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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 




ISSUCDBYTHl 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C 



Volume XIII Number I 

SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN, 1942 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume Xni— Number 1 
SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN, 1942 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




International Association of Chiefs of Police 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1942 



, [^ 'a b L 1 C ' 



MQ £5 mz 

Contents 



Page 

Summary of volume XIII, No. 1 1-2 

Classification of offenses 3 

Monthly reports: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population 

(table 1) 4-5 

Annual trends, offenses known to the police, 1941-42 (table 2) 6-7 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location 

(tables 3, 4) 8-10 

Offenses in individual cities over 100,000 in population (table 5) 11-12 

Police employee data: 

Police killed by criminals, 1941 (table 6) 13 

Number of police department employees, April 30, 1942 (tables 7, 8, 

10) 14-22 

Number of auxiliary police, April 30, 1942 (tables 9, 10) 16-22 

Annual reports: 

Offenses known and offenses cleared by arrest, 1941 — cities divided 

according to population (table 11) 23-27 

Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1941 — cities divided according 

to population (tables 12, 13) . 28-30 

Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and persons found guilty, 

1941 (table 14) 32 

Persons charged (held for prosecution), and persons found guilty, 1941 

(table 15) 31,33-34 

Persons released (not held for prosecution), 1941 — cities divided 

according to population (tables 16, 17) 34-37 

Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 1936-41 (table 18) 37 

Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

1941, by geographic divisions (tables 19, 20) 38-41 

Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1942: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested (table 21) 44 

Age distribution of persons arrested (tables 22, 23) 45-46 

Definitions of part I and part II offense classifications 47-48 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

As a wartime economy measure the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin 
will be issued semiannually beginning with this issue. 



Vol 13 
UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department of 
Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume XIII July 1942 Number 1 

SUMMARY 

Crime Trends, January-June, 1941-42. 

A 1.7 percent increase in crime during the first 6 months of 1942 
over the same period of 1941 was reflected in the montlily reports 
received at the FBI from cities over 25,000 in population. Rapes 
increased 9.9 percent; negligent manslaughters, 9.4 percent; robberies, 
5.2 percent; aggravated assaults, 4.7 [percent; ;and larcenies, 4.2 
percent. Decreases were noted as follows: Burglary, 4.3 percent; 
auto theft, 1.6 percent; and murder, 0.2 percent. 

With few exceptions, the increases were less pronounced during the 
second quarter of this year than in the first quarterly period. 

Police Department Employees and Auxiliary Police, April 30, 1942. 

For every 100 police department employees throughout the country, 
there were 175 auxiliary police enrolled on April 30, 1942 according 
to reports received from the cities over 25,000 in population. The 
range was wide among the nine geographic divisions, with the cities 
in the East South Central States reporting 479 auxiliary police and 
cities in the Middle Atlantic States reporting 98 auxiliary police for 
each 100 regular police department employees. In spite of the fact 
that many departments indicated their auxiliary poHce organization 
was in a formative stage, 167,705 auxiliary police were reported as of 
April 30 by 408 cities over 25,000 in population. 

Summary tabulations are included in this issue of the bulletin 
showing the average number of police department employees and the 
average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 inhabitants m cities 
grouped by size and location. The number of police department 
employees and the number of auxiliary police in individual cities with 
more than 25,000 inhabitants are also shown. 

There were 14 police officers killed by cruninals during 1941 in 
409 cities. The rate of 1.33 police killed per 5,000,000 inhabitants^is 
slightly higher than the 1940 rate of 1.24; but lower than the 1939 
rate of 1.79, and considerably less than the 3.91 rate of both 1938 
and 1937. 

(1) 



Offenses Cleared by Arrest. 

The 1941 annual reports received from police departments through- 
out the Nation reflected that 27.7 percent of the crimes known to the 
police were cleared by the arrest of the offenders. Criminal homicides 
ranked highest, with 88.1 percent of the murders and 86.6 percent of 
the negligent manslaughters cleared. The offenders were arrested in 
76.2 percent of the rape cases and in 75.0 percent of other felonious 
assaults. For crimes against property the percentage of clearances 
was as follows: Robbery, 40.4; burglary, 32.0; auto theft, 24.4; and 
larceny, 22.7. 

Although on the average there w^as one ofl'ender arrested for each 
crime against the person cleared, the police were frequently successful 
in clearing more than one oft'ense against property with the arrest of 
one thief. The 1941 annual reports showed that the arrest of each 
100 robbers cleared 121 such crimes; the arrest of each 100 auto thieves 
cleared 131 auto thefts; for each 100 persons charged with larceny, 
137 larcenies were cleared, and for every 100 burglars arrested, 162 
burglaries were solved. 
Persons Found Guilty, 1941. 

Of all persons arrested and charged by the police during 1941, 82.0 
percent were found guUty by the courts. The highest proportion of 
convictions was for persons held for traffic violations (84.8 percent 
guilty) and driving w^hile intoxicated (84.5 percent guilty). For in- 
dividual part I offense classes the percentage of convictions was as 
follows: Robbery, 83.6; burglary, 81.9; larceny, 77.9; auto theft, 77.8; 
aggravated assault, 59.1; murder, 57.8; rape, 56.0; and manslaughter 
by negligence, 31.4. 
Persons Arrested, 1942. 

In examining the 305,570 fingerprint arrest records received at the 
FBI during the first 6 months of 1942, age 19 again predominated 
in the frequency of arrests, followed by ages 18, 21, and 20 in that 
order. Persons less than 21 years of age made up 18.5 percent of the 
arrest records examined, while the corresponding percentage for the 
same period of 1941 was 17.2. 

Youths under 25 years of age represented 57.0 percent of those 
charged with robbery, 65.0 percent of those charged with burglary, 
and 76.6 percent of the persons arrested for auto theft. 

During the first half of this year, 10.2 percent (31,045) of the arrest 
records received represented women. This is an increase over the 
corresponding period of 1941, when the percentage was 9.1. 



CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to the 
police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting or 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be those most 
generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal homicide, 
including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (b) manslaugh- 
ter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault ; burglary — break- 
ing or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The figures contained 
herein include also the number of attempted crimes of the designated 
classes. In other words, an attempted burglary or robbery, for ex- 
ample, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner as if the crime 
had been completed. Attempted murdere, however, are reported as 
aggravated assaults. 

"Offenses know^n to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the law-enforce- 
ment agencies of contributing communities and not merely arrests or 
cleared cases. Offenses committed by juveniles are included in the 
same manner as those known to have been committed by adults, 
regardless of the prosecutive action. Complaints which upon inves- 
tigation are learned to be groundless are not included in the tabulations 
which follow. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of crime 
and criminal-law" enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

In the last section of this bulletin may be found brief definitions of 
part I and II offense classifications. 



MONTHLY REPORTS 

Offenses Known to the Police— Cities Divided According to Population 

Although only 4.4 percent of the crunes reported by 2,074 cities 
during the first half of 1942 represented offenses against the person, 
the reports listed 1,627 murders, 1,232 negligent manslaughters, 3,151 
rapes, and 15,580 other felonious assaults. The majority (60.8 per- 
cent) of the crimes were^larcenies ; 20.4 percent were burglaries; 11.2 
percent were auto thefts; and 3.2 percent were robberies. 

A combined population of 63,231,588 is represented by the reporting 
cities, and the number of offenses reported by them and the rate per 
100,000 inhabitants are presented in table 1 with the cities grouped 
according to size in order that comparisons may be made between 
the figures of a local community and national averages for cities of 
the same population group. Similar data for cities grouped not only 
by size but also by location may be found in table 4, 

(4) 



Table 1. — Offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 19J,2; number 
and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Population group 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 



ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter 

ing 



Auto 

theft 



GROUP I 

6 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 29,894,166: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP n 



52 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total pop- 
ulation, 7,247,109: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP m 

88 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,066,056: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP IV 



169 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total pop- 
ulation, 5,931,842: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP V 

03 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total pop- 
ulation, 7,677,976: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



GROUP VI 



1,226 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,414,439: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

2,074 cities; total population, 
63,231,588: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000 



251 
3.46 



159 
2.62 



119 
2.01 



113 
1.47 



109 
1.70 



141 
2.32 



1,876 
6.28 



319 
4.40 



258 
4.25 



1,737 
24.0 



1,037 
17.1 



1,882 
26.0 



2,083 
34.3 



280 
3.65 



1,079 
14.1 



■ 36, 859 
179.7 



14, 188 
195.8 



10, 025 
165. 3 



8,809 
148.5 



8,780 
114.4 



6,212 



2101,771 
496.3 



33, 183 
547.0 



31, 256 
526.9 



1,627 
2.57 



1,232 
2.00 



15, 525 
24.6 



15,580 
24.6 



2 84,873 
157.6 



253,414 
470.6 



7,901 
109.0 



5,118 

84.4 



4,627 
60.3 



2,990 
46.6 



' The number of offenses and rate for manslaughter by negligence are based on reports as follows: Group 
I, 35 cities, total population, 28,389,889; groups I-VI, 2,073 cities, total population, 61,727,311. 

' The number of offenses and rate for burglary and larceny— theft are based on reports as follows: Group 
I, 34 cities, total population, 20,607,837; groups I-VI, 2,072 cities, total population, 53,845,259. 



6 



Annual Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1941-42. 

Crime in general increased 1.7 percent during the first 6 months of 
1942 over the same period of last year, according to monthly crime 
reports received during the two periods from 337 cities with over 
25,000 inhabitants. Offenses of rape increased 9.9 percent; negligent 
manslaughter, 9.4 percent; robbery, 5.2 percent; aggravated assault, 
4.7 percent; and larceny, 4.2 percent. Burglaries and auto thefts 
declined 4.3 percent and 1.6 percent respectively, while offenses of 
murder remained substantially the same, showing a 0.2 percent 
decrease. 

The data presented in table 2 show the number of offenses reported 
during the two 6-month periods, subdivided by quarters. The 
tabulation reveals, with few exceptions, a more favorable situation 
during the second quarter of 1942 than in the first quarterly period; 
that is, the increases shown over the 6-month period were less pro- 
nounced in the second quarter than in the first, while the decreases 
were more pronounced during the second quarterly period. One of 
the exceptions to this general trend is found in the robbery figures, 
which evidenced a more substantial increase during the second 
quarter of the year than in the first 3-month period. Similarly, the 
murder figure, which reflected a decrease during the first quarter, 
shifted slightly upward during the second quarter of 1942. 

Table 2. — Annual trends, offenses known to the police, 337 cities over 25,000 in 
■population, January to June, inclusive, 19^1-42 



[Total population, 48,531,025, based on 1940 decennial census] 








Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 




661 
634 
698 
722 
1,359 
1,356 


1514 
1602 
1456 
1459 
1970 
1 1, 061 


1,122 
1,246 
1,219 
1,326 
2,341 
2,572 


7,425 
7,665 
5,801 
6,253 
13, 226 
13, 918 


5,236 
5,536 
6,612 
6,863 
11, 848 
12, 399 


39, 834 
39, 308 
36, 102 
33,326 
75, 936 
72, 634 


99, 820 
105, 466 
101, 738 
104, 570 
201, 558 
210,036 


23, 739 




24,501 


April to June 1941 


22,951 




21,454 




46, 690 


January to June 1942 


45,955 







I The number of offenses of manslaughter is based on the reports of 336 cities, total population, 47,026,748. 



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8 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location. 

Since the extent of crime varies greatly among the several States 
and larger geographic divisions, the data presented in table 1 concern- 
ing the number of offenses of murder, robbery, aggravated assault, 
burglary, larceny, and auto theft were further subdivided according 
to the nine geographic divisions. The data in table 4 make available 
regional crime averages to individuals interested in making com- 
parisons with local figures. 

The information presented in tables 1 and 4 is supplemented by 
the data presented in table 3, which show the number of cities repre- 
sented in each population group and each geographic division. 



Table 3. — Number of cities included in the tabulation of uniform crime reports, 
January to June, inclusive, 1942 

[Population figures based on 1940 decennial census] 





Population 




Division 


Group 


Group 


Group 
III 


Group 


Group 


Group 
VI 


Total 




Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 




GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 169 cities; total population, 
5,267,340 


2 
6 
8 
4 
3 
3 
4 

1 

5 


10 
10 
10 
5 

2 

3 

1 
5 


8 
19 
20 

8 
15 

4 

6 

2 
6 


25 
30 
49 
10 
17 
7 
10 

6 

15 


64 

124 

109 

58 

41 

18 

30 

20 
39 


60 

312 

304 

173 

94 

48 

64 

60 
111 


169 


Middle Atlantic: 501 cities; total population, 
18,570,773 


501 


East North Central: 500 cities; total popula- 
tion 15 810 980 


500 


West North Central: 258 cities; total popula- 
tion, 5,284,187 


258 


South Atlantic: i 176 cities; total population. 


176 


East South Central: 82 cities; total popula- 


82 


West South Central: 117 cities; total popula- 
tion 3 531 697 


117 


Mountain: 90 cities; total population, 
1,405,426 


90 


Pacific: 181 cities; total population, 5,923,792.. 


181 


Total: 2,074 cities; total population, 
63 231,588 


36 


52 


88 


169 


503 


1,226 


2,074 






1 Includes report of District of Columbia. 

















In order that the information may be readily available, there are 
listed below the States included in the nine geographic divisions. 



States Divided by Geographic Divisions 



New England: 
Connecticut. 
Maine. 

Massachusetts. 
New Hampshire. 
Rhode Island. 
Vermont. 



Middle Atlantic: 
New Jersey. 
New York. 
Pennsylvania. 



East North Central: 
Illinois. 
Indiana. 
Michigan. 
Ohio. 
Wisconsin. 



West North Central: 
Iowa. 
Kansas. 
Minnesota. 
Missouri. 
Nebraska. 
North Dakota. 
South Dakota. 



South Atlantic: ' 
Delaware. 
Florida. 
Georgia. 
Maryland. 
North Carolina. 
South Carolina. 
Virginia. 
West Virginia. 



East South Central: 
Alabama. 

Kentucky. 

Mississippi. 

Tennessee. 



West South Central: 
Arkansas. 
Louisiana. 
Oklahoma. 
Texas. 



Includes District of Columbia. 



Mountain: 
Arizona. 
Colorado. 
Idaho. 
Montana. 
Nevada. 
New Mexico. 
Utah. 
Wyoming. 



Pacific: 

California. 

Oregon. 

Washington. 



Table 4. — Number of offenses known to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, January 

to June, inclusive, 194-2, by geographic divisions and population groups 

on 1940 deceimial i 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


New England: 


1.07 
.66 

.49 


11.9 
8.3 
4.1 
3.0 
2.6 
1.8 


10.0 
5.4 
5.1 
1.2 
1.8 
2.6 


81.2 
196.6 
117.9 
119.4 

93.0 


191.4 
415.6 
373.3 
304.1 
233.8 
170.8 


183.4 


Group II 


103.1 


Group III 


72.9 


Group IV. _ 


45.1 


Group V 


.50 

.78 


36.4 




27.1 






Total, groups I- VI 


.59 


6.1 


4.7 


124.4 


295.9 


87.2 






Middle Atlantic: 
Group I 


L22 
.60 

:£ 

.75 


14.2 
10.7 
11.5 
6.0 
8.4 
5.5 


18.0 
20.5 
15.6 
10.7 
7.2 
5.9 


1 126. 4 
129.5 
125.4 
90.7 

73^0 


' 246. 1 
240.5 
301.4 
282.8 
227.8 
141.4 


74.7 




81.1 


Group III 


72.1 




47.5 


Group V . 

Group VI 


48.8 
32.6 






Total, groups I-VI 


1.45 


11.9 


15.4 


2 104.7 


2 235. 3 


67.0 







See footnotes at end of table. 



10 



TABI..E 4. — Number of offenses known to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, January 
to June, inclusive, 1942, by geographic divisions and population groups — Con. 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


East North Central: 


2.85 
2.90 
1.58 
1.00 
.61 
.61 


63. 8 
27.3 
19.6 
14.4 
11.6 
7.4 


25.3 
25.1 
12.7 

7.0 
4.7 
6.5 


170.3 
184.2 
171.6 
148.5 
119.6 
86.0 


424.7 
596. 5 
473.6 
460.2 
381.1 
239.8 


68.2 


Group II 


93.5 


Group III ' 


75.4 




67.7 


Group V 


54.0 










Total groups I- VI 


2.07 


39.8 


18.0 


155.2 


425.2 


66.5 






West North Central: 

Group I 

Group II 


2.61 
1.94 
.55 
.61 
1.06 
.36 


19.8 
16.5 

5'. 8 
4.0 
3.8 


28.8 
11.4 
3.1 
1.2 
4.2 
3.0 


134.9 
116.3 
114.6 
112.7 
92.2 
76.0 


418.4 
404.9 
579.2 
514.9 
402.1 
212.3 


61.8 
92.5 




79.0 




55.9 


Group V.._ 

Group VI 


45.3 
34.7 






Total, groups I-VI 


1.57 


12.1 


14.0 


112.6 


403.8 


60.5 


South Atlantic: s 


7.02 
8.89 
7.76 
7.62 
4.92 
6.65 


40.9 
52.0 
24.7 
31.3 
13.3 
12.9 


45.9 
72.7 
127.4 
189.9 

47^2 


175.3 
280.6 
214.9 
206.8 
128.4 
125.4 


580.1 
913.7 
768.3 
840.0 
524.1 
342.4 


168.3 


Group II 


142.0 


Group III 


105.5 


Group IV 


125.5 


Group V 


69.4 




52.3 






Total, groups I-VI 


7.24 


33.0 


84.0 


193.1 


669.7 


126.5 


East South Central: 


8.30 
14.60 
7.12 
6.37 
8.33 
8.37 


73.7 
33.4 
22.1 
21.7 
26.4 
16.7 


7L7 
42.4 
74.7 
70.3 
71.5 


286.8 
181.4 
200.8 
205.1 
172.1 
100.8 


673.0 
577.3 
723.3 
634.5 
560.4 
182.0 


132.2 




128.1 


Group III 


88. 6 


Group IV 


108.7 


Group V 


78.6 




45.6 






Total, groups I-VI 


8.65 


44.4 


76.9 


219.1 


595.7 


107.0 


West South Central: 
Group I 


7.14 
6.49 
4.32 
4.02 
4.80 
6.00 


29.3 
40.2 
27.3 
19.2 
10.9 
10.2 


61.9 
42.3 
46.6 
43.3 
31.8 
33.6 


201.5 
249.7 
197.7 
180.0 
160.2 
138.6 


781.2 
780.0 
702.6 
941.7 
512.8 
323.8 


99 3 




85.6 


Group III 


85.1 


Group IV 


117.7 


Group V 


61.0 


Group Vi 


53.1 


Total, groups I-VI 


5.97 


25.5 


48.7 


194.8 


709.1 


88.0 


Mountain: 


2.17 
2.00 
4.25 
.91 
1.36 
1.00 


31.3 
32.7 
55. 3 
32.8 
11.5 
29.9 


10.2 
3.3 

30.6 

11.4 
6.5 

18.3 


304'. 1 
296.8 
191.1 
146.7 
139.1 


709. 3 
793.7 
923.7 
1, 034. 3 
795.5 
414.0 


98.3 


Group II 


107.4 




140.3 


Group IV 


124.2 


Group V 

Group VI 


80.5 


Total, groups I-VI 


1.71 


29.2 


12.3 


215.0 


741.8 


94.6 


Pacific: 

Group I 


1.83 
3.40 

.92 
3.33 

.53 
1.29 


49.7 
27.7 
15.5 
17.9 
14.2 
12.4 


20.1 
13 8 
11.8 
9.8 
5.6 


250.2 
257.3 
194.9 
211.0 
169.2 
155.2 


737.3 
767.5 
854.1 
758.5 
733.2 
653.0 


211.6 




191.2 


Group III 


106.1 


Group IV 


119.0 




152. 7 


Group VI 


119.4 




1.89 


34.7 


15.2 


226.1 


741.9 


178.6 







1 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 4 cities. 

2 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 499 cities. 

3 Includes the District of Columbia. 



11 

Offenses in Individual Cities With More Than 100,000 Inhabitants. 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the period of January-June, 1942, is shown in table 5. The compila- 
tion includes the reports received from police depaitments in cities 
with more than 100,000 inhabitants. Police administrators and other 
interested individuals will probably find it desirable to compare the 
crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown in tables 1 
and 4 of this publication. Similarly, they will doubtless desire to 
make comparisons with the figures for their communities for prior 
periods, in order to determine whether there has been an increase or 
a decrease in the amount of crime committed. 

It is more important to determine whether the figures for a given 
community show increases or decreases in the amount of crime com- 
mitted than to ascertain whether the figures are above or below those 
of some other community. A great deal of caution should be exer- 
cised in comparing crime data for individual cities, because the differ- 
ences in the figures may be due to a variety of factors. For a list of 
some of the factors affecting the extent of crime in a community, 
reference may be made to the comments immediately preceding table 
80 m volume XII, No. 4 of this bulletin. 



Table 5. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 1942, 
cities over 100,000 in population 



City 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 



Burglary 
—break- 
ing or 
entering 



Larceny— theft 



«50/,f Under $50 



Akron, Ohio 

Albany, N. Y 

Atlanta, Ga 

Baltimore, Md 

Birmingham, Ala. 



Boston, Mass 

Bridgeport, Conn, 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Camden, N. J 



Canton, Ohio 

Charlotte, N. C 

Chattanooga, Term. 
Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



Cleveland, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Dallas, Texas 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Colo 



Des Moines, Iowa. 

Detroit, Mich 

Duluth, Minn 

Elizabeth, N.J... . 
Erie, Pa 



Fall River, Mass. 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Fort Worth, Tex.. 
Gary, Ind 



45 

73 

3,111 

216 

293 
91 
63 
55 

101 



1,031 
953 
944 

473 
141 
205 
121 
128 



259 
5,736 



956 
474 
946 

159 
2,870 
81 
178 
173 



87 

2,077 

404 

121 
265 
94 
59 
163 



1,014 
219 
2,455 
2,926 
1,127 



1,( 



6,397 
2,547 

4,499 
1,347 
4,180 
1,529 
2,124 

591 
9,936 
502 
280 
430 



975 

1.378 

607 



572 

1,459 

347 

1,561 
172 
316 
156 
177 



94 

127 

1,655 

358 

277 
328 
294 
198 
317 

195 

1,537 

66 



12 



Table 5. 



-Number of offenses known to the police, January to June, inclusive, 1042, 
cities over 100,000 in population — Continued 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 
—break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


City 


$50 and 
over 


Under $50 


Grand Rapids, Mich 




6 

17 

2 

167 

215 

120 

45 
104 

7 

51 
776 
288 
6 
248 

102 
21 
56 
54 

109 

22 
12 
115 
722 
127 

169 
62 
31 
21 
16 

318 
440 
159 
21 
14 

74 
4 

53 
181 
54 

49 
73 
55 
323 
19 

120 
3 
32 
18 
3 

10 

18 
20 
74 
21 

104 

3 

325 

15 

47 

12 
3 
76 


2 
31 

14 
115 
263 

93 
Complete 
15 
17 
119 

15 

268 

359 

2 

224 

70 

28 
24 
97 
171 

3 

10 

240 

1,262 

124 

87 
38 
86 
33 

383 
148 
29 
23 
11 

172 
16 
27 

513 
20 

5 
382 

18 
202 

10 

29 


173 

586 

246 

1,404 

1,487 

671 
data not 
236 
269 
176 

610 

4,073 

1,045 

93 

525 

655 
538 
696 
399 
624 

375 
254 
194 
3,179 
409 

592 
302 
252 
202 
148 

1,932 
1,522 

876 
359 
181 

466 
179 
340 
1,318 
408 

456 
322 
425 
1,031 
220 

1,220 
196 
190 
230 
200 

169 
209 
267 
375 
237 

515 
126 
1,215 
111 
233 

420 
54 
319 


44 
102 
141 
207 
309 

287 
received. 

