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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 




ISSUED BY THE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Volume XXII Number f 

SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN • 195! 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume XXII— Number 1 
SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN, 1951 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




International Association of Chiefs of Police 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1951 



Contents 



Page 

Summary of volume XXII, No. 1 . . 1-2 

Classification of oflfenses 2 

Crime trends: 

Urban crime trends, January-June, 1950-51 (table 1) 3-4 

Rural crime trends, January-June, 1950-51 (table 2) 5-6 

Crime rates: 

Urban crime rates, January- June, 1951 — cities divided according to 

population (table 3) 7-8 

Urban crime rates, January-June, 1951 — cities divided according to 

location (tables 4-6) 9-11 

Offenses in individual areas: 

Offenses in cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants (table 7) 12-14 

Police employee data: 

Police employees killed, 1950 (table 8) 15 | 

Number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants, April 30, 1951 — 

cities grouped by size and location (tables 9, 10) 15-1! 

Police employees in individual cities, April 30, 1951 (tables 11, 12) 18-38 i 

Offenses cleared and persons arrested: I 

Offenses cleared by arrest, 1950 — cities divided according to size ' 

(table 13) 39-44; 

Offenses cleared by arrest, 1950 — cities divided according to location 

(table 14) \ 44-45 

Persons charged, 1950 — cities divided according to population (tables 

15, 16) 45-48 

Persons charged, 1950 — cities divided according to location (table 17) _ 50-51 
Offenses known, offenses cleared, persons charged and persons found 

guilty, 1950 — part I offense classes (table 18) 52-54 

Persons charged and persons found guilty, part II offense classes 

(table 19) 55-56 

Persons released, 1950 — cities divided according to population (tables 

20, 21) 57-59 

Data compiled from fingerprint cards: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested, January-June, 1951 (table 22) 60-611 

Age distribution of persons arrested, January-June, 1951 (tables 23, 

24) 62-63 

Definition of part I and part II offense classifications — 65-66 

(H) 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department 
of Justice, Washington, D. C. 



Volume XXII 



JULY 1951 



Number 1 



SUMMARY 

Crime Trends, January-June, 1951 

Crime rose 5.1 percent in the cities and 4.0 percent in the rural 
areas during the first half of 1951 as compared with the same period 
of 1950. In more detail the trends were as follows: 



Offense 


Urban 


Rural 




+5.1 


+4.0 


Murder 




-6.1 

+6!o 

-8.4 
-1.9 
-3.2 
+7.9 
+18.6 


—7 4 






Rape 


—2.4 




-21.8 




-9.4 


Burglary 


— .5 2 




+12.9 


Auto theft 


+20.0 







Police Killed, 1950 

1 During 1950 there were 36 police department employees killed in 
line of duty for a death rate of 2.13 per 5 million inhabitants. 
Number of Police Employees, April 30, 1951 

A total of 143,669 employees was reported as of April 30, 1951, by 
! 3,657 cities for a ratio of 17 employees for each 10,000 inhabitants. 
Civilian employees made up 7.6 percent of the total. 
Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1950 

For every 100 crimes reported to the police in 1950, 28 were cleared 

by the arrest of 22 ofi'enders. For individual offense classes the per- 

' centage cleared was as follows: Murder, 93.8 ; negligent manslaughter, 

I 88.3; rape, 80.3; aggravated assault, 76.6; robber}^, 43.5; burglary, 

29.0; auto theft, 25.6 and larceny, 22.1. 

Persons Found Guilty, 1950 

The percentage of persons who had been formally charged by the 
police that were found guilty in 1950 range from 54.5 percent for 
negligent manslaughter and 56.8 percent for receiving stolen property 
I to 84.0 percent for liquor law violations and 86.4 percent for driving 
while intoxicated. 
Persons Arrested, January-June, 1951 

The FBI examined 419,451 arrest records as evidenced by finger- 
print cards during the first 6 months of 1951. More than 42 percent 

(1) 



of these arrests were for major violations with age 23 predominating 
in the frequency of arrests, followed by ages 22, 21, 24, and 18. 

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to the 
police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting or 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be those most 
generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal homicide, 
including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (6) manslaugh- 
ter by negligence; rape; robbery; aggravated assault; burglary- — break- 
ing or entering; larceny- — theft; and auto theft. The figures contained 
herein include also the number of attempted crimes of the designated 
classes. In other words, an attempted burglary or robbery, for ex- 
ample, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner as if the crime 
had been completed. Attempted murders, however, are reported as 
aggravated assaults. 

"Offenses known to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the law-enforce- 
ment agencies of contributing communities and not merely arrests or 
cleared cases. Offenses committed by juveniles are included in the 
same manner as those known to have been committed by adults, 
regardless of the prosecutive action. Complaints which upon inves- 
tigation are learned to be groundless are not included in the tabula- 
tions which follow. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of 
crime and criminal-law enforcement. 



In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incomplete 
or otherwise defective were excluded. 

In the last section of this bulletin may be found brief definitions of 
part I and II offense classifications. 



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CRIME TRENDS 

Urban and Rural Crime Trends, January-June, 1950-51 

There was a general increase in crime across the country during 
the first half of 1951, as compared with the same period of 1950, with 
the totals up 5.1 percent in the cities and 4.0 percent in the rural 
areas. 

Auto thefts rose 18.6 percent in the urban communities and showed 
a 20.0 percent jump in the rural places. Larcenies which increased 
7.9 percent in the cities were up 12.9 percent in the rural areas. 

Rape oft'enses in the urban areas showed a 6.0 percent rise but 
were down 2.4 percent in the rural communities. On the other hand, 
negligent manslaughters which were dpwn 3.2 percent in the cities 
were up 21.3 percent in the rural districts. 

Murders, robberies, aggravated assaults, and burglaries declined 
in both the urban and rural jurisdictions. 

The crime trend data comparing the first half of 1951 with January- 
June of 1950 are presented in table 1 for the urban, and table 2 for the 
rural areas. Thej-eports of identical police agencies, of course, were 
used for both periods. The rural population shown is from the 1940 
census since the 1950 figures for individual counties were not available 
at the time the tables were prepared. 



Table 1. — Urban crime trends, January-June, 1950-51 



[Oflenses known to the police in 2,182 cities, total population 67,038,755; based 
preliminary counts] 


on 1950 decennial census 


Offense 


Number of oflenses 
January-June 


Change 




1950 


1951 


Number 


Percent 


TotaL_ - 


507,426 


533.436 


+26, 010 


+5.1 




Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


1,638 
1,047 
3,550 
17, 973 
23, 400 
122, 902 
287, 218 
49, 698 


1,538 
1,014 
3,763 
16,456 
22, 955 
118,927 
309, 817 
58,966 


-100 

-33 

+213 

-1,517 

-445 

-3, 975 

+22, 599 

+9,268 


—6 1 




-3.2 






Robbery 


—8 4 




-1.9 




-3.2 


Larceny 


+7.9 


Auto theft 


+18.6 





(4) 



Table 2. — Rural crime trends, January- June, 1950-51 

[Based on reports of 1,552 sheriffs, 97 rural village officers, and 11 State police; total rural population, 
34,384,455, basedon the 1940 decennial census] 



Number of offenses 



Percent 
change 



Total 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

Manslaughter by negl igence 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 



89, 122 



1.0 



920 
742 
2,002 
3,274 
5,685 
31,374 
37, 380 
7,745 



852 
900 
1, 953 
2.561 
5, 150 
29, 751 
42, 203 
9, 297 



-7.4 
+21.3 

-2.4 
-21.8 

-5^2 
+12.9 
+20.0 



CRIME RATES 

Urban Crime Rates, January- June, 1951 

To the end that a yardstick might be available with which to 
measure the volume of crime locally the offenses known to the police 
as reported during January-June of 1951 are presented in the tables 
which follow in terms of the number of crimes per 100,000 inhabitants. 
The volume of crime varies noticeably among cities of different sizes 
and the variation is particularly marked between the different sections 
of the country. 

In the crime rate tables the monthly reports of 2,467 cities were 
used representing a combined 1950 population of 69,028,325. The 
data have been presented in tables 3-5 in such a manner as to make 
available the average crime rates for cities grouped by size and 
location. In selecting the returns to be used in preparing the tabula- 
tions the reports of any city were eliminated if it appeared they had 
been improperly prepared. Rural crime rates are not shown since 
current population data were not available at the time. 

The rates shown in tables 3-5 were based on the reports of the 
number of cities indicated in table 6. 

(7) 



966801°— 51- 



Tabi>e 3. — Ihhan crime rnteft, January— J nne, 1951, hy population groups 

[Offenses known to the police and rate per 100,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on !%( 
decennial census preliminary counts] 



Population group 



TOTAL, GKOUPS I-VI 

2,467 cities; total population, 
69,028,325: 
Number of offenses known _ 
Rate per 100,000 



36 cities over 250,000; total popu- 
lation, 25,a35,210: 
Number of offenses known _ . 
Rate per 100,000 



65 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population, 9,645,867: 
Number of offenses knowai- _ 
Rate per 100,000 



118 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 8,326,723: 
Number of offenses known_ . 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP IV 

23 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 

population, 7,836,522: 
Number of offenses knowTi- - 
Rate per 100,000 



GROUP V 

635 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 9,885,713: 
Number of offenses known_ . 
Rate per 100,000 _. 



GROUP VI 

1,390 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 7,698,290: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100,000_-. 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
laugh 
ter 



824 
3.21 



256 
2. 65 



156 

1.87 



Man- 
slaugh 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



203 
2.10 



56 
0.73 



Rape 



3.819 

5.53 



243 
3.10 



326 
3.30 



Rob- 
bery 



16. 624 
24.1 



2, 134 
22.1 



[,347 
16.2 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



12. 906 
50.3 



,3, 014 
31.2 



3,016 
36.2 



1,921 
24.5 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 



118, 501 
177.0 



50. 297 
213.4 



20, 799 
215.6 



14, 581 
175.1 



11,934 
152.3 



12, 957 
131.1 



7,933 
103.0 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



124, 106 
526. 5 



53, 150 
551.0 



40, 918 
491.4 



36, 849 
470.2 



38, 359 
388.0 



19. 507 
253. 4 



Auto 
theft 



I The number of offenses and rates for burglary and larceny— theft are based on reports as follows: Group 
35 cities, total population, 23,570,416; groups I-VI, 2,466 cities, total population, 66,963,531. 



Table 4. — Urban crime rates, January-June, 1951, by geographic divisions and 

States 



[Oflfenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. 


Population based on 


1950 deceimial census preliminary counts] 


Division and State 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Total 


2.30 


24.1 


34.2 


1177.0 


1 467. 3 


88.8 






.53 


7.5 


6.1 


110.6 


304.7 


58.0 




Connecticut 


.39 
.92 
.64 


10.0 
3.4 
8.0 
3.1 
5.7 
2.8 

13.6 


12.2 
2.4 
4.5 
1.6 
7.0 

15.7 


112.6 
106.2 
107.5 

85.4 
149.0 

87.7 
2 107. 4 


332. 3 
329.6 

26116 

368. 8 

267.6 

2 230. 


52.5 
43.8 
64.7 
16.1 
61.9 
42.5 
55.7 




Massachusetts 






.21 


Vermont 


Middle Atlantic . 


1.14 




New Jersey 


1.09 
.58 
1.52 

2.08 


14.5 
5.5 
18.5 
31.5 


21.7 
8.0 
17.8 
31.8 


135.9 
100.2 
3 92.5 
154.2 


266.2 

257.9 

3 173.0 

453.3 


62.5 
45.5 
59.0 
79.8 


New York 


Pennsylvania 






Illinois 


2.54 
1.91 
2.19 
1.96 
.56 
1.37 


50.3 
15.2 

18! 1 
5.3 
19.3 


37.0 
18.8 
58.7 
18.1 
6.2 
25.1 


158. 3 
172. 2 
203. 8 
134.0 
64.3 
157.3 


324. 3 
444.9 
693.9 
447.5 
391.4 

409.2 


8.3.0 
90.9 
102.9 
60.3 
56.4 
73.2 


Indiana 


Ohio..__ 


West North Central 






.55 
1.40 

.34 
3.02 

.76 


6.0 
13.3 
12.3 
38.8 
12.0 

6.1 
10.0 
24.8 


2.5 
14.1 

2.5 
66.8 
14.7 

1.2 

2.1 
102.7 


111.3 
199.2 
111.5 
209.1 
154.0 
140.7 
83.1 
221.7 


352.5 
472.2 
376.1 
417.8 
481.0 
453.4 
387.8 
500.7 


71.0 
62.2 
67.3 
86.0 
92.9 
•44.2 
20.5 
113.1 


Kansas 


Minnesota 

Missouri 


Nebraska..- 


South Dakota .... 




South Atlantic * 


4.70 




Delaware 


1.61 
4.59 
8.96 
3.49 
3.61 
6.20 
4.57 
.78 
6.17 


17.7 
31.8 
16.4 
23.6 
16.4 
8.7 
30.5 
16.2 
23.8 


13.7 
51.1 
75.6 
47.9 

202.4 
58.3 

108.5 
24.4 
47.5 


286.1 
358.8 
172.6 
135.6 
233.2 
206.4 
208.8 
148.5 
214.7 


637.4 
662.7 
436.9 
293.0 
433.4 
483.2 
668.3 
279.3 
352.3 


11.3.6 
108.1 
101.8 
205.4 
78.9 
95.0 
121.3 
60.4 
95.7 


Florida 




Maryland 


North Carolina 


Virginia 




East South Central 






8.08 
5.51 
3.74 
5.75 
4.65 


15.0 
45.6 
11.0 
21.1 

20.9 


66.6 
50.4 
32.4 
34.1 
37.5 


204.0 
267.5 
138. 8 
213. 4 
228.7 


330.7 
439.0 
310.5 
326.4 
537.5 


82.9 
130.3 
48.4 
99.2 
108.0 


Kentucky 




Tennessee 








3.99 
4.71 
-2.77 
5.16 
1.26 


20.6 
23.6 
22.7 
19.7 
23. 2 


52.8 
.39.4 
19.0 
40.0 
17.4 


164.9 
147.2 
235.3 
258.4 
236.0 


334.4 
319. 4 
574.4 
615.5 
712.9 


42.7 






115.2 
116.7 
102.8 


Texas 






Arizona 


1^35 
2.60 


59.9 
37.1 
12.5 
16.1 
36.4 
14.4 
18.3 
14.7 
37.4 


35.5 
19.1 

8.8 
16.1 
20.2 
20.1 

9.0 
10.4 

26.6 


347.7 

205! 3 
165.8 
359.1 
138.0 
188.4 
140.9 
259.5 


1, 178. 8 
619.7 
744.9 
668.3 

1,031.3 
374.4 
757.9 
597.5 
823.9 


160.5 
106.0 
68 1 


Colorado 


Idaho 


Montana 


121.4 
125.5 
81 9 


Nevada 


1.35 
1.54 
1.37 


New Mexico 


Utah 


78.9 
88.2 
128 5 




Pacific 


1.36 








1.42 
.96 
1.24 


40.9 
18.3 
27.4 


31.0 
11.1 
9.8 


267.9 
234.3 
226.3 


840.3 
724.5 
784.5 


132.5 
83 2 


Oregon 











1 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 2,466 cities, total population 66,963,531. 

2 The rates for burglary and larceny are brsed on the reports of 539 cities, total population 9,913,052. 

3 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 235 cities. 
* Includes the District of Columbia. 



10 



Table 5. — Urban crime rates, January-June, 1951, by geographic divisions and 
population groups 



[Offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. 


Population based on 


1950 decennial censu. 


preliminary counts] 


Division and group 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Total 


2.30 


24.1 


34.2 


1 177. 


1467.3 


86.8 






New England. 


.53 


7.5 


6.1 


110.6 


304.7 


58.0 




1.26 
.36 
.46 
.11 

!fi7 
1.14 


11.3 
9.5 
7.4 
5.2 
2.9 
3.7 

13.6 


11.5 
7.0 
3.9 
3.5 
4.6 
4.7 

16.7 


71.4 
136. 6 
114.3 
110.3 

86.6 
105. 6 
2 107. 4 


274.3 
339.6 
.347. 
317.5 
207.2 
192.8 
' 230. 


112.2 




69.5 


Group III 


45.8 


Group IV _ 


36.1 




26.3 


Group VI 


24.4 


Middle Atlantic — --- 


55.7 


Group I 


2.15 
1.04 
.49 
.66 
.44 
.54 
2.06 


26.5 
9.8 

10.2 
6.1 
5.5 
4.6 

31.5 


26.1 
12.6 
15.6 
9.9 
7.8 
8.0 
31.8 


3 137. 2 
120.0 
130.8 
102.0 
83.0 
78.3 
154.2 


' 229. 3 
277.8 
264.4 
274.0 
209.2 
164.2 
453.3 


80.3 


Group II 


63.4 




56.6 


Group IV 


44.8 


Group V 


30.5 


Group VI 


30.4 


East North Central 


79.8 




3.05 
2.79 
1.66 
.78 
.93 
.22 
1.37 


53.5 
22.2 
18.3 
9.9 
7.1 
6.3 
19.3 


51.5 
33.4 
24.9 
9.8 
6.6 
3.8 
25.1 


185.4 
179.7 
146.7 
126.9 
107.8 
86.2 
157.3 


499.4 

465^9 
435.4 
386.4 
■ 235.8 
409.2 


100.6 




97.5 


Group III 


77.6 


Group IV 


62.5 


Group V 


46.8 


Group VI 


32.2 


"West North Central' 


73.2 


Group I 


2.58 
1.70 
.75 
.18 
.19 
.87 
4.70 


40.7 
18.4 
8.6 
5.4 
4.8 
5.2 
24.8 


60.5 
14.0 
11.2 
3.6 
3.4 
3.7 
102.7 


200.4 
224.9 
148.3 
133.5 
110.2 
81.2 
221.7 


465.0 
543.8 
550.0 
398.5 
331.3 
181.5 
500.7 


102.4 




113.7 


Group III 


81.4 


Group IV 


44.2 




36.8 


Group VI 


28.4 


South Atlantic < 


113.1 




5.76 
4.94 
4.60 
3.46 
4.05 
.3.94 
6.17 


34.] 
40,2 
17.4 
17.0 
11.6 
10.9 
23.8 


133. 7 
84.2 

114.4 
&1.3 
79.1 
69.0 
47.5 


187.9 
333.9 
236.1 
208.0 
202.0 
126.6 
214.7 


463.8 
747.5 
527.0 
514.5 
379.4 
236.9 
352.3 


163.3 


Group II 


148.5 


Group III 


95 2 




92.0 


Group V 


52.9 


Group VI 


45 4 


East South Central 


95.7 


Group I 


5.94 
8.79 
5.15 
9.67 
4.19 
2.04 
4.85 


42.2 
18.9 
26.5 

9.7 
12.6 

8.2 
20.9 


41.7 
71.0 

57.7 

30.2 
17.4 
37.5 


283.5 
264.6 
196.4 
151.8 
147.0 
100.7 
228.7 


457.0 
376.4 
385.0 
382.4 
249.0 
101.7 
537.5 


125 6 




134.2 






Group IV 


84 6 


Group V 


49.6 


Group VI 


32.7 


West South Central 


108 








6.41 
.3.32 
3.81 
2.96 
3.87 
3.46 
1.26 


31.4 
25.6 
13.6 
12.8 
5.3 
6.7 
28.2 


44.0 
33.0 
51.3 
39.2 
26.3 
22.8 
17.4 


300.8 
251.4 
203.1 
187.5 
128.9 
97.8 
236.0 


661.4 
643.2 
655.1 
426. 3 
289.7 
158.9 
712.9 


140.9 


Group II 


134.3 


Group III 


120 9 


Group IV 


66.5 


Group V 


48 2 


Group VI 


30.7- 




102.8 






Group I 


1.94 
1.74 
1.30 

.58 
1.79 

.42 
1.36 


56.0 
36.2 
26.0 
32.0 
7.7 
14.0 
37.4 


26.6 
11.1 
16.9 
23.6 
10.7 
14.4 
28.6 


367.4 
304.4 
126.0 
232.3 
171.2 
171.6 
259.5 


575.0 
1, 016. 2 
601.0 
1,011.1 
701.0 
475.3 
823.9 


133 




123.6 






Group IV 


152 2 


Group V 


74.0 


Group VI .- 




Pacific 


128 5 








1.74 
1.44 
.72 
.84 
.71 
1.42 


51.9 
33.2 
33.0 
19.6 
16.3 
11.0 


40.8 
11.3 
18.1 
12.9 
9.6 
U.9 


271.9 
266. 4 
302.1 
252.3 
217.1 
197. 2 


770.9 
892.2 
929.7 
912.6 
846.5 
795.4 




Group II 


133.9 


Group III 


115 5 




90.7 


Group V 


93.1 


Group VI 


87.1 







' The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 2,466 cities with a population of 66,963,531. 

2 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of ,'j39 cities with a total population of 9,913,052. 

3 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 4 cities. 
* Includes the District of Columbia. 



11 



Table 6. — Number of cities in each population group, geographic division, and 
State represented in the uiban crime rale tabulations for January-June, 1951 
(tables 3-5) 





Total 


Population group 


Division and State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 


Total: 

Population, 69,028,325 


2.467 


36 


65 


118 


223 


635 


1,390 






New England: 

Population, 5,327,966 


140 


1 


U 


15 


25 


35 








Connecticut 


25 
20 
61 
15 
8 
11 

540 




4 


1 
10 

2 


2 
12 

2 
1 

35 


5 
5 

130 


9 








Massachusetts 


1 


6 




New Hampshire 


7 






1 










Middle Atlantic: 

Population, 11,977,846 


5 


10 


21 


339 




134 
170 
236 

590 


2 
2 

8 


3 
4 
3 

10 


5 
8 


13 
14 

8 

64 


36 
40 
54 

145 


73 


New York 


105 


Pennsylvania 


161 


East North Central: 

Population, 18,337,736 


334 


Illinois 


158 
84 
111 
156 
81 

302 


1 

1 
1 

4 

1 

4 


1 
4 
2 
3 


10 
4 

4 
4 

9 


13 
10 
9 
20 
12 

17 


42 
18 
30 
41 
14 

69 


91 


Indiana . 


47 


Michigan 


62 


Ohio 


84 




50 


West North Central: 

Population, 6,266,652 


5 


198 


Iowa 


66 

58 
68 
53 
28 
12 
17 

250 




1 
2 

1 


4 

2 

1 


2 
3 


9 
19 
14 
14 
6 
3 
4 

59 


45 






34 


Minnesota 


2 
2 


49 


Missouri 


32 




1 


20 


North Dakota 




2 

1 

29 


7 








19 


11 


South Atlantic: 

Population, 7,448,831 


3 


8 


132 




4 
1 
46 
30 
18 
56 
27 
43 
26 

121 




1 








3 


District of Columbia 


1 










Florida 


3 
1 


2 
3 


9 
3 
2 
5 

1 
5 
4 

12 


9 

7 

7 
16 

4 
10 

6 

30 


22 


Georgia 


1 

1 


15 






North Carolina 


1 


5 
3 
3 
3 

4 


29 


South Carolina 




19 


Virginia 




2 


23 


West Virginia 




13 


East South Central: 

Population, 3,243,848 


3 


5 


67 




34 
34 
19 
34 

172 


1 
1 


2 


1 

2 
1 


3 
2 
4 
3 

11 


11 
6 

58 


16 




23 


Mississippi ■ 




8 




1 
5 


3 
8 


20 


West South Central: 

Population, 5,826,584 


8 


82 




21 
25 
38 
88 

125 




2 
3 
2 




2 
3 
3 
3 

10 


15 
31 

25 


13 




1 




12 






18 




4 

1 


8 
2 


39 


Mountain: 

Population, 2,063,688 


85 


A ri" nn i 


13 

28 
19 
18 
5 

13 
19 
10 

227 




1 




1 
1 
2 

1 


6 
4 

2 

1 
4 

84 


11 




1 




19 








11 










11 










3 








1 
1 


10 


Utah 




1 


1 
20 


15 




5 


Pacific: 

Population, 8,535,174 


6 


6 


11 


100 




161 
28 
38 


4 
1 
1 


4 


11 


14 

1 
5 


64 
8 
12 


64 




18 




2 




18 









OFFENSES IN INDIVIDUAL AREAS 

Offenses in Individual Cities With More Than 100,000 Inhabitants 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the period of January-June, 1951, is shown in table 7. The compila- , 
tion includes the reports received from police departments in cities 
with more than 100,000 inhabitants. Police administrators and other 
interested individuals will probably find it desirable to compare the • 
crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown in tables 3-5 of 
this publication. Similarly, they will doubtless desu-e to make com- 
parisons with the figures for their communities for prior periods, in 
order to determine whether there has been an increase or a decrease in 
the amount of crime committed. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 
cities because the differences in the figiu'cs may })e due to a variety ol' 
factors. Such comparisons are not desirable even though the figures 
for individual communities are converted into terms of the number of 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. 

The following is a list of some of the factors which affect the amount 
of crime in the community: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 

The composition of the population with reference particularly to 
age, sex, and race. 

The economic status and activities of the population. 

Climate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 

The number of police employees per unit of population. 

The standards governing appointments to the police force. 

The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law-enforcement problems. 

The degree of efficiency of the local law-enforcement agency. 

The figures presented in the following tabulation are those reported 
by the individual police departments in the cities represented without 
reducing the data to crime rates (number of offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants). 

In considering the volume of crimes committed locally, it is generally 
more important to determine whether the figures for a given com- 
munity show increases or decreases rather than to ascertain whether 
they exceed or fall short of those for some other individual community, 
and it should be remembered that the amount of crime committed in 

(12) 



13 

a community is not solely chargeable to the police but is rather a 
charge against the entire community. 

In publishing these figures the FBI acts as a service agency. The 
figwres published are those submitted by the contributing agencies. 



Table 7. — Number of offenses known to the ■police, January-June, 1951, cities 
over 100,000 in population 

(Based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



City 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or 
enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Akron Ohio 

Albany, N.Y... 
AUentown, Pa.. 

Atlanta, Oa 

Austin, Tex 



Baltimore, Md 

Baton Rouge, La-. 
Berkeley, Calif... _ 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Boston, Mass 



Bridgeport, Conn. 
Buffalo, N. Y..-._. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Camden, N. J 

Canton, Ohio 



Charlotte, N. C ._.. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 



Columbus, Ohio.. 
Corpus Christi, Tc 

Dallas, Tex 

Dayton, Ohio 

Denver, Colo 



Des Moines, Iowa. 

Detroit, Mich 

Duluth, Minn 

El Paso, Tex 

Elizabeth, N.J 



Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Tnd... 
Fall River, Mass. 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Wayne, Ind. 



Fort Worth, Tex 

Gary, Ind 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Hartford, Conn 

Houston, Tex 



Indianapolis, Ind... 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Jersey City, N. J... 
Kansas City, Kans. 
1 City, Mo... 



Knoxville, Tenn... 
Little Rock, Ark.. 
Long Beach, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 
Louisville, Ky 



12 
63 
13 
32 

18 

21 
38 
2, 630 
159 
240 

126 
22 

200 
41 

231 



251 
46 
1, 864 
191 
181 

94 
136 
361 

97 
110 

10 

1, 802 

1 



75 
54 
817 
195 

1,210 

154 
278 



1, 031 
330 

1, 933 
328 

1,517 



4,671 
184 
338 
170 

126 
196 
100 

428 
187 

789 
310 
345 
337 
1,934 



77 
572 
839 

177 
282 
78 
139 
122 

129 
15 
5,311 
495 
395 

(') 
62 
636 
276 



229 
1,676 



1, 087 602 

749 613 

Complete data not received 



28 


303 


73 


253 


803 


784 


171 


357 


206 


20 


260 


(') 


31 


752 


(') 


1,114 


5, 328 


6,096 


230 


1,324 


854 



1,076 
120 
185 

1,475 



1,529 
161 



795 
1,330 



149 
248 
401 

597 

136 

6,746 



2,149 
712 
3,986 
1,189 
1,614 

731 

12, 665 

540 



520 



2,256 
495 

1,080 
473 

2,636 



551 
1,446 



See footnote at end of table. 



14 



Table 7. — Number of offenses known to the -police, January-June, 1951, 
over 100,000 in population — Continued 



City 



Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or 
enter- 
ing 



Larceny — theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Memphis, Tenn 

Miami, Fla 

Milwaukee, Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Mobile, Ala --.. 



Montgomery, Ala... 

Nashville, Tenn 

Newark, N. J 

New Bedford, Mass. 
New Haven, Coim.- 



New Orleans, La 

New York, N.Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Oakland, Calif 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 



Omaha, Nebr 

Pasadena, Calif. . 
Paterson, N. J... 

Peoria, 111 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Phoenix, Anz 

Pittsburgh, Pa... 
Portland, Oreg.-- 
Providence, R. I. 
Reading, Pa 



Richmond, Va 

Rochester, N. Y... 
Sacramento, Calif. 

St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn.... 



Salt Lake City, Utah. 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Diego, Calif 

San Francisco, Calif. . 
Savannah, Ga 



Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash 

Shreveport, La... 
Somerville, Mass. 
South Bend, Ind. 



Spokane, Wash . . . 
Springfield, Mass. 
Syracuse, N. Y... 

Tacoma, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 



Toledo, Ohio 

Trenton, N.J 

Tulsa, Okla 

Utica, N. Y 

Washington, D. C. 



Waterbury, Conn. 

Wichita, Kans 

Wilmington, Del.. 
Worcester, Mass.. 
Yonkers, N. Y.... 



Youngstown, Ohio. 



1,340 
342 
577 
394 

241 
346 
l,0r)3 
207 
222 



283 1, 055 946 

Complete data not received 
433 605 657 

1, 208 249 

65 821 



478 
313 
240 

241 
2,747 

431 

811 

1,044 

462 

136 

539 
375 
269 
2, 340 
553 

443 

1,143 

502 



No reports received 



170 
195 
52 
110 
1,435 

275 
423 
745 
247 
79 

453 

157 



No 
37 


eports rec 
686 




86 


935 


1,854 


6 


100 


37 


492 


9 


329 


3 


276 


9 


155 


12 


234 



Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and muior larcenies. 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

Police Killed, 1950 

Urban police departments reported 36 employees killed in line of 
duty dm-ing 1950 and this figm-e includes not only officers killed by 
criminals but also any employee killed in traffic accidents or under any 
other cu'cumstances considered in line of duty. 

The figm^es for police employees killed for cities grouped by size and 
location are shown in table 8 below and the death rates are shown in 
terms of the number per 5,000,000 inhabitants. 

Table 8. — Number of police department employees killed, 1950, by geographic 

divisions and population groups 

[Includes only those employees killed while on active -duty with their local police agencies] 





Total 




Population 


group 






Geographic division 


Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
5,000,000 
inhabit- 
ants 


Over 

250,000 


100,000 to 
250,000 


50,000 to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Less 
than 
10,000 




36 




15 
2.20 


5 
2.60 


3 

1.77 


4 
2.36 


5 
2.17 


4 


Rate per 5,000,000 inhabit- 
ants 


2.13 


1.64 










2 
8 
9 

1 
4 
3 
2 


1.78 
1.87 
2.28 
.73 
2.41 
3.88 
1.41 




1 




I 






Middle Atlantic 


5 
5 




1 
1 








2 


1 


West North Central 








i 


1 




1 


1 


East South Central 






West South Central 


1 


















Pacific 


7 


3.90 


3 


2 


1 






1 











Number of Police Employees, April 30, 1951 

A total of 143,669 police department employees were reported as of 
April 30, 1951, by 3,657 cities representing a combined urban popu- 
lation of 84,356,828. According to the preliminary counts of the 
1950 census, this gives a ratio of 1.70 employees for each 1,000 inhabi- 
tants. 

The data as to police employees per unit of population are presented 
in table 9 with the cities grouped by size and by location. While the 
figures as to the number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants are 
generally lower than those shown in similar tables during recent years, 
it must be remembered that this year for the &-st time the calculations 
were based on 1950 census figm-es. The data for that reason are not 
strictly comparable to those shown in the semiannual issue of the 
bulletin for 1950. 



