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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"



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.iVo *9353.5a3 




1957- 



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Given By 



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1^ Mill II U * I /* 

FOR RELEASE WEDNESDAY, P.M.. SEPT. 2. 1959 



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UNIFORM 
CRIME 



\ 



= REPORTS 



FOR THE UNITED STATES 



printed annually — 1958 



Issued by the 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 
Washington 25. D.C. 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United Slates 



PRINTED ANNUALLY — 1938 



\|)\1S()KY: ( -omniillro on I nilorin ( iriint' Kt'cords 
Iiil«Tnatioiial Association of (Chiefs of Police 
Stanley R. Schrotel, Chief of Police 
dncinnati. Ohio. CluiirrtKin 



J. l-d^'ar Hoover, l)ir«Mtor. I\'(h'ral Riirraii ol I ii\ cstijjatioii 

I .S. I )r|>art?n«'nt of In-t iir. \\ a-liiiiL'l<>ii - >• \).(.. 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

SEP 2 3 1959 

DEPOSITORY 



L iiiud Slutrs GoviTiiiiHiit I'rinliiis (Xlif <•. \\ .i-liiiiL'ion. I ).C. — 1959 



Contents 

I'll ire 
Si 1 1 11 1 IKl IV I 1-i 

Inlio(liicti(»M 14 "iO 

'I'lif iiitlcx of (Time. l*i.")S 27 (17 

Shiiuliiid incl i(»|)»)lil!iii niciK (l)il)lf 1) 28-49 

Sillies (tal)l(' 2) no-fiii 

liiitcd Stairs. 1958 (table 3) <>:i 

liiiicd Stales, 1957-58, 1)V ^'coirraphic divisions and 

Stales (tal)lc 4) 64-07 

( MMicral riiilcd States ciiiiif statistics, 1958 68-97 

Cilv eiiine trends. Ht.")7 aS, hy |)o[)ulal ion groups (tal)le 

:,) " 69-70 

City ciiine ti-ends. 1958 versus aveiaire of 1953-57 (table 

111 "• 

Moiillily valuations (table 7) '1 

( it \ eriine rates, by |)o|)ulat ion {groups (table 8) 72-73 

Oll'ense analysis, trends, 1957-58 (table 9) 74 

\ iiiiie of i)roperty •stolen, by type of eriine (table 10) . . . 74 

\ alne of property stcden and value of pro})erty recovered, 

by type of property (table 11) "•'' 

Otfenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons c}iar«red, 

by population ^'roups (table 12) 75-/6 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

by treogra|)liic divisions (table 13) n-tH 

Persons found guilty (table 14) '^ 

Offenses in individual area-^ <9 91 

Cities over 25.00(1 (table 15) 80 91 

,Iiirisdi<-ti<.ns outside the Cnited States (table 16) . . 91 

Age, s«'X, and lace of persons arrested 92-9* 

Age <iistribution (tabl.'s 17. 18) 93-94 

Arrest trends, 1957-5K (table 19) »•'> 

Sex distribution (table 20) ^^ 

Race ilistribiition (table 21) ^' 

l'on< e eni|)loyee data 98-121 

l'..li.e eniph.ye.'s killed, 1957 (tables 22. 25) 98 

( ivilian employees, percent of total (table 23) 98 

Fiill-linie jx.lice employees, number and rale. April 30, 

l'.»5,S (tables 24,25) ." 99-100 

I'olic.' em|)lovees in individual eilie-^, April 30. 195.S 

(tables 211, 27) "" '-' 

III 



liMI'OKM CKIMK KKPOIMS l<;r>8 



Sunlma^^ 

'This is the liisl of llic rnit'driii (liiiic lu-poits piiMi^lird niidci- llic 
irvisions siii^LTcslcd hy a special ( 'oiisiiltaiit ( 'oinmit Ice of cxix'ils 
appointed l>y tlic FBI to study this proiriaiii. 'Plicir rccoinrnciida- 
tioiis. ciidoiscd l)y tlic ( "(miinil I ci' on I'nifoiin ('rime liccords of the 
Intt'inat ional Association of ('liicfs of I'olicc, arc reflected in cliangi'S 
in form and content of this report. 

The piir|)ose of tlie Suriunary is to present the nmin |)oints which 
may l)e of interest to the j^eneial reach'r. For the sake of simplicity. 
(|inilifyin<; stati'meiits have been omitted insofar as [)ossil>le. 

l''or th()se readers who are interested in a more precise, technical 
treatment or who desire to make specilic studies, detailed discussions 
of the sc()j)e and limitations of the data will he found in siihsecpieiit 
sections of this |)iihlication. Anyone who desires assistance in the 
proj)er interi)retation of material contained herein is ui-^ed to <'om- 
inunicate with the Dii'ector, Federal Bureau of InvestiLration. C.S. 
Department of Justice, Washintjton, D.(\ 

Crinn' Imlrx Trt'iids. l'J.y7-.yH 

Note: Ksti mated crinn' Intals fur the ('nilid Stairs aii/traring 
here are not coinparahle to surh totals published in prior years. 

In this issue, the volume of crime in the United States has heen 
niejisured for the first time hy the new Crime Index. This inde.x is 
composed of seven separate crime catet^ories, which are shown in the 
left c«>liimn of the tal>le below. 

As im'asured by the Crime Index, crime in the Inited States 
showed an ov<'rall increase in 1058 of 0.3 percent over the 1057 level. 
There were increases in all of the individual classihcations, as follows: 



Crime index rliLiiiiflciil ion 


Kittiniiiled niiniU-r of 
offen-H** 


ChHiiitP 




1057 IWA8 


Number 


Percent 


Totiil 


1. 422. 2R5 ' 1 .VAtr^i 


- ni.rwTT 


+B.S 








III 


60. M3 ri. .u: 


+ !.» 

+ IS.0 
t ». r*H +12. 7 




lia«73 

SM.073 
»a.l78 


U 3. .'>;•• 
«7». 7K7 
9t\.hH\ 


+ 2. M« 

+ 3«.578 
-)-5.7W 


+1« 


Hiiri'l.iry ..^ 

l.iMTfnv over iJO 


+12.0 

+ia3 


.\illo Ihcfl 


+2 2 







1957-1958 
PERCENT CHANGE 




CRIME INDEX 
TREND- U.S. 



(BASED ON NUMBER OF REPORTED OFFENSES) 



TOTAL MURDER FORCIBLE ROBBERr A66RAVATED BURBLARr LARCENY AUTO IHEET 
RAPE ASSAULT OVER 

S50.00 



FBI 
CHART 



Fluiirr I 

It will he seen fi'oni tiic al)ovo that tho catci^ories of iioj^li. spoilt 
manslaufiihter and larceny under $50, which in i)ievious issues of the 
l-niform Crime Reports were listed together with the above offenses, 
have not been included in the Crime Index. Statutory- rape (no 
force used — victim under lep:al age of consent) has also been omitted, 
and ijipe flixnit's lijivr hem limited to oU'enses involving fiu'ce. 



Ill iidditioii to llif^c <-liiiiiiri'<, llic csi imal iii;^ prtM-rdiiics used in 
iiriviii^ at llic jiIxinc lulals foi- ihc I'liili'd Stales arc riilin-ly in'u 
Mild arc itascd on tlic I'ccoiiiiiicndat ions of tlic ('onsiiliant ('oniniittcc 
1)11 rnifoiin ('rime He[)oiiiiiLr. In view of these elian^es and inas- 
iniieli as the ( "liiiie Iii(h'\ was noi ii>cd in pievious years, the ciiine 
TiLMires sh(»\vn altoNc for 1!>')7 will diller from similar eslimales f(»r 
the I'nited States uhieli appeared in the l!l.")7 annual issue of the 
rniform ('rime Ke|)oiis. Aeeordiii<;jy, no valid (•(Uiiparison ean 
he drawn hetwceii the eslimale«l I'.S. crime totals shown ai)ove and 
the totals appealing' in pie\ ions issues of this puhlieation. 

I'i>iuilnl'um iiiul ( rinir {( rinir linlrs) 

.\«>le: The crime niten pma nhil hire arc mil < niiifiiirnhh irith the 
riites presented in finrii>ii.i ismus, iri/h llii rxn fitinnx nulnl hrlnii). 

I'^rom H)")7 to 1!)')S, it is estimated that the po|)uIatioii in the United 
Slates increased 1.7 percent As seen in the |)recedinir section, how- 
ex t-r, the percent increase in the ('rime Index was live times as ^reat. 
Thus, it is ohvious that crime is ^rowin<r far more ra[)i(lly than is the 
L'ciieral [)o|)uIation. Below, ('rime Index li^Miies for ]\)')7 and W^'tS 
have hoen converted into crime rates (the miinhcr of crimes per 
KM). 000 inhahitants) hy iisiiiLr po|)ulation estimates for the i-espcci ive 
\ c;irs. 



Critnc iiidi-x clussifldijion 



NumbtT of criniwi pt*r 
lOO.non inhabitiint<i 



1W57 



11158 



I'lTO'llt 

chiinpc 



Total 

MurdtT 

iMf rnpo 

•ry 

' >\iit('<l assault 

ItiirK'l.iry 

Liim-ny over %S0... 
Aiilo theft 



83&.2 



4.7 

7.6 

39.3 

6.S.0 

3M.5 

206.4 

I.W? 



8B6.0 



4.7 
8.4 
43.5 
65,5 
3U2. 4 
2;« 
l.lfi 4 



+7.4 



+10.5 

+ 10.7 

+0.8 

+ 10.7 

+ H. 4 

+0 4 



All |)o|)uliilioii li;_'uirs used in this issue of I'liiforiii ( 'liiiic Rcjjoil^ 
are ciiririil estimates for each yeai\ Ih'ietofore, [)oj)iihi(ion fi^un 
from the hilest U.S. decemiial census were used. For example, uiul« 
the |)re\ ious iikMIkxI, th(> crime rales for each year from ll>5() ihrou^^ 
1{>')7 were obtained l)y measutin<; the crime fi<i:ures for the respectlNc 
years ajrainst the 1!»5() population. Inasmuch a.s current populatior 
estimates for cadi year are now used, the rates set forth in this issii 
ar<' not comparable with tlios(> presented in other 3'ears, with the 
exception of the years 1930, 1940, and 1950 when the general Censn- 
of the Tnited States was taken. 

Man I lily \ aridtlftus 

Althou<rh crimes of all types occur throuirhout the year, certain 
rather definite seasonal patterns emerge wiien crime data are arranged. 
I)\' months. 

Aggravated assaults, for example, occur with greatest fn^fpienc] 
liming the warmer months of the year. The same is true of forcib] 
rapes. On the other hand, neghgent manslaughters, which ai 
mostly traffic deaths, tend to rise during the last cpiarter of the ye£ 

Crimes with property as their object have generally been moi 
prevalent during the darker and colder months of the year. 
19.')S, this was demonstrated most sharply in the robbery and l)urglai 
classifications. 

Offense Ati€ilysis 

During 1958, robbei's using weapons or force committed one-half 
of their crimes in streets and allevs. One-third of their crimes were 
against places of business. In both of these areas they increased 
their activity more than 10 percent over 1957. 

Although burglars, as might be expected, operate principally at 
night, they are also active in the daytune. This is most noticeable in 
cases involving sneak thiev«'rv from homes. Foui" out of 10 residence 



OFFENSES AGAINST 
THE PERSON 




OFFEHSES 
KNOWN TO 
POLICE 

1958 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 

3,131 CITY POLICE AGENCIES 
TOTAL POPULATION 96,539,841 




FORCIBLE 
RAPE 



/ 



■\ 



FBI 

CHART 



»•; 
a-. 



AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 



/ 



/ 






^\ 



\-s 



■ •%. 
IK 

an 

SK 



Figure 2 



.-i120O4* 59 



OFFENSES AGAINST 
PROPERTY 




OFFENSES 
KNOWN TO 
POLICE 

1958 



MONTHLY VARIATIONS 

3,131 CITY POLICE AGENCIES 
TOTAL POPULATION 96,539,841 



FBI 
CHART 




Fiiiiiro ,'i 



hur^hwics (XMiiiicd (|iirin;z tliivliL'liI lioiirs. Krsidciicc l»iii-j;lari<'s 
inrrcascd iicnilv 10 pcrcciil in l',t")S over I'.t.'i? and nccuiitilcd foe \ 
oiil of cvcrv 10 l)Ui}rl>irn"<. 

( )f iill criincs n^niiisl propcrl \-, llmt is, rnl)l)t'i\ , l»iii^diir\, niito 
tlirfl, and oilier llicfts. (lie latter account for six cases in every (en. 
Almost one-half (4') [x'lcent ) of these coninion thefts involve >\ccr<- 
sorics or other articles stolen fioni aniornohiles. (Tahle '.).) 

I nlin' i>f Pr<t[><'rt\. Stnlrn mttl lircnrrrrd 

Over one-half of the dollar \aliie (»f property stolen in WiFtH was 
accounted for l>y auto thefts, in this catei;orv, the average vahiu 
[>er tln'ft (or the avera«r«' value of the cars inv(>lved) was $K.Sr>. Other 
property stolen by robbers, bur«rlars, and thieves, as rcp(»ited to the 
police. avera<;ed $111 per offense. 

While j)olice recovered 92 cents for ciicli si siojcn in the anio theft 
<'ate|jory, recovei'V of other types of propert n" was at the rate of 14 
cents on the dollar. (Tables 10 and 11.) 

Ol)fn.s('s ( li'(trcil hy trrr.sl ntnl Vfisims i .imv'utrd. I'J.IH 

I'olice c(»ntiniied the iclatively liiirh clcatiuices of crimes ajxainst the 
person. They cleared 79 of each 100 of these j)y arrest, and char^'d 
(held for- proseciitiorr ) ti^ per'sons. Criminal h(»nncides, forcible rapes, 
and airuiavated assaidls (the crimes a<rainst the [)er-son) }^ener-ally 
receive more intensive invest ij;at ive attention than the more muner-ous 
and to some e.vtent less important crimes which have [)roperty as t heir- 
object. Hol>l)ery, the most vicious of the pr-operty <Times, is urii({ue 
in that ijioiip in that the victim is confronted l)y the criminal. Police 
cleared by arr-est 4X of each 100 robl>eries and charged 42 persons. 
With r-obbery and other [)r-oj)erty crimes of bin'^laiy, larceny and auto 
theft jrronped toi;«'tlier. the clearance rate wai* 24 for oach 100 ofTeii-ses. 
The overall experience for crimes a<rainst the person and apdnst 
j)r-(»perty was 2t) offenses cleared by arrest and 21 f)ersons charj.'ed f(»r 
.'.H h ion (.(Tenses. (Tables 12 and lii.) 

I'"or- all crime cate>rories, as a sitrjrie «:r-oup, police reported that of 
each 100 |)er-soris cliait;ed »>7 |)eisons were found guilty. The liif;he><t 
conviction rate was for drivin«r uhile intoxicated, with 81 persons 
foitnd «:uil(y for each lOOchai-^'ed ( 'har-ps of n<%di^'ent manslaujrhter 
Were, as in previ<»iis year's. f»tllowed by the smallest proportion of 
<-«iti\ ict ions, }i))orjt .SI of each 100 peiNons chai-'^ed. (Table 14.) 



OFFENSES AGAINST 
THE PERSON 




FBI 
CHART 



OFFENSES 
CLEARED 
BY ARREST 



iSff liymMiMSMi 



CALENDAR YEAR 1958 



1,994 CITIES 77,469,233 POPUUTION 



NOT CLEARED 



CLEARED 



MURDER 



93.5% 



NEGLIGENT 89.8% 

MANSLAUGHTER 



FORCIBLE 73.0% 

RAPE 



AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 



78.9% 



Figure 4 



OFFENSES AGAINST 
PROPERTY 




OFFENSES 
CLEARED 
BY ARREST 



CALENDAR YEAR 1958 

1,994 CITIES 77,469,233 POPULATION 



FBI 
CHART 



NOT CLEARED 






CLEARED 




ROBBERY 


42.7% 


















BURGLARY 


nj% 














LARCENY 


IU% 














AUTO THEFT 


26.9% 

















Fifinre 5 



PERCENT OF 
PERSONS CHARGED 




PERSONS 

FOUND 

GUILTY 



CALENDAR YEAR 1958 

198 CITIES OVER 25,000 TOTAL POPULATION 38,007.281 



FBI 
CHART 



TOTAL 










kijH 


















DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED 












lll%| 


DRUNKENNESS. DISOR0EM.Y CONDUCT: VAGRANCY 








73.5% 




FORGERY AND COUNTERrEITING 










72 7% 1 




LARCENY 










710%| 




LIQUOR LAWS 










tS.3% 1 




BURGLARY 










S7.I%J 




TRAFFIC AND MOTOR VEHICLE LAWS 










66 7%J 




NARCOTIC DRUG LAWS 










65.5% 1 




AUTO THEFT 










640'-.J 




WEAPONS CARRYING. POSSESSINa CTC 










633-sJ 




EMBEZZLEMENT AND FRAUD 










62 5% 1 
60 8%! 
608%! 

59.5%J 

59.1%J 




ROBBERY 












SEX OFFENSES (INCLUDING IflOSTITUTION AND COMHERCIAUZEO VICIi 




MURDER 












OFFENSES AGAINST FAMILY AND CHILDREN 












OTHER ASSAULTS 






S2 


3% 




FORCIBLE RAPE 




456% 

45.6% 
45.1% 1 


1 








STOLEN PROPERTY: BUYING. RECEIVING. HC 






GAMBUNG 






AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 


41.8% 1 




NEGLIGENT MANSLAUCHTIR 30.5% | 









ALL OTHER OFFENSES 



ma 



10 



.tut' of I't'i Situs trti-slnl 

Alli'sls of pcisons H'^cil IS lUid n\cr liii\c iiicrrii«;r(| nlioiit I pcrcciil 
rnrli yriir for I lie past .'> vrnis. uliilc jincsls of |icisoiis iitidrr- Is linvr 
in(ifji<t'tl nlxmt 10 pcicciil rncli vcnr. In l!»r>.S, nrtrsls in I lie inidcr-l S 
iiiTi' <ri-oii|) iiicicjiscd r_'.(» pcrrtMil in cilirs iindrf 2."».()()() popwliil ion nnd 
7.1 |)ri<cnt in llic liULrcr cilirs, nccoidinir to i('poil>i of I .J.'is ciiics. 
Tlif oNciidl increase in niicsu of persons iindrr is nnionntcd to S.l 
pnccnl . 

I'ficrtil iiircw isc, lliis increase in llie arre-^l-- of \oiillis uns <:realer 
lluin the increase in the nurnix'r of yonn*: [x-opje in llie |)opiilat ion. 
'riiiis. it can he seen that the increase in the \oiith population «|oes not 
acconnt foi- all of the increase in \onth arre>^|s. Xor do isohitcd 
I'haii^'es it) report injr |)r-oc»>(liii-es of police a<'<-ount for the incr'eas<', as 
explained in another section (see p. 2i\) of this |)ul>lical ion. 

( 'haiiLCes in aiicsts of yontlis from l".t."»7 to HtftS ranjred fiorn an 
increase of '.VA.S percent in l)n\in»;, receivini;, ()r possessin*; stolen 
pro[)erty down to an enconrajxinir decrease of '.t.7 percent in irainldin^. 
I'crlia|)s the most si«rnific»nl decrease was that of 7.4 peicent in auto 
I heft ; how evei". this is offset hy increases of 7. J [)eicent and 7:2 percent 
in l>ur«:larv and larceny, i('s|)ect ively. 

Althon«rh youths under is ie|)|-esenled otd\ I'J.l percent of nil 
persons arrested, they were the suhjects of ti4.1 percent of the arrests 
for auto theft. 40. l> per'cent ()f those for hrtr^laiN . 4s.r) percent of those 
for- larceny, 'M)V percent of those for' r'eceivirii: <»r possessinj^ stolon 
property, and 2'J.S percent of those for rohhery. In other specific 
catciTories then" indicated [)articipat ion in crimes ian»re(l fi'om 1S.."» 
percent of all arrests for fcucihie rape dow n t<» less than one [)eicent ftu* 
dri\irit: while into.\icated. dr iird<enness, and <:amhlin»r. 

Tahles 17 thronL'li 21 pre>^ent dat>i l)\ aire, st-x and race of persoris 
arrested. 



11 



CRIMES AGAINST 
PROPERTY 




PERSONS ARRESTED 
UNDER 18 YEARS 
OF AGE 



\>^ 



PERCENT OF TOTAL ARRESTS 

CALENDAR YEAR 1958 



OFFENSES ARRESTS, PERSONS UNDER 

18 YEARS OF AGE 



TOTAL ARRESTS, 
ALL AGES 



22.8% 



ROBBERY 



BURGURT 



ItRCENY 



WIO THEn 



EMBE2ZLEMENI 
m FRItUD 



RECEIVING 
STOLEN PROPERTY 



FORGERY «ND 
COONTERFEITING 




FBI 
CHART 



1,586 CITIES TOTAL POPULATION 52329,497 



Fiiiitrc 7 

Volice Employee Data 

In reports from police covering niosi of the city poj)iilalion, 4") 
police employees were listed as having been kilKnl in line of duty 
during 1957. Based on current population estimates api)licable to 
that year, one policeman was killed for each 2.3 million iuiiabilants. 
Cities with less than 10,000 inhabitants had the highest incidence of 
police deaths, and, geographically, the I'acihc States reported the 
most police deaths per unit of population. Such deaths are counted 
in all cases where they result from injuries receiv(>d during the course 



12 



liJlW!) ' UW i 'J!'llJl)IJim^l!t ' ,JJI.,.L Ull«l i .. l .m ! J j 



BY POPULATION GROUPS 
APRIL 30. 1958 







AVERAGE NUMBER 
OF FULL-TIME 
POLICE OEPARTMENT 
EMPLOYEES 



PER 1.000 INHABITANTS 



24 



1.3 1.3 



1.4 



1.5 



1.6 



AVERAGE CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES 

OF 3.781 LESS 10,000 25,000 50.000 100.000 OVER 

CITIES THAN TO TO TO TO 250.000 

10,000 25.000 50.000 100.000 250.000 



of ollicial busiiu'ss juul tln-.v jiic not limilrd to tlrjiili> jiI the luiiuls of 
crimitmls. (Tul)K' 22.) 

As of April :iO, lOoS, in n|)oriin^' cilics. fiiil-tiiiu' polict- pcrsoiiiicl 
nvcin^'cd 1 .S ptT 1.000 iiiluihihints (i<>'»S cstiinatcd poi)iilntioii). In 
\\w Inr^Mst citirs (those willi «>v. r 250.000 iiiluihilniils) tlirn* were 2.4 
police employees p.T l.OOd iiiliahil Mills. Civilian «'njploye«'S repre- 
sented SXt percent of the total reported police eniployres. (Tables 23 
and 24.) 



18 



r.l2«MH»— 50 



IntroducLioii 

riulcr the riiiforiii Crinio Ucportitifr proprani police statistics on 
the state aiul local level are compiled for the Nation. The objectives 
in brief are (1) the presentation of an "Index of Crime" composed of a 
iclatively small group of offense classes to serve as an indicator of the 
extent of and trend in criminality, and (2) the comi)ilation of the total 
volume of all tyj)es of criminal offenses. 

Prominent among the users of the data, of course, arc the police 
departments throughout the country who make the publication of the 
Uniform Crime Reports possible througii their volinitary contribution 
of crime reports, and many of the tabulations are constructed |)ri- 
marily for their use. At the same time, efforts are made to publish 
the Uniform Crime Reports in such form that they might be of 
greatest possible value to the general public and to social scientists 
as well. 

The International Association of Chiefs of Police 

The I'niform Crime Reporting program was iniiiatcd by the Inter- 
national Association of Chiefs of Police in 1930 and continues to be 
carried on under their auspices. Virtually all the information called 
for by this program is data actually needed for the administration of 
local law enforcement. 

The International Association of Chiefs of Police has a Committee 
on Uniform Crime Records which serves in an ailvisory cajiacity to 
the FBI in the conduct of this program. The assistance of this 
committee is especially valuable in actively |)r<)ni(>iiiig the (piality of 
the reports supplied by the cooperating jiolice dr|);iitments. 

The Consnllaiit i.omniitlcc ami Its Kcroinincntlations 




14 



Ii-<lir»l icpoil ' (M)iil niiird 22 riMDniiin'iiiliil inii'^, nil of wjiicli luiNr Ihtii 
cikIoi-^imI I)\ llic ( '(Hiimil t re on I iiiloriii ('linii' Kcruids of iIm- Inti-r- 
iMltioiuil Associiil itMi ttT ( 'liifi-^ (if rolicr niid llir KIH. 

Tlic yrtiv h».')i» will !)»• llir lirsi liill \ rjir of (t|)('iJil inn nndcr llic rn-w 
pidccdiMfs. .\('\ t'll lii'lcss, it is hoped lluil sMldmls of the ( 'oii- 
sidtiinl ( 'onunil li'c's report will reeo;xni/e in the ciiireiil issue of the 
I'niforin ("rime Ke|)oits sul)st iint iid pfo^^-ess tttwnrd the ultiinnle 
<:oids oul lined hy I he ( 'onsnll ;i nl ( "oniinil I ee. 

The iinpleinenliil ion of the reeoinnnMidnl ion to pid)lisli one iintnial 
I niforiM ( 'liine Kepoit in lien of the seininnnuid issues ms heictofore 
innkes ii |)ossil)le to include in this one |-e|)oi'l idl n\tiiliil)le diitn for 
h>.")S. Ketruljir users of the Inifoini ('rime Ke|)orts will find iheeur- 
leiit issue (|uite dill'eien! in foinuil from |)iior issues. Al the snine 
time. ever\' reiisoiudde etforl Iims heen nunh' t<» nniinlnin eonlinnily of 
(hitii pre\ioUsly puhlished. 

Since Severn I of the recom mend m t ions of t he ( 'onsultnni ( 'ommit tec 
.'ire ill the nut me of loni^-innLTc phinnin^^ I hey could not he implemented 
in the first year of the modilicd pro*:r!im jind some comment conccrn- 
iug ihcm therefore n[)pejirs in oidci'. Brielly, Kecommendiit ions ."), 
f). iind J 1 in\()lve the pioposid thnt i'irort> he innde to eidiir-;_'c the 
(•oveiMjxc of stjitistics on persons nricsted to include hoth iirhjin and 
rural areas hy a sampliii«r lcclini(pu' if need he- to the r]\t\ that 
( 1 ) t he data on a^e, sex. a nd race of persons aires! ed miirhl he a \ ailahle 
for the entire criminal |)opulation. and (2) that eventually the total 
crime picture of the I'nited States mijrlit <'over all l\|)cs of oireiises 
includiiii; those reported only tliidfi<rh the me<lia of arrest reports. 

( '(Misccpicntly. forms for reports on |)ersons arrested in n>')S \\«'re 
-^ent for the first time to sheriffs and other law enforcement authorities 
|)olicin;X rural areas. In line with existing: iiisiriiction> for reporting 
offenses known, these authorities were re(|Ueste(l to <-onfine their data 
to arrests for ofl'eiises in the rural j)ortion of their counties. 'I'liis first 
aiiempl to collect such data hroiijrht an encoura},dii<r response. Re- 
ports Were received fr<tm ahoiit 10 |)ercent of the rural |)olice ap'iicies 
and (»thers are perfectin<r arranj^^'incnts to report arrest data in the 
future. I poll examination of the reports receiNcd it hecaine clear 
that it was not yet feasihle to lahulale summary data from ihein. hut 
the |)ro^rain lias gotten off to a irood start. 

The Consultant ('oinmiilce aUo recommended discussions with ex- 
perienced representatives of police departments to re<'onsider the 
olfeiises which should l)e handled a> "otlenses known" and which 
should he re|)orted on the basis of the arrest of the olfendeis. as well 
as to determine t he ^idU[) of otrelises es[)eciall\ im|>or. aiit lo t he police 



(iii/orrn I'ritur Ifrintrlt. .S/irri.i/ Ittur ln.iM, KinIcriI Miirfiili nl lin ••>lii;^ill'iii. W (.lilii^-iiiii, I).<'. 



ill its woik. (Rcconiiiiciulations 12 mid I.'?.) Tliis topic will he on 
the ji^'fiuln for the next iiUM'tiiifi; with the ( 'oinmit tec on I'liiforin ( 'linic 
liccords of tiic Iiitcrnutioiial Association of Chiefs of l^olicc in the fall 
of 1959. It is anticipatod tliat in accordance with the recommendation 
of the ( 'onstdtant ( 'onunittee a special part of the Uniform ( 'rime Re- 
|)oits will he developed in the future to deal sj)ecially witii the offenses 
which at a piven time are especially important to the police in its 
work. 

All other reconiniendalions of the ( 'oniniiltee have been put into 
efl'ect. From the more important and far-reaching ones may be 
mentioned here the lesseninfj of the emphasis on the difTerentiation 
between the Part 1 and Part II offenses; tiie use of a somewhat revised 
p:roupino; of ofl'enses known to the police as an index of the extent of 
and the trends in crimiiuility ; the discontinuance of decennial census 
population figures as the basis for the computation of rates except for 
the census years and use instead of annual population estimates by the 
T^ureau of the Census, current data provided by various State and 
local governmental agencies, and private population estimates; and 
the adoption of the differentiation into standard metropolitan areas, 
other urban population, and rural population instead of the former 
distinction between rural and urban population. 

In effect also is the recommendation that a pei-manent technical 
consultant committee be established to be available to the Bureau 
stafl" for consultation. The original committee agreed to serve in 
this capacity for 1959, and the FBI staff has been in regular contact 
with it during the preparation of this fii-st report mider the revised 
plan. The Committee has indicated its concurrence with the manner 
in which its recommendations have been implemented in this issue. 

Reporting Procedure 

Monthly and annual crime reports are sent to the FBI on a vol- 
untary^ basis by city police departnuuits and agencies providing police 
protection for the rural areas. These latter agencies may be the 
cotmty sherifl', the county police department or in some cases the 
state police organization. Carefully prepared instructions are pro^ 
vided so as to avoid duplication in reporting. 

All police ageiu'ies participating in tiiis program are furnished the 
I'niform Crime Reporting Handbook containing complete instruc- 
tions, with sample forms bearing specimen entries. A Manual of 
Police Records containing a basic outline of sound record procedures 
is also available to the police upon recjuest. 

The entries on the monthly reports are based on "offenses known 
to I lie police." This means that tlie crinu>s are taken from the 

16 



police I('((»l(l of oIlCiix-- known to the Ijolicc iis liiivili;^ occilITcd. 
iTpiidlrss of w licl her nii jirir^l \\n^ iiiimIc in llic ciisc or not. Such 
fjirlois as the iccovcrv of |)ro|)«'il y, the hj^c of the person or j)crsons 
Unown to have hccn i-csponsililc for Mu' act. or tlic attitude of the 
\iclitn towards |)ro>eciilion ai'c not taken into consideiation. On an 
annual basis the ])olice submit a suniination of the 12 monthly re|)orls, 
makin«x any necessary aidjusinu'nts. The crimes re|)orted on the 
basis of "oU'eiises known" are criminal homicide, forcible raj)e, rob- 
beiy, ajZLrravated assault, bur^dar\, laiceny and auto theft. 

In addition to t his repoi! in^r <»f t he "olfcnses know n," the city police 
(and in the future also ihe ruial |)olice, >>ce ai)o\<') furnish an annual 
report of |)ersoiis arrested for all ty|)es of crinu'S includini;: those 
mentiiMU'd above. These annual reports provide data on the ajjo, 
sex and lace of tiie arre^-ted persons, as well as inf(Uiuation on the 
<lis|)(»siti(Mi of the chari^cs |)laced ajrainst them. 

Anothei- item of iid'ornuilion provided by the coo|)erat in;^ ajfcncii-s 
and presented in this report is the "cleared by arrest" data (tables 
12 and 13). These data, available for cities «;rou|>ed by size and 
location, show the success the police had in lO'jS in soivin*; crimes 
by arrest. An oU'eiise is Ireated as cleared when one or moic of the 
oU'eiulers involved in its conunission is arrested and made available 
for i)rosecution. These clearatu-es icfer to olFenses, not arrests. 
Thus, the arrest of one |)erson nuiy cleai' seveial crimes while under 
other circumstances the arrest of se\cral persons nuiy <'leai" only 
one crime. 



( hi.s>.ijir4i lion of (flfriisrs 

The complete cla^^ilical icui of crinu's is shown below with l)ri(f 
definitions for each: 

1. ( 'riminal fiiimirit/e. (<i ) Murder and nonne«rli<rent maiislau<rh(('r 
includes all wilful felonious homicides as distintruished from deaths 
cau-ed by iu'{;lip'nce. Does not include attempts to kill, assaults to 
kill, sui<id«'S, ac<'idental deaths, or justifiable homicidt'S. Justifiable 
homicides (wchided from this classification are limited to the followinjr 
t \ pes of cases: (1) The killin^r of a felon by a peace oflicer in line of 
duty; (2) the killing of a holdup man b\ a private citi/en. (6) Man- 
slaughter by neglij:enc«' includes any death which the police investipi- 
tion establishes was primarily attributable to jrross nejjiipenro on the 
part of some individual other than the victim. 

2. Forcible rapt. Imludes forcible rape, a.ssault to rape, and al- 
tem|)te(l rape. Does fiot include statutory offenses (no force used — 
victim iimler a<re of consent). 



17 



'A. Rohhen/. I ncliidos stoaliiij; or lakiii;: iin\ thing of vnlm- from the 
person hy fcdcc or violcnrc or by i)iittin(; in fear, surli as strong-arm 
i<il)l)('i'\', sticknps, rol)l)cry iirmcd. IndiKlfs assault fo rob and at- 
tfinpl to rob. 

4. A(j(]ravat((i aftxanlt. — Includes assault with intent to kill; assault 
by shootinfr. euttinjr, stabbinfr, mnimin<r. poisoninfr, sraldinfr. or bv 
lIuMise of acids. Does not include simple assaidt, assault and l)atterv, 
(i<;htin<r, etc. 

5. linnjlary -breaking or entering. — Includes btM-<ii:larv, housebreak- 
ing!:, safecracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, 
even though no force was used to gain entrance. Includes attempts. 
Burglary followed by larceny is included in this classification and not 
counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny — theft (except auto theft). — (a) Fifty dollars and over in 
value; (6) under $50 in value — includes in one of the above subclassi- 
fications, depending upon the value of the property stolen, thefts of 
bicycles, automobile accessories, shoplifting, pocket picking, or any 
stealing of property or article of value which is not taken by force 
and violence or by fraud. Does not include embezzlement, "con" 
games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. A\ito theft.- — ^Includes all cases where a motor vehicle is stolen or 
driven away and abandoned, including the so-called joy -riding thefts. 
Does not include taking for temporary use when actually returned by 
the taker, or unauthorized use })y those having lawful access to the 
vehicle. 

8. Other assaults. — Includes all assaults and attempted assaults 
which arc not of an aggravated nature and which do not belong in 
class 4. 

9. Forgery and couj^terfeiting.— Includes oflenses dealing with the 
making, altering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, any- 
thing false which is made to appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Includes all offenses of fraudulent 
conversion, embezzlement, and obtaining money or propert}' by false 
})retenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Includes buying, 
receiving, and possessing stolen propertj' as well as attempts to com- 
mit any of those offenses. 

12. Weapons; carrying, j^ossessing, etc. — ^Includcs all violations of 
regulations or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, 
furnishing, and manufacturing of deadly weapons or silencers and all 
attempts to violate such statutes or regidations. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized rice. — Inchules se.x offenses of a 
commercialized nature, or attempts to commit the same, such as 



18 



|H(i-.i ii III ion, l\('r|)iiiH; luiwtiv lii)ii>>r. procijiiii}.^, I niiisporlin;^', or d.-- 
I.'iiiiin;^ uoiiifii lor iiiiiuoiJil puiposr-^. 

14. SfX offfiist.s (» sci jit liucih/f ra/H, junstiliitiiui ami cdiiiiih i citil- 
iztil rirt).- I iicliitlt'S sliihiloiv iiipe, oH'i-iisrs ii^oiiiisl clmslily, coiii- 
nioil »lcc('lir\ , moiiils, iilid lilt' like. Ilirllldr-^ il I I clll |)l s. 

I,"), (tfft lists tuidiiist tilt Jtliinhi iihil ihiltht II . lliclildcs oH'cliscs of 
iioiisiippoil , iM'f^It'cl, dcscilioii. or iil»ii-it' of fniiiily iind rliildrcii. 

If). Xdirntlc i/i III/ III irs. I nrludo oUtiiM'-^ irlnl iii;^ to iinrcol ic (lrii<;s, 
such lis unlawful possession, sjiU'. or use. Ivxcludfs Fcdriul od'cnscs. 

17. l/i([iii>r Itiirs. With the cxccplion of "(h'Uid^cnncss" (class IS) 
and "'driNini; while intoxicated" (class 22). licpior law violations, 
Sijile or local, aie placed in this class. Hxcludes Kedeial violations. 

15. Pruiikt iiiu ss. IiM'ludes all olfenses of drunkenness or into.xi- 
calion. 

\\). Ifisnn/tr/y ctuii/iirt.- inclndes all <liai}:es of coinniil I in;.; a 
hreach of tlu' peace. 

I'll. \'a(fnliin/. Includes such otleiises as \ a^al)onda^e, he^^in^, 
loiieiinj:, etc. 

21. (/(imh/lini. Includes oireiises (»f |)roinotin^. permit t int;, or 
enira^iii^ in gainhlin^. 

22. Ifrln'iKi ir/iile Intoj-icdfnl.- Incliules driving or o|)eratin^ any 
motor vehicle w liile drunk or under (he inlliience of lupior <u- narcotics. 

'2'A. \'ii>lnt 11)11 nf /(Hid a ml ilrir'niii hni's. Includes violations of ici^ii- 
latiiMis with respt'ct to the pro[)er handrui*: «»f a motor vehicle to 
prevent accidents. 

24. I'dikiinj r'lnhif'iiiiis. Includes violations of pnrkiii^X ordinances. 

2."). (ff/itr rin/atiinis of tniffir oiid inotur rtlnclt hiii's.- Includes viola- 
I ion-, of Slate law s and municipal ordinances wit h repird l«> t raffic and 
motor vehi<"les not otherwise pn)vided hu' in classes 22 24. 

2t). .1// nth( r itjfeiists.- — Iiwliides idl violations «)f .State or locid laws 
for which no provision has heen made ahove in classes 12'). 

27. Sit.sjtlriini.- This classification includes all peisons aiicsled as 
suspicions eharaetei-s, hut not in connection with any sp«'ci(ic olFeiise, 
who are released without formal chaitres l)ein<: plaee<| against (hem. 

lirfntrl i II u imi 

('lime rej)oiis were recei\cd Un !'.).').S from 4,(147 city j)olice depart- 
ments^ 2,780 counties, I.") .Sinte |)olice ap-ncii'S whose HUthohtics 
extend to criminal nuitters and which assum*' responsihilities for 
specilic iej)ortin^ areas, and II (h'par(nn'n(s in 'reiril<»ries aiul otluT 
reirions administered l)\ the Inited Slates. 'I'hese reporting (le|)art- 
nienis represented '.»7.2 percent ttf the urhan population and '.)7.1 



19 



percent (»f the IUImI |)(»|)IiIii t ion of the I'liiled States. Xot nil of tliese 
repoils could l)e used for the j)urposes of the ruiforin ( 'rinie Reporting^ 
[)i-o<;i}ini. eilliei- Ix-enuse a complete' set for tiie year was not received 
or an exarninatir)n indicated that they had heeti incorrectly prepared. 
Ap'iicies forw nrdint,' re|)()rts foi- the full year repieseiited S7.7 percent 
of the j)o|)ul!ition. 

f rrif'nni iini I'rtx't'sst's 

('ontaci with conlrihuting agencies is maintained hy means of an 
active correspondonco program. As the reports arc received at the 
FBI, they are subjected to a variety of checks for accurac}' and 
reasonableness. Efforts are made to evaluate the quality of the 
reports from each agency on the basis of such considerations as other 
reports received from the same agency, those received from other 
agencies similar in size and location, as well as on the basis of infor- 
mation received from collateral sources, such as public health agencies, 
for example. To bring to light misunderstanding concerning the 
manner of preparing the reports as well as to gather information 
concerning the types of records from which the data are drawn, 
questionnaires are sent out from time to time. As an indication of 
the extent of followup, it might be stated that approximately 3,000 
letters were directed to contributing agencies with reference to the 
1958 n'ports. 

Each class of the FBI National Academy since its inception in 193o 
has received specialized instruction in the preparation of tiie infor- 
mation for the Uniform Crime R(>ports. This subject has also been 
l)i"esented in regioiud police schools throughout the country in which 
representatives of the FBI have participated. 

In special situations when ('Oi-r(»sj)ondence seems inadequate, a 
re|)rese!itative of the Committee on I'niform Crime Records of tin* 
liiteniat ioiud Association of Chiefs of Polic(> nuiy make a personal 
visit to a local department for tlie purpose of being of assistance to 
the local agency in the ]>reparation of its reports. 

Beginning with 1958, the rape category, which heretofore included 
also statutory rape cases, was limited to forcible offenses. While full 
instructions with r(>gard to this change were distributed, it apjx'ared 
that some agencies continued to iiichide statutory offenses in the 
forcible rape class in 1958. In about \ ,'M)0 instaiu-es, it was found 
that the rape figures for 1958 eqmdled or exceedeil those reported by 
the agency in 1957 and in each such instance, a special letter re- 
iterating insti-uctions on the change was sent specifically inquiring 
whether the new procedures conceining this class of offense had ])een 
followed for 1958. Tliis ])rought about a numl)er of corrections. All 

20 



ill till, ('\ t'lv fH'oii is Miiidi' l»» [)i(irii()lr iind iiiaiiit.'iiii liiirli slniidjiids 
tor I he thihi ifccix (•(!. M(irrn\cr, I lie liLTurcs of iiii\ niri-iicv w liidi jirc 
ol)\ioii>I\ iiicorifci JUT fxrliidnl from I lie siiiiiiiiiir\ hihlis. 

Xolw il list Mild i 11^' 1 lit" viirifl V of cliccks I lint arc jipplicd mid liou ex ci- 
ilioroiiirli till' \ crilical ion pioccsscs, it is ol»\ ions tlitil llic I'MiJ ciimiol 
\oiicli l<»r I lif iicciiriiry of ilic crime icjiorls rcc('i\rd, no nmrr iluin 
conld any nalioiial ^)v slalc a;i:('ncy cii'^a^'cd in a simiiai' nndcilakiiij;. 
'riic Itasic rcsponsiliility fni* (lie accnracy of tlir reports rests with tlic^ 
local law enforcemeiil e\eciiti\<s from w lioiii and for whom I he data 
arc collect ed. 

I'ttfni hi lion 

\ alid and nji-lo-date information on tin* mimiier of inhahitants in 
the various states and snlxlivisions thereof is vital in <'onstiiiet iii>,' 
maii_\' »if the tallies in this rej)oi-t. Such popiilalion (ijrures are used 
in j)r«>rat ini; for unreported areas on tlie hasis of t he nunihei- of ci'lmes 
reported in similar areas, 'i'hen too, j)oj)ulation fi^Mires afe needed in 
calcniatiiiir erinu' rates, i.e. the numher of offenses per unit <if jxtpii- 
lation. in this ease the numher per 100, ()()() iniiahitants. 

In this report, special efTorts were nuule to utilize the best availahle 
population data. The proeedufcs followed in selecting I)oj)ulation 
liiTures \vere worked out in the conferences hetween the staff of the 
FBI. ineiuheis of the Consultant Coniniittee on rniform Crime 
Keportinj;. ami repicsentatives of the I'nited Slates Bureau of the 
( 'eiisus. 

Koj- the most jiait, the pojjulation (i^'urcs used j-ej)i-es<'iit li)o8 
po|)ulation estimates since the last geiieial census of i)opulation was 
taken in 10.')0. In no case were umidjusted population data, collected 
oj- estimated prior to \9')7, used. The jxipulatioii liirures used in this 
re()ort Were drawn frcmi the hdlowin^' souices and in the ordei" t)f 
preference indi<-ated helow : 

1. W'henevei' I'.S. Bureau of the Census data or estimates were 
availahle thoe were used. This includes the piovisiomil State 
estimates for .hily 1. 19")S. and special censuses taken for certain 
specific areas. 

2. I><)cnl population data and estimates prepared hy State and 
city jfovernnnMilal ajrericies whereviT availahle were used next if 
recommended hy the I'.S. Hurenu of the Census. 

A. Population estimates compiled ]>y <*ommer(inl concerns for 
'business and industry were <-ni)sulte(l for the remaining nreas, 
and the averages of three such commercially «om|)iled estimates 
Wen' used. 



21 



.'il2»MH*' 



■}. riic f(>rr;,M)iii^' profidiiir prox idctl popnhil ion fipiros for 
all coniitics and for all citits willi over 10.000 inliahitaiits in 1958 
as w rll as for a ^rcal many snuillcr cities. For other small cities, 
for which the ahove sources did not pro\ ide any population fipires, 
the f()IIo\\inj; piocednre was resorted to: Ki^hly percent of the 
popidation change in the cities inuler 10,000 during the decade 
between 1940 and 1950 within <'ach State was cond)ined with the 
1950 census population of each place in a simple linear extiap- 
olation to estimate the 195S population for this rejK)rt. 

It should he pointed out that this compilation of population fi{2:iires 
for 1958 took ncconnl of such data as were available as of May 1, 
1959. 

A sumnuiry of the populations derived from oicli source is as 
follows : 



Soiirco 


Populations 


Percentage 


Provisional estimate for United States, U.S. DuEcau of the Census 


173. 2fln. 000 


100 






1. Special Censuses by T^.S. Bureau of the Census 


18.073.000 

73. .S8.5. 000 

72. 104. 000 

9. 498. 000 


10 4 


2. E.stiniates by State and city agencies ' 


42 5 


3 A verapes of eoinniercially compiled estimates . .. 


41 6 


4. Kstimate by exfrajKjlation . . 


5 5 







• Actually this population source provided estimates by coimties totaling 115,000,000. The 73,.'iS,'i,(X10 
shown here represents the population used after deducting the estimates for plao\s within counties derived 
from sources 1, 3, and 4. 

When the population data from the abovi' sources were added, the 
total for the continental United States fell short, l)v two-tenths of 1 
percent, of the July 1, 1958, provisional estimate of the T.S. Bureau 
of the Census. In 40 individual States, the figures were within 3 
percent of the Census Bureau estimates. In seven of the remaining 
States, the difference did not exceed 5 percent and in one it was as 
liigh as 11.8 percent. These differences are attributable in part to 
differences in dates of reference. In all cases, the population figures 
were adjusted so that the State totals would agree with the i)ro- 
visional estimates of the U.S. Bureau of the Census. 



irva Definitions 

Tlie i)opuliilioii of llic United Sttites is generally divided into urban 
(cities) and rural although with the 1950 CVnsus the Jiureaii of the 
Census introduced the additional concept of standard metropolitan 
areas.' ( 'onse(piently, the crime dalji in this r(>port are, when 
approprijite, grouped according to (1) sttiiuhird metropolitan ar(>as, (2) 
other cities (urban jjlaces outside staiulard metropolitan areas) and 
(3) rural. 

' AeeordiUK to a rrlriusc dated June R, lO.W, by the Bureau of the nudpet, such areas will be identified in 
the future a.s standard metropolitan statistinil areas. 

22 



Sliiii«lar(i in«-| ropolitan :ir«-a> in lliis npnit nic lliu^c idciil ilii')| 
1)\ llic I'rilcuil ( oiiiiiiil I I'c on St iindiiid Mrl i(»|)ii|il mm Arms.' The 
Index (if (lime liiis Ix'eii roiiipilled f(H- these aiCHS t hroiij^hoiit the 
(•(iiiiilry except ill New KmlHiiihI wheic the Iiuh'X of ("time is pre- 
sciiled for met ropoht nil Sinte eeoiioime mens.' Brii'lly, a st)in<hii'd 
metrop«»lil JIM area is u eoiiiily or <ri<Mip of coiilii^iioiis eoiinlies whieli 
eoiilaiiis al least one eenlral eily of ")().()()() itduihil ants, if aeeordini; 
to eeiiam criteria the coiinlii's and cities thus iiu linh-d are suHicieiilly 
meliopoHtan in character. In New Kn^dand, however, cities and 
towns are the nnils used in delinitiir staiichird melropohlan areas and 
since the compihilion of crime and current |)opuhitioii thita for towns 
picseiils practical ohsiacles, metropolitan Stale economic areas were 
used in Ni'W Kn^land instead. in .\e\\ Kn<rland these consist of a 
county or ^rouj) of counties wit hi n a Slate iti which half t he [)o|)uhilion 
III I'.tIO was within a standai'd metropolitan area. Standard metro- 
politan areas and metropolitan State economic areas comprise til 
percent iA the l!t.")S estimated popiihitioti for the <()ntiiieiital I'nited 
Slates in I hi> re|)orl . 

OtluT c-i tit's, as the term is used in the Index of ( 'rime I a hula t ions 
in this re|iorl. refers to urKan communities as delined in the lUoO 
( "eiisus wlii«-li are situated outside any standard metropolitan area. 
These are places with over 2,')00 inhabitants, most of I hem incor|)o- 
rated. They comprise 1') j)ercenl of llie 19')8 estirnated po[)ulaiion 
for t he count rv. 

Hurul areas are the territory and population not included either in 
the standaitl metropolitan areas or in "other cities." .Since the 
standard metropolitan areas themselves include some population clas- 
silied as rural, the term "other rural" mijrht even be ust'd for this 
re|)ort. Kuial areas here include neither any place of 2,500 or more 
inhahilants. nor any of the «lensely populated siihiirhan areas adjacent 
to our lar*;e nietro|)olitan centers. In that sense the somewhat 
rt'siricted nieanirijr attached to the term "rural" may actiiallv more 
• losely re[)resenl what has l)een traditionally considered rural than 
the term "rural" as used iti earlier rnifiuin ('rime Reports. Twenty- 
four percent of t he population reside in rural areas as presently defined. 

The division into the three major types of areas just desciihed is 
u-.ed in the pait of this report dealing; with the Inde.x of Crime, 
llowcvi-r. in tin* |)arts entitled "(leneral I'.S. Crime Statistics'" and 
I'olice Km|)lo\ee Data. " informati<ui is presented for cities ^n>upe<l 
hy si/e and location. The term "city" in these two |)arts denotes 
an urhaii coniinunity with a reporting police fone servinjj: the pojnila- 

' I' - Hiir. Ill ..f It., r, i,.ii~ nn.niii nnd Cilf Pata linnk, !«.*>« (« SlulUMnil .\fwlriirt Siiiipli-nii-iil). 

'■ ~ nul<in25. !».r.. IWi". .K\M\>Hnndard Mrlrnpolilan XTfalhfinUinnt, 

K\' iiifthc liinlKct, niiniooRn>|ih sditciiiciit, iliitt^d Jiuuiitry I.S, IU.S7. 

mi' I -r .V iwsii. 

23 



(ion witliin the ii<liiiiiiisl rat ivc city limits. This j^roupinjx <»f tlic cilios 
(Iocs not liikc into coiisidciutioii wlictlicr tlicy lie within a standard 
metropolitan area or a metropolitan State economic area. 

Till' ('.rinir Tttttils 

('rime reports received at the FBI from cooperating' local law 
enrorceinent a<;encies cover nearly the entire j)opiilation of the Nation 
and this covera<;e continues to grow (see section on Ke|)orting Are:i 
ahove). Xevert heless, there are some areas for which there are no 
re[)orts. These ga|)s are filled in by an estimatin«^ procedure based 
j:enerally on the extrapolation of the known crime experience of the 
reported areas. In this report the use of crime estimates for the total 
l)o|)idation was confined to the part dealing with the Index of Crime. 
The following methodology was used: 

As a general rule the figures supplied by a rejjorting agency were 
not used in this rej)ort uidess the agency liad foi-warded a complete 
<et of reports for the year. The oidy exception made was the following: 
If a re|)orting agency sent in as many as nine monthly reports of 
apparently good quality, and the population of the conununity served 
by that agency comprised at least 25 percent of tiu' area for which 
totals wa*re being tabulated, the offenses for the missing months were 
estimated on the basis of those actually reported during the other 
months of the year. Otherwise, the crime, figures for the year were 
estimated on the basis of those actually reported by other agencies in 
the same area. 

For example, if City A, with a population of 2.5,000 situated in 
a standard metropolitan area of 100,000, sent in reports for each 
month of 1958 except for May, August, and December, the crimes for 
those months were estimat(>d on the basis of those rej)orted by City A 
during the other 9 months of 1958. On the other hand, if the popula- 
tion of City A were only 24,000 (less than 25 percent of the SMA), 
(ir if City A had only reported for 8 months, the crime figures for the 
entire year for City A would be estimated on the basis of those actually 
reported by other agencies in that standard metropolitan area. 

Estimating crime totals for standard metropolitan areas or metro- 
politan State economic areas, "other cit\" areas and ruial ar(>as was 
accom|)lished by simple proration of the crim(>s for the reported ariMS 
to th(> uiU('j)orted portions within the same overall area, thus obtaining 
the estimated total for (he latter. Both the reported offenses and 
estimated totals for each area are shown in the lai)ulations in sufficient 
detail to enable those interested to determine the extent ami nu'thod 
of estimating. 



24 



l*rin|- ((> this issue »>l llic I Iiitoiin ('rililr Kr|)<Hts. ihr old (I'.llO) 

rciisiis (IcCmitioii of iiii iiilmii (•umiiiuiiily uiis followed wliich. willi 
II few cxccplioiis. (Icsciil)c(l nil iiil)iiii (•oiiiiiiimil y as an iiicor|)oral(M| 
place of ovei" 'J. .*)()() iiiluiMt aiils. \iiliially all siicli |)laees ucro 
polriilin! colli l'il>llt iliu' illills |o the I 'iiifttilil ('lime lve|)or|s. 

Beu'iimin^' with this re|)ort, howcNcr, the 1!)')() census delinii ion 
of iirhan coiimiiiiiit ies is heiim followed. This includes Mniiicoi|)oral ed 
MS well as iiicoipoialed places with over 2.."»(l() iiihahit aiils. A few 
of the iinincoipoialed |)laccs arc unils <-onl rihni in^ to the rnifonn 
( 'liinc Iveports. There arc 2'.1!> such iinincor|)orated places (total 
population 1 , sot). ()()()), scallcicd ahoiit the coiiiitiy fr<tni wliich no 
rc|)orts arc received. A study has shown that virtually all of these 
are |)oliced by county law cnforcenieiit agencies. .\ppropriale 
est i mates of crimes in each such place wci-e made with a corresponding 
deduction from the crime li;riircs re|)orted for the rcs|)ectivc county. 

In some States, rural ciime report iiiL' is handled in varyin*; dcirrees 
hy the State |)olice. Inlcss the State [)olice rep(»ited separalcl\' l)y 
county, its (i;^ures wci'e prorated accoidinir to population to su[)ply 
county crime data needed for the rural portions of a standard 
met ro|>olitan ai'ca. 

In tal)le 4. showin<r the Index of Ciiine 1)\' State foi' l'.<')7 and 1!>5.S, 
the same population hase as outlined under /*i>/)u/(ili(ni above was 
used in proratinir l!i')7 re|)orte(l crimes to unre[)orted areas. It was 
not considered feasible to establish li)')7 |)opulation estimates for in- 
dividual j)laces for proration puii)oses. In this connection, it may be 
njtseived that in many instances the individual population estimates 
used were as of .lanuarv 1, IDoS, and thus were ecpially applicable to 
n».')7. For 1!>')7 State <-rinK' rates the July 1, 19.")7, estimates for each 
^late prepared by the U.S. Bureau of the Census wen* used. 

Crlinr Trrnds 

l*nd)ably more people are interested in crime trends than in any 
other plia.se of crime statistics, and consecpicntly substantial space in 
this H'port is devoted to various aspects of tliis subject. 

Broad general (piestions as to whether crime is increasin*: or de- 
I reasin«;in the country as a whole or in the various geojrrapliic <li visions 
and States can best be answered by referrin*; to the tables dealing with 
the Inde.x of ("rime. See also the discussion al>t)ve under "The ('rime 
Totals." 

In the part "General US. ('rime Statistics." trend information is 
presented for city p()U|)s in terms of absolute numln'i^s only, since the 
task of nuikinjr population estimates for each reporlinj; unit for the 



25 



l)rior Ncnrs in order to calculate rates was not possi])le with the re- 
sources avaihiblo. The noeessarv population data has ])een estab- 
lished for 10')S, and as the Uniform (Jrinie Reports are published in 
futint' years under the revised |)lan, it will be possible to g;\vc crime 
trends for cities based upon rates. 

It will l)e observed that the crime trend information for cities in the 
part of this report entitled "General U.S. Crime Statistics" is not 
limited to the ofTenses comprised in the Index of Crime. Such tabula- 
tions as these are of primary interest to police executives and it was 
felt that, since the additional information was available, it should be 
included. Thus, the crimes of manslaughter by negligence and 
larceny under $50 appear in these tabulations. 

All city crime trend information is based on the reports of cities 
which reported for each of the respective years. Whenever the re- 
ports of an agency or correspondence with the executive of a depart- 
ment reflected that a change in reporting procedure had taken place 
(luring a period to be covered by a trend tabulation, the figures for 
that community were elimhiated entirely from such a tabulation. 
For example, whenever a city's report on the age, sex and race of 
arrested persons showed as much as a 20 percent change in arrests of 
persons under 18 years of age from 1957 to 1958, a letter was directed 
to the reporting department inquiring as to what, if any, change in 
local practices or procedures took place during the period which might 
make the comparison of the figures for the 2 j'cars invalid. Incident- 
ally, this procedure eliminated some 20 cities from the tabulations of 
the trends in juvenile arrests 1957-58. 

One tabulation (table 6) in this report compares the crimes reported 
by 2,703 city police agencies during 1958 with the average of the crimes 
rej)orte(l by those same agencies during 1953-57. As the revised pro- 
cedures of Uniform Crime Reports are developed over the years ahead, 
it is planned to extend the comparisons of 1 year's figures wTtli the 
average for several prior years to the presentation of tlie "Index of 
CriiiKv" 



26 



Tlic Index ol (irinio, 1 93o 

In tliis part of tlic Krport, ns (lie title iiiiplirs, tlic inrotiiuit inn 
|»lt'Srlitc(l with IciTJird to ji Ifhit i \ rl y sriinll triniil) of oHV rises is siippuseij 
I o he indicill i\ e of the ext eiil , ral e^ iiihI I len<ls of cil niliiiilit y in <i^eiier)il 
in this eonntry. 'riii- oll'enses selected for this |)iil|)ose me: Minder- 
iind nonne^liirent in(irisj}iiiuditer\ foreihle rnpe, r(d)hei\-, in^^zi'JiN uled 
Mssjinlt, Iniiirhiiy hreiikiiiL: or- enterinjr. hir-eeiiy o\er- S."»() niid jiiito 
theft. 

