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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

cW»9353 .5a 3 



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CRIME 



IN THE UNITED STATES 



ISSUED BY 

JOHN EDGAR HOOVER, DIRECTOR 
FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS-1961 




FOR RELEASE 



THURSDAY, P.h 
PRINTED ANNUALLY 



JULY 12, 1962 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United States 



PRINTED ANNUALLY— 1961 



Advisory: Committee on Uniform Crime Records 
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
Stanley R. Schrotel, Chief of Police 
Cincinnati, Ohio, Chairman 



J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
U.S. Department of Justice, Washington 25, D.C. 



& 






Of. 






Contents 

Page 

Preface v 

Crime factors vi-vii 

Summary 1-23 

Introduction 24 31 

The index of crime, 1961 32-77 

United States, 1961 (table 1) 33 

United States, 1960-61, by geographic divisions and states 

(table 2) 34-37 

States (table 3) 38-52 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas (table 4) 53-77 

General United States crime statistics, 1961 78-90 

Crime trends, 1960-61, by population groups (table 5) 79-80 

Crime rates, by population groups (table 6) 81-82 

City crime trends, 1961 versus average of 1956-60 (table 

7) 83 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

by population groups (table 8) 83-84 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, and persons charged, 

by geographic divisions (table 9) 85-86 

Disposition of persons formally charged by the police 

(table 10) 86 

Offenses known, cleared; persons arrested, charged and 

disposed of (table 11) 87 

Monthly variations (table 12) 87 

Offense analysis, trends 1960-61 (table 13) _ 88 

Type and value of property stolen and recovered (table 

14) 89 

Value of property stolen, by type of crime (table 15) 89 

Burglary by day of week, October, 1961 (table 16) 89 

Murder victims — weapons used (table 17) 90 

Murder victims by age, sex and race (table 18) _ _ 90 

Arrests 91-106 

Number and rate by population groups (table 19) 92-93 

City arrests by age groups (table 20) 94 

City arrests of persons under 18, under 21, and under 25 

(table 21) 95 

City arrests, distribution by sex (table 22) 96 

in 



Arrests — Continued page 

City arrests by race (table 23) 97 

City arrest trends, 1960-61 (table 24) 98 

City arrest trends by sex, 1960-61 (table 25) 99 

Rural arrests by age groups (table 26) 100 

Rural arrests of persons under 18, under 21, and under 25 

(table 27) 101 

Rural arrests, distribution by sex (table 28) 102 

Rural arrests by race (table 29) 103 

Rural arrest trends, 1960-61 (table 30) 104 

Rural arrest trends by sex, 1960-61 (table 31) 105 

Police disposition of juvenile offenders taken into custody 

(table 32) 106 

Police employee data 107-130 

Full-time police employees, number and rate (table 33) _ 108-109 

Civilian employees, percent of total (table 34) 109 

Police employees killed (table 35) 110 

Assaults on police officers (table 36) 110 

Full-time State police employees and State police killed 

(table 37) . 110 

Police employees in individual cities (tables 38 and 39) _ 111-130 

Offenses in individual areas 25,000 and over by population 

groups (table 40) 131-143 



JV 



Preface 

Crime is a social problem and a community responsibility which 
crosses all walks of life. Yet from time to time unfair pressures, 
often political in nature, are brought to bear on a police department 
which has exposed a local crime problem. This happens despite the 
fact that law enforcement efforts to control crime are basically lim- 
ited to effective preventive patrol and deterrence through successful 
investigation. Crime, like a disease, can only be treated after 
identification and full exposure. It cannot be erased by employing 
different and less repugnant terms for criminal acts, thus, in a sense, 
defining them out of existence. 

Law enforcement is a public service and as such imposes an obliga- 
tion on each executive head of a department to advise his community 
of crime conditions, whether favorable or unfavorable, and the extent 
and the effectiveness of the police operation. For the most part, this 
is done through the use of crime statistics, which we in law enforce- 
ment should look upon as a means to measure the "blood pressure" 
of the department. They will indicate weaknesses and strength, as 
well as suggest certain operational and administrative needs. The 
purpose of crime reporting then is dual; namely, public disclosure and 
internal appraisal. 

Law enforcement records are the basic source of crime data, and the 
police executive, because of his daily experience with crime incidents, 
is uniquely qualified to interpret crime counts. It is extremely 
important that the chief or sheriff in releasing these "numbers" also 
make available his knowledge of their meaning. This should include 
the wide range of circumstances involved in each crime classification, 
general facts about the types of persons who commit these crimes, 
assistance that can be rendered by local citizens in reducing the 
opportunity for crime, and particularly the limitations of the police 
prevention and deterrence efforts. 

Although the responsibility for reversing our crime trend is vested 
in the entire community, law enforcement fulfills its obligation by 
effectively carrying out its traditional role and by taking the leader- 
ship in directing community attention to specific crime problems, 
including public indifference. 



tf"T 



John Edgar Hoover, Director. 




VI 



Uniform ('rime Reports give a nationwide view of crime based on 
poliee statistics made possible by the voluntary cooperation of local 
law enforcement agencies. Since the factors which cause crime are 
many and vary from place to place, readers are cautioned againsl 
drawing conclusions from direct comparisons of crime figures between 
individual communities without first considering the factors involved. 
The national material summarized in this publication should be used, 
however, as a starting point to determine deviations of individual 
cities from the national averages. Crime is a social problem and the 
concern of the entire community. The law enforcement effort is 
limited to factors within its control. Some of the conditions which 
will affect the amount and type of crime that occurs from place to 
place are briefly outlined below: 

Density and size of the community population and the metro- 
politan area of which it is a part. 

Composition of the population with reference particularly to age, 
sex and race. 

Economic status and mores of the population. 

Relative stability of population, including commuters, seasonal, 
and other transient types. 

Climate, including seasonal weather conditions. 

Educational, recreational, and religious characteristics. 

Effective strength of the police force. 

Standards governing appointments to the police force. 

Policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

Attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

The administrative and investigative efficiency of the local law 
enforcement agency. 



VII 



Summary 

(This section is for the reader interested in the general crime picture. 
Technical data, of interest primarily to police, social scientists, and 
other students, are presented in the following sections. If you wish 
assistance in the interpretation of any information in this publication, 
please communicate with the Director, Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tion, U.S. Department of Justice, Washington 25, D.C.) 

Crime Capsule 

1,926,090 serious crimes reported in 1961 representing a 3 percent 
increase over the previous all-time high recorded in 1960. 

* * * 

Crime during past 5 years outstripped population growth 5 to 1. 
Crime clock ticked off four serious crimes per minute. 

* * * 

852,500 burglaries in 1961 up 4 percent. Average value of property 
stolen $187 per burglary. 

Forcible break-ins made in 70 percent of all burglaries while entry 
gained by open means in 21 percent. 

* * * 

Three males murdered for each female victim. Fifty-three percent 
of the murders committed by use of firearms. 

* * * 

Value of property stolen reached $591,815,000 but loss cut to 48 
cents on dollar by effective police recoveries. 

Police performance in solving the violent crimes of murder, aggra- 
vated assault, robbery and forcible rape up 7 percent over 1960. 

* * * 

Arrests for all criminal acts increased 1 percent with female arrests 
rising at a faster pace than male arrests. 

* * * 

Arrests of young people under 18 up 4 percent over previous year. 
Nearly half of the juvenile arrests handled by police without referral 

to juvenile court. 

* * * 

Arrests for white collar crimes of forgery, embezzlement, and fraud 

up 4 percent. 

* * * 

Over 8 police officers per 100 were assaulted during course of duty 
in 1961 and 71 law enforcement officers killed. 

Average number of police employees per 1,000 inhabitants was 1.9. 
No change over 1960. 



Crime Index Totals 

During the calendar year 1961 there were an estimated 1,926,090 
crimes of murder, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, 
larceny $50 and over, and auto theft in the United States. These 
crimes are counted by law enforcement agencies as they become 
known and are utilized as the index to criminality in the United 
States. The 1961 total was 3 percent above the peak reached in 
1960 or 63,410 more serious crimes than the previous year. 

Crimes against property — robbery, burglary, larceny $50 and over, 
and auto theft — which make up 92 percent of the index offenses in- 
creased 4 percent as a group. Crimes against the person — murder, 
forcible rape, and aggravated assault — as a group were up 1 percent. 

The upward trend in crime continued at a faster pace in the smaller 
cities under 25,000 population, metropolitan fringe counties and 
rural areas with increases of 6 to 8 percent. Geographically, the 
crime trend ranged from a 2 percent increase in the South to 6 percent 
in the Northeastern States. 





Estimated number of 
offenses 


Change 1961 


Crime index classification 


1958-60 
Average 


1961 


Oyer 3-year average 


Over 1960 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Total 


1, 688, 790 


1, 926, 090 


+237, 300 


+14 


+63, 410 


+3 






Murder.. . 


8,590 
15, 250 
81, 140 
122, 710 
733, 900 
428,800 
298, 400 


8,600 
16, 010 
91. 660 
133, 020 
852, 500 
498, 100 
320. 200 


+10 
+760 
+10. 520 
+10,310 
+118.600 
+69. 300 
+27, 800 




-370 

+20 

-1,060 

+2, 120 

+33, 800 

+21, 200 

+7, 700 


-4 


Forcible rape 


+5 
+13 

+8 
+16 
+16 

+9 




Robbery 


— 1 


Aggravated assault. ... ... 


+2 


Burglary... . 


+ 4 


Larcenv $50 and over . 


+4 


Auto theft. . 


+2 







As indicated in the above tabulation, murder was down 4 percent 
when compared with 1960, leveling off to the average for the 3-year 
period 1958 through 1960. Forcible rape showed no change over 
1960, and aggravated assault was up 2 percent. Burglaries and 
larcenies $50 and over rose 4 percent, while auto theft was up 2 
percent. 

Although robbery in 1961 was down 1 percent when compared to 
the peak reached in 1960, it was still 13 percent above the 1958- 
1960 3-year average. Similarly, forcible rape, with slightly more 
than 16,000 offenses reported in 1961, remained at the 1960 level 
but was 5 percent above the previous 3-year average. 



Crime and Population 

When measured in relation to the population increase of 2 percent, 
1961 over 1960, the crime rate was up 1 percent. During the past 
5 years our national population has increased 7 percent and crime 34 
percent showing a rate of growth of crime five times that of the popu- 
lation. Nearly two-thirds of our national population reside in 
large cities over 50,000 population and their surrounding metropolitan 
fringe. The crime rate in this metropolitan complex is three times 
higher than that of rural areas and twice that of the nonmetropol- 
itan cities. Crime rates are generally higher in the Western States 
which are also recording the sharpest population increases. For the 
United States as a whole, there were 1,053 serious offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants. 

Arrest data appearing in subsequent pages of this publication will 
indicate to some extent those who are committing these crimes by 
age, sex, and race. 





Crimes per 100,000 inhabitants 


Crime index classification 


Rate 1961 


1961 percent change 




Over 1960 


Over 3-year 
average 


Total 


1,052.8 


+ 1 


+10 






Murder 


4.7 

8.8 

50.1 

72.7 

466.0 

272.3 

178.3 


-6 
-1 
-3 


_o 


Forcible rape 


+2 


Robberv.- 


+9 


Aggravated assault 


+5 


Burglary 


+2 
+2 


+13 


Larceny $50 and over 

Auto theft 


+ 13 

+6 









As shown above, the 1961 crime rate for the United States as a 
whole was 10 percent above the average rate for the past 3 years, 
1958 through 1960. Examined by individual crime categories, only 
murder recorded a decrease in the crime rate when compared with 
the average for the past 3 years. Rates for burglary and larceny $50 
and over showed increases of 2 percent, 1961 over 1960. 

The following chart graphically portrays the extent of the crime 
increase in relation to the population change during the 5-year period, 
1957 through 1961, in the U.S. 



CRIME AND POPULATION 

1957-1961 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1957 



+40 



+ 30 



+ 20 



+ 10 









/" 






t 

/ 
/ 
/ 
/ 

# 1 
/ / 
/ / 
/ / 


r 




/" 


/ / 
/ / 
/ / 
/ / 
/ / 
/ / 
/ / 




/ 
/ 

/ / 
i/ 
i/ 
i/ 

/- 


S j 









i 



Crime 
up 34% 



i 



Crime Rate 
up 25% 



< 



Population 

up 7% 



1957 1958 1959 I960 1961 

CRIME = INDEX OF CRIME OFFENSES 

CRIME RATE = NUMBER OF OFFENSES PER 100,000 POPULATION 



FBI CHART 



Chart 1 



CRIME CLOCKS 



1961 





SERIOUS CRIMES 

4 EACH MINUTE 



MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE 
OR ASSAULT TO KILL 

ONE EVERY 3 MINUTES 




MURDER 

ONE EVERY HOUR 






FORCIBLE RAPE 

ONE EVERY 33 MINUTES 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

ONE EVERY 4 MINUTES 



ROBBERY 

ONE EVERY 6 MINUTES 




BURGLARY 

ONE EVERY 37 SECONDS 





LARCENY 
$50 and over) 

1 EACH MINUTE 



AUTO THEFT 

ONE EVERY 1 V2 MINUTES 



FBI CHART 



Chart 2 



Crime Calendar 



There are patterns in crime, and its frequency by type can be 
generally predicted during the course of the year. Monthly and 
seasonal variations in crime (chart 3) appear in this publication 
every year. The seasonal variation for different types of crimes 
varied very little in 1961 against the average experience for the prior 
5 years. There will be occasional exceptions by month from year to 
year. 

Forcible rape, aggravated assault and murder, commonly crimes 
of passion, had their greatest frequency during summer months 
reaching a peak in July, 1961. Murder again was substantially above 
the annual average in December, but for the first time in the last 6 
years December was not the high month for murder. Aggravated 



CRIMES 



KEY: 1956-1960 MOVING AVERAGE 

AGAINST THE PERSON 



+30% 


MURDER 


+ 20% 




+ 10% 
ANNUAL 


^L^* 


'"" >£>. 




AVERAGE 
-10% 

-20% 

-30% 




™»»»^^ 





JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



+30% 


NEGLIGENT 




yT^Vaf 


+20% 


MANSLAUGHTER 




/ / 

/ y 


ANNUAL 


u - — ""v / \ 


'■"i 


l-S 


AVERAGE 
-10% 

-20% 

-30% 




^ ./- / 




V' \i^*^^ 





JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



+30% 



+20% 




-30% 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



+30% 




Chart 3 



BY MONTH 



VARIATIONS FROM 1961 ANNUAL AVERAGE 

AGAINST PROPERTY 



+30% 

+20% 

+ 10% 
ANNUAL 


ROBBERY 






• 
t 


■"""t^^V 






/. 
M 


^N*. ^4 


AVERAGE 










-10% 
-20% 
-30% 




S jZ^~—~~^* 






^^-^, ^z^^*"" 





JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



+30% 




FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



*30% 



+20% 




-30% 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



30% 



+20% 




-30% 



FBI CHART 



Chart 3 



assault, however, which is often akin to murder except the victim does 
not die, was 4 percent higher in December, 1961, than the previous 
5-year average for that month. 

Property crimes — robbery, burglary, larceny, and auto theft — ran 
their usual course, high during the colder and darker months of the 
year which provide more opportunity for thieves, as well as place 
greater pressure on the economically marginal population. Robbery 
was at its peak in February, burglary in February, and auto theft 
in November. Larceny-theft, which year after year displays the 
most consistent monthly frequency during the year, had its high 
point in August. This is out of step with the other property crimes, 
but closer examination indicates that August over the years is a high 
month for larceny particularly due to bicycle thefts. Thefts of 
bicycles and pickpocket activity were up 9 percent in August, 1961, 
over August, 1960. 

When the above crimes, both against the person and property, were 
totaled by month, September, 1961, appeared the lowest month in 
volume and February, the highest. 

Crime Analysed 

Burglary is briefly defined in this Program as any unlawful breaking 
or entering to commit a theft or felony. Because of its volume and 
seriousness, it is one of the major crimes with which law enforcement 
must contend. During the calender year 1961, there were an esti- 
mated 852,500 burglaries, an increase of 4 percent over 1960. This 
crime makes up 44 percent of the total offenses in the Crime Index. 
The value of property stolen in the average burglary was $187, making 
a total dollar loss in property stolen $159,419,000. Not included in this 
loss is the destruction of property frequently resulting from burglaries, 
including damaged and destroyed safes which would add substantially 
to total losses. During the past 5 years burglaries have increased 
38 percent. The sheer volume of these offenses makes police pre- 
vention and detection of the perpetrators difficult since it would 
require police to be everywhere at once. During 1961 there was one 
burglary committed every 37 seconds. As pointed out earlier, 
burglaries occur most often during those months that provide longer 
periods of darkness. The months of January, February, March, 
and December, 1961, as a group, showed a daily burglary average 
12 percent above the rest of the year. 

About 40 percent of the burglaries involve thefts from residences, 
homes, apartments, motels and hotels, and nearly 60 percent of these 
were accomplished during the nighttime. Residence burglaries 
increased 5 percent during 1961. These residence burglaries begin 
with forcible entry in 58 percent of the cases, while in 32 percent some 

8 



Types of Structures 
Entered 



BURGLARY BY TYPE OF STRUCTURE 



RESIDENCE 

Anywhere on premiss 



RETAIL STORE 



16,072 



42.0% 



8,367 



21.9% 



WAREHOUSE OR PLANT £ ^l? 6.5% 

2^6.7% 
Jm 8.0% 



PUBLIC BUILDING 
(School, Libre- v «tc. 



GAS STATION, 
GARAGE, ETC. 



BUSINESS OR 
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE 



BANK 
(Savings and Loon, »»c 



OTHER 
Boxcar Private Clubs, 



3.291 j 8.6% 



(41) .1% 
feSl 6.2% 



TOTAL 



Fased or special Questionnaire lor month 
of OcloOtr 1961. received from 1,941 cities. 
total population 71.606.731 



Chart 4 



FBI CHART 



Chart 5 



BURGLARY BY PLACE OF 


ENTRY 




TYPES OP STRUCTURES PERCENT 


DOOR 


WINDOW 


ROOF 


OTHER 


RES.DENCE <«nn 
(Anywhere on premise) 1 UU.U 


61.4 


33.7 


.2 

i 


4.7 


— "- 1 " 

RETAIL STORE ] QQ Q 


49.2 


39.3 


4.6 


/.» 


WAREHOUSE 1 fifl f. 
OR PLANT 1 UU.U 


45.1 


41.7 


4.0 


9.2 


PUBLIC BUILDING 1 flfl fl 

(School, Library, etc.) | UU.U 


38.8 


52.9 


i - 9 


7.4 


GAS STATION, * pfl « 
GARAGE, ETC. | UU.U 


39.7 


53.6 


.9 


5.7 


business or mn n 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE I UU.U 


53.1 


37.6 


1.6 


7.7 


BANK 1flnn 
(Savings and Loan, etc.) | UU.U 


56.1 


34.1 


2.4 


7.3 


(Boxcar, Private Clubs, etc ) | UU.U 


60.6 


27.2 


1.6 


11.2 


TOTAL BURGLARIES 100,0 


53.6 


38.3 


! « 


6.4 


DUE TC 


ROUNDING MAY NC 


T ADD TO 100 PERCENT 





641799°— 62 2 



FBI CHART 

9 



Types of Structures 
Entered 


BURGLARY BY MEANS OF ENTRY 

(PERCENT) 


RESIDENCE 
Anywnor* on pramisoi 

RETAIL STORE 
WAREHOUSE OR PLANT 

(HJBUC BUILDING 
1 School, Library, ore.) 

GAS STATION, 
GARAGE, ETC. 

BUSINESS OR 
PROFESSIONAL OFFICE 

BANK 
Savings and Loan, ate.) 

OTHER 

Boxcar, Private Clubs, ore.) 

TOTAL 




58.3 32.4 Efl 




83.5 | 10.1 Efl 




77.5 14.2 HI 




67.7 21.6 JTif-J 




82.7 | 10.4 Ql 




76.1 13.8 Mil 




82.9 9.8 HJ 




72.2 16.9 H39 




70.0 213 EH 






KEY:P 




FORCE OPEN UNKNOWN 

Due to rounding may not add to 100 percent . 



FBI CHART 



Chart 6 



means of access was left open to the burglar. Sixty-one percent of 
these home burglaries were through a door, while 34 percent were 
through a window. About half the property stolen in residence burgla- 
ries involved personal property. Twenty-nine percent was cash, and 
14 percent was jewelry. Although there was no substantial variation 
in the day of the week when burglaries of residences occur, the week- 
ends are high and Wednesday and Thursday the low period (table 16). 

Attacks against nonresidence structures make up about 60 percent 
of all burglaries. Of these, 38 percent were directed at retail stores, 
84 percent of which were forcible entries. Other types of structures 
burglarized in this general category of nonresident, were private 
businesses and professional offices 15 percent, gasoline or service 
stations 14, public buildings 12, warehouses 11 and others (such as 
private clubs, boxcars, etc.) 11 percent. Bank burglaries were less 
than 1 percent of the total. 

On the whole, forcible entry was used in 70 percent of all burglaries, 
21 percent of the structures provided some open means and in 9 
percent the means of entry was unknown. Safes were attacked in 
2.5 percent of all burglaries. Percentage-wise, safe burglaries 
occurred more frequently in the smaller cities with 25,000 or less 
population. Residence burglaries were a greater part of the total in 
the big cities. Property stolen in burglaries was 38 percent cash, 30 

10 



BURGLARY BY DAY OF WEEK 



17% 



15% 



13% 13% 

11% 11% 



14% 



6% 



SUN. WON. MS. WED. THURS. FRI. SAT. UNK. 



FBI CHART 



Chart 7 



percent personal property, 25 percent merchandise, with jewelry 
making up 7 percent. 

There is no way of measuring the number of burglaries that are 
deterred through effective police investigation and preventive patrol. 
Police patrols are based for the most part on the incidence of burglary 
and other crimes as to when and where they happen. This is limited 
severely, however, by demands for other types of police service and 
the manpower and equipment available. The police effort could be 
assisted greatly by citizens affording better security to their own 
property, by being alert to the carelessness of others and by fully 
cooperating with police. 

The accompanying charts on burglary are based on a 1 -month 
survey, October, 1961, using figures submitted by 1,941 city police 
departments throughout the United States. 

All larceny-theft increased 4 percent in 1961. The ratio of larceny 
under $50 in value to larceny $50 and over is about 3 to 1. It should 
be noted that many thefts, particularly those of small value, are not 
reported to the police. All larceny-thefts without regard to value of 
the property stolen were approximately 1,863,740 in 1961 for an aver- 
age loss of $74 per theft or a total loss approximating $137,917,000. 



11 



Larceny by type as reported by city police is shown in table 13. 
Shoplifting was up 11 percent in 1961 followed by purse-snatching 
7 percent and thefts from autos 5 percent. Again, in many of the 
latter thefts which made up 19 percent of all larcenies, more care by 
the owners in locking vehicles and keeping valuables from view would 
assist police in reducing this type of crime. 

Rates indicate that robbery is primarily a big city crime, occurring 
more frequently in the larger cities. There were an estimated 91,660 
robberies in 1961, a decrease of 1 percent compared with 1960. The 
big cities reported a reduction in the high volume reached in 1960; 
however, cities under 100,000 and metropolitan counties generally 
showed increases from 2 to 6 percent. 

Street robberies, which made up almost half of all robberies, had 
less than a 1 percent increase in the cities. Commercial house and 
chain store robberies had the most significant decreases of 4 and 9 
percent, respectively. The value of property stolen in the average 
robbery was $266 resulting in a total loss of $24,381,000. Again, 
this loss does not take into consideration injury or death of the victim 
which frequently accompanies this vicious crime. 

Total value of property stolen in robberies, burglaries, larcenies, 
and auto thefts was $591,815,000 in 1961. On the average, law en- 
forcement agencies recovered 52 percent of the property stolen. 

Crimes of passion, particularly aggravated assault and murder, are 
less subject to police prevention efforts than property crimes. These 
are primarily the result of human and social problems occurring spon- 
taneously within the family or among acquaintances out of reach of 
preventive patrol. As indicated in last year's publication, 65 percent 
of the aggravated assaults were committed by members of the vic- 
tim's family or acquaintances and neighbors. 

Last year a Supplementary Homicide Report was introduced into 
this Program to collect more detail on this important crime classifi- 
cation. A partial collection, mostly from cities, on 3,008 murders is 
available for 1961. Data on the age, sex, and race of the murder 
victims and the type of weapons used is shown in tables 17 and 18. 
Arrests for murder by age, sex, and race appear on subsequent pages 
of this publication. 

Sonic indication of the motives and circumstances surrounding 
these murders is possible through this preliminary collection. Twenty- 
seven percent of the 3,008 killings occurred within the family, the 
large majority being spouse killing spouse. Altercations outside of 
the family, involving money, property, lovers quarrels, drunken fights, 
etc., made up over half of the total. Of these 3,008 willful killings 
there were 30, or 1 percent, juvenile gang slayings. Significantly, 
about 10 percent of the murders involved felons killing police officers 

12 



or private citizens. Male murder victims out numbered females 
about 3 to 1. 

The similarity of weapons used in murder and aggravated assault 
is shown in the following tables. 







Murder 




Gun 


Knife 

or other 

cutting 

instrument 


Blunt 
object 
(club, ham- 
mer, etc.) 


Personal 

weapons 
(strangula- 
tions and 

beatings) 


Poison 


Explosives 


Other 


Total 


3,008 

100.0 


1,578 
52.5 


725 
24.1 


198 
6.6 


336 
11.2 


9 
0.3 


o.i 


160 
5.3 










Aggravated assault 




Shooting 


Cutting or 
stabbing 


Blunt 
object as 
weapon 


Personal 

weapons 

(hands, 

fists, feet, 

etc.) 


Poisoning 

or use of 

acid 


Explosives 


Other 


Total 


7.34S 

100.0 


931 
12.7 


3,230 
44.0 


1,760 
24.0 


906 
12.3 


90 
1.2 


9 

0) 


429 

5.8 







i Less than Ho of 1 percent. 

Crime and Police Effectiveness 

One measure of police effectiveness in meeting the crime problem is 
the clearing of offenses by arrest of the offenders. To what extent 
these persons are later prosecuted is largely out of the hands of the 
police. Police clearances of the more vicious crimes against the 
person are high. Property offenses because of their great volume, 
lack of witnesses, and in some instances their minor nature, show 
lower clearance rates as a group (chart 8). Police success in solving 
crimes, again, will depend to a large extent upon the alertness, coopera- 
ti ven ess, and general assistance rendered to the police by citizens. 

During 1961, police effectiveness in clearing crimes increased 2 
percent. Specifically, increases were shown in murder, manslaughter, 
robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft. Rob- 
bery clearances were up 8 percent in 1961 over 1960. Law enforce- 
ment success in this crime category must be considered a factor in 
over-all reduction in the number of robbery offenses for the year. 

All city police departments, when grouped by population size, and 
county law enforcement agencies showed increases in crime clearance 
totals over the previous year (tables 8 and 9). 

Persons Arrested 

Law enforcement arrests are collected for all criminal acts by age, 
sex, and race. During 1961, total arrests increased 1 percent. There 

13 



CRIMES CLEARED BY ARREST 

1961 



AGAINST THE PERSON 



CLEARED 



93.1% 



MURDER 



of NEGLIGENT 

/o MANSLAUGHTER 



72.6% 



FORCIBLE 
RAPE 



10 1°/ AGGRAVATED 
10. l/o ASSAULT 



NOT CLEARED 



AGAINST PROPERTY 



CLEAREC 


) 






NOT CLEARED 




41.6% 


ROBBERY 


















30.0% 








BURGLARY 
















20.8% 


LARCENY 














27.8% 


AUTO THEFT 

















FBI CHART 



Chart 8 



n 



were about 4 arrests for all types of criminal acts for each 100 Ameri- 
cans. Adult male arrests outnumbered adult females better than 9 
to 1. Police arrests of females continued to increase faster than male 
arrests in 1961. The arrest rate in the cities was 3 times that reported 
by metropolitan and rural county agencies. 

Chart 9 graphically portrays the trend in police arrests from 1957 
to 1961 for the crimes of murder, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated 
assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft. From 1957 through 1961, 
adult arrests for these crimes increased 23 percent, persons under 18 
years of age 21 percent and the total 22 percent. 

Arrests of young people under 18 increased 4 percent in 1961 over 
1960. This includes a 5 percent jump in the cities, 4 percent in 
metropolitan counties and a 3 percent rise in the rural areas. Young 
male arrests outnumbered young female arrests better than 6 to 1, but 
again arrests of girls continued to increase faster in 1961 than young 
male arrests, with a rise of 7 percent. 

Youthful criminality is a major police problem. This young group 
under 18 years of age made up almost 15 percent of all police arrests 
for criminal acts in both the city and rural areas. As a group, persons 
under 18 years of age represent 43 percent of all arrests for the more 
serious offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, 



ARREST TRENDS 

1957 - 1961 

LIMITED TO MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE, ROBBERY, AGGRAVATED 
ASSAULT, BURGLARY, ALL LARCENY, AND AUTO THEFT 



+ 30 



+20 



+ 10 






1957 



1958 



1959 



I960 



1961 



KEY: TOTAL ARRESTS UP 22% OVER 1957 

AGE UNDER 18 UP 21% OVER 1957 
AGE 18 AND OVER UP 23% OVER 1957 



FBI CHART 



Chart 9 



15 



PERCENTAGE OF ARRESTS BY AGE GROUP, 
FOR ALL CRIMINAL ACTS 

1961 



31.5% 




50 and 
over 



23.3% 



Due to rounding may not add to 100 percent. 



KEY: 




PERCENTAGE OF ALL ARRESTS (TRAFFIC & SUSPICION EXClUOeO) 

PERCENTAGE OF U S. POPULATION 

(POPULATION DATA - BUREAU OF CENSUS, 7-1-61) 



FBI CHART 



Chart 10 



16 



burglary, larceny, and auto theft. When examined by offense, they 
were involved in 59 percent of the auto theft arrests, 47 percent of the 
burglaries, 48 percent of the larcenies, 22 percent of the robberies, 17 
percent of the forcible rapes, 12 percent of the aggravated assaults, 
and 8 percent of the murders. 

Chart 10 shows the percentage representation in the population and 
the percentage representation in arrests for all criminal acts by age 
group for the year 1961. Further details concerning arrests by 
specific offense and by age, sex, and race of the offender are available 
in tabulations beginning on page 92. 

Persons Charged 

Not all persons arrested by police are later formally charged; i.e., 
turned over to the courts for prosecution. There are a number of 
reasons for this; namely, the victim refuses to cooperate in the prose- 
cution, police determine the person arrested did not commit the 
alleged offense, police release arrested person with a warning, police 
are unable to establish sufficient evidence for a formal charge, etc. 
Tabulations beginning on page 86 indicate court dispositions of 
persons formally charged by police, as well as the percentage of young 
persons (local age limit) referred to juvenile court jurisdiction for 
specific criminal acts. It should be kept in mind in using these 
statistics that police handling of juvenile offenders differs widely. 
Table 32 indicates that police refer 49 percent of the juveniles arrested 
to juvenile court. The remainder are released by police with a warning 
or handled directly with parents or private and public welfare agencies. 
Young offenders are referred by police to the juvenile court primarily 
for property crimes; namely, auto theft, burglary, larceny, receiving 
and possessing stolen property, and robbery. However, based on all 
persons formally charged by police, the juvenile age group makes up 
14 percent of the forcible rape cases, 15 percent of the other sex 
offenses, and 14 percent of the liquor law violations. (For the pur- 
poses of this Program a juvenile is considered formally charged when 
referred to juvenile court or criminal court.) 

For adult offenders who are formally charged, acquittals and dis- 
missals run high in manslaughter (mostly traffic deaths), 35 percent 
and aggravated assault, 33 percent. Driving while intoxicated had 
a guilty rate of 83 percent. The wide use by police of laboratory 
aids in handling this type of violation must be considered a major 
factor in this conviction success. For all criminal acts (excluding 
traffic offenses), 79 percent of those persons formally charged were 
found guilty in court or turned over to juvenile court. 

Chart 11 attempts to demonstrate the experience of law enforcement 
in dealing with certain violent crimes as reported by 1,439 cities for 

17 



CRIME AND PUNISHMENT 

(LIMITED TO VIOLENT CRIMES OF MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE, ROBBERY, 
AND AGGRAVATED ASSAULT AS REPORTED BY 1,439 CITIES, 1961 



47,958 




CRIMES CRIMES NUMBER TOTAL ADULTS REFERRED ACQUITTED 

KNOWN SOLVED OF PERSONS GUILTY TO OR 

ARRESTS CHARGED JUVENILE DISMISSED 

COURT 



SEE TEXT 



FBI CHART 



Chart U 



18 



the year 1961. Crimes known to the police arc (hose reported and 
found to have happened based on the police investigation. Crimes 
solved are generally those cleared by police through the arrest of the 
offender, and also some others cleared by exceptional means such as 
murder followed by suicide. Crimes solved or cleared in 1901 which 
occurred in 1960 are included. r l nis is a carry-over from year to yeai 
and generally will balance itself; i.e., crimes committed in current year 
and cleared in subsequent year. The ratio of arrests to crimes cleared 
will not be one to one since the arrest of one person may clear several 
crimes or several persons may be arrested for one crime. 

As pointed out above, not all persons arrested will later be formally 
charged and turned over for prosecution. Adults guilty will include 
a small number of juveniles who were tried as adults in criminal court. 
As just explained, the disposition of persons charged includes some 
carry-over from the previous year. The remaining 15.7 percent (not 
shown in chart) are pending cases or persons tried in another juris- 
diction for another offense in lieu of the original charge. 
Police Employee Data 

Data is presented herein showing average police strength in cities, 
by geographic division and population group. It must be remembered 
that these are averages and the figures must not be interpreted as 
recommended or desirable police strength. Effective police work in a 



POLICE KILLED BY FELONS 

BY TYPE OF POLICE ACTIVITY 
1960 AND 1961 



RESPONDING TO DISTURBANCE" CALLS - fi ! *)£<£ 



Fomily quarrels, man with gun, etc.' 



INVESTIGATING BURGLARIES 
IN PROGRESS 



10 15% 



ROBBERIES IN PROGRESS, OR 
PURSUING ROBBERY SUSPECTS 


14 


| 22% 




ATTEMPTING OTHER ARRESTS 
AND TRANSPORTING PRISONERS 


15 


|. 



23% 



INVESTIGATING SUSPICIOUS 
PERSONS AND CIRCUMSTANCES 



8 I 12V 



65 POLICE KILLED 

INCLUDES CITY, COUNTY, AND STATE POLICE 



FBI CHART 
Chart 12 

19 



particular community or area will depend on many factors, only one 
of which is the number of police employees. 

The number of police employees per 1,000 population, as shown in 
table 33, discloses the wide variations which exist in similar communi- 
ties and will provide additional data for those desiring to make certain 
comparisons. 

