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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

BOSTOM 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 








IN THE UNITED STATES 



ISSUED BY--JOHN EDGAR HOOVER, m 



irector ' 



FBI 



Boston I'uinu- l^iliiiii> 
Superintendent of Uocumentf 

AUG 26 1970 

DEPOSITORY 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS-1969 




FOR RELEASE 

THURSDAY A.M., AUGUST 13, 1970 

PRINTED ANNUALLY 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United States 



PRINTED ANNUALLY— 1969 



Advisory: Committee on Uniform Crime Records /i^^^^^ts 

International Association of Chiefs of Police a^ V^uL % 



do rT\ oO 
D. B. Kelly, Colonel, New Jersey State Police \^!''"^^^ 

West Trenton, New Jersey, Chairman 



.^J^, 



J. Edgar Hoover, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 
U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. 20535 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office 
Washington, D.C. 20402- Price $1.60 



jh noT Ml-.'/ 



y9^9 



>^C-6- ^ 



Contents 

Page 

Preface v 

Crime factors vi 

Summary 1-46 

Crime Index totals 2-4 

Crime and population 4-5 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 5-9 

Aggravated assault 9-1 1 

Forcible rape 1 1-13 

Robbery 13-16 

Burglary 16-19 

Larceny 19-25 

Auto theft 25-28 

Clearances 28-3 1 

Persons arrested 3 1-34 

Persons charged 34 

Careers in Crime 34-40 

Police employee data 40-43 

PoHce killed data 43-46 

Introduction 47-54 

The index of crime, 1969 55-88 

United States, 1969 (table 1) 56 

United States, 1960 to 1969 (table 2) 57 

United States, 1968-1969, by regions, geographic divisions and 

states (table 3) 58-63 

States (table 4) 64-73 

Standard metropoUtan statistical areas (table 5) 74-88 

General United States crime statistics, 1969 89-106 

Crime trends, 1968-1969, by population groups (table 6) 90-91 

Crime trends, 1968-1969, suburban and nonsuburban cities, by 

population groups (table 7) 92 

Crime trends, 1968-1969, suburban and nonsuburb&n counties by 

population groups (table 8) 93 

Crime rates, by population groups (table 9) 94-95 

Crime rates, suburban and nonsuburban cities, by population 

groups (table 10) 96 

Crime rates, suburban and nonsuburban counties, by population 

groups (table 11) 97 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, by population groups (table 12) _ _ 98-99 
Offenses known, cleared by arrest, by geographic divisions (table 13) _ 100 
Offenses cleared by arrest of persons under 18 years of age 

(table 14) 101 

Disposition of persons formally charged by the police (table 15) — 102 

Persons charged-percent arrested or summoned (table 16) 103 

Offenses known, cleared; persons arrested, charged and disposed 

of (table 17) 103 



lU 



Page 

General United States crime statistics, 1969 — Continued 

Police disposition of juvenile offenders takert into custody (table 

18) 104 

Offense analysis (table 19) 105 

Type and value of property stolen and recovered (table 20) 105 

Murder victims — weapons used (table 21) 106 

Murder victims by age, sex and race (table 22) 106 

Arrests, 1969 107-146 

Number and rate by population group (table 23) _ 108-109 

Arrest trends, 1960-1969 (table 24) 110 

Arrest trends by sex, 1960-1969 (table 25) 111 

Total arrest trends, 1968-1969 (table 26) 112 

Total arrests by age group (table 27) 113-1 14 

Total arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and under 

25 (table 28) 115 

Total arrests, distribution by sex (table 29) 116 

Total arrest trends by sex, 1968-1969 (table 30) 117 

/ Total arrests by race (table 31) ,^18-120 - 

City arrest trends, 1968-1969 (table 32) "~'r2r 

City arrests by age (table 33) 122-123 

City arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and under 25 

(table 34) 124 

City arrests, distribution by sex (table 35) 125 

City arrest trends by sex, 1968-1969 (table 36) 126 

/City arrests by race (table 37) 127-129, 

Suburban arrest trends, 1968-1969 (table 38) 130 

Suburban arrests by age (table 39) 131-132 

Suburban arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and 

under25 (table 40) 133 

Suburban arrests, distribution by sex (table 41) 134 

Suburban arrests by race (table 42) 135-137 

Rural arrest trends, 1968-1969 (table 43) 138 

Rural arrests by age (table 44) 139-140 

Rural arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and under 

25 (table45) 141 

Rural arrests, distribution by sex (table 46) 142 

J Rural arrests by race (table 47) 143-145 

Suburban and rural arrest trends by sex, 1968-1969 (table 48) 146 

Police employee data, 1969 147-168 

Full-time police employees ; number, rate and range (table 49) 148 

Full-time i3olice officers; number, rate and range (table 50) 149 

Civilian employees, percent of total (table 51) 150 

Police officers killed (table 52) 150 

Assaults on police officers by geographic divisions and popvdation 

groups (table 53) 150 

Assaults on police officers, percent distribution of weapons used 

(table 54) 151 

Full-time state police and highway patrol employees, and police 

killed (table 55) 151 

Police employees in individual cities (tables 56 and 57) 152-168 

Offenses in individual areas 25,000 and over by population groups 

(table 58) 169-185 



IV 



Preface 

The decade of the 1960's has seen many changes in society, both good and 
bad. Our Nation has experienced a number of significant advancements during 
recent years; however, unusual increases in crime and criminal behavior as 
documented in this publication have most certainly detracted from these 
improvements. Crime increases were not unique to the United States. They 
have occurred in most of the advanced nations of the world which publicly 
report crime statistics. The causes — social, human, and material — that con- 
tributed to these trends are beyond the immediate control of law enforcement 
agencies. The effect, however, placed new and increasing demands on the law 
enforcement profession requiring substantial changes in all phases of its activities. 

Advanced technologies have been adapted to poUce management and 
operations, the improvement of standards, and comprehensive training pro- 
grams for law enforcement personnel. These needs have long been recognized 
by law enforcement professionals. The Congress of the United States, as well 
as state legislatures and others in authority, has taken positive action to meet 
the increasing crime and civil disorder crises. This support has been primarily 
in the form of Federal funding to complement local and state budgets. Through 
this support progress in developing new methods and approaches has become 
possible. 

Computer and communications technologies have been applied to the 
problems and are playing a major role in improving law enforcement perform- 
ance. These technologies offer law enforcement at all levels the means by which 
documented information, vitally important to all phases of performance, can be 
centralized and shared on a national scale. At the same time computer systems 
at the state level are rapidly developing and furnishing centralized services to 
local agencies in both management and operational areas. Therefore, the 
traditional local and state authority \vith regard to the law enforcement function 
is preserved and strengthened. How well we apply and discipline ourselves in 
the use of these major technological tools will determine much of law enforce- 
ment's achievements during the next decade. 

Improved means of carrying out our tasks are constantly beco min g 
available. We must remain alert to utilize every resource available in order 
to assure continued progress in meeting our many responsibilities. 



I\ 






^ CI 

\ John EDGAft/HoovER, 



Director 



Crime Factors 

Uniform Crime Reports give a nationwide view of crime based on police 
statistics made possible by the voluntary cooperation of local law enforcement 
agencies. Since the factors which cause crime are many and vary from place to 
place, readers are cautioned against drawing conclusions from direct com- 
parisons of crime figures between individual communities without first con- 
sidering the factors involved. The national material summarized in this publi- 
cation should be used, however, as a starting point to determine deviations of 
individual cities from the national averages. 

Crime is a social problem and the concern of the entire community. The 
law enforcement effort is limited to factors within its control. Some of the 
conditions which will affect the amount and type of crime that occurs from place 
to place are briefly outlined below : 

Density and size of the community \ oj} dation and the metropolitan area 
of which it is a part. 

Composition of the population with reference particularly to age, sex and 
race. 

Economic status and mores of the population. 

Relative stability of population, including commuters, seasonal, and other 
transient types. 

Climate, including seasonal weather conditions. 

Educational, recreational, and religious characteristics. 

Effective strength of the police force. 

Standards governing appointments to the police force. 

Policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

Attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

The administrative and investigative efficiency of the local law enforce- 
ment agency, including the degree of adherence to crime reporting 
standards. 



VI 



Su 



mmary 



This section is jor readers who are interested in the general crime picture jor the United States. The 
volume, trend and rate of crime related to current estimated population are discussed in context with the Crime 
Index olffenses — murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, 
larceny $50 and over in value and auto theft. In addition. Crime Index offenses are treated individually to 
better delineate the nature of these criminal acts. Arrests, persons charged, clearances of crime, police employee 
data, police killed, and police assaults are discussed. Statistical data concerning the criminal recidivism of 
persons who have at least on one occasion during their criminal career become involved in the commission 
of a federal offense are also examined. In subsequent sections technical data of interest primarily to police, 
social scientists and other students are presented. If yoai desire assistance in the interpretation of any infor- 
mation in this publication, please communicate with the Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. 
Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. 205S5. 







CRIME AND POPULATION 
1960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 








+ 150 
+ 140 

+ 130 

+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+ 90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+ 40 

+ 30 

+ 20 

+ 10 





J Crime 




















/ 

/ 
/ 


S up 148% 






















/ 
/ 

/ 
/ 
1 

1 
1 


















, 






ICrime Rate 
> up 120% 


















/ 

/ 

1 


/ 




















1 
1 
1 
1 


/ 


















1 I 
1 / 
/ / 
/ / 
















i 

1 
1 

1 


















1 
1 
1 

1 


















1 I 
















i 
/ 

/ 
/ 
/ 
















/ 
• 

* 


y 


















/ 














-"A 


iT 




















/ 






-S-.-r-.— ^ 







Population 
<; up 13% 




,»rr^x'^i 


2^^^^** 


/ 



















19 


60 19 

c 
c 


61 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 IS 

RIME - CRIME INDEX OFFENSES 

RIME RATE NUMBER OF OFFENSES PER 100,000 POPULATION 


169 





FBI CHART 



Chart 1 







CRIMES OF VIOLENCE 
1960 - 1969 










+ 130 

+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+ 90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+ 40 

+ 30 

+ 20 

+ 10 




PERCENT CHANCiE UVEK IVGU 


Violent Crime 

up 130% 




















* 




















/ 
/ 






Rate 
up 104% 


















/ 
1 


J 
















1 
1 


/ 




















1 


/ 
















/ 


• / 


















/ 
















// 


f 














• 
• 
• 


/ 














^'' 


> 


r 












y 


.'' 


/^ 














yy 














.,--- 




X 












19 


60 19 

LIMIT 


61 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 

ED TO MURDER. FORCIBLE RAPE. ROBBERY AND AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 







FBI CHART 



Chart 2 



+ 150 

+ 140 

+ 130 

+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+40 

+30 

+20 

+ 10 





CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 
1960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 



/ 

/ 

/ — 

I 

/ 

i A 
f. ^ 

/ X 

/ X 

/ x 
/ X 

1 JL 

/ X 
/ X 

?— /^ 

/ X 

1 X 

/ y 
* i' 

1 X 

t x^ 

1^-/- 

**^ ' ^^ \ 

^ 

^^-;;^ 



^ Property Grin 
"S up 151% 



Rote 
up 123% 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



LIMITED TO BURGLARY. LARCENY $50 AND OVER. AND AUTO THEFT 



Chart 3 



FBI CHART 



CRIME INDEX TOTALS 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program em- 
ploys seven crime classifications to establish an 
index to measure the trend and distribution of 
crime in the United States. These crimes — murder, 
forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, bur- 
glary, larceny $50 and over in value, and auto 
theft — are counted by law enforcement agencies as 
the crimes become known to them. These crimes 
were selected for use in the Crime Index because, 
as a group, they represent the most common local 
crime problem. They are all serious crimes, either 
by their very nature or due to the volume in which 
they occur. Offenses of murder, forcible rape, 
robbery and aggravated assault, are categorized 
as violent crimes. Offenses of burglary, larceny 
$50 and over in value, and auto theft are classed 
as crimes against property. 

