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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"



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3* 







CRIME 



IN THE UNITED STATES 



ISSUED BY 

JOHN EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS — 1959 



"\ FOR RELEASE 

FRIDAY, P. M., SEPTEMBER 16, 1960 
■y- PRINTED ANNUALLY 



■ 




Contents 



Pa?p 

Preface 1-2 

Summary 3—20 

Introduction 21-31 

The index of crime, 1959 32-73 

United States, 1959 (table 1) 

United States, 1958-59, by geographic divisions and 

States (table 2) 34-37 

States (table 3) 38-51 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas (table 4) . . . . 52-7;} 

General United States crime statistics, 1959 74-97 

City crime trends, 1958-59, by population groups (table 

5) 75-76 

City crime trends, 1959 versus average of 1954-58 (table 

6) 77 

Monthly variations (table 7) 77 

City crime rates, by population groups (table 8) 78-79 

Offense analysis, trends, 1958-59 (table 9) 80 

Value of property stolen, by type of crime (table 10) . . . 80 

Value of property stolen and recovered (table 11) ... . 81 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, by 

population groups (table 12) 81-82 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

by geographic divisions (table 13) 83-84 

Persons found guilty (table 14) 84 

Offenses in individual areas over 25,000 (table 15) . . . 85-97 [i 

Age, sex, and race of persons arrested 98-103 

Age distribution (tables 16, 17) 99-100. 

Arrest trends, 1958-59 (table 18) 101, 

Sex distribution (table 19) 102 11 

Race distribution (table 20) . . . / 103 

Police employee data 104-128 

Police employees killed, 1958 (tables 21, 24) 104 

Civilian employees, percent of total (table 22) 104 

Full-time police employees, number and rate, April 30, 

1959 (tables 23, 24) 105-106 

Police employees in individual cities, April 30, 1959 

(tables 25, 26) 107-128 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United States 



PRINTED ANNUALLY— 1959 



Advisory: Committee on Uniform Crime Records 
nternational Association of Chiefs of Police 
Stanley R. Schrotel, Chief of Police 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Chairman 



J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
U.S. Department of Justice, Washington 25, D.C. 



m i'tibln Library 
„wrtd«fit ot Document* 

. , i 3 1960 

DEPOSITORY 



1 "i...l State* Government Printing Office, Washington, I). C— 1960 



The Police Profession 
1 Mill \M) CONFIDENT I 




PhJJisot I'ri-.r wbudng photo bj BJU Bomtt t WothingUm Doll) V«w 



in 



Preface 

The fad that we have a clear picture « » I" the extent <>r crime in the 
1 " n i tnl States today is a tribute to the vision of American law enforce- 
ment. The current program, from which we gain such insight, grew 
out of i In- recognized need on i he part <>!' i he police profession for some 
means of coordinating available crime statistics. 

li had its inception thirt) years ago when the International Associa- 
tion of Chiefs of Police requested the Federal I lureau <»i' Envest igat ion 
rve in collecting and processing this important data. In the en- 
suing three decades police agencies and the FBI, working together on 
:i wholly voluntary basis, have produced the widely used Uniform 
( Jrime Report 3, 

The Uniform Crime Reports, comprised of police data, are recog- 
nized as the most complete for f crime statistics available on a 

nationwide basis. Data compiled in this issue art- based upon volun- 
tary contributions received from approximately 7,000 law enforcement 
agencies throughout the country. The police and the FBI engage in 
this cooperative effort to learn more about the extent and fluctuation 
of crime in the belief that such knowledge will enable them to plan 
their work accordingly and to achieve more effect ive law enforcement. 

Crime, the criminal and the juvenile delinquent are an ever-growing 
problem in our complex society. Crime is the concern not solely of 
law enforcement l>ui <>f the community as well. 

Over ilic years researchers, law makers, public and private welfare 
bodies, governmental agencies, the press ami the general public have 
indicated increasing interest in this publication and are using it <>n an 
extensive scale. While these statistics li«>l«l the greatest significance 
for police agencies, and are collected and produced for the use <»l such 
agencies, the FBI is striving to make the information more meaningful 
t<» those with specialized interests outside the immediate field of law 
orcement, and to the general public as well. 

In :i number of instances, usage by those outside the law enforcement 
profession has resulted in some misinterpretations and in subsequent 
criticism being directed toward the law enforcement agencies which 
make the compilation <>f these crime statist ics possible. Those who are 
sincerely concerned with the crime problem in America are encoui 
io use the data in the Uniform Crime Reports to the utmost ; how. 
they are urged to keep such usage within it > valid limitations. 



I with the FBI's efforts to improve the standards •>! 

ompiling statistics, as well as t<» expand coverage in 

order i<» make the reports fullj representative, ;t group <>f consultants 

■ <\ Oil :i I '•) nuiiclll Im-I-. 

I .• 1 1 M-ii are prominent in their respective t i « • 1 < 1 — <>f sociology, pub- 
lic administration and law enforcement, and their suggestions have 
\ ;il i if. Their efforts and those of the FBI, notwithstand- 
the fact remains that 1 1 1 • - effectiveness of the LTniform Crime Re 
I mi i- is dependent upon the accuracy and quality of the data reported 
voluntarily by contributing lav* enforcement agencies. 

The excellent relationship existing among local, state ;tn<l Federal 
l:iw enforcement is indicated in this very successful cooperative en- 
deavor. The FBI is proud to have a part in this program. 



AT 



'V X^K/^^m 



Joh \ Edgar I h io> 1 1:. Dit • 



IMKOKM CKIMK REPORTS l ( >.V) 



Summary 

you bave here a wealth of information on crime in the U.S., < 1 u« 
in the cooperation of police and sheriffs who voluntarily Bend crime 
figures to the FBI 

This summary is for the reader interested in the general crime pic 
ture. Technical data, of interest primaril) t<> police, social scientists, 
and other students, are presented in the following sections. 

It" you wish assistance in the interpretation of any information in 
this publication, please communicate with the Director, Federal 
Bureau of [nvestigation, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington 25, 
D.C. 

( rim* ( 'apsule 

( Vinie volume continued unabated in 1959. Lasl year of the fifties 
tered a new all-time high with 69 percenl more crime than L950 
ami 128 percenl over 1940. Crime continues to outpace population 
growth -1 to 1 . 

Crime clock -how- three serious crimes per minute. 

( 'rime calendar shows criminal activity reached peak in December, 

L959 alter a low point in May. 

Loss of "\, •!■ $500 million loot in 1959 cut to 17 cent- on dollar by 
police reeo\ eries. 

Police have increased their effectiveness in arresting and charging 

ons over 50 percenl since 1950 bul this has been offset by a 

slower rise in court convictions, up onl\ 36 percent in the same 

period. 

Proponents <»f abolition <>f capital punishment cannot find support 

for their cause in Btudy of state murder rate-, since results are 
inconclusive. 

■ ■-!- of persons under 18 have doubled since a post-World War 
II low in 1948, while population of young people age 10 through 17 
ha- increased by lees than one-half. 

( i imr I Otatt 

Criminals did not Blacken their activities in L959. They rolled up 
an awesome crime total for the last year of the decade. By the end 
of the year, police had counted 1,592,160 serious crimes. They listed 
increases in the vicious crimes of murder, forcible rape, and assault t<> 
kill or to inflict Berious injury. Auto thefts ami other major thefts 



(I while h mined unchanged and robberies declined. 

- percent abo\ e 19 10 see opposite I, and a 

in the lir>t half of I960, t he <»n<- pcrcenl 

.1 in proper perspecl ive as one more 

I upward climb of crime. 

tea for 1957 and l' 1 "^ have been adjusted to 
Hawaii : 



. 














Number 


• 








. 


• • 






110,830 


14,610 


- ■ 
28* 





























< rime and Population 

I- the crime problem really increasing or is it merely keeping j >:i< ■<• 
with population growth? 

For :i number of years, crime 1ms been rising four times ;is fasl as 
population. A more direel answer comes from measuring crimes 

nsl inhabitants in the U.S. By this means, we obtain r.-ii- 
the number of crimes per 100,000 people. 

If rates <l<> nol change from year t<> year, crime is just keeping up 
with population. If rates increase, crime is outstripping population 
growth. 

These -Imu ;i 1959 figure 12 percent above an average of the past 
ind 70 percenl above 1940. 

Thus, by two methods comparing the percentage change in 
crime and population and a study of crime rates we find thai some- 
thing more than the rise in population is behind the upsurge in crime, 
ils are shown below and in the accompanying chart. 





- per hmi.imhi Inhabitants 


■ 


Nun 






Ovi 








i 


+ 12 








- 


-i 
+3 

-a 






+ 12 




-1 




+8 




+ 13 




+ 1<> 







+ 11 





CRIME 



AND 



rv"""v"vTv/"i'7'\\\ ; A^VT?^v ' . ' . i ,', ' . | . | . | . , . , .'. , . ! . 1 : 1 , 1 . 1 . 1 , ' . 1 .'. 1 

POPULATION 



1940 - 1959 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1940 



t 120% 
: 100% 



i -• 



- 



CRIME 



^ / CRIME RATE 



POPULATION 




1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 



CRIME = INDEX OF CRIME OFFENSES 

RATE = NUMBER OF CRIMES PER 100.000 POPULATION 



FBI CHART 



.. 2 



i i irtu t !>•> I. 

ach minute in 19 

-. hour. 

• 

. 7 minutes. 

ussault occurred >-\ < \ \ 4 minul 

16 seconds. 

i l rious larcenj ($50 and over) occurr d each minute. 

I ito theft occurred every 2 minuti 

1 minutes, there was a crime of murder, forcible rape, 
ill t<> kill. 

( rime ( alendar 

Thi •■ month without crime, but some crimes are more pro- 

aounced in their own season. December L959 was easily the crime 
month <>i' the year, leading all other months in murder, manslaughter 
by negligence, robbery, burglary, and larceny. Auto theft reached a 
peak in November, and during the month of August the other two 
ous crimes, rape and aggravated assault, had their greatest 
I uency. 

Crimea againsl property (robbery, burglary, larceny, and auto 
theft) tend t<> rise during the darker or winter months <>t' the year. 
More hours of darkness providing more opportunity is our factor. 
Crimes against the person (murder, rape, and aggravated assault) 
will occur more frequently during the warmer or summer months. 
n the elements provide the conditions which influence the occur- 
rence of many of these violent crimes. Negligent manslaughter 
comprised mostly of traffic deaths is the only crime against the person 
with opposite seasonal tendencies. It i- affected to sonic extent by 
the hazardous driving mouth- of the winter. 

\ comparison of seasonal patterns is demonstrated in the following 
ising the 1959 experience and the average for the 5-year 



CRIMES BY MONTH 

VARIATIONS FROM ANNUAL AVERAGE 
1959 AND 1954-1958 AVERAGE 



CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON 

+ 30% 




NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 




. ANNUAL 
* AVERAGE 



^ Q- u 



Q^ C-3 C=3 t-^ 




I ' I 



CRIMES BY MONTH 

VARIATIONS FROM ANNUAL AVERAGE 
1959 AND 1954-1958 AVERAGE 






CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

♦30% 





FBI CHART 



Robbers, burglars, and other thieves Btole over $500 million in loot . 
during L959. Police recoveries rut the net loss to 17 cents mi the 
dollar. 

Almost one-half the stolen valuation represented autos; l>ut a high 
■ . or} r;l1 '' ■'- percenl - l>\ police led to a nel Loss of only 8 cents on 
the dollar in tin- category. For other types <>i property, police 
ivered 13 cents lor every dollar stolen. Currency, jewelry, and 
furs are the leasl likely to !><• recovered alter theft. This i- due al leasl 
in part to a lack of personal identification and the quick assimilation 
of Buch items into our everydaj living. 

Tin- average value loss for every robbery v* burglary, $1 

larceny, *7f>; and auto theft, $829. 

( i i mr inaly ;«•</ 

In 1959 over half the robberies with weapons or force were com- 
mitted on Btreets. In addition, business houses were (lit- Bcenes of 
robberies in a third of the cases, although the} were victimized 9 
percent less in 1959 than 1958. People were confronted by robbers in 
their homes and at other locations in the remaining l 1 percenl of such 
crim 

Burglars unlawfully entered residences with 7 percent greater fre- 
quency in 1959 than in the previous year, accounting for 42 percent 
of all burglaries. Attack- on Btores, offices, and other oonresidence 
structures declined 4 percent, Imt these places were victimized in 58 
percent of the burglaries. 

'PI;' isories and other articles from automobiles accounted 

for 44 percent of the thievery. Pocket-picking, purse-snatching, and 
Bhoplifting combined represented over eighl percenl of the theft 

problem hut shoplifting ontnmnhercd the Other two by more than "_' to 

1. Bicycle theft- (14 percent) and miscellaneous theft- (35 percent) 
make up the balance of the theft problem. A significant decreas 
11 percent occurred in auto accessory theft- in [959. 



( i inn ami l'tiiii*liimrit 

Police linve i the challenge of the upsurge in crime with :i cor- 

onding ii hi activity. In spite of demands from ever bal- 

ug traffic problems and over 60 percent j > 1 1 1 1 } > in crime from 1950 

to 1959, cit 3 police in L959 cleared by ai percent more crimes 

[lercent more persons for such crimes than in 1950. 

Phis high rate of effectiveness by the police has 1j»*«mi offset by a 
slower pace in court convictions. From 1950 t<> 1959, persons found 
j_r n iit\ in court increased onlj 36 percent or slightly more than one- 
half the rise in crime. To what extenl this made ineffect ual the added 
effort of police can only be conjecl ured. 

Police experience in 1959 was similar to that of previous years, 
insofar as percentages are concerned. Grouping all offenses against 
the person, it i- noted that for each 100 crimes, 79 were cleared by the 
arrest of 67 persons. Variations from these averages are shown in 
the individual classifications. For each LOO murders, 93 were cleared 
bj arrest. For each 1"<i manslaughters by negligence, 89 were cleared 
by arrest. Similarly. 71 percent of the forcible rapes and 7'.' per- 
of the aggravated assaults were cleared by arrest. 

\- i group, the crimes against property of robbery, burglary, lar- 
ceny and auto theft show a lower percentage of clearances than do the 
crimes against persons. For each LOO property crimes as a group. 
25 writ- cleared by charging L8 persons. This group total is held 
down by the numerous larcenies (including property of -mall value) 
for which only 21 of each 1< ( <) were cleared by arrest. In partial 
explanation of this seemingly low clearance rate, it should be noted 
that in numerous instances owners leave property unguarded in a 
hazardous place. Also, much of the stolen property does not bear 
identifying serial numbers or such numbers are not known to the 
ownei . 

Vnother property category, where value is generally not inconse- 
quential and where the articles are identifiable by numbers, is auto 

theft. I low ever, only l'»', of each LOO anto theft- are cleared by arrest 

VIji j a ut os are stolen for "joyriding'' or transportation purposes and 
ecovered by police within a relatively -hort period of time. The 
precipitous abandonment of the anto by the thief accounts in part for 
lack of sufficient opportunity to find him in possession or to trace to 
him i he illicit possession. 



]o 



rrrTTiT D TT 



CRIMES CLEARED BY ARREST 

1959 



L--.-, •■•-■■•-•■■■•■•■■ j 



I - - 



CRIMES AGAINST THE PERSON 

NOT CLEARED CLEARED 



MURDER 






NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 



92.7% 
88.5% 



FORCIBLE 
RAPE 



73.6% 



AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 



78.9% 



CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

NOT CLEARED CLEARED 















ROBBERY 


42.5% 












BURGLARY 


30.7% 
















LARCENY 


20.9% 














AUTO THEFT 


26.2% 





FBI CHART 



( re slightly higher than larceny and auto 

I ; ! 100 burglarii • • clea red bj arrest in 

Uobl •• only crime against property followed by, -r fre 

• -i approaching the experience in crimes 
• : . § ilar to t hese latter crin • -> • i he ■••iin- 

ts the victim, robbei • leared by arrest 13 tim< ovl 

\ ftuse of iIh- vicious nature of robbery, a greatei por- 

of available investigative time is allotted to i - solution. 
When the police investigation establishes the identity of the offendt p 
or offenders, one or more persons musl be arrested and charge- 1 
with the commission of the crime in order to list the case as 
red bj arrest (the arrest of one person may clear several 
crimes while several persons may be arrested for the commission of 
one crime). A.fter charging the arrested persons, police follow 
ilic prosecution to determine the final dispositions of the cases. Al- 
though this may be considered a step beyond police or "offei 
known" statistics, it is nevertheless essential information for adminis- 
trative purposes and in order thai the police may at some future time 
readily identify miscreants with their past records. 
A.s explained above, not all these crimes are cleared by arrest nor 
ill the persons convicted who are arrested and charged with 
a crime. But a comparison of averages shows that foreach LOO crimes 
discussed above, II persons were found guilty in 1959. The com- 
parison is somewhat more favorable when convictions are measured 
against arrests. Of each 100 persons ant-ted and charged with the 
group of crimes discussed above, 66 were found guilty. Expanding 
the study to all categories, including traffic, the average number of 
persons found guilty foreach 100 persons charged was 75. 

'i In- percentage of persons guilty ranged from a high of 86.8 for 
driving while intoxicated to a low of ■". \X> for manslaughter by 

negligence. Embezzle nt and fraud was at the midpoint. 65.4. 

These data show that the top three classes in convictions, were driving 
while intoxicated, drunkenness and \ agrancy. The i hree crimes show- 
ing the lowest convictions of the 25 categories listed were man- 
slaughter by negligence, forcible rape and aggravated assault. In 
other word-, persons charged with any of the last-named crimes were 
less likelj to be convicted than if they had been charged with driving 
while intoxicated, drunkenness or vagrancy. 

\ person charged with aggravated assault (assault with intent to 

kill, maim, or seriously wound) was the least likely to be convicted foi 

the offense charged. Over 40 percent of the persons charged in that 

"i \ vvho were found guilty at all were found guilty of some lesser 



12 



""""""*" " ^""vv^vv^vv^y.v^ 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

1959 






PERCENT OF PERSONS CHARGED 



TOTAL 



75.4% 



Driving while Intoxicated 



Drunkenness; Disorderly Conduct; Vagrancy 



Forgery and Counterfeiting 



Traffic and Motor Vehicle Laws 



Liquor Laws 



Larceny 



82.8% 



Burglary 



Auto Theft 



67.5% 
Sex Offenses (Including Prostitution and Commercialized Vtcej 67.5% 

Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, Etc. ]67.2% 

Embezzlement and Fraud 



77.1% 
75.6% 
74.7% 
72.6% 

71.4% 



Narcotic Drug Laws 



Robbery 



Offenses against Family and Children 



Murder 



Gambling 



Other Assaults 



Stolen Property: Buying, Receiving, Etc. 



Aggravated Assault 



65.4% 
65.2% 
64.8% 



60.2% 
59.4% 



53.6% 
52.5% 
51.4% 



Forcible Rape 



Negligent Manslaughter 



34.6% 



43.9% 
43.0% 



Other Offenses 



63.7% 



FBI CHART 






l:: 



,11,1 tin- ate tli" highesl p< "found guilt 

■ I,- !•_'. ! '■. 'I 11 for details of 1958 data.) 

< upitai Punish men t 

Most Btates have capital punishment; a few do not. For the 
ipital punishment is associated with the crime <»l murder. 
have high murder rates; some <l<» not. Of those states 
with low murder rates, -nun' have capital punishment; Borne <l<> not. 
murders that occur within a state as indicated l>y 
due to a wide range of social, human and material factor-. 
It would be convenient for a study of tin- effects of capital punish- 
ment a- :t deterrent if states fell neatly into two groups: (1) Th<>-.- 
with low murder rates anil capital punishment; and (2) those with 
high murder rates ami no capital punishment. Or, if the user oi 
- making a case against capital punishment, In- would 
prefer to demonstrate that the states with low murder rates are those 
that do not have capital punishment. But i<> expect such an over- 
simplification of a highly complex subject is to -n<_ r aL r »' in wishful 
thinking or a futile i_ r i'opiii<_ r for proof that i< not there. 

!>ome who propose the abolishment of capital punishment select 
statistics that "prove" their point ami ignore those that point the 
other way. Comparisons of murder rates between the nine si 
which abolished the death penalty or qualified it- use and the forty- 
states which have retained it either individually, before or after 
abolition, or l>y group are completely inconclusive. 

The professional law enforcement officer is convinced from experi- 
ence that the hardened criminal has been and is deterred from killing 

■d mi the prospect of the death penalty. It IS possible that the 

deterrent effect of capital punishment is greater in states with a high 
murder rate if the conditions which contribute to the act of mur- 
der develop more frequently in those states. For the law enforce- 
ment officer the time-proven deterrents to crime are sure detection, 
-wiit apprehension, ami proper punishment. Each i< a necessary 
ingredient. 



11 



PERSONS ARRESTED UNDER 
18 YEARS OF AGE 

1959 


PERCENT OF TOTAL ARRESTS 

OFFENSES ARRESTS, PERSONS TOTAL ARRESTS 
UNDER 18 ALL AGES 

26.2% 




ROBBERY | 


15.379 


52.4% 




BURGLARY | 


65,044 


48 9% 




LARCENY 1 


132.441 


63.6% 




AUTO THEFT | 


33.409 


2.4% 




EMBEZZLEMENT 1 
AND FRAlin 1 


21.009 


30.2% 




RECEIVING M|^HM 
STOLEN PROPERTY ^H 


6.115 


7.6% 




FORGtRY ANU WM 
COUNTERFEITING ■ 


12.007 






jgFBI CHART::;;: 



i:. 



I report after report received from police, the seriousness of the 

. delinquency problem is highlighted. Early in the post~World 

War M period, juvenile delinquency and youth population figures 

,1, ,,|i|»'i| in their lowest point since 1940. This is shown by arrest, 

juvenile court, and population data on an accompanying chart for the 

.,,| 1940 59. Since 1948, juvenile arrests and court cases have 

more than doubled while tli»' population of our young people has 

• •( I li\ less i han one-half. 

I',\ directh comparing percentages <>t" the rise in delinquency and 
the growth in the young population, we find thai juvenile am 
■ .| two ;iimI one-half t imes as fast. 

P n pointing this situation further is a comparison of adults with 
juveniles. Arrests of young people during this period (1948 L959) 
have increased six times as fast as arrests of persons who have reached 
their 18th birthday. 

\ comparison of L958 and L959 figures shows a continuation of the 
rise in arrests of young persons under 18. Arrests of persons age 1 v 
or older remained unchanged. In smaller cities (under l'.''."" 1 "). ar- 
rests of youths increased five percent, and this was almost matched 
with a I percent rise in the larger cities (25,000 and over). For all re- 
porting cities combined, the increase in juvenile arrests was i percent 
te yea r. 

