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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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.iVo *9353 .5a3 




57- 



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Given By 



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POSITORY 



) 



/ 'V 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 



FOR THE UNITED STATES 



U? v^ 



FOR RELEASE THURSDAY, A. M., SEPT. 26, 1957 




ISSUED BY THE 




FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 




WASHINGTON, D. C. 




Volume XXVIII Number 1 


SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN • 


1957 




>^l ^ 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 



Volume XXVIII— Number 1 
SEMIANNUAL BULLETIN, 1957 



Issued by I hv 
Federal Bureau of Iniest if/at ion 
United States Department of Justice 
^ Washington, D. C. 




ADVISORY 



International Association of Chiefs of Police 

PUBLIC 



UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 19i7 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

WJV 1 8 1957- 

Contents 

Hoy 5 1962 

Page 

Summary of volume XXVIII, No. 1 1 

Crime trends, January-June, 1956-57: 

Estimated number of major crimes (table 1) 2-4 

City trends (table 2) 4 

Rural trends (table 3) 5 

Crime rates, January-June, 1957: 

City rates (tables 4-7) 6-10 

Rural rates (table 8) 11 

Offenses in individual areas: 

Cities over 25,000 (table 9) 12-20 

Police employee data: 

Police employees killed, 1956 (table 10) 21 

Number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants, 

April 30, 1957 (tables 11, 12) 22-26 

Police employees in individual cities, April 30, 1957 

(tables 13, 14) 26-46 

Offenses cleared and persons arrested, 1956: 

Offenses cleared by arrest (tables 15, 16) 47-51 

Persons charged (tables 17-19) 52-57 

Offenses known, offenses cleared, persons charged and 

persons found guilty, part I offense classes (table 20) . 58-61 
Persons charged and persons found guilty, part II offense 

classes (table 21) 62-63 

Persons released (tables 22, 23) 63-65 

Classification of offenses 66-68 

(II) 






a. 



■^a^c--? s"^ 3 



4^ 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 



J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U. S. Department of 
Justice, Washington, D. C. 



Volume XXVIII 



JULY 1957 



Number 1 



Summary 



Crime Trends, January- June , 1957 

An increase of 8.4 percent in U. S. major crimes brought the mid- 
year crime total to a new high. This increase in the estimated major 
crimes for the U. S. resulted from city crime rising 7.2 percent and 
rural crime 13.2 percent during the first half of 1957, as compared 
with the same period of 1956. Details of the percentage changes 
are as follows: 



Crime 



United 
States 



City 



Rural 



TOTAL - 

Murder 

Negligent manslaughter 

Rape 

Robbery.- 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny 

Auto theft 



+8.4 



+0. G 
+1.2 
+3.3 

+3.8 

+3.7 

+10.1 

+8.5 

+7.9 



+7.2 



+5.0 
+4.0 
+3.5 
+2.3 

+2.5 
+9.4 
+7.1 
+6.5 



+13.2 



-7.6 

-2.0 

+3.2 

+11.0 

+8.2 
+11.8 
+15.0 
+16.3 



Police Employees 

City police employees numbered 2.0 per 1,000 city inhabitants as 
of April 30, 1957, and this figure is limited, for the first time, to full- 
time employees. Of these, 8.3 percent were civilians. 

Fewer police employees were killed in line of duty in the year 1956. 
Measured against every five million inhabitants, there were 2.6 killed 
in 1956 as compared with 3.2 in 1955. 



Offenses Cleared by Arrest and Persons Convicted, 1956 

City police reported that for each 100 major crimes in 1956, 27 
were cleared by arrest, 19 persons were charged, and 13 persons were 
found guilty. 

(1) 









■ 




CRIME TREND--U. S. 




BASED ON THE ESTIMATED NUMBER OF 




MAJOR CRIMES 




JAN. - JUNE 1956 VS. JAN. - JUNE 1957 






1956 LEVEL 






TOTAL IB + 8.4 PERCENT 






MURDER 


] + _6 CHANGE 






NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 


] + 1.2 






RAPE 


+ 3.3 






ROBBERY 


+ 3.8 






AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 

BURGLARY 

LARCENY 

AUTO THEFT 


+ 3.7 


^^Ek. .^^vV " 




+ 10.1^^^11 


^H^Bi 


+ 8.5 11 « 




■1,2 ^ 


" ^H^^ 


FBI CHART 



liuitri' I. 



(^rimr r?*(MicI 



Major C.riinv Tttlttl>. Jiiniuiry-Jiiiir, I'f.'ift-ST 

Tn-iul. More iiuijor clinics occurri'd in the I'liitctl SImIc- (liiiiii<; 
the first lialf of \d'u than in any lik*' period in the past. Police 
reports relleitini; an 8.4 pi-rcent increase l)roii<;ht the rnitioind total 
of major crimes to l.:?99,07() at the midyear jmint. 

By June 30, the estinnited total criminal homicides and ussaidts, 
robberies, l)urglaries, and other thefts e.xceetled the averaj;e for the 
preceding five years by 24.4 ])ercent. 

Increases occurreil in all crime classifications of the part I (major) 
classes, and particularly noteworthy is the fact that robberies in- 
creased for the first time since 1954. 

Estimated crime totals for the United States in the part I (major) 
( atetrories for the first half of 1957, as compared with the same period 
in 195G, are presented in table 1. 

Tul>lf 1. — Crime Trends, City and Rtinil 
(EstltnaUKl numbor of major crimes in the Unit«-d States, January-June, 1956-571 "jj"^ 



Offense 


NumlHT of offenst's 
January -June 


Change 




19K 


19S7 


Number 1 


PiTceiit 


TOTAL 

Miirdi-r and nonnreltKcnt manslaufcht' r 


1.291 120 ' 

J.J'" 

29. MO 

47.41(1 

796,630 
134.320 


1,899.670 

3.44(1 

3. SW) 
10. 2»Jt 
31.<»«' 

49. 1711 
2»3. 14(1 
864. 3<5n 
144,990 


+ 108.550 

■4 .M 
+ )" 

+;»• 

+ 1.14(1 
+ 1.7(-i 

+ai. ".M(i 

+67. 710 

+iar>io 




+8.4 

r '• 
+ 1.-' 


K;ili.- 


+3.3 


KoDbery 


+3.8 


\ - lUlt 


+3 7 


Ii iking or entering 

1 , ;..,;t 

• 'itothHt 


+ 1(1. 1 
+7.9 







Crime increased 7.2 percent in cities and i:{.2 percent in the areas 
outside of cities (rural). In the individual classifications, all city 
crimes increjvsed and all rural crimes increased except munler and 
ne«:li«:ent manslau<:hter. 

Popiilut ion and Crime. Since first compiled in 1951, midyear 
crime csiiniates have increased 45.7 percent, which is 4 time-^ Hie I 1 
percent increa.se in ])opulation in the same period. 

Crimes .Vfsainst I In- Person. Murders, ne^lip-nt manslaii^'hters, 
rapes and ajrtrravatcd assaults, as a jcroiip. increased 3.4 percent in 
the fir>t half of 1957. There was an increjiS4« in each cat4^p)ry, siul 
-tated as percentages, thes4» increas4's were as foll«>ws: A^ravateil 

(S) 



nssaiilf, ;i.7; iMpc. '-l.'A; iH'^'li^o-iil iii)iiis|;ni>:lilci-. 1.2; mihI iniirdcr iiiid 
iioinicL'li<r<'iil nijiiisljinirlilcr. ().(». 

(Irinit's Against PropiTly. I m rcjiscs were s\i])s(anlial in niosl of 
the crimes liavin*; jji-opcrly as the ohjcd, and as a <;roui) they in- 
cicascd S.7 ])('rc«'iil durinj; tin* first (> months of 19">7. Increases in 
the iiuhvidnal ohisses of property crimes were us follows: Bnr<i;larv, 
lO.l ; hiiceny, S.5; auto thelt, 7.9; and rohbcry, 3.8. 

KsiiiiiaN'd Oiiiic Totals. A count of ci'imes represenlinjz; (S4.0 
j)crccnt of th(> U. S. ])()])ula.tion is availal)le from contributors repre- 
sent in*; 92.8 percent of the city ])opulation and 72.8 percent of the 
inral poi)ulation. Accoi(hn<!;ly, estimates are necessary for only 1.5.4 
])ercent of the ])oi)ulation. Also, an adjustment is included for a 
calculated iucompl(>teness in reports from some rural areas. 



City Crime Trends, January— June, 1956-57 

City ])olic(> i-epoited a 7.2 ])ercent increase in part I (major) crimes 
as listed in table 2. 

Inci'cases in city crimes durini:; the first half of 1957 were general 
thi-oufj:hout the individ\ml classifications with the lowest increase, 2.3 
])ercent, and the highest incicase, 9.4 ])ercent. Increases in the 
numeious property crimes of burglaiy, larceny, and auto theft headed 
the list. 

The percentage increases for city crimes in the iiuhvidnal crinu* 
rhissifications, in descending oriler, were as follows: Bniglary, 9.4; 
larceny, 7.1; auto theft, fi.S; imu'der, .5.0; negligent manslaughter, 
4.0; rajK', 3.5; aggravated assault, 2.5; and robbery, 2.3. The increase 
of 2.3 percent in lobberies represents the first uptiu'u in the number of 
robberies since 1954. 

Tahlr 2. — City Crime Trends, January— June, 1956-57 

[OlTfiisi s known to iln- imlin jn 2,.'iis titji's, total population 8(),340,8«l bas<'<l on I'jSO decennial census) 



OlTtnse 



TOTAL 

Miinlrr an<l nonneulipont nmnslauKlitiT 

Manslaucliter by negligence 

Hape. 

UoblK'ry. 

AcBravated n.ssault 

Hiirclary— breaking or cntprini; . 

Larceny theft 

Autollieft 



Number of otienses 
January-June 



826,565 



l.St'vl 

1.321 

.Mt38 

24, 892 

.34, 494 
]81,ri95 
4K2, (ICil 

94, an 



885, 758 



1,957 

1,374 

)!, 14K 

Z\ 4C.9 

3.1, 344 
MIK, 7211 
.llti. 27S 
lIX), 402 



Change 



Number Percent 



+59, 187 



+93 

+,■13 
+210 
+577 

+&')0 
+ 17,025 
+34. 217 
+<V HJ2 



+7.8 



+5.0 
+4.0 
+3.5 
+2.3 

+2.5 
+9.4 
+7.1 
+r,.5 



liiirni i'ritm- 1 li-inls, Jtinnnry-Jiinr, /'y.)6— .77 

Sliciiirs, ((Mliily and Slate police, aixi oilier law-eiiforeeliieiil nireii- 
cit's covi'iin":; i uial areas (arras outside the limits of i-itics) icpoi led a 
I. "{.2 piTccMit increase in part I (major) crimes (liiriii;; the lirsl (i hkhiIIi 
of I*.)')!, as comj)ai-e(l with the same period in lOT)!;. 

Ail hill two crime classes i-elleded increases in rural area>. Murder 
and nonnei^li'^enl nuuislauLrhter declined 7.(1 percent and iie<xli"'erit 
nnmslaui^hti'r declined "J.O percent. 

In rural areas the aulo ihefl, larceny, and i)uri:;lary classifications 
led the increases. Auto thefts iiu-reased !().:{ |)ercent, larcenies weie 
uj) 15.0 percent, ami buri^laries rose ll.S percent. 

Robberies oecurretl with 11.0 |)ercei\t greater fre(piency in rural 
areas durintr the first (> months of \{)')7 than during the same period 
of \\)~A\. Similarly, there were 8.2 percent more olfi'iises of aggravated 
a»ault and '.\.2 percent more ofFeiises of rape. 

Table :\ rellects the details of the trend fiiruri-s for rural areas. 



Tahle 3. — Rural Crime Trends, Jniiuury-June, 1956-57 

|n:is*''l on rc|>orl.>! of 1,4S0 sluTilLs, 140 rurul vlllago olTicfr.s, uiid 12 Slate i>oU(r; lutiil ruriil |K>pulatluu 
3»,S(I0,G50 based on the 195H ilecrnnial (viisus) 



Offonso 



TOTAL 

Miinlt-r and nonnoKllEont manslaughter 

M an.slaughtiT by negligence 

KaiK- 

Kohbery 

\ ' i\ ated a<w»ault 

'■ iry— breaking or entering 

; ,> theft 

Auto lliefl 



NuiiiImt of o(Tens<'s 
Jamiary-June 



195C 



149.478 



8ri5 

1,010 
2.S13 

3, \r,2 

7.(161 
4K,.')n6 
74,021 
12,3S0 



law 



169.235 



799 

9MI 

2. rAa 

3.499 

7, CAit 
M.ZH 
M. lir. 
14,3(>.'i 



Change 



Number 



+ 19,757 



-Oft 
-39 

+WI 
+347 

+.'.79 

+ .'..72S 

+ 11.1194 

+2,018 



Percent 



+ 18. i 

-7.0 

-2.0 

+3.2 

+11 

+8 2 
+ 11 H 
+ 15.0 
+16 3 



Crime Kales 



City i'.rinir Itnlfs. Jniiitary—Juni'. I'J.'yT 

('ily ( rimes jis (■())))])il('(l .iiid npoilcd hy ;'),(I2.S j)olico agencies and 
ilic lij::iii('s foi- these crimes measured against units of 100,000 in- 
li.ihitants in tlie reporting cities are presented in tables 4-7. Kaw 
litrures as reported by contributing police departments were con- 
verted into the number of ciimes ])er 100,000 iidiabitants, refencd to 
as rrime latcs, to assist polic<' administrators and olheis interested in 
the (lime problem. It should be noted that the ciime lates represent 
iiverage figures. For this i(»ason roughly half the cities represented 
may be expected to have lowei- crime rates and the balance ma}' be 
expected to have higher ciinx' rates in a compaiative study of indi- 
vidual cities using these average figures. 

Since population figures used in figuring crime lates aje from the 
hUest decennial census, 1950, the effect on the rates of changes in 
])opulation should be borne in mind when making comparisons, as 
should the many other factors affecting the incidence of crime. fSee 
discussion on page 12.) 

Re|)oi-ts for the cities, as summarized in tables 4-0, reflect vaiiations 
in the incidence of crime in cities when grouped by size as well as when 
grouped geographically. Such variations are comparatively constant 
in lange fiom year to year. Table 7 shows details as to the number, 
location, and size of the leporting cities represented in tables 4-6. 

(0) 



Tulilr 1. — City Critiic Utiles, Jaititary-Jttiiv, l'J57, by I'upitlutiuii i^raups 

[Odi'UM'S known to tlio |>oliiv luul rate |M-r l(X),(X)t) lnliitl)ltiitit.s. I'o|)(ilullon flKuri-s h:i.s<-(| on M)») di-ciiiiilil 

tvnsiis) 



Fopii lilt Ion isroiip 



TOTAL. GROUPS I-VI 
S,0J3 citirs; toUl population, 
83.039.9W; 

Number of offenses known 

B«te p«r 100.000 



r.Roip I 

41 cities over 250,000; total popiilti- 
tlon. 31.9;«2.lt5.S 
NuinlHT of otTensos known. . . 

Uate p«T 100.000 

6 cities over 1.000.000; total |X)p- 
tllation. I7.404.4.'i0: 
Niunber of oITi-hm'S known. 
Rate per l(X),000.. 

6 cities, 7.W,«)0 to 1.000,000; 
total population, .S,IOU,2<.il: 

NiiinlxT of olTenst'S known. 
RaU> iH-r 100,000 - 

7 cities. 500.000 to 750,000; total 

popiiilation. 4.0Sii.)i64: 

Nunilter of otTen.s*>s known. 

Rate ix^r 100,000 

23 cities, 2.V),000 to 500,000; total 
|)Opillation, 8.;<41.5»i(): 
NunitHT of otTenst's known.. 
Rate per 100,000 

r.ROi p II 

GC cities. 100,000 to 250.000; toUil 
ftopuiation. 9,0<M.I1I: 

Number of otTenses known 

Rate per 100,000 

r,RotP III 

lan cltlt><<. 50,000 to I00,000; total 
impiilatlon, H,Wi0,577: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate per 100,000.. 

r.ROlp IV 

2»>5 cities, 25.000 to .Vl.OOO; toUil 
|>opulatlon. «.2i4.*JtK; 

NunilxT of offen.ses known 

Rale per 100.000 

r.Roip V 

TOO cities. 10.000 to 25.000; toUl 
ixmulation. l0.7U4.rilO: 

Number of olTen<i«« known 

Rate per 100.000 

OBOt-r VI 

l.'tIO citle<i under 10.000; tot:>l pop- 
ulation. 9.371.7H4: 

NuniN>r of offenses known 

Rate per 100.000 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder, 

IlOIUIl'k'' 

llm-iit 

mail- 

slauKli- 

t4'r 



2,007 
2.4 



l.OltO 

;t. I 



4)'iK 
2.7 



l<tO 
3.9 



142 

3.5 



2S1 
3.4 



2(I3 
3.0 



2.0 



KVt 
1 H 



172 
1.0 



108 
1.3 



Mari- 
sl:itii;li- 
ler i)V 
neKll- 
Kenee 



1,396 
1.7 



7<« 
2.2 



2S0 
1. 11 



ll'.» 
2.3 



118 

2.<.» 



2.-. I 
3.(1 



202 
2.1 



1,13 
1.7 



133 
1.4 



I{a|)e 



6.219 
7.8 



4.220 
12.1 



2. .M2 
14.0 



554 
10.9 



3fiS 
9.0 



.5.8 



4a3 

4.5 



3.1.') 
3.8 



405 
3.8 



270 
2.9 



Rol>- 
iM-ry 



25.653 
30.9 



18. 5Zt 
.WO 



10. (Vil 
Gl. 1 



3.0f>3 

m. 1 



1.423 
34.8 



3. 402 
40.8 



2.fi87 
27.7 



1.520 
17.0 



1.2f.f. 
13.fi 



908 
9.0 



083 
7.3 



AtJura- 
vale.l 
iis.sault 



36.021 
43.4 



22.278 
(a.8 



13.537 

77.8 



4. 475 
87.7 



994 
24.3 



3.272 
39.2 



4.439 
45.8 



3. ;m2 
37.5 



2.213 
23.8 



2.248 
20.8 



1.481 
IS. 8 



Bur- 

Klary— 

l.reak- 

Irij! or 

i-iiierinc 



202,045 
243.3 



9(».850 
285.9 



49. 282 
283.2 



12. 4fiO 
244.3 



10.800 
2M.i 



27,308 
327.4 



29.537 
304.7 



20. !>2\ 
229.0 



19.300 
208.0 



19.902 
184.9 



IZ803 
130.0 



l/ir- 

(I'llV — 
theft 



521.794 
628.4 



211.302 
G04.9 



90. 439 
519. C. 



35. 210 
090.4 



20.051 
505.3 



05. 002 
779.3 



70,103 
785.7 



02. 800 
701.5 



00.321 
714.3 



O.V02a 
008.0 



30.510 
431 7 



Auto 
theft 



101. 708 
iS8.5 



57. 8f>2 
105. 



20. 757 
119.3 



12. ir,4 
238.5 



7.953 
194.6 



10.988 
203.7 



13. 095 
141.3 



0.503 
100.7 



8.400 
00.6 



7.581 
70.2 



4.601 
49.1 



4::7l.i4* 



Tnhl*' ."). — City C.rinn' linlrs, Jttniinry-Jnne, 1957, by Geoisraphir Divlslnns 

niul Slates 



(Offenses known per 100.000 inhabitants. Population based on 1950 decennial census; 




DIvL-ilon and .^tatr 


Mur.li-r. 
nonni'Kli- 
Rcnt man- 
slauKhK^r 


RobU'ry 


.\ppra- 
vatf<l 
assault 


Bur- 
clary— 
break inp 
or pn- 
terinjt 


Lar- 

wny— 

thf-rt 


Auto 
th.ft 


TOTAl 


2.4 


30.9 


43.4 


243.3 


628.4 


122.5 








.6 


8.6 


10.7 


155.7 


400.0 


102 I 








1.1 
.fi 
.r, 
.4 
.3 


7.2 
3.5 
10.3 
1.9 
7.9 
.9 

25.8 


19.6 

.5.9 
8.9 


163.7 
106.2 
154.0 

85.2 
224.8 

57.6 

194.3 


367.9 
443. 1 
394.5 
248.7 
.557. 1 
328.3 

391.8 


87 


Maine 


62 




120. 1 




27.0 


RhfKle l.sland.. 
Vermont 


1Z8 


84.0 
44.5 


Middle Atlantic 


l.S 


41.8 


86.2 




1.4 

1.5 
1.5 

2.2 


2.3. 2 
24! 9 
29.0 

39.8 


30.9 
47.8 
36.7 

33.1 


219.9 
198.5 
171.6 

187.6 


400.6 
419.2 
3.34.8 

560.0 


106.0 




81.3 


Pennsylvania. 


84.1 


East North Central 


97.4 








2.7 
1.9 
2.2 
2.2 

.S 

1.8 


ti2. 2 
23. 3 
4.V 6 
27.2 

28.9 


.37.0 
21.1 
63. 6 
IS. 2 

8.7 

25.6 


172.8 
2-27.5 
251.9 
17.3. 1 
94.5 

214.8 


3 47. 4 
681.1 
80.5.2 
573. H 
572.9 

644.7 


65. 9 




140. 9 




i:is. 6 


Ohio 


94.7 




73.6 


West North Centra] - 


101.8 








.6 
2.3 

.5 
3.6 
1.2 


.5.9 
•JO. 7 
IS. 2 
fa. 

N.O 

3.0 
2.5 

28.7 


3.7 
29.3 

3.4 
.^9. 5 
14.4 

3.6 
. 5 

93.9 


170.0 
2.TX.0 
196. 
2S0.9 
r27.4 
S9. 8 
90.7 

295.7 


.584.0 
81S. 1 
5.59. 5 
717.5 
.506.9 
677.7 
507.6 

727.4 


48.8 




6.3.8 


Minnesota 


88.5 




166.9 




88.3 


Nnrlh niikotft . 


S9. 8 


c 
■J 


1.0 
4.9 


.30.9 


South Atlantic ' - - 


131.3 








4.4 
.1.4 
fi.O 
4.0 
f..O 
4.6 
4.5 
1.5 

6.5 


Kt.O 
\X 3 
27. 
33. 1 
11.4 
1.V4 
30. 7 
1(1.4 

19.4 


14.6 
47.5 
77. 9 
101.3 
16<). 7 
43. .H 
100. 3 
26. 4 

55.1 


273. 9 
.529. 2 
279. 1 
179.8 
234.0 
276. 6 
337. 
133. 

253.9 


742. 9 
1,127.6 
6.59. 5 
.532. 1 
63.5. 7 
7H4.0 
873. 9 
339. 6 

502.8 


13.''i. 9 


Kliiridrt 


142.7 


(icorcia .-.- 


131.6 
206.7 


North Carolina 


;«. 1 




91.9 




141.7 




.54.5 


East South Central — 


137. 2 








9.0 
3.7 
.5.7 
6.8 

4.4 


IC.O 
29. 5 
11.3 
IS. 1 

24.6 


61. 6 
.52.7 
:u. 5 
.50. 3 

48.2 


ZiA. 2 
314.2 
l.'i4.2 
270. 3 

328.5 


469.8 
618.2 
41.5.6 
4S2. 6 

800.1 


110.2 




245. 1 


Missi"!sippi 


49. 2 




lis. 4 


West South Centra] 


160.8 






Arkansas 


3.2 
4.3 
2.2 

.■■.. 1 

1.9 


17.3 
3S.2 
1«.4 
23. 3 

32.9 


61.4 
43 4 
•20. 1 

26.5 


186.1 
245. 2 
2S9. 7 
377. 6 

338.9 


4S9. 9 
.5.50. 7 
H.52. 8 
896.3 

1. 207. 


46. 4 




232. 3 




126.9 


Ti-\as . 


160.2 


Mountain 


207.1 


Arizona . 


4.7 
1.7 

.5 
1.3 
6.0 
2.1 

.H 
2.2 

1.8 


4H. 1 
.52. 
7.0 
14.0 
r.2. 
■22. 9 
2.V 1 
10.8 

52.9 


S.5. 5 
24.0 

4.7 
11.9 
•22. 
36. 2 
16.1 

9.4 

56.8 


.Vi3. 3 
395. 5 
1S6. 5 
1.S4.6 
4.M. 3 
4f«. 1 

■i:«. 9 
191.0 

433.0 


•2,020.4 
1.030.3 
1,068.6 
1,0.V2.2 
1,741.1 
1, .59.5. 7 
1.012. 4 
7'>3.8 

1, 201. 9 


;is6. 2 




243. 9 


Idaho 


70.1 




132.1 




•2«.0. 2 




323. 7 


Itah 


106. 4 




Wl.O 


Pacific 


238.7 


California . 

Oregon 


2.0 
1.2 
.9 


ro. 5 
27.8 
23. 3 


6H.3 
19.6 
10.1 


473. 2 
261.9 
294.8 


1,249.7 

!»69.9 

1,0.53.9 


2.54.8 
12.3.1 


WashinRton 


173.5 



' Incluilcs the District of rohimbia. 



Tal>l«' 6. — ('ily Crliiw Half>, Jiinti<iry-Jiiin\ I'Hi?, hy (IftmntpJtir f}!il>iittis ami 

I'n/mlal iim ('rtntfts 

[(^troiiscs known |HT IO(i,(K)0 liititililtitnts. Popubitlon basinl on lUM doocnnlal ocni*Uii| 
nivbilon and Kroiii* 



TOTAL. 
New Enicland. 



Oroiip I... 
Oroiip II.. 
Ciroup III. 
(Iroup IV. 
Oroiip V . 
(Iroiip VI. 



Middle Atlantic. 

Oroiip I 

(Iroiip II 

(trnup III.. 
Oroup IV... 

Ormip V 

Oroup VI... 



East North Central. 

(■roup I... 

Oroiip II 

(Jroiip III 

Oroiiji I\' 

Oroiip V . . 
Group VI 



West North Central. 



droiip I 

(iroiip II... 
OroupIII.. 
(Iroup IV.. 
(iroup V 
(.Jroiip VI 

South Atlantic >. 



(irnlip I... 

{iroup II.. 
OroupIII. 
Oroup IV. 
Oroup v.. 
Oroup VI. 



East South Centnl.. 

<ir<iiip I 

(iroup II 

(irouj. Ill 

(Jrou|. IV 

Oroup \' .. . 
(ir-'iii) \ I 

West South Central. 



Oroup I... 
Oroup II.. 
(iroup III. 
(iroup I\ 
(iroup \' 
(iroup \'l 



Mountain. 



< iroiiii I... 
Oroup II.. 
(iroup III. 
(iroup IV 
(iroup \' 
(iroup \ I 



< Ifollp 1 . . , 

(ipHip II.. 

(iriHip III. 
(ir.Mip IV 
Oroup V 
Or.KipX I 




8.4 



I. I 



IS 



1.8 



3. a 

2.H 
1.9 



4.9 



4. (! 

."■.. I 
4. .■■. 

;<. :. 
6.S 



5.3 

9.8 
4.0 
ri.4 
8.4 

4.:. 
14 



7.0 
3.« 
3.2 
3.7 
2.U 
1.3 

l.» 



1.7 
Zl 
1.8 
Z2 
2.0 
1.5 

1.8 



2.2 
1.4 
1.4 
2.3 
1.0 
1.0 



KoItU'ry 



SO. 9 



8.6 



32. 2 
«. 7 
5. » 
3. 5 
2. I 
1.4 

25.8 



3tl. I 

i.vn 

10. « 



39.8 



(17. I 

:«. 3 

•M. (i 
12.5 
U). ('. 
7.4 

28.9 



M. ;i 
2l». 5 
6.3 
5.4 
4.H 
4.7 

28.7 



K\. •> 
20.7 
20.2 
i». K 



19.4 



2»i.M 
25.4 
IA.8 
14.0 
8.4 
10.1 

84.6 



42.2 
23.2 
21.5 
lfl.7 
7.3 
a 5 

38:9 



77.4 
43.3 
21.0 
Vv.r> 
II. 
18.2 

a8.9 



7(i.« 
31.3 
3X8 
34.5 
Zl.3 
13.8 



.\KKni- 

V!lU'<I 

iissuiilt 



43.4 



10.7 



2«. K 

IS. (i 

5. 4 

5. 

I. t 



41.8 



(H. ■<. 
'.tl. H 
U). H 
10. 5 
(i. 3 
»i. 5 

33.1 



.V.'. 4 
43. 3 
21. 5 

8.3 
10.3 

4. I 

25.6 



X\. (i 
34. 1 
9.8 

5^9 
3. I 

93.9 



IJ.x I 
8.1. 7 
93. 5 
77.4 
8.3. r^ 
M. 8 

65.1 



50.8 
58.9 
70.1 

n.o 

57. I 
31.4 

48. S 



34.7 
72.3 
III. 7 
44.3 
37.4 
24.0 

86.5 



34.9 
5A.4 
13.8 
7i.r> 
11.5 
22. H 

96.8 



87.0 

ir.. 3 

-.Si. 3 
29.1 
3n.6 
17.1 




843.3 
"195.7 



lti9. 7 
•M\. 4 
152.8 
134. 2 
121.3 
112. I 

194.3 



244. 5 
1(19.9 
IftS.O 
129.3 
102.8 
95. 7 

187.6 



201.3 
248. 7 
IS-S. fi 
l(M.8 
178.8 
123.5 

214.8 



3(14. () 
341.0 
194. 1 
135. 2 
140.3 
93.6 

295.7 



222. 9 
473. 2 
274.9 
334.4 
2.59. 2 
183.8 

253.9 



298. 3 
IV.. 4 
2:J4. 7 
211.4 
183. I 
I3(J. 7 

388.5 



461. 4 
390.4 
3.59. I 
228.4 
167.5 
114.5 

338.9 



5<K0 
4ia8 
41i7 
33.'.. 9 
231.3 
221. 5 

4SS.0 



491. « 
322. 4 
3W. 1 
424.8 
396.5 
2S.5 



Liir- 

ocny— 

tlii'It 



628.4 
400.0 



50.3. I 
432. 
4.55. 4 
378. 8 
28:t. 8 
297. 5 

391.8 



429. 9 
412.7 
359. I 
3W. 3 
326.0 
254. 6 

560.0 



4'.Ki. 6 
801.5 
6:»4. 5 
661.2 
648.2 
388.6 

644.7 



742. H 
934. 7 
741.4 
66.3. 7 
.5.55. 7 
309.8 

727.4 



1.024. 1 
747. I 
879.9 
657. 6 
437. 2 

503.8 



570. 3 

644.6 
513.0 
406. I 
181.0 

800.1 



8.54.0 
1.071.6 
1. 140.0 
864.5 
529. 9 
322.8 

1.907.0 



i,aM.5 
I..VI6.0 

I.6M8. 2 
I.4IH.9 
1. 060 8 

8».'.. 5 

1.901.9 



1.091.4 
1.146.0 

i.r«. 5 

I..V5I. I 
1.377.8 
1.192.8 



> Includes the District o( Cdumbla. 



10 



Tilldf 7. — \iiiiilnT nf i'.ilifs 
ami .S/*i/«> lifprt'si'ii li-il in 
Jiiiiv l</r>7 (TabU's l-(>) 



in /•,Vi<7« I'niiii hil iini f^roii/t. ( ^fitunipliir />ii 
llif i'.ily t'.riini- Kulv I'nlmhiliims for Jan 



iifiry- 





TOTAL 






PopHlati 


on croup 






Division anil Stati' 


Over 


1III),I)IM) 
to 

2.''i<),n(xi 


to 
inn.rxK) 


2.'>.<i(>0 

to 
.■io.iino 


10,0(11) 

to 
2.1.000 


I-«ss 
than 
10,000 


TOTAL: 

l'i>|iiilntion, K3,(1B8,9M 


3.02S 


41 


66 


126 


265 


706 


1,819 




New England: 

l'n|illlillinn, f.,f.2«,C3« 


200 


1 


11 


17 


37 


71 


63 








29 
21 
106 
17 
16 
11 

652 




4 


2 
11 


12 
2 
18 

1 
3 
1 

49 


41 


2 

148 


,; 


Miiine 




11 


Massacliusetts . 


1 


fi 


2ti 


New llnmpshire 


H 


lilHMle Island 




1 


4 


Vcriuont 




s 


Middle Atlantic: 

l'i>|iiilatioD, 21,6(i(i,725 


7 


12 


23 


413 






New Jersey 


176 
197 
270 

681 


2 
3 
2 

9 


4 
4 
4 

10 


K 
fi 
i» 

31 


IS 

Ifi 
15 

62 


45 
43 
CO 

148 


',«( 


New York 


12.5 


I'cnnsvlvania 


IKU 


East North Central: 

rojtuliition, 19,118,790 


421 






Illinois 


188 
89 
123 
188 
93 

350 


1 
1 

1 

1 
5 


1 
4 
2 
3 


10 
4 

ti 

4 

9 


14 

y 

8 
19 
12 

20 


39 
16 
36 
41 
15 


12:1 


Indiana 




Mirliitian 


69 


Oliio 


114 


Wisionsin. 


no 


West North Central: 

I'dliulalion, (i,.')77,489 


4 


235 








74 
67 
83 
70 
32 
13 
21 

314 




1 
2 

1 


4 

1 


2 
3 


10 
20 
14 
18 
8 
3 
4 

63 


52 






32 




2 
2 
1 


63 


Missouri 


2 

1 


43 






22 






2 

T 

32 


8 


Souih Dakota 






I 
20 


15 


South Atlantic: 

ropulation, 8,217,022 


3 


9 


187 








6 
1 
61 
46 
20 
65 
37 
50 
28 

150 




I 








5 




I 










Kloriila 


3 

I 


3 


11 
4 

2 

i 
t; 

3 
14 


11 

8 

6 
IS 

5 
10 

5 

26 


34 


nrornia 


I 
1 


2?t 


Maryland 


11 


Xiirl h Cnrnlinn 


I 


3 
4 

3 

4 


36 


a 
c 

■7 




2s 


Vir^'inia - . 




3 


27 
17 


East South Central: 

i'lipulalion, 3,:JSS,130 


3 


5 


98 






Alabama 

Kontncky 


37 
44 
33 
36 

252 


1 
1 


- 


1 
2 

1 


2 
3 

11 
3 

15 


8 
6 

64 


23 
32 




19 




1 
5 


3 
8 


24 


West South Central: 

I'oplllalinn, (i,3Hl,lS3 


8 


152 








38 

31 
47 
136 

151 




1 
2 

;> 

3 

s 




3 
4 

3 

12 


5 

5 

13 

41 

26 


29 




1 




19 






in» 


Texas 


4 
1 


3 


75 


Mountain: 

ropiilaliim, 2,2riO,002 


107 








15 
30 
23 
21 
4 
18 
23 
17 

873 




1 




1 

1 

3 

1 
2 

1 

24 




13 




1 


I 


4 


21 


Maho 




14 










14 











3 


New Mexico . 


r 


1 
1 


4 

I 
4 

83 


II 


riali 


19 




12 


Pacific: 

Population, 8,NOO,987 


7 


5 


11 


143 


California 

( )re>;f)n . . - . 
WasliJnulon - 


196 
36 
41 


5 

1 


3 


II 


17 


(.5 
8 
10 


95 
25 


2 




•£i 



11 



liiinil i'rirnr Ruth's, Jnnnnry-Jiim\ l'f.17 

Pi'opli' li\ iii<; ill rural areas arc- less likely to !)(' tho victims of criinos 
than arc i)co|)lc residing; in cities. A ('(mi|)aris()ii of the rural data 
iti tal>l»' S with similar data for cities indicates that as a j^eueial propo- 
sition tliei-e are fewer crimes per 1(1(1, (KM) population outside cities 
than within the limits of cities. 

Keportin»j: hy sherilfs, county |)olice. Slate |)olice nnd other agencioa 
ii>presentin«; rural |)opuIations under this |)ro«jram is limited to areas 
outside city jurisdictions. 

Crimes re|)orted for January rlune, I'.).")?, hy 1957 agencies repre- 
sentiiii; a total rural population of 44,r)24,84r) are summarized in table 
S. In addition to listint!; the raw fijrures in table S, a conveision was 
prej)are(l, as shown, to slate the nund)er of crimes that occurred in 
these rural areas for each l()t),()()t) persons in the general i)opulatioii 
of the represented areas. The figuies obtained by this conversion 
are referred to in table S as rates. 



Talilt- 11. — Hiirul ('.riinr /<<i/«'.s. Jtinimry—Jiiiu', 1957 

|o(Tfnsrs known and rnti- [ht KKI.iuki iiilutliitaiits, ;is n-iwrU'd by 1,753 .>;licrl(Is. I'Jl rural vHIuko odicors, and 
13 SUiU" |K)lio-; toUil rural jHipulatlun 44,524,845 ba.scd on I<»5() dca-nnial wnsiisj 



Offons«' 



Offenses known 



Number Rate 



Murder and nonnegllKent mimslaughter 

MnnslauKhter by neKligenoe 

Klin- 

KonU-ry 

.Xecravated assault 

BurKlary— hreakUiK or entering. 

I.,;ircvny— theft -. 

Auto theft 



943 


2.1 


i.ogfi 


2.5 


2.877 


6.5 


3.855 


8.7 


8.809 


19.8 


58.447 


131.3 


91.ft52 


at).5.8 


15.811 


35.5 



Ollenses in hi(li\i(lual Areas 



()l]\-ns<'s ill liulivifliml C.itit's II ilh Man- lliaii 2.},0(}(t hiluihituitts 

The imnihcr of ofTciisos roportod as lmviii|,' hcon coinniiltcd during 
the period of .hiiuuuy .lunc, 1057, is sliown in table 9. The compila- 
tion inclu(k>s tlie reports rec(>ived from police departments in cities 
witii more than 2"),(l()0 inhahitanls. Police administrators and other 
interested indiviihials will probably find it desirable to compare the 
crime rates of their cities with the average rates shown in tables 4, 5, 
and G of this publication. Similarly, they will doubtless desire to 
make comparisons with the figures for tlieir communities for prior 
periods, in order to determine whether there has been an increase or 
a decrease in the amount of crime committed. 

Caution s hould be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 
cities becau se the difrerences in the figures may be due to a variety 
of fa ctors. Such comparisons are not necessarily significant even 
though the figures for individual communities are converted into 
ter ms of number of offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. 

The following is a list of some of the factoi's which affect the amoimt 
and type of crime in the community: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 
The composition of the popidation witli reference particularly^ to 

age, sex, and race. 
The economic status and activities of the population. 
Relative stability of population. 
Climate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 
The number of police employees per unit of population. 
The standards governing appointments to the police force. 
The policies of the prosecuting ofhcials and the courts. 
The attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 
The degree of efficiency of the local law enforcement agency. 
The figures presented in the following tabulation are those reported 
by the individual police departments in the cities represented without 
re<lucing the data to crime rates (number of offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants). 

In considering the volume of crime connnittcd locally, it is generally 
more important to determine whether the figures for a given com- 
munity show increases or decreases rather than to ascertain whether 
they exceed or fall short of those for some other individual community, 
and it should be n>mend)ered that the amount of crime committed 
in a conununity is not solely chargeable to th(> i)olic(' but is rathcM- a 
<harge against the entire conununity. 

In publishing these figun's, the FBI acts as a service agency. The 
figures published are those submitted by the contiibuting agencies. 

(12) 



13 



l'iil»l«- •>. — \iinihiT nf (ffft'nsr^ Kiioiitt In ihi- l'<iliri-. Jiitnniry-Jiini- 
(.'ifM'.s ihvr 2.'tjf(l(l in I'lt/nilnliini 



I't.'tT, 





Miirdj-r. 

noiiiU'n- 

lIlIlMll 

iiiaii- 
slaiicliter 


Uol.tuTy 


AKpru- 
val('<l 
a.x.Siiiilt 


Bur- 

Rlary— 

Hrwik- 

liiK or 

cntcrinK 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 


City 


%50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


theft 


AMUiic. Tvx 

viiiimtuii, I'a... 


1 

3 
1 

s 

4 

1 

r 

3 
3 


111 
(> 
3 

I'l 
3(1 
Id 

IS 

II 

3 
3 
3 

18 

7' 

4 

1(1 

3 


8 
I 

.11 
3 

.11 

28 
HI 
(•)2 
l.t7 
II 

17 
3 
2 

I 
1 

75 

3 

8 
.13 


87 
«7 

(-.84 
Ki 

1,18 

I!»3 
(i24 
117 
21(1 
2tl2 

'22 
.lit 
4(°> 
.14 

sn 

2:17 

14 

94 
7(» 
92 

4('i 
23 

2:«i 

1(11 


34 

43 
27(1 
41 
45 

.Kl 
111 

43 
129 
135 

24 
47 
12 
12 
32 

183 

8 

31 

2:14 

77 

22 

13 

247 

84 

celvi'd 

25 

8.i;j 

127 

7 

52 

.15 
1(18 
192 
1, .1.1.1 
39 

28 
2ri9 
.14 
27 
G» 

183 
21 
f. 
47 
19 

V, 
93 
33 
23 
59 

23 

79 
51 
46 

530 
43 

38 
4K 
81 

1.3(tl 

33 

194 

17 

&1 


893 

1(1(1 

l.(W2 

278 

228 

143 

1.731 
198 

.178 
3.10 

.Kl 
26.1 

97 
210 

.17 

771 
29 
18fi 
451 
107 

4.16 

70 

699 

192 

.14 

3,27(1 

131 

43 
211 

195 
1.383 

736 
3,349 

84 

194 
569 
392 
387 
193 

730 
KK 

128 
59 

191 
714 
92 
102 
211 

109 

488 
114 
2» 

1,357 
107 
1.M 
341 
191 

2,731 

274 

411 

SO 

274 


09 
13 




514 


Vhimr.la. rullf 

Mhiiiiy. Oa 

\lliunv, N. Y 


30 

29 

1K.1 


V ll)iii|iii'ri|ii(>, N. M6X 


527 


V U'xaiiilria, La 

A li'xuiiilria, \'n 

AllKiiiibni, ralif 

A li<|»i|M>'i> I'* 


72 
81 
38 




A llriitowii. Pa 


.13 


A lliaiii'j', Ohio 


13 


Alldii. Ill 


27 


Aliuoiia, Pa 


33 


A marlllo, Tex 


137 


Amstfr.lam. N. Y 

\ ixIcr.'Nnii, Ind .. 


9 
38 


Aim ArlK)r, Mich 




3.1 


Viiiilston, Ala 





13 


\ |>|>l<'tOII, Wis 


21 






11 






11 
7 


31 
2G 


122 


AslicvllU". N. C 


i 

1 

32 

1 

3' 

1 

3 

2 

44 


50 


Ashland, Ky 


Only 4 niontlis re 




Mhfiis, Oa -. 


33 

322 

47 


47 

1.»..14 

3(19 

8 

124 

;«t 

37(i 
233 

1.7f.H 

2.1 

r.i 

i12 
95 

115 
83 

32ii 
113 

;«t 

2it 
2St 

41 

3ni 

.14 

ni 

3A 

31 
iwrts n-ci-l 
til 

78 
51 

fAI 
44 

49 
71 

.18 

l.3i~<ll 

3:t 

13 

97 


6 


Atlanta. Oa 


184 
2(1 

1 
8 

9 

23 

21 

3fi3 


909 


Ailatitlc CUy, N. J 


99 






A iifiusta, Oa 


811 

ISf. 

1.1 

1. 143 

2 

5 
.13 
8 
f. 
12 

lfi4 


53 


Aurora. Ill 


24 


\iistiii, Tox 


133 


Makcrsnold. Calif 


169 


Haltiniorc. Md 


2,234 


Haiiijor. Maine 


35 






4 

14 
5 
4 
4 

15 
3 

1 
2 
2 

2 
22 
17 
9 
3 


35 




4 

1 


131 


HatlU' Crwli. Mich 


34 


Hav City, Mich 


IIH 


Hayonnc, N.J . . 




58 


licaiiniont, Tex 


2 


71 


11. ll.vllU', III 


IH 


H<ll4VllU'. N' J 






28 


liilhiiKliani, Wash 






21 


Mi-lniunt. Mass 




2 

2 

2(i 

8.1 
2 


10 


H.|..;t. Wis 


1 

1 


10 


H. rk. Irv. Calif. 


92 


H.rwvi), 111 


% 


McvM-niiT. Ala ... 


3 


31 




30 


II. ' ■ : ^ 




12 


li Calif 




4 
9 
2 

54 
2 
2 
4 
5 

258 

1 
9 


No re 




11 .t 


52 


llUuM. Mbj 

HlMKhamton, N. Y 

H Ala 


4 
3 

39 


32 
un 

3 

1 

23B 
42 


48 
33 

532 


11 \ J 


90 


11, . Ill 




47 


IlKxjiuiat;!!!!!, Ind .. 




» 






54 


11 •■ - 


9 


2,361 


11 A iish 


10 


11' I'onn. ...... ... 


1 


161 




S3 


MriMkton. MaM 




i 


I 


76 



14 



TaI»I«- 9. — \itiiilnT itf ()Jffn.srf< hinnvii lit tin- I'liliif. Jniiiiary—Jiiiir 
C.itlr.s Orvr 2.1,0110 in {'a/nihititni — ( ittiit iiiiit-d 



IV57, 



City 



Murder, 
nonnoR- 
llfsent 
man- 
slaughter 



Rohbery 



valed 
assault 



Bur- 
glary— 
Br«ik- 
ing or 
entering 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Hrookllne, Mass.. 
Hro\vii.s\ illo, Tox.. 

Butlalo, \. Y 

B urban k. Calif . 
Burtin^-tnn, Iowa 

Burlliipton, Vt 

Butlf, Mont 

Cambrldpo, Mass. 

Camden, N. J 

Canton, Ohio 



Cedar Hai)lds, Iowa. 

ClianiiKiisni, 111 

Charl.sioii, S. C 

Charltsion, W. Vs.. 
Charlotte, N. C 



Charlntt<>sville, Vn.. 
Chattan<><ip:i, Tenn. 

Chelsea, Mass 

Cluster, Pa 

Cheyenne, Wyo 



Chicago, 111 

ChicoiK'e, Mass 

Cieer.>. Ill 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Clarksburg, W. Va. 



131 



Clevohind, Ohio _ 

Clevi land Heights, Ohio. 

Clifton, N.J. - 

Clinton, liwa 

Colorado Springs, Colo... 



Columbia, Mo 

Columbia, S. C... 

Columbus, Ga 

Columbus, Ohio.. 
Compton, Calif. .- 



Concord, N. 11 

Cori>us Christi, Tex .. 
Council Blufls, Iowa.. 

Covington, Ky 

Cranston, R. I 

Cumberland, Md 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. 

Dalhi.s Tex 

Danville, 111 

Danville, Va 



Davenport, Iowa 

Davton, Ohio 

Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Dearborn, Mich 

Dec-atur, III 



Denver, Colo 

Des Moines, Iowa. 

Detroit, Mich 

Dubuiiue, lown. 
Duluth, Minn 



Durham^ N. C. 
Kast Chicago, Ind 
KasI Clevelanil. C)liio 
East Hartford, Comi 
Kastcin, Pa 



I 



Kast Onince, N. J 
East rnividenee. U. 
East St. Louis, III 
Eau Cbiire, Wis 
Elgin, III 

See footnote at end of tabl*>. 



3,3.32 

1 

25 

120 

22 

.^38 
5 
4 
3 
f) 

1 

8 

•J 

104 

41 



34 
4 

10 
4 

1 
4 

17.n 
'J 
2 

t) 
!t2 
10 
20 

<) 

322 

.30 

l,4r>."i 

4 

12 

Vt 
lit 
4 



8 
109 
24 



16 

5 

12U 

4 

1 

4 

33 

f*) 
304 



77 
138 
.'.20 
232 

29 

21 
37 
114 
444 

229 

H.S 
3«i 
290 
101 
431 



34 
44 

I'M 
147 



3.'> 
03 
108 
ISi'. 
137 

91 

ltd 



(') 



46 

Am 

<3 

Only 1 month rt'oeive<i 
1 78 



l,88.i 

4 

14 

130 



223 

1 

10 

1 
33 
28 
12.5 
42 



1 

205 
1 



117 
40 



14 
1,933 



0. 778 

16 

126 

7.V) 

'.•3 

1.117 

tU 

ra 

1.58 

<a 

232 

170 

1.0.3S 

rui{) 

17 
f.20 

so 

12.5 
9<» 

24 

CO 

I.. 546 



SI 6 

rss 

179 
28.5 
313 

.', 112 

r>.53 

5.371 
43 
138 

99 
114 
37 
44 
44 

71 

1S8 

11 

.50 



51 



4.422 

42 

121 

491 

3 

4.S9 
14 
.59 
36 

128 

19 

.^5 
729 
336 

20 
174 

.VS 



44 

408 



119 

ISS 

Km 

ir,.5 

.51 

1.039 
323 

1.4<.H) 
37 
138 

tiO 
PVJ 
6 
31 
23 

89 
60 
<M 
13 
23 



181 

;«7 
.Ml 

430 
108 

161 
2I>4 
1.51 
472 
615 

.546 
249 
710 
388 
951 

111 

C67 

SO 

2<)6 

4.672 
1.^3 
141 

1.8-26 
33 

5. 665 
145 
190 
221 
428 

153 
751 
204 
2,195 
691 

61 

898 
245 
257 
169 

101 

149 

4. 344 

.59 



.VS2 
9,5;} 

320 

1,123 

444 

3, :t« 

1.0.56 

11.347 

196 

3.32 
414 
137 
81 
120 

244 

181 
203 
1'23 
111 



16 



lal.l. 



•>. — \iiiiihrr of OJJfilsfs Kiiinin In //(<• I'ltllrr, Jtiniinry-Jn iir 
ililivs itv*'r 25,000 in I'ltimlnl Ion — < onlinii«-«| 



l<f.-,7 



City 



KliralMtli, \. J 
KIktiarl. IikI 
Khiiini, N. Y... 
Kl I 'MS... TfX 
KlyrLi. Ohio 

Knid, Okhi . 
Krio, Pa . . 
Kiifliil, Ohio . 
KuRi'iic, Orel?.. . 
Kv:iiisl>>n, III 

KvaiisvUlo, Ind.. 
KviTftt, Mass 
Kvcntt. Wash 
Fairmont. W. Va . . 
Kail Hivcr. Mass 

Fanto, N". Dnk 
Favi'tt.-vill.«. N. C. 
F.'ftKlalc, Mich.. 
Fit<'lil>iiri», Mass. 
Flint. Mich 

Fond dii I/ic. Wi> 
Fort I)o(l(fc. Iowa 
Fort Lauderdale. II 
Fort .'^niith. Ark 
Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fort Worth. Tex 
FratidiiKhani, Mass. 
Fresno, Calif . . 

(iadsden, Ala 

(laiiiesville, Fla 



r>ale.<;>>iirK, III... 
(Jalveston. Tm. 
(JarfleM. N.J. 
(larv, Illd 
(Jlendale. Calif 



(Hoiin'Ster. Mn.ss 
Orand Fork.s X. Dik 
Or.ind Hapids, Mich 
Ormite Citv. 111. 
Ori-at Fall.s, Mont 



Ore*-!! Bay, Wis... 
Orwiishoro. N. C 
fJreonvllIc. Miss. . 
(Ircfiivlll*'. .<;. C... 
Orwiiwich, Conn 



llarkonsikrk, X. J. 
Haporstown, Md.. 
Iliiiillton, N.J. ., 
Ilatnllion, Ohio .. 
llaniniond. Ind. . 

tiampton, Va 
llanilramok, Mlrh 
llarrishiint. Pa... 
Hartford, Conn. 
Itattle.<ibiire. Miss 

Havrrford, Pa 

M I .. rtiil' \T:lss 

II f 

II 

11, \. \ 

Iltdeah. KLi... 
IliEhlaiid Park. Mich 
llu-h Point, X. C 
ll..t«.keii, N.J. 
lloly„ke, .Mass 



Murder, 

IIOIUU'I!- 

IlKcnt 

niitn- 

.sliiunhtcr 



KohlM>ry 



1 

102 



21 
12 
V.I 

110 

rj 

.10 

1 





lliir- 


Larceny— theft 




Accra- 


Klary— 
Hreak- 






A 


vute«t 






tt 


n.«S!iiill 


lii)! or 


%nn und 


I'ndcr 






onterhiK 


over 


$5" 




.14 


IHIf 


220 


4H4 






4H 


42 


121 




1 


.M 


17 


IH4 




TiO 


H4(i 


11H 


l.W)7 






4r. 


22 


111 




., 


ir. 


11 


21.'-. 




47 


I'.t7 


lO.'. 


4'.t4 






12 


14 


1«2 




r. 


77 


i:« 


:m 




11 


01 


1.'.4 


171 




:m 


I'.M 


217 


7(»2 




1 


02 


27 


KO 




r, 


,17 


11 


402 




No r 


•liortsrcce 


ved 




11 


IHO 


127 


17.1 




2 


18 


31 


2.18 




70 


l.-il 


.1 


.Ht.l 




1 


m 


.v. 


120 




2 


lOS 


02 


211 




2.'l.t 


441 


.Vkl 


l..'i7» 




.1 


20 


17 


172 





No n'i»orls received 



l.H 
i.18 



4 

32 
24 

20 
7 

lU 
|OH 
17 



i.ll 
I2<.» 