(15) 



966801°— 51- 



16 

It should be understood, too, that in presenting the following- 
summary tabulation there is no intention to suggest that the published 
ratios of police strength to population are necessarily the proper ratios 
or in any way standards recommended. The figures merely present 
the results of a survey conducted annually to show the situation as it 
existed on April 30. 

The reports from the police include both police officers and civilian 
employees, and the averages shown in table 9 are based on the number 
of city returns shown in table 10. 



Table 9. — Police Department employees, Apr. SO, 1951, number and rate per 1,000 
inhabitants, by geographic divisions and population groups 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



Population group 



Group I 



Over 
250,000 



Group II 



Group III 



100,000 

to 
250,000 



100,000 



Group 
IV 



25,000 

to 
50,000 



Group 
V 



10,000 

to 
25,000 



Group 
VI 



Less 
than 
10,000 



Total: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 
1,000 inhabitcUits 

New England: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

Middle Atlantic: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 in habitants 

East North Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

West North Central: 

Number of police employees.. 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

South Atlantic: • 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

East South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

West South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants 

Mountain: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 

1,000 inhabitants — . 

Pacific: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 
1,000 inhabitants 

' Includes the District of Columbia. 



143, 669 
1.70 



11,284 

2.01 

43, 967 

2.05 

31, 993 

1.62 

9,021 

1.31 

14,610 

1.76 

4,893 

1.27 

8,092 

1.14 

3,202 

1.31 

16, 607 

1.85 



12, 920 
1.52 



11, 749 
1.39 



14, 566 
1.27 



2,955 

3.74 
29,847 

2.44 
18,439 

2.08 
3,900 

1.83 
4,941 

2.39 
1,301 

1.28 
3,022 

1.33 
653 

1.58 
9,328 

2.19 



3.385 

2.04 
2,580 

1.78 
2,103 

1.43 
994 

1.21 
2,230 

1.82 
821 

1.24 
1.391 

1.22 
393 

1.37 
1,371 

1.52 



1,844 

1.75 

2,685 

1.88 

2,857 

1.40 

790 

1.19 

2,115 

l.M 

390 

1.43 

689 

1.12 

252 

1. IG 

1,298 

1.56 



1,579 

1.05 

2,241 

1.64 

2,944 

1.23 

622 

1.00 

1,519 

1.54 

629 

1.29 

533 

1.11 

530 

1.32 

1,152 

1.47 



1.34 
3,332 

1.39 
2,719 

1.14 
1,269 

1.06 
1,716 

1.47 
739 

1.27 
1,301 

1.01 
535 

1.19 
2,025 

1.49 



14, 720 
1.21 



1.13 
1,446 

1.01 
2,089 

1.39 
953 

1.19 
1,156 



17 




18 



Table 10. — Number of cities used in tabtdations regarding number of -police depart- 
ment employees, Apr. 30, 1951, and police killed, 1950 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 





Total 


Population group 


Division 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 
VI 




Over 
250,000 


100,000 to 
250,000 


50,000 to 
100,000 


25,000 to 
50,000 


10,000 to 
25,000 


Less than 
10,000 


Total: 

Population represented 


84, 356, 828 
3,657 


34, 072, 114 
39 


9, 619, 452 
65 


8, 492, 104 
121 


8, 468, 436 
241 


11,512,050 

748 


12, 192, 672 






New England: Total population, 


190 

720 

789 

416 

446 

223 

378 

186 
309 


7 
9 
4 
3 
3 
5 

6 


10 

5 
7 
5 
8 

6 


15 

21 

30 

9 

19 

4 

9 

3 
11 


26 

39 

66 

19 

29 

15 

13 

12 
22 


42 

154 

161 

79 

74 

37 

82 

29 
90 




Middle Atlantic: Total population, 
21,397,908 ^^-- 




East North Central: Total popula- 
tion 19 740 676 


513 


West North Central: Total popula- 
tion, 6,873,667 


300 


South Atlantic: Total population, 
8,306,553 




East South Central: Total popula- 
tion, 3,863,892 




West South Central: Total popula- 
tion 7 113,945 


261 


Mountain: Total population, 
2,450,779 


139 


Pacific: Total population, 8,981,814, 


174 



Police Employees in Individual Cities 

The two following tables show the number of police employees in 
the individual cities listed as reflected in the reports forwarded as of 
April 30, 1951. Within each population group the cities are listed 
alphabetically, by State and city. 

Comparisons of police strength between individual cities should 
not be made indiscriminately, since so many factors enter into the 
adequacy of the number of employees in individual police depart- 
ments. Some departments, for example, may still operate on a 12-hour 
shift basis. Then too, it is known that some are on a 40-hour work- 
week, while in others the employee week is 48 hours or longer. 

It was clear in processing the police employee reports that there 
were variations between the reporting agencies in listing school cross- 
ing guards. Generally, when shown, such emploj-ees were listed as 
part-time employees and, as provided for on the report, the part-time 
employees were expressed in terms of full-time personnel. 

If, however, the department's entries as to part-time employees 
were limited to the total time worked during April, the data were 
changed by the FBI into terms of full-time personnel, and on the 
assumption that a regular full-time employee worked 200 hours per 
month, if the hours of part-time personnel totaled 150 for April, or 75 
percent of a full-time employee, 1 regular employee was counted. 



19 

Also the differences in available automotive and radio equipment 
have a direct bearing on the problems of the adequacy of the nmnber 
of employees. It must also be recognized that the following figm-es 
do not reflect the extent to which private police and guard forces are 
in existence or such information as to the number of public park police 
and the like. 

Most of the larger cities reported civilian employees, and the follow- 
ing listing shows the extent to which civihan employees are used in 
police departments of different sizes: 

Percent 
civilian 
Population group: employees 

Total, all cities 7. 6 

Group I (over 250,000) 8. 4 

Group II (100,000-250,000) 10. 8 

Group III (50,000-100,000) 8.4 

Group IV (25,000-50,000) 6. 2 

Group V (10,000-25,000) J 4. 2 

Group VI (2,500-10,000) . 4. 2 

If employees were not paid from police department funds, or from 
some public fund allocated for police personnel, they were excluded 
■from the tabulations. Also, employees on military or other extended 
leave of absence were excluded from the figm-es. 



Table 11. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities over 
25,000 in population 

[Based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 

CITIES WITH OVER 250,000 INHABITANTS 



City 


Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 


City 


Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 




Police 
offi- 
cers 


Ci- 
vil- 
ians 


Total 


Police 
offi- 
cers 


Ci- 
vil- 
ians 


Total 


Birmingham, Ala 


371 

4,124 

656 

379 

1,631 

574 

2,061 

473 

6,961 

695 

501 

958 

1,916 

2,738 

4,313 

582 

372 

'881 


37 

780 

117 
74 
96 
79 

174 
63 

350 

no 

30 
5 
254 
217 
334 
51 
27 
134 
412 
123 


408 

4,904 

773 

453 

1, 727 

653 

2,235 

536 

7,311 

805 

531 

963 

2,170 

2,955 

4,647 

633 

399 

723 

2,302 

1,004 


Newark, N.J : 

Buflalo, N. Y 


1,219 

1,202 

18, 236 

441 

259 

825 

1,802 

432 

370 

659 

4,889 

1,327 

340 

483 

359 

605 

280 

608 

1,313 


143 
142 
812 
94 
13 
31 
337 
82 
64 
103 
297 
41 
82 
65 
37 
140 
90 
101 
117 


1 362 






Oakland, Calif 


New York, N Y 


19, 048 


San Diego, Calif 


Rochester, N. Y 




Akron, Ohio 

Cmcinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio.. 

Columbus, Ohio 




Denver, Colo 


856 






Atlanta, Ga 

Chicago, lU 


514 


Indianapolis, Ind. 


Portland, Oreg 


762 


Louisville, Ky 


Philadelphia Pa 


5,186 

1,368 

422 

548 




Pittsburgh, Pa 

Memphis, Tenn 


Baltimore, Md 








Minneapolis, Minn 


Houston, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

Seattle, Wash 

Milwaukee, Wis 


745 


St. Paul, Minn 


370 


Kansas City, Mo 

St. Louis, Mo 


709 
1,430 


Jersey City, N. J 







20 



Table 11. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30 
25,000 in 'population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 100,000 TO 250,000 INHABITANTS 



1951, cities ovei 



City 



Mobile, Ala 

Montgomery, Ala... 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Little Rock, Ark 

Berkeley, Calif 

Long Beach, Calif.. 

Pasadena, Calif 

Sacramento, Calif... 
Bridgeport, Conn... 

Hartford, Conn 

New Haven, Conn.. 
Water bury. Conn... 

Wilmington, Del 

Jacksonville, Fla 

Miami, Fla 

Tampa, Fla 

Savannah, Ga 

Peoria, 111 

Evansville, Ind 

Fort Wayne, Ind... 

Qarv, Ind 

South Bend, Ind.... 
Des Moines, Iowa.. 
Kansas City, Kans. 

Wichita, Kans 

Baton Rouge, La... 

Shreveport, La 

Cambridge, Mass.. 
Fall River, Mass... 
New Bedford, Mass 
Somerville, Mass. . . 
Springfield, Mass... 
Worcester, Mass 



Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 



Police 


Ci- 


offi- 


vil- 


cers 


ians 


131 


23 


137 


12 


157 


28 


118 


5 


126 


6 


360 


37 


147 


35 


196 


32 


309 


14 


295 


29 


375 


29 


197 


15 


180 


24 


333 


46 


490 


140 


165 


22 


146 


13 


137 


9 


163 


14 


192 


3 


201 


38 


156 


9 


165 


16 


148 


22 


179 


31 


116 


6 


128 


16 


230 


9 


213 


12 


208 


12 


170 


2 


351 


23 


376 


24 



City 



Flint. Mich 

• Iraiiil Raiiids, Mich.. 

Diiluth, Minn 

Omaha, Xobr 

Camden, N. .7 

Elizabeth, X.J 

Paterson, N. J 

Trenton, N. J 

Albany, N. Y 

Syracuse, N. Y 

Utica, N. Y 

Yonkers, N. Y 

Canton, Ohio 

Dayton, Ohio 

Youngstown, Ohio 

Oklahoma Citv, Okla. 

Tulsa, Okla 

.\llentown. Pa 

Reading, Pa 

Scranton, Pa 

Providence, R. I 

Chattanooga, Tenn... 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Nashville. Tenn 

Austin, Tex 

Corpus Christi, Tex.. 

El Paso, Tex 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Arlington County, Va 

Norfolk, Va 

Richmond, Va 

Spokane, Wash 

Tacoma, Wash 



Number of polici 
department em 
ployees 



Police 
offi- 
cers 



CITIES WITH 50,000 TO 100,000 INHABITANTS 



Gadsden, Ala 

Alameda, Calif 

Alhambra, Calif 

Burbank, Calif 

Fresno, Calif 

Qlendale, Calif 

Richmond, Calif 

San Bernardino, Calif 

San Jose, Calif 

Santa Monica, Calif.. 

South Gate, Calif 

Stockton, Calif.. 

Pueblo, Colo 

New Britain, Conn... 

Stamford, Conn 

Orlando, Fla 

St. Petersburg, Fla. . . 

Augusta, Ga 

Columbus, Ga... 

Macon, Ga 

Aurora, 111 

Berwyn, 111 

Cicero, 111 

Decatur, 111... 

Eiist St. Louis, HI 

Evanston, 111 

Jolict, 111 

Oak Park, 111 

Rockford, 111.. 

Springfield, 111 

East Chicago, Ind 

Hanunond, Ind 

Muncic, Ind 

Terre Haute, Ind 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. . 
Davenport, Iowa 



80 


2 


82 


66 


2 


68 


57 


8 


65 


87 


26 


113 


148 


30 


178 


123 


40 


163 


140 


10 


150 


108 






118 


7 


125 


126 


33 


l.M) 


48 


8 


56 


98 


() 


104 




5 


72 


120 


6 


126 


141 


10 


151 


78 


7 


85 


89 


8 


97 


135 


11 


146 


116 




116 


10(1 


2 


162 


51 




51 


39 


n 


50 


80 


22 


102 


54 


4 


58 


76 


24 


100 


90 
63 


40 
2 


1.30 
65 


69 


6 


75 


94 


6 


100 


97 


21 


118 


110 


6 


116 


113 

82 
90 


14 
...... 


127 

82 
92 


79 
80 


8 


86 
88 



Sioux City, Iowa.. 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Topeka, Kans 

Covington, Ky 

Lexington, Ky 

Portland, Maine... 

Brockton, Mass 

Brookline, Mass... 

Holyoke, Mass 

Lawrence, Mass... 

Lvnn, Mass 

IVialdon, Mass 

Medford, Mass 

Newton, Mass 

Tittsfield, Mass.... 

Quincv, Mass 

Bay City. Mich... 

Dearborn, Mich 

Jackson, Mich 

Kalamazoo, Mich.. 

1/ansing, Mich 

i'ontiac, Mich 

Saginaw, Mich 

Jackson, Miss 

St. Joseph, Mo 

Springfield, Mo.... 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Manchester, N. H. 
Atlantic City, N. J 

Bavomie, N. J 

Clifton, N. J 

East Orange, N. J. 

Hoboken, N. J 

Irvington, N. J 

Passaic, .N. J 

UnionCity, N. J.. 



79 


17 


65 




75 


25 


75 


8 


91 




111 


7 


97 


5 


131 


5 


103 


1 


145 


5 


183 


14 


115 


2 


111 


1 


167 


4 


67 


2 


145 


4 


79 


8 


161 


29 


68 


5 


SO 




131 


4 


70 


10 


125 


15 


105 


29 




11 


78 


11 


82 


18 




8 


198 


40 


221 


7 






139 








99 


5 


125 




114 





21 



Table 11. — Niimher of -police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities over 
25,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 50,000 TO 100,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 


City 


Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 




Police 
offi- 
cers 


Ci- 
vil- 
ians 


Total 


Police 
offi- 
cers 


Ci- 
vil- 
ians 


Total 


Albuquerque, N. M 


114 
117 

137 
129 
149 
152 
80 
88 
121 

149 

65 
70 
59 

48 

78 

?i 

130 
75 
67 
76 
97 
76 
72 


...... 

9 
20 
14 
26 
3 
8 
7 

14 
12 
26 
5 

17 
...... 

4 
8 
5 
7 
5 
10 

i 


114 
128 
146 
149 
163 
178 
83 
96 
128 
91 
161 
91 
75 
76 
48 
83 
88 
82 
135 
82 

86 
97 

77 
72 


Woonsocket, R. I 


76 
160 
134 
114 

60 
95 
87 
72 
44 
93 
54 
53 
95 
68 
61 
84 
79 
123 
89 
83 
76 
76 
65 
123 
112 


5 
14 
11 

10 

2 
3 

2 
6 
5 
4 
4 
3 
7 
14 

4 

8 

3 


81 








Mount Vernon, N. Y 

New Rochellc, N. Y 

Schenectady, N. Y 


Columbia, S. C 

Greenville, S. C 

Sioux Falls S Dak 


145 
124 

67 


Trov, N. Y 


Amarillo, Tex 


97 


Asheville, N. C 

Durham, N. C 

Greensboro, N. C 


Beaumont, Tex 

Galveston, Tex 

Laredo, Tex 


88 
74 
47 


Raleigh, N C 


Lubbock Tex 


101 


AVinston-Salem, N. C 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio -. 


Port Arthur, Tex 

San Angelo, Tex 


56 
55 






97 




AVichita Falls, Tex . 




Lorain, Ohio 


Ogden, Utah 


66 






88 




Portsmouth, Va 

Roanoke, Va 

Charleston, W. Va 




Chester, Pa 


126 


Johnstown, Pa 


Huntington, W. Va 


97 


Lancaster, Pa • 


Wheeling W Va 


77 








Wilkes-Barre, Pa 


Kenosha, Wis 


73 


York, Pa 


Madison, Wis 

Racine, Wis _. 


148 











CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS 



Anniston, Ala 

Bessemer, Ala 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 

Tucson, Ariz 

Hot Springs, Ark 

North Little Rock, Ark 

Pine Bluff, Ark 

Bakersfleld. Calif 

Beverly Hills, Calif 

Compton, Calif 

Huntington Park, Calif. 

Inglewood, Calif 

Lynwood, Calif 

Palo Alto, Calif 

Pomona, Calif 

Redondo Beach, Calif.. 
Redwood City, Calif.... 

Riverside, Calif 

San Leandro, Calif 

San Mateo, Calif 

Santa Ana. Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Bristol, Conn 

East Hartford, Conn.._. 

Greenwich, Conn 

Meriden, Conn 

Middletown, Conn 

New London, Conn 

Norwalk, Conn 

Torrington, Conn 

West Haven, Conn 

Daytona Beach, Fla 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla... 

Gainesville. Fla 

Lakeland, Fla 

Miami Beach, Fla 

Panama City. Fla 

Pensacola, Fla 

Tallahassee, Fla 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Albany, Ga 

Athens, Ga 

Rome, Qa 



42 


1 


43 


30 




30 


51 


2 


53 


67 


12 


79 


38 


1 


39 


48 




48 


26 




26 


86 


6 


92 


54 


10 


64 


42 


H 


50 


48 


3 


51 


51 


4 


55 


28 




28 


30 


3 


33 


47 


14 


61 


26 


1 


27 


31 


2 


33 


67 


6 


73 


28 




29 


50 


2 


52 


60 


4 


64 


58 


12 


70 


63 


5 


68 


42 


1 


43 


52 


2 


54 


92 


10 


102 


63 


2 


65 


34 


2 


36 


60 


3 


63 


78 


1 


79 


49 


1 


50 


4S 




48 


50 


5 


55 


51 


6 


57 


35 


4 


39 


34 


5 


39 


132 


23 


155 


26 


6 


32 


74 


10 


84 


39 


5 


44 


67 


2 




37 




37 


34 


1 


35 


38 


7 


45 



Boise, Idaho 

Pocatello, Idaho 

Alton, 111 

Belleville, III 

Bloomington, 111 

Champaign. Ill 

Danville, 111 

Elgin, 111 

Galesburg, 111 

Granite City, 111.... 

Kankakee, 111 

Maywood, 111 

Moline, 11! 

Quincy. Ill 

Rock Island, 111 

AVaukegan, 111 

Anderson, Ind 

Bloomington, Ind.. 

Elkhart, Ind 

Kokomo. Ind 

Lafayette, Ind 

Marion, Ind 

Michigan City, Ind 

Mishawaka, Ind 

New Albany, Ind.. 

Richmond, Ind 

Burlington, Iowa... 

Clinton, Iowa 

Council BluSs, low; 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Fort Dodge. Iowa_. 

Iowa City, Iowa 

Mason City, Iowa,. 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Hutchinson, Kans.. 

Saltna, Kans 

Ashland, Ky... 

Newport, Ky 

Owensboro, Ky 

Paducah, Ky 

Alexandria, La 

Lake Charles, La... 

Monroe, La 

Bangor, Maine 



52 


1 


32 


3 


37 




31 


1 


36 


3 


30 


1 


28 




42 


2 


32 


5 


20 




22 


1 


24 


1 


30 


2 


41 


4 


43 




34 


2 


68 


5 


36 


4 


55 


5 


56 


1 


48 




39 




43 




43 


2 


26 




50 




33 




27 




30 


2 


50 




20 


3 


21 




28 


7 


30 


3 


27 


2 


26 


1 


32 


3 


46 


8 


44 


2 


49 




55 


1 


36 




48 


4 


48 


8 



22 



Table 11. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities over 
26,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



Lewiston, Maine _. 

Cumberland, Md 

Hagerstown, Md 

Belmont, Mass 

Beverly, Mass 

Chelsea, Mass 

Chicopee, Mass 

Everett, Mass.. 

Fitchburg, Mass 

Gloucester, Mass 

Haverhill, Mass 

Melrose, Mass... 

Northampton, Mass 

Revere, Mass 

Salem, Mass 

Taunton, Mass 

Waltham, Mass 

Waterto'W'n, Mass. 

Weymouth, Mass 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

Battle Creek, Mich 

Ferndale, Mich 

Hamtramck, Mich 

Highland Park, Mich 

Lincoln Park, Mich 

Muskegon, Mich 

Port Huron, Mich 

Royal Oak, Mich 

Wyandotte, Mich 

Rochester, Minn 

St. Cloud, Minn 

Biloxi, Miss 

Greenville, Miss 

Hattiesburg, Miss 

Meridian. Miss 

Vicksburg, Miss 

Columbia, Mo 

Independence, Mo 

Joplin, Mo 

University City, Mo 

Billings, Mont 

Butte, Mont._ 

Great Falls, Mont 

Reno, Nev 

Concord, N. H 

Nashua, N. H 

Belleville, N.J 

Bloomfield, N. J 

GarfiPld, N.J 

Hackensack, N. J 

Kearny, N. J 

Linden, N. J 

Montclair, N. J 

New Brunswick, N. J 

North Bergen, N. J 

Nutley, N.J 

Orange, N. J 

Perth Amboy, N. J 

Plainfield, N. J 

Teaneck, N. J. 

Union Township, N. J 

West New York, N. J 

West Orange, N. J 

Woodbridge, N. J 

Roswell, N. Mex 

Santa Fe, N. Mex 

Amsterdam, N. Y 

Auburn, N. Y 

Elmira, N. Y 

Hempstead, N. Y 

Ithaca, N. Y.. 

Jamestown, N. Y 

Kingston, N. Y 

Lackawanna, N. Y 



Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 



Police 


Ci- 


offi- 


vil- 


cers 


ians 


52 


3 


46 


4 


50 


4 


45 


3 


55 




82 


'5 


71 


2 


118 




66 


6 


41 


2 


70 


2 


48 


1 


.31 


3 


70 


4 




7 


55 


8 


60 


4 


67 


5 


41 


2 


48 


5 


47 


8 


32 


4 


97 


13 


107 


12 


32 


2 


59 


6 


40 


11 


39 


4 


51 


6 


41 




27 




24 


5 


38 


4 


26 




55 


8 


32 




30 


3 


30 


1 


34 


4 


39 


6 


35 


2 


31 




30 


2 


74 


10 


35 


3 


43 


5 


54 


2 


84 


7 


43 




52 




104 


1 


83 




99 


6 


52 


2 


76 


5 


36 




71 


2 


91 


4 


70 




47 




58 


13 


95 




52 


2 


56 


9 






31 


1 


42 


1 


48 


4 


94 




48 


3 


34 


2 


59 




42 


1 


01 


1 



City 



Lockport, N. Y 

Newburgh, N. Y.. 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y 

Rome, N. Y 

Watertown, N. Y 

White Plains, N. Y 

Fayetteville, N. C 

High Point, N. C 

Kannapolis, N. C 

Rocky Mount, N. C 

Wilmington, N. C 

Fargo, N. Dak 

Grand Forks, N. Dak... 

Alliance, Ohio 

Barberton, Ohio 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio... 

Ea.st Cleveland, Ohio 

Elyria, Ohio.. 

Euclid, Ohio... 

Lima, Ohio 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Marion, Ohio 

Massillon, Ohio 

Middletown, Ohio 

Newark, Ohio 

Norwood, Ohio 

Parma, Ohio 

Portsmouth, Ohio.. 

Sandusky, Ohio 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Steubenville, Ohio 

Warren, Ohio 

Zanesville, Ohio 

Enid, Okla 

Lawton, Okla 

Muskogee, Okla 

Norman, Okla 

Eugene, Oreg 

Salem, Oreg 

Aliquippa, Pa 

Easton, Pa 

Hazleton, Pa 

Lebanon, Pa 

New Castle, Pa 

New Kensington, Pa 

Norristown, Pa 

Sharon, Pa._ 

Washington, Pa 

AVilkinsburg, Pa 

Williamsport, Pa 

East Providence, R. I... 

Newport, R. I 

Warwick, R. I 

Spartanburg, S. C 

Rapid City, S. Dak 

Jackson, Term 

Johnson City, Tenn 

Oak Ridge, Tenn 

Abilene, Tex 

Brownsville, Tex 

Tyler, Tex 

Provo, Utah 

Burlington, Vt 

Charlottesville, Va 

Danville, Va 

Lynchburg, V^a 

Newport News, Va 

Petersburg, Va 

Bellingham, Wash 

Bremerton, Wash 

Everett, Wash 

Vancouver, Wash 

Yakima, Wash 

Clarksburg, W. Va 



23 



Table 11. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities over 
25,000 in population — Continued 

CITIES WITH 25,000 TO 50,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 


City 


Number of police 
department em- 
ployees 




Police 
offi- 
cers 


Ci- 
vil- 
ians 


Total 


Police 
offi- 
cers 


Ci- 


Total 


Fairmont, W. Va 


29 
14 
33 

38 
39 
47 
35 
62 


1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
7 


29 
15 
34 
39 
41 
51 

69 


Manitowoc, Wis 

Oshkosh, Wis - 


38 
58 
48 
55 
37 
50 
60 
25 


'" 2 

4 


40 


Parkersburg W Va 


Sheboygan, Wis 


48 


Appleton, Wis 

Beloit, Wis 

Eau Claire, Wis 


Superior, MMs 

Wausau, Wis 

W auwatosa. Wis 

West Allis, Wis . 


56 
37 
50 




62 


La Crosse Wis 


Cheyeime, Wyo 


29 









Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30; 1951, cities with 
population from 2,600 to 25,000 

[Based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


ALABAMA 


13 
22 
31 
12 
24 
11 
34 
15 
25 
21 
35 
20 
IS 

17 

11 
10 
19 
14 
11 
17 
20 

19 
20 

32 
17 
22 
21 
32 
17 
21 
20 
14 
21 
41 
19 
24 


CALIFORNIA— con. 

El Cerrito 


23 
35 
16 
20 

25 
16 
12 

14 
20 

20 

25 
23 
22 
23 
25 
26 
29 
29 
14 
33 
17 
22 
22 
19 
25 
33 
16 
14 
26 
24 
25 
25 
16 
17 
18 
41 
18 
17 


CALIFORNIA— con. 

Santa Rosa 




Decatur 


Eureka 


South Pasadena 

South San Francisco.. 
Torrance 


28 




19 


Fairfield 




34 






19 




Hayward 


Vallejo 


64 




Hermosa Beach 

La Mesa 




27 


Opelika 


Visalia 


18 




Lodi 


Watson ville 

Whittier 

COLORADO 

Aurora 


20 


Pfichard 


Madera 


31 




Manhattan Beach 

Maywood . - . . 




Sheffield 




Talladega 




12 






23 




Modesto 


Englewood 

Fort Collins 


13 


Mesa 


Monrovia 


15 






Grand Junction 

Greeley 


21 


ARKANSAS 

Blytheville 


Monterey 

Monterey Park 

Napa 


22 
14 




CONNECTICUT 




ElDorad9 


National City 

Newport Beach 

Oceans ide 


47 


Helena 


Naugatuck... 


29 




Ontario 


42 






Shelton 


14 






22 




Petaluma 


Willimantic 


19 






FLORIDA 

Bradenton 




Albany. 


Pittsburg 




Antioch 


Redlands 


14 




Salinas 


Clearwater . 


36 








49 


Bell 


San Carlos 


Fort Myers . 


17 




San Fernando 

San Gabriel 


Fort Pierce 


15 


Burlingame 

Chieo 


Hialeah 


30 


San Luis Obispo 


Hollywood ... 


43 


Chula Vista 


Key West 


22 




San Pablo 


Lake Worth.... 


24 






North Miami 


18 






24 


Culver City 


Santa Cruz 


St. .\ugustine 

Sanford 


22 


Dalv City 


Santa Maria 


15 


El Centro-... _. 


Santa Paula. — 


Sarasota.... 


23 



966801° — 51- 



24 



Table 12. — Nvniher of police department employees, Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


GEORGIA 


17 
30 
13 
24 

25 
27 
27 
36 
16 

14 
28 
30 

16 
13 
30 
25 
14 
20 
20 

12 
14 

8 
12 
14 

8 
14 
31 
11 
12 
14 
12 
11 
14 
19 
16 

8 
21 
21 

5 
16 
17 
17 
17 
21 
13 
10 
12 

7 
18 
17 
10 
15 
15 
16 

22 
22 
14 
16 
14 
7 

19 

8 

20 
21 


INDIANA— con. 


25 
19 
11 
22 
14 
9 
20 
13 
28 
30 
29 
20 

14 
24 
17 
16 
12 

16 
15 
12 
11 
13 
21 

20 
13 
11 

15 
14 
10 
22 
14 
11 
16 
11 
12 
12 
11 
14 
19 
20 
18 
12 
13 
16 
20 
13 

30 
12 
14 
36 
15 
14 

14 

19 
13 
12 
21 
18 
12 
8 
14 


MAINE 


25 


BriiBswick 


Crawfordsville 

Elwood 


Augusta 


23 


College Park 


Bath 


15 




Biddeford 


14 


Decatur 


Goshen 

Hobart 

Huntington 

Jeffersonville 


Saco 


8 


East Point 


Sanford 


13 




South Portland 

Waterville 


26 


La Grange 


18 


Marietta 


La Porte 


Westbrook 

MARYLAND 


9 








Thomasville 


New Castle 




Valdosta 


Peru 

Shelby ville 


27 




Valparaiso 

Vincennes 






IDAHO 


College Park 


10 




Wabash 




26 


Caldwell 








Coeur D'Alene 

Idaho Falls 


West Lafayette 

IOWA 


Mount Rainier 


8 
26 


Lewis ton 


Takoma Park 


12 


Moscow 


MASSACHUSETTS 

Adams 








Twin Falls 


Boone 






Cedar Falls 


15 


ILLINOIS 


Charles City 


Attleboro 


33 










Blue Island 


Keokuk 


Gardner 


25 


Brookfleld 


Marshall town 


Greenfield 








25 


Calumet City 


Newton 


Marlborough 


19 




Milford 


16 




KANSAS 

Arkansas City 






Centralis 


North Adams 


29 


Chicago Heights 

Colllnsville 


Peabody 


40 




23 


De Kalb 


Southbridge 


21 


Des Plaines 




Webster 


16 


Dixon 




Westfield 


37 


Downers Grove 




Woburn 


22 


East Moline 




MICHIOAN 

Adrian 




Elmhurst 






Elmwood Park 




19 


Evergreen Park .. .. 




Albion 


9 


Forest Park 




Allen Park 


14 








14 






Benton Harbor 

Berkley 


28 






12 


Highland Park 


Liawrence . 


Birmingham. 


25 


Jacksonville .. 




Cadillac 


9 






East Detroit 


23 


La Grange 


Pvewion 


East Lansing 


13 


La Salle. 


u t lawa 


Eeorse-.- 


40 


Lincoln 




Escanaba 


16 


Macomb 




Grosse Pointe Park... 
Grosse Pointe Woods . 
Hazel Park 


32 


Marion 


KENTUCKY 

Bowling Green 

Fort Thomas 


17 


Mattoon 


18 




Holland 


19 






18 


Mount Vernon 


Ironwood 


17 










Frankfort 






Pekin 


Henderson 




10 


River Forest 


Middlesborough 

Richmond 


Midland 


20 








Sterling 


LOUISIANA 


Mount Clemens 

Mount Pleasant 

Muskegon Heights . . . 
Niles 


20 




9 




23 




24 








22 


Winnetka 


Bossier City 


River Rouge 


32 


Wood River 




Roseville 


20 




Hoiima 


St. Clair Shores 


25 






18 






Sault Ste. Marie 

Traverse City 

Ypsilanti 


18 


Bedford 




16 


Columbus 


West Monroe 


28 



25 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1961, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


MINNESOTA 

Albert Lea 


16 
27 
13 
14 

9 

20 
26 
15 
10 
11 
10 

9 

19 
31 

21 
22 
25 
25 
23 
10 
30 
9 
14 

19 
15 
28 
10 
7 

23 
24 
11 
10 
24 
20 
12 
10 
11 
10 
17 
19 
24 
22 

9 
13 
19 
23 

15 
31 
22 
12 
15 
14 
18 

60 

30 
13 


NEW HAMPSHIRE— 

continued 
Dover 

Keene 


21 
16 
23 
27 
15 

49 
27 

21 
24 
31 

21 
18 
20 

44 
31 
24 
24 
20 
66 
17 
27 
47 
17 
13 
30 
21 
18 
24 
19 
22 
54 
25 
14 
27 
28 
15 
26 
13 
19 
38 

39 
21 
36 
16 

16 
13 
20 
15 

' 23 
20 
40 
18 
21 
24 
33 

42 
19 
36 
26 
97 
33 
27 
23 


NEW YORK— con. 

