qz. Sweet Potato, Carrot or Parsnip grated or 

chopped quite fine, 
2 oz. Green or Ripe Tomato, Sweet Salad Pepper or Young 

Cucumber chipped, 
l / 2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or these or other nuts 
chopped. Mix these well together and serve. 

OCTOBER SALAD 

i oz. Tomato, Husk Tomato chipped or Garden Huckleberry, 
i oz. Cucumber chipped or Young White Corn sliced off 

the cob, 

i oz. Egg-plant chipped or Carrot grated, 
l /2 oz. Sweet Pepper chipped, Cabbage, Celery stalks, Parsley, 

Oxalis or Sorrel minced and 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix the nut well into 
the salad and serve. 



86 UNFIRED FOOD 

OCTOBER SALAD 

]/2 Cabbage cut into shreds and chopped, 

l / 2 oz. Potato chopped 

l /2 oz. Celery, Parsley, Onion, Oxalis or Sorrel minced 

2 oz. Tomato chipped and 

i oz. Nut Meats chopped 

Y-2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). Mix 
well and serve, 

FALL SALAD 

This salad comes in handy when the lettuce season is over, 
i oz. Carrot, Parsnip or Parsley Root grated, 
i oz. Peanuts flaked and 

i oz. Endive (smooth or curled), Scorzonera leaves, Parsley, 
Celery (leaves and stalks), Chicory leaves, Dande- 
lion, Nasturtium leaves or Upland Cress cut into 
shreds and minced. Mix the three and drip over it 
l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful), mix again, garnish and serve. 

ARTICHOKE AND SWEET PEPPER SALAD 

\ l /2 oz. Archichokes diced or chopped, 

i oz. Sweet Salad Pepper or Tomato chipped, 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or other nut meats chopped 

and if on hand 

l /4 oz. Parsley, Leek or Celery minced. Toss these together 
and serve. 

GREEN TOMATO SALAD 
3 oz. Green Tomato chipped, 
l / 2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or other nuts chopped. To 

the chopped nuts 

l /> oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) may be 
added. Mix all together and serve. Green 
tomatoes have a delicious acid flavor. 



OCTOBER SALADS 87 

OCTOBER TOMATO SALAD 

4 oz. Tomato chipped 
y 2 oz. Celery, Parsley, Sweet Pepper, Oxalis or Sorrel minced 

and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or chopped. Mix well and 
serve. 

TOMATO AND MADAPPLE SALAD 

2 oz. Tomato chipped 

i l / 2 oz. Egg-plant chipped or cubed and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix and serve. 

CARROT AND PEPPER SALAD 
i oz. Carrot chopped or cubed, 
i oz. Sweet Pepper chipped, 
V 2 oz. Celery or Parsley root grated or Radishes cubed and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix well and serve. 

TOMATO AND PEPPER SALAD 

3 oz. Tomato chipped 

iV 2 oz. Sweet Pepper chipped and 

i oz. Peanuts flaked. Toss together and serve. 

VEGETABLE FRUIT SALAD 
2 oz. Tomato chipped, 
i oz. Sweet Pepper chipped, 
i oz. Egg-plant cubed or chipped 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Beat together and serve. 

MADAPPLE AND CELERIAC SALAD 

2 oz. Egg-plant chipped or cubed, 

i oz. Celery or Parsley root grated and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Mix these well and serve. 

When the nuts are chopped 
l /2 oz. Olive Oil or Honey may be added. 



88 UNFIRED FOOD 

GUMBO SALAD 

5/2 oz. Gumbo pods chipped or chopped 
y 2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced and 

1 oz. Pignolias flaked. Mix these thoroughly and chip over 

it a layer of 

2 oz. Tomato and serve. 

This salad helps the intestines carry off fecal and 
other poisons. It tones the excretory glands and 
liver and is advised in cases of inflamed mucous 
surfaces. 

KALE SALAD 
i oz. Curled Kale or Chinese Cabbage chopped and 

1 oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or Almonds flaked. Mix these and 

serve. 

Learn to like this salad for the sake of your blood. 

PARSLEY AND OXALIS SALAD 
y 2 oz. Parsley or Celery minced, 
y 2 oz. Oxalis or Sorrel minced and 

1 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Mix these evenly and 

chip over it to cover 

2 oz. Banana and serve. 

SWEET POTATO SALAD 

2 oz. Sweet Potato grated and 

1 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked or other nuts chopped. Toss 

these together and chip over it neatly 

2 oz. Sweet Peppers or Cucumber. 

EURICA SALAD 
2 oz. Potato grated, 

i oz. Oxalis or Broad-leafed Sorrel shredded and chopped 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the potato and nut first 
and add the honey last. 



OCTOBER SALADS 89 

REDEMPTION SALAD 

2 oz. Potato grated, 

i oz. Celery, Parsley or Cabbage minced, Sweet Pepper, 
Onion or Tomato chipped, Radish or Carrot cubed, 

i oz. Almonds or Pignolias flaked, and if desired, 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Beat the nut well into the potato 
and add the oil last. 

This Salad, without the oil, will tone the stomach 
and liver and cure stomach and intestinal troubles 
if cooked starches are avoided. It can not ferment 
or constipate. 

SELECTED SALAD 

i oz. Egg-plant chipped, 

i oz. Sweet Pepper chipped or Celery chopped or minced, 

i oz. Young Lima Beans chopped, 

l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the dressing well into the 
salad and serve. 

LIMA BEAN SALAD 

1 oz. Young Lima Beans chopped, 

y 2 oz. Pignolias or other nut meats chopped, 

l / 2 oz. Sweet Pepper chipped, Parsley or Celery minced, 

2 oz. Tomato chipped and 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). Mix the oil well into the salad 
and serve. 

CHICORY SALAD 
\y 2 oz. Chicory leaves or Dandelion cut into shreds and 

chopped crosswise and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or Cocoanut grated. Toss 

these together and serve; or drip over it 
i oz. Rhubarb juice or Cocoanut milk (2 spoonfuls). 



90 UNFIRED FOOD 

A MODEL WINTER SALAD 
i oz. Grated Carrot, Sweet Potato, Parsnip, Turnip or 

Hard Squash, 

i l / 2 oz. Chopped Cabbage or Endive, diced Pumpkin, Arti- 
chokes, Irish Potato or some other crisp vegetable, 
y 2 oz. Chopped Celery, chipped Onion, minced Parsley or 
Leek, diced Rampion or grated Celeriac or Parsley 
root and 

I oz. Grated Cocoanut, flaked Pignolias, Peanuts or Al- 
monds or chopped nut meats mixed. Toss these 
together to mix loosely and serve. When the 
chopped nuts are used dress the salad with 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). 1-16 
oz. Caraway seed ground (y 2 teasponful) witli 
cabbage and % oz. grated horseradish ( l /2 tea- 
spoonful) with pumpkin blend well. 

ALL WINTER SALAD 
2 oz. Sweet Potato or Parsnip grated, 
l / 2 oz. Cabbage cut into shreds and chopped or Carrot sliced 

and chopped, 

y 2 oz. Onion chipped or Celery chopped and 
i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. Stir these well together 

and then add 
l /2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) and serve. 

WINTER SALAD 
y 2 oz. Carrot or Parsnip grated, 

i oz. Pumpkin, Squash, Potato or Turnip diced or chopped, 
l / 2 oz. Onion chipped, 
l / 2 oz. Celery stalks cut very thin and 

i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and four Black Walnuts 
adds to the flavor. Mix the nuts well into the 
salad and serve. 



WINTER SALADS 91 

CABBAGE AND BANANA SALAD 

2 oz. Cabbage cut into shreds and chopped, 

1 oz. Celery stalks chopped and 

2 oz. Banana chipped. Stir these until the banana becomes 

nearly fluid and serve. 

WINTER SALAD 

r oz. Carrot, grated, 

r oz. Celery stalks chopped and 
[ /8 oz. Horseradish grated. Mix these \yith 

i oz. Nut Meats chopped and 
'/> oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 

CAULIFLOWER AND CHICK PEA SALAD 

i oz. Cauliflower tops or Cabbage chopped 

1 oz. Chick Peas or Green Peas soaked till soft and chopped 
'4 oz. Celery or Parsley minced (if on hand) 

l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). (^4 oz - 
Oil added to the honey may please some palates 
exceedingly.) Mix the honey or oil well into the 
salad and serve. 

POTATO SALAD 

(Dressed with Honey) 

2 oz. Potato, peeled, sliced and chopped 

r oz. Peanuts or other nut meats chopped and 
l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful . Mix these and sprinkle with 
minced Parsley or grated Horseradish. 

POTATO KRAUT SALAD 
i l / 2 Potato chopped fine or cubed, 

i oz. Cabbage cut into shreds and chopped, 

Teaspoon Caraway seed ground and 

j/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix all together and serve 
immediately. This is a relish and stomach tonic. 



92 UNFIRED FOOD 

IRISH POTATO SALAD 
2 oz. Potatoes, peeled, sliced and chopped 
y> oz. Leek minced, Onion or Cabbage chopped and 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked or Cocoanut grated. Toss 

these into one another and serve. When the above 
nuts or other nut meats are chopped 

Y-2. oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) may be 
used as dressing. 

GRATED SALAD 

Toss together lightly but thoroughly. 

2 oz. Sweet Potato, Carrot, Yellow Turnip, Parsnip or Hard 

Squash grated and 
i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias flaked, Cocoanut grated or your 

^ favorite nuts chopped and serve. 

]/2 oz. Celeriac or Parsley root grated or Onion chipped may 
be added to vary the flavor. When chopped nuts 
are used add 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 

PEA AND CABBAGE SALAD 
i oz. Soaked Green Peas chopped 
i l /2 oz. Cabbage cut into shreds and chopped and 

i oz. Pignolias flaked or other nut meats chopped. Mix 

these and serve. With chopped nuts 

*/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful) may 
be added to advantage. 

PEAS IN AMBUSH 
i oz. Dried Green Peas soaked, 
l /2 oz. Pignolias whole or Almonds or other nuts chopped. 

Cover these with 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and then cover the honey-coated 

peas and nuts with 
V 2 oz. Sweet corn or Green Kern meal and serve. 



WINTER SALADS 93 

LENTIL SALAD 

i oz. Lentils, soaked over night, rinsed and dried in a towel, 
i oz. Pignolias or other nuts chopped and 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the honey well into the 
lentils and nuts and serve. 

LENTILS IN HONEY 

i oz. Lentils, soaked over night, rinsed, and dried in a towel 

and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the honey into the lentils 
and serve immediately. 

CHICK PEAS AND COCOANUT 

i oz. Chick Peas or Green Peas soaked till soft and chopped 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias flaked or other nut meats 

chopped and 
J4 oz. Parsley, Celery leaves, Leek or Onions minced. Toss 

all together and serve, 
i oz. Cocoanut milk (2 spoonfuls) dripped over the cocoanut 

mixture covers all the papilionacious flavor and 

renders it most delicious. With chopped nuts 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful) may be 

used. 

VEGETABLE WURST 

i oz. Sweet Potato, Carrot or Parsnips grated, 

i oz. Blood Beet or Turnip chopped, 

l /4 oz. Horseradish grated, 

1 oz. Celery stalks, Parsley, Leek or Onions minced, 
y 2 Teaspoon Caraway seed ground (optional), 

2 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 

i oz. Black Walnuts or other nut meats chopped. Mix and 
rub all these together and form into rolls y 2 inch 
thick and 2 inches long. Roll them into wax- 
paper and serve. 



94 UNFIRED FOOD 

LIMA BEANS IN WINTER 

Soak lima beans until soft and then slip them out 

of their coats. Chop 

i oz. Blanched Beans and mix them with 
i oz. Cocoanut grated or Pignolias or Almonds flaked. This 

dish is wholesome but still better when 
i oz. Chopped Celery or Cabbage is added. 

VEGETABLE PUDDING 
i oz. Beet, Potato or Carrot grated, 
i oz. Celery stalks or Cabbage chopped , 
y% oz. Horseradish grated (teaspoonful) and 

1 oz. Peanuts, Pignolias flaked or other nut meats chopped. 

Mix these to a pudding and if it must be im- 
proved add 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). 

CABBAGE SALAD 

3 oz. Cabbage sliced into shreds and chopped, 
l / 2 Teaspoon Caraway Seed ground, and 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix the honey into the slaw and 
serve. 

SQUASH SALAD 

2 oz. Squash or Pumpkin cut into small dice or chopped and 
i oz. Walnuts, Pecans, Brazil or other nuts chopped. Mix 

and serve dressed with 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). 
l /2 oz. Celeriac grated or Leek, Parsley or Celery minced, 

added, improves the flavor. 

MALLOW CRISPS 

Serve 

i oz. Mallow crisps (dried hollyhock flowers) whole with 
l /2 oz. Pecan meats. 



SIMPLICITY SALADS 95 

SIMPLICITY FLOWER SALAD 

Serve 
2 oz. Dandelion flowers with their stems, Althea flowers, 

Hollyhock flowers, Nasturtium flowers, Marigold 

flowers or Stock flowers with 
i oz. Mixed nut meats whole. 




A SIMPLICITY SALAD. CELERY, RADISHES AND PEANUTS. 

SIMPLICITY LETTUCE AND NUTS 

Pile neatly into a proper dish 

4 oz. Washed Lettuce and set beside it a small dish with 
i oz. Pignolias or other shelled nuts. Mix the juices of both 

while chewing. 

SIMPLICITY VEGETABLES AND NUTS 
3 oz. Curled Garden Cress rinsed and dried in a towel, Young 
Dandelion leaves, Endive rinsed, Crisp Cabbage, 
Kohl-rabi peeled, Tender Cauliflower Tops or 
white or yellow Turnip peeled served neatly to- 
gether with a small dish of 

i oz. Peanuts, pignolias, Black Walnuts, Pecans or Brazil nut 
meats. Chew one or more nuts with each bite of 
vegetable and surprise yourself with the delicious 
blend of flavors. 



96 UNFIRED FOOD 

SIMPLICITY RADISH WITH NUTS 
2 oz. Radishes (five small red radishes) laid on a lettuce leaf 

covered with 
i oz. Whole Peanuts or other shelled nuts and serve with a 

teaspoon. When the ensalivated nut juice is 

chewed into the radish juice the hottest radish 

will not bite. 



SIMPLICITY ROOTS AND NUTS 
A 2 or 3 oz. Potato peeled or Carrot or Sweet Potato 

scrubbed served with 

i oz. Peanuts or other Nutmeats. This is a palatable dish 
when the juices of the roots and nuts are blended 
in the saliva; especially to those whose tastes are 
unperverted. 

This dish will tone the alimentary canal and cure 
stomach and intestinal fermentation if all cooked 
starches are avoided. The uncooked roots cannot 
ferment and the nuts absorb the stomach acids. 

SIMPLICITY GREEN ONIONS AND NUTS 
i oz. Green Onions with nice tops average about 3. Serve 

these with 

i oz. Peanuts or other shelled nuts whole. Chewing the nuts 
together with the onions blends into a more relish- 
able flavor than if salt or sugar were used. 

SIMPLICITY SWEET CORN AND NUT BUTTER 

Lay in one dish a neat looking, fully grown 
4 or 5 oz. Young Sweet Corn ear and place beside it a butter 

chip with 

i l / 2 oz. Savory Butter, Horseradish Butter or Cranberry 
Butter. 



SIMPLICITY SALADS 97 

SIMPLICITY LIMA BEANS 
\y 2 oz. Young Lima Beans and 

i oz. Pignolias or other Nutmeats. Mix and serve. Chew 
each bean with a nut and you will learn to crave 
this dish. 

SIMPLICITY MADAPPLE AND NUTS 
3 oz. Slice of Eggplant and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias whole, chewed together is a whole- 
some dish. 

SIMPLICITY GREEN PEAS AND NUTS 
i l /2 oz. Young Green Peas mixed with 

i oz. Black Walnut-meats or other Nutmeats except Pea- 
nuts. In winter dry green peas may be soaked 
over night or till soft and dried by tossing in a 
towel. 

SIMPLICITY DAHLIA TUBERS 

Peel the thin silicious rind off from 
3 oz. Dahlia tubers and serve them with an addition of 

1 oz. Pignolias or Pecan meats. 

SIMPLICITY SUGAR CANE 

Slice or strip off the rind from 

2 or 3 Medium Sugar Cane Joints and serve the whole piths 

as a dessert. 

The sweet juice is rich in organic materials. 

SIMPLICITY DRIED FRUITS AND NUTS 

Serve 

3 or 4 oz. Dates, Figs, Raisins, Pears or Prunes with an addi- 

tion of 

i oz. Peanuts or other nutmeats. Mix the juice of the nuts 
and fruit while chewing and enjoy the blended 
flavors. 



98 UNFIRED FOOD 

SIMPLICITY OAT DISH 

Mix 

\ l / 2 oz. Hulled Oats and 

Y* oz. Nutmeats, whole or chopped. This is the most 
palatable dish that can be prepared of whole 
grains, besides it is very easily digested. Intro- 
duce it to the children, but do not let them eat 
more than a dish at a time. 

SIMPLICITY WHEAT OR RYE 

Soak the best Wheat or Rye over night or till soft 
and then rinse it and dry the surface by rubbing 
it on a towel. 

2 oz. Soaked Wheat or Rye served plain or mixed with 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Olive Oil (spoonful). .Mix 
these only on serving as the oil or honey hardens 
the grain in standing. 

This dish served plain or with honey to children 
when they have time to chew it, affords a healthy 
exercise for the teeth, saliva, tastebuds and acts 
beneficial and wholesome otherwise. It also cures 
constipation. When dressed with oil let it be 
followed with some tart fruit. 

FRUIT SALADS 

2 to 4 oz. Strawberries, Cherries, Blackberries, Raspberries, 
Currants, Gooseberries, Mulberries, Blueberries, 
Huckleberries, Apples, Pears, Plums, Prunes, 
Peaches, Quinces, Prickly Pears, Oranges, Grape 
Fruit or Bananas cut into halves, quarters, chips 
or cubes and mixed with 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias or Almond flaked, Wal- 
nuts or other soft Nutmeats chopped and if too 
tart drip over it 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or i oz. Cocoanut milk (2 spoon- 
fuls) and serve. 



FRUIT SALADS 99 

BANANA RELISH 

Drip over 

3 oz. Banana chips mixed with 
i oz. Nuts, chopped 
*4 oz. Lemon juice (teaspoonful) and serve 

SANDWICHED APPLES OR PEARS 

2 or 3 oz. Apple or Pear slices sandwiched with or only spread 

with 
i l / 2 oz. Lemon Cheese, or Mock Cottage Cheese. 

PLUM SALAD 

Stir until creamy 

3 oz. Plums or prunes chipped off the stone with or without 

the peeling and 

1 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and serve 

PEACH SALAD 

2 oz. Peaches chipped off the stone, 

i oz. Apricots, Apples or Pears diced, Plums or Prunes 
chipped and 

1 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked or other nuts chopped. Mix 

these and serve. 

STUFFED PEACHES 

Pear and cut into halves 

2 Peaches. Remove the stones and fill the cavities with 
i oz. Pignolias flaked or i^ oz. Fruit Butter. 

SLICED PINEAPPLE 

Spread on 

3 or 4 oz. Pineapple slices 

i oz. Pignolias flaked or Lemon Cheese. 



ioo UNFIRED FOOD 

STUFFED DATES 

Stuff 

3 oz. (or 12) Dates with 

y 2 oz. Almonds or Walnut halves, and serve 

STUFFED BANANA 

Take a nice sunripened 

Banana Draw back a strip of the peeling, split the 
pulp with a knife and draw it apart enough so as 
to stuff into the gap 

1 oz. Flaked Nuts or Fruit Butter. Lay the loose strip of 

peeling back and serve. 

CANTALOUPE STUFFED 

Fill the cavity of an 
8 oz. Half Cantaloupe with 

2 oz. Banana sliced, Pineapple chipped, Berries or Banana 
and Lettuce mixed and serve. For variety the 
banana may be mixed with 

T/2 oz. Cocoanut grated or the pineapple with Peanuts 
flaked 

MIXED FRUIT SALAD 

Mix 

2 oz. Apples or Bananas cubed with 

2 oz. Grapes or Berries in season and serve. 

ORANGE SALAD 

Peel off the rind of a medium Orange. Pull it 
into sections and cut them into bits. It will yield 
about 

4 oz. Orange pulp. Add to this 

^2 oz. Pignolias or Almonds flaked and 
*/2 oz. Walnuts, pecans or other nuts chopped. Mix and 
serve 



FRUIT SALADS 101 

GRAPE FRUIT SALAD 

Stir until creamy 
3 or 4 oz. Grape-Fruit cut into chips and 

i oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and serve. 

WINTER FRUIT SAUCE 

After washing the proper quantity of Dates, Figs, 
Prunes, Pears, Raisins or Currants take 
2 oz. Dried Fruit, mince it and soak it in 
2^2 oz. Water over night or till soft and then add 
y* oz. Nutmeats chopped or Cocoanut grated. Mix and 
serve 

WINTER FRUIT SALAD 

Mix 

2 oz. Apple, Banana or Orange chipped with 
i oz. Raisins or chipped Figs or Dates and 
i oz. Pignolias flaked or other Nutmeats chopped and serve. 

DRIED FRUIT SALAD 

Mix 

oz. Figs minced (3) 
oz. Dates minced (4) 
oz. Raisins and 

oz. Cocoanut grated or other nuts chopped and serve, 
oz. Cocoanut milk added improves the salad. 

MINCE-FRUIT 

Put into a chopping bowl 
i l / 2 oz. Seeded or Seedless Raisins, (6) Dates, Figs or Dried 

Pears and 

i oz. Walnuts, Pignolias, Pecans, Almonds, Brazil Nuts, 
Filberts, Chestnuts, Peanuts or Mixed Nutmeats 
and chop until there is nothing larger than a lentil. 
Serve this plain, with fresh fruit or mixed with 
meal. 



102 UNFIRED FOOD 

SELECTED FRUIT SALAD 
i oz. Banana quartered and sliced, 
i oz. Pineapple or Orange cut into chips, 
i oz. Apple or Pear cut into dice or White Grapes halved 

and 
i oz. Pignolias, Pecans, Almonds or other nuts chopped. 

Mingle these and serve or at your option drip 

over it 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or Lemon juice (spoonful) or 

both beaten together. 

COCOANUT SUPAWN 
i oz. Cocoanut grated, 
i oz. Rolled Wheat or Oatmeal, 
i oz. Raisins or other dried fruit chipped and 

1 oz. Cocoanut Milk (2 spoonfuls). Stir till the whole is 

equally moist. If there is not enough cocoanut 
milk stretch it with orange juice. 

GRAPE SUPAWN 

2 oz. Oatmeal or Rolled Wheat and 

3 oz. Grape juice. Mix these and let it soak half an hour or 

so and serve. 

Fresh grape juice is rich in tonic elements and the 

combination is easily digested. 

SOUR LENTILS 

Soak over night or till soft 

i y 2 oz. Lentils in 

i l /2 oz. Lemon Juice. Before using them for the table rinse 
them in water, then spread them on a tablecloth 
and rub them gently till the surface is dry. Sour 
Lentils can be served in various ways as directed 
elsewhere. Green Peas and Spanish Peanuts can 
be prepared like Lentils. 



FRUIT SALADS 103 

LEGUME AND APPLE SALAD 

Soak the desired quantity of chick-peas, lima 
beans, lentils or green peas six to eight hours or 
over night. Slip the lima beans out of their coats 
(testa). Before chopping any of the above rub 
them dry in a towel. Legumes young and fresh 
from the garden should be preferred in their sea- 
son. 

i l / 2 oz. Legumes chopped and 

3 oz. Tart Apple cubed or Quince chopped. Mix these to- 
gether with an addition of 

l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. The palatability of 
this dish depends on the honey. 

LENTIL SURPRISE SALAD 

Serve 

i oz. Sour Lentils (see Sour Lentils) dressed with 
l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). This is an appetizer. 

NUT AND LENTIL SURPRISE 

l /2 oz. Sour Lentils (see sour Lentils), 

l /2 oz. Pignolias, Pecans, Walnuts or other Nutmeats 

chopped and 
l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix these well and serve. 

SOUR LENTILS AND NUTS 
y 2 oz. Sour Lentils (see Sour Lentils), 
y 2 oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias flaked or other Nutmeats 

chopped and 

i oz. Raisins, Dates, Figs or Dried Pears chipped or chopped. 
Mix these and serve 



104 UMPIRED FOOD 

BRAWN FOODS 

The brawn-foods are the most natural, most wholesome, the most 
easily prepared and therefore the most economical cereal foods. They 
can be prepared in an almost endless variety to suit every palate. 
They are certain to become the most favorite cereal foods because 
they are better than baked bread. 

BRAWN FOOD OR NUT O MEAL 

i oz. Spelt, Wheat, Sweet Corn, Hulless Barley, Brazilian 
Flour Corn, Jerusalem Corn or Maize ground to 
meal, Flaked Rye, Oatmeal or Rolled Wheat 
mixed with 

i oz. Cocoanut grated, Pignolias, Peanuts or Almonds flaked 
and served in a deep oatmeal dish with a teaspoon. 
This dish is of the right consistency to encourage 
ensalivation, increase the production of saliva and 
prevent stomach fermentation. Let it follow a 
salad. 




A BRAWNFOOD. 

FRUIT ON NUT-O -MEAL 

Cover 

2oz. Nut-O-Meal with 

2 or 3 oz. Banana, Apple, Pear cut into small cubes, Orange 
or Plums cut into chips. An apple may be cut 
through the centre into thin sections and so ar- 
ranged on the meal as to represent a lotus. If 
you would make it extremely delicious drip over 
the fruit a thread of 
J4 oz. Honey (half teaspoon). 



BRAWN FOODS 105 

BERRIES ON NUT O MEAL 

Cover 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal with 

2 or 3 oz. Berries in season. Strawberries, Cherries, Black- 
berries, Currants, Gooseberries, Mulberries, 
Huckleberries, Currant Tomatoes and Husk 
Tomatoes make tempting dishes. When the ber- 
ries are very tart drip over them a thread of 
J4 oz. Honey ( l / 2 teaspoonful) 

BRAWN FOOD WITH DRIED FRUIT 

Mix into 
2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

1 oz. Figs, Dates or Pears chipped or chopped or covtr it with 

seeded or seedless Raisins. 

BRAWN FOOD WITH PEPPERS OR BLANCHED 

CELERY 

Chip over 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

2 oz. Sweet Salad Pepper or Blanched Celery and serve. 
When the sweet pepper taste is acquired this dish 
is highly relished. The peppers may be used green 
or red. 

QUINCE SPONGE 
Mix into 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

i l /2 oz. Quince grated and serve. The quince imparts to the 
meal a most delicious aroma. 

FLOR-O-MEAL 

Mix into 
2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

l / 2 oz. Dandelion Flowers, Nasturtium Flowers or Hyacinth- 
bean Flowers minced and serve. 



io6 UNFIRED FOOD 

MOCK STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE 

Cover 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal with 
2 or 3 oz. Strawberries and drip over them 
]/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. 

EGG ON BRAWN FOOD 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal or Fruit-O-Meal covered somewhat to 
one side with 

1 or 2 oz. Persimmon Egg Dressing or Persimmon Pulp. This 

is a tempting dish. 

TOMATO-CREAM ON NUT O-MEAL 

Drop over 
2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

2, l /2 oz. Tomato-Cream and serve 

(Look under Dressings). 

CEREAL SALAD 

Mix into 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

1 oz. Green Celery, Parsley, Lettuce, Oxalis, Endive or Cab- 

bage chopped or minced very fine and serve. 
This combination is both .tonic and laxative es- 
pecially when ryemeal or cornmeal is an in- 
gredient. 

PANNUTROMEAL 

Toss together 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal and 

i oz. Radishes, Cabbage, Rampion, Kohl-rabi, Artichoke, 
Pumpkin, Eggplant or Potatoes cut into small dice 
or chopped 

When barley-meal or oatmeal is an ingredient of 
this dish it is a true pan-nutrient, containing, 
food for muscle, brain, nerve and bone. 



BRAWN FOODS 107 

NUT O MEAL WITH HONEY 

Stir into 
2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 

l /2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. 

PAN NUTRO SPONGE 

i oz. Cereal Meal (see Nut-O-Meal), 

i oz. Peanuts, Pignolias or Almonds, flaked, Pecans, Black 
Walnuts or other nuts chopped or Cocoanut 
grated and 

I oz. Parsley-root, Celeriac, Carrot, Sweet Potato, Turnip, 
Parsnip, hard Squash or Salsify grated. Stir 
these into one another, but do not rub into a mass. 
Garnish and serve. 

This dish in all its possible variations is rich in 
positive tonic elements. When rye-meal or corn- 
meal is an ingredient it predominates in laxative 
qualities. With barleymeal or oatmeal as an in- 
gredient it is rich in bone building material of 
which expectant mothers must have a plenty. 

OAT BRAWN FOOD 

y 2 oz. Almonds and 

YZ oz. Dried Fruit chopped together in a chopping-bowl. 

(Medium fine). Mix into this 

i oz. Hulled Oats, whole. Put this mixture into an oatmeal 
dish and serve. This dish cannot be produced 
with any other grain except hulled buckwheat. 
Other whole grains are not soft enough nor have 
they that delicious flavor. 

This dish affords exercise for the teeth to keep 
them young and strong. This is an important dish 
for the growing girls and boys as it supplies the 
elements they need. 



io8 UNFIRED FOOD 

PULSE MEAL AND FRUIT 

Chop in 
y 2 oz. Chick-Pea Meal 

I oz. Evaporated Fruit and then mix into this 
*/2 oz. Cereal Meal and serve. The chick-pea is the only 
legume that can be used for a meal. 

SWEET CORN MEAL AND FRUIT 
2 oz. Sweet Corn Meal mixed with 

2 oz. Large Fresh Fruit chipped or Small Fruits quartered or 
halved is a wholesome dish for variation. Do not 
stir to a mush. 

BRAWN FOOD AND LOCUST BREAD 

Mix into 

2 oz. Nut-O-Meal 
I oz. Locust-bread grated and serve. Be sure that no locust 

seeds remain in the grated pulp. 

SNOW MEAL 
I oz. Unpolished Rice, Brazilian Flour Corn or Rice Corn 

ground to meal and 
I oz. Cocoanut grated or Pignolias flaked. Mix these and 

serve plain or dressed like Nut-O-Meal. 

NUT GROATS 

I oz. Whole Hulled Buckwheat (Buckwheat groats) and 
I oz. Peanuts flaked or any mixed Nutmeats chopped or Co- 
coanut grated. Toss these together and serve 
plain or otherwise like Nut-O-Meal. The above 
Nut Groats mixed with 

I oz. Evaporated Fruit chopped or chipped is another way. 
Hulled buckwheat is a very soft and crisp grain 
with a pleasing nutty flavor. Children like it 
and if their tastes are not perverted they are good 
judges. 



BRAWN FOODS 109 

MINCE-MEAL 

Put into a chopping-bowl 

oz. Cereal Meal (your choice) and 

oz. Dates, Figs, Seedless Raisins, Prunes or Dried Pears 
and chop the fruit to the size of peas and till the 
fine flower is all absorbed; then mingle it and 
serve. In chopping the meal adheres to the fruit 
and prevents it from sticking to the knife. This 
is a palatable and wholesome substitute for sweet 
bread. 

BRAWN FOOD TART 

Spread to the sides of an oatmeal dish 
2 oz. Nut-O-Meal and fill the hollow with 
2 oz. Pie Filling (see Pies). 

NUT-O-MEAL BREAKFAST 

5 to 8 oz. Any Fruit in season served with 
2 oz. Nut-O-Meal is an ideal breakfast 

BREAD FOR THE TOOTHLESS 

I oz. Oatmeal slightly ground, 
l /2 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and 
Yz oz. Locust Bread grated. Mix and serve with a small 
spoon. The unfortunate toothless need only en- 
salivate this food with the tongue. 

BRITTLE MEAL 
\y 2 oz. Rice, Rice Corn, Sweet Corn or Hulless Barley 

ground to meal and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). Mix and rub these together 
until every particle of meal has come in contact 
with honey and serve. Other grains take more 
honey. 



no 



UNFIRED FOOD 
LAXATIVE BRAWN FOOD 



Rye meal, figs and nuts in the form of Nut-O-Meal and Rye-fig- 
flakes have wholesome laxative properties on account of the high per- 
centage of dextrine and cellulose in rye and the abundance of harmless 
seeds in the fig. 

Rye meal intended for laxative brawn food must be ground coarser 
than other meals. When the mill is set as for other meals rye will 
grind so fine that it becomes pasty in the mouth and sticks in bunches 




A WALL-MILL FOR GRINDING 
CEREAL-MEAL FRESH 
EACH DAY. 



to the gums and to the spoon. Flaked rye is preferable to fine rye 
meal. Combination rye meal does not become pasty in the mouth. It 
is prepared as follows : Mix two parts of rye with one part of either 
rice, rice corn, Brazilian flour corn or maize and grind as fine as other 
meals. 



SALINE MEALS in 



SALINE MEALS 

Saline meal is something new in the line of foods. It consists of 
the dried leaves and roots of sweet herbs (rich in organic salts), and 
cereals, which are mixed and ground together. This meal is then 
mixed with an equal weight of grated cocoanut, flaked peanuts or 
pignolias and served like the "brawn-foods." It is especially useful in 
winter when green herbs can not be had. A dish of this meal which 
contains a half ounce of dried leaves is equal to a salad containing 
four ounces of green herbs and gives the same service. It should be 
used as a substitute for tonic teas. It will prove more beneficial, 
wholesome and efficient since the organic salts of the herbs are not 
disorganized by the boiling temperature besides the beneficial effect 
of the chlorophyll and cellulose is not lost. Sorrel, dock, swiss chard 
and beet leaves should be stripped off their stalks and dried in the sun 
separately. The stalks should be bunched on a chopping board and 
whittled as fine as possible and then dried until they are brittle before 
they can be ground with the cereals. The dry leaves must be rubbed 
into small particles before they are mixed with the cereals for grind- 
ing. The stalks of the swiss chard are so rich in the organic salts that 
these often crystallize on the outside of the dried stalks. Mix one ounce 
of the above dried leaves or stalks to every three ounces of hulless 
barley or wheat and grind &s you would for "brawn-foods." The 
dried leaves of celery, parsley, strawberries, common malva (cheeses), 
hollyhocks, clover and other sweet tea herbs and clover flowers may 
be used in the same proportions as directed above. Celeriac roots 
and hamburg parsley roots must be sliced across their grain as thin as 
possible and dried to brittleness. These roots impart a delicious flavor 
to the meal. They are also used in the same proportions as directed 
above. Blood beets contain so much beet sugar that when they are not 
absolutely dry they will clog the mill. Of the dried beet mix only one 
ounce to every five ounces of cereals. This meal is very sweet al- 
though it sometimes has an acrid aftertaste. The acrid principle, how- 
ever, is neutralized with flaked peanuts. 



112 UNFIRED FOOD 



CAKES AND BREAD 

When it is necessary to have a cereal production in the form of 
loaves or slices which can be handled with the fingers like the baked 
breads, then the following recipes will be convenient : 

WEDDING CAKE 

Rub and knead together 
I */2 lb. Rice ground to meal and 

12 oz. Honey. Press the dough into a 6 inch Fruit Cake Ring 
and let it stand 6 to 10 hours to harden. This 
will serve 10 to 15 persons. Double the above 
weights and press the resulting dough into an 8 
inch cake-ring with a smooth glass in the middle 
to produce a hole in the cake. While the hole in 
the cake facilitates slicing it may be utilized for 
the insertion of a live floral ornament. Place the 
cake on a cake-lace and stud the cake, artistically, 
with the choicest dried fruits, nuts and live 
flowers but preserve the symbolism of the cake. 

POUNDCAKE 
20 oz. Sweet Corn, Wheat, Hulless Barley, Rice Corn or Rice 

ground to meal and 

12 oz. Dates or Figs chopped in part of the above meal. Mix 
all the meal and chopped fruit and run it through 
the flaker twice. The second time do not let the 
flakes pile up and become a mass. Mix and work 
into the flakes 

4 oz. Prunes or dark Raisins chopped and 
4 oz. Almonds or Peanuts chopped. Now press and pound 
this mass hard into a 6 inch cake ring or four 3 
inch muffin rijngs lined with paper. Set it aside 
to harden and slice with a sharp knife in a saw- 
ing motion. This cake improves by age. 



CAKES AND BREADS 

HONEY MUFFIN 

Rub and knead together 

6 oz. Wheat, Rye, Brazilian Flour, Corn, 7 oz. Rice, Rice 
Corn, Sweet Corn or Hulless Barley ground to 
meal and 

3 oz. Honey. Press the dough into a 3 inch muffin ring and 

set aside to harden. You may also shape it into 
any convenient loaf or use the half ounce butter 
form. 

FRUIT BREAD 

Prepare it like Poundcake omitting the second and third 
ingredient and form into a long round loaf or press it into 
the half ounce butter form. 

FRUIT CAKE 

20 oz. Wheat, Rye, Hulless Barley, Sweet Corn, Rice Corn 

and Maize ground to meal 

i Ib. Dates, Figs or Dried Pears chopped in part of the above 
meal, then add all the meal, mix it well and run 
it through the Flaker twice. Press the flakes into 
a 6 inch fruit ring lined with paper and set it 
aside to harden. If you want the fruit to show 
in the slices; work into the flakes 

4 oz. Dark Raisins or Prunes chopped and then press it into 
the ring. 

NUT MUFFIN 

Beat to a butter 
2 oz. Lemon juice and 

4 oz. Pignolias or Almonds flaked and let if soak a while. 

Then add 

4 oz. Rice, Rice Corn or Hulless Barley ground to meal and 
knead to dough. Press this into a 3 inch muffin 
ring or use the half ounce butter form. 



114 UNFIRED FOOD 

HONNUT MUFFIN 

Beat to a butter 

1 oz. Lemon juice and 

2 oz. Pignolias or Almonds flaked and let it stand half an hour. 

Then add 
2 oz. Honey and 

6 oz. Rice, Rice Corn, Sweet Corn or 5 oz. Hulless Barley or 
Brazilian Flour Corn ground to meal. Mix and 
knead these into dough and press it into a 3 inch 
Muffin Ring or use the half ounce butter form. 
Let it stand to harden. 

HONNUT CAKE 

Take four times the weight of each ingredient as given for 
Honnut Muffin and prepare as directed. Press the dough into 
a 6 inch fruit cake ring or double this amount into an 8 inch 
ring and set it aside to harden. 

HALF OUNCE BREADS 

Honey Flakes and Evaporated Fruit Flakes can be pressed 
into the half ounce butter form while fresh and will keep in 
that form or can be served immediately. 




HALF-OUNCE CAKES AND THE HALF-OUNCE BUTTER-FORM. 

Fresh Fruit Flakes, Vegetable or Flower Flakes can also 
be pressed into the half ounce butter form while fresh but the 
breads must be exposed to sunshine or air until they are thor- 
oughly dry before they are palatable as the moisture prevents 
the saliva from acting on the starch. 



CEREAL FLAKES 115 



CEREAL FLAKES 

Although the "brawn-foods" are all sufficient in the line of 
natural cereal foods with an almost endless variety yet the 
recipes for cereal flakes will come in handy when odd and fancy 
dishes must be prepared. 

FRUIT OR HERBAL FLAKES 

Take either 

4*/2 oz. Sweet Corn or 3 oz. Wheat or Hulless Barley or 5 
oz. Rye ground to meal. Mix the indicated 
weight of the chosen meal with 

I oz. Apples, Blackberries or Tomatoes chipped, Dandelion 
Flowers chopped, Parsley or Celery leaves minced 
or Celery-root or Carrot grated. When it is well 
mixed run it through the flaker twice and spread 
the flakes on a large tray or sheet in the sunshine 
or an airy place to dry. Serve the dry flakes 
plain or with flaked nuts. These flakes when dry 
will keep. 

This food contains all its tonic and laxative ele- 
ments unchanged. 

EVAPORATED FRUIT FLAKES 

Chop in half of 

8 oz. Cereal-Meal 

4 oz. Figs, Dates, Raisins, Prunes or Dried Pears and then 
mix the remaining meal into it and run it through 
the flaker twice. Serve two ounces per dish plain 
or with nuts. For flavor mix into the grain, be- 
fore grinding, half of a vanilla bean pod, cut into 
very small bits, or % oz. fennel seed (spoonful) ; 
but first question the tastes of the consumer. 



ii6 UNFIRED FOOD 

CEREAL FLAKES 

Soak wheat or rye an hour and wash it in several waters 
to clean it thoroughly from all impurities. Then cover it with 
slightly warm water and let it stand over night or until the 
kernels are entirely soft. In summer the water should be 
changed several times to prevent it from getting sour. It 
should be used before the tiny white sprouts start ; for sprout- 
ing will make it disagreeably sweet. Spread the soaked grain 
on a table cloth after it is rinsed and drained and rub it until 
the surface moisture is absorbed. Now it is ready to be flaked. 
Home flaked cereals are a most wholesome food from a hygienic 
standpoint whejn the flakes are dried in sunshine. Children 
relish the sundried flakes plain; but they are generally served 
with dried fruits like "brawn-food." Run the soaked grain 
through the flaker and let the flakes fall singly on a large plate 
and spread them on a table cloth where the sun may dry them 
quickly. If the flakes emerge from the flaker so soft that they 
adhere to one another and lump the grain is too wet and should 
be allowed to dry for a while. 



SWEET CORN ROSES 

Mix 
oz. Sweet corn meal with 

i oz. Fruit of any color chipped or Dandelion flowers 
chopped or green Celery leaves minced or carrots 
grated and run it through the flaker twice. The 
second or third time it will emerge from the ma- 
chine in a large continuous flake which can be 
folded into flowers. The heart of the flowers 
may be filled with some nut-cheese to render them 
palatable. Sweet corn is the only grain that can 
be used for this purpose, because it displays the 
colors best and hangs together firmly. It also 
makes the best pie crusts. 



CEREAL FLAKES 117 

HONEY FLAKES 

2 oz. Honey mixed into 

5 oz. Wheat Meal, Hulless Barley Meal or 6 oz. Sweet Corn 
Meal or Rice Meal. Run the mixture through the 
flaker twice. Serve two ounces per dish plain, 
with fruit, vegetables or nuts. 
If annis or fennel seed flavor is relished mix J4 
oz. (2 spoonful) to the pound of grain before 
grinding. Caraway seed blends best with rye, 



ii8 UNFIRED FOOD 



SALAD PIES 

The salad pies prescribed below differ from baked pies in that they 
contain only natural ingredients which the "nature trained" digestive 
system knows how to handle for the health of the body. Pies made as 
prescribed below can not be improved for wholesomeness and they 
will taste better and look as good as the best bakery made pies. They 
are truly as wholesome as they taste both for the sick and well. A 
quarter of these pies contains the substance of a whole dinner; hence 
it is advisable to cut the pie into eight sections for a course dinner. 




UNFIRED PIES. 

PIE CRUSTS 

A pie crust for an eight or nine inch pie plate must weigh about 
eight or nine ounces. If the crusts are made as prescribed below they 
will not become soggy or too soft to hold a section of a pie. These 
pie crusts will not cause trouble in the stomach nor will any part of 
them be absorbed into the circulation unless it is properly digested. 

HONEY PIE CRUST 

Mix and rub together 
7 oz. Sweet Corn Meal or other meal and 
2 oz. Honey and run it through the flaker twice. Spread these 
flakes in a slightly oiled pie plate and press them 

even and hard with a spoon. 



PIE CRUSTS 119 

SALAD PIE CRUST 

For an eight or nine inch pie mix 
7 oz. Sweet Corn Meal and 

i l / 2 oz. Tomatoes chipped, Cranberries chopped; Carrot, 
Parsley root, or Squash grated or i% o z - Parsley 
or Celery leaves chopped. Run this through the 
flaker twice a^id immediately spread it into a 
slightly oiled pie plate and press it even with a 
spoon. Sweet corn meal is the only meal that 
can be used for this combination since all other 
meals become soggy. Do not use herbs or roots 
in crusts intended for tree fruit fillings. 

