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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume VIII— Number 3 
THIRD QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1937 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON: 1937 



-JPtRiNTtND?' 



'"" ~ 1~ '-.r'i Itl - K-r 



ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE ON UNIFORM CRIME RECORDS 

OF THE 

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CHIEFS OF POLICE 

(n) 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 
U. S. Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume 8 October 1937 Number 3 



CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population (table 
59). 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1937 (table 60). 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1931-37 (table 61). 

Offenses known to the police— cities divided according to location (tables 
62, 63). 

Data for individual cities over 100,000 in population (table 64). 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police (table 65). 

Offenses known in the possessions (table 66). 

Data from supplementary offense reports (tables 67-69). 

Offenses known to the police, 1930-35, cities 25,000 to 100,000 (table 70). 
Annual returns: 

Offenses known, offenses cleared and persons charged — cities divided 
according to location and population (tables 71-90). 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1937: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested (table 91). 

Age distribution of persons arrested (tables 92, 93). 

Number and percentage with previous fingerprint records (tables 94, 95). 

Number with records showing previous convictions (tables 96, 97). 

Race distribution of persons arrested (tables 98-101). 

Classification of Offenses. 

The term "offenses known to the poHce" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the poUce jurisdiction, whether they become known to 
the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting 
or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following 
group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (6) 
manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are reported 
as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted burglary or 
robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 
Complaints which upon investigation are learned to be groundless are 
not included in the tabulations which follow. 

(107) 



108 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths, (b) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, robbery 
armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids. Does not 
include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value, (b) 
Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, 
passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unau- 
thorized use by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of crime 
and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area. 

In the table which follows there is shown the number of police 
departments from which one or more crime reports have been received 
during the first 9 months of 1937. Information is presented for the 
cities divided according to size. The population figures employed are 
estimates as of July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census for cities 
with population in excess of 10,000. No estimates were available, 
however, for those with a smaller number of inhabitants and, accord- 
ingly, for them the figures listed in the 1930 decennial census were 
used. 

The growth in the crime-reporting area is evidenced by the follow- 
ing figures for the first 9 months of 1932-37: 



Year 


Cities 


Population 


Year 


Cities 


Population 


1932 


1,546 
1,638 
1,727 


52, 802, 362 
62,041,342 
62, 391, 056 


1935 


2,050 
2,271 
2,358 


64, 012, 959 


1933 


1936 


65, 319, 548 


1934 


1937 


65,811,861 









The foregoing comparison shows that during the first 9 months of 
1937 there was an increase of 87 cities as compared with the corre- 



109 

sponding period of 1936, the population represented for those cities 
being 492,313. 

In addition to the 2,358 city and viHage police departments which 
submitted crime reports during 1937, one or more reports were re- 
ceived during that period from 1,182 sheriffs and State police organi- 
zations and from 8 agencies in possessions of the United States. This 
makes a grand total of 3,548 agencies contributing crime reports 
during 1937. 



Population group 


Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total popu- 
lation 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total -. 


983 


887 


90.2 


60, 281, 688 


58, 314, 632 


96.7 


1. Cities over 250,000 


37 

57 

104 

191 

594 


37 

57 

101 

173 

519 


100.0 

100.0 

97.1 

90.6 

87.4 


29, 695, 500 
7, 850, 312 
6, 980, 407 
6, 638, 544 
9,116,925 


29, 695, 500 
7,850,312 
6, 773, 170 
5, 986, 591 
8, 009, 059 


100 


2. Cities 100,000 to 250,000.. 


100 


3. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


97 


4. Cities 25,000 to 50,000. 


90 2 


5. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


87 8 







Note. — The above table does not include 1,471 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population 
of 7,497,229. The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns whereas 
the rural townships are of varying population groups. 



MONTHLY RETURNS 



Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population. 

There is presented in table 59 the number of ofl'enses reported as 
committed during the first 9 months of 1937 by pohce departments 
in 1,759 cities with an aggregate population of 59,420,889. The data 
are also presented in the form of crime rates for cities divided according 
to size, in order that interested individuals may readily compare the 
crime rates of their communities with the average figures for cities of 
approximately the same size. 

The compilation shows generally that there is a tendency for the 
larger cities to report higher crime rates than the smaller communities. 
This tendency is in line with the data published for prior years. For 
offenses of robbery and auto theft, the crime rates vary directly in 
accordance with the size of city. 

More than one-half (53.6 percent) of the crimes reported were 
larcenies, while other offenses against property, consisting of 41.6 
percent of the total crimes reported, were as follows: Burglary, 22.7 
percent; auto theft, 15.1 percent; and robbery, 3.8 percent. It should 
be noted that although robberies represented only 3.8 percent of the 
total, there were 23,766 such crimes reported by contributing police 
departments. The remaining 4.8 percent of crimes consisted of 
felonious assaults, rapes, negligent manslaughters, and murders. The 
amount of each type of crime is indicated in the following percentage 
distribution: 



Offense 



Total. 

Larceny 

Burglary. __ 
Auto theft-- 



Rate per 
100,000 


Percent 


1, 045. 9 


100.0 


559.9 
237.4 
157.9 


53.6 
22.7 
15.1 



Offense 



Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Rape 

Murder 

Manslaughter 



Rate per 
100,000 



40.0 

35.5 

6.5 

4.6 

4.1 



Percent 



3.8 

.3.4 

.6 

.4 

.4 



More detailed information concerning the nature of the criminal 
act, time and place of commission and value of property stolen may 
be found in tables 67, 68, and 69, 

Most of the police departments forwarding crime reports to the 
FBI divided offenses of larceny into two groups, those in which the 
value of property stolen was $50 or more and those in which the value 
was less than $50. Of the cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants, 
84 reported larceny data classified in accordance with the foregoing, 
and a separate compilation of that information is presented below: 





Larceny 


—theft 


Population group 


$50 and over 
in value 


Under $50 
in value 


31 cities over 250,000; total population, 19,505,100: 

Number of offenses known . _ 


15, 308 
78.5 

5,191 
71.0 


99, 782 


Rate per 100,000. 


511.6 


53 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total population, 7,315,212: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 


43, 705 
597.5 







Of the 163,986 larcenies classified according to the value of property 
stolen, 20,499 (12.5 percent) were cases in which the value of the 
property exceeded $50. 

(110) 



Ill 



Table 59. — Offenses known to the police, January to September, inclusive, 1937 
number and rates per 100,000, by population groups 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Population group 



Group i 

35 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 28,558,500: 

Number of offenses known 

Kate per 100,000. 



ORorp II 

56 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 7,702,312: 

N'umber of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Group hi 

87 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation, 5,891,123: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Oeoup IV 

149 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popu- 
lation, 5.168,124: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000. ._ 



Group v 

439 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,811,861: 

Numberiof offenses known 

Rate per 100,000... 



Group vi 

993 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 5,288,969: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Total 1,759 cities; total population, 
59,420,889: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100.000.. 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonncR- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



1,438 
5.0 



384 
5.0 



339 
5.8 



164 
3.2 



212 
3.1 



175 
3.3 



2,712 
4.6 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



1 1, 434 
5.3 



3 371 
4.9 



180 
3.1 



107 
2.1 



137 
2.0 



111 
2.1 



3 2, 340 
4.1 



Rape 



2,194 

7.7 



412 
5.3 



347 
5.9 



289 
5.6 



325 
4.8 



289 
5.5 



3,856 
6.5 



Rob- 
bery 



15, 381 
53.9 



2,956 
38.4 



2,055 
34.9 



1,184 
22.9 



1,243 

18.2 



947 
17.9 



23, 766 
40.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



10, 101 

35. 4 



< 3, 642 
48.8 



3,032 
51.5 



1,517 
29.4 



1, 670 
24.5 



1,055 
19.9 



821,017 
35.5 



Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
ingor 
enter- 
ing 



2 54, 672 
255. 4 



22, 947 
297.9 



15, 491 
263.0 



12,067 
233.5 



11, 155 
163.8 



7,736 
146.3 



124,068 
237.4 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



2 130, 066 

607.7 



51,380 
667.1 



35, 975 
610.7 



30, 131 
583.0 



29,823 
437.8 



15,290 
289. 1 



292,665 
559.9 



Auto 
theft 



2 41, 353 
193.2 



13, 859 
179.9 



9,465 
160.7 



7,288 
141.0 



6,922 
101.6 



3,644 
68.9 



■ 82, 531 
157.9 



'The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 33 cities with a 
total population of 26,830,300. 

2The number of offenses and rate for burglary, larceny and auto theft are based onreportsof 34 cities with 
a total population of 21,404,200. 

'The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 55 cities with a 
total population of 7,578,812. 

*The number of offenses and rate for aggravated assault are based on reports of 54 cities with a total 
population of 7,468,212. 

'The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,756 cities with 
a total population of 57,569,189. 

'The number of offenses and rate for aggravated assault are based on reports of 1,757 cities with a total 
population of 59,186,789. 

'The number of offenses and rate for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on reports of 1,758 cities 
with a total population of 52,266,589. 



112 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1937. 

In table 60 there are presented data on the number of offenses 
committed during the first 9 months of 1937. The table includes 91 
cities having a total population of 36,260,812. The data are presented 
in the form of daily averages. The compilation discloses that murder 
and aggravated assault were most frequently committed in the third 
quarter of the year. For offenses against property (robbery, burglary, 
larceny, and auto theft), the opposite trend was shown. The highest 
number of offenses for those classifications occurred during the first 
quarter of the year. 



Table 60. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 91 cities over 100,000, 

January to September, inclusive, 1937 

[Total population, 36,260,812, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Month 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Jime 

July 

August 

September- 

January to March 

April to June 

July to September 

January to September 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



5.9 
6.8 
7.0 
6.0 
6.8 
6.6 
7.0 
7.0 
7.0 



6.5 
6.5 
7.0 
6.7 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



I 7.5 
7.4 
7.0 
6.9 
5.8 
5.9 
6.1 
6.0 
6.9 



7.3 
6.2 
6.3 
6.6 



Rape 



8.0 

8.6 

10.2 

10.5 

10.2 

10.7 

8.9 

8.8 

10.0 



10.4 
9.2 
9.5 



Rob- 
bery 



79. s 
81.7 
75.2 
64.8 
55.9 
58.5 
61.7 
64.4 
63.5 



78.8 
59.7 
63.2 
67.2 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2 45.0 
41.8 
43.1 
47.3 
51.4 
52.6 
58.2 
59.5 
53.6 



43.3 
50.4 
57.1 
50.3 



Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



I 301. 6 
305.0 
318.8 
289.3 
264.6 
262.1 
267.9 
278.7 
271.9 



308.6 
271.9 
272.8 
284.3 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



3 658. 2 
683.5 
677.5 
684.2 
643.1 
638.1 
650.6 
673.3 
675.2 



672.7 
655.0 
666.3 
664.6 



Auto 
theft 



3 212.2 
221.5 
214.5 
211.1 
194.1 
192.1 
184.1 
192.0 
200.5 



215.9 
199.0 
192.1 
202.2 



' Daily averages for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 
34,409,112. 



1 cities with a total population of 



2 Daily averages for aggravated assault are based on reports of 89 cities with a total population of 36,026,712. 

3 Daily averages for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on reports of 90 cities with a total population 
of 29,106,512. 



113 

Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-37. 

Table 01 is presented in order to make available information on the 
annual variation in the amount of crime committed. The compila- 
tion is based on reports from 68 cities representing a total population 
of 19,126,702 and includes reports for the first 9 months of the cal- 
endar years 1931-37. 

The compilation discloses an increase in the number of offenses 
committed durinsr 1937 as compared with the number reported for 
1936. This is particularly true with reference to offenses against 
property (robbery, burglary, larceny, and auto theft). Robberies 
increased from 8,297 to 9,443, burglaries from 44,645 to 48,032, 
larcenies from 112,089 to 128,109, and auto thefts from 34,516 to 
36,126. 

The data included in table 61 are also presented in figure 13. 

Table 61. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 68 cities over 100,000, 
January to September, inclusive, 1931-37 

[Total population, 19,126,702, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known: 

1931 


1,145 

1,186 

1,246 

1,122 

999 

958 

976 

4.2 
4.3 
4.6 
4. 1 
3.7 
3.5 
3.6 


1,014 

779 
879 
604 
561 
568 
719 

3.7 
2.8 
3.2 
2.2 
2.1 
2.1 
2.6 


908 

945 

985 

965 

1,219 

1,168 

1,318 

3.3 
3.4 
3.6 
3.5 
4.5 
4.3 
4.8 


14,649 

13, 952 

13, 529 

U, 148 

9,513 

8,297 

9,443 

53.7 
50.9 
49.6 
40.8 
34.8 
30.3 
34.6 


7,752 
7,015 
8,716 
7,875 
7,491 
7,942 
7,915 

28.4 
25.6 
31.9 
28.8 
27.4 
29.0 
29.0 


51,400 

56, 419 

57, 540 
54, 396 
51,811 
44, 645 
48, 032 

188.3 
205.9 
210.8 
199.3 
189.8 
162.9 
175.9 


113,040 
116, 535 
122, 576 
120, 446 
122, 872 
112,089 
128,109 

414.1 
425.3 
449.0 
441.2 
450.1 
409.1 
469.3 


6t, 435 


1932 


54 615 


1933 


51,790 


1934. 


47, 976 


1935 


41 604 


1936 . 


34, 516 


1937 


36, 126 


Daily average: 

1931 


236 


1932 


199.3 


1933 


189 7 


1934 


175 7 


1935 


152.4 


1936 


126 


1937 


132.3 







24928° — 37- 



114 






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115 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location. 

In table 62 there is presented information concerning the number 
of police departments whose reports were employed in the preparation 
of figures representing crime rates for the individual States. This 
information is included here in order to show the nund)er of such con- 
tributors divided according to size of city, and it is believed it will be 
helpful in evaluating the crime data for individual States, since table 
59 has indicated that there is a noticeable tendency for the large 
cities to report higher crime rates than the smaller communities. It 
should be further observed that in several instances the number of 
records entering into the construction of State rates is quite limited. 
In some cases the figures for individual States are based on reports 
from only four or six police departments. Obviously, the crime rates 
based on such a Hmited number of records may differ considerably 
from the figures which would result if reports were available from 
all urban communities in the State. 

In table 63 there are presented the crime rates for the individual 
States, together Nnth figures for nine geographic divisions of the 
country. 



116 



Table 62. — Number of cities in each State included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to September, inclusive, 1937 





Population 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 165 cities; total population, 
5,547,295 


2 

6 

9 

4 

2 

3 

3 
1 
5 


12 

11 

10 

5 



3 

4 

1 
4 


10 

18 
24 

7 
12 

3 

6 
2 

5 

1 

1 


26 

23 

48 

10 

12 

4 

8 

6 

12 

1 

2 

1 

11 

4 
7 

10 

15 
9 

\ 

8 


58 

122 

97 

50 

24 

17 

24 
13 
34 

6 

4 
1 
36 
5 
6 

44 
29 
49 

26 
12 
28 
19 
12 

11 
5 
8 
3 
5 
6 

12 


57 

275 

252 

138 

57 

26 

59 
47 
82 

8 

5 

6 

30 

4 
4 

100 

56 

119 

69 
29 
72 
58 
24 

52 
29 
15 
5 
3 
15 
19 

3 

4 
7 

10 
9 
3 
4 

17 

12 

I 

1 

10 

5 

23 

21 

5 
7 
3 

11 
3 
5 

10 
3 

10 

7 
65 


165 


Middle Atlantic: 455 cities; total population, 
18,066,623 


455 


East North Central: 440 cities; total popula- 
tion, 15,863,216. _. 


440 


West North Central: 214 cities; total popula- 
tion, 4,938,025 


214 


South Atlantic: ' 113 cities; total population, 
3,440,952 


113 


East South Central: 56 cities; total popula- 
tion, 1,980,961... 


56 


West South Central: 104 cities; total popula- 
tion, 3,127,752 


104 


Mountain: 70 cities; total population, 1,199,671. 
Pacifle: 142 cities; total population, 5,256,394.. 
New England: 

Maine . 


70 
142 

16 


New Hampshire 






12 


Vermont 






8 


Massachusetts 


1 
1 


8 
-- 

4 
4 
3 

3 

4 
1 
o 

1 
1 


5 
2 
1 

6 
5 

7 

4 
3 

7 
8 
2 


91 


Rhode Island . . 


16 


Connecticut . ._ 


22 


Middle Atlantic: 

New York .. 


3 
1 
2 

5 
1 
1 
1 

1 

2 


167 


New Jersey . 


101 


Pennsylvania .. 


187 


East North Central: 
Ohio 


122 


Indiana 


58 


Illinois 


118 


Michigan 


95 


Wisconsin... 


47 


West North Central: 

Minnesota 


66 


Iowa .. 


3 
2 


5 
2 

1 
1 
-. 


43 


Missouri 


2 


29 


North Dakota 


9 


South Dakota... 








9 


Nebraska . 




1 
2 

1 


1 
1 


23 


Kansas 




35 


South Atlantic: 

Delaware. 




4 


Maryland .. 






2 
3 

1 
2 
2 
1 

1 

2 


3 

4 
4 
5 
1 
3 
4 

5 
2 
4 
6 

2 

4 

7 

11 

2 
1 
2 
4 
2 

I 

1 

7 

4 

23 


9 


Virginia 




2 


1 
2 

5 
1 
3 

1 


17 


West Virginia 




17 


North Carolina. 






21 


South Carolina . .. 








Georgia 


1 


3" 


12 


Florida 


25 


East South Central: 

Kentucky 


1 
1 

1 


21 


Tennessee 


13 


Alabama. 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
1 
2 

4 

2 


13 


Mississippi _ . .. 


9 


West South Central: 

Arkansas . 






14 


Louisiana. 


1 


3 


12 


Oklahoma 


33 


Texas 


2 


45 


Mountain: 

Montana .. 


9 


Idaho 








8 


Wyoming . . 










5 


Colorado. 


1 




1 


1 
1 

1 
1 


18 


New Mexico ... 


6 


Arizona _. 






1 


7 


Utah 




1 


13 


Nevada . . 




4 


Pacific: 

Washington 


1 

1 
3 


2 




2 
T 
9 


22 


Oregon.. 


13 


California 


2 


5 


107 







• Includes District of Columbia. 



117 

Table 63. — N^uinber of offc7ises knoum to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, 
January to September, inclusive, 19S7, by States 



Division and State 



GEOGRAPHIC niVISION 

New England 

Middle Atlantic. 

East North Central 

West North Central 

South Atlantic' 

East South Central 

West South Central 

Mountain. 

Pacific , 

New England: 

Maine..- 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York. 

New Jersey.- 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan. 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Minnesota 

Iowa.- 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska. 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virg inia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado. 

New Mexico. 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon 

California 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



1.0 

2.9 

3.4 

3.3 

15.3 

17.0 

11.9 

4.0 

2.9 

.4 

.5 
1.2 
1.0 
1.1 
1.0 

2,9 
2. o 
3.2 

4.1 
4.4 
3.8 
2.1 
1. 1 

1.0 

1.6 

5.6 

2.9 



2.2 

5.3 



6.7 
2.2 
13.6 
7.7 
19.5 
11.1 
25.6 
17.7 

14.0 
18.5 
20.3 
11.3 

13.2 

12.2 

6.6 

13.2 

4.7 



4.9 

4. 1 

7.3 

6.0 

2.0 

5.4 

2.3 
1.4 
3.2 



Robbery 



13.1 

20.5 
59.7 
32.5 
70.4 
62.8 
41.3 
46.7 
52.3 

7.4 

2.8 

5.9 

16.3 

5.2 
11.4 

11.4 
21.5 
38.8 

69.4 
45.3 
82.1 
40.6 

7.1 

25.5 
20.8 
49.0 
26.6 
18.0 
20.5 
28.3 

31.0 
25. 5 
54.4 
46.5 
47.5 
18.8 
77.9 
89.1 

70.8 
82.4 
39. 1 
17.3 

.52.8 
24.5 
41.3 
46.7 

40.7 
34.3 
44.5 
46.7 
30.6 
72.4 
48.2 
29.9 

51.0 
74.0 
50.2 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



9.8 
27.4 
29.0 
12.0 
147.6 
3 115.6 
63.2 
16.8 
20.2 

36.7 
5.2 


9.0 
7.4 
9.1 

25.0 
44.6 
24.8 

30.8 
36.6 
29.5 
32.0 

4.8 

7. 7 
11.0 
14.7 
15.2 
5.4 
9.6 
17.1 

38.5 

21.0 
164.5 

56.9 
338.7 
124.7 

77.7 
182.9 

107.9 

5 189. 3 

73.9 

45.8 

72.3 

72.8 
45.2 
63.9 

12.5 
4.9 
3.3 
16.5 
24.7 
46.6 
10.2 
10.9 

15.5 
14. I 
21.9 



Bur- 
glary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



183.6 
1 128.8 
223.4 
198.5 
424.0 
334,2 
321.2 
315.3 
372.0 

209.4 
101.6 
75.9 
185.3 
124.7 
234.1 

* 113.5 
189.1 
112.9 

267.6 
232.1 
238.9 
192.4 
87.9 

198.5 
198. 1 
194.6 
235.6 
125.9 
95.7 
294.8 

237.0 
159.4 
391.4 
219.3 
364. 1 
147.0 
558. 
611.0 

390. 1 
317.3 
312.8 
269. 1 

300.3 
134.7 
285.5 
406.5 

159.5 
246. 5 
145. 
291.9 
371.0 
433.8 
425.2 
353.2 

454.0 
458.8 
345.8 



I.^irceny 
I heft 



345.9 
'254.6 



568. 
576. 
953. 
590. 
877. 
803. 
865. 



356. 5 
210.7 
342.9 
337.7 
331.6 
409.0 

< 309. 1 
373.4 
165.8 

734.0 
635.3 
321.3 
753.1 
446.4 

425.6 
529. 6 
708.2 
423.8 
478. 6 
313. 6 
825.3 

525.0 

4.58.9 

1,113.5 

632.0 

572. 4 

810. 9 

1,108.4 

1, 127. 5 

749. 8 
480.3 
593. 2 
495.9 

789.1 

303.3 

944.6 

1, 090. 6 

871.7 

540.2 

823.9 

652.7 

1. 290. 6 

1,027.2 

770.2 

1,551.2 



&53.4 

1,092.3 

842.9 



.\uto 
theft 



131.4 
' 111.2 
131. 4 
134.2 
208.0 
174.8 
136.8 
225.6 
343.2 

126.5 
4.5.9 
67.6 

147.3 
65.5 

143.1 

< 102. 3 
117.9 
114.3 

167.8 
168.3 

77.0 
165.2 

94.6 

164.9 
152.3 
114.0 
140.6 
111.5 
129.1 
111.1 

154.9 
127.3 
180.4 
147.6 
184.4 
117.0 
201.7 
159.4 

238.6 

175.2 

134.0 

62.5 

69.1 

81.9 

71.6 

184.7 

265.0 
168.1 
128.5 
156. 3 
234. 3 
425.2 
247.7 
464.5 

245.8 
236.9 
374. 7 



' The rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on the reports of 454 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 10,912,323. 

2 Includes reiwrt of District of Columbia. 

'The rate for aggravated assault is based on the reports of .54 cities with a total population of 1,746,861. 

<The rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on the rei)orls of 166 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 3,509,066. 

' The rate for aggravated assault is based on the reports of 12 cities with a total population of 495,513. 



118 

Data for Individual Cities With More Than 100,000 Inhabitants. 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the third quarter of 1937 is shown in table 64. The compilation has 
been limited to the reports received from police departments in cities 
with more than 100,000 inhabitants. Such data are included here 
in order that interested individuals and organizations may have 
readily available up-to-date information concerning the amount of 
crime committed in their communities. PoUce administrators and 
other interested individuals will probably find it desirable to com- 
pare the crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown in 
table 59 of this pubHcation. Similarly, they will doubtless desire to 
make comparisons with the figures for their communities for prior 
periods, in order to determine whether there has been an increase or 
a decrease in the amount of crime committed. 

With reference to the possibility of comparing the amount of crime 
in one city with the amount of reported crime in other individual 
communities, it is suggested that such comparisons be made with a 
great deal of caution, because differences in the figures may be due to 
a great variety of factors. The amount of crime committed in a 
community is not chargeable to the police but is rather a charge 
against the entire community. The following is a list of some of the 
factors which might affect the amount of crime in a community: 
The composition of the population with reference particularly to age, 
sex, and race; the economic status and activities of the population; 
climate; educational, recreational, and religious facilities; the nimiber 
of police employees per unit of population; the standards governing- 
appointments to the police force; the policies of the prosecuting 
officials and the courts ; the attitude of the public toward law enforce- 
ment problems. Comparisons between the crime rates of individual 
cities should not be made without giving consideration to the above- 
mentioned factors. It should be noted that it is more important to 
determine whether the figures for a given community show increases 
or decreases in the amount of crime committed than to ascertain 
whether the figures are above or below those of some other community. 

In examining a compilation of crime figures for individual communi- 
ties it should be borne in mind that in view of the fact that the data 
are compiled by different record departments operating under separate 
and distinct administrative systems, it is entirely possible that there 
may be variations in the practices employed in classifying com- 
plaints of offenses. On the other hand, the crime reporting manual 
has been distributed to all contributors of crime reports and the 
figures received are included in this bulletin only if they apparently 
have been compiled in accordance with the provisions of the manual, 
and the individual department has so indicated. 



119 



Table 64. — Xutnber of offenses known to the police, July to September, inclusive, 

1937, cities over 100,000 in population 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


City 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Akron, Ohio 


2 

1 
35 
20 
27 

2 


68 
9 

98 

198 

36 

100 

4 

24 

11 

4 

27 

23 

1,195 

166 

387 

83 

50 

39 

47 

17 

326 

5 

9 

12 

19 

8 

5 

27 

14 

12 

35 

9 

9 

74 

74 

30 

31 

81 

13 

27 

272 

123 


41 
11 
85 
11 
55 
56 


289 

66 
722 
550 
331 
331 

76 
131 
101 

22 
137 

74 
2,967 
640 
596 
555 
400 

83 
331 
148 
942 

34 
137 
135 

58 

63 
113 
202 

80 
247 
119 
215 
182 
441 
526 
282 
213 
273 
251 
362 
1, 794 
565 

39 
122 
207 
336 
115 
387 
162 
265 

78 
187 
116 
866 
191 
398 
169 

19 

92 

23 
505 
371 
524 

85 

67 
323 
134 
341 
240 
212 
312 

90 
497 
124 
716 

31 


82 

30 
121 
191 

64 
229 

52 
111 

21 

(') 

20 

810 

244 

101 

158 

35 

35 

129 

20 

245 

57 

17 

15 

21 

17 

12 

78 

24 

27 

8 

27 

30 

67 

220 

113 

(■) 

(') 

31 

91 

803 

1.38 

22 

25 

26 

63 

53 

154 

(') 
93 
36 
51 
60 
(2) 
9 

59 

67 

11 

9 

16 

181 

186 

181 

28 

24 

93 

39 

51 

16 

121 

25 

(') 
17 
131 
7 


401 

198 

931 

656 

500 

708 

166 

.522 

134 

69 

270 

300 

3, 320 

1,462 

3,032 

898 

1, 243 
738 
280 
473 

4,744 
297 
171 
298 
67 
346 
121 
537 
454 
599 
171 
485 
374 

1,110 

1,047 
610 
204 
511 
168 
534 

2,547 
919 
62 
240 
224 
279 

1,152 
842 
285 
902 
272 
226 
192 

358 

850 

515 

111 

67 

52 

460 

392 

1,114 

187 

137 

844 

457 

2, 452 
304 
294 
5.38 
165 

1, 735 

99 

771 

44 


109 

39 

9f>n 


Albany, N. Y. 

Atlanta, Ga . . 


Baltimore, Md 


648 
167 


Birmingham, Ala— 


Boston, Mass 


701 
99 


Bridgeiwrt, Conn 


BuJTalo, N. Y 

Cambridge, Mass. 


7 


53 

2 

34 

29 

438 

120 

73 

39 

93 

38 

10 

6 

272 

2 

13 

9 

12 
4 


181 
103 


Camden, N. J 




22 


Canton, Ohio 




34 


Chattanooga, Tenn 


12 

61 

11 

26 

6 

14 

3 

3 


62 


Chicago, lU 


744 


Cincinnati, Ohio.. 


305 


Cleveland, Ohio 


557 


Columbus, Ohio 


211 


Dallas, Tex.. 


279 


Dayton, Ohio 


165 


Denver, Colo 


124 


Des Moines, Iowa 


132 


Detroit, Mich.. 


16 

1 


863 


Duluth, Minn .. 


74 


Elizabeth, N. J 


36 


El Paso, Tex.. 


1 

1 
4 
1 
3 
1 
9 
4 
1 


27 


Erie, Pa 


49 


E vans vi lie, Ind... 


83 


Fall River, Mass. 


20 


Flint, Mich 


51 
4 

17 
23 
6 
18 
84 
102 
47 
13 
18 

126 

138 

1 


163 


Fort Wayne, Ind 


62 


Fort Worth, Tex 


60 


Gary, Ind 


56 


Grand Rapids, Mich 


75 


Hartford, Conn 


114 


Houston, Tex 


24 
5 
6 
6 

14 
8 
1 

11 

13 


312 


Indianapolis, Ind 


286 


Jacksonville, Fla 


68 


Kansas City, Kans. 


23 


Kansas City, Mo 

Knoxville, Tenn.... 


141 
30 


Long Beach, Calif 


163 


Los Angeles, Calif 


2,101 


Louisville, Ky... . ... 


315 


Lowell, Mass 


44 


Lynn, Mass 


1 
12 
8 
1 
1 

15 
10 


8 
80 
45 
12 
31 
39 
30 

3 
11 
24 
273 
24 
89 
-34 

6 
13 

6 

179 

408 

95 

3 

12 
30 
10 
97 
16 
26 
57 
16 
75 

9 
49 

4 


39 


Memphis, Tenn 


196 

250 
11 
17 

124 

180 

1 

9 

83 

887 
49 
41 
58 
12 
20 
15 

253 
31 
25 
13 
U 

161 

8 

47 

4 

5 

66 

4 

97 

14 

n 


97 


Miami, Fla. 


75 


Milwaukee, Wis.. 


224 


Minneapolis, Minn. . . 


321 


Nashville, Tenn 


205 


Newark, N.J. .. ... . 


384 


New Bedford, Mass 


25 


New Haven, Conn 


1 

26 

85 

9 

6 

3 

2 

2 

1 

26 

6 

4 

3 

1 

10 
1 

18 
1 
1 
6 


90 


New Orleans, La.. 


93 


New York, N. Y 


1, 775 


Norfolk, Va 


129 


Oakland, Calif. 


229 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


55 


Omaha, Nebr.. 


74 


Paterson, N.J 


46 


Peoria, 111 


87 


Philadelphia, Pa 


582 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


512 


Portland, Oreg . . 


262 


Providence, R. I 


69 


Reading, Pa. . . . 


31 


Richmond, Va... 


145 


Rochester, N. Y 


84 


St. Louis, Mo. -. .... 


377 


St. Paul, Minn 


117 


Salt Lake City, Utah . . 


139 


San Antonio, Tex 


155 


San Diego, Calif- . . 


142 


San Francisco, Calif . 


9 


1,090 


Scranton, Pa 


79 


Seattle, Wash 


2 


378 


Somcrville, Mass 


39 



' Larcenies not separately reported. 
2 Not reported. 



Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



120 



Table 64. — Number of offenses known to the police, July to Septemher, inclusive, 
1937, cities over 100,000 in population — Continued 



City 



South Bend, Ind... 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield, Mass-- 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Tacoma, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 

Toledo, Ohio 

Trenton, N.J 

Tulsa, Okla 

Utica, N. Y 

Washington, D. C. 
Waterbury, Conn.. 

Wichita, Kans 

Wilmington, Del-.. 
Worcester, Mass... 

Yonkers, N. Y 

Youngstown, Ohio. 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



1 

3 

1 

20 



Robbery 



6 

22 

1 

5 



54 
16 
45 

1 
211 

3 

3 

10 
10 

5 
57 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



23 

42 

36 

21 

2 

167 

2 

5 

15 

14 

16 

41 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



68 
201 

76 
107 

92 
129 
331 
134 
242 

27 
768 

55 

85 

95 
133 

24 
109 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



22 
63 
25 
26 
10 
23 

107 
32 
57 
20 

336 
25 
14 
37 
66 
3 
12 



Under 
$50 



90 
552 
267 
242 
204 
106 
899 
217 
464 
142 
1,934 

54 
450 
179 

64 

71 
286 



Auto 
theft 



45 

103 
69 

105 
62 
21 

211 
28 
49 
59 

677 
59 
31 
61 

135 
52 

144 



Offenses Known to Sheriffs, State Police, and Other Rural Officers, 1937, 
In table 65 are presented data concerning the amount of crime com- 
mitted in the rural portions of the United States, The compilation 
was prepared from reports received from 580 sheriffs, 5 State police 
units, and 78 police agencies in villages (places with less than 2,500 
inhabitants). The following comparative tabulation indicates the 
percentage distribution of urban and rural crimes: 



Offense 



Total 

Larceny 

Burglary _,. 
.A-uto theft-. 



Percent 



Urban 



100.0 



53.6 
22.7 
15.1 



Rural 



100.0 



47.3 

27.4 

9.4 



Offense 



Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Rape.-- -.. 

Murder 

Manslaughter 



Percent 



Urban 



3.8 

3.4 

.6 

.4 

.4 



Rural 



4.2 
6.3 
2.7 
1.4 
1.3 



The above tabulation shows the percentage of each class of offense 
to the total of all offenses and the data are presented separately for 
urban and rural communities. Comparable with prior periods, of- 
fenses against the person (homicide, rape, and aggravated assault) re- 
flect a considerably higher percentage in rural communities than in 
urban. This may be due to the fact that some rural reports may be 
based on arrests rather than offenses. Inasmuch as offenses against 
the person are more generally followed by arrest, any incompleteness 
in reporting other types of offenses would naturally tend to increase 
the percentage of reported crimes against the person. 



121 

Table 65. — Offenses known, January to September 1,937, inclusive, as reported bij 
5S0 sheriffs, 5 State police organizations, and 78 village officers 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
iionneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Offenses known 


659 


608 


1,253 


1,925 


2,876 


12, 590 


21,717 


4,319 



Offenses Known in the Possessions of the United States. 

In tabic 66 there are shown available data concerning the number 
of offenses known to law-enforcement agencies in the possessions of 
the United States. The tabulation includes reports from Honolulu 
(city and county); the Canal Zone and Puerto Rico. The figures 
are based on both urban and rural areas and the population figures 
from the 1930 decennial census are indicated in the table. 

With reference to the figures presented for the Canal Zone, it should 
be noted that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been advised 
that less than one-third of the persons arrested for offenses committed 
in the Canal Zone are residents thereof. It appears, therefore, that 
a large proportion of the crime committed in the Canal Zone is 
attributable to transients and other nonresidents. 



Table 66. — Number of offenses known in United States possessions, January to 

September, inclusive, 1937 

[Population figures from Federal Census, Apr. 1, 1930] 



Hawaii: Honolulu, city and 
county, population 
202,923; number of offenses 

known 

Isthmus of Panama: Canal 
Zone, population, 39,367; 
number of offenses known- 
Puerto Rico: Population, 
1,543,913; number of 
offenses known - - 



Criminal homi- 
cide 








Bur- 


Larceny— theft 










Mur- 








Aggra- 


glary— 






der, 
non- 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


vated 
as- 


break- 
ing or 






negli- 






sault 


enter- 


Over 


Under 


gent 
man- 








ing 


$50 


$50 


slaugh- 


gence 














ter 
















9 


7 


10 


10 


24 


736 


104 


1,285 


1 


3 


2 


3 


9 


61 


10 


171 


195 


95 


56 


33 


1,459 


648 


80 


2,732 



Auto 
theft 



178 
24 
36 



Data From Supplementary Offense Reports. 

In tables 67-69 are presented the more detailed data compiled 
from supplementary offense reports received from 162 police depart- 
ments in cities with a combined population of 17,703,899. The 
tables cover the third quarter of 1937. 



24928° — 37- 



122 



Table 67 reveals that more than one-half of the rapes reported 
were forcible in nature. The data for robbery disclose that 59 percent 
(1,897) of such crimes were committed on city highways and that 26 
percent (828) were robberies of various types of commercial estab- 
lishments. 

The cities represented in table 67 reported 14,986 burglaries, 
approximately one-half of wliich were committed in residences. Of 
the total burglaries reported, 76 percent (11,461) were committed at 
night, and 24 percent during the day. However, the compilation 
shows that 36 percent of the residence burglaries occurred during the 
daytime. 

The larcenies reported numbered 34,748. There were 4,114 
(11.8 percent) in which the value of the property stolen was $50 or 
more; 22,055 (63.5 percent) involving property valued at $5 to $50; 
and 8,579 (24.7 percent) in which the value of the property stolen 
was less than $5 per offense. With reference to the type of theft 
committed, the compilation shows that there were 594 cases of pocket- 
picking (1.7 percent) and 746 offenses of purse-snatching (2.1 percent). 

Table 67. — Number of known offenses with divisions as to the nature of the criminal 
act, time and place of commission, and value of property stolen, July to September, 
inclusive, 1937; 162 cities over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 17,703,899, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Classification 


Number 
of actual 
offenses 


Classification 


Number 
of actual 
offenses 


Rape: 

Forcible 

Statutory 


203 
169 


Larceny— theft (except auto theft) (group- 
ed according to value of article stolen) : 
Over $50 

$5 to $50 


4,114 
22, 055 


Total . 


372 


Under $5 

Total. .. 


8,579 


Robbery: 


1,897 
507 
265 
54 
201 
2 
243 


34, 748 


Highway... 


Larceny— theft (grouped as to type of 
offense) : 
Pocket-picking 




Commercial house.. 




Oil station 




Chain store . 


594 


Residence. . . .. 


Purse-snatching. 


746 


Bank 


\\\ other 


33, 408 


\Tiscellaneous 


Total - 






34, 748 


Total 


3,169 










Burglary— breaking or entering: 
Residence (dwelling): 

Committed during night. . 


4.800 
2,737 

6,661 

788 




Committed during day 




All other (store, office, etc.): 
Committed during night . 




Committed during day 








Total 


14, 986 









The police departments of 162 cities reported thefts of 8,087 auto- 
mobiles during the third quarter of 1937. As indicated in table 68, 
7,526 (93.1 percent) of the automobiles were recovered. 

Table 68. — Recoveries of stolen automobiles, July to September, inclusive, 1937; 

162 cities over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 17,703,899, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 

Number of automobiles stolen 8, 087 

Number of automobiles recovered 7, 526 

Percentage recovered 93. 1 



123 



The value of property stolen in connection with offenses of robbery, 
burglary, larceny, and auto theft is shown in table 69 as amounting 
to $5,154,049.20. Recoveries totaled $3,143,889.11, which is 61 per- 
cent of the amount stolen. More than one-half of the value of stolen 
property consisted of automobiles. Exclusive of automobiles, the 
value of stolen property was $2,283,323.79 and the value of recovered 
property was $501, 298^36 (22 percent). 

The data in table 69 are also shown in figure 14, 

Table 69. — Value of propertij stolen and value of property recovered with divisions 
as to type of property involved, July to September, inclusive, 1937; 162 cities over 
25,000 in population 

[Total population, 17,703,899, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau oi'the Census] 



Type of property 



Value of 

property 

stolen 



Value of 
property 
recovered 



Percent 
recovered 



Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs... - 

Clothing... 

Locally stolen automobiles.. 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



$675, 126. 87 

536. 024. 62 

44, 770. 25 

236, 204. 46 

2. 870, 725. 41 

791, 197. 59 



$104, 277. 14 

103, 192. 68 

3, 827. 70 

45, 747. 39 

2, 642, 590. 75 

244, 253. 45 



15.4 
19.3 
8.5 
19.4 
92.1 
30.9 



5, 154, 049. 20 



3.143,889.11 



61.0 



124 




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125 



Offenses Knoun to the Police, 1930-35, Cities 25,000 to 100,000 in Popu- 
lation. 

Crime data for 1936 for individual cities with from 25,000 to 
100,000 inhabitants were inchided in vohime VII, No. 4, of this 
pubUcation. However, such data for 1030-35 have not heretofore 
been pubUshed. In order that figures for all years may be readily 
available to interested individuals and agencies, figures for those cities 
for 1930-35 are presented in table 70. Similar figures for cities with 
population in excess of 100,000 have been included in previous issues 
of this bulletin. 

The information presented in table 70 should be considered as subject 
to the comment which precedes table 64. 

Some of the reports received from local poUce agencies are not 
represented in the follo%ving tabulation because they were either ob- 
viously or apparently incomplete or othermse deficient. In all in- 
stances in which figures for certain years are not listed reference is 
made to a footnote indicating that the data were not reported. This 
footnote refers to cases in wliich reports on file were not published due 
to some apparent deficiency, as well as to cases in which reports were 
not received. 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 

[Cities 25,000 to 100,000 in population] 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Abilene, Tex.: 

1930 




16 
10 
21 
20 
15 
6 

10 

11 

7 

12 

3 

2 

13 

10 
14 
13 
,18 
15 

14 
13 
11 
G 
11 
12 

7 


8 

10 
11 
11 
14 
21 

8 
2 


186 
148 
223 
184 
185 
126 

150 

118 

108 

88 

66 

52 

(}) 
87 
136 
139 

157 
125 

116 
117 
179 
108 
201 
181 

14 
25 
16 
48 

287 
221 
217 
215 
303 


10 

16 

6 

4 

14 

21 

11 

20 

3 

10 
12 

(') 
36 
32 
31 
38 
27 

18 
4 

11 
8 
4 
8 

3 

5 

11 

6 

82 
65 
70 
91 
68 


349 
458 
494 
505 
358 
253 

352 
285 
344 
306 
222 
250 

404 
275 
343 
336 
373 
420 

137 
181 
234 
210 
192 
192 

14 
36 
29 
26 

152 
240 
183 
376 
344 


104 


1931 


5 
2 

7 
7 
5 

1 
5 


81 


1932 


65 


1933 . 


46 


1934 


35 


1935..-- 


32 


Alameda, Calif.: 

1930 


90 


1931 


61 


1932 


17 


1933 . . 




7 
5 
2 

7 
4 
5 


36 


1934 


1 


20 


1935 


34 


Albuquerque, N. Mex.: 
1930 


1 
6 


152 


1931 


108 


1932 


73 


1933 


1 
3 
2 

5 
1 


/7 


1934 


2 

1 


104 


1935 


93 


.\lhambra, Calif.: 
1930 


31 


1931 




8 


1932 




35 


1933.- 


1 
1 




76 


1934 . . 




56 


1935 




41 


Aliquippa, Pa.: 

1930-31 


2 
2 

1 
4 


21 
14 
23 
26 

7 
9 
6 
5 


W 


1932 


10 


1933 


12 


1934..-. 


2 
11 

37 
13 
19 
23 
31 


19 


1935 


15 


Allentown, Pa.: 

1930 


(') 


1931 


160 


1932 




311 


1933 .-- 




216 


1934 




257 


1935 


2 


176 



See footnotes at end of table. 



126 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-85 — Continued 



Alton, 111.: 

1930---. 

1931-. 

1932-.. 

1933-. 

1934 

1935 

Altoona, Pa.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Amarillo, Tex.: 

1930 

1931 

1932-. 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Amsterdam, N. Y.: 

1930-31. 

1932.. 

1933 

1934-.-. 

1935.-. 

Anderson, Ind.: 

1930-32 

1933. 

1934. 

1935 

Ann Arbor, Mich.: 

1930 

1931 

1932.. 

1933. 

1934. 

1935 

Appleton, Wis.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933- 

1934-35... 