\ ir:i i 1 1 in 1959, arrests of youths were disproportionately high in 
certain categories. On an overall basis, they represented 12 percent of 
the arrests, but for auto theft, 64 percent. This was followed by 52 
percent for burglary, 19 percent for larceny, 30 percent for possession 
of stolen property, and 26 percent for robbery. 

Details of age, sex, and race information as compiled by city police 
for arrested persons are shown in tables 16 through 20. 



JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 



1940 - 1959 

PERCENT CHANGE 



+ 220% 
+ 200% 
+ 180% 
+ 160% 
+ 140% 
+ 120% 
+ 100% 



-40% 



JUVENILE COURT CASES 
(includes traffic) / 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

/ 



POLICE ARRESTS 




POPULATION 
AGED 10 - 17 



1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 

JUVENILE COURT DATA FROM CHILDREN'S BUREAU 
POLICE ARREST DATA FROM UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 
POPULATION DATA FROM BUREAU OF CENSUS 

FBI CHART 



17 



Folic* 

"f criminals and .1 hazardous occupation, 49 citj police 
employees lost their lives in line of dut) during 1958. This is an 
. ovei t lie previous year and a reversal "I a slight downward 
trend in sucli deaths noted in the past few years. 

During 1959 no change was recorded in the citj police strength t<> 
combat crime and to handle other multitudinous duties. There 
1.8 police employees per thousand inhabitants available in city police 
departments in 1959. These figures refer to average police strength, 
including civilians, and <l<> no1 represent a measure of desirable police 
strength. Undermanned, as well as sufficiently manned, departments 
are represented in the figures. 

V It hough 3uch data are of some assistance in measuring probable 
manpower needs, in a given community, particularly if existing 
strength falls short of average, there are definite limitations to the 
reliance which should be placed in such figures. Obviously, not all 
departments can be average in the number of employees. 

\ realistic approach to the complex problem <>i" police manpower 

ds involves a careful study <>f many factors. Length of the work- 
week is important. For example, a decrease in working hours from 
18 to 10 per week results in a need for an increase in the tunc of about 
17 percent in order to maintain the same number of available man- 
hours. In improv ing services available through ilir police department 
well i<> give some thought to the not -<> obvious factors, such as 
selection and training of personnel, pay. retirement provisions, and 
qua! it} of supervision. 



Is 



AVERAGE NUMBER OF 

FULL-TIME POLICE 

DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES 

BY POPULATION GROUPS APRIL 30, 1959 



PER 1.000 INHABITANTS 



2.5 



1.3 1.3 



1.4 



1.5 



1.6 



AVERAGE CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES 

OF 3,932 LESS 10,000 25,000 50,000 100.000 OVER 

CITIES THAN TO TO TO TO 250,000 

10,000 25.000 50,000 100,000 250.000 



FBI CHART 



L9 



law &d0to&$aȣ OtiiceM Pfedge 

1- BE JD,IC faithfully and feark 

2- PHOLD the rights of every individual within the law 

3- '• • .: : ,.•. to secure the evidence to free • 

guilty 

4- 'NOR his badge never tarnish it with personal 

: jty. 

5- BE COURTEOUS and FRIENDLY for most citizens the 

with law enforcement is to report or seek infor 

6- -VOID favoritism race, creed, and influence have no place on the 

scales of justice 

7- ACT as a model to youth help youngsters to be good citizens. 

8- KEEP m good physical condition A healthy body and mind 

mean better work. 

9- uEARN MORE about the law enforcement profession acquiring 

knowledge is a never-ending process 

10- BE LOYAL to self, organization, country and God 



OIMCTOR 
>fC[R*l B'JKIAU Of INVESTIGATION 







Introduction 



Objectives 



Under the program of Uniform Crime Reporting, police and sheriffs 

.•on i pile in t'.ui nation on the number of offenses known to them. These 
offenses axe Limited to notations of Btate and local Laws and the 
voluntary efforts of contributing Law enforcement agencies arc aimed 
at obtaining a picture of the crime problem on a nationwide scale. 
Aj the collecting and coordinating agency under this cooperative 
■ in. the Federal Bureau of Investigation publishes information 
fr. mi the locally compiled reports. In presenting these printed tab- 
ulations, two broad needs are recognized. Perhaps of primary in- 
terest and importance are the extent and fluctuation of criminal 
activity as mirrored by a group of serious offense classes selected 
as a practical and convenient measure. Beyond the evaluative data 
obtained through the media of these index classifications, there re- 
mains the compilation of the total volume of '•rime in the United 
State-. For this second goal, the crime index classes and all other 
crime categories under thi> system are considered. 

Although cont ributing police are interested in informing themselves 
through Uniform ('rime Report-, they have placed no limitation on 
the use or distribution of the data which they voluntarily prepare 
to make available the only general crime Statistics on a nationwide 
basis in the United State-. A- a result, printed tabulations are 
shaped not only to meet the need- of the poli.e but are also con- 
structed with a view to Berving the interests of other students of 
the crime problem. In spite of the somewhat involved nature in- 
herent in stich a statistical presentation, it i- felt that the general 
public ha< mi interest in and Bhould he kept informed of all facets 
rime ami criminality. To this end, the preceding section was 
presented in a fashion as nontechnical n- possible with qualifying 
and Limiting statements held to a minimum. Such a broad treat- 
ment of this vital information should not detract from the value of 
the technical approach incorporated in this and following sections 

which are of primar\ interest to police, SOCial Scientists, and other 

stude 



!•— 60- 



21 



I In Inti i national Ittorfotion tif i hirfs of I'olirt 

I oreani; rmulated Uniform Crime Reporting in 1930 

• 11 tin T the interests of scientific |>«»li.-«* management Reporting 

. limited to those matters essentia] to the police executive, 

legislator, the sociologist, and the public generally. Through its 

.in Uniform Crime Records, this organization acts as an 

to liic Federal Bureau of Investigation in the conduct of 

program. Valuable assistance is received from the Committee. 

I • ctively promotes the quality of the reporting by the participating 

pol 

/ hr i onsultani ( ommittee and Its Recommendations 

Uniform Crime Reports — 1958 contained on pages 14-16 a discus- 
sion <>f' progress and status following 22 recommendations made by 
pecial committee. The Consultant Committee, appointed by the 
FBI in 1958 to study the more pressing problems of the 28-year old 
program, was composed of Dr. Peter I'. Lejins, Professor of Sociol- 
. I rniversity of Maryland, who served as ( lhairman : I >r. ( Sharlton 
F. < hute, Director of the Institute of Public Administration, New 
York City; and Colonel Stanley R. Schrotel, Police Chief, Cincin- 
nati, ()lii<». Their entire report was published by the FBI in Uni- 
form ('rime Reports, Special Essue— 1958. 

Most of the recommendations of the Committee were incorporated 
in Uniform ('rime Report- — 1958. These completed changes in- 
volved three major revisions in the presentation of data but no 
change in information collected from contributors. Broadly, format 
changes were ( l ) elimination of manslaughter by negligence and 
minor thefts from crime classes used as a ••rime index: (2) crime 

i totals for standard metropolitan area- and for States: 
crime rates based on current estimates of population for individual 
- prepared by the FBI in line with suggestions by the U.S. 
Bureau of the ( lensus. 

There remains unfulfilled one phase of the recommendations. This 
relates to the second objective outlined above, the compilation of the 
total volume of crime in the United States covering all crime cate- 
Realization is contingent on the degree of participation l>y 
Bheriffs, county police, and, in some instances, state police in the 
preparation of annual report- of persons arrested. 

for probative collections of annual reports from those agen- 
'ii the past, only monthly reports had Ween requested of them. 
jr, tentative distributions of annual report forms to law enforce 
cies outside cities indicated thai efforts to extend the num.- 



ber of report forms were premature. Reflection will indicate :i part 

oi the obstacle when it is observed thftt 01 t the annua] forms, thai 

!'<>r collecting the age, sex, and race of persons arrested, provides for 
1,074 fiit ries, 

W'iih renewed interest in the possibility of obtaining ;i total crime 
count for all areas, as evidenced by recommendations of the Commit 
tee and indications that the general level of record keeping had im- 
proved out the years throughout the entire held of law enforcement, 
annual report forms were sent t<> all contributors for the year 
A- reported in Uniform Crime Reports 1958, the initial response by 
police agencies outside cities was encouraging. A.bou1 L0 percent pre 
pared and returned the reports and numerous agencies replied that 
they hoped to respond in the future. And for 1959, about •_'•_' percenl 
of all Buch agencies made an annual report of arrests. Excerpts of 
this information appear in textual form preceding tabulations based 
on report ing of arrests by age, sex, and race. 

A careful evaluation of tabulations prepared from the annual re 
ports received from sheriffs and state police for L959 indicates the 
advisability of broader coverage before attempting to construct U.S. 
totals bo that such totals will be authoritative from the start. An 
accelerated, intensive program is being carried out during L960 
through persona] contacts with contributors by Special A.gents of the 
FBI and bj mailings series of informative, instructional material. 
Through this means it. is hoped that information assembled at the 
close of I960 may be presented in <>t her than a progress report form. 

I: sort to a permanent technical consultant committee is now an in- 
tegral part of t he FBI's procedures in t he conduct of this program. 

Reporting Procedure 

Transferral of crime data in the records of local law enforcement 
:ies to the FBI at Washington, 1 >.( ".. is dependent upon act ion on 

the [.art of the police. None of the i n format ion is compiled directly 
from police record.- I>y the FBI. 

Special reporting form- used under this program are illustrated and 
discussed in the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook. Bach revision 
of this handbook containing complete reporting instructions and illus- 
ons i- mailed to all contributors by the FBI. Currently, the 
handbook is dated January I960. An expanded explanation of the 
necessary basic record procedures, as outlined in the handbook, is fur 
nished by the FBI to law enforcement agencies in the Manual of Police 
Records. Obviously, without a sound record procedure it is difficult, 
if not impossible, for a contributing agency t" meet the minimum 
standard • ptable report ing under this system. City ami county 



■ . md certain State police organizations receive monthly 

annual report forms, tally sheets, and abbreviated instructions 

larly, monthly and annually. I ! • iea voluntarily complete 

the entries m n< 1 return tin forms i<» the FBI as a cooperative gesture 

,n| the i the program which is possible only through the 

combined effortsof all. 

is tulvt'ii to insure thai do duplication occurs in reporting 
by various agencies. In addition to tin* detailed description in the 

hand! k of the limits of reporting jurisdictions as between sheriffs 

,iii,| police in urban places, lists of urban places by county have been 
furnished to sheriffs, '■•unity police, and, in some instances, State 
police organizations. These lists will be supplemented or repeated 
from time to time to insure that current information is readily avail- 
able to contributors. During the past year, Special Agents of the 
FBI contacted all State police, State highway patrols, and similar 
ganizat ions to insure that no changes in jurisdictions affect ing 
crime reporting had taken place. At the same time, a review was 
made of the areas covered by contributing State police reporting in 
place of sheriffs or supplementing the reports of sheriffs. From this 
survey it was found that the contributors interviewed were alert to 
the dangers involved and had resolved locally many intricate report- 
ing problems through a sound understanding of the object and spirit 
of i lie program. 

Proper police procedure demands that as each criminal act (crime) 
'nine- to the attention of the police, it is made a mutter of written 
record. This is a running log or record of facts about each theft, 
burglary, robbery or other crime that happens which comes to the 
attention of the police from any source. This is standard procedure 
in police work, and from such a record police tally information des _ 
nated as "offenses known." Thus, the broad base of police statistics 
its basic form, not affected by considerations of whether property 

overcd. whether anyone is arrested for the crime, the age of the 

perpetrator, prosecutive policies, and the like. Police count each 
criminal acl to get the total crime problem insofar as volume is 
concerned. 

N itionally, the number of offenses known to the police (and sher- 
iffs) is collected on monthly crime reports for criminal homicide. 
forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny and 
autotheft. Information reported monthly to the FBI is summarized 
by participants on one of the annual return-. All contributors are 
requested to furnish annual return-, and in addition to the above these 
provide for listing information for all crime categories concerning 

person arrested. Thus, the only information collected under 
this program for crime classifications other than those itemized just 

24 



above is based on arrests, as distinguished from "offenses known" 

w 1 1 i ( - 1 1 til* im»i refer to arresl s. 

( Certain corollary information is also reported to round oul the basic 
count of "offenses known" and persons arrested. This lends addi 
iioii.il significance to the effort, not only from the police managerial 
ami tactical standpoints but also from the point of interested ob 
servers of the crime data. 

Along wiih "offenses known."" police count those offenses which 
have been cleared by arrest. This furnishes them with one measure 
of ilic effectiveness of their operations. An offense is cleared l>y 
arresl when a person is identified through investigation with the 
commission of the crime, i> arrested, ami i> made available for pr< 
cution. Sometimes one person commits several crime-: sometimes 
several persons commit only one crime. For these reasons, the a] 
of one person may clear more than one offense, while the arresl of 
several persons may clear only <>ne offense. 

Arrests are analyzed by police in their reporting by noting the num- 
ber of persons found guilty ami a listing of arrests by age, Bex, and 
i ace. 

Classification of Offenses 

A stumbling block to a national crime reporting system in t he United 
States results from variations in definitions of criminal violations 
among the State-. This obstacle, insofar a- uniformity of definitions 
tncerned, was removed by the adopl ion of an arbil rary sel of crime 
classifications. To some extent the title of each classification connotes 
in a general way its content. However, in reading the explanation 
•h category it i- very important t<> keep in mind that because of 
the differences among the State codes there i- no possibility in a system 
such as this to distinguish between crimes by designations such as 
"felony" ami "misdemeanor." 

An example of the above is aggravated assault. Ii is reserved for 

attacks by one person upon another for i he purpose of inflicting severe 

bodily injury. By definition certain assaults, such a- assaults by 

.ml wife beating, felonies in some States regardless 

of tin* seriousness of the resulting injury. do not necessarily qualify 

for inclusion in the Uniform ( !ri Report ing classification of agg 

rated assault. < Consideration must be given to the seriousness of the 
attack and not to it- local designation as a felony. A continuing 
gram is carried oul to furnish contributors with timely supple- 
mental instructions as the need arises in certain classifications. These 
are aimed :it the clarification of any misunderstandings which may 

U 



edirection <<\ attention to the pro|>er application <d 

a ion pi<" edui >•- ler t hi- system. 

me classification, with a brief definition, is listed below: 

I. Criminal homicide, (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaugh- 
:il! willful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths 
caused bj negligence. Excludes :i t r «>n i j »t - t<> kill, assaults to kill. 
suicides, tal deaths, or justifiable homicides. Justifiable horn 

icides are limited to: i 1 ) the killing of a felon by a peace officer in line 
of dutj : (2) the killing <»t' a holdup man by a private citizen, (b) 
M slaughter by negligence : any death which the police investigation 
establish* primarily attributable to gross negligence of some 

indi> idual ol her than t 1h- v\c\ im. 

•_'. Forcible rape. Forcible rip", assault to nipt', and attempted 
rape. Excludes statutory offenses (no font' used-victim under age 
•nsent > . 

'.. Robbery. Stealing or taking anything <>t' value from the person 
i>\ force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, 
stickups, robbery armed; assault to rob and attempl to rob. 

1. V^nra\at»'(l assault. . \ — : 1 1 1 1 1 with intent to kill or for tin 1 
purpose of inflicting severe bodily injury by shooting, cutting, stab- 
bing, maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids, explosives, 
or other means. Excludes simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, 
etc. 

."•. Burglary-breaking or entering. — Burglary, house-breaking, 
safecracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, 
even though no force was used to gain entrance and attempts. Bur- 
glary followed by larceny is not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny-thefl (except autotheft). — (./) Fifty dollars and over 
in value: (b) under $50 in value. Theft- of bicycles, automobile 

• 3ories, shoplifting, pocket-picking, <»r any stealing of property 
"!• article of value which is not taken by force and violence or by 
fraud. Excludes embezzlement, "eon" games, forgery, worthless 
ks, etc. 

7. \uto theft. Stealing of driving away ami abandoning a motor 
vehicle, including the so-called joy-riding thefts. Excludes taking 
'"i temporal*} use when actually returned by the taker, or unauthor- 
/•■d use l>\ i hose ha\ ing law fid access to the vehicle, 

s . Other assaults. Assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggra\ ated nature. 

I orgerj and counterfeiting. Making, altering, uttering, or 
possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is made to 

appear t rue. Include- attempts. 

i". I mix //Lineni and fraud. Fraudulent conversion, embezzle- 
ment, and obtaining ney or property by false pretenses. 



11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. Buying, 
receiving, and possessing stolen property and attempts. 

12. Weapons; carrying, po s s e s s ing, etc. All violations «»l regu 
Istiona or Btatutee controlling the carrying, using, possessing, furnish- 
ing, ami manufacturing of deadly weapons or silencers and attempts. 

l •"•. Prostitution and commercialized vice. Sex offenses "I :i com 
mercialized nature and attempts, such as prostitution, keeping bawdy 
house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for unmoral 
purposes. 

II. Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitution and commer- 
cialized vice). Statutory rape, offenses against chastity, * -« u 1 1 1 1 1* >i i 
decency, morals, ami tin- like, [ncludes attempts. 

15. Offenses againsl tin- family ami children. — Nbnsupport, 
lect, desertion, or abuse of family ami children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. Offenses relating t<> narcotic drugs, such 
a- unlawful possession, Bale, <>r use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. Stale or local liquor lav* violation- except 
•'tliunkcnnc— *' (class I s ) and "driving while intoxicated" (class 22). 
Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. Drunkenness or intoxication. 
1'.'. Disorderly conduct. Breach of the peace. 

20. Vagrancy. Vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. Promoting, permitting, or engaging in gambling. 
*_'•_'. Driving while intoxicated. — Driving or operating any motor 

vehicle while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation «>f road and driving laws, [mproper handling of a 
moving motor vehicle. 

24. Parkin:: violations.— [mproper or overtime parki 

_'."'. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Traffic 
and motor vehicle violations other than classes 22 ■_' I. 

•_'»'.. Ml other offrnses. — All violation- of State or local law- ex 
cepl classes 1 •_'.*>. 

•j~. Suspicion. Arrests for no specific offense and released 
wit hon t formal charges being placed. 

Reporting Ireu 

Voluntary contributions of crime reporl - were made by law enfo 
nicnt agencies in 1959 lor 7.000 reporting areas, cities, and counties. 
All but 8 percent of tin- population was represented by this report 
1 . county, and Stat.- police organizations joined in this cooperative 

. llort. 

AJthough the reporting area is nearly loo percent, not all reports 
were usable and in some instances a comp t figures for the year 

87 



1 Tubulatioi - i"i the lull year are available for 89 
population. 

I i i i tn at ion I' i <>< i i n •> 

I hi fui init_\ of crime data collected under this program is of primari 

.in i«t ilic FBI as the national clearinghouse. With approxi 
preparing crime reports on a voluntary basis 
under tin- system the supervision for uniformity ia indeed complex. 
I--' nstructions does not fulfill the role <>f the FBI. On the 

i ii \ . it i- standard operating procedure to examine each incoming 

•! i not on I \ for arithmetical accuracy but also, and possibly of even 
more importance, for reasonableness. 

Variations in the level and ratios among the crime classes estab 
lished by previous reports of each agency arc used as a gage of pos- 
sible or probable incompleteness or changes in reporting policy. 
\' essary arithmetical adjustments or unusual variations are broughl 
to the attention of the submitting agency by correspondence. During 

'. 1,500 letters were addressed to contributors as a result of verifi- 
cation and evaluation processes. Correspondence with contributors 
is tin- principal tool for supervision of quality. Not only arc the indi- 
i idnal reports st udied but also periodic t rends for individual reporting 
units arc run, as are crime rate- iii descending order for all units 
grouped for general comparability to assist in detecting variations and 
fluctuations possibly due to some reason other than chance. For the 

• pan. die problem is one of keeping the contributors informed 
of t la- type in format ion necessary to the success of this program. 

Uniform ("rime Reporting has been taught to all law enforcement 
officers attending the I-'I'.I National Academy. This Academy was 
established in !!»:'..'. and there art- 2,562 graduates who arc -till in law 
enforcement with almost •_"•» percent tin- executive heads of law en- 
forcement agencies. The KI'.I also presents this subject '<> regional 
police schools throughout the count ry. 
I ontacts by Special Agents of the FBI arc utilized to enlist the 

peration of new contributors and to explain the purpose of this 
program and the methods of assembling information for reporting. 
When correspondence including specially designed questionnaires 

, Special Agents may he directed to visit the contributor to affirma- 
tively resolve the misunderstanding. Special surveys arc used to in- 

e into various areas of the system. Also, Special Agents of the 
FB] are instructed, from time to time, to conduct in the field specific 
survej s of quality. 

Hi rough these means there arc com union- probing and re-evalua- 
tionof the degree of compliance attained. From this constant acl ivity 



it is clear thai a level of uniformity exists in the data collected thai is 
extremely high with the result thai tabulations presented herein are 
reliable from the standpoint of comparability. However, it is well to 
note at this point that there are many factors affecting the incidence 
of crime. 

The careful student, before reaching conclusions based <>n an exam 
ination of crime rates of different ureas, should, of course, give full 
izance to the possibilities thai \ ariations result from conditions 
oilier than incomplete crime figures or lack of uniformity in the 
reporting of contributors. Some of the factors affecting crime are 
enumerated on page 85. 

Those variations from the desired reporting standards which can- 
not I"' resolved l>\ the steps indicated above are brought t<> the 
attention of the Committee <»n Uniform Crime Records of the [ntei 
national Association of Chiefs of Police. That < Committee may desig 
nate a representative to make a personal visit to the local department 
to assist in ilif needed revision of records and reporting methods. 

Ii is clear, of course, thai regardless of the extent of the statist i « * .* 1 1 
verification processes used by the FBI, the accuracy of the data as- 
sembled under thi> program depends upon the degree of effort exerted 
by each contributor to meel the necessary standards of reporting and. 
for this reason, the FBI is not in a position to vouch for the validity 
of the reports received. 

