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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

q3s'5 ^ a^Z 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume V — Number 1 
FIRST QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1934 



Issued by the 

Division of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1934 



ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(n) 



U. S. SUPEKlliiliVUuU OF 00CUNIINT8 
MAY 1819M 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Division of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, 
Washington, D.C. 

Volumes April 1934 Number 1 

CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1934. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-34. 

Offenses known to the police— cities divided according to location. 

Data for individual cities. 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police. 

Offenses known in the possessions. 

Number of police department employees. 
Annual returns: 

Offenses known and offenses cleared by arrest, 1933. 

Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1933. 

Persons released (not held for prosecution), 1933. 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 1931-33. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1934: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records. 

Number with records showing previous convictions. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecut- 
ing or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following 
group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to' be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and 
(6) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are re- 
ported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted 
burglar}^ or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the 
same manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 

(1) 



Complaints which upon investigation are learned to be groundless 
are not included in the tabulations which follow. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deatlis. (6) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the per- 
son responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, rob- 
bery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shoot- 
ing, cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maiming. 
Does not include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft {except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value. (6) 
Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con" games, 
forgery, passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unau- 
thorized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the Division of Investigation does not vouch for its accuracy. It is 
given out as current information, which may throw some light on 
problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area 

In the table which follows there is shown the number of police 
departments from which one or more crime reports have been received 
during the first 3 months of 1934. The data are presented for the 
cities divided according to size. The population figures employed 
are estimates as of July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census for all 
cities with population in excess of 10,000. No estimates were avail- 
able, however, for those with a smaller number of inhabitants, and 
accordingly for them the figures listed in the 1930 decennial census 
were used. 

The growth in the crime reporting area is evidenced by the follow- 
ing figures for the first 3 months of 1932-34: 



Yenr 


Cities 


Population 


1932- 


1,476 
1..561 
J. 593 


49,368,23! 


1933 


53. 295, 620 


1931 


61, 715, 0.'9 







The above comparison shows that during the first quarter of 1934 
there was an increase of 32 cities as compared with the corresponding 
period of 1933, the population represented by those cities being 
8,419,459. 



Population proup 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total pop- 
ulation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total - 


983 


828 


84 


60,813,881 


57, 347, 707 


94 






1. Cities over 250,000 

2. Cities 100,000 to 250,000. 

3 Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


37 
57 
105 
192 
592 


36 

57 
94 
173 

468 


97 
100 
90 
90 

79 


29. 955, 600 
7,908,112 
7, 092, 407 
6, 695, 136 
9,162,626 


29, 672, 100 
7,908,112 
6,378,111 
0,072,113 
7, 317, 271 


99 
100 
90 


4. Cities 25,000 to 50,000 


91 


5. Cities 10,000 to 25.000.. 


80' 



The above table does not indude 765 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population of 4,367,372. 
The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural 
townships are of varying population groups. 

MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

In table 1 there is presented the number of know^n offenses recorded 
by the police departments in 1,382 cities with an aggregate popula- 
tion of 57,844,446. The figures are also presented for the cities 
divided into six groups according to size. 

The compilation shows that in general cities with over 100,000 
inhabitants report liigher crime rates than the smaller communities. 
Examination of the compilation discloses, however, that there are 
some exceptions to that general tendency. 

There is considerable variation in the crime rates for the six groups 
of cities, the amount of the variation differing with the offense. With 
the exception of manslaughter by neghgence, the largest amount of 
variation in the figures occurs in the data pertaining to robbery and 
auto theft, whereas the smallest amount of difference in the crime 
rates is found in the figures for murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

Seventy-nine of the cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants 
reported offenses of larceny — theft separated according to the value of 
the object stolen. In the compilation below there appear figures for 
that type of offense separated according to the value of the article 
involved. 





Larceny— theft 


Population group 


$50 and over 
in value 


Under .$50 in 
value 


28 cities over 250,000: total population, 19,176,900: 
Number of offenses known 


5.171 
27.0 

1,061 
23. 5 


30 958 


Rate per 100,000 




51 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population, 7,071,712: 
Number of offenses known 


13 165 




186.2 







It will be observed from the above compilation that the larger 
cities report a sUghtly liigher rate for major larcenies but the opposite 
is true with reference to minor offenses of that type. 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to March, inclusive, 1934; number 
and rates per 100,000 by population groups 



[Population as estimated July 



2, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



GROUP I 

36 cities over 250,000; total populati 
29,672,100: 
Number of offenses known 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP II 

52 cities, 100.000 to 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 7,195,512: 
Number of offenses known . . 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP in 

79 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popula- 
tion, 5,408,343: 

Number of offenses known. 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP IV 

149 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popula 
tion, 5,214,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP V 

419 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popula- 
tion, 6,555,335: 

Number of offenses known _ 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP VI 



647 cities under 10,000; total population, 
3,799,156: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Total 1,382 cities; total popula- 
tion, 57,844,446: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000... 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 



Rob- 
bery 



1,244 
17.3 



3.061 
10.3 



706 
13.1 



562 
10.8 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 

enter- 



25,723 
86.7 



4,024 
77.2 



2,009 
52.9 



47, 948 
82.9 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



10, 591 

195.8 



8.723 
133.1 



4,060 



19,529 
87.0 



5,929 
82.4 



3,167 
58.6 



2,319 
35.4 



• The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 35 cities with a 
total population of 28,287,100. 

2 The number of offenses and rate for larceny — theft are based on reports of 34 cities with a total population 
of 22,153,100. 

3 The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are based on reports of 35 cities with a total population of 
22,454,000. 

* The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,381 cities with 
a total population of 56,459,446. 

» The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,380 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 50,325,446. 

« The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are based on reports of 1,381 cities with a total population 
of 50,626,346. 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1934 

Table 2 shows the daily average number of offenses reported during 
the first 3 months of 1934 by the same 1,382 cities whose reports are 
included in table 1. The averages show an increase for murder and 
aggravated assault but for the remaining offenses there is a decrease, 
although the decrease for robbery is rather slight. 

With the exception of the figures for murder and manslaughter, 
the average number of ofl'enses reported for February is lower than 
for either of the other 2 months. 



Table 2. — Daily average, offenses known to the -police, January to March, inclusive, 
1934; 1,382 miscellaneous cities 

[Total population, 57,844,446, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breakmg 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




ai 

10.1 
10.5 


1 10.6 
9.2 

8.8 


10.1 

8.7 
9.8 


141.0 
137.4 
139.5 


66.0 
63.1 
71.6 


556.3 
509.5 
530.2 


2 1, 024. 3 

934.3 

1, 017. 6 


3 407. 9 


Februarv 


350.1 


March " 


392.6 






Total 


9.8 


9.5 


9.6 


139.4 


67.0 


532.8 


994.0 


384.7 







' The daUy averages for manslaughter bv negligence are based on reports of 1,381 cities with a total 
population of 56,459,440. 

2 The daily averages for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,380 cities with a total population of 
50,325,446. 

2 The daily averages for auto theft are based on reports of 1,381 cities with a total population of 50,626,346. 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-34 

In order to make comparisons with previous years there is presented 
in the following table the number of offenses reported for the first 3 
months of 1931 to 1934 by the police departments in 70 cities with an 
aggregate population of 19,311,002. The data are also presented in 
the form of daily averages. The compilation discloses that the 
number of murders reported was lower in the first three months of 
1934 than during the corresponding period of any of the previous 
years included in the table. Similarly the figures for robbery and 
auto theft showed a substantial reduction while the figures for aggra- 
vated assaults w^ere only slightly lower than for 1933. The number 
of burglaries reported was lower than last year but higher than the 
preceding 2 years. The number of larcenies showed a slight increase 
over 1933. 

Compared with 1933 robberies showed a 21 percent decrease and 
auto thefts an 18 percent decrease. If compared with the figures 
for 1931 the percentages of decrease would be substantially larger. 

Compared with the corresponding period of 1933 the number of 
murders reported during the first quarter of 1934 showed a decrease 
of 41 (10.8 percent). 



Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the -police, 70 cities over 100,000, 
January to March, inclusive, 1931-34 

[Total population, 19,311,002, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known: 
1931 


362 
358 

339 

4.0 
3.9 
4.2 

3.8 


363 
306 
255 
338 

4.0 
3.4 

2.8 
3.8 


295 
304 
305 
304 

3.3 
3.3 
3.4 
3.4 


5,726 
5.074 
4,925 
3, 913 

63.6 

55.8 
54.7 
43.5 


2,244 
1,931 

2|l58 

24.9 
21.2 
25.4 
24.0 


17, 571 
19, 024 
19, 437 
19, 108 

195.2 
209.1 
216.0 
212.3 


36, 129 
36, 121 
38, 004 
38, 236 

401.4 
396.9 
422.3 
424.8 


21 932 


1932 


18, 680 


1933 


1934. . 


13,868 
243 7 


Daily average: 
1931 


1932 


204.2 


1933 




1934 


154 1 







Offenses Known to the Police—Cities Divided According to Location 

In table 4, there is shown the number of cities in each State, the 
reports of which were employed in determining the crime rates listed 
in table 5. The figures in table 4 are divided into six groups according 
to size of city. Such information is presented in the bulletin in order 
to provide a suitable basis for properly evaluating the data presented 
in table 5. In some instances the crime rates for individual States are 
based on a very limited number of reports and such data should be used 
with caution, particularly for comparative purposes. Obviously, 
crime rates based on the reports of 2 or 3 communities may differ 
considerably from the rates which would be obtained if based on 
data for the entire State. Furthermore, in comparing crime rates 
for two or more States, consideration should be given to the compo- 
sition of the population of the State with reference to the number of 
large cities included. This is of significance in view of the fact that 
table 1 indicates that as a general rule cities with population in excess 
of 100,000 have higher crime rates than the smaller communities. 

Table 5 discloses that the East South Central States have the highest 
rates for murder and aggravated assault. The New England States 
report the lowest figures for those offenses. 

For robbery, the highest rates are reported by the East South Cen- 
tral and East North Central groups, and the lowest figures by the 
Middle Atlantic and New England States. The tabulation shows the 
highest number of burglaries in the Pacific States, with the lowest 
figure being reported by the Middle Atlantic group, which also reports 
the lowest figures for larceny — theft and auto theft. The highest 
figures for larceny — theft are reported by the Pacific and West South 
Central States, and the highest rates for auto theft by the Mountain 
and Pacific divisions. 



Table 4. — Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform crime 
reports, January to March, inclusive, 1934 





Population 




Division ;\nd' State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 155 cities; total population, 
5 505 244 


2 

7 

9 

4 

2 

3 

3 
1 
5 


12 
8 
9 
4 
6 
3 
5 
4 


10 

18 
23 
6 
8 

5 

1 
6 

1 


25 

25 

46 

11 

12 

5 

10 
5 
10 

1 
1 
1 

10 
5 
7 

8 
9 
8 

15 

7 
9 
7 
8 


53 
124 
97 
46 
24 
12 

20 

7 
36 

6 

4 
1 
34 
1 
7 

42 
30 
52 

28 
12 
24 
22 
11 

10 
8 
7 
3 
5 
5 
8 


53 

175 

177 

69 

36 

8 

29 
29 

71 

9 
1 
8 
23 
4 
8 

74 
63 
38 

48 
12 
27 
77 
13 

23 
9 

11 
3 
2 

13 

1 

io' 

5 
5 


155 


Middle Atlantic: 357 cities; total population, 
17.777,793 


357 


East North Central: 361 cities; total popula- 
tion 15 391 183 


361 


West North Central: 140 cities; total popula- 
tion, 4,369,389 

South Atlantic: • 88 cities; total population, 
3,652,301 . 


140 


East South Central: 33 cities; total population, 
1,777,316 


33 


West South Central: 72 cities; total population, 
3,096.650 

Mountain: 44 cities; total population, 937,301.. 
Pacific: 132 cities; total population, 5,337,269.. 
New England: 
Maine 


72 
44 
132 

17 


New Hampshire 






7 








10 


Massachusetts 


1 
1 


8 
.. 

4 
1 
3 

3 
3 

1 
2 


6 

1 
1 

5 
4 
9 

3 
2 
7 
8 
3 


82 




12 


Connecticut.. . 


27 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York.. 


3 

2 

5 

1 
1 
1 
1 

2 


136 




109 


Pennsylvania 


112 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


102 


Indiana 


37 


Illinois 


69 




117 




36 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


36 




3 
2 


6 
2 

i' 


27 


Missouri 


2 


24 


North Dakota 


7 










8 


Nebraska 






1 


14 


Kansas 




1 


24 


South Atlantic: 
Delaware 




2 




1 




2 
4 
2 
2 


2 
5 
3 

7 


5 


Virginia 


2 


1 
2 
2 
1 
2 

1 


22 


West Virginia 




12 








16 










Georgia 






1 
1 

3 


4 
3 

3 

1 
1 
7 

2 
2 

9 

' i' 

1 

4 


5 
10 

3 

3 
2 

1 
2 
14 
12 

3 

4 
1 

10 
1 
2 
6 

3 

7 
61 


12 






3 


17 


East South Central: 
Kentucky 


1 

1 
1 


11 


Tennessee 


8 




1 


1 

1 

1 
2 
2 
5 

2 


6 


Mississippi 


8 


West South Central: 






1 


5 




1 




7 


Oklahoma 


2 
3 


.. 


25 


Texas 


2 


35 


Mountain: 


5 


Idaho 








5 


Wyoming 










2 




1 




1 


1 

1 


17 




2 


Arizona 








2 


Utah 




1 




1 


i" 

8 
4 
24 


8 


Nevada 




3 


Pacific: 

Washington 


1 

1 
3 


2 




2 
1 

7 


16 




13 




2 


6 


103 







Includes District of Columbia. 
56259—34 2 



Table 5. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to March, 
inclusive, 1934 



Division and State 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England 

Middle Atlantic i 

East North Central 2 

West North Central 

South Atlantic ^ 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 

Pacific < 

New England: 

Maine 

/New Hampshire 

•■ Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Jlhode Island 

■' Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York5_ 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 8 

Indiana 

Illinois. 

Jdichigan 

''^Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

I*fra 

^Missouri. 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

itansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina. 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

see 

la 

ippi...c 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas.. 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California ' 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man 
slaughter 
by negl 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



7.6 
7.4 
39.3 
24.7 
23.3 
38.5 
19.9 
29.1 



4.3 
11.5 
11.8 

20.5 
20.9 

iiis 

3.1 

30.5 
16.4 
26.2 

6.3 
25.8 

9.5 
29.2 

6.4 
22.1 
17.2 
23.8 
16.3 
16.1 
20.3 
32.3 

40.8 
47.5 
28.2 
14.9 

31.3 
13.5 
21.7 
20.4 

12.5 
13.3 


40.3 
11.9 

7.1 
25.6 
11.7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



3.1 
7.8 
9.0 
4.7 
33.2 
42.6 
15.9 
4.9 



7.3 
11.9 
7.1 

9.0 
10.8 
12.1 

7.1 
1.3 

2.1 

4.1 

6.1 



1.8 

7.0 

7.8 

11.0 
2.3 
61.5 
15.3 
102.8 
28.9 
32.6 
40.8 

37.7 
52.7 
30.7 
45.5 

19.0 
7.2 
9.7 

20.7 

3.4 
5.7 


5.7 
3.0 
21.4 
2.8 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



63.3 
38.0 



71.6 
112.6 
157.5 
124.8 
154.2 
160.3 

41.9 
36.4 
17.0 
69.1 
42,4 



45.3 

80.2 
85.2 
140.8 
0I.2 
33.7 

72.6 
85.6 
57.0 
86.7 
78.2 
45.6 
105.3 

65.1 

152! 2 
70.7 
94.8 
89.9 
102.6 
176.1 

182. 1 
137.7 
167.5 



121.1 
58.4 
142.2 
141.3 

42.0 
49.2 
54.0 
195.6 
122.1 
163.9 
153.1 
140.5 

224.9 
223.2 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



112.5 
71.2 

172.5 
170.3 
232.1 
204.5 
312.5 



54.6 
57.9 
38.9 
118.3 
112.4 
123.9 

94.3 

78.2 
52.9 

204.4 
196.7 
120.7 
213.0 
143.5 



91.9 
141.7 
249.9 
273.0 

140.2 
100.2 
327.9 
151.7 
194.4 
636.0 
324.0 
304.7 

297.4 
167.4 
142.3 
199.9 

269.4 
84.7 
293.2 
398.6 

323.7 
155.2 
92.6 
322.9 
401.9 
349.3 
265. 7 



354.8 
411.9 
317.2 



» The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 356 cities with a total population of 
10,559,693. 

2 The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 360 cities with a total population of 15,090,283. 

■" Include? report of District of Columbia. 

* The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 131 cities with a total population of 
3,952,269. 

' The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 135 cities. 

« The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 101 cities. 

' The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 102 cities. 



Data for Individual Cities 

In accordance with the recommendation of the Committee on 
Uniform Crime Records of the International Association of Chiefs 
of PoHce, the Di\ision of Investigation is resuming with this issue 
of the bulletin, the publication of data for individual cities with 
population in excess of 100,000. 

As might reasonably be expected, there is considerable variance 
in the crime rates for individual offenses reported by the several 
cities. Such variance in the data reported may be due to several 
factors, which should be given consideration when using the data for 
comparative purposes. One of these is difference in the composition 
of the population, since individual cities differ considerably in the 
proportion of Negroes and foreign-born whites included. Likewise, 
in the cities, there may be considerable variation in the proportion 
of the population under 15 years of age. These factors are of 
significance since data compiled by the Division of Investigation 
indicate that in proportion to the number of such individuals in the 
general population of the country, the number of Negroes arrested 
is much larger than the number of whites. Furthermore, if in one 
city the proportion of individuals less than 15 years of age were 
unusually low, the crime rate for that city would be decreased in 
comparison with the rate for a city having an unusually high pro- 
portion of individuals less than 15 years of age, if such individuals 
were eliminated when calculating crime rates for those cities. How- 
ever, in determining the crime rates presented below^ the population 
figures given in the 1930 decennial census have been employed. 

Other factors which may cause variation in crime rates are differ- 
ences in the economic activities of the cities and in the recreational 
and educational facilities provided. Also in the preparation of 
reports there may be unintentional deviations from the procedure 
specified in the Manual, Uniform Crime Reporting. Furthermore, 
in some cities, there may be no arrangement to obtain complaints of 
offenses which are received by other authorities than the police (such 
as the prosecuting attorney, the sheriff. State poUce, or other officials 
having concurrent jurisdiction with the local police department). 
In addition, due to a misunderstanding, criminal attempts may not 
be included, and there may be a failure to include larceny of objects 
of trivial value. However, copies of the manual, outlining in detail 
the procedure to be followed, have been furnished to all contributors 
of uniform crime reports and wherever there is reason to suspect 
from examination of the reports that the uniform procedure has not 
been employed, the matter is taken up with the police department 
involved. 

In instances of figures which show an extreme deviation from the 
general trend for a given offense, it should be considered as possible 
that there is some substantial variation from the uniform procedure 
for scoring of offenses as outlined in the manual. 

The tabulation of crime rates for individual cities should not, in 
the opinion of the Division of Investigation, be used to discredit or 
to glorify individual police departments. They should serve as a 
source of information regarding crime conditions in individual cities 
which would other\^ise be more or less unavailable to interested 
individuals. A commendable situation or, on the other hand, a bad 
situation with reference to crime is not due entirely to the activity 



10 

■or lack thereof of the police. The crime problem is a community 
problem, many-sided in nature, and its successful solution demands 
the cooperation of local civic organizations with the police. It is 
believed that the following compilation may help to raise questions 
which will lead to further study of crime problems in individual 
cities which will indicate desirable remedial action. 

Table 6. — Offenses known to the police Jan. l~Mar. 31, 1934; rale per 100,000 

inhabitants 



[Population figures from Federal census, Apr. 1, 1930] 





Criminal homi- 










Larceny— 






cide 










theft 










Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ingor 
entering 






City and population 


Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 


Man- 
Slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Over 
$50 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 




slaugh- 
ter 
















Akron, Ohio, 255,040 


2.0 


0.4 


2.0 


22.0 


21.6 


86.3 


38.4 


124.7 


55.7 


Albany, N.Y., 127,412 


.8 





1.6 


7.1 


9.4 


78.5 


25.9 


76.1 


93.4 


Baltimore, Md., 804,874 


1.2 


.4 


1.5 


24.5 


1.6 


76.9 


17.0 


79.4 


71.9 


Birmingham, Ala., 2.59,678. _.. 


11.2 


3.5 





28.1 


29.7 


203.7 


31.2 


80.1 


no. 9 


Boston, Mass., 781,188 


.6 


3.1 


2.3 


24.4 


5.6 


86.3 


62.0 


144.8 


120.6 


Bridgeport, Conn., 146,716..-. 










13.6 





109.7 


10.9 


115.9 


81.8 


Buffalo, N.Y., 573,076 


o' 


1.6 


2.6 


7.5 


20.4 


42.1 


12.0 


67.5 


41.9 


Cambridge, Mass, 113,643 





2.6 


5.3 


8.8 


3.5 


62.5 


12.3 


73.0 


64.2 


Canton, Ohio, 104,906 











5.7 


4.8 


158.2 


37.2 


132.5 


98.2 


Chattanooga, Tenn., 119,798.. 


3.3 


.8 





43.4 


7.5 


168.6 


28.4 


373.1 


72.6 


Chicago, 111., 3,376,438 


2.2 


1.5 


1.5 


123.1 


14.9 


183.5 


26.9 


104.3 


124.3 


Cincinnati, Ohio, 451,160 


3.8 


1.6 


1.8 


16.8 


17.7 


65.8 


28.1 


184.2 


64.7 


Cleveland, Ohio, 900,429 


1.1 


1.7 


.3 


34.9 


4.3 


87.1 


8.3 


320.4 


73.0 


Columbus, Ohio. 290,564 


1.4 





1.4 


37.5 


14.1 


172.8 


26.5 


234.7 


73.3 


Dallas, Tex., 260,475 


7.7 


3.1 


.8 


22.3 


36.9 


153.9 


20.3 


587.4 


142.4 


Dayton, Ohio, 200,982 


4.0 


.5 


.5 


15.4 


25.4 


46.3 


6.5 


239.3 




Denver, Colo., 287,861 


.7 


2.8 


.7 


61.5 


2.4 


257.1 


(') 


314.0 


160;i 


Des Moines, Iowa, 142,559.... 


2.8 








23.8 


2.1 


105.2 


7.7 


276.4 


134.7 


Detroit, Mich., 1,568,662 




1.9 


2.4 


17.6 


10.3 


50.2 


11.7 


291.8 


52.3 


Duluth, Minn., 101,463 


o' 








7.9 





70.0 


24.6 


199.1 


64.1 


Elizabeth, N.J., 114,589 


.9 


2.6 


.9 


7.9 


7.0 


115.2 


15.7 


104.7 


41.0 


El Paso, Tex., 102,421 


5.9 





2.9 


22.5 


20.5 


84.9 


17.6 


149.4 


49.8 


Erie, Pa., 115,967 











12.9 





151.8 


15.5 


68.1 


56.1 


Evansville, Ind., 102,249 


2.0 





1.0 


20.5 


3.9 


67.5 


9.8 


212.2 


114.4 


Fall River, Mass., 115,274 


.9 





3.5 


2.6 


1.7 


72.0 


6.9 


37.3 


51.2 


Flint, Mich., 156,492 





.6 


1.9 


4.5 


19.8 


67.1 


17.9 


260.7 


101.0 


Fort Wayne, Ind., 114,946 


.9 








12.2 


.9 


47.0 


14.8 


201.0 


55.7 


Fort Worth, Tex., 163,447 


5.5 


.6 





31.8 


3.7 


195.2 


14.1 


490.1 


146.2 


Gary, Ind., 100,426 


7.0 


1.0 


2.0 


31.9 


11.0 


70.7 


8.0 


60.7 


45.8 


Grand Rapids, Mich., 168,592. 








1.8 


3.0 


1.2 


73.0 


6.5 


211.8 


49.8 


Hartford, Conn., 164,072 











13.4 


7.3 


77.4 


30.5 


208.4 


59.1 


Houston, Tex., 292,352.. 


4.4 


2.4 


4.1 


38.0 


18.1 


251.8 


56.8 


488.1 


171.4 


Indianapolis, Ind., 364,161 


3.0 


.5 


.5 


34.9 


11.8 


156. 8 


117.5 


267.5 


132.9 


Jacksonville, Fla., 129,549 


5.4 


4.6 





70.2 


38.6 


157.5 


84.9 


461.6 


122.0 


Jersey City, N.J., 316,715 


1.3 


2.2 


.6 


3.5 


17.7 


27.2 


2.5 


12.9 


22.4 


Kansas City, Kans., 121,857.. 


4.1 





2.5 


82.9 


9.8 


189.6 


(') 


208.4 


9.5.2 


Kansas City, Mo., 399,746 


6.3 


7.8 


.8 


21.5 


.8 


25.5 


20.5 


25.0 


30.8 


Knoxville, Tenn., 105,802 


4.7 


1.9 


2.8 


9.5 


19.8 


141.8 


25.5 


42.5 


75.6 


Long Beach, Calif.. 142,032... 





2.1 





30.3 


9.9 


298.5 


45.8 


368.2 


158.4 


I.0S Angeles, Calif., 1,238,048.. 


1.2 


(2) 


4.4 


40.1 


10.0 


180.7 


64.7 


286.3 


136. n 


Louisville, Ky., 307,745 


2.6 





.3 


43.9 


35.1 


255.7 


46.1 


285. 3 


81.6 


Lowell, Mass., 100,234 


1.0 





3.0 


8.0 


1.0 


50.9 


8.0 


52.9 


24.9 


Lynn, Mass., 102,320 .. 


1.0 
9.1 



1.6 



2.8 


10.8 
68.3 


1.0 
99.2 


94.8 
152.9 


27.4 


195. 5 
90.5 


101.6 


Memphis, Tenn., 253,143 


45.4 


Miami, Fla., 110,637 


4.5 


.9 


1.8 


38.0 


96.7 


294.7 


68.7 


51.5 


132.9 


Milwaukee, Wis., 578,249 







1.4 


3.6 


1.0 


35.6 


16.6 


170.7 


33.9 


Minneapolis, Minn., 464,356.. 


^9 





.4 


46.7 


2.6 


83.6 


9.3 


17.4 


184.6 


Kashville, Tenn., 153,866 


5.8 


4.5 


1.3 


59.1 


53.3 


120.9 


47.4 


174.8 


109.8 


•JNewark, N.J., 442,337 


1.1 


3.2 


.7 


30.5 


23.1 


230.4 


(') 


156.0 


128.6 


New Bedford, Mass , 112,597.. 








5.3 


3.6 


1.8 


94.1 


13.3 


175.0 


51.5 


New Haven, Conn., 162,655... 


.6 





.6 


8.6 


1.2 


78.7 


23.4 


150.0 


97.8 


New Orleans, La., 458,762 


4.4 





1.1 


13.1 


2.8 


49.5 


(') 


52.3 


51.7 


New York, N.Y.. 6,930,446.... 


1.1 


3.1 


2.2 


4.3 


7.5 


12.0 


(2) 


(2) 


(0 


Norfolk, Va., 129.710 


9.3 


5.4 


1.5 


17.7 


70.9 


320.7 


9.3 


372.4 


57.x 


Oakland, Calif., 284,063 


.4 




1.8 


22.5 


6.0 


134.5 


21.5 


401.3 


115.1 


Oklahoma City, Okla., 185,389. 


1.1 


o' 





25.9 


5.4 


69.6 


75.0 


142.4 


74.4 


Peoria, 111., 104,969 


1.0 








7.6 





6.7 


12.4 


46.7 


65.7 



• Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies 
^ Not reported. 



n 



Table G. — Offenses known to the police Jan. 1-Mar 
inh abitants — Continued 



SI, 19S4; rate per 100,000 



City and population 



Philadelphia, Pa., 1,950,961... 1. 1 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 669,817 1.3 

Portland, Oreg., 301,815 . 7 

Providence, R.I., 252,981.. 

Reading, Pa., 111.171 

Richmond, Va., 182,929.... 

Rochester, N.Y., 328,132 . 3 

St. Louis, Mo., 821,960 2.6 

St. Paul, Minn., 271,606 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah, 140,267 
San Antonio, Tex., 231,542... 

San Diego, Calif., 147,995 

San Francisco, Calif., 634,394 

Scranton, Pa., 143,433 .7 

Seattle, Wash., 365,583 

Somerville, Mass., 103,908 1. 

Spokane, Wash., 115,514... 

Springfield, Mass., 149.900 i 

Syracuse, N.Y., 209,326 .5 

Tacoma, Wash., 106,817 - .9 

Tampa, Fla., 101,161 2.0 

Toledo, Ohio, 290,718 ..! • 1.4 

Tulsa, Okla., 141,258 j 4.2 

Utica. N.Y., 101,740 i 

Washington, D.C., 486,869.. __j 2. 1 

Waterburv, Conn, .3 99,902... 

Wichita, Kans. 111,110.. i .9 

Wilmington, Del., 106,597 : 1.9 

Worcester, Mass., 195,311 | .5 

Yonkers, N.Y., 134,646 .7 

Youngstown, Ohio, 170,002... 2.4 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rob- 
bery 



8.3 
35.1 
51.4 



24.2 
25.0 
23.6 
11.2 
13.9 
45.1 

4.8 

18.2 

.7 

7.6 
15.0 



24.1 
11.8 



1.0 
3.0 

17.1 



Bur- 

vated ' fpreak- 
assault 1 entering 



10.0 
2.2 
2.1 

33.7 
4.1 

12.6 
6.3 
1.4 
1.0 

25.1 
2.7 
2.9 
.9 

21.7 
5.8 

19.1 
2.9 

10.7 
1.0 
9.0 

10.3 


13.4 

12.4 



42.3 
47.3 
282.3 
53.4 
52.2 
180.9 
64.9 
57.3 
105.3 
171.1 
158.1 

120'. 9 
70.4 

268.6 
72.2 

299.5 

97! 5 
232.2 
111.7 
100.8 
285.3 
80.6 
129.2 
62.1 
70.2 
65.7 
93.7 
29.0 
72.4 



Larceny- 
theft 



Over 

$50 



10.9 
26.4 
58.0 

9.5 
17.1 
62.3 

9.1 
(') 

9.9 

7.1 
64.4 
20.9 
(') 

7.0 
44.6 

6.7 
83.1 
14.7 
10.5 

9.4 

8.9 
27.2 

14' 7 
49.7 
17.0 
15.3 
15.9 
20.0 
4.5 
6.5 



Under 

$50 



29.1 

41.5 
408.9 
100.4 

91.8 
374.5 
100.6 
238.7 
162.0 
181.8 
270.4 
227.0 
303.1 

60.7 
247.3 



123.4 
147.6 
247.2 
217.5 

(0 
347.6 
136.6 
219.2 

457 2 
125.7 
26.6 
26.0 
133.5 



33. 5 
99.0 

87.5 
8.3 
51.3 
80.4 



109. 
168.3 
236.7 
130.4 
138.4 
35.6 
143.6 
65.4 
122.1 
43.4, 
74. 0- 
113.3 
86. & 
96.3 
81.4 



142.7 
90.1 
36.9 
41. St 
91.1 
11.1 
55. » 



' Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 

2 Not reported. 

3 The population of Waterbury as estimated July 1, 1930, by the Bureau ot the Census was 100,100. 

Offenses Known to Sheriffs and State Police, 1934 

No attempt has been made to determine crime rates for rural areas 
of the United States, due to the fact that it has been impossible to 
ascertain the population represented by the reports received from 
sheriffs and State police organizations. As of general interest, how- 
ever, there is presented below a tabulation showing the number of 
offenses reported during the first 3 months of 1934 by 34 sheriffs and 
6 State police troops. 

Monthly reports are received from a much larger number of law 
enforcement agencies policing rural territory. However, there is pre- 
sented in table 7 the number of offenses reported by those agencies 
which have submitted a complete set of reports for the first quarter 
of the year and whose reports apparently are prepared in accordance 
with the procedure outlined in the Manual, Uniform Crime Reporting, 
and are limited to rural areas. 

It should be noted that the data presented below represent only a 
very small portion of the rural territory in the United States.. 



12 

Table 7. — Offenses known, January to March 1934, inclusive, as reported hy S4 
sheriffs and 6 State police troops 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
breakmg 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




13 


13 


21 


48 


65 


512 


974 









Offenses Known in Possessions of the United States 

In table 8 there is presented available information regarding the 
number of offenses known to the police in Hawaii County, Territory 
of Hawaii; the Canal Zone, and Puerto Rico. The figures presented 
include offenses in both urban and rural areas of the territories speci- 
fied. The population area represented in each case is indicated in the 
table. 

Table 8. — Offenses known in United States possessions, January to March 1934; 
number and rate per 100,000 

(Population figures from Federal Census Apr. 1, 1930] 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ing or 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 




Jurisdiction reporting 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Over 

$50 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Hawaii: 

Hawaii County, popula- 
tion 73,325; number of 






1 
1.4 

19 






9 
12.3 

22 

55.7 

205 
13.3 


1 
1.4 

4 
10.1 

26 
1.7 


48 
65.5 

53 
134.3 

44.6 




Rate per 100,000 










8 2 


Isthmus of Panama: 

Canal Zone, population 
39.467; number of of- 
fenses known 


1 
2.5 

54 
3.5 


1 
2.5 

1.4 


1 
2.5 

15 
1.0 


3 
7.6 

410 
26.6 


9 


Rate per 100,000 




Puerto Rico: 

Population 1,543,913; 
number of offenses 













Number of Police Department Employees, 1933 

For the benefit of individuals interested in a study of data pertain- 
ing to police personnel there is presented in table 9 a compilation 
showing the average number of police employees during 1933. The 
figures are also expressed as the number per 1,000 inhabitants and 
are limited to cities with population in excess of 100,000. It is sug- 
gested that a study of the data presented herewith in connection 
with the data presented in table 6 may disclose a definite relationship 
between the number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants and 
the size of the crime rate in the cities represented. 



13 



The data presented below were in practically all instances obtained 
from the monthly crime reports received during 1933. It should be 
observed that they include civilian employees. 

