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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 




ISSUED BY THE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C 




11 » 


Volume XXI 


Number 1 


SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN 


1950 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume XXI— Number 1 
SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN, 1950 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 



d!w§^stor\ 



Errata : 

Correction on page 10. 

Under column "Murder, nonnegligent manslaughter" oppo- 
site New England, the figures 6.8 should be .68. 

Correction on page 37. 

Under column "Number of police department employees" 

opposite Walton, N. Y., the figure 3 should be inserted. 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1950 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume XXI— Number 1 
SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN, 1950 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




International Association of Chiefs of Police 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1950 



&c ?>i9<rV' 



Contents 

Page 

Summary of volume XXI, No. 1 1-2 

Classification of offenses 2 

Crime trends: 

Urban crime trends, January-June, 1949-50 (table 1) 3-4 

Rural crime trends, January-June, 1949-50 (table 2)__ 5-6 

Crime rates: 

Urban crime rates, January-June, 1950 — cities divided according to 

population (table 3) 7-8 

Urban crime rates, January-June, 1950 — -cities divided according to 

location (tables 4-6) 9-1 1 

Rural crime rates, January-June, 1950 (table 7) 12 

Offenses in individual areas: 

Offenses in cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants (table 8) 13-15 

Police employee data: 

Police employees killed, 1949 (table 9) 16 

Number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants, April 30, 1950 — 

cities grouped by size and location (tables 10, 11) 17-20 

Police employees in individual cities, April 30, 1950 (tables 12, 13)___ 20-43 
Offenses cleared and persons arrested: 

Offenses cleared by arrest, 1949 — cities divided according to size 

(table 14) 44-48 

Offenses cleared by arrest, 1949 — cities divided according to location 

(table 15) 49-50 

Persons charged, 1949 — cities divided according to population (tables 

16, 17) 50-53 

Persons charged, 1949 — cities divided according to location (table 18) _ 53-55 
Offenses known, offenses cleared, persons charged and persons found 

guilty, 1949 — part I offense classes (table 19) 56-58 

Persons charged and persons found guilty, part II offense classes 

(table 20) 59-60 

Persons released, 1949 — cities divided according to population (tables 

21, 22) 61-63 

Data compiled from fingerprint cards: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested, January-June, 1950 (table 23) __ 64-65 
Age distribution of persons arrested, January-June, 1950 (tables 24, 

25) 66-67 

Definition of part I and part II offense classifications 69-70 

(ID 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department 
of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume XXI JULY 1950 Number 1 

SUMMARY 

Crime Trends, January-June, 1950 

Crime increased 7.4 percent in the rural areas and 1.9 percent in the 
cities the first half of 1950 over the same period of 1949. For the 
individual offense classes the trends were as follows: 



Offense 


Urban 


Rural 




+19^8 
-4.6 
-3.8 
+.4 
+1.9 
+2.2 
+3.2 


+1.6 




-3.7 




+4.8 




+3.4 




+4.7 




+14.9 




+5.6 




-3.9 







Police Killed, 1949 

Fifty-five urban police employees were killed in line of duty during 
1949 for a rate of 3.75 killed per 5 million inhabitants, the lowest figure 
for the past 5 years. 

Number of Police Employees, April 30, 1950 

City police departments as of April 30, 1950, reported an average of 
1 .95 employees per 1,000 inhabitants and 7.5 percent of the total were 
classed as civilian personnel. 

Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1949 

During 1949 the police made arrests in 27.9 percent of reported 
crimes. The percentages cleared for murders and negligent man- 
slaughters were 93.7 and 85.1, respectively, while 80.2 percent of the 
rapes and 77.2 percent of the aggravated assaults were cleared by 
arrest. Arrests were made in 39.5 percent of the robberies, 29.0 per- 
cent of the burglaries, 21.6 percent of the larcenies, and 27.3 percent of 
the auto thefts. 

Persons Found Guilty, 1949 

Two-thirds of the persons formally charged by the police in 1949 
were found guilty. The percent found guilty ranged from 44.7 for 
negligent manslaughter offenses to 83.9 for driving while intoxicated. 

(1) 



Persons Arrested, January-June, 1950 

Of the 402,383 fingerprint arrest records received during the first 
half of 1950, 9.4 percent represent women. The predominating age 
among persons arrested was 21, followed by 22, 23, 19, and 20 in that 
order. 

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to the 
police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting or 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be those most 
generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal homicide, 
including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (b) manslaugh- 
ter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; burglary — break- 
ing or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The figures contained 
herein include also the number of attempted crimes of the designated 
classes. In other words, an attempted burglary or robbery, for ex- 
ample, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner as if the crime 
had been completed. Attempted murders, however, are reported as 
aggravated assaults. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the law-enforce- 
ment agencies of contributing communities and not merely arrests or 
cleared cases. Offenses committed by juveniles are included in the 
same manner as those known to have been committed by adults, 
regardless of the prosecutive action. Complaints which upon inves- 
tigation are learned to be groundless are not included in the tabula- 
tions which follow. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of 
crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

In the last section of this bulletin may be found brief definitions of 
part I and II offense classifications. 



CRIME TRENDS 

Urban and Rural Crime Trends, January-June, 1949-50 

Crime rose 7.4 percent in the rural areas during the first half of 1950 
over January-June 1949 as compared with a 1.9 percent increase in 
urban communities. The rural upswing was registered in each crime 
category except negligent manslaughter and auto theft, where de- 
creases of 3.7 and 3.9 percent, respectively, were shown, in contrast to 
increases of 19.8 and 3.2 percent for these crimes in the cities. 

Burglaries in the rural areas rose 14.9 percent as compared with a 
1.9 percent increase in such crimes in the urban communities. Larceny 
offenses in the rural areas were up 5.6 percent and robberies 3.4 per- 
cent, while in the cities larcenies showed a 2.2 percent rise and rob- 
beries a 3.8 percent decrease. 

Rapes reported by rural agencies rose 4.8 percent as compared with 
a 4.6 percent decrease in urban communities, while aggravated assaults 
and murders in the rural districts showed increases of 4.7 and 1.6 
percent, respectively, in contrast to a 0.4 percent increase in ag- 
gravated assaults and a 1.1 percent decline in murders reported by 
city police. 

In table 1 the offenses reported during the first half of 1949 and 1950 
by the cities represented are shown and it will be observed that only 
the submitted figures are presented without reducing the data to the 
number of crimes per unit of population. Similarly table 2 presents 
the number of offenses reported to the F B I by rural police agencies 
during the first 6 months of 1949 and 1950. 



Table 1. — Urban crime trends, January-June, 194.9-50 
[Offenses known to the police in 1,662 cities, total population 59,300,183; based on 1940 decennial census] 



Offense 


Number of offenses 
January-June 


Percent 
change 




1949 


1950 


Total 


508, 035 


517, 497 


+ 1.9 








1,062 
894 
3,779 
18,889 
23, 655 
123, 347 
287,004 
48, 805 


1,644 
1.071 
3,604 
18, 162 
23, 755 
125, 674 
293, 234 
50, 353 


-1.1 




+19.8 




-4.6 








+.4 




+ 1.9 
+2.2 






+3.2 





(4) 



Table 2. — Rural crime trends, January- June, 1949-50 

[Based on reports of 1,656 sheriffs, 127 rural village officers, and 10 State police; total rural population, 

36,080,457, according to the 1940 decennial census] 



Offense 


Number of offenses 
January-June 


Percent 
change 




1949 


1950 


Total 


90, 739 


97, 442 


+7.4 








932 
872 
2,053 
3,402 
6,028 
29. 295 
39, 485 
8,672 


947 
840 
2,152 
3,517 
6, 313 
33, 650 

8^331 


+1.6 




-3.7 




+4.8 




+3.4 




+4.7 




+14.9 




+5.6 


Auto theft 









r. 



" *r^ 



*> -^s! 



Alg^'i li rt a 




CRIME RATES 

Urban Crime Rates, January-June, 1950 

The volume of crime in terms of the number of offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants shows pronounced variations among cities of the various 
population groups as well as among the different sections of the 
country. 

In tables 3-5 there are presented the crime rates (number of offenses 
per 100,000 inhabitants) calculated on the basis of the 1940 decennial 
census and according to the reports submitted by the 2,471 city police 
departments represented. 

Individuals interested in measuring crime on a local level may make 
direct comparisons of crime rates based on local figures with cities of 
the same general size according to the data presented in table 3, or 
comparisons may be made within a geographic division or State with 
the use of the figures shown in tables 4 and 5. 

In selecting the returns to be used in preparing these tabulations 
only those were included wherein an examination indicated they had 
been prepared in accordance with the principles of uniform crime 
reporting and the number of cities represented in the crime rate 
tabulations is shown in table 6. 

(7) 



Table 3. — Urban crime rates, January-June, 1950, by -population groups 

Offenses known to the police and rate per 100,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on 1940 decennial 

census] 



Population group 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mul- 
der, 

noimeg- 
ligent 

man- 
slaugh- 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 

entering 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

2,471 cities; total population, 
61,347,235: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate per 100,000 

group I 

35 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 22,439,171: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 

group n 

55 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 7,792,650: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 

group in 

103 cities, 50,000 to 100,000: total 
population, 7,126,538: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 

group IV 

210 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 7,316,873: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100,000 

group v 

588 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 8,891,938: 
Number of offenses known . . 
Rate per 100,000 

GROUP VI 

1,480 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 7,780,065: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate per 100,000 



1,086 
1.77 



775 
3.45 



202 
2.83 



18. 432 
30.0 



24. 188 
39.4 



125, 666 
211.5 



296, 549 
499.1 



510 
2.27 



201 
2.58 



2.064 
9.20 



12,011 
53.5 



i so, e 

241 



2, 772 
35.6 



317 
4.45 



228 
3.12 



L, 376 
19.3 



15,535 
218.0 



13.60: 
185. < 



111.727 
544.8 



44. 5.33 
571.5 



37.631 
528. 



36,315 
496.3 



64 

0.82 



11,798 
151. 6 



27. 2:i<» 
350.1 



23,427 
104.4 



5.216 
71.3 



5. 035 
56.6 



>. 667 
47.1 



i The number of offenses and rates for burglary and larceny— theft are based on reports as follows: Group 
I, 34 cities, total population, 20,507,837; groups I-VI, 2,470 cities, total population, 59,415,901. 



Table 4. — Urban crime rates, January- June, 1950, by geographic divisions and 

States 



[Offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. Population 


based on 1940 decennial census 




Division and State 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur 

glary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny — 

theft 


Auto 
theft 




2.76 


30.0 


39.4 


1211.5 


i 499. 1 


83.8 








.68 


9.0 


5.5 


135.6 


287.9 


52.5 








.75 
.69 
.67 

!79 


8.2 
3.5 
10.5 
3.4 

7.5 


9.8 
3.8 
4.7 
1.5 
6.0 
1.1 
16.0 


159.3 
141.0 
125.1 
103.4 
173.3 
97.5 
2 120. 8 


292.0 
395.5 
279.1 
244.2 
293. 5 
350. 3 
2 213. 4 


51.5 




53.5 




56.6 




25.7 




41.5 




47.7 




1.22 


15.1 


47.6 








.95 
.89 
1.55 
2.21 


13.2 
5.1 
22.1 
39.1 


20.3 
9.4 
17.8 
35.4 


156.2 

106.5 

3 108. 3 

189.1 


235. 7 

245.1 

3 168. 9 

449.9 


49.7 




44.4 




48.6 




68.4 








2.88 
2.55 
2.08 
1.97 
.55 
1.87 


62.2 
19.5 
41.5 
29.2 
5.1 
22.0 


46.2 
20.6 
61.4 
19.9 
4.4 
29.0 


177.5 
216.4 
262.4 
175. 1 
84.3 
165.9 


287.8 
489.8 
707.5 
458.6 
394.7 
443.2 


68.5 




79.6 




86.3 




55.8 




53.7 


West North Central 


71.6 








.87 
1.98 

.52 
3.80 
1.31 


5.6 
21.9 
13.8 
42.0 
13.3 
1.6 
4.3 
32.2 


3.7 
15.4 

3.1 
74.0 
17.7 

3.3 

1.4 
121.4 


124.2 
202.9 
118.4 
214.6 
144.7 
150.9 
172.3 
268.1 


402.9 
551.7 
365.0 
455.6 
536.0 
511.7 
384.1 
567.9 


66.0 




75.1 




55.5 




78.2 




110.1 




61.5 






45.2 




6.37 


109.4 








3.78 
8.89 
9.38 
3.42 
7.82 
6.22 
6.73 
2.01 


21.9 
38.8 

25.5 
26.7 
20.1 
14.4 
41.4 
17.4 
32.7 


9.8 
73.1 
83.9 
56.1 

261.6 
59.3 

112.6 
26.2 
71.6 


1 18. 3 
490.8 
198.0 
138.9 
274.7 
240.2 
327.6 
188.1 
242.1 


479.8 
853.1 
440.9 
315.5 
472.0 
629.9 
803. 5 
339.7 
395.0 


92.3 


Florida 


117.2 




91.0 




133. 1 




102.3 




91.6 




128.9 




78.3 




107.6 








11.54 
5.22 
8.27 
8.23 
6.41 


24.3 
43.3 
18.1 
35.6 
31.9 


92.6 
59.5 
71.7 
65.0 
50.2 


237.8 
283. 1 
188.4 
229.7 
324.1 


404.3 
444.9 
361.7 
355.9 
692.2 


87.6 




127.8 




73.8 




119. 1 




143.3 








3.77 
6.21 
2.26 
8.10 
1.88 


18.8 
31.4 
25.3 
35.8 
33.9 


54.8 
48.7 
19.8 
59.5 
24.5 


208.5 
193.9 
318. 7 
387.3 
339.0 


369.8 
389. 5 
663. 5 
851.1 
1, 036. 5 


66.1 




117.0 




118.7 


Texas 


170.2 
140.3 








3.00 
2. 27 
2.07 
1.64 


52.8 
43.1 
24.1 
27.4 
38.4 
28.3 
15.8 
31.6 
57.3 


63.0 
19.5 
13.8 
15.3 
33.4 
44.9 
13.9 
21.9 
41.2 


417.2 
397.0 
273.9 
215.3 
442.6 
333. 1 
318. 8 
195.7 
362.3 


1. 488. 7 

1, 055. 4 

987. 3 

701.9 

1. 194. 3 

963. 2 

964.4 

1, 044. 3 

1. 078. 5 


250.3 




116.8 




114.5 




128.8 




163. 7 




.98 
.73 
3.65 
1.96 


271.6 


Utah „ 


101. 1 




90.0 




149.0 








2.08 
.58 
2.13 


62.8 
29.5 
43.8 


49.2 
18.5 
11.1 


376.7 
298.6 
321.3 


1.125.6 
867.3 
944.4 


156.6 




121.8 




123.7 







i The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 2,470 cities with a total population of 
59,415,901. , , . , 

2 The rates for burglary and larcenv are based on the reports of 567 cities with a total population ol 
10,423,955. 

s The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 249 cities. 

* Includes the District of Columbia. 



10 



Table 5. — Urban crime rates, January- June, 1950, by geographic divisions and 
population groups 
[Offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. Population based on 1940 decennial census] 



Division and Group 



New England - 



Group I 

Group II 

-Group III... 
Group IV.... 

Group V 

Group VI... 
Middle Atlantic 



Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

st North Central- 



Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

West North Central- 



Group I 

Group II... 
Group III.. 
Group IV.. 
Group V... 
Group VI.. 
South Atlantic < 



Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

East South Central. 



Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV. _ _ 

Group V_... 

Group VI 

West South Central. 



Group I... 
Group II _. 
Group III. 
Group IV. 
Group V. - 
Group VI. 
Mountain 



Group I 
Group II 
Group ill 
Group IV 
Group V . 
Group VI 

Pacific. 



Group I... 
Group II_. 
Grou t ) in. 
Group [V 
Group V. 
Group VI. 



Murder, 






Bur- 






nonneg- 




Aggra- 


glary- 


Lar- 


Auto 
theft 


ligent 


Robbery 


vated 


breaking 


ceny- 


man- 




assault 


or enter- 


theft 


slaughter 






ing 






2.76 


30.0 


39.4 


1211.5 


i 499. 1 


83.8 


,6.8 


9.0 


5.5 


135.6 


287.9 


52.5 


1.07 


18.3 


14.0 


113. 3 


312.7 


92.5 


.74 


12.1 


6.2 


174.7 


314.9 


64.3 


.10 


7.8 


2.2 


128.1 


316.4 


49.7 


.95 


5.4 


4.2 


142.4 


290.8 


42.3 


.48 


3.3 


1.5 


110.8 


235.9 


23.8 


.46 


4.2 


3 7 


121.6 


197.6 


25.6 


1.22 


15.1 


16.0 


2 120. 8 


2 213.4 


47.6 


2.34 


31.4 


28.9 


3 157. 6 


3 209.8 


66.7 


1.04 


11.0 


14.7 


145.1 


250.5 


55.0 


.63 


8.1 


13.2 


139.2 


244.1 


53.1 


.55 


6.4 


9.4 


109.5 


248.7 


31.2 


.83 


5.5 


7.2 


96.9 


202.8 


33.0 


.43 


7.3 


7.1 


83.6 


151.0 


25.9 


2.21 


39.1 


35.4 


189.1 


449.9 


68.4 


3.21 


65.7 


57.4 


211.7 


465.7 


80.4 


2.56 


31.1 


35.7 


221.4 


572. 7 


82.8 


1.87 


20.2 


26.9 


201.9 


523.0 


72.4 


.93 


10.9 


10.0 


154.4 


430.5 


61.1 


.97 


10.8 


7.8 


144.1 


424. 3 


44.3 


.68 


8.2 


5.3 


139.8 


274.1 


34.9 


1.87 


22.0 


29.0 


165.9 


443.2 


71.6 


3.21 


41.1 


65.1 


200.5 


471.1 


85.7 


2.08 


21.5 


12.9 


190.8 


539.6 


118.0 


.91 


10.9 


14.4 


178. 1 


624.0 


81.8 


1.01 


8.8 


3.3 


157.1 


424.0 


55.6 


.67 


8.7 


4.3 


130.9 


405.6 


40.6 


.90 


5.8 


6.4 


99.4 


237.1 


34.5 


6.37 


32.2 


121.4 


268.1 


567.9 


109.4 


5.70 


45.7 


152.4 


201.6 


. 481. 4 


129.8 


8.26 


53.0 


114.0 


461.3 


851.3 


154.4 


6.27 


21.7 


109.9 


248.2 


564.9 


89.1 


5.70 


16.9 


108.1 


290.8 


714.8 


99.5 


6.70 


13.9 


122.6 


241.8 


478.3 


90.8 


5.76 


20.2 


78.8 


202.6 


351.7 


52.6 


8.26 


32.7 


71.6 


242.1 


395.0 


107.6 


7.16 


55.5 


68.3 


309. 


521.9 


138.1 


10.56 


35.1 


91.6 


221.3 


352.5 


134.1 


11.39 


18.9 


80.1 


341.4 


409.4 


87.2 


8.02 


19.1 


101.8 


177.6 


420.0 


105.5 


7.11 


19.3 


64.7 


195.7 


349.4 


86.9 


7. 50 


13. 3 


31.7 


138.7 


154.0 


46. 1 


6.41 


31.9 


50.2 


324.1 


692.2 


143.3 


8.13 


43.4 


58. 1 


421.8 


760.8 


191.6 


6.68 


42.3 


34.9 


422.7 


965.2 


177.0 


6.50 


40.2 


73.0 


334.7 


848.9 


158.0 


4.42 


19.3 


55.8 


256.4 


736.9 


130.2 


5.03 


15.2 


35.5 


181.2 


463.6 


70.0 


3.72 


9.9 


29.3 


164.5 


261.8 


54.3 


1.88 


33.9 


24.5 


339.0 


1, 038. 5 


140.3 


2.48 


65.8 


23.9 


531.3 


1, 254. 9 


148.6 


.67 


16. 7 


8.0 


383.5 


977.8 


105.4 


4. 59 


71.9 


110. 1 


478.5 


1, 930. 8 


380.7 


2.44 


31.3 


29.7 


291.2 


1.129.8 


218.8 


1.53 


21.1 


19.9 


279 


1, 078. 9 


115.3 


1.40 


21.4 


18.4 


231.1 


671.7 


83.9 


1.96 


57.3 


41.2 


362.3 


1, 078. 5 


149.0 


2.02 


77.6 


60. 6 


368. 8 


955. 8 


160.1 


1.99 


49.1 


19.9 


279.2 


L,099.6 


169.2 


3.49 


47.2 


36.5 


431.5 


1, L78.2 


135.6 


1. 99 


36.5 


22.7 


377. 2 


1,147.6 


113.9 


1.84 


31.4 


20.2 


:;ss.n 


1.317.3 


138.8 


.80 


25.6 


15.8 


33-1.7 


1. 217. 7 


127.6 



1 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 2.470 cities with a population of 59.415,901. 
- The rales for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 567 cities with a total population of 

' The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 4 cities. 
i Includes the District of Columbia. 



11 



Table 6. — Number of cities in each population group, geographic division, and State 
represented in the urban crime rate tabulations for January-June, 1950 (tables 3-5) 





Total 


Population group 


Division and State 


Over 

250,000 


100,000 to 
250,000 


50,000 to 
100,000 


25,000 to 
50,000 


10,000 to 
25,000 


Less than 
10,000 


Total: 

Population, 61,347,235 


2,471 


35 


55 


103 


210 


588 


1,480 


New Encland: 

Population, 6,069,959 


193 


2 


10 


13 


35 


67 


66 




26 

18 
106 
17 
17 
9 

568 




3 


2 
1 

8 

1 
1 


8 
2 
16 
2 
6 
1 

36 


7 
5 
42 
6 
6 

144 


6 






10 




1 


7 


32 


New Hampshire 


8 


1 




3 






7 


Middle Atlantic: 

Population, 12,355,289 


5 


11 


23 


349 




144 

174 
250 

583 


1 

2 

2 

8 


4 
4 
3 

10 


6 
10 

23 


14 
10 

60 


36 

40 
62 

117 


82 




106 




161 


East North Central: 

Population, 16,773,354 


365 




149 

85 
109 
157 

83 

266 


1 
1 
1 
4 

1 

4 


1 
3 

4 


7 
4 
6 
4 

8 


14 
10 
9 
14 
13 

12 


31 

14 
23 
32 
17 

61 


95 




53 




68 




99 




50 


West North Central: 

Population, 5,442,172 


5 


176 




55 
53 
64 
45 
25 
10 
14 

239 




1 
2 
1 


4 
1 


6 
1 
1 
2 


8 
15 
11 
13 
6 
3 
5 

59 


36 






34 




2 

2 


49 




2 
1 


26 




1 


17 






1 
1 

20 


6 










8 


South Atlantic: 

Population, 6,108,659 


3 


7 


16 


134 




6 
1 
41 
37 
15 
51 
24 
39 
25 

120 




1 








5 




1 












3 


1 
4 


4 

1 
2 
4 
2 
5 
2 

10 


11 

11 
4 

15 
5 
6 
7 

29 


22 




1 
1 


20 






8 




1 


4 
2 
2 
3 

4 


27 






15 






2 


24 






13 


East South Central: 

Population, 2,687,670 


3 


3 


71 




32 

38 
22 
28 

162 


1 
1 




2 

1 


3 
5 
1 
1 

13 


7 
6 

10 
6 

43 


19 






25 






10 




1 

4 


3 
3 




West South Central: 

Population, 4,104,851 


8 


91 




21 
21 
39 

81 

118 






1 
1 


1 
3 
2 

7 

7 


6 
4 
14 
19 

22 


13 




1 




12 




2 

1 

1 


21 




3 
1 


6 

1 


45 


Mountain: 

Population, 1,540,624 


86 




14 
27 
18 
16 

5 

12 
18 

8 

222 






1 


1 
1 
1 
2 




12 




1 




5 
5 
4 
1 
2 
1 
4 

46 


20 








12 










10 










4 










1 
1 


9 


Utah 




1 




15 


Wyoming 

Pacific: 

Population, 6,264,657 






4 


5 


5 


7 


17 


142 


California 


158 
30 
34 


3 


3 


7 


13 
3 


34 

5 


98 
23 




2 




21 









12 



Rural Crime Rates, January-June, 1950 

The number of offenses and the rate per 100,000 inhabitants as 
reported by 1,849 sheriffs, 151 rural village officers, and 11 State police 
organizations are shown in table 7. The rural population represented 
is 39,694,356, according to the 1940 census. 

For offenses of criminal homicide and rape, the rural crime rates 
compare reasonably well with those for urban areas, but for the other 
offenses the rural rates are noticeably lower and this is particularly 
true with reference to crimes against property. In this connection, it 
should be observed that the rural data do include some returns which 
may have been limited to information as to persons arrested and such 
incompleteness in reporting would be most pronounced in connection 
with crimes against property where a relatively small proportion are 
followed by arrest. 



Table 7. — Rural crime rales, January-June, 1950 



Offenses known and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, as reported by 1,849 sheriffs, 151 rural village officers, 
and 11 State police; total rural population, 39,694,356, based on 1940 decennial census] 




Criminal homi- 
cide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Mur- 
der, 
nonneg- 

ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Population 39,694,356: 

Number of offenses known 


1,123 
2.83 


903 
2.27 


2,383 
6.00 


4. 009 
10.1 


7, 378 
18.6 


36, 611 
92.2 


44, 961 
113.3 


9,188 
23.1 







OFFENSES IN INDIVIDUAL AREAS 

Offenses in Individual Cities With More Than 100,000 Inhabitants 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the period of January-June, 1950, is shown hi table 8. The compila- 
tion includes the reports received from police departments in cities 
with more than 100,000 inhabitants. Police administrators and other 
interested individuals will probably find it desirable to compare the 
crime rates of then cities with the average rates shown in tables 3-5 
of this publication. Similarly, they will doubtless desire to make com- 
parisons with the figures for their communities for prior periods, in 
order to determine whether there has been an increase or a decrease 
in the amount of crime committed. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 
cities because the differences in the figures may be due to a variety of 
factors. Such comparisons are not desirable even though the figures 
for individual communities are converted into terms of the number of 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. 

The following is a list of some of the factors which affect the amount 
of crime in the community: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 

The composition of the population with reference particularly to 
age, sex, and race. 

The economic status and activities of the population. 

Climate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 

The number of police employees per unit of population. 

The standards governing appointments to the police force. 

The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law-enforcement problems. 

The degree of efficiency of the local law-enforcement agency. 

The figures presented in the following tabulation are those reported 
by the individual police departments in the cities represented without 
reducing the data to crime rates (number of offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants) . 

In considering the volume of crime committed locally, it is generally 
more important to determine whether the figures for a given com- 
munity show increases or decreases rather than to ascertain whether 
they exceed or fall short of those for some other individual community, 

(13) 



14 

and it should be remembered that the amount of crime committed in 
a community is not solely chargeable to the police but is rather a 
charge against the entire community. 

In publishing these figures the FBI acts as a service agency. The 
figures published are those submitted by the contributing agencies. 



Table 8. — Number of offenses known to the police, January-June, 1950, cities over 
100,000 in population 

[Based on 1940 decennial census] 



City 





4 


Albany, N. Y 


3 

41 




32 




29 




7 




3 


Buffalo, N. Y 


7 
2 




5 




1 


Charlotte, N. C 


13 




8 




135 




22 




25 






Dallas, Tex 


28 




11 




8 




5 




43 






Elizabeth, N.J 














3 




1 


Fort Worth, Tex 


24 




9 




1 




1 


Honolulu, T. H 


4 








11 




16 








3 




25 




15 


Long Beach, Calif... 


2 




22 




19 








15 




16 








2 




20 


Newark, N. J 


11 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



135 
263 
113 

157 
12 
41 
24 

48 

25 
16 
33 

3, 036 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or en- 
tering 



56 76 658 485 

Complete data not received 



1,101 
1,306 
1,664 
454 
1,713 

254 

5,213 

111 

187 

187 

166 
439 
222 
586 
308 

396 
324 
440 

2,248 
1,213 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
$50 



913 
140 
322 
92 
95 

128 
109 
(') 

3, S2S 
512 

317 

415 



72 


32 


296 


96 


528 


220 


231 


866 


956 


1,851 


39 


266 


307 


210 


404 


132 


71 


5% 


(') 


1,528 


1,329 


1,361 


5,659 


5, 618 


10,040 


225 


252 


1,368 


835 


1,176 


13 
150 




146 
748 


341 


130 
868 


156 


147 


152 


1.282 


513 


862 


44 


50 


299 


443 


2,072 


118 


16 


580 


503 


1,338 


71 


62 


295 


218 


407 


130 


270 


995 


520 


904 



Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



15 

Table 8. — Number of offenses known to the police, January- June, 1950, cities over 
100,000 in population — Continued 



City 



Murder, 

nonneg- 

ligent 

man- 

slaughtei 



Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or en- 
tering 


Larceny— theft 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


8 
13 
212 


1 
23 
250 


285 
394 
1,125 


97 
185 
635 


517 

465 

1,168 



Auto 
theft 



New Bedford, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn.. 

New Orleans, La 

New York, N. Y.„. 
Norfolk, Va 



Oakland, Calif 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Omaha, Nebr 

Paterson, N. J 

Peoria, 111 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh. Pa... 
Portland, Oreg... 
Providence, R. I. 
Reading, Pa 



Richmond, Va 

Rochester, N. Y . 
Sacramento, Calif. 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn.... 



Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. . 
Scranton, Pa 



Seattle, Wash 

Somerville, Mass.. 
South Bend, Ind__ 
Spokane, Wash... 
Springfield, Mass. 



Syracuse, N. Y. 
Tacoma, Wash. 
Tampa, Fla.___ 
Toledo, Ohio... 
Trenton, N. J.. 



Tulsa, Okla 

Utica, N. Y 

Washington, D. C_ 

Wichita, Kans 

Wilmington, Del... 