2:« 

1,894 

21 

.144 

92 

m 

24 

280 

28 

.1.10 

124 

28 
44 
4.X1 
47 
71 

Hi 

100 
49 

24.'> 
28 

52 
Ol 

.W 
310 
293 

187 
OV 

290 
4NI 

78 

33 

«3 
SI 

m 

77 



17.1 
201 

2S0 
27 

1.13 
28 
.Kl 

11 
21.1 

19 
1.10 
200 

22 

17 

200 

8 

49 

.18 
100 
39 

i.m 

24 

47 
33 
01 
09 
21.1 

144 

78 

lai 

2.KI 
32 

38 
38 
M 
14 
88 



.1 113 70 

Onlv 3 niontlfi n-n-Ued 
» I .12 :t3 

19 I 79 , 32 

I '. .VI I 54 



W9 
20.1 
9.19 

2.017 

IS 

8K(I 

118 

174 

1.19 
19.1 
104 

840 

41 

.Kr2 

1.291 

219 

377 

112 
4fi6 
199 
370 
49 

911 
1.19 
175 
200 
054 

446 
103 

384 
.19K 
1119 

132 

80 

271 

(a 

90 



137 1 


13 


43 I 


88 


275 1 


»• 



4.'l-ia4' — 67- 



1() 



iltir 9. — \iiiiilnT ttf OJffny-i-s hniiiin In I In- I'ttliif. Jninttir\-Jtnn' 
i'.ilit's OiiT 2.')JI(III III l'i>i>ii III I I4HI — < on I iniK <| 



19 57, 



City 



Honolulu City, Hawaii. 

Hot Sprlnps, Arlj 

Jlwiiston. Tex 

iiiinliiictoi), \V. Va 

Hiiiitinctoii Piirli, Calif. 



Hiit(-hlns«>ii, Kans 

Iri<l<'i)«'ndfiic»', Mo 

indliinapolis, Ind 

Inclfwond, Calif 

Iowa City, Iowa 



Ironrloquoit, N. Y. 

Irvinpton, X. J 

Ithac-J, X. Y 

laflison. Mich 

Jackson, Miss 



Jackson, Tcnn 

Jacksonville. Fla... 
Janiostown, X. Y.. 
Jc>fTers/)n Citv, Mo. 
Jorsfy City, X. J... 



Johnson CItv, Tcnn. 

Johnstown, Pa 

Jolift, 111.- 

Joplin, Mo 

Kalamazoo, Mich... 



Kankakcp, lU 

Kannajxilis, X. C 

Kansjis City, Kans... 

Kansas City, Mo 

Kearny, X. J 



Kenosha, Wis 

Ketterlnp, Ohio... 

Key West, Fla 

Kinpston, \. Y... 
Knoxvllle, Tenn... 



Kokomo, Ind 

Lackawanna, X. Y. 

I. a Crosse, Wis 

La Fayette, Ind 

Lafayette, La 



La ranee, Qa 

Lake Charles, La. 

Lakeland, Fla 

Lakewood, Ohio.. 
Lane-aster, Pa 



Lansinp, Mich... 

Laredo, Tex 

Lanrcl, Miss. .. . 
Lawrence. Mass. 
Lawton, Okla 



lA>banon, Pa 

Lewiston, .Maine. 
I^exinpton, Ky... 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, Xebr 



Lincoln Park, Mich. 

Linden. N.J 

Little l{c)ck. Ark.... 

Loek|)ort, .\. Y 

Lonp Beach, Calif... 



Ix)rain, Ohio . 

I/os .\nceles. Calif., 

Ix>nlsville, Ky 

Ixiwell, Ma.-is 

lyower Merlon, Pa. 



Murder. 

nonnep- 

llpent 

nian- 

slauphler 



14 



Robbery 



221 
19 
3.*) 



1114 
2:< 



1 
1 

5 

1 

173 

1 



3 

2 
12 
,5 
3 

3 

1 

7.5 

1811 

2 



2118 

9 

2, (MI 

\S7 

4 
1 



Appra- 
vatnl 
a.«sault 



71 

.53 
9 

2 

5 

1.38 



1.5 
28 

1 

121 

4 



8 

4 

1114 



Hur- 


l^irtvny— theft 




plary— 






.\uto 


Hrciik- 






theft 


InRor 


$.50 and 


Under 




onterlnp 


over 


$.50 




U7.5 


439 


2.062 


413 


.53 


46 


113 


9 


3. .51 7 


1.178 


3.816 


1.592 


173 


121 


1>>3 


SI) 


2113 


i7f; 


3»-.2 


119 


4.5 


2rt 


1.52 


14 


1 1 


r>i 


182 


36 


1.122 


fm 


1.824 


1.236 


3*'i<) 


218 


4.52 


120 


1.5 


2«) 


121 


12 


34 


13 


121 


10 


]IK) 


39 


169 


35 


32 


.54 


115 


26 


«) 


•i7 


212 


42 


184 


43 


543 


.54 


S<) 


41 


146 


2<'i 


1.429 


l.i'12 


1.171 


371 


22 


14 


39 


17 


42 


19 


7.5 


16 


382 


1.32 


417 


413 


.59 


14 


88 


26 


.52 


,51 


175 


41 


77 


47 


3(X) 


74 


S8 


ii2 


271 


31 


1.57 


109 


605 


49 


49 


U 


125 


22 


42 


17 


112 


16 


3<15 


57 


S27 


127 


.547 


418 


1.234 


388 


31 


33 


108 


18 


•i7 


30 


224 


32 


70 


11 


79 


16 


21) 


2t) 


75 


l"i 


.V) 


19 


40 


4 


43fi 


147 


574 


347 


,>«) 


.5.5 


246 


39 


.5.5 


29 


86 


88 


40 


34 


208 


26 


78 


.53 


323 


23 


t;9 


21 


28 


7 


31 


14 


110 


18 


I..5 


40 


103 


17 


124 


.50 


221 


21 


,59 


19 


1.54 


22 


113 


.52 


332 


23 


74 


74 


4.53 


.50 


7.5 


.5<") 


18«5 


98 


37 


4 


23 


14 


110 


2.5 


130 


66 


1I« 


39 


347 


54 


10 





1.50 


2 


4.5 


32 


183 


19 


242 


1.5*1 


525 


97 


112 


140 


340 


41 


1,52 


9f. 


7.53 


60 



1 

122 

9 



.No re|Kirt.>i ree«'ive<l 



4 

99 

1 

134 

30 

772 

182 

3 



,52 

323 

41 

1.214 

116 

12.988 

1..532 

99 

85 



2J^) 

10 
(') 

27 

9. 025 

945 



144 
743 

91 
2.394 

231 

1.5. 398 

1.912 

3;iH 

186 



See footnote at end of table. 



17 



lahlr y. — .\iiiiilii-r ttf OJJriisf>> hniniii lt> llu- I'ttlirr, Jiiiiintr\-Jiiin' 
Citivs iPvvr 25,(MfO in t'opiilnlittn — (ioiiliiiiicd 



l'f.',7. 



City 



l.iililiork, 'W'X. . . 
I.yiichlxir)!, Vii. 
Lyiiii, Muss . 
l.yiiw(»oil, I'lillf. 
Miicoii, (!u 



Madison. Wis 

M allien, Muss 

MaiichfStiT, \. II 
Manitoww, Wis. . 
Maiisn.-l.l, Ohio . 

Mapli'WOCKl, N. J. . 

Marion, Ind 

Marlon, Ohio 

Mason Citv, Iowa. 
.Massilloii, Ohio 



Maywooil, III 

Mrktvsport, I'u. 
Mt^lfonl, Mass.. 
Mi'lros*', Mass. . . 
Mfiiiphls, Toiin. 



Mi-rklcn. Conn 

Moridlan, Miss 

Miami, Kla 

Miami Hrach, Fla.. 
Mich lean City, In^l 



MUldlctowii, Conn . 
MIddlctown, Ohio 
Mllwaiikii', Wis 
Mliinoa|>olis, Mniii 
M Ishawaka, Ind . . . 

Mot.il.\ Ala 

Molln.'. Ill 

Monroe. La 

Montdalr, V.J 

Motdifonipry, Ala.. 

Morsantown, W. Va. 
Mount l.tdiaiion, I'a . 
Mount N'crnon, N. Y. 
Miinric, Ind... 
Muskcpon, Mich. 

Muskogoe. Okla 

Nashua. \. II.... 

Nashville. T<>nn . . 

New .\lbany, Ind. . 
Newark, N. J.. 

\ewark, Ohio 

New HetlfonI, Mas".. 
New lint.'iln, Coiui. . . 
New lininswlrk. N. J 
Vewlniryh, N. Y... 

■ w Cti-tl.-. I'a.. 
. < "onii . 

ton, I'a.. 
.1, Conn.. 
. .» *)rleitit.«, I.a... 

. .k I'.i-t k V , . 
I 

\ ■. 

, .\. ^ 

• ••» ton, .Mii.>.>. .. 



\,. .^ 

Norrt^owii. V*. 



Murder, 

nonnoK- 

IlKcht 

inun- 

slautshtiT 



I 
IV. 
tit 



Koliliery 



4 

a IS 



2 

LIS 



4.J7 

I 

.1 
2 
l<.l 
1 

I 

I'.i 
I 



.t 

.to 

II 
.^ 

M 
Itl3 





llur- 


l,.iirivny— theft 


AKiira- 


Klury- 
Ureak- 






vutvU 






ItKUUlt 


hiK or 


$50 and 


Under 




cnt«rln){ 


over 


$ao 


r^i 


42<i 


21 s 


1, 120 


•2\ 


77 


17 


21 H 


)• 


2117 


151 


r*,\ 


2,1 


IKi 


ir.' 


2;»9 


M 


2<i.< 


9(1 


399 


7 


lis 


K'. 


4('><> 


2 


4;< 


24 


15H 




4i'> 


34 


212 




44 


15 


131 


" 


KM 


7C. 


207 


1 


22 


17 


22 




:<ii 


22 


i7r» 


1 


411 


49 


213 


1 


Mt 


21 


K9 


■-' 


n; 


4 


ISO 


2 


4(1 


27 


77 


ift 


1(12 


4S 


KW 




74 


m 


2lfi 




2:i 


12 


104 


2111 


I.CI.VS 


557 


1.022 


1 


Ml 


(i7 


97 


:ij 


72 


41 


1(12 


:<( 


I.H^H 


7s7 


2. (102 


« 


71(1 


449 


957 


1 


m 


;«i 


113 


2 


40 


33 


r,i 


I'l 


('■II 


Nl 


23(1 


125 


4rd 


9sl 


2. k:j2 


•2r> 


1 . .'■.it2 


717 


2.174 




SS 


43 


209 


7!> 


ri49 


173 


a% 




70 


30 


147 


i 


(12 


39 


3(iO 


2 


39 


2S 


79 


"I'l 


:t7s 


U12 


3S3 




2;< 


7 


57 




71 


29 
95 


2t» 


5 


170 




I2» 




39f. 


1 


Kl.'i 


S2 


3(K 


2 


4('> 


37 


2S2 


4 


32 


Xi 


170 


rdi 


M4 


44(> 


9fi«-. 


:j 


27 


47 


219 


4211 


2.513 


I.IIO 


1.9»12 




34 


29 


\rfi 


17 


223 


120 


479 


r, 


IKi 


(;s 


2»V3 


|H 


Ki 


2<i 


213 


.< 


59 


.•■..'. 


123 




54 


25 


K7 


27 


2s;{ 


lis 


440 


:« 


7 


H 


45 


li 


51 


32 


140 


221 


1.041 


l.ino 


2.127 


7 


411 


37 


52 


H 


Sll 


40 


22.5 


4'J 


175 


2.VI 


4*1 


IV 


Nh 


ttr. 


149 


i 


IM 


147 


2fi(l 


.'.. 24tt 


19.112 


20.409 


1.5. OOH 


24 


I5M 


I.Vi 


332 


4417 


I.I9I 


Mft 


I.HI4 




N 


51 


115 


1 


11 


29 


49 



IS 



Tultlt 'J. — \iiiiifnr »»/ OjU'fiisi-s Kmiiin Id llu- I'nliir. Jaiiimrs-Jiiiu' 
(Cities Ov*^r 2S.(IIHI in I'li/niliitinn — ( '(till iiiiK <i 



l'J57, 



City 



\'ortl);im|>loii, Mhss 

Vorth HiTvcii. X. J 

Xortli l.ittl.' Kock, Ark. 

N'onvalk, ("onn 

Norwich, Conn 



\orwoo»l, Ohio... 

Nutlpy, X.J 

Oaklan.l,(\illf.... 

Oak Park, 111 

Oak Hlilwi', Tenn. 



Odessa, Tex 

Opfien, Utah 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Omaha, Xohr.. 

Ontario, Calif 



Oranpp, X. J 

Orlamlo, Fla 

Oshkosh, Wis... 
Ottumwa, Iowa. 
Oweiisboro, Ky. 



Pa<lucah, Ky 

P: Jo Alto. Calif 

Panama City, Fla... 
Parkcrsbiinr, \V. Va. 
Panna, Ohio 



Pasadena, Calif 

Passaic, X. J 

Paterson, X. J 

Pawtucket, R. I 

Peniiacola, Fla... 



Peoria, 111 - 

Perth .\mhoy, N. J 

I'eli-rsbiirp, Va 

i'hiladelphia. Pa 

Phoeni.x, .\riz 



Pine Bluff, Ark. 
Pittsburtrh, I'a.. 
PitfslUld, .Mass. 
IMalnli.ld, X. J.. 
Pocatello, Idaho. 



Pomona, Calif. . . . 

Pontine, Mich 

Port Arthur, Tex . 
Port llnriin. Mich. 
Portland, .Maine... 



Portland, Orec 

Portsniotith, f)hlo 

Portsmouth, Va 

Pouuhkerpsie. X. Y 

I'rovldence, K. I 



Provo, Utah. . 
Pilehlo, Colo.. 

gulncy. 111 

guinev. Mass. 
Racine, Wis... 



Raleieh. N. C 

Rapid City, S. Dak... 
Rendlnt', Pa . 
Ke.lond<) Reach. Calif 
Redwood City, Calif. 



Reno, Nev 

Revere. Mass 
Riehiiiond. Calif 
Hieiiinond. hid 
Riclunund. \ ;i 



Murder, 
nonnci!- 
llgent 
man- 
slaughter 



KoiilMTy 



vate<l 
assault 



233 

7 



8 
1 
1 

.S 

21 
9 

41 
ti 

S 

37 

2 

12 

1,136 

M\ 

<J 

427 

1 



ni7 

17 



Hur- 

Clary- 

Br«ik- 

Ing or 

enterini! 



Larceny— theft 



19 
4 <W 

Xo reports rewlvfl 



$aiand 
over 



3()7 
1 
14 



12 
23 
70 

49 

S4 
16 
.^4) 

1.698 
112 

2(1 

307 

2 

2 

2 

16 
49 



II Mi 

1 

l.Sl 



17.1 



47 
3 

177 



72 
3<) 

4R 

43 

l.:«7 

1(13 



1.17 
14.1 
1.236 
4(W 
101 

39 
2.14 

.17 
3.1 
131 



4»i9 
Ki6 
407 
S2 
19.1 

277 

64 

104 

.1,033 



78 
2.014 
37 
67 
69 

18.1 

2.16 

43 

49 

117 

1.231 

184 

249 

60 

77>* 

22 
129 

:« 

1.19 
123 

181 

.1 

139 

224 

.11 

170 

71 

27.1 

127 

1 iK4 



21 

30 

17 

43 

2H9 

■m; 
11 

1-2.1 

!()•; 

930 
90 



177 
37 
29 

82 



47 
21 
11 

31.1 

»•« 
60 
108 



160 

84 

1.1 

2. 728 

.18.1 

10 
1,089 
36 
47 
44 

119 
66 
41 
2.1 

HM 

9.14 
94 

178 
49 

441 

,1 
14.1 
48 
.18 
38 

10.1 
3<l 
94 

117 
99 

IIS 
18 
H8 
98 

444 



Under 
$60 



27 

69 

1.10 
60 

101 

7.1 

3,701 

104 
•■« 

506 
W7 
1.964 
789 
326 

113 

402 
367 
174 
240 

183 

488 
101 
111 
IV) 

1.031 
113 
278 
162 
449 

1,034 

169 

1(18 

.1. 031 

1,617 

149 

1,-12.1 
119 
197 
211 

30.1 
44.1 
218 
243 
487 

2, 62,1 
337 
491 
167 

1.235 

280 
.176 
134 
32.1 
482 

4ta 
148 
40fi 
486 
227 

4.11 
131 
764 
14.1 
2.ai9 



19 



Talilf y. — .'SiimluT nf (tjji-lisf.s Kinniti lit tin- I'niirr. Jniniiii \-Jiinr 
Cities Ott'r 25,0011 in I'ltinihitiim — < '<>iiiiiiii<-il 



/'Air, 



city 


Murder, 

nonrieR- 

llRent 

man- 

.slaughter 


Kobhery 


.\Rt!ra- 
vated 
aivsault 


liur- 

Blary— 

Break- 

hiK or 

entering 


Larouii 

)50 and 
over 


^— Ihefl 
liider 


Auto 
theft 


ItlvorsUlf. Calif 

Uounokf, V'li 
|{(K'hi-v(('r. MIdii 
U.Hli.'Nt.T. N. Y 
K<K'kror.l. Ill 


4 
2 

4 


10 
17 

10 
ir. 


10 
Ki 

32 

17 


193 

2;i 

473 
9U 


206 

i:m 

20 

310 

IMi 


704 

Rt8 

135 

I.4K8 

3.57 


90 

7n 

41 

2.1 » 

5( 


l((Hk Ishtiul. Ill 
K<K-kv Mount. .N. C 

lUtuw. ()u 

Komi'. N. Y 
Uiiswcll. N. Mvx 


2 
1 


11 

2 



8 
99 
14 

3 


2 
42 
20 

10 

34 

81 

3 


87 
73 

52 

ir. 

52 

184 
G03 
84 
25 
03 


95 
34 
10 
32 
4'J 

39 
0'.7 
01 
2S 
51 


202 
211 
90 
100 
2(K> 

420 

1.798 

090 

192 

in 


3; 
\r 

22 

28 
7 


Uoval Ouk, Midi 




101 


Sacraiiioiilo. Calif 
Sufsliiaw, MIcli 
St. Cloud, Minn 
St. J»>s«'pli, Mo... 


w 

4 
4 


41'- 
43 
13 
2*. 


St. LouLs. Mo.. 
St. I'aul. Minn 
St. IVtiTstiunt. Fla . 
Salt'iii, Mas-s . . 


.■il 

1 
5 


l.(N>N 
9S 

3(1 


1. l.T. 
19 
2G 


4,029 
72»-. 
309 

84 
75 


1,707 
3t'>2 

27 

45 


8. 109 

2. 0K9 

071 

l'20 

331 


2.74r 

35( 
68 
10 


Salfiu, Orpg - 




2 


3 


28 




1 
1 
1 
1.'. 
2 




l.S 
.SI 

2;i 

20,'i 
55 


04 

OOH 

104 

I. 00(1 

400 


21 
41 Ml 

00 
523 
301 


418 
1,894 

2.59 
3.103 

751 


22 


Salt I^iko City, Utah 
San .\iipclo. Tex 
San .\iitonlo, Tox 
San Bi-rnanilno, Calif 


69 

3 

97 

21 


22f 

48 

1, lo:i 

13'.l 


San DIopo, Calif . 

Sandusky. Ohio 
San Kran(i.«<'o. Calif 
San Joso. Calif 
San Leandro, Calif 


3 

1 

1 
1 


128 
2 

548 
31 
10 


132 
14 

4f.9 
IS 



880 

20 

2.741 

151 


1,110 
34 

1.140 
397 
100 


2, 519 

148 

.5, 572 

1,444 

345 


73' 

9 

2, .594 

3.i« 

3r 


San Matoo, Calif 
Santa .\na, Calif 


1 


9 
Ifi 
10 

4 
33 

81 
3 
••> 

177 

1 


11 

H 
27 

7 
18 

201 

5 

2 

4*. 

6 


105 
222 
128 
143 
.300 

310 
H4 

112 

2,014 

17 


222 
93 
93 
90 

400 

498 
02 
49 

975 
23 


630 
558 
461 
312 
691 

551 

79 

325 

4.025 

226 


nil 

74 


Santa Barbara. Calif 
Santa Fe. \. Mox 
"^inta Monica, Calif 


1 


47 
11.'- 
170 


- ivannah, Oa 

.TlinuTtady, N. Y 

Scraiitiiti. I'a 

Soai t Ic , W x-ih 

Shakrr Heights, Oblo 


7 

1 
I 
6 


207 

.5f 

65 

1,258 

29 


Sharon. Pa 

ShplwyBan. WLs 

ShrrvciMJrt. I..a 
Sloux Cilv. Iowa 




2 


5 


17 
.50 
170 
112 
.55 

143 

241 
2S4 
II Kt 
344 


38 
42 
14(1 
74 
6U 

127 
195 
241 
05 
222 


99 
198 
651 
603 
342 

2*5 
730 
425 
333 
1.517 


20 

ir 


14 


18 
4 
2 

9 
12 
14 

2 
37 


22 
3 

1 
4 
8 
G 
IS 


151 
04 


Sioux Falls, S. I)uk 




2»" 


Som.Tvtllp. Ma-ss 




171 


'ilif 


3 


122 


-|H,K Ul> , \> .l.sil 


3 
2 


3«- 

101 


-:.rin7f1oM. Ill 

M iliil'iri. 1 c>iiii 


2 

1 
1 


10 
4 
5 
12 
11 


21 

IH 

2 

f, 

22 


KM 
320 
tmi 
liM 

2IH 


S3 
44 

65 
02 
117 


371 

.500 
2WI 

2J»s 
2rtN 


M 
19S 
2»' 
47 
35 


MouN-nvlllp. Ohio 
Stockton. Calif... 
Stratford. Conn 


1 
3 


10 
61 


Ml 

r, 

1 

1 

13 


121 
3:i3 

♦H 

.58 

395 


:« 

34K 
57 
12 

310 


3in 

843 
130 
311 
921 


38 
19(1 


Sui>frtor. Wi.« . 
Syniru-v, N'. V 

Tn<^rm. Wuh 




4 
21 


25 




205 




28 

7 

76 

1 
1 


18 
31 

79 

1 


415 
91) 

760 
A4 


385 
34 

397 

S 
1? 


947 

212 

1. 5«H 

1*5 

<1 


152 


T Via.... 

'1 


2 

• 10 


27 
245 


'i ' : .>s 

K. N.J 


24 

6 



20 



Talilr v. — \iiinlnr nj O/f* /»>«•> hintuti to I In- I'nlin-. Jan imry-Jiiin- 
dlH's Out 2.'tJKI0 In rn/tn In I inn— -L'Miitiiiiivd 



I'fiT, 





Murder, 
nonneg- 
llKcnt 
man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 


AKRra- 
Vrttml 
assault 


Bur- 

jrlary— 

Break- 

Intr or 

i-nterini! 


Larceny— theft 


Auto 


rity 


*50 and 
over 


Under 
%S0 


theft 


Ti'inplr. Tex. 


2 
1 
4 
2 


6 

9 

117 

12 


27 
10 
52 
Zi 
Only 3 


93 
189 

6118 
216 

months u- 

19 
342 

117 
434 

677 

43 
59 
112 
82 

'.♦6 
10.1 
51 
30 
6.1 

28 

;ioi 

60 
62 
1.16 

na 

1.445 
20 
186 

ai 

103 
61 
74 
39 
46 

4S 

21 

4S 

' dat.i not 

m 

121 
43 
99 
81 

S.83 

21 IS 
74 

•«;< 

2>t5 

12:< 

19 

290 
67 
60 

462 
37 

lo:) 
lis 

179 

270 
69 


27 
70 
62<i 
78 
wived 

109 
41 
1.17 
517 

.s7 

3 

47 

12 

m 

'A 
.32 
98 
19 
.10 

28 
90 
43 
71 
96 

91 
8.16 
20 

68 
3V) 

43 
.18 
18 
44 

45 
29 
25 
eceivt'd ' 
37 

tW 

:<o 
m 

117 

4117 

S9 
f.2 
20 
45 
191 

1.3 
1IK2 
36 
41 

2i>;) 
:<o 

61 

57 
45 

2.19 
52 


191 

338 

1.846 

663 

30 
469 

60 
1.298 
1,.100 

112 
140 
112 
69 
179 

.309 
345 
316 
104 
176 

69 
714 

236 
1^1 
ll^8 

2.16 

2.616 

75 

268 

291 

ft3 

ia3 

219 
164 
132 

338 
46 
57 

85 

346 

94 

229 

174 

2.(»*.1 

1.147 
127 
149 
162 

657 

375 
61 

.137 
95 

100 

r»46 
223 
905 
607 
.321 

.161 
202 


24 


Trrri' Hnnte, Ind 


57 


Tol«'<lo, Ohio 


243 


Toixka. Kans 

Torrano', Calif 


V) 


Torrincton, Conn 

Tmilon.N. J 

Troy. \. Y 

Tiics<in. Arir - 


5 


1 

h' 

4 

1 


38 
9 
24 

48 

2 
3 

2 

1 
4 

12 
2 

26 
1) 


65 

5 

34 

.19 

411 

8 
9 


129 

72 

243 


Tulsa, Okla 


329 


Tiisc;iloosa, Ala 


9 


TyltT, Tex 


10 


I'nion, N. J .. 




17 


Union City. N.J. 


1 

1 


57 
17 




17 
3 

9 
1 

1 
93 

3 
15 


71 


rtica. X. Y.. 

Vall.jo, Calif 

Valley Stri'am, N. Y 

Vancouver, Wash 


I 


46 
47 
34 
29 




7 


Waco. Ti-\ 


4 

i 


72 


Waltham. Mass 

Warren. Ohio 


23 

48 


Warwick, R. I 


12 




2 

38 


10 

288 

3 
4 

3 

6 

2.1 


47 
1,266 


42 


Wa.shinpton. T). C 


899 
29 


Wat<»rbnrv. Conn 


2 
.3 


8 
8 


208 


Wat<'rloo, Iowa .. 


38 




19 


Watertown. X. Y 


1 


2.3 


38 
.13 






8 






1 

3 

1 

2 




15 


Wist A His, Wis 




3 
1 


44 


West Hartfonl. Conn . . .- 




20 




1 
3 


13 


W.-st Xew York. N.J 

West Oranne, N. J 

West Palm Beach, Fla. 


Conipli'tt 

28 
1 
3 

19 

1.3:1 

.18 

.1 

1 

IS 
122 


15 
45 




13 


WhilrT'lains. X. Y 

Wichita, Kans 

Wichita Falls, Tex 


2 
11 

2 
2 


8 

54 

H 
li 
1 
4 
2t) 

13 


47 
23 
241 

131 


Wilkis-Harre, Pa 


34 




37 






17 


WilnilMCt"", Del 


6 
4 


160 


Wilmincfnn, X. C 


67 
5 


Winston-Sal.in. N. C. 

W()o.lt.ri.lK<\ X. J 

WooM'iockrl, R I 


» 


8' 
3 
A 

15 

13 
6 

51 

8 


1(8 
3 
2 

9 

1 
9 
19 
9 

5 
2 


107 
18 
59 


Worci'sttr. Mas.s 

Wyan<lc(tl»', Mich 


1 


241 
62 


Yakima. Wii.sh 


1 
1 

1 

8 


.13 


Yonk.rs. N. Y 

Ynrk.l'a 


112 
73 


Vonncstown. Ohio 

/ani'^ville Ohio 


146 

38 









• l.arc«>nles not separately reixirted. Fipure \i!>U^l inclinles l>oth major rtn<l minor larci>nifS. 
' Thi' crime r.iiortint: f(ir II).- city indicated <lo«S not meet nccvplahh- standards •slahlishcd by the Cnm- 
niitliT on Inifoi ni Crinn' Kecords of (he Intirnational Association of Cliii (s of l'olie«'. 



r<)li('(' iMiiployec Data 



Of the ;{,7()9 city [xdicc (IcpMrlnu'iits wliidi fuiiiislicd polico- 
cmploycc data, iiti ri'portcd that |)()li(t' I'liiployi'cs were killed iluriiig 
tlic calciidaf yoar I'.loti while in the ix'rlonnance of iheir duties. 

Polico oinploycos killed in line of duty in these ;'.() cities uiiiidxTed 
1(». Six of the ."{(') depart iiieiits reported more than one eiii|)loyet' 
killed ill line of duty during 1 '.•.'»(;. 

'riie lii^ures include all deaths of |)olice personnel as lon<:j as the 
employee was killed while perfoiinin^ oflicial police duties. For 
example, an ollicer killed in a trallic misha|) while in pursuit of a law 
\ ioIatt>r is counted in the same manner as a policeman shot and killed 
hy a ciimiiial. 

During; the 12 years city police have reporteil the nuniher of police 
eni|)loyees killed in line of duty, the general trend in such deaths lias 
heen downward and n>r»(l olVers no exception. 

In tahle 1(1. these data are piesentetl with cities grouped hy size and 
location. The same :\,H\\) cities are covered in tai)les 10-12 and they 
represent about \)H percent of the total population residing in cities. 
As indicated, not all cities ami no rural areas aie represented in the 
data. 



Tahlf la. — yiiifihrr nf I'oliro DpftartniPtit Emplityovs Killed, 1956, hy i'.vo- 
graphic Divisions and Population Groups 



[3.789 cities, total 


populiition H7,771,^ 


20, based 


on 19M decennia 


census) 








TOTAL 


Population group 


Oeographic division 


Oroup 


Oroup 
II 


Oroup 
III 


Oroup 
IV 


Oroup 
V 


Oroup 
VI 




Num- 
ber 


Rate |>er 

.■..ooo.atd 

inhab- 
itants 


Over 

a-iciwo 


100.000 

to 
2SO.000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


2.'i.000 

to 
.■iO.OOO 


10.000 

to 
25,000 


Les.s 
than 
10.000 


TotAt number. 


46 




9S 
S.6 




t 

i.r 


1 

1.6 


7 
9.9 


B 


Rate per ), 000, 000 inh«biUknls 


9.6 


9.9 


1 


10 


\.i 
2 
2.5 
2.9 

4.4 
l.S 
1» 






1 


1 






tic 


5 
7 
2 

2 




2 


.> 


1 ' enlral 




1 
1 


1 


1 


\\i--; N'lr! ti Central.. 


1 


-'>'i»h Xtlnntic ._. . . 


1 


3 
1 

1 














S 








1 












I'li'ilr .... 


T 


18 


6 










1 















(21) 



\iimlnT Iff I'nlitf Hmftloyt'1-s. tprit.'iO. I'K'i' 

Soiim- ami Sro|M'. Cily jjolici' (li-piii lliU'iils iuiiiilji')iM<^ ^iJG'J 

rclm I s|)("( ijil <|iirsli()nimir('S conconiiiifr police-employee strenj^th. 

'riicsr cilics I'cprcsciit iihoiit \)9> ])('i-c(Mil of all poj)ulation i"csi(liii<r 
ill ril ics. 

Bt'i^iniiin^j: witli li^nircs for tliis year, 1957, only full-liiiic employees 
ar«' incliitlc'd. Previously, 1 lie iiiinilx-r of i)int-time police employees 
was reported in fciiiis of full-lime e(piivalciils. In response to a 
siijjgestion hy contrihulors of the <lata, the Committee on Unif(»rm 
Crime Keconis of llie International Association of Chiefs of Police 
recommended that collection of information .ihoiit i)ait-tinic ]>olic<> 
employees be discontinued. 

Pi'ior to this decision, a special tal)ulation of the 1!J">(> data was 
made to determine the possible effect of the elimination of part-time 
cmploj'ces from the study. It was found that tlie variation was 
barely discernible l)etween the tlata with the ])art-time em])loyees 
inclu<led and the data with tliem excluded. Also, because of wiile- 
sjjread variation in the use of part-time personnel, and in regard to 
<luties and houi's they work, comjiarisons liad litth^ significance. For 
e.\ami)le, the practice with reference to school-crossing guards varies 
widely. In some cities, such work may be handled by school children 
under supersivion of teachers with ojily incidental assistance from the 
police. In other cities, there may be the schoolboy patrol with 
assistance from regular or part-time police. Elsewhere, the regular 
jiolice or a coii)s of ])art-time ])olice employees may handle tlM» entire 
school-crossing i)rol)lem. 

Niiniber of Police Kinployecs. — Full-time police employees average 
2 per 1 ,000 inhabitants in the :i,7(i9 cities re))rcscnted in tables 1 1 and 
12. It should be noted that their 174,97;^ full-time personnel do not 
constitute the total number of full-time police employees in the 
United States. This is true because rejwrts as to the number of 
personnel are not collect<'d from rural areas and not all cities responded. 

Table 11 shows the mnnber of i)olice employees per 1 .()()() inhab- 
itants for cities grouped by size. (Iroiip I cities, over 2.")0.0(M), had 2..') 
police per 1 ,000 inhabitants, as of Ai)ril M), Hl.")7, as shown in table 1 1 . 
A further study of the group 1 cities shows the niimi)er of jHilice 
employees i)er 1,000 inhabitants to be as follows: Five cities with 
more than one millit)n inhabitants, 2.8; si.x cities, from 750,000 to 
one million inhabitants, 2.S; seven cities, from 500,01)0 to 750,000 
iiiha hit ants, 2.1 ;and 2:; eities. from 250,000 to. 500,000 inhai)itants, 1.9. 



23 

C'iviliun Polirt' Mniployccs. -AI)oii( S out of cvciv KM) police 
cinployi'i's ill cities aic civirmns. Tlic follow iii<; tal>iilatioti indicalcs 
the pert'eiita«ce (listiil)iitioii of civiliMn police employees am()ii<; 
various-sized eity K''^*"P'^- 



Police F.inpUnjer Data, t!fo7 



Pupulatioii (iroiip: 

Total, all I'itu's 

Group I (ov.r 2.')n,()()<)) 
(Over l.OOO.OOO) 
(750.0(K>-1,()()<),0()())^ 
(5(X),(MH>-7r)().()()0) . 

(2r)0.o<)()-r)()o.()()0) 

Croup II (l(){),()()(V-2r)0,0(H)) 
Croup III (r>(),()()()-l()().()()tli 
Crou|) IV (2.'), ()()(>- '.(),(><»()( 
(;roup V (lO.OOO- 2"). ()(»(») 
Crouj) VI (2. 500- 10. ()()()) 



4::71.!4'— 37- 



124 



ialilc II. — I'niirr Dt'fuirl im-nl Liiiitlnyrrs. i/tr. liU, I'fUT, \iiinhrr ami liiilr 
Per 1,000 liilmhilatils, />y iJvufirapliiv Diiisiints and PitiHtlntum (inntps 

(3,709 cKics, total iwpulallon 87,771, 22»"i based on IK.*)*) (U-c-eiinial oiisus] 



Division 



TOTAL 



TOTAL: 

Number of police employees. 

Average number of employees per 1,000 
inhabitants 

New England: 

NninhiT of police employees . 

Avcriipe number of employees per 1,(XX) 
inhabitants 

Middle Atlantic: 

Ninnbcr of jjolice employees 

\vfT;i(.'r' number of employees per 1,000 
inhM^pit:lnIs 

East North Central: 

Number of police emjiloytH'S 

\v«'r:icc number of employees per 1,000 
inhabitants 

West North Central: 

Number of police employees 

Averape number of emiiloyees per 1,000 
inhabitants . 

Sonth Atlantic: > 

Number of i)oIic(" emjiloyi'es.. . 

Averape numlx-r of emiiloyees jwr 1,000 
inhaliilanis _ _ 

East South Central: 

Number of polic*' employees _ 

\verape mimber of enij)Ioyees per 1,000 
inhabitants 

West South Central: 

Number of police employees 

Averape number of employees )x»r 1,000 
inhabitants _ 

Mountain: 

Number of police employees 

Averape number of emjdoyees |ht 1,()(K) 
inhabitants 

Pacific: 

Number of jiolice eiiij)loyees 

Averape mimher of employees iht 1,000 
inliabilants 

■ Includes the District of C^>luinl>ia. 



174,973 
2.0 



14, 035 

2.1 

52,706 
2.4 

37,648 
1.9 

10, 588 
1.5 

18, 949 
2.1 

6,153 
1.5 

10,902 
1.5 

4,238 
1.7 

19,754 
2.2 



I'n))uIation Kfoup 



Oroup 



Over 

250,000 



87,838 
2.5 



3,010 
.IK 

3.5. 082 
2.9 

21,143 
2.4 

4, tMHI 
1.9 

«;, (140 

2. S 

l,i>:i(i 

4,1(11 
l.s 



10, 797 
2.4 



(Iroup 
II 



1IN),000 

to 
2.'iO,(l(K) 



17,731 
1.9 



3, 723 

2.2 

3,040 
1.9 

2.411 
l.ti 

v4:< 
i.:> 

3, 3(H 
2. 1 

1,127 
1.7 

i,<;.".4 

l.r, 
l.s 

1,093 
1.7 



(iniiip 
III 



50.000 

to 
100,000 



15,203 
1.7 



2,241 

1.9 

3,129 
1.9 

3, 177 
I.e. 

'M)2 

1.3 

2, 4(^ 
1.7 

432 

l.ii 

s7s 
1.4 

34 H 
1.11 

l.i'.2H 
l.H 



Oroiip 

rv 



25,000 

to 
.■iO.dOO 



2,.'>30 

1.9 

3,124 

l.H 

.3. 4.-.H 
l..i 

1.3 

2,12:} 
1.9 

~-A) 
1.5 

9t)7 

i.:> 

74(1 
1.9 

l,7(l«l 
2.0 



Groui) 
V 



10,000 

to 
25,(KIO 



19,328 
1.6 



1,874 

l.f. 

4,239 
l.fi 

.3,4M 
1.."; 

1,.M2 
1.3 

2 223 
1.9 

9ft3 
l.ti 

1.3 



2, (V)2 
2.0 



(iroup 
VI 



Less 
than 

10,(KN) 



18,670 
1.5 



«.')7 
1.2 

3, 4>lfi 
1.4 

3. 97.5 
1..5 

l.st« 
1.3 

2, 792 
1.9 

1,311 
1..'. 

1,077 
1.2 

1,(VK1 

!.(■> 

l,ss,S 



25 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF POLICE 
DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES 

BY POPULATION GROOPS 
APRIL 30, 1957 



PER 

1,000 INHABITANTS 



2.5 



1.9 



1.5 



1.6 



1.7 1.7 



CirifS CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES OtlES 

LESS 10.000 25.000 50.000 100.000 OVER 

THAN TO TO TO TO ?50000 

10.000 25.000 50000 100.000 250000 




FBI ciuirr 



Fiunrv 2. 



I'alih- 12. — \ii inhrr tij i'.ilir?^ I >»■»/ j;i I'ahiilnl itni> l\futtr«lii»H \iiiithfrftj'l'tilif- 
Dtlinrl nn III Einplnyvfs, Apr. 30, 1957, niid Folicv Klllvtl, 1956 





H'.ipulr.ti., 


11 Ik'uri'^ frii 


II V.i'i) ilecennial r^ensus] 








TOTAL 


PopulationRroup 


Division 


Oroup I 


flroiipll .Oroup III 


Oroup IV 


Oroup V 


Oroup VI 




Over 
2.'W,000 


KIO.tMK) to 
2.'iO,0(IO 


50.000 to 
100,000 


25,000 io 
.'iJ.OOO 


10.000 to 
2.5,000 


l..essthan 

10.01 N) 


TOTAL: 

Population represented. 
Number of cities 


87,771.226 
3.769 


34. 932, 955 
41 


9. 566. 905 
65 


9, 075. 463 
128 


9, 639. 559 
275 


12, 148. 133 
795 


12.408.211 
2.465 


\'<'\v KnclHiKl: Total \wp- 

iilalion, «.7S6,44I 

Mi<l<lle .Mlantic: Total 

IKiinilation. 22,3:W.2!M . 
East .North Central: Total 

pojuilation. l'J.>v4s,.siO 

West North Central: Total 

population. i"..?M9,S2(i 

South Atlantic: Total jMipu- 

lation, s.<«>2.77.5 

East South Central: Total 

Itopulat ion. :j,<JKK,s2fi 

■\Ye-;l South Central: Total 

population. 7,20'J,():JI 

Mountain: Total jwpula- 

tion, 2,47fi.549 . 


226 
735 
803 
421 
445 
237 
396 
191 
315 


1 

9 

5 
H 
3 
5 

1 
7 


11 

12 
10 
4 

it 

7 

2 
.5 


17 
24 
30 
9 
20 
4 
9 
3 
12 


37 
49 
05 
21 
33 
1« 
17 
12 
25 


77 
lfi« 
162 
80 
74 
37 
80 
30 
89 


S3 
477 

527 
302 
306 
172 
27S 
143 


Pacific: Total population, 
9,179,674 


177 







I'oUce Employees in liidividiial Cities 

The police ('ini)lovcc figjurcs for iii(livi<lual citios in tables Li and 14 
in sonic instances are not comparable to similar li^ures wliicli \v<'ie 
jiiiblislicd for lOoO. 

J^art-time em])loye(>s were not enumerated on the 1957 question- 
naire. Accordingly, tlie full-time ecjuivalent for part-time emi)lovees 
is not included in the 1957 figures presented in this bulletin. Foot- 
notes in previous years identify those cities whose data included part- 
time employees expressed as full-time eciuivalents. 

The difference between the 1957 figui'es and those for jirevious 
years should be noted carefully in any study or attiMiipted comparison 
of the i)ublislied ligures. 

(.'omi)arisons of figures for an iiuhvidual city with those of other 
cities and with averages are helpful at times for various purposes. 
However, no definitive conclusion as to the number of police needed 
in a particular community can be reached through such comparisons 
alone. Differeiwes in the length of the workweek, automotive and 
communicative ecpiipmeiit, area and terrain, and the crime problem 
arc some of the items that may affect such comparist^ns. 

Table i;i shows all reporting cities having 25, ()()() or more inhabif- 
aiits. The cities ai"e antuiged by states and iil|)hiii)ef ic:illy within 1 lie 
Sliile. Ill I;ibh' l.i, police ofliccis iirc itciiii/.cd •<( pjHii tcly fioiii tlic 
civihan jjolice em|)loyees. Jii table 14, <ities having l(>ss than 25,()()() 
inhabitants are arranged siniihiily but only the total police employees 
are shown. 



27 



IjiI*!*' 1.5. — \iiiiihfr nf I'ttlirr Ih'imrl iiirti I I'.inplityffs, Apr. '.UK /'>>", i'ilit'S 
Oi'er 25^000 in I'ofnilnllun 



City 



ALABAMA 

Atiniston 

IW'ssemer 

Kii'iuinKhani 

(i:i(|s.U»n 

Mol.ile .. 

Montj!oinery 

'riiscaloosa 

ARIZONA 

l'li(H'rii\ 

TiK>on 

ARKANSAS 

K(irt Smith 

Mot Springs 

I.iiilc Hook 

N'orili Little Hock 

I'ltu' UliitT 

CAUFORNIA 

A l:iiiie(lii 

Alli;iml>ra 

H:ik.TsrieId 

Itiililwin Park 

Uerkelev 

Heverly Hills 

Htirliank 

< otiipton 

Krt'siU) 

• ilt'iHlale 

Miywnrd 

lliitititiKton Park 

lni:i»"uo<)fl, 

LoriK Heath 

I.Ks Aniietes 

L\ iiuood 

(>akl;ind 

onlirio 

!• ilo Alto 

I' i^mlena 

I'otiinna 

Itc-londo Beach 

Kei|»<Kxl City 

ItichnioiKl 

Ri\eniide 

Sacriimento 

San Hernardino 

San Diego 

San KranciMx) 

San Jose 

San I.eandro 

San Mateo 

Santji Ana 

Snnt;i nnrhitra 

8ani:i Monica 

South CJate ... 

.Stockton 

Tdrrsince 

\" illejo 

COLORADO 

('i)I<ir;ido Springs 

Denser. 

I'lieM.. 

CONNECTICDT 

HrilkTi'iHirt 

Mn.i..| _ 

K.l^t Hartford 

Cireenwich 

Hrtrtfurd 



Ntimher of |M>licc de- 




imrlniciit eniployws 




TOTAL 


Police 


Civil- 






..(!lc«'i-s 


ians 




47 


4f. 


1 




41 


4(1 


4 




440 


3U<> 


.50 




81 


7» 


2 




2IH 


iri 


46 




IKS 


17ti 


12 




7\» 


75 


4 




2r.2 


223 


29 




llflt 


122 


17 




4<t 


47 


2 




*S 


37 


1 




mi 


159 


10 




70 


70 






38 


37 


1 




74 


69 


5 




82 


71 


11 




158 


122 


36 




34 


20 


8 




140 


135 


5 




80 


70 


10 




US 


127 


18 




80 


71 


9 




2ft7 


232 


25 




161 


142 


19 




54 


40 


8 




5.t 


51 


2 




84 


70 


14 




4H4 


4:m 


.50 




5. 475 


4, 387 


1.088 




31 


28 


3 




7»2 


679 


113 




Xt 


49 


4 




51 


49 


2 




189 


153 


36 




1 1 


61 


16 




51 


47 


4 




4f. 


43 


3 




145 


127 


18 




105 


96 


9 




275 


2:« 


42 




Ifis 


1.55 


13 




KJI 


MS 


83 




l.wr.' 


1.700 


102 




16H 


l.W 


9 




51 


4M 


3 




74 


70 


4 




w\ 


HS 


8 




71 


64 


7 




I5K 


119 


30 




61 


■V« 


6 




13fi 


124 


12 




72 


72 






r.T 


.M» 


8 




102 


95 


7 




7M 


«M5 


121 




III 


101 


10 




■Mf> 


350 


,, 




65 


M 






no 


57 






137 


123 


H 


1 


431 


385 


« 



City 



CONNECTICDT— Con. 



Meriden 

Middletown... 
New Hritairi... 
New Haveti ... 
New London. . 

Norwalk 

Norwich 

.Stamford 

Stratford 

Watcrbury . . 
West Hartfonl. 
West Haven... 



DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

WtisliintJloii 

FLORIDA 



Daytona Heacli 

Fort Lauderdale.. 

Oainesville 

Hial.ah 

Jacksonville , 

Key West 

Lakeland 

Miami 

Miami Beach 

Orlando 

Panama City 

Pensacola 

St. Petersburg 

Tallahassee 

Tampa 

West Palm Head) 



GEORGIA 



.Mbany 

Athens 

Atlanta 

Augusta... 
Columbus. 
La (Irange. 

Macon 

Home 

Savannah.. 



IDAHO 



Boi.sc 

Pocatello. 



ILLINOIS 



Alton .. 

AurcHa 

Belleville 

Berwyn 

Blcwniington. 
Chaininfgn... 

Chicago 

Cicero 

Danville.. . 
Decniiir . .. 

•• ■-' ^' IxKJls 



...... ■ura 

iiranite City. 
Jdiet 



Number of polio 


partinciit enipio 


TOTAL 


PollM! 





oil leers 


85 


8:{ 


41 


40 


1.54 


144 


418 


397 


04 


01 


100 


lo:j 


55 


.5;} 


184 


176 


01 


58 


205 


2.56 


82 


78 


00 


59 


24y 


200 


•J. 4r,1 


2.2S1 


07 


01 


131 


112 


4H 


41 


51 


48 


440 


386 


3H 


38 


64 


M 


8.54 


582 


Zix 


17S 


11>.I 


114 


4.' 


37 


\m 


91 


130 


116 


o:t 


.59 


332 


279 


92 


83 


.53 


ra 


40 


39 


097 


001 


1.58 


145 


132 


126 


41 


40 


122 


121 


48 


45 


190 


159 


1.. 


3«> 


40 


44 


70 


67 


3.S 


37 


M 


.53 


41 


40 


.50 


40 


0,301 


8,9.59 


W 


82 


30 


36 


-1 


68 


91 


75 


ao 


43 


IX) 


112 


39 


34 


31 


31 


81 


72 



28 



lahl. 



I.{. — \Mf»i/»ir Iff I'aliiv Ih-iHirliiivnt EntpUtyeva, Apr. 3lt, I'fJiT, C.lll^'s 
0(-er 25,000 in PopitUttioif—CMtilinuvtl 



City 


Xumber of polk* de- 
partniiiil i-niployeos 


City 


Number of police de- 
partment employees 




TOTAL 

2-H 
.-11 
4.T 

4f, 

12:} 

66 
110 

79 

42 

1.3.1 

64 

202 

2IS 

227 

149 

821 

67 

.19 

.11 

.10 

48 

98 

3.1 

.16 

203 

9C 

3.1 
103 
30 

91 
217 
.13 
28 
2.1 
40 
36 

ia3 

82 

4.1 
172 

42 
147 
316 

3.1 
91 
100 
.183 
61 

40 
I.INll 


l-..lice 

i>IIic<TS 


Civil- 
ians 


TOTAL 


Poll(t' 
ollicers 


Clvil- 
iun.<i 


lUINOIS-Cnntinueti 


2H 

31 
41 
74 

MH 

43 
112 
62 
9H 
.13 

73 

.39 

j:« 

1,0 

1!.0 

212 

203 

1.39 

7.13 

62 

.17 

.11 

49 

46 

91 

3.1 

.=•..1 

193 

86 

:m 

92 
30 
44 

90 
19.1 
.11 
28 
24 
33 
31 
.S6 
81 

38 
14.1 

3.1 
113 
2.16 

.33 
80 
99 
.113 
.14 
47 

iv.t 
40 
39 
49 
I.UKt 


2 

1.1 
3 

11 
4 

12 
4 

6 
.3 

4 
12 

6 
24 
10 
68 

.1 

i 

2 
7 

i 

10 
4 

1 
11 

""io 

1 

22 
'2 

i 

7 
,1 

17 

1 

7 
27 

34 
60 

2 
II 

1 
70 

7 

3 

22 

\ 

20 

.12 


MAINE 

BanKor 


.19 
60 
11.1 

2, ST9 
.19 

ro 

82 

4.1 

.14 

3,010 

10.1 

144 

238 

7.1 

87 

113 

256 

74 

46 

46 

113 

142 

178 

184 

115 

113 

47 

230 

.39 

84 

1.18 

78 

80 

170 

374 

67 

90 

76 

tVi 

.393 

SO 
6:} 
86 
200 
4. 87.1 
44 
315 
2<i.1 
VM 

m 

128 

145 
.18 
92 

140 
t.9 
M 

l.M 
69 

l.v>« 

•134 

.1.1 

29 


.12 
.16 
101 

2, (.21 
55 
.1.1 

74 
42 
.14 
2,809 
101 
1.36 
22?» 
71 
84 

no 

238 
67 
46 
44 
69 
111 
134 
168 
175 
115 
109 
45 
218 
39 
80 
151 
74 

168 

3.14 
63 
8.1 
70 
63 

352 

71 
Xi 
80 
1S3 
4.419 
41 

2n 

219 
104 

78 
107 
140 

73 
118 

48 

70 
140 

19 

\22 

.17s 

.13 

2S 




Knnkiikpc 


Lrwislon 


4 


Maywcxnl 


I'orthind 


14 


Mnline 


MARYLAND 
Hallimorc 




Oak Park 




I'eorla 




<juincy 




Kmkfrir.i 


Cunilierland 


4 


HfK'k Island 


HnRfTstown . . 


5 


Sprink'tieM 


MASSACHUSETTS 




Wnukptian 




INDIANA 


(( 




Bohnont 


3 


A mlersnn. 


Beverly 




Hlofiniinjrtnn 


Boston 


201 


East Chlcapo 


Brockton 

Brookline 


4 


Flkhart 


s 


Kvansville 


Cambridge 

Chelsea 


'1 




4 


Oarv 


ChieoiH-e 


3 


Hanimond . . 


Everett 


3 


Indianapolis 


Fall Hiver 


IS 


Kokonio 


Fitchburg 

Fraininpham 

Ciloucester 




\.n Fayette 




Marion. 


2 


Michifian City 


Haverhill 


3 


Mishawaka . 


Holvoke 







Lawrence 


s 


New Albany 


Lowell 


10 




Lvnn .. 


9 


.■^outh Bend 


Maiden ...- 

Medford 






4 




Mclros*' . .. 


<> 


IOWA 


Xew Bedford 


12 




Northampton 






Pittsfield 


4 


Cedar Rapids 


Quincy 




Clinton 




4 


Council Bluffs 


i^alem. 


5 


naven|K>rt 


•Somerville 


2 


De-s Moines 


.'^prinpf^eld 


20 




Taunton 


4 


Fori Dodge 


Walt ham 


5 


Iowa City 


Watertown 


ti 


Mason City 


Weymouth 


•> 


Ottumwa 


Worci'ster 


41 


Sioux City 


MICHIGAN 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek . 




Waterloo 

KANSAS 


9 
10 




Bay City 


6 


Kansas City 


Oearborn 


17 


Salina 


Detroit 

Ferndale 


4.16 


Topeka 


3 




Flint 


84 




Orand Rapids 


46 




Highland Park 


30 


\shland. . 


Jack.son 

Kalamazoo 


15 
21 




Lansing.. 


5 




Lincoln Park 


1 


Louisville 


Muskegon 

Pontiac 


19 




22 




Port Huron 


21 




Roval Oak 


13 




Saginaw 


11 


LOUISIANA 

Mt'xandriii 

H;iton House 


Wyandotte 

MINNESOTA 

Duluth - 

Minneapolis 

Rochester 


in 


Lake Charles 


r,r, 
2 


New Orleans 


St. Cloud 


1 



29 



'I'liltlf l'.\. — yiiniln-r <»/" I'olivv Ih'ftnrl iin-ii I ^.t^ll^lnyl^^^s, .ipr. Mt, I'f. 't7, ('.it if ft 
itvt'r 2:1,000 iti I'ltim In I iiui^-i'.ottlittuvil 



City 



MINNESOTA-Cont. 
-I. I'liul 

U illiin:i 

MISSISSIPPI 

Hil.>\i 

Orc<-n villi' 

II iiiLshiirg.... 