BANANA SWEET CORN PIE CRUST 

2 oz. Banana chopped fine in 

8 oz. Sweet Corn Meal. Mix it well and run it through the 
flaker twice. Spread the flakes immediately in 
a slightly oiled pie plate and press them even and 
hard with a spoon. 

HONEY FLAKE PIE CRUST 
Honey Flakes make very good pie crusts. 
(See Honey Flakes.) 

EVAPORATED FRUIT PIE CRUST 

Prepare 8 oz. of dough as directed in "Evaporated Fruit 
Flakes" or "Cereal Confection Dough" and spread it into an 
oiled pie plate before it becomes too hard to handle. This crust 
is intended for tree fruit fillings. 

BROWN PIE COVERING 

Locust Bread grated. Sprinkle it over Fruit Pies only. It 
will add that peculiar flavor and aroma of the Locust which 
some with unperverted tastes relish and others dislike very 
much. 



120 UNFIRED FOOD 



PIE FILLINGS 

The weights of the ingredients of the following pie fillings are so 
computed that the final combination will just fill a common nine inch 
pie plate. If more than one pie is to be made the weight of each in- 
gredient is to be multiplied by the number of pies intended. These 
recipes have been tested for exactness and good results. 

APPLE CREAM PIE 

Crust 8 oz. 

6 oz. Sweet Corn Meal and 

3 oz. Currants. Mix and run through the flaker. Spread 
the resulting dough into a slightly oiled plate. 
Filling 1 6 oz. 

7 oz. Apple, grated and 

3*/2 oz. Pignolias, flaked. Mix and beat these into a cream, 

add 

6 oz. Apple, cubed, mix again and spread over the above 
crust. Garnish with four or six ornamental apple 
slices and cut into 4 or 6 sections. 
One quarter of this pie equals a full and whole- 
some meal. 

HUCKLEBERRY PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
Rub to a butter 

6 oz. Huckleberries or Blueberries and 

3 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. Then add and mix care- 
fully so as to leave them whole. 

3 oz. Huckleberries. Fill this evenly into the crust and spread. 

evenly over the surface. 

4 oz. Huckleberries and press them in just enough to adhere 

to the filling. 



l'll<: FILLINGS 121 

APPLE CUSTARD PIE 

Crust 8 oz. (See Pie Crusts.) Filling 16 oz. 
Filling 1 6 oz. 
6 oz. Pignolias (or other nuts) flaked fine and 

10 oz. Apple grated. Tart apples are preferred. Mix and 

beat to the proper creamy consistency and fill into/ 
crust. Garnish, cut into sections and serve. 

STRAWBERRY AND HUCKLEBERRY PIE 

Mix and rub together 

4 oz. Pignolias (or Peanuts) flaked and 

7 oz. Strawberries macerated with a fork. Gently mix into 
this cream, without breaking them 

5 oz. Huckle or Blueberries whole. Fill into crust and 

sprinkle over the surface a few berries and press 
them in just a little so that they can not roll. 

PRUNE OR PLUM PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
5 oz. Pignolias or peanuts flaked and 

11 oz. Fresh Prunes or plums chipped off the stone with a, 

sharp knife. Mix and rub these to a creamy con- 
sistency leaving as much of the chips unmashed, 
as possible and fill into crust. 

STRAWBERRY CUSTARD PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 

Mix and rub together 
5 oz. Peanuts (or Pignolias) flaked and 
9 oz. Strawberries macerated with a fork. Fill into the crust 

and garnish with 
2 oz. Nice Whole Strawberries, pressing them half way into 

the custard. Arrange them as artistically as you 

can. 



122 UNFIRED FOOD 

APPLE AND BANANA PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
7 oz. Apple, grated and 
$ l /2 oz. Pignolias, flaked. Mix and beat these into a cream, 

add 
6 oz. Banana, cubed, mix again and spread into the crust. 

Cut into four or six sections and serve. 

BANANA CUSTARD PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
Mix and rub together 
6 oz. Pignolias (or Peanuts) flaked and 
10 oz. Bananas sliced. Fill into crust and let it stand an hour 
when it will turn to a rich chocolate brown color. 

CREAM OF PINEAPPLE PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
Chop in a chopping bowl 
12 oz. Pineapple until all is the size of corn and then beat 

into it 

4 oz. Pignolias flaked until it is quite creamy. (When the 
pineapple is green and tart add I oz. Olive Oil 
after the filling has stood half an hour). Fill 
the filling into the crust, cut it into four or six 
sections and garnish each section with a thin slice 
of pineapple. This pie can be served to both fruit 
and vegetable menus. 

MUSKMELON PIE IN AMBUSH 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 

Rub together 

7 oz. Muskmelon pulp and 
5 oz. Pignolias flaked. Fill this evenly into the crust and 

spread evenly over the surface 
4 oz. Blueberries or other small fruit. Press them in just 

enough to adhere to the filling. 



PIE FILLINGS 123 

TOMATO PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
6 oz. Pignolias flaked fine and 

10 oz. Tomato peeled (with a very sharp knife) and chipped 
into small bits. Do not strain the juice, but use it 
all in its natural proportion. Mix and stir lightly 
to a creamy consistency, but so as not to mash the 
tomato chips, and fill it into the crust. 

CRANBERRY PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
Put into a chopping bowl 

5 oz. Cranberries and chop them as fine as possible; then add 

4 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and take a wooden potato 

masher and rub the juice of the cranberries into 
the nuts. Twist the masher when pressing down. 
When the juice is well extracted add 

6 oz. Pumpkin, Squash, Carrot or Parsnip grated and rub 

until it is well mixed; then add and mix into it 

1 oz. Honey (spoonful) and fill it into the crust. In place of 

the honey grated celeriac or minced parsley may 
be used. 

PUMPKIN PIE 

Crust 8 oz. Filling 16 oz. 
Mix and rub together 

5 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked and 

9 oz. Pumpkin, Squash or Carrot grated. Let this stand while 
you prepare the under crust and then mix into 
the filling. 

2 oz. Honey. Rub it well and fill it into the crust. For va- 

riety take i or 2 oz. less of the pumpkin and re- 
place it with an equal weight of grated Celeriac 
or minced parsley. 



124 UNFIRED FOOD 

TART PUMPKIN PIE 

For the filling mix and rub together 

2 oz. Lemon juice and 

6 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. When the lemon juice is 

absorbed add 
8 oz. Pumpkin grated ; rub it until even and fill into the crust. 

CELERY CREAM PIE 

Use green celery leaves in the crust. 
Mix and rub together 
6 oz. Peanuts flaked and 

3 oz. Tomato juice or rhubarb juice. Then add and mix into 

it gently 

3 oz. Tomato chipped or banana cubed and 

4 oz. Blanched Celery chopped to the size of corn. Fill this 

into the crust and serve. 



SAUCES AND DESSERTS 125 



SAUCES AND DESSERTS 

Sauces and desserts are intended to be served as the last course 
of a dinner. The recipes given below are only samples of an endless 
variety of dishes that can be combined and served. 

BANANA MOUSSE 

Macerate with a silver fork until liquid 
2 oz. Banana and then stir into it 
i oz. Strawberries quartered or bruised, small tomato chips, 

orange chipped or small raisins and serve. 

BERRY SAUCE 

Mash with a potato masher 
2 oz. Strawberries, blackberries, huckleberries or mulberries 

and beat into this 

J4 oz. Pignolias flaked and then stir into it gently 
i oz. Whole berries of the same or different kind and serve. 

MIXED FRUIT SAUCE 

Stir together 
i oz. Oranges chipped, 
i oz. Peaches chipped, 

1 oz. Plums chipped, 

l /4 oz. Pignolias flaked and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. This dish can be com- 
posed of other fruits in their season. 

APPLE SAUCE 

Mix and beat together 

2 oz. Apple grated 

l /4 oz. Pignolias or peanuts flaked and 
i oz. Raisins seedless or chipped dates, figs or prunes and 
serve. 



126 UNFIRED FOOD 

CRANBERRY SAUCE 

Chop in a chopping bowl 
2 oz. Cranberries and mix into them 
J4 oz. Peanuts flaked and mash the mixture with a wooden 

potato masher until quite even. Then put it into 

a dish and beat into it 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. 

PRUNE WHIP 

Soak in 

2 oz. Cold or Tepid Water 
i oz. Prunes, with the pits removed, six or eight hours or 

until very soft. Then take the soft prunes out 

of the water, mash them with a potato masher, 

return the mashed pulp into the soaking water, 

add 
l /4 oz. Pignolias flaked and beat it until it is even. Then stir 

into it 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and serve. 

Serve in a neat dish. 

PLAIN DESSERT 

2 or 3 oz. Strawberries, whole, small plum tomatoes whole, 
large tomatoes sliced, cherries, raspberries or mul- 
berries ; or in winter 2 oz. selected seedless raisins 
or six stuffed dates. 



CONFECTIONS 



127 



CONFECTIONS 

Unfired confections will in time be as much in demand as candy is 
now. A large variety of confections can be prepared by following 
the directions given in the receipts below. The cerial, nut and ceronut 
confections can be eaten by the sick, the convalescent and the children 
of all ages with impunity. They are self satiating and therefore no 
one will eat more than the system requires. 




MAKING CONFECTION. 

NUT CONFECTION 

4 oz. Peanuts or Almonds cracked or chopped and 
4 oz. Dates, Figs, Dried Pears, Raisins or Prunes chipped 
or chopped. Mix the fruit and nuts in the chop- 
ping bowl and chop to separate the fruit and mince 
the large pieces. When this is well mixed run it 
through the flaker twice. Take care to run the 
the flakes so coarse that the oil is not pressed out 
of the nuts, which can be noticed on the flakes 
as they emerge. Put the flaked dough on a bread 
board and roll it to a half inch thickness and then 
cut it into suitable squares as you would caramels. 
This is ready to serve or it can be wrapped into 
wax paper to keep for some time. The dough 
pressed into a half ounce butter form serves 
equally well. Serve an ounce per dish. 



128 UNFIRED FOOD 

CEREAL CONFECTION 

4 oz. Rice, Brazilian Flour Corn, Sweet Corn, Hulless 
Barley, Rice Corn or Wheat ground to meal and 

4 oz. Dates, Figs, Dried Pears, Raisins or Prunes chopped 
in part of the above meal. Mix all the meal with 
the chopped fruit and run it through the flaker 
twice. Put the flaked dough on a bread board, 
covered with wax paper, and roll it to a half 
inch thickness and then cut it into 24 inch squares 
or I inch by three inches strips. Wrap these 
into wax paper and they will keep a year and 
longer and improve by age. When cut into two 
inch squares, they may be packed, in a paper or 
tin box, in layers between wax paper. For imme- 
diate use the half ounce butter form may serve. 
For flavor mix into each pound, of the chosen 
grain, before grinding, one Vanilla pod cut into 
bits as small as the grain or 1-3 oz. Annis seed 
(4 teaspoonfuls). Remember that annis flavor 
is delicious to some and repulsive to others. 

CERONUT CONFECTION 

2 oz. Cereal meal, 

2 oz. Peanuts or Almond chopped and 

4 oz. Evaporated Fruit chopped. Mix these and prepare like 
Nut Confection. For flavor see Cereal Confection. 



DRESSINGS 129 



DRESSINGS 

The dressings prescribed below are all as wholesome as useful. 
They are all so combined as to promote a healthy digestion and not 
to pervert the sense of taste. The dressings combined with lemon and 
orange are preferable for fruit salads and those combined with rhubarb 
juice should be only used for vegetable salads. Lemon juice should 
not be used for herbs and roots unless there is no other wholesome sub- 
stitute. This should be remembered for hygienic reasons. 

LEMONOLED DRESSING 

(Mayonaise improved) 
Mix and beat together 

YZ oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked very fine and 
i oz. Lemon juice and let it stand 15 minutes or more, then 
add 

y 2 oz. Olive Oil and beat it well into a cream. The flavor 
of this cream may be varied to suit by adding a 
half teaspoon of either ground caraway seed, 
annis seed, mustard or powdered cinnamon; but 
use your judgment as to the advisability of the 
use of the condiment for a patiefnt. 

HONEY CREAM DRESSING 

Mix and beat together 
YZ oz. Peanuts flaked very fine and 

i oz. Lemon juice and let it stand 15 minutes or so, then add 
l / 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) and beat it into an even cream. 

Olive Oil y* oz. (spoonful) may also be added to 

suit the flavor of the dish. 

BANANA DRESSING 

2 oz. Banana pulp macerated with a table fork until liquid 
makes a good dressing. 



130 UNFIRED FOOD 

ORANGE CREAM DRESSING 

Mix and beat together 
% oz. Pignolias flaked very fine and 

\y 2 oz. Orange juice and let it stand half an hour or longer. 
Beat it again until even before using. 

LEMON CREAM DRESSING 

Mix and rub together 
y 2 oz. Pignolias flaked very fine and 
YZ oz. Lemon juice and let it stand half an hour or so, and 

then add 
i oz. Orange juice and beat till quite creamy. 

ORANGEOLE DRESSING 

Mix^ and beat together 
y 2 oz. Pignolias, Peanuts or Almonds flaked very fine and 

1 oz. Orange juice and let it stand half an hour or so and 

then add 
y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) and beat it well into the cream. 

PERSIMMON EGG DRESSING 

Mix and rub into a cream 

2 oz. Persimmon pulp (of the seedless kind) and 

y 2 .oz. Pignolias flaked. If egg flavor is desired beat into it 
y oz. Olive Oil (teaspoonful). To make it more fluid add 
i oz. Orange juice or half ounce each of Honey and Lemon 
juice. 

LEMON HONEY DRESSING 

Beat together 
i oz. Lemon juice and 

y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). If this mixture should prove 

too tart you may add 
5/2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 



DRESSINGS 131 

PLAIN RHUBARB DRESSING 

2 or 3 oz. Rhubarb juice is a simple and efficient dressing to 
be dripped over nut salads. It supplies that tart 
flavor so much relished and helps to digest the 
nuts. Even plain lettuce and cabbage are relished 
with it. 

COCOANUT MILK AS DRESSING 

2 oz. Cocoanut milk is an excellent dressing for lettuce and 
cucumber salads as an addition to grated cocoanut. 

PLAIN HONEY OR OLIVE OIL DRESSING 

1/2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful) or 

Y 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful) is all that is required to make 
mild salads palatable. 

RHEUMOLE DRESSING 
Mayonnaise Imitated. 

Mix and beat to a cream 

l /2 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and' 
i oz. Rhubarb juice. Let it stand a while and then beat 
into it 

J4 oz Olive Oil (spoonful) or Honey (teaspoonful). Use 
this for vegetable salads and other dishes in 
vegetable menus. Vary the flavor to suit mild 
dishes with one of the following ingredients: 
J4 oz. Savory, Thyme, Majoram, Dill, Pepper- 
mint, Basil or Tar agon minced very fine. 1-16 oz. 
(small teaspoon) Caraway seed or Mustard 
ground or Cinnamon powdered. 
YZ oz. Parsley, Celery or Oxalis minced very fine 
or Horseradish grated. If "redhots" are craved 
horseradish makes a wholesome one. 



1 32 UNFIRED FOOD 

RHEUM CREAM DRESSING 

Mix and beat together 

1 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and 

2 oz. Rhubarb juice and let it stand 15 minutes before 

using. v Use this dressing for vegetable salads 
only. 
l /4 oz. Savory herbs minced may be added if desired. 

RHUBARB HONEY DRESSING 

Beat together 

i l / 2 oz. Rhubarb juice and 
y 2 oz. Honey (teaspoonful). If the salad is otherwise quite 

tart you may finally add 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 

TOMATO CREAM 

Beat and rub together 
2 oz. Tomato peeled with a very sharp knife and chipped, and 

y 2 oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. The flavor may be im- 
proved by adding 

J4 oz. Parsley or Celery minced and at option. 

y\ oz. Olive Oil (teaspoonful). 

CREAM OF GRAPES 

This cream is prepared like Tomato Cream with grape 
juice and flaked pignolias; omitting the herbs. 



NUT BUTTER 133 



NUT CHEESES AND BUTTERS 

The nut cheeses, butters and sandwich fillings, as prescribed below, 
are to be spread, in equal thickness, on slices of vegetables and unfired 
wafers. 

HORSERADISH BUTTER 

Mix and rub together 
I oz. Peanuts flaked and 
i oz. Horseradish grated. Let it stand five minutes or so 

and then beat into it 

1 oz. Rhubarb juice or J4 oz. Lemon juice when rhubarb 

can not be had. The citric acid of the lemon tends 
to render the alkaline elements of horseradish 
neutral and unavailable. 

FRUIT BUTTER 

Mix and rub together 
i oz. Lemon juice, Tart Apple grated or other tart fruit 

pulp and 
i oz. Pignolias or Peanuts flaked. If it suits your purpopse 

you may mix into it 
y 2 oz. Raisins, Figs or Dates chopped. 

CRANBERRY BUTTER 

Mix and rub together with a wooden spoon 

2 oz. Cranberries chopped (rather minced) and 

i oz. Peanuts flaked. When it is smooth let it stand an hour 
or so before using. You may save time and 
. "elbow grease" by running the mixture through 
the flaker which process rubs them better than 
you can with -the wooden spoon. This butter can 
be used on slices of eggplant, pumpkin, turnips, 
parsnips, carrots and on crisp cabbage leaves and 
breads from September through the Winter. 



134 UNFIRED FOOD 

LEMONOLE BUTTER 

Mix and rub together 
I oz. Lemon juice, 
I oz. Peanuts flaked, 

1-16 oz. Mustard ground ( l /2 teaspoon), and 
1-16 oz. Caraway seed ground (J^ teaspoon). After a half 

an hour beat into it 
I oz. Olive Oil (2 spoonful) or less. 

CELERIAC BUTTER 

Is prepared like Horseradish Butter with grated Celeriac 
or Hamburg Parsley Root. 

SAVORY BUTTER 

Mix and rub together 
I oz. Rhubarb juice, 
I oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked, 
y\ oz. Horseradish grated (spoonful) and 
YZ oz. Mixed Savory Herbs minced very fine. Do not forget 
Curled Cress, Upland Cress, Parsley, Green 
Celery and Dill. This is excellent for sliced veg- 
etables and sandwiches. 

GREEN SWEET CORN BUTTER 
2 oz. Sweet Corn grated off the cob on a coarse grater. Use 

the back of a knife to scrape the embrios out of 

the cob. Add to this 
I oz. Pignolias (or other nuts) flaked very fine and mix till 

smooth. 

ONION BUTTER 

Rub into a butter 

I oz. Onion chopped or diced very fine 
I oz. Rhubarb juice, Green Tomato juice or, in want of the 

afore named, Lemon juice and 
I oz. Peanuts flaked. When the onion is grated the tart 

juices may be omitted. If found too strong add 
l / 2 oz. Olive Oil (spoonful). 



NUT CHEESE 135 

LEMON CHEESE, PLAIN 

Mix and rub together 

1 oz. Lemon juice and 

2 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked. 

RHUBARB CHEESE, PLAIN 

Mix and rub together. 

1 oz. Pignolias flaked 

2 oz. Peanuts flaked and 

1 oz. Rhubarb juice. This cheese is very sweet. Three 

ounces of the peanuts without pignolias make a 
good cheese but rather dark and the pignolias 
alone produce a cheese like limburger in texture 
but the above combination is a happy medium. 

LEMON COTTAGE CHEESE 

Mix and rub together 

1 oz. Lemon juice, 

2 oz. Peanuts flaked very fine 

Y% oz. Mustard, ground, (small teaspoonful) and 
l /% oz. Caraway seed, whole. Set it aside to blend. 

HORSERADISH CHEESE 

Put into a chopping bowl 

3 oz. Cranberries and chop them as fine as possible. Then add 

2 oz. Peanuts or Pignolias flaked and rub the cranberry juice 

into the nuts with a wooden masher. Now add 
i oz. Turnip, Carrot, Celeriac, Parsley root, Parsnip or Sweet 

Potato grated and 
I oz. Horseradish grated and rub it all even with the 

masher. This cheese is deliciously piquant and 
sweet. If you would have it pungent use less 
turnip and more horseradish. 
This recipe has tonic and purifying properties. 



136 UNFIRED FOOD 

RHUBARB COTTAGE CHEESE 

Mix and rub together 

1 oz. Pignolias flaked very fine, 

2 oz. Peanuts flaked very fine, 

Y% oz. Mustard, ground, (teaspoonful), 
Y% oz. Caraway seed, whole (teaspoonful) and 
i oz. Rhubarb juice. Mix all the ingredients at once. This 

cheese is sweeter and richer than Lemon Cottage 

Cheese. 

HORSERADISH CHEESE PLAIN 

Mix and rub together 
I oz. Peanuts, flaked, and 
I oz. Horseradish grated. This is an excellent "redhot" for 

sliced carrots, parsnips, eggplants and squashes. 

CRANBERRY SAVORY CHEESE 

Prepare like Cranberry butter and add to the 
weights as given 

I oz. Parsley or green Celery and other Savory herbs minced 
very fine. This is delicious when spread on 
sliced vegetables. 

CELERIAC CHEESE 

1 oz. Peanuts flaked and 

2 oz. Celeriac or Hamburg Parsley root grated. This is a 

sweet relish. 

SAVORY CHEESE 

Mix and rub together 

1 oz. Rhubarb juice and 

2 oz. Peanuts flaked very fine. Let it stand 15 minutes and 

add and mix into it 

i oz. Mixed Savory herbs minced very fine; such as marjoram 
sage, thyme tarragon or parsley. 



NUT CHEESE 137 

VEGETABLE SANDWICH FILLING 

Mix and rub together 
I oz. Rhubarb juice, 
i oz. Peanuts flaked very fine and 
i oz. Carrot, Parsley root or Parsnip grated, then add and 

mix into it 
i oz. Celery stalks, Cabbage or Kohl-rabi chopped. When 

Rhubarb cannot be had use twice the quantity of 

grated material. 



UNFIRED FOOD 



NIBBLERS 

Nibblers is an ounce dish of such natural food as needs no prepara- 
tion or dressing which is to be eaten or nibbled at as a pastime be- 
tween the first and second courses of a dinner. Nibblers is served in 
a small deep dish such as an egg cup and set on the table before the 




SUGAR CANE PITHS, LICORICE-ROOTS AND CAROBS AS NIBBLERS. 



dinner is served, 
ceeding dinners, 
nibblers. 



The same nibblers should not be served for two sue- 
Any one of the following foods may be served as 



Sweet Raisins. 

Carobs (St. John's Bread) 

Pecan meats. 

Pignolia meats. 

Walnut meats. 

Pistachios. 

Filberts. 

Almond meats. 

Peanuts, Spanish shelled. 



Chufas (earth almonds, rush nut). 

Cocoanut (an inch square chip). 

Young peas. 

Lima beans (green or dried). 

Brazilian flour corn (whole). 

Hulled buckwheat. 

Hulled oats. 

Dried olives (one-half ounce). 



UTENSILS NEEDED 139 



THE UTENSILS NEEDED FOR PREPARING THE 
UNFIRED FOODS 

There is no such a thing as a kitchen for the naturists, sanatists or 
hygienists for they do not cook their food. Their nurse prepares all 
their food in the "pabularium," large pantry or nursery and she needs 
only the following list of utensils for her art : 

A chopping boid and 

A double bladed chopping knife for chopping cabbage, roots and nuts. 

A chopping board and 

A cake knife with a 5 to 7 in. blade for chopping and mincing salad 
herbs. 

A coarse grater for grating cocoanuts, roots, cucumbers, rhubarb stems 
and carobs. 

A flaker (or a Dana food chopper, No. 20), for flaking nuts, cereals and 
for making piecrusts and confections. (See last page). 

A zvall mill with a glass canister or a table mill for grinding cereal meal. 

An 8-inch cake ring. 

A 6-inch cake ring. 

A 3-inch muffin ring and 

A one-half ounce butter form for wedding cake, fruit cakes, fruit 
muffins and half ounce breads. 

A glass lemon juice burr. 

A rinsing pan for washing herbs and roots. 

A ivater boiler for heating water for winter soups. 

An Enterprise Juice Extractor, No. 21. Price, $2.50 (optional). 

A scale, weighing in ounces. A package scale will serve the purpose. 
Price, $1.50. 



140 UNFIRED FOOD 



MEMORANDA 

These blank pages are reserved for the insertion of good recipes 
from other sources or from experience. The author may occasionally 
publish, in the Nature Cure Magazine, new finds in the line of natural 
foods which may then be pastled on these pages. Do not scribble 
every trash you find on these pages, for it will be disgusting to you 
in the future, after many changes of unfoldment. 




HUmentaria 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 167 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 
FOOD 

Food is the substance needed to sustain the normal func- 
tions of animal life in the production of heat and energy and 
in the building, rebuilding and replenishing the tissues and 
organic fluids of the body. Food in general consists of inor- 
ganic and organic material. The vegetable kingdom is the 
great organizer and the direct or indirect source of sustenance 
of the whole animal kingdom, man included. The materials 
necessary to sustain human life are air with its oxygen, water 
and vegetable products such as fruits, succulent herbs and 
roots, cereals and nuts. Man is not a carnivore by nature of 
his anatomical structure nor by his instinctive proclivities. 

Flesh food is a second hand material, structurally approach- 
ing decomposition and saturated with the poisons of wear and 
waste which are a prolific cause of disease except for a hyena. 
Dairy products, such as milk and eggs are free from fatigue 
products or waste poisons, but being unnatural food for the 
human anatomical structure are also apt to cause disease. 
Fruits are mostly liquid food which is most wholesome. Fruits 
contain a sundigested stimulant, sugar, which is very refresh- 
ing. Nuts are the richest source of protein for tissue building. 
Cereals are the great source of starch for heat and energy. 
Vegetables are the most valuable succulent food, the juices of 
which are the prime source of tonic elements (organic salts). 
The indigestible fibre and cellulose in vegetables serves as a 
bulk for the intestines to work on and as a carrier of waste 
poisons. 

AVERAGE FOOD ANALYSIS 

In the following table is compiled the average and common 
analysis of nutrients and nutrient salts, from European and 



i68 UNFIRED FOOD 

American analytical chemists with an appendix demonstrating 
economical and hygienic values. 

WATER (H 2 O) as a component or ingredient of wholesome 
food has none but benificial attributes. 

PROTEID or nitrogenous matter is generally composed of 
six elements (C, O., H., N., P. and S.) in vaiable forms. It 
is useful in the construction and reconstruction of tissues. 
This demand, however, is not as large as the majority of doc- 
tors claim and the laity believe. Every particle of protein ab- 
sorbed into the circulation that is not used in construction be- 
comes destructive as it catabolizes into destructive acids and 
poisonous alkaloids such as carbonic, sulphuric, phosphoric, 
uric, hippuric acids and xantin, creatine creatinine and 
ptomaines. These acids then attack the living cells for their 
alkaline elements unless they are neutralized by an abundance 
of the positive nutrient salts in the blood and eliminated. The 
alkaloids must be dissolved by the positive nutritive salts for 
elimination or they become the food for germs and microbes 
which break them down into still worse poisons which then 
are the cause of fevers. Cellular waste and emotional poisons 
(explained elsewhere) absorbed along with flesh foods in addi- 
tion to that created in the system is another source of food for 
the scavengers known as disease germs. All proteid food that 
is not 'sufficiently balanced with positive nutrient salts always 
becomes a source of trouble. Unfired proteid food is not 
craved, (nor digested when injested) unless there is a demand 
for it. 

STARCH, SUGAR AND OIL (carbohydrates and hydrocarbons) 
are all composed of three elements (C, O. and H). They 
are useful in the production of heat and energy, but in this 
process they are reduced to carbon-dioxide gas which must be 
neutralized and eliminated by sodium or it will interfere with 
the process of digestion, oxydation, and cremation and thus pro- 
duce anaemia. The natural unfried condition of starch, sugar 
and oil is the most beneficial to the "nature cure" patient. Cook- 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 



169 




m 



o 
m 

n 
O 
O 

o 



CO 

35 



170 UNFIRED FOOD 

ing slightly changes the nature of sugar (unfavorably) and 
frees its nutrient salts. 

The beneficial nature of starch is almost ruined by cooking. 
Dr. Hutchison, a recognized authority on dietetics says : "cook- 
ing does not improve the digestibility of starch." Cooked 
starch is generally saturated with water which interferes with 
the penetration of saliva ( pthyalin) which is to convert it into 
sugar. Cooked starch tempts to overingestion. Starch 
rendered soluble by cooking and glucose (starch cooked with 
acid fruit) is to be avoided religiously by the "nature cure" 
patient and all who would maintain the best of health. This 
form of starch penetrates into the circulation undigested, as a 
foreign substance, interferes with arterial osomsis, and finally 
buredns the liver to be changed into glycogen or lays the 
foundation for arterio-sclerosis. 

THE ORGANIC TISSUE SALTS which are found in analyzing 
the ash, are divided into positive acid-binders, detoxicators, 
eliminators and negative acid-forming elements. The positive 
elements are the most important in the "nature cure" system. 
These elements are nature's only means to establish, reestablish 
and maintain an equilibrium between the constructive and de- 
structive functions, (anabolism and catabolism). 

The CALORY is the unit by which is measured and indicated 
the amount of heat and energy that can be derived from any 
food. One-fqurth ounce of tissue salt is the average require- 
ment per day. One-fourth of this amount should be positive 
and detoxicating tissue salt. 

The most extreme daily requirements are : 

Carbo-hydrates 9 oz. 

Proteids 2 oz. 

Oil 1.5 oz. 

Nutrient salts % oz. 

The indicated weight of each of the following foods, as a 
single diet, is more than enough of all the required elements 
for a day. 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 171 

10 to 15 oz. Cereals 

6 to 8 oz Nuts or 

40 to 50 oz. Fruits and Vegetables 

In the unfired state only two-thirds of the above weights 

are required. 

Study these tables well and you will have the shortest way 

to the fundamental understanding of hygienic and economical 

food selection. 



RELATIVE RATIO OF NUTRIENTS TO DETOXYL 

I would like to impress the reader with the fact that 

All proteid food intended to sustain and reestablish health 
must, of necessity, be well balanced with the positive, detoxicat- 
ing, (acid-binding and eliminating) elements. Why? Be- 
cause protein is composed of C, O., H., N., P. and S., which 
resolve into five different destructive acids, while carbo-hyd- 
rates are composed of Carbon, Oxygen and Hydrogen, which 
resolve only into Oine gaseous acid. As long as the carbo- 
hydrate group is unfired the system can protect itself; for it 
will not digest and absorb more than is needed. 

The most important acid-binding elements (Fe., Na., Mg. 
and Ca. ) we will consider in a group and call it Detoxyl. All 
foods that predominate in acid-forming elements are negative, 
and foods that predominte in acid-binding elements are pos- 
itive. If the reader will carefully study the following tables 
the reason for the above statements will become very clear. 
Multiply the percentage under positive salts by four and com- 
pare the result with the percentage under mineral matter. This 
will reveal to you a significant relation and the operation of the 
next following table. 

You will now have noticed that the vegetables and fruits 
are very rich in organic tissue salts and that their aggregate 
percentage of the positive salts runs extremely high. The 
cereals have not much to spare. Hence we capnot afford to 



172 



UNFIRED FOOD 



RELATIVE RATIO OF NUTRIENTS TO DETOXYL 

The variable ingredient, water, has been deducted in this table to 
show the comparative amounts from a common basis. 





Water 
Detucted 


Raised to 100 Parts Without Water 


gSi^ti 

i^?l . 

SSgcngS 


_c 
'3 
g 



o 


a! 

* 

CO LO 


Mineral 
Matter 


Salad Herbs 
Salad Roots 


89.22 

77.14 
88.17 
80.00 
11.88 
11.30 
4.52 
86.35 
73.07 
71.32 
80.80 
90.26 
95.00 
90.02 
92.00 
94.30 


18.74 
7.22 
12.43 
4.75 
13.29 
27.96 
20.16 
29.30 
53.29 
68.79 
94.39 
27.98 
23.43 
20.27 
7.23 
15.79 


3.25 
1.11 
4.31 
3.50 
3.47 
1.85 
62.95 
28.57 
40.96 
28.25 
1.04 
4.40 
5.05 
3.62 
4.82 
7.02 


62.24 
82.67 
77.34 

88.00 
80.27 
66.74 
14.26 
36.63 
1.85 


15.77 

9.00 
5.92 
3.75 
2.97 
3.45 
2.63 
5.50 
3.90 
2.96 
4.42 
25.69 
17.40 
12.23 
7.23 
8.77 


5.67 
2.61 
1.77 
1.09 
.56 
.59 
,76 
1.87 
1.40 
.29 
2.47 
14.64 
5.84 
4.65 
2.11 


Herbal Fruit 
Tree Fruit 


Cereals 


Leo-umes . 


Nuts 


Milk 


Ecrp-s 


>no 

Flesh 


Ox Blood 


.15 
41.93 
54.12 
63.88 
80.72 
68.42 


Spinach 




Cabbage 


\Vater Melon 


Tomato . 



PROTEID AND DETOXYL COMPARED 



Compare the First and Second 
Columns with the Third 


Mineral 
Matter 
Multiplied by 
Ten 


Detoxyl 

Multiplied by 
Forty 


.s * 

| 

c o> 
'3 jj 

llg 


Ill 

*- i rt 
'35 3 t* 
o <u w 

fSzz 


Salad Herbs 


J57.7 


226.8 


18.74 


Positive 


Salad Roots 


90.0 


12.1 

104.4 


to 1. 

7.22 


Positive 


Herbal Fruits 


59.2 


14.4 

70.8 


to 1. 

12.43 


Positive 


Tree Fruits 


37.5 


5.7 

43.6 


to 1. 

4.75 


Positive 


Cereals . 


29.7 


9.1 

22.4 


to 1. 

13.29 


Positive 


Legumes 


34.5 


1.7 

23.6 


to 1. 

27.96 


Neutral 


Nuts 


26.3 


30.4 " 


to 1. 

20.16 


Positive 


Milk 


55.0 


1.5 

74.8 


to 1. 

29.30 


Positive 


Effffs 


39.0 


1.6 

56.0 


to 1. 

53.29 


Neutral 


&& 
Flesh 


29.6 


11.6 * 


to 1. 

68.79 


Negative 


Ox Blood 


44.2 


98.8 " 


to 1. 

94.39 


Neutral 






i. 


to 1. 





MATERIA ALIMENT ARIA 173 

polish them or discard their brans. The legumes tend to pre- 
dominate in negative salts. The nuts predominate in positive 
salts. Milk is positive. Eggs and ox blood are about alike. 
Flesh food runs remarkably low in tissue salts and is extremely 
wanting in positive salts. Healthy blood is slightly alkaline. 
That means that the positive elements have neutralized the 
acids and have formed urates and alkaloids which are ready 
to be eliminated. Hence we take ox-blood as a standard of 
neutrality. 

THE POTASSIUM AND SODIUM SALTS COMPARED 

The organic potassium salt is not ruined very much . by 
cooking as it is quite stable. The organic sodium salt, how- 
ever, is very frail and it only requires a scalding temperature 
to break it up, when it immediately unites with some element 
in closer affinity, thus becoming a useless inorganic and stable 
salt which is so soluble that it is generally washed away with 
the scalding or boiling fluid to be cast away. This act is un- 
fortunate for cooked food because potassium is by nature super- 
abundant in the foods chosen to be cooked and then cooking 
renders them still more unbalanced. 

For this reason instinct has revealed the want of organic 
sodium and thereby has demanded the substitution of the inor- 
ganic sodium-chlorid (table salt) in cooked foods. Chemistry 
reveals that potassium may change partners with sodium, but 
that would not improve conditions since the resulting salts 
would still be inorganic. The author has sought four years 
for the redeeming good that the inorganic table salt might work 
in the human body, but he has been disappointed in finding that 
it can do nothing but injury. The organic sodium salt, on the 
other hand, is as useful and necessary in the blood as organic 
iron. It is nature's anti-toxine. 

Organic sodium in unfired foods has a most favorable con- 
stitution in that it is more easily digested and absorbed than 
the organic potassium. Thus nature has, fortunately, provided 



174 



UNFIRED FOOD 



a balancing tendency. Organic (uncooked) potassium may, 
and does, neutralize waste acids in the absence of sodium but, 
it is more useful as a tissue base. 



THE PERCENTAGE OF SODIUM AND 

COMPARED 



POTASSIUM 





Sodium 


Potassium 


Ratio 


Salad Herbs 


14.36 


27.55 


1 to 19 


Salad Roots 


15.33 


42.09 


1 to 2.7 


Herbal Fruits 


14.41 


35.31 


1 to 2.4 


Tree Fruits 


11.07 


46.50 


\ to 4.2 


Olives 


7.53 


80.67 


1 to 10.7 


Cereals . . 


2.45 


28.40 


1 to 11 6 


Chestnuts 


7.19 


57.10 


1 to 7.9 




5.20 


41.67 


1 to 8.0 


Nuts 


4.98 


30.99 


1 to 6.2 


Milk 


9.52 


23.91 


1 to 2.5 


Eggs 


23.46 


16.48 


1 to .7 


Flesh 


4.17 


41.02 


1 to 9.8 



ORGANIC IRON 

Iron is the oxydizing agent in the blood. Upon iron de- 
pends the distribution of oxygen for combustion and digestion. 
It is only available for constructing red blood, when bound in 
organic molecules. Cooking frees the iron from the organic 
molecule and renders it as useless as iron filings. Organic iron, 
when cooked, is in the form of a dilute, tincture of iron (a 
dilute poison) which is generally cast away with the boiling 
fluid. Never cook foods that are intended for toning the blood. 
Organic iron is indicated in anaemia and general debiity. Foods 
rich in this element are as important for the maintenance of 
health as for regaining health. The following table shows what 
foods are richest in organic iron. 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 175 

FOR ORGANIC IRON 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per cent, 
of Iron. 

Lettuce 91 

Spinach .86 

Strawberries .38 

Radishes * 33 

Asparagus 32 

Cabbage 21 

Onions 13 

Gooseberries ...... .13 

Horse Radish 12 

Lentils .07 

Barley 05 

SODIUM 

Organic sodium is the most important of the positive tissue 
salts in the blood. Sodium has a strong affinity for waste phos- 
phoric acid. It neutralizes this forming sodium-phosphate a 
stable molecule which has the capacity to accomodate a com- 
panion atom of sodium in loose affinity. In this form this mole- 
cule is very useful in the blood. It travels along in the blood 
until it meets carbon-dioxide. Mr. loose sodium is resistlessly 
attracted to the last and unites with her forming sodium-carbon- 
ate. Carbondioxide, however, loves freedom better than Mr. 
sodium and on arriving at the lungs she makes her escape. Mr. 
sodium now goes back to his brother sodium-phosphate. This 
molecule (di-sodium-phosphate) is now ready to repeat the 
same trick. Sodium also neutralizes the other waste acids 
forming sodium-sulphate, sodium-nitrate and urate of sodium, 
in which form they can be eliminated or reutilized. 

Without a plenty of sodium in the blood the poisonous waste 
acids would accumulate, attack the living cells and render the 



176 UNFIRED FOOD 

blood viscid, while carbon-dioxide gas would saturate the blood, 
turn it blue and then penetrate into the tissue and asphyxiate 
the whole metabolic process. Obesity is generally caused by 
the customary cooked diet in which organic sodium salt has 
been catabolized and rendered unavailable. When the system 
gets overstocked with the degenerate cells and waste poisons 
obesity finally develops into rheumatism, consumption, 
anaemia and other diseases. All such diseases can only be suc- 
cessfuly prevented and cured by ajn unfired diet rich in sodium 
and other organic positive salts, judiciously administered in 
connection with plenty of fresh air, sunshine, water and exer- 
cises to assist in distribution. 



ORGANIC SODIUM 

The water is not included in these figures 

Per cent, 
of Sodium. 

Spinach .8.68 

Swiss Chard 6.27 

Radishes 2.50 

Strawberries . . . 1.85 

Leek 175 

Pumpkins 1.79 

Asparagus 1.61 

Carrots . . 147 

Dandelion 14 

Cabbage i-37 

Lettuce 1.31 

Rampion 1.13 

Cucumbers 1.04 

Apples 86 

Figs 77 

Artichokes 51 

Lentils 44 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 177 

MAGNESIUM 

Organic magnesium is important in the construction of bone 
and cartilage in which it is found in the form of Magnesium 
phosphate and other forms. It lends flexibility to the bones and 
elasticity to the muscles and other tissue. As a positive element 
it is most important in the blood to neutralize waste acids which 
would otherwise attack the living tissue. This element like 
iron is unorganized by the influence of fire. 



ORGANIC MAGNESIUM 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Magnesium 

Spinach 1.65 

Lettuce 1.08 

Beechnuts 55 

Almonds 48 

Cucumbers 43 

Barley 39 

Corn 29 

Walnuts 27 

Figs 27 

Wheat 26 

Rye 24 



178 UNFIRED FOOD 

CALCIUM 

Calcium is the most important constituent of the bony 
framework and the teeth. Mothers' teeth often suddenly de- 
cay when this element is scantily supplied in her food or when 
unorganized by fire. During the age of tooth construction 
the food should be rich in organic calcium otherwise the teeth 
will decay in later years. If by accident the enamel of any 
tooth is injured avoid chewing acid fruit on that side ; keep the 
teeth clean; the stomach sweet and eat foods rich in organic 
calcium and the injury will heal and often small cavities will 
cease to decay. Organic calcium is another positive element 
most useful in the blood to neutralize waste acids which are 
the cause of all diseases. 



ORGANIC CALCIUM 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Calcium 

Spinach 3.06 

Cabbage 2.62 

Lettuce 2.56 

Radishes 1.65 

Onions 1.29 

Asparagus i .02 

Strawberries 92 

Carrots 78 

Figs 56 

Prunes 43 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 179 

POTASSIUM 

Potassium, the fifth of the positive elements, is not so active 
in the process of neutralization and elimination but acts as a 
solid tissue base. It is to the muscles and the softer tissues 
what calcium is to the bones. It is not necessary to select for 
potassium as all natural foods contain it in abundance; but in 
health or disease, always, select for iron, sodium, magnesium 
and calcium. In cases of scurvy and rachitis selection for 
potassium is indicated. 



ORGANIC POTASSIUM 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Potassium 

Lettuce 6.54 

Cauliflower 5.51 

Olives 4.45 

Cucumbers 4.28 

Spinach 4.26 

Radishes 378 

Cabbage 3.36 

Potatoes 2.75 

Horseradish 1.98 

Onions 1.91 



180 UNFIRED FOOD 

PHOSPHORUS 

Phosphorus is a negative element and forms a powerful 
acid which forms neutral salts in combination with all the 
positive elemeints such as ferous-phosphate, sodium-phosphate, 
magnesium-phosphate and calcium-phosphate. These salts are 
found abundantly in the bones and cartilage and in small quan- 
tities in the brain and nerves. The table below shows that an 
unfired food diet contains enough phosphorus for all demands. 



ORGANIC PHOSPHORUS 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Phosphorus 

Pumpkins 2.79 

Spinach 2.63 

Lima Beans 2.10 

Cucumbers 2.08 

Cabbage 1.80 

Lentils 1.20 

Almonds 1.19 

Barley 1.02 

Rye 1.02 

Wheat i.oo 

Onions 9 8 

Walnuts 89 

Potatoes -77 

Apples 45 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 181 

SULPHUR 

Sulphur like phosphorus belongs to the negative elements 
and is well represented in vegetables and fruit. It is used in 
the construction of hair, nails, cuticle and proteid matter. It 
needs little attention in the health question except to guard 
against the accumulation of its destructive waste products. 



ORGANIC SULPHUR 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Sulphur 

Horseradish 1.98 

Spinach 1.77 

Cauliflower 1.57 

Cabbage i.oo 

Radishes 76 

Asparagus 58 

Cucumbers ,55 

Onions 32 

Potatoes .* . . .29 

Figs 19 



182 UNFIRED FOOD 

SILICON 

Traces of silicon are found throughout the whole body. It 
is an important constituent in the enamel of the teeth and in 
the structure of hair, finger nails and cuticle. It is claimed 
to be a component of nerve fibre insulation. Science has not 
yet delved into the radiatory functions of the organic elements 
composing the animal organism. Organic Silicon is an im- 
portant ingredient in the food of the expectant mother to safe- 
guard her own teeth and to supply the demand of the unborn 
and nursling. 