Population 

Following the recommendations of the Consultant Committee on 
Uniform Crime Reporting and under the guidance <>f the United 
S tea Bureau of the Census, the FBI, in presenting crime data for 
1958, overcame the defect inherent in published crime rates for in- 
1 years based on population figures provided by the decennial 
count.-. In addition to the need for reliable, current population data 
for individual reporting areas in the preparation of crime rate-, the 
• nt estimating procedure is built on a proration method for un- 
reported areas using current population figun mating methods 
used in constructing r.'"' s population figures are described in Borne 
detail in Uniform Crime He port- 1958. 

timates of 1959 population would l>c 9 yean removed 

from the most recent applicable population count, the United States 

eau of the Census recommended that the preliminary figures from 

the I960 count when applied to L959 crime counts would represent a 

higher degi f accuracy than could bt for 

This suggested procedure was accepted by the FBI. 



:"!•— 






tiia Definition* 

Extensive shifts by cit) dwellers i<> nearby rural areas have de- 
iyed the classic concepi of populations divided between city (urban) 
Mud rural, [nterpretation of economic and other statistical data 
collected without regard to the erasure of city limits as a guide to 
where the city ends and the farms begin, has become difficult if not 
misleading. In line with the need for adjustments of areas to better 
define the contemporary scene, the Bureau of the Census introduced 
the standard metropolitan area with the 1950 census. According i<> a 
release dated June s . 1959, by the Bureau of the Budget, such areas 
were in be identified thereafter as standard metropolitan statistical 
areas. A.s far as practicable, presentation of crime data in this pub- 
lication follow- the area designations of the Bureau of the Census 
of i 1 ) standard metropolitan statistical areas, (2) other cities (urban 
places outside standard metropolitan statistical areas i and (3) rural. 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas were formerly know] 
standard metropolitan areas. Totals for the Cndex of Crime are 
shown for these areas wherever boundaries of such areas coincide with 
those of crime reporting units. Generally, standard metropolitan 

Mat i-t ie:il area- ;i If made ll|> of Mil entile colintV or COUntieS having 

:ii least one core city of 50,000 or more inhabitants with the whole 

n ting the requirements of certain metropolitan characteristics. 

Police in cities (urban places) report for crimes committed within 
the city limits. Sheriffs or county police report for crime- com- 
mitted within the limits of a countj but outside cities. Refinements 
of reporting to lit other subdivisions of these units are not prac- 
ticable, at least at this t ime. 

In New England, •"town" instead of "county" is used to describe a 
standard metropolitan statistical area. These towns do not coincide 
generally with established crime reporting units. However, metro- 
politan State economic areas in Vw England are. somewhat similar 
to standard metropolitan statistical area- elsewhere in thai they 
encompass an entire county or counties. Accordingly, in order to 
approximate the presentation of the Index of Crime by standard 
metropolitan statistical area- in New England, metropolitan Slate 
ecu inn lie area- have l.een n-ed for the practical considerations outlined 
above. 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas (metropolitan State eco 
nomic areas in New England) comprise over 60 percent of the I960 
population (preliminary figures). 

Other cities. Index of ('rime totals are -how n under this caption 

tor urban places outside standard metropolitan statistical areas, 
80 



Most of these places of 2,500 or more inhabitants are incorporated 

and they make up M perceni of the I960 population (preliminary I. 

Rural areas are outside the two described above and represent 

•_* I per. I'm nf the population < I960 preliminary figures). 

The Crime Total* 

Aivm- ntit represented by crime reports are relatively small, as dis- 
cussed previously and as Bhown by an examination of the following 
tables presenting L959 crime totals for the Index of Crime classi- 
fications. A- indicated, an intensified program is underway to furt her 
reduce the unreported areas. 

Within each of ilit- three areas, standard metropolitan statistical 
areas, other urban, and rural, it was assumed that the unreported 
portion had the same proportionate crime experience as that for 
whi.h reports were received. In lieu of figures for the entire year 
from those agencies representing at least 25 percent of any one of 
the individual units <>f the three areas indicated above for which 
estimates were prepared, reports for as many as !• month- were 
accepted as sufficiently representative on which to base estimates for 
the year. In these cases, figures for 9 months were divided by 9 and 
multiplied 1>\ 12. In prorating for unreported areas, the I960 pop- 
ulation count (preliminary figures) was used. 

Crime Trend* 

Where estimated crime total-, as described above, were not avail- 
able for comparison from period to period, data for trends are 
homogeneous to the extent that figures from identical reporting units 
were used for each of the periods tabulated. Exclusions were made 
when figures from a reporting unit were obviously inaccurate for 
any period or it was ascertained that unusual fluctuations were due 
ich variables as improved record procedures and not to chance. 



81 



'he I ml<'\ of ( Irime, I { )~^) 



In this section lire presented data for a select group of classi- 
ed to furnish a ready index to the probable amount 
and fluct iiat ion of crime. 

I. mitations in the extent of coverage afforded by ;i few categories 
• from certain practical considerations from the police standpoint, 
known (criminal acts) are the basis of the index. Not .-ill 
crimes come readily to the attention of the police. Not .ill crimes 
of sufficient importance t<. In- significant in an index. Not all 
important crimes occur with sufficient regularity t<> warrant a sepa- 
rate category in an index designed i<» furnish an abbreviated insight 
intothe -Time problem. 

Classifications in the [ndex of Crime are: murder and nonnegli- 

L'fiii manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, bur- 

\ breaking or entering, larceny over $50 and auto theft. Prior 

publication of Uniform ('rime Reports -1958, classifications used 

\<>i index purposes included manslaughter by negligence, statutory 

rape, and larceny under $50. 

The dividing line <•!' $50 does not necessarily represent the differ- 
ence between grand and petit larcenj since, a- indicated previously, 
these classifications are arbitrary I'm- the purpose of this system and 
do not a -ice in all respects to all State statutes. 

Tables in this section include totals lor the Index of Crime classi- 
fications arranged by standard metropolitan statistical areas (metro 
politan State economic areas in New England) and by State-. State 

totals for 1959 are built up from three area-: standard metropolitan 

statistical areas, other urban, and rural. All population figures used 
from Bureau of the Census preliminary releases of the I960 de- 
cennial count subject to change as the count is completed. 






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1958 


174.095,000 


1.573,210 


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1959 


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1. 862.000 


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217 








5, i 1 


36,218 


708 I 


60 


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231 








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- 


- 
















47,272 


822.2 


132 


2.3 


|(|S 


7.1 






6, Olt 




77- t 


III 


2.4 


III.', 








16,22 




942 I 


mi 


• 












159,764 




197 


3.0 


1,037 






1958 


11. lOl.lHKI 


72, 755 














1969 


11,2 


73, 691 






2.5 


1,029 




■ 




618,000 




813.8 


1. 106 


:i i 












295, 106 




1,290 


3 6 














+.8 


• n, . 


+ 16. 1 


+ 10.9 












39,000 
10,012,612 


87. 065 


880.4 


.".••- 


4.0 


935 


7.7 








SI, 000 
17,005 


36,916 




134 

- 


3.4 












7. 866,000 




1,048 8 




3.1 


- - 


10.8 






7,774,787 




1,077.2 


325 






113 






9, :i r 
17,371 


63 r 312 




»i7 


:< l 
:<. 2 




' ' 








.'(. '• • 


18,096 




- 


in 


170 


1 3 






3,95 


16,823 




15 


1. 1 


128 


a l 


1 


1958 


15,391,000 


100,317 




106 












16,21 


102, 195 


67 1 . 1 


l.'7 


- - 


M7 




















- 










2, 736, (08 


12, 135 
12, 782 


mi. 7 
167. i 


13 

:i'.i 


1 5 

l I 


97 

s:( 


3 1 

3.0 






1958 


2, 116,000 


12,981 


611.2 






128 


.; n 




1969 


2, 161, 121 


13,618 


can. ii 


51 


2 1 


129 




Minm 


1958 
1959 


3,376,000 
93,302 


19,912 
20, 132 




Ml 


in 


113 


a a 






1968 
1959 


1,271,000 
1,273, 171 


43, 109 

13, .'.:f. r . 


1,009.2 
1,018. - 


215 

•J 16 


5 

- 


111 


in 7 






1958 


1,467,000 


6, 325 


184.0 


16 


8 -' 




1 






1,3 


6, 27 1 


ti* :< 




. - 


77 










2, 131 


:v.'7.7 


1 


■ 


17 






1969 




•J. 112 


836. 9 


:< 


..■i 


28 


8.7 








:<. 171 




n 


1 6 


51 


7.8 






- 


4,046 




14 


2, l 


12 








'J. INMI 




886 i 


2, 120 


'.i. 5 


-Mil 


- 






'-. IIS 




S'KI 2 






2, 1 16 


- i 








■ 


B16 9 


14 

is 


;< l 
t l 


+.1 








143, 168 




28 
33 


6.2 








l 142,000 
0,001 


- 


1,372.9 
1,386 n 


500 


11 B 

in 2 


416 


- 








• 8,000 




B61 i 




13 B 


481 


11 .8 








31,643 


- 




ia i 


Hi, 


in 6 






56,000 






161 












•'(. 1 . 






136 


1 1 


L'ls 


7. 1 



r Columbia All 106C ilated prior to population rounding. 



::i 



Divisions and States, 1958—59 















1 


' 






Robl 




Hiii. 






Ihifl 


Number 




Numbei 




Number 




Number 




Number 


Rate per 












100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


75. 493 


43.4 


113.654 


65 3 


aa4,ata 


393.4 


393, 822 


226.1 


282. 787 


182 4 


71. US 


40.3 


119.614 


67.3 


685. 862 


385.9 


403. 426 


227.0 


288,337 


182 3 


-J. 8 


- : l 


+6.a 


+3 1 


+.2 


1 9 


(-2 5 


+ 4 


+ 2.0 


1 


1 671 


16 B 


! (51* 




31,641 


.(17 6 


18, 175 


ISJ .', 


17. Ill 


171 H 






a oie 








i: 687 




17,278 




- 1 1 a 


-15.8 




• tg i 




■ 






• I .. 


1 


316 


13.6 


507 


21.0 


7.060 


881 l 


1 oiu 


173.6 






■ 


11 4 


641 






:<n a 




17ii 




ioa -i 




m a 


102 


in 7 








128 B 








- : 


117 


[2 l 










881 


■ 




2i a 




15.9 


15,498 


818 * 




1*7 ii 


11. mi 








BOO 




14,704 








10,721 


208 -. 




4 1 




5.5 


1 . 857 






06.3 










20 


I B 






801 


100.2 


in 




187 


-'1 1 


107 




4,074 






882 i 


1.947 




ias 


90 ii 




27 i 


8,742 


II-' B 




300.6 








a i 




i a 


980 




870 


09.4 


828 




6 


1.3 


lit 




BQ6 


208 1 


:«>i 


77 7 


291 


7 1 




41 ii 


l>, ggg 


00 i 




810 a 




254.9 


16 148 






• 








812 1 


86.911 


256.9 




147 r, 




-7.3 


+7.0 




-.1 


-2.3 


+3.1 


+.8 


+8.1 


+5.7 


2.160 


37.6 


2.727 


47.4 


21,782 


378.9 


10. XW 


187.0 


8,260 


161.1 




33.3 




a a 


20, 771 


845 i 


11,000 


182 a 










12 068 


7i a 


50,389 


310.5 








149.9 


7, 116 










802 a 


61,084 






164 1 








46.8 


33,564 


802.8 




142.0 




118 1 










34,609 


- 


14,818 


132 1 


■ 


116 - r . 


19. 94 5 




16,275 




126,813 






189.0 




157 B 








50.0 


- 


848 1 




• 


60, l-i 


167 2 


+.4 


-.7 




+ 11.4 




-2.2 


-.. r . 






+6.0 


g 2aa 


03.7 


5.322 


53.8 


31.822 


321.8 


19. 057 


102.7 


20, 187 


206.7 


- 


ioa : 


- 


63.0 


33. ir,7 


331.3 




201 7 










1.310 


•> > 




390.8 








in :t 






1. 133 


ao a 


1 7. 725 




7,821 


170 B 


7 180 


161 








77 8 


■ 


508 2 






13, 788 






60.6 




80.4 




510 ii 








17' B 








32.5 










1.'. 164 


180 2 


• 






IL 4 


-'7.7111 


287 I 






12,200 




■ 


8.6 




13.3 


8,035 






14s a 




- 


306 


- 


sia 


15.8 


7,038 




5,391 


i:<7 :< 


8,816 




4.000 




1 IM 




47,360 


307, 7 






- 


11" 7 


■ Baa 


- 




80 7 




.(14 1 






17.866 


118.7 






+4.6 


+5.5 


+ 1.3 


+2.1 


+4.9 




+ 1.0 




264 


0.4 


184 


65 


6.137 


217.5 


3.954 


140.1 


1.756 


i.J .' 




0.0 


an 


8.4 










1,818 


7". 1 




23.5 


576 




.. 08 


:til 4 


3,343 




1,748 




• 


24.0 












161 i 




- 


700 


21 


211 




9,649 












603 


10.5 




a i 




'-'71 7 




171 B 




• 


1,08a 










456. 4 








175 1 








75. y 












170 7 




10.1 




ii a 




i « B 


1,817 












177 


12 7 








11" ii 






58 


8.0 




60 














30 


i 8 


34 




















127 










165.8 


400 


71 1 


101 




05 


II (1 


1,710 








670 








30.175 




■ 


















1-11 _' 




880 a 


• 








- 






+ 1.0 






"Mil 


+2.7 










<t 






176 4 




164 J 


114 




04 










177 1 


750 


171 a 




68.7 


5,068 


• 










7.71" 






61.6 


5,670 


111-, 1 




7iH 1 








1M 7 








00 6 














■ 






li'l 7 












141 .7 




36.2 






















2.607 




















I . 1 1 > I • - 2 — Inili i oj < i mi- l>\ f .« ographic 

















































































































































































12 2 




- 7 




























• 






































• 


i i 


no 








1 1, > » | - . < M X • 






1,019 


















1,071 
















• 






- 11.4 




i 1,000 




117 
























- 














' i 


241 










22.649 
















' 


7,340 




III 




mi 














247 


11 t 


116 










• 


791. : 








7 1 












247 


: 










19,000 


153,207 




1,336 


8. 1 


1.471 


- 












I. 136 






- • 
















• 1 


-1. 1 












II. 196 






9.4 


- 


; * 






1,77: 




- 


1*1 


10. 1 




: - 






.•(. Ill 


24, I'.l 




183 






7 1 












183 








■ 










150 






- 






2, 31 


- 


■ 


154 


• ; 




11.0 








96,318 




• 














■ 


















76, II." 


1,140 5 


305 


i ii 


7ln 


11. 1 










• 




+ 17.8 




-1.3 












1. 140,000 
l,2K 


19,518 
19,239 


1,711.5 




6.6 


- 


17 1 








1,711,000 
1,71 


20,659 


1 . 1 - 1 2 


711 


1 1 




11 7 

11 * 










I. Ill 
1,364 




16 
15 




41 














• 


17 


- 


in 


- 










1,298 


1,610 6 








in 9 










1,918 8 


.. 


r 8 


18 


17 1 


' 




842,000 




I. 187.0 


36 


I 3 










• 


11,039 


1,170 -' 






- 


- 










816 1 


10 


1 2 












:.:(ui 


827 I 




1 n 


71 


- 








2. 776 








31 








■ 






it 


4.3 




7 (. 


















16 * 


















IS • 












i 




-1.7 












2, 1 58 




12 


9 1 


17 










1 1, :t:tr. ooo 






S3] 


:< 7 




Jii 7 










- 


- 
















.'1 




23 








- 




1.201 n 


17 




.':< 


:i 7 








1 1,016 




43 


2 1 


125 












819 1 




2 2 


in. 


- 












12 




172 
















i g 


171 








Division* and States, I9S8—59 — < unlinued 





















N urn ••• i 






Bur| 








Number 




\ umbei 




Numbei 


' 


\llllll.. 1 


■ 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




17 - 






1 1 . B63 








8,806 






it B 




183 a 


1 1, 800 




5, 117 


113 1 




71 1 




n, B 


2, 161 


















IB l 




118 B 


8, 104 


343 '. 
















113 I 


18, 138 


;mi a 






5,210 


■ 


1 M|| 






mi 3 


12, 138 


811. i 


,. 196 


|s| ., 










044 


.(.' 7 




316 B 




- 


i. M6 






13 B 




81. 6 




-:. i 


l.ssii 


mi s 
























■ 




24 i 






In. n7l 




is. 166 








I 8 






+3 ii 












. 






104 5 








167 8 




si J 








;<i :i 


In. MS 


831 '• 




171 7 


8, 138 






80 a 


1,307 


18 i 




SOL I 








l '..' B 






i.:t'.7 




10,397 


841 B 








139.2 




it I 


1,881 






161 8 


1,810 




7UI 




:t»Ki 


18 8 


1,794 


• 




17'- 1 


1.S7I 






11 ii 










14, 148 


Hi. ■'■ 




143 1 




131.9 






1,084 








6,847 


151 I 




135.7 










71,869 






















113 n 








150 3 




- 


+.9 






-4.3 


+3.1 


+ 1.4 








88 n 


I.IW.I 


01.7 


5,508 


311.8 


2.5111 


141.6 


1,213 




146 




'Mil 


:.i 8 


1,691 






146.8 


943 






is 1 


1,843 






286 i 




183 1 






i 180 








•-. 153 






161.7 


5,319 


161 r, 








88 i 




128 l 








142.5 






711 






891 B 






8, 181 


- 


- 






111! 


17,288 




- 


198 s 




174. 1 




30 .. 


in. 168 


ln7.il 


- 


490.0 








167 i. 




m : 


:t.n:t7 




80,620 


171.8 


19,853 




16,217 


249.7 










81,724 


I-.7 7 


20.819 


• 




243 B 


II 6 

- 




+12 


-a s 


+a •'. 


-.8 


+4.9 


+ 4 


+2.0 


-2.3 






114.2 


7.1.31 




L616 


404.8 


4,949 


434.0 


Ms 








7,841 


















■ 


9, 160 








4. ilH. 


240.0 






878 


:ts B 




539.7 


5,018 










is >. 




23.0 


2,044 


- 


i. m 




643 


97.1 




n B 


184 


18 7 








281 :i 




113.5 


148 




111 


16 1 








244 7 


960 


139.6 






119 


17 B 


2,347 




1.77'. 






193.1 






90 


87 1 


2.UM 


76L 1 


1,084 


108 2 




292.3 


800 


106 B 


109 


38.7 




958.6 


1,320 






317.8 


SfiO 


11 8 


CI 




8, 130 


In7 S 


2,631 


312 5 












58.8 




lis 8 


8,035 


821.7 


8,014 


319.5 






199 




8,089 








1,819 


153 i. 




- 


229 


25.9 


3.254 


- 


2, 17n 




l. mi. 




171 








984 


291.0 




841 •• 




141.3 




r. 




19 :i 


943 


288.8 






too 








16,980 




















17,609 




134,833 




81,654 










r t 


+4.0 




-15 




+ 10 




■ 








64 


31.7 


428 


211.9 


570 


282 2 




253 '1 








13 n 


m:i 
















16, H" 


113 •• 




- 






- 




II. 168 




■ 


107 » 


111,643 


718 i 










• 








1,611 








1.314 




- 


17 4 






(711 


508.5 






2 013 






80 l 














2, 100 


lis 4 






• 


31 B 




360 9 


1 s|7 














n ii 


13 806 


442 4 


7. 'MI 






183 1 








M ii 












17n 



80 •; 
























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: 



Genera] I nited States Crime Statistics 

I formation is presented in this section to round out and expand 

data available through the Index of Crime. It will be noted that 

Locations other than those in the preceding section are shown. 

No attempt has been made in this section to build up crime totals 
for States or other areas. Totals for crime categories other than in 
the [ndex of Crime will be presented in the future and await the 
results of an accelerated program of broadening the base of arrest 
information. These additional totals, when available, will represent 
offenses known to the police through arrests as distinguished from the 
present offenses known to the police as representing a fount of 
criminal acts. 



71 



' 









St 



. 



CO — <M 












M 



gj 



55 



9 |- - 



— ■ -> " 
i.i- 









Socb 

«-"«" + 
t~ ao 



' 



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rave! 



i - 









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— z"? = = 
« g* - 



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i 

I + 



riKn 



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ri i - . i - < / - 



oo 
oie* 



i — — 

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— 



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H 













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I - 1- — . 



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I- — — 






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etei 






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+ 



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« § >» a 



m — r. 

I 



+ 



Kel- 



tic- 



S = 



N 3 — 
M M — i 



: a 












rc 



Table 6. — City Crime Frenda, 1959 versus iverage 1954-58 

ol .1 population 84, 





Numbei "i i'iii : • 












ToUl 


1. 528, 144 


1.791.249 


17 1 






- 
1 892,901 


71. 188 
•1,0 . 


- .'. 8 






+21.5 

+ 11.3 












+ 17 9 




+ 17. 6 





tegory was limited to forcible offenses, Prior to l958statutoi 
luded. rhe forcible r;i|><- used to • oostrucl the annu ;l average foi 

■ malyses furnished by o il population over 50,000,000) which 

; ■• .rt ion of reported rap forcible each 

■ Include* ill reported thefts regardless of value of property stolen, . 

Table 7. — Monthly Variations, 1959 

known i" thi' police in 3,235 cities, tol <-\ populatioi 



Month 



Criminal hnmiride 



Murder 

and non- 

nun- 
slaughter 



slaughter 



Forcible 






vated 
assault 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or enter- 
ing 



! lief I 



Auto 
theft 



January-December 

rch 

IpriMune. . 
July-September. 

ember 

January 

June 

July. 



■ er. 



12.4 



7.6 



23.6 



160.0 



231.1 



1.310 6 



3. 307. 7 



lii.T 
12.4 
13.5 



7.3 
6.5 
7.2 



2U.7 
24. 1 

- - 



L81.0 

- - 

112.li 

178.6 



240.6 



1,409.6 
1. 184. 1 

1,389. 7 



3.217.7 

3,307.6 



10.8 
11.0 
10.5 
11.8 

11.9 

13. 4 
13. 2 
14.2 

13.1 
12. 1 
11.9 



7.3 
7.8 
7.0 

'7 

6.8 

8 1 

7. 1 
8.8 

]n.3 



20 j 
21.5 
20.6 

- - 

28. 7 
25.5 

27 4 

- 



184.8 

172.4 

- - 

12& 1 
130.5 
138 ii 

17'. 4 



201.4 
213.7 
205.9 

346. l 

2" 2 



1,424 2 
1,370 S 

1, 144. f. 
1, 151.7 

1.370.3 

- 



3. (I'M.!. 

1 
. - 



636.4 



(.22. 1 



631.2 
617.7 



~- k 



- 9 

s 



Sec 



• 












- — — T. 



• 






i - . c. 









r 

p! 