64 
124 

95 

(') 
2,295 

866 
14 

183 

219 
114 
289 
90 
345 

'58 
■99 
242 
(') 
170 

112 

!24 
'46 

604 
243 
341 
138 
24 

180 
84 
102 
0) 

72 

73 
116 
156 
322 

40 

320 
21 
78 
37 

64 

57 
64 
100 
148 
50 

171 
40 

620 
25 

85 

182 
15 
20 


1,080 
1,096 
653 
3,957 
1,540 

1,653 

508 

1,285 

544 

1,108 
10,502 
2,114 
178 
1,387 

684 
1,868 
1,524 

631 
1,479 

582 

685 

1,043 

7,154 

1,170 

1,991 

1,166 

618 

142 

447 

1,413 

1,102 

1,992 

529 

253 

1,575 

890 

1,177 

4,113 

942 

1,117 
1,314 
1,575 
3,003 
106 

'l68 
724 
520 
425 

528 
592 
853 
1,376 
442 

1,278 
346 

3,739 
450 

685 

422 
117 
463 


140 




3 

6 
27 
11 

14 

6 
14 

7 

2 
35 
23 


251 


Honolulu, Hawaii 


98 




375 


Indianapolis, Ind 


656 


Jacksonville, Fla_ 

Jersey City, N. J 

Kansas City, Kans 


285 

58 




176 


TTrinYvillA, Tfinn 


180 


Long Beach, Calif _ 

Los Angeles, CaUf 

Louisville, Ky 


224 

3, 551 

665 




46 


Memphis, Tenn 


21 

15 
4 
3 

31 
6 

1 

32 
140 
20 

6 
6 
5 
4 

5 

51 
17 
6 

1 

19 
3 

8 
34 

1 

3 

19 
10 
10 


151 


Miami, Fla -_ 


121 


Milwaukee, Wis 


303 




400 




201 


Newark, N. J 


724 


New Bedford, Mass . 


HI 


New Haven, Conn 


155 




570 


New York, N. Y.2 


4,820 


Norfolk, Va 


367 


Oakland, Calif 


460 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


129 




283 


Paterson, N. J 


189 


Peoria, 111 


85 


Philadelphia, Pa 


1,502 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


971 




379 


Providence, R. I 


318 


Reading, Pa 


84 


Richmond, Va 


228 


Rochester, N. Y 


175 




219 


St. Louis, Mo 


568 


St,. Paul, Minn 


90 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


161 




178 


San Diego, Calif . 


585 


San Francisco, Calif 


1, 463 




64 


Seattle, Wash_ .. 




737 


Somerville, Mass 




100 


South Bend, Ind 


1 
2 


8 
32 
11 

1 

5 
33 
56 
63 

89 

226 

7 

7 
9 
50 


125 




130 


Springfield, Mass 


128 


Syracuse, N. Y.... 


2 
2 
6 
6 
2 

10 


127 


Tacoma, Wash 


190 




76 




284 


Trenton, N.J 

Tulsa, Okla... 


116 

187 


Utica, N. Y 


52 


Washington, D. C 

Wichita, Kans 


29 
3 


1.040 

75 




132 




220 


Yonkers, N. Y 


1 
8 


44 


Youngstown, Ohio 


184 







' Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 
' Figures include offenses committed by juveniles; this is in accord with the uniform reporting procedure 
followed by other cities. 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

Police Officers Killed by Criminals, 1941. 

There were 14 police officers killed by criminals during 1941 in 
409 cities over 25,000 in population. The rate for last year of 1.33 
police killed per 5,000,000 inhabitants is slightly higher than the 1940 
rate of 1.24; however, the 1939 rate was 1.79, and for both 1937 and 
1938 the figure was 3.91 police killed per 5,000,000 inhabitants. The 
data for 1941 are represented in table 6 with the cities subdivided 
according to size and location. 

Table 6. — Number of policemen killed by criminals, 1941, cities over 25,000 in 

population 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Population group 


Total 
groups 






Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Number 


Geographic division 


37 cities 

over 
250,000; 

total pop- 
ulation, 

30,195,339 


54 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
7,628,379 


106 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
7,245,750 


212 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
7,380,509 


409 cities; 
total pop- 
ulation, 

52,449,977 


5,000.000 
inhabit- 
ants 


New England: 61 cities; total population, 
4 640 655' number of policemen killed 








' 


1 
5 
2 
1 
1 


1.08 


Middle Atlantic: 80 cities; total popula- 
tion, 10,093,985; number of policemen 
killed 


5 






1.55 


East North Central: 101 cities; total popu- 
lation, 13,112,140; number of policemen 








.76 


West North Central: 29 cities; total popu- 
lation, 3,661,503; number of policemen 
killed ...... ' 


1 






1.37 


South Atlantic: > 47 cities, total popula- 
tion, 4,616,676; number of policemen 
killed 




1 




1.08 


East South Central: 20 cities; total popu- 
lation, 1,891,962; number of policemen 








.00 


West South Central: 27 cities; total popu- 
lation, 2,903,132; number of policemen 
killed 


2 


1 






3 

1 


5.17 


Mountain: 11 cities; total population, 
835 805' number of policemen killed 




' 


5.98 


Pacific: 33 cities; total population, 
4,694 119- number of policemen killed 








.00 
















Total: 

Number of policemen killed 

Number killed per 5,000,000 inhabi- 
tants 


9 

1.49 


2 
1.31 


1 
.69 


2 
1.35 


14 
1.33 











1 Includes the District of Columbia. 



(13) 



14 



Number of Police Employees, April 30, 1942. 

During prior years data published in the Uniform Crime Reports 
bulletin relative to the number of police-department employees in 
cities throughout the Nation have been based on average figures for an 
entire calendar year. However, in view of the added duties the police 
are called upon to perform during wartimes, a survey was conducted 
by the FBI relative to police employees in cities over 25,000 in 
population as of April 30, 1942, in order to make available data of 
maximum current value to law-enforcement administrators. In the 
interest of economy the survey was limited to cities with population in 
excess of 25,000. 

Table 8 shows the average number of police-department employees 
on April 30, 1942, for groups of cities divided according to size and 
location. When comparing the data presented in table 8 with the 
figures for 1940 (vol. XII, No. 2, table 50) several mcreases are noted. 
The April 30, 1942, figures representing the number of police employees 
per 1,000 inhabitants showed increases over those for 1940 in cities of 
all population groups in the South Atlantic and Pacific States; and 
cities of the 50,000 to 100,000 group in each geographic division like- 
wise showed increases. However, it may be of some significance to 
note that 1940 decennial census figures were used in calculating the 
number of police employees per thousand inhabitants for both 1940 
and 1942. 

The data presented in table 8 are supplemented by the figures shown 
in table 7, which indicate the number of cities used in preparing the 
averages. 

Table 7. — Number of cities included in the tabulation showing the average number of 
police-department employees, April SO, 1942, by geographic divisions and population 
groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Population 




Division 


Group 


Group 


Group 

ni 


Group 
IV 


Total 




Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 




New England: 61 cities; total population, 4,640,655... 

Middle Atlantic: 79 cities; total population, 

16,014,787 . 


7 

8 

4 
3 

3 

4 

1 
5 

37 
30,195,339 


10 
11 
10 

5 

7 

3 

3 

1 
5 


13 

23 

23 

8 
17 

4 

8 
2 

7 


36 

38 

60 

12 
19 

10 

12 

7 
17 


61 
79 


East North Central: lo'l cities; total population. 


101 


West North Central: 29' cities; total population, 
3 661 503 


29 


South Atlantic: ' 46 cities; total population, 47586,097. 
East South Central: 20 cities; total population, 
1,891,962 


46 
20 


West South Central: 27' cities; total population, 
2,912,650 


27 


Mountain: 11 cities; total population, 835,805 


11 
34 






Total: 
Cities 


55 
7,792,650 


105 
7, 166, 552 


211 
7,359,448 


408 




52, 513, 989 






» Includes the District o( Columbia. 













15 




16 



Table 8. — Average number of police -deparhnent employees, Apr. 
graphic divisions and population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



1942, by gco- 



New England: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants-.. 

Middle Atlantic; 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants 

East North Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants 

West North Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab 

itants 

South Atlantic: • 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants 

East South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants 

West South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants 

Mountain: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants.- - - 

Pacific: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants. - 

Total: 

Number of police employees... 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhab- 
itants 



Population 



Group Group Group Group 
I II III IV 



Over 
250,000 



2,881 

2.81 
28, 650 

2.45 
15, 371 

1.94 
3,793 

1.90 
4,087 

2.24 
1,074 

1.22 
1,832 

1.28 
447 

1.39 



64,254 
2.13 



100,000 

to 
250,000 



2,670 

1.97 
2,493 

1.73 
1,720 

1.16 
835 

1.16 
1,571 

1..56 
495 

1.22 

1.27 
164 
1.09 
1, 091 
1.55 
11,707 
1.50 



50,000 

to 
100,000 



1,798 

1.87 
2,651 

1.64 
2,041 

1.31 
586 

1.07 

1.43 
424 

1.51 
664 

1.19 
162 



1.30 

10, 435 

1.46 



25,000 

to 
50,000 



1,926 

1.48 

1,933 

1.46 

2,370 

1.10 

389 

.98 

942 

1.44 

386 

1.19 

524 

1.30 

264 

1.07 

750 

1.36 

9,484 



9,275 

2.00 
35, 627 

2. 22 
21,. 502 

1.64 
5,603 

1..53 
8,176 

1.78 
2, 379 

1.26 
3,688 

1.27 
1,037 

1.24 
8,593 

1.77 
95,880 

1.83 



" Includes the District of Columbia. 
Number of Auxiliary Police, April 30, 1942. 

The reports on the number of police employees forwarded to the 
FBI by the 408 cities represented in table 8 not only provided for 
listing regular police-department employees but also provided for 
listing the number of auxiliary police enrolled. Such data include all 
volunteers for auxiliary work who were accepted for service as of 
April 30 and who may be called to assist the police during an air raid 
or other emergency conditions arising as a result of the war. Average 
figures showing the number of auxiliary police for cities grouped by 
size and location are presented in table 9. 

It should be borne in mind in examining the data in table 9 that the 
organization of auxiliary police forces in some cities was in April in a 
formative stage. Although the great majority of the cities reported 
an auxiliary ])olice force, 57 show^ed no auxiliary police; however, 20 of 



17 

these advised that an aiixiUary poHce force was being formed. Alto- 
getlier, 33 cities vohinteered the information that their aiixihary pohce 
force was either being formed or was being expanded, and there prob- 
ably are additional cities in the same status in this respect. A few 
cities reporting no auxiliary police indicated that a force of "special 
police" was available. Special police, supernumerary officers, and 
reserve officers, some of whom may be employed as guards near de- 
fense plants or at public utilities, were not included as auxiliary police 
in table 9. 



Table 9. — Average mimher of auxiliary police, Apr. SO, 194 
and population groups 



by geographic divisions 



Population 



Group 



Over 
250,000 



New England: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants -. 

Middle Atlantic: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants - 

East North Central: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants .-- 

West North Central: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants 

South Atlantic: ' 

Number of auxOiary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants 

East South Central: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants 

West South Central: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants 

Mountain: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants.. 

Pacific: 

Number of auxiliary police : 

Averse number of auxihary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants 

Total: 

Number of auxiliary police 

Average number of auxiliary police per 1,000 in- 
habitants 



4,348 

4.24 
16, 951 

1.45 
10, 754 

1.36 
5,271 

2.64 
7,045 

3.86 
5,165 

5.87 
3,549 

2.49 
540 

1.67 
20, 970 

6.73 
74, 593 

2.47 



Group 
II 



100,000 

to 
250,000 



50,000 

to 
100,000 



5,005 

3.69 
6,068 

4.22 
5,681 

3.83 
2,485 

3.45 
4,456 

4.44 
938 

2.30 

3.58 1 
1,500 ! 
10.00 

6,073 ; 

8.61 1 

34,084 ' 

4.37 



4,510 

4.70 
5,578 

3.58 
5,441 

3.50 
994 

1.81 
5,444 

4.94 
4,277 
15.22 
1,579 

2.83 
245 

2.08 
2,332 

4.79 
30, 400 

4.24 



Group 
IV 



25,000 

to 
50,000 



6,469 

4.87 
5,764 

2.67 
742 

1.87 
3,398 

5.19 
1,007 

3.11 
1,000 

2.48 
434 

1.77 
3,375 



20,302 

4.37 
35, 066 

2.19 
27, 640 

2.11 
9,492 

2.59 
20, 343 

4.44 
11, 387 

6.02 
8,006 

2.75 
2,719 

3.25 
32, 750 

6.74 
167, 705 

3.19 



Includes the District of Columbia. 



18 




19 

Police Employees in Individual Cities. 

Figures for April 30, 1942, showing the number of regular police- 
department employees and the number of auxiliary police in individual 
cities with more than 25,000 inhabitants, are presented in table 10. 
The cities are divided into groups according to size and then listed 
alphabeticall}^, first by State and then by name of city. 

Man\' factors should be taken hito consideration prior to making 
any comparison between the police personnel figures of individual 
cities. For a list of some of the factors to be considered, reference 
may be made to the comments appearing on pages 99 and 100 of 
volume XII, No. 2 of the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin. In con- 
nection with the possibility of making comparisons between the 
auxiliary police figures of individual cities, reference should be made 
to the comments inmiediately preceding table 9. 



Table 10. — Number of police-department employees, and number of auxiliary 
police, Apr. 30, 1942, cities over 25,000 in population 

[Based on 1940 decennial census] 

CITIES WITH OVER 250,000 INHABITANTS 



City 


Number of police-de- 
partment employees 


Num- 
ber of 
auxil- 
iary 
police 


City 


Number of police-de- 
partment employees 


Num- 
ber of 


Police 
oflScers 


Civil- 
ians 


Total 


Police 
ofBcers 


Civil- 
ians 


Total 


iary 
police 


Birmingham, Ala 

Los Angeles, Calif 

Oakland, Calif _ 

San Francisco, Calif __. 
Denver, Colo- 


261 

2,492 

403 

1,306 

420 

1.601 

395 

6,354 

509 

456 

836 

1,727 

2,253 

3,584 

482 

333 

521 

1,786 

860 


25 
680 

72 
27 

102 
64 

307 
70 
24 

198 
88 
234 
24 
23 
141 
483 
117 


286 

3,172 

436 

1,378 

447 

1,703 

459 

6,661 

579 

480 

853 

1,925 

2,341 

3,818 

506 

356 

662 

2,269 

977 


4,865 
11.705 
2,000 
2,190 

540 
4,193 

962 
4,000 

300 

300 
3,313 
1,890 
3,600 

"Im 

512 
1,449 
2,810 


Newark, N.J 

Buffalo, N. Y 

New York, N.Y 

Rochester, N.Y 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Columbus, Ohio 

Toledo Ohio 


1,137 

1,132 

17, 784 

455 

688 

1,339 

334 

365 

428 


91 
147 
968 
46 
32 
215 
24 
48 
77 
244 
39 
70 
58 
33 
62 
68 
57 
126 


1,228 

1.279 

18, 752 

501 

720 

1,554 

358 

413 

505 

4,848 

1,055 

540 

308 

321 

384 

274 

628 

1,268 


655 

2,599 
400 


Washington, D. C 

Atlanta, Ga 


"2,"o66 

854 


Chicago, 111 


Indianapolis, Ind 


Portland, Oreg 

Philadelphia Pa 


5,000 

12, 897 

400 

748 


New Orleans, La 

Baltimore, Md 


Pittsburgh, Pa > lio26 

Providence, R. I 470 


Detroit, Mich 


Dallas, Tex 

Houston, Tex 

San Anlonio, Tex 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis _ 


288 
322 
206 
571 
1,142 




Minneapolis, Minn 

St. Paul, Minn 

Kansas City, Mo 

St. Louis, Mo-._ 

Jersey City, N.J 


236 

'"""7.5 
3,600 



Long Beach, Calif. 
Sacramento, Calif. . 
San Diego, CaliL.. 
Bridgeport, Conn.. 

Hartford, Conn 

New Haven, Conn. 
Wilmington, Del.. 
Jacksonville, Fla_. 

Miami, Fla 

Tampa, Fla 

Peoria, 111 

Fort Wayne, Ind.. 

Gary, Ind 

South Bend, Ind.. 
Des Moines, Iowa. 
Kansas City, Kans 

M''ichita, Kans 

Cambridge, Mass.. 
Fall River, Mass.. 



274 


26 


300 


1,185 




127 


2.S 


150 


123 




304 


45 


349 


2,000 




259 


2 


261 


225 




418 


23 


441 


300 




318 


22 


340 


140 




208 


6 


214 


506 




256 


6 


262 


2,845 




270 


14 


284 






92 


14 


106 






122 


7 


129 






126 


2 


128 


506 




. 133 


27 


160 


150 




114 


7 


121 


503 




137 


20 


157 


445 




100 


5 


105 


246 




130 


21 


151 


1,400 




225 


5 


230 


500 




197 


14 


211 


900 





Lowell, Mass... 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Somerville, Mass 

Springfield, Mass 

Worcester, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

Duluth, Minn 

Omaha, Nebr 

Camden, N. J 

Elizabeth, N. J 

Paterson, N. J 

Trenton, N. J 

Albany, N.Y 

Syracuse, N.Y 

Utica, N. Y.... 

Yonkers, N. Y 

Charlotte, N. C 

Akron, Ohio.. . 



169 


10 


179 


184 


10 


194 


148 


2 


150 


283 


19 


302 


339 


23 


362 


178 


16 


194 


182 


32 


214 


128 


9 


137 


243 


42 


285 


182 


26 


208 


205 


8 


213 


238 




238 


216 


29 


245 


329 


44 


373 


305 


8 


313 


148 


10 


158 


261 


17 


278 


113 


2 


115 


253 


15 


268 



220 
300 
450 

1,620 
250 

2,500 
303 
91 
407 
119 
185 

2," 700 

1,400 

400 

700 

450 



20 

Table 10. — Niwiber oj police-department employees, and number of auxiliary 
police, Apr. SO, 1942, cities over 25,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 100,000 TO 250,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of police-de- 
partment employees 


Num- 
ber of 
auxil- 
iary 
police 


City 


Number of police-de- 
partment employees 


Num- 
ber of 
auxil- 
iary 
police 


Police Civil- 
offlcers ians 


Total 


Police 
officers 


Civil- 
ians 


Total 




134 
187 
160 
232 
159 
133 
HO 
165 
112 


4 
15 

6 
28 
15 

5 
12 

1 


138 
202 
166 
260 
174 
138 
152 
177 
118 


1,100 
196 
200 
178 

1,700 
65 

'" "92 
800 


Knoxville, Tenn 

Nashville, Tenn 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah_ 
Norfolk, Va 


142 
198 
215 
154 
224 
302 
145 
143 


15 
22 
19 
10 
18 
46 
4 


157 
220 
234 
164 
242 
348 
149 
143 


138 


Dayton, Ohio 




Youngstown, Ohio 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Tulsa, Okla 


"1,256 
230 


Erie, Pa 


Richmond, Va 

Spokane, Wash 

Tacoma, Wash 


425 




1,989 


Seranton, Pa 


776 


Chattanooga, Tenn.... 





CITIES WITH 50,000 TO 100,000 INHABITANTS 



MobUe, Ala 

Montgomery, Ala 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Little Rock, Ark 

Berkeley, Calif 

Fresno, Calif 

Glendale, Calif 

Pasadena, Calif 

San Jose, Calif 

Santa Monica, Calif. _ 

Stockton, Calif 

Pueblo, Colo 

New Britain, Conn... 

Waterbury, Conn 

St. Petersburg, Fla... 

Augusta, Ga 

Columbus, Ga 

Macon, Ga 

Savannah, Ga 

Cicero, 111 

Decatur, 111 

East St. Louis, 111.... 

Evanston, 111 

Oak Park, 111.. 

Rockford, 111 

Springfield, 111 

East Chicago, Ind 

Evansville, Ind 

Hammond, Ind 

Terre Haute, Ind 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa.. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Topeka, Kans 

Covington, Ky 

Shreveport, La 

Portland, Maine 

Brockton, Mass 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Lawrence, Mass 

Lynn, Mass 

Maiden, Mass 

Medford, Mass 

Newton, Mass 

Quincy, Mass 

Dearborn, Mich 

Highland Park, Mich 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

Lansing, Mich 

Pontiac, Mich. 

Saginaw, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Springfield, Mo 



113 


9 


122 


2,700 




152 




152 


800 




100 


13 


113 


164 




105 




105 


50 




93 


1 


94 


100 1 






12 


89 


..... 




109 


2 


111 


750 1 




98 


14 


112 


457 ' 




64 


2 


66 


325 i 




73 


19 


92 


500 ' 




67 


2 


69 


200 ; 




48 


1 


49 


81 




109 




109 


64 




223 


9 


232 


415 1 




85 


3 


88 


100 1 




116 


10 


126 


325 






3 


86 


85 




71 


2 


73 


J, 100 




144 


9 


153 


1,000 1 




92 




93 


350 1 




58 


4 


62 


175 




56 


16 


72 


100 




90 


18 


108 


223 




67 


5 


72 


112 




86 


5 


91 


287 




89 


21 


110 


2,100 




85 


1 


86 






133 


15 


148 


320 




90 


15 


105 






76 




76 







• 64 


3 


67 


78 




68 




68 






79 


11 


90 


180 




49 


1 


50 






54 


12 


66 


76 




65 


1 


66 


652 




105 


10 


115 


233 




108 


6 


114 


710 




95 


3 


98 


600 




94 


1 


95 


246 




127 


2 


129 


200 




163 


10 




250 




97 


3 


100 


263 








90 


250 




154 


5 


159 


400 




131 


3 


134 


481 




139 


11 


150 


300 




98 


6 


104 


36 




70 


10 


80 


171 




87 


4 


91 


165 




66 


8 


74 


337 




91 


18 


109 


153 




74 


10 


84 


125 




96 


2 


98 


500 




58 


6 


64 


160 





Lincoln, Nebr 

Manchester, N. H... 
Atlantic City, N. J.. 

Bayonne, N. J 

East Orange, N. J 

Hoboken, N. J 

Irvington, N. J 

Passaic, N. J 

Union City, N. J 

Bingham ton, N. Y. . 
Mount Vernon, N. Y 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 
Niagara Falls, N.Y... 
Schenectady, N.Y... 

Trov, N. Y 

Asheville, N. C 

Durham, N. C 

Greensboro, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C 
Cleveland Heights, 

Ohio 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Springfield, Ohio 

Allcntown, Pa 

Altoona, Pa 

Bethlehem, Pa 

Chester, Pa 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Johnstown, Pa 

Lancaster, Pa.. 

McKeesport, Pa 

Upper Darby Twp., 

Wilkes-Barre," Pa'. '. " ' 

York, Pa... -..- 

Pawtucket, R. I 

Charleston, S. C 

Columbia, S. C 

Amarillo, Tex 

Austin, Tex 

Beaumont, Tex 

Corpus Christi, Tex_ 

El Paso, Tex 

Galveston, Tex 

Waco, Tex 

.\rlington, Va 

Portsmouth, Va 

Roanoke, Va 

Charleston, W. Va.. 
Huntington, W. Va. 

Wheeling, W. Va 

Madison. Wis 

Racine, Wis 



106 3 

195 I 29 224 

No report received 



108 


1 


109 


1.57 




157 


73 


11 


84 


110 


10 


120 


118 




118 


114 


7 


121 


123 


3 


126 


130 


9 


139 


113 


11 


124 


153 


10 


163 


147 


3 


150 


66 




66 


73 


8 


81 


92 


6 


98 


108 


2 


110 


55 


IS 


73 


52 


1 


53 


57 


13 


70 


.56 


5 


61 


93 


H 


101 


67 


1 




54 


1 


55 


69 


5 


74 


138 


8 


146 


64 




64 


60 


2 


62 


63 


18 


81 


89 


11 


100 


103 


2 


105 


60 




60 


120 


8 


128 


1.52 




152 


112 


6 


118 


46 




46 


87 


29 


116 


61 




61 


73 


13 


86 


82 


15 


97 
98 


54 


1 


55 


43 




43 


49 




49 


98 


1 


99 


69 


4 


73 


78 


7 


85 


75 


1 


76 


79 


4 


83 


68 


2 


70 



291 
100 
6,50 
300 
400 
170 
250 
114 
35 



62 
320 
275 
250 
350 

51 
100 
150 
155 



1,000 
73 
72 
196 



400 



21 



Table 10. — Nvinber of police-departinent employees, and number of auxiliary 
police, Apr. 30, 1942, cities over 25,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS 



Number of police-de- 
partment employees 



City 



Police Civil- 
ofBcers ians 



Aiiniston, Ala 

Gadsden, Ala 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 

Tucson, Ariz 

Fort Smith, Ark 

Alameda, Calif 

Alhambra, Calif 

Bakersfield, Calif 

Belvedere Township, 

Calif 

Beverly Hills, Calif-. -- 

Burbank. Calif 

Huntington Park, 

Calif 

Inglewood, Calif 

Riverside, Calif 

San Bernardino; Calif-. 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif-- . 