ORGANIC SILICON 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Silicon 

Lettuce 1.41 

Oats 1.31 

Spinach 1.16 

Asparagus 95 

Barley 89 

Horseradish 82 

Strawberries 78 

Cucumbers 61 

Onions 47 

Cherries 30 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 183 

CHLORINE 

Chlorine is a component of hydro-chloric acid which is 
secreted as an intestinal antiseptic. It needs no detailed de- 
scription as a judicious variety of food supplies it abundantly 
for the animal metabolism. 

ORGANIC CHLORINE 

The water is not included in these figures. 

Per Cent of 
Chlorine 

Spinach 1.62 

Lettuce 1.33 

Radishes 1.08 

Cabbage 97 

Asparagus 55 

Cucumbers 51 

Carrots 31 

Cocoanuts 26 

Potatoes .16 

Lentils 15 

NON FERMENTABLE FOODS 

The following list of vegetables is arranged in the order 
of alkalinity. These roots do not and can not ferment in the 
stomach. They counteract existing fermentation, neutralize 
the acids, relax the pylorus and leave the stomach sweet. The 
pylorus does not and can not relax and pass fermenting foods 
and hence such food continues fermenting until it neutralizes 
itself by decay. There is a cause for this. The digestive juices 
of the stomach are acid and the faithful pylorus is not supposed 
to pass the contents until the acids have become neutralized 



i&j. UNFIRED FOOD 

upon the foods; besides the astringency of the acid produced 
by fermentation makes it impossible for the sphincter muscles 
to relax. 

The intoxicating product of intestinal fermentation retards 
and perverts the peristaltic function of the intestines and thus 
becomes the cause of constipation. The uncooked vegetable 
fibre and cellulose has the mechanical property of stimulating 
the peristaltic contractions and relaxations. All cooked foods 
are very much inclined to ferment because the applied heat 
frees and neutralizes their alkaline atomic ingredients. The 
potato, which is the most unfermentable while uncooked, will 
readily ferment after it is cooked. All succulent roots and 
herbs that are intended to cleanse the system of morbid matter 
are intended as laxatives and tonics must never be cooked or 
scalded. They may be prepared as directed under Salads but 
the most effective and artistic way to serve them as a curative 
food is prescribed under Simplicity Salads. Where the 
stomach has been abused for a long time with unnatural 
foods so that its function is incorrigibly perverted it may 
be advisable to avoid all cooked starchy and proteid foods 
and sweet fruits until the stomach and intestines have been 
sufficiently toned and recuperated to resist ajn accidental 
abuse. Cereal foods should not be eaten soaked or moistened 
except with saliva which is intended for this purpose. In cor- 
recting stomach troubles it is best to start with the potato and 
peanuts and chew them together the first day. The next day 
take the carrot and pignolias or another nut and so on through 
the list allowing yourself more variety of preparation and com- 
bination as you go on but on being cured do not slide back to 
cooked victuals and ! 

Some sweet fruits have a tendency to ferment in the 
stomach when they are eaten before the stomach is emptied 
of the previous meal or when there is no systemic demand for 
that "sweet element. When this is noticed take a medium hand- 
ful of Pignolias, Peanuts or other nuts and chew them care- 
fully. The protein of the nuts will absorb and neutralize the 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 185 

acid produced unless your stomach is full to the neck. If you 
have eaten too much it is best to submit to vomiting. 

NON FERMENTABLE VEGETABLES 



Irish Potato 

Carrot 

Sweet Potato 

Artichoke 

Parsnip 

Salsify 

Turnip 

Kohl-rabi 

Winter Kale 



Cabbage 

Dandelion 

Sorrel 

Cress 

Spinach 

Eggplant 

Radish 

Celery 

Lettuce 



DRY ANALYSIS OF FOOD 

The following table is carefully computed from the best 
analytical tables; all of which include the pe|r cent of water. 
Athough water is a most essential element in food it is so 
variable in the various natural foods that it makes it impossible 
to comprehend at a glance what their ultimate and comparative 
food value could be. All food material in the blood is carried 
in 80 per cent of water. Nature has provided the most valu- 
able health foods (succulent herbs and fruits) with 75 to 95 
per cent of water. All the dryer foods must be well diluted 
in the process of digestion before they can be absorbed into 
the blood. All foods are finally equally diluted. With these 
hints the reader will appreciate why the author has computed 
the table; although there is no natural food that does not con- 
tain water as an ingredient. From the column under "calories" 
it will be observed that all natural foods are practically alike as 
to their value for heat and energy when equally diluted with 
water. The column under "salts" demonstrates which foods 
are richer in "detoxyl" and tonic elements. Finally the table 
proves that the more dilute foods are generally richer in the 
essential organic salts than the more concentrated food. 



1 86 



UNFIRED FOOD 



DRY ANALYSIS OF FOOD, FOR COMPARING 
THEIR VALUE 





Protein 


Oil 


Carbo- 
hydrates 


Salts 




Calories 
Per Ounce 


Celery 


20.4 
23.4 
20.3 
17.6 
15.2 
15.8 
7.3 
17.7 
22.5 
10.1 
6.3 
5.3 
14.5 
2.4 
22.0 
28.1 
2.5 
14.0 


2.3 
5.1 
3.6 
1.5 

12.9 
7.0 
4.8 
1.6 
2.2 
.5 
1.6 
2.5 
7.0 
3.1 
57.7 
42.5 
3.3 
2.5 


59.1 
54.1 
63.9 
69.1 
61.5 
68.4 
80.7 
73.8 
69.9 
84.8 
87.9 
88.5 
75.1 
91.2 
17.6 
27.2 
92.1 
81.4 


18.2 
17.4 
12.2 
11.8 
10.4 
8.8 
7.2 
6.9 
5.4 
4.6 
4.2 
8.7 
3.4 
8.3 
2.7 
2.2 
2.1 

2.1 

j 




96.2 
101.0 
104.9 
102.4 
119.8 
113.5 
112.2 
108.1 
110.7 
109.2 
111.2 
113.0 
119.6 
114.3 
190.7 
170.2 
115.9 
114.8 


Lettuce 


Cabbage 


Radishes 


Cucumbers 


Tomatoes 


Watermelons 


Carrots 


Lima Beans .... 


Potatoes 


Oranges 


Bananas 


Oats, hulled. 


Apples. . 


Almonds 


Peanuts 


Dates 


Wheat, whole 




=,100 



THE SALTS AND PROTEIDS OF NUTS COMPARED 





The Percent 
of Ash Salts 


The Percent 
of Protein 


Ratio 


Fuel Value 
Calories per oz. 


Cocoanuts 


1.7 


5.7 


1 to 3.3 


52.36 


Chestnuts 


1.8 


6.3 


Ito 3.5 


72.10 




3.0 


14.6 


1 to 4.1 


192.47 


Brazil Nuts 


3.9 


17.0 


1 to 4.4 


195.97 


Pecans . 


1.9 


9.6 


Ito 5.0 


205.33 


Filberts 


2.4 


15.6 


Ito 6.5 


197.41 


Hickory Nuts 


2.1 


15.4 


Ito 7.3 


200.67 


Almonda 


2.6 


21.0 


Ito 8.1 


181.50 


Walnuts 


2.0 


18.3 


Ito 9.0 


197.71 




2.9 


27.9 


1 to 9.3 


190.15 


Peanuts 


2.0 


25,5 


1 to 12. 7 


154.56 


Ground Nuts 


1.8 


24.5 


1 to 13.6 


167.43 



MATERIA ALIMENT ARIA 



187 



COMPOSITION OF CEREALS 





la 
V 

ts 


Proteid 





Carbohydrates 


3 


Is 

f < 

g3-! 

.5 S 


Starch 


Cellu- 
lose 


Oats, hulled 


10.5 
10.5 
11.3 
12.1 


13.0 
12.4 
11.3 
9.3 


6.3 
1.8 
3.6 
4.4 


65.2 

69.8 
67.3 
70.4 


2.0 
2.7 
4.2 
1.5 


3.0 
2.8 
2.3 
2.2 


104.9 
98.0 
98.5 
102.0 


Barley, hulless 


Millet (Hirse) 


Kaffir Corn 


Milo-Maize 


Jerusalem Corn 
















Buckwheat, hulled 


12.6 
11.6 
10.4 
10.5 


10.4 
10.6 
12.5 
11.8 


3.0 
1.7 
2.2 
2.1 


70.3 
72.0 
71.2 

72.0 


1.7 

1.7 
1.8 
1.8 


2.0 

1.9 
1.9 
1.8 


99.4 

98.2 
98.1 


Rye. 


Wheat, spring unpeeled 


Wheat, winter 


^r\alf /Eramer Wheat \ 




Corn 


9.5 


9.9 


3.8 


73.7 


1.4 


1.7 


104.7 


Sweet Corn 


Rice Corn 
















Flour 
















Brazilian Flour Corn 
















Rice unpolished 


12.4 


7.6 


.9 


67.4 


1.5 


1.2 
4 


98.1 


Rice, polished 


White Bread 


33.4 
12.0 


8.6 

4.7 


.9 
2.2 


56.6 
77.9 





.5 
3.2 


76.4 
99.6 


Banana Meal 



COMPOSITION OF NUTS 





Water 


Protein 


Oil 


Carbo- 
hydrates 


Ash or 

Salts 


Cocoanuts 


15 


5.7 


50.6 


27.9 


. 1.7 


Cocoanut-Milk 


91 5 


7.2 


.1 




1.2 


Chestnuts 


40.3 


6.3 


4.5 


47. i 


1.8 


Pignolias 


3.3 


14.6 


61.9 


17.2 


3.0 


Brazil Nuts 


5 3 


17.0 


66.8 


7.0 


3.9 


Pecans , 


2.7 


9.6 


70.5 


15.3 


1.9 


Filberts 


3.7 


15.6 


65.3 


13.0 


2.4 


Pistachios 


4.2 


22.3 


54.0 


16.3 


3.2 


Hickory Nuts 


3 7 


15.4 


67.4 


11.4 


2.1 


Almonds 


4 8 


21.0 


54.9 


16.7 


2.6 


Walnuts 


2.5 


18.3 


64.2 


13.0 


2.0 


Butternuts 


4.4 


27.9 


61.2 


8.5 


2.9 


Peanuts 


9 2 


25.5 


38.6 


24.7 


2.0 


Ground Nuts 


7.5 


24.5 


50.0 


11.7 


1.8 



188 



UNFIRED FOOD 



COMPOSITION OF LEGUMES 





S 

"rt 



Protein 


o 


Carbo- 
hydrates 


Is 

<J5 


V 

Si- 
lls 

fc u a 


Lima Beans 


10 


20.3 


2.0 


62.8 


4 9 


99 57 


Water Deducted 

Navy Beans 


12.6 


22.5 


1.8 


59.6 


5.4 
3 5 


97 93 


Water Deducted 

Lentils 


12.0 


25.0 


1.9 


58.3 


4.0 

2.8 


99 55 


Water Deducted 
Peas 


9 5 


24 6 


1 


62 


3.3 
2 9 


101 03 


Water Deducted 










8.2 





FOOD VALUE OF SALAD HERBS, ROOTS AND SEEDS 





i 

Calories 
per 
Ounce 




Calories 
per 
Ounce 


Spinach 


7 8 


Radishes 


8 


Celery . 


5.3 


Beets 


13 1 


Lettuce 


5.0 


Parsnips . . 


17 


Endive 


5 9 


Turnips 


11 1 


Dandelion 


15.2 


Sweet Potatoes 


34 5 


Cabbage 


10.5 


Carrots 


14 


Plantain 


9.7 


Artichokes 


22.4 


Parsley 


16.1 


Potatoes 


24 


Sorrel 


16.5 


Spring- Beans . 


11.8 


Asparagus . . ... 


8.6 


Sugar Peas 


9 8 


Pimpinella .... 


27.8 


Lima Beans 


34 9 


Onions , t 


11,7 


Green Corn 


28.7 











MATERIA ALIMENT ARIA 



189 



FRUITS 





Water 


Protein 


Oil and 
Acid 


Sugar and 
Starch 


Ash or 
Saline 
Matter 


Fuel 
Value or 
Calories 
per ounce 


Cucumbers 


95.20 


.73 


.62 


2.95 


.50 


5.75 


Water Deducted 




15.21 


12.93 


61.46 


1040 




Tomatoes 


04.30 


.90 


.40 


3.90 


.50 


6.47 


Water Deducted 




15.79 


7 02 


68.42 


8 77 




Pumpkins . 


88.00 


1.55 


.28 


9.18 


99 




Water Deducted 










8.24 




Watermelons ... 


92.00 


.60 


.40 


6.70 


.60 


9,31 


Water Deducted 




7.23 


4.82 


80.72 


7.23 




Strawberries 


90.77 


1.03 


.60 


7.00 


.60 


11.23 


Water Deducted 




11.15 


6.51 


75.84 


6.50 




Muskmelons 


89.50 


.60 


.05 


9.25 


.60 


11.33 


Water Deducted 










5.71 




Currants 


85.00 


1.50 


.20 


12.60 


.70 


16.54 


Water Deducted . . 










4.66 




Oranges 


87.00 


.82 


.20 


11.43 


.55 


11.57 


Water Deducted 




6.31 


1.54 


87.92 


4,23 




Raisins, Dried 


14.60 


2.60 


3.30 


76.10 


3.40 


97.85 


Water Deducted 




3.05 


3.86 


89.11 


3.95 




Prunes 


84.10 


.70 


.10 


14.50 


.60 


17.54 


Dried 


22.00 


3.43 


.49 


71.14 


2.94 


86.06 


Water Deducted 




4.40 


.63 


91.20 


3.77 




Bananas 


75.10 


1.33 


.62 


22.03 


.92 


28.14 


Water Deducted 




6.34 


2.49 


88.47 


3.70 




Cherries 


82.40 


1.00 


.80 


15.20 


.60 


20.45 


Water Deducted 










3.40 




Apricots 


85.00 


1.05 


.21 


13.23 


.51 


16.77 


Dried 


29.40 


4.94 


1.00 


62.28 


2.38 


78.99 


Water Deducted 




7.00 


1.42 


88.22 


3.36 




Apples 


84.60 


.38 


.48 


14.04 


.50 


17.61 


Dried 


28.00 


1.77 


2.23 


65.66 


2.34 


82.33 


Water Deducted 




2.45 


3.10 


91.20 


3.25 




Figs 


79.67 


1.50 


.30 


17.93 


.60 


21.86 


Dried 


18.50 


6.10 


1.21 


71.87 


2.41 


90.53 


Water Deducted 




7.38 


1.48 


88.19 


2.95 




Gooseberries 


85.00 


.56 


1.42 


12.60 


.42 


18.55 


Water Deducted 










2.80 




Pineapples 


89.30 


.40 


.30 


9.70 


.30 


12.24 


Water Deducted 




3.74 


2.80 


90.66 


2.80 




Persimmons 


66.10 


.80 


.70 


31.50 


.90 


38.51 


Water Deducted 










2.65 




Pears 


84.40 


.60 


.50 


14.10 


.40 


17.98 


Water Deducted 










2.56 




Grapes . . 


78.30 


1.30 


1.60 


18.30 


.50 


26.32 


Water Deducted 










2.30 




Dates 


55.01 


1.12 


1.47 


41.46 


.94 




As Bought 


15.35 


2.11 


2.77 


78.00 


1.77 


88.12 


Water Deducted 




2.49 


3.27 


92.15 


2.09 




Mulberries 


84.71 


.36 


1.86 


12.41 


.66 


19.49 


Raspberries 


84.10 


1.70 


1.00 


12.60 


.60 


18.79 


Peaches 


84.30 


.50 


.10 


14.80 


.30 


17.65 


Water Deducted 










1.91 






81.90 


.60 


.60 


16.60 


.30 


21.08 


Nectarines 


82.90 


.60 




15.90 


.60 


18.76 


Lemons 


89.30 


.95 


.70 


9.00 


.50 


24.46 



190 



UNFIRED FOOD 



SALAD HERBS 





Water is 
Deducted 


Protein 


Oil 


Sugar 
Starch 


Ash 


Spinach . , 


90.26 


27 98 


4 40 


41 93 


25 fiQ 


Portulaca Oleracea. ... 


92.61 


30 31 


5 41 


43 17 


21 11 


Celery 


94.50 


20 46 


2 27 


59 09 


18 18 




92.50 


20 47 


5 87 


55 90 


17 76 


Lettuce 


95 00 


23 43 


5 05 


54 12 


17 40 


Dill 


83.84 


21 53 


5 44 


58 05 


14 98 


Goosef oot, White 


79.53 


19 25 


3 71 


62 29 


14. 75 


Endive ... 


94 13 


29 50 


2 22 


54 31 


IQ 07 


Dandelion 


85.63 


19.56 


4 80 


62 42 


13 22 


Rhubarb Stalks 


94.80 


10 59 


5 00 


71 86 


12 55 


Cauliflower 


90.90 


24 51 


4 18 


58*90 


12 41 


Leek 


87.62 


9 6 09 


5 57 


55 98 


12 36 




90.02 


20 27 


3 62 


63*88 


12 23 


Mugwort 


79.01 


26.49 


5.53 


55.83 


12.15 




93.40 


40 90 


6 10 


40 90 


12 10 


Plantain 


81.50 


14 32 


2 22 


71 78 


11 68 


Parsley 


85.05 


24.48 


4 81 


59 47 


11 24 


Sorrel 


92.19 


30 98 


6 14 


52 38 


10 50 


Summer Savory 


77.88 


19 76 


6 46 


64 24 


9 54 




92.00 


27.15 


3 46 


59 95 


9 44 




75.35 


22 92 


4 99 


65 11 


6 98 


Onion . . 


89.60 


13.03 


3.42 


77.91 


5.64 



(Cellulose, which is so useful in stimulating: intestinal peristalsis, constitutes from 1 to 6 per cent 
of herbs. It is included in the carbohydrates.) 

SALAD ROOTS 





Water is 
Deducted 


Protein 


Oil 


Sugar 
Starch 


Ash 




92.17 


17.54 


.50 


69 12 


11 84 


Beets 


87 50 


13.00 


.00 


77 00 


9 00 




84.25 


10 32 


.17 


77.78 


8 73 




83.70 


21.08 


.00 


69 57 


8 35 




89.57 


12.32 


.37 


78.09 


8 22 


Kohlrabi 


85.57 


33.75 


.45 


56 69 


8 11 


Sweet Potatoes 


67.80 


6.22 


.86 


83 85 


8 07 




84.10 


9.91 


2 85 


80.24 


7.00 




87.05 


17.72 


1.54 


73.79 


9.95 




76.70 


11.58 


.35 


80.47 


6.44 




79.50 


12.64 


.98 


81.36 


5.02 


Potatoes.. 


78.00 


10.14 


.46 


83.81 


4.59 



SALAD SEEDS 





Water is 
Deducted 


Protein 


Oil 


Sugar 
Starch 


Ash 


String Beans . .... 


89.25 


21.00 


3.00 


69.00 


7.00 


Sugar Peas 


91 00 


22.31 


1.58 


69.21 


5.90 


Young Green Peas 


74.60 


27.56 


1.97 


66.53 


3.94 


Lima Beans 


68.50 


22.54 


2.22 


69.84 


5.40 


Green Corn 


75.40 


12.60 


4.47 


80.08 


2.85 



MATERIA ALIMENTARIA 



191 



CEREALS 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS 

OF 100 PARTS 



The Water is Deducted 
in These Figures 


Percent of 
Total Salts 


c 




Sodium 


Magnesium 1 


Calcium 

II 


Potassium 


Phosphorus 


3 

JS 

3 


c 

I 


Chlorine 


Oats 


3.35 


,04 


.06 


.25 


.12 


.61 


.87 


.06 


1.31 


03 


Barley . . . 


3 10 


05 


13 


39 


09 


51 


1 09 


09 


89 




Buckwheat 


2 29 


,04 


.14 


.28 


,10 


53 


1 .11 


05 


005 


03 


Rye 


2.15 


.03 


.02 


.24 


.06 


.68 


1.02 


.06 


.03 


.01 


Wheat 


2.12 


.03 


.05 


.26 


.07 


.65 


1.00 


,01 


04 


007 


Corn 


1 90 


02 


02 


.29 


,04 


,57 


,86 


02 


04 


04 


Rico 


1.37 


.02 


.06 


,15 


.05 


.33 


.71 


,007 


.04 


.001 

























NUTS 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS 

OF 100 PARTS 



The Water is Deducted 
in These Figures 


Percent of 
Total Salts 


c 



c 


& 
I 


Magnesium 


Calcium 


Potassium 


Phosphorus 


3 

J2 

a 
1 


_u 

c7) 


Chlorine 


Cocoanuts 


2 00 




17 


18 


09 


86 


33 


10 


01 


26 


Almonds 


9, 73 


02 


01 


48 


23 


77 


1 19 


01 


008 


006 


Walnuts 


9 05 


03 


05 


27 


18 


63 


89 


001 






Chestnuts 


3 01 


005 


21 


22 


12 


1 72 


55 


11 


,05 


' 09 

























LEGUMES 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS 

OF 100 PARTS 





| t 






a 






















a 




8 


3 


1 

a 


3 




1 




II* 


a 
o 


1 





o 

3 


1 


1 


I 


ft 




g 


Lima Beans 


5 4 


03 


06 


,38 


,27 


2 25 


2 10 


18 


03 


10 


Lentils 


3 3 


07 


44 


08 


91 


1 15 


1 90 






15 


Peas 


3 9 


08 


04 


26 


15 


1 38 


1 15 


11 


03 


05 

























192 



UNFIRED FOOD 



FRUITS 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS 
OF 100 PARTS 



The Water is Deducted 
in These Figures 


V*. M 

II 

83 




| 


Sodium 


Magnesium 


Calcium 


Potassium 


Phosphorus 


Sulphur 


Silicon 


Chlorine 


Strawberries 


6 50 


38 


1 85 




9? 


1 37 


90 


20 


78 


10 


Gooseberries 


2 80 


13 


28 


16 


34 


1 08 


55 


17 


07 


02 


Cucumbers. . 


10 40 


14 


1 04 


43 


76 


4 28 


2 08 


55 


61 


51 


Pumpkins 


8 24 


22 


1 79 


,29 


65 

. w 


1 65 


2 79 


20 


62 


03 


Apples . . 


3 30 


05 


86 


29 


13 


1 18 


45 


20 


14 




T^' 

Figs .... 


2.9" 


04 


77 


27 


56 


,84 


04 


19 


16 


08 


Prunes 


3.77 


09 


84 


13 


43 


1 83 


60 


18 


15 


02 


Olives 


5.51 


05 


41 


01 


41 


4 45 


07 


06 


04 


01 


Cherries 
Watermelons . . . 


3.40 
7.23 


.07 
3? 


.08 
68 


.19 
39 


.25 
7? 


1.76 
3 24 


.54 
1 01 


.17 

88 


.30 

28 


.04 
21 


Pears. . . 


2.56 


03 


22 


13 


20 


1 40 


39 


14 


04 


01 


Grapes 


2 30 


01 


03 


11 


26 


1 29 


36 


14 


06 


M3 


Peaches 


1.90 


0? 


16 


10 


15 


1 04 


29 


11 


03 




Blueberries. . 


1 65 


08 


,08 


10 


13 


96 


29 


05 


02 





VEGETABLES 





Percent of Salts 
After Water 
is Deducted 


c 
o 


g 

s 


MaRnesium 


Calcium 



1 

cs 
I 


Phosphorus 


u 

p 

.c 
5 
"3 

C/3 


c 



<J 

173 


Chlorine 


Spinach 


25 69 


86 


8 68 


1 65 


3 06 


4 26 


2 63 


1 77 


1 16 


1 62 


Swiss Chard 


17 76 


23 


6 27 


76 


2 11 


4 49 


1 94 


69 


53 


74 




17.40 


91 


1 31 


1 08 


2 56 


6 54 


1 60 


66 


1 ,41 


1 33 


Dandelion 


13.22 


12 


1.40 


1 13 


2,70 


5,24 


1.05 


,29 


.94 


,35 


Cauliflower 


12 41 


12 


73 


,46 


69 


5 51 


2 45 


1 57 


46 


42 


Leek 


12.36 


94 


1 75 


36 


1 28 


3 79 


2 04 


91 


91 


38 


Cabbage . . 


12.23 


21 


1 37 


44 


2 62 


3 36 


1 80 


1 00 


.46 


.97 


Rampion 


12.10 


02 


1 13 


26 


72 


5 50 


1 02 


47 


2 42 


56 


Radishes 


11.84 


33 


9, 50 


36 


1 65 


3 78 


1 28 


76 


10 


1 08 


Asparagus 


9.44 


32 


1 61 


40 


1 02 


2 26 


1 75 


58 


.95 


, 55 


Rutabagas 


8.35 


05 


47 


32 


94 


3 92 


1 21 


80 


09 


55 


Kohlrabi 


8.11 


24 


53 


55 


88 


2 84 


1 76 


,71 


.20 


.40 


Celeriac 


7.00 


10 


02 


40 


90 


2 96 


89 


38 


,27 


1 08 


Carrots 


6 95 


07 


1 47 


30 


78 


2 55 


87 


44 


16 


31 


Horseradish 


6 44 


12 


26 


19 


53 


1 94 


50 


1 98 


82 


06 


Onions 


5.64 


13 


14 


26 


1 29 


1 91 


98 


32 


48 


13 


Artichokes 


5.02 


19 


51 


15 


16 


2 37 


70 


25 


.50 


19 


Potatoes 


4.59 


05 


14 


22 


12 


2 75 


77 


29 


09 


.16 

























MATERTA ALIMENTARTA 



193 



VEGETABLES 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS OF IOO PARTS 





cent of Salts 
fter Water 
Deducted 




5 

3 


inesium 


E 

p 


assium 


en 





1 

<f> 


3 

.a 


a 




1 

o 




r 4 


o 

h 


1 


& 


03 

u 


o 

fc 


& 
OH 


"3 
c/) 


c/5 


3 
o 


Spinach. 


25.69 


86 


8 68 


\ 65 


3 06 


4 '^6 


2 63 


1 77 


1 16 


1 62 




17 76 



&) 


6 27 


76 


2 11 


4 49 


1 94 


69 


53 


74 




17 40 


91 


1 31 


1 08 


2 56 


6 54 


1 60 


66 


1 41 


1 33 


Dandelion. .... 


13.22 


12 


1 40 


1 13 


2,70 


5 24 


1 05 


29 


94 


35 


Cauliflower . 


12 41 


12 


73 


46 


69 


5 51 


2 45 


1 57 


46 


42 


Leek 


12.36 


94 


1 75 


36 


1 28 


3 79 


2 04 


91 


91 


38 


Cabbage . 


12.23 


21 


1 37 


,44 


2 62 


3 36 


1 80 


1 00 


46 


97 


Rampion 
Radishes 


12.10 
11.84 


.02 
33 


1.13 

? 50 


.26 

36 


.72 
1 65 


5.50 
3 78 


1.02 
1 28 


.47 
76 


2.42 
10 


.56 

1 08 


Asparagus 


9.44 


32 


1 61 


40 


1 02 


2 26 


1 75 


,58 


95 


55 


Rutabagas . , 


8.35 


05 


.47 


32 


94 


3 92 


1 21 


80 


09 


55 


Kohlrabi 
Celeriac 


8.11 
7.00 


.24 
10 


.53 
02 


.55 
40 


.88 
90 


2.84 
2 96 


1.76 

89 


.71 

38 


.20 
27 


.40 

1 08 


Carrots 


6.95 


07 


1 47 


30 


78 


2 55 


87 


44 


16 


31 


Horseradish 


6 44 


12 


26 


19 


53 


1 94 


50 


1 98 


82 


06 


Onions 


5.64 


13 


14 


26 


1 29 


1 91 


98 


32 


48 


IB 


Artichokes . . , 


5.02 


19 


51 


15 


16 


2 37 


70 


25 


50 


19 


Potatoes 


4.59 


05 


14 


22 


12 


2 75 


77 


29 


09 


16 

























FOOD VALUE OF SALAD HERBS, ROOTS AND SEEDS 





Calories 
per 
Ounce 




Calories 
per 
Ounce 


Spinach 


7 8 


Radishes 


8 


Celery 


5 3 


Beets 


13 1 


Lettuce 


5 


Parsnips . 


17 


Endive 


5.9 


Turnips 


11.1 


Dandelion 


15 2 


Sweet Potatoes 


34 5 


Cabbage 


10 5 


Carrots 


14 


Plantain 


9.7 


Artichokes 


22.4 


Parsley . 


16.1 


Potatoes 


24 


Sorrel 


16.5 


Spring Beans 


11 8 


Asparagus 


8.6 


Sugar Peas 


9 8 


Pimpinella .... 


27.8 


Lima Beans 


34 9 


Onions 


11 7 


Green Corn 


28.7 













Is that part of the healing art which treats on natural 
food to be administered as a remedy for disease. 



This is the first time " Tropho - Therapy " appears in print. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 197 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS AND FOOD 
PROPHYLACTICS 

The prime cause of the common diseases is unnatural food 
and to this is added airproof and sunproof clothing and un- 
hygienic housing. The artificial life of the civilized world is 
the general cause of all misery. True health of body and mind 
can be only realized when every vital organ functionates nor- 
mally and in harmony with every other organ. Happy only is 
he who lives in harmony with Nature's plan. The true art of 
healing is employed in that system of cure which removes the 
cause of the disease and assists vitality to correct the injury 
and restore normality of function. There is a principle in 
Nature which forces health to assert itself but the process is 
painful and therefore it is so diligently suppressed by the doc- 
tors ignorant of these facts. Where a perfectly natural life 
is pursued health will assert itself without any attention of 
the patient or the doctor. The natural diet prescribed in the 
above pages is the first essential in the restoration of health as 
well as for its maintenance. The most common diseases are 
treated separately in the following pages. The possible causes 
of those diseases are there explained a^nd followed with instruc- 
tions how to remove the causes and how to assist Nature in 
the restoration. 

THE LAW OF HEALING AND CRISES 
Cause of Diseases 

The primary causes of nearly all diseases are lowered 
vitality and accumulation of waste. In the hurry scurry life 
of today these causes often go on for years without coming 
to light or being recognized until the system is wholly saturated 
with the waste poison and vitality is so low that resistance is 
out of the question. 



198 UNFIRED FOOD 

Source of Waste Poisons 

1. The natural oxydation (combustion) of food for heat 
and energy. 

2. The natural wear on muscles and nerves. 

3. The natural destruction of old tissue to make room for 
reconstruction and growth. These are the three natural 
sources of waste material which need never cause disease as 
long as there is a proper provision of natural food, pure 
water, fresh air and sunshine. The organs of elimination will 
do the rest. Unnatural (cooked) food and flesh are the dan- 
gerous sources of waste poisons. Natural (unfired) food is 
anabolic and the portion absorbed into the circulation con- 
tinues to be anabolic (constructive) until it has served its pur- 
pose when it naturally becomes catabolic (destructive). The 
anabolic tendency of food is destroyed by cooking and flesh 
is already in the process of catabolism. 

There is a tendency to over-injest on cooked food because 
the organic salts are freed and have lost their savor and cooked 
proteids and starches do not act properly on the taste buds be- 
sides they can be gulped uninsalivated and untasted. 

Every particle of cooked proteid food, absorbed into the 
circulation, that is not used in the process of metabolism (con- 
structive exchange) catabolizes (breaks down) into five de- 
structive waste acids and since the positive organic salts, in 
cooked food, are already neutral they can not neutralize nor 
eliminate these waste acids. Cooked starch which is, digested 
and, not used for heat or energy is stored in the form of adipose 
tissue (the cause of fatty degeneration). But more than this; 
cooked starch, like glucose, becomes so soluble that it can be 
absorbed into the circulation undigested. This foreign sub- 
stance causes untold trouble and confusion in the circulation 
of blood and finally becomes a burden to the overworked liver 
which must transform it into glycogen (a form of sugar). 
Unfired starch never causes any trouble because the saliva de- 
termines the quantity to be digested. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 199 

Flesh in addition to what was said before is saturated with 
the poisons of emotion, uric and other acids and alkaloids, 
which were not eliminated, and ptomaines (the product of 

decomposition). Beef extract is concentrated. All 

cooked foods have a predisposition to ferment in the stomach 
and to decay in the intestines and the gases formed penetrate 
the alimentary walls and saturate the whole system. All 
these poisons circulating in the system irritate the nerves and 
brain and thus cause emotional disturbances which result in 
the production of emotional poisons. 

The Apparent or Secondary Causes of Disease 

These are not causes at all. They are the means which the 
organism adopts to eliminate some of the poisons. A dose of 
cold air, a good dose of fresh air, a dose of hot air, a dose of 
sunshine, a dose of hard work, a dose of exercise, a dose of 
excitement, a bruise, a boil, a dose of cold, hot, sour or sweet 
food or a dose of microbes (germs, bacteria, scavengers) may 
be the means of starting an elimination in acute forms of 
disease. 

The normal blood can circulate through contracted cap- 
illaries unhindered. It is only the blood which is saturated with 
waste and filth that clogs the capillaries and causes painful con- 
gestions. Pure blood can not be infected with microbes. There 
is nothing for them to live on. Microbes are scavengers. They 
can only live and thrive in blood and tissues saturated with 
waste and filth. Evqn intestinal germs and worms object to 
feed on unfired fruit and vegetable juices. They prefer the 
filthy juice and decaying remnants of cooked flesh and other 
cooked food which will decay in the intestines. When the 
germs infest any part of the body the blood carries to them 
all the waste and filth until it is exhausted. Then the germ 
dies of starvation in the abundance of its own waste which is 
a subtile irritant causing inflammation and high fevers. This 
marks the crisis of any disease. If from this time on the patient 
subsists on rational unfired food he is forever cured. If at any 



200 UNFIRED FOOD 

time before the crisis the blood is saturated with a poison 
(medicine) more powerful than the subtile waste of the germ 
the disease is not cured but becomes chronic and slumbers until 
that poison is worn out, when it will surely reappear in the 
same or another form. Chronic diseases are acute diseases 
subdued and slumbering, and can only be truly cured by awak- 
ening their acute form to be helped to a crisis. The medical 
poisons which interfere with the development of the crisis are 
often so persistent that the patient, temporarily relieved, finally 
succumbs to their influence in a sad and lingering death. 

Mercury, as an example, invariably produces paralysis, 
insanity or other destructive diseases after a period of a few 
years. The crisis of the worst bacterial disease under proper 
Naturopathic care never turns out fatally but leaves the patient 
to become healthier than before. The bacterial waste product 
must be eliminated from the patient to keep the fever from ris- 
ing too high. This is best and most effectually accomplished 
by means of the wet pack. By means of the reaction of this 
cold wet application the circulation of the blood is stimulated 
which is the means of nursing the bacteria to death. Here 
I must fortify those who have inherited chronic tendencies 
and those who have, by ignorance or imprudence allowed some 
acute disease to be suppressed by the use of those deceitful 
drug's. 

It often happens, when patients have lived a strict unfired 
food diet, from five to eight weeks, that the poison suppressing 
an acute disease is first eliminated and then the suppressed 
disease reappears in the same or another form. But some- 
times the system eliminates the most dangerous drug poisons 
by reacting on them, causing non-bacterial healing crises. 
These then must be assisted by all the natural means of 
elimination; such as, water, air, sunshine and food. Under 
the above circumstances the uninformed patient might 
become discouraged in persisting with the diet. This 
would be like dropping a good thing near the point of 
success. This law of Healing Crises was taught by 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 201 

Hipocrates, the father of medicine, about 400 B. C. Prisnits 
in Germany rediscovered this law and the nature-cure system 
and became a world-famous healer. By means of a strict 
nature cure life, as prescribed in this book, any one can quickly 
and completely neutralize, eradicate and eliminate waste poisons 
and even drug poisons from the system and so increase the 
power of resistance that the common miasmic and other diseases 
with their crises stand no show at all. When the prime cause 
of disease is eliminated there is no secondary cause nor crisis. 

OBESITY 

Disorderly proliferation is a degenerate condition of the 
body in general, due to saline starvation and is the outcome 
of consenting to the temptations of the baneful "Culinary 
Artifice." 

The organic salts of Sodium, Calcium, Iron, Silicon, Mag- 
nesium, Manganese, Potassium, Chlorine and Fluorine are the 
cement and mortar in the construction and repair of the Human 
Temple. These organic salts are only available in unfired veg- 
etables, fruits, grains and nuts. Cooking reduces them to min- 
eral salts in which form they are poisons like medicines which 
cannot be used in the metabolism of the system and must be 
eliminated and excreted sooner or later like common table salt. 

The adispose tissue in obesity is carbohydrate material 
stored for want of the binding salts. The carbohydrate and 
nitrogenous substances are a superabundantly available food- 
stuff in a cooked regime. 

By way of an occasional uncooked relish a scanty quantity 
of organic salt finds its way into the circulation and this is im- 
mediately utilized to neutralize nitrogenous waste products and 
what is left unites with other waste products to render them 
soluble for elimination and even then some of the waste must 
be stored with the adipose tissue. Loose adipose tissue is 
wholly impossible with uncooked foods and what reserve tissue 
the system produces by their use is healthy, well distributed, 



202 UNFIRED FOOD 

firmly bound and never inconvenient. Any person subsisting on 
the proper unfired foods may become trimly sleek, but never 
unshapely fat. 

The only natural curative elements for obesity are the un- 
fired organic salts which are so profusely abundant in a tireless 
variety of succulent herbs and roots. The acid element of fruits 
is not to be overlooked as it helps to oxidize and thus eliminate 
the unnatural adipose store to make room for healthy tissue. To 
get the best results, the fruits and vegetables must not be mixed 
at the same meal. Fatty degeneration of any vital organ is a 
localized obesity and must be dieted as such. 

The curative diet in this case should consist of plain fruits 
for breakfast and lunch and plain green vegetable salads dressed 
with, the least possible quantity of nuts, simply to render them 
palatable. This diet is also advisable in several cases of bilious- 
ness and indigestion. If continued uninterruptedly for several 
days or a week the system will be relieved and toned in a sur- 
prising degree. In addition to this diet the patient must take 
all the fresh air exercise he can get in rain or shine, and in an 
extreme case he must not forget to. take nude sunbaths. 

MORNING SYMPTOMS AND CONSTIPATION 

If you have a bad taste in the mouth, a coated tongue, a 
headache or that tired feeling and allied symptoms in the morn- 
ing, let that remind you that you have taken too much of a din- 
ner, perhaps too much variety, too much soluble starch (cooked 
starch) or too much commercial sugar, which has burdened the 
liver by direct absorbtion or by fermentation. Decaying meat 
in the intestines produces -the same symptoms. The gases of 
fermenting foods produce auto-intoxication and this is the 
cause of constipation. The system must be well filled with 
stench if it comes to the mouth. Unfired potato and root salads 
cannot ferment. They will leave the stomach sweet, start the 
peristalsis of the intestines and will carry off intestinal poisons. 
They cure constipation and restore the alkalinity of the blood. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 203 

Eat vegetable salads only, for a day or so and the above symp- 
toms will abate. 

When constipated eat plenty of salads, especially the green 
salads to tone the intestinal tract. The fibrin of vegetables, the 
cellulose of rye and the numerous seeds of figs promote intes- 
tinal peristalsis. Let "laxative brawn food" be the last course 
of fruit menus. 

ANAEMIA 

The first cause of anaemia is the perversion of instinctive 
functions and the suppression of instinctive knowledge by 
ignorance of Nature's laws. This then leads to the use of un- 
natural foods which induce diseases and thus create a demand 
for, medicines with their string of baneful and chronic after 
effects. The vital organs are generally overtaxed in rotation 
by abuse or want of natural tonic food elements, until the spleen 
is involved, which is a storage battery and factory of vital fluid. 
Return to Nature. Replenish the blood with the wanting or- 
ganic iron and sodium by an unrestricted diet of green veg^ 
etable salads or alternate with berry salads in their season. Re- 
member Dock, dandelion, asparagus, spinach, the cresses, let- 
tuce and radishes and of the fruits, strawberries and goose- 
berries. The brawn food should contain fresh homeground 
wheat, barley, rye or unsteamed oatmeal with grated cocoanut 
or flaked pignolias. By all means provide for plenty of fresh 
air, outdoor exercise and sunbaths. Nature will do the rest. 
In cases of nervous diseases plenty of sleep and rest must be 
prescribed in addition to fruits and vegetables, since they are 
generally caused by vigorous drains on the general vitality. 

INEBRIETY AND GLUTTONY 

After expounding the general value of unfired foods in 
health and disease, someone asked. "What will you do with 
those who are addicted to the use of chocolate, tea, coffee, wine, 
beer, alcohol and effervescent drinks, smoking, and chewing 
tobacco and drugs?" And another added, "Overeating on 



204 UNFIRED FOOD 

cooked food ?" Answer Nothing more than command an ab- 
solute abstinence from salt and irritating condiments and ad- 
vise an unrestricted use of lucious fruits, when thirst demands, 
and such unfired foods that contain all the necessary elements of 
nutrition. The starved, irritated and crippled cells of the body, 
in general, cause an irresistible craving for elements that are 
not found in the foods ingested and then "civilized ignorance" 
misinterprets this natural craving. 

The craving for strong drinks and intoxicants is a perverted 
state of the sense of bibativeness which misinterprets the or- 
ganic craving for purgative liquids (water and fruit juice) 
and neutralizing salts. Ninety-five per cent of drunkenness 
starts in the kitchen. Flesh food and beer or wine is one set and 
fermentable (cooked) starch combinations and brandy is an 
other set. The irritant waste products in flesh food and the salt 
and "redhots" which must cover the flavor of the corpse stimu- 
late a craving for an internal bath to wash out the irritants. 
Cooked foods produce a tendency to overeating, because its 
satiating elements are destroyed. Habitual overeating distends 
the stomach. 

A distended stomach cannot entirely empty its contents. 
The revolting mixtures of such a stomach always ferment, espe- 
cially when the leaven of the last meal infects the next. Habit- 
ual fermentation in the stomach inflames its walls, which 
creates a perpetual hunger and thirst. Water does not quench 
this thirst, but rather aggravates the condition by aiding the 
process of fermentation. Now the troubled brain goes in search 
for a temporary relief which is found in brandy or diluted 
alcohol which kills the germs of fermentation; as it were, by 
their own waste and paralyzes the nerves which communicate 
the pain of the inflamation and the person seems relieved. 

But ? ! Take away the cause for inebriety and the cure 
will surely follow. Substitute the flesh by nuts, since the latter 
are richer in proteid and non-fermentable. Cut out table salt, 
peppers and all "red hots." Avoid all fermentable (cooked) 
foods. Eat nothing that stimulates an abnormal appetite or 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 205 

thirst. Eat sparingly to aid digestion. Natural (unfired) 
foods tend to create an aversion for all intoxicants. The very 
odor of intoxicants becomes repulsive when the taste buds and 
olfactory nerves have become normal. The following receipe 
is prescribed by many good doctors. "Spend the money, which 
buys your liquors, for luscious fruits, such as oranges or other 
juicy fruits, and eat the fruit whenever you crave for liquor." 
Unfired fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains supply these 
craved elements with unerring certainty. Unfired foods will 
correct the perverted bibativeness and alimentiveness. They 
will give natural exercise to the whole octave of the senses of 
taste and smell and bring about their (normal functioning. 
When these senses are normal there will be an aversion for un- 
natural flavors and odor in the same way as one dislikes in- 
harmonious sounds and colors. Wholesome unfired food is the 
natural material out of which can be constructed a healthy body 
with normal functions and unperverted senses. 

A CURE FOR ALCOHOLISM. 

Editor Chicago American: 

Some time ago one of your readers sought 
a way to aid her husband fight the drink 
habit "he willing." So far I have failed to 
see any suggestions, so will give you a posi- 
tive cure for alcoholism. 

In the morning, before breakfast, an orange 
should be eaten, one about 9 o'clock, one be- 
fore dinner, one before supper and one before 
retiring, making five for the day and costing, 
as a rule, less than two drinks of so called 
whisky. 

