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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

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Given By 







CRIME 



IN THE UNITED STATES 



ISSUED BY 

JOHN EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



INFORM CRIME REPORTS — 1960 




FOR RELEASE 

MONDAY, P.M., JULY 24, 1961 

PRINTED ANNUALLY 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United St(il<>s 



PRINTED ANNUALLY— 1960 



Advisory: Committee on I triform Crime Records 
[nternational Association <>f Chiefs of Police 
Stanlej l\. Schrotel, Chief of Police 
( lincinnal i. ( )hio. ( hairman 



.1. Edgar Boover, Director, Federal Bureau <>l [nvestigation 
I ,S. Department «•! Justice, Washington -~>. D.C. 



D ^OSiTORy 



' sited States Gorernmeni Printing Office, Washington, !>.<:.— L96] 



Contents 



Preface VI 

Summary 1-23 

[introduction 24-31 

The index of crime, I960 32-77 

United States, I960 (table 1) 33 

United Stair-, 1959 60, by geographic divisions and 

Si airs (table 2) * 34-37 

States (table 3) 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas (table l) . . . . "».'!-77 

( ral United States crime statistics, 1960 78-103 

('n\ crime trends, 1959 60, 1>\ population groups (table 

5) " 79-80 

City crime rates, by population groups (table 6) .... 81-82 
City crime trends, I960 versus average of L955 59 (table 

7) 82 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

by population groups (table s ) 83-84 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

by geographic divisions (table 9) 85-86 

Persons found guilty (table i<») 86 

Monthly variations (table 11) 87 

Offense analysis, trends, 1959-60 (table 12) 87 

T\ pe and value of property stolen and recovered (table 

13) 88 

Value of property stolen, by type of crime (table 14) . . ^ s 

Arrests 89-103 

City and rural arrest rates (table 15) '. ,l1 

Arrest rates, by population groups (table 16) 91 

City arrests by age groups (table 17) 92 

City arrests of persons under 18, under 21, and under 25 

>le 18 93 

City arrests, distribution by sex (table L9) 94 

City arrests by race (table 20) 95 

City arrest trends, 1959-60 (table 21) 96 

City arrest trends bj sex, 1959 60 (table 22) "7 

Rural arrests by age groups (table 23) 98 

Rural arrests of persons under 18, under 21, and under 

25 (table 24) 

in 



Pagi 

Arrest - < !on1 inued 

Rural arrests distribution by ses < t »t I »l« • 25) kmi 

Rural arresta by race (table 26) nil 

Rural arrest trends, 1959-60 (table 27) 102 

Rural arrest trends by sex, 1959-60 (table 28) 103 

Police employee data km 128 

Police employees killed, 1959 (tables 29 and 34) .... 104 
Police employees killed, 1960 (tables 30 and 34) .... 104 
Full-time police employees, number and rate (tables 31 

and 34) L05, 107 

('i\ili:m employees, percenl of total (table 32) 106 

Assaults on police officers, 1960 (table 33) 106 

Full-time State police employees, I December 31, 1900, and 

State police killed 1959, 1960 (table 35) i»>7 

Police employees in individual <itir<. December 31, I960 

(tables 36 and 37) 10S-126 

Offenses in individual areas over 25,000 (table 38) by popula- 

tion groups 129-141 



AROUND THE CLOCK 




Preface 

( )iif of the best indicators "!' la^w enforcement professionalization 
involves the proper reporting and collecting of police activity and 
crime incidence, along with intelligent interpretation and use of these 
statistics .it local level. This is the primary purpose of the Uniform 
Crime Reporting program. By their very nature, national compila 
tions are limited in their pracl ical use locally. ( )n the other hand, 1 i >«■ 
chief or sheriff armed with significanl data made possible through 
businesslike records is uniquely qualified to present for examination 
the community crime picture. With such Facts, meaningful direction 
can be given t<> enforcement, treatment and prevention programs by 
the executive head of the department as well as other responsible 
cit izens, public ;in<l private. 

It has been gratifying t<> me to observe the ever-increasing number 
and quality of law enforcement annual publications. Even more 
significant is the widespread scientific use <>t' crime counts on a daily 
and monthly basis to identify "trouble spots" and plan operations to 
cope with the growing crime problem. Emportant too is the increasing 
frequency with which the nationwide press has reported thoughtful 
and knowledgeable interpretation of local clime conditions by execu- 
tive heads of enforcement agencies. All of this point- to progress in 
the practical use of this valuable information. 

Crime reporting is an essential element of effective police work. 
This program, devised by the [international Association of Chiefs of 

Police over 30 years ago, is a nument to the cooperat ive attitude of 

local and Federal agencies. It also carries with it. however, heavy 
responsibilities for each contributor sheriff or chief particularly to 
assure uniformity and completeness of reporting. This is a personal 
responsibility which he owes not only to his own community but also 
as a | .art ne r in this joint effort of professional law en forcement. 

A wide audience is served by this program. It is imperative thai 
we, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Enternational Association 
of Chiefs of Police and the 7,700 contributors police, sheriffs, and 
state police do the utmost to produce the most useful information 
possible. 



T 



John Edgab 1 l"o\ ik, / >:, ■ 



Su 



in in; 



ar\ 



I / // is s, i-t ion is fat i In reader interested in tfu general crimt picture. 

nical da it primarily to police, social scientists, <m<l 

\resi nted in the following sections. If you wish 

a*sixtanc\ in th< in', rpn tation of any information in this publication, 

pleasi communicati with tin Director, Federal Bureau of Investiga 

tion, f 'JS. I >< /"" 'no nt of Justice, Washington '■•. D.( '. I 

< i ime ( apsuie 

Willi 1,861,300 serious offenses reported in I960, crime continued 
its upward surge, 11 percent over L959. First year of the sixties 
recorded a new all-time high, with 98 percent more crime than 
in L950. 

• t ■■;■■ 

Crime continued to outstrip population growth over I (o 1. 

Crime dock shows lour serious crimes per minute. 

Robbery had most significant increase in I960, ii|> I s percenl 

over L959. 
Criminal activity reached peak in November, after low in March, 

I960. 

* * 

Police recoveries cut loss of over $570 million in stolen property 
to 18 cents on dollar. 

[ncreased police effectiveness resulted in 71 percent more cases 
cleared by arrest and 65 percenl more persons charged than 
in L950; meanwhile courl convictions up I- percent. 

t ■-:■■ ■:■ 

Arrests totaled 3,640 for every 100,000 persons in I960. City 
arrests almost three t imes rural rate. 

Arrests of persons under I s more than doubled since L950, while 
population of youths, ages L0 17. increased by less than one- 
half. 

Rural and city arrests up •"> and 2 percent over L959. 

Arrests of juveniles climbed 8 and 9 percent in rural and city 
areas respectively. 

I ile arre L0 and 3 percent in rural and city areas. 

• * • 

I ty eight police employees killed in I960 and over 9,000 police 
assaulted. 

1 



( i ime Index 1 fitih 

The total number of criminal acts thai occur is unknown and im- 
measurable; however, based on reports to lav enforcen ticies 
in I960, there were 1,861,300 crimes of murder, forcible rape, robl 
aggravated assault, burglary, larcen} $50 and over, and auto theft. 
This total figure for the United States was 1 I percent higher than in 
1 !'.".'.'. or •_'■">■ '.^T 11 more serious crimes than the prior year. These crimes 
which are counted bj police as they become known to them are the 
index to criminality in the United States. 

The following table and chart graphically portray the crime situa- 
tion in the United States during I960. A.rrest data which is discussed 
in subsequent pages of this publication furnishes detailed information 
on oi her t \ pes of criminal acts. 





number <>f 
off< ■ 




• mi 




1060 










iber 




Nu: 




ToI;il 


1,547,590 


1,861,300 


+313.710 


+20 


+2* ■ 


+ 14 






Murder - 


8,290 

11. 2 in 

72,640 

116,020 

663,500 


9,140 

130,230 
B21, urn 
474,900 
321,400 


+850 

+1,320 

+16,430 

+14,210 

+157,600 

+37, 200 


+10 

+23 
+ 12 

+22 

+ 13 


+560 

+ 13.771) 

+122,800 


+6 






Robber; 


- 












+ 14 


Auto Ili.fi 


+9 







Crime and Population 

For ;i number of years, crime, based on the index, lias been increas 
ing four times faster than the population. A crime rate offers a 
method of measuring crime in relation to population, [f the crime 
rate increases, then crime is outstripping population growth. It can 
be seen from the following table that population growth does not 
account for a substantia] portion of the upsurge of crime. In I960, 
the crime rate was 24 percent above the average for the past 5 years; 
66 percent over 1950; and 96 percent higher than L940. 



Crime Indox 



rriiii.- per 100,000 Inbal 






hange 



• 






Murder 

i 

i nd over 

Auto tbi n 

■> 



!.<>:«: 9 



+ 13 






• 1 
8 : 



+ 4 
+ 17 



+16 



CRIME INDEX TREND 

UNITED STATES --1960 

1959 - 1960 PERCENT CHANGE 

(BASED ON NUMBER OF REPORTED OFFENSES) 



18.3". 



14.2 



6.4". 



2.6 '. 



17.6 % 



5.4 % 



14.2 "■• 



9.4 "■■ 



19 5 9 



LEVEL 



TOTAL MURDER FORCIBLE ROBBERY AGGRAVATED BURGLARY LARCENY AUTO 

fBI CHART B * PE ASSAULT OVER $50 THEfT 



i 2 



CRIME CLOCKS 

1960 




SERIOUS CRIMES 
4 EACH MINUTE 




MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE 

OR ASSAULT TO KILL 

ONE EVERY 3 MINUTES 




MURDER 
ONE EVERY 58 MINUTES 






FORCIBLE RAPE 

ONE EVERY 34 MINUTES 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 
ONE EVERY 4 MINUTES 



ROBBERY 
ONE EVERY 6 MINUTES 






BURGLARY 
ONE EVERY 39 SECONDS 



LARCENY 
($50 and over) 

1 EACH MINUTE 



AUTO THEFT 
ONE EVERY 2 MINUTES 



Chart 2 FBI CHART 

Crime Calendar 

There is no month without crime, l>ut certain crimes occur more 
frequently in their season. Crimes against the person, most notably 
aggravated assault and forcible rape, reach their peaks in the warmer 
or summer months of the year. An exception is negligent man- 
slaughter, which, mainly comprised of traffic deaths, occurs more 
frequently in the winter months due to fewer hours of daylight and 
hazardous driving condil ions. 

Property crimes, particularly robbery, burglary and auto theft, 
tend to rise during the winter months. More hours of darkness pro- 

vid e contributing factor. During I960, March was the low crime 

month for the year in volume, December, I960, was the high month 
for murder, manslaughter by negligence, robbery and burglary. 

The follow ing charts demonst rate I he I960 monthly varial ions com- 
pared to the moving average for the past 5 years, 1955 59. 



( lime ( Mfj 

The total cost <>f crime in human waste, misery, and material l<» 
incalculable. Some indication of direct property I" se lue to certain 
crimes is obtainable from the Following averages. For each robbery, 
there was n loss of $256; burglary, $183 ; larceny, $74; and auto theft, 

$830. Thieves, then, in I960 stole over $570, ,000 in loot Effective 

police work reduced the loss 52 percent through recovery <>r stolen 
property, Automobile recoveries renin in at a high level of 92 percent 
whereas other personal items such as Furs, jewelry, clothing, etc., are 
recovered with difficulty because of the lack of identification and quick 
assimilat i«>n into r\ eryda} living. 

i rime \iuth znl 

The startling IT percent increase in robberies reported by city police 
during 1960 marked it as the most significant crime of the year. 
Details as t<» robbery by type and distribution for I960 compared with 
1959 are shown in chart 5. ( lity arrest trends indicate that both adults 
and youths under I s years of age contributed t" the robbery problem, 
with an I s and 25 percent rise respectively within each age group. 

Burglary, with a nationwide increase of I s percent, when examined 
more closel) reveals a •_'•_' percent greater frequency of night break-ins 
of homes. Night attacks <>n nonresident buildings increased 17 percent 
and da} light burglaries of i hese premises 15 percent. 

I. rceny was up 11 percent in I960, with .-ill types of thefts con- 
tributing to the substantial increase from ;i Low of 7 percent in theft 
of auto accessories i<» a high of 1 1 percent in thefts from autos. Shop- 
lifting ami purse-snatching were also n|> 1 1 percent, while pickpocket 
activity increased 11 percent. Many of these thefts, as well as locally 
Btolen automobiles, can be prevented if law-abiding citizens will heed 
police advice t<» afford better protection to personal property. 

During Augusl I960, police departments in cities with over 25,000 

inhabitants completed a special questionnaire on aggravated assault. 

The purpose of the survey was i<> test the uniformity of reporting 

nationwide and also to gather additional data on ilii- crime which 

poa il problem i<» police. These serious attacks have increased 

dily over the . ind although the police clear by arrest 76 out 

ery 100 aggravated assaults and charge 63 persons, only 25 are 

found guilty as charged and I s for some lesser offense. Of all criminal 

[red with aggravated assault is the least likely to be 

(•<.n\ icted of ili" offei ged. 





M 




KEY: 




OW Ofr )00 W Oft >Ofr 

AGAINST 

1955-1959 MOVING AVERAGE 



•30% 




-20% 



-30% 



( ha,t 3 







m m m m m m 

THE PERSON 

VARIATIONS FROM 1960 ANNUAL AVERAGE 
♦30% 






♦20% 



10% 



NEGLIGENT 

MANSLAUGHTER 



\ 



ANNUAL .'' \ 




AVERAGE 
-10% 

-20% 



-30% 

J 

♦30% 





\ \ 


'*„, 


* 










1 
ft 

1 
' 1 
















** "m 


<&\ 





























JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



♦20% 



AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT 




•30% 



FBI CHART 



Chart .»• 








KEY. 



0* «■ >0C O0( <♦ >06 

AGAINST 

1955-1959 MOVING AVERAGE 



♦30% 
♦20% 

♦10% 



ROBBERY 


■ 




i 


■n 


IHII 




Hi 




-20% 

-30% 
♦30%' 

♦20% 

♦10% 

ANNUAL 
AVERAGE / 

- 10% 
-20% 
-30% 



B. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC 



LARCENY 


■ 


I 


I 


I 




I 


■ 


I 


I 


■ 


I 


I 




■ 


I 


■ 


■ 


■ 


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I 


B 


a 


B 




B 



— 4 1 m» .mi 



J L 



( hurt t 



W M>' «» W W A* 

PROPERTY 









♦30% 

♦20% 

♦ 10% 
ANNUAL 



VARIATIONS FROM 1960 ANNUAL AVERAGE 



BURGLARY 








I 


































B 




• 



FBI CHART 



Chart t 



ROBBERY 

PERCENT CHANGE, 1959 AND 1960 
AND PERCENT DISTRIBUTION. 1960 



KEY: 1<?S9 ! I 1960 



TOTAL 
♦ 17* 



49= • HIGHWAY 




COMMERCIAL 
HOUSE 



RESIDENCE 



OIL STATION 



SEE TABLE 12 



COMMERCIAL 
HOUSE 



HIGHWAY 
♦ 13* 



OIL STATION 
♦ 31* 



RESIDENCE 

+ 11T 



P 



( Inn I ."> 









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FBI CHART 



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11 



A- .1 result <»t' the survey in A 1 1 lt< i - 1 I960, il was found that of t ! 
aggravated assaults resolved by investigation, prosecution was au- 
thorized in <>l percent of the cases; in 27 percent of the assaults the 
.11 refused to cooperate with the police or prosecution, ami in the 
remaining 1- percent, prosecution was found unwarranted. Chart f> 
indicates the type of weapon used in these serious assaults and the 
category <>l' the assailant. Some understanding of the police preven- 
tion, as well as tli* 1 prosecutive problem surrounding aggravated as- 
sault, becomes evident when it is noted that 65 percent of these attacks 
were committed by members of the same family, neighbors or 
acquaintances. 

Crime and Police Effectiveness 

One measure of police effectiveness is their ability to clear crimes 
by the arrest of the person or persons responsible. In spite of the 
II percei i upsurge in crime during I960, police clearances, percentage- 
wise, were only slightly less than reported in 1959. The extra work- 
load created by the 17 percent increase in city robberies was one 
factor in reducing the clearance rate from 43 out of every LOO rob- 
beries in L959to39 in I960. 

< hart 7 demonst rates police effect iveness during I960 in clearing by 
arrest of the offender certain crimes against property and against 
the person. In reviewing this chart, it should be remembered that 
police necessarily concentrate investigative attention on the more 
serious crimes. In addition, due to the great volume of burglaries, 
larcenies and auto thefts, a number of which are of a less serious 
nature since property of little value was stolen or the vehicle was 
recovered within a few hom-. detection of the offender becomes more 
difficult dni' to the alienee of witnesses and lack of identification of 
property stolen. 

From 1950 to I960, crime increased 84 percent. During tin same 
period, police clearances of crimes by arrest were up 71 percent. The 
niimher of persons charged by police for these offenses increased 65 
percent. The number of persons found guilty rose 42 percent. Police, 
therefore, have kept pace with the crime increase. The lag in court 
convict ions is not primarily within police control. See chart 8. which 
was developed on the hasis of annual percent changes from 1950 to 
I960. 

During I960, city police reported 76 percent of all persons charged 

for all offenses were found guilty. When examined by offense, those 

persons charged with driving while intoxicated had the highest irui It \ 
rate, at 80 percent, and those charged with negligent manslaughter 

the lowest, at 36 percent. As pointed out above, police clearances of 
property crimes arc generally low compared to the more vicious crimes 

12 



CRIMES CLEARED BY ARREST 

1960 



HE PERSON 

NOT CLEARED 



92.3':; 



MURDER 



83.3 



" MANSLAUGHTER 



m% 



FORCIBLE 
RAPE 



ICQ" AGGRAVATED 
/J.O b ASSAULT 



AGAINST PROPERTY 



FBI CHART 



CLEARED 






NOT CLEARED 




38.5% 


ROBBERY 


















29.5% 


BURGLARY 












^0.1% 


LARCENY 












25.7% 


AUTO THEFT 















( hurl 7 



13 



POLICE ACTIVITY 
AND PERFORMANCE 



1960 OVER 1950 



BASED ON OFFENSES 
KNOWN TO POLICE 



♦ 80 — 



♦ 60 — 



♦ 40 — 



♦20" 




CRIMES CLEARED 

BY ARREST 

UP 71°g OVER 1950 



PERSONS CHARGED 

BY POLICE 

UP 65°; OVER 1950 



COURT CONVICTIONS 
UP M% OVER 1950 



1950 



1960 



FBI CHART 



(hart 8 



14 



PERSONS FOUND GUILTY 

1960 
PERCENT OF PERSONS CHARGED 



TOTAL 




76.3% 




Driving while Intoxicated 




79.8% 


Forgery and Counterfeiting 




77.2% 


Traffic and Motor Vehicle Laws 




77.1% 


Narcotic Drug Laws 




75.9% 


Drunkenness; Disorderly Conduct; Vagrancy 




73.6% 


Larceny 




72.0% 


Liquor Laws 




69.0% 


Burglary 




^67.4% 


Embezzlement and Fraud 




64.4% 


Auto Theft 




64.0% 


Weapons: Carrying, Possessing, Etc. 




61.7% 


Offenses against Family and Children 




|61.6% 


Sex Offenses (Including Prostitution and Commercialized ViceJ 61.5% 


Murder 




59.8% 


Robbery 




J59.0% 


Other Assaults 




J51.9% 


Forcible Rape 




50.8% 


Stolen Property: Buying, Receiving, Etc. 




50.6% 


Gambling 


50.2% 


! Aggravated Assault 


43. 
4% 


2% 


I Negligent Manslaughter 3 6 




| All Other Offenses 




67.8% 


1 




FBI CHART 



( Inirl 9 



Lfi 



against the person, and yet the guilty rate for these offenses i 1 - in 
contrast. Forgery and counterfeiting, larceny, burglary, and auto 
theft, for example, have a high guilty rate when presented to the 
courts. ( )n the other band, juries and courts are lees apt to find per- 
guilty for murder, assaults, forcible rape, and negligent man- 
slaughter. Police preparat ion <>t' these more serious offenses for court 
presentation as a whole i- qo less complete than the property crimes. 
i '• ■ ills "ii guilty data bj offense appear in chaii 9. 

Persona Irrested 

During ilif calendar year I960, city and rural law enforcement 
reported a rate of 3,640 arrests per 1.00,000 persons for all 
criminal offenses in the United States. Citj arresl rates were almost 
three times higher than the rural rates. There was one reported arresl 
for every 26 young persons between the ages 10 to 17 in I960. Cities 
reported an arrest rate of young persons more than three times that 
of the rural area. 

Jn cit ies, total arrests were up 2 percent over 1959, with adult arrests 
registering a 1 percent increase and juveniles another sharp 9 percent 
jump. Again, city female arrests climbed •"> percent over L959, while 
male anvMs rose -2 percent. Girls under I s year- of age contributed 
greatly to the upward trend in female arrests, with a 1 1 percent rise 
within their own age group. City youths, male and female, comprised 

14 percent of all police arrests. They were involved in <''•_' percent 
of the auto theft arrests, 51 percent of the burglaries, 19 percent of 
the larcenies, 28 percent of the robberies, 20 percent of the forcible 

tape-. ]•_' percent of the aggravated assaults, and s percent of the 

murders. 

Rural arrest information is presented for the first time, and al- 
though proportionately -mailer in numbers, it is otherwise similar t<> 
the crime experience in cities. In rural areas, total arrests were up 
■". percent over L959. Adult arrests increased 2 percent, and arrests <d' 
persons under L8 years of age rose s percent. When broken down by 
Bex, female arrests in the rural areas were up L0 percent compared 

to the male increase of :'> percent over 1959. Rural youths made up 

15 percent of all arrests reported by county agencies. The\ repre- 
sented 52 percent of all rural arrests for auto theft. 11 percent of the 
burglaries, :'••"> percent of the larcenies, l-"> percent of the robberies, 
10 percent of the forcible rapes, 8 percent of the aggravated assaults, 

and .'»..') percent of t he murders. 

Chart 10 displays graphically the trend in police arrests, L940 to 
I960 for all offenses. Although :dl criminal acts comprise the year to- 
year totals upon which each percent change is based, police arrests 
are a smaller gauge of the crime problem than "offenses known." since 

l»; 



ARREST TRENDS 



1940-1960 







DASCO ON ANNUAL PERCENT CHANGE OF REPORTED ARRESTS 
FOR ALL OFFENSES. 1940 BASE YEAR. 






| 










































/ 


+ 90*. 
+ 80t 


KEY 

____ TOTAL ARRESTS 
■mm AGE UH0ER 18 


























/ 












AGE 18 AND OVER 


























+ 70*. 
+ 60*. 
+ 50*. 

+ 40*. 






















































i 


































/ 4 
f / 


'' 





,' 




























^i\ 




•/- 


/ . 






























^ 












+ 20*. 
+ 10*. 
















/.' 


// 
4 




























































































































-30*. 




If 
1/ 






































1 

































1940 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 W 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 

TOTAL POPULATION INCREASE I960 OVER 1940 16%. 

ADULT POPULATION INCREASE 2t%. 

10-17 AGE GROUP POPULATION INCREASE J2*«. 



(hurt ID 




FBI CHART 



ARRESTS OF PERSONS UNDER 18 

PERCENT CHANGE 1955-1960 



BASED ON REPORTS OF CITY POLICE 



STOLEN PROPERTY 
( Buying, Receiving, etc. ) 

FORGERY AND COUNTERFEITING 

NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 

DRIVING WHILE INTOXICATED 

LARCENY 

MINOR ASSAULTS 

EMBEZZLEMENT AND FRAUD 

GAMBLING 

ROBBERY 

TOTAL 

WEAPONS 
( Carrying, Possessing, etc. j 

BURGLARY 

DISORDERLY CONDUCT 

ALL SEX OFFENSES 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

MURDER 

AUTO THEFT 







♦82% 




♦67% 






♦65% 


!•< 


i1% 
% 


_j*58 



105% 




AGE 10-17 

POPULATION INCREASE 25% 

1955-1960 



FBI CHART 



Chart 11 



18 



nil crimes committed and reported to the police do not result in an 
arrest. Ii can be seen from the charl thai total police arrests were 
up <*>1 percent, I960 over 1940, and while adull arrests increased 58 
percent, juveniles nearly doubled the adull percentage ri 

Chart II presents a trend in juvenile crime L955 60 based on police 
Arrests for specific criminal code offenses. While the young popula- 
tion, ages 10 to 17, has increased 25 percenl from L955to I960, juvenile 
crime based on these offenses was up 18 percent, with a high of 105 
percenl for stolen property i«> a l<>w of 26 percent for auto theft. 
Again the annual percenl change for comparable cities for al leasl _ 
years was used. There were 1,160 cities in L955 •"'•'» and 1,614 cities 
in L959 60, Willi few exceptions, the same cities used in L955 were 
available for I960. 

Police arrests are primarily a measure of police activity; however, 
they also provide :i means of ascertaining more aboul the extent ;in<l 
nature of criminality. In interpreting arresl data, it is well t<> re- 
member thai arrests, nol persons are counted. One person may be 
arrested several times in m year. One arresl may represent a number 
of criminal acts, and several persons may be arrested f or one off ense. 

Police Employee Data 

Data presented herein which relates to police employees musl be 
considered for what it is. averages alone. The figures submitted by 
police are not to be interpreted a- guides for desirable police strength, 
lnit they are published with the though! they may he helpful in mak- 
ing certain limited comparisons. Effective police work in a particular 
community or area will depend on many factors, only one of which 
i- 1 he number of police emploj 

This year, for the first time, there are shown in table -"»1 ranges of 
the number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants, by population 
groups ami geographic area-. These data will not only serve to dis- 
■ the wide variations which exist in similar communities, but will 
provide more specific information I'm- those desiring to make certain 
comparisons. 

During L959, 19 police employees were killed in line of duty, again 
pointing up the hazardous nature of the occupation and the devotion 
to duty of these dedicated men. In I960, 18 police lost their lives. 

I en percent, or 13, of the police death- in 196 scurred in 

the South Atlantic State-, while II percent, or 21, of the officers who 
lost their lives served in cities with over 250,000 inhabitants. 

There is also being presented for the first time an analysis, by \ 
graphic division and by population group, of police officers assaulted 
in line <d' duty. These figures, presented in table 88, emphasize the po- 

•-.1—1 ii' 



tential d »n fronting the police officer each time he responds !<• 
a call, whether it be a domestic quarrel or a barricaded murderer. The 
analysis discloses thai 6 of every l 1 " 1 <iiy police officers were assaulted, 
many seriously, during I960, with tin* highest number of assaults oc 
curringin the South Atlantic States and in cities with populations un- 
der 10,000. Fewest assaults were reported by the Bast North Central 
States and by cities containing 50, to 100,000 inhabitants. 

While the demands on police to fight an ever-increasing wave of 
crime continue t<» mount, the number of police employees available to 
<;iit\ on this battle remained virtually the same in I960 as in L9i 59. In 
I960, 'H\ police departments employed an average of L9 persons per 
L,000 inhabitants (including civilian employees), compared with L.8 
in L959. 

In recent years, many city police departments have been handi- 
capped in their effectiveness due to the annexation into the city of 
heavily populated surrounding areas without a corresponding increase 
in the number of police employees. It is true, some cities have in- 
creased police personnel to handle the added responsibilities, but it 
is equally true that other cities have neglected to keep pace by meet- 
ing the needs created by increased population and area annexed. 

In many instances, therefore, the police are faced wit h heavier burdens 

and a need to .-pread even thinner a staff which was overtaxed before. 

If a community is to have an effective police force, it must provide 
sufficient manpower, adequate salaries, professional training, and men 
who have the respect of the community and pride in their 
depart ment. 