Hudson 


18 


Austin 


Johnson City 


%i 










Faribault 


Portsmouth 


Kenmore 


26 








40 


Hibbing . 


NEW JERSEY 




37 


Mankato 


Mamaroneck 


29 






13 








Red Wing 


Bergenfleld 


Newark 


10 


Richfield 


Bridgcton 

Burlington 


North Tonawanda.... 
Ogdensburg 


26 


Robbinsdale 


18 


St Louis Park 


Carteret 


Olean 


32 




ClifFside Park 

Collinswood 


Oneida.- 


17 


Virginia 


Oneonta 


14 


Winona 






25 




Dumont 


Oswego 


2:3 


MISSISSIPPI 


East Paterson 


Peekskill 


31 






25 


Clarksdale 


Fair Lawn 


Port Chester 


44 


Columbus 


Fort Lee 


Rensselaer 


19 


Greenwood 


Gloucester City 

Haddonfleld 


Rockville Centre 

Rye 


44 


Gulfport 


32 






Saratoga Springs 


28 






36 


Natchez 


Lodi 


Tonawanda 


20 






Watervliet 


24 


Tupelo 


Madison 


NORTH CAROLINA 

Albemarle. . 






Millville 












North Arlington 

North Plainfleld 


17 






44 






30 




Pleasantville 


Elizabeth City 

Gastonia 


19 






48 


Fulton 


Rahway 


Qoldsboro... 


26 


Harmibal 


Red Bank 


Greenville 


25 




Ridgefleld Park 

Ridgewood 




16 


Jennings 


Hickorv... 


28 


Kirksville 




Kinston 


25 






20 


Maple wood 


Rutherford 


Monroe 


13 






Reidsville 


24 


Moberly 


Somerville 

South Orange 


Salisbury. 


29 


Overland 


Sanford 


10 






Shelby 


21 


Richmond Heights..- 


Summit 


Statesville.. 


24 




Thomas ville 


17 


Redalia 


Westfleld 


Wilson 


31 




Woodbury 


NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck 




MONTANA 


NEW MEXICO 

Carlsbad 


22 






8 




Clovis 


Minot 


26 




Hobbs 


OHIO 

Ashland.. 




Missoula 


Las Cruces 






NEW YORK 


16 




Ashtabula 


30 






9 


Grand Island 


Beacon 


Bellaire 


16 








9 


Kearney 


Coming 


Berea 


13 


-Vorfolk 


Cortland 


Bexley 


15 






Bowling Green 

Bucyrus 


12 


Scottsbluff 


Endieott 


14 




Floral Park 


Cambridge . .. 


17 


NEVADA 


Freeport 


Campbell 


16 






Chillicothe 


16 


Las Vegas 


Garden City 


Conneaut 








Coshocton 


13 








10 








8 




Gloversville 


East Liverpool 

Findlay 


24 


Claremont 


Homell 


22 



26 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500'to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


OHIO— continued 

Fostoria 

Fremont 

Garfield Heights 

Qirard 


15 
16 
20 
11 
16 
9 
24 
13 

14 
15 
11 
19 
17 
16 
17 
9 
14 
21 
11 
18 
11 
19 
14 
12 
16 
14 

17 
27 
19 
18 
19 

9 
12 
13 
22 
14 

9 
17 
23 
11 
12 
25 
20 

13 
21 
13 

15 
27 
22 
11 
12 

19 
11 
21 
14 
8 
8 
5 
28 
22 
15 
14 
27 
14 
17 


PENNSYLVANIA — COn. 

Carlisle 


16 
14 
17 
25 
19 
9 
21 

12 
23 
13 
15 
10 
15 
22 
13 
18 
21 

9 
21 
14 
14 
18 
16 
13 
15 
13 

7 

16 
21 
19 

8 

22 
16 
20 
23 
13 
24 
11 
25 
27 
13 
12 
11 
12 
12 
26 

7 

13 
32 
13 

8 
15 
14 
15 

16 
30 

38 
30 

24 
40 
27 

24 
15 
13 
15 


TENNESSEE 

Bristol 


18 








Chambersburg 

Clairton 


Cleveland 

Columbia.. 


14 
12 


Ironton 












15 




Conncllsville. 

Conshohocken 


Kingsport 


33 


Maple Heights 








15 


Martins Ferry__ 




TEXAS 

Alice 




Donora 




New Philadelphia.... 
Niles 






Du Bois 


10 


Painesville 


Dun more 


Baytown 


18 






Bellaire 


6 


Rocky River 


EUwood City 


Big Spring 


19 




Farrell 


Borger. 


15 








21 


South Euclid 


Hanover . 


Bryan 


24 


Struthers 


Homestead 


Cleburne 


10 


Tiffin 






16 


Troy 


Jeanneite .. 


Del Rio 


5 


University Heights... 
Van Wert 












20 


Washington C. H 

Wooster 






11 


Lewistown 


Gainesville. 


11 


Xenia 




Garland 


9 




Mahanoy City 

McKees Rocks 

Meadville 


Grand Prairie 


10 
21 




Harlingen 


21 




Monessen 


Highland Park 

Kingsville 


19 




Mount Carmel - 

Munhall 


12 




Lamesa 










Nanticoke. 


Lufkin... 


16 




North Braddock 

Oil City 


Marshall 


23 


McAllen 










Phoenbcville 


McKinney 


16 




Pittston 


Mercedes 


4 




Plymouth... 


Midland 


33 






Mission 




Midwest City 






9 


Shamokin 


New Braunfels 

Orange 


13 


Ponoa City 






State College 


Palestine 










Steelton 


Pampa.. 


21 




Sunbury . 


Paris 


22 






Pasadena 


18 




TamaQua 


Plainview . . 


15 




Turtle Creek 


San Benito 


5 


OREGON 






20 








18 


Albany 






16 


Astoria 








Bend 


West Mifflin... 

Yeadon 






Corvallis 




27 


Klamath Falls 


RHODE ISLAND 


Texas City 


22 


Medford. .. 

Pendleton 


University Park 


24 


Springfield.- 


Victoria . 


18 




Central Falls 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Anderson 




8 


PENNSYLVANIA 


W. University Place.. 

UTAH 


10 


Arnold 






12 




Greenwood 


VERMONT 




Berwick. 

Bethel 


Orangeburg 

Rock Hill 






Sumter. 


11 




SOUTH DAKOTA 




29 


Bradford 


VIRGINIA 

Bristol 




Brentwood 




Bristol 




Butler 


Huron 


21 


Can ens burg 


Mitchell 


Fredericksburg 

Harrisonburg 


19 


Carbondale 


Water town 


23 



27 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 10,000 TO 25,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
cuent em- 
ployees 


VIRGINIA— continued 
Hopewell 


15 
26 
23 
24 
26 
18 
19 

27 
17 
12 
23 
22 
14 
15 
9 
26 


WASHINGTON— con. 

Richland 


42 
33 
23 

23 
13 
9 
15 
26 

14 
11 

15 
16 


WISCONSIN— con. 
Janesvllle 


30 




Walla Walla 




16 


South Norfolk 


Wenatchee 


Marshfield 


17 




■WEST VIRGINU 

Bluefield.- 




20 


Suffolk .. .-. 


Neenah 


20 


Waynesboro 


Shorewood 


24 




South Milwaukee 

Stevens Point 

Watertown 


18 




Martinsburg 


19 




Moundsville 


14 


Aberdeen 


South Charleston 

Weirton 


Waukesha 


33 


Hoquiam 


Whitefish Bay 

Wisconsin Rapids 

WYOMINO 


23 




WISCONSIN 

Ashland . 


19 


Longview 










26 


Port Angeles 


Beaver Dam 


Laramie 


13 




Chippewa Falls 

Cudahy 




9 


Ren ton 


Sheridan 


12 










CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS 


ALABAMA 

Albertville 


6 

12 
3 
9 

10 
5 

11 
4 
5 
2 
4 
5 
4 

■ 7 
4 
6 
4 
3 
9 
6 
4 
5 
3 

14 
5 
4 
3 
2 
2 

12 
5 
4 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

19 
6 
9 

12 
5 
4 

3 
3 

7 
4 
7 
1 


ARIZONA — continued 
Coolidge 


2 
13 

6 

8 
13 

7 
19 

7 
12 
12 
11 

3 

10 
14 

2 
6 
2 

7 
5 

2 
3 
2 
3 
9 
2 
7 

4 
4 
3 
4 
2 
7 
2 
10 
2 
2 
3 
4 
3 
5 
5 
3 
6 
1 
6 
7 
6 


ARKANSAS— continued 
Warren 


3 






West Helena...- 


5 




Eloy 


Wynne... 


4 


Andalusia 


Flagstaff 


CAUFORNIA 

Alturas 






Glendale 




Atmore 


Globe 

Kingman 


4 


Attalla 


Areata 


6 


Boaz 


Miami 


Atherton .. 


7 




Nogales 


Atwater 


5 








7 


Ohildersburg 


Tempe 


Banning 


9 






Barstow 


11 


Cordova 


Winslow 


Beaumont 


6 




Yuma 


Belmont 


8 


Elba 


ARKANSAS 

Ashdown 


Benicia 


9 


Enterprise 


Bishop.- 


6 


Fairhope 


Blythe 


8 


Florala 


Batesville 


Brea 

Calexico.. 


6 


Fort Payne 


Clarksville 


10 






Carmel By The Sea... 
Chino 


9 


Guntersville 


Crossett 


7 


Hartselle 


De Queen 


Claremont.. 


8 






CloviK 


5 


Jasper 


De Witt 


Coalinga 


12 


Leeds 




Colusa 


4 








9 




Forrest Citv 


Corcoran 


8 








3 


Monroeville 


Magnolia 


Covina 


8 






Davis... 


5 






Delano- 


11 


Oneonta 


Mena 


Dinuba 


5 




Monticello 


ElCajon 


6 






El Monte 


16 




Nashville 


El Segundo 


15 




Newport 


Emeryville 


J4 


Shawmut 


Osceola 


Escondido-- --. 


15 




Paragould 


Exeter .. 


5 






Fairfield 


7 


Trov 


Piggott 


Fillmore 


6 


Tuscumbia 


Pocahontas 


Fort Bragg- - . ..- 


6 






Gilroy 


8 


Union Springs 






6 


Russellville 


Grass Valley 


9 






Gridley 


5 


Ajo 


Siloam Springs 


Hanford 


17 




Healdsburg 


8 








6 


Casa Grande 


Stuttgart 


Hillsborough 


8 






HoUister 


8 


Clifton 


Van Buren - 


Huntington Beach 


17 



28 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


CALIFORNIA— con. 


12 
Ifi 

3 
6 

7 

7 

10 
11 

4 
11 
20 

7 

8 
12 

8 
11 

5 

4 

12 
11 
24 
12 

5 
1.3 

4 

7 
3 
4 
16 
10 
10 

8 
6 
9 

8 

6 
3 


COLORADO— con. 
Leadville 


3 

11 
8 
4 
4 
5 
5 
7 

11 
6 

4 
12 
4 
8 
2 
1 
10 
10 
13 
18 
1 
10 
9 

15 
4 
9 

13 
5 

3 

4 
4 
9 
14 
4 
2 
6 
4 

3 

6 
6 
6 
3 
3 
4 
5 
6 
4 
7 

11 
5 
8 
7 
8 
5 
7 
6 

24 
8 
3 

11 

11 
4 


FLORIDA— con. 








Palatka 




La Habra 


Longmont 


Palm Beach 


43 












Manitou Springs 

Monte Vista 






Lindsay 


Plant City 


14 










Lompoc - 


Roclcy Ford 


Quincy 




Los Banos 


Salida 


Riviera Beach 

St. Cloud 


\\ 




Sterling 




Manteca 


Walsenburg.- . 


Se bring 




Martinez 


CONNECTICUT 

Bethel 


South Miami 


10 








Millbrae 


Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 




Mill Valley 












Needles 


Danielson. 


Wauchula 




North Sacramento 


Groton 


West Miami 




Oakdale 


New Milford- 


Winter Haven 

Winter Park 




Ojai 


Portland 


8 


Oroville 


Putnam 


GEORGIA 
A del 






Rockville 










Paso Rohles 


Routhington 


3 


Placerville 








Porterville 


Thompsonville 

Winsted 


Ashburn 


2 






12 


Red Bluff 


DELAWARE 


Barnesville 


4 


Reedley 


Baxley 


4 


Rialto... .- 




7 








Roseville 


Laurel.. 


Calhnnn 


5 




Milford 


Camilla 


4 


Sanger 


Newark 


Canton 


5 


Sausalito 


New Castle 


Carrollton 


s 




Seaford 




7 


Sebastopol 


FLORIDA 


Cedartown 


12 


Selma 


Chamblee 


3 






3 


Signal Hill 






Sunnyvale 


Arcadia 


Cordele 


11 








5 


Taft 


Bartow. 


Cuthbert 


4 


Tracy 


Belle Glade 


Dawson 


5 




Boynton Beach 

Chipley. 












Upland 


Cocoa 


Eastman 


3 


Vacavilie 


Dade City 






Weed 


Dania . 


Elberton 


10 


Wesco 


De Fimiak Springs. .. 
De Land 


Fitzgerald 


9 


West Covina 


Forest Park 


2 


Willits 








Willows 


Eustis 


Fort Valley 


5 


Woodlake. . 






2 


Woodland 


Fort Meade . 




14 


Yrelca City 


Green Cove Springs.. 
Gulfport 


Hartwell 


5 


Yuba City 


Hawkinsville 


3 








6 




Hallandale... . 




7 




Holly Hill 


Lafayette 


6 








3 




Jacksonville Beach... 
Kissimmee 




3 


Canon City 


Manchester 


4 


Cortez 


Lake City 


Milledgeville 


11 


Craig. 


Lake Wales 


Millen 


4 


Delta 








Durango 


Live Oak 


Montezuma 


3 


Edgewater 


Marianna 


Nashville 


3 












Miami Shores 

Miami Springs 

Mount Dora 


Ocilla 


3 


Golden 


Pelham .. . 


4 




Perry 


3 




New Smyrna Beach.. 
Opalocka 




i; 


Lamar 


Quitman 


5 


Las Animas 


Ormond 


Rockmar't 


6 



29 



Table 12. — Number of -police departvient employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 



GEORGIA— con. 



Rossville 

Sandersville 

Statesboro 

Summerville 

Swainsboro 

Sylvania 

Sylvester 

Tallapoosa 

Thomaston 

Thomson 

Toccoa 

Vidalia 

Warner Robins. 

Washington 

West Point 



IDAHO 



Alameda 

Blackfoot 

Burley 

Emmett 

Gooding 

Grange ville.- 

.Terome 

Kellogg 

Malad City.. 
Montpelier.. 

Payette 

Preston 

Rexbnrg 

Rupert 

St. Anthony - 

Salmon 

Sandpoint--- 

Wallace 

Weiser .- 



Abingdon 

Aledo- 

Anna 

Arlington Heights. 
Barrington 



Beardstown.- 

Bellwood 

Belvidere 

Bensenville.-- 

Benton 

Bradley 

Broadview 

Bushnell 

Carlinville 

Carlyle 

Carmi 

Casey 

Charleston — 

Chester 

Chillicothe--- 
Christopher.. 

Clinton.. 

Creve Coeur.. 
Crystal Lake. 
Deerfleld-.-- 

Dolton 

Du Quoin 

Dwight 

East Alton. - 
Edwardsville. 

EfQngham 

Eldorado 



Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 



City 



ILLINOIS— con. 



Fairfield 

Farmiiigton 

Flora 

Franklin Park 

Galena 

Galva 

Geneseo 

Geneva 

Georgetown 

Gibson City 

Gillespie 

Glencoe 

Glen EUyn 

Glenview 

Greenville 

Harvard 

Havana 

Herrin 

Highland.- - 

Highwood 

Hillsboro 

Hinsdale 

Home wood 

Hoopeston 

Jersey ville 

Johnston City.-- 

Kenilworth 

La Grange Park. 

Lake Forest 

Lansing 

Lawrenceville — 

Lemont 

Lewistown 

Liberty ville 

Lincoln wood 

Litchfield 

Lockport 

Lombard 

Loves Park 

Lyons 

Madison 

Marengo 

Markham 

Marseilles 

Marshall 

Mascoutah 

McLeansboro — 

Mendota 

Metropolis 

Midlothian 

Momence 

Monticello 

Morris, 

Morrison 

Morton 

Morton Grove... 
Mount CarmeL _ 
Mount Morris. -- 
Mount Prospect - 

Mundelein 

Murphysboro... 

Newton 

Niles .... 

Nokomis 

Normal 

Northbrook 

North Chicago... 
North Riverside. 

Oak Lawn 

Oglesby 

Oregon 

Palatine 

Pana 



Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 



City 



ILLINOIS— con. 



Paris 

Park Forest 

Paxton 

Peoria Heights 

Peru 

Pinckney ville 

Pittsfleld 

Pontiac 

Princeton 

Rantoul 

Riverdale 

River Grove 

Riverside 

Robbins 

Robinson 

Rochelle 

Rockdale Junction. 

Rock Falls 

Rush ville 

St. Charles 

Salem 

Sandwich 

Savanna 

Shelby ville 

Silvis 

South Beloit 

South Holland 

Sparta 

Spring Valley 

Staunton 

Steger 

Stickney 

Sullivan 

Summit 



Taylorville 

Tuscola 

Vandalia 

Venice 

Villa Park 

Virden 

Washington 

Waterloo 

Watseka 

Westchester 

West Chicago.... 
Western Springs. 

Westmont 

West ville 

Wilmington 

Woodstock. 

Zion 



Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 



INDIANA 



Alexandria 

Angola 

Attica 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Batesville 

Beech Grove 

Bicknell 

Bluffton 

Boon ville 

Brazil 

Bremen 

Brook ville 

Cambridge City. 

Charlestown 

Chesterton 

Clarksville 

Clinton.- 



30 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities with 
popxdation from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



1 

1 

city 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


INDIANA— con. 

Columbia City 

Decatur 


6 
9 
3 
4 
5 
4 
1 
9 
3 
3 

10 
4 
9 

3 
6 
5 
2 
4 
2 
5 
4 
6 
9 
9 
8 
6 
4 
4 
6 
3 
4 
10 
2 
7 
2 
3 
4 
10 
9 
3 
7 
10 
3 
4 
10 
4 
5 

5 
8 
5 

25 
8 

3 

6 
4 
2 
3 

3 
5 
8 
3 

5 
3 
5 
4 
9 
5 
5 


IOWA— eon. 
De Witt 


2 
4 
4 
5 
8 
5 
2 
6 
3 
3 
3 
3 
5 
3 
7 
4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
6 
3 
2 
8 
3 
3 
7 
3 
3 
5 
2 
5 
7 
3 
2 
3 
6 
2 
7 
7 
2 
2 
4 
4 
3 
4 
10 
4 
3 

5 
5 
7 
6 
5 
4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
3 
6 
3 
3 
5 
4 
3 
4 
4 
10 
4 
3 
4 


KANSAS— con. 


2 


Eagle Grove 


Hugoton 


1 


Delphi 


Eldora 


Tola 


9 








3 


East Gary 


Estherville 


Lamed 


4 




Fairfield 


Liberal 


g 








4 




Grinnell 


Marysville 


4 








15 








3 




Hawarden 


Norton 


3 


OrfMiTlflpIfi 


Humboldt 


Olathe 


4 








4 




Indianola 


Paola 


3 








2 


Hartford City 






7 


Knoxville 


Russell - -- 


6 






Scott City 


3 








11 






KENTUCKY 












Missouri Valley 




Lawrenceburg 


4 


Mount Pleasant 

Nevada . 




4 


T in ton 


Bellevue 


6 


Madison 


New Hampton 

Oelwein 


Berea 


7 




CampbeUsviUe 

Carrollton 


3 


Mitchell 


Onawa 


3 


IVTnntipplln 


Osage 


Catlettsburg 


7 


Mount Vernon 


Osceola 


Corbin 


12 


Pella - 




6 




Perry 


Cynthiana 


6 




Red Oak 




12 


North Manchester.... 


Rock Rapids 


Dayton 


5 




Elizabethtown 






Sheldon 


1 








2 


Plymouth 


Sibley 


Franklin.- 


9 




Spencer 


Fulton 










- 




Tama 


Glasgow .. 


16 




Tipton - - 


Greenville 


4 








12 




Washington 


Harrodsburg 


6 




Waukon 


Hazard 


8 




Waverly 


Irvine 


8 


Speedway 


Webster City 


Jenkins 


5 


Tell City 


West Des Moines 

Winterset 


Kenvir Redbud. 


3 




5 


Union City 


KANSAS 

Abilene 


Ludlow 


6 


Warsaw 


Mayfield 


10 


West Terre Haute 




12 




4 


Winchester 


Anthony . . 


Morganfleld 


4 




Augusta 


Mount Sterling 

Murray 


7 




Baxter Springs... 

BelleviUe 


7 




Nicholasville 

Paintsville.... 


5 


Albia 


Beloit 


6 






Paris 


10 






Park Hills 


3 


Audubon 


Clay Center 


Pineville 


5 


Belle Plaine 


Colby 


Prestonburg 


5 








4 






RusseUville 


4 






Shelbyville 


6 




Ellis 


Somerset 

South Fort Mitchell.. 
Versailles -.- 








2 






2 


Clarinda 


Galena 


Williamsburg-. 

Winchester 


3 


Clarion 


Gamett 


13 


Clear Lake 




LOUISIANA 

Abbeville..- 

Amite 




Cresco 


Hays 














13 


Denison 


Hoisington 


3 



31 



Table 12. — Number of police de-partment employees, Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


LOUISIANA— con. 


1 
4 
4 
3 
4 
2 
8 
3 
4 

4 
4 

1.3 
4 
4 

3 
2 

3 
3 
4 
5 
6 
9 
6 
3 

4 
6 
6 
12 

6 
2 
6 

3 

4 
4 

10 
4 
3 
2 
1 
4 
2 

10 

\ 

4 
3 
8 
10 
10 
6 
4 

3 

5 
4 
4 
1 
4 

10 
4 


MARYLAND— con. 

Ellicott City 


2 

8 
6 
6 
3 
2 
2 
6 

9 

7 
14 

6 

7 

4 
18 

4 
10 

7 

4 

8 

4 
11 

3 
4 

10 

11 
6 
3 
6 
6 
3 
3 
6 

23 
5 
6 
8 
2 


MICHIGAN- con. 

Houghton 

Howell 

Hudson 


4 


Bunkie 

Church Point 


Frostburg 

Greenbelt 


2 




Havre de Grace 

Laurel 


Huntington Woods. . . 

Ionia 

Iron Mountain 




Donaldsonville 


4 


Ferriday 


Pocomoke City 

Riverdale 




Franklin 




Haynesville 


Western port 


Ishpeming . 


13 








3 




MASSACHU,SETT.S 






Jonesboro 


Ludington 


9 




Manistee... 

Manistique . 


8 


Lake Arthur. . 


4 


Morgan City 


Amherst... 


Marine City 


5 


Natchitoches 


Marshall 






Ayer 






PineviUe 


Melvindale 


15 






Michigan Center 

Milan 






Falmouth 


9 


Port Allen 


Mount Morris 


3 




Franklin 

Great Barrington 




St. Martinville 


Negatinee 


11 


Slidell : 


Newberry . 




Springhill 




Northville 


8 


Sulphur 


P . 


Norway 


3 


Tallulah 


Middleborough 






Thibodaux 




4 


Ville Platte 


North Brookfleld 

Orange 

Palmer 


Petoskey 












Pleasant Ridge 

Plymouth 








lo 






Portland 


4 


Bar Harbor 


rtoc pori 


Rochester 


8 


Belfast 


Uxbridge ,.... 






Brewer.- 




2 


Brunswick 




St. Clair 




Calais 


Williamstown 






Camden 






Caribou 


MICHICAN 

Algonac 

Allegan 


St Louis 


4 


Dexter .. 




10 


Dover Foxcroft 




8 


Eastport 




5 


Fairfield 




q 








Fort Fairfield 


Alma 

Bad Axe 

Belding 

Bessemer... 




g 


Hallowell 






Houlton 


W^ntefielH 




Kennebunk 




, 




Big Rapids 








Boyne City 


MINNESOTA 




Livermore Falls 






Care 




Mexico 


Center Line 






Charlevoix 


6 




Anoka 


8 


Old Orchard Bea'ch-^^ 




Bemidji 


9 


Chelsea... 




4 




Clawson 

Coldwater 


Blue Earth 


4 




Breckenridge 


3 




Brooklyn Center 

Cambridge 


1 




Durand 


1 




Eaton Rapids 




12 




Cloquet 


11 




Fenton 


Columbia Heights.... 


S 




Fremont 


8 






3 




Gladstone 


Detroit Lakes 

East Grand Forks 

Edina 


5 




Grand Haven 


9 
9 


Bel Air 


Greenville 


Ely 


10 




Eveleth 


14 


Brunswick 


Grosse Pointe Farms . 
Hancock 


Fairmont 

Fridley 


10 


Capitol Heights 


1 


Hastings 

Hillsdale 




3 




Glenwood 

Golden Valley 


3 


Elkton 


Holly 


3 



966801°— 51- 



32 



Table 12. — Nvmber of police department employees, Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000- — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 to 10,000 INHABITANTS-Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


MINNESOTA— con. 

(Jrand Rapids 


5 
3 
fi 
4 
4 

3 
3 
3 

4 
8 
4 

6 
4 
9 
4 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 

3 
4 
4 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
4 
8 
8 
3 
f) 
6 
4 
6 

12 

8 

6 
6 
4 
5 
8 

10 
7 

11 
7 
2 
3 
8 
5 
5 
3 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
4 
4 
6 
3 
6 
3 

12 


j MISSOURI 

Aurora 


5 
5 
3 
2 

1 
9 

3 
2 
4 
4 
3 

11 

3 
4 
2 
3 
(i 
2 
2 
4 
2 
5 
4 
2 
3 
3 
8 

15 
2 

11 
2 
4 
b 
4 
5 
3 
3 

10 
5 
5 
2 

12 

15 
4 
4 
5 
4 
9 
2 
4 
4 

3 
3 
2 

1 

5 
5 
6 
9 
5 

4 

4 


MONTANA — continued 
Glasgow 


4 


Granite Falls 


Berkeley- 


Qlendive 


G 




Bethany 

Bolivar 


Havre 


Hopkins 


Kalis pell 


10 










International Falls.-.. 


Breckenridge Hills 












Lake City 


Brookfield...: 


Miles City 




Le Sueur .. 


Butler 






Litchfield 


California . . 


Shelby 


4 
4 
4 
2 


Little Falls 






Luverne 


Carrollton 


Whitefish 


Marshall . . 


Chaflee .. . 


W^nlf Pnint 


Montevideo 


Charleston 


NEBRASKA 




Chillicothe 




New Ulm 






Northfleld 


De Soto 


10 
4 
4 


North Mankato 


Dexter 




North St. Paul 


Eldon 




Ortonvillc 


Eldorado Springs 

Excelsior Springs 




Park Rapids 






Pipestone 


Chadron 




Festus •. 


•' 


Redwood Falls 


Florissant 


Cozad 




St. James. ... 


Fredericktown 

Glendale 




5 


St. Peter 


^'^?^- " — 


Sauk Centre 


Harrison ville 




' 


Sauk Rapids. 


Hayti 




4 


Shakopee 


Higginsville 




Sleepy Eye . 


Jackson 




f 








Staples 


Kinloch 






Stillwater 




Nebraska City-.-.. ... 


Thief River Falls 


Lamar 


4 
3 


Tracy 


Lebanon 








Schuyler 




Lexington 








4 


Waseca .. 


Liberty 




West St. Paul 




South Sioux City 

Superior . -- 












Maiden 


















Wahoo 






A/Tarshnll 






Maryville 


WajTie 


4 










Monett. 






York - . 






Mountain Grove 

Neosho 




Aberdeen 


NEVADA 

Boulder City 




Amory 


Nevada 




Bay St. Louis 

Booneville 


Mpw IVTaHriH 


23 


North Kansas City... 






Elko 


12 






Ely 


6 






North Las Vegas 

Sparks 


7 


Corinth 


Rock Hill 


9 






Winnemucca 


5 






NEW HAMPSHIRE 










Indianola 


Salem 








3 


Leland 


Slater 


Exeter 


9 


Lexington 

Louisville 




Franklin 


6 






4 


Moss Point 


Vallev Park 


Lebanon 


9 


New Albany. 


Vandalia 


Littleton 


3 






MiUord 


3 


Ocean Springs 


Washington 


Newport 


5 


Pass Christian 


Webb City 


Somersworth .. . 




Philadelphia 


Wellston 


NEW JERSEY 






West Plains 




Port Gibson 


MONTANA 

Cut Bank 

Dillon.. ..... 




West Point 


o 


Winona 


Atlantic Highlands- -- 
Audubon 




Yazoo City 


14 



33 



Table 12. — Ninuhe)- of police department employees, Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 to 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


NEW JERSEY— con. 

Barrington 


1 

5 

8 
lf> 

5 

4 
16 
10 

5 
12 
13 

4 
15 

9 
13 

n 

3 

2 

8 

8 

8 
19 

3 
22 

3 

4 
17 

2 
13 

4 

9 

9 

3 

6 
22 
10 
13 

17 
4 

5 

3 

8 
8 


NEW JERSEY— con. 

Oaklyn 

Ocean City 


5 
29 
12 

r. 

9 
18 
10 
11 

4 
11 
10 

8 

5 
10 

4 
6 
4 
17 
13 
6 
5 
2 

11 
24 
19 

6 
12 
23 
15 
10 

3 
28 
13 

13 
6 
8 
2 
5 

3 
24 
2 

4 
16 

5 
13 
7 
5 
5 
6 

10 
9 
3 
4 
37 
5 
5 
6 

y 

4 
12 

6 
11 

2 
12 


NEW YORK— con. 

Baldwinsville 


4 


Bellmawr 


Ballston Spa 


5 


Belmar 


Ocean Grove 


Bath 

Blasdell 


11 


Bernardsville 


Oceanport 


5 




Oradell- ... 


23 


Bogota 


Palisades Park 


Canajoharic 

Canandaigua 

Canastota 

Canisteo-. 

Canton 

Carthage 

Catskill 


3 




12 








Bound Brook 


Park Ridge 




Bradley Beach 

Butler 






Penns Grnvp 


5 


Caldwell 


Pitman 






Point Pleasant 

Point Pleasant Beach _ 

Pompton Lakes 

Prospect Park 

Ramsey 


Cobleskill 

Cooperstown .. 

Corinth 




Carlstadt 




Chatham 


•7 


Clayton 


Coxsackie 

Croton-on-Hudson -. 
Dansville 


1 




9 






6 




Ridgefleld 


Depew 

Dobbs Ferry 

Dolgeville 

East Aurora 




Dunellen 


River Edge 


13 


East Rutherford 


Riverside 

Riverton 


3 






East Rochester 

East Syracuse 

Ellenville 


- 


Egg Harbor City 

Fair Haven 


Rumson 

Runnemede .. 


9 




Salem 


Elmira Heights 

Elmsford 

Fort Edward 

Fort Plain 






Secaucus 


8 


Flcmington 


South Amboy 

South Bound Brook. . 

South Plainfield 

Tenafly 

Toms River 


3 


Florence Roebling ___ 
Franklin 




Frankfort 

Fredonia 

Geneseo 

Goshen 


3 


Freehold 


G 




3 


Gibbstown 


Totowa 


4 




Union Beach 


Gouverneur . 

Gowanda 

Granville 

Green Island 


f> 




VentnorCitv 


3 


Glen Rock 


Vineland 






Waldwick 






Wallington 




Haddon Heights 




Hamburg 

Hamilton ... .. 




West Caldwell 

AVest Long Branch... 

West Paterson 

Westville 




Hasbrouck Heights... 
Higliland Park 


Hastings-on-Hudson . . 


ji 








Westwood 


Highland 




Hillsdale 


Wharton 


Highland Falls 


4 




Wildwood 






Williamstown 

Woodlynne . 