It is believed desirable to point out that there 
is no way of determining the total number of 
crimes which are committed. Many criminal acts 
occur which are not reported to official sources. 
In light of this fact, the best source for obtaining 
a count of crime is the next logical universe, 
namely, crimes which come to police attention. 
The crimes used in the Crime Index are those 
considered to be most consistently reported to 
police and the computations of crime trends and 
crime rates are prepared using this universe — 
offenses known to police. 

The crime counts set forth in this publication 
are actual offenses established by police investi- 
gation. When police receive a complaint of a crime 
and the follow-up investigation discloses no crime 
occurred it is "unfounded." On a national average, 
police investigations "unfound" four percent of the 
citizen complaints concerning Crime Index of- 
fenses ranging from 3 percent in the larceny 
classification to 18 percent in forcible rape com- 
plaints. Unfounded complaints are eliminated from 
these crime counts. 

In calendar year 1969 almost 5 million Index 
offenses were reported to law enforcement agencies, 
a 12 percent increase over 1968. The violent 
crimes as a group made up 13 percent of the Crime 
Index total and rose 11 percent, with murder up 
7 percent, forcible rape 17 percent, robbery 14 
percent, and aggravated assault 9 percent. Each 
of the voluminous property crimes recorded an 
increase, which contributed to the 12 percent rise 
in this group of offenses representing 87 percent 
of the Crime Index total. Individually, burglary 



was up 7 percent, larceny $50 and over in value 
increased 19 percent, and auto theft was up 12 
percent. Since 1960, the violent crimes as a group 
have increased 130 percent, property crimes 151 
percent, and the combined Crime Index 148 
percent in volume. 

As in prior years the suburban areas continued 
to show an above average rise in the volume of 
crime with a 13 percent increase over 1968. The 
large core cities having populations in excess of 
250,000 were up 9 percent in volume and the rural 
areas registered an 11 percent upswing. The 
largest American cities over 1 million population 
registered an average increase of 7 percent. As 
noted in prior issues, while the suburban areas 
continued to record sharp upswings in the volume 
of crime, a much higher volume of crime occurs in 
the large cities. 

Crime increases were noted in each crime classi- 
fication in each geographic region with the volume 
of crime in 1969 up 16 percent in the North Central 
States, 14 percent in the Western States, 13 per- 
cent in the Southern States, and 5 percent in the 
Northeastern States. 

Estimated 1969 crime figures for the United 
States are set forth in the following table. As 
explained on page 53 of this publication, the 
trends shown in this table are based on the actual 
reporting experience of comparable places. 

CRIME AND POPULATION 

Crime rates relate the incidence of crime to 
population. From a realistic point of view, a 
crime rate should be considered as a count of 
victims. The discussion that follows will demon- 
strate the risk of becoming a victim of crime in 
this country is increasing and that population 
growth cannot alone account for the crime 
increases. 

The Crime Index rate for the United States 
rose from 2,235 offenses per 100,000 inhabitants 
in 1968 to 2,471 in 1969, an 11 percent increase 
in the victim rate. The rise in the national crime 
rate since 1960, or the risk of being a victim of one 
of these crimes, has more than doubled. Many 
factors influence the nature and extent of crime 
in a particular community. A number of these 
factors are shown on page vi of this publication. 
A crime rate only takes into consideration the 
numerical factor of population and does not 
incorporate any of the other elements which 
contribute to the amount of crime in a given 



National Crime 


, Rafe, and Percent Change 










Estimated crime 1969 


Percent change over 1968 


Percent change over 1960 


Crime Index Offenses 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 

inhabitants 


Number 


Rate 
+10.6 


Number 


Rate 


Total 


4,989,700 


2,471.1 


+11.7 


+147. 7 


+120.0 






Violent 


665, 100 
4,334,700 


324.4 
2, 146. 7 


+11.2 
+11.8 


+10.1 
+10.6 


+129.7 
+160.6 


+104.0 


Property 


+122. 6 








14, 590 

36, 470 

297, 580 

306, 420 

1, 949, 800 

1,512,900 

871, 900 


7.2 
18.1 
147.4 
151.8 
965.6 
749.3 
431.8 


+6.9 
+17.4 
+13.7 
+8.5 
+6.6 
+19.0 
+12.1 


+5.9 
+16.8 
+12.5 
+7.4 
+5.6 
+17.8 
+11.0 


+62.1 
+116.3 
+177. 1 
+101. 6 
+117.3 
+198.9 
+167. 7 


+44.0 


Forcible rape ... ... 


+92.6 


Robbery ... 


+146. 1 




+79.2 


Burglary 


+92.9 


Larceny $60 and over 


+165. 4 


Autotheft - 


+137. 8 







area. The statistical tables in this publication 
disclose the varying crime experiences, especially 
among large cities and suburban communities, 
are affected by a complex set of involved factors 
and are not solely limited to numerical population 
differences. The text tables set forth on these 
pages reveal the variation in crime experience by 
geographic region and particularly large core 
cities as contrasted with the suburban and rural 
areas. 

The above table discloses each crime category 
recorded a rate increase ranging from 6 percent in 
burglary to 18 percent in larceny $50 and over in 
value. The number of crimes per unit of population 
is, as expected, highest in the large metropolitan 
centers and in those areas where the population is 
rapidly increasing. 

The accompanying charts illustrate the trend of 
crime in the United States for 1960 through 1969 
by sh owing percentage changes in volume and rate 

Crime Rate by Area, 1969 

[Rate per 100,000 inhabitants] 





Area 


Crime Index Offenses 


Total 
U.S. 


Cities 

over 

250,000 


Sub- 
urban 


Rural 


Total 


2, 471. 1 


4,824.7 


1, 940. 8 


858 6 






Violent 


324.4 
2, 146. 7 


869.7 
3,965.0 


162.6 
1,778.2 


113 8 


Property... 


744.8 


Murder 


7.2 
18.1 
147.4 
151.8 
966.6 
749.3 
431.8 


16.7 

37.9 

487.6 

318.6 

1, 759. 1 

1, 165. 3 

1, 040. 6 


3.7 

13.7 

50.4 

94.7 

804.6 

702.6 

271.2 


5 6 


Forcible rape 


10 


Robbery. 




Aggravated assault 




Burglary 




Larceny $50 and over 




Autotheft 


72 8 







Crime Rate by Region, 1969 

(Rate per 100,000 inhabitants) 



Crime Index Offenses 


North- 
eastern 
States 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 


Total 


2,585.8 


2,170.4 


2, 087. 2 


3, 516. 9 






Violent 


330.4 
2, 255. 4 


293.3 
1, 877. 1 


326.2 
1, 761. 1 


363.9 


Property 


3, 162. 








5.2 
12.6 
188.6 
124.1 
985.3 
743.7 
626.4 


6.1 

17.2 
148.5 
121.5 
807.2 
654.2 
415.7 


10.4 
17.0 
112.2 
186.5 
837.4 
616.2 
307.6 


6.1 


Forcible rape 


29.2 


Robbery 


161.8 




176.7 


Burglary 


1,437. 1 


Larceny $60 and over 


1,161.4 


Auto theft 


553.5 







of crime together with the population increase. 
Separate charts provide similar information rela- 
tive to crimes of violence and crimes against prop- 
erty. Since 1960, the rate for crimes of violence 
as a group increased 104 percent and property 
crime rate rose 123 percent. 

The reader's attention is directed to the tables 
containing arrest data which commence on page 108 
for additional information on the seven Crime 
Index offenses, as well as arrest statistics for other 
criminal acts. 

MURDER AND NONNEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

This Crime Index offense includes all willful 
killings without due process and is scored on the 
basis of police investigation as opposed to any 
decision of a court, coroner, jury or other judicial 
body. Deaths caused by negligence are not 
included in this category but are counted as man- 
slaughter by negligence. Attempts to kill or as- 



saults to kill are scored as aggravated assaults and 
not as murder. The crime count for this offense 
classification also excludes suicides, accidental 
deaths and justifiable homicides. 

Volume 

In 1969, there were an estimated 14,590 mur- 
ders committed in the United States. This repre- 
sents a numerical increase of 940 over the 13,650 
homicides recorded in 1968. This also represents 
the smallest absolute rise of murder in 1 year since 
the 600 total increase in 1965 over 1964. This 
crime makes up slightly more than 2 percent of the 
crimes of violence and represents less than one- 
half of 1 percent of all Crime Index offenses. 

The frequency of murder in 1969 was highest 
during the period August through December, 
with December representing the high month of the 
year. During the past decade, with the exception 
of 1963 and 1968, more murders were committed 
m December than any other month. In a break- 
down by region, 45 percent of the murders in 1969 
occurred in the Southern States followed by the 



North Central States with 24 percent. North- 
eastern States with 17 percent, and the Western 
States with 14 percent of the total. 

Trend 

Murder increased 7 percent in 1969 over 1968 
and this represents the smallest percentage in- 
crease since the 6 percent rise in 1965. The long- 
term trend in this serious crime during the period 
1960-1969 reveals an increase from 9,000 to 14,590 
murders. This is a rise of 62 percent. (Chart 4.) 

Regionally, murder offenses rose 16 percent in 
in the Western States, 10 percent in the North 
Central States, 8 percent in the Northeastern 
States, and 2 percent in the Southern States. 
Large core cities with 250,000 or more population 
and suburban areas had a 10 percent rise in the 
number of murders in 1969, while rural areas 
experienced a 10 percent decline in the number of 
murder offenses. 

Murder Rate 

There were 7.2 victims per 100,000 inhabitants 
in 1969. This is a rise from the 6.8 murder rate 



+ 70 
+ 60 



+ 50 



+ 40 
+ 30 



+ 20 



+ 10 



-10 



MURDER 

I960 - 1969 



PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 

.NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 62 PERCENT 

.RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 44 PERCENT 



y. 

^ ^^ 

j^ ^f_ 



I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 4 



recorded in 1968 and represents a 6 percent in- 
crease in the murder rate, 1969 over 1968. Nation- 
\vide, cities with 250,000 or ov'^er in population had 
a murder rate of 15.7 per 100,000 inhabitants, up 
11 percent over 1968. In the suburbs the rate was 
3.7 per 100,000, an increase of 12 percent over 1968. 
The rate in the rural areas was 5.6 per 100,000 
inhabitants, a decrease of 1 1 percent. 

As in past years, the number of murder victims 
in proportion to population was highest in the 
Southern States where the rate of 10.4 was 1 
percent above 1968. In the Northeastern States a 
rate of 5.2 was 8 percent above the prior year, 
and the North Central States rate of 6.1 was up 9 
percent. The Western States also had a rate of 
6.1 which was 15 percent higher than the 1968 rate. 

Nature of Murder 

Through the use of a supplemental report, 
details are collected on murder offenses to obtain 
data on age, sex, and race of the victims, the 
weapon used to commit the oflFense, and the 
circumstances or motives which lead to the crime. 

Males outnumbered females as victims of 



murder by more than 3 to 1 in 1969, which is 
similar to the experience in 1968. Nationwide, 
the ratio of arrests for murder was more than 
five males to each female. Forty-four of every 
100 victims were white and 55 were Negro. The 
remaining 1 percent was distributed among all 
other races. It was determined that six of every 
10 murder victims were between 20 and 45 years 
of age, with the largest number, 28 percent, falling 
in the 20 to 29 age group. 

Firearms continue to be the predominant 
weapon used in murder, as illustrated in the 
accompanying chart. For the year 1969, as in 
1968, 65 percent of the homicide victims were 
killed through the use of a firearm. As in prior 
years handguns were again the pre lominant fire- 
arm used, with 51 percent of the murders resulting 
from the use of handguns, 8 percent from the use 
of shotguns, and 6 percent of the m irder victims 
died from rifle wounds. Cutting or stabbing 
weapons were used in 20 percent of the murders, 
other weapons (blunt objects such as hammers 
and clubs, poison, arson, explosives, drowning, 
etc.) in 7 percent, and in the remaining 8 percent 





MURDER 

BY TYPE OF WEAPON USED 
1969 


HANDGUN 

RIFLE 

SHOTGUN 

CUTTING OR STABBING 
OTHER WEAPON 

(CLUB, POISON, etc.) 

PERSONAL WEAPON 


S&iS:-:..... : . . : , ... .v...-.-.:.. ... . . ...:.-..... ...:.. .:.;.:.,.;.. ........ :.:.:...-.-.... ..::.:... ...-.:::......; 


._J51% 











8% 


8% 




^ -»-i|20% 


^fc7% 


1—8% 


(HANDS, FISTS, FEET.etc.) 