20 






AVERAGE NUMBER OF FULL-TIME 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
EMPLOYEES 







BY 


POPULATION 


GROUPS - 


-DECEMBER 


31, 


1960 

















PER 1,000 INHABITANTS 



AVERAGE 

OF 3,778 

CITIES 



1.4 1.4 1.4 



CITIES 
LESS 
THAN 

10,000 



1.6 



CITIES 
10,000 

TO 
25,000 



CITIES 
25,000 

TO 
50.000 



CITIES 
50,000 

TO 
100,000 



1.7 



CITIES 
100,000 

TO 
250.000 



2.5 



CITIES 

OVER 

250,000 



( hart 12 



FBI CHART 



21 




ICaui jEufomumtt (tab? af ttlrirs 

As a lEatu Euf iimmmt ©f f trcr, my fundamentally u to 

serve manhind; to safeguard lives and property; to protect the innocent againit 
</. . . ntion, tne weah against oppression or intimidation, ana tne peaceful 
against t'iotence or disorder; ana to respect tne L^onstitutional rights of all 
men to liberty, equality ana justice. 



in cou ra- 



ti 1UH1 Keep my private life unsullied as an example to alt; mainlaii 
geous calm in tne face of danger, S.corn, or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and 
be constantly mindful of the welfare of others. ~J4onest in thought and deed 
in both my personal and official life, Js will be exemplary in obeying tne laws 
of the land and the regulations of my department. Whatever *J see or hear of 
a confidential nature or that is confided to me in my official capacity will be 
hept ever secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of my duty. 

X lUlll never act off iciousty or permit personal feelings, prejudices, animos- 
ities or friendships to influence my decisions. lAJith no compromise for crime 
and with retentlejS prosecution of criminals, _7 will enforce (he taw courteously 
and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or itt wilt, never employing 
unnecessary force or violence and never accepting gratuities. 

II rFriiyttlH* the badge of my office as a Symbol of public faith, and 
^r accept it as a public trust to be held So long as ^J am true to the ethics of 
the police Service, ^r wilt constantly strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, 
dedicating myself before Ljod to my chosen profession . . . taw enforcement. 



launmliml »..~..i o* •■< OMaft •> p«ii». la 

22 



Crime Factors and Comparisons 

In any publication of this type where reported crime figures appear 
for distinct areas, Buch as states, metropolitan areas :ui<l individual 
cities, there is :i tendency to make direct comparisons. Just as these 
statistics cannot conve} the human misery and grief resulting From 
many of these criminal acts, so a count of crime is totally inadequate 
a^ the sole measure of comparison between places. Even when con- 
verted into the number of crimes per 100,000 inhabitants < rates), such 
comparisons are not necessarily significant. A rate does not take into 
consideration the numerous other causes affecting i In- extent and type 
<il' crime from place to place. 

This is a national summary <>f police statistics. The proper use <'i 
this information locally lies in the comparison of cadi community's 
crime experience with the national averages appearing herein. An 
analysis of local crime conditions should primarily be based on cadi 
community's own crime count over a period «»l time. Such analysis 
should include thoughtful consideration <>i' the many elements which 
will influence the amount ami type of crime. These vary with each 
community. It should be remembered that crime is a social problem 
ami the responsibility of the entire community. The police effort is 
limited to factors wit hin its COnt rol. 

Some of i hi- factors \\ hich will affect the amount ami type of crime 
from one community to another are briefly out lined below : 

Density and size of the community population and tin- metropoli- 
tan area adjacent thereto. 

Composition of the population with reference particularly to age, 
sex, and race. 

I >nomic status and mores of the population. 

Relative stability of population, including commuters, seasonal, 
and other t ransient types. 

Climate, including seasonal weather conditions. 

Bducat ional, recreat ional, ami religious lei els. 

I-', tic- 1 ive strength of the police force. 

Standards governing appointments to the police force. 

Policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

Attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems, 

I ' . of efficiency of the local law enforcement agency. 



Introduction 

Background 

The Uniform Crime Reporting program is the outgrowth of a 
■ for a national and uniform compilation of police statistics 
expressed by law enforcement executives manj years ago. In 1930, 
crime reports were solicited from police departments throughout the 
nation based on uniform classifications and procedures developed by 
the Committee on Uniform Crime Records, [nternational Association 
of Chiefs of Police (IACP). In that year, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation ( FBI ). on request <>l' the above organization, assumed 
the role as tin- national clearinghouse. 

The Committee on Uniform Crime Records, IACP, continues to 
serve in an advisory capacity to the FBI in the operation <>t' this 
program. The assistance of the Committee is especially valuable in 
actively promoting the quality of the reports supplied by the coopei 
a i ing law enforcement agencies. En this connection, the Field Service 
Division of the [ACP is also beginning to play an important and 
effective pari in quality control through surveys of police records 
sj stems. 

Improvements in statistical presentations and progress in law en- 
forcement record keeping have resulted in a more useful program 
over tin' years. Of major significance was the Report of the Con- 
sultant Committee in L958 which was published in detail in a special 
issue of Uniform Crime Reports that year. All recommendations 
of this independent group of experts have been incorporated into the 
Uniform ('rime Reporting program, and the advice of technical 
consultants in the FBI's conduct of this program is a continuing 
pract ice. 

Objectives 

The primary objective is to produce a reliable program of nation- 
wide criminal statistics for administrative and operational use of law 
enforcement agencies, and in so doing provide meaningful data for 
other professionals with related interests in the crime problem and 
inform the average citizen of general crime conditions. 

Specifically, the means utilized to attain these goals are: (1) 
Through a crime index consisting of seven -elected offenses, an 



24 



attempt is made to measure the extent, fluctuation and distribution 
of crime in the United States. This count is based on these seven 
offenses being reported to the police or coming directly to their 
attention. (2) The i<»ial volume of all types of criminal offenses is 

c piled as they become known by police arrests. (3) Since the 

above are also measures of law enforcement activity, related data is 
collected i<> demonstrate effectiveness <>f enforcement activities, 
available police Btrengtli and significant factors involved in crime. 

Reporting Procedure 

Under thi-< national voluntary system each contributing law en 
foreement agency is wholly responsible lor compiling its own crime 
reports for submission t<> the FBI. Bach contributor is supplied 
with the I ' n i form ( 'rime Reporting Handbook which outlines in detail 
procedures for scoring and classifying offenses. The Handbook illus- 
trates and discusses th*' monthly and annual reporting forms, as well 
as the numerous tally sheets made available to facilitate the periodic 

tabulat ion of t he desired data. 

Recognizing that a sound records system is necessary if crime 
reporting is to meet desirable standards, the FBI furnishes a Manna] 
ot Police Records to law enforcement agencies upon request. Special 
Agents of the FBI are widely utilized to encourage new contributors 
and to assist them \>\ explaining the procedures and definitions 
-ary under I hi- uniform system. 

On a monthly basis, city police, sheriffs, and state police report the 
number of offenses that become known to them in the following crime 
categories: criminal homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated as- 
Bault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft This count is taken from a 
record of all complaints of crime- received by the police from victims 
or other sources or discovered by the police in their own operations. 
Complaints determined by police investigation to he unfounded are 

eliminated from this COUnt. The nniiiher of "offenses known'* in 

these crime categories is reported t«i the FBI without regard to 
whether anyone i- arrested, stolen property is recovered, local prose 
cutive policy, or any other consideration. Police agencies report on 
a monthly basis the number of these crime- which t hey clear by arrest 
and certain other analytical data pertaining to specific crime 
categories. 

In annual reports, "offenses known" data and clearance- by arrest 
arc summarized by the contributors. Annual form- provide a report 

of persons arrested for all criminal offenses with respect to age, sez 
and race of the offender as well as an accounting of the number of 



•_'•- 



persons charged and found guilty. Police employee data is collected 
annually, including the number of police killed and assaulted. 

Reporting Area 

During tin' calendar year I960 crime reports were received from 
77 |in l:iw enforcement agencies representing '."i percent <»t" the total 
I 'iiitcW Si ates populat ion. 

The arrest data phase of the program which last fall underwent an 
extensive expansion effort to increase coverage, particularly in rural 
areas, has been built up substantially. For the year I960 tabulations 
are shown in this publication for tO percent of the rural areas and 73 
percent of the urban communities. This represents a ■>- percenl in- 
crease over the previous year, h should be noted that many agencies 
contacted in I960 indicated an inability to report the informatioi 
1960 l>ut would revise record procedures to make it available for 1961. 
This again demonstrates the excellent cooperative attitude of Ameri- 
can law enforcement agencies. 

Presentation of crime data by areas as used in this publication 
follows as closely as practical the definitions promulgated by the 
Bureau of the Census. Standard metropolitan statistical areas are 
generally made up of an ent ire county or counties having at least one 
core city of 50,000 or more inhabitants with the whole meeting the 
requirements of certain metropolitan characteristics. In NTevi Eng- 
land "town" instead of "county" is used to describe standard metro- 
politan statistical area-. These towns do not coincide generally with 
established crime reporting units: therefore, metropolitan State eco- 
nomie areas in New England arc used in this area tabulation since 
they encompass an ent ire county or counties. St and aid metropolitan 
statistical areas make up 63 percent of the total United State- popu- 
lation as reported by the Bureau of the Census in the I960 decennial 
count. 

Other eities are urban places outside standard metropolitan sta- 
tistical areas. Most of these places of 2,500 or more inhabitants are 
incorporated and comprise L3 percent of the l ( -'<i (| population. Rural 
areas are outside the two described above and represent 24 percent 
of our national population. Throughout this program, sheriffs, 
count} police and ma ny st at e police report on crimes committed within 

the limits of the county but outside cities, while police report on 

crimes committed within the city limits (urban places). 

\ erification Processes 

Uniformity of crime data collected under this program is of pri- 
mary concern to the FBI as tin national clearinghouse. With ap- 
proximately 7700 persons preparing crime report- on a voluntary 

26 



basis, tlit- problems <>l attaining uniformity are readily apparent. 
I mce "I instructions does not complete the role <>l the FBI. ( >n 
the contrary, il is standard operating procedure i<» examine each in- 
coming reporl n<>t only for arithmetical accuracy but also, and |">- 
>ilil\ of even more importance, for reasonableness. 

Variations in the level and ratios among the crime classes estab- 
lished l'\ pro ions reports <•! each agencj are used as a gauge of p i 
sible or probable incompleteness or changes in reporting policy. 
Necessary arithmetical adjustments or unusual variations are brought 
to the attention of the submitting agency by correspondence. During 
I960, 1 1 ,400 letters were addressed to contributors as a result of veri- 
fication and evaluation processes. Correspondence with contributors 
is ilif principal tool for supervision of quality. N<>i only are the 
individual reports studied, but also periodic trends for individual 
reporting units are run, as are crime rates in descending order for all 
units grouped for general comparability to assist in detecting varia- 
tions and fluctuations possibly due to some reason other than chance. 
For ilif most part, the problem is one- of keeping the contributors in- 
formed of the type information necessarj to the success of this 
program. 

The elimination of duplication of crime reporting by the various 
agencies is given constant attention. In addition to detailed instruc- 
tions as to tlif limits of reporting jurisdictions between sheriffs and 
police in urban places, lists of urban places by county are furnished 
in sheriffs, county police and in some instances slate police 
organ izat ions. 

Uniform Crime Reporting has been taught to all law enforcement 
officers attending the FBI National Academy. This Academy was 
blished in 1935, and there are 2625 graduates who are still in law 
enforcement, over 28 percent of whom are the executive heads of 
l:iu enforcement agencies. The FBI also presents this subject to re- 
gional police schools throughout the count ry. 

mtacts lt\ Special Agents of the FBI are utilized to enlist the 
cooperation of new contributors and to explain the purpose of this 
program and the methods of assembling information for reporting. 
\\ ■•: correspondence, including specially designed questionnaires, 
fails, Special Agents may be directed to visit the contributor to af- 
firmatively resolve the misunderstanding. Special surveys are used 
to inquire into various areas of the system. 

Variations from the desired reporting standards which cannot l»e 
resolved b} the steps indicated above are brought t<> the attention <»f 
the Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the LACP. The Com- 
mittee may designate a representative to make a personal visit to the 



5 - • 



local department to assist in the needed revision of records and report* 
ing iih'i hods. 

Ii is clear, of course, thai regardless of the extent of the statistical 
verification processes used by the FBI, the accuracy of the data asw 
sembled under this program depends upon the degree <»i' sincere effort 
exerted by each contributor to meet the necessary standards of report* 
ing, and, for this reason, the FBI is not in a position to vouch for the 
validity of the reports received. 

The (rime Totals 

Communities not represented by crime reports are relatively few, 
as discussed previously and as shown by an examination of the tables 
which follow presenting 1!)C><> crime totals for the Index of ('rime 
classifications. The FBI conducts a continuing program to further 
reduce the unreported areas. 

"Within each of the three areas — standard metropolitan statistical, 
other urban, and rural — it is assumed that the unreported portion had 
the same proportionate crime experience as that for which reports 
were received. In lien of figures for the entire year from those agen- 
cies representing at least 25 percent of any one of the individual units 
of the three areas indicated above for which estimates were prepared. 
reports for as many as 9 months were accepted as sufficiently repre- 
sentative on which to base estimates for ihe year. Estimates for un- 
reported areas are based on the reported crime experience of similar 
areas within each state. 

Crime Trends 

Crime data for trends are homogeneous to the extent that figures 
from identical reporting units were used for each of the periods 
tabulated. Exclusions were made when figures from a reporting unit 
were obviously inaccurate for any period or when it was ascertained 
that unusual fluctuations were due to such variables as improved 
record procedures and not to chance. 

As a matter of standard procedure, crime trends for individual 
places .ire analyzed by the FBI four times a year. Any significant 
increase or decrease is made the subject of a special inquiry with the 
contributing agency. Whenever it is found that crime reporting pro- 
cedures are responsible for t he difference in level of crime, the figures 

not only for totals but also individual offenses are excluded from the 

trend tabulations. 

Classification of Offenses 

A stumbling block to a uniform national crime reporting system 
in the United States results from variations in definitions of criminal 



28 



violations among the States. This obstacle, insofar as uniformity "I 
definitions is concerned, was removed by the adoption <>l an arbitrary 
set of crime classifications. To some extent the title of each classifies 
(ion connotes in a general way its content. However, in reading the 
explanation of each category ii is very important i<» keep in mind thai 
because <>t' t be di fferenoes among t he State codes i here is no possibility 
in a system such as this t<» distinguish l>et wren crimes by designations 
such as "felony" and "misdemeanor." 

A continuing program is carried out to furnish contributors with 
timely supplemental ins! ruct ions as t he need arises in certain classifica- 
tions. These are aimed at the clarification of any misunderstandings 
which may arise and the redirect ion of at tent ion to t he proper applica- 
tion of classification procedures under this system. 

Brief definitions of crime classifications utilized in this program are 
listed below : 

1. Criminal homicide.— (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaugh- 
ter: all will tul felonious homicides as distinguished from deal lis caused 
by negligence. Excludes attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicide.-. 
accidental deaths, or justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides are 
limited to: (1) the killing of a felon by a peace officer in line of duty; 
(2) the killing of a holdup man by a private cil izen. i b ) Manslaugh- 
ter by negligence : any death which the police invest igal ion establishes 
was primarily attributable to gross negligence of some individual 
other than t he victim. 

•_'. Forcible rape. — Rape by force, assault to rape and attempted 
rape. Excludes statutory offenses (no force used — victim under age 
of consent | . 

•"». Robbery. — Stealing or taking anything of value from the person 
by force or violence or by putting in fear, such as si rong-arm robbery, 
stickups, armed robbery, assault to rob, and attempt to rob. 

I. Vy:jjravate<l assault. Assault with intent to kill or for the pur- 
pose of inflicting severe bodily injury by shooting, cutting, stabbing, 
maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acid-, explosives, or 
other means. Excludes Bimple assault, assault and battery, fighting, 

etc. 

5. Burglarj — breaking or entering. — Burglary, housebreaking, 
safecracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, 
even though no force was used t<> gain entrance and attempts. 

Burglary followed by larceny i- not counted again as larceny. 

• i. Larceny-thefl (except auto theft)- (a) Fifty dollar- ami over 
in value: i />) under $50 in value. Thefts of bicycles, automobile ac 
cessories, shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or 
article of value which is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. 
Excludes embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 



7. iuto theft. Stealii g or driving awaj and abandoning a motor 
vehicle. Excludes taking for temporary use when actually retui i I 
by the taker or unauthorized use by those having lawful access to the 
vehicle. 

Other assaults. Assaults and attempted assaults \\lii<-li are not 
of an aggra \ ;it«'<| nat lire. 

9. Forger) and counterfeiting. Making, altering, uttering or 
possessing, with intent t<> defraud, anything false which is made to 
appear i rue. I ncludes at tempi s. 

1<». Embezzlement and fraud. Fraudulent conversion, embezzle- 
ment, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Buying, re- 
ceiving, and pos s stolen property and attempts. 

12. Weapon*-: carrying, possessing, ete. — All violations of regu- 
lations or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, fur- 
nishing, and manufacturing of deadly weapons or silencers and 
attempts. 

1".. Prostitution and commercialized vice.— Sex offenses of 
commercialized nature and attempts, such as prostitution, keeping 
bawdy house, procuring, transporting, «>i detaining women for im- 
moral purposes. 

II. Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitution, and commer- 
cialized vice).- Statutory rape, offenses against chastity, common 
decency, morals, and the like, [ncludes attempts. 

1 5. Offenses against the family ami children. — Nbnsupport, neg- 
lect, desert ion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. — Offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such 
as unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — State or local liquor law violation- except 
"drunkenness" (class L8) and "driving while intoxicated" (class 22). 
Excludes Federal violation--. 

18. Drunkenness. — Drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. Breach of the peace. 

20. \ agrancj . -Vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. -Promoting, permitting, <>r engaging in gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. Driving or operating any motor 
vehicle while drunk or mider the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

•_';'>. Violation of road and driving laws. — Improper handling of a 
)in>\ ing motor vehicle. 

24. Parking violations, [mproper or overtime parking. 

_!.">. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. Traffic 
and n mii or vehicle violations other than classes 22 24, 



30 



26. Ul other offenses. All violations of State or local lawsexcepl 
es 1 -■>. 

27. Suspicion. Arrests for no specific offense and released with 
mi form a 1 charges being placed. 



31 



The Index of Crime, I960 



In ihi< section, tabulations arc shown to indicate the prohahle 
extent, fluctuation, and distribution of crime for the United Sim 
;i whole, geographic divisions, individual States, and standard metrol 
pnl it a n statistical areas. The measure used is a Crime [ndex consist in J 
of seven important offenses which are counted as they become known 
t<> the law enforcement agencies. Grime classifications used in the 
index arc: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape] 
robbery, aggravated assault, burglary — breaking or entering, lai 
$50 and over, and auto i heft. 

The total number of criminal acts that occur is unknown, but those 
that arc reported to the police provide the first means of a count! 
Not all crimes come readily to the attention of the police; not all 
crimes arc of sufficient importance to be significant in an index and 
not all important crimes occur with enough regularity to l>e meann 
ingful in an index. "With these considerations in mind, the abovi 
crimes were selected as a group to furnish an abbreviated and con- 
venient measure of the crime problem. 

This is the t hird year t bat tabulat ions of crime totals for standard 
metropolitan statistical areas have been shown. The reality ot' met roH 
politan or "fringe" living has affected the pure rural and city concepl 
of crime incidence. This factor is taken into consideration through 
the presentation of tabulations of crime totals for standard metro- 
politan Statistical area-, and Stale .•rime totals arc constructed on the 
basis of standard metropolitan Statistical area-, other urban com- 
munities and rural areas. Recognizing the importance of the metro- 
politan complex to both crime reporting and law enforcement opera- 
tion-, special attention is being given to efforts to further reduce tin* 
unreported area and re line est imating procedures. 

Definitions for crime classifications used throughout this program 
arc arbitrary in order to overcome the wide statutory variations 
among the States and thus provide a method of compiling uniform 
figures. Population figures used throughout \h'\< issue arc based on 
the United States Bureau of the Census I960 decennial count. 



32 



: 



r 
s 






■ - - 









-r t — 












- 









;;: 






— — ; 






i - — 









— ri 



•- 3 , ■ 



pH 



OS _ ^ 

a" v i 






- .3 U. 






si* 



If 



37 

v> 9 



= ~ * 



3 « L. 



C - 
pg 

- 



3 9 



3 d 

* a 









Table 2. — Index of Crime bj Geographic 






Continental United 

;. unite 

I 



' 

od 

Vermonl . 

:!iC 

Pen 

\.-u Jersey 

New York 

nia 

East North I i atral 
Percent change... 

Illinois. 

Indiana 

Michigan 

"i lo 

Wisconsin 

orth Central. 





Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

NOTtl 

Sou: I 






1959 

1960 






1969 

I960 
I960 

I960 
1959 

I960 
L969 
I960 

I960 
1959 



1960 
1959 

1960 
1959 
1960 
L959 
1960 



1959 

1960 
1959 
1960 
1969 
I960 
1959 
1960 

1960 
1959 
1960 



1959 
I960 
1959 
I960 
1959 
1960 
1959 
I960 

1960 
1959 
1960 
1959 
[960 






177.709.512 
179,323.175 






2,514,897 

969, 265 
5, 114,558 
5,148, 578 

606,921 

859, i* s 

389, 8hl 
33,834, ill 



6,018,670 

16, 782, 304 
11,219,034 

11,319,366 
35, 987, 629 



10,012,612 

10, 0M, 158 
4, 637, 005 
4, 662, 498 
7, 774, 7S7 
7, 823, 194 
9, 637, 371 
9, 706, 397 
3, 925, 854 
3,951,777 
15,266,894 
15,394,115 



2,736, 108 

2, 757, 537 

2, 161,421 

2, [78,611 

3, 393, 302 

3,418,864 

4,278, 174 

4,319,813 

l , 398, 875 

1,411,330 

626, 976 

632, 446 

676, 738 

680, 51 I 






Number 



1.630.403 

1,861.261 

+ 14.2 






17. 188 

[,615 

2, 821 
2,076 

B, 942 

11. ion 

[,420 

2, 1 in 

+ 10.3 



51,012 

60, 306 

175,374 

77. 900 
328,512 

+ 14.6 



145,210 
35,980 

83, 749 

• 

63,312 

16,823 
20,294 
102,496 
115,951 

+ 13.1 



12,782 

14,249 

13,618 

14,669 

20, 132 

26,077 

43, 535 

47. 332 

6,271 

7. 399 

2, 1 1 2 

2, 374 

4.(14:. 

3, 851 



100,000 



917.5 
1.037.9 
+ 13.1 



; 9. 



17g 6 

708. 1 

- 
I7n 5 
342. 1 

1,291. 5 

,. , 

541 2 
840. 5 

917.7 



847.6 
994.0 

1,045.0 

688. -J 

912 - 

1,038 9 

+13.8 



I. 284 9 

1,441) 4 

775. 9 

B55. 7 

1.077. 2 

[,230 9 
656.9 
769. l 

671. 4 

753 2 

+12.2 



467 l 
516 7 
630.0 
673. 3 

763 9 

1,018 B 

l.o'.' 7 

148 3 

330 9 

375 i 
597 7 

• 



\l urder and 



N'miii- 



8.583 
9.136 
+ 8.4 



133 

+ ):» 



1 

"7! 
+4. 9 



144 

177 

497 

481 

• 

313 

1,290 

1,430 

+ 10.9 



511 

- 
207 

325 

338 
307 
328 

45 
51 

4 .'7 

■ 

-11.9 



39 
17 
51 
60 
85 

43 
1*40 
197 
39 
38 
3 

a 

14 
14 



100,000 



4.8 

5.1 

+ 6.3 



1.3 

1 6 
+ 15. 4 



1.3 

1.7 

1.7 

L2 

l. 6 
2.7 

1.3 

9 

1.0 

.3 

2 7 

2.8 

+3.7 



2.4 

3.0 

2 9 

2.5 
2 B 

I 
3.9 

+ \ 3 



4.5 
:.. 1 
3.4 
4.4 
4.2 
4.3 
3.2 
3.3 
1.1 
1.3 
2.8 
2.4 
-14.3 



1.4 

.6 

2.4 

3.2 
1.0 
1.3 



2. 8 

.5 

B 

2. 1 

2. 1 






Num- 
ber 



15.164 
15. 555 
+2.6 



+18.7 



1(17 
41 

18 
231- 

• 
25 
18 



2.513 
2, .566 

+2. 1 



417 
479 
1,037 
1,064 
1,029 
1,023 
3,017 
3, 138 
+4.0 



1,254 
. . 
220 
882 
970 
534 
583 
123 
ill 
847 
•o>7 

+ 47 



• 
103 

129 
116 

7" 
84 
414 
474 
77 
59 
28 
14 
4.' 
37 



100,000 



• mi of table. 



:;•! 



Division!* <uul State*, 1959-60 















i ccnj 


ISO m i 






..TV 


\ 








A ii In 


lli.fl 


Komber 




N'umber 


i; ite pei 


N'umber 


1 




Rate pei 


Number 


' 








100,000 




100,000 




100,000 






75.198 






69.5 


BM 807 


392.9 




234 


293. 779 


185.3 


89. 970 


49 6 


130.230 


72 6 


821.057 


457.9 


474.911 


284 .8 


321.402 


179.2 




II 2 


























■ 


i :, 279 


i'. : 








1- a 


• 








- ,- 


180 ., 


+5.7 


+4.9 






+7.3 












- 


13.4 


641 


25.5 


7,003 












•Jin 






2L0 






- 


179.0 




i .1 i 


B4 


B 7 


117 


18 I 


2, 110 




1,240 


130 5 




102 B 


77 




KM 


ln.7 




246.0 






i. ii ■ 


117.9 


842 






18 1 


14,704 






168 "• 


In 721 






Al 


I 087 


90 i 




■ 


1 


Is 1 


11,098 












i . 676 






loo 2 


ill 




1* 






i B 


1. Ills 


182 8 




-■ 






168 






27. 1 




142.8 








364 '. 


i- 


II ' 


17il 


I < g 


I. 146 


517. . 










. r » 


1 ■ 


in 








301 


77 7 


291 


7 1 


'.i 




18 




044 


242 1 


7v 


■ 


142 


H7 7 


■ 


- - 
















1 -i 1 


■ 




1 


64 7 


118,008 


i i 


09,000 




■ 


165 s 


- 


+7.7 


+.2 


- 


+ 10.7 


+9. ti 


+12.3 


+11.1 


+ 11.3 


+ 10.2 


- 


- 


3.416 


56.8 










10. .594 


176.0 
301 9 




16 ii 




■ 








- 




7. 116 




•- 


- 






61,084 


- 


27, 236 


164 1 




41 1 


- 


- 








1 ' 


_-. im 


1 7S J 










i BOB 




14, Ms 




- 


116.5 












- - 


1 


140.6 


- 


- 






81, 17'» 


- • 


1 16.660 




- 


217 7 


• 










- 


- ■ 


hi ii 




240 1 


70 130 


1 >: B 




- 






+ 17.7 


+16.8 


-1-15.2 


+14.4 


- 


+7.9 




137. 4 


9.154 


01.4 


44. 5.59 


445. 


31.266 


312.3 




282.0 


- 








■ 






:tin I 








88 1 






17.725 


- 


■ 


176 8 


- 


155 (1 






1. 71" 


" 1 






■ 


182 s 


7,361 


163 2 








■^ i 








22 • 




- 










1 




21, 120 






• 


u 




■ 


31. I 




287 1 


16 210 


168 3 


■ 


126 : 










34.013 




18 07 


195 i 


13, 106 


Its 1 




7.8 




IS s 


7.023 


178 8 


• 


117 3 


3. 3 Hi 


si S 




• 




1-. B 


--- 




7,037 


17s 1 




• 


1 s.._ 


- 




80 7 




314 1 




17J 6 


17,366 


US 7 




1 


4.707 




• 


• 


- - 


1 .1 ii 




126 'I 


■ 


1 


+.4 


-.3 




• it i 


+18 4 


+ 12.4 


+ 11.7 


- 


9 




8.4 


6 013 


■ 


4. 251 


155 3 


1.919 


70.1 


- 


11 I 




- ; 


■ 


233 5 


5.017 


181 'i 


2, 126 


77 1 


• 






■ 


7.044 


■ 




161 i 


1 . 735 


- 




• 




- 1 i 


7 742 






168 6 




91 ii 








8 i 




271.7 




174 B 




- 




. 1 t 




10 -v 


■■ 




7,443 




l slJ 


Ml H 




• 








168 B 




:\- l 




170 7 








71 6 




■ 


10,018 


■ 




177 II 


I7n 




177 


12 7 








im ii 


1 135 


102 6 




U » 








231 B 


1.772 


u '. 