Hoosick Falls 


4 




Horseheads 


4 




Wood Ridge 








NEW MEXICO 




53 




Ilion 


13 


Lincoln Park __ 


Irvington 

Islip 

Lake Placid 


13 


Lindenwold 




46 


Little Ferry 


Belen 


6 


Little Silver 




Lakewood 

Lancaster 

Larchmont 

Le Roy 


2 




Deming 


9 


Manville 


22 


Margate City 




4 




Las Vegas City 

Las Vegas Town 


Lindenhurst____ 

Little Falls 


11 




12 


Merchantville 


Liverpool 


4 


IVIetuchen 


Los Alamos 


Lyons 


6 


Middlesex 


12 


Mi<llandPark 




Malveme ..•. 


15 


Milltown 




Mechanicville... 

Medina 

Mohawk 

Monticelto 


10 








Silver City 








Mountain Lakes 

Mount Ephraim 


Socorro 

Tucumcari 


9 




NEW YORK 

Albion 






Mount Morris 

New York Mills 

North Pelham 

Northport 

North Syracuse 

North Tarry town 




NewMilford 




New Providence 


15 


Newton 


Amitvville 


g 


Northfield 


Attica.-- 

Babylon 




North Haledon 


IS 



34 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities will 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


NEW yoRK— con. 
Norwich 


11 
12 

4 

16 
23 

6 
15 
15 

.2 

13 
9 
6 

11 
8 
5 
6 

16 

3 
6 

3 
9 

19 
3 

19 

4 
2 
5 
3 
4 
3 
6 
10 
2 
5 

1 
1 

5 

15 
3 
9 
2 
4 
9 

10 
5 

11 
7 
4 

10 
6 
6 

4 
8 
12 
8 
10 
14 
6 
14 
9 
4 

19 
12 

14 


NORTH CAROLINA— 

continued 


4 
9 
9 

8 
4 
16 

4 
3 
8 
5 
2 
3 

12 
4 
4 

17 
6 
7 
7 

6 

8 
4 

3 

7 
4 
7 

2 
3 
1 

6 
5 
12 
10 
5 
5 
7 
8 
3 
5 
4 
6 
8 
9 
9 
7 
3 
6 
1 
7 
6 
4 
13 
10 
6 
4 
5 

14 
5 
7 
6 

6 

6 
2 


OHIO— continued 
Greenfield 


g 


Nyack 














Palmyra 


North Wilkesboro.... 
Oxford 


Hicksville 


o 




Hillsboro 


„ 










Penn Yan 


Roanoke Rapids 


Huron 


3 


















Scotland Neck 
















Lincoln Heights 

Lisbon 




Saranac Lake 


Southern Pines 


5 




Lockland 












Seneca Falls 


Tarboro 


London 


7 




Valdese 








Wake Forest 






Solvay 


Washington . 


Lyndhurst 


g 




Waynesville 


Madeira 




South Glens Falls. . 


White ville 


Mariemont 


4 


South Nyack 


Williamston 


Marysville 


5 




NORTH DAKOTA 

Devils Lake 


Maumee ^_ 

Mayfield Heights 

Medina 








Suflern 


9 








Ticonderoga - . 


Dickinson 


Middleport 


3 


Tuckahoe 


Grafton .. ... . 


Minerva 


3 


Tapper Lake 

Walden 




Mingo Junction 

Montpelier 


g 


Rugby 


6 


Walton 


Valley City 


Napoleon 








Nelsonville 




Warsaw .- 


Williston 


New Boston 


g 


Waterloo 


OHIO 

Ada 


Newburgh Heights. . . 

New Lexington 

Newton Falls 


4 


Watkins Glen 

Waverly 


5 

5 






North Baltimore 

North Canton 

North College Hill.... 

North Olmsted 

North Royalton 

Norwalk 




West Elmira 


Avon 


4 


Westfleld 




5 




Bay 




Whitesboro 


Bedford 




Yorkville 


Bellevue 


11 




Brecksville 


Oakwood 


21 






Oberlin 












Ahoskie 










Cadiz 


Oxford 




Beaufort 


Carey 


Parma Heights 

Perrysburg 


3 


Belmont 


Carrollton 


g 




Celina 














Canton. 


Cheviot 


Ravenna 


10 


Chapel Hill 


Circle ville . . 




12 




Clyde 






Clinton - - -.. 


Columbiana 


Rossford 


3 


Cramerton . - . 


Crestline . . 


St Bernard 


14 




Crooksville 






Dunn... 


Deer Park 


St Marys 




Edenton 


Delphos... 




4 


Elkin 








Forest City 


Dover 


Shelby 


10 


Graham 


Eastlake 


Solon 


3 


Hamlet - . 


East Palestine 


Strongsville 


5 








.Jacksonville 


Elmwood Place 

Fairborn 


Tipp City 


4 


Kings Mountain 


Toronto 


6 




Fairport Harbor 

Fairview 


Uhrichsville 


6 


Leakesville 


Upper Arlington^ 

Upper Sandusky 


10 










Qalion.... 


9 






Wadsworth 


10 


Lumberton 


Geneva .. . 


Wapakoneta 


6 






Warrensville Heights. 
Wauseon 




Morehead City 


Grandview Heights... 
Granville 


1 


Mount Airy... 


Wellington 


2 



35 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities with 
population frovi 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


OHIO— continued 
Wellston 


6 
4 
2 
4 
8 
1 

5 
14 
10 
10 

2 
10 

11 
5 
8 
4 
4 
3 

15 
7 
2 
3 
2 
3 
5 

10 
2 

12 
2 
4 
5 
8 

7 
5 
3 
8 
4 
6 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
5 
3 
4 
4 
5 
4 
3 
6 
10 
5 
4 
4 
4 
6 
2 
4 
5 
8 
6 
3 
2 
3 
2 
8 
5 


OREGON 

Ashland 


8 
12 

4 

11 
5 
8 
5 
5 

13 
4 
4 
6 
6 

10 
3 
9 
6 
4 
6 
3 
6 
3 
6 

14 
3 
5 
4 

14 
5 
7 
5 
7 

10 
4 
2 

2 

6 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 
4 
6 
2 
2 
3 
3 
9 
2 
8 
1 
2 
3 
7 
6 
3 
3 
7 
2 
4 

14 
2 
2 
4 
5 
3 

12 
5 


PENNSYLVANIA— con. 

Clarks Summit 

Clearfield . . - 




Wells ville 


Baker 

Beaverton 

Burns 




West Carrollton 


Clifton Heights 

Clymer... 

Coaldale - . . 




Westlake 




Whitehall 


Coquille 


Collingdale 


? 


Wicklifle - 


Cottage Grove 

Dallas 

Forest Grove 


Coplay 

Corry 




Willard 




Willoughby 

Willowick 


Crafton 


11 








Wilmington 


Gresham 

Hermiston. 


Cur wensville - 

Dale 




Windham 












Hood River 


Danville 














Lakeview 

Lebanon 






Altus 


Downingtown. 










Anadarko 


Milwaukie 


Dravosburg 




Antlers 


Newberg 


Dupont 












Bethany 


North Bend 


East Conemaugh 

East Lansdowne 

East Mauch Chunk.. 

East Pittsburgh 

East Stroudsburg 




Blackwell 


Nyssa 










Broken Arrow 


Oregon City 


16 














Cherokee 


Redmond 


Eddystone 










20 










Cordell 


Seaside 


Elizabeth 








Elizabeth town 










Drumright 


The Dalles 


Emporium 




Tillamook 






Elk City 


West Linn 


Ephrata 




Eufaula 


PENNSYLVANIA 


Etna 


It 










Ford City 






Forest City 




Henrvetta 


Ambler 


Forest Hills 




Hobart 


Annville 


Forty Fort 




Holdenville 




Fountain Hill 

Franklin 




Hollis 


Archbald 


10 




Ashland 


Freedom . .. 








Freeland 












Avalon 


GaUitzin ._ 












Madill 


Baden 


Glassport 








Glenolden 












Nichols Hills 


Beaver 


Greenville 




Nowata 


Bedford 


Grove City .... 












Pauls Valley 


Bellwood 


Hatboro .._ 












Perry 


Birdsboro 


Hollidaysburg 

Honesdale 




Pryor Creek 


Blairsville 






Blakely 


Hummelstown 














Ingram 
















12 


Tahlequah 


Brookville 


Jprmyn 




















Waeoner 


California 


Kane 




Walters """ 








Watonga 


Castle Shannon. 

Catasauqua 


Kennett Square 

Kittanning 




Weatherford 




Wewoka - 








Woodward 


Clarion 


Kutztown 


2 



36 



Table 12. — N^tmber of police department employees, Apr. 30, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Contimied 

CITIES "WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


PENNSYLVANIA~COn. 

Lansdale 


11 






Larksville 






2 








6 






Lewisburg 


4 


Lititz 


3 








5 












3 


Mauch Chunk 

McAdoo 








Meotianicsburg 

Media 


5 




2 


Middle town 


5 










Millers ville 




Millvale --- 


„ 










Monaea - 


9 
q 


M on tours ville 


1 
8 


Morrisville 








Mount Oliver 

Mount Penn 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Union 

Muncy 


10 

6 
3 

1 




2 


Nanty Qlo 






6 


Nazareth 


5 


New Brighton 

New Cumberlatid 

New Holland 


4 


Northampton 

North East 


11 
3 


Northumberland 

North Wales 


2 
2 










Old Forge 


3 






Oxford 




Palmerton 


5 


Palmyra 


3 






Pat ton 


2 


Pen Argyl 


3 






Philipsburg 


4 










Port Allegany 


1 


Prospect Park_ _ 

Puiixsutawney 


4 

10 






Red Lion 


4 






Ridgway 


3 


Ridley Park 


6 


Roaring Spring 

Rochester 


2 
4 



City 



PENNSYLVANIA— con. 

Royersford 

St. Clair 

St. Marys 

Sayre 

Schuylkill Haven 

Scottdale 

Selinsgrovc 

Sewickley 

Sharon Hill 

Sharpsburg 

Sharps ville 

Shillington 

Shippensburg 

Slatington 

Somerset 

Souderton 

South Fork 

South Greensburg 

South Williamsport.- 

Spangler 

SpringCity 

Springdale 

Stowe 

Stroudsburg 

SummitHill 

Susquehanna 

Swarthniore 

Swoyerville 

Tarentum 

Taylor 

Throop 

Titusville 

Towanda. - _ 

TrafTord 

Trevorton 

Tyrone 

Union City 

Upland 

Vandergrif t 

Verona 

Waynesburg 

Weatherly 

Wellsboro 

Wesley ville 

West Hazleton 

West Homestead 

Westmont 

West Newton 

WestPittston 

West Reading 

West View 

West Wyoming 

West York__ 

Wilmerding 

Wilson 

Windber 

Winton 

Wyomissing 

Youngwood 

Zelienople 

RHODE ISLAND 

Westerly 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Abbeville 

Aiken 

Andrews.- 

Bamberg 

Batesburg 

Beaufort 

Belton 

Bennettsville... 

Bishopville 



Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 



City 



SOUTH CAROLINA- 

con. 

Camden 

Cayce 

Cheraw 

Chester 

Clinton 

Clover 

Conway 

Darlington 

Denmark 

Dillon 

Duncan 

Easley 

Eau Claire 

Edgefield 

Gaffney 

Georgetown 

Greer 

Honea Path 

Kingstree 

Lake City 

Lancaster 

Langley Bath 

Laurens 

Manning 

Marion 

McCoU 

MuUins 

Myrtle Beach 

Newberry 

North Augusta 

Seneca 

Union . 

Walhalla 

Walterboro 

Ware Shoals 

Whitmire 

Williamston 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Belle Fourche 

Brookings 

Canton 

Deadwood. -. 

Hot Springs 

Lead 

Lemmon 

Madison 

Mobridge 

Pierre 

Redfield 

Sisseton 

Spearflsh 

Sturgis 

Vermillion 

Webster 

Winner 

Yankton 

TENNESSEE 

Alcoa - 

Belle Meade 

Brownsville. 

Clinton - 

Cookeville 

Covington 

Dayton 

Dickson 

Etowah 

Fayette ville 

Gallatin 

Greeneville 

Harriman 

Henderson 



Number j 
of police 
depart- ' 
ment em- 
ployees 



37 



Table 12. — Number of police department employees, Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,600 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


TENNESSEE— con. 


8 
2 
4 
7 
8 
5 
4 
3 
7 

10 
3 
7 
5 
1 
4 

11 
6 
4 
6 
4 
4 
3 
9 
3 
4 
9 

13 
4 

2 

4 
2 
1 
10 
1 
5 
1 
5 
2 
4 
4 
7 

6 

5 
7 
5 
3 
1 
2 

4 
6 

8 
5 

7 

4 
2 
9 
1 
4 
8 
4 
1 
4 
5 
2 
4 
2 
4 


TEXAS— con. 


5 
5 
6 
8 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
6 
4 
3 
3 
5 

13 
3 

12 
1 
3 
3 

11 
3 
5 
7 
3 
5 
1 
2 
9 
2 
2 
2 
4 
4 
8 

15 
5 
3 

3 
2 

3 

7 
2 
2 
5 

1 
6 
4 

5 
5 
3 
1 
2 
2 
3 

2 
2 
2 
6 
6 
8 
3 
2 
1 
6 
3 
3 


TEXAS— con. 




TpfTprsnn Citv 


Edna 


Smithville 


2 


La FoUette 


El Campo 


South Houston 

Stamford. . 


2 


Lawrenceburg 


Electra 


6 




Stephenville 


6 


T.Dnnir Pitv 


Falfurrias 


Sulphur Springs 


9 




Floydada 


1 




Fort Stockton 

Fredericksburg 


Tahoka 


2 




Taylor 


7 




Teague 


1 




Galena Park 


Tulia 


2 


McMinnviUe 


Gatesville 


Uvalde. 


6 


Georgetown 


Weatherford 


11 




Giddings 


W.'llington 


2 


Mount Pleasant 




Weslaco 


7 




Yoakum _ 


4 


£, ,'®--r 


Haltom. 


Yorktown 


2 


Riulev 


Hamilton 


UTAH 

American Fork 

Bingham Canyon 

Bountiful 






Hamlin 






Haskell 




South Pittsbm-g- ---- 




4 


Henrietta 


6 


Sparta _- 


Hereford 


3 




Hillsboro 


Brigham 


9 






Cedar City 


5 




Huntsville 


Clearfield 


2 






Helper 


4 




Jacksboro 


Lehi 


4 






Midvale 

Murray 

Nephi 


6 






5 






3 




Karnes City 


Orem 


4 
3 
2 
9 
3 


Alpine 

Andrews 

Angleton 


Kermit 

Kerrville 

Kilgore 


Pleasant Grove 

Price 

Richfield 


Athens 

Ballinger 


Killeen 

LaFeria 


Roy 

St. George 


1 
3 
2 


Bastrop 




South Salt Lake 




BavCity 




4 


Beeville 




Springville 




Belton 


Littlefleld 

Livingston 




Bishop 


Vernal 


3 


Bonham 


VERMONT 

Bellows Falls 


Bowie 






Bra<ly - - 


Marlin 




Brcckenridge 


6 




McGregor 

Memphis 




9 


Brownfield 






Essex Junction 




Calvert 


Mexia 

Mineola 

Mineral Wells 




Canadian 


Montpelier 


g 


Canyon - - 




5 


Carrizo Springs 


St. Albans 


7 




Mount Pleasant 

Navasota 


St. Johnsbury 

Springfield _ 




Center 


9 


Childress 


Nederland 


1 


Cisco 


Olney 

Paducah 




3 


Clarlvsville 


Winooski 

VIRGINIA 


7 


Cleveland 






Coleman _ 


Pharr 




College Station 


Pleasanton 




Colorado City 




6 


Comanche 


Fremont 


AltaVista 


4 


Commerce- 


Quanah 


Ashland 


4 






5 


Crockett 


RaymondvUle 






Crystal City.. 


Big Stone Gap 

Blacksburg 

Blackstone 

Bluefield 


6 


Cuero 




4 


Dalhart 


Rusk 


5 


Dublin 




5 


Dumas 






8 


Eagle Lake 








Eagle Pass 


Sin ton 


Christiansburg 


5 



38 



Table 12. — Niimher of -police department emploijees, Apr. SO, 1951, cities with 
population from 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 

CITIES WITH 2,500 TO 10,000 INHABITANTS— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of police 

depart- 
ment em 

ployees 


VIRGINIA— continued 


7 
7 
7 
4 
7 

13 
7 
7 
9 
6 

17 

10 
4 
7 
6 
4 
5 

13 

n 

4 
8 
16 
15 
6 

7 
9 
3 
6 

12 
9 
3 
5 
1 
3 
2 

12 
4 
2 

14 

5 

12 
3 
8 

87 
21 

6 

5 

3 
11 

4 

4 

9 

4 

4 

7 

8 

4 

6 


WEST VIRGINIA 


9 
4 
5 
1 
2 
4 
8 
3 
7 
7 

10 
2 

10 
2 
2 
2 
2 

11 
11 

11 


WISCONSIN— con. 




Colonial Heights. 


Buckhannon 

Charles Town 

Chesapeake 


Kewaunee 

Kimberly 


2 


Culpepcr 


Ladysmith 


4 








Falls Church 


Dunbar 


Lake Mills 


2 


Farmville --- 


Elkins 


Lancaster 


4 


Franklin 










Mauston 

Mayville.. 

Medford 




Galax 


Hinton 

Keyser 

Keystone 


3 






Lexington 


Menomonie 

Merrill.... 


10 


Lurav 




13 








Norton 


Marmet 


Monroe 




Orange 


NeiUsville- _ 

New London 


3 


Phoebus - 


Mount Hope 


6 


Pulaski 


Mullens 

New Martinsville 

Nitro 


New Richmond 


5 


Radford 




Richlands 


Oconto 


4 


Salem 


Oak Hill 


Onalaska 


2 






Park Falls 


3 


Virginia Beach 


Philippi 


Platteville 


5 












Point Pleasant 

Salem 


Portage 


11 


WASHINGTON 


Port Washington 

Prairie Du Chien 


6 














Auburn 


War 


Rhinelander 


13 


Buckley 


Welch.. 




7 




Wellsburg 


Richland Center 

Ripon 


6 


Centralia 


Weston 


5 


Chehalis 




River Falls... 


3 


Cheney 


White Sulphur 


Shawano 


7 


Colfax 


Sheboygan Falls 


3 




Williamson 


7 


Colville 


WISCONSIN 

Algoma 


Spooner 


4 






6 






9 




Tomah 


6 








4 








13 


Kelso 


Berlin 


Viroqua 


4 




Black River Falls..... 




5 






6 


Moses Lake 


Burlmgton 


West Bend 


8 






West Milwaukee 


14 


Navy Yard, Bremer- 
ton 




5 


Columbus 


WTOMINO 




North Richland 


Delavan 




Omak 


De Pere 




Port Townsend 


Dodgeville 








3 




Elkhom 


Cody 


5 




Evansville 


Douglas 


3 


Sedro Wooley. -. 

Shelton 


Fort Atkinson.. 


Evanston 


4 




3 


Snohomish 


Greendale 


Lander 


3 




Hartford 


Newcastle 


3 








8 








7 


Tumwater 


Hurley 


Torrington 

Worland... 


6 




Jefferson 


5 







OFFENSES CLEARED AND PERSONS ARRESTED 

Offenses Cleared by Arrest, 1950 

For every 100 crimes reported to the police, 28 were cleared during 
1950 by the arrest of 22 offenders, some of whom were thus responsible 
for the commission of more than 1 crime. For the group of offenses 
characterized as crimes against the person, 78 out of each 100 were 
cleared by the arrest of 67 persons, while for the generally less serious 
but much more frequent crimes against property, 25 out of each 100 
were cleared with 19 persons arrested and charged. 

In a list of the percentage of cleared cases, murder would take first 
place with 93.8 percent cleared, followed by 88.3 percent for negligent 
manslaughter. Rape was next in 1950 with a clearance percentage 
of 80.3, while 76.6 percent of aggravated assaults were followed by the 
arrest of the offenders. 

Among the crimes against property, the 43.5 percent cleared for 
robberies was highest, followed by 29.0 percent for burglaries, 25.6 
percent for auto thefts, and 22.1 percent for larcencies. 

The cities whose annual reports were used in the tables which 
follow number 1,601 and represent a combined urban population of 
54,690,179. Altogether the police in these reporting cities cleared 
40,335 of 51,451 crimes against the person with the arrest of 34,270 
persons. Similarly, these departments arrested 150,094 persons who 
were charged with the commission of 197,251 of the total of 792,006 
crimes against property in these communities. 

The term "cleared by arrest" refers to a situation wherein one or 
more of the offenders responsible for the commission of the offense 
have been arrested and made available for prosecution. Under the 
system of uniform crime reporting the arrest of one individual may 
clear several offenses when the police investigation discloses evidence 
identifying that individual as being involved in the commission of 
other offenses. On the other hand, where several people jointly 
commit one offense and all are arrested, only one offense is treated as 
cleared. 

(39) 



40 

Exceptional circumstances are present in connection with the com- 
mission of some offenses which render them cleared even though an 
offender may not be arrested and made available locally for prosecu- 
tion. Included in the exceptional clearances would be instances 
wherein the oft'ender had been arrested in another jurisdiction but for 
reasons beyond the control of the police he was not prosecuted locally. 
The suicide of the offender would also be treated as an exceptional 
clearance. Such clearances are relatively few in number and definitely 
limited under instructions included in the Uniform Crime Reporting 
Handbook, which is distributed to all contributing police agencies. 

From the foregoing it is understandable why in most instances the 
number of persons charged is less than the number of offenses cleared. 
This appears more noticeable with reference to crimes against property 
which may be attributable to some extent at least to the fact that in 
the more serious crimes against the person frequently more than one 
person is arrested. 

In connection with the relatively small percentage of auto theft 
oft'enses cleared, it should be borne in mind that the police year in and 
year out consistently report the highest percentage of stolen property 
recovered in auto theft oft"enses as compared with other crime 
categories. 



41 



OFFENSES CLEARED BY ARREST 

Calendar Year 1950 



Offense 

Against 

The Person 



1.601 CITIES 
54.690,179 POPULATION 




Figure 4. 



42 



Table 13.^ — Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged {held for prose- 
cution), 1950, by population groups, number per 100 known offenses 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary countsj 



Population group 



TOTAL, GEOUPS I-VI 

1,601 cities; total population, 54,- 
690,179: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP I 

30 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
tion, 21,496,816: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP II 

55 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total pop- 
ulation, 7,960,881: 

Offenses known. 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP III 

99 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation, 7,048,981: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP IV 

181 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total pop- 
ulation, 6,332,238: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP V 

481 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 
lation, 7,476,789: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

GROUP VI 

755 cities under 10,000; total popula- 
tion, 4,374,474: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



100.0 
92> 



100.0 
94.2 



100.0 
94.4 
98.2 



100.0 
94.4 
98.0 



100.0 
93.8 
89.4 



100.0 
90.5 
83.2 



100.0 
92.6 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



100.0 
88.3 
77.0 



100.0 
89.6 
82.0 



100.0 
88.7 
69.7 



100.0 
82.4 
68.2 



100.0 
82.4 
80.9 



100.0 
98.7 
72.5 



100.0 
86.0 
89.5 



100.0 
80.3 
74.4 



100.0 
79.4 
65.4 



100.0 

77.1 
79.6 



100.0 
79.1 
84.4 



100.0 
83. 9 
98.6 



100.0 
83.1 



Rob- 
bery 



100.0 
48.6 
40.9 



100.0 
44.8 
38.5 



100.0 
.38.5 
39.6 



100.0 
39.6 
46.0 



100. 
44.9 
53.5 



100.0 
41.0 
49.4 



100.0 
50.9 



Aggra- 
vated 



100.0 
76.6 
63.2 



100.0 
73.3 
53.3 



100.0 
82.8 
76.5 



100.0 
86.3 
91.5 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



100.0 
29.0 



100.0 
29.2 
20.3 



100.0 
26.3 
16.9 



100.0 
26.7 
18.0 



100. 
28.9 
22.4 



!00. 
32.2 
25.7 



100.0 
36.5 
33.0 



While the foregoing tabulations present the available data grouped 
according to size of the reporting city, the following table presents the 
information according to the location of the cities involved so that 
comparisons might be made with the average of other cities in one 
general location. 



43 



OFFENSES CLEARED BY ARREST 

Calendar Year 1950 



Offenses 

Against 

Property 



1,601 CITIES 
54.690.179 POPULATION 




Figure 5. 



44 

In considering the differences in the data between the various group- 
of cities, it must be remembered that a number of factors are in\olve(l 
which affect the charge to be placed against an offender. In sonK 
areas, for example, the figures for prostitution and commercialized vi(( 
may be considered conservative, for the offenders may be charged 
with some other sex offense, vagrancy, or disorderly conduct. Simi- 
larly, persons arrested for drunkenness might in some areas be most 
frequently charged with disorderly conduct. 

While theoretically an offender should be charged with the offense 
committed, in many instances the policies and practices of prosecuting 
attorneys, judges, and other officials as well as public opinion and 
established custom in the community govern to a great extent the 
charge placed by the police against arrested individuals. 



Table 14. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage cleared by arrest, 
1950, by geographic divisions 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



Geographic division 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



Auto 
theft 



TOTAL, ALL DIVISIONS 

1,601 cities; total population, 
54,690,179: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 

100 cities; total population, 3,894,236: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

! cities; total population, 9,587,131: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

423 cities; total population, 16,582,626: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

! cities; total population, 5,451,231: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 



SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES • 

142 cities; total population, 6,008,4.34: 

Number of offenses known 

Number clenrod by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

1 Includes the District of Columbia. 



1.824 
1.611 
88.3 



701 
94.9 



221 
202 
91.4 



165 
151 
91.5 



324 
84.6 



264 
249 
94.3 



5.911 
4.745 
80.3 



28. 129 

12. 236 

43.5 



40.866 

31. 306 

76.8 



192. 141 

55. 731 

29.0 



487. 396 

107. 667 

22.1 



245 
225 
91.8 



579 
458 
79.1 



2,176 
1,700 



549 
438 
79.8 



11. 494 
5,256 
45.7 



2,366 
1,241 
52.5 



3,083 
1.711 
55.5 



521 
497 
95.4 



3.433 
2,506 
73.0 



12,011 
8,504 
70.8 



3,185 
2.223 



14, 161 

12, 048 

85.1 



9,452 
3,494 
37.0 



22.488 
5.882 
26.2 



54, 435 

17.177 

31.6 



16,602 
5,495 



23,395 
6,841 
29.2 



41. 720 
9.644 
23.1 



46, 712 

11, 075 

23.7 



25.178 57,962 
7.843 16. .597 
31.2 I 23.6 



84, 340 

21. 617 

25.6 



4,405 
1.310 



9. 012 
2.031 
22.5 



21,451 
6.021 
28.1 



7.795 
2,105 
27.0 



12, 203 
2,911 
23.9 



45 

Table 14. — Number of offenses known, number and percentage cleared by arrest, 
1950, by geographic divisions — Continued 


Geographic division 


Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

tekT 

ingor 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


EAST SOr'TH CENTRAL STATES 

t 51 cities; total population, 1,789,281: 

Number of offenses knowii 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

WEST SOITTH CENTRAL STATES 

; 72 cities; total population, 3,647,169: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

MOTTNTAIN STATES 

' 73 cities; total population, 1,654,588: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 

PACIFIC STATES 

184 cities; total population, 6,075,483: 

Number of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Percentage cleared by arrest 


266 
243 
91.4 

374 
345 
92.2 

53 

51 

96.2 

193 
173 
89.6 


87 

70 

80.5 

149 
140 
94.0 

46 

28 

60.9 

244 
202 

82.8 


193 
151 

78.2 

362 
289 
79.8 

193 
149 

77.2 

806 

587 
72.8 


1,016 
345 
34.0 

1,608 
672 
41.8 

924 
355 
38.4 

4,309 
1,418 
32.9 


2,413 
1,516 
62.8 

2,121 

1,878 

647 
485 
75.6 

2,374 
1,649 
69.5 


• 

7,617 
1,810 
23.8 

17, 034 
4,468 
26.2 

8,649 

30, 686 
7,112 
23.2 


14,496 
3,008 
20.8 

34,607 
8,607 
24.9 

27,860 
5,017 
18.0 

95, 651 

15, 3.39 

16.0 


3,734 
858 
23.0 

7,529 
2,094 

27.8 

3,947 
1,046 
26.5 

14,264 
3,241 
22.7 



Persons Charged, 1950 

Since as a general thing the largest cities report the highest crime 
rates (offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants), it normally follows that 
the great metropolitan centers show the highest figures for persons 
arrested and charged per 100,000 inhabitants in most crime categories. 
As a matter of fact, for narcotic drug violations, prostitution, and 
commercialized vice the arrest rate of cities over 100,000 in population 
is more than 6 times that of cities with less than 25,000 inhabitants. 
On the other hand, for driving while intoxicated the rate for persons 
charged is substantially greater in the small cities than in the large, 
heavily populated districts. 

The data presented in tables 15-17 summarize the reports of 1,601 
cities representing a combined urban population of 54,690,179 and in 
reviewing the data it is well to remember the distinction in the pro- 
cedure followed in scoring persons charged as compared to that 
governing the scoring of offenses known to the police. As an illustra- 
tion, if a hold-up man committed three robberies in three different 
establishments, thi-ee separate offenses of robbery would be scored, 
whereas in the event he was arrested, only one person charged would 
be listed. On the other hand, if three individuals steal a car and are 
arrested, one offense of auto theft would be listed in the data pertain- 



46 

ing to offenses known to the police but tlii-ee persons charged would be 
shown in the data pertaining to persons arrested. 

With the use of questionnaires which accompanied the annual 
returns and through correspondence which was directed to approxi- 
mately one-third of the 1,601 cities represented in the following 
tabulations, considerable information was obtained relative to the 
quality of the returns being used. It was found, for example, that 96 
percent of the cities whose returns were used indicated they had 
correctly listed the number of persons charged as distinguished from 
the number of charges placed against persons arrested; i. e., if on an 
occasion of a single arrest an offender was charged with robbery and 
larceny, only one person was shown as charged, the entry being made 
opposite robbery, the more serious offense. 

Similarly, it was found that 89 percent of the reporting departments 
advised that all or some juveniles were included in the reports of 
persons arrested and 84 percent showed that all juveniles were in- 
cluded. Of those departments including juvenile arrests, 98 percent 
properly listed them opposite the substantive violation involved, such 
as robbery or burglary and the like, regardless of the technical charge 
of juvenile delinquency which might have been placed against the 
offender at the time of his arrest. Other reporting departments 
including juveniles scored them opposite ''all other offenses." 



Table 15. — Persons charged {held for prosecution), 1960, number and rate per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 



[Population figures from 1950 dece 


tinial census preliminary counts 








Total, 
1,601 
cities; to- 
tal popu- 
lation, 
54,690,179 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group 
VI 


Offense charged 


30 cities 

over 
250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
21,496,816 


55 cities, 
100,000 tc 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
7,960,881 


99 cities,' 
50,000 to 

100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
7,048,981 


181 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
6,332,238 


481 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
7,476,789 


755 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

4,374,474 


Criminal homicide: 
(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter: 
Number of persons 


2,642 
4.83 

1,406 
2.57 

11, 608 
21.0 

25, 823 
47.2 

88, 636 
161.9 

39, 933 
73.0 

80, 019 
146.3 


1,402 
6.52 

662 
3.08 

7,273 
33.8 

12, 553 
58.4 

34, 455 
160.3 

17, 106 
79.6 

33, 921 
157.8 


435 
5.46 

260 
3.27 

1,477 
18.6 

3,372 
42.4 

15. 222 
191.2 

5,781 
72.6 

13, 076 
164.3 


295 
4.19 

163 
2.31 

14.2 

3, 777 
53.6 

12, 510 
177.5 

4,522 
64.3 

9,652 
136.9 


203 
3.21 

161 
2.54 

756 
11.9 

2,834 
44.8 

10,923 
172.5 

4.363 
68.9 

9,377 
148.1 


218 
2.92 

108 
1.44 

683 
9.1 

2,285 
30.6 

10,796 
144.4 

4,928 
65.9 

8,854 
118.4 




Rate per 100,000 

(6) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence: 
Number of persons 
charged 


2.03 
51 




1.17 


Robbery: 

Number of persons charged -- 
Rate per 100,000 


321 
7.3 


Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons charged- - 
Rate per 100,000 

Other assaults: 

Number of persons charged-- 
Rate per 100,000 


1,002 
22.9 

4,629 
105.8 


Burglary— breaking or entering: 
Number of persons charged— 
Rate per 100,000 


3,233 
73.9 


Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons charged— 
Rate per 100,000- — 


5,139 
117.5 



47 



Table 15. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), 1950, number and rate -per 
100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



OSense charged 



Auto theft: 

Num ber of persons charged . . 