FBI CHART 



Chart 5 



of the murders, personal weapons such as hands, 
fists and feet were used. 

An analysis of types of murder weapons by 
region shows that in 1969 the Southern States led 
in homicides by use of firearms with seven of 
every 10 victims succumbing from gunshot wounds. 
Knives or other cutting instruments were used 
most frequently as murder weapons in the North- 
eastern States where three out of every 10 homi- 
cide victims died of cut or stab wounds. The use 
of pei-sonal weapons resulting in murder by 
strangulations and internal injuries, was highest 
in the Western States and lowest in the Southern 
States. Since 1964, murder through the use of a 
firearm lias risen 80 percent, a cutting or stabbing 
instrument 28 percent, other weapons 31 percent, 
and personal weapons 26 percent. 

(Percent distribution] 





Murder, type of weapon used 


Region 


Total 

all 

weapons 

used 


Fire- 
arms 


Knife or 
other 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


Other 

weapon; 

club. 

poison, 

etc. 


Personal 
weapons 


Northeastern States. .. 
North Central States,. 

Southern States 

Western States 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


46.3 

70.0 
71.8 
68.4 


32.4 
IS. 6 
16.8 
19.7 


9.4 
6.6 
6.2 

y.7 


11.9 
7.8 
5.2 

12.2 


Total 


100.0 


64.5 


19.9 


7.4 


8 2 







As it has been pointed out in prior issues of this 
publication, police are powerless to prevent a 
large number of these crimes, which is made readily 
apparent from the circumstances or motives which 
surround criminal homicide. The significant fact 
emerges that most murders are committed by 
relatives of the victim or persons acquainted with 
the victim. It follows, therefore, that cruninal 
homicide is, to a major extent, a national social 
problem beyond police prevention. In 1969, 



killings within the family made up over one-fourth 
of all murders. Over one-half of these involved 
spouse killing spouse and the remainder involved 
otlier family killings such as parents killing 
children and other in-family relationship type 
murders. In this Program, felony murder is defined 
as those killings resulting from robberies, sex 
motives, gangland slayings, and other felonious 
activities. These known and suspected felonious 
killings comprised 27 percent of the total murder 
offenses in 1969. This is up slightly from the 25 
percent known or suspected felonious homicides 
in 1968. The following table demonstrates by 
geographic region the percentage of murder by 
type or circumstance in 1969. 

During 1969, 7 percent of the murders were 
the result of romantic triangles or lovers' quarrels. 
More than four of every 10 were the direct result 
of arguments outside the family unit and not 
involving the romantic triangle situations. It is 
known that the persons ])articipating in these 
arguments were most frequently acquainted prior 
to the fatal act. 

In situations involving husband and wife, the 
wife was the victim in 54 percent of the cases 
and the husband in 46 percent. In these incidents, 
48 percent of the victims were white, 52 percent 
were Negro and less than 1 percent other races. 

In lovers' quarrels, the females were the victims 
in 56 percent of the murders, but when a third 
party entered the scene to complete a romantic 
triangle, a male was the victim in 95 percent of 
the confrontations. 

The victims of felony-type murders were 62 
percent white, 36 percent Negro, and 2 percent 
other race or race not stated. 



a 



earances 



Nationwide, poUce continue to be most success- 
ful in clearing or solving by arrest a higher per- 



[Percent distribution) 





Murder by circumstance 


Region 


Total 


Spouse 
killing 
spouse 


Parent 
kilhng 
child 


other 
family 
killings 


Romantic 
triangle 

and lovers 
quarrels 


Other 
arguments 


Known 
felony 
type 


Suspected 
felony 
type 




100.0 
100. 
100.0 
100.0 


10.7 
13.0 
14.1 
13.6 


6.4 
3.5 
2.2 
6.0 


4.7 
9.3 
10.1 
6.9 


5.2 
6.0 
8.6 
6.9 


37.9 
40.3 
46.1 
34.4 


2-2.6 
22.5 
13.5 
26.6 


13.5 


North Central States 


5.4 


Southern States .... 


5.6 


Western states 


6.8 






Total 


100.0 


13.1 


3.7 


8.4 


7.0 


41.3 


19.3 


7.2 







centage of the murder cases than any other Crime 
Index offense. In 1969, as m 1968, 86 percent of 
the crkninal homicides were solved. Persons under 
18 years of age were involved in 6 percent of the 
willful killings solved by the police. 

Persons Arrested 

Based on reports submitted by law enforcement 
agencies, 9 percent of all persons arrested for 
murder were under 18 years of age, and 42 percent 
were under 25. The involvement of the young 
age group under 18 years of age is indicated in 
the long-term arrest trends for murder, 1960-1969, 
where a 151 percent increase occurred. The in- 
crease in adult arrests for murder during this 
period was 78 percent. Numerically, the 20 to 24 
year age group had the heaviest involvement 
during 1969 with 23 percent of the total arrests 
coming from within this age group. Negroes made 
up 62 percent of the arrests for murder in 1969, 
and 55 percent of the victims of homicide were 
also Negroes. There was a 5 percent increase in 
the number of arrests of females for murder in 
1969 compared with 1968, and a 28 percent in- 
crease in the arrests of young females under 18 
years of age for this offense. 

Persons Charged 

Law enforcement agencies' reports disclose that 
56 percent of all adults charged with murder in 
1969 were prosecuted during the year. Forty 
percent of the adults prosecuted were found guilty 
as charged, and 23 percent were convicted on some 
lesser charge. The remaining 37 percent won 
release by acquittal or dismissal of the charges 
against them. Of all individuals processed for 
murder, 13 percent were juveniles who had their 
cases referred to juvenile court jurisdiction. 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

Aggravated assault is defined as an unlawful 
attack by one person upon another for the purpose 
of inflicting severe bodily injury usually accom- 
panied by the use of a weapon or other means 
likely to produce death or serious bodily harm. 
Attempts are included since it is not necessary 
that an injury result when a gun, knife, or other 
weapon is used which could and probably would 
result in serious personal injury if the crime was 
successfully completed. 

Volume 

In calendar year 1969, there was an estimated 
total of 306,420 aggravated assaults. This is an 



increase of 24,020 offenses over the previous year. 
This violent crime against the person made up 
over 6 percent of the Crime Index offenses in 
1969 and comprised 47 percent of the crimes of 
violence. Regionally, the Southern States recorded 
38 percent of the total count of these crimes 
followed by the North Central States 22 percent, 
while the Northeastern and Western States each 
accounted for 20 percent. As has been the ex- 
perience in prior years, the warm summer months 
recorded the high frequencies during 1969. (See 
Chart 12.) 

Trend 

In 1969, the volume of aggravated assault 
offenses increased 9 percent over 1969 and 102 
percent over 1960. Cities with 250,000 inhabitants 
and over had an 8 percent increase in volume. 
The suburban areas reported an 11 percent rise 
and rural areas were up 8 percent. The Western 
States reported an upward trend of 15 percent 
while North Central States registered an increase 
of 12 percent. The Northeastern States were up 

6 percent and the Southern States recorded an 
increase of 5 percent. 

Aggravated Assmult Rate 

For each 100,000 persons in the United States 
during 1969, there were 152 victims of aggravated 
assault. Large core cities 250,000 and over in 
population recorded a victim rate of 319 per 
100,000, suburban 95, and rural areas 85. Overall, 
the victim rate for aggravated assault increased 

7 percent over 1968, and 79 percent over 1960. 
(See Chart 6.) The Southern States were again 
highest with a rate of 187 per 100,000 followed by 
the Western States 177, Northeastern States 
124, and the North Central States 122. This 
victim rate was up 8 percent in large core cities 
while the suburban area rate was up 11 percent 
and the rural area 5 percent. 

Nature of Aggravated Assault 

Most aggravated assaults occur within the fam- 
ily unit, or among neighbors or acquaintances. The 
victim and offender relationship, as well as the 
very nature of the attack makes this crime similar 
to murder. In 1969, 24 percent of the serious as- 
saults were committed with the use of a firearm. 
A knife or other cutting instrument was used in 30 
percent of the assaults, 25 percent were committed 
with blunt objects or other dangerous weapons, 
and 21 percent with personal weapons, such as 
hands, fists and feet. The collection of crime 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 




I960 - 1969 




PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 




___ NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 102 PERCENT 




^B^ RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 79 PERCENT 


























+ 100 


















A 




















/ 

/ 


+ 90 
+ 80 


















/ 




































* 


y 


+ 70 
















/ 


y^ 
















/ 




/ 


+ 60 
+ 50 














/ 


/ 
















> 


y 
<► 
• 


/ 
















• 
• 


y 






+ 40 












X 


X 
















^^^ 


" ^ 








+ 30 










,-•' 


y^ 
















t 

/ 


^^^„000^ 










+ 20 

+ 10 



- 10 








// 


















_.^' 


y 
















,^^ 


:^ 


f 
































1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 6 



counts in this offense category was broken down 
into the above subclassifications commencing in 
1964 in order to further define the nature of these 
serious assaults. A comparison of the assault 
subclassifications for 1969 with 1964 indicates 
that assaults with firearms have increased 143 
percent; assaults with a knife or other cutting in- 
strument have risen 14 percent; those assaults 
where blunt objects or other dangerous weapons 
are used increased 66 percent, and those assaults 
through use of personal weapons have climbed 50 
percent. The table which follows demonstrates the 
regional experience of aggravated assault in 1969 
by type of weapon used. 

C/eofonces 

Performance, as measured by solutions, indicates 
American law enforcement agencies were success- 



[Peroent distribution] 





Aggravated assault by type of weapon used 


Region 


Total 

all 

weapons 

used 


Firearms 


Knife or 
other 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


Other 
weapon; 

club, 

poison, 

etc. 


Personal 
weapons 


Northeastern States. . - 
North Central States.. 

Southern States 

Western States 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


16.2 
27.1 
26.9 
22.9 


32.7 
29.0 
31.2 
25.4 


31.9 
21.5 
21.0 
27.8 


19.2 
22.4 
20.9 
23.9 


Total 


100.0 


23.8 


29.8 


24.9 


21.5 







ful in solving 65 of each 100 cases in 1969. This 
relatively high solution ratio follows that of the 
other crimes against the person. Persons under 18 
years of age were identified in 1 1 percent of these 
clearances. Due to the nature of these crimes, 



10 



arrests are frequently made upon the response of 
])atrol units. This type of patrol call is hazardous to 
the officers. Since 1960, 107 officers have lost their 
lives responding to disturbance-type calls, which 
frequently involve family arguments. 

Persons Arrested 

Comparing aggravated assault arrests for 1969 
uith those in 1960 indicates that arrests of young 
jiersons under 18 increased 123 percent while 
arrests of adults were up 45 percent. As a group, 
persons 21 years of age and over accounted for 70 
percent of the arrests for aggravated assault in 
1969 and those under age 21 accounted for .30 per- 
cent. Arrests of males outnumbered females by 7 
to 1. 

Persons Charged 

Law enforcement agencies have difficulty in 
obtaining convictions based on original charge in 
the aggravated assault category. The close family 
or other relationship which exists between victims 
and assailants in this category accounts for the 
victim's frequent unwillingness to testify for the 
prosecution. Acquittals and dismissals, therefore, 
continue to run high, almost four out of each 10 
cases. Seventy-two out of every 100 adults 
arrested for aggravated assault in 1969 were prose- 
cuted. Forty-four percent of the adults prosecuted 
for this offense were convicted on this charge, 18 
percent were convicted of lesser charges while 18 
percent of all persons processed were referred to 
juvenile court jurisdiction. 

FORCIBLE RAPE 

Forcible rape, as defined under this Program, is 
the carnal knowledge of a female through the use 
of force or the threat of force. Assaults to commit 
forcible rape are also included; however, statutory 
rape (without force) is not counted. Crime counts 
in this offense category are broken down by actual 
forcible rapes and attempted forcible rapes. 