The second week four oranges per day will 
be found sufficient, the third week three and 
the fourth week the tippler won't be able to 
bear the smell of alcohol. If the oranges make 
too great a demand on the pocketbook substi- 
tute apples which will be almost, but not so 
effective. 

J. M. SMITH. 

3400 Sixtieth St. 

DYSPEPSIA AND INDIGESTION 

This trouble is primarily due to the ingestion of foods pre- 
diposed to fermentation. Cooked foods cause 90 per cent of 
this trouble. The mischief is not done by the want of digestion, 
but by the fermentation of the food which produces an as- 
tringent acid which contracts the pylorus and thus keeps the 



UNFIRED FOOD 

fermenting food in the stomach until it decays. The function 
of the pylorus is not to relax until the acid fluids of the stomach 
are neutralized by the alkaline element of the food. Cooked 
foods which are robbed of their alkaline ingredients cannot 
neutralize the acid of fermentation nor the acids of the stomach 
and so . Some sweet fruits which are poor in alkaline salts, 
such as blackberries, often ferment in the stomach, especially 
when the previous meal has been fermenting. This is easily 
cured with a handful of peanuts well masticated, provided there 
is no cooked food in the stomach and provided your stomach 
is not full up to the neck. When such fermentation of the 
stomach is allowed to become habitual it will pervert every 
function of the stomach by auto-intoxication which will spread 
to the whole alimentary canal. Enlargement of the stomach 
is due to overingestion of cooked food which subsequently fer- 
ments. As to the cure; study the list of "nonfermentable 
foods/' Avoid all cooked starches and sweets. Green herbs 
will tone the stomach. Do not fill the stomach to the full ex- 
tent of its capacity. Do not eat food when you are excited or 
very tired. 

The stomach often becomes so inflamed from constant fer- 
mentation that the pain involved produces an artificial craving 
and hunger that cannot be quenched. Many a heartfailure has 
been the result of eating to satisfy this false hunger. 

HEART TROUBLES 

There are various forms of heart troubles, with only two 
causes, exhaustion of vitality and unnatural or ignorant feed- 
ing. The heart, the spleen, the liver and stomach are sym- 
pathetically connected. There is the "tobacco heart" the 
"coffee heart," the "whiskey heart/" the "fatty heart" (see 
Obesity), the "rheumatic heart" (see Rheumatism) and "pa- 
ralysis of the heart" due to narcotic and toxic elements which 
cripple the nerves that control the heart. The gases of ferment- 
ing foods come under this head. The remedy and prevention 
lies in unfired food rich in the organic salts which tone the 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 207 

blood, the nerves and the muscles and which eliminate the waste 
poisons. Fresh air, sunshine and exercise must not be for- 
gotten. 

LIVER DISEASES 

The liver must endure untold abuses from the use of cooked 
and predigested foods. Nature never trained the liver or any 
part of the alimentary tract for the use of cooked foods. In 
other words; man was not evoluted by the side of a cooking 
stove or caldron. All the unjnatural foods ingested and absorbed 
must be corrected by the liver. This is an unexpected outrage ; 
for it has enough to do without correcting dietetic mistakes. 
The liver is -the laboratory of the body. It neutralizes waste 
poisons and filters effete matter from the blood and transforms 
it into bile which emulsifies oil for assimilation and stimulates 
the peristaltic movement of the intestines. It converts starch 
and sugar into glycogen (a muscle lubricant) and stores organic 
iron for the building of new blood corpuscles. In order to do 
all this work and several other chores right, the liver must be 
furnished plenty of organic iron, sodium, clorine and other ele- 
ments which can only be extracted in available form from un- 
fired green salads, root salads and fruit salads. Tomatoes, 
sweet salad peppers and eggplants are the best liver tonics. 
Cooked or baked starches, dairy products and meat must be 
religiously avoided. 

DIABETES, BRIGHT'S DISEASE AND CALCULUS 

All these diseases originate from saturating the blood with 
soluble starches and cooked proteids. These elements over- 
work the liver until it can no longer produce the proper di- 
gestive fluids. When the liver is unable to correct the half 
digested foods absorbed, the kidneys must take up the burden 
and thereby become ruined. Remove the cause, i. e. cooked 
food, and eat plenty of green herbs and uncooked roots for their 
tonic elements and pignolias for organic protein. The unfired 
starches can do the patient no harm, for they cannot be ab- 



208 UNFIRED FOOD 

sorbed unless they are properly digested. When the urine con- 
tains brickdust sediment flaxseed water is a good drink. 

COLDS AND GRIPPE 

These and similar diseases are due to the clogging of the 
waste and filth saturated blood in the contracted capilaries of 
the skin and thus obstructing elimination through the pores 
of the skin. This waste poison then is- forced through the 
mucous membranes and you call it a catarrh of some kind. If 
the mucous surface cannot eliminate it, then the grippe bac- 
teria come in and feast until you cease to produce the poison, or 
until normal skin action is reestablished. It is very persistent 
and generally runs its course when once started. The best way 
to curtail it is to help it along all you can until all the waste is 
cleaned up in your system. Avoid milk, eggs, cooked food and 
bottled air. Let salads be your important dish. Reestablish 
normal skin action by cold sponge baths followed by brisk rubs, 
cold air baths and sun baths. Do not bundle yourself in a 
dozen garments. Let the air get at the skin through porous 
garments. Make friends with Mr. Cold. Try to catch him 
when you have time to fool with him and he will never annoy 
you when you are busy. 

RHEUMATISM 

In a normally healthy human being subsisting on natural 
foods the blood is alkaline because it is rich in positive tonic, 
eliminating and acid binding elements, which are sodium, cal- 
cium, magnesium and iron. The blood of those who suffer 
from rheumatism is sluggish and viscid, being overloaded with 
acids and negative elements. Such sufferers are generally will- 
ingly and stubbornly addicted to the use of meats, cooked leg- 
umes, cooked or baked cereals and fruits, preserves, commercial 
sugar and salt and invariably coffee, tobacco and alcoholic 
liquors. What little of positive elements the legumes and cer- 
eals contain have been changed to inert or irritating inorganic 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 209 

(mineral) salts by the process of cooking which has rendered 
them unavailable to the normal metabolism of the system. 

Such a patient can be cured, either by giving him anaestetic 
poisons until he goes to sleep forever or by feeding him natural 
foods which are rich in positive organic salts. The most im- 
portant foods for overcoming rheumatism are lettuce, spinach, 
cresses, radishes, cabbage, dock, dandelion, asparagus, sweet 
potatoes and carrots, and of the fruits cucumbers, tomatoes, 
strawberries and apples. The starches of unfired cereals and 
the protein of nuts and uncooked legumes can do no harm as 
long as the patient eats enough of uncooked herbs, roots and 
fruits. It is best, however, not to eat more than three ounces 
of nuts per day. Let the patient improve his skin elimination by 
daily sunbaths and cold sponge baths. Water saturated with 
alkaline mineral elements or other inorganic salts may produce 
symptoms similar to rheumatism. In this case the pain is not 
caused by destructive acids, but by the irritation of inorganic 
salts. These salts are best elimi(nated by feeding on plenty of 
juicy fruit rich in organic acids. 

The rheumatic patient should give the affected parts plenty 
of blood circulating exercise by day, regardless of the pain it 
may cause, and bundle the same parts in wet packs by night. 

GOUT 

The gout is caused by the same uric acid producing foods 
as rheumatism and it is aggravated by the inorganic salts in 
fermented wine and baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). The 
patient must avoid all foods which tend to ferment in the 
stomach and intestines and follow the instructions given the 
rheumatic patient. It is the uret of soda which deposits around 
the gouty fingers and toes. 

TONSILITIS 

The tonsils are glands which are essential in the process of 
purifying the blood. Nature has provided no superfluous or- 
gan in the whole vital anatomy. The tonsils cannot be cut out 



210 UNFIRED FOOD 

without destroying their function. The thyroid gland seems 
to be of less importance than the tonsils and yet when it is 
cut out the patient is certain to die within a few years. Any 
doctor that advises a surgical operation for tonsilitis is either 
unscrupulous or insane. When the blood becomes oversat- 
urated with the poisons absorbed from flesh food and those 
produced from it, the tonsils become overburdened and clogged 
with that poison and a fungus growth sets in to feed on the 
poisons they contain. This often involves the very tissues of 
the tonsils. The inflammation, swelling, pain and discomfort 
is partly due to the irritating waste of the fungus, but espe- 
cially to the vital activities i. e. the attempt to save the tonsils. 
Patients who suffer from tonsilitis really suffer from flesh 
poison, which their constitution is not able to eliminate. Cut- 
ting out the tonsils does not cut out the poison which produces 
tonsilitis, rheumatism or cancer. These patients must cut out 
flesh forever and diet on natural food if they wish to avoid the 
recurrence of tonsilitis. 

The nature cure treatment consists of fasting from one to 
three days, of an ice cold pack around the neck until the swell- 
ing subsides, of rubbing the tonsils occasionally to aid the cir- 
culation in them and feeding on herbal salads and herbal fruit 
or other fruits until well. Smaller and smaller attacks of ton- 
silitis may return occasionally until the system has eliminated 
all that flesh poison. If the patient will reestablish normal 
skin activity and skin elimination by taking nude sun and fresh 
air baths he may be cured for good. 

CONSUMPTION 

Consumption is the "Great White Plague" of the civilized 
world. Dr. Senn, after his travels over the world, reported that 
consumption was unknown among all the uncivilized races of 
the North and the South. In the circular of 1908, issued by the 
Illinois State Board of health are these statements "Of all 
diseases common to man, consumption is the most widespread 
and most deadly. Fully one-seventh of all mankind die of this 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 211 

disease. Consumption is the cause of one death out of every 
four deaths which take place between the ages of twenty and 
fifty!" Consumption consumes more lives than all the other 
germ diseases together. Dr. Lindlahr says: "Consumption is 
the creation of civilized man." Nature cures all diseases after 
their prime cause is removed. 

Therefore let us trace consumption back to its prime cause. 
The biased medical profession traces consumption to the tuber- 
cular bacillus. This germ belongs to the fungi of which the 
yeast germ is an example. It generally inhabits the pulmonary 
tissues, but it often infests other parts of the body or other 
vital tissues. It is a natural scavenger like other fungus 
growths which only grow where there is filth and decaying 
matter. Its infection is only taken when the vitality is lowered 
and when the blood is saturated with filth (nitrogenous and 
carbohydrate waste). It generally starts its active career un- 
noticed in those lobes of the lungs which are kept inactive by 
unnatural habit or constraint of clothing. 

This germ finds it most favorable when the blood is so sat- 
urated with filth that the tissues are not able to unload their 
waste and are rather forced to absorb filth from the blood. Now 
what causes the blood to become so saturated with filth? The 
causes are unnatural food, unhygienic clothing, unventilated 
bedrooms and dwelling rooms, want of sunshine and drug 
poisoning. Flesh food is by nature saturated with unelimin- 
ated tissue waste and the digestive decomposition of its nitro- 
geneous elements adds acid poisons to this waste. All cooked 
foods are short in the eliminating elements, sodium and calcium 
and the oxidizing agent iron. Cooked food is rendered too 
soluble and therefore is absorbed in quantities greater than the 
circulation needs and this superfluity acts like so much waste. 
The artificial flavor of cooked food stimulates overingestion 
and this adds the consequences of stomach fermentation and 
intestinal gases. Now as to clothing. Covering the body with 
half a dozen of almost airproof garments, so interferes with 
skin elimination that the skin actually becomes inactive and 



212 UNFIRED FOOD 

pale. The poisons that ought to have been eliminated through 
the skin are now forced on the lungs and the scavengers get 
the benefit of it and thrive the better. The air of unventilated 
bed rooms and dwelling rooms soon 'becomes saturated with the 
poisons exhaled and its oxygen is simultaneously exhausted. 
This condition shuts off osmosis and stores the poisons for the 
scavenger. Consumption is a house disease. Without sun- 
light man, like vegetation becomes pale, because the building 
of red blood corpuscles is partially dependent on light. Sun- 
light is Nature's fungicide and functional stimulant. Drug 
poisons, such as mercury and other metallic poisons, so inter- 
fere with the functions of elimination that these alone often lay 
the foundation for consumption. Now let me emphasize that 
unnatural food, airproof clothing and unventilated housing are 
the prime causes that make consumption possible. Do away 
with these causes and return to Nature and the Bacillus Tu- 
berculosis will be harmless. The macrophites of the white 
blood corpuscles, often consume and digest millions of these 
germs. As long as the blood circulates unobstructed by filth 
the germs cannot take lodgement. Even the medical profes- 
sion admits that there is no medicine that can cure consumption 
except fresh air and plenty of it. The "Out-Door Sleeping" or 
the sleeping under a "Window Tent' is approaching the 
"Nature Cure" system. Dr. Albert P. Francine, in his recently 
published work on Pulmonary Tuberculosis, suggests the fol- 
lowing (irrational) dietary. I shall here copy it from the cir- 
cular of 1908, issued by the Illinois State Board of Health, and 
correct it to illustrate the right and the wrong dietary 
treatment. 



DIETARY FOR CONSUMPTIVES 

7 A. M. One pint of milk and 7 A. M. One glass of herbade 
two raw eggs, taken in bed. (diluted herb juice sweetened with 

honey}. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 



213 



8:30 A. M. Breakfast. Fresh 
fruit, cereals, bacon, salmon, her- 
ring or tender steak, chop or 
chicken ; dry toast, wheat bread or 
corn bread ; a pint of milk or cup 
of coffee, chocolate or cocoa. 



8 A. M. Breakfast. A small 
dish of fruit and nut salad. 



10 A. M. One pint of milk and 
one raw egg. 



10:30 A. M. One glass of 
orangeade (or pure orange juice). 



12:30 P. M. Lunch (heaviest 
meal), preceded by half hour's 
rest. Thick soup puree of vege- 
tables, especially the albuminous 
legnmen ; a roast and vegetables ; 
bread with plenty of butter; simple 
desserts with sugar. 



12:30 P. M. Lunch, preceded 
by half hour's rest. One glass of 
warm dilute grape juice, or other 
fruit juice; a dish of fruit and nut 
salad composed of strawberries, 
pineapple, grapefruit or apple, fol- 
lowed by a small dish of brawn 
food and some dried olives. 



4 P. M. One pint of milk and 4 P. M. Eight ounces of to- 
one raw egg. matoes or a glass of herbade or 

cucumber juice. 



6 P. M. Supper, preceded by 6 P. M. Supper, preceded by 

half hour's rest. Light, simple half hour's rest. An unfired, warm 

meal, cold meats, light salads, vegetable soup; an herb and root 

tongue, sardines, etc. Pint of milk salad with olive oil or nuts, fol~ 



or cup of weak tea, or cocoa. 



lowed by a small plain brawn 
food. 



9 P. M. One pint of milk and 9 P. M. A glass of rhubarbade 
two raw eggs. sweetened with honey, or other 

vegetable juices. 



9:30 P. M. Patient goes to bed. 9:30 P. M. Patient goes to bed. 

The above dietary will increase This dietary will eliminate and 
the proteid and carbohydrate waste neutralize the period and carbo- 



poisons in the blood and thus feed 
the scavengers. 



hydrate waste poisons and tone 
the blood and thus starve the 
scavengers. 



214 UNFIRED FOOD 

The following is the good advice given by the above men- 
tioned Board of Health. "Live 'out-of-doors' day and night, 
winter and summer. Have no fear of night air and none of 
draughts. Court the open air. Avoid 'stuffy' houses or rooms. 
Avoid all excesses. Drink plenty of good water. Keep your 
body clean. Take no drugs . Be hopeful and cheerful. 
'Take systematic exercise or massage to favor assimilation and 
excretion/ ' 

"God gives man an abundance of fresh air and sunlight for 
his daily use. Man, with the perversity which characterizes 
the human race, immures himself behind wooden or stone walls 
and excludes or grudgingly admits even that air and sunlight 
which is necessary for his well-being. The sickness and death 
resulting from this violation of the laws of nature is invariably 
attributed to 'the will of God/ The germs which cause con- 
sumption thrive in the living quarters of man where sunlight 
and fresh air are excluded/' This is credit to the board of 
health and some doctors but they are all ignorantly ignorant 
of the therapeutic (curative) value of natural foods. 

The lungs of almost every corpse dissected show the scars 
of cured consumption and often the very germs are found im- 
prisoned in a calcium secretion. When the system is properly 
fed with the necessary elements these secretions are re- 
dissolved and the germ is then digested by the macrophites 
of the blood. Natural food rationally selected in combination 
with light, air, water and a cheerful mind is the panacea for 
all diseases. Take a cold sponge bath twice a day and rub dry 
with the palm of the hand and take a nude sun bath once a day. 
This is to stimulate and restore the eliminative functions of 
the skin. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 215 

CURE FOR CONSUMPTION 

FOUND IN THE JUICES OF 

HOMELY VEGETABLES 

New York Physicians Believe Fangs 
of White Plague Are Drawn; Every 
Subject of Experiment Has Recovered 

NEW YORK, Aug. 25., 1907. In a circular 
just sent to all the prominent physicians of 
New York the announcement is made by the 
New York Post Graduate Hospital of the dis- 
covery of a vegetable fluid which has been ac- 
cepted as a positive cure for consumption. 

Results covering many months of exhaus- 
tive and costly experiments show complete 
cures in every instance. Eleven patients who, 
on beginning the treatment in January, were 
sufferers from the disease have been dis- 
charged as fit subjects for a life insurance 
risk, and fifty others still under observation 
in the hospital are on the high road to recov- 
ery. 

The discovery is this: That a compound of 
raw vegetable juices is the long-sought for 
element of diet needed to cure obstinate cases, 
where the lesions in the lungs persisted after 
the ravages of the disease had been apparent- 
ly checked and the general health of the body 
restored, as testified by an increase in weight. 
The use of the new compound has overcome 
this difficulty to the complete satisfaction of 
a disinterested board of doctors. 

The circular to the profession thus describes 
the method of preparing it: 

Method of Preparation. 

"Equal parts by weight of raw vegetables 
are scrubbed with a brush in fresh water, then 
mixed and chopped until the particles are 
small enough to go into the receiver of a 
grinding machine, where the mass is reduced 
to a pulp. The pulp is collected and the 
juices squeezed out through coarse muslin 
cloth. 

"Vegetables first used were potato, onion, 
beet, turnip, cabbage and celery. Later were 
added sweet potato, apple, pineapple, carrot, 
parsnip, and later still rhubarb (pie plant), 
summer squash, tomato, spinach, radishes, 
string beans and green peas with the pods." 

This juice is prepared every day in the hos- 
pital and is kept on ice. Each patient re- 
ceives two ounces twice a day after meals. 
Discoverer la Modest. 

Dr. John F. Russell, to whom all the credit 
is given for the discovery, will commit himself 
only to the most modest claims for his dis- 
covery. 

Thus the Doctors Grope in the Dark I 



216 UNFIRED FOOD 

CANCERS AND TUMORS 

Cancers and tumors often grow where the tissues have been 
injured (internally or externally) by accident, surgery or 
hypodermic injections. However, they need a predisposing 
condition for their existence and growth. The blood and 
tissues saturated with proteid waste poison is the predisposing 
cause. In ninety cases out of a hundred the trouble has been 
traced to flesh foods. The blood which contains a normal quan- 
ity of the positive organic salts absolutely eliminates the cause 
and cures or destroys the disease. The cure consists in ab- 
staining from all animal foods and all cooked proteid foods 
and feeding on those unfired foods which are rich in organic 
sodium, calcium, magnesium and iron. The green herb and 
root salads are the most important. See the list of foods under 
the above named elements. 

OSTEO MALACIA 

("Mother's Disease") 

Softening of the bones and crumbling of the teeth is radically 
due to irrational food selection. It may be ascribed to the in- 
gestion of white flour products which are robbed of the bone 
building elements ; cooked mushes sweetened with refined sugar 
and cooked proteid foods which too readily catabolize into five 
or more destructive acids (as explained elsewhere). When 
these proteid acids accumulate in the circulation they must be 
neutralized by food rich in organic calcium, magnesium, sodium 
and potassium or they will attack the bony structure or the 
teeth for their alkaline constituency. Cooked foods and arti- 
ficial foods (the best of them), are poor in organic salts; the 
elements necessary to form healthy blood and lymph, the bone 
building elements, acid-binding elements and eliminating ele- 
ments. 

The above disease, Rachitis (rickets of children), inflam- 
matory rheumatism and gout are all, in concise terms, due to 
the ingestion of food poor in the organic basic elements calcium, 
magnesium and potassium and consequently too rich in acid 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 217 

forming material, such as cooked carbohydrates and proteids. 
The cure, therefore, consists in the feeding on natural unfired 
food which is rich in positive tonic elements and includes the 
elements for bone repair and construction. The most important 
cereals are 

(1) Hulled Oats 

(2) Hulless Barley 

(3) Wheat (unpeeled). 

eaten as prescribed in this book. For other foods rich in the 
required elements study the lists under Calcium, Magnesium, 
Sodium, Phosphorus and Silicon. The fetus in constructing 
its skeleton requires an abundance of the above elements to 
form the bony matter. Nature favors the child at the expense 
of the mother. Hence it often happens that expectant mothers 
uninformed on the food question of this period pay a tooth or 
two for each child. When the ignorant mother becomes af- 
fected with general osteo-malacia she goes to a biased surgeon, 
an unscrupulous surgeon or a surgeon affected with the "mania 
vivisecti" who promptly performs bilateral ovariotomy and 
thus unsexes the poor pitiable victim. 

INTESTINAL WORMS 

Helminthiasis is a disease contracted by persons with im- 
pure blood and sluggish intestinal movement from measly flesh, 
fish and vegetables grown in barnyard manure. Worms do not 
infest healthy bodies. Flesh, eggs, milk and cooked proteid foods 
are most favorable to the development of helminthes. The tape- 
worm (taenia solium or cestoidea) may live peacefully and un- 
beknown in the intestines of those who feed on a mixed cooked 
diet but he objects, squirms and causes trouble if they attempt to 
persist in feeding on a vegetable and fruit diet. Some have ex- 
pelled the tapeworm by eating cocoanut and drinking the cocoa- 
nut milk after a fast but this may not always be successful. The 
following remedy is more efficient and safe. After fasting from 
morning till evening eat slowly the meats of two ounces of 
pumpkin seeds for supper taking nothing else till morning. In 



-2i8 UNFIRED FOOD 

the morning take one or two ounces of fresh castor oil which 
may be mixed in a little lemonade. If the patient will sit in a 
tepid bath the worm is more easily expelled. Another remedy. 
Grind to powder two ounces of root bark of the pomegranate 
(granatum). Soak half an ounce of the powdered bark in each 
of four cups filled with two ounces of warm water for six hours 
and while you fast. Then swallow the contents of the first cup 
and take the rest at inervals of thirty minutes. Vegetarians 
can only contract tapeworms from impure water but it is not 
so apt to take lodgement in the healthy and active intestines. 
Maw worms or stomach worms (ascaris lumbricoides) and pin- 
worms or rectal worms (ascaris vermicular is) seldom take 
lodgement in the intestines of those subsisting on natural fruits 
and herbs. These worms are often expelled by the simple use 
of coarse wheat, corn or kaffir corn meal. The pecan nut some- 
times does the work. Tart fruits and carrots have been pre- 
scribed. The author has expelled maw worms with a dish of 
yarrow salad. Another efficient remedy is worm seed 
(santonica), (Chenopodium ambrosioides or anthelminticum). 
The seed is powdered or ground and mixed into a salad or 
nut-o-meal. A small teaspoonful of santonica is a large dose. 
It is an irritant and in large doses may produce dilatation of 
the pupils. Granatum should also be used only as a last resort. 

CHILDREN'S DISEASES 

Every mother who nurses embryonic life should desire, 
crave and cultivate all the graces, virtues and capacities which 
she would plant into that embryo for its inheritance. She should 
not allow thoughts or passions to enter her mind which she 
would not have her child think or talk about. She should feed 
on such variety of natural foods as will keep her body in robust 
health and supply the embryo with all the required elements 
of nutrition. 

Only then can she expect to be blessed with a child that 
has inherited a healthy body, a sane mind and no annoying 
tempers and weaknesses. She should know that the quality 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 219 

of mother's milk is largely influenced by her diet and mental 
attitude. If mother's milk must be substituted let it be un- 
sterilized, uncooked and from an absolutely healthy cow fed 
on natural food and not on brewery slop and swill. The nursing 
mother should never touch alcoholic beverages, such as beer 
and wine, as these deplete the quality of her milk. The child 
should be gradually weaned on the dilute juices of sweet fruits 
until it is able to partake of undiluted juice, the soft pulp, nut 
milk, sweet succulent herbs and flaked cereals. With a judicious 
selection of unfired fruits and vegetables rich in the essential 
organic salts the growing organism can be absolutely fortified 
against the prevalent diseases. 

Summer complaints, measles and diphtheria can invariably 
be traced to inferior or diluted cow's milk. Rickets and scrof- 
ula can be traced to unnatural foods, such as mushes sweetened 
with refined sugar, the products of white flour and other 
"predigested"( ?) foods which may be rich in carbohydrates 
and proteids (acid formers) but so poor in organic salts that 
they can not produce healthy blood, lymph and tissues. When- 
ever and as long as the child is afflicted with the fever crisis 
of any disease it should never be fed solid food even in liquid 
form until the fever subsides and the natural appetite returns. 
Many a child and even "grownups" are sent to the other world 
by ignorant feeding during the fever period. Dilute orange 
juice or other fruit or vegetable juice may be administered to 
quench the thirst and keep the fever from rising too high. The 
wet packs are the most useful to keep the fever under control. 
Never allow your child to be vaccinated with the- vaccine which 
is the carrier of at least ten other awful diseases. 

THE POX 

Here is another disease that is caused by unnatural and 
irrational diet and unsanitary clothing and housing. Variola 
(smallpox), scarlatina, measles and rubella are by cause alike 
and differ only in degree of activity. Smallpox is a zymotic 
disease which originates in fermentation and decompostion of 



220 UNFIRED FOOD 

the blood saturated with tissue and proteid waste (urea) which 
failed to be eliminated by the kidneys and the skin. The bacteria 
and micrococci which characterize the pox and its variations 
are only the concomitants of decomposition, the scavengers of 
death. When urea is not promptly eliminated from the blood 
by the kidneys it forms a septic poison which saturates the 
capillaries of the skin and gathers in small abscesses which are 
cesspools wherein these bacteria (scavengers) breathe. Slug- 
gish and stagnant blood saturated with urea and albuminous 
matter on the verge of putrefaction is the absolute requirement 
for the growth and development of these bacteria. They are 
powerless against internal and external cleanliness, ventilation 
(pure air), sunshine and wholesome food. 

The fever of this disease is due to the irritation of the poi- 
sonous waste of the bacteria. This poison must be promptly 
eliminated by the cold wet packs in order to keep the fever in 
abeyance. As long as the fever lasts the patient should not be 
offered any solid or liquid food except diluted orange juice or 
other diluted fruit or vegetable juice to quench the thirst and 
assist elimination. Food during fever disturbs elimination and 
adds fuel to the, already -raging, fire. The only reliable pre- 
ventive is natural food rich in tonic, neutralizing and elim- 
inating salts (unfired vegetables and fruits) in combination 
with plenty of fresh air, sunshine and exercise. To promote 
a healthy skin activity and skin elimination wear light and 
porous clothing and do not forget your daily sponge bath and 
sun bath. Vaccination belongs to the age of superstition. It 
has perpetuated (domesticated?) the pox and other bacterial 
diseases. Blind faith in vaccination has led many to live an 
unsanitary life. Vaccination has been proven useless as a pre- 
ventive. It has killed millions of children and adults by in- 
fecting them with the pox, with syphilis, with erysipelas, with 
pyaemia, boils and other infectious diseases and the doctors 
know it. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 221 

FEVERS 

During the fever crises of most diseases Nature takes away 
all desire and appetite for food; because, during the fever 
Nature burns up all undesirable and waste material and elim- 
inates it through every eliminating organ, externally as well 
as internally into the alimentary canal therefore, since food 
induces a process of absorption, it would interfere with the 
process of elimination into the alimentary canal. If you wish 
to help Nature to be successful then do not interfere with her 
plans and operations. Let the patient drink only water or 
dilute fruit juice until Nature reestablishes hunger and ap- 
petite for food. Food would add fuel to the already raging 
fire and danger would follow. 



CLIMATIC FEVER 

There are hundreds of vegetarians living in the worst fever 
districts enjoying the best of health simply because they live 
on the luscious fruits and luxuriant vegetables that grow 
around them. If the traveler would leave his canned and 
pickled meats, baked beans and alcoholic beverages at home 
and live like the natives on the native fruits and keep his 
blood toned with the vegetables rich in the organic salts he 
would not know of malaria, yellow fever or dysentery. The 
germ accused is a scavenger and can not live in pure blood 
supplied with the proper organic salts. Quinine and anti- 
pyretics may suppress the feverish symptoms for a time but 
these alkaloids have a dangerous chronic effect often considered 
incurable. They are protoplasmic toxins which permanently 
cripple and destroy vital nerves. Doctors are forbidden to 
prescribe quinine for railroad men as they will become color 
blind but it is no loss to other people to become color 
blind. What say you? Quinine produces an insanity which 
is characterized by nervous cruelty to beasts and man. 



222 UNFIRED FOOD 

SEX TROUBLES 

Sex Troubles like most of the other diseases originate in the 
kitchen. Cooked foods are predisposed to fermentation and de- 
cay in the alimentary canal and the gases produced by this proc- 
ess irritate all the nerves an the vital plexuses. The irritation on 
the abdominal nerves perverts their functions which produces 
abnormal sex stimulation and constipation. Constipation, again, 
produces pressure on the delicate organs of sex and thus adds to 
the trouble by causing congestions. Cooked proteid and carbo- 
hydrate foods are ingested and absorbed in superfluous quan- 
tities and these superfluous foods catabolize into waste poisons 
which are carried in the blood to all the vital organs, irritating 
the nerves that control them and thus pervert their functions. 

Flesh food adds another more dangerous source of trouble 
in its being saturated with ready absorbable poisons such as 
worn out tissues, waste alkaloids, uric acid and other acids 
which, in the concentrated form, are called "beef tea." Next 
comes the habitual use of irritant, toxic alkaloids of hot condi- 
ments, of coffee (caffeine), bf tea (thein) and of tobacco 
(nicotine). All these toxic irritants affect the small brain, the 
circulation (through the nerves controlling the heart), the 
spinal column and the sympathetic nerves that control the sex 
functions and perversion must follow. 

Last but not less dangerous is the alcohol of all alcoholic 
beverages which as a protoplasmic toxine cripples the indi- 
vidual nerve cells of the weaker nerves, of the more sensitive 
nerves and of the upper convolutions of the brain in which are 
the moral faculties, the last product of evolution. This process 
inhibits the circulation of blood to the affected convolutions 
and by reaction increases and stimulates the circulation in those 
lobes that control courage, boldness and the animal senses and 
passions. Now as to the cure of sex trouble. Avoid all late 
dinners and going to bed with a full stomach. Confine your- 
self to an exclusive unfired diet with all its delicious varieties. 

Eat to satisfaction at noon, but very, very sparingly at the 
last meal, if at all. Take plenty "out of door" exercise espe- 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 223 

cially when it is cold. Avoid associating with your own sex 
as that aggravates sex trouble. Mingle only with those of the 
opposite sex, whose moral character is unreproachal>le and 
then cultivate the purest, the noblest within you that platonic 
affection can stimulate and cooperate in the most intellectually 
fascinating amusements. Seclusion and bashfulness are aggra- 
vating symptoms of this diseae. Avoid all promiscuous gather- 
ings, where doubtful characters are admitted, theatrical and 
political included. Sexual weaknesses are often inherited 
through ignorance of the parents. 

Parents should not desire, crave or indulge after conception, 
for even immoral thoughts demoralize these functions in the 
fetus often for life. 

PRIVATE DISEASES 

The diseases which attack the genito-urinary organs should 
be no more private or secret than any other disease. These 
diseases may be innocently contracted by coming in contact 
with infected surfaces or by intemperate indulgences; but 
ninety per cent of these diseases are transmitted by promiscu- 
ous intercourse. Most generally the bacteria of genital diseases 
are bought from those who cater to commercial lust. Urethritis, 
gonorrhea, vaginitis, leucorrhea and whites are sequels. 
Syphilis is similar to the pox. These diseases can be safely 
and successfuly cured with systematic fasting, followed by a 
strict fruit and herb diet, when both the water cure and 
plenty of sunshine are employed. 

MERCURY POISONING 

Mercury, in its various forms, is the king "alterative" (?) 
of the allopapthic practice. Quicksilver, calomel, (chloride of 
mercury), corrosive sublimate, blue mass, blue pill, hydrargy- 
rum, cum creta, mercuric iodide, red precipitate, turpeth min- 
eral, cinnabar and mercurious vivus are only a few names of 
its many preparations. Typhoid and malaria fever germs were 
once killed with it, but the poisoned corpses of the germs could 



224 UNFIRED FOOD 

not be eliminated and so these poisoned the patient, and up to 
this day mercury is regarded a specific in syphilis what a ter- 
rible mistake. Mercury because of its extreme poisonous 
nature works temporary wonders but but after years comes 
the woeful ( !) reaction . 

Dr. Mathias says: "The mercurial disease (secondary and 
tertiary syphilis) is more destructive than venereal diease." 
Mercury has brought untold suffering to millions of unsuspect- 
ing victims. The best known reactions of mercury, are saliva- 
tion (a profuse discharge of saliva), ozaena (stinking of mouth 
and nose), loosening of the teeth and swelling of the tongue. 
Most people never suspect that mercury may be the cause of 
barrenness (sterility), paralysis, bone cancers, rotting of bones, 
consumption, dropsical effusion, softening of the brain and in- 
sanity. The mercurial doctor guarantees his cure "quick and 
safe" while he knows that when the reaction comes he will be 
forgotten. 

If the crisis of one of the above mercurial reactions should 
come on after the patient had lived, for some time, on unfired 
food the doctors would (surely) lay it to the food. If the sys- 
tem should react on the poison in an effort to expel it assist the 
process by all the natural mean of elimination, which are water, 
air, SUNSHINE and food. The nature cure life is the safest. 
You cannot do better, since the drugs would add fuel to the 
fire. A few other dangerous drugs are Iodine, Lead, Zinc, 
Tin, Bromides, Iron, Arsenic, Belladonna, Quinine, Gold and 
Silver. Yes! These and many others are prescribed under 
scientific names, the names of their compounds or any old name 
to blind the suspicious public. 

INSANITY AND OBSESSION 

Insanity and obsession are often the result of malnutrition. 
If the poisons produce from negative food can pervert the func- 
tions of the body by irritating the controlling nerves; what 
would prevent that poison from irritating the brain directly 
and thus perverting its functions? If the tissues become 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 225 

diseased because the blood is poor in tonic and positive salts; 
may not the brain be affected by the same want? If the re- 
sistance and endurance of the body is dependent on the basic 
salts supplied in organic food ; how about the brain ? These are 
only pointers by the way. People who subsist largely on neg- 
ative food such as cooked proteids, flesh, cooked starches, white 
bread and refined sugar, which are all wanting in the positive 
elements, iron, sodium, magnesium and calcium often become 
very negative and mediumistic. They are then easily controlled 
by beings in the body or obsessed by low and degraded beings 
out of the body. Drugs and intoxicants often aid in this direc- 
tion. The prevention and cure lies in such natural foods which 
are rich in the positive salts. Fresh air and sunshine must not 
be forgotten 

IVY POISONING 
(Rhus Toxicodendron) 

Poison ivy generally affects people when their blood does 
not contain the proper proportion of organic salts, especially 
organic iron. The person whose blood is strongly alkaline may 
handle the ivy with impunity ; on the other hand persons whose 
blood is acid may be poisoned when passing on the windy side 
of the place where the ivy grows. The poisoned patient should 
diet mostly on herbs and roots ; especially those rich in organic 
iron. This diet will also keep the bowels open to assist elimina- 
tion. The cold wet pack is the best application to the affected 
parts or when the feet are affected they may 'be kept in a tub of 
water. Rhustox, potency x6, may be given as an antidote. 

f 

THE ITCH 

The itch germ is another scavenger which feeds on the 
filth in the human system. Never try to kill these germs with 
mercurial or other poisonous salves or ointments or drugs, for 
you cannot poison these germs without poisoning the infected 
and adjacent parts of your body. The itch is not a local disease 
for the germ infects the whole system before it appears as the 



226 UNFIRED FOOD 

itch ; therefore local treatment cannot cure it. Don't feed these 
germs and they will leave. Eat unfired foods especially herbal 
salads. Increase your skin elimination with cold water baths, 
and rubbing, sun baths and air baths. Apply the cold pack 
locally. This treatment will soon starve most of the germs and 
the remainder will be devoured by the phagocytes of the blood. 
The suppressed itch, continues its activities in the vital organs 
unbeknown to the patient until . 

ARTERIO SCLEROSIS 

The hardening or calcifying of the arteries is due to 
the gradual accumulation of inorganic salts (especially the 
inorganic salts of calcium) in the blood of such vegeta- 
rians who persist in eating cooked foods. Inorganic salts 
cannot properly combine with the cooked proteids or 
starches to form elastic connective and muscle tissues of the 
arterial walls. When any inorganic or inert material in the 
blood infiltrates into the walls of the arteries it sets up irrita- 
tion and then it is quickly imprisoned in a callous wall. Let 
this process continue long enough and ! Mineral water may 
also contribute to this condition. The juices of fruits and the 
organic salts of uncooked foods will prevent this disease. 

RELAXED MUSCLES 

Refined and inorganic foods (which are wanting in the or- 
ganic protein and organic potassium, calcium and magnesium) 
cannot produce the strongest and most enduring muscles, even 
when the patient does take plenty of sunbaths and exercise. 
Flabby and relaxed muscles and tendons are the secondary 
cause of the falling of any or all the vital organs. This often 
causes intense suffering. When the muscles which hold the 
vertebrae of the spinal column in place relax on one side, those 
on the other side may pull one or more vertebrae out of place. 
The displaced vertebrae then press on the nerve which branches 
from the spine at that place. The irritation set up in that nerve 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 227 

will not be felt at the place of dislocation, but in the vital organ 
to which that nerve goes. This is the cause of many misleading 
symptoms which are mistaken to be caused by some imaginary 
disease. 

The osteopath may replace or correct such dislocations and 
thereby relieve the suffering so caused; but, unless the system 
is properly fed with organic foods, which will tone and rebuild 
the relaxed muscles, those vertebrae may slip out of place and 
-! . Often the cartilages between the vertebrae shrink from 
want of proper food, and this may also be the cause of pressure 
on some nerve. Many an expensive and unnecessary operation 
is performed, especially, on confiding women, only, to cripple 
them for life. Such diseases can only be truly prevented and 
cured by feeding on natural food, rich in organic potassium, 
calcium and magnesium. When the muscles regain their nor- 
mal tonicity every fallen vital organ will be drawn into place 
and even the spine will become straighter. 



LICE 

Lice are a necessary and blessed evil, because they awaken 
negligent people to the duty of cleanliness. People who are 
otherwise cleanly do not know that the eliminative function of 
the skin must be active and here the lice come to cause them to 
give their skin a cold bath and massage. Unnatural food and 
too heavy clothing also pervert the activity of the skin and thus 
make it necessary for the lice to help eliminate the effete mat- 
ter. Do away with the necessity of having lice by tending to 
cleanliness, to skin activity and skin elimination and to the use of 
{natural food ; and then the lice will leave you or your children 
like any other disease. Never commit the crime of smearing 
blue ointment or any other poisonous salve on the bodies of 
your dear children. Only when the extreme emergency re- 
quires it, you may soak and rub the hair in kerosene, no longer 
than three or four minutes, and then quickly apply soap and 



228 UNFIRED FOOD 

water until the least odor of kerosene is washed out. Remem- 
ber that kerosene absorbed through the skin acts as an irritant 
poison and is hard to eliminate. Kerosene like the coal tar 
products will show its effects in the iris of the eye. 



THE TONGUE 

The tongue is a valuable aid in diagnosing the condition of 
the digestive and eliminating organs. In perfect health the 
tongue is clean, moist, without prominent papillae, is round at 
the edges and lies loose in the mouth. A dry tongue indicates 
fever, nervous prostration and depression. A white tongue in- 
dicates fever, often due to a sour stomach. A moist and yellow- 
ish-brown tongue indicates a disordered digestion. A dry and 
brown tongue indicates intestinal troubles, often connected 
with typhoid germs. A dry and red tongue indicates gastric 
and intestinal inflammation. Large and very red papillae on 
the end of the tongue indicates scarlet fever. 

A yellow coating on the tongue indicates liver derangement. 
A sharp pointed red tongue indicates inflamation or irritation 
of the brain. Most of the above indications of the tongue are 
connected with dietetic mistakes and the indicated trouble can 
then be corrected by selecting the proper foods. 



FOOD THERAPEUTICS 229 



Diagnosing Disease from the Iris of the Eye 

The iris of the eye in normal health is of an even color without any 
spots, rings or spokes. Every injury, poisonous drug, irritation, inflam- 
mation and nervous or functional disorder in any part of the body can 
be seen in the corresponding part of the iris of the eye. Dark or black 
lines or spots indicate inactive, dying or paralyzed nerves or loss of tissue 
in the corresponding part of the body. Light or white lines or spots 
indicate irritation, inflammation or catarrhal affections. A white line 
around a black mark indicates a healing of the defects. 

Drug-poisoning is generally indicated in the iris by the natural color 
of the particular poison. Thus: Sulphur and quinine shows yellow; 
iodine, red; iron, rust-brown; lead, grayish blue; salycil, dirty gray; ar- 
senic, grayish white ; mercury, metallic white ; strychnine, yellowish white 
lines and phenacetin and creosote shows white. In this manner the signs 
of the iris indicate the seat of the disease and its cause with unerring pre- 
cision. The drug-signs indicate in what part of the body the poison has 
accumulated and where it is doing its destructive work. Nurses and 
mothers: Study the "Diagnosis from the Eye"* diligently for it will 
make you better tropho-therapeutists. 



* On receipt of one Dollar in money order we will mail you a cop*y of 
the "Diagnosis From the Eye." 




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PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 

This department contains further information on hygienic living and 
feeding, commercial food and other subjects which should be better 
understood by all. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 233 



HYGIENIC DIETETICS 

Hygienic Dietetics is that branch of science that treats on proper 
food and its relation to health. This subject becomes very brief when 
we understand that natural food,* unperverted food (unfired food), is 
the only proper food, the only hygienic food and, truly, the only health 
perpetuating food. A hygienic diet therefore involves a selection of the 
best natural food material on hand or procurable. Natural food must 
be cleansed for hygienic reasons and it may be prepared and combined 
so that it may appeal more favorably to sight, smell and taste; but its 
chemical constitution must not be changed (can not be improved) by 
any artificial process. The nurse should always aim to so prepare natural 
food that it may give the greatest pleasure in thorough mastication and 
ensalivation. Tasting, chewing and ensalivation are the first steps to 
perfect digestion and assimilation; assimilation of those elements re- 
quired and craved by the system. Diet does not imply starvation or 
denial of the natural gratification of hunger and appetite nor the rejection 
of any wholesome food. Therapeutic diet embraces scientific selection 
of foods which contain the elements for the reconstruction of impaired 
organs and for re-establishing their natural functions. It also embraces 
systematic fasting when it is necessary to aid nature in tearing down 
and consuming old and useless tissue to make room for perfect recon- 
struction. A cheerful atitude of mind, proper social environment, fresh 
air, exposure to sunlight, proper use of water, recreating exercises and 
peaceful sleep are indispensable factors in restoring and perpetuating 
health. 