Kate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Num ber of persons charged . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 
ing, possessing: 

Number of persons charged . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons charged . . 

Rate per 100,000..^ -. 

Rape: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercialized 
vice: 

Number of persons charged -_ 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution) : 

Number of persons charged . _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws: 

Number of persons charged. , 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc.: 

Number of persons charged. - 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and 
children: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000. 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons charged. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons charged.. 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons charged. 

Rate per 100,000 



Total, 
1,601 
cities; to- 
tal popu- 
lation, 
54,690,179 



B,634 
34.1 



13, 701 
25.1 



4,058 

7.4 



4,400 
8.05 



19. 812 
36.2 



15, 975 
29.2 



25, 381 
46.4 



1 37, 715 
89.0 



1 92, 865 
169.9 



118,472 
216.6 



75, 871 
138.7 



241, 039 
440.7 



Group I 



30 cities 

over 
250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
21,496,816 



6,235 
29.0 



3,257 
15.2 



2,268 
10.55 



8,382 
39.0 



4,050 
18.8 



7,439 
34.6 



9,199 
42.8 



10, 325 

48.0 



125, 872 
585.5 



453, 804 
2,111.0 



44, 440 
206.7 



99, 705 
463.8 



Group II 



55 cities, 
100,000 to 

260,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
7,960,881 



5,719 
71.8 



4,304 

54.1 



2,550 
32.0 



5,166 
64.9 



8,442 
106.0 



13, 636 
171.3 



'2,564,248 
32, 720. 6 



207, 670 
2, 608. 6 



33. 754 
434.0 



13, 767 
172.9 



34, 488 
433.2 



Group III 



99 cities, 
50,000 to 

100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
7,048,981 



2,706 
:38.4 



2,332 
33.1 



1,972 
28.0 



57.2 
7,020 



14, 116 
200.3 



'1,830,720 
26, 327. 7 



143, 855 
2, 040. 8 



16, 338 
231.8 



7,559 
107.2 



31, 562 
447.8 



Group IV 



181 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
6,332,238 



30.1 
1,462 



349 
5.51 



1,163 
18.4 



1,882 
29.7 



3,181 
50.2 



5,007 
79.1 



13, 318 
210.3 



n, 596,164 
25, 447. 8 



6,124 
96.7 



30, 119 
475.6 



Group V 



481 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
7,476,789 



2,295 
30.7 



1,106 
14.8 



1,320 
17.7 



456 
6.10 



1,706 
22.8 



1,444 
19.3 



2,609 
34.9 



' 1,813,111 
24, 672. 



129, 819 
1, 736. 3 



9,788 
130.9 



30, 313 
405.4 



Group 
VI 



755 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

4,374,474 



1,413 
32.3 



15.9 
255 



>i 677. 025 
15, 647. 



20, 236 
462.6 



65, 522 
1, 497. 8 



4,159 
95.1 



14. 862 
339.5 



Footnotes 1-11: Thenumberof persons charged and the rate are based on the reports from the number 
of cities indicated below: 



Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


J 


1,600 
754 

1,600 
480 

1,581 
29 


54, 686, 146 
4, 370, 441 

54, 669, 118 
7, 455, 728 

52, 396, 739 

19, 658, 299 


7 


54 

98 
179 
474 

747 


7, 836, 808 


2 


8 


6, 953, 583 


3 


9 


6,272,317 


4 


10 


7, 348, 851 


5 


11... 


4, 326, 881 


6 











48 

Of the 1,601 cities represented in the foregoing tabulations, 1,443 
showed their traffic data separately for (1) violation of road and driving 
laws, generally referred to as moving violations, (2) parking violations, 
and (3) other traffic and motor vehicle laws, excluding driving while 
intoxicated, and the available data reported by these cities are pre- 
sented in the following tabulation. 



Table 16. — Persons charged (held for prosecution), traffic violations, except driving 
while intoxicated, 1950; number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population 
groups 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 





Total, 
1.44.3 

cities; 
total 

popula- 
tion. 
43,460,733 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


GroupVI 


Offense charged 


25 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
14,452,428 


44 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
6,257,662 


91 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
6,419,902 


163 cities, 
25,000 to 

50,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
5,690,967 


428 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
6,620,209 


692 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

4, 019, 575 


Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons charged . . 
Rate per 100,000 

Parking violations: 

Number of persons charged.. 


2, 204, 461 
5. 072. 3 

9, 329, 323 
21, 466. 1 

386, 955 
890.4 


1,095,173 

7, 577. 8 

3,211,486 
22, 221. 1 

147, 073 
1,017.6 


291.653 
4, 660. 7 

1, 636, 778 
26, 156. 4 

66, 486 
1, 062. 5 


290, 033 
4.517.7 

1,410,122 
21, 964. 9 

55. 654 
866.9 


163, 759 
2, 877. 5 

1, 198, 873 
21,066.3 

662.2 


231,448 
3, 496. 1 

1, 382, 832 
20, 888. 

53,389 
806.5 


132, 395 
3, 293. 8 

489, 232 
12, 171. 2 


Other traffic and motor vehicle 
laws: 

Number of persons charged.. 
Rate per 100 000 


26, 665 
663.4 







50 



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52 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

(PERCENT OF PERSONS CHARGED -PART I OFFENSES) 

Calendar Year 1950 
CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON 






lljji 64.5% |||j||j||||||if63:5% 
ililll 54.5% "I'l'i'li ■''■I 



^g^ MURDER NEGLIGENT RAPE AGGRAVATED 
■V MANSLAUGHTER ASSAULT 

1,195 CHARGED 455 CHARGED 1,992 CHARGED 9,755 CHARGED 

206 CITIES WITH OVER 25.000 INHABITANTS TOTAL POPULATION 24.341.092 
FBI CHART 



Figure 6. 



53 

Persons Found Guilty, 1950 

A drunken driver arrested and charged with driving while intoxi- 
cated stands a greater chance of being convicted in court than does 
a person charged with any other offense, but, ironically enough, 
were he instead negligently to kill another and be charged with 
manslaughter, the chances of his going free are greater than if he 
were charged with any other crime. 

The percentage of persons charged by the police who were found 
guilty during 1950 ranged from 54.5 percent for manslaughter by 
negligence, and 56.8 percent for receiving stolen property, to 84.0 
percent fer liquor-law violations and 86.4 percent for drivmg while 
intoxicated, according to the reports of 206 cities with over 25,000 
inhabitants representing a combined urban population of 24,341,092. 

The data relating to persons found guilty are shown in tables 18 
and 19 and in selecting the cities used in these tabulations, reports 
were eliminated unless answers to questionnaires and correspondence 
indicated the data on persons found guilty represented the final 
disposition of the charges placed against the arrested individuals 
as distinguished from the disposition at some preliminary judicial 
stage. A few classifications are not listed separately in table 19 
since the figures in sufficient detail were not available in some of the 
reports used. 



Table 18. — Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and number of persons found guilty, 
1950; 206 cities over 25,000 in population 

[Total population, 24,341,092, based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



Oflfense (Part I classes) 



Total... 

Criminal homicide: 

(n) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence 

Rape 

Robbery 

-V ggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 
Larceny— theft (except auto 

theft) 

Autotheft 



Number 

of 
offenses 
known 
to the 
police 



1,282 

840 
3,402 
17, 651 
21. 145 
96, 987 

252, 494 
41,387 



Number 

of 
offenses 
cleared 
by arrest 



1,216 

732 
2, 652 
7,677 
15. 466 
27, 379 

51, 245 



Number 
of persons 
charged 
(held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 



1,195 

455 
1,992 
5,301 
9,755 
15. 149 

36, 068 
7,976 



Number 
found 

guilty of 
offense 

charged 



518 

182 

832 

3.185 

4,649 

9,175 



Number 
found 

guilty of 
lesser 

oflense 



452 
1,010 
1,544 
2,364 

1,992 
747 



Total 
found 
guilty (of 
offense 
charged 
or lesser 
oflense) 



749 

248 
1,284 
4,195 
6,193 
11, 5.39 



Percent- 
age 
found 
guilty 



54.5 
64.5 
79.1 
63.5 
76.2 

78.8 
66.5 



54 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

(PERCENT OF PERSONS CHARGED -PART I OFFENSES) 

Calendar Year 1950 
CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 




■^ ROBBERY BURGLARY LARCENY AUTO THEFT 

HIV 5,301 CHARGED 15.149 CHARGED 36,068 CHARGED 7,976 CHARGED 

208 CITIES WITH OVER 25,000 INHABITANTS TOTAL POPULATION 24.341.092 
FBI CHART 



Figure 7. 



Table 19.- 



55 



-Number of persons charged {held for prosecution) and number found 
guilty, 1950; 206 cities over 25,000 in population 



[Total population, 24,341,092, based on 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



Offense (Part II classes) 



Total 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

■\Veapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (including prostitution and com- 
mercialized vice) 

Oflenses against the famOy and children 

Narcotic drug laws 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness, disorderly conduct; vagrancy 

Gambling.-. 

Driving while intoxicated 

Traflic and motor vehicle laws 

All other offenses 



Number of 
persons 
charged 
(held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 



21, 
13, 
2, 
14, 
639. 
32, 
37, 
'■ 6, 078, 
94, 



Number 
found 

guilty of 
offense 

charged 



22, 403 
2,401 
4,033 

981 
5,447 

15, 448 
7,314 
1,776 

11,979 
467, 022 

23. 273 
29. 186 

, 737, 519 
51, 133 



Number 
found 

guilty of 
lesser 
offense 



3,503 

492 

2,955 

■■ 50, 503 

2,105 



Total 
found 
guilty (of 
offense 
charged 
or of 
lesser 
offense) 



, 442, 937 



23, 509 
2, 755 
4,474 
1,059 
5,654 

16, 112 
7,572 
1, 8.34 
12, 277 
470, 525 
23. 765 
32, 141 
2 4, 788, 022 
53,238 



found 
guilty 



77.9 



62.6 
76.0 
66.6 
56.8 
81.5 

76.0 
57.1 
62.6 
84.0 
73.6 
73.7 
86.4 
'78.8 
56.1 



The total figures are subject to footnote 2. 
■ Based on the reports of 196 cities, total population, 19,978,629. 



I 



56 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

(PERCENT OF PERSONS CHARGEO) 

PART li OFFENSES 

CALENDAR YEAR 1950 



OTHER ASSAULTS 



62.6% 



FORGERY AND COUNTERFEITING 



EMBEZZLEMENT AND FRAUD 



STOLEN PROPERTY: 
BUYING, RECEIVING, ETC. 



66.6% 



56.8% 



WEAPONS: CARRYING, POSSESSING, ETC 



SEX OFFENSESdNCLUDING PROSTITUTION 
AND COMMERCIALIZED VICE) 



I OFFENSES AGAINST 
FAMILY AND CHILDREN 



57.1% 



NARCOTIC DRUG LAWS 



62.6% 



LIQUOR LAWS 



DRUNKENNESS. 

DISORDERLY CONDUCT, VAGRANCY 



DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED 



TRAFFIC AND MOTOR VEHICLE LAWS 



ALL OTHER OFFENSES 



56.1% 




* FIGURES BASED ON REPORTS OF 196 CITIES WITH OVER 
25.000 INHABITANTS. TOTAL POPULATION 19,978.629 
ALL OTHER FIGURES BASED ON REPORTS OF 206 CITIES WITH OVER rD| 

CHART 



25.000 INHABITANTS, TOTAL POPULATION 24.341,092 



FiCURE 8. 



57 



Persons Released — Not Held for Prosecution, 1950 

While the foregoing tables concern persons formally charged by 
the police, the annual returns also provide for listing the number of 
persons taken into custody but released by the police without being 
charged. The available data are shown in tables 20 and 21. 

The figures on persons released include those given a warning in 
traffic cases as well as persons failing to respond to summonses, notices, 
or citations who are not subsequently arrested. Included also are 
persons released under the "golden rule" principle. 



Table 20. — Persons released without heitig held for prosecution, 1950; number and 
rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide: 
(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter: 
Number of persons re- 
leased 

Rate per 100,000 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence: 
Number of persons re- 
leased 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery: 

Number of persons released. _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault: 

Number of persons released _ _ 

Rate per 100,000 

other assaults: 

Number of persons released _ _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Burglary — breaking or entering: 
Number of persons released _ _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Larceny— theft: 

Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Auto theft: 

Number of persons released _ . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Embezzlement and fraud: 

Number of persons released. . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Stolen property; buying, receiv- 
ing, possessing: 
Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Forgery and counterfeiting: 

Number of persons released . _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Rape: 

Number of persons released. . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercialized 
vice: 
Number of persons released. . 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except rape and 
prostitution) : 
Number of persons 
Rate per 100,000-..- 
Narcotic drug laws: 
Number of persons 
Rate per 100,000...- 



Total, 
1,142 
cities; 
total 
popula- 
tion, 
37,896,741 



310 

0.82 



222 
0.59 



1,995 
5.3 



2,112 
5.6 



3.041 
15.9 



10, 763 
28.4 



2,411 
6.4 



4,602 
12.1 



Group I 



23 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

13,378,435 



102 
0. 76 



3, 533 
2(3.4 



4,197 
31.4 



Group II 



40 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
5,606,452 



Group III 



77 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
5,507,182 



58 
1.05 



560 
10.2 



Group IV 



131 cities, 

25,000 to 
50,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

4,622,037 



Group V 



373 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
5,825,449 



741 
16.0 



1,449 
31.3 



27 
0.46 



20 
0.34 



820 
14.1 



100 
1.72 



58 



Table 20. — Persons released without being held for -prosecution, 1950; number and 
rate per 100,000 inhabitants, by population groups — Continued 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 



Offense charged 



carrying, 
etc.: 

Number of persons released , . 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and chil- 
dren: 

Number of persons released- - 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws: 

Number of persons released- - . 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving while intoxicated: 

Number of persons released- - . 

Rate per 100,000 -- 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws: 

Number of persons released- . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct: 

Number of persons released- - 

Rate per 100,000- 

Drunkenness: 

Number of persons released - - 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy: 

Number of persons released- - 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling: 

Number of persons released - - 

Rate per 100,000 

Suspicion: 

Number of persons released- - . 

Rate per 100,000-- 

All other offenses: 

Number of persons released- - 

Rate per 100,000 



Total, 
1,142 
cities; 
total 
popula- 
tion, 
37,896,741 



1,204 
3.2 



1,505 
4.0 



958, 186 
2, 672. 6 



10, 234 
27.0 



83, 764 
221.0 



6.926 
18.3 



115, 756 
305.5 



19, 868 
52.4 



Group I 



23 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

13,378,435 



1,925 
14.4 



46, 687 
349.0 



4,356 
32.6 



Group II 



40 cities, 
100,000 to 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
5,606,452 



9,085 
162.0 



1,370 
24.4 



Group III 



77 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
5,507,182 



11,976 
217.5 



1,127 
20.5 



Group IV 



131 cities, 
25,000 to 

50,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
4,622,037 



1,194 
25.8 



3,451 
74.7 



3,569 
77.2 



Group V 



373 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
5,825,449 



2,740 
47.0 



6,190 
106.3 



1,845 
31.7 



Group I 
VI ' 



498 cities 
under 
10,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

2,957,186 



'94,869 
3,223.5 



2,047 
69.2 



4,894 
165.5 



Footnotes 1-6: The number of persons released and the rate art- ba.sed on the reports from the number of 
cities indicated below: 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


Footnote 


Cities 


Population 


1 


1,133 
22 
76 


35, 852, 061 
11, 539, 918 
5, 411, 784 




130 
496 


4, 587, 989 


2 - - 

3. 


5 

6 


5,762,895 
2 943 023 









59 



Table 21. — Persons released without being held for prosecution, traffic violations, 
except driving while intoxicated, 1950; number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants, 
by population groups 

[Population figures from 1950 decennial census preliminary counts] 





Total, 
682 cities; 

total 
popula- 
tion, 
20,018,380 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


OfEense charged 


11 cities 
over 

250,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

5,992,767 


19 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
2,758,776 


48 cities, 
50,000 to 

100,000; 

popula- 
tion, 
3,422,279 


69 cities, 

25,000 to 
50,000; 

popula- 
tion, 

2,411,084 


231 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
3,573,609 


304 cities 
under 
10,000; 
popula- 
tion, 
1,859,865 


Road and driving laws: 

Number of persons released- 
Rate per 100,000 


117,632 
587.6 

734, 209 
3, 667. 7 

21, 874 
109.3 


60, 731 
1.013.4 

54, 664 
912.2 

9,447 
157.6 


4.780 
173.3 

58,494 
2, 120. 3 

1,622 
58.8 


174.9 

177, 753 
5, 194. 

2,328 


22. 694 
941.2 

135, 309 
5, 612. 

2, 857 
118.5 


11,733 
328.3 

232, 015 
6, 492. 5 

3.293 
92.1 


11, 708 
629 5 


Parking violations: 

Number of persons released _ 
Rate per 100,000 

Other traffic and motor vehicle 
laws: 
Number of persons released _ 


75, 974 
4, 084. 9 

2,327 







DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Source of Data 

During the first 6 months of 1951, the F B I examined 419,451 arrest 
records, as evidenced by fingerprint cards, in order to obtain data 
concerning the age, sex, race, and previous criminal history of the 
persons represented. The compilation has been limited to instances 
of arrests for violations of state laws and municipal ordinances. In 
other words, fingerprint cards representing arrests for violations of 
Federal laws or representing commitments to any type of penal insti- 
tutions have been excluded from this tabulation. 

The number of fingerprint records examined exceeded the 402,383 
prints handled during the first half of 1950 by 4.2 percent. The 
tabulation of data from fingerprint cards obviously does not include 
all persons arrested, since there are individuals taken into custody 
for whom n© fingerprint cards are forwarded to Washington. Further- 
more, data pertaining to persons arrested should not be treated as 
information regarding the number of offenses committed, since two 
or more persons may be involved in the joint commission of a single 
offense, and on the other hand one person may be arrested and charged 
with the commission of several separate crimes. 
Offense Charged 

More than 42 percent (177,279) of the records examined during 
the first half of 1951 represented arrests for major violations. 

Persons charged with murder, robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, 
and auto theft numbered 112,626, constituting 26.9 percent of the 
total arrest records examined. 

Sex 

Fingerprint cards representing arrests of males during the first half 
of 1951 numbered 377,507, a 3.6 percent increase over the 364,519 
cards received during the same period of 1950. 

Female arrest prints increased from 37,864 during the first half of 
1950 to 41 ,944 during the same period of 1951, representing an increase 
of 10.8 percent. 

Age 

During the first half of 1951, males and females under 21 years of 
age arrested and fingerprinted numbered 63,592, constituting 15.2 
percent of the total arrests. In addition, there were 62,146 (14.8 
percent) between the ages of 21 and 24, making a total of 125,738 

(60) 



61 

(30.0 percent) less than 25 years old. Arrests of persons 25 to 29 
years old numbered 70,696 (16.9 percent). The resultant total is 
196,434 (46.8 percent) less than 30 years of age. It should be remem- 
bered that the number of arrest records is doubtless incomplete in 
the lower age groups because of the practice of some jurisdictions not 
to fingerprint youthful offenders. 

Youths played a predominant part in the commission of crimes 
against property as indicated by the following figures: During the 
first half of 1951, there were 98,700 persons of all ages arrested for 
robbery, burglary, larceny, auto theft, embezzlement, fraud, forgery, 
counterfeiting, receiving stolen property, and arson; and 29,750 (30.1 
percent) of those persons were less than 21 years old. 

The extent of the participation by youths in the commission of 
crimes against property is further indicated by the following figures: 
During the first half of 1951, 30.0 percent of all persons arrested were 
less than 25 years of age. However, persons less than 25 years old 
numbered 53.6 percent of those charged with robbery, 61.7 percent 
of those charged with burglary, 45.2 percent of those charged with 
larceny, and 69.7 percent of those charged with auto theft. Approxi- 
mately one-half of all crimes against property during the first half 
were committed by persons under 25 years of age. 



Table 22. — Distribution of arrests by sex, January-June, 1961 



Offense charged 



Total Male Female 



Male Female 



Total 

Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses agamst family and children. _. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. . . 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other oflenses 

1 Less than Ho of 1 percent. 



100.0 



0.8 
2.3 
7.1 
5.6 
8.7 
2.5 
2.8 
.5 
.1 
1.4 
LO 
1.1 
2.3 
1.5 
1.2 
2.0 
1.5 
7.2 
2.1 
.1 
1.8 
5.3 
22.2 
5.9 
2.3 
5.4 
1.0 
4.5 



0.8 
2.4 
7.0 
6.0 
8.6 
2.7 
2.6 
.5 

L3 
1.1 
.5 
2.2 
1.4 
1.3 
2.1 
1.3 
7.7 
2.3 

L9 
5.1 
22.4 
5.5 
2.3 
5.3 
1.0 
4.5 



6.9 
3.4 
2.1 

.6 
1.1 
2.4 
3.1 

.5 
) 

.7 
7.6 
20.4 
9.5 
2.7 
6 5 
1.0 
4.8 



62 



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63 



Table 24. — Number and percentage of arrests of persons under 25 years of age, 
January-June, 1951 



Offense charged 



Total... 

Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape... 

Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice 

Other sex offenses.. 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 

etc 

Offenses against famUy and 

children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle 

laws 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gam bl ing 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

Another offenses. -. 



Total 
number 
of per- 
sons 
arrested 



419,451 



3,316 
9,634 
29,614 
23,322 
36,457 
10, 2S3 
10,697 

1,953 

533 

5,818 

4,306 

4,753 
9,816 



4,996 

8,342 
6,102 
30, 179 

'307 

7.559 
22,453 
93,205 
24,782 

9,850 
22, 660 

4,284 
19,087 



Number 
under 

18 years 



20, 435 



841 

656 

4,591 

3,692 

2,668 

131 

97 
41 
201 
338 

46 
241 
253 



234 
591 
497 

877 

57 

1,587 

77 



Number 
under 

21 years 
of age 



63, 592 



351 
2,784 
3,017 
9.812 
10, 002 
5,232 

703 



362 
1,054 
1,259 



362 

802 

1,166 



29 

1,352 
3,189 
3,547 
3,519 

319 
4,822 

401 
4,317 



Total 
number 
under 

25 years 
of age 



125, 738 



875 
5,167 
7,650 
14, 389 
16, 463 
7,165 
2, 153 



165 
1,804 
2,259 

1,373 

2,595 
3,010 

1,817 

1,687 
1,412 
4,262 
3,827 
71 

2,994 
6,975 
11, .347 
7,272 
1,062 
8,917 
1,014 
7,387 



Percent- 
age un- 
der 18 

years of 



2.8 
8.7 
2.2 
19.7 
10.1 
25.9 
1.2 

5.0 

7.7 
3.5 

7.8 

1.0 
2.5 
4.1 



3.1 
2.6 

.5 
3.5 

.6 
7.0 
1.8 
10.0 



der21 

years of 

age 



10.6 
28.9 
10.2 
42.1 
27.4 
50.9 



16.3 
18.4 
13.8 
29.9 

7.6 
10.7 
20.4 



4.3 
13.1 

3.9 
20.0 

9.4 

17.9 
14.2 

3.8 
14.2 

3.2 
21.3 



Total 
percent- 
age under 
25 years 



30.0 



26.4 
53.6 
25.8 
61.7 
45.2 
69.7 
20.1 

32.0 
31.0 
31.0 
52.5 



36.4 

20.2 
23.1 
14.1 
42.6 
23.1 



31.1 
12.2 
29.3 
10.8 
39.4 
23.7 



For males and females combined, the figures for the groups in which 
the largest number of arrests occm-red during the first half of 1951 
are as follows: 

Age: Number of arrests 

23 15, 798 

22 15,726 

21 15,322 

24 15, 300 

18 15,204 

The frequency of male arrests were for ages 23, 18, 22, 21, and 24. 
AiTests for females showed the largest nimiber occurring at age 24, 
followed by ages 23, 22, 25, and 26 in that order. 
Criminal Repeaters 

Of all the 419,451 arrest records examined, 253,618 (60.5 percent) 
represented persons who already had fingerprint cards on file in the 
Identification Division of the FBI. For males the percentage having 
prior records was 62.1 and for females the percentage was 46.0. 
These figures pertain to fingerprint arrest records and in no way relate 
to the Civil Identification Files of the FBI. 



64 

Race 

Most of the persons represented in this study were members of 
the white and Negro races. Members of the white race represented 
302,744 of the 419,451 arrest records received, while 110,309 were 
Negroes, 4,188 were Indians, 424 Chinese, 137 Japanese, and 1,649 
were representatives of other races. 



OFFENSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in part I and 
part II offenses, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 

il Part I Offenses 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter includes all 
i willful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 

Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or 
justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides excluded from this classification are 
limited to the following types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer 
in line of duty; (2) the killing of a hold-up man by a private citizen. (6) Man- 
slaughter by negligence includes any death which the police investigation estab- 

J lishes was primarily attributable to gross negligence on the part of some individual 

: other than the victim. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — victim under 
:age of consent), assault to rape, and attempted rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
'force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, stick-ups, 
r robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
I cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids. Does not 
i include simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
I cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, even though no 
f force was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. Burglary followed by 
! larceny is included in this classification and not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value; 
' (6) under $50 in value — ^includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
! upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
■ shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article of value which 
I is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, 

"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — -Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven away 
and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Does not include taking 
for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized use by 
those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Part II Offenses 

8. Other assaults. — ^Includes all assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — -Includes offenses dealing with the making, 
altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is 
made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Includes all offenses of fraudulent conversion, 
embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — -Includes buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property as well as attempts to commit any of those offenses. 

(65) 



12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — Includes all violations of regulations 
or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufac- 
turing of deadly weapons or silencers and all attempts to violate such statutes 
or regulations. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Includes sex offenses of a commer- 
cialized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as prostitution, keepinji 
bawdy house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for immoral purposes. 

14. Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution and commercialized vice). — In- 
cludes offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, and the like. Includes 
attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of nonsupport, 
neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as 
unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of "drunkenness" (class 18) and "driving 
while intoxicated" (class 22), liquor-law violations. State or local, are placed in 
this class. Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all offenses of drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Includes all charges of committing a breach of the 
peace. 

20. Vagrancy. — Includes such offenses as vagaliondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, permitting, or engaging in 
gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Includes driving or operating any motor vehicle 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws.'- — Includes violations of regulations with 
respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to prevent accidents. 

24. Parking violations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor-vehicle laws. — Includes violations of 
State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and motor vehicles 
not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws for which 
no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as suspicious 
characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, who are released with, 
out formal charges being placed against them. 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 
RE PO RTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 




ISSUED BY THE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Volume XXII Number 2 

ANNUAL BULLETIN • I95J 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 
AND ITS POSSESSIONS 



Volume XXII— Number 2 
ANNUAL BULLETIN, 1951 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




International Association of Chiefs of Police 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1952 



CONTENTS 

Page ! 

Summary of volume XXII, No. 2 07-69 

Classification of offenses 68-09 

Reporting area 09 

Crime trends: 

Estimated number of major crimes (table 25) 70-7 1 

Url)an crime trends (tables 26-27) 72-79 

Rural crime trends (table 28) 80-8 1 

Monthly variations (table 29) 82-84 

Crime rates: 

Urban crime rates (tables 30-33) 85-89 

Rural crime rates (table 34) 90 

Offenses in individual areas: 

Offenses in cities with more than 25,000 inhabitants (table 35) 91-99 

Offenses in Territories and possessions (table 36) 100 

Supplemental crime data: 

Offense analysis (table 37) 101-102 

Value of property stolen by type of crime (table 38) 102-103 

Value of property stolen and value of proi^erty recovered (table 39) - _ 103 

Data compiled from fingerprint records: 

Sex distribution of persons arrested (table 40) 104-105 

Age distribution of persons arrested (tables 41-42) 106-1 10 

Percentage with previous fingerprint records (table 43) 110-1 1 1 

Race distribution of persons arrested (table 44) 111 

Definition of part I and part II offense classifications 112-113 

Index to volume XXII 115-116 

(II) 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. 
Department of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

Volume XXII January 1952 Number 2 

SUMMARY 

Estimated Number of Major Crimes 

Crimes increased to an estimated 1,882,160 serious offenses during 
1951. This is an increase of 92,130 crimes or 5.1 percent over the 
1950 figure. Wanton killers caused the death of 12,330 individuals 
within the boundaries of the continental United States while an 
additional 147,530 persons were feloniously assaulted by rapists and 
potential killers, in crimes of rape, aggravated assault and robbery. 
Major crimes during 1951 averaged 5,157 each day or 34 felonious 
homicides, 1,115 burglaries, 143 robberies, 3,064 larcenies, 46 rapes, 
540 auto thefts, and 215 aggravated assaults. 
Crime Trends 

Crime was up 5.1 percent throughout the Nation with cities regis- 
tering a 5.2 percent increase and rural areas a 5.0 percent increase. 
A Nation-wide increase of 15.3 percent in auto thefts and 7.1 percent 
in larcenies occurred with negligent manslaughter and rapes showing 
rises of 3.4 percent and 1.3 percent, respectively. Murders, rob- 
beries, aggravated assaults, and burglaries reflected slight downward 
trends of 2.9, 2.1, 2.9, and 1.2 percent, respectively. 
Monthly Variations 

Traffic deaths due to negligent manslaughter occur more freciuently 
during winter months. Other crimes against the person, murder, 
rape, and aggravated assaults, tend generally to increase in the 
warmer months of the year. An unusual increase in murders was 
noted for December 1951. Robberies, burglaries, and thefts consti- 
tuting crimes against property, are at their highest point during the 
colder months of the year. 
Property Recovered 

Almost 92 percent of stolen automobiles were recovered by police 
during 1951. Currency and jewelry valued at almost 15 percent of 
the total value stolen were recovered. Recoveries of other types of 

(67) 



68 

property were made as follows: P^iirs, 3.7 percent; clothing, 16.6 i)er- 
cent ; and miscellaneous pro])erty, 26.0 ])erceut. 
Persons Arrested 

The 831,288 local fingerprint arrest records examined by the FBI 
during 1951 exceeded l)y 4.7 percent the number in 1950. Major 
violations were represented in more than 41 percent of the arrest 
figures. Age 23 predominated in the frequency of arrests, followed 
by ages 22, 21, 24, and 26, in that order. Females arrested increased 
11.3 percent in 1951, a reversal of the trend at the end of 1950 when 
a 2.5 percent decrease was noted. 

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 

The ])olice statistics herein concern local offenses only and in no 
manner relate to crimes characterized as exclusively Federal. 

The term "offenses known to the police" is designed to include those 
crimes designated as part I classes of the uniform classification occur- 
ring within the police jurisdiction, whether they become known to the 
police through reports of police officers, of citizens, of prosecuting or 
court officials, or otherwise. They are confined to the following group 
of seven classes of grave offenses, shown by experience to be those 
most generally and completely reported to the police: Criminal 
homicide, including (a) murder, nonnegligent manslaughter, and (b) 
manslaughter by negligence; rape; rol)bery; aggravated assault; 
burglary^ — ^breaking or entering; larceny — theft; and auto theft. The 
figures contained herein include also the number of attempted crimes 
of the designated classes. In other words, an attempted burglary 
or robbery, for example, is reported in the bulletin in the same manner 
as if the crime had been com])leted. Attempted murders, however, 
are reported as aggravated assaults. 