Volume 

During 1969, there was an estimated total of 
36,470 forcible rapes. Numerically, the volume 
increased by 5,410 ofifenses over 1968. Forcible 
rape made up less than 1 percent of the Crime 
Index total and less than 6 percent of the crimes 
of violence in 1969. The greatest volume was re- 
corded in the Southern States with 29 ]iercent of 
the total, while the North Central and tiie Western 
States each recorded 27 percent, followed by the 
Northeastern States with 17 percent. 



A comparison of the month-to-month variations 
of forcible rape in 1969 with the long-term sea- 
sonally adjusted trend followed the pattern set 
for many years. Chart 12 reflects the month- 
to-month variations of forcible rape during 1969, 
as well as a comparison with the prior 5-year 
experience. 

Trend 

The volume of forcible rape offenses in 1969 
increased 17 percent over 1968, and 116 percent 
over 1960. This crime was committed most often 
in the big cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants 
which accounts for 46 percent of the forcible rapes. 
In 1969, this group of cities registered an upward 
trend of 18 percent, while the volume increased by 
12 percent in the suburban areas. An increase of 
10 percent was recorded in the rural areas. Geo- 
graphically, an overall increase was noted in all 
regions with the Western States up 22 percent, 
Southern States 19 percent, Northeastern States 
15 percent and the North Central States up 13 
percent. 

Forcible Rape Rate 

A crime rate equates the number of crimes per 
unit of population, and in its proper perspective, 
is a victim risk rate. In 1969, 35 out of every 
100, 000 females in this country were reported forc- 
ible rape victims. Since 1960, the forcible rape 
crime rate has increased 93 percent. In calendar 
year 1969, the forcible rape rate increased by 17 
percent over 1968. 

The large core cities recorded a victim risk rate 
of 74 per 100,000 females, while the suburban 
area rate was 27 and the rural area 21. Again, as 
experienced in 1968, females residing in the 
Western States were most often the victims of 
forcible rape. In these States, the forcible rape 
rate was 57 per 100,000 females. The North Cen- 
tral States recorded a rate of 34, followed by the 
Southern and Northeastern States with rates of 
33 and 25 per 100,000 females respectively. 

Nature of Offenses 

In 1969, 70 percent of all offenses reported in 
this crimie class were actual rapes by force while the 
remainder were attempts or assaults to commit 
forcible rape. This offense is a violent crime against 
the person, and of all the Crime Index offenses, 
law enforcement administrators recognize that this 
offense is probably one of the most under reported 
crimes due primarily to fear and/or embarrassment 
on the part of the victims. As a national average, 

11 



397-633 O - 70 ■ 



FORCIBLE RAPE 

I960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 

NUMBER OF OFfENSES UP 116 PERCENT 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 93 PERCENT 



+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+ 90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+ 40 

+ 30 

+ 20 

+ 10 





-10 



/. 

/ 
/ 
I 

7^ 
/ k 

7 — y 

/ 

f — J. — 

/ i 
/ # 

/ M. 

/ / 

/ M 

_^ — ^ 

y. y^ 

^ ^^ ■ 

/-^^ . , 

/ y 

/-^ 

/ X 

»-g — — -—.^ — X ■ ■ 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 7 



18 percent of all forcible rapes reported to police 
were determined by investigation to be unfounded. 
In other words, the police estabUshed that no 
forcible rape offense or attempt occurred. This is 
caused primarily due to the question of the use of 
force or threat of force frequently compKcated by a 
prior relationship between victim and offender. 
Crime counts in this publication are limited to 
actual offenses established by police mvestigation. 

In 1969, 56 percent of all forcible rape offenses 
were solved. This represents an increase of approxi- 
mately 1 percent in solution rate when compared to 
1968 or approximately 3,000 additional solutions 
of forcible rape offenses during 1969. During the 



previous 3 years, 1966, 1967 and 1968, the solu- 
tion rates for this offense showed decreases. 

Persons Arrested 

Males 17 to 20 years of age constituted the 
greatest concentration of arrests for forcible rape 
in 1969. Total arrests for this offense increased 13 
percent with the arrest of persons under 18 years 
of age up 9 percent over 1968. Sixty-five percent 
of the arrests for forcible rape during the year were 
of persons under the age of 25. All arrests for 
forcible rape in 1969 compared to 1960 indicate an 
increase of 57 percent. Figures for the same years 
indicate that arrests of those under 18 years of age 
have increased 86 percent. In 1969, approximately 
50 percent of the persons arrested for forcible rape 



12 



were Negroes, 48 percent whites, and all other 
races comprised the remainder. 

Persons Charged 

Of all adults arrested for forcible rape in 1969, 
62 percent were prosecuted for this offense. Thirty- 
four percent were found guilty of the substantive 
offense. An additional 17 percent of the adults 
prosecuted were convicted of lesser offenses. 
Prosecutive problems accounted for acquittals 
and/or dismissals in 49 percent of the cases. 
Juvenile referrals amounted to 28 percent of the 
persons processed on forcible rape charges in 1969. 

ROBBERY 

Robbery is a vicious type of crime which takes 
place in the presence of the victim to obtain 
property or a thing of value from a person by 
use of force or threat of force. Assault to rob and 
attempts are included. This is a violent crime and 
frequently results in injury to the victim. For 
crime reporting purposes data on robbery is 
collected for armed robbery where any weapon 
is used, and strong-arm robbery where no weapon 
other than a personal weapon, is employed. The 
latter category includes crimes such as mugging, 
yoking, etc. 

Volume 

During calendar year 1969, there were an esti" 
mated 297,580 robberies committed in the United 
States. This represents a significant increase over 
the 261,730 robberies which occiu-red in calendar 
year 1968. This offense makes up 6 percent of the 
total Crime Index and comprises 45 percent of the 
crimes of violence. In 1969, these offenses occurred 
most frequently during the period August through 
December. 

Geographically, the heaviest volume of robbery 
occurred in the Northeastern States, which re- 
ported 31 percent of the total in 1969. The per- 
centage distribution in the other geographic regions 
showed the North Central States had 28 percent, 
the Southern States 24 percent, and the Western 
States 17 percent. 

Trend 

In 1969 robbery offenses increased 14 percent 
in volume when compared with 1968. Since 1960, 
robbery has increased 177 percent. Large core cities 
with over 250,000 population \\atnessed a 13 percent 
rise in the volume of robbery. Subiu-ban areas 
surrounding the large core cities also recorded a 



13 percent increase while the rural areas reported 
an upward trend of 11 percent. 

There were substantial increases in robbery in 
each geographic region. The Southern States had 
the sharpest increase with a 20 percent rise, 
while the North Central States were up 16 per- 
cent, the Northeastern States 10 percent, and the 
Western States 9 percent. 

The accompanying chart depicts the long-term 
trend in the volume of robbery and the robbery 
rate, 1960-69. 

Robbery Rate 

The 1969 robbery rate of 147 victims per 
100,000 inhabitants was 13 percent above the 
1968 rate and 146 percent above the 1960 rate. 
Robbery is a big city crime. American cities with 
over 250,000 population accounted for nearly three 
out of every four robberies which occurred in the 
United States during 1969. 

Cities with over 250,000 inhabitants had a 
robbery rate of 488 victims per 100,000 inhabi- 
tants. There were 50 robbery victims per 100,000 
in the suburban areas, up 12 percent over the 
preceding year, and 13 victims in the rural 
portions of the country. Robbery rates in the 
larger cities were about 10 times greater than 
they were in the suburban areas, again pointing 
out the fact that robbery rates tend to increase in 
proportion to density of population. On a geo- 
graphic basis, this crime occurred most frequently 
in relation to population in the Northeastern 
States where the rate was 189, 9 percent higher 
than 1968. The Western States followed with a 
rate of 152 which was an 8 percent increase, the 
North Central States 148, a 15 percent rise, and 
the Southern States 112, a 19 percent increase. 

Nature of Robbery 

Supplemental information is obtained from 
cities with populations of 2,500 or more as to 
robbery by type as a part of the monthly collection 
of statistical data under this Program. In 1969, 
these figures disclosed that 55 percent of the 
robberies were committed in the street. Bank 
robbery in cities with 25,000 or more population 
^vitnessed a 7 percent decrease in 1969. Nationally, 
bank robbery offenses declined over 1 percent. 
The average bank robbery dollar loss also de- 
creased from $5,200 in 1968 to $4,500 in 1969. 

The long-term trends in robbery by type as 
illustrated by the following charts show bank 
robbery has increased 296 percent since 1960. 



13 



+ 180 

+ 170 

+ 160 

+ 150 

+ 140 

+ 130 

+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+ 90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+ 40 

+ 30 

+ 20 

+ 10 





ROBBERY 

I960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 

• NUMBER Of OFFENSES UP 1 77 PERCENT 

.RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 146 PERCENT 



-10 





































1 

1 
1 


















1 

1 
1 
















• k 
















r 

1 

1 


/ 
















1 
1 
1 


/ 

' 
















1 i 


















1 / 
1 / 

/ # 


















1 / 
/ / 
















1 
1 


















1 
1 
1 


















1 1 


































* 


j 


















f 














,"' 


/ 


















r 










^ 


^ 


'X 












""^^ 


''^^^ 

















1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 8 



14 



STREET ROBBERY 
1960-1969 

UP 186% 



iJ^Pl^ 




1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1966 1969 

+300% 



ROBBERY OF 
GAS STATION 
1960-1969 

UP 214% 



+ 250% 
+ 200% 




ROBBERY OF 
CHAIN STORE 
1960-1969 

UP 279% 




/^ 




I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 

+300% 



ROBBERY OF 
RESIDENCE 

1960-1969 



UP 133% 




+ 250% 


BANK ROBBERY 
1960-1969 


+ 200% 


UP 296% 


+ 150% 




+ 100% 


/ 




+ 50% 


/ 


:•:•:•:•:•:•:■: 





I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 

FBI CHART 



Chart 9 



15 



During this same 10-year period, gas or service 
station holdups have risen 214 percent, chain 
store robberies 279 percent, street robberies 186 
percent, robberies in residences 133 percent, and 
holdups of other commercial or business establish- 
ments rose 117 percent. 

Armed perpetrators were responsible for six out 
of every 10 robbery offenses during 1969, while 38 
percent were muggings, yokings, or other violent 
confrontations where personal weapons were used 
to subdue or overcome the victim. Since 1964, 
armed robbery has increased 147 percent and 
unarmed robbery increased 103 percent. 



/Jobbery by Geographic Region 






Total 


North- 
eastern 


North 
Central 


South- 
em 


West- 
em 


Armed — any weapon 

Strong-arm— no weapon. 


61.5 
38.6 


62,7 
37.3 


68.6 
41.6 


62.8 
37.2 


62.6 
37.5 


Total . 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100 







Special surveys have indicated that approxi- 
mately 63 percent of all armed robbery is com- 
mitted with a firearm, 24 percent with a knife or 
other cutting instrument, and 13 percent with 
blunt objects such as clubs, etc. 

As it has been pointed out in prior issues of 
this publication, the full impact of this violent 
crime on the victim cannot be completely measured 
in terms of dollar loss alone. While the object of 
the attack is money or property, many victims 
of the mugger and the strong-ann robber, as well 
as the armed robber, suffer serious personal injury 
as a result of the attack. During 1969, the average 
value loss to the victims of robbery was $288 
for a total loss of $86 million. 

Clearances 

In 1969, law enforcement agencies were success- 
ful in solving 27 percent of these crimes. Seventy- 
seven percent of the robberies which were cleared 
by arrest involved adults. Fourteen percent of 
the armed robberies and 36 percent of the strong- 
arm type which were cleared, involved arrests 
of persons under 18 years of age. 

Persons Arrested 

Nationally, arrests for robbery increased 13 
percent in 1969 compared to 1968. The greatest 
volume of arrests occurred in cities and were up 
13 percent. In the rural areas arrests increased 18 



percent and in the suburban areas arrests rose 
7 percent. 

Arrest data discloses that 77 percent of the 
persons arrested for robbery were under 25 years 
of age, and 56 percent were under 21 years of age. 
Nationally, 33 percent of the persons arrested for 
robbery were under 18. This greater proportion 
of young age arrests, compared to solutions, is 
accounted for in part by the fact they act in 
groups such as in strong-arm robbery. Robbery 
arrests for this young age group recorded a 13- 
percent increase in 1969 over 1968. In the subur- 
ban areas young persons made up 26 percent of 
the arrests, and in the rural areas 14 percent. 
In 1969, six of every 100 persons arrested for 
robbery were females and arrests of women for 
this offense rose 31 percent in 1969 when related 
to 1968. 