These o Iff uses ille icporl ed ii< I he\ heeorne known I o the |)olice. ;ind 
it ishelicNcd tliiit }i re|jili\ely hiLdi iirid r-ehit i\el\- consistent niiniher-of 
them hecomes so known. (ieriei-iill\ s|)eid<ilif; these olfenses afe seri- 
ous in natni-e. 'riieir- delinitions do not \)\vy too much ffoin one 
jurisdiction to nnolhei- hut pr-eseiit in this respect n fnirly hijzh deiri-ee 
of iinifoi-niit \-. 

It should i)e kept in mind thni in conlinst to the e.-irlier- |)i-iiclice, 
neirliirt'iit iniinshiu^htei-, stiilutor-\ r-jipe and laiceiiy irndef s.")(). which 
wei-e included in the so-called Part I olfenses fortiierly used for the 
|)ur-poses of ji ci-ime index, now are no Ioniser- included in the index of 
Clime tai)ulai ion. 



27 



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63 



Table 'i.— Index of Crime by Oeographic 

[Populiktion fljcuras shown in thi.s table are those puhlisho'l by the t'.S. Tlureati of the feasu-S, 



Area 


Year 


I'opiilation 


Total olTeases 


Murder and 
nonncclipent 
manslauRhter 


Forcible rape 




Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


1 
Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
100.000 


Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
100.000 


Continental United 
States ' 


1987 

ies8 

1957 
1958 


170, 293, 000 
173, 260. 000 


1,422.285 

1. 553. 922 

+9 3 


835 2 
896 9 

+7.4 


8.027 
8,182 
+ 1.9 


4.7 
4.7 


113.886 

> 14. 561 

+ 18.0 


7 6 


Percent change . . . 


8.4 
+10.5 


New Kn^lanil 


9, 8.36, 000 
9.961.000 


6.3, 8.58 
70.364 
+ 10.2 


«49.2 
706.4 

+8.8 


140 
145 

+3.6 


1.4 

1.5 

+7.1 


(«) 
(») 








Percent rhange 






1957 
19.58 
1957 
19.58 
19.57 
19.58 
19,57 
1958 
1957 
19.58 
19.57 
1958 

19,57 
19,58 








Connect ictit . .. 


2, 269. 000 

2. 316, (MK) 
93'.», (KMI 
9.52, (KHl 
4, 827, (MMI 
4, 862. (MMI 
.573. (MMI 
.5M. (MMI 
8.57. (KK) 
87.5. (MMI 
370. (KK) 
372, 000 

32, 776, OOO 
,33. 080, 000 


14.0.52 
1.5.073 
3. 9.30 
4.421 
34. 920 
37. 4H4 
2. CK12 
2. 370 
7. .565 
9.317 
1.389 
1.699 

2.50. 889 

270. 625 

+7.9 


619.3 
6,50.8 
418.5 
464.6 
723.4 
771.0 
349.4 
40.5. 5 
882.7 
1,064.7 
37.5. 4 
456.2 

765. 5 
818.1 
+6.9 


38 
30 
16 
24 
62 
69 
4 
4 

10 
6 
10 
12 

794 

875 

+ 10.2 


1.7 
1.3 
1.7 
2.5 
1.3 
1.4 
. 7 

L2 

.7 

2.7 

3.2 

2.4 

2.6 

+8.3 


(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 

<') 
(') 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(') 

(') 








Maim- 




Ma.s-sachu.setts 








New Hampshire.-. 








Rhode liiland.. . . 








Vermont 








Mi'ldle .\tlantic 








Percent change 






19,57 
1958 
1957 
19.58 
1957 
1958 

19.57 
19.58 








New Jersey 


5.617,000 
5. 749, 000 
16, 148,000 
16, 229, 0(K) 
11,011,000 
11.101.000 

34, 979, 000 
3.5,618.000 


43. 0(K) 
46. 864 
141. 166 
151.921 
66, 723 
71.840 

252. 029 

277. 993 

+ 10.3 


765.5 
815.1 
874.2 
936. 1 
606.0 
&»7. 1 

720.5 
780.5 
+8.3 


131 
132 
400 
461 
263 
282 

1,211 
1,106 

-8.7 


2.3 
2.3 
2.5 
2.8 
2.4 
2.5 

3.5 

3.1 

-11.4 


(») 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(») 
(') 

(') 
(') 








New York . 








Pennsvlvania. . . 








Kftst North Tentrul 




Percent change 






1957 
1958 
1957 
1958 
1957 
19,58 
1957 
19.58 
1957 
1958 

1957 
1958 








Illinois 


9, 699, 000 
9, 889, 000 
4, 507, 0(M) 
4, .581. (MMI 
7, 70.5, (MMI 
7, 866, (MMI 
9.206. (M 10 
9. 34.5, (MMI 
3, 861, (MMI 
3. 9.38, mo 

15,214.000 
1,5,391.000 


68.2.59 
76. .■{02 
34. 218 
3(>. 710 
73,914 
H1,6S7 
,59, 351 
6.5, 368 
16,287 
17,926 

91,0.33 

99.397 

+9.2 


703. 8 
771.6 
759.2 
801.4 
9.59. 3 
1,038.5 
644.7 
699. 5 
421.8 
455.3 

508.4 
645.8 
+7.9 


419 
398 
169 
134 
247 
246 
332 
290 
44 
38 

383 

406 

+6.0 


4.3 
4.0 
3.7 
2.9 
3.2 
3.1 
3.6 
3.1 
1.1 
1.0 

2.5 

2.6 

+4.0 


(») 
o 
(») 
(») 

8 

O 
(») 

o 
(') 

o 
(») 








Indiana 








Michigan 








Ohio 




Wisconsin 





West North Central 






1957 
1958 
19.57 
19,58 
19.57 
19.58 
1957 
19.58 
1957 
1958 
1957 
19,58 
1957 
19.58 










2, 783, (MMI 
2, 822. (MMI 

2, KKI. (MMI 

2, 116. (MMI 

3, 3lN. (Kid 

3, 37.5, (MM) 

4, 2:18. (KKI 
4. 271, (KM) 
1,437, (MM) 
I, 457, (KKI 

64.5, (KK> 
6.50, (HKI 
693, (XKI 
rm. 000 


11.721 
12. .3.38 
12.9.58 
1 2, 803 
17,0.56 
I'.t, 799 
3.S, 491 
42, 6.51 
,5,616 
6, 266 

2, 075 
2,114 
.3.116 

3. rSi 


421.2 
437. 2 
617.0 
60.5. 1 
514.0 
.586.7 
908.2 
9<t8. 6 
390.8 
429. 9 
321. 7 
325. 1 
449.6 
489.6 


20 
43 
68 
56 
52 
31 
210 
215 
25 
46 
8 
4 
10 
11 


l!5 
2.8 
2.6 
1.6 

.9 
5.0 
,5.0 
1.7 
3.2 
1.2 

.6 
1.4 
1.6 


o 
o 
(») 
(•) 
(») 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(») 
(') 
« 








Minnesota. 


... 


Mis-sourl 


- 


Nebraska 




North Dakota 

















.•^i-c footnotes at end of tabh 



(it 



/>(' iiN/'ofis 1111)1 >f»i/<->. I'>.'>7-'>H 

yiTli's r-'.'.'i, .Ni'. ivt. (lattMl Ndv. I.f, ly.'iN. .Ml I1i.'>k rlll^^s ciilciilnip)! prior lo iM>|iiiljiiion nuitKliriKl 



Kol.»Mry 


.\Ki:nivntt><l H.tsaul( 


Hurt 


lary 


l.nrc«'My 


over $.'i<) 


.\illo 


th.ft 


Nuinbor 


Rate i>or 


KuinlHT 


Rale por 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate Iter 


Number 


Kale per 




100,000 




100.000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


66. 843 


38. S 


110.079 


65.0 


003,707 


854.5 


S54.972 


208.4 


265. 178 


155.7 


:J.S47 


43.5 


113.530 


65.5 


679. 787 


398.4 


391. 550 


226.0 


270. 965 


156.4 


+ U,7 


+ 10.7 
15.0 


+8.6 
1.600 


+.8 


+ 18.6 


+ 10.7 


+10.8 


+8.4 


+2.2 


+.4 


1.473 


16.3 


27.181 


270.3 


16, 874 


171.6 


10, .590 


108.7 


1,671 


16.8 


1.618 


16.2 


31.641 


317.0 


18.175 


182.5 


17.114 


171.8 


+ 13.4 


+ 12.0 


+ 1.1 


-.6 


+ 16.4 


+ 14.0 


+7.7 


+0.4 


+3.2 


+ 1.8 


mi 


12.8 


.VM 


24.4 


n. .551 


288.7 


3,937 


173.5 


2,681 


118.2 


310 


13 6 


,V)7 


21.9 


7. 669 


331.1 


4,019 


173.5 


2, .532 


109.3 


67 


7.1 


82 


8.7 


1.544 


164.4 


1,100 


118.1 


1,112 


118.4 


08 


10.3 


102 


10.7 


2.063 


210.8 


1,226 


128.8 


908 


95.4 


(MO 


19.7 


753 


I.S.6 


13. .504 


281.6 


8.790 


182.1 


10, 771 


•22:{. 1 


1.037 


21.3 


775 


1.5.9 


15.408 


318.8 


9.091 


187.0 


11.014 


226.5 


25 


4.4 


19 


:i.3 


1. 125 


196.3 


517 


90.2 


312 


.54.5 


34 


4 1 


32 


5.5 


I..J57 


232.2 


563 


96.3 


390 


06.7 


120 


14.0 


lUO 


22. 2 


.3. .564 


415.9 


2.211 


258.0 


1,470 


171.5 


IK7 


21 4 


197 


22. 5 


4.074 


465.6 


2.906 


332.1 


1,947 


222. 5 


20 


5.4 


2 


.5 


S<)3 


217.0 


310 


83.8 


244 


65.9 


V 


2.4 


5 


1.3 


»80 


263.2 


370 


99.4 


sa 


86.7 


ii.r.i6 


35.4 


19. 170 


58.5 


100.073 


:«)5. 3 


7t), 335 


232.9 


42.901 


1.30.0 


13.549 


41.0 


19,985 


60.4 


105. 735 


319.6 


84.332 


254.9 


46. 140 


139.5 


+ 16.6 


+ 15.8 


+4.3 


+3.2 


+5.7 


+4.7 


+ 10.5 


+9.4 


+7.6 


+6.6 


1.933 


34.4 


2.644 


47.1 


19.418 


345.7 


9,794 


174.4 


9,081 


161.7 


2.100 


37.6 


2.727 


47.4 


21.782 


378. 9 


10,803 


187.9 


9.260 


161.1 


.\S00 


34.6 


11. 6,58 


72.2 


49.940 


309.3 


.V>, 129 


322.8 


21.449 


1.32.8 


7,007 


43.2 


12.066 


74.3 


50.389 


310.5 


.57.666 


355.3 


24, ;«2 


149.9 


4.004 


37.2 


4.808 


44.2 


30.715 


278. 9 


14,412 


130.9 


12,371 


112.4 


4.382 


39.5 


5,102 


46.8 


33, .VA 


:«)2.3 


15,863 


142.9 


12.557 


113.1 


17.M)6 


50.9 


15.796 


4.5.2 


108.196 


.109.3 


61, 244 


175.1 


47, 776 


136.6 


ID. MA 


MO 


16,275 


4.5.7 


126,813 


3.16.0 


67, 634 


189.0 


46.220 


129.8 


+ 12.0 


+ 10.0 


+3.0 


+ 1.1 


+ 17.2 


+ 15.1 


+ 10.4 


+8.5 


-3.3 


-5.0 


>. 191 


84.5 


5.178 


53.4 


27,454 


283.1 


17.224 


177.6 


9,793 


101.0 


.<.2«3 


93.7 


5.322 


53.8 


31,822 


321.8 


19.057 


192.7 


10.440 


10.5. 6 


1,3W 


30.1 


1,322 


29.3 


15.410 


341.9 


8.737 


193.9 


7,222 


160.2 


1,M0 


34.7 


1,319 


28.8 


17,901 


390.8 


9,292 


202.8 


6,474 


141.3 


4.287 


55.6 


.5,979 


77.6 


32,294 


419.1 


1.5. 96.5 


207. 2 


15. 142 


196.5 


4.733 


60.2 


6.078 


77.3 


39, 578 


503.2 


17,263 


219. 5 


13,789 


17.5.3 


3,073 


39.9 


2.900 


31.6 


28,167 


284.2 


14.0.57 


1.52.7 


12,213 


132. 7 


4,021 


43.0 


3,034 


32.5 


29,477 


315.4 


16,382 


175.3 


12,164 


I.'IO. 2 


297 


7. 7 


408 


10.6 


6,871 


178.0 


5.261 


136. 3 


3.406 


88.2 


338 


sio 


522 


13.3 


8.035 


204.1 


5.640 


143.2 


3,353 


85.2 


4,002 


30.8 


4,263 


28.0 


42. 242 


277.7 


22,578 


148.4 


16, 875 


110.9 


4.000 


32.4 


4.481 


29.1 


47,360 


307.7 


2.5. 122 


163.2 


17,038 


110.7 


+6.4 


+5.2 


+5.1 


+3.9 


+ 12.1 


+ 10.8 


+ 11.3 


+ 10.0 


+ 1.0 


-.2 


263 


9.1 


167 


6.0 


6,119 


219.9 


3.486 


125.3 


1,670 


60.2 


2ft4 


9.4 


184 


6.5 


6,137 


217.5 


3,054 


140.1 


1,756 


62.2 


511 


24.3 


622 


29.0 


6,843 


325.9 


3,227 


153.7 


1,697 


80.8 


407 


23.5 


576 


27.2 


6.588 


311.4 


3,343 


158.0 


1.743 


82.4 


82S 


19.0 


103 


4.9 


8.148 


24.5.6 


4,756 


143.3 


3.308 


99.7 


700 


21.0 


211 


0.3 


9.649 


285.9 


.5,501 


105.7 


3,608 


100.9 


2.968 


70.0 


2.939 


09.3 


16,282 


:i84.2 


8.260 


194.9 


7,832 


184.8 


3,093 


72.4 


3.130 


73.4 


19, 452 


45.5. 4 


9,278 


217.2 


7.480 


175.1 


160 


11.0 


211 


14.7 


2.501 


174.0 


1.225 


85.2 


1,488 


103.5 


278 


19.1 


208 


14.3 


2.912 


199.8 


1,317 


90.4 


1,505 


103.3 


54 


8.4 


40 


7.1 


901 


1.53.6 


514 


79.7 


462 


71.0 


S» 


8.0 


30 


0.0 


1.080 


167.0 


480 


73.8 


447 


68.7 


111 


16.0 


115 


10.0 


1.358 


190.0 


1,110 


160.2 


412 


.50.5 


91 


13.0 


127 


18.3 


1.530 


219.7 


1,150 


105.8 


499 


71.4 



65 









Table 


t. — Index of Crime by Geographic 


Area 


Year 


Population 


ToUl olTcnscs 


M urdcr and 
nonnegllgent 
manslaughter 


Forcible rape 




Number 


Kate jMT 
100.000 


Num- 
ber 


Kate |)cr 
100,000 


Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
100.000 


.'^oulh .\tlantlc ' 

Percent change... 


I9.'>7 
19.M 

1957 
19,58 
1957 
19.58 
19.57 
19.58 
19.57 
19.58 
19.57 
19,58 
1957 
19.58 
1957 
19,58 
1957 
1958 

1957 
1958 


24.761,000 
25, 3,52, 000 


203, 4♦^ 

222, .503 

+9.4 


821.7 
877.7 
+6.8 


2.257 
2,420 

+7.2 


9.1 
9.5 

+4.4 


(») 
(') 










Delaware 


4.34. 000 

4.M. 000 

4, ZfC.l.CKK) 

4. 442. 000 

3, 771. (KM) 

3. 81H,0(K) 
2, 895. 000 
2. 9,V,, 0(H) 

4. 172, (H)0 
4. .M!), (KH) 
'J. :',liH, (KK) 
L', lOt.lHHI 
:•(, KliN. (MK) 
3] 93.5, (MM) 
1, !)(►(. (HH) 
].<((1!I.(MH) 

11,81.5,000 
11,947. (MM) 


2,8.54 
3. 681 
.54. 971 
60, 6.5.3 
29,642 
32, 062 
24, 733 
27, 285 
27, 103 
29,7.56 
1,5,431 
17,901 
31,400 
32, 079 
7, 065 
8,447 

71,866 
77. 714 
+8.1 


657.6 
810.7 
l.:«)6.0 
1,36.5.4 
786. 1 
K39. 8 
8.M. 3 
922. 9 
606. 1 
6.51. 1 
(i51. 6 
744.6 
820.3 
81.5.2 
359. 9 
429.1 

608.3 
(i50. 5 
+6.9 


27 
14 
613 
524 
478 
.527 
141 
161 
439 
428 
211 
251 
278 
340 
92 
95 

1,175 

1,019 

-13.3 


6.2 
3.1 
12.2 
11.8 
12.7 
13.8 
4.9 
5.4 
9.8 
9.4 
8.9 
10.4 
7.3 
8.6 
4.7 
4.8 

9.9 

8.6 

-14.1 


(») 
(•) 
(') 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(') 
(') 
(>) 
(») 
(») 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(») 
(') 

{») 
(») 




Florida 








Maryland 




NOrlli ("arolina 

South Carolina 

Virfiinia 

West Virtiinia 

East South Central .. 


::::::: 


Percent chanRC... 






1957 
1958 
19.57 
1958 
19.57 
1958 
1957 
1958 

1957 
1958 






Alabama 


3, 162, (MX) 
3, 211, (KM) 
3, (ll.'i.lKX) 
3, OHO. (KHI 
2, ll><), (MM) 

2, 186. (MM) 

3. 443. (MM) 
3. 469, (MX) 

16, 277, (XX) 
16, 539, (XX) 


18,368 
22,1,50 
20, 444 
21,118 
7, 403 
7, 2;i6 
2.5,651 
27, 210 

139,(i22 

151,736 

+8.7 


580.9 
689.7 
671. 8 
685. 6 
341.8 
331.0 
74.5. 
784.3 

857. 8 
917. 5 
+7.0 


401 
417 
217 
1(55 
241 
144 
316 
293 

1.239 
1,336 
+7.8 


12.7 
13.0 
7.1 
6.4 
11.1 
6.6 
9.2 
8.4 

7.6 

8.1 

+6.6 


{») 
(») 
(>) 
(») 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(') 

(») 
(') 




Kentucky 




Mississippi 




Tennessee 




West South Central.. 
Percent change.. - 






1957 
19,58 
1957 
1958 
1957 
1958 
1957 
1958 

1957 
1958 










1,780,0(X) 

1.766, (MMJ 

:i, (HiC. (KH) 

:\. iin. (H)() 

2, 2.'7.(HIII 
2, 2k.',, (KM) 
'.», 17.'.. 000 
9, 377. (MM) 
6. 2XX, (MM) 
6, 49^1, 000 


9, 242 
11,0,58 
2I,!)49 
24, 2;« 
2(1.791 
■JO. '.t95 
S7.tl4() 
9.5, 450 

61, 3,50 
73,345 
+ 14.0 


519.2 
626.1 
715.9 
779. 1 
921.2 
918.8 
95,5. 2 
1,017.9 

1.023.4 
1, 129. 4 
+ 10.4 


171 
166 
207 
183 
129 
150 
732 
837 

232 

259 

+ 11.6 


9.6 
9.4 
6.8 
5.9 
,5.7 
6.6 
8.0 
8.9 

3.7 

4.0 

+8.1 


(») 
(') 
(') 
(?) 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 

(') 
(') 




Louisiana 




Oklahoma . 




Texas 




Mountain . 


-- 


Percent change 






19,57 
19,58 
19,37 
19,58 
1957 
19,58 
19,57 
19.58 
1957 
1958 
1957 
1958 
19,57 
19,58 
19.57 
19,58 

1957 
19,58 








Arizona 


1,078,(XM) 
1, 140, (MM) 
l,lirKi,(MM) 
1,711. (MM) 

t')l.'., 000 
6'i2. (H«» 
671. (100 
C.XS, (KM) 
2ii2, (KIO 
267, (KK) 

8i:i.(KHi 

SI2. (KMI 
SKI. (KM) 
S),.'i. (KKI 
:il7,(KKl 
3L'().(MM) 

18. 347, (MM) 
18, 879, (MM) 


14,518 
19,320 
17,907 
20, 408 
3, 682 
4, 403 
4,877 
,5, 281 

1, VA 
4.269 
9. 165 
9.916 

6. 724 

7, (M)3 
3,013 

2, 745 

272, 288 

295, 68-1 

+8.6 


1.34(>.8 

l.(i94. 1 

1.076.8 

1. 193. 1 

570. 9 

(i64. 8 

72(i. 8 

7()7. 9 

1.703.8 

1, 599. 8 

1,127.3 

1, 177. 9 

8tM). 5 

810.0 

9,50. 5 

858.0 

1,48-1.1 

1, .5()(i. 2 

+5.5 


75 
75 
41 
70 
11 
16 
20 
17 
24 
2t) 
40 
36 

6 
10 
15 

9 

596 

616 

+3.4 


7.0 
6.6 
2.5 
4.1 
1.7 
2.4 
3.0 
2.5 
9.2 
9.7 
4.9 
4.3 
. 7 
1.2 
4.7 
2.8 

3.2 

3.3 

+3.1 


(») 
(>) 
(') 
(') 
(') 
0) 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(') 
(») 
(') 
(') 
(») 
(») 
{') 

(») 
(') 




Colorado 




Idnlin 




Montana 








New Mexico 

Itah 




Wvoming 




Pacinc 




IVrcent change 






1957 
19,58 
I9,>7 
19,''.8 
19,57 
10,58 








California 

Oregon.. 


13, 879, (MM) 

14, .3.37. (MM) 
1.7I3.(KNI 
1.773. (KH) 
2, 72,5, (MM) 
2, 769, (MM) 


2.32, 517 

25|.6(IS 
13, (I2;i 
13. S'.ll 
26, 748 
27, 185 


1.675.3 
1,775.9 
747. 2 
783.3 
981.6 
981.7 1 


489 

46 
43 
61 
42 


3.5 
3.7 
2.6 
2.4 
2.2 
1.5 


(») 
(') 
(») 
(') 
(») 
(«) 




Wa.shington 


— 



I Includes the District of Columbia. 

J Hc'^-iiuiiui: in 19,58 the rape calouorv was liiiiittMl (n forcible olTeiises. Prior to 19,58 statutur.v 
also iiicludi'il. 'I'ho best availnhli' indication of I he chance in forcible nipes fioin ly.'w lo 19.5S 
percent rise sliown for cities. See table 5iind pertinent footnote. rhi.>i percentai-'e cliaiiue u.>-('d lie 
for c^linxitiiiK total 1957 forcible rapes. 

GO 



cjises were 
is the 13.0 
re (table 4) 



>iiisM>/i> <ifi</ >nj/«v. I'K'>7-'>H — ( oeiliim««l 



KDl.lK^ry 


.\».'Kni\ III 


«•.! icsmilt 


HurRlary 


I.iii(Tn> 


over $50 


.\uto thtft 


\ iuhUt 


Kale |M>r 


Number 


Rate |ier 


Nuiiibor 


Unte |M>r 


Number 


Hate |HT 


Nuinbor 


Rate per 




100,000 




lai.lKiU 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


7.H52 


.11.7 


30,248 


122.2 


84.356 


340.7 


44.732 


180.7 


34,019 


137. 4 


H. 770 


:«4. fl 


.■«), 175 


110.0 


07, 564 


384.8 


48. 357 


100.7 


3.1,217 


KiK.lt 


+ II.7 


+u. 1 


-.2 


-2.6 


+ 1.1.7 


+12.9 


+8.1 


+.1. 5 


+3. 5 


+ 1.1 


110 


25. 3 


03 


21.4 


I.4K5 


342.2 


610 


142.6 


520 


110.8 


112 


24.7 


83 


18.3 


1,071 


434. 1 


801 


176.4 


700 


1.14.2 


iiM 


.11.0 


l.M.I 


ll.Vl 


2.1,013 


•11.1. 7 


13. .V)3 


3^20. 8 


8.013 


190. 4 


:t. (I.M' 


<i8. 7 


.'.. t).'^i 


113.8 


•21t, 026 


673. 7 


14,3H5 


3^2:». 8 


7,710 


173.11 


I.IS)-.' 


:<l.i» 


1. I7il 


110.7 


I-2. .Kll 


331.5 


6, 28.3 


ItUI. 6 


.1. UI2 


1.32.6 


1. 122 


29.4 


3.so;i 


00. ft 


14,322 


37.1. 1 


6, .176 


17^2.2 


.1.712 


140.11 


l.lM 


a7.4 


■.',014 


100.7 


8. •260 


•285. 3 


.1.483 


180.4 


fi,h51 


•ai). 11 


1,071 


36.2 


•2. 877 


07.3 


0, 572 


323.8 


6, 732 


227.7 


6, N72 


2:<2.4 


tiWU 


1.1.6 


8, 140 


182.2 


10. •2>v{ 


•2-20. 


4, 343 


07. 1 


3. 100 


71.3 


NIO 


17.8 


N .174 


188.5 


11,8.12 


•2»I0. 5 


4.786 


10.1. 2 


3, -Mm 


72.7 


375 


1.1.8 


2. 437 


102.0 


n. 742 


2M.7 


3,814 


161. 1 


1,S.V2 


78.2 


•IIW 


Ifi. 8 


2, Itil 


SUO 


8,.V1H 


3,'>6. 


4,'2&1 


178.5 


2. 2:15 


93.0 


1. I«!7 


30. .1 


4. 3-28 


113.1 


12.807 


Mi. « 


7,251 


180.4 


5, .1frt» 


145.5 


1. 17.1 


20.0 


4. 4-22 


112.4 


13. 425 


341.2 


7. .107 


100.8 


.1.210 


132. 4 


2lt2 


14.0 


.170 


20.5 


3. 201 


1(57.7 


1..1H3 


80.6 


1.2^28 


62. ti 


31W 


1.1.5 


644 


32.7 


4. -268 


216.8 


1,580 


80.7 


l..Mfi 


78. 5 


2,787 


•23. n 


7,080 


67.6 


31.72.1 


•2f>8. 5 


1.1,046 


127. 3 


13. 147 


111.3 


1068 


24.8 


7,947 


66.5 


36,841 


:i08. 4 


16,351 


136.9 


12. .188 


10.1. 4 


+6.5 


+ 5.1 


-.5 


-1.6 


+ 10.1 


+ 14.0 


+8.7 


+7.5 


-4.3 


-5.3 


.184 


18.5 


2. 074 


04.1 


7.370 


233. 4 


4. .147 


143.8 


2.4h:j 


78.5 


817 


2.1. 4 


3. 3.V1 


104.5 


0, .180 


■MK 3 


5. 373 


167.3 


2. (i^lS 


81.2 


SH» 


20.2 


1.410 


46.6 


8. 577 


•281.0 


4.330 


14^2. 3 


.1.012 


164.7 


«34 


31) 3 


1.307 


42.4 


0. 275 


:<oi.i 


4.738 


1.13.8 


4. f.iw 


1.12.6 


:«h2 


17. r. 


1. 1 »■>»•) 


.13.8 


3. 3.18 


1.V).0 


1.375 


r<i. 5 


881 


•10.7 


Mta 


14.1 


i.-2;<i 


.16.3 


3. .138 


161.0 


1.310 


.10. 9 


7<M 


32. 2 


V3-2 


27. 1 


2.427 


70. 5 


1-2. 411 


3f.O. 5 


4.704 


139.2 


4.771 


138.6 


\*)S 


26.2 


2. 054 


50.2 


14.448 


416.5 


4.030 


142.1 


4, 577 


131.0 


i. \.V1 


20.8 


13. 701 


84.2 


W, (Kiy 


387.1 


30.284 


186.1 


2f.. .134 


163.0 


.*>.w^ 


3.1.7 


1.3.206 


70.8 


71,35!l 


431.5 


32. 080 


100.5 


26. 042 


162.0 


+21.6 


+ 10.8 


-3.6 


-.1.2 


+ 13.3 


+ 11.5 


+8.0 


+7.2 


+ 1.5 


-.1 


42y 


24.1 


1,154 


64.8 


4.337 


243.7 


2.116 


118.9 


1.035 


.18.1 


:j<2 


33.0 


1.080 


61.7 


5. .108 


311.8 


2. .101 


141.6 


1.212 


68.6 


tmi 


.•C.3 


2.034 


G6.3 


7.463 


243. 4 


4.008 


163.0 


6. 257 


2IM. 1 


i.4w; 


48.1 


1.842 


69.2 


8.808 


•28»>. 1 


.1. mi 


18^2. 1 


6. 1.10 


107.7 


748 


,H3, 1 


I.O02 


48.4 


0..187 


424. 8 


.1. 824 


2.18. 


3.411 


151.1 


»»45 


•28.2 


SDK 


3.1.4 


0.668 


423.1 


6, 4t-« 


•283.0 


3. 2.16 


142..1 


2.«8« 


■M. 3 


!'. 421 


102.7 


41.r.22 


4.i:j. 6 


17.346 


180.1 


1.1.831 


172..1 


3,181 


33.0 


1'. 467 


101.0 


47. •28.1 


.104.3 


18. .3.16 


10.1.8 


16.324 


174.1 


2.705 


43.0 


2. .185 


41.1 


27. 142 


431.6 


17.410 


276.9 


14. 276 


•227.0 


3.3.10 


.11. 7 


3,037 


46.8 


30.620 


471.5 


10.8.13 


30.1.7 


16.217 


240.7 


+24.2 


+20.2 


+ 17.5 


+ 13.0 


+ 12.8 


+0.2 


+ 14.0 


+ 10.4 


+ 13.6 


+ 10.0 


516 


47.9 


1.018 


04.4 


.1.832 


.141.0 


3.601 


342.4 


3.386 


314. 1 


758 


)W. 5 


1.302 


114.2 


7. «^2<l 


W<k. 2 


4.616 


4IM.8 


4.040 


434. 


1.0A3 


63.0 


.123 


31.4 


8,146 


480.8 


4.367 


•2f.2. 6 


3. 767 


2-26. .1 


1.352 


70.0 


620 


36.8 


0,160 


.135. 5 


.1.001 


•207.6 


4. loti 


240.0 


75 


11.6 


61 


0.5 


1.725 


267. 4 


1.243 


102.7 


.H<7 


87. 


123 


18 •; 


1.12 


•23.0 


•2.044 


:i08. 6 


1.425 


21.1.2 


••►43 


07.1 


133 


10.8 


124 


18.5 


l.OM 


•205. 2 


1.510 


225. 


I. l(K.t 


16.1.3 


148 


21. 1 


111 


If.. 1 


2. 3«.2 


343. 5 


1.683 


244.7 


U)'iO 


130. f. 


205 


78.2 


104 


74.0 


"2. r2o 


800.2 


1.086 


414.5 


835 


318.7 


240 


03.3 


00 


37.1 


2,031 


761.1 


1.084 


406.2 


780 


202.3 


236 


20.0 


381 


46.0 


3. 1.18 


388.4 


•2.517 


3O0. 6 


2.833 


348.5 


3.10 


41.0 


461 


.14.8 


3,430 


407. 5 


2.631 


312.5 


3. IN)8 


3.17.3 


287 


34.2 


184 


21.0 


3.175 


378. 


1.8G8 


2^22.4 


1.204 


143.3 


206 


23.8 


100 


23.0 


.3.030 


351.5 


2.230 


2.17. 


1.310 


1.12.6 


100 


.10.0 


100 


31.5 


1,005 


317.0 


1.128 


3.1.1.8 


575 


181.4 


173 


54.1 


84 


26.3 


034 


201.0 


1.003 


341.6 


4.12 


141.3 


I3.ai7 


71.2 


1.1.323 


83.5 


110.783 


6.12.0 


70. 46« 


384.1 


.13. 060 


280.2 


14.101 


7.1.2 


HV8IW 


80.0 


131.854 


6W. 4 


:\ 737 


417.1 


53.480 


•283.3 


-»-'< 7 


+5.6 


+0.7 


+6.6 


+ 10.1 


+7.0 


+ 11.7 


+ 8.0 


+ .8 


-2.0 


■ ... 


83.8 


14.6.M 


105.6 


101,643 


732.4 


.18.746 


423.3 


4A.3&5 


326.8 


. ■ »' 


88.5 


16. 140 


112.6 


112.611 


785.5 


66.208 


462.4 


46.338 


323.2 


,\.'.S 


30.1 


304 


17.4 


.V85I 


335.7 


4. 0.17 


232.8 


2.240 


128.5 


.133 


.10.1 


270 


15.7 


A. 438 


363.0 


4.408 


•253.6 


2.100 


118.4 


•*r; 


:w 1 


:«v. 


n 4 


!? TW 


4.1! n 


:. <"/v, 


2st :i 


.'.. ir..-, 


200. 6 



>r Kt^ufirrtitbtc tltt t.-<t«iu. 



iiidiviiliiiil 



General United States Crime Statistics 

'I'liis pal I of the Report presents general infornuition on llic oxtent 
of criniinality and some crime trends in the Ignited States as reported 
1)V the poHc(> agencies which cooperate with the Uniform Crime Re- 
porting program. As stated elsewhere in this report, a sustained 
effort is being made to develop the coverage and make it as complete 
as possible, so that the total "crime picture" of the United States will 
be rcllected. In using the data contained in this part, it should be 
k('])l in mind that the type of information reported and the kind of 
tabulations made are determined to a large extent by the needs and 
interests of the police administration. 



68 



SI"'' 



g-« uja, jeg« gp« ttg» 
*i««o c-«*« otC-rt SB — — Sl-v 



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<eSo> •r;So> nc>i>n v2Sh> fioi"- 






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to CI "O 
C^ S "O 



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o«5 

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— K a* 



70 



I'liltlf (>. — (.ilv i'.riinf lrrinl>. I'f.'tH irr.^iis ivrriitii- yv.j.J— .»r 
(OtTcnscA known to the itollcw in 3,703 cities over 2,M0, tutal population 84,872,1A0] 





.VunilK'r of olIi-ii.s»'s 


Porceiit 


OlTi>n.«o 


AvcniKf, 
Wil 57 


1U.'« 


ctlllllKO 


TOTAL . 


1.419, MS 


1, 782, 534 


+28.2 


Miiritcrniul iionnpKlicont iiiiuuilauKlitor 

Mnn.'ilntiKhtfr t>y ii<'KilK<'nci' , 

Ki>rcll)li' niiM' 

Kol.lK'ry 

ApKmvatci! a.ssnult 

»iin:liir> bnaking or entering 

I.nriviiy tluft 

Auto Ihcft 


3,314 

2,301 

'5,20:1 

4.\6lU 

.■J21.218 

JH1>I,1'12 

l.W.flOl 


3,67» 
2,343 

H, 872 

,v.>, \m 

f.7, IMHl 
KM. -Mi 

* i.(i«u.:ii'>u 

183. 832 


+ 11.0 

+ 1.8 

+32.1 

+ 14.3 

+7.8 
+2."). « 
+2«.2 
+22.1 





' BiTiiiiiiiiK in 19'>8 tile n»i><' oU»'ifory wius liiuiU'.! i» fornlil.' olloiist'.s. Prior to 1958 statutory cases were 
nLso includiii. The forclhlc rapfS us«'<| toc-on.struct tin- annual a\cniui> for lU.V) .17 wito esliruati-s linseil on 
sixfialoifin.sortimlyseisfurnislic.l l.y o\.r lut soU-cti-"! ciiu> i total itopulatioii ovi-r .'jd.iKKi.tKMD which showed 
tho proportion of rcporiol rapo.s clas.sihi'il a.s forcililc each year. 

' Incluili's all rrporti'il ilu-fts reKunllcvs of \aluo of property stolen. 



^ Tulilr 7. — Mitnllilv f nrinliniis. l<f.iH 

[Daily aveniKi', oifinses known to the poller in 3,131 cities, total poiiulatiou W5,530,81IJ 



Month 



Jtnukry December 

January- March 

April- June 

July-Septenilier - - 
October- l)f<^'fnt>«'r 

January 

Kehniary - 

.March 

.\pril 

May 

June 

July 

Aunut 

Scptenitx r 
October 

Novenitier . 

DecvnitKT 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 
nonni>K- 
liKent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



11. B 



ia9 

11.2 
1Z9 
12.4 



11.5 
9.7 
11.3 
10. tS 

11.1 
11.8 
117 
12.7 

IZ4 
la 6 
12.5 
14.0 



Man- 
slaut:h- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



7.6 



7.« 
6.7 
7.1 

8.8 



7.4 

a4 

7.2 
•i.ti 

7.0 
6.5 
A.2 
0.8 

a4 

8.1 

a4 

tt.8 



Forciiile 
rape 



Robljcry 



.Aggra- 
vated 
a.ssault 



Burglary 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Larce- 
ny- 
theft 



98.4 



164.3 



las 

23.0 
26.0 
21.7 



10.2 
18. «i 

lao 

20.3 

22.8 
26.0 
25.2 
26.8 

25.9 
22.6 
22.5 

2ai 



192.7 
196.0 
189. 3 
l.-iS. 5 

142.8 
142.8 
144.9 
l.V). 7 

l.i2. 9 
1.W.6 
162.2 
187.2 



214.4 I 1,269.3 



180.1 
221.5 
245.6 
209.9 



171.3 
176.6 
192.9 
209.0 

226.4 
229.1 
244.0 
2.'M. 6 

2*7.8 
214.1 
217.2 
198.6 



1,365.9 
1,21&0 
1.23a6 
1. 2.'i6. 3 



1. 3«'>l). 4 
1,347.2 
I,38H. 3 
l,3ia9 

1.153.9 
1,183.3 
1,221.7 
1.2.52.5 

1,241.8 
1, 187. 8 
1,256.2 
1,324.7 



9,250.6 



3, 2ia 4 
3,339.4 
3,233.8 
3,211.0 



3.110.3 
3,122.4 
3,413.1 
3. 483. 3 

3.20O. 1 
3. 277. 4 
3. 213. 8 
3.334.5 

3, 150. 5 
3,302.5 
3,2219 
3. 106. 1 



.\uto 
theft 



583.5 



613.0 
577.8 
55a8 
585.1 



633.9 
57.^ 9 
02.S.5 

6iao 

5«H.7 
551.2 
537.5 
.'>58.4 

.VI. 2 
591.9 
598.9 
564.9 



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a** 



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u 



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PQA 



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5£S 



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oo 

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— pj a* t * 2 

r- . <s . O . so 

— r- is o> ^ to « 



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— o 


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'^ — 


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Ol.- 


o'— 


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3". 



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Mco c^ o csao 
ao • cd . to . 

■"I'M ^M MM 



cc »c 



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M 1- 
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So 






.2 a 



:3 m 

O.H _ 

a °- 

Cos 
tctEM 



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a <« = = / 3 ^ ■/" = " 

a.i/'.2:.ix.is:.i;/'.; 



= 8 

o — 

a" 
3 a 



111 

S 3 3 






i-J, 






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2*^ 


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73 



ral.l«'». — (tjjrtoi- itiiil\>i>. irrntl^. I'KiT-'iH. ami I't-rtrti I IH^I rilm I inn 
[W.5 vUk-i over Ji.OOO. Total jjoijulutioii 01.228,835] 



Classincntlon 



Robber v: 

TOTAL. 



Highway 

Coninierelal house. 

Oil station 

Chain store 

Kesi<lenee 

Hank 

Miscellaneous 



IJurglary— breaking or entering: 
TOTAL.. 

Hesidence (dwelling) : 

Night 

Day 

Konresidcnce (store, office, etc.): 

Night 

Day 



T.arccnv-ihcft (except auto theft, by value): 
TOTAL 



iU) and over. 

$5 toS-W 

rnder$5 



l/iriciiv— theft (by tvpe): 
TOTAL 



Pocket-picking 

Purse-snatch ing 

Shoplift ing 

Thefts from aiitos (except accessories). 

Auto accessories 

Hicycles 

All others 



Number of offenses 



1967 



48,7S0 



22. 445 
10. .')74 

2. 10.1 
1,217 

3, 072 
136 

2,523 



897,367 



64,591 
52,843 



163, 377 
16,556 



744, 549 



20.1.954 
430. 321 
103, 274 



744,549 



7.177 
11,812 
35,556 
124. 095 
203.644 
106. 408 
255, 257 



1958 



48,S39 



25,159 
12,322 
2,262 
1.044 
3.882 
208 
2.855 



329. 9S7 



71.406 
57. 003 



186. 5,S5 
14.373 



803, 185 

223.248 
463. 408 
116. .lafl 



803, 185 



7.056 
12,611 

41.924 
144. 187 
221. 141 
108. 447 
267.819 



Percent 
change 



-i-lS.1 



+ 12.1 
+ 16.5 

+4.6 
+3,5. 1 

+5.7 
+52.9 
+ 13.2 



+11.0 



+ 10.6 
+9.0 



+ 14.2 
-13.2 



+7.9 



+8.9 

+6.2 

+ 12.8 



+7.9 



-1.7 
+6.8 
+ 17.9 
+ 1.1.6 
+8.6 
+ 1.9 
+4.9 



Percent 
(Ibtrihu- 
tioB, 1958 



100.0 



52.1 
25.5 
4.7 
3.4 
&0 
.4 
5.9 



100.0 



21.6 
17.5 



56.5 
4.4 



100.0 



27.8 
67.7 
14.5 



100.0 



.9 
1.6 
5.2 
18.0 
27..'; 
13. .1 
33.3 



ahle 10. — f'aliie of Property Stolen, by Type of Crime, 1958 

[(0.'> cities over 2.1.000. Total i)opulation 01,228.83.1] 



1 
Classification 


Number of 
offenses 


Value of prop- 
erty stolen 


.Vverage 

value per 

offense 


TOTAL 


1,342,926 


$265,700,000 


tl98 


HohbiTy 


48. 332 
329. 937 
803,185 
101,472 


10.9tKt.O«K( 
61. 400. (KM) 
58. ChX). IHW 
134. 800. (XX) 


20,; 


Hmplary 

1 .iirecny — theft 


isr, 
7:t 


.\iito theft 


835 







71 



I'jiltN- II. — I tilitf Iff I'rufH-ils ."^liflrti ittui t iiltir <»/' I'lit/K-rt \ Hrtinvml, h\ 

Type «/ ProfH-rlv. I'f.'iH 

[405 dtk'S over 25,000. Tittnl popnlniiun )il,rj>,N.i.'i] 



TviM' i.f |ir<i|i<rty 


Value of proiHTty 


I'erct'iit 




Stolen 


Recovertnl 


refovereil 


TOTAI 

• 111 reney, notes, etc 

Jrwrlrv ftiiil pr«'<'iniis nit'tnis 


1865,700,000 

31.700.000 

2:1,200,000 

7.«00,U)0 

12,200,000 

■ 134,000,000 

50, 100. 000 


•149,300,000 

3. MKI.dlNI 

2.21X1.(11X1 

|(KI,(XXI 

1. I(K).(XMI 

121. I(K),(NN) 

11, l(KI.(NNI 


»8.9 

12.0 
9 5 


Kiir^ 


5 3 


Cloihint! 


(I 


l.tMiillv stolen autnniohilcs 


tt2.2 


M isrcllikneous 


20 3 







I X'ftiiie of automobil{>!< stolen may not npre<' with stolen autonioliile value in table 10 since value of 
vrliieli-s stolen In nihht'rics nn<l I'lirulnrii"; I.-; ini'lii>|i'i| In the values of stolen property for those olTense 
eliivv s. 



'lalilr 12. — (fXfrii»\ hinmn. (h-iinil hy irn-sl. ami 1%-rstnis Clutrnitl {llvUl 
fur I'rasmilinn), I'K'tH. Ity I'lP/nihil inn i'.rtmps. "Sintihrr pvr liXI Kinniii 
Off en sen 





Total 


Crlniinal 
homieide 


For- 
cible 
ra|X' 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
o&sault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




I'opiilatlon Group 


1 
Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
genl 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
Slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


.\ulo 
theft 


TOTAI, GROUPS I-Vl 

l,<.''>t eities; total population, 
77,4t».Z«: 
Offenses known 
Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged 


100.0 
26 4 
20.6 


100 
93. 6 
M.0 


100 
89.8 
76.7 


100.0 
73.0 
78.9 


100.0 
42.7 
42.2 


100.0 
78.9 
66.7 


100.0 
29.7 
21.3 


100.0 
20.2 
13.0 


100.0 
26.9 
23.0 


i.lKji r 1 

3S <i(li-s over 2.'iO,(N«i: total 

1- I."'!.." :«,»t7.92»: 

»>•■ 1 ... - 

< ' 1 by urrest . 

!• ...1 

4 (111.-, ovtr l.tm.fxx); total 
l».pul.>tlon. l.^ft.M.«l7: 

((If. ' - . !.> ..V. tl 

<>'' 1 by arrest 

r. 1.. 

8 ell.. . , -, .^ lo 1,000.000: 

lotul iHipulatlon, 0,7(16,- 

UM: 

f))T. ,,.. . i,,,.,.n 

• ••' 1 by arrest . 

1-. !.. 

• r;!.. . •.....; to 750.000; 

t'ltni |M)pulation. 5,16.%,- 

349: 
Or',-.— - I.I.... n . . 
<n' 1 by arrest. 
I'. 1.. 


KXl.O 
28.2 
20.5 

100.0 
32.1 
20.7 

100.0 
26.5 
23.4 , 

100.0 
20. S 
21.7 

1 

un.o 

22.5 


KXl.O 
«3. 1 
U3.4 

100.0 
02.0 
100.5 

100.0 
«.7 

71».9 

100.0 
06.2 
04 9 

100.0 
00.4 

"4 7 


KXI.O 
00.5 
70.0 

1(X).0 
03.1 
103. 8 

KXt.O 

on. 1 

117.0 

KM.O 
01.0 
30.2 

100.0 
M-6 

■■.' 1 


liXt.O 
70.6 
74.5 

1(X).0 
00.0 
74. 

1(X). 
73.0 
<■*. 2 

loi.o 
72.1 
95.1 

100.0 
TO K 


IINI.O 
43.1 
39. .•> 

lit). 
46.7 
38.7 

100.0 
37.7 
41.0 

Ksl.O 
42.2 
42.0 

100.0 
ao 

■'• 4 


KXt. 
f>\.0 

100.0 
76.1 
63.2 

IW.O 
80.3 
56.0 

100.0 
84.1 
6P.0 

100.0 
75.3 
57.0 


KXI.O 
20.4 
18.0 

100.0 
32.0 
16.2 

100.0 
28.4 
2.V2 

100. 
31.4 

17.8 

100.0 
34.2 
14.5 


100.0 
21.7 
15.0 

100.0 
24.0 
12.8 

1(X). 
30.7 
18.1 

un.o 

25.8 
10.5 

100.0 
10.4 
12.4 


100. (1 
23.1 
10.4 

100.0 
27.1 
21.8 

100.0 
17.5 
18.6 

100.0 
22.4 

18.7 


I* <illr<. .'.<i,n«) to .WO.OOO: 
t..l.i| [...luliition, 6.400.- 

(' ' 1 by arrest 

!■■ 


100.0 
25.1 

17.fi 



'luble 12. — Offennr.H Known, (^It'aml by Arrest, niul Pcrsonn Chnrtivd {Hflil 
fur I'rusvviitinn), 1958, by Papulation (irouptt, i\unil*er pt-r WO hnourt 
(tjffnsrs — C.onliiiued 



Population nroup 



r.ROfp II 

70 citit's. lOO.OCK) to 250.000; 

total populutioii, 10,289,- 

757: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



GROUP m 

134 cities, 50,000 to 100.000; 

total population, 9,241, 

128: 

Offenses known -- 

Offenses cleared by arrest . 
Persons charged 



Total 



OROVP IV 

264 cities. 25,000 to 50.000; 

total population, 9,296,- 

665: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest- 
Persons charged - . 



GRorp V 

594 cities, 10.000 to 25,000; 

total population, 9,426.- 

284: 

Offenses known — 

Offenses cleared by arrest . 
Persons charged 



GROUP VI 

894 cities under 10,000; total 
population, 6,227,470: 

OlTenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest- 
Persons charged — 



100.0 
23.6 
18.9 



100.0 
23.2 
19.4 



100.0 
24.7 
20.8 



100.0 
26.0 
21.9 



100.0 
30.6 
26.9 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
negli- 
gent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



100.0 
94.8 
94.8 



100.0 
95.0 
92.8 



100.0 
92.5 
92.9 



100.0 
94.9 
105.6 



100.0 
90.6 
86.3 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



100.0 
93.6 
72.7 



100.0 
80.3 
67.9 



100.0 
82.6 
85.4 



UK). 
94.7 
94.7 



100.0 
93.6 
88.5 



For- 
cible 
rajK- 



100.0 
75.3 
87.3 



100. 
73.8 
82.7 



KM), I) 
80.8 
87.6 



100.0 
83.6 
91.8 



100.0 
83.2 
96.1 



Kob- 
bery 



100.0 
39.1 
44.3 



1(X).0 
40.1 
49.0 



100.0 
43.4 
55.5 



100.0 
44.1 
55.1 



100.0 
55.8 
71.7 



Aggra- 
vatc-d 
assault 



100.0 
76.4 
65.3 



100.0 
81.0 
84.0 



100.0 
86.3 
84.2 



100.0 

85.8 
88.6 



100.0 
89.1 
SM. 5 



Bur- 

glary- 
breiik- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



100.0 
28.0 
20.7 



100.0 
28.1 
21.3 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



100.0 
31.9 
28.9 



100.0 
34.8 
35.6 



100.0 
17.7 
14.1 



100.0 
17.6 
14.2 



100.0 100.0 
32. 2 19. 2 
26. 7 15. 4 



100.0 
20.4 
15.3 



100.0 
25.1 
19.1 



Auto 
theft 



100.0 
27.4 
21.2 



100.(1 
27.1 
23.3 



100.0 
35.2 
31 7 



100. 
41.4 
39 2 



100.0 
50 4 
51.1 



76 



I'nisi-t-iititm), I'f.'iH, /»>■ i'.t'tmrupiiir Hiiisitnis. .\iiiiihrr /»<t IOO hnnirii 



(ifocniphic (llvLsloii 



Tot 111 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Mur- 

tllT, 

iionni>K' 
llK<-nt 
mull- 

slaiiRli- 



Mikii- 
slaiieli- 
tt-r hy 
n»'Kll- 



Forcl- 
l>lf 
rape 



Kol)- 
Jwry 



AK»rni- 

Vttt4'<l 

ossuiill 



Hur- 
Klury— 
bn'ttk- 
Ine or 

I'lltlT- 
illK 



Lar- 

ci'iiy— 

theft 



TOTAL ALL DIVISIONS 

I.WM citif,-;: ti.tal poiniliilinii, 

Offensps known . . .. 

Offenses rleared by arrest. . 
Persons charged 

NKW KM. IJIM> STATES 

IM citiw: totnl iK>|)ulHtion, 
A.fi7K.:M2: 

OtTeii.'ips known.. . 

oiIi'ii.M's cU'ariNl by arrest.. 
rers<)n.«i fharj;e<l- . 

\llt>l>I.E .\TI..\NTK STATE.S 

H"^ r'nws: total population, 
ly.'l-.'.OH: 

<)tIpnM>s known 

oilenjies rleare<l by arrest., 
rcnum.'i ctmrKed 

EA.HT NORTH 1 ENTHAI STATE.S 

4fiO cities: total {Mipulation, 
19.J«»i.4l»<: 

OfIen.se.<i known 

Offen.'ios cleared by arrest. . 
1'erson.s i-hnrRe*! . . 

WE-ST NORTH 1 ENTRAI. STATES 

231 cities: total population, 

f..yir.l.'J 



•til by arrest. 
v:od 



SOITTR ATLANTIC STATES ' 

75 rilies: total popuUtlon. 
7.>-.'.hll: 

f>(Ien.<«i known.. 

OfTenses cleared by arrest. 
Penona charKed 



EAST SOlTn I ENTRAI. STATES 

f» cii.-: I. til population, 



red by arrest. 

Vt-rMtit.-. iiiiirKed 



WE-ST SOVTM TENTRAL STATES 

III rlties; total population, 

f,. I'H.Ml 



100.0 
36.4 
80.6 



• I by arrest.. 
atl 



100.0 
23.0 
22.2 



100.0 
2fi.S 
21.0 



100.0 
28.9 
19.7 



100.0 
23.9 
15.1 



100.0 
32.4 
33.2 



100.0 
25.0 
25.5 



100. n 

29. 1 

|U. 4 



100.0 
03.6 
94.0 



100.0 
90.1 
85,9 



100. 
93. K 
lO.'i.O 



100.0 
89.6 
88.9 



100. 
91.1 
59.1 



100.0 
97.7 
101. 1 



100.0 
97.5 
08.0 



100.0 

94. H 



100.0 
80. 8 
76.7 



100.0 
73.0 
78.8 



100.0 
42.7 
42.8 



100.0 
78.0 
06.7 



100.0 
29.7 
21.3 



100.0 
20.2 
IS.O 



100.0 
83.8 
87.7 



100.0 
94.3 
Ill.l 



100.0 

86.5 
64.1 



100.0 
93.6 
35.9 



100.0 
94.5 
113.4 



100.0 
95.2 
83.3 



100.0 
87.2 



100.0 
77.8 
101. 5 



100.0 
72.4 
98.6 



100.0 
73.3 
59.0 



100.0 
75.6 
41.3 



100.0 
81.5 
119.3 



100.0 
72.3 

84.5 



lUU.O 
76.3 



100.0 
39.5 
70.7 



100,0 
43. 6 

.12. 



100.0 
44.4 
31.9 



100.0 
34.0 
19.7 



100.0 
47.2 
68.1 



100.0 
44.9 
.VI. 9 



100.0 
44.1 



100.0 
79.7 
90,4 



100.0 
76.1 

77.8 



100.0 
78.1 
43.7 



100.0 
73.6 
25.9 



100.0 
85.2 
86.6 



100.0 
83.6 
08.3 



100.0 
82.4 



100.0 
25.1 
24.1 



100. 
28.5 
19.8 



100.0 
33.6 
20.3 



100.0 
27.4 
17.4 



100.0 
33.2 
32.0 



100.0 
26.7 
23.3 



100.0 
.32.0 

19. S 



100.0 
19.9 
17.fi 



100.0 
19.6 
11.9 



100.0 
22.0 
1.5.6 



100.0 
19.3 
12.6 



100.0 
24.2 
24.9 



100.0 
20.0 
20.6 



100.0 
23.7 



.See footnote at ('nd of tabb 



77 



Tuble Hi. — OJfrn.ses /vnoirrt, Clt-nrrtl hy Arrest, anil /'rrstms Cluir^vil {livid for 
I'raseriititm), 1958, by (weugraphiv Divisions, dumber jht 100 Knoicn 
Ojjrttsfs — (°.<>iitiiiiir«l 





Total 


Criminal homi- 
cide 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
Ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Oi'ogruphlc division 


Mur- 
der, 
nonneg- 
ligcnt 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


MOr.STAIN STATES 

101 cities; total population, 
2.6a3,9K.'i: 

OlTiTisfts known 

OlTi'ti.sivs cleared by arrest . 


100.0 
2:1.4 
19.3 

100.0 
20.0 
15.1 


100.0 
91.4 
78.5 

100.0 
91.2 
90.7 

1 


100.0 
96.5 
52.6 

100.0 
81.8 
50.2 


100.0 
74.0 
61.7 

100.0 
62.3 
45.6 


100.0 
43.9 
38.5 

100.0 
37.8 
38.3 


100.0 
75.8 
61.3 

MO.O 
70.0 
47.1 


100.0 
30.9 
23.0 

100.0 
24.7 

17.8 


100.0 
18.5 
15.7 

100.0 
15.4 
11.2 


100.0 
25.6 
22.3 


PAdFIC STATES 

22.'i cities; total population, 
7.4!»0,:i27: 
Offenses known 


100.0 


Offenses cleared by arrest. . 
Persons charged . _ 


24.7 
22.0 







' Includes the District of Columbia. 



Tul>I«- I \. — \ur»i/j«'r of I* or sans Finiml (Guilty per 100 Peraons Foriiuilly iliariivil 
by the Police, 1958; 198 Cities Over 25,000, Total Population :i8,0O7,281 



Offense 



TOTAL 



Criminal homicide; 

(a) Murder and nonncpligcnt manslaughter. 

(b) .Manslaughter by negligence 

Hobbcry 

AgRravatcd assault 



Other assaults 

Burglary —breaking or entering . 



Larceny -theft 
Auto theft 



Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Forcible ra|)e 



I'rostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory rape). 

Narcotic drug laws. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Offen.-ics against family and children. 

Liquor laws 

Uriviiic while intoxicated 

Trallie and motor vehicle laws 

I lisorderly conduct 

Mriinkeruiess. 

\'at'r:incy . 

Uainliling 

All other offenses 



Xumber of persons 



Charged 

(held for 

I.TOsecu- 

tion) 



100.0 



100 (I 
IIHV (I 
UK), (t 
KNI. II 

1IKI II 
■IKI (I 

KHI 
!IHI. 

HKI. 
IIHI. II 
IIHI II 
KKI (I 

IIHI II 
KHI. (1 
IIMI. 
UNI. (I 

IINIII 
UMI. 
lUO II 
1(X). f. 
IIKI. (I 
IIKI II 
IIMI. II 
l("l 
10(1.0 



Found guilty 



Total 
guilty 



.19. .5 
M. 5 
1)0. H 
11. «< 



71.0 
tV( 



."iO. 


i> 


(W. 





()5 


,1 


(k?. 


s 


59 


1 


f)9. 


.{ 


80 8 


m. 


7 


CO. 


:t 


7K 


1 


r.i. 


8 


7:(. 


s 



Offense 


Lesser 


charged 


offense 


66.4 


0.6 


45.0 


14.^ 


25.1 


5.4 


49 7 


U.l 


27.4 


14.4 


48.7 


3.6 


na.i 


11.7 


66.7 


4.3 


5«.2 


7.8 


56.3 


6.2 


41.4 


4.2 


62.1 


10.6 


;«.9 


11.7 


49.4 


1.2 


02. 5 


5.5 


62. 6 


2.0 


,18.5 


4.8 


57. 5 


1.6 


67.8 


1.5 


73 3 


7.5 


66. ;i 


.4 


59. 6 


. 7 


7H 


.4 


r.l.o 


.8 


44. 4 


. ( 


72 7 


11 



7H 



OD^'usrs in Imlivithnil iituis 

TJif niiiiilxT ol odciisi's rcporlcd as liiniii;^ hccii (■(•iniiiil led (liirii)<^ 
I lie jx'iiod of .Inmiaiy Dcccinlx'r. I!)")S, is sliown in inhlc I"). The 
rompilalioii includes llic reports received from police depml iiicrils 
ill cities willi more (iiaii 'J.'), 000 inlinbilaiils. Police admiiiisl ralors 
and oilier iiilercsled iiidi\idiials will prol>al)ly find il desiral)le to 
coinj)are llic crime rates of llieii- cities with the a\era;^e rales shown 
ill tahh' S of this piihlicat ion. Similarly, they will douhlless desiro 
to make comparisons with the li<i:nres for their commnnit ies for prior 
periods, in order l«> deleriniiie whether there has Ix-cit an increase or 
a decrease in the amount of crime committed. 