''Offenses know^n to the police" include, therefore, all of the above 
offenses, including attempts, which are reported by the law-enforce- 
ment agencies of contributing communities and not merely arrests or 
cleared cases. Ofienses committed by juveniles are included in the 
same manner as those known to have been committed by adults, 
regardless of the prosecutive action. Complaints which upon investi- 
gation are learned to be groundless are not includ(>d in the ta])idations 
which follow. 

In pu])lishing the data sent in by chiefs of ])olice in difl'erent cities, 



the FBI does not vouch for the 


r accuracv. Thev 


are given out 


as 


current information which mav 


throw s(une light 


on problems 


of 



crime and criminal-law eiiforccnu-nt. 

In compiling the tables, returns which were apparently incom- 
plete or otherwise defective were excluded. 



69 

In the last section of this bulletin may be found brief definitions 
of part I and II offense classifications. 

REPORTING AREA 

During 1951 one or more crime reports were received from 3,113 
city and village police departments, 2,146 county police agencies, 13 
State police, and 9 agencies in Territories and possessions of the 
United States, for a total of 5,281 contributors as compared with 5,21 1 
in 1950. The 1950 census figures were used in compiling the crime 
data for this issue of the bulletin. 



CRIME TRENDS 

Estimated Number of Major Crimes 

Crime increased 5.1 percent during 1951 throughout the United'; 
States, rising to a total of 1,882,160 serious offenses or 92,130 over the 
1950 estimates. Major crimes during 1951 averaged 5,157 each dn\ 
or 34 felonious homicides, 1,115 burglaries, 143 robberies, 3,0(11 
larcenies, 46 rapes, 540 auto thefts, and 215 aggravated assaults. 

The untimely death of 12,330 individuals at the hands of killers 
occurred within the United States during 1951. In addition, 147,530 
persons were feloniously assaulted by rapists, robbers, and potential 
killers in crimes of rape, rol)bery, and aggravated assault. 

Crimes of negligent manslaughter, consisting principally of traffic 
fatalities, increased to 5,510 or 3.4 percent over 1950. Victims of 
rapists numbered 16,800, a 1.3 percent increase over 1950. Auto 
thieves stole 196,960 automobiles, an increase of 26,180 or 15.3 percent 
over 1950. Other thefts increased 7.1 percent. 

Alm-ders, robberies, aggravated assaults, and bm-glaries reflected 
slight downward trends of 2.9, 2.1, 2.9, and 1.2 percent, respectively. 

The estimated major crime total is considered conservativ^e since 
such crimes as arson, emlx'zzlemeiit, carrying concealed weapons, and 
others are not included. 



Table 25.— CRIME TRENDS, URBAN AND RURAL 

[Estimated number of major crimes in the United States, 1950-51] 



OlTeiise 


Number of offenses 


Change 


1950 


1951 


Number 


Percent 


TOTAl . _ _ 


1, 790, 030 


1, 882, 160 


+92, 130 


+5. 1 






Murder and nonneglisjent manslaugliter 


7,020 
5,330 
16.580 
53,230 

80,950 

411,980 

1,044,160 

170, 780 


6,820 
5, 510 
16, 800 
52.090 

78. 640 

407. 130 

1, 118, 210 

196, 900 


-200 

+180 

+220 

-1,140 

-2,310 
-4,850 
+74, 050 
+26. 180 


-2.9 


Manslaughter by negligence 


+3.4 




+1.3 




-2.1 




-2.9 


Burglary — breaking or entering 

LarciMiv— tlicft 


-1.2 

+7 1 




+15.3 







(70) 



71 




72 

Urban Crime Trends 

The treiul has been up in urban crime for the 4 years since 1947 
wlien a 5.1 decrease was noted. The figures for 1951, as a whole, are 
5.2 percent above those for 1950. The 2,124 identical cities rep- 
resented m the trend figures for 1951 as compared with 1950 reported 
1,091,039 crimes. The indicated cities represent a total population 
of 68,117,563. 

Larcenies, representing 58.4 ])ercent of the crimes reported, increased 
7.0 percent. Auto thefts, comprising 11.0 percent of the crimes re- 
ported, increased 15.4 percent. Burglaries, second only to larcenies in 
frequency of occurrence, decreased 1.1 percent. Larcenies, auto 
thefts, and burglaries combined represent 91 percent of all crimes 
reported in the trend figures. Combining these three classifications, 
a 5.8 percent increase is noted. Thus, the percentage change in total 
crime is controlled by larceny, burglary, and auto theft. 

Murders declined 3.7 percent in 1951 to 3,344 killings from 3,474 
in 1950 in the cities represented in the trend figures. Murders 
increased 2.3 percent in 1950 but had decreased 7.6, 2.1, and 5.9 
percent, respectively, in the 3 years preceding 1950. 

Manslaughter by negligence declined 4 percent in these cities but 
still 2,181 victims lost their lives through the gross negligence of some 
other persons. The 1950 figures showed a 15.4 percent increase in 
negligent manslaughters over 1949. Foe the 3 years prior to 1950 
substantial decreases had been noted of 9.7, 7.7, and 8.9 percent, 
respectively. . 

Rapes increased 3.3 percent, from 7,391 in 1950 to 7,635 in 1951. 
This was the only crime against the person classification reflecting an 
increase in 1951. In 1947 a 2.9 percent increase over 1946 was noted. 
During 1948 a 2.3 percent decrease occurred but in 1949 rapes in- 
creased 0.3 percent. Again, in 1950, a decrease of 0.7 percent was 
noted. 

The sharp dowaiward trend of minus 11.2 percent in robberies at the 
end of 1950 was interrupted in 1951, and at the end of the year only 
140 less robberies than in 1950 had occurred resulting in a negligible 
0.4 percent decrease. 

Aggravated assaults have increased steadily in urban communities 
during the period 1947-50 but last year reflected a 1.4 percent decrease. 

Reporting cities are groui)ed l)y size in tables, as follows: 

Group: PopJilnfion 

T 250, 000 and over 

II 100,000-250,000 

III 50,000-100,000 

IV 25,000- 50, 000 

\ 10,000-25,000 

VI 1 2,500-10,000 



73 

Decreases in murder are shown for all city groups. The sharpest 
declines were noted in group V and VI cities, 11.8 and 12.7 percent, 
respectively. The pattern is not as uniform in the negligent man- 
slaughter classification since the over-all decrease was not followed by 
the group IV and VI cities. Group IV cities had an increase of 3.2 
percent but their smallest neighbors, the group VI cities increased 21 .2 
percent in the number of negligent manslaughters. 

All city groups above 25,000 in population reflected increases in the 
rape classification ranging from a 5.4 percent increase to a 7.4 percent 
increase. In the group of cities having between 10,000 and 25,000 
population a decrease in rapes of 5.4 percent occurred while the 
smallest city group, VI, reflected an 18.1 percent decrease. 

The total decrease of 0.4 percent for ro])beries noted in the trends 
for all cities is not supported by any definite pattern based on the size 
of cities. The largest city group had a 1.1 percent decrease in rob- 
beries w^hile groups II, III, and IV had increases of 4.7, 5.1, and 4.8 
percent, respectively. In the two smallest city groups, cities having 
a population of 10,000-25,000 experienced a 10.7 percent decrease and 
the smallest cities noted an 11.8 percent decrease. 

Burglaries increased 6.7 percent in 1949 but the trend figures re- 
flected a 1.3 percent decrease in 1950 and a 1.1 percent decrease in 
1951. Larcenies have been on the increase since 1947 when a 2.3 per- 
cent decrease was noted. The percentage increases for city larcenies 
are as follows: 1948, 2.3; 1949, 4.6; 1950, 0.7; 1951, 7.0. 

The 1951 increase of 15.4 percent in auto thefts was in addition to 
the 6.4 percent increase seen in 1950. The 1950 increase reversed the 
downward trend in auto thefts noted for 1947-49, when the decreases 
were 20.7, 8.8, and 2.6 percent, respectively. 

Aggravated assaults increased 10.6 percent in group IV and 3.9 
percent in group III cities but decreases were found in all other city 
groups. Biu-glaries increased only in the largest city group where an 
0.8 percent increase was recorded. On the other hand, larcenies in- 
creased in all sizes of cities. Auto thefts increased in all city groups 
with a high of 21.2 percent in group I cities and a low of 1.1 percent 
in the smallest city group. 

Urban crime increased in all geographic divisions except the Moun- 
tain States. In the individual crime classifications murder ranged 
from a decrease of 17.5 percent in the West North Central States to 
an 11.9 percent increase in the New England States. The West 
North Central States also reflected a decrease of 28.8 percent in neg- 
Hgent manslaughters, and at the other extreme of the range the South 
Atlantic States experienced an increase of 10.8 percent. 

Robbery increased 4.5 percent in the Middle Atlantic States but 
a 9.9 percent decrease occurred in the East South Central States. 

994945°— 52 2 



74 

Between these limits varied trends are noted for otlier divisions. 
Larceny and anto theft increased in all ^eo^raphic divisions except 
the Monntain States. 

The accompanyino; tables present urban trends by grouping identical 
cities first by population and then by geograi)hic divisions and State. 



Table 26.— URliAN CRIME TRENDS, 1950-51, BY POPULATION GROUPS 

[Offenses known to the police in 2,124 cities, total population 68,117,563, based on 1950 decennial census] 



Population group 



.TOTAL: 

f 1950.-. 

1951 

Percent change 

Group I: 39 cities over 
250,000; total popula- 
tion. 26,(>41.981: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

Group II: 64 cities 
100,000 to 250.000; total 
population, 9,353,981: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

Group III: 121 cities, 
50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 8,592,462: 

1950... 

1951 

Percent change 

Group IV: 229 cities, 
25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 7.990,724: 

nm 

1951 

Percent change 

Group V: 602 cities, 
10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 9,365,284: 

1950.. 

1951 

Pe rcen t change 

Group VI: 1,069 cities 
under 10 000; total 
population, 6,173,131: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 



1, 036, 935 
1, 091, 039 

+5.2 



467, 630 

497, 523 

+6.4 



160, 276 

171, 387 

+6.9 



136. 049 

+2.9 



111,202 

118, 693 

+6.7 



108. 966 

111,186 

+2.0 



56, 641 
56. 221 
-0.7 



Murdei 
and 
non- 
neali- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



3,474 
3,344 
-3.7 



1.51 
-12.7 



Man 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



2,273 
2.181 
-4.0 



1, 103 
1 , 006 
-3.4 



273 

236 

-1.3.6 



220 
227 

+3.2 



164 

131 

-20.1 



85 

103 

+21.2 



7,391 
7,635 
+3.3 



4,433 

4, 676 
+.5.5 



798 

841 

+5.4 



614 

653 

+6.4 



474 

.509 
+7.4 



458 

375 

-18.1 



Rob- 
bery 



34,315 
34, 175 
-0.4 



23, 132 
22, 886 
-1.1 



4,044 

+4.7 



2,574 
2,704 
+5.1 



1,829 
1,917 

+4.8 



1,716 
1,532 
-10.7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



28,223 
27, 303 
-3.3 



6,321 
6,212 



6, 060 
6, 296 
+3.9 



3, .554 
3,929 
+10. 6 



3, 263 
3, 164 
-3.0 



1^744 
-7 9 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



240, 744 

238. 193 

-1.1 



108, 732 

109, 623 
+0.8 



30, 521 
29, 431 
-3.6 



24, 460 
24, 066 
-1.6 



23, 926 
23,390 
-2.2 



14, 211 
12,951 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



595.231 
638, 683 

+ 7.0 



248, 430 

267,419 

+7.6 



92, 234 

101, 006 

+9.5 



79, 455 
83, 105 
+4.6 



70, 784 
76, 927 
+8.7 



70, 276 
73.009 
+3.9 



34, 052 
35, 197 
+3.4 



104, 193 
120, 200 
+ 15.4 



51,798 
62,785 
+21.2 



16,990 
19,390 
+14.1 



12,358 
13,274 

+7.4 



9,605 
10,849 
+13.0 



9,102 

+4.7 



4; 800 
+1.1 



75 




76 



Table 27.— URBAN CRIME TRENDS, 1950-1051, BY GEOGRAPHIC 
DIVISIONS AND STATES 

[Offfiises known to the police in 2,124 cities, total population, OS, 117,5^3 based on 1950 decennial census] 



Divisions and States 



Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
^l3Ugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggr 
vate 



Bur- 
glary— 
brealv- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



TOTAL, 2, 124 cities; pop- 
ulation, 68,117,563: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

New England, 128 cities; 
population, 5,295,310: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

Connecticut, 17 cities; 
population, 926,688: 

1950 

1951 

Maine, 18 cities; popula- 
tion, 335,119: 

1950 

1951 

Massachusetts, 60 cities; 
population, 3,130,321: 

1950 

1951 

New Hampshire, 14 
cities; population, 243, 
696: 

1950 

1951 

Rhode Island, 9 cities; 
population, 558,273: 

1950 

1951 

Vermont, 10 cities; pop- 
ulation, 101,213: 

1950 

1951 

Middle Atlantic, 466 
cities; population, 12,- 
017,777: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

New Jersey, 119 cities; 
population, 2,807,423: 

1950 

1951 

New York, 158 cities; 
population, 3,689,292: 

1950 

1951 

Pennsylvania, 189 cities; 
population, 5,521,062: 

1950 

1951 

East North Central, 523 
cities; i)opulation, 18,- 
445,615: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

Illinois, 137 cities; pop- 
ulation, 5,930,220: 

1950 

1951 

Indiana, 73 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,993,443: 

1950 

1951 



1,036,935 
1, 091, 039 

+5.2 



53. 9i(; 
54, 51S 
+1.1 



9,805 
10, 601 



31, 466 
31,021 



1,972 
1,896 



105,390 
+7.2 



30, ( 



30, 917 
32, 022 



41, 125 
42, 749 



m9, 819 

g91.S99 

+8.S 



3,474 
3,344 
-3.7 



2,273 
2,181 
-4.0 



7,391 
7,635 
+3.3 



34,315 
34, 175 
-0.4 



49, 314 
48, 648 
-1.4 



240, 744 

238, 193 

-1.1 



205 

15i 

-21 9 



327 

3U 

+5.2 



G37 

625 

-1.9 



13, i96 
12, 259 
-9.2 



3.50 
■Hi 



812 

813 

+0.1 



3,367 
S, 519 
+4.5 



i,231 
4, 238 
+0.S 



7,470 

6,784 



1,906 

1,877 



28,353 
27.952 
-l.i 



778 

811 

+4-S 



421 

461 

+9.5 



2,350 
2,661 
+9.0 



12, 182 
12, 408 
+1.9 



1,318 
1,442 



2, 249 
2, 057 



12, 473 
12, 455 
-0.1 



7, 569 
7,149 



12, 931 
12, 498 



30, 382 
31, 193 



6, 223 
6, 286 



5,114 
4, 703 



77 



Table 27.— URBAN CRIME TRENDS, 1950-1951, BY GEOGRAPHIC 
DIVISIONS AND STATES— Continued 



Divisions and States 



Michigan, 94 cities; pop- 
ulation, 3,816,542: 

1950 

1951 

Ohio, 143 cities; popula- 
tion, 4,924,372: 

1950 

1951 

Wisconsin, 76 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,781,038: 

1950 

1951 

West North Central, 252 
cities; population, 6,- 
113,343: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 



Iowa, 60 cities; popula- 
tion, 1,074,935: 

1950 

1951 ■- 

Kansas, 50 cities; popu- 
lation, 826,469: 

1950 

1951 

Minnesota, 54 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,425,700: 

1950 

1951 

Missouri, 40 cities; popu- 
lation, 1,926,397: 

1950 

1951 

Nebraska, 23 cities; pop- 
ulation, 526,138: 

1950 

1951 

North Dakota, 11 cities; 
population, 157,009: 

1950 

1951 

South Dakota, 14 cities; 
population, 176,695: 
1950 



South Atlantic,! 2i:Uitic 
population, 7,190,191: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 



Delaware, 3 cities; popu- 
lation, 121,758: 

1950 

1951 

Florida, 40 cities; popu- 
lation, 1,140,440: 

1950 

1951 

Georgia, 28 cities; popu- 
lation, 955,532: 

1950 

1951 

Maryland, 16 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,137,698: 

1950 _ _ . 

1951 



80, 541 
87, 103 



19.375 
20, 270 



8S. 705 

87, ms 

+4-3 



12, 522 

13, 530 



30, 939 
32,719 



2,050 
1,994 



2,077 
2,726 



24, 043 
24,921 



14, 464 
15, 740 



14, 391 
16,212 



Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



153 

109 

-28.8 



278 

308 

+10.8 



Rape 



965 
1,084 



557 

583 

+17 



Rob- 
bery 



2,878 
3, 106 



2, 249 
2,090 



2,m 

2,407 
-2.3 



3. 595 
3. 469 
-S. 5 



vated 
assault 



4,502 
4, .'^61 



3. 293 
3, 300 
+0.2 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



16, 182 
15, ,546 



2, 451 



17, 948 
19, 401 
+8.1 



70 2, 361 
69 2, 656 



3,024 
3,173 



2,726 
2,738 



3,106 
3,231 



7,155 
8,127 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



49, 650 
54, 999 



42,811 
47,214 



14, 236 

15, 380 



50, 781 
62, 254 
+2.9 



8,274 
8,006 



10, 788 
11, 192 



159 
141 


1,431 

1, 459 


5 
4 


426 
394 


10 
6 


445 
361 


15, 413 
15, 590 
+1.1 


30, 409 

30, 287 

-0.4 


5 
24 


452 
647 


1, 092 
999 


7,414 
7,144 


1,535 

1,579 


3,039 
3,292 


1,187 
1,170 


2, 727 



1,454 



65, 945 
70, 146 
+6.4 



12, 642 
13,619 



Includes the District of Coluiii 



78 



Table 27.— URBAN CRIME TRENDS, 1950-1951, BY GEOGRAPHIC 
DIVISIONS AND STATES— Continued 



Divisions and States 



North Carolina, 49 cities; 
population, 1,051,122: 

1950 

1951 

South Carolina, 21 cities; 
population, 418,670: 



1951 

Virginia, 36 cities; popu- 
lation, 1,094,781: 



1951 

West Virginia, 19 cities; 

population, 468,012: 

1950 

1951 

East South Central, 91 

cities; population, 

3,101,867: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 



Alabama, 26 cities; pop- 
ulation, 924,087: 

1950 

1951 . 

Kentucky, 23 cities; pop- 
ulation, 703,697: 

1950- 

1951 

Mississippi, 20 cities; 
population, 431,139: 

1950 

1951 '-. 

Tennessee, 22 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,042,944: 

1950 

1951 

West South Central, 1:50 
cities; popuhitioii, 
5,480,568: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 



Arkansas, 18 cities; pop- 
ulation, 321,892: 

1950 

1951 

Louisiana, 20 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,084,959: 



1951 

Oklahoma, 27 cities; pop- 
ulation, 800,438: 

1950 

1951 



7,308 
7,017 



5,455 
5.007 



15, 736 
4'', 476 
+S.8 



14, 184 
13, 967 



4,540 
4,737 



97. 87S 

102, 739 

+5.0 



3,814 
3,937 



12, 606 
12,948 



15,825 
15,811 



Murder 
and 
non- 
nesli- 
gent 
man- 
laugh- 
ter 



3.95 
-IS.i 



2 Increase of less than one-tenth of : 



43 
LTcent 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



+8.3 



Rape 



S36 
-13. 1 



Rob- 
bery 



2,306 
2,180 
-5.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4,436 
4.201 



2, 255 
2, 605 



3, 757 
3. 289 
-12.0 



3,709 
i,222 
+13. 8 



Bur- 
glary- 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



4,561 
4, .585 



12, 478 
IS, 049 
+i.6 



3. 962 
3, 614 



25, 023 

24, 266 

-3.0 



79 



Table 27.— URBAN CRIME TRENDS, 1950-1951, BY GEOGRAPHIC 
DIVISIONS AND STATES— Continued 



Divisions and States 



Texas, 65 cities; popula- 
tion, 3,273,279: 

lOSO 

19ol 

Mountain, 112 cities; pop- 
ulation, 2,004,208: 

1950 

1951 

Percent change 

Arizona, 12 cities; popu- 
lation, 224,040: 

1950 

1951 

Colorado, 24 cities; pop- 
ulation, 654,662: 

1950 

1951 

Idaho, 18 cities; popula- 
tion, 190,673: 

1950 

1951 

Montana, 14 cities; pop- 
ulation, 189,940: 

1950 

1951 

Nevada, 4 cities; popula- 
tion, 45,351: 

1950 

1951 

New Mexico, 14 cities; 
population, 224,340: 

1950 

1951 

Utah, 18 cities; popula- 
tion, 366,690: 

1950 

1951 

Wyoming, 8 cities; pop- 
ulation, 108,512: 

1950 

1951 

Pacific, 209 cities; popu- 
lation, 8,468,684: 

1950 

1951 

•^rccnt change 

nia, 149 cities; 
I i»ion, 6,666,927: 

Orcgo cs; popula- 

tion, o. : 

1950 

1951. 

Washington, 34 cities 
population, 1,184,899: 

1950 . -. 

1951 



65,633 
70, 043 



kt, 531 

U, 794 

-5.S 



7,308 
7,802 



4,013 
4,379 



3,846 
4,035 



1,489 
1,512 

3,571 
3,126 

7,771 



2,415 
2,068 



208, 819 

219,011 

+4.9 



13, 823 
13,818 



27, 510 
29, 417 



Murder 

and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



259 

273 

+5.i 



Man- 
ilaugh- 
tor by 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



1,421 
1,349 
-5.1 



Rob- 
bery 



1,401 
1,260 



1,066 
1,103 
+3. 5 



6,748 
6, 752 
+0.1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2,429 
2,777 



4,223 
-17.0 



4,662 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



16, 920 
16, 754 



4,046 
3,810 



4S, 238 
43, 344 
+0.2 



34, 571 
34, 944 



2,919 
2, 895 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



36, 692 
40, 568 



31,080 
28, 793 
-7.4 



5, 370 
5, 325 



1,704 
1,429 



132, 409 

140, 338 

+6.0 



105, 450 
111,381 



9, 009 
9,322 



17, 950 
19, 635 



80 




81 

Rural Crime Trends 

Rural crime increased 5 percent in 1951. Negligent manslaughters, 
larcenies, and auto thefts increased 11.7, 11, and 15.1 percent, respec- 
tively. Crimes of murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and 
burglary decreased in the rural areas. 

The direction of the trends in rural crime agreed with city crime 
trends in all but two classifications. Negligent manslaughters in- 
creased outside the cities but decreased in the cities. Crimes of rape 
increased in the cities but decreased outside the cities' boundaries. 

Rural crime has increased each year since the publication of such 
figures began with the 1944 annual issue of this publication. The 
percentage increase has been as follows: 



Year 


Percent 

increase 


Vpqr Percent 
^^^^ \ increase 


1944 


4.0 
8.5 
14.1 
7.1 


1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 


4 3 


1945 

1946 

1947 


11 

5.0 



The rural crime trends in table 28 are based on monthly reports 
received during 1950 and 1951 from 1,506 law enforcement agencies 
representing a rural population of 37,676,816 according to the 1950 
decennial census population figures. 



Table 28.— RURAL CRIME TRENDS, 1950-51 

[Offen.ses known as reported by 1,419 sheriffs, 77 rural village officers, and 10 State police. Total rural 
population 37,676,816, based on 1950 decennial census] 





Number of offenses 


Offense 


1950 


1951 


Percent 
change 


TOTAL . _- . _ . 


173, 306 


181,913 


+5.0 






Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


1.725 
1,813 
3, 912 

5, 717 

11,494 
57, 527 
75, 457 
15, 661 


1,704 
2, 025 
3. 866 

5,183 

10, 607 
56. 727 
83, 781 
18, 020 


-1.2 

+ 11.7 


Rape 


— 1.2 




-9.3 


Aggravated assault 


—7.7 




-1.4 


Larceny — theft 


+11.0 




+15.1 













82 




MONTHLY VARIATIONS 


Offenses Known to the Police , 1951 


2,594 URBAN POUCE AGENCIES- TOTAL POPULATION 70,608,111 


(Offenses Ageiinst the Person) 








r Murder ^ 


^W Negligent Manslaughter ^H 




JAN. 
FEB. 

APR. 
AWY 
JUNE 
JULY 
AUG. 
SEPT 
OCT 
NOV 
DEC 


JAN. 
FEB. 

APR. 
A\AY 
JUNE 
JULY 
AUG 
SEPT 
OCT 
NOV 
DEC 




+ to% 

+ 30% 
-30% 


r^s^=^ 


+ 20«-, 

ANNUAtl 


\ y" 


y^s^ 




lJ -^^ -^ 








Rape 


^^ Aggravated Assault ^| 




JAN, 

FEB, 

A\AR. 

APR. 

MAY 

JUNE 

JULY 

AUG 

SEPT 

OCT. 

NOV 

DEC 


JAN, 
FEB 

APR. 
MAY 
JUNE 
JULY 
AUG 
SEPT 
OCT. 
NOV 
DEC 




+ 30% 
+ 10% 
- 10'. 


- />/^^ 


+ «0% 

1^ 


/^-A 


^ '-\ 


- lO-r, 

- 30-. 


U-^ V 




^ J 


^^ 







FictKh. 12. 



83 

Monthly Variations 

The seasonal variations in the incidence of crime continue to present 
the general pattern established in past years. Crimes against the 
person generally occur with more frequency during the warmer months 
of the year. An outstanding exception is the crime of manslaughter 
b}^ negligence. Crimes in this category occur almost entirely as a 
result of gross or criminal negligence in the operation of a motor 
vehicle, and this crime follows an opposite pattern to that presented 
by murders and felonious assaults. 

In December 1951 murders were 18.1 percent above the annual 
average, a somewhat unusual upward trend for this crime for that 
time of year. Murders occurred with almost 8 percent more fre- 
quency in December than in the next highest month, July. Negligent 
manslaughters were 45 percent more frequent in December than in 
May. 

Of the property crimes, robbery shows the most pronounced sea- 
sonal pattern. Robberies were 66 percent more frequent in December 
than in May. Burglaries were 25 percent more frequent in January 
than in June while larceny varied 16 percent from a low in January 
to a high in October. Auto theft varied 16 percent from the low 
month June, to the month of greatest frequency in auto thefts, 
October. 



Table 29.— MONTHLY VARIATIONS, URBAN 



[Daily average, ofTenses known to the police in 2,594 cities total population 70, 
decennial census] 



COMMUNITIES, 1951 

1, based on 1950 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonnegli- 
gent man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by neg- 
ligence 



Rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



January-December 

January-March. _. 

April-June 

July-September . , _ 
October-December 

January 

February 

-March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



9.40 

8. 51 



9.43 
8.16 
9.57 

8.84 
9.13 
10. 32 
10.13 

9.07 
9.55 
9.43 
11.10 



21.18 



134.7 



1, 759. 4 



a 07 

5.J,Z 
5.58 
7.17 



19.23 
23. 07 
22.88 
19.53 



1213 
135.6 
149.2 
129.5 



721.8 
625.7 
615.6 
687.6 



1, 697. 
1,8014 
1,752.3 
1, 783. 1 



6.77 
5.39 
5.97 
5.57 

5.19 
5.50 
5.29 
5.71 

5.73 
6.87 
7.13 
7.52 



19.39 
18.46 
19.77 
23.07 

21.81 
24.37 
24.03 
23. 68 

20.87 
21.74 
19.77 
17.10 



86.6 
81.2 

92.3 
92.0 
104.2 
123.5 



117.9 
125.5 
129.7 
131.8 

133. 
142.1 
147.2 
147.6 

153.0 
132.9 
119.4 
136.0 



745.0 
729.9 
691.4 
673.7 

606.1 
597.9 
610.9 
613.2 

622.9 
649.8 
670.6 
741.7 



1,6.33.8 
1,690.9 
1,765.8 
1, 843. 5 

1,788.1 
1,781.9 
1,716.8 
1,770.1 

1,770.4 
1, 902. 2 
1,732.4 
1,713.0 



333.1 



340.8 
322.2 
318.6 
350.8 



329. 9 
343.1 
349.5 
344.2 

316.5 

306.2 
309.3 
307.7 

339. 4 
355.2 
348.9 
348.3 



84 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 
Offenses Known to the Police, 1951 

2,594 URBAN POUCE AGENCIES -- TOTAL POPULATION 70,608,111 

(Offenses Ageiinst Property) 



Robbery 





JAN. 

FEB. 

MAR. 

AP^ 

MAY 

JUNE 

JULY 

AUG 

SEPT. 

OCT. 

NOV. 

DEC 


+40% 


_ 


+ X>% 


^ 


+ 20% 
+ 10% 


A / 


avemgeB 

-10% 


V-^ : 


-U)% 


- 



Burglary 

Ttl:«<«=;T<viOzS 



^ 



^ 



Larceny 



Aulo Theft 



^ s I 5 



3 t 



§1 



Figure 13. 



CRIME RATES 

Urban Crime Rates 

I All crime rates in 1951 were higher in cities with population in 
! excess of 100,000 except in the aggravated assault classification. 
Although cities over 250,000 in population had the highest aggravated 
assault rate, cities having 100,000 to 250,000 inhabitants had less 
incidence per capita of serious assaults than did the next smaller cities, 
the 50,000 to 100,000 population group. 

The smallest cities in 1951 had the lowest crime rates with the 
exception of the crime of negligent manslaughter where cities with 
from 10,000 to 25,000 population were lower. 

The above generalities are based on the rates of all cities in the 
United States divided by population groups. However, in a sub- 
division of these figures by geographic location the variations noted 
underline the undesirability of comparing the volume of crime in 
individual communities. The crime rate figures for cities subdivided 
according to location indicate that crime in communities of different 
size and location varies considerably. 

(85) 



80 



Table 30.— URBAN CRIMK RATES, 1951, BY POPULATION GROUPS 

[Offense.'^ known to the police and rate per 1(10,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on UJ.'iO decennial 

census] 





Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


IJur- 

glary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 




PopukilioM irniMi) 


Mur- 
der, 
non- 
nef;li- 
Kcnt 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


TOTAL, OROXtPS I-Vl 


















2,421 cities; total population, 
69,980,551: 
Number of offenses known. . 
Rate per 100 000 


















3,416 

4.88 


2, 214 
3.16 


7,731 
11.05 


34, 474 
49.3 


49, 355 

70.5 


1 235, ?08 
347.2 


1 638, 412 

940. 1 


121, 609 

173 8 






C.EOUP I 


















39 cities over 250,000; total pttpu- 
lation, 26,641,981: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 


1,765 
6.62 


1, 066 
4.00 


4, 676 
17. 55 


22, 886 

85. 9 


27, 303 
102. 5 


' 103.667 
421. 9 


• 262, 003 
1. 066. 3 


62, 78'^ 
235.7 


GROUP 11 


















64 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total 
population. 9,353,981: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 


532 
5.69 


418 
4.47 


841 
8.99 


4, 236 
4.5.3 


6, 212 
66.4 


38, 732 
414.1 


101, 006 
1,079.8 


19, 390 
207.3 


GROUP III 


















121 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total 
population, 8,592,462: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rite per 100 000 


350 
4 07 


2:36 
2 75 


6.53 
7 60 


2. 704 
31 5 


6, 296 
73 3 


29, 4:51 
342 5 


83, 105 
967 2 


13, 274 
154 5 


GROUP IV 


















232 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population, 8,105,148: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 


279 
3.44 


232 

2.86 


516 
6.37 


1,948 
24. 


3,977 
49.1 


24, 406 
.301.1 


77, 833 
960. 3 


11,019 
136. 


GROUP V 


















639 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population, 9,871,122: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 


.301 
3. 05 


139 
1.41 


(J08 
6.16 


1, 616 
16.4 


3, 421 
34.7 


24, 499 

248.2 


76, 061 
770.5 


9, 599 
97.2 


GROUP VI 


















1,326 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 7,415,857: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 


189 
2.55 


123 
1.66 


437 

5.89 


1,084 
14.6 


2,146 
28.9 


15, 073 
203. 3 


38, 404 
517. 9 


5,542 
74.7 



' The number of offenses and rates for burglary and larceny— theft are based on rei)orts as follows: Group 
I- VI 2,420 cities, total population 67,908,946; group I, 38 cities, total population, 24,570,376. 



