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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



J^^f 



Volume III - Number 1 
FIRST QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1932 



Issued by the 

United States Bureau of Investigation 

Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1932 



"OR SALE BY THE SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS, WASHINGTON. D. C. 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 



'' '• '"'''^^^^^mi OP DOCUMuriS 

MAY 9 J932 



(H) 



/ UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, United States Bureau of Investigation 

Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 

Volume 3 April, 1932 Number 1 

Contents of Bulletin for First Quarter. 

With the pubhcation of the current issue of the bulletin, the United 
States Bureau of Investigation has inaugurated a departure from the 
policy to which it has previously adhered of publishing the bulletin 
on a monthly basis. For the present it is planned to release the figures 
for publication on a quarterly basis. The bureau will continue, how- 
ever, to receive reports from police departments on a monthly basis 
as has been the practice in the past. 

It will also be observed that a different method of presenting the 
data has been initiated. The bureau has received numerous requests 
for summarized data, and accordingly in the current issue the indi- 
vidual reports are omitted and an effort has been made to present the 
statistics in more desirable form. 

The bulletin contains tables showing the extent of the reporting 
area and the population represented thereby. The daily averages of 
the number of offenses reported for the first quarter are also shown, 
together with comparative tables showing the rates for cities in va- 
rious population groups. In addition thereto, tables are included 
showing the number of crimes reported for the first quarter of this 
year as compared with the first quarter of 1931. A tabulation showing 
the number of offenses of robbery and murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter for cities of m.ore than 100,000 population for 1931 as 
compared with the number for 1930 is included. 

The term "Offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as Part I Classes of the Uniform Classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prose- 
cuting or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the fol- 
lowing group of seven classes of grave oft'enses, shown by experience 
to be those most generally and completely reported to the police: 
Felonious homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, 
and (b) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated as- 
sault; burglary — breaking or entering; larceny- — theft; and auto theft. 
The figures contained herein include also the number of attempted 
crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are 
reported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted bur- 
glary or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same 
manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police " includes, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities, and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities 
the Department of Justice does not vouch for its accuracy. It is 

116864—32 (1) 



given out as current information, which possibly may throw some 
light on problems of crime and criminal law enforcement. 

It should also be borne in. mind that the figures contained in the 
bulletin are confined to reports submitted for a 3-month period 
only and naturally crime statistics for such a short space of time are 
subject to the necessarily implied qualifications. 

In compiling the figures in each of the tables, apparently incomplete 
and defective returns were excluded. The population figures were 
obtained from the 1930 census. 
Population Table, 

The following table is based upon the number of cities from which 
returns were received for any one month during the first quarter of the 
current year. The cities are shown according to various population 
groups, together with the number of people represented by the individ- 
ual groups and the percentage of the number of reporting cities as 
compared with the entire number of cities of the several groups. 

The number of such cities from which the data were received during 
the first quarter was 1,476. The population represented by those 
cities is 49,368,231. For the same period in 1931, that is, for the 
first quarter of that year, there were 1,227 cities from which reports 
had been received during that period. The figure 1,476, therefore, 
represents an addition to the reporting area of 249 police depart- 
ments. There are excluded from the above figures a considerable 
number of returns received from county officials, State police, and 
officers in the possessions. In other words, the population data pre- 
sented in the table is confined to urban localities in the contmental 
United States. 

It will be seen from an examination of the table that of the cities 
having a population of 10,000 or more 78 per cent are included in the 
reporting area. Of the cities having a population of more than 
250,000, returns have been received from all except three. With re- 
spect to those cities having a population of 100,000 to 250,000, re- 
turns have been received from all departments except four. Of the 
next group, those with a population of 50,000 to 100,000, eight cities 
have not contributed reports, while in the smaller cities in the next 
two groups, namely, those from 25,000 to 50,000 and those from 
10,000 to 25,000, 86 per cent and 71 per cent, respectively, furnished 
the figures. In addition to those departments included in the table, 
there were 707 cities aggregating a total population of 3,927,720, from 
which reports were received. 



Population groups 


Total 
num- 
ber of 
cities 

or 
towns 


Cities filing 
returns 


Total 
population 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent 


Number 


Per 

cent 


Total - 


982 


769 


78 


58,340,077 


45,440,511 


78 






A Cities over 250 000 


37 
56 
98 
185 
606 


34 
52 
90 
160 
433 


92 
93 
92 
86 
71 


28, 784, 770 
7. 540, 966 
6,491,448 
6,425,693 
9,097,200 


20, 345, 910 
6.943,652 
5.950,267 
6,603,060 
6,597,622 


71 


B Cities 100 000 to 250 000 


92 




92 


D. Cities 25,000 to 50,000 


87 


E Cities 10 000 to 25 000 


72 







The above table does not include 707 cities and rural townships, aggregating a total population of 3,927,720. 
The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural 
townships are of varying population groups. 



Extent of Reporting Area. 

During the first quarter of 1932 reports were received from 1,476 
urban police departments. This figure includes all the cities having 
a population of more than 250,000, with the exception of Atlanta, 
Los Angeles, and New York City. 

Keturns were received from all cities having a population of 100,000 
to 250,000 except Des Moines, Iowa; Reading, Pa.; Syracuse, N. Y. ; 
and Tulsa, Okla. 

In the population group having from 50,000 to 100,000 people, 
returns were received from all cities except Montgomery, Ala.; 
Little Rock, Ark.; East St. Louis, 111.; Holyoke, Mass.; Bayonne and 
Passaic, N. J.; Asheville, N. C; and Charleston, W. Va. 

There were 25 cities having a population of 25,000 to 50,000 which 
were not included in the reporting area, namelj^, Belvidere Township, 
Calif.; Pensacola, Fla.; Belleville and Granite City, 111.; Anderson 
and Elkhart, Ind.; Council Bluffs, Iowa; Ashland and Paducah, 
Ky.; Lemston, Me.; Taunton, Mass.; Port Huron, Mich.; Meridian, 
Miss.; Concord, N. H.; West New York, N. J.; Raleigh, N. C; 
Green-vdlle, S. C; Easton, Hazleton, Lebanon, Lower Merion Town- 
ship, Nanticoke, and Upper Darby, Pa.; Johnson City, Tenn.; and 
Laredo, Tex. 

Of the cities having a population from 10,000 to 25,000, returns 
were received from 433, leaving 173 departments not in the reporting 
area, which are as follows: Anniston, Bessemer, Decatur, Dothan, 
Florence, Gadsden, Huntsville, Phenix City, Selma, and Tuscaloosa, 
Ala.; Blytheville, El Dorado, Hot Springs, Pine Bluff, and Texarkana, 
Ark.; Salinas, CaUf.; Trinidad, Colo.; Ansonia, Derby, and Shelton, 
Conn.; Daytona Beach, Gainesville, Key West, and Tallahassee, 
Fla.; Albany, La Grange, Thomasville, Valdosta, and Waycross, 
Ga.; Boise and Pocatello, Idaho; Blue Island, Brookfield, Canton, 
Chicago Heights, East Moline, Harrisburg, Jacksonville, Kankakee, 
Lincoln, Mehose Park, Pekin, and Sterhng, 111.; Bedford, Craw- 
fordsville, Goshen, Jeff ersonville. New Castle, and Shelbyville, Ind. ; 
Boone, Muscatine, and Oskaloosa, Iowa; Chanute, Independence, 
Lawrence, and Leavenworth, Kans.; Bowling Green, Henderson, 
Hopkinsville, and Middlesboro, Ky.; Bogalusa and Lake Charles, 
La.; Sanford, South Portland, and Westbrook, Me.; AnnapoUs 
and Sahsbury, Md.; Danvers, Easthampton, Framingham, Milford, 
Northampton, Plymouth, Webster, and West Springfield, Mass.; 
Monroe, Mich.; Virginia, Minn.; Biloxi, Greenwood, Gulfport, 
Hattiesburg, Laurel, and Natchez, Miss.; Cape Girardeau, Columbia, 
Hannibal, Maplewood, and St. Charles, Mo.; Anaconda and Helena, 
Mont.; Norfolk, Nebr.; Keene and Rochester, N. H.; Asbury Park, 
Bridgeton, Cliffside Park, Colhngswood, Millville, and Nutley, N. J.; 
Roswell and Santa Fe, N. Mex.; Dunkirk, Geneva, Irondequoit, 
and Valley Stream, N. Y.; Elizabeth City, Fayetteville, New Bern, 
Salisbury, Shelby, and Statesville, N. C; Ada, Bartlesville, Lawton, 
Seminole, Okla.; Medford, Oreg.; Bellevue, Braddock, Canonsburg, 
Carbondale, Charleroi, Columbia, Du Bois, Dunmore, Duquesne, 
Hanover, Hanover To^vnship, Homestead, Leudstown, Meadville, 
Mount Carmel, Munhall, Old For^e, Plains Township, Shamokin, 
Shenandoah, Steelton, Sunbury, Swissvale, Turtle Creek, Vandegrift, 
Warren, and Washington, Pa."; Bristol, Cumberland, Lincoln, North 



Providence, Warmck, and West Warwick, R. I.; Florence, Greenville, 
and Rock Hill, S. C; Jackson, Tenn. ; Big Springs, Cleburne, Del Rio, 
Denison, Greenville, Lubbock, Marshall, Palestine, and San Benito, 
Tex.; Suffolk and Winchester, Va. ; Bremerton and Longview, Wash.; 
Fairmont and Martinsburg, W. Va.; Marinette, South Milwaukee, 
Watertown, and Waukesha, Wis.; Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Of the urban places having a population under 10,000, reports 
were received from 707 police departments, leaving a total of 1,476 
communities of this group not in the reporting area for the first 
three months of 1932. 



Cities Reporting, by States, First Quarter, 1932. 

The following table shows the number of returns, by States, received 
by the United States Bureau of Investigation for each month of the 
first quarter of 1932. The figures present a substantial increase over 
the number received for the same period during 1931, and an increase 
is also shown over the number received during December of that year. 
For example, the number of returns received currently for January, 
1931, was 1,049. The increase over this number for January of the 
current year was 332. The number received for February, 1931, was 
1,077; for February, 1932, 1,385; for March, 1931, 1,138; and for March 
of this year, 1,393. 



Alabama. 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho... 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas.- 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska.. 



Janu- 
ary 


Febru- 
ary 


March 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


4 


107 


106 


106 


15 


14 


15 


29 


28 


30 


2 


i 


2 


25 


25 


25 


13 


16 


14 


3 


3 


3 


71 




71 


34 


35 


37 


24 


24 


24 


25 


27 


27 


13 


13 


13 1 


6 


6 


8 


14 


14 


14 


5 


5 


5 


84 


83 


87 


99 


106 


113 


36 


35 


35 


4 


4 


3 


22 


22 


21 


7 


6 


7 


14 


15 


14 



Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island.. 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total number con 
tributing 



Janu- 
ary 



Febru- 
ary 



Average Daily Number of Offenses, First Quarter, 1932. 

The daily average of the number of offenses known to the police of 
the Part I Classes of the Uniform Classification of offenses for the 
first three months of 1932 is shown in the following table for 1,253 
cities of miscellaneous population groups. The figures are confined to 
those cities which submitted apparently complete reports for each 
of the three months. The population represented by the cities included 
in the tabulation is 41,949,049. 

An examination of the table shows a steady decline for the first 
three months in offenses against property, namely, robbery, burglary — 
breaking or entering, larceny — theft, and auto theft. It will be noted 



that offenses of larceny — theft are not subdivided into major or 
minor crimes. In other words, all offenses of larceny — theft reported 
are included in the same group. The average daily number of offenses 
against the person, namely, murder, manslaughter, rape, and ag- 
gravated assault, shows in each instance a slight increase for Feb- 
ruary with a decline in March. The figures presented do not include 
all offenses known to the police, but merely the average daily number 
of the offenses listed for the first quarter as reported to the United 
States Bureau of Investigation by 1,253 police departments. 



Daily average, 


1,S5S miscellaneous cities 






■ 


Felonious homi- 
cide 


Rape 


i 

^"y assault 

1 


1 
Bur- 

ing I 

1 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




7.4 
8.1 
7.5 


4.5 
5.4 
4.2 


6.8 
7.0 
6.1 


161.2 ! 46.6 
138. 2 I 49. 6 
131. 5 1 45. 7 


478. 5 824. 8 
471.8 1 800.0 
448. 5 j 777. 9 


473.0 


February, 1932 


454.1 


March, 1932 


422 







The average daily number of offenses reported as shown in the 
following table is based on returns submitted for each month of the 
first quarter by 72 cities, each having a population of more than 
100,000. The total population represented is 21,890,582 for those 
72 cities. The reports show a slight increase in February in the daily 
average number of murders and nonnegligent manslaughters, man- 
slaughters by negligence, and aggravated assaults, with a decrease 
in that month for offenses of burglary — breaking or entering, rape, 
robbery, larceny — theft, and auto theft. The table indicates an 
increase in the daily average number of each of the offenses listed 
for the larger cities dm-ing the month of March, with the exception of 
manslaughter by negligence, which shows a slight decrease over the 
average for February. 



Daily average, 72 cities over 100,000 'population 





Felonious homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 

nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January, 1932 

February, 1932 


4.2 
4.4 

4.7 


2.4 

3.5 
2.6 


2.9 

2.7 
3.8 


105.2 

87.7 


21.5 
24.8 
26.1 


264.6 
250.7 
274.8 


413.5 
409.1 
450.1 


282.1 
268 5 


March, 1932 


292.0 



The reports for 1,181 cities, each having a population of less than 
100,000, aggregating a total population of 20,058,467 for the first 
three months of 1932 indicate there was an increase during February 
in the average daily number of offenses of murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter, rape, and burglary — breaking or entering, but the 



reports show a decrease for that month in the average daily number 
of offenses of manslaughter by negligence, robbery, aggravated 
assault, larceny — theft and auto theft. There was a decrease in 
each of the offenses shown for the month of March as compared with 
the daily averages for January and February. 

Daily average, 1,181 cities less than 100,000 population 





Felonious homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January, 1932 


3.1 
3.6 
2.8 


2.1 
1.9 
1.5 


3.8 
4.3 
2.3 


56.0 
50.5 
33.1 


25.2 
24.8 
19.6 


213.9 
221.1 
173.9 


411.3 
390.9 
327.8 


190.9 


February 1932 


185 6 


March, 1932 


130.1 







Offenses Known to the Police, First Quarter, 1932. 

In the table which follows are shown the total number of crimes 
reported by 1,253 cities of miscellaneous population groups for the 
first three months of the current year, together with the rates per 
100,000 population for each of the crimes of the Part I Classes of the 
Uniform Classification of Offenses. The population represented by 
the 1,253 cities included is 41,949,049. This table is a summary of 
the more detailed information set forth in the tabulation which 
follows it. 

Offenses known to the police, first quarter, 1932, 1,253 miscellaneous cities; number 
and rates per 100,000 





ITotal population, 41,949,049] 












Felonious homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




695 
1.7 


435 
1.0 


599 
1.4 


13, 092 
31.2 


4,294 
10.2 


42,463 
101.2 


72, 855 
173.7 


40.834 


Rates per 100,000 


97.3 









In the following table are shown the number of crimes and the rates 
per 100,000 people for each class of the designated offenses for cities 
of six different population groups. 

Not much variance appears in the rates per 100,000 of offenses of 
murder and nonnegligent manslaughter for the several groups. The 
rate for manslaughter by negligence shows a gradual decline commen- 
surate with the decrease in population with the exception of cities in 
the group from 10,000 to 25,000 people, which shows a very slight in- 
crease over the rates for cities in the groups having a population from 
25,000 to 100,000. The classification murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter includes all murders and manslaughters reported by the 
police to the United States Bureau of Investigation, exclusive of 



homicides attributable to criminal negligence. Offenses of that 
nature are classified under the heading "Manslaughter by negligence." 

There is not much variation among the population groups with 
respect to the number of offenses of rape, and it will be noted tnat the 
rate for this offense for the smaller cities is practically the same as that 
for large metropolitan areas. These figures, however, are subject to 
limitations because of the comparatively small number of offenses of 
rape reported, and for the further reason that all crimes of this type 
are not always reported to the pohce. 

The figures on robbery show" a decided predominance among the 
larger cities, with a gradual reduction in proportion to the size of the 
cities. For example, for the first quarter of 1932 there were 52 
offenses of this nature per 100,000 people reported by 27 cities having 
a population of more than 250,000, whereas the rate per 100,000 
reported by 575 cities having a population of less than 10,000 was 
12.7. The total population represented by the latter group of cities, 
however, was only one-fifth of that represented by the larger cities. 

