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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 



FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



H 



Volume IV - Number 1 
FIRST QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1933 



Issued by the 

United States Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1933 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(n) 



U. S. SUPERINTENDl. 

MAY 15 1933 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, United States Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D.C. 

Volume 4 April 1933 Number 1 

Contents of First Quarterly Bulletin 

Extent of reporting area, 1933. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police, January to March, inclusive, 1933. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1933. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-33. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to geographic location, 
1933. 

Average number of police-department employees, 1932. 

Monthly trends for cities over 100,000 population, 1932. 
Annual returns: 

Offenses known and offenses cleared by arrest, 1932. 

Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1932. 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 1931-32. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1933: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous record. 

The term "offenses known to the pohce" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as Part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the pohce jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the poUce through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prose- 
cuting or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the follow- 
ing group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to 
be those most generally and completely reported to the police : crimi- 
nal homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and 
(b) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary-breaking or entering; larceny- theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are reported 
as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted burglary or 
robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" includes, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In pubhshing the data sent in by chiefs of poUce in different cities, 
the United States Bureau of Investigation does not vouch for its 
accuracy. It is given out as current information, which may throw 
some fight on problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compifing the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

(1) 



Extent of Reporting Area 

In the table which follows, any city which contributed a return for 
one or more months of the first quarter of 1933 is included. The 
number of cities contributing is shown, together with the population 
represented, the cities being divided according to size. The popula- 
tion figures for cities having 10,000 people or more were obtained 
from the Bureau of the Census as estimated July 1, 1932, while 
figures for cities having less than 10,000 were taken from the 1930 
census, due to the fact that similar estimates were not available for 
this group. 

A total of 1,561 cities contributed returns during the first 3 months 
of 1933, representing a population of 53,295,620. The number of 
cities filing returns thus far in 1933 shows an increase of 85 as com- 
pared with the same period of 1932. Returns were also received from 
sheriffs. State police, and officers in the possessions, but such returns 
are not included in the above figures. 

Of the 37 cities in the United States having a population over 
250,000 returns were received from 33, or 89 percent. The four cities 
of this group from which returns were not received are Atlanta, Ga. ; 
Louisville, Ky. ; Memphis, Tenn. ; and New York City. Memphis and 
Louisville, however, did contribute returns during 1932, but reports 
for this year have not yet been received. Of the cities within the 
population range of 100,000 to 250,000, all but three have contributed 
reports this year. The three cities not contributing are Des Moines, 
Iowa; Reading, Pa.; and Tampa, Fla. The city of Tampa was, how- 
ever, a regular contributor during 1932. It will be noted that the city 
of Tulsa, Okla., which has previously been listed as a noncontributor, 
is now forwarding crime statistics reports to the United States Bureau 
of Investigation. 



Population group 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


983 


813 


83 


60, 813, 881 


48, 999, 865 


81 






A. Cities over 250,000 


37 
57 
105 
192 
592 


33 
54 
93 
168 
465 


95 
89 
88 
79 


29, 955, 600 
7,908,112 
7, 092, 407 
6, 695, 136 
9, 162, 626 


21, 881, 800 
7,542,112 
6, 376, 075 
5, 892, 400 
7, 307, 478 


73 


B. Cities 100,000 to 250,000 


95 


C. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


90 


D. Cities 25,000 to 50,000 




E Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


80 







The above table does not include 748 cities and rural townships aggregating a 
total population of 4,295,755. The cities included in this figure are those of less 
than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural townships are of varying 
population groups. 



Number of Cities Reporting 

The following table shows the number of monthly crime statistics 
reports received during the first quarter of 1933. Due to the fact 
that the returns are counted on a quarterly rather than a monthly 
basis, the figures for January and February, as compared with March, 
are necessarily large. During the first quarter it is found that 1,511 
cities contributed during January, and 1,492 cities during February, 
as compared with 1,459 cities for the month of March. However, a 



more accurate comparison for the first 3 months can be made at the 
end of the second quarter when returns from cities which contribute 
reguhirly, but the returns of which are sometimes received too late to 
be included in the current bulletin, have been received and added to 
the counts for the preceding months. 



Alabama 

Arizona 

Arkansas. 

California. 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa. 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachu 

Michigan.. 

Minnesota. 

Mississippi. 

Missouri... 

Montana.-. 

Nebraska.. 



Janu- 


Febru- 


March 


ary 


ary 




7 


8 


8 


5 


6 


6 


6 


6 


6 


111 


105 


105 


15 


15 


15 


30 


31 


31 


2 


2 


2 


25 


24 


25 


15 


14 


13 


3 


3 


2 


76 


71 


71 


40 


44 


42 


26 


25 


25 


30 


28 


29 


13 


12 


14 


9 


9 


9 


17 


17 


16 


5 


4 


3 


88 


88 


85 


123 


122 


117 




39 


38 


8 


9 


9 


24 


23 


23 


8 


8 


8 


16 


16 


15 



Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York. 

North Carolina.. 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee... 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington... 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total number contrib 
uting 



Janu- 
ary 



Febru- 
ary 



1,511 1,492 1,459 



MONTHLY RETURNS 



Offenses Known to tlie Police, January to Marcti, inclusive, 1933 

There are contained in table 1 the number of offenses known and 
the rate per 100,000 for 1,332 cities in the United States, representing 
a total population of 45,718,303. The figures are also shown for the 
same cities subdivided according to size. 

The figures in the table tend to indicate that the crime rate varies 
directly with the size of the city. It will be recalled that the same 
trend was noticeable in the figures reported for 1932, as published in 
the issue of the bulletin for the fourth quarter of 1932. However, 
there appear several exceptions to this general trend, which will be 
mentioned. The first exception to the general tendency is that 
cities having a population of from 25,000 to 50,000 report the lowest 
crime rate for the offense of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 
The same group of cities reported the lowest crime rate for manslaugh- 
ter by negligence. For the offenses of robbery and auto theft the 
crime rate varies directly with the size of the city, and for the offense 
of burglary there is only one exception to tliis general relationship, 
the cities ha\ing a population of from 100,000 to 250,000 having ahigher 
rate than cities over 250,000. The rates for larcency-theft are highest 
for cities in the third group, and the rates for the groups of smaller 
cities vaiy according to the size of the city. However, the rate for 
the largest cities is lower than that for cities in the second group, 
which in tm^n is exceeded by the rate for cities in the third group. 
This may be a real exception to the general trend evidenced by the 
figures in the table, but, on the other hand, the variance may be caused 



to a considerable extent by lack of uniformity m reporting this par- 
ticular type of offense. 

It is interesting to note that the rate for murder reported by cities 
over 250,000 m population is a little more than twice the rate reported 
by cities having a population of from 25,000 to 50,000. For the offense 
of manslaughter by neghgence the highest rate is more than three 
times as great as the lowest rate. For cities over 250,000 the rate 
for robbery is a little more than twice that for cities whose population 
is between 100,000 and 250,000 and more than four times as great 
as the rate reported by cities under 10,000 in population. The table 
reveals that the highest burglary rate is approximately twice as large 
as the lowest, and that the highest rate for auto theft is more than 
four times as great as the rate for cities under 10,000 in population. 

Table 1 — Offenses known to the police, January to March, 1933; number and rates 
per 100,000 by population groups 



Population group 



28 cities over 250,000; total population, 
18,109,800: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

49 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population 
6,929,712: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

83 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total population, 
5,673,153: 

Number of offenses known.. 

Rate per 100,000.... 

149 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total population, 
5,196,573: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

392 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total population, 
6,163,335: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000. 

631 cities under 10,000; total population, 
3,645,730: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

Total, 1,332 cities; total population, 
45,718,303: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000.. 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugli- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



8,599 
47.5 



1,614 
23.3 



857 
16.5 



757 
12.3 



13, 466 
29.5 



Aggra- 
vated 



2,016 
11.1 



Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



19, 149 
105.7 



118.2 

5,303 
93.5 



4,197 
80.8 



64.3 
2,511 



43,312 
94.7 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



30, 470 
168.3 



13, 791 
199.0 



172.8 
8,591 



4,026 
110.4 



77, 732 
170.0 



18,858 
104.1 



2.753 
53.0 



2,336 
37.9 



35, 191 
77.0 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, First Quarter, 1933 

In table 2 there is shown the daily average number of offenses 
reported during the first three months of 1933 by the same 1,332 
cities as were included in table 1 . Examination of the table discloses 
that the daily average for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 
showed a very slight decrease during February, with an increase in 
March, bringing the average for that month above the figure for 
January. The daily average for aggravated assault also indicated 
an upward trend, the daily averages for February and March being 
in each instance higher than that for the preceding month. For the 



periods from January to February and from February to March the 
daily averages for the offenses of manslaughter by negligence and 
robbery showed a decrease. The averages for burglary, larceny- 
theft, and auto theft are lowest for February and the averages for 
March are lower than those for January. Considering the table as 
a whole, January reflects the highest daily average and February 
the lowest. 



Table 2. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, January to March, inclusive, 
19S3; 1,3S2 miscellaneous cities 

[Total population, 45,718,303] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break mg 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




8.2 
8.0 
8.5 


6.0 
5.3 
5.1 


6.7 

5.8 
7.5 


166.9 
144.4 
137.0 


53.4 
54.5 
57.6 


504.5 
449.2 
486.9 


891.1 
830.3 
866.5 


412.5 


February .- 


355.5 


March 


401.6 






January to March 


8.2 


5.5 


6.7 


149.6 


55.2 


481.2 


863.7 


391.0 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-33 

It will be noted that table 3 sets forth the daily average number of 
offenses reported by 66 cities over 100,000 in population during the 
first quarter of 1931, 1932, and 1933. 

With the exception of rape, burglary, and larceny, the daily average 
number of offenses known shows a substantial decrease in 1932 as 
compared with 1931. Some of the more important decreases are: 

Percent 

Manslaughter by negligence 11. 4 

Robbery 11. 9 

Assaultl 18. 7 

Autotheft 16. 1 

The daily averages for larceny show a slight decrease (2.6 percent) 
in 1932. Offenses of manslaughter by negligence, robbery, and auto 
theft continued to decline in 1933, whereas offenses of aggravated 
assault show an increase in 1933 over 1932, but are slightly less than 
in 1931. 

The table reflects a consistent increase in the offenses of burglary- 
breaking or entering for 1932 and 1933 over 1931. An increase of 
6.6 percent was shown for this offense in 1932 as compared with 1931, 
and an increase of 9.2 percent in 1933 over 1931. 

Although the average for 1932 showed a decrease of 5.3 percent for 
the offense of murder as compared with 1931, the highest daily average 
for this offense (3.9) occurred in 1933. The average number of offenses 
of manslaughter by negligence committed daily in 1933 was 22.9 
percent less than in 1931, while the 1932 average was 11.4 percent 
less than that for 1931. 



Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 66 cities over 100,000, 
January to March, inclusive, 1931-33 

[Total population, 17,842,102] 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Eape 


Rob- 
bery 


vated 
as- 
sault 


Bur- 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
Slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known: 

1931 


343 
332 
350 

3.8 
3.6 
3.9 


319 
283 
241 

3.5 
3.1 
2.7 


251 
276 
290 

2.8 
8.0 
3.2 


5,304 
4,723 
4,541 

58.9 
51.9 

50.5 


2,026 
1,663 
1,975 

22.5 
18.3 
21.9 


16,017 
17, 263 
17, 493 

178.0 
189.7 
194.4 


33,091 
32, 581 
34, 078 

367.7 
358.0 
378.6 


19, 814 
16,817 
15,243 


1932 

1933 


Daily average: 
1931... ... 


1932 


184 8 


1933- 









Rates of Offenses by Geographic Divisions, First Quarter, 1933 

There is shown in table 4 a percentage distribution of population 
of the cities reporting during the first quarter of this year, arranged 
in nine geographic divisions according to the size of the city. An 
analysis of this table discloses that for the New England States only 
5.7 percent of the total population represented by the cities whose 
returns are included in the tables consists of cities having a population 
over 250,000, whereas all of the other geographic groups have a much 
larger corresponding percentage. The data of which this table is 
composed should be of value to those who desire to examine the rates 
for cities subdivided according to geographic location, with a view to 
determining whether there is any relation between the variation in 
rates and the variation in the composition of the geographic groups 
with reference to size of city. 

In table 5 there is set forth the rate of offenses per 100,000 for each 
month for 1,332 cities subdivided according to geographic location. In 
examining the figures reflected by this table it will be noted that the 
highest rates for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter and aggra- 
vated assault were reported by cities in the East South Central, West 
South Central, and South Atlantic States, whereas the lowest number 
was reported by the New England States. A further analysis of these 
rates indicates that the maximum and minimum figures for the various 
offenses vary in different geographic localities. For instance, it will 
be seen that for the offense of manslaughter by negligence the highest 
rate was indicated by the Middle Atlantic States and the lowest 
rate by the Mountain States. Cities in the East North Central States 
recorded the maximum rate for robbery and the low^est number was 
reported by the New England States. The highest rate for burglary- 
was shown by cities in the Mountain States, and comparatively high 
figures for this offense were also reported by the East South Central, 
West South Central, and the Pacific States. The minimum rate for 
the offense was reported by the cities in the Middle Atlantic States. 
Cities in the West South Central States recorded the highest rates for 
the offenses of larceny-theft, and auto theft, while cities situated in 
the Middle Atlantic States reported the lowest figure. 



An interesting feature revealed by the table is the fact that the rate 
for robbery for cities in the New England States is less than one half 
of the next lowest figure reported and is only one ninth of the highest 
rate for cities in other geographic groups. With reference to this fact, 
it shoidd be noted that table 4 discloses that only 5.7 percent of the 
total population of the cities in the New England States included in 
these tables consisted of cities having a population in excess of 250,000, 
and table 1 shows that the rate for robbery for the larger cities is more 
than twice as great as the rate for cities between 100,000 and 250,000 
and more than four times as great as the rate for cities under 10,000. 

The grouping of the various States according to geographic location 
is identical with that employed by the United States Bureau of the 
Census in the decennial census of 1930. 



Table 4. — Percentage distribution of population according to size of city for 
geographic groups, 19SS 



Geographic group 



All cities included 
in tabulation 



Population 



Cities over 250,000 



Population 



Cities 100,000 to 
250,000 



Population 



New England States 

Middle Atlantic States 

East North Central States. 
West North Central States 

South Atlantic States 

East South Central States. 
West South Central States. 

Mountain States 

Pacific States 



4, 484, 649 
10, 732, 580 
12, 414, 745 
5, 303, 475 
3, 655, 590 
1, 185, 123 
3,094,347 
954, 896 
3,892,898 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



256, 400 
•4,351,600 
6, 875. 700 
2, 010, 400 
1,313,500 

277. 100 
1, 081, 500 

294, 700 
1, 648. 900 



5.7 
40.5 
55.3 
37.9 
35.9 
23.4 
34.9 
30.9 
42.4 



1. 586, 605 
1.113,300 
1, 176, 200 
564, 200 
670, 507 
393, 200 
730, 600 
145, 300 
549,800 



35.4 
10.4 
9.5 
10.7 
18.3 
33.2 
23.6 
15.2 
14.1 



Geographic group 



Cities 50,000 
to 100.000 



Popula- 
tion 



Per- 
cent 



Cities 25,000 
to 50,000 



Popula- 
tion 



Per- 
cent 



Cities 10,000 
to 25,000 



Popula- 
tion 



Per- 
cent 



Cities under 
10,000 



Popula- 
tion 



Per- 
cent 



7.3 

7.5 
4.8 
6.0 
6.5 
15.6 



New England States 

Middle Atlantic States 

East North Central States. 
West North Central States. 

South Atlantic States 

East South Central States. 
West South Central States. 

Mountain States 

Pacific States 



626, 302 
1, 347. 152 
409. 500 
1.433,310 
700, 689 
137, 700 
456, 000 
103, 300 
459, 200 



, 064, 400 
, 596. 655 
281. 500 
468, 538 
107, 944 
332, 800 
179, 932 
354, 900 



783, 421 
, 898, 335 
,451,075 
614,775 
327, 171 
197, 468 
292,833 
83, 200 
515, 057 



422, 017 
957, 793 
905, 615 
399, 290 
175, 185 
71,711 
200, 614 
148, 464 
365, 041 



Table 5. — Rate per 100,000, offenses knoivn to the police, 1933 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 
[147 cities, representing a population of 4,484,649] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


0.11 
.11 
.07 


0.16 
.13 
.11 


0.47 
.22 
.36 


2.16 
1.81 
2.19 


L43 
LOO 
1.14 


28.36 
2L32 
24.53 


35.39 
29.92 
36.10 


16 10 


February 


13 04 


March 









Table 5. — Rate 'per 100,000, offenses known to the police, 1933 — Continued 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

[351 cities, representing a population of 10,732,580] 



January... 
February. 
March 



Criminal homicide 



^iS'l^l-^^^-^^ 

man- 
slaughter 



by negli 
gence 



0.76 
.61 
.64 



Rape 



Robbery 



5.27 
3.54 
4.81 



3.11 
2.62 
3.73 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



17.13 
20.04 



Larceny- 
theft 



14.85 
11.50 
14.23 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[340 cities, representing a population of 12,414,746] 





0.46 
.42 
.58 


0.26 
.16 
.22 


0.60 
.47 

.77 


19.51 
16.16 


3.75 
3.33 
3.84 


36.51 
27.53 
39.41 


67.66 
53.07 
66.45 


35.22 


February . . . 


24.87 


March 


35.26 







WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[136 cities, representing a population of 5,303,475] 



January 


0.36 
.40 
.64 


0.26 
.15 
.09 


0.17 
.19 
.23 


10.05 
7.62 
6.49 


1.36 
1.51 
1.41 


24.78 
19.21 
23.40 


47.27 
40.05 
45.61 


26.08 


February 


21. 55 


March 


26.57 









SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 
cities, representing a population of 3,655,£ 





1.09 
1.15 


0.44 
.47 
.38 


0.52 
.55 
.52 


10.91 
8.04 
8.26 


9.60 
9.03 
10.75 


43.17 
39.15 
41.22 


82.59 
72.14 
77.83 


33.15 




28.59 


March 


30.47 







EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[33 cities, representing a population of 1,185,123] 





1.94 
2.19 
1.94 


0.42 
.68 
.68 


0.17 
.00 
.51 


12.74 
10.04 
7.00 


11.05 
13.59 
11.39 


54.34 
42.19 
45.31 


63.12 
57.12 
59.07 


32.99 


February . 


27.85 


March 


28.27 







WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[74 cities, representing a population of 3,094,347] 



January -- 1.39 


0.48 
.36 
.45 


... 


12.64 
8^69 


4.78 
4.59 
5.75 


57.30 
43.37 
45.37 


116. 60 
95.69 
103. 41 


40.40 


February 

March 


1.00 
1.10 


33.25 
36.62 



MOUNTAIN STATES 
[40 cities, representing a population of 954,896] 





0.73 

.84 
.52 


0.10 
.00 
.10 


0.94 
.31 
.84 


10.47 
8.06 
8.06 


1.57 
1.26 
2.09 


55.08 
45.97 
55.08 


98.44 
81.79 
95.61 


32.88 




25.34 


March - 


37.49 







PACIFIC STATES 
[123 cities, representing a population of 3,892,8 





0.33 
.21 
.23 


133 


0.46 
.39 
.31 


13.25 
10.45 
8.79 


1.93 
1.49 
1.44 


48.68 
42.00 
44.59 


101. 80 
97.87 
105. 06 


39.76 




32.37 


March -. 


35.81 







Average Number of Police- Depart meat Employees, 1932 

Table 6 shows the average number of police-department employees 
per 1,000 population, as reported monthly during 1932 by 29 cities 
over 250,000 population and 45 cities having a population between 
100,000 and 250,000. 

Individual averages for the larger cities ranged from 3.49 to 0.72. 
For 50 percent of these cities the average number of police-department 
emploj^ees per 1,000 population varied between 2.31 and 1.32. One 
fourth of the cities had averages ranging from 0.72 to 1.29, and the 
averages for the remaining fourth ranged from 2.32 to 3.49. 

Averages for individual cities having a population between 100,000 
and 250,000 ranged from 2.80 to 0.70. For one half of the cities the 
average number of police employees per 1,000 population varied 
between 1.10 and 1.75. Twenty-five percent of the cities in this popu- 
lation group had averages ranging from 0.70 to 1.09, while the remain- 
ing 25 percent had averages ranging from 1.77 to 2.80. 



Table 6.- 


—Average number of police-department employees, 1932 


Size of city 


Employees 

per 1,000 
population 




2.04 


100 000 to 250,000 


1.4S 







Monthly Trends for Cities Over 100,000 Population, 1932 

There is reflected in table 7 the daily average number of offenses for 
each month of 1932 as reported by 79 cities over 100,000. The total 
population represented by these cities is 26,652,312. The variations 
in the monthly figures will be seen more readily by referring to figure^l^ 
where the same data are graphically represented. 