South Gate, Calif 

Colorado Springs, 

Colo 

Bristol, Conn 

Meriden, Conn 

Middletown, Conn 

New London, Conn 

Norwalk, Conn 

Stamford, Conn 

Torrington, Conn 

West Hartford, Conn.. 

West Haven, Conn 

Miami Beach, Fla 

Orlando, Fla.. -_ 

Pensacola. Fla 

West Palm Beach, 

Fla 

Rome, Oa 

Boise, Idaho- 

Alton, 111 

Aurora, 111 

Belleville, 111.- 

Berwyn, 111 

Bloomington, 111 

DanvOle, 111... ._. 

Elgin, 111-.- -.- 

Galesburg, 111 

Joliet, 111 

Maywood, 111 

Moline, 111 

Quincy, 111 

Rock Island, HI 

Waukegan, 111 

Anderson, Ind 

Elkhart, Ind 

Kokomo, Ind 

Lafayette, Ind 

Marion, Ind 

Michigan City, Ind... 

Mishawaka, Ind _ 

Muneie, Ind 

New Albany, Ind 

Richmond, Ind 

Burlington, Iowa 

Clinton, Iowa 

Council Bluffs, lowa.. 

Dubuque, Iowa.. 

Mason City, Iowa 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Hutchinson, Kans 

Ashland, Ky 

Lexington, Ky 

Newport, Ky 

Owensboro, Ky 



Num- 
ber of 
auxil- 
iary 
police 



City 



Padueah, Ky 

Alexandria, La 

Baton Rouge, La 

Monroe, La 

Bangor, Maine 

Lewiston, Maine 

Cumberland, Md 

Hagerstown, Md 

Arlington, Mass 

Belmont, Mass 

Beverly, Mass- 

Brookline, Mass 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chicopee, Mass- 

Everett, Mass .-. 

Fitchbm-g, Mass 

Haverhill, Mass 

Melrose, Mass 

Pittsfield, Mass 

Revere, Mass 

Salem, Mass 

Taunton, Mass 

Waltham, Mass 

Watertown, Mass 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

Battle Creek, Mich.. - 

Bay City, Mich 

Hamtramck, Mich... 

Jackson, Mich 

Muskegon, Mich 

Port Huron, Mich 

Royal Oak, Mich 

Wyandotte, Mich 

Rochester, Minn 

Meridian, Miss 

Joplin, Mo -. 

University City, Mo. 

Butte, Mont 

Great Falls, Mont 

Concord, N. H 

Nashua, N. H-. 

Belleville, N.J 

Bloomfleld, N. J 

Clifton, N.J 

Garfield, N.J 

Hackensack, N. J 

Kearny, N. J 

Montclair, N. J 

New Brunswick, N. J. 
North Bergen, N.J-.. 

Orange, N. J 

Perth Ambov, N.J... 

Plainfleld, N.J 

Teaneck, N. J 

West New York, N. J. 

AV'est Orange, N.J 

Woodbridge, N. J 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Amsterdam, N. Y 

Auburn, N. Y 

Elmira, N. Y 

Jamestown, N. Y 

Kingston, N. Y. 

Newburgh, N. Y 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Rome, N. Y 

Watertown, N. Y 

White Plains, N. Y.. 
High Point, N. C-... 

Raleigh, N. C 

Rocky Mount, N. C 
Wilmington, N. C... 



Number of police-de- 


partment employees 


Police 


Civil- 


Total 


officers 


ians 


38 




38 


46 


6 


52 


46 


10 


56 


34 


2 


36 


44 




44 


51 




51 


44 


5 


49 


33 


4 


37 


54 


4 


58 


36 


3 


39 


47 




47 


115 


3 


118 


66 


4 


70 


56 


4 


60 


84 




84 


46 


5 


51 


63 




63 


34 




34 


57 




57 


52 


3 


55 


68 


2 


70 


53 


3 


56 


50 


4 


54 


51 


4 


55 




2 


38 


55 


8 


63 


69 


20 


89 


91 




93 


60 




60 


48 


1 


49 


38 


4 


42 


25 


1 


26 


45 


6 


51 


26 




26 


40 




40 


31 


5 


• 36 


27 


1 


28 


30 




30 


32 




32 


43 




43 


43 




43 


59 




59 


49 




49 


37 




37 


53 




53 


82 


2 


84 


74 




74 


50 


2 


52 


68 


3 


71 


65 




65 


66 




66 


56 


5 


61 


38 




40 


84 




84 


44 


2 


46 


39 


2 


41 


39 
36 




39 
36 


45 


2 


47 


78 




78 


61 




61 


41 




41 


46 


2 


48 


58 


\ 


59 


35 




35 


40 


'2 


42 


102 




102 


47 




47 


62 


2 


64 


30 


3 


33 


56 




56 



( p u t3 L 1 c ; 



22 



Table 10. — Number of 'police-department employees, and number of auxiliary 
police, Apr. 30, 1942, cities over 25,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 



Fargo, N. Dak 

East Cleveland, Ohio. 

Elyria, Ohio 

.Lima, Ohio 

Lorain, Ohio 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Marion, Ohio 

Massillon, Ohio 

Middletown, Ohio... 

Newark, Ohio 

Norwood, Ohio 

Portsmouth, Ohio 

Steubenville, Ohio 

Warren, Ohio 

Zanesville, Ohio 

Enid, Okla 

Muskosee, Okla 

Salem, Oreg 

Aliquippa, Pa 

Easton, Pa 

Haverford Twp., Pa.. 

Hazelton, Pa_-_ 

Lebanon, Pa 

Lower Merion Twp. 

Pa 

'New Castle, Pa 

Norristown, Pa 

Sharon, Pa 

Washington, Pa 

Wilkinshurg, Pa 

Williamsport, Pa 

Central Falls, R. I... 

Cranston, R. I 

East Providence, R. I 

Newport, R. L 

Warwick, R. I... 

Woonsockef, R. I 



Number of police-de- 
partment employees 



Police Civil- 
oflicers ians 



Num- 
ber of 
auxil- 
iary 
police 



City 



Greenville, S. C 

Spartanburg, S. C... 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak.. 
Johnson City, Tenn. 

Abilene, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Lubbock, Tex 

Port Arthur, Tex.... 

San Angelo, Tex 

Tyler, Tex 

Wichita Falls, Tex. . 

Ogden, Utah 

Burlington, Vt 

Alexandria. Va 

Danville, Va. 

Lynchburg, Va 

Newport News, Va. 

Petersburg, Va 

Bellingham, Wash.. 

Everett, Wash 

Yakima, Wash 

Clarksburg, W.Va.. 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 

Appleton, Wis 

Beloit, Wis 

Eau Claire, Wis 

Fond du Lac, Wis... 

Green Bay, Wis 

Kenosha, Wis. 

La Crosse, Wis 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Sheboygan, Wis 

Superior, Wis 

Wausau, Wis 

Wauwatosa, Wis 

West Allis, Wis 



Number of police-de- 


partment employees 


Police 


Civil- 


Total 


officers 


ians 


58 


1 


59 


50 


1 


51 


46 


6 


52 


21 




21 


39 


2 


41 


36 




36 


32 




32 


26 




26 


27 


3 


30 


30 




30 


74 




74 


45 


2 


47 


32 


1 


33 


53 




53 


51 


1 


52 


52 




52 


07 


3 


70 


44 


3 


47 


30 


1 


31 


35 




35 


33 


i 


34 



Num- 
ber of 
auxil- 
iary 
police 



No report receiv( 



23 


1 


24 


26 




26 


30 


3 


33 


28 




28 


31 




31 


51 


4 


55 


64 


2 


66 


47 


3 


50 


49 




49 


44 




44 


50 




50 


36 




36 


41 




41 


47 


2 


49 



1,000 
240 



25 

"14 

'l83 
12 
1.50 
207 
220 
218 
281 
64 
320 
496 
100 

145 
120 
48 
165 



86 
317 
107 



ANNUAL REPORTS, 1941 

Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1941. 

Last year 27.7 percent of the crinies known to the poHce were 
cleared by the arrest of the offenders. Criminal homicides ranked 
highest in the proportion of solved cases, with 88.1 percent of the mur- 
ders and 86.6 percent of the negligent manslaughters cleared by 
arrest. Arrests w^ere made in 76.2 percent of the rape cases reported 
and in 75.0 percent of other felonious assaults. 

Most crunes reported to the police, however, are offenses against 
property, and in such cases the degree of success in apprehending the 
offenders is considerably less than that experienced in connection 
with the identification and arrest of offenders in assault cases. The 
percentage of clearances for individual offenses against property was 
as follows: Robbery, 40.4; burglary, 32.0; auto theft, 24.4; and 
larceny, 22.7. 

In examining the data presented in table 11 it should be remembered 
there is a distinct difference between the terms, "offenses cleared by 
arrest" and "persons charged," The arrest of one individual may 
clear several crimes, while on the other hand the arrest of several 
persons may clear only one offense. Generally an offense is treated 
as cleared by arrest when one or more of the offenders has been taken 
into custody and made available for prosecution. 

Comprehensive information concerning the number of crimes 
khow^l to have been committeed during the calendar year 1941, 
based on monthly reports, may be found in volume XII, No. 4 of this 
bulletin. By way of supplementing this information, the following 
data were taken from annual crime reports received from the police 
departments in 1,206 cities throughout the country, representing a 
combined population of 39,462,821, which deal with the number of 
crunes disposed of by arrest, the number of persons arrested, and the 
number found guilty. 

The summary presented in table 11 shows the relation between 
offenses committed, offenses cleared by arrest, and persons arrested 
and held for prosecution. To indicate the manner in which the 
tabulation should be interpreted, it may be noted that among the 
group I cities, of every 100 offenses of burglary committed, 33 were 
cleared by the arrest of 17 persons. 

It is found in connection with manslaughter by negligence cases 
that it is the practice of the police in some communities to arrest and 
formally charge w^th manslaughter all drivers of vehicles involved in 

475640—42^ 4 (23) 



24 

traffic fatalities pending the outcome of the investigation. In siun- 
mary tabulations based on the reports from cities where this practice 
is prevalent, the figures for persons arrested for manslaughter by 
negligence will often exceed the number of offenses cleared, and wUl 
sometimes even exceed the number of offenses of manslaughter by 
negligence committed. 

For offenses against property (robbery, burglary, larceny, and auto 
theft), the number of offenses cleared is generally in excess of the 
number of persons charged. Often the police, by questioning an 
individual arrested and investigating his activities, will clear a number 
of previously unsolved crimes, and the tendency of the recidivist to 
repeat the same type of crime is found to be most pronounced on the 
part of persons committing crimes against property. 



25 




26 



Table 11. — Offenses known, offenses cleared hy arrest, and persons charged (held for 
prosecution) , 1941, by population groups, number per 100 knoion offenses 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Population group 



GROUP I 

24 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 16,380,178: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP II 

39 cities, 100.000 to 250,000; total 
population, 5,620,630: 

Offenses known - 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP in 

65 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total pop- 
ulation, 4,574,434: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 



GROUP IV 

127 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total pop- 
ulation, 4,419,505: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



325 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total pop- 
ulation, 4,961,235: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP VI 

626 cities under 10,000; total popu- 
lation, 3,506,839: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged - . 

TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

1,206 cities; total population, 
39,462,821: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 



100.0 
87.6 
85.7 



100.0 
94.4 
89.2 



100.0 

88.4 



100.0 
91.8 
90.1 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



100.0 
75.2 
72.3 



100.0 

88.1 
86.5 



100.0 
88.4 
151.8 



100.0 
86.5 
82.5 



100.0 
77.6 
74.9 



100.0 
86.0 
68.5 



100. 100. 
82. 5 95. 
87. 3 99. 3 



100.0 
69.2 



100.0 
74.6 

84.2 



100.0 
84^8 



100.0 

92! 



100.0 

87.5 
84.2 



100.0 100.0 
76.2 
109.5 



100.0 
40.8 



100.0 
37.6 
41.1 



100.0 



77.5 



100.0 
42.7 
46.0 



100.0 
45.2 
51.8 



100.0 
40.4 
33.4 



vated 
as- 
sault 



100.0 
70.2 
61.6 



100.0 
73.0 



100.0 
78.2 
82.6 



break- 
ing or 
enter- 



Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 



100.0 
87.2 
94.3 



100.0 
75.0 
72.4 



100. 
33.1 
17.2 



100.0 
31.4 
17.9 



100.0 
33.1 
22.4 



100.0 
29.9 
20.8 



100.0 
30.2 
23.1 



100.0 
30.7 



100.0 
32.0 
19.7 



Auto 
theft 



100.0 
20.7 
15.2 



100. 
23.5 
16.3 



100.0 
23.8 
18.3 



100.0 
24.0 
16.3 



100.0 
27. 3 
20.4 



100.0 
22.7 
16.6 



27 




28 

Persons Charged {Held for Prosecution), 1941. 

Although the majority of persons charged by the pohce in the 1,206 
cities represented in tables 11 and 12 were proceeded against for com- 
paratively minor violations, a substantial number were arrested for 
serious crimes as reflected in the following figures: 



Embezzlement and fraud 7, 648 

Stolen property (receiving, etc.) _ 3, 122 

Forgery and counterfeiting 4, 028 

Rape 2,782 

Narcotic drug laws 1, 498 

Weapons 6, 105 



Murder 1, 791 

Manslaughter by negligence 1, 832 

Robbery " 6,832 

Aggravated assault 12, 754 

Burglary 23, 712 

Larceny 58, 716 

Auto theft 12, 477 

Table 12 shows the number of persons charged during 1941 for 
individual offense classes and the number per 100,000 inhabitants for 
cities grouped by size. 

The average figures for cities grouped by size show a wide variation 
in some offense classes in the number of persons charged by the police 
per unit of population. Generally, the figures are higher for the larger 
cities. This is particularly true for offenses of prostitution and com- 
mercialized vice, narcotic violations, liquor law violations, traffic viola- 
tions, and gambling. On the other hand, for driving while intoxicated 
the reports of the smaller cities show a considerably larger number of 
arrests per unit of population. 

The information presented in table 12 is not only valuable to persons 
interested in comparing local figures concerning persons arrested with 
national averages for cities of the same size but also furnishes some 
basis for estimating the number of minor crimes committed. Estimates 
concerning the number of serious crimes committed in the United 
States during 1941 were presented in volume XII, No. 4 of this 
bulletin. 



29 



Table 12.— Posons charged {held for prosecution), 1941, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Offense charged 



Group I 



24 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

16,380,17J 



Group II 



39 cities, 
100, OCO to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
5,620,630 



Group III; Group IV 



65 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
4,574,434 



127 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
4,419,505 



Group V 



325 cities, 
10,000 to 

25,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
4,961,235 



Group VI 



626 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

3,506,839 



Criminal homicide: 

(o) Murder and nonnegli- 
gent manslaughter: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000... 

(6) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000... 
Robbery: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100.000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 

Nimiber of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft; 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 
ing, poFfessing: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution): 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc.: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and 
children: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 _ 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 



927 
5.66 



3,893 
23.8 



5,232 
31.9 



18, 702 
114.2 



8,579 
52.4 



21, 588 
131.8 



4,461 
27.2 



1,256 

7.67 



21,599 
131.9 



3,724 
22.7 



2,690 
16.4 



1 9, 162 
57.0 



2,192,055 
14854.6 



257 
4.67 



245 
4.36 



922 
16.4 



1,832 
32.6 



8,941 
169.1 



3,773 
67.1 



9.560 
170.1 



2,199 
39.1 



1.262 
22.5 



14.1 

384 
6.83 



7,520 
133.8 



2,160 
38.4 



2 4. 871 
88.5 



4,806 
86.5 



5,848 
104.0 



' 805, 549 
14799.8 



270 
5.90 



194 
4.24 



2,267 
49.6 



7,779 
170.1 



1,558 
34.1 



2,054 
44.9 



2,111 
46.1 



2,284 
49.9 



4,922 
107.6 



7,635 
166.9 



590, 340 
12905.2 



122 
2.76 



5,647 

127.8 



2,621 



7,018 
158.8 



241 
5.45 



1,414 
32.0 



541 
12.2 



3 2, 146 
48.9 



2,141 
48.4 



■> 7, 128 
162.3 



10 395, 764 
9212. 4 



965 
19.5 



6.147 
103.7 



2,779 
66.0 



321 
6.47 



1,073 
21.6 



596 
12.0 



'291,413 
5926.3 



73 
2.08 



2,918 
83.2 



4,754 
135.6 



1,416 
40.4 



370 
10.6 



500 
14.3 



373 
10.6 



1,392 
39.7 



8,646 
246.5 



183, 734 
5247. 1 



See footnotes at end of table. 



30 



Table 12. — Persons charged {held for prosecution), 1941, number and rale per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 





Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


Total, 
1,206 

cities; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
39,462,821 


Offense charged 


24 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

16,380,178 


39 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
5,620,630 


65 cities, 
50,000 to 

100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
4,574,434 


127 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 

To'^f 
4,419,505 


325 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
4,961,235 


626 cities 
under 
10,000; 

3,506,839 


Disorderly conduct: 

Number of personscharged. 


81, 314 

496.4 

268,809 
1641. 1 

31,677 
193.4 

36, 832 
224.9 

55,256 


23, 100 
411.0 

137, 945 
2454. 3 

20, 657 
367.5 

10,419 

185.4 

27, 769 
494.1 


22, 272 

486.9 

78, 170 
1708.8 

10, 533 
230.3 

10, 278 
224.7 

22, 280 
487.1 


19,050 
431.0 

65,463 
1481.2 

5,566 
125.9 

3,347 

75.7 

21,775 
492.7 


17,049 
343.6 

72,237 
1456.0 

6,060 
122.1 

3,549 
71.5 

15,230 
307.0 


13, 439 
383.2 

54, 688 
1559.5 

5,452 
155.5 

2,136 
60.9 

10, 135 


176, 224 
446.6 


Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged- 
Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged 
Rate per 100,000-. 


677,312 
1716.3 

79.945 
202.6 


Gambling: 

Number of persons charged. 


66, 561 
168.7 


-Ul other offenses: 

Number of persons charged. 
Rate per 100,000 


152,445 
386.3 



1-13 The number of persons charged ; 
cated below: 



on the reports from the number of cities indi- 



Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


^ 


23 

38 
126 

1,203 
126 
324 

1,204 


16,085,444 
5,505,664 
4, 386, 756 

39,020,372 
4, 392, 299 
4,950,043 

39, 424, 423 


8 


23 
38 
123 
322 
625 
1,196 


14,756,726 


2 


9 


5,442,968 




10 


4,296,002 


4 


11 


4, 917, 287 


5 


12 

13 


3, ,501, 600 




37,489,017 













The foregoing table includes opposite "Traffic and motor vehicle 
laws" persons charged with violations of road and driving laws, park- 
ing regulations, and all other traffic and motor vehicle laws (excluding 
driving while intoxicated). Most of the cities represented, however, 
reported separate figures for each of these three categories and these 
data are presented in table 13 with the cities grouped according 
to size. 

Table 13. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), traffic violations, except driving 
vMle intoxicated, 1941; number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population 
groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


Total, 990 

cities; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
29,971,249 


Offense charged 


21 cities 

over 
250,000; 


30 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 

4^3^10 


55 cities, 
60,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
3,891,307 


89 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
3,156,230 


239 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
3,690,079 


556 cities 
under 
10,000; 
popula- 
2,965,227 


Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons charged. 
Rate per 100,000 


603, 743 
5, 053. 5 

1, 105, 213 
9, 250. 9 

193, 288 
1,617.9 


120,877 
2, 797. 2 

494,931 
11,453.2 

25,254 
584.4 


108, 603 
2, 790. 9 

374, 316 
9,619.3 

28,618 
735.4 


63,554 
2,013.6 

206. 671 
6, 548. 

15,409 

488.2 


74,366 
2,015.3 

166,458 
4,511.0 

19, 829 
537.4 


49, 055 
1,654.3 

70, 874 
2,390.2 

17,409 

587.1 


1,020,198 
3,403.9 


Parking violations: 

Number of persons charged. 
Rate per 100,000 


2,418,463 
8, 069. 3 


Other traflfic and motor vehicle 
laws: 
Number of persons charged . 
Rate per 100,000 


299, 807 
1,000.3 







31 



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o 



p 

o 

Em 

S 

s 

D 

g 

H 
O 



flu 





p^ 


>i 


' r^ 


\ 


H 


lo\\ 




f^ ^^1 


tryr 


P 


^ 






\ V 




s 


.W 


^^^^ 






^ 


\l^^?^"S^v 


^ M^MMMMH 






32 

Offenses Known, Offenses Cleared by Arrest, and Persons Found Guilty, 

Eighty-two percent of all persons charged by the police were found 
guilt}^ by the courts according to the 1941 annual reports received 
from 94 cities over 25,000 in population. The highest proportion of 
convictions was for persons held for traffic violations (84.8 percent 
guilty) and driving while intoxicated (84.5 percent guilty). Only 31.4 
percent of those charged with negligent manslaughter were found 
guilty; however, here again is reflected the practice of some jurisdic- 
tions to arrest and charge with manslaughter all drivers involved in 
traffic fatalities pending the outcome of police investigation, following 
which in many instances no further prosecutive action is had. 

Separate tabulations concerning persons found guilty are presented 
in tables 14 and 15 for the part I and part II classes of offenses re- 
spectively, since the annual reports do not provide for the listing of 
offenses committed for the part IT crimes shown in table 15. The 
offense classes shown in table 15 are not identical with those shown 
in table 12, because some of the reports used in preparing the compi- 
lation relative to persons found guilty did not include separate figures 
for the offense classes which have been consolidated in table 15. 



Table 14. — Offenses known, offenses cleared by arrest, and number of persons found 
guilty, 1941; 94 cittes over 25,000 in population 



[Total population 


, 15,604,056, based on 1940 de 


cennial census] 


















Total 






Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Number 


found 


Per- 




of 


of 


of 


found 


found 


guilty 


Offense (part I classes) 


offenses 
known 


offenses 
cleared 


persons 
charged 


guilty 
of 


guilty 
of 


(of 
offense 


age 
found 
guilty 




to the 


by 


(held for 


offense 


lesser 


charged 




police 


arrest 


prosecu- 


charged 


offense 


or lesser 








tion) 






offense) 




Criminal homicide: 
















(o) Murder and nonnegligent man • 
















slaughter _-- 


839 


729 


704 


317 


90 


407 


57.8 


(6) Manslaughter by negligence-..- 


625 


523 


678 


165 


48 


213 


31.4 




1,817 
12, 889 


1,228 
4,796 


1,185 
3,331 


466 
2,050 


198 
735 


664 

2,785 


56.0 


Robbery 


83.6 




7,631 


5,036 


4,526 


1,903 


771 


2,674 


59.1 




51,517 


15, 254 


7,199 


4,441 


1,453 


5,894 


81.9 


Larceny— theft (except auto theft) 


151, 788 


30, 065 


20, 554 


15, 138 


867 


16, 005 


77.9 




26, 101 


5,540 


3,913 


2,485 


559 


3,044 


77 8 






Total .. 


253, 207 


63, 171 


42, 090 


26, 965 


4,721 


31 686 


75.3 











33 




34 



Table 15. — Number of persons charged (held for prosentlion), and number found 
guilty, 1941; 94 cities over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 15,604,056, based on 1940 decennial census] 



Offense (part II classes) 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud-. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (including prostitution and 

commercialized vice) 

Offenses against the family and children... 

Narcotic drug laws 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness; disorderly conduct and va- 
grancy 

Gambling... 

Driving while intoxicated 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

All other offenses 



Total. 3 2, 104 



Number of 
persons 
charged 
(held for 

prosecution) 



Number 

four d guilty 

of offense 

charged 



9,411 
961 

1,553 
539 

1,392 

11,273 

1 5, 984 

373 

6,262 

187, 377 
24, 223 
11,077 
, 435, 255 
23, 179 



Number 

found guilty 

of lesser 

offense 



1,156 

2 4, 027 

751 



Total found 
guilty (of 

offense 
charged or 
of lesser of- 
fense) 



9,617 
1,096 
1,728 
629 
1,498 

11, 604 
1 6, 069 

382 
6,644 

188, 554 
24,412 

12, 233 
439, 282 

23, 930 



3 8, 819 3 i_ 727, 678 



Percentage 
found guilty 



54.1 
80.0 
57.9 
61.2 
75.5 

69.1 

157.3 

73.9 

78.8 

72.3 
79.0 
84.5 
2 84.8 
59.7 



3 82. 



' Based on reports of 93 cities with a total population of 15,489,090. 