THE DAILY RATION 

People who can boast of ordinary health and do an average 
day's work require no more than three meals per day, namely, breakfast, 
lunch and dinner, with an interval of four to five hours between them. 
Those who are under nature cure treatments do better on two meals 
per day, which should, then, be taken from six to eight hours apart. 
Let your breakfast consist of fruits (unprepared), a fruit salad or a 
crisp herb salad, followed by a small dish of brawn food. Lunch may 
consist of either an orangeade, a tamarade, a lemonade, a rhubarbade or 
a cup of nut milk, and a salad, followed by a regular dish of brawn 
food. A packed shop lunch will be described farther o.n>. If you had 
fruit for breakfast and lunch, then choose herbs and roots for your 
dinner salad. The menu should consist of a dish of uncooked soup, 
an ounce of nibblers, a dish of salad, a dish of brawn food and an ounce 

(*Natural food is defined under introductory subjects). 



234 UNFIRED FOOD 

of cereal confection or a small dish of fruit dessert. In place of the 
salad may be served a quarter of an unfired pie. A dinner served in 
the order prescribed may be large for a person of ordinary capacity, but 
that can be remedied by diminishing the dishes of the last course, 
Whatever you eat, eat slowly and search every morsel for its flavor and 
enjoy it all. Cultivate the tastebuds, as they are the tally keepers of 
the stomach. Every flavor tasted in the mouth stimulates the flow of 
an appropriate digestive fluid in the alimentary canal; therefore all 
the food that passes the tastebuds has a diminished food value because 
the stomach is not prepared for it. Use your teeth well while you 
have them or you will lose them for want of healthful, blood circulating 
exercise. Do not think, talk or transact business while you eat. Do 
not talk of any disagreeable food or flesh at the table. Good humor, 
jolly stories and occasional laughter are most wholesome and beneficial 
additions to natural food. When your saliva is exhausted do not sub- 
stitute other liquids, but cease to eat for the time. Do not order a dish 
which, you fear, will not agree with you, and do not eat it if set before 
you ; for your stomach will have heard your thoughts, your suspicions, 
and therefore will object to receive the food you suspicioned. The best 
food will not agree with you if you fear and suspicion it. 

Use china or glassware for fruit juices or vegetable juices. The 
oxides of lead, tin or zinc, produced by the action of fruit or vegetable 
juices, are very poisonous. The practice of cooking or steaming vegeta- 
bles is unhygienic and uneconomical from every point of view. The 
human animal developed and flourished for thousands of years on 
natural (uncooked) foods and they are still the most wholesome. 




A SHOP-LUNCH. 

PACKED LUNCHES 

It is everything but pleasant to be pointed at as a crank or to be the 
subject of gossip and ridicule among the besotted people with whom 
one is forced to associate or to be the laughing stock of one's unin- 
formed fellow laborers. It is not wise to give the ignorant a chance to 
make a fool of you; therefore let no one know that your food is of a 
different nature. The unbaked bread prescribed in this book can be 
sliced and sandwiched just like other bread ; while one sandwich of this 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 235 

bread will satiate you more than three of the other. When you have 
finished your bread eat two or three apples or other fruit which you 
may have. You need not be conspicuous with this diet unless you like 
to brag. The above illustration shows the author's lunch outfit, which 
he carried daily for more than five years. The four ounce tin box in 
front of the scale holds about three ounces of rawn food. This box full 
of brawn food and two or three apples, pears, oranges or half a pound 
of grapes fully satisfied his gastric wants. When the men would eat 
their habitual slice of bread at ten a. m. the author would keep them 
company by eating an apple, a chunk of cocoanut or a few nuts. He 
had formed the strict habit of drinking a cup of water thirty minutes 
before lunch time and now he would advise all naturists to form that 
habit in> place of drinking at lunch time. When good water could not 
be had where he worked he carried it in a coffee bottle. The six ounce 
glass jar in front of the lunch box is advisable for those who find that 
they require more than three ounces of brawn food. The two ounce 
jar back of the apples contains one ounce of nuts. 

THE AVERAGE RESTAURANT DINNER 

If all the promiscuous dishes called for by the average restaurant 
customer were minced, macerated and churned into one dish and served 
as his bill of fare, the sight of it would cause aversion; he would call 
it swill and walk away hungry. Let that dish stand at the temperature 
of the stomach for several hours and it might be impossible to compare 
it with Limburger cheese. If many a man, after a civilized debauch of 
gluttony, could take his stomach into his hands and look at the con- 
tents he might drop it all. The culinary art yes ! That sounds lofty 
but it is degrading. 

WHY VEGETARIANS FAIL 

Many "would be" vegetarians who, by sad experience, have 
learned that death is in the "flesh pot," seek information on the 
subject of diet, but, alas, they are generally misinformed by teachers 
and reformers who have only half of a truth and can not get away 
from extremes of some kind. The present diet of the uninformed civi- 
lized world is a most perverted one. It consists mainly of flesh, white 
flour (starch) bread, refined sugar and animal fats. It is very very 
poor in organic salts, but rich, yes, remarkably rich, in drugs. Every- 
thing must be cooked, roasted, baked, salted, spiced and spoiled before 
it is fit to eat ( ?) Some good uninformed people have acquired such 
perverted tastes that they can not relish an apple, a banana, an orange 
or watermelon unless it is cooked, baked or salted and peppered. This 
diet of flesh and cooked carbohydrates oversaturates the human system 
with albumen poisons and carbonic acid gas. Take the flesh out of this 
diet and it is worse than starvation. Atonicity followed by ruptures is 
often the result of this experiment. Next comes the proteid advocate 



236 UNFIRED FOOD 

with cooked legumes, baked nuts and sterilized milk. Although this 
nitrogenous food is free from ready waste poisons, yet on account of 
being cooked it is predisposed to break down into proteid poisons like 
the tiesh diet. It is true, this proteid food has enough positive organic 
salts to neutralize the waste acids it may produce ; but the process of 
cooking renders those salts uselessly neutral and stable. Therefore an 
over ingestion of cooked proteid foods may prove nearly as destructive 
as flesh food. Next comes the salt advocate with the theory of "Saline 
starvation." He analyzes the animal body and finds that it is composed 
of a certain percent of various salts. These salts waste and therefore 
must be replenished. He analyzes the various foods and finds that 
vegetables (especially spinach and beets) are richest in saline elements. 
He certainly found part of the truth but he did not investigate the effect 
of cooking on the saline elements. Cooking alters every organic 
molecule and mineralizes and frees the most important saline elements. 
He advocates steam cooking in order that the free salts may not be cast 
away with the boiling fluid. Those who have tested this extreme have 
found that the free, unorganized salts of cooked vegetables have ap- 
proximately the same effect on the body as strong mineral waters. 
Where the cooked proteid and albumen diet produces uric acid saturation 
with its consequent aches and pains these inorganic salts may collect in 
the joints and muscles and produce stiffness from irritation. These 
inorganic salts, like baking soda and table salt, are often eliminated in 
catarrhal eruptions and inflamed armpits. Those who have met with 
the discomforts of this diet go* to an other rash extreme, adopting the 
"nut and fruit diet" and forbidding every vegetable that grows in or 
near the ground. The weak point in this diet is that it produces extreme 
negativeness which is often followed by mediumistic insanity. Now if 
flesh is saturated with the waste poisons of the animal, if cooked proteid 
foods produce poisonous alkaloids, uric and other acids, if cooked carbo- 
hydrate foods produce carbonic acid gas and saturate the blood with 
soluble starch, glucose and "refined (?)" sugar; if cooked vegetables 
contain useless free inorganic salts, and if the nut and fruit diet is not 

rich enough in positive organic salts what is good to eat? ? 

( !) ? Does this look like an insurmountable "trilema" "quadri- 

lema" or "omnilema"? How did Nature evolute the human animal 
before he knew about fire ; before he could make a caldron ? How does 
the anthropoid ape survive his uncooked diet and thrive? Is there really 

such a thing as a RAW product in the realm of natural food? ! 

poo r, perverted humanity ! RETURN TO NATURE and adopt 
that wholesome unfired diet which includes all natural food. This diet 
supplies every want of our anatomical economy and it can be prepared, 
combined and served as neatly, artistically and temptingly as imag- 
ination and ingenuity can contrive, refinement and culture can de- 
mand and as varied as unperverted tastes can crave. The unfired 
foods always produce a feeling of satisfaction when enough has been 
eaten, hence overeating is unusual. When the system is once accus- 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 237 

tomed to the unfired diet there will be a reliable craving for the right 

variety. You may fill your stomach with impunity on the 

soups and salads prescribed in this book. Unfired foods do not ferment 
in the stomach unless a blunder was made in combining them. Unfired 
foods can not sneak into the system without a natural provision. The 
fermentation of unfired food is not half as injurious as the fermentation 
of the same cooked food. The variety of natural foods in their season 
can support vitality, health and endurance when cooked foods fail. 

FLETCHERIZATION 

In order to derive the greatest benefit from all food ingested it must 
be well macerated by the teeth, properly ensalivated and thoroughly 
enjoyed. The teeth did not -evolve without the demand of necessity. 
The mechanical action of chewing starts the saliva. No solid food 
should be swallowed until it is soup in the mouth. Even liquid foods, 
water included, is more beneficial when chewed and churned to mix 
them with saliva. Saliva is the most important digestive fluid and 
solvent for starch. For this reason starchy food should be eaten dry in 
order to facilitate the infiltration of saliva. It is a proven fact that 
the gastric fluids differ according to the flavor of the food tasted. There- 
fore every particle of food should be scrupulously tasted and enjoyed. 

The nerves of taste are also in close sympathy with the solicitations 
of hunger and craving for special food material. When the taste buds 
report the needed elements present a sense of satisfaction takes place. 
This explains the cause of overeating. The quantity and quality of 
saliva is improved by using it consciously. The sense of taste is also 
cultivated by the enjoyment of natural flavors. Those who would be- 
come healthy and beautiful should Fletcherize their unfired food with 
diligence. 

SOAKING 

All starchy foods, such as cereals, are best eaten dry for soaking 
water into them interferes with the salivary digestion. If they are soaked 
for the purpose of flaking then the flakes should be dried again in the sun. 

OVEREATING 

A moderate supply of unfired foods in season will furnish almost all 
the elements needed in building and sustaining a healthy, well balanced 
body. There is little room for overeating where the system does not 
crave for wanting elements of food. Where the diet consists largely 
of meat, boiled potatoes and white wheaten bread it is natural that the 
system should demand a large quantity of trashy food to find a little 
of the tonic elements. Satiation has nothing to do with the size of 
the stomach or the bulk of food material. The tastebuds control appetite 
by recording either a plenty or want of essential elements. A salad 



238 UNFIRED FOOD 

consisting of one-half ounce of young linden leaves and one ounce of 
flaked nuts is more satiating than one-half pound of white wheaten 
bread. Try this salad and prove the fact to yourself. There is very 
little danger or risk in overeating on natural unfired foods as prescribed 
in this book because they are not so apt to ferment and cause autointoxi- 
cation as cooked foods. An improper combination of unfired foods may 
ferment, but if it does the poisons produced are not as detrimental as 
those of any cooked food, and a subsequent meal . consisting of a large 
dish of vegetable salad only will invariably cure the trouble. If you 
indulge in two or three meals each day four hours apart you will not be 
tempted to overeat. 

FASTING 

Nature often prescribes her own method of cure by taking away the 
appetite and craving for food. She even goes so far as creating an irre- 
sistible aversion for food. These signs should be promptly and religiously 
obeyed. Food should not be touched until there is a natural craving for 
it. When and as long as the patient has fever no food should be offered 
him except plenty of water internally and externally. Foods simply add 
fuel to the already raging fire and create danger. Pure fruit juices 
and vegetable juices diluted with 50 to 75 per cent of pure water are 
Nature's best aid in counteracting and eliminating disease. Read the 
article on blood purifiers. A protracted fast is sometimes the best 
means of correcting perverted vital functions and disorderly proliferation. 
A fast of three to five days is the best means of increasing will power. 
It must be remembered, however, that unless you can absolutely van- 
quish the desire and craving for food during the fast, even in the pres- 
ence of luscious fruit, you will indulge in dangerous starvation. During 
your fast you must not allow the presence of food to stimulate the flow 
of saliva or gastric juice. If you can not do this do not fast more than 
three days. During the second day you may be troubled with a very 
sick spell, but do not allow this to discourage you, as it is only a storm 
of adjustment and is on the third day followed by a sweet calm of 
lightness and clearness. If food is taken during the sick spell of the 
second day the beneficial effect is destroyed. Benedict Lust, N. D., 
says. "There is no disease that can resist a proper period of sane fasting 
scientifically employed," provided the patient has enough vitality and 
will power. 

H. Lindlahr, M. D., says : "Fasting is a two edged sword which may 
do as much harm as good when promiscuously employed." Fasting is 
indicated in diseases caused by mistakes in diet; such as colds, catarrh, 
tonsilitis, obesity, rheumatism and incipient consumption. Some cults of 
the orient advise fasting as a cure for old age. The process is to fast 
until the old and worn tissues are consumed in the effort to sustain life 
and then they partake of a selected diet to rebuild them a young body. 

Fasting for health is absolutely useless as long as the intestines and 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 239 

colon are full of decaying and rotten faeces. During the week before 
the fast the patient should diet only on fruits, herbs and roots in order 
to give tonicity to the intestinal tract. The last day he should eat only 
lettuce or cabbage because this is most easily carried along by the peris- 
taltic intestinal motion 1 . Lettuce or cabbage is the least injurious if 
portions of it do remain in the intestines and decay. This seldom hap- 
pens. Drink all the water you crave during the fast. Never break a fast 
abruptly. Eat very little the first day. Break the fast with oranges, 
watermelon or some other light and juicy fruit. In conclusion, do not 
undertake a fast of more than three days unless you are properly in- 
formed or have the care of a competent doctor. 

VARIETY 

"Variety is the spice of life," but do not indulge in all the varieties 
at once or you will have no variety. You may indulge in simple har- 
monious and scientific combinations of foods for the sake of the pleasing 
blends of flavors and the satisfying of important wants and craving of 
the system at one sitting, but do not mix and jumble together foods 
that are foreign to one another nor mix a promiscuous something of 
everything lest you baffle the digestive functions and get into trouble. 
Always plan for such an artistic display and arrangement of the foods 
to be partaken that they will appeal, through the eyes, to the highest 
sense of art and refinement and vary succeeding settings to give new 
delight to those finer senses. 

Each dish of a menu should be so changed in a succeeding menu that 
both the sense of smell and taste may be delightfully surprised, but 
in this do not cater to perverted taste and craving, or the lickerish 
palate of the glutton except with a determination to bring about nor- 
mality and natural harmony of sense and function. In order to enjoy 
to the fullest extent the pleasures of health provide the stomach with a 
variety or change of material in succeeding menus in order to give 
the system a chance to absorb all the required elements provided in 
foods. This is accomplished by changing off or alternating in the lines 
of fruits, herbs, roots, grains and nuts. 

Above all, plan all variety as a means to physical, mental, moral, 
spiritual and social health and within the limits of your financial standing. 

THE TOXIC POISONS OF EMOTION 

The operations of anger, fear, fright, terror and grief produce danger- 
ously toxic poisons in the organism which, according to the quantity 
produced, may cause congestion of the blood, resulting in fainting or 
death. It may cause accute or chronic illness or it may cripple some 
function of the organism temporarily or for life. Everv one has wit- 
nessed proof of this. Slaughtered meat is saturated with this poison 



240 . UNFIRED FOOD 

and it will irritate the nerves and burden the eliminative organs of the 
consumer. It may determine the turning point for life or death in the 
crisis of disease. 

FLESH A STIMULANT 

Flesh food is saturated with the waste products of muscle and nerve 
activities and ptomaines. These are toxic poisons which intoxicate deli- 
cate persons like alcohol. When these poisons irritate the nerves con- 
trolling the heart, the blood pressure is raised with a corresponding 
sense of exhilaration which is followed by reactionary depression. The 
blood which is saturated with uric acid (the waste product of flesh 
food), is sluggish, thick and viscid. Every new addition of this waste 
poison liquifies the blood temporarily by chemical oversaturation, 

but ( ?) (!) This process is cotemporary with the increased blood 

pressure. 

W. M. Cornell, M. D., LL. D., says that flesh food lays the foun- 
dation for inflammatory diseases, tends to produce a putrid diathesis 
and putrid diseases and also has a bad effect upon the mind, producing" 
peevishness, fretfulness and an irritable disposition. 

When the blood is saturated with the waste products of flesh it is 
fertile soil for cancers and for zymotic and bacterial infections. The 
food elements in flesh are wholly catabolized (i. e., worn out), and there- 
fore take up energy in metabolic changes instead of giving out energy. 

EGGS 

The most common and prevailing danger of eating eggs are albumen 
poisoning. This fact is little understood, and therefore overlooked and 
reluctantly accepted by the majority of people who are slaves to per- 
verted appetites. All the albuminous food ingested and absorbed in 
excess to the requirements of the tissues, catabolizes (disintegrates) into 
proteid waste (uric and other acids). Excessive proteid waste in the 
blood is the cause for rheumatism and similar disea*ses and the same 
substance is the food for all bacteria and miasma of disease. The 
Farmers Bulletin No. 128 by C. F. Langworthy, Ph. D., expresses the 
following facts. "Overindulgence in eggs, as is the case with other 
foods, may induce indigestion or other bad effects. Furthermore, eggs 
may be the cause of communicating some bacterial disease or some 
parasite. An egg may become infected with micro-organisms, either 
before it is laid or after. The shell is porous, and offers no greater 
resistance to micro-organisms which cause disease than it does to those 
which cause the egg to spoil or rot. One of the most common trou- 
bles due to bacterial infections of eggs is the more or less serious illness 
sometimes caused by eating those which are "stale." This often re- 
sembles ptomaine poisoning, which is caused, not by the micro-or- 
ganisms themselves, but by the poisonous products which they elabo- 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 241 

rate from materials on which they grow. Occasionally the eggs of 
worms, etc., have been found inside hens' eggs." 

Sickly and emaciated persons are often ignorantly fed to death 
on eggs and their products. Boiling or scrambling the egg makes it 
less digestible and gives it the predisposition to disintegrate into un- 
favorable compounds. 

MILK 

Fresh milk from healthy cows or goats is good for those infants 
who can not be supplied with mothers milk. Cow's milk should, at first, 
be diluted with forty percent of pure water, to make it similar to mother's 
milk, but never add any other inorganic or chemical ingredient. The 
water may, gradually, be substituted with the juices of luscious fruits 
which will then supply the increasing requirement of organic salts. Our 
primitive mothers weaned their infants with the juices and soft pulp of 
luscious fruits but succulent herbs were used when fruits could not be 
had. When the infant becomes constipated give it some well churned 
(or beaten) thick milk diluted with fruit juice (or water). After 
the child is weaned fresh milk ceases to be natural or wholesome 
food. Milk is only naturally beneficial and wholesome for emaciated 
adults when it has become curdled. A cup of churned thick milk or 
buttermilk along with a dish of green salad may be served to con- 
valescents with good results. 

FOOD AND MORALITY 

The science of sarcognomy teaches that there is an interdependence 
of harmony between all parts of the body and between all their corre- 
sponding functions, that every function of the body is in close sympathy 
with a corresponding function of the mind and that the physical, spirit- 
ual and moral health is dependent on the normal and harmonious func- 
tioning of every part of the body as well as every organ of the mind. 
The "Diagnosis from the Eye" proves this science. The science of 
feeding teaches that unnatural food perverts the functions of alimen- 
tation directly and indirectly, that the character of the blood is deter- 
mined by the character of food and that the healthy functioning of 
every organ in the body is dependent on the character of the blood. 
Therefore we may expect disease, immorality and insanity, all,, from 
the same cause, namely, unnatural food. 

THERAPEUTIC VALUE OF FRUITS 

In chronic and acute diseases where fasting is not quite advisable 
it is still best to refrain from taxing the digestive organs with bulky 
foods especially where the crisis must be hastened to give Nature a 
chance to be victorious. During the high fever period the patient 



242 UNFIRED FOOD 

should be offered only fruit or vegetable juice diluted half or more 
with pure water. Such fruits as contain a high percentage of acid 
and a low percentage of sugar are to be preferred, namely, the orange, 
the grapefruit and lemon. (Commercial sugar should be avoided and 
prohibited as it adds fuel to the fire already raging). 

As the patient recovers the sweeter fruits may be gradually intro- 
duced and these less and less diluted with water while partaken in the 
liquid form. The patient as a convalescent will do best when fed on 
fruit at one sitting and on tender herbs and succulent roots at the next 
sitting and so on. The acid tree fruits and the alkaline herbs and roots 
should not be served together when feeding for therapeutic results. 
Lettuce and endive are the best herbs for weak stomachs. Even those 
who are well will enjoy sweeter health, more joy in activity, keener 
perception and greater endurance when breakfast consists of fruits and 
a very small dish of brawn-food. 

FRUIT ACIDS STERILIZE 

Citric and malic acid, even in dilute form, quickly destroys typhoid, 
cholera and other fever germs. Water and milk containing fever or 
other germs may be made sterile by the use of these acids. Should it 
ever happen that vegetables are contaminated with typhoid or other 
bacilli, they cam be soaked in lemon solution, I to 10 parts, which will 
effectively destroy the bacilli. 

ORGANIC OR INORGANIC WATER 

Organic or Inorganic Water: Which is preferable? A very little 
common sense and reason will make this plain. We will first take rain 
water. This is the purest natural water that can be obtained as it 
contains only traces of aerial minerals and were it not for the dirt of 
roofs and the flavor of shingles it would be more in demand. Artesian 
water is the very opposite, as it is saturated to its fullest capacity with 
inert soluble minerals which are often the source of trouble in the 
animal organism because they are hard to handle by the organs of 
elimination. 

Shallow well and lake water has had a chance to deposit some of 
its burden of minerals. This is therefore the best source of common 
water. 

Boiled water has only one advantage in that the germs of putrefac- 
tion have been destroyed. The deposit of stone in the kettle can only 
be considered as the load of the water that is evaporated. 

Distilled water is chemically the purest but in many cases even 
this is burdened with soluble metalic oxides from the sides of the still. 
Such metallic oxides are more injurious to the animal organism than 
the inert soluble minerals in common water. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 243 

The water of fruits and vegetables, i. e. fruit and vegetable juices, 
are laden to the utmost of capacity with organic salts and sugars. 
Some of these organic salts aid in the process of elimination by uniting 
with the waste material and thus rendering it soluble and elimitable. 
Organic water, therefore, has a two-fold eliminating capacity above 
mineral water. It has been proven that after eating watermelon one 
may eliminate more water by weight than the weight of the consumed 
portion of the melon. This would prove that the organic salts in fruits 
aid kidney elimination. 

THE TASTE BUDS 

Did you ever think that the people's organs of taste are compara- 
tively weaker than their organs of sight ? Yes ! They are unable to 
relish the innumerable delicate flavors which Nature has evolved in 
natural food. "The tastebuds are the eyes of the stomach." Reason 
and instinct permits no one to look into the sun when his eyesight is 
weak, but who, who reasons that salt, spices, and strong condiments 
act on the nerves of taste as direct sunlight does on the retina of the 
eye. This explains why people are not able to relish the delicate flavors 
of natural dishes. The trouble is due to the use of unnatural food 
which has blinded and perverted the sense of taste. Remove the cause 
and let Nature restore the powers of taste. 

For every natural food is a special digestive fluid. These special 
digestive fluids are caused to flow by the stimulus of enjoying the flavor 
of the corresponding food. The stomach is unprepared for every food 
that is not enjoyed or tasted. If you would get the best results of the 
food you eat try to detect and enjoy the flavor of every morsel. Do 
not deceive the tastebuds and stomach with condiments, but instead 
combine such foods as will produce a harmonious blend of flavors. 

CONDIMENTS 

Fames (hunger) est condimentum optimum. 

Condiments, if used, must be unfired, for when cooked they be- 
come irritants like drugs. The unperverted senses of taste and smell 
should be employed on the natural undiluted spicy herbs and seeds to 
determine whether they are wholesome for food or not. If they can 
not be eaten with good effects in their natural state they should not be 
used for food even in a dilute form. Black pepper is an incorrigible 
irritant and red pepper decreases and contracts the liver. It is best 
to avoid those condiments which could not be used as a natural food. 

COMMON SALT 

Salt, Sodium Chloride (NaCl) is a very stable substance, composed 
of chlorine gas which is intensely negative and sodium an intensely 
positive metallic element. The elements, sodium and chlorine, when 



244 UNFIRED FOOD 

united to form a molecule still manifest their individual character by 
an intense molecular vibration. The molecular vibration of salt is as 
blinding to the sense of taste in the tastebuds as direct sunlight blinds 
the sense of sight to everything that is less bright. After a continued 
use of salt the sense of taste becomes so blunted to the natural and 
finer flavors of food that nothing savors or pleases except salt or condi- 
ments of equal intensity. For this reason salt has been commonly used 
to hide flavors objectionable to the normal or perverted sense of taste. 

Salt is so stable that it can not be digested or broken up and uti- 
lized in the metabolism of the system. It is ingested as salt and ex- 
creted unchanged. Every cell in the system that absorbs salt contracts 
and thereby disgorges its albumen and other constructive elements. In 
this way it hardens the tissues in general and shrivels the corpuscles 
of the blood. It obstructs absorption of food and disturbs natural os- 
mosis (the filtering through the membrane). It also interferes with se- 
cretion and excretion, prevents the formation of fibrin and dissolves 
the globules. It is a historic and scientific fact that salt in connection 
with flesh gives rise to scurvy, salt-rheum, kidney trouble and other 
cutaneous and constitutional disorders. The historic epidemic "Black 
Death," of Europe, was caused by pickled meat. Salt is the cause of 
the inflammation under the breasts, in the armpits and under the nose. 

Salt causes an irresistible thirst which has led many a man to 
inebriety or dipsomania. 

Salt has only a few uses in domestic economy. It is indispensable in 
liquefying ice below the freezing point. It compels ice to absorb posi- 
tive temperature when used in freezers. It is substituted for sand in 
saltrubs. It is a good emergency emetic and, if need be, an irritant. 
Lastly it is a good antiseptic in substances that are not intended for 
food. English stockbreeders found it detrimental to the highest de- 
velopment of prize stock ; hence, they have excluded salt from all stock- 
food. Their stock is known to be the finest. Salt is a poison to fowls, 
especially to songsters. Don't try it on your pet bird. In North 
Siberia salt is unknown as a food condiment. 



COMMERCIAL SUGAR 

Commercial sugar is an unnatural approximate food. The atomic 
constitution of sugar has been rendered inorganic in the process of cook- 
ing and refining. This is the reason why it can not be absorbed like the 
sugar in fruits and honey, why it irritates the mucous membranes of 
the stomach and intestines and why it so often produces catarrh of 
the stomach. Traces of the chemicals used in bleaching remain in the 
sugar and can be estimated as so much 'dilute poison. Brown sugar 
does contain some useless unorganized salt but its color is due to burnt 
sugar (caramel). Don't imagine that the digestive fluids can restore 
this sugar. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 245 

VACUUM SUGAR 

As soon as the commercial world will place on the market cane or 
beet sugar concentrated by the cold vacuum process, leaving in it the 
natural organic salts undisturbed, then I will again advocate and advise 
the use of sugar. By means of the cold vacuum process it is possible 
to concentrate the sugar without altering the organic molecule and 
without separating the organic salt combination from the sugar. 

WHOLESOME SWEETS 

Honey and uncooked cane juice do not and can not overwork the 
liver and render it torpid as does soluble starch and commercial sugar. 

An emaciated and depleted negro will crawl into the cane field and 
suck and chew cane stems until he is is sleek and strong. 

The sugar and organic salt in cane juice is valuable food and tonic 
for brain, nerve, muscle and vital tissues. The same can be said of 
maple juice. These juices, uncooked, will thus foster health without 
the least danger of producing obesity or adipose tissue which is a con- 
dition of disease. Licorice root is another most wholesome sweet, rich in 
organic salts. When it is powdered it may be used like sugar. 

HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENT 

Since perfect health is the result of the normal activity of every 
function of body, mind and intellect, and since the majority of these 
functions are reactionary let us study the effect of environment on 
health. The mind reacts on the influence of all animate and inanimate 
environment and reflects the effect on the body for health or disease. 
Cheerfulness and serenity of mind, playfulness, confidence, love and 
kindness and varied intellectual activities are most important factors 
for health. An environment which suggests and perpetuates unpleas- 
ant and evil thoughts ; fear, anger, hatred and revenge is most inju- 
rious to health and must be avoided by the convalescent. Therefore 
a natural environment and congenial company, affording proper enter- 
tainment and intellectual intercourse, are as essential to health as natural 
food, air and sunshine. 

LAUGHTER 

Laughter is an essential exercise for the civilized human being. A 
jolly and gleeful laughter expands the cells and tissues of the whole 
body, whereas sorrow, grief and the blues contract them. A pneumatic 
massage is taken in each spell of laughter. The induced spasmodic 
motion of the lungs produces a more voluminous circulation of air and 
brings more oxygen in contact with the blood than in common breathing. 
This produces a better circulation of blood and a more perfect digestion 
of food as the stomach and intestines receive their share of the massage. 
Laughter is a well known cure for indigestion and a sure cure for the 
blues. 



246 UNFIRED FOOD 

DOCTOR NATURE 

Supply Doctor Nature with all the organic medicinal elements found 
in wholesome unfired food and she, guided by infallible wisdom, will 
utilize them to your greatest advantage for prevention or cure. 



NATURAL REMEDIES 



Draws the poison to the surface. 
Oxydizes and cremates. 



Water - Carries poisons from the body. 

__^__^__-_______ ^ 

- Aid in depuration. 



Vegetable JukeS Rich in detoxicating iron, sodium, 

magnesium and calcium. 

Exercise - - - Aids circulation. 



Pleasure and - Prevents the production of emotional 
r. .. poisons. 

- - - Recreation 



Sleep - - Rests the voluntary and involuntary 

functions 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 247 

DRUGS 

Any drugs which can kill or destroy parasites, microbes or miasms 
or which can suppress any disease or the healing crisis of a disease is 
a destructive poison. Drugs which are poison to microbes are also 
poison to the living cells in the human organism. To give a patient 
drugs is equal to increasing the quantity of poison his system is bat- 
tling with. Nature can not throw off two or more burdens more easily 
than one. Impurities can not deterge impurities. If you harbor 
scavengers in your system quit supplying the filth and the scavengers 
will leave or starve. If your system is out of harmony give Nature a 
chance to re-establish harmony and disease will be no more. 



BLOOD PURIFIERS 

There is only one natural and wholesome blood purifying medium 
and that is unfired vegetable juice and fruit juice. Such wholesome 
vegetables and herbs as contain the highest aggregate percentage of 
the positive (detoxicating) elements (Fe., Na., Mg. and Ca.) are best 
adapted for this purpose. The tables on food analysis will make this 
clear. All drugs concocted or decocted from vegetables or herbs by the 
thermal process (cooking) are unorganized and are often as dangerous 
( !) as mineral or metallic drugs, because the system can not utilize 
or eliminate them. These saturate the blood still more with useless 
(rather irritating or dangerous) matter instead of purifying it. All 
inorganic elements (except pure water and fresh air) that are not 
bound in an organic molecule are dangerous and a source of trouble 
whether they are used for food or remedies. 

Unfired herb and fruit juices used as blood purifiers should be diluted 
with fifty percent (or more) of pure water. When the juices are too 
acrid or tart they may be diluted with sweet juices or flavored with 
honey (not sugar as it irritates the absorbent 1 surfaces). Sugar is un- 
organized in the process of manufacturing and hence is most unfavor- 
able for remedial purposes. The juices may be extracted by grating, 
macerating or by means of an "Enterprise Juicer." 

Cold or warm infusions of sun-dried herbs can be used as a substi- 
tute. Soak the dried herbs from five to ten hours. Do not use scalding 
or boiling water. Why not eat such vegetables, herbs and fruits in 
their natural state or in the form of salads ? Do that while you are well 
as a fortification. The sick and the convalescent person is generally 
too weak to eat the required quantity of such remedial foods. In order 
to get the prescribed quantity of the purifying elements they would 
have to fill up so tight that the stomach could not act nor digest the 
bulk. The problem is, to get the greatest amount of unquestionable 
good at the least expense of energy. Drink a cupful of the prescribed 
juices (Detoxyl), warm or cold, one hour before breakfast and take a 



248 UNFIRED FOOD 

fresh air exercise after it. Always drink detoxyl on an empty stom- 
ach, i. e., three hours after a meal and one hour before the next meal. 
The following list is in the order of efficiency : 

Swiss Chard stems. 

Lettuce. 

Strawberries. 

Radishes. 

Kohl-rabi. 

Sorrel leaves and stems. 

Rhubarb stems. 

Cucumber. 

Pineapple. 

Orange. 

Tomato. 

Tangerine. 

Grape-fruit. 

Apple. 

Grapes. 



BLOOD AND NERVE TONICS 

Blood tonics are not far removed from blood purifiers. To properly 
tone the blood, nerves and vital tissues the whole list of organic tissue 
salts are indicated. Select judiciously of vegetables, herbs and fruits 
to suit the case. These may be prepared in the form of juices or salads. 
Study the lists under the various organic tissue salts and read the article 
on blood purifiers. 

THE VALUE OF SUNSHINE 

All vegetable-life utilizes sunshine in the process of anabolizing in- 
organic matter into organic material. Every ray of light, heat and 
energy derived from burning or oxidizing organic fuel is freed sun- 
shine that had been imprisoned in the organic molecule by vegetable 
anabolism. The very existence of vegetable life depends on sunshine. 
Animal-life is not so far removed from vegetable life that it can do with- 
out sunshine. Instinct prompts the fish and wild animals to bask in 
sunshine. Even the mole basks where the sunshine can penetrate a 
thin layer of sandy earth. Nature did not cover the human body with 
a dense coat of hair. Why? ? It would take a volume to explain 
why the law that perpetuates the fittest, should have selected the nude 
human animal. After a little sane reasoning the reader will agree with 
me that Nature fully intended that the human body should be exposed 
to sunshine and air for chemical reasons. The function of chlorophyll 
in plants is to transmute inorganic matter into organic matter by the 
aid of sunshine. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 249 

THERE ARE CELLS IN THE TISSUES OF THE HUMAN 
SKIN WHOSE FUNCTION IS ANALOGOUS TO THAT OF 
CHLOROPHYLL and this stands to reason when there are, actually, 
some lower animals whose tissues contain chlorophyl granules. It is 
a proven fact that the skin absorbs solar energy. It has also been 
proven that the perspiration gathered during a solar bath is composed 
largely of uric acid and other waste poisons; whereas, that gathered 
during hot-air or steam baths is composed mostly of blood serum. Sun- 
shine therefore draws the blood to the surface, vitalizes the skin and 
stimulates its respiratory and eliminative functions ; thus relieving the 
overworked lungs, liver and kidneys. Furthermore, sunshine, by supply- 
ing the proper energy, stimulates every function of the body to normal 
activity. What is more important in preventing disease and restoring 
health, vitality and strength? Natural food, fresh air and sunshine are 
the infallible factors^ in preventing and curing consumption. There is 
nothing like sunbathing for those who are emaciated from any disease. I 
would advise every seeker for health to take a nude sunbath every day 
and if your neighbors object wear a single open mesh garment through 
which sunshine can penetrate. 

Doctor Babbitt has summed up many facts bearing upon the power 
of sunlight to augment strength, beauty and intelligence. Those races 
who go partly or wholly nude in the sun demonstrate their superior 
strength and physical development. No race that swathes in sunproof, 
airproof garments can compete with the nude Dyaks, Ahts, Kaffirs, 
Arabs and Fuegians for strength, speed and endurance. 

Sunshine, fresh air and proper exercise are as essential as natural 
(unfired) foods for gaining and maintaining health, vitality, strength 
and beauty. Some very thoughtful women keep the blessed health- 
giving sunshine out of the house because it bleaches the carpet. Does 
this sound consistent? 

When you tan very quickly it indicates that you should take plenty 
of sunbaths to eliminate the poisons in your system until the tan leaves 
and the beautiful pink color of healthy blood remains on the whole 
body. Remember that THE CHLOROPHYLL-LIKE FUNCTION IN 
THE SKIN HAS THE POWER, WHEN AIDED BY SUNSHINE, 
TO CHEMICALLY, TRANSMUTE INORGANIC ELEMENTS 
AND POISONS INTO ORGANIC AND USEFUL ELEMENTS 
AS IS DONE IN THE LEAF OF PLANTS. 

THE LIFE OF FOOD 

We do eat live fruits, herbs, nuts and grain ? not to absorb 
their life to sustain our life ! but, in order to get the food material 
anabolized or organized to the highest perfection and stored with the 
greatest amount of sun-energy and before it has a chance to catabolize 
or disorganize and lose its store of energy in the process of decay or 



250 UNFIRED FOOD 

returning to inorganic life. The idea of absorbing life to sustain life 
is held in ignorance and superstition in the minds of those who are 
not yet fully ransomed from the cannibal of the past to the human. 
Life substance or magnetism can only be communicated or exchanged 
on the same plane of being. 

ORGANIC MOLECULES 

An organic food molecule is an anabolized molecule in which the 
composing atoms are held together in loose or forced affinity by a super- 
imposed force (solar energy) which is liberated in metabolic and 
catabolic changes. The basic atom of the organic salt molecule is only 
valuable and available as long as it is held in loose affinity. Organic 
foods are those in which the loose affinity between the composing ele- 
ments is undisturbed by fire or decay. The inorganic molecule is the 
result of chemical affinity; whereas, the organic molecule is constructed 
or built up by confined association of the atoms and incomplete molecules 
in the organic cell. 

THE TOOTH DESTROYERS 

The alum, soda and salaratus used in baking powder, mercurial and 
feric (iron) drugs and all foods which ferment in the stomach are in- 
jurious to the health of the teeth. All approximate and refined foods 
are deficient in the elements from which strong teeth can be built. The 
teeth are also indirectly injured by the perpetual use of soft foods. The 
teeth without natural exercise can not get proper nutriment from the 
blood. 

THE BABY 

Dr. Woods Hutchinson says "The baby knows, instinctively, what 
he wants, when he has enough and will reject vigorously what does 
not suit him." During the first three days of his existence the healthy 
baby cries but little and sleeps a great deal. During this period he is 
supplied with plenty of food in his veins and requires no other food, in 
fact, he is better off without it. Nor is there a natural supply of food 
for him until the third day. Colic and "colickiness" is generally due 
to the senseless insistence of officious nurses and anxious mothers 
crowding things into the baby's stomach during the first three days. 
Mother's natural supply of milk is the most wholesome and safest food 
for baby until he is to be weaned. Start him first with the sweet fruit 
juices and gradually introducing more and more of the soft pulp. After 
a while you may introduce the succulent vegetables beginning with 
lettuce. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 251 

WHOLESOME POULTICES 

For bee stings, burns, scalds, frost bites, inflamed abrasions and 
local inflammations a poultice made of grated potatoes, grated onions 
or other grated vegetables is very cooling and it assists nature to elim- 
inate the poisons more readily. It does locally what a cold pack does 
over a larger area. It does not suppress Nature's operations. When 
a very large area of the body is scalded then apply olive oil (or other 
vegetable oils) mixed with sodium-bicarbonate (baking soda) until it 
is like butter. Change this application as often as the pain returns. 

DOMESTIC HARMONY 

It often happens that the question of right feeding and right living 
causes the most serious family jars. Some husbands or wives, however, 
bear their burden in secret because they wish to keep harmony as long 
as possible; but secret burdens are the hardest to bear and speedily 
grow to unbearable dimensions. Discontent is sure to grow alongside 
of this burden and then finally some other minor affair, generally, is 
the last straw that breaks the camel's back or the pebble that starts 
an avalanche. Weed it out while it is small. When husband and wife 
can not agree on the question of right feeding then let the wiser one 
give in and see to it that he or she gets the best of meat procurable 
and plenty of it and let every particle of food be thoroughly cooked 
and let this be of the most strengthening and of the most refined that 
can be bought. Nature will soon forbid this debauchery without a 
word said about it. This is the best way to convince stubborn igno- 
rance. Never try to keep him or her from eating flesh or cooked foods 
as long as he or she is not convinced that it is an undesirable habit 
and as long as he or she has not outgrown the craving for such 
food ? because the absence of the material desired increases the very 
craving for it. This is why forbidden food tastes the sweetest. 

The very best way for reasonable people to settle the food question, 
once and forever, is that both parties agree to thoroughly investigate 
fhe value of natural feeding during a period of six months exclusively 
and then try the old system again for a week or two. By this time 
both parties will be mutually convinced that the natural diet combined 
with right living increases the joys and pleasures of life and makes 
them more lasting. 

SOCIAL DINNERS AND ETIQUETTE OF FEASTING 

Man is a social being. To feast in common with others is a proper 
and rightful response to man's social nature (instinct). From time 
immemorial social eating, drinking and feasting has been the ceremony 
that welds social equality on respective planes and that binds true friend- 
ship of the kindred minded and kindred souls. Therefore if a man 



252 UNFIRED FOOD 

indulges in a social smoke, in a social beer or social intoxicants of any 
kind he degrades himself to the plane of the perverted, unrefined and 
inebriates. If a woman indulges in a social tea or coffee (of the in- 
toxicating kind) she degrades herself to the plane of female sots. 

In like manner; anyone who dines at a social dinner, where flesh 
food is served, degrades himself to the plane of cannibals. Surely; 
my host or hostess who would honor me by inviting me to a social 
dinner would not (intentionally or otherwise) degrade my social stand- 
ing and character by the presence of a measly mouthful of disease 
breathing, filthy flesh food . Surely not! It is sacrifice enough when 
a hygienic reformer condescends to partake of inferior (cooked or 
baked) food. Let me repeat to those who would give social dinners. 
Let it be your prime aim to cater, first, to the health of the body with 
wholesome food, next, to social refinement and then to ethical and 
spiritual unfoldment. 

It is therefore necessary that the best forms of etiquette required 
by good breeding be complied with. The arrangement of the spread 
should suggest harmony and the decoration and garnish should appeal 
to sense of beauty and art but never to extravagance. The dinner 
talk should be entertaining, cheerful, jolly and interspersed with gentle 
laughter. All unpleasant subjects, including diet, should be avoided 
at the table. 

THE POWER OF RESISTANCE AND RECUPERATION 

It has been proven in history that the people and races that live 
on the most natural foods have the greater resistance against the attack 
of diseases and when wounded, at times almost fatally, heal up and 
recover in most remarkable speed, whereas those who subsist on un- 
natural foods and whose blood is, consequently, burdened with unnat- 
ural elements, body waste and effete poisons fall subject to blood poi- 
soning and die even under most favorable circumstances. Example. 
The Turco-Greek and Russo-Japanese wars. 

MAN IS A FRUGIVORE AND HERBIVORE 

Those branches of the great tree of the animal kingdom are best 
developed and flourish most which keep most closely to that kind of 
food for which their organism is adapted. Man -is no exception to this 
rule. The entire anatomy of man, in structure and functions, proves 
him to belong to that branch of the animal kingdom which chiefly 
subsist on fruits and succulent herbs. Man is, therefore^ neither a 
carnivore nor an omnivore. It stands to reason that Nature's intended 
food, for which the system is fitted, would produce the highest tonicity 
and development of all the organs and their functions. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 253 

THE VEGETARIAN SPORT 

If you would be a sport. If you love to go out into the wildwood. 
If you love to hunt. Then be a vegetarian sport. Do not take a gun 
for there is no pleasure in shooting herbs. Take a knife and an ap- 
propriate bag and hunt the wild herbs which are rare or plentiful. 
Learn to know the habitat of delicious and wholesome wild herbs. Bag 
the leaves or flov/ers of such herbs and bring them home and give them 
to your mother, your sweetheart or wife that she may prepare the rare 
dish in her sweet way. If you found a plenty of such herbs as keep 
for a day or two in cold water when stored in a cold place reserve part 
of them for a subsequent meal or else have your nurse prepare them 
for a social dinner and invite your friends to partake of the rare dish. 
If you feel prompted to divide with your friends do that. Such sport, 
and such feasting will not degrade the soul nor defile the temple in 
which it lives. 

THE SENSE OF SMELL 

People who always feed on natural foods generally have a keen 
sense of smell. This fact is partly due to their constitutional health, 
to living in clean, live, air and partly to the habit of paying attention 
to the odors emitted from different people and domestic and wild ani- 
mals. These people tell us that persons, apparently healthy, feeding 
largely on flesh food radiate a disagreeable, stinking, odor which is 
not found emitted by vegetarians. Every surgeon corroborates this 
by telling us that the flesh of a meat eater emits an almost unbearable 
odor especially when the operation is in the region of the viscera which 
is not so with vegetarians. Every disease can be recognized by the odor 
it produces. 