1.776 


126 B 




• 


II 


•■ 1 


1 n, 


171 6 




-• 


371 












I 260 




■ 








101 


14 9 


• 


II II 


1 718 










100 8 




8 1 




I-, II 


■ 






- 







'—61- 



Table 2. — Index oj Crime by Geographit 






■ 



Maryland 

olina 
• Una 

■ 

Per. • 

ma 

Mississippi 

Tenne 

mth Central . 

Arkansas 



In 

.1 



i 

i 

Mexico 



Wyoming 





ornia 

Baw .iii 











1 959 

1959 
I960 

1900 
1 969 
1960 

I960 



I960 
I960 
1960 

1959 
I960 



I960 

I960 
1959 
960 

1960 
1959 



1959 
1960 

1960 
1959 
1960 
1959 
I960 

1960 
1959 
I960 

1959 

1960 
1959 
I960 
1959 
I960 



I960 
1956 
I960 
1959 

I960 
I960 



Population 



25,698, li* 
25,971,782 



448, 1 58 

4,890,001 

3,917,240 

3,072,999 
3, 100,689 

- 

3, 898, 77* 

1,847,082 
1,860,421 

12,050. 126 



3, 244, 386 
3,266, 740 
3,012,051 
3,038, 156 
2, 162,422 
2, 17*. 141 
3,531.809 
3,567,089 
16,806,908 
16,951,255 



1 . 771'. 

1 . 786, 
3.230, 
3, 257, 
2,300, 

2, 328, 
9.503, 

6, 783, 



1,282, 105 

1,302, 161 

1,735,315 

1,753,947 

663,606 

667, 191 

668,022 

674,767 

281,348 

285, 278 

943. 348 

951,023 

883,066 

B90.627 

326, 578 

330,066 

20.956,963 

21, 198,044 






100,000 



253,718 



- 
31,643 

- 

19,698 
29,954 

+7.2 



24,343 

26, 74(i 
22. r>49 

9,090 
9. 574 
29,014 
30,220 
150.029 
182, 113 
+21.4 



9.906 
10,355 
22.680 
33, 490 
19.868 
26, 461 

112,801 
76, 145 
85,803 

+ 12.7 



19.239 
21,337 
20,650 

21.977 
4. 3li4 
1,699 
.'. 771) 
6,628 
5,390 
6, 686 

11.039 

12,661 

7.31)4 
2, 4*9 

305, 113 



2,158 
2, 332 

310.645 

i.. '.'77 
14,392 
16,347 
27,055 



750.3 
818.8 
751.9 

* I 1 . 9 

120 I 

439. 5 

821.8 

S47 2 

892. 7 

1,074.3 

+20.3 



579 7 
702.0 

863. 2 
1.093.6 
1,026.9 

1.177. 5 
1. 122.5 
1,251.7 

+11.5 



1. 500 -' 
1,638.6 
I. 184.2 

667. 6 

704.3 

863. 7 

982 3 

i. 915.8 

1 . 993. 1 
I, I7(i 2 
1.331.3 

827. 1 

1,118.8 

762. l 



081 l 

- 

201.0 
102 6 
819 4 
924 2 

033 2 



\l unlc r and 
nonni 

tughter 



Null)- ! 

ber loo.ooo 






i* 
29 
600 

47'. 

170 

4iU 

316 

343 

395 

81 

82 

1,071 

1.153 

•7 7 



41* 

423 

169 

208 

247 

218 

247 

304 

1.436 

1,447 

+.8 



184 
164 
183 
284 

154 

175 

834 
105 

310 

+4.6 



67 

79 
94 
74 
15 
16 
27 
26 
22 
25 
57 
69 
9 
14 
14 
16 
630 
760 



12 

28 

508 

618 

17 
15 
39 
43 

64 

61 



9.2 

+5.4 



4.1 

10.2 

13.4 
12 

1 1 

8.9 
10. 1 

12 ' 

13 3 
8.8 

in ii 
4 4 
4.4 
9.0 
9.6 
4 6.7 



12.9 
12.9 

5. 3 
6.8 
11.4 
10.0 
7.0 
8.5 
- [ 
8.5 



10.4 
8.6 

■' 7 

B.7 

6.7 

7.5 

'i B 
* 7 
4.5 
4.7 
+4.4 



5. 2 

6. 1 
5.4 
4.2 
2.3 
2.4 
4.0 
3.9 
7.8 
8.8 
6.0 
7.3 
1.0 
1.6 
4.3 
4.8 
3. 

3, 6 

+20. 



10.2 

3 3 
3.9 

2 7 
2.4 

2.4 

1.9 

2 I 






Niiin- 



2.146 



37 

411, 

416 

37(1 
334 

288 
110 
81 

738 

-10.1 



272 

167 
116 

112 

232 

1*7 

1.473 

1,667 

+12. 5 



+ 



139 

! 56 
206 
311 

299 
874 
891 

710 
7"* 
1.'. I 



210 
205 

234 
34 
47 
53 

49 
4* 

86 

*i 

114 
71 

- 
23 

3. 246 
3. 283 

+ 1.1 



17 
47 

23 
21 
146 

174 
168 






4 4 

-11.6 



8.3 
8.3 

■" ! 

5. 1 

■ ■ 

■ 2 
• • 
9 * 

+ 11.4 

- 7 
& 4 

ll.ll 
12 * 
i 
9 3 
10. 5 
11 6 
+10. 5 



■ . 
10. 1 
11.8 

13.3 
5.1 

7 ii 

7 8 

7.3 

17. 1 

12.0 

- 

7.0 

7.(1 



. ■ 

- 

3 7 

a a 



revised upward based on records and reporting changes by several 
ted in i960 count 

36 



Hi iaiona <it\<l States, 1959-60 — < lontinued 


















1 


Auto i 




















dumber 


100,000 


Number 


100,000 


\ II til I'd 


100,000 


Number 


■ 


Numbei 


100,000 




- 




120 .■ 


100,062 




- 






1 1 J 


10 002 


- 




lis 


111 |s| 


140 ■« 


• 






1 1'l 1. 


IK 


• 17 1 




1 1 


• 11 1 




■ 






• 1 '. 




04 


21 2 




162 '■ 




177 1 


■ 




II 




B4 


21 i 






- 


• 




■ 


8.010 




■ 


116 I 




701 1 




- 




181 7 




SI 1 




III 7 


ii 078 


- 


is 126 


366 1 




198 ii 








1(11 7 


13,767 




6,874 


162 7 




111 7 


I 048 








i 2 


ins 1 


7.072 


179 i 




153 7 












- 


7. Hi. 


241. :t 


384 


I'M 7. 


1 171 






'.HI 1 


1 1 . 872 




7. 132 




5,716 


IM .! 




ii g 




182 2 


11. .'-Ml 




.".. 1 1 7 


118, 1 


3,231 


71 1 


771 


17 o 




182 1 


11,768 






1 in 2 








18 I 




118 B 


s. mi 


848.6 








- 






2, 184 


102 -J 




:i7i i 




1 




Ml 7 


1.044 


- 




lot 2 


12 128 


811. I 


7. I'll. 


|S| 1, 




1. .. 








102. 1 


13.738 




S. Illl 


212.0 


1 7-.I 


120 'i 


- 




- 








1,880 


mi s 


1,891 








BQO 




I 146 


289 o 


1,831 


IB : 


l H 830 


71 ". 








78 •-' 


10.074 


835 :< 


is. |66 






108 s 






- - 




14.702 


;i7i ii 


19.846 




12,712 






+9.4 


+ 10 


+.1 


- II ." 


- 


+7.5 






1 


- 






111.1 


10.443 


321.9 




174.7 


3,128 


96.4 










12,040 






188 2 


:(. 128 




- 




1.867 


16 I 


10,297 


841 '.' 


• 


185.2 


1. 192 


■ 






1.674 


- 


II. 117 


:<7r. s 




211.8 




I- 7 




n 9 


1.794 




- 


179 1 


1,874 


86 7 


-- 












1. 171 


205.3 






1,064 


18 I 






I 984 




15, I'.l 


187 B 




151 1 








- 






16,744 




".. 177 


I 53. :> 


1.716 


132 2 


" 




• 




69 IT' 


118 ii 


33,999 


202.8 




150 3 




- 


19,099 


39 i 


■ ■ - 


- 




28L 1 




17>l » 












- 




1-14. 2 


-11 I 


+13.6 








61.8 


1,691 


264.7 


2.593 


146. 3 


943 


53.2 


117 




1.013 


Sfl 7 


i. BOS 


278 9 


- 




s.l! 




1.180 


- 


l. SOS 










l'.l 7 


\:v-> 


1"1 '. 


1,721 


- 




7* ii 




Ill ■_' 




242 s 


7. ;i:i7 








711 






891 '. 


■ 


■ 


:;. isi 


- 






• - 




12 105 




>■. H7" 


261 


1,642 








• 


107.0 


• 


i'«i ii 


20,224 


■ 


IV '.<_'•. 


167.6 






10, 708 


111 s 






22,330 




i". nn 


168 1 








16 8 


81.724 


167 7 


20,819 






243 •> 






1.013 




:;■.. 17>. 








17. Il'.l 












• n ii 


1-12.8 




• U i 


+5.5 


+4.3 


• 




1,200 


93.6 


7.341 


572. 4 


4.969 


387.5 


1 s|-l 




711 




l S64 


120 1 




'.v 1 


:.. mi 


117. 


I. 122 


AA\I li 








- - 






6,018 




3,941 


1 




XI, I! 


7I'» 


II 


10, 167 






.117 a 


8,814 


■J 17 .'. 




11 B 


124 


18 7 


1 -.'7 








7. VI 


113.5 








11 7 


J. nin 


801.8 


I. 768 




'-.7 


IKI II 






119 


17 B 


2,847 


861 8 


1.777. 




1,290 


193 I 






168 






mi :< 


1,817 




1,674 


IMS | 








• 






1,820 






817 s 


■Jll 




lit 










Ml '.< 


1. lis 


891 '.) 




• 








IN -. 








.d'.i 5 


- 








f. 136 










:i7i i 




18 7 










2 170 




1. KM 






.-- 1 






1.611 


617 7 


- 


820 l 


1,846 


1117 8 


















KM) 


122 S 


177 




170 








1 m", 


• 




111 s 














- 










- 






• 






150 'I 






• 






• 






- 








57 




94 




543 




706 


315.3 


729 


828 ■• 
























• 




1"7 I 




71s s 
















1." 2 














• 


17 4 


89 




8,714 


598. 5 










OB 


■ 














• 












• 




1.817 










■ 






















■ 


II i> 












170 n 


s'H 


















• 






















-4/ 
r -' /' — ■ —' 



l -' i .* 




. . . ~i 



r« ' - - 






e — 



L 



— e i r /• ^ - cs — 






no -j — •-- 



— CC t- r 

rl— 'to x. 



i — <m : 



i - - — -. 
§8 7 J 
r* /:" — — 



■ ' 



i- e w — : 



— r- 



^{fSsiir 



= H M b : 



< < 

s - 

— - 

< - 

< . 



gg 

- 

; 

t C. — _ O _ 



£ < Z 



- §5 r 

c _ o — 



— .'"— — 



w a 



-f- c - 



- & 



at 

£.>. 

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General United States Crime Statistics 

The diita presented in this section is primarily of value to the lav 
enforcement executive for the purpose of comparing the crime experi 
ence in bis community with the averages reported nationally 1>; 
similar cities. Crime trends and rates are tabulated by groupinj 
cities according to population size. Police performance in clearing 
clinics by arrest and the number of persons they charge for thea 
ciimcs are presented by population group and geographic division 
National city averages are also shown indicating the type and valu< 
of the property stolen by offense and type and value recovered 1>; 
police investigation. Robbery, burglary, and larceny-theft an 
examined by type, a^ well as where and when they occurred. 

For the first time, city and rural arrest rates are shown for a! 
criminal offenses. Arrest rates by population group are also lisle* 
for specific offenses. This is another step in building totals for crinn 
categories other than those in the Crime Index and in presenting 
crimes known to the police through arrests. 

It is important to remember in studying averages that about hall 
the units used must be above and about half below. Nations 
averages can provide the police administrator with valuable guidance 
in analyzing the local crime count, as well as the performance of hi; 
force in combating crime. The analysis, however, does not end witl 
such a comparison, for it is only through an appraisal of local con- 
ditions that a clear picture of the community crime problem or tlu 
effectiveness of the police force is possible. 

City crime in I960 based on offenses known to the police, who 
examined by population groups, had total increases ranging from 14 
to 7 percent. Again, the most significant increase was in robbery, 
with a 25 percent jump in cities between '_'."><). ()<>(» and 500,000 popu- 
lation, to a low of 4 percent in cities under 10,000. City crime rates 
illustrate that robbery in 1900 was distinctly a big city crime, with 
a high of 141 in cities 750,000 to 1,000,000 ami a low of 13 in cities 
under 10,000. These small cities, however, reported a total crime 
increase of 14 percent and the largest percentage change in auto theft. 

City crime was up 24 percent over the average for the 5-year 
period 1955-59. 



rs 




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r» 




























































S (T 




































































































































































- 






























































-<C 




























" 


~~ 






















































«D 






































































































































— 


























■ 




































ci 


— 














































































































*r> tc 




























^■^ 




























V 




















































w 






































































































- 


i 




- 








— 























O 
K 


£ 




- 
























O 

-J 
< 


18 














M 














H 


S.M 


























O 


lit 






































A 










































8 




ft 








-3 b 



• - 
c- o 



£1 






a. 
o 

= 



a. 



a 







ha3 

l_ .77. I- 

gx« 
a 2 « 



«73 — 

t. o — 



i - y. 



= ^57* 



sag, j 

B s •- 3 si 



|=2 

— ^ a 

-/a * 

.S§a 



i o — 

Be s 

■r 3 a 

: 2 * 

CO 



I S3 



i 5 

at 3 

5 -2 



^ * 



I 



— 


o 


m 


$ 


9Q 




-= 




r 


-1 


e 


M 


h 








i 





e b 



I o 

- a 



8 3 



m-<>onr>K 



cm r. — r i 7i — 






oo s 3 > co — - . - — /• 

"" -r 7 I B 1. - 

rj -o 7j -r i • r. 



u so 
MS 
S3 5c 

V B ■ -c 

B ^ = ._ 

Dm ^ 7T *— 

g -a-- -- » 

HB — 9 r -B _ 

a ag-s 



~ o 
|| 

•a ; 
B — 

! 

— - 
I? 



5 a 



7--. 



3 o 

T B 



a — 

c 

s 3 

77- 



« 



= 5? 
a.— 



O a5 



B-a 



S B 



a c - 3 5 . Sf - ~ 

"; « o 3 =*B a B 



■ssj 

B — — 
3 1* « 

'3>«S S 

X , — 



s2 



'able if. — Offenses Known, Cleared by Unrest, and Persons Charged (//«•/»/ /<>» 
Prosecution), I960, bj Population Groups, Vumber per loo Known Offenst - 







1 




Rob- 


- ► 


glarj 
break- 
ing «'i 

Ing 


I...I- 




Murdei 
and 

II T 

man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter bj 
negll- 




TOTAL, GRODPS I VI 

351 rilir.-.; lotal popula- 
tion 33,428,926: 
Offenses known. . 
Offenses cleared by ar- 


100.0 

26.1 
19.8 


100.0 

92.3 

96.8 


100.0 

83.3 
66.7 


100.0 

72.5 
74 2 


100.0 

38.5 
41 B 


100 

75.8 

63 3 


100 

29.5 
19 3 


100.0 

20.1 
14 I 


100.0 

25 7 


Persons charged 

.'.Ill': 


3] 4 


100.0 
19 1 


100.0 

- 


100.0 
Bl 5 


70.8 


100.0 

87. 9 
41.fi 


7*1 7 

• 


100.0 


100.0 

21.0 
13.8 










17 6 


• 


17. a 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

- - 

100.0 

- - 
- 

• 


100 I 

100.0 
99.5 

100.0 

09.1 

100.0 

100.0 

100.0 
90.1 

100.0 


100.0 
63. 1 

114 i 

100.0 

90. 8 

1 

100.0 
100.0 

74 I 


100.0 

60 I 
65.9 

100.0 
SO ii 

100.0 

7s A 

100.0 

100.0 

77. 1 

100.0 
73 1 


100.0 

100.0 

46. 2 

60.6 

100.0 
47.9 

100.0 

- ! 
32. 4 

100.0 

- ' 

100.0 


100.0 

100.0 
88. 2 

100.0 

75. 4 
59.1 

100.0 
50.7 

100.0 

71 - 

08 i 
100.0 


100.0 
13.0 

100.0 
29.5 

a 

100 n 

32, . r . 
20.9 

100.0 

100.0 

19.4 

100.0 


100.0 
10. 6 

17. 2 

100.0 
14.8 

100.0 

- 


100.0 




. 








21. S 












. 




. - 


T II 












' 




- 


34 



- 



fable 15- — Qffensea Known, Cleared by Arrest^ and Persona Charged (ll<l<l 
for Prosecution), I960, by Population Groups, Number per 100 Known 
Offenses Continued 



- re Mil ► 



GBOI P IV 

i to 50,000 

total population 10,1 10, 

i (flenses knew ti 
Offenses cleared by ar 

oboup v 

68, in, ikim : 

total population 10,922, 
881 

< (flenses known 
Offenses cleared by ar 

r«-~T 



GBOI P VI 

1,691 cities under 10,000 
total population 0,263,' 
343: 

< (flenses known 
Offenses cleared by ar 



ons charged 

RUBAl 

630 counties; total popula 

lion 17,884,682: 
( (flenses know a 
Offenses cleared by ar 

rest 
Persons charged -. 



Tol .1 



100.0 



.'I 2 
j) 6 



25. 6 

22.4 



100.0 



30.6 
27 6 



27.0 
23.2 



Criminal hom- 
icide 



Murdei 

and 

oonneg- 
ligent 
man- 

slaugh- 



100.0 



94 7 
91.9 



100. 



91. 1 
97.2 



100.0 



97. 1 

103. 6 



KS :; 
91.2 



\I m- 
Blaugb- 

negll- 

genCC 



100.0 



80.5 



100. 



91.2 
95.6 



100.0 

86.9 
92.9 



89. 'J 

n7 7 



Forcible 
rape 



100.0 



77.8 
87. I 



100.0 

78. 7 
95.3 



100.0 



^ r, 
103.3 



69. l 
03.0 



Rob- 
bery 



100.0 



41.0 

- 



II. 1 
60.5 



100.0 



In. 1 

61.8 



in.:'. 
50.6 



rated 



100.0 






83 1 
83.9 



100.0 



90.3 

'.'7.n 



52.5 



Hur- 

hrcak- 
ing or 

inn 



100.0 



28 2 



30. 7 
26.5 



100.0 



36 
35.0 



29.1 



I ' 
ceny- 

theft 



100.0 



L9. B 
16.0 



20.3 
16. 8 



100.0 



;'t - 
20.1 



16 7 



theft 



SI 



fable 9. — Offenses Knotcn, t bared bj lrra*t| and Parsons Charged {Held fox 
Prosecution), l')(>(). by Geographic Divisions. Sumber />»-r lixi Knotcn 
Offenses 



• 



TOTAL ALL DIVISIONS 

l'.i i Idea; total population 

Offenses known 

ea cleared by ar- 
rest 
Persons charged 

M u | ■ 

ilation 






MII'I'IK \M \MH 

IV II 
I 

1 ■ 



HAL 

■ t: 

■ 

II • • ; til.it ion 

a :i 
I 
I • 















vTES 






Total 



100.0 
26.1 



19.8 



UNI II 






100.0 

. - 






100.0 






100.0 
ISO 



Murdei 
and 

llgeni 
man- 
si llH'll 



Crimln ■] hom- 
icide 



100.0 
92.3 



96.8 



111.0 



IIKI (. 



100.0 

77. I 



1 "HI II 



100.0 






Man 
negll- 



100.0 
83.3 



66.7 






100. n 

- . 



-., n 



100.0 



1IMI.II 












100.0 
72.5 



:■; i 



97 6 



HKl II 



100.0 
M 1 



HHI.II 

78. 7 



110.3 



IIKI I' 



IIKI 






100.0 
38.5 



42.8 



1IHI II 
47 7 
i.l I 



4U ii 



M. l 



100.0 

-- 






100 



IIKI II 

41 i 
I 






100.0 
75.8 



63.3 



1IMI (I 
"7 I 



1IMI II 

72 : 



100.0 

i.7. 1 



100.0 
44 n 



1IHMI 

87 - 









tag i.i 



100.0 
29.5 



19.3 



100.0 



100.0 
2) I 



100.0 
16.0 



HHI.II 

- 






HKl II 






Tabic ( >. — Qffenaes Known, Chared by Arrest, and Persons Char ged {Held for ■ 
Prosecution), I960, by Geographic Divisions. Number per 100 Known 
Offenses — t 'out iiui<-<l 





Total 


Crimln 
leide 


Forcible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Iggra- 


Mur- 

break- 

ing or 

Ing 


I. ir- 
cenv- 

theft 




Geographic division 


Murder 

and 
nonneg- 

ligent 
in. hi 
slaugh- 
ter 


m m- 
-i iugh- 
ter by 

negli- 


v 
theft 


mint UN STATES 

124 cities; tol il p>pulatioii 
J6.318: 


100.0 
23. 5 
L8 6 

100.0 
26.5 
16.6 


100.0 
87.7 

79.2 

100.0 

90 t 

120.4 


100.0 
B3.3 
37.4 

100.0 
54. 1 
47.0 


100.0 

76.8 

01.7 

100.0 
69.3 
69.7 


100.0 
40.7 
34.3 

100.0 
47.8 
59.4 


100.0 
77.0 

48.9 

100.0 

;- ii 
56. 'J 


100.0 
21.7 

100.0 
34.0 
15.4 


100.0 

i ;. a 

It. 7 

100.0 
19 J 

11.7 


toad 


i (Senses cleared b; 


2 . 9 


PACIFIC STATES 

290 cities: total population 
1 1 ,689,625: 


100. 


Offenses cleared b 


2S.5 
20.8 







Table 10.— Number of Persons Found Guilty per 100 Persons FormaUm 
Charged by the Police, I960: 279 Cities Over 25,000, Total Population 
39,025,550 



Offense 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligenl manslaughtei 
id' Manslaughter by negligence. . 

Robbery 

Aggr ivated assault 

Other assaults - 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

•theft -.- 

Auto theft - - 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Forcible r i|m- 

Prostitution and i ommercialized vice 

statutory i •!"' 

drug law - 

ling, et( 

Offen »s against lamily and children 

Llquoi Laws 

v. hile Intoxicated ... - 

ad motoi rohlcle Law - 

■ iduct. 

Drunkenness 

j 

Gambling 

ah other offenses 



86 



Number of pel sons 



held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 



100.0 



100. 
100. 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100. 
100 I) 

LOO 

100.0 
100 
100.0 
100 

100.0 

100,0 

1 1 

100. 
100. 
L00 
LOO 

100 
100. 



Found guilty 



Total 

guilty 



59.8 
36.4 
58.7 
43.2 

51.9 
67.4 

72.0 
64.0 

i,l t 
50.6 
77. 2 
50.8 

52. 6 

67.0 



61.6 
69.0 
79.8 
77. 1 
64.1 
78.3 
66 
50.2 
67.8 



Offense 

charge.! 



42.0 
28.0 
11.7 
25.4 

48.5 
52. 7 

66.3 
53.6 

58.0 
41.9 
62. 9 
36.3 

51.3 
60.9 
67. 2 
55.6 

59.9 
68.0 
72, 7 
76 7 
63.7 



offense 



0.6 



17 8 
8 t 
17.0 

17.8 

3 4 
14.7 



10.4 



6 

s 
li 
it 


t 

3 

5 


1 


3 


s 
G 


1 


1 

1 



1 

t 


r 
i 


t 







r 



Table 11.— Monthly Variations, I960 

[Daily average, offenses known to the poller In 3.163 cities, total imputation 93,368,862] 



Moi Mi 



Crlmlii'il bomlclde 



Murder 
anil noii- 
Defdlgent 

man- 
slaughter 



slaugh- 
ter bj 



bie 



bery 



rated 



Bur- 

breaf tag 
tag 



Hi. ft 



Unit 



nuary December 

1 1 1 1 . i r > March 

I ■ 

)tob( r 1 I 

' 

tprl] 

ii y 

n «• 

- 

•InlT 

- 



12.0 



8.3 



23.0 



164.6 



227.5 



1.459.1 



3,611.6 



888. 



10.9 

II. 7 
II' 7 
12 8 



a ii 

B. i 



2 



24. 8 

21 i 



145.9 

191 I 



240. 7 



I 






702 ; 



11.2 

11. I 

1 2. 3 

ll.fi 
ll.fi 
18,8 
12. l 

12.7 

1 -'. 4 

12.2 



6. 5 

B 
7.2 

7.:. 

- 

8.3 

8 8 



20. 3 

:•! ii 
28. 3 

26. 6 

2:t. I 
lit. 4 



176.6 

142. 7 
137.2 

143. 5 
188.0 

191. 8 

•J 17. 5 



196.3 
240. I 
243. 7 

237. 3 
215. i 



I. S01 6 

1,335.2 
1,452.8 

1, 440.fi 



.'.. 131.7 

3,251.4 
3, 736. 6 

• 

■ 
3. 588. 3 

3. 7M. 1 



611. I 

613. 6 

613.6 
631. 7 

- 



able 12. — Offense tnalysis, Trends, 1959—60, and Percent Distribution 

! i Itlea over 25.000. Tot;il population 55,809,1 Ml 



Classification 


Number ofoffi 


Pa 


Percent 
distri- 


1950 


I960 


bution, 


TOTAL 


38,236 




16.6 


100.0 


V ,v 




19,302 

9, 4:(7 

1,513 

2,771 
315,011 


21 

- 
. 1 

3,316 

- 

363,541 


+ 12.9 
4-31.2 

—16.6 
+ 10.7 
4-11.5 
4-13.2 

+15.4 


■ 

















7 A 






TOTAL 

Qg): 

■ 


100.0 


—,.;' 


■- 

201,600 
16, 739 

861,113 


+21.7 

- 

■ 1 
+10.8 








Not • 








lue): 

TOTAL 


100.0 






• 

110. 173 
777. 2-13 


- 
661,113 


+9.6 
+ 11.0 
+ 12.2 


. 








H.4 


TOTAL 


100.0 






- 


- 
301,3a'. 


+ 14.0 














J4 1 








85.0 



-7 



Tabic 13. — Type ami Value oj Property Stolen and Recovered 

[407 



Tj !"• "f property 



TOTAL 

Currency, r>" ! - 

itolen automobiles 
ncou 






' 



1881,800, WO 



24, 100. IMHI 

7. 700,000 






$147. 300. COO 



2,000,000 

100,000 

1. 100,000 

128, JIM I. IMHI 

12,000,000 



: 



52. 



Table 1 1. — I alue <>/ Property Stolen, by Type <>l Crime, I960 

1 107 cities over 25,000 Tol J popul it ion 55,809,144] 



('! isslfil ilii.il 


Nun ' 


Value of 

property 
stolen 


value i»t 
offense 


TOTAL 


1,437,003 


$281, 300, 000 


. 




44. :>79 

881, 113 
167,770 


11,400.000 

U0.IXH) 

54,000,000 


•>• 




i> 








H 










N^ 



Arrest Data 

Annual reports prepared bj contributing law enforcement agencies 
isclosing personal characteristics of persons arrested are presented in 
te Following tabulations. As ;i result of b Btepped-up program last 
II to expand reporting area, total arrests are shown this year from 
gencies covering 60 percent <>l the United States population. This 
as a 13 percent increase in the actual Dumber of contributors. E 
uision of this phase of the program is continuing in order that totals 
n- the country ma\ be Bhown as soon aa possible. 

An arrest rate of 3,640 per 100,000 persons was developed on the be 

the city and rural report-; received. Fot all offenses, the rate was 

Host tin.'.' times higher in the cities; however, when a number of 

b Berious violations are excluded, the rutin of city arrests to rural 
Tests is slightly less than 2 to 1. The arrest rate for persons under 
J in the city was 1,830 compared to 1,440 in the rural areas. This 

based on the l<> to 17 age population, and when both rural and city 
arrest figures are combined, a rate of 3,866 per 100,000 young 

rsons is established. The distribution of rural arrests l>\- totals 
id by certain i oups, including persons under 18, is similar to 

ie city experience, with few exceptions. Arrest rates are Bhown by 
ty population group and rural area. Trend information is shown for 
>th city and rural areas, as well as tabulations l»; \. and race. 