I . ■ .11 

I I 

M : hin 

\ irk-lmrit ... 

MISSODRI 

< 'oluiiihl:! 

I iiMc|M'n<1enC8..! 

J. t(. r-on City 

J •I-n .■ 

K ,ti IS City 

-I. Ji>s.'j>h 

~t. I^uiis „ 

~l>riinffl<'M 

rtii\<r.sity City 

MONTANA 

Hillinir!! 

Uiitte 

OrvM Kails 

NEBRASKA 

I.iDrnln 

oniuha 

NEVADA 
Ki'tio 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1 

•■ster 

NEW JERSEY 

m: .ntir City 

II 1-. .line 

HI . rndelil 

(' itu'li-n 

Clifion 

K i-i oranKe 

Kluit,.-tli . 

(JirlicM . 

li:i('kon^.ii'k 

Uainillon 

Hohuken 

Ir\ iiiKlon 

J- .y City 

K.-.-r.y 

I ■ ;..ii 

Aood ......... 

ilr 

Brunswick 

HciTften 

\ .• > 

r 1-- lie . ......... 

I' rr-on 

!'• ■ ' Amhoy 

!•:. -^.-M 

I ...•..•.k 

Trenton 

In ion 



Nlimlu'r ol police <li'- 
partnictit omploy«><>» 



TOTAL 



:<ii 



4t 

M 
III I 
4'.i 
"irj 
lUi 
. :j.v.) 

Its 
M 



441 



41 
11'.' 
47 



ISA 

2if> 
W 
137 
271 
47 
TO 
OK 
lAI 
10.1 
.Wi 
112 
KM 
47 
W 
.392 
77 
103 
47 
K.1 
121) 
2W 



47 
2riA 



rolUr 

olllccpi 



4s 
i:i2 



4(1 

:»7 

:to 
■.ir, 

(MIS 

If.' 
I , uai 

IM 
4'.t 



92 
:J75 



41 
ItXi 
42 



158 
174 

SH 
201 

va 

VM 
•2M 
47 
(W 
AS 
101 
M 
K27 
III 
104 
47 
»6 
1.302 
7« 
VO 
45 
7« 
120 
277 
VI 

7H 

47 

247 



Clvll- 

l.-tlUi 



II 

IM 

X 

4:w 
4 
2 



22 



9 

175 
1 



City 



NEW JERSEY-Ci)ntliiuc(l 



Union City 

West New York. 

West Ortmite 

W(KHll)ri<l(jt<. 



NEW MEXICO 



All)ii(|uer(|iif 

Hoswell 

Snntu Fe 



NEW YORK 



All.iiiy 

Aiiisl(>r<l:iiii 

Aiitmrn 

Itinulianiton 

HulTalo 

KItiiirit 

ilenipstead 

Irondequoil 

Illmca 

Jamestown 

KinKston 

I.ai-ka wanna 

Lock port 

Mount Vernon.. 

Newhurnh 

New Koclielle 

New Yoik City 

Niagara Falls 

PoiiRlikeepsie 

Rochester 

Home 

Schenet-tatly 

Syracuse 

Troy 

Itica 

Watertown 

White Plains. 

Vonkers 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Asheville 

Charlotte 

Durham 

Kuyettevllle .... 

(Jreensltoro 

IliKh Point 

Kannai>olis 

KaleiKh . 

Ko<-ky Mount 
Wilminxton. ... 
Winslon-i'aletn. 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Farijo 

(Iranil Kork> 



OHIO 



4 Akron 
90 \lli,(i<- 



•■in 

^ti ' "! 
.. .lis' 

ii'velnnd. 



Number of police de- 
partmeiit (■mploy(H>s 



TOTAL 



I7:t 

34 
30 



34<J 
43 
5H 

131 
,447 
90 
f.7 
32 
39 
09 
50 
~i 
3H 

10.3 

151 
. .305 

74 

5.VJ 
55 
l.W 
441 
193 
17".t 
52 
1.'.2 
311 



271 

109 
HI 

149 
K2 
24 

127 
.'>:< 
9.1 

171 



2>Cl 
37 
37 

I4S 

943 
.040 

A40 
XT 

3i> 



I I. I! 



30 



Taldf l.'{. — \iinihrr iij l'nli<-f Ih'iMirt tnriil /!,'fii/i/»»\«'*».s, .-Ifir. 30, 1957, i'.ilit's 
ih>er 25^000 in Popululiun — (^iitiiiu«?«J 



City 


NumWr of |»ollcc de- 
partment emiiloyces 


City 


Number of police <lc- 
pariment employees 




TOTAL 


roiiM' 

■ .llicers 

Itl 
VA 

.17 

.12 
.34 
21» 
.19 
42 
41 
4t) 
.17 
.33 
."..s 
92 
44 

4(IS 
tVl 

27s 
34 

41 
41 
4S 
2tl 
3fj9 
244 

r,i 

41 
31 
12.1 
94 
7s 
72 
49 
173 
1.39 
47 
32 
SO 
SI 
.39 

74 

:« 

."kS 

29 

49 

4, 93.1 

i.4.i:i 

1.1N 
173 
2(t 
124 
31 
9.1 
32 

:a 

s7 

91 
7.1 
Wl 
13S 


Civil- 
lan.s 

1 

R 

1 
2 
2 

3 

2 
9 
3 
1 
3 
« 
1 

43 
1 

24 

2 

1 

44 

40 

14 

I Oil 

11 

.... 

11 
11 

H 
19 

13 
10 
3 

1 
Iti 

' 
33 

4 
1 

"490 

4ti 

20 

12 

1 

22 

1 

2 

J 

1 

3 

2 

I 
14 


TOTAL 


Poltif 
otliti-rs 


Civil 

ians 


OHIO— Continued 
Krftt'rinp 


17 
1.9 

la 
.Iti 
.■>4 
3fi 
29 
ii2 
42 
43 

|-« 
M 
til 
101 

A■^ 
4.M 

ll.=> 
302 

34 

4s 
41 

27 
3.13 
284 

733 

41 
32 

1311 

10.5 
Kti 
91 
.11 

l.st. 

149 

r*) 

33 
911 

m 

39 
11.1 
107 
37 
.19 
25» 
49 
.1, 42.1 
1.41W 
17H 
IK.1 
30 
14(1 
32 
97 
33 

<KI 

'.'i 

S7 
152 


RHODE ISLAND-Con. 

Provitleiifi- 

Warwick 

WoonsfK-kri 

SOUTH CAROUNA 

('harli'Sli)ii 

('olunil)iii 

(ireenville 

SpartanhurR. 


5.12 
IVV 

147 
1.15 
129 

40 

1.S9 

43 

3*> 

214 

l»l 

31.S 

3.1 

93 

\:<\ 

242 

117 

(17 

1.18 

1.001 

2:i7 

.i:« 

510 

1,005 

51 

1.38 
Wl 
(-.4 
57 

,101 
33 
5« 

110 

'IS 

i'.4 
32 
279 

47 

119 
ISO 
41 

1.4 
tl7 
74 
■.WA 
4« 
101 
.398 
117 
42 


479 
(-.4 

127 
142 

nil 

74 
3.1 

181 
43 
37 
170 
49K 
29t) 
35 

89 
130 
191 
103 

41 
145 
S4I 
207 
492 

90 
7SS 

44 
131 

82 

m 

5(i 
42<.» 
33 

54 
10(1 
.sil 

30 

2:{i 

42 

\m 
im 

41 
71 

.18 

la 

('.8 
.3.12 

43 

89 
314 
113 

3() 


73 


Lakewootl 

1-inia 

Lorain.. 


4 


Mnn.>;fl(l<i 




-Marion 




Massillon 


20 


Miildli'town 

Newark 


13 
13 


NorwtKxl. . 


3 


I'arnia 

I'ortsnioiith 


SOUTH DAKOTA 

KapitI City. 
Sioux KmIIs . 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Jftcks<jn 

Johnson City 




.^^antlusky 




.•shaker Heights 


5 


.•^ pr i npficid 


10 


.~teiil)fnville. 




Tolt^tlo 




Warren . 




Younpstown 


S 


Zanesville 


i 


OKLAHOMA 


Kno.wille 


44 


Kni'i 


Memphis .. .. 


mi 




Nashville 


22 




Oak Riflge 






TEXAS 
Abilene . . 




tiklahonia City 










4 




.\marillo 


Xi 






51 


Eiiernt' 

Fortlauil 


Beaumont 


14 


ttrownsville 

Corpus Christ! 


2(i 




13 




Dallas 


HiO 




Kl I'aso .. . 


30 




Kort Worth 


41 








.\lit|uipr>a .. 


Houston.. 

Larc'lo - 


217 






Altoona 


Liibl.ock 


7 




Odessa 


4 


Chester 


Port .\rthur 


3 


Kaston 


.'^an .^ncelo.. 


1 


Krio .. .. 


San .\ntonio - 


72 




Temple 






Tyler 


2 




Waco 


4 




Wichita Falls 


12 


Lancister 


UTAH 

Ogden 

Prove 








Lower Merion 

McKet'sport.. 


4 




•> 




Salt Lake Citv 


48 




VERMONT 
nurlington 

VIRGINIA 
Alexandria 




Norri.«town 




I'hilailelphia 

I'itt.shurRh 




Ke»<lini! 




."^cranton 










10 




.Xrlinpton 


1(! 




Chariot I esville 






Danville 


It 






tl 


York . 

RHODE ISLAND 


Lynclil.iirj: 

Newport Niw- ... . 

Norfolk 

PetersliurK 


2 
li 

31 
3 

12 




Hichmontl . 


44 






4 


I'awt ticket 


Warwick 


6 



31 



Tulilr I'l. — V((fM/»iT nf I'ltlirr Itr/Kirf milt I Hmftlityirs, Apr. .Vt, lOTtT, C.iti) 
Ovfr 'J.'t.lKHf ill I'lt/niliilitm — ( loiil iiiii«*«l 



City 



WASHINGTON 

KfllillKllitlll 

Hremorldii 

Kvorett 

Seattle 

Spoknne 

Tnoonui 

Vancouver 

Ynklnia 

WEST VIRGINIA 

("Inrlosioii 

('lurkstiiirn 

Kiurniont 

Hiiiitintrlori 

Morumitimii 
P:irktTstiiirt:. . 

WlliflilH!. 

WISCONSIN 

Apple ton 

BeloU 



Number of iwllce de- 
purtinont omployi<es 



TOTAl 



2.'.:i 



I'.'i. 
Ill 
3.{ 

lit 



I'olUf 


Clvll- 


olllwrs 


liins 


tJ 
47 




rci 


:» 


771 


itn* 


•JH-.I 


27 


•IM 

7:f 


22 
:i 


ii'i 


. 


■u 




M) 


3 


«s 


ir> 


i:» 


7 


a:. 


/; 


HI 


2 


t'.i 




4H 


3 



rily 



WISCONSIN Continued 

Kiiii Cliiiri' 

Kdiiil <lii l/ic 

(IriN'ii Hiiy . . 

Kt'niishii. 

I.ii Cross** 

Mii(ii<ion 

MiinilDWdc . 
Milwiiukcf. . . 
Oslikosli. 

Uiicliu' 

ShfhoyKnn .... 

SuiM'rior. 

VViiusiiu 

Wnuwntosii 

West Allis 

WYOMING 

Cheyeiitif .. 

HAWAII 

IlonoliiUi City . . 



Numl>er of itolico df 
purtment employee 






i i 


— 


TOTAL 


I'ollce 


Civ, 


- - - 


oUUvrs 


laii 


41 


4'i 


•> 
3 


1»2 


H.''. 


7 


Wl 


H2 


H 


71 


m 


6 


Kit 


142 


21 


4.^ 


42 


3 


1 , M'.t 

(•.:t 


I.7.M 


HH 


vr.i 


127 


2 


(V, 


(•,:, 




r^ 


/>7 


1 


42 


42 




f.:t 


m 






3(1 


10 
12 


M'.l 


4:.H 


(•1 



4:171 :t4*— 57- 



32 



Tal.I. 



II. — \iiiiihtr of I'ltliif Dt'imrl ini-iil Kinplttyt'vs, Apr. MK /'/.>", C.itivs 
nilli l',,inilnli,iii Irnin 2..iUU In 2.'}, 000 



rity 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of i>ollce 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
fUoyees 


City 


Number 
of polic*' 
• leimrt- 

nient 

em- 
ployees 


ALABAMA 

AliAalxIcr Cil v. . . 


17 
3 
13 

ir, 
11 

21 
4 
5 
5 
11 
8 
N 
4 

13 
30 
f. 
39 
4 
9 
4 

18 

6 

7 

6 

30 

12 

4 

8 

5 

6 

6 

15 

."«( 

4 

14 

l.^ 

fi 

3 

13 

11 

5 

20 

7 

9 

27 

5 

6 

31 

5 

6 

8 

38 

18 

25 

21 

♦) 

10 
13 
12 
4 

14 
13 

1! 

II) 
13 

14 
It 


ARIZONA-Cnn. 
Miami 


8 
14 
18 
15 

3 
12 
33 

8 
2 
6 

18 
9 

15 
3 
3 
8 
6 
2 
2 

21 
3 

19 
2 

10 
5 
5 

n 

9 

16 
8 
7 
4 
4 
4 
5 
2 
7 
6 

13 
2 
2 
3 
5 
5 
5 
5 
4 

10 
9 

24 
4 
•5 
5 
5 
4 

21 
5 

21 
4 

7« 
20 
47 
12 
12 
8 
11 
30 
15 
18 
7 


CALIFORNIA -< on. 
Bell 


27 


Allccvlllf 


Nopalcs 


Belmont 


13 


A iidnliishi 


Prcscott 


Benlcia . 


11 


Athi'iis 


Tenipe... 


Bishop 


6 


Attalla. 


Tolles<jn 


Blvihe 


15 


Aiihurn 


\VinsIo\v 


Bniwley 


23 


Bay Mlnelir'. . 


Yuma 


Bre-a 


11 


Boaz 


ARKANSAS 
Arkadelphia 


Burllnpame... 


34 


Brewton 


Calevieo 


16 


Chickasaw 


Carniel by the Sea 

Ceres 


11 


Childersburp 


6 


Clanton 


Aslidown 


Chico 


21 


Cordova 


Batesville 


Chino 


11 


Cullman 


Blvtheville 


Chowchilla 


H 


I'ecatur 


Brlnkley 


Chula Vista 


43 


r)emopolls 


Camden 


Claremont 


14 


I^othan 


Clarendon 


Clovis 

Coachella 


s 


Elba 


Clarksville 


4 


Enterprise 


Conway 


Coalinga 


12 


Evergreen 


Crossett 


Colton 


27 


Fairfield 


Dermott 


Colusa 






De Witt 


Concord 


33 


Fayette 


El Dorado 


Corcoran 


9 


Florala 


Eudora . . 


Corning 


4 




Fayetteville 


Corona 


20 


Fort Payne 


Fordyce 


Coronado 


•» 


Oencva 


Forrest City 


Costa Mesa 


21) 


Greenville 


Hamburg . 


Covina 


20 


Guntersvllle 




Culver City 


58 


HaleyvlUe 




Daly City 


35 


Hartselle 


Hope .. .. 


Davis 


7 






Delano 


21 


Huntsville 


Magnolia 


Dinuiia 


9 


Jacksonville 


Malvern 


El Cajon 


24 


Jasper 


McCiehce 


El Centro 


32 






El Cerrito 


27 




Monlieello 


El Monte 


L'4 


Marion 


Morrilton . . 


El Sepundo 


34 




Nashville 


Emeryville 


17 






Escondido 


]>; 


Oneonta 


Osceola 


Eureka 


44 


Opelika 


Paragould . . 


E.xeter 


5 


Odd 


Paris 


Fairfax 


5 


Ozark 


Pippott 


Fairfield 


14 


Phenlx City 


Pocahontas . 


Fillmore 


r'l 


Plednionl 


Prcscott 


Fontana 


20 


Prattvllle 


Ropers 


Fort Bragg 




Prlchard 


RussellviUe 


Fullerton 


<>7 






(iardena 


35 


RussellviUe 


Siloam Springs 

Sprinpdale 


(HIrov 


8 




(ilenciora 


18 


Selma 


Stuttgart 


(irass Valley 


9 


Sheffield 




Hanford 


19 




Trumann . 


Hawthorne 


42 


Talladega 


Van Buren 


Healdsliurg 


9 


Tallassee 


Walnut Ridge 

Warren 


Hemet 

Hermosa Reach 

HlllsLoroiiph 


9 


Tarrant City 


24 


Troy 


West Helena 

West MemjJhis 

Wynne 


14 


TuscumbJa 


HollisI.T 

Hiintinj;ion Beach 

hullo . 

Lapuna Beach 

I.a Habra.. 


9 




18 




CALIFORNIA 
Albany 


19 


ARIZONA 


17 
19 




La Mesa 

Larkspur 


2»> 


Avondale 




4 


Bis bee 




La \'erne 


7 






Lindsay 


8 


Chandler 




Livermore 


17 






Lodi. 


30 


Coolldce 




Lompw 


12 




Atwaler 


Los Baniis 


11 


Eloy 


Los OalDS 


10 


Flagstaff 

Olendale 


Azusa.-- 


Madera 

Manhattan Bejkli 

Mantecji.. 

Martinez 


IK 
31 


(ilobe 


Barstfiw 


11 


M.s;l 


Beaumoiii . 


11 



33 



ll»l«- It. — yiiinhi-i (»/' I'ltliir Itr/Hirl fiH-ii I /-'//i/i/im <'r.s, -iftr. ,70, I'i.'}', 
M ilh I'lunilaliuti Iruni 2,500 to 25,000 — l!oiitiiuu*d 



(.Hi,- 



City 



CALIFORNIA-(^>n. 



Miir>-svUlo. .. 
Maywcxxl 

MtMilo Turk 

Mercwl . .. 

Mlllhnip 

Mill Viilloy 

Mu«l(>st(> 

Ntoiirovlu 

MontotM'llo 

Moiitpn-y 

Montori'v I'ark 

Nfonto Vtsla 

Moiiiituln VIpw 

NaiK). 

Nallonal City 

N»>e<ll«*s . 

Nevada City 

N eu- iKjrt Hooch 

Nortli SacraniontO- 

Oakdale 

Oceanslde 

OJat 

Oranjte 

Orovllle 

Oxnard 

Pacific fJrove 

I'alni Sprlnits 

Taso Holil(>s 

I'C"t;illini:i 

PltHlinuiit 

Plttsburjs 

Placorvlllo 

Porterville 

Port iliiiMipme 

Red BliitT 

Rwldlng 

Redlamls 

Rwdley 

Rlalto 

Rivprhank 

Roscvllle 

Salliias 

San Aii.<)clino 

Pnn Bnino 



f ' 



lo 



Pan I.ul-s Obispo. 
Pin \frir(no 



Sclma 

Shaft rr 



. lona 

i randsc*. 



\ Ml 

Tracy 

Tulare.. 
Turiock. 
Uklah.. 
Upland. 



.\' urn her 
of ixillcj- 
(lipiit- 

incut 

cm- 
ployt-cs 



City 



CAUFORNIA-Con. 



Vacavllle 

Ventura 

Vlsjilla.. 
Wiusco 

Watson vlllc. 
West Covlna. 

Whiltler 

Wllllta 

Willows . 
Womlliind . 
YrekaCltv 
Yut.!i City 



COLORADO 



Alamosa 

Aurora 

Boulder 

BrlKhton 

Canon City 

Cortei 

CralK 

Delta 

Durantro 

Edgewater 

Enplewood 

Florence 

Fort Collins 

Fort Morgan 

Oolden 

flrand Junction.. 

Oreeley 

La Junta 

Latnar.. 

Las Animas 

Leadvllle 

Littleton 

Lonemont 

Ix)veland 

Manltou Pprlnfts. 

Monte VLsta 

Montrose 

Rocky Ford 

Sallda 

Rterllne 

Trinidad 

Wal.senMurp 



CONNECTICUT 



.\n.soni:i 

Branford 

Danhury 

Danlel.son. 

Derby 

Oroton 

Jewett City 

Kaueatuek 

Putnam 

Rockvllle 

Khelton... 

HtafTord SprlniD. 

Willlmantlc 

Wlnsted 



DELAWAU 



|r, NrU irk 

18 II N'pw Castle 
17 " tkwford 



Number 

of [KlIICI' 

de|»:irt- 

inent 

em- 

ployiM'S 



City 



FLORIDA 

Apulachlcolii 
ArcJidla . 
Aiil'urndiili- 
Avon Park 
Bartow 
Belle niude 
Boyiitnn Beacli 
Bradeiiton. . 
Chlpley 
ClearwatiT 
Cocoa • . 
Coral OaMes 
Crest view 
Dade City . 

Dania .. _ 

De Funlnk Springs . 

De I/an<l - 

Delray Beach 

Dunedln 

F.ustls 

Fernandlna Beach... 

Fort Meade 

Fort Mvers 

Fort Plerc<> 

Ctulfport 

Haines Cltv 

Hallandale 

Holly Hill 

Hollywood 

Homestead 

Jacksonville Beach.. 

Kl.sslmnn><' . 

Lake City 

Lake Wales 

Lake Worth 

Leesburg 

Live Oak 

Marlanna 

Melbourne 

Miami Shores 

Miami Purines 

Mount Dora . 

N'ew Smyrna Beach. 

N'orth Miami 

Ocala 

Opa-locka 

Ormond Beach 
Palatka . 
Palm Beach . 
Palmetto 

Perry . 

Pinellas Park. 
Plant City . 
PomjMino Beach . 
Quinev 
RIvlcra Beach 
St. Auirustlne 
St. Cloud 

Sanford ... 

Sarasota 

Sobrlnjt 

South Miami 
Stuart 

Tarpon Sprlnes 
Tltusvlllp 

Vem Bench 



WinU-r Ha»i-ii 
WUiler I'ark 



em- 
ploye) 



34 



Tal»l«' II. — \iinihf'r nf I'niiro Drjmrl invitt I'.itiployrrs, Apr. 30, 1957, Cities 
M illi I'ltpnlalinn From 2.:ill(t In ;^.>,00f> — ( ioiitiiiiitMl 



Number 
of police 
(If'IMirt- 

mrnt 

•■m- 
ployeos 



City 



IDAHO 

Alameda 

Blackfoot 

Buhl 

Burley. 

Caldwell 

Coeur d'Alene... 

Emmelt.. 

Ooodinp 

(iranpeville 

Idaho Falls 

Jerome- 

Kellopp 

Lewiston. 

^!aladCity 

Mont|)elier 

Moscow 

Mountain Home. 

Xanipa 

Payette. 

Preston.. 

Rexburg. 

Rupert 

St. Anthony 

Salmon 

.Sandpoint 

Twin Falls 

Wallace.. 

Wciscr. 



UUNOIS 

Abinedon... 

.Vledo 

Alorton 

Anna 

Arlington Heights. 

Barrington 

Batavia 

Beardstown 

Bell wood 

Belvidere 

Bensenville 

Benton 

Blue Island 

Bradley. 

Broadview 

Brookfield 

Bushnell- 

Cairo.. 

Calumet Cily 

Canton 

Carhondale 

Carlyle 

Caniii 

Cartervllle 

Carthage 

Casey 

Centralla 

Charleston 

Chester 

Chi("apo Heights... 

Cliilllfolhe ... 

Christopher 

Clinton 

Collliisvllle 

(Vcve Ciienr 

Crystal Lake 

DeerlieM 

DeKalb 

Des Plalnes 

Dixon 

Dolton 

1 ^owners Grove .. 

Dwlght 

East Alton 

Fast Moline 

Fast Peoria 




City 



ILLINOIS— (on. 



Fdwardsville... 

Ffliiigham 

Fldorado 

Flmhurst 

Flmwood Park. 
Evergreen Park 

Fairneld 

Fannington 

Flora 

p-orest I'ark 
Franklin I'ark.. 

Freeport 

Fulton 

Galena 

Galva 

Geneseo 

ficneva 

(ieorgetown 

Gibson City 

(iillespie 

Glencoe . 

Glen Ellyn 

CHonviow. 

Greenville 

Harvard 

TFarvey 

Havana 

Herrin 

Highbnd 

Highland Park.. 

High wood 

Hillsboro 

Hinsdale 

Honiewood 

Hoopeston 

Jacks<mville 

Jerseyville. 

Kenihvorth 

Kewanre 

La (Jrange 

I^ C} range Park. 

Lake Forest 

Lansing 

La Salle 

Lawrcneeville 

Lemont 

Lewlsfown 

Libert yville 

Lincoln 

Lincoln wood 

Litchfield 

Lock port - 

Lombard 

Loves Park 

Lyons 

Macomb 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marlon 

Markham.. 

Mars<'illes 

.Marshall 

Ma.scoulah . 

Mai toon 

Mcl-<'ansb<»ro. 
Melros<' I'ark . 
Mcnilota 

■MeIroiK)lis 

.Midlothian . 
Moirii-nci' 

Monmoiuh 

.Montlccllo . 

Morris 

Morrison 

Morton 

Morion Grovr . . 



35 



Tiililc 11. — \ninln-r of I'nlirr Di-juirl tiii'iil I'.ttiplnyvrs, ipr. 30, 1957, Citirs 
U illi l'i>i>iiltitiini i'nmi 2,'t<K) /i> 2.'i,0U() — < ioiitiiiiii-d 



City 



ILLINOIS— Con 

\f oiint ("ariiH'l 

Miiiint Morris 

Mount !'rosfH>cl. . 

Mount Vernon 

NTiinilcIciii 

Miirijhystioro 

VaixTvllIc 
N'fwton. 

N'llrs 

N'okornis 

Normal 

N'orrl<l(!«« 

N"orthl>r<Kik 

Norlli ChlraRO 

N'orili I-ako 

N'orih Klvcrslde... 

Oak Lawn 

O'Kallon 

Oifl.sl.y 

Oini-y 

Or.eon 

Ottawa 

I'ulatino 

I'ana 

I'arls 

Park Fon-st 

Park RUIpe 

Paxton 

Pckln 

Pt-orla Holehts 

Pfru 

Pinckncyvlllc 

Plttsfli'Ul 

Ponllac 

Princeton 

Kantoiil 

Klv<r<l!il.- 

Klvrr Forest 

Hlver Orove. 

RlverslfJe 

Ro»>hlns 

RoMnson . 

Ro<-helli' 

Ro<<k Falls 

Kushvllle 

St. Charles 

Salem 

Sari'lwlch....' 

s,iv;mna 

si..|t.yvHlr 

Silvis 

Skokli- 

Souih Belolt 

South Holland 

S|. irl.i 

S|iriri(r Vall«>y 

Siaiiiiton 

St.KiT 

Sierllnjr 

SrirkiM-y 

Slnalor 

Siilli\an 

Summit - - - . 

S><-:imore 

'I !i> lor\ llle 

'I'u.M-ola 

rrt>ana . . 

Vuixlalla 

VenUv 

Villa Pork 

Vlr.lm 

Wa-shlnirton 

\Va.sliinirton Park. 

Waterloo 

WatM-ka 

W^•^t^h«<te^. ...... 



Number 
of imlico 
di'IMirt- 
meiit 
em- 
ployees 



S 

A 

1.3 
IS 
II 

r, 

12 

2 
IS i 

.3 

n 
11 

1.3 
11 

8 
19 

3 

4 

9 

4 

IH 
10 

.s 

12 
IS 
2f. 

4 
19 

8 
12 

2 

3 
II 

4 

in 

9 
21 

in 

13 

.") 

7 

7 
2 

in 

6 

3 

7 

H 

3 
42 

3 

3 

3 

.S 

3 

2 
14 

n 
in 

3 
12 
A 
8 

I 

21 

A 
I.% 
14 

2 

S 

9 

a 

5 

II 



City 



ILLINOIS-<'on 

West Clijcauo 

Western Sprlnirs... 

Westmont 

Westvllle 
Wheiiton 
While Hall 

Wllmette 

WilminKton 

WInnetka 

Wood River. . 

Woodstock 

/.elpler 

ZIon 

INDIANA 

Alexandria 

Angola 

Attica 

Auburn 

.Aurora 

Batesvllle 

Bedford 

Beech Orove 

BUknell -- 

Bluffton 

Boonvllle 

Brar.il 

Bremen 

Brook vlllo 

CamhridRp City.. 

Charlestown 

Chesterton 

Clarksville 

Clinton 

Columbia City--. 

Columbus 

ConnersviUe 

Crawfordsvllle 

Crown Point 

Danville 

Decatur 

Delphi 

Dunkirk 

East Gary 

Edlnburjr 

Elwood 

Falrmoiuit 

Frankfort 

Oarrett 

OasClty 

Ooshen 

Orc<-ncastle 

fireenfleld 

On-ensburir 

Clre«'nwoo<l 

(Irlfliih 

Hartford (^Ity 

HIjrhland 

Hobiirt 

HuntinirburK 

Huntlncton 

Ja.s<inville 

JasiMT 

Jptlersonvillo 

Kciiilallville 

Knox 

Im Porte 

Ijiwrenc«hurR 

Lebanon 

Linton 

Lofmnitport 

Madlsnn 

Martinsville 

Mitchell 

Monlicrllo 



Number 
of iwlloe 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



14 

4 

2 
19 

4 
2K 

1 
22 
10 I 

3 I 
10 



City 



INDIANA-Con. 



Mount Vernon 

-Munster 

Nappance 

New Castle 

Noblesville 

North Manchester. 

North Vernon 

Oakland City 

I'aoli 

Peru 

PetcrsburR 

Plainfield 

Plymouth 

Portland 

Princeton 

Rensselaer 

Rochester 

Rushville 

Salem 

ScottsburK 

Seymour 

Shelby ville 

Si)eodway 

Sullivan 

Tell City 

Tipton 

Union City 

Valparaiso 

Vincennes 

Wabash 

W'arsaw 

Washington 

West Lafayette 

West Terre Haute. 

Whitinp 

Winchester 



IOWA 



Albia 

.Mftona 

Ames 

Anamosa 

Atlantic 

Audubon 

Belle Plaine.- 

Bettendorf 

Boone 

Carroll 

Ce<lar Falls... 
Centerville- . 

Chariton 

Charles City.. 

Cherokee 

Clarinda 

Clarion 

Clear Lake. . . 

Cre.sco 

Creston.. 

Decorah 

Deni»in 

DeWitt 
Eacle Orove 

Eldoni.- 

Emmetsburu 

Estherville 

Evan.Mlale 

Fairfield 

Forest City... 
Fort Madl.ion. 

(JlenwofKl . 

lininell 



, t ■■!en. 

A ,, lluiljiMjIdl. 



Numlx I 
of (lolic** 
dipart- 

nient 

em- 
ployees 



36 



liii.i. 11.- 



\nnifnT ttf I'niirr Di/mrf nnn I I'-niftlnvi-fs, i/tr. '.U>, I'lTu, Cilii-s 
II ilh I'nptilalunt Frnm 2,'t(M) In 2't,(HM — ( onliiiiifd 



City 



IOWA— Continual 



ImleiH-u'leiKf 

Iii(liunol:t . 

Iiiwa Falls 

JclTcrson 

Kc^ikiik 

Kiioxville 

Lc M:irs 

M:K|iioketa 

M:kri()n 

M:irsh:illlnwn . . 
Missiiiri \';illey.. 

Moiitii-cllo 

Mount rieasaint. 

Muscatine 

Nevada 

New Hampton... 

Newton 

Oelwein 

Onawa 

Osage 

Osceola 

Osknloosa 

I'ella 

Ferrv , 

Red Oak 

Rock Rapids 

PacCity 

Sheldon 

Shenandoah 

Spencer 

Storm Lake 

Tama 

Tipton 

\'iiitnn , 

^V:ishineton 

\V;iukon 

Waverly 

Webster City 

West Pes Moines 
Wintersef 



Number 
of pollc<' 
deiwrt- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



KANSAS 



AtuliTie. 

Anthony 

Arkansas City. 

.\tchison 

Aiieiista 

Believille 

Belnit 

Caney 

Chanute 

Cherrvvale 

Clay Center... 

Coftewille 

Colby 

Columbus 

Concordia 

Council Orove. 

Oodee City 

Kl Dorado 

Fllinwood 

Ellis 



Rm|ioria 

F.ureka 

Fort Seott 

Frolonla 

Oalena 

Harden City.. 

Oarnett 

Ooodland 

(Ircat Rend.. 

Mays 

Horinpton. . . . 
Hiawatha 



City 



KANSAS-Con. 

Hoisiimtoti 

Holton 

Hupoton 

Indeix-ndencc 

lola 

Junction City 

KiiiL'inan 

l/arncil 

Lawrence 

Leavenworth 

LitM-ral 

Lyons 

Nitinhattan 

Marysville 

McPhcrson 

Xeodesha 

Newton 

Norton. 

Olathe 

Osawatomie 

Ottawa 

Paola... 

Parsons , 

Phiilipsburg 

Pittsburg 

Pratt 

RUSS.-1I 

Scott City 

Wellington 

Winfirld 



Number 
of polio- 
depjirt- 
inent 
em- 
ployees 



KENTUCKY 



Burbourville 

Bardstown 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Bowling Oreen. 

Carrollton 

Catli'ttsburg... 
Central City.... 

Corhin 

CunitMTland 

Cynthiana 

Danville 

Dayton 

Klizabi'thtown. 

Flsniere 

Krlancrr 

Fort Thomas... 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Georgetown 

fllascow 

Oreen viUe 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg... 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Hopkinsvllle... 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

I/ehanon 

Ludlow 

Maytleld 

Maysville 

Middles lx»ro... 

Montiwllo 

Morehead 

Morganfleld. . . 

Murray 

Niehola-sville... 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park Hills 



City 



KENTUCKY -Con. 

Pikevllle 

T'ineville 

Princeton... 

Providence 

Uichtnond 

Huss.-llville 

Shelbyville 

Somerset 

South Fort Mitchell. 
Versailles 
Williamsbiiri' 
Winchester 

LOUISIANA 



Atibeville 

Bastrop 

Berwick 

Boealusa 

Bossier City 

Bnnkie 

Church Point... 

Coviniilon 

De Quinev 

De Riilder 

Donaldson ville. 

F.unic»» 

Ferriday 

Hammond 

Harahan 

Haynesville 

Homer 

llouma 

Jeanen tte 

Jennines 

Jonesboro 

Kaplan 

Kenner 

Lake .\rthur 

Mansfielil 

Marksville 

Morcan City.. . 
Natchitoches. . . 

New Iberia. 

New Roads 

Oakdale 

Pineville 

Plaquemine 

Ponchatoula 

Rayne 

Riiston... 

Slidell 

Sprinchill 

Sulphur 

Tallulah 

Thihodaux 

Vinton 

Wi'st Afonroe... 

Winnfleld 

Wiiuisboro 



.Number 
of imllee 
de|>art- 

ment 

em- 
ployees 



MAINE 



.\ubura 

Auuusta 

Bath 

Belfast 

Brewer ... 
Brunswick. 
Calais ... 



Rasti¥>rt 

Ellsworth 

Fairfield 

Fort Fairfield. 

Oardiner 

Hallowell 



37 



Tiililr 11. — \iiinln-r of I'ttlit-f Di'imrl iiifii I /'."m />/•»% ••#'>, -l/tr. .10, l'J!i7, Ciliis 
U ilh roiniliilinti I'rtnn J.MH) In 2').(MH) — roiil iniitil 



City 



MAINE-CoM. 

Mii'lison. 
()1<I Town 
Vri-.s<|iii' Isif 
l{o«-kliin<l. 
Huiiifonl. . . 

Sui-o . 

Sotitli Vortl:iii<l 
WaUrvillc 
Wfsthrook 

MARYLAND 

Anna|M)li<; 

HplAir 

HIiKlonshurp. 
UroiitwfXMl 

Uriiiiswii'k 

Ciinihritlpe 

Cupitol Heights 

Orisncld 

Kaston 

Klkton 

Kriilerick 

• irwiihelt 

Iluvro cip CSrooe 

Hyattsville 

I.aurcl 

Mount Rainier 

Pocotnoke City 

Kivenlule 

Salisbury 

Takoma Park 

Western port 

Westminster 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Abington 

Adams 

Amesbury 

Amherst 

Andover 

Athol 

Attleboro 

All bum 

Ayer 

Hanistable 

Hl.i. k-itone 

Hi.iiiiiree 

Hri"l»:ewater 

• '.iiiicm 

fliiiiiin 

(■ t,rd 

D.ilii.n 

I >.iii\pr8 

1 ).iitinouth. ......... 

n.-ltmm. 

hr.imt 

DiplUy ... 
K.islli:illi|>t<i|i 

K ijrli.ivi'll 
Kr.LTiklin... 

< J.irilnor 

< ir< .it Hairinirtiin 

• irr.iir.I.l 
ll,iii'l...n. 
H..|...lil.> 
llu.K-.n. 

[....rin-i.T 
I.. Mi,.'.,n 
I,..! .■" . ..I. u 

Man<inel.l 



NuhiIkt 

of |K>li(1< 

ilipait- 

ini'iit 

cm- 

ployws 



City 






MASSACHDSETTS 

("iiniiiiiii"! 

Marl)li'luiiil 
Mai'lltorout:!) 

M:iynaril 

M iiMlcliomuch 

Mlllnl,! 

.Millt.iiry 

Milton 

.Montague 

.N'anlucket 

Natick 

Xeedham , 

Newbury port 

North .\ilams 

North .^Illlover 

Nortli .Mlleboro 

Northbridpe 

Norwood 

Orange 

I'almer 

Pea body 

Plymouth 

Provineetowii 

Randolph 

Reading 

Rockland 

Rockport 

Saupus 

Somerset 

Southbridge 

.South Hadley 

Spencer 

Stoneham 

Stoughton.. 

Swanioscott 

U.xbringe 

Wakefield 

Walpole 

Ware 

Webster 

Wellesley 

Westfleld 

West Springfield... 

Whitman 

Winchendon 

Winthrop 

Wobum 

MICHIGAN 

Adrian 

-Mbion 

Alponac 

.Mlegan 

Allen Park 

.\lma. 

.M|>ena 

Bad Axe 

Belding 

BpTiion Harbor 

H.ikl.v .. 

Hi-^. iiiiT 

' . Iiaiii 

'ity 

m 

I . ; 1 10 

I'lt.. 

< . it.r Line 

( I, irlfVOil 

II iiloite 

III t •ivpan 

I'! , 1 , 1 

< 1 v« -.n 



NuniU-r 

of |M)llc«' 

dppart- 
nipnt 
piii- 

ployws 




MICHIGAN -Con. 

Dlliand 

Kasl I )pIroil 

Fast (iraiid Rapids.. 

Kast I.ansinp 

Katon Rapids 

Kcorse 

EscanaVia 

E.-Jsexville... 

Fen ton 

Fremont.. 

Garden City 

Gladstone 
Grand Haven .. 
Gnind l-e<l(.'p 
Greenville. 

Grosse T'ointP 

Gros.«e Pointe Farms. 
Grosse Pointe Park. . 
Grosi'e Pointe Woods 

Hancock 

Hastings 

Hazel Park 

Hillwlale 

Holland 

Holly 

Houghton 

Howell 

Hudson 

Huntington Woofls . 

Inkster 

Ionia 

Iron Mountain 

Iron River 

Ironwoo<l 

I-shpemlng 

KIngsford 

T.at>eer 

Laurium 

I.lvonia 

I.iidlngton.. 

Madl-son Heights. . . 

^Ianlstee 

Manlstlque 

Marine City 

Marquette 

Marshall 

Marysvllle 

Mason 

MelvlndaJe 

Menominee 

Mldhuid 

Milan 

Monroe 

Mount Clemens 

Mount Morris 

Mount Plea-yint 

Munlsing 

Mu.-ikegon Heights . 

Negaunee 

Newberry 

Nile*. 

NorthvllJe 

Norway 

Oak Park 

f)tS4'gO 

Owroso 

Petoskev 

Plalnupll 
IMp;i.vai)l Rldr<' 
I'lyniotilh. 
Rl\pr Rouge 

'■ '"'.tv 



.-I. t uiir. .. 



38 



Talil<- 11. — VufM^rr of rulitr Dt-jmrt tttrni llinplnycvs, Apr. ,VK I'f'i 
II ilh I'ltjmhiliim I'ntm J.'iiHt In :?.),000 — ( .out iiiimmI 



an 



City 



MICHIOAN-Con. 



St. Clair Shorc-t-. 

St. iRnace 

St. Johns 

St. Joseph 

St. LouLs 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

South Haven 

Sturpls 

Tecumseh 

Three Rivers 

Traverse Clty.-- 

Tronton. 

Va^'^ar 

Wakcnt-M 
\Vaviie. 

Ypsilunti. 

Zt'cland 



MINNESOTA 



Albert Lea .-. 

Alexandria 

Anoka 

Austin - 

Bavport 

Bemldjl 

Benson 

Blue Karth 

Bralnerd 

Rreekenrldpe 

Brooklyn Center... 

Camhridpc. 

ChLsholra 

Cloquet 

Columbia Helpht.s. 

Crookston 

Crosby 

Crvstal 

Detroit Lakes 

East Orand Forks . 

F.dlna 

Ely 

Eveleth 

Fairmont 

Faribault 

Fercus Falls 

Fridley 

nipiieoe 

f ili'iiwood 

OoMi'ii Valley 

firand Uupids 

Oranlte Falls 

Hustings 

Hit. 1. inn 

II(.|.kliis 

Hutchinson 

International Falls. 

Lake City 

I^e Sueur 

Lltchneld 

Little Fulls 

Luvertie 

Munkato 

Marshall 

Montevideo 

Moorhcad 

MorrLs 

New I'lm 

Northfleld 

North Maiikalo 

Nortli St. I'aul 

Ortonville 

Owatoniia 

Park Ha(>lds 

ri|H>stone 

I'roctor 



Number 
of iwlio' 
dep:irt- 
nient 
em- 
ployees 



City 



MINNESOTA— Con. 



Red WinR 

Redwood Falls. 

Rlchneld 

Robbin.sdale 

St. James... 

St. Louis Park... 

St. Peter 

Sauk Centre 

Sauk Rapids 

Shako|)ee 

Sleepy Eye 

South St. Paul.... 

Springfield 

Staples 

Stillwater 

Thief River Falls 

Tracy 

Two Harbors 

\'irpmia 

Wadena 

Waseca 

West St. Paul 

White Bear Lake. 

Willmar -.- 

Windom 

Worthington - 



MISSISSIPPI 



.\t>enleen 

.Vniory - 

Bay St. Ix)uLs... 

Boone ville 

Brookhaven 

Canton 

Clarksdale 

Cleveland 

Coluini)ia 

Columbus - 

Corinth 

Crvstal Springs. 

Ellisville 

Forest 

Oreeiiwood 

(irenada 

fiiilfport 

Htizlehurst 

Holly Springs. .- 

liidianola 

Kosciusko 

Leland 

Lexinpton 

Loup Beach 

.McCoinb 

Moss Point 

.Natchez 

New .\lbuny 

dcean Springs.. 

Oxford 

I'asctmoula 

I'!i<s Christian.. 
|-Ilila.|elphla.... 

Picayune 

Port (fibson 

Tupelo 

Water Valley... 

Wavnesboro 

West Point 

Winona 

Va7.oo City 



Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



MISSOaRI 



.\iironi... 
Berkeley. 
Bethany. 



City 



Number 

of [H)liCO 

dejwrt- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



MISSOURI— Con. 



Bolivar 

Bonne Terre 

Boonville 

Breckenridpe Hills.. 

Ureiitwoo'l 

Hrookfleld 

Butler 

Cameron 

Cape Crirardeau 

Carroliton 

Carthaiie 

CaruthersvlUe 

Cliarl.'^ton 

Chillicothe... 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Crvstal City 

DeSoto 

Dexter 

East Prairie 

Eldon 

Eldorado Sprinps... 
Excelsior Sprinps. . . 

P'arminpton 

Fayette 

Ferpuson 

Festus 

Flat River 

Florissant 

Frefiericktown 

Fulton 

Olcndale 

Hannibal 

Harrison ville 

Hayti 

Hermann 

Hip^'ins ville 

Hillsdale 

Jackson 

Jeiniinps 

Kennett 

Kinloch 

Kirks ville 

Kirk wood 

Lailue - 

Lamar 

Lebanon 

LcH-s Summit 

Liberty 

Louisiana... 

Maiden 

Maplewood... 

Marcvline 

Marsllall 

Maryville 

Mexico 

Moberly 

Monett 

Neosho 

Nevada 

New Madrid 

North Kansas City. 

Overlanil 

PaeiMlale 

Pine Lawn 

Poplar Bluff 

Portapeville 

Richmond 

Richmond Heiphts. 
Rock Hill... 
Rolla... 

St. .\nn 

St. Charles 

Salem 

SiHlalia 

Shrewsbury 



39 



TalWr M. — \iiiiilnr of I'nilif Ihimi I nun I I'.inpltty its, i/tr. ,{(>, l')57, CiticB 
\f Hh I'uimlution train 2,300 la 2.i.(H)0 — lluiiliiiucil 



City 



MISSODRI— Ton. 

stkrston , 

Shlt.T 

SlllllVIUl 

Pn'titoii 
I' II ion 

VallfV I'.iik 
V:in.l;ili:i 

W.imMistMiri: 

\Vii.<liim;ttiii 

\V..l.l)('lly 

WchstiT (irivcs 

WolNloM 

West l'l;iiiis 

MONTANA 

Alt:u-oii<l.i 

Ho7i'fii:in . . 

<'nl n:iiik 

l)r.T l,«).l;:f. 
l>lllon 

• JhlSL'OW 

• )loii<1ivc 

M:iiiultnn. 

H.l.>ii:i 

Kalis|»ll 

l.aiin-l 

I.owistown 

1-ivinpslon 

\UU'S City 

MIssoiila 

Kp<I 1/Orlpe 

KtNiii<lup. 

>li-ll.y 

SlillU'V 

whit.-nsii 

Wolf I'olnt 

NEBRASKA 

AlliiUut* 

Aiibtini . .. 

HojitrU-p 

Ht>II<'vn«> 

Blair 

Hrokcn Bow 

I "Iri'lroii 

' "i)1iimbus 

'•../ ..I 

I 'r> ii' 

Kalrbnry 

FallsCity 

FmiTiont 

liolh.nt.iirv 

• ir:ir»l 1-1 ill"! 

Ila^iinrs 

HohlivipR 

Kcarnry 

l^'xincloii. 

MH'ook 

Nebraska City 

Vorfolk . 

N'orth Plattr 

OcalLiIa 

O'NMII 
riuttsrni.utl 
S<-huyliT 
.<c«tt5bIulT . 

Si-ward 

Sltlnoy 

Vali-ntliM 

Wahoo . 

WayiK" 

West Point 

York 



Niimbor 

of |Mlllct> 

(li'parl- 

nient 

pm- 

ployws 



9 
12 
5 
3 
4 

10 
12 
3 
22 
14 
4 
H 
11 
10 
32 
3 
2 
K 
4 
4 
6 



City 



NEVADA 



Carson City. 

KIko... 

Ely 

Hendt-rMm. 
Las Vecus 
North Las Vccas 

Spark.s 

WInncnincca ... 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ILrllii 

Chm-mont 

Dorry 

Dover 

Expt4«r - 

Franklin 

KWMM^ 

I.4)ronia 

liobanon 

Littleton. .. 

Mllforil 

XewjHirt 

Port.sniouth. 

Koc)itst-r 

Soiiicrswortl). 



NEW JERSEY 



.\sbury I 'ark 

.\tlanlie Hij:lilan<ls 

.\uiiul>on 

Barrlnpton.. 
BellmawT .. 

Belmar 

Berv'tntleld 

Beverlv 

Blooniinpialo 

Bogota. 

Boonton . 

Bordenfown 

Boinid Brook 

Bradley Hiach 

Bridc<-ton 

Burlington 

Butler - 

Caldwell 

Cape May 

Carlstadt 

Carteret 

Challtani . . . . 

Clayton. . . 

Clementon 
Cllffslde Park. . 

Closter 

Colllnpswootl . . 

Cranford .. 

CresskUl 

Dover 

Duntont 

Dunelh-n . 
East PatiTS4)n 
Ea-st Kutlu rf<»ril 
Eutoiitoun 
K.tf. w.if. r . 
I ' ;:\ 



Kair I -aw ii 
Fttll^Jew. . 
Fanwood . 
Flcminclon 
Fori Lee .. 
Franklin. . 
Frwhold... 



NimiN'r 

of |N)1ICV 

depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



2 I 
3V 

3 
II 




NEW JERSEY— t>n 

tiarwooil 

(il;us.<l>oi<) 

Cden Hl.lpe 

Clen U«Mk 

(Ilouost.r City 

CJuttrnN'rp 

llackritsiown 

lladdoiili.M 

Iladdon Ibiphts . 
llaledon..- 
Hammonton . .. 

Harrison 

Ha.sl>rou('k llelphts.. 

Hawthorne 

lllphlan.l Park 

lllphlands 

llllls<lalo. 

Mlll.side 

Keansburp 

Kenilworth 

Keyport 

LamN'rtvillc 

lx>onia 

Linetdn l';irk , 

I.hxlriiwnld 

Little Ferry 

Little Silver 

Lodi ... 

Lonp BriUieh 

Lyndhurst 

Mad1s*>n.. 

Mnnas'piiui 

Manvllle 

Marpate City 

M ataw an 

Mavwood. .- 

Merehant villi' 

Metnchm 

Middles. X 

Mldlaml P;irk 

Mlllburn 

Mllltown 

Millville 

MorrLs Plains 

Morristown 

Mountain Lakes.. 
Moinit Kphralni 

N'eptwne . 

N'eptune Townsliip. 

.New .Mllford 

N'ew Provldeniv... . 

Newton 

North Arlinpton 

Norihn.ld.. 

North llaledon 

-North Plalnneld . 

North Wildwood 

Oaklyn 

«"»ei-;in r\',\ 



I'onii i 
PI. PI 
Pomptoii I- 
Prlncvton.. 



40 



laM. 



I I. — .\iinihi'r of Pttlirv Dt'imrltiiftil Uniplttyves, Apr. 30, 1957, Citivs 
H illt I'aitulalioii From 2,500 to ^J,0(M>— C'x>iitiiiue4l 



City 


Number 
of police 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of i)ollcv 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of |)ollce 
depart- 
ment 
eni- 
ployei'S 


NEW JERSBT-Con. 
Prospect Park 


3 
40 
12 

6 
31 
17 
20 
37 
14 

4 

5 
33 
18 
11 

31 

12 

27 

28 

21 

18 

5 

42 

2(1 

2() 

47 

27 

9 

4 

27 

22 

32 

7 

21 

4 

5 

43 

12 

46 

8 

7 

7 

15 

4 

22 

21 

4 

19 

18 
13 

5 
21 

7 
20 

G 
24 
23 
27 
20 
10 

G 

5 
21 
13 

8 

8 
11 

G 

7 
13 


NEW YORK 
Albion 


G 

in 

2 
4 

3 

30 

11 

27 

4 

4 

22 

3 

14 

5 

2 

6 

8 

7 

3 

43 

2 

2 

27 

25 

1 

10 

7 

10 

IG 

2 

28 

9 

G 

8 

10 

6 

9 

41 

5 

4 

1 

30 

4 

2 

3 

G 

52 

22 

GO 

2 

29 

42 

27 

28 

4 

7 

5 

2 

7 

4 

13 

2 

15 

10 

15 

2 

2 

3 

21 

5 

23 
8 
13 
14 
21 
13 


NEW YORK-Con. 
Kcnmore 


29 


Amity ville 


Lake Placid 


9 




Attica 


Lakcwood 


2 




Baldwinsville 


Lane-aster 

Larchniont 


» 


Ke<l Kaiik 


Ballston Spa 


22 


Kiiiuefield 


Batav'ia . . . 


Le Rov 


4 


Riduefleld Park 


Bath 


Liberty 


10 




Beacon 


Lindenhurst 


17 




Blasdcll 


Little Falls 


14 




Hrockport . . .. 


Liverpool.. 


4 


Itoc'kuway 

Itdselle 


Hronxville . .. 


Lonp Beach 


45 


Canajoharie 


Lowville 


3 




Canandaigua 


Lynbrook 


47 




Canastota 


Lyons 


G 




Canistco. . 


Malone 


12 




Canton 


Malverne 


21 




Carthape 


Mamaroneck 


35 




Catskill 


Massena... 


25 




Cobleskill 


MechanicvlUe 

Medina 


12 




Cohoes 


9 


South Ainboy 


CooperstowTi 


Middletown. 


3C 


Corinth 


.Mohawk 


3 


South Oraiipe 

South Plaiiifield 




Montict'llo 


11 


Cortland 


Mount Kisco 


IS 


South River 


Coxsackie 


Mount Morris 

Newark 


2 




Croton on Hudsoti 

Dansville 


14 


Tenaflv . . . 


New York Mills 

North Pelham... 

Northport 


1 


Totowa 


I>epcw 


IG 




Dobhs Ferry 


14 




Dolpevillc 


North Syracu.se 

North Tarrytown 

North Tonawanda — 
Norwich 


4 




Dimkirk . . . 


2D 




East Aurora.-- 


42 


W'aMwkk 


East Rochester 

East Syracuse 

Ellenville . . . 


14 




Nyack 


IS 




Ogdensburg 


19 


W'ashinplon 


Elmira Heights 

Elmsford 


Olean 


35 


W'eehawken 


Oneida 


18 


West Caldwell 


Endicott 


Oneonta 


17 


West field 


Fairport . . . . 


Osslnlng 


30 


West Long Branch... 




Oswepo 


30 






11 


Wesiville 


Floral Park 


Palmyra 


3 




Fort Edward.. 