Serenity of mind, peacefulness and a kindly attitude to all life causes 
the body to emit an odor distinctly different and always pleasing 
whereas hatred, anger and revenge produce disagreeable odors to those 
who can perceive them. It is said that all destructive beasts emit an 
odor which is, at once, a warning of danger to other animals. Mr. 
Kellog, a naturalist, has proven this to his own satisfaction in extensive 
experiments with his dog, Don. Corroborate this with what you know 
and with what others have told you ; reason cooly and deliberately and 
form your conclusions. 

SUNSHINE AND SHADOW 

Stand before a large mirror: and try to determine for yourself, 
which of the following attitudes will increase your circulation, will aid 
digestion, will make the time pass pleasantly and which will help to cure 
diseases of mind and body. Drop your shoulders, chin, the corners of 
your mouth and frown, scowl and look "grouchy ;" but stop this before 
it takes a hold of your constitution. Now : Take a deep breath, throw 



254 



UNFIRED FOOD 



your chest out, stand erect, open your eyes wide, raise the corners 
of your mouth, and smile ! Grin ! ! LAUGH ! ! ! Cultivate this into a 
habit if it does you good. Try this also: Raise the corners of your 
mouth into a smile and try to feel sad if you can. 



NURSING, A FINE ART 

Every little girl instinctively loves to play nurse to her doll and 
later on to her playmates. The tender hopes of a young lady include 
nursing. The young woman realizes sweet joys in nursing her hus- 
band and the young mother enjoys the most sacred instinctive pleasures 
in nursing her sweet darling. Thus Nature has sanctioned the inclina- 
tion to nurse by inscribing it deep into the heart of woman. Nursing 
is now one of the fine arts and will become the true art oi healing. 
What well bred woman could disdain to be master of the art of nurs- 
ing? It means great usefulness to self and humanity to be well in- 
formed in nursing. The hospital nurse will cease to be when the home 
nurse can outwit the doctor. The home nurse will prevent and cure all 
diseases of body and mind by judiciously serving Nature's unfired 
panacean foods. The accomplished nurse will know how to select, pre- 
pare, combine, garnish, set a spread and serve. Wholesome food is the 
foundation of health, beauty and refinement of character. 




THE LIGHT, AIR AND LABOR CURE. 



TWO ORANGES FOR A NICKEL are cheaper than beer. They 
stimulate more but are perfectly harmless. Two oranges each 2^2 
to 3 inches in diameter contain 8 ounces liquid or a pint. The 
8 ounces contain ^4 ounces stimulant sugar and % ounce nutrient 
elements. What beer can equal orange juice when there is not a 
single wholesome element in any beer. 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 255 

A FEW MAXIMS 
"WHERE REASON RULES THE APPETITE OBEYS/' 

'There is no gluttony 
or inebriety 
where Nature provides 

and woman nurses," 

"The cook made it possible 
for the doctor to exist." 

"Where the cook is discharged 
and the nurse takes charge 
the doctor goes by." 

"Natural foods contribute to 
Physiological, 
Financial, 
Domestic and 
Social 

Economy." 

"Your body partakes of the character of food." 

"What comes out of the mouth is characterized by what goes into it." 

"Tell me what you eat and I will tell you who you are." 

"Cease to eat when food tastes best" is a rule invented for cooked 
food only. 

It is said, by good authority, from a cooked food standpoint: "The 
aged should eat less as they grow older; because the ripe body requires 
less food according to age." This chastisement and starvation is the 
reward for feeding on perverted food. 

The aged as well as the young who feed on natural food may satisfy 
and gratify their unperverted appetite and craving with impunity. The 
dictates of the sense of alimentation may be trusted when feeding on 
natural food. The alimentary canal of the aged requires normal exercise 
as well as that of the young ; while the absorption of natural food is con- 
trolled by the demand of the system, which then controls digestion. 

Ignorance fosters disease, sin and crime. 




1. Peas 

2. Rice 

3. Spelt 

4. Hulled Oats 

5. Milo-Maize. 



6. Hulled Buckwheat 

7. Kaffir-Corn 

8. Brazilian Flour Corn 

9. Rye 

10. Jerusalem Corn 



11. Hulless Barley 

12. Sweet-Corn 

13. Wheat 

14. Peanuts 

15. Lima-Beans 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 259 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 

Under this head the author has sought to give the necessary infor- 
mation on the available natural food material produced by the vegetable 
kingdom. He found by investigation that the people generally know 
nothing of the many natural and wholesome foods that Nature pro- 
vides outside of the garden and farm products demanded on the market. 
There are many wholesome uncultivated herbs growing in waste and 
desert places, in fields and woods which could be gathered profitably 
for salads; but people fear to taste them; yet when a doctor prescribes 
actual poison they fear no danger. The author wishes to call special 
attention to the Salad Flowers,, the uncultivated herbs and the rarer 
vegetables. This whole subject is presented from the standpoint of 
Prophylactic Foods. 

WHEAT 

The natural (unpolished and unfired) wheat berry contains all the 
elements in proper combination, which are necessary to maintain health 
(normal metabolism) indefinitely. We cannot improve upon Nature's 
products, either by polishing, separation, fermentation, baking or cook- 
ing. Every attempt in this direction has proven detrimental. The com- 
mon white wheat bread, as it is known today, is no longer the "staff of 
life." 

The six layers of bran contain several most essential food and 
tonic elements. These layers weigh about thirteen per cent of the 
whole grain. The outer coat, one, of the skins is composed of cellulose 
which stimulates the peristaltic function and prevents constipation. 
The second and third coat of the skin contain the salts of phos- 
phorus and potassium, which are indispensable in the construction and 
reconstruction of bone and teeth. The three remaining layers of the 
bran form the envelope of the seed proper. The first one of these is 
the testa. This and layer five contain coloring matter and some valu- 
able salts. Layer six is called the cerealin or aleurone layer and weighs 
about eight per cent of the whole grain. Cerealin is a nitrogenous sub- 
stance which gives flavor to the grain. This valuable bran is too coarse 
(hm?) for the delicate and perverted human animals. It is much nicer 
or even stylish to take some bitter and acrid concoction prescribed by, 
a doctor (hm?). The hogs and cows know better! 

The scutellum is composed of proteid, oil and organic salts. This 
combination is very soluble, as it is the first food for the young embryo. 
The embryo is composed of cellulose, nitrogenous matter and oil. These 
parts are so rich in oil that the .miller cannot allow them to go into the 



260 



UNFIRED FOOD 



flour or it will all become rancid. The endosperm is the portion that 
makes white wheat flour. It is composed of starch, cellulose and gluten. 
These elements produce heat and energy, but without the proper organic 
salts contained in the bran, scutellum and germ, they cannot produce 
good brain, nerve and bone, nor strong elastic muscle. In the process 
of baking the most digestible part of the starch is consumed by the 
yeast germ and changed into alcohol and carbonic acid gas. The very 
little of organic salt that is left in the white flour is freed from the or- 




-Embryo 

indospernr 



A GRAIN OF WHEAT. 

ganic molecule by the heat of baking and thus rendered unavailable. 
Now it is plain that white bread is the prevalent cause of stomach 
troubles, constipation, mal nutrition, brain fag, decayed teeth and the 
overwhelming increase of ruptures. "Back to Nature." Buy good seed 
wheat by the bushel or peck from reliable seed houses and grind it 
yourself from day to day in a wall mill or table mill and eat it in the 
form of "Nut-O-Meal" or "Brawn Food" as directed in this book. If 
your taste is not extremely perverted you will find it delicious, whole- 
some and simple. 

Dr. Tryon of the fifteenth century says: "Whoever values health 
and would be true to Nature must not separate the bran from the flour. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 261 

GRAINS 

The anatomical and analytical description of wheat may be applied 
to all the other grains with slight variations. 

Oats 

Of all the grains hulled oats is the softest, the sweetest, the most 
spicy and the richest in saline elements. Even its cellulose is easily di- 
gested. It is the most important grain for mother and the growing- 
child. Its constituent elements have much the same ratio as those in 
milk. It is pleasant to chew whole, but it can also be ground into 
"Scotch oatmeal" on your wall mill or table mill. The meal in the 
form of "Brawn Food" can be served even to the toothless. Do not 
grind it too fine. Fresh hulled oats is always preferable to "Steel Cut 
Oats" which is sold at the groceries. Fresh hulled oats used to be sold 
as chicken feed at Siegel & Cooper, Chicago. 

Hulless Barley 

Hulless barley comes next to oats considering its nutrient and tonic 
ingredients. It is as naked as wheat, which it resembles, but it is much 
harder. In spite of its hardness, when ground and served in the form 
of "Brawn Food," it is preferable to wheat. It can be procured from 
seed houses or health food stores. 

Maizes 

Jerusalem corn has the largest kernel of the maizes. Milo maize is 
next in size. Kaffir corn must be kept in a very dry and airy place. The 
maizes are medium soft and brittle, resembling corn. Maize is somewhat 
too dry and brittle by itself, but when mixed half and half with, rye and 
ground together, a happy medium is struck, which improves the flavor 
and consistency of both grains. This meal served in the form of 
"Brawn Food" has laxative properties. 

Buckwheat 

Hulled buckwheat serves an excellent diversion in the line of cereal 
foods. It is strong in heat producing properties and therefore is a good 
winter cereal. It is very crisp and softer than hulled oats and has a 
nutty flavor. It is best served whole and may be mixed with a very 
few chopped nuts. Children like it. Buckwheat can be hulled at home 
by grinding it with the stones set so far apart that they merely crack 
the hull and then the hull is sifted and fanned out. 

Rye 

Rye is an excellent laxative cereal, but its meal has a tendency to 
gum in the mouth and stick to the teeth. This, however, can be easily 
remedied by mixing into two parts of rye one part of rice, rice-corn or 
Brazilian flour corn and then grinding the mixture to meal. This meal 
has a good flavor in "Brawn Foods." 



262 UNFIRED FOOD 

Spelt 

Spelt is a grain similar to wheat, but not so rich in glutin, therefore 
more brittle and has a slightly warm flavor. Green Kern is spelt har- 
vested before it is fully ripe and in this form it has a very spicy flavor 
and therefore is much relished in "Brawn Foods." 

Corn 

Sweetcorn, ricecorn and Brazilian flour corn are a most excellent 
natural food, just before they are ripe and hard. It is then that their 
flavor is most delicious. Cooking does not and cannot improve the 
young corn but, to the contrary, ruins its best qualities. 

Sweet Corn 

Sweet corn is the only grain the meal of which makes the best un- 
fired pie crusts which do not become soggy and retain their flavor. 
Sweetcorn meal makes very sweet, but also very satiating "Brawn 
Food." On account of its sweetness it does not blend well with peanuts, 
but very well with pignolias or other nuts. 

Rice Corn 

Rice corn, Brazilian flour corn and rice with grated cocoanut make 
delicious "Brawn Food" as white as snow. Rice corn has laxative qual- 
ities. 

Brazilian Flour Corn 

This corn is the softest of all the corn known. It is not as soft as 
hulled oats, but so near it and so brittle that it will take the place of 
popped corn in the unfired diet. 

CORNMEAL made of the whole grain cannot be kept very long as 
the oil in the germ and surrounding scutellum readily oxidizes and be- 
comes rancid. Therefore buy the corn and the other grains and grind 
them yourself when you want them. 

Rice 

It is a mistaken idea, fostered by ignorance, that rice cannot be eaten 
unfired (unexploded). Unpolished rice makes a wholesome and palat- 
able meal for "Brawn Food." After a long line of investigations the 
author discovered that rice meal and rice corn meal are the best (and 
rather the only) meals that can be mixed with honey to make unfired 
wedding cakes. 

Millet 

German millet when hulled and ground to meal makes good and 
wholesome "Brawn Food," but after it is hulled it has a tendency to 
get rancid. When buying German millet always taste it to make sure 
that it is not rancid. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



263 



Wild Rice 

Wild rice must not be forgotten, as it is sweeter than common rice. 

In conclusion let me say that the unfired foods need not be motonon- 
ous with such a variety of grains. In cases where you cannot get the 
grain you want from your grocer or health-food store try the" larger 
seed houses. 



BANANA MEAL 

The plantain banana which is not sweet enough for a commercial 
fruit yields a wholesome meal when sliced and dried in a temperature 
which is below that of scalding water. The sliced banana after it is 
dried and before it is ground into meal is called "banana fig." The 
banana fig can be bought in wholesale quantities and eaten whole or 
ground to meal for "Brawn Food." 



COMPOSITION OF CEREALS 





5 

rt 


Proteid 


o 


Carbohydrates 


S 


Fuel Value 
in Calories 
per oz. 


Starch 


Cellu- 
lose 


Oats, hulled 


10.5 
10.5 
11.3 
12.1 


13.0 
12.4 
11.3 
9.3 


6.3 
1.8 
3.6 
4.4 


65.2 
69.8 
67.3 
70.4 


2.0 
2.7 
4.2 
1.5 


3.0 
2.8 
2.3 
2.2 


104.9 
98.0 
98.5 
102.0 


Barley, hulless 


Millet (Hirse) 


Kaffir Corn. 


Milo-Maize 


Jerusalem Corn 
















Buckwheat, hulled. 


12.6 
11.6 
10.4 
10.5 


10.4 
10.6 
12.5 
11.8 


3.0 
1.7 

2.2 
2.1 


70.3 
72.0 
71.2 
72.0 


1.7 
1.7 
1.8 

1.8 


2.0 
1.9 
1.9 

1.8 


99.4 
98.2 
98.1 


Rye. 


Wheat, spring unpeeled 
Wheat, winter 


SnAlf /Emmer Wheat \ 




Corn 


9.5 


9.9 


3.8 


73.7 


1.4 


1.7 


104.7 


Sweet Corn 


Rice Corn 
















Flour 
















Brazilian Flour Corn 
















Rice, unpolished 


12.4 


7.6 


.9 


67.4 


1.5 


1.2 
4 


98.1 


Rice, polished 


White Bread 


33.4 
12.0 


8.6 
4.7 


.9 
2.2 


56.6 

77.9 





.5 
3.2 


76.4 
99.6 


Banana Meal . . 



264 



UNFIRED FOOD 



CEREALS 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS 

OF IOO PARTS 



.1 

The Water is Deducted 
in These Figures 


Percent of 
Total Salts 


1 


Sodium 


Magnesium 


Calcium 


Potassium 


Phosphorus 


1 

*s 
in 


c 



. 

i 




3 
u 


Oats 


3 35 


04 


.06 


.25 


,12 


.61 


.87 


06 


1 ,31 


03 


Barley 


3 10 


05 


13 


39 


0? 


51 


1 0?, 


09 


89 




Buckwheat 


2 29 


.04 


.14 


.28 


.10 


.53 


1.11 


.05 


005 


.03 


Rye 


2 15 


.03 


.02 


,24 


,06 


,68 


1,02 


06 


03 


01 


Wheat 


2.12 


.03 


.05 


.26 


.07 


,65 


1.00 


.01 


.04 


.007 


Corn 


1 90 


02 


,02 


.,29 


.04 


.57 


.86 


02 


,04 


04 


Rice 


1.37 


.02 


.06 


.15 


.05 


.33 


.71 


.007 


.04 


.001 

























SALINE MEAL 

Saline meal of one ounce of dried Swiss chard leaves to three 



ounces of Hulless Barley analyzed. 

Water 11.5 

Protein 15.3 

Oil 2.2 

Carbohydrates 63.3 

Organic Salts 7.7 

100.0 

Fuel value or Calorics per 
ounce 92.18 



Iron 2.1 

Sodium 11.9 

Magnesium i i.o 

Calcium 3.5 

Potassium 16.3 

Phosporus 27.2 

Sulphur 4.0 

Silicon 22.5 

Chlorine 1.5 

100.0 

NUTS 

Nuts in general are the best, the most wholesome and most econom- 
ical source of Protein, because while they are ea'ten unfired their pro- 
tein is well balanced with the positive salts (detoxyl). The nuts bear 
no exception to other foods in the fact that baking deteriorates the use- 
fulness of their positive salts. 

For economical reasons it is best to buy all nuts shelled provided 
they are fresh and not exposed to moist air. The fresh COCOANUT 
grated produces the most delicious blend of flavors in" "brawn foods," 
sweet fruit salads and all the mild herb and root salads. The fresh co- 
coanut milk should not be wasted. It is nature's provision for infants 
and invalids. The SPANISH PEANUT is the softest and most useful 
in the unfired diet, because it can be used in a greater variety of ways 
than any other nut. To those who have learned to like the peanut, it 
takes the place of milk, butter, cream, eggs, sugar, salt and spices. The 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



265 



flaked peanut is the solution to an inexpensive but substantial "brawn 
food." No other nut can take the place of peanuts in making hot, 
pungent, acrid, bitter or strong herbs or roots palatable and often most 
delicious. It also blends well with all herbal fruits, including bananas 
and dates and of the tree fruits, the lemon, but it does not blend well 
with the sweet tree and shrub fruits, locust bread and sweetcorn. The 
experienced nurse will always buy the fresh shelled Spanish peanut at 
wholesale, in not less than ten pound quantities. The peanuts and the 
cocoanuts are the least expensive of all the nuts. Next to the peanuts 
comes the Mexican or Italian pine nut, called PIGNOLIA or "proteid 
nut." It is a most digestible, very soft and" sweet nut with a slightly 
resinous flavor. It can be flaked and used just like the peanut with 
the exception that it blends with sweet fruits, but cannot restore very 
acrid herbs/ It may be bought shelled at wholesale in five pound quan- 
tities. 

The ALMOND is another useful nut as it also bears to be flaked 
or ground, but I do not advise it being blanched, because its skin is of 
great service in the intestines. WALNUTS, PECANS, BRAZIL 
NUTS and FILBERTS have each their special virtue and serve for 
variety. They may be used chopped or coarsely grated, but they cannot 
and must not be flaked or ground as their oil separates when exposed 
to the slightest pressure. All the nuts are useful in brain and bone 
building as they are very rich in magnesium and phosphorus, especially 
the almond. For the food analysis and saline value of nuts study the 
tables. 

COMPOSITION OF NUTS 





Water 


Protein 


Oil 


Carbo- 
hydrates 


Ash or 

Salts 


Cocoanuts 


15.0 


5.7 


50.6 


27.9 


1.7 


Cocoanut-Milk 


91 5 


7.2 


.1 




1.2 


Chestnuts 


40 3 


6.8 


4.5 


47.1 


1.8 


Pignolias 


3.3 


14.6 


61.9 


17.2 


3.0 


Brazil Nuts 


5 3 


17.0 


66.8 


7.0 


3.9 




2.7 


9 6 


70.5 


15.3 


1.9 


Filberts . 


3 7 


15 6 


65.3 


13.0 


2.4 


Pistachios 


4.2 


22.3 


54.0 


16.3 


3.2 


Hickory Nuts 


3.7 


15.4 


67.4 


11.4 


2.1 


Almonds 


4.8 


21.0 


54.9 


16.7 


2.6 


Walnuts . . 


2.5 


18 3 


64.2 


13.0 


2.0 


Butternuts 


4.4 


27.9 


61.2 


8.5 


2.9 


Peanuts 


0.2 


25.5 


38.6 


24.7 


2.0 


Ground Nuts. . 


7.5 


24.5 


50.0 


11.7 


1.8 



266 



UNFIRED FOOD 



THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS 
OF 100 PARTS 





M tfl 






E 




g 


8 








The Water is Deducted 


|3 




g 


i/i 


E 


3 




1 


u 




P 


in These Figures 


u "w 


fl 


3 


a 
B 


3 

'u 


% 

cB 


a 

CO 


"a 





'g 




o 

PH H 


5 





& 


03 

u 


c2 





3 

c/: 


i 





Cocoanuts 


2 00 




17 


18 


r^9 


86 


33 


10 


01 


26 


Almonds 


2 73 


02 


01 


48 




77 


1 19 


0] 


008 


006 


Walnuts 


2.05 


.03 


.05 


27 


18 


63 


89 


001 






Chestnuts 


3 01 


,005 


,21 


22 


12 


1 72 


55 


11 


05 


02 

























THE SALTS AND PROTEIDS OF NUTS COMPARED 





The Percent 
of Ash Salts 


The Percent 
of Protein 


Ratio 


Fuel Value 
Calories per oz. 


Cocoanuts 


1.7 


5.7 


1 to 3.3 


52.36 


Chestnuts 


1.8 


6.3 


1 to 3.5 


72.10 


Pignolias 


3.0 


14.6 


1 to 4.1 


192.47 


Brazil Nuts 


3.9 


17 


1 to 4.4 


195.97 


Pecans 


1.9 


9.6 


1 to 5.0 


205.33 


Filberts t 


2 4 


15.6 


1 to 6.5 


197.41 


Hickory Nuts 


2.1 


15.4 


Ito 7.3 


200.67 


Almonds 


2.6 


21.0 


Ito 8.1 


181.50 


Walnuts 


2.0 


18.3 


1 to 9.0 


197.71 


Butternuts 


2.9 


27.9 


1 to 9.3 


190.15 


Peanuts 


2.0 


25.5 


1 to 12. 7 


154.56 


Ground Nuts 


1.8 


24.5 


1 to 13.6 


167.43 



LEGUMES 

Beans, Peas and Lentils are the richest proteid foods known. It 
must be remembered, however, that cooked legumes are as injurious to 
the general health as they are rich in proteid elements, because they 
tend to saturate the blood with proteid waste poisons. Unfired legumes 
are as wholesome as any other natural foods because their organic salts 
are still unstable (digestible) and thus able to neutralize proteid waste 
products. No one can eat too much of unfired legumes ; but this is not 
true with cooked legumes. The tima bean has the least of that papilio- 
naceous flavor and therefore the ripe, dried, lima bean can be soaked 
and used in winter salads just like the young lima bean. All the other 
beans are too harsh when ripe and therefore cannot be used in unfired 
dishes. Green string bean salads and wax bean salads are as valuable as 
any green salad recommended for tonic values. The flowers of the 
hyacinth bean, double dolichos and other flowering beans make tempting 
and wholesome salads. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



267 



Young green peas in summer and dried green peas soaked in winter 
make palatable salads when dressed with honey. The chick pea (nahit) 
(Circer) deserves special attention here as it is the sweetest of all peas. 
Soaked it can be used for salads and when ground and mixed with 
grated cocoanut it makes a palatable meal. Soaked lentils dressed with 
honey make a delicious salad especially when soaked in lemon juice. 

COMPOSITION OF LEGUMES 






O) 

"rt 


Protein 


5 


ij 


JS 


0) 
3 

ll * 


Lima Beans 


10.0 


20.3 


2.0 


62.8 


4.9 


99 57 


Water Deducted 


12.6 


22.5 


1.8 


59 6 


5.4 
8 5 


97 93 


Water Deducted 
Lentils 


12.0 


25.0 


1.9 


58.3 


4.0 
2 8 


99 55 


Water Deducted 

Peas 


9.5 


24.6 


1.0 


62.0 


3.3 
2 9 


101 03 


Water Deducted 










8.2 





COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS OF 

100 PARTS 





! 






6 
















i?l 




B 


J 
c 


Q 

3 


D 
I 


1 


3 


C 


V 

a 
'C 




ll 


1 


1 





13 
U 


cd 
I 


1 


O. 


.J3 


1 

Q 


Lima Beans 


5 4 


03 


06 


38 


?n 


2QK 


2 10 


18 


03 


10 


Lentils 


3 3 


07 


44 


08 




1 15 


1 ?0 






15 


Peas 


3 2 


03 


,04 


.26 


15 


1 38 


1 15 


11 


03 


05 

























FRUITS 



The fruits are nature's intended foods. In the fruits nature has 
purposely concentrated and elaborated the most wholesome and most 
delicious elements for the nutrition of the animal kingdom in order that 
its seeds might be carried far from the parent tree or plant to insure per- 
petuation by distribution. The law of "Survival of the Fittest" works 
hand in hand with Nature in evoluting the instinctive responsiveness or 



268 UNFIRED FOOD 

reciprocity in all fruit-bearing vegetation. Extensive observation has 
proven that Nature has protected the seeds of all luscious fruits, either 
against digestion by a hard and impervious seed coating or against in- 
gestion by a disagreeable flavor of the seed itself. Think this over. 
There is the law of reciprocity between the vegetable kingdom and the 
animal kingdom. Nature has provided every climate with the most 
necessary fruits that will restore, establish and sustain health and longev- 
ity when judiciously used. She has elaborated in the fruits the most 
harmless stimulants, perfect tonics and the best purgatives, laxatives, 
cholagogues and antiseptics. Beauty is the result of perfect physical, 
mental, moral and spiritual health. In the fruits are the elements that 
sustain health on all the mentioned planes. The very picture of beauti- 
ful fruits suggests beauty to the soul through the senses. In the vari- 
ous fruits is food that will sustain the mind in its quest after knowledge. 
"If you would be wise it is wise to breakfast on" sweet fruits. The 
sugar of fruits requires almost no digestion. 

Fruits are Nature's predigested foods. The APPLE is the king of 
fruits, because it is the most durably valuable and the most practical al- 
though it is not the most luxurious or luscious for the moment. Its special 
value lies in the fact that its better varieties, under, favorable condi- 
tions, can be kept all around the year. It has harmless stimulating 
properties. It is more nutritious than the potato and it is an excellent 
brainfood because of its large endowment of phosphorus. Let the chil- 
dren of all ages eat all the apples they crave. Those who eat apples 
freely are almost protected against all diseases, and especially jaundice, 
indigestion and torpidity of the liver, because it is very rich in sodium. 

The PEAR is not quite so rich in the positive salts except in potas- 
sium. The hard aromatic QUINCE is valuable for mildly cleansing 
the intestines. The PEACH has no equal for deliciousness and is al- 
ways relished by invalids. The fresh undiluted juice of CHERRIES is 
a mild but most effective tonic for invalids. The LEMON and the 
LIME are the most wholesome source of acid for cooling and refresh- 
ing drinks. The GRAPEFRUIT is somewhat bitter on account of its 
potassium, but that is wherein lies its dietetic value and you will soon 
learn to crave the flavor. It is Nature's gastric stimulant. In the 
ORANGE and TANGERINE Nature has elaborated a non-intoxicat- 
ing stimulant in combination with tonic ingredients. Patients suffering 
from fever should not eat solid foods, but orangeade and lemonade 
quenches their thirst and cools their feverish heat. The GRAPES and 
PRUNES are very much alike in their chemical composition, especially 
in potassium and calcium. Almost every common disease has been 
cured with grapes but an "apple cure" could be more successful. The 
FIG is another fruit that is as valuable as the apple. The OLIVE is 
an exception to all the fruits in that it is composed of fifty per cent of 
oil and in that its ash is eighty per cent potassium. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 269 

The fresh ripe olive would be a blessing to ailing humanity if it could 
be shipped over the country. Every "Health Food" store is supplied 
with the dried olive, which has the same chemical composition minus 
the water. Its lubricating, cleansing, beautifying and rejuvenating 
power is the greatest among all the fruits. Olive oil retains some of 
the above properties, but it is very deficient in the important organic 
potassium salt. Before passing to the shrub fruits I must leave a word 
for the unappreciated MULBERRY. It has no less- value for health 
than the grape. It is sold in the city of Chicago for blackberries and 
the public does not know it. The tree is both ornamental and useful. 
Its fruiting season extends over half of the summer and when its lusci- 
ous fruit is most needed. Every city front or rear yard should be orna- 
mented with one or two of these fruitiferous and umbriferous trees. 

BLUEBERRIES and BLACKBERRIES are sometimes employed 
to advantage, in diarrhea. The sugar of the blackberry, however, is 
somewhat predisposed to fermentation and therefore is best eaten when 
the stomach is emptied of all fermentable food. The HUCKLEBERRY 
is like the blueberry in wholesome properties and flavor. The RASP- 
BERRY has in flavor and quality what the blackberry has in juiciness. 
The GOOSEBERRY comes next to the strawberry in its rich endow- 
ment of calcium and iron and it makes up in magnesium what it is 
short in sodium. The CURRANT with its delicious acid comes next in 
line and the black currant is not less valuable. The ELDERBERRY 
is so saturated with organic salts that the salts will form an insoluble 
crystal in the preserved juice. The DATE and the BANANA belong 
to the herbal fruits. Dates and bananas form the most complete food 
for man. It is possible that the date and the banana are man's first 
fruit in his primitive tropical haunts. The banana that is shipped north 
is inferior to the banana that can be picked sun-ripened in the planta- 
tion. The reason is this. The bananas to be shipped north must be cut from 
the plant when they are yet grass green, and from that time until the 
consumer buys them they ripen without the aid of sunshine and some- 
times their unnatural ripening is hastened by kerosene heaters in the 
cars or in damp basements where the fruit must absorb the foul gases. 
This is why the starch of the undeveloped banasas afTect some people 
like cooked starch. Therefore it is best to buy the largest bananas which 
have been more fully developed in the plantation. Bananas for con- 
valescents should be hung into sunshine for a day or two. The plantain 
banana, (which is not sweet enough for fresh fruit), is dried and then 
called Banana-Fig. This is a most wholesome substitute for bread and 
when coarsely ground makes a delicious meal. 

The CAROB (St. John's bread or locust fruit) and TAMARINDS 
are the fruits of leguminous trees. If the public knew the virtue of 
these fruits they would be more extensively used. So much organic 
sugar is in the carob that it often forms white crystals in the larger 
pockets of the pod and its fibrous element is most useful in the in- 



2 ;o UNFIRED FOOD 

testines. The children f all ages should eat it freely. The tamarind 
has a concentrated, germicidal, acid, a delicious flavor, resembling that 
of grapes, and plenty of sugar and organic salts. It makes a most 
wholesome, delicious and refreshing tamarade and can also be used for 
flavoring cereals and confections. There are many other most valuable 
fruitsi that are little known because of their scarcity. Some of them de- 
serve to be cultivated more extensively. A few of the scarcer fruits 
that find their way into the Chicago market are the PAWPAW, the 
AVOCADO PEAR, the PRICKLY PEAR (cactus fruit), the JAP- 
ANESE PERSIMMONS, the POMERGRANATE and the WIN- 
GREEN BERRY. Keep your eyes open for them. 

Many of the temporary fruits can be preserved by rapid desicca- 
tion in the warm sunshine or by an applied draft of warm air, 
that is not hot enough to cook them, without injuring their 
chemical constitution. Such dried fruits can be kept the year 
round if protected against moist air, moths and worms. Dried fruits 
can be nearly restored to their original lusciousness by soaking them in 
water for several hours or over night. The saline ingredients of dried 
fruits do not lose their value unless the fruit is heated to the scalding 
temperature. In the following table most of the fruit is arranged in 
the order of saline abundance. Since the saline abundance can only 
be determined from the percentage of ash after the water is deducted the 
figures are inserted after the letters "W. D." These figures are pro- 
duced as follows. Add the percentage of each ingredient except water; 
divide this sum by 100 and multiply the per cent of ash by this quotient. 
The fuel value is obtained as follows. Multiply the sum of the per cent 
of protein and starch by 1.1375. Then multiply the per cent of oil by 
2.525. The sum of the two quotients is the fuel value in calories per 
ounce. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



271 



FRUITS 





Water 


Protein 


Oil and 
Acid 


Suparanc 
Starch 


Ash or 
Saline 
Matter 


Fuel 
Value or 
Calories 
per ounce 


Cucumbers 


95.20 


.73 


.62 


2.95 


.50 


6.75 


Water Deducted 




16.21 


12 93 


61 46 


1040 




Tomatoes 


94.30 


.90 


.40 


3.90 


50 


fi.47 


Water Deducted 




15.79 


7.02 


68.42 


877 




Pumpkins 


88.00 


1.55 


s 


9 18 


qq 




Water Deducted 










8 24 




Watermelons 


92.00 


60 


.40 


6 70 


60 


<) 31 


Water Deducted 




7 23 


4.82 


80.72 


7 23 




Strawberries 


90.77 


1.03 


.60 


7.00 


.60 


H2S 


Water Deducted 




11.16 


6.51 


76.84 


6 50 




Muskmelons 


89.50 


.60 


.05 


9.26 


.60 


11 33 


Water Deducted 










571 




Currants 


85.00 


1.50 


.20 


12 60 


70 


16 54 


Water Deducted 










4,66 




Oranges 


87.00 


.82 


.20 


11.43 


65 


H57 


Water Deducted 




6.31 


1.54 


87.92 


423 




Raisins, Dried 


14.60 


2.60 


3.30 


76.10 


3.40 


97.85 


Water Deducted 




3.05 


3.86 


89.11 


395 




Prunes 


84.10 


.70 


.10 


14.50 


.60 


17.54 


Dried. 


22 00 


3 43 


.49 


71 14 


2 94 


86 06 


Water Deducted 




4.40 


.63 


91.20 


3 77 




Bananas 


75.10 


1.33 


.62 


22.03 


.92 


28.14 


Water Deducted 




5.34 


2.49 


88.47 


3 70 




Cherries 


82.40 


1.00 


.80 


15.20 


.60 


20 45 


Water Deducted 










340 




Apricots 


85.00 


1.05 


.21 


13.23 


.51 


16.77 


Dried 


29.40 


4.94 


1.00 


62.28 


2.38 


78.99 


Water Deducted 




7.00 


1.42 


88.22 


3.36 




Apples . . 


84.60 


.38 


.48 


14.04 


.50 


17.61 


Dried 


28.00 


1.77 


2.23 


65.66 


2.34 


82.33 


Water Deducted 




2.45 


3.10 


91.20 


3.25 




Figs 


79.67 


1.50 


.30 


17.93 


.60 


21.86 


Dried 


18.50 


6.10 


1.21 


71.87 


2.41 


90.53 


Water Deducted 




7.38 


1.48 


88.19 


295 




Gooseberries 


85.00 


.56 


1.42 


12.60 


.42 


18 55 


Water Deducted 










2.80 




Pineapples 


89 30 


.40 


30 


9 70 


30 


12 24 


Water Deducted 




3.74 


2.80 


90.66 


2.80 




Persimmons 


66.10 


.80 


.70 


31.50 


90 


38.51 


Water Deducted 










2 65 




Pears 


84.40 


.60 


.50 


14.10 


.40 


17.98 


Water Deducted -, 










2 56 




Grapes 


78.30 


1.30 


1.60 


18.30 


.50 


26.32 


Water Deducted 










2.30 




Dates 


55.01 


1.12 


1.47 


41.46 


.94 




As Bought 


15.35 


2.11 


2.77 


78.00 


1.77 


88.12 


Water Deducted 




2.49 


3.27 


92.16 


2,09 




Mulberries 


84.71 


.36 


1.86 


12.41 


.66 


19.49 


Raspberries 


84.10 


1.70 


1.00 


12.60 


.60 


18.79 


Peaches 


84.30 


.50 


.10 


14.80 


.30 


17.66 


Water Deducted 










1.91 




Huckleberries 


81.90 


.60 


.60 


16.60 


.30 


21.08 


Nectarines 


82.90 


.60 




15.90 


.60 


18.76 


Lemons. . 


89.30 


.95 


.70 


9.00 


.50 


24.46 



272 



UNFIRED FOOD 



FRUITS 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN 
OF 100 PARTS 



FRACTIONS 



The Water is Deducted 
in These Figures 


Percent of 
Total Salts 


c 




Sodium 


s 

re 


Calcium 


Potassium 


Phosphorus 


ft 


c 

O 

M 


Chlorine 

II 


Strawberries 


6.50 


38 


1 85 




92 


1 37 


90 


20 


78 


10 


Gooseberries 


2 80 


13 


98 


16 


34 


1 08 


55 


17 


07 


02 


Cucumbers. 


10 40 


14 


1 04 


43 


76 


4 98 


9 08 


55 


61 


51 


Pumpkins 


8 24 


22 


1 79 


99 


65 


1 65 


9 79 


90 


69 


03 


Apples . . 


3 30 


05 


86 


99 


13 


1 18 


45 


90 


14 




IT- 

Figs 


2.95 


04 


77 


27 


56 


84 


04 


19 


16 


08 


Prunes 


3.77 


09 


34 


13 


43 


1 83 


60 


18 


15 


09 


Olives 


5.51 


05 


,41 


,01 


.41 


4 45 


,07 


06 


04 


01 


Cherries 

Watermelons .... 


3.40 
7.23 


.07 
32 


.08 
68 


.19 

39 


.25 
72 


1.76 
3 24 


.54 
1 01 


.17 

38 


.30 


.04 


Pears 


2.56 


03 


22 


13 


20 


1 40 


39 


14 


04 


01 


Grapes 


2 30 


01 


03 


11 


26 


1 29 


36 


14 


06 


03 


Peaches 


1.90 


02 


16 


10 


15 


1 04 


99 


11 


03 




Blueberries 


1.65 


08 


08 


10 


13 


96 


29 


05 







TOMATOES OR LOVE APPLES 

(Lycopersicum Esculentum) 

The tomato is one of the most useful herbal fruits for restoring 
health and for fortifying health. It is very luscious and delicious and 
it is rich in the most valuable organic salts. A few chips of tomato im- 
prove the flavor of most of the herbal salads. No other herbal fruit can 
produce such a delicious uncooked soup as the tomato. For soup the 
tough thin skin of the ripe tomato is peeled off with a very sharp knife. 
The juice with the seeds is squeezed into one dish and the pulp is 
macerated in another dish with a table fork until liquid. Then the juice 
with seed and all is mixed with the macerated pulp and other ingred- 
ients, according to the kind of soup desired. Even the green unripe 
tomato makes a relished salad when combined with flaked peanuts and 
celery. The green tomato can be kept nearly two months after frost 
when laid singly in a light and airy place. They should be looked over 
carefully each day and those that show tendencies to spoil should be 
promptly used for salads before they have a chance to spoil and infect 
the rest. Patients who would help nature to overcome cancer or liver 
troubles should make friends with tomatoes. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 273 

SWEET SALAD PEPPERS 

(Capsicum Annuum) 

The sweet salad peppers are distinct varieties from the burning and 
hot varieties. The sweet peppers are grown extensively in Italy, Spain 
and France. There are five or six varieties which are absolutely free 
from that acrid or burning pungency/ The sweet salad peppers are 
as wholesome in every respect as the tomato. Everyone who eats the 
absolutely sweet peppers twice will certainly crave to eat them again. 
Great care must be exercised in buying sweet salad peppers in the market* 
because some of the hot varieties look almost exactly like the sweet 
varieties. There is only one way to make certain whether the peppers 
are sweet or hot. First ask the farmer or dealer if he can guarantee 
that the peppers are sweet. If he says "they are sweet" do not be too 
certain about it; but, take one, break it open, take out one seed and 
touch it to the tongue but be careful not to touch the lips. Now if the 
seed bites the tongue you may be certain that you would not like that 
pepper in your salad. Therefore do not buy them. The absolutely 
sweet peppers have not the slightest pungency on the seeds or on the 
inner surface. That is the only certain test. Do not buy sweet pepper 
seed for pepper culture unless you have tasted four or five of the seeds 
to make certain that it is not mixed with the seeds of the hot varieties. 

HUSK TOMATO 

(Physalis Pubescens and Alkekengi) 

The husk tomato is also called winter cherry, ground cherry and 
strawberry tomato. This tomato is loosely enclosed in an enlarged leafy 
calyx resembling a Chinese lantern. This tomato can be kept long into 
winter if the fruit is left in the husk. The fruit is relished much after 
it is eaten several times. 

EGGPLANT 

(Solanum Melon gena) 

The eggplant is also called madapple. It is a very useful fruit. The 
flavor of the flesh resembles that of string beans and some varieties are 
slightly pungent. They may be served in half inch slices spread with 
nut butter. 

THE PEPINO 

(Solanum Muricatum) 

Is a wholesome fruit, the pulp of which resembles the musk melon 
in flavor. 

CUCUMBERS 

(Cucumis Sativus) 

The cucumber comes next to the tomato in its usefulness for health. 
The very small cucumbers called pickles should be only used for salads, 



274 UNFIRED FOOD 

and those which are longer than three inches are most useful for soups, 
but they may also be used in salads sliced or chipped. The small cucum- 
bers should not be peeled, but the large ones should be peeled very 
thinly. Cucumbers for soup should not be wilt or too young or the soup 
will become too thick. A six inch cucumber peeled and grated produces 
one soup; which may be flavored with flaked nuts, parsley and honey. 
The rind of the cucumber has a most beneficial effect on the kidneys, 
because of the organic salts which concentrate in and near it. The 
cucumber sometimes stirs up painful eliminative crises in subjects whose 
blood is overloaded with some poison. This, then, proves that the 
cucumber is their very best friend. 



PUMPKINS AND LARGE SQUASHES 

(Cucurbita Maxima) 

There are many varieties of pumpkins and large squashes. The hard 
shelled varieties can be kept all through the winter for most wholesome 
salads. The Hubbard squash has a much sweeter and harder flesh than 
the pumpkin. It makes a most delicious salad when grated and mixed 
with chopped cabbage and chopped nuts. The pumpkin requires some- 
thing tart to bring out a pleasing flavor. The cranberry when chopped 
and well mashed or macerated combines well with pumpkins and 
squashes, but it takes a few flaked nuts to subdue its extreme acidity. 
Green tomatoes also bring out a good flavor. In summer and fall oxalis 
and sorrel combines well with pumpkins and squashes, especially when 
a little celery is added. Very soft pumpkins should not be grated, but 
chopped or cubed. 

VEGETABLE MARROW, CROOK NECK AND SCALLOP 

SQUASHES 

(Cucurbita Pepo) 

All these varieties of squashes are very useful for summer and winter 
salads. When they are soft and young they can be used like cucumbers 
and when they are very hard they may be grated for salads, like pump- 
kins and Hubbard squash. 

MUSK SQUASHES 

(Cucurbita Moschata) 

The varieties of this squash are the carpet bag gourd or Naples 
squash, the early Neapolitan squash, the Yokahama gourd and the Can- 
ada crookneck gourd. The flesh of all these squashes is sweet and per- 
fumed and therefore will be preferred for salads to pumpkins. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 275 

NETTED MELONS 

(Cucumis Melo~) 

The netted melons include the sugar and musk melons. There is 
a large variety of these having either green, white or red flesh and all 
are sweet juicy and fragrant. They need no preparation, except to be 
cut in halves or quarters and served with a spoon. 

CANTALOUPE OR ROCK MELONS 

(Cucumis Melo) 

There is very little difference between the varieties of the cantaloupe 
melons and the netted melons except that the cantaloupes are sup- 
posed to have a warty skin. 

WATERMELONS 

(Citrullus Vulgaris or Cucumis Citrullus) 

The watermelons differ from the previous melons in that the water- 
melon has the seed cavity filled entirely with minute granular cells which 
are crisp and filled with a sweet and refreshing juice. The flesh which 
is eaten in the other melons is, in the watermelons, hard and rather in- 
sipid. There are many varieties of watermelons, differing in the color 
of the seeds, which are either white, yellow, red, brown or black and 
they differ also in the color of the crisp flesh which varies from greenish 
white to dark red. The crisp flesh of nearly all the watermelons is melt- 
ing, sugary sweet and fragrant. 

The watermelon is the most juicy of all the herbal fruits. The 
juice of no other fruit can filter into the blood and through the kidneys 
as quickly as that of the watermelon. This is due to the fact that it is 
very rich in those salts which aid kidney elimination. Organic iron, cal- 
cium, potassium and sulphur are most abundant in the watermelon 
juice. It is advisable to always eat a portion of the hard flesh with the 
crisp flesh. The cellulose in the hard flesh and the organic salts it con- 
tains are as useful in the intestines as the salts in the juice are to the 
kidneys. Watermelon should be served in sections or slices with a knife 
and fork. Watermelon is the best fruit to eat after a fast. Con- 
valescents should eat watermelon when they would drink water. 