Table 7. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive^ 
1932; 79 cities over 100,000 





[Total population, 26,652,312] 












Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or en- 
tering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
Slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


5.9 
6.0 
5.6 
6.0 
5.5 
6.2 
8.2 
6.2 
5.5 
5.1 
5.5 
6.4 


4.4 
5.3 
3.7 
3.9 
4.0 
3.4 
2.5 
3.1 
3.9 
4.7 
4.2 
4.5 


4.6 
4.1 
5.2 
4.9 
4.8 
5.2 
4.5 
5.1 
5.1 
5.5 
4.3 
4.4 


134.0 
115.2 
107.6 
100.6 
93.9 
87.5 
91.0 
94.3 
97.8 
114.7 
124.9 
145.5 


29.4 
33.7 
30.7 
37.7 
39.3 
40.1 
41.9 
39.7 
38.2 
36.3 
35.0 
34.3 


343.7 
332.4 
314.2 
323.2 
300.5 
304.4 
313.4 
316.2 
320.5 
317.5 
334.6 
337.3 


544.5 
534.0 
512.5 
557.2 
527.9 
529.8 
528.1 
562.9 
573.7 
620.0 
627.1 
594.8 


360 9 


February 


342 6 


March 




April 




May 


341 4 






July — . 




August 


346 




340.5 






November 


353 3 




323.8 






January to December.. 


6.0 


4.0 


4.8 


109.0 


36.4 


321.4 


559.4 


344.7 



10 



f»v €UUa of 100,000 p<^^p*U4Uioif 4U%b o-Hx. 




Jan. Si^. 9|um;. Cifn.*)tuij^June JuU^ (iu0.Stpt, Oct. 9lov. J 

Figure 1. 



11 

ANNUAL RETURNS, 1932 

The system of uniform crime reporting includes the submission by 
Teporting units of an annual return showing the number of offenses 
known and the number of offenses cleared by arrest and in addition 
an annual return showing the number of persons charged. As will 
be seen by referring to page 1 of this bulletin, the term "offenses 
known to the police^' includes all offenses which come to the attention 
of the police, regardless of the original source of information. An 
offense is cleared by arrest when one or more persons are arrested, 
charged with committing it, and held or turned over for prosecution. 
Exceptional clearances, such as the suicide of the offender, are also 
included. The term "persons charged" refers to those who have 
been held to answer criminal charges. 

The tables which follow are based on the annual returns for 1932 
received from 596 cities throughout the United States. More than 
900 such annual returns were received but there have been eliminated 
from the tables those which were incomplete or apparently defective 
in any respect. Some of the defects requiring exclusion of returns 
from the tables prepared were as follows : failure to distinguish between 
the number of persons charged and the number of offenses cleared 
therebj"; failure to report the number of offenses of auto theft cleared 
by arrest (the figures reported showed merely the number of stolen 
automobiles which had been recovered) ; and incomplete figures for 
one or more of the offense classifications. It is to be expected that 
the number of complete annual reports which will be available for 
inclusion in tabulations will show considerable increase in years to 
come. 
Offenses Known and Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1932 

In table 8 are revealed for 596 cities in the United States the number 
of offenses known, the number of offenses cleared by arrest, and the 
percentage of offenses cleared by arrest during 1932. The figures 
for these cities are also shown with the cities divided into six groups 
according to their size. The table indicates that the percentage of 
offenses cleared by arrest is higher in the case of offenses against the 
person than in the case of offenses against property. The highest 
percentage of clearances is found for the offense of manslaughter by 
negligence and the lowest percentage of clearances occurs in the case 
of auto theft. In examining the figures for the offense of auto theft 
it should be remembered that, although in many cases the offender 
is not arrested and prosecuted, in a high percentage of cases the stolen 
automobile is recovered by the police. The figures presented in this 
table are limited strictly to the number of offenses cleared by the 
arrest of the offender. 

It appears generally that the larger cities have a slightly lower 
percentage of clearances than the smaller cities. In this connection 
it should be kept in mind that the larger cities have on the whole a 
higher crime rate than the smaller cities. 

An examination of the table shows that the most decided variation 
in the percentage of offenses cleared by arrest occurs in the case of 
auto theft, where there is a consistent increase in the percentage of 
clearances from the larger cities to the smaller cities, cities over 
250,000 reporting 13 percent of such offenses as cleared by arrest 



12 

while the corresponding percentage reported by cities under 10,000 
is 27.1. 

Table 8. — Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest, 1932, by population groups 



Population group 



15 cities over 250,000; total population, 
9,094,500: 

Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest... 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 
20 cities 100,000 to 250,000; total population, 
2,678,405: 

Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest... 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 
48 cities 50,000 to 100,000; total population, 
3,319,817: 

Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest... 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 
68 cities 25,000 to 50,000; total population, 
2,332,573: 

Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest. . . 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 
164 cities 10,000 to 25,000; total population, 
2,640,897: 

Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest. . . 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 
281 cities under 10,000; total population, 

Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest... 
Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 

Total, 596 cities; total population, 21,661,366: 
Number of offenses known 

Number of offenses cleared by arrest. . . 
Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest. 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Mur- 
der, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



642 
493 
76.8 



228 
190 
83.3 



1,338 
1,077 
80.5 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



82 
95.4 



51 

44 

86.3 



Rape 



131 

115 
87.8 



144 
131 
91.0 



Rob- 
bery 



8,203 
2,752 
33.6 



1,744 
626 
35.9 



2,087 
779 
37.3 



1,183 
465 
39.3 



14,892 
5,153 
34.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



3,098 
2,272 
73.3 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing, or 
enter- 



27, 696 
7,878 
28.4 



10, 623 
2,710 
25.5 



11,492 
2,981 
25.9 



7,767 
1,813 



7,707 
2,096 
27.2 



4,617 
1,300 

28.2 



18, 778 
26.9 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



62, 693 

15, 363 

24.5 



18, 487 
4,602 
24.9 



25, 541 
6,789 
26.6 



16, 238 
3,871 
23.8 



16, 092 
4,363 
27.1 



7,879 
2,429 
30.8 



146, 930 

37,417 

25.5 



Auto 
theft 



27, 721 
3,613 
13.0 



8,868 
1,487 
16.8 



5,227 
1,083 
20.7 



1,713 
464 
27.1 



Persons Charged (Held for Prosecution), 1932 

In table 9 are shown the number of persons charged and the rates 
per 100,000 as reported by 596 cities for the year 1932. As mentioned 
previously persons charged are those who have been held for prosecu- 
tion. Table 10 is a percentage distribution of persons charged, and an 
examination of this compilation discloses that 44.5 percent of all 
the persons held for prosecution were charged with violations of traffic 
and motor-vehicle laws. Furthermore, 14.1 percent were charged 
with drunkenness and 11.2 percent with disorderly conduct and 
vagrancy. It is seen that persons charged falling within these three 
classifications constituted almost 70 percent of the total number of 
persons held for prosecution. 

The number of persons charged is generally somewhat greater than 
the corresponding number of offenses cleared by arrest as shown m 
table 8. The explanation for the difference between the figures 
representing the number of ofl'enses cleared by arrest and the figures 
indicating the number of persons charged is, of course, that the arrest 
of one person who has committed several offenses will clear several 



13 

crimes, whereas the arrest of several persons who have jointly com- 
mitted only one offense will solve only one crime. 

In a stuiy of the table it will be observed that the number of persons 
charged per 100,000 population varies quite regularly with the size of 
the city only in the cases of robbery and gambling. The proportion 
of persons charged with manslaughter by negligence is much larger 
for cities over 250,000 in population than for any other group of cities. 
Approximately the same proportion of persons was held for prosecu- 
tion for the offense of robbery in cities over 100,000, but the rate for 
these cities was more than twice as great as the figure for cities under 
25,000 population. For the offense of aggravated assault the number 
of persons charged per unit of population by cities whose population 
was between 50,000 and 100,000 was almost twice as great as that 
for any other size city. There was held for prosecution for burglary 
in cities over 100,000 a larger proportion of persons than in cities 
under 100,000, and of the cities under 100,000 the highest rate was 
for cities under 10,000. Cities having a population between 50,000 
and 250,000 had the highest figures for the offense of larceny- theft. 
Another feature shown by these figures is that for the offense of 
forgery and counterfeiting, cities having a population between 100,000 
and 250,000 held for prosecution 22.9 per 100,000 of population, 
whereas cities over 250,000 held only 8.1 for prosecution. 

For sex offenses other than rape in cities over 250,000 the rate of 
persons held for prosecution was 153.2 which was about five times as 
great as the next highest rate reported. The table indicates that the 
proportion of persons prosecuted for violation of narcotic drug laws 
in cities over 100,000 is from two to three times as large as it is in 
cities under 100,000. An interesting observation is that for the 
offense of driving while intoxicated, with but a single exception the 
rate of persons held for prosecution varies inversely with the size of 
the city, the highest rate being for cities under 10,000. For the offense 
of drunkenness cities having a population between 100,000 and 250,000 
charged a larger proportion of persons than any other cities, while 
cities over 250,000 held a proportion which was less than that for all 
other groups of cities with the exception of cities having a population 
less than 10,000. A larger proportion of persons was charged for 
violation of liquor laws in cities over 100,000 than in the smaller cities, 
which is also true in the case of persons charged for disorderly conduct 
and vagrancy and gambling. 

With reference to the classification "suspicion" it should be noted 
that the figures submitted by police departments have been carried 
in the following table as originally reported, although according to 
the procedure outlined in the manual, "Uniform Crime Reporting," 
individuals prosecuted as suspicious persons should be listed opposite 
the classification "disorderly conduct and vagrancy." 



14 



Table 9. 



-Persons charged {held for prosecution), 19S 
100,000, by population groups 



number and rates per 



Offense charged 



15 cities 
over 

250,000, 

popula- 
tion 

9,094,500 



20 cities 
100,000 to 
250,000, 
popula- 
tion 
2,678,405 



48 cities 
50,000 to 
100,000, 
popula- 
tion 
3,319,817 



68 cities 
25,000 to 
50,000, 
popula- 
tion 
2,332,573 


164 cities 
10,000 to 
25,000, 
popula- 
tion 
2,640,897 


281 cities 
under 
10,000, 
popula- 
tion 
1,595,174 


81 
3.5 


HI 
4.2 


75 
4.7 


58 
2.5 


72 
2.7 


.1 


147 
6.3 


144 
5.5 


99 
6.2 


467 
20.0 


426 
16.1 


251 
15.7 


642 
27.5 


682 
25.8 


336 
21.1 


1,471 
63.1 


1.881 
71.2 


1,281 
80.3 


3,871 
166.0 


4,260 
161.3 


2,437 
152.8 


682 
29.2 


31.7 


503 
31.5 


3,216 
137.9 


2.460 
93.2 


1,152 
72.2 


432 
18.5 


313 
11.9 


171 
10.7 


464 
19.9 


425 
16.1 


251 
15.7 


365 
15.6 


360 
13.6 


243 
15.2 


732 
31.4 


465 
17.6 


314 
19.7 


1,160 
49.7 


1,011 


403 
25.3 


53 
2.3 


67 
2.5 


58 
3.6 


2,209 
94.7 


2,449 
92.7 


2,009 
125.9 


3,167 
135.8 


3,812 
144.3 


2,072 
129.9 


21, 658 
928.5 


19, 749 
747.8 


9,655 
605.3 


7,655 
328.2 


10,699 
405.1 


6, 608 
414.2 


1,332 
57.1 


924 
35.0 


411 
25.8 


53, 488 
2, 293. 1 


50. 754 
1,921.8 


39, 528 
2, 478. 


17, 567 
753.1 


11,451 
433.6 


6.853 
429.6 


2,136 
91.6 


2,947 
111.6 


• 1,820 
114.1 



Total, 596 

cities; 
total pop- 
ulation 
21.661,366- 



Criminal homicide: 

a. Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter: 
Number of persons charged. 
Rate per 100,000.. -.. 

6. Manslaughter by negligence: 
Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary — breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 — 

Larceny — theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 - 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged- 

Rate per 100,000 -. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against the family and chil- 
dren: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.- 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 --- 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct and vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 - 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000-- 

All other oflenses: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Suspicion: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



2,219 
24.4 



7,907 
86.9 



16, 301 
179.2 



3,358 
36.9 



12, 581 
138.3 



2,738 
30.1 



2.182 
24.0 



13, 934 
153.2 



3,246 
35.7 



16, 942 

186.3 



56, 740 
733.9 



77,966 
857.3 



13,449 
147.9 



277, 189 
3,047.9 



55, 578 
611.1 



14, 772 
162.4 



36.1 

771 



5,343 
199.5 



3,062 
114.3 



613 
22.9 



539 
20.1 



1,006 
37.6 



1,283 

47.9 



5,751 
214.7 



31, 584 
1, 179. 2 



23,519 
878.1 



2,150 
80.3 



2, 299. 7 
18. 660 



11, 648 
434.9 



1,676 
50.5 



2.295 



6,428 
193.6 



1,356 
40.8 



3,427 
103.2 



753 
22.7 



20.0 

663 
20.0 



2,571 
77.4 



4,164 
125.4 



30,640 
922.9 



17. 305 
521.3 



86. 826 
2, 615. 4 



18, 364 
553.2 



7,231 
217.8 



15 



Table 10. — Percentage distribution of persons charged (held for prosecution), 
[596 cities; total population, 21,661,3r)f)] 



1932 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
slaughter 

(6) Manslaughter by neghgence 

Rape -- 

Robbery... 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

.\uto theft 

O t her assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

AVeapons; carrjing, possessing, etc.. 
Sex offenses (except rape) 



Per- 
cent 



.50 
.49 
1.36 

!63 
2.03 
.21 
.40 
.38 
1.31 



Offense charged 



Offenses against the family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct and vagrancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

All other offenses 

Suspicion 

Total 



Per- 
cent 



Percentage of Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1931 and 1932 

A comparison of the figures for nine cities over 250,000 in popula- 
tion for 1931 and 1932 as shown in the following table indicating the 
percentage of offenses cleared by arrest reveals a decrease in the pro- 
portion of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, rape, and robbery- 
clearances in 1932. The decrease in the percentage of rapes cleared 
was quite substantial, whereas the decrease in the clearances of murder 
and nonnegligent manslaughter and robbery was so slight as to be of 
little significance. 

The following substantial increases were shown in 1932 as compared 
with 1931: 

Percent 

Burglarv-breaking or entering 15. 8 

Auto theft 9. 4 

Larceny-theft 9. 

In addition, smaller increases were shown in the clearances for man- 
slaughter by negligence and aggravated assault. 

Table 11. — Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 1931 and 1932 
[9 cities over 250,000, total population 5,449,500] 





Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
as- 
sault 


Bur- 

tekT 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 
1931 


79.7 
79.2 


94.2 
95.2 


82.5 
69.7 


37.0 
36.3 


69.2 
71.3 


29.1 
33.7 


23.3 
25.4 


10.6 


Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 


11.6 







DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

The data in the tables which follow should be distinguished care- 
fully from the data compiled from the uniform crime reports. The 
following tabulations were made from fingerprint records received 



16 

currently by the Identification Division of the United States Bureau 
of Investigation. 

During the first 3 months of 1933, 80,785 arrest records as evidenced 
by fingerprint cards were examined. It has been characteristic of 
the figures compiled by the Bureau since February, 1932, that the 
distribution of arrests subdivided according to age groups has been 
fairly constant. In the past the number of persons arrested who were 
19 years of age has exceeded the number of persons arrested for any 
other age group, and the same is true for the first quarter of 1933 
taken as a unit. However, examination of the figures for the month 
of March only, reveals that the number of persons arrested aged 22 
is slightly greater than the number of those who were 19 years old. 
Persons under 21 years of age account for 1 of each 5 whose arrest 
records were examined. The following tabulation shows the per- 
centage of the total number of persons arrested who were under 21 
years of age and the percentage under the age of 25 in those instances 
where the proportion of youthful offenders was high. 



O Sense charged 



Percentage 
under 21 



Percentage 
under 25 



Auto theft 

Burglary-breaking or entering. 

Robbery 

Rape -.- 

Larceny 



27.9 
26.7 
26.4 



These figures indicate that auto theft is an offense which is particu- 
larly characteristic of youth. So also is the offense of burglary, al- 
though in a somewhat less pronounced degree. 

Persons under 25 years of age constituted 41 percent of those whose 
arrest records were examined, and persons between 25 and 29 years of 
age accounted for approximately 19 percent of the total number ar- 
rested. Persons in this age group were not predominant among the 
arrests for any particular offense. 

Almost one third of the total arrests were for disorderly conduct, 
drunkenness, and vagrancy, or on suspicion and for investigation. 
The arrests on these charges total 24,842. Of the remaining arrests 
over one half were for the offenses of larceny-theft, burglary, robbery, 
and assault. The number of arrests for each of these offenses is as 
follows : 

Larceny-theft 11,312 

Burglarv-breaking or entering 8, 895 

Robbery 5,241 

Assault 5, 030 

Total 30,478 

Most of the persons arrested were males, females numbering only 
5,221 (6.5 percent). For the offenses of larceny, homicide, and viola- 
tions of the liquor laws the percentage of females arrested to the total 
number of females arrested exceeded the corresponding percentages 
for males. However, the opposite was true with reference to the of- 
fenses of burglary, robbery, auto theft, driving while intoxicated, and 
miscellaneous violations of motor vehicle and traffic laws. 

Approximately 35 percent of the persons arrested had a previous 
record in the identification files of the United States Bureau of Investi- 



17 

gation. As has consistently been the case in previous tabulations 
made, those charged with violations of the narcotic drug laws had the 
highest percentage of previous records, it being 55 percent. Persons 
arrested for embezzlement, fraud, and forgery and counterfeiting 
likcAvise had a high percentage of previous records, although the 
percentage was somewhat below that found among those charged with 
violating the narcotic drug laws. From 34 to 39 percent of the persons 
arrested for auto theft, larceny, burglary, and robbery had previous 
records. 

The data tabulated by the Bureau are based upon the record of 
arrests for violations of State laws as evidenced by the fingerprint 
cards received from contributors throughout the United States. 
Obviously the tabulation should not be interpreted as a measure of 
the amount of crime committed, since the fingerprint cards received 
do not represent all arrests made throughout the country, nor do they 
represent any particular geographic or population group. 

At the end of March 1933 there were 3,483,629 criminal fingerprint 
records and 4,594,224 index cards containing the names or aliases of 
individuals with criminal records on file in the United States Bureau 
of Investigation at Washington, D.C. Of each 100 fingerprints re- 
ceived dming March, more than 46 were identified with criminal data 
in the files of the Bureau. During March 1933, 394 fugitives from 
justice were identified through fingerprint records and information as 
to the whereabouts of these fugitives was immediately transmitted to 
the law-enforcement official or agency desiring to apprehend these 
individuals. The number of pohce departments, peace officers, and 
law-enforcement agencies throughout the United States and foreign 
countries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Bureau at the 
end of March totaled 5,689. 



Table 12. — Distribution of arrests, Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 1933 





Number 


Percent 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Criminal homicide 


1, 502 

890 

5,241 

5,030 

11,' 312 
2,722 
1,274 
2,697 
1,781 
1,696 
942 
794 
1,163 

12, 036 
732 
789 
12, 806 
1,147 
4,948 


1,361 
890 
5,068 
4,679 
8,744 
10, 424 
2,695 
1,175 
2,511 
1,740 
1,045 
894 
717 
1,135 
2,162 

11, 220 
715 
773 
11,996 
1,061 
4,559 


141 

173 
351 
151 

27 
99 

186 
41 

651 
48 
77 
28 

226 

816 
17 
16 

810 
86 

389 


LIO 
6.49 
6.23 
11.01 
14.00 
3.37 
1.58 
3.34 
2.20 
2.10 
1.16 
.98 
1.44 
2.96 

14.90 
.91 
.98 
15.85 
1.42 
6.12 


1.80 
1.18 
6.71 
6.19 
11.57 
13.80 
3.57 
1.56 
3.32 
2.30 
1.38 
1.18 
.95 
1.50 
2.86 

14.85 
.95 
1.02 

15.88 
1.40 
6.03 


2.70 




.00 


Robbery 


3.31 




6.72 




2.89 


Larceny-theft 


17.01 




.52 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


1.90 




3.56 




.78 


Sex offenses (except rape) 


12.47 


Oflenses against family and children 


.92 
1.47 


Driving while intoxicated 


.54 




4.33 


Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and va- 
grancy 


15.63 




.33 




.31 


Suspicion and investigation 


15.51 




1.65 




7.45 






Total 


80, 785 


75, 564 


5,221 


100.00 


100. 00 


100.00 







18 



Table 13. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 



Oflfense charged 



Not 
i known 



Under 
15 



Criminal homicide... 

Rape 

Robbery... 

Assault 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

Autotheft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc_. 