R .- — — 



■ - / - 



■ 

r r to 
ES ■ 



ri — — — 



!S 



E 



r E 



f » o Q re — o 



. 



r 



T 

- 



~ -*. ~ 



& g g a 

5 






e z - C ^ ri 






■ S 
•i: 

3 « 
o-c _ 

0*1 8 

1« 

.- 4» 0> 

lis 

. Km 
2 



5 n 



— a 
3 is 

■a s 




= - 
o. 

- i 

^ = 



B i 



■ = s 

- 
5 .- a 



g|8 



~y.x 



n " 


































7- 










•N'T 


_ , 


















- 9 















I ,|,|, ., _ , Inolyaia, Trend*, 1958-59, and Percent Distribution 

population 





NiiiiiUt i.f i.irenses 


Pereent 
ibge 


ant 
tribo- 






1959 


IIOU, 


\L 


48, 517 


48.753 


-8.6 


100.0 




- 
12,372 

2,291 

2,881 

331,602 


261 

333, 058 


-1.0 

-li. a 

-i 2 

-2.2 

+24.9 
+ -' 6 

+.4 


53.3 








1 7 












.6 




6.3 




100.0 




187, MM 
14,516 

807.909 


15,807 

797. 362 


+6.0 

-4.7 

■ 

-1.3 






18 7 









4.7 


• . theft, by \ 


100.0 




224,460 
117,164 

807.909 


113,547 

797. 362 


+1.9 
-2 i 
-3.1 

-1.3 


28.7 




57. 1 





1 1 I 


TOTAL 


100.0 








7,116 
12,670 

11. 'Ml 

145,616 


7,312 
1-'. '■-'-• 
46, 013 
140, 177 
108, KM 

'.':.". ','U 


+2.8 

-.4 

4-0, B 

+-• ~ 

-10.7 

-1.7 

+2.5 


.9 




L8 




5.8 








24.0 


AUothen 









I able 10. — > alue of Property Stolen, by Type of Crime, 1959 
[80S 16,000, Total population 50,015,8 



■ on 


Number of 
offa 


Value <>f 

property 

stolen 


value per 

dlTense 


TOTAL 


1 341.023 


$269. 000. 000 


$201 








46,753 

- 

- 


10, 900, 000 

.Hl.OOO 
-'10.000 


233 




186 




:■ 














Table II. — Type and Value oj Property Stolen and Recovered 



pert; 














TOTAL 


$289, 000. 000 

■ ■ 0, 000 

12, II 

00, 000 
100,000 


•0.000 




■ 


00,000 

1. MM 1,1 H III 

l, 100,000 

00,000 

11,400,000 






11.'. 















.il.li \2. — Offense* Known, Cleared bj irrest, and Person* Charged (//</</ 
for Prosecution), l't.~>'>. I>\ Population Groups, \umber /»<■/■ lot) Known 
Offenses 





Total 

100.0 

27. 1 


Inal 
bom 


cible 


Rob- 
bery 


vated 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing 


thefl 

100.0 

20.9 
15.4 




roup 


Murder 

ami 

lim'iit 
Blaugh- 


Man- 
f laugh- 
ter by 

nrpli- 


thefl 


TOTAL, GRODPS I VI 

! population 

Offenses known 
Offenses cleared by ar- 
rest 
Persons charged . . 


100.0 
92.7 

n. ! 


100.0 

88.5 
73.0 


100.0 

73.6 
75.6 


100.0 

42.5 

42. 1 


100.0 

78.9 
64.7 


100.0 

30.7 
20.8 


100.0 

26.2 
21.4 




100.0 

21 n 

100 ii 
100 


too ii 

100.0 

• 
• 


100.0 

71 .n 

01. 1 
100 ii 

41.7 


100.0 
100.0 

100.0 


100,0 

too 

100 ii 

• 


100.0 

77 * 

81. 1 
100.0 

100 ii 

H. i ii 
61.0 


100.0 

100 ii 

17. 1 

100.0 

100 ii 
100 ii 


100 ii 

- 

100 

100.0 
17.0 

100 n 
100 


100.0 
17.8 

100.0 

1'. 7 

100.0 




17. 5 




100 n 


irrest. 


1» 1 
21 i 



BJ 



I .(i.l. \2. — Qffmnam* Known, Cioarmd by irrett, ami Pmrmtn* Charged (//</</ 
i,,i Prosecution), 1959, by Population Groups, Sumber \><r 100 Known 
mu n *. — < out Inued 









V Ill 



P IV 

,000 to 50,000; 
. population 

OW II- . 

■ 
I 



GBOUP V 

000 tn 25.000; 
illation 10,- 

• a r, 



OBOUP VI 

: 10,000; total 





< 'ri::. 














homicide 
























Ilur- 










Murder 






Bob- 




break- 


ceny— 




and 


Man- 


TOM 


bery 




ing ril- 


theft 




nonneg- 


slaugh- 














Ugent 


ter by 








ing 






man- 


negll- 






























tar 














100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 








78. r, 


44. 1 


78.0 




10. 4 


,,, ._, 






8L 1 


42 1 


67. l 


21.0 


14.5 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 




95.5 




7& :< 


38.8 




27.5 


18.2 




95.2 


71 " 


89.2 


45.6 


76.5 


19.1 


13.6 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 






7- 1 


77 S 


42.0 




29.7 


18.5 


19.2 


90.5 


66.1 


82.3 




7'.'. 1 




14.7 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 




'.'»; : 






it a 


M 1 


38 '.' 






106.1 


97.0 




61.6 


88.5 


27.0 


15.6 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


1O0.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 






'.Mil 




17 1 


- 1 




24.7 




95.9 


86.3 


89.9 


68.9 


90. i 




19.9 






I .d«l«- 13. — Offense* Known, Cleared b$ Irrest, antt Person* < hargeti (//<■/</ /<</ 
Prosecution), 1959, l>\ Geographic Divisions. Sunther per l<»t Known 
Offense* 







Criminal 
bomlcide 


elble 


Rob- 




Him 

Ins m 

iii^ 


Hi. Ii 




C <ll\ Moll 


Murdi i 
and 

in in 

i.i 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter bj 
negll- 


tuto 

ih.it 


TOTAL. ALL DIVISIONS 




















illation 

Offenses known 
Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charRc! 




















100.0 

bo. a 


100.0 
92.7 
93.8 


100.0 

88.5 
73 


100.0 
73 8 
75 6 


100 
42.5 
42 1 


100 
78.9 

«4 7 


100.0 
30.7 
20 8 


100.0 
20.9 
15.4 


100 
26 2 

.'1 1 


NEW ENOLA NT> 8T/ 




















population 

- 


100.0 
27 : 
21.7 


100.0 


100.0 

91. I 

77.li 


100.0 

87. 2 
101.8 


ioao 

is 7 


100.0 


100.0 
31.3 


100.0 

23. 3 

17.4 


100.0 


MODI 1 




















• 

« n 


too o 


100.0 
M 

- 


100.0 
93. l 


100.0 

7' 7 
- 


100.0 

11.7 


100.0 

77. 1 


100.0 


100.0 
19. 3 
12 B 


100.0 


H i t ntk.M. 




















population 
19,010,481: 

Wl 




100.0 


100.0 


100.0 

:■■ : 


100.0 
71.9 

■ 


ioao 

4a i 


100.0 
79.0 

41.7 


100.0 

34. 1 
!8 7 


100.0 
15.0 


100,0 

19. 1 


NORTH 1 1 STKAL 




















318 


100 o 


ioao 


100.0 


100 

7ii.7 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 

28 I 
18. 1 


100.0 

11 - 


100.0 




M.s 






















- 

do 




ioao 

- 


100.0 
108 4 


100.0 

108 7 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 






K\L 




















population 


100 o 


Ho o 




100.0 

74 I 
89.2 


11 :t 


100.0 

80.9 


100.0 


100.0 

- 

17 ' 


17. J 




























SO. 9 


84.8 




100 


81 4 




17 I 






1,1,1, i •, — ( m, ,, s , « Known, ( U <"• <d by Irreat, and Persona Charged {Held l<>r 
Prosrrution), 1959, />n (ieographit Division*. Surnber par 100 Knoicn 

i ' — < ..lit nun . I 





100.0 
21.7 






Rob- 
ber] 




Hur- 

iiiE or 
Inc 


tluft 








Man- 
negli" 


thfft 


• 


100.0 
100.0 


100.0 

80 7 


100. 
100.0 


100.0 

hum. 


ioao 

51.8 
100.0 


100.0 

100.0 

27. 8 
18 l 


100.0 
16.7 

12.2 


1... o 
23.2 


■ 


100.0 







I. .1.1. 1 1. 

I.\ the 



—Numberoj Persona Found Guilty per 100 Persona Formally Charged 
Police, 1959} 201 Citiea (t,,r 25,000, Total Population 32,993,900 






i of persons 



(held fur 
tion) 



Poand guilty 



guilty 









TOTAL 



nonnegUgenl manslaughter 

■ • . 






: fr m. I 









bildren. 



.t..r vohli 



100 



too ii 

100 (i 
100 ii 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100 n 
100.0 

inn ii 
i 

100.0 

IIHI II 
1IMI II 

100 o 

IIHI (I 

IIHI II 

IIHI (I 

IIHI II 

IIHI II 

100. 
100.0 

IIHI II 
IIHI II 



75 4 



M B 
43.9 

71 1 

i..". I 

51 I 
77 1 
43.0 

59.7 
7) 7 

68. 7 



74 9 



36 1 
49.0 

67. 1 

59.7 

lie 

68 ii 

i.i ; 
59.0 
7s 8 

s., 1 

7- 1 



5 



1.. .. 
i 8 

II 1 

17 s 

3.5 

11 -. 

5.5 
8.8 

7 4 

18 I 

1 1 
| ., 

7 ii 
5.5 

1.2 

i :i 

: '.< 

.3 

1.9 

.4 

1.4 
.7 
1.0 



M 



UJrnsrs in I mlii iiluul treat 

Offenses becoming known i<» the police during the calendar year 
i.v.i are listed in table 15 for those cities having 25,000 <>r more in 
abitants. Of primary interest t<» m police administrator is the II 1 1 < • - 
lotion of crime in lii^ <»\\u jurisdiction from one period to the next 
ul the current incidence of crime compared with an average <»f the 
tperience for the preceding five years <>r other cumulative period. 
i addition, figures for an individual community may be converted 
> the number <>l crimes per 100,000 inhabitants for certain compari 
us with pertinent average rates contained in tlii> publication. 

Caution should be exercised in comparing crii lata for individual 

era use t lit- differences in the fig ures may be due to a variety of 
ictors. Such comparisons are not necessarily significant even though 
ic figures for individual communities are converted into terms of 
mnber of offenses per 100.000 inhabi tants. This observation is 
[ually applicable in making comparisons between standard metro- 
olitan statistical areas, states, geographical divisions, and other 
■ 

The following is a list of some of the factors which affect the amount 
ml type of crime in the community but it should be noted that these 
i all-inclusive: 

Population of the city and metropolitan area adjacent thereto. 

The composition of the population with reference particularly 
to age, sex and race. 

The economic status and activities of the population. 

Relat i\ e stability of populal ion. 

( llimate. 

Educational, recreational, and religious facilities. 

The number of police employees per unit of population. 

The standards governing appointments i«» the police force. 

The policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

The attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

The degree of efficiency of the local law enforcement agency. 
In considi ring the volume of crime committed locally, it is gener- 
lly more important to determine whether the figures for a given 
immunity show i or decreases than to ascertain whether 

I or fall short of those for some other individual com- 
tunity, and it should be remembered that the amount of crime com- 
i it ted in a community is not Bolely chargeable t<» the police 1 »ut i- 
ither a charge against the entire community. 
In publishing these figures, the FBI acts as a Ben ice agency. The 
published are those submitted by the contributing agencies. 
1m FBI, t hrough it- verification procedures and personal contact 
rogram, attempts t«> hold to ■ minimum t li<»— «- instances where a 
[immunity's crime figures fall short of full compliai 



I ,1.1. I 



. — Sumbei ../ Offenses Known in the Police, 1959, Cities anil Totcnt 
ii. MM in Population 







































• ■ • 























15 

4 

8 
12 

25 
118 
30 
80 
16 

6 

ia 
ie 

it 

7 
87 

I 







tbofl 




Bor- 






















160 and 














ing 






n 


- 




1,888 


1 


llll 




III! 




1,591 


Ml 


3, 7Ji i 


8 




73 








SI 


114 


B8 




181 


494 


KM 


1. 108 


1,040 


3. . r .7.1 


1.'. 


378 


73 






417 


243 


1,333 


20 




374 


660 


11 


33 




93 


3 


130 


84 


311 


is 




138 


727 


1 


B8 


u 


194 


7 


133 


17 


m 





111 


GO 


218 




449 


595. 


1,849 




S3 




ls| 


1 


21 


19 


69 




494 


170 


1,196 


31 


160 


168 




16 




77 


188 


1 


107 


127 


418 


11 


179 


486 


880 


84 


158 


126 


306 


1 


66 


63 




20 




219 


811 






37 


172 




KM 


583 


1,801 


187 




209 





null i month* received 



■ 
56 



11 
18 

in 
6 

18 

a 

9 

1 



s 
88 

89 



1 

178 

2 

i 
280 

1 

4 
140 

31 

I 
88 

37 

829 



81 


28 


296 


108 


80 


17.', 




2,214 


7,620 




449 




60 


.11 


lot 


82 


20 


107 






1 52 




111 


SM 


U> 


88 




LIN) 


lis 




M 


68 










307 


888 


1,517 




168 




4. IHl 


1. 4(10 




61 




807 


154 


- 


337 


84 


Is 


L'i:< 


i 1 18 


859 


2, 1J1 




114 


7l(i 






751 


318 


13s 


311 


mi 




117 


718 


848 


l . 189 






808 




88 




84 


110 


848 


t',1 




189 




74 


189 






1. 1.- 15.- 



\timl>< i i>i Offense* Known i<> ih<- Police, 1959, i 'itiet and /.<km- 
Our 15,000 iii Population — Continued 






us. in II..' i ■•!. Mich 

i '.,:>: 

thletiem, I'a 



rerly Hi 

■ -it 

ighamton, \ , i 



i, Mich. 
\ 1 
ii. Ill 
n, I ii" I 



PS 
ill« lor. < 



' 



• i . V Y 
Kikliiie. ' 

i whs villi 



\ Y 

■ ■ . I 
n, Vt 



S ' 
V Met 



. Ill 






I • 



III 






Criminal homicide 




Man 
slatiKh- 



Forcible 



13 



33ii 












\..l. 'I 



71 

-' 

I i; 

2 

3 

1 
3 



Bur 
riary 

inv or 

Lng 



161 
138 

p.: 

in 
242 



<inlv 9 months received 

l . r . 4 186 



i thofl 



".\. i 



58 






I 

4 
I 

.'••"7 

. 
1 
.'. 

U5 



200 

I 



1 
I 

HI 

I 



141 

3s 

l 



23 

II 

186 



7 

108 

71 
71 

123 

9 

43 

i 

81 

l 
l 

13 



III 

16 

643 



in 

3 

25 

7 
14 

27 



19 



19 

27 

363 

13 

in 

8 

ins 

106 

711 

7 



1 



11 



71 

132 
167 

ISO 

73 
4(1 

8, 132 

n 

92 
919 

L5JS 

217 

186 

\': 

1,027 

76 
102 
110 

162 
246 

17» 

106 

190 
208 

- 

- 
1.41s 






116 
149 

V, 

278 



I ii.l. , 



1, 718 

117 

288 

s7 
1,211 



\ill.i 

thcfl 







1,884 


3,318 


61 


327 




136 


115 




80 




286 




Is 


128 


81 


103 


2, 189 








72 


71 




107 


120 


1 . 232 


38 


1(13 


206 


194 


ill 




si 


17s 


136 




ti 




188 


lis 


120 


1,139 


821 




21 


826 






Is 








276 




618 




824 


1,072 


136 




88 




168 


800 


90 


614 




I, Isj 


171 






•-'. 1 1 1 




240 






17 


1 28 


- 


109 


71 




137 


317 


88 








I7s 




7s 


177 




U7 










1 . 283 





..I 

Hi7 

1,068 

17 

18 

108 

136 

II 

12 

3,660 

a 

88 
888 

192 

17 

108 

100 

12 

1. I "I 
244 

is 

no 
008 

u 

37 

148 

880 

11 

73 
37 

17.278 

71 



-7 



I ,|,i, I,. — S umbei ••! OJJvnnea Known t<> the Police, 1959, Cities and Town* 
Ovei 25,000 in Population — < ontinued 















Bar- 


' 








ante 


then 










1 

12 

i 
16 

.is 

'..1 

I 
12 

84 

11 

'.< 

21 

1 

3 

348 
13 

1 
16 

19 

19 

51 

1 


l 

77 

7i«i 
157 

11 
1 
9 

13 

22 

1 

I 

3 

1 

11 

- 

97 

9 

3»V> 

tl 

1 

1,706 

:i 

16 

-- 
89 

3 

1:1 
2 


194 

J 17 
108 

.Ml 

1 . 1 53 
188 

■Ml 

l 23 1 

130 
313 

307 

1,216 

1'. 

118 

851 

485 

:« 

IT' 
100 

1,280 

87 

14,274 

117 

128 
«88 

83 1 

77 
lss 
111 

M 

ISO 
888 

117 
119 
658 

45 
MS 

7'< 

94 

344 


1,066 

96 

1,918 

7--( 

- 

- 
Us 

1 52 
258 

234 

149 

l.i as 

Is., 

31 
188 
112 

Kin 
519 

380 

379 

133 
81 

3,810 

961 

78 

3,816 

19 

(') 
181 

184 

151 

a 

45 

301 

- 
151 

1H7 

• 

108 


46 
12,910 

•■17 
344 

1,736 

1.991 
.174 
631 
443 

510 

168 

330 

86 

953 

2, 117 

sir, 
H>4 

872 
887 

220 
- 
180 

1510 

1,640 

711 

380 
200 

.':< 7 

- 

148 
888 

881 

4.Vi 

187 
80S 

L087 




• 


1 




1 

1 
1 


■« 






;<i 


1 
1 


3 




7 


101 

17 


1 

' 
1 

1 
1 


n 
II 

i 


1 

i: 

l 
l 
l 


1 
2 

i: 
i: 

l 


1 Uf 
1.1 




I 
- 


Is7 


1 
1 




7 

(9 




1 
1 


i 


l 
l 

2 

1 
61 


113 








1 
1 


188 

•l 








1 






186 








21 




1 
5 

i 


a 

in 


1 
5 

- 

7 
7 


57 








1 B 






' 


H 
404 




Is 




i 
'.' 

89 
2 


1 


1 


96 




Is 




5 


1>. 


78 
4 

t 

19 

1 

i:. 
31 
60 

is 
in 

J 






' 1 




4 


- 




6,068 






1 


1 Is 




7 .'( 


' 


2 
8 

1 

1 


l 
i 
I 


1 
4 

It 


190 


' 


:a 


. Ill'l 


Is.' 


Mich 




a 


08 


Ml 

M Ich 






88 

10 


. ■ »l 




2 


i 
n 

i 

13 

1 
4 

a 

i 

5 


4 

5 

•-".HI 

1.1 

5 
10 


1 
5 

l.l 1 


7 
87 
12 
109 


17 


1 


1 
I 


:i'i 




1 in 


1 




i: 1 
. Ill 


11 


17 

■ 

15 


' 


4 


i 


\s 




s 






1 




- 


3i7 



'i'l of tnble. 






'able l">. — Sumber of Offense* Known '<> il>< Police, 1959, Cities and Town* 
(hi i 15, 000 in Population — Continued 



City 



Ikhart, I v ■ - 1 

\ Y 



■I. N I 






. Ill 



ColW .. 

. \ I 
W \ .i 

le, N.C 
Mich .. 



[Ich 



Uti. Ark ... 
Ind. . . 

■ . i 






: 

. Mlrll 



'. 



I 



I 



< *i i miii.L ; 



\llir.li i \l 111 

and non 









forcible 






i 
i 

n 

:t 

-■ 

:t 
12 
II 

:t 

10 

I 






:< 
147 

I 

71 

l 

8 

i 



Hur 



110 

1,748 

128 
101 

77 

88 

17s 
-I 
177. 

i:i7 
138 
101 









Complete data not reo 
3 ii 13 



126 

16 

867 
143 

143 

103 
124 

'.'1 






170 

1 



87 
13 



146 
13 

I 

-1 

7 

12 

1 
i 

:t 
211 

80 



■-' 
170 

1 
11 

410 



- 
176 

- 



in 
18 
82 

- 



I*i 
II 

47 
1 

in 
10 



1x7 

846 
437 

'HIS 

117 
I'll 












96 






270 


4 










■ii 


12 


306 


182 




816 


1,217 


1,088 




I in 






7 J 


:(7 




B4 


71 


HI 


618 




1,607 


237 


I'M 






till 




.'.'■ii 


521 




71 




in. 




13 


169 


1 63 


78 






21 








2, :t»7 














160 


02 


4i a 


lln 






- 


■ 




:<77 






- 








814 




- 




130 




12 




121 




- 








• 










i.:us 






UNI 






801 


117 











































I ,|,|, |- — \,,nil»r >•/ Offer**** Known tO the Police, l'>~>'>. Cilif* anil loiin-f 

(>,,, 25,000 in Population — Continued 













Hur- 
ri iry 

iiiK "r 

tug 


' 






$50 and 


Under 

$50 










1 

- 

1 

10 

18 


7 
- 

21 

1 


106 

*i7 

625 

111 
216 

167 

301 

118 

l . 28 1 

17 
230 

77 

359 
202 

l-'l 

18 
212 
281 

180 

286 

146 

•-".'7 

7. 125 
819 
386 

870 

• 

71'.' 
227 
16 
118 
109 

186 

- 

81 

lnl 

720 


'<:< 
89 

n 

328 
51 
42 

187 
80 

123 
250 

U>. 
337 

I'M 

187 

■J n 

13 
88 

53 

77 

291 

113 

33 
115 

117 

291 

7-'. 

Bl 

114 
105 

1,188 

117 
•J. 877 

184 

313 

•-•7 

'.HI 
I'M 

:ti 
53 
73 

ins 
Hi7 
1 88 
i.-.i 
88 

68 
39 


369 
888 
952 

831 
184 

71 
201 
477 

419 

1,038 

405 

1 . 856 

282 

579 

'.U7 
414 

76 
1''. 
443 

88 
914 

337 

100 

4.452 

■ 
751 

1,042 

1,068 

•J 17 
180 

881 

877 
216 

i. 152 
848 

:<. 879 

339 
218 
808 


-• 
18 
189 

_■_ 

171 

81 
t 

'■ 
•■■J 

71 
117 

Sil 

U'.l 

53 

It-'. 