Table 9. — Ahimber of police depart/iient employees, 1933 



City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabit- 
ants 


City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabit- 
ants 


Akron, Ohio 


189 
363 

'228 
2,414 

277 

'244 
214 
76 
103 

6,512 
614 

1,556 
330 
246 
206 
395 
147 

3,798 
131 
204 
84 
124 
147 
197 
139 
127 
204 
133 
254 
432 
320 
533 
178 

1,075 
124 
597 
130 
195 

2,646 
474 
180 
175 
249 
167 

1,149 


0.7 
2.8 
2.4 
.9 
3.1 
1.9 
2.2 
2.1 
1.8 

!9 
1.9 
1.4 
1.7 
1.1 

.9 
1.0 
1.4 
1.0 
2.4 
1.3 
1.8 

.8 
1.1 
1.4 
1.7 

.9 
1.1 
1.2 
1.3 
1.5 
2,6 
1.1 

1.4 
3.4 
1.0 
1.5 
1.2 
1.4 

1^5 
1.8 

LO 
1.5 
2.0 




498 
200 
1,354 
230 
423 
854 
19,611 
256 
370 
212 
234 
281 
114 
5,228 
1,099 
442 
550 
155 
284 
470 
2,273 
356 
158 
218 
214 
1,366 
171 
660 
154 
99 
131 
322 
385 
115 
123 
440 
246 
159 
164 
1,404 
188 
101 
150 
400 
310 
170 


I I 


Albany, N.Y 






Baltimore, Md 


Newark, N J 


3 1 


Birmingham, Ala 


New Bedford Mass 


2 








Bridgeport, Conn 


New Orleans, La 


1 9 


Buffalo, N.Y._ 


New York, N.Y 






Norfolk, Va . . 




Camden, N J 


Oakland, Calif 


1 3 








Chattanooga, Tenn 


Omaha, Nebr 


1 1 


Chicago, 111 


Paterson, N J 


2 




Peoria, 111 






Philadelphia, Pa .. 




Columbus, Ohio 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


1 6 


Dallas, Tex 






Davton, Ohio 


Providence, R.I 

Reading, Pa 


2 2 


Denver, Colo 


1 4 








Detroit, Mich 


Rochester, N.Y 


1 4 


Duluth, Minn 


St. Louis, Mo 


2 8 


Elizabeth, N.J.... 




1.3 


El Paso, Tex 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


1. 1 


Erie, Pa 




.9 






1.4 


Fall River, Mass 


San Francisco, Calif 


2.2 


Flint, Mich 




1.2 




Seattle, Wash 


1.8 


Fort Worth, Tex 


Somerville, Mas«! 


1.5 




South Bend, Ind. 


1.0 








Hartford, Conn 


Springfield, Mass 


2 1 




Syracuse, N.Y. 


1.8 






Jacksonville Fla 


Tampa, Fla 


1.2 


Jersey City, N.J 

Kansas Citv, Kans 


Trjledo Ohio 


1 5 


Trenton, N.J 

Tulsa, Okla 

Utica, N Y 


2.0 


Kansas Citv, Mo 


1. 1 


Knosville Tenn 


1 6 






2.9 


Los Angeles, Calif 


Waterbury, Conn 


1.9 






.9 






1.4 


Lynn, Mass 


Worcester, Mass 


2.0 




Yonkers, N.Y 


2.3 


Miami, Fla 




1.0 


Milwaukee, Wis 











ANNUAL FETURNS, 1933 

The system of uniform crime reporting provides for annual reports 
of offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, the number of persons 
held for prosecution, and the number of persons arrested but released 
without being formally charged with the commission of an offense. 
In the following pages there are presented data compiled from annual 
reports for 1933 received from police departments throughout the 
country. 

Under the system of uniform crime reporting an offense is treated 
as cleared by arrest when the offender is apprehended and held or 
turned over for prosecution. The data pertaining to the number of 
cleared cases include certain exceptional clearances, such as instances 
where the offender commits suicide or is not available for prosecution, 
due to the fact that he is already incarcerated for some other offense. 



14 

Examination of the reports disclosed in some instances that the 
number of offenses Hsted as cleared by arrest was identical with the 
number of persons listed as held for prosecution, indicating a failure 
to distinguish between those two types of data. Obviously the two 
sets of figures need not be the same, since the arrest of two or more 
individuals jointly involved in the commission of a single offense 
would clear only one crime, wliile the arrest of one individual who had 
committed several offenses would clear several crimes. 

It appeared in other instances that the number of offenses of auto 
theft listed as cleared by arrest was unusually large, indicating that 
the figure possibly represented stolen automobiles recovered rather 
than the number of offenses cleared by the arrest of the offender. In 
still other cases it was observed that for a given offense the number of 
cleared cases was high in comparison with the number of persons 
listed as held for prosecution, whereas in some instances the opposite 
set of facts was observed. 

In all instances where there were any of the above indications that 
the reports had not been prepared in accordance with the procedure 
outlined in the Manual, Uniform Crime Reporting, an attempt was 
made to ascertain definitely whether the report had been prepared 
in accordance with uniform practice. When it was learned that the 
reports were not uniformly prepared, or wdien it appeared liighly 
probable that such was the case, the reports were not included in the 
compilation of data appearing in the tables presented m the following 
pages. 

With reference to the compilation of data pertaining to persons 
arrested by the police but released without being held for prosecution 
it should be pointed out that the figures reported should not include 
individuals arrested and turned over to other authorities. In some 
instances, it has been ascertained that such cases have been included 
in the figures listed on the report forwarded to the Division of Inves- 
tigation. It is, of course, possible that some such cases have been 
listed without the fact being Icnown to the Division, and it is therefore 
possible that the figures are to some extent inflated due to the inclusion 
of such items. 

If entries pertaining to individuals released without being formally 
charged were limited to the classifications relating to violations of 
parking, road and driving, and other motor vehicle and traffic regula- 
tions, such reports from cities with population in excess of 10,000 
were not employed in the tabulation of data regarding persons 
released, it being assumed that the reports were probably incomplete 
in that respect. 

In July 1933 contributors of uniform crime reports were furnished 
with copies of the annual returns wliich indicated that on the report 
of persons held for prosecution and of persons released, the following 
new classifications had been added: 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing (formerly included 
in All other offenses). 

Prostitution and commercialized vice (formerly included in Sex 
offenses). 

Violation of road and driving laws (formerly included in Traffic 
and motor vehicle laws). 

Parking violations (formerly included in Traffic and motor vehicle 
laws). 



15 

Disorderly conduct; drunkenness; vagrancy (these classifications 
are now listed separately on the report, whereas formerly they were 
listed as Disorder^ conduct and vagrancy and Drunkenness). 

In a few instances the I'eporting cities submitted figures in accord- 
ance ^^'ith the old classification. In such cases these unclassified 
figures were divided among the new subclassifications in the ratio in 
which such data were reported by other cities in the sane population 
group. 

Offenses Known and Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1933 

In table 10 there is shown the number of known offenses reported 
for 1933 by the police departments in 762 cities with an aggregate 
population of 30,288,970. There is also indicated the number of 
those offenses which were cleared by arrest during the year. It should 
be observed that in a few instances the figures are based on the reports 
of a smaller number of cities as indicated by the footnotes to the table. 

Examination of the compilation reveals that the proportion of 
oft'enses against the person which were cleared by arrest is consider- 
ably larger than that for offenses against property. The tabulation 
indicates further that in general cities with population in excess of 
100,000 have a lower percentage of clearances than cities with a lesser 
number of inhabitants. 

During 1933 some offenses were cleared by the arrest of the offender 
which were committed in a previous year and which in the report for 
that year had been listed as not cleared. The number of such in- 
stances is indicated in table 10-A. 

In table 11 there appears a compilation showing the relationship 
between the number of known offenses, the number cleared by arrest, 
and the number of persons held for prosecution for those offenses. 
In examining that compilation it should be kept in mind that the 
figures representing offenses cleared by arrest include all offenses 
cleared during the calendar year 1933, irrespective of when they were 
committed. In other words, table 11 includes the offenses listed as 
cleared by arrest in both table 10 and table 10-A. 

The compilation discloses that for all oft'ense classes except burglary, 
larceny, and auto theft, the number of persons charged exceeded the 
number of offenses cleared by arrest. The figures for individual 
population groups disclose, however, certain variations from this 
general relationship. 

Table 11 should be interpreted in the following manner: With 
reference to group I cities, of each 100 offenses of murder known, 78 
were cleared by the arrest of 96 individuals who were held for prosecu- 
tion. It should be noted, however, that the figures for known offenses 
are limited to cases committed or first reported to the police during 
the calendar year 1933, while the data regarding offenses cleared in- 
clude all cases cleared during the year, irrespective of when the crimes 
were committed. Similarly, the data pertaining to persons held for 
prosecution include all those charged during the year, even though 
the crimes were committed in some prior period. 

Since the proportion of offenses cleared in a subsequent year will 
probably not vary greatly from one period to another, it is not 
believed objectionable to treat the data in table 11 as though they 
related entirely to offenses committed in 1933. 



16 

Table 10. — Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest, 1933, by population groups 



[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census) 





Criminal homicide 




















Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


GROUP I 


















20 cities over 250,000; total 
population, 14,843,800: 
Number of offenses 


1,316 
965 


882 
732 
83.0 


69.8 


27,008 
7,211 
26.7 


7,238 
4,181 

57.8 


59, 542 

13. 795 

23.2 


' 109, 492 

24, 122 

22.0 


2 32, 183 


Number of offenses 
cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


3.740 
11.6 


GROUP II 


















23 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 
total population, 3,167,505: 
Number of offenses 
known 


212 
169 

79.7 


134 
117 
87.3 


174 
161 
92.5 


1,743 
39.5 


1, 5.34 

957 
62.4 


12, 367 
3.028 


25, 922 
6, 212 
24.0 


9.765 


Number of offenses 
cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


1.659 
17.0 


GROUP in 


















50 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 

total population, 3,456,758: 

Number of offenses 


162 
133 

82.1 


91 
80 

87.9 


185 
168 
90.8 


2,482 
759 
30.6 


2,522 
2,226 

88.3 


11,283 
2.778 
24.6 


3 28, 656 
6.821 
23.8 


3 7.863 


Number of offenses 
cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


1.290 
16.4 


GROUP IV 


















92 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 3,250,766: 
Number of offenses 
known 


141 
128 
90.8 


87 
98.9 


141 
129 
91.5 


1,557 
579 
37.2 


1,094 
922 
84.3 


10. 480 
2,235 
21.3 


22. 932 
5.883 
25.7 


7.167 


Number of offenses 
cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


1.073 
15.0 


GROUP V 


















210 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 

total population, 3,304,001: 

Number of offenses 


123 

99 

80.5 


106 
90 

84.9 


173 
162 
93.6 


1,301 
430 
33.1 


810 
737 
91.0 


< 8, 829 
2,255 
25.5 


' 20, o07 
25.4 


5 4. 542 


Number of offenses 
cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


783 

17.2 



1 The number of known offenses of larceny— theft and the number cleared are based on the reports from 
19 cities with a total population of 14,542,900. 

2 The number of known offenses of auto theft and the number cleared are based on the reports from 18 
cities with a total population of 10,838,700. 

■■ The number of known offenses of larceny— theft and auto theft and the number cleared are based on the 
reports from 49 cities with a total population of 3,366.658. 

' The number of known offenses of burglary and larceny— theft and the number cleared are based on the 
reports from 209 cities with a total population of 3,286,601. 

' The number of known offenses of auto theft and the number cleared are based on the reports from 209 
cities with a total population of 3.280,201. 



17 

Table 10. — Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest, 19SS, by population groups — Continued 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


GROUP VI 

367 cities under 10.000; total 
population, 2,266,140: 
Number of offenses 
known 


9S 

82 

83.7 


71 

67 

94.4 


175 
165 
94.3 


686 
276 
40.2 


438 
367 
83.8 


5,748 
1,632 
28.4 


10, 386 
3,200 
30. S 


2 067 


Number of offenses 
cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


510 
24.7 


Total, 762 cities: total popula- 
tion, 30,288,970: 
Number of offenses 

known 

Number of offenses 

cleared by arrest 

Percentage of offenses 
cleared by arrest 


2,052 

1,576 
76.8 


1,372 

1,173 

• 85.5 


1,784 
1,438 
80.6 


34, 777 
9,943 


13, 636 
9,390 
68.9 


6 108, 249 

25, 723 

23.8 


" 217, 895 

51,452 

23.6 


' 63, 587 
9,055 
14.2 



« The number of known offenses of burglary and the number cleared are based on the reports from 761 
cities with a total population of 30,271,570. 

" The number of known offenses of larceny— theft and the number cleared are based on the reports from 759 
cities with a total population of 29,880,570. 

<■ The number of known offenses of auto theft and the number cleared are based on the reports from 758 
cities with a total population of 26,169,970. 



Table 10-A. — Number of offenses cleared by arrest during 1933 which were reported 
during some prior year as not cleared 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




72 
2 
10 

4 

1 


52 

1 


36 


799 
3 
30 
24 
12 
6 


90 
2 
27 
49 

3- 


921 
102 

192 
110 

187 
54 


743 
36 
174 
353 

55 


146 




2 


Group III 


17 


Group IV 


1 


48 




23 


Group VI 




1 


14 








Total, Groups I-VI 


96 


54 


38 


874 


171 


1,566 


1,447 


250 



18 

Table 11. — Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and persons charged (held for 
prosecution) , 1933; Number per 100 known offenses 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



Crimi: 



homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



GROUP I 

20 cities over 250,000; total 
population, 14,843,800: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



GROUP II 

23 cities. 100,000 to 250,000; 
total population, 3.167,505: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



GROUP III 

50 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 3,456,758: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest- 
Persons charged 



GROUP IV 



92 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 3,250,766: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



GROUP V 

210 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 
total population, 3,304,001: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged 



GROUP VI 

367 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 2,266,140: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged... 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

762 cities; total population, 
30,288,970: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged 



100.0 
78.8 
96.4 



100.0 
80.7 
81.6 



100.0 
88.3 



100.0 
95.7 
103.5 



100.0 

83.7 
84.6 



100.0 

84.7 
85.7 



100.0 
88.1 
104.5 



100.0 
87.9 
92.3 



100.0 
100.0 
102.3 



100.0 
84.9 
95.3 



100.0 
94.4 
101.4 



100.0 
73.6 
89.0 



100.0 
92.5 
89.1 



100.0 
.39.6 
39.4 



100.0 
38.7 
40.5 



100.0 
34.0 
38.5 



100.0 
41.1 
51.3 



100.0 
59.0 
62.9 



100.0 
62.5 
64.4 



100.0 
95! 3 



100.0 
90^5 



100.0 
91.0 
97.2 



100.0 
84.5 
87.9 



100.0 
24.7 
19.3 



100.0 
25.3 
19.6 



100.0 
26.3 
20.5 



100.0 
22.4 
20.0 



100. 
27.7 
22.5 



100.0 
29.3 

27.7 



1 100.0 
22.7 
24.0 



100.0 
24.1 
21.2 



100.0 
27.2 
24.7 



100.0 
25.8 
25.8 



100.0 
31.3 
29.2 



100.0 
89.4 
110.6 



100.0 
82.7 



100.0 
31.1 
27.5 



6 100.0 
25.2 
20.3 



100.0 
24.3 
24.0 



' Figures for larceny— theft are based on the reports from 19 cities with a total population of 14,542,900 . 

2 Figures for auto theft are based on the reports from 18 cities with a total population of 10,838,700. 

3 Figures for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on the reports from 49 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 3,366,658. 

< Figures for burglary and larceny— theft are based on the reports from 209 cities with a total population 
of 3,286,601. 
» Figures for auto theft are based on the reports from 209 cities with a total population of 3,280,201. 
' Figures for burglary are based on the reports from 761 cities with a total population of 30,271,570. 
" Figures for larceny— theft are based on the reports from 7.59 cities with a total population of 29,880,570. 
9 Figures for auto theft are based on the reports from 758 cities with a total population of 26,169,970. 



19 



RELATION BETWEEN OFFENSES 
KNOWN, OFFENSES CLEARED, 
AND PERSONS CHARGED (HELD 
FOR prosecution), ' ' 1933 

MURDE R.NONNEGLIG ENT MANSLAUGKTER . 

^/r^-T- mmm^^W/MM//// /7////////M 100.0 

W. , • fmSES,^0l^M<^'////////m? l 81.5 

^^M^J^ERSONSCHARGEPW////-/^^^ 93.6 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

Mmm7mm///'/////m////////M 100.0 

%?'f fe:n.se'$' 'c l'e. a"r e d'/////\ ei.i 

'y.P.ER.S,b,NS.;ctiAP.G.Eb/////:/^/| 64.7 



ROBBERY 

r//////7/////////6£FENSES:KNO-W^^ 100.0 

y//////m/////m offenses cleared 31.1 

V/M///////////A persons charged 27.5 

BURGLARY 

t7// ///y///////////QF^^ 100.0 

offenses cleared 25.2 



V////////////\ persons charged 20.3 

LARCENY 

v//////////m^^ 100.0 

y/////////////A offenses cleared 24.3 

PERSONS CHARGED 24.0 



AUTO THEFT 

y/////////A OFFENSES CLEARED |4.6 

W/'^'/M PERSONS CHARGED |32 



20 

Persons Charged (Held for Prosecution), 1933 

Table 12 shows the number of persons charged and the rate per 
100,000. In table 13 there is presented a percentage distribution of 
persons charged. As previously explained, under the system of 
uniform crime reporting, the term "persons charged" refers to indi- 
viduals held for prosecution. 

An examination of table 13 reveals that almost one half of the indi- 
viduals involved were charged by the police with violation of some 
type of motor vehicle or traffic law. In addition, more than one 
fourth were charged with drunkenness, disorderly conduct, or va- 
grancy, making a total of approximately 75 percent charged with the 
preceding types of offenses. Of the remaining individuals held for 
prosecution, 3 percent were charged with homicide, rape, or aggra- 
vated assault, whereas 21 percent were charged with robbery, burglary, 
larceny — theft, auto theft, embezzlement and fraud, receiving stolen 
property, or forgery and counterfeiting. 

For the offenses of criminal homicide and robbery it will be observed 
that the number of persons held for prosecution per unit of popula- 
tion is higher for cities in groups I and II than in the smaller com- 
munities. However, tliis relationsliip does not occur without ex- 
ception for the remaining offense classes. 

The rates for the offenses of forgery and counterfeiting and viola- 
tion of narcotic drug laws are considerably higher for cities in group II 
than for any others. Cities in groups I and II have a rate for prosti- 
tution and commercialized vice several times larger than the rates 
for the remaining groups. Cities in group II report the highest 
rates for drunkenness and vagrancy, whereas group I cities report the 
highest figure for disorderly conduct. It is of interest to observe 
that for driving while intoxicated, the highest figures are reported by 
the smallest communities. Tliis same trend was noted in the tabu- 
lation of data from the annual reports for 1932. 

Violations of parking regulations are reported most frequently 
by cities in groups I and II. In connection with the fact that the 
smaller cities report the highest rates for other traffic and motor 
vehicle laws, it is suggested as possible that some of them failed to 
properly assign arrests to one of the two classes immediately pre- 
ceding in table 12. 

In connection with the classification Suspicion, it should be ob- 
served that according to the procedure outlined in the Manual, 
Uniform Crime Reporting, entries for that class should be limited 
to persons arrested and released without being held for prosecution. 
If a person were held for the action of the court, the individual should 
be carried opposite the offense class with which he was formally 
charged. However, in table 12 the data have been presented as 
reported to the Division of Investigation. 



21 



Table 12. — Persons charged {held for prosecution) , 1933; number and rates per 
100,000, by population groups 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Group I 



Otiense charged 



§i 






Group Oroiip 
II III 



8§- 



Group 
IV 






3§S i 'Sfj 



Group 
V 



oo o 



Group 
VI 



Criminal homicide: 
(a) Murder and nonnegligent man 
slaughter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

(h) Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny — theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rale per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying receiving, possess 
ing: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) : 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

"Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Licjuor laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. .- .-- 

Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Parking violations: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

See footnotes at end of table. 



4,556 
30.7 



20, 805 
140.2 



1,520 
77.6 



3 26, 313 
180.9 



4,505 
30.3 



1,713 
11.5 



35, 906 
241.9 



4,563 
144.1 



2,430 
76.7 



5,504 
173.8 



1,271 
40.1 



356 
11.2 



3,787 
119.6 



813 
25.7 



1,648 
52.0 



23, 535 
743.0 



81,001 
2, 557. 2 



4,376 
126.6 



2,312 
66.9 



' 6, 484 
192.6 



975 
28.2 



2,735 
79.1 



521,453 
631.8 



'541,388 
1,219.0 



631 
19.4 



4,904 
150.9 



621 
19.1 



1,486 
46.2 



15, 321 
471.3 



31,017 
954.1 



111.0 



5, 292 
161.0 



7 795 
24.2 



506 
15.3 



448 
13.6 



401 
12.1 



12 2, 229 
67.8 



2,975 
90.0 



1829,103 



352 
15.5 



500 
22.1 



316 
13.9 



256 
11.3 



492 
21.7 



17, 756 
783.5 



11,050 

487.6 



22 

Table 12. — Persons charged (held for prosecution) , 1933; number and rates per 
100,000, by population groups — Continued 



Offense charged 



Group I 



Group Group 
II III 



"II 



Group 
IV 



S| 



Group 
V 



11 

o Q. 



Group 
VI 



Other traffic and motor vehicle 1 

Number of persons charged - 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Suspicion: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 



43, 537 
967.0 



134, 622 
906.9 



11,869 
374.7 



10, 319 
325.8 



524,198 
712.7 



15, 416 
446.0 



36, 193 
1. 047. 



4,258 
123.2 



3,602 
104.2 



19, 093 
587.3 



9,224 
283.7 



38, 821 
1, 194. 2 



3,442 
105.9 



1617,252 
527.0 



10, 320 
312.3 



29,906 
905.1 



6,566 
198.7 



1,833 
55.8 



2,808 
85.0 



19, 841 



17, 944 
791.8 



6,531 

288.2 



5,840 
257.7 



440 

19.4 



878 
38.7 

6,884 
303.8 



■150,38 
528. 



195, 347 
644.9 



308, 829 
1, 019. 6 



'3 29, 377 
97.0 



166, 924 
551. 1 



1-17 The number of persons charged and the rate are based on the reports from the number of cities 
indicated below: 





Cities 


Population 




Cities 


Population 




Cities 


Population 


en 


209 
761 
19 
49 
759 
18 


3, 286, 601 
30, 271, 570 
14, 542, 900 

3, 366. 658 
29, 880, 570 
10, 838, 700 


(-) 

0) 

(9) 


209 
758 
91 
209 
760 
209 


3,280,201 
26, 169, 970 

3, 214, 066 

3, 284, 901 
30, 233, 170 

3, 287, 301 




761 
19 
49 

208 

758 






('•) 

(15) 


13 123 100 


0) 


3, 395, 358 


(') 




('«)-- 




/5\ 


(11) 


28 476 370 


W 


(12) 













Table 13. — Percentage distribution of persons charged {held for prosecution) 
[763 cities; total population, 30,288,970] 



1933 



Offense charged 



Per- 
cent 



Offense charged 



Per- 
cent 



Criminal homicide: 

(fl) Murder and nonnegligent man 

slaughter 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Robbery _ 

Aggravated assault 

Other assaults 

Burglary^breaking or entering _ . 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud __- 

Stolen property: buying, receiving, possess- 
ing _. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape - 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses _ 



.49 
.51 
2.04 
1.12 
2.66 
.43 
..36 



.14 
.08 
2.14 



Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against the family and children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness - 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

All other offenses... .-. 

Total-... 



.61 
1.75 
.97 
10.66 
27.72 
7.65 
9.93 
15.70 
3.25 
1.49 
.76 
8.49 

100.00 



23 



Persons Released {Not Held for Prosecution), 1933 

Examination of the annual reports received from contributing^ 
police departments disclosed that in quite a large number of instances 
no entries were made to represent persons arrested but released with- 
out being held for prosecution. In some instances definite statements 
were made on the reports that no records were maintained regarding 
such indi%dduals, while on others there were no entries at all, or 
entries were limited to the three classifications pertaining to violations 
of motor veliicle and traffic laws. In compiling data regarding persons 
released all such reports were eliminated, except that for group VI, if 
entries regarding persons released were limited to the classes involving 
persons arrested for violation of traffic regulations, the reports were 
nevertheless employed in the tabulation. Consequently, in table 14, 
the number of persons arrested and released and the rate per 100,000 
are based on the reports received from 309 cities mth an aggregate 
population of 11,195,920. 

The following table represents persons arrested and released without 
being held or turned over for prosecution. There are included, there- 
fore, instances where juveniles were arrested and it was definitely 
established that they were responsible for a given offense, but instead 
of being prosecuted they were released to their parents, probation 
officers, or were given some similar type of treatment. Likewise, the 
compilation includes individuals who were arrested and released with 
a reprimand or on the "golden rule" principle, as is sometimes done 
in the case of violators of traffic and motor vehicle regulations. Per- 
sons summoned, notified, or cited to appear in court to answer criminal 
charges who failed to appear in response thereto and who were not 
subsequently arrested are also represented in the following tabulations. 

With the exception of arrests on suspicion, the largest number of 
releases is disclosed in cases of drunkenness and violation of parking 
regulations. 

Table 14. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, 1933; number 

and rates per 100,000, by population groups 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by tlie Bureau of the Census] 



Oflense charsed 



S2. 

ml 



l§l 



£§a 



o a 






3 A 



2 S'-s 



3S 



o o 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 -.- 

Robbery: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary-breaking or entering: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 



1,748 
30.6 



1,359 
23.8 



117 
12.4 



101 
10.7 



178 
15.6 



181 
15.4 



120 

11.2 



87 
0.8 



2,073 
18.5 



4,133 
36.9 



2,131 
19.0 



56259—34- 



24 



Table 14. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, 193S; number 
and rates per 100,000, by population groups— Continued 



Offense charged 



Larceny-theft: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 
ing: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons released... 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercialized vice: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000. 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) : 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000.- 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000. 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 _ 

Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons ; 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Parking violations: 

Number of persons i 

Rate per 100,000 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100.000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000. 

Suspicion: 

Number of persons released.. . 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 



SB 



3Qg 



4,331 
75.9 



10.7 
348 



11, 176 
195.9 



10, 793 
270.9 



7.901 
198.3 



2,315 
58.1 



3,860 
67.7 



18, 003 
315.6 



51,615 
904.7 



18, 511 
324.5 



181 
19.2 



4,961 
527.1 



12, 242 
1300. 8 



347 
36.9 



3,451 
366.7 



821 
87.2 



404 
34.8 



1,359 
117.0 



20, 539 

1768. 4 



373 
32.1 



1,234 
106.2 



406 
35.0 



6,011 
525.9 



1,952 
170.8 



o a 



2,178 
185.5 



601 
51.2 



2,110 
179.7 



1, 681 
143.1 



2,137 
182.0 



256 
23.9 



2,027 
189.3 



4,113 
384.1 



1,254 
117.1 



351 
32.8 



168.0 
1,199 



■The number of persons released and rate per lOO.OCO are based on reports of 8 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 3,984,500. 

2 The number of persons released and rate per 100,000 are based on reports of 308 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 9,475,220. 



25 

Percentage of Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1931-33 

There are presented in table 15 data comparing the percentages of 
clearances for 1931, 1932, and 1933. The data are based on the 
annual reports received from the police departments in 22 cities with 
an aggregate popidation of 9,381,231. The data for the ofi'enses of 
larceny and auto theft are based on a smaller number of reports as in- 
dicated in the footnotes to the table, due to the fact that a few of the 
reports were incomplete with reference to those offenses. 

It should be observed that the compilation is limited to offenses 
cleared during the same year in which they were committed or first 
reported. In other words, offenses cleared during the year which 
were reported during some prior year were not included in the follow- 
ing compilation. 

In general the table does not show any marked change in clearances 
during the 3-year period. However, the compilation does show a 
substantial decrease in the percentage of clearances for rape from 
84.9 to 70.7, and a notable increase in the proportion of burglaries 
cleared by arrest from 27.6 in 1931 to 32.6 in 1933. 

It should be observed that data pertaining to auto thefts arc re- 
stricted to ofi'enses cleared by the arrest of the offender. A much 
larger proportion of stolen automobiles is recovered, but such informa- 
tion is not reported to the Division of Investigation under the system 
of uniform crime reporting. 

Table 15. — Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 1931-33 
[n cities over. 100,000, total population 9,381,231, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


1931 ... 


80.0 
79.0 


90.3 
9219 


84.9 
73.5 
70.7 


35.5 
34.2 
35.1 


65! 6 
69.1 


27.6 
30.0 
32.6 


■23.9 
1 23.5 
124.3 


2 11.6 


1932 


2 11.3 


1933.. -_ 


79.3 


2 11.7 



The data for larceny— theft are based on the reports of 21 cities with a total population of 9,080, 
The data for auto theft are based on the reports of 18 cities with a total population of 7,671,897. 



DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

During the first 3 months of 1934, the Division of Investigation 
examined 87,917 arrest records as evidenced by fingerprint cards 
received from local law-enforcement officials throughout the United 
States. Of the total, 6,212 (7.1 percent) represented females. 

Fingerprint cards representing commitments to jails or other 
penal institutions or arrests for violation of Federal laws were not 
employed in this tabulation. The tabulation of data from finger- 
print records obviously does not include all persons arrested since there 
are individuals taken into custody for whom no fingerprint cards arc 
forwarded to Washington. Furthermore, data pertaining to persons 
arrested should not be treated as equivalent to information regarding 
the number of ofi'enses committed since two or more persons may be 
involved in the joint commission of a single offense, and, on the other 



26 



hand, one person may be arrested and charged with the commission of 
several separate offenses. 

Exclusive of arrests for vagrancj^, disorderly conduct, or on sus- 
picion, there were 57,087 arrests. Of them 64.5 percent were for 
the following serious offenses against life or property: 

Criminal homicide 1, 643 

Rape 1, 087 

Robbery 4, 258 

Assault 6, 230 

Burglary — -breaking or entering 8, 360 

Larceny — theft 12, 534 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 926 

Auto theft 2, 770 

Forger}' and counterfeiting 1, 192 

Embezzlement and fraud 2, 648 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 1, 622 

Total 43, 270 

Table 16. — Distribution of arrests, Jan. 1, 1934-Mar. 31, 1934 



Oflfense charged 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Criminal homicide 


1,643 
1,087 
4,258 
6,230 
8,360 
12, 534 
2,770 
1,192 
2,648 

926 
1,622 
1,057 
1,336 
1,126 

966 
2,109 
2,093 
6,849 
3,550 
5,956 
1,292 

337 
5 

614 
11, 324 
1,238 
4,795 


1,514 
1,087 
4,080 
5,786 
8,230 
11,437 
2,713 
1,071 
2,488 

851 
1,585 

322 
1,091 
1,071 

875 
2,065 
1,906 
6,503 
3,201 
5,461 
1,248 

331 
5 

598 
10, 540 
1,148 
4,498 


129 

""'178" 
444 
130 
1,097 
57 
121 
160 
75 
37 
735 
245 
55 
91 
44 
187 
346 
349 
495 
44 
6 

ie' 

784 
90 
297 


1.9 
1.2 
4.8 
7.1 
9.5 
14.2 
3.2 
1.4 

?:? 

1.8 
1.2 
1.5 
1.3 
1.1 
2.4 
2.4 
7.8 
4.0 
6.8 
1.5 
.4 

(>) 
.7 

12.8 
1.4 
5.5 


1.9 
1.3 
5.0 
7.1 
10.1 
14.0 
3.3 
1.4 
3.0 
1.0 
1.9 
.4 
1.3 
1.3 

2.5 
2.4 
8.0 
3.9 

6.7 
1.5 
.4 
(') 

.7 
12.9 
1.4 
5.5 




Rape 








Assault 


7 1 










Auto theft 


9 






Embezzlement and fraud 


2 6 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 


1 2 






Prostitution and commercialized vice 


11 8 


Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 


3 9 










Driving while intoxicated 


7 




3:0 




5 6 


Disorderly conduct 


5 6 


Vagrancy 


8 
8.0 






Road and driving laws 


1 










Suspicion and investigation 


12 6 


Not stated 


1 4 










Totals 


87, 917 


81, 705 


6,212 


100.0 


100.0 


100 







than yio of 1 percent. 



Examination of the ages of the persons arrested indicates that those 
aged 19 were more numerous than those of any other single age group. 
The predominance of that group has been observed since the Division 
began the compilation of this type of data in 1932. The folio whig 
analysis of individuals less than 30 years of age is of interest: 



Correspond- 
' quarter of 1933 


Under21 


16,952 1 19.3 1 20.8 


21 to 24. 




25 to 29 


16 192 18 4 I 18 8 








49,021 1 55. 8 : 59.5 



27 

It will be observed that the proportion of youthful persons arrested 
was slisrhtly smaller durina; the first quarter of 1934 than for the 
corresponding period of 1933. 

The compilation shows that auto theft is generally committed by 
youthful individuals. Of the total of 2,770 individuals arrested for 
that type of offense 66.5 percent (1,841) were under 25 years of age. 
Similarly, 59.9 percent of those arrested for burglary and 53.7 percent 
of those charged with robbery were less than 25 years old. 



T.\BLE 17. — Arrcsti^ by age groups, Jan. 1,-Mar. 31, 1034 



Offense charged 


Not 
known 


Under 
15 


15 


16 


17 


IS 


19 


20 


21 


22 


Criminal homicide 


5 
I 

18 
8 


3 

7 
8 

79 
119 

10 
1 


3 

1 
25 

5 
102 
99 
34 

1 


5 

38 
483 
314 
174 
8 
4 

14 
25 
8 

17 
12 
1 
2 
9 
17 
31 
57 
3 
1 


18 
37 
177 
77 
692 
563 
277 
19 
13 

15 
40 
5 

16 
2 
7 
4 
11 
31 
72 
120 
11 


45 
70 
279 
137 
752 
765 
302 
30 
22 

42 
64 
21 

34 
10 
8 
17 
32 
81 
125 
265 
28 
12 


54 
83 
324 
181 
662 
782 
288 
29 
47 

42 
81 
23 

47 
11 
13 
29 
52 
139 
156 
327 
32 
19 


53 

74 
274 
177 
509 
615 
203 
42 
49 

33 
63 
35 

53 
27 
17 
34 
57 
134 
118 
265 
33 
14 


62 
56 
330 
255 
506 
635 
159 
42 
48 

41 
80 
54 

54 
25 
16 
67 
65 
175 
176 
266 
33 
20 
1 
29 
537 
51 
235 


70 


Rape 






308 


Assault 


240 


Burglary— breaking or entering 


430 
561 


Auto theft 


161 


Forcery and counterfeiting 


54 




3 

I 

1 
2 
1 
3 
5 
3 

8 
6 


55 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
possessing 


1 
1 
1 

....... 