The hazards of the police profession were again brought sharply into 
focus in 1961 when city police, sheriffs, county and State police 
reported a total of 71 law enforcement employees killed in the line of 
duty. Thirty-seven officers were victims of direct attacks by criminals 
with 35 of these officers dying from gunfire. Accidents took the lives 
of 34 officers. Fifty-two city police were killed in 1961, an increase of 
four over the prior year. During 1960 and 1961, a total of 65 police 
were killed by felons. (Chart 12) 

The chart following, which also combines police deaths in 1960 and 
1961, discloses more police were killed while working the watch from 
4 p.m. to midnight than during either of the other standard watches. 
Since normally more police are assigned to work this watch, it is a 
period of high exposure and would, therefore, be expected to have a 
higher incidence of police deaths. In 1961, the greatest number of 
fatalities occurred in the month of June when six officers were killed 
by^ criminals and five were accident victims. In March, seven men 
were killed by gunfire, the highest number of violent deaths for any 
one month during the year. Fewer police were killed in January than 
in any other month, when three officers died, all the victims of felons' 
guns. 

An analysis of police officers assaulted in line of duty is presented 
again this year showing the continuing pattern of vicious attacks 
against law enforcement officers who daily risk their lives to protect 
the life and property of the citizens of their communities. Table 36 
shows the breakdown of police assaulted by geographic division and 
population group. Of every 100 city police officers, 8 were assaulted 
during 1961. 

In 1961 as in 1960, the highest rate of assaults on police occurred in 
the Southern States. The big cities with over 250,000 inhabitants had 
the highest rate on a population breakdown. Cities with the lowest 
assault rates were in the Northern States and in the cities containing 
25,000 to 50,000 population. 

Out of more than 13,000 assaults on police, over half resulted in 
some injury to the victim. These statistics do not, of course, disclose 
the seriousness of injuries sustained, but it should be recognized that 
many of these assaults were of such a nature that the victim was 
disabled or missed death by a very narrow margin. 



20 



POLICE KILLED 

DURING STANDARD POLICE WATCHES 
1960 AND 1961 



MIDNIGHT 



MIDNIGHT 




8 am 




AM 



INCLUDES CITY, COUNTY, AND STATE POLICE 



FBI CHART 



Chart 13 



As crime continues its upward climb, the demands on police increase, 
yet the number of full-time police employees to handle the job remains 
relatively constant. In 1961, city police departments employed an 
average of 1.9 persons per 1,000 inhabitants (including civilian em- 
ployees). Rapidly expanding cities, both in area and population, 
require spreading even thinner the inadequate manpower now avail- 
able to scores of law enforcement agencies. Sheriffs' departments 
with limited budgets find it increasingly difficult to maintain adequate 
enforcement, and clerical staffs. Statistics show the wide range of 
police strength in cities of comparable population size and suggest 
the necessity of constantly evaluating local police needs. 

Citizens of each community have a duty and responsibility to 
inquire into the adequacy of police personnel, budgets, training, 
salaries and, in fact, all phases of police operations, to insure this 
important branch of their government has the manpower, money, 
equipment, and training required to do the most effective job. An 
alert, cooperative citizenry can go a long way toward assisting the 
law enforcement profession in its drive to prevent crime and detect 
offenders. 



21 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF POLICE DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES, AND 
RANGE IN NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, PER 1,000 INHABITANTS 

BY POPULATION GROUPS, DECEMBER 31, 1961 



AV. 
1.9 



ALL 
CITIES 



4.3 



4.4 



AV. 

2.6 
••••• 



1.1 



2.7 



AV. 
1.7 



*»••»««( 



1.1 



0.5 



10. 



4.7 



3.4 



av,; AV . 

16 I !.5 



0.3 



AV. 



U 



AV. 
1.4 



1.2 



CITIES CITIES 

OVER 100,000 

250,000 TO 

250,000 



CITIES 
50,000 

TO 
100,000 



CITIES 
25,000 

TO 
50,000 



CITIES 
10,000 

TO 
25,000 



CITIES 
LESS 
THAN 

10,000 



FBI CHART 



Chart 14 



22 




Earn Ettfnramwt (£obt of iEtljtrB 

As a IGaw infarct vat nt ©fftr*r, my fundamentally u u 

serve mankind; to Safeguard lives ana property: to protect the innocent against 
deception, the wean against oppression or intimidation, and the peaceful 
against violence or disorder', and to respect tne (constitutional rights of all 
men to liberty, equality and justice. 

It tUtil keep my private life unsullied as an example to all; maintain coura- 
geous calm in the face of danger, S.corn, or ridicule; develop Self-restraint; and 
he constantly mindful of the welfare of others. ^J4onest in thought and deed 
in both mu personal and official life, «^V will he exemplary in oheging the laws 
of the land and the regulations of mu department. Whatever ^r see or hear of 
a confidential nature or that is confided to me in mu official capacity will be 
hept ever Secret unless revelation h necessary in the performance of mg dutg. 

1 ltnll never act officiously or permit personal feelings, prejudices, animos- 
ities or friendships to influence mg decisions. With no compromise for crime 
and with relentless prosecution of criminals, ^7 will enforce the law courteously 
and appropriately without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never employing 
try force or violence and never accepting gratuities. 



unneceSSaru force or viol 



It r£f00UXZ£ the badge of my office as a symbol of public faith, and 
^r accept it as a public trust to he held So long as ^7 am true to the ethics of 
the police Service. *J will constantly strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, 
dedicating myself before \jod to my chosen profession . . . law enforcement. 

Inwrnauon.l >..oci«i,on of Ch.*f. of Pollc*. Inc. 

23 



Introduction 

Background 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program is the outgrowth of a need 
for a national and uniform compilation of police statistics. This 
need was expressed by law enforcement executives many years ago. 
In 1930, crime reports were solicited from police departments through- 
out the Nation based on uniform classifications and procedures 
developed by the Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP). In that year 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), on request of the above 
organization, assumed the role as the national clearinghouse. 

The Committee on Uniform Crime Records, IACP, continues to 
serve in an advisory capacity to the FBI in the operation of this 
program. The assistance of the Committee is especially valuable in 
actively promoting the quality of the reports supplied by the cooperat- 
ing law enforcement agencies. In this connection, the Field Service 
Division of the IACP is also playing an active and effective part in 
quality control through surveys of police record and crime reporting 
systems. Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Professor, Department of Sociology, 
University of Maryland, continues as a consultant to the FBI in the 
conduct of this program. 

A resolution was adopted at the IACP convention in October, 1961, 
calling for the formation of Uniform Crime Reporting Committees 
within State law enforcement associations. The purpose of these 
Committees is to promote greater interest in Uniform Crime Report- 
ing, to foster more widespread administrative use of uniform crime 
statistics, to encourage new contributors to the program and to 
lend assistance to current contributors when the need exists. As of 
June 1, 1962, 55 Uniform Crime Reporting Committees had been 
formed in 41 States. 

Objectives 

The primary objective is to produce a reliable program of nation- 
wide criminal statistics for administrative and operational use of law 
enforcement agencies, and in so doing provide meaningful data for 
other professionals with related interests in the crime problem, for 
scholars and also to inform the average citizen of general crime 
conditions. 

24 



Specifically, the means utilized to attain these goals are: (1) 
Through a crime index consisting of seven selected offenses, an attempt 
is made to measure the extent, fluctuation, and distribution of serious 
crime in the United States. This count is based on these seven 
offenses being reported to the police or coming directly to their 
attention. (2) The total volume of all types of criminal offenses is 
compiled as they become known by police arrests. (3) Since the 
above are also measures of law enforcement activity, related data is 
collected to demonstrate effectiveness of enforcement activities, 
available police strength, and significant factors involved in crime. 

Reporting Procedure 

Under this national voluntary system each contributing law 
enforcement agency is wholly responsible for compiling its own 
crime reports for submission to the FBI. Each contributor is supplied 
with the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook which outlines in 
detail procedures for scoring and classifying offenses. The Handbook 
illustrates and discusses the monthly and annual reporting forms, 
as well as the numerous tally sheets made available to facilitate the 
periodic tabulation of the desired data. 

Recognizing that a sound records system is necessary if crime 
reporting is to meet desirable standards, the FBI furnishes a Manual 
of Police Records to law enforcement agencies upon request. Special 
Agents of the FBI are widely utilized to encourage new contributors 
and to assist them by explaining the procedures and definitions 
necessary under this uniform system. 

On a monthly basis, city police, sheriffs, and State police report 
the number of offenses that become known to them in the following- 
crime categories: criminal homicide, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated 
assault, burglary, larceny, and auto theft. This count is taken from 
a record of all complaints of crimes received by the police from victims 
or other sources or discovered by the police in their own operations. 
Complaints determined by police investigation to be unfounded are 
eliminated from this count. The number of "offenses known" in 
these crime categories is reported to the FBI without regard to whether 
anyone is arrested, stolen property is recovered, local prosecutive 
policy, or any other consideration. Police agencies report on a 
monthly basis the number of these crimes which they clear by arrest 
and certain other analytical data pertaining to specific crime 
categories. 

In annual reports, "offenses known" data and clearances by arrest 
are summarized by the contributors. Annual forms provide a report 
of persons arrested for all criminal offenses with respect to age, sex, 
and race of the offender as well as an accounting of the number of 

641799°— 62 3 25 



persons formally charged and their disposition. Police employee 
data is collected annually, including the number of police killed and 
assaulted. 

Reporting Area 

During the calendar year 1961 crime reports were received from 
7,800 law enforcement agencies representing 96 percent of the total 
United States population. 

Presentation of crime data by areas as used in this publication 
follows as closely as practical the definitions used by Bureaus of the 
Budget and Census; namely, standard metropolitan statistical areas, 
other cities and rural areas. Standard metropolitan statistical areas 
are generally made up of an entire county or counties having at 
least one core city of 50,000 or more inhabitants with the whole 
meeting the requirements of certain metropolitan characteristics. 
In New England "town" instead of "county" is used to describe 
standard metropolitan statistical areas. These towns do not coincide 
generally with established crime reporting units; therefore, metro- 
politan State economic areas in New England are used in this area 
tabulation since they encompass an entire county or counties. 
Standard metropolitan statistical areas make up 63 percent of the 
total United States population as reported by the Bureau of the 
Census in the 1960 decennial count. 

Other cities are urban places outside standard metropolitan statis- 
tical areas. Most of these places of 2,500 or more inhabitants are 
incorporated and comprise 13 percent of the 1960 population. Rural 
areas are made up of the unincorporated portion of counties outside 
of urban places and standard metropolitan statistical areas and 
represent 24 percent of our national population. Throughout this 
program, sheriffs, county police and many State police report on 
crimes committed within the limits of the county but outside cities, 
while police report on crimes committed within the city limits (urban 
places). 

Verification Processes 

Uniformity of crime data collected under this program is of primary 
concern to the FBI as the national clearinghouse. With approxi- 
mately 7,800 agencies preparing crime reports on a voluntary basis, 
the problems of attaining uniformity are readily apparent. Issuance 
of instructions does not complete the role of the FBI. On the con- 
trary, it is standard operating procedure to examine each incoming 
report not only for arithmetical accuracy but also, and possibly of 
even more importance, for reasonableness as a possible indication of 
errors. 

•26 



Variations in the level and ratios among the crime classes established 
by previous reports of each agency are used as a gauge of possible or 
probable incompleteness or changes in reporting policy. Necessary 
arithmetical adjustments or unusual variations are brought to the 
attention of the submitting agency by correspondence. During 1961 , 
12,443 letters were addressed to contributors primarily as a result of 
verification and evaluation processes. Correspondence with contribu- 
tors is the principal tool for supervision of quality. Not only are the 
individual reports studied, but also periodic trends for individual 
reporting units are run, as are crime rates in descending order for all 
units grouped for general comparability to assist in detecting varia- 
tions and fluctuations possibly due to some reason other than chance. 
For the most part, the problem is one of keeping the contributors 
informed of the type information necessary to the success of this 
program. 

The elimination of duplication of crime reporting by the various 
agencies is given constant attention. In addition to detailed instruc- 
tions as to the limits of reporting jurisdictions between sheriffs and 
police in urban places, lists of urban places by county are furnished to 
sheriffs, county police, and in some instances State police organiza- 
tions. 

Uniform Crime Reporting has been taught to all law enforcement 
officers attending the FBI National Academy. This Academy was 
established in 1935, and there are 2,674 graduates who are still in law 
enforcement, almost 28 percent of whom are the executive heads of law 
enforcement agencies. The FBI also presents this subject to regional 
police schools throughout the country. 

Contacts by Special Agents of the FBI are utilized to enlist the 
cooperation of new contributors and to explain the purpose of this 
program and the methods of assembling information for reporting. 
When correspondence, including specially designed questionnaires, 
fails, Special Agents may be directed to visit the contributor to 
affirmatively resolve the misunderstanding. During the calendar 
year 1961 there were almost 5,000 personal contacts with contributors 
by Special Agent personnel of the FBI. Special surveys are used to 
inquire into various areas of the system. 

Variations from the desired reporting standards which cannot be 
resolved by the steps indicated above are brought to the attention of 
the Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the IACP. The Com- 
mittee may designate a representative to make a personal visit to the 
local department to assist in the needed revision of records and 
reporting methods. 

It is clear, of course, that regardless of the extent of the statistical 
verification processes used by the FBI, the accuracy of the data as- 

27 



sembled under this program depends upon the degree of sincere effort 
exerted by each contributor to meet the necessary standards of 
reporting, and, for this resaon, the FBI is not in a position to vouch 
for the validity of the reports received. 

The Crime Totals 

Communities not represented by crime reports are relatively few, 
as discussed previously and as shown by an examination of the 
tables which follow presenting 1961 crime totals for the Index of 
Crime classifications. The FBI conducts a continuing program to 
further reduce the unreported areas. 

Within each of the three areas — standard metropolitan statistical, 
other urban, and rural — it is assumed that the unreported portion 
had the same proportionate crime experience as that for which re- 
ports were received. In lieu of figures for the entire year from those 
agencies representing at least 25 percent of any one of the individual 
units of the three areas indicated above for which estimates were 
prepared, reports for as many as 9 months were accepted as sufficiently 
representative on which to base estimates for the year. Estimates 
for unreported areas are based on the reported crime experience of 
similar areas within each State. Certain refinements are made of 
this basic estimating procedure as the need arises. 

Crime Trends 

Crime data for trends are homogeneous to the extent that figures 
from identical reporting units are used for each of the periods tabu- 
lated. Exclusions are made when figures from a reporting unit are 
obviously inaccurate for any period or when it is ascertained that 
unusual fluctuations are due to such variables as improved record 
procedures and not to chance. 

As a matter of standard procedure, crime trends for individual 
places are analyzed by the FBI five times a year. Any significant 
increase or decrease is made the subject of a special inquiry with 
the contributing agency. Whenever it is found that crime reporting 
procedures are responsible for the difference in level of crime, the 
figures for specific crime categories or totals are excluded from the 
trend tabulations. 

Pop ulat ion Da ta 

In computing crime rales by State, geographic division, and the 
Nation as a whole, population estimates released by tin' Bureau of the 
Census December 13, 1961, were used. Since estimated population 
was not available for most individual places, cities and counties, 1960 

28 



census figures were utilized in preparing such tabulations. The 
United States population increased 2.1 percent 1961 over 1960. 

Crime estimates for individual unreported units were based on the 
1960 census population. This was discussed with the Bureau of 
the Census, and it was agreed this was the most practical approach 
since differences would be negligible. Population estimates for 
individual places will be resumed for the 1962 annual report. 

Classification of Offenses 

A stumbling block to a uniform national crime reporting system 
in the United States results from variations in definitions of criminal 
violations among the States. This obstacle, insofar as uniformity of 
definitions is concerned, was removed by the adoption of an arbitrary 
set of crime classifications. To some extent the title of each classifica- 
tion connotes in a general way its content. However, in reading the 
explanation of each category it is very important to keep in mind that 
because of the differences among the State codes there is no possibility 
in a system such as this to distinguish between crimes by designations 
such as "felony" and "misdemeanor." 

A continuing program is carried out to furnish contributors with 
timely supplemental instructions as the need arises in certain classifica- 
tions. These are aimed at the clarification of any misunderstandings 
which may arise and the redirection of attention to the proper 
application of classification procedures under this system. 

Brief definitions of crime classifications utilized in this program are 
listed below: 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaugh- 
ter: all willful felonious homicides as distinguished from deaths caused 
by negligence. Excludes attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, 
accidental deaths, or justifiable homicides. Justifiable homicides are 
limited to: (1) the killing of a felon by a peace officer in line of duty; 
(2) the killing of a holdup man by a private citizen, (b) Manslaugh- 
ter by negligence: any death which the police investigation establishes 
was primarily attributable to gross negligence of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Forcible rape. — Rape by force, assault to rape and attempted 
rape. Excludes statutory offenses (no force used — victim under age 
of consent). 

3. Robbery. — Stealing or taking anything of value from the person 
by force or violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, 
stickups, armed robbery, assault to rob, and attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Assault with intent to kill or for the pur- 
pose of inflicting severe bodily injury by shooting, cutting, stabbing, 
maiming, poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids, explosives, or 

29 



other means. Excludes simple assault, assault and battery, fighting, 
etc. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering.- — Burglary, housebreaking, 
safecracking, or any unlawful entry to commit a felony or a theft, 
even though no force was used to gain entrance and attempts. 
Burglary followed by larceny is not counted again as larceny. 

6. Larceny-theft (except auto theft) — (a) Fifty dollars and over 
in value; (b) under $50 in value. Thefts of bicycles, automobile ac- 
cessories, shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or 
article of value which is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. 
Excludes embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Stealing or driving away and abandoning a motor 
vehicle. Excludes taking for temporary use when actually returned 
by the taker or unauthorized use by those having lawful access to the 
vehicle. 

8. Other assaults. — Assaults and attempted assaults which are not 
of an aggravated nature. 

9. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Making, altering, uttering or 
possessing, with intent to defraud, anything false which is made to 
appear true. Includes attempts. 

10. Embezzlement and fraud. — Fraudulent conversion, embezzle- 
ment, and obtaining money or property by false pretenses. 

11. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — Buying, re- 
ceiving, and possessing stolen property and attempts. 

12. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — All violations of regu- 
lations or statutes controlling the carrying, using, possessing, fur- 
nishing, and manufacturing of deadly weapons or silencers and 
attempts. 

13. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Sex offenses of a 
commercialized nature and attempts, such as prostitution, keeping 
bawdy house, procuring, transporting, or detaining women for 
immoral purposes. 

14. Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitution, and commer- 
cialized vice). — Statutory rape, offenses against chastity, common 
decency, morals, and the like. Includes attempts. 

15. Offenses against the family and children. — Nonsupport, neg- 
lect, desertion, or abuse of family and children. 

16. Narcotic drug laws. — Offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such 
as unlawful possession, sale, or use. Excludes Federal offenses. 

17. Liquor laws. — State or local liquor law violations except 
"drunkenness" (class 18) and "driving while intoxicated" (class 22). 
Excludes Federal violations. 

18. Drunkenness. — Drunkenness or intoxication. 

19. Disorderly conduct. — Breach of the peace. 

30 



20. Vagrancy. — Vagabondage, begging, loitering, etc. 

21. Gambling. — Promoting, permitting, or engaging in gambling. 

22. Driving while intoxicated. — Driving or operating any motor 
vehicle while drunk or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

23. Violation of road and driving laws. — Improper handling of a 
moving motor vehicle. 

24. Parking violations. — Improper or overtime parking. 

25. Other violations of traffic and motor vehicle laws. — Traffic 
and motor vehicle violations other than classes 22-24. 

26. All other offenses. — All violations of State or local laws except 
classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — Arrests for no specific offense and released without 
formal charges being placed. 



31 



The Index of Crime, 1961 

In this section, tabulations are shown to indicate the probable 
extent, fluctuation, and distribution of crime for the United States 
as a whole, geographic divisions, individual States, and standard 
metropolitan statistical areas. The measure used is a Crime Index 
consisting of seven important offenses which are counted as they 
become known to the law enforcement agencies. Crime classifications 
used in the index are: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, 
forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary — breaking or 
entering, larceny $50 and over, and auto theft. 

The total number of criminal acts that occur is unknown, but those 
that are reported to the police provide the first means of a count. 
Not all crimes come readily to the attention of the police; not all 
crimes are of sufficient importance to be significant in an index and 
not all important crimes occur with enough regularity to be meaningful 
in an index. With these considerations in mind, the above crimes 
were selected as a group to furnish an abbreviated and convenient 
measure of the crime problem. 



32 



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33 









Table 2.— Index of 


Crime 


>y Geographic 




Year 


Population 


Total offenses 


Murder and 
nonnegligent 
manslaughter 


Forcible rape 




Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
100,000 


Num- 
ber 


Rate per 
100,000 


Continental United 

States. 1 


1960 
1961 


179, 323, 175 
182, 953, 000 


1, 862, 703 

1,926,119 

+3.4 


1, 038. 7 
1, 052. 8 

+1.4 


8,971 
8,599 
-4. 1 


5.0 

4.7 

-6.0 


15,986 
16, 012 

+.2 


8.9 

8.8 

-1.1 




1960 
1961 




New England 


10, 509, 367 
10, 723, 000 


76, 273 

86, 996 

+14.1 

17. 276 

18. 892 

5,226 

4,980 

38, 645 

48. 531 

2,077 

2,706 

10, 934 

9,607 

2,115 

2.280 


725.8 
811.3 
+11.8 
681.4 
722.7 
539.2 
502.0 
750.6 
927.2 
342.2 
435.7 
1, 272. 2 
1, 108. 1 
542.5 
577.2 


149 

137 

-8.1 

41 

25 

16 

16 

74 

77 

8 

4 

9 

9 

1 

6 


1.4 
1.3 
-7.1 
1.6 
1.0 
1.7 
1.6 
1.4 
1.5 
1.3 

.6 
1.0 
1.0 

.3 
1.5 


454 

483 

+6.4 

103 

64 

48 

58 

249 

291 

25 

19 

20 

15 

9 

36 


4.3 
4.5 
+4.7 
4.1 
2.4 
5.0 
5.8 
4.8 
5.6 
4.1 
3.1 
2.3 
1.7 
2.3 
9.1 


Connecticut 

Maine 


1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 

1960 
1961 


2, 535, 234 

2, 614, 000 

969, 265 

992, 000 

5, 148, 578 

5, 234, 000 

606, 921 

621, 000 

859, 488 

867, 000 

389, 881 

395,000 


Massachusetts 

New Hampshire. . . 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 




Middle Atlantic 

Percent change.. 


34, 168, 452 
34, 745, 000 


307, 233 

319, 414 

+4.0 

58, 246 

62, 783 

175, 029 

181, 566 

73, 958 

75, 065 


899.2 

919.3 

+2.2 

960.1 

1, 005. 5 

1, 042. 9 

1, 066. 

653.4 

654.6 


935 
1,050 
+12.3 
164 
153 
479 
603 
292 
294 


2.7 
3.0 
+11.1 
2.7 
2.5 
2.9 
3.5 
2.6 
2.6 


2,446 

2,259 

-7.6 

442 

458 

1,061 

1,004 

943 

797 


7.2 
6.5 
-9.7 
7.3 
7.3 
6.3 
5.9 
8.3 
6.9 


New Jersey 

New York 


1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 

1960 
1961 


6, 066, 782 
6, 244, 000 
16, 782, 304 
17, 033, 000 
11.319,366 
11, 468, 000 


Pennsylvania 


East North Central. . 
Percent change. .. 


36,225,024 
36, 822, 000 


397, 413 
410. 147 
+3.2 
168, 724 
174, 022 
39, 596 
42, 112 
95, 817 
97, 731 
73, 200 
75, 320 
20. 076 
20, 962 


1, 097. 1 

1,113.9 

+1.5 

1,673.7 

1, 696. 5 

849.2 

893.9 

1, 224. 8 

1, 228. 7 

754.1 

762.7 

508.0 

521.2 


1,386 

1.360 

-1.9 

489 

492 

202 

190 

334 

309 

311 

306 

50 

63 


3.8 
3.7 
-2.6 
4.9 
4.8 
4.3 
4.0 
4.3 
3.9 
3.2 
3.1 
1.3 
1.6 


3,633 

3,573 

-1.7 

1,773 

1,767 

217 

226 

962 

925 

572 

554 

109 

101 


10.0 
9.7 
-3.0 
17.6 
17.2 
4.7 
4.8 
12.3 
11.6 
5.9 
5.6 
2.8 
2.5 


Illinois 


1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 

1960 
1961 


10,081,158 
10, 258, 000 
4, 662, 498 
4,711,000 
7, 823, 194 
7, 954, 000 
9, 706, 397 
9, 876, 000 

3, 951, 777 

4, 022, 000 






Ohio 


Wisconsin 




West North Central. . 
Percent change 


15, 394, 115 
15, 581, 000 


120. 014 

121, 278 
+1.1 

14, 099 

13, 846 

14, 464 
14, 531 

25, 338 

26. 098 
52, 521 
52. 189 

7, 385 
8.245 
2.357 
2,490 
3,850 
3,879 


779.6 
778.4 
-.2 
511.3 
498.2 
663.9 
662.3 
742.2 
752.1 
1,215.8 
1. 192. 1 
523.3 
576.2 
372.7 
389.1 
565. 8 
562.2 


362 

386 

+6.6 

17 

36 

64 

41 

42 

34 

189 

223 

33 

34 

3 

6 

14 

12 


2.4 

2.5 

+4.2 

.6 

1.3 

2.9 

1.9 

1.2 

1.0 

4.4 

5.1 

2.3 

2.4 

.5 

.9 

2.1 

1.7 


1,029 

993 

-3.5 

102 

81 

109 

118 

81 

94 

627 

578 

59 

47 

14 

33 

37 

42 


6.7 
6.4 
-4.5 
3.7 
2.9 
5.0 
5.4 
2.4 
2.7 
14.5 
13.2 
4.2 
3.3 
2.2 
5.2 
5.4 
6.1 


Iowa. .. 


1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 


2, 757, 537 

2, 779, 000 
2, 178, 611 
2, 194, 000 

3. 413, 864 

3, 470, 000 

4. 319, 813 
4. 378, 000 
1, 411, 330 
1, 431. 000 

632, 446 
640, 000 
680, 514 
690, 000 


Kansas 


Minnesota 




Nebraska. . 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 



See footnotes at end of table. 



34 



Divisions and States, 1960-61 















Larceny $50 and 






Robbery 


Aggravat 


■(I assault 


Burglary 


o vet- 


Auto theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Kate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate pei 


Number 


Rate per 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


92, 724 


51.7 


130, 901 


73.0 


818, 673 


456.5 


476, 928 


266.0 


318, 520 


177.6 


91,659 


50.1 


133, 020 


72.7 


852, 506 


466.0 


498,117 


272.3 


326, 206 


178.3 


-1.1 


-3.1 


+ 1.6 


-.4 


+4.1 


+2.1 


+4.4 


+2.4 


+2.4 


+.4 


1,514 


14.4 


1,866 


17.8 


33, 190 


315.8 


20, 459 


194.7 


18, 641 


177.4 


1,543 


14.4 


2,154 


20.1 


38, 658 


360.5 


22, 698 


211.7 


21, 323 


198.9 


+1.9 




+15.4 


+12.9 


+16.5 


+14.2 


+10.9 


+8.7 


+14.4 


+ 12. 1 


236 


9.Y 


548 


21.6 


8,452 


333.4 


4,608 


181.8 


3,288 


129.7 


238 


9.1 


551 


21.1 


9,526 


364.4 


5,068 


193.9 


3,420 


130.8 


77 


7.9 


105 


10.8 


2,380 


245.5 


1,458 


150.4 


1,142 


117.8 


87 


8.8 


123 


12.4 


2,615 


263.6 


1,359 


137.0 


722 


72.8 


1,052 


20.4 


1,000 


19.4 


15, 918 


309.2 


9,484 


184.2 


10, 868 


211.1 


1,066 


20.4 


1,181 


22.6 


19, 683 


376.1 


12,018 


229.6 


14, 215 


271.6 


18 


3.0 


30 


4.9 


1,108 


182.6 


537 


88.5 


351 


57.8 


21 


3.4 


45 


7.2 


1,573 


253.3 


589 


94.8 


455 


73.3 


122 


14.2 


165 


19.2 


4,388 


510.5 


3,577 


416.2 


2,653 


308.7 


115 


13.3 


233 


26.9 


3,937 


454.1 


3,121 


360.0 


2,177 


251.1 


9 


2.3 


18 


4.6 


944 


242.1 


795 


203.9 


339 


86.9 


16 


4.1 


21 


5.3 


1,324 


335.2 


543 


137.5 


334 


84.6 


13, 717 


40.1 


21, 235 


62.1 


115,474 


338.0 


98, 085 


287.1 


55, 341 


162.0 


13, 287 


38.2 


22,094 


63.6 


125, 622 


361.6 


98, 200 


282.6 


56, 902 


163.8 


-3.1 


-4.7 


+4.0 


+2.4 


+8.8 


+7.0 


+.1 


-1.6 


+2.8 


+1.1 


2,591 


42.7 


3,331 


54.9 


25, 698 


423.6 


14, 112 


232.6 


11, 908 


196.3 


2,371 


38.0 


3,299 


52.8 


29, 329 


469.7 


14, 272 


228.6 


12, 901 


206.6 


7,379 


44.0 


12, 338 


73.5 


56, 374 


335.9 


67, 612 


402.9 


29, 786 


177. 5 


6,921 


40.6 


13, 305 


78.1 


60, 234 


353. 6 


69, 067 


405.5 


30, 432 


178.7 


3,747 


33.1 


5,566 


49.2 


33, 402 


295.1 


16, 361 


144.5 


13, 647 


120. 6 


3,995 


34.8 


5,490 


47.9 


36,059 


314.4 


14, 861 


129.6 


13, 569 


118.3 


32, 528 


89.8 


25, 665 


70.8 


165, 584 


457.1 


94, 473 


260.8 


74, 144 


204.7 


32, 039 


87.0 


26, 190 


71.1 


172, 267 


467.8 


101, 029 


274.4 


73, 689 


200.1 


-1.5 


-3.1 


+2.0 


+.4 


+4.0 


+2.3 


+6.9 


+5.2 


-.6 


-2.2 


21,048 


208.8 


12, 724 


126.2 


58, 241 


577.7 


38, 830 


385.2 


35, 619 


353.3 


20, 977 


204.5 


13, 128 


128.0 


60, 204 


586.9 


41, 062 


400.3 


36, 392 


354.8 


1,568 


33.6 


1,683 


36.1 


19, 958 


428.1 


8,526 


182.9 


7,442 


159.6 


1,783 


37.8 


1,577 


33.5 


20, 586 


437.0 


9,817 


208.4 


7,933 


168.4 


5,695 


72.8 


7,419 


94.8 


46, 111 


589.4 


21, 409 


273.7 


13, 887 


177.5 


5,004 


62.9 


7,802 


98.1 


46, 861 


589.2 


22, 964 


288.7 


13, 866 


174.3 


3,890 


40.1 


3,195 


32.9 


33, 427 


344.4 


18, 736 


193.0 


13, 069 


134.6 


3,914 


39.6 


3,066 


31.0 


35, 595 


360.4 


19, 838 


200.9 


12, 047 


122.0 


327 


8.3 


644 


16.3 


7,847 


198.6 


6,972 


176.4 


4.127 


104.4 


361 


9.0 


617 


15.3 


9,021 


224.3 


7,348 


182.7 


3,451 


85.8 


5,929 


38.5 


4,211 


27.4 


57, 924 


376.3 


31, 127 


202.2 


19, 432 


126.2 


5, 702 


36.6 


4,354 


27.9 


59, 557 


382.2 


31, 709 


203.5 


18, 577 


119.2 


-3.8 


-4.9 


+3.4 


+1.8 


+2.8 


+1.6 


+1.9 


+.6 


-4.4 


-5.5 


301 


10.9 


236 


8.6 


6,375 


231.2 


4,973 


180.3 


2. 095 


76.0 


291 


10.5 


235 


8.5 


6,356 


228.7 


4,907 


176.6 


1,940 


69.8 


410 


18.8 


632 


29.0 


7,705 


353.7 


3,644 


167.3 


1,900 


87.2 


460 


21.0 


608 


27.7 


7,275 


331.6 


4,149 


189.1 


1,880 


85.7 


950 


27.8 


351 


10.3 


11, 926 


349.3 


7,322 


214.5 


4,666 


136.7 


951 


27.4 


413 


11.9 


12, 473 


359.5 


7,464 


215.1 


4,669 


134.6 


3,913 


90.6 


2,619 


60.6 


25, 712 


595.2 


11, 479 


265.7 


7,982 


184.8 


3,637 


83.1 


2,705 


61.8 


26, 782 


611.7 


10, 913 


249.3 


7, 351 


167.9 


253 


17.9 


232 


16.4 


3,267 


231.5 


1,771 


125.5 


1,770 


125.4 


234 


16.4 


257 


18.0 


3,730 


260.7 


2,289 


160.0 


1, 654 


115.6 


40 


6.3 


33 


5.2 


1,252 


198.0 


585 


92.5 


430 


68.0 


68 


10.6 


53 


8.3 


1,286 


200.9 


595 


93.0 


449 


70.2 


62 


9.1 


108 


15.9 


1,687 


247.9 


1,353 


198.8 


589 


86.6 


61 


8.8 


83 


12.0 


1,655 


239.9 


1,392 


201.7 


634 


91.9 



35 



Table 2. — Index of Crime by Geographic 



Area 



South Atlantic 2 _ 



Percent change- 
Delaware 



Florida 

Georgia 

Maryland 

North Carolina. .. 
South Carolina___. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 



East South Central. 

Percent change .. 
Alabama 



Kentucky.. 
MississippL 

Tennessee.. 



West South Central- 
Percent change- 
Arkansas 



Louisiana. 
Oklahoma- 
Texas 



Mountain. 



Percent change . 
Arizona 



Colorado 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico. 

Utah.. 

Wyoming 



Pacific- 



Percent change. 
Alaska 



California... 

Hawaii 

Oregon 

Washington. 