11 
87 

lis 


■ 


I 

:i 

l 

l 
10 


i 


i 
• 




n 

i 

2 




- 
88 

24 

2 

3 
3 
•-•1 
18 
12 

1 

88 

18 

l 

28 

in 

1 

1 
II 


18 

3 
95 

71 

51 

(8 
86 

250 

19 

1 

10 
12 

4 
1 

16 

■ 

10 

7 
1 

21 

1 

1,580 

183 

10 

:< 

I 

I 
i 

6 
5 

5 

208 
7 

7 

142 


7 
1 

2 

1 


8 

o 

12 

9 
5 

1 

3 
16 


1 






• 






1 


1 


1 
1 










3 
3 






i 

1 

1 


1 

3 

1 


152 

65 


1 


19 
95 

lsl 




! 

8 


1 

12 

1 
88 

1 
I 


1 
2 

1 
1 
1 

10 

:t 
100 

l 
-• 


183 

62 
U 




1 
! 

ta 

i 

■ 
i 


188 




18 




135 




1 . 788 








3,014 


1 lllf . 


lsl 

lSII 

157 










H 


: 








Hi7 




i 
i 
i 


18 


11 

1 
1 


•J. 185 


i till 


81 

l.s 




i 


1 
2 


its 

91 






41 




i 
i 


1 
2 

ig 

i 


8 

1 

8 
1 
2 
2 
10 


10 



118 

6 


155 

a 

844 

1.'. 

23 

810 









.1,1. 15.— /Vl 



,/.. 



• of Offenses Known i<> ih< Police, 1959, Citiea <m<l Towns 
Over 95,000 in Population — Continued 



ttertni 

\ Y 




•.-■•■•. I ■ : 

Iceland, 

r, Mass 



niiiln. N'.-lir 
neoln Park, Mich 
Dden, v .J 

irk 



S'.Y 
















mi 


131 


192 


in 


2 


197 


..l 


134 




29 




134 


878 


3 


1 




16 


57 


:< 


2 


1M4 


41 






3 


- 






70 








1, 155 


i 




MA 


-'-Ml 




11 




- 


-- 





1 

184 



170 



No reports n 



l 



1- 



13 


3 


171 




Ml J 


- 


Bl 


- 




1,983 


11 


n 




71 




3 


6 




1 


186 


17.1 








8. 141 


5 


4 




12 




1 


3 


11 








5 


128 


11 


131 


80 


17 


164 


111 




1,871 














8, 187 








11 






47ii 




7 


180 


197 


299 




71 








14 




17ii 
















81 


17 










Id 




• 


- 



280 

.'1 
1,801 

4 

1» 

Ins 



Ul 



91 



1 .il.lt 15. — Vu ml" i 

< 


../ Offwi 

> 

■ 


w>. Knott n in the 
hid in Population — 


-< mil inued 


Citimt 


and Town* 






Forcible 






Itnr 

MIL' <T 


1 






Murder 

:m>l D0I1- 


^i uii'ti- 
negll- 






■ 


1 




a 

8 

1 

3 


12 

7 
- 
8 

81 

a 

i 

6 

2 

ia 

25 


9 

7 
1 

f. 

2 
9 

6 

1 
2 
5 


108 

271 
61 

68 
140 
79 

116 
127 

67 
208 
129 

- 
3,548 

55 
137 

145 

117 

1,098 

80 
92 

17'.' 

"- 
889 

68 

91 

1,884 

8, 182 

go, 

108 

1,830 

140 
118 

B4 

117 
818 
278 
847 

41 

809 

86 

in 

877 

848 
811 

- 
it:* 

.'. :<77 


106 

- 

49 

- 

Ill 
25 
54 

85 

11 
142 
118 

81 

186 

in? 

172 

38 

1,700 

112 

56 
160 

4f. 
126 
78 

2,009 

2, 181 

^7 

105 
108 
878 

111 
71 
24 

Ins 

181 

156 

139 

84 

10 
311 

6 
186 
89 

1.059 


1,124 

117 
4.'1 

858 

380 

u 
804 

317 
111 

:tin 
299 

338 

145 

1. !!•> 
289 
11^ 
505 

443 

l->4 

1.710 

185 
861 

1.417 

278 

208 

512 

1,841 

181 

148 

184 

28 
126 

724 
767 
515 

2, 199 


141 

111 




1 


1 


II 




1 


1 
1 

2 


1 


i: 


!ilp, 








1 


7' 








11 


■ 


1 

2 

I 


2 


1 


89 




IS 




1 


2 

1 


81 




1 




1 


33 




g 




I 


3 


3 


25 

! 

1 

189 

5 
1 

5 
4 

1 

711 

43 

6 

3 

2 

1 
16 


20 
2 

1 
117 

12 

1 

68 

19 

1 

771 

16 

8 
6 

84 


i." 




101 








2 

eg 

3 


17 




1 










. '.' 


C 


3 


2 
2 








'.' 






21 




3f> 

1 


25 
2 


It 
4 


1 494 


Ill 




! 


51 


• 
• 


1 

1 


l 
5 


1 


186 


Mldlan . 


39 


" 


is 

i 


1 


1 


81 


OU 


.31 


1 • u 


2 
39 

28 


i 
133 

:it7 
l 

l 

90 

39 
3 
6 
1 

18 

6 

11 
13 

17 


1 

148 
1 
8 
2 

197 

35 
2 

I 

10 

15 
84 






23 
18 


18 
24 


1 449 


polls, Minn 


17 


! 




1 

28 

1 
1 


3 

1 
7 

6 
8 

2 




'•.lit 


3 
26 




1 




1 






1 
1 




'.' | 


53 


1 kllf 


2 


2 
8 


56 


r, N.J 




40 






131 


Monl I till 

tOWn, ^ \ :i 


8 
10 


2 
1 




Moui ' 1 :ilif 




1 


4 

2 

1 

1 

81 

41 
10 

N 

2 

177 


8 
f» 

■Jl 

5 

4 

140 


45 


Mount <'!«■!! 


I 




H 




1 




15 






6 




I 

1 
I 

1 
80 






181 


In.l 


2 
1 
1 
4 

1 


4 

1 
3 


145 


M h 


117 






N 1 1 


71 




1,047 



no 



,l.l. 15. 



•Number of Offennea Known i<> '/"• Police, 1959, i itiea ami Town* 
Over 15,000 "' Population — Continued 



Criminal homicide 






it tonal City, i 

ny, l n. I 
u:irW, N. I 

■ 
« Bedford, ' 
m Britain, Cum 
>w Brunsw Ick, N I 
iw burgh, \ '> 



m Haven, » 'onn 
'\v London, Conn 



R I 

lie, \ V 
•u ton, M 



Is, N Y 



irthampton, M 



>rtti Utile Rock, \rk 



. Conn 



. 111... 

I 

■ 



'• ' 



tumu | 



Murdi i 
and noii- 

m. in- 



i 









l 
28 

1 



16 






2 

l 



Rob 



7 

17 

I. Ill 

I 

13 
13 



Bui 
Ing 



I 



i:<7 

i.i 

193 
172 



ovei 



112 

7:i 
300 

in. 
124 



* ii- 1. . 



No n i 
12 

910 

13 

li 
61 
28 

HI 

6,200 
23 

171 
8 
6 



- 
Only 2 nit hi 1 1 1 
( inlv ', months received 

'.HI 






149 

in 

13 
10 



1 
1 
:i 

41 

:<» 

B4 

- 
24 

11 



196 
101 

71 

r.i 



163 
61 

121 

131 
KM 

J 11 

4ii 

1,078 
113 



210 

:i:tu 

121 
1,000 

281 



\ui.i 
thefl 





612 




1,276 ! 




HI 


16 
















2,334 


1,512 


4 


too 


-7 


128 


14 


111 


186 




114 






1. 161 






204 








277 




11,168 






:«. 827 


19 


368 


118 




719 


1,781 


1. 124 


3,341 


2 












12 


143 


1 




71 


mi 


1 


112 


1 22 


mi 









- 


109 


78 




177 


35 


s7 


1,198 








- 










161 


274 


i.:t7.' 




1.872 


- 




361 




III 




no 












Ml 












106 




71 


177 






130 




115 








16 


22 






-mi 




74 


713 



18 
118 

71 
78 



3, 7<;i 

19,798 
89 



II 
32 
11 

21 

ll» 

I, 106 



1- 
121 

7 






I .,1.1. tS. — S'umbei <■' Offenses Known i>> th* 
n, . i 2 i 000 in Population- 



Police, 1959, t itiea and Townt [a. 
-< i>mi hnued 







Forcible 

rape 




V . 1 1 < • 1 


liur- 

i lit. r 
Ing 


. theft 


theft 




' 


licgll- 


• 


Under 

$50 




3 

7 


3 


8 

6 


25 
115 

10 


41 
148 




334 
907 
291 
132 
102 

129 
806 

168 
179 

11,838 

264 

101 
186 
158 
355 
60 

802 
223 
153 
410 

2,578 

171 

124 

19 

lis 
238 

1,701 

B8 

348 

87 

261 
142 

ins 

22 
278 

288 
197 
548 
206 

190 
72 

n 

816 
1,780 

51 

- 

67 

1. 167 
820 
118 
166 

109 


lis 

lf.l 

33 
84 

83 
2ft4 

388 

127 

51 

I 909 
2, 120 

132 
182 
264 

42 

348 
110 

51 

287 

2, 1 47 

188 

34H 

20 

96 

56 

1. 126 

43 
295 
118 
131 

139 
61 

■J'. 7 

56 

206 

178 

BO 

811 

201 

354 

sj 

67 
86 

231 
182 

.'II 
176 
286 

68 

27 

110 


no 

207 
294 

271 
I. 181 

310 
3r>3 

10.937 

3.314 

215 
314 
784 
592 
274 

350 

646 

1,078 

... 174 

630 
1,091 

83 
359 

56 

! 

630 
1,094 

178 

499 

1. 120 
261 

853 

63 

853 

1. 128 
140 

771 

•J 7 7 

3ss 

11 

1,721 

I . 233 
(28 

848 
212 
848 
102 


13 










■ 








7 
2 
7 


8 
12 

7 
21 

2,006 

208 

16 

761 

1 

18 
15 
30 

2 

1H', 
11 
6 
12 

330 

20 

98 

2 

10 

ss 
6 

22 
2 

1 

20 
7 

16 
2 

19 

11 

i 

12 

1 


2 

ls3 
142 

• 
160 

1,202 

884 

24 

583 

3 
6 

52 
39 

7 

189 
2 
5 

183 

13 
264 

22 
5 

133 

1 
4 
2 
9 

24 
10 

1 
28 

1 

14 

31 

B 

11 

1 


Z 






6 
3 

1 
6 

1 

134 
83 

1 

t 


i. 




7 
3 


27 




37 




81 




3 

ug 

4 

1 


6 




3,95 




■J.LI' 




4 




3.23 

r, 




12 






in 






1 


• 


10 




1 

1 

7 
1 
3 
12 

t 


2 






3 


l? 




7 




2 

- 


33 

1 

8 

1 
1 
1 

3 

•_• 

B 

1 


4 




13 




1,12 








29* 




■ . 


\ , 


- 
3 


3 

2 

6 

1 




R 1 


1,32 




! 


18 


1: 


I 








■ 






12 


1 


1 


8 

B 


3 


• 




10 


1 




■ 


1 

1 
1 
1 




16 
16. 






1 
- 




1 


Is 

14 


i | . 




I 






1 


16 


' 












l 




19 




12 


13 

- 
1 

18 
18 

1 

79 

17 
9 


Bl 
6 

19 
163 

10 
15 
5 


16 


' 


21 


84 


1 " 1 




i 


■ 




B 


■J 
18 

6 

i 


r< 










. 'I 


8 


2 

a 

i 

2 


!'' 




n> 




1 
1 






13 


. > 


3 



!'l 



Iil<- l.'i. — \iimln-r of Offenses Known /<> the /'<»//«•<•. 1959, Cities and Towns 
Our 25,000 in Population — Continued 






cky Mount, N C 

me, \ Y 
Bevllle, Mich 
swell, N. Mei 



>,i Oak, Mich 
•ramento, Calif 
jlnaw, Mich 

Clair Shores, Mich 

Cloud, Minn 



. Mo 
Louis, Mo 
Louis Park, Minn 
Paul, Minn 

burg, Fla 



em, <*!• . 

in l. k .1 

Utah 

... Tex 



i \nt"nio. 'I • 

i Bernardino, Calif 

■ 
aduskj , Ol 

1 '.ilif 



C 
ii Leandro. Call! 

Call! 



\ Mei 
, i 'all! 

. if . 



vannab, i 

: . . V . Y . . 



Criminal hoi 



Mm. I. i 

and non- 
man 



;ik.r B( 

UTOn, Pa 

aw nee, Okl i 

■'■ 



erman, Tea 

3 I > X 
Okie, III 



M . 
■!. lint 
mil Euclid, < ' 

nth Portland, 



nth 6 

Id, Man 



l 



Man 
Blaugb 

t,i i,\ 
negll 



27 



Forcible 
rape 



i 



! 
13 
67 

110 



Rob 

i , i > 



li 

294 
23 

8 

1 

12 



193 
97 

3 

li 
i 

12 

807 

69 

246 

4 

1,233 

82 

13 
28 
12 

16 

■l 
- 

in 
13 

m; 
16 
10 



\ atcd 



in 
18 

1 

117 
18 



11 



30 
126 

716 

B4 

306 

1, 145 

:<s 

'-'7 

12 

8 
13 

1 



3 



;<- 



Bui 

Ing "i 
[ng 



90 
187 

196 

107 
1,310 

227 
62 

239 

67 
1,715 

1. 126 

230 

82 

1 . 532 

1,896 
104 

389 
381 
581 

172 
374 

842 

104 

B12 
22! 

• 
4. 637 



• inly 3 months rei elv< •! 



Larceny thefl 



ovei 



7.t 
190 

172 

I. Ill 



83 

138 

624 

19 
195 

78 

134 

2, 136 
702 

2,312 
101 

2, 103 

1,004 

269 

- 

157 

312 

169 

17(1 
1,090 

34 



604 

117 
2,343 



I ndei 



403 
180 

676 
520 

1. 128 

3, B53 

1,363 

548 

13,919 

313 

1,1 79 

I. 269 

'•73 

1,240 
626 

7.:, 1 3 

1,787 

i, 757 

329 

918 

1. 190 

1. I 

891 

321 

373 

1,658 

184 

."in 

1.434 

III 



\lllo 

then 





63 


279 






414 




7(i 


210 


143 


II 


239 






193 




21 


43 


498 


ISO 


1,708 






l. 108 








158 


Jit 


17n 












1. 7'.-. 


41 


.'1 










102 


18 




17 


























in.. 





19 

i 

ii 

I Hi 

1. 145 

112 

16 

28 

94 

i. 159 

n 

168 

132 

15 

112 

1,902 
1,781 

27 

4,709 

B74 
137 
153 

134 

46 
'.'1 
■ 
67 
38 

437 

274 
2.311 



16 
85 

18 

37 

19 

37 s 

163 
110 

71 

214 
16 

11 

73 






I.. 1,1, i -, — Vumber oj Offennea Known i<> the Police, 1959 Cities and Totcnt 
a,, i 25,000 in Population — < ontinned 









■ 






I 
I 



I 



1 






i Ity, Mo 



.' nsblp, 






K. R.I 

III' 



I iwnshlp. Mich 

I 



I, 'A 

« la 
. Mo 






18 

1 
|.. 

1 
128 

■J 
7 
7 

I- 

.,1 
IX 



237 
BO 
82 






3 

51 
31 
83 

1 
60 
18 

7 
29 



■Jin 

17 

27 
• ived 

90 sis 



Hur- 

int' or 



l.'l 
1 :.:t 
112 

Ml 
118 

1H7 

1 96 

480 



1 . r,77 
sin 



24 
129 

1 in 
72 
10 

25 
15 

1 
1 



4 

1.-. 

•J 

39 

9 
I 

4 
288 

I 



176 

1.17s 

1,616 

• 
114 

189 

112 

a 

48 



s7 
236 

14s 

1S7 

l.'l 
166 

M 

lis 



2 9 
3ii 28 

Only n months received 

3 :< 









i" 



mi 

71 

31(1 

71 

27 
761 
116 
148 

- 
1,321 

M 

222 
.'(4 
108 

1,610 

41s 



353 




118 




612 




1. 102 




.'J' 


ion 


in 


117 


22 


11.' 


135 




191 


416 




187 


25 


SI 


• 


840 


44 


128 


1 28 


727 


67 


808 


341 


1,087 






U 




(8 


1 58 




1,674 








403 


I ill 


417 



i 188 




7,272 


37 


55 


135 


640 


■.MS 




■Jlis 


si 


513 


286 




71.'. 


1 86 


76 


132 


127 






172 


17s 


no 






148 




08 


280 




I-' 




72 


12 


as 






I.ihlf 1~>. — \umber of Offensea Known to ths /'»»//»»•. I't.'i'K Cities and Town* 
Dirr 25,000 in Population — Continued 






\ lis, Ui- 
viiiii, CulM 
u. i ii trtford. Conn 
Wert Haven, Conn 
• (Bin, I 



< York. \ I 
in'.-. \ I 

ft'est Pah 

Weymonl h, \i 

. w \ 



White Plains. N.W 
A t.iiit.r. Calll 
Wichita, K.n' 
Wichita Pall 
(Vilki I 



A llklnsl . 
Williams port, Pa 

. Ill 
Wilmington, l>- 1 
Wilmington, \ C 



\ C 
Winona, Minn 
Winston-Salem, \ ' 
Woburn, M ISI 

Township, 
N i 



■ • 

k'jUim.i. 

S".Y 






■ iin» i- n Hi»ni(-rii>v- 



•tlinm- 



Criminal homi< l<l< 



Mil' -It i 
.iixl nun 
negligent 

in in 
slaught*! 












\ iti. I 



llin 
rl..i> 

niv m 
int. i 



181 

mi 
71 






180 and 



■ 



12 
197 
112 



34 
100 



123 
233 
82 



I ml. i 






138 



Auto 
then 







J 14 




i-i. 






• 


118 




.. 




93 


J-'i 


870 




80 




1,110 


• 






811 


1 . 838 


173 


DO 


882 


ISO 






1 52 




47.'. 


117 










1.717 




154 




117 


411 


366 




41 






208 


1.144 




37 


163 


-- 


134 


1 89 


- 


1(1.1 


186 


1,033 


468 


1,240 


.in 




538 


Mil 


J17 




850 




-. 


280 






710 




1,214 


- 


1IKI 


4. r .7 















102 

414 

74 

:«> 

441' 
103 

34 

in 

80 



Hi7 

105 

- o 

l.'l 
344 



1 Figure listed ln< 

■ it porting for tl»- cltj in 

• • ■• [nlernath issociatioi 
II ible. 



■ ; 



\m ^,i ami liiui >>l Per$OM irrrst<il 

Ann u-ed by contributing police showing personal 

if persons arrested are tabulated in the following 

i ich data from cities was begun for the calendar year 

tive collections <>n a sampling basis. Agencies 
rural an ere not circularized for this information until 
\ splained elsewhere, a stepped-up program is now under 
ubstantial reporting t'<»r the rural areas, as well 
thai totals for the country may be presented with a mini- 
mum of delay. 

Available arrest data from rural area- indicate a high degree of 
n h report ing standards in the second year of such collec- 
tions. Rural arrests and arrests reported by cit ies under 25,000, when 
arrayed bj percent distribution, show the six highest and the six 
lowest crime <-.i 1 1-^- .1 ies to be the same for both areas. Embezzlemenl 
and fraud was the median of both series. A.rrests of young persons 
under 18 made up 1 1.8 percent <>f all arrests in the small cities while a 
similar figure in the rural data was I t.3 percent. 
An arrangement of the arrest figures for ages under I s as percent- 
of arrests for all ages revealed the six highest crime categories 
were the same. A.t the bottom of the lists, five classificat ions matched. 
\- in the city group, the highest percentage of arrests of youths in 
rural areas n as for unto t heft, followed by burglary and larceny. 

- ice these data are basically for use by police in measuring and 
analyzing their problem, arrest data for yoimg persons is not limited 
uvenile court" or similar court proceedings. For the purpose of 
tabulations here, police count a young person as arrested when he or 
she has committed a ••rime and the circumstances are such that it" the 
individual were an adult, an arrest would be tallied. Thus, as be- 
n tabulations for persons under L8 and persons I s years of age or 
older, homogeneity is retained and variations between the two which 
might arise from specialized terminology and procedures applicable 
t>> young offenders arc held to a minimum. Instructions include pro 
visions for 1 i r- 1 i 1 1 u arrests <>l' young persons opposite the substantive 
violation rather than classifying by specialized terminology such as 
"juvenile delinquent." 

I e data include all persons arrested and are not limited to those 
held for forma] pr< tsecut i<>n. 






.- '_- - 1 









— ' -i 















-■ 



— 



: 

ri t4 ri 



' 












■ 



■ 









■ 
t — — — 



■ 



— 3 — 

- - 3 "" ■ 












- - i — ' ri i -' 






• 



■ 



I 












-i — -. 









!?S3 









r cc 






— — 















X y 3 






— — 






7 ^ - : I - 5§! 



— " ■-'— ■ rii- 















•- 






■ 



ft - i -< - s ! 



! I 

- 









- _ ... . 



z £ 



- 



' z 1 i = ££ 



^ < _ Z. — < — 



:- ; . 



f 

r * — = -. 5» = i 






-£ r~ 



99 



Table 17. — Number and Percentage of Arrests of Persons Under 18, Under 21, 
and Under 25 Years of Age, 1959; 1,789 Cities Over 2,500, Total Population 
56,187,181 



Offense charged 



Number of persons arrested 



TOTAL 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negli- 

gence 



Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Other assaults 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 



Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
etc 



Forgery and counterfeiting 

Forcible rape 

Prostitution and commercialized 

vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statu- 
tory rape) 



Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
Offenses against family and chil- 
dren 

Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxicated- 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



Gambling 

Suspicion 

All other offenses. 