Caution sliould he exercised in eom|)ariii<j; crime data for individual 
cities hocrtuso tho di(r>'reiicos in t.he fi«;iire!> may he duo to rt vrtriely 
of factoi-s. Such com puiisons are not necessarily si gnificant, even 
though the li«;ures for indivitlual < onmiunilies are eonverte<l into terms 
of numher of olTenses per 100.000 inhal)itants. 

The following is a list of some of the factors w Inch aOecl the aiiiouni 
;ind \\])o of crime in the community: 

l*oj)ulation of the city and meti"oj)o]itan ai<'a adjacent thereto. 

Tho composition of the popnlalion with reference |)articularly to 
ajre, se.\. and race. 

The economic status and activities of tjie popuhition. 

Relative stahility of po|)uI:ition. 

(■linnite. 

Kducational. i-ecrcatioiial, and icli^iou> facilities. 

The mimber of police employees per unit of j)op\dation. 

The standards i;overnin<r appointments to the police force. 

The j)olicies of the jjrosecut iii»; oflicials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

Till' de«rree of efliciency of the local law enforcement ajjency. 
In considering' the volume of crime commit ted locall}'. it is «jenerally 
more iinj)ortant to determine whether the figrures for a given com- 
munity show iiKicases or decreases than t(^ ascertain whether they 
exceed or fall short of those for some other individual communitN. 
and it should be renn'mbered that tln' amount of crime conunit ted in a 
<'onimunify is not solely chargeable to the polic(> but is ralli(>r a charg<' 
against the entire community. 

In publishing these figun'S, the FBI a<'ts as a service agency. The 
figures pnl)lished are iho<e submitted by th(^ contributing agencies. 



79 



'J'lil.lr I'). — \iinihrr nf Offrnsrs kiioirn l» ihr I'nliir, J*f58, Cities ihvr 23,000 

in I'upiilutiafi 



Pity 



Criminal bomicido 



AMli'iu'. Tex 

AliliiKton. Pa 

Akron, Oliio 

Aliimi-<la. Calif 

Alimny, Oa 



Alhiiny, N'.Y 

Alliiuiuorfiuo, X. Mez. 

AlrxaiKlria, La 

Alexaiulria, Va.. 

Alhamhrn. Cailf 



Alifiuippa, Pa 

Alliii I'ark, Mich. 

AllfUlowii, Pa 

AlliaiuT, Ohio 

Alton, III 



Altoona, Pa 

Amarlllo, Tex 

Amos, Iowa 

Amherst. X.Y 

Amsterdam. -V.Y 



An;ilieim, Calif.. . 

Anderson, Ind 

Ann Arhor, Mich. 
Annapolis, Md — 
Anniston, Ala 



Appleton, Wis.. . 
Arcadia, Calif.... 
Arlington, Mass. 
Arliniiton, Va — 
Asheville, X.C... 



Ashland, Ky 

Ashtabula, Ohio... 

Athens, Oa 

Atlanta, Oa 

Atlantic City, NJ. 



Atlleijoro, Mass. 
Auburn, Maine.. 
Auburn, N'.Y — 
August a, Oa. ... 
.\urora, Colo 



.\urora. III. 

Austin, Mlun 

Austin, Tex. .- - 

Hakersfleld, (5iJlf.. . 
Baldwin Park, Calif. 



Hiilllniore, Md... 

HiiiiKor, Maine 

Hart>erton, Ohio. 
Hartlesville, Okla. 
Haton KouRO, La. 



Matlle Creek, Mich. 

Hay City, Mich 

Uayonne, N'.J 

Haylown, Tex 

Heaumont, Tex 



Melleville. Ill 

Helleville, X.J 

HellinKham, Wash. 

Belmont, NIa.'W 

Belolt, Wis 



Murder 
anil non- 
neclifient 

nian- 
.slaupliter 



100 
1 
2 



Man- 
dauKh- 
ter by 
m-Rli- 
tsence 



Forrible 
r.ipe 



Rob- 
bery 



22 



11 

2 

3()3 

15 

1.5 

20 
74 
35 
32 

28 

4 
7 

18 
6 

11 

3 
33 




383 
67 



1 

1 

15 

10 

17 
3 
2fi 
57 
15 

798 

2 



1 

42 

II 
8 

18 
4 

56 

3 

5 
2 
2 
16 



30 

5 

127 

2 



40 
66 
14 
276 
28 

19 
3 
9 



12 
156 

2 
1 

10 
11 
14 

108 



03 
lO.-i 

3 

1 

62 

628 

133 



177 
1 



260 
55 
39 

2,224 

1 

1 

1 

151 

?a 

8 

37 

35 

303 



462 
126 
1,.'>33 
133 
231 

494 
1,000 
274 
502 
382 

41 

172 
232 
60 
121 

182 
462 

40 
171 

13 

418 
276 
177 
142 

256 

91 
275 

67 
414 
224 

103 

.58 

106 

3,919 

886 



40 

33 

341 



954 
480 
273 

3,807 
55 
72 
37 

1,049 

,304 
246 
197 
117 
899 

150 
125 
85 
99 
132 



187 
88 

762 
57 
68 

117 
970 
70 
237 
367 

42 
111 
140 
28 
47 

50 
451 

40 
133 

31 

404 
86 
476 
100 
128 

41 
191 
32 

660 

2:j6 

32 

40 

73 

2,157 

376 

77 
37 
30 
128 
95 

127 

o2 

202 

.Sf>5 

(A 

3,923 

61 

.M 

51 

534 

108 
74 

196 
86 

322 

69 
23 
147 
■50 
47 



1,501 
198 

3.977 
675 
197 

.5;j9 
3. 413 

4.58 
1.315 

740 

103 
336 
626 
275 
515 

174 

1.844 

145 

321 

72 

1.169 
401 

1.011 
405 
395 

764 
527 
128 
1.447 
Ctrl 

251 
2H4 
161 
7.717 
.VKI 

131 
.50 
l.T 
.518 
3.50 

.5.58 

.550 

3.250 

1..5W 

369 

7.729 
326 
320 
147 

1,479 

768 
810 
.300 
143 
1.619 

1H4 
flO 
4U) 
VM 
42.5 



80 



Tilhlr I'l. — \M;fi/»«r <»/" Oj^r/iM-.s hinmit /«» tin- I'ltliir. I'f.'tH. i.illis Oirr J.l.DOO 
ill Populiitiati — < '.ontiiiiK'd 





Crlniliml homicide 


Kordble 
n»p«< 


Rob- 
bery 


AcRra- 
valed 
assimlt 


Bur- 
Kliiry— 
break - 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larwny— theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
ncKllRi'nt 

muii- 
slauRhter 


.Man- 
slauKli- 
ter by 
neKll- 
Kence 


IMand 
over 


Cnder 
$.10 


Auto 
theft 


lU'iiton llnrl»<>r, MIfh. .. 
Hi'rk.-lr> . Ciillf 

MtTW >ll, III . . 

HfS.s«>mt'r, AIn 

lU'lhK'lioni. I'a 

IWv€>rlv, Miiss 


1 


1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

11 


2 

ao 

1 
1 

2 

1 
3 

47 

1 

? 
64 

"l 

•■5 

5 

2 
3 

1 
1 

Ifi 
9 


27 
78 
29 
12 

.^ 

2 
1.') 

1 

1S9 
3 
3 

5 
5 

.1 
1 
4 
.■>23 
1 

4 

5 
38 

14 

4 

10 
3 
3 
9 

191 
48 
5 
2 


10 
66 

1 

145 

3 

1 

; 

79 
1 

433 

2 

5 
2 

12 

9 

211 

448 

15 
•y 

69 
3 

4 

4 

.'..■i 
11 
10 

247 
38 

33' 


l«i3 
614 
143 

192 
170 

26 
<M 
1H.^ 
1.S2 
\H) 

Z470 
66 
88 
193 
13«» 

215 
87 
42 
3.113 
20 

76 

8.54 
92 
23<5 

298 
l.W 
240 
97 
170 

1.1>>4 
.M3 
37 
71 
86 

115 
270 
918 
592 
13.5 

142 
195 
164 
WH 
364 

1.3.54 
76 

l..'i25 
134 
130 

290 
113 
14.295 
317 
83 

90 
1S6 
306 

1.87S 
68 


47 
172 
135 

.58 
113 

65 
52 
?22 
102 
103 

1,284 
24 
137 
106 
119 

166 
32 
25 
2.739 
73 

81 
34 

385 
.58 

169 

24 
78 
83 
39 
104 

380 

276 

17 

57 

78 

»4 
302 
519 
418 
101 

78 

163 

140 

482 

(') 

388 
70 
98 
73 
94 

151 
73 
8.996 
156 
112 

40 

90 

252 

1,141 

17 


.5.59 
1.725 
241 
199 
433 

216 

70 

1,287 

234 

600 

2.878 
333 
220 
419 
449 

.529 

348 

67 

4.155 

224 

97 
.584 
1.2.57 
136 
512 

2.S«i 
439 
362 
186 
215 

1,286 
693 
378 
303 
353 

559 

334 

1.127 

1.435 

488 

216 

9»B 

603 

1,456 

1,005 

2,016 
265 

1,917 
124 
306 

355 
625 
10.267 
318 
179 

111 
353 
392 
4,352 
W 


37 
143 

NO 
73 
4i; 

2"J 


ll.v.rlv mils. Calif 

lUllliips, Mont 


1 
1 
1 
1 

45 


102 


lUloxl. Miss 

BliiK>i!Wi)lon, N'.Y 

BlrnilMffhani, Ala 


82 

m 
940 


Ulrniliikrliiim. Mich 


:io 


BlfH)iiin,l(I. \.J 






51 


Blouiiiiiicton, III 


1 
1 

1 


1 
34 


105 


Blooniliitcton, Ind.... 


M 


Boi<«>. MiUio 




Borurr, Ti'X 


4.1 


Hosskr City, La 


1 

27 


r, 


Boston. Mass 

Boulder, Colo 


4. .543 
21 


Brttlntr»>o, Ma'ss... 






39 


BronuTton, Wiisli 




2 
6 

1 
2 

3 
3 


42 


Mridpi'iHtrt, Conn.. 


2 

1 


3K.«; 


Bristol. Conn.. 

Brockton, Mass 


2'.t 
147 


Brookhiivm, N.Y 

Brooklliii'. Muss 


1 
1 
1 


87 
105 


Brownsville, Tex 


IW. 


Bryun, Tex 


32 


Bijenu Park, Calif 


1 

10 
2 


2 

23 
3 


55 


BiilT.d... V. Y 

Biirbiink. Calif 


1,607 
239 


Burlliictim, Iowa 


16 


BurllnKtnn, \.C 


1 






42 


Burllninon, Vt 






97 


Butte. Mont 




3 
6 
6 


8" 

28 
S 


14 
32 
149 

75 
2 

3 

24 

>*\ 
"2 

128 
2rt 

71 

5 

7,319 

40 

8 

3 

13 

78 

243 


28 
12 
301 
15 
31 

3 
1 
13 

72 
117 

iMI 
42 
IC.7 

216 

2 

a 9112 

79 

1 

io' 

14 

288 
1 


127 


Cumbrlilue, Mass 




2X3 


Camden. N'.J 


3 

4 


672 


Canton, Ohio 


339 


CarLobn.l, \. Mei 


4.'i 


Casper, Wyo 


4 


3" 


2 

2" 

15 

4 

9 
1 

1 

1 

5 

532 

5 

1 


•■12 


Cp<lar Hapids. Iowa 


72 


ChamiKilKn, III 




64 


Charloton, .-^.C 

Charleston, W. Va 


7 

21 
3 

28 

1 


4 
1 

9 

18* 

2 

I 

1 

107 

4 
1 


179 
216 


Ch ,rl,,tT.. \ r" 


346 


Va 


21 


iin 

CliritclihiiUl, V». .......... 


33.^ 
42 


rr.-.-.r I'n 


4 


166 
45 


Wyo 


11. :.:..:: 


805 


4 7«io 


;l.l|thtS. Ill 


98 


Clitcu|Hi', .Mass 




50 


rt, :' ,,,ti,o. Ohio 




12 


•1, Calif. 


• 


1 
8 

24 
1 


8 

m' 

1 


63 




166 


:i. Ohio 

Clofk.-l.tirK'. W v.. 


» 


918 
44 



.scf footnot*v< at ••ml of table. 



81 



I'uhlv 1.".. — .Nu/;i/><r «»/ (fjfrn.sfs Knnnn In tlu- Pulire, 1958, Citit'.t Out 25,000 
in Population — (Continued 





Criminal homicide 


ForclbU 
rape 


• Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vatffl 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
Ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 




City 


Murder 
an<l non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 

; slaugh- 

1 lerby 

negU- 

genoe 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


rii'urwiiler, FIb 


2 
73 






4 
1,107 
3 
8 
3 

21 

1 

27 

31 

414 

126 

5 

1 

76 

6 

8 
32 

3 
49 

6 

17 

403 

7 

4 

20 

9 

25 

224 

21 

53 

1 
17 


36 
524 

17" 

16 

64" 

46 
742 

122 
2 

""476" 
16 

4 

4 

7 

34 

2 

1 

594 
3 
2 

78 

'"""225" 
96 
23 

4 

2 

5 

327 

43 

""4." Its' 
33" 

15 
85 
120 
4 
8 

1 

1 

6 

22 

1 

4 

106 

2" 

6' 

78 
139 

8 
103 

1 


198 
2,939 
143 
153 
62 

317 
108 
598 
580 
2,647 

1,079 
135 
26 

1,324 
122 

191 
261 
250 
312 
106 

94 

4,297 

167 

39 

241 

152 
411 
1, 513 
508 
779 

32 
559 

61 
4,782 
1.202 

67 
14. 187 
110 
598 
152 

420 
197 
281 
116 
130 

100 
23 

85 
566 
113 

137 
599 

26 
110 

42 
182 

120 
1.H89 
114 
412 
112 


106 

1,026 

61 

102 

86 

236 

37 

391 

152 

1,995 

946 
23 
67 

381 
27 

142 
191 
281 
263 
42 

155 
868 
125 
18 
145 

96 
106 
446 
340 
367 

33 

l.W 

84 

2,374 

745 

80 

3,703 

26 

422 

146 

301 

m 

448 
99 
177 

80 
16 
25 
192 
75 

132 
386 
27 
45 
43 
38 

64 

658 
76 

486 
99 


476 
14,146 
268 
624 
431 

936 
394 

1,708 
538 

5,686 

1,738 
667 
117 

1,905 
287 

628 
458 
577 
400 
183 

342 
10, (M2 
301 
100 
430 

640 
1,365 
2.192 

845 
2.684 

138 

863 

270 

6.382 

2.258 

203 

29,455 

147 

1,070 

666 

1,618 
759 
756 
311 
691 

246 
88 
199 
686 
158 

301 
442 
38 
210 
376 
367 

180 
3,928 

286 
1,051 

216 


37 


('U'Vi<l;ini|, Ohio. 


18 

1 
8 

1 

i" 

3 
12 

3 

1 
1 
6 


60 

i' 

7 
1 
5 
9 
60 

29 

9" 

6 

i' 

2 
3 


2,326 
46 
85 


Clovclund Heights, Ohio... 
Cllflon. \.J 


Clinton, Iowa 




18 


Coloniflo Springs, Colo 

Columblu, Mo 


2 

1 
6 
7 
19 

6 

1 


140 
61 


ColuniM;», 8.C 


251 


Columbus, Oa 


100 


Columbus, Ohio 


1 219 


Compton, Calif 


669 
48 


Concord, Cnllf 


Concord. -N'.H 


16 


Corpu.s ChrLsll, Tex 

Costa Mesa, Calif 


6 


387 
32 


Countil Bluffs, Iowa 

Covinpton, Ky 


3 
3 


1 

r 


110 
217 


Cranston, R.I 


80 


Culver City, Calif. 




89 


Cumberland, Md 


1 




43 


riivahoga Falls, Ohio 




1 
40 
1 
1 
3 

6 
9 
12 
7 
6 


25 


Dallas, Tex 


82 


61 


1 620 


Dalv Citv. Calif 


171 


Danbury, Conn 






25 


Danville, 111 


I 

5 
1 

19 
4 
2 


1 

8" 

1 
9 


62 


Danville, Va 


68 




l.'>8 


Dayton, Ohio . .. 


589 


Daytona Beach, Fla 


101 
372 


Decatur, Oa 


15 


Decatur, III 


4 


1 


i 


121 


Denton, Tex s 


22 


Denver, Colo. 


23 

6 


4 
3 


106 
14 


917 
78 

4 

3,367 
2 

33 
8 

16 
25 
67 
12 
22 

3 

1 

12 
18 

4 

1 
278 
1 
4 
1 
8 

10 
122 

4 

107 

5 


*> 445 


Des Moines, Iowa 


312 


Des Plaines, III 


14 


Detroit. Mich 


110 
2 
2 


14 


237 
3 
13 


6,029 
22 


Dothan, Ala 


Downev, Calif 


116 


Dubuque. Iowa 


86 


Duluth, Minn . . 


2 

8 

7 


1 
2 

i" 


r 

9 

2 

I 
1 


163 


Durham, N'.C 

East Cliicago, Ind 


106 
220 


East Cleveland, Ohio 


36 


Eiist Detroit, Mich 




90 


East Hartford, Conn 






38 


East Lansing, Mich 






12 


East Llviri>ool Ohio 






45 


F^ast Onmpe, N'.J 


1 
7 


4 


3 


148 


East Point, Oa 


48 


East Providence, R.I 


3 
9 


2 

28 


36 


F:aat .St. I»ulB, 111 


9 


345 


Eastehcster, .\.Y 


6 


Easton, Pa 








34 


EauClalro. Wis 


2 

6 

2 
10 






28 


El Cajon, Calif 


1 

13" 

1 
11 


1 

20 

1 

16 
1 


69 


El Dorado, Ark 


19 


El Pa.so, Tex 


1, 142 


Elgin. Ill 


38 


Elizabeth, N.J 


4 

1 


292 


Elkhart, Ind 


42 



82 



'I"iil»l«- l.'). — .\iiinlu-r Iff OXfrii.^rf. hiiiniii l,> llir I'ltlirc, I'l.'tH, i.il'u'H ihvr 2a,UU0 
in I'opiiltitiim — < oiil iiiiirti 



City 



Crlmlnul homioldr 



Mur.liT 
aiKl non- 
nexllKi'iii 

man- 
slaughter 



Kluilmrst, 111.. 
Klnilm, N'.Y 
KlyrUi. Ohio 
KllKli'wood, Colo 
Kn(!l«'Woo<l, N.J. . 

KiiUI, Okla... 

Krlo, I'u 

Kuj-lltl, Ohio - . 
KuRrno, On'B 
Kiinka, Calif 



Rvaiistoii, 111.. 
Kvaii.-ivlU.'. IiKl 
Kv.-n-tt, Ma,>yi. 
Kvrntt, \Vx<h 
Fair Ijiwn, X.J 

Kalrtl.-l.l. Conn 

Fairmont. A\ .Va 

Fall Hlvir, Muss 

FarKo. N'. Dak 

Fay.tt.-vlll.-, N'.C 



K.rn.liilf. Mich.. 
' M.IUiy, Ohio... 
f !• Iiliiin;, Ma«S. 

I Uiit, Mich 

Kloniur, 8.C ... 



Fond ■!» I-ac, Wis 

Fort l)(Hl(ri", Iowa 

Fort I^inil<r.laU', Fla. 

Fort Smith. .\rk 

Fort Wayne, Ind 



Fort Worth. Tex 

Fruinliiirhani, Mass... 

Fn'«i><>rt, III.. 

Fnt'iMirt, N'.Y 

Fr»-.<no. Calif 



Fulfcrtoi). Calif.. 
Gadsden, .KU ... 
(}aln«svllU>. Kla. 
Oak-shun:, 111 .- 
Galveston, Tex.. 



Gar>l.-nCUy, Mich 

Ganlen Orove Calif 
Oarlena, Calif 

Oarflild.N.J 

Garfield HelKhU, Ohio. 

Garland, Tex.. 

Gary, Ind 

Gastonla, N.C 

Olen<Uk>. Calif . 
GloQCfster, Milm. . . 

Clftl.M..,r,. V ( 

(i- 

«ir-.. . ! 

Grwi.l Kuiml-. .Mkl> 

Or>!i I. ("if. Ill 



\l!in- 
>laui!li- 
ter by 
neifll- 
Rence 



Korclhlr 
ni|>e 



42 



.>ul., N.V.. . .1 
'•otnot(>« at end of table. 



Hot) 
Ix-ry 



I Hur- 
.\i;k.Tii- ! Rlury — 
vati'd hreak- 
hiR or 
enter- 
hiR 



M 

\:m 

71 
IDK 
IIU 

.'* 

I'.U 
.'i3 

l.V) 
»3 

144 

130 
173 
137 



Loroeny- theft 



l-Mland 
over 



1 1 17 

Complete data not recilve<l ' 
II 
2 
29 



38 



ao 



10 
3 

g 

178 




1 

35 
18 
31 

294 

5 

14 

f, 

118 

10 
1 
15 
3 

74 

4 

30 
42 
2 
10 

2 

2.S1 

3 



2 
414 



1 
10 
97 
fi2 
34 

114 
2 



3« 

81 
94 
30 
2 
34.S 

1 
24 
29 

f> 



28 
3AA 
102 



107 
27 
121 

:io 

44 

23."i 
19 

2K4 

100 

309 

.Ml 

60 

81 

79 



I'nder 



194 
372 
IMI 
411 
.M 

4«19 
1,277 
483 
H)V2 
ONI 

8.')! 
1.753 
107 
875 
2«->8 



299 


322 


715 


K2 


77 


.VIO 


39« 


4 


836 


172 


124 


381 


KN) 


37 


319 


ItV, 


H9 


405 


1.1H7 


1.235 


2. 6.52 


80 


tW 


164 


89 


2« 


393 


122 


103 


160 


519 


478 


I.:i04 


218 


134 


543 


4S(I 


439 


2.151 


2.913 


899 


.5.680 


107 


66 


96 


57 


an 


234 


192 


147 


369 


676 


825 


2.221 


213 


223 


682 


■222 


100 


272 


184 


91 


481 


83 


39 


411 


700 


443 


764 


124 


51 


.VM 


277 


249 


649 


247 


427 


.163 


f» 


lU 


166 


HO 


6 


232 


132 


62 


327 


1.325 


872 


1.845 


146 


36 


603 


774 


423 


1.S38 


75 


87 


107 


92 


NO 


336 


UH 


34 


.586 


93 


.^3 


370 


154 


139 


415 


908 


snu 


2.W5 


177 


14 


431 


ia« 


ins 


605 


iia 


.54 


6a« 


147 


11» 


391 


118 


M 


208 



sa 



'llll.lr I. 



. — \iiiiilnT Iff OJJfUsrs Kmiuii In tin- I'tilirr 
in I'opulatiuii — CuiitiiiutMl 



]<>.-,H. f.'.MVN (tirr 



,000 



City 



Criminal liomicidc 



Murder i Miui- 
uiul non- sliiui;)!- 
nefEllgenl tiT hy 
man- i negll- 
slaufEhti-r g^nce 



Forcible 
ra(>e 



Rob- 
bery 



Bur- 
Aggra- (slary— 
vated break - 
a.Hsault ' inc or 
enter- 
ing 



j Larceny— theft 




(irri'iislioro, X.C- 

(irrrliville, MlsS 

(ir.cnvUlf, S. C 

( iriTiiwIch, Conn 

(irotoii, Cdiin 



Il^ickriisiick, N.J. 
lliit-'crstown^ Md. 

Hiitiiltdii, N .J 

lliniilloii. Otiio... 
ilainiiiond, Ind... 



H:impton, Va 

Ilanitnimck, Mich. 

Hirlinncn, Tox 

11 irrislmrp, Pa 

Hartford. Conn 



Mastinps, Ni-hr 

lliittUshtirp, Miss. 

llavcrford, Vi\ 

HaviThill, Mass... 
Ilawtliorno, Calif.. 



Havward. Calif ... 
Ha/cl Park, Mich. 

Ilazliton, Pa 

Henipstcad, K.Y.. 
Hial.ah. Fla 



Hit'h Point, N.C 

Hit-'hland Park. Mich. 

llol.okin, X.J 

llnllywood, Fla 

llolvdki-. Mass 



Honolulu City, Hawaii. 

lloi Springs, Ark 

Houston. Ti'x 

llimlint'ton, \V. Va 

Hiuitint;ton Park, Calif. 



lliintsville, Ala 

Hutchinson. Kans. 
Idaho Falls. Idaho. 
Indi iMiulintf, Mo 
Indiatiapolis, Ind.. 



lni;lf\vood, Calif.. 

Inkslor, Mich 

Iowa City. Iowa.. 
Irondrquoll. N'.Y. 
lr\ inp, Ti'X 



Irvington, N.J. 
Ithaca, .\.Y.... 
.Jackson, Mich. 
Jackson, Miss.. 
Jackson, Tcnn. 



Ja<-ksonvillc, Fla 

jMnicsi/)wn, .N'.Y 

J«ncs\ illo, \Vis 

JciTcrson City, Mo. 
Jcrsi'y City, N.J 



Johnson City, Tenn. 

Johnstown, Pa 

Jolict, 111 

Jo|)lin, Mo 

Kalaniatoo, Mich 



117 

5 



22 



23 



6 
.■jl 
137 

4 

13 

3 

6 

28 

26 
11 



25 
33 

5 
67 
15 
12 

2 

85 
18 
597 
50 
48 

1 

5 

6 

13 

654 

45 
28 



463 
2 
6 
1 

119 

5 
10 
21 

5 
10 



6 
55 
43 

95 
18 
94 
17 
194 



25 



1.130 
168 
20 

4 
11 
2 
1 
301 

31 
28 



1 
14 

7 
4 

49 
74 
6 

290 
7 



5 
176 



539 
114 
650 
87 
37 

165 
220 
1G4 
267 
610 

447 
167 
273 
456 
1,030 

12 
219 

75 
2.33 
340 

273 
236 
44 
146 
304 

129 
504 
199 
175 
147 

3.4.V4 
222 

7.790 
363 
443 

200 

93 

194 

121 

2.936 

782 

331 

43 

80 

105 

278 
63 
102 
533 
200 

3.137 
41 
63 
61 

1.011 

215 
223 
122 
160 
367 



285 
102 
340 
52 
34 

65 

89 

155 

202 

506 

353 
194 

106 
227 
656 

12 
91 
92 
63 
214 

263 
147 
41 
145 
141 

49 
300 
44 
69 
104 

1.179 
123 

2,593 
199 
327 

(') 

62 

75 

235 

1.813 

511 
72 
42 
35 
83 

151 
59 
125 
120 
75 

1.609 

18 

61 

39 

346 

82 
107 

39 
122 
255 



1.020 
492 
895 
IU3 
36 

154 
493 
416 
666 
1.237 

858 
271 
490 
620 
1.583 

323 

182 
245 
2H4 
528 

892 
474 
136 
141 

405 

287 

1,030 

89 

616 

6.217 

362 

a 467 

678 
805 



402 
1,020 

445 
3.274 

1. 112 
625 
l&t 
169 
352 

483 
189 
359 
1, 2.S2 
312 

3.204 
118 
369 
162 
865 

327 
334 
436 
421 
1,323 



See footnoti's at end of tahh 



84 



Tal»l«- 1.'). — .Niiiii/mt iij (tj)'i-iisf> hiiinm U> llir I'ltlirr. I'i.'tH, i.itirs ifirr _'.S,00« 
in I'opii In tion—i '.on I i ii ueil 



Cliy 



Ktmkaki<<>, III 

Kiiiuiii|H)lbs, N.C 

Kmisiis fity, KttiM.. 

Kikii.siks City, Mo 

Kciumy, N.J 



Crimlruil liomiclilc 



Murder ^^un- 

aiid noil- sIuukIi- 

neRllRi'iit UT by 

nmii- ' noKli- 

HiaUKllttT R{>lltV 



Konoshn, Wis... 
Krtiiriiii;, Ohio. 
K.y \V,st. Kill . 
KiiiKSlon. N.Y . 
Kirkwood, Mo. 



Knowllle. Tiiiii. 

Kokoiiio, Ind 

La Criuv-i*', WLs.... 

La (fpimre, (Ju 

Lackiiwtuina, N.V., 



Lafuyotto, Ind 

Lrtfuycttc, La 

Lftkp CharU-s, La. 

Lnkcl'tiid, Kin 

Lakcwoud, Ohio.. 



Laiiouslor, Ohio. 

Lttiicitstor, Pa 

LaiLsiiip, Nlich... 

Laredo, Tei 

Lus Vi*ir!is, Ncv. 



Laun-1, Miss 

Liiwrriuv, Kiuis. 
Liiwrt'tin>, Miiss. 

Luu (on, Okhi 

Ijohunon, Pa 



Leoniin5trr, Mass. 
Lewiston, Maln<>.. 

I.,exinpton, Ky 

Llnia, Ohio 

Lincoln, Ncbr 



Lincoln Park. Mich. 

Linden, NJ 

Liltle Rotk, Ark 

Livonia, Mich 

Lock|K>rt, N.Y 



Ixjng Boflcta, Calif... 

Lonp Brach, .N.Y 

Lonit Branch, SJ 

Longvifw, Tvx 

Ix>ruin, Ohio 



Los .Mir.-Ir-;. Tnlir 

L<. > 

Lo.. !•« 

LuM-Kk, T>\ 



LyiichhurK. Vs., 

Lynn. Mass 

Lviiw .kmI, Calif. 

Mai-iiii. f 18 

Mndi.«on, Wis... 



MiiMrn. M:l'= 

M. II 

Mr , h. Calif. 

M 




1 
1 
3 
2 

las 

36 
3 
2 

12 

8 
2 
2 
« 
I 



Korclblo 
raiM* 



20 



150 

46 

5 



Roh- 
N-ry 



16 

1 

130 

SOU 

6 

3 
6 
2 
f> 
1 



Angra- 

VBll'd 

a».suiilt 



6 

89 
77 
178 



Bur- 
It iiiry— 
brcuk- 
InK or 
enitT- 
inR 



129 
100 
718 



US 
79 
f>\ 
U3 
13 

803 

2fil 

80 

67 

143 

217 
150 
liM 
123 
102 

130 
185 
246 
207 
607 

144 

78 
205 
286 



Larcc-ny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



Only 10 months received 



SI 
47 

117 

028 

82 

80 
31 
37 
55 
43 

273 
110 
52 
23 
70 

126 
81 
140 
111 
22 

57 
88 
197 
104 
182 

17 
07 
71 
95 



Un.ler 
$50 



Only 8 months receivwl 



1.028 

26 

4 

2 

7 

11 
1 



14 

123 

8 

1 

460 

5 

3 

5 

32 

4.622 

435 

30 

8 

53 

11 
34 

42 
38 
10 

8 
7 
8 



22 



11 

184 

12 



300 

8 

5 

11 

29 

6.354 
341 

18 



160 

1,133 

365 

84 

3.103 

85 

03 

54 

294 

31,123 

2,866 

426 

161 

1,284 

161 
557 
324 
570 

329 

103 
138 
302 
73 
234 



278 

255 

1,872 

3,340 

149 

568 
237 
79 
nil 
143 

1.227 
602 
454 
173 
195 



93 
285 
322 
462 

445 

640 
1,015 

380 
1.150 



111 

368 
171 

880 



2 


1 


76 


41 


166 


5 


3 


114 


72 


301 


73 


281 


674 


438 


1,310 


13 


10 


304 


254 


716 


6 


26 


313 


238 


1,716 



72 


411 


560 


1.944 


57 


054 


47 


219 


2.103 


3 1S4 


12 


431 


40 


30 


126 




102 


675 


22.513 


32,626 


1,713 


4,226 


95 


370 


170 


331 


410 


2.080 


37 


SOS 


291 


1,150 


301 


502 


343 


822 


240 


1,207 


41 


353 


01 


SIS 


151 


40S 


33 


24« 


171 


473 



85 



Ial> 



I.'). — NnfufxT itf i)JJ«-n.sv.s hiitmn tn thr Polivr, 1958, Citit's (tier 25,000 
ill I'opulutiaii — Continued 





Criminal homiride 


Forcible 
rai>e 


Rob- 
bery 


ARcrn- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
rIuO'- 
break- 
inR or 
enler- 

JHR 


Larcrny— theft 




City 


Murder 
and non 
neRliRint 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
sliiuph 
ter by 
ncRli- 
pcnco 


(50 and 
over 


Under 

$50 


Auto 
theft 


Miiple lleiKhts, Ohio 








6 

1 
5 
2 
8 

2 
20 
11 


6' 

4 

1 
4 
2 


92 
56 

145 
63 

130 

65 
141 
70 
79 
189 

126 

88 

2,863 

45 

150 

166 

193 

4,419 

1,067 

93 

90 
194 

69 
335 

98 

1,643 

3,449 

105 

122 

134 

1,674 

392 

98 

182 

77 

209 
156 
353 
294 
778 

71 
93 
69 
15 
180 

77 
417 
184 
96 
91 

2,158 

94 

62 

224 

142 

608 
263 

289 
received 
753 


38 
49 
61 

27 
166 

48 

11 

77 

5 

116 

114 

37 

1,107 

45 

149 

84 

45 

1,855 

650 

79 

64 
164 

63 
115 

93 

2,128 

1,948 

38 

95 

96 

378 
174 
89 
94 
33 

99 

83 

153 

168 

444 

45 
99 
60 
18 
315 

112 
39 

174 
64 
50 

1.007 
48 
38 
168 
130 

297 
123 
43 

281 1 


202 
56 
414 
393 
614 

2(M 

377 
140 
195 
369 

303 
145 
2,843 
186 
170 

344 

714 
6,054 
1,497 

270 

140 
607 
614 
944 
222 

6.357 

6.320 

224 

401 

788 

1.477 

1.485 

398 

809 

422 

317 
196 
812 
681 
1.281 

129 
348 

93 

49 

472 

411 
1.006 
714 
604 
304 

2.175 

203 

61 

853 

365 

1.156 
483 
615 

1,084 


18 






3 




10 


Mariettii, Oa 


3 


68 


Mnrion, Ind. 


1 


2' 


29 


Miirion, Ohio 




46 


Mason City, Iowa . 






46 


Mitssillon, Ohio .. 






1 

1 


47 


MnvwoiMl, III 


2 


1 

2 
2 


14 


McAllcn, Tex 


13 


McKci'.sf>ort, Pa 


4 


1 
1 


42 

1 
2 
190 
2 
4 

5 

11 

693 

45 

2 

1 
10 

2 
13 

1 

133 

389 

1 

10 

14 

103 

37 

5 

8 

3 

16 
6 
24 
18 

87 

3 
11 
2 


25 

"376' 
6 

7 

53 

5 

695 

11 

7 
6 

""'169' 

1 

404 
95 

i' 

209 
12 

i' 

5 

29 
6 
9 

20 
136 

1 
3 

2" 

4 

7 
2 
15 

3' 

205 
5 

24" 

32 
15 
69 
months 
68 


67 


Medford, Mass. 


81 


Melrose, Mass 






8 


Memphis, Tenn 


37 


17 


20 

1 


661 


Menlo Park. Calif 


31 


Meriden, Conn 






75 


Meridian, Nliss 


8 

2 

40 

2 


2 

is" 

4 
1 

3 
6 


1 
1 

10 
4 
2 

2' 


32 


Mesa, Ariz 


94 


Miami, Kla 

Miami Heach, Fla 

Miehipan Cit V, Ind 


1.347 
237 
37 


Middle! own, Conn 




20 


Middlctown, Ohio .. 


I 


158 


Midland, Mich 


40 


Mi<lliind, Tex 


3 


1 


3 
3 

58 
16 

1 
1 
2 

16 
2 
5 
3 

1 

6 
2 
10 
4 

1 


98 


Milford. Conn 


33 


M ilwaukee, Wis . 


11 

8 


18 
27 


1,421 


Minneapolis, Minn 

Minot, X. Dak 


1.648 

65 


Mishawaka, Ind - . 






4r< 


Missoula, Mont 






86 


Mobile. Ala 


24 


10 


406 


Modesto, Calif 


101 


Moline, 111 




2 

1 


67 




10 
1 


74 


Monroe, Mich 


28 


Monrovia, Calif . . 


61 






2 

1 

i' 


24 


M ont (hello, Calif. 




170 


Monterey Park. Calif 

Moiitt'omerv, Ala 


1 
11 


96 
205 




13 


Mount Clemens, Mich 


1 




4 

1 


53 
11 


Mount I'lciisunt, N.Y 






1 


Mount Vernon, N.Y 


3 




2 

4 
1 
2 


20 

9 
38 
10 
2 
2 

195 
3 

1 
21 
8 

19 
14 
13 
Only 11 
24 1 


125 
39 


Muneie, Ind 


3 
2 


s' 


134 


MuskcRon, Mich 


70 


MuskuKee Okla 


62 






7 
8 


1 
43 


66 


Nashville, Tenn 


M 
2 


942 




14 




1 


2 

1 


10 


National City, Calif 


1 
1 

1 


100 
33 


New Medford, Mass 


6 


7 


362 
68 


New Hrwnswick, N.J 




3 
21 


2 

5 


109 




3 




New Haven, Conn 


271 



86 



Tahlf 1.".. — .\tiiiibrr oj (>//«n.sr> Kniniii f«> //i«- /'«»/itr, I'JJS, iiilivs (Pitr :.'.>, t>«0 
in Population^-i'jontinuet\ 



City 



rrluilnnl iKiinlcUlo 



Mm 

kIuukIi 
lor by 

lU'Pll 
RI-IUV 



New Ki-it>>li>x(on, Pa. 
Ni'w l^iiKlon, Conn. . 

Nrw Orli'ikii!*, I^ 

N.w K.Mhollo. N.Y.. 
N.w York. N.Y 



\twrtrk. N.J... 
NiHitrk. Ohio 
Nrw liiiivh. N.Y 
Ni'»|M>rt, Ky . 
N.«|M.rt,K.I 



Ni«|M>rt Nows, Va. 

Ni'Wlmi, N!b.« 

MaKiin» KidLs. N.Y. 

Norfolk, Vb 

Norman, Oklu . .. 



Norrislown. I'a 

Norili H<>r)!«'n, N.J 

North l.ittl.' KiK'k. .\rk 

North MIhiuI. Kla 

North 'roimwiiiula, N.Y 



Nurthiuiiptoii, Mass. 

Nornrtlk, Conn 

Norwich, Conn .. 

Nor*'oo«l, Ohio 

Niithy, N.J 



Oak Park. ID 

Oak Park, Mich.. 
Oak Kiiltjo, T.'un. 
Oaklan.l. Calif ... 
Odessa, Tex 



Otden. I'tah 

Oklahoua City, Okla. 

Omaha, Nehr 

OnUrio, Calif 

Orance, NJ 



Orfauido. Fla... 
Oahkwh, WU 
Oituniwa. low^i 
OwpnsNim, Ky 
Omard. Calif . 




Padu. .1 . K\ 

Pal.. ■ 

Par 

Paj^ 

Park U:.l^>, l;i . 

P.irk. i-t.iir.-. \V. ^a. 



NJ.. 
t. HI 

\la.«. 



!•■ IV. 
T.u- 



ik.n. \.J 

I. Fla 

tK>y, N.y.".'" 
/, Va . . . 

rbuu City. All 



2 

3M 

1 
1 
2 



Kori'ihlr 
n»|X' 



4 32 

I )iily II iiionllis n>r<'ivril 



117 
I 

:2S 



I2U 
2 



iiob 
Ix'ry 



Ap;:rn 
voiiil 
Ms.>iaiili 



Miir- 
Kl:iry— 
hn'uk- 
inK or 
fntr>r- 

inK 



l.iirM-ny -tlu-fl 



VVlunU 



IriilM 



110 



I,IU1 


>-M 


4.417 


3. ttM 


:., 200 


u 


•M 


221 


ItH 


iw 


('>, (Mil 


io,ia<i 


;M, 092 


4(1. U71 


3.'.. M\ 


1»U 


R4(i 


4.03A 


2,401 


4,9.W 


7 




1IK2 


KH 


42y 


tt 


11 


i:>2 


111 


2W2 


11 


u 


H.'i 


lOU 


170 


1 


10 


113 


lOU 


3»4 


M\ 


117 


r.M 


447 


1,24« 


11 


3 


347 


2115 


:i3»l 


20 


m 


:M3 


.'■|<17 


7tk') 


•2f*\ 


KIO 


2,014 


1.223 


3, .^•V4 




s 


75 


176 


.w 


n 


a 


82 


61 


15«1 


It) 


u 


154 


12» 


I.VI 



1 

1 

Only 1 month ii'WiviHl 
130 
130 



2 


2 


1 


.. 


1 


t 1 


I'l 


1 1 

4 1 


•a; 




H 


7 




14 


4M 


1st) 


1)'. 


3U 


3) 


2d 


172 


100 


148 


tW 


12 


18 


~ 


10 


40 


3f>.i 


I 


2 


2 


6 


12 


17 


12 


.V) 


13 


.-k1 


l» 


1 


2 


7 


2 


2 


6 




6 




78 


31) 


n 


34 


11 


43 


06 


151 


12 


6 


5 


I 


3 




5 


4 


ai 


1T2 


08 


\» 


10 


2 


If. 


110 




12 



24 

215 
70 
tUi 
HO 

IU6 

00 

47 

2, .MO 

425 

212 
2,374 
1,000 

-221 
01 

S37 
I2K 
124 
2M5 
213 

280 
170 
117 
27 
42 

176 
112 
071 

no 

»4 

I.OfiO 

3B8 

00 

30 

116 

608 
rt&S 
243 

Hw 
1> 



83 


.S35 


44 


113 


20 


00 


170 


:<8i 


52 


110 


ra 


207 


54 


142 


53 


100 


137 


351 


20 


170 


lilO 


ft. 007 


221 


1,270 


1».7 


1.303 


2,180 


4.126 


:i41 


3. 4.19 


120 


.'i05 


75 


240 


550 


1.108 


.W 


031 


00 


337 


161 


.547 


143 


*)09 


77 


.-)00 


230 


1.030 


KO 


•251 


.S3 


344 


10 


24 


«7 


237 


57 


140 


73« 


2.246 


47 


732 


21)1 


182 


107 


03» 


241 


.V55 


40 


257 


56 


140 


27 


141 


»l 


1.173 


372 


2.127 


140 


371 


37 


284 


21 


56 



87 



Tahic lo. — Number of Ojjvtisrs hnnnn li> ihr I'alirr, 19.^8, Cities Over 25,000 
in i'optilation — ilontinueci 





Criminal homicide 


ForclbJe 
raiH) 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vate<l 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
break - 
Ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lorccn} 


-theft 


City 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


I'hila(lcli)hla, Pa 


117 
17 

4 
27 

1 

1 
3 
4 
1 


104 
17 

2 
67 

3 

2 


666 

33 

5 

94 

1 

1 
2 
4 


2.334 

202 

17 

884 

2 

13 
8 

25 
6 

33 

12 

2 

36 

341 

25 

92 

3 

6 

7 

127 

5 
40 
8 
7 
15 

3 

19 


3,286 

258 

51 

671 

4 

11 
35 
35 
6 
43 

6 

8 

23 

98 

21 

322 
4 
18 
13 

153 

io" 

3 
3 
23 

6 
348 


10. 874 

1,751 

202 

4.499 

114 

188 
232 
302 
.59 
658 

209 
139 
3a3 
2,766 
313 

511 
62 
132 
148 
1,876 

64 
320 
171 
275 
222 

86 
415 

69 
277 
204 

619 
159 
385 
205 
62 

52 

531 

210 

1,605 

54 

673 
628 

ia5 

1.179 

87 

115 
337 
87 
142 
108 

65 
143 

169 

370 

1,292 

227 
161 
193 
139 
1,301 


5,779 
1,418 

47 
2,378 

73 

103 
147 
323 
30 
245 

131 

66 

277 

2,097 

209 

307 

25 

89 

59 

1,287 

32 

278 
143 
108 
136 

66 
228 

87 
196 

96 

353 

229 

314 

64 

66 

34 
216 
181 
737 

47 

474 
278 

55 
663 

40 

218 
226 
125 
66 
40 

76 
63 
207 
144 
1,119 

161 
64 

163 

85 

1,017 


9,719 
3,973 

423 
3,316 

230 

304 
707 
723 
189 
894 

332 

658 
1.104 
6.299 

718 

1,045 

84 

3S9 

50 

2.974 

743 
1.174 

657 

536 

1.078 

274 
876 
19i 
686 
468 

962 
480 
721 
138 
152 

273 
1,843 

302 

2.840 

60 

1,585 
1,203 

360 
2.945 

2S9 

.'i26 
7S3 
150 
251 
179 

224 

777 

608 

1,329 

3,951 

1,607 
208 
894 
676 

4,637 


riuM'filx, Ariz 


I'inc HhifT, Ark 


I'lttslxiriili. Pa 


I'ittsflrlil, Mass 


I'lainneld, N.J 


rooitcllo, Idaho 




I'on(-,i CItv, Okla 


I'ontl:ic. Mich 


4 


4 

1 
1 
4 
33 
3 

16 


Port .\rtlmr, Tex 


1 


I'ort Huron, Mich 


I'drtlaml. Maine 






I'(irll:iii<l. OrpR .- 


10 


25 
1 

4 


I'ortsiiioiitli. Ohio. 


Portsmouth. Va .. . 


12 


I'ottstown. Pa 


I'mit'likcepsie, N.Y 

I'ricluircl, Ala 


2 

7 
2 


3' 

6 

2 
2 

1 


2 
4 

5 


Providence, R.I. . 


Provo, Utah 


Pueblo, Polo ... . .. 


5 


gniiicv. 111 


(^uincv, Mass 




Kaclne, Wis 


1 

1 
6 








1 
5 


1 
7 


Hal.ich, N'.C 


Rapid ritv, R. Dak 


ReadiriR, Pa 


2 




2 
2 

i 

4 
3 


14 

8 

24 
6 
81 
16 


8 
11 

22 
6 

34 
1 


Redlands. Calif 


Redondo Heach, Calif 

Redwood City, Calif 

Reno, N'l'V .. . 


2 

1 
6 

1 


3 


Revere. Mass 


Richfield. Minn 


Richland, Wash 










1 

99 

6 

383 

62 
129 

54' 

12 

6 
41 

2 
08 
34 

2 
9 

35 
8 

76 

179 
2 
12 
10 

109 


Richmond, Calif 


1 

1 

28 


1 
28" 


6 

1 
38 


70 

16 

223 

1 

23 
22 

2 
54 

2 

10 
14 
2 
3 
2 


Richmond, Ind ... 


Richmond, Va 


Rldpewood, N.J 


Riverside, Calif 


6 
9 
1 
6 
3 

3 
2 


1 
3 
1 

1 


1 

1 

1 

15 


Roanoke, Va 


Rwhester, Minn 


Roclnster, .N.Y 

Rock Hill, S.C 


Rock Island, 111 


4 

10 


1 

2 

1 

1 


Rockford. Ill ... 


Rockvllle Centre. N.Y 


Rocky Mount, N.C 

Rome. On 


6' 


2 


Rome. N.Y 


Ro.<yvlllo, Mich 


1 
1 
12 

2 






16 

6 

9 

268 

31 
6 

1 
92 


Roswell. N. Mex 


i* 

2 


2 

4 
20 

3 


Itoval Oak, Mich ... 


Sacramento, Calif 


SaRlnaw, Mich 


Salem, Mass 


Salem, Oreg 






3 
8 
21 


Salliia, Kans 






Salt Lake City, Utah 


3 


2 



88 



Tal»l«- I'l. — Ni</m/»«t 



>/ O0riisr.> hinntit /«» tin- l'»liri\ I'f.Ht. i'.itifs (hrr J.'t,0()0 
iit Pftpn la I inn— i'ttutiiiunl 



Olinlnalliotiilrltlo 



Cliy 



Miirdor 
and non- 

lU'KllKOIt 
lUIUI- 

slauKlitiT 



Miui- 
sIuukIi- 
tor by 
iicull- 

Rt'IlW 



Kon-lhlf 
ru|M> 



Rol>- 
f)ory 



val<<l 



Mui- 
Klury— 
hrciik- 
liiK <ir 

Int! 



Laro'iiy — tlirfl 



$.V)untl 
over 



liKlir 



Sun Angolo, TfX 

San Atilonlo, Tox 

San lliTnardliu), Calif. 

Sun Dl.^o. Cullf 

Sun Knmrlsco, Calif. .. 



San Jos«\ Calif 

San I.can<lro, Calif. 
San Mal«'«>, Calif 

Sainlii.sky, Ohio 

Santa .\nu, Calif .. 



iiiia Harhara. Calif 

■ I Clara. Calif... 

I K.', N. .\l.'x. . 

> .Monica. Calif . 

1 Uo.sa. Calir 



Kla 
. «ia. 



... l-a 
Wash 



.N.Y. 



i;a. Mo 

1. Ala 

' r llflKhts. Ohio. 

•n, l*a 

tuv, Okla 



.. Wis. 



, La 

.; i, Iowa 

KaH.1, 8. Dak. 



, MU.SS 

I. In.l .. 

. . ,..Uil. Ohio. 

ii liale. Cullf .. 



< Maine.... 
.■!«), Calif 



iKhWil. 111. 



, ;.:iKfl.|.|. .Mass 

.-Iirititrnilil, Mo 

Sprlia-t'.l.l. Ohio 

•St. Clair Short-s. Nlldl. 
81. Clou.l, .Minn .... 



St. Jo!u-|.h. Mo 

8t. Ixinis, Mo 

St. I^iii.-i Turk. Minn 

8t. I'anl. -Minn 

81. PplrrsLunr. Kla... 



'(onl. ( Onii 

>- ■'-. Calif 
Wis .. 

\.Y .. 

- Wash . 

rnil.'i! ,-..•<•, Fin., 



4 

•22 
17 
.M 
H4 



3" 


2 




M 


2 


2 




3 


1 


4 


4 


13 

1 


7 


16 


1 




7 


4 


20 


03 




1 
1 



10 

2UI 

.W 

2S.S 

I.5IM 

U2 
32 
IH 
10 
2ft 



13 

HI 

5 

N 
108 
11 
15 

.122 



78 
HIM) 

91 

337 

1.217 

28 

15 
2« 

.V) 

.■>! 
(I 

.1 
W 



3U 

372 

5 

21 

1(»7 



289 
4.2UU 

blNl 
l.HNO 
«.0K7 

r34 

378 

372 

1)5 

424 

303 
184 
3»1 
U13 
132 

32« 
fil9 
193 
321 
4.505 



9 U M 

11 lU 185 

Only 6 months n-colved 

4 91 

4 140 



3 

220 



28 

2 
15 
30 

8 
2 

5 

2.222 

1 

IW. 

117 

10 
34 

4 



20 
2.432 



100 
.W 
427 
204 
171 

110 
202 
ti25 
48 
.MO 

KO 

45 

271 

825 

375 

8»4 
329 
236 
228 
50 

148 

0.543 

71 

1.777 

967 

513 
187 
37 
H5tt 
143 

142 
103 
610 
587 
118 



141 
I.<103 

.'.90 
2.424 
2.303 

1.231 
285 
287 
1-28 
144 

239 

162 

230 

1.301 

75 

102 
577 
155 
100 
2.376 

13 

50 



722 

6.»i00 

1.731 

.'.. 171 

11.914 

3,344 
1.040 
1.3.14 
383 
1.171 

020 

304 

613 

1.778 

<i88 

380 
810 
174 
635 
8,338 

312 

300 



67 


2.16 


42 


282 


.W 


446 


11 


.19 


366 


1,618 


257 


1,350 


201 


7.14 


198 


328 


228 


576 


38«i 


1.794 


44) 


65 


.105 


683 


14 


213 


76 


172 


90 


508 


.111 


3.126 


200 


8.13 


70 


769 


145 


705 


84 


6.10 


360 


.183 


68 


391 


00 


441 


4. .183 


17.417 


133 


289 


8.13 


4.897 


265 


1.009 


2.18 


.120 


75 


532 


26 


113 


803 


1.765 


135 


280 


116 


385 


43 


fi«7 


7.13 


2.417 


553 


2.235 


72 


231 



89 



lal)!*- 1. 



■"Siinihrr of OJfrtisf.H Knimn la the I'ttl'nr 
ill I'optiluliuii — (^uiitiiiueil 



1958, Citirs Over 25,000 





Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bm-- 

glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny— theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
sluugli- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 




30 


5 
4 


24 

1 


182 

2 

3 

4 

31 

7 

5 

308 

70 

)nly 4 n 

1 
87 
12 
84 
89 

3 
3 
13 

16 

8 

4 

1 
9 
6 
8 

9 
32 


645 
9 

1 
48 
14 

10 

14 

202 

36 

onths re 

1 
134 
33 
114 

162 

74 
9 
9 

22 

3 

69" 

5 
12 

3 
26 


2,260 
171 
111 
118 
511 

101 

118 

1,757 

650 

;clved 

53 

850 

203 

1,033 

1.750 

231 
141 
164 
262 
147 

44 

26 
202 

76 
184 

263 
135 


1,060 

52 

78 

61 

202 

76 

77 

1,639 

282 

27 
348 
100 
370 
1.257 

209 
61 

109 
23 

234 

102 
30 

142 
40 

120 

52 
268 


3,751 
318 
218 
414 

865 

101 

500 

4,297 

1.647 

71 

799 

217 

2.664 

2,905 

166 
415 
383 
165 
450 

196 
70 
795 
185 
677 

356 
852 


608 


Taunton, Mass 


42 






33 


Teniplo, Tex 

Terrc Haute, Ind 


3 
3 

3 

5 
10 

7 


4' 


2 

1 


67 
110 




33 


Texas City, Tex 


6" 

8 


1 

21 

5 


32 


ToU-<lo, Ohio 


563 


Toi)rkrt. Kans 

Torrance, Calif 


79 


Torrin^ton, Conn 


11 


Trenton, N.J 


10 

4" 

11 


7 

3" 

5 


is 

13' 

20 


280 


Troy, X.Y 


135 

621 


Tulsii, Okla 


540 


Tuscaloosa, Ala 


34 


Tyler, Tex 






3 

1 
1 


45 


Union, N.J 

Union City, N.J 


1 


6 
2 


43 
121 


University City, Mo 




42 










13 


Upper Arlington, Ohio 








8 






2 


1 


133 


Urbana, 111 ... 




19 


Uticrt. N.Y 


1 

2 
1 


8 


1 
2 


160 


\'al<i()sta, Oa. 


53 


Vall.jo, Calif 


109 






Vancouver, Wash 


1 


1 


1 
2 

4 

18 

2" 

1 

58 


5 
8 

3 
51 

4 
25 

1 

639 
9 

11 
1 

20 

4 
3 

22 

1 
2 

3 


9 
9 

9 

192 

14 

15 

2,329 

12" 

12" 

7 

52 

1 

1 

1 
4 


99 
175 

98 
946 
138 
192 
351 

3,316 

30 

478 

212 

199 

164 
169 
189 
39 
104 

47 
20 
104 
114 
123 

138 
45 
rewived 
121 
366 

64 

34^1 

163 

ved 

1,015 


117 
125 

54 

186 
105 
165 
369 

1,548 
60 

162 
52 

141 

74 

84 
l.M 
36 

76 

42 
15 
119 
(>5 
36 

68 
10 

1 

87 
111 

46 
155 
328 

685 


374 

292 

120 
1,532 
352 
412 
427 

5.294 
182 
560 
414 
387 

156 
263 
518 
443 

297 

175 
32 
764 
138 
102 

152 
60 

259 
612 

147 
513 
471 

3,448 


37 
56 


XicksliurK, Miss 


3 

7 


1 
2 

1 


24 




143 


Wiiltii;im, .Mass 


62 


\\'<irriii. Oliio 


2 


112 


W M\^ Ick, K I 


M 


\Vu.shint;tou, D.C 


74 


18 


1,723 
44 


Wjitrrliurv, Conn . 


1 
1 
3 


4 

1 


i' 

6 


361 


\\ iit.rford 'Iwp., Mich 

Waterloo, Iowa 


31 
76 




40 










48 


\V:iiikiKan. Ill 


1 

1 

1 


2 

i 


i 

1 


103 


\Viiu>iiu, Wis 


31 


\Vau\v:itosa, Wis 

Web.ster droves, Mo 


43 
12 


Welrton, W.Va 








5 


West .\lll.s, Wis 








10 
14 


61 


West Covlna, Calif 

Wf.st Murlford, Conn 


1 


2' 


1 
1 


19 
14 






2 


1 


30 


W'eM Mimin, Pa 




i 
2 




35 


West New York, N.J 

West Orange, N.J 




Cc 

2 

3 


)mplete c 
2 
26 

1 
25 
15 


lata not 

1 

34 

1 
18 
54 


45 


Wist Palm Heaeh, Fla 


e 

1 


71 
36 


Wheelinc, W.Va 


2 






95 


White Plains, N.Y 






87 


Whitller, Calif 


61 


6 


25 


No reiwrts rece 
81 1 219 




Wichita, Kans 


359 



See fooinotos lit end of tiibli 



DO 



Tnl»lr l.H. — \ntiihrr nf (fjfriisrs Kiumii la llw I'ttlirr. 1'>.'>H, C.ilirs Our J.'i.tKHI 
in I'tt/tiihilitni — < '.out iiiii<-<l 



City 



Wlihlta Kails T. 
WlIk.-s-Hiirrr. Pa 
W tIkliisluirK. I'a 
WlllUmisixiri, I'm 
WUmttti-, 111... 

Wllmliittton, 1). 1 
WllinlnKton, \ «' 
\Mls<jn. N.C 
\V liiuiiit, Minn 
WInstonSah'iii, .\.C. 

Wiiliiirn, Ma«> 
\Vo<«ll.rl.lKi', N.J. 
\Vo«jn>tHk(i, HI 

Worct'stor, Miu-i-s 

>Vyan<lott«', MIcto 



Yakima, Wash 

Yonk.rs, N.V 

York, I'll 

YouiiK-'town, Ohio. 
Zaiipsvlll.', Ohio... 



Ci liniiial liunilcUto 



Miinlcr 
and nnn- 
noKlli;<-nt 

man- 
•ilaiiehlcr 



Foiflhli' 
raiH' 



Kub- 
bory 



2 
9 

a 

41 
3 

» 
18 
28 
120 
14 



.\KKra- 
vatxl 
H.<saiilt 



307 

3 
3 
3 

•J 

24 
49 
35 
21 
1 



Hiir- 
Rlary— 
liri'ak- 
UiR or 
cnlrr- 
IllK 



430 

1«12 
m 
ix; 

N3 

017 
4<K2 
103 
23 

488 

45 
189 
174 
1,318 
191 

276 
323 

318 
784 
194 



Larceny- Ihi-ft 



$Mancl 
over 



347 
74 

34 
l)V4 
Ul 

384 

ItM 

14 

28 
188 

34 
W2 
114 
473 

79 

232 
119 
138 
ti23 
133 



l.'adcr 



2.017 

278 
203 

298 

x.rM 

7«2 
234 
130 
973 

127 
liil) 
237 
1.379 
.175 

1.7.'>3 
1.085 

744 
1.281 

483 



.\ni<> 
Hurt 



.-X13 

142 

20 

12 

217 

31 

.18 
92 

84K 

\r,r, 

ua 
:«J3 

131 
215 

SI 



' Larivnlcs nut s«-parat«'ly n'|H)rtfHl. Fltinn- llslnl ini'lii<li's Imtli major ami minor larrfnlcs. 
» Th»' crime rfjK>rtln(j for tin- city liulli-.itcil dot's not miN't aii'c[iialili' standards cstaMlsht'd by the Com- 
lulttw on I'nlform Crime Keeonls of the International Ass<xiatlon of Chiefs of Police. 