From a standpoint of race, 66 percent of those 
arrested were Negro, 32 percent were white, 
and all othei races made up the remaining 2 
percent. 

Persons Charged 

In 1969, 57 percent of all adults arrested for rob- 
bery were prosecuted, and 43 percent of the persons 
processed for this crime were juveniles whose 
cases were referred to juvenile court jurisdiction. 
Of the adults prosecuted in 1969, 45 percent were 
convicted of the substantive charge, 17 percent 
were convicted on lesser charges, and 38 percent 
were acquitted or their cases were dismissed. 

BURGLARY 

Under this Program, burglary is defined as the 
unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony 
or theft, even though no force was used to gain 
entrance. Collection of crime counts in this cate- 
gory is broken down into three subclassifications: 
forcible entry, unlawful entry where no force is 
used, and attempted forcible entry. 

Volume 

An estimated total of 1,949,800 burglaries oc- 
curred during 1969. Volume-wise, there was an 
increase of 120,900 offenses over 1968. The large 
cities over 250,000 population accounted for 40 
percent of all burglaries during 1969. This offense 
makes up 39 percent of the Crime Index offenses 
and over 45 percent of the voluminous property 
crimes. The Southern States reported 27 percent 
of the total volume, the Northeastern and Western 
States 25 percent and the North Central States 
23 percent. 



16 



Highs were recorded during the last half of 1969, 
with the peak month being December. 

Trend 

Since 1960, burglary has increased 117 percent. 
In 1969, burglary rose 7 percent over 1968. 
Big cities over 250,000 population and the subur- 
ban areas recorded increases of 5 percent. The 
rural areas were up 6 percent. By region, the North 
Central ?*ates registered the largest overall gain 
in volume; up 10 percent. The Western States were 
up 8 percent, the Southern States 7 percent and 
the Northeastern States 2 percent. 

Burglary Rate 

The long-term rise in the burglary rate, 1960- 
1969 was 93 percent. The 6 percent rise in the 



burglary rate, 1969 over 1968, followed the sharp 
13 percent rise in the rate, 1968 over 1967. It 
should be remembered the crime rate equates the 
number of offenses per 100,000 inhabitants and 
this continuing upswing in volume indicates the 
increasing number of victims of burglary both 
residential and nonresidential. The Western States 
again recorded the highest burglary rate in 1969 
with 1,437 offenses per 100,000 inhabitants fol- 
lowed by the Northeastern States with 985 
offenses, the Southern States 837 and North 
Central States 807. Core cities over 250,000 popu- 
lation recorded a rate of 1,759 per 100,000 inhab- 
itants while the suburban and rural areas had 
rates of 805 and 408 respectively. 



+ 120 



+ 110 



+ 100 



+ 90 



+ 80 



+ 70 



+ 60 



+ 50 



+ 40 



+ 30 



+ 20 



+ 10 



BURGLARY 

I960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 117 PERCENT 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 93 PERCENT 



^^_ 

/ 

t. 

/ 
/ 
f > 

> -/■ 

/ X 

/ X 

/ X 

t f 

/ A 

/ X 
/ X 

> X 

A X 

y X 
^ X 

z^'^- 

^j^^ 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 10 



17 



RESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

NIGHTTIME 



1960-1969 

UP 108% 





1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



NONRESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

NIGHTTIME 



1960-1969 

UP 57% 




^ i 



I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



+ 300% 



+ 250% 



+ 200% 



+ 150% 



+ 100% 



+ 50% 



• 150% 



+ 100% 



M +50% 



RESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

DAYTIME 



1960-1969 

UP 286% 




I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



NONRESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

DAYTIME 




1960-1969 

UP 142% 



I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 

FBI CHART 



Chart 1 1 



18 



Nature of Burglary 

As it has been pointed out in prior issues, 
burglary is a crime of stealth and opportunity 
committed by amateurs and professionals alike. 
In 1969, 77 percent of the burglaries involved 
forcible entry, while 17 percent were unlawful 
entry (wdthout force) and 6 percent were attempts. 
Residential burglary accounted for 56 percent of 
the total while nonresidential amounted to 44 per- 
cent in 1969. Daytime burglaries of residences rose 
11 percent in 1969, and accounted for over one- 
half of these offenses. Since 1960, there has been 
a substantial increase of 286 percent in daytime 
residential burglaries. It should be noted that un- 
attended apartments and homes during daytime 
hours are becoming increasingly easy prey for the 
burglar. Daytime burglaries of nonresidences rose 
8 percent in 1969, but accounted for only 6 percent 
of the total burglary. 

As a group, residential and nonresidential 
nighttime burglary represented 63 percent of the 
total volume. Prevention and detection are most 
difficult for law" enforcement agencies due to the 
tremendous volume of these offenses and the lack 
of adequate police patrols. In 1969, property 
owners suffered an economic loss of $620 million, 
with an average dollar loss of $318 per burglary. 
Residential burglary losses amounted to $363 
million while nonresidential losses due to burglaries 
amounted to $257 million. 

Clearances 

Law enforcement agencies were successful in 
solving less than one out of every five cases of 
burglary in 1969. This low clearance rate indicates 
the lack of a deterrent and slight risk of detection. 

The burglary solution rate declined 3 percent in 
1969. Adults were identified in 60 percent of all 
cases solved while yoimg persons under IS years 
of age were identified in 40 percent. Solution levels 
were fairly consistent in all population groups. 
Law enforcement agencies in cities 250,000 and 
above solved 20 percent in 1969. In the suburban 
areas 18 percent were solved while 21 i)ercent 
were cleared in the rural areas. 

Persons Arrested 

In 1969, total arrests for burglary increased less 
than 1 percent. Arrests of persons under 18 years 
of age decreased less than 1 percent and arrests of 
persons IS years and over rose 2 percent. Burglary 
arrests increased less than one-tenth of 1 percent 
in the cities, 1 percent in suburban areas, and rural 
areas recorded a 7 percent increase during 1969. 



An analysis of the 10-year period 1960-1969, 
reveals a 52 percent increase in burglary arrests. 
Arrests of individuals under the age of 18 increased 
72 percent, while arrests of adult burglary offenders 
increased 34 percent, 1960-1969. 

Nationallj^, persons under 25 accounted for 83 
percent of all arrests for burglary in 1969. Of the 
total, young persons under 18 accounted for 54 
percent of all arrests for this crime. Females were 
involved in four out of 100 arrests for burglary 
during 1969. Ai-rests of whites outnumbered 
Negroes by almost 2 to 1. 

Persons Charged 

Nationally, in 1969, 72 percent of the adults 
arrested for burglary were prosecuted. Of the 
adults, 56 percent were found guilty as charged, 
16 percent were convicted of lesser charges and 
28 percent were freed through acquittal or dis- 
missal of charges. Juveniles referred to juvenile 
court jurisdiction accounted for 60 percent of all 
persons processed for burglary in 1969. 

LARCENY-THEFT 

Larceny-theft is the unlawful taking cr stealing 
of property or articles of value without the use of 
force or violence or fraud. It includes crime? such 
as shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, 
thefts from autos, thefts of auto parts and acces- 
sories, bicycle thefts, etc. In the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program this crime category does not 
include embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, and 
worthless checks. Auto theft, of course, is excluded 
from this category for cr'me reporting purposes 
inasmuch as it is a separate Crime Index offense. 

The Crime Index offense of larceny is limited 
to those thefts where the value of property stolen 
is $50 or more. 

Volume 

Larceny, the second most volumimus Index 
crime is exceeded only by burglary. In 1669 
there were 1,512,900 offenses of larceny $50 and 
over, up from 1,271,000 in 1968. This crime 
makes up 30 percent of the Crime Index total. 
From a seasonal standpoint, larceny was highest 
in the summer months and reached a peak in 
August. 

Offenses of larceny- thefts were distributed quite 
evenly throughout all geographic regions. The 
Northeastern and North Central States each 
contributed 24 percent, while the Southern and 
Western States each contributed 26 percent. 



19 



CRIMES 



KEY: ---- )964-1968 MOVING AVERAG€ 

AGAINST THE PERSON 




30% 



+ 30% 
+ 20% 
+ 10% 

ANNUAL 



JAN. FEB. WAR. APR. MAY JUWE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. D§C. 



m^mmr MMmmnTER 




- 30% 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 




JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 




30% 



Chart 12 



20 



BY MONTH 



VARIATIONS FROM 1969 ANNUAL AVERAGE 



AGAINST PROPERTY 



+ 30% 



+ 10% 

ANNUAL 



i ii i ii < ■ 1^ . 111 1 111 




MMMMIt 



l ^ lllll l IIII IJ I J I _^ M^^ ^^\_ _ illlllli ni i . jt w ^ l ^ i 




JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC 



+30% r^- 
+ 20?6 fr" 



mmiMY 



+ 10% 



L:.... 



ANNUAL .. ^_ 

fiiTnrr - m """" "- 



10% 
20% 




ti i TT t V i y ii V ii 



30% 



+ 30% 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC 




^^ J AN. FE B. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC 



20% umnrmPT 




FBI CHART 



Chart 12 



21 



Trend 

In 1969, the Index offense of larceny $50 and 
over, recorded a 19 percent increase over 1968 
and 199 percent over 1960. Substantial increases 
were noted in all population groups with cities 
over 250,000 population up 15 percent. The 
suburban areas increased 24 percent and the rural 
areas registered a 21 percent upward trend. 

Geographically, larceny increased 25 percent 
in the North Central States, 24 percent in the 
Southern States, 23 percent in the Western 
States, and 6 percent in the Northeastern States. 

Larceny Rate 

During 1969, the larceny crime rate rose to 749 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants, an increase of 19 
percent over the 1968 rate and 165 percent over 
1960. In 1969, the large core cities registered a 
crime rate of 1,165 per 100,000 inhabitants. The 
suburban larceny rate was 702 and the rural rate 
was 264. Viewed geographically, the Western 
States reported the highest larceny rate with 1,161 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants which was 21 
percent above 1968. The Northeastern States had 
a rate of 744, up 5 percent; the North Central 
States 654, up 24 percent, and the Southern 
States 616, an increase of 22 percent in the rate. 

Nature of Larceny-Theft 

The average value of property stolen in each 
larceny in 1969 was $111, up from $74 in 1960. 
This average value includes losses from the 
voluminous thefts under $50 in value, of which 
there were 2,300,000 in 1969. When average value 
is applied to the estimated crimes in this category, 
the dollar loss to victims was in excess of $420 
million. It is true that a portion of the goods 
stolen was recovered and returned to victims, but 
the relatively low percentage of these crimes 
cleared by arrest, and the lack of specific identifica- 
tion characteristics on such property indicates 
these recoveries will not materially reduce the 
overall loss. In addition, of course, many offenses 
in this category, particularly where the value of 
the stolen goods is small, never come to police 
attention. 

Since dollar valuation of property stolen in 
thefts determines whether or not a theft becomes a 
Crime Index offense, economic conditions are a 
factor. The rising cost of living with its upward 
influence on prices, coupled with increased demand 
for more expensive commodities, present greater 
criminal opportunity and also exert some unreal 
effect on the larceny $50 and over trend. Likewise, 



the average value of property stolen in larceny was 
50 percent over the 1960 figure. However, the 
volume of thefts $50 and over was 199 percent 
more than the larceny volume recorded in 1960. 

The dollar valuation of larceny (larceny $50 
and over in value) as a Crime Index offense has 
been the subject of discussion by the Committee 
on Uniform Crime Records of the lACP. In 
recent years, beginning with the April, 1963, 
meeting in Washington, D.C., the Committee 
has considered raising the dollar valuation in order 
to take account of the increasing cost of living 
factor. It has been felt, however, that this does 
not solve the problem but merely postpones it. 
Furthermore, it does not come to grips at all with 
the problem of fixing dollar valuation within the 
thousands of reporting law enforcement agencies. 