2 

1 

3 

5 


31 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sex offenses (except rape and prostitu- 
tion) 

Offenses against family and children, . . 
Narcotic drug laws 


79 

82 

68 
30 
36 








70 




5 

5 

10 


3 
1 
9 
15 
1 


76 


Drunkenness 


219 


Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancv 


149 
264 


Gambling 


43 




19 








1 


other trafiSc and motor vehicle laws 


1 
4 


47 
"'"46" 


""52" 
4 
36 


6 
126 
21 


14 
244 

37 
167 


25 
457 

52 
239 


31 
590 

61 
272 


27 
497 

51 
234 


30 

577 


Not stated 


38 


All other offenses 


215 






Total 


141 


360 


402 


1,544 


2,669 


3,914 


4,375 


3,688 


4.018 


3,974 



O flense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery _ 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny- theft 

Autotheft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 
ing 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) . . 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambling.. 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations _ 

Other traSic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 

Not stated 

All other offenses... 



Total. 



1,277 

1,300 

2,186 

454 

229 

465 



127 
2,196 



116 
519 

1,061 
895 

1,657 
244 
202 
497 

140 
214 
171 
182 
217 
210 
402 
339 
1,086 
551 
867 
257 
51 



208 6,707 4,409 5,519 87,917 



28 



Thiity-five percent of the individuals whose arrest records were 
examined during the first 3 months of 1934 had previous fingerprint 
records on file in the Identification Unit of the Division of Investiga- 
tion. The proportion having such previous fingerprint records varies 
with the offense from 59.1 percent for those charged with violation of 
narcotic drug laws to 19.2 percent for those charged with criminal 
homicide. 

Table 18. — Arrests, Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 1934 



Offense charged 


Total 


Pre- 
vious 
finger- 
print 
record 


Offense charged 


Total 


Pre- 
vious 
finger- 
print 
record 




1.643 
1,087 
4,258 
6,230 
8,360 
12, 534 
2,770 
1,192 
2,648 

926 
1,622 

1,057 

1,336 


316 

236 

1,800 

1,804 

3,055 

4,665 

969 

516 

1,134 

233 

458 

360 

348 


Offenses against family and children. 


1,126 

966 

2,109 

2,093 

6,849 

3,550 

5,956 

1,292 

337 

5 

614 

11,324 

1,238 

4,795 








Robbery 




416 


Assault _ 




591 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


Drunkenness 


2 283 


Larceny — theft 


Disorderly conduct 


1 190 


Autotheft... 




2! 795 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


Gambling 


266 






73 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, 


Parking violations 


2 


possessing 


other traffic and motor vehicle laws. 
Suspicion and investigation 


150 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 


4,466 


Prostitution and commercialized 


Not stated 


481 


vice 


All other offenses 


1,595 


Sex offenses (except rape and prosti- 






87,917 


31, 018 









Table 19. — Percentage with previous records; arrests, Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 1934 



Offense charged 


Percent 


Offense charged 


Percent 


Narcotic drug laws 


59.1 
46.9 
43.3 
42.8 
42.3 
40.0 

37^2 
36.5 
35.0 
34.1 
33.5 
33.3 
33.3 


Assault 


29 




Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Liquor laws 


28.2 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


28 2 




Sex offenses (except rape and prostitu- 






20.0 


Parking violations 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, pos- 






26.2 




Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Offenses against family and children 


24.4 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


21.8 


Autotheft 


21.7 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


Road and driving laws 


21.7 


Disorderly conduct 


Gambling 


20.6 






19.7 


All other offenses 


Criminal homicide 


19.2 









In addition to those referred to in the preceding paragraph, there 
were 2,143 arrest records examined which bore notations indicating 
that the individuals involved had at some previous time been arrested, 
making a total of 33,161 cases in which the files of the Division con- 
tained data showing a previous criminal history. In 22,798 of them 
(68.7 percent) the records indicated that the persons involved had 
been previously convicted. The following convictions for offenses 
against life and property were included: 

Criminal homicide 271 

Rape 197 

Robbery 1, 243 

Assault 1, 093 

Burglary — breaking or entering 3, 207 

Larceny — theft 4, 834 

Auto theft 943 

Forgery and counterfeiting 893 

Embezzlement and fraud 746 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 314 

Drug laws _" 577 

Total 14,318 



29 

It is significant to note that the above total constitutes 62.8 percent 
of the entire group sho\ving previous convictions. It should be noted 
further that there are undoubtedly numerous instances in which the 
uidividuals concerned had been previously involved in the commission 
of cnmmal offenses but such criminal activities were not reflected 
by the records of the Division. 

Durmg March two persons were arrested and charged with homicide 
whose records showed previous convictions for the same type of 
offense. In one instance the individual mvolved was committed to 
a State penitentiary in 1920 for murder under a sentence of 21 years. 
He served 10 years and was released. On the current charge of 
murder he was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment. The 
record of this person also shows that he served 1 year for burglary 
and grand larceny in 1910. 

The record of the second individual shows that he served 10 years 
for murder in 1921 and that the current murder charge is still pending. 



30 












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32 

Of the 22,798 records showing previous convictions of the indivi- 
duals involved, 7,274 indicated that they had at some time in their 
previous criminal history been released on parole or given some similar 
type of treatment. This figure may be further analyzed as follows: 

Paroled — current arrest in period of parole 873 

Paroled — prior arrest in period of parole 1, 023 

Current arrest in period of previous sentence 2, 076 

Previous arrest in period of a prior sentence 1, 230 

Total 5, 202 

In the remaining 2,072 cases the records did not show an arrest within 
the parole period. 



Table 21.- 


—Arrests Jan 


t-Mar. 


31, 1934 






Offense charged 


Paroled, 
current 
arrest in 
period of 
parole 


Paroled, 

prior 
arrest in 
period of 
parole 


Paroled, 
no arrest 
in pe- 
riod of 
parole 


Current 
arrest in 
period of 
previous 
sentence 


Previous 
arrest in 
period of 
a prior 
sentence 


Total, 
paroled, 

or ar- 
rested in 
period of 

prior 
sentence 


Pre- 
viously 

con- 
victed, 
not pa- 
roled 




6 
7 
56 
29 
87 
72 
31 
12 
17 

6 
9 
4 

6 
6 
7 
6 
15 
36 
21 
34 
4 


5 
5 

72 
45 
145 
169 
41 
37 
59 

11 
2 

14 
6 

9 
14 
56 
27 
81 

t 


20 
23 
129 
135 

278 
344 
74 
48 
83 

18 
32 
22 

23 
19 
42 
21 
20 

115 
67 

156 
13 
2 
1 
9 

262 
26 
90 


26 
18 
219 
73 
271 
284 
102 
58 
83 

13 
50 
12 

8 
8 
17 
14 
31 
65 
64 
127 
6 
4 


7 
4 
76 
45 
134 
264 
42 
25 
61 

12 
17 
5 

12 
3 

29 

53 

34 

120 

2 


64 
57 
552 
327 
915 
1,133 
290 
180 
303 

55 
119 
45 

63 
42 
123 
57 
97 
325 
213 
518 
29 
10 

1,027 
128 
576 




Eape 


112 










Burglary — breaking or entering 


1 432 




2,509 




Forgery and counterfeiting 


220 






Stolen property: buying, receiving, pos- 
sessing 


101 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice... 
Sex offenses (except rape and prostitu- 
tion). 


236 
181 

177 


Offenses against family and children.. .. 




Driving while intoxicated 


246 










Disorderly conduct 


650 










Road and driving laws 


37 


Parking violations 




1 


Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation 


3 
95 
16 
288 


3 
125 
13 
43 


7 
352 
43 
121 


3 
193 
30 
34 


74 

2,210 

239 


Not stated 










Total. 


873 


1,023 


2,072 


2,076 


1,230 


7,274 


15, 524 





The following tabulation shows that the majority of those who 
were paroled were originally convicted of serious crimes and were 
arrested during the first quarter of 1934 on charges of a similarly 
serious nature. There were 159 individuals paroled subsequent to 
convictions for criminal homicide. Of those 4 were currently charged 
with criminal homicide, 3 with rape, 10 with robbery, 23 with assault, 
10 with burglary, and 16 with larceny. 



33 



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35 

Of the 87,917 arrest records examined, 63,385 represented whites 
and 20,056 (22.8 percent) were those of Negroes. The remaining races 
were represented as follows: 

Indian 364 

Chinese 348 

Japanese 73 

Mexican 2, 920 

All others 771 

In proportion to the number of each in the general population of the 
■country" the Negroes arrested were almost 5 times as numerous as 
foreign-born whites and 3 times as numerous as native whites. 
Expressed in terms of the number per 100,000 in the general popula- 
tion of the country (exclusive of those under 15 years of age) the 
arrests were as follows: 

Negroes 249. 4 

Native whites 83. 1 

Foreign-born whites 52. 6 

It will be observed that the number of native whites is 58 percent 
greater than the number of foreign-born whites. However, it should 
be noted in this connection that persons whose parents were foreign- 
born have been counted among the native whites. 

The compilation shows that for criminal homicide, assault, and 
carrying concealed weapons, the proportionate number of foreign-born 
whites exceeded that of native whites, whereas for robbery, burglary, 
and larceny, the opposite was true. For all of the preceding offenses, 
the proportionate number of Negroes arrested was considerably higher 
.than for whites. 



36 



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37 



Table 24. — Arrests Jan. 1-Mar. 31, 1934, rate per 100,000 of population {excluding 
those under 15 years of age) 



Offense charged 



Native 
white 



Foreign- 
born white 



Negro 



Criminal homicide— 

Rape 

Robbery 

Assault- 

Burglary — breaking or entermg 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution)^... 

Offenses against family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Driving while intoxicated— 

Liquor laws.. 

Dnmkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

Gambling _.. 

Road and driving laws.. 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Suspicion and investigation. 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total... 



3.7 
8.3 
11.4 
3.4 
1.4 
3.2 
.8 
1.1 
1.1 
1.4 



.5 
11.1 
1.3 
4.6 



6.9 
2.4 
12.4 
30.6 
23.7 
41.5 
4.1 
1.0 
2.9 
2.3 
6.9 
3.3 
2.8 
1.4 
1.5 
2.1 
6.9 
14.4 
11.6 
12.8 
6.1 
1.0 
) 

1.6 
34.5 
2.6 
12.2 



• Less than Moth of 1 per 100,000. 

At the end of March, there were 4,213,114 fingerprint records and 
5,346,197 index cards containing names or aliases of individuals with 
records on file in the Division of Investigation at Washington. Of 
each 100 fingerprint cards received during the first 3 months of 
1934 more than 47 were identified with data in the files of the Divi- 
sion. During the same period 1,208 fugitives from justice were 
identified through fingerprint records and information as to the 
whereabouts of these fugitives was immediately transmitted to the 
law-enforcement officers or agencies desiring to apprehend these 
individuals. 

The number of police departments, peace officers, and law-enforce- 
ment agencies throughout the United States and foreign countries 
voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Division at the end of 
March totaled 6,568. 

O 



{-\ 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume V — Number 2 
SECOND QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1934 



Issued by the 

Division of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON: 1934 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(II) 



U. S. SUPFRINTFNDENT OF DOCUMENTS 
AUG 18 1934 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Division of Investigation, U.S. Department of 
Justice, Washington, D.C. 

Volume 5 July 1934 Number 2 



CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1934. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-34. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location. 

Data for individual cities. 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police. 

Offenses known in the possessions. 

Number of police department employees. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1934: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records. 

Number with records showing previous convictions. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term "offenses known to the pohce" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of pros- 
ecuting or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the 
following group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience 
to be those most generally and completely reported to the police: 
Criminal homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, 
and (b) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated 
assault; burglary — breaking or entering; larency — theft; and auto 
theft. The figures contained herein include also the number of 
attempted crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, 
however, are reported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an 
attempted burglary or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin 
in the same manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 
Complaints which upon investigation are learned to be groundless 
are not included in the tabulations which follow. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 

(1) 



attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths. (6) Manslaughter by negligence includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and at- 
tempted rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, rob- 
bery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shoot- 
ing, cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maiming. 
Does not include simple assault assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, house-breaking, safe 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value. (6) 
Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con-games", 
forgery, passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven away 
and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not include 
taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized 
use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the Division of Investigation does not vouch for its accuracy. It is 
given out as current information, which may throw some light on 
problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 
Extent of Reporting Area 

The number of city police departments contributing one or more 
crime reports during the first half of 1934 is shown in the following 
table. The information is presented for the cities divided according 
to size. The population figures employed are estimates as of July 1, 
1932, by the Bureau of the Census, for cities with population in excess 
of 10,000. For the smaller communities the figures listed in the 1930 
decennial census were employed.^ 

Growth in the reporting area is evidenced by the following figures 
for the first 6 months of 1932-34: 



Year 


Cities 


Population 


1932 


1,536 
1,606 
1,645 


52, 692, 749 




54, 208, 740 


1934 


62, 319, 945 







The above comparison shows that during the first half of 1934 there 
was an increase of 39 cities as compared with the corresponding period 
of 1933. The combined population of those cities is 8,111,205. 





Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total popu- 
lation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


983 


853 


87 


60, 813, 881 


57, 819, 767 


95 








57 
105 
192 
592 


36 

57 
96 
174 
490 


97 
100 
91 
91 

83 


29, 955, 600 
7,908,112 
7, 092, 407 
6, 695, 136 
9, 162, 626 


29, 672, 100 
7,908,112 
6,494,911 
6,103,613 
7,641,031 


99 


2. Cities 100,000 to 250,000 


100 


3. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


92 


4. Cities 25,000 to 50,000.-- 


91 


5. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


83 



The above table does not iMcIude 792 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population of 4,500,178. 
The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas the rural 
townships are of varying population groups. 

MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

In order to make possible comparisons of the amount of reported 
crime in cities of different size there is presented in table 1 the number 
of offenses reported by the police departments of 1,307 cities with an 
aggregate population of 56,679,644. In addition to showing the 
number of offenses reported by all those cities, the figures are pre- 
sented with subdivision as to size. 

The compilation shows that in general, cities with more than 100,000 
inhabitants report more offenses than the smaller communities. 
However, the crime rates vary directly with the size of the city only 
in the cases of robbery and auto theft. 

The amount of variation in crime rates for the several groups of 
cities differs with the offense. The robbery figures show the largest 
amount of variation, while the least is shown by the data for murder 
and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

Of the cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants, 76 reported 
separate figures for larceny according to the value of the article 
stolen. The compilation of that information is presented below. 





Larceny— theft 


Population group 


$50 and 
over in 
value 


Under $50 
in value 


28 cities over 2.50,000; total population, 19,176,900: 
Number of offenses known 


10,315 
53.8 

2,769 
41.7 


60, 337 


Rate per 100,000 


314 6 


48 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population 6,643,312: 
Number of offenses known 


24, 726 


Rate per 100 000 


372 2 







The above tabulation shows that the cities with more than 250,000 
inhabitants reported a higher crime rate for major larcenies than was 
reported by cities with from 100,000 to 250,000 inhabitants. For 
minor lai'cenies, however, the opposite was true. • 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 1934; number 
and rales per 100,000 by population groups 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



3 cities over 250,000; total 
population, 29,(i72,l(K): 
Number of olTonsos known. 
Rate per 100,000 



OUOUP II 

52 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 7,297,412: 
Number of oll'onses known. 
Kate per 100,000.. 



GROUP III 

7i cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 4,9H0,i:i:{; 

Number of olVonses known 
Itateper 100,000 



GROUP IV 



141 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 4,H«1,381: 
Number of olTonsos known. 
Hate per 100,000 



GROUP V 

401 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, «,322,04;j: 
Number of olToiisos known 
Hate per 100,000 



GROUP VI 



001 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 3,52fi,57fi: 
Number of offenses known 
Jtatepor 100,000 



;otal 1,307 cities; total 

population, 5n,679,(i44: 

Number of ollensos 

known 

Rate per I0(),0(X) 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



1,044 
3.5 



1,810 
3.2 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



1, 193 
4.2 



1,042 
3.0 



Rape 



1,065 
3.0 



1,830 
3.2 



liob- 
bery 



2,457 
33.7 



1,464 
29.4 



1,078 
22.1 



952 
15.1 



22,711 
40.1 



1,998 
27.4 



1,273 
25. 6 



1,079 
17.1 



407 
11.5 



12, 703 
22.4 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 



48, 369 
163. 



15,627 
214.1 



8,508 
172.0 



7,644 
156.6 



6, 900 
109. 1 



3, 853 
109.3 



90, 901 
160.5 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



! 82, 081 
370.5 



29, 788 
408.2 



20, 999 
421.7 



17, 330 
355.0 



10,682 
203.9 



7, 807 
223. 1 



174,747 
355.6 



Auto 
theft 



12,389 
169.8 



6,172 
123.0 



4,511 
71.4 



1,642 
46.6 



« 69, 087 
139.7 



The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 35 cities with a 
total population of 28,287,100. 

2 The number of olTcnsos and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 34 cities with a total population 
of 22,1.53,100. 

3 The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are ba,sed on reports of 35 cities with a total population of 
22,454,000. 

* The number of olTonses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,300 cities with 
a total population of 55,294,644. 

' The number of ollensos and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,305 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 49,160,644. 

» The number of olTonses and rate for auto tlioft are based on reports of 1,306 cities with a total population 
of 49,461,544. 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1934 

In tabic 2 there is prcsontod a compilation showino; tlio daily avcraf2:e 
number of olVenses reported durino; the first G months of 1934 by the 
police dejiartments in the same cities as are represented in table 1. 
The tabulation disclosi^s that during^ the second quarter of 1934 there 
were more oll'enses of nuirder and ai2;<2:ravated assault than durino; the 
first 3 months of the year. The opposite was true with reference 
to offenses of manslauo;hter by nej^ligence, robbery, burii;lary, and 
larceny. The trends evidenced by the fi<2;ures for murder, a<i;<2;ravated 
assault, robbery, and bur<::lary are similar to those disclosed by the 
tabulations covering previous years. 



Table 2. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 
1934; 1,307 miscellaneous cities 

[Total population, 56,679,644, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

sault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


I>ar- 
cony— 
thoft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
tlieft 




8.7 
9.6 
10.4 
11.3 
10.0 
11.0 


1 10.7 
9.1 
8.7 
8.8 
8.4 
8.7 


10.0 
8.8 
9. G 
9.8 
10.6 
11.8 


139.2 
136.4 
138. 5 
129.9 
107.1 
102.4 


64.1 
GO. 6 
68.8 
73. 5 
74.9 
78.7 


548. 8 
499. 5 
524. 
514. 5 
464. 2 
463.1 


2 1,002.8 

907.9 

1,000.3 

1,005.3 

948.2 

922.7 


3 402. 9 


February.. 


346. 9 


March 


392 6 


April 


409.9 


May 




June 


365.5 






Total January-June 


10.2 


9.1 


10.1 


125.6 


70.2 


502.5 


965.5 


381.7 



• The daily averages for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,306 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 55,294,644. 

' The daily averages for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,305 cities with a total population of 49, 160,- 
644. 

' The daily averages for auto theft are based on reports of 1,306 cities with a total population of 49,461,544. 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-34 

For comparative purposes there are presented in table 3, the num- 
ber of offenses reported during the first half of the years 1931 to 1934 
by the police departments in 69 cities with more than 100, 000 inhab- 
itants. The aggregate population of the cities represented is 18,931,- 
202. 

The compilation shows substantial decreases in the number of rob- 
beries and auto thefts. There is a slight decrease in the nmnber of 
offenses of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter and the figures for 
aggravated assault show a slight decrease as compared with 1933; 
similarly the figures for burglary and larceny show slight decreases as 
compared with 1933, although the figures for the first half of 1934 are 
larger than those for the corresponding period of 1931. 



Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 69 cities over 100,000, 
January to June, inclusive, 1931-34 

[Total population, 18,931,202, as estimated July 1, 1932, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

as- 
sault 


Bur- 

ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known: 
1931- 


740 
752 
759 
731 

4.1 
4.1 
4.2 
4.0 


729 
662 
617 
652 

4.0 
3.6 
2.9 
3.6 


583 
666 

3.2 
3.4 
3.7 
3.5 


9,706 
9,109 
8,461 
6,885 

53.6 
50.0 
46.7 
38.0 


4,726 
4,240 
5,043 
4,727 

26.1 
23.3 
27.9 
26.1 


33, 357 

36, 631 

37, 073 
35, 264 

184.3 
201.3 
204.8 
194.8 


71, 233 
72,831 
76, 983 
75, 596 

400^2 
425.3 
417.7 


43, 759 
36, 805 


1932 


1933 


1934 


29 906 


Daily average: 


241.8 


1932 


202 2 


1933 


184.5 


1934 


165 2 







Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location 

Table 4 shows the number of city poUce departments whose reports 
have been employed in the tabulation of data appearing in this 
issue of the bulletin. It shows for each State and for each of nine 
geographic subdivisions of the country the number of communities 
represented, divided according to population. It is believed that 
this information should be employed in connection with any com- 
parison of crime rates for States or other geographic units, particu- 
larly in view of the fact that table 1 indicates that the larger cities 
report more crimes than smaller communities. Furthermore, the 
figures for some States are based upon a very small number of reports, 
as indicated by table 4. This factor should be given appropriate 
consideration, since crime rates based upon the reports of only a 
small number of communities may differ substantially from the 
figures which would be obtained if they were based upon reports 
received from all communities in the States. 

In general, the factors which may cause the crime rates for individ- 
ual cities to vary should also be given consideration in making any 
comparison of State crime rates. This matter is more fully discussed 
in connection with table 6. 

The highest rates for murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and 
aggravated assault were reported by the East South Central States, 
whereas the lowest rates for these offenses were reported by the New 
England group. The highest figures for robbery were reported by 
the East North Central States ; for burglary, larceny, and auto theft 
by the Mountain States. The lowest rates for robbery were reported 
by the New England group; for burglary, larceny, and auto theft by 
the Middle Atlantic division. 



Table 4. — Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to June, inclusive, 1934 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 146 cities; total population, 
5,339,462... 


7 
9 
4 
2 
3 
3 
5 


12 

8 

5 

6 

3 

5 
1 
3 


9 
18 

4 
8 
2 

3 

2 
6 

1 


25 

23 

43 

10 

14 

3 

8 
4 
11 

1 
1 
1 
10 
5 

8 
8 

14 
5 
9 

7 
8 


52 

119 

93 

46 

24 

14 

16 
8 
32 

5 
4 

34 

6 

42 

49 

27 
12 
24 
20 
10 

9 

1 
5 
6 
9 


46 
1G2 
169 

34 

5 

27 
29 
61 

8 

19 
4 
8 

70 
59 
33 

47 
9 
26 
73 
14 

23 
9 
10 

4 

9 
12 

9' 

5 




Middle Atlantic: 337 cities; total population, 
17,578,281 




East North Central: 344 cities; total popula- 
tion, 15,058,831 


344 


West North Central: 137 cities; total popula- 
tion, 4,387,327 


137 


South Atlantic: i 88 cities; total population, 
3,680,138 


88 


East South Central: 30 cities; total popula- 
tion, 1,738,841 


30 


West South Central: 62 cities; total popula- 
tion, 2,813,131 


62 


Mountain: 45 cities; total population, 972,521. 
Pacific: llScities; total population, 5,111,112... 
New England: 
Maine 


45 

118 

15 








7 


Vermont 






8 




\ 


8 


6 


78 






Connecticut 


4 

4 
1 
3 

3 
3 

1 
2 

1 

1 


5 
5 
8 

4 

6 
8 
2 


26 


Middle Atlantic: 


3 
2 
2 

5 

1 
2 


132 


New Jersey 


103 




102 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


100 




31 






Michigan 


111 




35 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


35 




2 
2 


5 
2 

1 


26 


Missouri 


2 


23 


North Dakota 


6 










7 


Nebraska 




1 
2 




16 


Kansas 






1 


24 


South Atlantic: 




2 


Marvland 


1 




2 
4 

2 

3 
3 


1 
5 
4 
8 


4 




2 


1 

2 
1 
2 

1 


21 


West Virginia 




12 


North Carolina 






17 










Georgia 






3 
3 

4 

7 

i 

6 

8 

1 
1 
4 


4 
10 

3 
2 

52 


10 


Florida 




3 


19 


East South Central: 
Kentucky 


1 

1 
1 




Tennessee 


7 




1 




4 


Mississippi 


7 


West South Central: 






1 


1 
2 
2 
3 

1 


4 


Louisiana 


1 




5 




2 
3 


'"""2 


24 


Texas 


2 


29 


Mountain: 
Montana 


6 


Idaho 








5 


Wyoming 










3 




1 




1 


1 
1 


16 




2 


Arizona 






^ 


4 


Utah 




1 


1 


9 
20 


6 


Nevada 




3 


Pacific: 

Washington 


1 
3 


1 




2 

1 
8 


15 




12 


California 


2 


6 


91 







Includes District of Columbia. 
76663—34 2 



Table 5. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to June, 
inclusive, 1934 



Division and State 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
lifjent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England 

Middle Atlantic ' 

East North Central 2 

West North Central 

South Atlantic ^ 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 

Pacific *.- --- 

New England: 

Maine. 

New Hampshire-- 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York ' --- 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 6 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia. 

West Virginia- 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky. 

Tennessee -.. 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana -. 

Oklahoma 

Texas.. 

Mountain: 

Montana - .-. 

Idaho - 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico -. 

Arizona 

Utah-. 

Nevada , 

Pacific: 

Washington--. 

Oregon , 

California ' 



2.9 
3.9 
6.7 
13.3 
9.0 
3.5 
1.8 



1.8 
2.0 
2.1 

3.7 
4.4 
3.7 
1.4 
.2 

1.7 

2.1 

6.8 

2.8 



2.6 

3.2 

5.5 
2.2 

10.0 
6.1 
8.9 

12.9 
8.2 
7.2 

9.1 
15.1 
17.3 
10.1 

17.6 
6.4 
6.2 

10.2 

2.8 
5.7 
8.7 
2.8 
3.0 
12.8 
1.4 


1.7 
1.2 
1.9 



14.3 
14.5 
73.1 
43.5 
39.5 
66.1 
41.0 
60.6 



9.2 
24.6 
21.2 

41.9 
43.8 
159.0 
23.6 
6.8 

49.3 
29.6 
46.9 
33.7 
48.7 
23.2 
52.9 

13.7 
34.7 
35.4 
38.9 
25.2 
24.8 
34.6 
52.2 

79.0 
77.9 
39.7 
20.3 

50.7 
22.4 
47.1 
44.5 

22.4 
26.5 
8.7 
75.1 
26.8 
139.2 
42.4 
26.3 

54.6 
77.9 
35.8 



7.3 
17.3 
20.4 

9.5 
67.3 
92.4 
34.3 
10.0 
12.7 

10.7 
4.1 

4.8 
7.1 
11.5 



16.5 
25.4 
15.3 

21.0 
17.9 
26.5 
18.3 
3.1 

3.9 
6.9 

13.3 


3.9 
8.8 

16.6 

22.0 
4.6 

125.2 
39.2 

231.5 
37.7 
61.5 
69.4 



113.0 
63.1 
85.6 

41.1 
9.5 
20.5 

48.2 

2.8 
9.5 
5.8 
9.4 
3.0 
35.5 
7.2 



5.3 
9.2 
14.4 



134. 6 
74.2 
177.5 
152.4 
218.3 
280.8 
247.7 
324.5 
279.4 



114.7 
148.6 

46.9 
184.7 
82.3 

161.5 
186.3 
265. 2 
106. 1 

78.5 

170.2 
178.7 
114.7 
234.4 
151.0 
109.7 
225.5 

130.1 
133.2 
287.2 
140.8 
165. 6 
211.3 
206.3 
343.3 

345.1 
255. 9 
290.5 
70.9 

246.1 
106.8 
272.2 
290.0 

190.7 
113.6 
72.6 
392.4 
235.2 
413.5 
301.8 
295.6 

372.8 
414.1 
248.7 



252.4 
162.2 
356.9 
352.0 
464.2 
377.8 
575.6 
649.0 
590.7 

147.5 
119.7 
108.4 
257.9 
250.3 
290.0 

212.6 
204.3 
109.0 

398.8 
467.2 
243.7 
452. 2 
308.3 

207.7 
400.4 
384.4 
259.7 
338.1 
337.0 
544.2 

307.9 
203.7 
626.8 
290.9 
345.5 
979.9 
702.5 
601.0 

601.3 
284.7 
258.0 
235.7 

510.6 
131.3 
571.9 
745.8 

835.9 
407.0 
441.3 
637.2 
610.3 
, 102. 6 
529.9 
831.3 

601.3 
778.9 
568.8 



' The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 336 cities with a total population 
of 10,360,181. 

» The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 343 cities with a total population of 14,757,931. 
' Includes report of District of Columbia. 

* The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 117 cities with a total population of 
3,726.112. 

« The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 131 cities. 

• The rate for larceny — theft is based on reports of 99 cities. 

' The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 90 cities. 



For the six States represented by the largest number of reports 
there are presented in table 5A crime rates i'or six groups of cities. 
The grouping of the cities according to size is the same as that 
employed in table 1. The number of cities represented in the figures 
for each group may be ascertained by referring to table 4. 

Table 5A. — Offenses known to the ■police, January to June, inclusive, 1934; number 
per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 



State and population group 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 

enter- 



Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 



Auto 
theft 



CALIFORNIA 

Group I ' 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV .,. 

Group V 

Group VI 

MICHIGAN 

Group I - 

Group II. 

Group III - 

Group IV.. 

Group V 

Group VI 

NEW JERSEY 

Group I. 

Group II.. 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

NEW YORK 
Group 12 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

OHIO 

Group I' 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V. 

Group VI 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V. 

Group VI 



45.3 
37.9 
24.6 
22.8 
11.0 
11.6 



31.5 
12.2 
26.6 
15.1 

9.4 
7.8 



39.7 
18.5 
25.1 
15.3 
17.7 



9.5 
14.0 
10.3 
6.0 
5.1 
3.2 



55.9 
35.4 
22.6 
27.8 
21.1 
17.3 



27.2 
22.6 
16.9 
11.9 
8.9 
12.3 



18.1 
8.3 

13.1 
7.2 
4.0 
9.9 



25.4 
24.4 
11.1 
8.5 
5.7 
4.5 



37.8 
11.0 
30.7 
18.9 
17.3 
13.0 



18.0 
12.8 
17.7 
20.1 
6.3 
5.0 



25.3 
36.4 

11^2 
9.3 
10.6 



18.7 
6.7 
12.5 
13.2 
11.9 
10.3 



258.8 
284.6 
251.7 
281.9 
164.7 
179.0 



148.1 
165.8 
138.2 
68.5 
54.7 



285.4 
177.8 
191.7 
128.6 
92.0 
116.4 



30.3 
137.3 
95.5 



101.4 

84.4 



187.0 
169.3 
116.5 
133.7 
114.9 
107.8 



77.3 
163.1 
96.4 
89.5 
55.9 
50.2 



574.8 
527.6 
750. 9 
455.6 
490.5 
517.3 



573.8 
499.4 
466.9 
311.1 
141.7 
115.8 



178.4 
305.8 
373.4 
145.0 
167.5 
171.4 



191.4 
103.5 



506.5 
406.1 
248.4 
296.4 
271.3 
166.0 



92.6 

184.7 
179.7 
127.7 
83.3 
56.6 



233.9 
214.3 
186.4 
172.2 
116.6 
99.8 



107.4 
130.1 
128.4 
106.2 
50.0 
22.0 



186.0 
95.2 
94.2 
71.8 
41.5 
40.3 



94.1 
115.6 
96.3 
61.8 
53.5 
25.5 



159.0 
136.0 
52.5 
108.4 
72.7 
43.6 



109.1 
96.9 
97.6 
31.8 
25.6 



1 The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 2 cities. 
» The rates for larceny- theft and auto theft are based on reports of 2 cities. 
» The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 4 cities. 



Data for Individual Cities 

In presenting crime rates for individual cities the Division of In- 
vestigation desires to point out that there are many factors which, 
if present, may operate to cause variations in the data for the several 
cities. In the first place it should be observed that differences in 
crime figures may be due either to real differences in the amount of 



10 

crime or to the fact that the procedure employed in the preparation 
of crime reports has not been uniform among the several reporting 
units. Wherever deviations from the procedure outlined in the 
crime reporting manual have been observed, efforts have been made 
to eliminate them. There has been, however, no field supervision in 
connection with the preparation of individual crime reports. It is 
believed, therefore, that the proper function of the following compi- 
lation of crime data for cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants is 
to furnish the information which will serve as a stimulus to further 
study of local crime problems on the part of police administrators 
and interested civic organizations. 

Some of the factors wdiich may produce real differences in crime 
conditions in individual communities are the following: 

Differences in the composition of the population with reference particularly to 
age, sex, and race. 

Differences in the economic status and activities of the population. 

Differences in climate. 

Differences in the educational, recreational, and religious facilities in the 
several communities. 

Differences in the number of police employees per unit of population. 

Differences in the standards governing appointments to the police force. 

Differences in the policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

Differences in the attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

Crime data for individual communities may also be affected by 
lack of uniformity in the compilation thereof. In that connection, 
it has been recently ascertained that in the past there has been con- 
siderable variation in the procedures employed in scoring ofi'enses of 
manslaughter by negligence. The methods used have ranged, on 
one hand, from the inclusion of all deaths resulting from automobile 
accidents to the inclusion, on the other extreme, only of instances 
where the automobile driver was tried and convicted. It will be 
apparent that where individual cities report high crime rates for man- 
slaughter by negligence they probably have included all cases of 
automobile deaths, whereas on the other hand, cities reporting ex- 
tremely low crime rates may possibly have failed to include cases 
where the drivers w^ere guilty of culpable negligence, but were not 
tried and convicted. The Division is constantly endeavoring to 
eliminate such deviations from the uniform scoring procedure. 