• Complete lanvny IlKures are not available. 

* PoIIoinI by till' Nassau County Polli-e Deiwrtnient; crime llinires not sojMrately rejiorted for Valley 
Stri'ani. 

Tabic 16. — .\uiiilnr nj (fjffvnsrs hnituii /«* //w I'lliii- in Juristliilitiits Oiit.siili- 

tlw I nited States. 1958 



Juri<Mllcllon r<>porting 



Criminal homicide 



Murder, 

non- 
noRllKent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 











Larceny— theft 






-VKpra- 


Bur- 
ghiry— 








Forcible 


Rob- 


vuted 


break- 






raix.' 


bery 


assault 


higor 


Over 


Under 








enter- 


$50 


$50 








ing 






fl 


20 


17 


121 


172 


.582 


12 


14 


38 


230 


310 


215 


1 


1 


2 


22 


11 


31 




)°i 


13 


131 


76 


120 


1 




9 


180 


36 


»J59 


14 


85 


40 


3.454 


1.179 


6.217 


8 


8 


< 


749 


2.54 


1.475 




1 


3 


63 


12 


265 




I 


2 


165 


21 


357 


4 


9 


4 


268 


95 


600 



.\ulo 
theft 



Alaska 



'y 

f Terrl- 



Juii.au Cuy 

Ouani: .\Riu)a.. 

Uawuli: 

Hawaii County.-. 

Honolulu City 

IIoiimIiiIu ( iiiuity. 

K • V . . . . 



Isthi' , 

ZoDl-. 



: 11 u: Canal 



125 
3-28 

as 

14 

1.123 

1.52 

4 

21 

21 



iU 



ifiv. .SV'.v (iikI Ritcc nf l*t'rs(tns .irrrslrtl 

Iiiforiimlioii rt'^ardin<2: the poisoiial cliaracleristics of arrested 
persons presented here is derived from the aiimial reports prepared by 
eity police. As was pointed out above, efforts have been initiated to 
broa<k>n this series to cover the rural areas (see the section on "The 
Consultant Committee and lis Keeommendations," p. 15). Tlie 
figures include persons arrested and later released as well as those held 
for prosecution under a formal charge. Instructions also provide 
that all person,s arrested be reported opposite the charge embracini: 
the violation prompting their arrest, regardless of theii' age or the fact 
that some technical charge such as "wayward minor" may be formally 
filed. 



92 



/§ 



M iM <oo <eo M 



82 : 



lIMFlilfT 



ill ^^un 






oc — 4 « 



-•>o te set 



§l?i 



MO M«C CO 






^ CO w po I"" •■* ro 



1 o « a tc 



"5-iii 



"i a — ■ w 



SSSi 5 



^"isi 



Ills = 



«wo» ^ «* oa 






C T T o> o 



^Hi\ 






— t» « a; -« 



'8 S--== 



lO^p'Tsp r ill 1 2 

? 5 § 5 1^ - S3 53 S 5 1? § ' 

B rt o5 S i» w « -^ «r -r ■£ u'. 2 f» fc 

sS S SS kS ^^ Srl'*^ 

m" n n N N V V M o' s oc ac ;^' jj 

a;2 f^^ 2s SSSr"5r5 a? » s a ~ 
88 S 38 25Ss>r'S.f5]t =" 

35?* * «'* P.«S5« — af5 — w 

N oT C5 — ' "-' V I- 

— " e>» o" t>« M — " V ad 

CO — ■ o> 00 ^ •*" i~ 

«S S SI'' 2"^ voa e>«p« — c 55 

coS ■» SS Su^l^^o 3SSr2« 

>»• — o" i-^w •cod 

»C r«. ^^ — C tC C** T l-» 't* C* W — 31 CS 

Ot- t 9?2 I- ": — « <o lo oa>rt » o 

S«M 00-" 00 ^J?fO o6t-«c: — 

o> -^ 00 a — « «»-> — » 

S £ n oi 5;s^i~s 



-« N M «r-« 



— " N 






: rjoegi 



isiS S 



-< •♦oom 



« 


S! 




8 1 




•D 


•o 


t 




« 


l» 




8| 


■C-5 


• 1 


c — 


^1 



—" 5C"o"«o" 



e s? 



0» t» t-MP9 



lli" B M 



» lo a>iQ 



i--e>« g c o 



r^ M? o -^ «0 






-" «' 5 3> ic — " ?o r^ V » 



OS ri aC lo 2 



-« t, j5» «s5Sig- 



S8 |^**S 



ft. . M 

B ; e 
S ' >> 






i2 fcf 






c Z 



Z C M— = 3 = C 5 V 



c mC: 
es-<o 



8 

tllllll 

u. u. i. o /: 



2£ 



2 u 



Is 

2 s; 



? i^£^^ 






:zi EHr= 



93 



Tiililr IH. — \iiinhrr nitil Pvrifitlitiif itf irrrsis itf Pvrstnts I luU-r IH. I tnU-r 21, 
iitnl I inltT !'.» ^ fur.s nf li.'#'. I't.iH: I ..'tHh ritirs «»r#'r 2,500, Inlnl imjittlitlum 

52.:{2<f. ft: 





.Number <i( jM-rsons arrestwl 


I'ercvntage 


oitfii.M- cliiirin'cl 


TOTAl 


I'nder 
18 


I'nder 
21 


I'nder 
25 


Inder 

18 


I'nder 
21 


I'nder 
25 


TOTAl . 


2.340.004 


S84.215 


460.015 


685.654 


12.1 


19.7 


29.3 


Cririiiiiiil lioinicidf: 

nil Miirdir hiuI iiiiniu't!liK<-nt 


2,303 

i.iee 

14.968 
25. 824 
82.454 
61.045 

118.325 
30. 240 
19. 489 

5.504 

11.317 
3.680 

17. 482 

24. 517 

9.863 
18.611 

23. 701 
52. 707 

102. 219 

281.997 

908. 957 

88. 351 

61. 546 

96. 740 

276. 998 


130 

78 

3.415 

2, 340 

6, .121 

M). 460 

.17. :i89 

19.386 

477 

1, 7(K) 

7<)7 
f.82 

195 

4.267 

376 
3,072 

291 
9,494 

618 

27. 765 

7,748 

4. .188 

575 
17. 589 
84.292 


317 
2(r2 

6.496 

4. .15*9 
13. 578 
39, 709 

72. 051 

Zi. 9H2 

1..129 

2. 510 

1,9.10 
L.IOtt 

1.431 

6.826 

1.447 

5, 522 

1.799 
21.. 165 

4.434 
57. 8.13 
31.067 
11.711 

2.446 
3.1. 20t> 
1 10. 276 


.193 

3.18 

9.429 
8.016 
2.1, .113 
46. 766 

82.418 

26. :*f.9 

3. 924 

3. 195 

3.840 
2.249 

.1. 104 

10. :<B4 

3. 4.19 
8.494 

.1..345 
25. .137 

1.1.044 
9«i.(W6 
85. 405 
19.671 

7. .i:u 

51.172 
139. 792 


.1.6 
0.7 

22.8 
9.1 
7.9 

49.9 

48.5 

64. 1 

2.4 

30.9 

6.8 
18.5 

1.1 

17.4 

3.8 
16.5 

1.2 
18.0 

.6 
9.8 

.9 
5.2 

.9 
IK. 2 

:«i.4 


13.8 
17.3 

43.4 

17.8 
10. 5 
6.1.0 

0O.9 
79.3 

7.8 

4.1.6 

17.2 
41.0 

8.2 

27.8 

14.7 
29.7 

7.6 
40.9 

4.3 

20.5 
3.4 
13.3 

4.0 
36.4 
39.8 


2.1.7 


(l>) MimsliuiuhtiT by ncfjli- 
UllMl- 

Kolil.cry 


30.7 
63.0 


Vj!i!rHvntpd as.sault 


31.0 




31.0 


Murt'liiry— Jircakiiig or entering 


76. i; 
69.7 


\uiiiiii(rt - -.- 


87.2 




2U. 1 


stoKn propiTty; buying, receiving, 
ete - 


58.0 




;«. 9 




61. 1 


Prostitution and commereialized 

vice - 

Other sex offenses (Includes statu- 


29.2 
42.3 


Niircotic drug laws .- -.. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
OlTen.ses against family and chil- 


3.1. 1 
4.1.6 

22.6 




48.5 


Oriviiip while intoxicated 


14.7 
34. 1 




0.4 




22.3 




12.2 




52.9 


All oilier olTenses 


50.5 



94 



Tahli- l'>. — trrrst I'rrinls l'/S7-5H: l.2:iH i ilirs ihi-r l',.)«« in I'ft/mhil Itm , inlttl 

I'npiitatiun t3,6SH,M3 



OlTt'iisi' fhnnntl 



TOTAL 



Orlmfniil homicUlo: 

(n) Murder ami nonn(>f!lli;ent man- 

sliuiKhtcr 

(b) Mansliuit:hter by ncKligencc — 



R<.».»..rv 

Avprnviiifil nssault 

Otlur iisMiiilts 

Hur?lnr> - breaking or entering. 



1 .n rr«> n y - t hr f t 

Autotheft 

Kmberili'iiifHt antl traud 

Stolen proporty; buying, receiving, etc. 



Korpery and counterfeiting 

Korcibif ra|>e 

Prostitution and commercialired vice.. 

Otlier s«'X olTen.s«'S (includes statutory 

rape) 



Number of persons arrested 



Under 18 years of ago 



10.17 



Narcotic dni(f laws 

\Vea|>on.<; c-arryinp, possessing, etc... 
OlTen.s«>!: acainst family and children. 
I.i<|Uor laws 



Driviiit: while intoxicated. 

ni.>iorilerly ctinduct 

Drunkeiint-ss 

Va^nincy 



Oamhling 

Suspicion 

All other offenses. 



Sa3,491 



103 

58 

2,(V41 

1.809 

4.732 

23.080 

45.414 

17,8«0 

377 

1,082 

.S83 
702 
116 

3.103 

238 
2,346 

293 
6,665 

520 

24.211 

5.783 

3,766 

528 
14.0(>( 
62,298 



841.468 



97 
61 

2.685 

l.s:{8 

5,429 

25,753 

48.678 

16, .V)9 

422 

1,448 

041 

461 
155 

3,630 

312 

2, ,198 
274 

8,195 

.502 

24.003 

6. .504 

4,141 

477 
14.439 
72, 167 



IVrcent 
change 



•+8.1 



-6.8 
+5.2 

+1.7 

-3.2 

+14.7 

+7.4 

+7.2 

-7.4 

+ 11.9 

+33.8 

+9.9 
(') 
+33.6 

(') 

+31. 1 

+ 10.7 

-6. 5 

+23.0 

-3.5 

-.9 

+ 12. 5 

+10.0 

-9.7 

+3.1 

+15.8 



Total all ages 



1.8M.862 



1,874 
98.J 

10. 9,54 

20. .'.<»li 
68. IW 
43. H«i5 

90. .595 

2»i. (1X8 

14. .525 

3. .5as 

7.640 
3.788 
14. 091 

21. ia> 

7,946 
14.489 
20. .585 
3«'>. ta7 

87. 4.59 
232. l«7 
78l.,58t) 

74,835 

43.199 

75. 8»)5 

203,257 



1,955,081 



1,864 
911 

12.025 
21. 149 
72. 126 
.50.3«»8 

100. 220 

25. 4.12 

17.115 

4. .5.37 

9.31(1 
2. 705 
14,271 

21,. 583 

8.295 
1.5.487 
21.. 517 
41.699 

83.829 
2:«. 4."^^) 
7.54. 526 

78. 404 

44. 046 
84. 117 
23t), 075 



I'ercent 
chantte 



+2.S 



-0.5 
-7.3 

+9.8 
+2.7 
+ .5.0 
+14.7 

+ 10.6 

-2.4 

+ 17.8 

+29.3 

+21.9 
(') 
-2.9 

(») 

+4.4 
+6.9 
+4.5 
+ 13.8 

-4.2 

+.6 
-3.5 

+4.8 

+2.0 
+ 10.0 
+16.1 



' Arrc-its of pensons under IS years of age increased 12.6 percent In 008 cities under 25,000 and 7.1 percent 
in 3;tO riti. = nv.^r 2.'.nno in (wpulation. 

5 I \ i»lTen!«' flpure."! for 1957 and 1958 arc not eomparahio individually since beginning in 

I9.'.v . iou!ily included «.< rape wiLs includi'd as oihor se\ otTea-ses. Combining the,<e clu.-i.'ws, 

rsi>' . ii.-ics increased 5.0 iwrcenl among the youths and decreased 2.5 perci'nt in the total 

lor all iigi .<. 



95 



Till. I. m. — IHslrihiill,,,, ,,f irr, sl> l,y SVr. I'f.'tH: /..T«6 Cilits Our 2, .',00, Inlal 

I'niHilfilinn .)!'.. Vl'V, i'fT 



OITt-nso clmrKtvi 



TOTAl 

Criminal liomiciile: 

(h) MiinliT ami [iiiiiii(-Kli»!i-ni iiian- 

slaiinhlcr 

(h) Matislaiijtliti'r by negiiuenpe 

Uohhery 

Ak.'k.'ravuted assault 

oilier assaults 

Uiirulary— breaking or entering 

I.iini'iiy— theft 

Auto theft 

Knihezz lenient and fraud 

Stolen iiroperty; buying, receiving, etc. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Korcible rape 

I'rostilution and commercialized vice.. 

other sex olTenses (includes statutory 

rape) 

Narcotic drug laws 

W capotis; carrying, possessing, etc 

oiTciiscs against family and children... 
LiniKir laws _. 

1 iriving while intoxicated 

I >isorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

\ aurancy 

(ianibling 

Sus[iicion 

All other olTenses 



Numl>er 



TOTAI Mule Female 



8,340,004 



2,303 
1,166 

14,968 
25.824 
82,454 
61,045 

118.325 

30. 240 

19. 489 

5,504 

11,317 
3.680 
17. 482 

24. 517 

9.863 
18,611 
23, 701 
52, 707 

102.219 

281. 997 

908. 957 

88.351 

61.546 

96. 740 

276, 998 



8,091,56ft 



1,H44 

14. 21)fi 
21. 7«« 
74, ,V12 
59. 572 

KlI.HKi 
^^•.>. 2x2 
l(i. 7|(<* 
5,078 

9, B12 
3,680 
5,412 

19, .%5 

8,249 
17. 675 
21. 671 
44. 654 

96,782 
239,582 
841,440 

81,6;J7 

5.5, m> 
86, 730 
2:«, 874 



848,439 



4. '.9 
111 

672 
4.0.V, 
7. H92 
1, 473 

16.979 

9.'i8 

2.780 

426 

1. 705 



4. 922 

1.614 

936 

2, ():«) 

8, {)Xi 

5. 437 
42.415 
67.517 

6.714 

6. (is7 
1(1.01(1 
43. 124 



I'erccnt 



TOTAl Male Female 



I 100.0 



(') 



.6 
1.1 
3.5 
2.6 

5.1 
1.3 
.8 
.2 

.5 



1.0 



1.0 
2.3 

4.4 
12.1 
38.8 

3.8 

2.6 
4.1 
11.8 



> 100.0 



.1 
.1 

.7 
1.0 
3.6 
2.8 

4.8 
1.4 

.8 
.2 

.5 
.2 
.3 



1.0 
2.1 

4.6 
11.5 
40.2 

3.9 



4.1 
11.2 



■ 100.0 



(') 



1.6 
3.2 



6. H 
.4 
1. I 



4.9 

2.0 



2.2 
17. 1 
27. 2 

2.7 

2.5 
4.0 
17.4 



• Bec-au.<e of rounding the sum of the individual cla.ssifications may not add to precisely l(H).l) i>ercent. 
» Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



!M) 



'I'alil»- 21.— irrists /» Karr. I'K'tH, I ,.tH(i Cilirs (htr 2,r>tHK 

52,329,497 



I nitil I'njHilal itni 



OlTt'iis*' rImrRfvl 



TOTAL 

Oiininitl homicldo: 

(ii) Miirdpr un<i noiiii(>Kli|;pnt 

niiinsliiiiclilcr 

(b) Miiii.sliiiij:liti'rl)y negligence 



RoblxTy 

AKKTiivatCHi iissault 

Otiior lusyniills 

Uurglnry— breuking or entering. 



Larceny- 1 licft 

Aulo tiled 

Kinbc/rleinfiit and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
et« « 



Forgerv and rounterfeiting 

Koriiiile rajK? 

I'rostitution and cotnmercialized 

vlit) 

Other »ex otTenses (includes statu 

tory rape) 



N'uroot Ic drup laws 

WeaiHins, carrying, iwssessin^, etc. 
0(Ten.ses against family and children 
Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxicated. 

IlLstirderly conduct 

Prunkennc&s 

Vagrancy 



Tf ambling 

Suspicion 

All other olTenses. 



TOTAL 



9.840,004 



2.303 
1,160 

14.908 
3i. 824 
82.464 
01,045 

118. S95 
30,240 
19,489 

5. MM 

11.317 
3,680 

17,483 

S4,il7 

9.86.1 
18.611 
33,701 
82, 707 

102,219 

281. 997 

906,957 

88,351 

61.546 

96.740 

276,998 



Race 



NVIillo Ni'Kro Indian 



1,683.070 



MO 

(KM 

fi. 7:V2 
0. ()7S 
i\ MO 
41,7.M 

80. JUi 
23. tVUl 
1.'), MH 

3,666 

0.580 
1,821 

0,194 

17,079 

3,807 

», t)7S 

15,118 

34.158 

84. WO 
1«1.721 
67H. N'.M 

64,6<>5 

1.1. 820 
6.'*. 231 
193, 254 



096.900 



1.427 
245 

8.034 
16,389 
3.1. 733 
18, 623 

36, M2 
6, 135 
3,782 

1.765 

l.ft.S3 
1.707 

7.885 

7,058 

5.740 
9.6«3 
8.378 
17.877 

1R.068 
11.1. 171 
Ut.l.O.ll 

20,9,10 

46.767 
32.711 
80,635 



43,196 



8 
7 

72 

75 

311 

343 

678 
227 
48 

23 

52 
9 

110 

105 

17 

56 

71 

453 

1.008 

2.301 

3;<,017 

1,929 

3 

579 

1,624 



Chi- 
nese 



1,262 



34 

13 

7 

21 

16 

s:} 

297 
97 

341 
42 
99 



Japa- 
ni'M 



296 



16 

17 

128 

24 

8 
10 
28 



All 
others 



16, 051 



24 

8 

1Z< 
2S0 
.140 
297 

643 
149 
38 



2Ki 

261 
167 
127 

188 

471 
2. 704 
6. .170 

686 

607 

167 

1,360 



or 



Poli<:c Employee Data 

I alili- 22. — \iiinhfr of I'ltlira IPffmrl illfti I l:iii/tlnY4-i-.s hUli'il. I'f.'tT. hy (,»■<>- 
Lintfthir Difisitms ami /'<>/>(< /<if ion (^rtnifm 

f.iJH] .-Ittiw, tntiil |«>piiliirl<.n W2,K4.TJ^t] 





TOTAL 






'M|iiiliillofi t!roii|i 






Oc(»^'rii|ililc ilivlslon 


Oroup 


Oroiip 
II 


Group 
III 


Group 
IV 


Group 


Group 
VI 




NumlHT 


Rate ruT 

.S.O(K),0(10 

inhatv 

ttaiits 


Over 
'iMI.tKNI 


KKi.iino 

to 


.■io.nnn 

to 
KIO.tKII) 


lu 
.10.(100 


10.000 

to 
2A,IIU0 


Lfs.s 
than 
IIMNIO 




45 




81 
2.7 


2 
0.8 


2 
0.0 


6 
8.0 


6 

8.8 




Rate per 5.000.000 inhabitants 


8.2 


8.7 










3 
9 
9 
4 

4 
3 
5 


1.4 
1.9 
1.9 

2.5 

1.8 
3.1 
2.6 






1 


1 






Mi<|.|le MlMnlic 


7 
a 
2 

2 

1 




1 
1 
1 




Ka.-il .\nrtli Central 






2 




\Ve,st North Central 










1 








K;isl South Central 










West .•>oulh Central 


1 




2 


1 








I'lriflr ^ 


9 


3 9 ' 


1 


! 


? 





police ciliploN ('<■ tlilhl t riidit ioii.-illv collfcl cd ;i lililiallx !l> t)l' Aj)!'!! .10 
is picsciitcd licic l'(»i' 19")S. ()l)\ iously, (lie jiNcra^e figures shown 
!iic not intended to serve as su^rixested ])olice siren>rtli for any partic- 
idiir eoninumity. Tliey merely reflect the police personnel situation 
its it wiis oti A[)iil HO, 



l";il»l«- 2."{. C.lfiliiiit I'ltliff Drfnirl nn-fi I l'',inpl<>yfi>s, I'f.iH I'rrtfii Inuf of lotiil, 

hy P„i,,itnlU>ii Cnmit I'lrculnv 

eirUinn 
l'o|)iil.ili(iri (Ir(>ii|i: futplitytti 

T(»t;il, all <'iti.-> _. 

(Iroiip F ((t\<T •_'.")n,(M)()) 

i( )\.r I, ()()(»,()()()) 

(7 ")(),()()() 1,0(10, 000) 

(.'lOO.OOO 7.")0,000i 

(2.')0.()0() .")00,000) _ 

C'iroiip II ( 100.000 J.')!), 000) 

Cruiip III (.")0,000 nio.oooi 

(!ri)H|) I\' CJ.'), 000 .")0,000) fi. 7 

(Jrotip V ( 10.000 2."),00(n 5. 5 

(Iruiip \I (•J,.")00 10,000) 7.5 



8. 


t; 


0. 


1 


1 . 


•) 


10. 


.") 


1 1. 


• ) 


12. 


8 


10. 


'.) 


9. 


1 



DH 



Tal>I«- 2>. — I'lill-liiiir I'olirr DriHirlim-ttl I'liiitlityi'i's, .Apr. HO, I'K^K, \initln'r 
uinl Half I'tT I JKH) Inhiiltiliints, hy i'.rntiniphir Difisitms nitti I'ltpnluliim 

|,I.7M .111.-. t..l ,1 [..ipiiliitioii 102,:<2l.'-'Ji 



Ocoirrnphlr dlvLslon 



TOTAL: 

Number of police employees. 
Aventge number of employees 
per 1,000 inhabitants 

New England: 

NiiiiiU'r of i)<)li(i» employees 

\veriit;t' niiiiil)er of employees 
jHT l,<XH) iiili;il)itants 

Middle Atlantic: 

Niiml>er of i>olk-e employees 

Average niiml»er of employees 
per 1.000 inhiiliiUmts 

East North Central: 

Niiinl.or of iH)lice employees 

Aver:n;o niimlH'r of employees 
IHT l.tXHJ mhiibitiints 

West North Central: 

\iiinl>er of iMilit-e employees. . . 

Averace niimlxr of employees 

per 1.000 inhiihitanis 

^ South Atlantic: • 

.\utnher of police employees 

* venipe niiml)er of employees 
oer 1,000 inhabitants 

Bastjonth Central: 

NtiinU'r of iHilice employees 

^ A Venice niimher of employees 
/ per 1.000 inhabil4Ults 
Weat South Central: 
Number of jKilice employees . 
Averape number i>f employees 
per 1.000 inhabitants 

Monntain : 

Number of police employees 

Averaite number of employees 
per 1.000 inhabiunis 

Paciflc: 

Nuniher of police employees. 
Averice number of employees 
i«T 1.000 mhabitanls 



TOTAL 



182. 068 
1.8 



14.398 
8.0 

54,188 
S.S 

S9, 476 
1.7 

10, 931 
1.4 

19,780 
1.8 

6,382 
1.3 

11,643 
l.S 

4,631 
1.4 

20.639 

18 



Po|iulatlon Rroup 



(iroup 
I 



Over 

2.V),()U0 



93,069 
9.4 



3,034 
i.O 

3«, 407 
3.0 

22,«)0() 
2.3 

4,829 
1.9 

7,499 
2.6 

1,672 
1.3 

.■), 032 
1.4 

816 
1.5 

11,090 

•J 1 



Oroup 
II 



100,000 

to 
2.V),000 



20, 196 
1.6 



3. 7X2 
2.3 

3,307 
1.9 

3, a'i7 
I. I 

1. 1.50 
1.2 

3,175 
1.5 

1,371 
1.5 

l.fi38 
1.2 

842 
1.5 

I. 874 

1 .', 



(Iroup 
III 



50,000 

to 
100,000 



17.509 
1.& 



2,096 
1.8 

3,t;i3 
1.7 

3. .-.74 
1.3 

S7I 
1. I 

2, ,>13 
1.7 

461 
1.3 

I, Ml 
1. I 

747 
l.ii 

1,963 
1.5 



Oroup 
IV 



25,000 

to 
50,000 



17,329 
1.4 



2, .586 
1.7 

3.200 
1.7 

3,614 
1.2 

1,006 
1.1 

2,008 
1.4 

894 
1.3 

1,217 
1.0 

ti8l 
1.2 

2,063 
1.4 



18. 150 
1.3 



1,614 
1.4 

4,117 
1.5 

3,094 
1.2 

1,300 
1.1 

2,073 
1.5 

884 
1.3 

1,416 
1.0 

C71 
1.2 

2,282 

1.0 



Oroup 
VI 

tlian 
10,000 



15.815 
1.3 



686 
1.3 

3,394 
1.3 

2,937 
1.2 

1,670 
1.1 

2,482 
1.6 

1,100 
1.3 

1,299 
1.0 

874 
1.3 

1,3C7 

1.8 



1 In. lii.|.< the District of Columbia. 



99 



I alilt- 2.'). — \ II nihrr Iff ( i ti)'> I >«•«/ if/ I nlniliiliini> /f«-i:«ir»///i i; \ ii in Ikt ol I'niirf 
IPrixirliiniil /./M/»/.»^ «•«•>, i/ir. .'10, l'K>H. iiiitl l'i,li,r hilh;l. /';.)," 





TOTAL 


FuiiulaliimKruup 


Oi-o^'mi'liif Division 


Group I 


Oroup II 


Oroup HI 

50.000 tu 
100,000 


Group IV 

25,0(XI to 
.W.OOO 


Oroup V 


Group VI 




Over 
250,IH)0 


100,000 to 
250,000 


lO.UK) to 
25,000 


I^SS tllUli 

10,0(10 


TOTAL: 

Population repre- 
sented . 

Number of cities.. 


102. 324. 229 
3.781 

2:«i 

743 

805 

41fi 
4.'i6 

234 

394 
186 

:)17 


39. 069. 939 
46 


12, 799, 953 
86 


11,748.435 
173 


12. 772. 97T 
366 


13. 857. 936 
888 


12.114.989 
2.222 


New Kiniliiiid: Total 
popiihitioii. 7,UIU.5H2 

Mi<l<lli- Allaiilic: Total 
I.(i|iiilalioii.2:<..'H0.962 

Kast North Ci'iilral: 
Total |io|iulation, 
2;t.272.;t70 

Wi^i North Central: 
Total population, 
H.017,t'>34 


1 

7 

10 

5 
5 

3 

7 
1 


11 
13 

15 

6 
14 

6 

9 
3 

'1 


22 
31 

42 

11 
21 

6 

14 

7 

I'l 


14 
.55 

84 

28 
39 

21 

35 
17 


71 
174 

210 

81 

88 

46 

88 
38 


81 

4»l.'t 

it4 

2x:> 


South Atlantic: Total 
population. 10.885.140. 

Kast South Ontral: 
Total population, 
4.sir>,97y 

West .<(>uth Central: 
Total population, 
W.7.'>;<,22tj 


2H« 
1.S2 
2-11 


Mnniitain: Total pop- 
iil:ition,3.362.%0 

{'iiiilic: Total po|)ula- 
lion, ll,,T(i«.37f. 


12t) 

117 



100 



Tnbit' 26. — ISuntfuT of Fiill-Timr l*nli< t- Dt-fturtnu-nt I'lnplnyvi's. ipr. .U). I^K'iH. 
(ilifs itvvr 2.'i,(HK) in l'<niiiliili<m 



City 


NumlKT of imjIIco ilepartnicnt 
MiU>loyiH« 


City 


Number of police dcimrtmcnt 
em ploy PC* 




TOTAI 


Police 
ofllcers 


Clvlllan.s 


TOTAL 


Police 
olDcers 


ClvHlan» 


ALABAMA 

Antii>l<>ii . . 

I»i'.>i.M'niiT 

HirininKhain 

I)<itliiin ... 


4r> 

443 
40 
34 

103 
66 

252 

191 
29 
43 

:w 

79 

33 
315 

152 

21 

59 
37 
154 
70 
38 

75 
91 
90 
58 

165 
35 

153 
81 
31 

1.56 
45 
91 
40 
3.^ 
57 
37 
28 
46 

26.5 
7b 
42 

162 
44 
64 
55 
86 

505 
5,675 
36 
31 
29 
57 
37 
42 
50 
30 
39 

794 
67 
4« 
67 


49 
43 
392 
40 
34 
91 
66 
200 
178 
29 
43 
38 
76 

32 

2X2 

i:« 

21 
.56 
36 
146 
70 
35 

71 
78 
84 
48 

1-2.5 
31 

144 
74 
24 

136 
41 
81 
35 
34 
.53 
31 
26 
38 

238 
75 
38 

140 
40 
.58 
51 
71 

449 
4.478 
33 
29 
27 
46 
34 
39 
47 
M 
36 

674 
52 
41 
64 


4 

3 
51 


CAUFORNIA— 
Continued 

Pa.sa(lenu.. ... 

Pomona 

Kedlands 

He<lon<lo Bench . 

KedwiKMl City 

Kichinond 

Hiversi<le . 

Sacramento. . 
San Hernardino — 

San Dieito 

San Franciiico 

San Jose 

San Leandro 

San Mateo 


IH9 
HO 
43 
.55 
48 
147 
113 
281 
176 
VM 
1,800 
187 
58 
75 
107 
71 
41 
172 
37 
72 

30 
135 
40 
86 
67 
43 
38 
46 

37 
35 
108 
816 
30 
.34 
109 

409 
56 
40 
60 

1.3H 
22 

440 
94 
43 

147 

396 
63 

107 
51 

188 
64 
62 

26.5 
93 
64 

260 

2. ''22 


1.^3 
6,5 
39 
.50 
45 

127 
9H 

1.59 

Ml 
1,697 

176 
.54 
75 
92 
64 
40 

131 
35 
67 

26 

127 
32 

m 

.58 
42 
35 
43 

34 
35 
95 

693 
27 
28 

100 

357 
54 
40 
57 

125 
22 

397 
91 
42 

1.36 

372 
60 

\m 

49 
177 
61 
60 
2.57 
88 
63 

224 
2, 32y 


36 
15 
4 






5 




12 


3 


Iliintsville ... 


20 


M.il.ile 


52 
13 


15 


Montgomery 

J'henix City 


43 
17 




98 


Sehnii . . 




103 


TuscaliHisa 

ARIZONA 


3 

1 
33 
19 


11 
4 


Mesa 


Santa .\na 

Santa Barbara 

Santa (Mara 

Santa .Monica 

Santa f{osa 

South (tate. . 

South San 

Francisco. 

Stockton 


15 

7 


Phoonix .... 


1 


Tucson.. . . 

ARKANSAS 
Kl Dorado . .. 


41 
2 
5 

4 




3 
1 

8 


8 


Hot S|)rin«ts 

I It tic Hook 




8 






Niirili I.ittlc Kock 


Vallejo 


9 


I'm.' IlliiiT. 
CALIFORNIA 


3 

4 

13 
6 

10 

40 
4 
9 
7 
7 

20 
4 

10 
5 
4 
4 
6 
2 
8 

27 
3 
4 

22 
4 
6 
4 

15 

.56 

1.197 

3 

2 

2 

11 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

lao 
s 

5 
3 


Ventura 


1 


West Covina 

Whittier 


3 
3 


Alaine<ia 

Alhanilira 


COLORADO 






a 


Arci.lii 

Bak.n-litld 

naldwiii Purk 






Colorado Springs .. 
Denver 


13 


Berkeley 

Beverly Hills 


Englewood 


3 
6 






9 


Burbank 


CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 




Chultt VisU 






52 




Bristol 


2 


Culver City 

D«lv City 






Eiu'it Hartford 

(Jrwnwich 


3 


El Cajon 


13 


Fur- K 






Fr.-- 


H art ford 


43 


Full. ■• 




3 


(>ar<l<iii . 


Mid<lletown 

New Britain 

New Haven 

New I,on<lon 

Norwalk 


1 
11 


II»wthorne 

Uaywikrd 

BunilnRton Park.. 

Jnplewrwwl 

.ch 


24 
3 
4 

2 




11 


' Ii4 


1 Stratford 


3 


1 




2 


.11 Beuch. 

rk 


! Wiii.rbiiry 

1 We.-l Hartford 

West Haven. 

DELAWARE 

WilniiiiKtciti 

DISTRICT OF 
COLOMBIA 

Wasliington 


8 
5 
1 


lo 

Park . 

View .. 
ilty 


V 












193 



101 



I ;il.l« :2(i. — \iiiiilt, r <>l I nil- I imi- I'lili, <■ I h i>ar I iiiin I l.nii)l,t\ii 
I'.itivs ih'iT 2't,000 ill I'ltfiiihilitm — (ioiiliiiii«-<l 



«/>r. .Ill, i<j:,h. 



city 


NuniJitT of iMillcc (Ifparliiiciit 
i'iiipl«y(H'S 


Clly 


N'oioUt 


if |H»llce depnrttncnl 
employees 




TOTAL 


I'llllCf 

otiicers 


Civilian."! 


TOTAL 


I'ollce 
onitvn* 


Clvlllan> 


FLORIDA 

1 'li'iirwiiicr - 
c.iral (i.ilili's 


7>* 
9.-1 
lU 

113 
.Vl 

1113 
lit) 

433 
37 
•ill 

H17 

■2:<\i 
It) 

41 
112 

39 
131, 

')» 
317 
ll.^ 

.".i 
Id 
()hd 
1 •"■•.' 
137 
■2.H 

42 

r2;< 

29 

202 
37 

III 

1." 

3.H 
.",3 
12 
It) 
10. II. -1 

13 
!t<l 
3S 

94 
74 
32 
130 
•£< 
3li 
31 
H4 

:«) 

31 
I'l 

M 


m 

7h 

.VI 
122 

43 

7.1 

.11 
370 

37 

«0 
(ilH 
19H 

3.1 
11.1 

3H 
100 

3.1 
1'20 

«0 
2H4 
IIMi 

.10 
39 

m.i 

139 

1-29 
2H 
41 
41 

122 
2S 
4.1 

170 
37 

19 

31) 

14 

1)7 
37 

.i:i 

40 
43 
9, t>97 
41 
92 

:w 

«8 
27 
HI 
rt7 
32 

iia 

•23 

:« 
31 
7« 
•2W 
31 

^^ 


12 

17 

7 

21 

1.1 


ILLINOIS— Con. 

I'ark Korf!<l 

I'ark HitlKf 

j I'ckiii 


21 

2»i 
2:< 

171 
4». 
f.l 

lid 
VI 

11.1 
21 
71 
•2^ 

H.'. 

43 
1 3s 

t).". 
•2(M 

2:it) 

243 
1.12 
Klili 

63 
,VI 
.12 
4K 
9<l 
3.1 
64 
•204 
93 

•2:< 

3.1 

lot) 

31 

99 
•227 
,19 

•28 

Id 

3t) 
110 

87 

44 

I HI) 

40 

IVi 

3.-. 
V. 
91 

.■>s.1 
1)3 
.VI 
.19 


J7 
24 
22 

1.17 
43 
DO 

132 
48 

100 
21 
67 
24 

7li 
10 
133 
>>d 
192 
•^29 
219 
142 

62 
62 
.10 
.10 
46 
91 
3.1 
.IS 
194 
91 

23 
34 

90 
31 
47 
94 
•201 
.18 
28 
24 
33 
31 
84 
8fi 

:<8 
I4S 
•22 
34 
11.1 
•>fw. 

:« 

92 

.118 

.16 

47 

.18 


1 

2 
1 


K.irt l.iiiKltriliilc . 
1 i:iirii'.^\ illf 


! I't'iiria 

Quincy 


17 
3 


ULil.vih 

llollvWlKMl - 


Kdck I.sland 

K.K-kfortl 

Skokit' . . 


4 




•) 


Ki\ Wi'St 


Sprinicflt^l'l - - 


1.1 


I.ikfland 


6 

22» 

61 

11 

S 

« 
12 

4 
Ifi 

4 
63 

9 

1 
1 

77 
13 
8 

" |i 

I 

10 
32 


I rlmna. 




Miiiuii 

Miiiiiii Hfiich . 
Nrirlh Mi;iiiii . . . 
"rliidili) 


Waukt'Kan 

Wilidcllc. . . 

INDIANA 

j AihIitsdii 

Bldoiiiinnton. 

Ka.sl Chlcatso 

Elkharl. .. 

Rvansvillc. . 

Fori Wayne .. 

<!ary 


4 
4 


l':iii)iiim City 


9 




3 


SI. I'cUTshiirR 

Talliilukssoe 

Tmiiim 


5 
.1 


NNC-^t I'alrii Hcach.. 
GEOBGIA 


L't 

IM 


Mtiiiriv 


Indianapolis 


III 


\llicns... 


Lafayette. ... . .. 

.Marion 

.MichiKan City 

Misliawaka 


1 


Mhinlii 




\ii(riista 


., 


1 'iiliimbus.. 


o 


Oc'catur - 


s 


Kiist Pdint 


New Albany. 






,; 


Macon 

Marietta 


Soiitli Bend 

Terre Haute 

IOWA 

Ami.- 

Biirliiixion 

Cedar Kapids 

Clinton .. - - . 

Council Hlutf.s. 

l)a\t-n|iorl . . 

Dis Moines 


Id 


Home 




.•Savannah 




Val<ld.ma 




IDAHO 

Hoisi- . . 


11 
4 

1 
10 

k 

418 ' 
2 
7 


1 

ID 


M.ilio Falls 

I'liCaU'llo 


6 
.1 


ILLINOIS 


1 




Fort Dodge 

Iowa City... . --- 
Ma,«.n City, 




\lton 


I 


\iirora 


~ 


hrllcville 


- 


ItiTW VII. 


Sioux ( 'ilv 


2i) 


Hlooiiiiti^cton 

< 'li.'iiii|iait;ii 

I'liicaKo 


Waterloo 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson. 

Kansas City 

Lawrence 

Saliiia 

Topeka 

WichilM 

KENTUCKY 

Ashland . ... 
CoviiiKlon. 
I.«\iiiKlon 
Louisville . 

Newport 

Owi'nslioro 

I'adlK'.ih 


1 


< liicauo HeiKhts. . 

1 'iccro 

Daiivilli" 


6 
3.S 


Hi'Catlir 


9 


3 


Dis I'lainM 


6 


K ist .'^1. Louis 


13 

7 


3.1 
6.1 






K\aiislnn 


23 




Krct'iMirl 




"ialc.xluirK.. 

• iratiih' City 

loli.'l 


3 

8 

'i 

H ' 


2 
10 
2 


K:iiikaki>e 


67 


.MuwvimkI 


7 


Molint- 


3 


Oak I'aric 


1 



Ki-J 



Tablf 26. — .\tiniln'r nf Fiill-'l'inn- I'ltlirf Ih-fnirtttirnt /■,»n/)/«>\ r/-s. f/»r. 30, I'KIH, 
i'itiv.s OiiT 23,000 in I'tipnlntion — < .oiil iiiiM-d 



City 



LOUISIANA 

AlcxMri'lrin 

Union KoiiRe 

Bossier City 

L.ifaycite 

I.iike (hiurles 

Monroe 

Now Orleans 

ShreveiK)rl 

MAIHS 

Aiitnirn 

nmiRor 

l.ewiston 

I'orl limit 

South I'ortland 

MABYLAND 

Annnpolls 

Hiiltiinore 

f'un)l>crland 

HiiKenitown 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Arlington 

AltU'txiro 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Brnintree 

BriHkton 

Brookline 

rnnit>ri'l(fe 

Chelsei 

rtiKTipee 

Everett 

FiH K;ver 

un. 

r 

;:iinster 

ell 

;i 

'ord 

I'tOO 

!*.„ 

;•!_ 

'. n.. 

,ih 

Woi.ufii. .......... 

Worrester. „ 

mCHIQAH 

Allen r>rk 

Add Arbor 



Number of |)ollr4> (!e|wrtnicnt 
employees 



TOTAL 



23.% 
22 

3(1 

1, 1311 



■2>\ 
.W 
flO 
124 
31 



3,0M 
06 
.S8 



87 
40 
43 
.S? 
3,034 
48 
101 
14.1 
240 
7.1 
8fl 
113 
25« 
74 
46 
.11 
74 
11.1 
142 
32 
173 
188 
118 

no 

40 
29 
3.1 

233 
39 
43 
87 

IAS 
84 
83 

IM 

372 
A4 
94 
7« 
72 
V, 

4m 



Police 
ofllcers 



211 
22 
46 
3.1 
.10 
1.06.1 
186 



26 
49 
•V. 
lOH 
31 



39 
2,800 

m 



Clvlllun.^ 



264 
6 
4 



78 


9 


39 


1 


40 


3 


57 




2.H26 


208 


46 


2 


96 


5 


137 


8 


230 


10 


70 


5 


H3 


3 


110 


3 


239 


17 


67 


( 


46 




49 


2 


72 


2 


113 


2 


133 


9 


30 


2 


164 


9 


179 


9 


118 




106 


4 


47 


2 


29 




34 


1 


220 


13 


39 




42 


1 


82 


.1 


1.18 


7 


79 


5 


76 


e 


16A 




3.10 


22 


61 


3 


90 


4 


70 


e 


70 


2 


3.1 




3<Q 


41 


42 





City 



MICBIQAN— Con. 

Hill III" Creek 

Hay Citv 

Henion lliirbor... 

HirliiinKliHiii 

Dearborn 

Detroit. . 

Kiist Detroit 

Kast I.ansiiiK 

Kerndale 

Flint 

Ciarilen City 

(irand ItHpiils 

ilanitranu-k 

Ila/el Hark 

Ilinhlan.l Hiirk... 

Inkster 

Jtu-kson 

Kalamazoo 

LansinK 

I.ineoln Park 

Livonia 

Mi.llan.l 

Monroe 

Mount Clemens.. 

Muskegon 

Oak F'ark 

Pontiac 

Port Huron 

Roseville 

Royal Oak 

Saginaw 

St. Clair Shores. . 
Wyan<lotte 

MUiNESOTA 

.\ustin 

Duluth 

Minneapolis 

RichneM 

Roi'hester 

St. Cloutl 

St. Louis Park... 

St. Paul 

Winona ... 

lassissiFPi 

Biloii 

Oreenville 

Oulfpf>rt 

HattiesbiirK 

Jackson 

Laurel 

Meri'li.in 

Natcher 

Vicksburg 

ussomu 

Columbia 

Iri'loHTi'lenoe 

' «ty 

' V . ... 

;. city'.: 
WcbiUf Orovee.. 



Number of police dupurtmeiit 
cinployocs 



TOTAL 



86 
38 
37 

220 

, S78 

42 

21 

46 

2K7 
2.1 

266 
9.1 
3.1 

11.1 
34 
89 

126 

149 
60 
.14 
32 
3.1 
32 
94 
.18 

130 
6.1 
42 
87 

1.14 
.17 
70 



34 

135 
631 
25 
.12 
35 
30 
465 
3>* 



46 
31 
35 
178 
311 

.3.1 
35 



Police 


Civilians 


iinceni 




07 


11 


81 


.', 


35 


3 


31 


6 


202 


IK 


4,426 


4.12 


37 


.1 


20 


1 


42 


4 


238 


49 


25 




229 


37 


(H) 


5 


31 


4 


103 


12 


33 


1 


82 


7 


102 


24 


142 


7 


57 


3 


46 


8 


30 


2 


.34 


1 


30 


2 


74 


20 


.14 


4 


111 


19 


47 


18 


37 


5 


75 


12 


143 


11 


.13 


4 


60 


10 


Xi 


1 


117 


Ml 


575 


.VI 


24 


1 


50 


2 


34 


1 


28 


2 


424 


41 



34 
40 
30 
33 
1.10 
30 
6K 
33 
35 



44 


40 


3U 


39 


31 


31 


.10 


37 


794 


«24 


.34 


32 


33 


33 


100 


94 


101 


92 


2. .127 


1.971 


51 


49 


3A 


23 



103 



'lalilf 2<>. — Nii/h/mt «»/ h'lill-Tiine Palicr DvfHirtnirnt Kruftltnrfs. Apr. 30. I9S8, 
Citien OvtT 25,000 in Population — (iuntiiiueti 



City 



Number of |iohn' (l«>|i»rtnu-nt 
employi-tT" 



TOTAL 



MONTANA 

MlUino . 
Hiitle 

Missoula . . 

NEBRASKA 

'.riii.l l>l.n.l.. 
II i>nni:s . 
I.inoiln . 

M!ii-,|i.. 

NEVADA 

I.iiS Vegiis 

Keno 

NEW HAMPSHISE 

I ".lui-oril. - - 
Miinchester . . 
\:islma 

NEW JERSEY 

Mlilllir <':l> 

H,i\onne 

Heik-ville 

HI.H.mfieM 

ram.len 

Clifton 

Kisi Orang* 

Kli/ :il>eth 

Km:le\v«xxl . 

K iir l.:iwn 

C irtiel-l 

H ickensack... 

II .inilton 

ll..t...ken 

lr\ mctrtn 

Jerst-y City 

Kr irny 

I.iii'len -- 

I.oni: Branch 

M;il>lewix>d 

Monti-Liir 

New Brunswick 

Newark 

North Bcrjren 

Nutley 

I >r:inpe 

Pissciic 

Pitterson 

l'enns,uiken, . 
I'orih \mlM«\ 
IM.iiifl.-M . 

K > -.v ,\ 

r.in.-, k._^^ ^ ., 

I r.-ii!,.n 

I !::..n 

I • •; CltV _ 

v ^.-rk... 

\'. " . 

NEW MEXICO 

Mfii-iupniue 

I .rM.:t.l . 

I; ^.'.M 



41J 



ii: 
51 



'M 

•24y 
lie 



112 
U'i 

47 
»4 

76 
1.427 

\W> 
47 

TV 
1J<' 
:<)»> 

>*7 
Ml 
,1J 

.M 



211 
2.1 

M 



I'oluv ClTillan? 
otr»cvn> 



fi3 




38 




SI 


3 


» 


5 


34 


1 


27 


2 


99 


23 


3«6 


4« 


111) 


M 


"^4 


Z^ 


41 


3 


112 


5 


4A 


5 


in 


34 


it>i 


11 


t>4 


3 


s^ 


3 


2ti7 


42 


y7 


o 


132 


1 


2M 


11 


.> 


o 


441 


5 


*S 




67 


3 


74 


4 



91 


, 


S22 


1:: 


111 


1 


lir? 




.tO 


2 


47 




i» 


5 


7fi 




3:0 


»4 


95 


10 


4.1 


2 


77 


3 


I'X) 




2^8 


18 


33 


2 


va 


4 


so 


10 


48 


4 


35 




M 




248 


24 


7« 


1 


110 


9 


^V 




7.1 


•1 


V. 


1 



City 



Numlier of i>ollrt' <lt'|>artiuHil 
employ «■< 



NEW YORK 



Au^uru. 

Bimthamton. 

Buflalo 

Elmira- 

Ffwport 

Hempstead 

Iron<teqiioit 

Ithat-a .-. 

Jamestown 

Kinfston 

Lackawanna .. 

L.-kiv.rt 

1 



New Vurk 

Newhurph 

Niagam Kails 

North Tonawanda. 

Poughkeepsie 

Rochester 

Kockville Centre-. 

Rome - 

Schenectady 

SjTacuse 

Troy 

I'tica 

Watertown 

White Plains 

Yonkens 

NORTH 
CAROLINA 



Asheville... 

Biirlineton- 



rviUe 

Gakuoia — 

Ooldsboro 

OrMnsboro 

High Point 

Kannapolis 

Raleigh 

Rocky Motmt 

Wilmington 

Wilson . 

Win>tnn-> ileni.. 

HORTH DAKOTA 



Fargo 

Grand Forks 
Minot 



IM 
21 
34 
33 



OHIO 



.Vkron 

.\lliance 

Ashtabula... 
Barl>erton... 

Canton 

Chillicothe 
Cincinnati 
Clf \el.ind. . . . 

•il Heinht.- 



44 

61 

13,1 

1..122 



43 

4> 

171 

1.11 

24.817 

5.1 

176 

35 

74 

.146 

49 

,1.s 

1.19 

4.33 

213 

179 

.V3 

162 

.3441 



91 

M 

274 

122 



36 
1S6 



26 
1-2S 



37 
174 



1 n<iyu>n 



Va Falb 



.■•A .vr> 



271 
42 
5» 

1-25 
1.354 
97 
4»> 
66 
31 
39 
«7 
64 
70 
42 
47 

159 

13y 

23,67!> 

55 

167 

34 

71 

4S2 

4> 

51 

149 

3S4 

156 

169 

51 

155 

30«i 



86 
49 

243 

111 
74 
58 
35 

170 
78 
26 

112 
49 
71 
34 

160 



27!n 
26 



37 


34 


1.1.1 


148 


2:< 


22 


'-*7h 


895 


1> 


1.926 


71 


67 


6,16 


539 


37 


11 


374 


328 



1(H 



Tubl*- 26. — \urnln'r <»/ t'ltll- 1 inn- I'ltlitf Ih-jnirt nn-it t /./h/i/jm «•«•«, Apr. 30, l'J38, 
Cities Oivr 25,000 in Population— (.Atntinueii 





NunilHT 


of iwlico dppartnirnt 
pinployi't's 


City 


NunilMT or |H>li<<i- d< 
«niployi"«'s 


purtniiiii 




TOTAL 


Police 
oflloers 


Civiliims 


TOTAL 


Police 

OfflWTS 


Civilians 


OHIO— Continned 

Ertst Clevelaiul 

EhM Liverpool 


68 
19 
46 
66 
31 
30 
96 
22 
69 

62 
61 
.16 
32 
35 
29 
67 
48 
45 
.W 
60 
34 
59 

i«i 

45 
450 

20 

69 
297 

35 

34 
51 
43 
21 
52 
27 
353 
32 
30 
24 

ri 

67 

759 

73 

51 
31 
134 
104 
93 
43 

52 
196 
146 
52 
32 
100 
M 
3» 
131 
108 

a 

ei 


61 
19 
46 
64 
25 
29 
93 
21 
64 
26 
57 
60 
S4 
27 
33 
29 
64 
48 
43 
46 
57 
33 
.16 
25 
92 
44 

409 
20 
67 

273 
35 

32 
♦4 
41 

21 
50 
26 

312 
29 
30 
23 

246 

52 

647 

58 

51 
30 
124 
92 
85 
42 
71 

to 

179 
142 
49 
32 
M 

30 
134 
75 
31 
67 


7 


PENNSTIVAWIA- 

Continurd 

New K)>n>ini;ti>n . 

Ncirristown 

PhilrtdelplUH 

PitlslmrKh . .. 


4h 
5.»W1 
1, 495 
30 
172 
185 
31 
152 
34 
17 
97 
33 
55 
88 

95 
77 
83 
154 
580 
73 
96 

MO 
160 
128 
49 

87 

37 

6«) 

196 
47 
34 
213 
644 
341 
35 

97 

174 

23« 

30 

124 

20 

48 

37 

166 

1.077 

30 

242 

575 

9K 

25 

35 

37 

1.023 

28 

30 


29 
48 

5. 1K9 
1.4.'i0 
30 
151 
173 
30 

'§ 

13 
94 
32 
54 

84 

95 
76 
82 
140 
508 
69 
92 

122 
147 

116 
45 
70 

33 
61 

186 
47 
33 
170 
536 
309 
35 

S6 

144 

184 

» 

117 

16 

42 

36 

150 

WI7 

30 

309 

523 

93 

24 

33 

28 

849 

28 

30 




Elvria 






Eu»li<l 


2 
6 
1 
3 
1 
5 
1 
5 
1 
2 
5 
2 




Fimllnv 


45 


(iHrncM Heights .. 


Pott.stown 


Hiuiillt"n 


KeailiiiK 


21 


L«k. > 
Laii. . •. 
I.IIli:).. 
l.oniin 

*• ' "'XhU 


Stmnton 

Shrtron 

ri>I>er Prtrhy 

WHshinRton 

West Mifflin 

Wilkes-Hiirre 

Wilkinsluinj 

\Villiamsi>ort 

York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Cranston 

Ea-st Provitleni-e... 


12 
1 

25 
2 
4 

3 
1 

1 
4 


\i ; :.-■•. .wn 


3 


Vorw.M-l 


2 
9 
3 
1 
3 
2 
9 
1 
41 




u 


1 
1 


luhts 




M 


lid 




72 


.•tr-iile 

lo 

- \rlinglon... 

vtU 


Warwick 

Woons<Hkei 

SOUTH 
CAROLINA 

Charleston 


4 
4 


2 
24 


18 




2 

7 
2 


13 


OKLAHOMA 




!•> 




Rock Hill 

.•>l>arIuiil>urK 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Rapid City 

Sioux Falls 

TENNESSEE 

Chattano<ipa 

Jackson 


4 
17 






Mitlwoi City 

Mu5k<v»>e 




2 

1 

41 

3 


4 

5 


Okl*honi.»Clly.-.. 








SUlhrmter 


1 
25 

15 

112 

15 


10 


TnlM 




ORBOON 


Johnson City 

Knoxville 


1 
43 






108 


Bucene 




32 


Portland 


Oak Ridge 




8*lein 


TEXAS 
Abilene 




PBHMSTIVAVIA 


II 


Abinr'^n 




30 




1 
10 
12 
8 
1 
24 
2 
17 
4 
3 


Au5tin 


52 






2 




Beaumont 








4 


Til 


Brownsville 

Bryan . 


8 
I 




Corpus Christ! 

nallas 


16 
180 


. 


Denton 






El Paso 


33 




Kort Worth 

r;:il\p-'r.n 

■le 

M.)ii>t.>ii 


52 




16 

7 


S 

2 


loo 

't 


S3 i 

4 1 


9 
174 


anon 


Ir\in« 






KimcsMlle 





i(»: 



Talilr 26. — .\iirnhiT of hiill-Tltm- I'nihr Di-fmrt rm-n I Hni[tlnyffs, ijtr. 30, 1958, 
(Ulii'.s ttvi-r 2'y,(t(K) in l'i>iiiiliiliini — < '.orit iniit-il 



City 


NlinilMT of police d 
cinployt-fj 


•partnipnt 


City 


NiinilKT of [>olice department 
employe** 




TOTAL 


Police 
otlicers 


Civilians 


TOTAL 


Policv 

OlIiOTS 


Civlllaii- 


TEXAS— Con. 


M 
37 

104 
32 
Ih 
82 
96 
30 
40 
70 
55 

597 
29 
32 
31 
37 
56 
23 

K»9 
»4 

73 

34 

316 

."iO 

124 
IHX 
44 
77 
69 

74 

3Hti 

4(( 
KM 
44:-( 
ILU 

4:< 

4X 


52 
H.-i 

l.vj 
2S 
17 
67 
90 
30 
37 
70 
55 

492 
28 
32 
28 
33 
54 

2:j 

105 

87 

68 

32 

267 

44 

109 
lf.6 
43 
71 
63 
72 
68 
3.i7 
44 
92 

tSi) 
119 

:« 

40 


1 
2 

10 
4 
1 

15 
6 


WASHINGTON— 
Continued 


'^ 

K72 
244 
24t, 

34 
74 

12>» 
.i\ 

120 
Zi 
44 
■2s 
<<4 

.in 
51 
fi) 
41 

42 
91 
74 

170 

4.T 

1, HOh 

o;< 
132 
06 
.^^ 
44 
67 
\m 

33 
.=12 


15 

."W 
707 
210 
225 
.14 
34 
74 

121 

;» 

103 
15 

:i8 

27 
92 

53 
48 
.tO 
3H 
H5 
41 
83 
68 

152 

43 

1.674 

02 

127 
06 
57 
44 
65 

32 
43 

492 




Longview 


8 


Liilmock 


Everett 


3 


Miirslmll 


Seattle 


105 


Mc.Mlen 


Sfmkane 


34 


Mi.lland 




21 


odpssn 


Vancouver 


1 


Oninije 


Walla Walla.. 






3 




I'ciii .\illmr 


WEST VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

Clark.shiirK 

Huntington 

Mornantown 

Parkershtirt; 

Weirton 

Wht'elini; .... 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Beloit - 

Eau Claire 

Fond du Lac 

Oreen Bay 




S;iM Anticlll 






-^:in Antonio 


105 
1 . 


7 


Ii'inple 


1 


TcMirkana - 

Texii.« Citv 


3 
4 
2 


17 
8 


'Ivler 


6 


liiiversity Park... 


1 




4 

7 

5 
2 
49 

6 

15 
17 

1 

6 

6 

5 

6 : 

29 

5 
12 
54 

4 

5 

3 


2 


Wichita Falls 

UTAH 




Ogfien - 


3 




10 


Salt I-ake City 


3 
4 


VERMONT 


Janesville 


1 






8 




La Crosse 


6 




24 


VIRGINIA 


Manitowoc . . . 


2 






134 


Mexandria 


Oshkosh 


1 


Arlinnton 


Racine 


5 


('li!irl<ilte.'<ville 


Shebovgan 




Danville 




1 


llHinpton 


W'ausau 




I,viuhl)iir(; . .. 


Wauwatosa 

West Allis. 

WYOMING 


2 


.\ew(it)rl News 

N.irfnlk 


10 


I'clfrsl.iiru 

I'orlsnioiith 


1 






9 


W an\ ick 

WASHINGTON 
Hellinnhaiii 


HAWAII 

Honolulu City 


96 



106 



I able 27. — Number uf FuU-Time I'lAice Departmpiit Employees, Apr. .'iU, l'J3}{, 
Cities With Population From 2,500 to 25,000 



Clly 



ALABAMA 

AIUtIviHiv . 
Al.xaiid.r City. 
Allcvill.-... 
Allcl;llu>lu 

Athfiis 

Alinorc. 

Altulla 

Auhiirn 

Hiiv Mlnette 

Hoiiz 

Hnwton 

Hrtiii<ll<lKe 

('liick:usi»w 

riillilcrsbiirtt 

('iillm;in.. - 

I )('r;il iir 

ncinoiMjlls.. 

KIbu 

Kiitcrprlsc. 

Kv. ii.'r.-«'n 

K^ilitl.l.l 

K:iirlii'|H^ 

F,i\.il.> 

Kl-.T.ll.l 

Fdtt I'.iyne 

licllfV:l 

(trn-iivllle. 

(iuiiti'iTivlUe 

llart^llf 

11,11!!. \MXXl 

Jack-iiivllle 

Jil.>it>tT 

I.<f<IS '. 