87 



Table 31.— URBAN CRIME RATES, 1951, BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
AND STATES 

[Offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on 1950 decennial census] 



Division and State 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 
—break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny 
—theft 


Auto 
theft 


TOTAL 


4.88 


49.3 


70.5 


1 347. 2 


1 940. 1 


173.8 






New England — 


1.24 


15.3 


12.1 


229.8 


630.4 


122.8 




1.77 
2.00 
1.14 
.41 
.90 


19.5 
7.7 

16.0 
4.5 

14.9 
5.9 

29.0 


23.9 
6.6 
9.1 
4.1 
14.3 
12.8 
34.9 


246.0 
185.9 
217.4 
163.3 
336.2 
181.8 
2 218.3 


691.8 
657.1 
595.7 
557. 7 
740.1 
569.1 
2 479. 5 


106.9 


Maine 


81.8 




139.8 


New Hampshire 


39.4 




127.4 


Vermont 


74.1 


Middle Atlantic 


2.56 
2.59 
1.27 
3.41 

4.33 


115.9 






New Jersey 


32.1 
11.4 
39.1 
66.2 


50.5 
20.4 
30. 6 
66.4 


293.5 

191. 5 

3 186.1 

312.2 


565.8 

532. 

3 356. 1 

943.8 


127.9 


New York 


92.6 


Pennsylvania. 


125.2 




154.7 






Illinois 


4.98 
4.78 
4.47 
4.34 
1.33 
3.05 


104.3 
36.3 
80.0 
42.1 
10. 1 
38.3 


78.1 
42.9 
117.3 
41.9 
12.3 
52.3 


317.8 
341.8 
402. 3 
286.2 
136.9 
311.5 


661. 9 
929.6 
1, 422. 6 
951.0 
852.3 
834.0 


160. 4 




176.6 


Michigan 


194.1 


Ohio . 


125.5 


Wisconsin 


106.1 


West North Central 


144.2 




1.53 
2.83 
.80 
6.71 
1.29 


14.6 
32.6 
24.5 
7.3.0 
21.4 
14.0 
14.7 
47.3 


6.4 
31.9 
4.8 
138.2 
26.2 
2.5 
3.3 
214.9 


243.0 
377. 9 
222.1 
414.1 
274.2 
250.9 
199.9 
416.5 


7.34. 8 
1, 008. 7 
759.6 
834.0 
958. 5 
911.4 
800. 
961.5 


129.8 




140.4 


Minnesota 


127.2 




173.3 


Nebraska 


166. 5 




90.4 


South Dakota 




5.3.0 


South Atlantic* 


10.30 


226.2 




4.93 

8.85 
18.23 

7.53 
10.40 
12.51 
10. .30 

2.84 
12.45 


41.1 
54.5 
30.4 
47.1 
31.3 
17.1 
64.8 
28.6 
47.9 


19.7 
88.1 
161.3 
100.8 
400.1 
108.8 
233.4 
53.6 
102.6 


531.4 
622.1 
346.1 
265. 6 
429.3 
354.0 
426. 
274.0 
413.2 


1, 369. 9 
1, 185. 7 
839.8 
581.8 
849.4 
940. 6 
1, 306. 
554.3 
711.8 


267.7 


Florida . 


201.0 




216. 5 




390.2 


North Carolina 


16.5. 6 




182.0 


Virginia 


256.2 




120.2 


East South Central 


191.3 




1.5. 27 
10. 51 

8.12 
12.95 

9.11 


32.7 
8.5.9 
22.7 
45.9 
38.9 


136. 9 
115.5 
103. 4 
64.0 
75.9 


413. 4 
502.1 
267.0 
411.1 
430.1 


613. 9 
927. 3 
595. 4 
700. 5 
1, 030. 1 


175.7 


Kentucky 


269.4 




91.8 


Tennessee 


191.9 


West South Central 


214.1 


Arkansas 


8.00 

5:73 
10.53 
2.76 


29.2 
42.3 
42.3 
37.8 
53.4 


105. 5 
67.1 
44.5 
84.2 
36.3 


297. 
249.9 
443. 5 
499.2 

463.4 


610. 3 

578.4 

1, 114. 5 

1, 198. 6 

1, 402. 9 


108. 9 




197.2 


Oklahoma 


207. 5 




232. 1 


Mountain 


215.6 




2.63 
2.85 
3.05 
2.21 
3.73 
4.50 
1.86 
1.78 
3.21 
3.50 
1.93 
2.23 


101.2 
69.7 
29.5 
36.7 

26! 6 
35.3 
37.4 
79.1 


75.8 
39.3 
16.8 
30.5 
42.9 
43.4 
19.9 
19.6 
49.7 


715.1 
577.3 
432.2 
286.0 
672.2 
272.0 
373.5 
307.0 
510.4 


2, 243. 
1, 2.51. 6 
1,613.9 
1, 352. 1 
1, 902. 8 
823.8 
1, 424. 7 
1, 276. 1 
1,652.7 


345. 7 


Colorado 


221.1 


Idaho . - 


148.7 


Montana 


285. 5 




218.5 


New Mexico 


159.9 


Utah 


161.9 




194.0 


Pacific 


263.9 


California 


85. 6 
40.5 
62.9 


57.1 
22.8 
22.1 


523. 5 
466.5 
459.6 


1, 669. 4 
1, 500. 3 
1, 638. 3 


272.4 




179.3 


Washington 


259.9 



1 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports' of 2,420 cities with a total population of 
67,908,946. , . 

2 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 532 cities with a total population of 
10,291,946. , , .. . 

3 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 222 cities with a total population of 
3,625,770. 

< Includes the report of the District of Columbia. 



88 



URBAN CRIME RATES, 1951, BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
AND POPULATION GROUPS 



Table 32 

[Offenses known per 100,000 inhabitants. Population figures based on 1950 decennial census] 



Division and group 


Murder, 
noiiiieg- 

man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 
—break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny 
-theft 


Auto 
theft 


TOTAL 


4,88 


49.3 


70.5 


' 347. 2 


I 940, 1 


173.8 


New England 


1,24 


15.3 


12.1 


229.8 


630,4 


122.8 


Group I 


2.25 
1.20 
1.29 

.34 
1.31 

.69 

2.56 


2.5.2 
19.7 
12.8 
9.8 
6.0 
9.7 
29.0 


23.2 
14.9 
7.2 
8.6 
6.0 
8.0 
34.9 


139. 1 
295. 5 
235.9 
221.7 
183.5 
202,1 

2 218. 3 


572, S 
701,3 
682, 5 
658, 8 
466, 
432.2 
2 479. 5 


271 f) 






Group III 


90 2 


Group IV 


76 3 






Group VI 


56 5 


Middle Atlantic 








Group I 


4. .56 
2.27 
2.10 
1. 61 
1.18 
.95 
4.33 


56.0 
24.6 
20.2 
14.1 
11.5 
9.7 
66.2 


57.8 
30.1 
42.0 
20.7 
1.5.2 
14.1 

66.4 


3 294, 8 
244.7 
270.7 
2(.)2. 5 
157. 9 
146,4 
312,2 


3 482. 2 
594. 5 
547, 8 
556. 2 
420,4 
333,8 
943.8 


170 I 










Grouj) IV 


88 3 






Group VI 


53 9 


East North Central 


154.7 


Group I 


6.40 
5.63 
3.38 
1.67 
1.70 
.76 

3.05 


112.0 
48.5 
3.3.4 
21.7 
14.9 
12.0 
38.3 


105. 6 
71.6 
48.3 
22.2 
15.6 
7.0 

52.3 


371,3 
361, fi 
296. 8 
258. 
218.2 
181.0 
311.5 


1.0.55.6 
1.1.37.9 
933. 3 
920.1 
781.1 
477 9 
834.0 


194 1 


Group II 


186 3 






Group IV 


120 2 






Group VI 


65 


"West North Central 








Group I 


5. 38 
4.48 
1.94 
1.23 
.37 
1.37 
10.30 
12.00 
10.94 
9.35 
9.18 
8.15 
10.36 
12.45 


72.6 

23^8 
14.9 
10.8 
8.2 

47.3 


116.1 
30.3 
20.2 
9.8 
7.7 
6.9 
214.9 


391.0 
475. 6 
298.0 
277.1 
209.1 
1.58. 6 

416.5 


925. 9 
1.139.9 
1.091.2 
8.58. 5 
681,0 
387, 2 

961,5 


206 5 


Group II 


201 1 






Group IV 


96 










South Atlantic * 


226 2 








65. 5 
79. 1 
34.3 
30. 5 
18.4 
23.4 

47.9 


292.2 
177.9 
233. 8 
170. 
164.9 
145.2 

102.6 


384.7 
622.1 
432.6 
382.6 
3,54. 
242.2 

413.2 


913,9 

1.400,1 

1,02.5,2 

1, 000, 1 

709,6 

466,8 

711,8 




Group 11 


309 6 










Group V 


113 5 


Group VI 




East South Central 


191 3 








11.82 
18.18 
9.49 
14.20 
10.00 
6.55 
9.11 


76.5 
48,1 
47.1 
22 f; 
26.4 
17.4 
38.9 


84.3 
134,2 
124,5 
162. 4 
68.8 
45,8 
75.9 


521. 5 
505.5 
397.8 
283. 8 
295. 5 
220.5 
430.1 


82L3 

765, 4 
709, 5 
461,7 
215, 7 

1.030,1 








Group III ^ 


151.1 


Group V 


104 3 


Group VI 


62 6 


West South Central 








Group I 


12.72 
6.85 
7.81 
6.09 
7.30 
5.04 
2.76 
3. .37 
2.08 
4.55 
2.93 
3.35 
1.45 
3.21 


57.8 
48.8 
25.1 
20.4 
10.1 
12.2 
53.4 


94,5 
73.5 
84.1 
54.2 
56.0 
44.3 
36.3 


558. 1 
480. 6 
391.0 
354. 6 
233. 5 
189.8 
463.4 


1,2.31,9 

1. 27.5. 3 

1.224,9 

842,7 

564, 3 

358. 8 

1, 402, 9 


302 3 


Group II 




Group III 


170 5 


Group IV 


154 7 






Group VI . 


a3 I 




215 6 








101,5 
65,8 
46.1 
57. 9 
19.6 
30.7 
79.1 


54. 6 
28. 7 
43.5 
47.0 
18,8 
28,4 
49,7 


744.9 
633. 4 
270. 9 
437.0 
308.3 
325.6 
510.4 


1.183,8 
1.930,9 
1.277,2 
1.96.5.8 
1, 317. 8 
947.1 
1, 652. 7 




Group II 


256 8 


Group III 








Group V .. 


147 1 














Group I 


3.88 
3.18 
2.16 
1.87 
2.41 
2.84 


103.8 
75.3 
70.0 
49. H 
35.9 
28.4 


69, 3 
26, 3 
42,6 
25.8 
20,8 
22.9 


538. 7 
482. 5 
589. 9 
510. 6 
418,9 
390,8 


1, ,526, 4 
1, 949, 7 
1.877,0 
1,866,9 
1,707,4 
1, ,584.1 


,306 I 










Group IV 


198 8 


Group V 




Group VI .', 


190,9 



1 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 2,420 cities with a total population of 
67,908,946. 

2 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 532 cities with a total population of 
10,291,946. 

3 The rates for burglary and larceny are based on the reports of 4 cities. 
* Includes the report of the District of Columbia. 



89 



Table 33.— NUMBER OF CITIES IN EACH POPULATION GROUP GEO- 
GRAPHIC DIVISION, AND STATE REPRESENTED IN THE URBAN 
CRIME RATE TABULATIONS (TABLES 30-32) 



Division and State 


Total 


Population group 


Over 
250,000 


100.000 

to 
2.'50,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
.•iO.OOO 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


1 Jjess than 
10,000 


TOTAL: 

Population, 69,980,.'i51 

New England: 

Population, 5,419,S98 _.., 

Connecticut 

Maine 

Massachusetts 

New Hampshire 

Rhode Island . 


|l 
2.421 39 64 


121 


232 


639 


1,326 


140 

23 
20 
64 
14 
9 
10 

533 


1 


11 


16 


24 


36 


52 




4 


1 
10 

3 


6 
2 
11 
2 
2 

36 


4 

9 
16 
4 

I 

134 


g 




g 


1 


6 


20 

7 




1 




Vermont 




8 


Middle Atlantic: 

Population, 12,363,5.51 . 


5 


12 


?2 


« 


New Jersey 

New York 


134 
176 
223 

585 


9 


4 

4 
4 

in 


\ 
S 

31 


13 
14 

9 

63 


36 
42 

56 

146 




Pennsylvania 


144 


East North Central: 

Population, 18,785,614 


326 


Illinois 

Indiana 


156 
84 
108 
155 
82 

289 


5 
5 


1 

4 

:f 
4 


10 
4 

6 
4 

9 


13 
10 
9 
19 

20 


42 

29 
42 

15 

72 


47 


Michigan 

Ohio _. 

Wisconsin 

West North Central: 

Population, 6,317,781 


@0 
80 
.50 

179 




67 
56 
67 
47 
28 
11 
15 

246 




\ 


4 

I 


3 
5 


10 
19 
15 
14 

3 
4 

58 








Minnesota -- 


2 

2 


46 


Missouri 

Nebraska 


2 


24 






2 

1 

30 




South Dakota 






19 


9 


South Atlantic: 

Population, 7,371,046 


3 


7 


129 


Delaware 

District of Columbia.. 


3 

1 
43 
32 
20 
58 
27 
40 
22 

110 




■ ■■ - !- 


3 

5 
3 
3 
3 

4 


9 
4 
2 
5 

1 
5 
4 

14 


8 

\ 

16 
4 

'^6 

27 


2 


Florida 


22 


Georgia 

Maryland 

North Carolina 


1 


17 
9 
31 


South Carolina 

Virginia 




19 


West Virginia 




9 


East South Central: 

Population, 3,252,762 


3 


5 


57 


Alabama 

Kentucky. 


31 
28 
20 
31 

168 


1 
1 


2 


2 

7 


3 
2 
(i 
3 

13 


9 
5 
6 

7 

57 


15 

18 


Mississippi 




7 


Tennessee 

West South Central: 

Population, 5,793,420 


1 
5 


3 
8 


17 
78 


Arkansas 


22 
28 
40 
80 

128 




2 
2 
3 

2 




2 
3 
4 
4 

11 


6 
7 

16 
28 

25 


13 




1 


13 


Oklahoma 


2 


18 


Texas 


4 
1 


34 


Mountain: 

Population, 2,103,879 


87 




13 
27 
20 
18 

5 

16 
20 

9 

222 




1 




2 
3 

1 
21 




11 


Colorado 


1 




7 
6 
4 


18 


Idaho 






12 












Nevada 








4 








1 
1 


3 
1 
4 

84 


11 


Utah.. 




1 


16 


Wyoming 




4 


Pacific: 

Population, 8,572,900 


7 


5 


11 


94 


California 


158 
27 
37 


5 
1 

1 


3 


11 


15 
5 


64 
8 
12 


60 
17 


Washington 


^ 




17 






994945°-52 4 

















90 



Rural Crime Rates 

The 1951 negligent manslaughter rate for rural areas exceeded by 
67.7 percent the rate for all urban communities as a group. 

Cities with less than 10,000 inhabitants are the most closely akin 
to the rural areas and it may be of interest to examine the difference 
in police experience as reported in the two areas: 



1951 crime rates 
per 100,000 inhabitants 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

Manslaughter by negligence 

Rape ' 

Robbery 



Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 




30. 
155.7 
237. 5 

49.9 



Rural crime rates for 1951 are based on monthly reports received 
from 1,621 sheriffs, 162 rural village officers and 11 State police or- 
ganizations covering a combined rural population of 42,433,145. 
Some of the rural reports included in the tabulation may have been 
limited to cases in which arrests were made, resulting in partial in- 
completeness particularly in the less serious crime classifications. 

Table 34.— RURAL CRIME RATES, 1951 



[Offenses known and rate per 100,000 inliabitants, as reported by 1,621 sheriffs, 162 rural village officers, 
and 11 State police; total rural population 42,433,145, based on 1950 decennial census] 




Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 






Murder, 
iionneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 

2,032 
4.79 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Number of offenses known 


2,247 
5.30 


4,384 
10.33 


6,016 
14.2 


'S 


66.068 
1.5,5. 7 


100,760 
237. 5 


21 166 


Rate per 100,000 


49.9 







91 
OFFENSES IN INDIVIDUAL AREAS 

Offenses in Individual Cities With More Than 25,000 Inhabitants 

The number of offenses reported as having been committed during 
the period of January-December, 1951, is shown in table 35. The 
compilation includes the reports received from police departments in 
cities with more than 25,000 inhabitants. Police administrators and 
other interested individuals will probably find it desirable to compare 
the crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown in tables 
30, 31, and 32 of this publication. Similarly, they will doubtless de- 
sire to make comparisons with the figures for their communities for 
prior periods, in order to determine whether there has been an increase 
or a decrease in the amount of crime committed. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 
cities because the differences in the figures may be due to a variety of 
factors. Such comparisons are not desirable even though the figures 
for individual communities are converted into terms of the number of 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. 

The following is a list of some of the factors which affect the amount 
of crime in the community: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 

The composition of the population with reference particularly to 
age, sex, and race. 

The economic status and activities of the population. 

Clunate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 

The number of police employees per unit of population. 

The standards governing appointments to the police force. 

The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law-enforcement problems. 

The degree of efficiency of the local law-enforcement agency. 

The figures presented in the following tabulation are those reported 
by the individual police departments in the cities represented without 
reducing the data to crime rates (number of oft'enses per 100,000 
inhabitants). 

In considering the volume of crime committed locally, it is generally 
more important to determine whether the figures for a given com- 
munity show increases or decreases rather than to ascertain whether 
they exceed or fall short of those for some other individual community, 
and it should be remembered that the amount of crime committed in a 
community is not solely chargeable to the police but is rather a charge 
against the entire community. 

In publishing these figures the FBI acts as a service agency. The 
figures published are those submitted by the contributing agencies. 



92 



Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1951, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION 

[Based on 1950 decennial census. Included in this listing are communities classified as urban places under 
either the 1940 or 1950 census] 



City 



Abilene, Tex.— 
Abin^ton, Pa. - 
Akron, Ohio... 
Alameda, Calif. 
Albany, Ga 



Albany, N. Y 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Alexandria, La 

Alexandria, Va 

Alhambra, Calif - ... 



Aliquippa, Pa.. 
Allentown, Pa. 
Alliance, Ohio. 

Alton, 111 

Altoona, Pa 



Amarillo, Tex 

Amsterdam, N. Y.- 
Anderson, Ind 

Ami Arbor, Mich..- 
Annistoii, Ala 



.\pl)leton. Wis.. 
Arlington, Mass 
Arlington, Va... 
Asheville, N. C. 
Ashland, Ky 



Athens, Qa 

Atlanta, Ga 

Atlantic City, N.J. 

Auburn, N. Y 

Augusta, Qa 



Aurora, 111 

Austin, Tex 

Bakersfield, Calif 
Baltimore, Md ... 
Bangor, Maine 



Barberton, Ohio 

Baton Rouge, La... 
Battle Creek, Mich. 

Bay City, Mich 

Bayonne, N. J 



Beaumont, Tex 

Belleville, 111 

Belleville, N. .1 

Bellingham, Wash. 
Belmont, Mass 



Beloit, Wis 

Belvedere, Calif. 
Berkeley, Calif. . 
Berwyn, 111 .___ 
Bes.semer, Ala... 



Bethlehem, Pa 

Beverly, Mass 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 

Billings, Mont 

Biloxi, Miss 



Binghamton, N. Y. 
Birmingham, Ala.. 
Bloomfield, N. .1 .. 
Bloomington, 111 . 
Bloomington, Ind.. 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Aggra- 
vated 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



170 

42 

1.001 

103 



liarceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



.352 
223 
No reports received 



1,584 
587 
54 
184 



31 
1,151 



357 

2,414 

60 

32 
260 
167 
125 
121 

556 
40 
34 
60 
53 



No reports received 
45 
97 
158 

78 



207 
1,671 
65 
118 
125 



53 


98 


1,288 


2,800 


589 


590 


30 


143 


83 


272 


94 


182 


119 


1,605 


260 


1,009 


2.117 


3, 093 


41 


210 


38 


216 


147 


381 


91 


564 


25 


471 


76 


274 


183 


1,154 


39 


123 


24 


91 


58 


144 


19 


84 


46 


244 


184 


619 


160 


1,179 


67 


151 


43 


88 



38 


177 


47 


68 


210 


634 


102 


323 


162 


r^r- 


1.045 


1.438 


65 


203 


73 


250 


43 


248 



93 

Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1951, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continued 



City 



Boise, Idaho 

Boston, Mass 

Bremerton, Wash- 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Bristol, Conn 



Brockton, Mass-. 
Brookline, Mass. 
Brownsville, Tex_ 
Buffalo, N. Y- — 
Burbank, Calif.. . 



Burlington, Iowa. 
Bnrliiiiiton, Vt.— . 

Butte. Mont 

Camliridge, Mass. 
Camden, N. J 



Canton, Ohio 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Champaign, 111 

Charleston, S. C_... 



Charleston, W. Va.. 

Charlotte, N. C 

riuulottesville, Va.. 
Chattanooga, Temi- 
Chelsea, Mass 



Chester, Pa..-^- 
Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Chicago, 111 

Chieopee, Mass. 
Cicero, 111 



Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Clarksburg, W. Va 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 
Clifton, N.J 



Clinton, Iowa 

Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Colurabia, Mo 

Columbia, S. C 

Columbus, Oa 



Columbus, Ohio 

Compton, Calif 

Concord, N. H 

Corpus Christi, Tex. 
Council BluU's, Iowa 



Covineton, Ky 

Cranston, R. I 

Cumberland, Md 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 
Dallas, Tex 



Danville, 111 

Danville, Va 

Danvenport, Iowa... 

Dayton, Ohio 

Daytona Beach, Fla. 



Dearborn, Mich... 
Decfltur, 111 

Denver, Colo 

Dcs Moines, Iowa. 
Detroit, Mich 



Dubuque, Iowa 

Duluth, Minn 

Durham, N. C 

East Chicago, Ind 

Eiist Cleveland, Ohio. 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
danphter 



Robbery 



54 
15 
421 
61 
2, .500 

5 
15 
32 
22 

7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



Larceny — theft 



$50 and lender 
over $50 



115 
1.S34 

79 
368 

43 

133 
38 
72 
651 
266 



28 346 255 

6 90 129 

Only 5 months received 
66 196 82 



,50 


114 


41 


497 


8 


22 


97 


125 


7 


6 


30 


72 


10 


2 


5, 526 


3,946 



(') 



53 



1H4 

98 106 
13,048 11,261 
month received 
231 



1, 350 
37 



121 
134 
2.-.3 
705 
224 

410 
253 

3, 097 
901 

9,213 

104 
321 
328 
141 

77 



1.044 
37 

1,044 
30 



]45 
107 
597 
167 

350 

61 

1,606 

468 
3,624 

55 
178 
234 
161 

25 



334 

2. 757 

396 

858 
208 

449 

161 

634 

1,418 

1. 053 

109 

277 
286 
266 
574 



156 

513 

13, 358 

260 

2, 622 

48 

12, 468 

246 

147 

1H5 
690 
170 

1, 105 
374 

2,928 
880 
136 

1,273 
291 

337 
219 
L56 
1.30 
7, 832 

126 
315 
730 
2,373 
346 

2, 151 
413 

5,088 
1, ,537 
26, 742 



e footnote at end of table 



94 



Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1951, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continued 



City 



East Hartford, Conn.. 
Easton, Pa 

East Orange, N. J 

East Providence, R. I- 
East St. Louis, 111 



Eau Claire, Wis. 
Elgin, 111 

Elizabeth, N. J.. 

Elkhart, Ind 

Elmira, N. Y.... 



El Paso, Tex. 
Elyria, Ohio. 
Enid, Okla._. 

Erie, Pa 

Euclid, Ohio. 



Eugene, Oreg... 

Evanston, 111 

Evansville, Ind. 
Everett, Mass_.. 
Everett, Wash.. 



Fairmont, W. Va.. 
Fall River, Mass. . 

Fargo, N. Dak 

Fayetteville, N. C . 
Ferndale, Mich 



Fitehburg, Mass 

Flint, Mich 

Fond du Lac, Wis 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 



Fort Smith, Ark 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort Worth, Tex 

Framingham, Mass. 
Fresno, Calif 



Gadsden, Ala... 
Gainesville, Fla. 
Qalesburg, 111... 
Galveston, Tex. 
Garfield, N. J... 



Gary, Ind. 

Glendale, Calif 

Gloucester, Mass 

Grand Forks, N. Dak 
Grand Rapids, Mich.. 



Granite City, 111... 
Great Falls, Mont. 
Green Bay, Wis... 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Greenville, Miss.. 



Greenville, S. C. 
Greenwich, Conn 
Hackensaek, N. J 
Hagerstown, Md 



Hamilton, N. J 

Hamilton, Ohio. 


3 

1 
5 


Hammond, Ind 




Harrisburg, Pa 

Hartford, Conn 


4 
2 

5 




Haverford, Pa 


Haverhill, Mass 




Hazleton, Pa 





Hempstead, N. Y._. 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 




Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



"I 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Undo 
over $50 



Only 10 months received 



13 


39 


•M 


05 


in 






■5 


5 


27 


15 


12 


5 


1 


30 


238 


8 


2 


2 


1 


130 


274 


4 


1 



Only 3 months received 
11 I 224 I 1 

No reports received 
402 
1,555 
47 



32 135 

4 71 

No reports received 
2 



211 



22 


34 


94 


585 


562 


1.026 


329 


250 


903 




19 




129 


53 


344 


711 


280 


2.148 


128 


15 


126 


63 


132 


390 


tU) 


36 


154 


439 


296 


542 


46 




95 


378 


237 


498 


37 


16 


65 


fiO 


53 


147 


192 


44 


246 


70 


88 


177 


238 


140 


277 


271 


237 


626 


135 


158 


340 


332 


155 


287 


775 


474 


1,096 


04 


45 


90 


108 


45 


106 


110 


03 


231 


37 


33 


92 


115 


93 


95 



95 

Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1951, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continued 



Highland Park, Mich- 

Hish Point, N. C 

Hoboken, N. J 

Holvoke, Mass 

Honolulu, T. H 



Hot Springs, Ark , . 

Houston , Tex 

Huntington, W. Va 

Huntington Park, Calif. 
Hutchinson, Kans 



Independence, Mo . 
Indianapolis, Ind.. 
Inglewood, Calif. . . 
Iowa City, Iowa... 
Irondequoit, N. Y. 



Irvington, N. J. 
Ithaca, N. Y.__. 
Jackson, Mich.. 
Jackson, Miss... 
Jackson, Tenn.. 



Jacksonville, Fla 

Jamestown, N. Y... 
Jefferson City, Mo.. 

Jerscy City, N. J 

Johnson City, Term. 



Johnstown, Pa 

Joliet, 111 

Joplin, Mo 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Kankakee, 111 



Kannapolis, N. C... 
Kansas City, Kans. 
Kansas City, Mo... 

Kearny, N. J 

Kenosha, Wis 



Key West, Fla 

Kingston, N. Y 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Kokomo, Ind 

Lackawanna, N. Y_ 



La Crosse, Wis 

LaFayctte, Ind... 

Lafayette, La 

La Grange, Oa 

Lake Charles, La. 



Lakeland, Fla 

Lakewood, Ohio. 

Lancaster, Pa 

Lansing, Mich... 
Laredo, Tex 



Laurel, Miss 

Lawrence, Mass.. 

Lawton, Okla 

Lebanon, Pa 

Lewiston, Maine. 



Lexington, Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Lincoln Park, Mich. 
Linden, N. J 



Little Rock, Ark... 
Lockport, N. Y... 
Long Beach, Calif. 

Lorain, Ohio 

Los Angeles, Calif. 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
daughter 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



Only U months received 



3, 858 
198 
25n 
190 

102 
2, 302 

366 
35 
42 

219 
32 
238 
345 
145 

1. 304 

89 
37 
774 
135 

105 
103 
211 
182 
56 

57 
545 
1, 606 
55 
90 



1,309 
131 
194 

56 

81 

1,385 

286 



55 
154 
83 
57 

1,205 
40 
14 
264 
53 

93 
53 
271 
144 
24 

32 

204 

1, 707 

58 
79 



No reports received 



26 



G 

6 124 

16 150 

No reports received 



679 
170 
67 
153 
2,604 



5,054 
400 
456 
386 

228 

3,042 

587 

137 



2, 025 
142 
97 
638 
140 

298 



110 
1,051 
2, 690 

143 

301 



3 


3 


39 


35 


231 


72 


127 


395 


277 


640 


14 


44 


146 


163 


323 


8 


46 


258 


159 


1, 006 




Only 4 months re 


ceived 




10 


7 


136 


62 


155 


56 


36 


473 


(0 


1,055 


1 


1 


44 


10 


92 


204 


100 


1,637 


(') 


3,418 


13 


28 


150 


106 


192 


1,998 


1,812 


10, 532 


12, 145 


19, 369 



See footnote at end of table. 



96 

Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1951, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continued 



Louisville, Ky.. 
Lowell, Mass-.. 
Lower Merion, 1 
Lubbock, Tex... 
Lynchburg, Va. 



Lynn, Mass 

Lynwood, Calif. 

Macon, Ga 

Madison, Wis... 
Maiden, Mass.. 



Manchester, N. E 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Mansfield, Ohio . 

Marion, Ind 

Marion, Ohio 



Mason City, Iowa. 

Massillon, Ohio 

May wood. 111 

McKecsport, Pa... 
Medford, Mass 



Melrose, Mass... 
Memphis, Term. 
Meriden, Conn.. 
Meridian, Miss._ 
Miami, Fla 



Miami Beach, Fla. _ 
Michigan City, Ind_ 
Middletown, Conn- 
Middletown, Ohio- 
Milwaukee, Wis 



Minneapolis, Minn. 

Mishawaka, Ind 

Mobile, Ala 

Moline, 111 

Monroe, La 



Montclair, N. J 

RTontgomery, Ala 

Morgan town, W. Va.. 
Mount Lebanon, Pa_. 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 



Muncie, Ind 

Muskegon, Mich. 
Muskogee, Okla.. 
Nashua, N. H.- 
Nashville, Tenn.. 



New Albany, Ind 

Newark, N. J 

Newark, Ohio 

New Bedford, Mass. 
New Britain, Conn.. 



New Brunswick, N. J. 

Newburgh, N. Y 

New Castle, Pa 

New Haven, Corm 

New Kensington, Pa.. 



New London, Conn.. 

New Orleans, La 

Newport, Ky. 

Newport, R. I 

Newport News, Va.. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Newton, Mass 

New York, X. Y 

Niagara Falls, N. Y.. 
Norfolk, Va 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 




Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 

or 
entering 



187 
31 
147 

54 
106 

75 
131 
121 

29 

1.621 

121 

124 

2, 346 

358 
68 
24 
105 
664 

1,143 

36 
762 

82 
174 

63 
404 
25 
13 
123 

285 
126 
147 
115 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



16 
987 
14 
69 
1,204 

484 
111 
32 
76 
1,491 



Only 6 months received 
No reports received 



1 


4 


6 




37 


41 


4 


1 


3 


11 


414 


537 


14 


12 


5 


6 


47 


132 


fi 


19 


8 


1 




Complet 


19 


121 1 


300 


1,039 1 



71 
500 
38 

78 
1,741 

70 

• 75 

253 



122 85 

246 211 

I not received 
191 I 159 I 

377 I 1,351 I 



302 

2,079 



97 



Tabi 



35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continvied 



Norman, Okla 

Nonistown, Pa._. 

Northaniptnn, Mass 

North Borseii, N. J 

North Little Rock, Ark_ 



Norwalk, Conn. 
Norwood, Ohio. 

Nutlcy, N. J 

Oakland, Calif.. 
Oak Park, 111... 



Oak Ridfjc, Tenn 

Odessa, Tex- 

Osden, I'tah 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Omaha, Nebr 



Orange, N. J 

Orlando, Fla 

Oshkosh, Wis___ 
Ottumwa, lowa. 
Owcnsboro, Ky. 