With reference to the rates for larceny, it is desired to point out 
that there probably is considerable variance on the part of individual 
police departments in connection with the procedure employed in 
disposing of reports of larcenies of trivial objects. In instances 
where the rates for larceny are quite low, it should be considered 
possible that the cities represented do not include reports of larceny 
where the value of the object stolen is quite trivial, whereas on the 
other hand, cities reporting extremely high rates for this offense 
probably include all reported thefts without regard to the value of 
the article stolen. It should further be borne in mind that there are 
no doubt many instances of thefts which are known to the owners of 
the property involved, but which are never reported to the police. 
These factors are called to your attention, not to discredit any of 
the figures included in the following tabulation, but merely to indi- 
cate the probable limiiations in the comparability of the rates for 
manslaughter by negligence and larceny. 



11 

From the foregoing, it will bo apparent that the tabulation which 
follows is not a fair basis for making comparisons as to the efficiency 
of police departments. Such comparisons cannot accurately be made 
without considering all factors which enter into the crime problem. 

Table 6. — Offenses known to the police, Apr. 1-June 30,1934; rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

[Population figures from Federal census, Apr. 1, 1930] 



City 



population 



Criminal 










Larceny- 


homicide 










theft 






Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 




Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 
$50 


1.2 


2.7 


3.9 


23.5 


32.2 


95.7 


34.9 


143.1 


.8 





.8 


9.4 


11.0 


67.5 


17.3 


137.3 


7 


.2 


3.0 


13.7 


1.5 


61.5 


18.6 


84.0 


9.2 


4.2 


.8 


12.7 


27.3 


159.4 


27.7 


57.8 


.3 


1.5 


4.9 


16.9 


5.6 


54.5 


41.9 


131.1 











13.6 


1.4 


144. 5 


15.0 


139.7 


1.2 


.7 


1.7 


7.0 


23.4 


37.2 


11.5 


83.9 





5.3 


1.8 


13.2 


5.3 


108.2 


21.1 


130.2 


1.9 


1.0 


1.0 


30.5 


27.6 


149.7 


(') 


207.8 


15.0 


4.2 





16.7 


1.3.4 


170.3 


30.9 


303.0 


2.6 


.7 


1.4 


93.3 


17.9 


153.2 


29.5 


99.8 


4.9 


.4 


1.6 


12.0 


23.7 


57.4 


27.0 


181.3 


3.4 


1.1 


.8 


36.6 


8.3 


81.8 


10.0 


271.4 


1.0 


.3 


1.7 


41.0 


18.2 


192.4 


39.2 


257. 4 


7.7 


1.9 


1.9 


16.5 


57.6 


137.8 


10.0 


426. 5 


2.0 


2.0 


1.0 


11.9 


22.4 


69.7 


13.4 


298.0 


1.4 


1.0 


1.4 


50.4 


4.5 


258.1 


(') 


278.3 


.7 








16.8 


2 1 


133.3 


18.9 


360.6 


1.1 


1 7 


2.5 


17.0 


17.6 


49.0 


15.2 


310.7 













1.0 


71.9 


30.6 


339.0 





3.5 


3.5 


1L3 


4.4 


68.9 


21.8 


174.5 


4.9 


7.8 


2.0 


20.5 


20.5 


63.5 


7.8 


146.5 


1.7 








12.9 





100.0 


28.5 


92.3 


1.0 


1.0 


3.9 


11.7 


7.8 


86.1 


10.8 


232.8 








6.9 






114.5 


10.4 


78.9 


.6 


1.9 


4.5 


15^3 


30^7 


97.8 


26.2 


312.5 


1.7 








10.4 


.9 


67.9 


12.2 


246.2 


4.9 


.6 


1. 2 


22.6 


5.5 


180.5 


9.2 


298.0 


6.0 


2.0 


o" 


28.9 


15.9 


100.6 


8.0 


76.7 








1.2 


3.6 


1.8 


76.5 


10.1 


218.9 





.6 





7.3 


10.4 


113.4 


34.1 


265.7 


5.8 


1.7 


2.7 


33.5 


30.8 


214.8 


54.0 


409.1 


2.2 





1.1 


32.4 


14.0 


152.4 


143.9 


311.4 


10.8 








49.4 


44.0 


202.2 


74.1 


382. 9 


.8 


.8 





65.7 


18.1 


175.6 


(') 


152.6 


4.0 


4.5 


1.5 


17.8 


2.0 


26.5 


23.5 


30.8 


8.5 


4.7 


1.9 


9.5 


22.7 


150.3 


8.5 


35.0 


.7 


2.1 





17.6 


3.5 


184.5 


46.5 


320.4 


1.5 


(2) 


4.0 


25.0 


9.3 


149.3 


48.9 


227 1 


5.8 


2.9 


1.3 


45.5 


60.8 


213.8 


43.2 


323^6 


2.0 





4.0 


2.0 





44.9 


7.0 


57.9 








1.0 


5.9 


2.0 


108.5 


23.5 




10.3 


1.6 


1.2 


40.3 


121.3 


116.9 


(■) 


37^9 


3.6 


2.7 


1.8 


28.9 


66.0 


287.4 


(2) 


(2) 


.2 


.2 


.5 


3.3 


2.8 


35.1 


17.5 


156.9 


1.9 





.9 


23.3 


1.9 


109.2 


9.5 


28.0 


5.8 


.6 


1.9 


46.8 


39.0 


91.6 


59.8 


108.5 


.9 


4.5 


.2 


34.4 


23.7 


231.9 


(') 


150.8 








2.7 


4.4 


7.1 


94.1 


14.2 


174.1 


g 


.6 


.6 


14.1 


7.4 


91.6 


27.7 


213.9 


ZO 


1.3 


.2 


8.3 


3.7 


44.5 


(') 


42.7 


1.3 


3.4 


2.1 


5.4 


9.5 


(2) 


(2) 


(2) 


3.1 


2.3 


1.5 


36.2 


75.6 


207.4 


10.0 


315.3 


1.1 


2.5 


2.8 


22.2 


14.8 


127.4 


21.5 


291.1 


2.7 


.5 


2.7 


24.3 


9.2 


57.2 


(0 


157.0 











12.1 


1.4 


49.5 


12.1 


94.9 











8.6 


4.8 


25.7 


5.7 


66.7 


1.8 


4.4 


1.2 


7.0 


11.9 


35.9 


13.7 


30.1 


.3 





.3 


28.5 


6.9 


32.1 


17.6 


37.6 


.7 





.3 


55.0 


4.6 


228.3 


64.9 


340.6 



Akron, Ohio, 255,040 

Albany, N.Y., 127,412 

Baltimore, Md., 804,874 

Birmingham, Ala., 259,678 

Boston, Mass., 781,188 

Bridgeport, Conn., 146,716 

Buffalo, N.Y., 573,076 

Cambridge. Mass., 113,643 

Canton, Ohio, 104,906 

Chattanooga, Tenn., 119,798.-- 

Chicago, 111., 3,376,438 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 451,160 

Cleveland, Ohio, 900,429 

Columbus, Ohio, 290,564 

Dallas, Tex., 260,475--. --. 

Dayton, Ohio, 200,982 

Den%-er, Colo., 287,861 

Des Moines, Iowa, 142,559 

Detroit, Mich., 1,568,662 

Duluth, Minn., 101,463 

Elizabeth, N.J., 114,589 

El Paso, Te.\., 102,421 

Erie, Pa., 115,967 

Evansville, Ind., 102,249 

Fall River, Mass., 115,274 

Flint, Mich., 156,492 

Fort Wayne, Ind., 114,946 

Fort Worth, Tex., 163,447 

Gary, Ind., 100,426 

Grand Rapids, Mich., 168,592.- 

Hartford, Conn., 164,072 

Houston, Tex., 292,352 

Indianapolis, Ind., 364,161 

Jacksonville, Fla., 129,549 

Kansas City, Kans., 121,857 

Kansas Citv, Mo., 399,746 

Knoxville, Tenn., 105,802 

Long Beach, Calif., 142,032 

Los Angeles, Calif., 1,238,048..-. 

Louisville, Ky., 307,745 

Lowell, Mass., 100,234 

Lynn, Mass., 102,320 

Memphis, Tenn., 253,143 

Miami, Fla., 110,637 

Milwaukee, Wis., 578,249 

Minneapolis, Minn., 464,356 

Nashville, Tenn., 153,866 

Newark, N.J., 442,337 

New Bedford, Mass., 112,597-... 

New Haven, Conn., 162,655 

New Orleans, La., 458,762 

New York, N.Y., 6,930,446 

Norfolk, Va., 129,710 

Oakland, Calif., 284,063 

Oklahoma City, Okla., 185,389. . 

Omaha, Nebr., 214,006 

Peoria, 111., 104,969.... 

Philadelphia, Pa., 1.950,961 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 669,817 

Portland, Oreg., 301,815 

Footnotes at end of table. 



12 

Table 6. — Offenses known to the police, Apr. 1-June SO, 1934; rate per 100,000 
inhabitants — Continued 



City and population 



Criminal 










Larceny- 


homicide 










theft 






Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 




Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 
$50 





.4 





1.2 


8.7 


87.8 


26.5 


164.8 








2.7 


12.6 


4.5 


97.1 


9.9 


117.8 


3.3 


3.3 


2.2 


18.6 


91.3 


107.1 


48.1 


364.6 





.3 





2.4 


5.5 


54.9 


8.8 


134.1 


4.0 


1.0 


5.1 


21.7 


10.1 


53.9 


(') 


252.0 


1.8 


.7 


4.8 


28.3 


1.5 


144.3 


18.0 


199.2 


.7 





.7 


17.8 


5.7 


148.3 


4.3 


208.9 


6.0 


3.0 


.4 


42.8 


30.2 


162.4 


59.6 


304.5 


.7 


.7 


1.4 


13.5 


1.4 


61.5 


16.2 


142.6 


1.6 


3.2 


2.0 


9.0 


7.4 


75.0 


(') 


269.9 





5.6 


2.1 


4.2 


7.0 


65.5 


13.9 


53.7 


1.6 





.3 


34.7 


6.8 


211.4 


31.5 


197.8 








1.0 


7.7 


2.9 


67.4 


14.4 


79.9 


3.5 








39.0 


26.0 


199.1 


81.4 


410.3 


1 3 





4.7 


8.0 


7.3 


64,0 


18.7 


132. 8 


1.0 





7.6 


9.6 


4.8 


93.2 


(') 


207.3 











15.9 


2.8 


147.0 


16.9 


263.1 


4.0 





3.0 


7.9 


24.7 


86.0 


13.8 


277.8 


1.4 





1.0 


21.3 


6.9 


109.0 


37.5 


Q) 


.7 





2.1 


37.5 


12.0 


243.5 


28.3 


387.2 








1.0 


5.9 


5.9 


73.7 


18.7 


160.2 


4.9 


1.2 


1.0 


24.9 


12.9 


123.9 


57.9 


243.6 


1.0 


1.0 


3.0 


15.0 


10.0 


34.0 


20.0 


108. 1 


1.8 





1.8 


11.7 


8.1 


144.9 


16.2 


454.5 


3.8 


.9 


.9 


7.5 


11.3 


65.7 


14.1 


156.7 











1.5 


1.5 


76.3 


20.5 


26.1 





1.5 





3.0 


5.2 


23.0 


3.7 


40.1 


2.4 








30.6 


16.5 


90.0 


1.2 


140.6 



Auto 
theft 



Providence, R.I., 252,981 

Reading, Pa., 111,171 

Richmond, Va., 182,929 

Rochester, N.Y., 328,132 

St. Louis, Mo., 821,960 -- 

St. Paul, Minn., 271,606 

Salt Lake City, Utah, 140,267-. 
San Antonio, Tex., 231,542.... 

San Diego, Calif., 147,995 

San Francisco, Calif., 634,394.. 

Scranton, Pa., 143,433 

Seattle, Wash., 365,583 

Somerville, Mass., 103,908 

Spokane, Wash., 115,514 

Springfield, Mass., 149,900___ 

Syracuse, N.Y., 209,326 

Tacoma, Wash., 106,817 

Tampa, Fla., 101,161 

Toledo, Ohio, 290,718 

Tulsa, Okla., 141,258 

Utica, N.Y., 101,740 

Washington, D.C., 486,869--.. 
Waterbury, Conn. ,3 99,902.... 

Wichita, Kans., 111,110 

Wilmington, Del., 106,597 

Worcester, Mass., 195,311 

Yonkers, N.Y., 134,646 

Youngstown, Ohio, 170,002... 



35.6 

72.0 
106.6 

69.8 

58.9 
148.7 
101.9 
201.3 

76.4 
122.5 

61.4 
132.7 

86.6 
118.6 

45.4 
105.1 

86.1 

57.3 
121.8 

160^4 
135.1 
48.6 
55.3 
116.2 
17.1 
66.5 



' Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 

2 Not reported. 

3 The population of Waterbury as estimated July 1, 1930, by the Bureau of the Census was 100,100. 

Offenses Known to Sheriffs and State Police, 1934 

Crime rates representing rural portions of the United States have 
not been calculated due to the difficulty encountered in ascertaining 
the population area represented by reports received from law enforce- 
ment agencies policing rural territory. There is presented, however, 
a tabulation showing the number of offenses reported by 34 sheriffs 
and 8 State police units. 

It should be noted that the data presented below represent only 
a very small portion of the rural territory in the United States. 



Table 7. — Offenses known, January to June 1934, inclusive, as reported by 34 
sheriffs and 8 State police units 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

as- 
sault 


Bur- 

&- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




50 


107 


105 


128 


211 


1,476 


2,782 


1,168 







13 



Offenses Known in Possessions of the United States 

In talkie 8 tliere is presented available information regarding the 
number of offenses known to the police in Hawaii County, Honomlu 
(city and county), Territory of Hawaii; the Canal Zone, and Puerto 
Rico. The figures presented include offenses in both urban and rural 
areas of the territories specified. The population area represented in 
each case is indicated in the table. 

Table 8. — Offenses known in United States possessions, January to June 1934; 
number and rate per 100,000 



[Population figures from Federal census, Apr. 


1, 1930] 










Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 




Jurisdiction reporting 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Over 
$50 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Hawaii: 

Hawaii County, popu- 
lation 73,325; number 
of offenses known 






2.7 

8 
3.9 

31 
2.0 


11 
5.4 

3 

7.6 

20 
1.3 


1 
1.4 

38 
18.7 

6 
15.2 

923 
59.8 


15 
20.5 

373 
183.8 

30 
76.0 

387 
25.1 


3 
4.1 

33.5 

8 
20.3 

39 
2.5 


82 
111.8 

870 

428.7 

91 
230.6 

1,491 
96.6 


7 


Rate per 100,000 - 






9.5 


Honolulu, City and 
County, population 
202,923; number of 
offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

Isthmus of Panama: 

Canal Zone, popula- 
tion 39,467; number 
of offenses known — 

Rate per 100,000 

Puerto Rico: 

Population 1,543,913; 
number of offenses 
known 


7 
3.4 

2 
5.1 

112 
7.3 


10 
4.9 

1 
2.5 

58 
3.8 


90 
44.4 

15 
38.0 

37 


Rate per l6o,6o6 


2.4 



Number of Police Department Employees, 1933 

In the issue of this bulletin for the first quarter of 1934 there was 
included a tabulation relative to police personnel in cities with more 
than 100,000 inhabitants. In the following table there is a similar 
compilation for cities with between 10,000 and 100,000 inhabitants. 
The cities are divided into three groups accordmg to size. In each 
group the cities are arranged alphabetically within each State. 

The table shows for each city the total number of police employees 
(including civilians), and the number per thousand inhabitants. In 
calculating the latter figure the population figures employed were 
taken from the Federal census, April 1, 1930. 

It is suggested that the information in this table should be taken 
into consideration when comparing crime rates for States or other 
geographic divisions of the country. 



14 



Table 9. — Number of police department employees 

CITIES WITH 50,000 TO 100,000 INHABITANTS 



193S 



City 



Mobile, Ala -- 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Little Rock, Ark 

Berkeley, Calif 

Fresno, Calif 

Glendale, Calif 

Pasadena, Calif 

Sacramento, Calif 

San Jose, Calif 

Pueblo, Colo 

New Britain, Conn-.. 

Augusta, Ga 

Macon, Qa 

Savannah, Ga 

Berwyn, 111 

Cicero, 111 

Decatur, 111 

Evanston, 111 

Oak Park, 111 _._ 

Rockford, 111 

Springfield, 111 

East Chicago, Ind 

Hammond, Ind 

Terre Haute, Ind 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa.. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Topeka, Kans 

Covington, Ky 

Shreveport, La 

Portland, Maine 

Brockton, Mass 

Everett, Mass 

Lawrence, Mass 

Medford, Mass 

Newton, Mass 

Pittsfleld, Mass 

Quincy, Mass 

Dearborn, Mich 

Hamtramck, Mich.._ 
Highland Park, Mich 

Jackson, Mich 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

Lansing, Mich 

Pontiac, Mich 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Springfield, Mo 



Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 



Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 



City 



Lincoln, Nebr 

Manchester, N.H 

Atlantic City, N.J 

Clifton, N.J 

East Orange, N.J 

Hoboken, N.J 

Irvington, N.J 

Union City, N.J 

Binghamton, N.Y 

Mount Vernon, N.Y 

New Rochelle, N.Y 

Niagara Falls, N.Y 

Schenectady, N.Y 

Troy, N.Y ._ 

Asheville, N.C 

Charlotte, N.C 

Durham, N.C 

Greensboro, N.C 

Winston-Salem, N.C 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Springfield, Ohio 

Allentown, Pa 

Altoona, Pa 

Bethlehem Borough, Pa. 

Chester, Pa 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Johnstown, Pa 

Lancaster, Pa 

McKeesport, Pa 

Upper Darby Township, 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

York, Pa 

Pawtucket, R.I 

Woonsocket, R.I 

Charleston, S.C. 

Austin, Tex 

Beaumont, Tex 

Galveston, Tex 

Port Arthur, Tex 

Waco, Tex 

Roanoke, Va 

Wheeling, W.Va 

Kenosha, Wis 

Madison, Wis 

Racine, Wis 



number 
of em- 
ployees 



CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS 



Tucson, Ariz 


36 

25 
38 

31 
20 
27 
29 
30 
44 
53 
36 
31 
102 
16 
50 
47 

(i3 

7« 

40 


1.1 
.8 
1.1 
1.3 
1.5 
1.3 
1.0 
.9 
.8 
1.0 
1.3 
1.1 
1.1 
1.1 
2.7 

1^7 
1.3 
1.9 
1.2 
2.5 
3.0 
.9 
1.0 


West Palm Beach, Fla 

Columbus, Ga 

Alton, 111 


26 
64 
33 
39 
34 
32 
32 
29 
47 
17 
23 
42 
19 
20 
43 
29 
33 
27 
24 
42 
15 
30 
24 
15 


1 




1.5 






Alhambra Calif 


Aurora 111 


8 


Bakersfield, Calif 






Huntington Park, Calif . 


Danville, 111 


9 


Inglewood Calif 


Elgin 111 


9 




Galesburg, 111 


1.0 


San Bernardino, Calif 


Joliet, 111 


1 1 




Maywood, 111 


.7 




Moline, 111 




Stockton, Calif 


Quincy, 111 


1 1 




Rock Island, 111 


.5 








Meriden, Conn 




1 1 






.9 






1.3 


Norwalk, Conn 


Michigan City Ind 


1 






.8 


Torrington, Conn .... 


Muncie, Ind 


.9 


West Hartford, Conn 


New Albany Ind 


.6 






.9 






.9 


St. Petersburg, Fla 


Clinton, Iowa 


.6 



15 

Table 9. — Number of police department employees, 193S — Continued 
CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 


II 

City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 




26 
39 
14 
32 
22 
75 
44 
27 
30 
36 
42 
42 
32 
52 
49 
130 
69 
52 
58 
83 
37 
73 
68 
46 
29 
55 
47 
44 
33 
23 
31 
24 
25 

27 
27 
22 
38 
32 
59 
36 
43 
150 
72 
45 
72 
63 
71 
65 
40 

24 
33 
38 
81 
53 
37 
43 
50 
54 
29 
38 
107 


0.6 
.9 
.5 
.7 
.8 
1.6 
1.5 
.8 
1.0 
1.4 
1.5 
1.1 
1.0 
1.4 
2.0 
2.7 
1.5 
1.2 
1.4 
1.7 
1.0 
1.7 
1.7 
1.3 
1.1 
1.3 
1.0 
1.1 
1.1 
1.0 
1.1 
.8 
.7 
1.1 
.7 
.9 
.9 

1.2 

1.2 

1.5 

1.2 

1.8 

3.7 

1.7 

1.3 

1.8 

1.8 

1.6 

1.9 

1.6 

1.5 
.9 
.9 

1.0 

1.7 

1.2 

1.3 

1.8 

1.6 

1.3 
.9 

1.2 

3.0 


High Point, N.C. 

Wilmington, N.C 

Fargo N Dak 


35 
45 
33 
13 
49 
23 
27 
33 
16 
18 
28 
30 
30 
32 
17 
32 
29 
29 
16 
34 
20 
19 
35 

100 
45 
32 
22 
15 
17 
34 
39 
36 

25 

65 

23 

55 

44 

35 

21 

40 

13 

14 

16 

33 

43 

29 

50 

47 

30 

38 

27 

27 

27 

23 

22 

21 

26 

39 

44 

42 

44 

56 

37 


1.0 

1.4 
1.2 


Dubuque, Iowa 


Ottumwa, Iowa _ 






Hutchinson, Kans 


East Cleveland Ohio 


1 2 


Lexington, Ky 






Newport, Ky.... 




.6 

.7 


Paducah, Ky 








Monroe, La _.. 


Massillon, Ohio 


7 


Bangor, Maine .. 


Middletown Ohio 


.9 

1.0 

9 


Cumberland, Md 




Hagerstown, Md 


Norwood Ohio 


Arlington. Mass 






Beverlv, Mass 


Sandusky, Ohio 

Steubenville Ohio 


.7 
.9 


Brookline, Mass 


Chelsea, Mass 




Chicopee, Mass ._- 


Zanesville Ohio 


g 


Fitchburg, Mass 


Enid, Okla 


.6 
1.1 
.8 
.7 
1 


Haverhill. Mass 


Revere, Mass 


Salem Oreg 


Salem, Mass.. 




Waltham, Mass 


Easton Pa 




Lower Merion Township, Pa.. 
New Castle, Pa 


2.8 


Ann Arbor, Mich 


Battle Creek, Mich 


Norristown Borough, Pa 

Sharon, Pa 


.9 

g 


Bay City, Mich 




Washington Borough, Pa _ 

Wilkinsburg Borough, Pa 


.6 
.6 


Port Huron, Mich 


Royal Oak, Mich 


Wyandotte, Mich 


Central Falls, R I 




Meridian, Miss 


Cranston R I 


g 




East Providence Town, R.I.._ 

Newport, R.I 

Warwick R I 


.8 
2.4 
1 


University City, Mo 


Butte, Mont 




Greenville, S.C 

Spartanburg, S.C 

Sioux Falls, S.D 

Abilene, Tex 


1.9 

1.5 

1.0 

9 


Concord, N.H 

Nashua, N.H 

Belleville. N.J 


Bloomfield, N.J 


Amarillo, Tex 


9 


Garfield, N.J 


Brownsville Tex 


g 


Hackensack, N.J 


Corpus Christi, Tex 


5 


Kearny, N.J 






Montclair, N.J 


Wichita Falls, Tex 




New Brunswick, N.J 








Burlington, Vt 




Orange, N.J 




Perth Amboy, N.J 


Newport News, Va 


1 4 


Plainfleld, N.J. 


Petersburg Va 


J 1 


West Orange, N.J 






Woodbridge Township, N.J.._ 


Bellingham, Wash 


9 


Albuquerque. N.Mex 


Everett, Wash 


9 


Amsterdam, N.Y 


Clarksburg, W.Va.. . . 




Auburn, N.Y 


Parkersburg, W.Va 


g 


Elmira, N.Y 


Appleton, Wis 


9 




Eau Claire, Wis 




Kingston, N.Y 


Fond du Lac, Wis 


1 








Newburgh, N.Y 






Poughkeepsie, N.Y 


Oshkosh, Wis 


1 


Rome, N.Y 


Sheboygan Wis 


1 1 


Watertown, N.Y 


Superior, Wis 


1 6 


White Plains, N.Y . 


West Allis, Wis 


1 1 









CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,C00 INHABITANTS 



Anniston, Ala 

Dothan, Ala 

Fairfield, Ala 

Florence, Ala 

Blytheville, Ark 

Hot Springs, Ark 

Jonesboro. Ark 

North Little Rock, Ark 

76663-34 3 



Anaheim, Calif 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 

Brawley, Calif 

Burbank, Calif 

Burlingame, Calif.. 

Compton, Calif 

Eureka, Calif 

Fullerton, Calif 



16 



Table 9. — Number oj police department employees, i5S5— Continued 
CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 


City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 


TVrnHp«fn Palif 


15 
16 
13 
20 
17 
12 
28 
9 
16 
41 
11 
21 
10 
13 
13 
15 
10 
8 
7 
9 
12 
21 
16 
30 
58 
15 
22 
21 
20 
12 
13 
13 
5 
12 
18 
14 
17 
19 

11 
11 
9 
6 
9 
13 
20 
8 
11 
12 
13 
17 
3 
13 
14 
12 
19 
17 
11 
10 
8 
6 
10 
12 
10 
9 
3 
16 
20 
9 
13 

10 

5 
12 
16 
21 
30 


1.1 
1.5 
1.0 
1.5 
.8 

\.\ 
.8 
1.2 
2.8 
1.0 

^9 
1.2 
1.0 

'.1 
.7 
.6 
.9 

2.\ 
2.5 
.8 
2.0 
1.7 

LI 

.7 
1.1 
.5 
.9 
.8 
.9 
.8 
1.2 
1.1 
1.1 
.8 
.7 
.5 

^9 

^8 

^9 

.8 
.3 
.8 
1.1 
.7 
.9 
1.0 
1.1 
.8 
.5 
.5 

L2 

.7 

.2 
1.1 
1.6 
.7 
.7 
.9 
.9 
.9 
.5 
.9 
1.0 
1.1 
1.2 


Shelbyville, Ind .-.. 


4 
13 
20 

8 
10 

I 

14 
9 

23 
6 

7 

ll 
6 

20 
8 
8 
10 
9 
10 
8 
5 
10 
15 
7 
10 
17 
5 
22 
24 
10 
8 
10 
15 
16 
17 
10 

9 
17 
U 
13 

9 

6 
27 
39 
18 

9 
15 

8 

22 
16 
38 
14 
20 
18 
36 
22 
30 
19 
15 
26 
26 
15 
21 
40 
12 
14 

16 
50 
22 
21 
23 
30 
21 


0.4 






.7 




Whiting, Ind 


1.8 


Pqln Altrv Cnlif 


Ames, Iowa 


.8 






.8 


Redlands Calif 


Fort Dodge, Iowa 


.8 




Fort Madison, Iowa. . 


.5 




Iowa City, Iowa 

Keokuk, Iowa 


.7 


San Mateo Calif 


.9 


Snnta Oru7 P.nlif 


Marshalltown, Iowa 


.5 






1.0 


South Gate Calif 


Newton, Iowa 


.5 






.7 






.6 


Ventura Calif 


Atchison, Kans 


1.0 






.6 


Boulder Colo 


Coffeyville, Kans. --- 


L2 


Fort Collins Colo 


Dodge City, Kans 


.8 




El Dorado, Kans 


.8 


Greeley Colo 


Emporia, Kans - 


.7 




Fort Scott, Kans 


.8 






.7 


East Hartford Conn 


Manhattan, Kans 


.8 


Naugatuck Borough, Conn 








.7 


Stratford Conn 


Salina, Kans 


.7 






.7 


Willimantie Conn 


Frankfort, Ky 


.9 


Daytona Beach Fla 


Henderson, Ky 


1.5 




Middleborough, Ky 


.5 


Lakeland Fla 


Owensboro, Ky. .. -- 


LO 


St Augustine Fla 


Alexandria, La 


1.0 






.7 


Brunswick Ga 


La Fayette, La 


.5 


Rome Ga 


Lake Charles, La ... 


.6 






.8 




Augusta, Maine 


.9 




Biddeford, Maine 


1.0 


Blue Island, III 


South Portland, Maine 

Waterville, Maine . . . 


.7 


Brookfield III 


.7 


Cairo, 111 


Westbrook, Maine 


.8 


Calumet City, 111 


Frederick, Md 


1.2 


Canton 111 


Salisbury Md .... 


1.0 


Centralia, 111 




LO 


Champaign, 111 


Amesbury, Mass - 


.8 


Chicago Heights III 


Athol Mass 


6 


East Moline, III 




1.2 


Elmhurst, 111 


Belmont, Mass . 


1.8 


Elmwood Park 111 


Braintree Mass 


1 1 


Forest Park, 111 




.7 


Freeport, 111 


Dedham, Mass 


LO 


Harrisburg, 111 




.7 






1.0 


Highland Park, 111 


Gardner, Mass 


.8 


Jacksonville, 111 




1 6 


Kankakee, 111 . . 






Kewanee, 111 


Leominster Mass 


9 






1.2 


La Salle, 111 




1.6 


Mattoon, 111 




1.0 






1.8 






1.4 


Park Ridge, 111 


Needham Mass 


1.4 


Streator, 111 




1 7 


Urbana, 111 . 




1.2 


West Frankfort, 111 


North Attleboro, Mass 


1. 5 


Wilmette, 111. _ 


1.4 


Winnetka, 111 






Bedford, Ind 




.8 


Bloomington, Ind 




1 






1.1 


Elwood, Ind... 






Frankfort, Ind 


Wakefield Mass 


3 1 


Goshen, Ind 




1.9 


Huntington, Ind 


Westfleld, Mass 


1. 1 


La Porte, Ind 


West Springfield. Mass 


1 4 






Marion, Ind... 


Winchester, Mass 


1.7 



Table 9. — Number of police department employees, 1933 — Continued 
CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 



Winthrop, Mass - 

Woburn, Mass - - 

Adrian, Midi - 

Alpena, Mich 

Benton Harbor, Mich 

Ecorse, Mich 

Escanaba, Mich 

Ferndale, Mich 

Grosse PoLnte Park, Mich 

Holland, Mich 

Iron Mountain, Mich 

Iron wood, Mich 

Lincoln Park, Mich 

Marquette, Mich 

Menominee, Mich 

Monroe, Mich 

Mount Clemens, Mich,.. 
Muskegon Heights, Mich. 

Niles, Mich 

Owosso, Mich_ 

River Rouge, Mich 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.-. 

Traverse City, Mich 

Ypsilanti, Mich 

Albert Lea, Minn 

Austin, Minn 

Brainerd, Minn 

Faribault, Minn 

Hibbing, Minn 

Mankato, Minn 

Rochester, Minn 

St. Cloud, Minn 

South St. Paul, Minn 

Virginia, Minn 

Winona, Minn. — 

Clarksdale, Miss 

Columbus, Miss 

Greenville, Miss 

Hattiesburg, Miss 

Laurel, Miss 

McComb, Miss 

Natchez, Miss 

Vicksburg, Miss 

Cape Girardeau, Mo 

Hannibal, Mo 

Independence, Mo 

Jefferson City, Mo... 

Maplewood, Mo 

Moberly, Mo 

St. Charles, Mo 

Sedalia, Mo 

Webster Groves, Mo 

Billings, Mont 

Beatrice, Nebr 

Fremont, Nebr 

Grand Island, Nebr 

Hastings, Nebr 

Norfolk, Nebr 

North Platte, Nebr 

Reno, Nev 

Berlin, N.H 

Claremont, N.H 

Dover, N.H 

Laconia, N.H 

Portsmouth, N.H 

Bridgeton, N.H 

Burlington, N.H 

Carteret, N.J 

ClifTside Park, N.J 

Cranford Township, N.J.. 

Dover, N.J 

Gloucester, N.J 

Harrison, N. r 

Hawthorne, N.J 

HOlside Township, N.J.--. 

Linden, N.J 

Lodi, N.J 

Long Branch, N.J 



Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 



Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 



City 



Lyndhurst Township, N.J. 
Maplewood Township, N.J. 

Millville, N.J 

Morristown, N.J 

Neptune Township, N.J 

Pensauken Township, N.J. 

Phillipsburg, N.J 

Pleasantville, N.J 

Rahwav, N.J 

Red Bank, N.J 

Ridgefleld Park, N.J 

Ridgewood, N.J 

Roselle, N.J 

Rutherford, N.J 

South Orange, N.J 

South River, N.J 

Summit, N.J 

Teaneck Township, N.J 

Westfield, N.J 

Union Township, N.J 

Weehawken Township, N.J 

Santa Fe, N.Mex 

Batavia, N.Y 

Beacon, N.Y 

Cohoes, N.Y 

Corning, N.Y 

Cortland, N.Y 

Endicott, N.Y 

Floral Park, N.Y 

Freeport, N.Y 

Fulton, N.Y 

Geneva, N.Y 

Glen Cove, N.Y 

Glens Falls, N.Y 

Gloversville, N.Y 

Hempstead, N.Y 

Herkimer, N.Y 

Hornell, N.Y 

Hudson, N.Y 

Irondequoit, N.Y 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Johnson City, N.Y 

Johnstown, N.Y 

Kenmore, N.Y 

Little Falls, N.Y 

Loekport, N.Y. 

Lynbrook, N.Y 

Mamaroneck, N.Y 

Massena, N.Y 

Middletown, N.Y 

North Tonawanda, N.Y 

Ogdensburg, N.Y 

Olean, N.Y 

Oneida, N.Y 

Oneonta, N.Y 

Ossining, N.Y 

Oswego, N.Y 

Plattsburg, N.Y 

Port Chester, N.Y 

Port Jervis, N.Y 

Rensselaer, N.Y 

Rockville Center, N.Y 

Saratoga Springs, N.Y 

Tonawanda, N.Y 

Watervliet, N.Y 

Concord, N.C 

Gastonia, N.C 

Goldsboro, N.C 

Rocky Mount, N.C 

Salisbury, N.C 

Shelby, N.C 

Statesville, N.C 

Thomasville, N.C 

Wilson, N.C 

Bismarck, N.Dak 

Grand Forks, N.Dak 

Minot, N.Dak 

Alliance, Ohio 



Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 



18 



Table 9. — Number of -police department employees, 1933 — Continued 
CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 


City 


Average 
number 
of em- 
ployees 


Number 
per 1,000 
inhabi- 
tants 




8 
20 
9 
8 
12 
17 
8 
9 
14 
23 
14 
7 
8 
16 
11 

12 
6 
7 
6 
8 
9 
5 

23 
7 

12 

16 
11 
9 
9 
17 
13 
10 
15 
10 
12 
12 
7 
25 
15 
6 
10 
12 
9 
23 
14 
7 
19 
6 
9 
9 

29 
13 
13 
11 

8 

8 

8 
11 

5 
29 

8 
12 

8 
15 

4 

37 
24 

5 
14 

8 
11 

6 
10 
15 


0.7 
.9 
.7 
.8 
.8 
.9 
.7 
.5 
.6 

1.8 
.7 
.5 
.6 

1.0 
.7 
.6 
.8 
.5 
.4 
.5 
.6 
.6 
.5 

1.3 
.6 
.7 
.7 

1.0 
.8 
.7 
.8 

1.0 
.8 
.9 
.6 

1.0 
.6 
.7 
.6 

1.3 
.7 
.6 
.6 

1.2 

1^2 

.7 
.6 
.8 
.5 

'.1 
.5 

1.8 
.9 
.9 
-.8 
.7 
.6 
.6 
.8 
.4 

1.4 
.6 
.8 
.8 
.9 
.3 

1.7 

1.2 
.3 
.6 
.8 
.6 
.4 
.6 
.7 


Mount Lebanon Township, 
Pa . 