Worcester, Mass... 

Yonkers, N. Y 

Youngstown, Ohio. 



Complete data not received 



173 


399 


849 


552 


1,150 


191 


175 


1,302 


196 


3,166 


81 


60 


951 


382 


1,466 


54 


40 


347 


184 


1,125 


16 


43 


382 


65 


263 


51 


47 


232 


83 


447 


792 


583 


3,060 


1 269 


1,267 


250 


170 


1.171) 


324 


372 


120 


78 


1,051 


680 


2,077 


30 


25 


521 


211 


674 


9 


8 


189 


48 


224 


73 


140 


782 


388 


1,402 


23 


42 


439 


150 


816 


73 


24 


303 


522 


1,241 


429 


1,029 


1,996 


605 


2,748 


53 


22 


558 


157 


1,243 


25 


12 


575 


211 


1, 255 


68 


156 


985 


297 


2,041 


41 


27 


335 


459 


1,382 


521 


223 


2,022 


661 


4,587 


14 

255 


10 
51 


145 
1,452 


60 
603 


225 
2,142 


14 
21 


1 
35 


192 
226 


41 
191 


200 
598 


20 


8 


314 


160 


1,505 


7 


9 


200 


98 


343 


14 


5 


265 


221 


666 


80 


10 


420 


243 


712 


46 


118 


506 


235 


743 


88 


82 


666 


333 


1,297 


23 


28 


177 


98 


155 


56 


36 


679 


413 


887 


7 


4 


123 


49 


221 


435 


1,911 


1,740 


833 


3,773 


17 


18 


368 


114 


714 


21 


2 


173 


134 


447 


28 


5 


335 


160 


466 


12 


15 


118 


47 


290 


28 


19 


215 


168 


381 



431 
433 
384 
134 
132 

,014 
660 
432 
133 
40 

358 
127 
317 
870 



158 

429 

357 

1,368 

47 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

Police Killed, 1949 

The number of police employees killed in line of duty has steadily 
declined during the last several years. The number killed per 
5,000,000 inhabitants during the past 5 years such surveys have been 
conducted is as follows: 

1945 4. 06 

1946 5.64 

1947 4. 59 

1948 4. 35 

1949 3.75 

The available figures showing police employees killed and the rate 
per 5,000,000 inhabitants are presented in table 9 for cities grouped 
according to size and location. The data include all employees re- 
ported killed in line of duty, regardless of the manner in which they 
lost their lives. Thus the figures include not only police officers killed 
by criminals, but also police employees killed in traffic accidents while 
in line of duty and the like. 

The police employee data in the tables which follow are supple- 
mented by the figures shown in table 11, which indicates the number 
of cities and the population represented whose police departments' 
reports are included in the summary tabulations. It is significant 
that over 98 percent of the urban population is represented. 



Table 9. — Number of police depart?nent employees killed, 1949, by geographic 

division and population groups 

[Includes only those employees killed while on active duty with their local police agencies] 





Total 


Population group 


Geographic division 


Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
5,000,000 
inhabi- 
tants 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total: 

Xumber 

Rate per 5,000,000 inhab- 


55 


3.75 


18 
2.98 


7 
4.49 


4 
2.72 


4 
2.70 


8 
4.08 


14 
6.48 










1 

11 
6 

10 

6 
3 

6 

8 


.79 
3.35 
1.73 
8.48 
4. 46 
4.89 
6.11 
2.85 
6.30 










...... 

...... 

1 






5 

4 

1 
1 


2 


2 


...... 

1 
2 


2 




1 


Wes1 North Central 




1 


3 




2 










West South Central 


2 


1 












3 


1 





















(16) 



17 



Number of Police Employees, April 30, 1950 



As of the last day of April 1950, police department employees 
numbered 1.95 for each 1,000 inhabitants, a slight increase (3.2 
percent) over the figures for the previous year, and some increase was 
registered in nearly every population group and geographic division. 

In connection with the steady increase in the number of police 
employees per 1,000 inhabitants recorded during recent years, it 
should be observed that this increase does not necessarily represent a 
proportionate increase in police strength. All calculations have been 
based on the 1940 decennial census figures, whereas it is entirely 
possible many departments have grown in size in an effort to keep 
pace with an increased local population, which local increases are not 
taken into account in the tabulations which follow. Then, too, any 
general tendency for departments across the country to change over 
from a 6-day work week to a 5-day week would call for more names 
on the payroll without necessarily increasing the police coverage. 

Average figures showing the number of police employees per 1,000 
inhabitants as of April 30, 1950, are presented in table 10 with the 
cities divided according to size and location so that interested 
individuals may compare local figures with national or regional 
averages. Obviously, the data represent the result of a survey of 
existing police strength across the country as of the date indicated 
and do not necessarily represent specific recommendations as to the 
number of employees that should be on the rolls of a department of 
any particular size or in any one section of the country. It should 
be observed, too, that the data include civilian employees such as 
clerks, stenographers, and others without police powers. 



IS 



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ITANTS 




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; 'h, ;..f. ;.;;■; , ■ 




1!) 



Table 10. — Police Department employees, April 80, 1950, number and rate per 
1,000 inhabitants, by geographic divisions and popidalion groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Population group 



Group I Group II Group III 



Over 

250,0(10 



100. I 

to 

250,000 



Group 
IV 



Group Group 
V VI 



10,000 

to 

25,000 



Less 
than 

10,000 



Total: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 
1,000 inhabitants 

New England: 

Number of police employees.. 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants... 

Middle Atlantic: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

East North Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

. 1,000 inhabitants 

West North Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

South Atlantic: ' 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

East South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1 ,000 inhabitants 

West South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

Mountain: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

Pacific: 

Number of police employees 

Averaee number of employees per 
1,000 inhabitants 

i Includes the District of Columbia. 



12,481 

1.96 

44, 578 

2.13 

31,352 

1.81 

8,891 

1.51 

14,037 

2.09 

4,689 

1.53 

7,579 

1.54 

2,911 

1.66 

16, 348 

2.57 



73, 684 
2.44 



13, 842 
1.78 



12, 941 
1.76 



14, 827 
1.51 



3,240 

3.16 
29, 860 

2.55 
18, 188 

2.30 
4, 036 

2.02 
4,772 

2.62 
1,308 

1.49 
2,449 

1.72 
587 

1.82 
9,244 

2.97 



2,778 
2.05 

2,606 
1.81 

2,102 
1.42 



1.36 
2,179 
2.17 

576 
1.41 

900 
1.72 

224 
1.49 
1,497 
2.12 



1,807 

1.88 
3,015 

1.84 
2,566 

1.65 
718 

1.31 
1,930 

1.75 
522 

1.86 
1,094 

1.67 
262 

2.23 
1,027 

2.11 



2,301 

1.77 

2,275 

1.71 

2,940 

1.36 

487 

1.23 

1.383 

2.02 

517 

1.59 

730 

1.70 

423 

1.72 

1,146 

2.08 



1,740 

1.47 
3,739 

1.49 
2,478 

1.32 
1,254 

1.26 
1,692 

1.82 
742 

1.55 
1,080 

1.40 
614 

1.62 
1,488 

2.24 



15, 370 
1.42 



615 

1.13 
3,083 

1.33 
3,078 

1.30 
1,416 

1.14 
2,081 

1.77 
1,024 

1.46 
1,326 

1.21 
801 

1.49 
1,946 

2.35 



20 



Table 11. — Number of cities used in tabulations regarding number of police 
department employees, April SO, 1950, and police killed, 1949 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Total 


Population group 


Division 


Group 
I 


Group 
II 


Group 
III 


Group 
IV 


Group 
V 


Group 
VI 




Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 

7, 792, 650 
55 


50,000 

to 
100,000 

7, 343, 917 
107 


25,000 

to 
50,000 

7, 417, 093 
213 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total: 


73, 340, 751 
3.223 


30, 195, 339 
37 


9, 793, 229 
652 


10, 798, 523 
2.159 


N umber of cities _ . _ 


New England: Total population, 
6,368,787 


223 

694 

692 

362 

363 

195 

304 

150 
240 


2 
7 
8 
4 
3 
3 
4 

1 

S 


10 
11 
10 
5 
7 
3 
3 

1 

s 


13 

24 

23 

8 

17 

4 

9 

2 
7 


36 
38 
60 
12 
20 
10 
13 

17 


76 
160 
126 
68 
64 
31 
54 

26 

47 


86 


Middle Atlantic: Total population, 




East North Central: Total popula- 


465 


West North Central: Total popula- 


265 


South Atlantic: Total population, 
6,720,172 


252 


East South Central: Total popula- 


144 


West South Central: Total popula- 


221 


Mountain: Total population, 


113 


Pacific: Total population, 6,351,226. 


159 



Police Employees in Individual Cities 

The number of employees as of April 30, 1950, is shown in tables 12 
and 13 for each city according to the reports of the individual police 
departments. The cities are grouped generally by size and then 
listed alphabetically, first by State and then by city. 

All reporting cities with population in excess of 250,000 indicated 
civilian employees were employed and in cities with population from 
100,000 to 250,000, all but 1 employed civilian personnel. For cities 
with population from 50,000 to 100,000, all but 6 reported civilian 
personnel and only 50 of the cities with population from 25,000 to 
50,000 showed no civilian personnel on the rolls as of April 30, 1950. 

The following tabulation indicates the proportion of employees 
classified as civilians in cities of the various population groups: 

Population group: Percent civilian employees 

Total, all cities 7. 5 

Group I (over 250,000) 8.4 

Group II (100,000-250,000) - 9.9 

Group III (50,000-100,000) . . 9. 

Group IV (25,000-50,000) 5.9 

Group V (10,000-25,000) 4 3 

Group VI (2,500-10,000) 3. 9 



21 

Comparisons of police strength between individual cities represented 
in the following tabulations should not be made indiscriminately since 
there are so many factors entering into the problem of the adequacy 
of police strength in individual cities. As an illustration, in some 
cities the police departments are on a 48-hour workweek or longer, 
while in others a 40-hour week has been adopted. Also, while in most 
departments the three-shift system is in operation, some may still re- 
tain the 12-hour day. Then, too, differences in automotive and com- 
munication equipment have a direct bearing on the problem as well as 
the number of private police and separate police organizations such as 
public park police and the like that are in existence. 

In some areas the handling of traffic at school crossings is assigned 
to full-time police officers, while in other communities the department 
may utilize part-time school crossing guards who may be classed as 
civilian employees. 

The report form forwarded by the police as of April 30, 1950, pro- 
vided for a separate listing of full-time and part-time employees and 
further, a designation of the number in each class who were police 
officers and those who were civilians. The form was also designed to 
include a statement of the equivalent number of full-time employees 
represented by the work of the part-time employees in April. If the 
department's entries relative to part-time employees were limited to 
the total time worked during April the FBI changed the data into 
terms of full-time employees. For this purpose it was assumed that 
200 hours was the approximate monthly time of a regular employee. 
In the event a part-time employee worked at least 75 percent of the 
normal working hours for the month, one full-time employee was 
counted. 

If employees were not paid from police department funds or from 
some public fund allocated for police personnel, they were excluded 
from the tabulations. Also, employees on military or other extended 
leave of absence were excluded from the figures. 



22 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities over 
25,000 in population 

[Based on 1940 decennial census] 

CITIES WITH OVER 250,000 INHABITANTS 



City 



Birmingham, Ala... 
Los Angeles, Calif.. 

Oakland, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif 

Denver, Colo 

Washington, D. C. 

Atlanta, Ga 

Chicago, 111 

Indianapolis, Ind... 

Louisville, Ky 

New Orleans, La... 

Baltimore, Md 

Boston, Mass 

Detroit, Mich 

Minneapolis, Mimi. 

St. Paul, Minn 

Kansas City, Mo... 

St. Louis, Mo 

City, N.J... 



Number of police 


department employ- 




ees 


Police 

officers 


Civil- 
ians 


Total 


331 


29 


360 


4,377 


844 


5,221 


673 


109 


782 


1,710 


101 


1,811 


537 


50 


587 


1,899 


174 


2,073 


4-77 


72 


549 


7,243 


337 


7,580 


689 


107 


796 


497 


51 


548 


922 


4 


926 ' 


1.917 


233 


2,150 


2,494 


235 


2,729 


4,374 


318 


4.692 


577 


49 


626 


366 


38 


404 


571 


158 


729 


1, 862 


415 


2.277 


868 


136 


1,004 



City 



Police Civil- rp. . 
officers ians lotal 



Newark, N. J 

Buffalo, N. Y.._. 
New York, N. Y. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Portland, Oreg... 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa... 
Providence, R. I. 
Memphis, Term. 

Dallas, Tex 

Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 
Seattle, Wash__._ 
Milwaukee, Wis.. 



Number of police 
department employ- 
ees 



1. 250 

1.220 

18,681 

438 

750 

1, 692 

411 

357 

593 

4, 390 

1, 30S 

444 

334 

474 

511 

282 

631 

1, 336 



CITIES WITH 100,000 TO 250,000 INHABITANTS 



Long Beach, Calif. . . 

Sacramento, Calif 

San Diego, Calif 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Hartford, Conn. 

New Haven, Conn... 

Wilmington, Del 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Miami, Fla 

Tampa, Fla 

Peoria, 111.. 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Gary, Ind 

South Bend, Ind 

Des Moines, Iowa. . . 
Kansas City, Kans.. 

Wichita, Kans 

Cambridge, Mass 

Fall River, Mass 

Lowell, Mass 

New Bedford, Mass. 

Somerville, Mass 

Springfield, Mass 

AVorcester, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

Duluth, Minn 

Omaha, Nebr 



329 


74 


403 


195 


32 


227 


373 


74 


447 


288 


19 


307 


297 


33 


330 


320 


28 


348 


181 


25 


206 


288 


45 


333 


513 


59 


572 


166 


20 


186 


142 


7 


149 


174 


3 


177 


201 


38 


239 


150 


11 


161 


160 


20 


180 


136 


21 


157 


174 


31 


205 


234 


9 


243 


214 


13 


227 


195 


4 


199 


195 


13 


208 


172 


2 


174 


302 


20 


322 


394 


26 


420 


185 


39 


224 


239 


27 


266 


121 


16 


137 


263 


38 


301 



Camden, N. J 

Elizabeth, N. J.. 

Paterson, N. J 

Trenton, N. J.__. 

Albany, N. Y 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Utica, N. Y 

Yonkers, N. Y 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Akron, Ohio 

Canton, Ohio 

Dayton, Ohio 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Oklahoma City, Okla 

Tulsa, Okla 

Erie, Pa 

Reading, Pa 

Scranton, Pa 

Chattanooga, Term... 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Nashville, Tenn 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah- 
Norfolk, Va 

Richmond, Va 

Spokane, Wash 

Tacoma, Wash 



186 


61 


227 


10 


242 


9 


233 


17 


316 


25 


320 


39 


155 


7 


240 


16 


180 


4 


251 


12 


134 


5 


206 


39 


203 


36 


220 


84 


192 


37 


152 


16 


133 


19 


170 


13 


156 


7 


166 


30 


191 


26 


345 


22 


224 




328 


24 


313 


33 


186 


17 


200 


17 



CITIES WITH 50,000 TO 100,000 INHABITANTS 



Mobile, Ala 

Montgomery, Ala. _ 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Little Rock, Ark 

Berkeley, Calif 

Fresno, Calif 

I Hendale, Calif 

Pasadena, Calif 

San lose, Calif 

Santa Monica, Calif 

Stockton, Calif 

Pueblo, Colo 
New Britain, ( !onn 
Waterbury, Conn. 
St. Petersburg, Fla 



134 


29 


103 


129 


13 


142 


167 


21 


188 


118 


5 


123 


127 


8 


135 


156 


20 


176 


122 


42 


164 


142 


24 


166 


117 


5 


122 


117 


45 


162 


98 


4 


102 


68 


6 


71 


126 


5 


131 


198 


15 


213 


85 


7 


92 



Augusta, Ga 

Columbus, Ga 

Macon, Ga 

Savannah, Ga 

Cicero, 111 

Decatur, 111 

East St. Louis, 111 

Evanston, 111 

Oak Park, 111 

Rockford, 111 

Springfield, 111 

East Chicago, Ind 
Evansville, Ind ... 
Hammond, Ind 
Terre Haute, Ind. 



121 


11 


lis 


2 


97 


3 


162 


13 


79 


22 


58 


4 


68 


32 


90 


39 


65 


22 


94 


5 


99 


24 


103 


7 


170 


8 


115 


15 


91 


2 



23 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities over 
25,000 in population — Continued 
CITIES WITH 50,000 TO 100,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



Oity 



Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Topeka, Kans 

Covington, Ky 

Shreveport, La 

Portland, Maine 

Brockton, Mass 

Holyoke, Mass 

Lawrence, Mass 

Lynn, Mass 

Maiden, Mass 

Medford, Mass 

Newton, Mass 

Quincy, Mass 

Dearborn, Mich 

Highland Park, Mich-.. 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

Lansing, Mich 

Pontiac, Mich 

Saginaw, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Springfield, Mo 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Manchester, N. H 

Atlantic City, N.J 

Bayonne, N.J 

East Orange, N. J 

Hoboken, N.J 

Irvington, N. J 

Passaic, N. J 

Union City, N.J 

Binghamton, N. Y 

Mount Vernon, N. Y.__ 
New Roehelle, N. Y_... 

Niagara Falls, N. Y 

Schenectady, N. Y 



Number of police 
department employ- 



Police 


Civil- 


officers 


ians 


78 


7 


82 


2 


80 


17 


65 




82 


22 


74 




153 


11 


114 


7 


101 


4 


103 


1 


139 


4 


181 


13 


103 


2 


112 


1 


149 


5 


138 


3 


163 


32 


102 


20 


73 


13 


115 


4 


74 


10 


127 


14 


115 


28 


94 


4 


75 


9 


84 


17 


118 


4 


196 


44 


221 


7 


113 


1 


179 




93 


5 


116 




114 




114 


18 


137 


6 


138 


9 


145 


9 


157 


14 



Oity 



Troy, N. Y 

Asheville, N. O 

Durham, N. O 

Greensboro, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Hamilton, Ohio 

Lakewood, Ohio 

Springfield, Ohio 

Allentown, Pa 

Altoona, Pa 

Bethlehem, Pa 

Chester, Pa 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Johnstown, Pa 

Lancaster, Pa 

McKeesport, Pa 

Upper Darby Township, Pa 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

York, Pa 

Pawtucket, R. I 

Charleston, S. C 

Columbia, S. C 

Amarillo, Tex 

Austin, Tex 

Beaumont, Tex 

Corpus Christi, Tex 

El Paso, Tex 

Galveston, Tex 

Waco, Tex 

Arlington County, Va 

Portsmouth, Va 

Roanoke, Va 

Charleston, W. Va 

Huntington, W. Va. 

Wheeling, W. Va 

Madison, Wis 

Racine, Wis 



Number of police 
department employ- 



Police Civil 
officers ians 



CITIES WITH 25,00(1 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS 



Anniston, Ala 

Gadsden, Ala 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 

Tuscon, Ariz 

Fort Smith, Ark 

Alameda, Calif 

Alhambra, Calif 

Bakersfield, Calif 

Belvedere Township, Calif 

Beverly Hills, Calif 

Burbank, Calif 

Huntington Park, Calif 

Inglewood, Calif 

Riverside, Calif 

San Bernardino, Calif 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif 

South Gate, Calif 

Colorado Springs, Colo 

Bristol, Conn 

Greenwich Town, Conn... 

Meriden, Conn 

Middletown, Conn 

New London, Conn,, 

Norwalk, Conn 

Stamford, Conn 

Torrington, Conn.. ._ 

West Hartford, Conn 

West Haven, Conn 

Miami Beach, Fla.... 

Orlando, Fla 

Pensaeola, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla 



31 


1 


32 


73 


4 


77 


44 


2 


46 


76 


9 


85 


44 




44 


66 


2 


68 


54 


16 


70 


74 


6 


80 


77 


8 


85 


56 


9 


65 


82 


24 


106 


41 


-2 


43 


47 


4 


51 


67 


5 


72 


107 


13 


120 


60 


4 


64 


53 


12 


65 


45 


8 


53 


63 


6 


69 


47 


2 


49 


93 


10 


103 


64 


1 


65 


34 


2 


36 


57 


3 


60 


66 




66 


112 


8 


120 


44 


1 


45 


76 




76 


40 




40 


125 


33 


158 


77 


2 


79 


67 


8 


75 


65 


1 


66 



Rome, Ga 

Boise, Idaho 

Alton, 111 

Aurora, 111 

Belleville, ni 

Berwyn, TJ1 

Bloomington, 111 

Danville, HI 

Elgin, HI 

Galesburg, 111 

Joilet, HI 

Maywood, HI 

Moline, HI 

Quincy, 111 

Rock Island, 111 

Waukegan, 111 

Anderson, Ind 

Elkhart, Ind 

Kokomo, Ind 

Lafayette, Ind 

Marion, Ind 

Michigan City, Ind.. 

Mishawaka, Ind 

Muncie, Ind 

New Albany, Ind 

Richmond, Ind 

Burlington, Iowa 

Clinton, Iowa 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Mason City, Iowa... 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Hutchinson, Kans... 



38 


6 


52 


3 


37 




53 




31 


1 


43 


8 


36 


4 


33 




46 


2 


32 


4 


63 


2 


24 


1 


30 


1 


41 


4 


46 




35 


2 


66 


5 


55 


5 


57 


3 


49 




38 




43 




41 


4 


82 




24 




47 




33 


2 


26 




34 


3 


43 




30 


5 


29 


3 


28 


2 



24 

Table 12. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities over 
25,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 



Ashland, Ky 

Lexingt on , Ky 

Newport, Ky 

Owensboro, Ky 

Paducah, Ky 

A lexandria, La 

Baton Rouge, La 

Monroe, La 

Bangor, Maine 

Lewiston, Maine 

Cumberland, Md 

Hagerstown, Md 

Arlington, Mass 

Belmont, Mass 

Beverly, Mass_ 

Brookline, Mass 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chicopee, Mass 

Everett, Mass 

Fitehburg, Mass 

Haverhill, Mass 

Melrose, Mass 

Pittsfield, Mass 

Revere, Mass 

Salem, Mass 

Taunton, Mass 

Waltham, Mass 

Watertown, Mass 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

Battle Creek, Mich 

Bay City, Mich 

Hamtramck, Mich 

Jackson, Mich 

Muskegon, Mich 

Port Huron, Mich 

Royal Oak, Mich 

Wyandotte, Mich 

Rochester, Minn 

Meridian, Miss 

Joplin, Mo 

University City, Mo 

Butte, Mont 

Great Falls, Mont 

Concord, N. H 

Nashua, N. H 

Belleville, N. J. 

Bloomfield, N. J 

Clifton, N.J 

Garfield, N.J 

Hackensack, N. J 

Hamilton Township, N. J... 

Kearny, N. J 

Montclair, N. J 

New Brunswick, N. J 

North Bergen Township. N.J 

Orange. N. J 

Perth Amboy, N. J 

Plainneld, N. J.... 

Teaneek Township, N. J 

West New York, N.J 

West Orange, X.J 

Woodbridge Township. \. J 
Albuquerque, \ \l<\ 

Amsterdam, N. Y 

Auburn, N. Y 

Elmira, X. Y 

Jamestown, N. Y... _. 

Kingston, N. Y.. 

Xrwburgh, N. Y 

Poughkeepsie, X. Y 

Rome, N. Y 

Watertown, N. Y__ 

White Plains, N. Y 

High Point, X. C._ 

Raleigh, N. C 



Number of police 
department employ- 
ees 



Police Civil- 
officers ians 



City 



Rocky Mount, N. C 

Wilmington, N. C __ 

Fargo, N. Dak 

East Cleveland, Ohio 

Elyria, Ohio 

Lima, Ohio 

Lorain, Ohio 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Marion, Ohio 

Massillon, Ohio 

Middletown, Ohio. 

Newark, Ohio 

Norwood, Ohio 

Portsmouth, Ohio 

Steubenville, Ohio 

Warren, Ohio 

Zanesville, Ohio 

Enid, Okla 

Muskogee, Okla 

Salem, Oreg 

Aliquippa, Pa 

Easton, Pa 

Haverford Township, Pa 

Hazleton, Pa 

Lebanon, Pa 

Lower Merion Township, 

New Castle, Pa 

Norristown, Pa. 

Sharon, Pa 

Washington, Pa 

Wilkinsburg. Pa 

Williamsport, Pa 

Central Falls, R. L. 

Cranston, R. I 

East Providence, R. I... 

Newport, R. I 

Warwick, R. I 

Woonsocket, R. I 

Greenville, S. C 

Spartanburg, S. C 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak 

Johnson City, Tenn 

Abilene, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 

Lubbock, Tex 

Port Arthur, Tex 

San Angelo, Tex 

Tyler. Tex 

Wichita Falls, Tex 

Ogden, Utah 

Burlington, Vt 

Alexandria, Va 

Danville, Va 

Lynchburg, Va 

Newport News, Va 

Petersburg, Va 

Bellingham, Wash 

Everett, Wash 

Yakima, Wash 

Clarksburg, W. Va 

Parkersburg, W. Va 

Apnleton, Wis 

Beloit, Wis 

Eau Claire, Wis 

Fond du Lac, Wis 

Green Bay, Wis 

Kenosha, Wis_. 

La Crosse, Wis 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Sheboygan, Wis 

Superior, Wis 

U'ausau, Wis 

Wauwatosa, Wis 

West Allis. Wis 



Number of police 
department employ- 



Police 

ollicers 



Civil- 
ians 



25 

Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 

[Based on 1940 decennial census] 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




35 
22 
32 
12 
23 

22 
31 
10 
19 
39 
16 
41 
19 
20 
18 
25 
21 
90 
31 
44 
29 
29 
16 
21 
26 
18 
20 
40 
28 
26 
21 
27 
32 
54 
26 
34 
31 
145 
29 
23 
30 
43 
34 
23 
21 
63 
30 
31 
18 
16 
20 
18 
14 
24 
41 
57 
28 
49 
11 
32 
21 
13 
32 
47 
48 
17 
35 
18 
39 
25 
21 
16 
21 
42 
37 


















Fairfield, Ala 
























Selma, Ala 






























North Little Rock, Ark... 






Pine Bluff, Ark 












Albany, Calif 












Bell, Calif 


Blue Island, 111 






Brookfield, 111 






Cairo, 111 






Calumet City, 111 


















Chicago Heights, 111 .. 












East Moline, 111 








































Ontario, Calif 


Highland Park, 111 
















Redlands, Calif .. 














La Salle, 111 










Salinas, Calif .. 






San Gabriel, Calif 












San Mateo, Calif . 






Santa Cruz, Calif... 








Pekin, 111 










Vallejo, Calif ... 












Whittier, Calif 


West Frankfort, HI 




























Trinidad, Colo 


























































































Key West, Fla 
















25 












21 














Albany, Ga ... 


Muscatine, Iowa 


21 



26 



Table 13. — Numher of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




12 
11 
15 
14 
10 
24 
12 
16 
12 
11 
21 
21 
17 
12 
10 
16 
19 
28 
26 
11 
14 
27 
16 
17 
21 
30 
41 
17 
24 
23 
15 
14 
25 
16 

8 
19 
16 
27 
23 
15 
12 
19 
13 
31 
34 
lf> 
16 
26 
11 
10 
34 
23 
42 
24 
25 
24 
20 
20 
27 
16 
40 
20 
25 
16 
27 
31 
11 

5 

27 
30 
21 
20 
14 
23 
20 
23 
24 
20 1 


Wellesley, Mass 
























































































Holland, Mich 








































































River Rouge, Mich 




































27 


















10 






21 












27 


















30 


















20 


















28 












25 






33 






34 


Greenfield, Mass 




18 


Leominster, Mass 






Lexington, Mass 




28 






33 


.MarlliiinniL'h, Mass 


Hannibal, Mo 


22 


Methuen, Mass 


27 


Milford, Mass 




24 


Milieu, Mass 


Kirksville, Mo 


11 
23 






20 






10 


North Adams. Mass 


Poplar HluiT. Mo 


9 
17 




St Charles. Mo 


13 






25 




23 












38 






18 






22 






• 10 




10 






26 




Eastings. Nebr 

Norfolk, Nebr .._ _. 




--- - 


16 



27 



Table 13. — Number of -police department employees, April 80, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS-Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


North Platte, Nebr 


17 
20 
89 
32 
14 
20 
18 
22 
29 
14 
47 
23 
21 
21 
21 
32 
18 
30 
15 
40 
19 
66 
14 
45 
74 
31 
41 
27 
44 
23 
16 
31 
19 
18 
40 
21 
24 
19 
43 
25 
16 
30 
24 
25 
38 

41 
67 
54 
38 
14 
19 
20 
31 
22 
21 
44 
18 
22 
25 
36 
24 
43 
18 
38 
25 
24 
33 
30 
51 
22 
18 
22 
34 
22 
13 
25 
52 


Little Falls, N. Y 




Scottsbluff, Nebr 




38 
34 
27 




Lynbrook.N. Y 

Mamaroneck, N. Y . 


Berlin, N. H 

Claremont, N. H 


Dover, N. H 


Middletown, N. Y 

North Tonawanda, N. Y 

Ogdensburg, N. Y 

Olean, N. Y 


29 




Laconia, N. H 


18 




Oneida, N. Y i 

Oneonta, N. Y 


17 
16 


Asbury Park, N.J 

Bergenfield, N. J 




Oswego, N. Y 

Peekskill, N. Y 

Plattsburg, N. Y 

Port Chester, N. Y . 




Burlington. N. J 

Carteret, N. J 

Cliffside Park, N. J 


29 
21 


Collingswood, N. J 

Cranford Township, N. J 

Dover, N. J 


Rensselaer, N. Y 

Rockville Centre, N. Y 

Saratoga Springs, N. Y 

Scarsdale, N. Y . 