Year 



1960 
1961 



1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 

1960 
1961 



1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 



1960 
1961 



1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 

1960 
1961 



1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
1960 
1961 

1960 
1961 



I960 
1961 
I960 
1961 
1960 
1961 
I960 
1961 
1960 
196] 



Population 



25. 971, 732 

26, 545, 000 



446, 292 
458, 000 

4. 951, 560 

5, 222, 000 
3.943,116 
3. 987. 000 
3, 100. 689 

3, 188, 000 

4. 556. 155 
4. 614. 000 
2, 382, 594 

2, 407, 000 

3, 966, 949 

4, 059. 000 
1. 860, 421 
1, 850. 000 



12, 050, 126 
12, 208, 000 



3, 266, 740 
3, 302, 000 
3, 038, 156 
3, 076, 000 
2, 178, 141 

2, 215, 000 

3, 567, 089 
3, 615, 000 



16, 951, 255 
17, 266, 000 



1,786,272 
1,797,000 
3, 257, 022 
3,321,000 
2, 328, 284 
2, 360, 000 
9, 579, 677 
9. 788, 000 



6, 855, 060 
7,073,000 



1,302,161 
1,391,000 
1,753,947 
1,781,000 
667, 191 
684, 000 
674, 767 
682, 000 
285, 278 
299, 000 
951, 023 
983, 000 
890, 627 
916, 000 
330, 066 
338, 000 



21,198,044 
21,989,000 



226, 167 

234, 000 

15,717,204 

16, 397, 000 

632, 772 

657,000 

1 . 768, 687 

1,799,000 

2,853,214 

2,902.000 



Total offenses 



Number 



249. 753 

260, 919 

+4.5 

4,299 

4,563 

76, 980 

74, 824 

33. 758 

37, 612 

28, 815 

31, 887 

31, 706 

32, 044 

19, 789 

21, 552 

32, 648 

35, 671 

8,469 

8,312 



91,000 
+2.1 
25, 853 
24, 878 
24, 235 
24, 266 
9,551 
10, 208 
29, 457 
31, 648 



176,309 
172, 643 
—2. 1 
10,317 
10, 481 
30, 799 
27, 223 
24,968 
24, 745 
110,225 
110,194 



82, 044 

90,246 

+10.0 

21,283 

24, 074 

21, 635 

25, 708 

4,701 

5,025 

6,534 

6,786 

5,686 

6,531 

11,564 

11,087 

7,838 

8,082 

2,803 

2,953 



364, 568 

373, 476 

+2.4 

2, 332 

2,452 

309, 552 

316,208 

6, 977 

8,358 

16,322 

17,011 

29, 385 

29. 447 



Rate per 
100,000 



961.6 
982.9 
+2.2 
963.3 
996.3 
1, 554. 7 
1, 432. 9 
856.1 
943.4 
929.3 
1,000.2 
695.9 
694.5 
830.6 
895.4 
823.0 
878.8 
455.2 
449.3 



739.4 
745.4 
+.8 
791.4 
753.4 
797.7 
788.9 
438.5 
460.9 
825.8 
875.5 



040.1 
999.9 
-3.9 
577.6 
583.2 
945.6 
819.7 
072. 4 
048. 5 
150. 6 
125. 8 



1,196.8 

1,275.9 

+6.6 

1, 634. 4 

1, 730. 7 

1,233.5 

1,443.5 

704. 6 

734.6 

968.3 

995.0 

1,993.1 

2. 184. 3 

1,216.0 

1,127.9 

880.1 

882. 3 

849.2 

873.7 



719.8 
698.5 
-1.2 
031.1 
047.9 
969.5 
928. 5 
102. 6 
272. 1 
922. s 
945. 6 
029. 9 
014.7 



Murder and 
nonnegligent 
manslaughter 



Num- 
ber 



2,522 

2.172 

-13.9 

30 

18 

527 

477 

469 

400 

168 

143 

456 

401 

314 

280 

395 

283 

81 

82 



1,131 
1,147 
+1.4 
406 
427 
205 
201 
218 
229 
302 
290 



1,417 
1,278 
-9.8 
152 
163 
270 
211 
174 
119 
821 
785 



311 
311 



758 
758 



23 

27 
616 
605 
15 
15 
43 
48 
61 
63 



Rate per 
100,000 



9.7 

8.2 

15.5 

6.7 

3.9 

10.6 

9.1 

11.9 

10.0 

5.4 

4.5 

10.0 

8.7 

13.2 

11.6 

10.0 

7.0 

4.4 

4.4 



9.4 
9.4 



12.4 
12.9 
6.7 
6.5 
10.0 
10.3 
8.5 
8.0 



4.5 
4.4 
-2.2 
6.0 
6.0 
4.2 
4.7 
2.4 
2.0 
3.9 
2.5 
8.8 
7.0 
7.2 
6.6 
1.0 
1.7 
4.8 
3.3 



3.6 
3.4 
-5.6 
10.2 
11.5 
3.9 
3.7 
2.4 
2.3 
2. 1 
2.7 
2.1 



Forcible rape 



Num- 
ber 



2,010 

2,161 

+7.5 

37 

24 

403 

398 

294 

380 

224 

262 

345 

327 

225 

213 

287 

373 

78 

81 



750 
769 
+2.5 
281 
252 
163 
146 
112 
129 
194 
242 



1,638 
1,624 
-.9 
159 
130 
279 
267 
299 
286 
901 
941 



767 

743 

-3.1 

209 

200 

229 

230 

48 

44 

48 

48 

36 

24 

113 

123 

61 

62 

23 

12 



3, 259 

3,407 

+4.5 

47 

■A] 

2,859 

3,033 

21 

25 

166 

138 

166 

180 



i 1960 estimate revised upward based on records and reporting changes by several agencies and reflected 
in 1961 count. 

36 



Divisions and Stales, 1960-61 — Continued 



Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larceny $50 and 
over 


Auto 


theft 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate pei 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


9,877 


38.0 


30, 518 


117.5 


112,742 


134. l 


56. 420 


217.2 




137. 3 


10, 100 


38.0 


30, 410 


114. 6 


117, 137 


441.3 


61,429 


231. 4 


37. 510 


141. 3 


+2.3 




-.4 


-2. 5 


+3.9 


+1.7 


+8.9 


+6. 5 


+ 5. 2 


+2.9 
161.3 


152 


"34.1 


96 


21.5 


2,467 


552.8 


797 


178. 6 


720 


120 


26.2 


98 


21.4 


2, 513 


548. 7 


1,062 


231.9 


728 


159.0 


4.005 


80.9 


5,292 


106.9 


39, 966 


807.1 


17.49K 


353. 4 


9, 289 


187.6 


3,746 


71.7 


5,835 


111.7 


37, 627 


72(1. 5 


17, 879 


342.4 


8,862 


169. 7 


974 


24.7 


3,892 


98.7 


15,461 


392.1 


6, 855 


173.8 


5,813 


147.4 


1.129 


28.3 


3, 750 


94.1 


17, 439 


437.4 


8, 254 


207.0 


6,260 


157.0 


1, 158 


37.3 


2.746 


88.6 


11,360 


366. 4 


7,451 


240. 3 


5, 708 


1-1 1 


1, 330 


41.7 


2,819 


88.4 


12, 348 


387.3 


8,688 


272. 5 


6. 297 


197. 5 


776 


17.0 


8,415 


184.7 


11,779 


258.5 


6,381 


HI). 1 


3,554 


78.0 


653 


14.2 


7,725 


167.4 


12. 478 


270.4 


6,742 


116.1 


3, 71H 


80.6 


477 


20.0 


2,396 


100.6 


8,958 


376.0 


4, 925 


206.7 


2,494 


104.7 


500 


20.8 


2,313 


96.1 


10. 241 


425. 5 


5,293 


219.9 


2, 712 


112.7 


1.004 


25.3 


4,056 


102.2 


13, 736 


346.3 


8,407 


211.9 


1. 763 


120. 1 


1,026 


25.3 


4,271 


105.2 


15, 151 


373.3 


9,386 


231. 2 


5, 1S1 


127.6 


238 


12.8 


641 


34.5 


4,358 


234.2 


1,781 


95. 7 


1,292 


69.4 


216 


11.7 


629 


34.0 


4, 396 


237.6 


1,645 


88.9 


1,263 


68. 3 


3,184 


26.4 


8.793 


73.0 


43. 666 


362.4 


19, 553 


162.3 


12, 019 


99.7 


3,160 


25.9 


8,929 


73.1 


43, 690 


357.9 


21, 098 


172.8 


12, 207 


ion. o 


-.8 


-1.9 


+1.5 


+•1 


+.1 


-1.2 


+7.9 


+6.5 


+1.6 


+ .3 


898 


27.5 


4,032 


123.4 


11,428 


349.8 


5, 955 


182.3 


2, 853 


87.3 


630 


19.1 


3,802 


115.1 


11,014 


333. 6 


6,218 


188.3 


2, 535 


76.8 


1,001 


32.9 


1, 533 


50.5 


11, 274 


371.1 


6,277 


206.6 


3,782 


124.5 


1,085 


35.3 


1,424 


46.3 


11,271 


366.4 


6,809 


221.4 


3,330 


108.3 


324 


14.9 


1, 435 


65.9 


4,459 


204.7 


1,952 


89.6 


1.051 


48.3 


345 


15.6 


1,425 


64.3 


4,703 


212.3 


2,066 


93.3 


1,311 


59.2 


961 


26.9 


1,793 


50.3 


16, 505 


462.7 


5,369 


150.5 


4, 333 


121.5 


1,100 


30.4 


2,278 


63.0 


16, 702 


462. 


0, 005 


166.1 


5. 031 


139. 2 


5,820 


34.3 


15, 012 


88.6 


86,838 


512. 3 


38, 527 


227.3 


27,057 


159. 6 


5,716 


33.1 


14, 919 


86.4 


84, 522 


489.5 


38, 599 


223. 6 


25, 985 


150. 5 


-1.8 


-3.5 


-.6 


-2.5 


-2.7 


-4.5 


+.2 


-1.6 


-4.0 


-5.7 


443 


24.8 


1,028 


57.6 


4,870 


272.6 


2,844 


159.2 


821 


46.0 


446 


24.8 


940 


52.3 


4,994 


277.9 


2,814 


156.6 


994 


55.3 


1,484 


45.6 


2,564 


78.7 


12,615 


387.3 


7,386 


226.8 


6,201 


190.4 


1,476 


44.4 


2,215 


67.0 


11.180 


336.6 


6, 241 


187.9 


5,633 


169.6 


914 


39.3 


827 


35.5 


12, 187 


523. 4 


6,070 


260.7 


4,497 


193.1 


804 


34.1 


1,173 


49.7 


11,951 


506.4 


5,982 


253. 5 


4,430 


187.7 


2,979 


31.1 


10, 593 


110.6 


57, 166 


596.7 


22, 227 


232. 


15, 538 


162.2 


2, 990 


30.5 


10, 591 


108. 2 


56. 397 


576.2 


23. 562 


240.7 


14.928 


152. 5 


3,286 


47.9 


3,861 


56.3 


34. 991 


510.4 


23,013 


335.7 


15.815 


230. 7 


3,653 


56.6 


3,305 


46.7 


38. 668 


546.7 


25, 862 


365.6 


17, 704 


250.3 


+11.2 


+7.7 


-14.4 


-17.1 


+10.5 


+7.1 


+12.4 


+8.9 


+11.9 


+8.5 


706 


54.2 


1,555 


119.4 


8,926 


685.5 


5,403 


414.9 


4,406 


338.4 


786 


56.5 


1,107 


79.6 


10, 262 


737.7 


6,692 


481.1 


4,943 


355.4 


1.362 


77.7 


702 


40.0 


9,996 


569.9 


5,523 


314.9 


3,750 


213.8 


1.633 


91.7 


673 


37.8 


11,681 


655. 9 


6,484 


364.1 


4, 924 


276. 5 


92 


13.8 


99 


14.8 


2,011 


301.4 


1,768 


265.0 


667 


100.0 


64 


9.4 


100 


14.6 


2,203 


322. 1 


1,827 


267.1 


773 


113.0 


186 


27.6 


163 


24.2 


2,675 


396.4 


1.793 


265.7 


1,643 


243.5 


173 


25.4 


185 


27.1 


2,857 


418.9 


1,983 


290.8 


1,523 


223.3 


211 


74.0 


144 


50.5 


2,606 


913. 5 


1,546 


541.9 


1,118 


391.9 


317 


106.0 


187 


62.5 


2,724 


911.0 


1,842 


616.1 


1,416 


473.6 


368 


38.7 


844 


88.7 


4, 132 


434.5 


3,601 


378.6 


2,438 


256. 4 


373 


37.9 


744 


75.7 


4,157 


422. 9 


3,511 


357.2 


2, 114 


215. 1 


185 


20.8 


229 


25.7 


3,655 


410.4 


2,285 


256.6 


1,414 


158.8 


186 


20.3 


187 


20.4 


3,558 


388.4 


2,447 


267.1 


1,626 


177. 5 


176 


53.3 


125 


37.9 


990 


299.9 


1,094 


331.4 


379 


114.8 


121 


35.8 


122 


36.1 


1.226 


362. 7 


1,076 


318. 3 


385 


113.9 


16. 869 


79.6 


19, 740 


93.1 


168, 264 


793.8 


95, 271 


449.4 


60, 407 


285. 


16, 459 


74.9 


20, 665 


94.0 


172, 385 


784.0 


97, 493 


443.4 


62, 309 


283.4 


-2.4 


-5.9 


+4.7 


+1.0 


+2.4 


-1.2 


+2.3 


-1.3 


+3.1 


-.6 


64 


28.3 


102 


45.1 


751 


332.1 


797 


352.4 


548 


242.3 


29 


12.4 


121 


51.7 


891 


380.8 


862 


368.4 


491 


209. 8 


15, 287 


97.3 


18, 707 


119.0 


143, 102 


910.5 


77, 648 


494.0 


51,333 


326.6 


14, 832 


90.5 


19, 591 


119.5 


146, 615 


894.2 


79, 137 


482.6 


52, 395 


319. 5 


69 


10.9 


33 


5.2 


3.328 


525.9 


1,803 


284.9 


1,708 


269.9 


70 


10.7 


51 


7.8 


3,909 


595.0 


2,285 


347.8 


2,003 


304.9 


563 


31.8 


460 


26.0 


7,175 


405.7 


5,604 


316.8 


2,311 


130.7 


626 


34.8 


430 


23.9 


7,276 


404.4 


5,994 


333.2 


2,499 


138. 9 


886 


31.1 


438 


15.4 


13.908 


487.5 


9,419 


330.1 


4, 507 


158. 


902 


31.1 


472 


16.3 


13. 694 


471.9 


9,215 


317.5 


4,921 


169.6 



2 Includes the District of Columbia. 



37 



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77 



General United States Crime Statistics 



The data presented in this section is primarily of value to the law 
enforcement executive for the purpose of comparing the crime ex- 
perience in his community with the averages reported nationally by 
similar communities. Crime trends and rates are tabulated by 
grouping places according to population size. Police performance in 
clearing crimes by arrest and the number of persons they charge for 
these crimes are presented by population group and geographic division. 
National city averages are also shown indicating the type and value 
of the property stolen, by offense and t}^pe, and value recovered by 
police investigation. Robbery, burglary, and larceny-theft are ex- 
amined by type, as well as where and when they occurred. 

City and rural arrest rates are shown for all criminal offenses. 
Arrest rates by population group are also listed for specific offenses. 
This is another step in building totals for crime categories other than 
those in the Crime Index and in presenting crimes known to the police 
through arrests. 

It is important to remember in stud3^ing averages that about half 
the units used must be above and about half below. National averages 
can provide the police administrator with valuable guidance in ana- 
lyzing the local crime count, as well as the performance of his force 
in combating crime. The analysis, however, does not end with such 
a comparison, for it is only through an appraisal of local conditions 
that a clear picture of the community crime problem or the effective- 
ness of the police force is possible. 



78 



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82 



Table 7. — City Crime Trends, 1961 versus Average 1956-60 

[Offenses known to the police in 2,700 cities over 2,500; total population 87,337,146] 





Number of offenses 


Percent 


Offense 


Average 
1956-60 


1961 


change 


TOTAL 


1,807,257 


2, 126, 638 


+17.7 


Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


3,687 

2,592 

J 6, 933 

46, 544 

69, 925 

410, 331 

2 1, 073, 308 

193, 937 


4,105 

2,577 

7,900 

54, 362 

80, 498 

503, 727 

2 1, 256, 171 

217, 298 


+11.3 

-.6 

+13.9 

+16. 8 

+15.1 
+22.8 
+17.0 
+12.0 


Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape . 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault _ _ . _ . 


Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft _- . 





1 Beginning in 1958 the rape category was limited to forcible offenses. Prior to 1958 statutory cases were 
also included. The forcible rapes used to construct the annual average for 1956-57 were estimates based on 
special offense analyses furnished by over 400 selected cities (total population over 50,000,000) which showed 
the proportion of reported rapes classified as forcible each year. 

2 Includes all reported thefts regardless of value of property stolen. 



Table 8. — Offenses Known, Cleared by Arrest, and Persons Charged (Held 
for Prosecution), 1961, by Population Groups, Number per 100 Known 
Offenses 



Population group 



TOTAL, GROUPS I-VI 

2,813 cities; total population 
75,642,090: 

Offenses known... 

Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged. 

GROUP I 

41 cities over 250,000; total 
population 30,162,765: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged 

3 cities over 1,000,000; total 

population 11,454,640: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

5 cities, 750,000 to 1,000,000; 

total population 

4,267,275: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

10 cities, 500,000 to 750,000; 

total population 

6,218,730: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 

Persons charged 

23 cities, 250,000 to 500,000; 

total population 

8,222,120: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest 
Persons charged 



Total 



100.0 
26.7 
20.8 



100.0 
28.9 
20.4 



100.0 
29.7 
18.3 



100.0 
33.7 
26.1 



100.0 
29.4 
21.1 



100.0 
25.7 
19.2 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 

and 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh 
ter 



100.0 
93.1 
95.9 



100.0 
93.3 
95.9 



100.0 
92.4 
105.9 



100.0 
95.1 
86.0 



100.0 
93.2 

88.2 



100.0 
93.0 
94.9 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



100.0 

86.8 



100.0 
85.5 
61.9 



100.0 
81.8 
84.1 



100.0 

87.5 

103.9 



100.0 



100.0 
82.6 

52.8 



For- 
cible 
rape 



100.0 
72.6 

78.4 



100.0 
71.5 
71.9 



100.0 
72.2 

80.8 



100.0 
74.9 



100.0 
66.7 
59.6 



100.0 
71.0 
67.8 



Rob- 
bery 



100.0 
41.6 

45.8 



100.0 
42.6 
44.4 



100.0 
42.1 
48.3 



100.0 
48.9 
46.6 



100.0 
36.5 
44.2 



100.0 
42.2 
37.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



100.0 
78.7 
62.1 



100.0 

78.0 
55.6 



100.0 
77.5 
56.0 



100.0 
82.2 
59.6 



100.0 
76.7 

54.8 



100.0 
76.3 
52.0 I 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



100.0 
30.0 
21.6 



100.0 
30.9 
19.3 



100.0 
30.7 
16.8 



100.0 
34.5 
25.7 



100.0 
36.4 
22.4 



100.0 
26.6 
17.0 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



100.0 
20.8 
15.7 



100.0 
22.5 
14.9 



100.0 

20.7 

9.5 



100.0 
26.8 
20.8 



100.0 
25.1 
16.9 



100.0 
20.7 
16.2 I 



Auto 
theft 



100.0 
27.8 
24.0 



100.0 
24.4 
19.8 



100.0 
27.2 
19.2 



100.0 
25.7 
19.5 



100.0 
20.3 
19.9 



100.0 
24.3 
20.5 



83 



Table 8. — Offenses Known, Cleared by Arrest, and Persons Charged (Held 
for Prosecution), 1961, by Population Groups, Number per 100 Known 
Offenses — Continued 



Population group 



63 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 

total population 

9,099,947: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



GROUP III 

148 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 

total population 

10,304,513: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



GROUP IV 

276 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; 

total population 

9,610,720: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



group v 

658 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 

total population 

10,235,078: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged. 



GROUP VI 

1,127 cities under 10,000; 
total population 
6,229,067: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



METROPOLITAN COUNTIES 1 

72 counties; total popula- 
tion 9,716,492: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



RURAL COUNTIES 

519 counties; total popula- 
tion 11,036,719: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



Total 



100.0 
24.6 
19.7 



100.0 
22.6 
19.3 



100.0 
24.8 
21.5 



100.0 
25.4 
22.6 



100.0 
29.6 
27.0 



100.0 
21.9 
15.5 



100.0 
38.6 
38.2 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 

and 
nonneg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



100.0 
93.9 

108.8 



100.0 
91.9 
91.1 



100.0 
95.7 
90.7 



100.0 
90.2 
91.4 



100.0 

89.4 
87.2 



100.0 

91.7 

108.0 



100.0 
81.6 
90.4 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



100.0 
89.7 
67.0 



100.0 
86.2 
72.1 



100.0 
79.7 
77.6 



100.0 
96.9 
92.5 



100.0 
86.7 
91.6 



100.0 
82.6 
83.1 



100.0 
93.5 
51.3 



For- 
cible 
rape 



100.0 
69.7 

78.5 



100.0 
71.9 

84.8 



100.0 
77.3 
99.8 



100.0 
79.9 
97.6 



100.0 
83.6 
105.1 



100.0 
67.2 
57.9 



100.0 

89.2 
85.4 



Rob- 
bery 



100.0 
38.5 
42.1 



100.0 
37.2 

45.8 



100.0 
39.7 
56.6 



100.0 
45.6 
62.0 



100.0 
47.1 
64.2 



100.0 
39.8 
46.7 



100.0 
59.7 

88.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



100.0 
74.6 
60.1 



100.0 
77.9 
72.1 



100.0 
85.7 
87.6 



100.0 

85.8 



100.0 
91.3 
99.3 



100.0 
77.0 
39.7 



100.0 
90.0 
93.6 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



100.0 
29.3 
21.1 



100.0 
25.9 
20.3 



100.0 
28.8 
24.5 



100.0 
30.7 
27.0 



100.0 
35.4 
32.8 



100.0 
24.8 
17.7 



100.0 
38.3 
37.7 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



100.0 
18.7 
15.2 



100.0 
17.7 
14.7 



100.0 
20.5 
16.9 



100.0 
20.2 
17.0 



100.0 
24.1 
20.5 



100.0 
15.2 
9.5 



100.0 
30.7 
29.4 



Counties in Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas as defined by the Bureau of the Budget. 



84 



Table 9. — Offenses Known, Cleared by Arrest, and Persons Charged {Held 
for Prosecution), 1961, by Geographic Divisions. Number per 100 Known 
Offenses 



Geographic division 



TOTAL ALL DIVISIONS 

2,313 cities; total population 
75,642,090: 

Offenses known. _ 

Offenses cleared by ar- 
rest -. 

Persons charged 



NEW ENGLAND STATES 

200 cities; total population 
5,S66,489: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

605 cities; total population 
20,195,173: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



EAST NORTH CENTRAL 

STATES 

539 cities; total population 
15,635,588: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



WEST NORTH CENTRAL 

STATES 

259 cities; total population 
6,314,197: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 

207 cities; total population 
7,685,373: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 
STATES 

75 cities; total population 
2,292,542: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged 



WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 
STATES 

130 cities; total population 
5,997,299: 

Offenses known 

Offenses cleared by arrest. 
Persons charged.. 



Total 



100.0 



26.7 
20.8 



100.0 
26.1 
19.9 



100.0 
26.5 
21.9 



100.0 
27.1 
17.3 



100.0 
27.7 
18.3 



100.0 
30.0 
30.5 



100.0 
28.4 
27.9 



100.0 
30.6 
19.8 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 

and 
non- 
neg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



100.0 



93.1 

95.9 



100.0 
98.8 
84.1 



100.0 
91.6 

108.8 



100.0 
93.8 
S9.3 



100.0 
87.3 
64.1 



100.0 
95.4 
102.4 



100.0 
96.4 
93.2 



100.0 
95.6 
94.8 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



100.0 



100.0 
89.1 

75.4 



100.0 
89.8 
96.2 



100.0 

87.4 
65.0 



100.0 
91.7 
32.4 



100.0 
92.4 
97.1 



100.0 
84.8 
64.3 



100.0 
92.5 
49.8 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



100.0 



72.6 

78.4 



100.0 

85.3 
97.4 



100.0 
76.6 
95.3 



100.0 
69.0 

58.7 



100.0 
71.6 
44.2 



100.0 
78.3 
112.0 



100.0 
89.2 
92.4 



100.0 
70.9 
66.2 



Rob- 
bery 



100.0 



41.6 

45.8 



100.0 
47.0 
59.9 



100.0 
39.2 
55.8 



100.0 
40.0 
30.2 



100.0 
41.8 
27.4 



100.0 
46.1 
60.8 



100.0 
46.7 
52.4 



100.0 
48.5 
41.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



100.0 



78.7 
62.1 



100.0 
85.8 
77.3 



100.0 
73.9 
73.0 



100.0 
84.1 
27.6 



100.0 
76.2 
33.7 



100.0 
83.2 

77.8 



100.0 
79.9 
80.0 



100.0 
81.0 
59.0 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



100.0 



30.0 
21.6 



100.0 
28.3 
22.1 



100.0 
28.2 
20.8 



100.0 
31.9 
19.0 



100.0 
30.2 
19.3 



100.0 
31.5 
29.2 



100.0 
28.3 
24.6 



100.0 
31.6 
19.6 



Lar- 
ceny 
trn-ft 



100.0 



15.7 



100.0 
23.1 

15.8 



100.0 
19.5 
13.7 



100.0 
21.0 
14.2 



100.0 
23.3 

15.8 



100.0 
22.0 
23.8 



100.0 
21.5 
23.1 



100.0 
25.2 
16.1 



85 



Table 9. — Offenses Known, Cleared by Arrest, and Persons Charged (Held 
for Prosecution), 1961, by Geographic Divisions. Number per 100 Known 
Offenses — Continued 





Total 


Criminal 
homicide 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




Geographic division 


Murder 
and 
non- 
neg- 
ligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Auto 
theft 


MOUNTAIN STATES 

124 cities; total population 

2,847,748: 
Offenses known ._ .... 


100.0 
25.3 
19.8 

100.0 
21.8 
18.0 


100.0 
92.7 
86.2 

100.0 
86.4 
91.7 


100.0 
73.6 
40.6 

100.0 
74.0 
53.8 


100.0 
72.7 
75.0 

100.0 
59.4 
63.7 


100.0 
47.6 

47.8 

100.0 
38.5 

47.8 


100.0 
68.4 
63.0 

100.0 
72.3 

57. 5 


100.0 
33.1 
24.6 

100.0 
28.4 
20.9 


100.0 
21.0 
16.0 

100.0 
17.0 
13.2 


100.0 


Offenses cleared by arrest. 


27.7 
23.5 


PACIFIC STATES 

274 cities; total population 
8,807,681: 
Offenses known 


100.0 


Offenses cleared by arrest- 
Persons charged 


24.8 

27.7 



Table 10.— Disposition of Persons Formally Charged by the Police 

[1,279 cities; total population 31,538,019] 





Percent of persons charged 


Offense 


Charged 
(held for 
prosecu- 
tion) 


Guilty 


Acquitted 

or 
dismissed 


Referred 

to juvenile 

court 


TOTAL (less traffic) 


i 100. 


68.7 


12.2 


10.2 






Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence... . 


100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100. 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 


50.7 
37.8 

43.9 
45.3 
43.4 
36.7 

45.3 
27.4 
53.8 
62.3 
48.9 

61. 5 
64.3 
62.0 

55. 8 
63.4 
50.6 
69. 6 

83.2 

62. 6 
S4.0 
81.3 

77.6 

56. 

82.8 


18.7 
34.5 

23.4 
16.2 
33.3 

8.1 

11.0 
7.8 
32.2 
22.2 
17.7 
13.4 
22.4 
13.0 

22.0 
16.4 
27.5 
10.0 

9.2 
15.4 

7.6 
11.9 

15.6 
14.4 

9.1 


3.5 
4.2 


Forcible rape . . ... 


14.2 


Robbery ... ... . .... .. 


20.9 


Aggravated assault . . 


8. 1 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


44.0 


Larceny — theft. . ... .. -.. 


37.3 


Autotheft. 


54.2 


Other assaults . 


6.3 


Embezzlement and fraud . 


2. 1 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 


22. 1 


Forgery and counterfeiting -. 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 


5.6 
1.0 


Other sex offenses (includes statutory rape) 


14.9 


Narcotic drug laws .. - . 


5.3 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. ... 


11.4 


Offenses against family and children __ 


13.1 


Liquor laws. ... 


14.3 


Driving while intoxicated .. . 


.4 


Disorderly conduct .. 


7.9 


Drunkenness .. . 


.6 


Vagrancy . ... . 


3.8 


Gambling .. 


.9 


All other offenses 


19.9 


Traffic and motor vehicle laws 


.4 







Will not add to 100.0 percent due to pending cases. 



86 



Table 11. — Offenses Known, Cleared; Persons Arrested, Charged and Disposed 

of in 1961 

[1,439 cities; total population 35,999,705] 



Type 



Offenses known... 

Offenses cleared ... 

Percent cleared. 

ARRESTS 



Total persons charged. 
Percent of arrests.... 



Guilty 

Percent of arrests. 



Acquitted and dismissed. 
Percent of arrests 



Referred to juvenile court. 
Percent of arrests 



Total 


Murder 

and non- 
negligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter - 


Forcible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 


821, 804 

213,658 

26.0 


1,366 
1,287 
94.2 


2,822 
2,122 

75.2 


18,954 
7,975 
42.1 


24, 816 

19, 967 

80.5 


187, 245 

54, 774 

29.3 


507, 054 

105, 359 

20.8 


194, 175 


1,402 


2,491 


10,222 


16, 004 


47,098 


94,457 


180, 939 
93.2 


1,306 
93.2 


2,355 
94.5 


9,233 
90.3 


15, 156 
94.7 


44, 361 
94.2 


86, 789 
91.9 


73,713 
38.0 


635 
45.3 


1,016 
40.8 


4,034 
39.5 


6,620 
41.4 


16, 291 
34.6 


39, 200 
41.5 


22,672 
11.7 


240 
17.1 


546 
21.9 


1,533 
15.0 


4,948 
30.9 


3,819 
8.1 


9,825 
10.4 


67,294 
34.7 


62 
4.4 


385 
15.5 


2,146 
21.0 


1,481 
9.3 


19, 457 
41.3 


32, 016 
33.9 



Auto 
theft 



79, 547 

22, 174 

27.9 

22, 501 

21, 739 



5,917 
26.3 



11,747 
52.2 



Pending cases not included. 

Table 12.— Monthly Variations, 1961 

[Daily average, offenses known to the police in 4,002 cities, total population 104,180,664] 



Month 



January-December. 



January-March 

April-June 

July-September 

October-December . 



January.. 
February. 

March 

April 



May___ 
June... 
July.. _ 
August- 



September. 

October 

November. 

December. 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



13.5 



13.0 
12.6 
14.9 
13.6 



13.3 
12.6 
13.2 
12.3 

12.5 
13.1 
15.5 
15.3 

13.8 

12.8 
13.5 
14.5 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



7.9 
8.0 
7.1 
10.3 



8.3 



7.4 
9.0 



8.1 
6.8 
7.1 

7.4 
9.7 
10.9 
10.5 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



:.? 



25.2 
28.0 
32.5 
28.2 



24.9 
24.6 
26.0 
27.9 

27.2 

28.8 
33.6 
32.5 

31.3 
29.9 
28.4 
26.4 



Rob- 
bery 



217.3 



241.8 
194.3 
204.5 
228.6 



238.3 
257.2 
231.5 
213.8 

187.4 
182.0 
202.0 
202.1 

209.7 
202.2 
227.1 
256.4 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



U 



238.8 
263.2 
307.4 
267.0 



219.8 
248.0 
249.6 
258.2 

258.5 
273.1 
313.2 
301.6 

307.4 
277.1 
257.2 
266.5 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 



1,676.4 



1,831.6 
1, 599. 5 
1,618.7 
1, 658. 4 



1, 802. 1 
1,910.8 
1, 789. 6 
1,670.9 

1, 588. 3 
1, 539. 6 
1,-612. 8 
1,641.2 

1,601.6 
1, 599. 9 
1, 665. 3 
1,710.4 



Larceny- 
theft 



4,057.6 



4, 048. 5 
4, 102. 2 
4,071.5 
4, 008. 5 



3, 729. 7 
4, 176. 6 

4, 251. 5 
4, 148. 7 

4, 032. 3 
4, 128. 
4, 047. 2 
4, 307. 

3, 853. 2 
3, 993. 

3, 988. 1 

4, 043. 7 



Auto 
theft 



740.8 



747.8 
721.2 

728.7 
765.4 



748. 3 
760.4 
735.8 
755.4 

722.8 
685.2 
707.5 
729.0 

750.2 

772.8 
787.2 
737.0 



ST 



Table 13. — Offense Analysis, Trends, 1960-61, and Percent Distribution 

[512 cities over 25,000. Total population 60,997,442] 



Classification 



Number of offenses 



1960 



1961 



Percent 
change 



Percent 
distribu- 
tion, 
1961 i 



Robbery: 

TOTAL. 



Highway 

Commercial house- 
Oil station 

Chain store 

Residence 

Bank 

Miscellaneous 



Burglary— breaking or entering: 
TOTAL 



Residence (dwelling): 

Night, l 

Day 

Nonresidence (store, office, etc.) : 

Night 

Day 



Larceny— theft (except auto theft, by value) : 
TOTAL 



$50 and over. 

$5 to $50 

Under $5 



Larceny— theft (by type) : 
TOTAL . 



Pocket— picking 

Purse— snatching 

Shoplifting 

Thefts from autos (except accessories). 

Auto accessories - 

Bicycles 

All others 



22,817 
12, 619 
2,749 
1,305 
3, 475 
304 
3,420 



390, 987 



95, 2SS 
61,028 



216, 821 
17, 850 



930,413 



257, 800 
540, 998 
131,615 



930,413 



8,374 
12, 148 
55, 617 
174, 221 
225, 701 
129, 230 
325, 122 



46, 584 



-0.2 



100.0 



22, 985 
12, 140 
2,930 
1,191 
3,520 
298 
3,520 



400,725 



+.7 
-3.8 
+6.6 
-8.7 
+1.3 
-2.0 
+2.9 



+2.5 



96, 951 
67, 522 



217,365 
18, 887 



952, 988 



+1.7 
+10.6 

+.3 
+5.8 



+2.4 



260, 734 
552, 769 
139, 485 



952, 988 



+1.1 
+2.2 
+6.0 



+2.4 



7,850 
13,034 
61, 530 
182, 492 
215, 277 
133, 324 
339, 481 



-6.3 

+7.3 
+ 10.6 
+4.7 
-4.6 
+3.2 
+4.4 



49.3 

26.1 

6.3 

2.6 

7.6 
.6 
7.6 

100. 



24.2 
16.8 



54.2 
4.7 



100.0 



27.4 
58.0 
14.6 



100.0 



..8 
1.4 
6.5 
19.1 
22.6 
14.0 
35.6 



Because of rounding, the sum of the individual classifications may not add to precisely 100.0 percent. 