Arlington, Mass.: 

1930--. 

1931 

1932 

1933. 

1934... 

1935 

Asheville, N. C: 

1930-32.. 

1933... , 

1934.. 

1936... 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

1930... 

1931. 

1932. 

1933. 

1934... 

1935-.-. 

Auburn, N. Y.: 

1930..... 

1931. 

1932 

1933... 

1934... 

1935 

.\ugusta, Qa.: 

1930 

1931.... 

1932 

1933-35 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



(2) 

(2) 



(2) 



(2) 



(0 



(2) 



Robbery 



(0 



6 

7 
7 

5 
13 
5 
6 
2 
12 



(') 



18 
16 
14 



(2) 



84 
110 
47 
74 
49 



7 
5 
4 
24 
8 



{') 



44 
53 
30 
26 
9 



(=) 



10 
15 

7 
3 



(0 

(2) 



12 

32 

10 
1 
1 
2 
5 
2 



(0 



1 
13 
4 
2 
8 
1 



(') 



36 
39 
39 

54 
98 
73 
47 
59 
68 

3 
3 
1 



(*) 



58 
27 
45 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



(0 



54 
23 
63 
65 
104 



9 

5 

11 

4 

7 



Q) 



12 
13 

28 
49 

57 



(2) 



(0 
(0 



18 



(^) 



(') 



(2) 



(2) 



590 
460 
237 

107 
164 
141 
117 
130 
105 

30 
46 
6 
1 
2 
1 

69 
79 
73 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



(2) 
(2) 



79 
106 
123 
129 

94 



67 
146 
108 
146 
138 



(2) 



62 
261 
162 
151 

97 



(2) 



113 

75 
66 
34 



(2) 



(2) 



(2) 



124 

98 

57 
15 
30 
48 
35 
14 

25 
23 
40 
19 



74 

57 

131 

126 

79 

109 



(2) 



(0 



395 
350 
195 

575 
498 
427 
460 
681 
654 

38 
78 
87 
42 
33 
35 

103 
147 
196 



Over $50 



(') 



(2) 
(2) 



27 

15 
24 
22 



24 
16 
15 
15 
8 



(2) 



25 
23 
21 
14 

18 



(2) 



63 

34 

1.4 

6 



(') 



(2) 



42 



29 
22 
29 
38 
28 
36 

6 

10 



(2) 









14 



(2) 






64 
29 



687 
514 
616 
551 
343 



(') 



(2) 



22 
5 
5 
1 
5 

23 
15 
11 



Under $50 



(^) 



149 
180 

182 
187 
161 



{') 



116 
160 
129 
139 
100 



(2) 



117 
69 
54 

122 
84 



(2) 



141 

98 
150 
108 



0) 



(2) 



(2) 



105 

90 

46 
19 
38 
44 
76 
62 

28 
17 
23 
17 



198 
106 
198 
228 
85 
123 



600 
684 
673 

1,439 
1,124 
1,084 
1,246 
1,206 
1,117 

96 
138 
220 
177 
161 
108 

202 
207 
216 



0) 



Auto 
theft 



{') 



110 

129 

95 

74 

116 



(') 



63 
114 

63 
137 
103 



(') 



51 
65 
45 
61 
67 



(') 



62 
34 
59 
20 



(2) 



(2) 



(') 



106 
) 
138 

26 
8 

11 
8 
4 
3 

16 
4 
8 

19 



35 

45 
29 
33 
21 
18 



(0 



(2) 



208 
177 
156 

447 
459 
269 
296 
271 
231 

59 
39 
24 
17 
22 
21 

170 
162 
93 



See footnotes at end of table. 



127 



Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35— Continncd 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 




Over $50 


Under .$50 


theft 


Aiu-ora, 111.: 

1930 


1 
2 


47 
30 
36 
35 
35 
37 

23 
31 

19 
17 
13 
12 
27 
14 

1 
5 
1 
3 

17 

17 

8 

5 

6 

12 

8 
27 
28 
20 
20 
16 

49 
66 
40 
28 
32 
20 

15 

11 

8 

10 

6 

7 

40 
31 
37 
11 
12 
15 

26 
88 
75 
76 
89 
74 

17 

20 
14 
7 
9 
4 
4 


2 
3 
6 
3 
1 
3 

32 
25 

3 

3 

13 

2 

11 

15 

(2) 
6 
8 
1 

4 


103 
105 
102 
82 
101 
102 

445 
577 

1,39 
175 
104 
138 
190 
176 

62 

81 

66 

106 

73 
53 
48 
32 
30 
20 

113 
172 
252 
218 
220 
107 

67 
231 
180 
158 
201 
123 

78 
155 
165 
210 
147 

68 

262 
236 
226 
213 

187 
198 

8 
35 
62 
45 
61 
51 

0) 
83 

178 
180 
122 
118 
114 
115 


38 
27 
23 
30 
25 
41 

234 
116 

(') 

(') 
22 
59 
15 
18 

(2) 
18 
14 
14 
17 

4 
7 
2 
1 
3 
4 

46 
29 
16 
29 

27 

(2) 
39 
38 
38 
31 
22 

(2) 
82 
14 
11 
17 
13 

(') 
98 
72 
27 
33 
24 

(') 
41 
33 
52 
41 
34 

0) 
13 

(') 
19 
7 

16 
29 


140 
205 
190 
217 
132 
123 

1,971 
1,900 

505 
402 
258 

388 
448 
566 

2.53 
276 
352 
328 

20 
22 
20 
13 
16 
21 

247 
227 
288 
274 
287 
257 

412 
511 
465 
435 
513 

597 
646 
792 
632 
457 

652 

599 
594 
339 
241 
174 

65 
65 
70 
79 
58 
49 

12 

186 
236 
160 
218 
275 
237 


161 


1931 


157 


1932 


121 


1933 




80 


1934 




73 


1935.... 


1 

1 
5 


64 


Au.<;tin, Tex.: 

1930-33 


(2) 


1934 


266 


1935 - 


199 


Bakersfleld, Calif.: 
1930 


129 


1931 


147 


1932... 


97 


1933 


1 
2 
3 

0) 


129 


1934 - 


128 


1935 


211 


Bangor, Maine: 

1930-31 


(*) 


1932 


72 


1933.. .... 


1 


90 


1934 


78 


1935 




119 


Barberton, Ohio: 

1930 . 


2 


26 


1931 


1 


16 


1932 


2 
1 

1 
2 

4 
6 
5 
1 
2 
5 


20 


1933 




26 


1934 . 


1 

1 

7 
7 
23 
22 
21 
29 

20 

12 

4 

U 

15 
6 

2 
2 
3 

3 

4 


18 


1935 


10 


Baton Rouge, La.: 

1930 . 


50 


1931 


72 


1932 


79 


1933 . 


65 


1934 


44 


1935 


40 


Battle Creek, Mich.: 

1930 


358 


1931 




389 


1932 . 


1 
2 


261 


1933 


160 


1934 


156 


1935 


5 


111 


Bay City, Mich.: 

1930 


113 


1931 




134 


1932 


2 


147 


1933 


129 


1934 




120 


1935 




113 


Beaumont, Tex.: 

1930 -- 


7 
3 
8 
6 
6 
7 


59 
65 
73 
81 
117 
89 

7 

10 
15 
15 
23 
22 

1 
18 


232 


1931 


200 


1932 


121 


1933 


97 


1^ 

1935 


132 
110 


Bethlehem, Pa.: 

1930 


65 


1931 


2 


112 


1932 


120 


1933 


3 
2 


59 


1934 


97 


1935 


81 


Belleville, 111.: 

1930-34 


(2) 


(2) 


1935 


29 


Bellingham, Wash.: 

1930 -. 




90 


1931 


1 


111 


1932 




89 


1933 


1 




55 


1934 




61 


1935 


i 


13 


30 



See footnotes at end of table. 



128 



Table 70.— Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over .$50 


Under $50 


theft 


Berkeley, Calif.: 

• 1930 




39 
50 
30 
48 
15 
3 

64 
69 
63 
54 
25 

1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
4 

13 
15 
13 
14 
10 
6 

16 
9 

(0 
114 
C2 
55 
61 
59 

2 
3 
3 


11 
4 
11 
14 
14 
9 

1 


314 
359 
326 
265 
205 
247 

85 
105 
76 
95 
55 

35 
11 
17 
24 
15 
39 

159 
165 
183 
254 
130 
136 

168 
165 

(2) 
189 
112 
173 
120 
171 

5 
11 

3 
15 

17 
35 

(?) 
168 
107 

187 
198 
217 
246 
222 
286 

45 
47 
81 
51 

67 

71 

26 
20 
46 
47 

(^) 
23 
48 
37 
41 

i}) 


0) 
46 
33 
21 
21 
23 

(') 
34 
49 
13 
5 
12 

24 

24 

8 

13 

6 

9 

(') 
42 
52 
26 
33 
33 

26 
16 

110 
33 
29 
62 
46 

6 

5 

5' 
20 
3 

121 
49 

(') 
122 
51 

(') 
46 
41 

10 
8 

12 
3 

1 

{') 

12 

4 
6 
3 

6 

18 

7 

9 

(0 


650 

718 
827 
862 
814 
787 

74 
74 
55 
147 
99 

128 
96 
91 

84 

76 
75 

437 
512 
568 
575 
629 
266 

(2) 
201 
166 

(2) 
137 
66 
178 
203 
291 

'S 

23 

64 
56 
47 

in 
546 
401 

336 
133 
55 
173 
133 
111 

99 
109 

76 
100 
138 

(^) 

98 

134 

86 

90 

(2) 

48 

83 

131 

95 

i}) 


115 


1931 




149 


1932 - 


2 

1 
1 


149 


1933 

1934 

1935 


88 
69 
62 


Berwyn, 111.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 


2 
2 
2 


(2) 
86 
91 


1933 

1934 


4" 

1 

30 
1 

1 
1 
1 

7 
7 
4 
7 
4 
3 

1 


43 
62 


1935 . 

Beverly, Mass.: 

1930 


2 


25 
6 


1931 




38 


1932 




19 


1933 


1 


7 


1934 


14 


1935 




10 


Binghamton, N. Y.: 

1930 


2 

2 
1 


151 


1931 


193 


1932 


• 202 


1933 


202 


1934 


3 


155 


1935 - ... 


169 


Bloomfield, N. J.: 

1930-33 .... 


1 
1 

1 


(2) 


1934 


72 


1935 


38 


Bloomington, 111.: 

1930 


35 

9 

8 

41 

11 


(?) 


1931 


202 


1932 


260 


1933 


1 
1 


175 


1934 . . 


201 


1935 


198 


Bristol, Conn.: 
1930 


1 


5 


1931 




1 


1932 






2 


1933 


1 




2 


1934 


1 


1 


2 


1935 




6 


Brockton, Mass.: 

1930-33 .. 


i}) 


(2) 
20 
16 

3 

18 

8 

11 

17 

5 

4 
1 


(2) 
4 

8 


C) 


1934 


130 


1935 




97 


Brookline, Mass.: 
1930 




259 


1931 


17 
3 
5 
1 


236 


1932 


315 


1933 - . 




247 


1934 

1935 




165 
167 


Brownsville, Tex.: 

1930 -- ... ... 






30 


1931 


4 
2 
2 

1 
2 

14 

18 

3 

2 


4 


1932 


8 


1933 - 


2 
3 

1 

4 
2 
9 
10 
5 
6 

3 
4 
3 


6 


1934 


12 


1935 




2 


Burlington, Iowa: 

1930 


48 


1931 -- - 


51 


1932 




57 


1933 

1934 


2 


47 
44 


1935. 




30 


Burlington, Vt.: 

1930 


(') 


(2) 
3 


(2) 


1931 .-- .- .. .- 


76 


1932 




37 


1933 






36 


1934 




2 


35 


1935 


« 


(?) 


(?) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



129 



Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35— Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligont 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 




Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa: 

1930 


1 


24 
33 
24 
30 
19 

15 
4 
1 
5 
1 

52 
23 
16 
33 
49 
40 

22 

78 

85 

93 

123 

137 

118 

20 
43 
66 
37 

48 

(2) 

(2) 

32 
(2) 

35 

5 
7 
6 
4 
3 
2 

182 
59 
93 
75 
80 

5 
3 
2 
16 
7 
5 

43 
64 
63 
46 
56 
41 


(2) 
5 


0) 
125 
178 
177 
167 
117 

55 
43 
45 
39 
32 

211 

155 
185 
157 
234 
152 

(2) 
155 

507 

381 
481 
575 
687 
680 

(2) 
273 
320 
322 
416 
444 

141 
■ i') 
222 

218 

28 
26 
41 
27 
51 
65 

(2) 
222 
112 
100 
93 
111 

10 
14 
15 
33 
20 
CO 

175 
133 
164 
149 
192 
236 


15 
9 
11 
26 
CO 

39 
4 
6 
3 
5 

(') 

(0 
325 
195 
245 
202 

{') 

12!) 
C4 
94 

122 
89 

120 

(2) 
50 
69 
65 
48 
34 

0) 

57 
0) 

22 

(') 
40 

(') 
6 
4 
3 
4 
14 

2 
3 


(0 
214 
240 
301 
414 
277 

113 

104 

97 

79 

109 

1,056 
1,563 
1,201 
1,118 
1,397 
1,457 

556 

265 
348 
294 
330 
368 
438 

275 
226 
173 
378 
327 

155 
(') 
225 

C-) 
156 

62 
28 
46 
46 
35 
62 

Q) 
36 
38 
43 
46 
30 

14 
15 
49 
58 
.■53 
130 

233 
350 
321 
432 
434 
340 


(») 


1931 


157 


1932 


120 


1933 






130 


1934 


1 
3 

2 


1 
5 

17 
1 

1 


74 


1935 


125 


Central Falls, R. I.: 

1930 - 


(2) 


1931 


40 


1932 


26 


1933 


1 


19 


1934 


16 


1935 ... 




3 

107 
13P 
g8 
79 
76 
61 

154 

190 
114 
215 

257 
242 
248 

30 
16 
19 
26 

(2) 
(2) 
(') 
35 

53 

5 
11 

9 
13 


30 


Charleston, S. C: 

1930 

1931- .- 


13 
7 
6 
5 

11 
8 

8 

27 
29 
24 
41 
65 
29 

1 
4 
1 
3 

1 

5 

0) 
5 

11 


65 

61 


1932 


44 


1933 


41 


1934 


71 


1935 


40 


Charleston, W. Va.: 

1930-34 . .. 


Q) 




303 


Charlotte, N. C: 

1930 


571 


1931. 


359 




421 


1933 


383 


1934 


375 


1935 

Chelsea, Mass.: 

1930 


365 

0) 


1931 


280 


1932. 


268 


1933 - 


323 


1934 


209 


1935 


217 


Chester, Pa.: 

1930 


(2) 


1931 


102 


1932 


(2) 


1933 


156 


1934 


« 


1935 


167 


Chicopee, Mass.: 

1930 


8 


1931 




30 


1932 




12 


1933 - 




6 


1934 




25 


1935 

Cicero, 111.: 

1930 

1931 . . . 


1 
2 


1 

45 
5 
5 
2 

3 


38 

287 


1932 


158 


1933 


7 
4 


111 


1934 . .". 


1 
8 

(') 
4 
6 
1 
7 
29 

0) 
29 
23 
23 
18 
2() 


7C 


1935 


49 


Clarksburg, W. Va.: 
1930 


3 

7 


124 


1931 .- 


1 


109 


1932 


63 


1933.. 




1 


15 


1934 




4 


1935 


3 


6 
3 


47 


Cleveland Heights, Ohio: 
1930 


62 


1931 




49 


1932 


1 

1 
1 




48 


1933 




41 


1934 




46 


1935 


i 


55 



See footnotes at end of table. 
24928"— 37 4 



130 

Table 70. — Number oj offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 



Clifton, N. J.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Clinton, Iowa: 

1930-33 

1934 

1935_ 

Colorado Springs, Colo.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Columbia, S. C: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933-34 

1935 

Columbus, Ga.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Corpus Christi, Tex.: 

1930-31 

1932 

1933-34 

1935 

Council Blufls, Iowa: 

1930-33 

1934 

1935 

Covington, Ky.: 

1930-31 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Cranston, R. I.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Cumberland, Md.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Danville, 111.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Davenport, Iowa: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934_ 

1935 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



m 



(2) 



(0 



(0 






10 

8 

14 

5 

7 

10 



m 



13 

13 

4 

3 

3 
1 



Robbery 



(2) 



74 
108 
76 
40 
10 



(0 



18 
27 

11 
18 
15 
12 

7 
8 



(2) 



(2) 



14 

21 
22 
39 
30 



(2) 
(2) 
(2) 

(2) 
(2) 



14 



28 
15 



129 
217 
199 
231 



10 
5 



160 
89 
58 
64 
54 
45 

37 
32 
30 

18 
22 
14 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



(2) 



15 
1 
3 
4 

4 



(2) 



14 
8 



(2) 



(2) 



(2) 

(2) 

0) 



141 
146 
) 
148 

23 

43 
33 
35 

85 



19 
20 



(2) 



72 
112 
1.37 
110 

12 
4 
3 
3 
5 
5 

1 
2 



3 
19 

18 

18 

1 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



(2) 



100 
146 

98 
77 
54 



(2) 



40 
89 

74 
59 
52 
76 
89 
102 



(2) 



(2) 



2 

(') 
1 

1 

(2) 



33 
62 

18 

163 
165 
389 
200 
231 



224 



132 



104 
60 



162 
167 
300 
279 

63 
74 
57 
63 
55 
62 

40 
69 
40 
37 
38 
47 

299 
153 
226 
197 
189 
137 

108 
147 
225 
307 
269 
283 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



(2) 



63 
90 
68 
40 
20 



(2) 



52 
99 



(') 



44 
33 
26 
19 
22 



(2) 

(•) 

(0 

(■') 

(2) 
(■) 

0) 
0) 

(I) 

0) 



63 
34 

61 



24 
11 
18 
64 



25 



17 



26 



71 
65 
93 
42 
38 
47 

28 
55 
21 
44 
36 
34 



(') 



(') 



18 
18 
33 
12 
23 



Under $50 



m 



96 
162 
100 
105 
101 



(2) 



125 

491 
590 
734 
692 
628 
540 



(2) 



(2) 



478 
659 
') 
573 

285 
391 
437 
420 
459 



(2) 

(') 
3 

(2) 
2 

{') 
3 
2 

(2) 



361 
233 



364 
270 



283 

355 
521 
426 

86 
79 
154 
217 
211 
236 

91 
137 
117 
125 
169 
276 

332 
344 
293 
277 
389 
3.50 

355 
510 
417 
547 
652 
692 



See footnotes at end of table. 



131 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive 

19S0-S5— Continued 



Dearborn, Mich.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Decatur, 111.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Dubuque, Iowa: 

1930 

1931.. 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935.... 

East Chicapo, Ind.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

East Cleveland, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934.... 

1935 

Easton, Pa.: 

1930-31. 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

East Orange, N. J.: 

1930 

1931.. . 

1932-33 

1934 

1935 

East Providence, R. I. 

19.30. 

1931. 

1932... 

1933- 

1934 

1935 

Eau Claire, Wis.: 

1930 

1931.. 

1932 

1933 . 

1934.. 

1935 

Elgin, 111.: 

1930 

1931 

1932. 

19.33 . 

1934. 

1935 

Elmira, N. Y.: 

1930 

1931 

19.32 

1933.. 

1934 

1935.. 



Murder, 

noiiiu'K- 

lik'ciit 

nian- 

slaughtpr 



12 
9 
2 
2 
7 
9 



(2) 






See footnotes at end of table. 



Robbery 



40 
25 
26 
23 
19 
25 

102 

102 

85 

138 

91 

67 

11 

8 
7 
8 
2 
4 

23 

37 
47 
55 
30 
26 

31 
52 
34 
29 
42 
42 



0) 



11 

5 
5 
1 



(2) 

(2) 



20 



4 
3 
4 
3 
5 

3 
12 

4 
3 

10 

14 
13 

15 
23 

14 
18 

2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



10 
9 

13 
8 
9 
6 

23 
23 
21 
21 
16 
19 






57 
56 

6 
1 
7 
5 
2 
1 



(2) 



0) 



4 

3 
16 

8 
13 

3 

20 
24 
20 

9 
10 

1 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



197 
154 
HX) 
271 
164 
1.38 

392 
.345 
360 
304 
24S 
231 

49 
56 
41 
85 
51 
62 



Larceny— theft 



Over .$50 



0) 



113 

108 

101 

63 

80 
1S3 
101 
242 
235 
245 



P) 



24 
22 
22 
29 



3 

m 

2 



308 

288 



87 

67 

98 

120 

118 

46 
27 
45 
9 
23 
21 

73 
94 
56 
74 
54 
64 

19 
44 
50 
55 
72 
71 



(0 



37 
31 
31 
35 
19 



(') 



(') 



2;} 

97 
74 
80 



41 
16 
27 
22 
19 
15 



(') 
(') 



24 
1!) 



(') 



20 
6 

12 
7 

10 



15 

14 
30 
17 



0) 
1 



134 
43 



21 
13 
29 
9 
10 



(') 



17 
9 

12 
5 
5 



(') 



50 
39 
67 
35 
36 



Under $.50 



233 
289 
533 
533 
373 
365 

372 
258 
348 
398 
327 
287 

273 
168 
224 
1.59 
281 
263 



(2) 



346 
454 
461 
159 
134 

177 
237 
267 
362 
316 
296 



m 



20 
63 
97 

78 



m 



(2) 



0) 



204 
) 
127 



132 
1,53 
163 
216 
193 

11 
31 
27 
21 
36 
27 






239 
191 
273 



W 



144 
298 
288 
302 
229 



Auto 
theft 



(') 



1.59 
120 
78 
163 
215 

419 
446 
173 
259 
215 
120 

73 
54 
52 
37 
40 
29 

167 
125 
123 
119 
70 
52 

47 
47 
42 
38 
40 
46 



0) 



37 
25 
21 
16 



(') 



1 

m 



89 
110 



3 

20 
16 
19 
14 

92 
125 
98 
71 
73 
51 



m 

31 
37 
46 

61 
81 
46 
62 
67 
55 



132 



Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

i550-55— Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over $50 


Under .$50 


theft 


Elyrla, Ohio: 
1930- 




21 
13 
13 

7 
13 

2 

25 

14 

15 

7 

3 

C) 
57 
43 
47 
40 
29 

27 
48 
46 
44 

26 
30 
27 
24 
16 
5 

18 
61 
73 

3 


7 
4 
6 
3 
6 
1 

3 
7 
1 


38 
69 
62 
65 
54 
59 

152 
75 
161 
153 
101 

202 
202 
154 
192 
164 

(^) 

282 
260 
310 

85 
101 
246 
157 
166 
109 

241 
280 
220 

67 

112 

156 

89 

69 

121 

16 
19 
21 
37 
37 
35 

81 

61 

120 

120 

75 
72 

496 
542 
528 
436 
488 
433 

90 
60 

(^) 
40 

(0 
87 
95 


(■) 
6 
7 
3 
4 
2 

20 
65 
16 

7 
13 

202 
80 

75 
88 
88 

35 
51 
54 
24 

(■) 
66 
36 
32 
21 
20 

(^) 
68 
83 

(') 

(■) 

17 
8 
8 
7 

12 

8 
12 
9 
8 
6 
6 

30 
6 


165 
180 
190 
184 
164 
155 

(') 
386 
402 
341 
335 
456 

(^) 
397 
303 
276 
443 
311 

(') 
106 
273 
354 
216 

370 
331 
529 
506 
619 
525 

196 
190 
388 

131 
93 
210 
195 
270 
186 

15 
31 
35 
61 
88 
116 

110 

75 

96 

132 

150 

892 

1,189 

1,152 

1,103 

936 

949 

156 
127 

51 
(?) 
155 
86 


90 


1931 

1932 


1 
2 
2 


64 
21 


1933.- 


31 


1934 


28 


1935 




30 


Enid, Okla.: 

1930 


(') 


92 


1931.- 


1932 




50 


1933 




54 


1934.- 




58 


1935 




1 

43 
39 
41 
30 
23 

(2) 

3 

13 

3 

6 


42 


Evanston, 111.: 

1930-.- 


(2) 
3 
4 


(2) 


1931 


194 


1932.- 


127 


1933 . - 


70 


1934 


2 
3 

2 


38 


1935 


35 


Everett, Mass.: 

1930-31 


(2) 


1932 


219 


1933 , 


181 


1934 


1 
1 


110 


1935 . _ 


94 


Everett, Wash.: 
1930... 


421 


1931 . . . 


1 




299 


1932 


1 


128 


1933 


1 

1 


109 


1934 - . - - 




131 


1935 




116 


Fargo, N. Dak.: 

1930-32 


(2) 
2 


(2) 
1 
4 
2 


(2) 


1933.-.. 


87 


1934 


131 


1935 


1 


84 


Fitchburg, Mass.: 

1930 


29 


1931 






38 


1932 




1 


2 
3 
3 

1 


55 


19.33 




61 


1934 


1 


3 
2 

3 
1 
9 

10 
5 
6 

33 
25 
46 
41 
25 
19 

61 
55 
55 
52 
68 
98 

19 
11 

18 

47 
5 


54 


1935 


29 


Fond du Lac, Wis.: 
1930 




36 


1931 


1 


2 


52 


1932 


11 


19.33 


1 


5 


33 


1934 


40 


1935 - 




3 

15 

5 

14 

14 

2 

5 

30 

27 
15 
19 
20 

25 

49 
26 

{') 
11 

(2) 
2 
5 


20 


Fort Smith, Ark.: 

1930 


2 

7 
5 
6 
6 

7 

8 
5 
2 
6 
8 
1 

6 
3 

(0 


88 


1931 


99 


1932 


106 


1933 


107 


1934 - 




134 


1935 - 


75 

184 
147 
125 
101 
89 
111 

48 
85 

(2) 
4 

7 
5 


117 


Fresno, Calif.: 

1930 


513 


1931 

1932 


516 
555 


1933 

1934 

1935 

Gadsden, Ala.: 

1930-33 

1934 

1935 

Oalesburg, 111.: 

1930-31 


381 
407 

521 

158 
121 

(?) 


1932 


149 


1933 


(2) 


C) 


1934.- 


73 


1935 




69 



See footnotes at end of table. 



133 



Table 70. — Nu7nher oj offenses known to the police, Januai 1/ to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 





Murder, 
nonncg- 
liRent 
man- 
slaughter 


Bobbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 




Over .$50 


Under $50 


Qurfleld, N. J.: 
1930 


7 


20 
20 
18 
18 
15 
15 

38 
63 
55 
49 
31 
16 

20 
29 
15 
10 

8 

60 
69 
20 
28 
26 
23 

39 

51 
(2) 
10 
4 

19 

19 

10 

8 

5 

4 

22 

12 

8 

13 

70 
62 
24 
30 
32 
38 

63 

38 
82 

38 
34 

62 
61 
69 

124 
99 

124 

30 
9 

50 
46 
45 
37 


W 
18 
19 
15 
13 
9 

1 

4 
2 
5 
5 

1 

1 
4 
2 
1 


C) 
75 

106 
74 
88 

102 

208 
246 
271 
333 
353 
272 

C) 
141 
185 
175 
108 
56 

95 

90 

117 

151 

116 

85 

61 

38 

C') 

137 

96 

83 
78 
49 
63 
72 
129 

88 
62 
56 
51 

174 
155 
83 
87 
69 
77 

253 
275 
307 

19(1 
227 

123 
141 
202 
211 

2-}(i 
228 

{') 

(») 
155 
204 
309 
270 


Q) 
23 
10 
11 
19 
10 

63 
77 
74 
80 
46 
32 

17 

18 

18 

15 

7 

(') 
0) 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 

98 

1 

0) 

13 

15 

28 
9 
17 
12 
20 
27 

C') 

45 
25 
19 
10 

(') 

37 

4 

5 

12 

24 

67 
10 
37 

36 
34 

(') 
152 
100 
96 
92 
83 

(') 

w 
2a3 

81 

107 

72 


W 
104 
104 
172 
179 
136 

401 
612 
1, lOH 
1,120 
920 
769 

{') 

240 
324 
301 
243 

358 
292 
220 
178 
135 
126 

278 
308 
(2) 
414 
436 

117 
37 
84 

102 
88 

122 

(2) 
184 
197 
169 
218 

270 
271 
252 
341 
290 
335 

197 
379 

258 
(2) 
275 
371 

504 
498 
627 
644 
500 
515 

729 

482 
4fi5 
561 
485 


29 


1931 


32 


1932. 


3 


48 


1933 


41 


1934 




27 


1935 




20 


(Hendale, Calif.: 

1930 




183 


1931 


2 


191 


1932.. 


183 


1933. - . 


1 


197 


1934 


187 


1935 


1 


235 


Green Bay, Wis.: 

1930 


171 


1931 


1932.... 


1 
1 


130 


1933 


103 


1934 - 


89 


1935 




112 


Greensboro, N. C: 

1930 


20 
11 
15 
10 
13 
8 

2 

6 

12 
5 

6 
5 
1 

1 
1 


(?) 
124 
44 
52 
35 
20 

1 
2 

4 
11 

86 
134 
24 
51 
47 
29 

{') 
5 
1 
9 


348 


1931 


278 


1932 


229 


1933 


218 


1934 


177 


1935 


159 


Greenville, S. C: 


238 


1931 


239 


1932-33 


(2) 


1934 


100 


1935 


104 


Hackensack, N. J.: 

1930 


66 


1931 


72 


1932 


50 


1933 .. 


79 


1934 


46 


1935..-- 


55 


1930-31 


in 
1 
1 
4 
4 

6 
6 
2 
2 
5 
10 


(0 


1932 


130 


1933 


78 


1934.. 


77 


1935.-.- 


61 


Hamilton, Ohio: 
1930- . 


13 
14 
16 
11 
9 
4 

37 

2.i 
20 
(■') 
IS 
11 

6 

11 

8 

3 

17 

17 

37 
47 
98 
52 
30 
34 


351 


1931 


356 


19.32 


145 


1933 


155 


1934.. 


140 


1935.. 


72 


Haminond, Ind.: 

1930 


267 


1931 


4 
2 


284 


1932 


208 


1933 


(2) 


1934 


186 


1935 




103 


Hamtramck, Mich.: 

1930 

1931... 


1 
8 
5 
2 
5 
2 

3 
2 
9 

1 
4 



254 

190 


19.32 


149 


19.33 


157 


1934 


199 


19.35 


237 


flarrisburg, Pa.: 

1930 


336 


1931 


320 


1932 

1933 


254 
221 


1934 

1935 -... 


158 
141 



See footnotes at end of table. 



134 



Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Haverhill, Mass.: 

1930 




1 
5 


4 
1 

7 


178 

173 

71 

150 

99 

99 

206 
272 
334 
306 

462 
412 

226 

124 
109 

98 
125 

{') 
170 
170 

470 
424 
480 
599 

92 

37 

94 

180 

337 

164 

160 

231 

124 

65 

56 

(2) 

81 

87 

111 

100 

82 

232 
274 
216 
203 
285 
251 

203 
209 

188 
141 
164 
247 

55 
81 
107 
78 
60 


(0 

9 
34 

9 
36 
21 

(0 
73 
62 
54 
57 
64 

(') 

68 
24 
33 
22 

21 
41 

160 
170 
133 
348 

24 
9 

18 
9 
1 

28 

7 

2 
1 
6 

18 

11 

2 
9 

5 
8 

(') 
65 
29 
41 
36 
63 

73 
56 
31 
23 
26 
13 

8 
24 
19 

9 
17 


315 
356 
133 
200 
140 
165 

335 
292 
701 
515 
307 
313 

410 

168 
107 
117 
148 

41 
33 

1,063 
948 
923 

1,020 

100 
47 
127 
276 
314 
222 

243 
338 
271 
233 
377 

148 
115 
106 
123 

182 

186 
143 
136 
168 
142 
182 

760 
786 
763 
751 
787 
740 

56 
174 
149 
100 

59 


133 


1931 


1 


188 


1932 


163 


1933 


1 


6 
6 
2 

74 
73 
79 
74 
40 
64 

16 

7 

5 

14 

13 

30 
20 

{') 

124 

126 

106 

68 

15 
8 
14 
23 
27 
5 

39 
16 
10 

7 
14 

14 

11 

9 

7 
6 

26 
45 
36 
36 
26 
13 

55 
36 
44 
20 
21 
20 

7 
5 
8 
8 
4 


136 


1934 . 


1 
10 

11 
37 
4 
5 
12 
10 

103 

127 
114 
165 
194 

46 
6 

28 

90 

111 

104 

13 
8 
3 
1 
1 
1 

(2) 


144 


1935 




103 


Highland Park, Mich.: 

1930 




254 


1931 


1 
3 
3 
1 


147 


1932___ 


128 


1933 . 


159 


1934 


128 


1935 


162 


High Point, N. C: 
1930 


8 

5 
3 
6 
5 

{') 
3 
1 

13 
11 
16 
11 

1 
1 


168 


1931 


(2) 
166 


1932 


1933 


76 


1934 


65 


1935 


61 


Hoboken, N. J.: 

1930-33 


(2) 


1934__.. 


58 


1935 . 


94 


Huntington, W. Va.: 

1930-31 ._ 


(2) 


1932 


877 


1933 


490 


1934... 


392 


1935 _ 


290 


Huntington Park, Calif.: 

1930 


80 


1931 

1932 


126 
110 


1933 




120 


1934 




116 


1935 


1 


81 


Hutchinson, Kans.: 
1930. 


(2) 


1931 - 


84 


1932 




1 


106 


1933- -. 




86 


1934. . 


3 
2 

1 


2 
3 

3 
6 
3 
1 
4 

2 
3 

1 
8 

1 

30 

28 
20 
22 
15 
12 

7 
12 
2 
4 
1 


24 


1935 


36 


1930 

1931 


64 


1932. 


49 


1933 


1 


49 


1934 


27 


1935... 




43 


Irvington, N. J.: 

1930 . 




115 


1931 

1932 


2 


91 
106 


1933 . - . 


1 


92 


1934 


114 


1935 




102 


Jackson, Mich.: 

1930 - . . 


4 
3 
1 


199 




180 


1932 


97 


1933 


56 


1934 


2 
2 

(2) 
2 


136 


1935 .... 


121 


Jamestown, N. Y.: 

1930 ... - 


(2) 


1931 

1932 


13 

57 


1933 


1 
1 


36 


1934 


23 


1935 


26 



See footnotes at end of table. 



135 



Table 70. — Number of offenses knotvii to the police, January to December, inclusive 

;.950-S.5— Continued 



Johnstown, Pa.: 

19.J0 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Joliet, III.: 

1930 

1931 

1932.. 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Joplin, Mo.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933.. 

1934 

1935... 

Kalamazoo, Mich.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935... 

Kearny, N. J.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Keno.sha, Wis.: 

1930 

1931 

1932.... 

1933 

1934 

1935... 

Kokomo, Ind.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Lackawanna, N. Y.; 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

La Crosse, Wis.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

La Fayette, Ind.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Lakewood, Ohio : 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933.. 

1934 

1935 



Murder, 

nonnpR- 

liRpnt 

man- 

slaughtpr 



0) 



0) 



(') 



2 
1 
1 
2 
4 
3 

12 

10 

3 

3 



Robbery 



4 
17 
20 

5 
4 
5 



V-) 



0) 



72 
66 
63 
49 
37 

146 
67 

99 
93 
75 

29 
14 
30 
37 
26 
27 

15 
16 

5 

8 

10 

5 

29 
7 

14 
6 
4 
5 

17 
44 
13 
19 
20 
19 

22 

15 

7 

5 



m 



13 
7 
6 
3 
6 

67 
45 
30 
28 
11 
12 

28 
29 
54 
34 
36 
35 



.Vggra- 
vate<i 
assault 



10 

10 

5 

4 

8 



(') 



0) 



18 
29 
27 
21 
14 

3 
4 



4 
4 

9 

2 
2 
12 
8 
2 

15 
6 
3 
2 
1 



2 
4 
6 
2 

10 
3 
2 
4 



Bur- 
glary- 
break inp 
or enter- 
ing 



42 
33 
32 

28 
48 
32 



W 



12 



49 
84 
69 
60 
59 
81 



(■') 



(') 



100 
131 
107 
141 

72 

278 
277 

394 
293 
301 



183 
290 
240 
299 
174 
164 

110 

91 

117 

87 
89 
81 

107 
99 
63 
64 
42 
49 

186 
226 
81 
125 
158 
155 

40 
44 
43 
58 
38 
32 



(^) 



96 
69 
92 
56 
60 

66 
130 
121 
129 
123 

70 

168 
157 
266 
192 
173 
345 



Larceny— theft 








Auto 
theft 






Over $50 


Under $50 




{■') 


0) 


W 


63 


139 


130 


28 


155 


102 


26 


138 


87 


21 


127 


161 


15 


189 


241 


(0 


(') 


(') 


25 


90 


360 


16 


130 


204 


20 


175 


193 


26 


209 


130 


13 


120 


105 


(') 


622 


247 


68 


481 


409 


(2) 


(2) 


0) 


70 


561 


329 


109 


604 


291 


171 


528 


245 


(') 


518 


311 


45 


696 


(2) 


37 


895 


237 


23 


861 


140 


32 


972 


194 


46 


985 


173 


44 


92 


29 


25 


79 


23 


14 


39 


17 


17 


49 


16 


12 


34 


32 


9 


40 


23 


(1) 


151 


32 


29 


90 


35 


17 


88 


51 


8 


242 


25 


7 


205 


19 


8 


173 


43 


50 


370 


117 


80 


487 


142 


22 


297 


68 


12 


430 


62 


22 


447 


72 


24 


339 


59 


(') 


164 


33 


30 


105 


23 


23 


166 


21 


13 


100 


15 


8 


146 


23 


8 


97 


6 


(2) 


(') 


(2) 


21 


242 


78 


6 


159 


72 


13 


193 


55 


13 


184 


59 


11 


193 


76 


25 


163 


169 


48 


262 


104 


23 


304 


60 


5 


249 


71 


3 


179 


48 


2 


115 


42 


(') 


91 


105 


13 


88 


71 


24 


123 


62 


15 


67 


38 


25 


64 


38 


21 


115 


46 



See footnotes at end of table. 



136 

Table 70. — Nuviher of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35— Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 


\uto 




Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Lancaster, Pa.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 - 


5 
8 


IS 

22 

9 

14 

8 

7 

55 
19 
20 
20 
27 
22 

22 
29 

3 

61 
51 
94 
94 
76 
70 

35 
38 
21 
29 
20 
14 

34 
59 
41 
35 
23 
22 

170 
119 
116 

41 
15 
29 
30 
35 
16 

9 
9 
5 

24 
42 
30 

17 
33 
22 
16 
37 
32 

18 
11 

18 
17 
16 
15 


41 
42 
14 
24 
32 
23 

6 
13 

7 
15 

8 

15 
4 


107 
145 
110 
127 
121 
89 

186 
151 
131 
159 
123 
108 

194 

158 

45 

257 
282 
371 
437 
353 
393 

166 
219 
232 
239 
144 
191 

184 
184 
230 
224 
195 
188 

524 
474 
638 

175 
207 
152 
171 
161 
161 

108 
129 
110 

(■') 
100 
135 
105 

154 
177 
210 
179 
161 
241 

117 

169 

109 

90 

41 

77 


65 
53 
44 
53 
36 

66 
47 
63 
69 
110 
63 

95 

67 

16 

0) 
64 
58 
84 
81 
69 

(') 
23 
25 
38 
19 
27 

(') 
72 
56 
77 
91 
63 

(2) 
(') 
0) 

(') 
(') 

31 
22 
29 
29 
29 

34 

42 
47 

30 
39 
23 

10 
37 
30 
16 
43 

55 
40 
34 
21 
51 


290 
375 
352 
353 
364 
334 

142 
113 
258 
300 
403 
346 

(2) 
183 
164 

174 

(2) 

749 

665 

883 

1,115 

1,161 

1,317 

204 
296 
390 
477 
290 
369 

572 
517 
321 
479 
802 
549 

{') 

1,221 

976 

1,159 

380 
239 
265 
247 
273 
337 

(2) 
46 
47 
50 

(') 
700 
470 
446 

403 

518 
652 
659 
736 

304 
237 
263 
284 
356 


185 
184 
156 


1933 


1 
2 


82 


1934 

1935 -- - 


114 

68 


Lansing, Mich.: 
1930 - - 




318 


1931 - - 




167 


1932 


1 
1 


118 


1933 


150 


1934 . 


196 


1935 


1 


140 


Lawrence, Mass.: 
1930-33 


(2) 
286 


1934 


1935 




166 


Lewiston, Maine: 

1930 




50 


1931-.35 


20 
15 
15 
23 

15 
15 

1 
3 


(0 

63 
101 
139 
210 
175 
224 

3 
8 
4 
4 
4 
6 

9 
23 
16 
12 
18 
10 

(2) 
119 
124 

20 
21 
22 
26 

21 
12 

5 

1 
2 

(2) 
48 
115 
80 

49 
26 
63 

77 
66 
71 

3 

5 

4 
5 
5 
5 


375 


Lexington, Ky.: 
1930 


1931 


517 


1932 


367 


1933 


223 


1934 


273 


1935 . . 


167 


Lima, Ohio: 

1930 -- 


204 


1931 -.- .-.-.. ... 


216 


1932 


231 


1933 


3 


118 


1934 


122 


1935 -. 


1 
3 


111 


Lincoln, Nebr.: 

1930 - 


266 


1931 


420 


1932 


3 
1 
2 
2 

16 
29 
13 

6 
5 
5 
1 
3 
2 

2 
2 

1 

12 
6 
6 

10 
10 
6 
13 
12 
18 

1 
1 
2 


372 


1933 - 


393 


1934 


280 


1935 


214 


Little Rock, Ark.: 
1930-32 . - 


(2) 
508 


1933 - 


1934 . ... 


359 


1935 


203 


Lorain, Ohio: 

1930 


214 


1931 


195 


1932 


102 


1933 


94 


1934 


106 


1935 


88 


Lower Merion Township, Pa.: 
1930-32 


(2) 


1933 


55 


1934 


92 


1935 


40 


Lynchburg, Va.: 

1930-32 .- 


(2) 


1933 


210 


1934 . - 


157 


1935 


227 


Macon, Ga.: 

1930 


(0 


1931 . 


195 


1932 


182 


1933 


139 


1934 


207 


1935 


210 


Madison, Wis.: 

1930 . 


(2) 


1931.... 


288 


1932 . . 


162 


1933 


121 


1934 




114 


1935... 




114 



See footnotes at end of table. 



137 

Table 70. — Number of offences known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

19S0-S5— Continued 



H.: 



M allien, Mass.: 

1930 

1931.... 

1932-35 

Manchester, N. 

1930... 

1931 

1932 

1933... 

1934 

1935. 

Mansfield, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932-34 

1935... 

Marion, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932. 

1933 

1934 

1935. -_ 

Massillon, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935.... 

Maywood, 111.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933.. 

1934 

1935 

McKeesport, Pa.: 

1930 

1931 

1932.. 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Medford, Mass.: 

1930... 

1931. 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Meriden, Conn.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Meridian, Miss.: 

1930-32 

1933 

1934.. 