19 
44 
22 


Gloucester City, N. J 






Harrison, N. J 

Hawthorne, N. J 

Hillside Township, N. J 


Watervliet, N. Y 

Burlington, N. C 


22 
39 


Linden, N. J 

Lodi, N. J 

Long Branch, N. J 


Elizabeth City, N. C 

Fayetteville, N. C 

Gastonia, N. C 

Goldsboro, N. C 


19 
67 

45 










Hickory, N. C 




Millville, N. J 


Kinston, N. C 


24 
17 




Reidsville, N. C 




North Plainfield, N. J 

Nutley. N.J 


Salisbury, N. C 

Shelby, N. C 


31 
19 


Pennsauken Township, N. J 

Phillipsburg, N. J 


Statesville, N. C 

Thomasville, N. C 


23 




Wilson, N. C 




Rahway, N. J 


21 


Red Bank, N. J 






Ridgefleld Park, N.J 


Minot, N. Dak 










Roselle, N. J 






Rutherford, N. J 












South River, N. J 




















Chillicothe, Ohio 




Westfleld, N.J 












Hobbs, N. Mex 




21 








Santa Fe, N. Mex 






Batavia, N. Y , 












Cohoes, N. Y-._ 












Cortland, N. Y 




24 


Dunkirk, N. Y 






Endicott, N. Y 






Floral Park, N. Y._. 




13 


Freeport, N. Y 






Fulton, N. Y 






Garden City, N. Y 






Geneva, N. Y 






Glen Cove, N. Y 






Glens Falls, N. Y 




10 


Gloversville, N. Y. 












Hornell, N. Y 




11 


Hudson, N. Y__. 




20 






16 


Ithaca, N. Y 






Johnson City, N. Y 




17 






25 








Lackawanna, N. Y 


I'hickasha. (>kla._ 


18 



28 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 




Durant, Okla 

El Reno, Okla 

Guthrie, Okla 

Law ton. Okla 

McAlester, Okla 

Norman, Okla 

Okmulgee, Okla 

Ponca City, Okla 

Sapulpa, Okla 

Seminole, Okla 

Shawnee, Okla 

Stillwater, Okla 

Wewoka , Okla 

Astoria, Oreg 

Bend, Oreg 

Eugene, Oreg 

Klamath Falls, Oreg 

Medford, Oreg 

Abington Township, Pa 

Ambridge, Pa 

Arnold, Pa 

Beaver Falls, Pa 

Bellevue, Pa 

Berwick, Pa 

Braddock, Pa 

Bradford, Pa.___j 

Bristol, Pa 

Butler, Pa 

Canonsburg, Pa 

Carbondale, Pa 

C arl isle, Pa 

Carnegie, Pa 

Chambersburg, Pa 

Charleroi, Pa 

Cheltenham Township, Pa 

Clairton, Pa 

Coatesville, Pa 

Columbia, Pa 

Connellsville, Pa 

Conshohocken, Pa 

Coraopolis, Pa 

Darby, Pa 

Dickson City, Pa 

Donora, Pa 

Dormont, Pa 

Du Bois, Pa 

Dunmore, Pa 

Duquesne, Pa 

Ellwood City, Pa 

Farrell, Pa 

Greensburg, Pa 

Hanover, Pa 

Hanover Township, Pa 

Harrison Township, Pa 

Homestead, Pa.._ 

Indiana, Pa 

Jeannette, Pa 

Kingston, Pa 

Lansdo wne, Pa 

Latrobe, Pa 

Lewistown, Pa. . _ _ __ 

Lock Haven, Pa_ 

Mahanoy City, Pa 

McKees Rocks, Pa 

Meadville, Pa 

Monessen, Pa 

Mount Carmel, Pa, 

Mount Lebanon Township, Pa 

Munhall.Pa.... 

Nanticoke, Pa 

New Kensingti n, I'm 

North Braddock, Pa 

Oil City, Pa 

Phoenix ville, Pa 

Pittston, Pa 

Plains Township, Pa 

Plymouth, Pa 

Pottstown, Pa 



Pottsville, 

Staler Township, Pa.. 

Shamokin, Pa 

Shenandoah, Pa 

Steelton, Pa 

Stowe Township, Pa... 

Sunbury, Pa 

Swissva'le, Pa 

Tamaqua, Pa 

Cniontown, Pa 

Vandergiift, Pa... 

Warren, Pa 

Waynesboro, Pa 

West Chester, Pa_. 

Biistol, R. I 

Cumberland. R. I 

Johnston, R. I 

Lincoln, R. I 

North Providence, R. I 

Westerly, R.I 

West Warwick, R. I... 

Anderson, S. C 

Florence, S. C 

Greenwood, S. C 

Orangeburg, S. C 

Rock Hill, S. C 

Sumter, S. C 

Aberdeen, S. Dak 

Huron, S. Dak 

Mitchell, S. Dak... 
Rapid City, S. Drk_.._ 

Watertown, S. Dak 

Bristol, Term 

Clarksville, Term 

Cleveland, Term 

Columbia, Tenn 

Dyersburg, Tenn 

Jackson, Tenn 

Kingsport, Tenn 

Bay Town, Tex 

Big Spring, Tex 

Borger, Tex 

Brownsville, Tex 

Brown wood, Tex 

Bryan, Tex 

Corsieana. Tex 

Del Rio, Tex 

Denison, Tex 

Denton, Tex 

Greenville, Tex 

Harlingen, Tex 

Highland Park, Tex.... 

Longview, Tex 

Marshall, Tex 

McAllen.Tex 

Palestine, Tex 

Pampa, Tex 

Paris, Tex 

Sherman, Tex___ 

Sweetwater, Tex 

Temple, Tex 

Terrell, Tex 

Texarkana, Tex 

University Park, Tex.. 

Victoria, Tex 

Logan, Utah 

Provo, Utah 

Rutland, Vt 

Charlottesville, Va 

Fredericksburg, Va 

Martinsville, Va 

Staunton, Va 

Suffolk, Va 

Winchester, Va 

Aberdeen, Wash 

Bremerton, Wash 

Hoquiam, Wash 

Longview, Wash.. 



29 



Table 13. 



■Number of -police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 



CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 




City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




18 
61 
34 
23 
18 
26 
30 
11 
18 
9 
16 
13 
11 
14 
14 
30 








Marinette, Wis 




Walla Walla, Wash 


Marshfield, Wis 




Wenatchee, Wash . 


Menasha, Wis. .. 




Beckley, W. Va 


Ncenah, Wis 




Bluefield, W. Va 






























South Charleston, W. Va 


















Chippewa Falls, Wis _ 

Cudahy, Wis 























CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS 





6 
11 

10 
10 


























7 
11 
15 

6 






Attalla, Ala 










8 








6 
7 
4 
5 
4 
3 
8 
6 
7 
4 

10 
3 

14 
6 
4 
4 
7 
5 

22 
5 
6 

18 

17 

10 
6 
8 

12 
3 
6 
7 
1 

12 
7 

11 
7 

17 

13 

15 
9 
5 
9 

15 
4 
6 
4 
4 
8 
5 














Monticello, Ark 










Fayette, Ala 


Nashville, Ark 




Florala, Ala- .. _. .. 








Osceola, Ark 
















Hartselle, Ala... 






Homewood, Ala 






Jacksonville, Ala 






Jasper, Ala... 






Lanett, Ala.. 


















Ozark, Ala 


Stuttgart, Ark. 




Piedmont, Ala 






Prichard, Ala.. 






Roanoke, Ala.. 












Sheffield, Ala 






Sylacauga, Ala. 






Talladega, Ala 






Tarrant City, Ala 






Troy, Ala. 






Tuscumbia, Ala 






Tuskegee, Ala... 


Brea, Calif 




Union Springs, Ala - . 


Calexico, Calif.. 




Bisbee, Ariz 


Carmel Bv The Sea, Calif . 


8 




Chico, Calif 






Chino, Calif 




Flagstaff, Ariz... 


Chula Vista, Calif 


19 
















Colton, Calif 


19 


Nogales, Ariz.. 




14 












8 




Culver Citv, Calif 


36 










Delano, Calif 


11 




5 




El Cerrito, Calif 


23 






15 






18 






15 


Conway, Ark 


Escondido, Calif 


13 



30 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 




Exeter, Calif 

Fillmore, Calif 

Fort Bragg, Calif 

Gardens, Calif 

Qilroy, Calif 

Glendora, Calif 

Grass Valley, Calif 

Hanford, Calif 

Hawthorne, Calif 

Hayward, Calif 

Healdsburg, Calif 

Hemet, Calif 

Hermosa Beach, Calif .. 

Hillsborough, Calif 

Hollister, Calif 

Huntington Beach, Calif 

Laguna Beach, Calif 

La Mesa, Calif 

La Verne. Calif 

Lindsay, Calif 

Livermore, Calif 

Lompoc, Calif 

Los Gatos, Calif 

Madera, Calif 

Manhattan Beach, Calif 

Martinez, Calif 

Marysville, Calif 

Menlo Park, Calif 

Mill Valley, Calif 

Montebello, Calif 

Monterey Park, Calif 

Mountain View, Calif 

Napa, Calif 

Needles, Calif 

Newport Beach, Calif 

North Sacramento, Calif... 

Oakdale, Calif 

Oceanside, Calif 

Orange, Calif. 

Oroville, Calif 

Oxnard, Calif 

Pacific Grove, Calif 

Palm Springs, Calif 

Paso Robles, Calif 

Petaluma, Calif 

Piedmont, Calif 

Pittsburg, Calif 

Placerville, Calif 

Porterville, Calif 

Red Bluff, Calif 

Redding, Calif 

Reedley, Calif 

Roseville, Calif 

San Anselmo, Calif 

San Bruno, Calif 

San Carlos, Calif 

San Fernando, Calif 

Sanger, Calif 

San Luis Obispo, Calif 

San Marino, Calif 

San Rafael, Calif 

Santa Clara, Calif 

S;mt;i Maria, Calif 

Santa Paula, Calif 

Sausalito, Calif 

Sclma, Calif 

I ire, i ';tlif 

•Ml. I Jil 

South San I i:n . 

Sunnyvale, Calif 

Taft, Calif. 

Torrance, Calif 

Tracy, Calif 

Tulare, Calif 

Turlocfc. Calif- 

fjkiah, Calif 

Upland, Calif 

Visalia. Calif 



Watson ville, Calif 

Woodland, Calif _. 

Yuba City, Calif 

Alamosa, Colo 

Aurora, Colo 

Brighton, Colo 

Canon City, Colo 

Durango, Colo 

Englewood, Colo 

Florence, Colo 

Fort Morgan, Colo 

Golden, Colo.... 

La Junta, Colo 

Lamar, Colo 

Las Animas, Colo 

Leadville, Colo 

Longmont, Colo 

Loveland, Colo 

Monte Vista, Colo.. 

Montrose, Colo 

Rocky Ford, Colo 

Salida, Colo 

Sterling, Colo 

Walsenburg, Colo 

Danielson, Conn 

Groton, Conn 

Jewett City, Conn. 

Putnam, Conn 

Kockville, Conn 

Southington, Conn 

Stafford Springs, Conn... 

Winsted, Conn 

Dover, Del 

Laurel, Del 

Milford, Del 

Newark, Del 

Newcastle, Del 

Seaford, Del 

Apalachicola, Fla 

Auburndale, Fla 

Bartow, Fla 

Belle Glade, Fla 

Cocoa, Fla 

Coral Gables. Fla 

Dania, Fla 

De Funiak Springs, Fla.. 

DeLand, Fla 

Delray Beach, Fla 

Eustis, Fla 

Fcrdinandina, Fla 

Fort Pierce, Fla 

Haines City, Fla 

Hialeah, Fla 

Hollywood, Fla 

Homestead, Fla 

Jacksonville Beach, Fla_. 
Kissimmee, Fla 

Lake Wales, Fla 

Lake Worth, Fla 

Leesburg, Fla 

Live Oak, Fla 

Madison, Fla 

Marianna, Fla 

Melbourne, Fla 

New Smyrna Beach, Fla 

Ocala, Fla 

Pahokee, Fla 

Palatka, Fla 

Palm Beach, Fla 

Perry, Fla.. — 

Plant City, Fla 

Pompano Beach, Fla 

Quincy, Fla 

Scoring, Fla 

Tarpon Springs, Fla 

Vero Beach, Fla 

Wauchula, Fla 

Winter Haven, Fla 



31 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 



Winter Park, Fla 

Americus, Ga._. 

Bainbridge, Ga 

Barnesville, Ga 

Baxley, Ga 

Buford, Ga 

Cairo, Ga 

Calhoun, Ga 

Camilla, Ga 

Canton, Ga 

Carrollton, Ga 

Cartersville, Ga 

Cedartown, Ga 

College Park, Ga 

Commerce, Ga 

Cordele, Ga 

Covington, Ga 

Cuthbert, Ga 

Douglas, Ga 

Douglasville, Ga 

Eastman, Ga 

Elberton, Ga 

Fitzgerald, Ga 

Fort Valley, Ga 

Hapeville, Ga 

Hawkinsville, Ga 

Hogansville, Ga 

Jesup, Ga 

Manchester, Ga 

Marietta, Ga 

Milledgeville, Ga 

Millen, Ga - 

Monroe, Ga 

Newnan, Ga 

Pelham, Ga 

Porterdale, Ga 

Quitman, Ga 

Rockmart, Ga 

Rossville, Ga 

Sandersville, Ga 

Statesboro, Ga 

T'homaston, Ga 

Thomson, Ga 

Tifton, Ga 

Toccoa, Ga 

Washington, Ga 

AVest Point, Ga 

Alameda, Idaho 

Blackfoot, Idaho 

Burley, Idaho 

Caldwell, Idaho 

Emmett, Idaho 

Gooding, Idaho 

Jerome, Idaho 

T Ieliogg, Idaho 

Malad City, Idaho... 

Montpelier, Idaho 

Moscow, Idaho 

Payette, Idaho 

Preston, Idaho 

Rexburg, Idaho 

Rupert, Idaho 

St. Anthony, Idaho.. 

Sandpoint, Idaho 

Wallace, Idaho 

Weiser, Idaho 

Abingdon, Dl 

Aledo, 111 

Anna, 111 

Arlington Heights, 111 

Barrington, 111 

Batavia, 111 

Beardstown, HI 

Bellwood, 111 

Belvidere, 111 

Benton, 111 

Bradley, HI 

d°— 50 5 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




Bushnell, 111.. 






Carbondale, 111 






Carlinville, 111 






Carlyle, 111 






Carmi, 111 . 




■* 3 


Casev, 111 






Charleston, 111 






Chester, 111 


6 






3 




Clinton, 111. 






Collinsville, 111. .. 


9 






3 




Crystal Lake, 111 


6 




De Kalb, 111 






Des Plaines, 111 . 


14 




Dolton, 111 


2 






10 




Du Quoin, 111 


5 




East Alton, 111. .. 


6 




East Peoria, 111. . 


14 




Edwardsville.Ill 


8 




Effingham, 111 


7 




Eldorado, 111 


4 






9 




Fairfield, 111 


5 




Flora, 111 .. 


7 




Franklin Park, 111 


10 




Galena, 111 


4 




Galva, 111 


3 












6 






2 




Gillespie, 111 


4 






16 




Glen Ellyn, 111 


12 






6 






5 




Harvard, 111 


5 






6 




Herrin, 111. 


4 




Highland, 111 


4 




Hiuhwood, 111 


5 




Hillsboro, 111 . 


5 




Hinsdale, 111 . . 


11 






6 






5 






6 


2 


Johnston City, 111 


3 
9 






8 






19 






3 






6 






2 






5 




Litchfield, 111 


5 






4 






8 






9 






12 






13 






5 




Marseilles, 111 


3 






9 






7 






8 






10 


2 


Monticello, 111 


2 
6 






3 






7 






3 






6 






3 






9 






2 


1 


Normal. Ill - - - - 


9 



32 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


North Chicago, 111 


10 
15 
4 

3 

5 
11 
4 
5 
11 
4 
2 
3 
7 
7 
3 

22 
10 
13 
5 
6 
5 
3 
7 
7 
3 

5 

19 
2 

5 
3 
2 
3 
16 
5 

4 

13 

9 
2 
5 
4 
7 
3 
2 
3 
8 
6 
8 

4 
4 

5 

5 
5 

5 

12 
9 
6 
3 
9 
4 
4 

10 
5 
3 
8 
4 
9 
6 
4 
7 
















2 


Olney, 111 










6 


Pana, 111 .. 




9 


Paris 111 
















7 


Peru 111 
















6 


Pittsfield, 111 
















2 






7 






2 






2 






5 






9 


Rochelle, 111 - 




9 


Rock Falls, 111 




3 






4 






10 


Salem, 111 




3 






10 




Tell City, Ind 


5 


Silvis, 111 










g 






13 






16 






9 






16 






12 






4 






9 






3 






5 






2 


Vandalia, 111 




4 






3 


Villa Park, 111 




7 






3 






6 






12 






8 






3 


Wpstville, HI 




10 


White Hall, 111 




4 






2 


Woodstock, 111 .. 




4 


Zion, 111 




9 






5 






4 






4 






2 






4 






7 






4 






2 






5 






4 






2 






3 






3 






5 






3 






7 






4 






6 






4 






3 






6 






5 






3 






4 






8 


iloliart, IihI 


Nevada, Iowa 


3 



33 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 




New Hampton, Iowa... 

Oehvein, Iowa 

Onawa, Iowa 

Osage, Iowa 

Osceola, Iowa 

Pella, Iowa 

Perry, Iowa 

Red Oak, Iowa 

Rock Rapids, Iowa 

Sac City, Iowa 

Sheldon, Iowa 

Shenandoah, Iowa 

Spencer, Iowa 

Storm Lake, Iowa 

Tama, Iowa 

Vinton, Iowa 

Washington, Iowa 

Waukon, Iowa 

Waverly, Iowa 

Webster City, Iowa 

West Des Moines, Iowa 

Winterset, Iowa 

Abilene, Kans 

Anthony, Kans 

Augusta, Kans 

Baxter Springs, Kans. _ . 

Belleville, Kans 

Beloit, Kans 

Caney, Kans 

Cher ; vvale, Kans 

Clay Center, Kans 

Columbus, Kans 

Concordia, Kans 

Council Grove, Kans... 

Dodge City, Kans 

Eureka, Kans 

Fredonia, Kans 

Galena, Kans 

Garden City, Kans 

Garnett, Kans 

Girard, Kans 

Goodland, Kans 

Great Bend, Kans 

Hays, Kans 

Herington, Kans 

Hiawatha. Kans 

Hoisington, Kans 

Holton, Kans 

Horton, Kans 

Iola, Kans 

Junction City, Kans 

Kingman, Kans 

Larned, Kans 

Maiysville, Kans 

MePherson, Kans 

Neodesha, Kans 

Norton, Kans 

Olathe, Kans 

Osawatomie, Kans 

Paola, Kans 

Pratt, Kans 

Russell, Kans 

Wellington, Kans 

Winfleld, Kans 

Bardstown, Ky 

Bellevue, Ky 

Carrollton, Ky 

Catlettsburg, Ky 

Corbin, Ky 

Cumberland, Ky 

Cynthiana, Ky 

Danville, Ky 

Dawson Springs, Ky 

Dayton, Ky 

Earlington, Ky 

Elizabethtown, Ky 

Elsmere, Ky 

Franklin, Ky 



Fulton, Ky 

Georgetown, Ky 

Glasgow, Ky 

Harrodsburg, Ky 

Hazard, Ky 

Irvine, Ky 

Jenkins, Ky 

Lebanon, Ky 

Ludlow, Ky 

Madisonville, Ky . . 

Mayfleld, Ky 

Maysville, Ky 

Morganfield, Ky 

Mount Sterling, Ky.. 

Murray, Ky 

Nicholas ville, Ky 

Paris, Ky 

Pikeville, Ky 

Pine ville, Ky 

Princeton, Ky 

Providence, Ky 

Richmond, Ky 

Russellville, Ky. . . 

Shelbyville, Ky 

Somerset, Ky 

Versailles, Ky 

Winchester, Ky 

Abbeville, La 

Bastrop, La 

Bossier City, La 

Bunkie, La._ „ 

Crowley, La 

De Quincy, La 

De Ridder, La.. 

Donaldson ville, La... 

Ferriday, La 

Franklin, La 

Houma, La 

Jeanerette, La 

Jennings, La 

Jonesboro, La 

Kaplan, La 

Minden, La 

Morgan City, La 

Natchitoches, La 

Opelousas, La 

Pineville, La 

Plaquemine, La 

Rayne, La 

Ruston, La 

St. Martinville, La... 

Slidell, La 

Springhill, La 

Tallulah, La 

Thibodaux, La 

Ville Platte, La 

West Monroe, La... 

Winnfield, La 

Belfast, Maine. 

Brewer, Maine 

Brunswick, Maine. .. 

Calais, Maine 

Eastport, Maine 

Fairfield, Maine 

Fort Fairfield, Maine 

Gardiner, Maine 

Hallowell, Maine 

Old Town, Maine 

Presque Isle, Maine.. 

Rockland, Maine 

Rumford, Maine 

Saco, Maine 

Brunswick, Md 

Crisfield, Md 

Easton, Md 

Elkton, Md 

Frostburg, Md 



34 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 




Greenbelt, Md 

Ha\re de Grace, Md 

Hyattsville, Md 

Laurel, Md 

Mount Rainier, Md 

Pocomoke City, Md... 

Takoma Park, Md 

Westernport, Md 

Westminster, Md 

Abington, Mass... 

Amherst, Mass 

Auburn, Mass -- 

Ayer, Mass . 

Barnstable, Mass 

Blackstone, Mass 

Bridgewater, Mass 

Canton, Mass. 

Concord, Mass 

Dalton, Mass 

Dartmouth, Mass 

Dracut, Mass 

Franklin, Mass 

Great Barrington, Mass 

Hingham, Mass 

Hopedale, Mass 

Hudson, Mass 

Ipswich, Mass 

Lee, Mass 

Longmeadow, Mass 

Ludlow, Mass 

Mansfield, Mass 

Maynard, Mass 

Middleborough, Mass 

Millbury, Mass 

Montague, Mass 

Nantucket, Mass 

North Andover, Mass 

Orange, Mass 

Palmer, Mass 

Randolph, Mass 

Rockland, Mass.. 

Hockport, Mass 

Somerset, Mass .. 

South Hadley, Mass 

Spencer, Mass 

Stoughton, Mass 

Oxbridge, Mass 

Walpole, Mass 

Ware, Mass 

Whitman, Mass 

Winchendon, Mass 

Albion, Mich 

Allegan, Mich 

Allen Park, Mich 

Alma, Mich 

Bad Axe, Mich 

Belding, Mich 

Berkley, Mich 

Bessemer, Mich 

Big Rapids, Mich -. 

Boyne City, Mich 

Buchanan, Mich 

Cadillac, Mich 

Caro, Mich 

Center Line, Mich__ 

Charlotte, Mich... 

Cheyboygan, Mich 

Clawson, Mich... 

Cold water, Mich 

Crystal Falls, Mich 

Dowagiac, Mich 

Durand, Mich, . 

East Detroit, Mich 

Easl I irand Rapids, Mich 

Easl Lansing, Mich 

Eaton Rapids, Mich 

Fenton, Mich 

Fremont, Mich 



Garden City, Mich 

Gladstone, Mich 

Grand Haven, Mich._ 

Grand Ledge, Mich 

Greenville, Mich 

Grosse Pointe, Mich 

Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 
Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich 

Hancock, Mich 

Hastings, Mich 

Hillsdale, Mich 

Houghton, Mich 

Howell, Mich 

Inkster. Mich 

Ionia, Mich 

Iron River, Mich 

Ishpeming, Mich 

Kingsford; Mich 

L'Anse, Mich 

Lapeer, Mich 

Ludington, Mich 

Manistee, Mich 

Manistique, Mich 

Marine City, Mich 

Marshall, Mich 

Mason, Mich 

Melvindale, Mich 

Mount Pleasant, Mich 

Munising, Mich 

Negaunee, Mich 

Newberrv, Mich 

Northvilie, Mich 

Norway, Mich 

Otsego, Mich 

Petoskey, Mich 

Pleasant Ridge, Mich 

Plymouth, Mich 

Rochester, Mich 

Rogers City, Mich 

Romeo, Mich 

RoseviUe, Mich 

St. Clair, Mich 

St. Ignace, Mich 

St. Johns, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mich 

St. Louis, Mich 

South Haven, Mich 

Sturgis, Mich 

Tecumseh, Mich 

Three Rivers, Mich 

Trenton, Mich 

Wakefield, Mich 

Wayne, Mich 

Zeeland, Mich 

Alexandria, Minn 

Anoka, Minn 

Bayport, Minn 

Bemidji, Minn 

Benson, Minn 

Blue Earth, Minn 

Breckenridne, Minn 

Chisholm, Minn.. 

Cloquet, Minn 

Columbia Heights, Minn.. 

Crookston, Minn 

Crosbv, Minn 

Detroit Lakes, Minn 

East Grand Forks, Minn. . 

Edina, Minn 

F.lv, .Minn 

Eveleth, Minn 

Fairmont, Minn 

Glenwood, Minn 

Grand Rapids, Minn 

Hastings, Minn 

Hopkins, Minn 

Hutchinson, Minn.. 

International Falls, Minn.. 



35 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




1 
4 
8 
4 
5 
6 

13 
3 
9 
4 
3 
3 

10 
3 
5 

11 
4 
9 
7 
4 
4 
3 
2 
4 
8 
8 
2 
6 
5 
4 
5 
4 
9 
2 
7 
5 
5 
4 

12 
5 

12 
9 
7 
3 
8 
6 
4 
4 

11 
4 
5 

10 
2 
4 
3 
6 

14 

6 
3 
10 
5 
4 
2 
2 

15 
10 
7 
3 
1 
4 
3 
7 
6 
10 
1 
5 




4 












6 






3 




Fayette, Mo 


2 




9 






2 






6 






5 






4 






3 






3 






11 






2 






10 






4 






5 






5 












4 






3 






10 






4 












5 


















16 






9 






4 






7 






2 






4 






2 






2 






7 






2 












4 






6 












15 












4 






5 






6 






10 












3 












10 






12 






2 












4 






9 






4 






3 






4 






3 






10 






3 






7 






6 






4 






12 






5 






11 






5 






4 






3 






3 






4 






6 






7 


Chillicothe, Mo .. 




2 


Crystal City, Mo 




4 


De Soto, Mo 


West Point, Nebr 


2 



36 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITII 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




\1 
5 
52 
9 
5 
7 
6 
9 
5 
3 
5 
6 
14 
12 
2 
16 
13 
4 
11 
13 
4 

12 
12 
12 
12 
2 
7 
18 
16 
15 
15 
23 
2 
25 
17 
3 
22 
3 
8 
8 
5 
22 
10 
12 
5 
26 
11 
14 
4 
6 
11 
7 
4 
13 
8 
21 
13 
13 
5 
14 
9 
15 
8 
6 
5 
10 
7 
18 
4 
2 
5 
26 
4 
8 
18 
10 
10 


Park Ridge, N. J 


3 






10 


Ely, Nev 


Penns Grove, N. J ___ 


11 
9 


Sparks, Nev 




5 


Princeton, N. J 


18 




4 








Lebanon, N. H 

Littleton, N. H 


Puritan, N. J 

Ridgefield, N. J 


4 
13 


Milford, N. H 

Newport, N. H 


River Edge, N. J 

Roselle Park, N. J 


12 
12 










Salem, N. J 

Sayreville, N. J 

Secaucus, N. J 

Somerville, N. J 

South Plainfield, N. J 






13 


Bogota, N. J 


19 




10 








Totowa, N. J 


9 


Butler, N. J 


Ventnor City, N. J 


2S 


Caldwell, N. J 






Cape May, N. J 


Vineland, N. J 

Wallington, N. J 

Wanaque, N. J__. 

Washington, N.J 

West Caldwell, N. J 


10 


Chatham, N.J 


3 

6 








West Paterson, N. J 

Westville, N. J 

Westwood, N. J 

Wharton, N. J 

Wildwood, N. J 


4 




7 


Last Paterson, N. J 


11 
2 






Egg Harbor City, N. J 


Woodbury, N. J 


16 




4 


Fairview, N.J 


Wood Ridge, N. J. 


15 

5 


Fort Lee, N.J 




13 






6 




Carlsbad, N. Mex 


16 






5 






8 


Glen Ridee, N. J 




6 






15 






10 






6 






4 


Haddon Heights, N. J 




4 






6 






6 


Hillsdale, N.J. 




12 




Albion, N. Y 


6 


Keyport, N. J 

Lambertville, N. J 


Amityville, N. Y 

Babylon, N. Y 


11 
12 




4 


Little Ferry, N. J . 


Ballston Spa, N. Y 

Bath. N. Y 

Brockport, N. Y 

Bronxville, N. Y 

Canajoharie, N. Y 

Canandaigua, N. Y 

Canastota, N. Y 

Canisteo, N. Y 

Canton, N. Y... 


2 


Madison, N. J 

Manville, N. J 


10 
5 
20 


Matawan, N.J 

Maywood, N. J 

Merehantville, N. J __ 


2 
12 
4 
2 




4 


Midland Park, N. J.... 


Carthage, N. Y 

Catskill, N. Y 

Cobleskill, N. Y. 


5 


Milltown, N. J 

New Milford, N.J... . 


7 
4 




Cooperstown, N. Y _. 

Corinth, N. Y 


2 


North Arlington, N.J 

Northfleld, N.J 


2 

8 


North Haledon, N. J 

Oaklvn, N.J 


Dansville, N. Y 

Depew, N. Y 

Dobbs Ferry, N. Y ..... 

Dolgeville, N. Y._ 

East Aurora, N. Y 

East Rochester, N. Y 

East Syracuse, N. Y 

Ellenville, N. Y 


5 
8 


Ocean City, N. J 

Oceanport, N.J 

Oradefi, N. J 

Palisades Park, N. J 

Palmyra, N. J. 