Through arrest data, an indication of the extent of all types of crimi- 

railable although this will l>e a smaller measure than 

known to police. In interpreting arresl information, it should 

remembered thai arrests, not persons, are counted. The same 

non may be arrested several times in a year for the Bame or several 
example, drunkenness). The arrest of one person may 
.d crimes, and Beveral persons may l>e am >r one 

iine. Not nil persons arrested by police are formally cha 
^\ all t } t < »~. • charged are found guilty in court. 

I ' ted by police are rel< tmber o s, in- 

Djding those where it i< found the person arrested did not commit 
ie all. an offense was committed but police unable t<» 

velop evidence to prove the person responsible, victim n 

te in prosecution, and arrested person it d after p 

■rnii 



Police arresl practices vary 


widely 


particu 


larly with respect to 


juveniles. For the purposes of this program, law enforcement agencies 


-coir an arresl when a person is taken 


into custody for committing ai 


specific offense. A young person under 


1 s is counted as arrested when 


he or she lias committed a crime, and t 


te circumstances are such that' 


if the individual were an adult, an arrest would be made. 


Although arrest information is primarily a measure 


of law enforce! 


nient activity, it provides useful info 


filiation on ch 


aracteristics ol 


persons arrested for criminal acts. It 


is also a gaugo 


of criminality 


when used within its limitations, as must be done with all form- ol 


criminal statistics, including court and 


penal. 




Table 15. — City arni Rural 


Arrest Rates, I960 




Total 


1 c '""-' 


Rural 




(3,443 agencies, total 


2,460 cities, popula- 




Offense charged 


population 
108,778,951 


tion 81,660,735 


tioil27.11S,216 




Number 


1: ite per 

100,000 


Numl ,.i 


i: ite per 

100,0011 


Number 


R tte [i" r 


TOTAL 


3, 959, 559 


3, 640. 


3, 552, 054 


4, 349. 8 


407, 505 


1.502.' 




Criminal homicide: 














(a) Murder and nonnegligenl 
















5, ' • t 


5. 1 


4,507 


5.5 


1,027 


, 


' ! in slaughter by negli- 
















o 400 





1,766 


r, 


666 


2. 


Robbery 


32,791 


30.1 


29, 320 


35.9 


3, 465 


12.1 




59, 961 


55. 1 


52 277 


64.0 


7,684 


28. 




! 53, 222 
137,800 


110.9 
126. 7 


134,538 

110,047 


164.8 

134. 8 


[8,684 

27, 753 


68, ! 
102. 


Burglary-breaking or entering 




237, 193 
63,682 
12, 189 


218. 1 

5a 5 

38.8 


207, 54S 
54,024 

2 - 


254.2 

66, 2 
39.9 


29. 645 
9.6.58 
9, 639 


109.. 
35. i 
35. 


Auto theft 




Stolen property; buying, receiving, 




11,792 
25,244 


10.8 
23, 2 


10,049 
18,958 


12. 3 
23. 2 


1.713 
6, 286 


23. : 






7. 7 1 9 


7. 1 


6,068 


7. 1 


1,651 


6. I 


Prostitution and commercialized 
















26, 182 


24.3 


25,851 


31.7 


631 


2 ! 


Other sex offenses (includi 


!'ii i ipe) 


50, 101 


46. l 


1 1, 532 


54. ■ 


-, -,.;, 


20.. 


N ireotic drug laws - 


27. 735 


25 ."1 


23, 130 


28. 7 


1. lOfi 


15.1 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 


38, 120 


35. 


31. 520 


12. 3 


3,600 


1 :. 


tgainsl ! cnily and chil- 
















50,557 
106,347 


16. - 
97.8 


14,203 
*6,818 


41.9 

1 


19.529 


Ml 

72. 1 


Liquor laws 


Driving while intoxicated 


183,94 ■■ 


169. 1 


146,381 


' • 


37. 582 


3 




175,502 

1. 112. 167 
1 1,201 


437. 1 

1. 2'»S J 

140.8 


149, 144 

1,326. 107 
146, 10". 


- 1 

1. 624. 3 

1 78. 9 


26,058 

B5.760 

r,09fl 


96. 1 

316.: 

26. '. 


Drunkenness. - 


Vagrancy.. 




122,946 
12,909 


113.0 
189.9 


1!'.*, 243 
1 3 1, 162 


1 16. 


7.'. 147 


13. < 




m (nol includi- 1 in tol ds 


1 16, I2J 


125. 3 


126, >-' 


! 


9, " 1 1 


■ - 


90 















T;il»l«' l<». — trreat Rates, 1960, l>\ Population Groups 






OTAL. GROUPS I VI 

I , total popula- 
tion hl.eeO.TS.'': 
Minul'iT of arrests 
100.000 

l' I 



P II 



P 111 

■ 



• r iv 



■ 



P VI 

I 



RCRAL 






Tot ,1 



M • S 

570. 1 



245, l'.'l 



• 






497. 4 



41_V f. 



411. 4 






Criminal 
homicide 



Murdei 
and 
non- 
negli- 

mau- 
ler 



4.507 
5.5 






453 



361 

3.7 



. 






■ 
2.4 



- 



Man- 

ter 

negll- 



1.786 
2.2 



i 



:•. 4 






172 



204 

1.9 



. 



1 01 

dole 



6.068 
7.4 









439 



473 

4 ,3 



. 



1,651 






29. 328 
85.9 



21,711 



2, 501 

30.4 






1,425 

14. 7 



1. 149 
10. 5 



- - 



3,465 

. - 



vated 



52. 277 
84 



■- 






4. 273 






. 






.- 



mi' or 






12,374 



11,722 
118. 3 



11.344 
117.3 









. 



tlic'fl 



207. 548 
254.2 






. 






i 



217. 1 



. - 






91 



■ J --- 



- 









ill . 



■ z — z '■> 



I 34 — — — 






"■ 



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• — R 






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— " - - i 



rfo "8 3 V - 2 '. ' " 






-'- \ 






; '-. ;i / /• -- 

- 
i t ■ • - 1 — « 



N i.g«rer-« s -w 






•^ I - I - -r I - 

• 
— " I -' - . , 






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£ a 

b I 

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I i 



3 



2 1" 



— ricoa 

— — ' -t Si :'. — " 






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— i - 3. 7 1 — — 77 3. 
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i- 71 r ■ i - • so 



- i — . 






r - < ' " / / -: t z 
- — - - 






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- — C DQOOtN 



— • 77 



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i . i - - — 
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i. i- . ■ 

MNNCOC 



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CO *-. z t — z r- 

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OSS r 3 _ ' — 
77 — 77 X »"7i t 



EQ* 7 1 — " — " — " — " 7 ( Z 



- 1 - ■ - 

■ GO T 



—■ I - ■ 7 '•" 77 I - 



■ - I -7 / I - -- 
/ — — " 



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r. - — " ' : 

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2 - c I - * z T 

n"— " so«e> r'-r 



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3 — ^ ' - r — 
1 

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IH \ ~ / — " I -' — •" .7* — " ' 7* f 



7J ~ f ■ 

*-• 3. Z -r '7 -z 1 - [ 






--^xvc 



■•■: — gj = • - 



71 — vr 3. 



1 - 1 - ^ 



o< — • 



7777-ct--rC— — o 
— 77 71 77 I- 71 

10" -n*« «"o 



— 77 — /• '7 7< 77 77 — 73 — . 



Z 77 71 '7 r7 77 » 73 

- 77 — y '7 7i 77 77 

77 O — 77 — 43 — • 

— " —7i' " 



82 



ia cc — — 



: £ — • ^J ~ 



_ ^ ci r 



— — -7 
: ■ - . - - 



1 - CD CD 1 - ( 



© <n 1- eo *r ^r c 






GO -O tJ" <0 



0^«fOO*TCDCD 



1 ^ cm ■<»• r- 



« CO TC ■* N -»f -« O CN 

-^ *r co ^ -^ -<r -* 



E 
< £ 

O 



a. ^^ 






- . 



3 

c H 






m* * h« 



. - r - j. 
pw w -S c » a* s P £ 



3. 71 



_ = -=r a C 

S • 2 tj s c - 



- bj a 






I 

-—1- s;^ - z— --2. 

s2r , baS"2'S-a 



© Sw 3 a a E 5.S o o S >5 « s * « tt c iTE s 5 S ears a 



02 



I '.i I ill- I)!. — / ity trreits of Person* I nder IX. I nder 2 /, and I nder .''> Year* •</ 

tge. 1969 









TOTAL 

•i r 



■ 



: fr.it ii 1 






• 



od ilnl- 






' 






■ 






TOTAL 



3. 678. 636 



4. J07 

1.T66 

29. 326 

134. 538 
110.047 

54. 024 
32.550 

10.049 

18. 958 
6.068 

25.851 

44.532 

23. 430 
34. 520 

34.203 
86.818 

146. 381 

449. 444 

1.326.407 

146. 105 

119.243 
453. 462 
126. 782 






.-' 10 



131 

Ml 

1.943 
51, 720 









10.715 
42,472 



14,210 

11, 140 






1.1*1.387 



- 
9, 100 









14 3 






11 i, 
in I 



: 

i 8 

■I 1 

- 

ii ' 

l ii 

I • 






22 4 



47 4 

. 

4.7 

- 


















lal>l« 19.— Cit$ trreata, Distribution bj Sex, I960 

[2,46 ■ 



i 



TOTAL 



i , boon le 

i i Murdi ' > ''■! 
i l tughtcr 

ig iter by neglige 



■TV 
Iggl I 
Oilier IS Hill 

Burglary- breaking or entering 



. • iefl 
\uio thefl 

Embezzlement and fraud 
Stolen property; baying, r< 

i-i. , , 

; < ounterfeiting 
l orcible r i|»' 

nt Ion tnd commercialize I 

Oilier 

ripe - 



\\ e ipons; carrj ing : -. etc 

Offenses igainsl family irvt children 
Liquoi iii 



Driving while intra 
Disorderly conduct 
Drunkennes 
Vagrancy 



(i unhling 

All other oflen e 



Number 



TOTAL 



1 1-i sH 



4,507 
1.799 

29. 326 
52. 277 
134.538 
110.047 

207. 548 
54, 024 
32. 550 

10, 049 

18,958 
6.068 
25,851 

44. 532 

23, 430 
34, 520 
34.203 
86,818 

146.381 

449.444 

1.326,407 

148, 105 

119,243 
453,462 
126. 782 



Male 



3,272.367 



- 
1. 575 

■ 

•^.'.0S4 

'.«, 177 

15,778 

., 068 

■ 

■ 
32,613 

- 
■ 

137,700 

387, 258 

1,223,276 

108,608 
380,171 

11I.86S 



106 W9 



191 

'■ 

34.967 

l.'.MO 

3.180 



:;. tn, 

1,907 

27 

_ • 

8,681 

62, I su 

11.1 4'.l 

■ 

14. Wl 4 



TOTAL M 



I 100 






- 



1.5 

■ 

.3 

.5 

- 



.6 

. i 
4.0 

4.0 

3.2 
12.3 

:: I 






' 100.0 






5.3 
1.6 
.8 



.6 
1.0 

2. 2 

1,2 

11.8 
1 I 
i 1 

11.6 

< 



' 100.0 



<-• 



3 

- ii 

:■.:; 
.1 

.5 
1.3 



1.7 

C. 1 



2 1 
15 3 

■::-> t 



2 fi 

:■ 7 



i Because of rounding, the umoftheind ,'idua • nsmaj ioI idd to precisely 100.0-percent. 

Mi in ' (, oi I percent. 



'.'1 



Table 


2(1. — <7/\ 


irreata 


/»\ Race, 


I960 












































i >t!i ■ 


TOTAL 




























tin- 
















■ 


TOTAL 


3. 488. 8-26 


2. 320. 63 ■> 


1.064.M4 


71.662 


. 066 


5, WO 


34.179 
















Murder ..?■<: ■ 
















aughter 


4.120 








•1 


4 
























1,812 






1 







j 


25. 501 


10,904 




■ 


9 


7 


178 




43.081 








17 




170 










;i* 




1 




Burglai 


102. 538 




1 






I7J 


. 


theft 


188.063 


I.-'. 158 






177 


■IM 


. 




48. 420 






413 


M 






'"-.Hi') 


30.607 








4 


. 




• eivlng, 


















8.552 








1 


8 


. 


[ ■ 


17.810 


14,798 




too 


7 


28 


- 




5,326 






" 


:i 






■ 


















23.031 


11,040 




. 


30 


27 










40.702 

18. 370 
32, 124 


14, 729 


11, Hi] 


LIS 


43 


- 
17 




m - 








• 


34.053 




11,679 


163 


. 


13 






86. 071 


56,007 




- 


. 


KM 




■ 


144.803 


130, 11'' 






. 


47 






388, 335 


231, 164 


• 








■ 




1.318.150 








861 




8.411 


5 


140.014 






■ 


!■; 




1,848 




87. 722 






83 


. 






• 


435.331 










-- 


- 


■ 


128.754 




- 




■i* 


B 





















95 






J> _ 



v. 5 



■ - — — r — i - 

S -r' r» • 



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N 




- 








3 


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s 


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■ 


S3 


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— 


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■ 










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ri 










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_ . - - . IN tlOte l-NBll 



"+ ++^+ 



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+ 



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« 71 r -' JO 3 — ' — — ' 



/ /• r -■•-■-. S««C = "i — 
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DO -■ I -* 



■ — - 3 3Mai HifOff D)£XO i - ■- r — r: re 

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c = = 


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7111 




7 

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- 7 £ = ? = 

74 — ri-Ti-r — i---- 



• i- >c m 

3mS ~ 



— r i — 



■ ' r. r. 77 — — -^ -:i;./,/.tm.i.i. -. i - 
— — / -r /. -r 77 •-. — X — .-. 74 74 33 - — t: - 



74 — — 



d <o cm ao k m at 
77 4- 74 — 77. -7 — — -r 



- - - z — ^ - - -. r -i ~ 

> ■ J — - — ~7 r - — 

-.7 .-. R 77. ~ •-. m 5 i - 






? I — — 7 1 - 



— iQHonioecononff ~ /: -r — r - - — - r 



— — n ri — — 



— — — 7 I f 



— 77 7 4 7 I 77 r 711- IQ I 

.r 77 77 77 I - 7". 7"- 77 ..7 /■ 7 4 I 

— 7) — ■- 77 r. r. 71 — 77 i 



-r J. - C T 7i N ^ r: -r i .: c 

77 71 I - I - « ■£. -C — — ." — t - — 
— 7 4 .7 I - /- 7 4 77 71 



■ 7 I C 77 I - C — 77 I - x 
c f - - ■; 7 7 7 / - 
71 71 — --Z 77 X f I- — r< 71 



I- I- I- -7 X 1- 77 T- — " 
77 7-4 7* — T 1 - *-7 X 74 • 7 ■ - ~i • 
— 70 CO 77- 7T. 74 77 74 — 



; ?l - - - 7t T - .-7 74 M -c 
I -r 7 1 77. -T -T — 77 77 X 77 77 

i r: — •.-...-. x s 3 — -r 77 



4 - 74 u7 77 X » 



n NtDO>r>H 



74 77 74 /- I - 77 7- — I - 77. -C — : 
74 74 4- 74 — 7: 7i 74 — 



Ncio<s<oog»onoi — 

77- 74 >.-. I - 74 C 77 77. C I - 77 » 

:j 7 - i-: t- 7". 74 — 74 s. 77 



t ct/.7.i-7.;?u.iccr. 

74 74 77 .-7 77 X — t - — t - 55 — 74 

74 77 — 1"-7 r7 71 74 — 



•7 fi 2 — — 71 — 71 74 ^7 77 ri 
74 77 r 74 ^ — X 74 XT 

74' — "— ' 74" 



19 
17, 077 

28 
287 

288 

550 

1 , *. r ,9 
1,930 

180 
175 
118 
224 
127 
11 

270 
167 
354 

2, 102 

479 

1,227 

1,621 

264 

44 

3, 264 


X 


18,793 

25 

291, 
37S 
802 

2,510 

2,413 
740 

112 
135 
224 

125 

240 
1.17 
251 

2. 742 

1,354 

1,446 
291 

38 

3, 349 

663 


4- 


r- 


22 
19 

246 

467 

2,531 

2,606 

1 , 056 
129 

L78 

74 
6 

262 
L08 

175 

02 

1,810 

192 
1,034 

167 

27 

4,661 


1 «, ani^«9a0« - - . r i- t-rr-ic-; ..7 -r — — = 77 

■^» > T — 74 77- — 74 1 - 1 - .-7 77 1 - 4 - — - 7 1 - .7 77 77 — 77 4 - 

-- — — 77 — 7: -r 74 — 7: EC i-~ — 74 I- 

»' m"ts— " — " ..7* 


TTJ3i-s2^r:-Tia 1-7. s osoooo e»oo 000 •» 
»r --7 77. 74 £ x 77 74 — 77 — 77 74 X 74 x -r -r -r 4- 77 
t- — :£ 77 — — 77 74 74 77 »-7 



77. 7 74 -.7 ^ T •--. IO 77 77. ■ 
— 77 74 3) 74 — 77 74 -T : 

— — — - / 5 



— . X OMOOVXe"! 

- 1 — — 77 >-7 -T u7 T 7~- 77 

C-4 — — 77 — 1 - > 






04 oo4 4.n 1 



1 fl 1 o o CD o cn — nowncNcnoP^n 






— — • CO 04 C40 



■J ^ ■- — 

2 * s a 

- ■-— « 

a — ^v 



o -=• 

I 






- - = 

- = t 



• - 

- ~ 

— 1 
7 — 



at 






t « a «« 
j ^ 9 % a fi o M 

i ~ ^ — — 

5r]£ 7 ; C- 
- -4. X ~ 



4,-77 

= - 
- 

a 

SI 

s c — 



7 - 
= -= •' 

= - . 



; : 

: 



— ' A . — 9 - — M • * 7-^r-£ 

x. s r -------- - 



«.'S 



Table 24. — It* mil irrett* of Peraont I ndmr in. I nder 21, mui I ml, i 23 Yean 

../ tg0, l'lt,0 

-in] 





Nil!. 






• 


TOTAL 




21 






21 




TOTAL 


398. 780 


59. 823 

i 
II 


1 1 • . 


163.096 


15 






- 

■ 


982 

mi 










1 


3,221 

7.414 

18.396 

25.754 








. 






1 


27,194 
8.834 
9.423 
1.613 


147 




7. IH7 




10. I 










8.073 

1.603 

597 

5,292 




OS 

I.- 


2, 081 




17. 1 




1 






4.101 
3.346 
18.071 
19. 242 


8, 7 1 S 


1,067 

1,210 

II, in; 


1,821 
13, 1 1 "» 


i7. a 


. - 








■ 


34.351 

23. 299 

83. 993 

7,069 


281 


1. 167 


10,017 
1,807 


- 


. 




• 

1! 


3.359 

77. 176 
9.399 




• 
i 707 


47s 


i. a 










Table 25.— Rural Irrest*, Distributions by Sex, I960 

[981 ' 1,688,111] 



i barged 



TOTAL 



Criminal homicide: 

Murder and nonnegligem man- 
. ;hter 
(ti) Manslaughter by negligence 



v 

i - lUlt 

- - 

ag or entering. 



•theft 

Auto theft.... 

Embezzlement 

: roperty; buying, receiving, etc.. 

1 felting 

Forcible i ipe 

i ind( ommei i I 

aclud I itutory 
rape) - - 





v- e ipons; i irrying, po 

j dnsl family and children. 




Di unkennels 

acy — 





All other offen 

in 



N umber 



TOTAL M;ile 



398.760 



982 
558 

3.221 
7.414 
18, 396 

25,754 

27. 594 
8.834 
9,423 
1.613 

6.073 
1,603 

597 

5,292 

4,101 
3.346 
16.071 
19,242 

34.351 

23. 299 

83.993 

7.069 

3.359 

77, 176 

9,399 



see i 



B42 

3,066 

17. 112 
24 888 

8, 189 

B, '.'71 

- 

171 

I - 

3,588 
' . 174 

17. 197 

. 180 
20, 91E 

6,413 

3.077 

68, 167 

8,743 



31.805 



140 



! 284 
866 

1, 152 
124 

732 



159 

513 

172 

718 

1,745 

< 
2, 184 

282 
8, 709 



; 



TOTAL Male Fern 



i 100 



' 100.0 



I 

6. ' 

'. i 

A 

1.5 

. 1 
.1 

1.3 

1.0 

.8 

4.0 

L8 

- 

21. 1 
1.8 



19. l 

2. I 



.2 

.1 

1.8 

1.7 

• 

- 
- 
. 1 



0) 
1.3 
1.0 

I - 

I ■ 

9.0 

' 7 

2L3 
1.7 

- 
18.7 

■J. 1 



' 100 



.4 
.1 

.5 

'- 1 
1.0 

- 7 



1.3 
1.4 
1.6 

2.3 

4.3 
7.5 

2. 1 

.9 

27.4 

2. 1 



i Be iiise of rounding, the sum of the individual classifications maj aol iddtopre 'percent. 

th in Mo of 1 percent. 



L00 



Table 26.— JturaJ irreataby Race, 1960 

. populatioi 







TOTAL 



■i ill**: 

'■' 

'■ : 

it') Manslaughter I 
Bobberj 

Bnrglao * ■ '• r ' 8 

■ efl 
Auto theft 

! fraud 
• property; l>u> lug, 

Forgei 

■ i \ ice 
I tutor? 



tic <lmn laws 
rryini 

:nl children. 



i 
Drunkem • 



■ 



388.615 



906 

558 

3, 032 

7,129 

17. 522 

23. 181 

24,890 
7,812 
9,080 
1,468 

5,408 

1,355 

574 

5.039 

3.989 
2,835 
15.683 
14. 398 

32. 070 

21.788 

80, 519 

6.997 

3.193 

69.918 

9.271 






u hite 



308, 89 



•177 

2,311 

t, 586 
14,000 

8, 256 
1,342 

1.829 

1,070 

3, 176 
1,020 

11,003 

17. 102 
67,076 

c. 1 19 

1,630 

7, 64 1 



Negro 




Chi- 












50.201 


7,584 


SI 


121 


337 
67 


11 
87 
















1 26 


2 


1 


.'..us: 




1 


:i 


2, 781 


404 


1 


s 


3, 626 




5 


8 


I in 






:) 




71 








13 


1 


l 


463 


04 




1 




11 




l 


182 


6 


1 






43 




11 


467 


11 


•> 


4 


876 


in 


1 








1 




2, 186 




- 


:i 


2, 518 


701 




6 






2 


4 






4 


17 


712 






3 


1,465 


4 


2 


- 




1,033 


6 


- 


- 


115 




1 






2.089 



3 
146 

15 



is 
76 

41 



44H 

.- 






? j — iO CO CN CO 
CO CO _L.oi 4I1-' 



co co ■---« oo X 'O »c h o*. r-*. o cN 



+"■"+' 



1 , *- O -.O 
c i 1 -' eo" 



T. Q X — ' CI --0 — J- Tf •<*" 

1 - • : . 1 — •-; r ~ o ^ 

c^r: C 1- t x -~ -r l- ry 

ci »-T .— ' 1 -^ x* «--' x r: w r-'o* 



coo t - ••- ■„- -r 1 - »- -JZ- > " 
-r:i ao <M — 00 co o x -— 

ci" 1 - »d 90 —' ? .' 



T- 1 ~ — t- -r CO -r i-4 OS OS ^ C» »^ ^ 

rc-rr- c i-Si»J 1- — 1- n C ro ci 

• -- --: — 30 cn co ao as o i>- co ■■— co i- as 

cl — * — * *S 30 CO 30 -f* SO — " »0 C*" 



r-o i-h o «-< uo ooto — -r 

cd »d C J co — • ~* 0^0^ o 

71 -H-22 1+"- ' 



++ 



+ 1 



co c -— oi co >-o t^ co 

' t^ t^ no ed m i~ 
cm co co — 

1 1 ++ 



1-1 1 I T 



++ 



t^ GO ov ^ — ^QOOii' h-NHO i-«cNCO<N ci -r : 



.— 1 ■- • t i-'-:- 



f-t ^H Tf -"-J* f-(C 



V— ' 1-+ CO 



>-- .— :T. r- ©3 CO *-< 



1 — — r- cj ci .— ■ 



1 coo «0 ci co t- © C] 01 '-o — co — : 



1— » »-i CO QO 



i> O da HOOt... 



OSQNCS T X v— t 



»C >-— I- O: I 



•00 O ~ -r C 



+ 1 



CO X 

+ 



3-. — •--- *r 






iC M I- C 
CI Ol CJ 00 

o -r co co w 



:-r — t^cion cci-m 



-r — — — rtococ — o : 



;i- o-. i-cN' 



: — co fil 



ec t — * 



CM 1— r- to ■■- J^p; ,-* CO 

^- ~ CC; C3 



00 OS ~- 



C1C 00 -> 3-. — 

o -r noon 

■OI~ t>l>OCO 

rHtN(-To oJpfec 



O O CJ — • -r CO 3: 



3. -j»t t;n -o o r» 

X' r — ^- CO — «-~ t- Tt* — < 

CN T O 0O i-COM cc •— 

— ' 0* 0" CO* 3-r O CO r-J -r 



^ r— CC 



0j C~ 

< 2 = 5 

H ~ — -; 



I -sis 

£^ S c 

a S H £ 

M "IStd 



a I 

a.s 

■0 I* 

a_ 03 S 

"O act 
C d o o 

i»5 = g 



! mo: 






mfcc 
3 fl - 5 

±; o a> 

o a " o 
c S S 3 
rt .^ sn .? 



2ts< 






mcl a. <i 


2"S 






CCO 


o<; 



102 



Table 28.— Rural Ar rest Trends by Sex, 1959-60 

[432 agencies, population 10,656,529] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL i. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 



Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Other assaults 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 



Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc_.- 



Forgery and counterfeiting -. 

Forcible rape 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory 
rape) 



Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Offenses against family and children. 
Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxicated. 

Disorderly conduct.. 

Drunkenness. 

Vagrancy 



Gambling 

All other offenses. 



Suspicion (not included in totals) . 



Males 



154,356 



3S0 
271 

971 

2, 226 
7. 653 

10, 440 

12,087 

3,554 
2,666 

784 

2,432 
745 
81 

1,870 

236 
1,428 
5, 686 

9,757 

15, 574 
8,672 

32, 733 
3, 070 

1,268 

30, 372 

3, 553 



1960 



158,466 



348 

270 

976 

2. 304 
7.063 

11, 283 

12,226 

3, 663 
3, 556 

646 

2,541 
707 

68 

1,901 

346 
1,440 
6, 808 
9, 624 

15, 020 
8,724 

31,940 
3,300 

1,419 

32, 293 



Percenl 

change 



+2.7 



-S. 4 
-.4 

+.5 
+3.5 

+. 1 
+8.1 

+ 1.1 
+3.1 

+33. 4 
-17.6 

+4.5 

-5.1 

-16.1 

+ 1.7 

+46. 6 

+.8 

+ 19. 7 

-1.4 

-3. 6 

+.6 

-2.4 

+7.5 

+11.9 
+6.3 



Females 



12, 282 



53 

21 

47 
197 
449 
300 

701 

147 

343 

37 

279 



125 

221 

53 

58 

322 

1,057 

590 

838 

2,319 
306 

74 
3, 745 



13,472 



61 
10 

49 
1S9 
564 
397 

822 

150 
457 
68 



207 

64 

62 

313 

1,039 

544 

1.035 
2. 360 

285 

113 
4, 149 



Percent 
change 



+9.7 



+15. 1 
-52. 4 

+4.3 

-4. 1 

+25. 6 

+32. 3 

+ 17.3 
+ 2. 
+33. 2 

+83. S 

+32. 6 



+31. 2 

-6. 3 

+20. 8 
+6. 9 
-2.8 
-1.7 

-7. s 

+23. 5 

+1.8 

-6.9 

+52. 7 
+ 10.8 

-15.4 



' Males under IS years of age increased 7 percent; females under 18 years of age increased 14 percenl 



103 



Police Employee Data 



The data presented in this section is based strictly on averages and 
must be so interpreted. It cannot be used as criteria relative to del 
sirable police strength since numerous other factors must also he 
considered to make such a determination. Ranges of police em- 
ployee strength are shown in table 31 to provide a broader base foi 
those who wish to make limited comparisons on a local level. 