1935 

Michigan City, Ind. 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Middletown, Conn.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



m 



0) 



0) 






See footnotes at end of table. 
24928°— 37 5 



V) 



Robbery 



m 



11 

17 



0) 



4 
5 
2 
f) 
4 
6 

32 
54 

15 

14 
11 
17 
19 
10 
10 

8 
15 

2 
18 
13 
19 

26 
26 
33 
33 
28 
20 



(2) 



62 
57 
50 
55 
54 

18 
22 
29 
14 
25 
5 

12 

13 

20 

5 

5 

4 



(2) 
0) 



m 



32 

23 

28 

21 

17 

9 

47 

1 
5 
5 
4 
9 
4 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



{') 



52 
69 



(-) 



4 
6 
3 
4 
3 
9 

24 
14 



15 
3 



10 



41 
11 
4 
4 
5 
3 



(2) 



33 

50 
5(1 
63 

85 



(2) 



26 
8 
5 
2 

3 
4 



(2) 



(2) 



W 



15 

27 

37 

37 

5 

1 



lUir- 
glary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



(2) 



27 
48 



(2) 



150 
125 
82 
115 
129 
104 

97 
155 
) 
142 

42 
62 
58 
48 
49 
128 

41 
41 
18 
31 
73 
80 

53 
71 

77 

67 

131 

70 



(2) 



82 
97 
95 
73 
87 

144 
174 
193 
160 
220 
285 

95 
117 
230 
174 

198 
200 



0) 



{') 



0) 



279 

304 

74 
88 
42 
47 

58 

8 

4 

3 

17 

27 

23 



Over $50 Under $50 



in 

(■) 



30 



31 
20 
24 
16 
32 



(1) 
(2) 



22 
29 



(0 



15 
10 
5 
13 
15 



(') 



5 
41 
28 
21 
12 

20 
8 
6 
11 
18 
12 



0) 



59 
68 
47 
55 
66 



(') 



21 
19 
22 
12 

12 
28 
10 
12 
27 
16 



(2) 



41 
49 



0) 



m 



28 
16 
27 

10 



(') 



12 
8 
4 
6 
5 



V) 



122 

88 



(2) 



194 
163 
174 
210 
196 
313 

295 
305 

259 

119 
116 
308 
349 
255 
274 

48 
58 
127 
71 
97 
95 

31 
77 
78 
95 
123 
75 



(0 



89 
146 
125 
112 
104 

271 
253 
259 
249 
257 
244 

174 
150 
235 
204 
197 
207 



0) 





286 
375 



(') 



n 



Auto 
theft 



(») 



21 

18 



(') 



74 
89 
59 
102 
108 
39 

105 
83 

59 

162 

103 

117 

83 

76 

69 

83 
107 
100 
44 
42 
34 

25 
42 
45 
79 
40 
17 



C) 



140 
115 
114 
105 
107 

102 
97 
88 

123 
69 
27 

62 
44 
63 
30 
45 
36 



(2N 



39 

30 





67 


1,50 


41 


193 


40 


105 


40 




(') 


72 


61 


31 


14 


32 


41 


33 


44 


42 


15 


26 


42 


24 


10 



138 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive 

1930-36 — Continued 



Middletown, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933- 

1934 

1935 

Mishawaka, Ind.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 - 

1935 

Mobile, Ala.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Moline, 111.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 --- 

Monroe, La.: 

1930 

1931- 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Mount, Vernon, N. Y.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 -_- 

1935 

Muncie, Ind.: 

1930-34 

1935 

Muskegon, Mich.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Muskogee, Okla.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Nashua, N. H.: 

1930 - 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

New .\lbany, Ind.: 

1930-34 

1935 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



7 

18 
24 
17 
21 
22 



1 
2 

5 

10 
8 
4 
2 
4 



(2) 



Robbery 



(^) 



(') 



See footnotes at end of table. 



40 
33 
31 
15 
17 
9 

19 

28 
62 
22 
17 
3 

44 
45 
81 
101 
86 
68 

28 
26 
26 
13 
12 
18 

61 
53 
50 
47 
38 
55 

11 

19 

12 

9 

3 

2 



m 



13 

19 

23 

5 

12 
15 



20 
33 
70 
93 
61 
54 



(^) 



(') 



19 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2 
1 

11 
13 
10 
16 



135 
150 
125 
132 
167 
153 

21 

6 

6 

5 

12 

15 

23 
25 
11 
19 
5 
3 

9 
10 
20 
6 
6 
6 



m 



100 

10 
3 
2 
4 
3 
7 

6 
1 
9 
7 
16 
22 



(2) 



(2) 



62 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



109 
117 
183 
124 
123 
109 

40 
45 
58 
74 
70 
63 

376 
523 
282 
307 
259 
255 

79 
77 
108 
63 
58 
58 



(2) 



238 
240 
178 
132 
161 

188 
91 

102 
68 
73 
73 



(2) 



51 

120 
140 
92 
115 
157 
144 

117 
169 
270 
321 
357 
327 



(.') 



69 
72 
82 
78 
90 



(») 



75 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



(') 



24 
23 
22 
32 
15 



(') 



40 
14 
24 
15 
12 



(1) 



108 

120 

108 

92 

66 

(') 
29 
25 
20 
20 
23 



(0 



25 
17 
19 
8 
24 



0) 



19 

13 

9 

11 

8 



(2) 



20 

34 
22 
26 
13 
31 
25 



(') 



(') 



21 



Under $50 



299 
407 
489 
508 
571 
516 

213 

72 
108 
150 
128 
157 

589 
529 
451 
549 
553 
316 

253 

227 
279 
190 
199 
262 

166 
294 
299 
235 
277 
282 

453 
167 
139 
186 
190 
142 



V) 



138 

253 
372 
246 
262 
227 
264 



26 


234 


109 


17 


306 


111 


2 


498 


95 


2 


542 


128 


2 


568 


108 


13 


670 


78 




m 


m 


22 


244 


27 


11 


201 


24 


9 


136 


18 


13 


175 


15 


11 


146 


16 



(2) 



267 



Auto 
theft 



124 
141 
66 
64 
91 
74 

180 
102 
50 
65 
53 
96 

300 
300 
234 
226 
195 
166 

95 
106 
84 
73 
61 
86 

107 

152 
84 
48 
41 
51 

96 
100 
78 
73 
54 
61 



(0 



177 

177 
115 
126 
52 
111 
133 



(.') 



42 



139 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35— Continued 



Newark, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932- 

1933 

1934. 

1935.. 

New Britain, Conn.: 

1930 

1931 

1932.... 

1933 

1934 

1935 

New Brunswick, N. J. 

1930-31.. 

1932 

1933... 

1934.. 

1935 

Newburgh, N. Y.: 

1930 

1931.. 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

New Castle, Pa.: 

1930-32 

1933.. 

1934 

1935 

New London, Conn.: 

1930 

1931.... 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Newport, Ky.: 

1930-31 

1932.. 

1933 

1934 

1935.... 

Newport, R. I.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935. 

Newport News, Va.r 

1930 

1931... 

1932 

1933 

1934... 

1935. _ 

New Rochelle, N. Y.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 ... 

1933 

1934 

1935... 

Newton, Mass.: 

1930-31 

1932 

1933 

1934.. 

1935 



MunitT, 
nonneg- 
II gent 
man- 
slaughter 



(-) 






{') 






13 
3 
8 
4 

10 
6 

5 
7 
5 
1 
1 
2 



w 



Robbery 



12 
2 

12 

11 

17 

9 

15 
6 
14 
11 
23 
26 



(2) 



15 
15 
15 
12 

3 

5 
4 
3 

7 
3 






U 
38 



Q) 



0) 
(2) 



93 
54 

77 



24 
21 
22 
25 
22 
24 

12 

26 

18 

9 

9 

4 



« 



8 

6 

11 

7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



3 

7 

5 

14 

11 

17 

26 



(2) 



7 
17 
13 
19 

4 

4 

10 

10 

3 



(2) 
(2) 



0) 



7 
11 
21 

9 
12 



(■) 
0) 



44 
58 
53 



82 
69 
52 
89 
90 
93 

25 
43 
72 
52 
59 
45 



{') 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



80 
80 

78 
72 
50 

77 



(2) 



166 
270 
358 
119 



0) 



61 
64 
99 
86 

43 
46 
87 
82 
50 
69 



(2) 
1 



172 

) 
181 



(2) 



68 

87 

115 

115 

74 



(2) 
1 
1 

(2) 



147 

164 

90 



63 
69 
48 
46 
79 

187 
191 
186 
166 
229 
258 

78 
97 
145 
79 
65 
82 



W 



223 
173 
172 
253 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



(') 



7 
15 
15 
12 



9 
38 
26 
31 
25 



(2) 
(2) 



39 
23 

21 
15 
13 
11 
12 
13 






46 



(2) 



35 
28 
18 
9 
12 



(2) 
(2) 



41 
15 

57 



34 
28 
26 
22 
22 



(>) 



42 
24 
29 
34 
36 



(') 



68 
70 
35 
35 
23 



0) 
(') 
(') 
(>) 
(') 



Under $50 



261 
206 
166 
290 
153 
317 

221 
164 
319 
413 
410 
431 



(2) 
0) 



183 
218 

75 
102 
137 
106 
130 
133 



1 

(2) 



134 
) 
147 



(2) 



126 
142 
194 
157 
119 



(2) 



0) 



136 
147 
206 



160 
163 
164 
177 
134 

156 
131 
99 
147 
166 
151 

244 
270 
211 
141 
89 
52 



0) 



221 
298 
305 
303 



.\uto 
theft 



88 
94 
56 
35 
70 
56 



0) 



89 
114 

105 
135 



(2) 



143 
122 
162 
273 

48 
54 
47 
25 
26 
46 






64 

114 



0) 



77 
52 
36 
81 
40 



(2) 
1 



126 
64 
53 



54 
47 
25 
37 
23 

141 
96 
48 
52 
71 
94 

87 
103 

88 
113 

70 

78 



« 



97 
116 
102 
109 



See footnotes at end of table. 



140 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Niagara Falls, N. Y.: 
1930 


3 
3 
5 


60 
40 
54 
31 
34 
31 

13 
21 

12 
8 
8 

11 

8 

12 

9 

6 

7 
5 

4 
10 

43 
18 
12 
18 
22 
17 

119 
163 
ISO 
175 
124 
100 

32 
35 
61 
38 
35 
56 

26 
23 

24 

26 

2 

1 

16 

10 

19 

4 

10 
4 
4 
7 
6 
4 

23 
23 
19 
31 

18 

34 
33 


40 
41 
24 
25 
45 
22 

23 
14 
10 
15 
18 
13 

4 
1 
1 
1 
1 


198 
253 
364 
314 
269 
287 

(2) 

(2) 
40 
35 
31 

82 
136 
88 
69 
68 
71 

(2) 

123 

68 
50 
51 

104 
67 

104 

322 
319 
314 

282 
256 

127 
289 
260 
249 
285 
234 

89 

141 

148 

(2) 

135 

184 
132 
124 
208 
232 
106 

(2) 
42 
57 
88 
75 
74 

(2) 

123 
146 
186 
167 

176 
149 


(■) 
54 
50 
49 
29 
36 

(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 

(■) 
12 
19 
11 

(2) 
(2) 

7 
5 

9 
11 

1 

6 
13 

9 

56 
58 
73 
54 
45 
48 

(') 
87 
73 
31 
47 
64 

0) 
15 
12 

14 

42 
24 
20 
10 
6 
74 

(2) 

11 

9 

12 

12 

(0 
11 

7 
15 
16 
19 

(2) 
20 

(') 


280 
357 
370 
399 
403 
350 

(') 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 
(2) 

121 
81 
49 
49 

(2) 

(2) 

m 
(■') 

178 

42 
100 

92 
148 
155 
132 

326 
399 
545 
438 
433 

304 
793 
695 
611 
692 
575 

107 

72 

49 

(2) 

159 

252 
236 
582 
536 
454 
171 

(2) 

129 
124 
171 
190 

56 

69 

92 

150 

142 

233 
363 


247 


1931 


305 


1932 


282 


1933 


178 


1934 


3 
2 

1 
6 


261 


1935 


200 


Norristown, Pa.: 

1930 


168 


1931 


104 


1932 


88 


1933 




116 


1934 . 




56 


1935 . 




56 


North Bergen Township, N. J.: 

1930- -.-_ 

1931 


3 

1 
1 


44 

57 


1932 


39 


1933 


41 


1934 . . 


2 
1 

9 

8 
(2) 


69 


1935 


38 


Norwalk, Conn.: 

1930 


(2) 
14 

4 

11 

2 
6 
2 
2 


(0 
26 


1931 .. 


1932 


14 


1933-35 


(2) 


Norwood, Ohio: 
1930 


52 


1931 




34 


1932 


2 


20 


1933 


i9 


1934 _ 




48 


1935 


1 

1 
1 
3 


25 


Oak Park, Dl.: 
1930. 


3 

1 
2 
1 
2 

1 

10 


170 


1931 


1932 


234 


1933.-. 


227 


1934 . 


2 


132 


1935 


63 


Ogden, Utah: 

1930 


3 


(2) 


1931.. . 


434 


1932 . . 




1 
1 
3 

4 

61 

44 
35 

46 

13 

12 

9 

16 


289 


1933 . .. 




155 


1934.. 




274 


1935 


3 

4 
2 
4 

5 

4 
1 
1 

1 


180 


Orange, N. J.; 

1930 ... 


47 


1931 


83 


1932_ 


68 


1933-34... 


(2) 


1935 


79 


Orlando, Fla.: 

1930 


106 


1931... 


93 


1932 . .. 


65 


1933 


58 


1934 


53 


1935 


4 


24 

2 
9 
2 


92 


Oshkosh, Wis.: 

1930 


96 


1931 




22 


1932 




29 


1933 




48 


1934 . 






62 


1935 






25 


Ottumwa, Iowa: 

1930 


(2) 
1 
1 
1 

1 


(2) 
13 
8 
17 
30 
29 

30 
30 


(2) 


1931 

1932 


83 
21 


1933 


34 


1934. . . 


41 


1935... 


24 


Paducah, Ky.: 

1930-33 


16 
12 


(2) 


1934 

1935.... 


173 
191 



See footnotes at end of table. 



141 



Table 70.— Xumber of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 





Murder, 
non neg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larcenj 


'—theft 






Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Pasadena, Calif.: 

1930 


4 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 

2 


29 
32 
37 
38 
20 
12 

8 
7 

10 
6 

8 
5 

31 
50 

27 

9 
24 
33 

9 

8 
4 

8 

28 

9 

(?) 
5 

21 

29 

14 

9 

2 

4 

78 

121 

71 

4 
4 
fi 
6 
5 
3 

15 

71 
53 
49 
28 
32 
22 

24 
13 
12 
11 
8 
10 

13 
5 
1 

11 
13 


3 
4 

6 

7 

10 

13 

6 

6 

15 

5 

22 

12 

8 
18 

40 

17 
1 


175 
225 
303 
234 
258 
225 

80 
63 
46 
46 
63 
115 

349 
243 

362 

98 
84 
96 
118 
79 
94 

112 

(») 

224 
(2) 

144 

75 
121 
110 
121 

406 
429 
444 

121 
112 
139 
173 
164 
130 

105 

243 

245 
301 
354 
307 
248 

167 

186 

126 

89 

94 

Q) 
69 
52 
52 

296 
417 


44 
21 
22 
17 
21 

(') 
19 
20 
34 

48 
71 

(■) 

29 
{') 

39 

(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(>) 
(■) 

57 
29 

(1) 

(0 

(') 

(') 
89 
109 
15 
21 
20 

130 

85 

108 

20 
11 
11 
12 
13 
8 

42 

(') 
74 
56 
66 
82 
56 

(!) 

17 
38 
14 
10 
24 

(?) 
24 
16 
5 


599 
657 
446 
400 
1,197 
967 

140 
184 
181 
140 
160 
147 

346 
185 
{') 
336 

456 
535 
803 
838 
875 
837 

70 
101 
199 

279 

638 
444 
460 
372 
559 
638 

(2) 

1,031 

1,223 

944 

187 
133 
182 
209 
168 
186 

(-) 
143 

521 
491 
473 
558 
530 
421 

76 
50 
88 

121 
94 

162 

146 
153 
253 

308 
439 


183 


1931 

1932 


254 
15<R 


1933 


142 


1934 


152 


1935 


14G 


Parkersburg, W. Va.: 

1930 


24 


1931 


150 


1932 


3 

5 

1 
2 


53 


1933 

1934 . . . 


30 

48 


1935 


78 


Passaie, N. J.: 
1930 


310 


1931 

1932-34 


2 

1 


251 
231 


1935 


Pawtucket, R. I.: 

1930 


236 


1931 - 




271 


1932 




230 


1933 




6 

20 

2 

34 
26 

20 

0) 

(2) 
69 
64 
81 
71 

(2) 
34 
32 
34 

21 
2 
1 
4 
2 
3 

32 

56 
37 
23 
20 

in 

7 

11 
13 
19 
21 
21 
30 

4 

11 

4 

84 
11 


194 


1934 


1 

1 

5 
8 


112 


1935 

Perth Amboy, N. J.: 

1930 .- 


113 
40 


1931 -- 

1932 


89 
109 


1933-34 


1 

2 
7 
4 
7 
9 
3 

14 
10 
15 


Q) 
112 


1935 


1930 


11 


1931 


27 


1932 


27 


1933 


13 


1934 


21 


1935 . 


22 


Phoenix, Ariz.: 

19.30-32 


(2) 


1933 ... 


553 


1934 


694 


1935 - 


711 


Pittsfield, Mass.: 

1930 


60 


1931 




119 


1932 




156 


1933 . 




123 


1934 -. 




141 


1935 

Plainfield. N. J.: 

1930-34 


1 

2 

2 
2 

4 
3 
2 

1 

15 
11 
5 
7 
5 
6 

(») 

1 
1 

1 

(») 


85 


1935 


94 


Pontiac, Mich.: 

1930 


410 


1931 


232 


1932 .. 


155 


1933 


142 


1934 


93 


19.35... 


179 


Port Arthur, Tex.: 

1930 


108 


1931 


72 


1932 


53 


1933 


62 


1934 


86 


1935 


72 


Port Huron, Mich.: 

1930-32 


(») 


1933 


28 


1934 


61 


1935 


35 


Portland, Maine: 

19,30-33 


(2) 


1934 


271 


1935 




303 



See footnotes at end of table. 



142 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the 'police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 



Portsmouth, Ohio: 

1930 

1931 

1932-. 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Portsmouth, Va.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Pueblo, Colo.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Quincy, 111.: 

1930-34 

1935 

Quincv, Mass.: 

1930 -. 

1931 

1932 -.. 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Racine, Wis.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Raleigh, N. C: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933-35 

Revere, Mass.: 

1930 

1931_ 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Richmond, Ind.: 

1930-31 

1932_ 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Riverside, Calif.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Roanoke, Va.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933. 

1934 

1935 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
4 

1 
22 
13 
12 

15 
11 



(') 



Q) 



(2) 



{') 



(2) 



{') 



8 
8 
8 
4 
11 
13 



Robbery 



24 
13 
20 
25 
20 
19 

15 
40 
61 
32 
26 
61 

21 

6 

10 



3 
5 

74 
53 
57 
63 
52 
37 



(2) 



(2) 



23 

18 
21 
24 
13 
18 



(2) 



9 
32 
24 
14 

9 
13 

5 
26 

8 



27 
24 
41 
26 
37 
17 



(^) 



(') 



31 
45 
20 

27 

30 

28 

8 

5 
4 

17 
13 
26 
32 
24 
44 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



14 
24 
15 
28 
39 
30 

93 

76 

76 

96 

115 

152 

11 
12 
21 
11 
14 
14 

11 
12 
10 

12 

7 
8 



(0 



(2) 



12 

106 
100 
111 
89 
118 



11 
9 
5 
7 
6 
8 



(2) 

(2) 



78 



10 

6 

17 

15 



(^) 



(») 



10 
5 

5 
2 

9 
16 
11 

4 

7 

63 
62 
68 
67 
46 
51 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



101 
128 
125 
135 
225 
156 

126 
214 

406 
328 
203 
280 

43 
84 
165 
136 
69 
85 

288 
371 
301 
339 
349 
259 



(2) 



(') 



163 

179 
236 
141 
216 
222 



33 
100 
134 
144 
188 

99 



(2) 

1 

(2) 



144 



177 
166 
274 
257 
235 
216 



(0 



(') 



162 

119 

96 

142 

116 
183 
139 

) 

121 
121 



(2) 



142 
105 

85 
78 



Larceny — theft 



Over $50 



(') 



44 
31 
39 
64 
49 

36 
125 
86 
55 
55 
41 



(0 



54 
28 
18 
11 
11 



(') 



50 
33 
36 
23 
24 



(2) 



(2) 



100 
42 
41 
32 
31 



54 
64 
21 
29 

18 



(') 



{') 



63 
62 



25 
43 
26 
30 
24 
22 



(2) 



46 
10 
21 
14 



(') 






26 
10 



17 



(2) 



111 

122 

120 

76 



Under $50 



195 
359 
346 
470 
677 
585 



(2) 



514 
613 
618 
539 
723 

220 
339 
370 
321 
376 
255 

500 
587 
638 
712 
501 
451 



(0 



(2) 
(0 



135 

330 
316 
404 
437 
382 



C) 



416 
411 
408 
449 
330 

211 
200 
191 



226 
280 
263 
230 
260 
220 



(2) 



(2) 



362 
298 
303 
385 

267 
406 
454 



226 



0) 

(2) 



605 
573 
551 
632 



See footnotes at end of table. 



143 

Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35 — Continued 



Rock ford, 111.: 
1030-31 


(') 




1932 


? 


1933 - -- 


3 


1934 




1935 




3 


Rock Island, 111.: 

1930 --- 


4 


1931 




1932 




8 


1933 - 




1934 






1935 




Rome, N. Y.: 

1930 - -- 




1931 --- 






1932 -.. - 




1933..- -- 






1934 . . 




1935 






Royal Oak, Mich.: 

1930 




1931.. 




1932 




1933 




1934... . 




1935 




Sacramento, Calif.: 

1930 


(2) 


1 


1931 




1932 


(i 


1933 


/ 


1934.. . 


i 


1935 




Saginaw, Mich.: 


f) 


1931... 


fi 




fi 


1933 


3 


1934.. 


n 


1935. .. 


4 


St. Joseph, Mo.: 

1930... 


1 


1931 


1 


1932 


1 


1933... 


8 


1934. 


6 


1935 


3 


St. Petersburg, Fla.: 

1930 


4 


1931 


3 


1932 


7 


1933 


fi 


1934 


8 


1935 


f. 


Salem, Mass.: 

1930-32 




1933 




1934 




1935 




Salem, Oreg.: 

1930-31.. 


(2) 




1932 . 


3 


1933. 




1934 




1935-. 




San .\ngelo, Tex.: 

1930 


(2) 




1931 


9 


1932.. 


4 


1933.. . . 


1 


1934... 


fi 


1935 





Murder, 
nonncg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



(■■) 



136 
fiO 
44 
47 

51 
58 
66 
43 
22 
34 

8 
3 
2 



10 
10 

I 

11 
1 
2 

244 

296 
252 
240 
148 
147 

93 
36 
42 
57 
48 
23 

268 
215 
106 
118 
126 
111 

14 
13 
50 
48 
24 
16 



(^) 



10 
3 



(2) 



3 

13 

9 



{.') 



16 
12 



(■) 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



(0 



9 
12 

7 

5 

6 
1 
6 
4 
4 
3 

9 

7 
4 
3 

7 
4 



96 
128 
25 
37 
73 
94 

51 
42 
18 
20 
35 
35 

3 

3 

9 

12 

41 

37 

12 
21 
24 
26 
19 
15 



0) 



22 

17 

6 



{') 



{') 



19 
9 



(') 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



(-) 
150 
112 
147 
122 

58 

84 

115 

103 

89 

123 

64 
59 
28 
27 
25 
59 

16 
36 
49 
65 
72 
49 

597 
1,024 
1,319 
1,260 

750 



357 
165 
518 
294 
479 
303 

616 
676 
669 
617 
544 
689 

270 
208 
272 
285 
244 
256 



i.') 



141 
116 
108 



(■') 



74 
103 

97 
126 



(') 



« 



85 
91 
26 
69 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



(2) 



51 
23 
32 
50 

19 
16 



5 
14 



(') 



60 
67 
23 
18 
4 

17 
18 
16 
12 
10 
20 



(■) 



156 
246 
231 
231 
194 

87 
112 

77 

96 

75 

104 

190 

123 

64 

73 
127 
166 



(') 



181 
57 
47 
49 
47 



(2) 



57 
49 
37 



(2) 



37 
59 
23 
13 



{') 



(') 



45 

26 

5 

4 



Under $50 



148 
142 
258 
287 

264 
298 
244 
237 
262 
274 

201 
126 
116 
186 
267 
232 

64 
152 
130 
141 
229 
140 

1,377 
1, 455 
1,775 
1,790 
1,602 
1,358 

672 
740 
1,339 
1,391 
1,435 
1,169 

769 

591 

671 

1, 252 

1,212 

1,150 

394 
374 
441 
609 
554 
504 



(2) 



359 
350 
246 



{') 



169 
195 
262 
151 



(.') 



(') 



61 

184 

43 

96 



Auto 
theft 



(2) 



258 
312 
221 
143 

123 
116 

89 

71 

95 

116 

68 
43 
47 
43 
45 
53 

79 
41 
34 
22 
32 
36 

824 
945 
884 
661 
801 
696 

463 
373 

249 
190 
257 
208 

432 
472 
356 
322 
328 
297 

112 

81 

103 

168 

72 

51 



(2) 



160 
114 
109 



« 



72 
104 
120 
150 



(0 



(') 



35 
54 
62 
45 



See footnotes at end of table. 



144 

Table 70. — Number of offenses knoivn to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35— Continued 





Murder, 






Bur- 


Larceny— theft 






nonneg- 




Aggra- 


glary— 






Auto 
theft 




ligent 


Robbery 


vated 


brealjing 








man- 
slaughter 




assault 


or enter- 
ing 


Over $.50 


Under $50 


San Bernardino, Calif.: 
















1930 - 


2 


5 


7 


296 


(2) 


(2) 


429 


1931 


1 


32 
42 
(2) 


23 
57 
(0 


191 
223 
(2) 


0) 
(') 
(2) 


196 
199 

(2) 


549 


1932 


468 


1933 


(^) 


(') 


1934 


1 
2 


27 
15 


7 
13 


168 
132 




293 
536 


267 


1935 


137 


San Jose, Calif.: 




1930 


2 
2 
3 
5 
2 
1 


34 
25 
23 
41 
16 
24 


3 

4 
2 

6 

8 
7 


243 
302 
275 
248 
235 
224 


37 
39 
29 
27 
27 
25 


618 
804 
902 
935 
901 
1,053 


414 


1931 


300 


1932 


289 


1933 .- 


296 


1934 


258 


1935 


226 


Santa Ana, Calif.: 




1930 


1 


83 




120 


(2) 


(2) 


105 


1931.. 


1 
1 
1 


63 
12 

15 
7 
6 


4 
2 
3 
4 
3 


145 
150 
1.56 
179 
122 


7 

2 

12 

17 

6 


107 
232 
272 
226 
234 


188 


1932 


112 


1933 


111 


1934 


87 


1935 


1 


80 


Santa Barbara, Calif.: 




1930 




27 
15 


11 

8 


366 
167 


(0 
35 


602 
301 


157 


1931 


1 


200 


1932 


1 


36 
40 
11 
23 


11 
16 
17 
16 


168 
142 
187 
186 


44 
90 
49 
56 


463 
468 
681 
600 


121 


1933 


137 


1934 . 


3 


144 


1935 


175 


Santa Monica, Calif.: 






1930 . . 


4 

1 
2 


77 
68 
72 
79 


22 
35 
30 

25 

(2) 


449 
347 
286 
244 
(2) 


68 

100 

68 

63 

(2) 


371 

698 
889 
978 
(2) 


171 


1931 


284 


1932 .. . . 


278 


1933 


266 


1934-35- 


(^) 


(^) 


Savannah, Ga.: 
















1930 . 


(0 
8 
30 
10 
14 
12 


43 
40 
52 
38 
24 
12 


39 
24 
28 
19 
23 
8 


224 
307 
369 
345 
393 
379 


257 

91 

145 

127 

52 


1,348 
1,590 
2,132 
2,513 
1,984 
2,211 


200 


1931 ... 


218 


1932 . 


316 


1933. 


178 


1934 ... 


167 


1935 


115 


Schenectacly, N. Y.: 




1930 . 


4 
3 

1 
4 


32 
19 
18 
16 
11 
13 


57 
22 
25 
23 
29 
16 


196 
371 
322 
244 
236 
307 


(>) 

51 

42 

128 

108 

111 


494 
111 

no 

308 
324 
322 


199 


1931 


52 


1932 . 


232 


1933 . 


140 


1934 


199 


1935 




157 


Sharon, Pa.: 






1930 


1 






31 
27 
60 
45 
41 
29 


17 
10 
7 
5 
5 
7 


105 
99 
97 
87 
69 
67 


61 


1931 


1 



i 


1 


64 


1932 ... 




33 


1933 




2 


32 


1934 


1 


56 


1935 


4 


3 


36 


Sheboygan, Wis.: 






1930 




3 
10 
5 
2 
3 
4 


9 

8 
2 


56 
61 
133 
116 
67 
54 


17 
11 
15 
16 
17 
12 


198 
235 
383 
290 
327 
346 


49 


1931 




48 


1932 




43 


1933 




43 


1934.. ... 




3 
3 


42 


1935 




66 


Shreveport, La.: 






1930 


(') 


(2) 


(2) 


(2) 


(^) 


(0 


(2) 


1931 


15 


94 


73 


586 


105 


935 


330 


1932 


11 


82 


49 


573 


48 


784 


324 


1933 


12 


83 


104 


556 


90 


1,066 


327 


1934 


13 


99 


114 


284 


95 


1,449 


329 


1935 


14 


74 


113 


366 


88 


1,474 


237 


Sioux City, Iowa: 
















1930 


(2) 


(2) 


(2) 


(') 


(2) 


(^) 


« 


1931 


6 


262 


16 


621 


(.') 


m 


508 


1932 


4 


181 


24 


651 


0) 


(2) 


312 


1933 


6 


157 


19 


673 


(2) 


0) 


448 


1934 


5 


102 


9 


448 


32 


710 


348 


1935 


1 


96 


2 


442 


29 


768 


283 



See footnotes at end of table. 



145 



Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive. 

1930-35— Continued 



Sioux Falls, S. Dak.: 

1930 

1931 

1932. 

1933 

1934 

1935._ 

Spartanburg, S. C: 

1930. 

1931 

1932-35 

Spriiigficki, 111.: 

1930.... 

1931 

1932 - 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Springfield, Mo.: 

1930.. 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934.. 

1935 

Springfield, Ohio: 

1930. 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

Stamford, Conn.: 

1930 

1931 

1932. 

1933 

1934 

1935.. 

Steubenville, Ohio: 

1930. 

1931 

1932..-. 

1933 

1934 

1935... 

Stockton, Calif.: 

1930 

1931. _._ 

1932 

19.33.... 

1934. -_ 

1935 

Superior, Wis.: 

1930 

1931 

1932. 

1933. 

1934 

1935 

Terre Haute, Ind.: 

1930-33 

1934 

1935-. 

Topeka, Kans.: 

1930.. 

1931. 

1932 

1933. 

1934 

1935 

Tucson, Ariz.: 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933.. 

1934 

1935.. 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



(^) 



2 
,1 

7 
3 



3 
2 
2 
4 

fi 
4 
2 
1 
4 
3 

2 
2 
] 
1 
1 
1 

6 
3 
1 
3 
8 
3 

4 
4 
4 
11 
4 



(2) 



(0 



W 



{') 



Robbery 



25 
32 

28 
28 
19 
18 



i') 



(') 



13 



(') 



110 
146 
99 
1.34 
112 
104 

152 

90 

123 

122 

47 

39 

41 
63 
09 
25 
31 
19 

10 
9 

16 
8 
4 
6 

41 
41 
33 
19 
34 
44 

86 
105 

83 
108 

56 

58 

29 

18 
5 
7 

14 



(0 



93 

48 



(2) 



V) 



92 

103 

82 

40 



15 
11 
20 
14 
12 
M 



-A.ggra- 
vated 
assault 



10 
10 



(0 



23 
6 
1 

11 

7 
6 

23 
12 
15 

5 
11 

8 

13 
17 
23 
42 
20 
21 

1 
3 
1 



1 
25 
16 
28 
11 
10 

13 

22 
31 
48 
24 
15 



(') 



(') 



27 
40 



W 



(2) 



11 
3 
1 

10 
18 
17 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



108 
08 
69 
66 
91 

114 



(0 



(') 



492 
451 
524 
397 
471 
498 

194 
190 

183 
451 
157 
157 

281 
294 
359 
172 
192 
216 

94 
140 
103 
93 
85 
96 

91 
115 
152 
160 
139 
120 

438 
499 
482 
377 
338 
359 

181 
) 

157 

123 

111 

71 



W 



207 
223 



(0 



(') 



312 
324 
309 
482 



76 
68 
68 

103 
64 

173 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



19 
20 
39 
11 

45 
41 



(') 



(2) 
0) 



20 



56 
90 
54 
23 
11 

118 
96 

124 
24 
49 
53 



(') 






33 
35 
45 



73 
84 
56 
51 
28 
39 



(') 



70 
25 
23 
15 
20 



Under $50 



(•) 



(2) 






128 
124 
128 
100 
106 

85 

55 
23 
13 



39 



(2) 



20 
11 
41 






(') 



148 
95 
128 
140 
184 



78 
81 
117 
145 
159 
109 

126 
132 

628 
801 
710 
854 
862 
896 

572 
423 
639 
675 
755 
950 

646 
662 
787 
738 
641 
646 

124 
173 
158 
180 
216 
157 

405 
265 
235 
234 
218 
293 

762 
1,054 
1,041 
1,045 
1.016 
1,145 



(2) 



353 



330 
330 
347 
256 



W 



859 
503 



(») 



(') 



473 

783 
482 
509 



271 
308 
195 
205 
295 
294 



.\uto 
theft 



(0 



101 
196 
137 
139 
174 
130 

116 
110 



(2) 



499 
496 
321 
384 
368 
363 

528 
550 
486 
279 
176 
125 

174 
289 
128 

88 

85 

114 

122 
1.54 
194 
198 
164 
101 

182 
143 

77 
120 
112 

64 

403 
392 
309 
202 
225 
251 

152 

97 
60 
50 
39 



(2) 



219 
167 



W 



(0 



398 
476 
301 
420 



198 

154 

78 

06 

,59 

125 



See footnotes at end of table. 



146 

Table 70. — Number of offenses knoivn to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-35— Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny — theft 


Auto 
theft 




Over $50 


Under $50 


Union City, N. J.: 
1930-31- - 


(2) 


0) 
47 
25 
15 
16 

77 
44 
36 
41 
18 
19 

16 
10 
40 

8 

16 
36 
53 
31 
29 
16 

8 
12 

6 

7 
11 

8 

23 
24 
28 
14 
20 
26 

13 

7 

21 

9 

58 
17 
22 
21 

6 

8 
7 
9 
7 
4 

2 
3 

1 
2 
2 

1 

20 

20 

28 

9 


17 
5 


(2) 

94 

24 

18 

7 

123 
104 
159 
155 
138 
95 

86 
95 
64 

58 

195 
267 
207 
152 
261 
230 

142 
150 
207 
151 
143 
163 

127 
132 
124 
84 
147 
108 

28 

70 
68 

84 

135 
116 
123 
163 

84 
48 
59 
73 
69 
68 

77 
121 
151 

89 
131 
152 

103 
171 
120 
127 


51 
51 
60 
40 

(0 
41 
43 
40 
42 
46 

(2) 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 

80 
49 
29 
26 
62 
70 

(') 
44 
18 
16 
26 
30 

21 
17 
15 
20 
31 
43 

5 

8 

10 

5 

(2) 

8 

6 

6 

11 

12 

5 
11 
6 
9 
8 

(■) 
16 
16 
22 
23 
24 

64 
33 
45 
83 


(2) 

135 

138 

94 

129 

209 
230 
247 
303 
223 
201 

0) 
65 
98 
89 

('} 
63 

241 
509 
650 
518 
743 
618 

285 
393 
338 
285 
249 
273 

99 
128 
121 
128 
180 
197 

22 
(2) 
50 
74 
69 

(2) 
329 
363 
422 
570 

65 
79 
98 
114 
108 
91 

351 
316 
240 
275 
357 
344 

211 
237 
226 
203 


(2) 
150 


1932 


1933 


2 


123 


1934 


110 


1935 


1 




141 


University City, Mo.: 

1930 


22 

19 

17 

5 

6 

5 

(') 
26 
23 
44 

26 

50 
42 
20 
25 
42 
59 

.. 

2 
13 


49 


1931 


2 
1 
1 

1 


52 


1932 . 


34 


1933 


39 


1934 

1935 - 


54 
50 


Uiiper Darby Township, Pa.: 
1930 


(2) 
9 
9 
11 

13 

11 

11 

5 

9 

5 

1 

1 


(2) 


1931 


147 


1932 _ 


135 


1933 


195 


1934 


C) 


1935 . 


96 


Waco, Tex.: 

1930 


275 


1931 


324 


1932 


255 


1933 


188 


1934 


344 


1935 


128 


Waltham, Mass.: 

1930 


131 


1931 


1.54 


1932 


1 
1 


126 


1933... . 


95 


1934 


72 


1935 






139 


Warren, Ohio: 

1930 


2 
1 

1 
1 
3 
1 

5 
(2) 
5 
4 
3 

(2) 


92 
70 
80 
38 
44 
35 

7 

(2) 

12 

8 

3 

3 
2 
2 
2 

43 
53 
6 
3 
3 
5 

2 
3 
3 
1 

4 


128 


1931 


156 


1932 

1933 


115 

88 


1934... 


138 


1935 


64 


Washington, Pa.: 

1930 


49 


1931-32 ... 


(-) 


1933 


31 


1934 


35 


1935 


39 


Waterloo, Iowa: 

1930-31 

1932 


133 


193^ 




89 


1934 




113 


1935 




100 


Watertown, Mass.: 

1930 




43 


1931 




57 


1932 . . 


1 


49 


1933 


35 


1934 




34 


1935 - . 




31 


Watertown, N. Y.: 
1930 




53 


1931 . 




35 


1932 




44 


1933 




33 


1934 




66 


1935 




83 


Waukegan, 111.: 

1930-31 


3 
2 
3 

1 


'"7 

18 
23 
22 


C) 


1932 . - 


94 


1933 .- 


53 


1934 


63 


1935 _. 


116 



See footnotes at end of table. 



147 

Table 70. — Number of offenses knoiim to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1930-S5— Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over $50 


Under S-W 


Auto 
theft 


West A 11 is, Wis.: 

1930 




12 
7 
8 

15 
7 
3 


3 
5 
2 
6 

4 
5 


01 
83 
104 
55 
70 
53 

(') 
24 
4 


28 
18 
18 
19 
19 
24 

(0 

(') 
4 

14 
17 
13 

(0 

18 
0) 

(2) 

m 
(0 

35 
16 
17 
20 
16 

(') 
25 
29 
71 
76 
161 

(0 
11 

26 
31 
27 

(') 
28 
36 
31 
26 
28 

0) 

(2) 

(0 

(0 
22 
39 

CO 
91 
88 
56 
64 
74 

(0 
21 
4 
9 

19 

75 
64 
58 
51 
63 
60 


383 
239 
364 
519 
455 
477 

36 
23 
58 
32 
28 

(0 

69 
(0 

(0 
(■') 

m 
(0 

57 
79 

133 
99 

114 

353 
333 
340 

685 
713 
654 

(0 
37 
C6 
41 
35 

41 
115 
93 
22 
98 
133 

(0 

(0 
(0 

1,617 
1,380 

C) 
174 
188 
203 
179 
191 

126 
139 
122 
115 

148 
207 
146 
136 
197 
195 


65 
70 


1931 




1932 


1 


fit 


1933 


37 


1934 




30 


1935 


1 


4'< 


West Uartford, Conn.: 

1930 _... 


(') 


1931 


10 


1932 


1 


1 




5 


1933 






1934 


1 


4 
1 

10 
8 
2 
3 
4 

(0 
7 
2 

10 
5 
2 

40 
14 
13 
10 

18 
13 

(0 
13 
20 
27 

i 

13 

6 

15 

12 

1 

4 

41 

102 

47 

17 

9 

24 

■ 46 

37 

32 

18 

20 

16 

7 
5 

31 
23 
22 
37 
34 
34 




14 
5 

(0 
44 
39 
38 
39 
39 

(2) 
42 
90 
55 
76 
60 

188 
217 
285 
249 
222 
189 

41 

99 

129 

144 

30 
21 
34 
23 
36 
35 

(-) 
246 
373 
201 
247 
222 

V-) 

(-) 

194 
257 
231 
219 

61 
112 
108 

87 

43 
49 

81 

81 

121 

99 


10 


1935 




11 


West Haven, Conn.: 
1930... 


(') 


1 


V-) 

6 


1931 


1932 


1 


9 


1933 




r, 


1934 






•> 


1935 


1 

8 
4 
3 
2 
2 

6 
.1 

10 
3 
2 

10 

2 
I 
3 
5 

1 




4 


West Orange, N. J.: 

1930 . 


m 

22 

1 
4 

1 
1 

(■') 
6 


(0 

37 


1931 


1932 


13 


1933 

1934 


36 
25 


1935 

West Palm Beach, Fla.: 

1930 


31 
122 


1931 


109 


1932 


76 


1933 


70 






88 


1935 




60 


Wheeling, W. Va.: 
1930-31 


2 

8 

12 

7 


(0 
107 


1932 


1933. .. . 


57 


1934. 

1935 


75 
61 


White Plains, N. Y.: 

1930 


3 


1931... 






1932 




9 

18 

28 

5 

(■') 
41 
34 
62 
73 
42 

(-) 
3 


7 




3 
3 
1 

(0 
5 
5 
3 
8 
5 

3 
3 
3 


3 


1934 


4 


1935 


10 


Wichita Falls, Tex.: 

1930 

1931 ... . 


(0 
200 


1932 


2.Vi 


1933 


133 


1934... 


113 


1935 


119 


W ilkes-Barre, Pa.: 

1930 


(0 
218 


1931 


1932 


258 


1933 

1934.... 


16 
10 
25 

7 

12 
13 

222 
272 
202 
208 
325 
284 


183 
222 


1935 


2 

(0 


258 


Wilkinsburg, Pa.: 

1930-31 ■ 


57 


1932 


1933 




57 


ia34 




57 


1935 


2 

3 
5 
3 
3 
5 
4 


62 


Wilmington, N. C: 


147 


1931. _ 


273 


1932. 


3'25 


1933 


ISl 


1934 


153 


1935... 


* 07 



See footnotes at end of table. 



148 



Table 70. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

1 930-35 — Continued 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 






Over $50 


Under $50 


theft 


Winston-Salem, N. C: 

1930 


14 
16 
26 
23 
21 
20 

21 


46 
86 
63 
57 
67 
52 

27 
23 
37 
28 
10 
13 

3 
3 

19 

{■) 
6 
3 

Q) 

U 

7 

12 

6 

7 

9 
20 
22 

8 
20 

9 


452 
692 
628 
824 
863 
936 

15 
34 
45 
26 
40 
20 


379 
383 
524 
615 
533 
670 

6 
28 
34 
36 
22 
68 

168 
213 
182 
(2) 
150 
121 

(-) 
46 
51 
34 
28 
23 

128 
82 
74 
66 
74 
48 


75 
80 
70 
55 
66 
66 

(>) 
50 
45 
35 
23 
13 

(') 
16 
14 

(2) 
12 
14 

(■') 
24 
7 
2 


471 
604 
1,065 
1,297 
1,137 
1,006 

76 
76 
59 
128 
45 
86 

245 
222 
170 

(2) 
206 
188 

(2) 

206 

164 

174 

78 

61 

93 

78 

81 

97 

210 

151 


496 


1931 

1932 


349 
323 


1933 


401 


1934 

1935 

Woodbridge Township, N. J.: 

1930 

1931 


241 
260 

6 
11 


1932 


1 
7 


7 


1933 

1934 


3 
8 


1935 

Woonsocket, R. I.: 

1930 - 


4 


9 

73 


1931 






62 


1932 - 






36 


1933 .. 