Paramus, N. J 


13 
3 
9 

5 
5 
9 



37 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 




Elmira Heights, N. Y__ 

Elmsford, N. Y 

Falconer, N. Y 

Fort Edward, N. Y 

Fort Plain, N. Y 

Frankfort, N. Y 

Fredonia, N. Y 

Goshen, N. Y 

Gouverneur, N. Y 

Gowanda, N. Y... 

Granville, N. Y 

Green Island, N. Y 

Greenport, N. Y 

Hamburg, N. Y 

Hastings-on-Hudson, N 

Haverstraw, N. Y 

Herkimer, N. Y 

Highland Falls, N. Y... 

Homer, N. Y 

Hoosick Falls, N. Y 

Horseheads, N. Y 

Hudson Falls, N. Y 

Eion, N. Y 

Irvington, N. Y 

Lake Placid, N. Y 

Lancaster, N. Y 

Larchmont, N. Y 

Le Roy, N. Y 

Liberty, N. Y 

Lindenhurst, N. Y 

Liverpool, N. Y 

Long Beach, N. Y 

Lowville, N. Y 

Lyons, N. Y 

Malone, N. Y 

Malverne, N. Y 

Mechanicville, N. Y 

Mecftna, N. Y 

Mohawk, N. Y 

Monticello, N. Y 

Mount Kisco, N. Y 

Mount Morris, N. Y 

Newark, N. Y 

New York Mills, N. Y__ 
North Pelham, N. Y____ 

Northport, N. Y 

North Tarrytown, N. Y 

Norwich, N. Y 

Nyack, N. Y 

Owego, N. Y 

Pelham Manor, N. Y... 

Penn Yan, N. Y 

Perry, N. Y 

Pleasantville, N. Y 

Port Jervis, N. Y 

Potsdam, N. Y 

Rye, N. Y 

Sag Harbor, N. Y 

Salamanca, N. Y 

Saranac Lake, N. Y 

Saugerties, N. Y 

Scotia, N. Y 

Seneca Falls, N. Y 

Sidney, N. Y 

Silver Creek, N. Y 

Sloan, N. Y.___ 

Solvay, N. Y 

Southampton, N. Y 

South Glens Falls, N. Y 

Spring Valley, N. Y 

Springville, N. Y 

Suffern, N. Y 

Tarrytown, N. Y 

Ticonderoga, N. Y 

Tuckahoe, N. Y 

Tupper Lake, N. Y 

Walden, N. Y__ __ 

Walton, X. Y .. 



Wappingers Falls, N. Y— 

Warsaw, N. Y 

Waterford, N. Y 

Waterloo, N.Y 

Watkins Glen, N. Y 

Waverly,N. Y 

Wellsville,N. Y 

Westfleld.N.Y 

Whitehall, N. Y 

Whitesboro, N. Y 

Yorkville, N. Y 

Albermarle, N. C 

Asheboro, N. C 

Beaufort, N. C 

Belmont, N. C 

Bessemer City, N. C 

Brevard, N. C 

Canton, N. C 

Chapel Hill, N.C 

Clinton, N. C 

Dunn, N. C 

Edenton, N. C 

Elkin, N. C 

Forest City, N. C 

Graham, N. C 

Hamlet, N.C 

Henderson, N. C 

Hendersonville, N. C 

Kings Mountain, N. C 

Laurinburg, N. C 

Lenoir, N. C 

Lincolnton, N. C 

Lumberton, N. C 

Marion, N. C 

Monroe, N. C 

Morehead City, N. C 

Morganton, N. C 

Mount Airy, N. C 

Newton, N.C 

North Wilkesboro, N.C. 

Oxford, N. C 

Roanoke Rapids, N. C 

Rockingham, N. C 

Roxboro, N. C 

Sanford, N. C 

Scotland Neck, N. C 

Smithfleld, N. C 

Southern Pines, N. C 

Spencer, N. C 

Spindale, N. C 

Tarboro, N. C 

Valdese, N. C 

Washington, N. C 

Waynesville, N. C 

Wh'iteville, N. C 

Williamston, N. C 

Devils Lake, N. Dak 

Dickinson, N. Dak 

Grafton, N. Dak 

Jamestown, N. Dak 

Mandan, N. Dak 

Valley City, N. Dak 

Wahpeton, N. Dak 

Williston, N. Dak 

Amherst, Ohio 

Athens, Ohio 

Barnesville, Ohio 

Bay, Ohio 

Bedford, Ohio 

Bellefontaine, Ohio 

Bellevue, Ohio 

Berea, Ohio 

Bexley, Ohio 

Bowling Green, Ohio 

Bridgeport, Ohio 

Bryan, Ohio 

Bucyrus, Ohio 

Cadiz, Ohio 



38 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




6 

4 

7 
8 
10 
8 
3 
9 

10 

8 
5 
4 

12 
5 
4 
5 

11 
4 
6 
5 

11 

5 

10 
3 
6 
5 
5 

13 
3 
9 
5 
7 
8 

10 
6 
5 

11 
6 
5 
3 

13 
5 

10 
6 
9 

10 
3 

6 
3 

10 
4 
8 
7 
3 
5 
2 
4 
5 
4 
2 
10 
15 
7 
2 
4 
8 
5 
8 
10 
11 
3 
15 


St. Bernard, Ohio 

St. Clairsville, Ohio 

St. Marys, Ohio 


14 




3 




6 




4 






2 




Shelby, Ohio 


9 


Clyde, Ohio 




Silverton, Ohio 

South Euclid, Ohio 

Tallmadge, Ohio 

Tipp City, Ohio 

Toronto, Ohio 


























Uhrichsville, Ohio 




















































Wauseon, Ohio 










AYellston, Ohio .. 






























Willard, Ohio 


5 




























Alva, Okla . . . 


5 






7 






3 






3 






14 






3 






2 






6 






3 






10 






2 






12 






3 






19 






5 






9 






6 






1 






7 






3 






7 




Hollis, Okla 


3 






3 






4 






3 






4 




Madill. Okla 








4 






4 






14 






4 






4 






6 






10 






\ 5 






3 






4 






3 






5 






2 






4 






4 


Rocky Kiver, Ohio --- 


Tonkawa, Okla 


7 



39 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




5 
3 
3 
1 
6 

13 
8 

11 
3 
9 
5 

15 
5 
4 

13 
6 
6 

10 
9 
5 
6 
5 
6 

15 

15 

12 
5 
8 
4 

11 

10 
4 
2 
6 
2 
4 
2 
4 
5 
4 
6 
2 
3 
5 
9 
2 
5 
1 
7 
2 
3 

6 
7 
3 

14 
6 
5 
2 
5 
9 
2 
2 
4 
4 
3 
3 
2 
5 
6 
1 
8 
2 
8 
9 

6 




2 






4 






2 






4 






6 






3 






4 






3 




East Landsdowne, Pa 


4 




1 






4 






15 






6 






5 






12 






5 




Elizabeth, Pa 


4 




2 






5 






2 






3 






7 






11 






4 






4 




Forest City, Pa 


3 




7 






6 






6 






12 






3 






3 






2 






1 






6 






7 






4 






2 






6 






6 






2 






6 






8 






4 






4 






1 






4 






3 






4 






12 






1 






3 


Blakrly, Pa 




3 






4 






4 






7 






3 






13 






5 






8 






2 






3 




Lehighton, Pa 


10 




3 




Li-.visburg, Pa 


4 




3 






5 






1 




M anheim, Pa 


2 




8 






3 






2 






3 






2 






4 






9 






2 


Curwensville, Pa 


Mi<idletown, Pa 


3 



40 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April SO, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 



CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 




City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




13 

2 

-1 
9 

8 
6 
1 
10 
6 
5 
3 
1 
2 
2 
5 

6 

3 
3 
3 

3 
4 
7 
6 
4 
6 
3 
2 
2 

2 
5 
5 
4 
1 
1 
4 

10 
5 

11 
3 
3 
3 
4 
5 
2 
5 
2 
6 
4 
5 
5 
6 

11 
9 

12 
3 
3 
4 
3 
7 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 
2 
3 

10 
7 
2 
1 




2 






9 






5 






8 






5 






5 




Titusville, Pa 


9 






4 






5 






10 






6 






3 






5 






4 






1 






5 






2 


Xarberth, Pa 




5 






11 






3 






2 






6 


North Charleroi, Pa 




6 


North East, Pa 




5 






3 




West York, Pa 








2 


Olvphant, Pa 




13 


Oxford, Pa 




2 






6 






5 






7 






15 






1 




Barrington, R. I 


8 




5 




East Greenwich, R. I 


6 




9 




Abbeville, S. C 


8 




14 




Bamberg, S. C 


3 




3 






5 






8 






5 






16 






6 




Chester, S. C 

Clinton, S. C 

Clover, S. C... 


12 




10 




6 




Conway, S. C 

Darlington, S. C 

Dillon, S. C 


12 




13 


St. Clair, Pa 


7 




Easley. S. C 


7 




4 




Fort Mill, S. C. 


7 




Gaffney, S. C 

Georgetown, S. C 

Greer, S. C 


17 




12 


Sharon Hill, Pa 


12 




11 






4 






7 






7 






15 




Laurens, S. C 

Marion, S. C 

Mullins, S. C 

Newberry, S. C 


19 




7 




7 


South Fork, Pa 


14 




North Augusta, S. C 

Summerville, S. C 


3 




3 




13 




Walhalla, S. C 


4 




Whitmire, S. C... 


6 






3 


State College, Pa __. 


York, S. C 


6 






6 






3 


Summit Hill, Pa 


Deadwood, S. Dak 


4 



41 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


Hot Springs, S. Dak 


6 
6 
8 
3 
5 

10 
4 
6 
4 
9 
6 
7 
5 
5 
7 
6 
6 

16 
4 

8 
5 
8 
11 

2 

7 
7 

4 
4 
5 

12 
6 
5 

11 
4 

14 
5 

12 
6 
4 
3 

13 
3 
3 
4 
5 

13 
6 
7 

13 
2 
3 
8 
1 
4 
4 
2 
4 
7 
3 
4 
4 
5 
5 
3 
3 
5 
7 
7 
2 
4 
1 
3 
4 
1 




3 
2 
3 
5 

5 
8 
3 


Lead, S. Dak 


Dublin, Tex 






Milbank, S. Dak 


Eastland, Tex 


Mobridge, S. Dak 




Pierre, S. Dak : 


Electra, Tex 


SNseton, S. Dak. 




S turns, S. Dak 




Vermillion, S. Dak 




i, 


Yankton, S. Dak 




14 
2 






Athens, Tenn 




Brownsville, Tenn . -. 






Clinton, Tenn 




2 
4 
11 


Cookeville, Tenn 




Covington, Tenn. __ 




Dickson, Tenn . . 




F.lizabethton, Tenn 






Erwin, Term.. ... . . 




11 
2 
1 
3 
3 
5 

15 


Etowah, Tenn .. .. ... .. 




Eayetteville, Tenn.. 




Franklin, Tenn 




Gallatin, Tenn 




Oreenev-ille, Tenn 




Iiarriman, Tenn 






Kingsville, Tex 






Lamesa, Tex 
Lampasas, Tex ~ ~ 
















7 




Liberty, Tex 










Llano, Tex, 


3 




Lufkin, Tex_. 


13 


\ i U '"'ii t 


Luling, Tex 


1 


;. .-. . .,, „ 




1 




Marlin, Tex... 


5 


^i ' •''''tovn^Tenn 


McCamey, Tex._ 


2 


Mount Pleasant, Tenn 


McKinney, Tex 


12 


Memphis, Tex 


3 


S , 


Mercedes, Tex 


3 


P iri • Tp'lin 


Mexia, Tex._ 


5 


.,' ,' ', . ,., 


Midland, Tex 


22 


R ' ',',. V™ ~ 


Mmeola, Tex 


3 




Mineral Wells, Tex 


9 




Mission, Tex.. 


8 




Monahans, Tex 


5 




Mount Pleasant, Tex 


5 




Nacogdoches, Tex 


6 




Navasota, Tex 


3 




New Braunfels, Tex 


12 




Nocona, Tex. 


3 




Odessa, Tex.. 


43 




Olney, Tex... 


2 




Orange, Tex. 


25 




Paducah, Tex 


2 




Pasadena, Tex 


17 




Pharr, Tex. 


4 




Pittsburg, Tex 


2 




Plainview, Tex 


13 




Quanah, Tex 


1 




Ranger, Tex. 


7 




Raymondville, Tex 


6 




Robstown, Tex 


7 




Rusk, Tex. . 


2 




San Marcos, Tex 


3 




Shamrock, Tex 


3 




Slaton, Tex. . 


3 




Snyder, Tex... 


11 




Stamford, Tex 


6 




Stephenville, Tex.. . 


7 




Taylor, Tex 


7 






2 


Clarksville, Tex 


Texas City, Tex 


21 




Uvalde, Tex_. . 


6 






15 






8 






10 


Crvstal City, Tex.__ 


Wellington, Tex 


2 



42 



Table 13.- 



■N umber of -police department employees, April 30, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS-Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


Weslaco, Tex 


8 
9 
5 
5 

2 
8 

4 
5 
5 
7 
3 
3 

4 
7 
3 
3 
4 
4 
S 
5 
5 

12 

8 

3 

7 
10 

9 

3 

5 

4 
7 
6 
5 
4 

19 
5 
8 
5 

13 

7 

6 
18 
18 
14 
11 

8 

6 

5 

3 
12 
12 
12 
10 
12 

4 
IS 
18 

6 
10 

6 

8 

6 
12 

9 

il 




2 
12 


West University Place, Tex 




Yoakum, Tex... ... 




American Fork, Utah. . 




4 

15 
5 
8 
5 
14 
15 
9 
11 
4 
2fi 
4 
8 
4 

10 
6 
3 


Bingham Can von, Utah 


Kelso, Wash 


Bountiful, Utah... 


Kent, Wash 


Brigham, Utah 




Cedar City, Utah 




Helper, Utah... 




Lehi, Utah 




Mid vale, Utah. 




Murray, Utah. . 




Nephi, Utah. 




Orem, Utah.. 




Park City, Utah. . 




Payson, Utah 




Price, Utah.. 




Richfield, Utah . . 




St. George, Utah . 




South Salt Lake, Utah . 


Charles Town, W. Va 


Spanish Fork, Utah 


Chester, W. Va.__. 


Springville, Utah 


4 
6 
3 
7 
7 

11 
3 

10 
2 
2 
5 
5 
3 
4 
2 
4 

13 
3 
3 
3 
2 
9 


Tooele, Utah.. 


Elkins, W. Va 


Bellows Falls, Vt__ 




Bennington, Vt 


Grafton, W. Va 


Brattleboro, Vt. 


Hinton, W. Va. 


Montpelier, Vt... 






Keystone, W. Va 


St. Albans, Vt 


St. Johnsbury, Vt 




Springfield, Vt.. 




Waterbury, Vt 




Windsor, Vt 


Mullens, W. Va 


Winooski, Vt__ 


Xitro, W. Va 




Oak Hill, W. Va.... 




Piedmont, W. Va 


Bedford, Va 


Point Pleasant, W. Va 


Big Stone Gap, Va 


Princeton, W. Va ... 






Bluefield, Va 


Salem, W. Va. 


Bristol, Va 


Shinnston, W. Va 




Sistersville, W. Va 




Welch, W. Va 




Wellsburg, W. Va 




Weston, W. Va 










Falls Church, Va.. 










11 








Berlin, AVis 




Galax, Va— 


Black River Falls, Wis.. 












Clintonville, V* is 




Hopewell, Va 












Marion, Va. 


F)e Pere, Wis 




Norton, Va. 






Phoebus, Va 






Pocahontas, Va 






Pulaski, Va 






Radford, Va 






Salem, va 






South Boston, Va 






South Norfolk, Va 






Vinton, Va 


Kewaunee, Wis.. . 






Kimberly, Wis . 


4 


Waynesboro, Va. 




Lake Geneva Wis 


6 
3 
3 


Wytlieville, Va 






Little Chute, Wis 


A uburn, Wash 










Centralia, Wash. 


Merrill, Wis 




Chehalis, Wash 


Monroe, Wis 




Olarkston, Wash 


\i'ills\ Qle, Wis 




Colfax, Wash 1 


New Loudon, Wis 


6 



43 



Table 13. — Number of police department employees, April 80, 1950, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




7 
4 

1 

4 
9 
6 
5 
3 
13 
7 
6 
5 
3 
6 
3 
S 
4 

6 








Tomah, Wis 




Park Falls, Wis . 






Plattcville, Wis 




















West Bend, Wis 












Whitefish Bay, Wis 


























3 


River Falls, Wis 










9 






6 

























OFFENSES CLEARED AND PERSONS ARRESTED 

Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1949 

During 1949, the police cleared by arrest 27.9 percent of offenses 
reported. For crimes against the person the percentage cleared was 
78.7 and for crimes against property, 24.7. 

Generally speaking, the less frequent but more serious offenses 
against the person are for the most part followed by the arrest of the 
offenders, whereas the more frequent crimes against property are not 
so likely to be cleared by arrest. Of the murders and negligent 
homicides last year, 93.7 and 85.1 percent, respectively, were cleared 
by arrest, while 80.2 percent of the rapes and 77.2 percent of the aggra- 
vated assaults were reported as cleared by arrest. 

Of the property crimes, robbery tops the list of those cleared. In 
some respects robbery offenses are similar to crimes against the per- 
son, inasmuch as the offender is observed by the victim in most cases. 
The 39.5 percent clearance figure for robbery contrasts with the 29.0 
percent for burglary, 21.6 percent for larceny and 27.3 percent for 
auto theft. 

In connection with the relatively small proportion of auto theft 
offenses cleared, it should be remembered that year after year the 
police report better than 90 percent of stolen automobiles recovered. 

The term "cleared by arrest" refers to a situation wherein one or 
more of the offenders responsible for the commission of the offense 
have been arrested and made available for prosecution. Under the 
system of uniform crime reporting the arrest of one individual may 
clear several offenses when the police investigation discloses evidence 
identifying that individual as being involved in the commission of 
other offenses. On the other hand, where several people jointly 
commit one offense and all are arrested, only one offense is treated as 
cleared. 

Exceptional circumstances are present in connection with the com- 
mission of some offenses which render them cleared even though an 
offender may not be arrested and made available locally for prosecu- 
tion. Included in the exceptional clearances would be instances 
wherein the offender had been arrested in another jurisdiction but for 
reasons beyond the control of the police he was not prosecuted locally. 

(44) 



45 

The suicide of the offender would also be treated as an exceptional 
clearance. Such clearances are relatively few in number and def- 
initely limited under instructions included in the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Handbook, which is distributed to all contributing police 
agencies. 

In view of the foregoing, it is understandable that the following 
tabulation indicates in many cases that the number of persons 
charged falls short of the number of offenses cleared. On the other 
hand, in some instances involving crimes against the person it is seen 
that the number of persons charged exceeds the figures for offenses 
cleared. This may be attributable to the fact that in more serious 
crimes frequently more than one person is arrested. 

All the reports used in the following tabulations were carefully re- 
viewed as to reasonableness and none were included in the tabula- 
tions which follow unless the contributing police agency indicated the 
reports included all offenses of the indicated types known to have 
been committed. Also these departments reported that their figures 
pertaining to offenses cleared were properly distinguished from those 
relating to the number of persons arrested. In verifying the reports, 
letters were sent to 422 of the 1,652 cities whose returns were used in 
the tabulations. 



46 



RELATION BETWEEN OFFENSES 

KNOWN AND 

OFFENSES CLEARED 

Calendar Year 1949 
OFFENSES AGAINST THE PERSON 



CL Q 




MURDER 



109 BfmtKS 



NIGU6EKT 
MANSLAUSHTER 

IS SFOKS KBSfPt 



JL P L 



A66RAVATED 
ASSAULT 




1,652 CITIES 



49,618,922 POPULATION 



47 



Table 14. — Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged (held for prose- 
cution), 1949, by population groups, number per 100 known offenses. 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Population group 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
neg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

1,652 cities; total population, 
49,618,922: 

Offenses known . 

Offenses cleared by arrest — 

Persons charged . 

group 1 

30 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 19,369,472: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest___-__- 
Persons charged _ 

group II 

48 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 6,784,374: 

Offenses known ... 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged _ 

GROUP III 

87 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation, 6,000,394: 

Offenses known ... 

Offenses cleared by arrest ... 

Persons charged . 

GROUP IV 

161 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popu- 
lation, 5,666,456: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest — 

Persons charged — 

GROUP v 

470 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 
lation, 7,138,332: 

Offenses known ... 

Offenses cleared by arrest ... 

Persons charged _ 

GROUP VI 

856 cities under 10,000; total popula- 
tion, 4,659,894: 

Offenses known . 

Offenses cleared by arrest — 

Persons charged. 



100.0 
93.7 
91.7 



ioo.o 

94.6 
94.0 



100.0 
90.7 
86.1 



100.0 
94.0 
93.1 



100.0 
93.2 
86.3 



100.0 
94.3 
91.2 



100.0 
91.5 



100.0 
85. 1 



100.0 
81.3 
82.0 



100.0 
84.9 
74.8 



100.0 
90.9 
84.0 



100.0 
80.8 
74.4 



100.0 
99.1 

ioo.o 



100. o 
91.4 
84.8 



100.0 
80.2 
75.3 



100. 
81.3 



100.0 
75^8 



100.0 
79.5 
84.0 



100. 
85.9 
92.9 



100. 
75.4 
85.9 



100.0 
39.5 
39.2 



ioo. o 

39.5 
35.8 



100.0 
36.8 
41.2 



100.0 
36.5 
48.0 



100.0 
40.7 
51.1 



ioo.o 

49.6 



100.0 
77.2 
66.3 



ioo. o 

73.3 
54.6 



100.0 
78.4 
72.8 



100.0 
82.0 
80.7 



100.0 
84.5 
86.4 



100. 
86.3 



100. 
28.7 
21.8 



100.0 
26.7 
17.5 



100.0 
29.1 
20.1 



100.0 
29.7 
21.3 



100.0 
30.7 
26.1 



100.0 
32.5 
30.6 



100.0 
21.6 
17.4 



100. 
22.8 
19.1 



100.0 
20.1 
14.6 



100.0 
19.9 
16.4 



100.0 
19.2 
16.0 



100.0 
22.0 
18.3 



100.0 
24.2 
16.9 



The foregoing tabulation shows the number of offenses cleared and 
the number of persons charged per 100 known offenses, with the data 
reported by the 1,652 cities divided into population groups. The 
raw figures reported by these cities showing offenses known and offenses 
cleared are presented in the following tabulation with the cities 
grouped according to location so that police administrators may 



48 



RELATION BETWEEN OFFENSES 

KNOWN AND 

OFFENSES CLEARED 

Calendar Year 1949 
OFFENSES AGAINST PROPERTY 




1,652 CITIES 49,618,922 POPULATION 



jm 



Figure 5. 



49 

compare the degree of success experienced locally in clearing offenses 
with the average of other departments in the same general section of 
the country. 



Table 15. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage cleared by arrest, 
1949, by geographic divisions 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Geographic division 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
neg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



TOTAL, ALL DIVISIONS 

1,652 cities; total population, 49,618,- 
922: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 

148 cities; total population, 4,927,146: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

372 cities; total population, 9,546,187: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

419 cities; total population, 15,254,227: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

183 cities; total population, 4,828,859: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES ' 

142 cities; total population, 5,113,373: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 

47 cities; total population, 1,297,054: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 

82 cities; total population, 2,967,825: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

1 Includes the District of Columbia 



2,772 
2,597 



54 

45 

83.3 



276 
254 
92.0 



184 
160 
87.0 



329 
316 

96.0 



1,679 
1,428 
85.1 



151 
123 
81.5 



143 
132 
92.3 



75 
63 

84.0 



6,241 
5, 003 
80.2 



292 

285 
97.6 



2,407 
1,846 
76.7 



457 
85.7 



32, 059 

12. 853 

39.5 



944 
432 

45.8 



2,784 
1,044 
37.5 



14,053 
5,322 
37.9 



2,392 
1,066 
44.6 



3,378 
1,931 
57.2 



40, 114 

30, 981 

77.2 



664 
625 
94.1 



3, 259 
2, 513 
77.1 



8^476 
71.2 



3,355 
2,357 
70.3 



13.296 

11, 183 

84.1 



1,634 
1,186 
72.6 



2,827 
2. 506 



13, 181 
4,619 
35.0 



57, 284 
17,378 



16,726 
5,154 
30.8 



6,741) 
8, 758 
32.8 



6,918 
1,624 
23.5 



17.037 
4,762 
28.0 



31, 379 
8,464 
27.0 



41,955 

10. 055 

22.4 



119, :;n; 

30, 541 

20.4 



44, 455 

10, 707 

24.1 



61,782 
17, 799 



11, 573 
2,505 
21.6 



35.9:19 
9,011 
25.1 



50 

Table 15. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage cleared by arrest, 
1949, by geographic divisions — Continued 





Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
as- 
sault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 

enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Geographic division 


Mur- 
der, 
non- 
neg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaueh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


MOUNTAIN STATES 

80 cities; total population, 1,304,921: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

PACIFIC STATES 

179 cities; total population, 4,379,330: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


60 

56 

93.3 

194 
172 

88.7 


65 
44 

67.7 

210 
184 
87.6 


194 
156 
80.4 

71.5 


987 
425 
43.1 

4,970 
1,515 
30.5 


683 
545 
79.8 

2,488 
1,590 
63.9 


9,434 
2,546 
27.0 

31,878 
7,159 
22.5 


27, 343 
4,747 

17.4 

94, 207 

14, 231 

15.1 


3,874 
1,004 
25.9 

14, 015 
3,166 
22.6 



Persons Charged, 1949 

On the average, 1 out of every 4 persons living in urban areas was 
formally charged in 1949 with some traffic violation and 1 out of 20 
was charged with some other violation such as drunkenness, disorderly 
conduct, assault, larceny and the like, according to the annual reports 
received from 1,652 cities representing a combined population of 
49,618,922. 

Generally speaking, the larger cities reported the greatest number of 
persons charged per unit of population, although a few exceptions to 
this general observation are noted in the following tabulations. 

In reviewing the figures presented in tables 16-18, it should be 
remembered that the procedure followed in scoring the number of 
persons charged is considerably different from that governing the 
scoring of offenses known to the police. As an illustration, if a holdup 
man committed three consecutive robberies in three different business 
establishments, three separate offenses of robbery would be reported, 
whereas if he is arrested, only one person charged with robbery would 
be scored. Similarly, if three individuals steal one automobile and are 
arrested, one offense of auto theft would be scored and three persons 
would be shown as charged with auto theft. 

Of the 1,652 cities represented in the following 2 tabulations, 96 per- 
cent indicated affirmatively they had correctly listed the number of 
persons charged rather than the number of charges placed against 
persons arrested; i. e., if on an occasion of a single arrest an offender 
was charged with robbery and larceny, only 1 person was shown as 
charged, the entry being made opposite robbery. 

Nearly 88 percent of the reporting departments advised that all or 
some juveniles were included in their returns of persons charged, 



51 

while 84 percent indicated that all juveniles were included. Of those 
including juvenile arrests, 98 percent properly listed them opposite 
the classification embracing the violation involved, such as robbery, 
burglary, larceny and the like, even though some technical charge 
such as "juvenile delinquency" was placed against the offender at the 
time of his detention. The other departments including juveniles 
showed them opposite "all other offenses." 



Table 16. — Persons charged (held for 'prosecution), 1949, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Oflense charged 



Criminal homicide: 
(«) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

(6) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence: 
Number of persons 

charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

N nm her of persons charged . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 
Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged . 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 
ing, possessing: 
Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 
Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice: 
Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution) : 
Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc.: 
Number of persons charged. 
Rate per 100,000 



tion, 

49,618,922 



2,541 
5.12 



1,369 
2.76 



91,158 
183.7 



56, 941 

175.2 



13, 488 
27.2 



4,265 
8.6 

10,355 



4,701 
9.47 



27, 378 
55.2 



20, 336 
41.0 



4,712 
9.5 



17. 909 
36.1 



Group I 



150 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

19,3119,47: 



1,375 
7.10 



7, 507 
38.8 



34, 19(5 
176.5 



36,015 
185.9 



2, Sal) 
14.7 



2,338 
12.07 



7, 9S1 
41.2 



Group II 



4S cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
6,784,374 



342 
5.04 



223 
3.29 



1,656 
24.4 



14.797 
218.1 



5,711 
84.2 



12,11 
178. 