STRAWBERRIES 

(Fragaria) 

The strawberry on account of its delicious flavor and lusciousness 
has become the favorite among all the small fruits. The true value of 
the strawberry, (which is, as yet, little appreciated by the world at 
large) lies in the fact that of all the fruits analyzed it is the richest 



276 UNFIRED FOOD 

in the most valuable organic salt; namely sodium, calcium, iron and 
silicon. The four prominent natural varieties are the wood strawberry 
(F. Vesca), the alpine strawberry (F. Alpina), the Hautbois (F. 
Elatior) and the pineapple strawberry (F. Grandiflora). Of these 
an endless number of artificial varieties have been produced by hybridiza- 
tion and selection. We would prefer the alpine varieties because they 
have a tendency to bear fruit during six months of the year. The 
strawberry may be served in any conceivable way, but it should never 
be (improved?), cooked or preserved. For reasons above stated the 
strawberry is the best blood toning fruit known. Therefore the sick 
and the convalescent should eat them to furnish Nature with the mate- 
rial for elimination, neutralization and reconstruction. Let no one pass 
the opportunity to sip the nectar from Nature's tonic fruit; the straw- 
berry. 

CRANBERRY 

( Vaccinum Macrocarpon ) 

The cranberry is the most acid of the common herbal fruits we know 
of. It ripens in the fall and can be kept throughout the winter, when 
it becomes very useful for flavoring winter salads. Cranberry-nut 
cheese is a most wholesome winter relish. The cranberries to be used 
for salads should be chopped and then mashed or macerated with a 
wooden potato masher or wooden spoon in the chopping bowl. If a 
small quantity of flaked nuts are mixed with the chopped cranberries be- 
fore they are macerated no juice will be lost. The cranberry is too 
acid to be eaten alone and I need not repeat why cranberry preserves are 
not wholesome 

PINEAPPLE OR ANANAS 

(Ananassa Sativa) 

The pineapple is the closest link between the herbs and the herbal 
fruits. The fruit itself consists of a fleshy consolidated spike. The 
cauliflower is a tendency in a similar direction. When the pineapple is 
ripe it is a most wholesome fruit. It is rich in organic sugar and acid 
and is not wanting in organic salts. Peter H. Rolfs says in the Farm- 
ers Bulletin of this fruit: it should be allowed to ripen fully, preferably 
on the plant. No matter how daintily the pineapple is served it is not 
quite equal in flavor to the deadripe fruit just picked from the plant and 
eaten out of hand." The pineapple contains a principle called "anan- 
asine," which possesses active digestive properties. This principle has 
been separated and used as an artificial digester by the doctors, but the 
reader will now be able to understand that such an organic principle 
would become inorganic in the process of separation and that it then 
would interfere* with Nature's operations. It would be far more reason- 
able to advise a small dish of the natural pineapple for dessert. The 
ripe pineapple may be served in any fancied way, but it should not be 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 277 

preserved, for reasons which the reader now understands. Do not let 
the juice of a half ripe pineapple touch the outer lips as the digestive 
principle is so active then that it may blister the lips. 

SALAD HERBS 

In the long evolutionary past the remotest human animal had only 
herbs for food, and even after fruits, grains and nuts had evolved, he 
still required herbs to balance his diet. Although man has acquired the 
power of adaptability, still there is no other food so conducive to health 
nor so useful in reestablishing health as the herbs, for there is no other 
wholesome food that is so rich in the required organic salts. "EAT 
HERBS TO GET WELL AND STAY WELL. Every cottage garden 
should have room for, at least one short row of every wholesome 
vegetable for variety. 




COS LETTUCE 

LETTUCE 

(Lac tn c a Sativa) 

Lettuce is a most universal salad herb. It has been selected into 
many varieties, such as leaf lettuce, head lettuce and cos lettuce. The 
cos variety has a more upright habit resembling broad leaved endive. 
Lettuce is most rich in organic iron, magnesium, calcium and potassium 
and therefore most valuable for convalescents. It is the most whole- 



2 7 8 



UNFIRED FOOD 



some food for flushing the intestines as it is not retained in the stomach 
and cannot cake or decay in the intestines. For this purpose the patient 
may eat a pound at a time with impunity, if other foods are avoided, 
except a few nuts to give relish. Cabbage may be eaten for the same 
purpose in winter. 




ENDIVE 

(Cichorinm Endivia) 

Endive is more firm than lettuce for which quality it is often pre- 
ferred. The broad leaved variety is best for close sowing, to be used 
in the early summer. The fringed varieties may be sown later for win- 
ter salads. The Batavia variety which has very broad folding leaves 
is also excellent for winter cultivation. 

CHICORY 

( Cichorinm In tibus) 

Chicory resembles the dandelion in flavor and firmness. Its roots 
penetrate into the subsoil and bring up valuable saline elements. Its 
leaves are narrow and often twelve to eighteen inches long. For salad 
use, it should be sown in a row and so thinned out that the plants are 
one inch apart. When the leaves become about ten inches long; those 
leaves which cannot bear their own weight and droop to the ground 
should be constantly picked for salad before they become soiled. If 
this method is practiced there will be a constant supply of tender leaves 
until frost. After the first frost the roots may be dug and packed into 
moist sand, with the heads up, in a cellar where they will sprout and 
produce that much relished blanched chicory called "barbe de capucin" 
or "Witloof." The broad leaved, the curled and the variegated chicory 
are equally useful for green salads. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 279 

ASPARAGUS CHICORY 

Asparagus chicory is a variety of chicory which bears large fringed 
leaves, resembling those of the dandelion both in appearance and flavor. 
When this chicory has become large and vigorous, it may be blanched 
like celery. The green leaves are prepared like dandelion leaves or 
endive. 



DANDELION 

(Common or French Giant, Taraxacum Officinale) 

The dandelion hearts in early spring are eaten as a spring tonic. 
The leaves are as wholesome as lettuce. They possess a bitter taste, 
which soon becomes agreeable, delicious and craved. The flowers alone 
or with their peduncles make a sweet and delicious salad tempting at 
sight. Rich? Think of the essence of the plant concentrated in the 
flower in the most refined state. Can you imagine yourself out in the 
field, hungry, with these beautiful, delicious and satiating flowers 
around you? The author, one beautiful spring morning, before the 
bees were out, picked five pounds of flowers (enough for forty dishes) 
in one hour. 

The common dandelion blossoms in May and June and sometimes 
a second time in fall. The new opened flowers should be picked in the 
cool of the morning, before the insects are able to get into them. Keep 
them in a cool place during the day. When the flowers are scarce use 
them as a garnish. If the common or the French (broadleaved) dande- 
lion is cultivated in the garden it will furnish tender leaves in spring 
and autumn till the snow covers them. The common dandelion should 
be sown among the grass in every lawn. The flowers will add to the 
beauty of the lawn, and the leaves can be kept trim with the grass. 
Thus the lawn may furnish that relished flower salad. 

The practice of gathering the hearts of the wild dandelion is well 
enough when you have no garden to cultivate them in. This practice, 
however, involves too much time in the gathering and cleaning, besides 
it ruins the flower crop which is of ten times greater value than the 
hearts. The cultivated dandelion comes so much earlier, so much more 
vigorous and has so much larger leaves that its heart need not be waste- 
fully cut ; besides it may furnish a perpetual source of salad leaves when 
the mature leaves are gathered before they are too hard and the young 
leaves are left to grow for a future gathering. Dandelion is often used 
as a tonic in diseases of the liver and dyspepsia. The varieties in culti- 
vation are thick-leaved, giant-erect and moss-leaved dandelion. 

A cold infusion of ground dandelion root is a known remedy for 
dropsy, when the kidneys refuse to do vicarious work for the over- 
worked liver, but the salad of the green leaves is preferable when they 
can be had. 



280 UNFIRED FOOD 

SALSIFY AND SCORZONERA 

(Tragopogon) 

The white and black roots of tragopogon are wholesome and tonic 
salad material. When fresh from the garden these roots contain a rich 
milky, but bitter juice. If the bitter milky juice is disliked in the salad 
let the roots lay exposed to the air until they become slightly wilted, when 
the roots will taste surprisingly sweet. The chips of the fresh root turn 
black on exposure to the air. This is not the case with the slightly wilted 
roots. The tender fresh roots should be quartered and chipped into a 
dish containing the intended quantity of flaked nuts and mixed to let 
the nuts adhere to the milky juice. 

The slightly wilt and tougher roots may be grated on a coarse 
grater. The chipped or grated root is best served, combined with some 
other vegetable. Some prefer the crisp root served whole, like radishes, 
with an addition of nuts. The grasslike leaves of salsify or French 
scorzonera are as palatable as lettuce and are more substantial. When 
finely chopped and mixed into lettuce it adds firmness to the dish, with- 
out changing the flavor. When a five foot square bed is sown closely 
with salsify it may be cut all summer and fall for salad, but do not cut 
it closer than two inches from the ground. Discard the leaves that have 
become too hard. 

CORN SALAD 

(Valerianella olitoria) (G. Rapuenschen) 

Corn salad is also called lamb's lettuce and is cultivated as an early 
summer salad herb. It is a tender herb and makes a good salad when 
dressed with flaked nuts. It will grow quite tender when sown closely 
in drills. 

AFRICAN VALERIAN 

(Fedia Cornucopia) 

The leaves of this valerian are also eaten as salad. It is not to be 
sown as closely as corn salad. 



RADISHES 

(Raphanus Sativus) 

Radishes are selected into early and late, short and long and mild 
and hot varieties, to suit every taste. If you do not like hot radishes, 
chew them together with peanuts and you will find that even, the hot- 
test are only pleasantly warm. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 281 

CURLED GARDEN CRESS 

( L ep idiu m Sativu m ) 

The curled garden cress or pepper-grass sprouts and grows 
very rapidly from seed. It should be cut for salads when it is three and 
before it is six inches tall. It has a most deliciously piquant flavor when 
dressed with nuts. If this or other cresses are too pungent, let them stand 
thirty minutes after they are chopped to let the pungent oils evaporate. 
The cresses are known to be anti-scorbutic. This is due to the available 
organic potassium and other salts they contain. There is also a broad 
leaved variety. Sow this cress closely in drills six inches apart. 

UPLAND CRESS 

{Barb area Vulgar is) 

Upland cress is also called Winter cress or yellow rocket. Sow this 
cress in drills, in early spring. It will furnish those deliciously piquant 
leaves from July until frost, if the heartleaves are left to grow. It has 
the same flavor as water cress, but it is more firm. 

SCURVY GRASS 

(Barbarea Praecox} 

Scurvy grass or American cress (loeffelkraut) is related to upland 
cress and is cultivated for early salads. 

ALPINE ROCK CRESS 

(Arabis Alpina) 

The leaves of this cress are somewhat fleshy and not very bitter. The 
leaves may be used in combination salads to impart that bitter flavor. 

WATER CRESS 

(Nasturtium Officinal e) 

Water cress is so much in demand in the larger cities that it is 
shipped in by the barrel. It will grow where the soil is constantly wet. 

NASTURTIUM 

(Tropaeolum) 

The nasturtium, also called Indian cress, has a pungent flavor and 
odor like the cresses. It is a wholesome and beneficial salad herb. The 
leaves are always clean, because neither water nor dust adheres to them. 
After the leaves are chopped awhile the pungency becomes milder. The 
flowers which are sweet and not as pungent as the leaves make a most 
delicious and tempting salad. Nasturtiums will grow in any sunny 
corner of the garden. 



282 UMPIRED FOOD 

NASTURTIUM TUBERS 

(Tropaeolum Tuberosum) 

The tuberous-rooted nasturtium yields tubers which are wholesome 
and can be eaten together with peanuts like radishes. 

WHITE MUSTARD 

(Brassica Alba) 

White mustard sprouts and grows very rapidly from the seed hence 
it is the earliest seedleaf salad-herb. Its stem always remains crisp as 
it does not develop fibers. Sow the seed in rows rather close so that 
it may be crowded in growing. Start to cut it when one or two inches 
tall. The pungency somewhat evaporates on being chopped. The 
pungent juices, hoever, blend so well with flaked peanuts that it is 
at once relished. It is a wholesome herb especially for those who crave 
"red-hots." 

FRENCH DOCK 

(Rumex Patientia) 

French dock, also called herb-patience, or Monk's rhubard, is cul- 
tivated as a pot herb but it is more useful and more wholesome when 
used as a salad herb especially in early Spring. Its mild acid juice com- 
bines well with flaked peanuts. The docks and sorrels are all blood 
toners and blood builders. 

SOUR DOCK AND WATER DOCK 

(Rumex Crispus and R. Britannica) 

Sour dock (Rumex Crispus) is also called Yellow dock, curled dock 
and narrow dock. It is a perennial introduced from Europe and now found 
throughout the United States in cultivated as well as waste ground, 
among rubbish heaps and along roadsides. It is commonly known as a 
medicinal weed of which the roots are employed for a blood purifier and 
skin remedy but its leaves are most wholesome food. It is nearly as rich 
in organic salts as spinach but it is much more palatable. The young 
leaves have a slightly acid flavor. When they are chewed and well mas- 
ticated they taste somewhat like bread and are quite satiating. The 
author, when out in the fields, botanizing, has often fed on the leaves, 
a la nature, with relish. A salad of these leaves combined with peanuts is 
very agreeable. When this dock is cultivated in the garden it is among 
the earliest spring salads and when it is not allowed to go to seed 
it is a perpetual source of tender leaves. Water dock (Rumex Britan- 
nica) looks much like the above but its leaves are narrower and more 
acid and often preferred for salads. It may be found in marshes and 
on river banks. Common dock also called Bitter dock and Broad-leaved 
dock are too bitter to be used for food. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 283 

FRENCH SORREL AND TALL SORREL 

(Rumex Scutatus) 

(R. Acetosa) 

French and tall sorrell are both cultivated as a spring vegetable. 
These sorrels are very crisp, acid and juicy. The sorrels make a fine 
salad when combined with equal parts of spinach or Swiss chard, a little 
onion, chives or parsley and flaked peanuts. The acid of the sorrels 
is converted into alkaline elements in the blood as it is rich in potassium, 
sodium and calcium. 

WOOD SORREL 

(Oxalis) 

There are many varieties of oxalis of which the most common have 
leaves resembling clover and all have a delicious acid juice. For salad 
culture buy about fifty of the Summer flowering bulbs and plant them 
in a row two to three inches apart. The bulbs must be taken up before 
frost and kept dry and away from frost till next spring. Below each 
set of bulbs will be found a mild crisp napiform root which can be 
eaten. 

OKAPLANT 

(Oxalis Crenata) 

The oka-plant is an oxalis and the leaves may be used for salad just 
like any other oxalis but it is cultivated for the edible tubers it produces. 
The tubers have a strong acid flavor but they become sweet and mealy 
when exposed to the action of the sun for several days in a bag. The 
dried tubers are called "Cani" and their flavor resembles that of dried 
figs. For cultivation the tubers are started in a hot-bed and transplanted 
in May, 3 feet apart. To promote the production of tubers the procum- 
bent stem is continually covered with light soil up to ten inches from 
the top. The tubers are dug after the leaves are frozen. 

RHUBARB 

(Rheum Rhaponticum) 

Rhubarb is not, here, advised as a "pie" plant for the juice of its 
large fleshy stalks is Nature's most wholesome substitute for vinegar 
and it should not be cooked. Rhubarb pies are very objectionable be- 
cause they involve the mixing of white flour, starch, oil and commercial 
sugar which are all perverted approximate food elements. Rhubarb 
juice fills a large bill in the natural diet. It is used for "rhubarbade," 
for "rhubarb soups," for "nut milk." "nut cream" and "nut cheese," 
for acid salad dressings and for acidifying sliced beets. The juice is 
best and most easily extracted in the following manner. Take the fresh 
stalk and cut it into two inch lengths and then grate the cut section 



284 UNFIRED FOOD 

on a coarse grater until it is grated half way (or one inch). Next turn 
it about and hold on the grated fibre to grate the remainder. Lay the 
fibre into another dish and when all the sections are grated discard the 
fibre after the juice is pressed out of it. Now a few fibres will have 
fallen into the juice and these can be fished out with a fork. If the 
nurse has an Enterprise juice extractor she may prefer it when a large 
quantity is to be extracted. Grating produces eighty-five per cent of 
juice and the juicer produces ninety per cent. Every cottage garden 
should have room enough for, at least, a half dozen or more large 
rhubarb plants as the juice will be in demand from early spring until 
winter. In the cities where the stalks must be bought in the market 
they may be kept for a week if placed upright into two inches of fresh 
water but the leafy portion must be carefully trimmed off. Rhubarb 
stalks may be kept into winter if packed into large Mason jars, covered 
with fresh ice cold water, sealed, and placed where they remain cold. 
The leafy portion of rhubarb can not be used for it is objectionably 
strong. Do not pull the stalks from the plant before they are full grown 
lest you injure the succeeding growth. 

CELERY AND CELERIAC 

(Apium Graveoleus) 

Green celery like parsley is a necessity in a vegetable menu either 
as an ingredient for its flavor or as a salad by itself when dressed with 
flaked nuts. The green celeriac leaves are sweeter than celery leaves. 
To be economical and insure a constant and plentiful supply always 
break away and use the outside and mature leaves of every plant first 
and leave the younger leaves for the next picking. For green salads 
sow like parsley. Blanched celery is a relish when it is not diseased 
from growing in barn-yard refuse. Grated celeriac is a most delicious 
ingredient for winter salads. Celery and celeriac when dug up with 
all the root and planted or packed closely together in moist sand in a 
convenient corner of the cellar can be made the source of green salads 
for the winter. Celery like parsley is rich in eliminating and tonic 
elements. 

PARSLEY 



(Carum Petroselinum Sativum) 

Plain or curled parsley is almost an every day demand as a garnish 
or as a flavoring salad ingredient. It adds greatly to the deliciousness 
of herbal fruit salads. Parsley, when dressed with flaked nuts or nut- 
cream, is a delicious salad by itself. The fleshy, sweet, aromatic tap- 
root of Hamburg parsley, when grated, supplies another demand in 
salads. The roots can be planted or packed, with heads up, in a box 
and kept all winter in a cellar where frost does not reach them. For 
economy sow the seed closely in rows 12 to 14 inches apart. When 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 285 

gathering for the table break away only the mature and drooping leaves 
and let the young leaves grow. With such care a 10 or 15 foot row 
will produce all the parsley a small family needs. 

CARROTS 

(Daucus Carota) 

The carrot is most valuable in winter when green herbs are scarce. 
These roots can be used grated or chopped in salads or they may be 
served quartered with an addition of nuts. 

PARSNIPS 

(Pastinaca Sativa) 

The roots of this herb are not injured by frost hence they can be 
left in the soil for spring salads or cellared in fall for winter salads. 
The odor of the parsnip is not universally relished but the taste can be 
cultivated by all. Parsnips are most palatable when grated and com- 
bined with chopped cabbage, a little onion, chopped nuts and dressed 
with honey. 

FENNEL FLORENCE 

(Foeniculum Dulce) 

This herb is distinct from the common fennel. It has an agreeable 
aromatic flavor, with a sweeter taste and more delicate odor than celery. 
The leaves, the leaf stalks and the enlarged, base of the leaf stalk can 
all be used for salad. Serve it like celery salad. 

GARDEN LOVAGE 

(Levisticum) (G. Liebstoeckel) 

Lovage is a wholesome and beneficial salad herb. The blanched 
leaf stalks have been eaten like blanched celery. The flavor resembles 
that of celery. It contains curative properties for female derange- 
ments, due to lack of nervous energy or catarrhal conditions, ovaragia 
and dysmenorrhea. 

CABBAGE 

(Brassica Oleracea) 

Cabbage is the best mid-winter salad plant we have. In its natural 
(uncooked) state it supplies all the organic salts and cellulose required 
in winter and has a flavor most universally relished. It is a common 
experience that cooked cabbage does not agree with most people but 
uncooked cabbage will cause no trouble whatever. Cabbage is known as 
the laborer's standby. 



286 UNFIRED FOOD 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS 

This is only another variety of cabbage which forms miniature, com- 
pact, heads in the axials of the leaves along the stout stem. It is also 
called thousand headed cabbage. 

CAULIFLOWER AND BROCCOLI 

Cauliflower and broccoli are a variety of cabbage and have similar 
food value. Do not discard the leaf stems of the cauliflower for they 
improve the flavor of the salad. Do you discard them because they con- 
tain woody fiber? The woody fiber of green herbs is a necessary and 
wholesome ingredient of natural food so long as it is not too hard 
and over abundant. It serves an important part in the process of diges- 
tion and aids the peristaltic function. Slice the stems across the fiber 
into sections one-eighth inch thick or a little thicker and you will find 
no more fault with the fiber. 

KALE 

Kale or borecole is another variety of brassica which is prized for 
its curled leaves, abundance of chlorophyll, firmness, hardiness and agree- 
able flavor after frost has touched it. Garnishing kale is most beauti- 
fully varigated with red or lilac on a green or white ground; especially 
after frost. 

CHINESE CABBAGE 

(Brassica Pe-Tsai) 

Pe-Tsai forms a loose head like cos lettuce. Its flavor resembles that 
of cabbage and can be prepared in the same manner. Another variety 
called pak-choi has smooth and wide leaf stalks like Swiss chard. 

KOHL-RABI 

Kohl-rabi is another variety of brassica oleracia in which the nutri- 
ment is stored in the. pith of the globularly expanded stem. 

TURNIP 

(Brassica Rapa) 

The turnip differs from the kohl-rabi in that its upper extremity of 
the root expands in becoming the receptacle of nutriment. 

RUTABAGAS 

(Brassica Campestris) 

The Rutabagas or Swedish turnips have firmer flesh and grow deeper 
in the soil than the turnips. Very hard turnips should be grated and 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 287 

combined with some other soft and coarser salad material such as 
chopped cabbage. 

RAMPION OR RAMPS 

(Campanula Ranunculus) 

The leaves as well as the roots of rampion make delicious and whole- 
some salads. The roots can be gathered from October on throughout 
the Winter. It should have a space in every cottage garden. In sow- 
ing simply spread the seed over the prepared surface as it does not bear 
covering. 

COMMON MALLOW OR CHEESES 

(Malva Rotundif olio) 

This herb grows as a weed in cultivated grounds ana roots very deep 
thereby drawing valuable mineral elements to the surface. It has no 
repulsive flavor or odor whatever and tastes mellow and mild so that 
it is relished by all who like lettuce. The young full grown leaves are 
tender, crisp, substantial and satiating. Prepare it for salad as you 
would lettuce and all will like it. It is valuable as a tonic herb. Even 
the ancients knew its emollient properties. 

LAVATERA 

(Malva Lavatera) 

Lavatera is cultivated for its large and pretty flowers which are borne 
all summer and fall. The flowers are sweet and the leaves are as mild 
and palatable as those of the cheeses. This plant is both ornamental 
and useful and is easily cultivated. 

CURLED MALLOW 

(Malva Crisp a) 

This mallow grows four to six feet high and is leafy to the top. 
The leaves are large and curled at the edges. They are sometimes used 
for garnishing desserts but they make as wholesome a salad as the com- 
mon mallow. 

HOLLYHOCK 

(Althaea Rosea) 

The hollyhock leaves resemble those of cheeses in flavor and con- 
sistency. Among the many varieties of hollyhocks there are some most 
pleasantly mild and mellow and some slightly bitter but not disagreeably 
bitter. The hollyhocks have many wholesome qualities and beneficial 
salts. The leaves, the flowerbuds and the petals of the double flower 
can all be prepared into tempting, delicious and beneficial salads. Pre- 
pare the flowers like Nasturtium flower salad or use them for garnish- 



288 UNFIRED FOOD 

ing. The black or deep purple flowers are used as a remedy in throat 
troubles and whooping cough. The hollyhock flowers, when picked and 
dried after they have fully unfolded, make a crisp and most delectable 
dry food. These dried flowers, called "Mallow-crisps" will be eaten in 
winter with avidity by young and old. 

SASSAFRAS 

(5\ Officinale) 

The young and tender leaves of the sassafras are slightly mucilag- 
inous and have a pleasant aromatic flavor. They can be added to salads 
for their flavor or prepared like linden leaves. 

THE LINDEN TREE 

(Tilia Americana) 

The young, half grown, tender linden leaves are wholesome as food. 
They have no repulsive flavor and are very satiating. They become 
mucilaginous in the mouth in chewing. This quality renders them a 
balsam on inflamed mucous surfaces and an intestinal lubricant. The 
indigestible portion absorbs effete poisons from the alimentary canal 
and carries them along. 

For a constant tender growth of salad leaves plant a young tree and 
let it grow in bush form by trimming off the main shoots. 

SPINACH 

(Spinacia Oleracid) 

Spinach as well as the beets belong to the goose-foot family. So 
far as analyzed; spinach, Swiss chard and beets have the highest per 
cent of organic salts among the salad herbs. The acrid principal in 
spinach is neutralized by combining the spinach with peanuts. Spinach 
should always be combined, either, with sorrel, parsley, celery, cress, 
nasturtiums, onions or tomatoes. It is also palatable when dressed with 
rhubarb juice and honey. 

SWISS CHARD 

(Beta Vulgaris) 

The broad succulent petioles of this beet are full of juice rich in 
tonic elements. The petiole or the whole leaf may be used for salad 
dressed with flaked nuts, oil or honey. Six plants, one foot ^ apart, will 
supply a small family all summer if the nurse will practice a little 
economy and break away only the outside and oldest leaves leaving the 
young leaves to grow to maturity. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



289 




SWISS CHARD 



BEETS 

(Beta Vulgaris) 

The beets, like spinach, contain a harmless acrid principle which an- 
noyingly irritates the throat of some people after they have eaten them; 
but when they are eaten together with peanuts there will be no acridity. 
The blood beets are preferable for their color, sweetness and tender- 
ness. They are fine for marbling salads and coloring soups and drinks. 
The flavor of beets is much improved by soaking them in rhubard juice. 
Beets, sorrel, nuts and oil or honey is a good combination. Two ounces 
of grated blood beet yields one ounce of juice and the pulp may still be 
used for salad. 

NEW ZEALAND SPINACH 

(Tetragonia Expansa) 

This is a low spreading and branching herb with soft, thick, fleshy 
leaves and of a crystaline appearance. When sown early it will grow 
in any soil an.d resist drought. This herb is wholesome and its juice rich 
in tonic elements. It is somewhat harsh in the aftertaste but still it 
makes a good admixture to other salad herbs when dressed with flaked 
nuts and rhubarb juice. 



290 UNFIRED FOOD 

ICE PLANT 

( Mesembrianthemum Crystallinum ) 

This herb is as wholesome as spinach and is not as acrid. It is 
very juicy and succulent as it develops no hard fibre. Its juice has 
demulcent and diuretic properties due to its fine organic salts. It re- 
quires only a little honey for a dressing to make it palatable. 

PURSLANE OR PUSLEY 

(Portulaca Oleracea) and (Claytonia Perfoliata) 

The cultivated varieties of purslane have thick and succulent stems 
and large fleshy leaves. The winter purslane, however, has not so 
large a leaf but its broadly funnel-shaped collarette (in which is a panicle 
of small flowers) is large and fleshy like the leaves. These herbs make 
a wholesome salad when minced and dressed with honey-cream dressing. 

MOUNTAIN SPINACH 
Melden or Orach 

(Atriplex Hortense) 

This is a good pot herb but for a green salad it has too much of a 
harsh repulsive odor. 

CHIVES AND SHALLOT 

(AlKum Schaenoprasum) 
(A. Ascalonicum) 

A row of each of the above alliums should be in every garden to 
take the place of onion tops. They take little attention being perennial. 
They are very useful for bringing out the sweetness of other herbs. 

LEEK 

(Allium Porrum) 

Leek is another most useful flavoring herb and has very wholesome 
properties. The hardier varieties can be wintered in a cellar and if 
planted in a large flower pot the leaves may be cut as often as they get 
too long to support themselves or the bulb may be whittled away from 
the top on the instalment plan until it is used up. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 291 

WELSH ONION 

(Allium Fistulosum) 

This onion is served like blanched celery. People who do not relish 
onions because of their pungency will find a relief in chewing them 
together with peanuts or other nuts. 

ONION 

(A Ilium Cepa) 

The onion is a natural provision for winter like cabbage and is most 
useful to give relish to winter salads. The pungent volatile oil of the 
onion as well as of the whole allium family has a usefulness other than 
its flavor. This oil imparts a positive character to the onion. People 
with a negative character especially those with a negative stomach relish 
positive foods exceedingly. Onions are indicated for some patients 
suffering from negative diseases who require positive food elements other 
than the positive organic salts for immediate action. 

N. B. The dark shade in the color of the lips indicates a negative 
stomach. For general use the mildest and sweetest onions are most 
advisable. The varieties that are known to be mild and sweet are the 
Teneriffe, Barletta and Rocca. 

THE IRISH POTATO 

(Solatium Tuberosum) 

The prevalent idea is that the common potato is unwholesome in its 
natural state. And why? Because mamma scolds the child that craves 
to eat them. The author has known many children who terrified their 
mother by eating uncooked potatoes. The peeled and washed potato is 
as sweet as an apple to the unperverted sense of taste when there is 
a demand for alkaline elements. It is known as an anti-scorbutic. The 
unfired potato has aseptic qualities and can not ferment in the stomach. 
It is the best food-cure for fermentation of the stomach and intestines. 
It leaves them sweet and strengthened if cooked foods are avoided. For 
salads the potato is best served chopped in combination with other veg- 
etables such as chopped cabbage, grated turnip or carrot dressed with 
flaked peanuts, pignolias or almonds and honey. 

SWEET POTATO 

(Ipomoea Batatas} 

The sweet potato is most useful in the unfired diet. It is rich in 
organic sugar and organic salts and like the Irish potato has aseptic and 
alkaline properties. For combination salads it may be sliced, chopped or 
grated to harmonize with the other ingredients. 



292 UNFIRED FOOD 

DAHLIA 

(D. Variabilis) 

The tuberous roots of the dahlia make a most delicious and whole- 
some food. They are as crisp and juicy as the finest young radishes. 
They have a warm spicy flavor which is, at once, relished and even 
craved. The tubers may be peeled, cut into sections and served like 
radishes or they may be chopped and combined with other vegetables 
and nuts to form salads. Hereafter that variety which is productive of 
the finest, the largest and the roundest tubers will be selected and culti- 
vated for food. The most perfect tubers were found among the red 
and yellow varieties. In good soil they are as productive as the sweet 
potato. They will be in great demand when their value is known* 

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE 

(Helianthus Tuberosus) 

The Jerusalem artichoke tuber can not be compared with the Irish 
potato as it is very distinct from it and has no disagreeable flavor and 
odor. It is as useful and wholesome as the sweet potato and is very 
rich in organic salts. For combination salads it may be chopped or 
sliced and dressed to suit the other ingredients. The tubers can be dug 
in fall, throughout the winter, and in spring until the sprouts form green 
foliage. The "potato-artichoke" is less knobby and larger than' the com- 
mon variety. 

HORSERADISH 

(Nasturtium Armoracia) 

Horseradish after it is cooked or pickeled is nothing but a useless 
irritant. As an unfired condiment judiciously used it is wholesome as 
the cresses and most beneficial. Its organic salts are useful in elim- 
inating uric acid and other waste poisons which when suddenly pre- 
cipitated into the urine often irritate the urinal tract. Grated horse- 
radish renders unfired soups and salads deliciously sweet and warm. 
Horseradish is very useful in cases of dropsy attended with general 
debility. 

CHUFA OR EARTH ALMOND 

(Cy perus Esculentum) 

This sedgelike plant produces edible tubers as large as peanuts which 
are rich in oil, sugar and tonic elements. They are wholesome for chil- 
dren and grownups. Their cultivation for the table and as nibblers 
should be encouraged. They are now procurable from large seedhouses. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 293 

TURNIP-ROOTED CHERVIL 

(Chaerophyllum Bulbosum) 

This chervil produces roots similar to short carrots with a fine gray 
skin and yellow-white flesh. These roots may be coarsely grated or 
chopped and mixed with other salad material. The seed must be sown 
in autumn in well prepared soil in order to have it germinate in spring. 
The roots are ripe after the leaves dry up but they improve in quality 
during the next four to eight weeks. The Prescot Chervil has larger 
roots which are coarser in flavor. This seed should not be sown before 
July to prevent the plants from running to seed. 

SKIRRETS 

(Sugarwort) 

(Slum Sis (c) arum ) 

This plant is a native of Asia but it has been long cultivated in 
Europe for its tuberous clustered roots which are white and very sweet. 
They are an excellent and delicious winter vegetable. 

POMME BLANCHE 

Prairie Turnip 
Pomme de Prairie 

(Psoralea Esculcnta) 

This is an edible, mealy and farinaceous turnip shaped root of a 
leguminous plant. It has similar food value as string beans. 

GOLDEN THISTLE 

(Scolymus Hispanicus) 

The roots of golden thistle are used for winter salad like salsify. 
They can be dug from September on through the winter. 

CARDOON 

(Cynara Cardunculus) 

Blanched cardoon stalks dressed with flaked nuts becomes a relish 
for those who crave that peculiar bitter flavor. 

ARTICHOKE (FRENCH) 

( Cyn ara Scolym us) 

The receptacle (or bottom) and the base of the scales of the young 
and tender artichoke flowers are eaten uncooked. Chop the eatable por- 



294 UNFIRED FOOD 

tion and serve it dressed with lemonole dressing, rheumole dressing or 
honey-cream dressing. Those varieties which are so harsh and strong 
that they can not be eaten uncooked are not good health food. The 
sweet artichoke of Genoa, the perpetual and a few other varieties are 
mild and delicate in flavor while the heads are young. The blanched 
stems and leaves of the artichoke can be served like cardoon. 



PIMPINELLA OR SALAD BURNET 

( Poteriu m Sa ngu is orb a) 

The tender young leaves of pimpinella are used for salads. Their 
flavor resembles that of the green cucumber. The leaves are produced 
for a longer time if the plants are not allowed to flower. 

BORAGE (GEISSFUSS) 

(Borago Officinalis) 

Borage is a wholesome herb rich in nitre but it will be forgotten 
in the abundance of other preferable herbs. The flowers are used for 
garnishing. 

ASPARAGUS 

(Asparagus Officinalis) 

The young and tender shoots of asparagus make wholesome spring 
salad material until they are six inches tall. They resemble string beans 
in flavor. They should be chopped (whittled), combined with chopped 
nuts and dressed with honey. 

HOP 

(Humulus Lupulus) 

In spring the very young shoots of hops are used in the same way 
as asparagus or salsify in Belgium. A small portion may be mixed 
with other salad herbs for variation. 

UDO 

(Aralia Cor data) 

Udo is extensively cultivated in Japan and China for winter salad. 
The roots of this plant are forced in winter like Witloof chicory. The 
blanched shoots of udo, which resemble asparagus are as tender and 
mild as the midrib of a lettuce leaf. The shoots may be either sliced 
or chopped and served like lettuce. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 295 

BEANS 

(Phaseolus Vulgaris) 

Only those varieties, of the common beans, which produce a fleshy, 
crisp and tender pod are useful in the natural (unfired) diet. The wax 
bean, the stringless (snap) bean and the string bean are well known. 
The tender pods, fresh from the garden, are chopped or whittled and 
dressed with honey or combined with sweet corn, sliced off the cob, 
chopped cabbage or grated roots and sweet nuts. Cooked beans are not 
advisable for health foods. 

LIMA BEANS 

(Phaseolus Lunahis) 

The full grown lima beans, as long as the pod is green, is sweet, 
crisp and tender. This bean when chopped and dressed with honey 
makes a most wholesome and delicious salad. The dried lima beans 
can be soaked until they are tender, slipped out of their coats and pre- 
pared like the young beans. Uncooked lima beans like nuts, absorb 
stomach and intestinal acids; whereas, cooked beans may start to fer- 
ment in the stomach and continue until they are eliminated. The lima 
beans are the only beans that are sweet and mild enough to be used, 
when ripe and dried, in unfired dishes 

PEAS 

(Pisum Sativum) (Circer Arietium} 

The young shelled common pea and chick pea make a most palatable 
salad when chopped and combined with grated cocoanut or dressed with 
honey. Dried green peas and dried chick peas can be soaked until 
tender and served, ' in winter, like young peas. The chick pea, when 
dry, is hard but brittle and it is the sweetest of peas. This pea makes 
a palatable "brawn food" when ground to meal and mixed with grated 
cocoanut. There is also the sugar pea which can be eaten with the 
pod or served like wax beans. 

SWEET CORN 

(Zea Mays) 

Sweet corn, white corn and black corn is a most palatable food 
when it is nearly full grown and before it becomes hard and ripe. 
Green corn may be served on the cob with an addition of nut cheese. 
Green corn for salads should be either sliced off the cob, grated off 
or scraped off with the back of a knife after the rows are split. 
Green corn sliced off the cob ; combined with nasturtium flowers, 
chopped ; a little parsley or celery; chopped and grated cocoanut makes 
a delicious salad. 



296 UNFIRED FOOD 

OKRA 

(Hibiscus Esculentus) 

The young seed pods of the okra or gumbo are prized for their 
mucilaginous albumen. Those who relish a gummy salad may chop 
a pod and mix it into the salad material. It will have a satiating ef- 
fect. The dried leaves and pods of gombo when ground to powder 
is called "gombo filee" and is used to thicken soups. The gombo filee 
in the market which is mixed with spices is not advisable for the health 
diet. Pure gombo powder may be used in uncooked winter soup to 
help it carry the ingredients. Use it sparingly or the soup will become 
stringy. 

LICORICE 

(Glycyrrhiza Glabra) 

The licorice roots are most wholesome for the children as well 
as the grownups. The dried or fresh roots are chewed to extract the 
sweet juice which is most rich in saline sugar. The pulp should be re- 
jected when it ceases to taste sweet. These roots may be chewed with 
benefit by all whose blood requires to be toned with organic salts. The 
licorice sticks and licorice candy, on the market, is worse than use- 
less because its organic sugar and organic salts have been rendered 
inorganic in the process of extraction and concentration. Dried licorice 
root powdered or ground very fine is the most wholesome substitute 
for commercial sugar; but it is so extremely sweet that it must be 
used in very minute and sparing quantities; otherwise the dish, so flav- 
ored, may become repulsively sweet especially, to those who are not 
accustomed to the licorice flavor; therefore powdered licorice-root is 
best served like sugar to be used by each individual in drinks or soups, 
on salads or brawn foods as desired. 

SUGAR CANE 

(Sorghum Saccharatum) (Saccharum Officinarum) 
Green sorgum or sugar cane for table use is of intestinal value in 
its season; not only because its juice is sweet and delicious, but especially 
because its juice contains organic salts so combined with sugar as to 
have the power to rejuvenate the human organism. This saline sugar 
will replace old and wornout tissue in your body and make you, almost 
to say, a new and younger being. This result, however, is only obtained 
when the juice is used in its natural, uncooked .and unfermented state. 
The stalks are prepared for the table by cutting them into sections below 
each joint and then slicing the rind off the pith with a sharp knife. 
The shelled piths may be dried in the sunshine and when they are per- 
fectly dry they may be stored in large mason jars or other airtight ves- 
sels for any season. The green or dried piths are chewed until all the 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 297 

sweet juice is extracted and the tasteless fibre is rejected. The clear 
juice may be extracted from the fresh shelled piths by running them 
through an Enterprize Juicer. This may then be used whole or diluted 
with other juices or water for tonic drinks or tonic soups, or as a sweet 
dressing for appropriate salads. A portion of the juice can be extracted 
by grating the piths and then pressing the juice out of the grated pulp 
with a fruit press, but this method is not quite economical. Common 
sorghum cane is ripe for use when the seed begins to form. The time 
will come when, the green sugar cane will be marketed like vegetables 
and the dried piths like sweet root. The author raised a dozen rich 
canes in a tub on the roof. 

MAPLE SAP 

Maple sap, in its natural state, fresh from the tree, in early spring 
will do for a depleted and wornout body what sugar cane juice can do 
in the fall. Its virtue lies in the unchanged, organic combination of 
sugar and salts. It can be used for delicious spring tonic drinks, for 
tonic soups or for flavoring admixtures of drinks and soups and also 
for dressing fruit and herb salads. It cannot be too highly recom- 
mended to consumptives, invalids and the convalescent. 

SALAD FLOWERS 

There are two flowers that have already been used for salads, namely 
the nasturtium flowers and the chrysanthemum flowers ; but there are 
many other wholesome flowers that are as delicious as the nasturtium 
flowers and more relishable than the chrysanthemum flowers. The sub- 
ject of esculent flowers deserves more attention. The following five 
salad flowers have been described among the Salad Herbs. 

Dandelion Flowers. 

Hollyhock Flowers. 

Nasturtium Flowers. 

Oxalis Flower Panicles. 

Lavatera Flowers. 

The rose petals would make a wholesome salad if they were not so 
acrid, but they may still be used for garnishing salads. 

MARIGOLDS 

(Tagetes Erccta and Patula) 

The large double flowers of the African marigold and also the double 
flowers of the French marigold make as good and wholesome flower 
salad as dandelion flowers. The petals are pulled out of the flower 
head, chopped, mixed with a few pignolias or chopped walnut and 



2 9 8 



UNFIRED FOOD 




AFRICAN MARIGOLD 



dressed with honey. The flavor and odor of these flowers may seem un- 
pleasant at first, but after the flowers are tasted about three times they 
will be craved, because their sweet aftertaste is like that of the dande- 
lion flower. Taste them with confidence the first time and you will like 
them thereafter. The leaves may be used for flavoring. 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

( Chrysan th emu m Sinensc ) 

The large double flowers of chrysanthemums make good salad when 
minced, mixed with chopped or flaked nuts and dressed with honey. 
The Japanese chef will take the flower of your selection and shortly 
return with it in the form of a delicious salad. Honey and peanuts 
make a delicious blend of flavors with the resinous flavor of this flower. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



299 




CHRYSANTHEMUM 



STOCKS OR GILLYFLOWERS 

(Matthiola Annua) 

The stocks are the most beautiful flowers of the mustard family. 
The leaves have an agreeable bitter taste like that of rock cress and are 
quite palatable when combined with peanuts. The double flowers make 
a tempting, delicious and wholesome salad when chopped, combined 
with chopped nuts and dressed with honey. They may also be served 
combined with flaked nuts and rhubarb juice. 

ALTHEA, ROSE OF SHARON 

(Hibiscus Syriacus) 

The flowers of the altheas are as delicious, and sweeter than the 
flowers of the sweetest hollyhocks. ' The petals may be served whole or 
chopped, like lettuce, dressed with honey or olive oil and lemon juice. 
The double flowering shrubs are preferable, because of the bulk and 
weight of their flowers. 



300 



UNFIRED FOOD 



ROSE OF CHINA 

(Hibiscus Rosa Sinensis) 

The double flowers of this rose mallow make as good salad as the 
althea flowers. 




PANSY 



STOCK 



PANSY OR HEARTSEASE 

(Viola Tricolor) 

The pansy is another wholesome herb. Its leaves and flowers have 
a dilute flavor of wintergreen, which is lost in persistent chewing. The 
leaves can be used as a salad ingredient. The flowers prepared like 
the nasturtium flowers alone or in combination with other flowers make 
a pleasing variation. 

FORGET ME-NOT 

(Myosotis Palustris) 

Both the flower and the leaves of forget-me-not can be used for 
salads. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



301 




ZINNIA 



WATER LILIES 

(Nymphaeas) 

The petals of water lilies make a luxurious salad, when chopped and 
combined with grated cocoanut or flaked pignolias. 



302 



UMPIRED FOOD 



DOUBLE ZINNIA 

(Zinnia Elcgans) 

The large double flowers of the zinnia make a good flower salad 
when combined with peanuts. The various colors of these flowers adapt 
them well for ornamental salads or for garnishing. The petals should 
be pulled, full length, out of the full grown flower head and chopped. 
These flowers have only traces of a bitter taste, which resembles that 
of the dandelion leaf. Zinnias are easily cultivated. 




SWEET PEAS 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 303 

FLOWERING BEANS 

(Phaseolus Multiflorus) 
(Dolichos Lablab) 
( W 'is t aria Ch in c t 1 sis ) 

The scarlet runner, the hyacinth bean and the Chinese wistaria, bear 
a profusion of bean flowers which can be used for flower salads. The 
double flowered varieties are preferred. Bean flowers and nasturtium 
flowers chopped, and chopped pecans dressed with honey is a tempting 
and delicious combination. 