88 



Table 14. — Type and Value of Property Stolen and Recovered 

[512 cities over 25,000. Total population 60,997, 162] 



Type of property 


Value of 


property 


Percent 




Stolen 


Recovered 


recovered 


TOTAL 


$309, 500, 000 


$159, 900, 000 


52 








36, 300, 000 

29, 100, 000 

8, 300, 000 

13, 900, 000 
151, 400, 000 
70, 500, 000 


3, 300, 000 

2, 000, 000 

300, 000 

1, 400, 000 

139, 100, 000 

13, 800, 000 


9 








4 


Clothing - --- -- 


10 




92 




20 







Table 15.— Value of Property Stolen, by Type of Crime, 1961 

[512 cities over 25,000. Total population 60,997,462] 



Classification 


Number of 
offenses 


Value of 
property 

stolen 


Average 

value per 

offense 


TOTAL 


1, 583, 444 


$309, 500, 000 


$195 




46, 584 
400, 725 
952, 988 
183, 147 


12, 400, 000 
74, 800, 000 
70, 700, 000 
151, 600, 000 


266 




187 


Larceny— theft 


74 

828 







Table 16.— Burglary by Day of Week, October 1961 

[1,941 cities; total population 71,606,734] 



Types of structures 


Per- 
cent 1 


Sun. 


Mon. 


Tues. 


Wed. 


Thurs. 


Fri. 


Sat. 


Un- 
known 


TOTAL BURGLARIES- . 


100.0 


16.5 


14.8 


12.6 


11.0 


11.2 


13.1 


14.4 


6.4 






Residence (anywhere on premise) 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


13.8 
19.1 
18.0 
20.1 
18.4 
16.3 
19.5 
17.0 


14.4 
15.7 
15.6 
15.2 
14.1 
14.0 
14.6 
15.1 


13.2 
12.5 
11.2 
10.8 
13.2 
12.2 
12.2 
11.8 


11.9 
11.0 
9.1 
8.4 
10.4 
10.3 
4.9 
11.2 


11.9 
11.1 

9.7 
10.1 
10.9 
11.1 

4.9 
11.1 


13.9 
12.3 
12.4 
12.4 
12.4 
13.2 
29.3 
11.8 


14.1 
14.9 
14.8 
14.6 
15.3 
14.1 
9.8 
14.3 


6.8 
3.5 




9.2 


Public building (school, library, etc.)-_ 


8.3 
5.4 




8.8 




4.9 


Other (boxcar, private clubs, etc.) 


7.8 



Due to rounding may not add to 100.0 percent. 



641799°— 62- 



89 



Table 17. — Murder Victims — Weapons Used, 1961 

[789 agencies; total population 79,711,762] 





Num- 
ber 


Per- 
cent 








Weapons 




Age 


Gun 


Cut- 
ting 
or 
stab- 
bing 


Blunt 
object 
(club, 
ham- 
mer, 
etc.) 


Personal 
weapons 
(strangu- 
lations 

and 
beatings) 


Poison 


Explo- 
sives 


Other 
(drown- 
ings, 
arson, 
etc.) 


Un- 
known 

and 

not 
stated 


TOTAL.... 


3,008 


"uoo" 


1,578 
52.5 


725 
24.1 


198 
6.6 


336 
11.2 


9 
0.3 


2 
0.1 


133 

4.4 


27 
0.9 








Infant (under 1)_ 
l-4_ 


59 
80 
30 
31 

178 
290 
357 
379 

375 
321 
273 
174 

125 
102 
49 
51 

54 
80 


2.0 
2.7 
1.0 
1.0 

5.9 
9.6 
11.9 
12.6 

12.5 
10.7 
9.1 

5.8 

4.2 
3.4 
1.6 
1.7 

1.8 
2.7 


3 
15 

7 
18 

104 
169 
221 

189 

205 
177 
150 
94 

68 
45 
26 
19 

14 
54 


7 
2 
8 
3 

50 

77 

90 

110 

104 
93 
61 
46 

21 
18 

7 
2 

8 
18 


1 

S 
3 
5 

6 

6 

17 

24 

26 
16 
22 

8 

12 
11 

8 
12 

12 

1 


21 
32 

5 

1 

10 
20 

18 
39 

27 
31 
34 
21 

19 

22 

5 

13 

13 
5 






25 

21 

5 

1 

8 
12 

12 

12 
3 
4 
3 

3 
4 
3 
4 

4 
2 


2 






2 


5-9. 

10-14 

15-19 


1 
1 





1 
2 


20-24 

25-29 

30-34 


3 


~ 1 


3 
3 

5 


35-39 

40-44 





1 


1 


45-49 






2 


50-54 






2 


55-59 

60-64 

65-69 

70-74 


1 

2 





1 

1 


75 and over 


1 





2 











Because of rounding, the sum of the individual classifications may not add to precisely 100.0 percent. 

Table 18. — Murder Victims by Age, Sex and Race, 1961 

[789 agencies; total population 79,711,762] 



Age 


Number 


Percent 


Sex- 






E 


ace 




Male 


Female 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Japanese 


Other 


TOTAL- - 


3,008 




2,176 
72.3 


832 
27.7 


1,334 
44.3 


1,648 
54.8 


13 
0.4 


7 
0.2 


1 


5 


Percent 


i 100.0 


0.2 










Infant (under 1). 


59 
80 
30 
31 

178 
290 
357 
379 

375 
321 
273 
174 

125 
102 
49 
51 

54 
80 


2.0 
2.7 
1.0 
1.0 

5.9 
9.6 
11.9 
12.6 

12.5 
10.7 
9.1 

5.8 

4.2 
3.4 
1.6 

1.7 

1.8 
2.7 


28 
42 
14 

18 

131 
209 
276 
262 

264 
234 
210 
135 

101 
83 
41 
32 

30 

66 


31 
38 
16 
13 

47 
81 
81 
117 

111 
87 
63 
39 

24 
19 
8 
19 

24 

14 


32 
48 
23 
22 

90 
118 
141 
138 

153 
113 
120 

86 

64 
60 
21 
37 

41 
27 


27 
31 

7 
9 

88 
170 
212 
236 

218 

208 

151 

85 

59 
40 

28 
14 

13 
52 










1-4 




1 






5-9 






10-14 










15-19 










20-24 


2 
3 
3 

2 








25-29 


1 
2 

1 






30-34 






35-39 




1 


40-44 






45-49 


2 
1 








50-54 




1 


1 


55-59 


2 




60-64 




2 


65-69.. 










70-74.... 










75 and over 










Unknown 








1 













1 Because of rounding, the sum of the individual classifications may not add to precisely 100.0 percent. 
Tables 17 and 18 based on limited data initiated in July, 1961. 



90 



Arrest Data 

Annual reports prepared by contributing law enforcement agencies 
giving certain personal characteristics of persons arrested are pre- 
sented in the following tabulations. Arrest rates for all criminal 
acts are shown by population group as reported by city and county 
enforcement agencies representing 64 percent of the United States 
population. Trend information is shown for both city and rural 
areas, as well as tabulations by age, sex, and race. 

In interpreting arrest information, it should be kept in mind that 
the same person may be arrested several times in a year for the same 
type or different offenses. Each arrest is counted. The arrest of 
one person may clear several crimes and several persons may be 
arrested for one crime. 

Police arrest practices vary widely, particularly with respect to 
juveniles. For the purpose of this program, law enforcement agencies 
score an arrest when a person is taken into custody for committing 
a specific offense. A juvenile is counted as arrested when he or she 
has committed a crime, and the circumstances are such that if the 
individual were an adult an arrest would have been made. 

Although arrest information is primarily a measure of law enforce- 
ment activity, it provides useful information on characteristics of 
persons arrested for criminal acts. It is also a gauge of criminality 
when used within its limitations, as must be done with all forms of 
criminal statistics, including court and penal. 



91 



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Table 21.— City Arrests of Persons Under 18, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of 

Age, 1961 

[2,776 cities over 2,500, population 85,158,360] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft. 

Auto theft 

O ther assaults 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
etc 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statu- 
tory rape) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.. 
Offenses against family and children- 
Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Disorderly conduct 

D runkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

All other offenses 

Suspicion 



Total 



3, 851, 825 



4,625 
1,618 

7,143 

33, 175 
55,355 

126, 477 

228, 067 
58, 547 
141, 784 

34, 286 



10, 745 
21,613 

26, 843 

46, 204 

25, 080 
35,985 
35,017 
99, 048 

164, 222 

434, 886 

1, 399, 293 

147, 526 

108, 571 



125, 616 



Number of persons arrested 



Under 
18 



566, 682 



384 
115 

1,363 

7,775 

7,189 

61, 508 

113,619 

35,714 

15, 089 

834 



2,940 
1,422 

544 

10, 012 

1,701 

6,860 

1,070 

18, 700 

1,207 
55, 627 
14, 207 
10, 143 

1,352 
176, 203 

21, 104 



Under 
21 



892, 245 



871 
305 

2,949 
14, 439 
12, 658 
81, 479 

141, 149 

45, 735 

27, 699 

2,594 



4,603 
3,814 



2,948 
14, 847 

4,898 
11,970 

3,567 
47, 615 

7,719 
107, 383 
56, 222 
25, 469 

4,715 
222, 199 



44,: 



Under 
25 



1, 270, 088 



1,511 
557 

4,381 
21, 138 
20, 029 
96, 783 

160, 819 

51, 016 

47, 504 

6,989 



5,997 
7,488 

9,574 

21, 003 

10, 456 
17, 379 
8,775 
55, 137 

23, 824 
163, 750 
144, 532 

40, 307 

14, 944 
270, 561 

65, 634 



Percentage 



Under 
18 



14.7 



8.3 
7.1 

19.1 

23.4 
13.0 

48.6 



61.0 
10.6 
2.4 



27.4 
6.6 

2.0 

21.7 



19.1 
3.1 
18.9 



12.8 
1.0 



1.2 

36.7 



16.8 



Under 
21 



23.; 



18.8 
18.9 

41.3 

43.5 
22.9 
64.4 

61.9 

78.1 

19.5 

7.6 



42.8 
17.6 

11.0 

32.1 

19.5 
33.3 
10.2 
48.1 

4.7 
24.7 

4.0 
17.3 

4.3 
46.3 

35.3 



Under 

25 



33.0 



32.7 
34.4 

61.3 
63.7 
36.2 
76.5 

70.5 

87.1 
33.5 
20.4 



55.8 
34.6 

35.7 

45.5 

41.7 
48.3 
25.1 

55.7 

14.5 
37.7 
10.3 
27.3 

13.8 

56.4 

52.2 



95 



Table 22. — City Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1961 

[2,776 cities over 2,500, population 85,158,360] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Other assaults _. 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc.. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized vice... 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory 

rape) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

All other offenses 

Suspicion 



Number 



Total 



3,851,825 



4,625 
1,618 

7,143 
S3, 175 
55,355 
126, 477 

228, 067 

58, 547 

141, 784 

34, 286 

10, 745 
21,613 
26, 843 

46, 204 

25, 080 
35,985 

35, 017 
99, 048 

164, 222 

434, 886 

, 399, 293 

147, 526 

108, 571 
480, 099 

125,616 



Male Female 



3,417,863 



3,791 

1,458 

7,143 
31, 563 
46, 951 
122, 400 

186, 999 
56, 409 

126,817 
28, 548 



17,821 
7,563 

37, 652 

21, 227 
33, 746 
31,099 
84, 790 

153, 462 

373, 760 

1, 286, 309 

134, 569 

99, 529 
403, 757 

110, 692 



433, 962 



834 
160 



1,612 
8,404 
4,077 

41,068 
2,138 

14, 967 
5,738 

937 
3,792 
19, 280 

8, 552 

3,853 
2,239 
3,918 
14, 258 

10, 760 

61, 126 

112,984 

12, 957 

9,042 
76, 342 

14, 924 



Percent 



Total 



J 100. 



( 2 ) 



.1 



.9 
1.4 
3.3 



1.2 

.7 

.9 

.9 

2.6 

4.3 
11.3 
36.3 

3.8 

2.8 
12.5 

3.3 



Male Female 



100.0 







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.9 

1.4 

3.6 

5.5 
1.7 
3.7 



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.5 
.2 

1.1 



1.0 

.9 

2.5 

4.5 
10.9 
37.6 

3.9 

2.9 
11.8 

3.2 



i 100. 



w 



.2 



9.5 

.5 

3.4 

1.3 

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.9 

4.4 

2.0 



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.9 

3.3 

2.5 
14.1 
26.0 

3.0 

2.1 



3.4 



1 Because of rounding, the sum of the individual classifications may not add to precisely 100.0 percent. 

2 Less than Ho of 1 percent. 



96 



Table 23.— City Arrests by Race, 1961 

[2,759 cities over 2,500, population 75,553,307] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
etc 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statu- 
tory rape) 

Narcotic drug laws. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.. 
Offenses against family and children 
Liquor laws. 

Driving while intoxicated 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

All other offenses 

Suspicion... 



Total 



608, 317 



3,694 
1,555 

6,068 
26, 333 
42, 157 
114,012 

212, 703 
52, 005 

132, 990 
31,445 



8,900 
20, 106 



41, 572 

18, 419 

32, 942 

33, 906 
94, 471 

161, 126 

376, 280 

1, 390, 976 

142, 683 

75,385 
442, 567 

125, 557 



Race 



White 



2, 424, 631 



1,493 
1,203 

2,922 

11,858 
16, 184 
75, 266 

142, 487 
39, 521 
74, 822 
25, 737 



5,810 

16, 356 

10, 597 
29, 680 

11, 371 

14, 908 
22, 501 
64, 691 

133, 491 

226, 386 

995, 331 

98, 710 

17, 630 
307, 620 



056 



Negro 



073, 491 



2,154 
321 

3,075 
14, 143 
25, 550 
36, 696 

66, 057 

11,023 

56, 069 

5,439 



2,960 
3,534 

9,573 

11, 006 

6,742 
17, 598 
11,094 
27, 550 

25, 152 
144, 129 
328, 741 

38, 813 

53, 155 
126, 583 

46, 334 



Indian 



79, 716 



18 
186 
201 
632 

1,521 
619 
725 
117 



39 
121 

85 

228 

78 

150 

141 

1,514 

1,876 
3,393 
59, 740 
3,766 

21 
3,697 



s.'l 



Chinese 



1,725 



4 

1 

4 
14 

14 
48 

129 

38 



389 
59 



391 
179 



Jap i- 
nese 



All 
others 

(in- 
cludes 

race un- 
known) 



2 

4 

5 

11 

19 

128 

317 

148 
82 
21 



57 

53 

39 

24 

10 

109 



116 
109 
593 



728 
608 

19 



25, 326 



23 

17 

44 

121 

189 

1,242 

2,192 
656 

1,224 
114 



75 
66 

121 

565 

120 
233 
149 

577 

473 
2,194 
6,182 
1,137 

3,460 
3,880 

272 



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100 



Table 27. — Rural Arrests of Persons Under 18, Under 21, and Under 25 Years 

of Age, 1961 

[1,061 county agencies, population 30,253,937] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory rape) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws.- - 

Driving while intoxicated 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

All other offenses 

Suspicion 



Total 



499, 115 



1,222 
838 

2,013 
4,115 
9,300 

32, 456 

37, 637 
10, 646 
22, 609 
12, 677 

2,357 

7,905 

686 

6,840 

4,042 
4,260 
19, 189 
22, 904 

40, 796 

33, 185 
105, 378 

9,829 

4,643 
93, 090 

10, 498 



Number of persons 
arrested 



Under 

18 



73, 052 



73 

48 

231 

588 

850 

13, 306 

12, 763 

5, 450 

1,248 

139 

501 

410 

29 

1,180 

181 



4,225 

314 
3, 530 
2,424 

534 



21, 132 
2,842 



Under 

21 



138, 453 



192 
156 

740 
1, 545 
2,032 

20, 581 

20, 738 

7,545 

3,733 

803 

983 

1,352 

73 

2,145 

883 

1,402 

1,413 

13, 079 

2,114 

8, 858 
8,675 
1,667 

275 
32, 645 

4,824 



Under 

25 



385 



357 
315 

1,196 

2,518 
3,475 
25, 312 

25, 680 
8,729 
7,115 
2,533 

1,313 

2,762 

209 

3,314 

1,926 

2,148 
4,422 
15, 380 

6,322 

14, 285 
19, 241 
2,801 

709 
44, 977 

6, 346 



Percentage 



Under 
18 



14.6 



6.0 

5.7 

11.5 

14.3 

9.1 

41.0 

33.9 
51.2 

5.5 
1.1 

21.3 
5.2 
4.2 

17.3 

4.5 
16.4 

1.5 
18.4 



10.6 
2.3 
5.4 

1.4 
22.7 

27.1 



Under 
21 



15.7 
18.6 

36.8 
37.5 
21.8 
63.4 

55.1 

70.9 

16.5 

6.3 

41.7 
17.1 
10.6 
31.4 

21.8 

32.9 

7.4 

57.1 

5.2 
26.7 

8.2 
17.0 

5.9 
35.1 



Under 

25 



40.7 



29. 2 
37. 6 

59.4 
61.2 
37.4 
78. 

68.2 
82.0 
31.5 
20.0 

55.7 
34.9 
30.5 
48. 5 

47.6 
50.4 
23.0 
67.1 

15.5 
43.0 
18.3 

28.5 

15.3 
48.3 

60.4 



101 



Table 28. — Rural Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1961 

[1,061 county agencies, population 30,253,937] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 



Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 



Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Embezzlement and fraud. 



Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory 
rape) 



Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc — 
Offenses against family and children. 
Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxicated. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



Gambling 

All other offenses- 
Suspicion 



Total 



499, 115 



1.222 
838 

2,013 

4,115 

9.300 

32, 456 

37, 637 
10, 646 
22, 609 
12, 677 

2,357 

7,905 

686 

6,840 

4,042 

4,260 

19, 189 

22, 904 

40, 796 

33, 185 

105,378 

9,829 

4,643 
93, 090 

10, 498 



Number 



Male 



457, 382 



1,054 
771 

2,013 

3,914 

8,446 

31, 505 

34, 268 
10, 228 
21, 004 
10, 949 

2,225 

6,988 

216 

6,174 

3,502 

4,083 

18, 140 

20, 532 

38, 950 
29, 688 
97, 194 

8,857 

4,272 
82, 769 

9,640 



Female 



41, 733 



168 

67 



201 

854 
951 

3,369 

418 

1,605 

1,728 

132 
917 
470 

666 

540 

177 

1,049 

2,372 

1,846 

3,497 

8,184 

972 

371 
10, 321 

858 



Percent 



Total 



i 100. 



1.9 

6.5 

7.5 
2.1 
4.5 
2.5 

.5 

1.6 

.1 



.8 

.9 

3.8 

4.6 

8.2 
6.6 
21.1 
2.0 

.9 

18.7 



Male 



100.0 



m 



1.8 
6.9 

7.5 
2.2 
4.6 
2.4 

.5 
1.5 



1.3 



4.0 

4.5 

8.5 

6.5 

21.3 

1.9 



18.1 
2.1 



Female 



i 100.0 



.5 
2.0 
2.3 

8.1 
1.0 
3.8 
4.1 

.3 
2.2 

1.1 



1.3 

.4 

2.5 

5.7 

4.4 
8.4 
19.6 
2.3 

.9 
24.7 

2.1 



i Because of rounding, the sum of the individual classifications may not add to precisely 100.0 percent. 
2 Less than Ho of 1 percent. 



102 



Table 29.— Rural Arrests by Race, 1961 

[1,048 county agencies, population 29,017,535] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft_- 

Other assaults 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc_. 
Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory rape) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Offenses against family and children 

Liquor laws 

Driving while intoxicated 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 

Gambling 

All other offenses 

Suspicion 



Total 



467, 697 



1,143 

777 

1,828 

3,927 

8,768 

29,841 

34, 542 

9,732 

21,405 

12, 152 

2,112 

7,096 

653 

6,529 

3,677 
3.771 
18, 630 
18, 027 

38, 876 

31,826 

101, 682 

9,672 

4,461 
86, 115 

10, 455 



Race 



\\ bite 



382, 735 



672 
658 

1,401 

2,814 

5,768 

25, 422 

28, 681 
8,448 
16, 738 
11,031 

1,768 

6,244 

449 

5,497 

3,096 
2,627 
14, 865 
14, 193 

34, 350 
24, 153 

82, 333 
8,115 

2,121 
72, 789 

8,502 



Negro 



67, 458 



447 
108 

374 
1,008 
2,814 
3,702 

5,033 

872 
4,179 



287 
660 
190 
856 

539 
1,099 
3,429 
3, 258 

3,208 

6,360 

12, 140 

1,262 

2,101 

10, 884 



Indian 



14, 186 



20 
6 

37 

73 

144 

497 

595 
344 
350 
124 

42 

173 

10 

70 

4 

31 

298 

479 

1,145 
1,120 
6,804 



9 
1,383 



219 



Chinese 



Japa- 
nese 



All others 
(includes 

race un- 
known) 



201 



3,037 



4 
4 

14 

32 

36 

205 

207 
60 

129 
38 

10 

19 

3 

98 

34 
14 
36 
92 

162 

176 

384 

77 

191 



43 



103 



Table 30.— Rural Arrest Trends, 1960-61 

[643 counties, population 20,512,305] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL- 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and 
nonnegligent 
manslaughter.. 

(b) Manslaughter 
by negligence.. 



Forcible rape 

Eobbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or 
entering 



L ar cen y— theft 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Embezzlement and 
fraud 



Stolen property; buying, 
receiving, etc 

Forgery and counter- 
feiting. 

Prostitution and com- 
mercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (in- 
cludes statutory rape). 



Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, 

possessing, etc 

Offenses against family 

and children 

Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxi- 
cated 

Disorderly conduct. . 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



Gambling 

All other offenses- 



Suspicion (not included 
in totals) 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1960 



562 

1,089 
2,574 
5,824 

19, 888 

20, 892 
6,664 
14, 996 

7,203 



1,244 

4,129 

460 

4,394 

4,143 

2,462 

12, 481 
11,086 



23, 927 

19, 921 

63,380 

5,342 

2,897 
57, 743 



1961 



297, 948 



635 

558 

1,139 
2,436 
5,609 

19, 933 

22, 944 
6,691 
14, 956 

8,189 



1,163 

4,088 

415 

4,285 

3,179 

2,446 

12, 669 
11, 528 



23, 444 
21, 098 
63, 031 

5,184 

2,846 
59, 482 



7,519 



Percent 
change 



+1.4 



-2.9 

-.7 

+4.6 
-5.4 
-3.7 

+.2 

+9.8 
+.4 
-.3 

+13.7 



-6.5 
-1.0 



-2.5 
-23.3 



+1.5 
+4.0 



-2.0 
+5.9 



-3.0 



-1.8 
+3.0 



2. 1 



Under 18 years of age 



1960 



41, 858 



40 

32 

109 
332 

517 

8,085 

7,100 

3,491 

814 

116 

298 

234 

11 

658 

241 

495 

163 
2,231 



194 
1,892 
1,500 

325 

30 
12, 950 



2. 622 



1961 



42, 920 



53 

27 

144 
340 
523 

8,126 

7,958 

3,563 

773 

94 



228 

234 

18 

647 

153 

460 

171 
2,267 



201 

2, 165 

1,538 

284 

45 
12, 908 



2,327 



Percent 
change 



+2.5 



+32.5 
-15.6 

+32.1 

+2.4 
+1.2 

+.5 

+12.1 

+2.1 
-5.0 

-19.0 



-23.5 



+63.6 
-1.7 

-36.5 

-7.1 

+4.9 
+1.6 



+3.6 
+14.4 

+2.5 
-12.6 

+50.0 



18 years of age and over 



1960 



252. 097 



614 
530 



2,242 
5,307 

11, 803 

13, 792 
3,173 
14, 182 

7,087 



3,895 

449 

3,736 

3,902 

1,967 

12, 318 
8,855 



23, 733 

18, 029 

61, 880 

5,017 

2,867 
44, 793 



5,061 



1961 



255, 028 



582 

531 

995 
2,096 
5,086 

11, 807 

14, 986 
3,128 
14, 183 

8,095 



935 
3,854 

397 

3,638 

3,026 

1,986 

12,498 
9,261 



23, 243 

18, 933 

61, 493 

4,900 

2,801 
46, 574 



Percent 
change 



+1. 



-5.2 

+.2 

+1.5 
-6.5 
-4.2 

0) 

+8.7 
-1.4 
(') 

+14.2 



-1.2 

-1.1 
-11.6 

-2.6 
-22.5 

+1.0 

+ 1.5 
+4.6 



-2.1 

+5.0 

-.6 

-2.3 

-2.3 

+4.0 



+2.6 



1 Less than Ho of 1 percent increase. 



104 



Table 31.— Rural Arrest Trends by Sex, 1960-61 

[643 counties, population 20,512,305] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 



Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 



Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Other assaults 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, etc 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Other sex offenses (includes statutory 
rape) 



Narcotic drug laws 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
Offenses against family and children. 
Liquor laws 



Driving while intoxicated. 

Disorderly conduct 

Drunkenness 

Vagrancy 



6-ambling 

All other offenses. 



Suspicion (not included in totals). 



I960 



269, 926 



560 

520 

1,089 
2, 449 
5,269 
19,200 

19, 055 
6,402 

13, 922 
6,260 
1,162 
3, 576 
128 

4,055 

3,634 
2,337 
11, 922 
9,993 

22, 983 
17, 939 

58, 642 
4,904 

2,640 
51, 285 

7,153 



Males 



273, 001 



549 
512 

1,139 
2, 304 

5, 095 
19, 320 

20, 844 

6, 446 
13, 894 

7, 095 

1,089 

3,608 

137 

3,930 

2, 723 
2,334 
11,973 
10, 381 

22, 437 
18, 954 

58, 270 
4, 625 

2,615 
52, 727 



Percent 
change 



+ 1.1 



-2.0 
-1.5 

+4.6 
-5.9 
-3.3 

+.6 

+9. 4 

+.7 

-.2 

+ 13.3 

-6.3 
+.9 

+7.0 

-3.1 

-25. 1 

-.1 

+.4 

+3.9 

-2.4 

+5.7 

-.6 

-5.7 

-.9 

+2.8 

-3.5 



Females 



I960 



24, 029 



125 

555 
688 

1,837 
262 

1,074 

943 

82 

553 

332 

339 

509 

125 

559 

1,093 

944 
1,982 
4,738 

438 

257 
6,458 

530 



24, 947 



132 

514 
613 

2,100 

245 

1,062 

1,094 

74 

480 

278 

355 

456 

112 

696 

1,147 

1,007 

2,144 

4,761 

559 

231 
6,755 

617 



Percent 
change 



+3.8 



-8.5 

+9. 5 



+5. 6 
-7.4 

-10.9 

+ 14.3 
-6. 5 
-1.1 

+ 16.0 
-9.8 

-13.2 

-16.3 

+4.7 

-10.4 

-10.4 

+24. 5 

+4.9 

+6.7 
+8.2 

+.5 
+27. 6 

-10.1 
+4.6 

+16.4 



1 Males under 18 years of age increased 2.5 percent; females under 18 years of age increased 3.1 percent. 



641799°— 62- 



105 



Table 32. — Police Disposition of Juvenile Offenders Taken Into Custody, 1961 



Population group 


Total i 


Handled 
within 
depart- 
ment 
and 
released 


Referred 

to 
juvenile 

court 
jurisdic- 
tion 


Referred 

to 
welfare 
agency 


Referred 

to 

other 

police 

agency 


Referred 

to 

criminal 

or adult 

court 


TOTAL: 1,863 agencies; total population 
60,390,239: 


391. 206 
2 100. 


176. 594 
45.1 


190, 877 
48.8 


7,586 
1.9 


11,688 
3.0 


4,461 
1. 1 


Percent - __ _ 






TOTAL CITIES: 1,498 cities; total popula- 
tion 50,371,972: 


360. 946 
100.0 


163, 460 
45.3 


176, 559 
48.9 


7,113 
2.0 


10, 505 
2.9 


3,309 


Percent . 


.9 






GROUP I 

28 cities over 250,000; population 22,495,569: 


141.957 
100.0 

40. 907 
100.0 

43. 308 
100.0 

53, 353 
100.0 

50. 025 
100.0 

31,396 
100.0 


51,447 
36.2 

18, 158 
44.4 

21, 697 
50.1 

28, 779 
53.9 

27, 196 
54.4 

16, 183 
51.5 


84, 887 
59.8 

21,547 
52.7 

17,641 
40.7 

20, 817 
39.0 

19, 474 
38.9 

12, 193 

38.8 


2.563 
1.8 

548 
1.3 

1,227 
2.8 

1,366 
2.6 

872 
1.7 

537 
1.7 


2.900 
2.0 

471 
1.2 

2,434 
5.6 

1,578 
3.0 

1,818 
3.6 

1,304 

4.2 


160 




.1 


GROUP II 

33 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; population 
4,842,394: 


183 


Percent. 


.4 


group in 

86 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; population 
5,932,516: 
Number 


309 




.7 


GROUP IV 

187 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; population 
6,432,126: 
Number 


813 


Percent.. ._ 


1.5 


GROUP V 

423 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; population 
6,597,379: 
Number 


665 


Percent, . 


1.3 


GROUP VI 

741 cities under 10,000; population 4,071,- 
988: 
Number . .. 


1.179 


Percent .- ... 


3.8 






365 county agencies; population 10,018,267: 
Number . 


30. 260 
100.0 


13, 134 
43.4 


14, 318 
47.3 


473 
1.6 


1,183 
3.9 


1.152 


Percent 


3.8 







1 Traffic and neglect cases not included. 

2 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to precisely 100.0 percent. 



106 



Police Employee Data 

This section presents selected tables based on national averages. 
Figures relating to police employee rates must not be considered as 
recommended or desirable police strength inasmuch as numerous 
factors must be considered in arriving at such a determination. Rate 
ranges shown are merely to provide supplemental information for 
those desiring to use these figures to make limited comparisons. 



107 



Table 33. — Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1961, 
Number and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants, by Geographic Divisions and 
Population Groups 





TOTAL 


Population group 


















(3,430 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


Geographic division 


cities ; 
population 














(51 cities 


(75 cities, 


(170 cities, 


(336 cities, 


(863 cities, 


(1,935 cities 




97,211,848) 


over 


100,000 to 


50,000 to 


25,000 to 


10,000 to 


under 






250,000; 


250,000; 


100,000; 


50,000; 


25,000; 


10,000; 






population 


population 


population 


population 


population 


population 






39,355,156) 


10,766,524) 


11,673,093) 


11,612,084) 


13,477,602) 


10,327,389) 


TOTAL: 3,430 cities; 
















population 97,211,848: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


189,093 


101, 565 


18, 187 


18, 448 


16,918 


19, 059 


14,916 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants, _ 


1.9 


2.6 


1.7 


1.6 


1.5 


1.4 


1.4 


Rate Range 


0. 2-10. 1 


1. 1-4. 3 


1. 0-2. 7 


0. 5-4. 4 


0. 3-3. 4 


0. 3-4. 7 


0. 2-10. 1 


New England: 273 
















cities ; population 
















6,906,488: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


13, 858 


2,970 


2,875 


2,769 


2,423 


1,908 


913 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


2.0 


4.3 


2.4 


1.9 


1.6 


1.4 


1.3 


Rate range 


0. 3-4. 3 


0) 


2. 1-2. 7 


1. 3-2. 8 


1. 0-2. 7 


0. 6-2. 4 


0. 3-4. 


Middle Atlantic: 707 
















cities ; population 
















22,608,811: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


54, 829 


37, 535 


3,061 


3,545 


3,082 


4,504 


3,102 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


2.4 


3.1 


1.9 


1.7 


1.6 


1.5 


1.4 


Rate range 


0. 2-5. 3 


1. 8-3. 6 


1. 4-2. 5 


0. 6-3. 8 


0. 6-3. 3 


0. 5-4. 7 


0. 2-5. 3 


East North Central : 779 
















cities ; population 
















21,905,860: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


41,662 


24,520 


2,757 


3,679 


3,688 


3,883 


3,135 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


1.9 


2.7 


1.5 


1.3 


1.3 


1.3 


1.3 


Rate range 


0. 3-4. 8 


1. 1-3. 3 


1. 1-1. 8 


0. 5-2. 4 


0. 4-3. 2 


0. 5-3. 3 


0. 3-4. 8 


West North Central : 390 
















cities ; population 
















7,472,031: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


11,353 


5,475 


748 


814 


1,068 


1,673 


1,575 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


1.5 


2.1 


1.3 


1.2 


1.1 


1.2 


1.2 


Rate range 


0. 3-3. 9 


1. 3-3. 2 


1. 1-1. 8 


0. 7-1. 4 


0. 3-1. 8 


0. 3-2. 3 


0. 3-3. 9 


South Atlantic: 353 
















cities ; population 
















9,914,182: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


21,038 


9,084 


2,953 


3,057 


1,860 


2,057 


2,027 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


2.1 


3.0 


1.6 


1.9 


1.7 


1.7 


1.8 


Rate range 


0. 2-10. 1 


1. 5-3. 9 


1. 2-2. 5 


1. 0-4. 4 


0. 8-3. 2 


0. 7-2. 8 


0. 2-10. 1 


East South Central: 149 
















cities ; population 
















3.755,709: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


5,692 


2.277 


946 


416 


791 


564 


698 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants. 


1.5 


1.5 


1.6 


1.6 


1.4 


1.4 


1.4 


Rate range 


0. 4-2. 8 


1. 5-1. 6 


1. 4-2. 


1. 4-2. 1 


0. 9-2. 


0. 9-1. 9 


0. 4-2. 8 



Only 1 city this size in geographic division. 



108 



Table 33. — Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1961, 
Number and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants, by Geographic Divisions and 
Popula tion Groups — Continued 





TOTAL 






Population group 




















(3,430 

cities ; 

population 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 




(51 cities 


(75 cities, 


(170 cities, 


(336 cities, 


(863 cities, 


(1.935 cities 




97,211,848) 


over 


100,000 to 


50,000 to 


25,000 to 


10,000 to 


under 






250,000; 


250,000; 


100,000; 


50,000; 


25,000; 


10,000; 






population 


population 


population 


population 


population 


population 






39,355,156) 


10,766,524) 


11,673,093) 


11,612,084) 


13,477,602) 


10,327,389) 


West South Central : 258 
















cities ; population 
















8,290,967: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


11,493 


5,756 


1,612 


1,057 


846 


1,303 


919 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants. 


1.4 


1.5 


1.5 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


1.2 


Rate range 


0. 2-2. 7 


1.1-1.8 


1.0-1.8 


0. 7-1. 5 


0. 7-1. 5 


0. 4-2. 2 


0. 2-2. 7 


Mountain: 168 cities; 
















population 3,646,605: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


5,881 


1,466 


874 


744 


703 


741 


853 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


1.5 


1.6 


1.4 


1.6 


1.3 


1.4 


1.5 


Rate range 


0. 4-3. 5 


1.4-1.8 


1.3-1.6 


0. 9-2. 7 


0. 9-2. 1 


0. 4-3. 2 


0. 4-3. 5 


Pacific: 353 cities; pop- 
















ulation 12,711,195: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


23, 787 


12, 482 


2,361 


2,367 


2,457 


2,426 


1,694 


Average number of 
















employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


1.9 


2.2 


1.6 


1.6 


1.5 


1.6 


1.8 


Rate range 


0.4-4.7 


1. 4-2. 5 


1. 2-2. 1 


1.0-2.9 


1. 0-3. 4 


0. 6-4. 1 


0. 4-4. 7 


County police: 20 agen- 
















cies ; population 
















4,823,583: 
















Number of police 
















employees 


5,899 














Average number of 














employees per 
















1,000 inhabitants- 


1.2 
0. 2-2. 9 














Rate range 





























Table 34. — Civilian Police Department Employees, 1961 Percentage of Total 

by Population Group 

[3,430 cities over 2,500, population 97,211,848] 



Population group 


Percentage 

civilian 
employees 


Total, all cities . 