Li(>s<H)mb 

Marion 

M mini tin Brook. 

NortliiMirt 

Ont-oiita 

Op.>llku 

Opp.. 

Plclnioiit 

PruttviUe 

Rounokt> 

ghenuid 

fylanuiKa 

fiilli.i.iia 

rCtj '..'.[ 

■'la 

;rlnKS... 

•;;:;'l'k.. 

ARIZONA 

Hide 

C;..i:. ;;.r 

Co<.li.|.i- 

r>..'i.; .- 

Wm-i'.w 

Yum I 



Number of 
polio- (Ic- 
purdiii'iit 

Pinploy»'os 



City 



ARKANSAS 

Arkiiii.lplila.. 

Aslnlown. 

Uul.svlllr . 

HlyllH'VilU'... 

Cumdi'ii-. 

Clurksvlllf... 

Coiiwav.. 

Cros-st'tt 

Pfrmott.. 
DuniiLs... . . 

Euilora 

Fiivottj'vllle 

Forrcsl City 

IIiimhurK 

Harrison.. 

ill'IcllU 

Hopo 

Malvern 

MarhuiDfl 

.Miukoil Tree 

.McOi-tiee 

Mfiia. 

.MontUvUo 

Morrlllon 

.Newport 

Oswola 

ParaRould 

F'iirl.s 

PlRROtt... 

Pocahontas 

Prescott 

RoRors - 

Ru.ssollvllle 

Searcy 

Siloam Springs — 

Sprincdale 

Stamps 

Stuttgart 

Texarknna.. 

Trumann 

Van Huren 

Walnut Ridge 

Warren. 

West Helena 

We.'t Memphis. . 
Wynne. -- 

CAUFORNIA 

.\lbany 

.Alturas 

Antloch 

Areata.. 

Atherton 

Atwater 

Auburn 

Arusa 

Banning 

Harstow 

Beaumont.. 

B<'ll 

Belmont 

Benlcla 

BUhop 

BIythe 

Brawley.. — 

Brea.. . . 

BurlinKatne 

Calexlco 

Carl.sbad 

Carmel-by-the-Sea 

Chlco... 

Chlno 



.\iiniber of 
pollit' <le- 
purtlllelil 
employees 



City 



CALIFORNIA— 

Continued 

Chowehllla 

Claremont.. 

Clovls 

Coachella . 

Coalliiga 

Colton 

Colusa.. - 

Corcoran 

Corning 

Corona 

Coroniulo 

Covlna 

na%ls... 

Delano ,... 

Dinuba 

El Centro 

El Cerrito 

EI Monte 

El Segundo 

Emeryville 

Escondido 

Exeter 

Fairfax 

Fairfield 

Fillmore 

Fontana 

Fort Bragg.. 

Oilroy 

Oli>ndora. 

Gniss Valley 

Gridley 

nanford 

Healdsburg 

Heinet 

Ilermosa Beach 

Hillsborough 

Hollister 

Huntington Beach. 

Indio 

La Habra 

La Mesa. 

La Verne 

Laguna Beach 

Larkspur 

Lind^iy 

Livermore 

Lodi 

Lom poc 

Los Banos 

Ix)s Oatos. 

Madera 

Manteea 

Nfartinc/ 

Marysville. 

Maywood 

Mere«»d 

Mill Valley 

Millbrae 

Montrlair 

Monterey 

Napa 

Ne«llP9 

Nevada City 

N'<-w|H)rt Beach 

Nortti Sacramento. 

Oakdale 

0«>anside 

Ojai 

Orange 

OrovilW 

Pacific CJrove 

Palm Springs 



\iini^)er of 
police de- 
part nient 
employees 



10^ 



Talilr 27. — yiiiiihfr itf l-'iill -I'i tin- I'olltf l)<-fMtrl iiifii I /-.'//i/i/fn^'f-.s, .l/*r. 30, 1958^ 
Cilirs II i//i I'ttpnltilnnt Irnin 2,500 In 2.'),(KI0 — < loiil iiiiifil 



City 



CAUFOBNIA- 

Continued 

1\,M> Koblcs 

I'ctiihinia 

I'ifiliiiont 

I'ill.^burp 

I'hi-crvillc 

roll Hufiu'ino 

rortirvilli' 

Hifl Bluff 

Hi'ddinc 

Hctilcv 

Kiiillo 

Hivi'ihitnk 

Hosi'ville 

Saliniis. . _ 

Pan Anst'lmo 

San Bruno 

Sun Carlos 

Sun Fcrniindo. .. 

Sun Gabriel 

San Luis Obispo.. 

Sun Marino 

San Pablo 

San Rafael 

Sanpor 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Maria 

Santa Paula. 

Sausalito - 

Seal Beach 

Sebastopol 

Selma 

Shafter._ 

Sierra Madre 

Signal Hill 

South Pasadena.. 

Susanville 

Taft 

Tracy 

Tulare 

Turlock 

fkitdi 

fpland 

Vacaville.. 

Visalia 

\Va,sco 

Walsonville 

WiUits , 

Willows 

Woodlake , 

Woodland 

Vreka City 

^uha City 



COLORADO 



Alamosa 

Brighton 

Canon City 

Corlez 

Craig 

Melta 

I )uran(jo 

Klorencc. 

Fori Collins 

Fort .Morgan . -. 

(Jolden 

Cir.ind Junction. 

Ouniii.son 

I, a lunla 

I.aniar 

I,:i.x .\nimiU5. . .. 

I.eadville 

l-iltleton 

I.ontrinont 



NumiMT of 
pollci- de- 
partment 
employees 



City 



COLORADO-Con. 

fiOVeland. 

M-ini!ou Springs 

.Motite Vista 

Montrose 

Rockv P'ord 

Salida 

.•^terlinp 

Trinidad 

WaWiMibiirc 

CONNECTICUT 

Ansonia_ 

Branford 

Daniclson 

Derby 

.lewett City 

Xaupaluck.. 

Putnam 

Hoekville 

.■'heUon 

Stafford Springs 

Wallingford. 

Willimantic. 

Winsted 

DELAWARE 

Dover 

Laurel 

Lewes 

Milford 

XVw Castle.. 

Xewark 

Seaford 

FLORIDA 

.\palachicola.. 

.\rcadia 

.\uburndale 

Bartow. 

Belle Olade. 

Boynton Beach 

Bradenton 

Chipley 

Cocoa --- 

Dade City.-. 

Dania - 

De Funiak Springs. 

De Land 

Delray Beach.. 

Dunedin 

Eustls.. 

Fernandina Beach.. 

Fort -Meade 

Fort .M yers. 

Fort Pierce.. 
Oreen Cove Springs 

Oulfport 

Hallandale 

Holly Hill 

Homestead... 
.lackMiiiville Beach., 

Kissimmee 

Lake City - 

I,ake Wales 

Lake Worth 

Leestiurg.- 

Live Oak 

.Madison 

Marianna... 

.Melbourne 

Miami Shores 

.Mlaiid Springs 



.Numlx-r of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



\umUT of 
police rli'- 
partment 
employe's 



FLORID A— Con. 

-Mount Dora.. 
Xew Sinvrna Beach. 

Ocala.. 

Opa-locka. 

Ormond Beach 

Patiokee 

I'alatka 

I'alm Beach 

Palmetto 

Perry 

Pinellas Park 

Plant City 

Pompano Beach 

Port St. Joe 

Quincy 

Riviera Beach 

Sanford. 

Sebrinp 

Soutii .NHamI 

St. .\UKUStlne 

St. Cloud. .- 

Stuart.. - - 

Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 

Vero Beach. 

Wauclmla 

West .Miami. 

Winter Oarden 

Winter Haven 

Winter Park 



GEORGIA 



Adel 

Alma 

Americus 

Ash bum 

Bain bridge 

Barnes viUe 

Baxley 

Blakely 

Brunswick 

Cairo 

Calhoun 

Camilla 

Canton 

Carrollton 

Cartersville 

Cedartown 

Chamblee 

Cochran. 

College Park.... 

Commerce 

Cordele.- 

Co\ ington 

Culhbert 

Dalton 

I)aw,son.. 

Dougla-sville 

Dul)lin 

Eastman 

Eatonton 

Elberion 

Fitzgerald 

Forest Park 

Forsyth 

Oaiiiesville 

(Irecnsboro 

Orillin. 

HaiH'vllle 

Hartwell 

Hawklnsville.. 

llazelhurst 

Hogansvllle 

Jesup 



los 



I.ll>l« 



— \n iiilnr itj I nil- I inn- I'olirt ItrpnrI tinit I Hin/iloy rrs. iftr. MK I'f.'tH, 
(.ilirs Hitlt I'npuliitiitn Frntn 2,500 tn 25,000 — ( !uiitiiiue<l 



City 



GEORGIA Con. 



1... Kiy.tt... ., 

l..l«M IKTVlllC. 

.M:iih!„st,.r.. ., 
M:!!. '.k'.vUlc... 

.M.i,.,... 

Mmi,', ;iira8 

Muiiltiic 

Niisliville 

NVwiiiUi 

Oclllii 

ri'lliiiin 

INirlcrdiJe 

Qiiltiimn 

Hixkiii.irt 

I<ONS\lll.< 

SiiiicliisvlU* 

t^iiiiiiiiiTvlUe 

S\v;iliisl>oro 

Pylviuilu 

t^ylvistcr 

Tiill;ilKK>sa- 

Th(>iiiii.<ton 

ThomiLsvUle 

Tifloii . 

Tri.'ii 
Vl.l.ilii 

W;iriii I KuttUlS. 
\\ L-liTiu-ton.- . 

W.i\,!,.v< . . . 

W.i) iiisl>f)ro. 



N'limlHT of 
|tollo- <tl«- 
piu-tmcnt 
omploywa 



IDAHO 

Al.iin.,|;i 
Hlwkf..,,! 

Buhl 

Burlov 

Culdw.-ll 

Coeur il'Alene. 

Emniftt 

OoodlDi; 

Oraiif!t-vllle 

Jeronu' 

KeUoRK 

LewLston 

Mont|)>>Iler 

Moscow 

Kampa 

Payrtto 

Prvjitoii 

R«>xl>iir(; 

Riijxrt 

Suliniiii „.. 

8an(l|K>int 

8t. Anthony .. 

Twin KalLi 

Walhuv .. 
WcU.r . 



ILLINOIS 

AWo . 

Alortiin 

Ann.i 

Ar!!; •■.•• n lletthta. 

'■ •i\ 



City 



ILLINOIS Con. 

nroiiilvli'w 

Hrookflild 

Hushii.ll... 

Culro 

Cahuni't City 

rmiton 

Ciirboiidiilo 

riirllnvlllc 

CnrlvU- 

Curnil 

Ciirthuge 

Ciuvy 

rmtrnlla ., 

Charli'ston 

Chp.stor 

Chllllcothe 

Christopher 

Clinton 

Collln.svllle 

Cri'vc Coeur 

Crystal Lake 

De Kalb 

Dwrfleld 

Dixon 

Oolton 

OowniTS Grove 

Du yuoln 

DwlRht 

Eikst Alton 

Ea.st .\lollnc 

Ea.'it I'ooria 

EdwardsvUle 

EtllnRham 

Eldorado 

Elm wood Park 

EvorKTocn Park 

Fairfield 

Farmlngton 

Flora.. 

Forest Park 

Franklin Park 

Fulton 

Galena 

Oalva 

Oono.'soo 

Geneva 

Oeorpetown 

Gibson City 

Olllc-snle 

Glen Ellyn .. 

Glencoe... 

Glen view 

Greenville 

llarri.sburg 

Harvard 

ilurvey 

Havana 

Herrln. 

IllRhland .. 

Illrhl md Park 



ity. 



Park... 



NiiinluT of 
polio- de- 
partment 
rniployccH 



10 
IH 
3 
l.^ 
H 
13 
10 
f, 
2 
6 
3 
4 

l.s 
9 

.^ 

2 
o 

,^ 

13 

7 

6 

16 

8 

13 

12 

19 

4 

5 

9 

16 

18 

10 

7 

6 

22 

18 

6 

2 

9 

23 

13 

1 

5 

2 

6 

9 

2 

3 

3 
20 
17 
20 

4 

7 

5 
2S 

9 

6 

5 
30 

6 

5 
15 
12 

6 
19 
II 

2 
11 
14 
2S 
IS 
14 
22 
11 



City 



ILLINOIS Con. 

Lawreilcevllle 

lA-morit 

l<<*wlstown 

I.itxrtyvlllo 

LltUMiIri 

Lllieolnwood 

I.llc'lifleld 

IXH-k|M)lt 

Loin hard . 

Ix)ves Park 

Lyons 

.\laoomb 

.Madison 

.Marenno 

.Marlon .'... 

.Markham 

.Mars<>llles 

.Marshall... 

.Ma-seoutah . 

Mattoon.. 

.Mcl>eansboro.. - 

.Melrose Park . . 

.Mendota 

.Metropolis 

.Midlothian 

Momeiice.. .. . 

.Monmouth 

-Montleollo 

•Morrl.'! 

.Morrl.son 

-Morton 

.Morton Grove 

-Mount Carniel 

Mount Morris 

-Mount Prospect... 

.Mount \'crnoiJ 

.Mundelein 

.Muriihysboro 

-Vapcrvillc 

-N'ewton 

Xiles 

-Vokomis 

-N'ormal 

-VorridRe 

-N'orth Chicajto 

North Lake 

-N'orth Riverside. . 

.Vorthhrook 

O' Fallon... 

Oak Lawn 

Oglesby 

Olney.... . 

Oregon ... 

Ottawa 

Palatine . . . 

Pana 

Paxton 

Peoria Heights 

Peru 

Phoenix 

PlnoknevvlUe 

Pitt.sfleld 

Pontine 

Princeton 

Rantoul 

River Forest . 

River Grove , 

RIverdale 

Kh.r^M.- ... . 



KuMu!lli-. 

SaVtn 

f^andwieh. 



Nunilx'r of 
IMillo' de- 
partment 
eniploye<'» 



loy 



1'al.l. 



. — "SiimfnT nf I'liH-'I'inn' I'ttVni- Dr/Htrt im-ii I l^nt/tlttyfrs, Apr. .70, 7958, 
t'.ilifn M ilh I'ltjHiliilittn trinn '2,.'t()0 tn ^.yJKKt — < !<tnl iiiiifii 



City 


NumN-r of 
police de- 
purl meiil 
empioyws | 


City 


.VuniN-r of 
pollci- de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


\umb»T of 
pollc<' de- 
part menl 
employees 


ILUNOIS Con. 


7 
S 
5 

5 
4 
3 
5 

10 
3 
3 

Ifi 
7 

16 
4 

14 
9 
8 
I 
6 

LI 

14 
2 

r> 

3 
10 

9 

6 
11 
14 

5 

i 

4 
7 

22 
10 
8 
3 
10 

9 
5 
5 
6 

10 
3 

22 

11 
4 

10 

12 
4 
4 
3 
4 
3 
9 

10 
7 

31 

25 

23 

3 

12 
4 
4 
S 
8 

14 
1 

22 


INDIANA Con. 
Franklin 


10 1 

5 

3 
10 
13 
11 
12 

8 

5 

8 
10 

4 
23 

4 

5 
19 
11 

5 
29 
10 
12 

9 
30 
13 
11 

6 

5 
12 

S 

4 
32 
14 

6 

8 

2 

3 
23 

4 

7 

7 
10 
14 

4 

5 
11 

5 

8 
12 
21 

8 

7 

5 

8 

fl 
18 
23 
18 
11 
14 
18 

5 
27 
10 

6 
8 
3 
7 
3 
3 
11 
4 


IOWA Con. 


7 


Shclhvvill<> 


Onrretl 


Cedar Fulls 


13 


Silvis 


Oas City 


Centnrville 

Chariton 




.'^outli Bcloit 


Oashen 


4 


Soiitli Holland 


Orcencdstle . 


Charles City 

Cherokee 


13 


SpiirtH- . 

Sprinf! Valloy 

St. Churlos 


Oro«-nflpld 


K 


flreensburg 

(Iri-enwood 


Clarinda 


C, 


Clarion 

Clear Lake 

Ores<'o 


3 




(Iriimh 


10 


StcRpr 


Highland 


3 


SlorlinK 


Hobart. 

HuiitinKhnre 

Huiitin^lon 


Creston 


11 


Stirkney 


Dp Wilt 

Detortih 


3 
G 






7 






Eaele fJrove 

Eldora 

Fmmetsburg 

Estlierville 


4 


Sycamore 

Tavlorvillo . . -. . 


lellersonville 

Kendallville 

Kno\ 

La Porte 


4 


Tu.>.col« 


9 


Vandalia 


Kvan.sdule 


2 


Venice . . 


Lawrencehurp 


Fairfield 

Forest City 




Villa Park 


3 






Fort M.idison 


H 


Washington 




3 






7 


Wat.soka 


Martinsville. - 

Mitcliell 


H.inii)ton 


4 




4 


Wist Frankfort 




Hiwarden 


3 




Mount Vernon 

Munsler 


4 


Western c^iiring'S 


Independence 


5 




5 


W'estville 


New Ca.stle 


lowi Falls.- 


9 


W'heaton . . 




1 


Wliite Hill 


North Manchester.. 

North Vi.Tnon 

Oakland City 

Paoli 




I'.t 


Wilniinpton 


Knoxville 

Le Mar; 






Manchester 


1 




Pern 

Petersburg .- 

Pluinfi-^ld 






Z«M"!er 






Zion - 


Marshalllown 

Missouri Valley 


21 




Plvniouth 


3 


INDIANA 




4 






Mount Pleasant 

-Muscatine 


'.1 


Mexaiidria 




21 






3 


Altievi 


Rushville 


New Hampton 

Newton 


3 


Alil)iirn 




i: 








13 


FJat.sville 








Bedford 


Shelbyville 




1 




Osceola 




Bieknoll 




Oskaloosa 


II 


BlufTton 


Tell City 


Pella ...-. 


1 


Boonvillc 


Tipton 


Perry 

Red Oak 


10 


Bra7.il .. .. 


In ion Citv 


s 


Bremen 


Valparaiso 


Rock Rapids. 

Sac City 

Sheldon 

Shenandoah 


•) 


Brook ville.. 




3 


C':iiiit)ridee City 


W'abash 


1 




7 




Washington.- 

West Lafayette 

West Terre Haute.. 
Whiting... 


II 


("lark«vi'le 


Storm Lake 


ti 


( Million 


Tama 


2 


Colniiiliia City 


Tipton 


2 


Vinton 


4 


Connersville 


IOWA 
Albia 


Washington 


3 


Crown Point 

Danville 


Waverly... 

Webster City 

West Oes Moines... 
Wintersi't 

KANSAS 

Abilene 

.Vnthony 

Arkan.sas City 


ti 
10 


heeatlir 




(I 


Dilplii 


Annmosa . 


4 


luirikirk 


Atlantic 




K;isi < larv . 


.\udubon . 




Kdiiiliiin; 

I'.lwood 


Belle Plaine 

Betlendorf 


n 


1' airiiiount 


Bloomfleld 


4 


Kn iiWforl 


Boone 


20 



110 



Tul)U' 27. — \iiinlnr of !■ nil- I iiiif I'ttlin- Ih'fxirl nnii f Hinitlnyrrs, i/tr. .'iO, I'/.'tH, 
Cities It itii t'opulutinn From 2,500 ttt 25,000 — <:<iiitiiuif<l 



city 



KANSAS Con 

At^hi^:(ln 

Aui;ti.stik 

Biixtor Springs... 

B>-llfvilli> 

B.-lolt 

("luuuito 

Chorryvnle 

Clay Ci-ntcr 

ColIcyviUe 

Colhy 

rolumbus 

Cotioiriliii 

Council drove... 

Pmlc.' City 

El Dorudo 

Ellinwood 

Ellis 

Ein|>oria 

Kiin-ka 

l"ort Scott 

Frcdonin 

Our-I.'n City 

Ournott 

()o<Kll!ind 

Ortiit IKnd 

Hays 

HiTMlRton 

Hhiu'tttim 

Hiii-iinpton 

Holtim 

Iliiiroton 

Iiidi'ix-ndi'ncr 

lola 

Juiution City 

Kinirnian 

L;im«Hl 

I^^ivcnworth 

I.iN-rul 

Lyons 

Mimh.ittnn 

M:irv-s;lU- , 

Mrl'li. r-on 

Ko<><l. .-.ha 

Vrwton , 

Norton 

Olathp 

Osuwutomle 

Ottawa 

Paoln 

Parvin-^ , 

ri)illip-».urK 

Pitt-iburn , 

Tnitt 

HvisivW 

trott City 

>V. 111!. .-Lin , 

Win'i.M 

KEHTUCKT 

Barbourville 

Bvdstown 

aBtUrvuo 
BowllnK Orwn... 
rmllton 
l!«-tt.if.urK 

Ceniml City 

Corbin 

f^ -■ nd 



NunilxT of 
pollcv do- 
piirtinoiit 

fuiployci-s 



Clly 


Number of 
polhv de- 
IMtrtment 
rmployeea 


City 


NumiImt of 
p<ille«' de- 
part nient 

employeos 


KBNTUCKT Con. 
Elsiiioro 


3 
7 
13 
2ft 
7 
8 
7 
8 

in 

7 

11 

34 

24 

4 

3 

6 

5 

6 

Ifi 

11 

15 

3 

4 

3 

11 

lU 

8 

6 

11 

3 

10 

6 

13 

5 

20 

10 

10 

12 

3 

6 

4 

17 

14 

21 

2 

21 

4 

4 

6 

8 

17 

14 

10 

I 

3 

« 

84 

9 

ft 

S 

« 

18 

13 

22 

3 

4 

« 

12 

2 

IS 

IS 

6 


LOUISIANA Con. 





Erljtn»r<>r 


Tallulah 


7 


Fort Thoiniis 


Thilxwlaux 


20 


Frankfort 


Ville riatte 


12 


Franklin 


Vinton 


3 


Fulton 


West Monroe 

Winnfleld 


20 


Oi'orpctown 


7 


Cinvn\ illi> 


WinnslMtro 


4 


Harlan 

HarrodsluirR 

Hur.nrd 

Ilondcrson 


MAINE 


27 


DopkinsvilU' 

Irvmc . 


Bath 


Ifi 


BelfiLst 


4 


Jenkins 


HIddeford 


17 


Lebanon 




7 


London 




15 


Ludlow 


Calais ... 


7 


Mav(Wl<l 


Ellsworth 


4 


MavivilU" 

Mi(i,IU;l>oro 


Fort Fairneld 


5 
8 


^'ollti(•l•llo 


Hullowell 


3 


Mori'hcad 


Madison 


3 


Morpanflcld 


Old Town 


6 


Mount Sterling 

Murray 


Pres(|ue Isle 

Rockland 


12 
11 


Nicholrtsville 


Runiford 


12 


Pttlntsville 




9 


Paris 


Waterville 


20 


Park Hills 


West brook 


13 


Pikevillp 


MARYLAND 

Aberdeen 




Pinovillo 




Priiuvton 




Providtnuv 


8 


Riflinioiul- 


Bel Air 


5 


Russi'llvillc. 


Bladensburg 


4 


SlulbvvilU' 


2 


Sonu'rsct 




3 


South Fort Mitchell. 
Vcn!aillc>s 


Caiiibri(l'.:c 

Capitol Heights 

Chestertown 

CrisHeld 


22 
3 


Willianisburp 

Winchester 


3 

8 




Euston 


11 


LOUISIANA 


Elkton 


5 






33 


Abbeville 


Qreenbelt 


6 


Bustrop 


Havre de Onicr 

Hyattsville... 

Laurel... 

Mount Rainier 

Pocomoke City 


8 


Berw ieit 


13 




9 


Covinpton 


g 


I)e Quinrv 


8 


De Kidder 


40 


Donaldson ville 

Eunice 


Takonia I'ark 

Westminster 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Abinpton 


19 

7 


Franklin 




Hammond 




Harahan 




Hayiiesvllle 


10 


Homer 




18 


Houma 


Amenbury 


13 


Jcnnlnpji 


Amherst 


10 


Jonesboro 


.Andovcr 


22 


Knfilnn 


Athol 


16 


V 


Aubum 


7 


ly 


Ayer 


6 


<-9 


Bumstabte .. .. 


28 




Blnekstone 


3 




Brldpewater 


7 
14 


1 UM . iU> 


Clinton 


17 


PliMjuein mc 


Concord 


18 


Port Allen 


Dallon 


5 


Ra>-ne 


Dan vers 


21 


Rii.<iton 


Dartmouth 


II 


SprlDKblll 


Dcdbom 


79 



Taldr 27. — \ii mhrr of h'lill-'l'iinr I'ltlirr Ifrfmrt iiii-n t I'lntftlnyrrs, Apr. 30, I'f.iS, 
(Ulirs If ilh l'(tintliilii>ii Irtnn 2,')(H) lit 1I3J)()() — ( '.mil iiiiicti 



City 


NumJ)or of 
tK)llce de- 1 
parlment 
eniploycfs 


1 

City 


.Number of 
police de- 
part mi-nt 

employws 


City 


Number of 
[Milicc de- 
partment 

employe<'S 


MASSACHDSETTS- 
Continued 


9 
15 
10 

9 
27 

7 
2fl 
30 

3 
14 
12 

4 
31 
16 
15 

6 
26 
22 
13 
16 
21 

4 
61 

8 

8 
39 
17 
31 
12 
18 
10 
33 

6 

24 
6 

in 

27 
V.i 

t> 
2:i 

(i 
12 
29 

3 
29 
14 
25 

6 
30 
19 

H 

20 
34 
44 
41 
10 
10 
36 
32 

2ti 

15 
4 
t) 

14 

19 
1 
4 

19 
4 
8 


HICHIOAN-Con. 
Bo\-np Cltv 


4 

9 
13 

3 
15 

4 

7 

6 

3 
15 
14 

9 

4 
11 

5 
53 
22 

7 

5 


16 

5 

8 
18 

28 
33 

31 

6 
10 

9 
23 

6 

4 

8 

3 
14 
13 

5 
18 
18 

5 

8 

5 

'2 1 

19 

10 

5 

4 
20 

9 

7 

4 
2(1 

1; 

15 

5 
32 
14 

2 
28 

7 

4 

6 
28 

9 

4 

8 
15 
45 

6 

4 


MICHIGAN- Con. 
Romeo 






Biirhanan 


Sault Sto Marie 

South Haven 

St. Clair 


27 


Kii.'^tliiinipton 


Cadillac 


n 


Caro 


1 


rrankliii 


Center Line 


St. Ignace 


:t 




St. Johns 




flrciit Harrinpton... 
firn-nnold 


Charlotte 


St. Joseph 


20 


C hebovean . 


St. Lotiis 




1 liiit-'hiim 


Chels-a 

Clawson 


Sturgis 


1.'. 




Tecumseh 


K 




Cold water 


Three Rivers 

Traverse City 

Trenton 


11 




Dowapiac 


IK 


I,to 


Dtirand 

E<ist Grand Rapids. 

Eaton Rapids 

F. corse 


;ui 




Vassar 






Wakefield 


- 


I.ildlow 


Wavne.. 


27 


.Miiiisftcld 




Vpsilanti 


37 




Fenton 


Zeeland 


4 


M;irlboroiiph 


Fremont 


MINNESOTA 
.\lbert Ijca 




Mavnard 


Oladstone. . 




Middlcboro 


Orand Haven 

Grand Ledpe 

Greenville.. 




Milford 


at 


Millburv 


.\le\andria 


t'l 


Milton 


Grosse Pointe 

Orossc Pointe 
Farms 


.\ n ok a 


i:! 


M ontague 






Nantucket - 


Bemiiiji 


IJ 


Nopdham 


Grosse Pointe Park. 
Grosse Pointe 
Woods 


Benson 


I'l 


N cw burvport 


Blue Karth 


4 


North Adams 




1.-. 


North Aiidovpr 




Breckenridge 

Brooklyn Center 

Cambridge. 


1 


North .\ttl('boro 


Hastings 


i; 


Northbri<tpc 


llillsilale 


o 




Holland... 


Chisholm 


14 


Oranpc 


Hollv 


Cloquet 


K' 


Palmer 


Houuhton 


Columbia Heights.. 
Crookston 


111 




Howell 


rj 




Hudson 

Hiintinpton Woods. 
Iron Moimtain 


Crosbv 


t 


Kandolph 


Crystal 


1 :; 


K(a<ling 


Detroit Lakes 

East Grand Forks.. 
Edina 


I'l 


Ivnckland 


',1 


Ruck port 




19 






Elv 


12 


Somcrwt 




Eveleth 


It 


South Iladlov 


Laiicer 


Fairmont 


l:t 


Southhridgo .... 


Lauruim 


Faribault 


17 


S|H'n«'r 


Ludington . 


Fergus Falls 

Fridlcv. 


U 


Sfonoham 


Madison Heights... 








-, 


Pwampscott 

I'xbridKo. _ 




Glen wood 




Marine City 

Maniuette 


Golden Valley 

Grand Rapids 

Granite Falls 

Hast iiigs 


7 


Wiikcflcld 


7 


Walpole. 


Marshall 


:t 


Ware 


Marvsville 


t) 


Wc.b.'ilcr 




llibbiiig 


21 


W.lli'slcv 




Hopkins 


n 


West .■^prinftfleld 


Menominee 


Hutchinson.. 

International Falls.. 

Lake City 

Le Sueur ... 

Litchfield 

Little FalLs 


4 


West field 


Milan . 

Mount Morris 

Motnit Pleasant 

Munisinp. . 

Muskegon Heights. 


K 


Whitman 


4 


Winchendon 

Winchester 


3 

t 


^\'iIltll^op 








4 


mCHIOAN 




Mankato 

Marshall 

Montevideo 

Moorhcad . 

New rim . 

-North Mankato 

.North St. Paul 

.Norlhfleld 

Orlonvllle 

Owatoniia 

Park Raplils.. 
Pl|H'stone.. 
Prwtur 


2S 




Niles 


8 


Adrian 


Norlhville 


8 


Albion 




ai 


Algonac 


Otsego 


15 


Allecnn 


Owo.sso 


4 


Alma 


rt 


Mpeiia 


Plain well 


,-, 


Had Axe 

Meldinu 


Pleasant Ridge 

Plvmouth 


4 
12 


Herklev 


River Rouge 

FtiK'hester .. 

1 Rogers City 


4 


Hi'S.s<'m('r 


5 


Hii; Kapids 


2 



Tilldr 27. — \iiinhrr nj' I'lill - I imr I'nliic Itfiuirlniriit i'.ini>lt>\t'i's, Apr. 30, l'J58f 
Citien If'ith Hopttlatian Front 2,.'HHf tn 25,000 — Continued 



City 



MINNESOTA Con 

K.'.l WlUK 

Kf.hv.MHl Falls 

KobhiiiMliile 

Siiuk Cfiitre 

Siuik Kitplds 

8hiikoi>«t' 

Slo'py Kyt> 

Sotiih SI Paul 

Sprlnnn.'ld 

St. Jimifs 

St. I'llcr . 

St!U>l.".>i 

StlUwiitiT.. 

Thi.f Klvcr Falls.. 

Trm-y 

Two llitrbors 

\'lrplniii 

Wiulfiia 

Wii.<«it 

Wot SI I'mil 

Wbiti' Xi'iir Lake.. 

Wllliiuir 

Wlii.lom 

WOrlhliiKton . 

MISSISSIPPI 

.Mx-nlti-n. . . ... 

H;iy St. Ix>Ui8 

Hooiu-vllle ... 

Hrimkliiiven 

Ciintoi) 

Charli-ton 

nuiks.liile 

niv.l.iii.l 

Coluiiitiiii 

Cotiiinhiis — 

Coriii'ti , 

Crv-i il Sprimo 

EIli>vill.. 

Kort-t 

(JrttiiwcHxl 

Ili7l. ')iir«t 

Imll i!'.m1;1 

K<>"^ ni^ko.... 

l^-liii'l 

I^'ll'lt'"!! 

Ixiiitr H.ich 

McCmiuI) 

.Mox-; I'..lnt 

N«w \lt>any . 

.St wliiti 

On. Ill Springs 

Oxfor.l 

I'l-.. Ik-Mlllll 

I'iLv- ("lirl.«tllin. .. . 
I'orl < iil'^>n 

\v ,t.r \ ,;;. V 

W.-t I',, lilt 

Will. .11 , 

Y.i/.-. «■»>• . 

MISSOURI 

.^uii.r 1 

H.rk. 1. V 

IWtll.l'.V 

»..liv r 

Hon!!, r.-ire 

H.».n\!:i.. 

Itr. . k. rrl.lRo illUs.. 

Hr.iiru.--1 . 

HriK.kll.ltl 



NtinilHT of 

|X)llt1> tlf- 

piirtiiii'iit 
cniploy<'«'s 



City 



MISSOURI Con. 

Htill.r ... 

Ciiltfonilu 

Ciimproii 

('u|H> (llnirdeau 

Carrollloii . . 

('mlhajri' 

Charleston 

Clillllcothe 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Crystal City 

Dp .<?oto 

IVxtpr 

Kast Prairie 

KIdon 

Kxcclslor Springs... 

FarmiiiRton 

Fayctto 

Fortnison 

Fcstus 

Flat River. 

Floris.<yint 

P'n'<lerlcktown 

Fulton 

Olendale 

Ilannihal 

llarri.sonvlUe 

Havtl 

HIpBinsvlUe 

MlUsdale... 

Jack.son 

Jennlnps 

Kennctt 

Ktrksville 

Lodue 

Lamar. 

Lebanon 

Lws Summit 

Ixjuisiana 

Maiden 

.Maple wood 

Mnrcrlinc 

.Marshall 

-VlaryvUle 

Mexico 

.Moberly 

.Monett 

.N'eosho 

.Vevada 

.Vorth Kansas City. 

Overland 

Pafiedale 

Pine Lawn 

F'oplar Hluff 

Richmond 

Richmond Heights. 

Rock lliU 

RoUa 

Salem 

Shri'w.sbury 

81ke9ton 

Slater 

.>i .Vim 





n-iituu 


. leTe 


1 T 




! r 




» V 


lU. y r 


,u-k 










'r« 

■n.. 

i» 



.Vuinber of 
po||(v de- 
partment 
employees 




MONTANA 

.\na('(iiid:i 

no7.eiiiaii 

Cut Hank 

Dillon.. 

filaspow 

Olendlve 

Hanillton 

Helena 

KallsiH'll 

Laurel 

Lewlstown 

Livingston 

Miles City 

Red Lodpc 

Shelby 

Sidney 

Whlteflsh 

Wolf Point 

NEBRASKA 

Alliance 

Auburn 

Beatrice 

Bellevue 

Blair 

Broken Bow 

Chadron 

Columbus 

Cor.ad 

Crete. 

Fairbury 

Falls City 

Fremont.. -- 

Oerinp 

(.lothenburg 

Holdrepe 

Kearney 

I>exinpton 

McCook 

Nebraska City 

Norfolk 

North Platte 

Opallala 

Platt,>;mouth 

Schuvlcr 

ScottsblulT 

Seward 

Sidney 

SuiH-rlor 

Valentine 

Wahoo 

WiUTie 

West Point. 

York 

NEVADA 

Carson City . 
Elko 

Henderson 

North Las Vegas.... 

Si«irks . 

Wiiinenmcca . 

NEW HAMPSHIRB 

Berlin... 

Claremont 

Derry. . . 

Dover 

Exeter 

Franklin.. 

Ke<"ne 

Laconia 



.N'umlM-r of 
IMillcf <le- 
partment 

employws 



li:j 



Tal»l«- 27. — \iiinlnT nf Fiill-Tiiin- I'ttllif Diimrlmml l^nifilnyri's, Apr. 30, IQ.'iS, 
Cilia's M »//i I'ttpiiliititut triun 2..'t(K) li> 2.'fJKK> — ( .oiiliiiiu'd 



City 



Number of 
pollco do- 
part mpiit 

employees 



NEW HAMP- 
SHIRE Con. 

Lcl.a 1 

Lltlltloii 

MllfonI - 

Newport 

Portsmouth 

Rochester 

•^nmersworth 

NEW JERSEY 

Aslmry Park 

Atlantie Highlands. 

.\uduV)on 

Burrington 

Bellmawr — 

Belmar ■ 

Berpenfleld 

Bemardsville 

Beverly 

Bloomingdale 

Bogota - 

Boonton -. 

Bordcntown.. 

Bound Brook 

Bradley Beach 

Bridpeton 

Brigantine - 

Burlinpton 

Butler..- --- 

Caldwell 

Cape May 

Carlstadt -- 

Carteret -- 

Chatham - 

Clayton - 

Clcmcnton 

ClifTside Park 

Closter 

CoUinpswood 

Cranford 

Cresskill - 

Dover 

Dumont 

Dunollen 

East Paterson 

East Rutherford- -- 

Eatontown 

Edpewater 

Egg Harbor City.. 

Fair Haven 

Fairvlew 

Fanwood 

Flcminpton.- 

Fort T-ee 

Fr.inklln 

Freehold 

fJarwood 

f}lassl)oro 

fll.n Ridge 

(lien Rock 

(iloucestcr City 

< iiilti'iilicrp 

llacki'ttstowii 

Ila.l.l.iii IleiphtS..- 

Iladdnnncld 

H.l.'.loii. . 
llarriiMontoli 
Harrison 
lla-itiriiiick Heights 

Hawthorne.. 

lliL'lilatid Park 

lliL'hlanrls 

lliL'tilstown 



53 
6 
13 

10 
17 
27 

."i 

1 
14 
15 

7 

14 
13 
26 

8 
28 

4 

18 
10 
15 
42 
17 

4 

3 

28 
11 
21 
37 
10 
15 
22 
11 
24 
20 
12 
18 

8 

7 
20 
14 

2 
40 

3 
11 
10 
11 
21 
21 
24 
12 

5 
12 
27 

5 
12 
5h 
17 
17 
IK 



NEW JERSEY- 
Continued 



Hillsdale 

Hillside 

Kealishurg. 

Kenilwortli 

Key port.. 

Lanihertville 

l.eonia 

Liiieolii Park 

l.iltlc Ferry 

Little Silver 

Lodi 

Lyndhurst 

Madison.. 

Manii,s(|uan 

Maiiville - 

Margate City 

Matawan. . 

Maywood 

Merehantville 

Metuchen 

Middlesex 

Midland Park 

Millljurn 

Milltown 

Millville 

Morris Plains 

Morristown 

Mount Ephraim 

Moimtuin Lakes 

Neptune City 

Neptune Township. 

Xew Milford 

New Providence 

Newton , 

North Arlington 

North Hak'don 

North Plainfield-.., 
North VVildwood... 

Northfleld.. 

Oaklyn. - 

Ocean City 

Oeeanport 

Uradell- 

Palisades Park 

Palmyra 

Paraiiius 

Park Ridge 

Paulsboro 

Pen lis drove 

Phillipsburg 

Pitman 

Pleasantville 

1 I'oint Pleasant 

I I'ompton Lakes 

; Princeton 

'■ Prospect Park . 

Ramsey 

Raritan 

Red Hank 

Ridgpneld 

Ridgefield Park... 

River Edge. 

I Riverton 

{ Rockaway 

I Roselle 

Raselle Park 

' Rutnson.. 

Riinnemede 

Rutherford 

Saletii 

Sayreville... - 

S<'eaueus 

I Somerville- 



Number of 
pollw dt^- 
purtment 
employees 



City 



NEW JERSEY 
Continued 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



South Ainlioy 

South Hound 

Brook 

South Orange 

South Plainfield... 

South River 

Summit 

Tenafly - 

Totowa 

Union Beach 

Ventnor City 

Verona 

Vineland 

Waldwick 

Wallington 

Wanaque 

Washington 

Weehawken - 

West Caldwell 

West Long Branch. 

West Paterson 

Westfield 

Westville 

Westwood -.- 

Wharton 

Wild wood 

Wood Lynne 

Wood Ridge - 

Woodliury,. 



NEW MEXICO 



Alaniopordo 

Artesia 

Belen 

Clayton 

Clovis 

Deming 

Farmineton 

Gallup 

Hobhs 

Las Cruees 

Las Vegas City 

Las Vegas Town... 

Lordshurg .. 

Los Alamos 

Lovington 

Portales 

Raton 

Silver City -. 

Truth or Conse- 
quences -. 

Tiiciiineari 

NEW YORK 



Albion.. 

Amity ville 

Attica 

Babylon 

Baldwinsville.. 
Ballston Spa... 

Batavia 

Bath.... 

Beacon 

Hlasdell 

Hroekport 

Bronx ville 

Canajoharie 

Canaiidaigiia.. 

Canisteo 

Canton 

Carthage 



114 



I able 27.^.\uni/i«'r <)/ Fii//-7V/n«' /'<>/i««- Ih/Hirl 111411 1 l^iiiftlityrt-s, Apr. M, l'}.'tH, 
K Citit's U itii PopuUitum train 2,500 to 25,000 — Coiiliiiiird 



City 



NEW YORK Con. 

(\it.skill 

Cotilcsklll , 

CoIkk'S 

('<><i|KTstown... 

Corinth 

CornitiR.... , 

Corthmil 

Coxsiu'kie 

Crotoii on Hudson. 

Dun.sville 

l)p|>ow 

Dobbs Ferry 

Dolppville 

Diuikirk 

East Aurora 

East K(X'hfSt<*r 

Eftst Svniciise 

Ellenville 

Elmim Hvigbts 

Elnisford 

Emlicotl 

Knirport 

Fulconrr 

Fuycttfville 

Flonil Piirk , 

Fort Edward 

Fort Plain , 

Frankfort , 

Frrdonia 

Fulton 

Oarden City 

Ocnesoo 

Geneva 

Olen Cove 

Olens Falls 

(fJoversviUe 

Ooshcn , 

Oouvemcur 

Oowan<hi , 

Oranville , 

Orren Island 

Orwnport 

iraml'iire 

Hiiiuilion , 

Ha'<iiiik'> on Hud- 
son. 

Haverstraw 

Herkimer , 

HlRhland Falla 

Homer 

Hoosiok Falls 

n<.ni.'Il 

Ilor-. N. ids 

Ilu.l-.h 

Hudson FaDs 

Illon . 

Irvlnirton 

Johnson City 

Johii^iown 

Keiiiiion' , 

Liik.- riicid , 

L«k.u.-).| 

Lan. t .r VUlage.. 

l.arrlillinnt 

1^- linv 

LlUrry 

Lind'M hurst 

Lltllr Kills 

Llv,r|-M.l , 

Lo\v\ illi' 

Lynbrcok 

Lyons „ 

Mai one... 



NutiiJHT of 
jxdliv de- 
|)iirtment 

employo«>s 



City 



NEW YORK Con. 



Mai Verne . 

Mamaroneck 

Ma.ss«'na 

Mirhanlcvlllo 

Me<llnu , 

MIddletown 

Mohawk 

Montlr<'llo 

Mount KIseo 

Mount .Morris 

New York .Mills... 

.Newark 

North I'elham 

North Syraeu.se 

.North Tarrytown. 

Northport 

.Norwich 

.Nyack 

Ogdensburg 

Olcan 

Oneida- 

Oneonta 

Ossining 

Oswego 

Owego 

Palmyra 

Patchogue 

Peckskfll 

Pelham .Manor 

Penn Yan 

Perry - 

Plattsburgh 

Plejisantville 

Port Chester 

Port Jervis 

Potsdam 

Rensselaer 

Rye 

Salamanca 

Saranac Lake.. 

Saratoga Springs 

Saugertles 

Scarsdale 

Scotia 

Seneca Falls 

Silver Creek 

Sloan 

Solvny 

.South (tlens Falls.. 

Southampton 

Spring Valley 

Springvillc 

SutTern 

Turryt own 

T Iconderoga 

Tonawanda 

Tuckahoe 

Tnp|>er Lake 

Walden 

Walton 

Wappingers Falls... 

Warsaw 

Warwick 

Waterloo ... 



g 

3 

40 

2 
31 
29 

1 

10 
10 
12 
17 

2 
28 
11 

8 

9 
12 

7 

9 
35 

5 

5 

1 
37 

4 

2 

3 

9 
25 
59 

2 

28 
33 
29 
33 

5 

8 

5 

2 
10 

5 
14 

2 

16 
11 
15 

3 

3 

3 
22 

6 
23 
12 
13 
14 
24 
16 
29 
10 

2 
II 
23 

6 

9 
26 
14 

3 

8 
fiO 

« ,, .'....,. ■ 

15 il YorkvUle. 



len. 



NurnlH'r of 
police de- 
part mi'lit 
employees 



City 



NORTH 
CAROLINA 

Ahoskle 

.MlK'inarle 

.\sheboro 

Beaufort 

Belhaven 

Belmont.- 

Bessemer City 

Boono 

Brevard 

Canton 

Chapel Hill 

Cherry villc 

Clinton 

Conc-ord 1 

Draper 

Duim 

Edcnton 

Elizabeth City... 

Elkin 

Farmville 

Forest City 

Oraham 

Oreenville 

Hamlet 

Henderson 

Hendersonville 

Hickory 

Jacksonville. . ... 
Kings .Mountain.. 

Klnston 

Laurinburg 

Leaks ville 

Lenoir 

Lexington. 

Liiicolnton 

Louisburg 

Lumberton 

Marion 

.Monroe 

Mooresvillc 

Morehead City 

Morganton 

Mount .\iry 

-Mount Olive 

.New Bern 

.Newton . 

.North Wilki-sboro. 

O.xford 

Plymouth 

Reidsville 

Roanoke Rapids.. 

Rockingham 

Ro.xboro 

Rutherfordton 

Salisbury 

Sanford 

Scotland .Neck 

Selma , 

Shelby 

Siler City 

Smithfleld 

Southern Pines 

Spencer 

Spindale 

Statesville 

Tarboro 

Thomasville 

Valdeso 

Wake Forest 

Wiishingion 

Wayncsville 

WhlleviUe 

Williamston 



.Vutnlicr of 

pollr.- <lr- 

l>art(nent 
employees 



115 



I ;il>l«- 27. — .\iiiiilnr nj I'lill-'I'imr I'ltlirv Drpurl mi-ii I llnipUtyvvs, Apr. 30, J958, 
Citii's II ilh I'opulatiim I'roni 2,500 to 25,000 — (.iuiitiiiiicd 



City 


Xiiniber of 
polltv de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


.XumlHT of 
police de. 
partment 

emi)loyees 


City 


Xumb<'r of 
IHillce de- 
partment 

employees 


NORTH 
DAKOTA 


20 
s 
11 

5 
15 
11 
4 
» 
4 

3 

5 
16 
12 
1 
14 
5 
10 
17 
15 
13 
11 
IH 
IH 
13 
7 
8 
17 
13 
10 
IS 
3 
19 
20 
5 
4 
9 
6 
8 
12 

3 
12 
15 
7 
2 
8 
16 
12 

4 

13 
5 
10 
5 
6 
27 
4 

15 
21 
H 

22 
14 
9 
<i 
15 
7 
8 
2 

4 
12 


OHIO— Continued 

Hk'ksville . 


3 
9 
10 
5 
8 
21 
11 
11 
10 
3 
12 
4 
4 

12 
8 
8 
5 
11 
5 
10 
17 
15 
5 

12 
12 
14 
11 
3 
5 
8 
3 
4 
19 
8 
4 
10 
5 
16 
7 
8 
6 
20 
3 
8 
6 
11 
11 
13 
37 

5 
3 
7 
18 
14 
10 
19 
3 
8 
10 
14 
4 
18 
4 
13 
5 
2 
10 
17 
10 
10 
17 
3 
8 
12 


OHIO— Continued 

Stnithers 


16 


llisiiiarck 


nillsboro 


Tallmadge. 


V 


Devils Lake 


Hubbard 


Tillin 


2.1 




Huron 


TIpp City 


4 


• iraflon 


Independence 

Ironton 


Toronto.. 




Jamestown 


Trov 


12 


MaiHJail 


Jaekson . 


Uhrichsville 

University Heights. 

I'ppcr Sandusky 

Urbana 




Uiiyliv 


Kent 


25 


Vallev Citv 




5 


\VahiH.'ton 


Lakeville Village 

Lebanon 


10 




Van Wert .. . 


13 


OHIO 


Lincoln Heights 

Lisbon 


Wadsworth.. 


13 




Wapakoneta 

Warrensville 
Heights 


» 


Ada 


Lock land 




Amherst 




10 


Ashland . 


London .. 


Wiishington Court 
House .. 




Athens 


Louisville... 


12 




Lvndhurst 




2 




Maderia 


Wellington 


3 


Harnesville 


Marieniont.. 


Wcllston 






Marietta 


Wellsville 


- 


liedford 


Martins Ferry 

Marvsville 


1 West CarroUton 

Westerville 




Hcll:iire 


6 


Hcllffontaine -- 


Mainnee 


Westlake 


14 


HcUcvue 


Mayfleld Heights... 
Medina 


Whitehall 


13 


HcreM. 


WicklitTe 


13 


Hf\lcv 




Willard 


9 




Middleport 


Willoughby 


19 


Hrecksville 


Minerva 


Willowiek 


14 


Hrjilt'eport 


Mingo Junction 


Wilmington 

Windham 


1(1 




\t 




Mount Healthy 

Mount Vernon 


Wooster 


!."> 


Hrvan . 


Wyoming 


11 




Xenia 


21 






Yellow Springs 

OKLAHOMA 
Ada. 


;j 


CanihridRe 


Xew Boston.. 

.Xew Lexington 

Xew Philadelphia.. 
Xewburgh Heights. 

Xewconierstown 

Xewton Kails 

Xiles .... 

Xorth Baltimore 

Xorth Canton 

Xorth College Hill.. 

Xorth Olmsted 

Xorth Uoyalton 

X'orwalk 




Campbell 




Carev 






is 




Altus 


21 




Alva 


s 


Cheviot 


Anadarko 


III 




.\rtimore 


3-' 


Civile 


.\toka 


3 




Bethany 


11 




Blackwell 


15 




Bristow 


1) 


Crestline 


Broken .\rrow 

Chandler 


6 






4 


Deer Park 


Oberlin 


Chccolah 


2 




Orrville 


C herokee 


3 




Ottawa 


Chickasha.. 


19 


1 )clphos 


Oxford 


C laremore 


8 


1 iciinison 


Painesville 


Clinton 


10 


l)()\cr 


Parma Heights 

Perrvsburg 


Cordell 


2 


Kasi I'alestine 


dishing. 


15 


I'astlake 




Dol Citv 


<» 






Dewey 


3 




Port Clinton 








Omicun 


2'.i 






Durant 


12 


l';iirview Park 


Kittman . . 


Edmond 


11 




Rocky River 

Rossford 


El Reno 


15 


I'ranklin 


Elk City 


>t 


Fremont 


Salem 


Eufaula 


•) 






(Uithrie 


13 


Ciallii>olis ... 


j Shadvside 


(luymon 


4 




Shelby 


Healdton 


2 




Sidney . 


Henrvetta 


10 




Silvcrton 


Hobart 


4 


<i rand view Heights. 


Solon . 


Holdenville 


.5 


St. Bernard 


HoUis 


4 


Oreentleltl 


St. Clairsvillc 

St. Marys 


Hominy 


4 


(iriH'nhllls 






flrwnvllle 


Strongsyille 


Idabel 


6 



116 



'I'alih- 27. — Stinthvr of Fiill-Tintr Pulii-r nejuirlnirttt KiitpUtyres, Apr. 3(1, I't'tH, 
f'ifrVs With Pofnilation Frtun 2,500 t<t 25,000 — (ioiitiiiued 



City 



OKLAHOMA-Con 

KiiiKtlslier 

I.iihImiv 

Madill' 

Mai IV II Ml 

Mail.uv 

M.Aloter 

M laiiu 

NuIkiIs HUls 

Nouiil.i 

Okfitiah 

OkiiiiilKoe 

rawluiska 

r.iwiuH* 

I'orry 

I'loher 

i'otouu 

I'ryor Creek 

I'urct'll 

SiillLsaw 

Siuul Springs 

Sa|>ul|>ti , 

Sayro.. , 

Seiniiiole , 

Sulpliiir , 

Tiihlfnuah... , 

Toiikawa , 

\'mii.i , 

Wa^'oiuT 

\V:llt.'l.- , 

\\atci|!i:a , 

W.allurford 

W'owokii , 

\\ otxlward 

OESOON 

Albunv 

Ashluii.l 

Astoria 

Maker 

Heaverton 

IU'IhI 

Hums 

CfM)s Hay 

Coijtiille , 

Corvallis 

Cott.u-.' <irove 

I>uil:i> 

Kon-i I irove 

<ir.iir- I'ass 

«ir> -h iiii 

Hcriiu-ton 

Illll-t.TO 

H.-i ! Hiver 

Kl III. ltd Fall5 

I-a < Ir iii.le 

l.ak. \ I. w.... ... 

I.et ii.i'ii 

M. M; iivlUe 

M..;'. '1 

Ntil-A >-.ikie 

N.-.*f..ri; 

.\.w |« rl 

North Mend 

N\-..i 

<»iit irio 

Or.i. !i City 

()--A.,,. 

r.iili. t..n 

I'riu. ^ ill.. 

K.li:;..ii.| 

R'.-fuik.- 

Sr.isi.l,. 

Siherton 



NuiiiNt (if 
polUf Ui'- 
luirtiiiiMit 
eniploytH>8 



City 



OREOON-Con. 



.sprlnclU'lil... 
St. Helens... 
SwiTi iloinc. 
The Dulles... 
Tllhunook... 
West Lliin . 



PENNSYLVANIA 

AUIan . . . 

.\nil)ler 

AnibriitKe 

.\rdibald 

Arnold 

Ashhuid 

.Ashley 

.\snin\vull , 

.Atnenii 

Avalon 

.\v.ofa. 

Baden , 

Bangor 

Barne.sboro 

Beaver 

Beaver Falls 

Bedfonl 

Belkfonie 

Bellevue. 

Bellwofxl. 

Bentleyville 

Berwick 

Bethel 

Birdsboro 

Blairsville 

Blakely 

Blooni.sburg , 

Boyerlown 

Brackeiiridge 

Bradford 

Brentwood 

BridRoport 

Bridpeville 

Bristol 

Brockway 

Brookville 

Brown.sville 

Burnhain 

Butler 

California 

Camp Hill 

Canonshurg 

Carbondale 

Carlisle 

CameRie 

r.i-iii- .-"liannon 



hurg. 



CUuluii 

Clarion 

Clarks .Summit. 

Cleiirflcld 

Clifton HelgbtA. 
rUin.r 



ille .. 
.ken. 



I Cr^tuii 
' Cmson 



Numl)or of 
police <le- 
pikrtineiit 

employees 



City 



PENNSYLVANIA- 
Continued 

Curwensvlllo 

Dallas! own 

Dam ille 

Darhy 

Derry 

Dickson City 

Donora 

Donnonl 

DowniiiRtown 

D<jy lest own 

Dravosliiirg 

Du Hois 

Dunniore. 

l)u(|uesiie 

Duryea. 

East Coneniauph . 
Eiist Lansdowne .. 
East .\lcK(>eS|iort.. 

East FillsburRh 

East .Stroiidsburg-. 

EtiellsblirR 

Eddysioiie 

Edpewofxl 

EdwardsviUe 

ElizalH'th 

ElizatK'thtown 

Ellwood City 

Emmaus 

Eriijioriura 

Enisworth 

E|)hrata 

Etna 

Exeter 

Farrell 

Ford City 

Forest City 

Forest Hills 

Fort y Fort . 

Fountain Hill 

Franklin 

Free<lom 

Freeland. 

Freeport 

Oallitzln 

Gettysburg 

Oirardville 

O lass port 

Olenolden 

Oreencast le 

Oreensburg 

Oreentree 

Oreenville 

Grove City 

Hamburg 

Hanover 

Hanover Township. 

Hellertown 

Hollidayshurg 

Homestead 

Honesdale 

Hunmielstown 

Huntingdon 

Indiana .. 

Ingram 

Irwin. . 

Jeiuinette 

Jenkintown... 

Jermyn 

Jers<'y .^hore.. 

Jim Thorpe 

John.sonburg 

Kane . 

Kenhorst 

Kennett Square 



NuiiiImt of 
pollc- de- 
part iiieiit 

employees 



117 



'l'iil>N- 27. — \iniilnT itf I'liH-Ti/nr I'nlitt' DfjHirt ttn-iit l!niftJi>yres, ipr. 30, 1958, 
('.ili«'s H ilh I'ltimlitlitut I' rum 2,.)00 lit 2.'t,IKI(t — < Ion t iiiiitMl 



City 


i 
Number of 
police de- 
i)arlmpnt 
employpos 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employws 


City 


Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 


PENNSYLVANIA— 
Continued 

l\iii);sli>li 


18 
9 
3 

14 

15 
5 
6 

15 
2 
3 
5 
4 
4 

16 
4 
2 

15 

I 
1 
2 

12 
4 
1 
4 
2 

20 

27 
4 

10 
3 
9 

14 
1 
7 
7 
4 

10 

21 

11 
1 
9 
8 
2 
7 
3 
5 
5 
2 

24 
2 

15 
2 
5 
6 
6 
4 
2 

20 
2 
4 
2 

10 
2 
4 
8 

2.1 
r, 
5 
4 
4 
6 
6 
2 


PENNSYLVANIA- 
Continued 

I'enbrook 

Phllipsbure 


2 

5 
14 

3 
21 

li 
12 
11 

2 

3 
.30 

4 
10 

7 
10 

4 

2 

3 

4 

2 

6 

3 

6 

5 

6 

4 
11 
17 
15 

8 
11 

5 
12 

4 

6 

2 ' 

8 

4 

I 
2 

1 

1 

2 

4 

5 

5 
15 
13 
15 

9 

3 
13 

2 
10 
19 

2 

8 

9 

3 

3 
13 

4 

3 
17 

6 

4 
44 

2 
10 

() 
IN 
111 


PENNSYLVANIA— 
Continued 

AVaviiesburg 

Weatherlv 


5 
2 


Kiitziown 


Phoenixvlllp 

Pitcairn 


%Vellsboro 


4 




Weslevvllle 


3 




PIttslon 


West Chester 

West llazleton 

[ West Homestead... 

West Newton 

West PItlston 

' West Reading 

West View 

West Wyoming 

AVest York 


20 




F'lahKS .. -. 


4 


l.irksvillp 


Plea.fant HllLs 

Plvnioufh 


13 




2 


1. iiircldalp 


Port Allegany 

Portage 

Poltsvllle 


5 




r, 








Prospect Park 

Punxsutawney 

Quakertow-n 

Rankin 


4 




3 




Westmont 


n 


Mtit/ 


Whitehall 


14 




Red Lion 


M'hiteoak.. 


5 




Rcnovo 


Wilmerdlnj 


10 




ReynoldsvUle 

Ridgwav .- -. 


Wilson 


4 


\hilianoy City 


Windber 




Roaring" Spring 

Rochester . 


Winton 


3 




Wyoming 


2 




Roversford 


Wyomi.ssing 

Yeadon 


9 




Sayrc 

Schuylkill Haven... 
Scot I dale. 


15 






2 


McAdoo 


Zelienople 

RHODE ISLAND 

Harrington 


4 


McDonald 






M(K..-s Ropks 

Miadville 


Sewickley... 