Sex oSenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, 

and vagrancy 

Gambling.. _ 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion a 
Offenses not stated 
All other offenses 

Total 



3,663 



Offense charged 



50 and 
over 



Total 
all ages 



Crimindl homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary- breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

Auto theft 

Forgery and eounterfei ting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated.. 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and va- 
grancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Offenses not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



303 

159 

1,121 

1,049 

1,430 

1,984 

438 

248 

502 

380 

385 

154 

139 

198 

477 

2,252 
175 
193 

2,466 

245 
917 



916 
1,420 
220 
218 
496 
239 



164 
205 
425 

1,764 
132 
100 

1,843 
173 
682 



192 
68 
285 
624 
543 
1,074 
111 
181 
463 
193 
191 
169 
129 
194 
302 



5,241 
5,030 
8,895 
11,312 
2,722 
1,274 
2,697 
1,781 
1,696 
942 
794 
1,163 
2,388 

12, 036 
732 



15, 215 



11,229 



Table 14. — Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 1933 



Age 


Per- 
cent 


Age 


Per- 
cent 


Age 


Per- 
cent 


Age 


Per- 
cent 


Under 15 


.30 
.37 
1.75 
3.31 
4.89 
5.44 
4.71 
5.02 
5.41 
4.89 


24 


4.54 
3.93 
3.81 
3.96 
3.74 
3.39 
3.20 
2.17 
3.56 
2.83 


34 


2.14 
2.23 

1.97 
1.85 
2.18 
1.75 
1.93 
1.03 
1.61 
1.19 


44 


i 01 


15 


25.. 


35 


45 


1.18 


16 






46 


.78 


17 


27 


37 


47 


.85 


18 


28 


38 


48 


.91 


19 


29 


39 




.68 


20 


30 


40 

41 


50 and over 

Unknown 

Total 


5.29 


21 


31 


.20 


22 


32 


42 




23 






100.00 











19 



PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION DY AGE OF PERSONS 
ARRESTED - DATA OBTAINED FROM FIHGERPRINT 
RECORDS JANUARY TO W\ARCH, 1933 



Auro TH£Fr 



UMptA 2S frMi Of Aoi 



\ eQ.no 



Aot 25Aft0 Qyf/f \ j/.6'^ 



Si/z^oiAny 



(/f^fie/t 25 yrAAs of Aoe 



60.77o 



A0£ 25 AAlfi OySA I jg.3% 



/^036£fiy 



i/A/oe-/i2S //Afis eeAoe 



S5.^% 



Aot 25 AW ori/f 



^¥.6% 



^A/fCJTA/y 



t/MO£j^ 15 YrARS OFAoe \ 2^^, /% 



AO£ 2S ANO Or£A 



J S^.3% 



Figure 2 
Table 15. — Percentage with previous records; arrests, Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 1933 



Offense charged 



Per- 
cent 



Offense charged 



Per- 
cent 



Narcotic drug laws _ 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and 

grancy - 

Forgery and counterfeiting. 

Robbery 

Suspicion and investigation 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

All other offenses 



55.2 
42.2 

41.7 
40.4 
39.5 
37.4 
35.3 
34.9 
34.3 



Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etC--. 

Assault 

Offenses against family and children 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Rape -- 

Liquor laws 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated _ 

Criminal homicide 



27.9 
27.8 
27.7 
26.2 
25.8 
24.9 
23.6 
22.7 
19.5 
18.0 



o 



']'^51>.S ^-^ 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume IV - Number 2 
SECOND QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1933 



Issued by the 

United States Bureau of Investigation 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1933 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 



U. S, SUPFRirfTFNDENT OF DOCUMFNr 

AUG 17 1933 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, United States Bureau of Investigation 
Washington, D.C. 

Volume 4 July 1933 Number 2 

CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses knovi^n to the police, 1933. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-33. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1933: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous record. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as Part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the poKce jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the poUce through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecut- 
ing or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the follow- 
ing group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to 
be those most generally and completely reported to the police: 
criminal homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, 
and (b) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated 
assault; burglary-breaking or entering; larceny- theft; and auto theft. 
The figures contained herein include also the number of attempted 
crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are re- 
ported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted burglary 
or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same man- 
ner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the pohce depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths. (6) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force'or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, robbery 
armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shoot- 
ing, cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maiming. 
Does not include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary-breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 

(1) 



burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny-theft {except auto theft). — {a) $50 and over in value (6) Under $50 in 
value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending upon the value 
of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shophfting, or any steal- 
ing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force and violence or by 
fraud. Does not include embezzlement, con-games, forgery, passing worthless 
checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unau- 
thorized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the United States Bureau of Investigation does not vouch for its 
accuracy. It is given out as current information, which may throw 
some light on problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 
Extent of Reporting Area 

The table which follows includes all cities which contributed a 
return for one or more months thus far during 1933. The number of 
cities reporting in the various groups is shown together with the 
population represented by them. The population figures for cities 
having 10,000 people or more were obtained from the Bureau of the 
Census as estimated July 1, 1932, while figures for cities having less 
than 10,000 were taken from the 1930 census, due to the fact that 
more recent estimates were not available for this group. 

During the first 6 months of 1933 reports were received from 1,606 
cities representing a population of 54,208,740. An increase of 70 
cities is shown for the first 6 months of 1933 as compared with the 
same period of last year. Returns were also received from sheriffs, 
State police, and officers in the possessions but they are not included 
in the above figures. 

As indicated by the table there are 37 cities in the United States 
having a population of 250,000 or more. Of this number 34 (92 per- 
cent) are contributors of crime statistics to the Bureau. The three 
cities which have not contributed returns are Atlanta, Ga. ; Louisville, 
Ky.; and New York City. Louisville did, however, contribute 
returns during last year, and it is expected that reports for 1933 
win be received. Of the 57 cities in the population group of 100,000 
to 250,000 only one city does not contribute returns, namely, 
Reading, Pa. 



Population group 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 




983 


826 


84 


60, 813, 881 


49, 728, 288 


82 






A. Cities over 250 000 


37 
57 
105 
192 
592 


34 

56 
94 
170 
472 


92 

90 
89 
80 


29, 955, 600 
7, 908, 112 
7, 092, 407 
6, 695, 136 
9, 162, 626 


22, 145, 300 
7, 796. 212 
6, 429, 175 
5, 958, 413 
7, 399, 188 


74 


B. Cities 100,000 to 250,o'o"6 


99 




91 






E. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


81 







The above table does not include 780 cities and rural townships aggregating 
a total population of 4,480,453. The cities included in this figure are those of 
less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural townships are of 
varying population groups. 



MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

In table 1 will be found the number of offenses and rate per 100,000 
people as reported during the first 6 months of 1933 by 1,248 cities 
throughout the United States, representing an aggregate population 
of 43,397,341. The numbers and rates are also shown for the same 
cities subdivided according to size. As was evident in the figures 
published during 1932, there appears a rather definite tendency for 
the crime rates to vary with the size of the city. To this general 
trend there are the following exceptions: criminal homicide as reported 
by cities having a population of less than 10,000; rape in cities under 
25,000 in population; aggravated assault, burglary-breaking or enter- 
ing, and larceny-theft as reported by cities having a population in 
excess of 250,000. 

The amount of variation in the rates reported by the several groups 
of cities differs wdth the offense. With the exception of the offense 
of rape, the smallest amount of variation occurs in connection with 
the figures reported for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, 
burglary-breaking or entering, and larceny-theft, the highest rates 
in these instances being approximately twice as great as the lowest. 
For the offenses of manslaughter by negligence and aggravated assault 
the largest rates are approximately three times as high as the smallest. 
It is interesting to observe that the largest amount of variation in 
the rates occurs in the figures for robbery and auto theft, where the 
highest rates are more than four times as great as the lowest. 

Of the 72 cities with a population in excess of 100,000 people, 65 
reported larcenies subdivided according to the value of the article 
stolen. A separate tabulation was made for these cities with the 
followdng result. 





Larceny-theft 


Population group 


$50 and over 
in value 


Under $50 
in value 


20 cities over 250,000; total population 14,451,300: 


6,634 
45.9 

3,067 
48.8 


38, 067 


Rate per 100,000 


263.4 


45 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population 6,291,115: 


23, 124 


Rate per 100,000 


367.6 







This compilation discloses that there is only a slight difference in 
the rates reported by these two groups of cities for offenses of larceny 
involving goods valued at $50 or more. However, the difference in 
the figures reported for minor larcenies is quite substantial. 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 193S; number 
and rates per 100,000 by population groups 



Population group 



25 cities over 250,000; total population, 
17,171,200: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

47 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 6,523,115: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

80 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popula- 
tion, 5,425,453: 

Number of offenses known- 

Rate per 100,000.. 

140 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popula- 
tion, 4,951,900- 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000... 

380 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popula- 
tion, 5,990,386: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

576 cities under 10,000; total population, 
3,335,287: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

Total, 1,248 cities; total population, 
43,397,341: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Mur- 
der, 

nonneg 
ligent 
man- 

slaugh- 



1,427 
3.3 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



:,250 
2.9 



Rob- 
bery 



14, 382 
83.8 



2,437 
37.4 



2,016 
37.2 



1,362 
27.5 



1,317 
22.0 



614 
18.4 



22,128 
51.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2,254 
34.6 



1,025 
17.1 



392 
n.8 



10,155 
23.4 



glary— 
break- 
ing or 



33,291 
193.9 



14,645 
224.5 



7,65? 
127. f 



76. 931 
177.3 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



56, 129 
326.9 



27,048 
414.6 



21, 714 
400.2 



16, 792 
339.1 



17, 195 

287.] 



7,500 
224.9 



146, 382 
337.3 



34, 943 
203.5 



11,544 
177.0 



7,104 
130.9 



4,501 
75.1 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, January to June, inclusive, 
1933 

Table 2 has been compiled to disclose the daily average number of 
offenses known to the police for the first half of the year 1933. It will 
be observed that the figures for robbery show a steady decrease, while 
the averages for aggravated assault have increased steadily since 
January. 

A comparison of the 1933 daily averages for these two offenses with 
those for the first 6 months of 1932 indicates that the trends are quite 
similar. There is additional similarity in the monthly trends for the 
2 years in the fact that the averages for manslaughter by negligence 
and for burglary-breaking and entering are on the whole lower during 
the second quarter than in the first 3-month period. 

The averages for larceny-theft and auto theft do not show any 
regular monthly variation. Considering each 3-month period as a 
unit, however, the average number of larcenies is slightly higher 
during the second quarter, whereas the average number of auto thefts 
is definitely lower during the second quarter of the year. 

The offense of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter likewise fails 
to show any regular fluctuation from month to month but in general 
the average is somewhat higher during the second quarter. 

Examination of the table shows that the largest amount of variation 
occurs in the averages for robbery. For this offense the January 
average was 158 as compared with 93.7 for the month of June, a 
decrease of 64.3 (41 percent). 



Table 2. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive 
193S; 1,248 miscellaneous cities 

[Total population, 43,397,341] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


7.8 
7.2 
8.0 
8.3 

7.8 
8.1 


5.8 
6.2 
4.7 
5.0 
5.1 
5.0 


6.4 
5.4 
7.2 
7.3 
6.7 
8.3 


158.0 
135.4 
129.6 
116.7 
100.2 
93.7 


51.0 
51.3 
52.7 
57.4 
61.4 
62.6 


467.3 
417.7 
444.3 
439.5 
407.1 
372.4 


833.6 
773.1 
817.1 
845.0 
808.1 
774.3 


388.9 




333.9 


March 


383.9 


April 


379.0 


May 


333.9 


June 


318.2 






January to June 


7.9 


5.1 


6.9 


122.3 


56.1 


425.0 


809.1 


356.8 



MONTHLY TRENDS (M/IY AVERA0£) ROBBERY 
JANUARY TO JUNE, 1933 

U'^e c/r/£s ■ rozAi popi/i^t/oa/ 43,397,3^/ 

20 40 6P 60 100 laO 140 IfeO 180 200 




Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-33 

There is shown in the following table the daily average number of 
ofiFenses reported by the police departments in 66 cities throughout 
the United States for the first half of 1933. Each of the cities has a 
population in excess of 100,000 and the aggregate population repre- 
sented is 17,735,605. The daily averages for 1933 are presented, 
together with the daily averages for the corresponding periods of 
1931 and 1932. The table discloses that there has been a substantial 
decrease in the number of manslaughters by negligence, robberies, 
and auto thefts reported. On the other hand, there is shown an 
increase in the number of offenses of murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter, rape, aggravated assault, burglary-breaking or entering, 
and larceny-theft. During the first half of 1932 the number of 



offenses of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter was slightly less 
than the number reported durmg the corresponding period of 
1933. However, during 1933 there has been shown a slight increase 
over both of the preceding years. In view of the fact that the 
aggravated assault classification consists of those assaults wliich 
threaten serious bodily injury, including attempted murders, it is 
interesting to observe that the variation in the daily average number 
of offenses of this type follows in a general way the fluctuation in the 
averages for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. During 1932 
the number of offenses of burglary-brealdng or entering showed 
approximately a 10-percent increase over the preceding year. During 
1933 the number of offenses of this type reported was slightly less than 
the number reported in 1932 but the daily average shows a very small 
increase. This is due to the fact that February 1932 contained 29 
days. The average number of offenses of larceny reported during 
1932 was only slightly greater than the average for 1931, but there 
was a substantial increase in the number of offenses of this type 
reported during 1933. 

The daily averages for 1933 show the following decreases as com- 
pared with the 1931 figures: 

Percent 

Manslaughter by negligence 22. 9 

Robbery 14.2 

Autotheft 24.5 

A similar comparison discloses the following increases in the 1933 
averages: 

Percent 

Rape 17.9 

Aggravated assault 6. 4 

Burglary-breaking or entering 9. 2 

Larceny-theft 7. 5 

Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 66 cities over 100,000, 
January to June, inclusive, 1931-33 

[Total population, 17,73.=),60S] 



Number of ofiEenses known: 

1931 

1932 

1933 

Daily average: 

1931 

1932 

1933.. _-. 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Mur- 
der, 

nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 

slaugh- 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



9,037 

8, 421 
7,754 



4,254 
3,622 
4,525 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 

enter- 
ing 



30, 552 
33, 524 
33, 377 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



64, 643 

65, 874 
69, 487 

357.1 
361.9 
383.9 



Auto 
theft 



32, 699 
29, 374 

214.9 
179.7 
162.3 



Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location 

In order to comply with requests for crime rates for individual 
States throughout the country these rates are shown in table 5. In 
accordance with the practice heretofore the crime rates are also given 



for the nine major geographic divisions of the country. In table 4 
there is shown a hst of the cities, the crime reports of which have 
been included in the tabulations in this issue of the bulletin. There 
is listed for eacli State the number of cities of each population group. 
In this connection it should be observed that caution should be em- 
ployed in comparing the crime rate of one State with that of another. 
For example, in the case of Delaware the crime rate is based on the 
report of only one city having a population of less than 10,000. 
Obviously the published rate for Delaware is not necessarily the true 
crime rate for the State. It may be much higher or much lower 
than the true rate. The same applies with reference to the rates of 
other States which are based on the report of only one city or a few 
small cities. Nevertheless, the crime rates for these States have 
been included in the table, in order that figures may be published for 
all States. It should be observed further that the crime rate of one 
State may be based on the reports of 100 or more cities, w^hereas 
the rate of another State may be based on a much smaller number of 
reports. Also the reporting units in one State may consist largely 
of small cities, whereas in another State there may be a much higher 
proportion of the larger cities. Due allow^ance should be made for 
all of these factors in making comparisons of the crime rates for 
different States. 

No crime reports are received by the Bureau from the police depart- 
ments in New York City or in Atlanta, Ga. In addition the reports 
from the following cities, having a population in excess of 250,000, 
have not been included in the tabulation due to the fact that, at the 
time the bulletin was published, reports had not been received for 
each of the first 6 months of 1933 or that the returns were incom- 
plete or defective in some respect: Los Angeles,- Calif.; Indianapolis 
Ind.; Louisville, Ky.; Boston, Mass.; St. Paul, Minn.; Cleveland, 
Ohio; Toledo, Ohio; Memphis, Tenn.; Dallas, Tex.; Seattle, Wash. 
Likewise reports from the following cities having a population be- 
tw^een 100,000 and 250,000 were not included: Long Beach, Calif.; 
Wilmington, Del.; South Bend, Ind.; Des Moines, Iowa; Camden 
N.J.; Paterson, N.J.; Trenton, N.J.; Syracuse, N.Y.; Tulsa, Okla. 

As was observed in the bulletin for the first 3 months of this year, 
the East South Central States reported the highest rate for murder 
and nonnegligent manslaughter. The next highest rates for this 
offense were reported by the West South Central and South Atlantic 
States, whereas the lowest figures were reported by the Pacific and 
the New England States. 

With reference to the offense of manslaughter by negligence, the 
highest figures w^ere submitted by the Middle Atlantic and East 
South Central States, with the lowest rates being reported by the 
New England and Mountain States. Com.parisons of the number of 
offenses of rape reported by the various States of the Union should be 
made with caution, since the classification includes all oft'enses of 
statutory rape, regardless of the age of consent as established by the 
legislatures in the various States. In order to make due allowance 
for such differences it w^ould be necessary to refer to the several State 
statutes to determine the age of consent in each State. The highest 
robbery rate was reported by the East North Central States wath the 
low^est figure being reported by the New England States. 



With reference to the offense of aggravated assault, the table dis- 
closes that the East South Central and the South Atlantic States re- 
ported the highest number of offenses per unit of population, whereas 
the lowest rates were reported by the Mountain and New England 
States. The highest burglary rate was reported by the Mountain 
States; the highest larceny rate by the Pacific States; and the highest 
rate for auto theft by the West South Central States. The lowest 
figures for these offenses were reported by the New England and 
Middle Atlantic States. 

As was mentioned in connection with the figures for indi\'idual 
States, it is important in comparing rates for different geographic 
sections of the country to observe the proportion of large cities in 
each section. This factor is significant, because table 1 shows that 
there is a definite tendency for the large cities to report higher crime 
rates than those reported by the small cities. 

Table 4:.— Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to June, inclusive, 1933 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250.000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England— 142 cities; total population, 
4,493,119- - -. 


1 
6 
6 
3 
2 
1 

2 

1 
3 


12 
6 
9 

: 
\ 


9 
19 

: 

10 

6 
6 


24 
29 
43 

9 
12 

2 

9 
4 

8 


48 
112 

44 

20 

10 

16 
6 
35 


48 
153 
149 

38 

9 

24 
24 
62 


142 


Middle Atlantic— 325 cities; total population, 
10,153,897 


325 


East North Central— 317 cities; total popula- 
tion, 13,232,100- . 


317 


West North Central-135 cities; total popula- 
tion, 4,040,374 


135 


South Atlantic '—87 cities; total population, 
3,631,180 


87 


East South Central— 27 cities; total popula- 
tion, 1,102,029 


27 


West South Central— 61 cities; total popula- 
tion, 2,601,165 


61 


Mountain— 37 cities; total population, 871,203 
Pacific— 117 cities; total population, 3,272,274. 


37 
117 


New England: 






1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
11 
4 
6 

11 

^9 

14 
5 

? 

8 


5 

t 

32 

1 
5 

38 
27 
47 

27 
12 
20 
20 
10 

8 

5 
5 
9 


9 
1 
6 
21 
3 
8 

67 
55 
31 

41 
10 
23 
65 
10 

25 
8 

10 
4 
2 
8 

12 


16 


New Hampshire 




. 


7 








8 






8 

i" 

3 
2 
3 

i 

2 

1 


"" 5 
\ 

4 
2 
4 
8 


77 


Rhode Island 


1 


10 


Connecticut 


24 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York . . - . 


2 
2 
2 

3 


126 


New Jersey 


98 


Pennsylvania 


101 


East North Central: 

Ohio -- 


92 


Indiana 


32 


Illinois 


1 
1 


.58 




103 


Wisconsin 


32 


West North Central: 


35 




3 


4 

2 

1 


22 


Missouri 


2 




23 


North Dakota 


8 










8 


Nebraska . 




1 




14 


Kansas 




1 


1 


25 



Includes District of Columbia. 



Table 4. 



-Number of cities in each Stale included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to June, inclusive, 1933 — Continued 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25.000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION— Continued 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 












1 

io" 

7 
2 


1 


Maryland 


1 






2 

4 

1 
2 


1 
5 
2 
6 


4 


Virginia 




2 


1 

2 
3 

3 

1 


22 


West Virginia 




12 


North Carolina 






13 


South Carolina 














1 
2 

2 


4 
2 

3 


5 
13 

4 
3 
2 

1 
2 
11 
10 

5 
3 
1 
6 

3 
4 
1 

3 

7 
52 


13 


Florida ... 




3 


20 


East South Central: 




10 






3 


6 


Alabama 


1 


1 




2 
5 

2 
2 
5 

7 

1 


8 


Mississippi 


5 


West South Central: 
Arkansas 






1 


1 
2 
2 
4 

1 


5 


Louisiana 


1 




7 




1 
3 


.- 


19 




1 




Mountain: 
Montana 


7 


Idaho— 








3 


Wyoming 












1 


Colorado 


1 




1 


1 


4 


13 




2 


Arizona 








3 


Utah 




1 




1 


i" 

8 
3 

24 


6 


Nevada 




2 


Pacific: 

Washington 




2 




2 

1 
5 


15 




1 
2 


12 


California 


1 


6 


90 









Table 5. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known io the police, January to June, in- 
elusive, 1933 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

sault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Division and State 


Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negU- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 


0.9 
2.2 

a 

6.0 
10.7 
7.4 
3.3 
1.5 


0.9 
4.1 

1:1 

2.7 
3.6 
2.0 

211 


2.6 
2.6 
3.3 
2.2 
3.5 
1.2 
3.3 
2.8 
2.7 


9.5 
21.2 
89.5 
52.1 
46.7 
50.3 
51.5 
50.4 
47.8 


7.0 
19.4 
21.3 
10.9 
70.9 
74.3 
29.9 

8.7 
10.8 


142.6 
104.2 
187.3 
161.6 
229.8 
263.2 
256.1 
316.1 
243.1 


233.7 
147.5 
365.0 
347.1 
448.2 
331.8 
529.1 
520.0 
621.4 


96.7 


Middle Atlantic 


75.7 


East North Central 


180 2 


West North Central. 