Patchopue 


17 




Fort Plain 


Peekskill 


35 




Frankfort 


Pelham Manor 

Penn Yan 


23 




P'redonia . 


8 






Perry 


3 


Wooil Hnlce 


Fulton 


Plattshureh 


30 






PleasantviUe 


15 


NEW MEXICO 




Port Chester 


50 






Port .IiTvis 


13 




(Hen Cove . . 


Potsdam 


10 




C.lens Falls 


Rensselaer 


20 


Helen 


(lloversville 


Rockville Centre 

Rye 


47 


Carlsbad 


(loshen 


39 




Oouvemeur . 


Salamanca 


11 






Sanuiac Lake 


10 


DetninK 


(Iranville 

fJreon Island 


Saratoga Springs 

Saugerties 


» 




7 


Oallup 




Se-arsdale 


54 


llobhs 


llanihurp 


Scotia 


11 




Hamilton 


Seneca Falls.. 


10 


Las Vcpas City 

Las \'egas Town 


Hastings on Hudson.. 


Sidney 


3 


Silver Creek 


5 




Sloan 


6 


Ixjrdshurg 


Ilitthland Falls 

Homer... 




15 


Los Alamos 




10 


l/ovinplon 


South (ilens Falls 

Spring Valley 


2 




Hornell 


12 




Horseheads 


Sprlngvllle 


6 




Hudson 


SutTern 


9 




Hudson Falls 


Tarrytown 


25 


Socorro 






5 


Truth or Couso- 




Tonawanda 


28 


<|tiences 




Tiickahoe 


20 


TiKiiinrari 


Johnstown 


Tupiwr Lake 


7 



41 



Ttil 



II illi i'ttpiiliitiuii t'ruin 2y5(M} t»t 25,UtlO — iU)iiliiiij«-«l 



City 



NEW YORK-Con. 

\V-l.l.-n . 
\V:ilt,)H. 

\Va|i|>liii;«'rs Falls 
\V iil>;l« .... 
W !ir\v U-k 
WatiiroTcl . 

\\ :iti"rl<K» 

Waf.rvll.t 

Watklii.s «iU'il 

Wavirlv 

\V.'Ils\ill.- 

Woslti.l.!. 

Wr.st HiiMTvtraw 

Ulilt.-liall 

\Vtiit<s»Kjro 
York\llI.'. 

NORTH CAROUNA 

\lioskic 

\ llMTinarle 

Ashi'f>oro . 

Hoaiifort 

Ifi'lliavon 

Ki'lniont 

H.^v^iiHT City 

UtH)IU' 

HrcvarJ 

Miirlincton 

raiiton 

(^hajn! niU 

<■■ hrrryvlUe 

(MInton 

Concord. 

nr.iinT 

Dunn 

I'lliiiton. 

Kh/.iU'ih City 

Klkm 

K.iriiiville 

Kc.r. -I City 

• i.i^i.mia 

< ioMsUiro 

Uniham 

'ini-nvlllp 

Ilainl.-t 

II. ii^l.-rson 

Mc'iiili'pionvnie 

Mirkory 

JacksonvllW 

Klnr< Mountain 

Kington 

I^urlnhiin: 

I>>ak!<\ llle 

I.<"noir. 

I^Mnpton 
l.lnfi.lninn . 

I.<H1!-I>IIII' 
I.IIMil* Itl^ll. 

Mr '..II. 

\i\]e '..'..'.'.'.'. 
kI City 



Wilknhoro 

1'Im:i.. nth.. ..'.!!. 

li.-I.UMll,- 

K..in..l>. n.ipids.. 

K -nn 

8aJi*f>urj- 

Sanford 



Niinibor 

of |K)llrt» 

<lt'l>«rt- 
nn>nt 
oni- 

jiloypfs 



7 
3 
4 
3 

4 I 
2 I 

4 : 

* I 

^ \ 

l\ 

I 

3 
2 
1 



8 ; 

21 
17 

4 

3 
10 

5 

4 

5 
52 I 

9 < 
15 

5 
13 
31 i 

14 

i'' 

7 

7 

13 I 
59 I 
33 

H 

31 

8 
22 
15 
39 
20 
13 
37 
15 

21 

27 
10 



City 



NORTH CAROLINA 

(\)lltiMU<'<l 

Scotland \«fk . 
Sclniu . 
Shelby 
Slier CUv . 
Smith ndd. 
Southom Vines... 
S|H'ncer. . 
Spindale .. 
Statesvllle.. 

Tarlwro 

Thomasvllle.. 
Valflesp. . 

Wadcshoro 

Wake Forest 
\Va.slilnctoii . . 
Whilevill.' 
Wllllainston. . 
Wilson 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck - 

Devils Ijike 

Dickinson 

(Irafton. 

Jamestown 

Mandan 

MInot 

Ruchy 

ValleyCity 

Wahpeton 

Wllliston 

OHIO 

Ada 

Amherst 

Ashland 

Ashtabula 

Athens 

Avon. 

Avon Lake 

Bamcsvllle 

Bav 

Bciford 

Bellalre 

Bellefontalnc 

Bellevuc 

Hen-a 

Bexfc-y 

Bowline CiTct'n 

Brecksvlllo 

Bri<li:e|K)rl 

HpH.klvn. 

Hr.M)k i'ark 

Hryan.... 

HnWruS— 

Cadi/. 

Canihriilpe 

CampUIl . 
Cir.v 




City 



OHIO— Continuc<l 

Delaware 

I>lphot( 

l^-nnison. 

Dover 

KiLstlake . 

K:\sl LIveriMJol 

Kast Valrsllne 

Katon 

Klmwixvl 1'lacc 

FairlHirn • 

Kairport llarlHJr 

Kalrview I'ark 

Findlay 

Fostoria 

Franklin 
Fn'niont . 

(iaiion . 

(ialHixjlis 

Oarfleld lluichts.... 

(leneva 

Ciiranl . 

Ciolf Manor . 

(iran(lvl<>w Heights 

(ininvlUe. . 

{Jnrnlleld 

(irtH-nhlUs 

(Jnvnville 

llleksvillc 

llillslwo 

Hubbard 

Huron 

I nde|N<ndenoe 

Ironton 

Jackson 

Kent 

Kenton 

T<an castor 

liO banon 

1>vtonla 

T^lneoln Heights 

T.islion 

I^oekland 

Ixjpm 

I^udonvillc 

Louisville . 

Lvndhurst 

Maple Heiphts 

Maricinont 

Marietta . 

.Martins Ferry 

Marysvllle 

.Mttumee 

.Mavfleld Helirht«... 

Mwllna 

MiiunlsburB-. 

Middleiwrt 

MiiM-rva . . 

.Minpo Junction 

MontiK'ller 

Motnit Healthy.. .. 

Mount Venion.. 

\.ilN>l.-on 
.\elsonv UK- 
New Boston 
Vrwhii'-vit 11. ,. : I~ 

i.hla. 



i'.ilii'H 



NuniIxT 

of IHlllo- 

depsirt- 
menl 
em- 
ployees 



3» 
lA 



iH-r l':»rk. 
DvHann- 



I- I «>akwo..l. 



42 



lahl* 



II. — \iinihrr «>/ I'ttlirr Dr/mrl mm I liiitpUtyi'i's, Aftr. ,'l(K 
\l itii I'ltpiiltilion hrinn 2,ii00 It} 2.t,000 — ( :oiiliiiii<-<| 



I'/r, 



a lies 



city 



OHIO— Continued 



(ilH-rlin 

Orrville 

(*tl:iwa 

Oxford 

I'liiiu'sville 

I'artim Heights 

IVrryshurg.. 

P1(|IIU 

POIIUTOV 

Port Clinton 

Ravenna 

Reading 

Rittman 

Rocky River 

Rossford 

St. Bernard 

St. Clalrsvllle 

St. Marys 

Salem 

Sebrlng 

.''hadyside 

Shelbv - 

Sidney 

Sllverton 

Solon. 

South F;ucUd 

Strongsville 

Struthers 

Tallniadge 

Tlflin. 

TlppCity 

Toronto. 

Troy 

Uhrlchsville 

University Heights... 

Upper .\rllngton 

UpiK>r Sandusky 

Urhana 

Van Wert 

Wadsworth 

Wiipakoneta 

Warrensville Heights 
Washington C. H.... 

Wauseon 

Wellington 

Wellston 

Wellsville 

West Carrollton 

WeshTviUe 

Westluke 

Whitehall 

WleklilTe 

Wlllard.. 

Wllloughby 

Wlllowick 

Wilmington 

Windham 

Wooster 

Wyoming 

Xeiiia 

■^'ellow Springs 



Number 
of polio- 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



OKLAHOMA 



A<lii 

Altus 

-Mva 

.\n:ulurko 

.\rtlmore 

Atoka 

Bartlesvllle 

HIackwell 

Hristow 

Broken Arrow. 

("handler 

Cheeotah 



City 



OKLAHOMA-Con. 



Cherokee 

Chlekasha 

Claremore 

Clinton 

Cordell 

Cushlng 

Del City 

Dewey 

Drumright 

Duncan 

Durant 

Kdmond 

Klk City 

Kl Reno 

Kufaula 

Frederick 

Outhrie 

Ouynion 

Heuldton 

Henryetta 

Hobart 

Iloldenville 

HoUis 

Hominy 

Hugo 

Idabel 

Kingfisher 

Konawa 

Lindsay 

Madill 

Mangum 

Marlow 

Mc.\lester 

Miami 

Midwest City- 
Nichols Hills. . 

Xowata 

Okemah.. 

Okmulgee 

I'awhuska 

Pawnee 

Perry. 

Picher.- 

Ponca City 

Poteau 

Purcell 

Sand Springs.. 

Sapulpa 

Say re 

Seminole 

Shawnee 

Stillwater , 

Sulphur 

TahUxiuah 

Tonkawa 

Vinlta 

Wagoner 

Wallers 

Watonga 

Weatherford... 

Wewoka , 

Woodward 



Number 
of polio- 
depart- 
nienl 
em- 
ployees 



OREGON 

Albany 

.\shland 

Astoria 

Baker 

Beaverton 

Bend 

Burns 

Coos Bay 

Co<iuille 

Corvallis 

Cottage Grove. . 



City 


NumlK-r 

of I«>lltt' 

depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


OEEOON— Continued 
Dallas 


(, 


Forest Orove 




Grants Pass, 

Gresham 

Hermiston 

Hillsboro 

Hoo<l River... 
Klamath Falls.. 

La Grande 

Lake view 


ir. 

5 

7 
r. 

:»2 

III 

t 


I^>banon 

McMinnville 


i:i 


Me<lford. . 


3;t 


Mllwaukle 


4 


N'ewberg 


(\ 




3 


North Bend 


10 


Nyssa 

Ontario. . 


:i 


Oregon City 


\r, 


Oswego 






IH 




K 


Redmond 


S 


Roseburg. . 


211 


St. Helens 


11 


Seaside 


(t 




1 




L>)( 


Sweet Home 


tl 


' The Dalles 


in 


Tillamook 


t'l 




a 


PENNSYLVANIA 


•2 


Ambler 




Am bridge 


21 


Apollo . 


•> 


.\rchbald 


4 


Arnold 


12 




3 


Ashley 


,"> 


.\spinwall 


r> 


Athens 


4 




10 




2 


Baden 


4 


Bangor 






4 




(t 


Reaver Falls 


24 


Bedford 


a 


Bellefonte 


r> 


Bellevue 


13 


Bellwood 


2 


Bentlevvllle 


2 


Berwick 


It 


Bethel 


14 


Mlrdsboro 


1 


Blairsvllle 


fi 


Blakelv 


4 


Bloonisliurg 


.■; 


Bo vert own 


3 


Brackenrldge 


3 




25 


Brentwood . 


18 


Bridgeville 


n 


Brbtol. 


IS 


Brockwav 


2 


Brmikville. 


4 


HrowiisvlUe 


1(1 




s 


Butler 


3i; 


California 


3 



43 



i'tii.i. 11. 



city 



PENNSYLVANIA - 

t'oiitinui'l 

CuiupHllI 
Caiiun^liurK . . 

CarbondaJe 

Carlisle 

Canipplo 

Catitii- Shannon 

Cata'i»ui|iui 

ChainU'rsliurg 

Charlerol 

Cheltenham 

Clalrton 

Clarion . 

Clarks Summit — 

ClearfleM 

CUfton Heights 

Clymer. 

CoatesvlUe 

CollliiKdiile 

Colun)bla 

ConnelsvlUe 

Conshohocken 

Coplay 

Contoiiolls 

Corry 

Cou<lersix)rt 

Crcsjion 

CurwcnsvHle 

I Jalla-itown 

nanvllle 

I>arl>y 

Derry 

Dickson City 

1 >ononi 

Dorniont 

Downlnctown 

Doylestown 

Dmviwl.iirs 

I>U |{4ll« 

ftuiinion-. 

l>u<liie<nr 

l»ury«'a. 

East Ciineniaui-'h 

East l.an'-'lowne . _ 

Eiijit MrKft-sjiort 

EjL-t ritt^t'iirch . ... 

Eji>t Siri)inl.*l>urf 

Etien.'tliurK 

Eddystone 

EdiEcwoo)! 

EdwanlsvUle 

EllwU'th 

ElUaN-thtow-n 

EUwood City 

EmnmiLo 

Em|>orluni 

Emsttorth 

Ephrolu 

Etna 

Eieter. 

Famll 

Ford City. . 

Forest City 

Forest Illlb 

Forty Fort 

Fountain Mill 

Frank lln . 

Frre<lom . . 

Free land 

Free|>ort 

HaUlttln.... 
Oettysbun; 
O Irani V Hie 
Oiassiwrt.. . 
Olenolden 
Oreencastie. 



\iinihfr «»/ /'«»//'•■»• Ih-imrl iiii-nl /•,m/»/«»\ «'«'.s, i/tr. .HI, I'f.t', 
II itii I'upululion t'ruin -,i(/0 to 23^000 — Cunliiiucd 



(.71. 



NumN-r 
of iiolire 
deiHirt- 

meiit 

em- 
|iloye«'8 




PENNSYLVANIA 

(°<intinu)'d 

(irwnshurK 

• irivntrn'. 

• in-ciu lUo 

»!ro\e<'lty 

Hiinihurv 

Hanover 

Hanover Twp 

Hani-son Twp 

Hall>oro 

Hellertown 

H(>lll<laysburg ... 

Hi>nii->tfad 

Honesilale 

Huniint'lstown. .. 

Hunlinedon 

Indiiuiu 

Inprara. 

Irwin 

Jeiumette 

Jenkintown 

Jermyn 

Jerst-y Shore 

Jim Thorpe 

Kane 

Kelihorst 

Kcnnetl Square. . 

Khij;st<»n 

Kiitanning 

Kulpniont 

Kiitzlown 

I.ans<lale 

I.aiisildwne 

l.an.-^fonl 

l,arks\llle 

IjitroN' 

I.,jiun'I"lale 

L»hinhlon 

Lenioyne 

l,e\vlsl'urg 

l.fwi.-town 

I.iiiiz 

l.iiilfvinwn 

I-«Kk Haven 

l.u/frne 

Mahaiioy City 

Nlanl.i'irii 

ManstleJM 

Marfa>i Hook 

.\la*ontown 

M< A<liK) 

McDonald 

.McKc<"i Itocks ... 

McjulvUle 

Mcchanicsl'urp 
M..ll\ 







. II 








M 


li. r-^ 


lie 


M 

M 


llvaic 























Muii..ii^' ili'l.i 
M lI Montoiirvvtlli- 

4 " M..if!-ull.' 



i Muni. .11 
2 I Mycr>t<)»ii 



NumiMT 
of |»ollc«- 
ilepart- 

nient 

eni- 
ployws 



2H 



2<'. 




PENNSYLVANIA 

( tiiiiniiit'd 

Nanlicoke. . 

Narlicrth 

Nazareth 

New Hrl^•hton. . 
New Ciiniherhmd 

.\c\v H<illan<l 

N'orllianipton .. 
.\<»ilh ('ata.siu<|ii:i. 
North Kiist . 
NorthiinilHTJaml 

Oakniuiit 

OilClty 

Olvphant 

Oxford 

I'liinitTlon 

Palmyra 

I'iirkcslturg 

I'attiin 

I'm A^^'yl 

fcrkasle 

Fhillpslium 

I'hoenixvilie 

I'itc-airn 

I'iilston 

Mains 

ricasant Hills 

I'lvmoiith 

I'olk 

I'ortayc 

Port .MIt'gany 

Port Viie 

I'oiistown 

I'ollsville 

I'rosiKM't I'ark 

I'unvsiitawney. . 

giiakcrtowD 

Kankln 

K.mI l.lon 

H<'novo 

Keynoldsvllle 

Kld):v\ay 

KoarinK Spring'. . . 
Rochester... 

Royersford 

St. Clair 

St. Marys 

Sayre 

Schii.vlklll Hav. n 
S(.«>tMal<'. .. 
.S'llnsKrove. . . 
.<cwlckh'y. . .. 
-■tril.T 



Nun. I., i 

of poller 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 



■i.'' .xuniiMt mil 
2 II Sunhury 



44 



'lalilr II. — .\iinihrr of I'ttlirv Ih-fxirl mm I i.iniilityvvs, Apr. ,W, /V.i 
W /'// rnfiitlation From 2,500 to 25,000 — Continued 



Cilii 



City 


Nunilirr 
of poll(r 
di-imrt- 

tni-tit 

oni- 
pUivfcs 

2 

10 
19 
2 
8 
H 
4 
3 
13 
4 
3 

ir. 
(i 

4 

43 

2 

8 
f. 

ir. 

10 

2 
5 
3 

20 
4 

12 

17 
f. 
3 

7 
1 
3 

13 

7 
4 

7 
3 

2 

K 

ir. 

2 
4 

II 

13 
1 
31 
It 
ii 
II 
It 
2(1 
12 
20 
27 

1(1 
2(1 
17 
1 
4 
10 

13 

19 
10 
13 


City 


Number 
of polUv 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployiH-s 


City 


Number 
of pollc-e 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


PENNSYLVANIA- 

('(ititiniicil 

-usr|uehaiina 

Swarthniori' 

Swlssvalc 


SOUTH CAROLIHA- 

Contlnued 

Clinton 

Clover 

Conwav 


7 
li> 
13 

r> 

12 

s 

39 

•( 

19 

20 

33 

18 

15 

4 

9 



18 

18 

13 

4 

12 
20 

Hi 

33 
4.5 
7 
3 
33 
4 
9 
4 
8 
5 

27 
4 
G 
3 
4 
7 

19 
4 
3 
9 
3 

18 

13 
3 
3 
3 
4 
.1 

13 
3 
t 

10 

10 
8 
9 

21 

8 

3.1 
20 
8 
14 
8 
7 
3 


TENNESSEE -Con. 

Dickson ..... 
Dversburg. 

KlizatK'lliton 

Krwln 

Ktowah... 


7 
17 
IS 

5 


Swovcrville 


Darlinpton 


4 


'ruinafina 


Denmark 

Dillon 


Favettevllle 


9 






g 


Tavlor 


Kasley 


Gallatin 


14 


Tliroop 


Florence 




23 


TItiisvllle 


Fort Mill 


Harriman 







OafTnev 




2 


'1 ralTord 


Oeorgefown 


Humboldt 


10 


'rrirtlf Creek 


flreenwood. . 


Jefferson City 


3 


'I'vrone 


Oreer 




40 


Iriion City 


Ilartsville 

Ilonea Path.. 


La Follette... 


s 




Lawrenceburg 


9 


Ipland 


KinRStree... 


9 


Xandcrgrift 


Lake Citv 


Lenoir City 


5 


\'<'rona 


Lancaster 


I>ewisburg 


10 




Laurens 


Lexington 

Loudon... 

Martin 


4 


Wavneshoro 


Marion . 


5 


W'aviH'Sbiirp 


McColi 


6 


X'.fatlit'riv . . 


Mullins 


Marvville 


15 


Wcllsboro 


Mvrtle Reach ... 




4 


Wcslcvvillr 


Newberrv 


Mc.Minnville. 


11 


W (St riioslpr 


Oranpeburg .-. 


Milan 


C 


West Ilazlcton .. 


Rock Hill 


Millington 


13 


West Homostpad 


Seneca 




17 


\\ Cst Mifflin 


Sumnierville . 




21 


\\'('stinoiU 


Sumter . . 


\'ewf)ort 


12 


W est Xc'Wtori 


Walhalla 


Paris 


14 


WCst Hcadlnp- . . 




Pulaski 


8 


West Vi(>w 


Williamston 

AVinnsboro -.. 


Riplev 


5 


West W'voniliij; 


Ro<'kwood 


7 


West York 


York . . . 


South Pittsburg 

Sparta . 


4 


U hitoliail... 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


7 


W liltpoak 


Springfield 


14 


Wijniordlng 


Sweetwater 









5 


Wliidber 


Belle Fourche 


Union Citv 


14 


\\ iiiton . . 


Brookings 




9 


W'yomlnR 

W vomlsslHR 


Canton 


TEXAS 
Alamo 




Dead wood-.- 




^'(■aflon. - 


Hot Springs 




^'(iiincwood 


Huron 


1 


Zt'liciiopic 


Lead 


Alamo Heights 

Alic<« 

.\lpine .. . 


12 






14 


RHODE ISLAND 


Mriilison ... 


3 




Milli.iiik 


.\iulrews 


7 




Mjtcliell 


Aiipleton 


3 


Mrlstol.. 




.\Tison.. 

Aransas Pass . 


2 


Kiirrillvillc 




13 


Ci'iilral Falls 


Hcdlifld 


.\rlington 


26 


('iliii)iorlaiid 




Athens 


3 


Kasi (Ircciiwlcli 


Spcarfish .. . 


.\tlantu 


4 


.lolinsloii . 


Stiirpis 


Ballinger 


s 


l.iricoli) ... 


\'erinillion 




2 


\ortli I'rovldencc . 


Watertown 


Bay City 

Bavtown 


g 


W'arron 


Webster 


27 


WcstlTlV 




Beeville 


13 


West Warwick 


Yankton 


Flellaire 


20 




TENNESSEE 

Alcoa 

Athens . . . 
Belle Meade 

Bristol 

Brownsville 


Helton 


4 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Big Spring 


28 




Monhani 


12 


AMicvill.' 


Borper 


10 


Alk.-ii. 


Bradv 


7 


A ndiMsoii 


Breckenrldge 


8 


Anilri'ws .. 

MatnlxTK 


Brownfleld 

Brownwood 

Bryan 


10 
22 


Kcaiiriirl. 


Clarksvllle . 


31 


Mellon. 


Cleveland 


5 


Mcrim'ltsvlllc . 


Clinton 


Canadian 


2 


Hishopvillc 


Columbia... . 


Canyon 

Carrizo Springs 

Carth:ige 


4 


Carndon 


Cookevllle 


2 


Clieraw 


Covington .. 


5 


Chester 


Daytou 


Center 


4 



45 



■jilih- 11. — \timlnT of VttUfv Ih'imrlinvnt Kinplnyeen^ Apr. 30, 7957, 
H »f/i Vitiuilalinn h'rnni 2,500 to 25JH>0 — < lout iniiid 



C.ilu' 



t'tty 


of |)Oll(f 1 
dl'lHU-t- 

ment 

em- 

ployws 

12 
7 
3 

III ' 
4 
,S 
■i 
it 

T 

2 

24 

3 

."i 

7 ■ 
3 

10 
18 
29 

4 ; 

, 

2 ' 

8 i 
.S 1 

11 I 
8 
6 1 

1 1 
s 1 
3 

3 ' 
4 

14 
14 

lit 
1 

5 I 
2 
«• i 

12 : 
1 

11 ' 
34 1 
21 
17 1 

1 1 
3H i 

f, 
13 

2 
>> 
20 1 

2 1 

^•< ! 

f, 

10 ' 

4 1 
2 

2 1 
A 

.( 

b> 
l» 

2" 

H 

i 

\« 

4 


City 


Nunilxr 
of iiollii- 
depart- 
ment 1 
em- 
ployees 1 


City 


NunilM-r 
of pollci' 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


TEXAS-rontinutsI 

Chlldrws 

Cisco 


TEXAS— Continual 

LoniivifW 

Lufkin 


38 
22 1 

2 

1 
27 
17 

3 

8 

4 

•') i 
71 

10 
» 
9 

8 
11 

3 ! 

3 i 
12 1 

3 ' 

2 

3 
29 : 

lil 

24 1 
24 i 
41 
13 

H 
1 i 

2.1 1 
10 
3 1 

K 

11 

K 

I 
2 

H 

'■? ' 

3 
2<". 

2 

S 

2 
211 

^ 

24 

n 

ll" 

2> 
31 

4 

2:' 

I' 
».< 
11 
1" 
It 

13 

4 


TEXAS— Continue*] 

White .'^.ttlement... 

Winnsboro 

Wlnt.rs 

Yoakum 

Yorktown 

UTAH 

.^miriean Fork 
Bountiful. 
Bripham.. . 


13 
1 


Clarksvlllo... 

riobumt' 

Clevolanil 


Lulinc 

M.rfa 

Marshall 




4 
1 


Coloiiian 


Mc.Ml.n 




Collcpe Station 

Colorado City 


McCamcy 

McCfri'por.... 




Colunilius . 

Comanche 


Mimphis 

M.rt>.Hl,-5 


7 
4 


Conimort*. 


M,\ia 


10 


Corslraiia 


Midland 

Mini'ola 
Min.ral \V. IN 

Mission 

Monahans. . 
Mount I'lia.^ant 
XacosdoclM'S 


Cediir City 


ll 


Colulla 


Cleiu-fi.1.1 


4 




HeNT 


3 


Dolliart 


Helper 


3 


DtH-atur 


I.ayton 




I)t>l Rio 


Lehi 


4 


Denlson.... .......... 


I.opan 

Midvale 


11 


Donton 


WIcrland 


i; 


Donna 


N'ew Boston 

NfW Braunf«*l.« ... 


Murray 


7 


Dublin 


Nephi 


3 


Kaelf l^e 


Nofona 

Olmos Park 


Orem 


I'l 




Payson 


4 


KiLstland 


Olnt-y 


Pleasant Orove 

Pric»> 

Richfield 


3 


Rdinburg 


Oranpo 




El Campo 

EliTtra 


Paducah 


4 


Palestine 


Roy 


3 


Elpin 


Pam|)a ._ 


St. Oeorpe.. 


4 


KnnLs 


Paris 


South Opden 


3 




Pasadena 


South Suit I-ake 

Spanish Fork. . 


*\ 


Floydad.i 

Fort Stofktc»n 


Pecos 


.1 


Perryfon 

Pharr 


S()rinpvill.. 

Tooele... 
Vernal.. 

VERMONT 

Barre 


8 




Pittsburjf 


4 


« Saint's ville 

Oali-na Park 


TMainvii'w 

T'ort Lavaca.. 




Oarland 


Quanah 




OaU««ville 


RanjriT 


12 


Ofoncptown 


Raymond ville 
Robstown . . 

Ros«'nlH'rp . 

RoUin 

Rusk 

San .\uKiistine 

San Hrnito 


Bennlnpton 


10 


niddinfs 


Brattleboro 


19 


OliiiM'r 


Essex Junction 

Mlddlebury 


a 


(]ladowal«r 


2 




Montpeller 


9 




Newport 


4 


Orawl Prairip 


Rutland 


» 


(Irwnville 


San Marcos 


St. Alt>ans ^^... 

>t. Tctiiisi.ury.iT. 

■' -# 

V 


« 


Haltom 


Si-niinole 


; 




Shamnx'k 

Sherman 

Silsb.v 

Slaton 


i 




2 






J 


Hfn<liT!«oil. . 


WUi.. -kl 

VI80IHIA 
.\blnpdon 


f. 




Smith ville.. 




HiTi'fonl 






Highland Park 


South Houston 
Stamford 
Stfphrnvillf - 

Sulphur Sprlnps 

SwM-t water 

Talt 

Tahok 1 
Tavlnr 

■I'. . L--;. 

■ 1- 

1 W. I iii.rtTjty PJaw.! 
' Wharton 


7 


Irvinp 


Vl'.,\i'r.i 


* 




Ifl 


Jackwnvilli- 

Ja.MM>r 

Jt'lfvr*on 


1 u' 


a 

8 




s 


Kanx-s City.. 


2^ 


ta 


10 


KtiK'^ly 


1 i- lout Uuyul 


4 


K<'rniit 


3 


K-.vii.. 

K 
K 

K 

I.... 1 >.k>..ii 
1 .;:;• i 
I. >!:,;. >> 
I. ,1 ... r.r 
I, , r..rr.. 

1.. \.;i.u»i 

LitUrflfld 

Livlnc5ton 


7 
10 
13 

7 

M 

12 

in 

8 
22 

la 


' 'iahl 


1(1 



46 



il)l«- It. — 'SiiinlxT of /'(»/(■<■«■ Ih'fHirl nifii I /•.'f»i/;/r>\«"fs, iftr. :Ut . 
\\ ith I'nftiihit ion iriiin J.'tOO In J.l.OIH) — < Mnliiiued 



I'f.'tT, (lit it's 



City 


Nuuiher 
of police 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


City 


Number 
of iwllcc 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


City 

WISCONSIN-Con. 
I.<ake Geneva 


Number 
of |>olice 
depart- 
ment 
em- 
ployees 


VIHOINIA— Con. 


2(1 
19 
12 
4 
« 
2'J 
4 
« 
5 
14 

in 

7 
12 

2 
13 

■ja 

31 
28 
21 
19 
13 
22 


27 
G 

11 

17 
3 
7 

16 
9 
2 
5 
5 
2 
3 
2 

12 
4 
% 
2 
4 

ir. 
ir. 

15 

f. 

9 

2r. 

IS 

1(1 

2(1 
5 
IS 

in 
fi 

4 
K 

14 
5 

31 
1 

II 
4 
5 


12 
5 

3S 
8 

27 


WEST VIEOINIA 


20 
9 
24 

5 
4 

1 
2 

n 

8 
4 
7 

8 
2 

10 
2 
1 

17 
6 
fi 
8 
4 
3 
5 
2 
4 

13 
3 
9 

21 
3 
1 
2 

28 

2 
12 

4 

12 
14 
14 
17 
C 
4 
4 

12 
4 
17 

4 

23 
8 
8 
2 
4 
5 

111 
I'.l 

r> 
n 

3 

8 
4n 

.I 
in 

3 
4 

4 


7 




Benw(M>(l 


Lake Mills 


3 


lA'XillglOII 


Bluefiel.l 


Lanftister 


4 


l-iirav 


nuckhannon 

Chiirles Town 

Chesapeake -. 


Little Chute 


3 




Marinette 


16 


Martinsville 


Marshfleld 


19 


Narrows 


Chester 


Mansion 


4 


Nortdii 


Dunlcar 


Mayvillc 


4 




Elkins 




2 


I'lihiskI 


Follanshee 


Menasha 


23 


K;i(Jf(.rd 


Orafton 


Menonionle 


12 


Kichlands 


Hinton 


Merrill 


13 


Salem 


Kevser 


Monona 


.5 


Saltvllle 




Monroe 


13 


South Boston 




Neenah 


29 


South Norfolk 


Manning ton 


N'eillsville 

New Richmond 

Oconomowoc 


3 




Marmet 


4 


Sullrilk 


Martlnsburp 


10 




Oconto 


4 




Montponierv 


Onalaska 

Park Falls 


2 






4 






Platttnille 


6 


W vthi'villo 


New Martinsville 

Nitre 


Plymouth. . 


h 




Portme.. 

Port Washincton 

Prairie Du Chicu 

Reedsburg 


11 




Padcn City 


7 


WASHINGTON 


Philippi 


6 









Richwood 


Rhinelander. . 


14 




St. Albans 


Rice Lake 


10 




South Charleston 


Richland Center 


7 




7 






River Falls 


4 


Hucklpy 


War 


Shawano 


8 






Sheboypan Falls 


4 






25 


Chphalis 


Weslover 


South Milwaukee 

Spartii 


23 


Chciiev 


White Sulphur 




Clarkston 




5 


Colfax 


Williamson... 


Stevens Point. 

Stouphton 


20 


Colloee Place 


WISCONSIN 
AI|;onia 


6 


CoUille 


Sturpeon Bay 


9 




Toinah 


7 




Tomahawk 


4 




AntiEo 


Two Rivers 


15 








4 






Watertown.. .. 


17 




Beaver Dam 


Waukesha 


47 




Berlin 


Waupacji 

Waupun 


5 


Kelso 


BUuk Kiver FaUs 

Bloomer 


7 




West Bend 


9 


Kent 


BurliuKton 
Cedarhuru 


West Milwaukee .... 

Whiteflsli Bay 

Whit<'water 

Wisconsin Rapids . . 

WYOMINQ 

Buffalo 


20 


Kirklund . . 


27 


L<ms\i('w 


Chippewa Falls 

Clinton villa 

Columbus 

Cudahy 


8 


Moses I^ake 

Mount Vernon 


22 




Oelavan 






De Pere 


7 




Oodpevillo 


Casper 


.^1 






Cody 






Rlkhorn 


Douplas 


3 




Rvansvllle 

Fort Atkinson 

Fox Point 

Oreendale 


Kvanston 


5 




(Ireen River 


4 




I,ander 


4 




I/aramie 


15 


Sedro Wool ley 

Shi'lton. 


Hartford 


Ixjvell 


2 


Horicon 




5 






Powell 


10 




Hurley 

Junesville 


Rawlins 


12 




Riverton 


12 


Top|M>nlsh 


Jefferson 


Rock Springs 


12 




Kaukauna 


Sheridan 


15 


WalLi Walk* 


Kewaunee 

Klniberly 


Thermo|K>li3 

Torrinptoa 




^VaI>ato 


6 




Ladysmith 


Worland 


8 











OflVnsrs CleanMl aii<l P<»rsoiis Arrrslcd 



A count of major < rimes, a couiil of major iilmcs «"h>anM| l)v llic 
niTcst of ail onCiMlcr, and a <"ounl of llic persons arrested in <-omiec- 
tion with <learan((>s of major crimes are inchuled in this section. 
The only indication of the volume of other than nnijor viohitions is 
picsented throutrh airrest information since no provision is juade 
tor coUeetinjj; offenses known and offenses ch'ared hy arrest for those 
lesser cate<;ories. 

For crimes of the major type, part I. ami of the lesser typo, part 
II, fi<;ures are |)resentetl indicating the number of jx'rsons arrested 
and releasetl without a formal <'har<;e havin<; boon file«l. For those 
who are formally char»rcd. there is indicated the numlxM" found i;uilty 
whether of the «rime as cjiarired or of a lesser offense. 

These tiata are from a ma.xinHim of 1,846 cities with fewer cities 
((•presented in some of the tables as stated in the headings. 

Offenses Cleared by Arrest^ 1956 

City police cleare<l by arrest about 3 of eadi 1 1 «rimes or 27.-3 
percent in lOot). This was oidy slij^htly under the 10").') expeiienc*- 
of 2S.4 percent. 

The percentages of crimes against the person and crimes against 
property cleared by arrest remained about the same as in prior years. 
Over three-fonilhs of the crinies against the i)erson and almost one- 
fourth of the property crimes were cleared by arrest. Percentages in 
the indivi«lual crime categories remained about th»^ same as in piv- 
vious years. 

I'nder this system, the arrest of one individual may clear one or 
several <rim«'s while the arrest of seveial persons may clear only 
one crime. 

(!riiin"«» A^ain^t ihe IVrson. For each 100 of these, police cleared 
79 by arrest in H)")t). In the individual classes, police cleared by 
arrest 92 of each 100 murders, S7 of each 100 negligent manslaughters, 
77 of each 100 rap«'s, ami 78 of each H)() aggravate*! assaults. 

OiiiK's A;.'aiiist Proprrly. I'olii'c cleare<l 24 out of each 100 of 
these «rimes by arrest during 19.")(>. Although the clearances of 
these crinies are proportionately less than the clearances of crimes 
against the person, it s1k>u1«1 be noted that police cleared live and 
one-half times as nniny property crimes as crimes against the person. 

Clearances of robberies by arrest was high among the property 
<Times with 42 of each 100 of these being clearetl by arrest. TIn'se 
Wi're followed by tln' <learanc«' of 31 burglaries, 30 auto thefts and 
20 otlur larcenies otit of each 100 crimes of each type. 

(■J7) 



48 



OFFENSES CLEWED BY ARREST 

OFFENSES AGAINST THE PERSON 



CALENDAR YEAR 1956 



1.846 CITIES 



65,292,929 POPULATION 



NOT CLEARED 




CLEARED 






MURDER 91.9% 
















NEGLIGENT 87.2% 
MANSLAUGHTER 




















RAPE 77.3% 










^is. 






AGGRAVATED 78.1% 
ASSAULT 


"^ 






4 


^^M\ 



FBI CHANT 



I'itiiirr .7. 



40 



Tiiltlr l.">. — ttfffiisfs Kiitnni. ('.Iriin-il h\ trrfsl, iiikI /'crsoiis i.7i<jrt;«'«/ (//</«/ 
/«»r /'ri».s«Tii /ion), t'f.'tO, hy l'f>inil<ili<ui i.rtnips, \tiniln-r I't-r KKt hiinnii 

itfffltSl'S 

IPupuliitlun liirurt'S from lUTiO (U>wi)iilal u-iuiuii] 



rupulatlon pruup 



TOTAL ORODPS 1-VI 

I, Mil Pities; tolnl population, 
«v.'i.jy.'.'.rJV: 

Offenws known 

Offenses rleared by trreat 

Persons rharited 

"iROl r I 

;« fltli-s ov»r a.Vl.Otir): total popula- 
iKiii. •.'«i.<»<i<i.-V<«i: 

I ir'. : . t iKiwil 

I 'I'. ! ■ . .■ .ircil by aiTPSt 

l\ i.-uu.- I li.irtfi'il 

4 lUii!. over 1 .(lOO.UOO; total popula- 
tion. I\434,(>92: 

OtTens«'!i known 

OtTt'ns«'s clfaro*! by arrest 

IVrson;: charv't'*!- 

f' <itl.s. 7M.(RKt to l,(X)»t,0<lO; total 
)-.|.iil,itiiin. .'.,100,291: 

I >i1i n.^ < known 

(.nl.ii.-^> tli'art'<l by an^'st 

pj-n-ons (•harj;«'<l 

Celtics, VMi,!!**! to T-'AOOO; total popu- 
lation, 3. 4<i<i.M}»: 

<)ITrn«'« known 

oiT.iivs iltartMl by arrest 

I . t-,.,1. . h trptHl 

17 I 'o.VXi,n00; total ix)p- 

1. jy9: 

1 ,.. ..-. „,,»wn 

Utfpa««'!; rl»^re<l by arri>t 
Persons charged . 

GROl P II 

.S2 cities. 100.000 to iW.OOt); total \x>p- 

11' •> " ■■'•r'^i: 

iwn 

ir«'<l by arrest 

i - . ii.irKOd 

GROrP III 

l,r.. ,...,.. -....-oto IO),000; total pop- 

I. TIKI: 

■ >wn - - . 

t ■-. - . .. an-<l by arrirtt 

Persons cbarjred 

• .HOtP IV 

ID*' to .w,nnit: total |)o|>- 

II. 11.";: 

tit1i'n»«s rleaHHl by .im-^t 
PerMJiLs channel 

OROl p V 

.M."i ritkw, lo.itnn to v>,ni»y mtM |mi|»- 



GROIP %i 
' - lO.nOO; total |-.|rtii 

wn 

< I . r -. . ..-.irwl by WTHt 

I'l r^>ii« ( h.trtred 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der. 
noinK'K' 
lli!i<nt 
nian- 
sluut! li- 
ter 



100.0 
81.8 
96.9 



l<N). )l 
Wl. 4 
W.i 



100.0 
01.1 
110. .5 



100.0 
92.0 
91.3 



100. 
7fi.8 



100. 

NS.1 

9S.3 



101). 
91.9 
90. N 



iiiao 

94.3 

•tr,. 7 



100. 

W. 2 



.Man- 
slaucl)- 
t.r bv 
net! li- 
cence 



100.0 
87. a 
88.4 



100.0 

te.7 

8S.S 



IINI. 

hi.:, 

SI. 4 



100.0 
88.4 
107.8 



100.0 
80.6 
119.4 



too. 
92.3 

29.7 



100. 
79.1 
02.1 



100. 
93.8 
7.1.9 



100.0 
80.7 
80.7 



100.0 
M».0 



1*10. 
B7 2 



loao 
«.a 

M.2 



Kaiw 



100.0 
77. J 
76.5 



KM). 
7.1.7 
72.2 



100. 
7.V7 
72.1 



100.0 
7.1. 4 
tVi.6 



100. 
77.3 
97.8 



100. 
7.1.2 
6.1.7 



100.0 
7fi.6 
72.8 



100.0 
81.8 
80.7 



100. 

Ml. A 

91. .1 



100. 
N3.7 
94.4 



100.0 
82.6 



Kob- 
h»'ry 



100.0 
41.8 
40.8 



1(H). 
41.1 
37.6 



KNI. 
43.7 
34.3 



100. 
3«.0 
44.1 



IINl.O 
42.7 
.11. 1 



llNI.O 
37. .1 
35.5 



100. 
42. 2 
42! 8 



100. 
44. .1 
.12.2 



100. 
44.6 
.13.7 



too. 
46 1 
.'*. 1 



100.0 
4Jk4 
M.I 



-^Kv'ra- 
vat4d 
a.ssault 



100.0 
78.1 
66.8 



100.0 
7»V.O 

la. 4 



UKI.O 
7.1.6 
64.1 



100. 
79.6 
.19. 7 



100.0 

77.8 
tin. 6 



100. 
71.2 
67.7 



100.0 
7.V.1 
.13.6 



100. 
81.6 
74.7 



lUl. 
K.V3 

8.1.4 



ll«). 
h7. 6 
89.2 



lflil.0 
SO. 6 
93.0 



Bur- 
glary 
l.r.ak- 
Inir or 
.ntir- 

Inn 



100.0 
90.8 

8i:o 



UN). 

31.7 
18. .1 



UN). 
34>. 2 
13.8 



100.0 

28.8 
28.3 



100. 
2a8 
24.3 



KN). 
26.7 

17.8 



KN). 
27.7 
19.7 



100.0 
28.5 
21.1 



loao 

31.3 
2.1.4 



100. 
30.4 
ZV6 



Kill. 
3&.0 
S2.7 



Lar- 
ceny - 
th.-ft 



100.0 
80.2 
14.8 



UN). 
22.6 
1.1.4 



1*K). 
24. f. 
12.7 



100. 
19.2 
17.3 



100.0 
29.6 
24.3 



100. 
19.3 
14.5 



100.0 
17.8 
12.9 



100.0 
16.8 
14.0 



ItMLO 
I8lO 
14.2 



loao 

18.6 
14.4 



100.0 
24.4 
19.2 



50 



OFFENSES CLEARED BY ARREST 

OFFENSES AGAINST PROPERTY 

CALENDAR YEAR 1956 

1.846 CITIES 65,292.929 POPULATION 







NOT 


CLEARED 




CLEARED 

i 
1 


( 




ROBBERY 


41.8% 














BURGLARY 


30.8% 


















LARCENY 


20.2% 


















AUTO THEFT 


29.9% 















FBI CHART 



iiuiirf t. 



:)l 



liilih- \<t. — \iiiiihrr nf itjfviisi-s Kiuntn, .\itiiihrr tiitti I'rrrtii Inuf i'.ltitntl h\ 
irrfst, I95t}, hy Hfititruphiv Divisitms 

IPoptilatloD tlcuns from lU.'iO ilfci>niiial tviiMLsJ 



Criminal honil- 
cl<le 



< ifOKrepblc division 



Mur- 
der. 
nonncU' 
llE»-nt 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



TOTAL. ALL DIVISIONS 

l,.s46 c-lilf."^: total iMjimlatlun, 
fV'...VJ,W.i: 

Number of offenioa known I 3,240 

Nurobri cleared by arrest j 2.979 

Percentage cleared by arrest.. . - 91.9 



~tatcs: 
total 



]>opulation, 



- known.. 
. arrest. . 
: l>y arrest. 

iwpulatlon, 



Niinil ■ 
I'croii' 
MlddU» .Atlantic ^taU 
4-11 olti.'s: total 

-. ■■• r . r of olT«'n>ii's known.. 
'. . I'T clrarfd l>y arrest.. 
J ■ ■ :iMpi' clpare<l by arrt-st. 
Ea.«t Norili Central Stat«'s: 

4.''.') ritie.s; total |K>pulation, 

1G.;.V..3J<1: 

Number of ofTcnst-s known . 

Nunilx'r cU-aro"! hy arrrst... 

Prrc»"ntaci' clfanMl by arrest. 

Weft North Central ."States: 

197 I'itU >; total population, 
- -i^i x,<, 

• ■ r of olTens4's known 
r cleared tiy arrest. 
. , :.:.ipe cleared by arrest. 
South .AtUiiiiic Slates: ' 

l>'>3 citii's; total (wpulation, 
1^147,74.'): 

NumlxT of ofTi iis«s known 
Number clearid t>y arrest. 
»'• '■••■ntape cloari'tl by arrest, 
iitral .''tales: 

total population, 

.\unih«T of otTen>j'S known 
NuniU-r cUiirol by arrest. 
I'lTCi-ntaKe cleared by arrest. 
Wi<l fknith Ci-ntrul Slates: 

'.If, cUiir-: total |>opulatlon, 

- known. 
> lurest . . 

I . ,.. ., .i. . ,. .,. .1 by arrest. 
Mountain ."«tat«'5: 
M 



rlllixi; 


total 


pniHilatlon, 

~ known.. 
. ! \ arrest . . 
ii-d by arrest 




toul 


pnpuL'ttlon, 


1 fH-.-|l 


l;i|Cr t'"'- 


1.-1 i-) utvSt. 



S9 
76 

S.V4 



.^4.^ 
91.0 



S39 

7S2 
93.2 



1-29 
2n4 
S9. 1 



r>43 
94.6 



14S 
143 

9»16 



43f, 
383 
t«.0 



IW4 

17« 

03.3 



Man- 
slaii);!)- 
ter by 
nepll- 
gence 



2.269 
1,974 
87.2 



182 

161 

88..% 



44,'> 

416 

93.5 



494 
430 
87.0 



167 
149 

S9.2 



315 

307 

97.5 



74 

fi7 

90.5 



229 

IHI 

79.0 



fitl 
A3 

"••. 5 



291 

2ra 

r*i 7 



Ra|)e 



9,583 
7,411 

n.8 



400 
367 
91.8 



3, 1S3 

2.473 

77.7 



2,184 
1.694 
77.6 



628 
437 

69.6 



1.(I3S 
Mil 

N2. 9 



171 

140 

8.V4 



«42 
49U 
77.7 



276 

21H 

79. U 



I.IAI 
716 



Rob- 
bery 



S9,M4 

16. M2 

41.8 



l,m() 

.•ioa 

48.3 



9.439 
4, 19.1 
44.4 



13,707 
.V603 
40.9 



3, UV, 
1,132 

.3.1. H 



3. ii«i2 
1.781 
49.4 



915 
340 
37.2 



2. 246 
38.4 



1,233 

.■«7 

41.2 



4,197 
1.619 



.\pKra- 
vate<l 
lussault 



46,757 

44.349 

78.1 



i,aH> 

l,tl40 
79.0 



1.1, IM 

ii.aifi 
7t;. s 



111.(139 
7f.. 3 



2,985 

2, 1.S7 

72.3 



13,726 
Il,s»14 

8»i4 



1,M3 
1,3.M 
73.3 



4.410 

3.42.1 

77.7 



Hur- 

Klary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



I.,ar- 

ceny— 

theft 



283,492 798,472 

87,459 161.469 

30. 8 20. 2 



Us .347 

4, 0.16 

2S. 4 



lA. 47li 

22. ti'M 

:«. 1 



1.1,672 

20, .128 

33.3 



22, 749 
.1.834 



31.9.14 

10.901 

34. 1 



H, 2«X 

2, .193 

31.4 



29.267 

8.295 

28.3 



941 Il,lh9 

712 3.396 

7.V 7 30. 6 



42, 372 

8,262 

19.5 



149.403 

30.2III 

20.2 



19.1, .V>4 

43,009 

22.0 



77, H> 

14.118 

18.3 



K.1, .176 

20.919 

24.4 



17,479 

3.719 

21.3 



7I\3.16 

111,164 

23.0 



39,8.18 

6.3.14 

15.9 



130,616 

, 18.723 

IIS 



30, MW 
34.5 



' Inriudrs the Dbtrtct of Columhhi. 



52 

'I'ahli's 17 Mild !'.♦ show the riuiiilx'i' ol pcisons cliiii-'^cd in 1!»")() as 
reported hy 1,^40 cities. 'I'liese figures are from the same cities 
re|)resento(l in tables 15 and 10. 

'i'ahle 18 shows the niimhei' of persons c!iarp:ed for traffic violations, 
as reported hy 1,081 cities. 

The mimher of persons charged is shown in the raw figures as 
reported and also in terms of the number of persons charged for each 
1 ()(),()()() iidiahitiints in the reporting cities. 

In tables 17 and 18 arrangement of the data is by cities grouped 
according to size. Except for traffic (table IS), cities with a popula- 
ti(Mi iVoni lot), 000 to 250.000 rej)orte(l the most persons charged per 
100,000 iidiabitants. The smallest number of peisons charged per 
100,000 inhabitants was rei)orted by the group of cities that have 
from 10,000 to 25.000 population. 

Not only does the numlx^r of persons charged pi'r 100,000 inhabitants 
vary among the cities, as shown when they are grouped by size as 
reflected in table 17, but also when the information for these same 
cities is arranged by the geographical areas contained in table 19. 

In counting i)ei-sons chai'ged under this system, one person chargi'd 
is counted for each individual even though in some instances more 
than one charge may be placed against the same iiidi\ i(bial. 

Foi- example, a person may be arrested for l)urglary and two 
chaiges brought against him for the one offense. It is the piactice 
in some jurisdictions to charge a person with uidawful entry that 
occui-red in the commission of an offense of burglary and also to 
|)lace a second charge for the property stolen aftcM' entry to the building 
was made. Kven with such multiple charges, only one person charged 
is counted on the rei)orting forms under this system. In other woi'ds, 
the count is of i)ersons and not of charges. 



.53 



Tillilf IT. — /'«T>«i;is < .7i«iri.'«'</ (llflil Jor l'ri>>-r<ii I itm). I'/.'tti, <i// Ojji-iisf^ i'.xffpl 
TrnJJiv, .\iiinlnr mul linlr I'vr liHIJHMI hihtihilnii Is, hy I'lt/nilul iint f.°r«iii/>.H 

|rii|Miliiliiiii litiiiri's from I*,i.'i4) ilcci'iiiital n-iiMisl 



Olleiw* cliarK»'<l 



ORAND TOTAL 

Xair per 100,000 

(^riiiiiiial liiiiiiiriiliv 

(a) Muriler :iii<l iiniinoKli- 
gent iii:iii-liiii^'htt>r: 
Niiiiilier of persons 

<'>iai^'p<l 

Hale 1*1 l(«l,llt)0 

(h) Man>laut:liier by iieK- 
lipnii'e: 
Nil III her of persons 

ih«rj:e<l 

Kale iier KKI.CXKI 

Ro»>»*r.v: 

.\ iim her i >f i >or-i< iiis charReil . 

Kale i>er lOn.OiN) 

Apj:in^:i'e<l iissaull: 

N inn Jier of |iersonscharire<L 

Kale i>er I(»,000 

other assault'^: 

N inn tier i if |iersoii.s charpe'l. 

Kale Iter I0«),0<)0 

Burglary— hreakiiiK or enler- 
ini:: 
N umher of iierson.s rharseil. 

Kate jier Kn.OUO 

Larceny— I hefl: 

N iiniher of |iersonsrharge<l. 

Kate i>er lon.noo 

Auto theft: 

N uni fwr of ivrsDiis eharpe*!. 

Kate i>er lOO.tXlO 

Eintiez/leiiieiit ami fiaiiM: 

N iiniher of jtersons charpe*!. 

Kat<> i>er IKl.UKt 

Stolen pfoi^rty; l>iiyinf!, re- 
.. :•. i)C. I" -.■-- lii:: 

\n::J -T ■ '. \- r ■■.Ti«-i-hari»«l. 

l; ,•<• I* r lMi.i«o_ . 

Forcer) an'l coiiiiu-rfeitinft: 
\ uin t>er I 'f [ler-ons c'haree<l. 

Kate |>er li«).i««» 

RaK 

N uin tier of (lersnns char(ce<l. 

Kate im lOO.ont).. 

^ro^tttlltion an<i coninierrial- 
izMl vi«"e: 

\ii!:,U r "fi>er>on>ii-httrce<l. 

• 1.000 

8« ■■ >'-e|»l rai>e an«l 

1 

rhariteil. 

Nj 

\u::.U; : ■.•.h|. 

K.itf (<-r li ■ 
\ViM|...ii>; c .irr ■■ iji;, 

eti : 

N u m > ler of I leru in s f^arfE«<l . 

Kate |ier liD.Ono 

()tTen.>«« aira!n«t biniily nn<i 
children: 

.N'umlier of i^rT^ons rh«ri;e<l . 

Kate |*r l(X).000 

I.i<|ii<ir laws: 

\un I'.r . f i«-r-'.|i-i liartte*!. 

Dr 

...| 

KjU 1*1 lUi.uu.'. 