Table 29. — Number of Poliro Department Employees Killed, 1959, by 

Geographic Divisions and Population Groups 

[3,779 cities, tot il p >pul rtio I 12,753] 



Geographic division 



TOTAL. 



New Engl m I 

Middle Atlantic 

East North I nil r il 

West Noith Central. 



South Atlant 

outh Central 
w est South ( 'entral 
Mountain 





TOTAL 



19 







■ il grou| 






i Iroup 

I 


Group 
II 


III 


IV 


Group 
V 


Oroup 
VI 


over 


250,000 


i . 


to 


10.000 

1 1 


Less 

th in 
10. 000 


18 


4 


5 


4 


7 


11 










1 

1 




6 
2 
3 

3 






1 






2 


1 






1 


2 


2 




2 


t 


2 
2 






2 

I 


1 
I 
1 


a 


1 
1 


1 


3 



Table 30. — Number of Polite Department Employees Killed, l*)60. by 
Geographic Divisions and Population (.roups 

[3,779 cities, tot tl popul ition 103,492,753] 






TOTAL 



Middle \tl intic 

West North ■ 



South U inl 

Mount rn 





TOTAL 



H 



Popul ition group 



Group Group 
I II 



J M l.i H III 



loo.oon 

til 

250. 



Ill 



50,000 
to 

100.000 



1\ 



to 
50,1 



Oroup 
V 



to 



VI 



i e 
than 

10.000 



104 



nl»!r 31. — Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, I960, 
\umber and Rate Per I .(><>() Inhabitants, l>\ Geographic Divisions <»m/ 
Population Groups 

. total populal 



phic division 



fOTAL: 

Number of police employees 
Atei-ARt* number of employees 

per 1.000 inhabitants 
Rate Range . 

lew England: 

bar of police empl 
Average tuiiii t -t-r of employees 
per i. uni lnh ibil ints 



tfiddle Atlantic: 

\un • 

..- Dumber of en | 
l*-r :.inki Inl 

- 



East North Central: 

Number of polii •■ en p 

Average Dumb r of ei 

jht 1,000 inhabit ints 



Vest North Central: 

\ amber "f polii «• en pi 

per 1,000 

south Atlantic: 
Nuii'' 

iber "f i'ii ; 

I 

East South Central: 

polic* emplo 

Vest South Central: 

N' umber of police empl 

■ 
■ ■ 

Mountain: 



TOTAL 



195, 109 



1.9 
0.2 6.0 






■ 



15.191 

3.0 

0. 3 4. 



55.459 



2.4 

0.2-5.8 



42. 536 



1.8 
0. 3 18 



11,817 

1.5 
0. 3 3. 7 



21,579 

2.0 

0.3 4.3 



6.883 



1.5 
0.2-2.5 



12.699 

1.3 

0. 2 2. 5 



5,524 

1.4 
0.13.5 



n an 



1.8 

0.2 6.0 



Popul 



i troup 

1 






99, 820 

2. 5 
1.1 1.3 



i. ; 






x I 
1.S 1.0 



. 



5, 172 



2. I 






2 8 
I. I 3.6 



l.sl.i 



1.6 

I. I 1.6 



• 



1.5 

I. l 1.8 



l, 1M 



l.i. 
1. 1 1.8 



- 



i Iriiup 

11 



19, 295 
1.7 

- 
Z ! 2. 8 

2.0 
1.4 2.8 

3,000 

1.5 

l.i 1.8 



1.3 

1.0- 1.7 



l.i. 



1,478 



i.; 

i.i .'i 



1.3-1.7 






Group 

111 



1. 1 

lim.iMNi 



20.417 



1.6 

0.6 4.3 






I. '.i 

- 






1.3 



1.0 






1.2 
1.0 






< iroiip 
IV 



to 



18,945 



1.6 



1.7 






1.3 
0.4 3.0 






I. 1 

0.7- 1.8 






1,022 



1.4 



1. I 
0.7 1.6 



I.J 

as i •■ 









( in. up 

\ 



1II.IMMI 
I.. 



1.4 
0.3 5.0 



I. 1 






I 



I, 163 



1.3 



1,692 



1. I 



0.7 J. '.I 



I 1 



1,711 



1. I 



l :t 

0. I .V 5 






• 



H'.". 



Table 32. 



•Civilian Police Department /•. rn /*/*»%«•«•■<. I960 Percentage <>l Total, 
by Population Group 



Populai ion group: 

i .-ill cii iea 

Group I (over 250,000 

(Over 1,000,000) 

(750,000 1,000,000 
(500,000 750,000) 

(250,000 500,1 

Group II (100, 000 250,000 
Croup III (50,000 100,000 
Group IV (25,000 50,000 
Group V (II), ()()() 25,000 
('.roup VI (2,500 10,000 



Pen i'!i'- 

civilian 
emploj - 

10. 

1 1. 1) 

9, 7 

1 3. 2 

9 _' 

1 I. 7 

1 I. I 

9. 7 

7. '.♦ 
6 3 

8. 7 



Table 33. — Assaults on Police Officers, I960, by Geographic Divisions and 

Population (Groups 

■ tol i! •> ■•■ I • 1,534] 



GeoRniphir division 


Assaults 


i: ite pei 
100 po- 
lice 

officer? 


Population group 




!: ite per 


TOTAL... . 


9.62] 


6.3 


TOTAL . 


' 6.: 


8 3 




ftroup I 
(over 250,000 




\>- ■ r ngl ind 


578 i 4.0 
3. 206 
1.073 9 

614 6 i) 

1.743 11.9 


4.585 
961 

m 

943 
1.304 
1.070 




Middle Vtlanti* 




East North < entr il 


i troup II 

(lOO.Ooo to 2 0,000 




\\ est North < 'entral 


», ■■ 




Group III 

(SO.Oon to 100,000 


1 t 




342 

749 

251 

1.087 


i, i 
7. 'J 
5.9 
B. 1 


i Iroup rv 
(25,000 to 50,000)—. 










( Iroup V 

(10,000 to 25,000; 






• 




Group V I 
(under 10,000) 


" 



L06 



able 34. — \ttmhir t>/ Citiea I -<<l in Tabulation* Regarding Xumber oj 
I', ih, , Department Employee*, December •'/. I960, and Police Killed, 1959 





TOTAL 










■ 


<ir..ii|> 1 




Group III 






















■ 


















TOTAL 
















Population repre- 
















sented 


103,4* 


S9, 363. 455 


11.383.784 


13.016.856 


13.238.964 


14.937.391 


11.554.303 


Number of 


S.779 


1 


79 


lb9 


379 


985 












1 . 




1 




. 




SI 


1(HI 


► • 


















771 


7 








I'M 




i 
































. 




in 


U 










i'. ■ 
















ilation 


















415 








.- 






M>lltll V 
















: 







11 


. 


• 






I 
















pulation 


















. 


3 








■H 








■ 


















- 


- 


- 


13 


a 


n 




' 
















• i 




. 




. 


- 


41 




I popula- 
















•: .. 




g 


11 


. 


47 


101 





I.iLIi .">. — Full-time State Police Employees, December .'(/. l')t>ti. and State 

Police Killed 1959, I960 





TOTAL 


■ 
• 


Han 


kill.-: 


■ 




847 
225 
976 

283 
155 
334 


443 

177 

- 11 

- - 


is 

V 

- 




1 





































LI 7 



I. ,1,1, 



36. — Sumber of Full'time Police Department Employees, December 3m 
1960, <itir-> Over 25,000 in Population 





Number <>( p rtmenl 
empl 




Numl 

empl 




TOTAL 






TOTAL 


I 




ALABAMA 

\nni-t".'i 
Birmlngb im 


:,1 

11 
95 
101 

280 

1ST 
24 
55 

1 
85 

82 

35 
606 
285 

2 
70 

in 
184 
84 

11 

71 
92 

150 
61 

L64 
40 

L48 
:,.' 

165 
1 

100 
:,l 
60 
r,l 
42 

15 

31 
!■■ 
42 
260 
93 
u 
98 

17.', 
1", 

86 

100 
36 

27 

■ 

12 

37 


68 
13 

60 


18 

53 
| ;. 

II 


101 

173 
24 

- 
81 

58 

33 
227 

24 

• 1 
39 
169 

v.' 
11 

70 

7s 

33 

lto 
11 

137 
46 
B7 

43 

15 

. 

77 

in 

27 

1 

1 

230 

72 

10 

78 

117 
11 
71 

19 
80 
33 
.i 
192 
1,681 

31 

28 
60 

■ 
i 


6 

""71 
3 
3 


CALIFORNIA-Con. 
Mountain \ iew 

il C'i'S 

New i">n Beach .. 
id. 


18 
18 

71 

791 
61 

54 

73 

B2 
16 
64 
57 

128 
106 
50 

179 
28 

1,811 

- • 
64 

146 
- 

63 
14 

174 
tl 
88 

160 
52 
110 

7s 
50 
47 
23 

46 

41 

37 

113 

• 

33 
36 

11 1 

187 

in 

27 

5 

64 

B7 

i 
34 

lill 

63 
121 

19 
200 

68 

60 


is 

)• 

54 

647 

- 
71 

39 
52 
50 
128 

104 

to 

153 
665 

232 

113 
69 

39 

38 
81 

28 
143 

39 
110 
72 
49 
38 

IN 

43 

38 
37 
99 

739 
32 
30 

105 

362 

58 

27 
53 

lis 

• 

B4 

i ■ 

1 55 
- 

60 
117 

17 
190 

64 

57 


1 
2 

3 
20 




111 




Ontario 


6 




60 

14 







Montgomery 
Phenix City 






Palo Uto - 


J 


.... 

4 

4 

2 
S3 

58 

1 
6 
1 

15 
2 


i i li 


16 




Pomona 


uj 




Redondo Beach 
Redwood Cil 




ALASKA 


12 

7 




ARIZONA 




24 


mento 


51 

10 


ti nnn 






: Dii 


no 




- in Ft inci 


113 




26 


ARKANSAS 


.- tn Le indi i 


11 
33 


El Dorado 


Santa Barb ira 

' ;iara 


14 


■ mil h 
Bol 3pi rigs 
Rock. 
North Little Rock 

Bluff 


8 




1 


South Gate 
South San Fran- 




CALIFORNIA 


4 
14 
11 

9 
35 

8 
8 

28 
8 

13 
8 

15 
8 
6 

L8 
5 
1 

1 
30 
21 

1 
20 
28 

1 
12 

I 
20 

:i 

3 
76 

6 
2 

B 






17 




Sunnyvale 


13 


Alhambra 






6 




Ventura 


1 




\\ i ;i Covina 
Westminster 


9 





5 
3 


COLORADO 

Aurora .. 
Boulder 

Colorado Springs 
Denver 

Englew 1 

i Ireeley 

Pueblo 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 
Bristol 


3 


Me , 
C it j 
Dal City 


14 

1 


I , . . • 


8 

9 


. 














2j 








Bast Hartford 
Enfield 


3 


i Hend ,!■■ 

1 1 ■ i > •■ 
Huntington P irk 




i Id 
( Ireeun ich . 


15 

I 


Hat tford 


Is 




•; 


M iddletow a 
Milford Town 

New Haven 
\,'\\ London 


■> 


La Mesa 

Bi 
ngeles 


11 

23 

i 




i 


. 


\,,ru ich 
Stamford 


in 




• ird 


I 




■ gton 


3 



L08 



fable ?•>. — Sumber «»/ Full- tint* Police Department Employee*, December II. 
1960, ( itiet Ovei 25,000 in Population — Continued 





\ iiml ir 


empl< 




\iiiii ■ 

empli 


TOTAL 




Civilians 


TOTAL 




1 


CONNECTICUT 

Continued 

gford 

Mir\ 

1-1 

\\. • 1 

DELAWARE 

n 

DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 

FLORIDA 

ell 

Port Pi< rce 

li 

I 

m\ ille 

• 

Si Peti rsl urg 

• 
• • 

GEORGIA 


280 

1 

76 

82 

IS 

ii 

M 

- - 
.'7(1 

IS 

152 

44 

131 

-Ml 

170 

37 

• 
- 
107 


243 

;oo 

191 

- 
420 
- 

71 
i 20 
21' 

37 
136 

li^ 
196 

42 

7.1 
112 

41 

..73 

• 
• 

74 

74 

41 




ILLINOIS Con. 

B< r« \ □ 
Bloomington 
« 'alumi • ' 
( 'bampaign 
i 'hicago 
( 'hie igo H' . 


i 

20 

i 

11.711 

17 

'• 

38 
80 
12 
■I.. 
60 

141 

28 
40 
36 
27 
36 

M 
31 
31 

62 

26 

-- 

24 
32 

20 

t'i 

Ml 

60 

7^> 

lis 
- 

61 
31 

47 
130 

70 

:iu 

257 

it.; 

To 

> i 
52 

.--. 
-J 

MH 

■ 

110 

40 

l-ii 

-•7 
114 

80 

41 


44 

10 

ii 
10,026 

II 
06 

- 
73 
32 

-1 

34 

36 

34 

74 

3(1 
47 
j 

77 
20 

150 

- 
60 
66 

22 

26 

T'i 
38 
134 

. 
-'17 

l.'.l 
77(1 

47 

•; 

34 


1 


37 
1 

39 

11 
11 
21 

32 

S 

38 

IS 

73 

Mi 

»'i 
Ir'. 

.» 
13 

45 

11 
4 

11 

1 

1 

KM 

13 

B 

t. 

1 

1 

13 

28 

1 
4 


1 
4 

3 


He 

ir 




7 


Elgin 
Elrubursl 

■■in 

orl 
urg 
( Iranite Citj 
Harvey 

Highland r.^rk 
Joflel 


- 
1 

21 


in 


2 
| 


May wood 
Moline 

i >. k I...W D 

i' r.-. Forest 
Ridge 
Pekin 


1 

1 
11 
4 

■ 




30 

3 


3rd 
Rock Island 


13 


• 


Springfield 


25 
3 
4 




" 


INDIANA 

Anderson 
Bloomington 

-•ii 

Elkhart 


10 

'' 








Fori U . □< 


8 


HAWAII 


31 




10 




- 




. 




. 


Richmond 

rem ii ut4 
IOWA 

Borlingti 

1 . : 

Cllnl 

■ 

■ 




- 


10 




. 


M . 




IDAHO 


4 
4 

4 
14 








ILLINOIS 


14 

I 







LO«J 



Table 36. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
I960, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



IOWA- Continued 



i >tii]nr.\ i 
Sioux City. 
Waterloo... 



KANSAS 



EutchinsoD 

K.m - 
Lawrence 

Salina 

Topek i 

Wichita 



KENTUCKY 



Ashland 

Bowling Green, 

Covington 

Lexington 

Louisvil!'' 
Newport.-. . - 

Owensboro 

Paducah 



LOUISIANA 



Alexandria 

Baton Rouge- 
Bossier City.. 

Lafayette- .... 
Lake Charles. 

Monroe 

New Iberia... 
New Orleans- 



MAINE 



Bangor... 
Lewiston. 
Portland. 



MARYLAND 



Baltimore 

Cumberland. 

11 tg'Tstown-. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Arlington 

Attleboro 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Braintree 

Brockton 

Brookline 

Cambridge. . 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Everett 

Fall River. .. 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Gloucester . 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 

Leominster. . 
Lexington 



Number (if police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



44 
204 
28 
48 
157 
332 



3f> 
32 

HI) 

138 
609 
61 
63 
62 



53 
261 



26 
1.093 



3,333 
65 
64 



40 

44 

63 

2,988 

48 

109 

151 

235 

73 

84 

118 

256 



Police 
officers 



1.-9 
26 
39 
127 
258 



33 
32 
79 
136 
521 
54 
60 
60 



51 
23-5 
28 
50 
39 
58 
26 
1,021 



53 
64 
116 



3, 023 

59 
61 



79 

39 

41 

60 

2, 763 

46 

105 

142 

226 

68 

81 

115 

238 

67 

55 

44 

74 

118 

124 

37 

35 



Civilians 



310 
6 
3 



1 
3 

225 



City 



MASSACHUSETTS 
Continued 



Lowell 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Med ford 

Melrose 

Methuen 

Milton 

Natick 

Needbam 

New Bedford 

Newton 

Northampton . 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 

Quincy. -.•.--. 

Revere 

Salem 

Samerville 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Waltham 

VVatertown.-- 

Wellesley 

West field 

Weymouth. .. 

Woburn 

Worcester 



MICHIGAN 



Allen Park 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek 

Bay City 

Birmingham 

Dearborn 

Detroit 

East Detroir 

East Lansing 

Ferndale 

Flint 

Garden City 

Grand Rapids 

Hamtramck 

Hazel Park 

Highland Park.... 

Inkster 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Lansing 

Lincoln Park 

Livonia 

Madison Heights.. 

Midland 

Muskegon 

Oak Park 

Pontiac 

Port Huron 

Redford Township 

Roseville.i 

Royal Oak 

Saginaw... 

St. I lair Shore- 

Southfield. 

Southgate. 

Warren 

Waterford Town- 
ship 

Wyandotte 

Wyoming 



Number of police dej' n i menl 
employees 



TOTAL 



17s 
193 
120 
117 
49 
29 
55 
50 
40 
246 
162 
39 
48 
86 
195 
84 
82 
173 
369 
68 
102 

34 
43 

75 

42 

402 



193 
4, 685 
51 
24 
47 

300 
30 

2.56 
88 
33 

116 
37 
82 

129 

161 
62 
64 



Police 
officers 



171 

185 

119 

113 

47 

29 

53 

4s 

38 

232 

157 

39 

46 

SO 

162 

79 

76 

170 

349 

64 

99 

70 

32 

41 

73 

42 



43 

78 
76 
88 
31 

171 
, 273 
45 
23 
42 

255 
29 

221 
84 
31 

102 
36 
72 

103 

151 
59 
57 
25 
29 
66 
58 

108 
47 
29 
51 
72 

148 
56 
33 
23 

117 

15 

58 
26 



< Civilians 



110 



Table 36. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1960, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



MINNESOTA 

Austin 

Bloomington 

Duluth 

Edina 

Minneapolis 

Richfield 

Rochester 

St. Cloud 

St. Louis Park 

St. Paul 

MISSISSIPPI 

Biloxi 

Greenville 

Gulfport 

Hattiesburg 

Jackson 

Laurel 

Meridian 

Vicksburg 

MISSOURI 

Columbia 

Florissant 

Independence 

Jefferson City 

Joplin 

Kansas City 

Kirkwood 

St. Joseph 

St. Louis 

Springfield 

University City... 
Webster Groves,-. 

MONTANA 

Billings 

Butte 

Great Falls 

Missoula 

NEBRASKA 

Grand Island 

Lincoln 

Omaha 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

Reno 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Concord 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Portsmouth 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Bayonne 

Belleville 

Bergenfield 

Bloomfield 

Camden 

Clifton 

Cranford 
Township 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



39 
29 

14.". 
24 

646 
29 
65 
36 
32 

431 



43 
43 
24S 
38 
91 
29 



49 
30 
76 
33 
51 

1,131 
43 
114 

2,483 
115 
50 
26 



36 

127 
44!! 



176 

I'd 



205 
161 
64 
31 
95 
301 
114 



Police 
officers 



37 
26 

128 
21 

589 
28 
63 
34 
30 

400 



34 
46 
36 
43 
218 
37 



45 
30 
70 
33 
40 

889 

40 

98 

1,915 

109 
48 
22 



36 
103 
391 



143 
101 



171) 
152 
64 
31 
92 
235 
L08 



Civilians 



11 
242 
3 
16 
568 
6 
2 
4 



35 



City 



NEW JERSEY- 
Continued 

East Orange 

Edison 

Elizabeth 

Englewood 

Fair Lawn 

Garfield 

Hackensack 

Hamilton 

Township 

Hoboken 

Irvington 

Jersey City 

Kearny 

Linden 

Long Branch 

Montclair 

Newark 

New Brunswick 
North Bergen 

Township 

Nutley 

Orange 

Passaic 

Paterson 

Pennsauken 

Perth Amboy 

Plainfield 

Rahway 

Ridgewood 

Teaueck 

Township 

Trenton 

Union City 

Union Township 

Vineland 

Westfield 

West New York. 

West Orange 

Woodbridge 

Township 

NEW MEXICO 

Albuquerque 

Carlsbad 

Hobbs 

Las Cruces 

Roswell 

Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Albany 

Amherst Town . _ 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton 

Buffalo 

Cheektowaga 

Clarkstown 

Elmira 

Freeport 

Greenburgh 

Hempstead 

Irondequoit 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Kingston 

Lackawanna 

Lockport 

Long Beach 

Mount Pleasant. 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



149 
62 

267 
60 
43 
48 
83 

81 
166 
97 
1,112 
112 
110 
53 
94 
1,377 



143 
49 
82 
123 
293 
37 
94 
94 
56 
41 

56 
288 
130 
80 
37 
50 
85 



278 
45 
46 
60 

149 
1, 496 
68 
29 
96 
53 
66 
62 
32 
48 
80 
63 
64 
46 



Police 
officers 



148 
60 

255 
60 

40 

45 
71 

77 
166 

90 
845 
111 
110 

51 

89 
1,277 

78 

101 
48 
79 
123 
277 
35 
90 
87 
53 
41 

56 
256 
109 
79 
36 
49 
85 
76 

105 



234 
25 
30 
26 
39 
54 



260 
43 
42 
56 

139 
1,287 
65 
29 
95 
49 
63 
61 
32 
43 
73 
61 
64 
45 
51 
19 



111 



I ;iU<- .'.<>. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
I960, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 





Number of police deparl men! 

employees 


City 


Number o 


f police department 
employees 




TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


NEW YORK Con 

Mount Vernon 


182 

60 

154 

24, 626 

197 

37 

74 

21 

581 

46 

59 

158 

478 

133 

208 

54 

177 

351 

115 
58 

332 

128 
77 
60 
36 

202 

100 
27 

150 
71 
92 
40 

174 

34 

82 
42 
38 

315 
33 
36 

166 

979 

2,219 

70 

662 
46 

407 
68 
47 
71 
36 
30 
97 
32 
69 
26 
81 
65 
68 
31 
35 
31 
70 


170 

60 

141 

23,519 

181 

36 

71 

21 

512 

46 

55 

149 

389 

124 

171 

53 

149 

321 

110 
53 

297 

118 
72 
58 
35 

176 
95 
27 

132 
50 
77 
39 

154 

31 
71 
38 
38 

295 
30 
35 

159 

888 

1,935 

67 

543 
44 

360 
62 
44 
69 
30 
29 
95 
30 
64 
26 
72 
64 
65 
31 
33 
31 
67 


12 


OHIO— Continued 


50 
4s 
59 
60 
36 
CI 
31 

103 
45 

540 
30 
71 

303 
49 

40 
51 
66 
28 
53 
33 
358 
325 

789 

77 

51 
31 
151 
106 
105 

47 
101 

54 
198 
158 

55 
34 
93 
92 
39 

124 
93 

37 
50 
6,005 
1, 537 
33 
169 
183 
35 

22 

158 
22 
99 
42 
60 
79 


47 

46 
50 
57 
33 
55 
29 
94 
44 

499 
24 
69 

279 
46 

37 
44 
65 
26 
45 
33 
308 
299 

56 

654 

56 

51 
30 
131 
94 
95 

46 
74 
50 
183 

152 

52 
33 
82 
88 
39 

118 
76 

33 
50 
5,453 
1,490 
32 
143 
173 
34 

18 

132 
20 
95 
34 

55 
74 


3 


Norwood . 


2 


New Rochelle 


13 

1,107 

16 

1 

3 




9 


Portsmouth 

Sandusky 

Shaker Heights 

South Euclid 

Springfield . 

Steuben ville 
Toledo 


3 


Niagara Falls 

North Ton iw inda 
Pougbkeepsie 


6 
2 
9 




09 


1 




41 




4 

9 
89 

9 
37 

1 
28 
30 

5 

5 

35 

10 

5 

2 

1 

26 

5 


Upper Arlington... 


6 


Schenectady 


2 


Youngstown 


24 


Troj 

Utica 

\\ atertown - - 

While Plains 

Yonkers - 


3 


OKLAHOMA 

Bartlesville 

Enid 


3 


NORTH 




1 


CAROLINA 


Midwest City 

Muskogee 

Norman 


2 

8 


Burlington 


Oklahoma City 

Tulsa 


50 
26 




OREGON 




I lyetteville 






21 






135 


High Point 




21 


PENNSYLVANIA 

Abington 
Township 




Raleigh... 

Rockv Mount 

Wilmington ... . 


18 
21 

15 

1 
20 

3 
11 
4 






1 


NORTH DAKOTA 


Allentown. 


20 
12 






10 




Cheltenham 
Township . .. 






1 




27 






4 




20 

3 

1 

7 

91 

284 

3 

119 

o 

47 
6 
3 
2 
6 
1 
2 
o 
5 


Erie 


15 


OHIO 


Ilarrisburg 

Haverford 
Township 


6 
3 




1 




Johnstown ,. 

Lancaster 


11 


Canton 


4 


Cleveland 

Cleveland Heights 

( Jolumbus .. 

Cuyahoga Falls 


Lower Merion 

Township 

McKeesport. 

Mount Lebanon 

Township 

Norristown 

Philadelphia... ... 


6 

17 

4 


East Cleveland 




Elyria 


552 


Euclid. 


47 






1 


Garfield Beights . 


Reading 

Scranton 

Sharon 

Springfield 

Township 

Upper Darby 

Township 

West Mifflin 

Wilkes-Barre 

Wilkinsburg 

Williamsport 

York. 


26 
10 




1 








4 




9 

1 
3 




Lorain 


26 


Mansfield 

M aple Heights 


2 
4 


Marion _ 

Massillon.. 


o 


8 
5 


Middle town.. 


3 


5 



112 



Table 36. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1960, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



RHODE ISLAND 

Cranston 

East Providence. _ 

Newport 

Pawtucket 

Providence 

Warwick 

Woonsocket 

SOUTH 
CAROLINA 

Anderson 

Charleston 

Columbia 

Greenville 

Rock Hill 

Spartanburg 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Rapid City 

Sioux Falls 

TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Jackson 

Johnson City 

Kingsport 

Knoxville 

Memphis 

Nashville 

Oak Ridge 

TEXAS 

Abilene 

Amarillo 

Arlington 

Austin 

Baytown 

Beaumont 

Big Spring. -_ 

Brownsville 

Bryan 

Corpus Christi 

Dallas 

Denton 

El Paso 

Fort Worth 

Galveston 

Garland 

Grand Prairie 

Harlingen 

Houston 

Irving 

Kingsville 

Laredo 

Longview 

Lubbock 

McAllen 

Mesquite 

Midland 

Odessa 

Orange 

Pasadena 

Port Arthur 

San Angelo 

San Antonio 

Temple 

Texas City 

Tyler 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



93 
80 
82 
158 

583 



54 
166 
170 
129 

53 

77 



191 

47 

38 

44 

218 

700 

357 

35 



122 

188 
40 

303 
39 

130 
47 
57 
31 

198 

1, 232 

32 

379 

598 
91 
36 
31 
51 
1,400 
34 
23 
58 
51 

179 
24 
30 
93 

115 
40 
53 
92 
73 

663 
37 
35 
66 



Police 
officers 



90 
76 
78 
145 
512 
85 
94 



53 

139 
156 
116 
47 



Civilians 



180 


11 


47 




37 


1 


39 


5 


175 


43 


586 


114 


318 


39 


33 


2 


104 


18 


160 


28 


40 




227 


76 


37 


2 


130 




43 


4 


40 


17 


30 


1 


179 


19 


1,046 


186 


29 


3 


349 


30 


524 


74 


88 


3 


36 




29 


2 


35 


16 


1,158 


242 


33 


1 


21 


2 


56 


o 


48 


3 


170 


9 


23 


1 


25 


5 


88 


5 


98 


17 


37 


3 


49 


4 


92 




73 




549 


114 


36 


1 



City 



TEXAS— Con. 