176.9 






East South Central 


168 6 


West South Central 


205.3 






Pacific. 


200 9 






New England: 

Maine 


'.6 


1.0 
1.0 

.8 


1.2 

.9 

.8 
1.1 


.8 
3.4 


3.3 

2.5 


9.0 
5.7 
L3 

10.4 
5.9 

10.6 


14.3 
.6 


6.6 
6.7 
8.1 


113.0 
68.2 
25.2 
149.1 
124.9 
163.8 


176.4 
134.6 
98.1 
197.6 
337.5 
309.2 




New Hampshire 


40 3 




26.5 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 


107.4 
63 9 


Coimecticut 


107.2 



Includes report of District of Columbia. 



10 



Table 5. 



-Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to June, in- 
clusive, 1933 — Continued 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
as- 
sault 


Bur- 

iSkT 

ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Division and State 


Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION— Continued 

Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


1.2 
3.2 
2.4 

3.1 
1.5 
4.4 
1.6 
.5 

1.7 

1.8 

6.6 





2.4 

4.3 



2.8 
5.9 
2.5 
9.7 
4.8 
8.2 
10.9 

9.6 
6.1 
17.0 
6.4 

14.0 
6.0 
3.1 

8.6 




11.7 

3.6 



5.1 

3.8 
11.9 

1.6 
.7 
1.7 


1.5 
6.6 
4.7 

1.5 
.8 

1.7 
.8 
.2 


.2 

2.7 

1.0 


.3 
.9 



.8 
3.1 

.4 
9.4 


1.5 
3.0 

4.1 
2.0 
5.8 


d 





o" 






.2 

2.9 


2.3 
3.4 
2.5 

1.9 
4.1 
2.4 
6.5 
1.3 

1.1 
.4 
3.7 
3.0 
1.0 
.6 
1.9 

79.0 
5.3 
5.0 
2.9 
3.2 
1.6 
2.1 
1.4 

1.4 
1.0 
1.3 
1.3 

.6 
1.9 
2.4 
4.4 

2.3 
3.7 
11.7 
3.5 



1.9 


.7 
.9 
3.4 


9.2 
29.5 
24.9 

38.5 
41.3 
189.9 
38.5 
11.4 

38.6 
37.7 
64.5 
16.8 
55.8 
36.0 
65.3 

39.5 
31.0 
36.3 
30.6 
31.3 
138.1 
21.2 
60.3 

81.7 
39.0 
51.2 
16.6 

104.6 
29.8 
72.5 
48.6 

20.6 
37.0 


67.6 
23.8 
26.6 
35.3 
61.7 

40.2 
76.0 
44.3 


14.0 
33.2 
16.5 

22.5 
33.8 
28.8 
13.9 
2.6 

6.0 

7.6 
15.6 



1.9 
10.7 
11.7 


3.0 

83.9 
24.4 

S229.6 
41.8 
39.2 

2 147. 1 

76.4 
77.6 
72.7 
62.7 

30.6 
18.9 
15.8 
38.6 

4.6 
11.1 



6.7 

3.0 
46.0 

4.8 
71.5 

11.6 
6.1 
11.5 


82.6 
174.1 
86.2 

161.3 
150.7 
281.0 
129.4 
86.6 

148.3 
209.8 
147.1 
80.2 
146.3 
129.4 
220.9 


147.6 
234.9 
153.0 
233.6 
35.3 
177.1 
402.3 

237.9 
283.9 
290.7 
87.0 

262.3 
126.1 
262.4 
306.7 

106.5 
114.7 
46.9 
379.2 
279.8 
266.0 
316.5 
282.1 

280.2 
375.2 
213.2 


177.1 
197.9 
106.5 

371.0 
335.9 
277.4 
520.2 
278.2 

136.4 
281.2 
424.6 
188.0 
301.2 
362.3 
530.0 

79.0 
222.8 
581.0 
300.7 
406.3 
1, 023. 
671.5 
551.8 

411.5 
427.1 
214.5 
202.0 

616.4 
165.0 
586.0 
651.7 

738.8 
303.3 
316.3 
511.5 
626.9 
616.7 
411.8 
1,112.7 

717.6 
681.0 
593.5 


59.7 




101.3 




74.2 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


104 4 




128.6 


Illinois 


326.4 


Michigan 


102.0 




67.5 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


221.6 


Iowa 


122 9 


Missouri 


167.9 


North Dakota 


64.3 


South Dakota 


106.8 


Nebraska 


302.9 


Kansas 


171.1 


South Atlantic: 







170.8 


Virginia . . 


121.0 


West Virginia 


131.1 




176.7 




24.1 


Georgia 


114.0 




174.8 


East South Central: 
Kentucky 


132.0 


Tennessee 


165.6 




216.6 


Mississippi 


44.8 


West South Central: 


301.2 




108.4 


Oklahoma 


118.6 


Texas 


269.5 


Mountain: 
Montana 


147.8 


Idaho 


44.4 




11.7 


Colorado 


173.8 


New Mexico 


128.0 




30.7 


Utah 


218.8 


Nevada 


194.7 


Pacific: 


193.6 




133.3 


California 


214.2 







s The unusually high rate may possibly be due to the inclusion of simple assaults in the reports received 
from this State. The classification should include only those offenses which threaten serious bodily harm . 



11 

DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

The data in the tables which follow should be distinguished care- 
full}^ from the data compiled from the uniform crime reports. 

During the month of June 1933, 27,555 arrest records as evidenced 
by fingerprint cards received by the United States Bureau of Investi- 
gation were examined, and it was found that the records of persons 
23 years of age were more numerous than those of individuals of any 
other single age-group. However, the records of persons aged 19 
and of those aged 22 were almost as numerous as those of persons 
aged 23. 

For the entire first half of the calendar year 1933, individuals aged 
19 exceeded in number those of any other age-group, although those 
of other ages between 18 and 24 were not greatly outnumbered. 
During the 6-month period 159,493 arrest records were examined. 
The continuing predominance of youthful offenders is indicated by 
the fact that 1 of each 5 arrested was under 21 years of age, while an 
additional one fifth of those arrested was aged between 21 and 24 
inclusive. A slightly smaller proportion of the total was between 
25 and 29 years of age. In other words, almost three fifths of the 
persons arrested were under 30 years of age. 

The offenses with which youths were most frequently charged 
include vicious crimes as is evidenced by the following table. 

Table 6. — Number and percentage nf arrests of persons under 25 years of age 
January 1-June SO, 1933 



Offense charged 


Total 
number 

of 
persons 
arrested 


Number 

under 21 

years of 

age 


Total 

number 

under 25 

years of 

age 


Percent- 

under 21 

years of 

age 


Total 
percent- 
age 
under 25 
years of 
age 




2,979 
2,008 
9,015 
10, 839 
16, 672 

22, 410 
5,432 
2,345 
5,325 
3,213 
3,349 
1,890 
1,604 
2,450 
4,320 

26, 310 
1,438 
1,778 

23, 393 
2,191 

10, 532 


309 

499 

2,459 

1,143 

6,253 

5,835 

2,458 

274 

254 

494 

415 

113 

73 

111 

347 

3,961 

261 
4,165 

355 
2,130 


782 

916 

4,941 

9^882 
10, 191 

3,676 
654 
866 

1,124 

1,131 
363 
252 
452 

1,071 

8,796 
254 
737 

8,979 
792 

4,138 


10.4 
24.9 
27.3 
10.5 
37.5 
26.0 
45.3 
11.7 
4.8 
15.4 
12.4 
6.0 
4.6 
4.5 
8.0 
15.1 
6.1 
14.7 
17.8 
16.2 
20.2 


26.3 




45.6 


Robbery 


54.8 




27.5 




59.3 


Lareeny-theft 


45.5 


Auto theft 


67.7 




27.9 


Embezzlement and fraud 


16.3 




35.0 




33.8 


Offenses against family and children 


19.2 


Narcotic drug laws.. 


15.7 
18.4 


liiquor laws - -- - 


24.8 


Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and vagrancy 


33.4 
17.7 




41.5 


Suspicion and investigation 


38.4 




36.1 




39.3 






Totals 


159, 493 


31, 997 


62,977 


20.1 


39.5 







It wall be observed that during the first 6 months of this year 6,253 
persons under 21 years of age were arrested and charged with burglary- 
breaking or entering, 5,835 mth larceny-theft, 2,459 with robbery, 
and 2,458 with auto theft. In addition, 309 persons under 21 years of 
age and 473 individuals aged between 21 and 24 were arrested and 
charged with criminal homicide. 



12 

The total number of records of persons aged 19 was 10 percent 
greater than the number of records of those aged 18. The tabulation 
shows, however, a much larger proportion of 19-year-olds in the 
following instances: 



Offense charged 


Number 
aged 18 


Number 
aged 19 


Number 
aged 19 
exceeds 
those 
aged 18 




50 
111 
237 
557 


87 
152 
318 
714 


Percent 
74 




37 


Assault 


34 




28 







These figures tend to indicate that youthful offenders quickly turn 
to the more serious crimes. 

On the whole, there were fewer arrests for robbery during the second 
quarter of 1933 than during the first 3 months of the year. Of 80,785 
arrests during the first quarter, 5,241 were for robbery, whereas of 
78,708 arrests during the second quarter of the year, only 3,774 were 
for that offense. The decrease in the number of arrests for robbery 
during the second quarter of the year is no doubt due largely to the 
fact that the number of offenses of that type shows a downward trend 
during the second quarter. It is beheved desirable in this connection 
to point out that the number of arrests reported as reflected by finger- 
print records should not be treated as an index to the amount of crime, 
since it is perfectly possible that there be an increase in the number 
of arrests although there is an actual decrease in the number of offenses 
committed, or vice versa. 

Arrests for disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and vagrancy showed 
an increase during the second quarter of the year, there being 14,274 
such arrests as compared with 12,036 during the first 3 months. Dur- 
ing June the number of arrests on these charges was greater than dur- 
ing any one of the preceding months of the year. 

The majority of the persons arrested were males. Of the 159,493 
arrest records examined, 11,029 (6.9 percent) were those of females. 

Negroes consitituted 23 percent of all the persons whose records 
were received. Of the total persons charged with homicide, 34 per- 
cent were colored, and this race contributed a correspondingly high 
proportion of individuals in the following instances: assault (40 per- 
cent), carrying and possessing weapons (33 percent), and gambUng 
(44 percent). Negroes constituted a comparatively small proportion 
of those charged with forgery and counterfeiting, embezzlement and 
fraud, offenses against the family, driving while intoxicated, and viola- 
tion of narcotic drug laws. 

Of the 159,493 persons arrested, 35 percent had a previous record 
in the files of the Bureau. This does not mean that they were pre- 
viously convicted, nor does it mean that they were previously charged 
with committing the same offense. It means merely that at some 
previous time they were arrested and fingerprinted and copies of 



13 



the fingerprint records were forwarded to the Bureau at Washington, 
D.C. Six of each 10 arrested for violation of the narcotic drug laws 
and approximately 4 of each 10 charged with forgery and counter- 
feiting; disorderly conduct, drunkenness and vagrancy; robbery; 
or embezzlement and fraud had previous records. A slightly smaller 
proportion of those charged with burglary-breaking or entering, 
larceny-theft, or auto theft had previous fingerprint records on file. 
Approximately^ 2 of each 10 charged with driving while intoxicated 
or criminal homicide had similar records. 

It should be borne in mind that the data compiled from fingerprint 
records do not represent all offenses committed during the month, 
since there are ofl'enses perpetrated for which no one is arrested, and 
there are persons arrested for whom no fingerprint records are for- 
warded to the Bureau. 

At the end of June 1933 there w^ere 3,780,584 fingerprint records 
and 4,901,443 index cards containing names or aliases of individuals 
with records on file in the United States Bureau of Investigation at 
Washington, D.C. Of each 100 fingerprints received during June, 
more than 47 were identified with criminal data in the files of the 
Bureau. During June 1933, 347 fugitives from justice were identified 
through fingerprint records and information as to the whereabouts 
of these fugitives was immediately transmitted to the law enforce- 
ment officers or agencies desiring to apprehend these individuals. 
The number of police departments, peace ofiicers, and law enforce- 
ment agencies throughout the United States and foreign countries 
voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Bureau at the end of 
June totaled 5,941. 

Table 7. — Distribution of arrests, Jan. 1-June SO, 1933 



Offense charged 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Crimiiial homicide 


2,979 
2,008 
9,015 
10. 839 
16, 672 
22, 410 
5,432 
2,345 
5,325 
3,213 
3,349 
1,890 
1,604 
2,450 
4,320 

26, 310 
1,438 
1,778 

23, 393 
2,191 

10, 532 


2,' 008 
8,649 
9,977 
16, 365 
20,500 
5,371 
2,147 
4,961 
3,122 
2,013 
1,781 
1,463 
2,395 
3,917 

24, 347 
1,401 
1,743 

21, 874 
2,025 
9,711 


285 


1.87 
1.26 
5.65 
6.80 
10.45 
14.05 
3.41 
1.47 
3.34 
2.01 
2.10 
1.18 
1.01 
1.54 
2.71 

16. 50 
.90 
1.11 

14.67 
1.37 
6.60 


1.82 
1.35 
5.83 
6.72 
11.02 
13.81 
3.62 
1.45 
3.34 
2.10 
1.36 
1.20 
.99 
1.61 
2.64 

16.40 
.94 
1.17 

14.73 
1.36 
fi.54 


2 58 


Rape- 






366 

862 

307 

1,910 

61 
198 
364 

91 

1,336 

109 

141 

55 
403 

1,963 
37 
35 
1,519 
166 
821 




Assault 


7 82 






Larceny-theft 


17 32 






Forgery and counterfeiting . 


1 80 


Embezzlement and fraud 


3 30 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (except rape) 


.82 
12 11 


Offenses against famUy and children 


.99 


Driving while intoxicated 


60 




3.65 


Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and 


17.80 








.32 




13.77 


Not stated 


1.51 




7.44 








159, 493 


148, 464 


11.029 


100.00 


100.00 









14 

Table 8. — Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-June 



Table 9. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-June 30, 1933 



1933 



Age 


Percent 


Age 


Percent 


Under 15 


0.29 
.36 
1.67 
3.19 
4.73 
5.23 
4.59 
4.84 
5.19 
4.90 


24 




15 






16 .. . 


30-34 


14.06 
10.32 
6.97 
4 55 


17 


35-39 


18 


40-44 . . 


19 


45-49 


20 


50 and over 


5.61 
.27 


21 




22 


Total 


23 


100.00 







Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary-breaking or entering _ 

Larceny-theft „ 

Auto theft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.— 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children . 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, anc 

vagrancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated... 

All other < 



Totals.. 



Not Un 
cnown der 15 



4f. 
62 
354 

145 
1,274 
1,026 
475 
32 
29 
61 
43 
19 



^82 



50 
126 
557 
237 
1,473 
1,404 
628 
66 
50 
111 
90 
17 
18 
16 
75 

972 
19 
56 
1,011 
70 



87 
140 
714 
318 
1,337 
1,393 
577 
83 
86 
152 
145 
24 
22 
39 
101 

1, 166 
31 
76 

1,223 
94 
526 



8,334 



7,323 



613 
406 
1,005 
1,179 
356 
91 
145 
146 
151 
38 



140 

1,201 
30 

121 
1,170 

116 



1, 185 
312 
98 
144 
173 
174 



8,273 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide. 



Robbery. 

Assault... 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

Auto theft 

Forgery and counterfeiting...- 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (except rape)... 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated. 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and 

vagrancy 

Oambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Totals 7,823 7,157 



Age 



1,025 
327 
92 
155 
151 
215 
70 
49 
91 
196 

1,207 
34 
130 

1,2.34 
126 
512 



160 
176 
83 
42 
87 
205 

1,137 
45 



628 

354 

1, 936 

2,196 

2,821 

3,902 

861 

456 

982 

676 

711 

327 



4, 846 
301 
413 

4,549 
466 

1,822 



485 

231 

1,077 

1,777 

1,773 

2,900 

470 

384 

987 

454 

502 

380 

310 

433 

726 

3, 844 
249 
244 
3, 459 
• 325 
1,415 



22, 425 



171 

531 

1,382 

1,007 

2, 126 

225 

349 

905 

389 

376 

334 

283 

380 

549 

2,930 
231 
166 

2,397 

247 



194 
75 
148 
705 
288 
856 
46 
142 
403 
150 
153 
115 
124 
188 
293 

1,495 
115 
64 

1,080 
102 
527 



7,263 



50 
and 
over 



242 
142 

99 

832 

302 

1,015 

37 
139 
539 
178 
249 
130 
141 
231 
350 



Total 
all ages 



2,979 
2,008 
9,015 
10, 839 
16, 672 
22, 410 
5,432 
2,345 
5,325 
3,213 
3,349 
1,890 
1,604 
2,450 
4,320 

26, 310 
1,438 
1,778 

23, 393 
2,191 

10, 532 



15 



NUMBER OF YOUTHFUL PERSONS ARRESTED 

DATA OBTAINED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 
JANUARY TO JUNE , 1933 _ 



1000 



H UMBER OF PERSONS 
4000 6000 5000 



10.000 



Larcenx Theft 



Burctlarv 



RoBBERV 



W//////////M, 



Autotheft 



WKttMMk 



UNOER 21 YEARS 



AbE 21-2^ 



Table 10. — Distribution of arrests according to race and previous record, 
Jan. 1-June SO, 193S 





Race 


Previous record 


Offense charged 


Un- 
known 


White 


Black 


All others 


Yes 


No 






1,920 
1,606 
7,050 
6,317 
12,815 
16, 190 
4,684 
2,113 
4,677 
2,084 
2.668 
1,689 
1,166 
2,250 
3,300 

20,623 

703 

1,272 

17, 088 

81427 


1,010 

372 

1,868 

4,408 

3,737 

6,030 

715 

208 

596 

1,068 

653 

183 

145 

168 

5,392 
640 
473 

6,108 
336 

2,002 


49 
30 
97 
114 
120 
189 
33 
24 
51 
61 

18 
293 
32 
25 

290 
95 
33 

197 
26 

103 


544 

462 

3,698 

2,965 

5,942 

7,950 

1,829 

950 

2,294 

921 

861 

467 

946 

495 

1,037 

10, 730 

318 

497 

9,106 

827 

3,049 


2,435 


Rape 




1,546 


Robbery 




5,317 






7,874 






10, 730 


Larceny-theft 


1 


14, 460 


Auto theft 








1,395 


Embezzlement and fraud 


1 


3,031 


Weapons' carrying, possessing, etc 


2,292 






2,488 






1,423 


Narcotic drug laws 




658 






1,955 




2 
5 


3,283 


Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and va- 


15, 580 




1,120 






1.281 


Suspicion and investigation 




14, 287 






1,364 






7,483 








Totals 


9 


120, 471 


37, 105 


1,908 


55,888 


103, 605 







16 

Table 11. — Percentage ivith previous records, arrests, Jan. 1-June 30, 1933 



Offense charged 



Offense charged 



Narcotic drug laws 

Embezzlement and fraud --. 

Robbery... 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and va- 
grancy 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Suspicion and investigation 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

Auto theft 

All other offenses 



59.0 
43.1 
41.0 

40.8 
40.5 
38.9 
35.6 
35.5 
33.7 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.. 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Assault 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws 

Rape 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated 

Criminal homicide 



28.7 
28.0 
27.4 
25.7 
24.7 
24.0 
23.0 
22.1 
20.2 
18.3 



o 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume IV — Number 3 
THIRD QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1933 



Issued by the 

Division of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1933 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(U) 



NOV 1319^ 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Division of Investigation, United States Department 
of Justice, Washington, D.C. 



Volume 4 October 1933 Number 3 



CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses knovi^n to the police, 1933. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-33. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1933: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records. 

Number with records showing previous convictions. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term ''offenses known to the police" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as Part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to the 
police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting or 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be those 
most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (b) 
manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. 
The figures contained herein include also the number of attempted 
crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, 
are reported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted 
burglary or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the 
same manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (o) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths. (6) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person 
by force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

(1) 



4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maiming. 
Does not include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft {except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con-games," forgery, 
passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft.— Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthor- 
ized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of poHce in different cities, 
the Division of Investigation does not vouch for its accuracy. It is 
given out as current information, which may throw some hght on 
problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area 

In the table which follows, there is shown the number of cities in 
each population group which contributed one or more monthly crime 
reports during the first 9 months of 1933. The population figures 
employed for cities with a population in excess of 10,000 are estimates 
of the Bureau of Census as of July 1, 1932. Similar estimates are not 
available for cities with a population less than 10,000, and for them 
the 1930 census figures have been used. 