16 
22 

18 
15 

8 
20 

9 
15 
15 
17 

12 
6 

14 
3 
5 

11 

19 
4 
5 

30 
9 

11 

15 

10 
8 
7 
8 
9 
9 
6 

13 
5 
8 

10 
5 

13 

11 
12 
14 
13 
32 
20 
34 
17 
12 
12 
13 
17 
8 
8 
6 
12 
15 
12 
22 
14 
16 
10 

10 
20 

12 
14 
17 
14 

9 
12 

7 
.9 
15 
19 
24 








Bellaire Ohio 


Munhall, Pa 


1 7 








Campbell, Ohio 


North Braddock, Pa 




Chillicothe Ohio 


Oil Citv, Pa 


7 








Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 


Pittston, Pa 




East Liverpool, Ohio 


Plains Township Pa 


6 


Euclid, Ohio 












Fostoria, Ohio 


Pottsville Pa 


7 








Garfield Heights, Ohio . 


Stowe Township, Pa 


9 


Ironton, Ohio 


Sunbury Pa 


4 




Swissvale, Pa 

Tamaqua, Pa 




Marietta, Ohio 


2 


New Philadelphia, Ohio 












Painesville, Ohio 


Uniontown, Pa 


1 


Parma Village, Ohio 




.3 








Salem, Ohio 


West Chester Pa 


2 4 


Shaker Heights, Ohio 


Westerly, R.I 




Struthers, Ohio 


West Warwick, R.I 

Aberdeen S Dak 


g 


Tiffin, Ohio 


9 


Xenia, Ohio.- 












Chickasha, Okla 


Rapid City S Dak 


7 








McAlester, Okla 


Bristol Tenn 


7 


Okmulgee, Okla.... 




.8 








Sapulpa, Okla 


Corsicana Tex 


9 


Shawnee, Okla 


Del Rio, Te.\ . 










Eugene, Oreg . . - . 


Greenville Tex 


g 


Klamath Falls, Oreg 
















.6. 








Arnold, Pa 


Sweetwater Tex 


1 1 


Beaver Falls, Pa 




.8 








Berwick, Pa 




1 3 


Braddock, Pa. 




1. 3. 


Bradford, Pa 


Danville, Va 


1 5 


Bristol, Pa 


Hopewell Va 


1 5 


Butler, Pa-- 






Canonsburg, Pa 


Suffolk Va 


1 2 


Carnegie, Pa 


Winchester Va 


1 2 


Chambersburg, Pa 


Aberdeen, Wash 


.8 


Charleroi, Pa . 


Hoquiam Wash 


6 


Cheltenham Township, Pa 


Olympia, Wash 


.7 








Coatesville, Pa 


Vancouver Wash 


g 


Connellsville, Pa 


Walla Walla, Wash 


.9 




Wenatchee, Wash 




Dickson City, Pa 


Yakima, Wash 


1.0 




Bluefield, W.Va 


.7 


Dormont, Pa ... 


Fairmont, W Va 




Du Bois, Pa 


Morgantown W Va 


6 




Moundsville,'w.Va 




Ellwood City, Pa 


Ashland, Wis 




Farrell, Pa 


Beloit Wis 


8 


Franklin, Pa 


Cudahy, Wis 




Greensburg, Pa 


Janesville Wis 


.6 


Hanover, Pa 


Manitowoc Wis 




Haverford Township, Pa. 


Shorewood, Wis 


1.0 


Homestead, Pa 


South Milwaukee, Wis 

Stevens Point Wis 


.8 


Jeannette, Pa 


9 






.7 


Latrobe, Pa 


Watertown Wis 


g 


McKees Rocks, Pa 


Waukesha, Wis 








.8 


Meadville, Pa 

Monessen, Pa 


Wauwatosa, Wis 


1.1 







19 
DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

During the first 6 months of 1934 the Division of Investigation 
exaniined 173,768 arrest records, as evidenced by fingerprint cards 
received from hiw enforcement agencies throughout the country. 
The records examined did not include prints representing commit- 
ments to jails or penal institutions or prints representing arrests for 
violations of Federal laws. The tabulation of data from fingerprint 
records obviously does not include all persons arrested, since there 
are individuals taken into custody for whom no fingerprint cards 
are forwarded to Washington. Furthermore, data pertaining to 
persons arrested should not be treated as information regarding the 
number of offenses committed, since two or more persons may be 
involved in the joint commission of a single offense, and on the other 
hand, one person may be arrested and charged with the commission 
of several separate offenses. 

As has been true during the past 2 years, the number of individuals 
arrested who were 19 years of age was greater than the number for 
any other single age group. In the following instances serious charges 
were placed against individuals 19 years of age: 

Larceny — theft 1, 510 

Burglary — breaking or entering 1, 268 

Auto theft 585 

Robbery 583 

Assault 373 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 129 

Criminal homicide 100 

Total 4,548 

It will be observed that the above figures constitute more than 
one-half of the arrests of 19-year-old individuals. The arrest records 
in 26,175 (15 percent) cases represented individuals less than 20 years 
old; 38,662 (22 percent) were those of persons between the ages of 
20 and 24, inclusive; and 31,749 (18 percent) represented persons 
from 25 to 29 years old. More than 55 percent (96,586) of the 
records were those of persons less than 30 years of age. 

Females constituted 11,971 (6.9 percent) of the 173,768 arrest 
records examined. 



20 



Table 10. — Distribution of arrests, Jan. 1-June 30, 1934 



Offense charged 



Total Male Female 



Total Male Female 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft - 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. . . 
Offenses against family and children- 
Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws.. _ 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling - 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other 



2,967 
7,387 
11,801 
15, 857 
21, 870 
5,561 
4,676 
1,650 
2,138 
2,121 
659 
2,177 
1,786 
3,030 
1,937 
3,945 
4,297 
709 
7 
1,339 
7,011 
13, 103 
10, 902 
2,306 
20, 013 
2,248 
10, 300 



292 
338 
952 
253 
2,054 
108 
308 
149 
221 



1,453 
458 
209 
70 
82 
407 



24 
765 
658 
935 

62 

1,343 

160 

567 



13.8 
3.3 
2.9 
1.0 
1.4 
1.2 
1.2 
1.5 
1.1 
1.8 
1.2 
2.5 
2.5 
.4 

.8 
4.5 
7.9 
6.8 
1.4 
12.3 
1.4 
6.2 



13.5 
3.4 
2.9 
1.0 
1.3 
1.3 
.4 
1.4 
1.1 
1.9 
1.2 
2.4 
2.7 
.4 

(•) 



1.4 
12.4 
1.4 
6.4 



Total - 173,768 



161, 797 



11,971 100.0 



1 Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

Table 11. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-June 30, 1934 



Offense charged 



Age 



Not Un- 
known der 15 



Criminal homicide --. 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft _.- 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws - 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations.. 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated... 

All other offenses 



1,296 

1,034 

555 



100 
583 
373 

1,268 

1,510 

585 



Total. 



■,721 



373 

338 
568 
64 
1,041 
98 
552 

7,910 



21 



Table 11.— ,4;-;ts<s by age groups, Jan. 1-June 30, 1934 — Continued 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide - 

Robbery 

Assault .- 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice- 
Other sex ofTenses.. _ 

Narcotic drug laws ■ 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. . 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion. 

Not stated 

All other oflenses 

Total 



23 24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 



1,010 
112 
459 



673 
1,650 
2,594 
2,582 
4,137 

875 



1,442 
2,304 
2,169 

442 
4,124 

470 
1,872 



7,596 31,749 25,419 



517 

970 

2,191 

1,677 

3,121 

496 



263 

403 

235 

307 

355 

429 

447 

387 

723 

815 

106 

3 

207 

1,211 

2,261 

1,685 

442 

3,413 

381 

1,419 



401 

540 
1, r,64 

989 
2,265 

237 



132 

851 
2,068 
1,101 

341 
2,225 

288 
1,015 



271 
1,133 

572 
1,549 

113 

674 

157 
222 
123 
130 
228 
232 
246 
256 
492 
575 
49 



614 
1,724 
803 
263 
1,454 
178 
792 



13, 245 



201 
125 
802 
361 
1,012 
47 



52 

400 

1,193 



50 and 
over 



358 

1,220 

30 



54 
552 

1,717 
956 
202 

1,118 



Total 
all 



3,259 
7,725 

12, 753 
16, 110 
23, 924 

5,669 
4,984 

1,799 
2,359 
2,121 
2,112 
2,635 
1,995 
3,100 
2,019 
4,352 
4,391 
718 
7 
1,363 
7,776 

13, 761 
11,837 

2,368 
21,356 

2,408 
10, 867 



173, 768 



AGES OF PERSONS ARRESTED 

DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT CARDS 
J ANUARY I -JUNE 30 . 1934 



26J75 



\^yyyy^M^z6^^^yyyyyyyy^ ^^^ 



\^^^y^^<^%^^'^1^0: i^XXXXA 



^^^^^'y^m^zoioXf^ 



x: 



>^GE'35 Tb^3^ 



^^^^^^ AGE 40 TO 44 
'^XXXA AGE 45 TO 49 

^yyy^y^y/\ AGE 50 AND OVER 



31749 
25419 
18374 
13245 
8 686 
11221 



In 61,347 (35.3 percent) cases the individuals involved already had 
fingerprint records on file in the Identification Unit of the Division of 
Investigation. Six of each 10 charged with violation of the narcotic 
drug laws had previous fingerprint cards on file and 4 of each 10 
charged with robbery, embezzlement, fraud, forgery, or counter- 
feiting had similar prior records. 



22 



Table 12. — Arrests, Jan. l~June 30, 



Offense charged 



Pre- 
vious 



Offense charged 



Pre- 
vious 
finger- 
print 
record 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering — 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized 

vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

3ns; carrying, possessing, etc. 



3,271 

5! 900 
8,903 
1,968 
2,092 

441 



Offenses against family and chil- 
dren 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other 



Total _. 173,768 61,347 



2,019 
4,352 
4,391 
718 
7 
1,363 
7,776 

13,761 

11,837 
2,368 

21, 356 
2,408 

10, 867 



459 
1,196 

869 

152 
3 

335 
2,805 
4,703 
5,422 

524 
8,551 

941 
3,621 



Tab 



LE 13. — Percentage with previous fingerprint records; arrests, Jan. 1-June 30, 



Offense 



Percent 



Narcotic drug laws 

Vagrancy 

Parking violations ' 

Robbery.. 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Suspicion 

Larceny— theft 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Disorderly conduct 

Auto theft 

Drunkenness 

All other offenses 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 



60.1 
45.8 
42.9 
42.3 
42.0 
40.9 
40.0 
37.2 
36.6 
36.1 
34.7 
34.2 
33.3 
32.1 



Assault 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Liquor laws. 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, pos- 
sessing 

Other sex offenses. __ 

Offenses against family and children 

Rape 

Gambling.. 

Road and driving laws 

Criminal homicide 

Driving while intoxicated 



> Only 7 fingerprint cards were received representing arrests for violations of parking regulations. 

In addition to the 61,347 instances in which the individuals repre- 
sented had previous fingerprint cards in the files of the Division, there 
were 3,899 cases in which the current records bore notations indicat- 
ing previous criminal histories of the persons concerned, making a 
total of 65,246 instances in which there were data regarding previous 
criminal activities of the individuals represented. In 44,329 of those 
cases (67.9 percent) the records showed previous convictions. Con- 
victions for serious oft'enses were revealed as follows: 

Criminal homicide 522 

Robbery 2,395 

Assault 2, 158 

Burglary — breaking or entering 6, 090 

Larceny— theft 9, 297 

Auto theft 1,856 

Embezzlement and fraud 1, 427 

Forgery and counterfeiting 1, 644 

Narcotic drug laws 1, 239 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 637 

Total 27,265 

It will be observed that the 27,265 previous convictions for major 
offenses constitute 61.5 percent of the total prior convictions disclosed 
by the records. 



23 



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25 

Further stiid}^ of the criminal histories of the individuals involved 
disclosed that in 1,011 cases the individuals were on parole at the time 
they were currently arrested. In addition, there were 3,933 cases 
in which although there was no affirmative showing that the individ- 
uals had been paroled, the current arrests were made within the 
period of prior unexpired sentences. This makes a total of 5,544 



PREVIOUS CONVICTIONS OF PERSONS ARRESTED 

DATA OBTAINED FROM RN6ERPRINT RECORDS 

JANUARY-JUNE. 1934 

NUMBER OF PERSONS 
500 1000 TSOO 2000 2500 






MD FRAU D 
FORGERV AND COUflTERFElTll JG 



AUTO THEFT 



Mwm^- 



instances in which the current arrests were made wliile the individuals 
were on parole or for some reason were at liberty prior to the expira- 
tion of previous sentences; and this number constitutes 12.5 percent 
of the 44,329 previous convictions disclosed by the records. The 
compilation shows further that in the majority of the 5,544 instances 
the individuals were previously convicted of major offenses and were 
currently charged with serious crimes. 



26 



Table 15. — Arrests, Jan. 1-June 30, 1934 



O Sense charged 



Criminal homicide. 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— brealjing or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Forgery and counterfeiting .-. 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons", carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunlfenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion... 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Total. 



Current 

arrest in 

period of 

parole 



Current 
arrest in 
period of 
previous 
sentence 



148 
n37 
524 
206 
124 
33 



65 

481 



671 
276 

157 
42 

122 
41 
24 
25 
48 



21 
174 
200 
295 

18 
796 



27 






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29 



Wliites were represented by 125,581 of the arrest records examined 
during the first 6 months of 1934, and Negroes by 39,913. The re- 
maining races were represented as follows: 

Indian 689 

Chinese 608 

Japanese 118 

Mexican 5, 597 

All others 1,262 

For comparative purposes it is believed best to present the figures 
in terms of the number of such individuals in the general population 
of the country. For each 100,000 Negroes in the United States (ex- 
clusive of those under 15 years of age) there were 496 arrests of 
Negroes as evidenced by fingerprint records received. Similarly for 
each 100,000 native whites there were 164 arrests of native whites 
during the 6-month period, and the corresponding figure for foreign- 
born whites is 104. It should be observed in this connection that 
the figure representing native whites includes the immediate de- 
scendants of foreign-born individuals. The compilation showing the 
proportion of each of the above three race groups charged with indi- 
vidual offenses discloses that for homicide, assault, and carrying 
concealed weapons the number of foreign-born individuals exceeds 
the number of native whites, whereas the number of Negroes exceeds 
both classes of whites by a large margin. 

Table 17. — Arrests, Jan. 1-June SO, 1934 











Race 








Total 
all races 


Offense charged 


White 


Negro 


In- 
dian 


Chi- 
nese 


Japa- 
nese 


Mexi- 
can 


All 
others 


Criminal homicide 


2,030 
5,670 
7,085 
11, 690 
16, 485 
4,775 
4,434 

1,398 
2,133 
1,600 
1,524 
2,160 
1,152 
1,801 
1,746 
2,997 
3,779 

482 
4 

959 
5,348 
10, 581 
8,791 
1, 325 

11922 
8,322 


1,119 
1,783 
5,007 
3,810 
6,309 
743 
483 

351 
180 
387 
530 
404 
255 

1,112 
188 

1,225 

332 

175 

3 

303 

1,987 

2,268 

2,247 
934 

5,202 
407 

2,169 


13 
23 

51 
47 
82 
19 
9 

g- 
12 

5 

9 

9 

7 

3 
21 
35 
11 


8 
4 

14 
9 

11 
3 
2 

3 

g- 
14 

3 
350 
18 

5 


2 
3 
13 

5 
8 
1 
9 

1 

5" 

5 
3 
3 

8 
2 


75 
159 
440 
472 
921 
121 

23 

41 
19 
84 
24 
38 
169 
105 
63 
77 
215 
36 


12 
83 
143 

77 

108 

7 

24 

5 
14 
30 
10 
20 
55 
54 
15 
26 
22 
12 


3,259 




7; 725 




12, 753 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


16, 110 


Larceny — theft 


23,924 




5,669 


Embezzlement and fraud 


4,984 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, pos- 


1,799 




2,359 


Rape 


2,121 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


2,112 
2,635 


Narcotic drug laws 


1,995 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws... 

Driving while intoxicated 


3,100 
2,019 
4,352 
4,391 




718 




7 


Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct 


4 

49 
129 
50 

....... 

13 


2 
6 
5 
26 
55 
46 
7 
8 


i 
4 

13 
2 

7 
5 
1 
8 


66 
329 
734 
622 
9 
463 

49 
243 


28 
53 
31 
99 
38 
181 

104 


1,363 
7,776 




13, 761 




11,837 


Gambling 




Suspicion 


21, 356 




2,408 


All other offenses 


10, 867 






Total 


125, 581 


39, 913 


689 


608 


118 


5,597 


1,262 


173, 768 







30 



Table 18. — Arrests, Jan. 1-June 30, 1934 
[Rate per 100,000 of population, excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born 
white 


Negro 


Criminal homicide 


2.3 
7.5 
7.7 
16.0 
21.9 
6.9 
5.9 
1.6 
2.8 
2.1 
2.2 
2.7 
1.6 
2.1 
2.2 
3.6 
5.0 

6.9 
14.3 
12.0 

1.5 
21.1 

2.6 
10.7 


.3.0 
2.5 

13.5 
5.3 

12.1 
1.2 
3.6 
2.4 
1.5 
1.5 

2^4 
.5 
2.7 
2.3 
4.7 
2.4 
.3 

.8 
5.6 
8.1 
5.6 
2.1 
9.9 
1.3 
8.0 


13.9 




22.2 




62.3 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


47.4 




78.5 




9.2 


Embezzlement and fraud 


6.0 




4.4 




2.2 


Rape 


4.8 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


6.6 




5.0 


Narcotic drug laws 


3.2 


Weapons; carrying possessing, etc 


13.8 




2.3 


Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 


15.2 
4.1 




2.2 




(') 


Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 


3.8 


Disorderly conduct 


24.7 




28.2 


Vagrancy 


27.9 


Gambling 


11.6 




64.7 




5.1 


All other offenses 


27.0 






Total- -. -.. 


164.7 


104.0 


496.4 







1 Less than one-tenth of 1 per 100,000. 

At the end of June there were 4,372,619 fingerprint records and 
5,501,084 index cards containing names or aliases of individuals with 
records on file in the Division of Investigation at Washington. Of 
each 100 fingerprint cards received during the first 6 months of 1934, 
more than 46 were identified with data in the files of the Division. 
During the same period, 2,164 fugitives from justice were identified 
through fingerprint records and information as to the whereabouts of 
those fugitives was immediately transmitted to the law" enforcement 
officers or agencies desiring to apprehend them. 



31 

The number of police departments, peace officers, and law en- 
forcement agencies throughout the United States and foreign coun- 



NUMBER OF NEGROES AND WHITES ARRESTED 

IN PROPORTION TO THE NUMBER OF EACH IN THE 

GENERAL POPULATION OF THE COUNTR Y. 

DATA COMPILE D FROM FINGERPRINT CARDS. JAN . I - JUNE 30^1934 
NUMBER OF PERSONS ARRESTED PER 100,000 IN POPULATION 

to 20 30 ^0 50 bO 70 60 lO lOO 




tries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Division at the end 
of June totaled 6,774. 

O 



q3T^,5c..^ 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume V — Number 3 
THIRD QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1934 



Issued by the 

Division of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1934 



S. SUPERINTFNDENT OF DOCUWHIT? 
NOV 14 1934 

ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(11) 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Division of Investigation, U. S. Department of Justice, 
Washington, D. C. 



Volume 5 October 1934 Number 3 



CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1934. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-34. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location. 

Data for individual cities. 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police. 

Offenses known in the possessions. 

Number of police department employees. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1934: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records. 

Number with records showing previous convictions. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of poUce officers, of citizens, of prose- 
cuting or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the fol- 
lowing group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience 
to be those most generally and completely reported to the poHce: 
Criminal homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, 
and (6) manslaughter by neghgence; rape; robbery; aggravated as- 
sault; burglary-breaking or entering; larceny-theft; and auto theft. 
The figures contained herein include also the number of attempted 
crimes of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are 
reported as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted bur- 
glary or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same 
manner as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the poHce" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities, and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 
Complaints which upon investigation are learned to be groundless are 
not included in the tabulations which follow. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included im 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

1. Criminal homicide. — -(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter- — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
94226—34 (1) 



attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths. (5) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Ra-pe. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maiming. 
Does not include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe 
•cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft {except aitto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value. 
(6) Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depend- 
ing upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, 
shoplifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by 
force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con-games", 
forgery, passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unau- 
thorized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of poHce in different cities, 
the Division of Investigation does not vouch for their accuracy. They 
are given out as current information, which may throw some Ught 
on problems of crime -and criminal-law enforcement.. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 
Extent of Reporting Area 

The number of city police departments contributing one or more 
crime reports during the first 9 months of 1934 is shown in the follow- 
ing table. The information is presented for the cities divided ac- 
cording to size. The population figures employed are estimates as 
of July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census, for cities with population 
in excess of 10,000. For the smaller communities the figures listed in 
the 1930 decennial census were employed. 

Growth in the reporting area is evidenced by the following figures 
for the first 9 months of 1932-34: 



Year 


Cities 


Population 


1932 


1,546 
1,638 
1,727 


52, 802, 362 


1933 -- --- 


62,041,342 


1934 


62,391,056 







The above comparison shows that during the first 3 quarters 
of 1934 there was an increase of 89 cities as compared with the cor- 
responding period of 1933. 





Total num- 


Cities filing returns 


Total popu- 
lation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




or towns 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


983 


866 


88 


60, 281, 688 


57, 615, 233 


96 






1. Cities over 250,000... 


37 

57 
104 

191 
594 


36 
57 
97 
175 
501 


97 
100 

92 

84 


29, 695, 500 
7,850,312 
6, 980, 407 
6, 638, 544 
9,116,925 


29,415,100 
7, 850, 312 
6, 503, 370 
6,114,421 
7, 732, 030 


99 


2 Cities 100,000 to 250,000 


100 


3 Cities 50 000 to 100 000 


93 




92 


5 Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


85 







The above table does not include 861 cities and rural townships 
aorgregating a total population of 4,775,823. The cities included in 
tiiis figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, 
whereas the rural townships are of varying population groups. 

MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

In the following table there is presented the number of offenses 
reported during the first 9 months of 1934 by the police departments 
of 1,228 cities with an aggregate population of 55,808,992. The 
data are also presented in the form of rates per 100,000 inhabitants 
and are divided into 6 groups according to size of city. 

The compilation shows that in general, cities with more than 100,000 
inhabitants report higher crime figures than the smaller communities. 
For the offenses of robbery and auto theft, the crime rates vary 
directly with the size of city. The same is true with reference to 
offenses of murder and burglary, with the exception that the rates 
for cities in group II exceed the figures for group I. 

The amount of variation m the six groups of rates for each offense 
is greatest for robbery, and the least variation is shown in the figures 
for rape. 

Of the cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants, 73 reported 
separate figures for larceny according to the value of the articles 
stolen. The compilation of that information is presented below: 





Larceni 


'-theft 


Population group 


$50 and 
over in 
value 


Under 
$50 in 
value 


26 cities over 250.000; total population, 17,328,700: 


15, 583 

4, 255 
65.7 


90, 357 




521.4 


47 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population, 6,480,012: 

Number of otTenses l^nown 


38, 206 


Rate per J 00.000 .-. 


589.6 







The above tabulation shows that the police departments of cities 
with more than 250,000 inhabitants reported a higher figure for 
major larcenies than was reported for cities with from 100,000 to 
250,000 inhabitants. With reference to minor larcenies, however, 
the opposite was true. 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, Jaminrj/ to September, inclusive, 1934; 
number and rates per 100,000, by population groups 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



Criminal homi- 


cide 


Mur- 




der, 


Man- 


nonneg- 


slaugh- 


liaent 


ter by 


man- 


negli- 


slaugh- 


gence 


ter 





Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Auto 
theft 



GROUP I 

36 cities over 250,000; total population, 
29,415,100: 
Number of offenses known .._ 
Rate per 100,000-.. 



GROUP II 

52 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 7,235,012: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000 



23, 683 
80.5 



10, 877 
37.0 



3,321 
45.9 



2 70, 163 
315.2 



45, 967 
645.0 



72 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation, 4,867,382: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP IV 

139 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popu- 
lation, 4,824,976: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP V 

39 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,176,178: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP VI 

530 cities under 10,000; total popula 
tion, 3,290,344: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



1,674 
34.7 



1,464 
23.7 



1,754 
36.4 



13, 145 
249.5 



11,519 
238.7 



10, 734 
173.8 



5,578 
169.5 



25, 583 
414.2 



11,007 
334.5 



Total 1,228 cities; total popu- 
lation, 55,808,992: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



2,823 

.5.1 



2,780 
5.0 



20, 894 
37.4 



U34,360 
276.2 



261,701 
546.0 



6,583 
106.6 



8102,856 
211.4 



• The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 34 cities with a 
total population of 27,686,900. 

2 The number of offenses and rate for burglary— breaking or entering are based on reports of 35 cities with 
a total population of 22,260,800. 

3 The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 33 cities with a total population 
of 21,642,000. 

< The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are based on reports of 35 cities with a total population 
of 22,260,800. 

» The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 51 cities with a total population 
of 7,126,812. 

« The number of offen.ses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,226 cities 
with a total population of 54,180,792. 

' The number of offenses and rate for burglary— breaking or entering are based on reports of 1,227 cities 
with a total population of 48,654,692. 

8 The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,224 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 47,927,692. 

« The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are based on reports of 1,227 cities with a total population 
of 48,654,692. 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1934 

Reports of offenses known to the police are submitted monthly 
by police departments throughout the country. In order to make 
possible an examination of the monthly fluctuations in the amount of 
crime, there is presented in table 2 the daily average number of offenses 
reported during the first 9 months of 1934. The compilation is 
limited to the reports received from the police departments of 88 cities, 
with a total population of 36,639,112. 

The tabulation indicates the highest figures for murder and assault 
occurred in July, and it will be observed that on the whole, the averages 
for the third quarter for those two offenses exceed those for the first 
6 months of the year. For robbery, burglary, and larceny the opposite 
is true, the highest figures occurring in the first 3-month period. The 
highest figure for auto theft was reported for April, but the averages 
for that classification fail to show any regular variation. 

Table 2. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 88 cities over 100,000, 
January to September, inclusive, 1934 



[Total population, 36,639,112, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census 


] 




Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


5.8 
7.1 
7.5 
8.1 
7.3 
7.8 
9.4 
7.7 
8.1 


17.2 
6.9 
6.2 
5.6 
6.2 
5.9 
5.4 
5.8 
6.4 


7.7 
6.7 
6.6 
7.0 
6.8 
7.7 
6.6 
7.7 
7.6 


114.0 
113.8 
115.9 
106.6 

88.5 
83.1 
86.5 
97.1 
98.1 


43.3 
42.0 
49.7 
50.9 
53.5 
56.7 
61.3 
54.1 
55.8 


2 380. 3 
355.0 
365.6 
348.1 
314.4 
312.4 
330.0 
347.5 
358. 6 


3 657. 2 
590.2 

638^7 
601.2 
586.7 
573.8 
636.1 
656. 5 


* 302. 3 




258. 4 


March 


294.4 


April 


306.8 


M^:::::::::::::;:::::: 


273.5 




273.9 


July 


258.2 




279.2 




302.5 






Total 


7.6 


6.2 


7.2 


100.3 


52.0 


345.7 


620.3 


283.4 







1 The daily averages for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 86 cities with a total population 
of 34.910,912. 

2 The daily averages for burglary— breaking or entering are based on reports of 87 cities with a total pop- 
ulation of 29,484,812. 

3 The daily averages for larceny— theft are based on reports of 84 cities with a total population of 21,533,800 
* The daily averages for auto theft are based on reports of 87 cities with a total population of 29,484,812. 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-34 

To enable the making of a comparison over a period of years there 
is presented in table 3 the number of offenses reported by the police 
departments of 71 cities with an aggregate population of 19,969,802 
for the first 9 months of each year during the period 1931-34. 
The compilation shows that the number of robberies and auto thefts 
has steadily decreased during the 4-year period, robberies from 15,291 
in 1931 to 11,448 in 1934, and auto thefts from 66,874 in 1931 to 
49,028 in 1934. 

The number of murders reported for the first 9 months of 1934 is 
less than the number for the corresponding period of 1933 and is only 
slightly in excess of the 1931 figure, which is the lowest for the 4-year 
period. Similarly, the number of aggravated assaults shows a decrease 
as compared with 1933, but the current figure is in excess of the figures 
reported for 1931 and 1932. The burglary and larceny figures show 
a slight decrease from 1933. 

The compilation shows a large decrease in the number of negligent 
manslaughters reported. It should be observed in this connection 



that prior to 1934 several of the larger cities were including as negli- 
gent manslaughter all instances of automobile fatalities. During the 
current year, however, this matter has been called to the attention of 
individual police departments with a view to including only those 
cases in which the driver of the automobile involved was guilty of 
culpable negligence. It is believed, therefore, that the decrease in the 
number of negligent manslaughters reported for 1934 should be con- 
sidered the result of a change in the procedure employed in scoring 
such cases, rather than a change in the number of such offenses 
occurring. 

Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 71 cities over 100,000, 
January to September, inclusive, 1931~S4 
[Total population, 19,969,802, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 



Number of offe 
known: 

1931. 

1932 

1933 

1934 

Daily average: 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 



1,209 
1,254 
1,332 
1,212 

4.4 



974 

1,012 

995 

3.5 
3.6 
3.7 
3.6 



15, 291 
14, 426 
13, 834 
11, 448 

56.0 

52.6 
50.7 
41.9 



7,984 
7,228 
8,948 
8,070 

29.2 
26.4 
32.8 



52, 377 

57, 557 

58, 530 
55, 404 

191.9 
210.1 
214.4 
202.9 



115,726 
118,434 
123, 607 
121, 380 

423.9 
432.2 

4.')2. 8 
444.6 



66, 874 
56, 400 
52, 941 
49, 028 

245.0 
205.8 



Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location 

In table 4, there is indicated the number of city police departments 
in each State whose reports have been used in the compilation of 
data regarding known offenses for the first 9 months of 1934. 

Table 4 shows for each State the number of police departments 
divided according to size of city. The same information is included 
for the entire country, divided into nine geographic divisions. This 
type of information is included because it is believed it should be 
taken into consideration in making comparisons between any two 
sets of crime rates. As indicated in table 1 , there is a general tendency 
for cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants to report higher crime 
figures than the smaller communities. It is of some importance, 
therefore, to ascertain the number of reports from large cities em- 
ployed in calculating the crime rates for an individual State. 

Another item of significance disclosed by the following table is 
that some States are represented by an extremely small number of 
reporting cities. Obviously, a set of crime figures based on a limited 
number of reports may differ substantially from the rates which would 
be obtained if they were based on the reports of a majority of the 
cities in the State. 

Examination of table 5 discloses that the highest rates for murder, 
nonnegligent manslaughter, and aggravated assault were reported by 
the East South Central States, whereas the highest robbery figure was 
for the East North Central States. The lowest rates for all of the 
preceding offenses were those of the New England group. The com- 
pilation shows further that the Mountain States reported the highest 
figures for burglary, larceny, and auto theft, whereas the lowest 
rates for those offenses were those of the Middle Atlantic group. 



Tabi 



4. — Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of nniform 
crime reports, January to September, inclusive, 1934 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 135 cities; total population, 
5,147,870 


9 
4 
2 
3 
3 
5 


12 
8 
9 
5 
6 

5 
4 


9 
16 
22 
5 
8 
2 

4 

1 
5 

1 
1 


24 
25 
44 

8 
11 

5 

9 
4 
9 

1 
1 

10 
4 

7 

8 
8 
9 

14 
6 
10 

7 

7 


47 
119 
91 
46 
23 

21 
34 

5 
4 
1 
30 
2 
5 

41 
29 
49 

27 
12 
24 
17 
11 

9 

7 

5 
6 
9 


41 
138 
143 

60 

28 

26 
26 
62 

5 
1 
6 
21 
4 
4 

60 
42 
36 

45 
9 
26 
50 
13 

22 
9 
9 
4 
2 
6 
8 

1 

.- 

4 
5 


1.35 


Middle Atlantic: 313 cities; total population, 
17,258.247 

East North Central: 318 cities; total popula- 
tion, 14,918,776 


313 

318 


West North Central: 128 cities; total popula- 


128 


South Atlantic: 78 cities; total population, 
3,556,320' 


78 


East South Central: 30 cities; total popula- 
tion, 1,661,313 


30 


West South Central: 68 cities; total popula- 


68 


Mountain: 39 cities; total population, 885, 117.. 
Pacific: 119cities; total population, 5,061,327... 


39 
119 


New England: 
Maine 






12 








7 








8 


Massachusetts 


1 
1 


8 
-. 

4 
1 
3 

3 
3 
1 
2 

1 
1 


5 
1 
1 

4 
3 
9 

4 

6 
8 
2 


75 


Rhode Island.. 