9 7 


Group I (over 250,000) 


10.3 


(Over 1,000,000) 


8 7 


(750,000-1 ,000,000) 


12.5 


(500,000-750,000) 


9. 1 


(250,000-500,000) 


14 6 


Group II (100,000-250,000) 


11.5 


Group III (50,000-100,000) 


9.6 


Group IV (25,000-50,000) 


8.1 


Group V (10,000-25,000) 


6.5 


Group VI (2,500-10,000) 


9.0 


20 county police agencies 


8.9 







109 



Table 35. — Number of Police Department Employees Killed, 1961, 
Geographic Divisions and Population Groups 

[3,430 cities, population 97,211,848] 



by 








TOTAL 


Population group 


Geographic division 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group IV 


Group V 


Group VI 


County 
and 




Over 
250,000 


100,000 to 
250,000 


50,000 to 
100,000 


25,000 to 
50,000 


10,000 to 
25,000 


Under 
10,000 


State 
police 


TOTAL. 


71 


18 


10 


8 


3 


8 


5 


19 






New England... 




















11 
12 
6 

12 
3 
8 
3 

16 


5 
3 
2 

4 


2 
1 






1 

1 
1 




3 


East North Central . 




2 


2 

1 

1 


3 




1 
2 


1 


South Atlantic 


4 
2 

1 




1 


East South Central... 






1 


W est South Central. _ 


2 


2 




2 




1 








3 


Pacific- 


2 




3 


1 


3 


1 


6 









Table 36. — Assaults on Police Officers, 1961, by Geographic Divisions and 

Population Groups 

[3,389 cities, population 90,032,892] 



Geographic division 


Assaults 


Rate per 
100 police 
officers 


Population group 


Assaults 


Rate per 
100 police 
officers 


TOTAL 


13, 190 


8.3 


TOTAL .. 


13. 190 


8.3 




Group I 
(Over 250,000).. 




New England __. 


595 
4.757 
1,425 

786 

2,549 
570 
555 
381 

1,572 


4.7 
9.2 
4.4 
8.1 

14.1 

13.5 

7.3 

8.8 

8.5 


7,381 
1,155 
1,241 
939 
1,405 
1,069 




Middle Atlantic. 


8.9 


East North Central 


Group II 

(100,000 to 250,000) 




W est North Central 


8.0 


South Atlantic _ . 


Group III 

(50,000 to 100,000) 


8.2 


East South Central . 


Group IV 

(25,000 to 50,000) 




West South Central 


6.2 


Mountain. _ 


Group V 
(10,000 to 25,000) 




Pacific 


7.9 




Group VI 
(Under 10,000) 


7.9 









Table 37. — Full-time State Police Employees, December 31, 1961. and State 

Police Killed 1961 



State police 


TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilian 


Police 
killed 


Alaska 


115 
670 
219 
288 

1,405 

1.129 

983 

329 


84 
462 
174 
240 

1,112 
906 
710 
262 


31 

208 
45 

48 

293 
223 
273 

67 




Connecticut _. 




Delaware . 




Maine 




Michigan 




New Jersey... 


1 


Virginia .. 




West Virginia. 









110 



Table 38. — Number of Full-tune Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities Over 25,000 in Population 



City 



ALABAMA 

Anniston 

Bessemer 

Birmingham 

Decatur 

Dothan 

Florence 

Gadsden 

Huntsville 

Mobile 

Montgomery 

Phenix City 

Selma 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Anchorage.. 

ARIZONA 

Mesa 

Phoenix 

Tucson 

ARKANSAS 

El Dorado 

Fort Smith 

Hot Springs 

Little Rock 

North Little Rock 

CALIFORNIA 

Alhambra 

Anaheim 

Arcadia 

Bakersfield 

Baldwin Park 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills 

Buena Park 

Burbank 

Chula Vista 

Compton 

Concord 

Costa Mesa 

Culver City-- 

Daly City 

Downey 

El Cajon 

El CerritO— . 

Eureka 

Fremont 

Fresno .. 

Fullerton 

Gardena 

Garden Grove 

Glendale___ 

Hawthorne 

Hayward 

Huntington Park. 

Inglewood 

La Habra 

La Mesa 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Lynwood 

Manhattan Beach 

Menlo Park 

Modesto 

Montebello 

Monterey Park... 
Mountain View... 



Number of police d€ 




employees 


TOTAL 


Police 




officers 


55 


49 


51 


51 


504 


435 


39 


35 


48 


47 


45 
96 


45 
91 


102 
279 


102 
216 


195 


181 


26 


25 


40 

81 


40 

78 


60 


54 


37 


34 


598 


509 


274 


214 


28 


24 


67 


63 


41 


40 


192 


169 


82 


80 


90 


78 


158 


136 


63 


54 


166 


131 


43 


34 


140 


130 


92 


85 


58 


48 


168 


137 


53 


48 


99 


86 


58 


47 


66 


51 


56 


51 


46 


39 


95 


77 


45 


40 


30 


29 


46 


43 


44 


41 


277 


250 


99 


77 


44 


40 


110 


88 


165 


139 


49 


45 


85 


73 


52 


48 


114 


86 


38 


31 


34 


31 


579 


489 


6,105 


4,711 


42 


35 


40 


34 


37 


36 


70 


62 


52 


46 


50 


47 


45 


41 



Civilians 



1,394 

7 



City 



CALIFORNIA- 

Continued 

National City 

Newport Beach. . 

Oakland 

Ontario.. ..- 

Orange 

Oxnard 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Redondo Beach. 

Redwood City 

Richmond 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

Salinas 

San Bernardino. .. 

San Bruno 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

San Jose 

San Leandro 

San Mateo 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Monica 

Santa Rosa 

South Gate 

South San 

Francisco 

Stockton.. -. 

Sunnyvale. 

Torrance 

Vallejo.- — 

Ventura 

Westminster 

Whittier 

COLORADO 

Aurora 

Boulder.. 

Colorado Springs. 

Denver 

Englewood 

Greeley.. — 

Pueblo 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 

Bristol 

East Hartford 

Enfield 

Fairfield.. 

Greenwich 

Hamden. -. 

Hartford 

Manchester 

Township 

Meriden. 

Middletown 

New Britain. 

New Haven 

New London 

Norwalk... 

Norwich. 

Stamford 

Stratford 

Torrington 

Wallingford 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



49 
85 

757 
63 
46 
60 
74 

219 
90 
48 
66 
60 

155 

134 

326 
57 

190 
33 

795 
1, 856 

273 
66 
87 

151 



44 
42 

113 
MIS 
35 
39 

127 



375 

57 
72 
31 
54 

135 
70 

422 

4!) 
89 
42 

L63 

397 
63 

130 
48 

212 
72 
57 
34 



Police Civilians 
officers 



606 
56 
39 
54 
71 

180 
72 
44 
55 
53 

133 

110 

273 
43 

161 
26 

669 
1, 735 

250 
54 
80 

114 
72 
61 
39 

132 
37 
76 

32 
146 
59 
124 
69 
52 
24 



41 
42 
99 

738 
34 
30 

119 



355 
54 
69 
31 
54 

120 
68 

387 



41 

150 

374 
60 

121 
46 

201 
68 
54 
34 



111 



Table 38.— Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 





Number of police department 
employees 


City 


Number of police department 
employees 


City 


TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


CONNECTICUT— 

Continued 


246 
111 
72 

234 

3,010 

92 
89 

78 

222 

49 

58 

83 

114 

498 

41 

85 

866 

276 

47 

153 

46 

122 

236 

55 

74 

506 

127 

65 
45 
811 
152 
175 
52 
155 
40 
56 
179 
36 

89 
632 

82 
107 

63 
69 
43 

56 
36 
85 
43 
59 
48 


237 
104 
70 

213 

2,809 

65 

73 

58 

191 

33 

48 

77 

94 

420 

37 

67 

620 

218 

41 

133 

37 

111 

206 

45 

69 

369 

114 

64 
39 
708 
139 
166 
47 
154 
38 
52 
158 
35 

85 
528 

78 
107 

58 
58 
38 

47 
30 
74 
41 
59 
45 


9 

7 
2 

21 

201 

27 

16 
20 
31 

16 
10 

6 
20 
78 

4 

18 

246 

58 

6 
20 

9 
11 
30 
10 

5 

137 

13 

1 

6 

103 

13 
9 
5 
1 
2 
4 

21 
1 

4 
104 

4 


ILLINOIS— Con. 

Calumet City 

Champaign 


22 

61 

11, 879 

51 

112 
36 
87 
34 
92 
67 
35 

146 
27 
36 
36 
28 
36 
82 
31 
35 
50 
28 
85 
25 
38 
29 

175 
49 

147 
68 
82 

115 
24 
66 
32 

86 

48 

140 

74 

202 

248 

269 

172 

932 

69 

62 

59 

57 

50 

108 

39 

61 

212 

107 

27 
38 

124 
33 
60 

225 
64 
31 
28 
41 
34 

123 

103 


21 

52 

10, 716 

46 

109 
36 
74 
34 
86 
59 
35 

116 
27 
31 
36 
27 
32 
72 
29 
35 
47 
27 
77 
20 
35 
23 

158 
46 

134 
59 
74 
94 
22 
57 
27 

78 

39 

135 

66 

192 

240 

234 

159 

827 

67 

62 

52 

55 

47 

97 

39 

59 

202 

105 

27 
29 

107 
32 
52 

199 
63 
29 
26 
34 
30 
95 
95 


1 
9 


West Hartford 


1,163 


West Haven 


Chicago Heights.. . 
Cicero .. 


5 
3 


DELAWARE 










13 


Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF 


Des Plaines 

East St. Louis 

Elgin -. 




6 

8 


COLUMBIA 










30 












5 


FLORIDA 


Granite City 






1 




Highland Park 


4 


Coral Gables -- 


10 


Daytona Beach .. 




2 


Fort Lauderdale . 






Fort Pierce 




3 


Gainesville. _ _ 




1 




Oak Park 


8 




Park Forest 

Park Ridge 

Pekin 


5 


Jacksonville 


3 

6 


Lakeland. - - 




17 






3 


Miami Beach. 


Rockford 


13 


North Miami 


Rock Island 


9 

8 


Panama Citv - 




21 






2 


St. Petersburg 




9 






5 


Tallahassee 

Tampa 


INDIANA 




West Palm Beach.. 


8 


GEORGIA 

Albany 


Bloomington 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 


9 
5 

8 


Athens 




10 




Fort Wayne 


8 


Augusta. _ __ - - 


35 


Columbus. __ 




13 




Indianapolis 


105 


Macon ... 


o 


Marietta. .. . . .. 










- 




Michigan City 

Mishawaka 







3 




11 


HAWAII 


New Albany 

Richmond 






2 


Hilo 


South Bend 

Terre Haute 

IOWA 


10 




2 






Maui 




IDAHO 


5 
11 
5 

9 
6 
11 
2 




Boise 




9 


Idaho Falls 


Cedar Rapids 


17 


Pocatello 


1 


ILLINOIS 


Council Bluffs 

Des Monies 


8 

26 

1 




Fort Dodge 




Arlington Heights 


2 




Mason City 




Belleville 


4 


Berwyn 




28 


Bloomington 


3 


Waterloo!. 


8 



112 



Table 38. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



KANSAS 



Hutchinson 

Kansas City 

Lawrence 

Prairie Village 

Salina 

Topeka 

Wichita 

KENTUCKY 

Ashland 

Bowling Green 

Covington 

Lexington 

Louisville 

Newport 

Owensboro 

Paducah 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Baton Rouge 

Lafayette 

Lake Charles 

Monroe 

New Iberia 

New Orleans 

Shreveport 

MAINE 

Bangor 

Lewiston 

Portland 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Cumberland 

Hagerstown 

Rockville 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Arlington 

Attleboro 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Braintree 

Brockton 

Brookline 

Cambridge-- 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Everett 

Fall River 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Gloucester 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 

Leominster 

Lexington 

Lowell 

Lynn.., 

Maiden 

Medford 

Melrose 

Methuen 

Milton 

Natick 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



220 

28 
24 
47 
160 
343 



38 
37 
83 
135 
621 
60 
71 
61 



55 
274 
52 
47 
72 
30 
128 
246 



57 
69 
125 



3,439 

64 

68 

4 



87 

39 

46 

63 

2,970 

48 

122 

151 

240 

71 

87 

118 

255 

76 

54 

46 

77 

121 

146 

35 

33 

179 

193 

120 

117 

50 

30 

53 

43 



Police 
officers 



39 
166 
24 
24 
34 
128 
268 



36 
37 
82 
132 
523 
52 
68 
58 



53 

246 

37 

45 

67 

30 

1,043 

220 



49 
64 
111 



3,116 

58 

65 

4 



38 

43 

60 

2,742 

47 

117 

141 

230 

66 

84 

115 

238 

69 

54 

44 

74 

119 

136 

33 

32 

171 

183 

119 

113 

48 

29 

51 

41 



Civilians 



323 
6 
3 



1 
3 
3 
228 
1 
5 

10 
10 
5 
3 
3 

17 
7 



City 



MASSACHUSETTS- 
Continued 

Needham 

New Bedford 

Newton 

Northampton 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 

Quincy 

Revere 

Salem 

Somerville 

Taunton 

Waltham 

Watertown 

Wellesley 

Westfield .. 

Weymouth 

Woburn 

Worcester 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek 

Bay City 

Birmingham 

Detroit 

Dearborn 

East Detroit 

East Lansing 

Ferndale 

Flint 

Garden City 

Grand Rapids 

Hamtramck 

Hazel Park 

Highland Park 

Inkster 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Lansing 

Lincoln Park 

Livonia 

Madison Heights- 
Midland 

Muskegon 

Oak Park 

Pontiac 

Port Huron 

Redford Township 

Roseville 

Royal Oak 

Saginaw 

St. Clair Shores. ... 

Southfield 

Southgate 

Warren 

Waterford Town- 
ship 

Wyandotte 

Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Austin 

Bloomington 

Duluth 

Edina 

Minneapolis 

Minnetonka 

Richfield 

Rochester 

St. Cloud 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



239 

163 
44 
48 
87 

170 
84 
81 

174 
68 

103 
75 
33 
43 
77 
41 

400 



90 

93 

37 

,737 

204 
51 
26 
48 

302 
35 

276 
84 
35 

120 
41 
89 

132 

180 
61 
69 
27 
30 
75 
67 

133 
55 
37 
55 
90 

153 
65 
39 
29 

146 



Police 
officers 



37 

225 

158 

44 

46 

81 

163 

79 

76 

171 

64 

100 

70 

31 

41 

75 

41 

354 



31 
4,301 

180 
45 
24 
42 

255 
34 

238 
79 
33 

106 
39 
79 

105 

164 
58 
62 
25 
29 
69 
59 

107 
45 
34 
52 
77 

143 
61 
33 
27 

132 

17 
59 
36 



35 
32 
126 
21 

582 

29 
66 
37 



Civilians 



113 



Table 38. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



Number of police department 
employees 



MINNESOTA- 
Continued 



St. Louis Park, 
St. Paul 



MISSISSIPPI 



Biloxi 

Greenville.. 

Gulfport 

Hattiesburg- 

Jackson 

Laurel 

Meridian... 
Vicksburg.. 



MISSOURI 



Columbia.. 

Florissant 

Independence 

Jefferson City 

Joplin 

Kansas City 

Kirkwood 

St. Joseph. 

St. Louis 

Springfield 

University City. 
Webster Groves. 

MONTANA 



Billings 

Butte 

Great Falls. 
Missoula 



TOTAL 



NEBRASKA 



Grand Island. 

Lincoln.. 

Omaha 



NEVADA 



Las Vegas. 
Reno 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Concord 

Manchester- 
Portsmouth. 



NEW JERSEY 



Atlantic City 

Bayonne 

Belleville 

Bergenfield 

Bloomfield 

Camden 

Cherry Hill Town- 
ship 

Clifton 

Cranford 

Township 

East Orange 

Edison 

Elizabeth.. 

Englewood 

Fair Lawn... 

Garfield... 

Hackensack 



35 
443 



41 
252 

39 

110 

34 



50 
39 
80 
34 
52 

1,161 
38 
113 

2,431 

109 

53 

29 



Police 
officers 



Civilians 



39 



36 
137 

458 



174 

134 



38 
L17 

U) 
1 53 

69 
249 

58 
41 
45 
85 



33 
407 



42 
49 
38 
36 
212 



32 



39 


13 


912 


249 


36 


2 


105 


8 


889 


542 


104 


5 


51 


2 


25 


4 


63 


7 


40 


4 


57 


3 


30 


9 


36 




112 


25 


390 


68 


139 


35 


106 


28 


44 




112 


6 


37 


1 


187 


42 


163 


8 


64 




31 




101 


3 


233 


56 


35 


3 


112 


5 


40 




152 


1 


66 


3 


242 


7 


58 




41 


3 


42 


3 


73 


12 



City 



NEW JERSEY- 
Continued 

Hamilton 

Township 

Hoboken.. 

Irvington 

Jersey City 

Kearny.. 

Linden 

Long Branch 

Middletown 

Township 

Montclair 

Newark 

North Bergen 

Township 

Nutley 

Orange 

Parsippany-Troy 

Hills Township. 

Passaic 

Paterson 

Pennsauken 

Perth Amboy 

Plainfield 

Rahway 

Ridgewood 

Teaneck 

Township 

Trenton 

Union City 

Union Township. 

Vineland 

Westfield 

West New York.. 

West Orange 

Woodbridge 

Township 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



NEW MEXICO 



Albuquerque . 

Carlsbad 

Hobbs 

Las Cruces.. 

Roswell 

Santa Fe 



NEW YORK 



Albany 

Amherst 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton 

Buffalo 

Cheektowaga 

Clarkstown 

Elmira 

Freeport 

Greenburgh 

Hempstead 

Irondequoit 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Kingston 

Lackawanna 

Lockport 

Long Beach 

Mount Pleasant. 
Mount Vernon . 

Newburgh 

New Rochelle.-. 

New York 

Niagara Falls... 



84 
162 
101 
1,000 
120 
114 
53 

25 

94 

1,444 

105 
50 



Police 
officers 



291 
114 
80 
38 
49 
84 



115 



291 

26 
30 
28 
45 
56 



32 
51 
79 
61 
63 
47 
58 
21 

181 
59 

153 
25, 532 

197 



161 
91 

835 
119 
114 

51 



1,327 



20 
122 

284 
32 
83 
89 
57 
40 

55 
258 
99 
79 
37 
48 
84 



240 

26 
30 

28 
44 
51 



222 
48 
40 
57 

139 
1,353 
67 
29 
97 
53 
66 
67 
32 
45 
71 
59 
63 
46 
52 
21 

171 
58 

140 
24, 382 

177 




114 



Table 38.— Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 





Number of police department 
employees 


City 


Number of police department 
employees 


City 


TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


TOTAL 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


NEW YORK- 
Continued 

North Tonawanda. 
Orangetown 


38 
31 

72 
583 

47 

59 
161 
394 
151 
1S4 

54 
349 

113 
56 

346 

131 
79 
60 
39 

236 
98 
27 

142 
60 
95 
41 

181 

36 
84 
42 
37 

309 
36 
37 

169 

983 

2,179 

67 

703 
45 

427 
68 
49 
70 
36 
30 
99 
32 
70 
27 
79 
70 
71 
35 
36 
32 
74 
48 
52 
59 
37 


37 
30 
69 
521 
47 
56 
152 
353 
138 
174 
53 
318 

109 
51 

308 

119 
73 
60 
38 

210 
93 
27 

127 
51 
75 
36 

157 

32 
72 
38 
37 

289 
32 
35 

161 

886 

1,901 

67 

584 
44 

379 
60 
46 
68 
30 
29 
97 
30 
65 
26 
70 

68 
35 
34 
32 
71 
46 
49 
56 
34 


1 
1 
3 

62 


OHIO— Con. 

Shaker Heiehts 

South Euclid 

Springfield 


59 
31 

118 
48 

528 
30 
76 

301 
46 

34 

51 
71 
27 
53 
33 
355 

83 
772 

78 

54 

31 

156 

100 

106 

53 
97 
54 
192 
167 

54 
37 
79 
91 
36 

126 
93 

25 

17 

39 

58 

52 

5,931 

1,512 

37 

175 

21 

184 

35 

22 

157 
20 
99 
42 
57 
73 


55 
29 

109 
47 

488 
24 
74 

279 
43 

31 
44 
64 
27 
46 
33 
348 

76 
653 

56 

52 
30 
132 
92 
96 

52 

74 

50 

185 

155 

51 
34 
79 

87 
35 

120 

78 

25 

13 

35 

55 

52 

5, 382 

1,466 

34 

147 

18 

173 

34 

19 

134 
20 
94 
34 
53 
72 


4 
2 


Poughkeepsie 

Rochester 


Steubenville 

Toledo 


1 
40 


Rockville Centre. . 


Upper Arlington... 


Rome 


3 
9 
41 
13 
10 
1 
31 

4 

5 
38 
12 

6 




Schenectady 

Syracuse 


Youngstown 


22 
3 


Trov 


OKLAHOMA 


Utica_. 




Watertown 

Yonkers ._ 


3 




Enid . . 


NORTH 




- 


CAROLINA 


Midwest City 

Muskogee 

Norman 

Oklahoma City.... 

OREGON 




Asheville 


7 


Burlington 




Charlotte 


' 


Durham.. . 




Fayetteville 

Gastonia 




Goldsboro.. . 


1 

26 
5 






Greensboro 


Salem. 


22 


High Point 

Kannapolis 


PENNSYLVANIA 

Abington Township. 
Aliquippa .. 




Raleigh 


15 
9 

20 
5 

24 

4 

12 
4 




Rocky Mount 

Wilmineton ... 


2 
1 


Wilson 




24 


Winston-Salem 


Altoona 






Bethlehem 


10 


NORTH DAKOTA 


Cheltenham Town- 


1 


Bismarck... 




23 


Fargo 


Easton 


4 


Grand Forks 


Erie 


7 


Minot.. 




12 


OHIO 


20 
4 
2 

8 
97 

278 


Haverf ord T own- 
ship 


3 




Hazleton 


3 


Akron... . . ... 






Alliance... . 




4 


Barberton. 




1 


Canton. . 


Lower Merion 

Township 

McKeesport 

Middletown Town- 




Cincinnati .. 


6 


Cleveland 

Cleveland Heights . 


15 


Columbus 


119 
1 
48 
8 
3 
2 
6 
1 
2 
2 

5 
1 
9 
1 
3 




Cuyahoga Falls 

Dayton 


Millcreek Town- 


4 


East Cleveland 

Elyria 


Mount Lebanon 

Township 

New Castle 

Norristown 

Philadelphia 


4 


Euclid 

Findlav. 


3 


Garfield Heights.. . 
Hamilton 


549 
46 


Kettering . . 


Pottstown 


3 


Lakewood 


28 


Lancaster .. 

Lima 


Ridley Township.. 


3 
11 


Lorain.. 




1 


Mansfield 

Maple Heights 


Springfield 

Township 

Upper Darby 

Township 

West Mifflin 

Wilkes-Barre 

Wilkinsburg 

Williamsport 

York 


3 


Marion 

Massillon . .. 


2 


23 


Middletown 


3 
2 
3 
3 
3 




Norwood 

Parma 

Portsmouth 

Sandusky 


5 
8 
4 

1 



115 



Table 38.— Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities Over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



City 



RHODE ISLAND 

Cranston 

East Providence.. 

Newport 

Pawtucket 

Providence 

Warwick 

Woonsoeket 

SOUTH 
CAROLINA 



Charleston... 

Columbia 

Greenville.-. 
Rock Hill.... 
Spartanburg. 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



Rapid City- 
Sioux Falls. 



TENNESSEE 



Chattanooga.. 

Jackson 

Johnson City. 

Kingsport 

Knoxville 

Memphis 

Nashville 

Oak Ridge.... 



TEXAS 



Abilene 

Amarillo 

Arlington 

Austin 

Baytown 

Beaumont 

Big Spring 

Brownsville 

Bryan 

Corpus Christi. 

Dallas 

Denton 

El Paso 

Fort Worth.... 

Galveston 

Garland 

Grand Prairie. . 

Harlingen 

Houston 

Irving 

Kings ville 

Laredo 

Longview 

Lubbock 

Mesquite 

Midland 

Odessa 

Orange 

Pasadena 

Port Arthur. .. 

San Angelo 

San Antonio. .. 

Temple 

Texas City 

Tyler 

Victoria 



Number of police department 
employees 



TOTAL 



104 
79 

83 
161 
556 
102 

98 



155 

173 

130 

53 

80 



199 
17 
13 
50 

221 

762 

390 



118 

204 
45 

310 
39 

144 
47 
48 
30 

195 

1,224 

38 

383 

608 
84 
42 
32 
51 
1,347 
36 
24 
58 
50 

188 
34 
94 

111 
35 
52 



Police 
officers 



102 
73 



148 
491 



93 



124 
159 
116 
50 
70 



Civilians 



City 



TEXAS— Con. 



Waco 

Wichita Falls. 



UTAH 



Ogden 

Provo 

Salt Lake City. 




VERMONT 

Burlington 

VIRGINIA 



Alexandria 

Arlington 

Charlottesville.. 

Danville 

Hampton 

Lynchburg 

Newport News. 

Norfolk 

Petersburg 

Portsmouth 

Richmond 

Roanoke 



WASHINGTON 



Bellingham. 
Bremerton.. 

Everett 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoma 

Vancouver.. 
Yakima 



Number of police department 
employees 



WEST VIRGINIA 



Charleston 

Clarksburg 

Huntington 

Parkersburg 

Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 



Appleton 

Beloit 

Eau Claire... 
Fond du Lac. 
Green Bay... 

Janesville 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Madison 

Manitowoc. _ 
Milwaukee. . 

Oshkosh 

Racine 

Sheboygan. __ 

Superior 

Waukesha . . _ 

Wausau 

Wauwatosa.. 
West Allis 



WYOMING 



Casper 

Cheyenne. 



TOTAL 


Police 




officers 


124 


102 


105 


97 


66 


62 


35 


33 


309 


250 


56 


51 


152 


127 


207 


187 


52 


52 


85 


77 


86 


77 


89 


83 


147 


139 


452 


411 


40 


36 


136 


125 


457 


416 


132 


126 


43 


36 


53 


46 


66 


62 


986 


850 


274 


234 


254 


234 


55 


55 


73 


73 



152 

36 
127 
54 
95 



54 
63 
44 

104 
49 

106 

74 

201 

52 

,843 

64 

142 
75 
58 
58 
47 
78 

122 



140 
35 

104 
46 
92 



63 

51 
51 
41 
94 
45 
94 
68 

163 

50 

1, 752 

62 

132 
74 
57 
55 
47 
75 

110 



116 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 



City 



ALABAMA 

Albertville 

Alexander City. 

Atmore 

Auburn 

Boaz 

Brighton 

Brundidge 

Chickasaw 

Fairfield 

Fairhope 

Fayette 

Fort Payne 

Graysville 

Hornewood 

Hueytown 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Lafayette 

Leeds... — 

Marion 

Monroeville 

Mountain Brook 

Northport 

Opelika 

Opp 

Piedmont 

Pleasant Grove. . 

Prattville 

Saraland 

Sheffield 

Tallassee 

Tarrant City— . 

Troy 

Tuscumbia 

Union Springs. .. 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

Juneau 

Ketchikan 

Kodiak... 

ARIZONA 

Ajo 

Avondale 

Bisbee 

Casa Grande 

Chandler 

Coolidge 

Eloy 

Flagstaff 

Glendale 

Globe 

Holbrook 

Jerome 

Kingman 

Miami 

Nogales 

Peoria 

Prescott 

Safford 

Sierra Vista 

Tempe 

Tolleson 

Williams 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 

Arkadelphia 

Batesville 

Camden 

Crossett 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



City 



ARKANSAS— Con. 

Hamburg 

Helena 

Hope 

McGehee 

Mena 

Monticello 

Paragould 

Rogers 

Russellville 

Siloam Springs 

Springdale 

Van Buren 

Warren 

Wynne 

CALIFORNIA 

Albany 

Alturas 

Anderson 

Angels Camp 

Antioch 

Areata 

Arvin 

Atherton 

Atwater 

Auburn 

Avalon 

Azusa 

Barstow 

Beaumont 

Bell 

Belmont 

Belvedere 

Benicia 

Bishop 

Blue Lake 

Blythe 

Brawley 

Brea 

Brentwood 

Broadmoor 

Burlingame 

Calistoga 

Campbell 

Carlsbad 

Carmel 

Ceres 

Chico 

Chino 

Chowchilla 

Claremont 

Cloverdale 

Clovis 

Coachella 

Coalinga 

Colfax 

Colma 

Colton 

Corcoran 

Corning 

Corona 

Corte Madera 

Covina 

Crescent City 

Cypress 

Davis 

Delano 

Dinuba 

Dixon 

Dorris 

Dunsmuir 

El Centro 

El Monte 

El Segundo 




City 



CALIFORNIA- 
Continued 

Elsinore 

Escalon 

Escondido 

Etna 

Exeter 

Fairfax 

Fairfield 

Ferndale 

Fillmore 

Folsom 

Fontana 

Fort Bragg 

Fort Jones 

Fortuna 

Fowler 

Gait 

Gilroy 

Glendora 

Gonzales 

Grass Valley 

Gridley 

Grover City 

Hanford 

Healdsburg 

Hemet 

Hermosa Beach 

Hillsborough 

Hollister 

Holtville 

Huntington Beach 

Huron 

Imperial 

Imperial Beach 

Indio 

lone 

Isleton 

Jackson 

Kensington 

Kerman 

King City 

Kingsburg 

Laguna Beach 

Larkspur 

La Verne 

Lemoore 

Lindsay 

Live Oak 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Lodi 

Lompoc 

Los Altos 

Los Banos 

Los Gatos 

Madera 

Manteca 

Martinez 

Marysville 

McFarland 

Mendota 

Merced 

Mill Valley 

Montague 

Montclair 

Monterey 

Morgan Hill 

Mount Shasta 

Napa 

Needles 

Newark 

North Sacramento. 

Novato 

Oakdale 

Oceanside 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



117 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 



CALIFORNIA— 

Continued 

Ojai 

Orange Cove 

Orland 

Oroville 

Paciflca 

Pacific Grove 

Palm Springs 

Parlier 

Paso Robles 

Patterson 

Perris 

Piedmont 

Pinole 

Pittsburg 

Piacentia 

Placerville 

Pleasanton 

Porterville 

Port Hueneme 

Portola 

Red Bluff 

Redding 

Reedley 

Rialto 

Rio Vista 

Ripon 

Riverbank 

Rocklin 

Roseville 

St. Helena 

San Anselmo 

San Carlos 

San Clemente 

San Fernando 

San Gabriel 

Sanger 

San Jacinto 

San Luis Obispo.. . 

San Marino 

San Pablo 

San Rafael 

Santa Paula 

Seal Beach 

Seaside 

Sebastopol 

Selma 

Shatter 

Sierra Madre 

Soledad 

Sonoma 

Sonora 

South Pasadena — 

Stanton 

State Harbor Police 

Suisun City 

Susan ville 

Sutter Creek 

Taft 

Tracy 

Tulare 

Tulelake 

Turlock 

Tustin 

Ukiah 

University of 

California 

Upland 

Vacaville 

Vernon 

Visalia 

Walnut Creek 

Wasco 

Watson ville 

Weed 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



City 



CALIFORNIA- 
Continued 

Westmorland 

Williams 

Willits 

Willows 

Woodlake 

Woodland 

Yreka City 

Yuba City 

COLORADO 

Arvada.- 

Brighton 

Brush 

Canon City 

Commerce City.. 

Cortez 

Durango 

Florence 

Fort Morgan 

Glenwood Springs 

Golden 

Grand Junction... 

Julesburg 

La Junta 

Lamar 

Leadville 

Littleton 

Longmont 

Loveland 

Manitou Springs. 

Monte Vista 

Montrose 

Rocky Ford 

Salida 

Thornton 

Trinidad 

Walsenburg 

Westminster 

CONNECTICUT 

Bethel 

Bloomfield 

Branford 

Cheshire 

Danbury 

Danielson 

Derby 

Glastonbury 

Groton Borough.. 

Guilford 

Monroe 

Naugatuck 

New Canaan 

Newington 

North Haven 

Orange 

Plainville 

Putnam 

Rock ville 

Rocky Hill 

Shelton 

Simsbury 

Southington 

Suffleld 

Trumbull.. 

Waterford 

Westport 

Wethersfleld 

Willimantic 

Wolcott 

Woodbridge 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



20 



City 



DELAWARE 

Dover 

Milford 

Seaford 

Smyrna 

FLORIDA 

Apalachicola 

Apopka 

Atlantic Beach 

Auburndale 

Bav Harbor Islands. 

Belle Glade 

Biscayne Park 

Boca Raton 

Boynton Beach 

Bradenton 

Clewiston 

Deerfield Beach 

Dunedin 

Eustis 

Florida City 

Fort Myers 

Green Cove Springs 

Gulfport '-. 

Haines City 

Holly Hill 

Homestead 

Kissimmee 

Lake Park 

Lake Wales 

Leesburg 

Maitland 

Margate 

Miami Shores 

Miramar 

Mount Dora 

Mulberry 

Naples 

New Smyrna Beach 
North Miami 

Beach 

North Palm Beach 

Oakland Park 

Ocala. 

Ocoee 

Opa-locka 

Ormond Beach 

Palatka 

Palm Beach 

Palmetto 

Palm Springs 

Pinellas Park 

Plantation 

Plant City 

Pompano Beach — 

Quincy 

Safety Harbor 

St. Cloud 

St. Petersburg 

Beach 

Sanford 

Sebring 

South Miami 

Starke 

Surfside 

Titusville 

Treasure Island 

Vero Beach 

West Miami 

Winter Haven 

GEORGIA 

Adel 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



118 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 





Number 




Number 




Number 


City 


of police 


City 


Of poller 


City 


Of police 




department 




department 




department 




employees 




employees 




employees 


GEORGIA— Con. 




ILLINOIS— Con. 




ILLINOIS- Con. 




Americus . 