Crime reports for one or more of the first 9 months of 1933 have 
been received from the police departments in 1,638 cities, represent- 
ing an aggregate population of 62,041,342. The number of cities 
contributing reports to the Division of Investigation during this period 
is 92 greater than the number of contributors for the corresponding 
period of 1932. Eighty-five percent of the cities with a population in 
excess of 10,000 submit uniform crime reports, and it will be observed 
that of the 94 cities with a population in excess of 100,000, only 2 do 
not contribute uniform crime reports, namely, Atlanta, Ga., and 
Reading, Pa. A monthly report for September has been received 
from the New York City Police Department, and it accordingly has 
been included in the reporting area. 



Population group 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 




983 


840 


85 


60, 813, 881 


57, 466, 395 


94 






A Cities over 250 000 


37 
57 
105 
192 
592 


36 
56 
94 
171 
483 


97 
98 
90 

82 


29, 955, 600 
7,908,112 
7, 092, 407 
6, 695, 136 
9, 162, 626 


29, 672, 100 
7, 796, 212 
6, 429, 175 
6,001,913 
7, 566, 995 


99 


B. Cities 100,000 to 250,000.. 


99 


C. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


91 


D Cities 25 000 to 50,000 


90 


E. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


83 







Note.— The above table does not include 798 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population of 
4,574,947. The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, where- 
as the rural townships are of varying population groups. 



MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

In table 1 there is presented the number of offenses reported during 
the first 9 months of 1933 by the police departments in 1,274 cities 
throughout the United States with an aggregate population of 
49,505,611. The number of offenses and crime rates are also shown 
for these cities, subdivided according to size. 

There appears a general tendency for the crime rates to vary with 
the size of the cities. To this general tendency, there are certain 
exceptions. The figures for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 
and manslaughter by negligence are higher for cities with population 
less than 10,000 than for certain groups of larger cities. For the 
offense of rape, the rate for cities having less than 10,000 inhabitants 
is higher than for any other group, and for cities with a population 
between 10,000 and 25,000 it is higher than the figures for cities rang- 
ing in population from 25,000 to 100,000. The rate for robbery for 
cities wdth a population between 50,000 and 100,000 is slightly higher 
than for cities having a population between 100,000 and 250,000. 
Cities with a population between 50,000 and 100,000 have the highest 
proportion of offenses of aggravated assault; and for the offenses of 
burglary — breaking or entering, and larceny — theft, cities with a 
population between 100,000 and 250,000 have higher rates than cities 
with a population in excess of 250,000. 

The amount of variance in the crime rates for cities of different 
sizes differs with the offense. The highest figures for robbery and 
auto theft are more than four times as great as the lowest ones reported 
for those offenses. For the offenses of manslaughter by negligence 
and aggravated assault, the highest rates are more than twice as 
great as the lowest figures. Less variation is found in the rates for 
murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, burglary— breaking or enter- 
ing and larceny— theft. For those offenses, the highest rates are 
slightly less than twice as great as the lowest ones. The smallest 
amount of variation in crime rates for cities divided according to size 
occurs in the figures for rape. 

It is probable that major larcenies are more nearly reported with 
complete uniformity than are minor offenses of larceny. Accord- 
ingly a separate tabulation was made for cities with population in 
excess of 100,000 which reported separate figures for offenses of lar- 
ceny — theft where the value of the goods stolen was greater than $50 
and those in which the value of the material was less than $50. 





Larceny 


—theft 


Population group 


$50 and over 
in value 


Under $50 
in value 


28 cities over 250,000; total population, 19,169,700: 
Number of offenses known 


15,901 
82.9 

5,275 
74.6 


94,154 




491.2 


50 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population, 7,070,512: 

Number of offenses known - - 


40,494 




572.7 







The above compilation shows that the rate for major larcenies 
reported by cities with population in excess of 250,000 is 11.1 percent 
higher than that reported by cities with population between 100,000 
and 250,000. On the other hand, the rate for minor larcenies is 
16.6 percent greater for the smaller cities than for those with popula- 
tion in excess of 250,000. 

Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to September, inclusive, 1933; 
number and rates per 100,000 by population groups 



Population group 



35 cities over 250,000; total population 
22,454,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

62 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total popu 
lation, 7,302,512: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

80 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popU' 
lation. 5.440,453: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per lOO.OOO.... 

141 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popu- 
lation, 4,997,713: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

371 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 
lation, 5,8.33,950: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

695 cities under 10,000; total popula- 
tion, 3,476,9^3: 

Number of offenses known.. 

Rate per 100,000_. 

Total, 1,274 cities; total popula- 
tion, 49,505,611: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100,000 



Criminal 
homicide 



negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



1,490 
6.6 



2,614 
.5.3 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



11,555 
3.2 



1,172 
5.2 



2,324 
4.7 



Rob- 
bery 



25, 764 
114.7 



3,791 
51.9 



3,035 
55.8 



1,855 
31.8 



901 
2,5.9 



3,505 
48.0 



2,847 
52.3 



1,580 
27.1 



682 
19.fi 



19, 157 
38.7 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



71, 525 
318.5 



24, 499 
335.5 



14, 758 
271.3 



11,879 
237.7 



10, 962 
187.9 



6,365 
18.3. 1 



139,98! 
282. J 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



127,709 
576.5 



47, 042 
644.2 



34, 520 
634.5 



26, 175 
523.7 



24,394 

418.1 



11,645 
334.9 



<271,485 
551.7 



70,661 
314.7 



19, 234 
263.4 



10, 827 
199.0 



7,280 
145.7 



2,577 
74.1 



116, 938 
236.2 



1 The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 34 cities with 
a total population of 21,069,000. 

s The number of offenses and rate for larcency— theft are based on reports of 34 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 22,153,100. 

3 The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,273 cities with 
a total population of 48,120,611. 

* The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,273 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 49,204,711. 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, January to September, 
Inclusive, 1933 

The daily average number of offenses as reported by the police 
departments in 1,274 cities with a population of 49,505,611 is shown 
in table 2. Examination of the tabulation reveals that the number 
of offenses of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter and aggravated 
assault was greater in the third quarter than in preceding portions of 
the year. The monthly averages for those offenses are showing a 
variation similar to that which occurred in 1932, The averages for 
robbery and burglary — breaking or entering show a low point in the 



third quarter. This trend was likewise evidenced by the robbery 
figures for 1932. 

The averages for the remaining offenses fluctuate in an irregular 
manner. 



Table 2. 



■Daily average, offenses known to the ■police, January to Septembery 
inclusive, 1933; 1,274 miscellaneous cities 





[Total population, 49,505,011] 












Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


9.2 
8.8 
9.2 
9.8 
9.0 
9.4 
10.1 
10.3 
10.4 


6.5 
0.5 
5.2 
5.5 
5.6 
5.3 
5.4 
6.3 
6.1 


7.8 
7.1 
8.7 
8.1 
8.2 

10.0 
8.2 

10.3 
8.1 


191.9 
165.9 
155.6 
139.8 
120.3 
112.6 
117.5 
112.0 
114.6 


61.0 
62.5 
63.0 
67.3 
73.2 
74.6 
79.3 
76.1 
77.5 


571.1 
519.2 
540.1 
539.4 
501.0 
458.6 
490.8 
499.4 
494.1 


1. 016. 3 
958.9 

i.osai 

987.5 

958.7 

972.6 

1, 007. 4 

1. 026. 4 


477.5 




413.3 


March 


462.5 


April 


459.0 


May 


408.5 


June 


388.8 


Julv 


412.8 




400.4 


September 


430.6 






January to September.. 


9.6 


5.7 


8.5 


136.5 


70.2 


512.7 


994.8 


428.3 



Ja/ntLOAXy to SAptcnfn$c/Zy, 1933 
1274 (HUUd - S^eUtt S&^uC<xtl<m.49,S05,6U 

O 20 40 60 80 too 120 140 I60 \60 200 




1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 1 




III 




'''ill 










1 1 1 1 I 








mk 











Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-33 

In table 3, there is shown the number of offenses reported during 
the first 9 months of the years 1931, 1932, and 1933 by the police 
departments in 70 cities with population in excess of 100,000. The 
data are also presented in the form of daily averages. Examination 
of the table discloses that there has been a decrease in the number of 
offenses of manslaughter by negligence reported from 1,024 in 1931 
to 940 in 1933, a decrease of 8.2 percent. However, the figure for 
1933 is larger than that for 1932. For the offenses of auto theft and 
robbery, the table shows yearly decreases. For the offense of auto 
theft, the decrease is from 64,381 in 1931 to 51,845 in 1933, a substan- 
tial decrease amounting to 19.5 percent. The decrease in the number 
of robberies was not so large, being 7.5 percent. 

The total population of the 70 cities included in table 3 is 18,716,038, 
according to the 1930 census. The population for this same group 
of cities was estimated to be 20,294,502, as of July 1, 1932. This 
represents an increase of 8.4 percent. This increase in population 
should be taken into consideration when interpreting the figures in 
the following table, since it contains the number of offenses reported 
by the 70 cities during the 3 years without reference to changes in 
population. 

The compilation for the 3-year period shows that the number of 
offenses reported for several offenses was greater in 1933 than in 1931. 
The amount of increase in each case is as follows: 

Percent 

M urder and nonnegligent manslaughter 10. 

Rape 8. 7 

Aggravated assault 10. 9 

Burglary — breaking or entering 15. 8 

Larceny — theft 7. 4 

It should be noted that in each of the above cases, with the excep- 
tion of the offenses of burglary and larceny, the proportion of increase 
is only slightly larger than the amount of increase in the population 
of the cities included in the tabulation. The increase in the number 
of burglaries reported is substantially larger than the increase in 
population, whereas the increase in larcenies is slightly less. 

Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 70 cities over 100,000, 
January to September, inclusive, 1931-33 







[Total population 


, 20,294,502] 










Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses 
known: 
1931 - 


1,077 
1,094 
1,185 

3.9 
4.0 
4.3 


1,024 
787 
940 

3.8 
2.9 

3.4 


908 
964 
987 

3.3 
3.5 
.3.0 


13, 724 
12. 782 
12, 693 

50.3 
46.6 

40.5 


7,417 
6,587 
8,227 

27.2 
24.0 
30.1 


50, 128 
54, 930 
58.044 

183.6 
200.5 
212.6 


109, 719 
111,176 
117. 787 

401.9 
405.8 
431.5 


64. 381 


1932 


54, 033 


1933 


51, 845 


Daily average: 
1931 


235.8 


1932 


197.2 


1933 


189.9 







Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location 

In table 5 there are presented crime rates for individual States and 
rates for the States grouped into 9 geographic divisions. There 
are obviously several factors which affect, to some degree, the com- 
parability of the rates for States. One of these is the variation in 
the size and the composition of the population represented by the 
reports. For instance, the rates for Alabama, Colorado, Delaware, 
Idaho, Nevada, South Carolina, and Wyoming are based on reports 
from a very small number of cities, ranging from 1 to 3. The 
rates for several other States are based on a number of reports almost 
as small. It is apparent that in such instances the rates published for 
those States are not necessarily the true rates, but may be higher or 
lower than the rates would be if they were based on reports from all 
communities in each State. The same is true to some extent of the 
rates for all States, but serious variance from the true rate becomes 
less probable as the number of reporting units in the State approaches 
the maximum. 

Another factor which bears on the comparability of rates is the 
proportion of reports from large cities which has been used in the 
calculation of the rates, since examination of table 1 disclosed a general 
tendency for the larger cities to have higher crime rates than the 
smaller communities. It is possible to determine the number of 
cities of each of six population groups, the reports of which have been 
used in calculating the crime rate for a State or a geographic division 
by referring to table 4. 

Table 5 reveals considerable variation in the rates for 9 geo- 
graphic divisions of the country. For murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter the lowest rate, 1.3, is for the New England States, and the 
highest, 17.7, for the East South Central group. The figures for man- 
slaughter by negligence vary from 0.3 for the Mountain States to 6.3 
for the Middle Atlantic States. For the offenses of rape, burglary — 
breaking or entering, larceny — theft, and auto theft the rates vary 
within a considerably narrower range than for the offenses previously 
mentioned. However, the figures for robbery are 19.1 for the New 
England States and 121.8 for the East North Central group, and for 
aggravated assault they range from 14.3 for the New England States 
to 155.4 for the East South Central States. 

18372-33 2 



Table 4. 



-Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to September, inclusive, 1933 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 142 cities; total population, 
6 312 253 - 


2 
6 
9 
4 
2 
3 

3 

1 
5 


12 

9 
5 
6 
3 

5 

1 
4 


10 
19 
21 

5 
10 

2 

5 
2 
6 


24 
27 
45 

8 
13 

2 

9 

4 
9 


43 

HI 

95 

40 

19 

8 

16 
5 
34 


51 

154 

159 

65 

34 

10 

25 
28 
69 


142 


Middle Atlantic: 324 cities; total population, 


324 


East North Central: 338 cities; total popula- 
tion 15 069 507 


338 


West North Central: 127 cities; total popula- 


127 


South Atlantic: 84 citias; total population, 


84 


East South Central: 28 cities; total population, 
1644 735 


28 


West South Central: 63 cities; total population. 


63 


Mountain: 41 cities; total population, 923,375. 
Paciflc: 127 cities; total population, 5,276,225-. 


41 
127 


New England: 






1 
1 


11 

6 

10 
9 

8 

14 
7 
10 

7 


5 

4 
1 
28 
1 
4 

38 
25 
48 

28 
11 
22 
21 
13 


8 
2 
6 

4 

8 

63 
54 
37 

42 
7 
26 
72 
12 

22 
8 

10 
4 
2 

12 

1 

& 

5 
2 


15 








8 








8 


Massachusetts - - - 


1 


8 

" 4" 

4 
1 
2 

3 
3 

1 

1 
1 


6 
1 

1 

6 
4 
9 

4 
2 
5 
7 
3 


77 


Rhode Island 


11 




23 


Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


2 
2 
2 

5 

1 

1 
1 

2 


123 




95 




106 


East North Central: 

Ohio - 


96 




31 


Illinois . - . . 


65 




110 




36 


West North Central: 


32 




3 
2 


4 
2 

1 
1 


22 


Missouri - - - 


2 


23 




8 


South Dakota 








7 






1 




12 










23 


South Atlantic: 








2 




1 




2 
4 

2 




4 


Virginia 


2 


2 

4 

2 

1 


20 


West Virginia 




10 








13 
















1 
3 

2 


2 
3 


12 

6 
3 

1 
3 
11 
10 

4 
3 
2 
9 

3 

5 

1 

4 

7 
58 


13 






3 
3- 


20 


East South Central: 


1 

1 
1 


13 




7 




1 






3 






5 

2 
6 
6 


5 


West South Central: 






1 
1 

3" 


1 
2 
5 

1 


5 


Louisiana 


1 


3 


8 




21 




2 


29 


Mountain: 


5 


Idaho 








3 














2 


Colorado -- 


1 




1 


1 


4 


16 




2 








1 


4 






1 


1 


7 
4 
23 


7 






2 


Pacific: 


1 
3 


2 




1 
6 


16 




13 


California 


2 


6 


98 







Includes District of Columbia. 



Table 5. 



-Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to September, 
inclusive, 19SS 



Division and State 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 

enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New Encland 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central i 

West North Central 

South Atlantic ^ 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain. 

Pacific 3 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont.-. 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio * 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland... 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina... 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee.. 

Alabama.. 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming . — 

Colorado .'. 

New Mexico 

.Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California « 



19.1 
30.6 
121.8 
76.2 
65.4 
94.6 
71.3 
79.2 
87.6 



14.3 
32.0 
33.2 
17.3 
115. 
155. 4 
49.4 
14.4 



215.0 
163.0 
279.3 
253.4 
338. 5 
404.8 
408.7 
490.1 
431.5 



408.4 
236.7 
586.7 
533.8 
676.7 
494.1 
852.1 
811.5 
936.2 



2.5 





2.3 

1.4 

1.5 

2.0 
10.0 

7.5 



5.2 

1.3 

11.0 

.0 

2.8 
4.1 

2.6 
4.9 



5.2 
3.0 
5.4 
1.0 
3.9 

10.1 
7.5 
8.5 
4.7 
5.4 
3.2 
2.8 
2.3 

4.3 
2.4 
2.0 
2.6 



2.8 
2.6 
6.0 

3.1 
11.1 
11.7 

5.3 


11.2 

1.9 



2.0 
2.5 
7.5 



2.5 
23.1 

6.6 
17.0 

13.1 
41.7 
37.5 

72.3 
69.0 
259.3 

51.8 
13.8 

65.5 
55.7 
95.8 
24.7 
67.1 
48.6 
92.7 

33.0 
44.1 
51.7 
52.8 
47.9 
181.5 
34.0 
73.5 

104.4 
106.5 
73.2 
21.7 

132.7 
42.0 

100.6 
66.4 

6.1 
37.0 
17.5 
106.1 
32.7 
88.4 
58.1 
67.6 

95.0 
100.6 



23.0 
3.8 
8.8 
14.9 
14.8 
12.2 

22.6 
56.0 

27.7 

32.2 
47.6 
45.3 
23.5 
4.3 

10.0 
10.6 
23.7 
2.0 
1.1 
27.7 
21.1 

50.4 

4.3 

146.1 

41.2 
411.8 

86.7 

65.6 
167.3 

155.4 
186.9 
105.1 
111.3 

42.1 
34.9 
35.2 
60.8 

1.5 
18.5 
11.7 
11.3 

3.0 
44.9 

8.9 
79.5 

12.3 
9.4 

18.6 



184.2 
112.0 
41.4 
223.8 
184.3 
240.6 

146.0 
275. 3 
124.3 



306.1 
399.5 
193. 5 
137.9 

287. 8 
286.6 
214.6 
118.8 
217.5 
188.7 
350.7 

273.1 
206.5 
356.0 
232.1 
347.0 
36.9 
281.6 
569.3 

388.7 
403.2 
497.6 
110.0 

368.2 
218.4 
422.7 
481.6 

69.0 
166.4 

87.5 
584.4 
431.7 
534.8 
472.0 
544.4 

525.4 
571.3 
397.4 



290.9 
207.6 
14.5. 6 
393.3 

528.8 



299.9 
319.9 
156.1 

632.2 
678.1 
422.0 
792.5 
433.2 

316. 7 
531.5 
631.3 
304.8 



436.2 
332. 3 
875.0 
468.1 
604.8 
1, 530. 6 
1, 1.50. 9 
830.1 

676.9 
460.8 
325.8 
282.6 

859.5 

309.8 

868.7 

1, 056. 4 

904.3 
473.4 
350.0 
794.2 
729.4 

1,381.1 
635. 

1. 565. 7 

1,111.4 

1, 043. 1 

889.3 



1 The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 337 cities with a total population of 14,768,607. 

' Includes report of District of Columbia. 

' The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 126 cities with a total population of 
3,891,225. 

* The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 95 cities with a total population of 3,923,072. 

« The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 97 cities with a total population of 
2,642,345. 



10 
DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

The data in the tables which follow should be distinguished carefully 
from the data compiled from uniform crime reports. It should be 
noted that the tabulation of data from fingerprint records does not 
include all persons arrested, since there are individuals arrested for 
whom no fingerprint records are forwarded to Washington. Further- 
more, the number of persons arrested should not be treated as equiva- 
lent to the number of offenses known to have been committed, since 
one person may have committed several offenses, while, on the other 
hand, several persons may have been involved in- the joint commission 
of a single offense. 

During the first 9 months of 1933 the Division of Investigation 
examined the arrest records of 240,871 individuals whose fingerprint 
cards were received from local law enforcement officials throughout 
the country. There was quite a large number of extremely youthful 
individuals included in the total, 774 who were under 15 years of age 
and 925 aged 15. The following tabulation shows that many of 
them were charged with serious offenses. 



Offense charged 


Under 15 


Age 15 




4 
15 
249 
221 
39 


18 


Robbery 


31 




252 




227 


Auto theft 


61 







There were 12,418 individuals 19 years of age and 12,040 persons 
aged 22 who were arrested during the 9-month period. The number 
of those arrested who were 19 years old was greater than the number 
for any other single age group, and the following serious oft'enses 
were among those with which they were most frequently charged: 

Larceny— theft 2, 102 

Burglary — breaking or entering 1, 917 

Robbery 967 

Auto theft 850 

Assault 503 

Rape 215 

Criminal homicide 129 

Similarly large proportions of youthful offenders of other ages were 
charged with those offenses. 

One of five persons arrested was under 21 years of age and an 
additional one was between 21 and 24 years of age. The third of 
each five arrested and fingerprinted was aged between 25 and 29 
years. In other words three of each five arrested were under 30 years 
of age. 