Similarly, there was a gradual reduction, with slight variation 
according to the size of the cities, with respect to the number of offenses 
of aggravated assault reported. 

The same comment is applicable to the rates on burglary — breaking 
or entering, larceny — theft, and auto theft. In each class of these 
offenses, with slight exceptions, the rate gradually declined in accord- 
ance with the size of the reporting cities. A notable exception to this 
is the number of auto thefts reported for cities between 25,000 and 
50,000, which was appreciably higher than the rate for the cities in 
the next largest population group. 

Offenses known to the -police, first quarter, 1932; number and rates -per 100,000 



27 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 15,863,475: 

Number of crimes 

Rat3 per 100,000 

45 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 6,027,107: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 

85 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 5,928,974: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 

147 cities. 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 5,121,297: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 

374 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 5,707,760: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000.. 

675 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 3,300,436: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 



Felonious homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 



Rob- 
bery 



249 8, 249 



652 
11.4 



418 
12.7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,727 
10.9 



655 
10.9 



729 
12.3 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



18, 892 
119.1 



7,079 
117.4 



4,732 
92.4 



2,366 
71.7 



Lar- 

eny— 
theft 



^^^^. theft 



30, 848 
194.4 



11, 724 
194.5 



10, 538 
177.7 



7,461 
130.7 



21, 636 
136.4 



8 

Average Daily Number of Offenses, 1931-32. 

In the table which follows is shown the average daily number of 
offenses of the Part I Classes of the Uniform Classification for 65 
cities having a population of more than 100,000 each for the first 
quarter of 1931, as compared with the reports from the same cities 
for the first quarter of the current year. The figures are confined to 
cities which submitted apparently complete reports for the periods 
indicated, while there were excluded any reports which were obviously 
defective or incomplete. The total population represented by the 
cities included is 15,988,308. 

An examination of the figures presented indicates that there was an 
increase for those cities in the average number of offenses of burglary' — 
breaking or entering reported daily for the first quarter of 1932 as 
compared with the same period of 1931. There was also a slight 
increase in the average number of offenses of rape reported. The 
figures indicate little change in the number of murders and non- 
negligent manslaughters while a decrease was shown in offenses of 
manslaughter by negligence, robbery, aggravated assault, larceny — 
theft, and auto theft. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 65 cities over 100,000, first quarter 1931, 

1932^ 





Felonious homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- • 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 

theft 


FIRST QUARTER 

Number of offenses, 1931 


327 
318 

3.6 
3.5 


253 
199 

2.8 
2.2 


213 
235 

2.3 
2.6 


5,436 
4,979 

eo.4 

54.7 


1,910 
1,702 

21.2 

18.7 


16, 631 
18, 053 

184.8 
198.4 


34, 560 
34, 599 

384.0 
380.2 


21,414 


Number of offenses, 1932 


17,906 


FIRST QUARTER 


237.9 




196.8 







Total population represented, 15,988,308. 



Felonious Homicide and Robbery. 

In the table which follows the term "felonious homicide" includes 
all oft'enses of murder and manslaughter reported except homicides 
attributable to negligence. The figures are based on reports sub- 
mitted by 58 cities, each haying a population of 100,000 or more, 
which contributed returns for the entire 12 months of 1930 and 1931. 
The total population represented by the cities included is 20,756,447. 
Based on the returns received from those cities, it appears that there 
was a slight decrease in 1931 in the average number of offenses of 
felonious homicide reported by those cities, while there was a sub- 
stantial increase in the number of offenses of robbery reported by the 
police departments included in the tabulation. 



Felonious homicide and robbery, 1930-Sl, 58 cities over 100,000 population 
(Rates per 100,000 population] 





Felonious 
homicide 


Robbery 


1930 


9.46 
9.03 


146.39 
179. 10 


1931 





Population represented, 20,756,447. 



o 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume III - Number 2 
SECOND QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1932 



Issued by the 

United States Bureau of Investigation 

Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1932 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 



II. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCU;'. i. ;. >o 

AUG 15 1932 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, United States Bureau of Investigation 

Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 

Volume 3 July, 1932 Number 2 

Contents of Second Quarterly Bulletin. 

The current issue of the bulletin contains tables showing the extent 
of the reporting area by cities and the population represented by con- 
tributing police departments. The average daily number of offenses 
of the Part I classes of the uniform classification are shown for more 
than 1,200 cities for each of the first six months of 1932. The rates 
per 100,000 people for each of the offenses listed are also shown, 
together with rates for cities of various population groups. There is 
also included a comparative table for cities of more than 100,000 
population showing the average daily number of offenses for the first 
six months of the current year as compared with the first six months 
of last year. The United States Bureau of Investigation is publishing 
for the first time in this issue of the bulletin summarized data based 
on the annual reports submitted by police departments throughout 
the country for 1931. These reports are described in more detail in 
the text immediately preceding the tables. 

The term "Offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as Part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prose- 
cuting or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the 
following group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience 
to be those most generally ancl xjompletely reported to the police: 
Felonious homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, 
and (b) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated 
assault; burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto 
theft. The figures contained herein include also the number of 
attempted crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, 
however, are reported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an 
attempted burglary or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin 
in the same manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" includes, therefore, all of the 
above offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police 
departments of contributing cities, and not merely arrests or cleared 
cases. 

134141—32 (1) 



In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities 
the United States Bureau of Investigation does not vouch for its 
accuracy. It is given out as current information, which possibly 
may throw some light on problems of crime and criminal law enforce- 
ment. 

In compiling the tables apparently incomplete and otherwise 
defective returns were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area. 

The following table is based upon the number of cities from which 
returns were received for any one month during the first half of the 
current year. The cities are shown according to various population 
groups, together with the number of people represented by the 
individual groups and the percentage of the number of reporting cities 
as compared with the entire number of cities of the several groups. 

The number of such cities from which the data was received during 
the first half of 1932 was 1,536. The population represented by those 
cities is 52,692,749. This represents an increase of 60 cities since the 
issue of the first quarterly bulletin for 1932. There are excluded from 
the above figures a considerable number of returns received from 
county officials. State police, and officers in the possessions. In other 
words, the population data presented in the table is confined to urban 
localities in the continental United States. 

The population data was obtained from the Bureau of the Census 
and represents the estimated population for cities of more than 10,000 
inhabitants as of July 1, 1931. Similar estimates were not available 
for cities of less than 10,000 people and consequently the 1930 census 
was the source of information for compiling rates for cities in the 
smaller group. 

At the present time there are 79 per cent of the cities in excess of 
10,000 population included in the reporting area. There are now 
only 2 police departments, namely, New York City and Atlanta, in 
the group of more than 250,000 from which returns are not received. 
Keading, Pa., and Tulsa, Okla., are the only cities not contributing 
in the group between 100,000 and 250,000. Of the next group there 
are only 7 cities not in the reporting area, while in the smaller cities, 
that is, those from 25,000 to 50,000 and those from 10,000 to 25,000, 
89 per cent and 72 per cent, respectively, furnish the figures. In 
addition to those included in the table there were 755 cities and rural 
townships aggregating a total population of 4,293,304 from which 
reports were received. 



Population groups 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Per cent 


Number 


Per cent 


Total 


983 


781 


79 


59, 714, 687 


48, 399, 445 


81 






A. Cities over 250,000 


37 
57 
103 
185 
601 


35 
55 
96 
164 
431 


95 
96 
93 
89 
72 


29, 435, 800 
7, 787, 612 
6, 852, 807 
6, 445, 336 
9, 193, 132 


22, 067, 900 
7, 530, 212 
6, 353, 911 
5, 760, 913 
6, 680, 509 


75 


B Cities 100,000 to 250,000 . .. 


97 


C Cities 50 000 to 100,000 


93 


D. Cities 25,000 to 50,000 


89 


E. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 . 


73 







The above table does not include 755 cities and rural townships, aggregating a total population of 4,293,304. 
The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural 
townships are of varying population groups. 



Number of Cities Reporting. 

The following table shows the number of returns by States received 
by the United States Bureau of Investigation for each of the first six 
months of 1932. The figures show a gradual increase from January 
to June, and although they are confined to the number of police 
departments submitting returns currently, they exceed the number 
received for the same period last year. For example, during the 
month of June, 1932, there were received reports from 1,437 cities, 
which represents an increase of 106 over the number of cities con- 
tributing for that month in 1931. Similar increases were noted in 
other months of the current year. 





January 


February 


March 


April 


May 


June 


Alabama 


5 
4 
4 
107 
15 

^9 

1 
25 
13 

3 
71 
34 
24 
25 
13 

6 
14 

5 
84 
99 
36 

4 
22 

7 
14 

2 

8 
127 

133 
19 
8 
104 
30 
15 
99 
12 
5 
8 

5 

10 
23 

17 
11 
30 
3 


5 

4 

4 
106 
14 
28 

2 

1 
25 
15 

3 
71 
35 
24 
27 
13 

6 
14 

5 
83 
106 
35 

4 
22 

6 
15 

3 

6 
129 

2 
136 

'I 
104. 
29 
14 
88 
11 
5 
9 
7 

8 
11 
24 
16 
13 
32 

2 


5 

5 

4 
106 
15 
30 

2 

1 
25 
14 

3 
71 
37 
24 
27 
13 

8 
14 

5 
87 
113 
35 

3 
21 

7 
14 

3 

8 
131 

1 
134 
18 

7 
100 
29 
14 
85 
11 

4 

9 

8 
38 

5 
10 
21 
17 
14 
34 

3 


5 
4 
4 
109 
15 
30 
2 
1 
26 
14 
3 
71 
37 
25 
25 
13 
8 
15 
5 
86 
113 
39 
4 
21 
7 
16 
3 
8 
131 
1 
136 
19 
6 
101 
25 
13 
102 
11 
4 
9 
8 
38 
10 
10 
24 
17 
12 
35 
3 


5 
4 
4 
109 
15 
30 
2 
1 
25 
14 
2 
72 
37 
26 
23 
13 
8 
15 
5 

117 
40 
3 
21 

16 
3 
8 
130 
2 
136 
19 

98 
25 
14 
108 
11 
5 
9 
8 
35 
8 
9 
23 
17 
14 
36 
3 


6 


Arizona 


5 






California 

Colorado 


110 
15 






Delaware 


2 




1 






Georgia . 


14 


Idaho 








Indiana 


38 


Iowa 


25 






Ken tuck V 


13 




8 






Maryland 


5 






Miehipran 


121 


Minnesota 


40 


Mississippi 




Missouri. 


22 


Montana 








Nevada 


3 


New Hampshire 


8 


New Mexico 


2 


New York 


136 






North Dakota 


7 


Ohio 


94 






Oregon 


13 


Pennsylvania 


107 


Rhode Island.- 




South Carolina 


3 


South Dakota 


9 






Texas 


37 


Utah 








Virjrinia 


24 










Wisconsin 


36 




3 






Total number contributing 


1,381 


1,385 


1,393 


1,424 


1,428 


1 437 







THE MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police, January to June, inclusive, 1932. 

In Table 1 are shown the total number of crimes reported by 1 ,270 
cities of miscellaneous population groups for the first six months of 
the current year, together with the rates per 100,000 population for 
each of the crimes of the Part I classes of the uniform classification of 



offenses. The population represented by the 1,270 cities included is 
47, 196,480. This table is a summar}'' of the more detailed information 
set forth in the tabulation which follows it. 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 1932, 1,270 
miscellaneous cities; number and rates per 100,000 

[Total population, 47,196,480] 





Felonious 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of ofTenses known 

Rates per 100,000 


1,579 
3.3 


1,030 
2.2 


1,415 
3.0 


25, 383 
53.8 


10, 395 
22.0 


90, 013 
190.7 


158, 900 
336.7 


86. 630 
183.5 







Offenses Known to the Police, Number and Rates, by Population Groups. 

In Table 2 are shown the number of crimes and the rate per 100,000 
people for each class of the designated offenses for cities of six different 
population groups. 

The lowest rate for offenses of murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter for the first six months of 1932 appears to have been in the 
cities of 25,000 to 50,000 population. The rate for this group was 
only 50 per cent of the rate for cities of over 250,000 population. 
It is also noted that the lowest rate of offenses of manslaughter by 
negligence was found in the group of cities from 25,000 to 50,000 
population. Concerning both of these offenses, the rates for cities of 
more than 250,000 people were higher than the rates for any other 
population group. 

The table also indicates that the rate of offenses of rape was higher 
in cities over 250,000 and in cities less than 10,000 than it was for 
cities between those two groups. 

The rate of offenses of robbery was much higher in the larger cities 
than the rate of this offense in smaller communities. It is par- 
ticularly noticeable that the rate for cities having a population of 
more than 250,000 was more than twice the rate for cities having a 
population of 100,000 to 250,000. The rates for the other population 
groups showed a gradual reduction and it will be noted that the rate 
for cities of less than 10,000 was approximately 21 per 100,000 
people. 

The rates per 100,000 people of offenses of aggravated assault were 
considerably higher during the past six months in cities of more 
than 50,000 people than the rates of those less than that number. 

The same comment applies to offenses of larceny^ — theft and auto 
theft, although it will be observed that the rate of offenses of lar- 
ceny — theft was higher for cities of 100,000 to 250,000 people than 
any other group. 

It is particularly noticeable that the rate of offenses of auto theft 
for cities of less than 10,000 people was only about 25 per cent of the 
rate for cities of more than 250,000 and is considerably lower than the 
rate for any of the other groups. 



Table 2. 



-Offenses ktiown to the police, January to June, inclusive, 1932; mnnher 
and rates per 100,000 by population groups 



Felonious 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

glary- 
breakmg 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


825 
4.0 


654 
3.2 


702 
3.4 


16, 952 
83.0 


5,004 
24.5 


44, 060 

215.8 


72, 390 
354.6 


248 
3.8 


120 

1.8 


163 
2.5 


2,669 
41.0 


1,480 
22.7 


14, 140 
217.1 


25, 286 
388.2 


157 
2.7 


73 
1.3 


146 
2.5 


2,314 
40.0 


1,571 
27.2 


10, 360 
179.1 


20, 764 
359.0 


106 
2.0 


64 
1.2 


124 
2.3 


1,530 
28.6 


899 
16.8 


8,877 
166.2 


17, 364 
325.1 


155 
2.7 


74 
1.3 


166 
2.9 


1,200 
21.0 


953 
16.7 


7,824 
137.0 


15, 335 


2.6 


45 
1.3 


114 
3.3 


718 
20.9 


488 
14.2 


4,752 
138.4 


7,761 
226.0 



32 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 20,413,200: 
Number of offenses known.,. 

Rate per 100,000. 

48 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 6,513,002: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000. 

86 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 5,783,253: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000 

151 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 5,340,169: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000 

367 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 5,712,498: 
Number of offenses known.. . 

Rate per 100,000 

586 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 3,434,358: 
Number of offenses known . . . 
Rate per 100,000 



9,075 
156.9 



7,117 
133.3 



Average Daily Number of Offenses. 

The daily average of the number of offenses known to the police 
of the Part I classes of the uniform classification of offenses for the 
first six months of 1932 is shown in Table 3 for 1,270 cities of miscel- 
laneous population groups. The population represented by the cities 
in the tabulation is 47,196,480. 

An examination of the table indicates that there was a slight 
increase in the average daily number of offenses of murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter during the nionths of April and June, while 
manslaughter by negligence showed a general downward trend for 
the six months. 

The figures reveal that robbery showed a gradual but marked 
decrease during that period, ranging from an average daily number 
of approximately 176 offenses in January to about 114 offenses daily 
in June. 

The number of offenses of aggravated assault reported during the 
second quarter showed a marked increase over the number reported 
during the first quarter, a sharp increase occurring in the average 
daily number of offenses of this nature for April as compared with 
the number for March. The term "aggravated assault" means a 
serious assault in which severe bodily harm may be inflicted, such as 
an assault with a deadly weapon. 

There was a gradual decline in burglary — breaking or entering 
during the first quarter, with a slight increase in April, followed by a 
continued decline in May and June. 

Little change was reported in the average daily number of offenses 
of larceny — theft with the exception that during the month of April a 



very slight increase was shown. This increase, however, did not 
continue during May and June. 

Auto thefts showed a steady decUne during the first quarter, but 
there was a sharp increase in the number of offenses of this nature 
during ApriL The average daily number of oft'enses of auto theft 
for June, however, was lower than for any other month of the first 
half of 1932. 

Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 
1932; 1,270 miscellaneous cities 

(Total population, 47,196,480] 





Felonious 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 1932 


8.3 
8.8 
8.3 
9.2 
8.3 
9.2 


6.3 

6.7 
5.4 
5.3 
5.4 
4.9 


7.5 
8.0 
7.6 
7.9 
7.6 
8.0 


175.9 
153.0 
140.7 
131.4 
121.4 
114.2 


50.3 
54.3 
50.4 
61.8 
62.3 
63.8 


529.7 
514.0 
486.6 
503.5 
468.9 
465.3 


885.3 
861.6 
843.8 
910.2 
868.5 
869.5 


497.7 




475.1 


March 1932 


450.3 


April 1932 


518.9 




470.2 


June 1932 


444.1 







Comparative Daily Averages, 1931-32. 

In the table which follows are shown the total number of offenses 
for the first six months of 1931 and the average daily number of 
offenses for that period, together with similar information for the first 
six months of the current year. The figures included are those 
received from 72 cities having a population of more than 100,000 
people, aggregating a total population of 19,260,402. 

Little change appeared between the average daily number of 
oft'enses of murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, or larceny — theft. 

The figures reveal that there was a decrease in the average daily 
number of offenses of manslaughter by negligence for the first six 
months of 1932 as compared with a similar period for 1931. 

A decrease was also shown in the average number of offenses of 
robbery, aggravated assault, and auto theft. 

Slight increases were shown, however, this year in the average daily 
number of offenses of burglary— breaking or entering. 

Table 4. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 72 cities over 100,000, 
January to June, inclusive, 1931, 1932 

[Total population, 19,260,402] 





Felonious 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Bur- 

glary- 
breakmg 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known, 1931.. 
Number of offenses known, 1932.. 
Daily average, 1931 


754 
751 
4.2 
4.1 


737 
579 
4.1 
3.2 


574 
609 
3.2 
3.3 


9,903 
9,245 
54.7 
50.8 


4,873 
4.356 
26.9 
23.9 


33,831 
36, 477 
186.9 
200.4 


71, 527 

72, 480 
395.2 


43, 838 
36, 430 
242.1 




200.2 







ANNUAL RETURNS FOR 1931 

The figures presented in the tables which follow are based on annual 
reports for the calendar j'ear 1931 submitted by 511 police depart- 
ments throughout the country, representing a population of approx- 
imately 16^2 million people. Annual reports were received from 920 
cities jfor that year. Each return was carefully examined and the 
attention of police officials invited to apparent inaccuracies. In 
instances where it was found impossible to obtain corrections of errors, 
or where it was not possible to furnish completely the information 
requested, the reports were disregarded and were not included in the 
tabulations which formed the basis of the tables which follow. 

The system of uniform crime reporting for police departments as 
adopted by the United States Bureau of Investigation provides for 
the regular submission of monthly reports showing the number of 
major offenses known to pohce departments each month. Annual 
reports are also required but these are in greater detail than the 
montlily reports. These annual reports enable police departments 
to make any adjustments which may be necessary in the figures sub- 
mitted on a monthly basis and are calculated to show principally the 
amount of crime committed during the year, the success which police 
departments have had in clearing cases by arrest during the year, 
and the number of persons charged; that is, those who were held to 
answer criminal charges. 

The figures in the tables are confined to the part 1 group of the 
Uniform Classification of Offenses, which consists of those serious 
crimes which are most generally reported to the pohce. 
Offenses Known and Rates per 100,000 People, 1931. 

In the following table is shown the number of offenses known to 
the police as reflected by the annual reports received from 511 cities. 
There is also shown the rate per 100,000 people for each offense. 
The population represented by the returns was 16,458,401. 

Table 5. — Offenses known to the 'police, 1931, 511 miscellaneous cities; number and 
rates -per 100,000 





[Total 


population, 16,458,401] 












Felonious 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known 

Rates per 100 000 


1,145 
7.0 


711 
4.3 


904 
5.5 


13. 055 
79.3 


7,264 
44.1 


51, 607 
313.6 


122,911 
746.8 


54. 637 
332.0 







Rates per 100,000 People, 1931, by Population Groups. 

The number of crimes of the designated classes and the rate per 
100,000 by population groups for 1931 are shown in Table 6. 

The highest rate of offenses of murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter appears to have been in the cities having a population of 
100,000 to 250,000, although the rate for that group was only slightly 
higher than the rate for cities of more than 250,000 people. The 
cities of intermediate sizes, that is, those between 10,000 and 100,000 
people, had a rate which was considerably lower than the large 



8 

metropolitan cities and was also much lower than the rate for com- 
munities having a population of less than 10,000 people. 

The rate of ofi'enses of manslaughter by negligence for cities having 
a population of 100,000 to 250,000 was also higher than the rate of 
offenses of this nature for any other group, w^hile the rate of offenses 
of rape was much higher in smaller communities than in larger cities. 
Aggravated assault seemed to have been more prevalent in cities 
between 50,000 and 250,000 than in any other group. 

The rate for robbery declined as the size of the city decreased, with 
the exception of the rate for cities between 50,000 and 100,000 people, 
which was substantially higher than the rate in cities in the next 
largest population group. If, however, the rates for all cities over 
100,000 were computed and compared with cities of less than 100,000 
it is quite apparent from the figures received that there was less 
robbery in smaller communities than in the larger cities. The same 
comment applies to offenses of burglary — breaking or entering, and 
larceny — theft. 

This condition also prevails with respect to offenses of auto theft 
and it is of particular interest to note the gradual decline in the rate 
of auto theft from the larger cities to the smaller cities. It will be 
observed that the rate of auto theft for cities of less than 10,000 is 
less than one-third the rate for cities of more than 100,000 people. 

The population data is based on information furnished by the 
Bureau of the Census showing the estimated population as of July 
1, 1931, for cities of more than 10,000 people, and, since such estimates 
were not available for cities of less than 10,000 population, the figures 
in the 1930 census were used for cities in that group. Due allow- 
ance, therefore, should be made when comparing cities in the low 
population group with those in the other groups. 



Table 



-Offenses known to the police, 1931; number and rates per 100,000 by 
population groups 



Felonious 
homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Auto 
theft 



11 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,555,100: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 

18 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 2,397,331: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 

31 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
• population, 2,058,900: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000.. 

50 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 1,749,072: 

Number of crimes 

Rate per 100,000 -_. 

143 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 2,194,049: 

Number of crimes.. 

Rate per 100,000 

258 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 1,503,949: 

Number of crimes 

Rate, per 100,000 



7,209 
110.0 



1, 458 
60.8 



1, 148 
55. 7 



9, 564 
399.0 



372. 



5, 2.^58 
300.6 



5,318 
242. 4 



56, 284 
858.6 



16, 165 
785.1 



11,061 
504.1 



6,710 
446.1 



6,416 
311.6 



.5, 100 
291.6 



4,075 
185.7 



1,902 
126.5 



Percentage Table of Part 1 Offenses, Annual Returns, 1931. 

The percentage of each offense class to the whole as indicated in 
the annual returns from 511 police departments is shown in Table 7, 

Offenses against property, namely, robbery, burglary — breaking 
or entering, larceny — theft and auto theft, constituted slightly 
more than 9(5 per cent of the entire group, whereas felonious homicide, 
rape, and aggravated assault accounted for only slightl}" less than 4 
per cent of the offenses reported. 

Table 7. — Percentage distribution of offenses known to the police, 1931; 511 mis- 
cellaneous cities 







[Total population, 16,458,401] 












Total 


Felonious homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 

theft 


Number of ofienses 


252, 234 
100.0 


1,145 
0.4 


711 
0.2 


904 
0.3 


13, 055 

5.2 


7,264 
2.9 


51, 607 
20.5 


122,911 


54,637 


Perrentage of total 


48.8 


21.7 



Offenses Known, Cleared by Arrest, and Persons Charged. 

The figures in Table 8 show the number of offenses known, the 
number of offenses cleared by arrest, and the number of persons 
charged, as reported by 511 police departments in their annual reports 
for 1931 to the United States Bureau of Investigation. 

The term "offenses known" includes all actual offenses of the part 
1 classes committed in 1931 which became known to the police 
departments of the cities represented. An offense is considered 
"cleared by arrest" when one or more persons have been taken into 
custody, charged with having committed it and are held or turned 
over for prosecution. The term "persons charged" signifies the 
indi\dduals who are taken into custody by the police and held to 
answer for a criminal offense, as distinguished from those who are 
arrested and later released without a formal charge having been 
placed against them. The number of persons charged need not 
necessarily be the same as the number of offenses cleared by arrest, 
since the arrest of one person may clear several crimes, whereas the 
arrest of several persons may clear only one offense. 

The percentage of offenses cleared by arrest is also shown in the 
next table. It mil be observed that the percentage of clearances for 
attacks upon the person — namely, felonious homicide, rape, and 
aggravated assault — is considerably higher than the percentage of 
clearances for other offenses. Of course, robbery is essentially an 
attack upon the person but the motive is to obtain property, and it 
is accordingly considered as one of the offenses against property. It 
will be noted that the percentage of clearances of offenses of this 
nature is not as high as the percentage of clearances of any of the 
offenses against the person. 

The percentage of clearances for the entire group was lower in 
offenses of auto theft than in any other offense. It is appropriate to 
observe, however, that in the great majority of cases stolen cars are 
usually recovered, but the recovery of a car does not in itself clear the 
offense according to the rules of uniform crime reporting. 



10 



Table 8. — Summary of offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and persons 
charged, 1931; 611 miscellaneous cities 

[Total population, 16,458,401] 





Felonious 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by 


1,145 

892 
1,003 

77.9 


711 

643 
709 

90.4 


904 

795 
1,051 

87.9 


13, 055 

5,071 
37.0 


7,264 

5,337 
6,592 

73.5 


51, 607 

14, 516 
12, 893 

28.1 


122, 911 

31, 698 
31,831 

25.8 


54, 637 

7,767 


Number of persons charged 

Percentage of offenses cleared by 
arrest 


6,807 
14.2 



In Table 9 are shown the number of offenses known, the number of 
offenses cleared by arrest, and the number of persons charged for 
1931, according to population groups. There is indicated in the 
margin the number of cities of each group, together with the popula- 
tion for the respective groups. 

Table 9.— Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 1931, by 
population groups 





Felonious 
















homicide 




















Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 


Lar- 
ceny- 






Murder, 


Man- 


Auto 
theft 




nonneg- 


slaugh- 




assault 


or enter- 


theft 




ligent 


ter by 








ing 








man- 


negli- 
















slaughter 


gence 














11 cities over 250,000; total popu- 


















lation, 6,555,100: 


















Number of offenses known. _. 


518 


270 


371 


7,209 


2,670 


20,048 


56,284 


27, 451 


Number of offenses cleared by 


















arrest 


400 


257 


308 


2,497 


1,802 


5,320 


12, 309 


2.985 


Number of persons charged _ . 


491 


281 


450 


2,518 




5,844 


13, 989 


2,842 


18 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 


















population, 2,397,331: 


















Number of offenses known. .. 


200 


171 


132 


1,643 


1,458 


9,564 


21, 111 


9,693 


Number of offenses cleared by 


















arrest 


172 


159 


122 


572 


1,081 


2,541 


4,676 


1,156 


Number of persons charged. . 


167 


160 


162 


632 


1,353 


1,817 


4,339 


881 


31 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 


















population, 2,058,900: 


















Number of offenses known... 


109 


61 


96 


1,690 


1,148 


7,659 


16, 165 


6,416 


Number of offenses cleared by 


















arrest 


79 
85 


50 
61 


102 


575 
570 


737 

678 


1,790 
1,100 


4,573 
4,194 


1,290 


Number of persons charged.. 


818 


50 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 


















population, 1,749,072: 


















Number of offenses known.. 


115 


85 


71 


1,021 


756 


5,258 


11, 580 


5,100 


Number of offenses cleared 


















by arrest 


87 
96 


75 
81 


70 
85 


524 
523 


684 
757 


1,845 
1,436 


3,608 
3,200 


1,074 


Number of persons charged. - 


865 


143 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 


















population, 2,194,049: 


















Number of olfenses known . . _ 


90 


73 


127 


891 


724 


6,318 


11,061 


4,075 


Number of offenses cleared by 


















arrest 


63 
75 


58 

75 


111 
132 


399 
461 


585 
622 


1,661 
1,377 


31620 


733 


Number of persons charged. . 


770 


258 cities under 10,000; total popu- 


















lation, 1,503,949: 


















Number of offenses known... 


113 


51 


107 


601 


508 


3,760 


6,710 


1,902 


Number of offenses cleared by 


















arrest 


85 


44 
51 


96 
120 


261 
367 


448 
496 


1,359 
1,319 


2,724 
2,489 


529 


Number of persons charged .. 


631 



11 

Percentage of Clearances, by Population Groups. 

The percentage of offenses cleared by arrest as reflected in the an- 
nual reports for 1931 from 511 police departments is shown according 
to population groups in the table which follows. 

The comparatively high percentage of clearances in offenses against 
the person, when considered in connection with the percentage of 
offenses against property which were cleared, seems to persist uni- 
formly in cities of all sizes. 

The percentage of clearances for murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter was higher in cities having a population in excess of 100,000 
than in cities of any other population group. This is also true with 
respect to cleared cases of manslaughter by negligence. The smaller 
cities, however, have reported a larger percentage of cleared crimes 
of robbery; aggravated assault; burglar}'^ — breaking or entering; 
larceny — theft; and auto theft than have the cities over 100,000 in 
population. 

Table 10.— Percentages of offenses cleared by arrest, 1931, by population groups 



Felonious 
homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



Auto 
theft 



11 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 6,555,100: 
Percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest 

18 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 2,397,331: 
Percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest 

31 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 2,058,900: 
Percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest 

50 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 1,749,072: 
Percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest 

143 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 2,194,049: 
Percentage of oflenses cleared 

by arrest 

25S cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 1,503,949: 
Percentage of offenses cleared 
by arrest 



o 



^'35'd,5 a.'Z) 



UNIFORM ^ t 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS /-r^TON^ 



Volume III - Number 3 
THIRD QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1932 



Issued by the 

United States Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1932 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(II) 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOC 
NOV 21 1932 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, United States Bureau pf Investigation 
Washington, D. C. 

Volume 3 October, 1932 Number 3 

Contents of Third Quarterly Bulletin. 

This issue of the bulletin contains tables showing the extent of the 
reporting area by cities and the population represented by contribut- 
ing police departments, arranged according to the various population 
groups. The number of cities contributing crime statistics in the 
various States from January to September, 1932, inclusive, is shown 
in a separate tabulation. There is also shown the number of offenses 
committed from January to September, 1932, inclusive, by popula- 
tion groups, together with the rates of crimes per 100,000 popidation. 
A comparative table setting forth the average daily number of offenses 
for the first nine months of the current year for cities over 100,000 as 
compared with the first nine months of last year is included. The 
average daily number of offenses of the Part I classes of the uniform 
classification is shown for 1,193 cities for each of the first nine months 
of 1932. Tables are included showing the rates by geographic 
divisions. 

There are published in this issue of the bulletin tables based upon 
the fingerprint records received by the United States Bureau of In- 
vestigation from February 1 to September 30, 1932, inclusive. These 
tables are explained in greater detail in the text immediately preced- 
ing them. 

The term "Offenses know^n to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as Part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecut- 
ing or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following 
group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police: Felonious 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (6) 
manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are reported 
as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted burglary or 
robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" includes, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities 
the United States Bureau of Investigation does not vouch for its 
accuracy. It is given out as current information, which possibly 
may throw some light on problems, of crime and criminal law enforce- 
ment. 

140884—32 ( 1 ) 



In compiling the tables apparently incomplete and otherwise defec- 
tive returns were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area. 

The following table shows the number of cities from which returns 
were received for any one month during the first three quarters of the 
current year. The cities are shown according to various population 
groups, together with the number of people represented by the indi- 
vidual groups. The percentage of the number of reporting cities as 
compared with the entire number of cities of the several groups is 
also shown. 

The number of such cities from which the data was received during 
the first three quarters of 1932 was 1,546. The population repre- 
sented by those cities was 52,802,302. This represents an increase of 
10 cities since the issue of the second quarterly bulletin for 1932. 
There are excluded from the above figures a considerable number of 
returns received from county officials. State police, and officers in the 
possessions. The population data represented in the table is con- 
fined, therefore, to urban localities in the continental United States. 

The figures for cities in excess of 10,000 people were obtained from 
the Bureau of the Census as estimated July 1, 1931. Similar esti- 
mates were not available for cities of less than 10,000 and conse- 
quently the 1930 census was the source of information for those cities. 