2,341 
34.5 



1,462 
21.5 



3,837 
56.6 



2, 526 
37.2 



Group III 



87 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 

6,1100,394 



310 
5.17 



194 
3.23 



1,042 
17.4 



3,841 
64.0 



13,298 
221.6 



5,134 
85.6 



10,540 
175.7 



467 

7.78 



2, 740 
45.7 



2,291 
38.2 



Group IV 



161 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 

5,666,456 



805 
14.2 



2, 560 
45.2 



9,721 
171.6 



4,443 
78.4 



9,471 
167.1 



1,603 
28.3 



Group V 



470 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
7,138,332 



238 
3.33 



13.0 

2,779 



13, 364 
187.2 



6,045 
84.7 



1,256 
17.6 



537 
7.52 



52 

Table 16. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 19^9, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 



Offense charged 



Total, 
1,652 
cities; 
total 

popula- 
tion, 

49,618,922 



Group I 



25(1,0(10; 
popula- 
tion, 
19,369,172 



Group II 



IS cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
6,7X4,374 



Group III 



S7 cities, 
56,0(10 to 

100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

0,000,391 



Group IV 



161 cities. 
25,000 to 
56, C00; 
popula- 
tion, 

5,666,456 



Group V 



470 cities, 
10,000 to 

25,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
7,1 



Group 
VI 



856 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

4,d5'.»,K94 



Offenses against family and 
children: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000— 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged- 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000. 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,060 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000. 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged _ 

Rate per 100,000--. 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000..-. 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 



28, 637 
67.7 



33,479 
67.5 



3 81.729 
164.8 



306, 538 
617.8 



1,162.429 
2, 342. 7 



139, 052 
280.2 



238, 326 
480.3 



8,549 
44.1 



5.195.391) 
29, 276. 4 



133,110 
687.2 



59, 300 
306.6 



48, 79:; 
251.9 



87,309 
450.8 



7, 285 
107.4 



9,357 
137. 9 



2, 370, 384 
34, 938. 9 



534.9 
12, 877 



36,510 
538.2 



3,673 
61.2 

5,551 
92.5 

11,700 

195.0 

1,975,834 
33, 387. 9 

628.3 

140, 721 
2, 345. 2 

14, 705 
245.1 

8,715 
145.2 

30,629 
510.4 



3,611 
63.7 



3,721 
65.7 



11,268 
198. 9 



1,445,227 
25,882.5 



124,. W.I 
2, 197. 8 



27, 044 
477.3 



i 3, 475 
48.8 



5,212 
73.0 



16, 399 
230.4 



1.713.180 
24, 300. 3 



10, 935 
153.2 



36, 471 
510.9 



3,161 
67.8 



12,927 
277.4 



i» 961, 843 
20, 786. 2 



27, 752 
595.6 



96, 176 
2, 063. 9 



8.934 
191.7 



2,384 
51.2 



20,357 
436. 9 



Footnotes 1-10: The number of persons charged and the rate are based on the reports from the number 
of cities indicated below: 



Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 




1,651 
469 

1,651 
469 

1,636 


49, 599, 522 
7,118,932 

49, 598, 243 
7,117,653 

47, 709, 356 


6 . 


29 
86 
159 
464 
850 


17, 746, 020 










8 




4 


9 


7, 050, 026 


5 


10 


4, 627, 322 







In the foregoing tabulation all persons charged with traffic violations 
were grouped under a single heading; however, 1,527 of the cities 
showed separate data for (1) violations of road and driving laws 
(usually referred to as "moving violations"), (2) parking violations, and 
(3) other traffic and motor-vehicle laws except driving while intoxicated, 
and these data are presented in the following tabulation with the 
cities grouped by size. 



53 

Table 17. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), traffic violations, except driving 
while intoxicated, 1949; number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population 
groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 







Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 




Total, 


I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 




1,527 
cities; 




























Offense charged 


total 


28 cities 


43 cities, 


77 cities, 


147 cities, 


429 cities, 


803 cities 


popula- 


over 


100,000 to 


50,000 to 


25,000 to 


10,000 to 


under 




tion, 


250,000; 


250,000; 


100,000; 


50,000; 


25,000; 


10,000 




44,773,342 


popula- 


popula- 


popula- 


popula- 


popula- 


popula- 






tion, 


tion, 


tion, 


tion. 


tion, 


tion, 






17,316,260 


5, 976, 573 


5, 334, 842 


5, 189, 906 


6, 549, 113 


4, 406, 648 


Road and driving laws: 
















Number of persons charged. 


2,670,648 


1,479,115 


328, 248 


271, 626 


186, 873 


211,307 


193, 479 


Rate per 100,000 


5,964.8 


8, 541. 8 


5, 492. 2 


5,091.5 


3, 600. 7 


3, 226. 5 


4, 390. 6 


Parking violations: 
















Number of persons charged _ 


9,673,405 


3, 399, 235 


1, 669, 580 


1, 512, 910 


1, 044, 149 


1, 358, 558 


688,973 


Rate per 100,000 


21,605.3 


19, 630. 3 


27, 935. 4 


28, 359. 


20,118.8 


20, 744. 2 


15, 634. 9 


Other traffic and motor vehicle 
















laws: 
















Number of persons charged _ 


528,455 


274, 495 


61, 229 


60,681 


40, 065 


47, 136 


44,849 


Rate per 100,000 


1,180.3 


1, 585. 2 


1, 024. 5 


1, 137. 4 


772.0 


719.7 


1, 017. 8 







The following tabulation shows the number of persons formally 
charged and the rate per 100,000 inhabitants with the cities grouped 
according to geographic division. The tabulation is based on the 
reports of the same 1,652 cities grouped in table 16 according to 
population. 

In reviewing the variations in the data between the various geo- 
graphic divisions, it should be remembered that many factors are 
involved affecting the charge which might be placed against an indi- 
vidual. For example, persons arrested in connection with a traffic 
fatality may by local custom in some areas be charged with reckless 
driving or some offense considered by some less serious than man- 
slaughter. Established local custom is reflected also in other classi- 
fications. The figures for prostitution and commercialized vice in 
some areas may be considered conservative for the offenders may be 
charged with some other sex offense, vagrancy, or disorderly conduct. 
Similarly persons arrested for intoxication in some cases may be for- 
mally charged with disorderly conduct while a person responsible for 
an aggravated assault may be taken into custody under a misdemeanor 
charge. 

Thus it will be seen that while theoretically an offender should be 
charged with the offense committed, in many instances the policies 
and practices of prosecuting attorneys, judges, and other officials as 
well as public opinion and established custom in the community will 
govern to a great extent the charge placed by the police against arrested 
individuals. 



54 



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56 



PERSONS CHARGED 

AND 

PERCENT FOUND GUILTY 

Calendar Year 1949 

CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON 



2%©UILT¥ 





murder tttiiioaoos 

— mmww. 

MUJ% GUILTY 

NEGLIGENT • • • • €> 

MANSLAUGHTER 

519 CHARGED 




53.5% GUILTS 
AGGRAVATED ® ® • • • O QQXl C 

SSL «"fWOT„, 





.1 



FBI 

205 CITIES WITH OVER 25,000 INHABITANTS TOTAL POPULATION 22,750,544 CHAHT 



Figure 6. 



57 

Persons Found Guilty, 1949 

Practically two-thirds of the persons formally charged (booked) by 
the police in 1949 were found guilty, according to the reports received 
from 205 of the Nation's larger cities (combined 1940 population, 
22,750,544). Those found guilty ranged from 44.7 percent for negli- 
gent manslaughter and 53.5 percent for aggravated assault up to 80.5 
percent for liquor law violations and 83.9 percent for driving while 
intoxicated. 

The data relating to persons found guilty are presented separately 
in tables 19 and 20 since figures on offenses known and offenses cleared 
by arrest are available only as to the Part I offense classes. 

While the figures showing the percentage found guilty for crimes 
against the person are small in comparison with those for offenses 
against property, it will be observed that in crimes against property 
arrests are made in a much smaller proportion of the cases. 

In selecting the cities used in tables 19 and 20, reports were elimi- 
nated unless the verification of them or the answers to questionnaires 
and correspondence indicated the figures for persons found guilty 
represented the final disposition of the charges placed against persons 
as distinguished from the disposition at some preliminary judicial 
stage. A few classifications are not separately presented in table 20 
since the figures in sufficient detail were not available in some of the 
reports used. 



Table 19. — Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and number of persons found guilty, 
194-9; 205 cities over 25,000 in population 



[Total population, 22,750,544, based on 1940 decennial census] 






Oflense (Part I classes) 


Number 
of 

offenses 
known 
to the 
police 


Number 

of 
offenses 
cleared 

by arrest 


Number 

of 
persons 
charged 
(held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 


Number 
found 

guilty of 
offense 

charged 


Number 
found 

guilty of 
lesser 

offense 


Total 

found 
guilty (of 

offense 
charged 
or lesser 
offense) 


Percent- 
age 
found 
guilty 


Total 


456, 594 


124, 282 


91,045 


57, 267 


7,775 


65,042 


71.4 


Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegli- 
gent manslaughter. _ _ 

(6) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence 


1,355 

789 

3,857 

20,806 

25, 124 

105, 464 

259, 139 
40, 060 


1,284 

626 
3,096 
8,176 
18,813 
30, 176 

52, 571 
9,540 


1,245 

519 
2,428 
7,040 
13, 388 
19, 159 

39, 769 

7,497 


558 

189 
1,018 
4,187 
5,511 
12, 744 

28,442 
4,618 


191 

43 

465 

1,027 

1,651 

2,107 

1,600 
691 


749 

232 
1,483 
5,214 
7,162 
14, 851 

30, 042 
5,309 


60.2 

44.7 
61.1 


Robbery 


74.1 
53.5 


Burglary — breaking or entering. 

Larcenv— theft (except auto 

theft) 


77.5 

75.5 
70.8 







58 



PERSONS CHARGED 

AND 

PERCENT FOUND GUILTY 

Calendar Year 1949 
CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 



% GUILTY 




A 



ROBBERY 

7,040 CHARGED 






77.5% GUILTY 



BURGLARY 

19,159 CHARGED 



inim 



• oo 

n 



75,5% GUILTY 



LARCENY 

39,769 CHARGED 



m 



▼TVVfTV 



coo 



70.8% GUILTY 
AUTOTHEFT ••••#•• >0 

\/ 




FBI 

205 CITIES WITH OVER 25,000 INHABITANTS TOTAL POPULATION 22,750,544 CH » RT 



Figure 7. 



59 



Table 20. — Number of persons charged (held for prosecution) and number found 
guilty, 19.J.9; 205 cities over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 22,750,544, based on 1940 decennial census] 



Offense (Part II classes) 



Xumber of 



charged 

(held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 



Number 
found 

guilty of 
offense 

charged 



Number 

found 
guilty of 
lesser of- 
fense 



Total found 
guilty (of 

offense 

charged or 

of lesser 

offense) 



Percent- 
age found 
guilty 



Total 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (including prostitution and com 

mercialized vice) 

Offenses against the family and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness; disorderly conduct; vagrancy 

Gambling 

Driving while intoxicated 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

All other offenses 



7, 862, 904 



39, 445 
3,376 
7,303 
1,849 
8,571 

23,519 
15, 879 

2,608 
15, 895 
687, 193 
42, 884 
30, 053 
2 6, 887, 215 
97, 114 



5. 229. 222 



2,257 

4,170 

933 

5,941 

16, 812 
8,872 
1,902 
12. 553 
515, 820 
27, 802 
22. 785 
4. 494, 993 
57, 491 



370 

34 

240 

2.210 

185 

2,415 

2 24. 968 

1,371 



23, 567 
2,500 
4,580 
1,010 
6,149 

17, 405 
9,242 
1,936 
12, 793 
518, 030 
27, 987 
25, 200 
2 4, 519, 961 
58, 862 



59.7 
74.1 
62.7 
54.6 

71.7 

74.0 
58.2 
74.2 
80.5 
75.4 
65. 3 
83.9 
J65.6 
60.6 



The total figures are subject to footnote 2. 

Based on the reports of 201 cities, total population, 20; 



60 



PERCENT FOUND GUILTY 



Calendar Year 1949 

3 o 

^\ n PART II CLASS OFFENSES 





Percent Found Guilty 



59.7% I 






Forgery and Counterfeiting 



74.1% 



Embezzlement and Fraud 



62.7%j 



Stolen Property: Buying, Receiving, etc. 54.6 m 



Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, etc. 



71.7% 



. „ (Including Prostitution 

Sex Offenses and commercialized vice) 



74.0% 



Offenses Against Family and Children 58.2% 



Narcotic Drug Laws 



74.2% 



Liquor Laws 



80.5% 



Drunkenness, Disorderly Conduct, Vagrancy 



75.4% 



Gambling 



65.3% 



Driving While Intoxicated 



83.9% 



Traffic and Motor Vehicle Laws 



-65.6% 



All Other Offenses 



60.6% 



Figure 8. 



61 

Persons Released — Not Held for Prosecution, 1949 

Persons taken into custody by the police are either held for prosecu- 
tion or released with no formal charge having been placed against them, 
and the annual return C provides for the listing of such information 
as well as data relating to persons charged. The figures concerning 
persons released are indicated in the following tabulations. 

Data pertaining to persons released do not include individuals taken 
into custody and turned over to other authorities for prosecution. 
The figures do include, however, persons failing to respond to sum- 
monses, notices, or citations who are not subsequently brought into 
court by arrest for reason of their failure to respond. Included also 
are offenders who are given a formal warning but not held to answer 
for an offense or who are released under the "golden rule" principle. 



Table 21. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, 1949; number and 
rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide: 
(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter: 
Number of persons re- 
leased 

Kate per 100,000 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence: 
Number of persons re- 
leased 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons released.. 

Rate per 100.000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons released _ _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary— breaking or entering: 
Number of persons released . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons 
Rate per 100,000.... 
Auto theft: 

Number of persons 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons released. _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
possessing: 
Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons released. . 
Rate per 100,000 



Total, 
1,213 

cities; 
total 
popula- 
tion, 

35,341,677 



301 
0.85 



257 
0.73 



2,237 
6.3 



2,157 
6.1 



5,473 
15.5 



11, 706 
33.1 



2,451 
6.9 



2.4 

664 
1.88 



Group I 



24 cities 
over 

250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 

12.010,421 



104 
0.86 



2, 470 
20.6 



1,346 
11.2 



:>. 558 
29.5 



Group II 



36 cities, 
II 10,01)0 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
,-i,o;;:;,\7u 



544 

lo. s 



14.2 
1,331 



106 
2.11 



Group III 



68 cities. 
.50,000 to 

100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
4,707,715 



45 
0.96 



751 
16.0 



1,192 
25.3 



70 
1.49 



Group IV 



131 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
4,031,228 



Group V 



368 cities. 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
5,608,798 



25 
0.45 



133 
2.37 



Group 
VI 



586 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

3,313,645 



17 
0.51 



231 
7.0 



11.6 

209 
6.3 



62 

Table 21. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, 1949; number and 
rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 



Offense charged 



Total, 
1,213 

cities; 
total 
popula- 
tion, 
35,341,07; 



Group I 



24 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

12,040,121 



36 cities, 08 cities, 
100,000 to 50,000 to 



Group II 



Group III 



Group IV 



250,00(1; 

popula- 
tion, 

5,033,870 



100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
4,707,715 



131 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
4,631,228 



Group V 



.08 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 

5,008,798 



586 cities 
under 
10,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
3,313,045 



Group 
VI 



Prostitution and commercialized 
vice: 

Number of persons released . . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution) : 

Number of persons released . _ . 

Rate per 100,000.. 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons released . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc.: 

Number of persons released . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and chil- 
dren: 

Number of persons released _ _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons released. _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons released, . 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons released.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Suspicion: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons 

Rate per 100,000-... 



1.001 
2.8 



1,238 
3.5 



1,713 

4.8 



1,176 
3.3 



3 1, 409 
4.0 



i 958, 187 
2, 860. 8 



10,977 
31.1 



90. 249 
255.4 



5, 284 
43.9 



; XX, 721 
851. 2 



519 

15.7 



93. 610 

1.859.0 



67.210 
558.0 



12.89 
256.: 



1.373 
27.3 



222. 730 
4,815.8 



1. 17! 
24.0 



O.SOS 
144.6 



11.330 
304.4 



1.244 
26.4 



1X8, 4113 
4,142.0 



1.573 
34.11 



'20S..S37 
3, 750. 8 



3.545 
63.2 



135.8 
1,340 



14.302 
256.1 



4.007 
71.4 



1 .-,:,, xxo 
4, 729. 9 



5,145 
155.3 



2,746 
82.9 



122 

3.7 



7. 952 
240. 



4, 262 
128.6 



Footnotes 1-10: The number of persons released and the rate are based on the reports from the number of 
cities indicated below: 



Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


1 


1,212 
367 

1,212 
367 

1,204 


35,322,277 
5, 589, 398 

35, 320, 998 
5,588,119 

33, 494, 015 


6 


23 
67 
129 
366 
583 


10, 422, 969 


2 




4, 625, 133 


3 


8 


4, 548, 574 


4 


9.-. 


5, 567, 862 


5. 


10 


3, 295, 607 









63 



Table 22. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, traffic violations, 
except driving while intoxicated, 1949; number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, 
by population groups 

[Population figures from 1940 decennial census] 





Total, 
753 cities; 

total 
popula- 
tion, 
19,526,690 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


Offense charged 


11 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

5,365,197 


17 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
2,454,061 


47 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
3,207,511 


84 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
2,911,457 


230 cities, 

10,000 to 
25,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

3,499,548 


364 cities 
under 
10,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
2,088,916 


Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons released . 
Rate per 100,000 


83, 887 
429.6 

814, 826 
4, 172. 9 

32,311 
165.5 


28,090 
523.6 

45, 502 
848.1 

14,835 
276.5 


16, 162 
658.6 

51, 204 
2, 086. 5 

1, 330 

54.2 


9,606 
299.5 

211, 133 
6, 582. 5 

1,991 
62.1 


10, 786 
370. 5 

171, 110 

5, 877. 1 

5, 957 
204.6 


6,781 
193.8 

197, 832 
5, 653. 1 

3,922 

112.1 


12, 462 
596.6 


Parking violations: 

Number of persons released . 
Rate per 100,000 


138,045 
6, 608. 5 


Other traffic and motor vehicle 
laws: 
Number of persons released 
Rate per 100,000 


4,276 
204.7 







DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Source of Data 

During the first 6 months of 1950 the FBI examined 402,383 
arrest records, as evidenced by fingerprint cards, in order to obtain 
data concerning the age, sex, race, and previous criminal history of 
the persons represented. The compilation has been limited to instances 
of arrests for violations of State laws and municipal ordinances. 
In other words, fingerprint cards representing arrests for violations 
of Federal laws or representing commitments to any type of penal 
institutions have been excluded from this tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint records examined exceeded the 400,089 
prints handled during the first 6 months of 1949 by 0.6 percent. The 
tabulation of data from fingerprint cards obviously does not include 
all persons arrested, since there are individuals taken into custody for 
whom no fingerprint cards are forwarded to Washington. Further- 
more, data pertaining to persons arrested should not be treated as 
information regarding the number of offenses committed, since two 
or more persons may be involved in the joint commission of a single 
offense, and on the other hand one person may be arrested and 
charged with the commission of several separate crimes. 
Offense Charged 

More than 42 percent (170,070) of the arrest records examined 
during the first 6 months of 1950 were for major violations. Persons 
held under charges of murder, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, 
and auto theft numbered 111,262, or 27.7 percent of the total arrest 
records examined. 
Sex 

Fingerprint cards representing arrests of males during the first 
half of 1950 numbered 364,519, a 1.0 percent increase over the 360,944 
cards received during the same period of 1949. 

Female arrest prints declined 3.3 percent, from 39,145 during the 
first half of 1949 to 37,864 during the same period of 1950. 
Age 

During January-June of 1950, persons under 21 years of age arrested 
and fingerprinted totaled 63,615 or 15.8 percent of the total arrests. 
In addition there were 64,886 (16.1 percent) arrests of persons within 
the ages of 21 through 24 bringing the total for persons less than 25 
years of age to 128,501 or 31.9 percent of the total arrests. Including 
arrests of persons age 25 through 29, the arrests of young people less 

(64) 



65 

than 30 years of age totaled 195,509 or 48.6 percent of all persons 
arrested during the first half of 1950, and it should be emphasized 
that the arrest records are unquestionably incomplete in the lower 
age groups because of the practice of many jurisdictions not to finger- 
print all youthful offenders. 

As an indication of the predominant part youths play in the com- 
mission of crimes against property, it may be observed that during 
the first half of 1950 persons of all ages arrested for robbery, burglary, 
larceny, auto theft, embezzlement and fraud, forgery, counterfeiting, 
receiving stolen property, and arson numbered 99,130 and 29.9 
percent of these persons were less than 21 years of age. 

It may also be observed that during the first half of 1950, while 31.9 
percent of all persons arrested were less than 25 years of age, those 
within this age group numbered 55.4 percent of those charged with 
robbery, 63.0 percent of those charged with burglary, 46.7 percent 
of persons charged with larceny and 68.7 percent of those charged 
with auto theft. Approximately one-half of all crimes against property 
were committed by persons under 25 years of age. 

Table 23. — Distribution of arrests by sex, January-June, 1950 



Offense charged 



Total 

Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape r 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex offenses 

Xarcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. . 

Disorderly conduct 

Drun kenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Mot stated 

All other offenses 

i Less than Mo of 1 percent. 



364, 519 



2,701 
10, 777 
26,113 

23, N09 
30, 478 



2, '.«'.) 
606 

3,754 
236 
950 
136 
60 
724 



2,722 

1,454 

470 

244 

423 

832 

1,051 

139 

6 

194 

2,955 

7, 673 

3,603 

777 

2,551 

387 

2,093 



21.1 
6.7 
2.0 
6.4 



.7 
3.0 
7.2 
6.5 
8.4 
2.5 
2.1 

.5 



6.5 
1.9 
?) 

1.7 
5.2 
21.2 
6.4 
2.0 
6.4 



66 



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67 



Table 25. — Number and percentage of arrests of persons under 
January-June, 1950 



years of 



Offense charged 



Total 
number 

of 
persons 

arrested 



Number 

under 18 

years of 

age 



Number 

under 21 

years of 

age 



Total 
number 
under 25 
years of 



under 18 

years of 

age 



Percent- 
age 
under 21 

years of 



Total 
percent- 
age 
under 25 
years of 
age 



Total. 



402, 383 



63,615 



128, 501 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny—theft... 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 

etc 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle 

laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



3.108 
11,255 
29. 052 
24.415 
34. 232 

9.200 
11,218 

1.812 
556 

6.442 
4,444 

4,295 
9,918 



5,598 
7,531 



24. 743 
7,118 



6, S23 
21,729 
85, 243 
26. 857 

8,031 
25, 875 

3.808 
19, 838 



817 

646 

4,496 

3. 355 

2,031 

130 

70 
31 
183 



22 
115 

173 
2 

159 
599 
375 
811 
27 
1,707 
52 
1,775 



3,299 
3, 178 

10, 173 

9,697 

4,399 

759 

323 

85 

925 

1,445 

330 

1,049 

760 



333 

714 

1, 115 

1,388 

10 

1,154 

3,095 

3, 540 

3,780 

257 

5.628 



4,; 



871 
6,233 

8, 086 
15.389 

6', 317 

2,318 

643 

174 

2,054 

2,502 

1,242 
2,758 
1,777 

2,148 

1,571 
1,375 
4,276 
3,139 
42 

2,729 
7.133 
11,448 
7,974 
932 
10. 515 
929 
7,943 



22.1 
1.2 

3.9 
5.6 

2.8 
7.9 

1.0 
2.3 
2.6 



12.1 
29.3 
10.9 
41.7 

28.3 
47.8 



17.8 
15.3 
14.4 
32.5 

7.7 
10.6 
19.0 



4.4 
12.8 

4.5 
19.5 



18.3 
14.2 

4.2 
14.1 

3.2 
21.8 
10.5 
22.2 



31.9 



28.0 
55.4 
27.8 
63.0 
46.7 
68.7 
20.7 

35. 5 
31.3 
31.9 
56.3 

28.9 

27.8 
44.5 



20.9 
24.6 
17.3 
44.1 
28.4 

43.2 

32.8 
13.4 
29.7 
11.6 
40.6 
24.4 
40.0 



For males and females combined, the figures for the groups in 
which the largest number of arrests occurred during the first half of 
1950 are as follows: 

Number of 
Age: arrests 

21 17,577 

22 16,761 

23 15, 570 

19 15,538 

20 15, 169 

Criminal Repeaters 

An examination of the total arrest records examined during the first 
half of 1950 reflected that 241,900 or 60.1 percent represented persons 
who already had fingerprint arrest records on file at the FBI. For 
males, the percentage with prior records was 61.6 and for females, 
46.2. 

At age 15, the percentage with prior fingerprint records was 17.8 
and such percentages increased to 45.4 at age 20. 



68 
Race 

Most of the persons represented in this study were members of the 
white and Negro races. Members of the white race represented 293,- 
298 of the 402,383 arrest records received, while 103,667 were Negroes, 
3,312 were Indians, 405 Chinese, 156 Japanese, and 1,545 were repre- 
sentatives of other races. 



OFFENSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in part I and 
part II offenses, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 

Part I Offenses 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter includes all 
willful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 
Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or 
justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides excluded from this classification are 
limited to the following types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer 
in line of duty; (2) the killing of a hold-up man by a private citizen. (6) Man- 
slaughter by negligence includes any death which the police investigation estab- 
lishes was primarily attributable to gross negligence on the part of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — victim under 
age of consent), assault to rape, and attempted rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill ; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids. Does not 
include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, even though no 
force was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. Burglary followed by larceny 
is included in this classification and not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value; 
(b) under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article of value which 
is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven away 
and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Does not include taking 
for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized use by 
those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Part II Offenses 

8. Other assaults. — Includes all assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Includes offenses dealing with the making, 
altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is 
made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Includes all offenses of fraudulent conversion, 
embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Includes buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property as well as attempts to commit any of those offenses. 

(69) 



70 

12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — Includes all violations of regulations 
or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufac- 
turing of deadly weapons or silencers and all attempts to violate such statutes 
or regulations. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Includes sex offenses of a commer- 
cialized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as prostitution, keeping 
bawdy house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for immoral purposes. 

14. Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution and commercialized vice). — In- 
cludes offenses against chasity, common decency, morals, and the like. Includes 
attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of nonsupport, 
neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as 
unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of "drunkenness" (class 18) and "driving 
while intoxicated "(class 22), liquor-law violations, State or local, are placed in 
this class. Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all offenses of drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — -Includes all charges of committing a breach of the 
peace. 

20. Vagrancy.— Includes such offenses as vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, permitting, or engaging in 
gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Includes driving or operating any motor vehicle 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws. — Includes violations of regulations with 
respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to prevent accidents. 

24. Parking violations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor-vehicle laws. — Includes violations of 
State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and motor vehicles 
not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws for which 
no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as suspicious 
characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, who are released with- 
out formal charges being placed against them. 

o 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 






ISSUED BY THE 






FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 






WASHINGTON, D. C 




Volume XXI Number 2 


ANNUAL BULLETIN 


1950 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume XXI— Number 2 
ANNUAL BULLETIN, 1950 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




International Association of Chiefs of Police 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1951 



U. S. SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS 

AW 11 1951 

CONTENTS 



Page 

Summary of volume XXI, No 2 71-72 

Classification of offenses 72 

Reporting area 72-73 

Crime trends: 

Estimated number of major crimes (table 26) 74-75 

Urban cri me trends (tables 27-28) 76-82 

Rural crime trends (table 29) .. 83-84 

Monthly variations (table 30) . _ 85-87 

Crime rates: Urban crime rates (tables 31-34) _ 88-92 

Offenses in individual areas: 

Offenses in cities with more than 25,000 inhabitants (table 35) . _ 93-101 

Offenses in Territories and possessions (table 36) 102 

Supplemental crime data: 

Offense analysis (table 37) 103-104 

Value of property stolen by type of crime (table 38) 104-105 

Value of property stolen and value of property recovered (table 39) __ 105 
Data compiled from fingerprint records: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested (table 40) 106-107 

Age distribution of persons arrested (tables 41-42) _ 108-111 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records (table 43) 111-112 

Race distribution of persons arrested (table 44) 112 

Definition of part I and part II offense classifications 113-114 

Index to volume XXI 115-116 

(ii) 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. 
Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 



Volume XXI January 1951 Number 2 

SUMMARY 

Estimated Number of Major Crimes 

Every 5 minutes during 1950 someone in the United States was 
feloniously assaulted or killed. During each average day 146 persons 
were robbed and the cars of 468 others were stolen. With the passing 
of each day 1,129 places were entered by burglars and in addition 
every 30 seconds on the average throughout the year a larceny was 
recorded. 
Crime Trends 

The total volume of crime in 1950 was up 1.5 percent across the 
Nation with all individual offense classes showing increases except 
robbery. Murders and negligent manslaughters rose 0.4 and 9.2 
percent, respectively, while rape showed an increase of 1.2 percent 
and aggravated assault 2.7 percent. Other increases were burglary, 
0.6 percent; larceny, 1.9 percent; and auto theft, 4.7 percent. Robbery 
declined 10.0 percent from the 1949 figures. 
Monthly Variations 

A study of the trend in crime from month to month makes it clear 
that murders, aggravated assaults, and rapes are committed with 
greatest frequency during the summer months, while the general 
category of crimes against property shows a tendency to increase in 
frequency during the colder seasons. Negligent manslaughters, con- 
sisting largely of traffic fatalities, occur with greatest frequency during 
the winter. 
Property Recovered 

During 1950 the police recovered 92 percent of all stolen auto- 
mobiles. For other types of property, recoveries were effected as 
follows: Money, 12.0 percent; jewelry, 19.7 percent; furs, 6.4 percent; 
clothing, 16.5 percent; and miscellaneous property, 28.0 percent. 
Persons Arrested 

A study of the 793,671 fingerprint arrest records received at the 
FBI during 1950 reflected that more than 41 percent were arrests 
for major violations and age 21 predominated in the frequency ot 

(71) 



72 

arrests, followed by ages 22, 23, 24, and 25 in that order. Female! 
arrests constituted 9.6 percent of the total. 

t 
CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 

The police statistics herein concern local offenses only and in no| 
manner relate to crimes characterized as exclusively Federal. 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include those' 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to t In* 
police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting on 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be those 
most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (b) 
manslaughter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; 
burglary — breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. In other words, an attempted burglary 
or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been completed. Attempted murders, however, 
are reported as aggravated assaults. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the law-enforce- 
ment agencies of contributing communities and not merely arrests or 
cleared cases. Offenses committed by juveniles are included in the 
same manner as those known to have been committed by adults, 
regardless of the prosecutive action. Complaints which upon investi- 
gation are learned to be groundless are not included in the tabulations 
which follow. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of 
crime and criminal-law enforcement. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incom- 
plete or otherwise defective were excluded. 

In the last section of this bulletin may be found brief definitions 
of part I and II offense classifications. 