(') 


(0 


(2) 


1934 


33 


1935 


1 

5 
1 




22 


Wyandotte, Mich.: 
1930 


(-') 


(2) 


1931 


62 


1932 




35 


1933 




41 


1934 - 


1 
1 

1 
3 




25 


1935 


1 

4 
3 
6 
4 
10 
6 




18 


Zanesville, Ohio: 

1930 . . 


14 

10 

5 

18 
17 


129 


1931 


139 


1932 - -- 


95 


1933 


3 
2 


75 


1934 


97 


1935 -- 


64 









' Larcenies not separately reported. 
2 Not reported. 



Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



ANNUAL RETURNS, 1936 

Several compilations based on annual crime reports for 1936 were 
included in volume VIII, No. 1, of tliis publication. Those tables 
presented data with the cities divided into six groups according to 
size, but without any subdivision as to the location of the cities 
represented. The information presented in tables 71-90 is based on 
the same reports represented in similar compilations included in 
volume VIII, No. 1, In tliis issue, however, tlie cities liave been 
cUvided into nine groups according to location. It should be noted 
that the totals of the detailed figures for the United States will dift'er 
slightly from those shown in volume VIII, No. 1, because of several 
adjustments in individual reports since the preparation of the earlier 
tabulations for 1936. 

For each geographic division the cities have been divided into six 
groups according to size, in order that comparisons can be made 
between the figures for a single community and the average for cities 
of the same size located in the same section of the United States. A 
further reason for the subdivision of the annual return data according 
to geographic subdivisions of the country lies in the fact that the only 
measure, based on police statistics, of the number of minor violations 
consists of a record of persons arrested and held for prosecution. One 
purpose of the information presented in the following tables is to 
furnish some basis for estimating the approximate amount of minor 
crimes in each of the nine geographic sections of the United States. 
It should be noted that several serious crimes are included among the 
violations for wliich only arrest data are available. In other words, 
under the system of uniform crime reporting information concerning 
the number of offenses known to have been committed is compiled 
only for seven general classifications, those crimes which as a matter 
of routine are usually reported to the police. All other types of crimes 
are represented only by compilations showing the number of persons 
arrested for such violations. 

In examining the tabulations relative to the proportion of offenses 
cleared by arrest, it should be noted that in some of the geographic 
divisions the total number of cities represented is quite low. This is 
particularly noticeable in the tables where the cities arc divided 
according to size within each geographic division. In some cases this 
results in a wide range between the highest and lowest figures. With 
reference to the agencies reporting the smallest proportion of offenses 
cleared by arrest, it is doubtless possible that this may be partially 
attributable to a failure to maintain a complete record of offenses 
cleared. On the other hand, the low figures reported by such cities 
may also be partially the result of inadequate personnel or other 
similar factors. The compilations include all offenses cleared during 
1936, even though some of them were committed during prior j-^ears. 

(149) 



150 

With reference to the tables showing the number of persons arrested 
and held for prosecution, it should again be noticed that the number of 
reporting units represented is in some of the subdivisions quite small. 
Furthermore, in some instances the figures indicate the possibility 
that data representing arrests for prostitution and for other sex offenses 
have been improperly classified. In this connection, it should also be 
noted that in some jurisdictions many persons arrested for prostitution | 

are charged with disorderly conduct or vagrancy and for that reason ^ 

the published figures concerning arrests of persons for prostitution 
and commercialized vice are probably quite conservative. 

Those desiring an additional explanation concerning the types of 
information recorded in the annual reports for 1936 should refer to 
pages 23-28 of volume VIII, No. 1, of this publication. 



151 



Table 71. 



-Number of offenses known, number and percentage dJ offenses cleared 
arrest, 1936, brj geographic divisions 



•sr 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

as- 
sault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
ing or 
cnlor- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Oeograpbic division 


Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


New England States 


















112 cities; population, 3,764,330: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


38 

36 

94.7 


124 

120 

96.8 


220 

206 

93.6 


535 

303 

56. 6 


444 

405 

91.2 


8,334 

2, 985 

35.8 


16,961 

6, 281 

37.0 


6, 966 

1,369 

19.7 


Middle Atlantic States 


















279 cities: population, 8,010.058: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


276 

236 

85.5 


411 

388 

94.4 


521 

488 

93.7 


1,742 

914 

52.5 


2, 705 

2,379 

87.9 


1.3, 460 

5,028 

37.4 


27, 029 

10,692 

39.6 


11,210 

3,197 

28.4 


East Noeth Central States 


















255 cities; population, 11,982,786: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


594 

465 

78.3 


364 

261 

71.7 


1,108 

734 

66.2 


11, 100 

4,707 

42.4 


4,352 

2,504 

r,7. 5 


35, 457 

12.532 

35. 3 


83, 035 

17,214 

20.7 


18,944 
3, 467 

18.3 


West North Central States 


















127 cities; population, 3,718,748: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


188 

150 

83.0 


175 

152 

86.9 


184 

147 

79.9 


2,224 
1,018 

45.8 


775 

598 

77.2 


11,748 

4,616 

39.3 


29, 940 

8,508 
28.4 


8,415 

2,124 

25.2 


South Atlantic States 


















36 cities; population, 2,598,555: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


401 

347 

86.5 


121 

103 

85.1 


285 

233 

81.8 


2,593 

897 

34.6 


2, 797 

2, 067 

73. 9 


12,716 

3,217 

25.3 


30, 204 

7,872 

26.1 


8,417 

917 

10.9 


East South Central States 


















8 cities; population, 198,199: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


54 

45 

83.3 


30 

27 

90.0 


15 

15 

100.0 


139 

69 

49. 6 


294 

203 

69. 


769 

281 

3(;. 5 


1, 262 

701 

.M. 5 


388 
40.2 


West South Central States 


















42 cities; population, 1,956,930: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


359 

310 

86.4 


142 
139 

97. 9 


122 
113 

92. 6 


1,137 
502 

44.2 


1,886 
1,487 

78.8 


8, 605 

2,739 

31.8 


24, 823 
6, 733 

27.1 


4,541 

1,092 

24.0 


Mountain States 


















39 cities; population, 732,927: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


57 

48 
84.2 


11 

10 

90.9 


60 

56 

93. 3 


381 

194 

50. 9 


163 

134 

82.2 


2, 668 

1,249 

46.8 


6,601 

2, 225 

33.3 


1, 851 

291 

1.5.7 


Pacific States 


















89 cities; population, 2,641,633: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


72 

61 

84.7 


163 

73 

44.8 


176 

KiO 

90.9 


1,.347 

457 

33.9 


901 

592 

65.7 


9,898 

2, 729 

27.6 


30, 797 

6. 494 

21.1 


10, 131 

1,322 

13.0 



152 



W 



IS charged {held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by geographic divisions 

opulation as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide: 

a. Murder and nonneg- 

ligent manslaugh- 
ter: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

b. Manslaughter by neg- 

ligence: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or enter- 
ing: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny — theft: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, possessing: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000. ._ 

Rape: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commer- 
cialized vice: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution): 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000. __ 



New 
Eng- 
land 
States 



O CO 

arc 

03 cC 



Middle 
Atlan- 
tic 
States 



a 

C.QO 

O to 



a 
o 



O C3 



41 
1.1 



186 
4.9 



50' 
13.5 



425 
11.3 



4, 365 
116.0 



2, 793 
74.2 



6,190 
164.4 



1, 326 
35. 2 



533 
14.2 



493 
13.1 



201 
5.3 



246 
6.5 



527 
14.0 



2,256 
59.9 



223 

2.8 



383 

4.8 



1, 095 
13, 



2,349 
29.3 



13, 770 
171.9 



4,763 
59.5 



9,574 
119.5 



2,192 
27.4 



957 
11.9 



682 
8.5 



39G 
4.9 



583 
7.3 



12, 175 
1.52. 



1,836 
22.9 



East 
North 
Cen- 
tral 

States 



3 
0,0 

as 
— .'^ 

o .J- 



525 
4.4 



436 
3.6 



2,613 

21.8 



2,551 
21.3 



10, 688 
89.2 



4,718 
39.4 



12, 440 
103.8 



2,369 
19.8 



3,396 
28.3 



933 

7.8 



622 
5.2 



692 

5.8 



3 9,175 
76.9 



3 1, 886 
1.5.8 



West 
North 
Cen- 
tral 
States 



a 

5*00 

•3 22 



170 
4.6 



143 

3.8 



777 
20.9 



520 
14.0 



1,495 
40.2 



2,156 
58.0 



6.239 
167.8 



1,113 

29.9 



1,007 
27.1 



299 
8.0 



South 
Atlan- 
tic 
States 



180 

4.8 



10, 902 
293.2 



432 
11.6 



a 


a 
a 


O u; 


O o: 


a^o 


aoi 






— . 00 




ojq; 


n'^ 


*J »o 


H^f 


o'" 



M a 

4) O 



406 
15.6 



235 
9.0 



1,726 
66.4 



2, 762 
106.3 



15, 638 
601.8 



4,177 
160. 



8,003 
308.0 



1,410 
54.3 



1,73 
66.8 



467 
18.0 



671 422 48 

18. 16. 2 24. 2 



East 
South 
Cen- 
tral 
States 



226 

8.7 



1,779 
68.5 



794 
30.6 






4 
23.7 



27 
13.6 



73 
36.8 



221 
111.5 



351 
177.1 



262 
132.2 



575 
290.1 



158 

79.7 



26 
13.1 



60 
30.3 



West 

South 

Central 

States 



14 
7.1 



95 
47.9 



25 
12.6 



a 

O CO 

ao5 

— to 
o - 



282 
14.4 



105 
5.4 



598 
30.6 



1,506 
77.0 



2,856 
145.9 



2,365 
120.9 



5, 825 
297.7 



Moun- 
tain 

States 



395 
20.2 



578 
29.5 



361 
18.4 



120 
6.1 



3,376 
172.5 



791 
40.4 



a 
a 

■t^ CO 

...a 
« o 



35 

4.8 



12 
1.6 



123 
16.8 



159 
21. 



12 294 
43.1 



533 
72.7 



2,218 
302.6 



963 210 

49. 2 28. 7 



129 
17.6 



56 

7.6 



119 
16.2 



64 

8.7 



13 771 
198.5 



91 
12.4 



Pacific 
States 



a 

O>co 
Om 

ao 
"Si" 

-l-i CO 



49 
1.9 



110 
4.2 



535 
20.3 



584 
22.1 



1,554 

58.8 



1,469 
55.6 



3,983 
150.8 



943 
35.7 



338 
12.8 



68 
2.6 



622 
23.5 



150 
5.7 



2,588 
98.0 



481 
18.2 



See footnotes at end of table. 



153 

Table 72. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and 
100,000 inhabitants, by geographic divisio ns^Continufid 

[Population as estimated, July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



rate per 



Offense charged 



Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possess- 
ing, etc.: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and 
children: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate i^er 100,000 

Traffic and motor-vehicle 
laws: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons 

charged ..- 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,(KX) 



New 

Eng- 
land 
States 



aw 



l<t2 
5. 1 



284 
7.5 



3,880 
103.1 



875 
23.2 



3, 572 
94.9 



1 92, 001 
2, 633. 4 



3,784 
100.5 



90, 302 
2, 398. 9 



1,180 
31.3 



3,132 
83.2 



14, 644 
389.0 



Middle 
Atlan- 
tic 
States 



o2? 

S.O 
.fcJ 00 



Vi 



U CD 



128 
1.6 



1,033 
12.9 



3. ,536 
44.1 



3,016 
37.7 



4,505 
56.2 



2 365,354 
4, 592. 4 



29, 714 
371.0 



107, 705 
1,344.6 



11,933 
149.0 



7,231 
90.3 



45, 970 
573.9 



East 
North 
Cen- 
tral 
States 



3 

3* 00 









588 
4.9 



1,189 
9.9 



3 5, 54; 
46.; 



4,963 
41.4 



8,796 
73.4 



< 487, 691 
4, 825. 



30, 768 
256.8 



118, 175 
986. 2 



7, 231 
60.3 



10, 165 

84.8 



3 34, 090 

2«5. 6 



West 
North 
Cen- 
tral 
States 



—00 



a 
o 



238 
6.4 



336 
9.0 



1,470 
39.5 



2,343 
63.0 



3,556 
95.6 



5 271, 674 
7,313.9 



14,817 
398.4 



39. 988 
1, 075. 3 



8,349 
224. 5 



1,817 
48.9 



17,356 

466.7 



South 
Atlan- 
tic 
States 



O iO 

— 00 
C3 05 



■ji a 



y ^ 
o 



120 
4.6 



1,438 
55.3 



6 4, 402 
171 



7,905 
304.2 



4,646 
178.8 



221. 503 
8,524.1 



42, 932 
1, 652. 1 



78, 779 
3,031.6 



,5, 410 
208.2 



6,322 
243.3 



36, 309 
1, 397. 3 



East 
South 
Cen- 
tral 
States 



3 

a 

OCT> 

aa> 



00 



c 
'3 

00 



12 
6.1 



90 

45.4 



"57 
44.6 



425 
214.4 



455 
229.6 



8 4, 239 
2, 138. 8 



s 1, 960 
988.9 



s 6, 717 
3, 389. 



515 
259.8 



744 
375.4 



1,230 
620.6 



West 

South 

Central 

States 



acn 



& o 



418 
21.4 



36.2 



S244 
17.0 



10 1, 309 
76.4 



1,593 
81.4 



'1 179, 790 
10, 602. 5 



12,611 
644.4 



52, 023 
2, 658. 4 



12, 284 
627.7 



3,807 
194. 5 



12,759 
652. 



Moun- 
tain 
States 



3 

a 
a^ 






112 
15.3 



189 
25.8 



44 
6.0 



273 
37.2 



1,373 
187.3 



i< 66, 696 
9, 190. 1 



12 5, 993 
879.2 



14,069 
1, 919. 6 



13 2, 202 
566. 9 



479 

65. 4 



2, 519 
343.7 



Pacific 
States 



3 

a~5 



© O 



00 



778 
29.5 



423 
16.0 



762 

28.8 



566 
21.4 



6, 224 
235.6 



15 271, 179 
10, 978. 1 



7,579 
286.9 



91, 774 
3, 474. 1 



21,971 
831.7 



6,829 
258.5 



33, 179 
1, 256. 



'-'5 The figures are based on the reports as follows: ' 109 cities, 3,516,459 population: ^ 276 cities, 7,955,.563 
population; 3 2.54 cities, 11,9.35,431 population; < 252 cities, 10,107,486 population; s 126 cities, 3,714,480 popula- 
tion; "i35 cities, 2,571,0.55 population; ' 7 cities, 127,699 population; ' 7 cities, 168,455 population; « 40 cities, 
1,435,430 population; >« 41 cities, 1,713,430 population; " 40 cities, 1,695,730 population; '2 38 cities, 681,627 
population; '3 37 cities, 388,427 population; '♦ 38 cities, 725,734 population; '^ 86 cities, 2,470,181 population. 



154 



Table 73. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest, 1936, by population groups 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


























Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 






Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Group I.— 2 cities over 250,000; total 


















population, 1,042,500: 


















Number of olTenses known 


11 


51 


73 


217 


176 


1,499 


3,846 


3,182 


Number cleared by arrest 


11 


51 


72 


157 


172 


1,258 


2,888 


713 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


100.0 


98.6 


72.4 


97.7 


83.9 


75.1 


22.4 


Group II.— 8 cities, 100,000 to 250,- 


















000; total population, 1,065,805: 


















Number of offenses known 


13 


23 


48 


122 


114 


3, 520 


6.698 


2,155 


Number cleared by arrest 


12 


21 


47 


57 


97 


774 


1,484 


252 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


92.3 


91.3 


97.9 


40.7 


85.1 


22.0 


22.2 


11.7 


Group III— 3 cities, 50,000 to 100,- 


















000; total population, 225,202: 


















Number of offenses known 


3 


4 


11 


13 


20 


466 


770 


300 


Number cleared by arrest 


3 


4 


11 


6 


16 


135 


167 


64 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


46.2 


80.0 


29.0 


21.7 


21.3 


Group IV.— 12 cities, 25,000 to 50,- 


















000; total population, 440,592: 


















Number of offenses known 


2 


7 


14 


59 


62 


1,113 


2,079 


658 


Number cleared by arrest 


1 


7 


14 


17 


58 


253 


674 


127 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


60.0 


100.0 


100.0 


28.8 


93.5 


22.7 


32.4 


19.3 


Group V.— 45 cities, 10,000 to 25,- 


















000; total population, 717,453: 


















Number of offenses known 


3 


20 


49 


80 


54 


1,276 


2,759 


539 


Number cleared by arrest 


3 


20 


40 


45 


44 


360 


679 


157 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


100.0 


81.6 


56.3 


81.5 


28.2 


24.6 


29.1 


Group VI.— 42 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 266,778: 


















Number of offenses known 


6 


19 


25 


44 


18 


460 


809 


132 


Number cleared by arrest 


6 


17 


22 


21 


18 


205 


389 


56 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


89.5 


88.0 


47.7 


100.0 


44.6 


48.1 


42.4 


Total, 112 cities; total population, 


















3,764,330: 


















Number of offenses known 


38 


124 


220 


535 


444 


8,334 


16, 961 


6,966 


Number cleared by arrest 


36 


120 


206 


303 


405 


2,985 


6,281 


1,369 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


94.7 


96.8 


93.6 


56.6 


91.2 


35.8 


37.0 


19.7 



Table 74. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 

100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Gjoup 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


"3 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


2° 














.-^ 


S.a 


2c3 


4^ C3 




2i 


under 
opula- 

78 


SS 




o O.00 


S D.<^^ 


o => 

O D.IM 


8 am 


Sm" 


o o - 


o OS 


o o q- 


o o >o 


" 


a^ 


oftg 


o-»^- 


.o'a"^ 


oft"'. 


ftt^ 


<N 2 


*0 rt 


2 •-= 


CO O 




w ^t^ 






+j o _r 




a>o ^ 


















o O O 




"S 2 


ti ° ° 


■sS.2 


■So. 2 


'3 o .2 


0-.2 


^a 




OIM 5 


^— • ♦-. 




CM *i 










M 


iC 




^ 




00 


m 




tP 


TT 


16 


11 


3 


1 


4 


6 


41 


L5 


1.0 


1.3 


0.2 


0.6 


2.2 


1.1 


114 


21 


4 


7 


24 


16 


186 


10.9 


2.0 


1.8 


1.6 


3.3 


6.0 


4.9 


295 


99 


13 


26 


62 


12 


507 


28.3 


9.3 


5.8 


5.8 


8.6 


4.5 


13.5 



155 



Table 74.— Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 

NEW ENGLAND STATES-Continued 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Oflense charged 



Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate i)er 100,000 "'_ 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate i)er 100,000.^ 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 
Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of i)ersons charged 

Rate per 100,000 "'"" 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged... 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: " "' 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged _ . 

Rate per lOO.fXXl 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged... 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000- 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged .. 

Rate per 100,000. 

Vagrancy; 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged- . 

Rate i)er 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged 



Group 
I 



196 

18.8 

1,668 
160.0 

1,286 
123.4 

2,801 
268.7 

704 

67.5 

316 
30.3 

293 

28. 1 

102 
9.8 



Group 
II 



97 
9.1 

i,m 

105. 2 

668 
62.7 

1,540 
144.5 

269 

25.2 

142 

i;i.3 

81 
7.6 

46 
4.3 

56 
5.3 

196 
18.4 

515 
48.3 

40 
3.8 

43 
4.0 

1,339 
125. 6 

355 
33. 3 

614 
57.6 

' 49, 408 
5, 896. 4 

2,486 
233.3 

22, 316 
2, 093. 8 

349 
32.7 

883 
82.8 

4,636 
435. 



Group 
III 



102 
71.9 

69 
30.6 

170 
75.5 

45 
20.0 



Group 
IV 



2.7 

8 
3.6 

9 
4.0 

11 
4.9 

1 
0.4 

83 
36.9 



47 
10. 5 

381 
85.3 

242 

54.2 

563 
126. 1 

111 
24.9 

13 

2.9 



Group 
V 



10 
4.4 

127 
56.4 

64 
28.4 

157 
69.7 

2. 4.58 
1,091.5 

44 

19.5 

3,926 
1, 743. 3 

82 
36.4 

67 
29.8 

723 
321.0 



26 
5.8 

13 
2.9 

14 
3.1 

39 

8.7 

191 
42.8 

2 
0.4 

14 
3.1 

386 
86.4 

73 
16.3 

491 
109.9 

4,670 
1, 045. 7 

261 

58.4 

5,640 
1, 262. 9 

147 
32.9 

106 
23.7 

1,956 
438.0 



43 

6.0 

701 
97.7 

347 
48.4 

724 
100.9 

147 
20.5 

44 
6.1 

71 
9.9 

27 
3.8 

46 
6.4 

27 

3.8 

114 
1.5.9 

1 
0.1 

30 
4.2 

586 
81.7 

121 
16.9 

1, 055 
147.0 

28, HI 
1, 162. 9 

388 
54.1 

8,655 
1,206.4 

200 
27.9 

244 
34.0 

2,294 
319.7 



"\9^P I Total 



26 
9.4 

332 
124.4 

181 
67.8 

392 
146.9 

50 

18.7 

12 

4.5 

14 

5.2 

4 
1.5 

21 

7.9 

8 
3.0 

77 
28.9 



8 
3.0 

200 
75.0 

64 
24.0 

516 
193. 4 

2, 949 
1, 105. 4 

168 
63.0 

3,302 
1, 237. 7 

117 
43.9 

129 
48.4 

636 
238.4 



425 
11.3 

4,365 
116.0 

2,793 
74.2 

6,190 
164.4 

1,326 
35.2 

533 
14.2 

493 

13.1 

201 
5.3 

246 
6.5 

527 
14.0 

2,256 
59.9 

192 
5. 1 

284 
7.5 

3,880 
103.1 

875 
23.2 

3,572 
94.9 

3 92, 601 
2, 633. 4 

3,784 
100.5 

90,302 
2. 398. 9 

1,180 
31.3 

3,132 
83.2 

14, 644 
389.0 



tion; TiVcitTei: t:5'l6.4r9Vopu'atio'r''^ '' '""""'= ' ' ""^' '''''"' P«P"'«"«'': ' « cities, 697.453 popula- 



156 

Table 75. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared by 

arrest, 1936, by population groups 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


























Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 






Population group 


Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 




slaugh- 
ter 








ing 






Group 1— 4 cities over 250,000; 


















total population, 3,337,600: 


















Number of offenses known 


160 


155 


208 


985 


1,620 


4,580 


10, 126 


5,154 


Number cleared by arrest 


131 


148 


190 


556 


1,450 


2,368 


5,352 


1,969 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


81.9 


95.5 


91.3 


56.4 


89.5 


51.7 


52.9 


38.2 


Group II.— 8 cities, 100,000 to 


















250,000; total population, 1,107,000: 


















Number of offenses known 


20 


85 


82 


204 


299 


2,656 


4,217 


2,089 


Number cleared by arrest 


14 


80 


79 


100 


218 


844 


1.195 


231 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


70.0 


94.1 


96.3 


49.0 


72.9 


31.8 


28.3 


11.1 


Group III.— U cities, 50,000 to 


















100,000; total population, 810,300: 


















Number of offenses known 


30 


27 


35 


172 


234 


1,723 


3,095 


1,357 


Number cleared by arrest 


30 


27 


30 


76 


193 


394 


933 


261 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


100.0 


85.7 


44.2 


82.5 


22.9 


30.1 


19.2 


Group IV.— 19 cities, 25,000 to 


















50,000; total population, 660,500: 


















Number of offenses known 


19 


42 


58 


133 


183 


1, 314 


2,934 


864 


Number cleared by arrest 


18 


38 


55 


60 


179 


346 


760 


179 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


94.7 


90.5 


94.8 


45.1 


97.8 


26.3 


25.9 


20.7 


Group V.— 74 cities, 10,000 to 


















25,000; total population, 1,214,118: 


















Number of offenses known 


25 


73 


85 


158 


254 


1, 992 


4,462 


1,322 


Number cleared by arrest 


22 


72 


85 


78 


232 


633 


1,554 


366 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


88.0 


98.6 


100.0 


49.4 


91.3 


31.8 


34.8 


27.7 


Group VI.— 163 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 880,540: 


















Number of offenses known 


22 


29 


53 


90 


115 


1,195 


2,195 


424 


Number cleared by arrest 


21 


23 


49 


44 


107 


443 


898 


191 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


95.5 


79.3 


92.5 


48.9 


93.0 


37.1 


40.9 


45.0 


Total 279 cities; total population. 


















8,010,058: 


















Number of offenses known 


276 


411 


521 


1,742 


2,705 


13, 460 


27, 029 


11,210 


Number cleared by arrest 


236 


388 


488 


914 


2,379 


5,028 


10, 692 


3,197 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


85.5 


94.4 


93.7 


52.5 


87.9 


37.4 


39.6 


28.4 



Table 76. — Persons charged {held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



03 

O td 

■"o 



Offense charged 



Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 ._ 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


over 
opula- 
,600 


000 to 
opula- 
,000 


50,000 
popu- 
,300 


000 to 
opula- 
00 


000 to 
opula- 

,118 


under 
opula- 
40 


«^R; 


o-aS 


oS 


uoO.'"- 


o-a2 


C". 


35 o 


les 10 
,000; 
n, 1,1 


cities 
100,00 
ion, 8 


ties 2 
000; 
n, 660 


ties 1 
000; 
n, 1,2 


cities 
000; 
n, 880 


S.2 


.tiS.2 


_ *^ 


O O .2 


'3 U5.2 


0.2 




oc^ *^ 






IN *j 












Tt> 




^^ 


oo 


•— ' 


'"' 


(^ 




120 


13 


35 


16 


20 


19 


3.6 


1.2 


4.3 


2.4 


1.6 


2.2 


138 


84 


28 


41 


68 


24 


4.1 


7.6 


3.5 


6.2 


5.6 


2.7 


632 


145 


81 


65 


110 


62 


18.9 


13.1 


10.0 


9.8 


9.1 


7.0 


1,299 


267 


203 


198 


256 


126 


38.9 


24.1 


25.1 


30.0 


21.1 


14.3 



o 






223 

2.8 

383 
4.8 

1.095 
13.7 

2,349 
29.3 



157 



T.\BLE 7ij.— Persons charged {held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES-Continued 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, hy the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense eliarged 



Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100.(M)0. 

Burglary— breakins or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Hate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Num her of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged-. .. 
Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 , 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution, commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100.000 

Se.v offenses (except rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged- - 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged-. -. 
Rate per 100,000. 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

N um ber o f persons ch arged - _ . 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged-. 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,(MW_.. _. 

All other ofTenscs: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 _ _ 



Group 


Group 
II 


Group 
III 


Group 
IV 


Group 
V 


Group 
VI 


Total 


8. 091 
242.4 


1,335 
120. 6 


870 
107.4 


1. i;j5 

171.8 


12:^.8 


836 
94.9 


13, 770 
171.9 


2,307 
69.1 


887 
80.1 


432 
5.3.3 


247 
37.4 


509 
41.9 


381 
43.3 


4,763 
59.5 


4,054 
121. 5 


1. 235 
111.6 


1,093 
134. 9 


791 
119.8 


1, 549 
127.0 


852 
96.8 


9,574 
119.5 


852 
25. 5 


434 
39.2 


270 
3.3.3 


164 
24.8 


315 

25. 9 


157 
17.8 


2,192 
27.4 


345 
10. 3 


95 
8.6 


71 
8.8 


135 
20.4 


185 
15.2 


126 
14.3 


957 
11.9 


389 
11.7 


66 
6.0 


60 

7.4 


30 
4.5 


61 
5. 


76 
8.6 


682 
8.5 


121 
3.6 


34 
3.1 


62 
7.7 


31 
4.7 


107 

8,8 


41 
4.7 


396 
4.9 


263 
7.9 


89 
8.0 


29 
3.6 


60 
9.1 


93 

7. 7 


49 
5.0 


583 
7.3 


11.188 
335. 2 


359 
32.4 


328 
40.5 


81 
12.3 


183 
15.1 


36 
4.1 


12, 175 
152.0 


1.119 
33.5 


76 
6.9 


177 
21.8 


100 
1.5. 1 


239 
19.7 


125 
14.2 


1,836 
22.9 


86 
2.6 


7 
0.6 


3 
0.4 


5 

0.8 


12 
1.0 


15 
1.7 


128 
1.6 


618 
18.5 


161 
14.5 


86 
10.6 


65 
9.8 


72 
5.9 


31 
3.5 


1,033 
12.9 


1.788 
53.6 


305 
27.6 


405 
50.0 


382 

.'•)7. 8 


466 
38.4 


190 
21.6 


3.536 
44.1 


2,079 
62.3 


130 
11.7 


151 
18.6 


201 
30.4 


322 
26.5 


133 
15.1 


3,016 
37.7 


1,834 
54.9 


432 
39.0 


443 
54.7 


386 
58.4 


909 
74.9 


501 
56.9 


4,505 
56.2 


173, 408 
5, 195. 6 


64,551 
5, 831. 2 


40, 755 
5, 029. 6 


'26,011 
4, 119. 6 


« 35,340 
2, 972. 9 


25,289 
2, 872. 


3 365,354 
4, 592. 4 


10, 993 
329.4 


2,947 
266. 2 


2,917 
360. 


3,114 
471.5 


5,980 
492. 5 


3,763 
427.4 


29,714 
371.0 


60,126 
1,801.5 


12, 345 
1,115.2 


9,307 
1, 148. 6 


8, ,503 
1, 287. 4 


11,9.53 
984.5 


5,471 
621.3 


107, 705 
1, 344. 6 


7,521 
225.3 


1, 151 
104. 


814 
100. 5 


522 
79.0 


1,137 
93. 6 


788 
89.5 


ll,9:« 
149.0 


4,663 
139.7 


371 
33.5 


377 
46.5 


1,023 
1.54.9 


603 
49.7 


194 
22.0 


7,231 
90.3 


30,100 
901.8 


4,266 
385.4 


2,820 
348.0 


2,763 
418.3 


3,787 
311.9 


2,234 
253.7 


45. 970 
573. 9 



'-3 The figures are based on the reiiorts as follows: ' 18 cities, 631,400 population; ' 72 cities, 1,188,723 ik)1iii- 
lalion; i 276 cities, 7,955,563 population. 



158 



Table 77. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared by 

arrest, 1936, by population groups 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 








Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 






Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Group I.— 6 cities over 250,000; 


















total population, 7,099,300: 


















Number of offenses known 


458 


237 


765 


9,166 


3,394 


23, 362 


52, 353 


11,366 


Number cleared by arrest 


349 


160 


442 


4,067 


1,819 


8,942 


10, 055 


1,759 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


76.2 


67.5 


57.8 


44.4 


53.6 


38.3 


19.2 


15.5 


Group II.— 6 cities, 100,000 to 


















250,000; total population, 871,100: 


















Number of offenses known 


44 


36 


88 


354 


403 


2,712 


7,665 


2,191 


Number cleared by arrest _ _ 


32 


20 


57 


120 


213 


813 


1,118 


573 


Percentage cleared bv arrest 


72.7 


55.6 


64.8 


33.9 


52.9 


30.0 


14.6 


26.2 


Group III.— 19 cities, 50,000 to 100,- 


















000; total population, 1,219,810: 


















Number of offenses known 


26 


47 


67 


722 


165 


3,300 


8,208 


2, 125 


Number cleared by arrest 


26 


43 


61 


212 


128 


860 


1,825 


388 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


91.5 


91.0 


29.4 


77.6 


26.1 


22.2 


18.3 


Group IV.— 30 cities, 25,000 to 


















50,000; total population, 1,052,055: 


















Number of offenses known 


27 


18 


77 


343 


171 


2,694 


7,170 


1,671 


Number cleared by arrest 


27 


17 


74 


128 


152 


924 


1,981 


337 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


94.4 


96.1 


37.3 


88.9 


34.3 


27.6 


20.2 


Group V.— 64 cities, 10,000 to 


















25,000; total population, 981,344: 


















Number of offenses known 


24 


11 


62 


335 


85 


2,121 


5,048 


1,036 


Number cleared by arrest 


18 


8 


59 


103 


78 


522 


1,259 


226 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


75.0 


72.7 


95.2 


30.7 


91.8 


24.6 


24.9 


21.8 


Group VI.— 130 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 759,177: 


















Number of offenses known 


15 


15 


49 


180 


134 


1,268 


2,591 


655 


Number cleared by arrest 


13 


13 


41 


77 


114 


471 


976 


184 


Percentage cleared by arrest. -- 


86.7 


86.7 


83.7 


42.8 


85.1 


37.1 


37.7 


33.2 


Total 255 cities; total population. 


















11,982,786: 


















Number of offenses known 


594 


364 


1,108 


11, 100 


4, 352 


35,457 


83, 035 


18, 944 


Number cleared by arrest _ , 


465 


261 


734 


4,707 


2, 504 


12, 532 


17,214 


3,467 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


78.3 


71.7 


66.2 


42.4 


57.5 


35.3 


20.7 


18.3 



Table 78. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Ofiense charged 



Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


«i 


°k 


°C3 


2i 


2i 


a; 03 


>.m 


8Ro 

o o o 


§R2 




O 3 


"2 3 
S O.I- 
3 .— 


o!?- 


O O - 


=■0 3- 


002; 


^'^S 


o" a'^- 


o' f^S 


^-ftg 


o'ft"- 


P.'^ 


"3 o 


o -^ 




CJ o 






.2R- 


:r- 


ss-" 


^o-^ 


^0=^ 


+3 ^ 


•MO - 


■2o-o 


.2o ^- 


•-0 _- 






— — - o 


*^— - G 








"S.2 


.tig. 2 


•3 §.2 


■Bo. 2 


u^'.2 


0-.2 


C^I +J 


ZJOi-t^ 


,— t +^ 


lo -,^ 


o\ +J 








05 


o 


■^ 


M 


o 


to 




« 





.-^ 


408 


31 


30 


25 


18 


13 


5.7 


3.6 


2.5 


2.4 


1.8 


1.7 


334 


26 


35 


21 


8 


12 


4.7 


3.0 


2.9 


2.0 


0.8 


1.6 


2,004 


123 


149 


129 


109 


99 


28.2 


14. 1 


12.2 


12.3 


11.1 


13.0 


1,861 


187 


127 


146 


77 


153 


26.2 


21.5 


10.4 


13.9 


7.8 


20.2 



-So 

O 00 



a 

10 o 



-3 
03 O. 
-M o 

o a 



525 
4.4 

436 
3.6 

2,613 
21.8 

2, 551 
21.3 



159 



Table 7S.—Perso7is charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inliabitants, by population groups — Continued 

EAST NORTU CENTRAL STATES-Continued 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



OfTi'iisc charged 



Other assaults: 

Numhor of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 1 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000. 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000-_ 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 1. 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of i>ersons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100.000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (e.xcept rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged - 

- Rate per I00,0OO-_. 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 . 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000- 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged . . 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per lOO.WK) 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged _ 

Rate per 100,000 



Group 
I 



6,160 
86.8 

2,620 
36.9 

7,060 
99.4 

1, 1.50 
16.2 

2, 619 
36.9 

624 

8.8 

183 
2.6 

405 
5.7 

8,264 
116.4 

1, 025 
14.4 

509 

7.2 

795 
11.2 

3, 601 
50.7 

2,867 
40.4 

2,691 
37.9 

'281,379 
5, 178. 9 

18,706 
263.5 

70, 856 
998.1 

2,634 
37.1 

6,817 
96.0 

18,686 
263.2 



Group 
11 



1,201 
137.9 

428 
49.1 

1,024 
117.6 

296 
34.0 

271 
31.1 

53 
6.1 

98 
11.3 

48 
5.5 

235 
27.0 

178 
20.4 

30 
3.4 

72 
8.3 

422 

48.4 

605 
69.5 

887 
101.8 

2 44,774 
6,411.9 

1,949 
223.7 

8,567 
983. 5 

1,861 
213.6 

1,252 
14:j. 7 

4.789 
549.8 



Group 
HI 



906 
74.3 

391 
32. 1 

1,300 
mi. 6 

247 
20.2 

230 
18.9 

55 
4.5 

79 
6.5 

62 
5.1 

248 
20.3 

310 
25.4 

15 
1.2 

78 
6.4 

689 
56.5 

375 
30.7 

1,319 
108. 1 

68, 185 
5, 589. 8 

3,273 
268. 3 

9.987 

818.7 

1,360 
111.5 

912 
74.8 

2, 677 
219.5 



Group 
IV 



1, 189 
1)3.0 

442 
42.0 

1, 183 
112.4 

279 
26.5 

115 
10.9 



7.3 

121 
11.5 

80 
7.6 

3 147 
14.6 

3 165 
16.4 

13 
1.2 

104 
9.9 

3 466 
46.4 

563 
53. 5 

1,410 
134. 

* 43,786 
4,311. 1 

2.110 
200.6 

13, 730 
1, 305. 1 

656 
62.4 

468 
44.5 

3 3,916 
389.8 



Group 
V 



709 
72.2 

416 
42.4 

1,082 
110.3 

220 
22.4 

105 
10.7 

71 
7.2 

80 

8.2 

55 
5.6 

263 
26.8 

141 
14.4 

13 
1.3 

78 
7.9 

266 
27.1 

.334 
34.0 

1,335 
136.0 

31,515 
3,211.4 

2.843 
289.7 

8,930 
910.0 

494 
50.3 

575 
58.6 

1,960 
199.7 



Group 
VI 



523 
68.9 

421 
55.5 

791 
104. 2 

177 
23.3 

56 
7.4 

53 
7.0 

61 
8.0 

42 
.5.5 

IS 
2.4 

67 

8.8 

8 
1.1 

62 
8.2 

103 
13.6 

219 

28.8 

1, 1,54 
152.0 

18, 052 
2, 377. 8 

1,887 
248.6 

6,105 
804.2 

226 
29.8 

141 
18.6 

2,062 
271.6 



Total 



10, 688 
89.2 

4.718 
39.4 

12.440 
103.8 

2,369 
19.8 

3,396 
28.3 

933 

7.8 

622 
5.2 

692 
5.8 

« 9, 175 
76. 9 

« 1. 886 
15.8 

588 
4.9 

1,189 
9.9 

5 5, 547 
46.5 

4,963 
41.4 

8, 796 
73.4 

6 487.691 
4, 825. 

30. 768 
256.8 

118, 175 
986.2 

7,231 
60.3 

10, 165 
84.8 

'34,090 
285.6 



'-« The figures are based on the reports as follows: ' 5 cities, ,5,4,33,200 population; 2 5 cities, 698,300 popula- 
population; < 29 cities, 1,015,655 population; '254 cities, 11,935,431 population; 

r 1 •,» f w in 



tion; 3 29 cities, 1,004,700 ^ .^„.. 
«252 cities, 10,107,486 population 



160 



Table 79. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest, 1936, by population groups 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 








Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 






Population group 


Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 


Auto 
theft 




slaugh- 
ter 








ing 






Group I.— 4 cities over 250,000; 


















total population, 1,998,500: " 


















Number of offenses known 


141 


149 


110 


1,386 


533 


6.052 


16, 395 


5,660 


Number cleared by arrest 


115 


134 


84 


724 


425 


3,119 


4,532 


1,428 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


81.6 


89.9 


76.4 


52.2 


79.7 


51.5 


27.6 


25.2 


Group II.— 4 cities, 100,000 to 


















25O.,000; total population, 488,200: 


















Number of offenses known 


15 


14 


18 


358 


83 


2,180 


3,771 


1,064 


Number cleared by arrest 


14 


7 


14 


101 


60 


403 


833 


192 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


93.3 


50.0 


77.8 


28.2 


72.3 


18.5 


22.1 


18.0 


Group III— 3 cities. 50,000 to 


















100,000; total population, 202,100: 


















Number of ofTensos known 


6 


3 


7 


106 


37 


939 


2,513 


374 


Number cleared by arrest 


6 


3 


7 


33 


21 


223 


490 


93 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


31.1 


56.8 


23.7 


19.5 


24.9 


Group IV. -4 cities. 25,000 to 50,000; 


















total population, 120,200: 


















Number of offenses known 


2 


1 


4 


118 


13 


568 


1,659 


303 


Number cleared by arrest. _ 


2 




3 


45 


12 


179 


689 


92 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


0.0 


75.0 


38.1 


92.3 


31.5 


41.5 


30.4 


Group v.— 36 cities, 10,000 to 25.000; 


















total population, 519,183: 


















Number of offenses known 


16 


6 


32 


165 


62 


1,336 


3,980 


690 


Number cleared by arrest 


14 


6 


30 


70 


47 


488 


1,372 


194 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


87.5 


100. 


93.8 


42.4 


75.8 


36.5 


34.5 


28.1 


Group VI.— 76 cities under 10,000: 


















total population, 390,565: 


















N umber of offenses known 


8 


2 


13 


91 


47 


673 


1,622 


324 


Number cleared by arrest _ 


5 


2 


9 


45 


33 


204 


592 


125 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


62.5 


100.0 


69.2 


49.5 


70.2 


30.3 


36.5 


38.6 


Total, 127 cities; total population, 


















3,718,748: 


















Number of offenses known 


188 


175 


184 


2,224 


775 


11, 748 


29, 940 


8,415 


Number cleared by arrest 


156 


152 


147 


1,018 


698 


4,616 


8,508 


2,124 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


83.0 


86.9 


79.9 


45.8 


77.2 


39.3 


28.4 


25.2 



Table 80. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 

100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 ._ 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


° g 


S^ 


°« 


2^ 


O L, 


o'g 


^•2 


o 3o 


_ 3 


rSo 


O 3 

O ftM 


Sr/S 


t..2 




R oo 


O CO 


o ooo 




» 3 


oa - 


s 50, 
00; p 
202,1 


S(=^'^- 


o a-i 


s unc 
popu 

65 


pop 

,500 


2^-38 


^..° 


23 






»o - 


CO - 






■Sog 


.= _r fl 


rog 


=°§ 




*.n o o 


.- o . 




•?10.S 


■p, O .2 


O'O.S 


"S^ 


OO -i 


oc^ ^ 


" -H *i 


^lO *i 


C^ «J 










?o 


to 


^ 


•^ 


CO 


■* 


m 


r>. 


120 


24 


5 


2 


15 


4 


6.0 


4.9 


2.5 


1.7 


2.9 


1.0 


123 


8 


3 


1 


6 


2 


6.2 


1.6 


1.5 


0.8 


1.2 


0.5 


497 


101 


16 


23 


90 


50 


24.9 


20.7 


7.9 


19.1 


17.3 


12.8 


298 


88 


15 


19 


63 


37 


14.9 


18.0 


7.4 


15.8 


12.1 


9.5 



170 
4.6 

143 
3.8 

777 
20.9 

520 
14.0 



161 



Table 80. — Persons charged {held for prosecution), JOSH, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES— Continued 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



OtTense charged 



Other a.'isaults: 

N umber of persons charged. 

Kate i>er 100,000 

Burplary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged - 

Rate per 100,000 

Larcency— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

-V umber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged....^ 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000- _. _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged _.. 

Kate per 100,000 _ 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged _. 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 . 

Sex oflenses (except rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

N umber of persons charged ..- 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Kate per 100,000 

Oflenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: * 

N umber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged- 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,(J(JO 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

N umber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Group 


Group 
11 


Group 
111 


Group 
IV 


Group 
V 


Group 
VI 


Total 


282 
14.1 


469 
96.1 


1.32 
65. 3 


92 
76.5 


2SK 
.55. 5 


232 

59.4 


1,495 
40.2 


1,123 
56. 2 


366 
72.9 


102 
50.5 


02 
51.6 


312 
60.1 


201 
51.5 


2, 156 
58. 