12 




21 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


3 

2 

5 
1 

1 
1 

2 


120 




85 


Pennsylvania 


108 


East North Central: 


98 


Indiana 


33 


Illinois 






85 


Wisconsin 


34 


West North Central: 


34 


Iowa 


3 

2 


4 
2 

1 
1 


25 


Missouri 


2 


22 




7 


South Dakota 








8 


Nebraska 




1 
2 

1 




13 










19 


South Atlantic: 
Delaware 








2 




1 




2 
4 

1 
2 


1 
5 
4 
7 




Virginia 


2 


2 
3 


19 


West Virginia 




11 








17 


South Carolina 






1 


Georgia 








I 

4 
2 
1 
5 

2 
2 

8 
9 

2 
2 


4 

7 

3 
2 
1 

1 
2 
15 

8 

3 
3 
2 

7 
1 
3 
5 
2 

2 
5 
55 


8 


Florida 




3 


15 


East South Central: 


1 
1 


12 




7 


Alabama 






5 




6 


West South Central: 

Arkansas 






1 


5 


Louisiana 


1 




7 




2 
3 


.. 


27 


Texas 


2 


29 


Mountain: 




Idaho 








4 


Wyoming 










4 




1 




1 




12 


New Mexico 


2 


Arizona 








3 


Utah 




1 






4 
23 


7 


Nevada .... 




3 


Pacific: 


1 
1 
3 


2 






14 




11 


California 


2 


5 


94 







Includes District of Columbia. 



Table 5. — Rate per 100,000, offenses known to the police, January to September, 
inclusive, 1934 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Division and State 


Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 


1.1 
3.0 
4.7 
5.5 
11.1 
19.4 
13.8 
3.3 
3.0 


1.5 
6.2 
2.4 
3.0 
4.0 
6.9 
4.2 
1.7 
3.4 


5.4 
5.4 
4.3 
4.9 
5.4 
3.4 
4.4 
4.4 
5.8 


20.6 
21.3 
111.2 
63.6 
57.3 
94.2 
69.4 
84.1 
63.3 


13.2 
26.7 
34.9 
15.1 
124.6 
143.6 
57.8 
16.9 
20.8 


209.5 
158.1 
276.7 
241.3 
328.3 
423.5 
370.8 
487.7 
430.2 


402.8 
244.4 
567.0 
536.0 
717.8 
519.8 
854.0 
913.7 
868.5 


181.0 


Middle Atlantic ' 

East North Central 2 

West North Central 

South Atlantic 3 4 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain 

Pacific'..- 


127.4 
204.6 

236! 7 
230.5 
300.7 
320.1 
311.5 


New England: 
Maine 




1.2 



1.3 
.6 
.8 

.3.1 
2.5 
3.0 

5.7 
6.6 
6.0 
2.4 

2.6 
2.9 
9.1 
2.3 
2.8 
4.2 
5.7 

9.2 
4.4 
17.4 
7.8 
13.7 
12.8 
13.2 
14.6 

13.8 
22.2 
25.0 
13.9 

22.6 
9.8 
8.5 

16.5 

6.1 

2.3 

5.7 

3.4 

9.0 



1.4 

3.0 

3.1 
2.1 
3.0 


.5 
.6 


1.4 
1.7 
1.9 

7.2 
10.1 
2.7 

2.8 
1.0 
2.4 
3.2 
.3 

.5 
1.4 
7.0 


1.9 


.5 

1.8 
1.1 
4.4 
1.9 
11.7 


1.3 
4.3 

6.8 
6.2 

2. a 

10.3 
2.1 
1.9 
5.3 

4.1 





3!o 





1.2 



4.3 


.9 
6.5 
4.8 
7.3 

.2 
2.9 

6.1 
4.5 
4.5 

3.7 
3.4 
3.9 
6.4 
3.1 

2.6 
1 7 
8.1 
4.5 
1.9 
3.3 
5.4 

1.8 
6.9 
8.5 
4.5 
5.0 
1.6 
6.9 
3.0 

3.2 
4.6 
1.7 
5.2 

5.5 
2.4 
5.2 

4.7 

12.2 


1.9 
3.9 


9.4 
3.7 

14.8 

1.2 
1.9 
7.2 


4.6 
5.3 
7.2 

23.9 
5.6 

24.9 

12.8 
37.0 
32.3 

67.1 
69.5 
234.3 
39.8 
8.6 

71.4 
46.3 
65.7 
56.6 
55.7 
35.8 
86.7 

20.2 
43.5 
53.1 
50.6 
46.7 
35.3 
32.7 
77.7 

119.4 
109.5 
55.5 
31.2 

77.4 
31.2 
71.5 
63.2 

26.5 
66.0 
23.0 
118.8 
33.0 
4.7 
65.0 
56.3 

80.8 
113.1 

54.2 


29.7 
5.3 
4.8 
12.0 
23.2 
10.3 

26.0 
36.8 
24.0 

37.1 
39.1 
40.8 
32.7 
5.9 

5.5 
11.8 
21.7 
6.8 
5.6 
15.2 
24.2 

37.6 

7.8 

203.3 

64.3 
465.0 

83! 
115.9 

145.6 
188.4 
93.3 
90.1 

63.0 
22.6 
35.6 

78.8 

10.2 
20.5 

9.6 
14.6 

3.0 
28.3 
26.6 

8.9 

21.8 
14.0 
21.4 


162.9 
124.6 
72.8 
212.4 
187.9 
247.5 

145.1 
269.4 
120.6 

256.8 
280.4 
397.9 
182.6 
114.9 

278.9 
279.1 
180.5 
312.4 
222.8 
149.8 
380.2 

186.0 
189.3 
426.8 
210.8 
293.5 
298.7 
316.4 
518.2 

507.5 
357.1 
441.9 
268.6 

322.8 
163.5 
425.2 
428.6 

187.6 
254.9 
243.1 
588.8 
420.5 
306.8 
478.1 
536.1 

571.5 
624.7 
379.8 


266.9 
187.5 
177.9 
391.3 
504.8 
471.2 

325.3 
322.6 
167.2 

622.7 
707.2 
382.5 
761.3 
463.9 

324.8 
621.7 
596.7 
371.3 
517.2 
434.4 
845.3 

482.0 
316.8 

45113 

637.5 

1, 781. 1 

1, 093. 4 

1, 087. 6 

883.5 
277.8 
374.2 
422.9 

707.9 

232.4 

859.4 

1, 089. 3 

1, 084. 8 

965.0 

1,048.9 

862! 1 
590.0 

1, 320: 9 

923.3 

1,183.0 

822.4 


152.7 


New Hampshire 


77.7 
28.7 


Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 


207.0 
64.1 
196.1 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 8 


116.0 




151.0 


Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 
Ohio* 


124.8 
198.0 


Indiana 


254.8 




257.3 


Michigan 


156.1 




99.7 


West North Central: 


336.0 




212.6 




172.8 


North Dakota 

South Dakota --- 

Nebraska 


176.6 
226.5 
371.1 




189.1 


South Atlantic: 
Delaware 


151.2 




209.8 




207.1 


West Virginia- 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 


166.9 
198.7 
80.3 
134.0 


Florida » 


222.0 


East South Central: 
Kentucky 


252.9 


Tennessee 


229.0 




253.6 




45.1 


West South Central: 


307.7 




136.4 


Oklahoma 


197.8 




399.6 


Mountain: 
Montana 


106.0 


Idaho 


186.6 




241.2 


Colorado 


347.7 


New Mexico 


240.3 




28.3 


Utah.. 


356.6 


Nevada 


598.3 


Pacific: 

Washington 10.. 

Oregon 


365.1 
239.0 


California" 


308.8 



1 The rates for burglary and auto theft are based on reports of 312 cities with a total population of 10,103,- 
947. The rate for larceny-theft is based on reports of 311 cities with a total population of 9,784,047. 

2 The rate for larceny-theft is based on reports of 317 cities with a total population of 14,619,876. 

3 The rate for larceny-theft is based on reports of 77 cities with a total population of 3,448,120. 

* Includes report of District of Columbia. 

' The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 1 17 cities with a total population of 3,333, 127. 

* The rates for burglary, larceny-theft and auto theft are based on reports of 119 cities. 
' The rate for larceny-theft is based on reports of 84 cities. 

8 The rate for larceny-theft is based on reports of 97 cities. 

» The rate for larceny-theft is based on reports of 14 cities. 

" The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 13 cities. 

" The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 93 cities. 



For the six States represented by the largest number of reports 
there are presented in table 5A crime rates for six groups of cities. 
The grouping of the cities according to size is the same as thatemployed 
in table 1. The number of cities represented in the figures for each 
group may be ascertained by referring to table 4. 

Table 5A. — Offenses known to the police, January to September, inclusive, 19S4; 
number per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 



State and 
population group 



CAUFORNIA 

Group I ' -- 

Group n 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

MICHIGAN 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

NEW JERSEY 

Group 1 2 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

NEW YORK 

Groupl' 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI --. 

OHIO 

Group I * --- 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Group I 

Group II-- 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man 
slaughter 
by negli 

gence 



11.7 
10.2 

6.4 
10.1 
10.2 

7.7 



6.2 
10.0 
5.1 
6.4 
3.6 
2.3 



Rob- 
bery 



65.8 
50.5 
48.8 
41.8 
22.6 
21.8 



51.4 
29.4 
45.7 
24.9 
12.2 
9.9 



60.2 
25.4 
30.4 
19.1 
26.8 
14.7 



13.5 
18.0 
9.8 
8.5 
7.4 
3.7 



61.2 
38.1 
43.3 
32.1 
26.1 



39.8 
32.0 
33.7 
18.1 
12.2 
27.4 



26.5 
14.6 
21.6 
8.0 
9.2 
11.8 



45.4 
47.1 
18.6 
11.7 
8.2 
6.2 



16.1 
7.0 
28.1 
25.0 

28.7 



28.2 
20.6 
26.0 
29.0 
11.4 
9.4 



44.4 
62.1 
8.2 
25.8 
13.5 
20.5 



30.0 
8.3 
20.7 

18.1 
15.8 
25.7 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 



391.2 
405.2 
401.8 
474.0 
299.3 
280.1 



154.6 
265.6 
287.7 
207.6 
108.2 
94.9 



429.7 
258.7 
167.7 
192.3 
156.1 
145.3 



138.6 
195.6 
120.8 
131.4 
141.4 
115.8 



291.1 
284.9 
194.2 



183.0 
160.8 



110.3 
251.3 
140.5 
115.2 

87.7 



Larceny- 
theft 



1. 092. 
574.3 
737.9 
796.1 



946.9 
795.3 
794.7 
518.4 
268.2 
196. 1 



468.0 
526.7 
213.3 
239.9 
257.7 
250.4 



304.7 
379.5 
358.3 
530.3 
293.8 
154.7 



766.3 
649.0 
409.5 
545.8 
439.6 
229.5 



136.8 
286. 8 
265.1 
175.8 
138.4 
130.0 



' The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 2 cities. 

2 The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 1 city. 

3 The rates for burglary, larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 2 cities. 
« The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 4 cities. 



10 

Data for Individual Cities 

In response to a widespread demand for information regarding 
crime in individual cities, and in accordance with a recommendation 
of the Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the International 
Association of Chiefs of Police, there is presented in table 6 the num- 
ber of offenses per 100,000 inhabitants in the larger cities of the United 
States. 

The crime rates appearing in table 6 are based on the number of 
offenses reported by the police departments of the cities represented 
for the third quarter of 1934. By limiting the current compilation 
to the third quarter, it is possible to compare the figures in table 6 
with the corresponding figures published for the same cities in the 
issues of the bulletin for the first and second quarters of this year. 

In comparing the data for one city with those of another, considera- 
tion should be given to the fact that variances in crime rates mav be 
due to several factors, such as differences in population composition, 
climate, economic activities, educational and recreational facilities, 
and the number of police emploj^ees per unit of population. It is 
believed that the information appearing in the following table should 
not be used as a basis for evaluating the efficiency of individual poHce 
departments, but should be treated as one source of information re- 
garding crime conditions in individual communities. 

With reference to the data regarding offenses of manslaughter by 
negligence, it is desired to point out that the Committee on Uniform 
Crime Records of the International Association of Chiefs of Police 
has recognized that there are instances of automobile fatalities in 
which it may be difficult for the police to ascertain whether the cir- 
cumstances constitute an actual oft"ense of negligent manslaughter. 
Accordingly, the committee has recommended that in such cases the 
complaint be scored as an actual offense if the prosecuting attorney 
authorizes the issuance of a warrant for the arrest of, or the grand jury 
indicts, the driver of the automobile involved. This recommendation 
has been called to the attention of all contributors of crime reports. 
There are, however, some police departments which have not found it 
feasible to adopt the recommendation of the committee, and in some 
instances it is belie v^ed that the figures reported for negligent man- 
slaughter probably include all instances of automobile fatalities. 
Similarly, it is believed probable that the practice in scoring larcenies 
of articles of trivial value is not entirely uniform throughout the 
country. Examination of the figures for larceny indicates the possi- 
bility that some police departments include all cases of minor thefts, 
whereas others have disregarded them. This matter is referred to 
here in order that it may be given appropriate consideration in making 
comparisons among the several crime rates appearing in table 6. 
Although there is no field supervision in connection with the prepara- 
tion of individual reports, the Division of Investigation is constantly 
endeavoring to obtain reports uniformly compiled in all respects. 



11 



Table 6. — Offenses known to the police, July 1-September 30, 1934; rate per 
100,000 inhabitants 

[Population figures from Federal 



City and population 



Akron, Ohio, 255,040 

Albany, N. Y., 127,412 

Baltimore, Md., 804,874 

Birmingham, Ala., 259,678 

Boston, Mass., 781,188 _.. 

Bridgeport, Conn., 146,716 

Buffalo, N. Y., 573,076 

Cambridge, Mass.. 113,643 

Canton, Ohio, 104,906 

Chicago, 111., 3,376,438 ._ 

Cincinnati, Ohio, 451,160 

Cleveland, Ohio, 900,429 

Columbus, Ohio, 290,564 

Dallas, Tex., 260,475 

Dayton, Ohio, 200,982 

Denver, Colo., 287,861 

Des Moines, Iowa, 142,559 

Detroit, Mich., 1,568,662 

Duluth, Minn., 101,463 

Elizabeth, N. J., 114,589 

El Paso, Tex., 102,421 

Erie, Pa., 115,967 

EvansviUe, Ind., 102.249 

Fall River, Mass., )ft,274 

Flint, Mich., 156,492 

Fort Wa\-ne, Ind., 114,946 

Fort Worth, Tex., 163,447 

Gary, Ind., 100,426 

Grand Rapids, Mich., 168,592. 

Hartford, Conn., 164,072 

Houston, Tex., 292,352 

Indianapolis, Ind., 364,161 

Jacksonville, Fla., 129,549 

Jersev City, N. J., 316, 715 

Kansas City, Kans., 121,857.. 

Knoxville, Tenn., 105,802 

Long Beach, Calif., 142,032_._ 
Los Angeles, Calif., 1,238,048.. 

LouisviUe, Ky., 307,745 

Lowell, Mass., 100,234 

Lvnn, Mass., 102,320 _ 

Memphis, Tenn., 253, 143 

Miami, Fla., 110,637 

Milwaukee, Wis., 578,249 

Minneapolis, Minn., 464,356.. 

Xashville, Tenn., 153,866 

Newark, N. J.. 442,337 

Xew Bedford, Mass., 112,597 . 
New Haven, Conn., 162,655... 

Xew Orleans. La., 458,762 

New York, N. Y., 6,930,446... 

Norfolk, Va., 129.710 

Oakland, Calif., 284,063 

Oklahoma City, Okla., 185,.389 

Omaha, Nebr., 214,006 

Peoria, 111., 104,969 

Philadelphia, Pa.. 1,950,961... 

Pittsburgh, Pa., 669,817 _ 

Portland, Oreg., 301,815 

Providence, R. I., 252,981 

Reading, Pa., 111,171 

Richmond, Va., 182,929 

Rochester, N. Y., 328,132 

St. Louis, Mo., 821,960 

St. Paul, Minn., 271,606 

Salt Lake City, Utah, 140,267 .. 

San .\ntonio, Tex., 231,542 

.San Diego, Calif., 147,995.. 

Footnotes at end of table. 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



2.0 
1.4 
2.1 
1.1 


.9 
4.9 

2.0 

.9 
1.3 


4.9 
5.0 
1.2 

.6 
11.6 
3.3 
10.8 

.6 
2.5 
7.6 


1.2 
4.5 
6.0 


8.7 
4.5 


1.3 
9.7 




3.7 

1.5 
10.8 
2.8 
3.2 
2.8 




Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



2.4 

1.1 



3.8 

1.5 

.3 
2.8 

.9 


4.4 
6.8 






1.2 




1.4 


.8 
5.1 


4.7 
1.4 

1.3 





2.4 

4.5 

.2 


.6 
5.4 




3.3 
1.5 

.7 






Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



17.3 
12.7 
21.8 

7.7 

16.7 

39.1 

96.6 

20.8 

42.8 

45.8 

20.7 

21.4 

52.5 

21.0 

20.0 

21.7 

7.0 

8.8 

12.1 

26.4 

3.5 

32.0 

5.2 

15.9 

29.9 

4.7 

9.8 

39.0 

39.5 

64.1 

7.6 

50.9 

15.1 

15.5 

26.2 

40.0 

3.0 

10.8 

34.0 

13.6 

2.6 

27.3 

37.7 

30.1 

3.6 

8.6 

5.4 

3.8 

27.8 

18.7 

30.2 

17.8 

18.1 

7.3 

28.2 

48.0 

1.2 

8.1 

21.9 

1.2 

19.6 

32.4 

25.7 

30.2 

10.1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



15.8 

6.7 


23.4 

3.5 
35.3 
18.0 
32.1 

8.0 
29.6 
54.1 
22.4 

5.9 

4.9 
20.4 



5.2 
12.7 


11.7 

1.7 
45.4 

1.7 
11.6 
17.9 

3.0 

9.1 
32.2 
16.5 
50.9 
10.7 

7.4 
13.2 
12.0 



5.9 
81.8 
102.1 

4.8 

63^7 
29.2 
2.7 
2.5 
8.3 
9.6 
60.1 
15.1 
18.3 
8.9 
3.8 
12.5 



12.0 
4.4 
13.5 
39.7 
1.4 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter 
ing 



69.1 

205! 3 

48.1 
127.5 

34.7 
100.3 
208.8 
159.2 

61.8 

90.7 
201.0 
153.6 

95.5 
222.3 
136.8 

65.0 

82.8 

82.0 
119.1 

68.1 

87.0 
113.6 
140.6 

68.7 
195.2 

70.7 
102.6 
129.8 
234.6 
168.6 
211.5 

27.2 
178.9 
136.1 
169.0 
163.2 
216.4 

43.9 
100.7 
148.1 
210.6 

39.9 
112.8 

98.1 
229.2 
144.8 
115.0 

45.1 

192.0 
117.9 
137.0 
27.6 
46.7 
32.9 
33.9 
244.9 
122.5 
80.1 
184.2 
68.9 
68.5 
184.1 
167.5 
172.8 
82.4 



Larceny- 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



43.1 
12.6 
20.0 
25.4 
33.7 
18.4 
10.8 
13.2 

(') 

35.6 

37.2 

8.4 
41.3 
13.4 

9.5 
(1) 
15.4 
16.2 
48.3 
18.3 
12.7 
25.0 
12.7 

8.7 
26.8 
11.3 
10.4 
12.9 
14.2 
29.9 
61.9 
133.2 
66.4 
(2) 
0) 
27.4 
29.6 
46.1 
44.8 

2.0 
20.5 
(') 

16.6 

10.8 

62.4 

(') 

18.7 

(>.) 
(2) 
13.9 
19.7 
(') 
11.7 
10.5 
12.8 
14.2 
55.7 
19.0 
7.2 
53.0 
12.2 
« 
24.3 
22.8 
45.3 
24.3 



Under 

$50 



125.1 
113.0 
88.8 
66.6 
81.7 
106.3 
63.0 
114.4 
219.2 
111.5 
200.2 
292. 5 
233.7 
454.2 
331.9 
278.3 
309.3 
360.1 
293.7 
206.8 
244.1 
100.9 
333.5 
91.1 
373.2 
190.5 
299.2 
102.6 
198.1 
257.2 
440.9 
339.1 
463.1 

192.0 

34.0 
316.8 
207.9 
296.3 

71.8 
221.9 

49.4 

(') 

170.5 

27.6 
131.3 
180.2 
238.0 
162.9 

56.5 

(') 
337.7 
236.6 
261.1 



29.9 
360.8 
208.3 



153. 
293.9 
183.0 
260.2 
257.8 
129.7 



Table 



12 



-Offenses known to the police, July 1-September 30, 1934; rate per 
100,000 inhabitants — Continued 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




City and population 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


San Francisco, Calif., 634,394.-. 

Scranton, Pa., 143,433 

Seattle, Wash., 365,583 

Somerville, Mass., 103,908 

Spokane, Wash., 115,514 

Springfield, Mass., 149,900 

Syracuse, N. Y., 209,326 

Tacoma, Wash., 106,817....-.-. 

Tampa, Fla., 101.161 

Toledo, Ohio, 290,718 


0.8 

2.1 

1.4 





2.0 

1.0 

.9 
5.9 
2.1 
3.5 


3.3 

1.8 
3.8 


.7 
2.4 


2.4 

4.2 

1.0 

.9 


.5 
1.9 
2.0 

.7 
2.1 
1.0 
1.4 



.9 


2.2 
2.4 


1.3 
.7 
.3 
1.0 


3.3 
3.3 
2.8 
3.0 
4.1 


.6 
1.0 
.9 


1.0 
1.5 
1.8 


12.5 
8.4 
32.0 
8.7 
39.0 
2.0 
3.3 
20.6 
12.9 
28.2 
34.7 
5.9 

9^0 
5.4 
6.6 
3.1 
.7 
24.1 


7.3 
2.1 
6.0 

39.0 
10.7 
4.8 

21.7 
12.7 
18.4 


12.9 
4.0 
8.1 
15.9 
.5 
11.9 
24.7 


93.5 

83.7 
236.6 

66.4 
187.0 

45.4 

63.1 
120.8 

95.9 
127.3 
285.3 

62.9 
140.1 

66.1 
150.3 

55.3 

99.8 

87! 1 


(') 

20.9 

31.7 

9.6 
53.7 
24.0 
(') 

7.5 
14.8 
49.5 
65.1 

8.8 
62.2 
2.3.0 
15.3 
20.6 
19.5 

5.2 

6.5 


255.7 
60.0 
176.4 
85.7 
448.4 
154.8 
171.0 
236.9 
290.6 

(0 
458.7 
134.7 
217.1 
89.1 
394.2 
155.7 
26.6 
22.3 
145.3 


143.1 
50.2 

149.9 
57.7 

145.4 
37.4 
93.2 

122.6 
41.5 


Tulsa, Okla., 141,258— 

Utica N Y 101,740 


93.4 
51 1 


Washington, D. C, 486,869.--. 

Waterbury, Conn., 99,902 3 

Wichita, Kans., 111,110-- 

Wilmington, Del., 106,597 

Worcester, Mass., 195,311 

Yonkers, N. Y., 134,646 

Youngstown, Ohio, 170,002--.- 


177.7 
142.1 
46.8 
58.2 
66.0 
22.3 
90.0 



' Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 

2 Not reported. 

3 The population of Waterbury as estimated July 1, 1930, by the Bureau of the Census was 100,100. 

Offenses Known to Sheriffs and State Police, 1934 

It has not been possible to calculate crime rates for rural areas of 
the United States, due to the difficulty of ascertaining the population 
represented by the reports received from law-enforcement agencies 
policing rural areas. However, there is presented below the number 
of offenses reported by 66 sheriffs and 6 State police units. It should 
be observed that the reports represent only a small fraction of the 
rural portion of the United States. 

With a view to obtaining more adequate data relative to crime in 
rural communities, the Division of Investigation has recently under- 
taken to encourage sheriffs in all parts of the country to participate 
in the compilation of offenses known to law enforcement officials. 
It is anticipated that during the next calendar year it will be possible 
to present in this bulletin, figures based on the reports received from 
a much larger number of agencies policing rural territory. 



Table 7. — Offenses known, January to September 1934, inchisive, as reported by 
66 sheriffs and 6 State police troops 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Offenses known.- 


69 


130 


149 


320 


373 


2,224 


4,214 


749 



13 



Offenses Known in Possessions of the United States 

There is presented in tal)le 8 available information regarding the 
number of offenses known to the police in Honolulu (city and county), 
the Canal Zone, and Puerto Rico. The figures are based on both 
urban and rural areas. 

With reference to the figures for the Canal Zone, the Division of 
Investigation has been advised that less than one-third of the persons 
arrested for ofl'enses committed in the Canal Zone are residents thereof. 
In other words, it appears that a large portion of the crime committed 
in the Canal Zone is attributable to transients and persons from 
neighboring communities. 

Table 8. — Offenses known in United States possessions, January to September 
1934; number and rate per 100,000 

[Population figures from Federal census, Apr. 1, 1930] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Jurisdiction reporting 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Over 

$50 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Hawaii: 

Honolulu, city and 
county, population 202,- 
923; number of offenses 
known 


8 
3.9 

4 
10.1 

166 
10.8 


13 
6.4 

2 

5.1 

83 
5.4 


9 

4.4 

2 
5.1 

43 
2.8 


17 
8.4 

4 
10.1 

29 
1.9 


57 
28.1 

8 
20.3 

1,374 
89.0 


564 
277.9 

51 
129.2 

554 
35.9 


94 
46.3 

12 
30.4 

65 

4.2 


1,331 
655.9 

148 
375.0 

2,574 
153.8 


146 


Rate per 100,000 


71.9 


Isthmus of Panama: 

Canal Zone, population 
39,467; number of of- 


26 


Rate per 100,000 


65.9 


Puerto Rico: 

Population 1,543,913; 
number of offenses 
known 


56 


Rate per 100,000 


3.6 







Number of Police Department Employees, 1933 

Prior issues of this bulletin have included information regarding the 
number of police employees in individual cities with more than 10,000 
inhabitants. The information for cities with more than 100,000 in- 
habitants appeared in the issue for the first quarter of 1934, and for 
cities with from 10,000 to 100,000 inhabitants in the issue for the 
second quarter of this year. In the following table there is presented 
a compilation showing the average number of police employees per 
thousand inhabitants for cities divided into five groups according to 
size. The population figures employed were taken from the Federal 
census, April 1, 1930. 

The average number of employees per thousand inhabitants for 
cities in group 1 was obtained by ascertaining the total number of 
employees in the police departments of the 36 cities represented. 
This figure was then divided by the total population of those 36 cities. 
The data for the remaining groups of cities were compiled in a similar 
manner. 



14 



Table 9. — Average 


number of police department employees, 19SS 


Population group 


Average 

number of 

employees per 

thousand 

inhabitants 


Populauon group 


Average 

number of 

employees per 

thousand 

inhabitants 


GROUP I 

36 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion 28,514,404 


2.2 
1.5 
1.3 


GROUP IV 

174 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popu- 
lation 5,825 810 


1 2 


GROUP II 

67 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 


GROUP V 
480 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 




GROUP ni 

95 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,133,171 













DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

During the first 9 months of the calendar year 1934, the Division 
of Investigation examined 260,506 fingerprint cards currently received 
for information relative to the age, sex, race, and previous criminal 
history of individuals arrested by law-enforcement officials through- 
out the United States. The number of fingerprint cards received by 
the Identification Unit of the Division of Investigation during that 
period was of coarse substantially larger than the above number. 
However, this compilation is limited to records representing arrests 
for violations of State laws and municipal ordinances. Fingerprint 
cards representing arrests for violations of Federal laws or commit- 
ments to Federal or State penal institutions were not included in this 
compilation. 

The tabulation of data from fingerprint records obviously does not 
include all persons arrested, since there are individuals taken into cus- 
tody for whom no fingerprint cards are forwarded to Washington. 
Furthermore, data pertaining to persons arrested should not be treated 
as information regarding the number of offenses committed, since two 
or more persons may be involved in the joint commission of a single 
offense, and on the other hand one person may be arrested and charged 
with the commission of several separate offenses. 

Examination of the records of arrests distributed according to 
age groups discloses a rapid increase in the number of individuals 
arrested from age 15 to age 19. The figures are as follows: 

Age: Number arrested 

Under 15 1,098 

15 1, 179 

16 4,576 

17 7,921 

18 11, 573 

19 13,035 

Total under 20 39, 382 

It will be observed that the number of arrests of individuals 19 
years of age was greater than that for any other single age group, 
although arrests of individuals between 20 and 24 years old were 
quite numerous, totaling 58,111. The compilation discloses that in 



15 

addition there were 47,220 arrests of individuals between 25 and 29 
years of age. This makes a total of 144,713 (55 percent) less than 30 
years old. 

More than half of the individuals 19 years of age were charged 
with the following offenses: 

Criminal homicide 167 

Robbery 821 

Assault 584 

Burglary — breaking or entering 1, 876 

Larcenv— theft 2, 231 

Auto theft 870 

Embezzlement and fraud 144 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 111 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 205 

Rape - 244 

Total 7,253 

Of the 260,506 arrest records examined, 18,186 (7 percent) repre- 
sented females. In the tables attached hereto may be found the 
specific charges placed against them. 

Table 10. — Distribution of arrests, btj sex, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 1934 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering. 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzelement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receivii 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws . 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.-. 
Offenses against family and children _ 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

-\11 other offenses 

Total- 



5,030 
10, 995 
20, 181 
23, 696 
35, 369 
8,421 
7,257 
2,623 
3,516 
3,388 
3,400 
4,038 
2,893 
4,714 
2,934 
6, 545 
6,552 
1,134 
16 
2,146 
12,217 
20, 508 
17, 922 
3,476 
31, 547 
3,625 
16, 363 



260, 506 



4,578 
10, 522 

18, 601 
23, 289 
32, 412 

8,259 
6,830 
2,410 
3,221 
3,388 
1,105 
3,378 

2, 547 
4,591 
2,826 
5,888 
6,398 
1,118 

16 
2,105 
11,017 

19, 495 
16, 492 

3,382 
29, 565 

3, 401 
15, 486 



452 
473 

1,580 
407 

2,957 
162 
427 
213 
295 



2,295 
660 
346 
123 
108 
657 
154 
16 



41 

1,200 

1,013 

1,430 

94 

1,982 

224 

877 



1.9 
4.2 
7.7 
9.1 
13.6 
3.2 
2.8 
1.0 
1.3 
1.3 
1.3 

l!l 
1.8 
1.1 
2.5 
2.5 



4.7 
7.9 
6.9 
1.3 
12.2 
1.4 
6.4 



1.9 
4.3 
7.7 
9.6 
13.4 
3.4 
2.8 
1.0 
1.3 
1.4 
.5 
1.4 

L9 
1.2 
2.4 
2.6 
.5 

(■) 
.9 
4.5 
8.0 
6.8 
1.4 

12.2 
1.4 
6.4 



242, 320 



18, 186 100. 



2.5 
2.6 
8.7 
2.2 
16.3 

.9 
2.3 
1.2 
1.6 


12.6 
3.6 
1.9 

.7 

.6 
3.6 

.8 



6.6 
7.9 
.5 
11.0 
1.2 
4.8 



100. 100. 



Less than Vio of 1 percent. 



16 



Table 11. — Arrests by age groups, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1934 



Offense charged 



Not 
known 



Under 
15 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, re 

ceiving, possessing 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercial 

ized vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing 



etc- 



Oflenses against family and 

children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle 

laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated --- 

All other offenses 



21 
181 
148 
1,314 
983 
483 

19 



437 
2,056 
2,125 



167 
821 
584 
1,876 
2,231 
870 
144 

111 
121 
244 



626 
1,428 
1,746 



1,354 
148 
911 



1,354 
141 
805 



159 
804 
742 
1,372 
1,766 
540 
162 

104 
100 
211 

177 
155 
59 



142 

579 
514 



219 
731 
795 
,291 
,667 
513 
160 

92 
137 
204 

252 

184 
85 



82 
214 



130 
607 
613 
914 
130 
,586 
144 
793 



Total. 



13, 035 



Offense charged 



25-29 30-34 



50 and 
over 



Total 
all ages 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault — 

Burglary— breaking or enter- 



Larceny — theft 

Autotheft .--. 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, possessing 

Forgery and counterfeiting.. 



1,174 

1,647 

447 

219 



1,088 

1,518 

377 

241 



1,045 
2,333 
4,018 



1,321 
1,241 



810 
1,404 
3,440 

2,463 

4,581 

723 

1,402 



Prostitution and commer- 
cialized vice — 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possess- 
ing, etc 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated... 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor ve- 
hicle laws 

Disorderly conduct. 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other 



Total. 



142 
570 
671 
850 
103 
1,534 
154 
763 

11,832 



815 

130 

1,515 

178 



395 
2,301 
3,393 
3,240 

655 
6,065 

678 
2,766 



1,224 

164 

5 



1,877 
3,400 
2, 491 

645 
4,929 

601 
2,113 



1,517 

3,308 

346 

1,174 

308 
475 
240 

354 
451 



534 

465 

893 

1,000 

109 

1 

211 
1,354 



497 
3,334 

433 
1,547 



2,284 
177 
941 

228 
346 
190 

222 
356 
347 



313 

188 

1,316 

524 



1.^ 



425 

1,632 

510 

1,747 

51 

720 

231 
243 
219 

121 
515 
285 



129 



2,556 
1,207 

397 
2,178 

257 
1,174 



11,458 



47, 220 



37, i 



27, 752 



19, 



72 
632 

1,797 
871 
240 

1,489 
163 
742 

13, 075 



2,589 
1,388 

286 
1,635 

226 
1,030 



5, 030' 
10,995 
20, 181 

23, 696 
35, 369 
8,421 
7,257 

2,62a 
3,516- 
3,388 

3,400' 
4,038 
2,893 

4,714 

2,934 
6,54& 
6,552 
1,134 
16- 

2,146 
12,217 
20, 508 
17, 922 

3,476 
31, 547 

3,625 
16, 363 



16, 909 



260, 506 



17 

In 90,912 (35 percent) instances, the individuals arrested already 
had fingerprint cards on file in the Identification Unit of the Division 
of Investigation. In addition, there were 5,572 instances in which 
the current fingerprint cards bore notations indicating that the indi- 
viduals concerned had been previously arrested. This makes a total 
of 96,484 instances in which there was available information relative 
to previous criminal activities of the individuals represented. In 
64,990 (67.4 percent) cases, the records showed that they had been 
previously convicted. (This number constitutes 25 percent of the 
total of 260,506 arrest records examined during the 9-month period.) 