MccliaiiicsbiirB 

M I'd la 




Iti 


Sharon Tlill _ 

Sharpsliurg 

Sharpsville 

1 Shenandoah ... 

1 Shillington 

j Shippenshurg 

Slatington 

Somerset. 

Soiiderton 


Bristol 


13 




Hurrillville 

Central Falls 

Cumberland 

East <ireenwlch 

Johnston 


4 


MidillclowTi 

Mi.ll.iiid 


33 
14 


MillcisvillP 


9 


.\lill\al(' 


l.f 


.Milldii . . . 


i;t 


Miners villP . 


-North Providence.. 
1 Warren 

West Warwick 

Westerly 

i SOUTH 

CAROLINA 

' .\bbeville 


21 




12 




South Fork 


27 


M onongahpla 

.Monloursvillp 


South Crreenshurg. . 

South Williainsport 

Southwest tlreens- 

burg 


20 


Miumt Carmol 












Spring City 

Spriiigdale . 


10 




1 Aiken 


20 




St. Clair 


! Anderson 


44 




St. Marys 

State College 

' Sleelton 


1 .\ndrews 


5 




Haml>erg 


4 


M iinhall 


Hatesl)urg .. 


6 


M verstown 


Stowe Township ... 

1 Stroiidshurg 

Suniniil Hill . 

Sunburv 


Heaufort 


10 




' Helton 


6 


\anlvtMo 


Hennettsville.. 

i Hishopville 


13 


Narhcrth 


5 


Nazarolh 

New Hriphlon . . 


Susfiiiehaiina 

Swart h more 

Swiss vale. 

Swoverville 


Camden 

Cheraw 


19 
10 


\i-\v ("lunlicrland . 


Chester 


13 


New llolialid.. 


Clinton 


12 


Norlh Hra.ldock .. 


! Tarriaqua 


Clover 






Tarentlim 




17 


North Kiisl 


! Tavlor 


Darlington 


15 


North \\.i\rs . . . 


Throop 




5 


Northaliiplon 


Titlisvillp 


Dillon 


11 


NorthiiinhiTland. . . 


Towanda: 


Easley 


8 


NorwiMKi 


1 TratTord 


Fort Mill 




Oaknidiit 


1 Turtle Creek 

Tyrone 


' (latTnev 


2(1 


Oil City 




21 


Old Vnrge 


I iiion CItV 




32 


Olyplmnt 


' t'niontown 




17 


Oxford 


Cpland 








Vandergrlft 




rallliiTton 


Honea Path 

Kingslree 










I'lrkcshiirp 

I'.ti Vrgyj 




III 


Waynesboro 


1 Lake City 


h 



118 



liihU- 27. — \uinln-r nf riill-'l'inn- I'nliri' Ih-itnrl nn-ii I /•,'/M/>/«»y*'«'.s, Apr. .' 
Citivn If ith Pnpulatian From 2,500 to 25,000 — Cuntiiiued 



W, 1958, 



City 


Number of 
tK)llif df- 
luirtnu-nt 
employ tfs 


city 


NumlxT of 
pollcv de- 
(wrtment 
employees 


city 


NumN-rof 
[M)llc«' de 
partment 

employees 


SOUTH 
CAROLINA Con. 


18 
18 

5 
13 

4 

12 
21 
15 
M 
331 

32 
li'i 

8 
5 

4 
8 
7 

28 

4 

6 

3 

4 

7 
20 

4 

2 

9 

4 
19 

7 
11 

4 

3 

i 

5 
13 

3 

4 
11 

9 

9 
10 
21 

6 
35 
22 

1- 

111 

8 

7 

19 
19 

5 

8 
In 
IJ 
2l' 

ll 


TENNESSEE Con. 

LnwniKvliurK 

L<-l)ation 


9 
12 

9 
11 

tl 

f, 
15 

4 
11 

7 
11 
19 

6 
22 
10 
17 

8 

5 

7 

4 
15 

4 

6 
14 

7 

10 
14 

9 

1 

13 
15 

3 

6 

2 
14 
35 

9 

4 

5 

2 

9 

9 
35 
12 

4 

7 

9 
14 
21 

1 

4 

2 

4 

2 

5 

5 

9 

8 
l(t 

2 

5 

5 

9 

2 

1 

.1 
14 

ii 


TEXAS— Continned 
DetJitur 


3 


Liilini.strr 


Del Hio 


]| 


l.aiin-n.s. . .. 


Li'iioir City 




20 


MaiiniliK.. 


Li>\vl.sl>urK 




7 


MiiruMi 


London 

Martin 


Duhlin 


2 


MK'oIl 




12 


Mullin.s 


Marjvillo 

McKi-nitit' 


Eat'le Lake 


2 


Mvitlf Moach 




g 


.Ni'wUrry 


Mc.MinnviUe 

Milan 


Eastland 


4 


-North .\u|!US(a 


EdlnhurK 


12 


C)nmt:»'''urg . 


MillinKton 


El f'am|K) 


8 


.'JoiH'ca 


Morri.stown 

Mount I'lrasant 

M urfr«< sl>oro 

.N"rw|Kirt 


Elect ra 


7 


Siiiiittr 


ElRJn 


1 




Kalfurrias , 


5 


Wiilhalla 


2 


Waltcrlioro 




Fort ."Stockton 

Frederloksbunr 

Free port 


6 


\\ hi I III ire 


Pulaski 


1 


\\'illiainston - 


Riplcv 


14 


Winiisboro 


Rofkwood 


Gainesville 


14 


York 


Ropcrsville 


Galena Park 

Olddinns 


12 




Sholhvvillo 


2 


SOUTH 


South rittsbunr 

Sjwrta 


Gilmer 


7 


DAKOTA 


Glade water 


12 




Springfleld 


Gonz.ales 


1 


AUr.li-.'ii 






7 


lit lU- Kourche 


Tullahoina 




23 


Hri)okings 


Union City 


Haltom . 


21 


(".iiilon 


Hamilton 


2 


I)va«lw(X)d 


TEXAS 

Alamo 

.\lamo IleiRhts 

Aliw 


Hamlin 


3 


Hot Springs 


lla-skell 


2 


Huron 




6 


Ua.l 




16 


I.4miiion.... 




12 


M,i.!i-oii 


Illghland Park 

Illllshoro 


20 


M:ll..Mk 


Alpine 


7 


M.r. ).-n. 


Andrews 


Hunt-iville 


7 


Mot.t;.I({e 




Jacinto City 

Jacksonville 


7 


r,.rr. 


Aransas Pass 


10 


K. ■.!;:. |.| 


5 


Si<^' t"ii 






4 








4 


SturL';< 


Rallinper 




3 


Vi rii! .llion 


Bastrop 


Kermit 


9 


\V i'. rtown 


Bay City 


Kerrvllle 


16 


W.lM.r 


Beeville 


Kilpore 


17 






Killeen 


17 


Yankton ... 






2 






La Porte 


5 


TENRESSEX 


Bnuly 

BreckenridRe 

Brown field 


Lake Jackson 


5 
15 


A1.-..1 


Lampa.sa.s 


1 


Atli.ii- . . . 


Brown wood 

Cal\-ert 




7 


H.ll. -M....I.- 


Levelland 


10 


Hri.-t'.l 




LifM'rty . 


3 


Urowi.^vilk- 




Liltlefleld 


8 


Clirk-ville 




Livlneston 


3 


Cl.v. !.n<l . . 


r.rri/o Springs 


Llano 


2 


Cl.iit..:! 


Lufkln 


21 


CMJuiiil.ia 




LulinK 


1 


r«-.k. Mile 


CLstu "......'.. 


Marlin 


6 


Ciiv rulon 


MathLs 


3 


I)l(k-"I1 




M c<^'amey 


3 


I)\i r-''iint.. 




McKlnney 


21 


Kli; li- thtoo 


Coleman 

Collette Station 

r..l..r.i.l.>CUy 


Memphis 

Merce<les 


4 

3 


F !>• 't. vilk» 

Fr.iiiklm 


Mexla 

Mlneola 


6 
S 


Gall.it n 




Mineral Wells 

M;--i..n 


8 






10 




• Lsant ... 

Il.« 


8 


HuttiNiMl 


1 


10 


Jeflcnu.n City 

K inK$i)ort 


1 


Ii 




3 


La Follette 


Dalhart 


Ncderland 


3 



ir.> 



;il»l«- 27. — '\iiniln-r t>J rnll-'liinr I'ttlitr l)4'fnirl nirn I I'm plovers, Apr. 30, I95H. 
i'.itif.s M ilii l'i>inilutitni I'nnn 2,'i()0 tit 2.>.0(>() — ( iiwitiiuied 



TEXAS Con. 

\i>\\ Ddstoti . ... 

\c\v Hraiinrt'ls 

NiX'dna 

(Mmiis I'ark 

n|iii-\ . 

railllciili 

I'alaciiis 

I'alisliiic 

I'ampa 

I'aris 

I'rcos 

I'crrvton 

I'liarr 

I'illsliiirp 

I'lainview 

I'ri'inonl 

Kaiigcr 

Raytnondvllle — 

Refugio -- 

Robstown 

Rosen berp 

Rotun - --. 

Rusk . 

San .\iii;ustinp 

San Benito 

San Marcos .. 

San Saba 

Seguin 

Seminole — 

Seymour 

Shamrock.. 

Silsbee .- 

Sinton 

Slalon . 

Snyder 

South Houston 

Stamford 

Stei)lu'nville _ — 
Sulphur Springs .. 

Sweetwater 

Taft 

Tahoka.- 

Taylor 

Teague 

Terrell 

'ICrrcll Hills 

Tulia - 

Cvahle 

N'eriion 

^Va\ahaehle 

^\'eatherfo^d 

\\ ellington 

\Veslaeo. 

West I'niversity 

IMaee 

Wharton 

W imislioro 

> n;ikllin 

^ Orklnwn 

DTAH 

Aiiieriran Fork 
fini^haiii Canyon 

Kdunliful 

Kiiphani 

<edarCity 

Clcartii-ld 

ll.'iM'r . 
llrllM'l 

l.aMi.n 

I.el'ii 

!.in.'an 

Midvale 

Murray 



N'umlter of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



2 
14 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 
15 
26 
23 
15 

8 
13 

2 
25 

1 

6 

7 

3 
14 

9 

3 

4 

2 

8 
14 

1 
11 

6 

3 

3 

2 

6 

8 
21 

8 I 

5 1: 

8 

l(i i 

23 l' 

2 \, 
2 I 

9 !■ 
2 I 

12 1; 

5 , 



UTAH Con. 

Neplii 
Orem 

Payson . 

Plea.sant Orove.. 

I'rifv. 

Riehfield 

Roy 

South Ogden 

South Salt Lake. 
Spanish Fork.. . 

Spring ville 

St. George 

Tooele 

Vernal . 



VERMONT 



IJarre 

Bellows Falls. . 

Bennington 

Brattlehoro 

Essex Junction 

Middlehury 

Montpelier 

Newport - 

Rutland 

Springfield 

St. Albans 

St. Johnsbury. 

Waterbiiry 

Windsor _. 

Winooski 



VIRGINIA 



.\bingdon 

.\ltavista 

.\shland -. 

Bedford 

Blacksburg 

Blackstone 

Bluefield.. 

Bristol. 

Biieiia Vista 

Chase City 

(^hincoteague 

(Mirisliansl>urg .. 
CliflDii Forge. . 
Colonial Heights. 

Ciiviiii;lon - 

Culpi'licr .. 

KiM|iori:i 

Falls Church... 
Fainiville .. 
Fraiikhii 
Fredcrieksluirg . 

Front Koval 

Oalax.. ■ ... - 

Harrisonburg 

HoiMwell 

Lexington 

Luray .. 

Marion. 

Martinsville 

Narrows 

Norton 

Orange . . . 

Pulaski 

Radford... 

Richlands 

Salem . . ... 

.Saltville 

.South Boston. . . 
South Norfolk.. 
Staunton 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 




VDtOINIA— Con. 

Suffolk 

Vinton. 

Virginia Beach 

Waynesboro 

Winchester 

Wylheville 

WASHINGTON 

AV)erdeen 

Anacortes 

Auburn 

Belle vue. 

Buckley 

Caniiis 

Centralia 

Chehalis 

Cheney.. 

Clarkston 

Colfax 

Colville 

Dayton 

Ellensljurg 

Enumclaw 

Ephrata 

(trand Coulee 

CJrandview 

Hoquiam 

Kelso . 

Kennewick 

Kent 

Kirkland 

Longview 

Moses Lake. _ 

Mount Vernon 

Olympia 

Oinak 

Pasco 

Port .\ngeles 

Port Town.send 

Pullman 

Puyallup 

Raymond 

Renton 

Sedro WooUey 

Shelton 

Snohomish ... 

Sunmer 

Sunnyside 

ToppenLsh.. 

Tumwater. . 

Wapafo _. 

Wenatchee 

WEST VIRGINIA 



Beckley . .. 
Benwood.. . 

BluefieM 

Buckhannon... 
Charles Town. 

Chesapeake 

Chester 

Ounbar 

KIkins 

Follansbee 

Grafton 

Hinlon 

Kenova 

Keyser 

lyOgan 

Mannington.. 
Martinsburg... 

Mc.Mechen 

Montgomery.. 



NumlKT of 
poliiv de 
partnient 

eniployei's 



Tublf 27. — .\itinbtr tij I'ull-iiinv I'oliir Di-purl ini-nt EinpUtyvvs, Apr. 30, l'J5H, 
Cities If it h HopuUitioii From 2,500 to 25,000 — (Continued 



City 


Number of 
iwllif de- 
partment 

employiH'S 


City 


Number of 
polli-e de- 
partment 

employees 


City 


NumlH'r of 
(Hillee de- 
partment 

employet's 


WEST VIRGINIA 
Continued 


13 
4 
4 

» 

2 
4 

2 

13 

•i 
2 

3 

21 

3 

10 

1 

2 

15 

5 

2 

2 
12 

4 

12 
14 
14 
16 

4 
4 

12 
4 

19 
7 
4 

■.M 
9 


WISCONSIN- Con. 
Doilmvillc 


3 

5 

5 
11 
21 
6 
K 
3 
5 
5 
5 

10 

3 

4 

4 

7 

3 

4 

4 

17 

21 

4 

2 

23 

12 

13 

5 

14 

29 

3 

4 

10 
4 
2 
4 
6 
5 
11 
6 
6 
13 
11 
6 


WISCONSIN Con. 

Rilioii. . 

Riv.r Falls.. 

Shawano. 

Sheboypan Falls 

Shorewood 

South Milwaukee... 
SparUi 




Moiiiidsvilli' 


Edi-'erton.. 


4 


MulU'iis . 


Klkliorn 


8 


.\iw Martinsville... 
Nitro 


Kvansvllle 

Fort Atkinson 

Fox I'oint 


4 

25 


Oak Mill 


23 


I'adi-Il Cilv 


(ireendale. 


7 


riulippi . . 


Hartford 


5 


Ilorieon 


Stevens Point 

StouRhton 


20 


I'oint rieasant 


Hudson 


6 


rnnei'ton 


Hurley 


Sturgeon Bay 

Tomah 

Tomahawk 


9 




Jefferson 


7 




Kaukauna 


4 






Two Rivers •.... 


LS 




Kinibcrly 


4 




Ladvsmith 


Wat«'rtown.. 


18 


SI. Allians.. 


Lake (Jeneva 

Lake Mills 


Waukesha 


48 






s 


War 


Laneiister 


Waupun 

West Bend... 

West Milwaukee... 

Whitefl.sh Bay 

Whiti-wal<r 
Wiseonsiri Itapids.. 

WYOMING 

Buffalo.. 
Cody. 

noiiplas 

Evanstoii 

Green River 

Lander. -. 

Laniiiiie.. 

Lov.ll 

Xew(-.i>lle 

Powrll 
Rawliii- .. 
Riv.Tton 
Rm-k Springs. 
Slieridaii 
Tliemiopolis 
Torrington 
WorlaiKi 


7 


Weleh 


Little Chute 

Marinette 


10 


w.llsl.urK 


20 


Wi'Stover . 


Marshfleld 


26 


\\ hit'' Sulphur 
SpriiiKs 


Mavville 


8 


Medford 


22 


W ilU:im.-i(iii 








Menoinonie 




WISCONSIN 


Merrill 






Monona 


6 


.\lpoma 




12 


Aiitigo 




3 


A>hland 


Neillsvllle 


•y 


H inil'oo 


N'ew Rk'hniond 

Oconomowoc 


4 


H.aver Dam 

Hrrlln 


7 
17 


Bhiek River Falls... 


Onalaska 


2 


Bloomer. 


Park Falls 


6 


BurlliiKton 


Platteville 


10 


('••darNurR 


Plvniouth 


14 


Chlpjji'wa Falls . . . 




n 


Clintonvllle 


Prairie Ou Chien... 
H.f<lsburp --- 


1.1 


("olumbus 


15 


("iidahy 


Rhiiuliinder 

Rlc> I^ike 

Riehland CenUr... 


11 


I)e Pere 


7 


Di'lavan 


8 







1-21 



JUJL 

UNIFORM 


CRIME 


REPORTS 



FOR THE UNITED STATES 



FOR RELEASE TUESDAY. A. M., DEC. 9, 1?58 







/ssafD fiy IHl 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



SPECIAL ISSUE • 1958 



UNIFORM 
CRIME REPORTS 

FOR THE UNITED STATES 



SPECIAL ISSUE, 1958 



Issued by the 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 

United Statis Depart nwnt of Justice 

Washington, I). C 




ADVISORY 

Committee on Uniform Crime Records 

International Association of Chiefs of Police 

STANI.KV K. S(HK<)TKL. ( hicf of Polici- 
( incinnati. <)hi«», (liairnian 



UMTKI) STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 19S8 



I^tston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

Conlrnttf/^N 2 8 1959 

Pnije 

SimuiDiiv of sj)i'('ial issiio, lOoS l-;j 

lu'porl of Consultant Committee: DEPOSITORY 

J.etter of transmittal 7-8 

Introduction 9-13 

Importance of Uniform Crime Reporting Program 

and the role of the Consultant Committee . . . . 9-11 

Voluntary nature of cooperation in data collection . . 1 1-12 

The broader function of the Uniform Crime Reports . 12-13 

Analysis of present practices and recommendations . . . 14-44 

Policies in making changes in the UCR's 14 

Continuity of the statistical series 14 

The objectives of the Uniform Crime Reporting 

Program 15-18 

Collection and publication of data 18-20 

Frequency of reports from cooperating police 

departments 18-19 

Frequency of publication 19-20 

Classification of ofl'enses 20-28 

Part I and part TI ofTenses 20 25 

Manslaughter by negligence 25-27 

Petty larceny 27-28 

Auto theft 28 

General United States crime statistics ..;.... 29-41 

Rural versus urban criminality 29 31 

Crime rates 31-33 

Estimating the totals 33-37 

The trends 37-38 

Present data gathering versus sampling .... 39-40 

Miscellaneous ofl'enses 40-41 

Juvenile oll'enders 41-43 

Various editorial matters , 43-44 

A Permanent Technical Consultant Committee 45-46 

Appendix I. Proposed agenda for the Committee . . . 47-49 
Appendix II. Exploratory tabulations using Standard 

Metropolitan Areas 51-62 

Appcnchxlll. List of actions taken by the Committee . . 63-70 

Data for l!t57 from police reports 71-74 

Oli'enses cleared and persons arivsted, 1957: 

Ofl'enses cleared by arrest (tables 1.2) 72-73 

( )ll"<'nses known, ofl'enses cleared, jicnsons charged and 

persons found guilty (table 3) 74 

Persons charged and persons found guilty (table 4) . . 74 

(II) 



UNIFORM CRIIVIE REPORTS 



J. Kdt;ur Hoovit, Dirt'ctor, I'l-dt-ral Iturcau oT Inve.sti((u(iun, l". S. I)i-par(nicnt 
of Justice, Washington, D. (". 



Special Issue November 1958 



Siiiniiiary 



Di.sciniliiniuiicf «>/ Sriniiiimmil Pitblication 

I'liifoiin C'rinu' Kopoils, |)ul)lisluHl scniiaiiiuially since 1941, will he 
piii)lisiu>(l only once each year in the fulnre. This action follows the 
reconinuMuhition of a Consultant Committee and will hring together 
in one aimual pul)lication all crime data for the calendar year. The 
19f)8 Uniform Crime Reports will he puhlished in the fall of 1959. 

Purpose of l9iiH Spcfutl Issue of L niforni Crime liejwrts 

The special issue of I'niforni Crime Rej^orts ])resc'nted here has as 
its primary purpose the puhlication of the rejjort and related papers of 
the Consultant Committee on Uniform Crime Reporting and also to 
l)resent, for continuity i)urpose, 1957 crime data which was not in- 
clutled in the 1957 annual issue of Uniform Crime Reports. 

Consultant Cotnntit tee on I nifitrtn Crime Reporting 

Late in 1957 tiie FBI emi)loyed a Consultant Committee on Uni- 
form Crime Reporting to make an independent analysis of the Uniform 
Crime Reporting program. The survey was made by Dr. Peter P, 
Lejins. Department of Sociology. I'niversity of Maryland, Chairman: 
Dr. Charlton F. Chute, Director of the Institute of Public Administra- 
tion, New York City; and Mr. Stanley R. Schrotel, Chief of Police at 
Cinciimati. Ohio. 

Copies of the report of the Consultant Committee were furnished 
to members of tlie Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the 
International Association of Cliiefs of l\)lice (lACP) for their iiuli- 
vidual reactions prior to publication of it here. While general endorse- 
ment of the report was given by the lACP group, some concern was 
e.xpressed as to whether the ])olic»' would, under the recommendations, 
luive available in the future the i)asic information that they have had 
in the past and whether that information would be available on a 
relativelv current basis. 

(1) 



Since tlu'so (|ii('s(ioiis may arise in the minds of otlicr usei-s of the 
(lata, it is suggested that the answer to tliem will be found in the 
(U'greo tlie Flil finds it i)ossil)h» to imi)lement the prinrii)k'S set forth 
in the report, particularly as to recommendation 2 (p. 14) and recom- 
mendation 7 (p. 20). 

Recommendation 2 suggests that in any clianges of format in the 
publication of Uniform Crime Reports the FBI make every reasonable 
effort to maintain continuity with reference to the crime statistics that 
have l)een publislied in the past. In rcconmiendation 7 the Consult- 
ant Committee, while suggesting that only one annual ])ulletin be 
issued, pointed out that "issuance of intermediate publications of 
limited scope, which the FBI might find apjjropriate for release, is of 
course not precluded by this recommendation but is actually en- 
couraged." 

For the information of the police and other users of the Tniform 
Crime Reports, the FBI is in accord with all of the recommendations 
of the Consultant Committee. With particular reference to the two 
recommendations referred to above, it is the present plan to issue 
(juarterly releases in the nature of preliminary data showing crime 
trends for the most recent available period for cities by population 
group and also the number of offenses reported by individual cities 
with population in excess of 100,000. For example, acconling to 
present plans, in April or May of 1959 such a release of preliminary 
(Uita covering the 1958 calendar year would be published with the 
expressed understanding that the data are subject to minor adjust- 
ments on the basis of additional reports and correspondence with 
contributing agencies. .\])])roximately 3 months later, ])reliminary 
figures covering the first quarter of the calendar j'ear 1959 would be 
released and so on throughout the year. 

in the early fall of 1959 a complete annual Uniform Crime Reports 
covering all available statistics compiled under Uniform Crime 
Reporting in considerable detail would be available for distribution. 

In the new annual Uniform Crime Reports a more convenient 
treatment of police statistics will be available in one volume for the 
general reader plus more meaningful presentations which will assist 
])(>lice and others interested in the crime ])roblem. 

.\n index to crime will be continued but emphasis is to l)e shifted 
somewhat from the original Part I crimes which were designed over 
a (|uarter of a century ago by the International .Vssociation of Chiefs 
of Police to serve such a purjjose and which have been so used in 
Uniform Crime Reports. Classifications retained for crime iiuhw 
piiri)()ses are: Murder and noniiegligent manslaughter; forcible rape; 
robbery; aggravated assault; burglary; larcen}', $50 and over; and 
auto theft. 



3 

Now tlint mo<\ of the i)()])ulnli(Hi is concciitiMlcd in aixl nrouiid 
cities with a n'sulttint loss of line iiiral areas in many instances, the 
retention of the distinction in ciinie tahh's separated oidy as to citij'S 
and rural has heeonie inade(|uate as a means of contrasting; difrercncos 
in crime experience hetween two areas formerly dissimilar in character. 
Critne re|)ortin«j: jurisdictions do not automatically shift with i\w 
po|)ulation and today many sherill's who report for areas in their 
county which are outside the limits of cities are in effect reporting; the 
e<|uivalent of city crime insofar as volume is concerned. 

Because of the impossihility of se|)aratin{; from a sheriff's crime 
re|)ort that portion of crime which covers areas inhan in character 
hut which are not cities, and because it would he entirely t<>o l>urden- 
somc to the report in<r law enforcement agencies to maintain several 
sets of statistical fi»jures for reporting purposes, a basis of publication 
other than city (urban) and rural was recommended, the Standard 
Metrojjolitan Area. 

A i)resentation of crime data for the three areas will be shown: 
1) Standard Metropolitan Areas; (2) Other Cities; (3) Rural. A 
Standard Metroinditan Area, as defined by the Bureau of tlie Census, 
generally is a county which contains at least 1 city of aO,0()0 iidiabit- 
ants i)lus any contiguous counties essentially metroj)olitan in ciiarac- 
ter and sufliciently integrated with the central city. Reporting juris- 
dictions for crime-reporting purposes coincide willi the boundaries of 
areas included in a Stan<lard Metropolitan Area. Outside these 
|)()[)ulation centei-s are other cities and the rural areas. Tabulations 
will not be limited to the three areas enumerated above but the use 
of the Standard Metropolitan Area data will permit the i)resentatioii 
of crime rates based on poj)ulation estimates in the l)etw(>en-census 
yeai-s which can be made available by the Bureau of the Census. A 
limited e.\i)loratory tabulation illustrating in a general way the steps 
involved in the procedure to be followed for the above three areas is 
presented in Appendi.x II of the Report, page 51. It will be observed 
from the indicated tabulation that one product of the proposed pro- 
cedure will be an estimate of total known crime in the l'nit«'(l States 
for selected categories with the detailed steps used in arriving at the 
estimates shown clearly. 

Ihild for I'i'u Ironi Pttlirr Uvjutrts 

()freiis<-s Ch'iirril and INtsoiis Arrcsicil, 1957. .Vvailable data on 
offenses cleared, pel-sons charged, and persons found guilty, compiled 
before receipt of the Consultant Committee report, are included in 
this special issue to round out tlie 19')7 data included in the annual 

issue for 19.')7 I'liifiirin ( 'rinic Rc|>orts. paL'c 71. 



UNIFORM CRIME 
REPORTING 

Report oj the Consultant Committee 

September IQ.'SS 



I)|{. PktI-H I', l.ljiys. Drp<irlrnrnl of Sociology, L niivrsily uf Murvlanil 

(Cluiirman) 

Dk. (!ii\hi.ton Y. CnvTV.. Director, Institute of Public Adminisiniiion, 

Neiv York City 

Mk. Sta.nlkv K. ^cuuotel. Chief <f Pitlicc. Ciiicinntili. Ohio 



(5) 



Letter of rraiisininal 

Ski-i-kmukk 'JU, 1958. 
M I . .1. Kix.Ai; lluoVKU, 

l>incior, Federal Jiurcaii of Inrtstitjatio/i, 

l'nit<(/ Staffs I)< jHirhiK lit of Justicr, Wds/ilnijton, I). ('. 

Dkak Mk. IIoovkic: Hcirwitli I am traiisiiiil(iii«x (o you (lie report 
t'f tlu' Consultant Coininittfc on rniforin Crime Reporting. 'I'lie 
report is self-explanatory and as such needs no further introduction or 
commentary. Dr. Charlton F. Chute and Chief Stanley K. Sehrolel 
( Miicur with mo, however, in the wish to take this oppoitunity and to 
slate the general position of this (\)mmittee on the rnifoiin Crime 
luportintr Program and its own role with reference to it. 

'The Committee considers the Uniform Crime Reports uncjuestion- 
al)ly the most important source of infonnation on crime in this 
(•(tun try on a national scale, of use to both practitioner and scholar. 
Their j)ublication is an outstanding accomplishment. For this the 
Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the personnel 
directly responsii)le for the production of the Reports, the Inter- 
nal iomd Association of Chiefs of Police and its Committee on Uniform 
("rime Reporting, and the cooperating police departments deserve a 
c«)mj)liment of the higiiest ortler from those who are concerned with 
the problem of crime in the United States. 

Perhaps the most outstanding feature of the Uniform Crime 
Re|)orting Program is the fact that for all of the information con- 
tained in the Reports the Bureau has to depend on the voluntary 
cooperation of the police throughout the country. Many other 
attempts by other agencies to secure continuous nationwide coopera- 
tion in similar enterprises liave failed. The Bureau's accomplish- 
ment in securing in many respects well-nigh universal coverage is 
unique. It reflects a delicate balance in the exercise of vigor and tact 
in the Bureau's relations with the participating police agencies, and 
must be attributed, of course, to the tremendous overall prestige 
which the Bureau enjoys in this country. 

The Committee sees itself as an instrument devj-loped by the FBI 
in the hitter's continuous effort to improve the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program. The Committee's suggestions for changes 
shouhl by no means be interpreted as criticism of the program as such, 
but rather as recognition of the need for continuous adjustment which 
every program of this nature requires. With constant changes in the 
crime |)icture, with changes in the patterns of law enforcement, with 

(7) 

4v74_.S»_58 2 



8 

the LTiidtial progress in tlip scioiioo and t('clini(|ii('s of gathering: and 
pirsciitiiig statistical information, the need for adai)tation of the 
program tlirongh periodic revision is to he expected. 

In reading this repoi't it sliould he kept in mind that althougii the 
( 'ommiitee was invited to review the Uniform Crime Reports in their 
entirety, it was charged at the outset with the task of considering 
certain specific issues which were of primary concern to the staff en- 
gaged in tiie production of tlie Reports. There were limits to the 
lime availal)le to the (Committee, whicli in turn restricted the scope 
(»f the project. By pointing this out, tlie Committee is not attempting 
to dodge responsibility for the content of its report, but rather wishes 
it to be very clear that the issues discussed therein are only selected 
issues wliich appeared to be particularly important, and that there 
may be other points which could appropriately be raised. 

Tlie Committee is particularly pleased to acknowledge the wonder- 
ful cooperation it received from the staff of the Bureau. It felt all 
along that the staff took the Committee fully into its confidence and 
made a real effort to supply all necessary information and answer all 
questions. 

Through its recommendations the Committee hopes to contribute 
in some measure to the even greater usefulness of the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program and is sure that this Pi'ogram will continue as the 
most important segment of the nationwi(h» criminal statistics puh- 
lislied in the United States, 
Sincerely yours, 

(S) Peter P. Lejins, 
Peter P. Lejins, 

Cha irman , 
Consultant Committee on Uniform Crime Reporting. 



Inlroducliori 

ItniHntdinc of I nlforni i.iinu- lir/Hn-tinfi Program and tliv little 
oj tlw i'.oiisiilltiiil ('.(niiniittee 

WluMi aijpoiiitiii^ the Consultant, Committee on Uniform ('limc 
Ri'portin*;, the Federal I^ureau of Invest i<i:ation drew up a proposed 
airenda for the stutly to be undertaken.' This agenda was predieated 
upon reeognition of the faet that the time had come to review the 
rniform Crime Reporting Program, in existence since 1030, "for the 
purpose of making suggestions." The task was delineated as a very 
general one, to wit, "these suggestions may cover any phase of the 
eolleetion or puhlieation of the data that comes to mind in the light 
of the experience gaineil thus far." 

More speciiically, however, three issues were tentatively singled 
t)ut for study, indicating to the Committee the current areas of 
primary concern to the personnel in cliarge of the publication. These 
were: 1. The population basis for the computation of the rates, 
especially in view of the rapid population changes occurring between 
the ih'cennial United States censuses; 2. the question of reporting 
criminal offenses for the rural population, which arises in view of the 
fact that numy rural areas, especially those in the vicinity of the large 
metropolitan centers have actually become urban in character, al- 
though retaining their rural police jurisdiction; and 3. the makeup of 
the group of olTenses labeled "Part I olTenses," especially with reference 
to the inclusion of manslaughter by negligence and larceny, and above 
all pett}' larceny. 

The suggestion of these specific issues served to channel the Com- 
mittee's work accordingl}'. But in order to see these issues in the 
overall perspective, the Committee had to resort to a broader review 
of the program and thus approached the more general assignment 
suggesteil in the tentative ageiula. 

The proposetl agenda suggested, moreover, that the Committee 
keep in mind in its reconnniMuhitions both the criminal statistics 
standpoint and the police slamlpoint. 

It should be pointed out that the Committee had definite time and 
personnel limitations, and its study and this report should therefore 
nt)l be interpreted as an all-inclusive <>i- cxlijiustive analy-i- of (he 
Uniform Crime Ueporting Program. 

The CVmsultant Committee a|)pr()iirhtil il.> task with full n ah/alion 
of llie great importance of the Uniform Crime Ke])orling Program of 
the FBI for police work, law enforcement, and crime control in general, 

* Sc« .\p|icadU 1. 

(0) 



10 

a< well as for rcscnrcli and the scientific interpretation of the crime 
situation. The Committee was fully aware of the fact that the 
I'niforin Crime Reports are the only general crime statistics on a 
nationwi(h^ scale available at the present time in the United States. 
Other criminal statistics are only partial, that is, they deal only with 
some particular cate^i^ory of ofTensi's, or have very limite<l coverage. 

By way of an example, one might mention the Juvenile Court 
Statistics published by the Children's Bureau. In achlition to being 
limited to juvenile delin((uency, these statistics were admittedly 
"incomplete both in items reported and geograpiiical representation." ' 
The new metlHxl introduced beginning with the 1956 data resorts to a 
sampling procedure, rather than attempting to collect the information 
for all the courts.- The National Safety Council statistics on traffic 
deaths, which constitute the greater part of man.slaughter bj^ negli- 
gence, present a similar problem. While these may be good statistics, 
they deal, of course, with only one particular offense. Similarly, 
one might mention the arson or embezzlement statistics which are 
attempted on a national scale by organizations in the respective areas. 
In addition to again being onl}' partial statistics, they are also very 
incomplete. The National Prisoner Statistics, collected and pub- 
lished at the present time by the Federal Bureau of Prisons, are still 
another example. While these are excellent statistics, they do not 
deal directly with the overall crime situation but rather with one 
single aspect of it, that is, with the institutionalized ofTenders. In 
that sense they reflect the policy and the facilities in the area of 
imprisonment rather than the crime situation in the country. 

The so-called Judicial Criminal Statistics, collected and published 
by the Bureau of the Census once upon a time, may well serve as an 
example of statistics which had to be discontinued because of ob- 
stacles which the Uniform Crime Reporting Program managed to 
overcome. They represented an ambitious undertaking of having 
statistics of crime based on the offenses established by the courts. 
This statistical series never secured the continuous coojieration of a 
sullicient number of courts and was discontinued at the r(H"ommen»la- 
tion of a special committee, called together by the Bureau of the 
Budget, since the statistics seemed totally useless in the form in 
which they appeared. 

The Committee was aware of the generally accepted theoretical 
position that at least for the United States, in view of the structure 
of law enforcement in this country, crimes known to the ])olice rejue- 
sent the best statistics for the purpose of a crime index both as to 
total volume, the volume of separate ofTenses, and in general. 

The Committee therefore api)roaehed its task with re<*ognition of 

' I. Rl(h;ir'l Pcrlman. "Reporting Juvenile Delinquency, " NPPA Journal, July 19.'>7, p. 24'). 

' Jun niu Court Slaliilics. 19.56. Children's Burenu Statistical .Scries No. 47, 1958, Washington, D. C, p. 1. 



11 

the iin])()rtniiro of \\\o T'nifoini Ciijiio R('j)()i(in^ Profrrnin, roroprii- 
lion of the ti-('iiUMul()Us ^vol•k doiio by the Fcdcnil Bureau of luvcsli- 
puiou iu ciun iiu^' (uit this program, and awareness of the fart that 
this j)ri\«;rnni shouhi hy nil means i)e contiinied and ene<)ura<xed. 
The (\)ninuttee's suggestions for some ehanges should therefore not 
))(• interpreted as critieism of the i)rogiiim as such; they are meant to 
he constructive suggestions for further im])rovement. The Com- 
mittee sees itself as an instrunu'nl developed by the FBI in the latter's 
eontiiuied efforts to improve its Tniform Crime Reporting Program. 
\\'ith tiie constant changes taking ])la('e in the crime picture, with 
changes in the patterns of law enforcement, with the gradual progress 
being made in the science and techniques of gathering and presenting 
statistical information, the need for adajjtation of all progi-ams of this 
type through jx-rioilic revision is to be expected. The recommenda- 
tions of this Committee and the work on which those recommendations 
are based shoidd be looked upon as art instance of such continuous 
pioirrani review. 

I (tliinttirv N</M/rf of Cooperation in Data dollrrtiftn 

In approaching tiie FBI Uniform Crime Reports, it should be kept 
in mintl that tjje relationshij) between the FBI and the police depart- 
ments which sui){)ly the FBI with the statistical ilata on which the 
reports are based is one of voluntary cooperation. The FBI does 
not have any legal authority over the local police departments where- 
by it could refjuire the statistical information and j^rescribe the way 
and the form in which it should be supplied. This fact is very often 
overlooked, especially by those who compare the Uniform Crime Re- 
ports with police statistics coming from abroad, where tlie relation- 
ship between the police authority of the central political government 
and the local police departments is frequently one of subordination 
ami where the local |)olice force is simply a branch or part of the 
central authority, so that the latter can issue directives which must 
be followed. 

It is in the nature of American government that most matters of 
law enforcement are in the hands of the States, counties, municipalities, 
etc. The local police is not in any way obligated to fulfill the re- 
quests or follow the tlirections of the Federal agency, but the relation- 
ship depends entirely upon voluntary cooperation at all levels. This 
type of relationship, of course, in many ways affects the j)rocess of 
collecting the infornnition needed for the Uniform Crime Rep()rl>. 

First, the information is only as complete and accurate as th«' local 
police authorities are willing to make it. If the local authorities 
ciioose not to report at all, to report irregularly, or to report incom- 
pletely, nothing can be done about this in the sense of ordering them 



12 

to do tliiiu^'s the way tlicv should he (lon(\ In addition, tlic type of 
cooporation rocoivcd by the FBI in this area cannot he intcrprctod 
I'xclnsivcly as a (h-iuonstration of the I'fTcctivt'ncss of the P'BI in so- 
cniinj: tlic infoiination fi'oin tlic police antlioritics. The amount of 
cooperation hy the police authorities expresses not only their cooper- 
ativeness or lack thereof with the FBI, but the «reneral climate of 
relations between local government and the Federal Government in 
niiy area. It is true that the FBI can, to a certain extent, improve 
tiiis cooperative relationship, but the latter will always reflect the 
>reneral pattern of cooperation with the Federal Government as a 
wliole. 

Secondly, anotiier way in which the factor of voluntary coopera- 
tion makes itself felt is in the manner in which the information has 
to be collected. Since cooperation is voluntary, the collectintr agency 
has to be very careful about its public relations. This undoubtedly 
affects the type and the form of data that may be requested. The 
FBI has to be constantly aware of how much information it can ask 
in order not to endanger cooperation. It also has to be aware of iiow 
much pressure it can exercise in case of noncompliance, how soon re- 
minders and how many reminders can be made, etc. This also plays 
an important role with regard to the nature of the data requested. 
The FBI has to be constantly watchful so as not to lose the coopera- 
tion of the local police agencies by asking information which would 
require too much work or be so complicated in form as possibly to 
discourage the local authorities from supplying it. 

The Broader Function of the Uniforin Crime Reports 

Another important consideration with regard to the Uniform Crime 
Reports arises in the following connection. These reports are sta- 
tistics which the FBI collects for the promotion of better law enforce- 
ment as a result of a request made by the International Association 
of Ciiiefs of Police. Moreover, these statistics are collected by 
the FBI, as previously stated, with the voluntary cooperation of the 
police agencies; they are collected for the use of the police and tlu>re- 
fore it is quite natural that they must include first of all information 
that is of interest to the police. Especially since, as was pointed out 
above, the cooperation of police agencies is involved, it is difficult to 
be guided by any purposes other than the direct interest of the police 
in the matter. The statistics presumably have to have some signif- 
icance for police work. 

On the other hand, it should be kept in mind that in spite of the fact 
that th(> Tniform Crime Reports represent statistical information of 
importance to the police, they are regularly released also to other 
interested agencies and individuals, as well as to the press, in other 



13 

words, to (ho fr(Mi(Mal |)ii!)Iic. Tims thoy are ncrossiMo to tho ontiro 
(•itizcnry of tho I'liitoil Statis. In that sonso they havo become tho 
major source of information for tho United States in niattei"s of crime. 
Tho release of tho reports is eagerly awaited by tho |)ross and receives 
front-pa<j:o attention all over the coinitry. Editorial commentary 
follows in many papei-s and adtlitional articles in the way of comment 
and analysis vor}' often appear. Keseai'chors, welfare a«^encies, both 
public ami private, various «;ovi'rnmen(al aj^oncios, local, State and 
Federal — all make ovor-increasin«; use of the reports. This fact 
imposes an added ii's|)()nstl)ility on tho FBI. It cannot simply 
maintain that what it publishes about crime is for the use of tiie 
police only and therefore the needs of the FBI and other police 
depaitments should alone detoiinine tho content of the releases. In 
view of tho fact that the Uniform Crime Reports have come to play 
the kinil of role they do in this country, the responsibility of informing 
tho public in such a way tiuU the information cannot lead to mis- 
umloi-staiulinps and misconceptions, but will be useful from the 
stanilpoint of crime control and law enforcement becomes self-evident. 

Anyone familiar with the situation knows that in spite of the fact 
that there is much intelliirent analysis by the press, there is also 
a regrettable amount of misinterpretation by some of the information 
contained in the Uniform Crime Reports each time they are released. 
This causes unnecessary concern on the part of local governmental 
agencies, private organizations, and the public, frequently about 
inniginary problems. Tlu^ FBI's own files of newspaper clippings from 
all over the country contain ample evidence of this. The Committee 
has learned about the great concern of the FBI about such mis- 
interpretations and the amount of ofl'ort it puts into the publishing 
of the reports to forestall these and again after each release to straighten 
out misunderstandings on the part of the usoi-s. 

Even though this is an introductory statement dealing with the 
general pei-spective on Uniform Crime Reporting, it appeal's warranted 
to sum up the Committee's point of view in the following recom- 
mendation: 

Krcnnimrrulniitm (/): Since tho UCR's have outgrown being of 
use prinuirily to the law enforcement agencies, especially the 
police, and have become a basic source of information on crime 
for the country as a whole, the FBI should be encouraged to 
give as much rocoLrnition to this fact as is comi)atil)le with its 
program and be guided in the compilation and publication of the 
criminal statistics by the need to present these in such a way that 
tilt' information will be meaningful to the general |)ublic and interested 
agi'ucies anil organizations even outsid<' il"- immediate field of law 
eiiforcement. 



Analysis of Present Practices and 
Recommendations 



/*«/ifif'.s in Mdkini! C.haniies in the I ('R's 



i'.tmtinuity itf the Statistical Series 

The Coniinitti'i' consitlors it very iiiiporlaiil that in making' any 
changes in tlio Uniform Crime Reports as the result of the Commit- 
tee's sii<r<;estions or at any other time, the utmost care should b? taken 
to preserve the continuity of the present statistical series. This is, 
of course, a problem which pertains not only to the FBI's Uniform 
Crime Reports hut to any statistics of sij^nificant duration. It grows 
out of the fact that, as time goes on, changes become nt'cessary and 
improve the quality of the statistical compilation. If on the other 
hand, clianges in the analytical categories lead to a loss of continuity, 
that is, comparisons can no longer be made after the change, this 
may mean a considerable loss to the value of the compilation. With 
the UCR's Ix'ing publislied for 28 years, the opportunities which they 
offer for comparisons in crime statistics over this period of more tluin 
a quarter of a century are, of course, of prime importance. 

If the format of tlie presentation or the statistical categories are 
changed, one should, wherever feasible, give both the old and tlu> new 
versions. In some cases it might suffice to present the thita in such a 
way that the reader who is esjx'cially interested in time series can him- 
self reconstruct the series as it appeared before, hy nuiking the neces- 
sary calculations. This is especially important in those cases where 
the use of ci'ime data for scientific purposes is anticipated. 

Krrointtif'inlation (2): In nuiking changes in the UCR's, the utmost 
care should be taken not to (h'stroy the continuity of the statistical 
series. Wherever feasibl(>, both versions, i. e., the old and the new, 
shoidd be giv(>n, or the data should l)e presented in such a way that 
the rea(hM- himself can make the calculations necessary to utilize the 
data earlier collected and publislied. 

(14) 



16 

1 ln' (PIfjt'ctivi's «»/ ///<■ ( niform i'.rlnn' Itrfunliiiu l'r«»urani 



Atjy analysis of the Uiiiforni Crinu' Reports, even one limited lo 
ccrtniii specific issues, is predicaled on a clear understanding:: of the 
|)nrposes of this i)ul)lieali()n. In a very fjeneral way the purf)oso 
was ijidieated in the "Intnxhielion" to this report as the promotion 
of l)etter law enforcement throufrh the collection and dissemiiiation 
of pertinent information ahout crime and its control. A mimher of 
more sp(>ci(ic objectives can, of course, he discerned. A closer look at 
the content of the ITCR's shows that, fii-st of mII, there are criminal 
statistics. On the one iuuid there is an attempt to ctdlect information 
ahout all offenses committed in this country, obtaining tliis infor- 
mation from the police jurisdictions into which the country is sub- 
divided. For certain offenses (Pt. 1 offenses) tins infornmtion is 
collected as these offeiLses become known to the police. For other 
offenses (Pt. II ofTenses) this information is collected as the ofTenders 
involved are arrested. On the other hand, the crime situation is 
analyzed by using a specific fjroup of ofl'enses (Pt. I offenses) as an 
index of criminality to establish trends and to make the figures for 
iiwlividual communities more meaningful by computing crime rates. 
All this is done separately for the urban and the rural areas of the 
I'nited States. While the Part I offenses arc used in these analyses 
as a crime index, this is not, as will be pointed out further in the 
Report, their only meaning or function. In the case of cities, the 
i'art I offenses arc further traced with regard to being cleared by 
arrest or by establishment of the offender's guilt. 

Generally speaking much less use is made of Part II than of Part I 
offenses. The Part II offenses become known only through the arrest 
statistics. Information about arrests is collected only from the 
urban police departments and is analyzed in terms of age, sex, and race 
f the arrested offeiulei*s, with some trend, analysis, and use of rates. 
This, as just stated, is also done for the Part I offenses which result 
in arrests. Similarly, statistics are published for persons charged 
with crime in the responding urban areas and for persons found 
guilty. In addition several other kinds of crime statistics are pub- 
lished, such as the monthly variations in Part I offenses, number of 
persons released after being arrested or cited for various violations, 
tlie value of property lost through offenses against property, the 
value of property recovered, etc. 

Another major statistical series within the UCR's — one which 
does not involve criminal statistics — is the section on police employee 
data. It should be pointed out that the Committee was concerned 
with the criminal statistics only, and the police employee data section 
was not studied at all. 

4S74-JS '.s _ ■; 



16 

l'"r(nii llii< \ciy l)ricf and very j^cdcnil r('\ icw of Oic riurciit content 
of I lie rniforni ('rime Reports it ran h<» seen tlmt a wide variety of 
(lata is beinj; collected and publishod, and a complicated statistical 
compilation results. Iti a very pjoneral way two major objectives or 
purposes seem to permeate tliis mat(>rial. One is the collection of 
(lime data for all commimities of the entire country, which would 
^'ive the total "crime bill" of the United States. The other is the use 
of a <:roup of specific offenses (Pt. 1 offenses) as an index of criminality 
and of law enforcement activities. 

One of the basic tasks of the Committee was to take a stand on 
these two objectives of the Uniform Crime Reports. 

The idea of an index of crime, based on statistics of certain offenses, 
is a well worked-out topic in American criminology. Its develop- 
ment was coincident in time with the development of I'niform Crime 
Reporting. Those who are familiar with the history of American 
criminology know that in this case the theory and the practice were 
developed in conjunction with one another, and the same people were 
involved in both. The conventional concept of an index of crime is 
based on six assumptions: (1) That the statistics on crimes known to 
the police mirror the true occurrence of crimes better than any other 
kind of criminal statistics, at least in the United States; (2) that not 
all crimes become known to the police with equal consistency and 
therefore, for the purposes of an index, those offenses should be 
selected which are relative^ most frequently and most consistently 
reported to the police; (3) that serious offenses have to be selected, 
becatise on the one hand we are interested mostly in the more S(M*ious 
crimes, and on the other hand, the more serious offenses have the 
general tendency of being reported to the authorities more frequently 
and more consistently than the less serious ones; (4) that an important 
qualification for inclusion of an offense is the uniformity of its defini- 
tion for the entire territory for which the index is constructed; (5) that 
the offenses to be included should be sufficiently frequent to be 
statistically significant; and (6) that a certain optimum number of 
offenses answering the above 5 qualifications be used; an index 
based on <S offenses is more meaningful than one based on 2. At 
the same time, of course, an index is supposed to be a managea])le 
instrument and a shortcut, comparetl to the country's total picture 
of criminality. 

The Committee endorses the production and use of a crime index, 
for the purposes of which the Part 1 offenses have luM-etofore been 
used. The Committee feels that an index of crime has a definite 
function to perform, and that historically speaking this was envisaged 
l)y the International Association of Chiefs of Police in developing the 
rnifoi'in Crime Keporting Program. This can be cieariy seen from 



17 

the ii|)|)r()i)iiatt' sections of Inifn/ni Ciiinr Ju jio/tiiifi.^ 'I'liroii^'lioul 
llu' 2H yt*Hi"s of tlii'ii' exist (Mice, the I'CR's luive produced and used 
such an index. Further aiudysis of what offenses shouhl he utiHzed 
to construct such an iiuh'X of crime and what chan<;es mii^ht he nuuh' 
in that connection in tlie conij)osition of the Part I offenses will he 
further discussiMJ in the section of the Report entitled "( 'liissificni ion 
of Offenses." 

The Coininilti'e also endorsees the collection of all pertinent infornui- 
lion on crime for the entire country as another majoi- ohjective of the 
rCK's. This also was envisaged hy the original desigiK'is of the 
I iiiform Crime KejM)rting Program, and the L'CK's stand as testimotjy 
of the umelenting effort of the FIJI to collect as complete information 
as |)ossil)le on criminality in this country. 

The Cominil tec niak(>s the following recomiuciKhitions: 

Hviointuendation {3)'. 'V\\v ohjectives for collecting and pi(>senting 
the statistical information on criminal offenses should he clearly 
formulated and adhered to at all times. A brief restatement of these 
ohjectives should appear in each issue of the UCK's to forestall 
misinterpi'etation of the data. 

Rrconirnvmhition (/): In view of the ofTicially stated purposes of 
tiie I'niform Crime Reporting Program and in view of the actual 
content of tho UCR's, the objective of publishing statistics on criminal 
offenses sliould be inteipicted as a twofold one. i. e.: (1) Compilation 
and publication of a meaningful index of crime for the United States 
(presently accomplished by the reporting of Pt. 1 offenses); and (2) 
compilation and publication of the total volume of criminal offenses 
committed in the United States, b^' categories, perhaps entitled 
General Crime Statistics for the United States. It is understood that 
l)()th of these statistical series are to serve as the basis for the com- 
putation of apj)i()priate rates and trends and for making comparisons. 
As already stated, the issues involved in the production of an index 
of crime will be discussed and certain recommendations made in 
that connection in the section of the report entitled "Classification 
of Offenses." Here, however, certain rather obvious recommenda- 
tions will be made in con?iection with the second objective of the 
< riminal statistics. 

Uocaniniendutioii (5): In prest-nting the total crime picture for the 
I nited States, a tabulation including all offenses, perhaps with the 
exception of .some minor ones, should be aimed at, wlii<h means that 
this tabulation should include not only offenses ctirrently reported 
as Part I offenses but also those reiK)rte<l as Part 11. 

• I'niform Crime Kepwttng. Committee on UnUorm Crime RocortU. International As!iorlati'>n of Chlob 
of Polliv. \9ti: p. 22. 



18 

livrtnunnniltit'uni (6): III order to make the iiiiplcinciitnt ion of 
iccoiiiiiKMidation (a) possiMc, the {•ollcctioii of oirciiscs of Part 11, 
tliat is, ollViiscs known through arrest, should l)e it)tensified in order 
to achieve more eonipk'te coverage for (he urban coniniunilies, and 
a pr<t<,nani of coih-eting tliis information for the rural areas should 
he initiate<l. \'arious analyses. su<-h as by a^e, sex, and raee, which 
can |)resently he nuule only for a limited nund»er of offenders could 
then he extended to tiie entire criminal po|)ulation. 

The Committee is aware of the fact that recommendations (5) and 
(6) involve long-range projeets, but feels that as long as the UCR's 
are not restricted to an index of crime ])ut also have as an o])jective 
the collection and pul)lication of information on all offenses, complete 
coverage for the country as a whole is a logical and ultimate goal. 
Kecommendation (6) is directed toward two majoi- gaps in the com- 
pleteness of coverage for ofl'enses of Part 11: The incompleteness of 
urban coverage and the total absence of rural reporting. The Com- 
mittee also refers the reader to its recommendation under the subtitle 
"Present Data Collection versus Sampling." 



Collection and Pitblication of Data 



Fretjuency of Reports From Cooperating Police Departments 

The Committee has very seriously considered the possibility of 
diminishing the frequency of submission of the statistical reports by 
the cooperating police departments. This would mean abandoning 
the present scheme of getting monthly reports and substituting per- 
haps a quarterly or semiannual report from the police instead. The 
Committee has, however, rejected the idea of any change in this 
direction, in spite of the fact that it appears reasonable to assume that 
a report submitted quarterly, for instance, would decrease the amount 
of work to be done by the local police departments as compared to a 
monthly report. This could then perhaps be used as an argument for 
requesting an increased amount of infonnation in the less frequent 
reports. The Committee is, however, aware of the fact that the re- 
(|uest for a monthly report from the local police authorities serves a 
valuable educational purpose. The police departments are alerted 
at fre(|uent intervals as regards statistical accoimting. There is the 
danger that with the pressure for monthly reports removed, the police 
departments might become somewhat less punctilious and instead of 
producing more data for the 3-months report, might actually become 
less precise and, not having gotten up a report for a longer period, 



19 

could roiu'civnblv" have <li(licully in pcttinp <lala to^cllicr foi' (ho 
:i-inon(hs r«'ix>rl. licsidos, reports on a quarterly hasis, if received 
(()<;('( her ^vith monthly hreaUdowns, would piohahly have to he cross- 
rhecked for accuracy in tlie l"'lil, in which case the amount of work — 
from the FBI point of view at least— would not dinnnish at all. Be- 
sides, of coui-si\ all analyses which are based on monthly reports, for 
instance tiu' (luctuation of crime fief|uencv in the coui-se of the year, 
initrht suH'er considerably, especially if some of the departments would 
fail to send in the monthly breakdowns and sup|)ly only the totals 
for [\w (juarter or the half year. 

After studyin*; this matter — Matters Discussed (7) — the Commit- 
tee decided not to recommend any chan<i:e in tlu^ current practice. 

Frt'fjtteucy of VuhUrat'mn 

At the present time the UCR's are beinj? published twice a year as 
a semiaiuuial and an annual bulletin. There was a time when they 
were issued on a quarterly basis and, prior to that, monthly. The 
question was raised whether any cliange should be made in the present 
frequency of publication, and it was suggested that only one annual 
bulletin be put out. 

First of all. it was felt that with (he present staff and budget facili- 
ties, the publication of two volumes a year places considerable picssure 
on the FBI in the sense that the agency has to be constantly publica- 
tion conscious; there are always deadlines to be met. If there are any 
defects in the information received from the local agencies, there is 
very little time to contact the latter and to secure better information. 
Also there is relatively very little time for statistical analysis of the 
information received. It is felt that these and similar difTiculties 
would decrease considerably if the Bulletin were published only once 
a year. 

In that case, tlie volume might be increased in size. Additional 
analyst's could be added. It woukl be much easier to refer back to the 
agencies for better reports and perhaps for some additional information 
on the basis of the reports received. 

A good example of the serious hantlicaps whiih impending ileadlines, 
growing out of the necessity of putting out two publications per year, 
are resj)onsible for, is the met hot! for deriving the anmuil crime totals 
to which the FBI has to resort. This is discussed in the section of the 
n'port dealing with the "General United States Crime Statistics" 
under the subtitle "Estimating the Totals." 

Another argument for having just 1 bulletin each j^car is that, with 
the present system of 2 bulletins, the data for a given ye^r do not all 
appear in the antnial bulletin covering that year but have to be in- 
chidt<l in (he semiannual bulletin of the following year. Thus, for 



20 

iiislniicc. tlic Atiinidl lin/lttlii for l'.t.')7, \\lii<li wns idcasrd on April 2'.i, 
1*(")K, <|()('s not contain olFcnscs cleared foi" I!).")?, becanse the pnblica- 
lion of the Annual liidht'tn is too early to pei-init inclusion of that 
type of (lata. "Olfensos Cleared" for 19o7 will appear otdy in the 
St niidnnutil BulUtln for 195S, which, as other seniiaiunnd bnlletins. will 
not appear until eai'ly fall. If there were oidy one hullelin each year, it 
could be released approximately at the time of the present semiannual 
bulletin, and in tluit manner could handle all data for 1 year in 1 
])ui)lication. 

An important factor would be that a certain amount of repetition 
now appearing in the two bulletins would be eliminated, and that the 
same space, the same personnel, time and, in general, the same budget- 
ary allotment could be utilized for publishing more data than is being 
done at the present time. 

Rvconittiendution (7): It is recommended that the present practice 
of publishing the UCR's as a semiannual and an annual bulletin be dis- 
continued and only one annual bulletin be issued. A sufficient amount 
of time should be allowed for the tabulation and analysis of the data. 
The ((uality of the publication should not be allowed to suffer from 
impending deadlines. The fuller scope of the one annual publica- 
tion — see recommendation (1) — will necessitate more preparation 
time. Issuance of intermediate publications of limited scope, which 
the FBI might find appropriate for release, is of course not precluded 
by this recommendation but is actually encouraged. 



Classification of OJfetises 



Part I and Part 11 Offenses 

The proposed agenda given the Committee l)v the FBI suggested 
looking into the advisability of revising the j)i'es(Mit distribution of 
offenses between Parts I and II, and more specitically a careful weigh- 
ing of the arguments for and against retaining manslaughter by negli- 
g<>nce and larceny below .$r)0 (petty larceny) among Part I ofTenses. 
The justifiability of this concern on the part of the FBI was well sub- 
stantiated by the fact that the resource persons contacted in the course 
of the study very often volunteered concern with reference to the 
above two categories, and vei'v many suggested the need for change. 
Still another category^, namely that of auto theft, was (juestioned, 
nllhouirh to a lesser extent. 