In the past, discussion has dealt with the 
possibility of selecting a certain type or types of 
larceny-theft to be utilized as the Crime Inde.x 
offense without respect to dollar value. In 1964, 
the FBI began an expanded collection of data on 
larceny by type. It should be noted that the 
percent distribution of larceny by type and area is 
significant. Like^vise, the trend in "street larceny," 
wdthout relation to dollar loss, suggests a better 
indicator of this crime experience than the present 
reporting subdivisions of "larceny $50 and over in 
value" and "larceny under $50 in value". In 
this regard, it should be noted that the category 
"street larceny" should include pocket-picking, 
purse-snatching, thefts from autos, automobile 
accessories, thefts from coin-operated machines 
and "all other" larceny. 

The term "street larceny" is used to identify 
this group of thefts since they generally occur 
within reach of police patrols. Wlien "street thefts" 
are used collectively, a larceny ups\\dng of 12 
percent was registered, 1969 over 1968, and 54 
percent, 1969 over 1964. During the same periods, 
larceny $50 and over in value increased 19 percent 
and 107 percent respectively. 

In 1969, the average value of goods and property 
reported stolen from victims of pickpockets was 
$100, by purse-snatchers $54, by shoplifters $28, 
by thefts from autos $146, and by miscellaneous 
thefts from buildings $197. 

From one year to another, the distribution of 
larceny as to type of theft remains relatively 
constant. As in prior years, a major portion of 
these thefts, 43 percent, represented thefts of 
auto parts and accessories and other thefts from 



22 



+ 200 

+ 190 

+ 180 

+ 170 

+ 160 

+ 150 

+ 140 

+ 130 

+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+ 90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+ 40 

+ 30 

+ 20 

+ 10 



LARCENY 

{$50 AND OVER) 

1960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 199 PERCENT 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 165 PERCENT 



















1 

1 


















1 
1 
1 


















1 

1 
1 


















1 

1 > 
















1 


'/ 


















/ 
















1 

1 
1 


/ 
















1 
1 i 


f 
















1 / 
/ / 

# 
















4 


1 t 
















/ 
/ 


















'V 
















* 


7 
















/ 
/ 
/ 

f A 


/ 














< 


/ 














/ 




/ 














• 


^ 














4 
* A 


/ 














^- 


'/ 














^^ 


i^ 


r 

















1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 13 



23 



POCKET-PICKING 
1960-1969 

UP 91% 




+300% 
+250% 

+ 200% 

+ 150% 

+ 100% 

+ 50% 




I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1966 1969 1960 1961 1963 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1966 1969 

+ 200% 



SHOPLIFTING 
1960-1969 

UP 174% 




+ 150% 



+ 100% 



+ 50% 



I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 

+ 100% 




THEFT OF AUTO ACCESSORIES 
1960-1969 

UP 57% 



r 



+ 50% 







THEFT OF BICYCLES ^^ 


^^! 


1960-1969 ^^^ — -^ 




mm 
mam 


UP 75% ^y 


■ 


r 










ilii; 






^ 









:■:•:■:■:•:•:•:•: 

yyyyyyyy. 










I960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 196T 1968 1969 

FBI CHART 
Chart 14 



24 



automobiles. Other major types of thefts which 
contributed to the large number of these crimes 
were thefts from buildings, 17 percent, and stolen 
bicycles, 13 percent. Miscellaneous types of lar- 
cenies, not falling into any of the specific categories 
for which statistics were collected made up 12 
percent of the total. The remainder was distributed 
among pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shop- 
lifting and thefts from coin-operated machines. 

The accompanying table presents distribution 
of larceny by type for large cities, suburban and 
rural areas. Cities and suburban areas appear to 
have similar characteristics except for pocket- 
picking and purse-snatching which are consider- 
ably less in the suburban or residential areas. 
This, of course, is to be expected as these theft 
opportunities flourish where population and busi- 
ness houses are highly concentrated. It is interest- 
ing to note that figures for shoplifting are quite 
similar in the city and suburban areas while there 
is a decided drop in the rural area. The shopping 
center which is still largely absent in rural areas 
contributes substantially to these figures. Thefts 
from autos made up 24 percent of larceny in large 
cities over 250,000 in population, but only 16 
percent in suburban areas and 13 percent in rural 
areas. 

Larceny Analysis, 1969 
[Percent distribution] 





Area 


Classification 


Total 
United 
States 


Cities 

over 

250,000 


Sub- 
urban 


Rural 


Pocket-picking... . 


1.3 

2.7 
8.2 
20.1 
21.0 
13.3 
16.8 
1.8 
14.8 


2.6 
6.3 
7.6 

23.8 

22.1 
9.4 

17.8 
1.5 

10.1 


0.2 
.5 

9.6 
16.0 
19.2 
15.6 
16.6 

3.1 
19.2 


3 


Purse-snatching 


3 


Shoplifting. _. 




Prom autos (except accessories) , . 
Auto accessories 


12.9 
17 6 


Bicycles 




From buildings . 


15 2 


Prom coin-operated machines 

All others 


1.8 






Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100 







Clearances 

The nature of larceny, a crime of opportunity, 
sneak thievery, and petty unobserved thefts, 
makes it an extremely difficult one for law enforce- 
ment officers to solve. A lack of witnesses and the 
tremendous volume of these crimes work in the 
thief's favor. In 1969, 18 percent of the larceny 
ofltenses brought to poUce attention were solved. 
Involvement of the young age group is demon- 
strated by the fact that 42 percent of these crimes 



which were cleared in the Nation's cities were 
solved by arrests of persons under 18 years of age. 
Juvenile clearance figures for suburban areas and 
rural areas were 43 percent and 29 percent, 
respectively. 

The larceny clearance percentages were consist- 
ent in all population groups ranging from 16 per- 
cent in the suburbs to a high of 19 percent in the 
cities over 250,000 inhabitants and 19 percent in 
the rural areas. Nationally, the larceny solution 
rate increased 1 percent when compared to 1968. 

Persons Arrested 

Forty-six percent of the total arrests for index 
crimes in 1969 were for larceny. Arrests for this 
crime were up 9 percent, 1969 over 1968. Volume- 
wise, 53 percent of these arrests were of persons 
under 18 years of age and when individuals under 
21 were considered, the ratio rose to over two- 
thirds. When examined by sex of arrested persons, 
it was determined that females comprised 26 per- 
cent of all arrests for larceny-theft and had a 
higher involvement in this offense than for any of 
the index offenses. In fact, women were arrested 
more often for larceny than any other offense in 
1969. 

Arrests of females rose 20 percent in 1969; while 
arrests of males increased 6 percent. Arrests of 
whites out-numbered Negroes by 2 to 1 with all 
other races comprising about 2 percent of the 
arrests for larceny-theft. The total volume of 
arrests for larceny-theft in 1969, as compared with 
the 1960 figure, reflects an 84 percent increase. It 
is significant to note that arrests of individuals 
under 18 were 100 percent greater than 1960. The 
number of adult arrests rose 69 percent over the 
number of recorded arrests for 1960, for this 
offense. 

Persons Charged 

As in prior years, law enforcement agencies 
nationally charged more than twice as many 
offenders for larceny-theft than for any other 
serious offense. Seventy-two percent of the adults 
prosecuted for larceny-theft were found guilty of 
this offense, 6 percent were found guilty of a lesser 
charge, and 22 percent had their cases dismissed 
or were acquitted. Forty-two percent of persons 
processed in 1969 for larceny were referred to 
juvenile court jurisdiction. 

AUTO THEFT 

In Uniform Crime Reporting, auto theft is 
defined as the unlawful stealing or driving away 



25 



of a motor vehicle, including attempts. This defini- 
tion excludes taking for temporary use when the 
vehicle is actually returned by the taker provided 
prior authority for its use has been granted or can 
be assumed. 

Volume 

In 1969, 871,900 motor vehicles were reported 
stolen compared to 777,800 thefts in 1968. Geo- 
graphically, the volume of auto theft was highest 
in the Northeastern States which reported 29 per- 
cent of the total number followed by the North 
Central States with 27 percent. The Southern and 
Western States each reported 22 percent. This 
crime made up 17 percent of the total Crime Index 
offenses. As was experienced in prior years, sea- 
sonal variations during 1969 disclosed auto theft 
reached its peak in the fall of the year mth 
November recording the high month in volume. 

Trend 

Auto thefts in 1969 volumewise increased 12 
percent over 1968. This offense has been steadily 
rising each j^ear since 1960, with an overall in- 
crease of 168 percent 1960-1969. Again, it should 
be remembered that it is invalid to assume more 
auto thefts occur solely because of more auto- 
mobile registrations. From 1960 through 1969, the 
percentage increase in auto theft has been four 
times greater than the percentage increase in 
automobile registrations and four times greater 
than the percentage increase in the young age 
population, 15 to 24 years. 

Auto theft increases in all areas contributed to 
the overall 12 percent rise in 1969. Big cities with 
250,000 or more inhabitants had a 12 jiercent rise 
while the suburban areas also registered a 12 
percent increase and the rural areas were up 
8 percent. 

Geographically, auto thefts were up 15 percent 
in the North Central States. The Southern and 
Western States each reported rises of 13 percent, 
and the Northeastern States 8 percent. The accom- 
panying chart shows the trend in auto thefts, 
1960-1969. 

Aufo Theft Rate 

There was a substantial increase in the auto 
theft rate in 1969 over 1968, with a rise from 389 
victims per 100,000 inhabitants in 1968 to 432 
victims in 1969, an increase of 11 percent. Since 
1960, the auto theft rate has risen 138 percent. As 
in 1968, citizens in cities with 500,000 to 1 million 
population were deprived more often of their 

26 



motor vehicles in 1969 than in any other popula- 
tion group, with 1,218 per 100,000 inhabitants 
suffering an auto theft. It should be recalled that 
as a part of a prior special study 30 percent of the 
autos stolen in the District of Columbia were 
owned by nonresident victims. This ratio will 
undoubtedly hold true in other large core cities 
because of the high mobility of the general 
population. 

Nationally, the auto theft rate in large core 
cities as a group averaged 1,041. In the suburbs 
the rate was 271, and in the rural areas the auto 
theft rate was 73. 

The auto theft rates by geographic region dis- 
closed the Western States were again high with 
554 followed by the Northeastern States 526, the 
North Central States 416, and the Southern 
States 308 auto thefts per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Across the Nation in 1969, one of every 100 
registered automobiles was stolen or a rate of 10 
per 1,000 registered autos. Regionally, the highest 
registration theft rate appeared in the North- 
eastern States where 14 cars per 1,000 registered 
vehicles were stolen. In the other three regions the 
figures were 11 in the Western States, nine in the 
North Central States, and seven in the Southern 
States. 

Nature of Auto Theft 

Auto theft rates again clearly indicate that this 
crime is primarily a big city problem, since the 
highest rates appear in the most heavily populated 
sections of the Nation. In 1969, the average value 
of stolen automobiles was $992 at the time of 
theft, and although police were successful in re- 
covering 84 percent of the stolen vehicles, the re- 
maining unrecovered 16 percent represented a 
dollar loss m excess of $140 million. 

Prior studies conducted under the Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program have documented the 
fact that auto theft is primarily a crime of oppor- 
tunity. The young offender who is most often 
involved finds the vehicle sub'ect to theft conven- 
iently ready to drive away or in many instances the 
ignition can be easily compromised. 
Clearances 

Due to the fact that prior studies have docu- 
mented two-thirds of all auto thefts occur at night 
and over one-half are from private residences, 
apartments, or streets in residential districts, law 
enforcement agencies were successful in solving 
only 18 percent of these thefts by arrest of the 
offender. These crimes occur under cover of dark- 



+ 170 

+ 160 

+ 150 

+ 140 

+ 130 

+ 120 

+ 110 

+ 100 

+ 90 

+ 80 

+ 70 

+ 60 

+ 50 

+ 40 

+ 30 

+ 20 

+ 10 



AUTO THEFT 

I960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 



■NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 168 PERCENT 

■ RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 138 PERCENT 



















1 

/ 


















/ 

/ 

/ 


















/ 

1 

i 
















1 

1 


/ 
















1 
1 

1 


/ 
















1 


f 














// 
















/ 
/ 


/ 
















/ 


f 
















/ 
















/ 
* 


/ 
















/ 


f 












t 


.''-' 


/ 














// 


-^•^^ 














• 

^ 


/ 














t* 


.'>^ 


f 














.^ 


^ 

















1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 



FBI CHART 



Chart 15 



397-633 O - 70 - 3 



27 



ness and there are seldom any witnesses to the 
theft. On the other hand, pohce nationally are 
successful in recovering about 84 percent of all 
stolen cars. Over one-half of the stolen vehicles 
are taken and recovered within 48 hours. Although 
recovery of the vehicle does not clear the offense, 
the property is available for return to the victim. 
This high recovery percentage can be attributed 
to the fact that approximately 75 percent of all 
cars stolen are used for transportation or the 
purpose of the theft is unknown. The remainder 
were taken for resale, stripping for parts, or use 
in another crime. 