3,123 
156. 3 


1,102 
22.5.7 


349 
172.7 


279 
232.1 


!I25 
1 7S. 2 


461 
118.0 


6,239 
167.8 


632 
31.6 


130 
26.6 


41 
20.3 


50 
41.6 


151 
29. 1 


109 
27.9 


1.113 
29.9 


576 

28.8 


60 
12.3 


.50 
24.7 


16 
13.3 


72 
13.9 


233 

59. 7 


1,007 
27.1 


123 
6.2 


33 

6.8 


13 
6.4 


13 
10. 8 


52 
10.0 


65 
16. 6 


299 
8.0 


377 
18.9 


82 
16.8 


23 

11.4 


45 
37.4 


80 
1.5. 4 


64 
16.4 


671 
18.0 


112 
5.6 


15 
3.1 


t 
3.5 


4 
3.3 


32 
6.2 


10 
2.6 


180 
4.8 


10. 634 
532. 1 


28 
5.7 


58 
28.7 


46 
38.3 


99 
19.1 


37 

9.5 


10,902 
293.2 


187 
9.4 


121 
24.8 


9 
4.5 


25 

20.8 


49 
9.4 


41 
10.5 


432 
11.6 


216 
10.8 


2 
0.4 


1 

0. 5 


2 

1.7 


10 
1.9 


7 
1.8 


238 
6.4 


182 
9.1 


80 
16.4 


17 
8.4 


9 
7.5 


28 
5.4 


20 
5.1 


336 
9.0 


1.141 
57.1 


155 
31.7 


66 
32.7 


8 
6.7 


47 
9.1 


53 
13.6 


1,470 
. 39.5 


600 
30.0 


737 
151.0 


101 
5U. 


128 
106. 5 


497 
9.5.7 


280 

71.7 


2, 343 
63.0 


1,327 
66.4 


615 
126.0 


108 
5.3.4 


288 
239. 6 


772 
148.7 


446 
114.2 


3,556 
95.6 


205, 444 
10,279.9 


30, 556 
6, 258. 9 


10. 776 
5,332.0 


1,567 
1, 303. 7 


17.463 
3, 363. 6 


" 5, 868 
1,519.0 


2 271,674 
7,313.9 


10, 764 
538.6 


904 
185.2 


619 
306. 3 


439 
365. 2 


1,321 
254.4 


770 
197.2 


14,817 
398.4 


13,4,59 
673. 5 


8,705 
1, 783. 1 


2,034 
1,006.4 


2, 220 

1,846.9 


8,262 
1..591.3 


5. 308 
1,359.1 


39,988 
1, 075. 3 


6,120 
306.2 


803 
164.5 


291 
144.0 


412 
342.8 


521 
100. 3 


202 
51.7 


8,349 
224.5 


543' 
27.2 


691 
141.5 


121 
59.9 


62 
51.6 


275 
5,3.0 


125 
32.0 


1,817 
48.9 


11,055 
553. 2 


2,599 
532.4 


1,493 
738. 7 


326 
271.2 


1,235 
237. 9 


648 
165.9 


17, 356 
466.7 



i-a The figures are based on the reports as follows: ' 75 cities, 386,297 population; ' 126 cities, 3,714,480 
population. 



162 

Table 81. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared 

by arrest, 1936, by population groups 

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 








Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 






Population group 


Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 




slaugh- 
ter 








mg 






Group I.— 3 cities over 250,000; total 


















population, 1,592,500: 


















Number of offenses known 


247 


58 


184 


2,054 


937 


7,700 


15, 332 


6,167 


Number cleared by arrest 


202 


47 


148 


628 


555 


1,661 


3,241 


525 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


81.8 


81.0 


80.4 


30.6 


59.2 


21.6 


21.1 


8.5 


Group II.— 2 cities, 100,000 to 


















250,000; total population, 314,610: 


















Number of offenses known 


54 


18 


42 


318 


1,013 


2,383 


6,542 


1,047 


Number cleared by arrest 


48 


17 


40 


125 


736 


572 


1,693 


143 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


88.9 


94.4 


95.2 


39.3 


72.7 


24.0 


25.9 


13.7 


Group III.— 2 cities, 50,000 to 


















100,000; total population, 163,724: 


















Number of offenses known 


25 


13 


23 


51 


23 


758 


3,046 


298 


Number cleared by arrest 


24 


11 


14 


30 


22 


220 


635 


45 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


96.0 


84.6 


60.9 


58.8 


95.7 


29.0 


20.8 


15.1 


Group IV.— 9 cities, 25,000 to 


















50,000; total population, 323,864: 


















Number of offenses known 


48 


29 


26 


103 


524 


1,189 


3,710 


606 


Number cleared by arrest 


48 


25 


21 


71 


475 


490 


1,615 


126 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


86.2 


80.8 


68.9 


90.6 


41.2 


43.5 


20.8 


Group V.— 9 cities, 10,000 to 25,00(i; 


















total population, 143,249: 


















Number of offenses known 


24 


1 


8 


50 


233 


496 


1,275 


233 


Number cleared by arrest 


21 


1 


8 


34 


217 


197 


531 


67 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


87.5 


100.0 


100.0 


68.0 


93.1 


39.7 


41.6 


28.8 


Group VI.— 11 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 60,608: 


















Number of offenses known 


3 


2 


2 


17 


67 


190 


299 


66 


Number cleared by arrest 


4 


2 


2 


9 


62 


77 


157 


11 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


133.3 


100.0 


100.0 


52.9 


92.5 


40.5 


52.5 


16.7 


Total, 36 cities; total population, 


















2, 598, 555 : 


















Number of offenses known 


401 


121 


285 


2,593 


2,797 


12,716 


30,204 


8.417 


Number cleared by arrest 


347 


103 


233 


897 


2,067 


3,217 


7,872 


917 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


86.6 


85.1 


81.8 


34.6 


73.9 


25.3 


26.1 


10.9 



Table 82. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 

100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Murder, nonnegligent manslaugh 
ter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged. . . 
Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate perlOO.OOO 



Group I 



> -o 
o so 






239 
15.0 

160 
10.0 

1,364 

85.7 

858 
53.9 



Group II 



O 3 
o Co 



CO 5 



I CO 



54 
17.2 

46 
14.3 

182 
57.8 

727 
231.1 



Group III 



£3 ^^ _ * 



Rg 



«;::;; 



28 
17.1 

6 
3.7 

40 
24.4 

421 
257.1 



Group IV 



o oco 

- Q.00 

OO " 
— o P 

•S§.2 



61 
18.8 

21 
6.5 

84 
25.9 

427 
131.8 



Group V 



■— o O 
t^ -r o 
■55 "o .a 



22 
16.4 

1 
0.7 

41 
28.6 

245 
171.0 



Group VI 



3 0=0 

ftg 

en o" 

■tio - 
3S a 



2 
3.3 

2 
3.3 

15 
24.7 

84 
138.6 



•3§ 

.3 

S o 
oft 



406 
16.6 

235 
9.0 

1,726 
66.4 

2,762 
106.3 



163 



Table 82. — Persons charged (field for prosecution), lOHfi, nianber and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — ContimiccI 

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES— Continued 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charRed 



Other assaults: 

XumbiT of persons charged 

Rate pcT 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen proiH-rty; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000_. 

Prostitution, commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000... 

Sex offenses (except rape and prosti- 
tution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per lOO.tXK) 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100.000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and chil- 
dren: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 -. 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Gambling: 

Numlier of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of jxTSons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Qrouj)! Croup II Croup III 



8. 550 
536.9 

2,780 
174.6 

3,764 
236.4 

944 
59.3 

807 
50.7 

203 
12.7 

161 
10.1 

121 
7.6 

891 
55.9 



304 
19.1 

84 
5.3 

771 
48.4 



1,839 
115.5 

2,439 
153.2 

1,988 
124.8 

160,621 
10,086.1 

26, 276 
1, 650. 

41, 106 
2,581.2 

3,432 
215.5 

2,777 
174.4 

21,395 
1, 343. 5 



3, 257 
1,035.2 

532 
169. 1 

1,4.55 
462. 5 

198 
62.9 

556 
176.7 

151 
48.0 

38 
12.1 

56 
17.8 

512 
162.7 



63 
20.0 



30 
9.5 

259 
82.3 



1,742 
5.53. 7 

2,463 
782.9 

592 

188.2 

23, 729 
7, 542. 4 

9, 336 
2, 967. 5 

11,455 
3,641.0 

962 
305.8 

1,319 
419.2 

7,787 
2, 475. 1 



1,385 
845.9 

160 
97.7 

630 

384.8 

55 
33.6 

171 
104.4 

37 
22.6 

7 
4.3 

17 
10.4 

136 

83.1 



122 
74.5 




108 
66.0 



212 
129.5 

1,405 

858.2 

399 
243.7 

6,737 
4,114.9 

2,382 
1,454.9 

3,752 
2,291.7 

594 
362.8 

1,042 
636. 4 

858 
524.1 



Croup IV Group V Croup VI Total 



1,545 
477.1 

449 
138. 6 

1,432 
442.2 

126 
38.9 

138 
42. 6 

39 
12.0 

170 
55. 3 

22 
6.8 

196 
00.5 



1 85 
57. 1 

4 
1.2 

191 
59. 



> 488 
164.7 

1,285 
396.8 

1,034 
319.3 

23,772 
7, 340. 1 

3,316 
1,023.9 

14, .331 
4, 425. 

287 
88.6 

518 
159.9 

4, 638 
1,432.1 



693 
483. 8 

171 
119.4 

514 
358. 8 

67 
46.8 

62 
43.3 

34 

21 
M.7 

8 
5.6 

23 
16.1 



104 
72.6 



80 
55. 8 



69 
48.2 

218 
152.2 

388 
270. 9 

5, 469 
3,817.8 

1.388 
968.9 

4,468 
3,119.0 

100 
69. 8 

611 
426.5 

1,419 
990.6 



208 
343.2 

85 
140.2 

208 
343. 2 

20 
33.0 

3 
4.9 

3 

4.9 

16 
26.4 

2 
3.3 

21 
34.6 



16 
26.4 

1 
1.6 

29 
47.8 



52 
85.8 

95 
156.7 

245 
404.2 

1,175 
1,938.7 

234 
386.1 

3, 667 
6, 050. 4 

35 

57.7 

55 
90.7 

212 
349.8 



15,6.38 
601.8 

4, 177 
160.7 

8,003 
308. 

1,410 
54.3 

1,737 
66.8 

467 
18.0 

422 
16.2 

226 
8.7 

1,779 
68.5 



794 
30.6 

120 
4.6 

1,438 
55.3 



2 4, 402 
■ 171.2 

7,905 
304.2 

4,646 
178.8 

221, 503 
8, 524. 1 

42, 942 
1, 652. 1 

78, 779 
3,031.6 

5,410 
208.2 

6,322 
243. 3 

36, 309 
1,397.3 



1-2 The 
lation. 



figures are based on the reports as follows: ' 8 cities, 296,364 pojmlatiou: 2 35 cities, 2,571,055 popu- 



164 

Table 83. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared by 

arrest, 1936, by population groups 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


























Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 






Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Group I and Group II.' 


















Group III.— 2 cities, 50,000 to 


















100,000; total population, 123,000: 


















Number of offenses known 


31 


21 


9 


57 


197 


422 


863 


236 


Number cleared by arrest 


25 


19 


9 


32 


142 


178 


599 


114 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


80.6 


90.5 


100.0 


56.1 


72.1 


42.2 


69.4 


48.3 


Group IV.— l city, 25,000 to 50,000; 


















total population, 29,744: 


















Number of offenses known 


8 


6 


2 


61 


56 


178 


240 


85 


Number cleared b y arrest 


7 


5 


2 


23 


27 


61 


33 


26 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


87.5 


83.3 


100.0 


37.7 


48.2 


34.3 


13.8 


30.6 


Group V.— 2 cities, 10,000 to 25.000; 


















total population, 24,900: 


















Number of oflenses known 


6 


2 


3 


12 


21 


59 


36 


38 


Number cleared by arrest 


4 


2 


3 


9 


18 


11 


29 


4 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


66.7 


100.0 


100.0 


75.0 


85.7 


18.6 


80.6 


10.5 


Group VI.— 3 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 20,555: 


















Number of offenses known 


9 


1 


1 


9 


20 


110 


123 


29 


Number cleared by arrest 


9 


1 


1 


5 


16 


31 


40 


12 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


55.6 


80.0 


28.2 


32.5 


41.4 


Total, 8 cities; population, 198,199: 


















Number of offenses known 


54 


30 


15 


139 


294 


769 


1,262 


388 


Number cleared by arrest 


45 


27 


15 


69 


203 


281 


701 


156 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


83.3 


90.0 


100.0 


49.6 


69.0 


36.5 


55.5 


40.2 



I No cities in this population group represented. 

Table 84. — Persons charged (held for prosecution) , 1936, number and rate per 

100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



3 
o 



a. 

3 



Group 
III 



gao 
o oo 



°o2 

■^3 2 



27 
22.0 

19 
15.4 

34 
27.6 

157 
127.6 

205 
166.7 

158 
128.5 



Group 
IV 



gH. 



?Sb 



7 
23.5 

5 
16.8 

23 
77.3 

27 
90.8 

55 
184.9 

61 
205.1 



Group 
V 



o oo 
o ^oi 

ajo ^ 

1S.2 

CM 



4 
16.1 

2 
8.0 

10 

40.2 

21 
84.3 

18 
72.3 

12 
48.2 



Group 
VI 



a 

o -c 

O.'S 



!oO 



9 
43.8 

1 

4.9 

6 
29.2 

16 

77.8 

73 

355.1 

31 
150.8 



■so* 



•■= a 
".2 

.3 

5 o 
o p. 



47 
23.7 

27 
13.6 

73 
36.8 

221 
111.5 

351 
177.1 

262 
132.2 



* No cities in this population group represented. 



165 



Table S4.~Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued. 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES— Continued. 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Larceny— theft: 

N'umber of persons charged 

Rate iwr 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per UXl.OOO.. 

Stolen proi)crty; receiving, etc.: 

Number of i)ersons charged 

Rate per 100,000 ,. 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of i)€rsons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) : 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged .. 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged .. 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Kate per 100,000.. 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Nimiber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100.000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged ^.... 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 



Group 
1* 



Group 
II* 



Group 
III 



473 
384.6 

114 
92.7 

H) 
13,0 

47 
38.2 

18 
14.6 



47 
38.2 



Group 
IV 



2, 






11 
8.9 

58 
47.2 

(') 
(') 

275 
223.6 

251 
204.1 

3,064 
,491.1 

990 
809.8 

3, 510 

8.58. 5 

436 
354. 5 

669 
543. 9 

1,007 
818.7 



33 
110.9 

26 
87.4 

6 
20.2 

7 
23.5 

20 
67.2 



0.7 

8 
26.9 

1 
3.4 



Group 
V 



6 
20.2 

49 
164.7 

3 

10.1 

3 
10.1 

(') 
(') 

(2) 

(-) 

(2) 

54 
181.5 

2 

6.7 

109 
366.5 



29 

1 16. 5 

6 
24.1 

3 
12.0 

2 
8.0 



8.0 

3 
12.0 

13 
52.2 

23 
92. 4 

1 
4.0 

16 
64.3 



28. 1 

109 
437.8 

113 
453. 8 

283 
1,136.5 

316 
1,269.1 

1,725 
6, 927. 7 

13 

.52.2 

6 
24.1 

33 
132. 5 



Group 
VI 



40 
194.6 

12 

58.4 

1 
4.9 

4 

19.5 

8 
38.9 

1 
4.9 

27 
131.4 

1 
4.9 



10 
48.6 

1 
4.9 

38 
184.9 



428.1 

836 
4,067.1 

82 
398.9 

1,471 
7, 156. 4 

12 

58.4 

67 
326. 

81 
394.1 



Total 



575 
290.1 

1.58 
79.7 

26 
1.3.1 

60 
30.3 

48 
24.2 

14 
7.1 

95 
47.9 

25 
12.6 

12 

6.1 

90 
45.4 

3 57 
44.6 

425 
214.4 

455 
229. 6 

* 4, 183 
2, 483. 2 

< 1, 394 
827.5 

* 6, 712 
3, 984. 4 

515 
259.8 

744 

375.4 

1.230 
620. 6 



• No cities in this population group represented. 
' Not reported. 

2 Figures for disorderly conduct and drunkenness were not separately listed on the report for this city. 
1 he combmed figure for those classes is 571. 
»-< The figures are based on the reports as follows: » 7 cities, 127,699 population ; < 7 cities, 168,455 population. 



166 

Table 85. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared by 

arrest, 1936, by population groups 

WEST SOUTH CENTKAL STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


























Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 






Population group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Group I.— 2 cities over 250,000; to- 


















tal population, 749,000: 


















Number of offenses known 


194 


55 


42 


374 


825 


2,601 


8,843 


1,910 


Number cleared by arrest 


159 


55 


38 


216 


531 


1,048 


2,420 


411 


Percentage cleared bv arrest 


82.0 


100.0 


90.5 


57.8 


64.4 


40.3 


27.4 


21.5 


Group II.— 3 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 


















total population, 518,500: 


















Number of ofifenses known 


71 


54 


44 


465 


367 


3,073 


7,210 


1,603 


Number cleared by arrest 


66 


50 


42 


133 


334 


725 


1,840 


384 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


93.0 


92.6 


95.5 


28.6 


91.0 


23.6 


25.5 


24.0 


Group III.— 5 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 


















total population, 311,100: 


















Number of offenses known 


45 


18 


14 


145 


438 


1,537 


4,099 


558 


Number cleared by arrest 


43 


19 


13 


72 


379 


526 


978 


108 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


95.6 


105.6 


92.9 


49.7 


86.5 


34.2 


23.9 


19.4 


Group IV.— 3 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; 


















total population, 104,500: 


















Number of offenses known 


9 


8 


3 


49 


64 


376 


1,587 


183 


Number cleared by arrest 


5 


8 


3 


25 


63 


86 


406 


26 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


55.6 


100.0 


100.0 


51.0 


98.4 


22.9 


25.6 


14.2 


Group V.— 9 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 


















total population, 146,430: 


















Number of offenses known 


29 


4 


12 


63 


145 


600 


2,188 


186 


Number cleared by arrest 


27 


4 


11 


42 


142 


222 


734 


114 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


93.1 


100.0 


91.7 


66.7 


97.9 


37.0 


33.5 


61.3 


Group VI.— 20 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 127,400: 


















Number of offenses known 


11 


3 


7 


41 


47 


418 


896 


101 


Number cleared by arrest 


10 


3 


6 


14 


38 


132 


355 


49 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


90.9 


100.0 


85.7 


34.1 


80.9 


31.6 


39.6 


48.5 


Total, 42 cities; population, 1,956,930: 


















Number of offenses known 


3.59 


142 


122 


1,137 


1,886 


8,605 


24,823 


4,541 


Number cleared by arrest 


310 


139 


113 


502 


1,487 


2,739 


6,733 


1,092 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


86.4 


97.9 


92.6 


44.2 


78.8 


31.8 


27. 1 


24.0 



Table 86. — Persons charged {held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Murder, nonneligent manslaughter: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


6. 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


a 


^i 


2i 


S a 


2« 


2i 


under 
opula- 
00 




> 5.0 


§ao 


rSo 


_ 3 

§ ao 


S^o 




oo 


o oo 


S oo 


o oo 


o o2 




es c 
00; p 
749,0 


, 100, 
00; p 
518,5 


S 50, 
00; p 
311,1 


WO-' 


« o ^ 


V3 O 




— ;o _r 




a; o _r 




QJ O ^ 






"S 2 


SS.2 


■-8.2 


5S.^ 


•ss ° 


"S-.2 


■3 3 


C^ +J 


ocs *^ 










o 


c^ 


CO 


"3 


n 


OS 


S 


t^ 


117 


74 


50 


7 


24 


10 


282 


15.6 


14.3 


16.1 


6.7 


16.4 


7.8 


14.4 


26 


43 


19 


9 


4 


4 


105 


3.5 


8.3 


6.1 


8.6 


2.7 


3.1 


5.4 


209 


209 


93 


19 


48 


20 


598 


27.9 


40.3 


29.9 


18.2 


32.8 


15.7 


30.6 


454 


351 


462 


65 


130 


44 


1,506 


60.6 


67.7 


148.5 


62.2 


88.8 


34.5 


77.0 



1G7 

Table 86. — Persons charged (held for prosendinn), tDSH, nnmher avd rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 

WEST SOUTH ("ENTR.AT. STATES-fontinued 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by ihe Bureau of the Census] 



OtTense charged 



Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary — breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Kate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Kate per 100,000 

Autotheft: 

Number of persons charged 1 

Kate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged - 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 -.. 

Rape: 

N umber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of i)ersons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000. 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged... 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged -.- 

Rate per 100,000... 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged 

Kate per 100,000 



Group 


Group 
II 


Group 
III 


Group 
IV 


Groui) 
V 


Group 
VI 


fifiO 

S8, 1 


002 

110. 1 


482 
1.54.9 


082 
052. 6 


200 
177.6 


170 
133.4 


714 
95. 3 


051 
12.'). 


613 
197.0 


70 
07.0 


174 
118.8 


143 
112.2 


1,995 
2fifi. 4 


1,029 
314.2 


1,056 
339. 4 


200 
197. 1 


587 
400.9 


352 
276.3 


302 
40. 3 


370 
71.4 


1,30 
43.7 


30 

28.7 


77 
.52.6 


48 
.37.7 


195 
20.0 


38 
7.3 


88 
28.3 


30 

28.7 


27 
18.4 


17 

13. 3 


150 
20.0 


44 

8.5 


101 
32.5 


201 
192.3 


42 

28.7 


40 
31.4 


79 
10.5 


73 
14.1 


117 
37.6 


31 
29.7 


26 
17.8 


35 
27.5 


43 

5.7 


42 
8.1 


16 
5. 1 


3 
2.9 


10 
6.8 


6 
4.7 


818 
109. 2 


2, 275 
4.38. 8 


159 
51. 1 


52 
49.8 


51 
34.8 


21 
16.5 


113 
15.1 


28 
5.4 


499 

100.4 


116 
111.0 


10 

0.8 


25 
19.0 


271 
30.2 


82 
1.5.8 


46 

14.8 


14 
13.4 


" ""o.o" 


5 
3.9 


173 
23.1 


222 
4^8 


162 
52.1 


55 
52.6 


,58 
39.6 


38 
29.8 


1 138 
29.3 


2 45 
10.4 


33 
10.0 


1 
10 


19 
13.0 


8 ■ 
6.3 


104 
13.9 


2191 

09. 5 


• 494 

1.58. 8 


1.54 
147.4 


146 
99.7 


220 
172.7 


276 
30.8 


300 
09.4 


371 
119.3 


206 
197. 1 


194 
132. 5 


180 
146.0 


88, 088 
11,700.7 


2 34,472 
12,. 535. 3 


44. 245 
14,222.1 


5, 274 
5, 046. 9 


3 4, 893 
3,801.0 


2.818 
2,211.9 


8,060 
1, 070. 1 


1,110 
214.1 


1,0,30 
.5-23. 9 


317 
303. 3 


808 
,551.8 


686 
538. 5 


10,887 
1,4,53.5 


18,013 
3, 474. 1 


8, 262 
2, 655. 7 


4,0.56 
3, 881. 3 


6, 751 
4, 610. 4 


4,0.54 
3, 182. 1 


5, 320 
710,3 


4.931 
951.0 


945 
303. 8 


340 

325. 4 


523 

357. 2 


225 
176.6 


810 
108.9 


777 
149. 9 


1,30? 
418.8 


2.53 
242.1 


302 
206.2 


3.56 
279. 4 


3,2.32 
431.5 


6, 061 
1,168.9 


1, ,557 
500.5 


666 
637.3 


917 
620. 2 


320 
255. 9 



Total 



2,8.56 
14,5. 9 

2,365 
120.9 

5, 825 
297.7 

963 

49.2 

395 
20.2 

578 
29.5 

361 

18.4 

120 
6.1 

3,376 
172.5 

791 
40.4 

418 
21.4 

708 
36.2 

<244 
17.0 

5 1,309 
76.4 

1,593 

81.4 

6 179,790 
10, 602. 5 

12,611 
644.4 

52, 023 
2, 658. 4 

12,284 
627.7 

3,807 
194.5 

12, 7.59 
652.0 



>-« The figures are based on the reports as follows: ■ 1 city, 471,000 population; 2 2 cities, 275,000 popula- 
tion; 3 8 cities, 128,730 jiopulation; « 40 cities, 1,4.35,430 population; « 41 cities, 1,713,430 population; « 40 cities, 
1,695,730 population. 



^Si 



168 



Table 87. — Number of offeiises, known number and -percentage cj offenses cleared by 

arrest, 1936, by population groups 

MOUNTAIN STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 








Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 






Population group 


Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 




slaugh- 
ter 








ing 






Group I.— 1 city over 250,000; total 


















population, 293,200: 


















Number of offenses known 


27 


3 


21 


170 


65 


1,008 


1,540 


645 


Number cleared by arrest 


21 


2 


20 


125 


58 


763 


851 


95 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


77.8 


66.7 


95.2 


73.5 


89.2 


75.7 


55.3 


14.7 


Group II. ' 


















Group III— l city, 50,000 to 100,000; 


















total population, 51,300: 


















Number of offenses known - . _ 


4 




2 


39 


7 


172 


418 


122 


Number cleared by arrest 


3 




2 


7 


3 


13 


53 


12 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


75.0 





100.0 


17.9 


42.9 


7.6 


12.7 


9.8 


Group IV —4 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; 


















total population, 136,600: 


















Number of offenses known 


12 


2 


15 


71 


41 


624 


1,972 


515 


Number cleared by arrest 


11 


2 


13 


21 


26 


166 


497 


43 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


91.7 


100.0 


86.7 


29.6 


63.4 


26.6 


25.2 


8.3 


Group V.— 6 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 


















total population, 101,444: 


















Number of offenses known. . .. 


7 
5 




8 

7 


49 
21 


19 
18 


385 
143 


1,423 
410 


348 


Number cleared by arrest 




60 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


71.4 





87.5 


42.9 


94.7 


37.1 


28.8 


17.2 


Group VI.— 27 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 150,383: 


















Number of offenses known _ . . 


7 


6 


14 


52 


31 


479 


1,338 


229 


Number cleared by arrest 


8 


6 


14 


20 


29 


164 


414 


81 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


114.3 


100.0 


100.0 


38.5 


93.5 


34.2 


30.9 


35.4 


Total 39 cities; population, 732,927: 


















Number of offenses known 


57 


11 


60 


381 


163 


2,668 


6,691 


1,851 


Number cleared by arrest 


48 


10 


56 


194 


134 


1,249 


2,225 


291 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


84.2 


90.9 


93.3 


50.9 


82.2 


46.8 


33.3 


15.7 



1 No cities in this population group represented. 

Table 88. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 

100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

MOUNTAIN STATES 

f Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census) 





Group 


Group* 
II 


Group 
III 


Group 
IV 


Group 
V 


Group 
VI 


■3 
2S! 


Oflense charged 






2a 


2i 

W o 

•2ga 
■Sg-2 


2 rt 

'" o 

•3^5-2 

CO 


a c9 

■ - O * 

r-t ^-a 
IN 


■4-3 .v 

si 

3 

- a 




Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter: 

Number of persons charged , _ 


12 
4.1 

3 
1.0 

34 
11.6 

74 
25.2 

9 
3.1 




3 

5.8 


7 
5.1 

2 
1.5 

22 
16.1 

32 
23.4 

141 
103.2 


5 
4.9 

.. 

34 
33.5 

19 
18.7 

64 
63.1 


8 
5.3 

7 

4.7 

26 
17.3 

31 
20.6 

80 
53.2 


35 


Rate per 100,000 


4 8 


Manslaughter by negligence: 

Number of persons charged .... . 


12 


Rate per 100,000 .. 






7 
13.6 

3 

5.8 

(2) 
(1) 


1.6 


Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 


123 


Rate per 100.000. 


16 8 


Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged 


159 


Rate per 100,000 


21.7 


Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged 


5 294 


Rate per 100.000 . 


43.1 


See footnotes at end of table. 







169 



Table 88. — Persons charged {hehl for proseculiou), 1f}S(>, number and rale per 
100,000 inhabilnnta, hi/ populalion groups — Continued 

MOUNTAIN STATES— Continued 

[Population as estimated July 1, 19.'«, by (he Bureau of the Census] 



Offense charged 



Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Emliezzlement and fraud: 

Num ber of persons charged 

Rale per 100,000. 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 : 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.: 

Number of persons charged. 

Kate per 100,000 _ 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. _ _ 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Numt)er of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000. 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000. 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged 

Kate per 100,000 

All other ofTen.ses: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,0(X) 



Oroup 
I 



124 
42.3 

899 
300. 

39 
13.3 

41 
14.0 



Oroup 
II* 



8 
2.7 

21 

7.2 

(0 
(•) 

7 
2.4 

74 
2.5.2 

83 
28.3 

10 
3.4 

24 

8.2 

458 
1.50.2 

3.5, 596 
2,140.5 

2,510 
856. 1 

2, 955 
,007.8 

(') 
(') 

152 
51.8 

358 
122.1 



f I roup 
III 



13 
25. 3 

53 
103. 3 



13.0 



1 
1.9 

8 
1.5. 6 

2 
.3.9 

P) 



16 
31.2 



1 
1.9 

72 
140. 4 

585 
1,140.4 

(») 
(') 

531 
1, 03.5. 1 

(3) 
(') 

8 
1.5.6 

328 
639.4 



firoup 
IV 



100 
77.0 

451 
330. 2 

32 
23. 4 

.50 
.36. 

39 
28.6 

22 
16.1 

13 
9.5 

491 
359. 4 

12 
8.8 

19 
1.3.9 

35 

25. 6 

27 
19.8 

129 
94.4 

261 
191. 1 

13, 729 
10,0.50.5 

482 
352. 9 

3, 852 
2, 819. 9 

974 
713.0 

HI 
103. 2 

502 
367. 5 



Oroup 
V 



124 
122.2 

398 
392. 3 

03 
02. 1 

27 
20. 

3 
3.0 

48 
47.3 

8 
7.9 

71 
70.0 

58 
57.2 

14 
13.8 

22 
21.7 

2 
2.0 

50 
49.3 

281 
277.0 

12,302 
12,126.9 

2, 043 
2, 013. 9 

3,164 
3,119.0 

815 
803. 4 

35 
34.5 

848 
835. 9 



Oroup 
VI 



166 
110.4 

417 
277. 3 

09 
4.5.9 

11 

7.3 

13 
8.6 

33 
21.9 

20 
13.3 

209 
139.0 

14 
9.3 



3.3 

33 
21.9 

5 
,3.3 

69 
4,5.9 

301 
2(K). 2 

* 4, 484 
3, 131. 5 

958 
637.0 

3,567 
2,371.9 

413 
274. 6 

143 
95.1 

483 
321.2 



Total 



533 

72.7 

2,218 
302.6 

210 
28.7 

129 

17.6 

56 
7.6 

119 
10.2 

64 

8.7 

6 771 
198.5 

91 
12.4 

112 
1.5.3 

189 
25. 8 

44 
6.0 

273 
37.2 

1,373 
187.3 

" 66, 696 
9, 190. 1 

5 5, 993 
879.2 

14, 069 
1,919.6 

2, 202 
560. 9 

479 
65. 4 

2.519 
343.7 



*No cities in this population group represented. 

' Figures for prostitution and commercialized vice and vagrancy were not separately listed on the report 
for this city. The combined figure for tho.se classes is 2,165. 

2 Figures for other assaults and disorderly conduct were not separately listed on the report for this city. 
The combined figure for those classes is 276. 

' Figures for i)rostitution and commercialized vice and vagrancy were not separately listed on the report 
for this city. The combined figure for those cla.s.ses is 485. 

*-' The figures are based on the reports as follows: * 26 cities, 143,190 population; ' 38 cities, 081,627 popu- 
lation; « 37 cities, 388,427 population; ' 38 cities, 725,734 population. 



170 



Table 89. — Number oj offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared by 

arrest, 1936, by population groups 

PACIFIC STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 








Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 






Population group 


Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 




slaugh- 
ter 








ing 






Group I.— 2 cities over 250,000; 


















total population, 951,800: 


















Number of offenses known 


26 


119 


53 


590 


378 


2,784 


10, 381 


4,611 


Number cleared by arrest 


23 


35 


49 


255 


327 


911 


2,227 


400 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


88.5 


29.4 


92.5 


43.2 


86.5 


32.7 


21.5 


8.7 


Group II.— 3 cities, 100,000 to 250,- 


















000; total population, 433,700: 


















Number of offenses known 


13 


11 


33 


225 


150 


1,819 


4,735 


1,557 


Number cleared by arrest 


10 


10 


28 


69 


66 


365 


811 


204 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


76.9 


90.9 


84.8 


30.7 


44.0 


20.1 


17.1 


13,1 


Group III.— 5 cities, 50,000 to 100,- 


















000; total population, 399,200: 


















Number of offenses known 


9 


9 


31 


278 


177 


1,864 


5,615 


1,432 


Number cleared by arrest 


8 


7 


27 


70 


63 


470 


1,230 


196 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


88.9 


77.8 


87.1 


25.2 


35.6 


25.2 


21.9 


13.7 


Group IV.— 8 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; 


















total population, 247,600: 


















Number of offenses known 


8 


8 


15 


94 


100 


1,275 


3,394 


997 


Number cleared by arrest 


8 


8 


13 


23 


52 


310 


551 


115 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


100. 


100.0 


86.7 


24.5 


52.0 


24.3 


• 16.2 


11.5 


Group V.— 21 cities, 10,000 to 


















25,000; total population, 321,732: 


















Number of offenses known 


9 


10 


20 


97 


28 


1,272 


3,857 


951 


Number cleared by arrest 


8 


8 


17 


23 


23 


433 


891 


250 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


88.9 


80.0 


85.0 


23.7 


82.1 


34.0 


23.1 


26.3 


Group VI.— 50 cities under 10,000; 


















total population, 287,601: 


















Number of offenses known 


7 


6 


24 


63 


68 


884 


2,815 


583 


Number cleared by arrest 


4 


5 


26 


17 


61 


240 


784 


157 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


57.1 


83.3 


108.3 


27.0 


89.7 


27.1 


27.9 


26.9 


Total, 89 cities; population, 2,641,633: 


















Number of offenses known, 


72 


163 


176 


1,347 


901 


9,898 


30, 797 


10, 131 


Number cleared by arrest 


61 


73 


160 


457 


592 


2,729 


6,494 


1,322 


Percentage cleared by arrest 


84.7 


44.8 


90.9 


33.9 


65.7 


27.6 


21.1 


13.0 



Table 90. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1936, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

PACIFIC STATES 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census, 





Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


"3 




I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 


3Q 




Si 


2i 


2c8 


3s 




4) c3 


gi 




>n.r. 


gao 


O 3 


5,000 

popu 

,600 


o 3 


5^.-. 


■^ Oi 


Offense charged 


"a^. 


ga° 


§-a°. 


O O CO 


-"an 


o 




« .^ 


o m 


S Ol 


ci t^ 




t^ 


OiS 






:^-- 


^S" 


coO^ 


So" 


•2o« 


Q0_c3 

.3 

1& 




cit 
50,0 
ion, 


itie. 
50,0 
ion. 


citie 
00,0 
ion, 


;itie 
0,00 
ion, 


citif 
5,00 
ion, 


cit 
0,00 
ion. 




c^ .^ 


y c^ .^ 


y-^ *^ 


^ lO +J 


|^^ *j 


,-H +^ 


o n 




C-1 


« 


iO 


=0 


OJ 


g 


tH 


Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter: 
















Niimher of person.'! chnrped 


22 


7 


5 


9 


5 


1 


49 


Rate per 100,000 


2.3 


1.6 


1.3 


3.6 


1.6 


0.3 


1.9 


Manslaughter by negligence: 
















Number of persons charged 


74 


9 


7 


7 


8 


5 


110 


Rate per 100,000 


7.8 


2.1 


1.8 


2.8 


2.5 


1.7 


4.2 


Robbery; 
















Number of persons charged 


337 


49 


64 


36 


27 


22 


535 


Rate per 100,000 


35.4 


11.3 


16.0 


14.5 


8.4 


7.6 


20.3 


Aggravated assault: 
















Number of per-sons charged 


296 


69 


66 


66 


23 


64 


584 


Rate per 100,000 


31.1 


15.9 


16.5 


26.7 


7.1 


22.3 


22.1 



171 



Table 90. — Persons charged {held for qyrosecntion) , J9S6, numher and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by i>oi)ulation groups — Continued 

PACIFIC STATES-Continued 

[Population as estimated July 1, 1933, by tlie Bureau of the Census] 



< >lTense charped 



Other assaults: 

Number of p ersons charped __. 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Number or persons charged 

Kate per 100,000.. 

Larceny — theft: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000... 

Auto theft: 

N um ber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; receiving, etc.: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

N um ber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 ,.., 

Rape: ^ ^^^ • 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution; commercialized vice: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

N umber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Weapons; carrying, po.ssessing, etc.: 

Nujiiber of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and children: 

Number of persons ch arged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.... 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per KXJ.OOO 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 



(iroui) 
1 



500 
52. ."i 

597 
C2. 7 

1,072 
112.6 

202 
27. 5 

167 
17.5 

32 
3.4 

278 
29.2 

45 
4.7 

553 
58.1 

214 
22.5 

646 
07.9 

129 
13.6 

449 
47.2 

220 
23.1 

547 
57.5 

106,368 
11,175.5 

1,211 
127.2 

30, 242 
4,122.9 

12,057 
1, 266. 8 

5, 828 
012.3 

21,871 
2, 297. 9 



Oroup 
II 



270 
62. 3 

107 
24.7 

4&3 
111.4 

125 

28.8 

1 
0.2 

8 
1.8 

91 
21.0 

21 

4.8 

1,543 
355.8 

45 
10.4 

10 
2.3 

42 
9.7 

96 
22. 1 

142 
32.7 

1.451 
334.0 

1 12,563 
4, 540. 3 

1,182 
272.5 

17,208 
3, 967. 7 

2,810 
647.9 

273 
02.9 

5, 067 
1,306.7 



Oroup 
III 



311 
77.9 

210 

54. 1 

803 
201.2 

187 
46.8 

105 
26. 3 

9 
2.3 

73 
18.3 

32 

8.0 

294 
73.6 

89 
22.3 

69 
17.3 

116 
29.1 

111 
27.8 

58 
14.5 

666 
166. 8 

52,890 
13,249.0 

2, 669 

6fi8. 

12, 594 
3, 1,54. 8 

2,144 
537.1 

355 

88.9 

1.539 
38.5. 5 



(iroup 
IV 



148 
.W. 8 

149 
60.2 

499 
201.5 

115 
46.4 



29 
11.7 

2 

0.8 

49 
19.8 

13 
5.3 

145 
68.0 

35 

14. I 

42 
17.0 

40 
16.2 

60 
24.2 

8 
3.2 

601 
242. 7 

32, 7.53 
1,3,228.2 

438 
176.9 



7,042 
2, 844. 1 

1,295 
523. 

179 
72.3 

972 
392. 6 



Orout) 
V 



130 
40.4 

190 
59. 1 

560 
175.9 

106 
32.9 

19 
5.9 

6 
1.9 

49 
1.5.2 

13 
4.0 

31 
9.6 

43 
13.4 

1 
0.3 

56 

17.4 

26 
8.1 

101 
31.4 

1,.527 
474. 6 

30, 294 
11,280.8 

1,000 
310.8 

7, 986 
2, 482. 2 

2, 251 
699.7 

73 

22.7 

2,028 
6:«). 3 



Oroup 
VI 



195 
07.8 

210 
73.0 

560 
194. 7 

148 
51.5 

17 
5.9 

11 
.3.8 

82 
28.5 

26 
9.0 

22 

55 
19.1 

10 
3.5 

40 
13.9 

20 
7.0 

37 
12. 9 

1,432 
497.9 

2 30,311 
11,096.9 

1,079 
375.2 

7,702 
2, 678. 

1,414 
491.7 

121 
42.1 

1,102 
383.2 



Total 



1..554 
58.8 

1,469 
55.6 

3,983 
1,50.8 

943 
3,5.7 

338 
12.8 

08 
2.6 

622 
23.5 

150 
5.7 

2,588 
98.0 

481 
18.2 

778 
29.5 

423 
16. 

762 
28.8 

566 
21.4 

6.224 
235.6 

3 271,179 
10,978.1 

7, 579 
286.9 

91,774 
3, 474. 1 

21,971 
831.7 

6, 829 
258. 5 

33, 179 
1, 256. 



'■5 The figures are based on the reports as follows: ' 2 cities, 276,700 population; 2 48 cities, 273,149 popu- 
lation; '86 cities, 2,470,181 population. 



DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 



During the first 9 months of 1937 the F B I examined 389,077 arrest 
records as evidenced by fingerprint cards, in order to obtain data con- 
cerning the age, sex, race, and previous criminal histories of the per- 
sons represented. The compilation has been limited to instances of 
arrests for violations of State laws and municipal ordinances. In 
other words, fingerprint cards representing arrests for violations of 
Federal laws or representing commitments to any type of penal 
institution have been excluded from this tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint records examined was considerably 
larger than for the corresponding portion of prior years, which were 
as follows: 1936—343,132; 1935—292,530; 1934—260,506. The 
increase in the number of arrest records examined should not be 
construed as reflecting an increase in the amount of crime, nor neces- 
sarily as an increase in the number of persons arrested, since it quite 
probably is at least partially the result of an increase in the number 
of local agencies contributing fingerprint records to the Identification 
Division of the FBI. The number of police departments, peace 
officers, and law-enforcement agencies throughout the United States and 
foreign countries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the F B I as 
of September 30, 1937, was 10,609. Comparable figures for the corre- 
sponding portion of prior years are as follows: 1936 — 10,070; 1935 — 
8,844; 1934 — 6,978. The tabulation of data from fingerprint cards 
obviously does not include all persons arrested, since there are indi- 
viduals taken into custody for whom no fingerprint cards are for- 
warded to Washington. Furthermore, data pertaining to persons 
arrested should not be treated as information regarding the number 
of offenses committed, since two or more persons may be involved in 
the joint commission of a single offense, and on the other hand one 
person may be arrested and charged with the commission of several 
separate crimes. 

More than 29 percent of the arrest records examined during the 
first 9 months of 1937 represented persons taken into custody for 
murder, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft. Arrests 
for major violations are reflected by the following figures: 



Criminal homicide 5, 161 

Robbery 9,971 

Assault 22, 644 

Burglary 24, 595 

Larceny (except auto theft) _ _ 44, 027 

Auto theft 9, 920 

Embezzlement and fraud 11, 535 

Stolen property (receiving, 

etc.) 2,563 



Forgery and counterfeiting 5, 465 

Rape 4,504 

Narcotic drug laws 3, 005 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 4, 638 

Driving while intoxicated 16, 382 

GambHng 5,413 

Arson 616 



Total 170,439 



Sex. — Of the total of 389,077 arrest records examined, 27,420 
(7.0 percent) represented females. During the entire calendar year 
1936 w^omen were represented by 7.3 percent of all arrest records 
examined. The types of crimes for which women were taken into 
custody may be ascertained from the following table. 

(172) 



173 



Table 91. — Distribution of arrests by sex, Jan. 1-Sepl. 30, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft— - 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud -.. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc... 