Waco- 

Wichita Falls 

UTAH 

Ogden 

Provo 

Salt Lake City 

VERMONT 

Burlington 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria 

Arlington 

Charlottesville 

Danville 

Hampton 

Lynchburg 

Newport News... 

Norfolk 

Petersburg 

Portsmouth 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

WASHINGTON 

Bellingham 

Bremerton 

Everett 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoma 

Vancouver 

Yakima 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

Clarksburg __' 

Huntington 

Parkersburg 

Weirton 

Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Beloit 

Eau Claire 

Fond du Lac 

Green Bay 

Janesville 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Madison 

Manitowoc 

Milwaukee 

Oshkosh 

Racine 

Sheboygan 

Superior 

Waukesha 

Wausau 

Wauwatosa 

West Allis 

WYOMING 

Casper 

Cheyenne 



Number of police department 
employees 



115 
L06 



69 

39 

329 



142 
201 

47 
103 

86 

81 
144 
443 

40 
135 
446 
132 



43 

48 

61 

974 

251 

255 

56 

74 



147 
36 

127 
44 
36 
95 



66 
54 
63 
47 
96 
46 
97 
74 

211 

50 

1,852 

64 

134 
75 
59 
54 
45 

119 



Police 
officers 



66 
34 

279 



117 

184 

47 

95 

77 

76 

136 

409 

36 

124 

410 

126 



40 

45 

57 

831 

212 

238 

55 

74 



138 

35 
105 
36 
27 
92 



66 
51 
50 
44 
89 
43 
84 
68 

181 

48 

1,762 

62 

129 
74 
57 
52 
45 
75 

107 



113 



Table 37. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 
31, 1°60, Cities With Population In tier 25,000 



City 



ALABAMA 

Albertvllle.. 
Alexander City. 

Aliceville 

Andalusia 

At more 

All ill >— . 

Auburn 

Bay Minette.. 

Boaz -- 

Brew inn 

Brundidge 

Chickasaw 

Childersburg 

Demopolis 

Elba 

Enterprise 

Evergreen 

Fairfield 

Fairhope 

Fayette 

Florala 

Fort Payne 

Geneva 

Greenville 

Hartselle 

Homewood 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Leeds 

Marion 

Monroeville 

Mountain Brook 

Northport 

Oneqnta 

Opefika 

Opp 

Ozark -. 

Piedmont 

Prattville 

Scottsboro 

Sheffield 

Sylaeauga 

Talladega 

Tallassee 

Tarrant City 

Troy..- 

Tuscumbia 

Union Springs.. 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

Juneau 

Ketchikan 

Kodiak 

ARIZONA 

Ajo 

Avondale 

Bisbee 

( !asa (irande 

Chandler 

Coolidge... 

Douglas 

Eloy 

Flagstaff 

Glendale 

Globe... 

Kingman 

Miami... 

NogaleS 

Prescott 

Safford 



Number of 

police de- 
partment 
employees 



City 



ARIZONA -Con. 

Scottsdale 

Tempe 

Tolleson 

Williams 

Winslow 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 

Arkadelphia 

Ashdown 

Batesville 

Benton ville 

Blytheville _ 

Brinkley 

Camden 

Clarksville 

Conway 

Crossett 

De Witt.. 

Dumas 

Eudora 

Fayetteville 

Harrison 

Helena 

Hope 

Jonesboro 

Magnolia 

Malvern 

Marked Tree 

McGehee 

Monticello 

Morrilton 

Nashville 

Newport - 

Paragould 

Pocahontas 

Prescott 

Rogers 

Russell ville 

Searcy 

Siloam Springs 

Springdale 

Stuttgart 

Texarkana 

Trumann 

Van Buren 

Walnut Ridge 

Warren 

Wynne 

CALIFORNIA 

Albany 

Alturas 

Anderson 

Antioch 

Areata 

Atherton 

Atwater 

Auburn 

Azusa 

Banning 

Barstow 

Beaumont 

Bell 

Belmont 

Benieia 

Bishop 

Blythe 

Brawley 

Brea 

Burlingame 

Calexico 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



CALIFORNIA Con 

< 'ampbcll 

Carlsbad 

( 'annel 

Ceres 

Chico 

Chino 

Chowchilla 

Claremont 

Cloverdale.. 

Clovis 

Coachella 

Coalinga 

Colton 

Colusa 

Corcoran 

Corning 

Corona 

Coronado 

Corte Madera 

Covina 

Crescent City 

Davis 

Delano 

Dinuba 

Dixon 

Dunsmuir 

El Centro 

El Monte 

El Segundo 

Emeryville 

Escondido 

Exeter 

Fairfax 

Fairfield 

Fillmore.-- 

Folsom 

Fontana 

Fort Bragg 

Fortuna 

Gilroy 

Glendora 

Grass Valley 

Gridley 

Hanford 

Healdsburg 

Hemet 

Hermosa Beach 

Hillsborough 

Hollister 

Holtville 

Huntington Beach. 

Imperial Beach 

Indio 

Kensington 

King City 

Kingsburg 

Laguna Beach 

Larkspur 

La Verne 

Lemoore 

Lindsay 

Livermore 

Lodi 

Lompoc 

Los Altos 

Los Banos 

Los Gatos 

Madera 

Manteca.. 

Martinez 

Marysville 

May wood 

McFarland 

Merced. 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 
employees 



114 



Table 37. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 
31, 1960, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 



CALIFORNIA— Con 

Millbrae 

Mill Valley 

Montclair 

Monterey 

Morgan Hill 

Napa 

Needles 

Newark 

North Sacramento.. 

Oakdale 

Oceanside 

Ojai 

Orange Cove 

Oroville 

Paciflca 

Pacific Grove 

Palm Springs 

Palos Verdes 

Estates 

Paso Robles 

Perris 

Petaluma 

Piedmont 

Pinole 

Pittsburg 

Placentia 

Placerville 

Pleasanton 

Porterville 

Port Hueneme 

Red Bluff 

Redding 

Reedley 

Rialto 

Riverbank 

Roseville 

San Anselmo 

San Carlos 

San Clemente 

San Fernando 

San Gabriel 

Sanger 

San Luis Obispo 

San Marino 

San Pablo 

San Rafael 

Santa Maria 

Santa Paula 

Seal Beach 

Seaside 

Sebastopol 

Selma 

Shatter 

Sierra Madre 

Soledad 

Sonoma 

South Pasadena 

Stanton 

Susanville 

Taft 

Tehachapi 

Tracy 

Tulare 

Turlock 

Ukiah 

Upland 

Vacaville 

Visalia 

Walnut Creek 

Wasco 

Watsonville 

Weed... - 

Willits 

Willows 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



CAIIFORNIA-Con. 

Woodlake 

Woodland 

Yreka City 

Yuba City 

COLORADO 

Alamosa 

Brighton 

Canon City 

Commerce Town... 

Cortez 

Craig 

Delta 

Durango 

Florence 

Fort Morgan 

Golden 

Grand Junction 

Gunnison 

La Junta 

Lamar 

Las Animas 

Leadville 

Littleton 

Longmont 

Loveland 

Manitou Springs 

Monte Vista 

Montrose 

Rocky Ford 

Salida 

Sterling 

Thornton 

Trinidad 

Walsenburg 

CONNECTICUT 

Ansonia 

Danbury 

Danielson 

Darien 

Derby 

Groton Town 

Jewett City 

Naugatuck 

New Canaan 

Putnam 

Rockville 

Rocky Hill 

Shelton 

Southington 

Stafford Springs 

Westport 

Wethersfield 

Willimantic 

Winsted 

Woodbridge 

DELAWARE 

Dover 

Laurel 

Lewes 

Milford 

Newark 

New Castle 

Seaford 

FLORIDA 

Apalachicola 

Arcadia 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



FLORIDA— Con. 



Auburndale 

Bartow. __ 

Belle Glade 

Boynton Beach 

Bradenton 

Cocoa .. 

Dade City 

Dania 

De Funiak Springs. . 

De Land . 

Delray Beach 

Dunedin 

Eustis 

Fernandina Beach. . 

Fort Meade 

Green Cove Springs. 

Gulfport 

Haines City 

Hallandale 

Holly Hill 

Homestead 

Jacksonville Beach.. 

Kissimmee 

Lake Worth 

Leesburg 

Live Oak 

Melbourne 

Miami Shores 

Miami Springs 

Mount Dora 

New Smyrna Beach. 
North Miami Beach. 

Ocala 

Opa-Locka 

Ormond Beach 

Pahokee 

Palatka 

Palm Beach 

Palmetto. 

Perry 

Pinellas Park 

Plant City 

Pompano Beach 

Quincy 

Riviera Beach 

St. Augustine 

St. Cloud.. 

Sanford 

Sebring 

South Miami 

Starke. 

Stuart. 

Tarpon Springs 

Titusville 

Treasure Island 

Vero Beach 

West Miami. 

Winter Garden 

Winter Haven 

Winter Park 



GEORGIA 



Adel 

Alma 

Americus... 
Bainbridge. 
Barnesville. 

Baxley 

Blakely 

Buford 

Calhoun 

Camilla 

Carrollton.. 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



115 



Table 37. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 
31, 1960, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 



GEORGIA-Con. 

Cartersville 

Cedartown __ 

Chamblee 

College Park 

Cordele. .... 

Covington 

Dalton 

Dawson 

Decatur 

Douglasville 

Dublin 

Elberton.. 

Fitzgerald 

Forest Park 

Forsyth 

Fort Valley 

Gainesville 

Griffin 

Hapeville 

Hartwell 

Hawkinsville 

Hazlehurst 

Hogansville 

Jesup 

La Fayette 

La Grange 

Lawrence ville 

Lyons 

Manchester 

Milledge ville 

Monroe 

Montezuma 

Moultrie 

Nashville 

Newnan 

Perry 

Quitman 

Rockmart 

Rossville 

Sandersville 

Statesboro 

Summerville 

Sylvania 

Sylvester 

Tallapoosa 

Thomaston 

Thomasville 

Toccoa 

Vidalia 

Washington 

Waycross 

Winder 

IDAHO 

Alameda 

Blackfoot 

Buhl 

Burley 

Caldwell 

Coeur d'Alene 

Emmett--- 

Gooding 

Grangeville 

Jerome. 

Kellogg. 

Lewiston 

Montpelier 

Moscow 

Mountain Home.. 

Nampa 

Payette 

Preston 

Rexburg 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



IDAHO— Continued 

Rupert 

St. Anthony 

Salmon 

Sandpoint 

Twin Falls 

Weiser 

ILLINOIS 

Abingdon 

Addison 

Aledo 

Alorton 

Barrington 

Batavia 

Bell wood 

Belvidere 

Bensenville 

Benton 

Blue Island 

Bradley 

Broadview 

Brookfield 

Bushnell 

Cairo 

Canton 

Carbondale 

Carlyle 

Carmi 

Carterville 

Carthage 

Casey _.. 

Centralia 

Charleston 

Chester.. 

Chillicothe 

Christopher 

Clarendon Hills 

Clinton 

Collinsville 

Creve Coeur 

Crystal Lake 

Deerfield 

De Kalb 

Dixon 

Dolton 

Downers Grove. ... 

Du Quoin 

East Alton 

East Moline 

East Peoria 

Edwardsville 

Effingham 

Eldorado 

Elm wood Park 

Evergreen Park 

Farmington 

Flora 

Forest Park 

Franklin Park 

Fulton 

Galena 

Galva 

Geneseo 

Geneva 

Georgetown 

Gibson City 

Gillespie 

Glencoe 

Glen view 

Greenville 

Harrisburg 

Harvard 

Havana 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



ILLINOIS-Con. 

Herrin 

Highland 

Highwood 

Hillsboro 

Hillside 

Hinsdale 

Home wood 

Hoopeston 

Jacksonville 

Jerseyville 

Johnston City 

Kenil worth 

Kewanee 

La Grange 

La Grange Park 

Lake Forest 

Lansing 

La Salle 

Lawrence ville 

Lemont 

Lewistown 

Libertyville 

Lincoln 

Lincoln wood 

Litchfield 

Lockport 

Lombard 

Loves Park 

Lyons 

Macomb 

Madison 

Marengo 

Marion 

Markham 

Marseilles 

Marshall 

Mascoutah 

Mattoon 

McLeansboro 

Melrose Park 

Mendota 

Metropolis 

Midlothian 

Momence.. 

Monmouth 

Morris 

Morrison 

Morton 

Morton Grove 

Mount Carmel... 

Mount Morris 

Mount Prospect. . 
Mount Vernon ... 

Mundelein 

Murphysboro 

Naperville 

Newton 

Niles 

Normal 

Norridge 

Xorthbrook 

North Chicago — 

Northlake 

North Riverside. . 

O'Fallon 

Oglesby 

Olney 

Oregon 

Ottawa 

Palatine.. 

Pana.. 

Paris 

Paxton 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



116 



Table 37. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 
31, 1960, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 



ILIINOIS— Con. 

iPeoria Heights 

peru 

jPinckney ville 

Pittsfield 

Pontiac 

Princeton 

Rantoul 

Riverdale 

River Forest 

River Grove 

Riverside 

Robbins 

Robinson 

Rochelle 

Rock Falls 

Rushville 

St. Charles 

Salem 

BSandwich 

Savanna 

Shelbyville 

Silvis 

South Beloit 

South Holland 

feparta 

JSpring Valley 

Staunton 

Steger 

Sterling 

Btickney 

Istreator 

Sullivan 

ISummit 

Sycamore 

.Taylorville 

(Tuscola. 

iVandalia 

'Venice 

Villa Park 

Virden 

Washington Park. 

[Waterloo 

Westchester 

West Chicago 

'Western Springs. . 
jWest Frankfort... 

Westmont 

Westville 

Wheaton 

White Hall 

Wilmington 

Winnetka 

Wood River 

Woodstock 

Zion 

INDIANA 

Alexandria 

Angola 

Attica 

Aubu r n 

Aurora 

Batesville 

Bedford 

Beech Grove 

Bicknell 

Bluffton 

Boonville 

Brazil 

I Bremen 

Brookville. 

Cambridge City. 
Charlestown 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



INDIANA— Con. 



Chesterton 

Clarksville 

Clinton 

Columbia City 

Columbus... 

Connersville 

Corydon 

C raw fords ville 

Crown Point 

Decatur 

Delphi 

Dunkirk 

East Gary 

Elwood 

Fairmount 

Frankfort 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Greencastle 

Greenfield 

Greensburg 

Greenwood. 

Griffith 

Hartford City 

Highland 

Hobart 

Huntingburg 

Huntington 

Jasper 

Jefferson ville 

Kendallville 

Knox 

La Porte 

La wrenceburg 

Lebanon 

Linton 

Logansport 

Madison 

Martinsville 

Mitchell 

Monticello 

Mount Vernon 

New Castle 

Noblesville 

North Manchester. 

NorthVernon 

Oakland City 

Paoli 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Plainfleld 

Plymouth 

Portland 

Princeton 

Rensselaer 

Rochester 

Rushville 

Salem 

Scottsburg 

Seymour 

Shelbyville 

Speedway 

Sullivan 

Tell City 

Tipton 

Union City 

Valparaiso 

Vincennes 

Wabash 

Warsaw 

Washington 

West Lafayette 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



City 



INDIANA— Con. 

West Terre Haute. 

Whiting 

Winchester 



IOWA 



Albia 

Algona 

Anamosa 

Atlantic 

Audubon 

Belle Plaine 

Bettendorf 

Bloomfield 

Boone 

Carroll 

Cedar Falls 

Centerville 

Chariton 

Cherokee 

Clarinda 

Clarion 

Clear Lake 

Cresco 

Creston 

Decorah 

Denison 

De Witt 

Eagle Grove 

Eldora 

Emmetsburg 

Estherville 

Evansdale 

Fairfield 

Forest City 

Fort Madison — 

Glenwood 

Grinnell 

Hampton 

Harlan 

Hawarden 

Humboldt 

Independence — 

Indianola 

Iowa Falls 

Jefferson 

Keokuk 

Knoxville 

Le Mars 

Manchester 

Maquoketa 

Marion 

Marshalltown... 
Missouri Valley.. 

Monticello 

Mount Pleasant. 

Muscatine 

Nevada 

New Hampton.. 

Newton 

Oelwein 

Onawa 

Osage 

Osceola 

Oskaloosa 

Pella 

Perry 

Red Oak 

Rock Rapids 

Sac City 

Sheldon 

Shenandoah 

Sibley 

Spencer 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



117 



Table 37. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 
31, I960, ( iti<* R ith Population I nder 25j0O0 — Continued 



i ■ 



IOWA Cor.linued 



Storm Lake 

Vinton 

\\ ashington 

Waukon 

■ r 'y 

\\ . i. !, r Citj 

West ] 
Win terse) 



KANSAS 



Abilene 

Anthony 

Arkansas < 'iiy 
Atchison 
August i 
Baxter Springs 
Belleville.. 
Beloil 

( : 1 1 1 < > , 

( 'hanute 
< 'herrj \ bJc 
( 'lay i i 
CoSeyville 
Colby- 
Columbus.. 
( !oncori I 

i i Irove. 

I it y 

El l torado 
Ellinwood .. 
Emporia 
Eureka 

l redoni 

i . i r - 1 ■ ■ ■ 

Qarnetl 
i loodland 
< -r«:it Bend 

Herlngt 

I I I 1 U 1 1 1 1 I 

gton 
Bolton 
Hugoton 

odence 

I 

J unci urn ( 'ity 
Kingman . 

i _ 

I venworth . 

Liberal 
Lyons 

Manbatl in. . 
M ir> -\ Ule 
McPherson 

h i 
New ton 
Norton 
Olathe 

tomle.. 

' HI |\V I . . 

i 

PhlHlpsburg— 
Pittsburg 

I'r ill 

Russell 

i Ity.. .. 
Wellington.. 
W infield 



Number of 

|Mllln- ill'- 

partmenl 
employees 



City 



KENTUCKY 

It udstow a 

lii-lli \ in- 

■ 

< 'ampbellsville 

« !arrollton. - 

Catlettsburg 

Centra] City 

Curtiiii 

□ i 
Dayton 
Earlington - 
Eliza be thtown... 

Elsmere. . - 

Erlanger 
Kurt 'I'll- 
Frankfort 
Prank] in 

l-'llltcill 

Georgetown 

( Ireenville 

l [arl hi 

Harrod I 

1 1 -i/ ird 

Henderson 
llnpkiiisvillo . .. 

Jenkins 

Lebanon 

Ludlow 

M adisonvUle 

Mayfield— 

Maysvllle 

M iddlesboro 

M onl icello 

M organfleld 

Mount Sterling 

Murray 

Nicholasville 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park Hills 
Pikeville 
Pineville 

burg 

l'i u\ tdence 
Richmond 
Russellville 
Somerset 
Bouth Fori 
Mitchell 
Versailles 
\\ Inchester 



LOUISIANA 



Abbeville - 
Bastrop 
Bogalusa 
Bunkie 
< 'row lej 

ler 
Donaldsonvillc 
Eunice 
■ 

Franklin 
Has " r " v i" 1 ' 
Houma 
Jonesb n 
Kaplan 
Eenner 
Lake Arthur 
Marksville 
Mlnden 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 






LOUISIANA Con. 



. City 
'■ 

New R 
Pine villi 
Plaquemine 
Port Alh-n 

SpringblD 
Sulphur 
Thibod iu\ 
Vinton 

' I onroe 
Winnfleld 



MAINE 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Bath 



Brunsw ck 

Calais 

Camden 



'i 

Ellsworth 

Fairfield.. 

Falmouth 

Farmlngton 

ner 

Hallowell 

"'•uiik 





Madawask i 



Mexico 

Millinockel 

on < irchard Beach 

Old Town 

Presque Isle 

Rockland 

Rumford 



S ii i r< >r< l 

Skowheg in 

South Portland 

Van Buren 

.ill.- 

k 
Winslow 



Number of 
: 
partmenl 



MARYLAND 



Aberdc* - 

\nn ipolis 

Bel Ur 

Bladensburg 

Brunswick 

Cambridge 

CrlsOeld 

I 

Elkton 

Fredei Ick 

Frost burg 

Oreenbell 

Hi\ re di 

El i-ille 

Laurel 

Mount i 

Pocomoke Citj 

Salisbury 

T ik-iin i P irk 

Westniil 



lis 



I. ,1,1, 



37. — Number <>/ Full-time Police Demmrtmeni Employee*, Decembei 
31, I960, t itiet li nh Populetitm I ndet ZSfiOC ( ontinued 





Number of 
polio 
pertinent 




Nun 

'Mill 






MASS A CI!' 


- 

13 
10 

Id 

11 

7 
SI 
4 

s 

IK 
12 
19 
6 

12 

10 
5 

in 

12 
9 
11 

*9 
30 
30 
14 

.1 
18 
1.1 

8 
-•■ 
23 

- 
- 

19 
31 
IS 
20 

1.' 

M 

6 

7 
11 
2» 

9 
21 

8 
* 


MASSACIU'SETTS 

Lnaod 
u. ton 


13 

io 
in 

*4 
9 
4 
9 

14 
3 

4 

H 
7 
3 
16 
13 
10 
4 
11 
4 
SI 
21 


- 
4 
6 

IN 

8 
8 
19 

28 
33 

36 

9 

11 

4 

3 


11 

.S 
lfi 
17 

A 

9 

4 

>« 

; 


MICHIGAN Con 
Moui ' 1 




\\. ' ! V 


•urv 


U llliilll ■ ■ 

rop 
MICHIGAN 


4 

4 
14 




Athol 






Iti tckstone 




t'lmti'ii 




I 
















1 1 








outh 






4 


Ml 






1 
4 


Dr iCUl 


■ lin 


1 


10 








• 


7 






4 








■ 
• 

- 


. 














11 


























-■■ 




4 














MINNESOTA 


- 


North 

-m1 


















rd 
















11 






















































■ 






• 
i 



































119 



Table -ST. Number <>/ Full-time Police Department Employee*, December 
:il. I960, ( itir* n ith Population I inlrr ZSftOO — Continued 



City 



MINNESOTA Con 

Olenwood 
Golden \ 01) 
Grand Rapid 

< Iranite !• ill 
II . ■ I : i i „■■ 
Hibbing 
Hopkins 
Hutchinson 
international F ilia 

in 

I i-.. City 

Le Sueur 

Litchfield - 

Little Falls 
Luveme 

Mankato 

Marshall. 

Montevideo. 

Moorhead - - 

Morris 

New lllll 

Northfleld 
North St. Paul 

Ortonville 



Park Rapids 

Pipestone 

Proctor -. 

Red Wing 

Redwood Falls 
Robbinsdale 
il>' 
■1,.' . 

.-!. Peter 

s : 1 1 1 k Centre 

Sauk Rapids 
Shakopee 
Sleeps Eye 
South St. Paul 
Springfield 

SI iples 

Stillwater 



i wo Harbors 

Virginia. 

W I'll IKi 

\\ iseca 

w e i SI Paul 

White Bear Lake 

Willmar 

w Indom 

w Inona 

Wortbington 

MISSISSIPPI 

\ innry 

B 51 Louis 
. Ule 

Brookhaven 

< 'anton 

< 'harleston 
Clarksdale 

< Cleveland 

< Columbia 

< tolumbu 
i torintb 

He 



Greenwood 
Grenada 

II izlehursl 



L20 



Number <>f 
police de- 
partment 



City 



MISSISSIPPI Con 



Hollan : 
Holly Springs 
Iri'li inol i 
Kosciusko 
Lei ind 
Lexington 
lie 
Mo Poinl 
Natchez 

- prlngs 
Oxford 
Philadelphi . 
Picayune 
I'ori Gibson 

Valley 
w i-t Poinl 
Yazoo City 



MISSOURI 



lllTOl i 

Berkeley 

Bethany 

Bolivar 

Boonville 
Breckenridge Hills 
Brentwood 
Brookfield 

Butler 

i ' uneron 

i i|ii < lirarde m 

Carrollton 

-'I' 

Chaffee 

Chillicothe 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Crystal City 

DeSoto 

KM. .n 

Excelsior Springs 

Farmington 

Fayette 

Ferguson 

Flal River 

ricktown - - 

Fulton 

Olendale 
Hannib .1 

onville 

l icrmann 

Higginsville 
Hillsdale 

in 
Jennings 

Kinloch 

Klrksville 
Ladue 

Lamar 

•i 

iinimit 

Lexington 
Libert} 

i I in i 

Macon 

Maiden 

M aplrw .... i 

Maroeline 

Mar-lull 

Man villi- 

Mexico 

Moberly 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 






MISSOURI Con. 



Muiir ■ 
North I. 

I Ivcrl lll'l 

I I igedale 

• Hlnil 

Richmond 

Richmond 1 1 

Hill 
Rolla 

D 

st. Charles 
3te Gem 
St. John Vill 
Sedalia 
Shrewsbury 

in 

Slater 

■i 

Union 

Vandalia 

Warrensburg 

Washington 

Webb City 
w ■ Ilston 
West Plains 



Number of 

; 

p irttncnt 



MONTANA 



Anaconda 
Bozeman 

('ill Bank 

Dillon 

Glasgow... 

Glendive 

Havre 

Helena 

Kalispell 

Laurel 

Lewistown 

Livingston 

Shelby 
Sidney 
Whitefish 
Wolf Point 



NEBRASKA 



Alliance 
Auburn 
Vurora 
Beatrice 
Bellevue 
Blah- 
Broken Bow 
Chadron 
Columbus 

Fairbury 

Falls City 

Fremont . 

< taring 

Gothenburg 

Hastings 

Holdrege 

Kearney 

Lexington 

Met !ook 

Nebrask 



1 . 1 1 » 1 « - $7.— Number of Full-time Police Department Emplo y ees, December 
31. !'><><>. Cities H ith Population I nder 25,000 — Continued 





Number ol 




N'uinl ■ 




Numl 


01 tj 


poll) ' 


City 


■ de 








pextmenl 




partment 








empli 




em pi a 






NEBRASKA Con. 




NEW JERSEY Con. 




NEW JERSEY Con 




\ 


is 
•„'. r . 


Dunellen 

i i Paterson 


12 
24 


New ton 

N'Ttli Arlington 




N 




■ 


9 


Rutherford 


21 


Northfleld. . 


i 


Plattsinouth 


8 


Eatontow □ 


9 


\>>rtii Haledi 


>. 




4 

19 


Edgow ii>r 

rt.or < 'it v 


16 




North Plainneld 

Ncirlli U ildw 




ill 


17 


. . . 


. r t 


1 .veil 


- 


Oaklyn 


13 




14 


Fairview 


20 




37 




4 


Fanwood 


13 


■ 


12 




3 
4 

4 
3 


Flemlngton 
Florence Tow nsbip 

1 ..rt 1 ..-.• 

Franklin 


3 
13 
40 

4 


OradeU - 

rk 
Palmyra 


- 




11 




is 




■ 


York.. 


7 


Freehold 


13 


Paramus 








I i irw OOd - - 


10 


Park Ridge 


9 


NEVADA 




i llassboro 


10 


Pauls boro 


13 






Olen Ridge .. 


30 


■ 1 rovi 


13 


Boulder Citj -- 


10 


Glen Rook 


32 


Phillinsburg 


. 


■ 


18 


i Houoester Citj 


O-l 




:i 


F.lkn 


12 


Quttenberg 


14 




13 


Henderson 


13 


ttstown.. 


B 


r villi' 


20 




36 


Haddonfleld 


27 


Point Pleasant 


14 


Winneri 


6 


Haddon Heights 


14 


.nt 








Haddon Township 


16 


... 


It. 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 




Hammontou 


12 


Pomp) 


13 




34 


■!1 

• tick 


59 






■ 








17 

24 
3 

11 
6 


Height.-. 
Hawthorne .. 
Highland Park.. . 
Highlands . . 
Hightstown 
Hillsdale 


18 

20 

19 

6 

11 




13 




Red Hunk.. 
















■ rk 
River Edge 










s 

30 
38 
9 
4 

4 
6 
19 


Hillside Township 
K( burg 
Kenilworth 


.18 
14 
IS 

. 

17 
S 

6 


River ton 

■ Park 
Rumson - - 


11 




4 




• 




rl 

••■ li 

Lincoln Pari 
Llndenwold. . 


- 




II 


Milfi.pl 


rd 








' 






•. rtl 


13 


Little Ferry.. 