TOTAL 


Oroiip I 


nroupll 


(•roup III 


nroup IV 


nroiip V 


(iroiip VI 


1 .Mf. 
.III.s. 
total 

IHtpilll^ 

lion, 
iwl, 292. VA> 


XJcltlis 

o\fr 
'ri4I.IMlO; 
|H>|iiila- 

tlon. 
2». \m, .Vjo 


.'.2 III lis. 

lINI.IXIOto 

2.'iii.iiiMi: 

IMipiila- 

tion, 
7.4«2,.'>41 


102 cllli'S. 

.'iii.niiii to 
lim.niNi: 
popiila- 

lloli. 
7.1«l,7i«i 


H19 fit lis. 

i'i.imo to 

.'lO.INIII; 

IHipiila- 

llon, 
7.li',KI,4l.'. 


.'.45 cltl.-s, 
lo.niNMo 

IMipiiht- 
tlon. 

H,3s«l,7W 


915rlll<-s 
iimlcr 
lo.nnii: 

IMipiila- 
llon. 

.'1,131.944 


3.000.799 
4»95.9 


1,435.086 
4783.7 


417.477 
5571.9 


335, 281 
4662. 1 


291.688 
4113.8 


304.946 
3636.0 


216. 321 
4215. 2 


3.126 
4.8 




3.'i7 
4.8 


2'.)0 
4.0 


240 
3.4 


lU'i 
2.3 


'.HI 

1.9 


1.86d 

2.9 


3.2 


283 
3.8 


201 

2.8 


I79 


NO 
1.7 


1.9 


16.140 
24.7 


10, '.t«i 
3ti. 7 


l.t«,s 
21. « 


1.210 
lil.S 


1.01)0 
14.1 


901 
10.8 


.392 
7. <■ 


37.939 
58.1 


22. 7sO 
7.'i. 'J 


3. .S«i8 
.'.1.6 


.3,910 
.'►4.4 


2, !«} 
40.9 


2.975 


1, :-iu 
I".*. 3 


102.002 
156.2 


41. •123 

i;w.7 


17.ai2 
227. « 


l.3.2.'.9 
1M.4 


12.202 
172.1 


11.46*} 
136. 7 


6.4011 
124.7 


59.559 
91.2 


2»;, .V,<J 
88.fi 


7. 8.V1 
104.9 


6, 3.s".t 

88.8 


<s792 
95.8 


7,1.39 
85.1 


4.814 
9:{.H 


118.768 
181.9 


.M. rm 

172.0 


14, .'rf;«) 

i!a.fi 


13.884 
1!.3. 1 


14.a'i7 
19S.3 


14,7S«J 
176.3 


9.m4 

19.3.8 


38.307 
58.7 


l'.».!M7 


4. 2:17 

.')«. .'1 


3, 8.-,2 
rci. 6 


3.739 
.'i2. 7 


4.023 
48.0 


2,.'<)9 
4**. 9 


18,914 
29.0 


8.089 
27.0 


3. 491 
4»i. « 


2.217 

Ml H 


32. .'. 


1.859 
22.2 


ri2 
lK.6 


7.607 
11.7 


.%0I9 
1*5. 7 


rm 

H.0 


406 

.'1.6 


.'«8 
8.4 


557 
6.6 


424 

H.3 


12. 717 
19.5 


lrt.0 


I.IUIO 
22.2 


l,.^77 

21.9 


1,672 
23.6 


1.904 
22.7 


1.096 
21.4 


7.399 
11.9 


4, .M.S 
15.2 


722 
9.6 


61.1 
8.6 


529 


6.8 


349 


23.156 
35.5 


I.S.UII 
.VI. 


4.4«!» 
»«.0 


1,0H7 
1.-..3 


Mil 

12.H 


578 

a9 


3.1 


31.406 
48.1 


I.\.3W7 
.'■1.3 


ft.2S»» 
h3.9 


2,9nh 
41.3 


3.2i« 
46. 1 


2.365 
28.2 


1,122 
21.9 


16.621 

2J.5 


n,»7K 
4A.A 


947 
I2.A 


••.73 
9.4 


441 

'-..2 


462 

5.5 


120 
Z3 


93.391 

35.7 


11,818 
3U.4 


3,.VW 
47.6 


2.3IU 
32.0 


2.574 
30.3 


1.814 
21. « 


1,244 
24.2 


33.170 
50.9 


U. l.'M 
47.2 


4,4nit 

.V.A 


4,7W» 


3,Mrt 
55.8 


3.973 
47.4 


l,8£1 


56.433 
86.4 


I7,3NS 
.'A.0 


\343 
III.4 


7,f*« 

lon.« 


8.913 
I2.V7 


8.003 
90.1 


&043 
117.8 


159.859 
235 6 


3\f3S 

I»».8 


3K4&7 
379. H 


IV. 176 

2M.H 


IV,4A5 
274. S 


300.2 


22.441 
437.3 



54 



lalili- IT. — /'rr>(»/i> ('liur:^rtl (llfhl for l'rtt>r<ii t iim), I'f.yO, nil (Pfffitsrs ICxvvpt 
'rrufjir. .\iimlnT ami Hnli- I'rr KKtJXU) hihiihi laiils. hy Popiihtlion iprmifn* — 
( !<>nliiiiii-<l 

(Popiilntloii flpuri-s from 19.5(1 ilect-iinlal f«'tisu.s| 





TOTAL 


Group I 


nroupll 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


Ofli'HsecharRod 


1.S46 
cities, 
total 
|)opula- 
tion, 
6.5, 292, 929 


33 cities 

over 
2.5<),0<K); 
Itopula- 

tlon, 
29, 999. .530 


.52 cities. 
100,(100 to 
2.50,0<KI; 
popula- 
tion. 
7,492,.541 


102 cities, 
.50,000 to 

1(HI,(NNI: 

popula- 
tion, 
7,191,700 


199 cities, 
a5,(K)0 to 
,50,(¥I0: 

Itopula- 

tion, 
7,090.415 


.545 cities, 
10,000 to 
2.5.(K«l; 
|>opulu- 

tion, 
8,380.790 


915 cities 
under 
10,000; 

iwpula- 
tlon. 

5,131.944 


Disitflcrly conilticl: 

Niitnticriif iiersonschartted. 

KillC IKT l(KI.(KJ(J 


337. 857 
517.4 

1,266.531 
1939. 8 

118.883 
182.1 

107. 048 
164.0 

408. 248 
625.3 


17.5.890 
.580.3 

562. 0.50 
1873. 5 

.58.518 
195. 1 

84,409 
281.4 

228. 0.58 
760.2 


3.5.9.59 
479.9 

192, 633 
2.571.0 

21,839 
291.5 

10, 248 
136.8 

43.9.53 
586.6 


3.5, 786 
497.6 

1.57,6.53 
2192. 2 

12,077 
167.9 

4,650 
64.7 

38,614 
536.9 


27,999 
394.9 

130,027 
18:J3.8 

10. 2.55 
144.6 

3,976 
.56.1 

3.3, 688 
475.1 


33, 435 
398.7 

129.021 
1538.4 

10.514 
12.5.4 

2. .574 
30.7 

39. 952 
476.4 


28,788 
561.0 


Driinkcniu'ss. 

i\ mil h««r of i)ers«ns charged. 
Hate per I(K),0(JO 


95. 147 
ia54.0 


VaKTiuity; 

NumlHTofpersonscharged. 
Kate Iter 100,000 


.5. 680 
110.7 


Oanililinn: 

Number of [tersons charged. 
Rate |>er 10O.(H)0 


1,191 
23.2 


All (it her olTense^: 

N u 111 1 ler of pel sons charged . 
Hate Iter 100,000 


23,983 
467.3 







O.) 



Tahl*' in. — I'lrsDiis Cliiiruiil (lltUI fur /'r«>s«« n /uin). 'I'riijjir I liilntinils, I'.xitpt 
Driiiii'j H liilf lultixitnlvtl, I'K'ytt; .\tiinlnT ami Hiitr I't-r l(M>JH}0 liiluiftiltinlH, 

li'iiimliiliiiii IlKUres from li«.'i() tld-etiiiiul i«i)su8] 





TOTAI 


Group 1 


Groiiitll 


Group 111 Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 




l.«Wl 


2N(ili<>8 


43 citlcii. 


75 rlllffl. 


l.M) citl.'s, 


.ViO rlll.fi. 


4ni(itU's 


OJToiiM' «'liurt:i'<l 


rlll.s; 


OVtT 


KNMMNIIo 


.VI.UM) to 


i'l.UXl to 


lO.liiitl to 


iiiKJcr 




total 


IMMKIO; 


2.MI.INIII: 


lim.dlNI; 


H),i»*K 


•ir>,i**); 


lo.uai; 




|)0|)ula- 


|M)tlUlU- 


IKipiila- 


|Ki|)lll;i- 


|H)|iiila- 


|HI|IUlU- 


|K)|tll|lV- 




tlon. 


tlon. 


tion. 


tinii. 


lioii. 


tion. 


tloii. 




!il.7.V),724 


ai. r,\n. 2tt3 


fi, 127,01)2 


.S,177.Wv3 


.'..(..■a.3I3 


.S.C.70,2.S3 


2,.'>27.W«» 


Hitail nml lirivinK laws: 
















N uin l>er of |>ers<ins charged . 


4.588.87a 


Z821..VW 


.•i7.\32fl 


3«.\8fi«I 


372.303 


323,376 


130,43.1 


H lit- iK-r IIXUKIO 


8,867.3 


10. >tnu. 7 


U. SMI. 1> 


7, {M].\ 9 


(!, .'jvi. n . 


.'.. 70:l. 


.'.,1.19.8 


. rkiii^' \ iiil.itiiiiis' 
















\iiiiil*r i>f iKMsonsrharRe*! 


17,876.612 


fi,.«s.l-w 2.fi:«..'il8 


2,17«.23S 


2, ftl9. 32« 


2.t«24.42:i 


1,132.9.11 


Kiite i«T h«).(i(«) 

' "ihertrdJIuaii'l iimlor veliicle 

1. .«■■.! ■ 


34. MS. 7 


23. sa2. 8 


4:1,014.2 


42,029..'; 


47,217.0 


.'.l,.'i74.8 


44,818.1 
















N'uiiili^riif iNTioDiii'hargeti. 


1,016.558 


4«0.2«e 


1«4,.S75 


W,3.12 


102. 329 


12fi.7.W 


47. 2M 


Knie JUT l»<J.()»il 


1.964.3 


I.M3.5 


2, fiWl. 


1,648.4 


1.810.1 


2, 23.1. .5 


1, S70. .1 







.")(! 



IV, CO 



ii ^ fl — • 






S'. 1;=: S"! J't 2J'- §«. :::T S« .-T" 8» S» 

-" -p. Tl^ Sj-j c-.,a^ &g ci^ S^ «^ «.- ^o 
« « «r "C — toM ^ — M 









0»"« 

coo 



S?-! a*. 5"! 



I* 3?* 



|2£ 

^ I 



.- to 



I «< 



coei 

OQOO 











y 


S^ 


Si- 


7,_- 














^- 






— ^- 





So -r-: Z^ 
- 1 '. - n 






i— »> I- 






s? 



1' gr. is 






c ?'. I r/ 



So^ 



a- 



IP i 
o-Ms I 

«:^cn I 






005 



CO s; M 31 WC3 



ax so 
— — o >c o — 



— o; 



•5 cj cc X -"T s; 

s.^ n- =- 

X CO -^ -^ 



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r* X o — o 1^ c« >o r^ -^ X 'r 

(M. tc. O. £J. C. I;- 
lOM ffi "O Of C CI I- CO O I- 



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r»« »«n CM «ita i-r^ "im »« «-« — « oim "^tc O'^ x*" 

==?2 «s |s s^ Sj:5 gft i^ .Vj 5^ ^.^ r^^ ^.s 5$ 
_ fi - - p. .-- jij-r «« jfl j.-y. - ^-i^ 



g- ?<= ?*« s» a-^ SS"* §" S" -" ff° 2" 5" S" 

S^J rfgj dg ^'^ "<^ ■♦J^ •-:; '-B "^si "^S ''"S li '^jj 



ere »3» r-r» — — M— t»os c» ore "CM «» g— "t-^ f»^ 

5d Sa- ^- S- S^ S-i 2;i S«- S.- S.^ St:j 3« 5- 
- ,•« „•- „•« c-i* - ,--1; „■;; «S 5§ «fi r.-?. -S 



SS 



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t»^ xr^ jcc ac>c 

"=.§ -5 ".15 ""IS 



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= 5? =1 






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=.'= '■'.2 =.n: ^.'f-. ":.r4 t^ *^ •;',§ 



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"s Ss ?J« S= Ih 



go MO go 5= i^-r o— rer^ 2;~ '£." 2* 3'~ 5= — "^ 
SsJ Ss re^; — aj ^5} RcM reg Sci — ^ 00 S-r i~g ?ji 



.— -re .-c 



>.■; M t- o ci ■ 

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JJM oo ct^ Mr^ XT 'jx ^— I; I- gri m— ^ci i^^o ^re 
5?« »S' t-o" rt_: 3» t^T Sk £c5 «g 3g re^ ~Jrj '2t~ 



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I-"- MO »~x XX — » tm tt r~T =re o— t-x mx om 
M. — . c, 3. «r. R. O. re. i^. I-. c. — . M. 
T» MT reM "CO X'.'j M— i^re — — -r£ so Ti^ re-i- x — 






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04 CD »« ^r ^400 CO*4 ceo OD CO 

rf^. rf^. CO. CD. ^. "^. 

OO^^ 3Dt'> •OA (0O* O"^ 74iO 

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CO ci r- «0 CD Ok 

rfi ra «o . — 

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3 

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2: s/'.s: ii'.i: r/:=: tz=: c/'.^: £x.2:-=>'.2:'=>'.s ' - 



58 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

(PERCENT OF PERSONS CHURGEO-PART I OFFENSES) 

CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON 

CALENDAR YEAR 1956 

211 CITIES OVER 25,000 TOTAL POPULATION 25,003,768 



MURDER 



59.9% 

1,340 CHARGED 



NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 



41.2% 

797 CHARGED 



RAPE 



61.3% 

2,434 CHARGED 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 



52.1% 

14,1M CHARGED 




FBI CHART 



59 

Persons Foniul Guilty ., 1956 

Most persons cliiirjiod hy police arc found jrnilly, iirconlinj; to 
jiviiilahli' infoinijilion. In 211 <ities willi over 2'), ()()() inliahilanls 
(liirinji: lOf)!), 7 of cadi 10 prisons char^^cd \)\ cily police were found 
{guilty. 

Tlic pciceiilaiic of piTsons found jiuilty lose slij,'litly in 10.'j<j ulicn 
(■(•). 1 pcn-enl of I lie persons <har«2;cd hy police with part 1 (nuijor) 
crinu's were found iruilty as contrasted willi ordy (IT. 7 percent found 
jruilty in the precedinj^ year, 1955. 

The data for 1950 are from the reports of 211 cities with more than 
25, ()()() inhal)itants represent inj; a total population of 25,()0;i,7(lS. 
For the part I classes of ollenses, table 20 presents the number of 
offi'uses known, tlu' nund)er of offenses eleare<l by arrest, the number 
of peiNons char<red and tlu' ninnber of such persons found i^uilty. 

An analysis in table 20 of the persons found {jcuilty shows the number 
foun<l <ruilty as charfjed and the number found guilty of some lesser 
offense. 

The same 211 cities are re|)i('sented in tables 20 and 21. Table 21 
shows the number of pei-sons charjred for the part II classes of offenses, 
ihe number of persons found jruilty as charged and the number of 
|)ersons foun<l guilty of a lesser offense. The number of offenses 
known for the part II classes of offenses is not compiled under this 
system. 

Table 20 iiulicates that for every 100 crimes, i)olice cleared 27 by 
airest and chargefl 19 persons. Of the 19 persons charged, 13 were 
foun<l guilty. This demonstrates clearly that arrest data alone can 
give little indication of the amount of crime that is occurring. 

The following are ap|)ro\imations of the ratios of offenses to convic- 
tions: For the part I classes there was 1 conviction for each S offenses. 
In the individual classes, there was 1 convi<tion for each 2 murders, 
3 negligent manslaughters, 3 rapes, 4 robberies, 4 aggravated assaults, 
7 i)urglaries, 7 auto thefts, ami 10 larcenies. 

For violations in the j)arl 11 classes, the ratio of offenses to convic- 
tions is not available. For all part II cla.sses, 7 of each 10 persons 
charged by city police were found guilty and this is the same ratio 
:!s noted abov«' for tin* part I classifications. 

For all classifications under this systi'in. the highest percentage of 
ron\ictions was obtained in "driving whih' intoxicated" cas«>s while 
the lowest percentaige of convictions occurred in "lU'gligent man- 
slaughter" cases. About 41 pen-ent of the persons chargeil in the 
latter cati'gory were fouiul guilty whih* almost S7 percent of those 
<harg«'d with driving while iiito\i<!ii«'d were foun<l guilty. 



60 









PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

(PERCENT OE PERSONS CHARCED-PART 1 OFEENSES) 

CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

CALENDAR YEAR 1956 

211 CITIES OVER 25,000 TOTAL POPULATION 25,003,768 














ROBBERY 








MIS CHAMEB 


\ 


BURG 


.ARY 






72.1% 

21^13 CHARGEO 




LARCI 


:ny 






74.5% 

45,2S9 CMARCEO 


3l 


AUTO 


THEFT 




/.% 




63.9% 

14,471 CHAKiiEO 


"if 






i 




FBI ( 


:HAirT 


Ki^ 





t'ijitirv 6. 



61 



'I":il»l<- 20. — Ojffnsrs Kmnvii, Clvnrvd hy .irrt'sl, itinl \iimhrr ttf Prrsoiis Ftniiitl 
i^iiillY. /V.T6,- 211 Citifn itvvr 25JMtO in I'ninilatitm 

tTutiil iMtpululioii 2A,003,7W bosi'd on IMO ditviinial wnaus] 



Offense (Part I classes) 



TOTAL 

Criminikl homlcWlt-: 

(lO MiinltTund iiuiinoKli- 

Ki'Mt IIIilll.slilUfEbUT. 

(b) Miii)sliiii)!litor by nog- 

liKfiice 

Raw 

Koi.Ury 

Appniviito*! nssitiilt 

Hiirvlary— brwiklnjt or enter- 

Inp 

L.irrttiy— thoft (except auto 

UiWt) 

Aut« theft 



Numl>er of offenses 



Known 
U> the 
IM>IJce 



i58. Ml 



1.432 

1.017 

3.979 

21.370 

2«i,622 

112,461 

326,951 
6i729 



rieare.1 
by iirrr;;! 



iM.ftei 



1,328 

8.M 
S, 002 

8. r.7:< 

20. .'i92 

33. 377 

64. .371 
10.3A4 



Number of persons 



Charc.d 

(held fur 

pro seen- 

tiun) 



10«,70e 



1.340 

7ft7 
2. 434 
(5.91.5 
14. IM) 

21.313 

4.V289 
14.471 



Found (lullty 



Total 
Ruilty 



73.719 



803 

310 
1.491 
.^386 
7.385 

l.\343 

3.3.754 
9.241 



OfTiiiS4' 
chiirRt'd 



64,411 



616 

2.W 
1.0.')9 
4.235 
5.261 

12,879 

31.841 
a 26.') 



Lessor 
offcnw 



9,308 



187 

f.l 
432 

1. 151 

2. 124 

2,464 

1.913 
976 



riTocnt- 

;ll'c fiilllld 

Viiilly 



69.1 



59.9 

41.2 

61.3 
77. '.) 
52.1 

7^0 

74. .'. 
63.9 



02 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

(PERCENT OF PERSONS CHARGED-PART II OFFENSES) 

CALENDAR YEAR 1956 

211 CITIES OVER 25.000 TOTAL POPULATION 25,003,768 



OTHER ASSAULTS 



FORGERY AND COUNTERFEITING 



VBEZZLEMENT AND FRAUD 



57.6%| 

77.6%| 
669%| 



STOLEN PROPERTY; 
BUYING, RECEIVING. ETC. 



57.8%| 



,',EAPONS; CARRYING. POSSESSING, ETC 



^EX OFFENSES (INCLUDING PROSTI- 
TUTION AND COMMERCIALIZED VICE) 



OFFENSES AGAINST 
FAMILY AND CHILDREN 



•.ARCOTIC DRUG LAWS 



LIQUOR LAWS 



DRUNKENNESS; DISORDERLY 
CONDUCT; VAGRANCY 



GAMBLING 



DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED 



TRAFFIC AND MOTOR VEHICLE LAWS 



ALL OTHER OFFENSES 




FBI CHART 



I'iiinre 7. 



()3 



Tahh- 21. — \iiinh<-r of I'rrsttns C.hariU'il (lliUI l\tr l'rn>r< u ll,ni) ami \unilnr 
Ftntiul t^nilly, I'/.itt; 211 i'.ilns Our 2.'},l>0() in l'n{nilnlnni 

(TotHl |H>|iu)ati<)n 2'>,00:<.7(>S bit.>«<l on Iti'iO ilr(«niiial i'Ciimik] 



Offense (I'Hrt II cla"is*s) 



TOTAL 

OtluT llSSllllllS 

Koriiery ami coiinterfellintj- 

KnilK>//k'nu'iit mill fraiiil 

StoU'ii pmiHTly: biiyiiin. rereivirn;, elc... . 
WeaiHuis; carryint:. |Mis,«*,ssin|{, etc 

Sei offenses (inclinlini; i>rostitution and i^oin- 

nierriali/eil vii*) 

Offcns«'s acainsl family and children . 

Nan'Dtic ilrui; laws 

I.ii|in>r laws 



Orunkenness: disorderly conduct; vaiirancy. 

< !:lllll)lill|;. - .-.-.. 
DriviiiK while inl<>xicate<l.. 
TrartU- and motor vehicle laws.. . 
\11 other offenses.. 



Niinibcr "f iiersons chnrKcd (held for 
prostH'iition) 



TOTAL 
CHARGED 



11.447,937 

«.27l 
i. I'M 
St. 7 10 
2. IM 
«,077 



2.'>. 4h7 

l.\410 

■S fl.SS 

21,7.12 

70(1, 38« 

Mi, 4fifi 

:>\. 17(> 

10. los. Ml 

114,747 



Found ituilty 



TOTAI 
GDILTY 



8,001,188 



24. <JS5 
X 2.V3 
fi,.M.1 
1,222 
(1,709 



18. I7« 
It, 212 
4,2tlO 

16, 973 

.M2,2:.7 

20, 1117 

41, 4>«f. 

, 2fi(t, sT'.t 



<'ffrnso 
charKcd 



7,953.076 



2:1, 9.53 
2.H91 
rt, 119 
I, IH2 
•1, 402 



17. .'<)« 
H.9()9 
4,177 

16,4.1S 

.110. h:^ 

20,091 

41. IWi 

,222.314 

70, \^-i 



l4»s,ser 
offense 



49. 113 



9KJ 
3(12 
3<lf. 
<N) 
307 



3«;{ 
113 
.'.15 

l.(V.(9 

ion 

3, MM) 

3.H, .v.."! 

1.G99 



I'rrccnt- 

a»!(' 

foiind 

I'lnli V 



«» 9 



lifl. 9 
.17. H 

73.9 



71.3 

.Ml. H 

72.0 
7K.0 

72. .1 
»Wl. 3 
Hfi. 9 

fflt, H 

(•.2. » 



l'*'isitns RvU'asetl — .\o/ llflil for Prt>scriitiiHi, 1956 

111 :i(l(litioii to listing inloinuilioii roncorniiij; tlu' nnnilxT of |)oi'sons 
cliiirp'd, city police also tabulate separately the nuinber of persons 
Mirested or cited for various violations hut who are released prior to 
lilin^ of a formal char«;e. 

hiforniation eoiiceriiin<r persons released does not include persons 
who are charged hut who are found "not iruilly" or whose charsxe is 
di>^inissed for some reason. 

'Pablo 22 consists of information from 1,02.5 cities with a total 
|)o|iulati<ui of :i9, 000,472 showin<x the number of persons arrested for 
violations that occurred within tin* reportinix jurisdictions but who 
were released without a formal char<;e havinjr been filetl ajrainst them. 
.Simihir infornnif ion for the trafiic catej;ories other than drivin<r while 
intoxicated is available f<«i- i". i '. .iii.v :md i^ ixi^ininl in inblc 2.S. 



G4 



Taldi- 22. — /'«rs(.fis Kthasnl Hlllnnit Itrirm 1 1, hi for l'r,,srrii f ioii . I'f'tft: ill 
(fljrnsfs lixiritt I'rujjn-, .\iiniln'r iintl Kiili- I't-r KKtJKXt liilnthiluni s, hy 
I'lt/iii hi I l(Hi f.'ri»(//».s 

|l'o|iiihitii>n flKurc's from lUM) dfcvnnlal ci-nsus) 





TOTAL 


Oroup 


Oroup 


Group 


Oroup 


Group 


Oroup 






I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 




1.02.5 


20 cities 


26 cities. 


73 cities. 


129 cities. 


313 Cities. 


4.58 Cities 


Offense charged 


cities; 


over 


IOO,(KM)to 


.50,000 to 


25.000 to 


10.000 to 


under 




total 


2.S0,(KKI; 


2.'.0.(KKI: 


100,(K)ll; 


,50.(KK): 


25.000; 


10.0(10; 




|M)pula- 


popula- 


popula- 


popula- 


|>opula- 


popula- 


(joiiula- 




tion 


tion. 


tion. 


tion. 


tlon. 


tion. 


tlon. 




39.090,472 


18,807.537 


3.659,082 


5.107.292 


4.662.858 


4,727.902 


2,065.801 


GRAND TOTAL.. 


264. 601 


118.525 


40.662 


22.430 


28.128 


28.199 


26.657 


RATE PER 100.000 


666.7 


630.2 


1,111.3 


434.1 


603.2 


596.4 


1.000.0 


(ritiiirKil lioriii(i<ie: 
















(a) Murder ami nonneuli- 
















Kent riianslaiiulilpr: 
















Number of persons re- 
















leased . 


262 


IMi 


12 


38 


21 


23 


15 


Hate per KKJ.CMX) 


.7 


.S 


.:i 


.7 


.5 


.5 


.0 


(1)) Manslaughter by negli- 
















gence: 
















Number of persons re- 
















leased 


120 


24 


8 


43 


24 


8 


13 


Hate per 100.000.. 


.3 


.1 


. 2 


.K 


.5 


.2 


.5 


Robbery: 
















Number of riersons released. 


2,393 


1,393 


371 


17(1 


1H5 


210 


64 


Hate per 100.000 


6.0 


7.4 


10. 1 


3.3 


4.0 


4.4 


2.4 


.\ggravaled n.ssault: 
















Number of i)ersons released. 


2.304 


1.202 


4:u 


192 


191 


2-22 


66 


Hate iier 100,(K)0 


5.8 


6.4 


11.8 


3.7 


4. 1 


4.7 


2.5 


C)ther a-ssaults: 
















Number of persons relea.'^ed. 


5,590 


2,603 


785 


208 


.592 


881 


.521 


Hate per 1(K),(MK) 


14.1 


y.i.H 


21.5 


4.0 


12.7 


18.6 


19.5 


Hiirglary, breaking or entering: 
















Number of persons released. 


6.672 


2,324 


784 


,526 


954 


1.324 


760 


Hate per 100,000 


16.8 


12. 4 


21.4 


10.2 


20.5 


28.0 


28.5 


Larc-eny, theft: 
















Number of persons released. 


14.731 


,5, 349 


1,798 


827 


2.224 


3.032 


1,501 


Hate per 100,000 


37.1 


28.4 


49.1 


16.0 


47.7 


64.1 


56.3 


Auto theft: 
















Number of persons released. 


2,972 


9.W 


320 


206 


585 


5.59 


292 


Hate per 1(H).(XM) 


7.6 


.1.1 


S. 7 


5.1 


12.5 


ll.S 


11.0 


Embezzlement and fraud: 




Number of persons relea.sed. 


1,127 


.119 


124 


55 


159 


1,53 


117 


Hale per 100.000. . . 


2.8 


2.8 


:«. 4 


1. 1 


3.4 


3.2 


4.4 


Stolen i)roperty: buying, re- 
















ceiving, possessing: 
















Number of persons released. 


448 


136 


62 


17 


84 


93 


56 


Hale per HH).(KK). 


1.1 


•" 


1.7 


.3 


1.8 


2.0 


2. 1 


Forgery and counterfeiting: 




Number of i)ersons released. 


902 


ISO 


95 


101 


180 


211 


135 


Hate per 100,000 


2.3 
580 


111 
239 


2.6 

82 


2.0 
44 


3.9 
46 


4.5 
111 


5. 1 


Hape: 

Number of persons released. 


58 


Hate per KKI.OOO 


1.5 


1.3 


2.2 


.9 


1.0 


2.3 


2.2 


I'roslitution and commercial- 
















ize! 1 vice: 
















Number of persons released. 


3,398 


2, 99.". 


164 


12 


77 


65 


85 


Hate per 1(H),(KH) 


8.6 


l.l.O 


4.5 


.2 


1.7 


1.4 


3.2 


Sex olTense-s (except rape and 
















prostitution): 
















N u m ber of persons released . 


1.216 


332 


146 


SO 


251 


2S8 


113 


Hale per 1(K),(HK1 


3.1 


l.N 


4.0 


1.7 


5.4 


6. 1 


4.2 


Narcotic ilrug laws: 
















Number of persons relea.Hed. 


935 


,'•.26 


IM 


80 


32 


8:1 


33 


Hate per IIM1,(MMI 


2.4 


2.8 


4.9 


1.5 


. 7 


1.8 


1.2 


weapons; carrying, possessing. 
















el c. : 
Number of persons relea.sed. 


1.183 


477 


178 


68 


172 


175 


113 


Hate per I(M|,(HHI.. 


3.0 


2. f. 


4.9 


1.3 


3.7 


3.7 


4.2 


(•Ileuses against family an<l 
















children: 
















Number of persons released. 


1.690 


.'.44 


213 


139 


214 


3.54 


226 


Hale per KXt.tKKI 


4.3 


2.9 


5.8 


2.7 


4.0 


7.5 


8.5 


Lirpior laws: 




Number of persons relea-sed. 


8,311 


720 


195 


96 


447 


529 


324 


Hate per lOO.tMMl 


5.8 


3.8 


6.3 


1.9 


9.6 


11.2 


12.2 



(M 



Talilr 2:2. — Pt-rsons Ui-lrasi-tl If illi, ml Uriiii: llvUI fitr l'rt>s,;uliini. /'>.T6.- HI 
Olfi'iisrs h'.xiffil iraXlif. \ttinhvr anil linlc I'tr IIHtJKIO /m/kWm/mm/ >, /»• 
I'l'imltil ion (^rtni/ts — < !<tiitiiiiic«l 

|I'()|iiil;itliin lUnirt'S from \W*) <lc(-<'niii:il ixhsu."-) 





TOTAI 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 


Group 






I 


II 


III 


IV 


V 


VI 




1,02.'5 


airitlr.'i 


2« rltlp.i, 


73 cit li«s. 


120 rltlt'!». 


313 rltlcii, 


4.'>8 ritles 


0(T»ns«< d>:»rpc<l 


cities; 


over 


inii.nooio 


.'lO.dtiO to 


2.'.,000(o 


lO.CItNl to 


uinlt-r 




total 


2.''<i.(Kl<); 


a.Mi.ODO; 


i(i(i,(i(Ni: 


.MI.IXXI; 


2.'.,<I«HI; 


IH.OOO; 




|M)pill:i- 


popiila- 


IMipillll- 


IMipula- 


|Mipul:i- 


popula- 


popula- 




tlon 


lion. 


tion. 


lion. 


tlon, 


tion. 


tion. 




39.f.WI.472 


18,807,:J7 


3,ti.W.(l82 


.'i,ir.7,2l»2 


4.r,<i2,8.'>8 


4,727,1t«2 


•i,lW).Httl 


Driving while iii(oxic-iito<l: 
















Niinibor of ix'rsoiis r«'lenso<1 


1.940 


71 


)M-..t 


113 


22.') 


3 Hi 


2411 


Kiil«- ixr Itm.WiO 


4.9 


.1 


2»i. 3 


2. 2 


4.8 


(1.7 


'J 3 


Oisorilcrly coikIucI: 




Niiinln'r of persons rolt'tistHl 


9.436 


2. 2".iS 


7(X! 


7.M 


1.741 


2.C40 


l.'.NIII 


Hiito per ico.oai 


23.8 


12. 2 


ni.3 


14. .1 


37.3 


43. 1 


71.3 


l>riinki'iiiii->-s: 
















\iitii»)»T of iMTS<»ns rclwiso*! 


60.018 


14.'.»2S 


2.'<. 27f, 


3. 1177 


3. .'.!tl 


3, 47'.l 


8. 7<.7 


Kiili> |M>r l(X).(il>0 


151. 2 


7".t. 1 


(«M). ^^ 


77.0 


77.0 


73. (i 


328. '1 


\ ^k-Diiicy: 
















.\uiiif>«r of jHTsons rfl«iM'<l 


6.117 


tut 


I..W. 


42r, 


l\H2 


•••OO 


2.0<-..'i 


Kiit«> |nr lrt).oiiO . 


15.4 


2. 1 


41. 1 


><. 2 


14.0 


20.'.) 


77. .'i 


(.ininlilini:: 
















NuiiiImt of i^rsons rt'lrnsoil. 


1,829 


1, t12 


(U 


I'.t 


W 


148 


f.l 


Uiitr per I(X),»«) 


4.6 


7. 7 


1.7 


.4 


2.1 


3.1 


2.3 


Suspicion: 
















Nimilirr of jMTSons rel«i»>d. 


111.274 


C.'.i, 7i.'l 


4. r,7C 


12. 4M 


•J, 7;t3 


8.407 


11.214 


Hiito pir Hii,«!«l 


280.4 


H71.0 


127. ti 


24 1..'! 


2t>8. 7 


177.8 


2:«. 1 


All otlur olTtiis..v: 




NiiiiiImt of |M'rson.« n'loa.«^Hl. 


23,153 


8, wn) 


l,:sM) 


\.im 


\ r.22 


4.4JtS 


2.'.H» 


Rnio iH-r 100,000 


63.4 


47.3 


41. S 


32. S 


12a 


M. 1 


lOU. 1 







T;«l>l«- 2.?. — I'lrsims Iii-lrns4-il II ilhnni Itrin:: llrlil fur I'rnsmtlioii, TriiJJi'' 
I it>l)ili<>n>. t-xtfjil lirhinu M hilr In Inxiralt'tl, 1956; .\tiinb4'r antl Rnlf fwr 
KHIJMHI Inhahilnnfs, h\ I'ltpitUtlinn C.ritnps 

ll'opulation f^guri'.s from IIKM) decennial census] 





TOTAI 


Group I 


<irou|> II 


(iroup Ml 


• iroup IV' 


Group V 


Group VI 


Oil. nx ill ,r..-.-.| 

I 


•'.13 cities; 

Uitil 

I>opula- 

tion, 
2l,irj7,2in2 


14 cities 
over 

2.''iO,ii«i«i; 
|M)piila- 

tion. 
9.562,»>27 


11 cities, 
1(NI,IIINIf> 
2.'iO,Uiil; 
|M>pula- 

tion, 
1,ft7.Sft43 


.XUitie.s. 
.■-10,111111 t > 

lui.uio: 
l>oiiula- 

lion. 
2,:J23,3.'W 


8.'l<ilies, 

2.1,000 to 

."iO.llOO; 

jiopilla- 

tion, 
3,003,.'i9.'i 


100 cities, 

lO.IKIO to 

2.\ooo; 
IKHiiila- 

tion. 
2,870.029 


281) cities 

under 
10,000; 

IMtpula- 
tion. 

I,«m,tkS8 


Kotiil and drivini: laws: 

NupiNt of iMrMins re- 
leim.-.! 


83,188 
S»4.3 

7M.S06 
1. 575. 4 

ao.0M 

tST.6 


7. KV. 
82.0 

l.-a.-li.'. 

i,na).o 

2l,0h0 

23ao 


)'.. Mil 
;ls2.0 

7-2. 2.M 
4,31-2.0 

7, 243 
4.TZ3 


.•.. .MK) 
240. ft 

n7, HK 
2.WW.U 

l,.'O0 
iUl.4 


1.124.2 

20.'.. .'^4 
»l, M2. 

«Vl«87 
232.A 


13. 728 
478.3 

I.'rfs842 
.'...'a4..'i 

7.a'<9 

277.3 


!.•>, S4'J 


Kate iM-r \(o,nt\. .. 


iVCx. 4 


ParkinK violations: 

NunitxT of iMTiions re- 

U-:i.s«><l 

Rate pn- 100,001) 

ODmy iramc and nioinr vphiciv 
laws: 

Number of iMY»uns rr- 
lenwd 


«ii. 743 
\ WO. 

.'.,.107 


Kate per 100,000 . 


323.3 







66 

Classification of OfTenses 



( iilfnrin ('rhuf l{r[nnl}nfi Program 

Kcndcrs not entirely f;imili:if with the iiniroriii ciiiiic i-c|)(irt iiit; 
pioLTram inny he interested in a brief e.\|)lan!it ion of the contents of 
(lime reports included in this htilletin: 

1. These ciinie fi<j:iii-es iiic called "police statistics" to distingjuisli 
them from judicial or- penal statistics in the ci-iminal field. (Protjr-aiu 
is Noltmtarv. Inter-national Association of Chiefs of Police started it 
January 19;{(l. The FBI has acted as the c(Mitr-al clearinghouse since 
Sei)lernl)er 19."U), hy an Act of Congress.) 

2. Climes that ar-e exclusively Federal are i\ot included. 

3. Each r-eportiiig ageruy counts ordy those crimes or arrests for 
crimes committed irr its jurisdiction. A sherifY reports only for his 
rural ai-eas outside the city or town limits of aii}^ urban places in his 
county. This feature avoids duplication. 

4. "Ofl'enses known to the police" (the part I ofTenses below) are 
limited to seven classes of grave ofl'enses shown b}' experience to be 
those most generally and completely reported to the police. 

'). OfTenses (ciimes) for the part I classes are reported as they 
become known. The [)olice may learn of the occurrence of crime in a 
number- of ways: reports of police officers; citizens' complaints; 
notification from pr'osecuting or court officials; or otherwise. 

(1. OU'enses ai-e included without regard to: (a) age of the otrender; 
{h) value of |)r()perty involved; {c) recovery of stolen property; 
{(I) ar-r-ests; or- {() [)i-osecutive action. The pur-pose is to show the 
amount of crime that has occurred as distinguished fi'om arrests and 
the classifying is based strictly on the facts in possession of the police. 

7. Complaints that ai'c fourul by j)olice investigation to be gi'our d- 
less ar-e not inclirded in crime tables in this bulletin, and returns that 
ap[)<'ar incomplete or- defective are excluded. 

5. Arr-ests are not included in "offenses known" information but 
arr-est data are collected separately for tlu^ entire crime classification, 
[)arts I and II. So, the onl}' information foi- |)art II offenses is that 
based on ar-rests. 

In publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in dilfci-i'iit cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
(urrent information which may throw some light on problems of 
crime and criminal-law enforcement. 



The complete classification of crimes is shown below with brit'f 
definit ions for- each: 



07 

I'll r I I <tjj'4-ns«'s 

1. ( 'r'nii'iiKil Itoiit'nUli . i<i) M mWcr luul iiouiic^'li^ciil manshiii^lilci 
includes nil wilful frlonious lioniicith's as (listin«riiislKMl from di'jillis 
cniiscd hy iu'<:liir('nc('. \){)v^ iiol iiH-Iiidc iil lciii|)(s (o kill, nssaidts to 
kill, suicides, accidentjd deaths, or juslilialde homicides. .lustilialde 
hoinicid(>s exelud»'<l from lliis chissilieation are limited to the followinir 
types of eas(>s: (1) The killinf; of a felon hy a jjcace ollicer in line of 
duty; (2) the killiii«; of a holdu|) man hy a j)rivate citizen, (b) Man- 
slan<rhtor by iiofrlijroiice inciutles any death which the police investif^a- 
tion estahlishes was piimaiily at t lihutahle to gross n('<r!i<;ence on the 
part of som«' individual other than the victim. 

2. AV//>^.- Includes forril)lo rape, statutory lape (no force used 
victim under a«re of consent), assault to rajx', and attemj^tecl ia|)e. 

A. Nobbtnj. Includes stealin*; or takinj; anythiiit!: of value from the 
pel-son by force or violence or by putting: in fear, such as strong-arm 
robbery. stieku]is, robbery aimed. Includes assault to rob a?id 
attempt to rob. 

4. Ayyraratfd (i'<.'<aiiit. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault 
by shooting, cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by 
the use of acids. Does not include simple assault, assault and 
battery, fighting, etc. 

'). Hunjliini — bnak'nuj or t nit ring- \\\v\yn\v:^ burglary, bousebn^ak- 
ing, safecracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, 
even though no force was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. 
Burglary followed by larceny is included in this classification and not 
counted again as larceny. 

(). Laramj — tlujt (except auto theft). — {a) Fifty dollars and over in 
value; {b) under S.'jO in value inchnles in one of the above subclassi- 
fnations, depending upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of 
bicycles, automobile accessories, shoplifting, pocket picking, or any 
stttding of property or article of value whi<'h is not taken by fone 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con"' 
games, forgery, worthless <lu*cks, etc. 

7. Aut<> tfuft.- Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stoKn or 
ilriven away and abandoned, incbuling the so-called joy-riding thefts. 
Doi»8 not iiK'lude taking for temporary use when actually returned i)y 
the taker, or unauthoriz«'d use by those having lawful access to the 
\ ehi<le. 

I'ltrt II (fjjcttsca 

5. Other assaults. — Includes all assaults and attempted assaults 
wlii<b are not of an aggravat«'d jialure and which do iu)t belong in 
class 4. 

9. Forgtry ami countftftiting.— lurhulvs ofTenses dealing with tin* 
making, altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, 
.uiythiiig false which is nuule to appear true. In<Iuil«'s attempts. 



68 

10. I'Jnbt zzlniK lit itiid fnin(l.— \n{\\u\{'<. nil ofFcnsos of fraudiilciit 
coil version, ('inlx'zzlciiK'iit, rtiul oI)hiiiiiM<x iiioiicy or property 1)3' fiilse 
preteiiSi'S. 

11. Sfolni propf/fi/; biii/ind, rcairiiuj, possfssinff. — Iiichides Imyiuij. 
i('ceiviii<!;. and jiossessiiij; stolen property as well as attempts to coni- 
init any of those ofTonses. 

12. \\'t(i])o7is; carrip'nf/, possfsfiinf/, ffc. — Tiu'hides all violations of 
regulations or statutes eontrollin*; the carryin<;, iisinfj:, possessin*;, 
furnishing, aiul iiianufiuturing of deadly weapons or silencers and all 
attempts to violate such statutes or re<:;ulations. 

\'.\. Prasfihifinti and cotmiK rcinlized rice. — Includes sex offenses of a 
comnierciali/.cd nature, or attemi)ts to commit the same, such as 
piostitution, keepin*:; hawdy house, procuring, transporting, or de- 
taining wonu'n for immoral piu'poses. 

14. Sex ((ffenf<es (except rape and prostitution and commercialized 
vice). — Includes ofTenses against chastity, common decency, morals, 
and the like. Includes attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Includes offenses of 
ii()nsui)port, neglect, desertion, or abuse of family and childicn. 

IG. A^arcotic drug laws. — Includes offenses relating to luircotic drugs, 
such as unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — With the exception of *'di"unkeniu'ss" (class 18) 
and "driving while intoxicated" (class 22), liquor law violations, 
State or local, are placed in this class. Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Ijicludes all offenses of druidvcimess or intoxi- 
cation, 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Includes all charges of committing a 
breach of the peace. 

20. Vagrancy. — Includes such oll'enso ;is vagal)()U<lag(', begging, 
loitering, etc. 

21. ^^a/z/ft/Z/zr/.— Includes olfi'uses of piomoting. permitting, or 
engaging in gambling. 

22. Driving while intoficated. — Inchules driving or (>|)erating any 
motor vehicle while drunk or under the inlluence of li(|Uor or narcotics. 

2'.\. Violation of road and (hiring laws. — Includes violations of regu- 
lations with respect to the pro])er hai\dling of a motor vehicle to 
|)revent accidents. 

24. Parking riolations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other riolations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Includes viola- 
tions of State laws and municipal ordinai\ces with regard to traffic and 
motor vehicles not otherwise jjiovided for in classes 22-24. 

2(). All other offenses. — Includes all violations of State or local laws 
for which no |)rovision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Susj)icion. — This classilication includes all persons arrested as 
susi)icious characters, but not in coimection with any s|)eci(ic offense, 
who ai'e released without formal chargt's being i)laced against them. 






UNIFORM 

CRIME 
REPORTS 



FOR THE UNITED STATES 



FOR RELEASE WEDNESDAY, P. M., APR. 23, 1958 




ISSUED BY THE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C 



Volume XXVIII 

ANNUAL BULLETIN 



Number 2 
1957 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 



FOR THE UNITED STATES 



Volume XXVIII— Number 2 
ANNUAL BULLETIN, 1957 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United States Department of Justice 

Washington, D. C. 




AI)VIS(tl(V 



International Association of Chiefs of Police 



UXITF.I) STAI i:S 

GOVERNMENT l'KINTIN(; OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1938 



Boston Public Library 
Superintcndont of Documents 

MAY 5 - 1958 

(]<)lU<MllS 

PaKO 

Suinni!n\ ol noIhiiic XX\ 111, No. 2 OD-TO 

Criin(> trends: 

EsliiiiiihMl luiiuIxT of iiiiijor criiiics (hihic 2t) .... 71-74 

C'il\ IriMuls (t-il)l(<s 2.") 27) 75-85 

Kiiral tiviuls (tiihlr 2S) S6-87 

Monthly Viiri;i(ions (lal)lo 2«)) 88-90 

Crime latcs: 

City rates (tal)l(>s ;i()-;};i) 91-95 

Rural rates (table o4) 96 

ClVeiises in individual areas: 

Cities over 2r).()()() (tal)le i^.')) 07-107 

.lurisdietions outsid(> tli(> I'nitiMl Stales (tal)le ;')()) . . . 108 

Sn|)|)leniental eiinie data: 

()irens(^ analysis trends (table ;i7) 109-110 

\alne of propcM'ty stol(>n by type of ciinie ((al)le ilS). . Ill 
\ able of property stolen and \ able of pro|).Mty rcM'overtMl 

(table :^9) Ill 

Ago, sex, and rac(> of piM'sons a i rested: 

Trends (tabl(> 40) 112-11;^ 

A<,M> distribution (tables 41-42) 114-llt> 

S(>.\ distribution (table 4:i) 117 

i{aee distribution (table 44) MS 

l\(>i)ortin<; area, (table 45) 11!) 120 

Classilieation of olVenses 121-12/5 

Index to volume XXVllI 12ti-127 

(II) 



UNIFORINI CRIME REPORTS 



.1. rdjjar H«>ov»'r. Dircrtor, Fcdi-ral Ilurrau of lnv»'sli>jali«tn, {'. S. n«>par(mi-n( 
of Justice, \\ ashin^loii, I). ('. 



Voluim- XXVIII JANUARY I95S Numbir 2 



Simiinary 



I rituv Irriuls 



Estitiiutod Major Crimes. Kstimatcs of the nunilxr of offonsos 
known to j)()li(c in l!l")7 total 2,70(1,400. This estimate inclndcs tlic 
so-called pait 1 crimes from minor larceny to murder. The 1057 
figrure is hi<;her than evi>r before; 0.1 percent ahove 1956 and 2.'i.0 
|)erceiit over an averaije of the previous five years. 

Chancres from 105G to 1057 amont; the eijrht categories ranged 
from a decreikse of less than one percent for murder to an increase 
of 12.2 percent for hurglarv. 

Murders totaling 6,020 were down 0.7 peicent fiom 1056 and 
compared with the average for the previous five years 1057 showed 
a 1.1 percent decline. Negligent manslaughters were up 1.6 percent 
in 1057, and the total of 5.740 was 2.5 percent above the average for 
the previous five years. Ha|)e, including statutory ofTenses, increased 
3.8 percent in 1057 to mimher 21,080 or 13.0 percent ahove the 
previous five-year average. The estimated 100,110 aggravated 
as.saults in 1057 were .3.8 percent above 1056 and 8.1 percent higher 
tlf.:in the average for 1052-56. 

Robberies, armed and unarmed, numbered 61,410 in 1057, an 
increase of 8.2 percent for the year and an increase of 1.4 percent 
above the average for the previous five years. 

Other property crimes (l)urglary, auto iheft and other larcenies) 
increased 12.2 percent, 0.0 percent, and 8.4 percent, respectively, in 
1057 and, when compared with averages for 1052-56. these classes 
were up 20 percent. 26.2 percent, and 27.3 percent, in that order. 

About 470 millio?! dollai-s was lost to robbers, burglar's and thieves, 
but police recoveries reduce<l the loss to about 212 million dollars. 

In terms of volume alone, crime at 56.2 percent above the 1050 
level is rising four times as fast as the total population — up 13 percent 
-ince 1050. 

Cily Crimes. Part I ofTenses known to the police in 2.585 cities 
increased 8.9 percent, the total being influenced substantially by gains 

(60) 



70 

i]i (lie niinicroiis properly crimes of l)iir<rljii y aiid (liefl. In iiidix idiial 
odViiso classes, percent aj^e chaiij^es ranj^ed iVoiii (lie one decrease of 
0.0 in nejjiigent. inanslan^hter to ati inciciise of 12.2 in l)in-<j:lanes. 
Cities under this |)r(\<j:rani i::enei;ill\ iire incorporaled pl;ices with at 
least 2,.')()0 iidial>il.ants. 

Hiiral (Iriiiios. Tart I oOenses known lo I lie police (includinfi; 
sheriffs and other aj2:cncies) in ar(>as outside cities increased 1 1.1 per- 
cent, here apiin as a result of increases in the numerous proj)erty 
crimes of burglary jind theft. Percentage changes in individind 
offense classes ranged from the only decrease, minus 4.o percent in 
murders, to a plus 12.:^ percent in huigliiri(>s. 

Mftnthly \ ariatioiis 

Crimes of nun'der, rap(> and aggravated assault tend to occur more 
frequently in the warmer months, ^segligent manslaughter does not 
follow this tendency of the other crimes against the person but follows 
a curve similar to that for property crimes, tending to increase in the 
cool(>r months of the year. 

Properly Kecovered 

I'olice in a limited nund)ei' of cities reportcul rei-overy of oS cents 
tor every dollar's worth of property stolen. Over 9o percent of the 
stolen cars wei"e recovered. 

Persons .irrt'sN'tl 

Arrests for all ( lime classilical ions by polic(^ in 1 .220 citic^s inci'eased 
4.;> percent in 19")7 as (•onii)ai(Ml with 1 '.)")(). In these same cities, 
arrests of pei-sons undcn- the age of IS increased !).S percent. Pei;- 
(•(Mitage changes from year to year indicate that arrests of persons 
under IS have increascMl .").") i)ercent sinc(> 10r)2, I he fii-st year com- 
parabl(> figures were available. During the same period, 19r)2-r)7, 
the I'nited Stat(>s population in the 10 17 age group has increased 22 
|)ercenl. Assuming that tiie icporting cities have experiiMiced a 
similar population growth, it api)ears that the percentage increase in 
arrests of young peo|)le is two aiul one-half times the percentage 
growth of their population grouj). 

Persons under IS years of age were arrested in 10.3 percent of all 
arrests for the crimes against the person of murder, negligent man- 
slaughter, rape and aggravated assault. For the crimes against 
property (robbery, bm-glary, auto theft and other larcenies) young 
people under IS represt'uted 'h].\ percent of all arrests. 'Their greatest 
participation in part 1 offenses as evidenced by arrests, was in thefts 
of autos. In that category they representiMl 07. (> percent of all arrests. 



c 



rime 



ThmkIs 



Miijin- Crime I itlnis, 19,^7 

Troiul. A (•(nitiiiucd upswing raised 1057 major crimes al)Ove 
oilier years. I'liited States estimates total 2,790,400 major crimes, 
'i'liis is '.).l i)ercent above 195G, the previous lii^li year. Also, it is 
'2'.\.\) [)ereeiit lii<rhei' lliaii the avera<;e of the previoiis 5 years. 
Based on police reports, these trends i-ef)reseMt 011I3" part I offense 
( hissifications. 

Police do not count offenses known for all ciime classes. In 1920, 
tliey selected a group of classifications to meet their administrative 
needs. Police called these g:rave offenses and the ones most generally 
and completely repoiMed to them by the public. These are the part I 
or major crime classes. They are identified in table 24 with a com- 
parison of the estimates for 1056 and 1057. 



Table 24. — Criniv Trviuls, ('.ily ami liitnil 

[Estimated number of major crlmrs in tlic rnitcl Stiifis, 19,56-1957] 



Olfciise 



TOTAL 

Murder and nonnoRlifrcnt manslaughter 

Manslaughter by negligence 

Hull? 

Hoblxry 

.Vceravated assault 

Hir.-.:l.iry— breaking or entering 

L.ito'nv— theft 

.\uto theft- . 



Number of olTi'M-. 