In the Nation's largest cities 17 percent of auto 
thefts were cleared during 1969. Police in the 
suburban areas were agam somewhat more suc- 
cessful clearing up 22 percent. Throughout the 
country auto theft clearance percentages ranged 
from 14 percent in the Middle Atlantic States to 
22 percent in the West North Central States. 

In all geographic divisions and population 
groups the participation of the young age group 
population is indicated by the high proportion of 
these clearances which were through the arrest of 
persons imder 18 years of age. In the large core 
cities, 50 percent were solved by an arrest in this 
age group whUe juveniles account for 40 percent 
in the subiu-bs and 39 percent in the rural areas. 

Persons Arrested 

As in prior years, persons arrested for auto 
theft come primarily from the young age group 
population. In 1969, 58 percent of all persons 
arrested for this crime were under 18 years of age. 
When persons under 21 are included in the compu- 
tations, the proportion of arrests rises to 77 percent. 

The national trend in auto theft arrests dis- 
closed an increase of two-tenths of 1 percent in 
1969 when compared to 1968. Adult arrests rose 
6 percent while arrests of persons under 18 
decreased 3 percent. During the period 1960-1969, 
auto theft arrests increased 73 percent. Arrests of 
individuals under the age of 18 rose 63 percent 
during the same period. The long-term arrest 
trend for adults disclosed an 89 percent increase 
for auto theft, 1960 through 1969. 

Of all crimes against property, next to burglary, 
auto theft as measured by arrest showed the least 
participation by females. Only 5 percent of per- 
sons arrested in 1969 were female although female 
arrests for auto theft increased 8 percent. Females 
under 18 recorded a 3 percent increase in arrests 
for auto theft. White persons made up 61 percent 



of the arrests for auto theft, Negroes 37 percent 
and all other races the remainder. 

Persons Charged 

Police reports disclosed that of all persons for- 
mally processed for auto theft in 1969, 67 percent 
were referred to juvenile court jurisdiction. No 
other Crime Index offense results in such a high 
percentage of juvenile referrals. When the remain- 
ing adult offenders were considered as a group, 52 
percent of those prosecuted on charges of auto 
theft were found guilty as charged, 14 percent 
were convicted of lesser charges, and 34 percent 
were acquitted or their cases were dismissed. 

CLEARANCES 

In this Program poUce clear a crime when they 
have identified the offender, have sufficient evi- 
dence to charge him and actually take him into 
custody. Crime solutions are also recorded in ex- 
ceptional instances when some element beyond 
police control precludes the placing of formal 
charges against the offender, such as the victim's 
refusal to prosecute or local prosecution is declined 
because the subject is being prosecuted elsewhere 
for a crime committed in another jurisdiction. The 
arrest of one person can clear several crimes or 
several persons may be arrested in the process of 
dealing one crime. 

The percentage of Index Crimes cleared by law 
enforcement agencies in 1969 was 4 percent below 
the clearance percentage in 1968. Whereas police 
nationally cleared 20.9 percent of these offenses in 
1968, this dropped to 20.1 percent in 1969. This 
decrease was noted in every Crime Index offense 
except muider and forcible rape. 

The murder clearance rate increased 0.2 percent, 
forcible rape increased 0.7 percent, robbery de- 
creased 1.8 percent, aggravated assault decreased 
2.1 percent, burglary decreased 2.6 percent, lar- 
ceny $50 and over decreased 1.7 percent and auto 
theft decreased 4.3 percent. In 1969, decreases in 
solution rates were universally reported by all 
city population groups and by all geographic 
divisions, except Pacific States. The highest over- 
all Crime Index clearance rate regionally was 
recorded by the Southern States with 21 percent, 
the North Central States 21 percent, the Western 
States 19 percent and the Northeastern States 
Avith 18 percent. 

Reports submitted by law enforcement agencies 
m 1969 disclosed poUce were successful in solving 



28 



CRIME CLOCKS 

1969 




SERIOUS CRIMES 

9 EACH MINUTE 




VIOLENT CRIMES 

MURDER. FORCIBLE RAPE, 
ROBBERY OR ASSAULT TO KILL 

ONE EVERY 48 SECONDS 




MURDER 

ONE EVERY 36 MINUTES 




FORCIBLE RAPE 

ONE EVERY 14 MINUTES 




AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

ONE EVERY 2 MINUTES 




ROBBERY 

ONE EVERY 2 MINUTES 






BURGLARY 

ONE EVERY 1 6 SECONDS 



LARCENY 
($50 and over) 

ONE EVERY 21 SECONDS 



AUTO THEFT 

ONE EVERY 36 SECONDS 



J 

FBI CHART 



Chart 16 




AGAINST THE PERSON 

NOT CLEARED CLEARED 



m 



9- 



MURDER 



NEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 



84% 




NOT CLEARED 







, ] I ■ifcfcX.MH.V^Hff^l^'I'l I I l.l.fcfc*<W|i»iVN>»WW W > 1 1 



FBI CHART 



Chart 17 



30 



86 percent of the murder offenses, 56 percent of 
the reported forcible rapes, 65 percent of the 
aggravated assaults and 27 percent of the rob- 
beries. Solutions in the property crime categories 
showed police cleared 19 percent of the burglaries 
and 18 percent of the larcenies and auto thefts. 
Police are able to clear a higher percentage of the 
crimes against the person, not only because of the 
more intense investigative effort afforded these 
violent offenses, but also due to the smaller 
volume of these crimes requiring police attention 
and, more importantly, because mtnesses are 
usually available who can identify the perpetrators. 

The accompanying chart reveals the crime and 
police clearance experience in the 1960's. From 
1960 to 1969 the Crime Index offenses rose 148 
percent. Police response to this sharp upward 
trend was a 63 percent increase in the number of 
Crime Index offenses solved, and a 71 percent 
increase in the number of arrests for Crime Index 
type offenses. However, the clearance rate, which 
relates the number of known offenses to offenses 
cleared, has shown a steady decline. In 1960, the 
ratio of Crime Index offenses cleared to crimes 
reported was 31 out of 100. In 1969, for each 100 
Crime Index offenses 20 were cleared — a decrease 
of 34 percent. 

There are a number of factors influencing the 
overall decline in the police solution rate. These 
include court decisions which have resulted in 
restrictions on police investigative and enforce- 
ment practices; sharp increases of police workloads 
in criminal and noncriminal matters, riots, dis- 
turbances, marches, etc.; the almost static ratio 
of police strength to population which is not com- 
mensurate with the sharp increase in crime; and 
the increasing mobility of those who commit 
crimes. Clearance tables are published beginning 
on page 98. 

Offenses Cleared by Arrests of Juveniles 

It has been noted in several prior sections of this 
publication that persons under 18 years of age 
are becoming increasingly involved with police 
through commission of serious crimes. Persons 
10 to 17 years of age make up approximately 16 
percent of the total United States population. 
One means of measuring the involvement of the 
young age group in crime is to identify the number 
of crimes in which they are the offenders. In 1969, 
32 percent of all Crime Index offenses solved in- 
volved persons under 18 years of age. 



PERSONS ARRESTED 

In 1969, arrests for all criminal acts, excluding 
traffic, increased 5 percent over 1968. The total 
volume of city arrests rose 5 percent while arrests 
in suburban areas were up 8 percent and the 
number of arrests in the rural areas increased 4 
percent. Nationally, there were 40 arrests for 
each 1,000 persons in the United States. In 1968, 
there were 38 arrests for each 1,000 inhabitants. 
The arrest rate for big cities as a group was 55 
per 1,000 population, up from 52 in 1968, for 
suburban areas 28, up from 26 in the prior year 
and for the rural areas the arrest rate remained 
at the same level as in 1968, 18 arrests per 1,000 
people. 

Ariests are primarily a measure of police ac- 
tivity. Arrest practices, policies and enforcement 
emphasis will vary from place to place and within 
a community from time to time. The volume of 
police arrests for certain unlawful conduct such 
as drunkenness, disorderly conduct, and certain 
local ordinances is particularly influenced by the 
above. On the other hand, robbery, burglary, 
and other arrests for serious crimes are more 
likely the result of standard procedures. Arrests 
are first a measure of police activity as it relates 
to crime. Arrests do, however, provide a useful 
index to measure involvement in criminal acts 
by the age, sex, and race of the perpetrators, 
particularly for those crimes which have a high 
solution rate. Procedures used in this Program 
require that an arrest be counted on each separate 
occasion when a person is taken into custody, 
notified or cited. Arrests do not measure the num- 
ber of individuals taken into custody since one 
person mav be arrested several times during the 
year for the same or different offenses. As noted 
above, this happens frequently for certain types 
of offenses against public order such as drunken- 
ness, vagrancy, disorderly conduct and related 
violations. 

In 1969, law enforcement agencies nationally 
made an estimated 7^2 million arrests for all criminal 
acts, excluding traffic offenses. A percent distribu- 
tion of arrests by type of offense in 1969 indicates 
that approximately 8 percent were for crimes 
against the person, property crime arrests made 
up 20 percent of the total, crimes against morals 

11 percent, crimes against public order and decency 
49 percent and all other offenses (except traffic) 

12 percent. 



31 



+ 180 
+ 160 
+ 140 
+ 120 
+ 100 

+ 80 

+ 60 

+ 40 

+ 20 


-20 

-40 

19 


CRIME AND CRIMES CLEARED 
1960 - 1969 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1960 


























=c: 




















/ 


Crime Index 
up 148% 


















> 


/ 




















/ 


















> 


/ 












Index Type 














A 


/ 




.'-;■ 


^ 


up 717. 














^ 


y 


.'-' 


A 


/ 


Crimes Cleared 
up 63% 










A 


r— - 


■"""■" 




















^^ 


H 


y 































< 


























Clearance Rate 
down 34% 




60 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 19 


69 







FBI CHART 



Chart 18 



Arrest Trends 

In 1969, police arrests of adults increased 6 
percent, while arrests for juveniles had an overall 
increase of 4 percent. For the period 1960-1969, 
police arrests for all criminal acts, except traffic 
offenses, increased 24 percent. During this same 
period, arrests of persons under 18 years of age 
doubled while the number of persons in this young 
age group, 10 to 17 rose 27 percent. It is apparent, 
therefore, the involvement of young persons as 
measured by police arrests is escalating at a pace 
almost four times their percentage increase in the 
national population. As it has been pointed out in 



prior issues, a relatively small percentage of the 
total young age population become involved in 
criminal acts, about six out of 100. Adult arrests, 
1960-1969, rose 11 percent in volume. During the 
1960's decreases in police arrests have occurred in 
the high volume offenses such as drunkenness, 
vagrancy, gambling, and sex offenses other than 
forcible rape and prostitution. 

Wlien only the seiious crimes are used in 
computing the long term trend 1960-1969, total 
arrests increased 71 percent. Adult arrests rose 
57 percent, while arrests of juveniles for Crime 
Index offenses rose 90 percent. Arrests of adults 



32 



for violent crimes were up 54 percent and for 
property crimes 59 percent. Juvenile arrests for 
violent crimes increased 148 percent, 1960-1969, 
while arrests of persons under 18 for the property 
crimes rose 85 percent. 