2 Based on reports of 92 cities with a total population of 13,698,255. 

3 The total figures are subject to footnotes 1 and 2. 

Persons Released {Not Held for Prosecution) , 1941. 

In order that the annual reports of persons dealt with by the police 
might reflect the activities of the departments as completely" as possible, 
provision is made not only for listing the number of persons arrested 
and formally charged with the commission of specific crimes but also for 
recording information as to the number of persons taken into custody 
but released by the police without being formally charged. The 
following tabulatio.n shows the number of persons released by the 
police and the number per 100,000 inhabitants in 802 cities representing 
a combined population of 24,254,397. The data are presented for 
cities grouped according to size. 

Figures showing persons released by the police generally represent 
those taken into custody because it was thought they had been mvolved 
in the commission of crimes, who were later released by the police 
without being formally charged either because the police found they 
were innocent or because the evidence available was not sufficient to 
warrant the filing of formal charges against them. The tabulation also 
includes some instances in which youthful persons were released because 
the complaining witnesses refused to prosecute the offender. Individ- 
uals taken into custody and released with a reprimand or on the 
"golden rule" principle are included, as well as persons summoned, 
notified, or cited to appear in court or at a police traffic bureau for 
alleged violations, who failed to appear and were not subsequently 
arrested. 



35 



Table 16. — Persons released without heing held for prosecution, 1941; number and 
rale per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Offense 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegli- 
gent manslaughter: 
Number of persons 

released 

Rate per 100,000.-.. 
(6) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence: 
Number of persons 

released 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or enter- 



Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 
ing, possessing: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 



Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution) : 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc.: 

Number of persons released 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and 
children: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons released. 

Rate per 100,000 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Group I 



18 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 



50 
0.55 



1,875 
20.6 



2,524 
27.8 



157 
1.73 



13, 730 
151.1 



78, 601 
1051. 6 



Group II 



23 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
3,275,978 



11 
0.34 



386 
11.8 



985 
30.1 



43 
1.31 



« 113,483 
3586. 2 



Group III 



46 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
3,223,165 



36 
1.12 



29 
0.90 



351 
10.9 



392 
12.2 



1,471 
45.6 



26 
0.81 



32,954 

1022. 4 



Group IV 



77 cities, 

25,000 to 
50,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

2,717,958 



5 
0.18 



360 
13.2 



0.66 

51 
1.9 

84 



94,656 
3482. 6 



Group V 



240 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion. 



709 
19.2 



31, 841 
861.0 



Group VI 



398 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

2,250,988 



430 
19.1 



742 
33.0 



29 
1.29 



21, 082 
936.6 



36 



Table 



. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, 1941; number and 
rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 





Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 




Offense 


18 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

9,088,039 


23 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
3,275,978 


46 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 

3,223,165 


77 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
2,717,958 


240 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
3,698,269 


398 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

2,250,988 


Total, 802 

cities; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
24,254,397 


Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons released. 
Rate per 100,000 


2,587 
28.5 

38, 197 
420.3 

2,488 
27.4 

9,083 

55, 108 
606.4 

8,454 
93.0 


11,805 
362.2 

559 
17.1 

121 
3.7 

11,233 
342.9 

25.2 


634 
19.7 

6,215 
192.8 

857 
26.6 

275 
8.5 

7 10, 436 
520.8 

1,253 
38.9 


639 
23.5 

3,510 
129.1 

1,510 
55.6 

185 
6.8 

10, 533 
387.5 

3,477 
127.9 


1,382' 

5,358 
144.9 

1,652 
44.7 

190 
5.1 

8,402 
227.2 

2,094 
56.6 


1,645 
73.1 

5,903 
262.2 

2,661 
118.2 

110 
4.9 

6,443 
286.2 

2,266 
100.7 


7,263 
29.9 


Drunkenness: 

Number of persons released. 


71,048 
292.9 


Vagrancy: 

Number of persons released. 
Rate per 100,000 


9,727 
40.1 


OambliP'': 

Number of persons released. 
Rate per 100,000 


9,964 
41.1 


Suspicion: 

Number of persons released. 
Rate per 100,000 


8 108, 155 
447.2 


All other offenses: 

Num ber of persons released. 
Rate per 100,000 


18, 370 
75.7 







The number of persons released and the rate are based on the reports from the number of cities indicated 



Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


1 


17 
22 
800 
17 


8, 793, 305 
3,161,012 
23,844,697 
7, 464, 587 


5 • . 


22 
800 

45 
801 


3, 164, 398 






22, 519, 365 




y 


3, 155, 718 


4 

4 


o 


24, 186, 950 









The figriires in table 16 opposite the classification "Traffic and motor 
vehicle laws" include all types of violations of traffic laws, since more 
detailed information was not included on many of the reports used. 
However, the reports of 521 cities did show separate figures concerning 
persons released by the police for (1) violations of road and driving 
laws, (2) parking violations, and (3) violations of other traffic and 
motor vehicle laws. These data are presented in table 17. Warning 
tags issued in some cities for minor violations of traffic regulations are 
included. 



37 

Table 17. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, traffic violations, 
except driving while intoxicated, 1941; number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, 
by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 




Offense charged 


9 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

3,951,823 


12 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
1,665,604 


25 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
I)opula- 

tion. 
1,766,561 


45 cities, 

25,000 to 
50,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

1,610,925 


156 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
2,364,117 


274 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

1,531,519 


Total, 521 

cities; 
total pop- 
ulation, 
12, 890, 549 


Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons released. 


26, 541 
671.6 

37,612 
951.8 

14,274 
361.2 


13, 781 
827.4 

91, 835 
5, 513. 6 

7,863 
472.1 


1,423 
80.6 

28, 697 
1, 624. 5 

1, 823 
103.2 


5,798 
359.9 

40, 922 
2, 640. 3 

10, 843 
673.1 


12, 168 
514.7 

63, 577 
2, 689. 2 

2,627 
111.1 


8,061 
526.3 

31, 447 
2, 053. 3 

3,412 
222.8 


67, 772 


Parking violations: 

Number of persons released. 


294. 090 
2,281.4 

40. 842 
316 8 


Other traffic and motor vehicle 
laws: 
Number of persons released. 
Rate per 100,000 







Percentage of Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1936-41. 

Annual trends in the percentage of offenses cleared by arrest for 
the period 1936-41 are presented in table 18. The proportion of 
criminal homicides, aggravated assaults, burglaries, and auto thefts 
cleared during 1941 was higher than in 1940 and was higher than the 
average figures for 1936-40. A rather steady improvement is re- 
flected during recent years in the percentage of negligent man- 
slaughters and auto thefts cleared. On the other hand the trends in 
the percentage of rapes and larcenies cleared by arrest during recent 
years have been downward, with the figures for 1941 the lowest for 
those offense classes during the past 6 years. 

Table 18. — Percentage of offenses cleared by arrest, 1936-41 
[Poiiulation figures from 1940 deceimial census] 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Year 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


1936 


82.1 
81.5 
86.4 
84.8 
77.4 


70.9 
80.9 
80.6 
81.1 
83.7 


72.7 
77.0 
77.9 
76.4 
73.7 


41.8 
38.8 
41.3 
39.5 
40.3 


68.1 
70.3 
69.0 

67.7 
68.4 


34.0 
32.5 
33.6 
33.7 
33.1 


25.2 
23.8 
22.4 
22.3 
21.8 


17.3 
19.1 


1937 


1938 


1939 .. 


19.8 


1940 






Average 1936-40 


82.4 
88.4 


79.4 
85.9 


75.6 
70.2 


40.4 
39.4 


68.7 
70.4 


33.4 
33.7 


23.0 
21.2 


19.4 
22.9 


1941 





38 

Offenses Known, Offenses Cleared y Arrest, and Persons Charged, by 
Geographic Divisions, 1941. 

In order to make possible the comparison of local figures concerning 
offenses cleared and persons arrested with average figures for other 
cities in the same section of the country the annual reports used in 
preparirg the tabulations shown in tables 11 and 12 were grouped by 
geographic divisions in order to prepare the data presented in tables 
19 and 20. For a list of the States included in each of the nine geo- 
graphic divisions reference may be made to the data immediately 
preceding table 4 of this issue of the bulletin. 

Marked variations in the number of persons arrested in the several 
geographic divisions are to be expected, since variations are regularly 
seen in the number of offenses committed per unit of population in the 
different sections of the country. 

Theoretically, an offender should be charged with the offense 
committed, as indicated by the police investigation; however, as a 
matter of practice, the charge placed against the offender by the 
police is sometimes dependent upon the policy and practice of other 
officials, such as the prosecuting attorneys and judges. Local prac- 
tices are, of course, materially affected by public opinion in the com- 
munity and established customs. For example, persons arrested for 
drunkenness in some localities may be charged with disorderly 
conduct; and persons arrested for felonious assault may be charged 
with a misdemeanor assault. 



39 



Table 19. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage of offenses cleared by 
arrest, 1941, by geographic divisions 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Oeograpliic division 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 



ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 



Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 



NEW ENGLAND STATES 

121 cities; total population, 3,900,519: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percent^e cleared by arrest 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

294 cities; total population, 7,636,733: 

Number of oflenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

326cities; total population,13,443,471: 

Number of oflenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest.— 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

148 cities; total population, 4,235,- 
150: 

Number of oflenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 

; cities; total population, 3,194,937: 

Number of oflenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 

17 cities; total population, 454,746: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest... 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 

52 cities; total population, 2,310,742: 

Number of oflenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



MOUNTAIN STATES 



43 cities; total population, 978,976: 
Number of oflenses known 



Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest... 

PACIFIC STATES 

121 cities; total population, 3,307,- 
547: 

Number of oflenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest... 



191 
181 
94.8 



162 
149 
92.0 



533 
491 
92.1 



30 
76.9 



140 
118 
84.3 



442 
364 
82.4 



173 
159 
91.9 



44 

41 

93.2 



71 

65 

91.5 



922 
57.7 



11, 321 
4,099 
36.2 



1,294 

584 
45.1 



2,090 



237 
45.3 



326 
250 

76.7 



2,063 
1,819 

88.2 



5,137 
3,003 

58.5 



5,023 
4,254 
84.7 



676 
500 
74.0 



2,202 
1.756 
79.7 



243 
200 
82.3 



11, 306 
3,294 
29.1 



14, 213 
5,451 
38.4 



41, 601 
12, 492 



11,528 
3,981 
34.5 



13,448 
4,327 
32.2 



1,587 
516 
32.5 



4,253 
1,463 
34.4 



14, 287 
4,027 
28.2 



25, 193 
5,193 
20.6 



31,627 
8,912 
28.2 



123, 505 

23, 932 

19.4 



10, 222 
27.9 



39, 766 

10, 785 

27.1 



7,841 
26.7 



15, 504 
2,852 
18.4 



49, 214 
9,435 
19.2 



40 



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DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Source of Data. 

During the first 6 months of 1942 tlie FBI examined 305,570 arrest 
records, as evidenced by fingerprint cards, in order to obtain data 
concerning the age, sex, and race of the persons represented. The 
compilation has been limited to instances of arrests for violation of 
State laws and municipal ordinances. In other words, fingerprint 
cards representing arrests for violations of Federal laws or representing 
commitments to any type of penal institution have been exchided from 
this tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint records examined was somewhat smaller 
than for the first half of 1941, which was 313,204. The tabulation 
of data from fingerprint cards obviously does not include all persons 
arrested, since there are individuals taken into custody for whom no 
fingerprint cards are forwarded to Washington. Furthermore, data 
pertaining to persons arrested should not be treated as information 
regarding the number of offenses committed, since two or more per- 
sons may be involved in the joint commission of a single offense, and 
on the other hand one person may be arrested and charged with the 
commission of several separate crimes. 

Offense Charged. 

More than 35 percent (109,101) of the records examined during 
the first 6 months of 1942 represented arrests for major violations. 
Persons charged with murder, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, 
and auto theft numbered 75,534, which is 25 percent of the total arrest 
records examined. 

Sex. 

During the first half of 1942, 10.2 percent (31,045) of the records 
represented women. This is an increase over the corresponding 
period in 1941, when the percentage was 9.1. 

Age. 

During the first half of 1942, age 19 continued to predominate in 
the frequency of aiTests, and was followed by ages 18 and 21, respec- 
tively. Figures for the individual age groups in which the largest 
number of arrests occurred during the first half of 1942 are as follows: 

Number of 
Age ; arrests 

19 12,991 

18 12,865 

21 11,946 

20 11,830 

22 10, 180 

(42) 



43 

The percentage of the total persons arrested who were less than 
21 years old was 18.5 for the first half of 1942 and 17.2 for the cor- 
responding; period in 1941. 

In additioTi to the 56,462 persons less than 21 years old arrested 
and fingerprmted during the first 6 months of 1942, there were 40,841 
(13.4 percent) between the ages of 21 and 24, making a total of 97,303 
(31.8 percent) less than 25 years old. Age group 25-29 accounted for 
an additional 44,215 (14.5 percent) resulting in a total of 141,518 
(46. 3 percent) less than 30 years of age. 

The participation of youthful offenders in crimes against property 
is revealed by an examination of the age distribution of all persons 
arrested for such crimes. During the first 6 months of 1942 there 
were 65,287 persons of all ages arrested for robbery, burglary, lar- 
ceny, auto theft, embezzlement and fraud, forgery and counterleiting, 
receiving stolen property, and arson; and 23,465 (35.9 percent) of those 
persons were less than 21 years old. The upward trend of youths' 
participation in crimes against property is indicated by the fact 
that the corresponding percentage for the first half of 1941 was 33.7. 

Further details of the picture of youth in crime are shown by the 
following figures. During the first half of 1942, 31.8 percent of all 
persons arrested were less than 25 years of age. However, persons 
less than 25 years old numbered 57.0 percent of those charged with 
robbery, 65.0 percent of those charged with burglary, 49.3 percent of 
those charged with larceny, and 76.6 percent of those charged with 
auto theft. Alore than one-half of all crimes against property during 
the first 6 months of 1942 were committed by persons under 25 years 
of age. 



44 



Table 21. — Distribution of arrests by sex, Jan. 1-June 30 


19J^2 




Offense charged 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 




2,900 
6,181 
18, 542 
13, 966 
27, 488 
6,457 
6,154 
1,730 
348 
2,963 
2,875 
4,186 
5,746 
585 
3,134 
4,987 

lb, 778 
3,741 
7 
4,734 
18, 021 
73, 338 
22, 259 


2,545 
5,941 
16, 706 
13, 688 
24, 602 
6, 331 
5,746 
1,619 
324 
2,756 
2,875 
1,172 
4,475 
502 
2,948 
4,833 
3.638 
15,298 
3,644 
7 
4,612 
15, 396 
68. 178 
18, 306 
6, 835 
24, 319 
1,223 
16, 006 


355 

240 

1, 836 

278 

'l26 
408 
111 
24 
207 


0.9 
2.0 
6.1 
4.6 
9.0 
2.1 
2.0 
.6 
.1 
1.0 
.9 
1.4 

i!o 

1.6 
1.5 
5.2 
1.2 
(') 
1.5 
5.9 
24.0 
7.3 
2.4 
9.1 
.5 
6.0 


0.9 
2.2 
6.1 
5.0 

9.0 
2.3 
2.1 

.6 

.1 
1.0 
1.0 

.4 
1.6 

.2 
1. I 
1.8 
1.3 
5.6 
1.3 
(1) 
1.7 
5.6 
24.8 
6.7 
2.5 
8.9 

.4 
5.8 








Assault 


5 9 






Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 


9.3 

4 






Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 


4 


Arson 


1 






Rape - 




Prostitution and commercialized vice 


3,014 

1,271 

83 

154 
999 
480 
97 


9.7 


Narcotic drug laws 






.6 


Offenses against family and children 


. 5 


Liquor laws 


3.2 




1.5 




.3 


Parking violations 






122 
2,625 
5,160 
3,953 

422 
3,638 

162 
2,208 


.4 


Disorderly conduct 


8.5 


Drunkenness 


16.6 
12.7 


Gambling 


7,257 
27, 957 

1,385 
18, 214 


1.4 




11.7 


Not stated 


.5 




7.1 






Total 


305, 570 


274, 525 


31,045 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



' Less than Ho of 1 percent. 



45 

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46 



Table 23. — Nurnher and percentage 
Jan. 1- 



of arrests of persons under 25 years of age, 
-June 30, 1942 



Offense charged 



Total 
number 
of persons 
arrested 



Number 

under 21 

years of 

age 



Total 
number 
under 25 

years of 
age 



Percent- 
age under 
21 years 
of age 



Total 
percent- 
age under 
25 years 

of age 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery... 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice_. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children- 
Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion ■ 

Not stated 

All other offenses 

Total 



2,900 
6,181 
18, 542 
13, 966 
27, 488 
6,457 
6,154 
1,730 
348 
2,963 
2,875 
4,186 
5,746 
585 
3,134 
4,987 
4,637 
15, 778 
3,741 
7 
4,734 
18, 021 
73, 338 
22, 259 
7,257 
27, 957 
1,385 
18, 214 



2,108 
2,489 
6,780 
9,337 
3,720 
584 

65 
563 
906 
420 
974 

40 
679 
275 
400 
753 
784 



1,036 
3,021 
3,470 
4,369 

513 
7,132 

256 
5,059 



3,522 

5,428 

9,081 

13, 549 

4,945 

1,378 

533 

107 

1,037 

1,475 

1,488 

1,952 

97 

1,179 

943 

899 

2,247 

1,522 

2 

1,992 

5,857 

8,833 

7,528 

1,210 

11,461 

430 

7,716 



14.5 
34.1 
13.4 
48.5 
34.0 
57.6 
9.5 
17.8 
18.7 
19.0 
31.5 
10.0 
17.0 
6.8 
21.7 
5.5 
8.6 
4.8 
21.0 



21.9 
16.8 

4.7 
19.6 

7.1 
25.5 



57.0 
29.3 
65.0 
49.3 
76.6 
22.4 
30.8 
30.7 
35.0 
51.3 
35. 5 
34.0 
16.6 
37.6 
18.9 
19.4 
14.2 
40.7 
28.6 
42.1 
32. 5 
12.0 
33.8 
16.7 
41.0 
31.0 
42.4 



305, 570 



56,462 



97, 303 



Race. 

Most of the persons represented in this tabulation were members of 
the white and '^ Negro races. Including Mexicans, ''who numbered 
10,063, members of the white race represented 229,223 of the 305,570 
arrest records received, while 73,028 were Negroes, 1,789 Indians, 
436 Chinese, 323 Japanese, and 771 were representatives of other races. 



OFFENSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in part I and 
part II offenses, there foUows a brief definition of each classification: 

Part I Offenses. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter includes aU 
wilful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 
Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to kiU, suicides, accidental deaths, or 
justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides excluded from this classification are 
limited to the following types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer 
in line of duty; (2) The killing of a hold-up man by a private citizen, (b) Man- 
slaughter by negligence includes any death which the police investigation estab- 
Ushes was primarily attributable to gross negligence on the part of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — victim under 
age of consent), assault to rape, and attempted rape. 

3. Robbery.— Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kiU; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids. Does not 
include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, even though no force 
was used to gain entrance. Includes attempted burglary. Burglary followed by 
larceny is included in this classification and not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny— theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value; 
(6) under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article of value which is 
not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes aU cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Does not include 
taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized use 
by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Part II Offenses. 

8. Other assaults. — -Includes all assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Includes offenses dealing with the making, 
altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is 
made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Includes all offenses of fraudulent conversion, 
embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Includes buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property as well as attempts to commit any of those offenses. 

(47) 



48 

12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — Includes all violations of regulations 
or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufactur- 
ing of deadly weapons or silencers and all attempts to violate such statutes or 
regulations. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Includes sex offenses of a commercial- 
ized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as prostitution, keeping bawdy 
house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for immoral purposes. 

14. Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution and commercialized vice).^ — In- 
cludes offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, and the like. Includes 
attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of nonsupport, 
neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as 
unlawful possession, sale, or use. Exclude Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of "Drunkenness" (class 18) and "Driving 
while intoxicated" (class 22), liquor law violations, State or local, are placed in 
this class. Exclude Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all offenses of drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Includes all charges of committing a breach of the 
peace. 

20. Vagrancy. — Includes such offenses as vagabondage, beggmg, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, permitting, or engaging in 
gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Includes driving or operating any motor vehicle 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws. — Includes violations of regulations with 
respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to prevent accidents. 

24. Parking violations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Includes violations of 
State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and motor vehicles 
not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws for which 
no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as suspicious 
characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, who are released with- 
out formal charges being placed against them. 

o 



^ ...; 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 




ISSUED BY THE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Volume XIII Number 2 

ANNUAL BULLETIN, 194 2 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume XIII— Number 2 
ANNUAL BULLETIN, 1942 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




International Association of Chiefs of Poli 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1943 



Contents 

Page 

Summary of volume XIII, No. 2 49-90 

Classification of offenses 50-51 

Extent of reporting area 51 

Monthly reports: 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to population 

(table 24) 52-53 

Annual trends, offenses known to the police (table 25) 54-59 

Monthly variations, offenses known to the police (table 26) 60-63 

Offenses known to the police — cities divided according to location 

(tables 27-29) 64-69 

Offenses in individual cities over 25,000 in population (table 30) 70-77 

Data from Supplementary offense reports (tables 31-33) 77-80 

Offenses known to sheriffs and State police (tables 34-35) 80-81 

Offenses known in Territories and possessions (table 36) 81 

Estimated number of major crimes, 1941-42 (table 37) 82-84 

Data compiled from fingerprint cards, 1942: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested (table 38) 85-86 

Age distribution of persons arrested (tables 39-41) 87-92 

Percentage with previous fingerpi int record (table 42) 92-93 

Race distribution of persons arrested (table 43) 93 

Definition of part I and part II offense classifications 94-95 

Index to volume XIII 96-97 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The members of the Board of OflScers of the International Asso- 
ciation of Chiefs of Police were contacted in December 1942 and 
each member emphasized that the police statistics compiled under 
the Uniform Crime Reporting program are indispensable to the ef- 
ficient administration of law enforcement in this Nation. Since the 
inception of the program in 1930 the number of local law enforce- 
ment agencies contributing crime reports to the FBI has steadily 
increased. It is generally recognized that now more than ever 
before is there a need for the data made available under Uniform 
Crime Reporting. This is evident from an examination of the some- 
what unusual crime trends during America's first war year as re- 
flected in this issue of the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin. While 
it is recognized that some departments may now be operating with a 
shortage of experienced employees, the necessity for the mainte- 
nance of adequate records and accurate statistical summaries should 
not be overlooked. These essential elements of police administra- 
tion during peacetime become vital during the war when crime prob- 
lems are so apt to change rapidly as a result of disruptions in our 
social and economic structure, which necessarily accompany the war 
eflFort. 

(11) 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department of 
Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume XIII January 1943 Number 2 



SUMMARY 

Crime Trends, 1939-42. 

A 7.2-percent increase in crimes against the person and a 5.8-percent 
decrease in crimes against property were noted during 1942 in com- 
parison with the 3-year average for 1939-41, according to the monthly 
reports received from 3 1 8 of the largest cities in the country. Murders 
mcreased 1.6 percent; negligent manslaughters, 1.3 percent; aggra- 
vated assaults, 7.6 percent; and rapes, 11.2 percent. Burglaries 
decreased 13.2 percent; robberies, 9.6 percent; auto thefts, 5.4 percent; 
and larcenies, 2.9 percent. 

Compared with 1941, there was an increase during 1942 in the 
average value of property stolen per offense of burglary, larceny, and 
auto theft. Although the number of thefts from autos decreased 20 
percent in 1942, bicycle thefts increased 10.1 percent; shoplifting, 9.2 
percent; and pocket-picking, 15.6 percent. While there was a 24.4 
percent decrease in the number of robberies of stores and other com- 
mercial houses, highway robberies increased 11.5 percent in 1942. 
Estimated Number of Major Crimes, 1942. 

An estimated total of 1,436,748 major crimes occurred in the con- 
tinental United States during 1942. During an average day there 
were 31 felonious homicides, 27 rapes, and 142 other felonious assaults, 
129 robberies, 729 burglaries, 459 car thefts, and 2,416 miscellaneous 
larcenies — a crime every 21.9 seconds on the average. 
Monthly Variations in Crime. 

Murders, rapes, and other felonious assaults in 1942 were least fre- 
quent during the first quarter and most frequent during the third, 
with August the peak month for each of these crimes. Negligent 
manslaughters, following the seasonal curve of traffic deaths, were 
least frequent during the summer months and most frequent during 
the winter. 