TOTAL 



2, 612, 704 



2,610 

1,319 

15, 379 
29, 860 
97, 118 
65, 044 

132,441 
33, 409 
21, 009 

6,115 

12, 007 
4,002 

18, 514 

29, 289 

10, 562 
22,231 

26, 042 
61,718 

109, 678 

323, 353 

1,011,427 

109, 116 

68, 082 
99, 663 
302, 736 



Under 
18 



320, 669 

173 

75 

4,032 

2, 734 
8,025 
34, 057 

64,717 

21,234 

509 

1,848 

918 
751 

207 

5,516 

457 
3,551 

319 
11,347 

777 
33, 581 
8,826 
6,663 

908 
17,912 
91, 532 



Under 
21 



519, 685 



193 

7,069 

5,311 

16, 171 

43, 576 

80, 228 

26, 518 
1,508 

2,658 

2, 191 
1,616 

1, 550 

8,656 

1,623 
6,461 

2,008 

27, 070 

5,029 
68, 087 
35, 051 
16, 968 

3,056 
35, 849 
120, 843 



Under 
25 



772, 583 



392 

10, 025 
9,307 
29, 732 
50,869 

91, 472 

29, 351 

4, 095 

3,391 

4,198 
2, 436 

5,318 

12, 699 

3,807 
9,963 

5,854 
31,845 

16, 338 
112,248 

9'!, 212 
27, 562 

8, 335 
52, 397 
154,014 



Percentage 



Under 
18 



12.3 



6.6 

5.7 

26.2 
9.2 
8.3 

52.4 



63.6 
2.4 



7.6 

18.8 



1.1 
18.8 



4.3 
16.0 



1.2 

18.4 



.7 
10.4 



1.3 
18.0 
30.2 



Under 
21 



19.9 



15.1 

14.6 

46.0 
17.8 
16.7 
67.0 

60.6 
79.4 
7.2 



18.2 
40.4 

8.4 

29.6 

15.4 
29.1 

7.7 
43.9 

4.6 
21.1 

3.5 
15.6 

4.5 
36.0 
39.9 



Under 

25 



29.6 



27.7 

29.7 

65.2 
31.2 
30.6 
78.2 

69.1 

87.9. 
19.5 



35.0 
60.9 

28.7 

43.4 

36.0 
44.8 

22.5 

.51.6 

.14.9 

'34.7 

9.5 

25.3 

12.2 
52.6 
50.9 



100 



u. C 



+ 1 7- 



+++7 



- :~ t :i- to ex 

+ ++ ' + i 



i+T +7 1 



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c-nt>-: x — csi ua 

c& ol *— -xT t-' o x* eo 



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C«NO CJ X — O ec x ■*+• ro 



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r^ t~ ^h 
C: r-: re* 



o -»■ * — -»■ r> — eo< 



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r- x c. X x c t- n 

CS l> M © CN LT — X 

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,1,1, [9.— Distribution a) trr,~t^ /.% s, x . /<//;</. i.:h<> ( iti<-> Over 2£0Q,Tota\ 
Population 56,187 f ltl 






TOTAL 



lg. etc 



ttutorj 



.:i'i children 



■ 
Drunki • 

MI other offenses 



' 



TOTAL 



2.812.704 



2.610 
1. 319 

15.379 
29.880 
97,118 
85.044 

132.441 
33. 409 
21.009 

6. 115 

12, 007 
4.002 
18.514 

29. 269 

10, 562 

22.231 
26.042 
61,718 

109, 678 

323. 353 

1.011.427 

1C9, 116 

68. 082 
99, 863 
302, 738 



Male 



.'.333. m 



112. oir, 

10,061 

>.. 147 

100,865 

61,616 
B8,209 



279.110 



127 

Tin 

1,774 
1,070 

1,706 

6, 27 1 

■ 
■ 

11, 154 



! 



TOTAL 



100 



1 
1 

6 
11 
3.7 
2.5 

5.1 
13 
.8 



1 I 



10 
2.4 



' 100.0 



. 1 

1 

.6 
I. I 

1.4 

- 

.4 

.3 

1.0 

. 4 
.9 
1.0 

- 

I I 

117 

4.:i 

- 
110 



• 100.0 






.4 

1. 1 



. 1 

■ 
3.2 

. . 
is. 1 

3.0 

i 



: tin 1 individual classifications may nol add to precisely lOO.n i 



LO-2 



Tabic SO. — Arrenu l>\ Race, f959, /..""«'> f <mYs Orcr 2,500, ><<'„/ /'<»/*.//„(..»./ 

'.(>.IH7.IXI 






TOTAL 

Criminal t>"" 

. lughtei 
(b) M 



Robber) 



i 
Autotheft 

■ .Hi 
Btolra propertj ; buj 



Ibfe r.i|t- 
titutli 






•'■ 

1 1 hildren 
fclqnor l»wa . 



i 

ll'lllCt 

Drunkenness 



GamMr . 
All olh- • 



TOTAL I 



2,612.704 



2.610 
1.S19 

15.379 
29, 860 
97.118 
65,044 

132.441 
S3, 409 
21,009 

6,115 

12,007 
4,002 

18, 514 

29, 269 

10.562 
22.231 
26.042 

61.718 

109.6:8 

323.353 

1,011.427 

109.116 

68. 082 
99, 663 
302. 736 









1 741 ■'"■• 



- 
182,437 






788. 799 















-- 
113 

311 



■ 
- 






I.4M 



- 
n 



. 



- 






3.000 



:: 



14 
1 



Ml 



20.465 



147 
1,671 



IK, 

881 

■ 



■ clu'le'l 



l-:; 



Police Employee Data 

I able 21. — Sumbet <>/ Police Department Employees Killed, /*>.,#, by Goo* 
iphic Divisions and Population Groups 

population 





TOTAL 




Population grout 








Oroup 


Group 

ll 


Oroup 

III 


Oroup 

IV 


t troup 

V 


VI 




N umber 


R ite pei 

. r ..IKtO,IHMI 
illli:il>- 
it .nt* 


Over 


100.000 

to 
260,000 


to 
100,000 


to 


10,000 
to 


than 

10,000 


Total number 

Rate per 5,000.000 inhabitants 


49 


2.4 


21 

- 


2 
.9 


7 
2.7 


7 
2 " 


5 

1 - 


7 
2.9 




4 

3 
6 
1 

10 
4 

7 
5 
9 


2.7 

8 
1.3 
.8 

4.8 
4.2 
3.7 
8.5 
3.9 






2 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


2 

1 






Middli 


1 
! 












1 










South At 


1 

2 

1 
7 


1 
1 


1 


2 

1 
- 


1 


uth ( •■iitr:.! 






• i 


. 




1 


1 

















Averages of personnel information submitted l>y police should not 
be construed as indications of desirable police strength. As with all 
averages, it is well to keep in mind thai approximately half the data 
exceeds and half falls short of the midpoint. Also, with numerous 
Agencies current ly expressing personnel needs it may well be that aver- 
liere are to some extent those of undermanned police departments. 
Certain comparisons with a local condition are helpful hut a definitive 
answer as to personnel needs can only be obtained by a detailed study 
of t lie extent of t he police problem in a given community. 

Table 22. — Civilian Police Department Employees, 1959 Percentage of Total, 

by Population (-roup 

/■ 

cirili.in 

Population group: tmp 

Total, all cities ss 

Group] (over 250,000) 9.4 

(dv.r I. Olio. 000) 7. 2 

(750,000 I. nun. nun in. 8 

(500,000 750,000) 11.2 

1,000-500,000) 13.6 

Group I] (100,000 250,000). Ll. 2 

Group III (50,000 100,000) 9.1 

Group IV (25,000 50,000) 7.2 

Cmup V | 10,000 25,000) 5. 7 

Group VI (2,500 10, i 7.7 

KM 



fable 23. — Full-time Police Department Employees, tpril l<>. 1959, Sumber 
tuul Rate Per MMHi Inhabitants, l>\ Geographic Division* and Population 



f »/•<»(//>«. 


--, 








i )< ographir .li\ Islon 


TOTAL 






Population . 






Group 

1 


Group 


ill 


i (roup 

l\ 


• Iroup 

\ 


Group 
VI 




186. 589 
1.8 


n\. i 

94,549 
2.3 


in 
18, 246 

: e 


to 

19.480 
1.3 


in 

18,071 
1.4 


10,000 

tl, 

20.069 

1 3 


I ■ 

ih hi 
10,000 


TOTAL 

Number of police employees 
AiiT»gf number of employees 
per 1.000 inhabitants 

New England 

\ umber ol police empli 
\ \ erage number ol employe* - 
pet i.imhi Inhabitants 


16. 123 
1.3 


15, 146 
2.0 




_ 




• 


1 I 




Middle Atlantic: 
Nun 1 

imher of employees 
pa 1,000 ink, 1. it .ni- 


55, 346 
- 1 


3. 1 


•i. iii 




1.8 




1.4 


East North Central 

Number of police empli 

ge numb r oi • mployet - 
pi r 1.000 inhabitants 


40.971 
1.8 


- 
. 1 


1. ' 


. 


1.3 


1.2 


L2 


West North Central . 

Number of police emplo 
\ rerage number of en 
per ' i 


11.264 

14 


. 


847 
1.2 


875 
1. 1 


1,008 

1. 1 


I. 1 


1,014 
1.2 


South Atlantic: 

Number "f police • mpli 

\ \- r ige numtx r <>f ei 

per 1,001 it- 


20. 495 

1.9 


8, 27 




1.8 


L5 


1.8 


1.6 


East South Central 

Number •>( police empli 
\\>t tge number "f employees 
per l ■ 


6.563 

1.4 


1,716 

1.4 


1, <M 
1.6 




1.4 


1.3 


1.8 


1, IIS 
1.8 


West South Central 

Number <•( police empli 
Average number of en 
per 1 ■ ' 


11.401 
1.2 


1.3 


1,397 
1.3 


1,087 

1.1 


1,034 

in 


1. 1 


1. 1 


Mountain : 

Number ol police i m\ l< 

per 1,000 inhabit inti 


4.855 
1.3 


1.4 




I.-. 


1. 2 


1. 1 


- 
1.3 


Paciflc: 

Number "f police empli 
gi numbi r of en | 

1" ' 


20, 398 

l : 


2.1 


1.4 


1.4 


1.3 




1,817 

1.7 



1".-. 



I.ilil< 24. — Sumberofi iHea • ted in Tabulation* Regarding Wuntber of Potiemjfi 
Department I mployees, tpril SO, 1959, nn<l Police Killed, /v># 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 

Population repre- 

■i 
Numbrr of 

■ Dtral: 

• il popul I 

- 

■ Dtral: 
population 

population 
- 
Mountain: Total popu- 
J5 194 
■ ii popula- 



102. 092. 886 
3.932 



280 

788 

Ml 

420 
463 

I'll 
197 



Population group 



: Group D Qroupin OroupIV Qroup V Group VI 



280,000 



37. 689. 895 
49 



100,000 to 
250,000 



11.214.128 
78 



100,000 



12.924.644 
188 



2.1.000 to 
50,000 



12, 953. 860 
374 



10.000 to 
25,000 



15.102.935 
975 



87 
198 

211 

100 

50 

93 
41 
08 



Lea to in 

10,000 



lot; 



I table 2">. — \n mht r of Full-time Police Department Employ «•«■>. tpril SO, 1959, 
Cities Over 25,000 in Population 






ALABAMA 

I 

... 

Birmingham 
[lie 

Phenii i 

■■i 

i 

ALASKA 

ARIZONA 

Mi 

■ 



ARKANSAS 
Smith. 

iTIIlk.'- 
'...c k 

Nortl 

: 'utT. 

CALIFORNIA 
Alameda 

I 

n Park 
Beverlj 

< hull \ 1st i 

: 
Culver I "ItJ 

PuUerton . 
ile 

■ 



Numl • 

ment empl 



TOTAL 



41 



. 
414 

179 



■ 



74 

-. 

43 

- 
41 



M 

4T 



" 



18 

U 

112 

II 

177 



31 



■ 
: ,4 

10 



47 
123 

! 
14.'. 
71 

134 

■ 
- 

- 

■ 

74 

28 
41 



i nil- 



i ItJ 



CALIFORNIA 

Continurd 

< >ak land 

< IntBlio 

i ixnard 
Palo MiH 
• na 
Pomona. . . 
Red) and 
Redondi 
Redwood • u> 
Richmond 
Rlversldi 
Sai r imento 
San Bernardino 

S.i ti 1 >;• . 

dro 

San Mair. i 
■ i 
Santa B 

I 

Sal!'. i Ro 

-nil 111 I '< ..'• 

Prancl i 
Stockton 

Simnj . ::• 

Torrani e 
Vallejo... 

ina 

COLORADO 

Aurora. 
Boulder 
( 'olorado S|>rintrs . 

Bnglewood 
i Ireeley. 
Pueblo. 

CONNECTICUT 

rl 
Bristol 
Danburj 

i,-i Bartford. . 
Fairfield 
Qreenwicfa 

I irnlnll 

Hartford 

Middleto* □ 
Milford i 

\iw HrHiiin. 
\«'.v II 
NVu Lot 
N'orwalk 
NOrw nil 
Stamford 
Stratford 
Torringfc 

irj 
\ . • II .rlf.ipl 

DELAWARE 



Number '•( police depart- 
raenl empli 



TOTAL 



47 

- 

•r 
58 

•■i 

14'i 

113 

-- 

17! I 

28 
I 

Ml 
ll'. r i 

178 

- 
•■ 

31 
151 

47 

7fl 

■ 

41 
47 



- 

36 

■ 

33 

mi 



I 

44 

" 

I3. r . 

. 

'.i 

4.1 
74 

4.H 

113 

. . 

M 

24 

lim 
- i 






163 

I 

411 

51 

i 

129 

IIMI 
147 

186 

n 
ioo 

67 

135 

34 
BO 

27 

135 

•■ 
73 

34 
II 



35 
12 
03 

7nl 

28 

a 



44 
61 
63 

119 

.. 
- 

Bl 

4 J 

73 
154 

60 

I'M 
I i 

• 






10' 



I ..I.I. J".. — Sumbt u -i>i Full-time Potiee Department Emplo y ee s , IprilSO, 1959 i 
4 iii- - <>t< r tSjOOO in Population — Continued 






DISTRICT OF 

( ..I I Mill \ 

FLORIDA 

II 

: I 

.ill.- 

■ 

I , City 

I.II1V 

GEORGIA 

Columbu 

■ 

HAWAII 

Hon.. lulu 

IDAHO 

ILLINOIS 

■ 

Bellevilli 

■ ■ 

III. ...Mill . 






TOTAL 






188 

41 
70 

- 

i:il 

11 

120 

] U 



39 

7-.1i 
150 
173 
28 

ll 

124 

31 
57 
198 



41 

7^ 
41 

II. 17d 

142 









• 
12 

71 

39 
63 

206 
27 

114 

• 
124 

39 

321 
L09 



38 
137 

m 

23 
41 
41 

L23 
30 
18 

172 
:i7 






in 

it 

ii 

10,712 

93 
38 

ill 
30 

• 

Hi 






L78 



r 

9 

9 

29 

7 

31 

L6 

69 

2 

7 

248 

II 

20 

G 

12 

29 

4 

6 

66 
27 



1 

100 

13 

8 
6 
3 
2 
1 
1 
9 
26 



100 



8 






ILLINOIS 
Continued 



< lalesbui 

Hlghlai 
Jollel 

8 

1 1 ik Lawn. 
Oak Park 
Park Fores) 
Park I; 
I'ckin. 
Peori i 
Quincy. - 
Rockford. . . . 
Rock [aland 

Springfield 

i rban i 



INDIANA 



Inderson 

Bloomington— . 

Elkhart... . 

Fort Wayne. .. 

Hammond... 

; >■ >1 1 - - 
10 

tte 

Marion 

Michigan < 'ity. 
M Ish IW ik.i_. 
Muni ie 

Now Albany .. 
Richmond. 
South Hon.) 

; i mte. - 



IOWA 



Ames 
Burlington — 

Clinton 

Council Hint's. 
Davenport . 

Dubuque 
Porl Do 
ii.u i City... 
Mason C it j 
Ottumv 
Sioux I 
71 



KANSAS 



Hutchinson.. 

Topek 
Wlchil 



Number <>f police dep .n 



TOTAL 



24 

■ 

- 

30 
30 
62 

• 

24 
26 
24 
187 

17 
111 

110 

:: 
81 
30 



88 

■<■ 

6fl 
243 

156 

• 

: • 
63 
61 
53 
(9 

1IKI 
ill 

- 

Ki:i 



104 
33 

08 

20 

- 
34 
106 



II 
190 

20 
167 






24 

12 
36 
32 

28 
30 
17 
22 
7:i 
20 
24 

i; 
1 14 

102 

22 

56 



7> 

• 

134 

&4 
102 
236 
._.,,, 

146 

7M 

67 

'.1 
51 

17 

'.-1 

:u 

103 



IS3 
122 



L08 



I.ilil« 2~>. — Sumber «»/ 
Citiea 


Full-time Police 
Over 93,000 in P 


Department En 

>/ mini ion — < Oil 


i>l<>\ eet 

iiHMil 


. ipril $0, 1959, 




Numb) r ol police d< part- 
inciii eropli 


1 .IV 


Number c.( poll) i 
rinnl empl 


TOTAL 

121 

34 

•- 
• 

.- 

4-. 
1,070 

n 

• 
• 

124 

. 

•• 

u 

38 

44 

- 

IS 

147 

. - 
74 

117 

n 

4'< 
4* 

119 

140 

ll» 

• 

a 

- 

4i 


38 

120 

- 

47 

- 

1,006 

.- 

61 

lid 

in 

. - 1 

55 

- 
41 

- 

■'7 

137 
IIS 

. - 

71 
117 

. 

lis 
104 
47 

-- 

- 
10] 

- 


Civil- 


TOTAL 

- 

• 
401 

4 1 

BO 

74 

M 

*4 

213 

. 

44 
21 

41, 

314 

. 

B4 

lis 

• 

- 
01 

. 

121 

• 

41 

-- 

11 

14M 
031 

.- 

. 
40 

•- 
(1 


Polioe 


Civil 


KINTUCKY 

Lexington 

rt . . . 



h 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandi 1 1 

B ■ 

L.if.r. ■ 


2 

10 

1 

66 

7 
3 

2 


MASSACHUSETTS 

Continued 

Taunton .. 
VYalthum. 

tow II. . 
w •". mouth. . 
Woburn.. 

MICHIGAN 


■ i 
94 

7n 

II 

02 

M 
30 

:n 

38 
20 
42 

31 
104 
34 

i.M 

- 
4S 

■ 1 

30 

7.1 

• 

107 

4-5 

;(7 

74 

14s 

33 

'-'7 

III) 
:t7 

II 
(1 


i 

2 
13 




12 


Baj City.. 
Birmingham 
Detroit . . 


I-' 


1 

2 
13 

1 
10 

4 
14 


i, 




i 


MAINE 


17 
447 


i t Lansini 


i, 
1 
4 




Flint 






en ( Itj 
i Rapids . 

Hamtrami k... 

Hazel I'.ii k . . 

Highland Park 






.is 


MARYLAND 




2 

. - 
6 
5 

9 


J 

14 
2 




12 




Kalamazoo. - 


.'4 


Cumber land 

... 

MASSACHUSETTS 
Arlington.. 




. . . 


■I 

7 


Midland... 


1 


Mount i 1>" 


4 

19 




3 




4 






14 




2 

5 
10 
11 

3 

. 
17 

7 


Huron.. 


11 




4 




1 Oak - 


14 






11 




Waterford Town- 


4 




. 




\\ \ tndotte. . 

MINNESOTA 


















2 

7 
2 
6 


1 


tall 


Dulutb 


17 




Ricbneld 


1 




St. i 'loud. 


i 




■ rk... 
ul... 


. 




4 
- 

13 

■ 
1 
1 

• 








: . . 

I 

■ 
• 


MISSISSIPPI 

BUoxL... 

. ill**. .. 


ii 

i 


! i • ■ . • irg 
el.. 

• 


i 






109 



I ,,l,l. 25. — Sumbei <>i FuU-time Police Department Employee*, April 30, 19S9\ 
( itifn thtr 25,000 iii Population — Continued 









TOTAL 



- 1 K I 

MONTANA 

■ 
NEBRASKA 

In . 

NEVADA 

I., \ eg i 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

•I 

NEW JERSEY 

I . 
I 
Ir\ ington 

Linden 

f, ,„„i 






122 
120 






217 

I,. I 

7n 
91 

1111 

149 

290 

60 

• 
176 

IIMI 

1,043 
112 
109 

17 

94 

I. n». 

71 

113 

17 









II 


1 






31 




• 


19 




180 


31 


a 


- 


18 
















1 




3 




4 




3 




a 




5 


.1 




- 


2 


100 


22 




50 


121 




112 


15 


40 


4 


117 


5 


II 


5 


183 


1 


157 


- 




3 


-- 


8 


213 


70 


1117, 




148 


1 




11 


60 




in 




li. 






v 




4 


171 


2 




. 




17s 


111 


1 


109 






J 


47 














1 






47 














20 




1 


01 


4 


79 


7 






NEW JERSEY 
Continued 



iwn- 

BDip 

Trenton 

d ihlp 

Woodbi 

Towri>lii|, 



NEW MEXICO 



Allni'Hiorf|ue. 

I ':irlst,:i.| 

I 

; e 



NEW YORK 

Albany.. 
Lmhersl Town.. 
Amsterdam 
Auburn 
Bingham ton 
Brookbaven Town. 
Buffalo. 

( 'heck'' 

Town 

Klmira 

Freeporl 

Oreenburgb Town. 
Hempstead 
[rondequoil 

Islip Town 
[thaca 

Bllngs ton 

Lock port 
Long Beach 
Mounl I'l.Msant 

Town 
Mounl Venn 
New t.iir^li 
New Rochelle 
\cu York 
i 
Nun ti Tonan and i 
Poughkeepsli 

DO 

Rochester 
RockviUe Centre. . 
Rome 

." 
Troy 
i tli a 

tow II 
white Plains 

NORTH 
CAROLINA 

He 
Burlington 
Charlotte 

m 



Number "f jH.iic- & 
ment empl 



TOTAL 



52 

57 



213 
42 



348 

a 
a 

66 

147. 

1.536 

62 

7.1 
67 

30 
132 

GO 
79 

61 
80 
41 
61 

19 
178 

1 52 
24,486 

33 

71 
20 

IS 

59 

■ 
17'' 

S3 
159 
353 



53 
126 






• I 



52 

• 

57 

113 

76 
Bl 

93 



177 

20 



41 
40 
61 
136 

117 
1.322 

60 

47 

66 
30 

23 

41 
70 
59 
M 

19 

. 

138 

23,383 

175 

- 

71 

2ii 

500 
17 

147 
390 

117, 
169 

163 

320 



869 

117. 