1956 



2, 563, 150 



6,970 

5,650 

20.300 

5fi. 770 

9f.. 430 

525, 720 

I.,'<87, 590 

2i':i. 7'3I 



8.796,400 



6,920 

6,740 

21,080 

Gl.ltO 

100,110 

.590. 020 

1.721, 170 



Change 



Number Percent 



+833,850 



-50 
+90 

+780 
+4. MO 

+3.680 

+64,300 

+ 133,580 

+ 2^.. 230 



+9.1 



-0.7 
+1.6 
+3.8 

+8.2 

+3.8 

+ 12.2 

+8 4 

+9.9 



Increases occurred in all pari 1 crime classes except one. Offenses 
of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter decreased; but this decrease 
was less than one (0.7) percent. From high to low, the percentage 
increases are: burglary, 12.2; auto theft, 0.0; larceny, 8.4; robbery, 
8.2; rape, 3.8; aggravated as.sault, 'A.H; and manslaughter by negli- 
gence, 1.6. Crimes of burglary, larceny and auto theft represented 
O.i percent of the part I crimes in 1057. As a group, these three 
increased 9.4 percent. Because of lh<ir bulk they controlled the 
over-all increase of 0.1 percent. 

(711 



72 

Po])iiIali(»ii iiuil Crime. In Iciins of volinno alone, crime at 56.2 

percent jil)OVc (lie l!)')fl level is risin<r four times as fast as the total 
population (up ]'.i percent since 19o0). 

Measured a^jainst each 100,000 inhabitants, there were 1,642 crimes 
in 1057, as compared with 1,188 in 1950. Had the crime increase 
corresponded to the population growth, the part I crime rate would 
remain 1,188, the same as the 1950 fig:ure. Source of population 
fig:ures for 1950 and 1957: U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau 
of the Census; Current Population Reports, Series P-25. 

Crimes Against the Person. Victims of killings, rapes, and aggra- 
vated assaults totaled 133,850. They immbered 4,500 or 3.5 percent 
nioi-e than 1956 victims. 

Only one 1957 count decreased. Murdei- and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter declined, but only 0.7 percent. Such killings totaled 6,920 
or 1.1 percent below the previous five-year average. 

Negligent manslaughters increased from 5,650 in 1956 to 5,740 in 
1957. These 90 additional ofTenses caused a 1.6 percent increase in 
this classification and brought it to 2.5 percent above the average of 
the previous five years. This classification for the most part reflects 
those trafTic deaths due to the gross negligence of some person other 
than the victims. 

Offenses of rape increased 3.8 percent in 1957. Such offenses num- 
bered 21,080 or 13.9 percent above the average of the previous five 
years. Information on page 110 reflects that 56.6 percent of the rapes 
in a limited number of cities were forcible in character. Beginning 
with January, 1958, statutory rape will not be reported in the ofTenses 
known data; this classification will be limited to forcible rapes. 

Aggravated assaults increased 3.8 percent, to 100,110. This 3.8 
])ercent rise })rought the 1957 figure to 8.1 percent above the average 
for the previous five years. Aggi-avated assaults gcnerall}- are those 
assaults accompanied by the use of a deadly weapon. 

Crimes Against Property. Over 95 percent of the 1957 part I 
crimes had pi-operty as their object. Together, they increased 9.4 
percent, and this is representative of the generally substantial increases 
in the individual classes. Even robbery reversed its two-3'ear down- 
ward trend to inci-ease 8.2 percent. 

If the 1957 experience of a limited number of cities is typical, page 
1 1 1 , robbers, burglars and other thieves grossed about 479 million 
dollars. Police reduced this to about 212 million dollars by recover- 
ing stolen property valued at about 267 million dollars. 

]{obbers, armed and strong-armed, personally confronted their 
victims to take 12 million dollars. Their 61,410 attacks in 1957 
topped their 1956 figure by 8.2 percent. This placed robberies 1.4 
jxrcent al)ov(> an average of 1952-56. 



73 



CRIME TREND--U.S. 



BASED ON THE ESTIMATED 
NUMBER OF MAJOR CRIMES 




if- 



1956-1957 PERCENT CHANGE 



+12.2 




TOTAL HUBOER lEElieUT RAPE ROBBERY t66R*VtTE0 BURSURT URCdY AUTO THEFT 
HAISUUGHTER A^UULT 



FBI CHART 



Finitrt' 8. 



74 

Binjrlaiy-brcaking; or mtoring reflected the sharpest rise of any 
major eriine (lass. A 12.2 percent rise l)roiiy;ht the 1957 total of such 
olfenses to ')90,02(). Losses totaled about 101 million dollars. Com- 
l)are(l with the previous five-year average, burglaries are up 20 
jiereent. 

A 9.0 percent rise in auto thefts brought tlie 1957 total to 289,950. 
These crimes in 1957 were 26.2 percent above an average of the 
])revious five years. Over 55 percent of part 1 property loss occurs 
in this classification. Autos valued at around 249 million dollars 
were stolen in 1957. This high loss rate was offset by recoveries 
1 (Staling about 232 million dollars. 

Larcenies (except autos) increased 8.4 percent with losses of about 
117 million dollars. These crimes arc now 27.3 percent above their 
five-year average. In the total of 1,721,170 are all types of larcenies 
other than auto. Purse-snatchings, very similar to robberies, num- 
bered about 28,000. Other thefts, not so serious from the standpoint 
of personal encounter with the criminal, are nevertheless important 
to the police administrator who cannot consider a current market 
value as an index to ci'iminal intent. 

Estimated Crime Totals. Estimates consist of actual counts for 
83 percent of the population and the assumption that the reported 
areas were representative of those not reported. Populations covered 
were 91 percent city and 70 percent rural. 

Compilation by police of offenses known data is basically a measm'c 
of the police problem in a selected area of crime activity. Limitation 
of such (lata to part I ofl'enses is discussed on page 122. 



75 



City C.ritur Tn'inls 



III I'.t")7. cilv police icporlcd I lull |)ini I oUciiscs inciciiscd S.*) pcr- 
cciil. 'PlioiiiLrli siihsliiiilijil, (his clinnjjo is loss lliiiii llir \'2.7 pncciil 
iiicicasc ill (licsc criiucs in lO")!; over 1055. In (he past five ycm- 
I licrc have Ixmmi iiicrcjiscs in I licsc cil \- ci-imcs foi- cjicli year cxccpl I!).")'; 
when !i niiiins O.S pcicciil cliaiiirc was ro^islcicd. Increases in llie 
|)asl live years have ranp'd from 4.0 perceiil lo 12.7 percent. 

('i(y police r(>porl(Ml increases in all hiil one of (he |)art I od'eiises. 
Maiisl!iii,uhl(>r hy ne*:Ii.ireiice decreased less than one (0.9) j)ercenl. 
I'ercen(a<:e increases for ol hei- (•lassi(ica(.ioiis, in descending oi'der, are: 
hurirlary-hreakini; or enleriii<]:, 12.2; aiilo (lief(, 9.1); rohhery, S.l; 
larceiiN -diefi. S.O; rape, .'^.7; ajr^ravatod assauH, ''i.7; and ninrder and 
iioniiei:litren( manslaiiirlder, 1.4. 

Tahles 2.') and 2(i re(le<'t suniiiiaries of ofTonsos known (la(a received 
from 2,'»sr) ci(i(>s represent in*; a po|)iila(.ion of over SO million under (he 
\\)'A) decennial census. Kepor(s from iden(ical ci(ies were used for 
10.")(') and 19')7 in preseiilinjj: (i-end information in (ahles 2") and 2(i. 
Citii's, under (his |)ro*rram, are mostly incorpora(ed places with a min- 
imum of 2.r)0() popuhUion accor(lin>i- (o the latest decennial census. 

Tahle 2") presents information with cities <rroiipe(l hy size. In 
table 20, these same cities are arransrcd hy *:-eoLMaphic divisions and 
states. 

Cities by Size. City tj:roups in tahle 25 include a special analysis of 
cities in «:roup 1. those over 250,000 in population. An examination ol 
all city pouj)s. iiicliidin<r th(> hreakdown for the lar<rest cities, reflects 
that increases in part I crimes ian<red from a liiirh of 15.4 percent in 
cities uiid(>r 10,000 to a low of 4.:i percenl in cities with 750,000 to one 
million inhahitants. 

Kohhery, hiir^dary, larceny and auto theft increased in cities of all 
sizes. .Murder. ne«rli^''ent iiianslaujjfhter, rape and a,i:,trrava(<'d assault 
redected decreases scattered throuirhout the city jxroujjs with the 
exception of cities over one million. Cities over one million reported 
no decreases in individual crime classes. 

An examination of the iiidivi«lual classifications and all city ^'rou[)s 
rellecis <-han<res ran<rin«r from minus IS. 7 percent to plus Ki.li percent. 
The extreme of the decreases occurred in ne^dijrent manslau«rhter in 
cities under 10.000. The liij^li of (he increases was in the next lar«rer 
^'roup, 10.000 to 25.000, and was a I (>.('» percent change in the auto 
theft classilication. 



4.V(n2R' — 5R- 



76 

Cities by Location. Increases in crime in all f^eo^rapliic divisions 
iire sliown in lahlc 2(1. Incroasos i-anfrod from a hi<j:li of 12.0 percent in 
both the West South Central and (lie Pacific States to a low of 6.4 per- 
cent in the Middle Atlantic States. However, the Middle Atlantic 
States had an experience similai- to tliat in the Pacific States in that no 
decreases occui-red in the individual crime classes. Burglary and 
larceny were the oidy classes to show increases in all geog:raphic divi- 
sions. Murd(>r and nonnegligent manslaughter and negligent man- 
slaughter each reflected decreases in four divisions; rape and aggra- 
vated assault each decreased in three divisions; and robbery and auto 
theft each decreased in one division. 



77 



Tnhlf 2'i.—City Crime Trviuls, I'/.'ift-.'iT, hy I'ttpiilarum (Irtmpn 

(Offonsos known to tln' polUv in '.'..'Vs.') citit's, tni:il |ii>|iiil:iti<>ti Kii,:Hi!»,(iii, iciscM on v.tM .licrnnlal ocnsiisl 



Popiilntinn Orniip 



TOTAL: 
1956 

1957 

Percent change 

• '.roup I Totiil: 41 cities 
over 2.".0.(HK); iM)pulii- 
tion, .•M,W2,!).'>,'"i: 

19.Vi 

1«.^7 

IVrt-ent chancp 

Ti cities over 1,000,000; 
popiihition, 17,404,- 
4M): 

19.V> 

19.'>7 

I'orc«>nt chnnRe. . . 
C cities, 7.10.000 to 
1,000.000; poplll:ition, 
MOO.atl: 

I9.V. 

1957 

IVrcvnt chnnKo 

7 cities, Mm.OOO to 
7.10.000; population, 
4,0f«>.f>.'l4: 

19.V. 

19.17 

Perci'iit chanitp 

23 cities. 2.V).noo to .100.- 
000; popiilution. 8,- 
341..1«): 

lav. 

19.17 

I'eroi'nt chanjrp 

'iroiip 11: tvi cities, 100.- 
n«(i to 2.'.<i.nii<i; popula- 
tion. 9.449,704: 

195« 

1957 

Percpnt chaiiRp 

'".roup III: 124 cities. 50,- 
IXm to KMl.tXNI; |>opula- 
tlon. 8,837,545: 

195« 

1«57 

Percpni chanitp 

firoup IV: 2r,2 cities, 2.1.- 
iNV) to .lo.ma): (mpula- 
llon. U.242.r.24: 

195fi 

1957 

Percent rhnnite 

'iroup V: <i«;7 cities, 10,- 
UK) to '2.1.IMIU: |)opula- 
tlon, 10,274.700: 

lft16 

IB57 

Percent ehnnire 

' iroup \' I: l.427cltles. un- 
• ler lO.liai; (mpulation, 
7.032.1183: 

IMfi 

lflS7 

pprcspot chansp 



TOTAL 



1.672.972 
1.821.248 
-f8.9 



802. 283 

852. 809 

+6.3 



363. 153 

382.116 

+5.2 



136,540 

142.478 

+4.3 



83.048 

87. 749 

+6.0 



220. 542 

240. 466 

+9.0 



229.653 

254.704 

+10.9 



184,073 

301.194 

+8.8 



181.874 

201. 779 

+10.9 



176. 213 

107.669 

+ 13.8 



97.978 
11S.0M 
+ 15.4 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and 
non- 
nepll- 
Rcnt 
man- 

sIuurIi 
ter 



4.003 
4.061 

+1.4 



2. 2fi5 

2.270 

+.2 



iMfi 

lis:? 

+:?. ii 



.392 
390 
-.5 



2S.T 

291 

+2.8 



r>44 

noo 

-5.9 



554 

575 

+3.8 



3A4 
374 

+2.7 



329 
3.32 
+.« 



302 

3.19 

+ 12.3 



180 

171 

-9.5 



Man- 
slaiif! li- 
ter hy 
nepll- 
penee 



3.841 
3.815 
-0.9 



1..120 
+ 1.S 



.1.35 
5.14 

+:$. f. 



240 

245 

+2.1 



247 
-4. 5 



498 

513 

+3.0 



490 

402 

-18.0 



288 

329 

+ 14.2 



2r« 

292 

+8.6 



151 

144 

-4.0 



123 

Kill 

-18.7 



Rape 



7,907 
8. 2S2 
+4.7 



4,f)99 
4.9.1('. 
+.1. 5 



l.llf) 
1.0<)7 
-1.7 



f.72 

"■.\ 

+ 1.1.0 



1.420 
1,4.1<". 
+2.5 



l.lll 
1.130 
+ 1.7 



8r>g 

821 
-5.5 



7on 

7(M 
-.3 



719 

8ai 

+ 12.0 



son 

517 
+12 



Roh- 
l)ery 



3.1. IM 
■M. 7.31 

+7.2 



20. 240 

20. KUi 
+2.9 



5. f.79 
0.000 
+ lf..2 



2. f.7l 
2.914 
+9.1 



r.. 593 

7. .^Hl 

+ 12.0 



4.8ai 

5. 473 
+ 13.9 



2.084 
3. Z19 
+9.2 



2. 315 
2.5A1 
+ 10.6 



I.Olfl 
2.002 
+9.2 



1.194 
1.307 
+1.1 



Arrhi- 
vate<l 
!i.s.sault 



44.204 

45, (194 
+3.4 



25. f.25 

27. 425 

+7.0 



8. fi.19 
9. 379 

+8.3 



2.340 
2.0S4 
-10.9 



7. .180 
»■>. 800 
- 10. 2 



7.900 
8. 016 
+9.1 



fi.80A 
0,941 
+2.0 



4.7.18 
4.5.18 
-4.2 



4.104 
4.5.14 
+11.0 



Z3B8 
2,371 
-1.1 



Hiir- 

Klary - 
hreuk- 
liiK or 
enler- 
ln(? 



1W..172 

200. K34 

+9.4 



89,708 

97, 171 

+8.3 



24. 021 

25.849 

+5.0 



19.172 
21.3.18 
+11.4 



50.071 
.Vi. 4.10 
+ 12.8 



.12.015 
60.251 
+ 15.8 



36,021 
41,944 
+ 14.5 



34.938 
39.593 
+ 13.3 



34.408 
39.795 
+ 15.7 



30.4n0 
23.700 
+ 1S.8 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



986,448 

1,065,038 

+8.0 



417,843 

438, 743 

+.1.0 



182,3.^■^ 

187. 940 

+3.1 



70. 820 

73.840 

+4.3 



41.309 

43. 700 

+5.6 



123.321 

133. 257 

+8.1 



138,707 

150,748 

+8.0 



iiao.19 

127,470 
+7.2 



123, .112 
130. 4.s,S 
+ 10.0 



121 
131 

-i 



CITY CRIME TRENDS 



A 




OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE 

1956 •■ 1957 PERCENT CHANGE 



Sj '.i^ 'ttfSah . ft rt. ^ -aowA^ f'-i ^f •»,.As-Ar//vv«v ^-K^fihAf* 



1957 

DECREASE 

FROM 1956 

TOTAL 

MURDER 



NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

RAPE 

ROBBERY 

AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 

BURGLARY 

LARCENY 

AUTO THEFT 



1957 

INCREASE 

FROM 1956 



.9: 



+ 8.9 



t + 1.4 

= + 3.7 



+ 8.1 



+ 3.7 



+ 12.2 



+ 8.0 



9.9 



2^85 CITIES TOTAL POPULATION 80,369,611 



FBI CHART 



I'ifiure 'J. 



79 



Talilc '2(t. — i'ily i'.riinr Irvmls. I'K'tft-HT, hy C.nttirttpliir IHiisiitns ttnil Sitttrs 

[UlTitiso known lo ihi- jiulliv la 2,58.') rlties, total poixiliilioii 8(),30g,)ill, husv^X on lUAO dou-nnlitl cciihusJ 



Divisions and States 



TOTAI 



TOTAL: 

1946 1.672.978 

1957 1.821. 248 

Percent change > -|-8.9 



New EnKland, 183 cities; 
|:(i|>iil:ilion.(>,404,884: 

1950 

19,17 

IVrwnt change 

< ■onnc'C'ticut. 27 cities, 
liopuliktion, 1,272,577: 
IU.V5 

iit:.7 

.Maine, 19 cities; popula- 
tion, 330.032: 

1956 

I9.'>7 

MiissHchiisotts, 96 cities; 
[>i>l>iil:ition, 3,780,88»: 

Ui.V. 

iy:.7 

.New iiampshire, l.") cities; 
IHipuliition, 252,028: 

l«.Vi 

1«.'.7 

Rhode Island, 17 cities; 
population, 673,758: 

1956 

1957 

Vorinont. 9 cities; popula- 
(ioti. U-l.tiOO: 

lU.Vi 



Middle AtUntic, 580citics; 
population, 21,305,536: 

1956 

1957 

Percent change 



N"cw Jersey, 167 cities; 
(Kiptiiation, 3,562,703: 

l'J.Vl 

lU-W 

X. tt York. 186 dtlcs; 
l-M»il:ttlon. 11,776.416: 



IViinsylvanla, 227 cities; 
{mpulutlon, 5,967,417: 

IttSfi 

l'.<.'.7 

East North Central. fia'> 
cities; population, 
l».6r)3.955: 

1956 

1957 

Percent change 



Illinois. i57citles:poptito- 
'•■-•■■. '..022.287: 



InilUii:t, 74 cities; popula- 
tion. I.H)<u,Z76: 

19.V, 

19.S7 



86, m 

93. m 
+8.i 



16.710 
18. 086 



3.944 
4.670 



51.419 
55.002 



8,012 
8,354 



11,867 
18,317 



790 
975 



310, UB 
390, W 



53.034 
60.404 



183,684 
187,815 



73. 731 
82.888 



S7t,7l8 
+S.7 



88. 674 
87.178 



48.81* 

46.700 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
mail- 

slatich- 

tlT 



4,003 
4.061 
+ 1.4 



100 
-H.O 



es8 
+t.s 



374 
371 



li^ 
188 



005 

880 

-i.6 



3.M 
363 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter ny 
negli- 
gence 



2.841 

2.815 

-.9 



Rape 



m 

184 
-9.ti 



125 
114 



633 

639 

+1.1 



123 
124 



212 
240 



631 

sot 

-S.7 



180 
100 



11.818 
12.259 
+3.7 



45/ 

467 
+S.S 



74 
IDS 



275 
291 



3,387 
3,450 
+1.9 



373 
403 



2,106 
2,013 



908 
1,004 



t,SSH 

t.S57 

(') 



778 
748 



153 
IM 



Rob- 
bery 



48. 397 

52.323 

+8.1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
hreak- 
Ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



Auto 
theft 



1.174 
I.SS5 
+7.8 



215 
244 



811 
8Sf 



94 
100 



10, 831 
10, 707 

+.r 



1,418 
1. 769 



5,797 
5,423 



3,416 
3.515 



n,S08 



6.949 
7.494 



905 
958 



70.170 362.023 986.448 187.272 
72.734 406.117 1.065.038 205.901 
+3.7 +12.2 ; +8.0 +9.9 



/. 435 
1,410 
-1.0 



482 
501 



734 
701 



176 
170 



18,160 
17. 940 
+11.1 



2,012 
2,307 



10,306 
11,345 



3.832 
4.288 



13.843 

13.30$ 

-S.» 



4.804 
4.7S 



m 

974 



4.587 
4,718 



731 
745 



11,9.58 
11,935 



400 
457 



2,716 
3,041 



129 
144 



78,850 

83,451 

+8.9 



13.9.%4 
16,789 



44. 375 
44.984 



18.331 
31.678 



87,496 

73. its 

+18 



19.843 
30.734 



9,188 
9.381 



61,311 

54, 6h3 

+8.3 



9,373 
10, 235 



2,680 
3.413 



29,981 
30, 938 



1,401 
1,660 



7,2«7 
7,594 



609 
723 



188,884 

175,411 

+5.1 



28,100 
30,613 



101,264 
103.205 



37,600 
41.508 



tl4,3«9 
tli.SOl 



43.033 
44.899 



35.456 
38,607 



10. 9i6 
14.373 
+31.3 



1,899 
2,200 



426 
418 



7,485 
10.091 



168 
204 



917 
1,3.53 



51 
101 



36,690 

S8,t91 

+7.8 



6.883 
8.249 



19.339 
19.730 



9. 358 
10.323 



36,188 

38, m 

+8.8 



7.7»4 
8.047 



5.581 
Sb50O 



Se« footnote nt end of inbh 



80 



TaliN- 26. — Cily Crhnr Tri-iids, /'A)6-.»r. hy Cvitiinipliii- l)ii isiims nml 
Slatt's — < .<iiiliiiiH-(i 

MTcn.scs known to the polioe in 2,5S5 cities, total population 80,369,611, based on 1950 decennial census] 





TOTAL , 

1 


Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Divisions and States 


Murder 
and 
non- 
ncpli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


MiihiKan, 111 cities: pop- 
iilulion, 3,896,126: 

i'.)r.fi 

I!t.'i7 

Oliio, 177 cities; popula- 
tion, 5,097,033: 

19.16 


106,456 
110,149 

90,377 
100,322 

26,477 
29,374 

127,913 

137, m 

+7.4 


151 
161 

276 
252 

24 
30 

?39 

2?9 

-4.2 


92 
72 

178 
191 

,34 
26 

173 

184 

+6.4 


823 
816 

441 
451 

164 
178 

64s 

751 

+1«.4 


4,038 
3,748 

2,452 
3,092 

164 

188 

S,iSl 
3,800 
+15.8 


5,399 
5,247 

2,472 
2,032 

393 
321 

3,078 
3,431 
+11.5 


18,508 
20,882 

16,741 
19, 177 

3,217 
3,349 

24,1 fO 
27,625 
+I4.S 


66,879 
67,774 

58,741 
64,630 

20,260 
22,594 

82,877 

87.755 

+5.9 


10,566 
11,449 

9,076 


19,57 


10, 497 


Wisconsin, 86 cities; pop- 
ulation, 1,759,223: 

law 


2,221 


1957 

West North Central, 293 
citii's; population, 
6,.115,7ti7: 

1956 


2,688 
13.500 


1957 


13.632 


Percent change 


+1.0 


Ii>\v:i, 62 cities; popula- 
tion, 1,070,362: 
19.16 


16. 228 
19, 100 

19,377 
20,634 

29,256 
28,839 

48, 951 
54,489 

9,292 
8,950 

2,676 
2,975 

2.133 
2,420 

m. m 

e08, 56S 
+7.1 


10 

1:5 

38 
35 

17 
15 

160 
148 

12 
15 

2 

3' 

7i9 

796 

+6.S 


14 

18 

24 
26 

63 
65 

46 
54 

25 
18 

i 

1 
2 

sss 

570 
+18 


49 
75 

104 
122 

109 
126 

354 
394 

18 
25 

9 
»') 

2 
3 

l.lSt 
l,07t 
-6.9 


120 
164 

358 
334 

.598 
586 

2,039 
2,592 

145 
96 

17 

14 
11 

4,sn8 

4,808 

+11.4 


100 
95 

-480 
501 

115 
133 

2,209 
2,522 

160 
166 

6 
V.i 

8 

1 

15,347 

15,407 

+.4 


2,622 
3,698 

3,751 
4,227 

6,207 
6,100 

9,470 
11,610 

1,388 
1,334 

366 
324 

316 
332 

42,888 
47,967 
+11.8 


12, 171 
13, 775 

13,391 
14,208 

19,186 
18,966 

27, 772 
30,325 

6,556 
6,222 

2,094 
2,320 

1,707 
1,939 

107.866 

116.471 

+8.0 


1,142 


19.17 


1,262 


l\un.sa,s. .53 cities; popula- 
tion, 844,505: 

la.Ki 


1,231 


1957 


1.181 


M iiine.sota, 72 cities; pop- 
iil;vtion, 1,514,923: 

1956 


2.961 


1957 


2,848 


Missouii, ,52 cities; popu- 
lation, 2,012,898: 

19.56 


6,901 


19.57 


6,844 


Nobfiiska, 28 cities; pop- 
ulation, .540,483: 


988 


19.57 

North Dakota, 11 cities; 
population, 1.54,441: 
19,V) 


1,074 

192 


19,57 


294 


population, 178,155: 


S5 


l'.l.57 


129 


South Atlantic,' 244 cities; 
lii.pulation, 7,781,560: 
19.56 


22,091 


19,57 


21,612 




-2.2 


lation. 121,758: 

19.56 


3,252 
3,301 

49,387 
56,208 

19. 469 

1 22, 998 


13 
11 

ICC 
171 

142 
129 


4 

9 

61 
73 

34 
40 


2 

125 
130 

87 
118 


71 
71 

994 
1,305 

309 
437 


25 
35 

1,.5.59 
1,625 

1,207 
1,191 


718 
737 

13,403 
16,053 

4,409 
5, 510 


2,032 
2,117 

28,945 
32,347 

11,267 
13,062 


382 


19,57 


319 


Florida, ,^3 cities; populn- 
lion. 1.449.022: 
19.5«; 


4,131 


1957 


4, .504 


OporRia, 25 cities; popu- 
lation. 9-J9..557: 
19,5«l 
19.57 


2,014 
2,502 



Sec lixiiiiiiti- :ii cihI of i.-ilih'. 



81 



Tahlr 2h. — City Crimr Tnntis, /'>.76-.7r. hy Crnuniitlilt Dltishms ami 
Slatfa — ( ioiiliiiii«'4l 

(OfTensi's known to the police in 2,585 cities, total population 80,369.nil, based on 1950 docennlal rensas) 



Divisions ami Slates 



Marvlanil, IScilies; pop- 
ula'llon, 1,133.8S7: 

IO.V> 

1957 

N'orlh Ciirolina, 55 cities; 
p«piiiatioB, 1,109,571: 

1956 

1957 

South Carolina, 23 cities: 
population, 429,703: 

1950 

1957 

Vircinia, 44 cities; popu- 
lation. 1.346,»i2: 

ig-Sfi 

1957 

West VirKinia. 22 cities; 
population, 458,942: 
IH-V) 

ly." 

Eait South Central, 105 
cities; population, 

3,045,164: 

1956 

1957 

Percent change 

Alabama, M cities; popu- 
lation, 912,915: 

1956 

1957 

Kentucky, 28 cities; pop- 
ulation, 763,138: 

1956 

1957 

MLssLssippi, 18 cities; 
population, 391,885: 

1956 

1957 

Tennessee, 29 cities; pop- 
ulation, 947,246: 

I9.V5 

1957. . ... 

West South C«ntr«l, 184 
cities; i>opulation, 5,- 
9»6,9I7: 

19VJ 

1957 

Terccnt change 

Arkan.<ia.<i, 25 cities; pop- 
ulation. 375,929: 

1958 

1957 

Ix>ui.<iana, 23 cities; pop- 
ulation, l.(»H.42H: 

1956 

1957 

Oklahoma, 34 cities; pop- 
ulation, 822,894: 

1958 

1957 

Texas. 102 cities; popula- 
tion. 3.680,886: 

1958 

1957 



TOTAL 



28,133 
26,344 



23,525 
26, 221 



9.767 
11.274 



39,823 
40,245 



4.859 
5.618 



67, 9H 
+9.G 



15.287 
18,602 



21.534 
20.522 



5.042 
5,970 



16,058 
18,361 



JSl9tS 

+it.e 



6,363 
7,838 



>6.saa 

n,770 



18.728 
as. 393 



104.461 
116. 8M 



Criminal 
liomlcldc 



Murder 
and Man- 
lion- ! slauKli 



negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



113 
135 



124 

124 



S7e 
388 



136 
157 



142 
117 



6SS 
-1.9 



106 
103 



389 



ter hy 
negli- 
gence 



let 

It! 
-ti.7 



tss 

909 
+8.i 



184 

ao4 



Hape 



227 
222 



128 
122 



27f> 
232 



(98 
-III 



Uoh- 
bery 



HI I 

H54 



271 
319 



148 
145 



921 

865 



I,i7l 
1, 358 
-7.7 



Aggru- 
vatc<l 
assault 



123 
72 



775 

8tt 

+8.5 



241 
258 



80 
108 



416 
442 



293 
362 



710 
.554 



391 
3.58 



s.ats 

3, Its 
+10. « 



168 
131 



821 
884 



212 
290 



1.624 
I.H40 



2.277 
2,451 



3, 977 
3,942 



481 
412 



2, 9.52 
2,762 



248 

281 



3. .509 
3, iv; 
-t.l 



Bur- 
glary - 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



1.161 
1,207 



1,018 
973 



360 
384 



070 
872 



6,tS^ 
+/.7 



457 
514 



1.267 
1.043 



347 
338 



4.063 
4.341 



.1.010 
4, 475 



4,230 
5. 433 



2,320 
2,748 



8, 405 
8,708 



1,171 
1,245 



tlirrr, 

17, US 
+16.8 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



4,172 
5,126 



4,687 
4,930 



1,218 
1,508 



4.599 
5.584 



3e.7SS 

+n.» 



1.59H 
1.760 



s.ao9 

5,037 



3,900 
5.430 



35.979 
2H.831 



13.219 
13, 133 



12.816 
14,128 



5,783 
7,037 



22.9(4 
23. .506 



2,760 
3.315 



t9.90i 
3t,t83 
+10.6 



7,657 
9,555 



10. 571 
9,800 



2,948 
3,490 



8,030 
0,429 



S9,&7l 
100.901 
+l»6 



3.555 
4.347 



12.043 
12.018 



1Z37I 
14.090 



81.803 
6H.848 



82 

Talilr 26. — City Cr'itnv Trrruls. l'f.ift-57^ Ity Geofiraphic Divixions and 
Slalvs — Coil till lift] 

[ (Offenses known to the police in 2,685 cities, total population 80,309,611, based on 1050 decennial census] 





TOTAl 


Criminal 
homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Divisions and States 


Murder 
and 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


Mountain, 132 cities; pop- 
iilalion, 2,166,150: 
iy.5»; 


7t 68S 
81, 704 


84 

101 

+g0.ll 


78 

6S 

-SO. 6 


384 
+19.3 


1,366 

1.669 

+22.3 


1,093 
1,195 
+9.3 


12,956 
15,412 
+ 19.0 


49,205 
64, 159 
+10.1 


7.605 


1957 

Percent change 


8.722 
+14.7 


Arizona, 14 cities; popu- 
lation. 226,454: 
lo.se 

1957 


13, 300 

14, 571 

23, 637 
25, 125 

5.670 
5,761 

8.337 
6,579 

2,305 
2.460 

9.409 
13, 182 

9,554 
11.100 

2.471 
2.926 

318,948 
359, 147 

+je.6 


18 
32 

26 
28 

8 

8 

5 
5 

3 
2 

8 
18 

10 
4 

6 
4 

347 
363 

+4.e 


32 
22 

15 
16 

4 
3 

4 
3 

1 
1 

8 
7 

13 
9 

1 
1 

Bti 

644 

+4.« 


46 
87 

130 
153 

13 
19 

21 
10 

8 
8 

24 

45 

42 
40 

13 
22 

i,4S7 
t,700 
+9.9 


244 
260 

718 
869 

44 

39 

75 
66 

51 
66 

S3 
117 

118 
196 

32 
56 

8,774 
10,061 
+li-6 


341 
421 

380 
344 

36 
31 

87 
60 

27 
24 

129 
160 

74 
130 

19 
25 

9. 58/ 
10,367 
+8.2 


2.323 
2, 679 

4,915 
5,855 

681 

811 

777 
772 

523 
.507 

1.786 
2,343 

1,531 
1,943 

420 
502 

65,961 
78,075 
+18.4 


8,838 
9,198 

14,581 
14, 874 

4,565 
4,533 

4,825 
5,106 

1, 517 
1,624 

6.088 
8,778 

6,981 
7.957 

1,810 
2,089 

196,091 

214,991 

+10.2 


1.458 
1,872 


Colorado. 28 cities; popu- 
lation. 715,678: 
1956 


2,872 


1957 


2,986 


Maho, 20 cities; popula- 
tion. 195,332: 

1956 


319 


1957 


317 


Montana. 18 cities; popu- 
lation. 218,428: 

1956 


543 


1957 


657 


Nevada. 3 cities; popula- 
tion, 46,093: 

1956 


175 


1957 


228 


New Mexico, 14 cities; 
imputation, 260,215: 
1956 


1,283 


1957 


1,714 


It ah, 19 cities; popula- 
tion, 369,469: 

1956 


785 


1957. 

WyominR, 16 cities; pop- 
ulation, 134,481: 

1956 


821 
170 


1957 


227 


Pacific, 259 cities; popula- 
lion. 8,699,678: 
1956 


36,115 


1957 


42.056 


Percent change 


+16.1 


California, 186 cities; pop- 
ulation, 6,841,003: 
1956 . . .. 


265. 581 
299, 864 

18. 248 
19,711 

35.119 
39, 572 


301 
304 

16 
24 

30 
35 


466 
486 

24 
31 

32 
27 


2.190 
2,465 

84 
71 

183 
164 


7. 865 
8. 952 

369 
375 

.540 
724 


8,997 
9.897 

263 
236 

321 
234 


.56, 344 
66,806 

2,987 
3,697 

6,630 
7,572 


158,304 
175, 125 

13, 170 
13,511 

23,617 
26,355 


31,114 


1957 


35,829 


OrcKon. 36 cities; popula- 
tion, 677,692: 

1956 .. 

1957 


1.335 
1,766 


Washington, 37 cities; 
population, 1,180,983: 
19.'J6 


3,766 


1957 


4,461 







> Dccrcasi' (if li'ss than onclciilli iif 1 percenl. 
' Includes I lie District of Coluinhia. 



83 



CITY CRIME TRENDS 




V jAj 1940-57 TREND VERSUS 1937-39 AVERAGE 

1 >S»-1 353 Cities -Total Population 42,719.693 



OFFENSES KNOWN TO THE POLICE 



CRIMES AGAINST 
THE PERSON 

PERCENT CHANGE 




IS40 '41 '42 '43 '44 '45 "46 "47 '48 '49 "50 "51 '52 "ii '54 '55 '56 '57 





CRIMES AGAINST 
PROPERTY 

PERCENT CHANGE 


' I ; 1 1 1 

KET 

:n mtUIT UKUT 

NIMir . UTI TWI 
















•100- . 1 1 1 














.80 
































yf^' 


*M- 






























^ 


^ 


.40 ' 

M 1 








^ 

" 




*^ 




-^ 




,^ 


^ 

,^^ 


^ 




>< 


^ 


-'' 


Wa- 


b-^ 


l>t_ 


y 


-^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


' 








— 


^ 


















-«- 










1 !•;''■! I 1 1 1 



FBI CHART 



tiuiirf lU. 



4 .V.t'.»28 •—.">? 



84 



l.nii'^-lrrm City Trends 



Crime Conn I. For each 100 city crimos on the average in the 
part I classifications immediately before World War II there were 177 
in 1057. 

A study of long-range data for selected cities, as presented in talde 
27 and figure 10, reflects increases in all part I crime classes. For 
eacli 100 of the respective crimes averaged for 1937-39, in 1957 there 
were: 111 murders; 111 negligent manslaughters; 219 rapes; 128 
robberies; 207 aggravated assaults; 176 burglaries; 182 larcenies; and 
IGS auto tliefts. 

Popiilulion Changes. Population counts for the 353 cities repre- 
sented in table 27 are available from the decennial counts in 1940 
and 1950. During the period 1940-50, population increased 17 
percent in these cities while crime increased only 11 percent. 

There was no 1957 population count for these cities. However, 
assuming that the population increases since 1950 as estimated b\'' the 
Bureau of the Census are characteristic of the population changes 
in these selected cities, then 1957 population was 13 percent above 
that for 1950. 

For the same period, 1950-57, total part I crimes rose 48.8. 

Based on the above percentage change figures, population was 
growing faster than crime from 1940-50, but this trend reversed 
sharply from 1950-57 and the gi-owth in crime far outstripped that 
of population. 

Cilies Used. To present a proper continuity in crime figures for 
examination of long-range changes, selection of cities was limited to 
those whose method of reporting has been consistent over the years. 
Tliis determination was made by an examination of reports and from 
available information concerning major changes in reporting 
procedures. 

This study is limited to 353 cities having over 25,000 inhabitants. 
Their total population was 42,719,693 in 1950. The identical 353 
cities arc represented for each year, 1937-57. 



85 



Tul.U- 27.— Cily Criino Tnmls, 1937-57 

[OfTrnsos known to tlu' polUv in 3A3 ellli'S with ovit 2'>.(i<t() lnhu»)lliints, total population <2,710,003 buac'<l on 

19.V) <li>oonniikl ct-nsus] 



Ycnr 



11*37 
IU38 
IU39 
MHO 

llMl 
1<.M2 
11)43 
UM4 

I'.M.I 

im; 

I'XS 
l<»9 

IWI 

1952 

19.53 
19M 
1955 
1956 
1957 



TOTAL 



605,447 

eis.oes 

637. 514 
661.988 

661. 132 
619. 165 
604.554 
621. 925 

702. 720 
745. 282 
708. 014 
704. 410 

734. 925 
736. 721 
779. 458 
809,267 

845,208 

876. 275 

884.682 

1,003.641 

1,096,337 



Mur- 










dlT, 


Mnn- 








non- 


slmicli- 






ARRta- 


ni'Kll- 


tcr liy 


Rape 


Uot). 


vutol 


K»'nl 


nmll- 




biTy 


assault 


iimn- 


Kcniv 








slitUKh- 










tor 










2,479 


1.978 


3.047 


2<'.. rm 


19,841 


2. 13.) 


1.428 


2,9«17 


27.83*1 


18. 70.5 


2.223 


1.229 


3.235 


2»i. 347 


19.003 


2,21)8 


l,4tW 


3.207 


25, 2(i9 


20.312 


2. ao.-i 


1.8.52 


3, .513 


24.212 


20, 7;{0 


2.278 


l.tiUS 


3.1103 


22. 903 


22.914 


2,030 


1.428 


4.349 


22. »a(i 


22. 120 


2,141 


1.424 


4. .592 


22, 301 


25. 698 


2, 3<;i 


1.723 


5. (M2 


27,(171 


28.020 


2, r.2i> 


1.724 


5. 225 


31,028 


30.228 


2.535 


1.481 


5.2«8 


29. 395 


31.004 


2.. 533 


1,4.50 


4.987 


27.8.50 


31,014 


2.332 


1.308 


5. 137 


29. 093 


32. 144 


2.370 


1.544 


4.994 


25.909 


32.3.50 


2.302 


1..557 


5. 3«5 


20.086 


31.884 


2,471 


l.(°>88 


5.302 


28.044 


30. 130 


2.439 


1.599 


5.449 


31.813 


38.004 


2,3.52 


1.573 


,5.339 


34. 139 


37, 97f. 


2.410 


l.fV43 


5.910 


30.075 


38.78.5 


2.502 


1. ~m 


ft. .502 


31.471 


39, 439 


2.533 


1.722 


0.752 


34,041 


39.833 



DurRla- 
ry- 

nrcuklnK 

or cntor- 

InR 



137.7,57 
I38.1»;J9 
14.5.208 
140.301 

i:j8.013 
\Zi.W2 
127,3<i8 
132. 7ti8 

1.50. 83.5 
171.029 
IM, 709 
103, Wi.5 

173.312 
170, 708 
109, 209 
181,210 

191,339 
206, 4»> 
202, o«;o 
218, 248 
247, 845 



Liir- 

wny— 

theft 



32.5, 074 
346, 178 
309, 442 
391,812 

.39.3.015 
372, t«V4 
342. 337 
346, 000 

375. 488 
40.5, 829 
39»i, 798 
402. 543 

422.583 
425. 325 
457. 977 
460,921 

470,771 
497,201 
505. 01 1 
586.9<i9 
632,215 



Auto 
theft 



87, 075 
74,816 
70, 767 
71,350 

76,866 
69, l(i3 
82,280 
86.941 

105, 574 
97, .590 
70. 824 
70, 008 

68.416 
73,521 
85,137 
92,889 

97,734 
91. 269 
97,588 
110,744 
130,706 



8(5 



RURAL CRIME TRENDS 



OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE 

1956 - 1957 PERCENT CHANGE 




1957 

DECREASE 



TOTAL 
MURDER -4.5 



NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

RAPE 

ROBBERY 

AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 

BURGLARY 

LARCENY 

AUTO THEFT 



REPORTING AREA 



INCREASE 

FROM 1956 



FBI CHART 



+ 11.1 



: + 4.4 

+ 4.0 



+ 8.5 



+ 4.2 



+ 12.3 



+ 11.6 
+ 11.6 



Sheriffs' Offices -1,394 
Rural Villages -153 



State Police - 12 

Rural Population - 38,823,058 




liuun' II. 



87 



r/ r 



r, 



th 



III arras outside llu' liiiiils of citii'S 1057 pnit T criiucs were 11.1 
pcrcMMit above the IOTjO level. Areas (lesit^nated as rural under census 
pnxt'dures have in many areas assumed eity-like proportions in tlieii 
crnne problem. The contimied <ri'o\vth of nonfnnn |)opuhition in 
ai\d near tiie I'ity eenters in all probability has been a ])otent factor 
in the steady growth in "rural" crime in recent years. Reports ol 
-hei-ill's cover those areas in counties which are outside the hniits of 
I ities. (Cities are incorporated places with at least 2,500 inhabitants 
according to the hxtest decennial census.) Acconhngly, reports for 
"rural" ari'as in some instances include not only farming areas but 
also city-like communities which lie just outside the limits of a city. 

The 1957 rise of 11.1 percent in rural crime, though substantial, 
was not as marked as the 1950 increase of 15.5 percent. In 1957, 
oidy one crime classification rellected a decrease outside cities. 
Murders declined 4.5 percent. Increases in the other classifications 
ranged from a high of 12.;^ percent in burglary to a low of 4.0 percent 
in rape. Percentage increases in descending order are: burglary, 
12. S; larceny, 11.6; auto theft, 11.6; robbery, 8.5; manslaughter by 
negligence, 4.4; aggravated assault, 4.2; and rape, 4.0. 

Source and Area. Reports for rural areas, those outside the limits 
of cities, are received from sheriffs, State police, and village officers. 
Sheriffs report only those part I offenses which occur outside cities 
in their counties. This is true even when the sheriff investigates crimes 
which occur in a city within his county. State police in some instances 
report in place of sheriffs. Reports from village officers are included 
in the tabulations only when the villages are not covered in the re- 
porting by sheriffs or State police. 

Data from identical reporting agencies were available for 1956 and 
1957 for comparison, as shown in table 28. The 1950 population 
represented by this reporting totals ;i8,82.'i,058. 



Table 2S.— Rural Criinr Trriids. l^rUt-HT 

|Iiasc><l on reports of 1,3W sheriffs, 153 rural vlllace olllwrs and 12 State police; total rural population 
38,823,058, based on the 1050 decennial census] 



Offense 



TOTAL 

'turder an'l nonncKllci-nt manslaughter 

■ lanslauuhter by ni-KliK<-nce... 

HaiK" 

Koobery 

\ ' Lv<iault 

I aking or entering 

I ft. 

.\in<> iri'ii 



Number of offenses 



1056 



1957 



310.892 313. SOS 



1.: 
2. i- 

6,(»S7 
6,737 

U,577 
00,031 
1M.780 
30,788 



7,300 

V,. ISM 

III. im 

172,743 
29,843 



I'ero-nt 
chimKe 



4-111 

-4.5 
+4.4 
+4.0 
+&5 

+4.2 
+ IZ3 
+ 11.6 
+ 11.6 



88 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 



;l 



mi^ 




OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE, 1957 
2,781 CITY POLICE AGENCIES 
TOTAL POPULATION 81,761,726 



OFFENSES AGAINST THE PERSON 




NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 



tr *■ «-> 



5 ^ =i S £ 




^^ 









».l 


AGGRAVATED 




:l 


ASSAULT 




30-,. ^ 

A(fhAC£ f 

2K 


► — — .^^^ 


^ 


IK 




mi 




9% 





FBI CHART 



/:'. 



89 



M<nillily larlnlunis 



Kiir\\ of the pint I crinic.^ follows a sonsoiinl fiirvc which is fniily 
lOMslaiit ill its Miiinliotis ymv after year. Crimes with property as 
the object occur in the cooler luontlis of llio year wiiich are also the 
iiKMiths with more darkness. Crimes ajjainst the person, except for 
manshniLrhter hy negli*;eii('e, seem to increase with the heal of the 
year. These patterns are not. piccise within the individii.-il chissidca- 
lions hut tend to follow some characteristics of the indicated seasonal 
\ ariatioiis. 

One crime apiinst the j)erson, manslaughter by negligence, follows 
the general curve of projjerty crimes. That is, it declines in (he 
warmer months of the year and increases in the colder months with 
its high in December. This similarity to the property crimes is in 
the seasonal curve only. Deaths in the manslaughter by negligence 
classification are for the most part those of traffic victims who die as 
the result of gross negligence on the ])art of some other ])erson. The 
hazardous driving months aj)pear to have a strong influence on the 
incidence of this crime. It should be observed that not all traflic 
deaths are rei)resente(l by the actual offenses entered in this negligeni 
manslaughter category. 

Data in table 29 are limited to the reports of 2,781 cities which 
\\ni\ a total |)opulation of 81,761,726 in IQoO. The accompanying 
charts, figures 12 and \'^. were derived from the data in table 29. 



TahK- 29. — Monlhly t'arinlUms, 1957 

(Dally average, offenses known to the police in 2,7.si citiis. total jjojjulation 81,761,726, based on 1950 

decennial census) 





Criminal homicide 


Rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
as.snult 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




Month 


Murder, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


JanuAry-December 


11.4 


7.8 


33.0 


144.1 


SOl.O 


1. 126. 6 


S. 951. 


470.5 






Jan uurv -March 


10.4 
11.7 
11.7 
11.7 


7.5 
7.7 
7.0 
8.0 


33.1 
35.2 
36.3 
31.1 


155.5 
126.0 
131.8 
162.3 


170.9 
214.6 
224.5 
188.4 


1.105.6 
1,053.8 
1.072.2 
1.214.8 


2.826.1 
2.014.8 
2.051.0 
3,111.7 


581.3 


.\prll-June. . 

July-.'^optember 




OctohiT- December 


' - ■ 


January .................. 


9.4 
1L6 

las 

11.4 

1X3 
11.3 
IZO 
II. 1 

13.0 
9.8 
11. « 
13.5 


8.0 
7.3 
7.3 
7.8 

7.1 
8.1 
0.1 
7.3 

7.7 
7.6 
0.2 
10.0 


32.5 
32.8 
33.0 
34.0 

35.0 
3A. 5 
35.0 
37.3 

35.0 
31.2 
32.3 
30.0 


158.5 
164.3 
144.6 
143.1 

110.0 
118.8 
135.5 
131.4 

138.7 
130.7 
198.7 
108.1 


160.4 
180.4 
100.0 

aoi. 1 

213.0 
220.8 
226.4 
238.8 

218.2 
180.4 
102.6 
102.4 


1.120.3 
1. 234. 6 
1.148.7 
1, 123. 8 

1.021.4 
1,017.3 
1.061*. 9 
1.075.7 

1.071.8 
1.04H.3 
1, 105. 1 
1,400.3 


2. 543. 7 
2. 9.S5. 8 
2.991.3 
3,030.5 

2.893.6 
2.H2I. 1 
2. 90«V r. 
3.036.7 

2.011.1 
Z045.6 
3.061.6 
3.336.2 




February...................... 




.March 


: '1 '. 


April 


57 i. 5 


May 


.'.29 9 


June .. 


■"1 •> 


July 


■ ; ' : 


.\UKUSt 


'.<• 1 


September.................... 


561.3 


October ............... 


.S77. 3 


.November 


640.(1 


December 


650.11 







00 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 



1 


^-^i 


A 


L ■'. 




Ik_7*^ 


4: 


Wi 


-^/fli 


f / ' 



OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE, 1957 
2,781 CITY POLICE AGENCIES 
TOTAL POPULATION 81,761,726 



OFFENSES AGAINST PROPERTY 




FBI CHART 



I'ifiitre 13. 



Cj'iiiK* Kates 



( ilv Kates 



rnil I Climes icpoi-tcd l)y 2,7S1 city poller depMitiiieiils are pie- 
denied ill Inhles lU), '.U, and 32, togclher with nii expression of ihr 
niiinl)er of eriines |)er 100,000 injiahitants neeordini; to the \\).'A\ 
di'eeiiiujd census. C'<)ni|)iirisons between an-as should he made with 
ciiution. I'opulation in the Uiiitod States increased 13 perceni 
hetween \\)'A) and l'.»")7. Tlie lO')? rates are hased on IDoO popula- 
tion li<«;ui'es of cit ies because no later data are available on a iial ion wide 
basis. 

Elimination of |)opulation dilferences by convert in<2, raw crime 
liirnn-s to crime rates reflects variations in crime experience in dif- 
ferent areas. It should be observed that a high crime rate in one area 
does not in itself demonstrate that other areas, with lower crime rates, 
have incomplete reporting. It is recommended that the user of these 
data consider the factoi*s affecting crime listed on page 97. It is also 
recommended that the user be familiar with the background informa- 
tion on j)ages 121-123 concerning offenses known to the police. 

Crimes per unit of population seem to increase with the size of the 
city, but this gradation in all crime classes is not so clear above the 
level of 50,000 iidiabitants. For example, table 30 reflects that in the 
cities with population ranging from 750,000 to one million there were 
more robberies (pvr 100.000 inhabitants) than in the cities with one 
million or more inhabitants. 

Crime rates of states and geographic divisions^ table 31, reflect 
difrer<>nces in crime rates among the various areas. Again reference 
should be made to page 97 regarding the factors aflecting crime. 
Also, note table 33 which shows the number of cities of each group by 
si/e included for each geograi)hic division and state. Those areas 
with no big cities may be expected to have fewer crimes per capita in 
lint' with the remarks above concerning the differences in crime rate- 
by size of city. However, the size of the cities in the various area 
does not account for all the variations found in the rates. Note tin 
grouping of the rates in table 32 by size of cities within geographic 
areas. 

Similar difFerenees may be observed even if the rates are adjusted 
on the basis of population changes since 1950. Estimates of popula- 
tion changes for individual states are available. These estimates 
combine populations in cities with populations outside of cities and 
are therefore not strictly applicable to changes in populations for the 
cities represented in tables 30-33. 

451»»28*— 58 1 (91) 



02 

TaliK' 'M).-—Cily Crime Rates, 1957, by PopiiUilian Groups 

[OlTensos known lo tlu- pollcv and rate \wt 100,000 Inhabitants. Population lljiuns l)a.«<'il on 1950 decennial 

census] 



l'()|iulatlon group 



TOT.VL, QHOUP.S I-VI 

2,761 cities; total population 
81,761,726: 
Number of offenses known... 
Rate per 100,000 

ORorp I 

41 cities over 250,000; population 
M.932,9.V.: 
Number of offenses known.. 

Rate per 100.000 

.'i cities over 1.000,000; population 
17.4(M,4.50: 
Number of oiTenses known.. 

Rate per 100.000 

»i cities, 7.'iO.O(«) to 1,000,000; popu 
lation, .M00,2'.il: 

Number of ulTen.ses known.. 

Kate per ino.ooo 

.ties. .'lOn.dOO to 7.M),000; popu 
1 it ion. 4,0M;,r.."ii: 
Number of offenses known.. 

Rate per 100,000 

23 cities, J.'iO.OtM) to .iO0,0O0; popu 
lation. K..341..V)0: 
Number of olfense.^; known.. 
Rate per lOO.OOfl 

r.Korr II 

ai cities, 100,000 to 2,iO,000; popu 
lation, <1,.574,473: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 

liROVP III 

124 citie.x, .50,000 to 100,000; popu 
lation, S,k:{7..">45: 
Nuiiiber of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 

r.noiT IV 

2«5 eities, 2.'>,000 to ,50,000; popu 
lation, !t.:{42.t'),il: 
Number of offenses known.. 
Rate per 100,000 

• iROip V 

003 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; popu 
latiop, 10,(M4,044: 
Number of olfenses known.. 
Rate per KMI.OOO 

r.Rofp VI 

.:•'(■% cities under 10,(K)0; popu 
lation, K,4.30,0.5S: 
Number of oifen.<ses known.. 
Rate per 100,(MM1 



Criminal 


homicide 


Mur- 




der, 


Man- 


non- 


slauph- 


nepll- 


ter by 


pent 


negli- 


man- 


gence 


slauRli- 




ter 





4, 150 2, 842 
5. 1 3. 5 



2,270 



983 

5.6 



390 



291 
7.1 



006 
7.3 



0.1 



374 
4.2 



338 
3.6 



353 
3.3 



229 
2.7 



1,548 
4.4 



554 
3.2 



245 
4.8 



236 
5.8 



513 
6.1 



404 
4.2 



329 
3.7 



293 
3.1 



1.55 
1.5 



113 
1.3 



Rai)c 



12, 384 
15.1 



8, 2S2 
23,7 



4, 956 

28,5 



1,097 
21.5 



773 
18.9 



1,4,56 
17.5 



1,139 
11.9 



821 
9,3 



713 
7.0 



836 
7.9 



693 
7.0 



Rob- 
bery 



52, 589 
64.3 



37. 731 
108.0 



20, 836 
119,7 



6, 600 
129.4 



2,914 
71.3 



7,381 
88.5 



5. 515 
57.6 



3. 2.59 
36.9 



2, 571 
27. 5 



2,134 
20.0 



1.379 
16.4 



Bur- 
Aggra- glary— 
vated break- 



assault 



Ingor 
entering 



73,709 411,201 1,077,442 
90.2 502.9 1,317.8 



Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 



45, 694 
130.8 


200,834 
574.9 


27, 425 
1.57,6 


97, 171 
5.58.3 


9,379 
183.9 


25, 849 
50C>.8 


2,084 
51.0 


21.358 
522.6 


6,806 
81.6 


.56. 4,56 
676. 8 


8,828 
92.2 


61.002 
637.1 


6,941 
78.5 


■11.914 
•174, 6 


4,671 
.50.0 


40. 145 
42t).7 


4,711 
44.3 


40. 866 
383.9 


2,864 
34.0 


26,410 
313.3 



438, 743 
1,256.0 



1S7, 946 
1,079.9 



73,840 
1, 447. 8 



43,700 
1, 069, 3 



133, 257 
1, 597. 5 



152,214 
1, 589. 8 



127,470 
1,442.4 



137,532 
1,472.1 



137,847 
1,295.1 



83, 636 
992.1 



93 

Tublf Ul. — i'.ily ('.rinu- liitlrs, l'}'i7 . (ty l^vanrnphlc Diiislaiis uiul Slulvs 

(Ollciises known per 1(K),(m»o iiihubitaiits. Poiiulution biusod on 1950 dccennliil census] 



DIvLslon and State 


Murder, 
notuiegll- 

gent 

man- 
slaughter 


Robbery 
64.3 


Aggra- 
vated 
a.ssault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Larceny 
-theft 


Auto 

theft 


TOTAL 


6.1 


90.3 


602.9 


1,317.8 


S64. 7 






New EnKland . 