REPORTING AREA 

During 1950 one or more crime reports were received from 3,071 
city and village police departments, 2,115 county police agencies, 
15 State police, and 10 agencies in Territories and possessions of 
the United States, for a total of 5,211 contributors as compared with 
5,184 in 1949. 



73 

The 1950 census figures were used in compiling the crime data 
for this issue of the bulletin. For individual urban places prelim- 
,inary counts of population had been published by the United States 
Bureau of the Census but at the time the tabulations were prepared, 
complete 1950 population data for individual rural police jurisdictions 
were not available. 



CRIME TRENDS 

Estimated Number of Major Crimes 

Every 5 minutes during 1950 someone was feloniously assaulted or 
killed in the United States. Every day on the average 146 persons 
were held up and robbed and 468 others had their cars stolen. With 
the passing of each day 1,129 places were entered by burglars and in I 
addition every 30 seconds on the average throughout the year a I 
larceny was recorded. 

By the year's end the estimated number of serious crimes totaled 
1,790,030, an increase of 1.5 percent over the 1949 estimates. Increases 
were registered in each crime category except for robbery, where a 
10-percent decline was shown. Murders and negligent manslaughters 
showed increases of 0.4 and 9.2 percent, respectively, while other 
increases were as follows: Rape, 1.2 percent; aggravated assault, 2.7 
percent; burglary, 0.6 percent; larceny, 1.9 percent; and auto 
theft, 4.7 percent. 

While the estimated major crime total includes some larceny of- ' 
fenses involving property of relatively small value, such crimes as 
arson, embezzlement, carrying concealed weapons, and the like 
are not included. Thus the estimated total is considered conservative. 



Table 26. — Crime trends, urban and rural 
[Estimated number of major crimes in the United States 1949-50] 



Number of offenses 



Change 



Number Percent 



Total 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

Manslaughter by negligence 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggra va ted assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

(74) 



+26, 740 



+ 1. 



78, 

409, 

1.024. 

163, 



5, 330 
16, 580 
53, 230 
80. 950 
411,980 
. 044. 160 
170, 780 



+30 

+450 

+200 

-5, 890 

+2, 090 

. 2,580 

+ 19.640 

+7, 640 



+.4 
+9.2 
+1-2 
-10.0 
+2.7 

+•6 
+1.9 
+4.7 



75 




76 

Urban Crime Trends 

Urban crime as a total in 1950 remained practically unchanged as 
compared with the figures for 1949. The 2,069 cities used in the 
crime trend tabulations reported 1,040,249 part I offenses in 1950, 
representing an increase over those reported by the same cities in 
1949 of\>nly 0.4 percent. »The population represented by the report- j 
ing cities is 67,465,803, according to preliminary counts of the 1950 j 
census. 

Among the individual offense classes, manslaughter by negligence 
showed the heaviest increase, amounting to 15.4 percent, while other 
increases were murder, 2.3 percent; aggravated assault, 1.3 percent; 
larceny, 0.7 percent; and auto theft, 6.4 percent. Decreases were 
registered as follows: Robbery, 11.2 percent; burglary, 1.3 percent; 
and rape, 0.7 percent. 

For manslaughter by negligence, robbery, burglary, and auto theft 
the urban crime trend was fairly widespread. In manslaughter by 
negligence, for example, increases were registered in cities of all popu- 
lation groups except those with less than 10,000 inhabitants and in all 
geographic divisions except the Mountain States. Similarly, a decline 
in robberies was reported in cities of all population groups and in all 
sections of the country except the South Central States. Burglaries 
were down in cities of all sizes except those with 10,000 to 25,000 in- 
habitants and in all sections of the country except the Middle Atlantic 
and West South Central States, while auto theft offenses showed in- 
creases in all areas except the population groups under 25,000 and in 
the Pacific geographic division. 

For the other offense classes, the pattern was not uniform. For 
example, murders, which for all cities as a group showed an increase 
of 2.3 percent, varied in trend direction from a 10.1 percent decrease 
in the Mountain States to a 27.6 percent increase in the West North 
Central area. 

Among the various geographic divisions, the West South Central 
States reported the most pronounced increase in offenses, 12.4 per- 
cent, with increases registered in each offense category except aggra- 
vated assault. 

The data presented in table 27 subdivide the reported crime accord- 
ing to the population groups of the cities represent ed and in table 28 
these same cities are divided according to geographic division and 
State. The percent change is not indicated for the individual States 
inasmuch as the figures in many instances are so small that any per- 
centages based thereon might be misleading. 



Table 27. — Urban crime trends, 1949-50, by population groups 

[Offenses known to the police in 2,069 cities, total population 67,465,803, based on 1950 decennial census 
preliminary countsl 



Population group 



Murder 

and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 

negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



Auto 
theft 



Total: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Group I, 37 cities; popu- 
lation, 25,936,568: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Group II, 66 cities; popu- 
lation, 9,754,929: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Group III. 123 cities; pop- 
ulation, 8,697,121: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Group IV, 227 cities; pop- 
ulation, 8,008,787: 

1949 .-, 

1950 

Percent change 

Group V, 583 cities; pop- 
ulation, 9,116,165: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Group VI, 1,033 cities; 
population, 5,952,233: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 



1, 040, 249 
+0.4 



3,467 
+2.3 



2,268 
+ 15.4 



7,420 
7,365 
-0.7 



38, 646 
34, 308 
-11.2 



49, 391 
50.014 
+1.3 



244. 179 

241, 100 

-1.3 



592, 975 

597, 086 

+0.7 



456, 781 

457, 873 
+0.2 



171, 149 

172, 277 
+0.7 



135, 604 

136, 886 
+0.9 



112. 144 

111,422 

-0.6 



106, 708 

108. 473 

+1.7 



53, 948 
53,318 
-1.2 



1,736 
1,763 
+1.6 



603 

594 

-1.5 



363 
379 

+4.4 



254 

258 

+1.6 



275 

312 

+13.5 



159 

161 

+1.3 



958 
1,077 
+12.4 



358 

446 

+24.6 



249 

275 

+10.4 



201 

222 

+10.4 



110 

164 
+49.1 



1. 337 
4. 361) 
+0.7 

874 

866 

-0.9 



359 

417 

+16.2 



25,539 
22. 817 
-10.7 



4.S55 
4,401 
-9.4 



3,321 
2, 703 
-18.6 



-10.3 
1,823 



1,109 

932 

-16.0 



2s, 176 
28,004 
-1.7 



6, 739 
+10.5 



6, 255 
6, 430 
+2.8 



3. 7*1 
3, 944 
+4.3 



3. 045 
3, 159 
+3.7 



His. I IVI 

106, 542 

-1.4 



42, 521 
41,711 
-1.9 



1,484 
-0.7 



21,651 
24,417 
-1.0 



23, 642 
23, 810 
+0.7 



13,5*0 
13, 136 
-3.3 



211.312 

212,7115 

+0.6 



.19, 222 
+0.3 



sn. r,l7 
81.956 
+1.6 



71,493 
70, 934 
-0.8 



32. 334 
32.372 
+0.1 



98, 367 

104, 641 

+6.4 



46, 304 
50, 596 
+9.3 



16, 943 
18, 298 
+8.0 



12, 404 
13,022 
+5.0 



9,242 
9,392 
+1.6 



4,582 
4,478 
-2.3 



78 






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2 
Id 

Id 

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u 

2 

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03 

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CJ 




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o 


UJ 




U 


o 


1 


<« 


o 


8 




a> 


»— • 


M-! 


1 


o 





O) 







ig 

z 
ui 
o — ■ 

ae 

3 

« 

3 



o 



r 



£ 6 
2 § 

33 



(N 



f 



79 



Table 28. — Urban crime trends, 1949-1950, by geographic divisions and Stales 

[Offenses known to the police in 2,069 cities, total population 67,465,803, based on 1950 decennial census 
preliminary counts] 



Divisions and States 


Total 


Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Total, 2,069 cities; popu- 
lation, 67,465,803: 
1949 


1, 036. 334 

1, 040. 249 

+0.4 


3,390 

3,467 
+2.3 


1,966 
2,268 
+15.4 


7,420 
7,365 
-0.7 


38,646 
34, 308 
-11.2 


49, 391 
50,014 
+1.3 


244,179 
241,100 


592,975 

597,086 

+0.7 


98, 367 


1950 


104,641 


Percent change 


+6.4 


New England, 127 cities: 
population, 5,347,887: 

1949 

1950 


55, 425 

51 031 

-2.5 


59 

58 

-1.7 


160 

210 

+31.3 


290 

334 

+15. 2 


1,051 

-14.7 


663 

623 

-6.0 


IS, 783 
13, 485 
-2.2 


S3, 715 

32, 465 
-3.7 


5,704 


Percent change 


+4.5 


Connecticut, 19 cities; 
population, 993,979: 
1949 


11, 158 

9,885 

3.502 
3,488 

31.857 
31, 639 

1.871 
1,979 

6,014 
6,121 

1,023 
919 

98, 420 

97, 827 
-0.6 


15 
14 

7 
4 

33 
32 

1 
2 

3 
6 


20 

47 

6 

8 

109 

m 

2 

5 

23 
19 


41 
60 

9 
12 

198 
218 

15 
17 

23 
22 

4 
5 

760 

791 

+4-1 


213 

148 

36 
29 

688 
633 

10 
14 

102 

2 

3,503 
3,300 

-5.8 


236 
202 

17 
26 

327 
307 

13 

8 

79 

1 
1 

3,759 
4.188 
+11-4 


2,987 
2,696 

780 
721 

7. 663 
7,512 

452 
493 

1,666 
1,879 

235 
184 

27, 371 
28, 027 
+2.4 


6,679 

5,748 

2,362 
2,366 

19, 042 

18, 857 

1. 240 
1,310 

3, 684 
3, 549 

708 
635 

50, 965 

49. 289 
-3.3 


967 


1950 

Maine, 17 cities; popula- 
tion, 305,489: 
1949 . 


970 
285 


1950 . 


322 


Massachusetts, 59 cities; 
population, 3,150,907: 
1949 , 


3,797 


1950 


3,949 


New Hampshire, 13 cities; 
population, 247,824: 
1949 


13S 


1950 


130 


Rhode Island, 8 cities; 
population, 541,331: 
1949 


444 


1950 . 


496 


Vermont, 11 cities; popu- 
lation, 108,357: 
1949 


73 








93 


Middle Atlantic, 465 cities; 
population, 11,840,608: 
1949 


308 

312 

+1.3 


373 

399 

+7.0 


11,381 


1950 . 


11,521 


Percent change 


+1.2 


New Jersey, 119 cities; 
population, 2,676,918: 
1949 


25, 370 
25, 334 

32, 687 
31, 596 

40, 363 

40, 897 

273, 139 

2(18, 932 

-1.5 


77 
62 

48 

183 
191 

831 

776 

—6. 6 


94 
111 

29 
82 

250 
206 

359 

418 

+ 16. A 


194 
189 

194 
145 

372 

457 

2,577 
2, 345 
-9.0 


716 
694 

430 

372 

2,357 
2,234 

14,655 
12, 160 
-17.0 


1,173 
1,244 

726 
735 

1,860 
2,209 

12, 373 
12, 450 
' +0.6 


7,129 
7,568 

7,758 
7,598 

12, 484 
12, 861 

62, 018 
59, 614 


13, 243 
12, 615 

20, 271 
19, 280 

17, 451 
17, 394 

158, 307 

157, 750 

-0.4 


2,744 


1950 


2,851 


New York, 163 cities; pop- 
ulation, 3,762,066: 

1949 


3, 231 


1950 


3,325 


Pennsylvania, 183 cities; 
population, 5,401,624: 
1949 . 


5,406 


1950 


5,345 


East North Central, 507 
cities; population, 
18,150,008: 
1949 


22, 019 




23. 419 


Percent change 


+6.4 


Illinois, 129 cities; popu- 
lation, 5,794,816: 


71,053 
70, 839 

30, 986 
30, 059 

81,404 
81,254 


346 
310 

91 

149 
159 


95 
114 

46 

47 

72 
88 


938 
794 

151 
149 

958 
965 


7,308 
6,209 

941 
654 

3,430 
2,882 


4,758 
5,102 

805 
791 

4.497 
4,492 


18,588 
18, 420 

7,302 

7,272 

16,812 


32. 516 
32, 447 

18, 585 

18, 073 

49, 784 


6, 504 


1950 . . 


7,443 


Indiana, 69 cities; popu- 
lation, 1,926,575: 


3,068 


1950 


2,982 


Michigan, 95 cities, popu- 
lation, 3,796,408: 


5,702 


1950 


16, 230 50, 281 


6,157 



80 

Table 28. — Urban crime trends, 1949-1950, by geographic divisions and Slales- 

Continued 



Divisions and Slates 



Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 

slaugh 

ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 

glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Ohio, 139 cities; popula- 
tion, 4,862,738: 

1049 

1950 

Wisconsin, 75 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,769,471: 
1949 



West North Central, 243 
cities; populat ion, 
5,984,221: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 



Iowa, 56 cities; popula- 
tion, 1,043,019: 

1949 

1950 

Kansas, 45 cities; popula- 
tion, 787,616: 



1950 

Minnesota, 59 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,435,357: 

1949 

1950 

Missouri, 40 cities; popu- 
lation, 1,894,861: 

1949 

1950 

Nebraska, 22 cities; popu- 
lation, 516,706: 

1949 

1950 

North Dakota, 10 cities; 
population, 149,658: 

1949. 

1950 

South Dakota, 11 cities; 
population, 157,004: 

1949 

1950.- 

South Atlantic, i 206 cities; 
population, 7,170,962: 



1950 

Percent change 

Delaware. 5 cities; pop- 
ulation, 129,496: 

1949 

1950.: 

Florida, 36 cities; popula- 
tion, 1,217,995: 

1949 

1950 

Georgia, 29 cities; popula- 
tion, 966,639: 

1949 

L950 

Maryland, 15 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,130,018: 

1949 

1950 

North Carolina, 46 cities; 
population, 1,022,311: 



71,244 
67,415 



81,234 

82. 5>io 
+1.7 



174 

222 

+27.6 



1U 

153 
+6.3 



545 

553 

+1.6 



2, 792 
2,242 



2,472 
2. 452 
-0.8 



11.522 
11.993 



11,485 
12.175 



16. 084 
16, 076 



30, 868 
30, 674 



7,770 
7.953 



1,751 
2,013 



1,754 
1,706 



135, ',!>>, 

1:11*44 

-1.2 



15,136 
14, 536 



13, 760 
14,350 



19,612 
19,440 



1950 

South Carolina, 20 cities; 
population, 404,531: 



1950 7,122 

Includes the District of Columbia 



231 

V8 

+20.3 



1,465 
1,479 



4.187 
3.644 
-13.0 



2.150 
1.874 



3.420 
3.273 
-4.3 



2. 927 
2, 724 



15. 207 
IB, 813 
+4-0 



1,407 
1, 538 



1,192 
1. IS! 



4. 465 
4,643 



16.2.TJ 
14, K26 



3, 084 

2. see, 



IS. I HI I 
17.645 
-2.8 



2. -I'M 



2.733 
2,911 



3, 161 
3,118 



88,378 
Si, 134 

-3.8 



S.30S 
S.255 



3.1157 
3.(162 



2, 5S7 
2,717 



4,491) 
4, is:. 



81 

Table 28. — Urban crime trends, 1949-1950, by geographic divisions and States — 

Continued 



Divisions and States 



Murder 
and 


Man- 


non- 


slaugh- 


negli- 


ter 


gent 


by 


man- 


negli- 


slaugh- 


gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

a- ault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 

cenv — 
theft 



Virginia, .34 cities; popula- 
tion, 1,043,566: 

1949 

1950 

/West Virginia, 20 cities; 
population, 458,736: 

1949 

1950 

'East South Central, 83 
cities; population, 
2,998,617: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

i Alabama, 22 cities; popu- 
lation, 867,430: 

1949 

1950 

Kentucky, 24 cities; popu- 
lation, 756,622: 

1949 

1950 

Mississippi, 19 cities; pop- 
ulation, 398,522: 

1949 

1950 

Tennessee, 18 cities; popu- 
lation, 976,043: 

1949 

1950 

West South Central, 130 
cities; population, 
5,684,665: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Arkansas, 18 cities; popu- 
lation, 371,914: 

1949 

1950 

Louisiana, 20 cities; popu- 
lation, 1,106,427: 

1949 

1950 

Oklahoma, 25 cities; popu- 
lation, 781,387: 

1949 

1950 

Texas, 67 cities; popula- 
tion, 3,424,937: 

1949 

1950 

Mountain, 100 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,910,544: 

1949 

1950 

Percent change 

Arizona, 11 cities; popu- 
lation, 212,136: 

1949 - 

1950 

Colorado, 23 cities; popu- 
lation, 641,755: 

1949 

1950 

Idaho, 18 cities; popula- 
tion, 188,873: 

1949 



24, 513 
24, 063 



i'l, SI i 
45, 179 

-2.2 



+19.8 



122 

154 

+26. 2 



194 

241 
+24.2 



+2.7 



1,969 
2, 24S 



S. 872 

3, im 

-6.9 



12. i;s<; 
12. 227 
-3.2 



13. Hi!) 
13, 164 



12, 126 
12,290 



15,326 
14, 566 



4,282 
4,390 



14,480 
13,933 



92, 822 
104, 287 
+12.4 



546 
+9.4 



4,265 
4,477 



11,687 
13, 102 



14, 673 

15, 772 



62, 197 
70, 936 



45, 181 
46, 361 
+2.6 



69 

62 

-10.1 



16,458 
17,014 



197 

249 

+26.4 



+12.4 



2, 323 
2, 437 
+4.9 



1,335 
1,019 



4,489 

4, 252 



3, 232 
3, 300 



4, 537 

4,007 



1,125 
1,202 



3,742 
3, 718 



23, 133 
26, 331 
+13.8 



5, 7X2 
5,020 



7, 103 

fi, 758 



2, 270 
2, 251 



6, 644 
6.130 



52, 176 
58, (11)8 
+11.2 



1.999 
2.277 



64 

52 

■18.8 



228 
+9.1 



1.052 
1,011 
-3.9 



2, 033 
2,770 



645 

732 
■13.5 



2, 84 1 
3,169 



3, 792 
3, 957 



15,274 
17,911 



9. 729 
9,581 



35.5112 
39, 792 



29, 253 

30. 'SCO 
+S.8 



1,377 

1,257 



4,445 
4,688 



10, 284 
10,911 



82 



Table 28. — Urban crime trends, 



1949-1950, by geographic divisions and States — | | 
Continued 



Divisions and States 



Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 



by 

negll 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary— 

break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
cenv — 
theft 



Montana, 12 cities; popu- 
lation. 147,754: 

1949 

1950 

Nevada, 3 cities; popu 
lation, 60,143: 

1949 

1950 

New Mexico, 12 cities 
population, 210,675: 

1949 

1950 

Utah, 14 cities; popula- 
tion, 345,456: 

1949 

1950 

Wyoming, 7 cities; popu- 
lation, 103,752: 

1949 

1950 

Pacific, 208 cities; popu- 
lation, 8,378,291: 

1949 -- 

1950 

Percent change 

California, 148 cities; pop- 
ulation, 6,605,580: 

1949 

1950 

Oregon, 28 cities; popula 
tion, 654,748: 

1949 

1950 

Washington, 32 cities 
population, 1,117,963: 

1949 

1950 



2,962 
2,886 



2,073 
2, 175 



2,929 
3,402 



7,439 
7,531 



2,229 
2,304 



;?'«, ',0-, 

207, 198 

-0.6 



164, 749 
166, 560 



27, 807 
26,018 



316 

355 

+12. 3 



1.386 
1,411 
+1.8 



1,152 
1,212 



7. 759 
6,719 

-13.4 



6, 461 
5, 599 



44. 976 
43,056 

-4-3 



m,07s 

+1-4 



35, 597 
34, 380 



101.358 
1114,838 



10.105 
9,530 



17,761 
16,705 



395 
646 



19. 475 
19, U6 
-1.2 



2, S30 
2, 503 



83 




84 



Rural Crime Trends 

Rural crime as a total in 1950 went up 4.4 percent over the figures 
for 1949, with increases registered in 5 offense categories and decreases 
in 3. 

Aggravated assaults and burglaries rose 7.4 and 6.8 percent, 
respectively, and a 4.3 percent increase was shown in larceny offenses. 
Other rural crimes showing increases were rape, 3.8 percent, and 
manslaughter by negligence, 3.0 percent. Murders in the rural 
areas were down 2.6 percent from the 1949 figures and robberies 
declined 4.5 percent. Auto theft offenses showed very little change, 
decreasing only 0.6 percent. 

The rural crime trend figures are based on monthly reports received 
during 1949 and 1950 from 1,674 agencies policing a rural population 
of 34,617,887. In the absence of 1950 rural population figures at the 
time the tabulations were prepared, the rural area was defined as such 
on the basis of the 1940 decennial census, whereas all urban crime 
figures in this issue of the bulletin are based on preliminary counts 
from the 1950 census. Thus the rural area covered in the crime trend 
tabulations contains some population classified as urban under the 
1950 census classification, but it is not believed there is a duplication 
of reporting area to any significant extent. 



Table 29. — Rural crime trends, 1949-50 

[Offenses known as reported by 1,566 sheriffs, 97 rural village officers, and 11 State police. Total rural 
population 34,617,887, based on 1940 decennial census] 



Number of offenses 



Percent 

change 



Total 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

Manslaughter by negligence 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 



+4.4 



1,823 
1,847 
4,076 
6,595 
11,140 
5S.02S 
76, 451 
16, 601 



1,776 

1, 903 
4,231 
6,299 
11,959 
61, 992 
79, 760 
16, 495 



-2.6 

+3.0 
+3.8 
-4.5 
+7-4 
+6.8 
+4.3 
-.6 



85 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 
Offenses Known to the Police , 1950 



2,297 URBAN POLICE AGENCIES- TOTAL POPULATION 69,643,614 

(Offenses Against the Person) 



Murd< 



vtitsiiStbSi 



Negligent Manslaughter 




^ ™ « of >- z 2 -*Q It !-' * 



Rape 



■2. ™ <* 



iXil 




Aggravated Assault 



j iriiiiiis iy 



yy 



A/ 



V 



Figure 12. 



936733°— 51 3 



86 



Monthly Variations 

The effect of the seasons on the volume of crime is clearly indicated 
in the data presented in table 30. It is apparent that felonious assaults 
and murders occur with greatest frequency during the summer months 
and that crimes against property as a group show a tendency to 
increase in frequency during the winter. 

Negligent manslaughter offenses, which consist almost entirely of 
traffic fatalities where gross negligence is present, occur with the great- 
est frequency during the winter months when driving conditions are 
less favorable. The daily average for these offenses in December 
was nearly three-fourths greater than that during the month of 
June in 1950. 

Murders, rapes, and assaults during peak summer months exceeded 
by approximately one-third the frequency of such crimes during low 
months in the colder seasons. 

Among the property crimes, the greatest variation was seen for 
robbery offenses, which were 55 percent more frequent during January 
than during the month of June. 



Table 30. — Monthly variations, urban communities, 1950 

^Daily average, offenses known to the police in 2,297 cities, total population 69,643,614, based on 1950 decen- 
nial census preliminary counts] 



January- Decern ber 

January-March . . . 
April-June 

July-September. __ 
October-December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

l lecember 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



92 



9.84 
10.95 
9.85 



s. 79 

I 

10.00 

9.00 
10. 53 
10.87 
10.35 
11,63 

9. 42 

9.80 
10. 32 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



6.47 



6.67 
5.78 

7.46 



6.61 
7.39 
6.06 
6.10 
6. 13 
5.10 
5.61 
6.06 
6. 30 
6. 77 
6.70 
8.87 



Rape 



21.00 



19. 00 
22.11 
S3. 36 
19.49 



IS. 65 



19. 42 

22. 00 

22. 52 
21. SO 

23. 35 
24.84 
21.83 

20. 32 
19.33 
18.81 



Rob- 
bery 



116.6 
82.7 



124. 2 
120.5 
105. 4 
101.2 
83.4 
79.9 
84.9 
82.5 
80.5 
83. 3 
92.7 
121.1 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



141.1 



130. 
141.7 

154. 3 
138.0 



12S.3 
139. 2 
123.3 
135.7 
142.5 
147.0 
161.7 
146.7 
154.3 
143 6 
128.7 
141.5 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



765. 4 
665. 2 
648.2 

683. 7 



S03. 1 
768.9 
724.4 
713. 5 

659. 2 
623. 2 
661. 1 
634.1 
649.6 
666.7 

660. 9 
722.8 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



1.612.8 
1,708.5 

1,697.8 

t. 73.1. ! 



1.581.7 
1.623.6 
1,634.2 
1, 729. 9 
1, 709. 9 
1,685.6 
1. 658. 2 
1,714.7 
1, 721. 2 
1,832 1 
1, 680. 3 
1, 685. 5 



297.2 



9.90. 2 
283. 5 
285.4 
329. 1 



289. 5 
285. 6 
295.1 
290.1 
2S8.3 
272. 1 
279.4 
277.8 
299. 5 
324.7 
321.5 
340.9 



87 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 
Offenses Known to the Police , 1950 

2,297 URBAN POLICE AGENCIES - TOTAL POPULATION 69,643,614 

(Offenses Against Property) 



Robbery 



5 si sf'"| § § I J '£ : £■'•&!' 

3... g.. 3i. .< < n -J ....< ffi O- z s 




Larceny 



Burglary 



*, > . # ft . fr ? 7 ? 



8 § B 




m imnsg 





Auto Theft 




.mt.i suss?? 


1 

1 
< 

"is . 


»0 ■ 
30 - 
20 - 


1 
1 


K ■ 
30 

>0 



FlG¥RE 13. 



88 
CRIME RATES 

Urban Crime Rates 

As a general rule, cities with population in excess of 100,000 show 
the highest crime rates and the lower rates are reported by the small 
communities. Some exceptions to this are seen, however. For 
aggravated assault the number of offenses per 100,000 inhabitants in 
cities with population from 50,000 to 100,000 exceed the rate for j 
cities with population from 100,000 to 250,000. 

In compiling the crime rate tabulations which follow, the prelimi- 
nary counts of the 1950 census of the United States Bureau of the 
Census were used. Thus the following crime rates are not strictly 
comparable with those appearing in recent issues of this bulletin I 
where up-to-date population data were not available. 

A study of the crime rate tabulations, particularly those with the 
cities subdivided according to location, will indicate the undesirability 
of comparing the volume of crime between individual communities, 
since it is apparent from the following tabulations that the extent of 
crime may reasonably be expected to vary considerably among com- 
munities of different size and location. 

In order that police administrators and others interested in the crime 
problem may have available a yardstick with which to measure local ' 
crime conditions, the offenses reported by 2,297 cities representing an 
urban population of 69,643,614 are presented in tables 31-33 in the 
form of crime rates per 100,000 inhabitants for cities grouped accord- 
ing to size and by location. 

In compiling the crime rate data presented in the tables which follow, 
only those reports were used where an examination of them indicated 
they had been properly compiled in accordance with the standards of 
uniform crime reporting. The data presented in tables 31-33 are 
supplemented by that shown in table 34, which indicates the number 
of cities used in compiling the crime rate tables. 



89 

Table 31. — Urban crime rates, 1950, by population groups 

[Offenses known to the police and rate per 100,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on 1950 decennial 
census preliminary counts] 



Population group 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

2,297 cities; total population, 
69,643,614: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP I 

37 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 25,936,568: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP II 

67 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 9,882,796: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



123 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population , S,697,121 : 

Number of offenses known. 
Rate per 100,000 



238 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 8,360,623: 
Number of offenses known 
Rate per 100,000 



635 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 9,935,178: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100,000 



1,197 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 6,831,328: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100,000 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
nonneg 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 




1.763 
6.80 



192 
2.81 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



1. 077 
4.15 



457 
4.62 



Rape 



874 
8.84 



Rob- 
bery 



22. 81 7 
88.0 



4,444 
45.0 



1.822 
18.3 



1.147 
16.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2S.004 
108.0 



3.517 
35. 4 



2. 051 
30.0 



Burglary 
— break- 
ing or 
entering 



240. 839 
356.4 



42.024 
425.2 



31,484 
362. 



25. 567 
257. 3 



15. 451 
226.2 



Larcency 

—theft 



604. 779 
894.9 



99. 7'Jll 
1, 009. 7 



SI. 1)56 
942.3 



74.490 
891.0 



74, 199 
746.8 



30.S05 
538. 8 



Auto 

theft 



106. 816 
153.4 



18, 424 
186.4 



13,022 
149.7 



9.524 
95.9 



5,210 
76.3 



i The number of offenses and rates for burglary and larceny-theft are based on reports as follows: Groups 
I-VI, 2,296 cities, total population, 67,578,820; group I, 36 cities, total population 23,871,774. 



90 



Table 32. — Urban crime rates, 1.950, by geographic divisions and States 

[Offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on 1950 decennial census preliminary 

counts] 



Division and State 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burg- 
lary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 

theft 




5.11 


50.0 


73.4 


i 356. 4 


i 894. 9 153. 4 






1.07 


16.5 


11.7 


251.5 


600.3 109.6 






1.35 

1.42 
1.00 

.74 
1.09 


14.5 
10.0 
19.9 
5.6 
12.9 
.9 
27.6 


20.8 
8.0 
9.8 
3.3 

14.7 
.9 

35.4 


272.7 
232. 2 
238. 3 
192.8 
345.5 
169.8 
2 224. 9 


577.5 
724.8 
594.7 
496.7 
649.1 
586.0 
2 447. 4 






97.4 
123. 8 








91.4 
85.8 
96.6 






2.60 






2.27 
1.56 
3.46 
4.21 


25.8 
9.9 
40.4 
66.0 


46.3 
19.6 
40.4 
67.5 


277.4 

204.8 

3 204. 2 

325.8 


465. 7 

510 2 

3 360. 