Robberies last year showed the usual seasonal variations in fre- 
quency of high in winter and low in summer. Over 50 percent more 

(49) 



50 

roliberies occurred during January than in August. Burglaries were 
DKist frequent during the winter months and lowest in number during 
the late siunmer and early fall. They were over 30 percent more 
f)c*(iient during January-March than in September and October. 

A.uto thefts, whLch are generally most frequent during the winter 
months and least frequent in the summer, generally followed that 
seayoual curve last year. Larcenies, contrary to the usual seasonal 
frwjuoncy pattern, were most frequent during the first quarter and 
lea«t frequent dfiring the last. 
Clime Rates, 1942, 

Except for aggravated assault and larceny, cities with over 100,000 
iiiljabitants reported more offenses per unit of population during 1942 
t))an the smaller communities. Aggravated assaults occurred with 
greatest frequency in cities with population of 25,000 to 100,000, and 
larceny rates in ^•L^.ies of that population group exceeded the larceny 
i-aU'.s for cities wirh population in excess of 250,000. 

Tabulations are iin-luded in this issue of the bulletin showing the 
mimljor of offenses reported and the rate per 100,000 inhabitants for 
cities grouped by size and location. 
/^cisons Arrested. 1942. 

Of the 585,988 tic igerprint arrest records examined last year, 70,353 
(12.0 percent) represented women. Fingerprint cards of arrested 
woimui receivttti dnring 1942 increased 21.7 percent in number over 
tliuHB received during 1941. Male arrests decreased 10.0 percent. 

For arrests of persons less than 21 years of age, males decreased 3.6 
yierce.at and females increased 55.7 percent. The fingerprint cards 
received representing females under 21 years of age arrested for pros- 
titutiou increast^'d »U.S percent; for other sex offenses, 104.7 percent; 
for vagrancy, L24.":; percen^t; for disorderly conduct, 69.6 percent; 
M.i);i for drunkentur^ss, 39.9 periCent. 

Of the total fingerprint arrest records received last year 49.1 percent 
iCfircHented persons who already had fingerprint recoi-ds on file in the 
Identification Division of the FB 1. 

Tlie wartime iLicrease in crime and delinquency among wonu'n and 
gjri^ spotlights the need for redoubled efforts to keep the borne front 
clenn, wholesoitit^ itid strong. 

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 

Tlio t(vrm"offe[ises known to the police" is designed to incliuk* those 
O'injos designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the [xoiLtce jurisdiction, whether they become known to the 
j:)oiice through L-Bpi«>rt5 of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting or 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of Siu^eii classes ot grave oft'enses, shown by experience to be those 



51 



most genorally and completely reported to the poh« v Criminal iionii- 
cide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaii<:]jtcr, and (6) man- 
slaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated ussault; burglary— 
breaking or entering; laj-cen_y — theft; and auto t-Leit. The figurt's 
contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes of tiie 
desigmited classes. In other words, an attempted b inglary or robbei'v , 
for example, is reported in the bulletin in the saifK manner as if tlse 
crime had been completed. Attempted murdiis, however, arc 
reported as aggravated assaults. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefifiT+ all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the law-enforce- 
ment agencies of contributing communities and not merely arrests or 
cleared cases. Complaints which upon investigatk'ij are learned to be 
groundless are not included in the tabulations wbkL follow. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police lu different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on probleniH of 
crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were ap|jr,r<ajtly incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded . 

In the last section of this bulletin may be found brief definitionM of 
part I and part II offense classifications. 

EXTENT OF REPORTING AREA 

In the table which follows, there is shown tlR uumber of police 
departments from which one or more crime reports were received din- 
ing the calendar year 1942. Information is presented for the cities 
divided according to size, and the population figures employed are 
from the 1940 decennial census. 





Total 
number 
of cities 
or towns 


Cities filing returns 




Population rei)ie 
sented in returns 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Peieent 


Total 


1,077 


1,012 


93.96 


62. 71 f), 897 


61, 444. 880 


97.0/ 






1 Cities over 250,000 


37 
55 
107 
213 
665 


37 
55 
105 
203 
612 


. 100.00 
100. 00 
98.13 
95.31 
92.03 


30. IV.,, 339 
..792.650 
7. J.41-., 917 
7.437, 093 
i(. W.(i. 898 


30, 195, 339 
7, 792, 650 
7, 210, 969 
7, 032, 829 
9, 213, 093 


100. ne 


2 Cities 100 000 to 250,000 


100. DO 


3. Cities 50,000 to 100,000 


98. 19 


4 Cities 25,000 to 50,000 


94. 82 


5. Cities 10,000 to 25,000 


0i44 









Note.— The above table does not include 2,018 cities, villages, and rur&"; ic-wnships aggregating n total 
population of 9,958,527. The cities and villages included in this figure are rridst; ol less than 10,000 popula- 
tion filing returns, whereas the rural townships are of varying population firoups 

In addition to the 3,030 city and village police departments which 
forwarded crime reports during 1942, one or more reports were re- 
ceived during the year from 1,924 sheriffs and State PoHce organiza- 
tions and from 9 agencies in Territories and possrssaons of the United 
States. There was, therefore, a grand total of 4 963 agencies (Con- 
tributing crime reports to the FBI during 1942. During 194 J tlie 
corresponding figure was 4,898. 



MONTHLY REPORTS 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Population. 

Following the pattern of prior years, the cities with more than 
100,000 inhabitants generally reported more offenses per miit of popu- 
lation during 1942 than the smaller communities. Exceptions to this 
were noted m the figures for aggi-avated assault and larceny. The 
assaults with intent to kill occurred with greatest frequency in cities 
with population from 25,000 to 100,000, and for larceny the crime 
rates in cities from 25,000 to 100,000 exceeded the number of these 
offenses per unit of population in cities with over 250,000 inhabitants. 

In order that police administrators and other interested officials 
may have available to them national averages with reference to the 
extent of crime in cities of varymg population groups, the number of 
offenses reported during 1942 and the rate per 100,000 inhabitants are 
presented in table 24. The data are based on monthly crime reports 
received from 2,119 cities representing a combmed population of 
65,322,511. The cities have been divided into six groups according 
to size, and similar data divided further on a regional basis may be 
found in table 29. State crime rates are shown in table 28. 

The following tabulation shows the percentage distribution of the 
crimes reported for 1942: 



Offense 


Rate per 
100,000 


Percent 


Offense 


Rate per 
100,000 


Percent 


Total 


1, 487. 2 


100.0 


Aggravated assault 


52.1 
47.1 
10.1 
5.5 
4.0 


3.5 






3.2 


T arpOTiv 


906.0 
294.8 
167.6 


60.9 
19.8 
11.2 


Rape, 

Murder 






.4 






.3 









Although the foregoing figures indicate that only 4.9 percent of the 
crunes represented in table 24 were offenses against the person it is 
observed that the cities reported a total of 6,242 criminal homicides, 
6,602 rapes, and 34,029 other felonious assaults. Robbery which 
constituted only 3.2 percent of the reported crunes totaled 30,784. 

The estimated total of serious crimes committed in the United 
States during 1942 is presented in table 37. 

(52) 



53 



Tabi.k 24. — Offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
monher ami rate per 100.000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population fisrures from 1940 decennial census] 



194^; 



Population 
group 



GROUP I 

36 cities over 250,000; total pop- 
ulation. 29.894,166: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP n 

55 cities, 100,000 to 250.000; total 
population, 7,792,650: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP in 

95 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 6,587,945: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate perl00,000 



GROUP IV 



191 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 6,653,497: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP V 

530 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 8,054,247: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP VI 

1,212 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 6,340,006: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

2,119 cities; total population, 
65.322,511: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



1.845 
6.17 



268 
3.33 



221 
3.49 



3,617 
5.54 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



264 
4.01 



298 
4.48 



2,625 
4.02 



Rape 



707 
9.07 



621 
7.71 



6,602 
10.11 



Rob- 
bery 



3,815 
49.0 



2,465 
37.4 



1,855 
27.9 



4,367 
56.0 



4,662 
70.8 



2,450 
30.4 



1,775 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



20, 355 
309.0 



18, 252 
274.3 



17, 350 
' 215.4 



11,503 
181.4 



1 164. 892 
294.8 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



82. 741 
1,061.8 



71. 055 
1, 078. 6 



67, 052 
1, 007. 8 



62. 059 
770.5 



32. 986 
520.3 



Auto 
theft 



1 The number of offenses and rate for burglary and larceny— theft are based on reports as follows: Group 
I, 34 cities, total population, 20,507,837; groups I-VI, 2,117 cities, total population, 55,936,182. 



54 



Annual Crime Trends 

PERCENT CHANGE. 1912 \S. A\EKA(;E 1939-11 

OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE - 318 CITIES, TOTAL POPULATION 45.062.198 

Offenses Against the Person 

Each Square Equals 1% 



Murder 



Negligent Aggravated 
Manslaughter Assault 




Offenses Against Property 

Each Square Equals 1 % 



Robbery Burglary Larceny Auto Theft 




Figure 



55 

Annual trends, offenses knoicn to the police. 

In examining the annual crime trends, it appears appropriate to 
compare 1942, the first full year of our participation in the war, with 
the 3-year average for 1939-41, which from the viewpoint of the 
Tnited States might be considered a pre-war average. 

Monthly crime reports received from 318 of the Nation's largest 
cities reflect a 7.2 percent increase in crimes of violence committed 
against persons (homicides, rapes, and other felonious assaults) during 
the calendar year 1942 as compared with the 3-year average for 1939- 
41. The increases for individual offense classes are as follows: Rape, 
11.2 percent; aggrav^ated assault, 7.6 percent; murder, 1.6 percent; 
and negligent manslaughter, 1.3 percent. 

A 5.8 percent decrease was noted m offenses against property 
(robbery, burglary, larceny, and auto theft) durmg 1942 as compared 
with the pre-war average. Burglary decreased 13.2 percent; robbery, 
9.6 percent; auto theft, 5.4 percent; and offenses of larceny decreased 
2.9 percent. 

Offenses of rape shewed increases in each of the nine geographic 
divisions with the exception of the Middle Atlantic and West South 
Central States which showed decreases of 3.0 percent and 10.4 percent 
respectively. In the Pacific States these offenses increased 44.6 per- 
cent, and a 74.1 percent increase in rape was reported for cities in the 
Mountain States. 

The New England, Middle Atlantic, and East South Central States 
showed decreases in aggravated assaults during 1942 but all other 
geographic divisions showed increases. The most pronounced rise 
occurred in the Mountain and West North Central States where in- 
creases of 30.1 percent and 39.0 percent, respectively, were reported. 

As to murder, the New England, Middle Atlantic, West North 
Central, and East South Central geographic divisions showed decreases. 
The other five geographic divisions showed increases. The largest 
decrease in murder occurred in the New England States (—8.6 per- 
cent), while the West South Central States showed a murder increase 
of 10.0 percent, and a 13.9 percent increase was reported in the 
Pacific States. 

Only three of the nine geographic divisions showed increases in 
negligent manslaughters last year. The most pronounced increases 
occurred in the West North Central States ( + 20.7 percent) and in the 
Mountain States (+70.7 percent). The East South Central States 
reported a 36.7 percent decrease in negligent manslaughters. 

With reference to the slight increase in negligent homicides last 
year in the Nation as a whole, it should be observed that the majority 
of these offenses grow out of traffic fatalities. The effect of wartime 
restrictions on the use of automobiles has already sharply reduced 
the number, of negligent m,anslaughters, as evidenced by the fact that 



56 

the December 1942 figure was 27.6 percent below the precedmg 
3-year average for December. 

The 13.2 percent decrease in burglaries last year was accompanied 
by a rather steady downward trend from the beginning to the end of 
the year. These decreases generally became more pronounced from 
month to month and the December 1942 figure for burglary was 24.9 
percent under the December average for the previous three years. 
All geographic divisions showed decreases except the Mountain States 
where a 22.3 percent increase was reported. The most pronounced 
decrease in burglary occurred in the Pacific States where the number 
of such crimes was 20.8 percent less than the average for 1939-41. 

Robberies wliicli declined 9.6 percent last year from the preceding 
3-year average likewise showed a general downward trend throughout 
the year, although the January and May figures exceeded the averages 
for those months by 3.7 percent and 4.2 percent, respectively. The 
most pronounced decrease in robbery occurred in November during 
which month the number of these crimes reported was 23.3 percent 
less than the previous 3-year average for November. All geographic 
divisions showed decreases with the exception of the South Atlantic 
and Mountain States where the robbery offenses increased 7.7 percent 
and 20.3 percent, respectively. The West North Central States 
showed a pronounced decrease in robbery of 40.8 percent. 

Auto thefts began the year 1942 with an 11.5 percent increase in 
January. A rather defuiite downward trend in these offenses was 
noted during the rest of the year, and the number of auto thefts 
reported in December showed a 26.7 percent decrease when compared 
with the average December figure for 1939-41. This general down- 
ward trend in auto thefts resulted in a 5.4 percent decrease for the year. 
Three geographic divisions (Mountain, West South Central, and East 
South Central) showed increases in auto thefts, the largest rise occur- 
ring in the East South Central States (+18.5 percent). The West 
North Central States reported a 16.9 percent decrease. 

Offenses of larceny showed a 2.9 percent decrease last year from the 
average figure for 1939-41. For the first seven months of the year 
these offenses exceeded the previous 3-year averages, but during the 
last five months of 1942 larcenies took a sharp drop. January 1942 
larcenies exceeded the previous 3-year average for that month by 
13.2 percent, while the figure for December was 26.7 percent less than 
the average December figure for 1939-41. 

The New England States reported a 4.7 percent increase in larcenies 
last year over the previous 3-year average and the South Atlantic 
States reported an increase of 9.9 percent. For both the East 
South Central and Mountain geographic divisions larcenies showed 
increases of 10.0 percent. All other geographic divisions reported 



57 

decreases in larcenies, the most pronounced occui-ring in the West 
North Central States (—12.1 percent). 

Table 25 shows by geographic divisions the number of offenses 
reported by 318 cities with over 25,000 inhabitants during the years 
1939-42, together with the 3-year average for 1939-41. 

The increase in crimes against the person, notwithstanding the fact 
that several millions of American men are in the armed services, is 
apparentl}^ an indication that crimes of passion tend to increase during 
a war period, due possibly to a partial break-down in normal restraints 
and inhibitions. 

On the other hand, the decrease in offenses against property (rob- 
bery, burglary, larceny, and auto theft) is apparently attributable to 
(1) the large number of men in the armed services, (2) severe restric- 
tions placed on the use of private automobiles, and (3) increased 
employment. 

The restrictions on the use of private automobiles cause more 
automobiles to be locked in garages, thus reducing the possibility of 
theft of the auto, as well as the danger of theft of auto accessories. 
In prior years, thefts of personal property and accessories from parked 
autos have constituted one- third of the total larcenies committed; 
and such thefts decreased 20 percent in 1942. With reference to 
burglaries, reduced use of autos probably causes more persons to be 
in their homes during the evening hours, thus reducing the likelihood of 
such offenses. In general, the restrictions on the use of automobiles 
tend to make more difficult the activities of criminals, because of the 
importance of the automobile in going to and departing from the 
scene of the crime. In this connection, it is interesting to note that 
highway robberies (mainly involving pedestrians) increased 11.5 
percent, whereas robberies of various types of stores and other com- 
mercial houses decreased 24.4 percent. The decrease in oil-station 
robberies amounted to 35.2 percent. 

In 1942, there was an increase in the average value of property 
stolen per offense of burglary, larceny, and auto theft; but for robbery 
there was a decrease. 



58 



Taisi^e 25. — Annual trends, offenses known to the police, 318 cities over 25,000 in 
population, January to December, inclusive, 1939-42, by geographic divisions 

(Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



fJoKraphic div 



.\[urder, 
aonneg- 
lifient 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



HEW E^LAND 

44 cities, total populacion. 
;!,(J30,386: 

Iii;i9 

194(1 

1941 

A verage— 1939-41 

il!4z 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC 

•V/ cities, total popularuia. 
13,531,551: 

1939 

1940 

1941 

Average— 1939-41 
1942 

iSAST NORTH CENTRAL 

8*> cities, total popiilLCioc. 
12,131*211: 

1939 

1940 

1941 : 

• Average— 1939-41 

1942 ,... 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL 

27 cities, total popubinori. 
3,641,995: 

11139 

1940 

1941 

Average— 1939-41 . 

1942 

SOUTH ATLANTIC ' 

Sf' cities, total po!)ulation. 
3,917,445: 

1939.... 

1940 

1941 

Average— 1939-41 

1942 _ 

KAST SOT"TH CENTRAL 

1^ cities, total poimliir,. .-, 
1,228,352: 

li»39 

1940. . . 

1941. 

/vverage— 1939-41 

1942 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 

2(1 cities, total pofiiibiAoa. 
2,414. 637: 

l!i:i9 

1940 

1941 

Average— 1939-41 

1942 

' Includes till' nistricr, ot .l 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



1,256 
1.292 
1,253 



1,181 
1.271 
1,241 



Rob- 
bery 



.3, 117 
3,395 
2,841 

3,118 
2,673 



12. 538 
11, 708 
11,125 
11,791 
10, 481 



2,161 
1,625 
1,306 
1,698 
1.006 



2,780 
2,968 
3.015 
2.922 
3,146 



1,127 

940 

1,012 

1,003 



1, 375 
1,313 
1,391 
1, 3.59 
1,185 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4,677 
4,404 
4,813 
4,632 
4,459 



4, 323 
4.444 

5, 056 
4,608 
5, 374 



1,107 

1,064 

946 



4.853 
4,449 
,5, 121 



2,219 
3,579 
2,480 
2. 7.59 
1.872 



2,225 
1,984 
2. 065 



Bur- 

glary- 

break- 

ing or 

entering 



9,656 
10, 073 
9,785 



22, 170 
20, 597 
20. 285 
16. 933 



40. 480 

41, 234 
38, 949 
40, 222 
35, 697 



10.845 
10, 056 
10.312 
10.406 
8,297 



16,838 
17,018 
15,763 



6. ,546 
6.687 
5,741 
6. 325 
5, 365 



10,803 
10,399 
11.277 
10,827 
9, 545 



Larceny- 
theft 



19, 208 
20,680 

20, 534 
20,139 
21, 094 



44. 107 
40, 662 
41.914 
40.156 



108, 736 
117, 551 
117,703 
114,664 
107, 806 



36, 510 
3.5. 777 
31,608 
34, 632 
30. 458 



44, .560 
49,311 
52. 935 



11,568 
12,941 
12,912 
12,474 
13, 721 



36, 698 
35, 415 
35, 791 
35. 969 
34,448 



59 



Table 2o.- — Annual trends, offenses known lo the polict. . .' tiiies over 25,000 in, 
population, January to December, inclusive, 1939-4:^. (';■ cicograhpic divisions— 
Continued 



)grai)hic divisions 



MOLXTAI.N 

11 cities, total population, 
835, 805: 

1939 _ - 

1940 

1941 

Average— 1939-41 

1942 

P.iCIFIC 

27 cities, total population, 
4,430,816: 

1939 

1940 

1941 

Average— 1939-41 

1942 

TOTAL— ALL DIVISIO.NS- 

31S cities, total population, 
45,062,198: 

1939 

1940 

Average— 19.39^41 ." 1 ]'.!]"]! ! 
1942 



Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
valwJ 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
jiig <ir 

tiiteriug 


Larceny- 
theft 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


30 
33 
33 
31 
34 

173 
188 
161 
173 

197 

2,643 
2,610 
2.645 
2,632 
2,673 


13 

44 
71 
41 
70 

382 
395 
349 
375 
366 

1,776 
1,968 
2,202 
1,978 
2,003 


53 
46 

77 
58 
101 

572 
564 
626 

587 
849 

4,110 
4,295 
4,458 
4,286 
4,764 


432 

488 
528 
483 
581 

4,158 
4.168 
4,099 
4,142 
3,907 

28, 030 
27, 215 
25,641 
26, 965 
24, 370 


' 135 
189 

177 
16€ 
23(i 

1, ^«6 
1. 50(. 
1. 54i 

1. f.2: 

1. 78<< 

21. (Kip 
21.<<2(' 

22. tiM 
21. M.4 

23. ^^> 


H,219 
:-), 504 
3, 909 
H. 544 
4,335 

2f,,609 
A 291 
2H, 646 
M, 848 

J 11 678 

J 41:, 160 
146,717 
141, 054 
J43,313 
124,428 


10,932 
13,315 
13, 511 
12, 586 
13, 840 

60,988 
67,904 
72.099 
66. 996 
61. 810 

370, 169 
397,001 
397, 755 
388, 389 
377. 105 



iVuto 
tliefl 



2, 189 
1,884 
2,0,^1 
2,041 
2,178 



1'/, 254 
13, 122 
17,531 
]•/, 123 



70, 888 
83, 901 
80, 097 
84,293 
73, 713 



60 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 
Offenses Known to the Police 



318 CITIES TOTAL POPULATION 45,062,198 



(Offenses Against the Person) 



Murder 



_FEB MAR APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NO< 

tr Spring Summer Fall 



3 YEAR 
AVERAGE (1939-41) 
— I9A2 




Negligent Manslaughter 



= 3 YEAR 
AVERAGE (1939-41) 
^^ 1942 



Rape 



FEB MAP APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT 



Venter. Spring Summer FaS 



-::-- 3 YEAR 
AVERAGE (1939-411 
— — 1942 




Aggravated Assault 

JAN. FEB MAR- APR, MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 

Winl«r Spring Summer Fall 



;rrr 3 YEAR 
AVERAGE (1939-41) 



« 



Figure 9. 



61 

Monthly lariations, offenses hnoirn to the police. 

Generally it is found that offenses against the person occur with 
greatest frequency during the summer months and show a tendency 
to decline during the winter. Offenses against property generally 
show opposite monthly trends to those reflected in crimes against the 
person, although a few exceptions to this general rule occurred dur- 
ing 1942. 

Figures 9 and 10 show the percent of monthly deviation from the 
annual average for the year 1942 in comparison with similar data 
based on the years 1939-41. The data included in the charts, and in 
table 26 Avhich presents the daily averages for 1942, are based on the 
monthl}" crime reports received from 318 cities with population in 
excess of 25,000. 

Following the pattern of the previous three years, murders were 
most frequent during the third quarter of 1942 and occurred with 
least frequency during the first quarter of the year. The same is 
true with reference to rape and aggravated assault. For all three of 
•these oft'enses the high month for 1942 was August. 

For manslaughter by negligence the seasonal curve is opposite to 
that of other crimes against the person. It should be observed, how- 
ever, that offenses of negligent manslaughter differ from other offenses 
against the person in that they are not accompanied by the element of 
actual malice or criminal intent. They grow almost entirely out of 
traffic fatalities, and, consequently, the monthly trend in these offenses 
will follow closely the seasonal curve of deaths resulting from traffic 
accidents. 

The monthly variations in robbery offenses during 1942 followed 
closely the pattern of these crimes for the years 1939-41. They 
occurred with most frequency during the first quarter of the year with 
the peak in January and were less pronounced during the third quar- 
ter. The lowest month in 1942 for robbery was August. 

The seasonal curve for the crimes of burglary, larceny, and auto 
theft during 1942 did not show the same pronounced tendencies to 
rise during the fourth quarter as is reflected in the montlily fluctua- 
tions for these crimes during 1939-41. This was particularly true for 
larceny and is attributable to a sharp decrease in the number of these 
offenses reported during the last quarter of 1942 in comparison with 
the number reported during the last quarter of prior years. 

Larceny oft'enses during the years 1939-41 showed a tendency to be 
least frequent during the spring and summer months with a tendency 
to rise during the fall and winter period. Due to the sharp drop in 
the number of these crimes committed during the fall and winter 
period of 1942, the seasonal variation in larceny offenses in 1942 is 
almost an exact opposite to the average figures for 1939-41. The 
unusual decrease in total larcenies committed during the fourth 



62 

quarter of 1942 is closely related to the wartime restrictions placed 
on the use of private automobiles, which were accompanied by very 
sharp reductions in thefts of personal property from autos and also in 
thefts of auto accessories. 

Burglaries were most pronounced during the first quarter with a high 
in January. They occurred with least frequency during October and 
showed a slight tendency to rise during November and December. 

For auto theft the' highest daily average for 1942 was reflected in 
the first quarter of the year, with January the highest month. These 
offenses were least frequent during the second quarter and showed a 
tendency to follow the curve for the previous three years with in- 
creases during the last half of the year, except that December fell 
sharply to a Ioav for the entire year. 