At the present time there are 79 per cent of the cities in excess of 
10,000 population included in the reporting area. There are now- 
only two police departments, namely. New York, N. Y., and 
Atlanta, Ga., in the group of more than 250,000 from which re- 
turns are not received. In the group between 100,000 and 250,000, 
Reading, Pa., and Tulsa, Olda., are the only cities not contributing. 
Of the next group there are only seven cities not in the reporting 
area, while in the smaller cities, that is, those from 25,000 to 50,000 
and those from 10,000 to 25,000, 89 per cent and 72 per cent, respec- 
tively, furnish the figures. In addition to those included in the table, 
there were 764 cities and rural townships, aggregating a total popula- 
tion of 4,376,498, from which reports were received. 





Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Per cent 


Number 


Per cent 


Total 


983 


782 


79 


59, 714, 687 


48, 425, 864 


81 








37 
57 
103 
185 
601 


35 
55 
96 
164 
432 


95 
96 
93 

89 
72 


29, 435, 800 
7, 787. 612 
6, 852, 807 
6, 445, 336 
9, 193, 132 


22, 067, 900 
7,530,212 
6,353.911 
5,760,913 
6,712,928 


75 






C. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


93 


D. Cities 25,000 to 50,000. 


89 


E. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 ._ 


73 



The above table does not include 764 cities and rural townships, aggregating a total population of 4,376,498. 
The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural 
townships are of varying population groups. 

Number of Cities Reporting. 

In the table which follows the number of returns by States received 
by the United States Bureau of Investigation for each of the first 
nine months of 1932 are set forth. The figures are confined to the 
number of police departments sulimitting returns currently. It is 
of interest to note that the number of returns received for September, 
1932, exceeds the number published in September, 1931, by 205 



reports. A similar increase for each of the previous eight months of 
this year has been shown over the corresponding months of 1931. 



Sep- 
tem ber 



Alabama - 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California -. 

Colorado 

Connecticut... 

Delaware.. 

District of Columbia 

Florida.. 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois.. 

Indiana _ 

Iowa 

Kansas... ._ 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland - 

Massachusetts. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina. 

North Dakota 

Ohio .- 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia 

"Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total number contrib 
uting 



1,428 



1,440 



Offenses Known to the Police, Number and Rates, by Population Groups. 

^ In the following table are shown the number of crimes reported to the 
United States Bureau of Investigation from January to September, 
1932, and the rates per 100,000 people for 1,193 cities subdivided into 
six population groups. An examination of the figures reveals that the 
rates for offenses of the Part I classes were considerably higher in 
larger cities than smaller cities. 

There seems to be a gradual decline in the crime rates proportionate 
to the decrease in population. For example, the rates for murder 
and nonnegligent manslaughter for the first nine months of the cur- 
rent year declined from 6.3 for 100,000 people for cities having more 
than 250,000 to 3.5 for cities of less than 10,000. 

A similar trend is noticed in connection with offenses of man- 
slaughter by negligence, although the rate for that offense for cities 
under 10,000 was slightly liigher than for those having a population 
between 10,000 and 50,000. 



The rate for offenses of rape is also higher in cities of more than 
250,000, showing a gradual decline in smaller cities, with the excep- 
tion, however, that cities under 10,000 show a rate approximated 
the same as that in the major group. 

The rate for robbery in the first group of cities was considerably 
more than twice that of any other group and was shown to be ap- 
proximately four times the rate of cities having a population of less 
than 25,000. 

Aggravated assault apparently was more prevalent in cities be- 
tween 50,000 and 100,000 than in any other group, while burglary- 
breaking or entering — showed a higher rate for cities from 100,000 to 
250,000 than for any of the other reporting units. The same com- 
ment applies to larceny — theft. 

For offenses of auto theft the rate for cities of over 250,000 was 
371.4. This figure is shown to be higher than in any other popula- 
tion group for tliis offense, although a gradual reduction in rate takes 
place; and in cities of less than 10,000 the rate has dropped to 89.6 
offenses, or about 25 per cent of the rate for cities of more than 250,000. 
The rate for this group is considerably lower than the rate for any of 
the other groups. 

Offenses known to the 'police, January to September, inclusive, 1932; number and 
rates per 100,000 by population groups 



Murder, 
aonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



31 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 20,043,400: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000 

49 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 6,726,102: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000... 

82 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 5,521,388: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000 

145 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 5,100,213: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000... 

340 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 5,271,460: 
Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000 .._ 

546 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 3,238,168: 
Number of ofTenses known. ._ 
Rate per 100,000... ._ 

Total, 1,193 cities; total 
population, 45,900,731: 
Number of offenses 

known 

Rate per 100,000 



Felonious homicide 



1,273 
6.3 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



1,422 
3.1 



Rape 



1,073 
5.3 



2,149 
4.7 



Rob- 
bery 



24, 316 
121.3 



3,100 
56.1 



1,530 
29.0 



904 
29 8 



35, 880 

78.2 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



7,598 
37.9 



2,327 
34.6 



2,289 
41.4 



1,438 
27.3 



678 
20.9 



15, 676 
34.1 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



64,480 
321.7 



22, 363 
332.5 



12, 714 
249.3 



10, 860 
206.0 



132.058 

287.7 



Lar- 
cenv— 
theft 



06, 540 
631.5 



40, 356 
600.0 



30, 806 
557.9 



21,9.52 
416.4 



11,276 
348.2 



236, 758 
515 8 



Auto 
theft 



74,441 
371.4 



19,649 
292.1 



12, 732 



6,728 
127.6 



2,903 



Average Daily Number of Offenses. 

The average daily number of offenses known to the police for the 
Part I classes of the uniform classification of offenses for the first 
nine months of 1932 is shown in the following table for 1,193 cities 
of miscellaneous population groups. The population represented by 
the cities in the tabulation is 45,900,731. 



5 



An examination of the tabic shows that in June there was a sUght 
increase in the average daily number of offenses of murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter over the first five months, with a decided 
increase in Jul,y. However, in August and September there was a 
decline in the daily average. 

The daily averages for the offense of manslaughter by negligence 
show that during the second quarter there was a noticeable decline 
as compared with the first quarter and a continued decline during 
the third quarter. 

The figures reveal that robbery showed a gradual but marked 
decrease during that period, ranging from an average daily number 
of approximately 172 offenses in January to 125 offenses in Septem- 
ber. The low daily average of approximately 112 offenses is shown 
for the month of June. 

The number of offenses of aggravated assault reported during the 
second quarter showed a marked increase over the number reported 
for the first quarter. However, the third quarter shows a gradual 
decline. 

There was a slight decrease during the second quarter in the daily 
average of offenses of burglary — brealdng or entering — as compared 
with the first quarter. The third quarter, however, shows a slight 
increase over the second quarter. 

There was a gradual increase in the larceny — theft offenses during 
the second quarter over the first quarter. An increase was also 
shown during the third quarter over the second quarter. 

The average daily number of auto thefts during the second quarter 
showed an increase over the total for the first three months. However, 
during the third quarter there was a slight decline as compared with 
the second quarter. During the month of January there was a daily 
average of approximately 486 auto theft offenses. However, the 
September daily average was 449. 

Daily average offenses known to the police, January to September, inclusive, 1932: 
1,193 miscellaneous cities 





[Total population, 45,900,731] 












Felonious liomicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 






Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




8.2 
8.4 
8.0 
8.8 
8.0 
9.0 
10.8 
9.3 
7 6 


6.1 
6.5 
5.1 
5.2 
5.2 
4.7 
4.1 
4.7 
5.2 


7.4 
7.8 
7.5 
7.6 
7.4 
8.0 
7.3 
8.6 
8.9 


171.6 
150.5 
136.4 
127.5 
119.2 
112.3 
117.3 
118.8 
125.3 


48.5 
63.0 
48.3 
59.5 

fd 

66.4 
62.4 
55.6 


515.8 
503.1 
471.7 
489.4 
461.1 
459.6 
477.8 
483.2 
476.8 


854.4 
834.1 
810.7 
877.2 
853.9 
855.9 
858.1 
907.4 
925.2 


486.2 
463.8 
439.4 
509.4 
466.1 
438.2 
436.7 
451 6 




Marcb 


April 


May 


June 


Julv . 


August . 


September 


44819 







Comparative Daily Averages, 1931-32. 

In the following table ai-e shown the total number of ofl'enses and 
the average daily number of offenses for the 9-month period from 
January to September, 1932, inclusive. Corresponding information 
is also shown for the same period of last year. The figures included 
were obtained from reports of 72 cities, each having a population of 



more than 100,000. The total population represented in this table is 
19,103,702. 

Very slight changes occur between the average daily number of 
offenses for 1932 as compared with 1931 for offenses of murder and 
nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, and larceny — theft. An examina- 
tion of the table reveals that there was a decrease in the average 
daily number of offenses of manslaughter by negligence, robbery, 
aggravated assault, and auto theft for the first nine months of 1932 
as compared with the corresponding months of 1931. An increase 
in the number of burglaries committed daily appears to have occurred 
during 1932. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 72 cities over 100,000, January to Sep- 
tember, inclusive, 1931-32 

[Total population, 19,103,702] 





Felonious homicide 






Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 






Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


.\.Ut0 
theft 


Number of offenses known. 1931.. 
Number of offenses known, 1932.. 


1,112 

1,127 

4.0 

4.1 


1,037 
799 
3.8 
2.9 


893 
956 
3.3 
3.5 


13, 525 

12, 896 

49.5 

47.1 


7,626 
6,700 
27.9 
24.4 


49, 582 
55, 186 
181.6 
201.4 


107, 154 

109, 246 

392.5 

398.7 


63, 471 
53, 730 
232.5 


Daily average, 1932 


196.1 







Rates of Offenses by Geographic Divisions. 

There follow a series of tables showing the rates per 100,000 people 
for major offenses reported by cities for the first nine months of the 
current year. The tables are grouped according to geographical divi- 
sions showing the number of cities and population represented in each 
division. 

In making comparisons of the rates for the various divisions it must 
be taken into consideration that the population represented in the 
different groups varies considerably. In some instances an insufficient 
number of crimes were actually reported from which to make any 
conclusive comparisons. 

Generally speaking, there was little change in the fluctuation of 
offenses of felonious homicide and rape. There was a general decline 
in all sections of the country in the number of offenses of robbery 
reported to the United States Bureau of Investigation during the 
second quarter as compared with the number reported during the first 
quarter. A general increase was shown during July, August, and 
September, although slight, in the number of offenses of this nature. 
There was little change in the number of offenses of aggravated assault 
reported from cities in the New England, Middle Atlantic, West 
North Central, Mountain, and Pacific States. The East North Cen- 
tral States showed a marked increase in the second and third quarters 
for this type of offense, while the South Atlantic States also showed a 
slight increase in the number of offenses of aggravated assault during 
the third quarter. The general trend of the reports received indicates 
a slight decrease in the number of offenses of burglary — breaking or 
entering. Increases were noted, however, in the West North Central, 
South Atlantic, and Mountain States in the number of offenses of this 



nature reported. The iiuinber of oflenses of larceny — theft reported 
showed a gradual increase during the third quarter with the exception 
of the South Atlantic and East South Central States. There was a 
slight decrease in the former and little change in the latter. Auto 
thefts seemed to be less prevalent during the third quarter than 
they were at the beginning of the year, with some few exceptions. 



Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 
[139 cities, representing a population of 5,172,155] 



Felonious homicide 



Murder, 
nnnnsgli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
lary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



January, 1932... 
February, 1932. 
March, 1932.... 

AprU, 1932 

May, 1932 

June, 1932 

July, 1932 

August, 1932... 
September, 1932 



27.4 
22.2 
24.2 
22 
22.3 
23.1 
24.3 
22.4 
22.3 



40.3 
34.7 
41.1 
45.7 
45.9 
46.4 
49.7 
48 9 
46.3 



Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent. 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 
[304 cities, representing a population of 9,601,611] 



January, 1932... 
February, 1932.. 

March, 1932 

AprU, 1932 

May, 1932 

June, 1932 

July, 1932 

August, 1932 

September, 1932. 



0.9 



18.7 
16.0 
16.7 
16.5 
16.2 
16.6 
17.7 
16.4 
16.7 



24.6 
22.0 
22.1 
24.8 
27.0 
28.4 

28 2 

29 6 
29.3 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[302 cities, representing a population of 13,093,37 



January, 1932... 
February, 1932. 

March, 1932 

April, 1932 

May, 1932 

June, 1932 

July, 1932 

August, 1932 

September, 1932 



181.9 
143,6 
149.0 
139.0 
137.8 
118.1 
134.1 
137.8 
147.2 



31.6 

32 

33 3 
40 
43 2 
40 6 
48.3 
42.3 
42.5 



365. 7 
319.8 
333 2 
348 9 
330 8 
298.7 
309. 5 
342.2 
325.7 



563.1 
510 8 
535 5 
628 2 
603 
598 6 
592.3 
675.1 
654.6 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[118 cities, representing a population of 4,216,325] 



January, 1932. . . 
February, 19.32.. 
March, 1932.... 

April, 1932 

May, 1932 

June, 1932 

July, 1932 

August, 1932 

September, 1932 



0.3 


0.1 


0.3 


12.5 


1.9 


22.3 


51.1 


.6 


.1 


.2 


10.3 


1.9 


23.9 


49.0 


.6 


.1 


.5 


9.6 


1.4 


25.1 


51.2 


.5 


(') 


.4 


8.8 


2.5 


27.2 


58.6 


.5 


(') 


.4 


8.6 


1.9 


30.3 


57.5 


.5 


.1 


.3 


7.0 


2.0 


26.9 


52.7 


.9 


(■) 


3 


8.5 


2.7 


30.4 


57.0 


.5 


.1 


.3 


7.7 


2.1 


29.4 


59.5 


.4 


.1 


.a 


7.7 


1.9 


28.4 


64.2 



Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent. 



8 



Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police — Continued 

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 

[78 cities, representing a population of 3,340,530] 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



January, 1932. . . 
February, 1932. . 

March, 1932 

April, 1932 

May, 1932 

June, 1932 

July, 1932 

August, 1932 

September, 1932 



Felonious homicide 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



8.0 
8.1 
7.5 

9! 6 
9.8 
10.7 
10.3 
9.7 



Bur- 
lary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



36.3 
36.3 
34.5 
33.5 
34.1 
37.7 
40.6 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[26 cities, representing a population of 1,601,502] 





1.7 
1.9 
2.1 
2.1 
1.8 
2.2 
2.0 
1.9 
2.3 


0.8 
.9 
.4 

i!o 

.6 
.5 

:^ 


0.2 

'\ 

.3 

'.i 
.5 


12.6 
14.4 
12.9 
10.9 
8.3 
10.5 
9.3 
9.7 
9.8 


11.2 
12.5 
10.6 
15.6 
14.1 
15.9 
15.4 
15.5 
14.6 


50.6 
48.0 
51.8 
51.4 
39.5 
45.1 
52.9 
63.7 
44.8 


58.2 
52.0 
49.5 
54.0 
52.0 
52.0 
52. V 
56.8 
57.5 


35.3 


February, 1932 


29.7 


March, 1932 


28.2 


April, 1932. 


34.0 


May, 1932 


31.5 


June, 1932 


29.5 


July, 1932 


30.8 


August, 1932 


28.7 




29.2 







WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[60 cities, representing a population of 2,723,81 



January 1932 


1.1 
1.1 
.8 
1.6 
1.7 
1.3 
1.9 
1.3 
1.6 


0.2 
.6 
.2 
.3 
.6 
.2 
.2 
.4 
.2 


0.2 
.3 
.8 
.6 
.6 
.5 
.5 
.5 
.4 


11.0 
9.8 
8.4 
7.8 
8.4 
8.8 
7.8 
8.0 
6.2 


4.4 
4.0 
5.0 
6.5 
5.8 
7.0 
7.1 
8.0 
5.9 


49.5 
44.7 
44.5 
46.2 
44.9 
41.5 
46.8 
47.2 
38.0 


106.2 
93.6 
85.8 
91.5 

741 
87.4 
81.3 
81.5 


45.3 




36.9 


March 1932 


34.5 


April, 1932 


34.9 


May, 1932 


35.2 


June, 1932.. 


35.2 


July, 1932 


41.4 




41.5 


September, 1932 


37.0 







MOUNTAIN STATES 
[35 cities, representing a population of 886,142] 





0.6 
.4 

.8 
.4 
.7 
.2 
.3 
.8 


0.1 

!3 


0.4 
.2 

.2 
.4 
.2 
(') 
.6 
.3 


16.6 
11.0 
12.5 
8.9 
10.8 
6.8 
9.5 
10.8 
10.7 


1.7 
1.3 
1.1 
1.1 
2,4 
1.8 
1.6 
1.6 
1.1 


44.1 

49.3 
46.6 
51.9 
52.2 
54.4 
55.5 
53.3 
51.2 


73.7 
76.8 
85.6 
87.0 
86.1 
77.6 
76,8 
93,9 
89.1 


42.6 


February, 1932 


43.0 


March, 1932 


34.7 


April, 1932 


40.5 


May, 1932 


43,1 


June, 1932. 