.\rson - 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

RaiW-- 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses- 

Narcot ic drug la ws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor la ws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy - 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Xot stated 

All other offenses 

Total - 



Number 



Total 



5,161 

9,971 
22, 644 
24, 595 
44, 027 

9.920 
11, 535 

2, 563 
616 

5, 465 
4,504 
4,264 

6, 852 
3,005 
4,638 
4,602 
6.740 

16, 382 

2,938 
22 

5,089 
17,797 
64, 121 
32,415 

5, 413 
44, 421 

4,439 
24. 938 



389, 077 



Male Female 



4, 649 
9, 5,M 

20, 688 

24,211 

40, 868 

9,775 

11.037 

2.391 

561 

5,127 

4,504 

1,020 

5, 852 
2. 345 
4.472 
4. 509 
5, 840 

16, 056 

2,894 
22 

5,001 
15, 609 
60, 817 
30, 230 

5,046 
40, 816 

4, 1.59 
23, 607 



361, 657 



512 
420 

1,956 
384 

3,159 
145 
498 
172 
55 
338 



3, 244 



000 
660 
166 

93 
900 
326 

44 



88 
2.188 
3.304 

2, 185 
367 

3, 605 
280 

1,331 

7,420 



1.3 
2.6 
5.8 
6.3 
11.3 
2.5 
3.0 

.7 

.2 
1.4 
1.2 
1. 1 
1.7 

.8 
1.2 
1.2 
1.7 
4.2 

.8 

(') 

1.3 

4.6 

16.5 

8.3 

1.4 

11.4 

1.1 

6.4 



100.0 



Percent 



Total Male Female 



1.3 
2.6 
5.7 
6.7 
11.3 
2.7 
3.1 

.7 

.2 
1.4 
1.2 

.3 
1.6 

.7 
1.2 
1.2 
1.6 
4.4 

.8 

(') 

1.4 

4.3 

16.8 

8.4 

1.4 

11.3 

1.2 

6.5 



100.0 



1.9 
1.5 
7.1 
1.4 
11.5 
5 
8 
6 
2 
2 



1 



1. 


11.8 
3.7 
2.4 

.6 

.3 
3.3 
1.2 

.2 


.3 
8.0 
12.1 
8.0 
1.3 
13.2 
1.0 
4.9 



100.0 



1 Less than Ho of 1 percent. 



Age.^ — Prior to the middle of 1935 arrests of persons 19 years of age 
outnumbered arrests for any other single age group. Since the last 
half of the calendar year of 1935 there have been more arrests for ages 
21 and 22 than for other age groups. This trend was continued during 
the first 9 months of 1937, the number of arrests being largest for age 
22, as may be noted in the following table: 

Age: Number arrested 

22 17, 036 

21 16, 534 

19 ^ 16, 183 

23 . 16, 158 

The compilation further disclosed an increase in the proportion of 
persons arrested who were less than 21 years old as compared with the 
record for 1936. The figure for the first 9 months of 1937 was 18.1 
percent, as compared wdth 17.4 percent for the calendar year 1936. 
In addition to the 70,417 persons less than 21 years old arrested during 
the first 9 months of 1937, there w^ere 64,677 (16.6 percent) betw^een 
the ages of 21 and 24, making a total of 135,094 (34.7 percent) less 
than 25 years old. Persons arrested who were between the ages of 
25 and 29 numbered 65,291 (16.8 percent). This makes a total of 
200,385 (51.5 percent) less than 30 years old. (With reference to the 
ages of persons represented by fingerprint cards received at the 
F B I, it should be borne in mind that the number of arrest records is 
doubtless incomplete in the lower age groups, because in some juris- 
dictions the practice is not to fingerprint youthful individuals.) 

The number of arrests for ages 16-24 is shown in figure 15. 



174 



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176 



Persons under 21 years of age were most frequently charged with 
offenses of robbery, burglary, larceny, and auto theft. This is clearly 
indicated by the following tabulation: 





Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups 


Age group 


All of- 
fenses 


Criminal 
homicide 


Robbery 


Burglary 


Larceny 


Auto 
theft 


Under 21 .. 


18.1 
33.4 
25.4 
14.2 

8.7 
.2 


13.1 
37.1 
27.0 
13.9 

8.7 
.2 


28.2 

45.3 

19.7 

5.3 

1.3 

.2 


41.7 

33.9 

16.0 

5.9 

2.3 

.2 


30.5 
32.4 
21.0 
10.4 
5.5 
.2 


51.3 


21-29 . 


34.3 


30-39 


10.5 


40-49 


3.0 


50 and over 


.8 


Unknown 


.1 


Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







The predominance of youths among those charged with offenses 
against property is further indicated by the fact that for all types of 
crimes 135,094 persons under 25 years of age were arrested, thus con- 
stituting 34.7 percent of the total of 389,077 arrest records examined. 
However, youths under 25 numbered 53.4 percent of those charged 
with robbery, 61.3 percent of those charged with burglary, 47.8 per- 
cent of those charged with larceny, and 72.9 percent of those charged 
with auto theft. There were 108,692 persons arrested for various 
crimes against property. One-half of them were individuals less than 
25 years old. Furthermore, the tabulation shows that 31 percent of 
the 108,692 persons were under 21 years of age. 

Table 93. — Number and 'percentage of arrests of persons under 25 years of age, 

Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 1937 

Total per- 
centage 
under 25 

years of age 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide.- 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft --- 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex oflenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Oflenses against family and children. - 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



Total num- 


Number 


Total num- 


Percentage 


ber of 


under 21 


ber under 


under 21 


persons 


years of 


25 years of 


years of 


arrested 


age 


age 


age 


5,161 


678 


1,558 


13.1 


9,971 


2,808 


5,325 


28.2 


22,644 


2,506 


6,241 


11.1 


24,595 


10, 251 


15, 077 


41.7 


44, 027 


13, 433 


21.057 


30.5 


9,920 


5,092 


7,235 


51.3 


11, 535 


795 


2,504 


6.9 


2,563 


477 


869 


18.6 


616 


97 


167 


15.7 


5,465 


839 


1,697 


15.4 


4,504 


1,115 


2,132 


24.8 


4,264 


430 


1,506 


10.1 


6,852 


927 


2,020 


13.5 


3,005 


220 


642 


7.3 


4,638 


817 


1,662 


17.6 


4, 602 


173 


830 


3.8 


6,740 


499 


1,419 


7.4 


16, 382 


717 


2,898 


4.4 


2,938 


522 


1,282 


17.8 


22 


3 


8 


13.6 


5,089 


935 


2,142 


18.4 


17, 797 


2,501 


5,677 


14.1 


64, 121 


2,812 


9,241 


4.4 


32, 415 


5,347 


11,281 


16.5 


5,413 


335 


961 


6.2 


44, 421 


9,023 


17,298 


20.3 


4,439 


769 


1,553 


17.3 


24, 938 


6,296 


10.812 


25.2 


389, 077 


70, 417 


135, 094 


18.1 



30.2 
53.4 
27.6 
61.3 
47.8 
72.9 
21.7 
33.9 
27.1 
31.1 
47.3 
35.3 
29.5 
21.4 
35.8 
18.0 
21.1 
17.7 
43.6 
36.4 
42.1 
31.9 
14.4 
34.8 
17.8 
38.9 
35.0 
43.4 



34.7 



Recidivism. — Examination of the previous criminal histories of the 
persons represented by fingerprint cards received during the first 9 
months of 1937 revealed that 41.8 percent (162,816) already had fin- 
gerprint cards on file in the Identification Division of the FBI. 
There were, in addition, 6,798 records bearing notations indicating 
previous criminal histories of the persons represented, although their 



177 



fingerprints had not previously been filed at the Bureau. There were, 
therefore, a total of 169,614 records containing data concerning the 
prior criminal activities of the persons arrested, and the records dis- 
closed that 113,003 (66.6 percent) had previously been convicted of 
one or more offenses. This number is 29 percent of the 389,077 
arrest records examined, the proportion being approximately the same 
as during 1936. 

In many instances the records revealed previous convictions of major 
violations, as indicated by the following figures: 

Criminal homicide 971 Forgery and counterfeiting 3,406 

Robl^ery 4,250 Rape 817 

Assault 5,640 Narcotic drug laws 2,137 

Burglary 12,536 Weapons (carrying, etc.) 1,330 

Larceny (and related offenses) _ 26,771 Driving while intoxicated 2, 381 

Arson 144 Total 60,383 

In 22 cases it was shown that persons charged with criminal homi- 
cide during the first 9 months of 1937 had been previously convicted 
of homicide. The tabulation indicates a general tendency for recidi- 
vists to repeat the same type of crime. 

As heretofore indicated, the records show that 113,003 of the per- 
sons arrested had been previously convicted. The records of those 
persons disclosed a total of 278,667 prior convictions, an average of more 
than 2 per individual; 124,413 of the convictions werefor major viola- 
tions and 154,254 were for less serious infractions of the criminal laws. 
Table 94. — Number ivith previous fingerprint records, arrests, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering.. . 

Larceny— theft 

.\uto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud --. 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 
ing, etc - 

Arson _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape - 

Prostitution and commercialized 

vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws -.. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc 





Pre- 




vious 


Total 


finger- 




print 




record 


5,161 


1,238 


9,971 


5,126 


22, 644 


8,013 


24, 595 


10, 562 


44, 027 


17,844 


9,920 


3,986 


11,535 


5,245 


2, 563 


841 


610 


147 


5,465 


2,689 


4,504 


1,292 


4,264 


2,175 


6, 852 


1,905 


3, 005 


1,936 


4,638 


1,559 



Oflense charged 




Offenses against family and chil- 
dren 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle 

laws _- 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy. 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Total. 



4, 602 

6,740 

16, 382 

2,938 

22 

5,089 
17, 797 
64, 121 
32, 415 

5,413 
44, 421 

4,439 
24, 938 



389, 077 



Pre- 
vious 
finger- 
print 
record 



1,537 

2, 595 

4,423 

735 

6 

1,601 

7,116 
29, 197 
18, 480 

1,460 
18, 787 

1,907 
10, 414 



162,816 



Table 95. — Percentage loith previous fingerprint records, arrests, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 

1937 



Offense 



Narcotic drug laws 

Vagrancy 

Robbery 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud... 

Drunkenness 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Suspicion _ 

.\11 other offenses 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

D isorderl y conduct 

Liquor laws _ 



Percent 


64.4 


57.0 


51.4 


51.0 


49.2 


45,5 


45.5 


42.9 


42.3 


41.8 


40.5 


40.2 


40.0 


38.5 



Offense 



Assault 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. . . 
Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 

other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Rape 

Other sex offenses 

Parking violations ' 

Driving while intoxicated 

Oambling.- - 

Road and driving laws 

Criminal homicide.. 

Arson 



Percent 



35.4 
33.6 
33.4 
32.8 
31.5 
28.7 
27.8 
27.3 
27.0 
27.0 
25.0 
24.0 
23.9 



1 Only 22 fingerprint cards were received representing arrests for violation of parking regulations. 



178 



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180 



Table 97. — Number of cases in which fingerprint records show 1 or more prior 
convictions, and the total of prior convictions disclosed by the records, Jan. 1-Sept. 
SO, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice- 
Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. . 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traflSc and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

Another offenses 

Total 



Number of 

records 

showing 1 or 

more prior 

convictions 



754 
3,520 
5, 558 
7,505 
12, 638 
2,585 
3, 175 

562 

108 
1,819 

872 
1,478 
1,307 
1,510 
1,111 

884 
1,665 
3,020 

483 

4 

1,077 

5,072 

22,611 

12, 246 

839 

11,769 

1,282 

7,549 



113, 003 



Number of 
prior con- 
victions of 
major 
offenses 



831 

5, 144 

6, 114 
11, 887 
20,043 

3,540 

4,802 

767 

106 

3,264 

1,011 

1,996 

1,537 

3,896 

1,305 

784 



1,042 

1,831 

357 

6 

912 

4,417 

11,947 

11,844 

882 

14,451 

1,685 

8,012 



124, 413 



Number of 
prior con- 
victions of 
minor 
offenses 



612 
3,573 
6,070 
6,683 
15, 122 
2,147 
2,710 

513 

96 

1, 187 

685 
1,226 
1,360 
1,611 
1,074 

766 
2,095 
3,527 

463 

2 

1,136 

8,145 

48,259 

21, 066 

734 

13, 103 

1,238 

9,051 



154, 254 



Total num- 
ber of prior 
convictions 
disclosed 



1, 443 

8,717 

12, 184 

18, 570 

35, 165 

5,687 

7,512 

1,280 

202 

4,451 

1,696 

3,222 

2,897 

5,507 

2,379 

1,550 

3,137 

5,358 

820 

8 

2,048 

12, 562 

60,206 

32,910 

1,616 

27,554 

2,923 

17,063 



278, 667 



Race. — Whites were represented by 285,015 of the records examined 
and Negroes by 86,506. The remaining races were represented as 
follows: Indian, 2,074; Chinese, 903; Japanese, 165; Mexican, 12,682; 
all others, 1,732. 

The significance of the figures showing the number of Negroes 
arrested as compared with the number of whites can best be indicated 
in terms of the number of each in the general population of the coun- 
try. Exclusive of those under 15 years of age, there were according 
to the 1930 decennial census, 8,041,014 Negroes, 13,069,192 foreign- 
born whites, and 64,365,193 native whites in the United States. Of 
each 100,000 Negroes, 1,076 were arrested and fingerprinted during 
the first 9 months of 1937, whereas the corresponding figure for 
native whites was 384 and for foreign-born whites 159. Figures for 
individual types of violations may be found in the following tabula- 
tions. It should be observed in connection with the foregoing data 
that the figure for native whites includes the immediate descendants 
of foreign-born individuals. Persons desiring to make a thorough 
study of the comparative amounts of crime committed by native 
whites and foreign-born whites should employ available compilations 
showing the number of instances in which offenders are of foreign or 
mixed parentage. 



181 

Table 98. — Distribution of arrests according to race, Jan. 1-Sepl. 30, 1937 



OfFense charged 



Criminal homicide.. 

Robbery.. 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.-.-. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws... _._ 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.. 

Offenses against family and children. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated. 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy.-- 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total --. 









Race 








Total, 
















all 


While 


Negro 


Indian 


Chi- 


Jap- 


Mex- 


All 


races 








nese 


anese 


ican 


others 




3,124 


1,816 


25 


4 


6 


148 


38 


5,161 


6, 786 


2,749 


34 


6 


5 


299 


92 


9,971 


12, 320 


9,297 


95 


14 


13 


727 


178 


22,644 


17,493 


6, 349 


80 


6 


4 


553 


110 


24, 595 


30, 365 


12,210 


166 


17 


3 


1,097 


169 


44,027 


8,157 


1,361 


62 


1 


3 


322 


14 


9.920 


9,856 


1,328 


33 


10 


6 


263 


39 


11,5.35 


1,794 


673 


5 


6 




78 


7 


2,563 


509 


91 


1 







15 




616 


4,864 


492 


20 


4 


13 


55 


17 


5,465 


3,362 


871 


47 


9 


2 


167 


46 


4,504 


2,934 


1,220 


33 


4 


1 


55 


17 


4,264 


5,651 


956 


30 


20 


1 


1,58 


36 


6,852 


1,654 


577 


13 


471 


1 


237 


52 


3,005 


2,544 


1,889 


6 


8 


4 


133 


54 


4, 638 


3,842 


595 


15 




2 


132 


16 


4,602 


3,792 


2,832 


19 


11 


4 


75 


7 


6,740 


14,204 


1,139 


154 


3 


15 


828 


39 


16, 382 


2,085 


674 


22 




1 


127 


29 


2,938 


21 


1 
1,058 












22 


3,792 


18 


5 


2 


181 


33 


5.089 


12, 281 


4,700 


115 


5 


2 


614 


80 


17, 797 


52, 094 


7,484 


625 


9 


50 


3.747 


112 


64, 121 


24,380 


6,500 


158 


35 


6 


1,152 


184 


32, 415 


2.990 


2,066 


4 


187 


11 


01 


94 


5,413 


31,940 


11,165 


183 


46 


5 


947 


135 


44, 421 


3, 4.55 


884 


29 


3 




53 


15 


4,439 


18, 726 


5,529 


82 


19 


5 
165 


458 


119 


24, 938 


285,015 


86, 506 


2,074 


903 


12, 682 


1,732 


389,077 



Table 99. — Number of arrests of Negroes and whites in proportion to the number of 
each in the general population of the country, Jan. 1-Sept. 30, 1937 

[Rate per 100,000 of population, excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

.Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson J - 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex offenses.. _ 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children... 

Liquor laws- 

Driving while intoxicated... 

Road and driving laws.. 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.-. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated.. 

All other offenses 

Total 



Native 
white 



0) 



4.1 

9.4 

15.3 

25.1 

43.2 

11.9 

12.9 

2.1 

.6 

6.9 

4.6 

4.3 

7.3 

2.3 

3.3 

5.2 

5.0 

19.6 

3.0 



5.3 
16.6 
64.4 
33.3 

3.5 
43.4 

4.8 
26.3 



383.9 



Foreign-born 
white 



3.0 
1.9 

1,5.9 
5.7 
13.5 
1.5 
5.0 
2.8 

.8 
1.9 
2.2 

.8 
5.6 

.7 
2.6 
3.0 
3.9 
6.6 

.8 



1.8 

9.8 
27.3 
11.7 

2.5 
15.0 

1.9 
10.4 



158.6 



Negro 



(') 



22.6 

34.2 

115.6 

79.0 

151.8 

16.9 

16.5 

8.4 

1.1 

6.1 

10.8 

15.2 

11.9 

7.2 

23.5 

7.4 

35.2 

14.2 

8.4 

13.2 
58.5 
93.1 
80.8 
25.7 
138.9 
11.0 
68.8 



1,075.8 



1 Less than ^lo of 1 per 100,000. 



182 

Table 100. — Percentage distribution of arrests, by age, of native whites, foreign- 
born whites, and Negroes, Jan. l-Sept. SO, 1937 





Number arrested 


Percent 


Age 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born white 


Negro 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born white 


Negro 


15 and under 21 . . 


46, 142 
42, 556 
40, 951 
33, 135 
28, 796 
20, 235 
13, 616 
19, 921 
187 


780 
835 
1,390 
2,070 
2,742 
3,410 
3,333 
6,130 
20 


16, 331 

15, 482 

17, 079 

12, 170 

10, 478 

5,894 

3,647 

4,197 

167 


18.8 

17.3 

16.7 

13.5 

11.7 

8.2 

5.6 

8.1 

.1 


3.8 

4.0 

6.7 

10.0 

13.2 

16.5 

16.1 

29.6 

.1 


19.1 


21-24 


18.1 


25-29 


20.0 


30-34 . 


14.2 


35-39 


12.3 


40-44 - - --- 


6.9 


45-49 --- 


4.3 


50 and over 


4.9 


Unknown - 


.2 






Total -- 


245, 539 


20. 710 


85. 445 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







Table 101. — Number of native whites, number of foreign-born whites, and number 
of Negroes arrested and fingerprinted, by age groups, Jan. 1-Sept. SO, 19S7 





Number arrested 


Number of arrests per 100,000 of 
the general population of the 
United States 


Age 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born 
white 


Negro 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born 
white 


Negro 


1.5 


1,709 

5,229 

8,060 

10, 459 

11,058 

9,627 

11.020 

11,264 

10, 444 

9,828 

40, 951 

33, 135 

28,796 

20,235 

13,616 

19, 921 

187 


32 

112 

155 

152 

178 

151 

172 

198 

224 

241 

1,390 

2,070 

2,742 

3,410 

3.333 

6,130 

20 


693 

2,049 

3,130 

3,601 

3,748 

3,110 

3,784 

3,958 

4,066 

3,674 

17, 079 

12, 170 

10, 478 

5,894 

3,647 

4,197 

167 


86.3 
258.8 
413.4 
531.5 
591.7 
530.2 
601.8 
632.2 
610.4 
590.5 
542.2 
482.8 
439.5 
367.6 
286.2 
137.6 
277.0 


83.3 
219.3 
237.5 
189.8 
198.3 
141.2 
147.6 
153.5 
155.4 
145.7 
136.1 
166.0 
168.0 
201.3 
212.9 
124.7 
203.6 


288.2 


16 --- 


795.0 


17 ... 


1, 277. 6 


18 


1, 338. 


19 . 


1, 573. 1 


20 ... - - 


1, 202. 9 


21 - ... 


1, 657. 4 


22 


1, 587. 1 


23 


1, 734, 


24 . 


1, 580. 5 


25-29 - 


1, 593. 5 


30-34 . 


1, 407. 7 


35-39 _. 


1, 176. 1 


40-44 --- 


857.4 


45-49 


578.8 


50 and over -- --- . 


293.7 


Unknown .. 


1,216.2 






Total 


245, 539 


20, 710 


85, 445 


381.5 


158.5 


1, 062. 6 







At the end of September 1937, there were 7,656,178 fingerprint 
records and 8,919,800 index cards containing the names and aliases of 
individuals on file in the Identification Division of the FBI. Of each 
100 fingerprint cards received during the first 9 months of 1937, rnore 
than 55 were identified with those on file in the Bureau. Fugitives 
numbering 4,616 were identified through fingerprint records during 
tliis same period, and interested law-enforcement officials were imme- 
diately notified of the whereabouts of those fugitives. As of Sep- 
tember 30, 1937, there were 10,609 police departments, peace officers, 
and law-enforcement agencies throughout the United States and 
foreign countries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the FBI, 

o 



^■i 



/v\ 



^ ^ S3 



/■■ 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume VIII — Number 4 
FOURTH QUARTERLY BULLETIN, 1937 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON: 1938 



U. S. SUPERIN)cnL'j::if OF DOUUMFNT^^ 

i^AR 25 1938 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department of 

Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume 8 January 1938 Number 4 

CONTENTS 

Classification of offenses. 
Extent of reporting area. 
Monthly returns: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population (table 
102). 

Daily average, offenses known to the police, 1937 (table 103). 

Annual trends, offenses known to the police, 1931-37 (table 104). 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location (tables 
105-107). 

Data for individual cities over 25,000 in population (table 108). 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police (tal)lc 109). 

Offenses known in territories and possessions (table 110). 

Data from supplementary offense reports (tables 111-114). 

Estimated number of major crimes, 1936-37 (table 115). 
Criminal history of persons in single fingerprint file. 
Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1937: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested (table 116). 

Age distribution of persons arrested (tables 117-120). 

Number and percentage with previous fingerprint records (tables 121-122). 

Number with records showing previous convictions (tables 123-126). 

Race distribution of persons arrested (tables 127-132). 
Index to Volume 8. 

Classification of Offenses. 

The term "offenses known to the poHce" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to 
the police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting 
or court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following 
group of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (b) 
manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. Attempted murders, however, are reported 
as aggravated assaults. In other words, an attempted burglary or 
robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. 

"Offenses know^n to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the police depart- 
ments of contributing cities and not merely arrests or cleared cases. 
Complaints which upon investigation are learned to be groundless are 
not included in the tabulations w hich follow. 



(183) 



184 



In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in 
each group, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter — includes 
all felonious homicides except those caused by negligence. Does not include 
attempts to kill, assaults to kill, justifiable homicides, suicides, or accidental 
deaths, (b) Manslaughter by negligence — includes only those cases in which 
death is caused by culpable negligence which is so clearly evident that if the 
person responsible for the death were apprehended he would be prosecuted for 
manslaughter. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape, assault to rape, and attempted 
rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as highway robbery, stick-ups, robbery 
armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by use of acids. Does not 
include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — ^Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or theft. Includes attempted 
burglary and assault to commit a burglary. Burglary followed by a larceny is 
entered here and is not counted again under larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft {except auto theft). — ■{a) Fifty dollars and over in value, (b) 
Under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting, or any stealing of property or thing of value whicii is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, 
passing worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called "joy-riding" thefts. Does not 
include taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unau- 
thorized use by those liaving lawful access to tlie vehicle. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of crime 
and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

Extent of Reporting Area. 

In the table wliich follows there is shown the number of police 
departments from which one or more crime reports were received 
during the calendar year 1937. Information is presented for the 
cities divided according to size. The population figures employed are 
estimates as of July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census for cities 
wdth population in excess of 10,000. No estimates were available, 
however, for those with a smaller number of inhabitants, and, ac- 
cordingly, for them the figures listed in the 1930 decennial census were 
used. 



Population group 


Total 

number 

of cities 

or 

towns 


Cities filing returns 


Total 
popula- 
tion 


Population repre- 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


983 


896 


91.1 


60, 281, 688 


58, 500, 647 


97.0 






1. Cities over 250,000 . 


37 

57 
104 
191 

594 


37 

57 

101 

175 

526 


100.0 

100.0 

97.1 

91.6 

88.6 


29, 695, 500 
7,850,312 
6, 980, 407 
6, 638, 544 
9,116,925 


29, 695, 500 
7, 850, 312 
6, 773, 170 
6, 067, 391 
8, 114, 274 


100.0 


2. Cities 100,000 to 250,000 


100.0 


3. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 . 


97.0 


4. Cities 25,000 to 50,000... 


91.4 


5. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


89.0 







Note. — The above table does not include 1,533 cities and rural townships aggregating a total population 
of 7,779,340. The cities included in this figure are those of less than 10,000 population filing returns, whereas 
the rural townships are of varying population groups. 



185 



The growth in the crime reporting area is evidenced by the following 
figures for 1930-37: 



Year 



1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 



Number of 
cities 



1,127 
1,511 
1,578 
1, 658 



Population 



45, 929, 9C5 
51,145,734 
53, 212, 230 
62, 357, 262 



Year 



1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 



Number of 
cities 



1,799 
2,156 
2,318 
2,429 



Population 



62, 757, 643 
64, 615, 330 

65, 639, 430 

66, 279, 987 



The foregoing comparison shows that during 1937 there was an 
increase of 111 cities as compared with 1936. 

In addition to the 2,429 city and village police departments which 
submitted crime reports during 1937, one or more repoi-ts were received 
during that year from 1,286 sheriffs and state police organizations and 
from 8 agencies in territories and possessions of the United States. 
This makes a grand total of 3,723 agencies contributing crime reports 
during 1937. 



MONTHLY RETURNS 



Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population. 

In table 102 there is presented the number of offenses known to 
have been committed during the calendar year 1937 as reported b}^ 
the police departments of 1,809 cities with a combined population of 
61,551,252. The figures are also presented for the cities divided into 
six groups according to size. 

The compilation discloses that the number of offenses committed 
per unit of population is higher in the large cities than in the compara- 
tively smaller communities. This distribution of the crimes is similar 
to the distribution shown in tabulations for prior years. 

More than two-thirds of the crimes listed in the following table 
consist of larcenies (53.9 percent) and auto thefts (14.9 percent). 
Burglaries and robberies represented 26.6 percent of the crimes listed 
in the table. It will be noted that the foregoing crimes which are 
classed as offenses against property constitute 95.4 percent of the total 
offenses. The remaining crimes, murder, manslaughter, rape, and 
aggravated assault, are classed as offenses against the person and 
constituted 4.6 percent of the total. In spite of the small percentage 
of offenses against the person, it will be seen from the table that 3,765 
murders, 3,406 manslaughters, 5,243 rapes, and 27,886 aggravated 
assaults were reported by the police departments represented in the 
compilation. Estimates of the total number of such crimes committed 
in the United States during 1937 may be found in table 115. A percent- 
age distribution of the crimes shown in table 102 is presented below. 



Offense 



Total- 
Larceny 

Burglary.-. 
Auto theft-- 



Rate per 
100,000 


Percent 


1, 446. 6 


100.0 


780.0 
325.4 
215. 6 


53.9 
22.5 
14.9 



Offense 



Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Rape 

Murder 

Manslaughter 



Rate per 
100,000 



59.8 

45.5 

8.5 

6.1 

5.7 



Percent 



4.1 

3.2 

.6 

.4 

.4 



The majority of the cities represented made separate reports of the 
larcenies in wliich the property stolen was valuecl at $50 or more. A 
compilation shoeing the larcenies divided according to the value of 
the property stolen yields the following figures: 





Larceny 


—theft 


Population group 


Larceny 


—theft 


Population group 


$50 and 

over in 

value 


Under 
$50 in 
value 


$50 and 

over in 

value 


Under 
$.50 in 
value 


32 cities over 250,000; total 
population, 20,322,200: 
Number of offenses 
known 


22, 137 
108.9 


141,963 

698.6 


54 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 
total population, 7,463,212: 
Number of offenses 
Ifnown -.. 

Rate per 100,000 


7,243 
97.0 


62, 518 


Rate per 100,000.. 


837.7 



There were 233,861 larcenies classified according to the value of 
the property involved, and the preceding figures reveal that 29,380 
(12.6 percent) were cases in which the value of the propertv exceeded 
$50. 

(186) 



187 

Table 102. — Offenses knoicn to the police, Januanj to December, inclusive, 1937; 
number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

(Population as estimated July 1, 1033, by the Bureau of the ("ensusl 



Population group 



(JROVP 



36 cities over 250,000; totaJ popula- 
tion, 29,375,600: 

Number of oiTenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP II 

37 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 7,850,312: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP 111 

96 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total pop- 
ulation, 6,462,015: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 --- 



GROUP IV 

102 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total pop- 
ulation, 5,62:5,637: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000. 



GROUP V 

441 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total pop- 
ulation, 6.854,785: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP VI 

1,017 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 5,:JS4,903: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Total 1,809 cities; total population, 
61,551,252: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
nonneg- 
lipent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



1,994 
6.8 



537 
6.8 



431 
6.7 



2.55 
4.5 



303 
4.4 



245 
4.5 



3,765 
6.1 



Man- 
.■ilaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



1 2, 090 
7.6 



3 516 
6.7 



241 
3.7 



197 
3.5 



193 
2.8 



169 
3.1 



5 3, 406 
5.7 



Rape 



3, 042 
10.4 



543 

6.9 



488 
7.6 



392 
7.0 



433 
6.3 



345 
6.4 



5,243 

8.5 



Rob- 
bery 



23, 932 

81.5 



4,413 

56.2 



3,202 
49.6 



1, 944 
34. 6 



1,822 
26.6 



1,486 
27.6 



36, 799 
59.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



i:j,352 
4.5. 5 



* 4, 723 

62. 



3, 662 

56. 7 



2, 398 
42.6 



2, 28() 
33.3 



1,465 
27.2 



6 27,886 
45.5 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



2 77, 597 
349.2 



32, 057 
408.4 



22. 522 
348. 5 



IS, 411 
:>27. 4 



1.^649 
228.3 



10, 771 
200.0 



177, 007 
325.4 



Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 



2 184. 706 
X31. 2 



73, 227 
932. 8 



5.5, 031 
851. 6 



46, 069 
S19. 2 



42, 667 
622.4 



22, 613 
419.9 



424,313 
780.0 



Auto 
theft 



2 58, 537 
203. 4 



19, .530 
248.8 



13, 771 
213.1 



10, 906 
193. 9 



9, 480 
138.3 



5,039 
93.6 



"117,263 
215.6 



' The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 34 cities with a 
total iwpulation of 27,647,400. 

2 The number of offenses and rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on reports of 35 cities 
with a total population of 22,221 ,.300. 

'The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 56 cities with a 
total population of 7,726,812. 

* The number of offenses and rate for aggravated assault are based on reports of 55 cities with a total popu- 
lation of 7,616.212. 

'The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports of 1,806 cities with a 
total pojJulation of 59,699,.552. 

'The number of offenses and rate for aggravated assault are based on reports of 1,807 cities with a total 
pojmlation of 61,317,152. 

• The number of offenses and rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on reports of 1,808 cities 
with a total population of 54,396,9.52. 



188 



Daily Average, Offenses Known to the Police, 1937. 

Monthly variations in the number of crimes committed during 1937 
are indicated in table 103, wliich is based on the reports received from 
the police departments of 93 cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants. 

The daily average number of murders and aggravated assaults was 
highest during the third quarter of the year. This is similar to the 
monthly variations shown by the corresponding figures for 1936. 
Offenses of manslaughter by negligence were most frequently reported 
during the first and fourth quarters of the year. 

All of the offenses against propert}^ (robbery, burglary, larceny, 
and auto theft) show similar monthly fluctuations, the highest points 
being in the first and fourth quarters of the year. In all instances 
the daily average for the fourth quarter of 1937 is higher than for the 
first quarter of the year. However, for burglary and auto theft the 
figures for the fourth quarter are only slightly in excess of the first 
quarter. The robbery and larceny data show rather sharp upward 
trends during the last 3 months of the year. 

The fluctuations in the figures for individual types of crimes may be 
readily noted in figure 16. 

Table 103. — Daily average, offenses known to the police, 93 cities over 100,000 
in po-pulation, January to December, inclusive, 1937 

[Total population, 37,225,912, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

as- 
sault 2 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 3 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 3 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence ' 


Auto 
theft' 


January 


6.2 
7.0 

7.1 
6.1 
7.2 
6.9 
7.2 
7.2 
7.3 
7.8 
fi. 1 
7.1 


7. 7 
7.5 
7.0 
6.9 
5.9 
6.1 
6.3 
6.1 
7.0 
7.9 
8.0 
9.3 


8.2 

8.7 

10.4 

10.6 

10.3 

10.9 

9.1 

9.3 

10. 1 

12.4 

9.4 

8.3 


83.7 
84.5 
78.0 
67.9 
58.5 
61.7 
63.9 
67.0 
67.2 
81.9 
101.1 
116.6 


45. 1 
42.4 
43.3 
47.5 
51.6 
52.7 
58.6 
59.7 
53.9 
48.3 
44.4 
46.1 


310.0 
315.4 
328.4 
296.4 
274.3 
271.0 
277.0 
288.7 
280.0 
279.7 
322.3 
362.3 


674.5 
702.4 
694,2 
700.8 
658.9 
652. 
664.0 
688.3 
692.0 
754. 9 
803.9 
794.5 


220.2 


February 


228.0 


March 


220.9 


April -- - -- 


217.3 


May - - 


202. 2 


June 


198.0 


July 


191.2 


Aueust -- - - 


199.8 


September - 


209.0 


October 


229.8 


November 


226.3 


December - 


225.0 






Januarv to March 


6.7 
6.7 
7.2 
7.0 
6.9 


7.4 
6.3 
6.5 

8.4 
7. 1 


9. 1 
10.6 

9.5 
10. 1 

9.8 


82.0 
62.7 
66.0 
99.9 

77.7 


43.6 
50.6 
57.5 
46.3 
49.5 


318.0 
280.5 
28L9 
321.4 
300.4 


690.0 
670.4 
681.3 
784.2 
706.7 


222.9 


April to June . - 


205.8 


July to September . __ . . 


199.9 


October to December 


227.0 


January to December . _ . - . - 


213.9 







1 Daily averages for manslaughter bv negligence are based on reports of 90 cities with a total population 
of 35,374,212. 

2 Daily averages for aggravated assault are based on reports of 91 cities with a total population of 36,991,812. 

3 Daily averages for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on reports of 92 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 30,071,612. 



189 



MONTHLY CRIME 
t R E N D S 

OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE 

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42965° — 38- 



190 



Annual Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1931-37. 

Annual variations in the number of crimes committed during 
1931-37 are indicated in table 104. The compilation is limited to the 
reports received from the police departments of 73 cities with popula- 
tion in excess of 100,000. The total population area represented is 
20,912,712. 

For all types of crimes except aggravated assault, the 1937 figure is 
in excess of the number of crimes reported during 1936. In several 
instances the amount of increase is quite substantial. For rape and 
larceny, the 1937 figures are the highest reported during the 7-year 
period represented. 

Estimates of the total number of crimes committed in the entire 
United States during 1936 and 1937 may be found in table 115. 

Table 104 shows a substantial decrease in the number of homicides 
during 1935 and 1936 as compared with prior years. In connection 
with the decrease in the number of offenses of murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter (willful felonious homicides), it is suggested 
that the decrease may be partially attributable to the fact that during 
1935 it was ascertained that many police departments had been 
including as felonious homicides cases which were excusable in nature, 
such as the killing of a felon who was resisting arrest by a police 
officer. Such cases were subsequently excluded, together with in- 
stances of killing in self-defense by private indi\dduals, in order that 
the published figures might represent felonious homicides. This has 
naturally resulted in a reduction of such cases listed since 1935. 

The data shown in table 104 are also presented in figure 17. 

Table 104. — Annual trends, offenses known to the police, 73 cities over 100,000 in 
population, January to December, inclusive, 1931-37 

[Total population 20,912,712, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

as- 
sault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of oflenses known: 
1931 


1,630 
1,637 
1,761 
1,613 
1,422 
1,418 
1,456 

4.5 
4.5 
4.8 
4.4 
3.9 
3.9 
4.0 


1,504 

1,170 

1,398 

935 

930 

995 

1,180 

4.1 
3.2 
3.8 
2.6 
2.5 
2.7 
3.2 


1,273 
1,306 
1,324 
1,398 
1,596 
1,681 
1,910 

3.5 
3.6 
3.6 

3.8 
4.4 
4,6 
5.2 


21, 887 
20, 784 
19, 981 
16, 973 

14, 204 
13, 339 

15, 381 

eo.o 

56.8 
54.7 
46.5 
38.9 
36.4 
42.1 


11,137 
9,792 
12, 079 
11,205 
10, 731 
11,598 
11,046 

30.5 
26.8 
33.1 
30.7 
29.4 
31.7 
30.3 


78, 983 
84, 340 
87, 202 
82, 813 
75, 532 
67, 352 
71, 936 

216.4 
230.4 
238.9 
226.9 
206.9 
184.0 
197.1 


165, 630 
168, 782 
180, 876 
181, 713 
179, 102 
170. 432 
189, 428 

453. 8 
461.2 
495.6 
497.8 
490.7 
465.7 
519.0 


95, 894 
81 867 


1932 


1933 


78, 398 
72, 144 
61 881 


1934 


1935._ 


1936 


53,662 
54, 848 

262 7 


1937 


Daily average: 
1931 


1932 


223 7 


1933 


214 8 


1934 


197 7 


1935 . 


169 5 


1936 


146 6 


1937 


150 3 







191 




1^ 



192 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location. 

In table 105 there is presented information regarding the number 
of poUce departments \\hose reports were employed in the prepara- 
tion of figures representing crime rates for the individual States. 
This information is included here in order to show the number of 
such contributors according to size of city, and it is believed it will 
be helpful in evaluating the crime data for individual States, since 
table 102 has indicated that there is a noticeable tendency for the 
large cities to report higher crime rates than the smaller communities. 
It should be further observed that in several instances the number of 
records entering into the construction of State rates is quite limited. 
In some cases the figures for individual States are based on reports 
from only three or four police departments. Obviously, the crime 
rates based on such a limited number of records may differ consider- 
ably from the figures which would result if reports were available 
for all urban communities in the State. 

In table 106 there are presented the crime rates for the individual 
States, together with figures for nine geographic divisions of the 
country. 

In table 107 may be found crime rates for the nine geographic divi- 
sions of the country, with the cities in each division being segregated 
into six groups according to size. This information is presented in 
order to make possible comparisons between the figures for an indi- 
vidual community and the average figures for cities of the same size 
which are located in the same section of the United States, 



193 



Table 105. — Number of cities in each Slate included in the tabulation of uniform 
crime reports, January to December, inclusive, 1937 



Division ami State 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 170 cities; total population, 
5,744,533... 

Middle Atlantic: 456 cities; total population, 
18,273,771 - 

East North Central: 449 cities; total popula- 
tion, Iti, 125,525 

West North Central: 224 cities; total popu- 
lation, 4,972,010 

South -Vtlantie: i 119 cities; total popula- 
tion, 4,473,447 - 

East South Central: 58 cities; total popula- 
tion, 2,004,558 

West South Central: 104 cities; total popula- 
tion, 3,278,923 

Mountain: 73 cities; total population, 1,226,- 
546. 



Pacific: 156 cities; total population, 5,451,939. 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire.- 

Vermont 

Massachusetts __. 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

M innesota 

Iowa 

Missouri. 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia 

AVest Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky.. : 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas ; 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas _ 

Moimtain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado. _ 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific: 

Wash ington , 

Oregon .' 

California 



Population 



Over 
250,000 



100,000 

to 
250,000 



12 

11 

10 

5 



3 

5 

1 
4 



50,0(X) 

to 
100,000 



12 

22 

26 

6 

13 

3 

6 

2 
6 

1 
1 



I 

1 
1 

6 

6 

10 

4 
3 
8 
8 
3 



25,000 

to 
50,0(K) 



20 
25 

51 
11 

1() 



G 
13 

1 
2 
1 
12 
4 
6 

10 
8 

7 

15 

9 

12 

7 
8 



10,000 

to 
25,(X)0 



CO 

lie 

99 

53 

20 

16 

21 

14 
36 

6 
4 
1 
35 
5 
9 

44 
29 
43 

27 
12 
28 
19 
13 

10 
6 
9 
3 
5 
6 

14 



4 

7 
10 

3 



1 
1 

8 

4 

24 



Less 
than 
10,000 



58 

276 

254 

145 

55 

28 

60 

49 
92 

9 
6 
6 
29 
4 
4 

103 

56 

117 

70 
28 
71 
58 
27 

54 
29 
17 
5 
3 
15 
22 

2 
4 
9 

11 
9 
2 
4 

14 

10 

7 
9 
2 

S 

li 

26 

20 

5 
8 
3 
12 
4 
5 
9 
3 

10 

8 

74 



Total 



170 

456 

449 

224 

119 

58 

104 

73 
156 

17 
13 
8 
92 
16 
24 

170 
104 
182 

124 
57 

121 
95 
52 

67 
44 
32 
9 
9 
23 
40 

3 
10 
21 
18 
23 

7 
12 
24 

18 
13 
16 
11 

10 
14 
37 
43 

10 
9 
5 

19 
7 
7 

12 
4 

23 
14 

119 



1 includes District of Columbia. 



194 



Table 106. — Number of offenses known to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, 
January to December, inclusive, 1937, by States 



Division and State 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 



New England 

Middle Atlantic 

East North Central. - 
West North Central. 

South Atlantic 2 

East South Central. - 
West South Central.. 

Mountain 

Pacific 

New England: 

Maine 

New Hampshire- 
Vermont 

M assachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 

Middle Atlantic: 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central: 

Ohio... 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Miimesota 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic: 

Delaware 

Maryland 

Virginia.- 

West Virginia 

North Carolina... 
South Carolina... 

Georgia 

Florida 

East South Central: 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 

West South Central: 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Te.xas 

Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 

Wyoming 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Utah 

Nevada... 

Pacific: 

Washington 

Oregon.- 

California 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



4 

17, 
22 
15 

4, 
4, 



1.2 



I. 
19. 

9. 
24. 
12. 
33. 
22. 

18. 
23. 
28. 
17. 

17. 

14. 

8. 

17. 

5. 
1. 

4. 
4. 
9. 

7. 
1. 
5. 

3. 
2. 
4. 



Aggra- 
Robbery vated as- 
sault 



19.4 
30.9 
88.3 
49.4 
105. 6 
87.3 
59.8 
64.9 
75.3 

11.2 
11.4 
10.7 
23.6 
7.8 
16.4 

16.5 
31.7 
60.0 

105.5 
65. 1 

120.6 
58.8 
11.3 

42.9 
27. 1 
74.6 
43.7 
25.2 
28.7 
39.6 

41.5 
103.9 

79.7 
75.9 
71.7 
28.4 
128.0 
124. 1 

102.0 

116.6 

53.8 

19.2 

79.8 
32.8 
73.0 
63.9 

65.4 
50.9 
52.7 
65.9 
46.3 
101.8 
57.0 
67.9 

68.6 
94.2 
74.6 



12.4 
35.5 
37.1 
15.2 
152.2 
152.9 
79.6 
22.6 
28.1 

40.8 
7.3 



11.8 

9.1 

11.7 

33.4 
58. 1 
29.6 

39.7 
48.6 
36.9 
41.9 
6.2 

10.0 
13. 5 
18.8 
16.2 
6.3 
13.9 
20.1 



43. 