10 










r 


9 






NEW JERSEY 




Livingston 






. 








34 


r\ ill"' 




Asbur- Pari 




17 


Atlantic Highlands 


7 


Tow nship. . 


II 






Andnban 


in 


Lyndburst 1 




South 1 






10 

16 
7 


in. in 


31 
11 










■ 




1 


2 


ii<'- . 










IS 
16 
7 


Mapl< 




■ 
• 






13 


■ 










21 








14 














21 
14 

- 




26 












10 






Mill! 








i 


1.1 














■ 


. 


'• 




















- 




39 


n. . 


4 






















•-. 










- 




• 


• 






• 


■ 




-.ill 


10 




29 




. 




- 








17 




34 






4 



121 



Tabic >T. \ umber i>f Full-time Polite Department Employees, December 
.il. I960, t Met W "/i Population I nder 25,000 — Continued 



City 



NEW JERSEY Con 



Wild* I 

\\ Ibury 

\\ oodlj one 
\\ ood I 
\\ oodstown 
u yckofl 



NEW MEXICO 



Mamogordo 



Clayton 

Deming 
Farmington 

Gallup 

' ; i >' - - - 
Las Veg is Town 
Lordsburg 
: imos 

Portales 

Raton 
Silver City 
Truth "r 

quences 

Tucumcari 



NEW YORK 



Ubion 

Amii vvilliv. 



Baldwinsville 

Ballston Spa. 

M il r. i i 

H .th -. 

Beacon 
Blasdell 
Briarclifl Manor. .. 

Brockport . 

Bronxville 

ill trie 

■i i dgu i 

tota 

'"O 

< ' inton 

Oannel 

Carthage 

Catskill 

< ':ivni:;i Heights 

I obleskill 

Cohoes 

Coopei town 

th 

Corning 

( Jortland 

i !oxs ickie 

i 'roton-on-1 iudson 

I ' ; 111- 

Depcw 

I >.i|.|i- 1 11! 

Dolgeville 
l Dunkirk 

• uro i i 

Town 

Rllcnville 

tits 
Elmlra Tow a 

'T'l 







Number of 
police de- 
partment 
employees 






NEW YORK Con 



Park 

[ward 

Fori PI ill 



Fredoni i 

Fulton 

□ City 

i 

< Hen < love 

i Hens Falls 
GHoversville 

Qouverneur 

Gowanda 

Granville 

i Ireen island 

Oreenporl 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 

Harrison 

Hud- 
son 

traw 

Haverstr iw Town. . 

Herkimer 

Highland 

ad Falls 

Homer 

Hoosick Falls 

Hornell 

Horseheads 

Hudson 

Hudson Falls - 

Ilion 

trvington 

Johnson City. 

Johnstown 

Kenmore 

Lake Placid 

Lakewood ^ 

Lancaster Town — 

imonl 

Le Roj 

Liberty .. 

Little F ills 

Liverpool 

Lowville 

Lyn brook 

Lyons 

M alone 

Malverne 

M amaroneok 
Mamaronecs 

la 

Mechanicville 
Medina 
Middletown 
Moh i«k 
Montlcello . 
Mount K Isc ' 
Mount Mon 
New ark 

New York Mills 
North Castle 
North Pelham 
Northport 
North Syracuse 
North T;irr\ town 
Norwich 
Nj ick 

burg 

< He in 

Oneida 

i ineonl i 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 






NEW YORK Con. 

■ g 

Palmyra 
PeekskUl 
Pelham Manor 
Penn Van 

Perry 

PI ittsburgh 
■ . Hi 
Port I bi tei 
Port Jervis 
Potsdam 

laer 

Riverhead Town... 



Salamanc i 
Saranac I. >k 

iga Springs... 
Saugerties 
Sc ir~- 1 de 

Scotia ■ 

F ilia 

SherriU 

Sidney 

Silver Creek 
Sloan 

Solvay 

Southampton 

South Glens F ills. 
South Nyack 
Spring Vallej 

SpringvUle -- 

Suffern 

Tarrytown_. 

Ticonderog i 
Tonawand > 
Tuck ihoe 
Tupper I. ik 
Walden 
Walton 
Wappingera Falls. 

W irs iw 

W irwick 

ford 
Waterloo 

■ ■■. liet . 

Watkins'Glen 

\\ averly 
Wellsville 

Westfield 

Whitehall 
\\ bitesboro 
Yorkvflle 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Ahoskie 

Ubemarle 

\.sheboro 

Beaufort 

Belmonl 

Bessemer City 

Boone 

Clinton 
Chapel Hill. 
Cherryville 
Clinton 
Concord 

Dunn 
Edenton 

th City- 



Number of 
police 'ii'- 
portmenl 

employee! 



1 22 



Table .'17. — Number <>/ FuU-time Police Department Emplo y ee s , Deeembei 
31, I960, ( itie$ U ith Population I ndet 25,000 i ontinued 



1 



NORTH I'AROUNA 
— Contuiui'il 

Farmvllle 

i in 

. illc 

■ 

1 lie 

■ y 

■. ill< 

Mountain 

•i 
Laurinburg 
i [lie 

I 

I Inton 

■ urg 
Lamberton 
Monroe 

. Hie 
Mcir. I 

ton 

Mount \it\ 

North v 
Plymouth 
He 
; fthani 

• .i 
Rutherfordti 

•ry 
Banford. 
Boot! ni't N>. k 

Shelby. 
Biler Cltj 

Sunt titi. I ! 
Boathern Pit 

- 
'•■ . 

. illc 
NORTH DAKOTA 

OHIO 



Number of 

DOliC0 t|r- 

par One nl 






OHIO— Coiitinut-il 

\\ iMi Lake 
. ille 
Hay Vill 
Bedford 
Bellalr 
Bellefontaini 
Belle\ in' 
Belpre 

Bexley . 
Bowlii . I 
Breclcs\ ille 
Bridge port 
Brooklyn 
Brook Park 
Bryan . 
Bucyrua 
Cadii - . 
i 'ambridge 
Campbell. 
i 

Carroll ton 
Celina . 
I 
Chevlol 
ChUlicothe . 
( 'irili-\ ille 
Clyde 

Columbiana 
Conneaul 
ton 
• 

< 'rOOks\ ille 
Deei P rk 

pilau ire 
Delpbo 

ke - 

Elmwood PI 

■ n 

•i ll.irt.i.r 
k 

•i 
Fremont 

Oallipolis. 



Number "f 






OHIO— Contu.u-.l 

. 
Loudont iiif 
I 

Lyndl 
Madeli i 
\I am monl 

Hi 
Man nice 
Mayfleld Hi 
Medina 

Middleport 
\1 illersfiurg 
Minerva 

Montpelier. 
Mount Healthy 
Mount '■ 
Napoleon 
S'elsom ille. 
New Bi ' 
Newburgh H 

■ iwn 

\l\V I • 

New Philadt 
\i wton Fall 

North Hall:: 

North ( 'an ton 
North College Hill 
North Oli ■ 
N'urtti Royal ton 
Norwalk . 

Orrville 

<)\f..nl 

illc 
Parma H< igl I 

■ urg 
Piqua 

linton 



■ 



123 



TabU 



;j 7 .—Number ,,/ Full-time Police Department Employees, December 
31, I960 s (uns \\ ith Population Under 25,000 — Continued 






OHIO Continued 



w apakoneta 
sville 

Heights 

Washii 

l louse. _ 

Wellington 

Wellston 

le 
w est i !arrollton 

W e tervllle 

We 'i.k- 

Whlteh 

Wlekllfle. 

Willard 

Wffloughbj 

Willowick 

\v llmlngton. 

w Lndham 

w i" i tor.. 

W > < lining 

Xenia - 

Yellow Springs 



Number <>f 

partmenl 
employees 



OKLAHOMA 



Ada 

Altus 

Alva 

Anadarko 

Ardmore 

Atoka 

Bethany 

BlackwelL .. 
Bristol 

Broken Arrow. 
Chandler. . . . 
Checotah. 

< ihickasha 

( linniore 

< !leveland 

i tlinton 

dishing. 

DelCit; 

I (ewey 

Drumwrigbt - 

, 

Durant 

Bdmond 
1-: i k ( ■ 1 1 % 
El Reno 
Frederick 
Guthrie 
Ouymon 
Healdton 
Henryetl . 

II., I, ,,! 

Holdenville 

I I oil; 

I lomm 5 

Hugo 

I 

Kingfisher 

Lindsaj 

Mndill 

Mangum 

M arlow 

M <■ blester 
M lam) 

Nichols Hills. . . 
Nowata 

< >kmul/ 
Pawhuska. . 
Perry 



22 

22 

9 

11 

27 

5 

14 

14 

9 

6 

4 

2 

21 

13 

3 

11 

13 

10 

3 

5 

28 

14 

11 

14 

18 

11 

14 

5 

3 

10 

6 

G 

5 

7 

7 

6 

3 

5 

4 

6 

5 

23 

19 

s 

5 

L'n 

11 

7 






OKLAHOMA 
Continued 



It j 
Pryor Creek 
Purcell 

Sallis i 
Sand Spi 
Sapulpa 
Seminole 
Shawnee 
Stillwater 
Sulphur 
Tahlequah 
'I inik. i« i 
\ mi' , 
Wagoner 
\V alter- 
w atonga 
Weatherford . 

Wcwiik i 
Woodward 



Number oi 
I 

partmenl 
employees 



OREGON 

Albany.. 

Ashland 

Istoria .. 

Baker 

Beaverton. 

Bend 

Burns 

e .. 

< 'in \ ;il lis 

( 'ottage ' 

• 
Forest < Irove 

< Irants r 
( Iresham 

Hermiston 

Hillsboro 

Hood River 
Klamath Kails 
La < Irande 

Lake view .. 

Lebanon . 
McM innviHe 
Medford 
M Uwaukie 
Newberg 

Ni*w purl 
North Mend 
N 

< Ontario 

•'reK'nn City 

Oswego 

Pendleton 

Prlneville 

Redmond 

Roseburg 

St. Helens .. 
Seaside . 
BUverton . . 
Springfield 
Sweet Home 
The Dalles 
Tillamook .. 

West Linn 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Aldan.. 

Ambler 

\ mbridge 

AnnvUle. . 

Apollo 

Arohbald 



City 



PENNSYLVANIA- 
Continued 

Arnold 

Ashland . 
Ashlej 
Aspinwall. . 

\ihi ii 

Avalon . . 
ea___ 
Baden 
Baldwin Borough 

r .. 
Barnesboro .. 

■ 
li 
Bedford 

Belles m 
Bentlej villi 

Berwick 
Birdsboro 
Blairsville .. 

Blakely . . 

Bloomsb 

Boyerto 

Brackenridge .. 

Bradfoi 

Brentu o 

Bridgeville 

Bristol 

Brockway 

Brookville 

Brownsville 

Burnham 

Butler 

I] QJ i 

Camp Hill 
i tanonsbui % 

I 'arliiind ale 
( 'arlisle 

i 'arnegie 

< Jastle Shannon 

< ! iti- tuqua 

i h tmbersburg 

( harleroi . . 

i 'lairton 

( Jlarion 

t 'larks Summit .. 
Clearfield 

< 'liftcm Heights 

( i) lh I lie 

ille 
i tollingdale 
Columbia 

( 'nnnells\ ill.- 

( ionshohocken 

( 'npi i> 

;mlis 
l "i>rr> 

Coudersporl 

i 'riftun 
( ri-^viii 
( ur« en-'. ;!:■ 

I > dlastov n 

Danville 

Darbj 

Herry 

Dickson Cltj 

Donora 

Downingtown .. 

D03 leston n 

Dravosburg 

I > r 1 Bin- .. 

Dunmore 
Duquesne.. 



Number of 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



12 
3 
4 

a 
4 
12 

•j 

1 

19 
3 
5 

10 

25 
4 

8 

17 
2 
12 

.' 

4 

1, 

4 

4 

.'I 

15 

15 

2 

4 
12 

6 
39 

3 

5 
13 
16 
19 
15 

(> 

4 
20 
1:, 
30 

5 

3 
11 

8 

■> 

23 
6 

'' 
18 

in 

21 
10 

u 

2 

:t 
3 

(i 
is 

2 

i> 
14 

»; 

8 

s 

11; 
I.-. 

23 



124: 



ible 37. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employee*, December 
.'{/. I960. Cities II ith Population I nder 25,000 — Continued 



Cuv 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

1 1 1 1 r > > ■■ 

' 'onemaugb 
1 msdowne 

IcKeesport 
I ittshurgh . - 

troudsburg 

« !1 

Ti'U nsliip- . 

burg 
Edd> stone 
Edgewood 
Edwardsville .. 
Elizabeth 
I i thtown 
Kllu I Cltj 

ua 

Emporium 

Kmsw orth 

1 

Etna 



Farrell 

u> 



City 

Hills 

: on 
Fountain Hill 
I 
Franklin 

■: 
•1 

burg 

,-ille 



Olenolden 

■ 
• 

Hi 
Drove Citj 

urg .. 

■ r 

. r Township 



tow n 

■ 

II, ■ , ■• ■ 

11, ■ . 

I 'A 

Ingram 
Irwin 

Jenkintow n 

■ 
burg 

I 
I 
I 



Number of 
police de 



City 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

i i Bchburg 

Lehlghton - 

tie 

Lew Isburg 

Lewlstown 

I. Hit/. 

Llttlestown 

I ink lla\ en 

Lower Moreland 
Township — 

i 

1, Skill-. 

Mahanoy City 

• 1111 

Mansfield 

Marcos Book — 
Marple Township.. 

Masontow n 

McAdoo 

\iii' indless Town 

ship 

McDonald 

McKees Rocks 
McSherrystown 

MeadviUe 

Mechanlcsburg 

Media - 

M yersdale 

Middle town 

Midland 

Millcrsville 

MiUvale - 

Milton.. 

Miners ville 

Monaca 

en 

Monongabela 

Montoursvllle 
Moosic 

ville 
Mount Carmel 
Mount toy 
Mount Oliver 
Mount Pi on 
Mount Pleasant 
Mount Union 

Money 

Munhall 

own 

oke ■ 

•ii 

th 

New Brighton 
■ tnmberland 

New 1 1 

\. w Kensington 

North Braddock 

North ■ 

North I . 

North Wales 

Norwood 

oivpliant . 

Palmyra 

.■ \ l 
Penbrooa 



Number of 
police de 
partmenl 



City 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

Phoenin Ule 
n 

Pitl ton 

Plains Tow nship 
Plymouth 

Porl Ulegany 

.i-i.oii 
Porl \ ue 

Ule 
Prospi cl Park. . 
Punxsutaw o< 

town 

Radnor Tow 

Rankin 

Red Lion 
Republic Cardale 

Idsville 
Ridgway 
Roaring Sprii 
Rochesti r 

Royersfbrd 

St. '"lair. 

St. Marys 

Schuylkill Haven 

Scottdale - 

Selinsgrove 

SewicEley 

sha!. r Township 

I !'l 

Sharon Hill 

. burs 

'• Ule . - 

Shenandoah 

Shillington 
Bhippensburg 
Slatingtoo - 

Somerset 

South Oreensborg 
Booth t I 

bars 

ler.. -- 

Spring City 

■;:• gi 
□ 

BtOWe Town 

8 troudsburg 
Bommil Hill 
Banbury .. 
Busquehann 
Bwarthmore 

• rsvlllc 
Tamaqoa 
turn. 

r ..- 

p 

Titusville 

rd . 
rton 
Turtle Creel 

Union City 
Union town 

Vandcrgrifl 

• rly 



Number of 
police de- 

1 1: i r 1 1 1 1< - 1 1 1 



125 



Tabic 37.— dumber <>/ Full-time Police De par t m ent Employees, December 
31, I960, Cities H iih /'<>/"<'"""" I nder 25/100 — Continued 



City 



PENNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

Wellsboro 

rville 
We i Chester 

\\ , t lll/lrloll 

West Hi. in. • 
\\ i i mont 
\\ i ■ t \ , n toi 
u e i Pit) ton 
w , i Re idl 
We i Vli n 
Wesl Wyoming 
Whitehall 
w hiteoak 
Wilmcrdlng 



Windber. 

Winton 

Wyomissing 
Yeadon. 
Youngwood 
Zelienople 

RHODEISLAND 

Barrington 
Bristol 
Burrillville 
( *i'nir il Falls 
i iumberland 
East Qreenw icb 
Johnston 
Lincoln 

aouth 
South Kingstown 
W nnii 
Westerly 
\\ , : V, ir\'. Hk 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Aiken 
Andrews . 
Bamberg 

■rl 

Belton 

Bennett . ille 
lti>iinp\ uie 
( 'amden 

Cheraw 
Chester 

Clinton - 

Clover 
< ! on way 
Darlington 
Dillon 
I 

Florence 
Fori Mill 
QafTney 

tow n 

i ill- 
Oreenwood 
Oreer 

Ille 

r 1 1 ii 

Lake Cltj 

Laurens 
m inning 

M hi. hi 



Number "f 
police i !<■- 
partmenl 
employees 



City 



SOUTH CARO- 
LINA Continued 

Mullins 
Myrtle Beach 
Newberry 

Nnrtll Align I i 

Orangeburg 

■ r 

\\, Ih ,11, 

■ I, urn 

u ire Shoals 
Whitmire 
Williamston 

York 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Aberdeen 
Belle Fourche 
Brookings 

i ' iiii.ni 
l >eadw "...1 
Hot Springs 
Huron 
Lead 

'ii 
M ilbank.. 

Mitchell 

Mobridge 
Pierre 
Redfli Id 

Spe n ii-.ii 

llion 

\\ ttertow n 

Winner 

Yankton 

TENNESSEE 

\lc. I 
I!: tOl 

Browns^ ille 
Clarksville - 
( 'level hi. I 

in 
Columbia 
i lookeville 
Dayton 

a 

mrg 
Elizabethton 
Etowah 

Franklin 
■ ii 
( Ireenville.. 
Hendci in 
Humboldt 
Jefferson < Itj 
Law renoeburg. - 
Lebanon 
Lenoii ■ 

•'irk' 
Lexington - . 
Loudon 

M irj \ ille 
McKenzie - 
McMinn\ ille 
Milan - 
M illington 
Morris town 



Number of 

partmenl 
employees 






TENNESSEE 
Continued 

Mount • 

Newport 

Pulaski 
Ripley 
Rookwood 
Shelbj ville.. 
Springfield 
Sweet water 
Tullahoi 
Union City 
Winchester. . 

TEXAS 

Alamo 

Alamo Heights. 

Alice 

Alpine 

Alvm 

Andrew 

Athens.. 
Atlanta 
Ballinger . 

ty 

Beeville 

Bonham 
Borger 

Brady. 
Breckem idg». . 

Brownfield. . 

Brownw 

Burkburnetl 

Cameron. . 

Canyon 

Carthagi 

Children 

Cleburne 

Cleveland. - 

Coleman 

( 'ollege Station . 

Colorado Citj . . 

Comanche 

D i 
1 'ijrpi 

Dalharl 
Del Rio 

Donna 
Dumas 

ke.. 

I 
Eastland 

.ii 
Edinbui 

i • 

' 

I 

i 

i 

ickton.. 

I ■- ^ t -iirj; . 

Freeporl 
Qainesville . 
t lalena I'. irk 



Number of 
partmenl 



L26 



Table 37.— -Nutnbor <»/ FuU-titne /'«>/»«•<• Department Employee*, Decembei 
81, I960, ( lllea H Ith Population I nder 25 <000— Continued 






TEXAS Continued 

He 

( il.l'lt'W :llrr 

les 

Greenville 

Cttj 

Henrietta 

■I 
Highland r.irk.. 
Hillsboro 

. [lie 

■ . '.;• 

'i 
Kermil . . 
K 

age 

- 

Levellai d 
■ ■ Id 
Livingsta ■ 
Lufkin 
Luling 

M lrlm 

Mi-t Iregor 
McKini ■ 

n 

■ I 

I 

- 



Number <>f 
police de- 
partment 
employees 



City 



Number "f 
police de- 
partment 

employees 



' 



TEXAS Conlinu.d 

Beminole 

Bej mom 

Sherman 

Blaton 

Snyder 

Soutb Houston 

Btamford. 

Btephenville 

Sulphur Bpi 

Bweetwatei 

Taft 

Taboka 

Taylor 

Terrell 

Terrell Hills 

Univi ■ 
Uvalde 

\'iT!lci!l 

w uahachie 
We itherford 
Wellington 

W< si i Diversity 

White Settlement 
Winters 
Yoakum 
Vorktovi ii 

DTAH 

American Fork. 
Bountiful 
Brigbam City 

• 

Murray 
Nepbi 



■ 

Id 

■ 
South - 

h Fork 
Sprin grille 

- 
VERMONT 



VIRGINIA 

Ibingdon 
Alta\ i-ii 
I 
Bedford 
Big Stone < lap 

h irg 
Bluefleld 
Bristol 
Buena Vista 

Cit> 
( Jbristiansburg 
( 'liftim Forge 
( Colonial Heights 
Covington 
Emporia . 
Falls Church 
Farmville 
Franklin 

mrg 
Front Royal 

uburg 
Hopewell 
Lexington 
Luray 

Marion 

Martinsville 

Narrow s 
' 

Orange. . 
Pulaski 
Radford 
Ricblands . 

Salem 

Baltville 

South Bostoi 

South Norfolk 

Staunton 

Suffolk 

Vinton 

Virgin! 

Willamsburg 
Winchesti i 
Wytheville 

WASHINGTON 
Auburn 

I 

■ 

n 

■ tirg 
KniiiiK l.i" 



police de- 



127 



Tabic 37. — Number of FuU'tinte /'»»/*<•(• Department Empioyees s December 
31, I960, t itiet R ith Population I nder ZSfiOO — ( ontinned 






WASHINGTON 
Continued 

M 'Hint \ it- 

:. llriTN 

Port Ai 

■ ad. . 
Pullman . 
Puyallup 

Bedro-W oolle 

a. 

. nlsh 
Sumner 
Sunn j side 

'i mhi a atei 
w .li! Walla 
VV ipato 

WEST VIRGINIA 
Beckley 

: noii 

■11 

i hesapeake 



Dunbar 





■ ■I 

Hinton... 

i. 

M tnnington 
M> hi insburg 
McMechen 
Montgomery 

intown 
M oundsville 
Mullens .. 

: irlinsvillc 

I' tden ' 1 1 v 

Point Pleas mi 

St. All. ins 

Shinnston . 

— .< *n 1 1 1 < !harleston 

Spencer. 

V ienn i . . 



Number of 

partment 
employees 



City 



WEST VIRGINIA 
Continued 

u a 

■ ' i m _ . 
w • ton 

Sulphur 
Springs. . 

WISCONSIN 


Ashl ind. . 
H ir kboo. - 

: I 

Berlin 

Blach Rivei 
Bloomer - . 

Burlington 

< !edarburg 

( 'tll|l|MU I I 

Clintonville 

( iolumbus. 
Cud thy_. 

I)(. IVrr 

Dodgeville... 

Edgerton. . 

Elkhorn 

Evansville - 

Fori Mkinson 

i oi Polnl . . 

Qreendale. -- 

Eartford 

1 1 <jric-«m 

Hudson .. 

Hurley 

Jefferson 

K tu k 1 1 j : . i 

Ki'w aunee. 
Kimhi'rly 

Ladysmith 

I. dee i tenet 

Lake Mills 

I. inc ister 
Little Chute 

Marinette. 

Marshfleld 

Mayvllle - 

Medford 

Menasha 

Menomonie 

Merrill. - 

Monon >. - 

Monroe 

.11 

Neillsville— 
New London. - 



Number of 

■ 
partmenl 






WISCONSIN 
Continued 

Platteville - 
Plymouth. - 

Port W 

• 

Rbinelander - 

Richland « '■ 

I 

Shawano 
Sheboygan F ill- 

Shores I 

South MiI'a . 
Spirt i 
Stevens Point 

ton.. 
Sturgeon M . . 

Tomahawk. . 
I w o Rivers 
Viroqua. - 
\\ ttertow n 
Waup to i 
Waupun 
Wesl Bend . 
West Milw tu 
j 
Whitewater 

WYOMING 

Buffalo. -. 
Cody- 
Douglas. . 
Evanston 
Qreen River 

r . 

Laramie. . 

Powell 

Riverton . . 

Rock Springs 

Sheridan 

Thermopolis 

Torrington 

Worland 



Numbei ol 
partmenl 



L28 



fable 



Ml. — Vumber <>l Offenses Known in the Police, l'>t>t). Cities ami 
I on a- 25,000 and Onr in Population 



City 



Murder 

and nun- 

slaughtei 



Criminal bomi- 
i |do 



slaugh- 
ter llV 



ble rape 






\ ,i,-i 



BUT 



I 









Hon 



At Ian I .. I 

'■! 1 

Birminghan . 



Buffalo, ' 

. ill.' 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
I I. Ohio 

Columbi 



1 

: 

. Mich 

; 



Kort Worth. 
Honolulu, ii 

. 

. hi'! 



Memphis, Tenn 



Miami, i la 
Mir* i 

. Minn 
. '• I 
New i • 



■ 
Norfolk, Yu 

■ 

Omaha. 






St. Lmla. 









. •• •<. l> C 



fl.OOO to UOflOO i* 
popul 



I 
Allcntow 

I 



12 
107 

18 

M 

J I 

Bl 

17 
ISO 

111 
1^ 

7 

113 
82 
12 

in 
164 
B8 

SB 

86 
16 

7 
47 

20 

150 
35 

II 
!J 

11 
15 

- 



18 
186 

80 

16 

:<j 
x< 

IB 
IB 
81 



121 

..t 

17 

88 

-■ 

14 
M 

81 

■ ■l 

12 

a 

to 
a 



108 

17 

Hi 
78 

17 

61 

11 

M 

882 
16 



30 



107 
1, 086 

- 

8 

82 

- 

164 

95 

841 

88 
12 

too 

17 

21 



17 

33 

111 

80 

111 



.(IN 

216 

18,386 

- 

1,803 

607 

181 
1,084 

118 

801 

614 
472 

B6 

662 
274 

1,016 
187 

-.71 

1,300 

122 

l-.l 

-Mill 
41 U 

848 

• 

241 
132 



U 



77 
UM 

1. 182 

818 

7. 326 

7117 

995 

.177 
6,012 

1-7 

LB6 

1,618 
802 
124 

418 
428 

180 
1,608 

11,021 

t:<7 
112 
94 

4. oil 

- 

167 



1-7 



I 898 

30,723 
8,421 

6, 1 1 1 

16,600 

1,818 

8,802 

2, IBS 

3 281 
761 

8, 661 

3,280 

;). 7:« 

1.738 
7.023 

1.1.74 

3,348 

;i.:iin 
991 

11,840 
2,631 
10,623 

3, 17:* 
i 080 



1,178 



1 , 124 

2, 182 

1. 117 
21,382 

1,308 
2,017 

2, 888 

704 

:ji 

2,313 

21,417 

2,612 

1,318 

1,067 

1,708 

612 

427 

2,821 
2, 117 



117 
1.044 

744 

m 



1, 132 

2, lvj 

:<. 876 
38,321 

6,012 

12,142 

- 

;<. no 

3.533 






129 



I.ilili- 38. — Xumber of Offenses Known in ih> Police 

I on a - — ' onl inued 



I960. ( itiea an, I 






i 



■ 



•A. \ I 





, Christi, '1 • • 
Des M 



Dulntti. Minn 
■<\, N.J 

,i!i\ Inil 
Flint, Mich .. 