37.6 


July, 1932 


36.3 


Ausust, 1932 


34.0 




36.3 







> No offenses reported. 



PACIFIC STATES 
[131 citie'3, representing a population of 5,265,201] 



January 1932 . - 


0,3 
,3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.5 
.5 
.3 
.2 


0,3 
,3 
.2 
.3 
.3 
.1 

.1 
.2 


0,8 
.8 
.9 
.6 
.8 
.6 
.6 

.6 


15.2 
11.6 
11.7 
9.5 
10.5 
9.4 
8.8 
10.7 
10.2 


1.3 
1.6 

l!7 
1.9 
1.4 
1.9 
1.5 
1.5 


GO. 3 
56,0 
52,7 
50,3 
47,8 
47.6 
52.9 
53,1 
51,0 


103.8 
97.0 

106.0 
95.5 
99.4 
93.0 
97.2 

104. 5 

100.9 


47. £ 


February 1932 


40. S 


March, 1932 


44. £ 


April 1932 


43. 


May, 1932 


43. e 


June, 1932. 


38.. 


July, 1932... 

August 1932 


43. r 
42. ^ 




39.' 








9 

Robbery and Burglary — Breaking or Entering Trends, 1930-1932. 

The charts which follow are based upon the average daily number 
of offenses of robbery and burglary — breaking or entering for 690 
cities representing a total population of 33,884,663. The population 
is based on the 1930 census. The trends are shown also for 65 cities 
each having a population of 100,000 or more and 625 cities each hav- 
ing a population of less than 100,000. 

The robbery chart, although indicating a decrease in the summer 
months of the past three years, shows a marked increase in Decem- 
ber, 1930 and 1931, and a rise during the third quarter of the current 
year. 

There appears to be an increase in the trend of burglary — breaking 
or entering, although during May and June of this year there was a 
sharp decline in offenses of this nature. 



10 



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12 



TABULATION OF STATISTICAL DATA FROM FINGERPRINT 
RECORDS 

In the files of the Identification Division of the United States 
Bureau of Investigation at Washington there are over three and a 
quarter million fingerprint records of individuals who have been 
arrested or committed to penal institutions in this and other coun- 
tries. These records naturally contain considerable information 
concerning the types of persons who are taken into custody by the 
police for various offenses. In response to numerous requests the 
bureau decided in the early part of this year to compile certain data 
concerning these individuals, believing that such information would 
prove of value to those interested in crime and criminals. So that the 
information would be confined to police records, fingerprint cards 
received from prisons and other law-enforcement agencies not directly 
connected with the police were excluded. The information tabulated, 
therefore, is based solely upon the records of those persons who were 
fingerprinted at the time of their arrest by police departments through- 
out the United States, The tabulations can not be taken as an indi- 
cation of the amount of crime committed, nor can they be interpreted 
as representing all arrests made by police departments throughout 
the country, because all persons arrested are not fingerprinted. The 
tables which follow represent the information compiled during the 
period from February to September, 1932, inclusive, concerning 207,- 
694 individuals whose fingerprints were forwarded to the United 
States Bureau of Investigation by police departments. 

The first table shows the number of fingerprint cards received with 
the per cent distribution by offense, using the uniform classification of 
offenses as the basis for the division. It will be noted that arrests 
for suspicion and investigation, disorderly conduct and vagrancy, 
and burglary constitute practically 49 per cent of the entire number of 
records received. The number of arrests for burglary and larceny, 
as reflected by the fingerprint cards received, forms a great portion 
of those taken into custody for major offenses. Arrests for offenses 
of felonious homicide constituted slightly less than 2 per cent of the 
whole number. 



Arrests, February 


1-Sept 


ember 30, 1932, inclusive 






Offenses 


Records 

re- 
ceived 


Per 

cent 
dis- 
tribu- 
tion 


Offenses 


Records 

re- 
ceived 


Per 
cent 
dis- 
tribu- 
tion 




4,029 
2,720 
11,393 
13, 610 
21,224 
26, 564 
7,462 
4,051 
7,330 
4,345 
5,296 

3.233 


1.9 
1.3 
5.5 
6.6 
10.2 
12.8 
3.6 
1.9 
3.5 
2.1 
2.5 

1.6 




1,884 
3,104 

11,494 
7,423 

21, 304 
1,228 
2,490 

32, 323 
4,139 

11,048 


0.9 






1.5 






5.5 


Assault 


Drunkenness 


3.6 


Burglary— breaking or entering.-.. 


Disorderly conduct and vagrancy. . 
Gambling 


10.3 
0.6 




Traffic and motor-vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 


1.2 


Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 


15.6 
2.0 


Carrying concealed weapons 




5.3 






Offenses against family and chil- 


207,694 


100.0 











The next table shows the number of persons arrested, according to 
oft'ense and age groups, as reflected by the fingerprint records examined. 

It will be noted that there were 32,287 persons taken into custody 
whose ages were less than 20 years. This number constitutes about 
16 per cent of the entire number of records received. There were 



13 

prints received for 49,048 persons whose ages range from 20 to 24 
years, inclusive. This number was 23.5 per cent of the entire num- 
ber of records examined. Of those taken into custody for robbery, 
about 21 per cent were less than 20 years of age, while 31.5 per cent 
of those fingerprinted for burglary had not yet reached 20. The 
number of persons under 20 arrested for auto theft was 3,066 or 
41 per cent of the total. Of those fingerprinted whose ages were less 
than 25, the greatest number for any particular year were the prints 
received for individuals aged 19 years, which was 10,926, or slightly 
more than 5 per cent of the entire number received. 

It should be borne in mind that the above figures do not relate to 
all fingerprint cards received by the United States Bureau of Investi- 
gation, but are confined to those records received from poHce depart- 
ments on individuals arrested by them. 

Arrests, February 1 through September 30, 1932, inclusive 



Felonious homicide - 

Rape— 

Robbery -... 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Carrying concealed weapons 

Sex offenses (except rape). 

Offenses against family and children 

Xarcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct and vagrancy.. 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Xot stated 

other offenses — 



Totals 

Per cent distribution. 



not 
known 



56 
96 

489 

168 
,684 
1,276 

752 
6 
40 

111 
81 
26 



154 
747 
314 
1,902 
1,811 
948 
115 
86 
176 
138 



944 
20 
96 
1,337 
136 
56: 



441 
1,841 
1,756 
839 
123 
128 
205 



19 
44 
227 
153 
1,1 
19 
12: 
1,508 
157 



543 519 712 3,459 6,774 9,897 10,926 9,390 10,219 10,426 9,634 9,379 
" .2 .3 1.7 3.3 4.8 5.3 4.5 4.9 5.0 4.6 4.5 



127 

195 

851 

392 

1,431 

1,512 

533 

159 

163 

213 

197 

70 

25 

54 

257 

141 

1,013 

24 

124 

1,258 

120 

531 



93 
376 
202 
1,187 
31 
161 
1,563 
170 
538 



551 

1,255 

1,444 

491 

181 

222 

223 

299 

112 

52 

109 

413 

216 

1,230 

47 

166 

1,56: 

181 

536 





Age— Continued 




25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50 and 
over 


Total 




857 

451 

2,456 

3; 486 

4,571 

1,072 

860 

1,295 

926 

1,125 

656 

359 

593 

2,219 

1,236 

4,057 

272 

543 

5,758 

782 

1,964 


646 

285 

1,307 

■ 2,297 

2,086 

3,311. 

529 

1,441 

634 

724 

620 

400 

608 

1,890 

1,241 

2,963 

235 

337 

4,511 

689 

1,460 


634 

194 

666 

1,778 

1,239 

2,300 

268 

549 

1,170 

449 

543 

527 

350 

510 

1,672 

1,140 

2,079 

208 

246 

3,371 

502 

1,185 


360 
144 
327 

1,268 
709 

1,468 
139 
326 
842 
298 
413 
359 
199 
378 

1,257 
882 

1,363 
107 
138 

2,415 
363 


226 
101 
156 
836 
446 
991 
60 
220 
547 
205 
247 
206 
125 
228 
928 
657 
961 
66 
77 
1,749 
193 


331 
186 
118 

1,007 
403 

1,138 
29 
219 
679 
227 
427 
229 
156 
213 

1,157 
871 

1,302 
76 
92 

2,935 
286 
640 


4,029 
2 720 


Rape 










Burglary — breaking or entering. 


21 224 


Larceny — theft.. 


26,564 
7,462 
4,051 
7,330 




Forgery and counterfeiting 


Embezzlement and fraud 






5,296 
3,233 
1,884 
3,104 
11 494 


Offenses against family and children 


Narcotic drug laws 




Liquor laws 


Drunkenness... 


7; 423 
21,304 

1,22s 

2,490 
32, 323 

4,139 
11,048 




Gambling. 


Traffic and motor vehicle laws 




-Vot stated . 






S37 1 ..„ 


Totals 


38, 346 
18.5 


28,883 
13.9 


21, 480 
10.4 


14, 592 
7.0 


9,794 
4.7 


12, 721 
6.1 


207, 694 
100.0 







14 

The following table shows the percentage of those having previous 
police records in the files of the United States Bureau of Investigation 
at Washington. The table is based on the number of prints received 
from February to September, 1932, inclusive, showing arrests by 
police officers. 

The percentages do not necessarily mean that the records con- 
stituted convictions, but merely signify that the person has been 
taken into custody on some previous occasion and a record of the 
arrest submitted to Washington. At the same time a great majority 
of the records showed convictions. 

It will be noted that the percentage of repeaters for arrests for 
violations of the narcotic drug laws was 54.8, the highest percentage of 
any of the groups of offenses. Forgery and counterfeiting also 
showed a considerably high average of persons having previous 
records. Robbery, disorderly conduct and vagrancy, and embezzle- 
ment and fraud showed about the same percentages. Felonious 
homicide and rape had the comparatively low percentage of 21 and 
20.5, respectively, for persons having previous records. 

Arrests, February 1-September SO, 1932, inclusive 

PERCENTAGE PREVIOUS RECORDS 

Narcotic drug laws 54. 8 

Forgery and counterfeiting 42. 

Robbery 38.8 

Disorderly conduct and vagrancy 38. 6 

Embezzlement and fraud 38. 2 

Drunkenness 36. 

Burglary — breaking or entering 35. 

Larceny — theft 32. 8 

Auto theft 32. 1 

Suspicion and investigation 30. 5 

Other offenses 28. 9 

Carrying concealed weapons 27. 3 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 27. 

Assault 24. 9 

Sex offenses (except rape) 24. 1 

Offenses against family and children 23. 3 

Gambling 22. 5 

Liquor laws 2L 9 

Felonious homicide 2L 

Rape 20. 5 

Driving while intoxicated 20. 1 

o 



n 



3 J" 5 , 6 a 



UNIFORM 
CRIIVJE REPORTS 

FOR TTIE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume III - Number 4 
FOURTH QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1932 



Issued by the 

United States Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFHCE 

WASHINGTON : 1933 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(II) 



''rtB 28 aiJ3* 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, United States Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D. C. 

Volume 3 January, 1933 Number 4 



Contents of Fourth Quarterly Bulletin. 

Extent of reporting area. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1932. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-32. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to geographic location. 

Offenses of burglary and robbery, 1930-1932. 

Statistical data from fingerprint cards. 

The term "Offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as Part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police tlirough reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecut- 
ing or court officials or otherwise. They are confined to the following 
group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police: Felonious 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and 
(6) manslaughter by negUgence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary-breaking or entering; larceny- theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are reported 
as aggravated assaults. In other w^ords, an attempted burglary or 
robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" includes, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities 
the United States Bureau of Investigation does not vouch for its 
accuracy. It is given out as current information, which may throw 
some Ught on problems of crime and criminal law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete or 
otherwise defective were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area. 

The following table shows the number of cities from which returns 
were received for any one month during 1932. The number of cities 
contributing is shown according to the size of the city. The popula- 
tion represented by the contributing cities is likewise shown. The 
population figures for cities having over 10,000 people were obtained 
from the Bureau of the Census as estimated July 1, 1931. Similar 
estimates were not available for cities under 10,000, and the figures 
for them were taken from the 1930 census. 

(1) 



During 1930 there were 1,127 cities from which returns were received 
for any one month, representing a total population of 45,929,965 and 
during 1931 there were 1,511 cities which contributed one or more 
reports, representing a population of 51,145,734. During 1932 there 
were 1,578 cities in the United States from which one or more returns 
were received, representing a population of 53,212,230. In addition 
thereto, returns were received from sheriffs, State police, and officers 
in the possessions, but such returns were not included in the above 
figures. 

During 1932 returns were received from 82 per cent of the cities 
over 10,000 in population, and these cities represented 82 per cent of 
the population of all cities over 10,000. In the group of cities over 
250,000 in population only New York City and Atlanta, Ga., did 
not contribute returns during 1932; and of cities having a population 
between 100,000 and 250,000 only Reading, Pa., and Tulsa, Okla., did 
not contribute returns. 



Population groups 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Per cent 


Number 


Per cent 




983 


803 


82 


59, 714, 687 


48, 793, 587 


82 






A Cities over 250 000 


37 
57 
103 
185 
601 


35 
55 
96 
166 
451 


95 
96 
93 
90 

75 


29, 435, 800 
7, 787, 612 
6, 852, 807 
6, 445, 336 
9, 193, 132 


22, 067, 900 
7, 530, 212 
6,353,911 
5, 830, 013 
7, Oil, 551 


75 


B. Cities 100,000 to 250,000 


97 


C. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


93 


D Cities 25 000 to 50 000 


90 











The above table does not include 775 cities and rural townships, aggregating a total population of 4,418,643. 
The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural 
townships are of varying population i 



Number of Cities Reporting. 

The following table shows the number of current returns received 
each month during 1932. The table shows a steady increase from 
1,381 in January to 1,459 in December. For December, 1930, 1,002 
current returns were received and for December, 1931, 1,352 such 
returns were submitted. The figure for December, 1932, shows that 
a steady growth has been maintained in the number of current returns 
received. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


\labama 


5 
4 
4 
107 
15 
29 
2 
1 
25 
13 
^3 

34 
24 
25 
13 

14 
5 

84 
99 


5 

4 

4 

106 

14 

28 

2 

1 

25 

15 

3 

71 

3S 

24 

27 

13 

6 

14 

5 

83 

106 


5 

5 

4 

106 

15 

30 

2 

1 

25 

14 

3 

71 

37 

24 

27 

13 

8 

14 

5 

87 

113 


5 
4 
4 
109 
15 
30 
2 
1 
26 
14 
3 
71 
37 
25 

11 

8 
15 

6 
86 
113 


5 
4 
4 
109 
15 
30 
2 
1 
25 
14 
2 
72 
37 

i 

13 
8 

15 

5 

86 

117 


6 

5 

4 

110 

15 

30 

2 

1 

26 

14 

2 

72 

38 

25 

26 

13 

8 

15 

5 

87 

121 


5 

4 
110 
14 
30 

2 

1 
26 
14 

2 
72 
37 
25 
27 
13 

8 
15 

5 
86 
120 


6 
5 
4 
111 
15 
31 

i 

26 
14 

1 
71 
38 
25 
26 
13 

9 
15 

5 
86 
120 


5 

5 

4 

110 

15 

30 

2 

1 

27 

14 

2 

72 

40 

25 

25 

13 

9 

15 

5 

86 

122 


5 

4 
111 
15 
30 

2 

1 
26 
14 

2 
69 
38 
25 
27 
13 

8 
15 

5 
86 
121 


7 
5 
4 
112 
14 
29 

27 
14 
2 

37 

25 
27 
12 

9 
15 

5 
86 
122 


6 




5 




3 


California 


109 




13 


Connecticut - - - 


30 


Delaware 


2 


District of Columbia 

Florida 


1 
27 


Georgia 


14 


Idaho 


1 




70 


Indiana 


39 




25 




27 


Kentucky 


13 


Louisiana 


8 




15 


Maryland .. . . 