19 


Belvidere 


10 


Liberty ville __ 


12 


Bainbridge 


17 


Benld 


2 


Lincoln 


16 


Barnesville 


6 


Bensenville 


13 


Lincolnwood _ 


is 


Bremen 


7 


Berkeley 


5 


Lisle 


2 


Buford 


" 


Bradley ... - 


7 


Litchfield 




Calhoun 


7 


Bridgeview 


4 


Lockport 


12 


Carrollton 


15 


Broadview 


12 


Lombard 


19 


Cartersville 


14 


Bushnell 


4 


Loves Park 


6 


Chamblee 


5 


Cahokia 


11 


Lyons 


13 


Cuthbert 


5 


Canton 


16 


Macomb 


13 


Decatur 


28 


Carmi 


8 


Madison 


15 


Douglas 


17 


Cary 


3 


Marion 


11 


Dublin 


14 


Casey ville 


2 


Markham 


14 


Elberton 


14 


Centralia 


17 


Marquette Heights. 


2 


Fitzgerald 


12 


Centreville 


7 


Mascoutah 


2 


Forest Park 


18 


Charleston 


12 


Matteson 


3 


Gainesville 


28 


Chester 


9 


Mattoon 


23 


Griffin . .. 


40 
6 


Chillicothe ._ 


6 
3 


McLeansboro 

Melrose Park 


4 


Jackson 


Christopher 


30 


Jesup 


10 


Clarendon Hills 


5 


Mendota 


10 


La Fayette 

La Grange 


9 


Coal City 


3 


Metropolis. 


7 


42 


Country Club Hills. 


1 


Midlothian 


10 


Lawrenceville 


7 


Crest Hill 


11 


Milan 


4 


Madison 


5 


Crystal Lake 


14 


Momence 


2 


Milledgeville 


19 


Deerfield 


14 


Monmouth 


11 




13 
23 


De Kalb 


24 
16 


Morris 

Morrison 


7 


Moultrie 


Dixon 


4 


Quitman 


9 


Downers Grove 


25 


Morton 


4 




5 
3 


Du Quoin 

East Alton 


4 

10 


Morton Grove 

Mount Carmel 


26 


St. Marys 


8 


Sanders ville 


7 


East Moline 


18 


Mount Olive 


4 


Smyrna 


13 


Edwardsville 


11 


Mount Prospect 


21 


Summerville 


8 


Effingham 


7 


Mount Vernon 


16 


Tallapoosa 


7 


Eldorado 


4 


Mundelein 


15 


Thomaston 


18 


Elk Grove Village. . 


13 


Murphysboro 


6 


Thomasville 


21 


Elmwood Park 


21 


Naperville 


16 


Thomson 


5 


Eureka 


2 


Nashville 


2 


Toccoa 


13 


Evergreen Park 


25 


Niles 


34 






Fairfield 


10 


Nokomis 


3 


IDAHO 




Fairmont City 


2 


Normal 


12 






Farmington 


2 


Northbrook 


17 


Alameda 


11 


Flora 


9 


North Chicago 


16 


Blackfoot 


12 


Flossmoor 


7 


Northfield 


9 


Buhl 


4 


Forest Park 


20 


Northlake 


16 


Burley - 


16 
19 


Franklin Park 

Galena 


17 

7 


North Riverside 

O'Fallon 


11 


Caldwell 


3 


Coeur d'Alene 


16 


Geneseo 


6 


Oglesby 


4 


Emmett 


7 


Geneva- 


10 


Olney - 


9 


Garden City . 


3 


Gibson City. 


4 


Orland Park 


2 




4 




18 




22 


Jerome 


8 


Glen Ellyn 


22 


Palatine 


19 




10 




24 


Palos Park 


10 


Lewiston 


22 


Grayslake 


2 


Pana 


5 


Montpelier 


4 


Harvard 


5 


Paris 


11 


Moscow 


15 


Harwood Heights... 


7 


Paxton 


4 




11 
24 




6 

7 


Peoria Heights 

Peru 


7 


Nampa 


Highland 


14 


Payette 


7 


Highwood 


6 


Piano 


3 


Preston 


4 


Hinsdale 


16 


Polo 


2 


Bexburg 


4 


Homewood 


16 


Pontiac 


8 


Rupert 


10 


Itasca 


4 


Princeton 


5 


Salmon 


3 


Jacksonville 


20 


Rantoul 


19 


Sandpoint 


8 


Jersey ville 


12 


Riverdale 


12 


Shelley 


3 


Johnston City 


2 


River Forest 


25 


Soda Springs 


4 


Justice 


3 


Riverside 


16 


Twin Falls 


25 


Kenilworth 


11 


Robbins 


13 


Wallace. . 


5 


Knoxville... 


2 


Robinson. 


5 






La Grange.. 


29 


Rochelle 


10 


ILLINOIS 




La Grange Park 


20 


Rockdale 


3 




11 


Lake Bluff . . 


4 
23 


Rock Falls 


19 


Addison 


Lake Forest 


Rolling Meadows.. _ 


14 


Barrington 


12 


Lake Zurich 


5 


Romeoville 


1 


Barton ville 


4 


Lansing 


12 


Roselle 


4 


Batavia 


9 
23 




17 

7 


Round Lake Beach. 
Rushville. . 


6 


Bellwood 


Lawrenceville 


5 



119 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000— Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


ILLINOIS— Con. 

St Charles 


13 

9 

4 

3 

7 
11 
10 

4 

2 
2 
3 
2 
4 

19 
5 

14 
2 
7 
9 
1 
5 
2 
6 

15 

21 
3 
3 
9 
5 

16 

10 
3 

15 
2 

25 
7 
8 

24 
2 

11 
8 

13 

6 

8 

7 

4 

22 

14 

2 

4 

10 

12 

3 

2 

5 

10 
10 
8 
40 
28 
3 

23 
8 
12 
4 
4 
8 
2 
22 
5 
5 


INDIANA— Con. 
Goshen 


21 

15 

12 

12 

6 

9 

12 

14 

4 

23 

3 

5 

21 

9 

4 

32 

10 

8 

9 

16 

5 

6 

4 

12 
40 
8 
5 
8 
23 
4 
8 
14 
12 
12 
4 
7 
4 
12 
3 

10 

2 

14 

21 

12 

9 

6 

8 

5 

19 

22 

12 

20 

27 

8 
3 
3 
3 
4 

12 
4 

16 

19 
9 
5 
7 
6 

12 
8 
7 
4 
3 

10 


IOWA— Continued 

Evansdale.. .. . _ 


5 




Fort Madison 

Glenwood 


17 






3 


Sauk Village 




Grinnell . . 


7 


Griffith 


Hampton. 


4 


Schiller Park 


Hartford City 

Highland. 


Hawarden ._ 


3 


Silvis 


Humboldt .. . 


4 




Hobart 


Independence 


10 


South Chicago 

Heights 

Sparta 


Huntingburg 

Huntington 


5 


Iowa Falls ... 


10 


Jefferson.. 


5 




Keckuk .. ... .. 


24 


Steger 


Jefferson ville 

Kendallville 

Knox. 




8 


Manchester .__ ... 


4 




M aquoketa 


10 




La Porte 


Marion.. _ 








Marshalltown 

Missouri Valley 

Monticello . 


22 


Swansea 

Sycamore 

Taylorville 


Lawrenceburg 

Linton . 


3 

6 




Mount Pleasant 

Mount Vernon 

Newton . 


10 


Mitchell 


2 


Tinlev Park 


Monticello.. 


17 




Moores ville 


Oelwein. 


12 




Mount Vernon 


Osage 


4 






3 


Villa Park 


New Haven 

North Manchester— 

North Vernon 

Peru .. . . . .. 


Oskaloosa 


11 


Washington Park... 


Pella 




Perry- 


10 




Red Oak 


10 




Petersburg 


Rock Rapids 

Sheldon 


3 




Plainfield... 


4 


West Chicago 

West Dundee 




Shenandoah 

Sibley 


7 


Portland 


3 




Princeton . 


Spencer... . 


9 






Spirit Lake. . 


3 








9 


White Hall 


Rockville. ... 


Tama 


4 


Wilmington 


Rushville . .. . 




3 






?, 


Winthrop Harbor... 


Scottsburg... . . 


Waverly.. . . . . 


10 




Sellersburg . . .. 


Webster City 

West Des Moines... 
Windsor Heights 


11 






16 




Shelbyville 


3 






4 


INDIANA 


Sullivan ... ... 


KANSAS 






Tell City 




Angola 


Tipton 






9 








4 


Batesville. . .. _- 


Vincennes 


Arkansas City 

Atchison ... 


18 


Bedford .... 




16 


Beech Grove ... 


West Lafayette 




16 




Baxter Springs 

Belleville 


6 


Bicknell . 


IOWA 


5 


Bluffton .. 


Beloit 


4 


Brazil _ ... __ 


Caney 


4 


Brookville. 


Chanute . . .. . 


13 


Chesterfield 






3 


Chesterton __ 


Ankenv . . . . 


Clay Center 

Coffevville 


5 


Clarksville . _. 




20 




Belle Plaine 




3 


Columbia City 




9 


Columbus.. 


Bloomfield 


Council Grove 

Derbv 


3 


Connersville 


Boone .. . . 


8 


Cory don.. 


Cedar Falls 


Dodge City 


17 


Crawfordsville.. 


Centerville . . 




1 


Crown Point 


Chariton . 


El Dorado 


13 


Decatur 


Cherokee 


Ellinwood... 


4 


Delphi 


Clarinda . 


Ellis 


4 


Dunkirk 


Clear Lake 




19 


East Gary.. _ . 


Decorah . .. 




8 


Fairmount 


Denison . 




6 


Frankfort 


Eagle Grove 

Eldora.. 




5 


Garrett.. 


Garden City 

Garnett 


16 


Gas City.... 


Estherville 


7 



120 



Table 39. 



-Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


KANSAS— Con. 
Goodland... 


5 
23 
12 

7 
5 
4 
5 
4 
4 
4 

14 

11 

27 
9 
5 

20 
6 

17 
2 
5 

28 
5 

15 
6 
4 
3 
9 
6 

13 
5 

17 

24 
2 

11 
6 
9 
8 
2 
4 

14 

15 

8 
6 
4 
5 
11 
3 

13 
13 
32 
8 
9 
9 
15 
7 
11 
9 
4 
3 
5 
7 

19 
15 
3 

10 
11 
7 
6 
12 
3 
5 
5 


KENTUCKY— Con. 

St. Matthews 

Scottsville 


7 
7 

14 
8 

1 

24 

24 

3 

5 

8 

19 

16 

39 

7 

7 

8 

4 

23 

20 

3 

6 

13 

13 

24 

4 

7 

26 

10 

30 
34 
15 
5 
9 
16 
7 
6 
2 
11 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
8 
9 
3 
2 
11 
3 

12 

14 

13 

11 

15 

7 

35 

2 

17 

1 

12 
52 
6 
4 
3 
18 
8 


MARYLAND— Con. 

District Heights 

Easton. .. . 


2 


Great Bend 


14 


Hays . 


Somerset 


Elkton 


5 








34 




Wilmore. 








LOUISIANA 

Bastrop .. 




g 




Havre de Grace 

Pocomoke City 

Salisburv. 


9 


Holton 


7 
49 


Humboldt 


Bogalusa. . 


Takoma Park 


22 




Delhi. .. 


2 


Iola 


De Ridder. 


University of 

Maryland 

University Park 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Acushnet. . 




Junction City 


Donaldson ville 

Eunice.. . . 


30 
15 


Larned 


Franklin .. 






Houma. . 






Jonesboro. 




Liberal. 


Kaplan. . . 


4 




Mamou .. 


Adams. .. 


18 




Marksville. 


Agawam .. 


21 




Morgan City 

Natchitoches 


Amesburv. . . 


13 


Marvsville 


Amherst . 


11 




Andover . 


27 




Pineville. 


Ashland 


8 






Athol 


17 






Auburn 


10 


Olathe 






3 






Ayer 

Barnstable 






Welsh. . 


32 




West Monroe 

Winnfield 


Bedford 


14 




Bellingham. .. ... 


4 




MAINE 


Blackstone 


4 


Plainville 

Pratt 


Bridgewater 

Burlington. .. . 


9 
20 




Chelmsford.. . . . 


20 






Clinton. .. 


18 




Bath... 


Cohasset 


12 




Belfast . 


Concord.. . . 


19 






Dalton. . . 


6 






Dan vers ... 


23 


WinfiekL 


Calais 


Dartmouth 


11 




Camden . 


Dedham 


37 


KENTUCKY 


Cape Elizabeth 


Dover - ... 


3 




Dracut .. 


10 




Dexter.. 


Duxburv. . 


6 


Bellevue 

Benton.. 


Dover-Foxcroft 

Falmouth.. 


East Bridgewater. .. 

Easthampton 

East Longmeadow.. 
Easton - . .. . 


5 
16 


Berea 


Farmington.. 


15 


Cynthiana.- 


Fort Kent.. 


9 




Gardiner 


Fairhaven .. 


13 




Houlton 

Lisbon Falls 

Madawaska 

Old Town 

Pittsfield 

Presque Isle 

Rockland... 

Rumford 




22 






9 


Frankfort 




11 






28 


Fulton 


Great Barrington... 


8 
28 






1 


Greenville 


Hamilton 

Hanson 

Hingham 


4 


Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Highland Heights. _ 


Saco 

Sanford 


4 
32 


South Portland 




15 




Hull 


27 








12 


Mayfield 








Middlesboro 

Monticello 

Mount Sterling 

Murray. 


MARYLAND 


Longmeadow 

Ludlow 


18 
15 
15 


Mansfield 


8 


Nicholasville 

Paintsville.- 


Annapolis 

Bel Air 


Marblehead 

Marlboro 

Medfield 

Middleboro.. 


28 
25 


Paris. . 


Bladensburg 


8 


Park Hills 


18 


Prestonsburg 

Radclifl. 




Milford 


23 


Crisfleld 


Millbury 





641799' 



-62- 



121 



Table 39.— Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000— Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


MASSACHUSETTS- 
Continued 


8 

9 

7 
10 
19 
31 
15 
20 

4 
12 

2 
11 
34 

6 

7 
12 

6 

3 
26 
10 
32 

8 
26 
12 
14 
11 
30 
13 

3 
30 
27 

6 
15 

1 
37 
18 
10 
20 
23 
10 
46 
19 
32 

30 

18 
4 

14 

19 
5 

41 

22 
4 

15 
9 
1 

11 
4 

13 
3 
2 

15 
8 
7 
3 

17 

14 
4 
3 

10 
4 

11 


MICHIGAN— Con. 


51 

21 
6 

16 

10 
8 
3 
9 
5 
1 
4 
6 

18 
7 
8 

18 

28 
32 

36 
5 

31 

10 
8 

32 
4 
8 

14 
8 

11 
5 

16 
7 

11 
4 
4 

11 
1 

11 
6 
4 

19 
9 
7 
4 

14 

27 

39 

32 

3 

14 

6 

31 

13 

5 

28 
7 
4 
28 
8 
10 
5 
8 
15 
4 
42 
14 
10 
3 
4 
7 
4 


MICHIGAN-Con. 
St. Johns 


6 


AT 


Escanaba 


St. Joseph 


22 


Mattapoisett 


St. Louis 

Sault Ste. Marie 

South Haven 

South Range 

Sparta 

Stambaugh 

Sturgis... ... 


5 


Farmington.. . . 


28 




Fenton 


14 


Newburyport 

North Adams 

North Andover 

North Attleboro 


Flat Rock .. 


1 




3 




3 




15 


Gaastra _- - 


Swartz Creek 

Tecumseh. .. 


3 


Northbridge 

North Brookfield... 
North Reading 




11 




Three Rivers 

Traverse City 

Trenton .. 


13 


Grand Haven 

Grand Ledge 


22 
37 




Vassar 


4 


Oxford 


Grosse Pointe 

Grosse Pointe 


Wakefield 


4 




Walled Lake 

Ypsilanti. 


4 




37 




Grosse Pointe Park. 
Grosse Pointe 
Woods . -- -- 


Zeeland. .. . . .-. 


3 




MINNESOTA 
Albert Lea . - 










Hancock... . 






Harper Woods 

Hastings . ... 


25 






7 




Hillsdale 




15 




Holland 


Arden Hills. ... _. 


2 




Houghton .... 


Aurora .. . 


4 


Southbridge 

South Hadley 


Howell 


Babbitt 


3 


Huntington Woods 




3 




15 




Iron Mountain 




6 


Swampscott 


Blue Earth 

Brainerd 

Breckenridge 

Brooklyn Center 

Brooklyn Park 


4 


Ishpeming . . . 


17 




Lake Orion __ . 


6 


Topsfleld 


Lapeer... 

Lathrup Village 


12 




6 




2 






Chaska 


2 




Mackinac Island 




14 




Cloquet . 


12 






Columbia Heights.. 
Coon Rapids. 


14 


"West Springfield 


Marine City 

Marquette - 


8 
16 






Crosby 

Crystal 


4 






16 


MICHIGAN 






2 




Menominee. 

Michigan State 
TJniversitv .. 




1 




Detroit Lakes 

Ely 


7 




12 




Milford 


Eveleth 


12 




Monroe... - - - 


Fairmont 


13 




Mount Clemens 

Mount Morris 

Mount Pleasant 

Munising . 


Falcon Heights 

Faribault. _. . ... 


3 




18 


Benton Harbor 

Berkley 


Fergus Falls 

Fridlev ... 


14 
9 




Muskegon Heights . 




10 


Beverly Hills 


Golden Valley 

Grand Rapids 

Granite Falls 

Hastings .__ 


11 


New Baltimore 


8 


Blissfield 


3 


Bloomfield Hills 




9 






Hibbing 


25 


Cadillac . 




Hovt Lakes. . 


3 


Caro 


Oxford 


Hutchinson . . 


5 




Petoskey - . 


International Falls. 


9 






5 


Charlotte 


Pleasant Ridge 

Plymouth .__.__. 


Lake City - 


4 




Le Sueur - - 


3 


Chelsea 


Richmond 

River Rouge 

Riverview .. . 


Little Falls 


7 




Luverne . 


4 




Mankato .- . 


31 


Crystal Falls 




Maplewood .. . 


5 






Montevideo 

Moorhead . 


7 


Dowagiac— 


Rogers City 


24 




Mound . . - 


5 


Easl Grand Rapids. 


St. Clair 


Mounds View 


8 



122 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 
department 
employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 
of police 
lepartment 

employees 


MINNESOTA— Con. 


3 
2 
15 

9 

6 

3 

4 
15 

4 

6 

3 
16 

4 
14 
10 

6 

5 

2 

3 

3 

4 

4 

4 
24 

3 

2 

4 

13 

4 

8 
22 

3 

4 

4 

3 

9 
12 
19 

4 
41 
12 

4 
5 
2 
14 
10 
16 
3 

33 
2 

10 
4 
2 
20 
38 
7 
8 
6 
9 

4 
3 

10 
19 

3 

10 
17 

6 


MISSOURI— Con. 


5 

36 
17 
5 

35 
11 

4 
6 

6 

17 
13 

8 
25 

9 

5 
25 
14 
22 

4 
16 
11 

6 

4 
13 
10 

3 

9 
10 
12 
22 

4 

8 
23 
18 
35 

5 
19 

15 
5 
6 

36 
6 

12 
3 
9 
2 
2 
9 
1 
9 
4 

11 
14 
2 
9 

13 
11 

6 
23 
14 
10 

5 
12 
13 

3 

8 


MONTANA— Con. 


5 


New Prague 

New Ulm 


Cape Girardeau 

Carthage 


Whitefish.. 


4 


Wolf Point 


3 


Northfield 


Centralia.. 


NEBRASKA 
Alliance . 












Clayton . . 








12 




Creve Coeur 

Crystal City 




3 


Park Rapid's 




is 


Bellevue 


10 


Plymouth 




Blair 


5 


Red Wing 


Eldon . 


Broken Bow 

Chadron.. .. .... 


4 


Redwood Falls - . 


Excelsior Springs — 
Ferguson 

Fulton _ ._ . 


6 


Rbbbinsdale 




17 


Roseville 






St. Anthony 






9 




Crete 


5 


St. Paul Park 


Hazel wood-. _ 


Fairburv - 


7 






Falls City 


10 


Sauk Rapids 






22 


Kirksville ... . 




9 






Gothenburg 


6 






29 


South St. Paul 


Lebanon. ... 




8 




Liberty. -. . 




20 




Maiden. _ .. 


McCook 


14 






Nebraska City 

Norfolk 


8 




Marshall . . 


19 


Thief River Falls 




North Platte 


25 


Tracy 


Moline Acres 

Monett . -. 


10 




Plattsmouth. 


5 




Neosho -_ . . 


■) 


Wabasha. .. 


Nevada. ._ .. 




4 


Wadena .. 


North Kansas City. 
O'Fallon 


Scottsbluff 


19 






5 


Wells 


Olivette. 




14 


West St. Paul 


Overland. _ . . 




4 


White Bear Lake... 


Poplar Bluff 

Ravtown. 




4 


Wilhnar 




4 


Windom . ._ .. 


Richmond . . 




4 




Richmond Heights 
Rock Hill 


West Point 

York 




Worthington 






Rolla 


NEVADA 

Boulder City 

Carson City 




MISSISSIPPI 


St Ann 






Ste. Genevieve 










Charleston 


Sikeston 


12 


Cleveland 


Slater 










North Las Vegas 




Corinth 


Valley Park 


24 


Ellisville 


W innemucca 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 






\X arrensbur g 














Long Beach 


Woodson Terrace. .. 

MONTANA 
Anaconda 


35 


Marks 






McComb 




K, 


Natchez. ____... 




1] 


New Albany 






Picayune 


Bozeman. . 




2( 


Waynesboro 


Conrad 


Keene — 


24 




Cut Bank 


Lancaster 






Dillon 


4 


MISSOURI 


Glasgow 




4 




Glendive 










Peterborough 




Ballwin 


Helena ... .. 




Bellefontaine 


Kalispell 




1] 


Neighbors 

Berkeley. - 


Lewistown 

Libbv 


Somersworth 

NEW JERSEY 
Allendale 


K 


Bethanv. 






Boonville 






Brentwood 






Brookfield 


1 Shelby 


t 



123 



Table 39.— Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000— Continued 



City 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



Asbury Park 

Atlantic Highlands. 

Audubon 

Bellmawr 

Belvidere 

Berkeley Heights. .. 

Berlin 

Bernards Town- 
ship 

Bogota 

Boonton 

Bordentown ... 

Bound Brook 

Bradley Beach 

Brielle 

Brigantine. 

Brooklawn 

Burlington 

Butler 

Caldwell 

Cape May 

Carlstadt 

Carteret 

Cedar Grove 

Township 

Chatham Borough.. 

Clark 

Clayton 

Cliffside Park 

Closter 

Collingswood 

Cresskill 

Deal. 

Demarest 

Dover 

Dumont 

Dunellen 

East Paterson 

East Rutherford 

Eatontown 

Edgewater 

Emerson... 

Englewood Cliffs.-. 

Fair Haven 

Fairview 

Fanwood 

Flemington 

Florence Township. 

Florham Park 

Fort Lee 

Franklin 

Franklin Lakes 

Freehold 

G arwood 

Glassboro 

Glen Ridge 

Glen Rock 

Gloucester City 

Greenwich Town- 
ship 

Guttenberg 

Haddonfleld 

Haddon Heights- .. 
Haddon Township. 
Harrington Park... 

Harrison 

Basbrouck Heights 

Baworth 

Hawthorne 

Highland Park 

Highlands 

Hightstown.. 

Hillsdale 

Hillside Township. 
Ho-Ho-Kus 



7 
13 
11 

2 

17 
5 

5 
15 
16 

9 
15 
14 
12 

8 

3 
29 

6 
20 
13 
15 
42 

16 
17 
19 

4 
28 
12 
22 
10 
15 

5 
13 
25 
12 
23 
16 
14 
18 
10 
10 

8 
20 
14 

3 

13 
14 
43 

3 

4 
13 
10 
10 
21 
22 
23 

10 
14 
27 
14 
19 

5 
55 
20 

6 

20 
19 

5 

8 
14 
58 

7 



City 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Hopatcong 

Jamesburg 

Keansburg 

Kenilworth 

Key port 

Kinnelon 

Lakehurst 

Lambert ville 

Lincoln Park 

Lindenwold 

Linwood... 

Little Ferry 

Livingston 

Lodi 

Lower Perms Neck 

Township 

Lyndhurst Town- 
ship 

Madison 

Magnolia 

Manasquan 

Maple Shade Town- 
ship 

Maplewood Town- 
ship 

Maywood 

Merchantville 

Metuchen 

Middlesex 

Millburn Town- 
ship 

Millville 

Montvale 

Morristown 

Mountain Lakes 

Mountainside 

Mount Ephraim 

Mount Holly 

National Park 

Neptune City 

Neptune Township, 

Netcong 

New Milford 

New Providence 

Newton 

North Caldwell 

North Haledon 

North Plainfield 

North vale 

North Wildwood--. 

Norwood 

Oakland 

Oaklyn 

Ocean City 

Ocean Grove 

Oceanport 

Oradell 

Palisades Interstate 

Park 

Palisades Park 

Paramus 

Park Ridge 

Paulsboro 

Penns Grove 

Phillipsburg 

Piscataway Town- 
ship 

Pitman 

Pleasant ville 

Point Pleasant 

Point Pleasant 

Beach 

Pompton Lakes — 

Princeton 

Prospect Park 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



City 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Ramsey 

Red Bank 

Ridgefleld Park 

River Edge 

Riverside 

Rochelle Park 

Township 

Rockaway 

Roseland 

Roselle 

Roselle Park 

Rumson 

Runnemede 

Rutherford 

Saddle Brook 

Township 

Sayre ville 

Scotch Plains 

Sea Isle City 

Secaucus 

Shrewsbury 

Somerdale 

Somer ville 

South Orange 

South Plainfield. ... 

South River 

Springfield 

Spring Lake 

Heights 

Stratford 

Summit 

Tenafty 

Union Beach 

Upper Penns Neck 
Upper Saddle River 

Ventnor City 

Verona 

Waldwick 

Wallington 

Washington 

Watchung 

Weehawken Town- 
ship 

West Caldwell 

West Deptford 

Township 

West Long Branch. 

West Paterson 

Westwood 

Wharton 

Wildwood 

Wildwood Crest- -- 

Williamstown 

Woodbury 

Woodcliff Lake— - 

Woodlynne 

Wood-Ridge 

Woodstown 

Wrightstown 



Number 

of police 

department 

employees 



NEW MEXICO 



Artesia 

Aztec 

Belen 

Clayton 

Deming 

Espanola 

Eunice 

Farmington 

Gallup 

Las Vegas City- 
Las Vegas Town- 
Los Alamos 

Portales 



124 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000— Continued 



City 


Number 
of police 

department 
employees 


j 

City 


Number 

Of police 

department 
employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


NEW MEXICO— 
Continued 


12 
13 

2 

3 

17 

11 

4 

5 

4 

31 

14 

27 

5 

13 

5 

24 

4 

17 

5 

3 

6 

12 

7 

2 

2 

21 

1 

2 

3 

36 

27 

2 

2 

26 

28 

10 

13 

19 

3 

29 

11 

53 

12 

7 

10 

39 

13 

5 

5 

33 

4 

3 

3 

9 

23 

58 

36 

31 

34 

4 

9 

5 

2 

8 

5 

13 
2 
57 

17 


NEW YORK-Con. 
Baverstraw. _ . 


11 
16 

1 

3 
24 

6 
22 
12 
13 
16 
29 
17 
29 
10 
16 
12 
24 

9 
13 

4 
52 

7 
15 
21 
37 
28 
26 
12 

9 
41 

2 
14 
16 

2 
16 

1 
16 
16 
10 

4 
22 
15 

2 
15 
21 
33 
20 
20 
14 
37 
31 
15 

3 

5 
34 
14 
24 
10 
31 
16 
50 
14 
14 

27 
21 
23 
43 

3 
13 
12 
32 

7 
52 
12 


NEW YORK-Con. 

Seneca Falls 

Shenill 


14 
2 
5 
3 


Silver Citv 


Herkimer. .. .. 


Tucumcari ... ___ 


Highland __ ... . 


Silver Creek 

Skaneateles 




Hoosick Falls 

Hornell ... . 


NEW YORK 


Sloan 


6 




Horseheads 




Akron . 


Hudson 


Solvay... 
Southampton 
South Glens Falls.. 

South Nyack 

Spring Valley 


12 


Albion ... . 


Hudson Falls 

Ilion 


Alfred 


3 
4 
15 
3 

11 


Amitvville 




Ardsley 

A sharoken 


Johnson City 

Johnstown. .. 


Baldwins ville 


Kenmore 

Lake Placid 

Lancaster Town. .. .. 
Lancaster Village... 

Larchmont 

Liberty .. 


Suffern 


Ballston Spa 


Tarrytown.. 


25 


Batavia 


Ticonderoga 


6 
32 
21 
9 
3 
6 
5 
3 
5 


Bath 


Beacon. ._ 




Blasdell 


Tupper Lake 

Upper Nyack 


Briarcliff Manor 

Brockport. 


Little Falls 

Liverpool. 


Bronx ville 


Lyn brook . 


Wappingers Falls. __ 


Canajoharie 


Lyons. 


Canandaigua 


Malone 

Malverne ... 


Warwick _ . 


Canastota .... . 




5 

23 
4 
11 


Canisteo. 


Mamaroneck 

Mamaroneck Town. 
Massena _ . 




Canton... _ 


Watkins Glen 


Carmel 


Carthage. 


Mechanicville 

Medina 

Middletown 

Mohawk 




Cayuga Heights 


Wellsville 


9 


Cazenovia.. 


West field 




Chapoaqua 




2 


Chittenango . _ . 


Monticello... . . 




Clyde 


Mount Kisco 

Mount Morris 

Newark 




1 


Cobleskill 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Cohoes 




Colonie. 


New York Mills 

North Castle 

North Pelham 

Northport.. 




Coopers town 


23 


Corinth... . 




22 
6 
4 
3 

10 

10 

26 

4 


Corning 


Ayden 

Beaufort 


Cortland 

Dans ville 


North Syracuse 

North Tarry town... 
Norwich .. 


Depew. 


Brevard 

Canton 

Chapel Hill 


Dobbs Ferry 


Nunda .. . 


Dolge ville 


Nyack __ 


Dunkirk 


Ogdensburg 

Olean 




Clinton 

Concord 


12 
34 
6 
14 


Eastchester 


Oneida 


Ellen ville 


Oneonta . 


Elmira Heights 


Orchard Park 

Ossining.. .. 




Elmsford 




7 

23 

4 


Endicott 


Oswego. 


Elizabeth City 


Evans.. 


Owego . 


Fairport... 


Painted Post 

Palmyra... . 




Falconer 


Fuquay Springs 


6 
10 

8 
38 
25 
19 
48 
25 

4 
14 
43 

1 
16 


Floral Park . . 


Peekskill 


Fort Edward . 


Pelham 


Granite Falls 


Fort Plain 


Pelham Manor 

Penn Yan. .... 


Frankfort.. 




Fredonia 


Plattsburgh 


Hendersonville 


Fulton 


Pleasantville 

Port Chester 

Port Jervis _ . . 


Garden City .. 
Glen Cove 


Jacksonville 

Kernersville 

Kings Mountain 

Kinston 

Lake Waccamaw... 


Glens Falls 


Potsdam 


Gloversville 

Goshen... . 


Poughkeepsie 


Gouverneur 


Rensselaer- .. 


Gowanda 


Riverhead Town 

Rye 




9 
22 
29 


Granville 


Lenoir 


Green Island 


St. Johnsville 

Salamanca 

Saranac Lake 

Saratoga Springs 


Greenport . 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 


Lincolnton 

Louisburg 

Lowell 


11 
6 
2 

24 


Harrison 


Hastings-on- 


Scarsdale. .. .. 




22 


Hudson 


Scotia 


Morehead City 


12 



125 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31. 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 
of police 

department 
employees 


NORTH CAROLINA 
— Continued 


17 
22 
33 
15 

4 

6 
30 
12 

6 
40 

4 
25 

7 
15 
10 

5 

2 
43 
16 
26 

4 
19 
10 
10 
10 

10 
12 
5 

17 
12 
4 
9 
5 
16 

2 

14 

18 

29 

2 

1 

14 

4 

14 

10 

17 

9 

14 

14 

11 

2 

18 

15 

9 

8 

16 

20 

11 

3 

19 

20 

3 

6 

3 

10 

6 

4 

8 


OHIO— Continued 

Chillicothe 


29 

12 

3 

7 

4 

13 

7 

2 

9 

19 

15 

4 

15 

12 

29 

6 

6 

7 

29 

18 

23 

9 

22 

5 

16 

10 

6 

7 

5 

16 

7 

9 

6 

4 

11 

10 

5 

3 

9 

10 

3 

9 

12 

11 

12 

3 

12 
9 
10 
9 
7 
14 
5 

10 
18 
15 
6 
15 
14 
6 

4 

14 
4 
2 
8 
4 
3 
3 

11 
4 

10 
4 

10 
6 


OHIO— Continued 

New Carlisle 

Newcomerstown 

New Lexington 

New Philadelphia 

Newton Falls 

North Baltimore 

North Canton 

North College Hill- 
North Olmsted 

North Royalton 

Norwalk . . 


3 


Morganton 

Mount Airy 




9 




5 


Clvde 


17 


Oxford 


Columbiana 

Conneaut-. - - 


6 




3 


Red Springs 




9 


Crooksville 

Deer Park. . . . _ 


7 




17 


Rutherfordton 




n 


Delaware -- 


13 


Scotland Neck 




Oakwood 

Oberlin. .. 


35 


Dover 

Eastlake 

East Liverpool 

East Palestine 

Eaton.. -.- -- --- 


7 


Siler City 


Ontario __. 


4 


Smithfleld 


Oregon . . . 


15 


Southern Pines 


Orrville 


11 


Oxford.- 


8 


Spring Lake 


Elmwood Place 

Fairborn . . .. 




20 


Parma Heights 

Paulding.-. .__ 


14 




Fairview Park 


2 


Thomasville 

Wake Forest 

Washington 

Waynesville 




il 


Franklin 




19 




Port Clinton 


8 




12 


Galion 


Reading.. 


15 


Williamston 




Reynoldsburg 

Rocky River 


10 




22 


NORTH DAKOTA 


Germantown 


5 


St. Bernard 

St. Clairsville 

Salem. . ._ 


17 






3 


Devils Lake 


Golf Manor 


15 




Grandview Heights. 

Greenfield 

Greenhills 


Sebring 


6 




Shadyside 


2 




Sheffield Lake 

Shelby 


5 


South West Fargo.. 




10 


Grove City 

Harrison.. . . 


Sidney . . . 


15 




Silverton . 


8 




Hicksville . 


Solon 


12 








3 






Stow 


11 


OHIO 


Huron 


Strongsville.. . 


13 




Independence 


Struthers 


16 


Ada 


Tiffin 


23 


Amberley 


Kent 


Tipp City 


3 


Ashland 








Ashtabula 


Lakeville Village 




13 
12 

7 
4 


Aurora 






Lincoln Heights 




Avon Lake 








University Heights. 


27 




Bay Milage 




13 


Beachwood 






10 


Bedford 


Madeira 




13 

17 


Bedford Heights 


Wadsworth. 


Bell aire 




Wapakoneta 

Warrensville 


8 


Bellefontaine 

Bellevue. 