7:( 
59 



1H» 



■Table 2">. — Numbered Full'time Police Department Employees, IprilSO, 1959* 
(iii<* Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 







r of police 


■ 




Numb 


r of police 


■ 




IlMlll 














cits 








TOTAL 




<i\ll- 


TOTAL 


Police 


Civil- 


















NORTH 








OKLAHOMA 








CAROLINA 








Contirnnd 








Continued 












30 




■ ro 




M 


1 


Stillu ■ 


. 




I 




193 


177 




Tuba . 






.7 






74 


R 










, oli> 


. 


116 

4* 




OREGON 




61 




Raleigb 


9 




■*■ 1< illllt 


14 


Wilmington 






■ 


Portland 






128 








t 


■ 


. 


■ 


II 


\\ Inston-Salem 


174 




15 


PENNSYLVANIA 








NORTH DAKOTA 








Ablngton Town- 














9 






:.l 




Fork 


to 


1 

• 


4 

2 


AJlquippa 


99 


81 
125" 

^7 


l 


Mlnol 


AJJentow n 


14 




Mi i.i 




OHIO 








Bethlehem 


104 


95 


•i 




Qham 




Akron .. 


Bit 


M 
161 


! . 


1 OW Dship 

• 


46 
90 

63 

156 


41 

17'.. 
ISO 


2 


■ 


1.1 




5 


4 


■ 


burg 








ChiUirotbe 


.. 


21 


1 


ford ["own- 








t'in< iriiiuU 


- 


-.1 


- 


Bhip. . . 


. 


49 


■1 


Cleveland 


. • • 


. 




■ ii 




33 




■ . 


70 


• ; 


3 


Johnstown .. 


- 


•- 


10 






- 


113 

1 


• 
Leb mon 


86 


• 


^ 






. 


• 






Lower Merion 








:.■! 






- 


Tow oshlp 


. 


123 


J 








4 


McKeesport 


117 


i i 


4M 


■ 


4', 






Mount Lebanon 








. 


71 




2 


I i.u nship 


- 


34 


4 


• 


■ 




6 


\i-u Castle 












. 


1 


New Ken Milk' I "IK. . 


. 






• 






3 


N orris town 


. 






■ 


_ 




1 


Pbiladelpl 


•- 




. 




- 
M 


• 


5 

1 
8 




1,493 

172 


1. 14t. 


47 










Qg . . . 






65 
BO 


M 


1 
6 

1 




- 


173 

31 


12 






l 












29 


2 




. 


19 


4 




larbj 






•-4 




2 


rown 1 p 




. 


-■ 


■ 


48 


• 




. 




. 


1 


' 


44 


4 J 


- 


Mifflii 


- 


14 


4 


■ 


so 




9 


■ 






8 


KJtl 


Mi 




3 


Wilkinsburg 






1 


Sandusk] 


M 




1 


Williamsport. 








. 






4 


York... 


-■ 


" 


1 


i m U i 


1 


- 














• 


91 


9 


RHODE ISLAND 








• -ivllle 




44 


1 












.• 


. 


39 
3 




- 


- 


3 


. 






TU 


■ 


2 




- 


Bl 
148 








18 


• 






2 




-• 


• 


. 


OKLAHOMA 






Ulc . . 






3 


SODTH 












44 


7 


CAROLINA 








-. 
















Mldw< 


. 


.'1 








ua 








'I 




■ 




147 


14 




- 


.- 




• 




no 


18 




' 






Hill ... 


- 






Ponca « It] 


36 


4 


. 


nburg 


77 


70 


. 



Ill 



j ,1,1, j- — \iiml>< r <>i I iili-iimt i Polk <• Department Emplo y ee ! , April 39, 1959, 
Citlet Ovei j~>.ikhi in Populati o n — Continued 









Number oi police dep iri- 

niet'i • 




TOTAL 




Civil- 


TOTAL 




' nil- 


SOUTH DAKOTA 


!" 
214 
831 

171 

:ti 

121 

19 

172 
1, 133 

31 

l, m 

30 

•ji 

40 
I6fl 

is 

:■ 

1<>-' 

■ 
(il 

20 

31 

li 

.' 
118 

• ; 


177 
17 
:tt 

I7;t 

301 

86 

'.<! 

ill 
1 00 

11.' 

13 

16 

117 

30 

-U 
20 
32 
28 
1,028 

21 

- 
157 

17 
71 
84 

16 

- 

27 

- 
- 

mi 
31 


4 
3 

9 


VIRGINIA 


187 

1S7 

77 

7' 

136 
131 

17 
96 
118 
129 

il 
IS 

59 

57 

:i4 
75 

133 
36 
34 

lis 

49 
94 

56 
80 

!-' 
'.'7 

BS 

71 

200 

1,816 
134 

i.7 

60 

7.' 

ins 


109 

171 

71 

71 
lis 

42 

- 
38Q 

r.'i 

41 
45 
56 

a 

812 

•Jin 
336 

■-. 

71 

35 
S3 

98 

41 
Jl 
91 

56 

"^ 
12 

80 

166 

a 

1,686 
130 

34 


is 




]' 


1 KSSEE 


( li irlottee\ Ille 
Dam Ills 


1 
9 


■ 


Lynchburg 
Ncu port New 
Norfolk. 

month 
Richmond 
Roanoke 

WASHINGTON 

Belling ham 
Bremei ton 
Everett 

Richland 

tie 

Spokane 
Tacoma 
v incouver 
W ,n . Walla 
Yakima 

WEST VIRGINIA 


8 




3 
41 
111 
30 


5 


He 


11 

29 

5 


TEXAS 


1 
30 

2 
9 
6 

5 


3 




:i 




3 




3 




1!' 












25 

177 










33 
2 
2 
2 
7 
160 
2 






7 


' 


( Clarksburg 

Euntlogton 

tntown 

^luirn. .. 
Welrton 
Wheeling. 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton.. 

Beloil 

Eau t l dre 

Komi 'In I.ac 

Baj 
Janesville 


1 
2 


-. 


20 




8 




5 
2 
9 
4 
1 
2 
- 

3 
4 


1 




3 










McAUen 

M i'll ih'l ... 




■ 


3 




11 
3 


rthur 


9 




1 
108 

2 
1 
3 
2 




: 


Kenosha 
La Crosse 


8 
6 


• ll\ 


Madison 

Maiutnu 00. . 

Milwaukee 


130 

l 




11 
2 

5 
4 
42 

6 




6 


UTAH 


Sheboygan 
Superior 

LU. 

Wauwatosa 

W.-st Alii-. 

WYOMING 

i 'heyenne 


1 




11 






VERMONT 


10 







L12 



Tabl« 



i Uiea » ith Population I nder 25,000 



City 



ALABAMA 






lllc 

It y. 

Attalla 

11 11 

on 

lidge 
■ 
Chlldersbu f 

o 
i 'ordo'v i 
Cullman 

Elba 
Eufnu) 

■ I 

• QVilfc 

..'1 
■ M 

Opp. 

:r;.| K 
ALASKA 

ARIZONA 






II 
19 

14 

12 

u 

■ 

4 
- 

11 

II 

4 

- 

9 



CitJ 



ARIZONA Con. 



Eloj 

I 

Olendale 

■ 

Jerome 

IN 

Kogales 

• 

BaSord 

Tempe 

i 

\\ illi.nn 

Win-low 

Vimiii-- 



ARKANSAS 






Bates\ >ll<' 
Benton \ IUe 
Blytbeville 
Camd< 

Conwaj 

l», w in 
Eudora. 
Fayetteville 

Hamburg 

Malvern.. 

Marked I n?e 

M. •< lebee 

Morrill"! 
Nashville 

Paragould — 

- 

lie 

-• 

BpringdaJe.. 

Truiii.ii ■ 
Van Bun 



CALIFORNIA 



Auburn 






2 
10 

T 

11 
3 

. 

a 

E 

4 

11 
ill 

4 
I 
- 
I 

4 

2d 

B 






CALIFORNIA 
Continued 

Beaumi 

■ii 

I 
Blythe— . 
Brow ley.. 

Burllnt in • 

l hum 

Chowchilla.. 
ont— 

i 11a. 

( lolton.. 

■ 

D 



m.. 

i i i entro 

•■ 

mdo. 
i/ille... 
Escondido.-- 

- •-- 

■ : I 

Fillmore 



■ agg 

Oilroy— 

- 
• 

rd.. 
burg. 

i 
Hillsborough 

Indlo... 

h.. 

Larkspur... 
Lompoi .... 



7 

|i. 
Ill 

H. 

18 
12 
IS 

7 

27 
12 

- 
18 

• 

i. 
12 

10 

i 
2] 

- 

■1-2 

HI 

7 

33 

30 

4J 

18 

in 

7 
HI 

12 
10 

31 

II 
II 

21 

21 

. 



21 

1-. 
12 
n 

11 



11: 



I .1,1. 



2i,. — \m tnber •>! Full-time Police Departmen i Employ <■<■*. iftril :Ut. I'/.Vf. 
< it tea l» iili Population I nder 25,000 — < nntinued 















MA 


































































8 








5 


• 


14 




; 






i: 














; 


7 




IB 




9 




M 


1 




1 


12 


; 






5 


1 










II 








28 












11 




■ 




■-'7 












44 








21 




- 












in 




18 


■ 






11 








7 






21 




19 










. 








' 




■ 








'■'■ 














in 


■' 
























COLORADO 

illlna 

< tunnison 
Julesburg 

He 
onl . 
Manitou Springs . 

Ford 

Sterling 
Trinidad 
aburg 

CONNECTICUT 

Enfleld . 

n 
Milford 
Putn .in 

I lie 
Mill... 

mr 
Soutbim 

Thomaston 

•,,r.| 

: 
•III !■■ 

•■';■!.•'■ 

DELAWARE 

FLORIDA 

• ■!•! tie 

P :rk 







Nun' 


7 

10 

7 
1. 

11 

■ 

7 

3 

11 

1 


9 

21 

. r . 
33 

Ml 

2 
9 

18 
4 

14 

21 
4 

i 
- 

19 

.'I 

i 

fi 

6 

Ifi 


FLORIDA-Con. 


1^ 






. 


. 




It 












10 


K,>rt Mi li 


in 
in 




84 


Springs. 
Oulfpoi 




Ballanri i e 


17 
6 




! 




1* 




18 


1. .k'' W ■ 


40 

■ 




II 




• 




in 

4 




in 




1^ 


N'ort! " 


30 

17 

17 




11 
6 




18 




56 




- 


Planl l 


-li 






si Vugustini 

i 


14 

. 

4 

10 


-in irl 

'.■ 

re island 


L'l 


il . 
■ 1 1 .\ in 
GEORGIA 

Anierlcus 
Ashhurn 


8 

.1 
is 



11 ! 



I .ill It 26. — \ u in In i ni Full-time Police Depot intent Employees, Ipril SO, 19 >'>. 
( itiea H ith Populotion I nner 25,000 — Continued 






GEORGIA Con 

Barm s\ illc 
Blakel) 
Brunsw irk 

rd 

i ' ilhoun 

II i 

■ n 

i 
Chaml •• 
Cochran 

t olli ge P rk 

■ 
gton 

lie 

Dublin . 

hi 
rton 
raid . . 
■ P rk 

•ii 

• 
II ipcvUle 

- 

MUlen 



MoaltrV 
ille 

Then. • ■ 
Tifton.. 











IDAHO 

Uameda 
Hi irk foot 
Buhl 

Hurlrv 

•II 

KtiiiiH" 

. . \ tile 

■ 
Kellogg 

Malad I 
Montpeliei 
Moscow 
Mow • 
\ impn 

Preston 
Rexburg 
Rupert . .. 

thonj 
Salmon. 
Sandpoinl . . 
Spi ng 
Twin Pall 
w allace 

ILLINOIS 

Abingdon 
tddison.. 

\l>"lo 
\ l«>rt> hi 

Arlington I 
Barrington 

Beardstow a 
Bell wood. . 
Belviden 

\ ill.-. 

Blur Is! ind 
Bredlej 

Brookfleld. 
Bushnell 

Calun 

n. 

Carlyle. . 
« ':»rmi . 
• -. ille 

( 'harleston 




ILLINOIS Con 

■ 
I hi Quol 

I 
i . • Uton 
l i ' Mollne. 

RdwardsA ill.'. . 
Effingham 
Eldor i'i 
Elmwood Park 

Parmington 
P irk 
Franklin I'. irk 

Oalva 



town 
i libson i 
i lillespie 

Olen Kllyn 

i llenview 
Greenville. . 
Harrisb . 
Harvard 

Harvey 

Havana 

Herrin. 

Highland 

Higbwoi 
Hlllsbon 
Hillside 
Hinsdale 

Homewood 

Hoopeston . 

Jacksonville 

Jerseyville. 

<'ity._ . 

Kenilwortb... 
La Qrai . 

Lake Foi 
Lansing 

Lawrenceville 

'. :i 

LibertyviDe 
Lincoln 
Lincolnv 
Litchfield . 
Lockpori . . . 
Lomb .r ■! 

rk 

n 

■ 



Is'uml 
police 

emplo 



11. 



ihlr 26. — Sumbet oi Full-time Police Department Employees, tprilSO, 1959, 

( iii> it M iih Population I nder 25,000 — < ontinued 






IS Con. 















ILLINOIS Con 

~ I >r i m u'~ 
'.'. ■ I i .iikf'iii 
Westmoi 
Westvillo 
■ 
White Hall 
WHmingl 
Winnel ^ 

River .... 
■■ k 
Zoiplrr.. 



INDIANA 

' 

Auburn 

Batesville 

Bedford 

Beech » li 

Bicknel! 

BlufTton. 

Boonville 

I 

Bremen 

Brookville. 

Cambridge City. 

Chariest own 

Chesterton 

Clarksville 

Clinton 

Columbl 

Columbus. . 

( 'onnersvllle 

( 'orydon 

( 'raw fordsville 

Crov* n Poinl 

Delphi 
Dunkirk 

Edinburg 

V.\\\ I 

Fair mom 
Frankforl 
Garrett. 

Ooshen 

i le 

Id - 
Qreenshurg 

Orifflth 

Hartford 

Highland 

Huntington 
Jasonyilli 

• ville 
Kendall ville.. 

Lawrencoburg . 

■ 







INDIANA Con. 

\'<>rrh Vera 

ljurg 
Plymouth. . . 

■ 
. ille 

■ir 

Sullivan. . 
Toll City.. 

■ 
Union City 

■ 
Vincennes. . - 
Wabash 

. _,. . 

Whiting 
Winchester. 

IOWA 

Algona 

- 
Atlantic... 
Audubon . 
Belle Plains 
dorf 
Bloomfleld 
Boone 

rville - 

n 

i | , 

De w Itl 

Ilk 

■ • Id 



L16 



I alilr 26. — .\iimlirr »»/ I n II - 1 i mi- Police Departmen i Employ eea, Ipril 30, \'i ',•>. 
Citiet With Population Unaer 25J0O0 — Continued 




IOWA Continued 

• ll 

lull 
llilinl.nl. H 

Kin w :11c . 

Maquoketn 

11 

ley — 
Mod tii ell 

Sheldon 

Vinton 

□ 

v. . • i ■. 

KANSAS 



Abilene 

ti 

■-.lie 

Cotaml 

i 
• 

Ellin* 

■ 
■ 
■ 



Number ol 
depot tmenl 




KANSAS Con. 
}■ red on I > 
Garden I 

i loodland 

M 

Berington 
Hiawatb 
; 

Bolton.. 
R or ton 
Hugo ton 
Indepen • 

! 

Junction 
Kingman 
Larned 
Leavenworth. . 

Manhatt 
lie 

..n 
Neodesb i 
Newton 
Norton. . - 
Olathe 

mie 

r .ii .l.i 

Pbillipsburg. 
Pittsburg 
Russell 
Bcott Citj 

Wellington 

W infield 

KENTUCKY 

Barbourvflle. 

Bellevue 

Bowling 

Carrolltj 

Catlettsl 

Centra] I 

Corbin 

( 'umherland 

Danville 

Earlington 

thtown... 

■ 
Pulton 

A II 

Bar! in 



department 






KENTUCKY 
Continued 

in 
:i\ ille 

1 

ille 
Mlddlesboro 
Moiilici lln 
Morebead 
Morganfleld 
Mount Sterling 
M urraj 
Nicholas* Ille 

. ill"' 
■ 

[lllls. 

le 

He 

ton 
!'r<>\ nil nee 

;•. ille 
Shelby* Ille. 

South Fort Mitchell 

Williamsburg 

LOUISIANA 

He 

p 

Bunkie 

■i Poinl 
( 'ovington 

( 'ruwii \ . 
De Quincj 
De i. dder 

He 

Ferriday 

Franklin 
Ooldi ■ 

Tl 

■. Ille 
Homer 
Bouma. 

■. 

Jennings 

■ 

!.■ Ille 
Mansfield 
ille 
Merry ville 

' ' :■ 

\. '.\ Iberia 
New Roads 

• ■ 
le 

'.leu 

Sulphur 
Tallulnh 



Numl 
emplo 



11 



I ,!.'■ 



•Sitmbei "I Full-time Police Department Employee*, tprilSO, 1999, 
ili Population I naer 25,000 — < ontinued 





I 
18 

7 

7 
Hi 

3 

1 

2 

2 

- 

9 

7 
3 
2 
2 
3 
1 
6 
4 
7 
- 

3 

13 

10 

7 
2 

20 

IS 

1 

20 

1 
3 

:» 
2 
8 
13 
5 

s 

7 
12 
9 
9 
7 
1 


MASSACHDSETTS 


Nun 
empl 






Continui-d 


18 

lit 

17 
10 

- 

17 
12 
18 

■ 

11 

. 

HI 
1 

111 

10 

- 

30 
3 

11 

12 
5 

15 

- 

13 
16 
21 

55 
8 
9 

17 
31 

13 

10 

2 

34 

fi 

■ 
7 

fi 

13 
6 

13 
fi 

13 
3 

16 
27 

fi 


MASSACHUSETTS 
Continued 


Is 
17 

10 
9 

9 

32 






















Mlml 






Auburn 


















w incbi 




Bridgi 


i 










MICHIGAN 


l 






■ 




31 








] i 








4 
















] | 




n 


] i 










ill: 


Berklej .. 


18 


1 




l 










i lardner 

Barrington. 


Bloon • 




' 


3 










Bingham. 




1} 


' 




















Mull 


Line 


IS 








' 


Lee 






' 








' 


Ludlow 




1 

is 


Old '1 






14 




Marblehead 










■ 


1 : 


; 


; 




■ 


11 




Millbury... 




- 




: 


M iltcii 




21 




Mont .. 




15 




Nantuckel 
















Km burj porl 

North \ . 

North A Ddo 

North Attlel 

Northbi 

North Brookfleld... 


Fremont 




■ 




1 


MARYLAND 


Gladstone 

<ir:il|.| i 1 

< Irand i 


18 


1 


Polnte 
Farms. 

Polnte Part 
Polnte 

U Q 


19 


1 


1 'r:ilik'i' 






Oxford 


28 




Pfilmi 






Plj turn:!' 




1 


I'rn\ Ini etowi 

: 




■ 


1 1 U COCk 

Harbor Beach 
[larpi i 

Hlllsd 

Holland 
Holly 








2 










Rockporl . 


li) 




Somerset 

SoUthbr lee 






















Hud 
Huntington H 

lion Mountain 


12 


■ 


t'xbridge 


10 


: 


w alpole. . . . 


Ironu ood 


17 
17 



II- 



T.il>l<- 2f>. — Vumber <>/ Full-time /'<»//««• Denartmen i Employ > < •-. i/>i H ,u. 1959, 
f itiei H iih Population f noW 25,000 — Continued 



MICHIGAN Con. 

I 

: 
:-ll 

Ludingt 

Imie 

I! 
.ill.- 

Melvii 
Menon 

Milan 
Mount M • 

M iih. 

■rv 
lie. 

i 

• II 

.id 

■ i 

Richmond 
River R 

■ 

St. Ign « 

lie 

South 11 

Summit 

■ 

MINNESOTA 

I 

I 
• 

• t 



Number "i 

police 
department 



- 
12 

•i 
n 

4 

M 

ii 

i 

•4 

8 

14 

11 

13 

. 

7 
4 

29 

4 
9 
S 
B 

4 

8 

- 

4 
7 
4 

8 

- 

6 
28 

. 

11 
■i 
■i 

U 

4 

12 

- 
80 

4 
t 

17 

t 






MINNESOTA Con. 

Brookh n < 'enter 
i 'ambrldge 
Chisbolm 
( 'loqui ' 

< 'olumbia Hi 
Crookston 

i 

Fairmont. 
Faribault 

FridJey. 
Qlencoe - 

< llenw ood 

i iolden Vallej . . 

■ 

Oranite I 

Bastings 

Uibbing 

Hopkins 

Hutchinson 

□ . 

ity. 
■ .■ 
Litchfield 
Little Falls 
Luveme.. 

to... 

ii 
Montei Idi o. - 
Moorbe id 
Morris 

New i lin. . 
Northfleld. . 
North Man! 

North St. Paul 

<>rtun\ Ule. . . 

Ml. I. , 

Red u tag. 

Redwood Falls 

Robbinsdale 

• 

s.iuk « 'en ire 
Sauk Rapids 
Bhakopee 

Thief R ■ 

■ 







MISSISSIPPI 



• n 

lie 
Brook i 

i 'barle I 
i 'lurksd • 

I ' < •] II III t . : 

' 'olumb . 

i in-.-nu 

Hazlehui 
Hollj B| 

Kosciusl 

Leland. 

Lexingtoi 

New \|l 

New t"u 

prings. . 
Oxford. 
■ 

t rlstian.. 

1 
Port Oil 

boro. . 

nt. 

' >'- 



Numl 
polii e 

Ki-iii 
emplo 



MISSOURI 

Berkeley 

• 

Bolivar 

BoonviUi 

• • 

Id. 
Butler. 
Californl 
Cameron 

Carrollti 
Carthage 

ton . 
Chillicotl 

Clinton 

■ 

Eldon 

■r 
nt 

Fulton 



llfl 



I ilil. _'<,. — \n mix r ni Full-time Police Department Employee*, ipril :m. 1959, 
( iii<* M ith Population ( naer J~>.<n><> — < ontinued 






: Con. 

lie 

■ y 

nd. 

Pop] ir Blufl 

Richmond 

Hirlimori"! Beights 

Rolla.. 