223! 
65. 
420. 
108. 
108. 
228. 



139. 6 

5 250. 

114.0 

50.4 

108.1 
89.5 
56.6 
82 



23.7 
11.3 
6.6 
22.2 
2(5.7 
61.2 
12. 1 
10.9 

22.7 
20.6 
30.0 



Burglary- 


breaking or 


entering 


252. 6 


• 181.6 


306.4 


264.8 


512.7 


468.7 


433.6 


432.0 


511.5 


271.3 


142.2 


112.7 


256.9 


171.1 


317.3 


t 160. 3 


276.2 


153.1 


366.0 


343.6 


320.5 


266.9 


123.9 


2.58. 7 


252. 5 


266.7 


324.0 


186.2 


125.2 


388.5 


337.6 


267.8 


554.3 


294.6 


467.6 


235. I 


741.2 


828.6 


570. 5 


456. 1 


411.9 


347.8 


423. 4 


184. 1 


446.4 


531.8 


231.7 


343.7 


207.6 


407.5 


501. I 


586. 5 


573. 


537.9 


632.5 


693. 5 


468.1 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



485.9 
I 354. 9 

779.6 

808.9 
1, 199. 

822.1 
L, 222. 9 
L 150. 5 



1,223.0 

475. 8 
287.6 
449.7 
476.6 
466.8 
577.4 

4 426. 6 
518.4 
233.0 

1, 008. 1 
910.0 
440.2 

1, 030. 7 
620.7 

591. 7 
834.2 
956. 5 
581. 5 
749.3 
425. 2 
1, 128. 7 



736.6 

505. 1 

1, 501. 5 

811.0 

877.4 
1, 545. 9 
1, 588. 1 
1, 586. 6 

1,087.3 
674.8 
783. 4 
650.8 

1, 124. 7 

445.6 

1,314.9 

1, 514. 4 

1, 287. 4 

1, 209. 4 
1, 191. 4 

898.7 
1,711.0 
1,447.2 
1, 077. 3 

2, 224. 9 

1, 196. 4 
1,618.3 
1, 186. 6 



Auto 
theft 



185. 5 
1 156. 1 
175.8 
184.4 
278.2 
234.2 
186.1 
302.4 
454.6 

154.1 
68.1 

103.2 

208.4 
93.8 

201.1 

4 138. 9 
166.0 
163.1 

225.2 
231.2 
103.6 
217.5 
135.5 

232. 5 
192.0 
158.3 
207.1 
172.7 
179.4 
153.9 

236.3 
282.0 
250.3 
200.4 
232.5 
148.0 
276.5 
207.6 

320.9 

243.7 

173.6 

86.8 

94.6 
115.7 
129.6 
245.3 

288.8 
267.3 
179. 6 
204.7 
339.7 
555.4 
365. 3 
638.4 

342.9 
323.9 
490.8 



1 The rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on the reports of 455 cities with a total popula- 
tion of 11,119,471. 

2 Includes report of District of Columbia. 

3 The rate for aggravated assault is based on the reports of 56 cities with a total population of 1,770,458. 
* The rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on reports of 169 cities. 

5 The rate for aggravated assault is based on reports of 12 cities. 



im 



Table 107. — Number of offenses known to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, 
January to December, inclusive, 1937, by geographic divisions arid population 
groups 



Geographic division and population 
grouj) 



NEW ENGLAND 

iirotii> I 

(iroiip II.. 

Ciroiii) III - 

Ciroup IV 

(Iroup V - 

Group VI 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC 

Group I-- - - 

Group II -- 

Group III.. 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI ..-- -. 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL 
Group I- 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL 

Group I -- 

Group II 

Group III... 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

SOUTH ATLANTIC 

Group 1 2 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V... 

Group VI 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 

Group I ^_.^...^.. 

Group II .'. 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

MOUNTAIN 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

PACIFIC 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

(•roup IV 

<}roup V 

Group VI 



Murder, 
nonnenli- 
pent man- 
slaughter 



1.7 
.7 
1.2 
1.3 
1.5 
2.4 



4.9 
1.4 
2.2 
2.0 
2.5 
2.0 



5.9 
5.2 
4.4 
2.4 
1.7 
2.2 



0. ( 

4.4 
3.4 
2.4 
4.3 
2.4 



15.5 
20.7 
19.5 
17. 5 
16.2 
19.4 



19.5 
32.5 
22. 7 
ll'.l 
21.4 
26. S 



22.1 
10,7 
15.0 

9.8 
14.9 

9.5 



6.1 
2.1 
9.8 
fi.3 
1.9 
3.6 



5.2 
3.7 
3.5 
1.7 
2.5 
3.2 



Rohbery 



30.6 
17.2 
17.9 
16.6 
13.8 
6.5 



36. 9 
24. 3 
34.5 

16.4 
15.2 
16.2 



128.4 
69.4 
58.0 
38.4 
33.6 
25.6 



74.4 
48.9 
30.0 
35.6 
27.5 
21.9 



157.7 
117.3 
76.0 
46.2 
45.7 
69.6 



110.9 

108.6 
42.2 
89.3 
35. 6 
34.2 



05. 3 
84.0 
43.9 
34.7 
29.7 
49.0 



69.9 
71.4 
121,3 
56. 8 
59.9 
45.0 



94.9 

58.7 
82.7 
44.1 
34.2 
39.9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



20.5 

13.7 

15.0 

6.0 

6.6 

9.5 



41.7 
34.5 

35. 1 
21.3 
21.3 
1.5. 



46.8 
57.4 
27.8 
18.9 
11.4 
21.7 



17.0 
19.7 
9.1 
20.5 
12.9 

y. 1 



57.0 
244.8 
181. 5 
207.4 
247.6 
100. 1 



161.7 

3 266. 3 

98.6 

159.7 

88.4 

147.6 



80.4 

68,3 

142.1 

59.2 

78.7 
51.4 



20.5 
12.5 
54.8 
21.9 
20.4 
20.3 



34.0 
27.1 
24.6 
19.9 
8.9 
24.9 



Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 



171.2 
335. 
278.4 
301.3 
182.2 
136.4 



1 153.9 
242.7 
267. 4 
212.8 
149.2 
127.3 



342.9 
321.7 
323.7 
274.0 
227. 
174.6 



271.5 
296, 7 
367,8 
300.8 
244. 1 
159.7 



537. 
762.8 
416.1 
476.4 
323. 6 
325. 3 



582.0 
527. 5 
277.4 
553.4 
201.2 
234.1 



394.6 
557. 4 
499.1 
363.7 
358. 2 
295,2 



451.2 
621.4 
677. 1 
449. 9 
296. 9 
309.1 



550.7 
547. 3 
518. 2 
492. 1 
392. 6 
377.7 



Larceny- 
theft 



437. 9 
611. 1 
502.4 
507.4 
387.6 
257.0 



' 337. 3 
458. 6 
420. 5 
482,0 
301.7 
212.6 



875.5 
975.0 
703. 7 
744.3 
501. 1 
290. 1 



850.7 
910.8 
1, 144. 
913.3 
793.7 
304. 1 



1.116.7 
1, 632. 5 
1,271.0 
1,301.2 
872.4 
504.6 



915.8 

929,0 

635. 5 

1,110.6 

520. 8 
358.8 



1,248.9 
1,497.8 
1,333. 1 
1, 003. 6 
1, 033. 3 
627.0 



622. 4 

093. 8 

1,560.7 

1,733.5 

1,.').^j4. 7 

905.4 



1, 190. 2 
1, 153. 7 
1,082.4 
1,074.0 
1.301.2 
1,114.0 



Auto 

theft 



309.5 
242.2 
170.4 
139.2 
70.8 
52.7 



1 198. 

186.6 

185.7 

149.9 

95.9 

55.9 



171.4 
273.9 
207.9 
196.4 
136.4 
78.7 



213.3 
217.3 
217.0 

178.2 

158.5 

84.2 



394. 2 
277.5 
227.8 
194.5 
142.2 
136.3 



269.5 
334.1 
184.1 
225. 3 
89.3 
77.1 



247.7 
208.5 
158.4 
112.7 
131.6 
80.7 



212. 1 
402.9 
552. 8 
463.0 
3()5.7 
130.6 



565.9 
333. 6 
352. 
317.4 
338.0 
255.8 



' The rates for burglary, larceny, and auto theft are based on the reports of 5 cities. 

' Includes the District of Columbia. 

' The rate for aggravated assault is based on the report of 1 city. 



196 

Data for Individual Cities With More Than 25,000 Inhabitants. 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the calendar year 1937 is shown in table 108. The compilation in- 
cludes the reports received from police departments in cities with more 
than 25,000 inhabitants. Such data are included here in order that 
interested individuals and organizations may have readily available 
up-to-date information concerning the amount of crune committed in 
their communities. Police administrators and other interested indi- 
viduals will probably find it desirable to compare the crime rates of 
their cities with the average rates shown in tables 102 and 107 of this 
publication. Similarly, they will doubtless desire to make compari- 
sons with the figures for their communities for prior periods, in order 
to determine whether there has been an increase or a decrease in the 
amount of crime committed. 

With reference to the possibility of comparing the amount of crime 
in one city with the amount of reported crime in other individual com- 
munities, it is suggested that such comparisons be made with a great 
deal of caution, because differences in the figures may be due to a 
great variety of factors. The amount of crime committed in a com- 
munity is not chargeable to the police but is rather a charge against 
the entire community. The following is a list of some of the factors 
which might affect the amount of crime in a community: The com- 
position of the population with reference particularly to age, sex, and 
race; the economic status and activities of the population; climate; 
educational, recreational, and religious facilities; the number of police 
employees per unit of population; the standards governing appoint- 
ments to the police force; the policies of the prosecuting officials and 
the courts; the attitude of the public toward law enforcement prob- 
lems. Comparisons between the crime rates of individual cities should 
not be made without giving consideration to the above-mentioned 
factors. It should be noted that it is more important to determine 
whether the figures for a given community show increases or decreases 
in the amount of crime committed than to ascertain whether the 
figures are above or below those of some other community. 

In examining a compilation of crime figures for individual com- 
munities it should be borne in mind that in view of the fact that the 
data are compiled by different record departments operating under 
separate and distinct administrative systems, it is entirely possible 
that there may be variations in the practices employed in classifying 
complaints of offenses. On the other hand, the crime reporting man- 
ual has been distributed to all contributors of crime reports, and the 
figures received are included in this bulletin only if they apparently 
have been compiled in accordance with the provisions of the manual 
and the individual department has so indicated. 



197 

Table 108. — Nuinber of offenses knoivn to the police, January to December, inclusive, 

19S7, cities over 25,000 in population 



City 



Abilene, Tex 

Akron, Ohio 

Alameda, Calif... 

Albany, N. Y 

Albu<itierquc, N. Mex — 

Alhauibra, Calif .-. 

Ali(iuippa, Fa 

-Mlentowii, Pa 

Alton, 111. - 

Altoona, Pa 

Amsterdam, N. Y 

Anderson, Ind. 

.\nn Arbor, Mich 

Arlington, Mass... 

Asheville, N. C 

.\shland, Ky - 

Atlanta, Ga - 

Atlantic City, N.J 

.\uburn, N.Y- 

Augusta, Oa 

Aurora, 111 - - 

Austin, Tex 

Bakersfleld, Calif- 

Baltimore, Md 

Bangor, Me 

Barberton, Ohio 

Baton Koupe, La. -.- 

Battle Crwk, Mich 

Bay City. Mich 

Beaumont, Tex 

Belleville, 111 

Bellingliam, Wash 

Berkeley, Calif 

Berwyn, 111 

Bethlehem, Pa 

Beverly, Mass.. -- 

Binghamton, N. Y 

Birmingham, Ala.. 

filoomfield, N. J... 

Blooniington, 111 

Boston, Mass 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Bristol, Conn... 

Brockton, Mass 

Brookline, Mass 

Brownsville, Tex 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Burlington, Iowa 

Burlington, Vt 

Butte, Mont 

Cambridge, Mass.. 

Camden, N. J 

Canton, Ohio 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Central Falls, H. I 

Charleston, S. C 

Charleston, W. Va 

Charlotte, N. C 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Chelsea, Ma.ss 

Chester, Pa 

Chicago, 111 

Chicopee, Mass 

Cicero, 111.... 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 

Clifton. N.J 

Clinton, Iowa 

Colorado Springs, Colo... 

Columbia, S. C 

Columbus, Ga 

Columbus, Ohio 

Concord, N. H 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



8 
3 

1 



11 



11 

1 

67 



3 

'is" 



79 



2 

12 



3 

19 



14 
37 
36 



16 

216 

2 

1 

62 

74 



1 

6 
16 
16 



Robbery 



3 

264 



30 

10 

19 

2 

9 

23 

6 

3 

27 

5 

3 

38 

27 

591 

51 

1 

42 

16 

28 

23 

941 

3 

17 

11 

8 

5 

14 

9 

2 

10 

17 

77 



2 

164 

11 

41 

362 

24 

4 

31 

19 



147 

2 

6 

47 

40 

29 

144 

9 

7 

21 

101. 

114 

105 

6 

34 

5,615 



49 

631 

1,663 

29 

17 

3 

5 

8 

37 

498 

1 



.\gpra- 
vated 
assault 



16 

132 

7 

37 



11 
3 

10 
3 
2 

21 
3 

'358' 

10 

276 

91 

2 
91 

4 
54 

4 
32 

2 

1 
28 

6 



102 



1 
12 

1 
26 

3 

4 
144 

1 

4 
180 

1 



2 
1 
1 

ir,'j 
4 



15 

17 

118 

66 

7 

1 

21 

.=52 

258 

4 

22 

1,548 

1 



(') 



404 

212 

1 

5 

1 



87 

35 

137 

1 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



1, 



84 
157 

75 
276 
193 
274 

60 
183 
101 
ISO 

46 

75 

59 

86 
232 

57 

3, 145 

596 

33 
286 

SO 

770 

173 

2,247 

74 

76 
174 
)27 

92 
183 

41 

87 
327 
116 

59 

34 
105 
1,511 
117 
182 
. 1,357 
347 

60 
221 
304 

88 
621 

66 

69 
105 
417 
153 
490 
134 

62 
173 
196 
715 
456 
285 
188 
12,246 

47 
132 
2. 503 
2, (i91 
119 
142 

53 

126 

9 

226 

2,156 

23 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



20 

2S4 

12 

91 

32 

25 

12 

30 

10 

19 

10 

47 

49 

13 

54 

25 

600 

267 

8 

50 

35 

91 

71 

829 

27 

13 

35 

11 

25 

10 

6 

16 

34 

8 

34 

3 

43 

370 

17 

28 

894 

179 

15 

54 

59 



371 

5 

11 

31 

101 

150 

(') 

20 

8 

119 

234 

103 

93 

39 

19 

3,213 

15 

31 

927 

342 

29 

24 

21 

24 

67 

45 

661 

6 



Under 
$50 



318 
1, 577 
242 
660 
708 
185 

63 
231 
144 
176 

86 

92 
359 

58 

433 

199 

4,422 

1, 112 

i(;6 

927 

86 

1, 733 

624 

3,146 

185 

61 

237 

473 

410 

118 

9 

167 

1, 059 

77 

60 

57 

308 

2, 343 
150 
281 

2,771 

609 

82 

373 

139 

55 

1,951 
108 
247 
375 
574 
266 

1.088 
496 
139 

1,252 
781 
573 

1,243 
172 
124 
11, 759 
176 
130 

5,827 
11,212 
402 
108 
109 
627 
460 
579 

3, 832 
33 



Auto 
theft 



29 

421 

41 

249 

179 

91 

31 

236 

75 

84 

29 

141 

60 

6 

91 

73 

1,069 

248 

32 

91 

83 

188 

164 

2,454 

57 

23 

31 

182 

135 

59 

7 

65 

76 

23 

84 

24 

1.58 

024 

59 

146 

2,952 

419 

19 

74 

202 

4 

908 

24 

50 

193 

476 

150 

203 

81 

23 

43 

308 

334 

279 

84 

94 

2, 929 

25 

75 

1, 1,50 

2,229 

.52 

44 

26 

65 

25 

134 

835 

16 



See footnotes at end of table. 
42965°— .38 3 



198 

Table 108. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
1937, cities over 25,000 in population — Continued 



City 



Council Bluffs, Iowa 

Covington, Ky 

Cranston, R. I 

Cumberland, Md 

Dallas, Tex 

Danville, 111 

Danville, Va 

Davenport, Iowa 

Dayton, Ohio 

Dearborn, Mich 

Decatur, 111 

Denver, Colo 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Detroit, Mich 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Duluth, Minn . 

Durham, N. C 

East Chicago, Ind 

East Cleveland, Ohio,.. 

East Orange, N. J 

East Providence, R. I— - 

East St. Louis, 111 

Eau Claire, Wis 

Elgin, 111 

Elizabeth, N. J 

Elkhart, Ind 

Elmira, N. Y 

El Paso, Tex 

Elyria, Ohio 

Enid, Okla 

Erie, Pa 

Evanston, 111 

EvansvUle, Ind 

Everett, Mass 

Everett, Wash 

Fall River, Mass 

Fargo, N. Dak 

Fitchburg, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Fond du Lac, Wis 

Fort Smith, Ark 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Fresno, Calif 

Gadsden, Ala 

Oalesburg, 111 

Gary, Ind 

Olendale, Calif 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

Granite City, 111 

Great Falls, Mont 

Green Bay, Wis 

Greensboro, N. C 

Greenville, S. C 

Hackensack, N. J 

Hagerstown, Md 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Hammond, Ind 

Hamtramck, Mich 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Hartford, Conn 

Haverhill, Mass 

Highland Park, Mich... 

High Point, N. C 

Hoboken, N. J 

Holyoke, Mass 

Houston, Tex 

Huntington, W. Va 

Huntington Park, Calif. 

Hutchinson, Kans 

Indianapolis, Ind 

Inglewood, Calif 

Irvington, N. J 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

Jacksonville, Fla 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



1 
11 



82 
1 
6 
2 

19 
6 
2 

18 
4 

74 
1 
2 

11 

11 
1 
1 
1 

14 
2 



2 
4 
29 
3 
2 



15 
2 
1 
1 
1 



13 

14 

1 

2 

4 



76 
9 



4 
24 



1 

6 

33 



Robbery 



8 

24 

3 

5 

205 

20 

23 

19 

144 

29 

35 

205 

74 

1,332 

28 

51 

24 

27 

19 

6 

105 

1 

4 

31 

10 

17 

57 

4 

2 

51 

21 

44 

10 

12 

17 

17 



99 
1 
20 
38 
66 
98 
18 
15 

118 

27 

48 

23 

12 

2 

30 

15 

8 

7 

27 

28 

102 
45 
18 
6 
60 
23 
11 
13 

363 

73 

16 

5 

447 

8 

14 

20 

11 

173 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



5 
15 

1 

1 
256 

1 
122 

4 
135 

6 

60 

18 

981 

4 

6 

80 

43 

1 

7 

6 

159 



1 

41 
2 



54 

5 

3 

21 

24 

20 

3 

1 

7 

8 

1 

191 



13 

34 

17 

6 



(2) 



133 
2 

17 
4 
3 
2 

62 

38 

4 

3 

9 

10 

46 

55 

4 

9 

220 

10 



258 
119 



4 

317 

3 

5 

17 

24 

180 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



94 

142 

39 

69 

1.663 

143 

121 

202 

589 

134 

339 

1,323 

695 

4,006 



114 

270 

105 

157 

278 

91 

258 

54 

64 

421 

119 

96 

504 

46 

91 

299 

199 

267 

189 

124 

497 

133 

109 

697 

24 

116 

364 

1,110 

406 

64 

104 

381 

331 

687 

73 

49 

112 

394 

120 

81 

70 

81 

191 

301 

292 

812 

242 

300 

122 

99 

239 

2,007 

492 

242 

79 

2,189 

125 

287 

174 

227 

1,174 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



(2) 



(') 



28 
84 
46 
39 

181 

4 

41 

30 

124 
62 
39 

465 
67 

971 
30 

177 
73 
26 
9 
31 
15 
85 
17 
10 
57 
29 
17 
63 
9 
5 
84 
96 
38 
26 
20 
33 
45 
6 

269 
17 
11 

111 
96 

137 
62 
7 
50 
68 
89 

21 
19 
140 
54 
16 
24 

39 

95 



0) 



147 
82 

107 
41 
26 
51 

271 

337 

31 

7 

946 
15 
39 
29 

552 



Under 
$50 



493 
359 
217 
214 

6,900 
343 
399 
849 

2, 638 
562 
378 

1,360 

1,829 

19, 118 

288 

1,041 
488 
141 
262 
196 
178 
340 
142 
164 
584 
511 
295 

1,281 
107 
225 
279 
445 

1,120 
227 
442 
408 
189 
258 

2,145 
100 
320 

1,674 

2,782 

1, 125 

181 

72 

499 

760 

1,867 

Q) 
579 
238 
286 
567 
108 
185 
439 
318 
537 
471 

1,525 

94 

315 

231 

40 

386 

5,035 
820 
197 
566 

4, 333 
313 
260 
554 
470 

2,564 



See footnotes at end of table. 



199 

Table 108.^ — Number of offenses knoivn to the police, January (o December, inclusive, 
1937, cities over 25,000 in population — Coiitimied 



City 



Johnstown, Pa. . 

Joliet, III 

Joplin, Mo.-- 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

Kansas City, Kans_ 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Kearny, N. J 

Kenosha, Wis. 

Kingston, N. Y 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Kokomo, Ind 

Lackawanna, N. Y 

La Crosse, AVis- 

La Fayette, Ind 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lansing, Midi 

Lawrence, Mass 

Lexington, Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Little Koek, Ark 

Long Beach, Calif. 

Lorain, Ohio 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Louisville, Ky 

Lowell, Mass.. 

Lower Merion Township, Pa. 

Lynchburg, Va 

Lynn, Mass 

•Macon, Qa 

Madison, Wis 

Manchester, N. H 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Marion, Ohio 

Massillon, Ohio 

May wood. 111 

McKeesport, Pa 

Medford, Mass 

Memphis, Tenn 

Meriden, Conn 

Meridian, Miss 

Miami, Fla 

Michigan City, Ind 

Middletown, Conn 

Middletown, Ohio 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn 

Mishawaka, Ind 

Mobile, Ala.. 

Moline, 111 

Monroe, La 

Mount Vernon, N. Y 

Muncie, Ind- 

Muskegon, Mich 

Muskogee, Okia 

Nashua, N. H 

Nashville, Tenn 

New Albany, Ind 

Newark, N. J 

Newark, Ohio '.. 

New Bedford, Mass 

New Britain, Conn 

New Brunswick, N.J 

Newburgh, N. Y .♦ 

New Castle, Pa 

New Haven, Conn 

New London, Conn 

New Orleans, La 

Newport, Ky 

Newport, R. I 

Newport News, Va.. 

New Rochelle, N. Y 

Newton, Mass 

New York City, N. Y 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



2 
2 

1! 
•12 



31 



1 

3 

16 



16 

4 



81 

51 

1 



8 

1 

23 

1 



36 
1 

5 

39 

1 



26 



3 
1 

60 
2 

39 
1 
2 



1 
1 
78 
3 
1 
8 



3 

331 

2 



Robbery 



1 

24 

42 

29 

143 

5t)2 

4 

4 

4 

54 

11 

11 

3 

10 

41 

3 

16 

6 

61 

25 

12 

69 

97 

23 

1,414 

385 

9 

6 

2 

39 

65 

13 

2 

24 

14 

24 

12 

58 

19 

396 

4 

12 

329 

20 



29 

44 

284 

6 
45 
15 
24 

1 

8 
13 
31 

3 
265 

4 
214 

7 
17 
43 
10 

1 
20 
34 



129 
47 



26 

4 

1 

1,276 

45 



.\ggra- 

valed 

assault 



2 
16 

6 
17 
47 
77 



(') 



3 

2 

7 

15 

1 



9 
6 
3 

231 
6 
4 

119 
29 
18 

452 

457 
8 



38 
9 

133 
8 
6 
4 
2 
9 
8 

104 



768 



796 
15 
1 
22 
55 
58 



148 

7 

6 

5 

64 



16 



416 

9 

587 

4 

19 

11 

12 

2 

4 

16 

8 

344 

40 

3 

72 

30 



2,921 
48 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



lUO 

279 

319 

775 

1.238 

83 

37 

29 

692 

126 

26 

57 

63 

202 

159 

232 

132 

308 

232 

99 

461 

1, 276 
130 

7, 301 

2, 350 
264 
119 

72 
476 
425 

70 
105 
163 
123 

71 

73 

92 

194 

1. 099 

136 

313 

1, 021 

75 

34 

101 

482 

1. 550 

74 
157 
108 
102 

55 
137 
128 
109 

75 
911 

41 
1,051 

93 
412 
328 
117 

59 
104 
857 

48 
540 
278 

62 
245 

91 

159 

3,258 

321 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



(0 



13 
32 
61 
28 



(') 



0) 



31 
14 

14 

131 

41 

8 

5 

21 

30 

47 

85 

61 

94 

65 

36 

251 

26 

.381 

624 
53 
34 
14 
68 
39 
46 
33 
47 
35 
17 
21 
78 
25 
97 
22 
27 

447 

18 

7 

26 

237 

537 
4 

35 
30 
6 
16 
48 
37 
22 
9 



0) 



21 

410 
14 

112 
31 
16 
22 
29 

183 
9 

244 
21 
31 
39 
26 



75 



Under 
$50 



S4 
105 
543 

1,094 
898 

2,217 
111 
106 
98 
679 
524 
108 
207 
321 
229 
426 
623 
111 
986 
457 
344 

1, 189 

1.921 

270 

11,074 

3,469 
327 
38 
301 
983 
705 
389 
266 
360 
316 
108 
95 
122 
212 
902 
145 
232 

1. 551 

91 

36 

417 

4,154 

2,305 
166 
257 
253 
287 



325 
305 
428 
128 

1,480 
291 

3, 658 
373 
988 
337 
194 
120 
104 

1,150 
129 
694 
222 
144 
184 
50 
234 

461 



Auto 
theft 



158 

101 

116 

248 

160 

607 

47 

56 

21 

215 

94 

45 

40 

27 

97 

81 

220 

185 

132 

165 

230 

82 

640 

92 

9,233 

1,273 

170 

26 

64 

183 

167 

160 

59 

93 

79 

28 

10 

137 

45 

394 

48 

26 

449 

35 

20 

115 

850 

1,654 

45 

110 

72 

28 

55 

155 

101 

46 

30 

810 

43 

1,546 

56 

189 

158 

82 

37 

183 

448 

23 

533 

95 

23 

69 

85 

97 

7,504 

242 



See footnotes at end of table. 



200 

Table 108. — Nvmher of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
1937, cities over 25,000 in population — Continued 



City 



Murder, 
nonnepli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Norfolk, Va 

Norristown, Pa -_. 

North Bergen Township, N. J. 

Norwood, Ohio 

Oakland, Calif 

Oak Park, 111 

Ogden, Utah 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

Omaha, Nebr 

Orlando, Fla 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Parkersburg, W. Va 

Pasadena, Calif 

Passaic, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Pawtucket, R. I 

Peoria, 111 

Petersburg, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Pittsburgh, Pa 

Pittsfleld, Mass 

Plainfield, N. J 

Pontiac, Mich 

Port Arthur, Tex 

Port Huron, Mich 

Portland, Maine 

Portland, Oreg 

Portsmouth, Ohio 

Portsmouth, Va 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Providence, R. I 

Pueblo. Colo 

Quincy, Mass 

Racine, Wis 

Reading, Pa 

Revere, Mass 

Richmond, Ind 

Richmond, Va 

Riverside, Calif 

Roanoke, Va 

Rochester, N. Y 

Rockford, 111 

Rock Island, 111 

Rome, N. Y 

Royal Oak, Mich 

Sacramento, Calif 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

St. Petersburg, Fla 

Salem, Mass 

Salem, Oreg 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Angelo, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Bernardino, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

San Jose, Calif 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif 

Santa Monica, Calif 

Savannah, Ga 

Schenectady, N. Y 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash 

Sharon, Pa... 

Sheboygan, Wis 

Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak 

Somerville, Mass 



30 



26 
2 
1 

13 
9 
4 



4 
5 
112 
8 
40 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 
2 
6 
5 
9 



6 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
38 



12 
6 
3 



8 

4 

5 

59 

4 



1 
3 
6 
32 
1 

28 



2 
1 

Ifi 
1 
2 

14 



1 

11 

3 



Robbery 



119 

6 

4 

13 

307 

41 

26 

153 

89 

10 

3 

15 

5 

43 

35 

41 

5 

22 

13 

803 

78 

,655 

4 

6 

51 

6 

7 

10 

359 

26 

45 

3 

20 

46 

10 

10 

34 

29 

17 

228 

4 

28 

27 

35 

21 

2 

6 

172 

42 

52 

485 

156 

17 

11 

11 

103 



257 

30 

61 

442 

27 

8 

14 

39 

19 

9 

35 

315 

1 

2 

42 

36 

10 

21 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



166 
17 



5 

148 

7 

10 

198 

55 

65 

1 

38 

13 

15 

40 

37 



53 

56 

836 

36 

109 

3 
15 
18 
42 

1 

87 

83 

27 

167 

9 
34 
20 
10 

3 
37 

1 

2 
621 

6 

50 
38 

7 
11 

2 



60 
66 
18 
173 
32 
24 
10 



18 
35 

239 
13 
17 

276 

6 

11 

7 

37 
49 
13 
49 
57 



2 

123 

5 

1 

4 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



933 

49 

109 

96 

1.634 

304 

353 

878 

124 

217 

54 
101 

74 
369 
320 
464 
169 
204 
126 
2.158 
479 
1,652 
115 

94 
283 

56 

65 
384 
2,518 
307 
315 
123 
428 
213 
118 
105 
326 
264 

81 
1,424 
161 
102 
699 
135 
136 

44 

45 
657 
328 
452 
1,603 
1,035 
335 
133 
100 
896 

39 

1,334 

132 

395 

1,943 

273 

117 

194 

270 

136 

286 

360 

3,066 

41 

78 
258 
226 

43 
129 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



67 
25 
12 
12 

222 
59 
81 

228 
39 
19 
10 
21 



0) 



53 

48 

42 

62 

33 

28 

828 

194 

784 

20 

58 

95 



(') 



709 
84 
65 
39 
94 
25 
29 
21 
94 
42 
19 

401 
11 

100 

149 
70 
45 
12 
20 

147 
76 

116 



(') 



(') 



218 

98 

49 

13 

83 

3 

483 

3 

93 



U) 



20 
13 
40 
30 
91 
56 
73 
451 
13 
9 
54 

27 
42 



Under 

$50 



1,612 

36 

117 

178 

3,626 
345 
853 

3,140 
543 
187 
118 
179 
217 

1,220 
227 
217 
631 
161 
482 

2,250 

1,009 

1,648 
199 
106 
471 
61 
226 
442 

4,471 
612 
753 
335 
806 
367 
259 
256 
568 
304 
105 

3,985 
281 
585 

1,498 

405 

389 

141 

60 

2.175 

1.122 

907 

10.216 

1.509 

1.001 
285 
195 
,350 
108 
.572 
467 
836 
.173 
873 
238 
601 
275 
,726 
99 
442 



1. 



1. 



112 

249 

1.034 

128 
178 



Auto 
theft 



458 

112 

31 

42 

900 

51 

269 

238 

350 

63 

32 

37 

31 

207 

211 

214 

129 

274 

14 

2.641 

459 

2.391 

106 

58 

247 

55 

50 

227 

1,061 

138 

69 

44 

275 

106 

94 

144 

113 

115 

44 

577 

59 

181 

464 

96 

108 

44 

43 

484 

156 

147 

1,454 

547 

54 

97 

55 

581 

21 

840 

144 

519 

4,237 

198 

93 

115 

219 

115 

125 

307 

1,484 

47 

50 

164 

279 

91 

169 



See footnotes at end of table. 



201 

Table 108. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
1937, cities over 25,000 in population — Continued 



City 



South Bend, Ind -. 

Spartanburp, S. C - 

Spokiiiie, Wash 

Springlidd, 111 

Springfield, Mass 

Springfield, Mo 

Springfield, Ohio... 

Stamford, Conn 

Steuhenville, Ohio 

Superior, Wis.. 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Taconia, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 

Terrs Haute, Ind 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kans 

Trenton, N.J. 

Troy, N.Y.. 

Tucson, Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

University City, Mo 

Utica, N. Y 

Waco, Tex _ 

Waltham, Mass 

Warren, Ohio 

Washington, D. C 

Washington, Pa 

Waterbury, Conn 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Watertown, Mass... 

Watertown, N. Y 

Waukegan, 111 

West Allis, Wis 

West Hartford, Conn 

West Haven, Conn 

West Orange, N. J 

West Palm Beach, Fla 

Wheeling, W. Va 

AVhite Plains, N. Y 

Wichita, Kans 

Wichita Falls, Tex 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

Wilkinsburg, Pa 

Wilmington, Del 

Wilmington, N. C. 

Winston-Salem, N. C 

Woodbridge Township, N. J. 

Woonsocket, R. I ^ 

AVorcester, Mass 

Wyandotte, Mich 

Yonkers, N. Y 

York. Pa--_ 

Youngstown, Ohio.. 

Zanesville, Ohio- 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
pent man- 
slaughter 



3 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 
6 

11 
4 
9 
4 
2 
1 
1 

16 



1 
65 



9 

7 

22 

1 



Robbery 



44 

5 

119 

52 

10 

18 

53 

7 

28 

19 

23 

41 

14 

53 

251 

12 

63 

51 

17 

196 

17 

7 

13 

11 

14 

980 

6 

9 

6 

17 

2 

9 

7 

1 

5 

5 

13 

59 



15 
10 
14 

6 
46 
11 
48 

2 

1 
34 

4 

11 

22 

257 

9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



98 

4 

24 



33 
3 



20 

3 

87 

12 

132 

4 

98 

44 

17 

68 

5 

8 

117 



13 

600 

6 

2 



3 

2 

20 

3 



1 
3 
9 

17 

13 

52 

19 

18 

47 

271 

274 

7 



55 



38 

1 

162 

3 



Bur- 
glary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



245 

129 

7(18 

530 

388 

291 

334 

116 

99 

84 

433 

527 

379 

181 

1,268 

319 

515 

111 

100 

1,012 

89 

155 

229 

140 

106 

3, 159 

61 

203 

79 

74 

120 

82 

38 

55 

35 

38 

277 

151 

45 

404 

162 

136 

66 

379 

130 

438 

70 

96 

499 

50 

147 

61 

531 

67 



Larceny— theft 



Over $50 



85 
39 
251 
4 
89 
85 

(') 
56 
6 
13 

108 
62 
95 
26 

455 
47 

147 

115 
44 

258 
35 
86 
45 
39 
21 
1,382 
7 



V) 



5 
40 
64 
18 

3 

17 

150 

35 

44 

48 

51 

55 

9 

135 

12 

51 

10 

14 

216 

10 

14 

6 

69 

23 



Under 
$50 



319 
345 

2, 032 
851 

1,077 
899 
731 
284 
142 
179 
952 
810 
568 
542 

3, 439 
827 
S38 
390 
193 

2,096 
179 
628 
884 
293 
211 

7,405 
114 
292 
320 
107 
614 
178 
404 
38 

47 
615 
192 

78 
1,788 
867 
175 
107 
672 
265 
762 
116 
248 
247 

66 

325 

164 

1,116 

193 



Auto 
theft 



189 

88 

377 

261 

301 

76 

195 

97 

96 

74 

556 

272 

79 

94 

,065 

270 

207 

184 

150 

281 

14 

227 

73 

98 

73 

, 755 

77 

251 

47 

43 

63 

32 

43 

15 

8 

20 

30 

89 

29 

125 

94 

131 

38 

264 

83 

164 

23 

67 

609 

15 

221 

118 

641 

86 



' Larcenies not separately reported. 
2 Not reported. 



Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



202 

Offenses Known to Sheriffs, State Police, and Other Rural Officers, 1937. 
In compiling and publishing national crime data, the Federal 
Bureau ol' Investigation distinguishes between urban and rural 
crimes. The figures presented in the preceding tables are based on 
reports from a large majority of the agencies policing urban areas 
(places with 2,500 or more inhabitants). Comprehensive data re- 
garding rural crimes are not yet available, but the information on 
hand is shown in table 109, which is based on reports from 605 sheriffs, 
75 police agencies in rural villages, and 7 State police organizations. 
For comparative purposes, there are presented below percentage 
distributions of rural and urban crimes (the urban data are based on 
figures shown in table 102). The percentage figures which follow 
should be thought of as representing an average group of 100 urban 
crimes and an average group of 100 rural crimes. 



Offense 



Total 

Larceny 

Burglary... 
Auto theft.. 
Robbery... 



Percent 


Urban 


Rural 


100.0 


100.0 


63.9 

22.5 

14.9 

4.1 


46.8 

28.2 

9.7 

4.1 



Offense 



Aggravated assault 

Rape 

Murder 

Manslaughter 



Percent 



Urban 



3.2 
.6 
.4 
.4 



Rural 



5.6 
2.6 

1.5 
1.5 



The preceding comparison reveals that whereas only 4.6 percent 
of the urban crimes are offenses against the person (murder, manslaugh- 
ter, rape, and aggravated assault), 11.2 percent of the rural crimes 
reported fall within those classes. This does not mean that more 
crimes against the person are committed in rural areas than in urban 
communities. The figures merely indicate that in an average group 
of 100 rural crimes there would be a larger number of offenses against 
the person than in an average group of 100 urban crimes. This may 
be due to the fact that some of the reports representing rural crimes 
indicate the possibility that they were limited to instances in which 
arrests were made. Incompleteness of this sort in the reports of 
rural crimes will tend to increase the percentage of rural crimes against 
the person because such offenses are much more generally followed by 
arrests than are the less serious offenses against property. 

The percentnge distribution of urban and rural crimes is also shown 
in figure 18. 



Table 109. — Offenses known, January to December, inclusive, 1937, as reported 
by 605 sheriffs, 7 State police organizations, and 75 village officers 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Offenses known 


940 


941 


1,715 


2,653 


3,017 


18, 295 


30, 326 


6,307 







203 




204 



Offenses Known in Territories and Possessions of the United States. 

In table 110 there are shown available data concerning the number 
of offenses known to law-enforcement agencies in Territories and pos- 
sessions of the United States. The tabulation includes reports from 
Hawaii County, Honolulu (city and county), and Kauai County, 
Territory of Hawaii; the Canal Zone; and Puerto Rico. The figures 
are based on both urban and rural areas and the population figures 
from the 1930 decennial census are indicated in the table. 

With reference to the figures presented for the Canal Zone, it should 
be noted that the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been advised 
that less than one-third of the persons arrested for offenses committed 
in the Canal Zone are residents thereof. It appears, therefore, that a 
large proportion of the crime committed in the Canal Zone is attrib- 
utable to transients and other nonresidents. 

Table 110. — Ninnher of off enses known in United States Terr.itories and possessions, 

January to December, inclusive, 1937 



[Population figures 


from Federal census, 


Apr. 1. 19301 










Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Jurisdiction reporting 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Over 

$50 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Hawaii: 

Hawaii County, population, 
73,325; number of oflenses 
known 


4 

10 

3 

4 
245 


1 

7 
2 

3 

127 


5 
14 




16 

31 

6 

11 
1,844 


91 
954 

78 
941 


12 

139 

2 

14 
114 


370 

1,751 

23 

229 
3,691 


23 


Honolulu, city and county, 
population, 202,923; number 
of offenses known .. - 


228 


Kauai County, population, 
35,942; number of offenses 
known . .. 


3 


Isthmus of Panama: Canal Zone, 
population, 39,367; number of 
offenses known _ 


2 

82 


G 
40 


29 


Puerto Rico: Population, 1,543,- 
913; number of offenses known.. 


51 



205 

Data From Suppletnentarij Offense Reports. 

Ill t:i])los 111-114 tlioie arc ])n^sontcd the more detailed data eom- 
piled from sui)plementary oirense reports received from the police 
departments of 139 cities with an aggregate population of 16,018,429. 
The period covered is the calendar year 1937. 

Table 111 reveals that more than one-half of the rapes reported 
were forcible in nature. Of the 12,717 robberies reported, 7,438 (58.5 
percent) were committed on city liighways and 3,783 (29.7 percent) 
were robberies of various types of commercial establishments. 

The 139 police departments represented in the tabulation reported 
54,936 burglaries, 25,700 (46.8 percent) of which were committed in 
dwelling houses. Of the total burglaries reported, 79 percent (43,473) 
were committed at night and 21 percent were committed during the 
day. With reference to residences, however, the j^roportion of day- 
time burglaries amounted to 34 percent. Only 9 percent of the non- 
residence burglaries were committed during the daytime. 

The larcenies reported numbered 123,552. There were 14,234 (11.5 
percent) in wliich the value of property stolen was $50 or more; 
79,146 (64.1 percent) involving property valued at $5 to $50; and 
30,172 (24.4 percent) in which the value of the property involved was 
less than $5 per offense. With reference to the type of theft com- 
mitted, the compilation discloses that there were 1,843 (1.5 percent) 
cases of pocket-picking and 3,860 (3.1 percent) offenses of purse- 
snatching. 

Table 1 11. — N^umbcr of known offenses with divisions as to the nature of the criminal 
act, time and place of coviinission, and value of property stolen, January to Decem- 
ber, inclusive, 1937; 139 cities over 25,000 in population 

(Total population, 16,018,429, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Classification 


Number 
of actual 
offenses 


Classification 


Number 
of actual 
offenses 


Rape: 

Forcible 


653 
537 


Burglary— breaking or entering— Con. 
All other (store, office, etc.): 

Committed during night 

CoTTimittpfi fliirintr dav 




Statutory . - 


26,562 




2,674 


Total 


1,190 


Total 






54, 936 


Robbery: 

Uighway-.. 

Commercial bouse 


7,438 
2,647 
895 
226 
607 
15 
889 


Larceny- theft (except auto theft) 
(grouped according to value of article 
stolen): 
Over $50 






Oil station . 




Chain store - 


14. 234 


Residence 


$5 to $50.-- 


79, 146 


Bank 


Under $5 -.- 


30, 172 


Miscellaneous - - 


Total 








123, 552 


Total 


12, 7ir 


Larceny— theft (grouped as to type of 
offense) : 
Pocket-picking 








Burplary— breaking or entering: 


16,911 
8,789 


1,843 


Residence (dwelling) : 


Purse-snatching 


3,860 


Committed during night. 


Another - 


117, 849 


Committed during day 


Total 


123, 552 









4290.5"— .38- 



206 



The police departments of 139 cities reported thefts of 31,382 
automobiles during the calendar year 1937. Table 112 indicates that 
29,576 (94.2 percent) of the automobiles were recovered. 

Table 112. — Recoveries of stolen automobiles, Januanj to December, inclusive, 1937; 

139 cities over 25,000 in -population 

[Total population, 16,018,429, as estimated .Tuly 1, 193S, by the Bureau of the Census] 

Number of automobiles stolen 31, 382 

Number of automobiles recovered 29, 576 

Percentage recovered 94. 2 

The value of property stolen in connection with offenses of robbery, 
burglary, larceny, and auto theft is shown in table 113 as amounting 
to $19,225,820.51. Recoveries totaled $12,426,895.00, which is 65 per- 
cent of the amount stolen. More than one-half of the value of stolen 
property consisted of automobiles. Exclusive of automobiles, the 
value of stolen property was $7,879,577.55 and the value of recovered 
property was $1,754,491.78 (22.3 percent). 

The data presented in table 113 are also shown in figure 19. 

Table 113. — Value of property stolen and value of property recovered with divisions 
as to type of property involved, January to December, inchisive, 1937 ; 139 cities 
over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 16,018,429, as estimated July 1, 1933, by the Bureau of the Census] 



Type of property 



Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs 

Clothing.... 