Fori Wayne, Ind. 
Fresno, < ' till 

: n i 
Glendale, * 'ilif 
Grand R 



. N . C 
Hammond, Ind 
Hartford, Conn 

. 
Jackson^ llle, Fla 



. K:ms 
Knoxville, Tenn .. 
Lansing, Mi 
Lincoln, Nel 
Little Rock, Aik 



Lubbock, 'l ■ 
Madison, w I 
Mobile, \i i 
Montgomery , Alu 
N ishville, Tenn 



N'i ■. II iven, • 
N'cwporl N( 

I 
I .'nl 



'. N I 

OUth, Vo 

pro\ idence, HI 
Ricbmoi 



I I 

I 



1 



■ 






















84 










17 




- 


173 




344 








89 






171 






' 






107 


1 "•"■ 






78 






12 


104 






12 




106 








- 


155 


l.i 


• 




173 


- 


304 






19 




- 




1 1 






- 


184 




241 






109 






B7 


12 




l 




: ■ 


- 


76 












in 




177 


B 




28 


16 




8 


109 








112 




lis 






- 




72 




280 




11 






119 















1.804 

- 

1,211 

- 

- 

■ 

- 
1,145 

B 

1.107 

• 

2.011 
1,143 
1,737 



' 



• 



164 

1.105 

3 - 
148 

71" 
1,076 

111 
1,704 






1.070 

- 

J. 61 1 
1,961 

1.115 

i.i7;< 

■ 
1. 171 

2, 444 
1,002 

- 



L30 



Tabic 38. — \iimhi-t <>/ Offense t Known t>> the Police 

I mi n - — < oni tailed 



/'Wi. Citiea anti 






'■ M. I' I 

South Bend, ln<l 



' 



i 






■ 
■ 






Ann \ 









Crliiilii.il hornt- 



Murder 

itri 11. in 



■ 



I 









■ 









11 

l 






u 



ii" 

lit 

17 

4 

47 
114 






■ 

ig 

- 

14 

4 

410 

41 
80 



1 

J71 

34 

- 

14 

- 



Hur 

in r 



. I 



8U 

m 



. - 









9U 

4_'7 

14<i 
443 



44 

8B3 









1.144 



3 




44 


6 




1*4 


471 






* 








Table 38.— Number 



>l Offense* Known t<> the Police, I960, Cities and 
Town* — ( oiii Inued 



I 



Orimlnal homl- 



Murdt r 
and iiiiii- 
ncgligenl 

man 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
tci bj 
negU- 



Forci- 
ble rape 



Rob- 






Kur- 

glary 

Ing or 



5 -theft 



• 



( tontinued 



Columbia, S.C 
( !ompton, Call! 
Council ! 1 1 1 1 it- . low i 

. K 
Cranston, R.l 



npoi i. Eowa 
I >e< ii mi . Dl 
Downey, Call! 
Dubuque, Iowa 
Durham, S.C 



l Ihlcago, End 
1 irangc, \..l - 
3t. Louis, 111 

i. Ohio 

1 1 i g 



• n, III 

Kali River, m 
Fori Lauderdale, Fla 
Fort Smith, Ark 
Fullertoi . I 



. ! 
Galveston, Tex 

Grove, C .hi 

i ills, Monl 
Green U ..-. , W 



Qreenburgb, N.Y 

. - I 

•■ leb. Conn - 

Hamilton 'low nship, N.J 
Hamilton, Ohio 



Hampton, Va 
lurg, Pa 

Ip, Pa 

ird, Calif 

b, Fla 



High Point. N.C 
Holyoke, M a 
Huntington, W. Va 
I iiini \ file, ai i 
Independence, Mo 



[nglewood. I 
Erondequoit. \ . ¥ 
Irvlngton, \ I 
on, Mich. - 

tow ii. Pa 



. ill 

i. Mich 

i \ 

Kettering, Ohio 
i barl( .1 i 



Lakewood, < (hlo 
Lancaster, P i 
l. kredoi i ex 

l.au rence, M tss 



16 



3 


3 


1 
2 


1 


1 


8 


9 


18 




8 



32 

it; 
13 

20 
24 

mplete 



187 

in 

Ml 

- 



Incomplete 



106 
13 

161 
32 

19 

34 

537 
II 
18 



21 

1 

! 
mi 

.-I 
l 

ii 
39 

38 

l 

192 

36 
1 

13 



842 

2 1 S 

131 

171 

-Ms 







30 


- 


149 


132 
168 


• 
810 


2 


12 


3 

2 


3 

1 


'.7 
1-. 


123 
23 


261 

:<7s 


283 


583 



! 


13 


142 


- 


164 


l. 170 


103 


285 


L089 


- 


228 


868 


803 


737 


l.V.s 


231 


127 


652 


. 


263 


1.111 




132 


328 


677 






837 






354 


198 






112 




113 


197 




750 


US 


924 


, . 


60 


143 


156 




371 


_ 




'.'7n 


178 


380 


794 


II ' 






[OS 


i.i 


218 


317 


874 


1,115 


121 


116 


609 


104 


gg 


884 


223 


120 




359 


182 


172 


380 




(') 


261 


197 


160 


009 


724 


I, 148 


106 


94 


281 


217 






- 


113 


270 


140 


- 


801 


169 




117 


. 




1,616 


177 


nr. 




- 












91 


38 




151 


108 


702 


213 


221 


340 




.171 


1,648 


ir 


88 


84 



So • footnotes al end ... . ii>l> 



132 



Tabk S8< — Number <\f Qffenae* Known in '/"■ Police, (960, Cttlea and 

I ../i n i — < <>m inn* <l 






Murder 
and dod 

slaugbtei 



• nued 



i 

: 

Lincoln Park 

i 



I<or:iln,< '!■'. 

1 

Lowei ' * nship, 



Lyncbl 

Lynn. M 



II 



Midland, Tej 

Mount Vernon, N.Y 
Muncii'. Iii'l 



'■' 



I 

I - 

■ 
i 



I 

I 

I' ;- -I C N ; J 

! 



!. M l- 

I 

I 



: 



I 

I 



R 

! 
I 



Criminal homi- 



-l.iin-h 
l.r by 






Rob- 






17 

ia 

7 
in 

a 
i 

10 

llil 



7 



iiiR 









29 


-•« 


1 


111 


27 




34 




isq 


7 


4 


11 


2 


- 


34 


1'. 


48 





6 


41 


150 




7 




42 


u 






15 




22 




10 


4 





M 


39 


ia 




n 


a 




7 


77 


IB 








58 








10 






17 






a 


3«i 





3sa 

801 

197 
281 

1,048 

183 
109 

I. 122 

140 

881 









I .'I 
71 

:i 

71 

182 
148 

819 

- 

B7 

184 






718 

1,014 
1,240 

4i. I 





- 








418 








444 


191 








1,781 










.■I* 




110 


























.'71 






























313 






311 


1.337 












1. ISI 


4I> 
























■ 


















17« 


































Table 38. — Sunxber <>l Offenses Known /<> the Police, I960, ( iiirs ,,n<l 

Tonus — < 'out inued 



i 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder 
and non- 
negllgcnl 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
i nigh- 

Irr l.v 



i'lr rape 



Rob- 



\ iii. i 
assault 



Bur- 
glary 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



1 .•■-theft 



over 



Cinder 

$50 



Auto 



lotion Continued 



Bhon -. Mi< h 

San Boi nardii 
San Leandro, Calif 



San Mateo, Calif .. 

S ml i ( 

8 ml i Monica, Call! 

Schenectady, x.Y . 



Sioux City, [owa 
Sioux Falls, 8. D.ik 
Skokie, III 

South Gate, Calif .. 



Springfield, 111 ... 
Springfield, M<> . 
Spi Lngfleld, Ohio, 

iford, Conn 
Stockton, Calif. .. 



Sunn: '■' de, Calif 
i erre IT iute, Iml 
Troy, N.Y 

. \i i 
Tyler, Tex 



Union City, N.J 

Union Township, X..I 
tlniversity City, Mo 

Darby Township, 



Vallejo, Calif 



Waltham, Mass 

I, Mich . 
w arren, Ohio .. 
Warwick, K.l 



I 
Waukegan, III 

Wauw il • i. W . 

, Calif 



W ■ t Hartford 

in Beach, l-'la 
Wheeling, W. Va 
White P 

B irri , P , 



Willi I i. 

\\ oodbi (dgo 'I hv. 
York, Pa 



1,000 in 
lotion 



i • 
Park, Mich 
Alton. Ill 



9 
13 
in 
79 
23 

20 

II 
78 

I 

II 

4 

G 

21 

70 

39 
25 
19 
12 
166 



13 


61 


51 






291 


•J 


"• 


33 


31 


27 


13 


1 


2 


te 


IN 


28 


47 


6 




8 




21 


25 


2 


1 


;«) 


40 


16 


4 


7 




'-' 




101 


31 


- 


5 


Xi 


26 


2f> 


8 


2 


9 


(i 


6 


» 


1 


9 


2 



316 
220 

I. 166 
413 

161 
570 
277 

17.". 

.'(.'in 
143 

L'I7 

368 

373 
168 
243 

821 

132 

248 
266 

117 

221 

ISO 

370 

I. loo 
156 
636 
809 

.■;:•. 

196 
213 
102 

1 23 

llo 

no 

1,042 

217 



19 
126 

in. 
182 



178 

lot 

173 
321 

32 1 
182 

275 
243 

:iiil' 
:<js 

126 

306 

M.' 
315 

!'s| 

'J Is 

112 

210 
37 

84 
142 
169 

Hi; 
•J 1 1 

101 

204 

213 
207 
189 
151 
801 



192 
134 

lis 
17.' 



63 
18 

loo 
17 

70 



703 
2, 103 

1, 110 

1,368 

1,036 

166 

1.7IO 
•J I.", 

I. 103 

L'lll 

735 
714 

0O| 

717 

342 

2.353 

ss., 

834 

no 

110 

i.-.i 



430 
1,246 

410 

334 

-• 

701 
170 

864 

i m 
306 

1,069 

246 

|.I7 



126 
895 
684 



154 

67 

as 

84 
101 

IW 
76 

117 
1 25 
69 

77 

68 

H 

70 
107 

26 
81 

■■ 
61 
99 

101 

100 



L34 



Tabl< 



58< — \itmhtr <>/" Qffenaea Known to the Police, I960, Cities and 
I own* — < lontinued 



City 



Murd( i 
and mm 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



population Continued 



Ames, Iciu.i 

dam , N. 1 
Ancboi 
\ m, End 

\ !. S.( ' 



Aniiistiiii. Ala 
Apple ton, w la 
Arcadia, Calil 
Arlington, M ■ 
Arlington I [.-inlit>. Ill 



Asbland, K\ 
Athens, 
Attleboi 
Auburn, N.Y 



Austin, Minn 

Baldwin Pari 

I 

Barberton, Ohio 

i ■■ die, Okla 



. Mich 
I 
Belleville, 111 

■-. \ J 
Bellini 



ll.lmoi • 
Beloit, W 

I 

! ■ 
I 



! 
I 
I 

Binninghan 

i 



Criminal bond- 



. Ill .. 
. Ind 

Bould( 



I • ii. k\ 

Brown 






I 
1 



Man 
slaugh- 

negli- 
gence 



Mi- rape 



Rob 
berj 



rated 



[neon 

3 1 19 



l 
86 


16 

123 
8 

17 



Hui 

glarj 

Ing or 
Ing 






130 



140 

171 
'•I 
293 

His 






86 
160 

in:. 
H»i 

nil 
76 

223 
41 

•in 



i ndei 



1.17 




171 


90 


,,. 


17(1 


Ifi 


4 J 


122 




103 


34:i 


124 


1.7 




443 


176 




10ti 


63 


372 


1K3 


80 


319 


(13 




306 


223 


131 




1.15 


76 


HO 


79 


77 


250 


80 


87 




61 


103 


346 






114 








14 


10 






Ml 




61 


73 




193 


113 


137 




--. 














341 


- 


21 


414 




no 




133 


- 


41 J 


- 


. 


731 


• i 




- 




17-' 




190 


103 






- 




123 






103 








144 






















114 












- 


100 


















HO 











135 



I ,1,1. 



•"•<■{. — Wutnher <*f Qffengea Known to the Police 
Town — ' ontinued 



I'tM. Cities nn, I 





Criminal homi- 
cide 


Forcl- 


bcry 


V lti-1 


Bur- 
glary 

ing or 
enter- 


y-thoft 




City 


Murder 

and non- 
negligenl 

man- 

ilaughtei 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


• 


Under 


theft 


,000 in 

popt ' 'inutd 


2 


2 


2 


3 

1 1 

I 

17 

Incor 

16 

5 


2 

1 

e 

1!) 

4 

30 

10 
3 


71 

150 

77 

233 
54 

.,i 
•J is 

•- 

100 
187 
28 

340 

13 

68 
106 

170 
149 
5.50 
127 
49 

11', 

96 

312 

116 

52 

s7 
117 

54 
65 

199 
110 

ill 
113 

lis 

59 
160 
74 

87 
164 

131 
11(1 
125 
183 

•JS7 

142 

r>7 

i .: 


7il 
76 
63 

• 

9 

128 

91 

■| 

367 

206 

16 
281 

42 
163 

258 

122 

32 

■ 

121 

127 

12 

68 

201 

i,l 
47 

39 

119 

182 

3 

48 

220 

45 

45 

80 
122 

79 
122 

32 
43 

li.i 

34 

59 
216 

72 
148 

137 
126 

92 1 
84 1 


280 
121 

.ill 
799 

B71 
28 
221 
562 
KM 

860 

-..(7 

112 
706 

548 

100 
419 
194 
362 

593 

480 

171 

317 
250 

169 
393 
770 
230 
97 

291 

408 

304 

CI 

188 
284 

216 
128 

1.17 
160 

46 
520 
667 

171 
1,030 

117 
185 

587 1 
833 1 




Chelsea. M i 


66 


( ' 1 1 . ■ ! I . • 1 1 h : 1 1 II 1 ( » W II 

< Iheyenne, Wyo 
Chicago Heights, 111 

Chula Vista, Calil 

CI ii ksburg, w \ ■ 




2 


i 
1 

3 


17 

78 

83 


Clarkstown, N.Y 




2 

1 




8 


1 


1 


3 
3 

4 
4 


13 


Clinton, Iowa 




33 


Columbia, Mo 






46 


Concoi d, C ilif 






- 


B4 


Concord, N.ll 




2 


17 


. ibles, I'l i 






15 

11 


7 
9 


Ul 


i !osl i Mesa, Calif 


1 


1 


13 


Cranfbrd Township, \M 


20 


Culver City, Calif 

< 'iiinbri land, M'l 




1 


2 


35 
2 

1 
24 

24 

I 
25 


41 

4 
5 

2 
48 
115 

2 

2 

1 
13 

3 

I 

2 
2 

6 

ii 

li ill 

IS 

7 

2 
4 
1 

2 

'.< 


1 66 

4S 


Cuyahoga Pails, Ohio 




1 
1 


- 
1 

6 
2 


4S 


Daly City, Calif 




193 


Danville, III 


33 




41 


i > ivinna Beach, Fla 


96 
39 


i >es PI tines, ill 








5 

3 
20 
11 

4 


83 






1 

1 


1 
1 
3 


23 


E isl Cleveland, Ohio 

I 1 Detroit, Mich 

East Hartford, Conn 


71 
54 
88 


East Lansing, Mich 




9 






1 
1 


I 
1 

I 


2 

5 

1 
1 

'J 
8 
4 
4 
4 

4 
2 

S 
5 
11 

6 


23 


E i i Point, 1 1 i 


64 




79 


Eau ( '1 aire, Wis 




25 


Ivlina, Minn 








57 


El Cajon, Calif 




2 


4 
4 
4 

2 

4 
1 


69 


Ito, < ' ilif 


83 






4 

1 

3 


18 


Elgin, ill 


3.5 


Elkb hi. iml 


34 


Elmhurst, III 


15 




33 


Elyrl i. Ohio 




2 


1 


80 




12 






1 

2 
1 


2 


IS 


Englewood, \..i - 


is 


Enid, Okla 




i :a 


Eureka, Calif .. 




1 


10 
6 
8 

3 

2 

[noon 

38 ' 


16 
2 
1 

1 

- 
plete 

3 1 
161 


107 


Everett, Mass 


1 


2 


67 


Everett, Wash 


120 


I, Cnn 


46 


Pali l. i»n. \.i 


13 




...J 


6 1 


8 1 






II 


• ill.-. N.C 


al 


177 



L36 



Table 38.— JVumbw <»/* Q0fen«ej Known t<> the Police, I960, < 'Itiea and 

l mi ii- — < onliniK <| 




Orlmlnal homi 


ble rape 






Ins 






• 


Murder 
and non- 
man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
glaugli- 

negll- 




i ndci 




Fernda 






3 
3 

2 

1 


12 

•j 

6 

1 


8 

1 


190 
149 

28 
70 

118 

127 
76 
[00 

278 

73 
871 

:n 

47 

- 

143 

183 

59 

123 

130 
194 
158 

138 

14* 

168 

'.<l 
808 
801 

200 

473 
100 

- 
- 

317 
11.'. 


127 

- 

■ 

40 

-• 

121 

••l 
110 

:•> 

28 
126 

43 

•«i 
42 

7-. 

120 
123 

7* 

70 

- 

- 
444 

- 
114 


377 

17^ 
104 

691 
816 

ill 

110 

208 

11 IS 

314 
343 

180 

127 

1. 147 

- 
177 










1- 


Pttehbunt, M at - 












' 


Pond ■• . 


i 






: 


2 

1 

1 


1 
3 


3 
18 

2 
4 
4 

14 
1 

5 

4 

3 
9 

7 


4 

- 

9 

22 
3 
44 

1 

164 


..1 


Fori P 




31 




i 
i 


41 


: ': 










l 
3 






' 


2 
1 


1 
4 






-- 


. Mlcl 


41 


. N i 


1 


~i 




1 

3 


1 
2 


2 
1 




■ 








Ooldsbon , N.C 
<ir. ni.| Forks, N" 1 1 
Grand Island, Mel • 
Grand ' 


I 
1 


1 

1 


3 

1 

.( 
1 


6 
7 

4 
1 
9 

8 

: 

13 

11 

4 
li... 

1'. 

- 

: 
i'. 


4* 

13 
3 

9 

M 

12 
■j 

rl 

41 
13 

1 
19 

4 


10? 
31 

. 








:( 






1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
4 


2 

1 
1 

- 

3 

1 

a 

6 




<illlf|M.rI. MtS 

M ! 


11 

- 


]> 












UN 








3 

1 




- 






Mich 
















rk, 1!'. 


1 

1 
1 


1 
1 


. 

i 

i 

i 

ii 

i: 

i 


- 
103 


49 


10 








1 
1 

6 


n 

lx 
74 

1 

Ifl 

1 

. 
8 


1 

9 

47 

4 
7 










71 






i 












1 
1 








I. 






















4 


4> 



Table 38. 



•Number <>/ Offenses Known to the Police 
I on a i — < ont inued 



1960, Cities and 



City 



Criminal homi- 



Murder 
and Qon- 

■ 

slaughter 



Man- 
ter by 



ble i ii"' 



Bob- 
bery 



\ ated 



Bur- 

Ing or 
enter- 
ing 



i ..-theft 






population Continued 



Jamestov* n, N.Y 

'■ 

. . Mo 
id City, Tenn 

. Mo 



Kant 
Kami 

Kearny, N. ' 
Key west, J 

. renn 



Kingston, N.Y 

. iili', Tex . 
Kirkwood, Mo 
Kokomo, tr 

• anna, N.Y 



e, w is 
Lafayette, Ihd. . . 
te, La 

i . i i i : . 
Lakelan I 



. I :iif 

ter, < Hon 

i I . , N. Mes 

Laurel, Miss 

Lawrence, Kans . 



Lebanon, P 
Leominster, M iss 

'in. Maine 

ton, M iss 

i, N.J 



lort, N.Y 

i, N.Y 
n, N.J 
. ' 
Lynwo . ' 



Madison Hi 
Manhatl in B 

Manitowoc, Wis 

B< Id, Ohio 
Mapli 



M n i. ii i, i ; , 

on, Iii'l 

Marion, Ohii 



Maywood, III 

McAUi . 

M . Kee poi t, Pa 

Menlo Park, i 

i, M 

. te, rex 
Methuen, M 
Michigan City, Ind. 



20 



[ni omplete 



1 


2 


1 


3 


5 


2 


11 


35 


6 




12 





Incomplete 

3 1 5 

14 20 



17 
1 
Incomplete 



119 

167 

116 
97 

■ 
118 



62 

ill 
101 

70 
23 



61 


57 


243 


35 


107 


194 


131 


150 


698 


1 25 


7! 


148 


138 


68 


136 


214 


205 


859 



[28 




299 




151 


402 


143 


80 


276 


143 


86 


• 


200 


211 




105 


2 


too 


98 


160 




33 


25 


171 


100 


60 




117 


92 


188 


'.'7 


34 


185 


248 


90 


315 


19 


41 


161 


127 






70 


12 




111 


II 


320 


161 


■-'..7 


578 


- 


16 


229 




148 


III 


81 


I" 












7-' 


137 


177 


89 




-- 


31 


170 


122 


159 


573 


31 


64 


233 


154 


11 '.i 




128 


104 


171 


II 


8 


231 


214 


ill 


361 


73 








76 






101 


391 




191 






11 


142 



311 



L38 



Table S8. — Vumbew of Offenses Known to the Police, I960, Citiea and 

Town* — < ont inued 



city 



I 

poi>til<ih" i Continued 



Middletown, Conn 
Middletown, Ohio 
Midland, Mil I 

Milford 



Milton, M 

• iik i, Mum 

M ishawaka, tnd 

■•it 



hf ... 
Moline, III 

■ ■'. N I 
Monti 



Monti lif 

Mountain View, t lalll 
Mounl Lebanon 

Muskegon, Mil li 



■-.'..1 ... 

. N . I i 

Natick, M 

m , M 



[nd.. .. 

'■ 

New 1'. 

Newbui 



N 

'. Ky 

New port, K.I 






■ 



l 



I 



■ 



i 
I 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder 
anil nun- 
aegligenl 

man- 
slaughtei 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter bj 
negll- 



i 



Fori i 
ble rapi 






V.lti .1 



lfnr- 

Ing 



71 

plete 

Inci : 

n 
10 

4 



-. 

43 
120 
109 

- 

112 

617 
134 
304 
136 

371 

47 

- 

118 

- 
- 

19 

22 

Hl4 

- 

142 



' 



■ 



193 
134 

-J 
142 

B4 

129 
143 

161 

173 
43 

111 
133 









. 



. 
1,912 

377 

12 

--7 

■•7 
- 
- 

421 

313 



. - 





73 




116 


183 


3f4 






1,055 














19 




- 






137 


. 










95 
















- 


49 






. 


































47 


146 






























iblc 'Ml. — \iimhtr of O/fin-is hnotrn to tin- Police 

Towns — < Continued 



l')M. Citiea and 





nil homi- 
cide 


Forci- 
ble r:i|>c 


lury 


rated 


litir- 
gl iry 
t.r.- ik- 
ingor 
enter- 
ing 


ay-theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negllgenl 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter t'V 
negli- 
gence 


$50 and 

over 


Under 

$50 


tuto 
then 


CUh-K t6.000 1 
population Continued 



i City, Fla 

lurg, W. \ i 
l':irk Forest, III 


2 
5 
2 


2 
3 
2 


1 

1 

3 


7 
1 

3 
2 
4 


63 

4 

1 
4 


400 

106 

111 

lL'l 

174 
147 
101 

90 
203 
220 
163 
142 

45 
305 

36 
126 
203 

B3 
176 

ill 
38 
261 

128 
716 

158 
62 

270 
18 
94 

185 
71 

112 
268 
233 

65 

mi 

253 
261 
111 
289 
B7 

128 
146 

161 

255 

230 
91 
93 
50 
56 


90 
130 
64 

38 

37 
89 
98 
117 
42 

16 

80 
180 
161 

59 

11 
186 

27 
100 
82 

40 
I is 
52 
3.5 
356 

120 
391 
242 
76 
100 

110 
4 

89 
31 

111 

68 

71 

208 

ins 
145 

11 
! 

91 
1.™ 

B2 

128 
63 

197 
100 

137 

60 
58 
71 
71 
27 


(61 
186 

264 

33'.* 
332 

- 

89 
310 
85 1 
R17 
624 

87 
688 

71 

4 it; 
100 

187 
264 

II 

352 

1.131 

132 

331 

508 
31 
II 
284 
102 

177 

684 
67 1 
832 

217 
1. 102 
706 
(67 
808 

371 

455 
557 

457 

311 
186 

• 

1.32 

BO 


01 

i 

61 

II 


!I1 






61 


Pe ibody, Mass 






61 


Pekln, III 








2 
8 
4 
14 

3 

19 

17 

, r . 

1 

27 
2 
8 

38 

3 
5 
4 


6 

4 

8 

125 

20 

36 

9 

in 
8 

1 
14 

5 
24 

4 

1 
1 

in 
2 

27 

6 

29 

4 

4 

8 
2 
2 
8 
3 

92 

49 
K 

2 
11 
31 
9 
4 

38 

11 

18 

1 

16 




Perth Amlniv, N.J 




1 
2 

1 
2 


2 
1 
3 

6 
2 
3 
1 

1 

3 






8 

2 

4 




Phenlx City, Ala 


4 


Pine HluiT, Ark 


3 


Plainfleld, N.J. 


10 


Pocatello, Idaho 












1 




Poi Hmonth, N'.II , 








1 
1 




s 




II 






1 
12 

4 






9 


4 
1 
1 






1 




1 
1 


71 




- 






Rapid City, S. Dak 

Redlands, Calif 


3 


1 
1 


15 
1 


3 
32 
18 
14 

2 

12 


11. 






17' 


Redwood City, Calif 


1 
1 


2 


13: 
Hi 


Richfield, Minn 






41 




3 


1 




7i 




i: 






1 


1 
2 


2 
1 
5 

4 
4 
4 

1 
6 

2 
IS 

4 

12 

9 

2 
i 

6 
8 

15 

6 
8 

2 


57 


Rock Hill, 5 C 


3 


11 


Rockvllle Centre, N.Y 


II 


Rocky Mount, N.C 


2 
5 
8 


1 


1 


81 




1 
3 


.' 


6 


St. Cloud, Minn 


a 


Lou] P nk, Minn 


1 

1 
1 
1 
2 

1 


3i 












1 

1 
1 

1 
a 
2 


2 
1 
8 
1 

6 

a 

i 










lm 


Ban Bruno, Call! 


48 

1. 






"* 


i e, \ Mex 

S inta Roe v. ' ' till 


1 
S 
2 

4 


I 




1 

2 
2 


i 

3 


1. 


Belma, Ua 

Shakei ihlo 


11 






1! 






l 


45 


South Euclid, Ohio 






2 


1 


19 



L40 



Table 58. — Number <>/ Qfferutea Known t<> //««• Police, I960, Citiet and 

'/'km im — < lontinued 



City 






/«•/'!..' 



Bouthfleld, Mich. 

South Ban 1 i 

ownship, P i 



BteubenvWi 

Buperior, w I 
TallaJb 
Taunton. M 



It Township, \ i 
Temp 

. ton, Conn 



,111 
Valdosl :. I • 
Vancou\ ei 
Ventura, <":ilif 



Vlcksbu 
Vineland, \ ' 
WalUngford, Conn. 

irashlp, Mich. 
Waterton a, M - 



A II, \ Y 

'■' 

111, Wii 

Welrton, w 



:. M 



S I 
Whittle!". <':>llf 



Wilmctb 

Wiln.. 



n, Mass 



.' 



Criminal homi- 
cide 



Murder 
and non- 
man- 
slaughter 



\i in 
slaugh- 
tei bj 



ble rape 






voted 



5 HI 

11 II 

[noomplete 



Bui 

I'l.n j 



[2 


. 






20 


23 


1', 


1 


. r . 


1 




S3 


8 


6 


4 


5 


T 


54 


3. 


7 


■• 


S3 



Incomplete 



l 
12 

[noomplete 



i 

4 
6 

25 



188 



■■ tlirft 






162 
103 






414 



I'll 




617 


86 




182 


I7. r . 


76 


813 


127 


182 




1 25 


51 




1 63 


111 


822 






381 


102 


17 




187 






59 


84 


98 


165 


108 





23 


-'7 




140 




199 


i:i: 




175 


S7 


70 


108 


106 


144 


360 


71 


48 


1 28 


173 


45 


204 


M 


62 


230 


241 


211 


522 


'•1 


Bfi 


93 


210 


78 


276 




7n 


347 






501 


4S 


62 


145 



41 




1 1 






180 


37 




180 


111 


<.<l 


216 




. 


53 




-. 






80 


14* 


114 


99 


211 






182 








98 


. 




168 






124 


no 




309 








- 




- 


- 


-. 


124 










MB 


ISO 










. 




129 





' 1. 

3 Cl 

J < ■ 



■ | 



o 



1 1 



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