St. ( 'h ■ li 

Salem 

burj 

Union 

VVi • Plains 






MONTANA 



I 

nk 

Deer l 
Dilloi 

I 

■ 
HamUto 

■ II 

I 

1 
■ 



I 
1 

18 

it 

7 
- 

I 
li) 
10 

le 

7 
Id 
111 
3 

20 

10 

I 

4 

G 

10 

13 

i 

17 
4 

6 
12 
8 

4 

2 

II 
18 



NEBRASKA 



Alliance 
Auburn 
Aurora 

Belle vui 
Blair 

Hr.»ki-n BOW 
i 'hadroi 
i "iilum I 
i loead 
Crawford. . 

Knirlinr 
Falls i 
Fremont 
Qering 

burg . - 
Boldreg 

McCoot 
Nebraal 
Norfolk 
North Platte 
OgaHal i 
O'Neill 

Plattsmoutb .. 
Schuyli ■ 
Scottsblufl ... 

Seward 

Sidney 
Valentii i 

York 









NEVADA 



Bouldi r City 

' ' irson i 'it v.. 

Bendei 

North I. 
Sparks 

\\ innemucca 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Berlin 
Claremont . 

Durham 

Exeter 

Franklin 

Banover 

; 

Laconia 

Littleton 

Milford 

Newport 

Peterborough 

Portsmouth 

"■ r 

Somersworth 



NEW JERSEY 

Asbury P nk 
Atlantic Highlands. 
Vudubon 



NEW JERSEY- 
Continued 

Mr ill- 

Burllngl • •■ 
Butler. 

■11 

May 

■ It. 

( 'arterel 

Chatham 

■ 

Cliflside P .:- 

■ 
Collingswood. 
Cranford Township 

CresskilL.. 

D 



Dumont 
Dunellen 

■ rl 

Rutherford - 

■ IK □ 

iter 
Edison 

I iVl-Il 

Falrvlew 

Fan wood 

Flemington 

• Township. 

Franklin 

Freehold 

Oar wood. 

< Hen Ridge 

Olen Rw :-. 

Greenwich Town- 
ship. /. 

Quttenberg. 
Backi l ■ 
Baddonfleld 
Baddon II. -i. 

Dship. . 
Baledon . 

irk Beights 
Bawtho i 

Highlands 

Blghtstown 

Hillsdale 

Billside Township . 

Keansburg 

Kenilw 

Key port 
Lakewood 
i • . . 

Lincoln Park 

Linden wold 

Little Ferry 



Numl 



120 



Table 26< — S'untberoi Full-time Police Department Employees, ipril W, I'tvt, 
Citie* II ith Population I naer 25,000 — * ontinued 



City 


Nun.' 

Intent 


City 


Nim.i 






NEW JEK 

3Uvcr 


33 
34 

14 

31 

12 

17 
6 

21 
11 

t 

42 

• 
21 

8 
5 

7 

. 

13 

9 

. 

5 

6 

- 
- 

It 
41 

- 

. 

19 

. 

n 

13 

13 

31 

. 
21 

4 

11 

30 
14 


NEW JEl: 
Continued 


. 

. 
80 

40 

.- 
11 

■ 

-• 

23 

14 

47 

13 

9 
45 

7 

6 

• 
15 

5 

22 
23 

4 
19 

4 
11 

.' 
7 

12 

7 

1 

-1 

8 

f. 
11 

.', 

- 


NEW YORK Con 

• 

Belli rose 


4 
4 






Tow 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 • 
Lyndhursl Town- 




South \- 
Smith Bound 
South < >r.uii ■ 
smith Plain! ■ 
Bout h Rivet 
.ti.l'l 


Brinrclifl M 

■ i • 

■ 


















4 








i 'nion i ■ 

Tow i ship 

r tit\ 














■ 




\li.M i 


1 


Mull Hi' 






kill 


. 






. 


... 
Millti 


i 




MiUvtllc 




. 


: -hip . 








ille 






aldwell 
tford 

w • 5t field 


- 


Mount I 
Mount Hollj 
Nrptmi. CltJ 
Neptune Tow oship 

1 




i ■ rry 
ille 


IT 




. 




\\ . -• i 
West 1 
u • rtviHe 


iri r 

•• r 
j (its 


11 


North \ 
North C tldwi 










North i 




North Wild ■ 




1 














- 




• r 

• \ illi 
!■ irk 






kofl 




Oradcll 


NEW MEXICO 




1 


1 
34 


1 


Fort 1 
Fort Plain 
Frankfort... 

Fulton 

■ j 

i 

■ 
oda. 

• 


4 

- 


















. 








■ 
1 


Gallup 


. 






1 
; 


Lordsbnrft 






- 




• 


• 


Trutl 










NEW YORK 


17 




11 












► ; 




1 














■ 


- 





121 



I .il.l< 26. — \umber oj Full-time Poiice Department Employees, i[>ril SO, lu.vt. 
< itiea With Population I naer 25^000 — Continued 






VORK Con 

■ 

tnicvlllo 

Middletow • 

M 

New I 

New York Mills 

North ' 

North Pelham 

Northporl . 

North 

N'ortli T irrytown . 

Norwich 

Nund 

burg 



g 

I 

1 

urgh 



in 

17 
in 

16 

!1 
■J I 

III 
21 

It 

3 
50 

7 

16 
20 

28 

12 

• 

16 

IS 

1 
17 
16 

in 
4 

15 
2 

21 

37 
20 
18 
36 
31 
11 
3 

51 
4 

24 

11 

18 
.'.7 
2 
16 
12 
21 
24 
43 
8 
8 

n 
41 

7 






NEW YORK Con. 

Sherrill.. 
Sidney- 
Sloan. 

Smith!'..'- '. 

Southamptoi 
South Qlens Falls 
Spring Vallej 

Ille 
SufTern. . . 
Tarrytown 
Ticondei . 



Tuckaboe 
Tuppei l ike 
Tuxedo Park 
Upper Nj ack 
V\alden. . 
Walton. 

Wappingera Falls 
Warsaw. . . . 
Warwick 

Watervllel 
Watkin Glei 
Wavi rly 
tile 

Whitehall 
Whltesboro 
Vorkville - 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Ahoskie 
Albemarle. . 
Asbeboro 

Beaufort - 

Belhaven 
Belmonl 

Boone ... . 

■ i 

t 'anton. 
Chapel Bill 
Cherryvllle. 
Clinton 

Draper 

Dunn 

Edenton 

Eltzabi 

Elkin 

Farmvllle 

( Ireenville. . 
1 1 i n ilit 

■ son 

Hickory. 

ivillt 
Kings Mountain 

i 

Laurinburg. 

Lenoir 
Lexington 
Lincoln ton 
irg 
Lumberton . 
Marion 









NORTH CAROLINA 
Continued 

Morehi 

Mount ' dive 

New Bern - . 

North \\ ilk' 

Oxford. 

Plymouth 

Rockingham 
Roxboro 

Ruth' rl 
Salisbury. 

S:il)f<iid 

Selma 
Shelby 
SilerCity - 
Smithfleld 
Southern I'i: • 

Spindale . - 

ille . 
Tarboro 

! 

'■ 

\\ adesb 
Wake Forest 
Washington. 
White vflle 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck 

Devil- 1 

Dickinson 

Qrafton 

town 

.•1 

Rugby.. 

Valley City 

■ ton. 
Willis ton 

OHIO 



Amberley .. 
Amherst 
Ashland . 

Allien- 

Avon. 

A vnii I. dti 

ille. . . 

it t \ Vill tge 
Bedford 
Bellaire. 
Bellefonl tine 

Melle\ ue 

Belpre.. 

■ 

Bowling Green 

Ii 
Bridgeport 
Brooklyn 

Itruiik Turk 
Bryan. . 
Bucyrus 
l 



Nun:' 

■ men! 
empli 



L22 



Tabic 26. — IVumbet <>i Full-time Police Department Employee*, tpril (". 1959, 
Cities It ith Population t nder 25,000 — Continued 



OHIO Continued 

t 'amhrldec 
Campbell 
( 'arej 

rarrollton . 
< "«■! i ii.i 
Chagrin K ill 

Ille 

fly.lt' 

Columbl ,!: i 
( 'onneaul 
ton. 

.... 

Crooks\ Ille 

Delaware 
Dennison. 

kc 

ElRlWOOd PI 

r M 

:k 

Kr.inklm . . 

Fremont 

■ 
D alii polls. 

' 1 1 r.ir. I 

floM M 

Orandv lew Heights 
'ireenfiel.i. . 
OreenhilN. . 
Ille. . 
'•■ 
■ 
Hubbard 

In<li:in BUI 

■i 

Ille Village... 

Unooli 

nd. 

n 
■ ■. ille 

lont 

•y 

\ti.l<ilr|».rt 



\ i uti t ■• i "f 
police 

■ mployee* 



Citj 



OHIO Continued 

Napoleon 

. ille 
New Boston 
New burgh Hi 

A II 

Now Lexington 
N< « Philadelphia 
New ton Fall 
Miles . 
North Baltln 
North Canton 
North College Hill 
North < llmstl 
North R 
Nor walk 
i lakwood 
Oberlln 
Orrville 

Oxford 

Palnesvllle 

Parma Hel| 

Perrysburg 

Plqua 

Pomexoj 

Dti : 

\i.t\ enna 
Reading. . 
Rittman 
Rockj Riv< 

•d 
St. Bernard 
st. Clairsvilli 
81 Maryt 

Setting 

Bbadyside 

Shelby . 
Sldnej .. 
Silverton . 
Solon. 

BtrongsvUle.. 
St rut her-. .. 
TaDmadge. 
Tltlin 

Tlpp City- 
Toronto 
Troy.. 
Uhrichsville 
Inion City 
1'nivi 

Croatia 
Van w erl 

■rth 
■ 
W ;irri'ii^\ ille 

Wellington 

Ille 



WiUard 

Willoughbj 

Willowlck... 

\N ilmin^t. i 
Windham 



depart m< nt 






. 

: 
: 

u II 

■ 



OHIO Continued 

OKLAHOMA 

\l\.i 
Ardmore 

Black well. 

( tl.lH.il> : 

tab 
■ 
Chicka8ha. 
Claremore. . 

Clinton 



Cushing. . 

Dramrigbt 

i »m can 

Our. ii.t 
Edmond. 

Eufaula 

Ick 
Guthrie... 
Ouymon 
Healdton 
Henryetta. . 

■ .. 

■ .ille 

;. . . 

lillL-n 

■ 

Lindsay. .. 

B 
Okmulgee 

I'.rry 

Pryor < "reek 
Purcell 












I. .1.1. 



2<>. — Sumbei <>/ Full-tint* Police Department Employees, tprilSO, 1959, 

< it,. * I' </// Population I nder J.'iJioe — < ontinued 









■ 

Bei I 
C i t j 
lie 

>..k.. 
PENNSYLVANIA 

l 

■ 






\NIA 
Continued 

H. tli. I 

III 
Blakely 
Bloomsburg 

Braddock 
Bradford 
Brentw 1 1 
Bridgeport 

\ ill.- 
Bristol 
Brockv. ■•. 
Brookvilie 
Brownsville 
Burnbam 
Butler 
California 

Hill 

□dale 
Carlisle 

Shannon 
iiiqua 
Cbambersburg 
Cb irleroi. . 
( 'lair ton. . 
Clarion. 
Clarks Summll 

Qeld 
Clifton Heights 
Clymer 
t !o ildale 
i !oatesi (lie 
Collingd ill 
i 'olumbia 

ell .Hi' 
i 'onsbohocken . . 
Coplay 
< 'oraopolis 
Corry 

Coudei port 
Crafton 

ana 
• Hi u ens\ ill. 
town. 
Danville 
Darby . . 
Derry 

Donnonl 
Downingtown 
stown 

I >ii Bol - . 
Dunmore . 
1 tuquesne ... 
I nil yea 

1 onemaugb 

Will' 

fcK< esporl 
Pittsburgh. 

.v ii Tow ii 

■ 
Eddy stone 
Edgewood 
orth 



Number ..f 






PKNNSYLVANIA- 
Continued 

. llli 
V.Yvi ■ii.. ihi.iu ii 
Ell wood « ii . 
Kintii iu- 
Emporlum 
irtb 

Farrell 
Ford Cll 

■ Hills 
Forty Fort 

dn Hill 
Ft ickville . 
Franklin 

Freeport 
Gallitzin 
Gettysburg. 
< lirardville 
• llassport 
Glenolden 

istle 
Qreensburg 

Greeni ill.- 
Grove • ii\ 
Hamburg 

• r 

Hanover Township. 
Harrison Township 
Hellertown 
l lollidaysbui 

; tie. , 
Hummelstow - 
Huntingdon 
Indiana 
[ngram.. . 
Iru in 

Jenkintown 
Jermj n 
Jersey Shore 
Jim Thorpe 
Johnsonburg 

Kenhorsl 

Kingston - . 

■ Ing 

Kill 7,1 IIW II. . . . 

Lansdale 
Lansdow no. 
Lansford 

LarksviUe 

Latrobe 
Laureldale . 

Lehigh ton.. 

I. nil/ 

Llttlestown 
Lock Haven 
Low er Moreland 

Tow nabip 
Luzerne ... 

Maham 



Number of 
employees 



llM 



Table 26.— IS 



umber <>i Full-time Police Department Employees, Ipril SO, 1959, 
(itir-* with Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



I 



PKNNSYLVANIA 
Contmuf (1 

! 

Marcti! n< 

' : iw n 

Ml \ : 

1(1 

\|, K. ■ 

M cS her ry stow n 
Meadvl ■ 

■ lown 
Midlnml 

M llll'OUI M>' 

Miller 
Mill\ 

Milton 

Monaca 

Monongahela . 

• 

Mount Carmel 

Moon I Jn> 
Mounl Olivi 
Mount Peon 
Mount • ■ 
Mounl 

M iinh. ill 

tow n. 

■ ' * 

umber land. 
New Holland 
New ! 

Nortb I 

North I 

North K.ist . 

North.- 

North '■'• • 

' 

I 

oil City 

Olyphanl 
Oxford 

■ 

1 
Plymouth . 

■ 
; 



Number ol 

department 
employi i • 



- 
20 

4 

8 
M 

. 
I 

111 

3 

- 

H 

4 
1 

- 
4 

9 

.M 
11 

l 

- 
. 
7 
4 

4 
. 
1 

4 

- 
4 
- 

4 
4 

- 
- 
- 
- 

- 

- 

N 
4 
. 

: 



City 



PKNNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

: Tow nshlp. . 
Rankin. 

Renoi o 
Republic < 
Res in i 
Ridgwa) 
R idle j Part 

ag Spi ing. . . 

it 
Bt. M urys 

Schu) Ikiil I 1 
Scottdale. 

kMi 
Hill. 

\ ille . 

: |0 ll 

Shillington. . 
Shippensbui | 
Slatington. . 

■ 

ton. 

South I 

■ - 1 ■ 1 1 r k' 
Soul I. 
burg 
South Williamsport 
. 

■ 

Stowe 

Summit Bill 
Sunbury.. 

Sw arthmore 

rsville 

lie... 
Turtle Creel 

■ grift. 

\\ . • r 



departi I 



l 

4 

. 
I 

j 

. 

18 
2 

B 

4 

3 

1 
- 

4 
4 1 

- 
Ill 

I 

,{ 






PENNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

D 
W . • Ri 
u . t Vi< w 

D 

\\ ilson. . 

\\ yoming .. 
w yomiss Dg 

food 



RHODE ISLAND 



Hurrilh ille 

I 
Cumber! ad 

• ich 

Johnston 

Lincoln. 

i at b 

tow n 

■ '■>---- 

ck 



N'liinl 
polli < 

• - 1 1 1 1 • I • 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Abbeville- .. 

Andei - 
Andrews 

• . : rg . . . 

rl 

ttsville. 
, trille... 

fi a. 

ter 

Clinton 



Darlington 

Dillon. 

! ill^. . . 

lie. 

I 



125 



l.il.l.iji.. — Wumbero) Full-time Police Department Employees, tprilSO, l't.~><>. 
Cities With Population I nder 25,000 — Continued 









■ 

Continued 



: 
'•'■ 






SOUTH DAKOTA 



1 

)h 



TENNESSEE 



B 
D 

illi 

■ 

Columb 

■ 
; 

; 

I 

' 
; 

; 
I 

I 



. F.SSEE Con. 

McMltu 
Milan 

low n 

Mull! ' 

Murfrei 
Newport 

Rockwi • 

ShelbyviUi 

8outb Pittsburg 

Union Cltj 
Wlncbestei 









TEXAS 

Alamo Heigl 

Alpine 

Andrews 

Arlingl 

A l hens 

Atlanta. _ 

Ballinger 

ity 

Beevllle 

Bellaire .. 

Belton 

Ides.. 
Big Spring 
Bonham . 
Bradj 

■ ridgi 
Hit-nli u 
Brownfleld 

Brownw I 

Burkburnett 
Calvert 
n 

Carrizo Sprii i 
Carthagt 

Childress 

Clebui : 
Clevel 
Colemai 
College 

Columl 

Commerce 

■ 

Donn i 



1 

10 

14 

I 

6 

11 

42 
6 
5 
5 
7 
9 

IS 
4 
1 
■ 

11 
5 

7 

14 

21 
4 
1 
5 
2 
4 
2 
6 
3 

7 

8 
:i 

5 

in 

- 

I 
IC 

- 

7 
B 

12 

- 



TEXAS Continued 



Dublin. 

Edinburt 

F:ilfurn i 
Ployd 

Fort Btockton . . 
• -burp.. 

GatesviUe.. 

Gilmer. 

CJreen\ i: 
Haltom (ity. 
Hamlltoi 
Benders 
Henrietta 
Ileref. ■■ 
Highland I 
Hillsboro. . . 
Hondo 
Enntsville 

inville 

Jefferson. 

Karnes I '.ty. 

Kaufman.. 

K'i irville 

Kilpore 

Killeen 

I . : 1 " ■ ! 



■n 

Lampasas. 



-■■ 

Lerelland 

Liberty 

Littlefield 
Livingston 

Lnekliart 

Lufkin 

Luling 

Marlin. 

Matbis 

McGn 
McKinney 
Memphis 
Mercedi 

. i. 

Mineral Well- - ... 

Monah ins 
Mount Pie 

ind 
New Boston 
New Braunl 





Nun: 

department 
emplc 



13 

10 

3 
24 

1 

4 

3 

1 

21 

4 
8 
19 
6 

H 

ia 

7 

11 

1 

14 



!•_'<; 



Table 26. 



\u mini- t>i Full-time Polia Department I mployees, IprilSO, 1959, 
Cities " ith Population I ruler 25,000 — Continued 





Nun 

dcptu 1 

< nil'! 




police 
<l< pari iii> n! 
i mpli 


City 


Vim. 
emplo 


TKXAS Continurd 
< >lnej 


- 

14 
11 
13 

7 

4 

13 
2 
4 

- 
14 
7 
7 
3 
3 
6 
<< 
o 

21 
8 
5 
- 

13 

23 
3 
2 

10 
o 

12 

ft 

• 

9 
1C 

- 
13 
14 
12 

12 

4 
3 
4 
2 

5 
6 

12 
6 
3 
3 
2 
3 
4 
2 
4 

12 


11 
3 

. 

7 
4 


I'TAH Continued 

South ' ■. Ii 
South 

. ille 

• 


4 

11 

ft 

5 

11 

3 
6 
2 
9 

. 

7 
8 
2 

ft 
5 

9 

ti 
5 
5 
6 
12 
6 
ti 

5 

11 
2 
4 
3 
5 
9 
12 
16 
8 
12 
IS 
12 
10 

14 

12 

.. 
11 

3 

9 

29 
ft 


VIRGINIA Con. 

Virginia Beach 

\\ llliami burg 
\\ incnestcr 
\\ ytheville 

WASHINGTON 


. 












• 


VERMONT 

Bennington 
Brattleboro. 


28 


irt* 


Viihiirn 










Belli t 






Buckli 








16 




Hartford 




- 




1 'llll 


j 


1 


Middleburj 
Montpelier. 






\tu port 


Collegi 1 


j 




Rutland 






St. tlbans 
St. Johnsburj 
Springfield 


D '.inn 


■ 






12 




Enumcl .« 


4 




• rburj 


]] 




\\ indsor 


Grand 1 




Stnlthville. 


VIRGINIA 
Abingdon 


4 






16 


• n. . . 


















Sulphui 


Altavista. . . 




in 


Appalachla. . 








Ashland. . 


Mi dii il Lake 
i >ake 

Mourn Vir: 

Vard, 

Bremerton 

t »;ik Harbor 


. 






]; 


T< rr> 11 


r.| 




Big Stoi 


HI 


Terrell Hill?.. 




46 


Talla. 


Bluefield 






Bristol 


. 


' 


Buena Vists 

Chin gut 

Christ 
Clifton Forgi 


< Mll:ik 


', 






is 




Port I 


17 




• 
4 




Pullman 


1 












', 


Winters 


( lllj" | • 
















Fannv Ille 


)J 






4 


UTAH 


In 








. rn 










. 


il 




4 


: 


i ell. 
















WEST VIRGINIA 

n.( ki.v 


. 


■ 






















- 










' 




■ •] 














1 


Murray 




■ 
















4 


■ 
: 


' 


H In ton 










1 




• 




; 









1-- 



I iliii _''■ — N ii in In i nj I nil - 1 1 mi Police Department I mployees, \pril SO, 1959, 
i i H iilt Population I nder 25,000 — < ontinucd 





3 
4 

4 

6 
11 
4 
2 

2 
2 

4 

12 
14 
14 

17 
7 
4 
3 
3 

12 
5 

4 

: 
3 




ii 

: 
7 
3 
5 
5 
5 
in 

4 

8 
3 
4 
1 
17 
23 
4 
4 
3 

13 
6 
12 
30 
3 
7 
4 

20 
10 
4 
2 
4 


s 
10 
7 
6 
2 

13 


'iNSIN Con. 






WISCONSIN Con. 








i 












i 












1 










































KinitM • :•. 


• 












1 




I J 














18 




Little <'hui.' 




.11 










.. 




: 








ia 






ukee 
Whiteflsn Bay . 

WYOMING 
Buffalo 


•ii 




Medl 




iiir 




9 




G 




WISCONSIN 


Merrill 




■ 










5 








11 




ondon 

New Kichinori'l 

■ reek 




3 












4 




imowoc. . . 








.11 






Lovell.. 






Tills 






Plattevllle.. 




in 


■ 


itb 
Portage 

Porl Washington... 
Prairie 'in i ! 

Rhinelan lei 










11 




■ ■ - 


1'. 
17 










Torringl ■ 
Worland 






in 



o 



L28 



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