Martins Ferry 


13 


Bellville 




Washington Court 




Bexley.. 




13 


Bowling Green 


Mentor 


Wauseon 


2 


Brecksville 


Mentor-on-the- 

Lake 




3 


Bridgeport 




7 




Miamisburg 

Middleport 


West Carrollton 


8 
7 


Brook Park 


Bryan 






15 


Cadiz 


Mingo Junction... 

M ogadore 

Montgomery 




25 


Cambridge 




15 


Campbell 


Willard 


7 


Canfield 


Willoughby 

Willmvick 

Wilmington 


18 


Carey 


Moraine 

Mount Healthy 

Napoleon 


16 




13 

8 


Celina — 


Chagrin Falls 


Woodlawn 


6 


Chardon 




20 


Cheviot 


Newburgh Heights. 


Worthington 


13 



126 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December .?/, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000— Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 
employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


OHIO— Continued 


12 
22 

21 
20 
28 
15 
14 
9 
3 
20 
14 
4 

10 
4 
2 
13 
10 
3 
5 

23 

12 

14 

18 

10 

14 

5 

11 

5 

6 

4 

6 

5 

23 

21 

8 

5 

4 

22 

8 

11 

6 

12 

5 

12 

17 

12 

31 

2 

29 

7 

7 

5 

9 

4 

10 

7 

23 
13 
17 
13 

8 
19 
13 

8 
27 
11 

5 

5 

9 


OREGON-Con. 

Gladstone 

Grants Pass 

Gresham 


3 

16 

5 

7 

11 

6 

37 

14 

16 

13 

7 

44 

10 

9 

3 

10 

5 

5 

12 

16 

23 

8 

6 

4 

23 

7 

10 

5 

28 

9 

17 

7 

5 

4 

8 
18 

3 

2 
12 

3 

4 

9 
19 

7 

5 
10 
25 

5 

7 

1 

2 
13 

2 

5 

4 

4 
17 

6 
15 
10 

1 
39 
14 

3 

5 
14 
18 
15 

4 

22 
15 
28 


PENNSYLVANIA 
Continued 

Clarion 

Clearfield- .. 

Clymer 

Coaldale 

Collingdale 

Colwyn 

Connellsville 

Conshohocken 

Coplay 

Coraopolis 

Corry 

Coudersport 

Crafton 

Cressona 

Curwensville 

Dallastown 




Xenia ._ 








OKLAHOMA 

Ada 


Hermiston 

Hillsboro 

Hood River 

Klamath Falls 

La Grande 

Lake Oswego 

Lebanon 

McMinnville 

Medford 

Milton-Freewater... 

Milwaukie 

Myrtle Point 


2 
2 
5 
2 
19 
10 


Altus 

Ardmore 


Bethany . . 


Black well 


3 

12 
9 
2 
12 


Broken Arrow 

Cherokee 




Claremore . 


Cleveland 


Clinton. . . . 


2 
4 
6 


Collinsville 


Newport 

Nyssa 

Ontario 

Oregon City 

Pendleton 

Prineville 

Redmond 

Reedsport 

Roseburg 

St. Helens 

Seaside 


Commerce. . . 


dishing 




17 


Del City... 


Derry 

Dickson City 

Donora 

Doylestown 

Dravosburg 


2 
3 
14 


Dewey ... 


Drumright 


Duncan 


Edmond.. _. 


5 


Elk City 


El Reno 


Duquesne 

Duryea 

East Lansdowne 

East Stroudsburg.. . 
Easttown 

Township 

Ebensburg 


23 

7 
5 
9 


Frederick- 


Guthrie... __ . . 


Guvmon _ 


Springfield 

Sweet Home 

The Dalles 


Henryetta... . 


Mollis 


8 


Hominv ... . 


Madill 


Toledo 

West Linn 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Ambler 

Ambridge 

Annville 

Apollo 

Arnold 

Ashland 

Athens 

Avalon 

Baldwin Borough... 
Bangor . 


4 


Mangum 


Edgeworth 

Edwardsville 

Elizabethtown 

Ellwood City 

Emmaus 

Emporium .. . 


5 
5 
5 
16 

7 
2 


Marlow 

McAlester 

Miami 

Nichols Hills 

Nowata 


Okemah 


Ephrata . - 


9 


Okmulgee 


Etna. 


8 


Pauls Valley 


Farrell . . 


22 


Pawhuska.. 




2 


Perry 


Ford City 


5 


Pryor Creek 


Forest Citv 


2 


Sallisaw 

Sand Springs 


Fountain Hill 


6 
15 


Sapulpa . 


Barnesboro ._ 


Gallitzin 


1 


Seminole 


Beaver 

Beaver Falls 

Bedford 

Bellefonte 

Bellwood 

Bentleyville 

Berwick . 




1 


Shawnee 


Glassport .. 


9 


Spiro 




2 


Stillwater... 




g 


Tahlequah 


Greenville.. . 


12 


The Village 


Grove City 


9 


Tonkawa . 




5 


Vinita..- 






15 


Wagoner 

Wewoka.. 


Bloomsburg 

Boyertown 

Brackenridge 

Brentwood 

Bridgeport 

Bristol 

Brownsville 

Burnham 

Butler 

Butler Township... 

California 

Camp Hill 


Hanover Township. 


18 
11 


Woodward 


Heller town. 






Honesdale.. 


5 


OREGON 
Albany 


H ummels town 

Huntingdon 

Indiana .. ... 


1 
8 
14 


Ashland 




5 


Astoria 

Baker 


Jeannette 

Jenkintown 

Jersey Shore 


21 
15 
5 
4 


Beaverton 

Bend 


Coos Bav. 


Canonsburg 

Carbondale 

Carnegie 

Catasauqua 

Chambersburg 

Charleroi 

Clairton 


Johnson burg 

Kane 

Kenhorst 

Kennett Square 


4 

4 
2 

7 
17 


Coquille 

Corvallis 

Cottage Grove 

Dallas 


Empire 

Forest Grove 


Kittanning 

Lansdalp 


9 
16 



127 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


PENNSYLVANIA— 
Continued 


18 
4 
2 

4 
4 
5 
3 
5 

16 
4 
2 

16 

9 

11 

4 
2 
7 
1 
7 
22 
3 
3 

14 

18 
1 

27 
5 

13 
3 
8 

19 

12 
2 

10 
8 
2 
4 
4 
2 

24 
2 

14 
5 
5 

9 
5 
3 

2 

25 
3 
4 
2 
5 
9 

27 
6 
5 
3 
3 
5 
2 
2 

19 
3 

23 
6 

15 
2 
2 


PENNSYLVANIA— 
Continued 

Port Carbon 

Prospect Park 

Pimxsutawney 

Quaker town 

Radnor Township . . 
Republic Cardale... 

Reynolds ville 

Roaring Spring 

Rockledge 


3 
4 

13 
8 

14 
3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
5 
5 
6 

11 

18 
4 

10 
5 
4 
3 
8 
2 
3 

1 

1 

24 
15 
14 
10 
2 
3 
11 
2 
10 
17 
2 
9 
8 
4 
2 
2 
12 
4 
3 
1 
17 
8 
4 
43 

21 
9 
6 

16 

36 
2 
3 
3 

21 

11 
6 
2 
5 
6 
8 

15 

3 
2 
4 

5 


PENNSYLVANIA— 
Continued 

Winton. 


3 


Lansford 


Wyoming .. . 


2 


Laureldale 


Wyomissing 

Yeadon 


9 




17 


Township 


Youngwood... 


2 


Zelienople 


4 


Lehighton _. _ . - 


RHODE ISLAND 

Barrington. 




Lemoyne 




Lew is burg . 






Roversford _ . 


16 


Lititz 


St. Clair 


Burrill ville 


5 




St. Marys .. 


Central Falls 

Cumberland 

East Greenwich 

Jamestown _ .. 


33 




Scottdale... 


18 


Lower Moreland 


Sewickley .... ._ 


12 


Township _ _ . 


Shaler Township 

Sharon Hill 


4 


Lower 


Johnston .. 


20 


Southampton __ 


Sharps burg 


Lincoln. 


13 


Luzerne . 


Sharps ville _...._. 


North Kingstown... 
North Providence. . 
North Smithfield... 
Portsmouth 


20 




Shillington 

Slatington . . 


28 


Mahanoy City ... 


2 


Manheim 


Somerset 


8 


Marcus Hook 


South Greensburg. . 
Southmont .. 


Smithfield 


10 


Marple Township 


South Kingstown... 
Ti vert on .. 


17 


Masontown... 


Southwest 

Greensburg 

Spangler . 


10 


McAdoo 


Warren. . 


15 


McCandless 


Westerly 


22 


Township 

McKees Rocks 

McSherrystown 

Meadville 

Mechanicsburg 


Springfield 

Township 

State College 

Stowe Township 

Stroudsburg 

Sugar Notch 

Summit Hill 

Sunbury 

Susquehanna 

S warthmore 

Swissvale.. . 


SOUTH 
CAROLINA 

Abbeville- 


10 


Media. 


Aiken.. 


23 


Meyersdale . 


Anderson 


52 


Milton . .... 




5 


Monessen 


Barnwell 


6 


Monongahela. . . . 


Beaufort. 


12 


Mon tours ville 


Bennettsville 

Camden 


12 


Morrisville 


Swoyers ville 

Tamaqua . __ 


20 


Mount Carmel ... 


Chester . 


11 


Mount Joy _. 


Tarentum . 




2 


Mount Penn 


Tavlor 


Clinton . 


14 


Mount Union 


Telford 


Conway 


16 


Muncy ... 


Throop... 




15 


Munhall 


Titus ville . 


Dillon 


13 


Myers town.. 


Towanda 


Easley 


8 


Nanticoke... . . 


Trafford 


42 


Nar berth 




Fort Mill 


9 


N azareth 


Turtle Creek 

Tvrone .... 




20 


Nether Providence 




19 


Township ... . 


Union Citv. 


Greenwood .. .. 


30 


New Cumberland 


Uniontown 


Greer 


17 


New Eagle _ .. 


Upper Moreland 
Township 

Vandergrift 

Verona 

Warminster 
Township 

Washington 

Weatherly 




21 


New Holland 

New Kensington 


Kingstree 

Lake City 


11 

15 


North Catasauqua.. 


Laurens 


19 


North East 


Myrtle Beach 

North Augusta 


23 


Northumberland _ . . 
Norwood 


7 
33 


Oakmont. - 




18 


Oil City 




Ware Shoals 

Williston 


6 


Old Forge 


Weslevville . 


4 


Olyphant .. 


West Chester 

West Homestead 


SOUTH DAKOTA 




Oxford 




Palmerton ... 




Palmyra 


West Newton 

West Pittston 

West Reading 

West View 

Whitehall. . 


29 


Pen Argyl . 


Belle Fourche 


5 


Penbrook 


2 


Phoenixville 

Pitcairn . .. 


Hot Springs 


7 
20 


Pittston 


Wilkes-Barre 

Township 

Williamstown 

Wilson 




6 


Plains Township 


Lemmon. .. 


3 


Plymouth 


Madison.. 


12 


Portage ... ... 


-Mitchell 


19 


Port Allegany 


Windber 


Mobridge 


7 



128 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31, 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


SOUTH DAKOTA— 
Continued 

Pierre .. . 


14 
4 

5 

6 

16 
3 

10 

9 
41 
28 

9 
23 
20 

4 

9 
16 
20 

4 
10 
11 

6 
10 

5 
16 
14 
10 
11 

6 
22 

1 
16 

8 

9 
3 
14 

7 
5 
14 

2 
4 

8 
6 
5 

13 
3 
8 

23 
9 

18 

26 

12 
2 
5 
7 
3 
7 
6 

18 
6 
8 
5 

10 
1 
4 
6 

26 
9 


TEXAS— Continued 

Daingerfield 

Deer Park... 


4 

5 

23 

2 

5 
3 
13 
1 
6 
11 
5 

12 
10 
7 
2 
1 
8 
8 
5 

17 
15 
2 

11 
12 
26 
28 
11 
23 
15 
10 
10 

2 
17 
26 

8 
12 
16 

5 

1 
35 

3 
18 

7 

5 

19 
11 
9 
6 
17 
5 
3 

11 
4 

3 

16 
27 
25 
1 
14 
4 

26 
4 
1 
9 
4 
4 
5 
28 
7 
18 
10 


TEXAS— Continued 

Stephenville 

Sweetwater 


9 


Redfield 


19 


Sisseton 


Denison. . 


Taft 


2 


Sturgis. 


Denver City 

Dimmitt—. 


Tahoka.. . 


3 




Taylor 


10 




Donna 


Tulia 


6 


Webster ... 


Dublin.. . 




11 








20 


TENNESSEE 


Duncanville 

Eagle Lake 


Waxahachie 

Weatherford 


Hi 
13 


Alcoa 


Eagle Pass. ... 


13 


Brownsville 

Clarksville 


Eastland 

Edinburg ... 


West Columbia 

West University 
Place. . 


2 


Cleveland .- _ _ 


El Campo.- 


12 




Electra 

Elgin 


White Settlement... 
Winters. .. 


10 


Columbia... . . 


3 


Dversburg . 


Elsa 

Euless 

Fort Stockton 

Fredericksburg 

Freeport 

Galena Park 

Gatesville 


Yorktown. . 


1 




UTAH 

American Fork 

Bountiful 

Brigham City 

Helper.. 




Fayetteville 

Gallatin 

Greeneville 

Jefferson City 


5 
13 




Gilmer.. . 


4 




Gladewater 

Graham 

Greenville.. 




14 




Midvale... 


6 


Martin 


North Ogden 

Park City. 


1 


Maryville 


Haltom City 

Hereford . 


2 


McMinnville . . 


Pleasant Grove 

Richfield 


5 


Milan . 


Highland Park 

Hurst... . 


4 


Millington.. 


Rov 


6 


Mount Pleasant 

M ur f reesboro 

Norris .. 


Jacinto City 

Jacksonville 

Karnes City 


South Ogden 

South Salt Lake 

Springville. .. 


4 

10 
6 




Sunset 

Tooele 

VERMONT 

Bellows Falls 


2 


Ripley 

Rockwood 

Savannah . 

Smyrna 

Springfield 


Killeen 

Lake Worth 

La Marque 

Lamesa 

Lewisville 

Luling 

Marshall 

Mathis . . 


10 

5 
16 


Trenton 

Union City. . 


Essex Junction 

Hartford 


4 






Manchester. 


2 


TEXAS 




Manchester Center. 

Middlebury 

Montpelier 

Newport.. . . . 


2 






2 


Alamo .. 




9 


Alpine .. 


Mission 

Monahans 

Mount Pleasant 

Muleshoe 

Nacogdoches 

Nederland 

Nocona 

North Richland 

Hills 

Olney 

Palacios 

Palestine 








27 


Azle ..... 


St. Albans 

Springfield 


9 


Ballinger _ __ __ 


9 


Beeville 


Waterbury 


2 


Bellmead 


Windsor ... 


6 






6 


Borger. 


VIRGINIA 




Bowie. 




Brownfield 




Brownwood 


10 


Burkburnett 


Bedford 


14 


Canadian . _ 


Bristol . 


26 


Carrollton.. . ... 




Buena Vista 

Cape Charles 

C hincoteague 

Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights 


12 


Carthage 

Castle Hills 


Pearsall 

Pecos 


2 
3 


Childress.. 


9 


C isco 


Plainview 


11 


Cleburne. . . 


16 


Clute 




Culpeper. 


8 


Coleman 

College Station 

Colorado Citv. 


Raymondville 

Refugio 

Richmond 

Rockdale 

Sherman 

Slaton 

Snyder 

South Houston 


Falls Church 

Farmville 


21 
12 
11 


Columbus 


Fredericksburg 

Front Royal 


27 


Comanche 

Copperas Cove. 


13 
12 


Corsicana 

Crockett 


Harrisonburg 

Hopewell 


20 
23 



129 



Table 39. — Number of Full-time Police Department Employees, December 31. 
1961, Cities With Population Under 25,000 — Continued 



City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 

of police 

department 

employees 


City 


Number 
of police 

department 
employees 


VIRGINIA-Con. 

Lexington . 


13 

5 

13 

33 

3 

9 

1 

15 

17 

9 

4 

15 

5 

34 

32 

30 

5 

22 

7 

24 

14 

27 

27 

8 

18 

21 

3 

4 

8 

18 

9 

7 

3 

4 

2 

5 

2 

2 

12 

13 

9 

11 

1 

3 

2 

15 

15 

16 

10 

11 

29 

10 

4 

18 

11 

11 

3 

5 

26 

1 

21 

17 

6 

10 

16 

4 

35 

37 

5 

3 

11 

5 


WASHINGTON— 
Continued 

Sunnyside 


9 
8 
4 
29 

18 
9 

23 
3 
6 
5 
2 
9 
7 

11 
3 

11 
2 

19 
2 
5 

19 
6 
3 
2 
7 
4 
5 
4 

12 
2 
3 
2 
4 
4 
5 

11 
3 

2 

1 

4 
12 
14 
8 
18 
8 
3 
4 
4 
21 
12 
6 
2 
19 
8 
4 
25 
8 
10 
3 
5 
8 
4 
20 
21 
11 
5 
6 
8 


WISCONSIN— Con. 

Horicon 

Hudson 

Jefferson 

Kaukauna 

Kewaunee 

Kiel 

Kimberly 

Ladysmith 

Lake Geneva 

Lake Mills 


4 




5 




Toppenish. .. 


6 




Washougal 


11 




Wenatchee.. ... 


3 


Norton. . . ... 


WEST VIRGINIA 
Becklev ... 


2 


Poquoson. .. 


4 


Pulaski __ 


4 


Radford 


10 




Benwood.. 


5 


Saltville 


Bluefield . 


Little Chute 

Marinette 

Marshfield 

Mayville 

Menasha 

Menomonie 

Mequon 

Merrill 

Middleton 

Monona 

Monroe 

Neenah 

Nekoosa 

New London 

Oak Creek 

Oconomowoe 

Onalaska 

Park Falls 

Peshtigo 

Plymouth . 


4 






18 


South Hill 


Buckhannon 

Charles Town 

Chester 


23 


South Norfolk 

Staunton ... .. 


4 
24 


Suffolk 


Elkins... 


13 




Hinton 








14 






5 


Waynesboro . 


Logan. . 


12 


Williamsburg 

Winchester 


Mannington 

Martinsburg 

McMechen. 


14 

31 

5 


WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen 

Anacortes 


Montgomery 

Morgantown 

New Martinsville... 
Paden City. . 


20 
10 
2 


Auburn 


Piedmont. 


4 


Bellevue . 


Point Pleasant 

Ravenswood 


4 


Bucklev 


5 




Port Washington.. _ 

Reedsburg 

Rhinelander 

Rice Lake 

Richland Center 

Ripon 

River Falls 

Rothschild 

Schofield 

Shawano 

Sheboygan Falls 

Shorewood 

South Milwaukee... 

Spooner 

Stevens Point 

Stoughton 

Sturgeon Bay 

Tomah 

Two Rivers 

Viroqua 

Waterford 

Watertown 

Waupaca 

Waupun 

West Milwaukee 

Whitefish Bay 

Whitewater 

Wisconsin Rapids. _ 

WYOMING 

Buffalo 

Cody 

Douglas 

Evanston 

Gillette 

Laramie 


7 


Camas.. 


Riplev 


7 




St. \lbans 


13 


Chehalis. .. . . .. 


St. Marys 


11 






Cle Elum 




- 


Colfax 




5 


College Place . 


Vienna _ . 


2 


Colville 


Wellsburg 


3 


Dayton 




9 


Des Moines. .. 




4 


Edmonds. . . 


White Sulphur 


27 


Ellensburg. . . . 


23 


Enumclaw.. 


Williamstown 

WISCONSIN 
Algoma... 


,5 


Ephrata.. 


22 


Fircrest... . . 


8 


Goldendale.. 


9 


Grand Coulee 


Antigo .. 


8 


Hoquiam. . 




19 


Kelso 


Bavside 


4 


Kennewick.. . .. 


Beaver Dam 

Berlin . . 


3 


Kent 


19 


Kirkland. . ... 


Bloomer 


7 


Longview 




7 


Lynn wood 




24 


Marysville . . 


Brookfield--. . .. 


26 


Moses Lake . 


Burlington 

Cedarburg 

Chilton- 


8 


Mountlake Terrace. 
Mount Vernon 


24 


Normandy Park... 

Oak Harbor 

Olvmpia.. 


Chippewa Falls 

Clintonville 

Columbus 

Cudahy 

Delavan 

De Pere 


4 
11 


Orting... 


3 


Pasco . 


6 


Port Angeles 


5 


Port Orchard. . 


Dodgeville... 


21 


Pullman.. . ... 


Elkhorn 

Elm Grove 

Evansville 

Fox Point 

Glendale... 


9 


Puyallup _ 


Powell 


10 


Raymond 


Rawlins 


10 


Renton 


14 


Richland 


Rock Springs 

Sheridan 

Thermopolis 

Torrington 


17 


Sedro-Woolley 

Selah '____ 


Greendale 

Grafton 

Hales Corners 

Hartford 


16 
9 


Shelton. 


7 


Sumner 


8 











130 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population 





Criminal 
homicide 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny 

thefl 




City 


Murder 

and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 

$50 


Auto 
theft 


Cities over 250,000 popula- 
tion 


16 
74 
89 
41 
26 

19 
365 
37 
80 
23 

99 
27 
32 
136 
10 

46 
9 
117 
40 
11 

49 
10 
159 
40 
36 

38 
21 
9 
31 
39 

52 

482 

18 

22 

18 

15 
144 

30 
23 

8 

12 
77 
3 
36 
15 

40 
23 
23 
10 
8 

88 
5 


4 

30 
46 
20 
35 

21 
108 
21 
19 
16 

60 
10 
14 
22 
15 

5 

16 
30 
26 

6 

31 
25 
188 
36 
12 

8 
25 
18 
18 
32 

22 
46 
20 
21 
21 

21 
108 

26 
41 

28 

4 

15 
15 
46 
51 

48 
10 
4 
9 
13 

18 
12 


8 
76 

134 
34 

103 

10 
1,481 
80 
41 
40 

55 

15 

108 

315 

38 

32 

15 

220 

37 

7 

222 

79 

1,156 

36 

18 

22 
14 
24 
10 
190 

122 

788 
32 
67 
57 

9 
500 

86 
82 
23 

13 

217 

29 

77 
40 

140 

72 
26 
27 

48 

100 
26 


259 
374 
1,029 
169 
594 

177 

18. 993 

242 

1,209 

480 

422 

236 

1.240 

3.397 

135 

297 

61 

636 

546 

88 

1,169 
511 

5,729 
620 
306 

844 
188 
591 
217 
1,138 

1.017 

5.955 

146 

535 

284 

139 
2,215 
365 
795 
448 

112 

1,998 
240 
216 
328 

1,631 
513 
275 
318 
137 

1,348 
60 


94 

491 

1,966 

833 

753 

262 
11,410 
340 
463 
635 

886 
324 
412 
5. 052 
249 

323 

28 

1,781 

252 

119 

1,194 
363 

7,973 
386 

481 

955 
447 
212 
140 
1,673 

597 
11, 976 
570 
448 
361 

83 

3,842 

336 

556 

183 

58 
978 

60 
815 
330 

1,400 
110 
621 
204 
130 

2,955 

208 


1,907 
4.025 
4.573 
2.043 
3,902 

2, 157 
39, 452 
1.693 
3,520 
3,381 

3,997 
2,073 
6, 565 
15. 300 
2,144 

4,605 
2,644 
10, 276 
3,408 
766 

6,020 
3,555 
35, 409 
3,221 
3,482 

4,209 
1,894 

4,784 
2,809 
7.509 

4,503 
38, 460 
1,917 
3,383 
3,837 

1,203 

11,752 
4,578 
4.949 
2,526 

1,198 
10. 375 
2,147 
5,366 
2,562 

6,692 
4,210 
2,997 
1.886 
1.936 

4,902 
1,071 


1.138 
3.331 
4. 460 
1,513 
2,579 

808 

27, 678 

1,376 

1,214 

2,152 

1,103 

640 

3.208 

4,364 

811 

897 

1,634 

3,118 

405 

209 

2,472 
2,058 
20, 192 
2,560 
1,420 

1,479 
2,886 
2,242 
1,254 
3,603 

2,460 

54, 827 

1,299 

1,736 

575 

660 
4,152 
3,014 
2.674 
2,587 

624 
3.390 
1,202 
2,429 
2,987 

2,449 
2,347 
1,425 
1,714 
1,443 

2,464 

748 


4,719 
8,295 
7.362 
3. 585 
4,659 

1,691 
39. 990 

4.761 
12. 777 

6,536 

12, 058 
3,420 
6.997 

29. 973 
4,531 

6,259 
5.319 
10.311 
3. 065 
573 

8,963 

3,482 

35, 191 

4,290 

2,724 

4,830 
7,201 
6,412 
2.669 
4,783 

4,652 
34. 565 
4.011 
6,431 
6,142 

4,481 
13, 068 
7,892 
3, 501 
7,074 

2,745 
14, 985 
4,872 
8,734 
6,574 

14. 389 
9,058 
4,261 
4, 857 
3,457 

7,268 
3,569 


1,351 


Atlanta, Qa 


2.71s 


Baltimore, Md 


3. is] 




718 




5,663 


Buffalo, N.Y 

Chicago, Ill.i._ 


1.346 

29, 737 

831 


Cleveland, Ohio 


2,418 


Columbus, Ohio 

Dallas, Tex 


1,286 
2,169 


Dayton, Ohio 


633 


Denver, Colo . . _ 


3,273 




6,164 


El Paso, Tex 


903 


Fort Worth, Tex. 


1.012 




1.600 




3.045 




2.728 




1,299 




1,995 




1,925 




14, 862 




1,264 




840 




1,389 


Milwaukee, Wis. - _. . 


1.594 


Minneapolis, Minn 

Nashville, Tenn.. . 


2,397 
1,385 


Newark, N.J 


3,692 
3,709 


New York, N.Y 


21.778 
717 


Oakland, Calif 


1,206 


Oklahoma City, Okla 


1,643 

966 


Philadelphia, Pa -. 


4,156 




2,411 


Pittsburgh, Pa 


3,242 




1.233 


Rochester, N.Y___ . 


473 




3.522 


St. Paul, Minn . 


794 




1.681 


San Diego, Calif 


1,817 


San Francisco, Calif. . 

Seattle, Wash 


5,389 
2,140 




681 


Toledo, Ohio 


511 


Tulsa, Okla 

Washington, D.C 


761 

2,459 


Wichita. Kans._ . 


404 



Figures not comparable with prior years. 



131 



Table 40.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 100,000 to 250,000 in 
population 



Albany, N.Y 

Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

Allentown, Pa 

Amarillo, Tex... 

Anaheim, Calif 



Arlington, Va 

Austin, Tex 

Baton Rouge, La. 
Beaumont, Tex... 
Berkeley, Calif. . . 



Bridgeport, Conn. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Camden, N.J 

Canton, Ohio 

Charlotte, N.C. _ 



Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Columbus, Ga 

Corpus Christi, Tex. 

Dearborn, Mich 

Des Moines, Iowa.. 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Duluth, Minn.. 
Elizabeth, N.J.. 

Erie, Pa 

Evansville, Ind. 
Flint, Mich 



Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fresno, Calif 

Gary, Ind 

Glendale, Calif 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 



Greensboro, N.C. 
Hammond, Ind.. 
Hartford, Conn.. 
Jackson, Miss... 
Jacksonville, Fla. 



Kansas City, Kans. 
Knoxville, Tenn — 

Lansing, Mich 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Little Rock, Ark... 



Lubbock, Tex 

Macon, Ga 

Madison, Wis 

Mobile, Ala 

Montgomery, Ala. 



New Bedford, Mass. 
New Haven, Conn.. 
Newport News, Va. 
Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Pasadena, Calif 



Paterson, N.J.... 
Peoria, 111 

Portsmouth, Va. 
Providence, R.T. 

Richmond, Va ... 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
ence 



is 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 




21 



Rob- 
bery 



30 
L46 

4 



47 
55 
74 
24 
76 

40 
4S 

193 
52 

118 

112 
57 
73 
62 

85 

15 
100 
52 
60 
140 

52 

123 

386 

27 

74 

20 
51 
39 
17 
638 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



53 

L29 

7 

181 

56 



232 



183 
44 



26 
200 

11 
327 

144 
73 

343 
26 

58 

10 
111 

72 

79 

616 

18 
78 

472 
33 

120 



65 

IDS 

226 

420 



Bur- 
glary - 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



127 


82 


49 


120 


21 


26 


7 


31 


77 


53 


61 


215 


88 


23 


21 


5 


75 


244 


43 


94 


17 


24 


9 


81 


62 


117 


25 


37 


65 


146 


108 


115 


97 


59 


72 


233 


50 


135 


229 


419 



622 
1,171 

260 
1.047 
1,187 

664 

1,380 

1,609 

812 

796 

1,074 
610 

1,059 
693 

1,402 



931 

,712 
720 
985 

534 
900 
500 
,202 
, 343 



Larceny- 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



664 
1,093 
1,118 

605 
1,193 

451 
468 

1,104 
784 

2,613 

914 
959 
507 
341 
756 

1,288 
1, 306 

393 
2,110 

965 

620 
578 
650 
388 

1, 115 

1,399 
447 
696 

1,638 

2, 299 



Under 
$50 



154 
931 
234 
652 
691 

818 
270 
929 
358 
281 



458 
552 
445 
972 

316 
320 

872 
442 

987 

252 
404 
191 
669 
1,284 

723 
962 
986 
440 
629 

330 
511 
457 
198 
1.653 

77 
296 
296 
352 

575 

774 
273 
378 
502 



337 
341 
458 
390 
733 

166 
492 
476 
, 102 
913 



Auto 
theft 



489 
3,568 

819 
2,184 
2,143 

1,944 
3,323 
2,580 
1,681 
2,309 

1,407 
398 

1, 353 
1,456 
2,744 

1,261 
1,192 

2, 622 
2,745 
2,692 

1,652 
1,410 
962 
1,853 
3,001 

2,681 
2.468 
2, 024 
1.426 
2,124 

1,208 
1,031 
1.258 
1,693 
3,992 

1,614 
1,284 

1,828 
1,587 
1,643 

2,163 
1,012 
1,636 
1,583 
1,657 

1,075 
1, 510 
1,753 
512 
2,392 

1,009 
1,786 
1,730 
2,432 
3.943 



305 
677 
143 
273 
330 

277 
282 
371 
206 
118 

414 
696 
583 

144 
414 

425 
355 
406 
372 
463 

218 
336 
253 
297 
422 

279 
658 
897 
209 
284 

192 
273 
564 

167 
560 

277 
503 
lfi4 
138 
238 

256 
217 
157 
415 
239 

475 
454 
211 
157 
269 

653 

315 

380 

1,258 

1,040 



132 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
aegligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 

negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary— 

break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 




Cities 100,000 to 250,000 in 
•population— Continued 



Rockford, 111 

Sacramento, Calif 

St. Petersburg, Fla... 
Salt Lake Citv, Utah. 
San Jose, Calif 



Santa Ana, Calif. 
Savannah, Ga... 

Seranton, Pa 

Shreveport, La.. 
South Bend, Ind. 



Spokane, Wash... 
Springfield, Mass. 

Syracuse, N.Y 

Tacoma, Wash... 
Topeka, Kans 



Torrance, Calif 

Trenton, N.J 

Tucson, Ariz 

Utica, N.Y 

Water bury, Conn_ 



Wichita Falls, Tex _ 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Worcester, Mass 

Yonkers, N.Y 

Youngstown, Ohio.. 



Cities 50,000 to 100,000 
in population 



Abilene, Tex 

Abington Township, Pa. 

Alameda, Calif 

Albany, Ga 

Alexandria, Va 



Alhambra, Calif.. 

Altoona, Pa 

Amherst, N.Y 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Asheville, N.C 



Atlantic City, N.J. 

Augusta, Ga 

Aurora, 111 

Bakersfield, Calif.. 
Bay City, Mich... 



Bayonne, N.J 

Berwyn, 111 

Bethlehem, Pa 

Billings, Mont 

Binghamton, N.Y. 



Bloomfield, N.J 

Bloomington, Minn. 

Brockton, Mass 

Brooklinc, Mass 

Burbank, Calif 



Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 

Charleston, S.C 

Charleston, W. Va... 
Cheektowaga, N.Y.. 
Chester, Pa. 



13 

358 
139 
106 



45 

144 

13 

65 
62 

40 
13 
67 

74 
83 

39 
97 

182 
24 
21 

26 
44 
34 
21 
143 



127 
11!) 
67 
83 
63 



286 
22 
57 



37 
35 
42 
25 
35 

42 

108 

303 

7 

4 

37 

480 
37 
55 
25 



19 
5 
2 

42 
251 

21 

12 

1 

15 

112 

64 
144 
30 
55 
13 

13 
12 
4 
8 
2 

2 
3 

13 
4 

23 

2 
107 
99 

4 
163 



605 
1,936 
1,120 
1, 693 
1,620 

1,057 

1, 503 

318 

782 
825 

739 
634 
792 
688 
695 

1,183 
1, 179 

1,938 
271 
494 

552 
824 
989 
446 
1,092 



582 
122 
192 
292 
491 

388 
196 
190 
275 
311 

1,106 
279 
233 
541 
200 

227 
208 
133 
304 
170 

53 
139 
356 
392 
501 

175 
1.071 
507 
107 
308 



315 
1,436 

609 
1,130 

600 

302 
773 
114 
352 

505 

395 
451 
806 
620 
282 

533 
433 

867 
182 
270 

291 
235 
429 
116 
564 



328 
84 
60 
39 

302 

250 
70 
148 

578 
300 

499 
128 
211 
422 
135 

163 
167 
112 
247 
101 



102 
327 
118 
436 

250 
815 
301 
81 
112 



1,168 

3, 980 
1, 561 

4, 423 

7, 268 

1, 776 

1,598 

579 

1, 534 
2,134 

3,344 
1,512 

2, 736 
2,336 
1,718 

1,507 

825 

6, 088 

797 

739 



1,603 

608 

1,398 



1,327 
163 
703 
169 

1. 474 

651 
131 
313 
1,270 
629 

616 

280 

739 

1,880 

1,172 

244 
191 
508 
1, 332 
623 

194 
218 
512 
487 
1,153 

1,090 
1,628 



295 
277 



133 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 50,000 to 100,000 in 
population— Continued 

Chicopee, Mass 

Cicero, 111 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio.. 

Clifton, N.J..: 

Colorado Springs, Colo... 



Columbia, S.C 

Compton, Calif 

Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

Covington, Ky 

Cranston, R.I 



Davenport, Iowa. 

Decatur, 111 

Downey, Calif 

Dubuque, Iowa__ 
Durham, N.C.... 