SWEET PEAS 

(Lathyrus Odoratus) 

The flowers of the sweet pea can be used for flower salads or for 
garnishing. 

ALFALFA FLOWERS 

(Me die ago Sativa) 

The flowers of alfalfa (lucerne) are rich in albumen, fibrine, cal- 
cium, sulphur, iron, sodium and potassium. The alfalfa roots pene- 
trate deep into the subsoil and therefore are able to bring up mineral 
elements that other plants are not able to reach. The ladies of the 
Median court ate these flowers to maintain their beauty. The flowers of 
this and other clovers have been found remedial in cases of nervous 
debility and female diseases. They are wholesome for all. Combine 
them with salad herbs or prepare them like hyacinth bean flowers. 

VERBENAS 

(Verbena) 

The corollas of verbenas can be used for flower salads. They may be 
used whole or chopped and dressed with honey or rhubarb cream. 

ROSELLE 

(Hibiscus Sabdariffa) 

The acid calyxes of this malva may be used for flavoring salads or 
drinks. 

SWEET ALYSSUM 

(Alyssum Martinum) 

Sweet Alyssum is covered with little flowers all summer till frost. 
The taste of the flowers resembles that of turnips. These make a very 
pretty salad garnish and when chopped can be sprinkled over salads. 



304 



UNFIRED FOOD 




SWEET ALYSSUM 



FLAVORING HERBS 

Flavoring herbs are those which are wholesome, but must be used 
in sparing quantities because of their strong and pungent flavors. They 
are useful for varying the flavor of dishes without materially changing 
their composition. 

FENNEL 

(Foeniculum Vulgare) 

Fennel is cultivated for its sweet aromatic foliage and seed. The 
leaves may be used to flavor salads and the seeds for confections. 

TARRAGON 

(Artemisia Dracunculus) 

This flavoring herb has a pleasing odor of new-mown hay and is 
much relished. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 305 

MINTS 

(Labiatae) 

Sweet Bazil (Ocimum Basilicum). 
Spearmint (Mentha Viridis). 
Peppermint (Mentha Piperita). 
Pennyroyal ( Hedeoma ) . 
Savory (Satureia Hortensis). 
Majoram (Origana Majorana). 
Thyme (Thymus Vulgaris). 
Creeping Thyme (Thymus Serpyllum). 
Sage (Salvia Officinalis). 
Ground Ivy, Gill, (Nepeta Glenchoma). 
Hoarhound (Marrubium Vulgare), 

All these aromatic herbs of the mint family are useful and whole- 
some for flavoring salads, soups and nut-cheeses. They must be used 
sparingly to get the best effects. In small quantities they stimulate the 
appetite, but in large quantities they satiate by tiring the tastebuds. 

TAGETES LUCIDA 

This herb has a flavor very much like Tarragon. 

CHERVIL 

(Anthriscus Cere folium) 

This herb resembles parsley, and is used like it, but its flavor is not 
universally relished; yet the taste may be acquired. 

DILL 

(Anethum Graueolens) 

Dill with its pleasant fennel odor may add much to the flavor of 
salads. 

SAGE 

(Salvia Officinilis) 

Sage is a wholesome flavoring herb and has also active anthelmintic 
properties. 

ANISE 

(Pimpinella Anisum) 

The sweet aromatic seeds of anise make a wholesome and often 
much relished condiment. The flavor combines well with wheatmeal. 
The seeds may also be used in fruit confection and fruit wafers. Before 
using anise seed in food,' it is best to find out whether those who are 
to eat relish the flavor. 



306 UNFIRED FOOD 

CARAWAY 

(Carum Can//) 

The aromatic fruit of the garden caraway is a wholesome condiment. 
A small quantity mixed into rye, which is to be ground for meal, may 
improve its flavor. The ground seeds also improve the flavor of cab- 
bage salad. 

HERBAL GAME 

There is a perverted and a natural sportmanship. The propensity 
to hunt after rare foods is an evolutionary acquirement and has become 
instinctive. The primitive sportsman hunted after rare and delicious 
herbs. When the first nuts and fruits were produced, in the order of 
evolution, these became the object of the hunt. When these first sports- 
men had evolved sufficient reason to realize the danger of exterminat- 
ing those rare relishes they turned to cultivate them and thus the 
gardener and the farmer is the son of yon sportsmen. The primitive 
sportsmen had no arrow nor gun and the humane sport of today needs 
but a knife and a bag or basket to gather the following uncultivated 
relishes. 

SHEEP SORREL 

(Rumex Acetosella) 

Sheep sorrel or red sorrel grows in all sterile fields and is a most 
useful "salad weed." It is often preferred to cultivated sorrel for its 
firmness and sweetish acid. 

SHEPHERDS PURSE 

( Cap sell a Bursa-Pastoris ) 

This herb is not injured by frost and is available in April and May. 
It blends well with flaked nuts and is a good tonic herb. 

YARROW 

(Achillea MiUefolium) 

Yarrow is also called milfoil, green arrow, thousand leaf, carpenters 
grass, bloodwort, old man's pepper and soldier's woundwort. It may 
be found in lawns and meadows. The leaves of this herb make a whole- 
some piquant salad in early spring, before they are five inches tall. 
They should be chopped quite fine and mixed with an equal weight of 
flaked peanuts. It is a mild worm expeller. It is often used as a stim- 
ulant tonic. It also acts on the bladder and checks excessive discharges. 

SWEET WOODRUFF OR WALDMEISTER 

(A spend a Odor at a) 
This herb has a pleasant taste and makes a wholesome salad. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



307 



BROOKLIME OR WATER SPEEDWELL 
(G. Bachbungenkraut) 

(Veronica Anagallis and Americana) 

This herb is as good and wholesome as water cress, beside which it 
grows. 

MEADOWSWEET, GEISSFUSS 

(Spiraea Salicifolia) 

Antonie Preissler has included this herb in her food book. It will 
add to the pleasures of the vegetarian sport. Those who suffer from 
rheumatism will eat it with benefit. 

MARSHMALLOW 

(Althaea Officinalis) * 
The marsh mallow leaves make a wholesome salad. 

SOUR KNOTWEED 

(Polygonum Hartivrightii) 

Sour knotweed (also called sour smartweed) grows in moist hard 
soil or muddy places. The leaves are narrow, short stalked, slightly 




SOUR KNOTWEED. 

hairy and the stems are covered with hairy sheaths, which have a con- 
spicuous leafy border. The leaves and young stems are crisp and have 
a delicious sweetish sour taste. This herb makes a palatable salad. In 
the sands near the lakes grows a similar plant which is hard and not 
so sweet. 



3 o8 UNFIRED FOOD 

VELVET LEAF 

(Abutilon Abutilon or Avicennae) 

Velvet leaf, also called Indian mallow, has large, roundish, velvety 
and yellowish leaves. Its flavor is at first disliked, but relished after 
it has been tried several times. 

HARTSHORN PLANTAIN 

(Plantago Coronopns) 

Hartshorn plantain is also called buckshorn and star of the earth. 
It grows wild near the sea in stony and sandy places, but it is also 
extensively cultivated for mixing in salads. The leaves of the cultivated 
plant are more tender. 

PLANTAIN 

(Plantago Major) 

The young leaves of the several varieties of plantain are quite pal- 
atable when chopped, minced and served with nuts and honey. The 
taste is soon acquired. The plants respond well to cultivation. 

CAT S PAW OR EVERLASTING 

(Antennaria Dioica or Ncodioica) 

This herb grows two to four inches tall in sterile soil and sunny 
places. It has cottony leaves and corymbed heads, which resemble a 
cat's paw. It is relished in salads for its pleasant warm flavor. 



MOONSHINE 

(An ap h alis Mar gar it ace a ) 

Moonshine is also called life-everlasting and silverleaf. It generally 
grows, in sandy woods, on the north side of trees and twelve to eighteen 
inches high. It has a pleasant warm flavor. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



309 



SALAD HERBS 





Water is 
Deducted 


Protein 


Oil 


Sugar 
Starch 


Ash 


Spinach 


90.26 


27 98 


4 40 


41 93 


25 69 


Portulaca Oleracea 


92.61 


30.31 


5.41 


43.17 


21.11 


Celery 


94.50 


20 46 


2.27 


59 09 


18 18 




92.50 


20.47 


5.87 


55 90 


17 76 


Lettuce . 


95 00 


23 43 


5 05 


54 12 


n40 


Dill 


83-84 


21.53 


5.44 


58.05 


14 98 


Goosef oot, White 


79.53 


19 25 


3 71 


62 29 


14 75 


Endive 


94.13 


29 50 


2 22 


54 31 


13 97 


Dandelion 


85.63 


19.56 


4 80 


62 42 


13 22 


Rhubarb Stalks : 


94.80 


10.59 


5.00 


71.86 


12 55 


Cauliflower ... . 


90-90 


24 51 


4 18 


58 90 


12 41 


Leek 


87.62 


26 09 


5 57 


55 98 


12 36 


Cabbage 


90.02 


20.27 


8 62 


63 88 


12 23 


Mugwort 


79.01 


26.49 


5.53 


55 83 


12 15 




93.40 


40.90 


6.10 


40.90 


12 10 


Plantain 


81.50 


14.32 


2.22 


71.78 


11.68 


Parsley 


85.05 


24.48 


4.81 


59.47 


11.24 


Sorrel . 


92.19 


30.98 


6 14 


52 38 


10 50 


Summer Savory 


77.88 


19.76 


6.46 


64.24 


9 54 




92.00 


27.15 


3.46 


59.95 


9 44 


Pimpinella 


75.35 


22.92 


4.99 


65.11 


6 98 


Onion 


89.60 


13.03 


3.42 


77.91 


5.64 















(Cellulose, which is so useful in stimulating intestinal peristalsis, constitutes from 1 to 6 per cent 
of herbs. It is included in the carbohydrates.) 

SALAD ROOTS 





Water is 
Deducted 


Protein 


Oil 


Sugar 
Starch 


Ash 


Radishes 


92.17 


17.54 


1.50 


69.12 


11.84 


Beets 


87 50 


13 00 


1.00 


77 00 


9 00 


Parsnips .... 


84 25 


10 32 


3.17 


77 78 


8 73 


Rutabagas 


83.70 


21.08 


1.00 


69.57 


8 35 


Turnips 


89.57 


12.32 


1.37 


78.09 


8.22 




85.57 


33.75 


1.45 


56.69 


8.11 


Sweet Potatoes 


67.80 


6.22 


1.86 


83.85 


8.07 


Celeriac 


84.10 


9.91 


2.85 


80.24 


7.00 


Carrots 


87.05 


17.72 


1.54 


73.79 


9.95 




76.70 


11.58 


.35 


80.47 


6.44 




79.50 


12.64 


.98 


81.36 


5.02 




78.00 


10.14 


.46 


83.81 


4.59 















SALAD SEEDS 





Water is 
Deducted 


Protein 


Oil 


Sugar 
Starch 


Ash 


String Beans 


89.25 


21.00 


3.00 


69.00 


7.00 


Sugar Peas . 


91.00 


22.31 


1.58 


69.21 


5.90 




74.60 


27.56 


1.97 


66.53 


3.94 




68.50 


22.54 


2.22 


69.84 


5.40 


Green Corn 


75.40 


12.60 


4.47 


80.08 


2.85 



310 



UNFIRED FOOD 



VEGETABLES 

THE COMPOSITION OF THE ASH IN FRACTIONS OF IOO PARTS 





Percent of Salts 
After Water 
is Deducted 





Sodium 


Magnesium 


Calcium 


B 
p 

cc 

-2 
^ 

PH 


Phosphorus 


Sulphur 


Silicon 


Chlorine 


Spinach 


25 69 


86 


8 68 


I 65 


3 06 


4 26 


2 63 


1 77 


1 16 


1 62 


Swiss Chard. , 


17 76 


23 


6 27 


76 


9, 11 


4 49 


1 94 


69 


53 


74 




17 40 


91 


1 81 


1 08 


2 56 


6 54 


1 60 


66 


1 41 


1 33 


Dandelion 


13.22 


12 


1 40 


1 18 


9, 70 


5 94 


1 05 


29 


94 


35 


Cauliflower 


12.41 


12 


73 


46 


69 


5 51 


2 45 


1 57 


46 


42 


Leek . ... 


12 36 


94 


1 75 


86 


] 28 


3 79 


2 04 


91 


91 


38 


Cabbage . . 


12.23 


21 


1 37 


44 


2 62 


3 36 


1 80 


1 00 


46 


97 


Rampion . 


12 10 


02 


1 18 


26 


12 


5 50 


1 02 


47 


2 42 


56 


Radishes 


11.84 


33 


9, 50 


86 


1 65 


3 78 


1 28 


76 


10 


1 08 


Asparagus 


9.44 


32 


1 61 


40 


1 02 


9, 26 


1 75 


58 


95 


55 


Rutabagas , 


8.35 


05 


47 


8?, 


94 


3 92 


1 21 


80 


09 


55 


Kohlrabi 


8,11 


,24 


.58 


55 


88 


2 84 


1 76 


71 


20 


40 


Celeriac 


7.00 


10 


02 


40 


90 


a 96 


89 


38 


27 


1 08 


Carrots 


6.95 


07 


1 47 


30 


78 


2 55 


,87 


44 


16 


31 


Horseradish 


6.44 


12 


26 


19 


58 


1 94 


50 


1 98 


82 


06 


Onions . . 


5 64 


13 


14 


26 


1 29 


1 91 


98 


32 


48 


13 


Artichokes 


5 02 


19 


51 


,15 


,16 


2 37 


70 


25 


,50 


19 


Potatoes 


4.59 


05 


14 


2?, 


12 


2 75 


77 


29 


09 


16 

























FOOD VALUE OF SALAD HERBS, ROOTS AND SEEDS 





Calories 
per 
Ounce 




Calories 
per 
Ounce 


Spinach 


7 8 


Radishes 


8.0 


Celery . . . 


5 3 


Beets . . . . 


13 1 


Lettuce 


5.0 


Parsnips 


17.0 


Endive 


5 9 


Turnips 


11.1 


Dandelion . . 


15 2 


Sweet Potatoes 


34 5 


Cabbaere . 


10.5 


Carrots 


14 


Plantain 


9.7 


Artichokes 


22.4 


Parsley 


16.1 


Potatoes 


24.0 


* v 

oorrel 


16.5 


Spring" Beans . 


11.8 


Asparagus 


8.6 


1 O 

Sugar Peas 


9.8 


Pimpinella .... 


27.8 


Lima Beans 


34.9 


Onions 


11.7 


Green Corn 


28.7 











ALIMENTARY BOTANY 311 

CITY GARDENING 

The lots in the larger cities are generally so small that there is very 
little room for the cultivation of salad herbs .and roots. Every family 
in a city should cultivate at least about five hundred square feet of 
fertile soil for food. Such an area judiciously cultivated and arranged 
can produce all the green herbs and some of the roots an average fam- 
ily may require, for their health, throughout the year. For the sake 
of experiment the author asked his landlord to permit him to cultivate 
a portion of the back yard. The landlord gave him an area of thirty- 
five feet long by six feet wide. The soil was very poor, yet this mini- 
ature garden produced enough salad herbs for a family of four, from 
the first of June until the last of September, during the last five years. 
The author would not advise the cultivation of corn, cabbage, cauli- 
flowers, parsnips, rutabagas, sweet potatoes and artichokes in so small 
a garden. The diagram below shows how the above mentioned, per- 
petual supply of salad herbs was produced. It will be noticed that 
every other row is lettuce, radishes, curled cress or corn salad. These 
rows should be used up before six or eight weeks after sowing, to make 
room for the later and larger herbs. It will be noticed again that nas- 
turtiums, Swiss chard, whitloof, chicory, sorrel, celery and parsley are 
thirty-two inches apart or every fourth row. These late herbs require 
all that space after ten or twelve weeks growth, and by that time the 
broad-leaved endive and cos lettuce is used up. The oxalis and upland 
cress does not need as much space as the other late herbs. Sow chicory, 
sorrel, celery, parsley and cress closely in a drill, traced with the finger. 
Plant two seeds of nasturtium every six or eight inches. Plant four 
Swiss chard seeds every ten inches and when the plants are six inches 
high cut the three smallest ones away and leave the largest one grow 
until the mature leaves can be broken from the side. The oxalis bulbs 
should be planted two or three inches apart. The radishes should be 
sown in the drill so that the seeds come about a half to an inch apart. 
The lettuce must be sown close enough that the sparrows can have a 
few seeds also. Sow the rampion in a shallow drill, but do not cover 
the seed. Always plan to use the early rows before they crowd the 
later rows. Do not cut the celery and parsley off like chives, but break 
away the mature and drooping leaves from the side of the rows as 
they grow. 

The young leaves should not be picked or cut off the plant unless 
you wish to kill it or retard its later growth. If the nurse will practice 
a little economy there will be no old leaves to waste, because she will 
have used them before! they are old. If the garden is large enough it is 
advisable to cultivate a row of dock, dandelions and plantain for early 
spring salads. Carrots, turnips, kohl-rabi and parsnips should be 
thought of next. Jerusalem artichokes may grow in a waste corner of 
the garden. Tomatoes, cucumbers and squashes need plenty of room. 
Dahlias and sweet potatoes should have their place, if the garden is 
large enough. 



312 



UNFIRED FOOD 



m 
| 




> 
> 

| KJ 

m Q/ 

5 

: 

a 
I *< 

x 3 



m 

> 


X 




t 

P 

i 


Fence 
Nasturtiums 9 
Radishes 
Broad-leaved Endive 
Radishes 
Swiss Chard 6 
Curled Cress 
Broad-leaved Endive 
Curled Cress 
Whitloof Chicory 
Early Lettuce 
Coss Lettuce 
Corn Salad 
Sorrel, broad leaved 
Early Lettuce 
Curled Endive 
Corn Salad 
Celery 
Lettuce 
Rampion 
Lettuce 
Parsley 
Radishes 
Oxalis Bulbs 25 
Radishes 
Upland Cress 
Radishes 
Coss Lettace 
Radishes 
Nasturtiums 9 
Fence 




< 6 "ft. ^ 


















a 
i 

i 































































If you wish to know more about the description and the cultivation 
of vegetables, send for "The Vegetable Garden," by W. Robinson. This 
is the most complete work on the subject. 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 313 

POISON IS SOLD AS 
CANDY AT SCHOOLS 

That most of the candy sold to the school 
children of Chicago is rank poison was made 
manifest in the report of Joseph W. Hora, a 
chemist, to the Consumers' League at a meet- 
ing in the Fine Arts Building yesterday. 

Mr. Hora showed that what is sold as 
licorice, for instance, contains a large amount 
of starch, carbon, charcoal and lamp black, 
but little or no licorice. He found candies 
flavored with coal tar dyes and colored with 
cochineal. Some specimens contained clay 
and saud and in several instances arsenic. 



THREE KILLED BY 

PACKERS' SAUSAGE 

Father and Two of His Children 
Die After a Lunch of Bologna. 

FT. SMITH, Ark., June 18. Three persons 
are dead and a fourth is hovering near death 
at Belle Point Hospital as the result of eat- 
ing packing-house sausages. 

The dead are J. B. Barmore, a farmer who 
resided near Ft. Smith, and two of his chil- 
dren, Emma, aged 5, and James, aged 18 
months. Clara, another daughter, aged 7 
years, it is thought cannot recover. 

Barmore purchased some bologna sausage 
from a lunch stand and he and the children 
ate freely of it. Before reaching home all 
were taken violently sick and the third death 
resulted to-day. Mrs. Barmore did not eat the 
bologna lunch and was not taken sick. 

POISONED BY CANTTED MEAT. 

STERLING, 111., June 18. Three families 
are suffering from the effects of eating what 
was undoubtedly poisoned meat sent out from 
some packing concern, but owing to the fact 
that the labels on the can were destroyed it 
could not be learned what company sent it 
out. 

The first family to be affected was that of 
William D. Mason of Springfield, followed by 
that of Harry Davis of the same place and this 
morning the family of Edward Onable became 
deathly ill and for a time it was feared the 
family would not recover. There is a prob- 
ability that the poisonings will result in the 
confiscation of canned meats. 



INDEX TO INTRODUCTORY SUBJECTS 



Pages 

Advantageous Food 29 

Allopathic Specialists 22 

Artistic Diet 11 

Attainment of Health 11 

Banquet Menu 32 

Beelzebub 13 

Beneficent Design 12 

Brawn and Brain Building Diet 11 
Cause of Mental, Moral and So- 
cial Diseases 7 

Cellulose, Unfired 27, 30 

Chlorophyll, Unfired 30 

Commercial Snares 34 

Cook and Doctor 19 

Course Dinner 32 

Dedication 5 

Digestive Fluids 20 

Disadvantageous Food 29 

Disease-Resisting Diet 11 

Drinks 35 

Drugging a Crime 20 

Drugs, Palliative 7, 22 

Eat to Live 9 

Economical Diet 11 

Ensnared Humanity 12 

For the Sake of Humanity. ... 22 

From Cause to Effect 24 

Galama 12 

Gastronomy 9 

Health and Beauty 16 

Health Dinners, Informal 31 

Health Sustaining Diet 11 

Herb and Nut Salads 27 

How to Begin the Unfired Diet 31 

Human Apes 28 

Human Perversity 26 



Pages 

Human Progress 28 

Ignorance and Sense 20 

Immoral Tendencies 12 

Indigestion and Cause 27 

Informal Dinners 31 

Interdependence of Body and 

Soul 11 

Introduction 11 

King's and Beggar's Food 23 

Malefic Design 12 

Man's Natural Food 15 

Materia Panacea 13 

Medicinal Properties of Food. . 17 

Natural Food 17 

Natural Food (in verse) 26 

Natural Food Remedies 7 

95 Per Cent of Disease 27 

Oils, Unfired 29 

Pain's Soliloquy (in verse) ... 25 

Preface 7 

Proteids, Unfired 29 

Recipes, The 33 

Resist not Evil 12 

Rich and Poor 23 

Saline Matter, Unfired 30 

Salvation of the Soul 11 

Snary Refuge 28 

Starches, Unfired 29 

Sugar, Unfired 29 

Unfired Food 17 

Unfired and Fired Food Com- 
pared 29 

Variety, Ample 15 

Volatile Essences 12 

Weights and Measures 34 

Youthful Vitality 16 



INDEX TO UNFIRED FOOD EECIPES 



Pages 

April Salads 56-60 

August Salads 73-79 

Banquet Menu 32 

Blank Pages 140-164 

Brawn-Foods 104-110 

Breads and Cakes 112-114 

Butters 133-134 

Cakes and Bread 112-114 

Cereal Flakes 115-117 

Cheeses 135-137 

Combination Salads 54 

Confections 127-128 

Dandelion Flower Salad... 60, 64 

Dinner, Informal 31 

Dressings 129-132 

Drinks 35-40 

Flower Salads 

....60,64, 69, 73, 74, 78, 94, 95 

Fruit Salads 99-103 

Health Dinner 31 

Health Drinks 35-40 

How to Begin the Unfired Diet. 31 

Informal Dinner 31 

July Salads 67-73 

June Salads 64-67 

Lily Salad 73 

May Salads 60-64 

Measures and Weights 34 

Memoranda 140-164 

Menu, Banquet 32 

Nasturtium Flower Salad 69 

Nibblers 138 

Nut-Cheeses and Butters. .133-137 

Nut-O-Meal 104-107 

October Salads 85-89 

Optional Ingredients 56 

Pan-Tonic Salad 59 

Pie Crusts 118-119 

Pie Fillings 120-124 

Preparation of Salad-Herbs 

and Roots.. ..52-54 



Pages 

Recipes, Introduction to the. . . 33 
Salad-Herbs and Roots, 

Preparation of 52-54 

Saline Meals Ill 

Salad Pies 118-124 

Salads, April 56-60 

Salads, May 60-64 

Salads, June 64-67 

Salads, July 67-73 

Salads, August 73-79 

Salads, September 80-85 

Salads, October 85-89 

Salads, Winter 90-94 

Salads, Simplicity 95-98 

Salads, Fruit 99-103 

Sandwich Fillings 133-137 

Sauces and Desserts 125-126 

Savories, Substitution of 55 

September Salads 80-85 

Simplicity Flower Salad 95 

Simplicity Dishes 95-98 

Soups 41-51 

Soups, Summer 41-47 

Soups, Winter 48-51 

Spring Salads .56-64 

Substitution of Savories 55 

Substitution of Vegetables, 

Fruits and Nuts 55 

Substitution of Oil Dressings. . 56 

Summer Salads 64-85 

Summer Fruit Salads 99-101 

Summer Soups 41-47 

Unfired Diet, How to Begin the 31 

Utensils Needed 139 

Water Lily Salad 73 

Wedding Cake 102 

Weights and Measures 34 

Winter Soups 48-51 

Winter Vegetable Salads 90-94 

Winter Fruit Salads.. .101-103 



INDEX TO MATERIA ALIMENTAKIA 



Pages 

Acid-Binding Elements 171 

Auto-Intoxication 184 

Average Food Analysis 167 

Blood, Healthy 173 

Calcium, Organic 178 

Calorie, The 170 

Calories of Water-free Food 

Compared 185 

Cereals Analyzed 187 

Cereal-Salts Analyzed 191 

Chlorine, Organic 183 

Daily Requirements 170 

Dairy Products 167 

Detoxyl 171 

Detoxyl and Nutrients Com- 
pared 171 

Detoxyl and Proteids Com- 
pared 172 

Dry Analysis of Foods 185-6 

Equality of Natural Foods 185 

Flesh Food 167 

Food Analysis, Average 167 

Foods, Non-fermentable 183-5 

Food Value of Salad-Herbs, 

Roots and Seeds 188 

Fruits Analyzed 189 

Fruit-Salts Analyzed 192 

Healthy Blood 173 

Herbs Analyzed 190 

Herb-Salts Analyzed 192 

Herbs, Food Value of 310-188 

Intestinal Intoxication 184 

Iron, Organic 174-5 

Legumes Analyzed 188 

Legume-Salts Analyzed 191 

Magnesium, Organic 177 

Non-fermentable Foods. . , . 183-5 



Pages 

Nuts Analyzed 187 

Nut-Salts Analyzed 191 

Oil 169 

Organic Tissue Salts 170 

Organic Iron 174-5 

Organic Sodium 175-6 

Organic Magnesium 177 

Organic Calcium 178 

Organic Potassium 179 

Organic Phosphorus 180 

Organic Sulphur 181 

Organic Silicon .182 

Organic Chlorine 183 

Phosphorus, Organic 180 

Potassium, Organic 179 

Potassium and Sodium Salts 

Compared 173 

Proteids and Detoxyl Com- 
pared 172 

Proteids 169 

Relative Ratio of Nutrients to 

Detoxyl 171 

Roots Analyzed 190- 

Roots, Food Value of 310-188 

Root-Salts Analyzed 193 

Salad-Herbs, Roots and Seeds; 

Food Value, of 310-188 

Silicon, Organic 182 

Sodium-Cloride in Food 173 

Sodium, Organic 175-6 

Starch 169 

Sugar 169 

Sulphur, Organic 181 

Tissue-Salts, Organic 170 

Vegetable Kingdom 167 

Water in Food 169 

Water-free Analysis of Food. . .185 



ill 



THERAPEUTICS AND PROPHYLACTICS 



Pages 

Adipose Tissue 201 

Alcoholism, Cure for 205 

Anaemia 203 

Anesthetics 209 

Ascaris Lumbricoides 218 

Arterio-Sclerosis 226 

Bad Taste in the Mouth 202 

Bones Softening 216 

Bright's Disease 207 

Calculus 207 

Cancers 216 

Cause of Diseases 197 

Cestoidea 217 

Children's Diseases 218 

Climatic Fever 221 

Coffee-Heart 206 

Colds 208 

Concentrated Urine 199 

Constipation 203 

Consumption 10 

Craving for Strong Drinks .... 204 

Diabetis 207 

Diagnosing from the Eye 229 

Dietary for Consumptives 212 

Diphtheria 219 

Dislocation, Spinal 226 

Disorderly Proliferation 201 

Dyspepsia 205 

Dysentery 221 

Eating Too Much 198 

Eugenics 218 

Fallen Vital Organs 226 

Fatty Degeneration 201 

Fatty Heart. 206 

Fever 221 

Gluttony 203 

Gout 209 

Great White Plague 210 

Grippe 208 

Healing Crises, Law of 197 

Heart Failure. 206 

Heart Troubles 206 

Helminthiasis 217 

Indigestion 205 



Inebriety 203 

Inheritance 218 

Insanity 224 

Intestinal Worms 217 

Itch, The 225 

Ivy Poisoning 225 

Kidney Troubles 207 

Law of Healing Crises 197 

Lice 227 

Liver Diseases 207 

Malaria 221 

Maw Worms 218 

Measles 219 

Mercury 200 

Mercury Poisoning 223 

Microbes 199 

Mr. Cold 208 

Morning Symptoms 202 

Mother's Disease 216 

Mother's Milk 219 

Muscles Relaxed 226 

Naturopathic Care 200 

Nursing Mother 219 

Obesity 201 

Obsession 224 

Osteo Malacia 216 

Outdoor Sleeping 212 

Pinworms 218 

Poison Ivy 225 

Poisonous Drugs 224 

Pox 219 

Private Diseases 223 

Pulmonary Tuberculosis 212 

Quinine and Antipyretics 221 

Rachitis 216, 219 

Relaxed Muscles 226 

Rheumatism 208 

Rheumatic Heart 206 

Rhus-Toxicodendron 225 

Scrofula 219 

Secondary Causes of Diseases. 119 

Sex Troubles 222 

Source of Waste Poisons 198 

Spleen 203 



iv. 



INDEX TO THERAPEUTICS AND PROPHYLACTICS Continued. 



Pages 

Spinal Dislocation 226 

Smallpox 219 

Summer Complaints 219 

Suppresed Diseases Reappear-. . 

ing 200 

Stomach Distended 204 

Syphilis 223 

Taenia Solium 217 

Therapeutics and Prophylactics. 197 

Thyroid Gland 210 

Tobacco Heart 206 

Tongue, The 228 

Tonsillitis 209 

Tropho-Therapy 195 



Pages 

Tumors 216 

Urethritis 223 

Urine, Concentrated 299 

Vaccination 220 

Vaginitis 223 

Variola 219 

Vegetable Juices for Consump- 
tion 215 

Whiskey Heart 206 

Window Tent 212 

Worms, Intestinal 217 

Yellow Fever 221 

Zymotic Disease 219 



PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS 



Pages 

Baby, The 250 

Bee Stings 251 

Blood and Nerve Tonics 248 

Blood Purifiers t 247 

Boiled Water 242 

Burns 251 

Cane Juice 245 

Cannibal of the Past 250 

Chlorophyll-like Function 249 

Clabbered Milk 241 

Commercial Sugar 244 

Common Salt 243 

Condiments 243 

Cow's Milk 241 

Daily Ration 233 

Detoxyl 247 

Digestive Fluids, Special 243 

Distilled Water 242 

Doctor Nature 246 

Domestic Harmony 251 

Drugs 247 

Eggs 240 

Emotional Poisons 239 

Environment and Health 245 

Etiquette of Feasting 251 

Eyes of the Stomach 243 

Fasting 238 



Pages 

Family Jars 251 

Flesh a Stimulant 240 

Fletcherization 237 

Food and Morality 241 

Frigivore 252 

Fruit Acids Sterilize 242 

Fruit Juices 243 

Health and Environment 245 

Herbivore 252 

Honey 245 

Humanity, Perverted 236 

Hygienic Dietetics 233 

Infant, The 250 

Inflammation, Local 251 

Laughter 245 

Licorice, Powdered, for Sugar. 245 

Life of Food 249 

Man is a Frugivore and Herb- 
ivore 252 

Maple Juice 245 

Maxims, a few 255 

Milk 241 

Natural Remedies 246 

Nursing, A Fine Art 254 

Organic Molecules 250 

Organic or Inorganic Water. 242 
Overeating 237 



INDEX TO PROMISCUOUS SUBJECTS Continued. 



Pages 

Packed Lunches 234 

Poultices 251 

Power of Resistance and Re- 
cuperation 252 

Rain Water 242 

Recuperation, Power of 252 

Restaurant Dinner 235 

Salt, Common 243 

Sense of Smell 253 

Soaking 237 

Social Dinners 251 

Sodium Chloride 243 

Sport, The Vegetarian 253 

Stockbreeders, English 244 

Sugar, Commercial 243 



Pages 

Sunshine, The Value of 248 

Sunshine and Shadow 253 

Taste-Buds 243 

Therapeutic Value of Fruit. . . .241 

Tooth Destroyers 250 

Toxic Poisons of Emotion . . . 239 
Two Oranges for a Nickle. . . .254 

Vacuum Sugar 245 

Value of Sunshine 248 

Variety 239 

Vegetarian Sport 253 

Wholesome Poultices 251 

Wholesome Sweets 245 

Why Vegetarians Fail 235 



ALIMENTARY BOTANY 



Pages 

African Marigold 279 

African Valerian 280 

Alfalfa Flowers 303 

Almonds 265 

Alpine Rock Cress 281 

Althea Flowers 299 

Althaea Officinalis 307 

Alyssum, Sweet 303 

Analytical Tablets of 

Cereals 263 

Fruits 271 

Legumes 267 

Nuts 265 

Salad Herbs 309, 310 

Salad Roots 309, 310 

Salad Seeds 309, 310 

Ananas 276 

Anise 305 

Apple 268 

Artichokes, Frencfr 293 

Artichoke, Jerusalem 292 

Asparagus 294 

Asparagus Chicory 279 

Avocado Pear 270 

Bananas 269 

Banana Meal . ..263 



Pages 

Banana Figs 263 

Barley, Hulless 261 

Beans . _ 266, 295 

Beans, Flowering 266 

Beets 298 

Blackberries 269 

Blueberries 269 

Borage 294 

Bran of Wheat 259 

Brazil Nuts 265 

Brocoli 286 

Brooklime 307 

Brussel's Sprouts 286 

Buckwheat 261 

Cabbage 285 

Calories, Figures for 270 

Cani 283 

Cantaloupe 275 

Caraway 306 

Cardoon 293 

Carobs 269 

Carrots 285 

Cats-Paw 308 

Cauliflower 286 

Cereals 261 

Celery 284 



INDEX TO ALIMENTARY BOTANY Continued. 



Pages 

Celeriac 284 

Cheeses 287 

Cherries 268 

Chervil 305 

Chervil, Turnip Rooted 293 

Chicory 278 

Chicory, Asparagus 279 

Chick Peas 267, 295 

Chinese Cabbage 286 

Chives 290 

Chrysanthemums 298 

Chufas 292 

City Gardening 311 

Circer 267 

Cocoanuts 264 

Common Potato 291 

Common Mallow 287 

Composition see Analytical Tables. 

Corn 262 

Corn, Brazilian Flour 262 

Corn, Jerusalem 261 

Corn, Rice 262 

Corn, Sweet 262 

Corn Salad 280 

Cos Lettuce 277 

Cottage Gardening 311 

Cranberries 276 

Creeping Thyme 305 

Cress, Garden 281 

Cress Indian 281 

Cress, Upland ,. 281 

Cress, Water '.281 

Crookneck Squash 274 

Cucumbers 273 

Curled Cress 281 

Curled Dock 282 

Curled Mallow 287 

Currants 26? 

Dahlia Tubers 292 

Dandelions 279 

Dates -2G9 

Desiccation of Fruits 270 

Diagram of a Garden 312 

Dill 305 

Dock, Curled 282 



Pages 

Dock, French 282 

Dock, Sour 282 

Dolichos 303 

Earth Almonds 292 

Egg Plant 273 

Elderberry 269 

Endive, Batavian 278 

Endive, Curled ;^> 

Everlasting 308 

Esculent Flowers 297 

Fennel 304 

Fennel Florence 285 

Figs 268 

Filberts 265 

Flavoring Herbs 304 

Flowers, Esculent 297 

Flowering Beans 303 

Food Value of Herbs, Roots 

and Seeds 310 

Forgetmenot 300 

French Dock 282 

French Marigold 297 

French Sorrel 283 

Fruits 267 

Garden Cress 281 

Garden Lovage 285 

Gardening 311 

German Celery 284 

Gill 305 

Gillyflower 299, 300 

Golden Thistle 293 

Gombo 296 

Gooseberries 269 

Grains 261 

Grapefruit 268 

Grapes 268 

Green String Beans 266, 295 

Ground Cherry 273 

Ground Ivy 305 

Gumbo 296 

Hamburg Rooted Parsley 284 

Hart's-Horn Plantain 308 

Heart's-East 300 

Herb- Patience 282 

Herbal Game 306 



vii. 



INDEX TO ALIMENTARY BOTANY Continued. 



Pages 

Hibiscus 299, 300 

Hoarhound 305 

Hollyhock 287 

Hop 294 

Horseradish 292 

Hubbard Squashes 274 

Huckleberry 269 

Hulless Barley 261 

Husk Tomato ....273 

Ice Plant 290 

Indian Cress 281 

Indian Mallow 308 

Irish Potato 291 

Jerusalem Artichoke 292 

Jerusalem Corn 261 

Kaffir Corn 261 

Kale 286 

Kohlrabi 286 

Lamb's Lettuce 280 

Lavatera 287 

Leek 290 

Legumes 266 

Lemon 268 

Lentils 266 

Lettuce 277 

Licorice 296 

Lilies, Water 301 

Lima Beans 266, 295 

Lime 268 

Linden Tree 288 

Locust Fruit 269 

Lovage 285 

Love Apples 27S 

Lucerne Clover 303 

Mad-Apple 273 

Maize 261 

Majoram 305 

Mallow, Common 287 

Mallow, Curled 287 

Mallow, Indian 308 

Maple Sap 297 

Marigolds 297 

Marsh-Mallow 307 

Meadowsweet 307 

Milfoil , ..306 



Millet 262 

Milo-Maize 261 

Mints 305 

Moonshine 30$ 

Monk's Rhubarb 282 

Mountain Spinach 290 

Mulberries 269 

Musk-Melon 275 

Musk-Squash 274 

Mustard, White 282 

Narrow Dock 282 

Nasturtiums 281 

Nasturtium Tubers 282 

Navy Beans 266 

Nepeta 305 

Netted Melons 275 

New Zealand Spinach 289 

News Clippings 313 

Nuts 264 

Nuts, their Salts and Proteids 

Compared 266 

Nymphaeas 301 

Oats 261 

Oko Plant 283 

Okra 296 

Olive 268 

Onion 291 

Orange 268 

Oxalis 283 

Pansy 300 

Parsley 284 

Parsley, Hamburg Rooted 284 

Parsnips 285 

Paw-Paw 270 

Peach 268 

Peanuts 264 

Pears 268 

Peas 266, 295 

Pea, Chick 267 

Pecans 265 

Pennyroyal 305 

Pepino 273 

Pepper-Grass 281 

Peppermint 305 

Peppers, Sweet Salad ........ 273 



viii. 



INDEX TO ALIMENTARY BOTANY Continued. 



Pages 

Persimmons 270 

Pe-Isai 286 

Phaseolus 303 

Pignolias 265 

Pimpinella 294 

Pineapple 276 

Pine-Nuts 265 

Plantain 308 

Plantain Banana 269 

Pod Beans 295 

Pomme Blanche 293 

Pomegranate 270 

Potato 291 

Prairie Turnip 293 

Preserving Fruit 270 

Prickly Pears 270 

Prunes 274 

Pumpkins 274 

Purslane 290 

Quince 268 

Radishes 280 

Rampion 287 

Raspberries 269 

Rhubarb 283 

Rice 262 

Rock Cress 281 

Rock Melons 275 

Rose-Kale 286 

Rose of China 300 

Rose of Sharon 299 

Rose Petals 297 

Rutabagas 286 

Rye 261 

Sage 305 

Saint John's Bread 269 

Salad Burnet 294 

Salad Herbs 277 

Salad Flowers 297 

Salad Peppers 273 

Salad Roots 284, 287, 291, 293 

Saline Abundance, to find the. .270 

Saline Meal 264 

Salsify 280 

Sassafras 288 

Savory 305 



Pages 

Scalop Squash 274 

Scorzonera 280 

Scurvy Grass 281 

Shallot 290 

Sheep Sorrel 306 

Shepherd's Purse 306 

Silver Leaf 308 

Skirrets 293 

Sorghum 296 

Sorrel 283 

Sour Dock 282 

Sour Knotweed 307 

Spanish Peanuts 264 

Spearmint 305 

Spelt 262 

Spinach 288 

Spinach Beet 288 

Sprouts 286 

Squashes 274 

Stocks 299, 300 

Strawberries 275 

Strawberry Tomato 273 

String Beans 295 

Sugar Cane 296 

Sugarwurt 293 

Sweedish Turnips 286 

Sweet Alyssum 303-304 

Sweet Bazil 305 

Sweet Corn 262, 295 

Sweet Herbs 304 

Sweet Peas 302, 303 

Sweet Potatoes . . . | 291 

Sweet Salad Peppers 273 

Sweet Woodruff 306 

Sweetroot 296 

Tagetes Lucida 305 

Tall Sorrel 283 

Tamarinds 269 

Tangerines 268 

Tarragon 304 

Thyme 305 

Tomatoes 272 

Turnips 286 

Turnip Rooted Chervil 293 

Upland Cress 281 



INDEX TO ALIMENTARY BOTANY Continued. 



Pages 

Udo 294 

Valerian 280 

Vegetable Marrow 274 

Velvet Leaf 308 

Verbena 303 

Walnuts 265 

Water Cress 281 

Water Dock 282 

Water Lilies 301 

Water Speedwell 307 

Watermelon 275 

Wax Beans 266, 295 

Welsh Onion . ..291 



Pages 

Wheat 259 

White Mustard 282 

Wild Rice 263 

Winter Cherry 273 

Winter Cress 281 

Wintergreen Berry 270 

Wistaria 303 

Wood Sorrel ....283 

Woodruff 306 

Yarrow 306 

Yellow Dock 282 

Yellow Rocket 281 

Zinia, Double 301, 302 



AUTHOES QUOTED 



Pages 

W. O. Atwater, Ph.D 169 

E. D. Babbit, Ph.D 249 

Mada Blasse, M.D 8 

Board of Health 212 

C. J. Buel 25 

Gustave Von Bunge 169 

W. M. Cornell, M.D., LL.D...240 

Carl Cropp 8 

Horace Fletcher 237 

A. P. Francine, M.D 212 

Julius Hensel 169 

Hippocrates 201 

Woods Hutchinson, M.D 250 

F. J. Koenig 169 

Hunold Lahamann 169 

H. E. Lane, M.D .....230 



Pages 

C. F. Langworthy, Ph.D 240 

Henry Letheby 169 

Henry Lindlahr, M.D., D.O. 

211, 238 

Benedict Lust, N.D 238 

Andrew Mathias, M.D 224 

A. G. Payne 169 

W. F. Pevy 169 

B. C. Peterson 8 

Antonie Preisler 307 

Prisnits 201 

J. F. Russell, M. D 315 

William Shakespeare 3 

R. T. Trail, M.D '. 13 

Trion . . 260 



The 
Flaker 



Most of the more complicated recipes in this book 
cannot be prepared without a FLAKER for grind- 
ing, macerating and flaking nuts and for mixing 
and flaking dough for unbaked bread, cakes, pie- 
crusts and confection. 

Send Us a Money Order for 
$1.25 or $1.50 

and we will send you a FLAKER, the express 
charges to be be paid by you on delivery. 

GEO. DREWS, A. D. 

35 Marion Court, 
Chicago, 111. 



Vaughn's Seed 
Store 

84 and 86 Randolph Street, 
Chicago, 111. 

14 Barclay St., New York. 

Can supply you with the best Seed for 
your garden and they can also supply 
you with good wheat, rye, hulless barley, 
sweet corn, and rice corn for food at 
reasonable prices but do not order less 
than a peck of a kind. 



APR 17 



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THIS BOOK ON THE DATE DUE. THE PENALTY 
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OVERDUE. 



APR 7 1936 

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LIBRARY USE 

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THIS BOOK IS DUE BEFORE CLOSING TIME 
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General Library 

University of California 

Berkeley