5 


Massachusetts 


86 


Michigan 


122 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




36 

4 
22 

14 

2 

8 

127 

1 

133 

19 

8 

104 

30 

15 

99 

5 

8 

38 
5 
10 
23 

17 
11 
30 
3 


35 
4 

22 
6 

15 

6 
129 
2 
136 
17 
7 
104 
29 
14 

11 
5 
9 

39 
8 
11 
24 
16 
13 
32 
2 


35 
3 
21 

14 
3 
8 
131 
1 
134 
18 
7 
100 
29 
14 
85 
11 
4 
9 
8 

38 
5 
10 
21 
17 
14 
34 
3 


39 
4 
21 

16 
3 
8 
131 
1 
136 
19 
6 
101 
25 
13 
102 
11 
4 
9 
8 
38 
10 
10 
24 
17 
12 
35 
3 


40 
3 
21 

16 
3 
8 
130 
2 
136 
19 
7 
98 
25 
14 
108 
11 
5 
9 
8 
35 
8 
9 
23 
17 
14 
36 
3 


40 
4 
22 

16 
3 
8 
130 
2 
136 
20 
7 
94 
26 
13 
107 
11 
3 
9 
8 
37 
7 
9 
24 
17 
13 
36 
3 


4 

22 
8 
16 
3 
8 
131 
2 
137 
20 
7 
97 
29 
14 
105 
11 
2 
9 
9 
37 
9 
9 
23 
16 
13 
35 
3 


38 
4 

22 
8 

16 

J 

2 
136 
19 

7 
98 
28 
14 
109 

2 
9 
8 
36 
8 
10 
24 
16 
14 
33 
3 


4 
22 

8 

15 

3 

8 

129 

2 

136 

20 

7 

102 

28 

14 

112 

2 
9 
8 
37 
8 
9 
23 
16 
16 
33 
3 


4 

22 
7 
16 
3 
8 
131 

136 
20 

7 
101 
27 

14 

11 
4 
9 
8 

33 
9 
11 
23 
16 
16 
35 
2 


4 
22 

16 
3 
8 
131 
2 
137 
20 

103 
27 
13 
117 
11 
4 
9 
8 
34 
8 
11 
22 
16 
15 
35 
2 


40 


Mississippi 


5 




22 


Alontana . 


8 


Nebraska 


16 


Nevada --- 


3 




8 


New Jersey - 


132 


New Mexico 


2 


New York 


137 




18 


North Dakota 


7 


Ohio 


103 




28 


Oregon 


13 




119 


Rhode Island 


11 


South Carolina 


5 




9 




9 


Texas 


33 


Utah 


7 




11 


Virginia 


22 


Washington. 


16 
16 


Wisconsin... 


35 
3 






Total number con- 
tributing 


1,381 


1,385 


1,393 


1,424 


1,428 


1,437 


1,440 


1,442 


1,450 


1,454 


1, 456 


1,459 



Offenses Known to the Police, Number and Rates, by Population Groups. 

In Table 1 are shown the number of offenses and rates per 100,000 
for 1932, the figures being given for six groups of cities, the subdivision 
being on the basis of population. 

On the whole, it appears from the table that the crime rates are 
higher in the larger cities than in the smaller ones. This is particu- 
larly noticeable in the case of manslaughter by negligence, robbery, 
and auto theft. 

As to murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, the rate varies gen- 
erally with the size of the city, the exception being that the rate for 
cities between 25,000 and 50,000 in population is lower than the rates 
for the two smaller groups of cities. The rate for cities in the first 
group is 12 per cent higher than the rate for cities in the next largest 
group and is 77 per cent higher than the rate for cities in the smaUest 
population group. 

Cities of over 250,000 population have a much higher rate for 
manslaughter by negligence than any of the other groups of cities, 
it being 74 per cent higher than the rate for cities between 100,000 
and 250,000 and 144 per cent higher than the rate for cities having a 
population between 25,000 and 50,000. All cities under 100,000 have 
approximately the same rate for this offense with the exception of 
cities having a population between 25,000 and 50,000. The rate for 
the latter group is 2.5. 

As to the offense of rape, the highest rate (7.2) is for the first group 
of cities, and the second highest rate is for cities in the smallest popu- 
lation group. The low^est rate (4.8) is for cities having a population 
of 100,000 to 250,000 and those having a population of 25,000 to 
50,000. The highest rate is 50 per cent greater than the lowest rate. 

The rates for robbery are, without exception, higher for the large 
cities than for the smaller cities. The rate for cities in the first group 
is 117 per cent higher than the rate for cities in the second group 
and 333 per cent higher than for cities under 10,000 in population. 



The highest crime rate for aggravated assault (57.8) is found in 
the third group of cities and it is 113 per cent higher than the lowest 
rate, which is for cities having a population under 10,000. 

The burglary rate for cities in the second group (460) is 5.7 per cent 
higher than the rate for cities in the first group and is 70 per cent 
higher than the lowest rate, which is for cities having a population 
between 10,000 and 25,000. 

For the offense of larceny the highest rate is found in the second 
group of cities, the rate (SOi.O) being 11 per cent higher than the rate 
for cities in the third group, 17 per cent higher than the rate for cities 
in the first group, and 83 per cent higher than the rate for cities in the 
sixth group. 

For the offense of auto theft the rates vary without exception 
with the size of the city as is also true for the offense of robbery. The 
rate for the first group (497.0) is highest and is 24 per cent greater 
than the rate for the second group and 324 per cent greater than the 
rate for cities in the sixth group. 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to December, inclns 
number and rates per 100,000 by population groups 



1932; 





Felonious liomicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

Ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 

glence 


Auto 
theft 


31 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 20,043,400: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000 


'8.5 

502 
7.6 

352 
6.2 

226 
4.3 

301 
5.4 

151 

4.8 


1,224 
6.1 

229 
3.5 

173 
3.0 

131 
2.5 

159 
2.9 

99 
3.1 


1,440 
7.2 

318 
4.8 

294 
5.1 

252 
4.8 

305 
5.5 

197 
6.2 


34,628 
172.8 

5, 252 
79.5 

4,345 

75.9 

3,170 
60.6 

2,407 
43.3 

1,265 
39.9 


10,212 
50.9 

3,097 
46.9 

3.304 

57.8 

1,845 
35.3 

1,952 
35.1 

860 

27.1 


87, 248 
435.3 

30, 398 
460.0 

20,656 
361.1 

17, 456 
333.7 

15, 074 
270.9 

8,740 
275.8 


147,839 
737.6 

56, 900 
861.0 

44,296 
774.3 

36, 425 
696.3 

30,955 
556.3 

14,912 
470.6 


99, 621 
497.0 


48 cities, 100,000 to 250,66o'; total 
population, 6,608,912: 

Number of offenses known .__ 


26.52» 
401.4 


85 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 5,720,988: 
Number of offenses known. _. 


17,906 
313.0 


149 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 5,231,009: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000 


13, 843 
264.6 


358 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 5,564,198: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 


9,492 
170.6 


535 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 3,168,846: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000 


3,712 
117.1 






Total, 1,206 cities; total 
population, 46,337,353: 
Number of offenses 


3,230 
7.0 


2,015 
4.3 


2,806 
6.1 


51, 067 
110.2 


21, 270 
45.9 


179, 572 
387.5 


331, 327 
715.0 


171,103 


Rate per 100,000 


369.1 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1932. 

In Table 2 is shown the daily average of offenses known for each 
of the 12 months of 1932 for 1,206 miscellaneous cities. The total 
population represented by these cities is 46,337,353. 

For the offense of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter the daily 
average is higher during the second quarter than during the first 



quarter of the year and continues to rise during the third quarter. 
The highest daily average during the year is 10.9 for the month of 
July and the lowest is 7.6 for October. The Jul}'- figure is 28 per cent 
higher than that for January and 43 per cent above the October 
figure. The daily average for December (9.3) is 9 per cent higher 
than that for Januar}'-. 

The table shows that the daily average for manslaughter by negli- 
gence is higher during the fu-st and fourth quarters than it was during 
the second and third quarters of the year. The lowest daily average 
(4.2) is for July and the highest daily average (6.5) occurs during 
February and November. This figure is 55 per cent higher than the 
July average. 

Variations in the daily average for rape are rather irregular. How- 
ever, the third quarter of the year shows a higher average than any of 
the other quarters. The daily average for September (8.7) is 40 per 
cent higher than the daily average for the month of December. 

Starting with the figure for January, the average for the offense of 
robbery shows a regular downward trend to a low point of 113.2 for 
June and thereafter shows a regular upward trend to a high point of 
183.4 for December. The January figure is 52 per cent higher and 
the December figure is 62 per cent higher than the average for June. 

The trend of the daily averages for aggravated assault is similar to 
that for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, the highest average 
occurring in July. This similarity is interesting, because aggravated 
assaults are those which threaten serious bodily harm and the classi- 
fication includes attempted murders. The average for July is 38 per 
cent above the figure for January. 

The averages for burglary show a seasonal trend similar to that 
shown by the averages for robbery. However, the downward trend 
of the burglary averages during the first six months and the upward 
trend during the last six months of the year are not as regular as was 
the case in connection with the offense of robbery. The robbery 
figure for December is higher than the figure for January, whereas 
for burglary the opposite is true. The January daily average for 
burglary (522.1) is 12 per cent higher than the average for June. 

The larceny-theft daily average shows a decrease during the first 
quarter to the lowest average for the year (822.8), which occurs in 
the month of March. The second quarter show^s an increase over 
the first quarter and there is an additional increase in the third and 
fourth quarters. The highest daily average (1,017.8) occurs in Novem- 
ber, and it is 24 per cent greater than the daily average for March. 

The daily averages for auto theft show a decrease from January 
through March but show a sharp increase to the high point of the 
year for April (514.6). This high daily average is followed by a 
substantial decrease to 442.5 for July. The averages for the fourth 
quarter are on the w^hole above those for the third quarter, although 
the average for December is the lowest for the year. The average for 
April (514.6) is 17 per cent higher than that for December (438.8). 



Table 2. — Daily average offenses known to the police, January to December, 
inclusive, 1932; 1,206 miscellaneous cities 

[Total population, 46,337,353] 





Felonious homicide 


Raiie 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




8.5 
8.4 
8.2 
9.0 
8.3 
9.0 
10.9 
9.4 
8.3 
7.6 
9.0 
9.3 


6.0 
6.5 
5.1 
5.2 
5.2 
4.8 
4.2 
4.6 
5.4 
6.2 
6.5 
6.4 


7.5 
7.9 
7.6 
7.7 
7.5 
8.0 
7.4 
8.6 
8.7 
7.8 
7.2 
6.2 


172.2 
150.4 
138.4 
129.0 
120.1 
113.2 
118.7 
119.5 
128.1 
145.9 
155.2 
183.4 


49.5 
63.8 
49.4 
59.9 
61.5 
62.4 

63! 7 
62.5 
57.2 
54.8 
54.6 


522.1 
507.0 
481.1 
495.3 
467.3 
464.1 
481.2 
487.8 
491.2 
481.0 
509.2 
501.3 


866.1 
842.8 
822.8 
886.9 
859.3 
864.2 
864.8 
914.3 
946.4 
1,015.0 
1,017.8 
961.9 




February 


469 6 






April 




May 


471 6 






July 




August . . 


457 8 










November . . 


481 2 











Daily Averages, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-32. 

Table 3 shows the daily average of offenses known to the police for 
70 cities over 100,000 in population. For purposes of comparison 
the number of offenses and the daily average are shown for the years 
1931 and 1932. 

The table shows that there have been the following substantial 
decreases in the rates for 1932 as compared with those for 1931: 

Per cent 

Manslaughter by negligence 18. 9 

Aggravated assault 10. 8 

Auto theft 15. 7 

The only substantial increase shown is in the daily average for 
burglary, which is 9.9 per cent higher in 1932 than it was in 1931. 
The other offenses in which an increase is shown are as follows: 

Per cent 

Murder 2. 6 

Rape 3. 1 

Larceny 1 1. 2 

The daily average for robbery shows a decrease of 3.7 per cent. 



Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 70 cities over 100,000, 
January to December, inclusive, 1931-32 





[Total population, 18,856,802] 












Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of oflenses known, 1931.. 
Number of oflenses known, 1932.. 
Daily average, 1931 


L437 

1,477 

3.9 

4.0 


1,362 

1,090 

3.7 

3.0 


1,156 

1,223 

3.2 

3.3 


18, 714 

18, 100 

51.3 

49.5 


9,777 
8.752 
26.8 
23.9 


67.003 
73, 845 
183.6 
201.8 


148, 333 

150, 472 

406.4 

411.1 


85,605 
72, 325 

234 5 




197.6 







Rates of Offenses by Geographic Divisions. 

In Tables 4 to 12 there are shown the rates per 100,000 for each 
month of the year, the cities being divided into groups according to 
their geographic location. The tables are designed to show the 
variation in crime rates from month to month during the year and 
the difference in such variations among the different geographic 
subdivisions of the country. The size of the crime rate for one geo- 
graphic division should not be compared with that of another, since in 
each geographic division there are included cities of all population 
groups and the major portion of the population of one geographic 
division may consist of large cities, whereas the major portion of 
another geographic division may include principally the smaller cities. 
As was pointed out in connection with Table 1, the crime rate is on 
the whole higher for large cities than for small cities. 

For the offense of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter the 
monthly variations in the crime rates differ among the various 
geographic subdivisions. In several, the highest rate is found for 
the month of July. This is to be expected, since the highest daily 
average as shown in Table 2 occurs in the month of July. However, 
for the New England States the highest crune rate for murder occurs 
in January and December, and it is approximately 400 per cent 
greater than the lowest monthly rate which occurs in April and 
November. In connection with Table 2 it was observed that the 
highest daily average for the 1,206 cities represented therein was 
only 43 per cent above the lowest daily average. This indicates that 
among the geographic divisions there will be found greater monthly 
variations in the crime rates. This should be expected, since the 
number of cities and the population represented for each group in 
Tables 4 to 12 are considerably smaller than in Table 2. 

Throughout all the offense classifications it will be observed that 
the variations in the monthly crime rates differ from one geographic 
division to another, as was seen in the case of murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter. 

An examination of Table 2 disclosed that for the offense of robbery 
the daily average decreased regularly during the first six months of 
1932 and increased regularly during the last six months of the year. 
This general trend is noticeable in the tables showing the monthly 
crime rates for the cities according to geographic location but the 
variation is not so regular. 

In general, the variation in the monthly rates for burglary among 
the several geographic subdivisions shows a similarity to the varia- 
tions in the daily averages for this offense as shown in Table 2. 
However, there are some exceptions, notably in the West North 
Central States, where the highest monthly crime rate occurs in July^ 
although for the 1,206 cities the July daily average is comparatively 
low. The Mountain States likewise show the highest crime rate for 
July, with the second and third quarters having rates considerably 
higher than occurred during the first and fourth quarters. 

The variations in the monthly rates for larceny-theft in the several 
geographic groups follow in a general way the variation in the daily 
averages for the total of 1,206 cities as shown in Table 2. The same 
is true with regard to the offense of auto theft, with the exception that 
the monthly rates for the Mountain States are considerably higher 



8 

for the first six months than they are for the second half of the year. 
The grouping of the various States according to geographic location 
is identical with that employed by the United States Bureau of the 
Census in the decennial census of 1930. 



Table 4. — Rate per 100,000 offenses known to the police, 1932 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 
[142 cities, representing a population of 5,222,055] 



January... 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October.. - 
November 
December. 