21 

Perusal (tf (he rcfiMviucs to the UCR's in the press shows tliiit one 
of tin- major points on wliicli misinterpretation of the pnhhshed (hita 
or eritieism thereof is apt to occur, is llir comixisition of tlir I'miI I 
offenses. 

An examph' of an instance in which the piesent reporting ol I'art 1 
offenses recently came under attack involveil criticism of the distribu- 
tion of the offenses by ag:e groups and the meaning; attached thereto. 
AVhih> this matter is |)roperly discussed in the j)art of the report dealiiif^ 
with juvenile t)fl"enses, il is referred to here because the criticism goes 
hack to the weaknesses in the present structure of Part I. The Com- 
mittee has in mind here a statement. ori<;inally ap[)earin<; in the May 
'.\, 11)58, issue of The A'V«' Yorker, which was quoted and apparently 
endorsed by the Annual Conference of the International Juvenile 
Officers' Association in its Milwaukee meetiiiij: on May 23, 1958, and 
is reflected in that organization's resolutions. The essence of the 
criticism lies in the fact that while 47.2 percent of all persons arrested 
for Part I ofTenses which are labeled major crimes appear to be under 
IS veal's of age — which, of course, represents an alarming situation 
indeed — in reality the immediate assumption that juveniles committed 
nearly half of all murders, aggravated assaults, rapes, etc., is erro- 
neous, since, as a more detailed analysis in the UCK's indicates, juve- 
niles are responsible primarily for the auto thefts and larcenies, and 
their participation in the above-cited three serious offenses is rela- 
tively low. 

The above criticism is based largely on a misinterpretation, since 
tlie Uniform Crime Reports Annual Bulletin for 1957 itself points out 
(p. 113) that: 

AlthouRh youth.s under 18 account for only 12.3 percent of arrests for all age 
group.s, they make up 47.2 percent of the arrests for the Part I crime.s of murder 
and nonnegligent inan.slaughter, negligent manslaughter, rape, robbery, aggra- 
vated ansault, burglary — breaking or entering, larceny — theft, and auto theft. 
The extent of the participation of youths in crime for the Part I classes is weighted 
by arrests for crimes against property. 

Persons under 18 represented 53.1 percent of all arrests for the Part I crimes 
of robljory, burglary — breaking or entering, larceny — theft, and auto theft, but 

ly 10.3 percent of all arrt-sts for the Part I crimes against the person of murder, 
■ klligent man.slaughter, ra|K*, and aggravated a.ssault. 

Nevertheless this superficial and erroneous impression is highly un- 
desiral)le. It is traceable to the composition of the Part I offenses: 
while bearing the title "major crimes," this group of offenses is numeri- 
cally made up for the most part not of major crimes but of petty 
larcenies, culpable traffic fatalities, and auto thefts of the type referred 
to as joyriding. 

The Committee studied and discussed in great detail the develop- 
mental histor>' of the category of ofTenses known as "Part I offenses" 
and the present philosophy behind using this category as contrasted 



22 

with "Part II olTonsos." It ostnblislicd that, historically, tlio (•atofj;orv 
of Part I ollVnscs was the result of a coinproiniso, in l)at'k of which 
wore various diireriiifr proposals at the time the oripnal commit lee of 
the International Association of Chiefs of Police formulated the plan 
for the Uniform Crime Reporting Protjram. It was also aware of at 
least one major chan^io in the Part I offenses, made prior to the estab- 
lishment of this Committee, viz., the elimination of statutory rape 
from that group. 

The Committee came to the conclusion that the difficulties en- 
countered in the separation of olTenses into Part I and Part II as well 
as the problems created by the composition of Part I are due to the 
fact that the classification as such has several purposes in mind, or 
attempts to achieve a number of objectives. Each one of these 
objectives is a perfectly justifiable one, but the classification, being a 
compromise, does not fully accomplish any one of these. Therefore it 
is easily open to criticism from the standpoint of any one single objec- 
tive. According to the Committee's analysis, the objectives which 
the current classification attempts to achieve or what might be called 
the classification criteria, are as follows: 

1. Difl'erentiation between the ofl'enses which are best reported, as 
they become known to the police (Pt. I offenses) and those which are 
best reported as they become known to the law enforcement agencies 
through the arrest of the oft'ender (Pt. II ofl'enses). 

2. Use of a certain number of offenses known to the police as an 
index of criminality. The crime situation in the country is evaluated 
on the basis of the statistics of Part I ofl'enses. Generally speaking 
the criteria for a crime index, which were enumerated above, apply and 
were actually considered in developing the category of "Part 1 
offenses." 

3. Separation of ofl'enses into more important and less important 
ojies. The term "major crime" is very frofiuently used in the UCR's 
with reference to Part I offenses, by implication conveying the idea 
that Part II offenses are not major, i. e., evidently minor or less 
important offenses. Just what is the exact meaning of the term 
"major" is not quite clear. 

4. Emphasis on the offenses whicii arc especially important from the 
standpoint of the police. The Committee met with the attitude that 
some of the ofl'enses should remain Part 1 ofl'enses because that stresses 
their importance to the cooperating police departments, and, con- 
versely, their removal from Part I would "deemphnsize ' them not 
onl}' in the sense of reporting but also in the sense of their suppression. 

As stated above, the Committee came to the conclusion that the 
sc|)aration of offenses into Part I and Part II does not satisfy all of the 
above four ciitcM-ia, and that probably no single grouping of the 
oflenses woidd either. Thus, for instance, it is cjuite obvious that, if 



23 

jmlircd exclusively from llic stniidpoiiil of ciilcrioti No. 1, i. p., tlio 
t('('lmi(|iio of rrconliii^, some of the Pnrt 11 offenses should ho trans- 
feifed to Part I, heeaiise (hev could he hetter recorded as (hey heconie 
l<rio\\n to th(« police instead of waitirio; until an airest is effectuated. 
A careful study would he necessary to definitely estahlish this, but 
oHhand tin* (|uestion could he raised with reference, for instance, to 
for^'cry and counterfeitinu;, many tj'pes of fraud, several of the "all 
other oflenses," etc. 

From the point of view of criterion No. 2, i. e., the index of crime, 
several of the l*art I olfenses are out of place. Manslaujxhter hy 
ne^dip:ence, which category is made up almost exclusively of culpable 
traffic <leaths, is certaiidy not a proper ofl'ense to be used for an index 
of crimiiuitity. Rape, for instance, even if statutory rape is excluded, 
is notoriously an oft'ense which is not consistently reported to the 
|)olice. * As a matter of fact, rape is often used as an example of pre- 
cisely the opposite, namely, of an offense which the victim and its 
relatives often hesitate to report because of the painfulness of the 
publicity attached. In many cases, on the other hand, a report of 
vixpo is made falsely. Larceny under $50 is certainly not an offense 
that is consistently reported. These ofTenses are mentioned here only 
to illustrate the point which the Committee is attempting]: to make; a 
more tletailed discussion of manslaughter by negligence and larceny 
follows under the respective headings. 

As for criterion No. 3, i. c, the seriousness of the offense in the sense 
of its being a "major" or "nonmajor" offense, the lack of defmiteness 
as to what "major" means should once more be pointed out. But 
it seems that whatever precise meaning is assigned to the term 
"major," potty larceny — below $.50 — certainly does not qualif}^ for 
inclusion in Part I on that score (except perhaps in the sense of numer- 
ical frequency). Concern about the fact that stolen hubcaps and 
minor thefts from the open counter are included in the category of 
"major crimes" is a repeated criticism of the UCR's. Perhaps one 
of the best statements of this criticism is in the FBI's own proposed 
agenda for the Committee's work. Moreover, the inclusion of joy- 
riding auto thefts m Part I solely by reason of being a "major 
offense" — whatever the meaning thereof — also can be questioned. 
On the other hand, depending again, of course, on the exact meaning 
of the term "major," several of the Part II offenses might possibly 
qualify. 

Finally, from the standpoint of criterion No. 4, that is, the im- 
portance of the offense for police work, it seems that if that criterion 
alone were to be followed, considerable flexibility would be an impor- 
tant consideration in order to keep up with changes in the actual crime 
probh'ms. Several offenses which are now in Part II would probably 
qualify. 

4H7428*— 58 4 



24 

III view (if tlio ahovp, the Committee recommeiuls dopjiipliasizing 
tlic prt'xiit division of offenses into Part I and Part II and sugrgests 
iicliicvii)^ the scvoial objeetives whieh the present classification at- 
tempts to accojni)lisli, by using several separate presentations or tabu- 
lations of statistical data. For this purpose the Committee makes the 
following recommendations: 

Rvronunviidatioii (H): In the UCR's publishctl hereafter, the em- 
phasis should be removed from the terminology Part I and Part II 
offenses. It is felt that if this terminology were retained in spite of 
considerable changes in the content of the groupings of offenses, 
confusion would result; new terms applied to a new classification 
would promote clarity. 

Recommendation (9): It may be advisable to retain, at least for the 
time being, the current terminology of Part I and Part II offenses in 
the Bm-eau's communications with the cooperating police depart- 
ments, since it is by now accepted practice and a tradition of long 
standing. 

Kerommendation (10): The publication of an index of crime, which 
function is presently performed by the Part I offenses, should be 
continued, but the tabulations should be entitled "index of crime" 
and the composition of the index be changed to exclude manslaughter 
by negligence and larceny below $50 (for elaboration of this see the 
respective subtitles and also the subtitle "Auto Theft"). 

HecotnineiuUition (-/i): The general tabulations of United States 
crime statistics should be divided into those offenses which are re- 
ported as they become known to the police and those which are re- 
ported as they become known through the arrest of the offender. 

Recommendation (72): The classification suggested in recommenda- 
tion (11), wliieh presently consists in the differentiation of Part I and 
Pait II offenses, should be further studied by the pereonnel of the 
l^ureau in consultation with experienced representatives of the police 
de])artments in order to determine the best manner of handling 
specific offenses. 

l<e<umiinend<tlion (13): A special section should be developeil in tiie 
rCK's to deal with the group of offenses which at a given time are 
especially important to the police in its work, so as to increase the 
effectiveness of the police in combatting the particular offenses by 
focusing attention on them and providing additional information on 
their fre(juency and distribution and their success in suppressing 
them. Both offenses known to the police and offenses reported follow- 



25 

iii^ arrest nii^jht he incliidcd liric. A^aiii, continupd study by tho 
pci-soiHU'I of the RuriMUi in corisMltatiou with the hcsl (luidificd ic|)r(>- 
sciitalivcs of llic i)()lico dcpartiiUMits sliould form the basis for iii<lii(|- 
\n^ ofTiMises in this section. 

The following; coninicnt may siTve to further ehuify the ahovo 
reeonimen<hitions. If these reromnuMuhitions are followed, tho 
UCR's will contain three tabulations of groups of offenses, each ono 
of which may bt» somewhat simihu* to the pi'esent Paii T ofTensrs, but 
would also tliU'er fi'om the latter; and all thice would dilfer from each 
other. Tiiese tlireo groups would be: (1) Oflfenses recorded as they 
bcconu' known to the police, within the j^eneral tabulation of the 
railed States crime statistics; (2) olfenscs used for the purj)oses of the 
(TJine index; (3) offenses which are sin«j:le(l out as beinj; at the ^ven 
time of si)ecial imj^ortancc to the police departments in their work. 
The sense of this change will be that each one of the three tabulations 
will be different from the Part I offenses in order to meet the objections 
to which this latter trrouj) is vulnerable when it is evaluated from the 
standpoint of each sei)arate one of the three specific objectives. 
Kach of the three new groups of offenses will satisfy one particular 
objective. 

Manslaughter by Negligence 

As to the nature of the offenses reported in this category and the 
ways in which they are reported, the following seems to be well 
established. Over 99 percent of all cases of manslau<:hter by negli- 
gence are made up of traflic fatalities which are attributable to 
culpable negligence. This represents the considered opinion of the 
experienced FBI staff involved in the preparation of the UCR's. As 
a matter of fact, the number of homicides other than traffic fatalities 
reported under negligent manslaughter is so small that it is hard to 
think of any example of anything else, the best one seemingly being 
the case of accidental shooting in the hunting season. 

It also became apparent to the Committee that in the reporting of 
manslaughter by negligence the conventiomil situation characteristic 
of the crimes known to the i)olice aj)pears to be considerably modified. 
The police itself is hesitant to evaluate a case as negligent man- 
■-laughter rather than as an accident and has a tendency to await the 
action of the grand jury. It is reasonable to assume that the policies 
of the various police departments vary in that respect, and it is 
therefore justifiable to question the consistency with which this 
offense is reported as a crime known to the police. 

The above two facts about negligent manslaughter make it a very 
suspect category from the point of view of its usefulness for an index 
of crime. In spite of the seriousness which the problem of tralli" 



•J(i 

fiiialitics rt'pn'scnts iintioiially. tliis ofTt'iisc cjin Imnlly ]>r cliarac- 
teri/A'd as a serious criiiii' in tlic same sense in wliicli other eiinies are. 
In a sense, trallie fatalities are a function of the trallie vohiine and as 
sueh do not primarily ineastnc crime l)Ut rathei- the extent to which a 
<-ountrv uses automohiles. Tlie fact (hat culpal)le ne«;lif;ence is 
undouhtedly present makes it possil)le to handle such instances as 
criminal olfenses. Our conc(Mii ahout the ma<i:nilii<le nf the problem 
and our desperate search to find a means to diminish it leads to our 
resorting: to the strongest measure society has, namely, punishinjr it 
as a serious crime. But in essence the traffic fatality is not a criniinal 
oU'ense that is characteristic enou<;h to he used as an index of the 
Nation's ciimiiiality. 

It is true that, since it involves loss of life, manslau^diter hy ne<rli- 
irence becomes known to the police retriilarly, but its classification 
under manslaughter, as pointed out a])Ove, very often does not 
rej)resent police action and the degree of consistency in reporting on 
that score is not quite certain. 

Another aspect in which the present way of reporting negligent 
manslaughter can be criticized is its appearance in the rural-urban 
distribution of crime and its use in the LX'R's for the computation of 
the rurid-uri)an rates. It is easily noticeable that a very substantial 
part of the cases of manslaughter by negligence takes place in the 
nu-al areas, i. e., they are reported by the rural police or the State 
police for the rural area. The reason is obvious: Automobile acci- 
dents, which constitute the vast majority of cases of negligent man- 
slaughter and which take place on the highways in the rural areas, 
are included; these automobile accidents, however, represent offenses 
not only by the rural poi)ulation, l)ut also by cityfolk who are in a 
state of travel at the time of the accident. This certainly confuses 
the meaning of the rural-urban distribution of this offense. 

From the point of view of police need, it might be important to 
know the place where the traflic fatalities occur, so that preventive 
and law-enforcement actions can be planned. In that sense it may 
be useful to tabulate negligent manslaughter in rural and urban cate- 
gories. On the other hand, however, if used in the interpretation of 
the reasons for the offense, such tabidation gives rise to the impres- 
sion that tlu' offense is attributable to the rural population and is 
therefore misleading. 

Rvvttnitnvudation (It): The category of manslaughter by negligence 
should be eliminated from the offenses used for the i)urposcs of a 
crime inde.x. It should however contiiuie to be included in the I'liited 
States crime statistics. 



27 

Itiiiatin' Siififiestioii (/): Mniislnu^liUT hy iic^'Ii^cMci' should he 
stmlicd for inclusion in the proposed now section of the IJCK's deol- 
in«r with ollVnses that are ('specially important to the work of tlie 
police. 

The sujjgestion has been made that consideration he ^iven to usin^ 
I he traflic-fatality data collected, talmlated and published by the 
National Safety Council. The Committee is uncertain to what ex- 
tent an ajxency like the FBI should dep(>nd in its reports exclusively 
on information assembled by an outside nonoflicial orfranization. As 

/cfif<i/iic Siiufifsiion (2) the Committee recommends looking into 
I he possibility of makinf; use of the statistics on traliie fatalities 
compiled by some such ajroncy, provided this source is competent 
and reliable. 

Prtty l.nrrrny 

There seems to be a rather stron<r conviction on the part of the 
police authorities that theft, regardless of how small, represents an 
important type of crime which in general is rather consistently re- 
ported to the police and is therefore a very suitable crime to be in- 
cluded in the crime index. 

There are, however, reasons why the inclusion of petty theft in the 
• rime index mi<j:ht be questioned below the level of felonious theft. 
One of these reasons is the fact that some of the petty larcenies are 
extremely minor offenses. Another reason for not including petty 
theft is the question of the consistency of reporting. In such major 
areas of larceny as, for instance, shoplifting, the policies of the firms 
involved often are against contacting the law enforcement agencies 
for the purpose of prosecuting customers who engage in petty stealing. 
In that case, not to report must very often be considered the policy of 
the firm. It would, of course, be against the theory of the crime 
index to use an offense of this kind. In that connection information 
given in the proposed agenda for the Consultant Committee is very 
significant. Accoiding to this information, thefts of bicycles, auto 
accessories, and other thefts from automobiles in 1956 represented 
over ')0 percent of all the larcenies, while approximately one-seventh 
of the larcenies represented property under $5 in value. Moreover 
it has been found difficult to determine when a bicycle is actually 
stolen and when it is borrowed by some other child, and in the case of 
hubcaps, or license plates it is very difficult to distinguish whi'ther 
these items were actually stolen or perhaps lost and reported stolen 
merely for insurance purposes. 

In view of all this, the suggestion that the petty larcenies be stricken 
from the offenses used for index purposes should be given serious con- 
sideration. There is again, of course, the question of the continuity 



28 

f>f a sliilisticnl s<'ri«'S, wliioli was discussod cailici-. Tlicicfoic it is 
liopcd that if petty lafccnics an- cxcliidrd from the iiulcx. thoy will bo 
rcportt'd in such a way that aiiyoiu' interested in the time series and 
comparisons could easily add the petty larcenies to the other olFcnsos 
whieii will hereafter make up Part I and in that way reestai)lish the 
catejrory currently used in the series. Perhaps one might even suj;- 
gest that in deference to the fact that petty larcenies were for so many 
years included in the larceny figures in the Part I ofTenses. one might 
have a special figure, at least for a while, appear in the UCR's which 
would include both felonious and petty larcenies. 

Recommendation (15): Tlie present division of larceny into cases 
of over and under $50 should be retained. The criteria for distinction 
should be further studied. Only larcenies above $50 should be used 
for the purposes of the crime index. Larcenies under $50 should be 
reported as offenses known to the police in the general tabulation of 
the United States crime statistics. 

Auto Theft 

The (juestion has come up whether auto theft, which at present 
is one of the Part I offenses, should be included in the crime index. 
The arguments against inclusion are mainly two: (1) Auto theft does 
not constitute a uniform category, since it includes as widely different 
offenses as professional theft of car parts and cars for stripping and 
resale on the one hand, and juvenile joyriding on the other. (2) Joy- 
riding, which comprises a very substantial portion of the auto thefts, 
is presumably not an offense of such an inherently criminal nature as 
to appropriately be used for the purposes of a crime index. 

The arguments in favor of retaining auto theft for crime index 
purposes are: (1) The extremely high consistency of reporting. An 
auto theft, especially in view of the insurance involved, is almost 
always reported; (2) a stolen car usinilly represents a relatively very 
high value, and almost automatically qualifies as grand larceny. The 
Committee decided to retain auto theft for the p\n-poses of the crime 
index. 

Mutters Discussed (2): Auto theft as a Part I offense. The Com- 
mittee decided on continuing the present practice, except that in 
view of the general changes in the structure of the UCR's, auto 
theft will from now on be included in the group of offenses going 
into the crime index. 



29 

i^vitrral I nilvtl Stdtt's C.rinir Statistics 



\\ lien (he puiposfs of the i)r('scntMti()ii of crimiiml statistics in the 
rCK's wt'iv tliscussccl caiTuT in this Report . the f^^ciici-jil tahtilntion of 
pt)li('t' statistics on ciiinc was pointed out as one of the major objec- 
tives. Tlie C\)inniittee fully endorsed this objective — see Kecom- 
in(Muhitioii (4) — and su^jjested further expansion of the collection 
of tlata with reference to the Part 11 olVenses so as to achieve more 
complete coverajje for the urban areas and to include also the rural 
l)opulntion — see Recommendations (5) and (G). 

Several issues are involved m the presentation of these general 
(rime statistics, and the Committee considered four of these as 
especially important. The TCR's analyze separately offenses re- 
ported for the urban and the rural areas and present crime rates, 
estimated crime totals and trends. The Committee discussed the 
desirability of this type of presentation and agreed that this aiudysis 
is very meaningful and should by all means be retained. But the 
following questions arise: (1) The question pertaining to the division 
of the United States population into urban and rural; (2) the question 
of the population base used for the computation of the crime rates; 
(3) the method of arriving at estimated totals for the entire United 
States on the basis of the available reports, which give criminal 
olTenses only for part of the country; and (4) the method used in the 
prest»ntation of trends. It can immediately be seen that especially 
the first A of these issues are very much interrelated, since all 3 of 
them revolve around the availability of sufficiently recent and ac- 
curate population figures. Therefore, although they will be handled 
separately for the sake of simplicity of presentation, it will be noticed 
that they all go back to one and the same basic problem. 

Rural Versus Urban Criminality 

The major problem involved in analyzing criminality on the basis 
of reports by rural and urban areas was ])ointed out in the tentative 
agenda drawn up by the FBI for the work of this Committee, namely, 
that the rapid trend toward urbanization, combined with the trend 
toward suburban living, leads to a situation where areas which 
administratively are rural, are in reality inhabited by urban people. 
Thus part of the crimes attributed to the rural population because 
they aro reported by police departments which are rural according to 
their organization, are in reality committed by city people. This is 
especially damaging for the accuracy of the crime rates; since these 
are generally higher for the urban areas, a considerable amount of 
distortion may result. This may be one of the explanations for ibf 



30 

it'cciitly ji|)|)iin'nt rclafivfly more ijipid incroaso in rural criminality 
as reported ill tli(» TCK's. In the uljove-nientioned ap-nda, the FBI 
itself raised the (|nestion uln-lln r it siioidd not perhajis "resort to a 
reliable sain|)le for rural crime reporting;." 

The Committee discussed th<' substitution of a sami)linfj techni(jue 
in inral <iime rep<>rtinfr for the present method, which attempts 
(<» nlttaiii full information on iiiral crimimility, and advises against 
the chanjxe. at h-ast for the reporting; of crimes known to the police. 
The main reason for this stand of the Committee was its desire to 
preserve the present general o])jective of the Uniform Crime Keport- 
injr Pron;ram to collect full information on criminality in the United 
States. Instead, the Committee recommends making use of the new 
analytical category introduced by the Bureau of the Census in its 
19.")() decemiial census, viz.. Standard Metropolitan Areas. 

Standard Metropolitan Areas are generally speaking urban in 
nature and contain a minimum of population which still adheres to 
the rural way of life. At the same time these areas are made up of 
governmental units, i. e., cities and counties (in New England cities 
and towns). Thus they do not cut across the areas for which police 
crime reports are available and the population figures can thus be 
used for the needs of police crime statistics. The Bureau of the 
Census was consulted in this matter, and it was found that the Cen- 
sus plans to continue the use of the Standard Metropolitan Areas in 
future censuses. 

For the population living outside of the Standard Metropolitan 
Areas ' the present differentiation into urban and rural communities 
should be continued, making use of the 1950 census definitions of 
these terms, which differ slightly from the earlier ones. It should 
l»e noted that no use can be made at this point of the category of 
"urban fringe," introduced by the census in 1950, since the areas 
assigned to this category cut across the political or administrative 
boundaries and consefpiently cannot be used for the tabulation of 
j)olice data. 

Matters l)isctisse€l (3): The ( 'oniniit tee discussed llu> jiossibility of 
substituting a sampling method for the present collection of criminal 
statistics for rural areas for crimes known to the ])olice and advises 
against the change. 

litrtminiviuUitiou (10): The Committee recommends the following 
j)lan for the analysis of the crime data into rural antl urban. The 
j)oj)ulation of the area of the United States should be divided into 
three tyi)es of communities: 



I AcconlliiK to the Unlti-d States 19.10 consus, of a iioimlatlon of nlxuit l^^ million, 84 million wore Ilvinp In 
Starnliir<l Metropolitan Arcay, an<l acconlinp to a U»,Mi sampU' stuilv h\ tlu- Htircau of the Census, of the 
ni>iiro\lmately IM million In 1«.16, 06 million were living In .Standar.l Metropolitan Areas. 



31 

1. S(aii<liii(l Mcli(»|)(tliljm Areas as ('s(al)lisli(Ml by I In- Hiiicaii 
of ( 'cnsus for the \\)'i{) cciisiis and as Ihrsc iiia\' he futtlici- j-cvised 
1)\' llial BurtMUi. 

'_'. I'lbaii comiiHinitics, llial is. ^niciall y spcaUiii^ <(»iiiiiimiiti('9 
with inoic than 'J,r)()() inhahitants. More spccKicallN' the cnrn-nt 
(1U")()) ( 'cnsus jh'linilion shonM he used. The url)an popuhitioii 
which is not comprised within the Stanthird MetiopoHlan Aicas 
wouhl l)e taken care of in this ciitej^oiv. 

;{. liuial popuhition, aj^ain in accoiihince with the current (lOoO) 
census <h'(inition. This wouhl amount to the total rural poj)uliition 
e.\cej)t for the small part which is included in the Standard Metroi)oli- 
tan Aieas. It is believed that this would <j:ive for the United States 
tin" rural i)oi)ulatioii in the truest sense of that word, for which 
statistical data is cuircntly available. 

At the re(|uest of the Committee this j)lan has been tested ])y 
the Statistical Section of the FBI for the States of Illinois and Mary- 
land. Tabulations wi're jjrepared in accordance with the three 
sujjjjjested categories, and althoui2;h the Committee did not feel it 
necessary to pursue this j)lan in all liiud detail, the exj)erience gained 
-howod that the plan is workal)Ie for the tabulation of the crime data 
received from the cooi)eiating ])olice depaitments. Tlie FBI per- 
soiniel concerned was also agreed on the workability of the plan, which, 
was likewise discussed with personnel of the Census Bureau and the 
tentative reaction there was also favoral)le as to the feasibility of the 
j)lan from the jjoint of view of the census data. For the exploratory 
tabulations for the States of Illinois and Marjiand and the respective 
Standard Metroj)olitan Areas, see Ajipendix 2. 

The advantages of this j)lan for estinuiting the ciime totals, which 
will be discussed under the i)ertinent subtitle, will i)e mentioned 
there. 

Crime Rates 

A considerable amount of the information appearing in the UCR's 
is converted into crime lates, with the population of the areas covered 
by the reports serving as the base. The FBI's proposed agenda lor 
this Committee contains the statement: "The rates are calculated for 
the purpose of furnishing a yardstick with which to assist local admin- 
istratoi-s in measuring the current magnitude of the police problem 
at hand." The Commit t<'e felt it hardly necessary to argue the 
importance of the computation of rates, which are not only desirable 
but often crucial for the meaningfulness of statistical data of this 
nature. 

Ami yet, the question of the crime rates has heretofore been one 
of the most difTicult problems for the I'CK's to cope with and has 

4^7428*— 58 5 



32 

prnliiiltly IxTii the most fi<'<|ii<'iit siihjcci loi' crit nism. Tlic i('as(»ri for 
the (lilliciilt y is that tin* odicial p()i)iilati()ii fi»;in<'S used by tlu- FBI are 
I he (li'ccDMial Cnitccl States ( 'oiisus fimircs, wliicli, with cvory aikli- 
tioiial ycai' further away from the epiisiis-takiuj;, beeonie further and 
fiirlhei" removed from reahly. The different ial rate of popuhition 
»;rowth in various communities makes communities with a rapiti rate 
of {growth appear exaggeratedly criminalistic in terms of the rates of 
oU'eiises repoiied hv the police. Conversely, the slowei-^rowint; com- 
munities are apt to appear in a favorable light toward the end of the 
decade. Thus, when the population basis is changed with tlie new 
census figures becoming available, sudden drastic upward or downward 
shifts in the crime rates appear for some areas. 

The Committee recommends against using the decennial census 
figures e.xcept for the 3'ear of the census. It feels that official annual 
population estimates, based on sample studies and other techniques 
should be used instead. This is especially suitable for the purpose 
of tlie crime statistics since the introduction of the new analytical 
categories in the most recent United States census, especially the 
category of Standard Metropolitan Areas, which was discussed under 
the preceding subtitle in connection with rural-urban analyses. 

The following annual estimates appear to be available from the 
Bureau of tlie Census: First of all there is, of course, an annual esti- 
mate for the total I'nited States popidation, and there are such esti- 
mates for the individual States. Moreover, annual estimates are 
available for the total population of the Standard Metropolitan Areas 
and for the total urban and i-ural populations outside of the Standard 
Metropolitan Areas. It would probably also be possible to obtain an 
annual estimate for the population of all metropolitan areas of 100,000 
and over-. The Committee gained the impression that with not too 
much of an additional budgetary outlay, the Bureau of the Census 
could supj)ly the Department of Justice with annual population esti- 
mates foi" the Staiuhu'd Metropolitan Areas on an individual basis, if 
«) refjuested. 

Tlie Committee discussed the feasibility of obtaining annual popu- 
lation estimates for various communities from other than oflicial 
governmental sources. Many such estimates are available ' and are 
being widely used, e. g., in business. The ( 'ommittee wouh' limit itself, 
however, to the tentative suggestion to the FBI that the possibility 
of resorting to that kind of estimates be exploied. 

As a residt of the sti ily reflected in the above discussion, the Com- 
mittee makes ijie followintr recoininciidations: 



' Sep, 0. f., v. S, nurciiu of the C<nsiis. "Lociil I'npiilniloii Esllmntos Propnrp*! hy .^tnteand City .\f;cn- 
cles: 1967-58." Current Population Rtportt- Population Estimates, Series p. 25, No. 178, Juno 27, 1958. 



33 

Itrttmum'iHliilitm {17): 111 view of ( lie (lidCrciil iai |)0|)iiliil ion ^rowtli 
in various conununitios, the (Icceiinial ct'iisiis fij^ures should not be used 
■for tlu> coinputation of tlu> {'rirnc rates heyond the year to whieh they 
pfitaiii. Instead, the avaihd)h' annual estimates by the Bureau of the 
( 'ensus should be used. It is felt that the plan for utilizing in the rural- 
urban analyses the aruilytical ealegories recently introduced by tlu^ 
Bureau of the Census woidd prove of value also in the computation of 
the crime rates. It is hereby also recommeiuled that the FBI further 
explore the possibility of obtainiiifr more detailed amnud eslinuites 
frt)m the Bureau of the Census. 

Tentative Sitfifiestion (,'t): The possibility of using annual popula- 
tion estimates by other than governmental agencies should be 
explored. 

1'^stiinatinii the Totals 

In spite of the remarkably high degree of cooperation by the police 
departments in supplying the Uniform Crime Reporting Program 
with crime data, complete coverage can hardly ever be expected in a 
jjrogram of this sort. 

Tlu're is a natural interest in having figures for the total amount 
of crime in the entire country or in a given community, calculated 
on the basis of the amount of crime reported by the cooperating 
dej)artments. Besides, since not necessarily the same police depart- 
ments respond each year, the estimated totals gain in importance as 
the figures which are to be used for comparisons from year to year 
antl as the basis for the calculation of trends. The only other method 
that might be used for the latter purposes instead of using the esti- 
mated totals would be to exclude from the entire time series those 
communities which have failed to respond even once, but this would 
tend to reduce the reporting universe unnecessarily. The use of 
estimated totals suggests itself whenever one or several segments of 
the unit under study fail to report. 

The FBI has for a long time resorted to estimating certain totals 
in the L'CR's. The Committee was informed by the staff members 
about the various ways used in the ptust to achieve this. Tiiere is no 
point in recounting the former methods here or the changes which 
gradually took place. It is necessary, however, to describe briefly 
the currently-used method in arriving at such estinuites. 

Each year, after the reports on the Part I offenses have been 
received from the cooperating dej)artments for the entire year, a com- 
parison is made between the nund)er of olfenses for the current ^ear 
and the number of ofTenses reported the previous year. The com- 
|)arison is always based on the information supplied by those depart- 



34 

mciiN which irs|)(ni»hM| Koth years. The comparison is made sepa- 
rately for the niriil and nrl)an areas and for the ei^lit offenses which 
make uj) Part 1. Percentage (Hfrerenees are noted and are con- 
sich'ied indieations of trends. Then the ostiniatcd number of offenses 
for the previous year, each offense txpe, rural and urban separately, 
are increased or deercased, dependinj^ on the established trend. 
A(Mit ion of the 10 fig:ures obtained {jives the estimated total of "major 
Climes" for the entire country for the <riven year. The ('ommittee 
labelled this method of obtaininj; estimates of the totals, Method A. 
It will be noted that the estimate for a given year is derived from the 
estimate for the previc^us year, and so on. The year which served 
as the basis for this continuing series of estimates was, and still is, 
194 7. In that year extensive studies were made to arrive at the 
estimate. 

Method A is not, iiowever, the only meliiod involved in the produc- 
tion of the estimated totals. Later in the year, after the estimated 
totals arrived at by Method A have been published, a more intensive 
study, which is impossible prior to publication because of the immi- 
nence of the deadline, is made. Estimated urban and rural totals 
are developed separately. For arriving at the estimated totals of 
urban crime, the following steps are taken: The cities, divided into 
fi groups by size, are taken separately by groups for the 9 geographic 
divisions of the country. This makes 54 units. The offenses re- 
ported by the police departments tor each one of these units are then 
tabulated. If not all departments have responded, the figure for 
each one of the offenses is increased accordingly. 

On the l)asis of the previous decennial census figures, tiie total 
number of offenses is estimated proportionately to the part of the 
population for which the reports have come in. Since, as indicated 
above, the 8 Part I olfenscs are handled separately, this produces 
eight times 54, that is, 432 figures, the sum-total of which gives the 
estimated total of urban criminality for the entire country. For the 
rural area the separation into nine geographic divisions is not used. 
Fxperienee has shown that the differences between the regions are so 
slight that there is no point in using them. Of course, there is no 
grouping by size of communities. Thus the estimated total for rural 
crime is arrived at simply by comparing the number of offenses 
reported for the portion of the nu'al jMipulation represented by the 
cooperating departments and the total rural population. Ilereto- 
lore, again, the previous decennial figures have been used. The 
('ommittee labeled this method of arriving at the estimated totals, 
Method B. 

The use mad(^ of the figures arrived at by Method B is as follows: 
These figures are used at the time of the calculation of the estimate 
for the next year as a supplementar}' step in Methoil A, but for the 



35 

purpose of cliirily of i)r('st'iiliit ion this was not iiiciil ioiird when the 
Ijittcr inothoti was describi'd. One might say lluil the figures arrived 
at l)y Method B serve as a control (h>viee in the sense of eonii)aring 
with them the figures arrived at hy Method A. As the staff pointed 
out, usually no appreciable discrepancy appeal's. 

The main device for making adjustments, if the above-mentioned 
(■ontr<»l device should indicate the need for such, is the use of a cor- 
rection factor. This correction factor was developed on the basis of 
an intensive study of the rural crime reporting, which was under- 
taken also in 11)47. In this study, the luial crime figures obtained 
from communities which were known to have excellent crime report- 
ing were comj)ared with the overall rural figures received from all over 
the coimtry. Considerable undei-reporting was discovered especially 
for two offenses: Larceny and auto theft. Since that time the rural 
crime «>stimates have l)een "blown up" by injecting the correction 
factor for larcenies and auto thefts. In 1947 this correction factor 
amounted to loO aiul 100 percent respectively for the 2 offenses. 
In view of the geiu'ral improvement in rural crune reporting, it was 
felt in time, however, that the correction factor should be less, and 
it is now considerably lower than in 1947. 

One of the main objections to the current procedure, as described 
above, is that the estinuited totals of major crimes, as published for 
a particular year, are not based on the reports of the offenses known 
to the i)olice for that year, except insofar as the latter are used to 
calculate the percentage increases and decreases (trend) in the sepa- 
rate crime categories and these are then applied to the estimate of 
the previous year. It will be recalled that each year, as described 
above, after publication of the bulletin containing the major crime 
estimates, the Bureau develops by means of Method B the major 
crime estimates for the same year on the basis of the crime rej)orts 
for that year. This calculation is not published, but is used as a 
control device in calculating the estimate for the next year. This 
procedure should be discarded, since it is not and probably should 
not be published in the I'CK's in view of the nature of the publica- 
tion, and secondly, because it injects a certain amount of arbitrari- 
ness even if this arbitrariness is ap|)lied on the basis of the best judg- 
ment of the expert staff thoroughly familiar willi the quality of the 
reports coming in from the police departments. 

The current procedure could also be interpreted as follows: In 
view of the impending deadlines, the major crime estimates are 
published on the basis of the calculation here referred to as Method A. 
The reports from the local depart nu-nts for the given year are really 
a!uily/.ed ordy after publication of the bulletin aiul are used in the 
<omputation of the estimates for the next year. Since the figure for 
the current year is already published, the FBI Is constrained by it 



36 

lUid illjccis lli(> licrrssjilV correct ioii sUfXfjcst cd liy the results of 
Mciliod H, l)v miinipuliilioii of the rural "coircctioti factor" and oi 
pcrcctitn^rc iucrcascs and dcci'cascs. In spite of the fact that this 
procc(hiic is l)iisc<l on tlic hcst ju<l;iniciit of c.\pei-ts, and in spite of 
(he fact tluit when taken over a |)eriod of years it |)rol)ai)ly does ^ive 
a reasouahly accurate picture of ciinie, it can liardly be justified 
statistically as a permanent i)i()ce(hne. 

The C\)nHuittee feels that in view of the al)Ove, the currently-used 
method for com|)utation of tlie crime estimates, while having; merit 
in the |)ast, should now he ehan^M-d. Tlie icason foi- recommending 
the chan<;e, stated more ^'I'lierally, is tiie fact that the amount of 
statistical manipulation in back of the figures whieh are currently 
presented in the UCR's as major crime totals are unnecessarily com- 
|)licated and too many; a more direct and simjjle procedure should 
be substituted. The calculations involving estimates between the 
reports submitted by the police department, and the figures fimdly 
published in the UCR's should be as few, as siini)Ie and as clear as 
|)ossible, and should be briefly described in the bulletins. 

Another point which the Committee would like to make is that 
the estimates of the total crimes in the Nation, made on the basis 
of the total number of offenses submitted by the rejjorting depart- 
ments all over the country, separately by urban and rural police, are 
bused on the assumj)tion that the portions of the population for which 
no reports were received have the same crime rates as those for which 
reports were received. It seems to be safer to estimate the offenses 
for the nonreporting sections of the country individually by sej)arate 
States rather than for the country as a whole or for geographic di- 
visions. Presumably, the situation witli regard to criminality witiiin 
individual States is somewhat more homogeneous than in the country 
as a whole. Law enforcement is a State matter, as is criminal legis- 
lation. A national total wiiich is a composite of State totals, which 
in turn are comjiutcd on the basis of the ])ortions of the State which 
actually reported the od'enses is therefore a better estimate. The 
same would apply, of course, to the various comi)onents of tlu^ total, 
such as city crimes, rural crimes, or any sj)ecific category of crime. 
It is lielieved that under the procedure discussed in "Rural Versus 
I'lban Criminality," such compulaiion on the basis of States will 
l)e (piite conveni(Mit and feasible. 

Rvcottnuvndation (IH): In eonipiiling the estimated totals of major 
• rimes th(> procedure suggested und(>r the heading "Rural V^crsus 
I'rbdii ('riniliKilitif should be utili/t>d. Olfenses known to the police 
should be computed from the police reports for the Standard Metro- 
poliiiin Areas, for the rest of (lie urban population and for the rural 
|)oi)ulation within each State (19oU United ^States census definitions). 



37 

Tlu' numlxT of if|)(nl('(l oH'ciiscs slioiild IIkmi he |)i()|)()il ioiinl cly 
increased to take cai-c of llic iiiu-cporlod portions, if any. of llioso 
same (■at('j;<»ri(>s within each State. Tlu> sum total of the cstiniatos 
for the States tluis obtained will <;ive the national estimate foi- the 
l^iven yeai". It is hoped that wherever available the annual popu- 
lation estimates by the I'nited Slates census will be substituted for 
the currently-used dectMuiial census fif^ures. 

The Committee has encountered the opinion on the j)arl of some 
of the resource persons with whom these nnitters were discussed, that 
in addition to the estimates of the totals, the totals of actually-reported 
lijrures should be more |)rominently displayed in the UCR's. The 
reasonin<r behind this su<r^estion is that tlie estimated totals, even if 
the methods emi)loyed in ari'iving at these estimates are described, 
still represent a figure which does not, so to say, actually exist, but is 
derived on the basis of certain statistical mani|)ulations. Presuma])ly, 
there would be a certain advantage in having the figure which actually 
represents the known olFenses more closely associated with the esti- 
mated data. This means that, in addition to the estimates of the 
totals, the actual figures based on addition of all the crimes known to 
the police, both urban and rural, should be given. In view of the 
very considerable size of the population which actually does report, 
especially the city population, these figures, although not giving 
the total picture countrywise, would still be of great significance. 

Koconiniendation (19): In view of the remarkable coverage for 
offenses known to the police, the actual figures representing the total 
number of offenses committed in the United States, both rural and 
urban, are very significant and should be presented more prominently 
and more accessibly. 

Tfir Trriuls 

Indication of the trends in crime is a traditional part of the Uniform 
Crime Reports. Heretofore the trends were usuall}' indicated by 
giving the figures or rates for the current and the previous year. 
Occasionally comparisons of a broader scope appeared, often very 
illuminating. 

In the very beginning of its work the Committee discussed this 
matter of measuring trends with the stafT of the FBI, and found that 
the stafT had already discu.ssed and was contemplating replacing the 
comparisons of the 2 most recent years by comparisons of the latest 
available figures with the averages of several years. The Annual 
Hidletin for 19.57 contains several instances of such comj)arlsons 
with the averages of the previous 5 years. 



38 

TIlO ( 'olllliiil Ice feels tliilt ulielever possible roinpnrisons with 
more than 1 year should he niarh'. The reasons for this reeonimenda- 
ii(Hi are (luite ohvious. A previous year can ho a year of especially 
hi«rh eiiine rates in general, or with roforeneo to certain specific of- 
fenses. Or, on the contrary, it can he an unusually low year. If the 
|)revious year hai)pens to he low, the ri<;ures for the current year will 
he interpreted as a trend in the dire<-tion of increased ciiniinality. 
If the fi«;ures for the past year hai)pen to he luuisually hij;h, the 
year under consideration will indicate a trend in the direction of 
lesser criminality. It is perfectly ohvious that such conclusions can 
he very iiiisleadinfr, because regardless of its relationship to the 
previous year, the year under consideration may in reality fit very 
neatly into a longer-range trend in ciimiiuility, which might be just 
the opposite, or considerat)ly different from, the one indicated by 
the comparison with the 1 single previous year. Comparisons with 
averages of several years will therefore be much more sound in most 
instances. 

The technique which should be used in computing these averages 
probably will be dictated by the particular set of statistical data. 
l"'ive-year averages suggest themselves as a convenient measure, 
(ienerally speaking, one would probably think in terms of average 
rates rather than absolute figures. It goes without saying that 
further comparisons, going beyond the 5-year averages, might be 
extremely illuminating as the series grows. Comparisons with 10- 
year and 20-year averages or the average of the entire preceding series 
might be in order, of course, one has to keep in mind changes that 
may have occurred in the statistical categories or in ilefinitions; such 
changes are bound to occur in a series of some length. Thus one 
shoidd not be swayed so far by the desire to make comparisons of 
this type as to overlook the fact that the data might not lend tliem- 
selves to such comparisons. Moreover, it should be kej)! in mind 
that the registeiing of offenses by the local police depart nu'uts and 
their reporting of these offenses improve with time, and the figures 
mny therefore not be quite comparable. All these considerations 
should be carefully weighed in deciding on the us(> of one or the 
other type of comparison. 

Rrrnntnu'iulalion (20): In the tabulations designed to demonstrate 
trends in tiie number of offenses, comj)arisons with more than only 
the previous year are recommended. The exact number of preceding 
years to b(> used for the i)urj)oses of such comparisons should pi'obably 
he determined in each individual case, dej)ending on the nature of the 
comparison and the nature of the data in question. 



39 

I'rrs4-iit Ihitd i '.(ttUvrltiii \ crsiis SninpUiX!* 

Tlio C'oniinittco lias ronsidt'iod the proposal thai the UCIl's resort 
lo some sainpliii}; pro('e<lure rather than attempt, as heretofore, to 
collect information on crimes for the entire country. After carefully 
considering the advantajjes and disadvantages of both procedures, the 
Committee has reached the conclusion that the present procedure 
should he retained. The main ai«;ument in favor of this is the re- 
nuirkahle coverag:e by now a(^hieved by the Uniform Crime Reporting 
Profrram in its statistical series of olTenses known to the police (Pt. I 
oirens(>s). Assuminp: that the trend toward increased coverage 
continues, more or less complete reporting will be a reality in a very 
few years. 

In favor of a sampling procedure is of course the argument that 
a carefully drawn stratified sample would give a statistically more 
accurate picture than incomplete reporting for the total area. More- 
over, handling of a small, altliough adequate, sample would be a 
much less extensive operation than the present program. Against 
ihe sampling procedure is the argument that all it would accomplish 
is a series of estimates for the country as a whole and, p('riiai)s, for 
some major subdivisions. The nature of the program implies, how- 
ever, a different and more extensive purpose. The cooperating 
police departments, various governmental agencies and the public in 
general are interested in tlie crime figures for individual communities, 
coimties. towns. States, etc., a.ssembled in such a way that meaning- 
ful comparisons are possible and trends can be discerned. 

The Committee is aware of the fact that beginning with 1956 the 
Children's Bureau has been using a sampling procedure for its Juvenile 
Court Statistics. This is based on the Curient Population Survey 
Sample developed by the Bureau of the Census. Of course, the 
Children's Bureau's statistical series has never had from the juvenile 
courts anything like the n^sponse the FBI has from the police depart- 
ments in its "oflTenses known to the police" series. 

It should be remembered, of course, that in addition to the tabula- 
tions based on the reported Part I olfensi's. the I'CR's also pid)lish 
figures which are based on much less complete reporting. The out- 
standing example of this an^ the arrest data by age, sex and race, 
which in the H>.j7 Ainiual Bulletin, for example, were based on rej)orts 
from 1,473 cities with a 1950 population of 40,176,369. As long as the 
analyses of the data are limited in their reference to that particular 
population, the procedure is sound. The moment a generalization is 
tnade. however, which implies that these observations ciiii be ex- 
tended to the urban population of the I'nited States as a whole, the 
jirocedure is exposed to the criticism that a representative stratified 
sample would produce a statistically much more sound picture. 



40 

Willi reference (o all such tnl)iilntions, thoreforc, either 1 of 2 courses 
of net ion sugj^esls itself, i-ither a (lefiiiite attempt should he made 
l)V the I"'BI, with tlie assistance of (he International Association of 
Chiefs of I*olice, to huild up the reporting so as to achieve more or 
less comi)Iete coverage, comparable to that for ''offenses known to 
the police," or a sampling tec-hni(|ue sliould he resorted to. 

ytniters Discussed (4): Present procedures in collecting data for the 
I'nifoi-ni Crime Reports versus sampling procedure. The consensus 
of the Committee is in favor of the present procedure. 

HcrommviiiUttUm (21): Witli reference to all tabulations in the 
riiiforni Crime Rej)orts which are not based on "ofTenses known to 
(he j)olice" (Ft. I ofTenses), for which a high degree of coverage has 
been built up, 1 of 2 courses should be followed: Either a definite 
attempt should be made to build up the reporting to achieve more or 
less complete coverage, comparable to that for "offenses known to 
the police," or a sampling technique should be resorted to. See 
Recommendations (5) and (6). 

Miscellaneous Offenses 

In the course of its study the Committee received several requests 
for analyzing certain ofTenses with a view to their reclassification 
within the Uniform Crime Reporting Program. 

The suggestion that arson, which presently is included among "all 
other ofTenses" in Part II, should be moved to Part I was given 
careful consideration. In view of the new methods suggested by the 
Committee for tabidating offenses in lieu of the present Part I, a 
recommendation that arson should be moved to Part I has, of course, 
lost its point. That arson is not a suitable offense to be used for the 
purposes of an index of crime is too obvious to require explanation 
liere. Whether it is desirable to have arson included in the group 
labeled offenses of special importance to the police is questionable 
and, besides, in accordance with the Committee's general recom- 
mendation, shoidd be decided by the staff of the Bureau in consulta- 
tion with the police authorities. The only change that might be 
considered, therefore, is placing arson as a named offense in the 
"Cleneral United .States Crime Statistics." Then the question would 
be whether it should be classified as a crime known to the police or as 
an offense reported on the basis of arrest. The latter issue should 
again be decided in accordance with the Committee's recommenda- 
tion, i. e., in consultation with the pohce authorities. As regards 
|)lacing arson as a named offense into the "General United States 
Crime Statistics," the Committee did not feel that there is any par- 



41 

liciilni' iummI Ioi- iloiii'; so. 'll\o firo ilcpartiiii'iits receive iiifoniialion 
iil)()iit (ires and study these more fre(|iieiit ly than the police. 'IMiiis 
more (h'lailed and more complete information on arson mi<.cht he 
expected fi'om the lire de|)art ments. The liri^ marshal often takes 
on a case of lire directly, when suspicion exists that the cas<> involvos 
aison. As thinj^s stand now, arson is an oU'ense which is reported 
to the police holh incompletely and inconsistently. 

Mdiirrs Disrnssvil (5): Arson. The Commit too feels that no chaiipo 
IS mdicated with reference to the present handlinjr of arson. 

The Committee also eonsi<lere<l the su<j:gestion that emhezzlemeiit 
l)e handhul as a separate olfense. Presently it is placed together with 
fraud as one of the eateirories of Part II. The Committee did not feel 
that this is an olfense with reference to wiiich the police can, geneiallv 
speakin<r. do very much, or that the reporting of this ofTonso to the 
police has much promise of being accurate or consistent. More than 
on anything else, th(> reporting depends on the policies of the firm or 
agency within which the embezzlement has taken place. Still, since 
fraud and (Mnbe/.zlement are two (piite different offenses, the Commit- 
tee was of the opinion that the (piestion of their ap|)earing in the 
rCK's as two distinct categories might be studieil further. 

Iiiit<iliie Suggestion (/): The ({uestion of handling fraud and em- 
bezzlement as two separate ollonso categories in the tabulation of the 
"Cieneral United States Crime Statistics" should be studied further. 



JiiLciiilv (PJJ'eiuU'rs 



The Committee devoted a considerable amoimt of time to the study 
:ind discussion of the rei)orting of statistics on juvenile ofrendei's. 

Till' general issue was raised to what extent the introduction of the 
concept of juvenile delin(|uency into the law enforcement system of a 
state affects the principles involved in the rei>orting of ofTensos known 
to the poli<e. The laws introducing the juvenile courts define juvenile 
delin(|uency as not being a crime, and a juvenile who is a<ljudged de- 
limpient is generally not a criminal in accordance with the law. What 
ollect does this have on the n'porting of olfenses before the identity 
of the ofTender has been t»stablisi)ed, since, if the latter turns out to be 
a juvenile, there is no crime uniler the law? What might be termed 
the material damage is there, but crime does not consist of an overt 
act alone; mens rea, either in the form of intent or culpable negligence. 



42 

iiiiisl jilso l>c |)i('S('iit. Since tin* liiw docs not consider a juvonilo 
( til)al>lc of coniniiKinj; u crime, this "inner element" is lacking:. It is 
Hue I lull also in the case of offenses by adults it sometimes turns out 
after (he offense has been reported, that no crime was committed or 
a crime different from the one originally reported has actually taken 
phice. But in the a<hilt cases tiiis is a matter of "human error." in 
spile of which crimes known to tlie police are considered the best 
statistics for the jjurposes of a crime index. In the case of a juvenile 
however, it is |)iesumably a matter of principle. 

llavinjj: discussed this issue, the Committee felt that there is no 
suliicieiit basis for a (•han<z;e in current procedures, since in juvenile 
cases, just as in adult cases, the violations of the rights of people are 
recorded as they become known to the police and are later reported 
to the Uniform Crune Reporting Program. 

The Committee discussed the resolution adopted by the Inter- 
natioiud Juvenile Officers' Association at its Annual Conference in 
Milwaukee on May 23, 1958. This resolution reads as follows: 

WnEUEAS, research hiis revealed the inadequacy of Uniform Terminology in 
the area of Juvenile Control; and 

Whereas, the International Juvenile Officers' Association is desirous of pro- 
moting a system of uniform terminology and reporting that will be in the best 
interest of the public, interested agencies and the members of this a.s.sociation : 
Now THKREFORE BE IT 

Resolved, That this association recommend the following changes and addi- 
tions be made iji the manual of Uniform Crime Reporting as distributed by the 
Federal Hureau of Investigation as a medium for the collection of facts and statis- 
tics in the area of juvenile control: 

1. That thefts under $50 be removed from Part I and placed in Part II. 

2. That the offenses of Escapees, Runaways, Truancy, and Vandalism be added 
to Part II. 

3. That age grouping be extended, reacliing down from the 15th year, by year 
aTid extended through 10 yeans and younger. 

4. That a new table be added to sliow the handling of nonoffenders, i. e., Lost 
Children, Witnesses, Victims, and Neglected Children. 

5. That a new table be added to show police disposition of all children handled, 
i. e., Released-Delin(|uency Not Sustained, Warned, Referred to Probation 
Department of Juvenile Court, and other dispositions. 

6. That space be made available to show the actual number of children handled 
for ofTen.ses, actual number of children handled for nonoflfenses, and the actual 
nunil)er of children placed in detention, . . . 

As may be remembered, this action of I lie International Juvenile 
Officers' Association was mentionetl earlier in this Report (j). 21) 
and reference was made to the erroneous interpretation of the infor- 
mation contained in the UCR's. 

As to the specific recommendations made in this resolution, the 
Committee reached the following conclusions. The suggestion con- 
tained in No. 1 is being taken care of by the new plan recommended 



43 

ill llir srrlioii on "( 'lassilicjit ioii of ( )irciis('s." If adopted, this will 
result in a pMierally somewlial diU'ei-eiit presentation of data. 

With icference to suj^^estioiis Nos. 2-(), with the oxccption of 
\an(lalisin in No. 2, thc^ (\)ininilt«M> feels that these data are not at 
the pi-esent time heint; handled in the UCK's because th(^ entire ai-eu 
from which they stem has not so far heeii considered the propei" sid)- 
ject for till' Uniform (^rime Ke|)ortin«r Pro«;ram. 'IMie Committee is of 
the opinion that the data iiKMitioned in the resolution is important, 
hut whether the FBI should extend its activities into collection and 
analysis of statistics of this ty|)e should d(>pend entirely on a policy 
decision of the FBI itself. 

As to the question of vandalism, in keeping with its general recom- 
mendation — see Recommendation (12) — the Committee feels that the 
issue of singling out vandalism from the cat(>gory of "all other offenses" 
should he decided hy th(> staff of the FBI in consultation with the 
police authorities. 

More specifically the Committee feels, e. g., that the offenses men- 
tioned under No. 2 (except vandalism) are not criminal code offenses 
hut rather juvenile delinquencies, and as was stated above, thiMr 
inclusion into the scope of the UCK's is a policy decision for the FBI 
to evaluate and make. This is even more the case with reference to 
th(» items mentioned under No. 4, which are not even offenses but 
matters from the area of child welfare. 

Milt tors Disriissofl (6): The Committee did not consider it necessary 
to make any s|)ecilic recommendations with regard to the collection 
and reporting of data on offenders in the juvenile age bracket, believ- 
ing that the FBI's entering into the juvenile field on a more intensive 
and extended basis would take the rniform Crime Reporting Program 
outside of its originally planned and presently observed scope, which 
i- a policy matter for decision by the FBI itself. 



lari(nts liilitininl Mulh-rs 



In the e»tiir<e u| this si udv the Committee and its individual tnem- 
l>ers on many occasions discussed various editorial questions involved 
in the publication of the UCR's with the staff responsible for the 
production of this publication. Some of the points raised were mat- 
ters of opinion whi<h couM be handled in various ways. Other sug- 
gestions were readily accepte<l by the staff and. as a matter of fact, 
liave already been incorporated in the issue of the Bulletin which 



44 

apiMiircd siiuc the Cominittcc Ix'^^aii its work. 'J'lic Committee does 
iu»t feel tlial Ji list of these items needs to be included in this report 
since they arc not of a {general nature but involve mostly questions 
of better ortranization and presentation of the nniterials. 

Perhaps the essence of most of these su^jgestions could be summed 
up in the following statement. The UCK's are read by persons of 
varied bacULrrounds and interests. The police olHcer, the newspaper- 
iiiiiii, ihc schohir niijiht be mentioned as typical consumers. Each of 
these ap|)r(»aches the information contained in the reports from a 
diU'cicnt i)oiiit of view, with a different set of requirements in mind. 
\\ hilr this enhances the importance of the UCR's, it places a heavy 
icsj)oiisibility on the stafT producint; them, in the sense that the infor- 
mation has to be presented clearly and succinctly, \\'ith the least 
( hance for misunderstanding and misinterpretation. In spite of the 
space this may require, it is necessary to hav^e in each issue a state- 
ment on the essentials of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program and 
frequent references in the text to the principles and policies appearing 
in this statement. The stafY engaged in the production of the UCR's 
should be complimented for having been alert to this need, and on 
the whole this problem has been handled very satisfactoril3^ The 
Committee feels, however, that the staff should be supported in the 
continuance of this indispensible feature of the publication. It is felt 
that if the Committee's recommendation to hmit the publication of 
the bulletins to one annual issue is accepted, the handling of this 
explanatory nniterial about the Uniform Crime Reporting Program 
will be even more effective. 



\ PcrniiiiKMil Technical ConsulliuU 
Cominillec 



111 llif course of its sliuly the ( 'oiisiiltniil ( 'oiniiiit (cc ^M-ii(liiall\- 
niiivcti HI llic coiiclusioii tluit it would he julvisiihlc to luivr a coiii- 
niittcc miidc up of persons well versed in eriiniiud stjitistics wliieli 
would l)e iiviiilidile whenever needed l)\ the V\M stall" oiipa^JJod in tlii' 
production of the rnifonn Crime Keports. This reconnnendjition 
should not be inter|)reted iis self-a<r<:randi/.einent hv (he Consiiltunt 
CoMiinittee. It LTrew out of the recoiriiit ion of the exlromc usefulness 
of (he discussions with the Coininittee inend)ers to (he Bureau stafT. 
This feelini; was repeatedly exjiressed by the stall'. \or should it bo 
iiUerprctod as an attempt on the part of this Commit tee to perpetuate 
itself. The thouirht of sutrircstint; themselves for such a |)ermaneiit 
technical committee is far from the minds of the present eonsul(an(s. 

Two (piestions arise in connection with the possible establishment 
of such a permanent technical consultant committee; namely, why 
there should be such a teciuiical consultant committee when the 
Bureau already has a |)rofessional stall" eni,'a<:ed in tlu^ produetion of 
the Keports. and how creation of such a committee can be justified 
when (here already exists a special committ(>e of the International 
Association of ( 'hiefs of Police. 