The monthly variations reflected in the figures for 1942 indicate 
the likelihood of further decreases in the number of crimes against 
property in 1943. 

A study of the seasonal fluctuations in crime emphasizes the need 
for local law-enforcement agencies to regularly compile data as to the 
yearly, monthly, daily, and hourly frequency of crime for administra- 
tive purposes. The many forces contributing to the commission of 
crime, which are not static in peacetime, are even more subject to 
change in time of war because of the rapid modifications occurring in 
the social and economic features of many commimities. 



Table 26.^ — Monthly variations, offenses known to the police (daily average), Jannirij 
to December, inclusive, 19^2, 318 cities over 25,000 in population 



[Total population, 45,062,198, based on 1940 decennial census] 








Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


January 


6.45 
6.32 
7.03 
7.87 
7.26 
6.93 
8.52 
8.71 
7.13 
7.97 
6.87 
6.71 


6.55 
6.29 
5.61 
4,83 
4.87 
4.13 
4.13 
5.16 
5.57 
5.23 
7.90 
5.68 


11.77 
12.25 
13.13 
12.00 
13.71 
13.33 
13.77 
15.06 
14.20 
13.13 
12.87 
11.32 


86.4 
77.1 
71.2 
64.4 
64.7 
61.2 
59.2 
56.2 
59.4 
63.5 
63.4 
74.8 


.50,7 
54.4 
60. 1 
64,3 
68.9 
67.3 
72.2 
77.0 
72.5 
65.4 
59.8 
60.3 


408.5 

400. 

401. 1 
350.0 
327.5 
332,7 
320,6 
322,5 
298. 6 
291.3 
316.0 
325.5 


1, 106. 2 
1,077.2 
1,108.0 
1,089.4 
1,060.5 
1, 070. 5 
1, 044. 4 
1,055.2 
1, 028. 6 
1, 002. 7 
913.8 
844.8 


252. 6 
235. 9 


March 

April 


244.0 
224.8 


Mav 


201.4 


June 

July 

August 

September 


202. 8 
201.7 
208.8 
220.4 
220.2 


November 

December 


218.7 
191.0 


January to March 


6.61 
7.35 
8.13 
7.18 
7.32 


6.14 
4.62 
4.95 
6.25 
5.49 


12.39 
13.02 
14.35 
12.43 
13.05 


78.3 
63.5 
58.3 
67.3 
66.8 


55.1 
66.9 
73.9 
61. 8 
64. 5 


403. 3 
336. 6 
314.1 
310.9 
340.9 


1, 097. 8 
1, 073. 3 
1, 042. 9 
920.5 
1, 033. 2 


244.4 
209.5 


July to September- , . . 
October to December. 
January to December. 


210.2 
209.8 
218.4 



63 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 
Offenses Known to the Police 



318 CITIES TOTAL POPULATION 45,062,198 



(Offenses Against Property) 



Robbery 



JAN FEB MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AU6 SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



, ¥BtH«r Spring Summer FoM 




= = = = = = 3 YEAR 

AVERAGE (1939-41) 
•■^ 1942 



Burglary 



' AUG SEPT OCT NOV. 



WitiHr Spring Summer fal 




= = = = = = 3 YEAR 

AVERAGE (1939-41) 
^— . 1942 



Larceny 



JAN. FEB. MAIi. APR. A<AY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 




JAN. FEB MAR. 



Auto Theft 

^PR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT OCT NOV. DEC. 



Winter Spring Summer F«t 




== = ;== 3 YEAR 
AVERAGE (1939-4!) 
"-■■ 1942 



% 



Figure 10. 



513327—43 3 



64 

Offenses Known to the Police — Cities Divided According to Location. 

The frequency of crime per unit of population varies considerably 
among the several States and larger geographic divisions. The varia- 
tions in the volume of crime among the different sections of the 
country is only to be expected in the light of the diversity among the 
States as to the economic and social features which affect the extent 
of crime. 

During 1942 murders and aggravated assaults generally occurred 
with greatest frequency per unit of population in the States comprising 
the South Atlantic and East South Central geographic divisions. The 
lowest rate for these offenses was seen among the New England 
States. The highest robbery rates were reported by the East South 
Central and Pacific States, and the highest larceny rates w^ere reported 
in the states comprising the Moimtain and Pacific geographic divisions. 
The number of robberies and larcenies per unit of population was 
lowest in 1942 in the States comprising the New England and Middle 
Atlantic groups. 

Burglary offenses occurred with the greatest frequency per imit of 
population in the States comprising the Pacific, Mountain, and East 
South Central geographic divisions, and the auto theft rates were 
highest m the Pacific, Mountain, and South Atlantic States Bur- 
glary and auto theft occurred with least frequency per unit of popula- 
tion in the Middle Atlantic and West North Central geographic 
divisions. 

The number of offenses per 100,000 inhabitants reported during 
1942 by the 2,119 cities represented in table 24 are again presented in 
table 29 with the cities subdivided not only by size but also by geo- 
graphic divisions. The crime rate for each State without regard to 
population group is presented in table 28. Both of these tabulations 
are supplemented by the data shown in table 27 which indicate the 
number of cities whose reports were used in compiling the information 
presented in tables 24, 28, and 29. 



65 



Table 27. 



-Number oj cities in each State included in the tabulation oj uniform 
crime reports, January to December, inclusive, 1.94-2 





Population | 




Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25.000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 

New England: 17S cities; total population, 


2 

6 

8 

4 

3 

3 

4 

1 
5 


10 

11 

10 

5 

7 

3 

3 

1 
5 


10 

18 
22 

17 

4 

8 

2 
6 


29 
30 
58 

19 

8 

12 

7 
17 


67 

131 

115 

62 

43 

21 

29 

22 
40 


60 
303 
307 
168 

40 

62 

58 
116 


173 


Middle Atlantic: 499 cities; total population, 
18 777,039 


499 


East North Central: 520 cities; total popula- 
tion, 16,369,598 




AVest North Central: 258 cities; total popula- 
tion, 5.366,291 


2.58 


South Atlantic:! 187 cities; total population, 
5 699,977 


187 


East South Central: 79 cities; total popula- 
tion, 2,337,652 . . 


79 


West South Central: 118 cities; total popula- 
tion, 3,729,542 


118 


Mountain: 91 cities; total population, 1,452,- 
496 


91 


Pacific: 189 cities; total population, 5,969.120.. 
New England: 

Maine .. .. 


189 






1 
1 


2 
2 

13 
5 
6 

10 
10 
10 

13 

9 
14 

9 
13 

1 

6 

1 
1 
1 
-- 


6 
6 

1 
42 
6 
6 

43 
33 

55 

32 
14 
32 

14 

11 
8 

13 
3 
4 
7 

16 


7 
5 
8 
31 
3 
6 

99 
69 
135 

87 
33 
95 
56 
36 

51 
39 
18 
6 
7 
17 
30 


16 


New Hampshire 






14 








10 




1 
1 


7 
.. 

4 
4 
3 

4 
3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


5 

1 
2 

6 
4 

8 

4 
3 
7 
6 

i 

2 


99 


Rhode Island 


16 




23 


Middle Atlantic: 
New York 


2 

4 

1 
1 

1 

2 


165 




121 




213 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


144 


Indians* 


63 


Dlinols 


150 


Michigan 


97 


Wisconsin 


66 


West North Central: 


66 




58 


Missouri 


2 


36 




10 










12 


Nebraska 




1 
2 


1 
1 


26 






50 


South Atlantic: 


1 


1 


Delaware 


1 








4 
8 
18 
11 
17 
11 
13 
16 

11 
12 
13 
4 

9 
8 
20 

25 

6 
14 
3 
13 
6 
8 
5 
3 

17 
13 
86 


5 


Maryland 


1 




2 
5 

4 

1 
4 

4 
1 
2 

1 

1 
3 
2 
6 

2 

1 


4 
6 

1^ 
4 
5 
6 

5 
5 
3 
8 

3 
3 

10 
13 

4 
6 
3 

4 
2 

2 

1 

7 
4 
29 


15 


Virginia 


2 


3 
3 
4 

4 
1 

1 
.. 

1 

1 
1 

' 6' 


34 


West Virginia 




21 






1 


38 


South Carolina 




19 




1 




24 


Florida 


30 


East South Central: 
Kentucky 


1 

1 
1 


22 




22 


Alabama 


21 


Mississippi 


14 


West South Central: 






14 


Louisiana 


1 


_. 

1 


16 




34 


Texas 


3 


54 


Mountain: 


12 


Idaho 








21 










6 




1 




1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


20 




9 


.Arizona 






^ 


10 


Utah 




1 


9 


Nevada 




4 


Pacific: 

Washington 


1 
3 


2 




3 

1 
13 


30 


Oregon 


19 


California 


3 


6 


140 



Includes District of Columbia. 



66 




67 



Table 28. 



'Number of offenses known to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, January 
to December, inclusive, 194^, by States 

[Based on 1940 decennial census] 



Division and State 


Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burglary - 
breaking or 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 


Auto theft 


GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION 


1.26 
2.97 
4.23 
3.32 
15.54 
19.76 
12.82 
3.79 
3.99 


11.8 
22.6 
71.7 
22.9 
69.8 
81.4 
45.8 
59.6 
74.4 


9.0 
31.2 
38.4 
29.8 
178.9 
147.8 
97.5 
27.3 
35.3 


228.4 
1 194. 3 
282.0 
212.9 
381.7 
414.8 
352.1 
424.0 
427.0 


.582. 6 
> 467. 5 
837.1 
785.1 
1,261.5 
1, 062. 9 
1,267.1 
1, 485. 2 
1, 430. 1 




Middle Atlantic 


122 3 




130.4 






South Atlantic ^ 


231 1 


East South Central 


211 3 




185.5 


Mountain 


225.3 


Pacific 


368.5 






New England: 


2.10 


15.4 
4.9 
2.1 

13.0 
9.9 

10.7 

14.3 
26.6 
37.6. 

53.8 
67.5 
106.2 
69.6 
7.4 

15.8 
11.7 
36.9 
15.6 
14.7 
13.6 
27.5 

75.5 
51.9 
105.6 
55.9 
46.8 
49.0 
76.6 
67.2 

111.1 
81.1 
63.9 
50.4 

105.0 
38.0 
41.9 
43.3 

53.2 
21.3 
46.4 
55.5 
31.2 

119.1 
50.1 

157.8 

45.0 
79.5 
79.5 


4.2 
6.9 
1.0 
7.2 
13.1 
15.0 

48^0 
30.3 

25.0 
57.4 
37.5 
63.2 
5.7 

8.0 
6.4 
71.8 
2.5 
2.4 
18.6 
20.2 

45.0 
109.9 
229.8 
118.4 
486.6 
174.2 
141.1 

94.2 

151.9 
135.7 
164.6 
138.8 

95.4 
114.7 

56.2 
104.2 

18.3 
6.9 
30.5 
21.4 
71.3 
81.2 
5.8 
39.4 

16.7 
21.4 
40.2 


265.1 
103.5 

21515 
233.1 
303.3 

3 137. 1 

235.3 

* 223. 3 

278.1 
397.7 
268.0 
304.8 
172.7 

197.1 
176.8 
230.3 
180.0 
201.2 
180.1 
280.0 

376.7 
210.7 
421.7 
349.8 
390.7 
346.2 
444.8 
553.6 

450. 4 
367.3 
472.0 
337.0 

395.6 
135.9 
391.4 
416.9 

240.4 
284,1 
343.6 
457.0 
281.8 
620.2 
509.6 
503.8 

458.9 
454.9 
418.2 


826.5 
390.6 
582.9 
481.0 
556.1 
923.1 

3 490.8 

551.1 

* 387. 6 

923.8 
1, 060. 8 

532.2 
1, 163. 6 

750.6 

651.7 
753.6 
862.4 
778.5 
1,028,8 
701:7 
913.1 

1, 393. 8 
777.8 

1. 521. 2 
793.2 

1,190.8 
1, 377. 4 
1, 672. 5 
1,418.2 

1, 215. 4 

900.0 

1,061.2 

1, 229. 7 

1, 425. 4 

631.4 

1,201.4 

1,511.2 

1, 065. 5 

974.0 

1, 876. 4 

1, 307. 
1,852.2 
2, 199. 2 
1,541.8 

2, 312. 9 

1, 323. 1 

1. 470. 3 
1,446.3 


183 2 




43.3 


Vermont 


1.04 
1.00 
1.36 
2.21 

2.84 
2.64 
3.36 

5.11 
3.91 
4.86 
3.62 
1.11 

1.12 
1.28 
6.25 


60.4 




158.7 


Rhode Island . 


132.2 


Connecticut 


170.6 


Middle Atlantic: 


113.4 


New Jersey 


143.4 




131.0 


East North Central: 

Ohio 


131.0 




205.0 


Illinois 


95.7 


Michigan 


170.1 




89.9 


West North Central: 


102.3 




131.7 


Missouri 


104.2 


North Dakota 


109.3 






120.6 


Nebraska 


3.76 
4.12 

6.86 
11.76 
19.93 

7.59 
16.93 
17.80 
23.12 
15.43 

16.14 
19.77 
24.59 
17.45 

18.73 
13.52 
5.70 
14.13 

2.36 
.63 
11.60 
3.35 
6.68 
6.19 
2.88 
3.59 

2.52 
3.49 
4.31 


163.8 




129.1 


South Atlantic: 
Delaware 


219.6 




315.8 


Virginia 


280.5 


West Virginia 


121.7 




162.1 


South Carolina 


182.9 




251.4 


Florida --- -.- 


157.4 


East South Central: 


277.6 




185.8 


\labama 


208.3 




139.6 


West South Central: 
Arkansas 


197.8 




207.9 




155.7 


Texas 


185.0 


Mountain: 

Montana 

Idaho 


191.9 
160.6 




176.9 


Colorado 


188.0 


New Mexico 


235.0 




260.2 


Utah --_ 

Nevada 


257.2 
618.6 


Pacific: 


354.2 


Oregon 


284.1 




379.6 







The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 497 cities with a total population of 
90,710. 

■ Includes report of District of Columbia. 

I The rates for burglary and larceny are based on reports of 164 cities. 
' The rates for burglary and larceny are based on reports of 212 cities. 



68 




69 

Table 29. — Number of offenses knovm to the police per 100,000 inhabitants, January 
to December, inclusive, 1942, by geographic divisions and population groups 

[Based on 1940 decennial census] 



Geographic division and 
population group 



NEW ENGLAND 



Group I... 
Group II _. 
Group III. 
Group IV.. 
Group V._. 
Group VI.. 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC 



Group I .. 
Group II _. 
Group III. 
Group IV. 
Group v.. 
Group VI. 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL 



Group !_.. 
Group II.. 
Group III. 
Group IV.. 
Group V... 
Group VI. 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL 



Group I... 
Group II_ . 
Group III. 
Group IV. 
Group V._. 
Group VI. 



SOUTH ATLANTIC 



Groupl'.. 
Group II_. 
Group III. 
Group IV.. 
Group V_.. 
Group VI.. 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 



Group I... 
Group II.. 
Group ni_ 
Group IV.. 
Group V... 
Group VI_. 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 



Group I--. 
Group II.. 
Group III. 
Group IV_ 
Group v.. 
Group VI _ 

Group I... 
Group II.. 
Group in_ 
Group rv. 
Group V_.. 
Group VI. 



Group I... 
Group II-. 
Group in. 
Group IV. 
Group v.. 
Group VI. 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



1.76 
1.40 
1.29 

.87 



2.50 
1.18 
1.81 
1.11 
1.35 



5.87 
5.66 
2.67 
2.34 
1.67 
1.52 



5.31 
5.13 
1.46 
.56 
1.54 
1.32 



14.80 
21.21 
15.14 
16.82 
10.51 
12.39 



16.71 
28.98 
19.58 
16.23 
20.68 
17.84 



17.37 
10.87 
11.43 
8.18 
8.49 
10.25 

3.10 
3.33 
7.65 
3.66 
3.07 
4.13 

4.43 
5.53 
2.49 
3.45 
2.13 
3.16 



Robbery 



20.0 
17.6 
10.2 
6.5 
5.3 
5.4 



27.6 
18.1 
20.0 
12.4 
15.5 
9.2 



114.7 
61.9 
36.9 
25.7 
21.6 
16.5 



34.8 
26.6 
14.9 
15.6 
13.5 
10.1 



78.7 
105.9 
61.1 
74.5 
26.0 
31.9 



131.4 
63.6 
51.3 
49.8 
53.1 
23.6 



61.8 
56.8 
34.4 
28.2 
25.3 

69.2 
59.4 
119.1 
52.5 
35.9 
57.5 

104.9 
66.5 
50.0 
32.3 
27.9 
27.1 



Aggravated 



16.8 
12.8 
8.7 
3.8 
3.5 
4.1 



30.2 
24.7 
16.5 
14.8 



55.0 
54.0 
29.8 
12.4 
10.2 
14.6 



61.5 
24.5 
7.3 
1.7 
10.4 
6.3 



107.2 
140.6 
249.7 
375.2 
157.0 
130.2 



186.3 
149.6 

87.6 
145.3 
124.7 

96.5 



126.4 
81.3 
91.8 

104.1 
55. 9 
57.3 

19.9 
4.7 
74.0 
23.6 
19.9 
39.6 

46.7 
32.9 
22.9 
20.3 
16.2 
20.2 



Burglary 
breaking or 
entering 



138.1 
375.6 
215.9 
219.8 
168.8 
159.3 



J 243.6 
222.7 
229.0 
180.9 
161.7 
128.7 



311.2 
341.2 
303.8 
260.1 
219.0 
162.1 



23S.2 
241.6 
237.9 
214.0 
189.4 



335.3 
564.1 
422.7 
398.3 
257.6 
222.6 



514.0 
425.4 
372.7 
364.2 
337.8 
194.1 



383.0 
460.9 
339.2 
292.7 
270.0 
253.3 

597.4 
603.6 

552.8 
347.7 
287.7 
304.2 

464.7 
484.4 
384.3 
411.1 
329.7 
304.6 



Larceny- 
theft 



347.3 
810.9 
685.0 
634.3 
470.0 
367.1 



1 463. 7 
501.2 
617.1 
571.3 
442.3 
282.1 



822.0 
1,161.2 
964.1 
940.0 
756.8 
455.2 



783.9 
1, 100. 8 
942.8 
808.4 
405.5 



1,113.7 
1,638.0 
1,487.1 



1, 156. 2 
1,024.5 
1, 251. 2 
1,200.8 
1,012.2 
328.4 



1, 348. 4 
1, 483. 3 

1, 422. 6 
912.0 
639.2 

1, 429. 2 
1,498.7 
1, 839. 7 
1, 952. 1 
1, 527. 4 
954.4 

1,356.9 

1. 558. 8 
1, 759. 3 

1. 448. 9 
1,616.3 
1, 256. 2 



> The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 4 cities. 
• Includes the District of Columbia. 



70 

Offenses in Individual Cities Witli More Tfian 25,000 Infiabitants. 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the calendar year 1942 is shown in table 30. The compilation includes 
the reports received from police departments in cities with more than 
25,000 inhabitants according to the 1940 decennial census. Such 
data are included here in order that interested individuals and organi- 
zations may have readily available up-to-date information concerning 
the amount of crime committed in their communities. Police adminis- 
trators and other interested individuals will probably find it desirable 
to compare the crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown 
in tables 24 and 29 of this publication. In order to deteriuine whether 
crime has increased or decreased in individual communities, reference 
should be made to tables in prior issues of the bulletin showing offenses 
committed in individual cities. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 
cities, because differences in the figures may be due to a variety of 
factors. The amount of crime committed in a community is not 
solely chargeable to the police but is rather a charge against the entire 
community. The following is a list of some of the factors which 
might affect the amount of crime in a community: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 
The composition of the population with reference particularly to 

age, sex, and race. 
The economic status and activities of the population. 
Climate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 
The number of police employees per imit of popidation. 
The standards governing appointments to the police force. 
The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 
The attitude of the public toward law-enforcement problems. 
The degree of efficiency of the local law-enforcement agency. 

In comparmg crime rates, it is generally more important to detennine 
whether the figures for a given conmiunity show increases or decreases 
in the amount of crime committed than to ascertain whether the 
figures are above or below those of some other community. 



71 



Tablk 30. — Number of offenses knotvn to the police, January to December, inclusit 
1942, cities over 25,000 in population (based on 1940 decennial census) 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



Abilene, Tex 

Akron, Ohio 

Alameda, Calif 

Albany, N. Y-... 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 



Alexandria, La... 
Alexandria, Va... 
Alhambra, Calif. 

Aliquippa, Pa 

Allentown, Pa... 



Alton, lU 

AJtoona, Pa 

Amarillo, Tex 

Amsterdam, N. Y. 
Anderson, Ind 



Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Anniston, Ala 

Appleton, Wis 

Arlington, Mass.. . 
Arlington, Va 



Asheville, N. C 

Ashland, Ky 

Atlanta, Ga 

Atlantic City, N. J. 
Auburn, N. Y 



Augusta, Ga 

Aurora, 111 

Austin, Tex 

Bakersfield, Calif. 
Baltimore, Md 



Bangor, Maine 

Baton Rouge, La.__. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

Bay City, Mich 

Bayonne, N. J 



Beaumont, Tex 

Belleville, 111 

BeUeville, N. J 

Bellingham, Wash. 
Belmont, Mass 



Beloit, Wis 

Belvedere Twp., Calif. 

Berkeley, Calif 

Berwyn, 111 

Bethlehem, Pa 



Beverly, Mass 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 
Binghamton, N. Y.. 
Birmingham, Ala... 
Bloomfleld, N. J 



Bloomington, 111.. 

Boise, Idaho 

Boston, Mass 

Bridgeport, Coim. 
Bristol, Conn 



Brockton, Mass... 
Brookline, Mass.. 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Burbank, Calif... 
Burlington, Iowa. 



Burlington, Vt 

Butte, Mont 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Camden, N. J 

Canton, Ohio 



Only 1 month received 
962 
38 
185 



145 


91 


4 




18 


22 


1? 




32 


128 


57 


251 






7 


7 


3 


2 


12 


18 


f) 


7 


18 


7 


4 


1 


7 




2 


1 



40 
No reports received 



17 
9 

55 

85 

7 

642 

406 

15 

65 
22 
29 
63 
1,023 



No reports received 



Only 6 months received 



216 

1,019 

417 
608 
392 
192 
375 

167 
332 
559 
92 
264 

542 

242 
153 
355 

444 

195 

4,423 

777 
237 



214 
1,450 

718 
5,645 

266 
250 



155 
175 
635 
2,052 
148 

236 

177 

1,803 

1,442 

111 

310 
310 
1,336 
427 
274 



513327—43 



72 



Table 30.— Number of offenses knoiun to the police, January to December, hiclusive, 
1942, cities over 25,000 in 'population (based on I94O decennial census) — Con. 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larcen 


•—theft 


Auto 
theft 


City 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 




2 
76 
135 
94 

120 

6 

32 

5,225 


1 

1 

191 

277 

327 

138 

6 

57 

1,567 


55 
42 
213 
531 
495 

582 
92 
144 
10. 253 
60 

95 

1,638 

1 months r 

1.531 

147 

67 
73 

181 

1.326 
27 

157 
88 

170 

69 
68 
1,643 
110 
90 

195 
788 
213 
281 
1,926 

337 

5,458 
35 
168 
246 

189 
137 
1 month re 
261 
61 

192 
81 
51 

307 
44 

101 
250 
45 
91 

298 

347 
(■ports rece 
73 
498 

47 
124 
557 

34 
111 


26 

148 

190 

168 
21 
58 
4.036 
29 

47 
795 
sceived 

259 
15 

26 
21 
41 
173 
138 

562 
12 

184 
41 
24 

22 
38 
203 
28 
60 

91 
138 
126 

437 

77 
1.528 

121 
66 

61 

ceived 

15 
9 

81 
17 
25 
86 
31 

22 

25 
4 
61 

74 

84 
ived 

10 
97 

28 
14 
209 

95 


489 
105 
529 
701 
1,429 

1,317 

134 

237 

12,311 

139 

231 
4,832 

8,398 
221 

135 

247 

679 

1.332 

1.187 

2.517 

926 
339 
244 

200 
293 
6,817 
291 
363 

660 

2,871 

844 

508 

4,171 

1,153 

19, 030 

333 

951 

494 

475 
242 

187 
185 

476 
250 
217 
550 
464 

410 
897 
157 
176 
711 

599 
1.277 

418 
525 

222 
206 
1,698 
130 
679 




Central Falls, R. I 




14 


Charleston, S. C 


13 
14 
31 

44 


97 
149 


Charleston, W. Va 


Charlotte, N. C 

Chattanooga, Tenn 


194 
299 


Chelsea, Mass 


61 


Chester, Pa 


1 
219 


105 

3.000 

29 


Chicago, 111 


Chicopee, Mass 


Cicero, 111 




34 
450 

638 
9 

11 
8 
4 
32 
43 

169 


57 

229 

Only 1 

71 

3 


65 


Cincinnati, Ohio 

Clarksburg, W. Va 


40 
63 


603 


Cleveland, Ohio 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 


634 
26 


Clifton, N.J 




23 


Clinton, Iowa .. 