1.4 


ie.6 


21.9 


329.6 


849.3 


922 ' 


CoiiiKvtieut 


2.1 
1.2 
1.3 

.4 
1.2 

.9 

3.1 


19.2 
9.1 

22.9 
2.8 

14.8 
2.8 

40.9 


39.4 
12.4 
18.2 
2.8 
25.2 


370. 7 
22.'.. 7 
318.7 
1S1.3 
451.3 
138.9 

389.4 


804.3 
1.034.1 

«I7.0 

f,M. 7 
1,127.1 

678.7 

818.7 


17.'J '■'. 


Maine 


J 26 7 


Ml\.>iS;»<'linS0tl8 


2tW 1 


Nt w IIuin|>shire 


80 


RIuhJo Island ... 


20(1 


Vorniont 


96.; 


Middle Atlantic 


83.4 


178 7 






Now Jersey 


2.7 
3.2 
3.1 

4.7 


49.1 
45.9 
57.9 

82.3 


63.9 
96.1 
70.6 

70.7 


467.9 
381.4 
3.'i8.2 

392.5 


855. 4 
874.7 
688.7 

1, 221. 5 


23(1 ' 




167 1 




17(1 : 


Ea.st North Central 


204 






IllinoU 


6.0 
3.9 
4.1 

4.9 
1.7 

3.8 


123. 6 
49. K 
95.1 
60.4 
10.6 

59.6 


78.1 
50.7 
132.9 
39.7 
18.3 

53.9 


343.7 
486. 5 
.'i34.6 
375. 3 
190.1 

435.6 


746. 1 
1, 496. 1 
1, 735. 4 
1, 263. 6 
1,281.1 

1,381.5 


I3:i 


Indiana 


291 




29'.' 


Ohio 


2or, 


Wl.sconsln 


152 


West North Central 


214 






1 owa 


1.2 
4.1 
1.0 
7.3 
2.7 


15.0 
39.5 
38.7 
121-.. 5 
17.6 
11.0 
6.6 

61.4 


9.0 

59.3 

8.8 

123.1 

3t).5 

8.4 

.6 

197.7 


342.0 
500.5 
402.7 
572.1 
247.9 
209.8 
184.4 

613.7 


1. 278. 6 
1, 682. 4 
1.251.9 
1, 487. 5 
1.153.7 
1..502.2 
1,067.2 

1,484.2 


\\r> ^ 


Kansas 


131' 




18>> 


Missouri . 


33t 


Nebraska 


197 1 




190.4 


South Dakota 


1.7 
10.2 


71.5 


South Atlantic ' 


273.7 






Dt'laware 


8.4 
11.6 
13.9 
8.1 
12.3 
9.1 
9.2 
3.7 

12.6 


56.2 
87.5 
44.5 
75.3 
28.7 
32.8 
63.5 
33.3 

42.6 


27.4 
113.6 
137.0 
216.2 
354. 7 
104. 6 
203. 6 

60.4 

113.8 


607.3 
1, 093. 9 
590.4 
394.7 
487.2 
613.5 
642.6 
269. 

649.2 


1.694.8 
2. 198. 5 
1.366.4 
l,l.'i8.2 
1, 2t'>6. 1 
1, 612. 4 
1, 731. 1 
713.4 

1,037.6 


252 3 


Florida 


303.4 




257 3 




445 5 




186 8 


South Carolina... 


19.S. 9 


Virginia 


292.7 


West Virginia 


126. 4 


East South Central 


280.0 








16.2 
8.6 
12.9 
12.2 

9.2 


36.6 
70.2 
20.6 
3<i.9 

51.2 


125. 2 
124. 5 
103.9 

99.8 

102.7 


518.7 
642.7 
365.9 
584.9 

690.0 


975.9 
1,267.9 

851.6 
1,002.7 

1.668.1 


2«KI. 1 


Kentucky . 


520. 1 


MLsslsslppl 


107.6 


Tennessee 


240.6 


West South Central 


SS4.6 






Arkansas 


7.6 
9.6 
3.6 
10.6 

4.7 


33.3 
7H.3 
34.5 
49.0 

76.4 


131. 6 
94.5 
40.0 

116.4 

65.4 


4.'>3.9 
.539.9 
644.1 
769.0 

704.8 


1,111.6 
1,171.7 
1. 773. 3 
1.830.5 

2, 488. 9 


133.4 


Ix>uLslana 


507.2 


Oklahoma.. ... 


251.5 


Texas 


324.4 


Mountain.. . 


403. S 






Arizona 


13.9 
3.9 
3.7 
2.6 
7.5 
7.0 
1.1 
2.9 

4.9 


114.6 
120.7 
18.8 
29.2 
142. 
49.0 
52. H 
43.7 

llft.O 


182. 5 
47.7 
14.7 
2.V8 
67.3 
66. 2 
34.5 
21.8 

118.6 


1. 162. 7 
813.7 
4(V>.3 
33,V3 

1. 107. 9 
920.4 
.S24. 3 
371.3 

896.0 


3.935.0 
2, 076. 4 
2,284.4 
2.221.9 
3, 674. 8 
3, 426. 1 
2,149.5 
1. 536. 9 

9.468.1 


811.3 




410.4 


Idaho 


l.%4.2 




2«1. 4 




483.9 




6M 1 


I'talJ 


222. 1 




17U 4 


P.iri- r 


489 1 






California 


4.5 
3.6 
2.9 


130.7 
53.0 
60.7 


144.3 
34.2 
19.8 


976.4 
536.3 
037.0 


2. 561. 5 
1.976.4 
2,219.0 


523. 1 


Orpgon . 


201.0 


Washlnxtoo 


376.0 







• Includes the District of Columbia. 



04 



Taldr '.V2. — fUlY Crime Rates, 1957- hy (iennrapliic Ditisitms niul Pttpiihition 

(iroiips 

lOflcnsos known jirr 100,000 inhabitants. Population based on I9.'iO dfcrnnial census.) 



Division and group 


Murder, 
nonnrpll- 
icnt nian- 
slaughtir 


Robbery 


AKCra- 
vated 
assault 


nur- 

Rlary— 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


Auto 
theft 


Total 


5.1 


64.3 


90.2 


502.0 


1.317.8 


254.7 






New England 


1.4 


19.5 


21.9 


329.6 


840.3 


222.6 




2.6 

2.0 

1.5 

.5 

.9 

.8 

3.1 


63.3 

23.8 

14.1 

8.3 

5.9 

4.1 

49.9 


56. 3 
.38.5 
10.8 
9.8 
3.5 
6.6 

83.4 


321.5 
442.7 
317. 2 
28.3.9 
2.5.3.7 
266.6 

380.4 


1,018.8 
912.2 
920.2 
817.7 
6.37.2 
692.0 

818.7 


6.36.6 




255.6 




18.3.1 


(;roiii> IV 


122.9 




82.5 




78.4 


Middle Atlantic 


178.7 




4.5 
1.4 
1.5 
1.1 
1.4 
.7 

4.7 


74.3 
33. 1 
22.4 
14.5 
11.1 
10.3 

82.3 


125.6 
57.6 
38.6 
21.7 
14.6 
14.2 

70.7 


474.0 
357.0 
366.1 
275. 9 
219. 6 
216.3 

392.5 


881.2 
86.5.4 
751.1 
800.8 
703.0 
599.4 

1.221.5 


217.7 




196.2 


Ciroiii) III 


16.3. 5 


(Jriiiip IV 


123.2 




97.4 




79.5 


East North Central 


204.3 




6.9 
6.3 
3.1 
1.7 
2.0 
1.4 

3.6 


137.1 
6<i. 2 
43.8 
27.1 
24.1 
14.7 

59.6 


111.0 
91.0 
62.9 
17.2 
20.9 
8.7 

53.9 


412.8 
517.7 
381.5 
352. 6 
378. 5 
279.2 

435.6 


1,08.3.8 
1,64.5.0 
1,3.52.6 
1,427.7 
1,401.0 
946.8 

1.381.5 


242.1 




257. 5 


Group III 


209.1 


Group IV --- 


166.1 


Group V 


14.S.4 


Group vi 


9.5.1 


West North Central .- 


214.0 




6.5 
3.6 
3.9 
1.4 
1.5 
.3 

10.2 


128.0 
58.9 
17.6 
11.2 
11.8 
7.7 

61.4 


108.8 
71.5 
22.6 

9.8 
12.8 

6.4 

197.7 


601.9 
666. 5 
.381.0 
259.1 
287.1 
21.3.8 

613.7 


1,5:11.4 
1,948.1 
1,517.6 
1,.397.3 
1,21.5.8 
75.3.8 

1. 484. 2 


370.7 




216.8 




1.38. 7 




120.4 




98.0 


Group VI 


74.2 


South Atlantic" 


273.7 




10.7 
11.9 
9.9 
10.3 

8.9 
8.1 

12.6 


S.i.9 
108.1 
42.0 
42.5 
22.1 
16.9 

42.6 


2tHl. 1 

167.2 
186. 6 
ItW.O 
184.3 

i.m 
113.8 


467. S 
1,000.2 
.^8.3. 4 
635. 
517.1 
441.0 

549.2 


1,24.5.1 
2, 037. 3 
1,498.2 
1,721.1 
l,.^34.7 
94S. 8 

1, 037. 6 


379. 5 




395. 1 


Group III 


204.8 




212.7 




1.50.7 




119.0 


East South Central 


280.0 




11. I 

17.4 
10.2 
10.3 
15.4 
10. :■. 

9.2 


62. 5 

5;?. 

41.2 
22. 5 
21.0 
19.3 

61.2 


lOH. 1 
121.2 
147.1 
141.3 
102.7 
74.4 

102.7 


631.0 
765. 6 
,505. 9 
457. 8 
.389. 3 
2S.3.4 

600.0 


1.103.6 
1,269.4 
1,31.5.4 
1,042.5 
861.9 
4.>v3. 9 

1, 658. 1 


440.9 




.335. 3 




236. 1 


Group IV 


145.8 




13.3.2 




100.6 


West South Central 


334.6 




14.1 
7.0 
7.3 
8.2 
5.1 
4.5 

4.7 


86. 4 
46. 6 
43. 3 
27.8 
13.8 
17.3 

76.4 


7H. 1 
143. 3 
2:J5. 2 
9.5.5 
79.9 
42.9 

65.4 


yoti. 

841.1 
723.0 
601.5 
.362. 1 
279.1 

704.8 


1,720.9 
2.170.9 
2, 259. 1 
1,717.8 
1,09.5.6 
796.7 

2,488.9 


1 .552. 


Group III 


351.0 
242.8 


Group IV 


193. 5 




101.3 




83.7 


Mountain 


403.3 




4.6 
6.9 
3.2 
6.7 
4.8 
3.2 

4.2 


186.6 
91.4 
49.6 
.59.8 
24.0 
44.5 

115.0 


69.0 
113.6 
29.0 
52.9 
24.0 
49.0 

118.6 


l.(M2. 1 
K(>l.8 
801.9 
704.2 
4(W. 1 
491.5 

895.0 


2. 093. 1 
3. 046. 3 
.3.281.1 
2. 893. 6 
2, 304. 1 
2.001.9 

2. 468. 1 


.5.30.1 


(Iroup 11 


518. 1 




742.6 




419.3 




21.3.6 




230.9 


Pacific 


482.1 




5.1 
3.8 
3.0 
3.6 
2.7 
3.6 


IM. 5 
76. 7 
79.8 
69.1 
52.0 
31.9 


181.9 
35.5 
68.6 
66.4 
66.4 
36.0 


l,02:t. 4 
64.5. 8 
780.7 
889.3 
799.4 
60«>. 6 


2. 232. 
2, 204. 3 
2,61.5.9 
3. 279. 6 
2, 842. 7 
2. 463. 1 


602. 7 




320.0 




418.0 




405.7 




.^37. 3 


G rou p VI 


264.8 



1 Includes the District of Columbia. 



95 



I'ahlr 'V.\. — "SiintfHT of (Ulivx in I'Airli I'ttfniUiluni Croup, f>foiirnithii- IHvi- 
sion, ainl Slalf Hrprvarulvil in thv C.ily i'ritiiv Halt' 'rahiilali«tns {'I'nhh-s 
30-32) 





TOTAL 


Populutlon group 


Division iirul State 


Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


50,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
50,000 


10,000 

to 
25,000 


Lcs.s 
than 
10,000 


TOTAL: 

I'opiiIatloD, 81,761,720 ... 


9,781 


41 


66 


124 


266 


683 


1 593 






New England: 

ropiiliition, 0,489,921. . 


189 


1 


11 


17 


36 


67 


67 


Connecticut . 


«7 
18 
101 
1& 
17 
W 

810 




4 


2 

1 
10 

1 
3 


11 
2 

17 
2 
3 
1 

60 


5 
7 
43 
4 

2 

146 






1, 


Miissiichusetts 


1 





21 


New IIiwniKshire . 


s 


Hho.le Nliui'l 




1 


t 






Middle Atlantic: 

Population. 21.536,724 


7 

2 
3 
2 

9 


12 


23 


37i 


New Jersey 


172 
198 
246 

631 


4 

4 

4 

10 


8 

9 

29 


19 
10 
15 

63 


42 
44 

00 

149 


97 


New Yorlv 


llti 


I'etiiisvlvania 


l.SO 


East North Central: 

I'opuliition, is,s4 1,512. 


371 






Illinois 


162 
79 
120 
181 

89 

307 


1 
1 
1 

5 

1 

5 


1 
4 
2 
3 

4 


10 
3 
7 
6 
3 

9 


14 
10 
8 
19 
12 

20 


40 
15 
35 
43 
16 

76 


90 




46 




67 


Ohio 


105 


Wisconsin . .. 


57 


West North Central : 

ropul-ition. r..:i<ij.M:i 


193 


Iowa 


67 
63 
72 
69 
29 
11 
16 

283 


i " 

2 
2 
1 


1 
2 
1 


4 
1 

2" 

1 


2 
3 
5 

2 

1 

32 


9 
20 
15 
18 
7 
3 
4 

62 


4ti 




28 


Minne.sota 


51 


Missouri. 


32 


Nel>ni.<kn 


2<) 


North Dakota 





South Dakota -. 






> 
20 


10 


South Atlantic: 

I*o|iuhitinn. 7.989,224 


3 


8 


159 






Delaware 


6 
1 
63 
36 
18 
68 
31 
47 
24 

130 


i' 

r 

1 


1 








4 












Florida 


3 


2 

3 


11 
4 

2 
5 
1 
6 
3 

16 


11 

8 

5 
18 

5 
10 

5 

26 


36 




20 


Marylaad 


10 


North Carolina 


1 


5 
3 

4 
3 

4 


29 


South Carolina 


2-.' 




' 


3 


24 


West N'irKinia 


li 


East South Central: 

Popuhtion. 3.SI4.791 


3 


6 


77 






Alabama . 


38 
35 
93 
34 

912 


1 
1 


2 


1 
2 

1 

8 


3 
3 
6 
3 

15 


9 
6 

7 
4 

69 


•>•> 


Kentucky 


Zi 


Mis.sissippi,... 


9 


Tennes>:eo 


1 
5 


3 
8 


2:} 


West South Central: 

Population. »>. 162,198 


117 








28 
24 
43 
117 

149 


i' 

4' 

1 


I 
2 
2 
3 

9 


s" 

3 


3 
4 

3 

5 

19 


4 
4 
13 

3« 

96 


20 




i:< 


Dklahomii 


25 


Texas 


M 


MountAin : 

Population, 2,250.018 


105 


Arizona 


16 
99 

94 

•0 
8 
17 
91 
17 

270 


i' 


1 


i' 


1 

1 
2 
3 

1 
2 
1 

1 

99 


0" 

7 

4 

4" 

1 
4 

BS 


M 


Colorado 


20 




15 


Montana.............. 








13 


Nevada . ....... . 








4 


New Mexico 






I 
1 


10 


rtah 




1 


17 


\\ yoming .. . .. 


12 


Paciilc : 

Population, 8,7M.S)5 


7 


6 


11 


143 


California 


190 
40 
40 


5 
1 
1 


3 


11 


15 
2 
A 


03 
8 
11 


v.-*. 


Oregon.. .... 


29 


Washington....... 


3 




21 







96 



lilt ml Rates 



The ( riino problem in nroiis outside cities is about O!io-bnlf tbnt 
iusido cifios per unit of population at'cordint; to an average of the 
ratios of city crimes to rural ci-inies for iudivid\ial classifications. 

Table '-'A contains available offenses known data from areas outside 
cities, which are referred to undei- this j)ro<xram as rural areas. The 
data ai'e presented as reported by the ruial law-enforcement agencies 
and are expressed in terms of the numbei' of crime per each 100,000 
inhabitants. Population figun^s used are from the 1950 decennial 
census in the absence of later nationwide figures for these areas. 

Kural areas, including the urbanized fringe areas outside cities, 
though relatively crime free when compared with all cities, report more 
crimes per capita in certain categories than some cities. The rural 
areas rc'presented in table 34 reported more murders per 100,000 
iidiabitants than city groups with less than 100,000 inhabitants. 
Negligent manslaughters, closely allied with traffic mishaps, occurred 
with greater frt>quency per unit of population in rui-al areas than in 
any city group e.vcept cities in the 2r)0,()00 to 500,000 population 
group. Ofl'enses of rape occmTed in rural areas with greater fre- 
quency per unit of population than in all city groups under 250,000 
inhabitants. 

More robberies and aggravated assaults occurred per unit of popu- 
lation in rural areas than in the smallest cities, those with less than 
10,t)00 population. In burglaries, larcenies, and auto thefts, all city- 
group rates were in excess of rural rates. 

Information in table 34 is based on the reports from law-enforce- 
ment agen<'ies representing 42,()00,5l')7 inhnl)itants (1950 population). 



Tabic U.— Rural Crime Rates, 1957 

Ulcn.<cs known and rati' por 100.000 lnl)ahitants, a.-; roportt'il by 1,()38 shorilTs, liiT rural village ofTioors, and 
13 State poliw; total rural population 42,rjOO,507, baser! on 1950 decennial census] 



Offense 



Miird'T and nonncirlieent manslaughter 

Manslaughter by neglijence 

Uaiv 

Koblx-ry - 

\Bcravated a.ssault 

'^iirclary— breaking or entering 

wci-nv— theft 

\:ito theft _ 



Offenses known 



Number Rate 



1,951 
2,508 
.5,844 
S.Of.9 

17.3.55 
120.412 
18«'., 255 

32. 918 



l.A 
.5.9 
1.T7 
18.9 

40.7 
282.7 
437.2 

77.3 



Ollcnscs ill Indixidual Areas 

The mmilxT of ofFciisi's rcporlcd as liaviiijx Ix'cn cominittcd (luring 
the period of rlamuwy-Dcccinhcr, l'.)")7, is shown in tahlr 'A'). The 
(•on\pilalion ini-liidcs the i('|)oi"ts received from |)oli('e departments 
in cities willi more than '2"),()()() inhal)itants and is limited to selected 
( lassilications. I'ohce administrators and other inti-rested individuals 
will |)rol)ai)ly lind it (U'siial)le to compare the crime rales of their cities 
with the avera«re ratt's shown in tables 'M), 'M, and 'A2 of this publica- 
tion. Similarly, they will douhtli'ss desire to make comparisons with 
the fijjures for their communities for prior periods, in order to (let<'r- 
mine wh(>ther there has been an increase or a decrease in the amount 
of crime committed. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crime data for individual 

ilies because the differences in the figures may be due to a variety 

of factoi-s. Such comparisons are not necessarily significant even 

though the figures for individual communities are converted into terms 

of number of offenses per 100,000 iiduibitants. 

The following is a list of some of the factois which affect the amount 
and ty|)e of crime in the conmiunity: 

Population of tlie city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 

The composition of the population with reference particularly to 
age, sex, and race. 

The economic status and activities of the population. 

Kelative stability of population. 

C'liniate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 

The nund)er of police employees per unit of population. 

The standards governing appointments to the police force. 

The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

The degree of efhciency of the local law enforcement agency. 
Tiie figures presented in the following tabulation are those for se- 
lected classifications reported by the indivi(hial police departments in 
the cities represented without reducing the data to crime rales (num- 
ber of ofTenses per 100,000 inhabitants). 

In considering the volume of crime committed locally, it is generally 
more important lo determine whether tlie figures for a given com- 
munity show increases or decreases than to ascertain whether they 
cxcfM'd or fall short of those for some other individual comnnmity, 
:ind it should be rememberi'd that the amoimt of crime committe<l in a 
ommunity is not solely chargeable to the police but is rather a charge 
airainst the entir«' community. 

In publishing these figures, the FBI acts as a service agency. The 
figures published are those submitted by the contributing agencies. 

(I'T) 



98 



Tabic 35. — .\iitnhvr «»/ Srlvrlril I'arl I (tffvnsvs K'rioirri /o tin- I'olirv, 1957, 
Cities Over 25,000 in Population 









Larceny— theft 




ARRra- 


Bur- 
clary— 










Rob- 


vat<><I 


broak- 






bery 


assault 


liijf or 


$50 and 


Under 






enter- 


over 


$50 






ing 






6 


15 


250 


102 


1,606 


5 


1 


193 


93 


181 


238 


94 


1,395 


668 


3,475 


13 


4 


144 


83 


550 


8 


112 


291 


82 


433 


23 


53 


406 


112 


264 


fiO 


35 


1,118 


920 


3,332 


25 


138 


252 


80 


394 


37 


257 


442 


268 


1,180 


29 


17 


404 


238 


683 


5 


34 


35 


49 


126 


8 


10 


159 


130 


623 


4 


2 


75 


24 


194 


8 


3 


95 


28 


422 


11 


11 


146 


61 


103 


39 


177 


547 


383 


1.601 






22 
174 


23 
56 


57 
382 


10 


8 


7 


12 


132 


412 


825 


13 


112 


168 


151 


354 


4 




104 


46 


.975 


18 


15 


391 


104 


561 


2 


1 


49 


25 


145 


2,5 


83 


448 


493 


1,423 


21 


128 


201 


205 


391 



Abilene, Tex... 
Ablnpton, Ta.. 

Akron, Olilo 

AhimtMla. Calif. 
Albany, Qa 



Albany, N.Y 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Alexandria, I,a.. 

Alexandria, Va 

Alhambra, Calif 



Allqulppa, Pa., 
.\llcnto\vn. Pa. 
Alliancr, Ohio. 

Alton, 111 

Altoona, Pa 



Amarillo, Tex 

Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Anderwn, Ind 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Anniston, Ala 



Apple ton. Wis... 
Arcadia, Calif.... 
Arlington, Mass. 

Arlington, Va 

Asheville, N. C 



Ashland, Ky 

Athens, Oa 

AtlantJi, Oa 

AllanticCity, N. J. 
.\ubuni, N. Y 



Augusta, Qa 

Aurora, 111 

Austin, Tex 

Bakersficld, Calif. 
Baltimore, Md 



Bangor, Maine 

Harbcrton, Ohio 

Baton Hotipp, La 

Biittif Crerk. Mich. 
Bay City, Mich 



Bayonne, N. J 

Beaumont, Tex 

Belleville, 111 

B.llcvlllc, N.J 

Belllngham, Wash. 



Belmont, Mass. 
Belolt, Wis . .. 
Berkeley, Calif.. 

Berwyn, HI 

Be.'isemer, Ala.. 



Bethlehem, Pa 

Beverly, \Ia.ss 

Beverly Hills, Calif. 

Billings, Mont 

Hiloxi, M1.SS 



Binghamton, N. Y. 
Blrminghnm. Ala.. 
Bloomllfld. .\. J... 
Blooniington, III... 
Bloomington, Ind.. 



10 



Only 4 months received 



1 


78 


344 


655 


45 


107 


1 


1 


12 


167 


19 


16 


44 


342 


46 


48 


813 


2,403 


2 


4 


5 


8 


27 


129 


14 


17 


4 


9 


5 


24 


31 


331 


6 




4 




3 




2 


3 


4 


2 


K.i 


59 


25 


4 


18 


145 


4 


5 


1 


2 


13 




6 


2 


16 


76 


7 


3 


l.W 


307 


4 


3 


6 


4 


7 





79 


55 


123 


3,312 


1,919 


6.730 


730 


325 


331 


12 


24 


88 


315 


114 


440 


112 


125 


497 


772 


231 


2,757 


443 


394 


1,596 


3,842 


3,543 


7, 165 


60 


99 


199 


110 


64 


351 


670 


483 


1,184 


245 


111 


831 


216 


65 


836 


168 


156 


310 


697 


380 


1,412 


153 


49 


184 


63 


10 


62 


78 


96 


300 


58 


36 


151 


74 


48 


381 


577 


178 


1.538 


120 


83 


186 


133 


54 


207 


131 


117 


412 


51 


53 


228 


81 


35 


75 


126 


165 


1,108 


180 


107 


225 


126 


98 


525 


1,696 


1,065 


2,658 


72 


89 


232 


129 


78 


387 


120 


99 


475 



99 



lal.lf ;{.-).- 



yinnhfr «>/ St'levtetl I'url I ifjfriisrs Kittmri la tin- I'ttliiv. 
Cities Over 25^000 in Population — (Continued 



1957, 



City 



Hol.st>, Idaho 

Moston, Miuss 

Uri'iiicrtoii, Wash. 
Hri>lt:i (Hirt. Conn. 
Uristol. Conn 



Hrockton, Mass.. 
HrooklliU'. Mass . 
Urowii.-vlllc. Tex. 
HiiII:ilo, N. \ .... 
Hurluiik, Calif... 



HiirlinRton, Iowa.. 

liurllncton, Vt 

Hutti". Mont 

Canibrlilpi'. Mass. 
Camden. .\. J 



Canton. Ohio 

Ca.si)or. Wyo 

C«><l:ir Uapld«, Iowa. 
Chanipalpn. Ill . ... 
Ch:>rl»ston. S. C 



Churlo.ston, W«Va.. 

Charlotto, N'. C 

Ch;irlottf.'ivmo. Va.. 
Chitt;i!i(toc;i. Tenn. 
Ch<'ls«>:i, .Mass 



Chplt<'nhani, Pa 

Che.stPF, Pa 

Cheyenne. Wyo , 

Chlfripo. Ill 

Chicago HelRhts, 111. 



Chlcopco. Mass 

Cicrro. Ill 

Cincinnati, Ohio... 
Clark shun?. W. Va 
Cleveland. Ohio ... 



Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 

ClWton. N.J 

Clinton. Iowa 

Colorado Springs, Colo... 
Coltinihla. .Mo 



Columhla. S. C. 
Columbus, Oa... 
Cohimhns, Ohio 
Compton, Calif.. 
Concwd, Calif... 



Concord. N. H 

Corpus Chrbtl. Tex.. 
Council BlulTs, Iowa. 

Covlnifton. Ky. 

Cranston, R. I 



Culver City. Calif 

CuinNrliii.l. Md 

C lis. Ohio X. 

I> _ 

1> ' .llf 



Danville. Ill , 

I>tiii-. ll!.. V:i , 

I> ^ra.. ., 

I> .. ... 

I) h, Fto. 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
nepll- 
Kent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Rob- 
bery 



14 

507 

5 

27 



2 
296 



10 

9 

4 

174 

40 



3 
25 
42 
139 

66 
8 
10 
23 
74 

58 
70 
2 
65 
17 



Aggra- 
VBte<l 
assault 



3 

451 

3 

74 



5 

1 

31 

250 

42 



32 

19 

329 

6 
9 
3 
12 

75 

123 

641 

66 

177 

1 



Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
lug or 
enter- 
ing 



142 

2,577 

72 

551 

54 

ISO 
163 

2yo 

1.0S4 
456 

51 
63 
93 

228 
825 

521 
137 
246 
82 
695 

199 

999 

89 

1,200 

119 

138 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



171 

2,781 

71 

419 

33 

146 

80 

78 

431 

342 

12 

71 

111 

206 

450 

404 
29 
194 
104 
311 

(I) 
313 

60 
112 

56 



Under 
$50 



486 
5,384 
610 
917 
121 

540 
392 
638 
1,212 
812 

318 
359 
489 
297 
957 

1.337 

46 

1,142 

519 

1.414 

743 
1.812 

231 

1.267 

95 

219 



Only 7 months received 



16 


4 


146 


no 


660 


6,461 


3.942 


12,681 


9,114 


9.675 


34 


79 


226 


172 


273 


1 


4 


46 


86 


248 


56 


26 


237 


258 


310 


230 


283 


1,476 


1.068 


3.993 


28 


1 


117 


29 


98 


1.185 


479 


2.644 


1.088 


12,783 


11 




139 


32 


290 


9 


5 


147 


108 


384 


4 




86 


55 


4.52 


17 


22 


324 


246 


845 


1 


9 


105 


48 


319 


20 


66 


485 


352 


1.458 


21 


.59 


362 


114 


436 


287 


369 


2.364 


1. .S93 


4.561 


82 


105 


1,110 


68.1 


1.4.'i6 


5 


3 


117 


39 


397 


1 


1 


39 


37 


125 


52 


683 


1,171 


354 


1.859 


7 


» 


142 


131 


550 


40 


20 


2«0 


171 


564 


13 


8 


220 


218 


433 


37 


17 


290 


213 


478 


3 


1 


62 


45 


189 


6 


1 


168 


113 


295 


373 


446 


3,330 


815 


8.<t22 


11 


2 


143 


121 


164 


10 


1 


161 


75 


2.58 


7 


64 


111 


103 


463 


11 




510 


203 


1,170 


156 


341 


1.330 


404 


2,109 


30 


78 


361 


237 


736 



58 
47 
156 
fl07 
79 



See footnote at end of table. 



ion 

'laiItU- .■{.">. — .\iiinln-r nj Si-lfilrtl I'nrI I (PJfriisfs hiinun In tin- I'alirc, 1957 f 
Cities Over 25,0(M) in I'apttUition — (i«>iitiiiued 



City 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
nrKll- 
RPnt 
tnan- 
slaufsh- 
ter 



Rob- 
bery 



AdRra- 
vatod 
assault 



Bur- 
(slary— 
break- 
liiR or 
enler- 
Ihr 



Larceny— theft 



$.V) and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Di-arborn, Mich... 

Decitiir, 111 

Dnivfr, Colo 

Dfs Molni'S, Iowa. 
Di'S I'i lines, 111.... 



netroit, Mlth... 

Doth:in, Ala 

I)iitiii(|ui', Iowa. 
Duhiili, Minn.. 
Durluini, N. C. 



East Chicago, Ind 

Kast riivrlan<l, Ohio. 
East H;irtf(»rd, Conn.. 

Ea.st Oraimo, .\. J 

East Providence, R. I. 



East St. Louis, 111. 

Easton, Pa 

Eau Claire. Wis... 
El Cajon, Calif.... 
El Paso, Tex 



Elgin, 111 

Elizabeth, X.J. 
Elkhart, Ind... 
Elnihurst, 111... 
Elmira, .\. Y... 



Elyria, Ohio. . 
Enid, Okla.... 

Erie, Pa 

Euclid, Ohio.. 
Eupenc, Oreg. 



Eureka, Calif . 

Evanston, III 

Evansville, Ind. 
Everett, Mass... 
Everett, Wash.. 



Fairmont, W. Va.. 
Fall River. Mass... 

FarKo, X. Dak 

Favelteville. -X. O. 
Ferndale. .Mich.... 



FitcliburK, Mass 

Flint. .Mich 

Fond du Lac, Wis 

Fort Dodpe. Iowa 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 



Fort Smith. Ark 

Fort Wayne. Ind 

Fort Worth. Tex 

Frandtighani. Mass. 
Freeport. Ill 



F"ree|Mirt, X. Y.. 
Fresno. Calif. .. 
Fullerton, Calif, 
tladsden, .Ma... 
<>iiinesville, Fla. 



liidesburi;. 111., 
lialveston. Tex. 
Ciardena. Calif. 
Oarneld, X. J.. 
Oary, Ind 



lilt 
1 



41 

23 

77fi 

7.") 

.■) 

:i,011 

1 

4 

24 

23 

39 
IS 

2 
29 

3 

201 
2 



If) 
3 

287 
38 



4,084 
3 



7 
34f. 

132 

4 

1 

17 

3 

141 
1 

2 

114 

21 
72 



.542 

4,333 

\,7SW, 

G8 

11.. WK 

4 

f>l 

337 

21)0 

2.^0 

73 

92 

4r.9 

123 

392 

82 

38 

108 

1.756 

87 
371 
133 

43 
123 

110 
58 

433 
5C> 

164 

79 
106 
8(V) 
126 
129 



347 

105 

2.209 

679 

35 

3,388 

9 

85 

300 

141 

3.10 
34 
60 
151 
116 

189 
46 
45 
36 

W7 

50 
470 
115 
62 
90 

49 
40 

198 
23 

235 

81 

304 

485 

50 

72 



Xo reiwrts received 



Only 1 month received 



2.303 

843 

6.494 

2.387 

204 

2.5. 405 

47 

391 

1,347 

634 

861 
351 
166 
600 
313 

391 
219 
274 
322 
3,734 

283 
980 
258 
190 
396 

232 
456 
1,082 
4,54 
793 

564 

819 

1,541 

189 

868 



21 


358 


246 


729 


2 


65 


1 1 


556 


167 


301 


6 


741 


3 


136 


114 


297 


7 


201 


123 


422 


471 


1, 026 


1,199 


2.901 


3 


52 


33 


368 



41 


36 


526 


358 


1,259 


17 


71 


265 


128 


510 


38 


6 


416 


428 


1.938 


228 


163 


2.343 


2.007 


3,384 


6 


1 


.50 


60 


52 


1 


3 


50 


40 


168 


5 


1 


107 


94 


233 


84 


46 


773 


730 


1.897 


10 


21 


155 


128 


347 


/ 


72 


195 


86 


28;i 





25 


221 


109 


400 


3 


7 


75 


29 


311 


49 


342 


.549 


4.59 


780 


35 


28 


277 


305 


542 


2 


1 


64 


35 


189 


177 


344 


977 


863 


1.821 



101 



Tublu 35. — .\iiiii(n'r of >«•/«'<•/<•«/ /'»ir/ / (tjfni.sfs Kinmii In llu- I'ulice, 1937 
Cities Over 25,01)0 in I'nimlation — Clonlinucd 



City 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
nopll- 
Rent 
man- 

ti'r 









Larceny— theft 




ARKra- 


Biir- 

Rlary— 










Rol>- 


vutcl 


l>rouk- 






bcry 


ossuult 


tiiR or 


IfiOati'l 


Under 






entcr- 


over 


$50 






Int? 






43 


12 


638 


412 


1,624 




1 


OU 


54 


114 


8 




72 


45 


688 


79 


70 


861 


517 


2,696 


13 


1 


113 


18 


409 


7 


5 


128 


116 


735 


3 


1 


112 


104 


251 


20 


80 


407 


210 


994 


2 


120 


122 


77 


367 


2g 


10 


518 


310 


777 




1 


67 


56 


121 


10 


14 


122 


76 


159 


14 




137 


79 


408 


4 


5 


114 


119 


353 


SO 


61 


378 


163 


641 


69 


42 


RW 


488 


1,438 


16 


48 


368 


318 


866 


SS 


21 


17S 


158 


184 


44 


36 


687 


240 


712 


120 


220 


1,064 


595 


1,253 


2 


27 


155 


65 


195 


2 




75 


75 


228 


6 




143 


69 


178 


21 


10 


350 


138 


414 


26 


11 


167 


168 


626 


3 


2 


68 


28 


99 


11 


18 


144 


156 


159 


11 


9 


235 


134 


389 


6 


48 


98 


61 


279 



(llcndiile. Calif 

Oloiic«»itor, Miiss . 
Cirand Koiks. \. Dak 
Oraiul Hahids. MUli.. 
Onmlte City. Ill 



Croat Falls, Mont. 
(Jrwn Hay, Wis.... 
(Irt-j-nslmro, \. C. 
(Irwiiville, Miss... 
(ir<H'iivilU«, S. C... 



(•roenwieh. Conn. 
Hack<'iu<nck, .N'.J. 
IlaRcrstown, .VId.. 

Iluniilton, .\. J 

Huinilton, Ohio .. 



Flanimond, Ind 

nani|iton, Va 

llanitramok, .Mich. 

HarrUbiirK, Fa 

Hartford, Conn 



natti«<slnirR, Miss. 

Huvi-rford, Pa 

Haverhill, Mass... 
Hawthorne. Calif. 
Hayward, Calif... 



Hazlrton, Pa 

HemiKstoiid, N'. Y 

Hialeah, Kla 

HiEh Point. .\. C 

Highland Park, Mich. 



HoN-ik.n. \. J 

H. 

11' . ilawaU. 

H. • \rk 

llOll-tMll. T-'V 



HuntltiRton, W. Va . 
HuntlnRtnn Park, Calif. 

Htint.<!vHk>. .\bi 

Hiitchliison. Kans 

In<lependencc, Mo 



Indl.in.r..II=. Ind.. 
In:' ■ !if... 
I... ,... 
Ir. ..Y. 
Irvlr,i:t"il. N.J 



Ithaci. V. Y 

Ja. ■ I... 

Ja. 
Ja. . 
Jack^>inille, Kla. 



Jnn!t;t.v.vn. N". Y... 
J." I' Mo.. 
U< I ... 
Joi I'cnn. 
Johi;>t'.\iu, I'a 



Jollet. in 

Joplin. Sfo 

KalnninrcK), Mich.. 

KanknkM>, 111 

KannapolU, \. C.. 



1 
1 
8 
3 
136 



Only 3 months received 



18 


44 


187 


as 


72 




1 


146 


107 


640 


39 


42 


2,015 


864 


4.024 


14 


22 


126 


108 


261 


467 


160 


7.020 


2,304 


7.803 


36 


120 


314 


216 


416 


62 


20 


400 


377 


824 


1 


7 


9r> 


55 


38 


6 


3 


102 


50 


371 


7 


5 


123 


137 


333 


380 


258 


2,364 


1.767 


4.169 


50 


19 


775 


482 


998 


4 


2 


34 


51 


212 


1 


1 


89 


35 


184 


10 


1 


233 


93 


370 


1 




64 


79 


230 


4 


38 


78 


166 


432 


13 


53 


426 


108 


969 


4 


9 


170 


82 


3as 


405 


274 


3.084 


1.699 


2.090 


3 


5 


47 


29 


84 


2 




81 


43 


147 


106 


194 


862 


303 


862 


6 


13 


186 


41 


216 


9 


2 


130 


112 


357 


25 


20 


167 


74 


577 


7 


4 


172 


113 


4H5 


8 


29 


307 


206 


1.229 


7 


9 


93 


35 


230 


5 


102 


73 


28 


186 



102 



Tiil)l«- ;?.">. — \iiniln-r o/" Srirrlcd Part I Offrnsrs Knniin In l}ii- Vntiii- 
Cilii'.-' (her 25,(K)(t in I'ttptilul'um — < '.oiM IiummI 



1057, 



City 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negll- 
ccnt 
man- 
slaueh- 
ler 



Rob- 
bery 



Anpra- 
vatc*! 
assault 



Bur- 

Klary— 
brt'ak- 
inR or 
cutcr- 
intr 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Kansas City, Kans. 
Kansas City, Mo... 

Kearny, X. J , 

Kenosha, Wis 

Ketterlnp, Ohio 



Key West. Fla... 
Kingston, X. Y.. 
Knoxvillc, Tenn. 
Kokomo, In<i . .. 
La Crosse, Wis... 



La Fayette, Ind 

La Ctninee, Oa 

Lackawanna, X'^. Y. 

Lafayette, La 

Lake" Charles, La... 



Lakeland, Fla — 
Lakewood, Ohio. 
Lanc;ister, I'a — 
Lansinp, Mich... 
Laredo, Tex 



Laurel, Miss 

Lawrence, Mass.. 

Lawton, Okla 

Lebanon, Pa 

Lowiston, Maine. 



Le.vinpton, Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln, X'^ebr 

Lincoln Park, Mich. 
Linden, X. J... 



Little Kock, .\rk... 

Lockp'irt, X. Y 

Loop Heach, Calif. 

Lorain, Ohio 

Los .\nBPles, Calif. 



Louisville, Ky 

Lowell, Mass 

Lower Merion, Pa. 

Lubbock, Tex 

Lynchburp, Va 



Lynn, Mass 

Lynwood, Calif. 

Macon, Oa 

Madison, Wis... 
Maldin, Mass.. 



Manchester, X. IT 

Manhatt;»n Beach, Calif. 

Manitowoc, Wis 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Maplewood, X. J 



Marion, Ind 

Marion, Ohio 

Mason City, Iowa. 
Massillon, Ohio.... 
Maywo<.d. Ill 



McKeesport, Pa 

Medford, Mass 

Melrose, Mass 

Memi)hi.s, Tonn 

Menio Park. Calif .. 



10 



6 

1 
119 



137 

314 

2 

7 

2 

7 

1 

42 

7 



73 

2 

400 

25 

4,269 

372 
16 
2 
45 
11 

25 
24 
30 
13 



157 
2 



95 

138 

5 



19 

10 

212 

10 

2 

9 
3 
22 
42 
55 

28 
2 
43 
15 
20 

4 
11 

23 



624 

1,202 

53 

127 

109 

41 
101 
751 
192 

94 

211 
48 
97 
111 
1% 

178 
107 
203 
173 
152 



225 

240 

21 

72 



110 

843 

76 

53 

25 

44 
39 
292 
119 
67 

136 
26 
53 
48 

111 

74 
43 
79 
M2 
118 

18 
46 
61 
14 
66 



496 
249 
270 
Onlv 1 month received 



258 
17 
60 



185 

2 

279 

43 

5,786 

404 

3 
93 
37 

15 
42 
22 
16 
3 




469 
6 



1,681 

2.698 

183 

560 

179 

125 
91 
1,174 
564 
496 

732 
187 
159 
69 
213 

368 
356 
659 
966 
353 

68 
250 
761 
371 
360 

1.095 

720 

1.547 



136 


66 


374 


790 


502 


1,642 


72 


30 


179 


2. 532 


(') 


4,579 


251 


61 


.538 


26.887 


19. 349 


30.824 


2.929 


1,726 


3. .371 


239 


94 


581 


166 


125 


309 


812 


448 


2, 145 


146 


43 


399 


614 


322 


1,230 


3.33 


227 


491 


568 


189 


749 


195 


221 


1,007 


80 


43 


340 


105 


uni 


426 


212 


106 


334 


80 


36 


277 


240 


1.50 


437 


44 


31 


36 


.59 


39 


357 


129 


129 


485 


70 


.52 


205 


99 


13 


3.54 


!»2 


66 


134 


190 


103 


3.55 


129 


120 


400 


,56 


25 


211 


2.260 


1.019 


2.193 


37 


37 


213 



See fOdtllnte :ll end of fjlblc. 



103 



Tahlr .{."J. — .\ii mhrr of Srlfctril I'lirl I itjfvusvs Kntntn la lltv I'nlivr, 1957 ^ 
i'.ilirs ifivr 'J.'),()0(t iit I'ttptiUttion — Cuiitiiiui'd 



City 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 

inaii- 
Icr 



Roli- 
Iwry 



Apprii- 
vntod 
luy^tuilt 



Hiir- 
k'hiry- 
hrciik- 
liiK or 
piitcr- 
lllR 



Larceny— theft 



SAOand 
over 



Under 
$.10 



Merwxl. Calif 

Merldcn, Conn 

Mrridian, Miss 

Miiuni. V\x\ 

Miami Beach, Fla.. 

MlehlRan City. Ind. 
^!l^l<il^•to\vn, Conn 
Mlddlitown. Ohio.. 
Milwaukee. Wis ... 
MlnneaiK)lls, Minn. 



^f Ishawaka, Ind. 

Mobile, Ala 

Mo.lesto. Calif... 

Moline, III 

Monroe, La 



Monrovia. Calif 

Montclalr. N. J 

Mont.tHllo. Calif 

Montpoinery, .\la 

MofKantown, W. Va... 

Mount I/Ohanon, Pa .. 
Mount Vernon, N. Y.. 
Mountain View, Calif. 

Munele. Ind 

.Muskegon, Mich 



Ma<'koReo, Okla 

Nashua, N. H 

Nashville. Tenn 

National City. Calif. 
New Albany, Ind 



New Be<lforil, Mass... 
New Britain, Conn... 
New Brunswick, N. J. 

New Ca«tle, fa 

New Haven, Conn 



New Kensington, Pa. 
New Lon<lon, Conn . 

New Orleans. La 

New Hoehelle. N'. Y.. 
New York, N. Y 



Newark, N. J 

Newark, Ohio 

Ncwliurgh. N. Y... 

Newixjrt, Ky 

Newport, K. I 



Newport Ni'w'", Va. .. 

N.u •• 

Ni. N-.Y... 
N.M 

Nortii.iti, < >ki;» .... 



NorTt''?"wn, Pa 

Ncf V.J 

N. < k. Ark. 

N(.' Mas* 

Norw .lU, ' "iiti 



Norwich. Conn... 

Norwoon, Ohio 

Nutley, N.J 

Oak Park, III 

Oak Kldge, Tcnn. 



18 



1 

48 

1 

314 



19 
1 
4 

408 
.'i.'i 



7 
112 
334 

.1 

m 

25 
8 
5 

l.S 

2 

20 

47 

1 



113 
12 

7 

17 
4 

2.5 
2 

29 



730 

16 

4,849 

885 
1 

e 

10 
9 

42 

9 

30 

229 

1 

8 
6 



20 
3 

.18 

204 



1 



10 

206 

71 

2 

1.13 

16 



31 
11 

8 
162 

1 

1 
13 
7 
1 
1 

2 

5 

103 

ai 

4 

26 
10 
46 



66 

5 

10 

474 

44 

10,467 

736 
1 
5 
11 

8 

103 

7 

57 

743 



90 

1.12 

149 

3.797 

1.105 

.15 

75 

131 

908 

2.975 

123 
1.178 
391 
128 
1.16 

189 

79 

336 

811 

.12 

49 
134 
113 
319 
219 

103 

54 

1,156 

230 

95 

421 
256 
199 
118 
606 

15 

103 

3,910 

186 

35,6.14 

5,158 
63 

123 
96 

143 

310 

3.19 

376 

2,223 

70 



23 

140 

71 

].<i()8 

744 

85 

06 

187 

2,198 

1,034 

92 

372 

327 

53 

81 

31 

.15 

89 

351 

25 

.14 
204 
71 
23 
179 

77 
47 
890 
121 
95 

281 

103 

41 

65 

255 

20 
90 

2.494 
192 

43,319 

2,.'<22 
99 
114 

84 
78 

433 

.mi 

1.229 
114 



6 to 4: 

9 151 95 
Only 1 month rcadved 



419 
200 

300 
,1, 4',0 
1,695 

2.35 

115 

.104 

0. 403 

4.678 

413 

1.299 

1.513 

324 

710 

354 
1.12 
.185 
762 
136 

78 
381 
4(M 
903 
730 

538 
285 
1.931 
578 
422 

1,036 
482 
424 
1.10 

1.015 

96 

290 

4.378 

302 

31. 752 

4.177 
439 
271 
135 
478 

890 
500 
717 
3.440 
266 

106 
119 



1 




29 


35 


57 


6 


3« 


194 


159 


361 


4 


8 


53 


42 


129 


9 


1 


82 


86 


217 


1 


1 


75 


52 


143 


17 


3 


195 


82 


190 


1 


19 


55 


24 


ao« 



104 



Tal»It' 'i't. — .\uiiilnr of Svlvitcd I'nrl I itjji-iiscti Kiuniii In lliv I'ttlicv, 1937y 
Cities Over 25,0(Kt in l'opiilalion—(.Mnlinuet\ 



City 



Mur- 
(Ipr, 
noii- 

nppll- 

KOIlt 

man- 

slniidh 

tor 



Rob- 
bory 



ApKrn- 
vate<l 
assault 



Dur- 
plary— 
break - 
Inc or 
ontcr- 
Ine 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Under 



Oakland, Calif 

0(less;i,Tcx 

Oedcii, I'fali 

Okliilidina rity, Okla. 
Oriiulia, Xcbr. . 



Ontario. Calif -. 

OrariL'i', N'. J 

Orlando. Fla 

Oshkosh, Wis .. 
Ottiiniwa, Iowa. 



Owcnsboro, Ky 

Oxnard, Calif 

'a<liicah. Kv 

'alo Alt f), Calif... 

'anartia City, Fla. 



ark Forest, 111 

ark Ridpc, 111 

arkcrsburp, W. Va. 

Parma, Ohio , 

isadena, Calif 



assaic, N'. J 

'aterson. X. J... 
awtiickpt, R. I. 

Vkin. Ill 

'onsacola, Fla... 



'coria. 111 

'crtli Amboy, N. J. 

'I'tcrstiurp, Va 

Iilhuiolphia, Pa 

iiocnix, Ariz 



inc HlulT, Ark. 
iltsl)iirKh, Pa.. 
iltslicM, Mass.. 
laiiificld, X. J., 
ocatello, Idaho. 



omona, Calif 

ontiac. Mich 

ort Arthur, 'I'ex.. 
ort Huron, Mich, 
ort land, Maine... 



orlland, OrcK 

Orl.srnouth, Ohio... 

orl.^inouth, Va 

ou^likcepsic, X. Y. 
ricliard, Ala 



•rovidence. R. I. 

'rovo, I'tali 

'U(d)l(i, Colo 

^ilncy. III 

Juincy, Mass 



{acinc, Wis 

{aU'ich. .\.C 

{apid City, S. Dak. 

{I'adliiK, Pa 

{.••Hands. Calif 



{(■don<lo Beach, Calif, 
{(•dwood City, Calif... 

{cno, Xev 

{(•vere. Mass 

{ichniond, Calif 



4 
1 
fi 
135 
10 

4 
25 



522 

ir. 

33 
118 

78 

f. 
12 
27 

2 

5 



18 
73 
10 
4 
28 

80 

f> 

24 

2, 210 

127 

13 

867 
2 
12 
9 

30. 

48 

it 
14 

327 
3(1 

(a 

1 

12 



002 
33 
24 

110 

87 

17 
23 
210 



48 

153 

5 

1 

135 

90 

21 

117 

3,14C 

234 

31 

580 

3 

G 

5 

20 
80 
20 
6 
24 

179 



295 

25 



144 
1 
4 
1 
4 



18 
330 



75 



2,037 
303 
302 

2, .537 
711 

243 
101 
072 
152 

84 

253 
180 
207 
117 

92 

15 

22 

71 

123 

926 

257 
808 
107 
07 
424 

590 

128 

160 

10, 381 

1,193 

141 

3, 985 
102 
137 
157 

411 
500 
136 
121 
240 

2, .500 
341 
448 
127 
100 

1. 002 
38 

325 
5<l 

279 

243 
341 
29 
275 
127 

495 
137 
415 
1.57 
521 



5.50 
226 
217 
1,779 
199 

170 
97 

398 
79 
70 

178 
199 

75 
205 

94 

27 
12 
41 
35 
642 

142 

113 

94 

34 

218 

320 

156 

28 

.5,358 

1,183 

20 
2.103 
79 
89 
101 

271 

176 

78 

59 

251 

1. 852 
221 
331 

98 
39 

915 
16 
271 
104 
121 

94 
210 

84 
205 

99 

258 
202 
273 
61 
179 



7,358 
936 
1, 262 
4,070 
1, 6.55 

686 
191 
935 
802 
348 

.533 
517 
357 
949 
198 

310 

6 

207 

166 

1,988 

194 
019 
517 
150 
1,014 

1,961 

365 

238 

9,762 

2.743 

338 
3,017 
261 
388 
456 

725 
818 
422 
601 
1,110 

5,488 

719 

909 

371 

35 

2, 461 
505 

1.138 
304 
572 

1,002 
849 
346 
819 
398 

925 
.508 
893 
243 
1, 570 



105 



T;il>l. 