East Chicago, Ind. 
East Orange, N.J.. 
East St. Louis, Ill- 
Euclid. Ohio 

Eugene, Oreg 



Evanston, 111 

Fall River, Mass 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

Fort Smith, Ark 

Fullerton, Calif 



Gadsden, Ala 

Galveston, Tex 

Garden Grove, Calif. 
Great Falls, Mont... 
Green Bav, "Wis 



Greenburgh, N.Y 

Greenville, S. C 

Greenwich, Conn 

Hamilton. Ohio 

Hamilton Township. N.J. 



Hampton, Va 

Harrisburg, Pa 

Haverford Township, Pa. 

Hayward, Calif 

Hialeah, Fla 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



High Point, N.C.. 

Holyoke, Mass 

Huntington, W. Ve 

Huntsville, Ala 

Independence, Mo. 



Inglewood, Calif.. 
Irondequoit, N.Y. 

Irvington, N.J 

Jackson, Mich 

Johnstown, Pa 



Joliet, 111 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kenosha, Wis 

Kettering, Ohio... 
Lake Charles, La- 



in 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



166 

11 

26 

4 

30 
22 
36 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



426 

87 
35 
95 



97 
16 
200 
70 
29 

96 

268 

38 

26 

6 

7 

28 

6 

107 

5 

121 
16 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



100 
292 
125 
202 

298 

640 
1,362 
150 
348 
315 

425 
457 
714 
90 
364 

309 
542 
894 
79 
321 

244 
316 

828 
238 
352 

332 
678 
750 
422 
105 

183 
833 
73 
314 
231 

598 
582 
123 
388 
257 

162 
264 
312 
353 
368 

1,033 
114 
254 
309 
215 

153 
409 
270 
112 
204 



Larceny- 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



95 
237 

59 
121 
147 

490 
570 
213 
164 
404 

176 
283 
533 
147 
135 

307 
329 
257 
10 
495 

311 
273 
714 
162 
277 

189 
504 
534 
258 
126 

189 
404 
64 
335 
185 

348 

237 

379 
120 

95 
161 
153 
422 
241 

701 
91 
84 

138 
93 

51 
324 
123 

58 
145 



Under 

$50 



129 
386 
272 
507 
831 

1,850 

1.948 

787 

722 

592 

1,890 

1,093 

1,311 

515 

759 

536 
594 
263 
495 
1,306 

1,117 
454 

1,993 
509 

881 

493 

679 

1,442 

1,180 

310 

328 
1,128 
190 
999 
437 

790 
553 
223 
1,256 
371 

378 
578 
289 
191 
674 

1,252 
305 
465 
276 
355 

127 
1,429 
646 
331 
313 



134 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Criminal 

homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary 
break- 
ing or 

enter- 
ing 



Larceny 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



Under 

$50 



Cities 50,000 to 100,000 in 
population — Continued 



Lakewood, Ohio. 

Lancaster, Pa 

Laredo, Tex 

Las Vegas, Nev.. 
Lawrence, Mass. 



Lawton, Okla.. 

Lexington, Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln Park, Mich. 
Livonia, Mich 



Lorain, Ohio 

Lowell, Mass 

Lower Merion Township, 
Pa 

Lynchburg, Va 

Lynn, Mass 



Maiden, Mass 

Manchester, N.H.. 

Medford, Mass 

Meriden, Conn 

Miami Beach, Fla. 



Midland, Tex 

Monroe, La 

Mount Vernon, N.Y. 
Muncie, Ind 

New Britain, Conn__ 



New Rochelle, N.Y 

Newton, Mass 

North Little Rock, Ark. 

Norwalk, Conn 

Oak Park, 111 



Odessa, Tex 

Ogden, Utah... 

Orlando, Fla 

Palo Alto, Calif. 
Parma, Ohio 



Pasadena, Tex.. 

Passaic, N.J 

Pawtucket, R.I. 
Pensacola, Fla._ 
Pittsfield, Mass. 



Pomona, Calif 

Pontiac, Mich 

Port Arthur, Tex. 
Portland, Maine.. 
Pueblo, Colo 



Quincy, Mass 

Racine, Wis 

Raleigh, N.C 

Reading, Pa 

Redford Township, Mich. 



Reno, Nev 

Richmond, Calif. 
Riverside, Calif.. 

Roanoke, Va 

Rock Island, 111.. 



14 
19 
91 

7 
7 

4 
24 
10 
38 

1 

38 
117 
15 
25 
50 

5 

18 
24 
14 
15 

106 
96 
19 
19 
42 



41 

308 
20 



77 

155 

13 

20 

5 

30 

3 

52 

49 

1 

42 
41 
163 



31 
54 
18 

48 
3 

36 
234 
37 
28 
20 

13 

23 

358 

1 

4 

27 
155 

80 
138 

17 



179 
182 

254 
438 
191 

353 
718 
309 
346 

436 

211 
266 

256 
156 
675 

143 
124 
151 
160 
1,106 

417 
200 
276 
535 

257 

350 
431 
417 
296 
301 



334 
861 
209 
159 

145 
453 
330 
589 
105 

413 

706 
304 
350 
455 

374 
262 
530 
359 
231 

756 
995 
786 
613 
221 



44 

97 

177 

404 

105 

215 

539 

209 

321 

91 

63 
154 

187 

67 

345 

180 
47 
153 
122 
654 

213 
60 
364 
284 
142 

332 
201 
158 
217 

44 

161 

186 

512 

222 

26 

67 
126 
248 
202 
139 

309 
382 
200 
336 
222 

183 
170 
389 
165 



580 
313 



594 
677 
293 
1.170 
282 

1,298 

1,176 

953 

1,058 
957 

360 
423 

353 

604 

1,003 

251 
455 
340 
276 
1,526 

995 
860 
561 
914 
431 

467 
392 
731 
366 
203 

1,338 
1,870 
1,767 
1,154 
233 

650 

120 

655 

1,033 

285 

705 
1,677 

763 
1,226 
1,301 

443 

1,135 

1,226 

768 

752 

1,379 
1,846 
2.069 
1,268 
749 



135 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Totvns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Criminal 
homicide 


Forci- 
ble 

rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 

$50 


Auto 
theft 


Cities 50,000 to 100,000 in 
population— Continued 

Rome, N.Y 










24 
10 

95 
12 

20 
lete 
80 
10 
26 

30 
10 
71 
14 
25 

2 
10 
25 
24 
19 

21 
13 

43 

90 

9 

10 

8 

114 

10 

31 

8 

28 

39 

247 

17 

27 

23 

1 

29 

lit 
2 

""36" 

3 

43 

16 
30 

34 


81 
317 
370 
353 
330 

404 

1.143 

450 
421 

519 
302 
866 

128 
308 

162 
161 
421 
476 
395 

400 
241 
672 
842 
233 

446 
143 

318 
247 
331 

244 

157 

224 

495 

1,293 

220 
624 
2S7 
218 
254 

243 
97 
115 
501 
lit 

499 
264 
158 
89 
906 

299 
276 


104 
206 
201 
180 
152 

196 


316 

688 

1,555 

1. 581 

818 


30 


Roseville, Mich 


1 




5 

2 

7 
1 


27 
18 
29 
11 

15 
Incomi 
79 
21 
32 

25 

14 

136 

4 
9 

12 
25 
41 
43 

31 

23 

18 

146 

5 

32 
9 
6 

7 

6 
10 

13 

67 
46 

26 

28 

3 

14 

25 
2 
5 

20 


52 


Royal Oak, Mich 


94 


Saginaw, Mich 

St. Clair Shores, Mich 

St. Joseph, Mo _________ 


8 
1 

2 

4 
2 
3 

5 
1 
1 


2 


96 
28 

96 


San Angelo, Tex. 


4 
1 
2 

2 
..... 


18 
2 
9 

4 
4 
11 






San Bernardino, Calif 

San Leandro, Calif 


944 
356 
337 

413 
249 
1,190 
108 
370 

232 
263 
264 
340 

278 

241 
101 

344 

888 
241 

264 

113 

303 

42 

91 

207 
167 

149 
267 
329 

134 
501 

228 
236 
187 

203 
155 
158 
320 
79 

215 
111 
324 

87 
460 

233 
127 


2,057 
1.239 
1,452 

1.217 
727 

2, 003 
394 
988 

835 
202 
804 
686 
890 

1, 126 

818 

297 

1,853 

1,089 

874 

89 

193 

408 

52 

443 

388 

766 
1.237 
1,815 

340 
1,233 
450 
434 
610 

749 
424 
974 

668 
167 

1,130 
3 18 
475 
252 

1,831 

327 
621 


463 
167 


San Mateo, Calif. _____ _ 


139 


Santa Barbara, Calif 

Santa Clara, Calif 


178 
107 


Santa Monica, Calif 

Schenectady, N.Y ... 


480 
98 


Sioux City, Iowa 


1 


5 

1 

4 
4 


5 

1 
1 
2 
9 

1 

2 

1 
8 
6 
4 

3 
1 


136 


Sioux Falls, S. Dak... 


92 


Skokie, 111 




156 


Somerville, Mass 


2 


339 


South Gate, Calif 


262 


Springfield, 111 . 


4 

1 
2 

1 
8 
4 

2 
1 


1 

1 
1 
5 
5 

1 


203 


Springfield, Mo.. 


126 


Springfield, Ohio 


142 


Stamford, Conn . . 


219 


Stockton, Calif 


606 


Sunnyvale, Calif. _ 


122 


Terre ETaute, Ind 


139 


Troy, N.Y . 


133 


Tuscaloosa, Ala.. 


23 


Tyler, Tex 


1 
1 

1 


2 
1 

1 


2 

1 

1 


21 


Union City, N..T... 


204 


Union Township, N.J 

University City, Mo. . ... 


120 
39 


Upper Darby Township, 
Pa 


6 
1 

8 

1 






119 


Vallejo, Calif 


3 

1 

5 
3 

2 
2 


9 
14 

3 

5 

8 
1 


184 


Waco, Tex 


187 


Waltham, Mass 


67 


Warren, M ieh 


130 


Warren, Ohio 


2 
1 
2 

1 


94 


Warwick, R. I. 


70 


Waterloo, Iowa _. 


74 


Waukegan, 111 

Wauwatosa, Wis _ 


3 


2 


70 
39 


West A His, Wis 








67 


West Covina, Calif 






3 


1 12 


West Hartford, Conn 




2 
1 


30 


West Palm Beach, Fla___ 

Wheeling. W. \a 


4 
3 


4 


.'57 
17 
15 
5 
84 

7 
40 


105 

74 


White Plains, N.Y 




2 

2 
4 

3 


76 


Wilkes-Bane, Pa.._. 
Wilmington, Del 


3 


2 
4 

12 


102 

380 


Woodbridge Township, 
N.J 


84 
218 


York, Pa 


2 



136 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 25,000 to 60,000 in 
population 



Alexandria, La 

Aliquippa, Pa 

Allen Park, Mich. 

Alliance, Ohio 

Alton, 111 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 

and iioii- 
negligenl 

man- 
slaughter 



Ames, Iowa 

Amsterdam, N.Y.. 
Anchorage, Alaska- 
Anderson, Ind 

Anniston, Ala 



Applet on, Wis... 

Arcadia, Calif 

Arlington, Mass 

Arlington, Tex 

Arlington Heights, 111 



Ashland, Ky 

Athens, Ga 

Attleboro, Mass. 

Auburn, N.Y 

Aurora. Colo 



Austin, Minn... 

Baldwin Park, Calif. 

Bangor, Maine 

Barberton, Ohio 

Bartlesville, Okla 



Battle Creek, Mich. 

Baytown, Tex 

Belleville, 111 

Belleville, N..I 

Bellingham, Wash— 



Belmont, Mass.. 

Beloit, Wis 

Bergenfleld, N.J. 

Bessemer, Ala 

Beverly, Mass... 



Beverly Hills, Calif- 
Big Spring, Tex 

Biloxi, Miss 

Birmingham, Mich. 
Bismarck, N. Dak.. 



Bloomington, 111.. 
Bloomington, Ind. 

Boise, Idaho 

Bossier City, La.. 
Boulder, Colo 



Bowling Green, Ky 
Braintree, Mass _ 
Bremerton, Wash... 

Bristol, Conn 

Brownsville, Tex... 



Brvan, Tex . 

Buena Park, Calif. 
Burlington, Iowa.. 
Burlington, N.C... 
Burlington, Vt 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



41 
35 
126 

1 
23 



Incomplete 



6 
3 

Hi) 



20 


2 


7 


73 


7 


59 


1 




1 


1 


18 


10 


4 





Bur- 
glary 

break 

Lng or 

enter- 
ing 



332 
97 

111 
95 

200 

54 

13 

328 

L69 

235 



119 
150 
34 



Larceny 

thel'l 



$50 



44 
33 
124 
71 
52 

45 

16 

230 

149 

119 

68 
302 

27 
237 

76 



I 'rider 

$50 



371 
107 
533 

327 

568 

267 
46 
701 
132 
256 

732 
654 
77 
681 
269 



221 


120 


236 


66 


52 


131 


35 


72 


153 


167 


166 


446 


126 


61 


547 


460 


173 


619 


82 


46 


305 


178 


124 


361 


100 


55 


260 


358 


134 


838 


146 


50 


128 


105 


106 


295 


82 


31 


64 


59 


122 


386 


109 


53 


98 


107 


87 


546 


23 


8 


88 


167 


104 


223 


69 


105 


267 


196 


128 


144 


217 


105 


259 


221 


84 


134 


63 


79 


391 


96 


24 


451 


348 


164 


505 


113 


118 


449 


190 


234 


685 


85 


85 


160 


47 


251 


533 


212 


10S 


345 


82 


189 


122 


153 


01 


752 


84 


59 


193 


499 


177 


992 


152 


24 


202 


297 


124 


485 


119 


22 


370 


lit) 


92 


408 


101 


57 


454 



137 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Criminal 
homicide 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 


Larceny- 
theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 

$50 


Auto 

theft 


Cities 25,000 to 50,000 in 
population— Continued 

Butte, Mont 






2 
1 
2 
2 

5 

2 


21 

46 
2 
« 

42 

2 

17 
6 
5 
6 

32 

16 

6 

1 

15 

7 
5 
8 


23 
34 
14 
5 
62 

41 
12 
4 
2 

67 

..... 

47 

.. 

6 
1 
4 

20 

3 

23 

----- 

13 

62~ 

111 

3 

2 

4 
15 

2 


151 
173 
104 
249 
207 

96 
152 
158 
136 
149 

262 

304 

61 

92 

217 

76 
98 

235 
44 

225 

468 
24 

334 
85 

109 

241 
196 
122 
707 
126 

131 
52 
114 
162 

265 

154 
38 
90 
111 
161 

54 

65 

251 

257 

111 

100 
86 

128 
70 

132 

70 
78 
116 
197 
134 


74 
131 
143 

98 
148 

70 
74 
94 
131 
117 

194 
231 

20 
101 

178 

87 
61 

207 
76 

395 

217 
32 

264 
43 

184 

254 
161 
122 
358 
37 

128 
104 
35 
60 
199 

95 
42 
52 
121 
176 

34 

68 

88 

216 

83 

49 
99 

107 
93 

111 

34 
37 
137 
35 
75 


472 
287 
849 
635 
609 

285 
87 
373 
178 
913 

292 
869 
22 
212 
606 

363 
414 
914 
120 
680 

688 
78 
389 
126 
463 

607 
488 
592 
1, 161 
230 

407 
243 
177 
396 
702 

278 
104 
238 
194 
410 

337 
335 
228 
516 
359 

209 
349 
144 
249 
455 

115 
136 
376 

57 
550 


165 


Calumet City, 111 

Carlsbad, N. Mex 

Casper, Wvo.. 


1 
1 
1 
2 

1 


2 
._ 

1 


86 
126 
56 


Champaign, 111 . 


70 


Charlottesville, Va 


28 
101 


Cheltenham Township, Pa. 




2 
1 
3 

1 


3 
..... 

3 


46 


Cherry Hill Township, N.J. 
Chevenne, Wvo 


1 
3 

3 


63 

87 


Chicago Heights. Ill 

Chula Vista, Calif 


70 
91 


Clarksburg, W. Va... 


1 






39 


Clarkstown, N.Y 






17 


Clearwater, Fla._ 




1 


3 
2 


45 


Clinton, Iowa 




27 


Columbia, Mo .. 


2 

1 




40 


Concord, Calif.. 




6 


111 


Concord, N.H_ _ ..... 


25 


Coral Gables, Fla 


1 




1 


23 
4 


133 


Costa Mesa, Calif 


80 


Cranford Township, N.J .. 


..... 


1 
1 




13 


Culver City, Calif 

Cumberland, Md. 


2 


48 
3 
8 

21 

23 

2 

21 


177 
24 


Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Daly Citv, Calif 


1 


1 


2 

9 
2 
5 
3 


47 
181 


Danville, 111 


2 
3 
3 
1 


40 


Danville, Va 

Daytona Beach, Fla 

Decatur, Ala 


38 
113 
34 


Denton, Tex . .. 


1 




2 
3 
4 
25 
12 

2 


29 


Des Plaines, 111 




24 


Dothan, Ala .. 


3 
3 


49 


East Cleveland, Ohio 

East Detroit, Mich 


..... 
1 


2 
3 

1 


45 
36 


East Hartford, Conn 




37 


East Lansing, Mich.. . 




9 


Easton, Pa 




1 
1 
2 

1 


3 


3 
2 
3 

3 


6 
_____ 


36 


East Point, Ga 

East Providence, R.I-.. . 


2 


68 
73 


Eau Claire, Wis 

Edina, Minn . 


1 


38 
37 


Edison, N J 


1 

1 


1 
4 


5 
2 

1 

3 
2 

7 


1 

9 

5 
3 
2 
3 
3 

8 
1 
5 
7 
5 


5 
10 

7 

74 

12 

6 

----- 

2 
4 
4 
7 
4 


64 


El Cajon, Calif 

El Cerrito, Calif .... 


76 
32 


El Dorado, Ark 


3 

1 


1 

5 


8 


Elgin, 111 


27 


Elkhart, Ind 


22 


Elmhurst, 111 






32 


Elmira, N.Y... 


1 






23 


Elyria, Ohio 


1 


1 
2 


36 


Enfield, Conn 




9 


Englewood, Colo.. 






116 


Englewood, N.J. 


1 

1 


.. 


2 


24 


Enid, Okla 


90 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



Bur- 
glary— 

break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Larceny- 

theft 



$50 
and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Cities 25,000 to 50,000 in 
population— Continued 



Eureka, Calif 

Everett, Mass... 
Everett, Wash... 
Fairfield, Conn.. 
Fair Lawn, N. J. 



Fairmont, W. Va. 
Fargo, N. Dak— . 
Fayetteville, N.C. 
Ferndale, Mich... 
Findlay, Ohio 



Fitchburg, Mass... 

Florence, Ala 

Florissant, Mo 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 
Fort Dodge, Iowa. 



Fort Pierce, Fla 

Framingham, Mass. 
Freeport, 111 

Freeport, N.Y 

Fremont, Calif 



Gainesville, Fla 

Galesburg, 111 

Gardena, Calif 

Garfield, N.J 

Garfield Heights, Ohio. 



Garland, Tex 

Gastonia, N.C 

Gloucester, Mass 

Goldsboro, N.C 

Grand Forks, N. Dak. 



Grand Island, Nebr. 
Grand Prairie. Tex.. 
Granite City, T1L.._ 

Greeley, Colo 

Greenville, Miss 



Gulfport, Miss 

Hackensack, N.J.. 
Hagerstown, Md._ 

Hamden, Conn 

Hamtramck, Mich. 



Harlingen, Tex 

Harvey, 111 

Hattiesburg, Miss. 
Haverhill, Mass... 
Hawthorne, Calif.. 



Hazel Park, Mich 

Hazleton, Pa 

Hempstead, N.Y 

Highland Park, 111 . 

Highland Park, Mich. 



Hilo, Hawaii 

Hobbs, N. Mex... 

Hoboken, N.J 

Hollywood, Fla... 
Hot Springs, Ark. 



130 
216 
309 
220 
140 



Incomplete 
1 

1 
5 

Incomplete 

4 

3 
13 

7 



25 



131 
1 



129 
63 

116 

205 
107 



494 
183 
1,011 
331 
211 





Incomplete 








2 


4 


2 


118 


101 


526 


12 


16 


218 


215 


22 


907 


4 


16 


9 


175 


119 


459 


1 


3 


1 


55 


54 


429 


2 


4 


3 


197 


108 


358 



51 


70 


267 


105 


47 


486 


92 


69 


373 



176 


132 


195 


85 


42 


210 


194 


48 


91 


420 


186 


875 


215 


87 


702 


118 


89 


325 


295 


476 


689 


42 


71 


118 


65 


16 


166 


182 


113 


224 


141 


85 


464 


63 


24 


67 


240 


93 


304 


118 


54 


607 


126 


103 


353 


265 


158 


489 


173 


50 


472 


113 


126 


515 


92 


55 


348 


136 


82 


210 


167 


102 


170 


211 


60 


464 


89 


84 


180 


382 


228 


605 


301 


155 


592 


68 


145 


260 


296 


80 


261 


238 


92 


260 


530 


336 


507 


182 


66 


652 


32 


80 


150 


201 


149 


137 


74 


100 


190 


595 


403 


1,021 


135 


34 


246 


234 


142 


391 


342 


100 


112 


301 


214 


669 


193 


181 


293 



139 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 25,000 to 50,000 in 
populat ion — Contin ued 

Huntington Park, Calif.-. 

Hutchinson. Kans 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Inkster, Mich 

Iowa City, Iowa 



Irving, Tex 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Jackson, Tenn___ 
Jamestown, N.Y. 
Janesville, Wis... 



Jefferson City, Mo 

Johnson City, Tenn... 

Joplin, Mo 

Kankakee, 111 

Kannapolis, N.C 



Kearny, N.J 

Key West, Fla__. 
Kingsport, Tenn. 
Kingston, N.Y_. 
Kings ville, Tex.. 



Kirk wood, Mo 

Kokonio, Ind 

Lackawanna. N.Y 

La Crosse, Wis 

Lafayette, Ind 



Lafayette, La_... 
La Habra, Calif- 
Lakeland, Fla... 
La Mesa, Calif. . 
Lancaster, Ohio. 



Las Cruces, N. Mex. 

Laurel, Miss 

Lawrence, Kans 

Lebanon, Pa 

Leominster, Mass. . 



Lewiston, Maine . 
Lexington, Mass. 

Linden, N.J 

Lockport, N.Y... 
Long Beach, N.Y 



Long Branch, N.J 

Long view, Tex 

Lynwood, Calif 

Madison Heights, Mich- 
Manhattan Beach, Calif. 



Manitowoc, Wis 

Mansfield, Ohio 

Maple Heights, Ohio. 

Marietta, Ga 

Marion, Ind 



Marion, Ohio 

Mason City, low; 
Massillon, Ohio.. 

Maywood, 111 

McAUen, Tex.... 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



1 ' 

3 I 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4 I 3 

Incomplete 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



389 

93 

181 

382 



202 
75 

217 
97 

106 

107 
299 
272 
157 
85 



113 
112 
64 
110 

50 
172 
142 
147 
181 

131 
126 
339 
182 
139 

196 

178 
105 
50 
115 

151 
97 

184 
95 

168 



Larceny- 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



241 

25 

72 

205 

102 

143 

102 
127 
23 
74 



104 
66 
43 

51 
85 
31 
85 
35 



174 
54 
96 

185 

70 
116 
157 
112 
103 

195 
71 

194 
18 
70 

61 

55 
134 

51 
251 

37 



Under 
$50 



700 
401 
1.151 
612 
166 

726 
357 
388 
45 
370 

207 
362 
361 
337 
255 

134 
51 
398 
199 
262 

222 
586 
117 
517 

777 

188 
330 
468 
343 
417 

467 
293 
590 
246 
296 

410 
139 
332 
215 
423 



395 


255 


417 


166 


74 


404 


437 


173 


482 


74 


47 


337 


356 


193 


721 


59 


50 


184 


143 


94 


587 


144 


85 


505 


132 


202 


473 


56 


60 


225 


160 


116 


255 


162 


121 


235 


55 


12 


359 



no 



Table 10.- 



-Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Criminal 
homicide 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assaull 


Bur- 
glary 

break- 
ing or 

enter- 
ing 


Larceny 
theft 




City 


Murder 

and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 

$50 


Auto 
lliel't 


Cities 25,000 to 50,000 in 
population — Continued 

McKeesport, Pa_. 

Melrose, Mass 

Menlo Park, Calif 


l 
..... 

7 


..... 

o 



l 
..... 

5 


36 

""16" 

3 

7 

2 
12 
9 
2 
13 

3 


18 
1 
12 
56 
9 

3 
2 
2 
6 

8 


206 

69 

96 

221 

236 

27 
180 
143 

86 
325 

89 

51 

219 

123 

111 

30 
57 
93 
139 
594 

173 
338 
173 
512 
302 

123 

46 

18 

302 

155 

177 
73 

299 
60 

116 

125 
222 
175 
176 
74 
247 

140 
93 

575 
58 

113 

34 

198 

242 

97 

46 

79 

49 
95 
102 

44 


124 
30 
59 
87 

227 

49 
50 
79 
70 
194 

87 
44 
137 
160 
51 

21 

77 
140 

98 
150 

123 
141 
141 
174 
261 

180 

63 

13 

192 

104 

112 
59 

169 
36 

200 

189 
365 
120 
165 
24 
91 

105 

97 

503 

178 

66 

20 

116 

241 

43 

51 

65 
33 
97 
156 
24 


265 
204 
153 
420 
520 

147 
113 
328 
239 

638 

144 
576 
432 
371 

' 78 

9 
274 
524 
736 

1,685 

441 
389 
230 
740 

452 

714 

124 

40 

894 

624 

525 
116 
766 
62 
547 

592 
510 
249 
176 
173 
346 

200 
277 
897 
545 
139 

88 

133 
655 

82 
105 

156 
58 
319 
576 
189 


97 
34 
40 


Meridian, Miss _ 


41 


Mesa, Ariz.. - .. . 


104 


Mesquite, Tex 

Methuen, Mass . 


2 


8 
61 


Michigan Citv, IncL-_ . . 




4 
2 


.. 


45 


Middletown, Conn 


1 

9 


2!) 
110 


Middletown Township, 
N.J 




9 
2 
2 




20 


Midland, Midi 




28 


Midwest City Okla 




3 

1 
1 

1 


9 
3 

1 

1 

1 

7 

21 

38 

14 

3 

27 

18 

7 


1 
5 

.. 

6 
60 

1 
53 

7 

18 
11 

6 


43 
62 


Milford Town, Conn, 




Milton, Mass. 






39 


Minne tonka, Minn _ 






9 


Minot, N. Dak 






44 




2 




5 

1 
4 


51 


Missoula, Mont--. 


SO 


Modesto, Calif--. 


4 

1 

2 
1 
1 

1 


2 


140 


Moline, 111.. . 


52 




..... 
..... 

2 


2 

7 
3 

1 


77 


Montelair, N.J. 


87 


Montebello, Calif.-. 


193 


Monterey Park, Calif 

Mountain View, Calif 

Mount Lebanon Town- 
ship, Pa .. ._ 


84 

69 

5 


Mount Pleasant, N.Y__. 








1 
14 

6 

1 

1 

19 


28" 
18 

4 

""16" 




Muskegon, Mich 

Muskogee, Okla 

Nashua, N.TI. 


4 

1 


2 

3 
2 


2 
4 

..... 

6 


77 
100 

36 


Natiek, Mass . 




17 


National Citv, Calif 




117 


Needham, Mass ... 






15 


New Albany, Ind 


2 




1 

1 
2 
1 


4 

14 
24 
14 
1 
2 
3 

23 
13 
11 
5 
6 


2 

3 
144 
53 

--- 

16 

6 
15 
12 

1 
32 

1 

12 

1 

..... 

1 


69 


Newark, Ohio 


108 


New Brunswick, N..T 

Newburgh, N.Y 


2 
3 


2 


143 
53 


New Castle, Pa 


41 






1 


1 


7 






50 


Newport, Ky 

Newport, R.I. 


2 


1 


1 


107 
94 


Newport Beach, Calif 




2 


3 

1 
1 


81 






40 


Norristown, Pa 

Northampton, Mass 


3 


1 


59 
14 


North Bergen Township, 
NJ . 




1 
1 


2 
..... 

1 


11 

29 
1 
3 

4 


71 


North Miami, Fla... 


1 


98 


North Tonawanda, N.Y _. 


10 


Norwich, Conn . . 




1 


27 






69 


Nutley, N.J .. 








19 










6 
17 


11 


42 


Oak Park, Mich .. 


2 
2 




1 


31 


Oak Ridge, Tenn 


9 



141 



able 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 25,000 to 50,000 in 
population — Continued 

Ontario, Calif 

Orange, Calif 

Orange, N.J 

Orange, Tex 

Oshkosh, Wis 



Ottumwa, Iowa 

Owensboro, Kv 

Oxnard, Calif.. 

Paducah, Ky 

Panama City, Fla. 

Parkersburg, W. Vi 
Park Forest, 111.... 
Park Ridge, 111.... 
Peabodv, Mass..— 
Pekin, ill 



Pennsauken, N.J.- 
Perth Amboy, N.J 

Petersburg, Va 

Phenix City, Ala.. 
Pine Bluff/ Ark.... 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Plainfiekl, N.J 

Pocatello, Idaho... 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Portsmouth, N.H. 
Portsmouth, Ohio. 



Pottstown, Pa 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y.. 
Prairie Village, Kans 

Prichard, Ala 

Provo, Utah 



Quincy, 111 

Rahwav, N.J 

Rapid City, S. Dak ... 

Redlands, Calif 

Redondo Beach. Calif. 

Redwood City, Calif 

Revere, Mass 

Richfield, Minn 

Richmond, Ind 

Ridgewood, N.J 



Ridley Township, Pa._ 

Rochester, Minn 

Rock Hill, S.C 

Rockville Centre, X.Y 
Rocky Mount, N.C... 



Rome, Ga 

Roswell, N. Mex 

St. Cloud, Minn 

St. Louis Park, Minn. 
Salem, Mass 



Salem, Oreg 

Salina, Kans 

Salinas, Calif 

San Bruno, Calif. 
Sandusky, Ohio. 



Santa Cruz, Calif. 

Santa I'Y, \. Mex 
Santa Rosa, Calif. 

Sarasota, Fla 

Selma, Ala 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



15 
120 

in 
22 

13 
13 

7 

1 

20 



27 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Incomplete 
2 1 



365 
166 
176 
117 
154 

116 
341 
262 
377 



310 
26 
63 
107 
146 

209 
252 
168 
74 
262 

230 
191 
177 
70 
237 

38 
127 
56 



Larceny- 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



240 
94 

106 
39 

95 

58 
212 
215 

73 
120 



58 
38 

44 
59 

L02 
L38 

44 
52 
91 

171 
L83 
16 
40 
198 

21 

1(14 



Under 
$50 



817 
199 
287 
103 
638 

326 
607 
774 
619 
379 

289 
441 
138 
287 
347 

263 
291 
346 
100 
310 

435 
807 
711 
103 
673 

51 
343 
118 



61 


64 


805 


176 


173 


213 


114 


69 


281 


226 


394 


1,154 


143 


156 


353 


621 


335 


846 


291 


216 


538 


139 


78 


141 


115 


88 


310 


226 


137 


538 


60 


13 


99 


66 


32 


126 


86 


92 


398 


237 


62 


394 


81 


152 


103 


125 


71 


354 


191 


54 


181 


178 


392 


778 


70 


100 


600 


127 


172 


364 


233 


28 


264 


257 


226 


1. 187 


141 


152 


808 


257 


189 


602 


149 


65 


417 


142 


104 


398 


155 


104 


518 


249 


194 


488 


104 


105 


535 


241 


117 


549 


262 


49 


367 



142 



Table 40. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1961, Cities and Towns 
25,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 25,000 to 50,000 in 
population — Continued 



Shaker Heights, Ohio 
Sharon, Pa 

Sheboygan, Wis 

South Euclid, Ohio... 
Southfleld, Mich 



Southgate, Mich 

South San Francisco, Calif. 
Spartanburg, S.C 

Springfield Township, Pa.. 
Steubenville, Ohio 



Stratford, Conn 

Superior, Wis 

Tallahassee, Fla 

Taunton, Mass 

Teaneck Township, N.J. 



Temple, Tex 

Texarkana, Tex 

Texas City, Tex 

Torrington, Conn 

Upper Arlington, Ohio- 



Urbana, 111 

Valdosta, Ga 

Vancouver, Wash. 

Ventura, Calif 

Vicksburg, Miss._ 



Vineland, N.J 

Wallingford, Conn 

Waterford Township, 

Mich 

Watertown, Mass 

Watertown, N.Y 



Waukesha, Wis 

Wausau, Wis 

Webster Groves, Mo. 

Weirton, W. Va 

Wellesley, Mass 



Westfield, Mass 

Westfleld, N.J 

West Haven, Conn. 
West Mifflin, Pa__. 
Westminster, Calif- 



West New York, N.J 

West Orange, N.J 

Weymouth, Mass 

Whittier, Calif 

Wilkinsburg, Pa 



Williamsport, Pa. 

Wilmette, 111 

Wilmington, N.C. 

Wilson, N.C 

Woburn, Mass 



Woonsocket, R.I_. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 
Wyoming, Mich.. 
Yakima, Wash... 
Zanesville, Ohio.. 



Guam: Agana 

Isthmus of Panama: 
Canal Zone 



Criminal 
homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



16 



Aggra- 
vated 

assault 



24 

1 
Incomplete 



Bur- 
glary 
break- 
ing or 
enter- 
ing 



Incomplete 



9 


4 


2 




11 


3 


11 


11 




3 


12 


10 


2 


2 


2 




1 


1 


4 


11 


1 





2 
4 
Incomplete 



3 

2 

161 

91 

1 

7 
4 
4 

50 
3 



117 
55 
55 
38 

272 

94 
232 
364 

62 



Larceny 
theft 



$50 
and 
over 



48 



48 

85 

65 

302 

185 
136 

58 
317 

83 

192 

78 
236 
136 



126 
241 
122 
262 
221 

209 



203 
173 



Under 
$50 



67 
44 

100 
32 

131 

91 
94 

78 
153 



97 
117 
143 

72 
53 

128 
103 
93 
241 
121 

95 

148 



455 
234 
539 



510 
263 
685 
206 



3 


2 


167 


121 


224 


6 


1 


119 


55 


591 


10 


36 


145 


64 


363 


4 


6 


264 


87 


311 


4 


3 


149 


98 


222 


15 


62 


399 


80 


846 



133 


91 


468 


68 


29 


116 


32 


29 


94 


94 


78 


324 


100 


67 


181 


115 


63 


235 


275 


147 


476 


84 


46 


155 


89 


35 


243 


129 


120 


274 


368 


271 


624 


141 


69 


170 


138 


81 


279 


44 


44 


233 


62 


43 


485 


83 


50 


189 



165 
159 
298 
52 
368 

200 
246 
119 
439 
210 

472 
469 
566 
348 
131 

210 
1,019 

438 
1,697 



212 
793 



143 



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