Locally stolen automobiles.. 
Miscellaneous 

Total 



Value of prop- 
erty stolen 



$2,235,115.07 

1,722,472.91 

302. 140. 54 

978, 099. 49 

11,346,242.90 

2, 641, 749. 54 



19, 225, 820. 51 



Value of prop- 
erty recovered 



$357, 070. 12 

378, 059. 66 

41, 787. 85 

190.037.86 

10, 672, 403. 22 

787, 536. 29 



12,426,895.00 



Percent 
recov- 
ered 



16.0 
21.9 
13.8 
19.4 
94.1 
29.8 



64.6 



207 



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208 

The value of property stolen in connection with offenses of robbery, 
burglary, larceny, and auto theft is shown for individual types of 
crimes in table 114. It should be noted that this compilation is 
based on reports of 138 police departments, whereas tables 111-113 
were based on reports from 139 police departments. 

Exclusive of auto thefts, the average value of property stolen per 
oft'ense is lowest for larceny and highest for robbery. Because of the 
nature of the property involved, the average value per offense of auto 
theft is considerably higher than for the preceding types of crimes. In 
this connection it should be noted that 94 percent of the stolen auto- 
mobiles are recovered, whereas only 22 percent of other types of 
property stolen are shown in table 113 as recovered. 

With reference to table 114, it should be noted that the figures 
representing the number of actual offenses include attempted crimes 
in which no thefts occurred and for which no property values are 
shown. This naturally has the effect of reducing the average property 
loss per oft'ense. 

The data presented in table 114 are also portrayed in figure 20. 



Table 114. — Value of property stolen, by type of crime, January to December, 
inclusive, 1937 : 138 cities over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 15,937,029, as estimated July 1, 1933, liy the Bureau of the Census] 



Classification 


Number of 

actual 

offenses 


Value of 

property 

stolen 


Average 

value per 

offense 


Robbery . .- 


12, 659 

54, 483 

122, 530 

31,235 


$1,131,184.23 
3, 224, 792. 47 
3, 598, 189. 91 

10,412,999.96 


$89 36 


Burglary . . _. .. __ ... ... _ ... 


59. 19 


Larceny — theft ...... 


29.37 


Autotheft-. - . ... 


333. 38 






Total. 


220, 907 


18, 367, 166. 57 


83. 14 







209 




211 

Estimated Number of Major Crimes in the United States, 1936-37. 

Based ou iiumthly reports reeeivecl from law enforcement agencies 
during 1936 and 1937, there have been prepared estimates of the 
total number of serious crimes committed in the entire Ignited States 
during those years. The i)<)pulati<)n area represented by the reports 
ou which the estimates were based is in excess of 60,000,000 for each 
3'ear. 

The tabulation refers to the crimes listed as major crimes. It is 
recognized that many of the larcenies reported were minor in character. 
However, it is believed that this is more than compensated for by the 
fact that miscellaneous types of serious crimes, such as embezzlement, 
fraud, receiving stolen property, forgery, counterfeiting, arson, drug 
violations, carrying concealed weapons, etc., have not been repre- 
sented in the estimates. It is, therefore, believed that the estimated 
total of major crimes for each year is conservative. 

The compilation reveals increases for all types of crimes except 
murder and aggravated assault. The estimated total of 1,415,816 
major crimes for 1937 is 82,290 in excess of the 1,333,526 for 1936. 
This represents an increase of 6.2 percent during 1937. The daily 
average number of serious crimes during 1936 was 3,644 as com- 
pared with 3,879 during 1937. This indicates an increase during 
1937 of 235 major crimes daily. 

The data in table 115 are also presented in figures 21 and 22. 

Table 115. — Estimated mimber of major crimes in the United States, 1936-37 



Offense 



Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

Manslaughter by negligence . 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 



Number of offenses 



1936 



7,894 

5,348 

7,881 

55, 660 

47, 534 



1937 



7,859 

5,705 

8,518 

59, 786 

45,478 



Offense 



Number of offenses 



Burglary.. 

Larceny 

Auto theft- 

Totnl 



1936 



278, 823 
716,674 
213,712 



1, 333, 526 



1937 



292, 870 
780,031 
215, 569 

1,415,816 



212 




213 




arently lived within the 

rrested subsequent to the 

76.4 percent of the 2,802 

subsequently arrested 

the parole period. 

ed while on parole, 

ed \\ith murder, 

^ the data 
?d in the 



I 




DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Criminal History of Persons in Single Fingerprint File. 

In February 1933, the FBI established a so-called smgle finger- 
prmt file as an adjunct to its main file of fingerprint records. The 
main file contains more than 8 million sets of fingerprint records and 
the average rate of increase is more than 5,000 daily. However, the 
number of individuals represented in the single fingerprint file is defi- 
nitely restricted due to certain technical reasons pertaining to criminal 
investigations. As of December 31, 1937, there were 13,602 persons 
represented in the single fingerprint file. They were selected because 
they had been arrested for or convicted of kidnaping, extortion, bank 
robbery or bank burglary, or had knowii gang affiliations. 

The data on file contain highly interesting information concerning 
the previous criminal history of the persons represented. Examina- 
tion of their records shows that the 13,602 individuals had been 
convicted of 23,869 crimes, as follows: 

yumber 
Offense: ' of convictions 

Criminal homicide 418 

Rape 145 

Robbery 4,871 

Aggravated assault - 219 

Minor assault . 457 

Burglary 2,451 

Larceny 3, 325 

Autotheft 894 

Kidnaping 704 

Blackmail 128 

Extortion 939 

Forgery and counterfeiting 640 

Embezzlement and fraud 650 

Receiving stolen property 192 

Carrying concealed weapons 500 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 144 

Other sex offenses 101 

Neglect of family and children . 55 

Narcotic drug laws 407 

Liquor laws 1,083 

Drunkenness 616 

Disorderly conduct 851 

Vagrancy 1, 044 

Gambling 151 

Driving while intoxicated 68 

Other traffic violations 506 

Miscellaneous 1, 437 

Not stated 873 

Total 23,869 

The records show further that 2,802 of the criminals were recipients 
of paroles on various occasions during their careers of lawlessness. 
In 1,014 cases they were thereafter arrested before the expiration of 
the parole period. In other words, 36.2 percent of the paroles ex- 
tended to these major criminals were violated by the recipients. In 

(214) 



215 

addition, thorc were 1,120 persons who apparently lived within the 
law during the parole period hut who were arrested suhsequent to the 
expiration of the parole. This means that 7G.4 percent of the 2,802 
major criminals who were given paroles were suhsequently arrested 
either while on ])arole or after the expiration of the i)arolc period. 

With reference to the 1,014 individuals arrested while on parole, 
the records indicate that two-thirds of them were charged with murder, 
rape, rohbery, kidnaping, and other felonies. 

For convenient reference there is set out a summary of the data 
pertaining to the criminal iiistories of the persons represented in the 
single fingerprint file. 

1. Number of persons represented in the single fingerprint 

file (Dec. 31, 1937) 13,602 

2. Nunit)t'r who had received i)ardons, paroles, probationary" 

or suspended sentences 4, 079 

3. Percent who received pardons, paroles, etc 30. 

4. Number who had received paroles 2, 802 

5. Number subsequently arrested while on parole 1, 014 

6. Percent of parolees arrested while on parole 36. 2 

7. Number arrested after expiration of parole period 1, 126 

8. Total i)arolees arrested on parole or subsequent to parole 

period 2, 140 

9. Percent of parolees arrested on parole or subsequent to 

parole period 76. 4 

It should be noted that the preceding data are probably not entirely 
complete, because full information concerning the previous criminal 
activities of the persons represented are probably not on file. The 
amount of information on file in the fingerprint di\'ision of the FBI 
is, of course, dependent upon the contribution of data pertaining to 
criminal activities by local officials. 

Fingerprint arrest records for 1937. 

During the calendar year 1937 the FBI examined 520,153 arrest 
records as evidenced by fingerprint cards, in order to obtain data 
concerning the age, sex, race, and previous criminal histories of the 
persons represented. The compilation has been limited to instances 
of arrests for violations of State laws and municipal ordinances. In 
other words, fingerprint cards representing arrests for violations of 
Federal laws or representing commitments to any type of penal 
institution have been excluded from this tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint records examined was considerably 
larger than for prior years, which were as follows: 1936, 461,589; 
1935, 392,251 . The increase in the number of arrest records examined 
should not necessarily be construed as reflecting an increase in the 
amount of crime, nor as an increase in the number of persons arrested, 
since it quite probably is at least partially the result of an increase in 
the number of local agencies contiibuting fingerprint records to the 
Identification Division of the F B I. The number of police depart- 
ments; peace officers, and law enforcement agencies throughout the 
I'uited States and foreign countries voluntarilv contributing finger- 
prints to the FBI as of Decend)er 31, 1937, was 10,674. Com- 
parable figures for prior years are as follows: 1936, 10,229 ; 1935, 9,085. 
The tabidation of data from fingerprint cards obviously does not 
include all persons arrested, since tliere are individuals taken into 
custody for whom no fingerprint cards are forwarded to Washington. 



216 

Furthermore, data pertaining to persons arrested should not be treated 
as information regarding the number of offenses committed, since 
two or more persons may be involved in the joint commission of a 
single offense, and on the other hand one person may be arrested and 
charged with the commission of several separate crimes. 

More than 29 percent of the arrest records examined during 1937 
represented persons taken into custodj^ for murder, robbery, assault, 
burglary, larceny, and auto theft. Arrests for major violations are 
reflected by the following figures: 

Criminal homicide 6, 945 

Robbery 13,779 

Assault 29,66^ 

Burglary 32,438 

Larceny (except auto theft) 59,281 

Autotheft 13,274 

Embezzlement and fraud 15,846 

Stolen property (receiving, etc.) 3, 466 

Forgery and counterfeiting 7, 382 

Rape 5, 931 

Narcotic drug laws 3, 996 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 6, 168 

Driving while intoxicated 22,385 

Gambling 7, 176 

Arson 839 

Total .. 228,575 

Sex.— Of the 520,153 arrest records examined, 484,177 (93.1 per- 
cent) represented men and 35,976 (6.9 percent) represented women. 
For all types of crimes except commercialized vice the number of men 
arrested was larger than the number of women. However, a compari- 
son of the figures representing an average group of 100 men arrested 
with those for an average group of 100 women arrested indicates that 
there were more women than men charged with murder, assault, and 
the use of narcotic drugs. Also, the same type of comparison indi- 
cates a somewhat larger ratio of arrests of women for larceny, but for 
other types of crimes against property, such as robbery, burglary, and 
auto theft, men predominate. The comparison further reveals that 
13 of each 1,000 women arrested and fingerprinted were charged with 
driving while intoxicated, whereas 43 of each 1,000 men arrested were 
charged with that type of violation. Data for individual types of 
crimes may be found in the following table. 

As mentioned in the preceding paragraph, 6.9 percent of the arrest 
records examined during 1937 represented women. This is a de- 
crease as compared with 1936 (7.3 percent), but the 1937 figure is the 
same as the proportion of women arrested during 1934 and 1935. 



217 



Table 116. — Distribuiion of arrests by sex, Jan. 1-Dec. SI, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Kobbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft - 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen properly; buying, receiving, etc. 

Arson - 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex olTenses _ 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Ollenses against family and children... 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws - 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct. 

Drunkenness.. 

Vagrancy.. 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated- 

All other offenses 

Total 



Number 



Total 



6. 945 
13. 779 
29. 669 
32, 438 
59,281 
13, 274 
15, 846 

3,466 
839 

7, 382 
5.931 
5,711 
8.986 
3.996 
6,168 
6,277 
8,668 

22, 385 
4,048 

30 
6,647 

23. 073 
85. 077 
45. 044 

7,176 
59. 056 

6,007 
32, 954 



520, 153 



Male 



6,289 

13,216 

27. 134 

31.915 

54, 946 

13, 082 

15, 169 

3, 232 

771 

6,939 

5.931 

1.472 

7.683 

3.087 

5.967 

6.142 

7,483 

21,930 

3. 990 

30 

6, 534 

20, 337 

80,791 

42, 182 

6,735 

54, 395 

5.612 

31. 183 

484, 177 



Female 



056 
563 

2,535 
523 

4,335 
192 
677 
234 
68 
443 



4.239 

1. 303 

909 

201 

135 

1,185 

455 

58 



113 
2,736 
4,286 
2,862 

441 
4,661 

395 
1,771 



35, 976 



Total 



1.3 
2.6 
5.7 
6.2 

11.4 
2.5 
3.0 
0.7 
0.2 
1.4 
1.1 
1.1 
1.7 
0.8 
1.2 
1.2 
1.7 
4.3 
0.8 

(') 
1.3 
4.4 

16.4 
8.7 
1.4 

11.4 
1.2 
6.3 



100.0 



Percent 



Male 



1.3 
2.7 
5.6 
6.6 

11.4 
2.7 
3.1 
0.7 
0. 
1. 
1. 
0. 
1. 
0. 
1. 
1. 
1. 
4. 
0. 

(') 
1.4 
4.2 

16.7 
8.7 
1.4 

11.2 
1.2 
6.4 



100.0 



Female 



1.8 
1.0 
7.0 
1.5 
12.0 
0.5 
1.9 
0.0 
0.2 
1.2 



11.8 
3.6 
2.5 
0.6 
0.4 
3.3 
1.3 
0.2 



0.3 
7.6 

11.9 
8.0 
1.2 

13.0 
1.1 
4.9 



100.0 



I Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



Age. — From 1932 to the middle of 1935 age 19 was the group in 
which the largest number of arrests occurred. Since the middle of 
1935 there have been more arrests of persons age 21 and 22 than for 
any other groups. During 1937 there were more arrests for age 22 
than for any other single age group. In this respect the record for 
1937 is the same as the record for 1936. The groups for which the 
largest number of arrests occurred during 1937 are as follows: 

Nu mber of 
Age: arrests 

22 22,875 

21 22,244 

23 21,930 

19 21,642 

The compilation for 1936 reflected that 17.4 percent of the persons 
arrested were less than 21 years old, but during 1937 the proportion 
was 18.0 percent. In addition to the 93,853 persons less than 21 
j^ears old arrested during 1937, there were 87,309 (16.8 percent) be- 
tween the ages of 21 and 24, making a total of 181,162 (34.8 percent) 
less than 25 years old. Persons arrested who were between the ages 
of 25 and 29 numbered 87,410 (16.8 percent). This makes a total of 
268,572 (51.6 percent) less than 30 years old. (With reference to the 
ages of persons represented by fingerprint cards received at the 
F B I, it should be borne in mind that the number of arrest records 
is doubtless incomplete in the lower age groups, because in some 
jurisdictions the practice is not to fingerprint youthful individuals.) 

The number of arrests for ages 16-24 is shown in figure 23. 



218 



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Youths less than 21 years old were frequently charged with of- 
fenses agamst property, particularly robbery, burglary, larceny, and 
auto theft. This is clearly indicated by the following tabulation: 

Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups 



Age group 


All of- 
fenses 


Criminal 
homicide 


Robbery 


Burglary 


Larceny 


Auto theft 


Under 21 . 


18.0 
33.6 
25.4 
14.2 
8.6 
.2 


13.0 
37.1 

27.0;. 

13.9 

8.9. 

.1 


28.2 

45.6 

19.6 

5.1 

1.3 

.2 


42.1 

33.9 

15.8 

5.8 

2.2 

.2 


30.3 
32.5 
21.1 
10.4 
5.6 
.1 


61.8 


21-29 


33.8 


30-39 . . 


10.5 


40-49 '.-^,-> 

50 and over.,., --, 

Unknown ■■ i 


3.0 

.8 
.1 






Total L-... 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







Note.— The data in the preceding compilation are also shown in fig. 24. 

The predominance of youthful persons among those charged with 
offenses against property is further indicated by the fact that during 
1937 there were 146,305 persons of all ages arrested for crimes against 
property (robbery, burglary, larceny, auto theft, embezzlement and 
fraud, forgery and counterfeiting, receiving stolen property, and 
arson), and that 45,303 (31.0 percent) of them were less than 21 
years old. During 1936 28.5 percent of the total crimes against 
property were committed by persons under 21 years of age. This 
indicates an increase in the proportion of such crimes committed by 
youths. 

Further indication of the large part played by youthful persons in 
the commission of crimes against property is seen in the figures show- 
ing that 34.8 percent of all persons arrested were less than 25 years 
of age. However, persons less than 25 years old numbered 53.9 
percent of those charged with robbery, 61.6 percent of those charged 
with burglary, 47.6 percent of those charged with larceny, and 73 
percent of those charged with auto theft. One-half of all persons 
arrested for crimes against property during 1937 were under 25 years 
of age. 



221 




222 



Table 118. — Number and percentage of arrests of persons under 25 years of age, 

male and female, Jan. 1-Dec. SI, 19S7 



Oflense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft. -_ 

Embezzlement and fraud-_ 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children... 

Liquor laws ... 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling -._ 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other oflenses 

Total 



Total 

number of 

persons 

arrested 


Number 

under 21 

years of age 


Total 

number 

under 25 

years of age 


Percentage 

under 21 

years of age 


Total per- 
centage 
under 25 

years of age 


6,945 


902 


2,094 


13.0 


30.2 


13, 779 


3,884 


7,421 


28.2 


53.9 


29, 669 


3,256 


8,162 


11.0 


27.5 


32, 438 


13, 661 


19, 995 


42.1 


61.6 


59, 281 


17, 943 


28, 228 


30.3 


47.6 


13, 274 


6,872 


9,686 


51.8 


73.0 


15, 846 


1,054 


3,479 


6.7 


22.0 


3,466 


635 


1,174 


18.3 


33.9 


839 


121 


225 


14.4 


26.8 


7,382 


1,133 


2,342 


15.3 


31.7 


5,931 


1,427 


2,782 


24.1 


46.9 


5,711 


541 


1,956 


9.5 


34.2 


8,986 


1, 225 


2,675 


13.6 


29.8 


3,996 


311 


892 


7.8 


22.3 


6,168 


1,090 


2,229 


17.7 


36.1 


6,277 


238 


1,122 


3.8 


17.9 


8,668 


625 


1,793 


7.2 


20.7 


22, 385 


955 


3,968 


4.3 


17.7 


4,048 


704 


1,737 


17.4 


42.9 


30 


4 


11 


13.3 


36.7 


6,647 


1,206 


2,798 


18.1 


42.1 


23, 073 


3,305 


7,445 


14.3 


32.3 


85, 077 


3,659 


12, 267 


4.3 


14.4 


45, 044 


7,239 


15, 830 


16.1 


35.1 


7,176 


466 


1,337 


6.5 


18.6 


59, 056 


12, 030 


23, 105 


20.4 


39.1 


6,007 


1,049 


2,110 


17.5 


35.1 


32, 954 


8,318 


14,299 


25.2 


43.4 


520, 153 


93, 853 


181, 162 


18.0 


34.8 



The age distribution of males arrested during 1937 is substantially 
the same as that for all persons arrested, due to the fact that males 
constitute more than 93 percent of the total arrest records examined. 
For females, the largest number of arrests occurred at age 22. In 
this respect the age distribution for females is similar to the distribu- 
tion representing all persons arrested. However, the proportion of 
women arrested between the ages of 21 and 29 was 44.3 percent, 
whereas for all persons it was only 33.6 percent. Similarly, of all 
persons arrested, 51.6 percent were found to be less than 30 years old, 
but 62.3 percent of the women arrested w^ere under 30 years of age. 



223 



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225 

Recidivism.- Thero were 220,304 (42.4 percent) of the 520,158 
persons arrested during 19)^7 wlio alrciuly had prior iiiigerprint cards 
on file in tiie IckMitification Division of tlie F B I. In achlition, there 
were 9,279 current records bearing; notations rehitive to prior criminal 
activities of persons arrested (hii'in^ 1937, althoui^h their fingerprints 
had not previously been on file. This makes a total of 229,583 persons 
arrested during 1937 concerning whom there was information on file 
dealing with prior criminal activities, and the records showed that 
149,091 had been convicted previously of one or more crimes. This 
nund)er is 04.9 percent of the 229,583 records containing data concern- 
ing prior criminal activities, and 28.7 percent of the 520,153 arrest 
records examined. 

In more than one-half of the cases the previous convictions were 
based on major violations as indicated by the following figures: 

Criminal homicide 1, 234 

Robbery - 5,600 

Assault 7, 336 

Burglary 16, 228 

Larceny (and related offenses) 34, 930 

Arson ,', 180 

Forgery and counterfeiting 4, 410 

Rape. - 1, 067 

Narcotic drug laws 2, 684 

Weapons (carrying, etc.) 1, 683 

Driving wliile into.xicated 3, 258 

Total 78,610 

There were 29 persons arrested for murder or manslaughter during 
1937 whose criminal history revealed that they had on a prior occasion 
been convicted of criminal homicide in some degree. As already 
indicated, more than one-half of the total prior convictions reflected 
in the tabulation were based on major crimes, and the tabulation 
further indicates a general tendency for recidivists to repeat the same 
type of crime. 

The 149,091 persons whose records revealed one or more prior con- 
victions were found to have been convicted of a total of 356,675 
offenses. In 160,253 instances the convictions were of major crimes, 
and in 196,422 cases the convictions w-ere of less serious violations of 
the law. 

Of the 35,976 females arrested, only 31 percent had previous finger- 
print cards on file, as compared with 42.4 percent for all persons 
arrested during 1937. Similarly, women represented only 4.6 percent 
of the 149,091 previous convictions found in the records. Since 
women represented 6.9 percent of the total persons whose arrest 
records w^ere examined during the year, the percentage of women 
among those whose records show^ed previous convictions is compara- 
tively low. 



226 

Table 121. — Number with 'previous fingerprint records, arrests, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 

19S7 





Total 


Male 


Female 


Offense cliarged 


Number 
arrested 


Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 


Number 
arrested 


Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 


Number 
arrested 


Previous 
finger- 
print 
record 


Criminal homicide- - 


6, 945 

13,779 

29, 669 

32, 438 

59,281 

13, 274 

15, 846 

3,466 

839 

7,382 

5,931 

5,711 

8,986 

3,996 

6,168 

6,277 

8,668 

22, 385 

4,048 

30 

6,647 

23, 073 

85, 077 

45, 044 

7,176 

59, 056 

6,007 

32. 954 


1,677 

7,040 

10, 562 

14, 004 

24, 263 
5,358 
7,259 
1,114 

207 
3,665 
1,737 
2,799 
2.448 
2, 526 
2,109 
2,064 
3.359 
6,102 
1,037 
8 
2,154 
9,347 
39, 406 
26, 198 
1,984 

25, 570 
2,541 

13, 766 


6,289 

13, 216 

27, 134 

31,915 

54, 946 

13,082 

15, 169 

3,232 

771 

6, 939 

5,931 

1,472 

7,683 

3.087 

5,967 

6,142 

7,483 

21,930 

3,990 

30 

6,534 

20, 337 

80, 791 

42. 182 
6,735 

54, 395 
5,612 

31. 183 


1,581 

6,778 

10,010 

13,887 

23, 034 

5,309 

7.053 

1.076 

201 

3, 551 

1,737 

662 

2,170 

2,137 

2,062 

2,051 

3,079 

6,013 

1,030 

8 

2, 125 

8,624 

37, 859 

25, 012 

1, 925 

24, 392 

2,416 

13, 360 


656 
563 

2,535 
523 

4, 335 
192 
677 
234 
68 
443 


93 


Robbery - 


262 


Assault 


5.52 


Burelarv — breaking or entering 


117 


Larcenv — theft - 


1,229 


Autotheft --- 


49 


Embezzlement and fraud 


206 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc— - 
Arson - 


38 
6 


Forgery and counterfeiting _ 


114 


Rape 




Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses 


4,239 

1,303 

909 

201 

135 

1,185 

455 

.58 


2,137 
278 


Narcotic drus laws 


389 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws - 


47 
13 

280 


Driving while intoxicated 


89 


Road and driving laws 


7 


Parking violations 

Other traflBc and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct.- . - - 




113 
2,736 
4,286 
2,862 

441 
4,661 

395 
1,771 


29 
723 


Drunkenness .... 


1,547 


Vagrancy - 


1,186 


Gambling . 


59 




1,178 


Not stated 


125 




406 






Total 


520, 153 


220, 304 


484, 177 


209, 142 


35. 976 


11, 162 







227 

Table 122. — Percentage icitli previous fingerprint records, arrests, male and feniale, 

Jan. 1 to Dec. SI, 1937 



Offense 



Narcotic drug laws 

Vaprjmcy.. 

Robbery 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Drunkenness 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Suspicion 

Burgbiry— breaking or entering 

All other olTenses 

Larceny— theft... 

Disorderly conduct 

Auto theft.- -- 

Liquor laws 



Percent 



63.2 
58.2 
51. 1 
49.6 
49.0 
46.3 
45.8 
43.3 
43.2 
41.8 
40.9 
40.5 
40.4 
38.8 



Offense 



Assault 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

OlTenses against family and children. . 
Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 
Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Rape -- 

Ciarabling 

Driving while intoxicated 

Other sex offenses 

Parking violations'.. 

Road and driving laws 

Arson 

Oriminal homicide 



Percent 



35.6 
34.2 
32.9 
32. 4 
32.1 
29.3 
27.6 
27.3 
27.2 
26.7 
25.6 
24.7 
24.1 



'Only 30 fingerprint cards were received representing arrests for violation of parking regulations. 



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Table 126. — Number of cases in which fingerprint records show one or more prior 
convictions, and the total of prior convictions disclosed by the records, male and 
female, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape - 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. . 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



Number of 
records show- 
ing one or 
more prior 
convictions 



1,001 
4,756 
7,206 
9,744 

16,675 

3,405 

4, 248 

741 

154 

2,414 

1,171 

1,804 

1,642 

1,940 

1,460 

1,177 

2,143 

4,057 

661 

6 

1,403 

6,536 

29, 783 

16, 643 
1,107 

15, 675 
1.694 
9,845 



149, 091 



Number of 
prior con- 
victions of 
major 
offenses 



1,103 

6,877 

7,846 

15, 250 

25, 642 

4,646 

6,235 

968 

152 

4,237 

1,361 

2,281 

1,867 

4,812 

1,720 

1,050 

1,307 

2,551 

503 

9 

1, 191 

5,602 

15, 022 

15, 430 

1,150 

18, 730 

2,238 

10, 473 



160, 253 



Number of 
prior con- 
victions of 
minor 
offenses 



812 

4,591 

7,701 

8,536 

19, 222 

2,708 

3,555 

710 

134 

1,528 

889 

1,498 

1,631 

2,016 

1,383 

1,009 

2,669 

4,623 

627 

11 

1,491 

10, 147 

60, 893 

27, 172 

909 

17, 055 

1,615 

11,287 



196, 422 



Total num- 
ber of prior 
convictions 
disclosed 



1,915 

11,468 

15, 647 

23, 786 

44, 864 

7,354 

9,790 

1,678 

286 

5,765 

2,250 

3,779 

3,498 

6,828 

3,103 

2, 059 

3,976 

7,174 

1,130 

20 

2,682 

15, 749 

75, 915 

42, 602 

2,059 

35, 785 

3,853 

21, 760 



356, 675 



Race. — Whites were represented by 383,306 of the records examined 
and Negroes by 113,524. The remaining races were represented as 
follows: Indian, 2,787; Chinese, 1,120; Japanese, 228; Mexican, 
16,897; all others, 2,291. 

The significance of the figures showmg the number of Negroes 
arrested as compared with the number of whites can best be indicated 
in terms of the number of each in the general population of the 
country. Exclusive of those under 15 years of age, there were accord- 
ing to the 1930 decennial census, 8,041,014 Negroes, 13,069,192 
foreign-born whites, and 64,365,193 native whites in the United 
States. Of each 100,000 Negroes, 1,412 were arrested and finger- 
printed during 1937, whereas the corresponding figure for native 
whites was 517 and for foreign-born whites 212. Figures for indi- 
vidual types of violations may be found in the following tabulations. 
It should be observed in connection with the foregoing data that the 
figure for native whites includes the immediate descendants of for- 
eign-born individuals. Persons desiring to make a thorough study 
of the comparative amounts of crime committed by native whites 
and foreign-born whites should employ available compilations show- 
ing the number of instances in which offenders are of foreign or mixed 
parentage. 



235 



Table 127. — Distribution of arrests according to race, inalc and female, 

Jan. l-Dec. 31, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide..- 

Robbery 

Assault - 

Burfilary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

etc 

Arson .-- 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialiEed vice- 
Other sex olTeuses 

Narcotic drug laws .- 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.-. 
Offenses against family and children- . 

Licjuor laws -. 

Driving while intoxicated - 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.- 

Disorderly conduct - 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

.\11 other offenses 

Total 









Race 








White 


Negro 


Indi- 
an 


Chi- 
nese 


Japa- 
nese 


Mexi- 
can 


All 
others 


4, 258 


2,399 


27 


5 


8 


204 


44 


9. 294 


3,871 


47 





/ 


415 


136 


16. 19H 


12, IIS 


116 


19 


18 


953 


247 


23, 032 


8.422 


106 


9 


7 


720 


142 


41,161 


16, 188 


228 


20 


6 


1,463 


215 


10. 956 


1,780 


74 


1 


4 


431 


28 


13,638 


1,738 


48 


12 


8 


351 


51 


2.427 


918 


i 


8 




90 


16 


697 
6. 583 


121 
654 


2 

29 






19 
74 


22" 


5 


15 


4.413 


1, 1.55 


53 


9 


2 


231 


68 


3. 966 


1,600 


40 


4 


1 


82 


18 


7. 421 


1,2.52 


35 


21 


2 


212 


43 


2, 193 


797 


18 


609 


1 


303 


75 


3. 370 


2, 502 


14 


8 


5 


191 


78 


5,217 


834 


17 




2 


184 


23 


4. 873 


3, 655 


20 


i.5 


4 


93 


8 


19,355 


1,.561 


218 


5 


21 


1, 165 


60 


2.8.50 


929 


32 




3 


198 


36 


26 
4, 974 


3 
1,367 








1 
237 


38' 


22 


5 


4 


16. 099 


5, 903 


153 


7 


5 


799 


107 


69, 372 


9, 654 


849 


14 


67 


4, 979 


142 


34, 388 


8,630 


208 


48 


8 


1, 526 


236 


4,088 


2,680 


4 


207 


11 


85 


101 


42, 792 


14, 563 


255 


52 


7 


1,202 


185 


4, 703 


1,162 


37 


5 




77 


23 


24, 962 


7,068 


128 


23 


12 


612 


149 


383. 306 


113. 524 


2,787 


1.120 


228 


16, 897 


2,291 



Total 

all 
races 



6,945 
13, 779 
29,669 
32,438 
59,281 
13,274 
15,840 

3,466 

839 

7,382 

5,931 

5,711 

8,986 

3,996 

6,168 

6,277 

8, 668 

22, 385 

4,048 

30 

6.647 

23,073 

85, 077 

45,044 

7,176 

59, 056 

6,007 

32.954 

520, 153 



Table 128. — Distribution of arrests according to race, male, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide -- 

Robbery 

Assault- -- 

Burglary— breaking or entering - - 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud-.- 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice- 
Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws - 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Offenses against family and children. - 

Liquor laws - 

Driving while intoxicated - 

Road and driving laws - 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.. 

Disorderly conduct - 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy - 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated - 

All other offenses 

Total 









Race 








White 
4.038 


Negro 


Indi- 
an 


Chi- 
nese 


Japa- 
nese 


Mexi- 
can 


All 
others 


1.979 


21 


4 


8 


197 


42 


8,999 


3, 024 


43 


9 


7 


404 


130 


15,613 


10, 194 


110 


19 


18 


937 


243 


22, 72S 


8,217 


103 


9 


7 


709 


142 


38, 820 


14, 30S 


209 


20 


6 


1, 397 


180 


10, 807 


1,746 


70 


1 


4 


426 


28 


13,120 


1.587 


46 


12 


8 


347 


49 


2. 324 


791 


7 


8 




86 


16 


652 
6,243 


100 
559 


1 
28 






18 
69 


22" 


5 


13 


4,413 


1,155 


53 


9 


2 


231 


08 


965 


4.58 


6 


4 


1 


23 


16 


6, 433 


■ 958 


28 


19 


2 


203 


40 


1,536 


595 


11 


608 


1 


2r,2 


74 


3.301 


2.371 


14 


8 


5 


190 


78 


5,115 


805 


16 




2 


181 


23 


4,517 


2.834 


20 


15 


4 


85 


8 


18, 941 


1, 532 


215 


5 


21 


1, 150 


60 


2,812 


909 


32 




3 


198 


30 


26 
4,887 


3 
1.344 








1 
234 


38" 


22 


5 


4 


14, .503 


4, 815 


137 


7 


6 


771 


99 


66, .331 


8, 582 


786 


14 


65 


4,877 


130 


32, 338 


7, 940 


177 


48 


7 


1,444 


228 


3, 954 


2.373 


4 


207 


11 


85 


101 


39, 569 


13. 224 


220 


50 


7 


1, 102 


103 


4,409 


1,069 


35 


5 




76 


18 


23, 709 


6,590 


119 


22 


'n 


593 


139 


361, 103 


100, 662 


2,532 


1,113 


222 


16, 362 


2,183 



Total 

all 
races 



6.289 

13.216 

27, 134 

31,915 

54, 946 

13, 082 

15, 109 

3,232 

771 

6,939 

5,931 

1,472 

7,083 

3,087 

5, 907 

6,142 

7,483 

21,930 

3,990 

30 

6,534 

20, 337 

80, 791 

42, 182 

0,735 

54,395 

5,612 

31.183 



484, 177 



236 

Table 129.- — Distribution of arrests according to race, female, Jan. 1-Dec. SI, 1937 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. .. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while into.xicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations. 

Other trafHc and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy .-. 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



Total- 



Race 



White 



220 
295 
585 
304 
2,341 
149 
518 
103 
45 
340 



3,001 
988 
657 

69 
102 
356 
414 

38 



87 
1,596 
3,041 
2,050 

134 
3,223 

294 
1,253 



22. 203 



Negro 



420 

247 

1,924 

205 

1,880 

34 

151 

127 

21 

95 



1,142 

294 

202 

131 

29 

821 

29 

20 



23 

1,088 

1,072 

690 

307 

1, 339 

93 

478 



12, 862 



Indi- 
an 



6 
4 
6 
3 

19 
4 
2 



35 

7 
7 



16 
63 
31 



35 
2 
9 



255 



Chi- 
nese 



Japa- 
nese 



Mexi- 
can 



7 

11 

16 

11 

66 

5 

4 

4 

1 

5 



59 
9 

41 
1 
3 
8 
9 



3 

28 
102 

82 



40 

1 

19 



535 



All 
others 



29 
"2 



22 

5 

10 



108 



Total 

all 
races 



656 
563 

2, 535 
523 

4,335 
192 
677 
234 
68 
443 


4,239 

1,303 
909 
201 
135 

1,185 

455 

58 



113 

2,736 

4,286 

2,862 
441 

4,661 
395 

1,771 



35, 976 



Table 130. — Number of arrests of Negroes and whites in proportion to the number 
of each in the general population of the country, male and female, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 
1937, rate per 100,000 of population 

[Excluding those under 15 years of age] 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglp-y- breaking or entering . 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson ._ 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

, Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. . . 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling . 

Suspicion " 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



Native white 



(') 



5.6 

12.8 

20.1 

33.0 

58.6 

16.0 

17.7 

2.9 

.8 

9.3 

6.0 

5.7 

9.6 

3.1 

4.4 

7.1 

6.4 

26.8 

4.1 

7.0 
21.8 
86.7 
46.8 

4.8 
58.6 

6.6 
35.0 



517.4 



Foreign-born 
white 



4.1 
2.8 

21.0 
7.3 

18.6 
2.1 
6.9 
3.7 
1.0 
2.4 
3.1 
1.1 
7.4 
1.0 
3.4 
4.1 
5.0 
8.7 
1.1 



2.3 

12.8 
36.7 
16.4 

3.5 
19.1 

2.5 
14.1 



212.2 



Negro 



0) 



29.8 

48.1 

150.7 

104.7 

201.3 

22.1 

21.6 

11.4 

1.5 

8.1 

14.4 

19.9 

15.6 

9.9 

31.1 

10.4 

45.5 

19.4 

11.6 

17.0 

73.4 

120.1 

107.3 

33.3 

181.1 

14.5 

87.9 



1,411.8 



» Less than Ho of 1 per 100,000. 



237 

Table 131. — Niiynbcr of native lohiles, number of foreign-born ivhites and number of 
Negroes arrested and fingerprinted bu age groups, t)iale and female, Jan. 1-Dec. 
31, 1937 



Age 


Number arrested 


Number of arrests per 
the general populat 
I'nited States 


100.000 of 
ion of tlie 




Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born white 


Negro 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
boru while 


Negro 


15 


2.301 

(i, 997 

10.769 

13.929 

14, 78.5 
12.982 
14.844 

15. 1.59 
14.261 
13, 726 
55, 153 
44, 791 
38, 652 
27,241 
18, 290 
26,841 

232 


38 

148 

219 

216 

264 

196 

244 

288 

296 

335 

1, 932 

2,753 

3,666 

4,494 

4,450 

8,152 

24 


914 

2, 682 
4, 1.57 
4,711 
4.984 

4, 163 
4.944 
5.113 

5. 232 
5, 032 

22, 354 

15,991 

13, 765 

7, 706 

4.709 

5.520 

199 


116.2 
346.3 
552.4 
707. 9 
791.1 
714.9 
810.6 
8.50. 8 
833.4 
824. 7 
730.2 
6.52. 7 
589. 9 
494.9 
384.4 
185.4 
343.7 


08. 9 

289.8 
335. 5 
269.7 
294. 1 
183. 3 
209.4 
223.3 
205. 4 
202. 5 
189.2 
220. 8 
224. 7 
265.3 
284.3 
165.9 
244.3 


380.1 


16 


1, 040. 6 


17 - :--- 


1, 696. 8 


18 


1,7.50.4 


19 


2, 091. 9 


20 - 


1.610.2 


21 


2, 16.5. 5 


22 


2, 050. 2 


23 


2.231.2 


24 


2, 164. 7 


25-29 - 


2, 085. 7 


30-34 


1,849.7 


35-39 


1.545. 1 


40-44 


1,121.0 


45-49 --- 


747.4 


50 and over 


386.3 


Unknown . 


1, 449. 3 






Total 


330,953 


27,715 


112,176 


514.2 


212. 1 


1, 395. 







Table 132. — Percentage distribution of arrests by age, of native whites, foreign-born 
tvhites and Xegroes, male and female, Jan. 1-Dec. 31, 1937 





Number arrested 


Percent 


Age 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born 

white 


Negro 


Native 
white 


Foreign- 
born 
white 


Negro 


15 and under 21, 


61,763 
57, 990 
55, 1.53 
44, 791 
38, 652 
27, 241 
18, 290 
26, 841 
232 


1,081 
1,163 
1,932 
2,753 
3,666 
4,494 
4.450 
8,152 
24 


21.611 

20. .321 

22; 354 

15.991 

13, 765 

7.706 

4.709 

5,520 

199 


18.7 

17.5 

16.7 

13.5 

11.7 

8.2 

5.5 

8.1 

.1 


3.9 

4.2 

7.0 

9.9 

13.2 

16.2 

16. 1 

29.4 

.1 


19.3 


21-24 .- . . .- 


18.1 


25-29 


19.9 


30-34. 


14.2 


35-39 .. 


12.3 


40-44 


6.9 


4.V-49 


4.2 


50 and over ... 


4.9 


Unknown 


.2 






Total 


330, 953 


27,715 


112, 176 


100.0 


100. 


100.0 







At the end of December 1937, there were 7,988,636 fingerprint 
records and 9,262,061 index cards containing the names and aliases of 
individuals on file in the Identification Division of the F B I. Of 
each 100 fingerprint cards received during 1937, more than 55 were 
identified with those on file in the Bureau. Fugitives numbering 
6,307 were identified through fingerprint records during this same 
period, and interested law enforcement officials were immediately 
notified of the whereabouts of those fugitives. As of December 31, 
1937, there were 10,674 police departments, peace officers, and law- 
enforcement agencies throughout the United States and foreign 
countries voluntarily contributing fingerprints to the FBI. 



238 
INDEX TO VOLUME VIII, UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

[All references are to page numbers] 

Age of offenders. {See Arrests.) 

Annual crime trends: Page 

Cities grouped by location 62-65 

Cities grouped by size 6-8, 56-58, 113-114, 190-191 

Estimated total number of major crimes, 1935-37 20-21, 211-213 

Arrests— based on fingerprint records 38-50, 95-106, 172-182, 214-237 

Age of offenders 39-44, 96-99, 173-176, 217-224 

Race of offenders 48-50, 104-106, 180-182, 234-237 

Recidivism 44-48, 99-104, 176-180, 225-234 

Sex of offenders 39, 96, 173, 216-217 

Arrests. {See Persons charged and persons released.) 

Classification of offenses 1-2, 51-52, 107-108, 183-184 

Cleared by arrest, offenses 23-27, 32-33, 37 

By geographic divisions 149-171 

Convictions, previous. {See Arrests — recidivism.) 

Crimes. {See Arrests, estimated number, offenses, persons charged, per- 
sons found guilty, and persons released.) 

Crime rates, relation to number of police employees 72-73 

Criminal history of persons in single fingerprint file 214-215 

Employees, number of police 74-90 

Number of, and relation to crime rates 72-73 

Fingerprint records 38-50, 95-106, 172-182, 214-237 

Offenses known to the police: 

Annual variations 6-8, 56-58, 62-65, 113-114, 190-191 

Cities grouped by location 9-11, 59-65, 115-117, 192-194 

Cities grouped by location and size 195 

Cities grouped by size 4-5, 54-55, 110-111, 18&-187 

Cleared by arrest 23-27, 32-33, 37 

Cleared by arrest, by geographic divisions 149-171 

Divided as to time and place and value of property stolen 16-17, 

69, 121-122, 205 

Individual cities over 100,000 in population 12-14, 

65-67, 90-94, 118-120, 196-201 

Individual cities over 25,000 in population 125-148, 196-201 

Monthly variations 6, 56, 112, 188 

Percentage distribution 4, 14, 54, 67, 110, 120, 186, 202 

Rural areas__- 14-15, 67-68, 120-121, 202-203 

Territories and possessions of the United States 16, 68-69, 121, 204 

Persons charged (held for prosecution) 26-32 

By geographic divisions 149-171 

Persons found guilty 32-33 

Persons released (not held for prosecution) 33-37 

Police department employees 72-90 

Possessions and territories of the United States, offenses in 16, 68-69, 121, 204 

Property, vakie stolen and recovered 17-19, 70-71, 122-124, 20&-209 

Prosecution, persons held for. {See Persons charged and persons found 

guilty.) 
Race of offenders. {See Arrests.) 
Recidivism. {See Arrests.) 

Rural crime data 14-15, 67-68, 120-121, 202-203 

Reporting area, extent of 2-3,52-53, 108-109, 184-185 

Sex of offenders. {See Arrests.) 

Sheriffs' reports 14-15, 67-68, 120-121,202-203 

State crime rates. {See Offenses known — cities grouped by location.) 

State police reports 14-15, 67-68, 120-121, 202-203 

Territories and possessions of the United States, offenses in 16, 68-69, 121, 204 

Trends, annual crime: 

Cities grouped by location 62-65 

Cities grouped by size 6-8,56-58, 113-114, 190-191 

Estimated total number of major crimes, 1935-37 20-21, 211-213 

Trends, monthly crime 6, 56, 112, 188 

Value of property stolen and recovered 17-19, 70-71, 122-124, 206-209 

o 



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