Felonious homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



0.21 
.15 
.17 
.19 
.29 
.29 
.42 
.25 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



2.76 
2.81 
3.06 
2.95 
1.97 
1.86 
1.84 

l!97 
2.70 
2.05 
2.51 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1.44 
1.32 
1.70 
1.61 
1.55 
1.09 
1.59 
1.59 
1.61 
1.61 
1.53 
1.51 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



27.15 
22.18 
24.22 
21.91 
22.19 
23.06 
2122 
22.50 
22.27 
23.99 
26.33 
27.15 



40.08 
3155 
40.83 
45.48 
45.67 
46.25 
49.54 
48.64 
46.25 
55.09 
50.34 
49.83 



Auto 
theft 



25.18 
19.57 
23.73 
25.83 
23.11 
20.95 
19.15 
18.61 
21.45 
27.19 
26.23 
23.78 



Table 5. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1932 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

[304 cities, representing a population of 9,561,842] 





Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




0.40 
.37 
.36 
.29 

140 
.48 
.33 
.31 
.38 
.43 
.35 


0.84 
.78 
.72 
.74 
.67 
.59 
.46 
.61 
.71 
.82 
.82 
.76 


0.49 
.52 
.58 
.59 
.47 
.60 
.55 
.55 
.56 
.58 
.47 
.47 


178 
131 
3.73 
2.97 
2.60 
3.15 
3.20 
2.60 
2.95 
3. .57 
164 
5.02 


2.84 
2.89 
2.61 
3.26 
3.23 
3.48 
3.56 
3.29 
3.06 
2.89 
2.83 
2.82 


18.53 
15.94 
17.02 
16.59 
16.50 
16.71 
17.59 
16.69 
16.59 
16.97 
17.73 
16.79 


2193 
22.18 
22.27 
25.06 
27.26 
28.75 
28.20 
30.03 
29.36 
32.49 
30.53 
27.61 


1184 


February ' 


1101 


March 


1130 


April 


16.38 


May 


15.40 


Junp 


13.22 


July 


11.85 




10.87 


September 


12.33 


October 


16.51 




15.36 




1147 







Table 6. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1932 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[309 cities, representing a population of 13,117,803] 





Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




0.50 
.45 
.46 
.55 
.34 
.45 
.56 
.73 
.47 
.43 
.47 
.60 


0.27 
.32 
.21 
.19 
.18 
.23 
.18 
.21 
.22 
.27 
.27 
.27 


0.53 
.46 
.43 
.48 
.50 
.67 
.48 
.58 
.69 
.75 
.48 
.41 


18.04 
1122 
14.84 
13.59 
13.64 
11.69 
13.39 
13.43 
14.72 
17.34 
17.57 
20.02 


3.21 
3.32 
3.77 
4.14 
3.84 
4.63 
4.12 
4.28 
3.80 
3.51 
3.34 


36.61 
32.06 
33.37 
33.61 
32.97 
29.74 
30.81 
33.07 
32.48 
31.95 
32.73 
32.15 


56.53 
51.50 
53.73 
58.75 
59.68 
59.26 
58.65 
63.68 
65.58 
73.53 
65.26 
63.75 


38.35 




33.45 


March " 


34.46 


April 


41.33 


May 


38.65 


June - - - - 


35.29 


July 


36.80 




40.37 




36.74 


October 


38.96 


November 


34.75 




30.78 







Table 7. — Rate per 100,000 offenses known to the police, 1932 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[121 cities, representing a population of 4,269,236] 





Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negh- 

gence 


Auto 
theft 




0.35 
.59 
.56 
.56 
.54 
.47 
.87 
.47 
.42 
.47 
.61 
.66 


0.14 
.09 
.12 
.05 
.05 
.07 
.05 
.12 
.14 
.14 
.07 
.21 


0.33 
.21 
.59 
.42 
.37 
.26 
.35 
.30 
.54 
.37 
.33 
.40 


12.39 
10.21 
9.53 
8.71 
8.53 
6.91 
8.36 
7.59 
7.66 
8.15 
9.67 
12.95 


L85 
L92 
L43 
2.46 
L92 
2.01 
2.69 
2.08 
L87 
1.92 
2.06 
L85 


22.14 
23.63 
25.11 
27.10 
29.94 
26.75 
30.26 
29.16 
28.15 
29.23 
30.01 
29.94 


50.78 
48.74 
5L02 
58.18 
57.18 
52.44 
56.66 
59.05 
63.78 
65.63 
64.09 
56.38 


3L13 


February 


35.44 


March 


32.35 


April— 


36.96 


May . . 


33.80 


June 


31.81 


July — 


3L41 




32.37 


September 


35.37 




36.12 


November . . 


33.33 


December 


29 54 







Table 8. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1932 

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 
[82 cities, representing a population of 3,621,466] 





Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ttk: 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
hgent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Jan'iary 


1.41 
1.16 
1.44 
1.27 
1.30 
1.16 
1.66 
1.30 
1.08 
1.16 
1.19 
L19 


0.47 
.39 
.58 
.36 
.33 
.41 
.44 
.33 
.47 
.47 
.44 
.41 


0.41 
.86 
.22 
.50 
.58 
.39 
.50 
.52 
.41 
.47 
.22 
.30 


10.24 
7.81 
6.63 
7.40 

5^14 
6.65 
6.30 
6.32 
7.46 
8.48 
10.27 


8.20 
8.34 
7.62 
7.62 

10.05 
9.50 

11.10 

10.44 
9.75 

10.16 
8.45 

10.30 


40.76 
38.71 
36.01 
36.73 
34.63 
33.33 
33.61 
36.50 
39.87 
28.36 
41.50 
42.52 


77.29 
68.78 
70.80 
68.29 
63.15 
63.01 
65.42 
72.51 
71.79 
82.04 
84.61 
81.18 


39 21 




36.17 


March 


35.43 


April 


36 28 


^i^:::::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


33.05 


June. 


29.57 


July 


31 15 




34.88 


September.. 


33.11 


October 


40 18 




39.93 




35.21 







10 



Table 9. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1932 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 

[26 cities, representing a population of 1,601,502] 



Felonious homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



January.. - 
February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

-August 

September, 
October... 
November. 
December. 



1.75 
1.94 
2.06 
2.12 
1.81 
2.25 
2.00 
1.87 
2.31 
1.37 
1.75 
2.06 



1.00 
.56 
.50 
.44 



0.19 
.06 
..37 
.31 
.06 
.31 
.25 
.37 
.50 
.12 
.06 
.37 



12.61 
14.42 
12. 93 
10.86 
8. ,30 
10.49 
9.30 
9.74 
9.80 
13.49 
16.17 
19.17 



11.18 
12.55 
10.62 
15.61 
14.11 
1.5. 92 
15.42 
15.49 
14.61 
13.55 
12.36 
14.36 



58.20 
52.01 
49.45 
55.01 
52.01 
52.08 
52.70 
56.82 
57.51 
61.75 
60.26 
58.82 



Table 10. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1932 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[58 cities, representing a population of 2,783,450] 



Felonious homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 



Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 



January... 
February. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 
October... 
November 
December. 



1.15 
.93 
.79 
1.58 
1.72 
1.40 
1.90 
1.40 
1.54 
1.29 
1.44 
1.22 



0.18 
.54 
.25 
.32 
.57 
.25 
.25 
.40 
.29 
.32 
.29 



0.29 
.36 
.72 



4.67 

5! 25 
6.32 
6.32 
7.04 
7.29 



4^99 
4.56 



49.94 
44.94 
44.80 
46.09 
45.23 
41.39 
46.60 
46.92 
38.44 
42.32 
39.77 
45.99 



106. 34 
92.91 
84.86 
90.50 
82.42 
74.33 
87.27 
80.44 
80.51 
90.68 
105. 23 
113. 82 



Table 11. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1932 

MOUNTAIN STATES 
[34 cities, representing a population of 874,342] 





Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ingor 
enter- 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 

glence 


Auto 
theft 


January. 


0.57 
.46 
.80 
.46 
.69 
.23 
.34 
.80 
.11 
.67 
.91 
.34 


0.11 

'".^ 

.11 
.11 
.11 

<.,■" 

.11 


0.46 
.23 
.23 
.23 
.46 
.23 

(0 
.57 
.34 
.23 
.11 

(') 


16.36 
11.09 
12.70 
9.04 
10.87 
6.86 
9.61 
10.75 
10.87 
11.78 
12.24 
12.01 


1.72 
1.37 
1.14 
1.14 
2.40 

lieo 

1.49 
1.03 
1.14 
1.49 
2.40 


43.35 
48.84 
45.63 
52.38 
52.38 
53.63 
56.04 
53.98 
50.78 
49.75 
44.03 
39.23 


71.60 
75.49 
83.95 
84.75 
83.61 
76.51 
75.03 
89.67 
87.27 
97.56 
101. 79 
88.98 


42.32 


February 


4.3.00 


March 


34.54 


April 


40.49 


May 


43.12 




38.09 


July 


36.48 


.August 


33.86 


September 


36.48 




34.65 


November. 


39.69 


December 


30.19 







1 No offenses reported. 



11 

Table 12. — Rale per 100,000, offenses knoion to the police, 1932 

PACIFIC STATES 

[130 cities, representing a population of 5,285,857] 





Felonious homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


0.30 
.34 
.34 
.32 
.32 
.53 
.49 
.25 

;l§ 

.40 

.44 


0.34 
.30 
.23 
.28 
.26 
.15 
.11 
.15 
.17 
.26 
.23 
.28 


igi 

.61 
.81 
.62 
.61 
.66 
.57 
.53 
.91 
.61 


15.27 
11.63 
11.63 
9.48 
10.52 
9.46 
8.74 
10.61 
10.18 
10.88 
10.92 
14.51 


1.34 
1.63 
1.72 
1.70 
1.95 
1.51 
1.91 
1.61 
1.59 
1.89 
1.65 
1.44 


60.39 
55. 92 
52.86 
50.49 
48.09 
47.86 
52.65 
53.14 
63.88 
63.14 
61.59 
56.53 


103. 52 
96.67 
105. 32 
95.16 
98.91 
92.59 
96.81 
103. 98 
100.61 
107.76 
110. 52 
113. 15 


48.68 




40.96 


March 


45.33 


\pril 


44.02 


aCv::::::::: ::::::::::::::::: 


44.52 




39.41 


July 


43.99 


August 


43.68 




40.32 


October 


42.57 


November 


42.36 




47.31 







Offenses of Robbery and Burglary, 1930-1932. 

Table 13 shows the daily average offenses of robbery for each 
month for 689 cities over the 3-year period from 1930 to 1932. 
Similar figures are shown for these cities subdivided into those over 
100,000 in population and those under this figure. 

The table shows that the daily average for 1931 was 19 per cent 
above the average for 1930. The daily average for 1932 showed an 
increase over that for the preceding year, but since the increase was 
less than 1 per cent it is not significant. 

Of the 689 cities represented in the table, 65 were over 100,000 in 
population and represented a total population of 21,541,913. For 
this group of cities the increase of the daily averages for 1931 and 
1932 over the 1930 average was larger than in the case of all 689 
cities. However, it is seen that the daily average for the 624 cities 
under 100,000 in population shows but a slight increase from 1930 to 
1931, and that the average for 1932 is less than the average for 1930. 

For the total of 689 cities the figures for each year show a variation 
similar to that for the other years, the averages for the first and 
fourth quarters being higher than those for the second and third 
quarters. The same relationship exists among the figures for the 65 
cities over 100,000 and the 624 cities under 100,000 in population. 

During 1930, for the total of 689 cities the December high point of 
138.3 is 92 per cent above the lowest average which occurred in June; 
in 1931 the highest daily average is 76 per cent above the lowest daily 
average for any one month; and for 1932 the highest daily average 
occurring in December is 70 per cent above the June figure. 

As to the 65 cities over 100,000 in population, the highest daily 
average for 1930 is 92 per cent above the June figure; for 1931 the 
December figure is 80 per cent higher than the June average; and for 
1932 the December average is 74 per cent above that for the month 
of June. 

For the 624 cities under 100,000 in population, the December com- 
pilation for 1930 is 104 per cent above the May average for that year; 



12 

the January figure for 1931 is 73 per cent above the average for Jiuie; 
and for 1932 the December average is 56 per cent in excess of the 
June figure. 

It will be observed that the widest variation in the daily averages 
by months occurs in 1930 and that the fluctuation in 1932 was less 
than in 1931. Furthermore, although the 65 cities over 100,000 show 
an increase in the daily average for 1932 over that for 1931, the 624 
cities under 100,000 population showed a decrease in the 1932 average 
from both the 1930 and 1931 averages. 

Table 13. — Daily average, offenses of robbery known to the police, 1930-1932 



Month 


689 cities (population 
33,838,959) 


65 cities over 100,000 
(population 21,541,913; 


624 cities under 100,000 
(population 12,297,046) 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1930 


1931 


1932 




119.6 
111.1 
95.1 
79.3 
73.7 
72.2 
76.1 
86.1 
90.2 
98.0 
120.3 
138.3 


126.7 
134.4 
116.1 
107.2 
96.3 

96! 2 
103.8 
106.8 
113.3 
130.8 
157.6 


139.0 
122.7 
114.5 
109.2 
99.1 
89.8 
100.0 
100.5 
109.4 
120.9 
128.8 
153.1 


99.6 
91.4 
76.7 
62.3 
59.3 
56.8 
61.1 
66.2 
69.6 
76.0 
94.4 
108.8 


99.2 
110.7 
96.8 
90.8 
79.3 
73.5 
77.4 
82.9 
85.4 
92.0 
109.8 
132.2 


116.3 
101.4 
95.2 
90.6 
82.5 
74.5 
83.4 
84.9 
90.7 
101.7 
110.1 
129.3 


20.0 
19.7 
18.4 
17.0 
14.4 
15.3 
15.1 
19.9 
20.6 
22.1 
25.8 
29.4 


27.4 
23.6 
19.3 
16.4 
16.9 
15.8 
18.8 
21.0 
21.4 
21.3 
21.0 
25.3 




February 


21 2 


March 




April 


18 6 


May 


16 5 






July 


16 5 










October 


19 2 


November 


18 7 


December 


23.8 


January to December.. 


96.6 


114.8 


115.6 


76.8 


94.1 


96.8 


19.8 


20.7 


18.8 



In Table 14 the daily average of offenses of burglary is shown for 
each month of 1930, 1931, and 1932 for the same cities that are in- 
cluded in Table 13. The daily average for the year is also shown in 
each instance. 

For each of the three groups of cities the average for 1931 is higher 
than that for the preceding year, and the average for 1932 is higher 
than for 1931. It is interesting to note, however, that in each of the 
groups although the average for December, 1931, is greater than the 
average for December, 1930, the average for the corresponding month 
of 1932 is less than the figm-e for 1931, although it exceeds the figure 
for 1930. 

On the whole, the daily averages for the three groups of cities show a 
variation from month to month similar to that shown by the daily 
averages for robbery for the same group of cities, but the variations 
for bm-glary are less regular. 

The figures for burglary do not show so wide a variation for any one 
year as was shown by the robbery averages. For the total of 689 
cities the highest average for 1930 occurs in December and is 30 per 
cent greater than the average for June. Similar increases occiu" in the 
figures for 65 cities over 100,000 in population and 624 cities under 
100,000 in population. 

There appears approximately the same per cent of difference 
between the lowest and the highest daily averages for 1931 as occurred 
in 1932. However, dm-ing 1932 the variation between the daily 
average in the middle of the year and that occm-ring at the end of the 
year is considerably less. 



13 



Table 14. — Daihj average, offenses of burglary known to the police, 19S0-1932 



Month 


689 cities (population 
33,838,959) 


65 cities over 100,000 
(population 21,541,913) 


624 cities under 100,000 
(population 12,297,046) 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1930 


1931 


1932 




243.6 
277.9 
275. 
255.5 
250.0 
238. 6 
250.5 
257.7 
267. 6 
257. 3 

309:7 


307.2 
322.5 
323. 5 
308.8 
302.5 
307.2 
316.5 
339.3 
331.2 
335. 
375. 8 
395.5 


399.9 

363! 2 
376.9 
348.9 
339.6 
354.4 
363.1 
365.3 
364.2 
375. 9 
375.7 


170.8 
194.7 
193.0 
180.7 
173.8 
166.6 
173.1 
172.1 
176.8 
170.1 
199.2 
207.3 


207.3 
216. 6 
228.3 
216.8 
212.9 
215. 8 
218.5 
239.6 
234.2 
242.3 
264.6 
283.5 


279.9 
272.2 
257. 3 
265.7 
240.2 
234.7 
242.4 
250.0 
254. 7 
254.3 
262.4 
266.3 


72.8 
83.2 
81.9 
74.8 
76.2 
72.0 
77.4 
85.6 
90.8 
87.2 
98.8 
102.5 


99.9 
105.9 
95.3 
92.1 
89.6 
91.4 
98.0 
99.7 
97.0 
92.7 
111.2 
112.0 


120.0 




117.4 


March - 


105. 9 


Anril 


111.1 


M^:::::::::::::::::.- 


108.7 


June 


104.9 


July- 


112.0 




113.1 




110.5 


October 


109.9 




113. 5 


December.- 


109.4 


January to December-. 


265. 


330. 5 


368.0 


181.4 


231. 8 


256.6 


83.6 


98.7 


111.3 



DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

The identification division of the United States Bureau of Investiga- 
tion receives an average of 2,000 fingerprint records daily of individuals 
who have been arrested or committed to penal institutions in this and 
other countries. These records contain valuable information regard- 
ing the types of persons arrested for various offenses. Early in 1932 
the United States Bureau of Investigation began tabulating informa- 
tion as to the type of crime committed, the place and date of arrest, 
the place of birth, nationality, age, sex, race, and previous record of the 
person arrested. In order that the information would be confined to 
poUce records, fingerprint cards received from prisons and other law- 
enforcement agencies not directly connected with the police were 
excluded. The information tabulated is, therefore, based solely upon 
the records of those persons who were fingerprinted at the time of 
their arrest by police departments throughout the United States. 
The tabulations can not be taken as an indication of the amount 
of crime committed, nor can they be interpreted as representing all 
arrests made by poUce departments throughout the country, because 
all persons arrested are not fingerprinted. 