For the first 9 months of this year the daily average number 
of persons arrested and fingerprinted for certain serious offenses was 
as follows: 



u 

Daily 
average 

Criminal homicide 16. 6 

Rape 11.6 

Robbery 46. 1 

Assault 64. 1 

Burglary — breaking or entering 88. 3 

Larceny — theft 123. 5 

Auto theft 29.5 

Of the total of 240,871 arrest records examined, 17,315 (7.2 percent) 
were those of females. The following charges are those on which 
they were most frequently arrested: 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and vagrancy 3, 284 

Larceny— theft 2,781 

Suspicion 2,394 

Sex offenses 2, 186 

Assault 1,470 

Negroes constituted 23.7 percent of the total whose arrest records 
were examined. However, the percentage of negroes arrested in the 
following instances was considerably higher: 

Criminal homicide 33. 2 

Assault 40. 6 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 34. 

Gambling 1 44. 7 

Expressed in terms of the number per 100,000 of the general popu- 
lation, the proportion of whites and negroes arrested for certain 
offenses is as follows: 

Number per 100,000 of the general population 
[Exclusive of those under 15 years of age] 



OSense charged 


Whites 


Negroes 




231.4 
3.8 
13.0 
3.8 


711.4 




18.7 


Assault - - - - - 


88.4 




19.9 







Thirty-five percent of the 240,871 individuals whose arrest records 
were examined during the first 9 months of this year had previous 
fingerprint records on file in the Division of Investigation. This 
means that in 84,776 cases the individuals had been previously 
arrested and fingerprinted and copies of the prints had been for- 
warded to Washington. It does not mean, however, that the indi- 
viduals had been previously convicted of the same offense or of any 
other crime. On the other hand, many of the individuals of whom 
the Division had no previous fingerprint record had no doubt been 
previously arrested. This fact is frequently noted on fingerprint 
cards received. The percentage having previous criminal records 
varies from 58.6 for those charged with violation of narcotic drug 
laws to 19.2 for those arrested on a charge of criminal homicide. 
It is possible to determine for each individual offense the number 
with previous criminal records by referring to table 8. 



12 



Table 6. — Distribution of arrests, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 19S3 



Offense charged 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Criminal homicide 


4,537 
3,175 
12, 596 
17, 496 
24, 115 
33.711 
8,058 
3,480 
7,957 
4,691 
5,321 
2,930 
2,472 
3,881 
5,911 
40,928 
2,192 
2,851 
34,431 
3,187 
16, 951 


4,106 
3,175 
12, 047 
16, 026 
23, 656 
30, 930 
7,947 
3,182 
7,439 
4,540 
3,135 
2,774 
2,221 
3,794 
5,349 
37,644 
2,141 
2,802 
32, 037 
2,953 
15, 658 


431 


549 

1,470 
459 

2,781 
111 
298 
518 
151 

2,186 
156 
251 
87 
562 

3,284 
51 
49 

2,394 
234 

1,293 


1.88 
1.32 
5.23 
7.26 

10.01 

14.00 
3.35 
1.44 
3.30 
1.95 
2.21 
1.22 
1.03 
1.61 
2.46 

16.99 
.91 
1.18 

14.29 
1.32 
7.04 


1.84 
1.42 
5.39 
7.17 

10.58 

13.84 
3.56 
1.42 
3.33 
2.03 
1.40 
1.24 
.99 
1.70 
2.39 

16.84 
.96 
1.25 

14.33 

7;oo 


2.49 







Robbery ... 


3.17 


Assault 


8.49 




2.65 


Larceny — theft 


16.06 


Auto theft 


.64 




1.72 


Embezzlement and fraud 


2.99 


Weapons' carrying possessing, etc 


.87 




12.63 




.90 




1.45 




.50 


Liquor laws 


3.25 


Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and vagrancy.. 


18.97 
.29 


TraflBc and motor vehicle laws 






13.83 




1.35 


All other offenses 


7.47 








240,871 


223, 556 


17, 315 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 







Table 7. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1933 











Age 










Offense charged 


Not 
known 


Un- 
der 
15 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




11 

8 
24 
34 
51 
12 
4 
8 

9 
6 

8 


4 
3 
15 
9 
249 
221 
39 
3 
5 

6 

1 

6 


18 
10 
31 
15 
252 
227 
61 
1 
2 

9 
7 

10 


40 
45 
184 
125 
1,146 
869 
414 

i'. 

48 
33 

'\ 

; 

7 
351 
43 
303 


71 
101 
471 
211 
1,826 
1,614 
690 
46 
39 

98 

77 

23 
8 
12 
51 

'\l 

46 
833 

527 


87 
185 
755 
376 
2,065 
2,087 
922 
91 
82 

161 
141 

22 

41 

90 

1,479 

108 

797 


129 
215 
967 
503 
1,917 
2,102 
850 
113 
138 

220 
216 

38 
28 
63 
140 

1,833 
48 

128 
1,771 

13C 


121 
200 
925 
542 
1,534 
1,756 
624 
125 
138 

179 
175 

41 

71 
161 

1,629 
42 
133 

1,474 
129 
763 


147 
190 
824 
640 
1,407 
1,764 
538 
136 
213 

218 
246 

61 
49 
104 
207 

1,789 

188 

1,718 

163 

810 


203 
201 
908 
678 
1,372 
1, 773 
466 
133 
214 

249 
260 

97 
81 
123 
241 

1,899 
86 
206 

1,871 
146 
833 


196 
162 
836 
773 
1,264 
1,579 
453 
134 
241 

226 
327 

107 
73 
141 

1,875 
61 
196 

1,767 
165 
801 


195 


Rape 


133 


Robbery 


740 




773 


Burglary— breaking or entering 


1,045 
1,431 




328 


Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc 


145 
240 

225 


Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and 
children 


276 
127 




71 


Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 


6 
14 

243 
5 
1 
62 
13 
26 






144 


3 

33 
3 

"""94 
11 
71 

774 


2 

49 
6 
3 
111 
15 
96 


271 


Disorderly conduct, drunken- 
ness, and vagrancy 


1,803 


Gambling 


78 


TraflBc and motor vehicle laws.. 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 


152 

1,591 

144 




752 






Total 


545 


925 


4,012 


7, .%! 


11,148 


12,418 


10, 821 


11,469 


12, 040 


11,640 


10, 670 







13 



Table 7. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1933 — Continued 



Offense charged 



50 and 
over 



Total al 
apes 



Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Lnneny— theft - 

Auto thpft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fra;;d 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated.. 

Liquor laws.. - 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, 

vagrancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



752 
3fi6 
1, 593 
2,839 
2,565 
4,2S0 



790 
582 
511 
707 
971 

5,9S1 

413 
5, 097 

481 
2,291 



558 

261 

778 

2,281 

1,511 

3,208 

353 

501 

1,365 

581 

607 

500 

414 

590 

756 

4,665 
335 

278 
3,585 

367 
1,748 



421 
182 
402 

1,598 
893 

2,063 
162 
323 
9.52 
331 
348 
363 
308 
484 



3,372 
236 

148 
2,432 

225 
1,274 



307 
128 
201 

1,135 
464 

1,315 
81 
210 
602 
217 
244 
197 
190 
300 
412 



179 
102 
1,584 
151 
865 



341 
221 
149 

1,414 
471 

1,578 
71 
216 
787 
257 
438 
184 
217 
367 
505 



1,865 

150 

1,175 



4, azr 

3.175 
12, 596 
17,496 
24,115 
33.711 
8,058 
3.480 
7.957 
4,691 
5.321 
2,930 
2,472 
3,881 
5,911 

40,928 
2,192 
2, 851 

34, 431 
3,187 

16, 951 



Total.. 45, 129 



34, 069 



25, 242 



17, 075 



Table 8. — Distribution of arrests according to race and previous record, 
Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 1933 



Offense charged 



known ^^^^^ ^^^^^ All others 



Previous record 



Criminal homicide 

Rape... 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Forgery and counterfeiting... 

Embezzlementand fraud 

"Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc.. 

Sex offenses (except rape).. 

Offenses against family and children. 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, 

vagrancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



2,943 
2,487 
9,713 
10, 052 
18, 288 
24, 187 
6,907 
3.152 
6,968 
2,957 
4,174 
2,603 
1,730 
3,522 
4,534 

31, 162 
1,071 
2,028 

24,765 
2,631 

13, 293 



1, 506 

594 

2,679 

7,105 

5.533 

8,942 

1,077 

287 

904 

1,597 

1,084 

276 

215 

257 

1,323 



754 
9,224 



3,382 



870 

732 
5,252 
4,839 
8.745 
12, 063 
2. 755 
1,407 
3,452 
1,361 
1,392 

705 
1,449 

807 
1,418 

16, 423 
562 
811 
13, 524 
1,223 
4,986 



3,667 
2,443 
7,344 
12. 657 
15, 370 
21, 648 
5,303 
2,073 
4,505 
3,330 
3,929 
2,225 
1,023 
3,074 
4,493 

24, 505 
1,630 
2.040 

20, 907 
1,964 

11, 965 



179, 167 



84, 776 



156,095 



14 



Table 9. — Percentage with previous records; arrests, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1933 



Offense charged 


Percent 


Offense charged 


Percent 




58.6 
43.4 
41.7 
40.4 

40.1 
39.3 
36.3 
35.8 
34.2 
29.4 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 


29.0 




28.4 






27.7 




Sex offenses (except rape) 


26.2 






25.6 


vagrancy 


Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws 


24.1 


Suspicion and investigation 


24.0 




Driving while intoxicated 


23.1 


Larceny— theft 


20.8 


Auto theft 


Criminal homicide 


19.2 













During September 1933, the Division of Investigation examined 
27,429 arrest records as indicated by the fingerprint cards received 
from law-enforcement officials throughout the country. Of the total, 
9,818 already had fingerprint cards on file in the Division of Investi- 
gation, Of the latter number, the records of 6,576 (67%) indicated 
that the individuals concerned had previously been convicted of 
some offense. The convictions for the more serious offenses are: 
Criminal homicide, 64; rape, 60; robbery, 421; assault, 378; bur- 
glary — breaking or entering, 1,073; larceny — theft, 1,431; auto 
theft, 309; forgery and counterfeiting, 239; embezzlement and 
fraud, 259; weapons (carrying, possessing, etc.), 94; and narcotic 
drug laws, 166. 

The total of 4,494 convictions for serious offenses listed above 
constitutes 68 percent of the total number of convictions which were 
disclosed by the fingerprint cards. Of the 64 individuals who had 
previously been convicted of criminal homicide, 1 was arrested and 
charged during September with criminal homicide, 2 with robbery, 
5 with assault, 5 with burglary, and 7 with larceny — theft. Similarly, 
over one half of those previously convicted of rape, robbery, assault, 
burglary, larceny, or auto theft were arrested during September on 
some one of the same group of serious charges. In other words, 
although they were not necessarily charged with the same type of 
offense as that of which they had been previously convicted, a large 
portion of the individuals whose fingerprint records showed that they 
had been previously incarcerated for serious offenses was arrested 
during September on charges which are generally considered as 
being among the more serious offenses against the person or against 
property. 

The tendency for individuals who have previously been convicted 
of serious crimes to continue exhibiting vicious criminal tendencies 
is further illustrated in the following figures. Of the 6,576 whose 
records showed previous convictions, 47 were arrested and charged 
with criminal homicide during September. Thirty of them had pre- 
viously been convicted of criminal homicide, rape, robbery, assault, 
larceny, or auto theft. Approximately one fourth of the individuals 
whose arrest records were examined during September had previously 
been convicted on some criminal charge, as indicated by information 
appearing in the fingerprint files of the Division of Investigation. 
Undoubtedly, some of the remaining persons for whom no convictions 
appear in the records of the Division had likewise been previously 



15 

convicted of some law violation but such information is not in the 
files of the Division at Washington. 

In connection with the tabulation showing previous convictions, 
it should be noted that the period covered is only 1 month. It is 
possible that the tabulation of this type of information over a longer 
period of time will reveal substantial variations from the data tabu- 
lated during September. 

Table 10. — Previous convictions of persons arrested and fingerprinted, 
September, 1933 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide -. 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault -- 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud — _.. 

Stolen property, buying, receiving, possess- 
ing 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution). 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws.. 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated.. 

All other offenses _ 



Total. 



Offense of which previously convicted 



16 



Table 10. — Previous convictions of persons arrested and fingerprinted, 
September, 1933— Continued 






Offense of which previously convicted 


Offense charged 


1 
Q 


£ 

11 


1 

•5 


a 


° o 
Q 


1 


a 
3 

a 

03 

o 


> 


III 


Is 

II 
5-s 


1 
2 




5 
2 
11 
20 

25 


, 










\ 

9 
30 
11 
29 
8 
3 
6 


1 
3 
17 
23 

24 
28 
4 
2 
2 


1 
3 
15 
17 
25 
42 
4 
1 
12 


2 


""2 

2 

3 

1 


1 
2 

J 

3 

1 
1 


1 
1 
6 
2 
4 
4 
1 


47 








3 

12 
24 
13 
28 
10 
6 
7 


72 


Robbeyry 


5 
8 
6 
14 
1 


2 
3 
4 
2 
2 


365 


Assault 


396 




692 


Larceny — theft 


321 992 


Auto theft 


5 
4 

2 

4 


222 




113 




3 

2 


1 




1 


.... 




241 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 
ing 


30 






5 

5 

.... 

1 
8 
24 
21 
11 
20 
3 


7 
2 
3 
2 

""l 
5 
128 
24 
41 
2 
2 


2 
3 
2 
2 
4 

"is 

19 


4 
4 
5 
4 
7 

4 
32 
24 
143 

4 




1 


1 
1 
1 






107 


Prostitution and commercializefi vice 


2 


-1 






52 


Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution),.. 










6 
3 
2 
2 
4 
7 
8 
32 
4 


51 






39 




63 

1 

7 
3 
17 

1 


"is 
"ib 

3 
4 

.... 










132 


Driving while intoxicated 


- 


1 






70 












83 




9 


3 
1 
3 


5 
...... 






438 


Disorderly conduct 


2 
4 




287 


Vagrancy 


678 




60 




3 








15 


Parking violations 


























3 

55 
2 
16 


1 
44 

"'ii 


1 
27 

4 
14 


""71 
6 
26 


1 
4 

2 


4 
4 


6 
6 






4 
41 

1 
29 


58 




24 
1 
6 


7 


17 


2 


950 


Not stated 


63 




1 


1 


3 










Total . . .. — 


166 


58 


281 


378 


250 


455 


33 


31 


44 


45 


4 


264 


6,57(5 







\00 200 300 400 500 


ditto J^e 


z 










m^m^m 


\ 




1 . 1 




! 1 




t i 1 


^^m 


^^^^^^^^\ 







17 

During the third quarter of 1933, the arrest records of 81,378 
individuals were examined Of the total, 51,429 were native whites, 
7,267 were foreign-born whites and 20,101 were Negroes. The signifi- 
cance of these numbers is probably best shown by stating the number 
of each of the three types of persons arrested in proportion to the num- 
ber of such persons in the general population of the country. Com- 
paring the number in each group with the total number in the country 
(exclusive of those under 15 years of age), there were 43 percent more 
native whites arrested during the third quarter of 1933 than foreign- 
born whites. The Negroes arrested were more than three times as 
numerous as native whites and almost five times as numerous as 
foreign-born whites. 

In the following instances, the proportion of foreign-born whites 
exceeded that of native whites and the proportion of Negroes was much 
larger than that of foreign-born whites: Criminal homicide, assault, 
weapons (carrying, possessing, etc.), stolen property (buying, receiv- 
ing, possessing). 

For the following major oft'enses, the number of native whites ex- 
ceeded the number of foreign-born whites, and the number of Negroes 
exceeded the number of native whites: Robbery, burglary — breaking 
or entering, larceny — theft, auto theft. 

Only in two instances was the proportion of Negroes less than the 
proportion of native whites arrested, namely, forgery and counterfeit- 
ing, and driving whOe intoxicated. 

At the end of September there were 3,914,228 fingerprint records 
and 5,042,123 index cards containing names or aliases of individuals 
w4th records on file in the Division of Investigation at Washington. 
Of each 100 fingerprint cards received during the 9-month period 
January to September, more than 45 were identified with data in the 
files of the Division. During the same period, 3,118 fugitives from 
justice were identified through fingerprint records and information as 
to the whereabouts of these fugitives was immediately transmitted to 
the law enforcement officers or agencies desiring to apprehend these 
individuals. 

The number of police departments, peace officers, and law enforce- 
ment agencies throughout the United States and foreign countries 
voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Division at the end of 
September totaled 6,226. 



18 

Table 11. — Arrests, July 1-September SO, 19S3 
[Number per 100,000 of population, excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Rape. - 

Robbery 

Assault - 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... _ 

Prostitution and commerciahzed vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated... 

Liquor laws. 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambhng 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations. 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



Native 
white 



4.1 
7.9 
11.1 
3.3 
1.4 
3.1 
.7 
1.1 



10.8 
1.2 
6.7 



Foreign- 
born 
white 



1.1 
1.1 

.4 
1.0 
1.3 
3.3 
3.5 
3.1 

.9 

.2 
) 

.6 
5.6 

.5 
5.0 



Negro 



6.2 
2.g 
10.1 
33.5 
22.3 
36.2 
4.5 
1.0 
3.8 
2.1 
6.6 
3.3 
2.1 
1.2 
.9 
1.1 
4.1 
12.6 
15.0 
17.1 
4,2 
1.2 
.1 
2.2 
38.8 
2.1 
15.1 



Less than one tenth of 1 per 100,000. 



o 



'^93b'3. ^^ 



O 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



// 



Volume IV — Number 4 
FOURTH QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1933 



Issued by the 

Division of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON: 1934 



ADVISORY 

COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(11) 



FEB 19 ^934 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Division of Investigation, United States Department 
of Justice, Washington, D.C. 

Volume 4 January 1934 Number 4 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

Pursuant to the recommendation of the Committee on Uniform 
Crime Records of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the 
Division of Investigation will begin in the issue of the bulletin Uniform 
Crime Reports for the first quarter of 1934, the publication of crime rates 
for individual cities with population in excess of 100,000. 

CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1933. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-33. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location. 

Daily average, offenses of robbery and burglary, 1930-33. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1933: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records. 

Number with records showing previous convictions. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prose- 
cuting or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the fol- 
lowing group of seven classes of grave oflenses, shown by experience 
to be those most generally and completely reported to the police: 
Criminal homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligcnt manslaughter, 
and (b) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated 
assault; burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto 
theft. The figures contained herein include also the number of at- 
tempted crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, 
however, are reported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an 
attempted burglary or robbery, for example, is reported iti the bulletin 
in the same manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

(1) 



1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths, {h) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maiming. 
Does not include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to coinmit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered" here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft {except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value. 
(b) Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con-games", 
forger^', passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for teinporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauth- 
orized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the Division of Investigation does not vouch for its accuracy. It is 
given out as current information, which may throw some Ught on 
problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 
Extent of Reporting Area 

In the following table there is shown the number of police depart- 
ments which contributed one or more crime reports during the cal- 
endar year 1933. The cities are listed according to size, and for each 
group the total population represented is shown. Population figures 
in excess of 10,000 are the estimates of the Bureau of the Census as 
of July 1, 1932. Similar estimates were not available for cities with 
less than 10,000 inhabitants, and, accordingly, for them the 1930 
census figures were employed. 

Since the inception of uniform crime reporting in 1930, there has 
been a continuous growth in the size of the reporting area. The 
number of reporting cities and the population represented thereby, 
are shown below for each calendar 3^ear to date. 





Year 


Cities 


Population 


1930... -- 


1,127 
1,511 
1,578 
1,658 


45, 929, 965 




51, 145, 734 


1932 


53, 212, 230 


1933 


62, 357, 262 







It will be observed that during 1933 the reporting area showed an 
increase of 80 cities with an aggregate population of 9,145,032. 
Furthermore, one or more reports were received during 1933 from 
86 percent of all cities with over 10,000 inhabitants. These cities 
included 95 percent of the population of all cities in that group. 



Population group 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total popu- 
lation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Tot^l 


983 


849 


86 


GO, 813, 881 


57. 728, 845 


95 






1. Cities over 250,000.. 


37 
57 
105 
192 
592 


36 
57 
94 
173 
489 


97 
100 
90 
90 
83 


29, 955, 600 
7,908,112 
7, 092, 407 
6.695,136 
9, 162, 626 


29. 672. 100 
7,908.112 
6. 429. 175 
6. 062. 513 
7, 656. 945 


99 
100 


3. Cities 50 000 to 100,000 


91 


4. Cities 25,000 to 50.000.. 

5. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


91 

84 







Note.— The above table does not include 809 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population 
of 4.628,417. The cities included in thi.s figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, 
whereas the rural townships are of varying population groups. 

MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

There is shown in table 1 the number of offenses reported by the 
police departments in 1,264 cities with an aggregate population of 
49,470,686. The figures are subdivided into six groups according to 
size of city, and are also expressed in the form of rates per 100,000 
people. On the whole, the compilation shows that cities with popu- 
lation in excess of 100,000 have higher crime rates than the smaller 
communities. It appears further that with certain exceptions, the 
crime rates vary among the six groups of cities according to size of 
city. The exceptions to this general variation are as follows: Murder 
and manslaughter for group VI, robbery for group II, aggravated 
assault for groups I and II, and burglary and larceny for group I. 
For the offense of rape there are several exceptions to the tendency 
noted above, but there is a rather small variation in the crime rates 
reported for the six groups of cities. 