NUMBER OF PERSONS ARRESTED 
AGES 16 TO 24 

DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT CARDS 
JANUARY I.- SEPTEMBER 30,1934 



n%'>V//A 4.576 



yAHW////////7A 7.921 



/AGE )^//////////^:mm 



K.AO-E' i^y/////////////////////A 13,035 

VA<^K¥/////////////////A 1^900 



'M^</////////////////////A .1,87^ 



^A'^K'^^y////////////////////\ .2,049 



VMW////////////////////A 
Y/MW//////////////////A ...458 



The compilation shows further that the majority of the previous con- 
victions were for major offenses, as follows: 

Criminal homicide 684 

Robbery 3,429 

Assault 3, 193 

Burglary — breaking or entering 8, 881 

Larceny — theft 13, 504 

Auto theft 2,683 

Embezzlement and fraud 2, 092 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 416 

Forgery and counterfeiting 2, 372 

Rape 505 

Narcotic drug laws 1, 814 

Weapons ; carrying, possessing, etc 965 

Driving while intoxicated 813 

Total 41,351 

The above total constitutes 63.6 percent of the previous convictions 
disclosed by the records. 



18 

It is believed of significance to examine the current charges placed 
against individuals with previous criminal records. The following 
serious charges were among those placed against individuals whose 
records showed previous convictions of homicide: Criminal homicide, 
24; robbery, 44; assault, 93; burglary^breaking or entering, 31; 
larceny — theft, 67; auto theft, 13; emi3ezzlement and fraud, 12; con- 
cealed weapons, 24. Similarly, current charges placed against those 
with previous convictions of robbery were as follows: Criminal homi- 
cide, 58; robbery, 530; assault, 202; burglary — breaking or entering, 
301 ; larceny — -theft, 384 ; auto theft, 107 ; embezzlement and fraud, 67 ; 
concealed weapons, 70. The complete tabulation of current charges 
placed against individuals with previous convictions discloses that 
in general the majority were previously convicted of major crimes and 
were currently charged with offenses similarly serious in nature. 

Table 12. — Number with -previous fingerprint records; arrests, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 1934 



Offense charged 



Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 



Offense charged 



Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery .- 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or enter- 
ing- 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft — 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, possessing- _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting. . 

Rape 

Prostitution and commer- 
cialized vice 

other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc 



5,030 
10, 995 
20, 181 

23, 696 
35, 369 
8,421 
7,257 

2,623 
3,516 

3,400 
4.038 
2,893 



1,012 

4,728 
5,755 



13, 104 
2,897 
3,035 

642 

1,453 

726 

1,117 

973 

1,727 

1,346 



Offenses against family and 

children _. _-- 

Liquor laws -._ 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

other tralDc and motor vehi- 
cle laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total.. 



2, 934 
6,545 
6.552 
1,134 
16 

2,146 
12,217 
20, 508 
17, 922 

3,476 
31, 547 

3,625 
16, 363 



683 

1,787 

1,281 

231 



7,952 
790 
12, 331 
1,375 
5,306 



90, 912 



Table 13. — Percentage with previous fingerprint records; arrests, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 



Narcotic drug laws 

Vagrancy 

Robbery 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Suspicion 

Parking violations '■ 

Larceny- theft 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Disorderly conduct 

Autotheft 

Drunkenness 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 
All other offenses 



44 4 
43.0 



37.5 
37.0 
36.7 
36.1 
34.4 
34.0 
32.9 
32.4 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Assault 

Liquor laws 

other traflac and motor vehicle laws.... 
stolen property; buying, receiving 

posse.ssing 

other sex offenses 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Gambling 

Rape - - 

Road and driving laws 

Criminal homicide 

Driving while intoxicated.. 



28.6 

27! 3 
26.4 

24.5 
24.1 
23.3 
22.7 
21.4 
20.4 
20.1 
19.6 



Only 16 fingerprint cards were received representing arrests for violations of parking regulations. 



19 



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21 



Further examination of the available information pertaining to the 
64,990 individuals with previous convictions reveals that 2,126 were 
currently arrested while on parole. In addition, there were 5,858 
instances in which the current arrests were made prior to the expiration 
of previous sentences, although the records failed to include any 
affirmative showing of paroles. This makes a total of 7,984 arrests 
while on parole or prior to the expiration of sentences previously 
imposed. This number constitutes 12.3 percent of the 64,990 
previous convictions disclosed, and 3.1 percent of the total of 260,506 
arrest records examined during the 9-month period. 

Of the 7,984 records referred to above, 6,927 indicate that the 
pre\"ious convictions were for the offenses listed below: 

Criminal homicide 293 

Robbery 1,390 

Assault 282 

Burglary — breaking or entering 2, 131 

Larceny— theft 1, 212 

Auto theft 613 

Embezzlement and fraud 166 

Stolen propert}^; buying, receiving, possessing 62 

Forgery and counterfeiting 484 

Rape 124 

Drug laws 114 

Weapons ; carrying, possessing, etc 56 

Total 6,927 

Table 15. — Arrests, persons on parole at time of current arrest, including those 
arrested before expiration of a prior sentence (no affirmative showing of parole), 
Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1934 



Offense charged 


Current ar- 
rest in period 
of parole 


Current ar- 
rest in period 
of previous 
sentence 


Total 




14 
109 
72 
210 
190 
87 
44 
9 
33 
13 
10 
10 
15 
30 
12 
25 
16 
6 


569 
241 
864 
777 
313 

47 
153 
44 
26 
33 
43 
133 
14 
76 
35 
8 


103 




678 




313 




1,074 




967 




400 


Embezzlement and fraud 


220 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing - - 


56 


Forgery and counterfeiting -- -. -- 


186 


Rape 


57 




36 




43 


Narcotic drug laws 


58 




163 


Offenses against family and children - - 


26 


Liquor laws . - . . 


101 




51 


Road and driving laws 


14 


Parking violations .- .- ._-_- -. 







13 

54 
76 
77 
6 

175 
35 

785 


19 
206 
196 
359 

19 
917 
136 
365 


32 




260 




272 


Vagrancy -- 


436 




25 




1,092 


Not stated 


171 


W\ other offenses 


1,150 








2,126 


5,858 


7,984 





2^ 



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24 

Whites were represented by 187,403 and Negroes by 61,335 of the 
records examined. Other races were represented as follows: Indian, 
976; Chinese, 843; Japanese, 150; Mexican, 8,036; all others, 1,763. 
In order to facilitate comparisons between the number of Negroes 
and whites arrested, they have been presented in terms of the number 
per 100,000 in the general population of the country. In other 
words, of each 100,000 native whites there were 245 such persons 
arrested, and the corresponding figure for foreign-born whites is 156. 
Similarly, of each 100,000 Negroes in the country there were 762 
arrested. The following figures are likewise in the form of the num- 
ber of arrests per 100,000 of each of the three groups in the general 
population of the country: 





Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born white 


Negro 




3.7 
12.4 

3.2 
10.8 
23.6 
32.3 


4.6 
20.7 
4.0 
3.6 
7.7 
17.5 


20.8 


Assault 


98.7 


WeapoQ"!" carrying possessing, etc 


21 4 




32.0 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


70.1 




118 2 







It should be observed in connection with the foregoing figures that 
the immediate descendants of foreign-born whites have been included 
in the figures for native whites. 

Table 17. — Distribution of arrests occording to race, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 1934 



Offense charged 



Negro 



Japan- 
ese 



Mex- 
ican 



All 
others 



Total 
all races 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault - 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft - 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Forgery and counterfeiting. 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

other sex offenses . _ 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Offenses against family and children - 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws -.- 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy _. _. 

Gambling.. 

Suspicion _. 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



3,177 
8,061 
11,293 
17, 195 
24, 326 
7,002 
6,455 

2,028 
3,182 
2,557 
2,461 
3,312 
1,693 
2,730 
2,529 
4,483 
5,648 
773 
7 
1,494 
8,260 

15, 768 

13,200 
1,950 

22, 489 
2,879 

12, 451 



1,672 
2,572 
7,940 

9^508 

1,186 

711 

524 



364 
1,721 

297 
1,882 

491 

277 
6 

508 
3,311 
3,352 
3,579 
1,386 



127 
214 
645 
683 
1,242 
195 
37 



5,030 
10, 995 
20, 181 
23, 696 
35, 369 
8,421 
7,257 

2,623 
3,516 

3^400 
4,038 
2,893 
4,714 
2,934 
6,545 
6,552 
1,134 
16 
2,146 
12, 217 
20,508 
17, 922 
3,476 
31, 547 
3,625 
16, 363 



Total.. 187,403 61,335 



260, 506 



25 



Table 18. — Nimiber of arrestt^ of negroes and whites in 'proportion to the number 
of each in the general population of the country, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1934 

[Rate per 100,000 of population, excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 



Native 
white 



Foreign- 
born 
white 



Negro 



Criminal homicide ..- 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape - 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children- 
Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling.. _ 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



3.: 
10. S 
12. ■! 
23. ( 
32.; 
10. ( 
8.( 
2.; 

4.: 
3.; 

3. J 

4. 

2. 

3. 

3. 

5. 

7. 

1. 
(>) 

1. 
10. 
21. 
18. 

2. 
30. 

3. 
16. 



4.6 
3.6 

20.7 
7.7 

17.5 
1.8 
5.0 
3.5 
2.2 
2.3 



4.0 
3.3 

7.8 
3.8 
.5 

:■) 

1.3 
8.7 

12.2 
8.3 
3.0 

14.8 
2.0 

11.8 



20.8 
32.0 
98.7 
70.1 
118.2 
14.7 
8.8 
6.5 
3.3 
7.7 
10.6 
7.7 
4.5 
21.4 
3.7 

6^1 

3.4 
.1 

6.3 
41.2 
41.7 
44.5 
17.2 
99.9 

7.8 
42.1 



156.4 



' Less than to of 1 per 100,000. 

At the end of September there were 4,529,281 fingerprint records 
and 5,660,336 index cards containing names or aliases of individuals 
with records on file in the Division of Investigation at Washington. 
Of each 100 fingerprint cards received during the first 9 months of 
1934, more than 46 were identified with data in the files of the Divi- 
sion. During the same period, 3,151 fugitives from justice were 
identified through fingerprint records and information as to the 
w^hereabouts of those fugitives was immediately transmitted to the 
law enforcement officers or agencies desiring to apprehend them. 

The number of police departments, peace officers and law enforce- 
ment agencies throughout the United States and foreign countries 
voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Division at the end of 
September totaled 6,978. 

O 



'^A 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume V — Number 4 
FOURTH QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1934 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D.C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1935 



ADVISORY 



COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department of 
Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume 5 January 1935 Number 4 

CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1934. 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-34. 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location. 

Data for individual cities. 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police. 

Offenses known in the possessions. 

Daily average, offenses of robbery and burglary. 1930-34. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1934: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested. 

Age distribution of persons arrested. 

Race distribution of persons arrested. 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records. 

Number with records showing previous convictions. 

Classification of Offenses 

The term "offenses known to the poHce" is designed to include 
those crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification 
occurring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known 
to the police through reports of poUce oflficers^ of citizens, of prosecut- 
ing or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following 
group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegUgent manslaughter, and 
(6) manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary-breaking or entering; larceny-theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are reported 
as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted burglary or 
robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses loiown to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the poUce depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 
Complaints which upon investigation are learned to be groundless are 
not included in the tabulations which follow. 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kiU, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths, (b) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

(1) 



2. Rape.^Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person 
by force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shoot- 
ing, cutting, stabbing, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids; mayhem, maim- 
ing. Does not include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary", housebreaking, safe 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft {except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value. (6) 
Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con-games", 
forgery, passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motpr vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taken for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or un- 
authorized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of poHce in different cities, 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation does not vouch for its accuracy. 
It is given out as current information, which may throw some light 
on problems of crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 
Extent of Reporting Area 

The number of city police departments contributing one or more 
crime reports during 1934 is shown in the following table. The infor- 
mation is presented for the cities divided according to size. The 
population figures employed are estimates as of July 1, 1933, by the 
Bureau of the Census for cities with population in excess of 10,000. 
For the smaller communities the figures listed in the 1930 decennial 
census were employed. 

Growth in the crime reporting area is evidenced by the following 
figures for 1930 to 1934: 



Year 


Cities 


Population 


1930 


1,127 
1,511 
1,578 
1,658 
1,799 


45, 929, 965 


jg31 


51, 145, 734 




53, 212, 230 


1933 


62, 357, 262 


1934 


62, 757, 643 







The above comparison shows that during 1934 there was an increase, 
of 141 cities as compared with 1933. 



Population group 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing 
returns 


Total 
popula- 
tion 


Population repW' 
sented in returns 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total.. - 


983 


871 


89 


60, 281, 688 


57, 689, 275 


96 


A Cities over 250,000 


37 
57 
104 
191 
594 


36 
57 
97 
175 
506 


97 
100 
93 
92 
85 


29, 695, 500 
7, 850, 312 
6, 980, 407 
6, 638, 544 
9. 116, 925 


29,415,100 
7, 850, 312 
6. 503, 370 
6.114,421 
7, 806, 072 


09 


B Cities 100 000 to 250 000 


100 




93 


D Cities 25 000 to 50,000 


92 


E Cities 10 000 to 25 000 


86 







Note —The above table does not include 928 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population 
of 5,068,368. The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns whereas 
the rural townships are of varying population groups. 



MONTHLY RETURNS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population 

In table 1 there is presented the number of offenses reported for 
1934 by the poHce departments of 1,285 cities with an aggregate 
population of 56,874,132. For certain offenses the number of reports 
included is slightly less, as indicated in the footnotes to the table. 

The figures are also presented in the form of the number per 100,000 
inhabitants, and there is shown below a percentage distribution of 
those crime rates. The percentage distribution is based on the crime 
rates rather than the number of offenses in order that it will not be 
affected by the variation in the number of reports on which the data 
for the individual offense classes are based. 



Offense 


Rate per 
100,000 


Percent 


Offense 


Rate per 
100,000 


Percent 




1. 542. 6 


100.0 




81.6 
49.4 
6.7 
6.4 
5.4 


5.3 








T arooTW 


771.0 
334.8 
287.3 


50.0 
21.7 
18.6 


Murder 


0.4 




Rape 

Manslaughter 


0.4 


Auto theft 


0.4 









Table 1 also includes crime rates for the cities divided into six 
groups according to size and examination of the data indicates that 
on the whole the cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants reported 
higher crune rates than the smaller communities. 

Of the cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants, 74 reported 
separate figures for larceny according to the value of the property 
stolen. The compilation of that information is presented below: 





Larcenj 


-theft 


Population group 


$50 and over 
in value 


Under $50 
in value 


27 cities over 250,000; total population 18,590,100: 
Number of offenses known 


20, 705 
111.4 

6,116 
94.4 


122, 643 


Rate per 100,000— 


47 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population 6,480,012: 


53, 406 











The above compilation shows that the police departments of cities 
with more than 250,000 inhabitants reported a higher crime rate for 
major larcenies than the communities with from 100,000 to 250,000 
inhabitants. However, the opposite was true in the case of minor 
larcenies. 



Table 1. 



-Offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 1934; 
number and rates per 100,000, by population groups 



[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



GROUP I 

35 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 29,002,500: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000.. 



2,112 
7.3 



GROUP II 

62 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 7,235,012: 
Number of offenses known. .. 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP III 

6 cities, 60,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 5,813,182: 

Number of offenses known... 

Rate per 100,000 



145 cities, 25,000 to 50.000; total 
population, 5,030,089: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000. 



GROUP V 

411 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 6,344,045: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000.... 



GROUP VI 



656 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 3,449,304: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 



2,124 
7.3 



31, 795 
109.6 



14, 027 

48.4 



3,737 
64.3 



2,432 
48.3 



2,205 
34.8 



2,352 

46.8 



2,017 
31.8 



97, 796 
337.2 



32, 358 
447.2 



20, 467 
362.1 



16, 355 
325. 1 



15, 453 
243.6 



7,960 
230.8 



2 171, 380 
795.3 



6 64, 789 
909.1 



51, 459 
885.2 



3 77, 735 
355.8 



25, 574 
353.5 



11,091 
220.6 



37, 730 
594.7 



3,513 
101.8 



Total 1,285 cities; total pop- 
ulation, 56,874,132: 
Number of offenses 
known 

Rate per 100,000 



i 2, 987 
5.4 



190, 389 
334.8 



8 380, 212 
771.0 



142,823 
287.3 



1 The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 33 cities with a 
total population of 27,274,300. 

• The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 33 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 21,549,300. 

3 The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are based on reports of 34 cities with a total population 
of 21,848,200. 

« The number of offenses and rate for rape are based on reports of 51 cities with a total population of 
7,066,512. 

• The number of offenses and rate for larceny- theft are based on reports of 51 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 7,126,812. 

• The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,283 cities with 
a total population of 55,145,932. 

' The number of offenses and rate for rape are based on reports of 1,284 cities with a total population of 
56,705,632. 

8 The number of offenses and rate for larceny— theft are based on reports of 1,282 cities with a total pop- 
ulation of 49,312,732. 

• The number of offenses and rate for auto theft are based on reports of 1,284 cities with a total population 
of 49.719,832. 



Daily Averages, Offenses Known to the Police, 1934 

In order to indicate the monthly fluctuation in the number of 
major offenses reported during 1934, there are presented in table 2 
daily averages based on the reports received from the police depart- 
ments of 87 of the larger cities with a combined population of 
36,237,512. It should be observed that for certain offense classes, 
the averages are based on the number of reports indicated in the 
footnotes to the table. 

In general, the compilation continues to show the types of fluctua- 
tions which were observed in similar compilations for the preceding 
years. The averages for murder and aggravated assault are higher 
in the second and third quarters of the year than for the first and 
fourth periods. On the other hand, the highest averages for negligent 
manslaughter, robbery, burglary, and larceny occur in the first and 
fourth quarters of the year. 

The above statements apply to the averages for the quarterly 
periods since the figures for individual months fail to show any 
entirely regular variation. This lack of regular variation is Ukewise 
evident in the averages for auto theft, but on the whole the figures 
for the fourth quarter exceed those for other periods. 

The information appearing in the following table is also presented 
in figure 1 . 



Table 2. 



-Daily average, offenses known to the police, 87 cities over 100,000, 
January to December, inclusive, 1934 



[Total population, 36,237,512, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Censusl 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




6.7 
6.7 
7.2 
7.9 
7.2 
7.5 
9.3 
7.6 
8.0 
6.8 
6.7 
8.1 


16.7 
6.6 
5.9 
5.3 
6.1 
5.7 
5.1 
5.6 
6.2 
5.8 
7.4 
8.5 


>7.7 
6.6 
6.6 
6.8 
6.8 
7.7 
9.8 
7.6 
7.4 
7.8 
6.9 
5.8 


113.3 
112.8 
114.8 
105.7 
87.7 
82.4 
85.6 
96.4 
97.6 
96.2 
106.1 
118.3 


43.2 
42.0 
49.7 
50.8 
53.5 
56.6 
61.2 
64.1 
66.0 
46.4 
47.7 
46.1 


36l!9 
375.0 
354.5 
321.3 
322.1 
337.4 
354.0 
366.1 
358.6 
372.5 
366.7 


3 656.8 
688.8 
638.1 
636.8 

58413 
671.8 
634.1 
654.3 
731.0 
761.3 
704.7 


«298.7 




March 


292 4 


April 




May 


271.6 
271 2 


June 


July... 




August 


276 6 


September 




October 




November 


309 2 


December 








January to December.. 


7.4 


6.2 


7.0 


101.4 


60.6 


356.6 


647.0 


283.0 



1 Daily averages for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 85 cities with a total population 
Oi 34,509,312. 
s Daily averages for rape are based on reports of 86 cities with a total population of 36,069,012. 
8 DaUy averages for larceny— theft are based on reports of 84 cities with a total population of 28,676,112. 
* Daily averages for auto theft are based on reports of 86 cities with a total population of 29,083,212. 



CHART OF MONTHLY CRIME TRENDS 
FOR CITIES OF 100,000 POPULATION AND OVER 

DAILY AVERAGE 

JANUARY TO DECEMBER 1934 

87 CITIES— POPULATION 36.237.512 



uuu 














1 










800 
700 
60C 
500 
400 

300 
200 


























^LARCENY- THEFT 








- 


— — 


..^ 


~*^ 








-- 






^^^ 


— *^ 










■^^ 




















^BURGLARY- BREAKING OR ENTERING 






^ 


^— 




EFT 


^_ 






• 


— 


=- 


■ 


"~ 


UTO TH 


^"^ 











*^ 


^ ROBBERY 

f 1 1 _ 


















^ 


100 










90 
80 
70 
en 










^*«Sii 






■ 




































































_.— 






*•**— . 


— ^ 










«^ 


^ 














"^ — 


-"-" 


"- 




^ AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 












20 
10 


























^^ 


<ANS 


LAUG 


HTE 


R B' 


i NE 


:gli( 


BENC 


E 










/ ' 


1 


















R 


^ 


RAPE 






i 


y V 


^^ 








,*^ 






i^"**- 


-^_^ 






^-* 


'r^'^S, 


y 


i<:" 


^ 




' ' I^^*^ 


..... 














k«< 






K 1 , , 


^ 


""""•v 


^^^ 


^"^ ' 


' 






'^ 




^MURDER, NON- NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 




3 


























? 


























1 



























JAN FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police 1931-34 

Table 3 indicates the number of offenses reported for each of the 
years 1931 to 1934 by the police departments of 71 cities with more 
than 100,000 inhabitants with a combined population of 19,969,802. 
The data are also presented in the form of daily averages. 

The compilation discloses that the number of murders reported 
for 1934 (1,610) was substantially less than for 1933 (1,749) but was 
in excess of the figures for 1931 and 1932. The same is true with 
reference to the figures for aggravated assault. The data for robbery 
and auto theft show reductions for the entire period covered by the 
table. The robbery figures decrease from 20,765 in 1931 to 15,754 
in 1934, and the auto theft figures from 89,835 in 1931 to 66,525 in 
1934. With reference to the burglary classification, the compilation 
shows that the 1934 figure is in excess of that for 1931 but is below the 
figures for 1932 and 1933. Further examination of the compilation 
indicates with reference to larceny that there has been a very slight 
increase in 1934 as compared with 1933. The figures for both of those 
years are somewhat in excess of those for 1931 and 1932. 

It will be observed that the tabulation shows a marked decrease in 
the number of offenses of negligent manslaughter reported by the police. 
In this connection it is desired to point out that it has been learned 
that prior to 1934 many police departments included all automobile 
fatalities as cases of negligent manslaughter. With a view to ob- 
tamlng greater uniformity in the figures for that classification, it was 
recommended during 1934 that in cases where there was doubt as to 
whether the complaint shoidd be scored as groundless or as an actual 
offense, the case should be scored as baseless unless an indictment 
was returned against the driver of the automobile. Such unfounded 
or baseless complaints are not included in the tabulations appearing 
in this bulletin. It will be observed, therefore, that the marked re- 
duction in the 1934 figures for negligent manslaughter is probably the 
result of a change in the scoring procedure rather than a decrease in 
the number of such offenses. 

Table 3. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 71 cities over 100,000, 
January to December, inclusive, 1931-34 



[Total population 19,969,802 


as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 






Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

as- 
sault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
igent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of oflenses known: 
1931. 


1, 5o0 
1,606 
1,749 
1,610 

4.2 
4.4 
4.8 
4.4 


1,432 

1,132 

1,419 

966 

3.9 
3.1 
3.9 
2.6 


1,223 
1,257 
1,252 
1,303 

3.4 
3.4 
3.4 
3.6 


20, 765 
19,914 
18, 664 
15, 754 

56.9 
54.4 
51.1 
43.2 


10, 291 
9,366 
11,487 
10, 633 

2516 
31.5 
29.1 


70, 656 
76, 706 
79, 086 
74, 891 

193.6 
209.6 
216.7 
205.2 


158,712 
160, 896 
171, 434 
171, 504 

434.8 
439.6 
469.7 
469.9 


89,835 
75, 597 
72, 483 
66, 525 

246.1 
206.5 
198.6 
182.3 


1932 


1933 . 


1934 


Daily average: 
1931 


1932... 


1933.. 


1934 





8 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location 

In table 4, there is presented information regarding the number of 
police departments whose reports were employed in the compilation 
of figures representing crime rates for individual States. This in- 
formation is presented so as to show the number of such contributors, 
according to size of city, and it is believed it will be helpful in evaluat- 
ing the crime data for individual States, since table 1 has indicated 
that there is a noticeable tendency for the large cities to report 
higher crime rates than the smaller communities. It should further 
be observed that in several instances the number of reports entering 
into the construction of State rates is quite limited. In some in- 
stances the figures for individual States are based on reports from 
only 2 to 6 police departments. Obviously, the crime rates based 
on such a limited number of reports may differ considerably from 
the figures which would result if reports were available from all urban 
communities in the State, 

In table 5, there are presented the crime rates for the individual 
States, together with figures for nine geographic divisions of the 
country. 



Table 4. — Xumbcr of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to December, inclusive, 1934 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10.000 


Total 


GEOORAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 149 cities; total population, 
5,441,774 


2 
7 
9 
3 
2 
3 

3 

1 
5 


12 

8 

9 

5 

6 

2 

5 
1 
4 


10 
19 
24 

6 
10 

2 

7 
2 
6 


26 

23 

43 

10 

14 

4 

9 
4 
12 


54 

118 

93 

50 

21 

12 

18 
10 
35 


45 

146 

152 

63 

29 

6 

25 
28 
62 


149 


Middle Atlantic: 321 cities; total population, 
17.430.SS8 

East North Central: 330 cities; total popula- 
tion, 15,113.193 


321 
330 


West North Central: 137 cities; total popula- 


137 


South Atlantic: ' 82 cities; total population, 
3,763,459 _ 


83 


East South Central: 29 cities; total population, 
1,613,735 


29 


West South Central: 67 cities; total popula- 
tion, 3,116,828 


67 


Mountain: 46 cities; total population. 999.792. 
Pacific: 124 cities; total population, 5,274,547.. 


46 
124 


New England: 

Maine... 






1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
12 
4 
7 

8 
7 
8 

13 
5 

10 
7 
8 


5 
4 
2 
34 
3 
6 

41 
29 

48 

27 
11 
25 
19 
11 

9 

8 

3 

5 


6 

1 
7 
23 
4 
4 

63 
46 
37 

46 
10 
26 
56 
14 

22 
8 
9 
4 
2 
8 

10 

1 

' 7' 

5 
5 


13 








7 


Vermont 






10 




1 
1 


8 
-. 

4 
1 
3 

3 
3 
1 
2 

1 

1 


5 
2 

1 

5 
5 
9 

4 
2 
7 
8 
3 


83 


Rhode Island.- . . 


14 


Connecticut 


22 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York 


3 
2 
2 

2 


124 


New Jersey 


90 




107 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


98 




32 


Illinois 


70 


Michigan 


93 




37 


West North Central: 
Minnesota 


34 


Iowa 


3 
2 


5 
2 
1 

1 
.. 


25 


Missouri 


1 


21 


North Dakota . 


8 


South Dakota 








8 


Nebraska 




1 
2 

1 


1 


16 


Kansas . 




25 


South Atlantic: 




2 


Maryland 


1 




2 
4 
2 
2 
1 
.. 

3 


1 

5 
3 
6 


4 


Virginia 


2 


1 
2 
4 
1 
2 

1 


19 


West Virginia 




12 


North Carolina 






17 


South Carolina 






2 








3 
3 

3 
1 
1 
7 

2 
2 

7 
7 

1 
1 
2 
4 
1 


5 
6 

3 
2 
1 

1 
1 
15 

8 

4 
3 
2 
7 
1 
4 
5 
2 

3 

6 
53 


10 


Florida 




3 
2 


15 


East South Central: 


1 
1 

1 


11 




6 


Alabama 


1 


1 


6 


Mississippi 


7 


West South Central: 
Arkansas... 






1 
1 

5 


1 
2 
2 
4 

1 


5 




1 


2 

3 


7 




26 


Texas 


2 


29 


Mountain: 


6 


Idaho 








4 


Wyoming- 










4 




1 




1 


1 
1 


14 


New Mexico 


3 


Arizona . 






1 


5 


Utah 




1 


1 


" i' 

7 
4 
24 


7 


Nevada 






Pacific: 

Washington 


1 
1 
3 


2 




2 
1 

9 


15 




12 


California 


2 


6 


97 







' Includes District of Columbia. 



10 

Table 5. — Rate 'per 100,000 offenses known to the police, January to December, 
inclusive, 193 A 



Division and State 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England i 

Middle Atlantic ' 

East North Central s 

West North Central 

South Atlantic ' ^ 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mount:un 

Pacific" 



New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire- 
Vermont 

Massachusetts.. - 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut ' 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York » 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio' 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska. 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina.. 
South Carolina— 

Georgia 

Florida •».. 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 



West South Central: 

Arkansas - 

Louisiana. 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana. 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington »,_. 

Oregon 

California 12 



1.6 
4.0 
6.0 
6.1 
15.9 
27.3 
18.3 
5.8 
3.9 



3.4 
2.8 
10.2 
2.0 
4.6 
6.4 
7.7 

11.0 
5.8 
22.6 
8.1 
29.0 
24.9 
20.4 
17.7 

18.7 



32.9 
15.7 
11.6 
20.6 

4.2 
6.8 
7.7 
5.4 
8.9 
15.5 
2.3 



152.6 
83.9 
79.0 

130. 1 
82.8 

119.1 
83.2 



21.6 
156.7 
191.5 
86.6 
25.0 
29.2 



284.4 
147.4 
373.8 
353. 
438.4 
.585. 
503.5 
656.5 
568. 6 



545. 2 

343.1 

794.1 

834.0 

1,011.2 

710.0 

1, 221. 1 

1, 388. 8 

1, 192. 9 



4.0 
.6 


2.4 
1.9 
2.9 

10.4 
12.8 
4.2 



.5 
1.6 
4.0 
1.0 
1.9 

1.6 

2.7 
2.1 
5.2 
2.8 
15.1 

1.4 



9.7 
8.5 
11.4 
4.7 

15.8 
2.3 
2. 1 
6.9 






3.5 
2.2 
16.8 





5.7 



1.3 

.5.7 
3.8 
9.0 
.2 
3.8 

8.0 
5.4 
5.6 

4.9 
5.0 
4.9 
10.2 
3.5 

2.9 
2.9 
11.5 
5.0 



10.8 
4.6 
6.1 

7.6 
6.8 
3.6 

4.5 
5.4 
1.8 
2.8 

6.2 
2.3 
7.2 
6.0 

8.5 


1.9 
4.8 
2.2 
9.0 
5.6 
14.8 

1.4 
2.7 
9.4 



6.3 
6.2 
5.6 

32.4 
6.6 

35.9 

17.2 
51.8 
43.6 



101.0 
316.7 
54.0 
13.0 

94.0 

61.7 



49.1 
105.3 

27.5 
60.8 
73.4 
54.5 
76.0 
63.8 
51.6 
103.0 

172.7 
158. 



124.0 
52.2 
105. 6 

82.8 

50.7 
81.9 
32.5 

15.5. 8 
57.5 

193.3 
83.7 
80.0 

109.9 
162.8 
69. 3 



40.4 
6.2 
8.5 
17.5 
26.1 
13.0 

33.4 
52.4 
31.5 

48.6 
50.7 
49.8 
41.4 
8.1 

7.7 
12.9 
38.0 

6.0 
13.0 
22.8 



10.0 
268.2 

5.5.2 
518.5 

86.5 
108.6 
152.9 

198.0 
240.5 
118.1 
176.0 

86.4 
60.2 
49.9 
110.4 

8.5 
27.3 
17.2 
20.3 

8.9 
63.1 
33.6 
11.8 

30.4 
17.8 
30.2 



158. 6 
8.5.5 
283.1 
262. 6 
354.9 

92.8 
380.5 



354.2 
363.5 
536.1 
250.6 
153. 3 



365. 2 
303.9 
360.5 
299.0 
208.0 
493. 7 

243.7 
252.1 

535. 8 
261.8 
476.9 
401.2 
362. 4 
683.9 

705.2 
509.1 
624.7 
207.6 

462.6 
238.5 
616.3 
568.3 

362. 
352.8 
329.2 
784.3 
502.3 

■ 634'. 7 
746.3 

786.5 
826. 2 
497.6 



400.6 
209. 7 
191.6 
516.6 
725. 2 
652.2 

451.3 
437.4 
231.8 

907.5 
980.8 
531. 7 
1, 046. 2 
643.4 

463.4 
886. 

1, 058. 5 
555.2 
706.6 
750.0 

1,165.6 



404. 5 

1, 387. 3 
550.7 

2, 237! 6 

1,403.1 
1, 535. 5 

1,230.5 
379. 5 
520.7 
415.3 

988.2 

534.3 

1, 199. 8 

1,515.6 

1, 793. 
1, 301. 8 

1! 298! 3 
1, 407. 4 
1,944.5 

l!89s!4 

1, 342. 7 
1, 622. 9 
1,116.7 



J The rate for rape is based on reports of 148 cities with a total population of 5,273,274. 

« The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 320 cities, population 10,276,588. 

3 The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 329 cities with a total population of 14.814,293. 

* The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 81 cities with a total population of 3,655,259. 
« Includes report of District of Columbia. 

« The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 122 cities, population 3,546,347. 

' The rate for rape is based on reports of 21 cities. 

« The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 123 cities. 

* The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 97 cities, 
•o The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 14 cities. 

" The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 14 cities. 
" The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 96 cities. 



11 

Table 5A iacludes for the six States which are represented by the 
largest number of contributors of crime reports, the number of 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants for the cities divided into six groups 
according to size. The grouping of the cities is similar to that 
employed in table 1. Tlie number of police departments whose 
reports were employed in the compilation of each set of figures may 
be ascertained by referring to table 4. 

Table 5A. — Offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 1934; 
number per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 



State and population group 



CALIFORNIA 



Group I '. 
Group II— 
Group III. 
Group IV. 
Group V_. 
Group VI. 



Group I-.. 
Group II-- 
Group III. 
Group IV. 
Group v.. 
Group VI. 