As shown in Table 15, during the 11-month period from February 
1 to December 31, 1932, fingerprint records representing 277,778 
arrests were examined. Of these, 42,700 (15.4 per cent) were in- 
stances where persons were arrested on suspicion or held for investiga- 
tion, while 28,004 (10.1 per cent) were arrests for disorderly conduct 
and vagrancy. Arrests for larceny number 37,052 (13.3 per cent) 
and for burglary the}^ numbered 28,366 (10.2 per cent). Arrests for 
these offenses accounted for 49 per cent of the total arrest records 
examined. The number of arrests for felonious homicide was 5,306 
(1.9 per cent). 

Arrests of males far exceeded the arrests of females, the latter 
numbering 20,551 or 7.4 per cent of the total. One out of 38 women 
arrested was charged with robbery, while 1 out of 17 men arrested 
was charged with that offense. A similar comparison for burglary, 
larceny, and \dolations of the narcotic drug laws gives the following 
results : 





Women 


Men 


Burglary 


1 out of 42 arrested 


1 out of 9 arrested. 








Narcotic drug laws 


1 out of 67 arrested 


1 out of 111 arrested. 









14 

Table 15. — Distribution of arrests 
[From February 1 through December 31, 1932] 



Offense charged 



Per cent distribution 



Total Male 



Felonious homicide- 



Robbery -. 

Assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Auto theft 

Forgery and counterfeiting... 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children. 

Narcotic drug laws.. 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct and vagrancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Offense not stated 

All other offenses 



4,844 
3,620 
15, 159 
16, 580 
27, 871 
33, 608 
9,771 
4,755 
9,226 
5,653 
4,595 
4,047 
2,335 
4,136 
12, 880 
9,416 
25, 538 
1,810 
3,355 
39,119 
4,686 
14,223 



462 



524 

1,567 
495 

3,444 
158 
414 
576 
155 

2,490 
181 



1,371 

694 

2,466 

53 

44 

3,581 

324 

1,145 



1.91 
1.30 
5.65 
6.53 

10.22 

13.34 
3.57 
1.86 
3.53 
2.09 
2.55 
1.52 
0.95 
1.52 
5.13 
3.64 

10.09 
0.67 
1.22 

15.38 
1.80 
5.53 



1.88 
1.41 
5.89 
6.45 
10.84 
13.06 
3.80 
1.85 
3.59 
2.20 
1.79 
1.57 
0.91 
1.61 
5.01 
3.66 
9.93 
0.70 
1.30 
15.20 
1.82 
5.53 



2.25 
0.00 
2.55 
7.62 
2.41 

16.76 
0.77 
2.01 
2.80 
0.75 

12.12 
0.88 
1.52 
0.46 
6.67 
3.38 

12.00 
0.26 
0.21 

17.43 
L58 
6.57 



Totals 277,778 



257, 227 



20, 551 



100.00 



100.00 



Table 16 shows the number of persons of individual age groups 
who were arrested for each of the offenses listed and Table 17 is the 
percentage distribution of the same arrest records. These tables 
show that youths aged 19 accounted for 14,518 (5.2 per cent) of the 
arrest records, the largest number contributed by any single age 
group. A total of 55,726 (20.1 per cent) were under 21 years of age. 
Persons aged between 21 and 24, inclusive, numbered 53,089 (19.1 
per cent), making a total of 108,815 (39.2 per cent) under 25 years 
of age. 

Table 16, — Arrests by age groups 

[From February 1 through December 31, 1932] 



Under 
15 



Felonious homicide 

Bape 

Robbery 

Assault.. 

Burglary 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud . . 

Weapons; carrying, posses- 
sing, etc - 

Sex offenses (except rape) . . 

Offenses against family and 
children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated . 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct and va- 
grancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle 
laws.. 

Suspicion and investiga- 
tion 

Offense not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



75 

125 

631 

237 

2,172 

1,743 

1,014 

88 

57 

138 
106 



1,01 
115 
495 



205 
1,023 

424 
2,640 
2,464 
1,243 

146 

123 

229 

194 

49 
19 
37 
171 
124 

1,228 



1,746 
170 

775 



158 

263 

1,264 

679 

2,430 

2,459 

1,087 

167 

167 

272 
255 



166 

259 

1,146 

531 

1,918 

2,055 



197 

267 

1,126 

679 

1,720 

2,024 

700 

209 

240 

295 



51 

214 

2,011 
208 

746 



195 

213 

1,169 

719 

1,683 

1,997 

630 

219 



314 
402 

137 
77 
150 
620 
273 

1,615 
70 



2,109 
230 
736 



235 

202 

1,002 

695 

1,509 

1,685 

495 

207 

339 

277 
406 



196 
174 
975 
805 
1,322 
1,636 
456 



146 
102 

173 
563 



1,944 
203 
657 



13, 57 



15 



Table 16. — Arrests by age groups — Continued 



50 and 
over 



Felonious homicide - - . 

Rape - 

Robbery- -.. 

Assault 

Burglary 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud- 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc-- 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws -.. 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct and vagrancy . . 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Offense not stated 

All other offenses - 

Total--- - 



1,111 

609 

3, 425 

3,747 

6!418 
1,434 
1,102 
1,724 
1,236 
1,480 
869 
491 



5,358 
392 

726 



858 

389 

1,816 

3,026 

2,854 

4, 628 

717 

851 

1,882 

850 

979 

818 

557 

826 

2,365 

1,702 

3,885 

358 

483 

5,i 

i 

2,( 



673 

364 

925 

2, 352 

1,670 

3,265 

362 

71 

1,588 

605 

706 

716 

488 

677 

2,051 

1,517 

2,751 

313 

345 



485 
193 
457 

'949 

2,134 

186 

424 

1,125 

403 

542 

468 

294 

502 

1,544 

1,207 

1,787 

172 

185 

3,243 

418 

1,176 



296 

148 

213 

1,117 



1,236 
114 
100 

2, 
226 
781 



458 

243 

178 

1,376 

535 

1, 

45 

290 

923 

292 

574 

288 

240 

313 

1,446 

1,206 

1,69 

11 

119 

3,714 

326 

927 



5,306 
3,620 

is! 147 
28, 366 
37, 052 
9,929 
5,169 
9,802 
5,808 
7,085 
4,228 
2,648 
4,230 
14,251 
10, 110 
28, 004 
1,863 
3,399 
42, 700 
5,010 
15, 368 



19, 582 



13,018 



16, ( 



277, 778 



Table 17. — Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups 
[From February 1 through December 31, 1932] 





Not 
known 


Under 
15 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


Felonious homicide 


0.26 


0.11 


0.19 


0.68 


1.41 


2.62 


2.98 


3.13 


3.71 


3.68 


4.43 


3.69 


Rape 


14 


.11 


19 


1 66 


3 45 


5,66 


7 '^7 


7,15 


7,38 


.5,88 


5. ,58 


4.81 


Robbery..- 


.20 


.13 


.29 


1.51 


4.02 


6.52 


8.06 


7. .31 


7.18 


7.45 


6.39 


6.22 


Assault - 


.21 


.06 


.07 


.60 


1.31 


2.34 


3.19 


2. 93 


3.74 


3.96 


3.83 


4.44 


Burglary 


.22 


.71 


86 


4 51 


7 66 


8 95 


H 57 


6 76 


6,06 


5 93 


5. 32 


4 66 


Larceny— theft 


.18 


.54 


.57 


2.89 


4.70 


6.65 


6.64 


5.55 


5.46 


.5.39 


4.55 


4.42 


Autotheft 


.13 


.54 


1.04 


5.79 


10.21 


12. 52 


10. 95 


7.43 


7. 05 


6.35 


4.99 


4.59 


Forgery and counterfeiting. 


.31 


.06 


.12 


.77 


L70 


2.81 


3. 04 


3.70 


4.04 


4.24 


4.00 


4.47 


Embezzlement and fraud- 


.10 


.02 


.03 


.20 


..58 


1.25 


1.70 


2.07 


2.45 


3.11 


3.46 


3.65 


Weapons; carrying, pos- 


























sessmg, etc 


.19 


.02 


.07 


.91 


2. 38 


3.94 


4.68 


4.84 


5. 08 


.5.41 


4.77 


4.84 


Sex offenses (except rape).. 


.11 


.06 


.11 


1.09 


L50 


2.74 


3.60 


3.87 


4.35 


5.67 


5.73 


5.S4 


Offenses agamst family 


























and children.— 


.17 


.14 


.26 


..^'i 


.66 


1.16 


1.70 


1.99 


2.63 


3.24 


2.98 


3. 45 


Narcotic drug laws 


.23 


.00 


.00 


.00 


.30 


.72 


1.13 


1.17 


1.89 


2.91 


3.17 


3.85 


Driving while intoxicated - 


.17 


.00 


.00 


.09 


.28 


.87 


1.28 


L82 


2.84 


3.55 


3.66 


4.09 


Liquor laws 


.22 


.01 


.06 


.15 


46 


1.20 


1.95 


2. 36 


3.16 


3. 65 


3.71 


3.95 


Drunkenness -. 


.43 


.01 


,05 


.?:\ 


.54 


1,23 


1.98 


2.06 


2,80 


2,70 


3.18 


3. .54 


Disorderly conduct and 


























vagrancy 

Gambling 


.30 


.08 


.13 


1.02 


2. .58 


4.39 


5. ,58 


4.79 


.5. 60 


,5.77 


.5.11 


4.99 


.21 


.05 


05 


.54 


1.29 


1,50 


1.45 


2,15 


2,74 


3.76 


4.40 


3.49 


Traffic and motor vehicle 


























laws....- 


.26 


.03 


.06 


.79 


1.91 


4.06 


5.12 


4.94 


6.30 


6.97 


6.21 


5.74 


Suspicion and investiga- 




tion 


.22 


.27 


.36 


1.01 


2.37 


4.09 


4.63 


3.96 


4.71 


4.94 


4.63 


4.55 


Offense not stated— 


.58 


.26 


.42 


1.22 


2.30 


3.39 


3.79 


2.75 


4.15 


4. ,59 


4. .57 


4.05 


All other offenses 


.26 


.42 


.49 


1.87 


3.22 


5.04 


5.60 


4.65 


4.85 


4.79 


4.29 


4.28 


Total 


.23 


.26 


.35 


1.70 


3.24 


4.76 


5.23 


4.53 


4.89 


5.04 


4.63 


4.55 



16 



Table 17. — Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups — Continued 





25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50 and 
over 


Total 


Felonious homicide 


20.94 
16.82 
21.84 
20.65 
16.55 
17.32 
14.44 
21.32 
17.59 
21.28 
20.89 
20.55 
18.54 
19.34 
19.32 
16.78 
19.13 
21.04 
21.36 
17.94 
19.48 
17.65 


16.17 
10.75 
11.58 
16.67 
10.06 
12.49 
7.22 
16.46 
19.20 
14.63 
13.82 
19.35 
21.03 
19.53 
16.60 
16.83 
13.87 
19.22 
14.21 
13.97 
16.79 
13.27 


12.68 
7.02 
5.90 
12.96 
5.89 
8.81 
3.65 
13.76 
16.20 
10.42 
9.96 
16.93 
18.43 
16.00 
14.38 
15.00 
9.82 
16.80 
10.15 
10.54 
!■:■. 30 
10.56 


9.10 
5.33 
2.91 
9.31 
3.35 
5.76 
1.87 
8.20 
11.48 
6.94 
7.65 
11.07 
11.10 
11.87 
10.82 
11.94 

9;23 
5.44 
7.59 
8.34 
7.65 


5.58 
4.09 
1.36 
6.16 
2.06 
3.75 
.78 
5.40 
7.48 
4.58 
4.81 
6.55 
6.46 
7.21 
7.85 
8.78 
4.41 
6.12 
2.94 
5.52 
4.51 
5.08 


8.64 
6.71 
1.13 

7.57 

4^33 
.45 
5.60 
9.43 
5.02 
8.10 
6.82 
9.07 
7.40 
10.15 
11.92 
6.05 
5.96 
3.51 
8.70 
6.51 
6.03 


100. 00 
100. 00 


Robbery . - 


100. 00 




100. 00 




100. 00 






Auto theft 


100 00 




100. 00 




100. 00 


Weapons' carrying, possessing, etc 


100 00 




100. 00 


Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 


100. 00 
100 00 




100. 00 


LiQuor laws 


100.00 




100 00 




100. 00 


Gambling - - 


100. 00 


Traffic and motor vehicle laws 


100 00 




100.00 


Offense not stated 


100.00 




100.00 






Total 


18.52 


13.93 


10.33 


7.04 


4.69 


6.08 


100.00 







Examination of Table 18 reveals that of each 100 persons arrested 
for the following offenses the number stated were persons under 21 
years of age: Auto theft, 48; burglary, 38; robbery, 28; and larceny, 

28. By reference to Table 17 it is seen that persons under 25 years 
of age constituted the following number of each 100 arrested for 
the following offenses: Auto theft, 71; burglary, 60; robbery, 55; 
larceny, 47; and felonious homicide, 27. Of each 100 arrested for 
felonious homicide, 21 were persons between the ages of 25 and 

29, inclusive. 

Table 18. — Number and percentage of arrests of persons under 21 years of age 
[From February 1 through December 31, 1932] 



Offense 


Total num- 
ber of 
persons 
arrested 


Niimber of 
persons 
arrested 
under 21 

years of age 


Percentage 
of persons 
arrested 
under 21 
years of age 




5,306 
3,620 
15,683 
18, 147 
28, 366 
37, 052 
9, 929 
6,169 
9,802 
6.808 
7, 085 
4,228 
2,648 
4,230 
14, 251 
10, 110 
28, 004 
1, 863 
3, 399 
42,700 
5,010 
15, 368 


.'•go 

923 

4, 366 

1,902 

10,786 

10, 203 

4,814 

630 

575 

978 

918 

265 

88 

184 

616 
5,198 

131 

575 
7,123 

708 
3,271 


11.12 




25.49 




27.84 


A'J'^ault - - - 


10.50 




38.02 




27.54 


Autotheft 


48.48 




12.20 




5.85 




16.84 




12.97 




6.26 




3.32 




4.34 




6.19 




6.10 


Disorderly conduct and vagrancy - - 


18.57 




7.03 




16.91 




16.69 




14.13 




21.29 








277, 778 


55,726 


20.06 







17 

Table 19 shows for each offense the percentage of those arrested 
who had a previous fingerprmt record in the files of the identification 
division of the United States Bureau of Investigation. The table 
shows that 55.1 per cent of those arrested for violations of narcotic 
drug laws had been previously arrested or convicted for some offense. 
Persons arrested for forgery and counterfeiting showed the second 
highest percentage of repeaters, 42.5 per cent, while the lowest per- 
centage of repeaters was 20.8 per cent for persons arrested for felonious 
homicide and driving while intoxicated. 

It should be kept in mind that the figures in the following table do 
not mean that the percentage listed had been previously convicted. 
They mean merely that in the percentage of instances indicated the 
persons arrested during the period from February 1 to December 31, 
1932, had at some previous time been fingerprinted and their prints 
forwarded to the identification division. 



Table 19. — Arrests, February 1 to December 31, 1932, inclusive 

PERCENTAGE— PREVIOUS RECORDS 



Offense charged 


Per cent 


Offense charged 


Percent 




55.1 
42.5 
39.7 

39:0 
36.4 
35.5 
33.4 
32.1 
31.7 
29.1 








Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Assault 
















Offenses against family and children 

Gambling 




Dnipl^pTiTiess 


22 9 














Autotheft - 


Felonious homicide 


20 8 








4.11 other offenses 











At the end of December, 1932, there were 3,340,261 criminal finger- 
print records on file in the United States Bureau of Investigation at 
Washington, D, C. The number of police departments, peace officers 
and law-enforcement agencies throughout the United States and for- 
eign countries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the bureau at 
the end of December totaled 5,282. During December, 1932, 355 
fugitives from justice were identified through fingerprint records and 
information as to the whereabouts of these fugitives was immediately 
transmitted to the law-enforcement official or agency desiring to ap- 
prehend these individuals. Of each 100 fingerprints received during 
December, more than 44 were identified with criminal data in the 
files of the bureau. The index cards on file at the bureau containing 
the names or aliases of individuals with criminal records totaled 
4,431,419 on December 31, 1932. 

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