Padiicah, Ky 

Palo Alto, Calif 

Panama City, Fla_._. 
Paikershurg, W . Va. 
Parma, Ohio 



Pasadena, Calif. 
Passaic. N. J..„. 



Patersoii, .\.,T_.. 
Pawtiu-ket, R. I_ 
Pensacola, Fla... 



Peoria, 111 

Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Petersburg, Va 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Phoenix, Ariz 



Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Piflshurgh, Pa... 
Pitt afield, Mass., 
Plalnfield.N. J.. 
Pocatollo, Idaho- 



Pomona, Calif 

Pontiae, Mich 

Port Arthur, Te.x._ 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Portland, Maine.. 



P'liilatid, Oreg 

pill isinouth, Ohio.. 

pdi-tsinouth, Va 

Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
] Providence, R. I 



Provo, Utah.. 
Pueblo, Colo.- 
Quiiiey, IlL... 
Quiney, Mass. 
Racine, Wis... 



Raleigh, N. C 

Rapid City, S. Dak... 
Reading, Pa 

1 Redondo Beach, Calif. 
I Redwood City, Calif.. 



Ren... Xrv 

Re\clr, .M:,ss : """ 

Richmond. Calif 

Riehin.iii.l, Ind 

Richmond, Va 

See footnote at end of table 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



33 

15 34 13 

2 27 41 

Only 4 months received 
59 205 78 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and Under 
over $50 



20 



45 

38 

2,328 

140 

37 

125 

109 

1,748 

833 

126 

107 
64 
101 



42 

48 
24 
503 

84 

42 
41 
104 
1,2G9 
354 

50 
214 
66 
20 



No re!)orts received 



25 
40 
82 
4 

57 

98 

22 

62 

1. 165 

58 

40 
246 
1 
4 
16 

7 
34 
18 



109 

5. 956 

950 



1. 735 

105 
123 

I2S 

201 
291 
43 
162 
245 

2. 005 
205 
375 
188 

1, 144 



22 
65 
158 

1,492 
108 
353 
79 
510 



10 


14 


6 




4 


4 


31 


216 


3 




23 


15 


13 


2 


10 


6 


46 


15 


6 


1 


61 


109 


10 


4 


157 


250 



4 88 29 

No reports received 



275 

231 

106 

60 

6, 969 



144 
1.064 
3. 223 
2.321 

155 
506 
524 
225 
362 



174 

472 

2.321 

2. 380 

124 
577 
238 
359 
424 



194 
413 
729 

4.492 
340 

592 



606 
206 
429 

586 
209 

2, 324 
79 

2, 806 



98 

Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1951 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continued 



City 



Riverside, Calif. _ 

Roanoke, Va 

Rochester, Minn. 
Roeliester, N. Y. 
Roclsford, 111 



Rock Island, 111 

Rocky Mount, N. C. 
Rome, Ga 

Rome, N. Y 

Roswell, N. Mex 



Royal Oak, Mich. 
Sacramento, Calif. 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Cloud, Minn.. 
St. Joseph, Mo 



St. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Salem, Mass 

Salem, Oreg 



Salina, Kans 

Salt Lake City, Utah.. 

San Angelo, Tex 

San Antonio, Tex 

San Bernardino, Calif. 



San Diego, Calif 

Sandusky, Ohio 

San Francisco, Calif. 

San Jose, Calif 

San Leandro, Calif... 



San Mateo, Calif 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif- 
Santa Fe, N. Mex...- 
Santa Monica, Calif.. 



Savannah, Ga 

Schenectady, N. Y 

Scranton, Pa 

Seattle, Wash 

Shaker Heights, Ohio. 



Sharon, Pa 

Sheboygan, Wis 

Shreveport, La 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak. 



Somerville, Mass... 
South Bend, Ind... 
South Gate, Calif.. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Spokane, Wash 



Springfield, 111.... 
Springfield, Mass. 
Springfield, Mo... 
Springfield, Ohio.. 
Stamford, Conn... 



Steubenville, Ohio. 

Stockton, Calif 

Stratford, Conn 

Superior, Wis. 

Syracuse, N. Y 



Tacoma, Wash.. 
Tallahassee, Fla. 

Tampa, Fla 

Taunton, Mass.. 
Teaneck, N. J.... 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



10 

1, ISfi 

45 

1.3 

10 
11 
11 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2,161 
.31 

15 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



516 
.335 
51 
211 

4, 673 

1,120 

610 

195 

103 

90 
880 
156 
2, 013 
552 

1,084 
98 

4, .327 
369 
122 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



54 
501 

72 
775 
320 

1,408 

70 

1,742 



143 



41 


31 


29 


120 


8 


24 


14 


21 


4.59 


134 


^ 


9 


2 
1 


10 


11 


28 


18 


8 


3 


1 


25 




51 


77 


33 


3 


15 


26 


90 


44 


74 


32 


8 


14 


18 


10 


24 


89 


24 


35 


17 


11 


160 


81 


1 


3 


4 




58 


23 


103 


12 


2 


42 



155 
189 

185 157 

Only 8 months received 
493 



194 

406 

2, 633 

25 



:l ii 



120 
Only 11 months received 

5 1 97 I 34 I 

2 1 47 I 31 I 



502 


1.124 


540 


772 


127 


327 


132 


436 


562 


4,421 


53 


224 


35 


150 


43 


193 


214 


782 


199 


694 


87 


417 


63 


272 


349 


i:093 


178 


426 


128 


438 


688 


3,895 


1.34 


617 


1,53 


651 


145 


648 


70 


603 


244 


564 


71 


134 


1,58 


1,900 


51 


181 


44 


392 


526 


1,461 


.539 


1,646 


40 


148 



99 

Table 35.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE, 1051, 
CITIES OVER 25,000 IN POPULATION— Continued 



City 



Temple, Tex 

Terre Haute, Ind. 

Toledo, Ohio 

Topeka, Kans 

Torrington, Conn- 



Trenton, N. J..- 

Troy, N. Y 

Tucson, Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 



Tvler, Tex 

Union City, N. J 

Union Township, N. J. 
University City, Mo-. 
Upper Darby, Pa 



Utica, N. Y 

Vallejo, Calif 

Valley Stream. N. Y. 

Vancouver, Wash 

Vicksburg, Miss 



Waco, Tex 

Waltham, Mass 

Warren, Ohio 

Warwick, R. I 

Washington, D. C. 



Washington, Pa_.. 
Waterbury, Conn. 
Waterloo, Iowa. . . 
Watertown, Mass. 
Watertown, N. Y. 



Waukegan, 111 

Wausau, Wis 

Wauwatosa, Wis 

West Allis, Wis 

West Hartford, Conn- 



West Haven, Conn 

West New York, N. J. 

West Orange, N. J 

West Palm Beach, Fla 
Weymouth, Mass 



Wheeling, W. Va 

White Plains, N. Y 

Wichita, Kans 

Wichita Falls, Tex 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 



Wilkinsburg, Pa... 
Williamsport, Pa__ 
Wilmington, Del._ 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Winona, Minn 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Woodbridge, N. J 

Woonsocket, R. I 

Worcester, Mass 

Wyandotte, Mich 



Yakima, Wash 

Yonkers, N. Y 

York, Pa 

Youngstown, Ohio. 
Zanesville, Ohio 



Murder, 

non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 



Burgla- 
ry- 
breaking 



90 

275 

1,590 

354 

37 

458 
2riO 
331 
1,130 
122 

37 
112 

76 
229 
205 

178 
174 
93 
123 

52 

318 
85 
197 
138 
4,017 



Larceny— theft 



>50 and Under 
over $50 



14 

97 

1, 006 

223 



Only 9 months received 
11 36 I 16 

51 44 

1 146 I 69 

No reports received 



10 



Only 10 months received 
15 I 127 I 89 

18 I 93 i 14 

Only 4 months received 

350 
163 
15 



No reports received 



148 

486 

3,112 

953 



752 
324 
316 

107 
7,959 

143 
384 
408 
144 



Larcenies not separately reported. Figure listed includes both major and minor larcenies. 



100 

Offenses in Territories and Possessions 

Eight law enforcement agencies in Territories and possessions of 
the United States furnished a complete -set of crime reports to the 
FBI dm-ing 1951. These data are presented in the following table 
and represent crimes m both urban and rural areas combined except 
that the figures for Honolulu City were separately reported. 



Table 36.— NUMBER OF OFFENSES KNOWN IN UNITED STATES 
TERRITORIES AND POSSESSIONS, 1951 



[Population figures 1 



[ on 1950 decennial census preliminary countsl 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaughter 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 
theft 


Jurisdiction reporting 


Over 
$50 


Under 
$50 


Alaska: Fourth judicial division (Fair- 
banks), population, 28,168; number of 


3 

1 
9 
3 
1 
1 
2 
176 


6 

40 
6 

11 

77 


9 

7 

67 
18 
5 
7 

12 
596 


13 

99 
946 
250 
56 
146 
122 
2,342 


17 

22 
396 
83 
15 
17 
100 
484 


21 

276 
2, 604 
455 
136 
315 
915 
5,477 




Hawaii: 

Hawaii County, population, 67,683; 
number of offenses known 


y 


Honolulu City, population, 245,612; 




Honolulu County, population,: 01,- 

917; number of offenses known 

Kauai County, population, 29,838; 


57 
4 


Maui County, population, 48,387; 
number of offenses known 


16 


Isthmus of Panama: Canal Zone, popula- 
tion, 52,300; number of offenses known. . 
Puerto Rico: Population, 2,205,398; num- 


12 
86 







SUPPLEMENTAL CRIME DATA 

In 401 cities over 25,000 in population 57.8 of the robberies in 1951 
occurred on the street or highway while 31.2 percent involved oil 
stations, chain stores, banks, or other commercial establishments. 
Residences were victimized in 5.8 percent of the 30,808 robberies 
reported by these 401 cities while 5.2 percent were classed as mis- 
cellaneous. 

During 1951 burglaries occurred four times more frequently at 
night than during the day, and 67.1 percent of the daytime burglaries 
involve residences. Stores and other nonresidence structures are 
victims in over 62 percent of the crimes. Of the residence burglaries 
64.2 percent occurred at night and 35.8 percc^nt during daylight hours. 
In nonresidence burglaries 89.5 percent occur during the night hours 
and 10.5 during the day. 

Of the 504,817 larcenies reported by cities furnishing supplemental 
ci-ime analysis information, 15,272 involved thefts of pocket-picking 
and purse-snatching. 

Owners of automobiles were victims of 206,420 or 40.9 percent of 
the thefts (other than auto thefts) reported by these cities. Thefts of 
auto accessories comprised 21 percent of these crimes while thefts 
of other items from automobiles accounted for 19.9 percent. 

Another troublesome problem confronting police is noted in the 
73.211 bicycle thefts. 

In 379,768 or 75.2 percent of the thefts, })roperty valued at less 
than $50 was stolen. 

Of the 101,938 automobiles stolen in the 401 cities reporthig this 
information, 93,535 or 91.8 percent were recovered. 

(101) 



102 



Table 37.— OFFENSE ANALYSIS, BY NATURE OF CRIMINAL ACT, 
TIME AND PLACE OF COMMISSION, AND VALUE OF PROPERTY 
STOLEN, 1951 



[Oflfcns 



known to the jiolice in 401 citios over 25,000 in population; total population, 50,0S1,429 based on 
1950 decennial census] 



Classification 


Number of 
offenses 


Percent 
distribution 


Rape: 

Total 


6.513 


100.0 






Forcible 


3,729 

2,784 


57 3 




42.7 






Robbery: 


30, 808 


100 






Highway 


1, 5.55 

421 

1,794 

53 

1,613 


57 8 




24.6 


Oil station 


5 


Chain store 


1 4 






Bank 




Miscellaneous 


5 •' 






Burglary— breaking or entering: 
Total 


193, 221 


100 






Residence (dwelling): 

Committed during night 


46, .501 
25, 962 

108, 026 
12, 732 


24 1 




13.4 


Nonresidence (store, office, etc.): 

Committed during night 


55. 9 
6.6 






Larceny— theft (except auto theft) (grouped accordmg to value of article 
stolen) : 
Total 


504, 817 


100 








125, 049 
306, 820 
72, 948 




$5 to .$50 


60 8 


Under $5 


14.4 






Larceny— theft (grouped as to type of offense): 
Total 


504, 817 


100 






Pocket-picking 


6, 563 
8.709 
20. 699 
100, 570 
105, 850 
73,211 
189, 215 


1.3 


Purse-snatching 


1 7 




4.1 


Thefts from autos (exclusive of auto accessories) 


19. 9 


Auto accessories 


21 




14. 5 


All others 


37. 5 







Complete information relative to the value of property stolen ac- 
cording to the type of crime was furnished by 381 of the cities repre- 
sented in the preceding table. Property valued at $157,266,508 was 
obtained in 804,843 crimes against property in 1951 in these cities. 
The average value per offense was $195. Excluding auto thefts, the 
average value of property taken was $88. 

The average loss per auto theft was $965, and in the average robbery 
property valued at $194 was obtained. The average value of prop- 
erty stolen in burglaries was $139 and in larcenies, $62. The average 
value per offense of $195 in 1951 is over 11 percent higher than 
reported for 1950. 



103 



Table 38.— VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN, BY TYPE OF CRIME, 1951 

[Based on the reports of 381 cities over 25,000 in population; total population, 48,301,692 based on 1950 decen- 
nial census. All values have been rounded off to even dollars] 



Classification 


Number of 
offenses 


Value of 

property 

stolen 


Average 
value per 
ofTense 


TOTAL ' 


804, 843 


$157,266,508 


$195 








30, 104 
186, 727 
489, 227 
. 98,785 


5,840.147 
25. 949, 247 
30, 164, 518 
95, 312, 596 


194 


Burglary 


139 


Larceny— theft 


62 

965 







Of the cities over 25,000 population furnishing supplemental crime 
information, 376 reported complete data relative to the value of prop- 
erty stolen and the value of property recovered by type of property. 
Automobiles comprised 60.2 percent of the dollar loss and 88 percent 
of the value recovered. Excluding automobiles, the property loss was 
$59,750,614 and 19.2 percent or $11,445,626 was recovered. 

Miscellaneous items valued at $25,557,398 were stolen and 26 per- 
cent or $6,640,342 was recovered. The recovery of currency and 
jewelry was 12.9 pei'cent and 18.2 percent of the value stolen, respec- 
tively, while only 3.7 percent of the $3,290,133 loss in furs was re- 
covered. Clothing valued at $6,279,767 was stolen and 16.6 percent 
or $1,043,226 was recovered. 



Table 39.— VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN AND VALUE OF PROPERTY 
RECOVERED, BY TYPE OF PROPERTY, 1951 

[Based on reports of 376 cities over 25,000 in population; total population, 45,928,894 based on 19,W decennial 
census. All values have been rounded off to even dollars] 



Type of [iroperty 


Value of 

property 

stolen 


Value of 
property 
recovered 


Percent 
recovered 


TOTAL 


$150, 136, 172 


$95, 648, 931 


63.7 


Currency, notes, etc 


15, 937, 706 
8, 685, 610 
3. 290, 133 
6. 279, 767 
90. .385. 5,58 
25. 557. 398 


2, 062, 452 
1, 577, 306 
122. 300 
1, 043. 226 
84, 203, 305 
6, 640, 342 


12 9 




18.2 






Clothing 


16. 6 
93.2 


Miscellaneous 


26 







DATA COMPILED FROM FINGERPRINT RECORDS 

Source of Data 

Arrest records of local police departments, in the form of fingerprint 
cards, totaling 831,288, were examined by the FBI to obtain age, 
sex, race, and criminal history data. Arrest records pertaining to 
violations of Federal laws or commitments to any type penal institu- 
tions are excluded, thus limiting the tabulations to arrests for viola- 
tions of State laws and municipal ordinances. 

There were 793,671 arrest records examined in 1950. The number 
examined in 1951 exceeded the 1950 records by 4.7 percent. These 
data do not represent all persons arrested for local and State charges 
since fingerprint cards are not forwarded to Washington for all 
individuals taken into custody. The number of offenses committed 
is not found by examining arrest data since one person may be re- 
sponsible for several offenses or two or more persons may have collab- 
orated in the commission of a single offense. 

Offense Charged 

Arrests for major violations were represented by more than 41 
percent (344,339) of the records examined during 1951. Murder, 
robbery, assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft charges numbered 
217,884 or 26.2 percent of the total arrest records examined. 

Sex 

Arrests of males numbered 746,055 in 1951, a 4.0 percent increase 
over the 717,088 fingerprint arrest cards examined during 1950. 

An increase of 11.3 percent in female arrest prints was noted in 
1951 when 85,233 records were received, as compared with 76,583 in 
1950. This is a reversal of the trend noted at the end of 1950 when 
female arrest prints had decreased 2.5 percent under the 1949 receipts. 

(104) 



105 



Table 40.— DISTRIBUTION OF ARRESTS BY SEX, 1951 



Offense chargied 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burslary— breaking or entering 

Larceny -theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialize' 1 vice. 

Other sex offenses 

Nr.rcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws. . 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling..- 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses 



831,288 



6, 522 
17, 997 
61,639 
42, 415 



20, 222 
19, 855 
3,479 

1,003 

10, 484 
8,971 
9,215 

20,173 
13,030 
9,723 
16, 677 

12, 902 
59, 910 
17,960 



15, 880 
46, 687 
191, 455 
46, 810 

18, 044 
43.094 
8, 090 
38, 259 



746, 055 



5,614 
17,077 
54, 676 
41, 279 

60,889 
19, 742 
17,875 
3,187 



9,045 
8.971 
3,606 

17, 125 
11,052 
9. 269 
15, 762 

10, 522 

57, 234 

17,402 

473 

15, 273 
39, 821 
173,865 
39,015 

16,474 
37, 885 
7,780 
34, 164 



6, 963 
1, 136 



1,980 
292 



5. 609 

3,048 

1,978 

454 

915 

2,380 
2,676 

468 



6, 866 
17, 590 

7, 795 

2,170 

5, 209 

910 

4, 095 



Total Male Female 



23.0 
5.6 

2.2 
5.2 
1.0 
4.6 



2.6 

2.4 
.4 

.1 
1.2 
1.2 

.5 

2.3 
1.5 
1.2 
2.1 

1.4 

7.7 
2.3 
.1 

2.0 
5.3 
23.5 
5.2 

2.2 
5.1 
1.0 
4.6 



Less than 1/10 of one percent. 



106 




107 

Age 

Males and females under 21 years of ao;e arrested constituted 14.4 
percent of the total arrests in 1951, or 119,676 of all fingerprint arrest 
records examined. Persons betAveen 21 and 24 years of age numbered 
120,271 (14.5 percent), bringing the total of all persons less than 25 
years old to 239,947, 28.9 percent of all arrests. Age group 25 to 
29 numbered 140,184 arrests, or 16.9 percent of all fingerprint arrest 
records reviewed for these tabulations. This makes a total of 380,131 
(45.7 percent) less than 30 years of age. It is the practice in some 
jurisdictions not to fingerprmt youthful offenders and accordingly 
fingerprint arrest figures in the lower age groups are incomplete to 
that extent. 

Youthful oft'enders under 21 years of age are represented in 29 
percent (53,562) of all arrests for crimes against property. For all 
ages there were 184,544 persons arrested during 1951 for robbery, 
burglary, larceny, auto theft, embezzlement, fraud, forgery, counter- 
feiting, receiving stolen property, and arson. For 1946 and 1941, 
the percentages of arrests of persons under 21 for property crimes 
were 31.5 and 34.7, respectively. 

As a fm-ther index to the part of youths in crime it is noted that 
over half (52.9 percent) of the arrests for serious crimes against 
property were of persons under 25 years of age although these indi- 
viduals represented only 28.9 percent of all arrests during 1951. 

The following presents the percentage of persons under 25 years of 
age arrested for property crimes in individual offense classes: 

PERSONS UNDP]R 25 YEARS OLD 

Percent, of all 
„ . , , arrests (all 

Crime charged: ages) 

Robbery 52. 9 

Burglary 60. 3 

Larceny 43. 9 

Auto theft 68. 4 



108 

The five age groiii)s having the highest number of arrests for males 
and females combined are listed below together with the number of 
arrests for each group. The corresponding age group figures for 
1946 and 1941 are also shown. 





1951 


Age 


Age 


Number of 
arrests 


1946 


1941 


2 
3 
4 
5 


23 
22 

24 
26 


30, f.25 
29,996 
29, 833 
29, 817 
29, 479 


21 
22 
23 
24 
20 


19 
18 
21 
20 
23 



During 1951, age 23 predominated in the frequency of male arrests 
followed by ages 21, 22, 18, and 24 in that order. The largest number 
of female arrests also occurred in age group 23, followed by ages 24, 
22, 25, and 26 in that order. • 



109 






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Table 42.— NUMBER AND PERCKXTAGE OF ARRESTS OF PERSONS 
UNDER 18, UNDER 21, AND UNDER 25 YEARS OF AGE, 1951 



Offenso charged 



TOTAI 

Criminal homicide - 

Robbery 

Assault... 

Burglary— breaking or entering .-. 

Larceny— theft - 

Auto theft --- 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Arson.. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape .-..--,---. 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children... 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations. 

Other traffic and motor vehicle laws... 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

Suspicion 

Not stated 

All other offenses . 



Total 
num- 
ber of 
per- 
sons 
arrested 



Num- 
ber 
under 

IS 
years 
of age 



37, i 



1.275 
7, 867 
6, 454 
4,893 
231 
163 



452 
1,246 



1,606 
97 



Num- 
ber 

under 
21 

years 

of age 



119, 676 



687 
5,063 
5.941 
17,099 
18, 196 
9,852 
1,239 

542 

181 
1,390 
2,576 

706 
2,052 
2,440 
1,621 

664 

1,771 

2.152 

3,577 

42 

6;507 

6,851 

6,610 

507 



Total 
num- 
ber 
under 

25 
years 
of age 



Per- 
cent- 



years 
of age 



239, 947 



1,666 
9,524 
15,329 
25, 580 
30, 319 
13. 840 
3,852 
1,071 
302 
3,125 
4,572 
2,588 
5,027 
5,935 
3,447 
3.214 
3,018 
8,140 



6,152 
14, 279 
22, 154 
13, 607 



1,971 
14, 804 



4.5 



3.0 

7.8 
2.1 

18.5 
9.3 

24.2 
1.2 
4.7 
8.0 
3.3 
6.7 
.9 
2.4 
3.7 
3.8 
.3 
2.0 



2.7 
.5 
3.4 

.5 
7.0 
2.1 
10.0 



Per- 
cent- 
age 
under 

21 
years 
of age 



10.5 
28.1 

9.6 
40.3 
26.3 
48.7 

6.2 
15.6 
18.0 
13.3 



7.7 
10.2 
18.7 
16.7 

4.0 
13.7 

3.6 
19.9 

8.3 
17.7 
13.9 

3.6 
14.1 

3.0 
20.9 

9.6 
22.8 



Total 
per- 
cent- 
age 
under 

25 
years 
of age 



25.5 
52.9 
24.9 
60.3 
43.9 
68.4 
19.4 
30.8 
30.1 
29.8 
51.0 
28.1 
24.9 
45.5 
35.5 
19.3 
23.4 
13.6 
42.8 
21.7 
38.7 
30.6 



Criminal Repeaters 

Prior fingerprint records were found for 500,780 (60.2 percent) of 
the individuals represented by the 831,288 records examined in 1951 
by the FBI Identification Division. Of the 746,055 males arrested, 
462,007 (61.9 percent) had previous fingerprint arrest records. Of 
the 85,233 females an-ested, 38,773 (45.5 percent) had prior finger- 
print arrest records. These figures are based solely on fingerprint 
arrest records and in no way refer to information in the Civil Identi- 
fication Files of the F B I. 

Of the 4,276 15-year-old boys and girls arrested 16.2 percent already 
had fingerprint records. At age 20, 44.9 percent of the 26,273 males 
and females arrested had prior fingerprint records. For males, the 
percentage was 16.9 at age 15 and 46.2 at age 20. Correspon(Hng 
percentages for females were 8.7 percent at age 15 and 33.6 percent 
at age 20. 



Ill 



Table 43.— PERCENTAGE WITH PREVIOUS FINGERPRINT RECORDS, 

1951 


Offense 


Percent 


Offense 


Percent 


Vasirancy -. - . 


73.0 
71.0 
70.7 
70.0 
64.8 
64.7 
58.8 
57.7 
57. 3 
56. 6 
56.3 
56.2 
54.8 
54.6 


Auto theft 


54.6 








Other traffic and motor vehicle laws 


53.5 






Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Liquor laws 


52.9 
51 '' 


Rohherv . - - . 


Biirelary — breaking or entering 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc.. 
Arson 


50.3 
48 2 


All other offenses 


Prostitution and commercialized vice 


Rape 


46 7 


Assault 






Suspicion 


Parking violations i 


43 1 


Larceny— theft 


Sex offon.ses 


42.8 


Di^uiderly conduct 











1 Only 503 fingerprint cards received representnig arrests for violations of parking regulations. 

Race 

Over 98 percent of the fingerprint arrest records examined in this 
study represented members of the white and Negro races. The 
balance of 1.7 percent represented Indians, Chinese, Japanese, and 
other races. Members of the white race represented 598,722 of the 
831,288 arrest records received, while 218,823 were Negroes, 8,953 
were Indians, 862 w-ere Chinese, 233 were Japanese, and 3,695 were 
representatives of other races. 



Table 44.— ARRESTS BY RACE, 1951 



Offense charged 



Criminal homicide 

Robbery 

Assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 



Larceny — theft 

I Auto theft 

. Embezzlement and fraud 

1 Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc- 



Arson ^- 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 



Other se.x offenses 

I Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrymg, possessing, ctc... 
' Offenses against family and chi4dren- 



Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated. 

Road and driving laws 

Parking violations 



Other trallic and motor vehicle laws. 

Disordcrl y conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



Gamhl 



ing 

suspicion 

Not stated 

All other oflenses. 



Total, 

all 
races 



6,522 
17, 997 
61, 639 
42,415 



19, 855 
3,479 

1,003 
10, 484 
8,971 
9,215 

20, 173 
13, 030 

9,723 

16, 677 

12, 902 
59, 910 

17, 960 
503 



15,! 



191,455 
48, 810 



18, 644 
43, 094 



38, 259 



White Negro Indian Chinese "L^'*'!' „.- „ 
^ nese others 



3.407 
11,122 
31,963 
30, 216 

16^041 
17, 033 
2,345 

730 
8,819 
6,200 
5,490 

16, 359 
5,873 
4,722 

12, 333 

6, 839 
52, 295 

13, 356 

378 

11,474 
31,603 
,53,619 
30, 148 

8,781 
30, 431 

6,646 
28,506 



218, 823 



3, 029 
6, 686 
28, 933 
11,810 

22, 555 
3.926 
2,713 

1,088 

264 
1, .560 

siooo 

3,529 
6, 697 
4,881 
4,206 

5,933 

6, 753 

4,413 

122 

4,194 
14, 267 
32, 404 

9,911 

9,429 
12, 307 
1, 856 
9,149 



648 

126 

2 

148 

540 

4,530 

498 



OFFENSE CLASSIFICATIONS 

In order to indicate more clearly the types of offenses included in ])art I and 
])art II offenses, there follows a brief definition of each classification: 

Part I Offenses 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter includes all 
willful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 
Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicide^., accidental deaths, or 
justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides excluded from this classification are 
Umited to the following types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer 
in line of duty; (2) the killing of a hold-up man by a private citizen. (6) ]\Ian- 
slaughter by negligence includes any death which the police investigation estab- 
lishes was primarily attributable to gross negligence on the part of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Rape. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — victim under 
age of consent), assault to rape, and attempted rape. 

3. Robbery. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the person by 
force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, stick-ups, 
robbery armed. Includes assault to rob and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault by shooting, 
cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids. Does not 
inchide simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Includes burglary, housebreaking, safe- 
cracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, even though no force 
was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. Burglary followed by larceny 
is included in this classification and not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in value; (6) 
under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassifications, depending 
upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article of value which 
is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or driven away 
and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Does not include tak- 
ing for temporary use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthorized use 
by those having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Part II Offenses 

8. Other assaults. — Includes all assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Includes offenses dealing with the making, 
altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is 
made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Includes all offenses of fraudulent conversion, 
embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Includes buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property as well as attempts to commit any of those offenses. 

(112) 



113 

12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — Includes all violations of regulations or 
statutes controlling the carrjang, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufactur- 
ing of deadly weapons or silencers and all attempts to violate such statutes or 
regulations. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Includes sex offenses of a commer- 
cialized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as prostitution, keeping 
bawdy house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for immoral purposes. 

14. Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution and commercialized vice). — 
Includes offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, and the like. 
Includes attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of nonsupport, 
neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

10. Narcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as 
unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of "drunkenness" (class 18) and "driving 
while intoxicated" (class 22), liquor law violations. State or local, are placed in 
this class. Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all offenses of drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Includes all charges of committing a breach of the peace. 

20. Vagrancy. — Includes such offenses as vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, permitting, or engaging in 
gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Includes driving or opei-ating any motor vehicle 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws. — Includes violations of regulations with 
respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to prevent accidents. 

24. Parking violations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Includes violations of 
State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and motor vehicles 
not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws for which 
no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as suspicious 
characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, who are released 
without formal charges being placed against them. 



I 



t 



INDEX TO VOLUME XXII, UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 

[All n'l'orencfs are to page numbers] 

Age of offenders. (See Arrests.) 

Annual crime trends: Page 

Cities grouped by size 72-74 

Cities grouped by location 72-74, 76-79 

Estimated total number of major crimes, 1951 70-71 

Rural crime trends 4-6, 80-81 

Urban crime trends 3-4, 72-79 

Arrests — based on fingerjirint records 60-63, 104-111 

Age of offenders 62-63, 106-110 

Race of offenders 111 

Recidivism 63, 1 10-1 1 1 

Sex of offenders 60-61, 104-105 

Automobiles — percentage recovered 101 

Classification of offenses 2, 65-66, 112-113 

Cleared by arrest, offenses 39-44 

By geographic divisions 44-45 

Crimes. (See Arrests, estimated number, offenses, persons charged, persons 

found guilty, and persons released.) 
Criminal 'repeaters. (See Arrests — recidivism.) 

Employees, number of police 15-38 

Fingerprint records 60-63, 104-1 1 1 ' 

Monthly variations, offenses known to the police 82-84 

Offenses known to the police: 

Annual trends _' 3-6, 70-81 

Cities grouped by location 7, 9-1 1, 76-79, 87, 89 

Cities grouped by location and size 10, 88 

Cities grouped by size 7-8, 74, 86 

Cleared by arrest 39-45 

Cleared by arrest, geographic divisions 44-45 

Divided as to time and place and value of property stolen 102-103 

Individual cities over 100,000 in population 12-14 

Individual cities over 25,000 in population 91-99 

Monthly variations 82-84 

Rural areas 4-6, 70-71 , 80-81 

Territories and possessions of the United Stat es 100 

Persons charged (held for prosecution) 45-48 

Bv geographic divisions ^ 50-51 

Persons found guilty 52-56 

Persons released (not held for prosecution) 57-59 

Police department employees 1 5-38 

Puhce killed , ' 15 

Possessions and Territories of the United States, offenses in 100 

Property, value stolen 101-103 

Property, value stolen and recovered 103 

(115) 



116 

Page 
Prosecution, persons held for. (See Persons charged and persons found 

guilty.) 
Race of offenders. (See Arrests.) 
Recidivism. {See Arrests.) 

Reporting area, extent of 69 

Rural crime data 4 G, 70-71, 80-81 

Sex of offenders. (*See Arrests.) 

Sheriff.s' reports 4-6,70-71,80-81 

State crime rates. (See Offenses known — cities grouped by location.) 

State police reports 4-6, 70-7 1 , 80-81 

Territories and possessions of the United States, offenses in 100 

Trends, annual crime: 

Cities grouped by location 72-74, 76-79 

Cities grouped by size 72-74 

Rural 4-6,80-81 

Urban 3-4,72-79 

Urban crime rates 85- 

Value of property stolen 101-103 

Value of property stolen and recovered 103 

Variations, monthly crime 82-84 

o 



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