,5."). — \iinilxi i>( Si-h-»l<il I'm I I ttjj'ritsfs himuti lu the I' 
('ilirs thrr '2'tJKM in I'ninilnl inn — < iontiliucd 



,li.r. l>f.->7. 





Mm- 

.ItT, 

non- 
nck'll- 
tn'nt 
inan- 
Nlauch- 

tlT 

a 

31 

5 

ft 

1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
3 


Kol>- 
liory 


A).'Kia- 
vatol 
as.saiilt 


Hur- 
diary 
hn-ak- 
IriK or 
outer- 

int! 


Lurcvny— theft 




City 


$.'iOan.l 
over 


Coder 
$.50 


Auto 
theft 


liicliinoixl, Ind 

KiclltllOIKl. \'ll 

I<l\ri>lili\ Ciilif 


II 

273 

24 

'l 

41 

22 
21 

1 
1! 


10 

37A 
37 
103 

ti2 
24 
42 


1.972 
4.'.2 
3N.'. 

.Vt 

1, 135 

1S2 

288 

115 

82 

41 

95 

.111 

i.2<;2 

191 

18ft 
194 
128 
1.212 
311 

3, 2ta 

821) 
1.83ft 
5. 730 

749 

330 
■XI2 
ft3 

rm 

297 

182 
317 
732 
539 
151 

28«> 
4.4S1 

188 
67 
3ft 

95 
33:) 
283 
121 
117 

287 
.544 
557 
35 
183 

759 
239 
715 
3AI 
217 

53 

log 

7.908 
755 


2.53 

8.54 

401 

288 

53 

ft5l 
198 

208 
73 
3ft 

f>5 
111 

89 

1,32ft 

123 

53 
138 

.52 
7a3 
150 

1,020 

581 

2, 352 

2.25»i 

881 

222 
389 
91 
lft7 
19ft 

128 
•234 

1,004 
732 
159 

91 
2. 089 
79 
53 
«5 

71 
2'.t7 
181 
122 
223 

26.5 
414 
.501 
43 
127 

428 
100 
112 
146 
110 

58 

S8 

3. 870 

7\iO 

327 


348 
3,973 
1,487 

1, 132 
343 

3,043 
543 
751 
37« 
193 

212 

407 

890 

3,557 

1,4.53 

281 
744 
842 
3.914 
589 

5,9«)4 
1,527 
5,182 
11.213 
3.243 

834 
1.305 

338 
1.120 

916 

303 

610 

1,580 

1.019 

196 

ft(U 
8,511 
320 
437 
203 

448 

1,393 

1,327 

682 

3t)8 

ftlO 
1.560 
872 
307 
012 

2. <Vi7 
807 
1155 
ft22 
630 

908 

335 

I.V931 

4.120 

1,337 


70 

1,213 

1<'>5 


Koailokf, \ :i 


194 


KiH-lii'sti'i, Minn 


81 


U.mIm-sI.t. N. Y 

K.H-k Islaii.l, III 


525 
80 


K.M-kfDnl. Ill 


118 


Hocky M..III11. N. O 

Koine, liii 


37 

55 


Home. N. Y 


43 


Raswcll, V. Mi'X 


2«') 
210 

1 
<i 
1 
137 
7 

177 

47 

2S() 

1.227 

SI 

24 

Hi 
a 

l.^ 

ID 

II) 

73 
12»i 

9 
41.2 
7 
(i 
2 


18 

77 

KW 

4 
21 
97 
ft4 

.VI4 

129 

279 

1.072 

3.". 

9 
17 

;« 

20 
4.'-. 

14 
4ft 

3S7 
9 

11 
92 
<•) 

8 
7 


31 


Roviil Oak, Mich 


188 


Siicniiiunio, Calif 

Saplnaw, Mkli 

8uh-rii, Muss 


9 

(5 


943 
139 

35 


Safc'iii, OroR 


72 




2 

1 

3r. 
.1 


33 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

I 

I 

1 

13 

1 
'l 


49 


Salt Lake (Mty, Utah 

San Anprlo, 1 i«x 

San Antonio, lex 

Siui ni>niar<linu, CiM 


471 

87 

2.04ft 
302 




1, 493 


Sun Kniiu-ist'o, ("allf 

San Jose, Calif.. . 

San l.<>;in<lro, Calif 

San Mau-o. Calif.. 

San<lii>kv, Ohio 


5,444 
645 

94 
193 
35 


Santa Ana, Calif 

Santa HarUini, Calif 

Santa CUiru. Calif 

Santa Kc, \. Mfx 

Santa Monli-a, Calif 


133 
94 

41 
202 
447 


Savannah, tJa.' 

■ .nivtady, N. V 


424 
102 

137 


Solnia, Ma 


2,698 
15 


•Sluik.r lliluht-s Ohio 

Slbirun, I'a 


55 
44 


ShrN)ycan, Wbt 




53 




18 


33 
12 
4 
17 

2.1 
31 
43 
4 


Kl 
22 
ft 
lA 
10 

3 

ZIMI 
IIM 

48 


58 
ft 

1 
12 

5 
31 
30 

2i 

3.'> 
46 
3A 
14 
18 

1 

7 

Z3r,fl 

4« 

45 


288 


Sloii\ ( Ity, Iowa 


310 


Slou\ KalLs, S. Dak... 


I 
1 


.55 


Skokl.-. Ill 


30 


r><»rTrr\ illf, M-i!W 


316 


.1 


6 


182 




243 


rbco, Calif 




80 






6 
3 
1 
3 

1 

7 
93 

6 
12 


73 


, k-mr. Wih 


394 




Iftl 


S| . ^,S... 


403 


S|M 


71 


Sprliut' M, otilo 


86 


St. Clnri-», \!tnn 


30 
70 




5,252 




066 


I-. t. r-|.iirv. KLi 


148 



footnote at end of tabic. 



106 



Tiildr ;?.". — \iiiiiln'r Iff Srlrrt4-il I'lirl 1 (Pffcnsrs hmntn to ifir I'olirr, I957y 
V.iliv.s ihrr H.'t.OOO in I'lt/niltilitin — ( !<>i)tiiiiH-<l 



City 



Sl:inif(ir(l, Conn 

Sti'iibciullU', r>hl... 

Stdcktoii, Calif 

St nit ford. Conn 

Sunnyvale, Calif... 



Supirior, Wis 

Syracuse, \. Y. . 
Ta«)ina, Wash... 
Tallahiissoo, Fla. 
Tarnpu, Fla 



Taunton, Moss... 

'rcaiicck, X. J 

Teniplf. Tex 

Terrc Haute, Ind. 
Toledo, Ohio 



TofK'ka, Kuns 

Torrance, Calif 

'I'orrinpton, Conn. 

Trenton, N'. J 

Troy, X. Y 



Tucson, Ariz 

Tulsa, Okla 

Tuscaloosa, Ala. 

Tvler, Tex 

Union, X. J 



Union City. X.J 

University City, Mo. 

l'|)IM'r l)arl>y, Fa 

Utica, X. Y 

Vallejo. Calif 



\allcy Stream, X. Y. 

\ancouver. Wash 

\'entura, Calif 

\'icksl)urp. Miss 

Waco, Tex 



Waltliain, Mass 

Warreti, Oliio 

Warwick, K. I 

Warwick, \'a. 

Washinpton, D. C. 



Wasiiinpton, Pa 

Water tiury, Conn 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Watertown, Mass 

Watertown, X. Y 



Waukepan, III 

Wausau, Wis 

Wauwatosa, Wis 

West Allls. Wis 

West Hartford, Conn. 



West Haven, Conn 

West Mimin, Pa 

West New York, \. J.. 

West Oraiipe, \. J 

W est Palm Heach, Fla. 



Wevinoutli, Mass -. 

WluH'linp, W. Va 

White I'lains, X. Y 

Whiltier, Calif 

Widilta, Kuns 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
neeli- 
pent 
man- 
slauph- 
ter 



Hob- 
bery 



21 

2») 

14« 

4 

5 

5 
01 
70 

8 
145 

1 
4 

13 
27 

270 

43 



79 
10 

73 

105 

2 

3 

12 

6 
10 
4 

21 

4 
10 
3 
2 
41 

U 
32 



Appra- 
vated 
as.'tault 



33 
32 

59 
4 
3 

2 

3S 

30 

51 

330 

9 

1 

47 

19 

115 

47 

25 

3 

118 

19 

88 
131 
09 
5 
10 

15 
1 

42 
9 

14 

1 
9 
9 



97 
2,708 



Bur- 
plar.v— 
break- 
Inp or 
enter- 
ing 



430 
222 
704 

lOS 
107 

122 
791 
747 
137 
1,786 

130 
133 
14H 
30O 
1,309 

500 
484 
43 
788 
224 

850 

1.057 

231 

85 

125 

221 
135 
191 
234 
HI 

85 
98 
147 
54 

598 

151 
146 
281 
378 
3,058 

50 
407 
1.59 
200 
KH) 

149 

00 
104 

89 
96 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



266 
70 
741 
12i'. 
110 

39 

687 

556 

53 

805 



52 

104 

1,324 

185 
382 

27 
242 

98 

283 

1.072 

170 

14 

93 

24 
174 
130 

83 
221 

30 
93 

154 
45 

182 

97 

150 

273 

207 

1,849 

39 
101 
101 

69 

84 

111 
43 

88 
80 
51 



Under 
$50 



2 122 M 

3 56 2 

Complete data not received ' 

3 

10 47 



482 
461 
1,727 
275 
346 

480 
2, 020 
2, 101 

340 
3.046 

3."V4 

159 

399 

741 

3.874 

1.289 

754 

58 

941 

183 

2.527 

3, 050 

184 

302 

249 

144 

381 
651 

698 
082 

214 
328 
254 
125 
1,418 

407 

asi 

441 

.590 

5,977 

130 
511 
022 
204 
251 

405 
343 
327 
710 

im 

113 
30 




111 


72 


154 


280 


144 


616 


70 


62 


184 


213 


141 


463 


107 


276 


307 


238 


30 


583 


1.611 


804 


3.997 



See footnote nt end of table 



Tabic 33. — .\utiiln'r oj Svlvvlftl I'arl I OJJfitsrs Kmmu (o ilu: I'ulivt', l'J57, 
Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



Wichita Falls, Tex. 
Wllkfs-niirri'. Pa. . 
Wllklnsbiirp. I'a .. 
Wllllainsivjrt. Pa.. 
WUmliiKton, Del... 



WUmlnRton. N. C 

Wlnoiiu, Minn 

Wlnslon-SaK-ni, N, O. 

WcKMU.rl.lpf, N. J 

Woon.sofkot, R. I 



Worco.stor, Mass. . 
Wyaiiilotto. Mich. 

Vaklina, Wivsh 

Yonkors, N. Y 

York, Pa 



YounKstown, Ohio. 
ZanesvUle, Ohio.... 



Mur- 
tlor, 
non- 
dckII- 
Kpnt 
mnn- 
slauRh- 
tor 



17 



Rob- 
bory 



43 
8 
23 
18 
14 

111 
10 



Areru- 
vutcd 
as.iault 



101 
11 

2 
34 

254 



201 
S 
3 

17 
3 
19 
39 
37 

23 
2 



Biir- 
Klury- 
hrcitk- 
Inif or 
pnicr- 

Ine 



407 
120 
129 
192 

f>»l»J 

36« 
42 
553 
132 
132 

l.OCfl 
105 
275 
230 
311 

556 
181 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



211 

102 

40 

109 

409 

\W, 
24 
187 
101 
92 

450 
77 
182 
115 
149 

528 
114 



Under 
(50 



2,097 
234 
233 
432 

1.455 

713 
10<i 
975 
197 
222 

1,472 

502 

1.908 

1, 173 

037 

1.138 
386 



Auto 
thrft 



232 
HI 
52 
51 

2H5 

134 
9 
179 
37 
125 

527 
143 
119 
244 
122 

330 
84 



' Larwnles not !»parately re|>orte<l. Flpure IliJted includes both major and minor larcenies. 

' Some unfounded complaints were Ini-ludcd as ollenses. The department's reporting procedures are 
belnp revLse<l. 

' The crime reporting for the city indicated does not meet acceptable standards established by the Com. 
mitten on I'niform Crime Kecords of tiie International .\ssociation of Chiefs of Police. 



108 



I\tiniln'r itf Svlfftvd Part / Ojjoikses Kmmn tn tlir Vttlicv in Jiiris- 
ilictinns (hitsith- tin- f ttilcd Shtlvs 

Police MLrciKirs ill Ahiskii, (liiiiin. Iliiwaii. and the Istlmuis of 
I'niuiiiui coiiliibiitcd criiuc fi<rui"('S for llic year li)')7. For selected 
|>:ii I I clii'^sinciit ions, (lie ofreiises known to tlie |)olice in these areas are 
|)l rseiiteil in taMe iiti. 

FiiTures received from law -eiifoiceiiieni ajreneies outside tlie 4S 
>tates ar<' not used in the eoini)ilatioii of siiininary data in other tables 
of this hiiUetin. 

Talilr .'U». — .\iinthrr of SvU'rIvil I'ltrl I (tffi'nsrs hiioivn In the VolUv in Juris- 
iliiliitns Oiilsitiv lliv I iiiird Slult'x, 1057 



Jurlsiliii 1(111 KiiortliiL' 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
iiopll- 
ppnt 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Rob- 
bery 



Apgra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
clary— 
break- 
ing 
or 
enter- 
ing 



Larceny— theft 



Over 
$50 



Under 
$50 



Auto 
theft 



Alaska: 

A ncliorage City 

Di'liarlnuMit of Territorial Police . 
First judicial division (Juneau)... 
Jiiiicau City 



'iuuni: Agana. 



Hawaii: 

Hawaii County... 
Honolulu City ... 
Honolulu County. 

Kauai County 

Maui County 



Isthmus of Panama: Canal Zone. 



172 
1% 
14 
23 

135 



254 

2.015 

559 

79 

162 

206 



215 

368 

17 

28 

35 



57 
8r>4 
219 



93 



435 

295 

9 

30 

166 



365 

4. 024 

1,245 

246 

391 

724 



169 

386 

1 

9 



25 
775 
123 
23 
24 



Sn|)|)l('inental Crime Data 



Some pail. I ofFrnscs arc annl^'zod in supplemental reports for- 
warded l)y poliee in cities with more than 2o,()0() inhabitants, Snj)ple- 
inental reports from 44') eilii's are summai-ized in table 37. 

Those 445 cities repoited a 2.7 pcr<('nt rise in offenses of ra])o in 
1057. This is slightly below the 3.7 percent increase reported by the 
2,585 cities rej)resented in tables 25 and 26. Almost 57 percent of 
the otrens(>s of rai)e in tlie 445 cities were forcible in character; how- 
ever, forcible offenses, as contrasted with statutory offenses (victim 
under the age of consent) increased only seven tenths of one percent 
while the statutory crimes increased 5.5 percent. Beginning with 
the January, 1958, reports, statutory ia])e is excluded from the part I 
offenses. 

Robberies increased 8.4 percent in the 445 cities and this agrees 
with the 8.1 rise reported by 2,585 cities (tables 25 and 26). Busi- 
nesses, as a group, were attacked 7.2 percent more times in 1957 than 
in 1956. There were seven less bank robberies in 1957 in the 445 
reporting cities. Armed and strong-armed rol)beries of victims at 
residences increased 8.4 percent while such incidents on the streets 
(highway) rose 10.3 jxTcent. 

Burglaries in the nighttime and in the daylight hours increased in 
1957. Nonresideiice structures, accounting for 60.7 of the burglaries, 
in<-reased 13.8 })ercent, while resitlence burglaries rose 6.8 percent. 

An analysis of larcenies by types shows decreases in two categories. 
Offenses of pocket -picking, comprising less than one jxTcent of the 
liirceny problem, declined 3.5 percent while thefts of bicycles, which 
make up almost 15 percent of total thefts, decreased 2.6 percent. 
Closely related to robberies, pui'se-snatchings rose 9.1 percent. Shop- 
liftings increa.sed 13.9 percent and thefts of accessories and other 
articles from autos increased 7.7 percent. 

Of the 177,165 autos stolen in 445 .•iti.>s. 164.988 or 93.1 percent 
were recovered in 1957. 

(109) 



no 



liilih- '.\~. — Offrnsv Aiutlysis, Trends. lOHfy-liT 

[u:, clil.s (ivtr 'ii.noo. Total im) population .VJ.UST.Siaj 



ClasslflKUIon 



|{;.pc: 

TOTAL 

iM.rcil)!.' 

Statutory 

KoMmtv: 

TOTAL 

Ili^'hway 

t'onmicrcial house - 

Oil station 

Chain store - - 

Hosidoncv --- 

Hank 

Mlsci'llancous - 

lUirfrlarv— breaking or entering: 

TOTAL 

Residence (dwelling): 

Night 

Day 

Nonresidence (store, office, etc.): 

Night 

Day 

I/arc»nv— theft (except auto theft, by value): 
TOTAL -- 

$'iO and over --- 

$r. to $'.0 

rn<k'r$5 

l.arcciiv- theft (by type): 

TOTAL 

rocket -picking - 

J'lirsi'-siiatching - 

Shoplifting 

Thefts from autos (except accessories) 

Auto accessories 

Bicycles 

All others 

Auto theft: 

Stolen 

Recovered 



Number of ofTcnses 



195f> 



1957 



10, 395 



10, 677 



0,004 

4. :{9i 



44,205 



23,504 
11.151 
2.047 
882 
3, 544 
149 
2,928 

296, 382 



07, 240 
53. 791 



150.915 
18, 43ii 



769, 534 



201,894 
450, 101 
111,539 

769, 534 



8,f)43 
12. 270 
34,388 
127, 277 
209. 157 
121. 952 
250,441 

101,992 
151, 703 



0, 045 
4,032 



47,902 



2.5,921 
11.499 
2, 370 
1.241 
3,841 
142 
2,882 

328, 791 



71,012 
57, f.31 



179.841 
19, 707 



821, 158 



219. 982 
484. 873 
110,303 

821, 158 



7,700 
13. 392 
39, 18.i 
138, nw> 
224,174 
118, S05 
279, WO 

177, 105 
104,988 



I'erctnt 
change 



+2. 



+.7 
+5.5 



+8.4 



+ 10.3 
+3.1 
+ 10. I 
+40.7 
+8.4 
-4.7 
-1.0 

+10.9 



+0. 5 
+7.1 



+14.0 
+6.9 



+6.7 



+9.0 
+0.3 
+4.3 

+6.7 



-3.5 

+9.1 
+13.9 
+8. 
+7.2 
-2.0 
+9.0 

+9.4 

+a8 



Property Loss, by Crime 

An avorage loss of $199 for crimes against properly was reported 
by 442 cities as shown in table 38. In the individual classes, average 
losses ranged from a low of $68 for larceny-theft to a high of $859 
for auto theft. In the other two crimes of this type losses averaged 
$202 in robberies and $171 in burglaries. 

Losses to auto thieves represented 55.5 percent of the property 
loss in tiie reporting cities due to the part I crimes against property. 



Ill 



Tul)I»' 'Ml. — Itiltti' of I'rofHTty Stttlfti, by Type of Crinw, 1957 
(442 cities over 'i'5,000. ToUil lU.IO |X)piilatlon 59,I73,5.^3. Values rouiulwl o/T) 



Classlflcntion 


Number of 
ofTonsefl 


Value of 

property 

stolen 


A veraRp 
value |¥'r 
o(T<-n.s«> 


TOTAL 


1,364,678 


IS71. 833, 974 


1199 






Hol.U'ry 


47. fill 
325. (Mtl 
81.1. 770 
175,fl.')l 


9. r.4(). S«7 
.'>.'.. .S7tl.'.tlS 
.55.fi«l2. 7KI 
15().952.ti8H 






171 


1-iiriviiv — theft .. . . . 


TiH 


Auto theft 


K.')ll 







lAtss nml lyrtori'iy I (ihiatiniis, h\ iypo of Property 

l'(»Iic(' riH'ovorril stolen jjiopcrt y valued at 58 cenls for every dollar's 
worih of property stolen in 1057, according to the reports of 433 
rilies. table 30. 

Over 03 percent of the valuation of stolen autos was recovered in 
1957. Police effected a recovery of 15.2 percent of stolen property other 
than automobiles. 



"al»l«- .V). — I «i/m«' «•/ I'roporly StiAeti ami 1'iilnt' of Property Recovered, by 
Typ*' oj Property, 1957 



(433 dtles over 25,000. Total 1950 population 


56,622,564. Values rounded off] 




Type of property 




Value of property 


Percent 




Stolen 


Recovered 


recov- 
ered 


TOTAL 


1261. 454. 334 


1151, 776. 516 


68. 1 








Currencv, noii«!, etc 


2S. 231. 364 

21,423.913 

7, 406, 545 

11.012.420 
143.85*3.569 
49, 486, 523 


3.01I..V)6 

1.9r>4.W)l 

4tX). S>s2 

1.195.41i> 

133. 907. 494 

11,236,357 


10.7 


Jeu-flry iinil prpcloU.S m4*tal8 


9.2 


Furs ' 


6.2 


Clothlnif 


10.9 


Locally stolen automobiles 


93.1 


Miscellaneous 


22.7 







Aw, Sex, and Race of Persons Arrested 



AiTcst records of cily police are (lie soui'ce of iiifoi-mat ion in tlii^ 
section. Ai'i'cst I'ecoi'ds do not refei' to t he innnhei' of offenses known. 
Data in the i)recedin<r sections of (his issue relate to olfeiises known 
to the police. 

Arrest information is re])orted by city police for |)art II as well a- 
part I classifications. Offenses known data in pi'cvious sections are 
limited to the part I classifications. Each i-eportin^ a<rencv limits 
its entries al)out airests to ari'csts for violations occurring within 
its jiM'isdiction. Arrests for violations occui-rintr outside its juris- 
diction arc excluded from its report. 

Trends, 1956-57 

Reports from 1,220 cities for 1956 and 1957, when compared, rellect 
a 4.3 percent increase in total arrests. In these same cities, arrests 
of per.sons under the age of 18 increased 9.8 percent. 

A build-up of percentage inereases with 1952 as the base year 
indicates that the ])opulation group aged 10-17 has increased 22 
percent while in reporting cities arrests of persons under 18 have 
increased 55 percent. Assuming that the population increase for 
the country is r(>presentatiye of the population change in the reporting 
cities, it may be observed that on a ])ercentage basis arrests of young 
persons have increased two and one-half times faster than the popu- 
lation of young peo])le. Soui-ce of i)opulation figures for 1950 and 
1957: U. 8. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census; ('urreiit 
Population Repoiis, Series P-25. 

Arrests of persons imder IS increased 16.0 percent in cities uiuh'r 
25,000 and 8.1 percent in cities of 25,000 or more. Arrests in all 
age groups increased 5.9 |)ercent in smaller cities and 3.9 percent in 
the larger |)opulation centers. 

These tr{ lid figures do not represent all arrests in the I niled States 
but are limited to the arrests by 1,220 rejwrting police dei)artments 
icpresent ing a total city population of 35.97S.S53 (1950 decennial 
census figures). Kc|)orts from identical cities were compared for 
1956 and f957 to obtain the ti'cnd information. 

(112) 



ii;i 



TuI»I«- U).— Arrest Trrtuls, l95(t-57 

H'lipill.lliMll tU'llli'. ftnm l'.l.''() ■ll'CflJIliill ivususj 



ToUl Arrests : 

1M.'.<1... . 

1W.'.7 

I'hHnife 

Percent rhnnite. 

Under IS: 

1957 

<"himK«?- 

I'crccnt change. 



ToUl— 1.220 

citii-s; loliil 
IMpulution 



1,782,328 

1,8S9,196 

+78,868 

+4.3 



208,690 

229,187 

+20,497 

+9.8 



Ovpr Z-S.OOO- 
2.10 cit I.-; 

|M)|)Ulllli(IIl 

27,0IU,M4 



1.4:}7,3.5I 

I.41»3,«fi3 

+5fl, .M2 

+3.U 



iru1,7.33 

177,O.W 

+ 13,305 

+8.1 



2,.V)0 to 

WA riti.>.; 
IKipllllllioil 

8,908,001) 



344.977 

3fi.% 3;u 

+20, 35«1 

+5.1» 



44, M7 

62, 149 

+7, 102 

+ 16.0 



Climber ttf trri'sts. 1937 

I'olico ill l,47:i cilics reported total arrests of 2,068,677 for viola- 
tions within their jurisdietions in 1957. Traffic violations other than 
tlrivin*; while intoxicated are not included in the figures. Data in 
tahle 41 do not represent all arrests but arc limited to cities which 
had 4(),17(),36n inhabitants at the last decennial census, 1950. 

Ajre of Persons Arrested, 1957. An examination of the <listribu- 
tion of 2.()()8,()77 arrests in 1,473 cities by age groups, tables 41 and 42, 
reflects that 253,817 of these, or 12.3 percent, were of individuals who 
had not yet reached their eighteenth birthday at the time of arrest, 
and 39.0 percent of these were under the age of 15. 

Although youths under 18 account for only 12.3 percent of arrests 
for all age groups, they make up 47.2 percent of the arrests for the 
part 1 crimes of murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, negligent 
manslaughter, rape, robbeiy, aggravated assault, burglary-breaking 
or entering, laneny-thcft and auto theft. The extent of the participa- 
tion of youths in crime for the part I classes is weighted by arrests for 

ines against prop'Mty. 

Persons under 18 represented 53.1 percent of all arrests for the 
part I crimes of robbery, burglary-l)r(>aking or entering, larceny- 
theft, and auto theft, but only 10.3 percent of all arrests for the part I 
crimes against the person of murder, negligent manslaughter, rape, 
and aggravated assault. 

The participation of youths under 18 in the part 1 property erimes 

uns highest in auto thefts where they represented 67.0 percent of all 

arrests. Of all arrests for burglary-breaking or entering, youths 

under 18 represented 54. S percent. Similarly, they were subjects of 

•'•"St in 51.3 pereent of all arrests for larceny-theft (other than auto). 

Miths under 18 accounted for 26.4 percent of the arrests for robbery. 



114 



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115 

;il»l«' 12. — \itmluT ami I'mriiniiir of Irrpsts of Prrstttis I'tnirr IH. I nilrr 
21, ntnl I itiliT '2!i \furs «»/ <y«'. I'fUT: 1,47.1 Cilit's OviT 2.S(Hi in l*t>inilntitni 

(Totiil populutiun 40,17i'>,309, biiscd on 1020 doconuial ct'nsus] 



OlTcnsc charpod 



TOTAL 



Criminal homiclile: 

(a) Miipirr ami nunnegligcnt man- 

slauKhter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 



K()l)lurv 

Olt 
Buiv 



•tilt 

iking or entering. 



Larct'ny— theft 

Auto theft 

EmN'ziIement ami fraud 

Stolon proixTty; buyinc, receiving, etc. 



Korpi-ry and counterfeiting 

Ilaix- 

Prostitution and conimereiallied vice. 
Other sex offenses 



Narcotic drug laws 

\Vea|K)ns; curyinp, inxsses^'JinR, etc. . 
01Tens«'S against family and children. 
Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxicated. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



Oambling 

Suspicion 

All other offenses. 



Number of persons arrested 



TOTAL 



8.068,677 



2.007 
1.238 

11.880 
83,266 
81. 749 
&1, 398 

102,476 

29. 121 

16. 168 

3.869 

8.288 
4.780 
12.694 



7.277 
16,864 
28.444 
43,347 

101.090 

241.167 

832.268 

60,520 

SO. 462 

84,645 

229, 742 



Under 
18 



853. 817 



133 
74 

3.124 
2.091 
0. 052 
28.179 

52. 5.50 

10.082 

4,54 

1.249 

059 

932 

122 

3.417 

219 
2.998 

289 
7,125 

0t)5 

26.029 

0.779 

4,705 

615 
1.5.972 
09,703 



Under 
21 



Under 
25 



390.680 599.551 



271 
201 

.5.287 

3.929 

12.090 

34. 974 

03.993 

23.472 

1.142 

1.733 

1,478 
2.110 
1.104 
5.256 

927 

5. 102 

1.000 

10. 245 

4, 470 
51.813 
28. 450 
10.504 



499 
381 

7.»!03 

7.030 

23, 787 

40.217 

72. 170 

25. r>48 

3.095 

2.200 

2. 744 

3. 107 
3.744 
8,137 

2. .508 
7. 084 
4.918 
19, 427 

15. 444 

8.5,801 
80.877 
17.017 



1.944 .5. 79<-. 
30,23.8 I 4.3. it24 
91.230 ; 115. 787 



Percentage 



Un<ler 
18 



18.3 



0.0 
0.0 

2<V4 
9.0 
7.4 

54.8 

51.3 

07. 

2.8 

32.3 

8.0 
19.5 

1.0 
10. 3 

,3.0 
17.8 

1.3 
10. 4 

.7 

10.8 

.8 

0.8 

1.2 
18.9 
30.3 



Under 
21 



19.3 



13.5 
10. 2 

44.7 

10.9 
14.8 
68.0 

02.4 

80. G 

7.1 

44.8 

17.8 
44.1 

8.7 
2.5.1 

12.7 

30.6 

7.4 

37.5 

4.4 

21.5 
3.4 
15.1 

3.9 
35.7 
39.7 



Under 
25 



89.0 



24.9 
30.8 

04.3 
30.2 
29. 1 
78.2 

70.4 
88. 1 
19.1 
5«5.9 

33.1 

0,5.0 
29.5 
38.8 

34.5 
45.0 
21.9 
44.8 

15.3 

35.6 

9,7 

24.5 

11.5 
51,9 
50.4 



116 



. 


PERSONS ARRESTED 
UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE 






PERCENT OF TOTAL ARRESTS 
CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 


1 




OFFENSES 


CALENDAR YEAR 1957 

ARRESTS, PERSONS UNDER 
18 YEARS OF AGE 

26.4"" 


TOTAL ARRESTS. 
ALL AGES 


m 


ROBBERY 


1 ■ 




11,820 


54.8 "o 








BURGLARY 


I 


^H 


51,398 




51.3 "" 








LARCENY 

AUTO THEn 

EMBEZZLEMENT 
AND ERAUD 

RECEIVING 
STOLEN PROPERTY 

FORGERY AND 
COUNTERFEITING 


I 


^1 


1 102,476 


67.6 "o 






I 




29,121 


2.8 "o 






1 




18,188 


32.3 ".: 






I 1 




, 3.369 


B.O "„ 






m 




8,288 









\,ii73 CITIES TOTAL POPULATION 40,176,369 



FBI CHART 



t'ifiurv It. 



11 



Sox «>f Persons Arr«'st«Ml, 1937. Arrests in 1.473 cities by sex of 
the oireiiders are sliowii in tnhle 4.i. The tnl)h' shows the imiiiher of 
siieh airests rejjorted hy |)oliee together with the percent distrihut ion. 
These (igures do not rej)resont. total arrests in the I'niled iStates hut 
are limited to cities with a totnl popnlnt ion of 10, 1 Td.i^OO acc(»r(lin;i: 
to th<> ]9.'}() thM-etmiiil census. 



liii)!.- \.\. — Distrihiilioii •>( trrrsts lt\ Srx. I'f.'tT: IJT.'t Cilirs Ovvr 2,31)0 in 

I'opiilalion 

ITotal |M)|)iiliiti«n 40,i7it,3tl«, ba.s<'d on 19.'iO downnlal wnsusj 



Ofli'ns)' churpoil 



Xuiiibor 



TOTAL Male Feiiial 



TOTAl 



iiiinal hoiniciilc: 

la) Mur<l<T im<l nuiiiit'Klik'inl inani^laughter. 
lb) ManslaiiphttT by ni'Bllgence 



Kohb«Ty 

Afteravatofi assault 

OthiT a.«saiilts 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 



Larwny— theft 

Autotheft 

Eaitx'zzlement and fraud. 

:^toU-n proiHTty; buying, receiving, etc. 



Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rape . - 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Ot her s«'x otT«-n.<t-8 



. inp, i)os.sessine, etc... 
I family an<l children. 



W 

Ol'. 

Ll<|Uiir 1 lu -■ . 



Driving while Intoxicated. 

DlsordiTly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



Oanibllng 

Suspicion 

All other offensM. 



a. 068. 677 



2.007 
1.238 

11,820 
23.266 
81, 749 
M,398 

102,476 

29,181 

16,168 

3,869 

8,288 
4,780 
18,694 
20,868 

7.2n 
16.864 
22.444 
43.347 

101.099 

241,167 

832,268 

69,520 

SO. 469 

84,645 

899,748 



1, 848, 725 



1,634 
1,134 

11.354 
10.201 
73.999 
50,195 

88,898 

28,328 

13.834 

3.5fiO 

7, 0^3 
4,780 
3,90*i 
16,064 

6.143 
15,992 
20,433 
35.910 

96,090 
201. ^a 
768.849 

62,783 

45,364 
76.612 
195,028 



219,952 



373 

104 

46*1 
4. 0<V5 
7,750 
1,203 

13.578 

793 

2.334 

309 

1.225 



8,788 
4,904 

1.134 

872 
2.011 
7,437 

5,000 
39, t)(),S 
63.419 

6.737 

5,098 

8.033 

34,714 



Percent 



TOTAL' Male Female 



100.0 



.1 
.1 

.6 
1.1 
3.9 
2.5 

5.0 
1.4 

.8 
.2 

.4 

.8 
.6 
1.0 

.3 

.8 

1.1 

2.1 

4.9 
11.7 
40.2 

3.4 

2.4 
4.1 
11.1 



100.0 



.6 
1.0 
4.0 

Z7 

4.8 
1.5 
.7 
.2 

.4 
.3 

.2 
.9 

.3 
.9 
1.1 
1.9 

5.2 
10.0 
41.6 

3.4 

^5 
4.1 
10.6 



100.0 



(') 



.2 
1.8 
3.5 

.5 

6.2 
.4 
1. 1 



4.0 
2.2 

.5 

.4 

.9 

3.4 

2.3 
18.0 
28.8 

3.1 

2.3 
3.7 
15.8 



' Less than one-tenth of onr ixnint. 



118 

Kac-o of IVrsoiis Arrested, 1957. Arrests in 1,473 cities by race 
of the ofreiulers are shown in tal)h' 44. These figures do not represent 
total arrests in the Tnited States hut are limited to reporting cities 
which had a total population of 40,170,309 according to the 1950 

(Iccciiiiial census. 



Talil*- \\.— irnsis hy Han; I'HiT : I.ITH Clllrs Over 2,500 in Population 

[Total populution 40,17r>,3<'ig, bused on 1050 decennial census] 



Oflcnsc charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder aii<l nonncgligent man 

slaugliter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence... 

Kobbery .■ 

.Vpgravati'd assault 

OUicr assaults 

Hurplary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft --■ 

EmlH'zzlemont and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 

I'orpery and counterfeiting 

Kapc - 

I'rostitution and commercialized vice... 
Other sex offenses 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children — 
Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Oaml)ling..- 

Suspicion 

All other oflenses 



TOTAL 



2, 068, 677 



2.007 
1.238 

11.820 
23. 266 
81. 749 
51.398 

102, 476 

29, 121 

16, 168 

3.869 

8,288 

4,780 

12, 694 

20, 968 

7.277 
16.864 
22.444 
43.347 

101. 099 

241. 167 

832. 268 

69. 520 

50. 462 

84.645 

229. 742 



Race 



White 



1,405,967 



7f.l 
973 

5.517 

8.041 

44. 740 

•■if). 058 

70, 701 

23,095 

13,030 

2,572 

f). 925 
2,(123 
7,520 
14, 492 

3.092 

7,814 

14.624 

26, 8.59 

84, 074 
14L0.17 
610.051 

51,679 

12,9.53 
.53. 789 
162. 921 



Negro 



616,028 



1,225 
254 

6, 158 
1.5.045 
36.316 
14.989 

30, 826 
5,716 
3,037 
1,263 

1.307 
2, 0S7 
5,054 
6,226 

4,108 

8, sta 

7. 639 
16, 000 

15.776 
97. 628 
188. 323 
16. 298 

37. 102 
3(t. 277 
64. 5U 



Indian 



37,715 



4 
3 

66 

78 
342 
189 

.561 

221 

43 

19 

35 
20 
82 
115 

18 

89 

66 

359 

864 

1.673 

30, 026 

1,230 

11 

366 
1,235 



Chinese 



267 



Japa- 
nese 



273 



3 
2 
6 

16 

20 

103 

13 

27 

4 

23 



All 
Others 



8,427 



77 

95 

335 

153 

345 

85 
48 
13 

20 
47 
35 
117 

46 
91 
112 
115 

365 

760 

3.723 

291 

323 

203 

1,005 



Report iii^; Area 



(!(nil rilnttttrs 



Tlu'ic was a ;^2 pcicciit iiiricasf in (lie uuiuhtT »»!' law-t'iitorft'iiicnl 
aj:;(»iU'ios wliicli coiiliihiitt'il one or more ciiinc r«'j)orts (lui"in<^ 10.")7. 
The 0,505 contrihiitois in 195t) infivascd (o ti.SOS in 1057. Tlicrc 
wtTL' :i,S57 city pt)li('(> (l('j)artnitMi(s, '2,0()t) siicriirs. 14 stato police, 250 
law-cnforcoincnt aj^encics in rnrai (o\vnsliij)s and villa»;os and 12 ap-n- 
cics in tcrritori«'s an<l oilier rctrions adniinist(M"cd l)\ the I'nitcd Stales 
whicli contrihHt(>d in 1057 nndei* (he proi^rani. 'I'lie ])oj)Hlations rep- 
resented hy llu> 12 agencies outside the forty-oiirhl States are not 
iiiehuh'd in the ptMcenta«rc of poj)ulalion coverage mentioned below. 
It should i)e nested that increases in the number of conti iI)iitors do 
not account for (he inci"ease in crim(>. 

Ich'ntical contributors are i'e])resented in each j^eriod in the (Com- 
parisons of figures for one or moiT yeais in llie tables rehitiuL'' (<» trends. 

(.Il\ am! liiirtil 

Cities are for the most pari incorporated phiees with at least 2.500 
inhabitants and follow the 1040 rule of the Bureau of thp Census. 
Other areas are rural although they include the nonfarm centers near 
cities. 



Pitfni In I inii Rrpreseti ted 

Nincty-seveii percent of the population of the Unite*! States was 
represi-nted by one or more crime reports in 1057. However, <lala 
avaihd)le for publication are not so comph'le. At least 17 percent of 
the population was not represented in the tables of this publication. 
In other words, the luaximum coverajre tor a complete period of n>57 
for any one type of tabulation was for .S3 percent of (he |)opuhi(ion. 

Al)out 09 percent of the city people and 95 percent of the people 
residing outside cities were represjMited by at least one <iimi' report 
in 1957 umler this voluntary reporting |)rogram. 



I 



120 

Tabic 45. — Reporting Area 



Population croup 



TOTAl 

1. Cities over 250,000 

2. Cities Kxt.nno to 2.'ki,(K)0... 

3. Cities.SO.CXH) to lOO.IKX) 

4. Cities 2.'),()()0 to .SO.fHK) 

5. Cities 10,(KK) to 25,000 

ft. Cities 2,5(KI to 10,(KH) 



Cities or towns 



Number 



TOTAl 



4.031 



41 

Of. 

130 

279 

814 

2,701 



Contrib- 
utors 



3,857 



41 

GO 

130 

277 

797 

2, 54fi 



Percer)t 
con- 
trib- 
utors 



95.7 



100. 
100. 
10f).0 
99.3 
97.9 
94.3 



Population 



Xumljtr 



TOTAl 



89. 518, 135 



34. 932. 9.55 
9.r,94. Ill 
9, 210. .598 
9. 7H0, 890 
12,440,475 
13. 447. \m 



Ucpre- 
scntwl by 
contrib- 
utors 



88, 489, 473 



34. 932. 9.55 
9.094.111 
9. 210. .59H 
9. 717.3H9 
12. 192. 001 
12. 7.'i.5. S19 



Percoiit 
repre- 
sente<l 



98.9 



100. 
100. 
100. 
99.3 
9s. 
94.7 



Lniform Crime Tfc^porling Program 



lirief liarkiiromul 

l*ri(>r to 19.'^0, Inw-cMtforci'iiKMit :ii;«'nci('s in tlio rnilcd States were 
inml)!(' to o.\t'liaiii:;(' (•()in|)aral)l(' tal)iilati()ns of report o<l crimes and 
ptM'sons nnt'stod. Stumbling blocks were: (1) differences amon^ tin* 
states in definitions of crimes; (2) variances in record procednres and 
aihninistrative teclmiqnes among law-enforcement agencies; and (:i) 
the not nnjustified fear that througii a popnlar misconception an 
a<lmission of the existence of crime woidd be a charge against th(^ 
police. 

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (lACP) rccognizeil 
the need for an interchange of police statistics and evolved a program. 
Available })enal and court statistics concerned matters somewhat 
removed in time from the immediate police problem. Among other 
things, police want to know: (1) how much crime there is; (2) its 
geographical distribution; (3) whether it is on the increase or tlecrease; 
(4) whether it varies for different types of offenses; and (o) the success 
obtained by the police in its investigation. 

Loi-ally, such tabulations ai<l the administrator in deploying his 
force by hour when and by area where crimes are happening. He 
studies means of coping with prol)lems presented. Ilis study may 
suggest the need for broail or sp(>cialized training ))rograms. He may 
evolve now taeties in response to certain trends. .Vlso, he will keej) 
his public informed. 

A by-product of such necessary administrative tabulations would 
be summary reports to be sent to a national clearinghouse for publica- 
tion of information useful to the police and others. As a basis for 
reporting for local and mitioiuil use it was emphasized that police 
should observe certain standards of record keeping: (1) make a 
permanent written record of each pertinent incident as soon as it 
comes to tlu* attention of the police; (2) keep this record as an adminis- 
trative control device to insure that the operating or field units do 
not mislay or otherwise lose the information; (3) place responsibility 
for tlu' classification and scoring of crimes and arrests in tin* head- 
quarters administrative phase of the police operation. 

Clussifiratioiis. National crime reporting categories are tlescribetl 
in the following pages. There are 27. Incidents or violations of a 
similar character are grouped. These classifications do not neces- 
sarily agree with the titles of state statiMes. A handbook is furnished 

(121) 



122 

to cacli colli lilniliiii,' police a<i:oncy ns a guide lo (he |)ro[)ei' i)i'e[)nrntioii 
of rej)orts. 

Voluntary rro<.'ram Slarted. The lAC'P collected the first report. 
It (Mtiidiicted the progiaiii IVoni .lamiarv 19IU), until legislation pei*- 
luilted transforral of the central files and duties to the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation (FBI). Since September 1930. the FBI has acted 
as the national clearinghouse. 

Keporting Jurisdiction. A police department is an accounting 
unit for crimes which occur within the city limits and related arrests. 
A sheriff rejjorts for areas in his county which are outside the limits of 
cities. This arrangement is followed even though the sherifY in some 
instances conducts all or a part of the investigations within a city. 

Folii'c Statistics. This program provides for collecting informa- 
tion about crime matters through reports prepared by local law-en- 
forcement agencies. The decision as to the classifying and scoring 
of a crime or an arrest is that of the reporting police who follow 
uniform instructions. This feature distinguishes information avail- 
able imder this program from any tabidations jirepared ]>riniarily 
from records of prosecutors, courts, penal institutions, and the like. 

Oflfcnscs Known to the Police. An auto is stolen. The owner 
calls the police. A police employee makes a brief record and assigns 
a patrol car by radio. A police officer interviews the owni'r and 
takes other appropriate action. This is an offense known to the 
police. Police may learn of an offense (crime) in numy ways. 
Police count an offense even though they make no arrests or even 
though they find that a juvenile committed the offense. Similarly, 
none of the following factors affect the scoi'ing of an ofl'ense: the 
value of property; the recovery of the property; the failure of a victim 
to cooperate in prosecution. In a small percentage of cases police 
investigation establishes that a crime did not occur. In such in- 
stances, the citizen's complaint is properly excluded from figures 
submitted for i)uhh( ation. 

For this pi-ogram i)olice limit th(>ir reporting of offenses known to 
seven classes, the part I offenses, listed and described on pages \2'A 
and 124. The lACP decided that these crimes of criminal homicide, 
rape, robbery, aggi'avated assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft 
were grave offenses wiiich e.xjjerience had shown to be most generally 
and com])letely reported by (he public. 

At the time the program was foi-mulated by the lACP no practical 
value was antieii)ated from an extension of the j)art I classes. Some 
crimes were exchi(h'(l becjuise only a small and unknown pi-rcentage 
could be expected to conu' to the a((en(ion of the police, because some 
crimes occurred so infre(|uently that a separate ca(egory in the par( I 
classes was not justified, or because a tabulation of (he luunber of 



\'2-A 

iirrosts would lolal substnnlinlly (ln' same as a lahulal ion of oH'cnsos 
known (lata. 

Arrrsi Dala. TIh' nuinlx-r of persons aricstcd l)\- the police is nol 
synonymous with the nuniher of oll'enses known. One is a count of 
persons, the otluT is a count of criniiiuil acts. Several persons may 
c(»nunit one crime or one jxM'son may commit several crimes. 

Polic(> i'onnt the nuniher of pei'sons arrested for violations which 
occur within tlu' reportiiii; jurisdiction. Police make this count for 
all classilications. Since oU'enses known data are not. tabulated 
for part II oU'cmiso classes, the only information contributed by 
police for them relates to persons arrest(>d. J-'ai't II olfenses ar(> 
described on paj^es 124 aiul 125. 

riihliralioii. lleturns which obviously are incomplete or defective 
are excluded from the |)ublished figures. Imlividual variations from 
the standard rt>porting |)rocedures are called to the attention of tlu' 
contributor. Failure of a contributing agency within a reasonable 
time to correct a demonstrated deficiency of its rei)orling is brought 
to the attention of the Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the 
lACP which acts in an advisory capacity in this program. 

in publishing the data sent in by chiefs of police in different cities, 
the FBI does not vouch for their accuracy. They are given out as 
current information which may throw some light on problems of crime 
and criminal-law enforcement. 

( Ittssijlcatioii of Offenses 

The complete classification of crimes is shown below with brief 
definitions for each: 

I'nri I Offenses 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nomu'gligent man.slaughter 
inchnles all wilful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths 
caused by negligence. Does not inchulc attempts to kill, assaults to 
kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or justifiable homicides. Justifiable 
homicides excluded from this classification are limited to the following 
types of cases: (1) The killing of a felon by a peace officer in line of 
duty; (2) the killing of a holdup man l)v a private citizen, (b) Man- 
slaughter by negligenct' inchuh's any death which the police investiga- 
tion establishes was primarily attributable to gi'oss negligence on the 
part of some individual other than the victim. 

2. I!a})e. — Includes forcible rape, statutory rape (no force used — 
victim under age of consent), assault to rape, ami attempted rape. 

3. liobbrry. — Includes stealing or taking anything of value from the 
person by force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm 



124 

I()I)1k'1'V, sticku|)s, roldx'iy jiiincd. Inchulcs assnnlt to rol) nnd at- 
Iciiij)! to rol). 

4. A(j{jr(ir(it(<l (iKmull.- I iicliidcs assault uilli intent to kill; assault 
by shooting, cutting, stahhing, niainiing, |)oisoniiig, scakling, or by 
tlic use of acids. Docs not include simple assault, assault and battery, 
lighting, etc. 

5. Bur<ilary — hreakiiKj or entcrifui. — Includes burglary, housebreak- 
ing, safecracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, 
even though no force was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. 
Burglary followed by larceny is included in this classification and not 
counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — tl^Jt (except auto theft). — {a) Fifty dollars and over in 
value; (6) under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassi- 
fications, depending \\\)0\\ the value of the properly stolen, thefts of 
bicycles, autonu^bile accessories, shoplifting, pocket ])icking, or any 
stealing of property or article of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con" 
games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or 
driven away and abandoned, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. 
Does not include taking for temporary use when actually returned by 
the taker, or unauthorized use by those having lawful access to the 
vehicle. 

/'«/•/ // Offenses 

8. Other assavlts. — Includes all assaults and attempted assaults 
which are not of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in 
class 4. 

9. Forgery and counterfeitinij. — Inclutles offenses dealing with the 
making, altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, any- 
thing false which is made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Kniht zzlenunt and fraud.- hwhidci^ all ofVenses of fraudulent 
conversion, embezzlement, and obtaining money or property by false 
pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiring, j^ossessing. Includes buying, 
receiving, and possessing stolen property as well as att;>mpls to com- 
mit any of those ofTenses. 

12. Weajions; carrying, possessing, <7c. Includes all violations of 
regulations or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, 
furnishing, and nuinufacturing of deadly weapons or silencers and all 
attemjjts to violate such statutes or regulations. 

\'A. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Includes sex ofTenses of a 
comnu'rciali/.iMl nature, or att;Mnpts to commit the same, such as 



125 

l)i()siitu(i()n. kctpiiijj: hnwdy lionsc. |)i()(iiriiit;, Irnnsport iiifj;, or dc- 
tjuiiiiiiZ woiiu'H for iminonil purposes. 

14. St J- iifftiisfs (except rape and prostitution and eoiniueiciali/.ed 
vice). Includes ofVeiisos n«;ainsl chastity, conuuou decency, morals, 
and the like. Includes at tempts. 

15. (ffftitsis (niaiiist the hiinihj and c/iih/nn. Includes oU'enscs ol 
nonsupport, ne«rlect, desertion, or abuse of famil\ and chihhcu. 

10. Xarcotlc tint (J faii'fi. — Includes ofTenses relalin»r to narcotic dru<]js, 
such as unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal oll'ensos, 

17. Liquor laws. — With th(> exception of "drunkenness" (class 18) 
and "driving while intoxicated" (class 22), licpior law violations, 
State or local, are placed in this class. Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Includes all ofTenses of drunkenness or intoxi- 
cation. 

19. Disorderly r(>/((///c/. -Includes all chary;es of committiujj; a 
breach of the peace. 

20. Vn(jrancy. — Includes such offenses as vagabondage, begging, 
loili'ring, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Includes offenses of promoting, j)ermitting, or 
engaging in gambling. 

22. Drivimj ivhilt intoxicated. — Includes driving or operating any 
motor vehicle while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. \'ittlation of road and driving latri^. — Includes violations of regu- 
lations with respect to the proper handling of a motor vehicle to 
prevent accidents. 

21. Parking ritdations. — Includes violations of parking ordinances. 

25. Other citdations of traffic aiid motor vehicle laws. — Includes viola- 
tions of State laws and municipal ordinances with regard to traffic and 
motor vehicles not otherwise provided for in classes 22-24. 

26. -1// other ojfcnses. — Inchides all violations of State or local laws 
for which no provision has been made above in classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — This classification includes all persons arrested as 
suspicious characters, but not in connection with any specific offense, 
who are released without formal chargi^s being placed against them. 



Index to Volume XXVIII, Uniform Crime 

Reports 1 

(All rcfcrciifcs jirc to page miml)ors) 



Age of offenders. (See Arrests.) ''"'" 

.Vire, sex and raee of persons arrested, reports from police . . 112-118 
Annual crime trends: 

City trends 4, 7o-8o 

Cities grouped bj^size 77 

Cities grouped l\y location 79-82 

Estimated total nund)er of major crimes, 1957 . . . 2-4,71-74 

Long term trends 84-85 

Rural trends 5, 86-87 

AiTCSts — based on age, sex and race of persons arrested, reports 
from police: 

AiTest trends 112-113 

Age of offenders llo-llC 

Sex of offenders 117 

Kace of offenders 118 

Automobiles — percentage recovered 109 

City Crime Rates 0-10,91-95 

Classification of offenses 00-08, 121-125 

Cleared by arrest, offenses 47-51 

By geographic divisions 51 

Crimes. {See Arrests, estimated number, offenses, persons 
charged, persons found guilty, and persons released.) 

Employees, number of police 21-40 

rlurisdictions outside the United States, offenses in 108 

Monthly variations, offenses known to tiu- polic(> 88-90 

Offenses known to the police: 

Annual trends 1-5. 75-87 

Cities grouped by location 79-82 

Cities grouped by locatioti and size 94 

Cities grouped by size 92 

Cleared by arrest 47-51 

Cleared by arrest, geogra|)lii<- divisions 51 

Divided as to time and place and vain;' of i)i()pt'rly 

stolen 109-111 

Individual cities over 25,()i)() in |)()pulati(»n . . . 12-20,97-107 

(12li) 



127 

Otrciises known to tlie police — ( 'oiiliiiiicd y.,^,^^ 

Montlily viiriiitions 88-90 

Rural ureas 11,90 

.luiisdit'tions outside (lie Tnitcd Slates lOS 

Persons eluirjj:ed (held fo»- prosecution) r)2-r)7 

By ^co«rrapliic divisions "jfi-')/ 

Persons found <;uilty "jS-G^i 

Persons released (not li'dd for prosecution) (ili -().") 

'(•lice de|)artnient oniplovees 21-40 

•(.lice killed 21 

Properly, value stolen Ill 

Pi()|)erty, value stolen iii\d recovered Ill 

Prosi'cution, persons held for. {See Persons char<2;e(l and 

persons found guilty.) 
Knee of Oll'enders. (See Arrests.) 

Keporting area, extent of 119-120 

Rural crime data o, 1 1 , 86-87, 90 

Sex of ofVenders. [See Arrests.) 

.■^herilf's reports. {S<e Kural crime data.) 

State crime rates. (See OlTenses known cities grouped by 

location.) 

State police reports. (See Rural crime data.) 
Tiends, annual crime. {See Annual crime trends.) 
I'rhan crime rate . (See City.) 

\'alue of property stolen Ill 

Value of property stolen and recovered Ill 

Variations, monthly crime 88-90 



o 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06351 



999 3