The amount of variation in the crime rates for cities divided 
according to size differs with the offense. For murder and larceny- 
theft, the highest rate reported is two times as great as the lowest, 
and for manslaughter by negligence and aggravated assault, the 
highest figure is more than 2^ times as great as the lowest. The 
highest burglary rate is slightly less than twice the lowest figure. 
The greatest amount of variation in the rates reported is found in the 
figures for robbery and auto theft. 

Offenses of burglary — breaking or entering, larceny— theft, and 
auto theft account for nine tenths of the reported offenses included 
in table 1 . Offenses of robbery constitute 6 percent, and the remain- 
ing 4 percent consists of offenses of murder, manslaughter by negli- 
gence, rape, and aggravated assault. 

Seventy-eight of the cities with population in excess of 100,000 
people reported larcenies classified according to the value of the 
article stolen. A tabulation of that information is shown below: 





Larceny— theft 


Population group 


$50 and over 
in value 


Under $50 in 
value 


28 cities over 250.000; total population. 19,169,700: 


22, 235 
116.0 

7,295 
103.2 


130, 150 


Rate per 100,000 


678.9 


50 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population, 7",070,5i2: 


56,517 




799.3 







It will be observed that for major larcenies the larger cities report 
the higher rate, but for the minor larcenies the opposite is true. 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 1938] 
number and rates per 100,000 by population groups 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 

glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



GROUP I 

35 cities over 250,000; total population, 
22,454,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000...- 

GROUP n 

52 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 7,302,512: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

GROUP III 

80 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popula- 
tion, 5,446,443: 

Number of oSenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

QROUP IV 

141 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popula- 
tion, 4,975,881: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000.... 

GROUP V 

370 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popula- 
tion, 5,820,789: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

GROUP VI 

586 cities under 10,000; total population, 
3,471,061: 

Number of offenses known. 

Rate per 100,000 

Total 1,264 cities; total popula- 
tion, 49,470,686: 
Number of ofTenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 



1 1,435 
6.8 



1,470 
6.5 



34,90 
155. 



5,173 
70.8 



4,238 

77.8 



2,772 
55.7 



2, 475 
42.5 



1,152 
33.2 



4,543 
62.2 



2,070 
41.6 



2,113 
36.3 



875 
25.2 



96, 120 
428.1 



32, 844 
449.8 



19, 295 
354.3 



15, 853 
318.6 



15, 025 
258.1 



2176,436 
796.4 



65, 656 
899.1 



46, 509 
853.9 



36, 330 
730.1 



95. 131 
423.7 



26, 556 
363.7 



14,933 
274.2 



10, 014 
201.3 



8,617 
148.0 



3.257 
93.8 



3 2, 285 
4.8 



50, 719 
102.5 



25, 082 
50.7 



187, 683 
379.2 



<374,662 
762.0 



158.508 
320.4 



1 The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 34 cities with a 
total population of 21,069,000. 

2 The number of ofTenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 34 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 22,1,53,100. 

5 The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,263 cities with a 
total population of 48,085,686. 

* The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,263 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 49, 169,786. 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, January to December, 
inclusive, 1933 

Table 2 shows the daily average number of offenses reported by 
the 1,264 cities included in table 1. It should be noted, however, 
that the averages for manslaughter by negligence and larceny — theft 
are based on the reports of 1,263 cities with population as indicated 
in the footnotes to the table. The compilation discloses that the 
daily average number of offenses of murder and aggravated assault 
is highest during the third quarter of the year. Offenses of man- 
slaughter by negligence, larceny^theft, and auto theft are most 



frequent during the fourth quarter of the year. On the other hand, 
the daily averages for robbery and burglary show a high point in 
the first quarter of the year with a secondary high in the fourth 
period. The figures for these two offenses are observed to be further 
similar in that the lowest points are found in the third quarter. 



Table 2. 



-Daily average, offenses known to the police, January to Decetnber, 
inclusive, 1933; 1,264 miscellaneous cities 



[Total population, 49,470,630, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau o( the Census] 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny- 
theft 



Auto 
theft 



January 

February.. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. 

September 

October 

November 

December 

January to December 



9.1 
9.4 
10.2 
10.3 
10.2 
9.1 
10.1 
10.2 



7.9 
7.3 
8.8 
8.3 
8.2 
9.7 
8.1 
10.0 
8.2 
7.1 



193.4 
165.7 
155.6 
140.1 
121.0 
112.9 
117.3 
111.4 
114.5 
132.0 
139.3 
165.5 



60.3 
62.0 
62.1 
65.1 
70.7 
72.4 
78.4 
75.6 
77.8 
69.3 
62.5 
67.9 



570.8 
519.7 
539.4 
537.5 
501.5 
459.4 
490.4 
499.5 
497.2 
502.4 
507.0 
541.3 



1, 014. 4 
956.2 

1, 035! 6 

970^5 
1, 004. 7 
1, 022. 9 
1,131.8 
1,151.2 
1, 088. 6 



139.0 



513.9 1,026.5 



' The daily averages for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,263 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 48,085,686. 

3 The daily averages for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,263 cities with a total population of 
49,169,786. 

In table 3 are shown the daily averages for 87 cities with popula- 
tion in excess of 100,000. It will be observed that the general trend 
of the averages is the same as that evidenced in table 2. The figures 
included in table 3 are graphically presented in figure 1 . 



Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 87 cities over 100,000, 
January to December 1933 



[Total population, 29,756,512, as estimated July 1 


1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 






Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


1 


Larceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Auto 
theft 


January 


6.4 
6.8 
6.6 
6.9 
6.4 
6.3 
7.4 
7.0 
7.2 
6.3 
7.2 
7.6 


14.9 
4.0 
3.9 
4.0 
4.1 
4.0 
4.3 
4.6 
4.4 
6.2 
5.7 
6.0 


5.0 
5.0 
6.3 
5.3 
6.8 
6.1 
4.3 
5.9 
4.9 
4.2 
4.1 
3.5 


151.9 
131.6 
124.3 
110.7 
95.9 
91.0 
94.4 
87.5 

102! 2 
110.0 
131.0 


39.1 

41.4 
42.3 
41.9 
47.4 
50.4 
51.0 
49.8 
49.9 
44.3 
39.6 
42.5 


388.2 
353.3 
373.5 
369.6 
347.7 
317.8 
336.1 
339.9 
338.8 
344.7 
351.8 
377.5 


2 649. 5 
602.8 
629.2 
671.9 
637.5 
627.5 
626.5 
648.0 
660.5 
729.1 
75L9 
720.7 


362 1 






March 


356 8 


AprU 


350.4 


May _ 








July 


323 










October 


364 3 


November 


341.2 






January to December. . 


6.8 


4.7 


5.0 


109.8 


45.0 353.3 


663.3 


333.4 



> The daily averages for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 86 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 28,371,512. 
' The daily averages for larceny— theft are based on reports of 86 cities with a total population of 29,455,612. 



lOQO 


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I 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-33 

Table 4 contains the number of offenses reported by the police 
departments in 70 cities with population in excess of 100,000 during 
the 3-year period 1931 to 1933. The figures are also expressed in 
the form of daily averages. The tabulation shows that there has 
been an increase 'in the number of offenses of murder reported during 
the period covered, from 1,418 in 1931 to 1,602 in 1933. Offenses 
of aggravated assault have likewise shown an increase from 9,724 in 
1931 to 10,766 in 1933. There has been a similar increase in the 
figures reported for burglary and larceny. Expressed in terms of 
percentages, the 1933 figures have shown the following increases as 
compared with those for 1931: Murder 12.8, aggravated assault 10.9, 
burglary — breaking or entering 14.9, larceny — theft 8.5. 

There have been substantial decreases in the reported offenses of 
robbery and auto theft; for robbery, from 19,198 in 1931 to 17,523 in 
1933; and for auto theft, from 87,342 in 1931 to 71,387 in 1933. 
Expressed in terms of percentages, these decreases are 8.7 and 18.3 
for robbery and auto theft, respectively. 

In presenting the averages in table 4, no attempt has been made 
to take into account the changes which have undoubtedly occurred 
in the population of the cities whose reports have been included 
therein. Although some cities may have shown a decrease in popula- 
tion during the period covered, it is reasonable to assume that on the 
whole, the population of the 70 cities has shown a slight increase. 
Taking such an increase into consideration would have the effect of 
minimizing the amount of increase in reported crime, and of enlarging 
the extent to which offenses of robbery and auto theft have decreased, 
as shown in the following table. 



Table 4.- — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 70 cities over 100,000, 
January to December, inclusive, 1931-33 

[Total population, 20,294,602, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


vated 
assault 


Bur- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of ofienses known: 
1931 


1,418 
1,446 
1,602 

3.9 
4.0 
4.4 


i;092 
1,371 

3.8 
3.0 
3.8 


1,178 
1,247 
1,227 

3.2 
3.4 
3.4 


19, 198 
18, 270 
17, 523 

52.6 
49.9 
48.0 


9,724 
8,725 
10, 766 

26.6 
23.8 
29.5 


68, 407 
74, 079 
78, 600 

187.4 
202.4 
215.3 


152, 705 

153, 638 
165, 614 

418.4 
419.8 
453.7 


87, 342 


1932 


73, 230 


1933 


71, 387 


Daily average: 
1931 


239.3 


1932 


200.1 


1933 


195.6 







Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location 

Crime rates for individual States and geographic divisions of the 
country are shown in table 6. The number of cities the reports of 
wliich have been employed in compiling these figures is shown in 
table 5. This information is obviously of considerable significance 
in view of the fact that there is a rather large variance in the number 
of reporting cities and the population represented thereby in the 
several States. To illustrate, the rates for Delaware, Idaho, Nevada, 



8 



New Mexico, South Carolina, and Wyoming are based on the reports 
of only from 1 to 3 cities. Because of the restricted reporting areas 
in those States the rates should be used with caution. 

Another factor which may affect the comparability of figures for the 
several States is the proportion of large cities included in the report- 
ing area. Tliis factor should be given consideration in view of the 
fact that table 1 discloses a tendency for large cities to have higher 
crime rates than the smaller communities. 

Table 6 discloses that the East South Central States have the 
Hghest rates for murder and aggravated assault, whereas the New 
England States report the lowest figures for those offenses. The 
Middle Atlantic group reports the highest figures for manslaughter 
by negligence and the lowest for burglary, larceny, and auto theft. 
The Mountain States show the liighest rate for burglary, but report 
the lowest figures for manslaughter by negligence. 

Table 5. — Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform crime 
reports, January to December, inclusive, 1933 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250, 000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 144 cities; total population, 
5 203 965 


2 
6 

4 
2 
3 

1 
5 


12 

7 

9 

5 

6 

3 

5 
1 
4 


9 
18 
22 
6 
10 
2 
5 
6 
1 


21 

48 
»9 
11 

10 
5 
10 

1 
1 
1 
9 
4 
5 

9 
9 
8 

14 
7 
11 

7 
9 


47 

107 

92 

41 

20 

9 

14 
4 
36 

5 
3 
2 
31 

1 
5 

39 
25 
43 

28 
11 
22 
19 
12 

6 
6 
7 
3 
5 
5 
9 


53 
151 
157 

62 

36 

10 

22 

67 

7 

2 

6 
24 

4 
10 

66 
52 
33 

43 
8 
24 
70 
12 

22 
8 
9 
4 
2 
7 

10 

io' 

6 
2 


144 


Middle Atlantic: 315 cities; total population, 


315 


East North Central: 337 cities; total popula- 
tion 15 213 963 


337 


West North Central: 127 cities; total" popula- 
tion 4,403,079 


127 


South Atlantic: 85 cities; total population. 


85 


East South Central: 29 cities; total popula- 
tion 1 656 803 


29 


West South Central: 59 cities; total popula- 




Mountain: 41 cities; total population, 935,901. 
Pacific: 128 cities; total population, 5,314,539.. 
New England: 
Maine 


41 
128 

14 


New Hampshire 






7 








9 




1 
1 


8 


6 


79 


Rhode Island 


10 




4 

4 
1 
2 

3 
2 

1 
1 


1 

4 
4 
10 

4 

6 
8 
3 


25 


Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


2 
2 
2 

5 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 


124 


New Jersey 


93 




98 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


97 




31 




65 


Michigan 


107 




37 


West North Central: 


31 


Iowa 


3 


4 
2 

3 1 

1 

r 


22 




2 


22 




8 


South Dakota 








8 


Nebraska 




1 
2 

1 


_ \_ 


14 






22 


South Atlantic: 




2 


Maryland 


1 




2 
4 


1 
5 
3 
5 


4 




2 


1 
4 


22 






12 


North Carolina 






13 



1 Only 8 of the 9 cities are included in tables 1 and 2. 

2 Includes District of Columbia. 

3 Not included in tables 1 and 2. 



Table 5. — Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of unifortn crinn 
reports, January to December, inclusive, 1933 — Continued 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION— Continued 
South Atlantic— Continued. 






2 

1 








1 


Georgia 




. 


1 
1 

2 


3 
3 

3 


5 
12 

5 
3 

1 

9 

5 
3 

2 
8 
1 
3 
5 
1 

3 

56 


11 


Florida 




3 
-- 


19 


East South Central: 
Kentucky 


1 
1 

1 


12 


Tennessee 


7 




1 






4 






6 

1 

6 
5 


6 


West South Central: 






1 


1 
2 

5 

1 


4 




1 




5 


Oklahoma 


2 
3 


" i' 


22 




2 


28 


Mountain: 


6 










3 














2 


Colorado 


1 




1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


3 

i' 

8 
4 
24 


14 


New Mexico 


2 








]_ 


5 


Utah . 




1 


7 


Nevada 




2 


Pacific: 


1 

1 
3 


2 




2 

1 
7 


16 




14 


California 


2 


6 


98 







Table 



-Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to December, 
inclusive, 1933 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Division and State 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England 


2.0 
4.5 
6.1 
7.1 
14.6 
23.4 
15.7 
7.4 
4.5 

1.7 
.6 


2.5 
1.7 
1.2 

2.4 
6.0 
5.3 


2.8 
9.3 
2.7 
3.2 
6.0 
7.4 
4.9 
.7 
3.8 

2.9 





3.4 

1.9 

2.2 

2.7 
14.5 
11.4 


5.3 
5.6 
6.2 
4.1 
7.3 
4.0 
5.3 
5.8 
7.6 

3.7 
6.2 
LO 
6.5 
.2 
4.2 

5.6 
6.2 

5.4 


25.5 

43.2 
164.2 
101.1 

92.7 
128.4 

94.0 
108.6 
117.3 

20.4 
8.0 
2.1 

31.2 
7.4 

2L3 

18.0 
56.9 
53.5 


18.0 
4L9 
43.0 
22.0 
156.2 
200.1 
61.5 
21.0 
23.8 

35.8 
4.9 
7.2 
17.8 
21.0 
16.3 

29.9 
71.7 
36.5 


285.5 
222.1 
373.4 
346.9 
44 LO 
550.3 
531.9 
647.6 
584.8 

227.8 
160.9 
73.9 
293.0 
250.8 
328.6 

200.1 
375.7 
167.7 


552.0 

327.7 

814.1 

754.3 

918.3 

706.5 

1, 148. 3 

1, 158. 

1, 272. 9 

395.6 
300.3 
174.4 
543.3 
636.0 
655.7 

417.0 
443.7 
217.5 


262.0 




164.2 


East North Central i 

West North Central 


358.1 
365.5 




340.3 


East South Central 


309.5 


West South Central 


410.6 




402.9 


Pacific ' 


452.4 


New England: 
Maine 


184.9 




102.4 




50.3 


Massachusetts 


317.1 


Rhode Island 


98.9 




218.6 


Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


m.i 




218.5 


Pennsylvania 


16L6 



' The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 336 cities with a total population of 14,913,063. 
» Includes report of District of Columbia. 

3 The rate for manslaughter by neghgence is based on reports of 127 cities with a total population of 
;,929.539. 



10 



Table 



-Rate -per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to December, 
inclusive, 1933 — Continued 



Division and State 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



bSing Larceny- 
or enter- i ^'^^"' 



Auto 
theft 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION— COn. 

East North Central: 

Ohio <-. , 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin. 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carohna _. 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky... 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho... 

Wyoming... 

Colorado.. 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California s 



7.8 
4.9 
8.4 
3.3 
1.1 

2.1 
2.9 
13.1 
2.0 
1.9 
4.1 
8.0 

9.2 

5.7 
16.3 

7.2 
23.4 

8.0 
19.7 
20.8 

19.0 
22.6 
34.5 
11.8 

17.6 
13.5 
10.5 
18.2 




11.7 

6.6 

3.0 
19.8 

4.7 
19.9 

3.2 
1.8 

5.1 



9.0 
2.3 
16.6 



3.8 
6.5 
15.0 
4.3 



3.0 
6.7 
1.2 
5.0 

10.1 
9.6 

11.2 
6.7 
7.2 
3.2 
6.2 
2.9 

5.8 
3.3 
2.5 
4.3 



2.9 
7.0 

6.6 
14.8 
11.7 

6.2 


10.4 

2.3 



2.0 
2.7 
9.3 



97.5 
102.2 
339.7 
75.1 
19.3 

86.5 
73.0 

128.5 
54.4 
82.8 
66.2 

121.8 

42.2 
63.4 
74.3 
73.3 
67.9 

263.4 
47.6 

107.1 

156.6 
136.3 

23^6 

179.3 
50.8 

133.7 
87.9 

27.9 
37.0 
23.3 

149. S 
38.7 
92.5 
80.1 



43.0 
52.3 
58.8 
32.0 
6.4 

11.6 
15.6 
31.7 
3.0 
2.9 
26.7 
25.0 

64.1 

6.2 

193.9 

50.9 
566.6 
126.9 

97.2 
233.3 

209.7 
229.1 
140.3 
165.4 

17.6 
33.4 
40.7 
82.1 

8.2 
22.2 
11.7 
15.7 

3.0 
54.7 
15.0 
87.4 

17.9 
15.0 
26.0 



330.5 
419.0 
528.5 
267.8 
175.7 

391.8 
384.5 
286.5 
403.8 
293.5 
263.3 
479.9 

353.7 
265.6 
479.0 
279.6 
470.0 
36.9 
393. 
727.2 

562.9 
518.8 
673.9 
229.9 

526.8 
241.8 
576.3 
616.6 

272.3 
233.0 
110.8 
769.3 
532.9 
578.6 
629.8 
774.9 

713.7 
828.6 
532.1 



865.3 
981.5 
566.9 
1, 130. 8 
619.0 

440.8 
754.1 

64l!3 

701.5 

741.1 

1, 123. 7 



340.4 
615.3 
206.1 
134.0 

478.4 
293.9 
307.1 
155.4 
240.6 
562.4 
305.3 



604.8 


208.0 


457.5 


323.2 


1, 244. 2 


250.7 


596.3 


257.9 


846.0 


376.3 


2, 258. 1 


67.5 


1, 657. 8 


221.6 


957.4 


302.6 


987.9 


284.9 


623.4 


308.0 


488.2 


413.0 


545.6 


61.2 


1, 146. 1 


477.5 


315.6 


201.0 


1, 195. 8 


299.6 


1, 418. 4 


616.3 


1, 164. 5 


126.3 


569.6 


144.2 


408.3 


35.0 


1, 172. 6 


393.4 


1, 104. 5 


247.1 


1,619.7 


591.8 


924.4 


487.0 


2, 133. 9 


472.9 


1, 504. 6 


508.1 


1, 491. 2 


303.0 


1, 202. 2 


457.6 



* The rate for larceny— theft is based o n reports of 96 cities . 

6 The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 97 cities. 



Offenses of Robbery and Burglary, 1930-33 

In order to indicate variations in the amount of robbery committed, 
there is included in table 7 the daily average number of offenses re- 
ported during 1930 to 1933 by the police departments in 616 cities 
representing a population of 33,276,222. The averages are also shown 
for the same cities subdivided into two groups according to size. For 
the total of 616 cities, the compilation discloses a large increase from 
1930 to 1931, with a slight increase from 1931 to 1932 which is followed 
by a decrease in 1933. The increase in 1931 is quite substantial, 
amounting to 21 percent. It should be noted in this connection, 
however, that 1930 was the first year during which uniform crime 



11 

reports were compiled, and it is possible that the increase m 1931 is 
partially due to more complete reporting. 

The increase during 1932 is so slight as to be without significance, 
and the decrease during 1933 amounts to 8 percent. In connection 
with the decrease shown during 1933, it is probably of significance 
to note that the averages for November and December of that year 
are lower than for the corresponding months of 1930, 1931, and 1932. 

The variations in the daily averages for cities with population in 
excess of 100,000 are quite similar to those referred to for the group 
of 616 cities. In examining the figures for cities with less than 100,000 
inhabitants, however, the situation is found to be somewhat different. 
The increase in 1931 was much smaller, amounting to only 6.7 percent 
and was followed by a decrease of 11.5 percent in 1932, and an addi- 
tional decrease of 2.4 percent in 1933. For this group of cities the 
averages for both 1932 and 1933 are lower than either 1930 or 1931. 