As to the first of the two (piestions, the functions of a technical 
consul(an( commi(tee as compared to those of the Bureau staff would 
consist in: (a) Sui)plyin«; the broader and more detached perspective 
of the outsider who is familiar with the fu'ld but is not himself en<rn<red 
in the publication of the document; aiul {b) providini: a more in<Ie- 
liendent critical evaluation of the procedures used. 

( "omj)ared to the committee^ of the International Association of 
( 'hi«'fs (»f Polic(>, the technical consultant committee would be made 
up of pei-sons trained and professionally en*xa<red in (he practical and 
scientific us<> of criminal s(a{istics rather than representin«; j)rimarily 
the adminis(ra(ive in(«'rests of (he police in (he I'niform Crime 
Keports. The importance of (he committee of the International 
Association of ('liiefs of Police is in no way questioned by the su<rires- 
tion that a permanent (echnical consuUant commi((ee be established. 

It is felt that a more or less permanent committee of this type would 
offer considerable advantap's over (dI Imr committees. aj)pointe(l as 
the need arises, since the memb«M-ship of the permanent committee 
would «rradindly accumulate a more thoroujrh and intimate knowletipe 
of the problems faced by the rnifonn Crime Keportinj; Pro^jram. 



46 

It is cMN isnircd lliiil (lie pciiiuiiinit Icclmiciil ('(Misultiiif; coininittee 
wdiiM iiiccl Jiud study unit Icrs ichitcd to I he rniform ( 'rinu' Rcjiorting 
I'lOiriani ns niid wIumi i('(|ii('sl('(l l)\' I lie staff of the Fcdci'.'d Bureau of 
1 nv<'st iirat i(»ii. 

Utrinnnuinliitlon (--)• -^ pciinanriit 1 ('cliiiical consullaut coiu- 
Miilti'o should he ostal^lislicd l(» he aNailaldc to the IJuretiu staff for 
coiisultali(tti wlicru'vcf needed. 
Ki'.s|H'Ctfull.\ suluiiit led, 

Charlton F. Chute, 
Stanley R. Schhotll, 
Peter P. Lejins, ('hai/man, 
CoiLsultant Committee on 
Uniform Crime Reporting. 
Seimkmuku 29, 1958. 



A|)|M'n(li\ 1 

hy I HI 

/'" 

Cotisiilhint 4 '.inninittoe 

IWnt'iiiln'r 1937 



I'niform Ciiino Koportiiig has Ih'imi in existence since 19.30, and 
over the years peat strides Imve been made in this area of criminal 
statistics throujrh the cooperation of local polict> and the FBI working; 
together. However, problems in coiuiection with the collection and 
publication of the data inherently abiding in this program suggest 
the time has come when a committee of three authorities in the field 
of criminal statistics, be employed in a consultant capacity by the 
I'BI to review the project as it now stands for the purpose of making 
suggestions. These suggestions may cover any phase of t he collection 
or publication of the data that comes to mind in light of the experience 
gaine<l thus far. The following agenda is presented as a suggestion 
only and any other nuitters which appear pertinent for discussion 
should be frankly considered. 

(1) Population sources 

All rates published in the Uniform Crime Reports bulletin are 
based on the latest United States Bureau of the Census decennial 
census figures. The rates are calculated for the purpose of furnishing 
a yardstick with which to assist local administrators in measuring the 
current magnitude of the police problem at hand. In an effort to 
indicate the trend in crime from one year to the next, the FBI has 
presented in the Uniform CYime Reports bulletin other tabulations 
showing the offenses reported by a group of cities during the 2 or 
more yeai-s under study. Any communities known to have changed 
in their reporting procedure during any of the years under study are 
eliminated from the calculations. Should the FBI contimie to pui)- 
lish crime tables as they now do? Is there some method avaiiablo 
to take into account iulracensal population changes? 

(IT) 



48 

(2) Kiiral <-riiii<- r«-|>ortiii<{ 

In the j)ast Iwo (Iccadcs (licrc have \)0v\\ sliifls in tlii' population 
lliat appear to alFeet erinie reporting;. Many areas that were strietly 
rural in chaiacter now contain hi«jhly urbanized fringe areas adjacent 
lo nuini(i|)alities. Silver Spring and Bethesda, Md., just out of 
Washington, 1). C, are typical examples. These growing fringe 
nreas are si ill /ural acrordinp to police jnr'n^dicthni, but their environ- 
jnental structure is inban. (ienerally, urban ci-inie rates are sub- 
stantially higher than those in the strictly rural areas. This gives 
rise to the question as to whether this shift in population does not 
tend to distort the so-called rural crime rates to the extent that 
they may be inflated by the reporting of rural police agencies covering 
these increasingly urbanized fringe areas. Should the FBI attempt 
to resort to a reliable sami)le for rural crime reporting, the sample to 
represent areas that are popularly considered rural eliminating those 
classified by the Census Bureau as urbanized fringe areas in 
nielropolitan districts? 

(3) Part I oflTense classes 

Does the experience in crime reporting to date indicate a need 
for further changes in the Part I offense classifications? One such 
change has been recently made upon the recommendation of the 
Committee on Uniform Ciime Records of the International Associa- 
tion of Chiefs of Police. Tiiat involved the elimination of statutory 
rape from the rape classification. 

For example: Other possible areas for consideration involve man- 
slaughter-by-negligence and larceny. The FBI conducts a constant 
program of correspondence with contributing agencies in an effort to 
bring about uniformity in these classifications. In spite of such 
educatioiud aiid corrective activity by the FBI for almost three 
decades many departments contimie to report in the manslaughter- 
l)y-negligence classification the action of grand juries as distinguished 
from the results of police investigation. Under present arrangements 
a lack of uniformity in the manslaugliter-by-negligence classification 
may be expected to continue indefinitely. The question is raised as 
to the significance of this classification from the criminal statistics 
standpoint as well as from the police standpoint. 

Basically, the manslaughter-by-negligence classification represents 
traffic fatalities attributable to culpable negligence. The question 
may be raised as to whethei- this is important. Is not the important 
thing to the j)olice and the public the number of traffic fatalities that 
occur as distinsruishcd from the numbei- attribu(nl)le to the vague 



49 

(crin. ciilpnblo iio<:li<;(Mic('? Tlio \nlioiinl Safely Poiinr-il lni)iiln<0R 
aiul |)iil)lislu's Irallic fatality data. 

Tlio FBI appoai-s to be wapn^ an almost endless battle to insure 
that rej)ortinir police a<r(Micies include minor thefts in their offenses 
known data. Sonu> have expressed the thouf^ht this classilication 
should be limited to felony larcenies, ])ut this term is far from uni- 
form amonjr the States. Included in the problem of uniformity in 
the larceny classification would be the efforts of the Flil to include 
bicycle thefts. It is admittedly difficult to determine when a bicycle 
is actually stolen and when it is borrowed by some other child. Also, 
a substantial portion of larcenies represent thefts of auto accessories 
and personal property taken from automobiles. It has been found 
very difTundt in some cases to distinguish whether a hubcap or license 
plate was lost and reported stolen merely for insurance purposes or 
was actually stolen. Bicycle thefts, auto accessories, and other thefts 
from automobiles in lOoG represented over 50 percent of all the lar- 
cenies. Approximately one-seventh of the larcenies represented prop- 
erty under $5 in value. Should the larceny classification be limited 
to tliefts over $100. or would this merely shift the prol)lem to one of 
obtaining' uniformity in the value placed upon property stolen? 
Should the larceny classification be eliminated altogether except 
possibly for purse snatchings? One possibility would be to eliminate 
larceny from the Part I offense classification and to change the rob- 
bery classification to "robbery and purse snatching." 



Ajipt'iulix 11 



Exitlonitory Sdni/tlr Tabithiti<ms of Popuhitum an<l Offrnsos 

hiitnrn (<» tliv l*aVict\ I liliz^lt^ Sliimldnl Mi-lrifixplilaii 

Areas — Prt'imrvd for tin- ('tmimitt*'*' hy tliv 

Sititistical Section oj the FBI 



I!xjtlniinii<ni: Thosi^ sniiiplf (iilniliit ions liavc a twofold purpose. 
(1) 'Plicy (Icinoiisiniti' the inaniicr in which the criinr reporting area 
of the country may be divitled into three segjiients; (a) Staiuhiiwl 
Metropolitan Areas (SMA), (6) urban communities outside any 
SMA, and (c) rural areas. (2) Tlie\- indicate the procedure Nvhich 
may be followed in arriviiiir at State totals. They are not shown 
here to illustrate the exact format of tables to be published in the 
future. As an expedient, these tables show one figure for all the 
so-ealled Part I offenses and of course in actual tabulations this 
information would be presented separately as to individual olfense 
categories. Hence, the only significance the following tables have is 
that of their serving as an illustration for the new methodology. 
They certaiidy shoultl not be used as substantive statistical material 
for any kind of comparisons or as a basis for any kind of conclusions. 



A. ILLINOIS 

Area Population 

SMA 026 ( hicaKo, III 5,495,364 

, , . Pouiilnlion 

Agenctes reporting: rtprtHnttd 

Evanston, 111 _ 73, r)41 

Oak Park. Ill «i3, 529 

C'hicafjo, 111 3, r.JO. <»62 

Cicero, 111. (i?, 544 

Bcrwyn, 111 51,280 

East Chicago, Ind 54,263 

Gary, Ind 133, IH 1 

Ilaniinoiid, Ind 87,594 

Jolirt, 111 51,601 

.Aurora, III 50,576 

Mavwood, 111 27,473 

Elgin, III 44,223 

f.-l) 



Pt. I Offi 


tntet 


knoiri 


1 


1, 


,376 




553 


47, 


368 


1, 


(r22 




468 


1, 


,916 


4, 


910 


3, 


095 




977 




843 




325 




489 



52 



A. ILLINOIS— Continued 



Area 

SMA 026 Chicago, III.— Continued 

Agencies reporting; 

WaukoRan, III 

Lake County, 111 

BarrinRton, 111 

HiKlnvood, III 

Lake Forest, 111 

Lil^ertyville, 111 

Mundelein, 111 

North Chicago, III 

Zion, 111 

Cook County, 111 

Arlington Heights, 111 

Belhvood, 111 

Blue Island, 111 

Brookfield, 111 

Calumet City, lU 

Chicago Heights, 111 

Des Plaines, 111 

Elmwood Park, 111 

Evergreen Park, 111 

Forest Park, 111 

Glencoe, 111 

Glenview, 111 

Hinsdale, 111 

Homewood, 111 

Kenilworth, 111 

La Grange, 111 

La Grange Park, 111 

Lansing, 111 

Lincolnwood, 111 

Lyons, 111 

Markham, 111 

Melrose Park, 111 

Midlothian, 111 

Mount Prospect, III 

Norridge, 111 

Northbrook, 111 

North Lake, 111 

North Riverside, 111 

Oak Lawn, III 

Park Forest, 111. 

Park Ridge, III 

Riverdale, 111 

River Forest, 111 

River Cirove, 111 

Riverside, III 

Skokie, 111.. 

South Holland, 111 

Summit, 111 

Westchester, III 

Western Springs, 111 

Wilmette, 111 

Winnetka, 111 





Population 


Population 


repreu 


nted 


38 


946 


80 


040 


4 


20'.l 


3 


813 


7 


819 


5 


425 


3 


189 


8 


028 


8 


950 


150 


037 


8 


708 


8 


740 


17 


622 


15 


472 


15 


799 


24 


551 


14 


994 


18 


801 


10 


531 


14 


909 


6 


980 


6 


142 


8 


070 


5 


887 


2 


789 


12 


002 


6 


170 


8 


082 


3 


072 


6 


120 


2 


753 


13 


360 


3 


210 


4 


009 


3 


428 


3 


348 


4 


301 


3 


230 


8 


751 


8 


138 


10 


002 


5 


840 


10 


823 


4 


839 


«) 


153 


14 


832 


3 


247 


8 


957 


4 


308 


6 


304 


18 


102 


12 


105 



Ft. I offenitt 
known 



12 
335 

19 
14 
10 
09 

133 
44 

308 

368 
68 

111 

158 
144 

90 
611 

19 
140 

58 

48 

489 

193 



53 
A. ILLINOIS Contiim.'d 

irrn ropulation 

SMA 026<hicuKo. III.— C'oiitimicd 

. . , . Poputnlion PI. I offentei 

Agencies reporting; rtprtttnUii knoim 

Du Pam* Countv, HI. 5'.t, 134 r,l7 

Clarcii.ion "Hills (2,437) in- 
oluilod, and Bensonvillo 
(3,754) include*!. 

Downers CIrove, 111 11,886 21fl 

Klmhurst, 111 21,273 315 

C;ien KUvn. Ill 9,524 23 

Lombard, 111. 9,817 20 

Naperville, 111 7,013 101 

Villa Park, 111 8,821 184 

Wheaton, 111... 11,638 75 

Kane County, 111 39,570 107 

Batavia, 111. 5,838 13 

Geneva, 111 5,139 12 

St. Charles, 111 6,709 120 

Will County, 111 72,142 662 

Rockdale Junction (2,820) 
included. 

Lockport, 111. 4,955 32 

Lake County, Ind 45,896 777 

Crown Point, Ind 5,839 45 

Grirtith, Ind 4,470 130 

Highland, Ind 5,878 144 

Hohart, Ind 10,244 199 

Munster, Ind 4,753 82 

Whiting, Ind 9,669 114 

Population and offenses represented by 

reports... 5,385,672 (9a 09c) 79,120 

Areas not represented: 

Deertield, 111 3,288 

Highland Park, 111 16,808 

Broadview, 111 5, 196 

Calumet Park, 111 2,500 

Dolton, 111 5,558 

Franklin Park, 111 8,899 

Harvey, 111 20,683 

Lemont ,111 2, 757 

Morton Grove, 111 3,926 

Niles, 111 3,587 

Palatine, III 4,079 

Phoenix, III 3,606 

Robbins, III 4,766 

Steger, 111 4,358 

Sticknev, 111 3,317 

West Chicago, III 3,973 

Westmont, III 3, 402 

Wilmington, 111. 3, 354 

East Gary, Ind 5, 635 

109,692 (2.0%) 

Total populaliiin and total rstimaicd nfrmsps 5,495,364 (100.0%) 80.735 



A. ILLINOIS—Continiied 

Area Population 
SMA 0.11 Davenport. Iowa, 

Uock Island-.Molin*'. Ill _. 234,256 

Population 

Ageitrt'efi reporltnq: repretenttd 

lJavtii|)ort, Iowa 7i,r>\9 

Hock Isliiiid, 111 IS, 710 

Moliii.-, Ill 37, :«? 

Rock Island County, 111 :iO, 48:j 

Kast Molino, III I'.i, 9\.i 

Silvis, III :i, 055 

Population and offenses represented bv 

reports ". 208.107 (88.8%) 

Areas not represented: 

. Scott County, Iowa... 26,149(11.2%) 

Bettendorf, Iowa (5,132) in- 
eiuficd. 

Total population and total estimated offenses. 234, 256 ( 100. 0%) 

Area Population 

SMA 036 Decatur, III 98,853 

Population 

Agencies reporting: represented 

Decatur 66, 269 

Macon County 32, 584 

Population and offenses represented by 

reports 98,853 (100.0%) 

Areas not represented None 

Area Population 

SMA 095 Peoria. Ill 250,512 

Population 

Agencies reporting: represented 

Peoria 111, 856 

Peoria Countv 54, 299 

Chillicothe 2, 767 

Peoria Heights 5,425 

Creve Coeur_- 5, 499 

Ea.st Peoria.. 8, 698 

Morton... ___ 3, 693 

Pekin 21,858 

Population and offenses represented bv 

reports ". 214,095 (85.5%) 

Areas not represented: 

Tazewell County 32, 132 

Washington 4, 285 

36,417 (14. 5%) 

Total population and total estimated offenses. 250, 512 ( 100. 0%) 



Pt 


. I offmits 




knotri 






o 


064 




1, 


064 
578 
244 
153 
26 




4, 


129 



4,650 



Pt. I offense* 
known 



1, 651 
313 



1,964 



Pt. I offense* 
known 

3,461 

316 

26 

50 

9 

298 

23 

249 



4,432 



5, 184 



O.) 



A. ILLINOIS CoJiliiiucil 



Arta 
S.M A IK) INxUn.rd. Ill 

A yc II cita n puiti luj: 

Hoi-kford 

Loves Park 

South Bi'loit 



I'oiinlalion 

152, 385 

I'oiiiilaliuii 
re/jreseiiled 

92, 927 
5, ;{()() 
•A, 221 



/'/. 1 offeuut 
knotrn 

1. 422 
19 
9 



(>l)wi!itioi» ami utreiisi's rrpn'scntt-d by 
reports 



101,514 (60. C%) 



1,480 



Areas not rrprtsi nttil: 
Wimiibago County 



To(al population and total CNtimated ofTenses. 



SMA 128 Springfield, III. 



Agencies reporting: 

SpriiiKfi«'I(l 

Saim;iiii(tii Countv 



Population and offenses represented by 
reports 



Anas not rcprotcntfti. 
Arta 



50,871 (33. 4%) 



Illinois I rban. 



Agencies reporting: 

Cairo 

Canton 

Centralia 

Collin-sville 

De Kalb 

Dixon 



Frccport 

Jack.sonville. 

Kewanee 

La Salle 

Macomb 

Marion 



Mattoon. 

Monmouth 

Mount Vernon. 

Ottawa 

Sterling 

Streator 



Urbana 

Wood River. 

.\lton 

Belleville 

BloominKton. 
C'hanipaimi . . 



152,385 (100.0%) 


2,222 


Pijliulation 




131,484 




Population 


PI. I offentes 


represented 


knoiin 


81,628 


1, 381 


49, 856 


285 


131,484 (100.0%) 


1,666 


None 




Population 




1,241,263 




Population 


Pt. 1 offtntet 


repr (tented 


knovn 


12. 123 


327 


11,927 


99 


13, 863 


135 


11,862 


93 


11,708 


127 


11,523 


147 


22, 467 


284 


20, 387 


276 


16,821 


137 


12, 083 


91 


10, 592 


24 


10, 459 


110 


17, 547 


283 


10, 193 


145 


15, 600 


MV.i 


16, 957 


181 


12,817 


318 


16, 469 


131 


22, 834 


258 


10, 190 


146 


32, 550 


628 


32,721 


419 


34, 163 


717 


39. 563 


794 



56 



A. ILLINOIS— Continued 



Population 



Illinois I'rban — Cuntiiiuod 

Agcuviit^ rcpurthig: 

Dan villi" 

Kiisl St. Louis 

(Iraiiitc City 

(lalrslnirg 

Kaiikakcf 

C^iiiiii'V 



Belvidere. 

Benton 

Hradk'V.- 
HiishnelL 

Carnii 

Chester- . 



Christopher-. 
ICast Alton... 
Kdwardsville. 

Eldorado 

Flora 

Galena 



Galva 

Geneseo 

Georgetown. 

Gillespie 

Harvard 

Herrin 



lliKlihind.. 
llillshoro- . 
Iloopeston. 
.lerscvville. 
Litelitield.. 
Madison... 



Marseilles. 
Mcndota. . 
Metropolis. 

Morris 

Morrison.. 



Mount Carmel. 

Muri)hysboro. . 

Normal 

OKlesbv 

Oliiey 

I'ana 

Paris 



Population 
repreienled 

37, 864 
82, 295 
29, 405 
31,425 
25, 850 
41,450 

9, 422 

7,848 
5, 099 
3,317 
5,574 
5, 389 

3, 545 

7, 290 

8, 770 

4, 500 

5, 255 
4,048 

2, 886 
4, 325 

3, 294 

4, 105 
3,404 
9,331 

4, 283 

4, 141 

5, 992 
5, 792 

7, 208 
7,963 

4,514 

5, 129 

6, 093 
0, 920 
3, 531 

8, 732 

9, 241 
9, 772 

3, 922 
8,012 
0, 178 
9, 400 



J'l. 1 offeniia 
known 

580 
1, 048 
598 
451 
404 
500 

5 

28 
8 
14 
19 
17 

11 

163 

31 

40 
19 

4 

3 

30 

8 

17 

78 

61 
12 
38 
31 
5 
197 

26 
51 
65 
53 

113 

11 

121 

6 

52 

71 

77 



57 



A. ILLINOIS- (\)).(iiiuc(l 



Illinois I'rhan Continued 



J'oi>uliition 



, . , . Pounliilion 

Agencies reporting: Ttprrtfnted 

rinckn««vvilli' li, 299 

Pontiiu'.'. ■ 8, 990 

I'riiuTton 5, 705 

Robinson (■», 4()7 

Roc'lu'llo 5, 449 

Rock Falls 7,983 

Sal.'in.. G, 159 

Sandwic-h 3, 027 

Sparta _ 3,576 

Spring Valley 4,910 

Staunton " 4, 047 

Sycamore 5, 912 

Tavlorville 9, 188 

Tuscola 2, 960 

Vandalia 5, 471 

V»>nic»> 6,226 

Westville 3, 196 

Woodstock. 7, 192 

Gibson City 3, 029 

Aledo 2, 919 

Carlyle 2, 669 

Casev 2,734 

McLeansboro 3, 008 

Nokoniis 2, 544 

Orepon 3, 205 

Pittsfi.'ld 3,564 

Sullivan 3, 470 

FarminRton 2, 651 

Lewistown 2, 630 

Monience 2, 644 

Newton 2, 780 

O'Fallon 3, 022 

Rantoul 6, 387 

Waterloo 2, 821 

Population and (iffenses represented bv re- 
ports _.." 1,041,771 



(83. 9%) 



Pt. I offtmri 
known 

1 
68 
46 
52 
30 
68 

36 
40 
2 
32 
60 
11 

29 
15 
27 
173 
I 
15 

1 
3 

7 
36 

8 
22 

11 
17 
15 

3 
16 

23 

13 

153 



12, 879 



58 



A. ILLINOIS -Continued 



Area 
Illinois Trban — ^Contiiiued 

Anns not represented: 

Abingdon 

Anna 

Beards town 

C'jirlxnulale 

Ciirliiivillo 

Cartervillo 



Cliarloston 

Clinton 

Crystiii Lake. 
Dm Quoin. . 

Dwi^ht 

I'lfTingham 



Fairfield 

Fulton 

(Ireenville 

Harrisburg 

Havana 

Johnston City. 

Lawrenceville. 

Lincoln 

Paxton 

Peru 

Savanna 

Shelbyville 



Virden 

Washington Park. 

Watseka 

\\'cst Frankfort- . 

White Hall 

Zeigler 



Marshall 

Carthage 

Motiticello 

Alorton Village. _ 
lirooklyn Village. 
Marengo 



Mascoutah 

Mount Morris. 
Rushvilie 





I'opulation 


Population 


Ttprefeiiled 


•i, 


:i(K) 


4. 


:i8() 


6, 


080 


10, 


921 


o, 


110 


2, 


71G 


9, 


164 


5, 


945 


4, 


832 


/, 


147 


9 


843 


6, 


892 


5, 


576 


o 


70G 


4, 


069 


10, 


999 


4, 


379 


4, 


479 


6, 


328 


14, 


362 


3, 


795 


8, 


653 


5, 


058 


4, 


462 


3, 


206 


5, 


840 


4, 


235 


11, 


384 


3, 


082 


2, 


516 


2. 


900 


3, 


214 


2. 


612 


9 


547 


9 


568 


2 


726 


3, 


009 


'2 


709 


9 


682 



199,492 (16.1%) 



Total population and total estimated or- 
fenses 



1,241,263 (100.0%) 



r)0 

A. II.IJ.NOIS ("oiiliiuii-d 



Illinois Rural 



Agencies reporting (couniies): 

Adams 

Alt'xaiuler 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun 

Clark. . 



Clav 

Colt's 

Crawford. 
Df Kalb., 
I)ou^las. . 
ICdgar 



Edwards. . 
Eflinnhain. 
Fayt'ttt". - . 

Ford 

Franklin.. 
Fulton 



(iallatin 

(Jruntiy 

Hamilton.. 
Haiicuc'k. . 

Hardin 

Henderson. 

Henry 

Iroquois 

Jersey 

Kankakee. 

Knox 

La Salle... 



Lawrence 

I>ee 

Livingston... 

Ix>gan. 

McDoiiough. 
McHenrv 



McLean 
Madi^(Hl... 

Marion 

Mason . 

MenartI- . . 
Mercer . 

Monr<K' 
Montgoine 
Morgan 
Moultrie. . 

Ogle 

Perry 



Piatt.... 
l»ike . 
Putnam 



I'liliiiliilion 




1,576,909 




J'viiiiliiliun 


PI. I oil r„.f. 


rtiimtntni 


knoun 


2\\, 240 


78 


8, lo:} 


33 


7, i:V2 


13 


27, o:{0 


lot 


C, S'.tS 


73 


1 1 , CCS 


16 


12, I'JO 


34 


1:^,017 


168 


14, 7:iO 


102 


20, i:i4 


78 


i:i, 74t) 


60 


13, 947 


64 


9, 050 


31 


14,783 


87 


19, 1 1 1 


84 


9, 077 


36 


23, 392 


67 


26, 508 


94 


9,818 


21 


12, 291 


93 


9, 248 


33 


22, 57C 


112 


7, 530 


22 


8,416 


29 


22. 460 


82 


28, 113 


67 


9, 472 


82 


39, 325 


259 


19,641 


136 


32, 935 


96 


14,211 


23 


24. 928 


31 


25, 924 


178 


16, 309 


65 


14, 290 


66 


32, 442 


306 


32, 642 


125 


63,941 


375 


22. 238 


271 


1(». 947 


63 


9, 639 


66 


14, 455 


73 


10.461 


8 


IS. .")C7 


26 


15. IS! 


64 


9,70! 


94 


22. 066 


15 


11,238 


103 


11,358 


73 


18,591 


48 


4. 746 


11 



60 



A. ILLINOIS— Continued 



Area Population 

Illinois Rural Continuod 

J'opttlation 
Aytnrirs reporting (rounttes) ; reproeuted 

l{:ii.<l()l|)li. .__ 22, 7(»S 

Hic-hliiiKl... 8, 277 

St. Clair 7:i, 754 

Rchiivlcr - -.- r., <>;{i 

Sholbv H). '.(72 

Stephenson.. 1'.), 128 

X'trniiiion 'M'k T'.VA 

WiilKish 5. nii) 

Warren 11,788 

Washington 14. m) 

White 1.5, MW 

Wliiteside.. 22, 2i)'.l 

Woodford 21, :!:i5 

Mount Olive 2,401 

Population and offen.ses represented bv re- 
ports : 1,181,218 (74.9%) 

Areas not represented (counties): 

Bond 10,088 

Boone 7, G48 

Carroll i:i. 918 

Cass 9,017 

Champaign .37, :^16 

Christian 23, 450 

Clinton 10. 305 

Cumberland 10, 406 

I)e Witt ^^'21^ 

Greene 15, 770 

Jackson 17, 002 

Jasper 0,480 

Jefferson 20,202 

Jo Duvie.ss 10,811 

Johnson 8, 720 

Kendall 12,115 

Maeoupin 25, 335 

Marshall ..- 13,025 

Ma.s.sac 7, 501 

Pope. 5, 770 

Pulaski 13, 030 

Saline 17. 021 

Scott 7, 245 

Stark.. 8.721 

Union 10, 120 

Wayne... 15. 3.57 

Williamson 21, 030 



PI. I offtnin 
knoun 



395,001 (25. Kr^ 



Total population and total «'slimated offenses. 1, 576, 909 ( 100. 0%) 



()1 



H. M Vin I.VM) 



Arm I'niiiiliition 

SMA on Ilaltini..r<'. M<l 1,337,373 

• , . I'ovulation 

Agenctts reporting: r,i,re>rnird 

Bnltimoro City •tj<,t. 7().S 

Anne Aruiuli-l County 1(17,34') 

Aiiiinpolis [ 10, UI7 

Baltimore County 270, 273 

Pupuluiion iiiul ofTense.s represented by 

reports I, 337, 373 ( 100. 0%) 

Arena not represented Nunc 



Pt. I offrntti 
kuoii n 

22, 8(58 

2, 109 

«V28 

6,423 



32, 328 



Arra 

SMA 1 H Wa>hin^'ion. D. C. 



Population 
1, 464. 089 



, , . Population 

Agencies reporting: repretented 

Washington, D. C 802, 178 

Montnoinerv County, Mil 155,010 

Rockviile (0,934) included. 

Prince Cleor^es County, Md 148, 957 

Capitol HeiKhts' (2,729) in- 
cluded. 

Cheverlv (3,318) included. 

Collene Park (11,170) included. 

Riv.rdale (5,530) included. 

Blad.'iishuru. Md.. 2,809 

(;reenhelt, Md 7,074 

Hvattsville, Md 12,308 

Laurel, Mil 4, 482 

Alexandria, Va. 61, 787 

ArliuKton, Va 135, 449 

Fairfax County, Va 98,557 

Population and offenses represented by 

reports 1,428,701 (97.6%) 

Areas not represented: 

Mount Rfunier, Md 10,989 

Takoina Park, Md 13,341 

Brent wfMjd, Md 3, 523 

Falls Church, Va 7, .535 



35,388 (2.4%) 



Total population and total estimated ofTenses. 1,464,089 (100.0%) 

Arta f'lipulatinn 

.Mar>lan«l Irhan. 167,775 

. Population 

Agencies reporting: rtprtnutid 

Cumberland 37, 679 

Hagerstown 36, 260 

Brunswick 3, 752 

Cambridge 10, 351 

Crisfield 3. r.8S 

ICaston 4, 836 



Pt. I olfrn»e» 
kiioii n 

16, 354 
2,599 

3,495 





96 




189 




301 




177 


2, 


370 


2, 


733 


2 


792 


31, 


106 



31,871 



Pt. I offenses 
knoun 

353 

688 

15 

148 

16 

77 



62 



B. MVRYLWl) C'oiiiiiiiiccl 



Maryland Urban — Continued 



Agencies reporting 

KIkton 

Frederick 

I'ocoiHoke City. 

Salisbury 

\\est minster 

AI)iT(leen 



Population and offenses represented by 
reports 

Areas not represented: 

Chest ert own 

Frost burg 

Havre de Grace 

Bel Air 



Total population and total estimated ofTenses. 

Area 

Maryland Rural 

Agencies reporting (counties) : 

Allegany 

Westernport (3,431) included. 

Calvert 

Cecil _ __ 

Dorchester 

Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Talbot 

Washington 

Population and ofTenses represented by 
reports 

Areas not represented: 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cliarles 

Kent 

Queen Annes _ 

St . Marys 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Worcester __ 



J'npuialion 


I'opt 


lation 


reprfffiiled 


5, 


•245 


18, 


142 


3, 


1<»1 


15, 


141 


^', 


140 


2, 


944 



147,369 (87. 8%) 



I'l I offense.1 
known 

ion 

285 

If) 

21'i 

25 

137 



2, 08.5 



3, 143 

T), 870 
7, 809 
2,578 



20,406 (12. 2%) 



167,775 (100.0%) 

Population 
479, 270 

Population 
represented 

45, 001 

12, 100 
28, 111 
17, 464 

40, 393 
21, 259 
38, 451 
23, 119 
14, 592 
42, 626 



283, 116 (59. 1%) 



2,375 



Pt. I offentif 
known 

313 

63 
119 
111 

3r. 

50 
150 
134 
102 
172 



1,250 



18, 234 
38, 767 
23,415 
10, 534 
14, 579 
29, 111 

17, 057 
24, 500 

19, 957 

196, 154 (40. 9%) 



Total population and total estimated ofTenses. 479,270 (100.0%) 



2, 115 



Appendix 111 



List «)/ i<-titnis ittUvn h\ the Cinnmitter, C.ornpilt'ii from 
tlu' Ititily <>/ I In- lii'iHtrt 



h.xplarmtitm: Tlic Cojuiiiittor's coiisidrnition of tho issues raised led 
to tliicc types of actions: A. Definite rccojninendations for eliaiifxr in 
the eiirreiit i)ractiee in i)rodiicing the Uniform Crime Reports — 
actions of this type are referred to as "Reoommen(hitions"; B. Tenta- 
tive su«rj;est ions for the Flil to consider changing current practice after 
aihlitional study by the l^ureau — such actions are referred to as 
"Tentative Suggestions"; and C. Decisions that the current ])ractice 
shouhl he h'ft as is — actions of this type are referred to as "Matters 
I )iscussed." 

A. lytrnni nn'mlntions 

Page 

Reeoininendation (1) 13 

Since the UCR's have outgrown being of use primarily to 
the law enforcement agencies, especially the police, and 
have become a basic source of information on crime for the 
country as a whole, the FBI should be encouraged to give 
as much recognition to this fact as is compatible with its 
program and be guided in the compilation and publica- 
tion of the crimimil statistics by the need to present these 
in such a way that the information will be meaningful to 
the general public and interested agencies and organiza- 
tions even outside the immediate field of law enforcement. 

Recommendation (2) 14 

In making changt'S in the I'CR's, the utmost care should 
be taken not to destroy the continuity of the statistical 
series. Wherever feasible, both vei-sions, i. e., the old 
and the new, should be given, or the data should be pre- 
sented in such a way that the reader himself can nnike 
the calculations necessary to utilize the data earlier 
colltH'ted and published. 

(o:j) 



64 

Page 

Rorommondfttion (.3) 17 

'Pile ()l)j('ctiv('s for r()ll('ctiii<^ and i)r('S('Mtiii(; the statistical 
iiiformatioM on criminal oH'cnscs should bo clearly formu- 
lated and adhered to at all times. A brief restatement of 
these objectives should ajipcar in each issue of the UCR's 
to forestall misinterpretation of tiie data, 

Recommeiulation (4) 17 

In view of the officiall}" stated purposes of the Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program and in view of the actual content 
of the UCR's, the objective of publishing statistics on 
criminal offenses should be interpreted as a twofold one, 
i. e., (1) Compilation and publication of a meaningful 
index of crime for the United States (presently accomp- 
lished by the reporting of Pt. I offenses) ; and (2) compila- 
tion and publication of the total volume of criminal 
offenses committed in the United States, by categories, 
perhaps entitled General Crime Statistics for the United 
States. It is understood that both of these statistical 
series are to serve as the basis for the computation of 
appropriate rates and trends and for making comparisons. 

Recommendation (5) 17 

In picsenting tiie total crime pictiu'e for the I'nited States, 
a tabulation including all oft'enses, perhaps with the excep- 
tion of some minor ones, should be aimed at, which means 
that this tabulation should include not only offenses cur- 
rently reported as Part I oll'enscs but also those reported 
as Part II. 

Reconnnendalion (6) 18 

In order to make the inii)lementation of recommendation 
(5) possible, the collection of offenses of Part II, that is, 
offenses known through arrest, should be intensified in 
order to achieve more complete covei-age for the urban 
communities, and a prograjn of collecting this information 
for the rural area should be initiated. Various analyses, 
such as by age, sex, and rac(>, which can presently be made 
ordy for a limited nundx'r of oll'enders could then be ex- 
tended to the entire criminal i)t)pulalion. 



65 

rage 

l{('C(HiiiiiiMi(ltit ion (7) 20 

It is r('«'«>iniii('iul('(l tluil tlir ])r('sriit |)iii<ticc of |)iil)lisliiri<; 
till' rC'K's as rt st'iniaiHUUil and an annual hullclin Ix' dis- 
continiKMl and oidy one annual bulletin be issued. A 
suflii'icnt ajnount of tiin(> should he allowed for the tabula- 
tion and aiuUysis of the data. The (piality of the i)ubli('a- 
tion should not be alloui'd to sulfer ffoni itni)ending 
(h'adlines. The fuller sco])o of the one annual j)ul)lica- 
tioii — see reooininendation (1) — will necessitate more 
l)reparntion time. Issuance of intermediate publications 
of limited scope, which the FBI mifjht find approj)riate for 
reh'ast>. is, of coui'se, not precluded by this recommenda- 
tion but is actually encourafred. 

Keciunniendation (S) 24 

In the I'CU's jmblished hereafter, \\\v em])]uisis should be 
remove*! from th(> terminology Part I and Part II offenses. 
It is felt that if this terminology were retained in spite of 
considerable changes in the content of the groupings of 
offenses, confusion would result; new terms applied to a 
new classification would promote clarity. 

Kecommendation (9) 24 

It may be advisable t«^ retain, at least for the time being, 
the current terminology of Part I and Part II offenses in 
the Bureau's communications with the cooperating police 
departments, since it is by now accepted practice and a tra- 
dition of long standing. 

Kecommendation (10) 24 

The publication of an index of crime, which function is 
presently performed by the Part I offenses, should be con- 
tinued, but the tabulations should be entitled "index of 
crime" and the composition of the index be changed to 
exclude manslaughter by negligence and larcMMiy below 
S50 (for elaboration of this see the respective subtitles and 
also the subtitle "Auto Theft"). 

Kecommendation (11) 24 

The general tabulations of United States crime statistics 
should be divided into those offenses which are rej)orted 
as they become known to the police and those which are 



66 



rcpoiicd lis llicy lu-comc known llinmirh the arrest of the 
oircndcr. 



Page 



Kecoininondatioii (12) 24 

Tlio classification suggested in recommendation (11), 
whicli presently consists in the difTerentiation of Part I 
and Part II offenses, should be further studied by the per- 
sonnel of the Bureau in consultation with experienced 
representatives of the police departments in order to de- 
termine the best manner of liandling specific offenses. 

Recommeiuhition (\'.\) 24, 25 

A special section should l)e developed in the UCR's to 
deal with tlie group of ofl'enses wliicli at a given time are 
especially important to the police in its work, so as to 
increase the effectiveness of the police in combating the 
particular offenses by focusing attention on them and pro- 
viding additional information on their frequency and 
distribution and tlieir success in suppressing them. Both 
offenses known to the police and offenses reported follow- 
ing arrest might be included here. Again, continued 
study by the personnel of the Bureau in consultation with 
the best qualified representatives of tlie police departments 
should form tlu^ basis for including offenses in this section. 

Kecojnmendation (14) 26 

The category of manslaughter by negligence should be 
eliminated from the ofi'enses used for the purposes of a 
crime index. It should, however, continue to be included 
in the United States crime statistics. 

Recommendation (15) 28 

The present division of larceny into cases of over and 
under $50 should be retained. The criteria for distinction 
should be further studied. Only larcenies above $50 
should be used for the ])ui'poses of the crime ind(>x. Lar- 
cenies under $50 should i)e reported as offenses known to 
the jjolice in the general tabulation of the United States 
crime statistics. 



67 

Page 

l\fC(Mnni('iHljit ion (Hi) ;i() 

The ( 'oiiiniillcc rccoiiiiiiciKls the follow iii<; pinii for llic 
analysis of the crime datn into rural and iirhan. Tlic 
j)oj)ulation of the area of the United Stales slioidd he 
divided into three tyjx's of conHnunities: 

1. Standard Metropolitan Areas as established by the 
Bureau of Census for the lOoO eensus and as these may 
he further revised l)y that Bureau. 

2. Urban communities, that is, {jjenerally speaking com- 
munities with more than 2,500 inhabitants. More spe- 
cifically the current (lOoO) census definition should be 
used. The urban population which is not comprised 
within the Standard Metropolitan Areas would be taken 
care of in this category. 

3. Rural population, again ill aeeordaneo with the cur- 
rent (lOoO) census definition. This would amount to the 
total rural population except for the small part which is 
included in the Standard Metropolitan Areas. It is be- 
lieved that this would give for the United States the rural 
population in the truest sense of that word, for which 
statistical data is currently available. 

Recommendation (17) 33 

In view of tlie difFerential population growth in various 
communities, the decennial census figures should not be 
used for the computation of the crime rates beyond the 
year to which they pertain. Instead, the available annual 
estimates by the Bureau of the Census should be used. 
It is felt that the plan for utilizing in the rural-urban 
ahalyses the analytical categories recently introduced by 
the Bureau of the Census would prove of value also in the 
computation of the crime rates. It is hereby also recom- 
mended that the FBI further explore the possibility of 
obtaining more <letaih'd annual estimates from the Bureau 
of the Census. 

Recommendation 08) 30.37 

In computing the estimated totals of major crimes the 
procedure suggested under the heading "Rural versus 
I'rban Criminality'* should be utilized. OfTenses known 
to the poli«'e should be <omputed from the police reports 
for the ."-Standard Nb-tropolitan Areas, for the rest of the 
iul>an population and for the rural po|>uhilion within 



68 



cnrli State (\9!')() United States census definitions). The 
number of rcpoited offenses siiouhl then l)e pro|)orlionalely 
increased to take care of tlic unreported portions, if any, 
of tiiese same catej^ories witliin each Stale. Tlie sum total 
of the estimates for the States thus obtained will pvo 
tlic national estimate for the given year. It is hoped that 
wlierever available tlie annual population estimates by 
tbe United States census will be substituted for the 
currently used decennial census figures. 

Rceoninieiuhition flU) 



In view of the reniaikai)le coverage for offenses known to 
the police, the actual figures representing the total number 
of offenses committed in the United States, both rural 
and urban, are very significant and should be presented 
more prominently and more accessibly. 

Recommendation (20) 



In the tabulations designed to demonstrate trends in the 
number of offenses, comparisons with more than oidy the 
previous year are reconnnended. The exact number of 
preceding years to be used for the purposes of such com- 
parisons should probably be determined in each individual 
case, depending on the nature of the comparison and the 
nature of the data hi question. 

Recommendation (21) 



^\ith i-eference to all liil)iihilions in the I'liiforni Crime 
Reports which are not based on "offenses known to the 
police" (Pt. I offenses), for wiiich a high degree of cover- 
age has been built up, 1 of 2 courses should be followed: 
Either a definite attemi)t should be niiule to build up the 
reporting to achieve more or less complete coverage, com- 
parable to that for "offenses known to the police," or a 
sampling technique should be resorted to. See recom- 
niendiitions (5) and (0). 

Rcconnnendation (22) 



A pernnment technical consultant committee should be 
established to be available to the Bureau staff for con- 
sultation whenever needetl. 



G'J 

H. I'vnldtin' SuiiiU'sttims 

Pagt 

'rriitiil i\ f Siii;«;('stioii (1) 27 

Mnuslaii{;li(or l)y m'<i:li^(Mi('(' should be studied for iuchi- 
sion ill the proposed new section of the L'CK's (h'idiii<r with 
offenses that are esjji'eially important to the work of iho 
poHce. 

Triitiitive Suggestion (2) 27 

The C'oniniittee reeoininends h)okin{; into tiie possihility 
of inakini; us(> of tiu' statistics on traflic falahtics compiled 
hy some ajjency other than the I'^BI. pi<>\ idi'<I this source 
is competent and reliahle. 

Tentative Su|rg:ostion (3) 33 

Tii(> j)ossibility of usinj; annual population estimates by 
other than governmental agencies should be explored. 

Ti'Utative Suggestion (4) 41 

The (juestion of handling fraud and embezzlement as two 
separate offense categories in the tabulation of the 
"General United States Crime Statistics" should be 
studied further. 

('.. flutters Discussed 

Mattei-s Discussed (1) ; 19 

After studying various considerations involved in the 
question as to the frequency with which crime reports 
are sent the FBI by the police, the Committee decided 
not to recommend any change in the current practice. 

Matters Discussed (2) 28 

Auto theft as a Part I offense. The Committee decided 
on continuing the present practice, except that in view 
of the general changes in the struct«n-e of the I'CR's, 
auto theft will from now on be included in the group of 
offenses going into the crime index. 



70 

I'agt 

Mutters Discussed CX) ;U) 

Tlie CoiMinittee discussed the possibility of sulistitutiii^ 
a saiiiplini^ method for the present collection of criiniiud 
statistics for rural areas for criincs known to the police 

and advises against the change. 

Matters Discussed (4) 4n 

Present jjrocedures in collcding (h'lta for the rnifoiin 
Crime Reports versus sampling jiroceduic. The con- 
sensus of the Committee is in favor of the present pro- 
cedure. 

Matters Discussed (5) 41 

Arson. Till' Coniinittee feels that no change is indicated 
witli i-eference to the present hiindling of arson. 

Matters Discussed (6) 43 

'J'he Conunittee did not consich-r it necessary to make any 
specific recommendations with regard to the collection 
and reporting of data on ollenders in the juvenile age 
bracket, believing that the FBI's entering into the juvenile 
field on a more intensive and extended basis would take 
the Uniform Crime Reporting Program outside of its 
origiruilly planned and presently observed scope, which 
is a j)()licy matter for decision by the FBI itself. 

(ICiixl oj (Umsiillant ( ktmmit Ice Report) 



Data lor 1957 Iroin Police Kc^ports 



ExplaiKilion 

'I'his st'ctioii was coinpilfd from [xtlicr reports before the receipt 
of the rej)ort of the Consult ant Coniniiltee which is piiiited in the 
precechnir pa,ir«'s and, therefore, (h)es not contain any of the changes 
reconiinench'd hy the C\)niniit lee. 

Crime (hita received under tliis program for the calendar year 1957, 
hut not includeil in the 1957 Uniform Crime Reports, are presented 
here. This comi)lett'S the presentation of 1957 (hita for tlie puipose 
of preserving continuity and is in line with recommendation No. 2 of 
tlie Consultant Committee on Uniform Crime Reporting. The semi- 
annual issue of I'niform Crime Repoits has been discontinued, and 
hereafter one Uniform Crime Reports each year will be available for 
distribution in the «>arly fall and will include all data for the previous 
calemlar year heretofore included in the amiual and semiannual 
issues. 

({Ifviises Cleared and Persons Arrested, 1957 

Table 1 reflects the ratio of offenses cleared by arrest and persons 
charged per each 100 offenses known, on the average, based on in- 
formation voluntarily submitted by 1,885 cities representing about 
74 percent of the popidation residing in cities in this country. The 
data in table 1 are limited to eight categories and are arrangeil with 
cities grouped by size. Table 2 reflects for the same 1,885 cities 
arranged by geographical divisions, the number of offenses known, 
the number of offenses cleared by arrest, and the percentage of 
otfenses cleared by arrest. 

Reports of 198 cities over 25,000 are sunnnarized in tai)le 3 to show 
for 8 categories the numl)er of offenses known, the number of offenses 
cleared by arrest, the number of pei'sons charged and the number 
and percentage of persons found guilty. For the other crime cate- 
gories, for which offenses known information is not collected, table 
4 reflects for the 198 cities used in table 3, the number of persons 
charged and the numl)er and percentage of such persons found guilty. 

(71) 



72 



Taldc I. — (tffvtisvs Ktiimn. ( hiir^il hy Arrvsl. ami I'vrsanit Chnriied {Held 
for I'rttsi-riititiii). I'fST, hy I'lt/niliit ion Cruitps, .\tnnher pvr 100 Knotcn 
OJfrii.sfs 



roinilittUin croup; number of cities 
iiinl pero-ntap*' of city populution 
rt-prescnti'il within each group 



Criminal 
homicide 



Mur- 
der, 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter ny 
negli- 
gence 



Rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
Rlary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

I.SW cities; 74 jHTcent: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

f.KOI P I 

35 cities over 250,000; 88 percent: 

0(Tens«'S known 

OlTensis cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

4 citits over 1.000.000; 89 percent: 

()(Tens<'S known. 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

6 cities, 750,000 to 1,000,000; 100 per 
cent: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

6 cities. ,500.000 to 750,000; 83 percent 

Offenses known. 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

19 cities. 250,000 to 500,000; 83 per 
cent: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

r.RoiP II 

'0 cities, 100.000 to 250,000; 75 per- 
c-ent: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

r.Roip III 

1(M cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 80 per- 
cent: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

r.RO'p IV 

198 cities, 25.000 to ,10.000; 72 per- 
cent: 

Offeiist's known. 

Olffiisi's clt-ared by arrest 

Persiiii^ ( hiirgcd 



MS iiii.s lO.iHKt to 25,000; 08 per- 
cent : 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

f Korp VI 

'.0 cities under 10.000; .iO iiercent: 

Offenses known 

Offenses clcMred by arrest 

Persons chiirged 



100.0 
81.5 
90.7 



100.0 
90.1 
89.7 

100.0 
89.1 
90.2 



100.0 
90.3 
82.4 

100.0 
9.3.0 
90.4 



100.0 
89.9 
94.3 



100.0 
93.8 
88.9 



100. 
95.0 
94.7 



100.0 
94.7 
94.7 



100.0 
94.8 
91.9 



100.0 
86.0 
90.7 



100.0 
90.2 
78.3 



100.0 
80.9 
78.5 



100.0 
42.6 
43.2 



100.0 
77.8 
89.3 



100.0 
29.8 
21.0 



100.0 
91.2 
77.1 

100.0 
94.3 
113.8 



100.0 
90.7 
106.2 

100.0 
88.8 
37.1 



100.0 
90.0 
50.4 



100.0 
92.0 
76.6 



100.0 
82.9 
67.3 



100.0 
84.2 
77.0 



100.0 
100.0 
108.5 



100.0 
95.7 
94.6 



100.0 

7y. 7 

71.3 

100.0 

80.7 
71.9 



100.0 
80.4 
('.2. 8 

100.0 
87.6 



100.0 
72.0 
08.2 



100.0 
79.1 
75.8 



100.0 
8.3.0 
91.1 



100.0 
86.0 
89.9 



100.0 
84.8 
91.7 



100.0 
86.9 
95.0 



100.0 
42.9 
40.0 

100.0 
45.7 
40.1 



100.0 
36.3 
39.0 

100.0 
46.7 
59.8 



100.0 
41.3 
34.5 



100.0 
39.9 
45.9 



100.0 
40.8 
.10. 9 



100.0 
44.5 
(K). 1 



100.0 
4Z1 
58.3 



100.0 
48.4 
58.0 



100 

75.9 
64.9 

100.0 
74.9 
65.0 



100.0 

77.7 
59.7 

100.0 
81.9 
73.5 



100.0 
7.M 
71.7 



100.0 
71.3 

.19.8 



100.0 
81.3 

76.8 



100.0 

8H.3 
90.5 



100.0 
87.1 
90.5 



100.0 
89.5 
94.6 



100.0 

29.6 
17.8 

100.0 
31.0 
15.4 



100.0 
25.6 
23.5 

100.0 
27.6 
24.5 



100.0 
30.2 
15.7 



100.0 
27.6 
20.5 



100.0 
28.4 
21.9 



100.0 
29.8 
25.0 



100.0 
31.8 
27.2 



100.0 
3.3.8 
32.5 



100.0 
20.1 
15.4 



100.0 
22.2 
15.3 

100.0 
23.6 
1Z8 



100.0 
18.9 
16.9 

100.0 
25.1 
25.0 



100. 
21.8 
14.0 



100.0 
1&9 
14.1 



100.0 
17.0 
15.0 



100.0 
18.5 
15.1 



100.0 
18.9 
15.7 



100.0 
23.8 
19.2 



73 



Table 2. — .\ timber uj (tJD'in>rs hnttttn, .\iiinbfr aiitl I'frcviilafiv Cleurvd by 
Arrest, 1957, by Geographic Diviniona 



Qook'raphic dlvUlon; nuiiit>or of 
cities iinil iHTrt'iitaKe of city iK>pij- 
liUloii roprfsriitod witlilii oncli 
iltvLslon 



Criminal hoiiil- 
cldo 



Mur- 
der, 
non- 
lU'cll- 
gent 
man- 
slauKh- 
ter 



Man- 
JatiK li- 
ter l>y 
ncBll- 
ttencc 



Ka|)e 



Rob- 
bery 



Hur- 
Ai!|!ra- clary— 



vutrd 
assault 



break- 
InK or 
enter- 
ing 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



TOTAL. ALL DIVISIONS 

l^l eitiis; 7-t jxTivnt: 

Number of olTeniei known 

Number cleared by arrest 

FercentAfe cleared by arrest 

Kew Kngland States; 151 cities; 78 
percvnt: 

Nunilx-r of ofTens'S known 

NiiniU-r cleiired by arrest 

PerivntaKe elrtired by arrest 

Middle Atlantic States; 418 cities; 83 
jH-rivnt : 

NuinlxT of offenses known 

NuniU-r cleared by arrest 

Percent ape cleared by arrest 

East North Centnil States; 4tiO cities; 
82 jwrn-nt: 

Number of olTenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

I'ercentiige cleared by arrest 

West North lentrid States; 202 
citie«: vo [>«Ti-»'r>t: 

N ' "'•■ns«'S known 

N d by arrest 

r. . . ired by arrest 

Soutti ATI ii;iir -tales; ' 174 cities; 68 
percent: 

Niit!!N>r of offenses known 

N ' ' -'d by arrest 

1 ■ irx'd by arrest 

East . il States; 00 cities; 

311 iHT.viit; 

Nunjb«'r of offenses known 

Number cleared by arrest 

Perwntaxte cleared by arrest 

West South C entrul States; 100 cities; 
58 |HT<'>-rit: 

N ' ' •' ■ 'n 

N 

I ■ -t 

Mount. ii.'i .-t.ii'>. nnj (iti's. 75 per- 
cent: 

Niimbr of off<T!<i«»« known 

N • ' ■ ' • 

I -I 

PflC ■ reent: 

■A..... 



3.336 

3.054 

91.5 



86 

73 

84.9 



r.25 

554 

88.6 



808 

724 

8U.6 



226 

206 

91.2 



672 
649 
96.6 



174 

1<J8 

96.6 



445 

40ti 

91.2 



86 

81 

»4.2 

214 

193 

9a2 



2.281 

2.057 

90.2 



9,763 
7.896 
80.9 



42. 529 

IB, 129 

42.6 



58.608 

45.506 

77.6 



320,117 867,514 

94.648 174,266 

29. 6 I 20. 1 



lt» 

138 

82.1 



488 

475 

97.3 



474 

413 

87.1 



171 

1.VI 

90.1 



305 

292 

95.7 



56 

49 

87.5 



2f>2 

246 

93.9 



50 

56 

94.9 

206 
234 
78.5 



421 

.389 

02.4 



3.179 

2.642 

83.1 



2,190 
1,734 
79.2 



718 

561 

78.1 



954 

782 

82.0 



123 

08 
79.7 



067 

574 

86.1 



336 

275 

81.8 

1,175 

841 

71.6 



1, 160 

505 

43.5 



9,519 

4.604 

48.4 



14, 257 
5,867 
41.2 



3,726 
1,351 
36.3 



3.993 
1.837 
46.0 



713 

272 

38.1 



2,636 
1,2.55 
47.6 



1,590 

637 

40.1 

4.935 
1,801 
36.5 



1,258 
1,032 
82.0 



16.945 

12,802 

75.6 



12. 4.'.6 

9.5h5 

77.0 



3,288 
2,2tl8 
69.0 



13, 744 

11.762 
85.6 



1,978 
1,438 
72.7 



4.210 
3,394 
80.6 



1,100 
810 
73.6 

3,620 

2,415 

06.5 



17,612 
5,143 
29.2 



74,727 

21.814 

29.2 



6.5,015 

20.123 

31.0 



25,058 

7,278 

28.4 



36,414 

11,193 

30.7 



8,788 

2,140 

24.4 



33,260 

11,841 

35.6 



14,184 

3,972 

28.0 



47, 167 

8,984 

19.0 



157,875 

31,755 

20.1 



200.899 

41.396 

20.6 



79,992 

15,103 

18.9 



91,496 

22, .596 

24.7 



18, 251 

3,500 

19.2 



78,906 

20.415 

25.9 



48.567 

8.334 

17.2 



44,459 144. .361 

11,344 22.185 

25. 5 15. 4 



■ Includes tbe District of Columbia. 



74 



Tiililr '.i.^(tfff'risf>< Knoirn, C.h'arrtl l>y .irrt'sl, nn<l \ii mhrr nf I'vrsnns 
I'lninil (^iiilly. I'f.lT: I'fH C.ilit's (Pvfr 'J.iJXXt irt I'n/mhil ioii lirprvsvntiitti 
at I'rrrrttt ttf tiiv ('ity I'ttpiiUit'um Jnr I'hnsr ('ilirs (hrr 1'.>.0W> 





Number of offenses 




Number of persons 






Offense 


Known 
to the 
police 


Cleared 
by arrest 


Charged 
(held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 


Found guilty 


Percent- 
ogefouni 




Total 
guilty 


Offense 
charged 


Lesser 
offense 


guUty 


TOTAl... 


757, 636 


211,066 


156, 299 


97,016 


8S,364 


13,661 


VI. b 


Criininul homicide: 

(a) M unlfT and nonnegli- 

Kfiil tuanslaiiphtpr. - 

(b) Manslaughter by neg- 


1,787 

1,170 

6,410 

28.994 

37, (i90 

169,094 

426,357 
86,033 


I.(i2K 
1.043 

.-i, i:w 

12,573 
29.194 

49, 080 

85,919 
26. 475 


1,654 

909 
4. 660 
12,150 
24.525 

30, 978 

60,638 
19, 785 


1,118 

283 
2,401 
7. 571 
10,116 

20,623 

42, 572 
12,331 


821 

221 

1,831 
6.034 
7,081 

17,071 

39,406 
10,889 


297 

02 

570 

1,537 

3,035 

3,552 

3.166 
1,442 


67.0 
31.1 


Rapo --- 


51.5 




02. 3 




41.2 


BurKlary— breaking or enter- 
ing . -- 


66.6 


Larceny— theft (except auto 
theft) 


ft 70.2 




62.3 







Tabic 4. — Niintbor of Persons Chnrspd {Held for Prosecution) and IVumher 
Finiml (wiiilly, l'f57 : l*Hi (litirs (tier 2.'>,0(Kf in Popitlntittn Hepresentinti 
54 Percent of the City PapnUttion for Those Cities Over 25,000 



Offense 



TOTAL -.- 

Other assaults - -. 

Forgi'ry and counterfeiting 

Knibezzk'ment and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Sex offenses (including prostitution and com 

niercialized vii'*') 

Offenses agiiinsl family and children 

Narcotic drug laws -. 

Lifjuor laws 

Drunkenness; disorderly conduct; vagrancy. 

Dambling 

Drivinu while Intoxicated 

Traffic and motor vehicle laws 

All other offens<'3 



Number of persons charged (held for 
prosecution) 



TOTAL 
CHARGED 



14. 783, 400 



52, 001 
4,854 

12,319 
3,274 

12,353 



34,246 
16. 145 
13. 147 
24, 813 

801,827 

81,712 

53,463 

13,463.187 

210. 059 



Foimd guilty 



TOTAL 
GUILTY 



10. 985. 099 



26.869 
3,954 
7,620 
1,565 
7,874 



22,676 
9,672 
9.453 

16. 277 

578, 336 
37.116 
42. 612 
10, 077, .-WO 
143.656 



Offense 
charged 



Lesser 
offense 



10.938.376 I 46.723 



25. 951 
3.285 
6,900 
1,429 
7,514 



21.453 
9.429 
9.082 

16.158 

577.116 

37, au 

38,723 

10,042,162 

142, 143 



918 
669 
720 
1.36 
360 



1,223 
243 
.371 
119 

1.220 

S5 

3.919 

35, 227 

1,513 



Percent- 
age four 
guilty 



74.3 



51.7 
81.5 
61.9 
47.8 
63.7 



6&2 
59.9 
71.9 
65. 6 

72.1 
45.4 
79.8 
74.9 
68.4 



o 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06351 999 3