861.4 


104.5 






97.7 
128.0 








5.26 
4.65 
4.11 
4.08 
.84 

3.70 


104. 9 
33. 5 
74.7 
45.8 
9.7 
40.1 


86.0 
40.0 
116.4 
38.2 
10.7 
53.4 


314.4 

375. 7 
422.4 
303. 1 
161.5 
292.2 


560.0 
921.2 
1,306.1 
874. 1 
801.4 
824.7 


128.3 










102.6 














1.30 
3.73 
1.64 
7.23 
3. 32 


11.4 
37.3 
27.7 
76.6 
24. 6 
4.5 
9.4 
50.1 


6.5 
28.1 
6.2 
141.0 
29.4 
3.2 
5.5 
218.7 


220.4 
364.6 
216.9 
370.8 
265.4 
272.9 
250.0 
430.9 


770.8 
932.8 
747.7 
830.6 
976.0 
927.1 
663. 3 
929.6 










106.2 














1.11 
10.97 


74.7 
192.0 








6.18 
11.86 

17. 79 
7. 59 

13.23 
9.41 

11. SI 
2. 119 

14.44 


36.3 
55.0 
40.0 
49.0 
30.8 
25.0 
64.6 
32.5 
53.7 


13.9 
106.6 

156. 8 
104. s 
451. 1 
107. 5 
212.4 
51.8 
119.7 


357.5 
665.6 
318.5 
240.7 
431.4 
395. 9 
509.9 
326. 4 
394.0 


1,013.9 

1, 148. 7 

773. 3 

566.7 

768. 2 

1,012.2 

1,257.5 

584.0 

662.5 












Maryland-.. 


284.9 












137.1 










18.96 
10. 26 
12.14 
14.68 
9.59 


40.3 
82.2 
23. 9 
56. 6 
42.2 


146.3 

114.6 
104. 7 
106.6 
74.7 


372. 9 
509.6 
286.0 
370. 9 

457.3 


617. 3 
852.6 
529.6 
614. 2 
1,001.8 










102. S 












Arkansas 


6.98 
9.87 
3. 76 
11.11 

3.10 


27.9 
42.9 
41.1 
43.9 
52.9 


84.2 
79.5 
36. 2 
80.8 
37.2 


329.7 
283.9 
499. 3 
517.4 
492.8 


581.3 

580.8 

1. 186. 7 

1,141.6 

1, 549. 5 


102.9 


Oklahoma. 


205.5 




224.2 






Arizona 


5. 42 
2.73 
4.07 
2.12 
7. id 
3. 1 1 
1.64 
2.78 
3.07 


78.2 
71.1 
34.6 
51.4 
72.0 
26.8 
26.5 
65.8 
79.3 


92.7 
29.1 
19.3 
41.9 
62.0 
40. 1 
18.9 
36.1 
59.6 


622.4 
614.6 
437.2 
350.9 

7io.3 

306. 1 
428.7 
354.8 
512.4 


2,138.0 
1,670.8 

1.423.4 
1,319.8 

2,117.9 

948.6 

1, 467. 3 

1 . 57S. 1 

1, 568. 1 


347.6 

199. 5 


Idaho 


166 : 

258.7 




335.7 




27!..". 


Utah 


160. 1 




178.8 




229.0 








3.21 

l.si 
2.98 


84.5 
49.8 
66.8 


29^6 
20.3 


522.4 
467. 5 

4S1.5 


1.590.5 
1.446.4 
1.510.5 


233. 




208.2 




218.3 







1 The rates for burglarv and larcenv are based on the report-; of 2, 290 eities with a total population of 
67,578,820. 

- The rates for burglary ami larceny are based on the reports <>f 504 cities with a total population of 
10,221,704. 

' The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 210 cities 

1 Includes the report of the District of Columbia. 



91 



Table 33. — Urban crime rates, 1950, by geographic divisions and population groups 

[Offenses known per 100.000 inhabitants. Population figures based on 1950 decennial census preliminary 

counts] 



Division and group 



Murder, 






Bur- 






nonneg- 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 


glary- 


Lar- 


Auto 

theft 


ligent 


vated 


breaking 


ceny- 


man- 


assault 


or enter- 


theft 


slaughter 






ing 






5.11 


50.0 


73.4 


i 356. 4 


i 894. 9 


153.4 


1.07 


16.5 


11.7 


251.5 


600.3 


109.6 


1.39 


34.0 


27.8 


161.1 


616.0 


216. 1 


1.45 


18.5 


14. 9 


328.7 


644.0 


122.8 


.24 


13.8 


7.2 


250.6 


649.7 


94.0 


1.76 


12.2 


4.9 


252.7 


618.4 


75.9 


.48 


6.2 


4.3 


171.4 


419.7 


45.8 


.68 


4.8 


6.2 


231.7 


434. 7 


55.7 


2.60 


27.6 


35.4 


2 224. 9 


2 447. 4 


96.6 


4.77 


55.3 


59.8 


3 292. 5 


3 432. 1 


131.8 


1. 89 


20.7 


30.7 


251.8 


523.8 


109.7 


2.24 


16. 7 


33.7 


278.2 


492.9 


106.4 


1.06 


12.5 


22.7 


207.9 


538.2 


72.9 


1.61 


111.7 


17.3 


161.3 


399.1 


62.2 


.72 


9.7 


14.7 


163.1 


340.8 


51.2 


4.21 


66.0 


67.5 


325.8 


861.4 


128.0 


6.15 


110. 2 


107.8 


375.1 


907.4 


151.8 


4.97 


47.1 


79.4 


374. 3 


1, 123. 6 


157.0 


3. 03 


31. 1 


46.9 


326.3 


893. 2 


128.1 


1.96 


22.6 


16.4 


273. 5 


867.1 


108.8 


1.51 


17.0 


13.7 


232.8 


746.3 


78.7 


1.32 


14.7 


8.1 


21.3. 


486.1 


65.9 


3.70 


40.1 


53.4 


292.2 


824.7 


134.5 


6.61 


80.0 


127.4 


357.3 


897.0 


171.0 


4.37 


37.5 


24.1 


356.4 


1,012.5 


211.8 


1.66 


21.4 


25.6 


321.0 


1, 174. 


161.0 


2.17 


13.4 


7. 9 


271.1 


845.2 


93. 2 


1.38 


13.6 


7. 3 


209. 


651.0 


72.4 


1.49 


10.6 


10.1 


169.4 


408.6 


57.9 


10.97 


50.1 


218.7 


430.9 


929.6 


192.0 


12.01 


72.5 


290.8 


355.8 


885.0 


252.8 


13. 65 


79.6 


181.4 


679.1 


1,343.7 


258.1 


10.58 


36.6 


230.0 


449.3 


962.7 


168.4 


7. 93 


24.2 


206.1 


419.8 


958.4 


151.3 


9.90 


22.0 


162.3 


339.6 


631. 8 


113.9 


9.09 


27.0 


146.9 


268. 1 


542.4 


90.3 


14.44 


53.7 


119.7 


394.0 


662.5 


193.1 


14.06 


93.1 


105. 3 


512.8 


881.6 


254.6 


19.69 


48.5 


169.1 


442.5 


634.0 


246.6 


11.40 


34.6 


127. 2 


446.4 


841.4 


160.7 


11.35 


31.4 


157. 6 


242.5 


579.6 


151.7 


15.68 


27.9 


92.8 


303.9 


499.5 


123.3 


10.25 


20.5 


46. 1 


210.2 


215. 3 


71.8 


9.59 


42.2 


74.7 


457.3 


1,001.8 


207.1 


13. 21 


58.4 


84.3 


590.1 


1, 143. 7 


268.5 


7.26 


48.8 


60.6 


502.4 


1, 174. 4 


233.9 


10.85 


46.9 


119.5 


428.5 


1,297.5 


238.6 


4.32 


14.4 


73.9 


318.7 


795. 6 


125.2 


6.95 


17.8 


46.0 


264.9 


585.4 


100.5 


6.69 


15.4 


55.9 


218.0 


404.8 


72.2 


3.10 


52.9 


37.2 


492.8 


1, 549. 5 


224.2 


3.39 


101.7 


36.6 


796.6 


1,895.1 


247.8 


4.18 


51.5 


48.4 


565. 9 


1, 880. 8 


273. 


1.30 


38. 3 


35.1 


315.1 


1, 359. 1 


419.0 


3. 75 


52.5 


52.2 


455.9 


1. 749. 5 


269.5 


2.11 


22.5 


21.4 


358.9 


1.374.0 


160.3 


2.99 


39.6 


30.9 


369. 3 


1,038.0 


114.3 


3.07 


79.3 


59.6 


512.4 


1, 568. 1 


229.0 


3.74 


107.9 


91.2 


543.7 


1,479.3 


266.8 


2.66 


78.1 


32.8 


516. 2 


1, 635. 6 


223.5 


2.89 


67.2 


49.5 


588.3 


1 791 3 


205.1 


2.30 


42.5 


19.3 


473.4 


1,637.3 


167.8 


2.06 


36.4 


21.9 


429.2 


1.684.5 


179.9 


2.19 


29.0 


18.0 


395.5 


1,441.8 


182. 



Total- 



New England 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

Middle Atlantic 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

East North CentraL. 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V__ 

Group VI 

West North CentraL 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V._ 

Group VI. 

South Atlantic < 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

East South CentraL. 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

West South CentraL 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 

Mountain 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI... 

Pacific 

Group I 

Group II 

Group III 

Group IV 

Group V 

Group VI 



1 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 2,296 cities with a total population of 
67,578,820. 

2 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 504 cities with a total population of 
10,221,704. 

3 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 4 cities. 
* Includes the report of the District of Columbia. 



92 



Table 34. — Number of cities in each population group, geographic division, and 
State represented in the urban crime rate tabulations (tables 81-33) 





Total 




Population 


group 






Division and State 


Over 

250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 
to 

100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total: 

Population, 09,643.614 


2.297 


37 


67 


123 


238 


635 


1,197 






New England: 


142 


1 


11 


17 


25 


37 


51 








21 
21 
64 
16 
9 
11 

505 




4 


2 

10 
1 
3 


5 
2 

13 
2 
2 
1 

38 


4 
8 
16 
6 
2 
1 

134 


6 






10 




1 


6 


18 


New Hampshire 


7 




1 


1 






9 


Middle Atlantic: 

Population, 1 2,286, 408 


5 


12 


22 


294 




128 
166 
211 

546 


1 
2 
2 

9 


4 
4 
4 

10 


8 
6 
8 

30 


13 

15 

10 

65 


37 
43 
54 

143 


65 




96 




133 


East North Central: 

Population, 18,511. 8S7 


289 




143 
76 
103 

147 
77 

273 


1 

1 

5 

4 


1 
4 
2 
3 


10 

4 

5 

4 

9 


13 
10 
10 
20 
12 

18 


41 
15 
30 
42 
15 

71 


77 




42 




53 




72 




45 


West North Central: 

Population, 6,181,695 


5 


166 


Iowa 


61 
52 
63 
45 
26 
11 
15 

233 




2 

1 


4 

1 


2 

2 

4 

...... 

29 


10 
19 
14 
13 

8 
3 

4 

59 


39 






28 




2 
2 


44 




2 

1 


24 




1 


16 






6 








1 
19 


9 


South Atlantic: 

Population, 7,395,553 


3 


8 


115 




5 
1 
43 
32 
16 
52 
23 
40 
21 

108 




1 












1 












3 

1 


2 
3 


9 
3 
2 

5 

5 

4 

14 


9 

8 

6 
16 

5 
10 

5 

28 


20 




1 

1 


16 




7 




1 


5 
3 
3 
3 

4 


25 












2 


20 






9 


l i t South Central: 

Population, 3,247.540 


3 


5 


54 


Alabama 


29 

32 
23 

24 

147 


\ 


2 


1 
2 

1 


3 
4 
5 
2 

15 


8 
6 
8 
6 

55 


14 
19 


Mississippi 






1 
5 


3 
8 




West South Central: 

Population, 5,860,844.. _ 


9 


55 




21 
22 
27 

77 

119 




1 
2 
2 
3 

2 




4 
4 
3 

4 

12 


8 
14 
27 

24 


10 




1 




7 






8 




4 
1 


9 
2 




Mountain: 


78 








12 

26 
20 
14 

5 

16 
18 

8 

224 




1 




1 
2 
3 

2 

1 

22 


...... 

6 
3 
1 
2 

4 

84 


10 




1 








































1 

1 




Utah 




1 








3 


Pacific: 


6 


6 


11 










156 
29 
39 


4 
1 


4 


11 


15 
2 
5 


65 






18 


\\ ashington 


2 




20 



OFFENSES IN INDIVIDUAL AREAS 

Offenses in Individual Cities With More Than 25,000 Inhabitants 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the period of January-December, 1950, is shown in table 35. The 
compilation includes the reports received from police departments in 
cities with more than 25,000 inhabitants. Police administrators and 
other interested individuals will probably find it desirable to compare 
the crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown in tables 
31, 32, and 33 of this publication. Similarly, they will doubtless 
desire to make comparisons with the figures for their communities for 
prior periods, in order to determine whether there has been an increase 
or a decrease in the amount of crime committed. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 
cities because the differences in the figures may be due to a variety of 
factors. Such comparisons are not desirable even though the figures 
for individual communities are converted into terms of the number of 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. ~ 

The following is a list of some of the factors which affect the amount 
of crime in the community: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 

The composition of the population with reference particularly to 
age, sex, and race. 

The economic status and activities of the population. 

Climate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 

The number of police employees per unit of population. 

The standards governing appointments to the police force. 

The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law-enforcement problems. 

The degree of efficiency of the local law-enforcement agency. 

The figures presented in the following tabulation are those reported 
by the individual police departments in the cities represented without 
reducing the data to crime rates (number of offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants). 

In considering the volume of crime committed locally, it is generally 
more important to determine whether the figures for a given com- 
munity show increases or decreases rather than to ascertain whether 
they exceed or fall short of those for some other individual community, 
and it should be remembered that the amount of crime committed in a 
community is not solely chargeable to the police but is rather a charge 
against the entire community. 

In publishing these figures the FBI acts as a service agency. The 
figures published are those submitted by the contributing agencies. 

(93) 



94 

Table 35. — Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 25,000 in 

population 

[Based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts. Included in this listing are communities classified as 
urban places under either the 1940 or 1950 census] 



City 



Abilene. Tex__. 
Abington, Pa- 
Akron, Ohio. . 
Alameda. Calif 
Albany, Ga 



Albany, N. Y 

Albuquerque, N. M«. 

Alexandria, La 

Alexandria, Va 

Alhambra, Calif 



Aliquippa, Pa.. 
Allentown, Pa_ 
Alliance, < > 1 1 i* . 

Alton, 111 

Altoona, Pa 



Amarillo, Tex 

Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Anderson, Ind 

Ann Arbor, Mich_ 
Anniston, Ala 



Appleton, AVis.. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Arlington, Va 

Asheville, N. C_ 
Ashland, Ky 



Athens, Ga 

Atlanta, Ga 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

Auburn, N. Y 

Augusta, Ga 



Aurora, 111 

Austin, Tex 

Bakersfield. Calif. 

Baltimore, Md 

Bangor, Maine 



Barberton, Ohio 

Baton Rouge, La 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

Bay City, Mich 

Bayonne, N. J 



Beaumont, Tex. 
Belleville, 111.... 
Belleville, N. J.. 
Bellingham, Wa 
Belmont, Mass 



Beloit, AVis 
Belvedere, Calif 
Berkeley, Calif 

Berwyn, 111 

Bessemer, Ala 



Bethlehem, Pa 

Beverly, Mass 

Beverly Hill . < ':. I il 

Billings, Mom 
Biloxi, Miss 



Binghamton, N. Y 

Birmingham, Ala 

Bloomfleld, X. .1 

Bloomington, 111. 

Bloomington, Ind 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 



A<jL'ra- 
vated 

assault 




Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



1,067 

109 
147 



37 

1,496 

423 

17 



Larceny— theft 



$5n and Under 
over $50 



18 
225 
188 

62 

42 
1.090 
435 
29 
66 



Only 5 months reeei 

29 

79 

148 

117 



1,212 

102 
146 
96 



30 


137 


33 


3,8 


118 


309 


111 


201 


127 


677 


1,087 


1,544 


58 


194 


83 


229 


51 


246 



95 



Table 35. — Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 25,000 in 
pop ulation — Continued 



City 



Boise, Idaho 

Boston, Mass 

Bremerton, Wash- 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Bristol, Conn 



Brockton, Mass.. 
Brookline, Mass.. 
Brownsville, Tex 
Buffalo, N. Y.._. 
Burbank, Calif... 



Burlington, Iowa.. 

Burlington, Vt 

Butte, Mont 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Camden, N. J 



Canton, Ohio 

Cedar Rapids, Iowe 

Champaign, 111 

Charleston, S. C._. 
Charleston, W. Va. 



Charlotte, N. C 

Charlottesville,. Va.. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chester, Pa 



Chevenne, Wyo.. 

Chicago, 111 

Chicopee, Mass.. 

Cicero, 111 

•Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Clarksburg, W. Va 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 

Clifton, N.J 

Clinton, Iowa 



Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Columbia, Mo 

Columbia, S. C 

Columbus, Ga 

Columbus, Ohio 



Compton, Calif 

Concord, N. H 

Corpus Christi, Te\ 
Council Bluffs, Iowa 
Covington, Ky 



Cranston, R. I 

Cumberland, Md 

Cuvahoga Falls, Ohio. 

Dallas, Tex 

Danville, 111 



Danville, Va 

Davenport, Iowa 

Dayton, Ohio 

Daytona Beach, Fla. 
Dearborn, Mich 



Decatur, 111 

Denver, Colo 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

Detroit, Mich 

Dubuque, Iowa... 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 




Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



165 
1. 274 



65 

267 
244 
116 
1,050 
362 

47 
73 
143 
184 
492 

405 
127 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



84 
1.913 
45 
321 
21 



444 
1,590 
1,048 

111 
352 
358 
276 





Only 


1 month received 




29 


75 


298 


134 


538 


76 


110 


424 


(') 


1,266 


40 


562 


822 


206 


1.016 


7 


25 


49 


56 


272 


• 67 


87 


557 


(') 


360 


25 


1 


83 


50 


68 


19 


56 


104 


31 


70 


25 


14 


129 


59 


755 


5,483 


4,339 


12. 480 


8,130 


10, 924 


5 


1 


43 


32 


91 


49 


80 


174 


87 


189 


325 


300 


1, 270 


1.002 


2,847 


6 




65 


31 


48 


589 


345 


2,015 


686 


10. 074 


5 


1 


117 


27 


199 


12 


3 


134 


77 


132 




4 


63 


38 


262 


2 


1 


53 


129 


598 


1 


8 


37 


33 


79 


37 


154 


528 


383 


978 


7 


14 


264 


132 


259 


349 


244 


2,542 


(') 


4,289 


32 


12 


439 


34 


799 


1 


2 


56 


40 


179 


42 


224 


769 


396 


1,077 


11 


6 


152 


104 


474 


37 


87 


273 


117 


370 


5 


3 


132 


38 


175 


3 


1 


126 


13 


146 


4 




79 


32 


128 


350 


626 


3,502 


920 


7, 438 


12 


4 


174 


38 


162 


3 


41 


131 


71 


188 


10 


3 


194 


86 


853 


106 


232 


871 


426 


2,631 


9 


42 


267 


157 


328 


49 


23 


522 


368 


2,349 


13 


6 


212 


74 


458 


425 


151 


3,299 


1,454 


6,439 


22 


7 


532 


265 


1,305 


2,320 


3,640 


9,474 


3,021 


23, 367 


1 




41 


53 


174 



See footnote at end of table. 



96 



Table 85. — Number of offenses known to the police, 
-population — Continued 



1.9.50, cities over 25,000 in 



Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



Duluth, Minn 

Durham, N. C 

East Chicago, Ind 

East Cleveland, Ohio, 
East Hartford, Conn.. 



Easton, Pa 

East Orange, N. J 

East Providence, R. I 

East St. Louis, 111 

Eau Claire, Wis.—:.. 



Elgin, 111 

Elizabeth, N. J 

Elkhart, Ind 

Elmira, N. Y 

El Paso, Tex 



Elvria, Ohio.. 
Enid. Okla... . 

Erie, Pa 

Euclid, Ohio. 
Eugene. Oreg. 



Evanston, 111 

Evansville, Ind... 

Everett. Mass 

Everett. Wash... 
Fairmont, W. Va. 



Fall River, Mass 

Fargo, N. Dak 

Fayetteville, N. C._. 

Fefndale, Mich 

Fitchburg, Mass 



Flint, Mich 

Fond du Lac, Wis 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Fort Smith, Ark 



Fort Wavne, Ind 

Fort Worth, Tex.... 
Framingham, Mass. 

Fresno, Calif 

Gadsden, Ala 



Gainesville, Fla. 
Galesburg, 111.... 
Galveston, Tex_. 
Garfield, N.J... 
Gary, Ind 



(ilendale, Calif 
< I loin-ester, Mass 
Grand Forks, X. Dak 
( Imiid Kapids, Mich 
Granite City, ill 



i ;h al Falls, Mont 
Green Hay, Wis.... 
Greensboro, N. C 
Greenville, Miss... 
Greenville, S. C.... 



Greene Ich, ('cum. 
Hackensaek, X. .( 
Eagei town, Md 
Hamilton, Ohio... 
Hamilton, X. .1 



I [ammond, Ind 
Hamtramck, Mich 
Harrisburg, Pa 
Hartford, < !onn 
Hattiesburg, Miss 



29 
34 

112 
14 

121 

192 
274 
91 
(17 
41 

162 
60 
0) 



624 

70 22 

X T o reports received 
8 
53 



217 


• 142 


366 


177 


38 


131 


382 


302 


905 


, 360 


410 


3,505 


39 


11 


66 


801 


287 


1,367 


97 


46 


144 


88 


38 


211 


51 


24 


126 


575 


619 


799 


38 


28 


101 


582 


484 


897 


403 


190 


845 


96 


55 


72 


150 


48 


362 


691 


238 


2,100 


108 


14 


83 


lit 


120 


457 


190 


41 


149 


478 


242 


456 


31 


89 


92 


320 


237 


484 


35 


23 


94 


94 


76 


126 


134 


44 


222 


212 


169 


234 


106 


56 


178 


278 


210 


534 


145 


131 


271 


:;io 


145 


335 


706 


337 


791 


108 


100 


96 



See fool note a1 end of table. 



97 

Table 35. — Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 25,000 in 
population — Continued 



City 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


1 


1 


6 


1 


2 




10 


11 


41 


37 


14 


196 


9 


.25 


4 




40 


82 


8 


49 


318 


233 


25 


76 


25 


3 


5 


14 


4 




203 


242 


22 


10 


4 




18 


...... 


2 


1 


9 


51 


6 


47 


11 


13 


164 


158 


7 


2 



Bur- 
glary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Haverford, Pa 

Haverhill, Mass 

Hazleton, Pa 

Hempstead, X. V 

Highland Park, Mich. 



High Point. X. C. 
Hoboken, N. J_... 

Holyoke, Mass 

Honolulu, T. H— . 
Hot Springs, Ark 



Houston, Tex 

Huntington, W. Va 

Huntington Park, Calif. 

Hutchinson, Kans 

Independence, Mo 



Indianapolis, Ind_. 
Inglewood, Calif... 
Iowa City, Iowa... 
Irondequoit, X. Y. 
Irvington, N. J 



Ithaca, N. Y 

Jackson, Mich. 

Jackson, Miss. - 
Jackson, Tenn... 
Jacksonville, Fla. 



Jamestown, NT. Y__ 
Jersey City, X. J— 
Johnson City, Tenn. 

Johnstown, Pa 

Joliet, 111 



Toplin, Mo 

Kalamazoo, Mich__. 

Kankakee, 111 

Kannapolis, X. C 

City, Kans. 



City, Mo. 
Kearny, N. J... .. 

Kenosha, Wis 

Kingston, X. Y... 
Knoxville, Tenn.. 



Kokomo, Ind 

Lackawanna, N. Y_ 

La Crosse, Wis 

LaFayette, Ind 

Lafayette, La 



Lake Charles, La_ 

Lakeland, Fla 

Lakewood, Ohio_. 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lansing, Mich 



Laredo, Tex 

Lawrence, 

Lawton, Okla 

Lebanon, Pa 

Lewiston, Maine. 



Lexington, Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Xebr 

Lincoln Park, Mich. 
Linden, N. J 



Little Rock, Ark._. 
Lockport, N. Y___. 
Long Beach, Calif. 

Lorain, Ohio 

[i 3, Calif 



2,364 
327 
22 
49 
256 

35 

445 

179 
1,446 



136 

126 
30 
45 

1,323 

210 
50 
2 
92 

7 
147 
129 
29 



79 25 

Complete data not received 



15 


5 


4 


5 


10 


6 


22 


5 


8 


20. 


7 


12 


1 


132 


133 


60 


460 


487 


8 


3 


2 






3 


74 


523 


14 


4 


5 


36 


1 


1 


1 


12 


1 




5 


23 


8 


33 


11 


1 


12 


13 


8 


9 


6 


16 


19 


5 



Only 1 month received 

Only 6 months ivivived 



5 


2 


50 


133 


7 


15 


7 


55 


10 




7 


7 


47 


7 


3 


1 


224 


139 


17 


29 


2,280 


2,642 



230 
56 
177 
602 

143 

46 

155 

2, 656 

53 

4,872 
359 
469 
400 
234 

3,003 
610 
152 

55 
277 

130 
455 

575 

189 

1,971 

155 



90 


59 


831 


139 


78 


221 


123 


66 


254 


211 


254 


319 


222 


152 


724 


32 


29 


72 


43 


(') 


130 


582 


157 


986 


1,641 


1,744 


3, 463 


46 


40 


115 


92 


47 


218 


49 


56 


95 


522 


409 


771 


138 


40 


176 


56 


21 


99 


134 


57 


544 


134 


78 


476 


84 


72 


99 


79 


109 


171 


169 


100 


139 


139 


35 


212 


143 


59 


419 


249 


96 


703 


120 


30 


251 


193 


55 


327 



42 


37 


312 


399 


285 


622 


194 


151 


300 


202 


162 


993 


93 


127 


455 


147 


37 


157 


539 


(') 


1,127 


39 




81 


1,423 


(») 


2.941) 


103 


88 


160 


10,610 


11,210 


19, 120 



Sir footnote at end of table. 



98 

Table 35.- -Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 25,000 in 
population — Cont ii 1 1 1< h 1 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
Iigent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



•.Ml:,,,. I ! mler 

over $60 



Louisville, Ivy.. 
Lowell, Mass... 
Lower Merion, ; 
Lubbock, Tex... 
Lynchburg, Va. 



Lynn, Mass 

Lynwood, Calif. 

Macon, Ga 

Madison, Wis... 
Maiden, Mass.. 



Manchester, N. 11 
Manitowoc, Wis... 

Mansfield, Ohio .... 

Marion, Ind 

Marion, Ohio 



Mason City, Iowa. 

Massillon, Ohio 

May wood, 111 

McKeesport, Pa._. 
Medford, Mass 



Melrose, Mass.. 
Memphis, Tenn. 

Meriden, Conn. 
Meridian, Miss.. 
Miami, Fla 



Miami Beach, Fla.. 
Michigan City, Ind. 
Middletown, Conn. 
Middletown, Ohio.. 
Milwaukee, Wis 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
Mishawaka, Ind.l.. 

Mobile, Ala 

Moline, 111 

Monroe, La 



Montclair, N. J 

Montgomery, Ala 

Morgantown, W. Va.. 
Mount Lebanon, Pa.. 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 



Muncie, Ind 

Muskegon, Mich. 
Muskogee, Okla. . 
Nashua, N. H... 
Nashville, Tenn 



New Albany, Ind... 

Newark, N. J 

Newark, Ohio 

New Bedford, Mass. 
New Britain, Conn. 



\r\v Brunswick, N. J.. 

Newburgb, N. Y 

New Castle, Pa 

Nev Haven, Conn 

New Kensington, Pa... 



New London, Conn 
New Orleans, La... 
Newport, K > 

New port, I!. I 

Newport News, Va 



New Bochelle, N. Y 

Newton, Mass 

New York, N. V . 
Niagara Falls, N. V 

Norfolk, Va 



2, 674 
282 
113 

278 
140 

298 
149 
341 
211 
114 

97 
48 
121 
40 
79 



Only 7 months received 



6 


3 


14 




27 


47 


4 


2 


3 


14 


381 


563 


9 


11 


4 


8 


26 


LIS 


3 


24 


9 


4 



A\ 



13 I 84 

!91 | 844 



98 


62 


184 


90 


38 


119 


679 


375 


871 


37 


29 


79 


133 


54 


186 


!,074 


1,390 


2, 108 


90 


16 


126 


97 


51 


212 


221 


157 


545 


98 


52 


104 


•_'7. r . 


159 


589 


a not 


v,vi\ ed 




260 


137 


273 


,648 


1,132 


2, 272 



99 



Table 35. — Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 25,000 in 
-population — Continued 



City 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 


Larceny— theft 


glary— 






breaking 
or enter- 


$50 and 


Under 


ing 


over 


$50 


49 


66 


154 


29 


13 


47 


30 


18 


59 


94 


38 


89 


114 


49 


206 


101 


(') 


243 


93 


42 


115 


35 


18 


33 


2,614 


441 


6,309 


132 


61 


202 


49 


24 


141 


78 


59 


79 


243 


151 


1,080 


1,701 


887 


3,026 


767 


420 


2, 365 


113 


36 


98 


257 


167 


400 


88 


68 


55S 


84 


23 


157 


143 


76 


331 


18 


(') 


33 


59 


111 


577 


76 


25 


34 


71 


32 


144 


38 


56 


135 


621 


355 


1,183 


146 


100 


281 


582 


132 


549 


238 


84 


433 


303 


120 


542 


416 


176 


911 


42 


(') 


153 


151 


160 


525 


5,868 


2,716 


2, 450 


643 


441 


2.074 


139 


125 


140 


2,142 


770 


693 


124 


28 


194 


112 


116 


331 


116 


76 


58 


200 


76 


558 


383 


157 


330 


68 


41 


248 


122 


59 


419 


218 


197 


822 


. 2, 188 


1,376 


4,543 


212 


78 


377 


376 


192 


460 


131 


49 


343 


1,055 


418 


1,435 


88 


12 


530 



Norman, Okla 

Norristown, Pa 

Northampton, Mass 

North Bergen, N. J 

North Little Rock, Ark. 