The tabulation shows a rather definite seasonal trend for each year, 
the averages for the first and fourth quarters being considerably higher 
than those for the second and third periods. 

The figures contained in table 7 are graphically presented in figure 2. 

Table 7. — Daily average, offenses of robbery known to the police, 1930-33 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May - 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November. 

December. 

January to 
December.. 



616 cities (population 
33,276,222) 



114.2 
105.0 
90.7 
75.3 
70.3 
68.1 
73.1 
81.9 
84.6 
92.6 
113.1 
131.0 



119.4 
129.4 
111.2 



134.1 
118.2 
110.0 
103.9 
96.4 
87.6 
97.5 
97.2 
105.3 
117.0 
124.6 
148.8 



139.5 
124.9 
116.9 
103.4 
92.4 
83.4 
87.2 
81.6 
82.1 
96.4 
103.8 
122.0 



62 cities over 100,000 
(population 21,715,215) 



1930 1931 1932 1933 



96.1 
87.2 
74.2 
60.1 
57.2 
54.7 
59.1 
63.4 
65.7 
72.4 
90.4 
104.5 



95.4 
107.8 
93.5 

77^4 
71.3 
76.0 
81.5 
84.2 



113.5 

98.8 
92.9 
88.5 
81.7 
73.8 
83.1 
83.3 
88.6 
99.6 
107.6 
126.7 



116.3 
104.6 
99.4 
88.1 
77.9 
71.8 
73.7 
67.5 
66.9 
79.2 
87.6 
102.9 



554 cities under 100,000 
(population 11,561,007) 



1930 1931 1932 1933 



18.1 
17.9 
16.5 
15.2 
13.1 
13.4 
14.0 
18.5 
18.9 
20.2 
22.7 
26.5 



24.1 
21.6 
17.8 
15.1 
15.5 
14.8 
17.9 
20.0 
19.4 
19.9 
19.7 
23.4 



23.2 
20.3 
17.5 
15.3 
14.5 
11.6 
13.5 
14.1 
15.2 
17.2 
16.2 
19.1 



12 











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13 

In table 8 is shown the daily average number of offenses of burglary 
as reported by the police departments in the same 616 cities included 
in table 7. For the entire group of cities, the compilation shows an 
increase of 25.8 percent during 1931, which was followed by an addi- 
tional increase of 12.5 percent during 1932. However, a decrease of 
3.1 percent was shown for 1933. The trends for cities divided into 
two groups, according to size, are similar to those shown by the total 
of 6f6 cities. 

As was observed in the case of robbery, the daily averages for bur- 
glary tend to show a seasonal fluctuation with the figures for the first 
and fourth quarters being higher than those for the second and third 
portions of the year. However, the seasonal variations are not as 
regidar as in the case of robbery. 

The burglary averages included in table 8 are likewise presented in 
figure 3. 



Table S. — Daily average, offenses of burglary known to the police, 1930-33 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Month 


616 cities (population 
33,276,222) 


62 cities over 100,000 
(population 21,715,215) 


554 cities under 100,000 
(population 11,561,007) 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


January 


227.7 
261.1 
261.2 
241.1 
236.0 
226.4 
234.7 
243.4 
251.8 
244.8 
279.8 
289.4 


287.8 
305.9 
308.8 
294.9 
288.3 

soil 

322.8 
315.5 
319.0 
359.9 

374.8 


383.1 
373.9 
348.1 
360. 4 
338.6 
330.0 
344.8 
348.9 
350.5 
346.7 
360.2 
359.1 


379.0 
339.0 
363.3 
364.2 
330.7 
300.1 
319.5 
333.9 
329.5 

33915 
370.1 


162.4 
185.8 
185.6 
173.4 
167.9 
160.1 
163.6 
165.9 
167.8 
163.5 
190.6 
196.5 


197.5 
210.3 
221.3 
210.3 
206.1 
205.1 
211.5 
232.1 
227.5 
234.5 
257.8 
275.0 


272.4 
266.3 
251.7 
259.0 
238.4 
233.1 
240.4 
244.1 
247.3 
245.7 
255.8 
258.5 


272.0 
241.3 
262.7 
260.7 
238.8 
213.8 
227.0 
235.8 
231.1 
243.2 
247.4 
265.0 


65.3 

75.4 
75.6 
67.7 
68.1 

7i;o 

77.5 
83.9 
81.3 

92! 8 


90.2 
95.6 
87.5 
84.7 
82.1 
84.8 
90.6 
90.7 
88.0 
84.5 
102.1 
99.8 


110.8 
107.6 

96.4 
101.3 
100.3 

96.9 
104.4 
104.8 
103.2 
101.1 
104.4 
100.5 


107.0 
97.7 


March 


100.6 


April 

May 


103.5 
91.8 


June 

July.-. 


92.6 




98.2 


September 


98.3 


October 


96.3 
92.1 


December 


105.1 






January to 
December— 


249.7 


314.2 


353.6 


342.5 


173.5 


224.2 


251.0 


245.0 


76.2 


90.0 


102.6 


97.5 



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15 

Offenses Known to Sheriffs and State Police, 1933 

It has not been possible to determine crime rates for rural areas 
based on uniform crime reports due to the difficulty of ascertaining? 
the population area covered by reports received from law enforcement 
officials policing rural territory. However, there is presented in 
table 9, the number of offenses reported during 1933 by 37 sheriffs 
and 7 State police troops. The Division of Investigation receives 
monthly crime reports from a larger number of law enforcement 
agencies policing rural areas. However, the tabulation includes the 
reports of those who have submitted a complete set of reports which 
apparently have been prepared in conformity with the system of 
uniform crime reporting. 

It is, of course, possible that in some few instances there is a 
duplication of offenses reported. In other words, a single offense may 
be reported both by the sheriff's department and the local police 
department in an instance where they have dual jurisdiction. 

It should be noted that the reports included in the tabulation below 
represent only a very small portion of the rural area of the United 
States. 

Table 9. — Offenses known, January to December, inclusive, 1933, as reported by 

37 sheriffs and 7 State police troops 
Criminal homicide: 

Murder, iionnegligent manslaughter 98 

Manslaughter bv negligence 80 

Rape 1 183 

Robbery 389 

Aggravated assault 428 

Burglary — breaking or entering 2, 985 

Larceny— theft 5, 623 

Autotheft 1,070 

DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

The data in the tables which follow should be distinguished care- 
fully from the data compiled from uniform crime reports. It should 
be noted that the tabulation of data from fingerprint records does not 
include all persons arrested, since there are individuals arrested for 
whom no fingerprint records are forwarded to Washington. Further- 
more, the number of persons arrested should not be treated as equiva- 
lent to the number of offenses known to have been committed, since 
one person may have committed several offenses, while, on the other 
hand, several persons may have been involved in the joint commission 
of a single offense. The tabulations are based on fingerprint cards 
received from local law-enforcement officials throughout the United 
States. They have, however, been limited to records representing 
arrests for violations of State laws and local ordinances. Fingerprint 
cards received from penal institutions or those representing arrests 
for violation of Federal laws have not been employed in this tabula- 
tion. 

During the calendar year 1933, 320,173 fingerprint records were 
examined. Of these, 297,225 represented males and 22,948 (7.2 per- 
cent) were those of females. A large proportion of youthful individ- 
uals was included. Thus, 62,625 (19.6 percent) of the records repre- 
sented individuals under 21 years of age; 60,272 (18.8 percent) were 
those of persons between 21 and 24 years old; and 59,766 (18.7 percent) 



16 

were those of individuals aged between 25 and 29. In other words^ 
sHghtly less than 6 of 10 persons arrested and fingerprinted were less 
than 30 years old. 

Examination of the arrests by age groups indicates a rapid increase 
from age 16 to age 19, at which position a high point was reached. 
The number of persons arrested at this age was 16,307 and was greater 
than that for any other single age group. For males, it likewise was 
true that the number of persons arrested was greatest at age 19. How- 
ever, for females the highest frequency of arrests occurs at age 23. 

Of the^ 320,173 arrest records examined, 55,978 were those of indi- 
viduals charged with disorderly conduct, drunkenness, or vagrancy 
and 45,038 were those of persons arrested on suspicion or for investi- 
gation. (It is probable that in many instances a substantive charge 
was later placed without the Division of Investigation being advised 
thereof.) Excluding arrests on the above charges, there were 219,157 
records examined. Seventy percent of these were arrests on the fol- 
lowing serious charges: 

Larceny— theft 45, 620 

Burglary — breaking or entering 31, 161 

Assault 23, 185 

Robbery 16,369 

Auto theft 10,547 

Embezzlement and fraud 10, 423 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 6, 183 

Criminal homicide 6, 125 

Rape 4, 151 

Total 153,764 

Table 10. — Distribution of arrests, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1933 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft -. 

Forgery and counterfeiting... 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic-drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and vagrancy 

Gambling 

TraflBc and motor-vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



Total Male 



320,173 297,225 22,948 100.0 100.0 



Total Male Female 



1.9 
1.3 
5.1 
7.2 
9.7 

14.2 
3.3 
1.4 
3.3 
1.9 
2.3 
1.3 
1.1 
1.7 
2.3 

17.5 
.9 
1.2 

14.1 
1.4 
6.9 



1.9 
1.4 
5.3 
7.1 

10.3 

14.0 
3.5 
1.4 
3.3 
2.0 
1.4 
1.3 
1.0 
1.8 
2.3 

17.3 
1.0 
1.3 

14.1 
1.4 
6.9 



3.1 

8.4 

2.6 

16.7 

.7 

1.7 

3.0 

.9 

13.0 

.9 

1.5 

.6 

3.0 

18.9 

.3 

.3 

13.3 



17 



Table 11. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. l~Dec. 31, 1933 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Kape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or enter- 
ing 

Larceny— theft— 

Autotheft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc 



Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Narcotic-drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws. _ _. 

Disorderly conduct, drunken- 
ness, and vagrancy 

Gambling.. 

Traffic and motor- vehicle laws. 
Suspicion and investigation... 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Total. 



Not 
known 



53 
,55 
234 
161 

1,491 

1,176 

541 

30 

24 

57 



2,309 

2,177 

924 



112 
243 
953 
503 

2.712 

2,814 

1,185 

111 

116 

212 
191 



42 
125 

67 

127 

1,912 



141 



14, 621 



183 

282 

1,246 

656 

2,481 

2,840 

1,066 

146 

172 



52 
45 
87 
182 

2,477 
65 



16, 307 



169 

265 

1,174 



1,946 
2,351 



2,395 
703 

177 



2,412 
74 

251 
2,235 

220 
1,027 



15, 184 



253 

250 

1,176 

883 

1,799 
2,302 



325 
364 

121 
107 
181 
295 

2,549 
110 
263 

2,367 
207 

1,085 



15, 697 



1,088 
1,029 



150 
103 
196 
332 

2,502 
87 

252 
2,307 

215 
1,027 



15, 433 



951 
1,010 

1,338 

1,925 

430 

185 

322 



2,375 
108 
194 

2,062 
202 



Offense charged 



50 and 
over 



Total, all 



Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft... 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (except rape) 

Offenses against family and children... 

Narcotic-drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and 

vagrancy 

Gambling 

Traffic and motor-vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



1,275 
743 
3,650 
4,708 
5,273 
7,828 
1,673 

1,893 
1,289 
1,549 
746 
617 
1,036 
1,506 

10, 065 
595 



883 
3,865 



1,019 

474 

2,084 

3,781 

3,287 

5,808 

965 

790 

1,940 

908 

1,102 

784 

698 

1,022 

1,216 

8,245 
559 
574 



758 
356 
1,037 
3,058 
1,985 
4,385 



458 
371 

4,767 
492 

2,324 



561 

231 

522 

2,129 

1,149 

2,771 

219 

428 

1,227 

445 

476 

471 

413 

667 

682 

4,682 
332 



163 
280 

1,488 
657 

1,787 
107 
282 
790 
284 
349 
287 
243 
422 
485 

3,357 
229 
136 

2,124 
206 

1,138 



205 
1,867 

626 

2,169 

88 

304 



610 
260 
297 
537 
649 

4,849 
237 
142 

2,543 
230 

1,555 



6,125 
4,151 
16, 369 
23,185 
31, 161 
45,620 
10,547 
4,572 
10,423 
6,183 
7,287 
3,988 
3,370 
5,512 
7,387 

55, 978 
3,033 
3,866 

45, 038 
4,363 

22, 015 



34, 042 



15, 192 



19, 296 



In 113,545 instances (35 percent), the individuals involved had 
previous fingerprint records in the files of the Division of Investi- 
gation. The proportion having such previous fingerprint records 
varies from 58.9 percent for persons charged with violation of nar- 
cotic-drug laws to 19.6 percent for those charged with criminal 
homicide. Over 40 percent of those charged with embezzlement 
and fraud, robbery, and forgery and counterfeiting, had such pre- 
vious records, whereas, this was true of only 21.2 percent of those 



18 

charged with driving while intoxicated. Examination of the finger- 
print cards for the individuals separated according to sex reveals 
that 36.6 percent of the males and 21.2 percent of the females had 
previous fingerprint cards on file. 

Table 12. — Arrests, Jan. 1-Dec. SI, 1933 



Offense charged 


Previous record 


Yes 


No 


Criminal homicide 


1,203 
950 
6,925 
6,438 
11,473 
16,454 
3,689 
1,914 
4,491 
1,815 
1,955 
964 
1,986 
1,170 
1,848 
22, 299 
799 
1,078 

L672 


4,922 
3,201 
9,444 
16 747 


Rape.-. 


Robbery.. 


Assault 






Larceny— theft . 


29 166 


.Autotheft 


6 858 






Embezzlement and fraud 


5 932 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 


4,368 
5,332 




Offenses against family and children .... 


3 024 


Narcotic-drug laws. 


1 384 


Driving while intoxicated . 






5,539 
33, 679 
2,234 


Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and vagrancy 


Gambling .. ... 




Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated . 


27, 279 
2,691 








Total 


113,545 









Table 13.- — Percentage with previous records; arrests, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 



Offense charged 


Percent 


Offense charged 


Percent 


Narcotic-drug laws 


58.9 
43.1 
42.3 
41.9 

36! 8 
36.1 
35.0 
30.3 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

TrafQc and motor-vehicle laws 


29 4 


Embezzlement and fraud 


27 9 


Robbery 


Assault 


27 8 








Disorderly conduct, drunkenness, and 


Gambling 


26 3 


vagrancy.. 


Liquor laws 


25 


Suspicion and investigation 


Offenses against family and children 


24 2 






Larceny— theft- . 


Driving while intoxicated 


21 2 


Auto theft 




19 6 


All other offenses 











During the last 4 months of the year, 106,731 records were ex- 
amined and of these, 26,945 (25 percent) showed that the individuals 
involved had been previously convicted of some offense. Convic- 
tions on the more serious charges were as follows: 

Criminal homicide 245 

Rape 261 

Robbery 1, 544 

Assault 1, 407 

Burglary — breaking or entering 4, 123 

Larceny" — theft 6, 029 

Auto theft 1, 117 

Forgery and counterfeiting 998 

Embezzlement and fraud 911 

Narcotic-drug laws 681 

Total 17,316 



19 

It will be observed that the above total of 17,316 prior convictions 
constitutes almost two thirds of the total convictions disclosed by 
the fingerprint cards. In addition, the tabulation indicates that 
over one half of those previously convicted of some one of the above 
serious charges were currently charged with some one of that same 
group of offenses. The table discloses further that during the 
4-month period under examination six individuals currently charged 
with criminal homicide had previous convictions for the same type 
of offense. 

Table 14. — Previous convictions of persons arrested and fingerprinted, 
Sept. 1-Dec. 31, 1933 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny^theft 

Auto theft__. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) . 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic-drug laws.. 

Driving while into.\icated 

Liquor laws ,.._ 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor-vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Total 245 261 1,544 



Offense of which previously convicted 



44 
50 
330 
234 
626 
1,645 
223 
78 
175 

60 



407 4,123 6,029 1,11' 



26 

5 

4 

2 

2 

19 26 
17 
27 



•20 



Table 14. — Previous convictions of persons arrested and fingerprinted, 
Sept. 1-Dec. 31, 1933 — Continued 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Rape - 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft- 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud — 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing-- 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice- . 
Sex offenses (except rape and prostitu- 
tion) 

Offenses against family and children. - . 

Narcotic-drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws - -. 

Drunkenness— --- 

Disorderly conduct --. 

Vagrancy - 

Gambling 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor- vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated -- 

All other offenses 



Total. 



Offense of which previously convicted 



333 1, 782 1, 074 1, 743 187 144 



© O !* 

53.2 
o 



261 196 138 1,118 26,945 



276 
218 
1,555 
1,536 
2,794 
4,262 



195 
449 
215 

223 

198 

546 

347 

356 

1,817 

1,053 

2,627 

172 

79 

172 
3,821 



Of the 320,173 records examined during the calendar year, 236,125 
were those of whites and 76,224 (23.8 percent) were those of Negroes. 
The proportion of Negroes among the males was substantially the 
same, but among the females was 34.7 percent. 

It is believed that figures pertaining to the number of Negroes 
and foreign-born whites who were arrested and fingerprinted can 
most fairly be presented by showing them in proportion to the 
number of such individuals in the general population of the country. 
Expressed in such terms, the Negroes arrested were three times as 
numerous as native whites and more than four times as numerous 
as foreign-born whites. It is further interesting to observe that on 
this basis the number of native whites arrested was 47 percent greater 
than the number of foreign-born whites. However, for the offense 
of criminal homicide, foreign-born whites exceeded native whites by 
24 percent, and for assault by 100 percent. With reference to these 
two classifications, Negroes arrested were more than four times as 
numerous as foreign-born whites. The preceding figures are based 
on a 6-month tabulation involving an examination of 160,680 finger- 
print cards. 

At the end of December 1933, there were 4,060,174 fingerprint 
records and 5,186,899 index cards containing names or aliases of 
individuals with records on file in the Division of Investigation, at 
Washington. Of each 100 fingerprint cards received during the 
calendar year 1933, more than 45 were identified with data in the 
files of the Division. During the same period, 4,290 fugitives from 



21 



justice were identified from fingerprint records and information as 
to the whereabouts of these fugitives was immediately transmitted 
to the law enforcement officers or agencies desiring to apprehend 
these individuals. The number of police departments, peace officers, 
and law enforcement agencies throughout the United States and 
foreign countries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to tlie Division 
at the end of December totaled 6,394. 



Table 15. — Arrests, Jan. 


1-Dec 


SI, 1933 








Race 


Offense charged 


Not 
known 


White 


Black 


All others 






3,955 
3,210 
12, 529 
13, 165 
23, 477 
32, 372 
8,947 
4,145 
9,111 
3,804 
5,683 
3,525 
2,251 
4.913 
5,586 
42, 230 
1,480 
2,704 
32,275 
3,579 
17, 184 


2,025 

784 

3,513 

9,430 

7,167 

12, 202 

1,445 

363 

1,196 

2,171 

1,489 

368 

362 

398 

1,696 

12, 156 

1,343 

1,019 

12,008 

687 

4,402 


145 








Robbery 




327 






590 








Larceny — -theft 


1 


1 045 




155 








Embezzlement and fraud 


1 


115 




208 








Offenses against family and children 




95 







757 


Driving while intoxicated . . . - - 




201 


Liquor laws 


2 
5 


103 




1,587 


Gambling . . . 


210 


Traffic and motor-vehicle laws 




143 






755 


Not stated 


1 
1 


96 




428 






Total 


11 


236, 125 


76,224 


7,813 







Table 16. — Arrests, July 1-Dec. 31, 1933 
[Rate per 100,000 of population, excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born 
white 


Negro 


Criminal hnmicidfi 


2.5 
2.1 
7.9 
7.5 

15.2 

22.3 
6.3 
2.8 
6.1 
1.3 
2.1 
L7 
2.3 
2.4 
L6 
3.7 
3.1 

10.2 
5.9 

13.2 
.9 
.7 

20.9 
2.4 
9.9 


3.1 

L7 
2.4 
15.1 
6.0 
12.8 
1.4 
1.5 
3.8 
2.2 
2.7 

.7 
2.4 
2.3 

.6 
2.1 
2.1 
6.3 
6.3 
6.3 
1.6 

.4 

11.7 
1.2 
8.6 


12.6 


Rape 


5 1 




20.5 


Assault 


62.5 


Burglary — Breaking or entering 


42 7 




76.8 


Auto theft 


9.1 




1.9 




7.5 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 


4.2 




13.7 




6.1 


Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 


4.3 




2.3 




2.7 


Driving while intoxicated 


2 9 




8.7 


Drunkenness. ... . . 


25.8 


Disorderly conduct 


26 3 




32.1 


Gambling 


8.7 


Road and driving laws 


2.7 




.1 


Other traffic and motor-vehicle laws 


4.0 


Suspicion and investigation 


73.4 




4.4 


All other offenses 


25.6 






Total 


156.1 


106.5 


486.5 







' Less than Ho of 1 per 100,000. 



o 



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