Colorado Springs, Colo 


1 
9 
20 

12 


2 

83 

44 

87 




Columbia, S. C 




Columbus, Ga 

Columbus, Ohio ^ 

Concord, N. H _. 


210 
618 


Corpus Christi, Tex 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 


9 


66 
10 
15 

2 
4 
106 
18 
15 

16 
125 
19 
22 
223 

25 

2 
24 
42 

25 
13 

'2 

53 

1 
2 
8 

7 
56 
5 
4 
10 

20 
50 

3 

23 

8 

47 
1 
23 


25 
4 
15 

1 

.351' 
4 

48 


364 
67 




2 
2 




Cranston, R.I 

Cumberland, Md 


26 
40 


Dallas, Tex 


62 
2 
3 


545 
65 


Danville, 111 


Danville, Va 




Davenport, Iowa 


83 


Davton, Ohio 


25 
2 
5 

10 

6 


66 
14 
16 
64 

40 
1,804 


448 


Dearborn, Mich 

Decatur.Ill 

Denver, Colo 


204 
47 
609 

332 

3,065 

40 


Des Moines, Iowa 
Detroit, Mich 


Dubuque, Iowa 


Duluth, Minn 

Durham. N. C 

East Chicago, Ind 


2 
13 

10 


5 
242 

62 
1 
Onlv 
2 
2 

126 
2 
5 
34 
4 

1 

57 
2 
1 

12 

20 
47 
No 
5 
6 

2 


146 
108 


East Cleveland, Ohio _ . . 

Easton, Pa 


24 


East Orange, N. .T 


60 


East Providence, R. I 




18 


East St. Louis, 111 : 

Eau Claire, Wis ... 


12 


150 
33 


Elgin, 111...... 

Elizabeth, N. J 

Elkhart, Ind ., 

Elmira, N. Y.._ 

El Paso, Tex 


3 

1 

1 
1 

3 

2 
2 

1 


24 
122 
16 

67 
278 


Elyria, Ohio 




Enid, Okla . .. 




Erie, Pa 


197 


Evanston, 111 

Evansville, Ind 

Everett, Mass 


40 
317 


Everett, Wash 




Fall River, Mass 


132 


Fargo, N. Dak 






Fitchburg, Mass 




34 


Flint, Mich . . 


2 


106 




Fond du Lac, Wis 


33 


Fort Smith Ark. 


6 


20 


90 



73 

Table 30. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
194'2, cities over 25,000 in population (based on 1940 decennial censiis) — Con. 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Fort Worth, Tex.. 

Fresno, Calif 

Gadsden, Ala 

Qalesburg, 111 



Galveston, Tex 

Garfield, N.J. _. 

Gary, Ind 

Glendale, Calif. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Great Falls, Mont.. 

Green Bay, Wis 

Greensboro, N. C__ 
GreenvUle, S. C ... 
Hackensaek, N. J.. 



Hagerstown. Md... 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Hammond, Ind 

Hamtramek, Mich. 
Harrisburg, Pa 



Hartford, Conn 

Haverford Township, : 

Haverhill, Mass 

Hazelton, Pa 

Highland Park, Mich. 



High Point, N. C 

Hoboken, N. J 

Holyoke, Mass 

Honolulu, T. H 

Houston, Tex 



Huntington, W. Va 

Huntington Park, Calif. 

Hutchinson, Kans 

Indianapolis, Ind 

Inglewood, Calif 



Irvington, N. J 

Jackson, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

Jacksonville, Fla.. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 



Jersey City, N. J 

Johnson City, Tenn. 

Johnstown, Pa 

Joliet, III 

Joplin, Mo 



Kalamazoo, Mich.. 
Kansas City, Kans. 
Kansas City, Mo.. 

Kearny, N. J 

Kenosha, Wis 



„ ton, N. Y.. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 

Kokomo, Ind 

La Crosse, Wis... 
La Fayette, Ind_. 

Lakewood, Ohio. 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lansing, Mich... 

Laredo, Tex 

Lawrence, Mass. 



Lebanon, Pa 

Lewiston, Maine. 

Lexington, Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Nebr 



79 



Only 1 month received 



2 108 

Only 11 months received 

8 1 421 I 89 

167 I 105 I 47 

Only 6 months received 
No reports received 
34 663 307 

2,728 



197 

97 

2,673 

143 

179 
127 
244 
1,270 
53 



Complete data not received 
37 I 68 I 17 

Only 1 month received 

3 I 132 I 36 

No reports received 



74 



Table 30. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusivey 
1942, cities over 25,000 in population {based on 1940 decennial census)— Con. 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

glary- 
breakmg 

or 
entering 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


City 


$50 and 
over 


Under 

$50 


Little Rock, Ark _.. 


6 
4 
2 

76 
53 

1 


125 
99 
18 
1,406 
541 

9 

7 
5 

13 
17 

64 
3 
3 
2 
5 

4 
8 
2 
16 
6 

32 
4 


68 

17 
572 
669 

5 
10 
37 
92 

7 

233 
3 
2 
11 

7 


514 
1,111 

127 
7,158 
1,804 

190 
120 
114 
124 
216 

332 
199 
110 
61 
180 

85 
36 
40 
96 
46 

103 
60 
125 
1,021 
139 

138 

1,039 

143 

months rec 

35 

131 
999 
1,151 
33 
351 

123 

76 
30 
282 
58 

235 
86 

190 
40 

774 

47 
1,194 

103 
• 645 

129 

eports rece 

82 

494 
81 

366 
111 

52 
330 

61 

124 

5,462 
183 
950 

79 


(') 
(') 

45 
4,442 
1,418 

36 
50 
48 
28 
116 

147 
73 
5 
23 
26 

23 
20 
0) 
22 
6 

27 
17 
14 
366 
23 

40 
302 
162 
eived 

11 

37 
265 
536 

18 
114 

38 
21 
22 
62 
17 

51 

14 

8 

202 

14 

18 
124 
33 

ved 

28 
25 
215 
26 

477 
27 
38 

225 
25 

(') 

81 
373 

18 


1,393 
2,501 
329 
17,522 
3,365 

286 
219 
694 
350 
816 

1,062 
457 
218 
319 

286 

298 
306 
144 
226 

88 

206 
239 
126 
2,345 
255 

280 

1,060 

433 

158 

443 
3,607 
2,829 

202 
1,164 

235 
369 
217 
733 
206 

472 
569 
458 
160 
1,279 

222 
2,565 

434 
1,076 

591 

224 

154 

1,317 

282 

1,808 
269 
335 
828 
144 

431 

14, 574 

396 

2,404 

106 


151 






liOrain Ohio 


73 




6,493 


Louisville, Ky 


1, 173 


Lowell, Mass 




Lower Morion Township, Pa _ 


41 


Lubbock, Tex 


4 
5 
1 

21 

1 


42 




39 


Lynn, Mass 


122 




144 




125 


Maiden, Mass 


53 






30 




1 
1 


39 




65 






68 


Mason City, Iowa 






22 




2 


18 
4 

13 


32 




17 


McKeesport, Pa 




56 


Medford, Mass . ^ 






Melrose, Mass 






7 




1 

1 
36 


393 


478 


328 




.50 


Meridian, Miss 


15 
126 
17 

2 

2 
39 
81 

2 

87 

8 
18 

2 
19 

7 

31 

6 
10 

118 

6 

247 

5 

37 

7 


24 

187 

2 

Only 4 


42 


Miami, Fla .. _ 


214 


Miami Beach, Fla 




Michigan City, Ind 








23 


Middletown, Ohio 


2 

7 
5 


12 
64 
41 

100 

6 
14 

4 
64 
15 

3 
3 

9 

1 

244 

5 

424 

4 

7 
6 

Nor 
3 
3 
19 

17 

250" 

25 

'"""2,'458" 
36 
233 

12 


36 


Milwaukee, Wis 


581 




734 


Mishawaka, Ind 


31 


MobUe, Ala 


19 




Moline, 111 . 


54 


Monroe, La 


5 
1 
28 


23 


Montclair, N. J 


50 


Montgomery, Ala 


134 


Mount Vernon, N. Y 


49 




1 

1 
2 


172 


Muskegon, Mich 


110 


Muskogee, Okla 


90 


Nashua, N. H 


15 


Nashville, Tenn 


53 

2 
21 
1 
1 
1 

3 


435 




44 


Newark, N. J.. 


1,223 


Newark, Ohio 


29 


New Bedford, Mass 


196 




97 


New Brunswick, N. J 




Newburgh, N Y 


52 




10 
26 
3 

180 
32 

5 
138 

6 

1 

1,288 

14 

307 

5 


91 


New Haven, Conn 


1 
1 

82 
6 


289 


New London, Conn 


46 






Newport, Ky 


64 


Newport, R. I 


69 




13 

1 


230 


New Rochelle, N. Y.. 


48 


Newton, Mass 


67 


New York, N. Y.K. 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 


265 


8,795 
152 


Norfolk, Va . 


45 


798 


Norristown, Pa 


42 



See footnotes at end of table. 



75 



Table 30. — Number of offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
1942, cities over 25,000 in population {based on 1940 decennial census) — Con. 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


City 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 








1 


115 


15 
ved 

31 
295 
46 

67 
126 
106 
18 
38 

16 
12 
35 


134 

169 

4,062 

326 

687 

2,479 

1,159 

151 

437 

419 
182 
380 

171 

1,105 
378 
289 
544 
425 

778 

235 
2,520 
1,577 

2,015 
236 

516 
590 

282 
847 

3,959 
573 

1,173 

470 
920 
448 
432 

656 
476 

588 

164 

3,143 
399 
593 
300 

1,760 

558 
417 
537 
108 
161 

237 
2,222 
1,193 

750 
8,553 

1,806 
824 
258 
560 

2,054 


40 


Nor walk, Conn 


I 
13 

1 

2 
10 
10 

1 
6 


8 
469 
40 

28 
97 
47 
6 
9 


No renorts recei 








46 

1,286 

197 

172 
593 
531 
87 
133 

55 
33 
131 


20 


Oakland, Calif 


253 
4 

4 
158 
76 
56 
27 

1 


1,134 


Oak Park, 111 


4C 


Ogden, Utah 


177 




311 




491 


Orange, N J 


15 


Orlando. Fla 


5( 


Oshkosh, Wis 


16 






5 

7 

5 

19 
12 
36 
4 
23 

34 

20 
737 
108 

809 
4 

19 

5 

6 
28 
346 
15 

82 

4 
33 
32 

2 

7 
25 
29 

11 

162 
8 
21 


50 




1 


23 
Only] 

10 
41 
171 
26 
26 

58 
Nor 
119 
791 

52 

284 
2 


91 










70 

355 
165 
361 
273 
201 

266 

sports rece 

109 

3,500 

471 

2,886 


9 

157 
45 
54 
49 

58 

78 
ved 

52 

1,147 

110 

537 
15 


Zi 


Pasadena Calif 




160 


Passaic, N.J 

Paterson, N. J 

Pawtucket R I 


2 
9 


104 
350 
73 


Pensacola, Fla 


6 

5 

5 

109 

5 

32 


45 




182 


Perth Amboy, N. J 

Petersburg Va 


44 


Philadelphia, Pa 


2,752 


Phoenix, Ariz 


218 




1,842 


Pittsfleld Mass 


4 


Plainfield, N J 


3 


Only 1 month received 






14 
10 

23 
6 

81 

9 

247 

11 
40 
35 
1 
Only 

4 

100 

25 

Nor 

5 

343 
13 
52 

1 
32 

6 
1 

20 


235 
35 

116 

341 

1,630 

246 

247 

66 
679 
179 

95 


67 
9 

123 
832 
53 
156 

54 

280 

28 

9 


147 


Port Arthur, Tex 


8; 


Port Huron Mich 


53 


Portland, Maine 


3 
14 

2 
21 

1 
3 
4 

1 


25- 


Portland Oreg 


952 




61 


Portsmouth, Va 


271 


Poughkeepsie, N. Y 


It 




51( 


Pueblo, Colo 


15J 




2- 








Racine Wis 


147 

201 

305 

eports rece 

78 

907 
181 
121 
42 
402 

171 
100 
60 
46 
25 

49 

256 

146 

2,409 

695 
346 
60 
123 
905 


45 
64 
55 
ved 

45 

436 
28 
50 
15 

146 

71 
45 
21 
9 
10 

7 
227 
56 
49 

0) 

127 
60 
19 
26 

193 


94 


Raleigh, N.C 

Reading, Pa 


12 

1 

43 
2 

4 


164 
14 






■Rinhmnnd, Tnd 


4 




47C 




4' 


Roanoke, Va 


8i 


Rochester Miim 


2. 


Rochester, N. Y 

Rockford, 111 


6 
1 


11 

17 
19 
2 
15 


28J 
7 


Rock Island, 111 


5 


Rocky Mount, N. C 


1 


2 


Rome, Ga 


5' 


Rome, N. Y. 




4 


Roval Oak, Mich 




3 
170 
17 
16 
349 

11 




4 




12 


61 

13 

14 

1,116 

40 

1 


51 




13 


St Joseph, Mo 


4 
62 

5 
4 


7 


St Louis Mo 


1,09 


St„ Paul, Minn . 


19 


St Petersburg, Fla 


3 




6 






4 


1 

7 


7 


Salt Lake City, Utah 


5 


37 



See footnotes at end of table. 



76 



Table 30. — Number oj offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
1942, cities over 25,000 in -population (based on 19^0 decennial census) — Con. 



City 



San Angelo, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Bernardino, Calif- 
San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. -. 



San Jose, Calif 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif 
Santa Monica, Calif-- 
Savannah, Ga 



Schenectady, N. Y. 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash _ 

Sharon, Pa 

Sheboygan, Wis..-- 



Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 
Somerville, Mass.-.. 
South Bend, Ind._.. 



South Gate, Calif. 
Spartanburg, S. C . 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield, 111 

Springfield, Mass.. 



Springfield, Mo ... 
Springfield, Ohio-.. 

Stamford, Conn 

Steubenville, Ohio. 
Stockton, Calif 



Superior, Wis .. 
SjTacuse, N. Y. 
Tacoma, Wash- 
Tampa, Fla 

Taunton, Mass. 



Teaneck, N. J 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kans 

Torrington, Conn. 



Trenton, N. J... 

Troy, N. Y 

Tucson, Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 



Tyler, Tex 

Union City, N. J 

University City, Mo. 

Upper Darby, Pa 

Utica, N. Y.. 



Waco, Tex 



Warren, Ohio 

Warwick, R. I 

Washington, D. C. 



Washington, Pa.... 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Watertown, Mass. 
Watertown, N. Y. 



Waukegan, 111 

Wausau, Wis 

Wauwatosa. Wis 

West Allis, Wis 

West Hartford, Conn. 



Murder, 
lonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



4 
21 
72 
No reports received 



40 
26 
19 
92 
316 

92 
74 
751 
12 
15 

40 
95 
44 
45 
172 

42 
45 

116 
46 

113 

44 
37 
102 
19 
93 

23 
118 
153 



Only 1 month received 



95 


470 


14 


176 


40 


298 


153 


994 


26 






50 



9 
Only li months received 



31 
1,269 



178 
2,422 



2,878 
5,784 



619 

410 

1,446 

2,514 

529 
337 



1,104 
864 
520 
313 

1,364 



510 

1,258 

824 

755 

872 
672 
493 
261 
1,077 

376 
1,064 
1,187 
1,507 



578 

2,751 

730 



925 

282 

],063 

2,241 



105 

223 
229 
673 

753 
371 

478 

79 

7,317 



390 

113 

1,221 

3,011 

196 
110 
41 
165 
173 

137 

113 

1,641 

41 



209 
185 
52 



206 
127 
112 
391 
34 



77 



Table 30. — Number oj offenses known to the police, January to December, inclusive, 
194s, cities over 26,000 in population {based on 1940 decennial census) — Con. 



City 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



West Haven, Conn 

West New York, N. J.. 

West Orange, N. J 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 
Wheeling, W. Va, 



White Plains, N. Y 

Wichita, Kans 

Wichita Falls, Tex_ 
AVilkes-Barre, Pa... 
Wilkinsburg, Pa... 



Only 4 months received 
No reports received 



Williamsport, Pa 

Wilmington, Del. 

Wilmington, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Woodbridge, N. J 



Woonsocket, R. I. 
Worcester, Mass.. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 

Yakima, Wash 

Yonkers, N. Y.... 



1,069 
181 



No reports received 



374 

45 I 10 

90 71 

140 19 



York, Pa 

Youngstown, Ohio. 
Zanesville, Ohio 



Only 1 month received 
116 I 558 I 54 

1 



133 



105 
493 
291 

184 

976 

1,130 



1,544 
840 
517 
111 



> Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 
' Figures include offenses committed by juveniles; this is in accord with the uniform reporting procedure 
followed by other cities. 

Supplement to Return A Data. 

Supplementary offense reports received from 56 cities over 100,000 
in population during the calendar years 1941 and 1942 showed that 
although burglary and larceny decreased last year, the average value 
of property stolen per offense increased to such an extent that the 
total loot stolen in burglaries and larcenies in 1942 exceeded the total 
for the previous year. 

These 56 cities reported a total of $4,495,679.99 in property stolen 
in 68,033 burglaries during 1941. Last year, although 5,577 fewer 
bm'glaries occurred, the total loot increased to $4,638,016.59. The 
average value of property stolen per offense of burglary rose 12.4 per- 
cent from $66.08 m 1941 to $74.26 m 1942. 

The 56 cities represented in tables 31 and 32 reported 183,640 
larcenies in 1941 with a total value of property stolen of $5,826,- 
158.47. Last year these offenses declined in number to 171,287 but 
the value of property stolen showed a slight increase to $5,835,- 
581.98. The average value of property stolen per offense of larceny 
rose 7.4 percent from $31.73 in 1941 to $34.07 last year. 

Although minor larcenies showed decreases, those involving prop- 
erty valued in excess of $50 increased 10.3 percent. Pocket-picking 
rose 15.6 percent; bicycle stealing, 10.1 percent; and shophfting, 9.2 
percent. 



78 



Although there was a reduction in the number of automobiles 
stolen in 1942, the value of the average automobile stolen increased 
5.0 percent from $471.88 in 1941 to $495.47 last year. However, the 
police were generally more successful in effecting recoveries as indi- 
cated in the following tabulation, based on the reports of the 56 cities 
represented in tables 31 and 32; 





1941 


1942 




40, 989 

39, 077 

95.3 


37,639 
36 855 


Number of automobiles recovered 


Percent recovered 


97 9 







More than half of the robberies reported were classed as highway 
robberies and these crimes showed an 11.5 percent increase last year 
although decreases in other types were sufficiently pronounced to 
bring about an over-all decrease in robberies. It is interesting to 
note that a 35.2 percent decrease was reported in robberies of oil 
stations, which is explainable in part at least by the fact that many 
gasoline stations were closed at night. The average value of prop- 
erty stolen per offense of robbery decreased 21.5 percent from $122.07 
in 1941 to $95.83 in 1942. 

The percentage of stolen property recovered last year was higher 
for all types of property than in 1941, as revealed in table 33, which 
shows the value of property stolen and recovered by type of property 
during the 2 years. The data are based on the supplemental crime 
reports of 55 cities over 100,000 in population. Excludmg automo- 
biles, these cities reported property stolen last year of $11,951,519.25 
and recoveries of $2,602,014.44 (21.8 percent of value of property 
stolen) . 



79 

Table 31. — Number of known offenses with divisions as to the nature of the criminal 
act, time and place of commission, and value of property stolen, January to Decem- 
ber, inclusive, 1941-4^; 56 cities over 100,000 in population; total population, 
19,505,967 



Classification 


Number of oflensos 


Percent 


1941 


1942 


change 


Rape: 

Forcible 


1,002 
954 


1,148 
1,065 


+14.6 




+11.6 






Total 


1,956 


2,213 


+13.1 






Robbery: 
Highway 


8,376 
3,863 

'■S 

628 
20 
437 


9,338 

69 
663 

28 
468 


+11.5 


Commercial house 


— 19 8 




-35.2 


Chain store , 


-50.7 


Residence 


+5.6 


Bank 


+40.0 


Miscellaneous 


+7.1 






Total . . .- 


14,752 


14, 499 


-1.7 






Burglary— Breaking or entering: 
Residence (dwelling): 

Committed during night 


22,238 
11, 171 

30, 944 
3,680 


20, 193 
9,075 

30,232 
2,956 


-9.2 




-18.8 


Nonresidence (store, office, etc.): 
Committed during night 


-2.3 




-19.7 






Total 


68,033 


62, 456 


-8.2 






Larceny— theft (except auto theft) (grouped according to value of 
article stolen): 


20, 782 
121, 429 
41,429 


22,924 
115, 248 
33, 115 


+10.3 


$5 to $50 


-5.1 


Under $5 


-20.1 






Total 


183, 640 


171, 287 


-6.7 






Larceny— theft (grouped as to type of offense): 
Pocket-picking 


2,450 
5,803 
5,427 
36, 078 
35, 296 
27, 258 
71,328 


2,832 
4,570 
5,928 
27, 708 
29, 184 
30, 000 
71, 065 


+15. 6 




-21.2 


Shoplifting 


+9.2 




-23.2 




-17.3 


Bicycles 


+ 10.1 


Another 


-0.4 


Total 


183, 640 


171, 287 


-6.7 







Table 32. — Value of property stolen, by type of crime, January to December, 
inclusive, 1941-42; 56 cities over 100,000; total population, 19,505,967 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Classification 


Number of offenses 


Value of property stolen 


Average value per 
offense 


1941 


1942 


Percent 
change 


1941 


1942 


Percent 
change 


1941 


1942 


Percent 
change 


Robbery 

Burglary 

Larceny— theft. 
Autotheft 


14, 752 
68,033 
183, 640 
40,989 


14, 499 
62, 456 
171, 287 
37,639 


-L7 

-8.2 
-6.7 
-8.2 


$1, 800, 757. 81 

4. 495, 679. 99 

5, 826, 158. 47 
19, 341, 764. 66 


$1, 389, 455. 23 
4, 638, 016. 59 
5, 835, 581. 98 

18, 648, 990. 12 


-22.8 
+3.2 
+0.2 
-3.6 


$122. 07 
66.08 
31.73 
471. 88 


$95. 83 
74.26 
34.07 

495. 47 


-21.5 
+12.4 

+7.4 
+5.0 


Total___. 


307, 414 


285,881 


-7.0 


31, 464, 360. 93 


30,512,043.92 


-3.0 


102. 35 


106. 73 


+4.3 



80 

Table 33. — Value 0} property stolen and value of properly recovered by type of 
property, January to December, inclusive, 1941-4^; 65 cities over 100,000; total 
population, 19,395,399 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





1941 


1942 


Type of property 


Value of 

property 

stolen 


Value of 
property 
recovered 


Percent 
recov- 
ered 


Value of 

property 

stolen 


Value of 
property 
recovered 


Percent 
recov- 
ered 


Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals, . 


$3,053,882.86 

2,909,790.87 

650,362.88 

1,312,039.77 

19,314,095.03 
4, 162, 410. 55 


$293, 189. 37 

482, 372. 96 

47,464.86 

236,206.35 

18,542,718.08 

1, 162, 994. 73 


9.6 
16.6 

7.3 
18.0 
96.0 
27.9 


$3, 597, 112. 85 

2, 338, 170. 67 

549, 865. 83 

1,473,726.65 

18, 480, 074. 49 
3, 992, 643. 25 


$433,092.18 

484,083.02 

51,850.23 

412, 139. 90 

18,042,824.51 

1,220,849.11 


12.0 
20.7 
9.4 


Clothing 

Locally stolen automobiles — 
Miscellaneous 


28.0 
97.6 
30.6 


Total -- 


31,402,581.96 


20, 764, 946. 35 


66.1 


30, 431, 593. 74 


20,644,838.95 


67.8 







Offenses Known to Sheriffs, State Police, and Other Rural Officers, 1942. 