Norwalk, Conn_ 
Norwood, Ohio_ 

Nutlev, N. J 

Oakland. Calif.. 
Oak Park, 111... 



Oak Ridge. Term 

Odessa, Tex 

Ogden, Utah 

Oklahoma City. Okla. 
Omaha, Nebr 



Orange, N. J 

Orlando, Fla 

Oshkosh, Wis... 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Owensboro, Ky. 



Paducah, Ky 

Palo Alto, Calif 

Panama City, Fla... 
Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Parma, Ohio 



Pasadena, Calif.. 

Passaic, N. J 

Paterson, N. J.._ 
Pawtucket, R. I. 
Pensacola, Fla... 



Peoria, 111 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Petersburg, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Phoenix, Ariz 



Pine Bluff, Ark_. 
Pittsburgh, Pa... 
Pittsfield, Mass.. 
Rlainfield, N. J_. 
Pocatello, Idaho. 



Pomona, Calif 

Pontiac, Mich 

Port Arthur, Tex__ 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Portland, Maine... 



Portland, Oreg 

Portsmouth, Ohio... 

Portsmouth, Va 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Providence, R. I 



Provo, Utah.. 
Pueblo, Colo.. 

Quincy, 111 

Quincy, Mass. 
Racine, Wis.. 



Ralriuh, N. C 

Rapid City, S. Dak... 
Reading, Pa 

Redondo Reach, Calif. 
Redwood City, Calif.. 



Reno, Nev 

Revere, Mass 

Richmond, Calif. 
Richmond, Ind_. 
Richmond, Va... 



9 


7 


14 


2 


14 


5 


23 


141 


1 


3 


14 


18 


8 


3 


5 


7 


34 


17 


10 


4 


56 


10.3 


14 


20 


179 


275 



No reports received 



78 


55 


256 


219 


64 


524 


256 


93 


7.38 


267 


261 


515 


61 


47 


104 


332 


103 


483 


172 


18 


233 


93 


23 


445 


287 


254 


620 


137 


57 


95 


480 


190 


2,272 


75 


65 


107 


,643 


774 


2,784 



See footnote at end of table. 



100 



Table 35. — Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 
population — Continued 



City 



Murder, 
nonneg- 

ligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assail II 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50and Under 
over $50 



Riverside, Calif. _. 
Roanoke, Va 
Rochester, Minn.. 
Rochester, N. Y_. 

Rock ford, 111 



Rock Island, HI 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Rome, Ga 

Rome, N. Y 

Roswell, N. Mex 



Royal Oak, Mich. 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Cloud, Minn.. 
St. Joseph, Mo 



St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Salem, Mass — 

Salem, Oreg 



Salinn,, Kans 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Angelo, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Bernardino, Calif. 



San Diego, Calif 

Sandusky, Ohio 

San Francisco, Calif- 
San Jose, Calif 

San Leandro, Calif.. 



San Mateo, Calif 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Santa Fe, N. Mex... 
Santa Monica, Calif.. 



Savannah, Oa 

Schenectady, N. Y 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash 

Shaker Heights, Ohio. 



Sharon, Pa 

Sheboygan, Wis .... 

Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, Iowa.... 
Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 

Somerville, .Mass 
South Bend, End ... 
South (late, Calif 
Spartanburg, 8. C_. 
' ine, Wash 



Springfield, 111 

Springfield, Mass 
Springfield, Mo 

Springfield, Ohio. 
Stamford, Conn 



Steubenville, ( >bio 
Stockton, i 
Strat ford, Conn 

Superior, Wis 

- ■ i i.-u e, \. Y 



Taconia, Wasli 
Tallahassee, I'la 
laiiipa, Fla 

Taunton, Ma 
Teaneck, \. ] 



84 
4 
1,037 
34 
10 

10 
14 

14 
4 
49 



3, 744 

1,047 

521 



153 

1,873 
502 

7!" I 
91 
1. <)_>_' 
136 
142 

130 
174 

144 

99 

467 



210 

318 

2,913 

49 

31 
64 
142 
240 
210 



48 
345 
156 

112 
50 

48 
25 

81* 



1.406 
367 



252 

997 

76 

1,446 

82 
40 

101 
73 

130 
57 

462 

524 

102 
151 

1, 222 
38 



25 



101 



Table 35. 



-Number of offenses known to the police, 1950, cities over 25,000 in 
population — Continued 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 


Larceny— theft 


glary- 






breaking 






or enter- 


$50 and 


Under 


ing 


over 


$50 


433 


93 


519 


1,365 


754 


2,817 


378 


190 


1,017 


18 


13 


51 


313 


214 


354 


311 


102 


46 


369 


224 


1,134 


1,307 


824 


1. 736 


96 


65 


162 


74 


43 


116 


153 


47 


128 


74 


49 


77 


177 


81 


144 


136 


54 


329 


194 


90 


508 


78 


38 


107 


141 


93 


327 


46 


32 


44 


211 


41 


756 


145 


37 


343 


198 


38 


298 


154 


94 


118 


3,618 


1,759 


7,941 


42 


27 


128 


* 258 


119 


346 


190 


32 


413 


56 


50 


164 


92 


63 


273 


112 


68 


255 


33 


16 


296 


52 


34 


136 


37 


31 


331 


50 


21 


68 


102 


16 


54 


58 


19 


9 


45 


44 


81 


157 


78 


203 



Terre Haute, Ind - 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kans 

Torrington, Conn. 
Trenton, N.J 



Troy, N. Y 

Tucson, Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Tyler, Tex 



Union City, N. J 

Union Township, N. J. 
University City, Mo... 

Upper Darby, Pa 

Utica, N. Y 



Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Vancouver, Wash 

Vicksburg, Miss 

Waco, Tex 

Waltham, Mass 



Warren, Ohio 

Warwick, R.I 

Washington, D. C. 

Washington, Pa 

Waterbury. Conn.. 



AVaterloo, Iowa 

Watertown, Mass. 
Watertown, N. Y. 

Waukegan, 111 

Wausau, Wis 



Wauwatosa, Wis 

West. Allis, Wis 

West Hartford, Conn. 
West Haven, Conn... 
West New York, N. J. 



West Orange, N. J 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Weymouth, Mass 

Wheeling, W. Va 

White Plains, N. Y____ 



Wichita, Kans 

Wichita Falls, Tex. 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa... 
Wilkinsburg, Pa... 
Williamsport, Pa... 



Wilmington, Del 

Wilmington, N. C 

Winston-Salem, N. C_ 

Woodbridge, N.J 

Woonsocket, R. I 



Worcester, Mass.. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 
Yakima, Wash.... 
Yonkers, N. Y_... 
York, Pa 



Youngstown, Ohio. 
Zanesville, Ohio 



4,2115 
-.2 
2 



7 


9 


8 


72 


51 


49 


58 


109 


9 


20 


9 

1 


21 


37 


4 


18 


316 


35 


186 



2 
No reports received 



Ids 


83 


151 


115 


147 


244 


853 


280 


1, 538 


457 


226 


1,067 


123 


96 


163 


91 


15 


153 


116 


50 


374 


418 


276 


951 


330 


119 


348 


501 


175 


445 



5 




44 


11 


4 


2 


29 


14 


20 


42 


20 


6 


53 


37 


9 





No reports received 



107 


99 


193 


658* 


338 


952 


72 


62 


231 


158 


173 


1,176 


330 


109 


666 


127 


63 


387 


423 


350 


762 


106 


63 


254 



Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



102 

Offenses in Territories and Possessions 

A complete set of reports was received during 1 950 from six Terri- 
tories and possessions of the United States and the available data are 
shown in table 36. Figures included are those reported by the First 
Judicial Division of Alaska; Honolulu City and Honolulu County I 
separately, Kauai County and Maui County in the Territory of ' 
Hawaii; and Puerto Rico. The figures include both urban and rural j 
crime except that the data for Honolulu City do not include offenses 
occurring in Honolulu County. 



Table 36. — Number of offenses known in United States Territories and possessions, 

1950 

[Population figures based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


Jurisdiction reporting 


Over 

$50 


Under 
$50 


Alaska: First judicial division (Juneau), 
population, 27,572; number of offenses 


2 

5 
3 
1 
3 


1 

40 
4 


2 

82 
21 
5 

10 
772 


19 

991 
281 
72 
99 
1,936 


10 

477 
95 
11 
19 

410 


12 

2,666 

441 

143 

273 

5.570 




Hawaii: 

Honolulu City, population, 245,612; 




HonoluluCounty, population, 101 ,917; 




Kauai County, population, 29,838; 




Maui County, population, 48,387; 


5 


Puerto Rico: Population, 2,205,398; num- 


245 72 


58 











SUPPLEMENTAL CRIME DATA 

While all police agencies participating in the uniform crime report- 
ing program forward monthly Return A reports to the FBI, the 
cities with population over 25,000 are requested also to forward 
a Supplement to Return A furnishing additional information relative 
to the part I offense classes, with the exception of criminal homicide 
and aggravated assault. While the records systems of all large city 
police departments do not readily provide complete information 
requested on the Supplement to Return A, most of them do and thus 
it is possible to summarize additional data relative to most of the part 
I offense classes. 

The police in 359 cities over 25,000 in population reported a total 
of 458,464 larceny offenses, 23.2 percent of which involved property 
valued in excess of $50, and in 61 percent of the cases the property 
stolen was valued at from $5 to $50 and the remaining 15.8 percent 
constituted thefts of property valued at less than $5. 

The larceny classification constitutes the largest single group of 
offenses known to the police and the supplemental reports indicate that 
17.5 percent of these crimes are thefts of some type of auto accessory, 
while 21.2 percent are thefts of other types of property from automobiles. 
Thus in 38.7 percent of all the larcenies, something is stolen from an 
automobile. Bicycle thefts make up another 15 percent of larceny 
offenses. 

These reporting cities showed a total of 190,885 offenses of burglary- 
breaking or entering and four-fifths of these offenses were committed 
during the night. Of those burglaries involving nonresidence struc- 
tures, 9 out of 10 were committed during the hours of darkness, 
while less than two-thirds of the burglaries of residences were com- 
mitted during the night. 

Of the 30,425 robbery offenses reported by the cities represented 
in the following tabulation, 56.9 percent were the so-called highway 
robberies, while nearly one-third were robberies in some type of 
commercial establishment. 

The Supplement to Return A reports forwarded by these larger 
cities indicate that 44.5 percent of the rape offenses recorded were 
statutory in character (no force used' — victim under the age of 
consent) . 

The police in the 359 cities mentioned above reported 85,865 
automobile thefts in 1950 and 78,709 or 91.7 percent of the stolen cars 
recovered. 

103 



104 



Table 37. — Offense analysis, by nature of criminal act, time and place of commission, 
and value of property stolen, 1950 

[Offenses known to the police in 359 cities over 25,000 in population; total population, 48,022,808 based on 
11 i".o decennial census preliminary counts] 



Classification 


Number of 
offenses 


Percent dis- 
tribution 


Rape: 


6,061 










3,361 
2,700 












Robbery: 

Total 


30, 425 


100 








17,311 
8,100 
1,263 
531 
1,703 
60 
1,457 
































Burglary— breaking or entering: 


190, 885 








Residence (dwelling): 


47, 432 
25, 024 

106, 494 
11,935 








Nonresidence (store, office, etc.): 












Larceny— theft (except auto theft) (grouped according to value of article 
stolen): 


458, 464 


100.0 








106, 355 
279, 823 
72, 286 






61.0 


Under $5 








Larceny— theft (grouped as to type of offense): 


458, 464 


100.0 








6,860 
8,339 
20, 272 
97, 036 
80, 448 
68, 873 
176, 636 






1.8 
















15.0 




38.6 







Of the cities represented in the foregoing tabulation, 353 were in a 
position to furnish also complete information relative to the value of 
property stolen according to type of crime, and they showed $130,- 
304,673 taken in the 745,781 crimes against property during 1950, for 
an average value of $175 for each offense. The loot taken in the 
average robbery amounted to $248, while in burglaries the average 
value of the property stolen was $127 and in larcenies, $58. The 
average car stolen was valued at $886. 



105 

Table 38. — Value of property stolen, by type of crime, 1950 

[Based on the reports of 353 cities over 25,000 in population; total population, 45,631,489 based on 1950 decen- 
nial census preliminary counts. All values have been rounded off to even dollars] 



Classification 


Number of 
offenses 


Value of prop- 
erty stolen 


Average 

value per 

offense 


Total. 


745, 781 


$130, 304, 673 










29, 770 
185, 566 
447. 579 

82, 866 


7, 370, 322 
23, 635, 085 
25, 881, 387 
73, 417, 279 





















Among the cities over 25,000 in population, 342 reported complete 
information relative to the value of property stolen and the value ot 
property recovered with subdivision as to type of property. Exclud- 
ing automobiles, property stolen in these communities was valued at 
$53,308,839 and 19.5 percent or $10,402,721 was recovered during 
1950. 



Table 39. — Value of property stolen and value of property recovered, by type of 
property, 1950 

on reports of 342 cities over 25,000 in population; total population, 44,228,484 based on 1950 decennial 
census preliminary counts. All values have been rounded off to even dollars] 



Type of property 


Value of prop- 
erty stolen 


Value of prop- 
erty recovered 


Percent 
recovered 


Total 


$121, 580, 198 


$73, 215, 882 


60.2 


Currency, notes, etc 

Jewelry and precious metals 


16, 180, 865 
8, 926, 171 
2, 363, 234 
5, 982, 455 
68, 271, 359 
19, 856, 114 


1, 939, 017 
1, 760, 100 
151,612 
988, 198 
62, 813, 161 
5, 563, 794 


12.0 
19.7 
6.4 


Clothing 


16.5 
92.0 


Miscellaneous _ . .__ . 


28.0 



DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Source of Data 

During 1950 the FBI examined 793,671 arrest records, as evidenced 
by fingerprint cards, in order to obtain data concerning the age, sex, 
race, and previous criminal history of the persons represented. The 
compilation has been limited to instances of arrests for violations 
of State laws and municipal ordinances. In other words, fingerprint 
cards representing arrests for violations of Federal laws or representing 
commitments to any type of penal institutions have been excluded 
from this tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint records examined exceeded the 792,029 
prints handled during 1949 by 0.2 percent. The tabulation of data 
from fingerprint cards obviously does not include all persons arrested, 
since there are individuals taken into custody for whom no fingerprint 
cards are forwarded to Washington. Furthermore, data pertaining 
to persons arrested should not be treated as information regarding 
the number of offenses committed, since two or more persons may be 
involved in the joint commission of a single offense, and on the other 
hand, one person may be arrested and charged with the commission 
of several separate crimes. 
Offense Charged 

More than 41 percent (330,794) of the records examined during 
1950 represented arrests for major violations. Persons charged with 
murder, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft numbered 
213,713, constituting 26.9 percent of the total arrest records examined. 
Sex 

Fingerprint cards representing arrests of males during 1950 num- 
bered 717,088, a 0.5 percent increase over the 713,444 cards received 
during 1949. 

Female arrest prints decreased 2.5 percent, from 78,585 during 
1949 to 76,583 during 1950, during which year they constituted 9.6 
percent of the total arrests. 

106 



107 



Table 40. — Distribution of arrests by sex, 1950 



Offense charged 



Total. - 

Criminal homicide 

Robbery . 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny —theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice- 
Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children- _ 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations. 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws.- - 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

(iainbling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



793, 671 



717, 



3,583 



5, 482 

IS, 930 
53, 168 
42, 564 
58, 409 
17, 905 
19. 505 

3,014 

932 

10, 395 

9, 323 



14, 255 

293 

12. 649 

39, 078 

n , : . ?m 

Vi, 965 
41.291 

7,083 
34, 401 



1,109 

7,622 
493 

1,934 
275 
122 

1, 348 



5,241 
2,874 
1,044 



1,794 
2,128 

316 
16 

403 
6. 360 
15. 963 
7.006 
1,525 
4,903 

847 
3,921 



2.5 
7.5 
5.5 
8.3 
2.3 
2.7 
.4 
.1 
1.5 
1.2 

2^5 
1.1 
1.3 
1.9 
1.4 
6.5 
1.8 
(0 
1.6 
5.7 
22.6 
6.1 
2.0 
5.8 
1.0 
4.8 



2.6 

7.4 
5.9 
8.2 
2.5 
2.7 
.4 

1.4 

1.3 

.5 
2.3 

1.0 
1.4 
2.0 
1.3 
6.9 
2.0 
(>) 
1.8 
5.4 
22.8 
5.8 
1.9 
5.8 
1.0 
4.8 



1.1 
8.3 
1.4 
10.0 
.6 
2.5 
.4 
.2 
1.8 



1.1 
2.3 

2.8 
.4 
(') 

.5 
8.3 
20.9 
9.1 
2.0 
6.4 
1.1 
5.1 



Less than Mo of 1 percent. 



108 













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NUMBER OF PERSONS 
ARRESTED 

MALE AND FEMALE 

AGES 16 TO 24 CALENDAR YEAR 1950 


^liraiiiiraiiiiii™ 

e j.ii.i,iii.iii l iii.i.iii l iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii_ 









































109 

Age 

During 1950, males and females under 21 years of age arrested and 
fingerprinted numbered 118,426, constituting 14.9 percent of the total 
arrests. In addition, there were 123,943 (15.6 percent) between the 
ages of 21 and 24, making a total of 242,369 (30.5 percent) less than 
25 years old. Arrests of persons 25 to 29 years old numbered 132,620 
(16.7 percent). The resultant total is 374,989 (47.2 percent) less 
than 30 years of age. It should be remembered that the number of 
arrest records is doubtless incomplete in the lower age groups because 
of the practice of some jurisdictions not to fingerprint youthful 
offenders. 

Youths played a predominant part in the commission of crimes 
against property as indicated by the following figures: During 1950, 
there were 185,406 persons of all ages arrested for robbery, burglary, 
larceny, auto theft, embezzlement, fraud, forgery, counterfeiting, re- 
ceiving stolen property, and arson; and 53,618 (28.9 percent) of those 
persons were less than 21 years old. 

The extent of the participation of youths in the commission of 
crimes against property is further indicated by the following figures: 
During 1950, 30.5 percent of all persons arrested were less than 25 
years of age. However, persons less than 25 years old numbered 54.1 
percent of those charged with robbery, 61.6 percent of those charged 
with burglary, 45.4 percent of those charged with larceny, and 67.3 
percent of those charged with auto theft. Approximately one-half of 
all crimes against property during 1950 were committed by persons 
under 25 years of age. 

For males and females combined, the figures for the groups in 
which the largest number of arrests occurred during 1950 are as 
follows: 

Age ' Number of arrests 

21-. 32, 313 

22_ .. 32,160 

23 30,436 

24. 29,034 

25 28,816 

The frequency of male arrests were for ages 21, 22, 23, 20, and 24. 
Arrests for females showed the largest number occurring at age 22, 
followed by ages 23, 24, 25, and 21 in that order. 



110 



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Ill 

Table 42. — Number and -percentage of arrests of persons under 18, under 21, and 
under 25 years of age, 1950 



Offense charged 


Total 
number 
of per- 
sons 
arrested 


Num- 
ber un- 
der 18 
years 
of age 


Num- 
ber un- 
der 21 
years 
of age 


Total 
number 
under 

25 years 
of age 


Per- 
centage 
under 
18 years 
of age 


Per- 
centage 
under 
21 years 
of age 


Total per- 
centage 

under 25 
years 
of age 




793, 671 


34, 599 


118,426 


242, 369 


4.4 


14.9 










6,336 
19,779 
59,496 
43,673 
66,031 
18,398 
21,439 

3,289 

1,054 
11,743 

9,323 

8,579 
19,725 

8,539 
10, 376 
15,233 
11,260 
51,318 
14,571 
309 
13,052 
45,438 
178,165 
48,604 
15,490 
46, 194 

7,930 
38, 322 


186 

1,389 

1, 232 

7,849 

6,041 

3,942 

235 

142 

61 

346 

680 

80 

445 

247 

457 

43 

195 

166 

339 

3 

346 

1,165 

776 

1,496 

55 

3,044 

131 

3,508 


736 
5,612 

6,150 

17, 771 

17,954 

8,592 

1,373 

579 

169 

1,568 

2,928 

692 

2,073 

1,546 

1, 762 
674 

1,330 

2, 123 
2,818 

21 
2,367 
6,164 
6,748 

'480 

9,877 

818 

8,615 


1,712 
10, 707 
15, 951 
26, 8S9 
29, 950 
12,387 
4,328 
1,137 
341 
3,645 
5,092 
2,491 
5,357 
3,812 
3,769 
3,175 
2,603 
8,378 
6,411 
84 
5,469 
14. 334 
22, 426 

14, 484 
1,721 

18, 571 
1,887 

15, 258 


2.9 

7.0 
2.1 
18.0 
9.1 
21.4 
1.1 
4.3 
5.8 
2.9 
7.3 

.9 
2.3 
2.9 
4.4 

.3 
1.7 

.3 
2.3 
1.0 
2.7 
2.6 

.4 
3.1 

.4 
6.6 
1.7 
9.2 


11.6 

28.4 
10.3 
40.7 
27.2 
46.7 

6.4 
17.6 
16.0 
13.4 
31.4 

8.1 
10.5 
18.1 
17.0 

4.4 
11.8 

4.1 
19.3 

6.8 
18.1 
13.6 

3.8 
14.2 

3.1 
21.4 
10.3 
22.5 












Burglary— breaking or entering 


61.6 










Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 


34.6 


Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 


31.0 
54.6 
29.0 
27.2 




44.6 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws- 

Driving while intoxicated 


36.3 
20.8 
23.1 
16.3 
44.0 




27.2 


Disorderly conduct 


41.9 
31.5 
12.6 




29.8 




11.1 




40.2 




23.8 




39.8 







Criminal Repeaters 

Of all the 793,671 arrest records examined, 477,574 (60.2 percent) 
represented persons who already had fingerprint cards on file in the 
Identification Division of the FBI. For males the percentage 
having prior records was 61.7 and for females the percentage was 46.1. 
These figures pertain to fingerprint arrest records and in no way 
relate to the Civil Identification Files of the FBI. 

For males and females combined, the percentage with a prior 
fingerprint record was 14.8 at age 15, and this figure rose rapidly to 
44.0 at age 20. For males, the percentage was 15.5 at age 15 and 45.0 
at age 20. For females, the percentage with prior fingerprint records 
was 6.9 at age 15 and 33.7 at age 20. 



112 



Table 43. — Percentage of arrests with previous fingerprint records, 1950 



Offense 


Percent 


Offense 


Percent 




74.4 
70.9 
70.3 
70. 1 
65.9 
63. 2 
59.1 
57.9 
56.9 
56.9 
56.8 
56, I 
55. 8 
55.1 


Offenses against family and children 










Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 


52.4 




52.3 






51.0 


Robbery 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Burglary— breaking or entering 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 


50.8 
50.2 
45.8 




45.6 






43.8 






41.9 






41.2 






41.1 













1 Only 309 fingerprint cards received representing arrests for violations of parking regulations. 

Race 

Most of the persons represented in this study were members of the 
white and Negro races. Members of the white race represented 
576,422 of the 793,671 arrest records received, while 205,576 were 
Negroes, 7,334 were Indians, 842 Chinese, 285 Japanese, and 3,212 
were representatives of other races. 

Table -14. — Arrests by race, 1950 



Offense charged 



Total 

all 
races 



White Negro Indian 



All 

others 



Total 

Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Em bezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc.. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against the family and children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 

l )isorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



3,671 



576. 422 



205, 576 



6,336 
19,779 
59,496 
43,673 
66,031 
18,398 
21,439 

3,289 

1,054 
11,743 

9,323 

8,579 
19,725 

8,539 
10,376 
15,238 
11,260 
51,318 
14,571 
309 
13,052 
45,438 
178,165 
48, 604 
15,490 
46,194 

7,930 
38,322 



3.372 
12. 517 
31.277 

31. 776 
44, 776 
14. 695 
18, .346 

2,209 
806 
9,927 
6. 473 
5.190 

16. 057 
3.939 
5.082 

11, 708 
5. 841 

44. 911 

10, 746 

210 

9,463 

31,217 
143.867 

37, 157 
7,584 

32, 751 
6,179 



7. 060 
27, 619 
11,534 
20, 672 
,£ 

2. 962 
1,050 

241 
1,689 
2.717 
3,260 

3. 473 

4. 262 
5.198 
3.415 
5.306 
5,706 
3, 662 

98 
3, 431 
13,610 
30, 040 
10. 657 
7.462 
13.054 
1,555 
9,454 



1 
83 
405 
3, 513 
504 
10 
251 
133 
229 



OFFENSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in part I and 
part II offenses, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 

Part I Offenses 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter includes all 
willful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 
Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or 
justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides excluded from this classification are 
limited to the following types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer 
in line of duty; (2) the killing of a hold-up man by a private citizen, (b) Man- 
slaughter by negligence includes any death which the police investigation estab- 
lishes was primarily attributable to gross negligence on the part of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — victim under 
age of consent), assault to rape, and attempted rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids. Does not 
include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, even though no force 
was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. Burglary followed by larceny 
is included in this classification and not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value; (b) 
under $50 in value — -includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article of value which 
is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven away 
and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Does not include tak- 
ing for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized use 
by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Part II Offenses 

8. Other assaults. — Includes allassaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Includes offenses dealing with the making, 
altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is 
made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — -Includes all offenses of fraudulent conversion, 
embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — -Includes buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property as well as attempts to commit any of those offenses. 

113 



114 

12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — Includes all violations of regulations or 
statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufactur- 
ing of deadly weapons or silencers and all attempts to violate such statutes or 
regulations. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Includes sex offenses of a commer- 
cialized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as prostitution, keeping 
bawdy house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for immoral purposes. 

14. Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution and commercialized vice). — 
Includes offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, and the like. 
Includes attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of nonsupport, 
neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as 
unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of "drunkenness" (class 18) and "driving 
while intoxicated" (class 22), liquor law violations, State or local, are placed in 
this class. Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all offenses of drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Includes all charges of committing a breach of the 
peace. 

20. Vagrancy. — Includes such offenses as vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, permitting, or engaging in 
gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Includes driving or operating any motor vehicle 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws. — Includes violations of regulations with 
respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to prevent accidents. 

24. Parking violations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Includes violations of 
State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and motor vehicles 
not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws for which 
no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as suspicious 
characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, who are released 
without formal charges being placed against them. 



INDEX TO VOLUME XXI, UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

[All references are to page numbers 

Age of offenders. (See Arrests.) 

Annual crime trends: P age 

Cities grouped by size 76-77 

Cities grouped by location 76, 79-82 

Estimated total number of major crimes, 1950 74-75 

Rural crime trends 4-6, 83-84 

Urban crime trends 4, 76-82 

Arrests — based on fingerprint records 64-68, 106-112 

Age of offenders 64-67, 108-111 

Race of offenders 68, 112 

Recidivism 67, 1 1 1-1 1 2 

Sex of offenders 64-65. 106-107 

Automobiles — percentage recovered 103 

Classification of offenses 2, 69-70, 72, 113-114 

Cleared by an est, offenses ' 44-50, 57 

By geographic divisions 49-50 

Crimes. (See Arrests, estimated number, offenses, persons charged, per- 
sons found guilty, and persons released.) 
Criminal repeaters. (See Arrests — recidivism.) 

Employees, number of police 1 6-43 

Fingerprint records 64-68, 106-112 

Monthly variations, offenses known to the police 85—87 

Offenses known to the police: 

Annual trends 3-6, 74-84 

Cities grouped by location 7, 9-11, 79-82, 90 

Cities grouped by location and size _- 10, 91 

Cities grouped by size 7-8, 77, 89 

Cleared by arrest 44-50, 57 

Cleared by arrest, geographic divisions. 1 49-50 

Divided as to time and place and value of property stolen 104-105 

Individual cities over 100,000 in population 13-15 

Individual cities over 25,000 in population 93-101 

Monthly variations 85-87 

Rural areas 4-6, 12, 74-75,83-84 

Teriitories and possessions of the United States 102 

Persons charged (held for prosecution) 45, 47, 50-59 

By geographic divisions - 54-55 

Persons found guilty 56-60 

Persons released (not held for prosecution) 6 1-63 

Police department employees 16-43 

Police killed 16 

Possessions and Territories of the United States, offenses in 102 

Property, value stolen 103-105 

Property, value stolen and recovered 105 

Prosecution, persons held for, (See Persons charged and persons found 
guilty.) 

115 



116 

Race of offenders. (See Arrests.) 

Recidivism. (See Arrests.) Page 

Reporting area, extent of 72-73 

Rural crime data 4-6, 12, 74-75, 83-84 

Sex of offenders. (See Arrests.) 

Sheriffs* reports 4-C, 12, 74-75, 83-84 

State crime rates. (See Offenses known — cities grouped by location.) 

State police reports 4-6, 12, 74-75, 83-84 

Territories and possessions of the United States, offenses in 102 

Trends, annual crime: 

Cities grouped by size 77 

Cities grouped by location 79-82 

Rural__. 4-6,83-84 

Urban _^l_ 4,76-82 

Value of property stolen 104-105 

Value of property stolen and recovered 105 

Variations, monthly crime 85-87 

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