Group I. 
Group II- 
Group Ill- 
Group IV- 
Group V.- 
Group VI- 



NEW JERSET 



NEW YORK 



Group 1 2. 
Group II— 
Group Ill- 
Group IV- 
Group V-. 
Group VI- 



Group 13.. 
Group II- 
Group Ill- 
Group IV- 
Group V_- 
Group VI- 



PENNSYtVANU 



Group I— - 
Group II-- 
Group III. 
Group IV- 
Group V-. 
Group VI- 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



16.2 
10.2 
7.1 
14.0 
12.5 
10.8 



Rape 



12.3 
5.0 
6.4 
5.2 
5.6 
5.1 



13.7 
10.9 
7.2 
3.1 
6.2 
4.9 



2.6 
5.9 
4.5 
5.1 
10.4 
5.9 



Rob- 
bery 



66.4 
42.4 
36.4 
29.5 



70.9 
44.1 



83.1 
33.1 
50.2 
26.8 
37.4 
20.6 



18.0 
21.6 
18.1 
10.6 
11.4 
7.1 



125.9 
104.9 
62.3 
55.8 
45.9 
34.0 



52.6 
41.9 
44.8 
26.1 
19.0 
40.4 



Aggra- 
vated 



37.4 
19.2 

28.8 
18.6 
14.5 
18.7 



57.8 
61.8 
24.6 
12.9 
9.5 
10.2 



82.3 
17.0 
46.6 
38.2 
34.0 
33.2 



34.4 
14.3 
13.1 



57.4 
80.7 
12.5 
36.7 
16.9 
25.9 



38.0 
14.7 
27.2 
29.4 
21.8 
30.8 



glary— 
break- 



524.1 
517.5 
508.0 
530.5 
395.7 
354.6 



213. 1 
343.8 
410.0 
269.5 
159. 5 
147.1 



569.4 
352.8 
433.8 
249.0 
218.6 
185.5 



61.3 
259.3 
205.9 
176.1 
197.4 
150.7 



407.2 
406.1 
245.2 
293.3 
253.5 
211.0 



140.0 
330.3 
191.7 
179.9 
121.6 
124.3 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



1,113.8 
1, 002. 8 
1, 506. 2 

930.4 
1, 033. 4 

960.2 



1,312.2 

1, 102. 6 

1, 127. 5 

755.6 

348.5 

260.5 



415.3 
715.9 
775.0 
258.0 
340.7 
311.6 



185.4 
409.1 
370.0 
284.5 
183.9 
184.9 



Auto 
theft 



487.5 
419.4 
418.3 
322. a 
246.2 
227. » 



229. e 
264.1 
263.0 
198.2 
103.1 
40.6 



348.4 
210.3 
198.7 
112.2 

7210 



427.5 


184.9 


512.1 


239.0 


492.9 


196.8 


716.6 


135.0 


421.5 


117.6 


219.8 


63.9 


119.6 


337.1 


975.2 


311.3 


580.4 


121.1 


770.6 


221.3 


633.3 


156.1 


328.3 


83.9 



186. 1 
239.0 
206.9 
176.2 
76.4 
77.9 



1 The rate for manslaughter by negligence is based on reports of 2 cities. 

2 The rates for larceny— theft and auto theft are based on reports of 2 cities. 

3 The rate for larceny— theft is based on reports of 4 cities. 



12 

Data for Individual Cities 

In presenting, in accordance with the recommendation of the Com- 
mittee on Uniform Crime Records of the International Association of 
Chiefs of PoHce, the number of offenses reported during the calendar 
year 1934 by the police departments of cities with more than 100,000 
inhabitants, the Federal Bureau of Investigation desires to recommend 
caution in the use of these figures for purposes of comparing the amount 
of crime in one city with the amount in other communities. It is felt 
that the proper function of the information appearing in table 6 is to 
serve as a source of information to the general public in each com- 
munity regarding the number of major offenses reported by its police 
department, and doubtless it will be found desirable to make com- 
parisons with the average figures presented in table 1. Generally 
speaking, however, it is more important to consider whether the 
amount of known crime in a given city is increasing or decreasing, in 
comparison mth prior periods, than to attempt comparisons with the 
figures for other cities. More thought should be given to the question 
whether the amount of known crime approximates a satisfactory 
standard for the individual community, considering all of the local 
factors affecting the problem, which may be operative in other com- 
munities to a greater or lesser degree. In other words, the amount of 
crime in a community depends upon a large number of factors, all of 
which should be given consideration when an analysis is being made of 
local crime problems. It should definitely be remembered that on the 
whole crime is a community problem, chargeable to the entire com- 
munity rather than to law-enforcement officials only. For this reason 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation recommends strongly against the 
use of figures appearing in the following table as the sole measure 
of the efficiency of a law-enforcement organization. 

With reference to the figures for manslaughter by negligence, it is 
desired to point out that during 1934 the Committee on Uniform Crime 
Records of the International Association of Chiefs of Police recom- 
mended that in connection with reports of negligent manslaughter 
which the police had difficulty in scoring as unfotinded complaints or 
as actual offenses, it would be acceptable to score as unfounded those 
cases of automobile fatalities in which the driver of the automobile was 
not indicted, and to score as actual offenses cases in which indictments 
were returned. This recommendation was made because prior thereto 
apparently there had been considerable lack of uniformity in scoring 
complaints based upon automobile fatalities. Nevertheless, examina- 
tion of the figures in table 6, representing negligent manslaughters, 
will indicate in some instances the probability that the figures include 
all cases of automobile fatahties. It has, however, been thought 
desirable to pubhsh the figures as reported by individual police 
departments. 

In examining a compilation of crime figures for individual com- 
munities, it should be borne in mind that in view of the fact that the 
data are compiled by different record departments, operating under 
separate and distinct administrative systems, it is entirely possible 
there may be variations in the practices employed in classifying com- 
plaints of offenses. On the other hand, the crime reporting manual 
has been distributed to all contributors of crime reports, and the 
figures received are included in this bulletin only if they are apparently 
compiled in accordance with the provisions of the manual and the 
individual department has so indicated. 



13 



Table 6. — Number of o 



known to the police, January to December, 
inclusive, 1934 



City 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 



ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Eape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Akron, Ohio 

Albany, N. Y 

Baltimore, Md 

Birmingham, Ala 

Boston, Mass 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Cambridge, Mass 

Canton, Ohio 

Chicago, lU... 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Columbus, Ohio 

DaUas, Tex... 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Colo 

Des Moines, Iowa... 

Detroit, Mich 

Duluth, Minn.- 

Elizabeth, N. J 

El Paso, Tex 

Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Ind 

Fall River, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Gary, Ind - 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

Hartford, Conn 

Houston, Tex 

Indianapolis, Ind 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Jersey City, N. J 

Kansas City, Kans.- 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Long Beach, Calif... 
Los .\ngeles, Calif. — 

Louisville, Ky 

Lowell, Mass 

Lynn, Mass... 

Memphis, Tenn 

Miami, Fla 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn 

Nashville, Tenn 

Newark, N. J 

New Bedford, Mass... 

New Haven, Conn 

New Orleans, La 

New York, N. Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Oakland, Calif 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Peoria, 111 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Portland, Oreg.. 

Providence, R. I 

Reading, Pa. 

Richmond, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

Salt Lake City, Utah.. 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. . . 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash 

Somerville, Mass 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield, Mass 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



29 
25 
25 
10 
7 
15 
7 
228 
1 
7 
15 
1 
11 
13 
24 
4 
6 
4 
13 

35 
11 

1 

11 
12 

5 

7 
228 
18 
10 

6 
17 



529 
212 
473 
90 
165 
62 
139 
14,444 
298 

1,473 
549 
208 
187 
646 
118 

1.182 



13 
121 

40 
161 
134 

29 

82 
430 
656 
301 

73 
319 

44 

117 

1,413 

629 

23 

47 
548 
128 

65 
672 
279 
564 

19 

62 
168 
1,250 
139 
252 
240 
153 

46 
665 



2,117 
411 
253 
233 
476 
185 
61 
15 



72 
34 
317 
444 
18 
22 
180 
2,409 
319 
141 



1,063 

359 

2,119 

2,076 

1,807 

758 

898 

393 

766 

22, 606 

1,206 

3,312 

2,231 

1,667 

627 

2,845 

767 

3,651 

334 

416 

465 

484 

316 

487 

658 

281 

1,227 

306 

611 

792 

2,770 

2,314 

943 

301 

876 

646 

1,163 

8,247 

2,880 

178 

438 

1,491 

1,121 

842 

1,914 

638 

4,066 

526 

684 

815 

3,099 

1,081 

1,447 

803 

407 

136 

2,762 

1,028 

3,036 

942 

333 

1,281 

964 

2,041 

1,682 

988 

1,615 

478 

2,392 

420 

3,518 

276 

1,028 

347 

676 



101 
248 
90 
(') 
4,291 
591 



156 
61 
78 
41 
78 

202 

676 
2,047 

463 
61 
(') 
90 

151 
2,716 

690 
20 
94 

8 

411 
196 
392 

(') 
75 
210 

0) 

Q) 
63 
244 

(>) 
116 



746 
197 
54 
402 
158 
(') 
239 



126 
(') 
80 
621 
42 
332 
123 
(') 



1,386 

561 

2,949 

794 

3,516 

753 

1,634 

490 

1,023 

14,400 

3,703 

11,638 

3,095 

6,611 

2,648 

3,471 

1,881 

20,968 

1,144 

750 

846 

397 

1,078 

331 

2,104 

1,066 

2,495 

368 

1,411 

1,708 

6,568 

4,737 

2,378 

114 

976 

171 

1,821 

11, 826 

3,788 

251 

912 

544 

3,968 
490 



252 
2,464 



1,884 
9,158 

ll415 
2,741 

992 
7,248 

374 
3,161 

322 
2,152 

912 
1,614 



• Larcenies not separately reported. 
'Not reported. 



Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



14 



Table 6. — -Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, 
inclusive, 1934 — Continued 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 




City 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Acto 
theft 


Tacoma, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 


2 
13 
18 
19 

62 
1 
6 

12 
1 
2 

15 


5 
5 

10 
6 
2 

39 


6 

30 

10 
6 

17 
6 
5 
2 
5 

15 
5 


72 
43 
289 
179 
29 

49 
43 
29 
23 

186 


4 
170 
103 
109 
13 
240 
17 
35 
51 
6 
51 
125 


730 

344 

1,318 

1,558 

300 

2,636 

235 

566 

260 

668 

188 

590 


42 
54 
457 
303 
60 
1,182 
89 
64 
96 
175 
21 
36 


1,062 
989 
(2) 

2,174 
608 

4,674 
366 

2,237 
654 
231 
142 

1,075 


488 
235 




1,340 


Tulsa, Okla 


461 


Utica, N. Y 

Washington, D. C 

Waterbury, Conn 

Wichita, Kans 


200 

3,245 

480 

179 


Wilmington, Del _ 


3 


263 
762 


Yonkers, N. Y 

Youngstown, Ohio 


13 

4 


103 
511 



1 Larcenies not separately reported. 
' Not reported. 



Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



Offenses Known to Sheriffs, State Police, and Other Rural Officers, 1934 

Due to the numerous difi&culties connected with obtaining accurate 
figures regarding the population area covered by crime reports re- 
ceived from officers poKcing rural territory, it has not been considered 
practicable to attempt to present crime rates for rural areas. How- 
ever, there is shown in the following table available information 
regarding the number of known offenses as reported by 53 sheriffs, 
7 State police units, and 86 law enforcement agencies in villages 
which are classed as rural in character by the Bureau of the Census. 
During the latter part of 1934, the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
initiated a movement to obtain crime reports from the majority of 
sheriffs throughout the country, and it is anticipated that during 1935 
it will be possible to present information regarding the number of 
known offenses for a much larger portion of the rural territory in the 
United States. 

Table 7. — Offenses known, January to December 1934, inclusive, as reported by 
53 sheriffs, 7 State police units, and 86 village officers 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auta 
theft 


Offenses known 


97 


129 


237 


478 


452 


3,765 


7,566 


2,895. 







15 



Offenses Known in Possessions of the United States 

The system of uniform crime reporting provides for the collection 
of data from law enforcement agencies in the various possessions of 
the United States, and there is presented in table 8 available informa- 
tion regarding the number of offenses known to the police in Hawaii 
County, Honolulu (city and county), Territory of Hawaii; the Canal 
Zone; and Puerto Rico. The figures are based on both urban and 
rural areas and the population figures from the 1930 decennial census 
are indicated in the table. 

In connection with the figures presented for the Canal Zone, it 
should be stated that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been 
advised that less than one-third of the persons arrested for offenses 
committed in the Canal Zone are residents thereof. It appears, there- 
fore, that a large proportion of the crime committed in the Canal Zone 
is attributed to transients and persons from neighboring communities. 

Table 8. — Offenses known in United States possessions, January to December 1934 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

&- 
ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 




Jurisdiction reporting 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
Slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Over 

$50 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Hawaii: 

Hawaii County, 
population, 73,325; 
number of offenses 
known 


2 

11 

4 
227 


1 

15 

3 
107 


5 

18 

3 
52 


27 

5 
36 


6 

75 

10 

1,867 


29 

790 

72 
734 


4 

122 

17 
75 


124 

1,834 

205 
3,448 


11 


Honolulu, city and 
county, popula- 
tion, 202,923; num- 
ber of offenses 
known 


228 


Isthmus of Panama: 
Canal Zone, popula- 
tion, 39,467; number of 
offenses known 

Puerto Rico: Popula- 
tion, 1,543,913; number 
of offenses known 


36 
73 



Offenses of Robbery and Burglary, 1930-34 

In order to make possible comparisons with the data for prior 
periods, there are presented in table 9 figures showing the number 
of offenses of robbery reported for the years 1930 to 1934 by the 
pohce departments of 583 cities with an aggregate population of 
32,174,189. To facilitate comparisons from month to month the 
figures are presented in the form of daily averages. 

The figures for each year reveal a distinct seasonal variation in the 
number of robberies committed, the high points occurring in the 
first and fourth quarters of the year. The compilation discloses a 
substantial increase from 90.3 in 1930 to 108.8 m 1931. The daily 
averages for the next 3 years are 110.2, 101.1, and 91.1 respectively. 
The percentage of increase from 1930 to 1931 is 20.5, and this is 
followed by an increase of 1.3 percent during the next year. How- 
ever, the 1933 average shows a decrease of 8.3 percent from the 1932 
figure, and in 1934 the decrease in comparison with the preceding 
year is 9.9 percent. With reference to the large increase indicated 
by the average for 1931, it is desired to point out that the compila- 
tion of uniform crime reports was begun in 1930, and it is possible 



16 

that a portion of the increase disclosed during 1931 is due to more 
complete reporting. 

Table 9 also includes separate averages for the cities with more 
than 100,000 inhabitants and for the smaller communities. The 
averages for the 61 cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants show 
substantially the same variations as are shown by the figures referred 
to in the preceding paragraph. However, the data for the smaller 
communities show an increase of only 4.2 percent in 1931, which is 
followed by substantial decreases in 1932 (10.3 percent) and 1934 
(15.8 percent). The average for 1933 shows a decrease of 3.2 percent, 
as compared with 1932. 

The data appearing in table 9 are presented graphically in figure 2. 

In table 10 there is presented a compilation of burglary data for the 
period 1930 to 1934. The cities whose reports were employed are the 
same as those used in compiling data for table 9. For the total of 583 
cities included in this compilation, the daily average number of bur- 
glaries increased from 243.2 in 1930 to 306.6 in 1931. The daily 
average for 1932 was 344.7, an increase of 38.1 (12.4 percent) over the 
preceding year. In 1933 there was a decrease amounting to 3.3 per- 
cent, which was followed by a slight increase (0.2 percent) in 1934. 
It is desired to point out here, as was done in connection with the 
robbery compilation, that part of the increase shown during 1931 may 
be due to more complete reporting, since 1930 was the first year in 
which uniform crime reports were compiled. 

The averages for the 61 cities udth more than 100,000 inhabitants 
show variations, which foUow closely the increases and decreases 
shown by the averages^^for the total of 583 cities. The same is true 
with reference to the figures for the smaller communities, except that 
the increase in 1931 was smaller (19.1 percent) and the decrease in 
1933 was slightly larger (4.8 percent). 

The burglary averages likewise show for each year a seasonal trend, 
with the high points generally appearing in the first and fourth quarters. 
However, this tendency is much less marked than in the case of the 
robbery figures. 

The daily averages appearing in table 10 are also presented graph- 
ically in figure 3. 



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20 

DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

During the calendar year 1934 the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
examined 343,582 arrest records, as disclosed by fingerprint cards 
received from law enforcement officials throughout the United States, 
and obtained considerable significant information regarding the age, 
sex, race, and previous criminal history of the individuals represented. 
The total number of fingerprint cards received during the year was, of 
course, much larger than the above figure, but this compilation has 
been limited to instances of arrests for violations of State laws and 
municipal ordinances. In other words, fingerprint cards representing 
arrests for violations of Federal laws or representing commitments to 
penal institutions have been excluded from this compilation. 

The tabulation of data from fingerprint records obviously does not 
include all persons arrested, since there are individuals taken into 
custody for whom no fingerprint cards are forwarded to Washington. 
Furthermore, data pertaining to persons arrested should not be treated 
as information regarding the number of offenses committed, since 
two or more persons may be involved in the joint commission of a 
single offense, and on the other hand one person may be arrested 
and charged with the commission of several separate offenses. 

During the year there were 6,636 persons arrested and charged 
with criminal homicide. In addition, the following serious offenses 
were among those charged: Robbery, 14,377 ; assault, 25,902 ; burglary, 
30,894; larceny, 47,450; auto theft, 11,071; embezzlement and fraud, 
9,576; weapons (carrying, possessing, etc.), 6,191. The compilation 
discloses that 42,332 persons were arrested on suspicion, 24,142 for 
vagrancy, 27,285 because of drunkenness and 15,852 for disorderly 
conduct. In addition, 4,501 were arrested because of violation of 
traffic and motor veliicle regulations. This makes a total of 114,112 
cases in which the charges were minor in character. The remaining 
229,470 cases represent instances in which the persons arrested were 
charged with substantial offenses against the person, property, or 
society. 

Females were represented by 23,645 (6.9 percent) of the records 
examined. They were most frequently arrested on the following 
charges: Larceny, 4,014; prostitution and commercialized vice, 3,022; 
assault, 1,994; vagrancy, 1,858; disorderly conduct, 1,472; drunken- 
ness, 1,343. In addition, 566 females were charged with criminal 
homicide and 614 with robbery. 



21 



Table 11. — Distribution of arrests by sex, Jan. l~Dec. 31, 1934 



Offense charged 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 




6,636 
14, 377 
25,902 
30. 894 
47, 450 
11,071 
9,676 
3,429 
4,718 
4,399 
4,536 
5,108 
3,918 
6,191 
3,772 
8,493 
8,657 
1,567 
20 
2,914 
15,852 
27,285 
24,142 
4,559 
42, 332 
4,615 
21, 169 


6,070 
13, 763 
23, 908 
30, 378 
43, 436 

9,' 034 
3,164 
4,342 
4,399 
1,514 
4,304 
3,440 
6,032 
3,630 
7,674 
8,455 
1,545 
20 
2,858 
14, 380 
25, 942 
22,284 
4,440 
39,641 
4,335 
20, 083 


666 
614 

1,994 
516 

4,014 
205 
642 
265 
376 


1.9 
4.2 
7.5 
9.0 

13.9 
3.2 
2.8 
1.0 
1.4 
1.3 
1.3 
1.5 
1.1 
1.8 
1.1 
2.5 
2.5 
.5 

(■) 
.8 
4.6 
7.9 
7.0 
1.3 

12.4 
1.3 
6.2 


1.9 
4.3 
7.5 
9.6 

13.5 
3.4 
2.8 
1.0 
1.4 
1.4 
.5 
1.3 
1.1 
1.9 
1.1 
2.4 
2.6 
.5 

(') 
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4.5 
8.1 
7.0 
1.4 

12.4 
1.4 
6.2 




Robbery 


2 6 










Larceny — theft 


16 9 










Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessmg 

Forgery and counterfeiting ^ 


1.1 
1.6 


Prostitution and commercialized vice -. . - 


3,022 
804 
478 
159 
142 
819 
202 
22 


12 8 


Other sex offenses 


3 4 






Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 


7 


Ofreris*»s f cBJrist ffvniily ard children 


e 






Driving while intoxicated - - - 


9 


Road and driving laws 


\ 






Ot.hflr traffic AnH mntfir vphidp Ifvws 


56 
1,472 
1,343 
1,858 

119 
2,691 

280 
1,086 


2 


Disorderly conduct 


6 2 






Vagrancy . 


7 8 


Gambling 


5 






Not stated 


1 2 










Total 


343, 582 


319,937 


23, 645 


100.0 


100.0 


100 







' Less than Ho of 1 percent. 



Examination of the persons arrested, distributed according to age 
groups, indicates a rapid increase from age 15 to age 19, the figures 
being as follows: 

. Number 

Age: arrested 

15 1,512 

16 6,046 

17 10,318 

18 15, 174 

19 17,304 

For ages from 20 to 24 the number arrested for a single group varies 
from 14,514 to 15,939. The compilation discloses there were 51,824 
(15.1 percent) under 20 years of age, 77,086 (22.4 percent) between the 
ages of 20 and 24, and 62,409 (18.2 percent) between 25 and 29 years 
of age. This makes a total of 191,319 (55.7 percent) less than 30 years 
old. 

As has been indicated by the preceding figures, the number of 
19-year-old persons arrested exceeded the number for any other 
single age group. A large proportion of them were charged with 
major crimes, as indicated by the following figures: 

Criminal homicide 219 

Robbery 1, 086 

Assault 780 

Burglary 2,411 

Larceny 2, 940 

Auto theft 1, 145 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 259 



22 

The age distribution of males arrested was substantially the same- 
as that for all persons represented in the compilation. However^ 
for females it appears the largest number of arrests occurred at age 23. 
There is a smaller proportion of females under 20 years of age, with 
corresponding increases in the proportions between the ages of 20 and 
24, and 25 and 29. The percentages are 12.8, 29.8, and 21.9, respec- 
tively. This makes a total of 64.5 percent of the females arrested who 
were less than 30 years of age, as compared with 55.7 percent for all 
persons represented in this compilation. 



23 






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24 



More than 35 percent (120,883) of the persons whose arrest records 
were examined during the year had previous fingerprint cards on file in 
the Identification Unit of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. In 
addition, there were 6,975 cases in which the current arrest records 
bore notations indicating that the persons had been previously ar- 
rested, making a total of 127,858 cases in which there was available 
some information regarding the previous criminal histories of the per- 
sons involved. In 85,351 cases the records disclosed previous con- 
victions. This constitutes 66.8 percent of the records containing any 
information regarding prior criminal histories and 24.8 percent of the 
total arrest records examined during the year. A large proportion of 



NUMBER OF PERSONS ARRES 
AGES 16 TO 24 

DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT 
JANUARY 1- DECEMBER 31, 193 


TED 

CARDS 
4 

6.046 
10,318 
15,174 
17034 
14,514 
15,809 
15,939 
15606 
15218 


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Figure 4 

the convictions were for major offenses, as is indicated by the folIo\ving 
figures: 

Criminal homicide 909 

Robbery 4, 394 

Assault 4, 184 

Burglary 11, 557 

Larceny 17, 634 

Auto theft 3, 499 

Embezzlement and fraud 2, 685 

Stolen property (receiving, etc.) 559 

Forgery and counterfeiting 3, 079 

Rape 631 

Drug laws 2, 427 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 1, 274 

Driving while intoxicated 1, 084 

Total.. 53, 916 



25 

In many instances the individuals whose records disclosed previous 
convictions were currently charged wath serious crimes. To illustrate, 
of the 909 persons previously convicted of criminal homicide, the 
following charges were currently placed against them: 

Criminal homicide 30 

Robbery 59 

Assault 112 

Burglary 42 

Larceny (and related offenses) 134 

Forgery and counterfeiting 6 

Rape 9 

Drug laws 5 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 35 

Driving while intoxicated 10 

Total 442 

Complete data as to the current charges placed against individuals 
with previous convictions may be found in the following table: 



Table 13. 



-Numher with previous fingerprint records, 
Jan. 1-Dec. 81, 1934 



arrests — -male and female — 



Offense charged 


Total 


Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 


Offense charged 


Total 


Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 




6,636 
14,377 
25, 902 
30, 894 
47, 450 
11,071 

9,576 

3,429 
4,718 
4,399 

4,536 
5,108 
3,918 

6,191 


1,322 
6,312 
7,479 
11, 492 
17, 577 
3,792 
4,005 

851 

1, 965 

971 

1,572 
1,226 
2,353 

1,818 


Offenses against family and chil- 


3,772 
8,493 
8,657 
1,567 
20 

2,914 
15, 852 
27, 285 
24, 142 

4,559 
42, 332 

4,615 
21, 169 






889 


Assault 


Liquor laws 


2,342 


Burglary— breaking or entering.. 
Larceny — theft 


Driving while intoxicated- 

Road and driving laws 


1,72a 
324 


Auto theft 


Parking violations 


6 


Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 


other traffic and motor vehicle 
laws 


790 


ins. Dossessine 


Disorderly conduct 


5,736 






9,411 






10, 775 


Prostitution and commercialized 


Gambling 


1,065 






16,342 


Other sex offenses 


Not stated 


1,746 


Narcotic drug laws 


All other offenses 


7,002 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc 


Total 




343, 582 


120,883 









Table 14. 



-Percentage with previous fingerprint records, arrests — male and female 
Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 



Offense 


Percent 


Offense 


Percent 


Narcotic drug laws 


60.1 
44.6 
43.9 
41.8 
41.6 
38.6 
37.2 
37.0 
36.2 
34.7 
34.5 
34.3 
30.1 
30.0 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Assault 


29 4 


Vagrancy 


28 9 


Robbery 




27.6 


Embezzlement and fraud 


Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 


27.1 








24.8 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


Other sex offenses 


24 Q 




Offenses against family and children 

Gambling 




Disorderly conduct 


2.3.4 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


Rape 


22.1 






20.7 


Auto theft - 


Driving while intoxicated 


19.9 


All other offenses- 


Criminal homicide 


19 9 


Parking violations 











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26 



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28 

Further examination of the data relative to the previous criminal 
histories of persons arrested indicates that 2,597 of them were on 
parole at the time. In addition, there were 7,696 cases in which the 
current arrests occurred prior to the expiration of sentences previously- 
imposed, although there was no affirmative showing of parole. This 
makes a total of 10,293 arrests prior to the expiration of previous 
sentences, which constitutes 12.1 percent of the 85,351 previous 
convictions disclosed by the records and 3.0 percent of the 343,582 
arrest records examined during the year. The following current 
charges were among those placed against persons arrested while on 
parole: 

Criminal homicide 14 

Robbery 126 

Assault 86 

Burglary 240 

Larceny (and related offenses) 384 

Forgery and counterfeiting 45 

Rape 16 

Drug laws 16 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 33 

The data compiled relative to the 10,293 persons arrested before 
the expiration of previous sentences discloses that 8,947 of them' were 
previously convicted of the following offenses: 

Criminal homicide 380 

Robbery 1,788 

Assault 353 

Burlgary 2, 798 

Larceny (and related offenses) 2, 610 

Forgery and counterfeiting 606 

Rape 155 

Drug laws 151 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 76 

Driving while intoxicated 30 

Of the 23,645 females arrested, only 22.2 percent had previous 
finger print cards on file, as compared with 35.2 percent for all persons 
involved in the compilation. Similarly, females numbered only 3.8 
percent of the 85,351 previous convictions foimd in the records, 
although they constituted 6.9 percent of the total persons whose arrest 
records were examined during the year. Further, females nurnbered 
only 1.9 percent of the 10,293 persons arrested prior to the expiration 
of sentences previously imposed. 



29 

Table 16. — Arrests occurring before expiration of a prior sentence, including persons 
on parole at time of current arrest — male and female — Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1934 



Offense charged 



Current 

arrest in 

period of 

parole 



Current 
arrest in 
period of 
previous 
sentence 



Criminal homicide - 

Robbery - 

Assault - -- 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft - 

Autotheft- -- 

Embezzlement and fraud -- 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape. 



Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Other sex offenses -- 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, posse-ssing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. . 

Liquor laws — 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness -. 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Total. 



7 

194 

40 

1,060 

2,597 



106 
770 
308 
1,160 
1,022 
418 
213 
62 



243 
477 
27 
1,214 
168 
479 



120 
896 
394 
1,400 
1,245 
524 
259 
71 
250 
79 
41 
57 
80 
211 
29 
115 



325 
327 

565 

34 

1,408 

208 
1,539 

10, 293 



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32 



Whites were represented by 247,753 of the arrest records examined 
during the year and Negroes by 80,618. The remaining races were 
represented as follows: Indian, 1,233; Chinese, 1,040; Japanese, 176; 
Mexican, 10,418; all others, 2,344, For comparative purposes, it is 
believed best to present the number of persons arrested of each race 
group in proportion to the number in the general population of the 
country, and in the attached tables there is presented in such terms the 
number of native whites, foreign-born whites, and Negroes arrested. 
The compilation shows that of each 100,000 foreign-bom whites in 
the general population of the country, 203.2 were arrested during the 
year. The corresponding figure for native whites is 325.2, and for 
Negroes is 1,002.6. It will be observed that the proportionate number 
of native whites arrested is 60 percent greater than that for foreign- 
born whites. Similarly, the number of Negroes is more than three 
times as great as the number of native whites. It should be observed 
in connection with the foregoing data that the figure for native whites 
includes the immediate descendants of foreign-born individuals. 



Table 18.- 



•Distribution of arrests according to race — male and female — Jan. 1- 
Dec. SI, 1934 





Race 


Total 


Offense charged 


White 


Negro 


In- 
dian 


Chi- 
nese 


Jap- 
anese 


Mex- 
ican 


AU 
Others 


aU 

races 




4.255 
10, 567 
14,513 
22, 507 
32, 781 
9.242 
8.520 

2.622 
4.280 
3,304 

3,296 
4,151 
2,327 
3,564 
3,241 
5.808 
7.468 
1.065 
9 
2.040 
10, 799 
21, 049 
17. 787 
2,506 
30, 251 
3.669 
16. 132 


2,150 

3.357 
10. 167 

7.324 
12. 674 

1,534 
936 

726 
350 
829 

1,138 

800 

611 

2,278 

397 

2,464 

646 

383 

8 

675 

4,189 

4,442 

4.830 

1.894 

10. 751 

784 

4,381 


29 
31 
84 
81 
151 
31 
18 

1 

16 
28 

13 
16 
13 
11 
5 
54 
54 
14 


10 

8 
33 
14 
24 
4 
3 

4 

13' 

16 

9 

621 

27 
2 
9 


3 
3 

17 
6 
9 
1 

10 

1 
7 

1 

6 
2 

13 
4 
3 
3 

12 
3 


154 
278 
822 
829 
1.607 
248 
48 

65 
40 
165 

50 

323 
204 

94 
125 
445 

76 

2 

143 

630 

1.484 

1,140 

23 
830 

92 
413 


35 
133 
266 
133 
204 
11 
41 

10 
25 
59 

17 
42 

110 

103 
30 
30 
32 
26 
1 
40 

130 
59 

249 
47 

301 
33 

177 




Robbery 


14 377 




25. 902 


Burglary— breaking or entering 


30,894 
47. 450 






Embezzlement and fraud - 


9.576 
3,429 


Stolen property; buying, receiving. 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


4,718 




4,399 


Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 


4,536 


Other sex oSenses 


6,103 


Narcotic drug laws 


3.918 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc- 
Senses against fivmily and children - 


6.191 
3.772 
8,493 




8,657 


Road and driving laws 


1,567 




20 


Other traffic and motor vehicle laws- 
Disorderly conduct 


9 
85 
217 
83 

""124' 
25 
40 


3 
13 

9 
49 
76 
67 
11 
15 


4 

6 
25 

4 
13 

8 

1} 


2,914 

15,852 




27.285 


Vagrancy - 


24.142 




4.559 




42, 332 


Not stated -- 


4.616 


All other offenses 


21, 169 






Total - 


247, 753 


80. 618 


1,233 


1.040 


176 


10, 418 


2,344 


343,582 







33 



Table 19. — Number of arrests of negroes and whites in proportion to the number of 
each in the general population of the country — male and female — Jan. 1-Dec. 
SI, 19S4 

[Rate per 100,000 of population, excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 


Native 
White 


Foreign- 
born 
White 


Negro 




4.9 
14.0 
16.0 
31.0 
43.7 
13.2 
11.4 
3.0 
5.6 
4.2 
4.7 
6 1 
3.2 
4.2 
4.0 
6.7 
9.9 
1.5 
0) 
2.6 
13.6 
28.7 
24.5 
3.0 
40.8 
4.9 
20.8 


6.0 
4.7 

26.1 
9.7 

23.3 
2.4 
6.6 
4.4 
3.0 
2.9 
1.8 
4 8 
1.1 
5.3 
4.2 

10.0 
5.0 
.7 

0) 

1.7 

15.' 7 
10.5 

3.7 
19.9 

2.5 
15.2 


26.7 


Robbery 


41.7 


Assault 


126 4 




91.1 






Auto theft 


19 1 




11.6 






Forgery and counterfeiting . . 


4 4 


Rape 


10 3 






Other sex offenses . 


99 


Narcotic drug laws 


6 4 




28.3 


OfTenses af^ainst family and ohildreTi , ... 


4 9 


Liquor laws 


30 6 




8.0 


Road and driving laws ..... 


4.8 


Parking violations 


1 




8.4 


Disorderly conduct 


52 1 


Drunkenness .. 


55 2 






Gambling 


23.6 


Suspicion... 


133 7 


Not stated 


9.8 


All other offenses 


54 5 






Total 


325.2 


203.2 


1,002.6 





' Less than Mo of 1 per 100,000. 

At the end of December 1934 there were 4,696,756 fingerprint 
records and 5,824,448 index cards containing names or aUases of indi- 
viduals with records on file in the Federal Bureau of Investigation at 
Washington. Of each 100 fingerprint cards received during 1934 
more than 46 were identified with data in the files of the Bureau. 
During the same period, 4,231 fugitives from justice were identified 
through fingerprint records and information as to the whereabouts of 
those fugitives was immediately transmitted to the law enforcement 
officers or agencies desiring to apprehend them. 

The number of poHce departments, peace officers, and law enforce- 
ment agencies throughout the United States and foreign countries 
voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the Bureau at the end of 
December totaled 7,220. 

o 




3 9999 06351 988 6 



MN 29 



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