In compiling uniform crime reports, the FBI tabulates urban 
crimes separately from rural crimes. The figures presented in the 
preceding tables are based on reports received from police depart- 
ments in urban communities (places with 2,500 or more inhabitants). 
Available rural crime data are presented in table 35, and in table 34 
is sho\\ai a percentage distribution of urban and rural crimes. 



Table 34. 



-Comparison of average groups of 100 urban crimes and 100 rural 
crimes, January to December, inclusive, 1942 



Offense 


Percent 


Offense 


Percent 


Urban 


Rural 


Urban 


Rural 




100.0 


100.0 




3.5 
3.2 
.7 
.4 
.3 


6.3 




Robbery 

Rape 


3.2 
2.3 


Larceny- 


60.9 
19.8 
11.2 


48.1 
24.9 
12.8 


Murder 


1.3 


\uto theft 


Manslaughter 


1.1 









The preceding comparison reveals that 4.9 percent of the urban 
crimes were offenses against the person (criminal homicide, rape, and 
aggravated assault), whereas the corresponding rural percentage was 
11.0. 

Obviously, this does not mean that the total of crimes against the 
person committed in rural areas is greater than in urban communities, 
because the figures in table 34 represent only average groups of 100 
urban crimes and 100 rural crimes. In connection with the rural crime 
data, it may be noted that some of the reports listing rural crimes 
indicate that they possibly were limited to instances in which arrests 
were made. Such incompleteness would tend to decrease the propor- 
tion of property crimes and to increase the percentage of rural crimes 
against the person, inasmuch as property crimes are less frequently 



81 

followed by arrests than are the more serious crimes against the 
person. 

Table 35. — Offenses known, January to December, inclusive, 1942, as reported by 
1,138 sheriffs, 10 State police organizations, and 120 village officers 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
as- 
sault 


Bur- 

ingor 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaught- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


flenses known 


1,234 


979 


2,205 


3,010 


5,981 


23,544 


45, 384 


12,084 



Offenses Known in Territories and Possessions of the United States. 

There are presented in table 36 the available data concerning crimes 
committed in Territories and possessions of the United States. In- 
cluded are the figures taken from reports received from the first and 
second judicial divisions of Alaska; Honolulu City, and the County of 
Honolulu in the Territory of Hawaii; and the Isthmus of Panama, 
C, Z. The tabulation is based on offenses reported by law enforcement 
officials policing both the urban and rural areas, except that the data 
for Honolulu City have been segregated from the figures for Honolulu 
County. 



Table 36. — Number of offenses known in United States Territories and possessions, 
January to December, inclusive, 1942 
[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


Jurisdiction reporting 


Over $50 


Under $50 


Alaska: 

First judicial division (Ju- 
neau), population, 25,241; 


3 




9 


9 

38 

663 
165 

84 


18 

10 

307 
41 

121 


27 

16 

1,364 
157 

1,056 




Second judicial division 
(Nome), population, 
11,877; number of offenses 
known 


2 

6 

1 

39 




Hawaii: 

Honolulu City, population. 
179,358; number of of- 


10 

7 

6 


34 
15 

22 


1S8 


Honolulu County, popu- 
lation, 78,898; number of 


33 


Isthmus of Panama: 

Canal Zone, population, 
51,827; number of offenses 
known 


134 



82 




83 

Estimated Number of Major Crimes in the United States, 1941-42. 

An estimatod total of 1,436,748 inajoi- crimes occurred in the United 
Slates during the cah^idar year 1942. This means that during an 
average <\f\y hist year 31 persons were feloniously slain ; 27 were raped ; 
and 142 were victims of other felonious assaults. Each 24 hours on 
an average 129 robberies were committed ; 729 places were burglarized ; 
the automobiles of 459 persons were stolen; and 2,416 miscellaneous 
thefts were committed. 

Although the estimated total crime for 1942 was 6.2 percent less 
than the 1941 figure the crimes against the person as a group showed a 
5.7 percent increase. Crimes against propert}'' (robberj^, burglary, 
larceny, and auto theft) declined 6.7 percent. 

The figures for 1941 and 1942 are presented in table 37 and the esti- 
mates for both years are based on monthly reports received from over 
2,100 cities representing a combined population in excess of 65,000,000. 
Any study of annual crime trends should be accompanied by a refer- 
ence to table 25 and the text immediately preceding it. As indicated 
there, the data in table 25 are based on reports received from identical 
cities during each of the years 1939-42. 

It is recognized that the larceny classification includes many thefts 
involving property of small value. However, it is also noted that the 
estimated total of major crimes does not include miscellaneous crimes 
of a serious nature, such as embezzlement, fraud, forgery, counter- 
feiting, arson, receiving stolen property, drug violations, carrying 
concealed weapons, etc. It is therefore believed that the estimated 
totals set out in table 37 are conservative. 



Table 37. — Estimated numher of major crimes in the United States, 1941- 



Offense 


Number of offenses 


Change 


1941 


1942 


Number 


Percent 


Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


7,562 
4,582 
9,257 
49, 832 
48. 385 
302, 475 
919, 120 
190, 059 


7, 569 
4,019 
10. 107 
47, 126 
52, 094 
266, 147 
882, 061 
167, 625 


+7 
-563 
+850 
-2, 706 
+3, 709 
-36,328 
-37,059 
-22,434 


+0.1 
-12.3 


Rape 


+9.2 


Robbery 


— 5.4 




+7.7 




-12.0 


Larceny 


-4.0 


Autotheft 


-11.8 


Total. 


1, 531, 272 


1, 436. 748 


-94.524 


-6.2 



84 




DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Source of Data. 

In order to tabulate available data concerning the personal charac- 
teristics of persons involved in crime during 1942, the FBI examined 
585,988 arrest records, as evidenced by fingerprint cards received 
during that calendar year, and recorded the age, sex, race, and some 
data relative to the previous criminal history of the persons arrested. 
The compilation was limited to instances of arrests for violations of 
state laws and municipal ordinances. Fingerprint cards representing 
arrests for violations of federal laws or representing commitments to 
any type of penal institution were excluded from the tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint cards examined was somewhat smaller 
than for the year 1941 (630,568) and was also less than the 609,013 
examined during 1940. The arrest records received during 1939 
totaled 576,920. It should be remembered that the tabulation of 
data from fingerprint cards does not include all persons arrested, 
since there are individuals taken into custody for whom no fingerprint 
cards are forwarded to Washington. Data pertaining to persons 
arrested should not be considered as the best index to the number of 
offenses committed since two or more persons may be involved in a 
joint commission of a single offense, and on the other hand, one person 
may be arrested and charged with several separate crimes. 
Offense Charged. 

More than 35 percent (206,560) of the records examined during 1942 
represented arrests for major violations. Persons charged with 
murder, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, or auto theft numbered 
143,993, or 25 percent of the total. 
Sex. 

Marked increases in female arrests were noted during 1942 in the 
fingerprint records examined. Last year 12.0 percent of the total 
records represented females and the corresponding percentage for 
prior years was as follows: 9.2 percent in 1941; 8.5 percent in 1940; 
and 7.6 percent in 1939. 

Male arrests last year numbered 515,635 which represents a 10.0 
percent decrease from the 1941 figure of 572,769. Fingerprints repre- 
senting arrests of females received, however, increased 21.7 percent 
from 57,799 in 1941 to 70,353 in 1942. 

Although the increase in the luimber of fingerprint records repre- 
senting females received in 1942 may be due partially to an increased 

(85) 



tendency on the part of the pohce to forward fingerprints of arrested 
women to Washington, the increases last year were so substantial as 
to indicate clearly a marked upswing in crime and delinquency among 
women and girls. The following are some of the changes in the arrests 
of males and females for 1942 as compared with 1941 : 



Offense 


Percent change 


Male 


Female 


• 


-14.7 +6.8 




-15.3 ' +18.3 




-14.5 ■ +17.9 




-6.1 ! +70.3 




-4.4 i +38.7 




+3.8 ' +42.9 




+0. fi +25. 9 




-27. 1 +59. 7 







m 
vol 



The number and percentage of arrests by sex for 1942 are presented 
table 38. Similar data for 1941 may be found in table 90 of 
"ume XII, No. 4, of the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin. 

T.4BLE 38. — Distribution of arrests by sex, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 19^2 



Offense charged 



Total Male Femali 



Total Male Female 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny —theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. . 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkermess 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion. 

Not stated 

All other oflenses 

Totals... 



5,039 
11,207 
33, 943 
24, 376 
44, 858 
11,810 
10, 144 

2,863 



968 
5,880 
8,654 
6,555 



51 
7,822 
31,481 
134, 418 
31, 284 
12, 621 
43,611 
2,331 
28, 176 



767 
586 

4,113 
554 

6,457 
283 
874 
241 
52 
463 



6,523 



1,02) 

154 

1 

239 

6, 622 

11.528 

9,843 

7, 760 



1.0 
2.0 
6.5 
4.2 
8.8 
2.1 
1.9 
.5 
.1 
.9 
1.0 
1.5 
2.0 
.2 
1.1 
1.5 
1.4 
5.0 
1.2 
(•) 
1.4 
6.5 
24.9 
7.0 
2.3 



515, 



1.2 
.5 
1.7 
.2 
1.1 
1.7 
1.3 
5.5 
1.3 
(') 
1.5 
6.1 
26.0 
6.0 
2.4 
8.4 
.5 
5.5 

100.0 



1.1 
.8 

5.9 
.8 

9.2 
.4 

1.2 
.3 
.1 



9.3 
4.3 
.2 
.5 
.5 
2.7 
1.5 
.2 



9.4 
16.4 
14.0 

1.1 

11.0 

.5 

7.6 



1 Less than Mo of 1 percent. 



Age. 

Dining 1942 age 18 predominated in the frequency of arrests. This 
is tlie first year since the examination of fingerprint records first began 
in 1932 that such a low age group predominated. Arrests for age 19 
were most frequent during tlie years 1932-35 and 1939-41. During 
1936-37 arrests for age 22 were most frequent and in 1938 age 21 
predominated. The 112,486 persons under 21 years of age arrested 
and fingerprmted in 1942 constituted 19.2 percent of the total arrests. 
The corresponding percentage for 1941 was 17.6. 

In addition to those under voting age there were 77,666 (13.3 per- 
cent) between the ages of 21-24 making a total of 190,152 (32.4 per- 
cent) less than 25 years of age. Arrests of persons from 25 to 29 years 
old numbered 82,175 (14.0 percent). The resultant total is 272,327 
(46.5 percent) less than 30 years of age. It should be remembered 
that the number of arrest records is doubtless incomplete in the lower 
age groups because of the practice of some jurisdictions not to finger- 
print youthful offenders. 

Confirming the study made in prior years the figures for the calendar 
year 1942 indicate that youths commit a large proportion of the 
crimes against property. During that year 32.4 percent of all persons 
arrested were less than 25 years of age. However, persons less than 
25 3^ears old numbered 57.1 percent of those charged with robbery; 
65.9 percent of those charged with burglary; 49.8 percent of those 
charged with larceny; and 77.0 percent of those charged with auto 
theft. More than one-half of all crimes against property during 1942 
were committed b}^ persons under 25 years of age. 



Table 39. 



-Percentage distribution of arrests by age groups, male and female, 
Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1942 



Age groups 


All 

offenses ' 


Criminal 
homicide 


Robbery 


Burglary 


Larceny 


Auto theft 


Under2l 


19.2 
27.3 
25.2 
17.2 
11.0 


15.2 
32.7 
27.7 
15.1 
9.2 
.1 


34.7 
40.3 
17.7 
5.7 
1.5 
.1 


50.0 
27.6 
13.8 
5.9 

2.6 

.1 


34.6 
28.4 
19.1 
11.8 
6.0 


58.4 


21-29 


29. 


30-39 


9.0 


40-49 ._ 


2.8 


50 and over 


.7 


Unknown 


■1 


Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 







1 Xot limited to specific crimes listed in the table. 



A study of the persons arrested during the past 2 years reflects that 
males under 21 years of age arrested during 1942 numbered 97,418, 
a decrease of 3.6 percent from the 101,097 fingerprint cards received 
during 1941 representing males less than 21 years old. On the other 
hand, arrests of females under 21 years of age increased 55.7 percent, 
from 9,675 in 1941 to 15,068 last year. 






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90 

Although the total arrests of males under 21 last year showed a 3.6 
percent decrease, some pronounced increases were noted for individual 
offense classes. For example, the arrests of boys under 21 years of 
age for assault increased 17.1 percent; those arrested for rape increased 
10.6 percent; arrests for disorderly conduct showed a 26.2 percent 
increase; and drunkenness arrests for males under 21 rose 30.3 percent. 

Arrests of girls under 21 for prostitution and commercialized vice 
showed a 64.8 percent increase last year; those arrested for other sex 
offenses increased 104.7 percent; vagrancy arrests increased 124.3 
percent; and girls under 21 arrested for drunkenness and disorderly 
conduct showed increases during 1942 of 39.9 percent and 69.6 percent, 
respectively. 

In a number of instances the arrests of males and females under 21 
during 1942 showed opposite trends. For example, arrests of males 
under 21 for criminal homicide declined 1.3 percent, while girls under 
21 arrested for these offenses showed a 29.6 percent increase. The 
number of young men less than voting age arrested for larceny de- 
creased 11.5 percent, while girls under 21 arrested for such offenses 
increased 27.5 percent. The percentage change in the number of 
males and females under 21 years of age arrested during 1942 as 
compared with 1941 for individual offense classes is presented in 
figure 16. 

The alarming upswing in crime among women and girls points to the 
need for renewed efforts to keep the home front clean, wholesome, and 
strong. Boom conditions and "easy money" in the hands of youthful 
persons, together with a possible let-down in the influence of the home, 
are factors which must be offset in designing programs to combat the 
general upswinging crime curve among women and girls, and the 
increases in certain types of crimes committed by boys. 

Local law enforcement agencies are confronted with many additional 
duties in wartime, and often there are sudden increases in the popula- 
tion of individual communities without proportionate increases in 
police personnel. To make the problem of law enforcement agencies 
even more difficult, they have lost many of their most capable and 
experienced personnel to the armed services or to national defense 
industries. All these factors indicate the need for increasing rather 
than decreasing activities which are crime preventive in character. In 
every community current information concerning the extent of delin- 
quency should be studied, together with a review of the circumstances 
contributing to the development of delinquency, and a vigorous 
"counter-offensive" should be started. 

Delinquency is an inexcusable waste of manpower during a period 
of crisis when every available piM'son is needed for essential service to 



Ul 




92 



the Nation; furthermore, the dehnquent of today is Ukely to become 
the habitual criminal of tomorrow, a human parasite. Crime and 
delinquency tend to devitalize the Nation; therefore groups and indi- 
viduals heretofore engaged in crime-prevention work should not lessen 
their activities, but rather should redouble their efforts and thus con- 
tribute to keeping the Nation strong on the home front. 

Table 41. — Number and percentage of arrests of persons binder 25 years of age, 
male and female, Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1942 



Offense charged 


Total 
number of 
persons 
arrested 


Number 

under 21 

years of 

age 


Total 

number 

under 25 

years of 

age 


Percent- 
age under 
21 years 


Total 
percent- 
age under 
25 years 
of age 


Criminal homicide 


5,806 
11,793 
38, 056 
24, 930 
51,315 
12, 093 
11,018 
3,104 
645 
5,157 
6,081 
9,031 
11,832 
1,123 
6,242 
8,991 

29; 197 
6,815 
52 
8,061 
38, 103 
145, 946 
41, 127 

5i; 371 
2,700 
33, 538 


883 
4,087 
5,317 

12, 463 
17, 765 

7,065 

1,146 

580 

153 

1, 0.39 

1,823 

1,093 

2,050 

75 

1,363 

516 

779 

1,503 

1,561 

1,961 

7; 574 
9,100 
1,013 

13, 793 
542 

10, 253 


1,803 

6,734 

11,164 

16, 428 

25, 560 

9,313 

2,532 

998 

242 

1,849 

3,113 

3,194 

4,066 

193 

2,389 

1,762 

1,733 

■ 4, 148 

2.m 

3,570 
12, 984 
18.000 
15, 358 

2,336 

21, 689 

887 

15, 210 


15.2 
34.7 
14.0 
50.0 
34.6 
58.4 
10.4 
18.7 
23.7 
20.1 
30.0 
12,1 
17.3 

6.7 
21.8 

5.7 

9.2 

5.1 
22.9 

1.9 
24.3 
18.3 

5.2 
22.1 

7.6 
26.8 
20.1 
30.6 


31 1 


Robbery _. 

Assault _... 

Burglary— breaking or entering 


57.1 
29.3 
65 9 


Larceny— theft 


49 8 


Auto theft 


77 


Embezzlement and fraud 


23 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 


32.2 
37.5 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


35 9 


Rape 


51 2 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 

other sex offenses 


35.4 
34 4 


Narcotic drug laws 


17 2 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 


38.3 


Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws 


19.6 
20 5 




14.2 


Road and driving laws 


42 4 


Parking violations ." 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Disorderly conduct 


17.3 
44.3 
34.1 


Drunkenness 


12 3 




37.3 


Gambling 


17.4 


Suspicion 


42 2 


Not stated 


32.9 


All other offenses 


45.4 






Totals 


585, 988 


112, 486 


190. 152 


19.2 


32.4 







Criminal Repeaters. 

Of the 585,988 arrest records examined, 287,657 (49.1 percent) 
represented persons who already had fingerprint records on file in the 
Identification Division of the FBI. For males the percentage with 
prior records was 51.0 and for females the percentage was 35.4. Dur- 
ing 1941 the percentage of males with prior records was 51.9 and for 
females, 39.6. The decrease in 1942 in the proportion of female 
arrest records representing women with previous fingerprint records 
indicates that the marked increase in females under 21 years of age 
arrested last year ( + 55.7 percent) was caused mostly by so-called 
first offenders. 

Table 42 shows for individual offense classes the percentage of 
fingerprint arrest records received in 1942 representing persons con- 
cerning whom the FBI already had fingerprint records on file. The 
tabulation, of course, relates in no way to the civil identification files 
of the FBI. 



93 



Jan 


. 1 to Dec. 31, 1942 




Offense 


Percent 


Offense 


Percent 


Narcotic drug laws 


75.3 
60.8 

58! 3 
56.6 
50.5 
48.3 
48.0 
46.8 
46.4 
45.7 
45.2 
43.9 
43.8 


Disorderly conduct 


43 5 






42.6 


DpinkpnnpsR 


OfTenses against family and children 

Weapons 


41.2 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


40 


Robbery 


Parking violations ' 


38 5 






37.8 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

Driving while intoxicated 


37.5 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


37 1 






35.0 


Liquor laws 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Other sex offenses 


34.4 


Auto theft 


32 5 






31.2 






27.6 


Assault 







1 Only 52 fingerprint cards were received representing arrests for violation of parking regulations. 
Race. 

Most of the persons represented in tliis study were members of the 
white and Negro races. Inchiding Mexicans, who numbered 21,559, 
members of the white race represented 431,908 of the 585,988 arrest 
records received, while 146,737 were Negroes, 4,688 Indians, 731 
Cliinese, 431 Japanese, and 1,493 were representatives of other races. 



Table 43. — Distribution of arrests according to race, male and female, Jan. 1 to 
Dec. 31, 1942 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting _ 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. . 

other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children. _ . 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws___ 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness _ 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated.. 

All other offenses 

Total.. ._ 



2.604 

4,835 
17, 467 

7,218 
17, 916 

2,179 



131 

538 
1,520 
3,028 
2,401 

244 
3,361 
1,567 
3,638 
1,990 
1,511 
17 
2,073 
10, 689 
19, 857 
8,579 
6.786 
14,929 

648 
8,277 



146, 737 



Jap- 



All 
others 



11,793 



24, 930 
51,315 
12,093 
11,018 
3,104 
645 
5,157 
6,081 
9,031 
11, 832 
1,123 
6.242 
8,991 
8,463 
29, 197 
6.815 
52 
8,061 
38, 103 
145, 946 
41, 127 
13, 398 
51,371 
2,700 
33, 538 



OFFENSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in part I and 
part II offenses, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 
Part I Offenses. 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter includes all 
wilful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 
Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or 
justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides excluded from this classification are 
limited to the following types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer 
in line of duty; (2) The killing of a hold-up man by a private citizen, {h) Man- 
slaughter by negligence includes any death which the police investigation estab- 
lishes was primarily attributable to gross negligence on the part of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — victim under 
age of consent), assault to rape, and attempted rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robber j-, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids. Does not 
include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, even though no force 
was used to gain entrance. Includes attempted burglary. Burglary followed by 
larceny is included in this classification and not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value: 
(6) under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article of value which 
is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven 
away and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Does not include 
taking for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized use 
by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Part II Offenses. 

8. Other assaults. — Includes all assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Includes offenses dealing with the making, 
altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is 
made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Includes all offenses of fraudulent conversion, 
embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Includes buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property as well as attempts to commit any of those offenses. 

(94) 



1)5 

12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — Includes all violations of regulations 
or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufactur- 
ing of deadly weapons or silencers and all attempts to violate such statutes or 
regulations. 

13. Prosliiution and commercialized vice. — ^Includes sex offenses of a commercial- 
ized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as prostitution, keeping bawdy 
house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for immoral purposes. 

l-i. Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution and commercialized vice). — In- 
cludes offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, and the like. Includes 
attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of nonsupport, 
neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Xarcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as 
unlawful possession, sale, or use. Exclude Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of "Drunkenness" (class 18) and "Driving 
while intoxicated" (class 22), liquor law violations, State or local, are placed in 
this class. Exclude Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all offenses of drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Includes all charges of committing a breach of the 
peace. 

20. Vagrancy. — Includes such offenses as vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, permitting, or engaging in 
gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Includes driving or operating any motor vehicle 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws.— Includefi violations of regulations with 
respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to prevent accidents. 

24. Parking violations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Includes violations of 
State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and motor vehicles 
not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws for which 
no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as suspicious 
characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, who are released with- 
out formal charges being placed against them. 



INDEX TO VOLUME XIII, UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

[All references are to page numbers] 

Age of offenders. {See Arrests.) 

Annual crime trends : Pae« 

Cities grouped by size 6 

Cities grouped by location 54-59 

Estimated total number of major crimes, 1941-42 82-84 

Arrests — based on fingerprint records 42-46, 85-93 

Age of offenders 42-46, 87-92 

Race of offenders 46, 93 

Recidivism 92-93 

Sex of offenders 42,85-86 

Automobiles — percentage recovered 78 

Classification of offenses 3, 47-48, 50-51, 94-95 

Cleared by arrest, offenses 23-26, 32, 37 

By geographic divisions 38-39 

Crimes. (See Arrests, estimated number, offenses, persons charged, per- 
sons found guilty, and persons released.) 
Criminal repeaters. (See Arrests — recidivism.) 

Employees, number of police 14-22 

Fingerprint records 42-46, 85-93 

Monthly variations, offenses known to the police < 60-63 

Offenses known to the police: 

Annual trends 6, 54-59 

Cities grouped by location 8^10, 64-69 

Cities grouped by location and size 8-10, 65, 69 

Cities grouped by size 4-5, 52-53 

Cleared by arrests 23-26, 32, 37 

Cleared by arrest, by geographic divisions 38-39 

Divided as to time and place and value of property stolen 77-80 

Individual cities over 100,000 in population 1 1-12 

Individual cities over 25,000 in population 70-77 

Monthly variations 60-63 

Rural areas 80-81 

Compared with urban areas 80 

Territories and possessions of the United States 81 

Persons charged (held for prosecution) 26, 28-34 

By geographic divisions 38, 40-41 

Persons found guilty 3 1-34 

Persons released (not held for prosecution) 34-37 

Police department employees 14-22 

Auxiliary police 1 6-22 

Police officers killed by criminals, 1941 13 

Possessions and Territories of the United States, offenses in 81 

Property, value stolen and recovered — 77-80 

Prosecution, persons held for. {See Persons charged and persons found 
guilty.) 

(96) 



97 

Race of offenders. {See Arrests.) 

Recidivism. (See Arrests.) Page 

Reporting area, extent of 51 

Rural crime data 80-81 

Compared with urban 80 

Sex of offenders. (See Arrests.) 

Sheriffs' reports 80-81 

State crime rates. (See Offenses known — cities grouped by location.) 

State police reports 80-81 

Territories and possessions of the United States, offenses in 81 

Trends, annual crime: 

Cities grouped by size 6 

Cities grouped by location 54-59 

Value of property stolen and recovered 77-80 

\'ariations, monthly crime 60-63 

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FEB 21 1956