Age 

Nationally, persons under 15 years of age made 
up 10 percent of the total police arrests; under 18, 
26 percent; under 21, 39 percent; and under 25, 
51 percent. In the suburban areas, the involve- 
ment of the young age groups in police arrests is 
again markedly higher than the national figures 
mth the under 15 age group represented in 13 
percent; under IS, 35 percent; under 21, 50 per- 
cent; and under 25, 63 percent. In the rural areas 
the distributions were lower for the younger age 
groups, with the under 15 group being involved in 
5 percent; under 18 in 21 percent; under 21 in 38 
percent; and those imder 25, 53 percent of total 
police arrests. When only the serious crimes are 
considered 22 percent of all arrests in 1969 were 
for persons under the age of 15 and almost one-half 
were under 18 years of age. 

In reviewing arrest figures, it is important to 
keep in mind that police arrest practices and 
emphasis vary which will account for some 
variations in these statistics from year to year. 
It is noted arrests of persons under 18 for Narcotic 
Drug Law violations have increased sharply in 
recent years. In fact, in 1969, 55 percent of the 
individuals arrested for violations of the Narcotic 
Drug Laws were persons under 21 years of age. 
Twenty-seven percent of the marijuana arrests in 
1969 were persons under the age of 18 and 63 
percent of the arrests for this offense involved 
persons under 21 years of age. It should be noted 
that in 1964 less than one-fourth or 23 percent of 

Narcotic Drug Laws 

[Percent] 



Region 


Heroin 

or 
cocaine 


Mari- 
juana 


Synthetic 
narcotics 


Other 


Northeastern States 


57.9 
16.8 
20.9 
10.7 


27.5 
61.6 
43.4 
49.3 


3.6 
6.6 
7.6 
8.7 


11 


North Central States 


25.0 


Southern States. 


28 1 


Western States 


31 3 






Total 


29.1 


41.2 


6.5 


23 1 







the persons arrested for Narcotic Drug Law 
violations were under 21 years of age. 

Arrests for Narcotic Drug Law violations 1969 
over 1968 were up 45 percent nationally. From 
1960 to 1969, arrests for this violation increased 
6 times, or 492 percent. There is set forth a 
tabulation by geographic region showing the type 
of narcotic drug involved in the arrest of the 
offender m 1969. 

Sex 

Male arrests outnumbered female arrests 6 to 
1 in 1969. Male arrests in 1969 rose by 4 percent, 
while female arrests were up 12 percent. Females 
were arrested in 16 percent of the serious or 
Crime Index type offenses. Ten percent of the 
arrests for violent crimes in 1969 involved females 
and arrests of females for these types of crimes 
increased 23 percent, 1969 over 1968. Again, as 
in prior years their involvement was primarily 
for larceny, which accounted for one out of every 
six female arrests. In fact, 17 percent of all 
property crime arrests in 1969 were of females. 
Females accounted for 23 percent of the forgery, 
26 percent of the fraud, 21 percent of the em- 
bezzlement, and 16 percent of the narcotics 
arrests. Over one-half of the runaway — police 
custody cases — were girls under 18 years of age. 

Long-term arrest trends, 1960-1969, revealed 
that arrests for young females under 18 years of 
age increased 176 percent, while arrests for young 
males under 18 rose 93 percent. It is noted that 
arrests for young females under 18 for each Crime 
Index offense more than doubled, 1960-1969. 
When the serious crimes, as a group, are consid- 
ered, arrests of males 1960-1969, were up 78 
percent and female arrests increased 212 percent. 

Traffic 

Supplemental data submitted by agencies over 
2,500 in population relating to traffic enforcement 
disclosed that nationwide, 58 percent of the 
citations and summonses issued and arrests made 
in traflic matters were for parking violations. 
Hazardous traffic violations accounted for 32 
percent, and other regulatory violations 10 per- 
cent. In the Southern States 50 percent of the 
traffic arrests were for hazardous violations. In 
the Western States 35 percent of the arrests 



33 



were for this type of infraction, in the North 
Central States 31 percent, and in the Northeastern 
States 18 percent. 

Arrest Rates 

The following table sets forth arrest rates by 
geogi'aphic regions for Crime Index type offenses. 
Arrest rates indicate law enforcement activity in 
response to crime rates. 

Arrests by Region, 1969 

[Kate per 100,000 inhabitants] 



Offense 


North- 
eastern 
States 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 


Murder 


6.6 

7.9 

61.5 

67.3 

135.0 

225.1 

66.1 


7.8 
9.6 
48.6 
66.0 
155.1 
397.0 
83.5 


11.8 
11.2 
49.6 
107.4 
185.1 
381.1 
74.6 


6.8 


Forcible rape 


12.6 
68.4 


Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny 


94.9 
271.7 
459.0 


Autotheft 


146.2 






Total 


659.4 


759.1 


824.3 


1,061.4 



PERSONS CHARGED 

Disposition data reveals the results of cases in 
which law enforcement agencies have made an 
arrest and subsequently formally charged the 
offender in a court of jurisdiction. This informa- 
tion is important to the law enforcement adminis- 
trator in evaluating the quality of investigations 
and court presentation functions. 

In 1969, 82 percent of the adults arrested for 
Crime Index type offenses were prosecuted in the 
courts. Of the adults prosecuted for Crime Index 
offenses 62 percent were found guilty as charged, 
and 1 1 percent of a lesser charge. 

It must be recognized that not all arrested 
persons are tm-ned over to the courts for prosecu- 
tion. There are various reasons for this: failure of 
the victim to cooperate or appear for the prosecu- 
tion, persons arrested are released with a warning, 
evidence is obtained which discloses the arrested 
person did not commit the offense or there is not 
sufficient evidence obtainable to support either a 
formal charge or a subsequent prosecution. For 
example, about one-half of the juveniles arrested 
are handled by the individual law enforcement 
agencies without preferring a formal charge or 
referring them to juvenile authorities. All contribu- 
tors to this Program ai-e urged to obtahi and report 
final disposition in cases involving persons they 
arrest. Tables containing this data commence on 



page 102. Keep in mind that police methods of 
handling juvenile offenders differ widely. Also, the 
tables concerning juveniles (local age limit) refer 
to those who were arrested and turned over to 
juvenile authorities in connection with specific 
criminal acts. 

In 1969, 38 percent of the murder defendants 
were either acquitted or their cases dismissed at 
some prosecutive stage. Forty-nine percent of 
those charged with forcible rape were acquitted 
or had their cases dismissed, and 38 percent of the 
persons charged with aggravated assault won their 
freedom through acquittal or dismissal. 

Of the adults who were prosecuted for Crime 
Index offenses, 28 percent were acquitted or their 
cases were dismissed. Larceny, 72 percent, re- 
corded the highest percentage for persons found 
guilty on the original charge in 1969. This was 
followed by 56 percent on the original charge for 
burglary, 52 percent for auto theft, 45 percent for 
robbery, 44 percent for aggravated assault, 40 
percent for murder and 34 percent for forcible 
rape. The offense which had the highest percent- 
age of a lesser charge was murder where 23 percent 
of the defendants were convicted on some charge 
other than murder. 

Forty-six percent of the persons processed for 
the Crime Index categories were young persons 
referred to juvenile court jurisdiction. Again, as 
in 1968, juvenile referrals were highest for auto 
theft with 67 percent of those processed for this 
offense, 60 percent burglary, 42 percent larceny, 
43 percent robbery, 28 percent forcible rape, 18 
percent aggravated assault and 13 percent criminal 
homicide. 

Similar to the 1968 experience, offenses of arson 
and vandalism in 1969 recorded high percentages of 
juvenile referrals. When all crime categories are 
reviewed, it is noted that convictions on original 
charges remained high in the offenses against 
public order and decency — driving under the in- 
fluence, drunkenness, disorderly conduct and 
vagrancy. As in jirior years offenses against trust 
such as fraud and embezzlement also recorded a 
high percentage of conviction on original charges. 

CAREERS IN CRIME 

The study is made possible by the cooperative 
exchange of criminal fingerprint data among local, 
state and Federal law enforcement agencies. The 
all-important fingerprint card submitted to the 



34 



Identification Di\nsion of the FBf by these law 
enforcement agencies contains information which 
serves as a basis for statistical examination of 
careers in crime. While there is a lack of uniformity 
in submissions made by all law enforcement 
agencies for all criminal charges, generally it is the 
practice to submit a criminal fingerprint card on 
all arrests for serious crimes, felonies, and certain 
misdemeanors. Fingerprinting by police is a part 
of the "booking" procedure of placing a formal 
charge against an arrested person. The arrest and 
charge have substance and differ from temporary 
detention for questioning or investigation. On the 
Federal level almost all persons arrested are 
fingerprinted by the arresting Federal agency or 
United States Marshals. Federal prisons, state 
penitentiaries and county jails also submit finger- 
print cards and related data to the FBI 
Identification Division. 

As the fingerprint card constitutes a positive 
means of identification it becomes possible to 
obtain each offender's criminal history. There is a 
limitation, of course, in that the offender must 
first be detected, arrested, and a fingerprint card 
submitted at the time of arrest. Of equal impor- 
tance is the disposition of each arrest which is also 
requested. FBI Identification Division finger- 
print files of known offenders in this Program are 
"flashed" to provide an accurate means of follow- 
up concerning any future criminal involvement. 
As additional information is accumulated on 
these persons, it is added to the record which has 
been previously stored in a computer. These 
offenders are initially selected because they have 
become involved in the Federal process by arrest 
or release. The sample also includes serious state 
\ lolators arrested as fugitives under the Fugitive 
Felon Act, as well as District of Columbia ^nola- 
tors. Specifically excluded from this study and 
resulting tabulations are chronic violators of the 
immigration laws and fingerprints submitted by 
the military. 

While the basis of selection is a Federal offense, 
it should be kept in mind that most Federal 
criminal violations are also violations of local and 
state laws. The offender records being examined 
in these tabulations are, therefore, felt to be 
comparable to local and state experience with the 
serious violator. 

Since 1963 the Careers in Crime Program has 
been used in this publication to document the 
extent to which criminal repeating over a period 
of time contributes to annual crime counts. This 



program has also been used to document the need 
for the centralization of law enforcement informa- 
tion at the state and national level in view of 
criminal repeating and mobility. Although the 
criminal history process requires tighter control, 
standardization, and more complete data, the 
Careers in Crime Program has demonstrated the 
potential statistical use of criminal history infor- 
mation to measure success or failure of the criminal 
justice system. The key to the effectiveness of the 
system is in knowing what happened to the people 
who were handled or treated by the criminal 
justice process, specifically, whether they were 
deterred from further criminal acts and/or 
rehabilitated. 

A summary of 240,322 offenders and their 
ciiminal history over the 10-year period, 1960- 
1969, is set forth in Table A. These offenders, as 
a group, averaged almost four arrests during this 
time, 36 percent had two or more convictions and 
46 percent a prison term of a year or more. Table 
A demonstrates the cost in victims and criminal 
justice dollars brought about by the recidi\'ism 
problem. 

Tabic A. — Criminal Recidivism, 1960-1969 

[240,322 oSenders— 942,241 charges) 





Frequency 












Five 






One 


Two 


Three 


Four 


or 
more 


Total 


Subjects charged _ 


68,362 


46,348 


31,394 


22,608 


71,610 


240,322 


Percent of total subjects. 


28.4 


19.3 


13.1 


9.4 


29.8 


100.0 


Subjects convicted. 


89,236 


38,202 


20, 463 


11,456 


16,442 


175,799 


Percent of total subjects. 


37.1 


15.9 


8.5 


4.8 


6.8 


73.2 


Subjects imprisoned 


69,164 


26, 150 


10,033 


3,600 


2,028 


110, 975 


Percent of total subjects. 


28.8 


10.9 


4.2 


1.5 


.8 


46.2 



Criminal Mobility 

After the initial arrest in the 1960's, these 
offenders were rearrested primarily on local and 
state charges a total of 693,000 times, which is 
almost three additional arrests per offender. Con- 
sidering the location of first arrest in the 1960's 
as the state of origin, 60 percent of the rearrests 
occurred in the same state and 40 percent of the 
rearrests occurred in another state during this 10- 
year period. Set forth in Table B is a percent 
distribution by state showing where the transient 
rearrests took place. It suggests that criminal mo- 
bility follows the pattern of general population 
migration with California and Florida getting a 
higher rate of mobile criminal repeaters. 



35 



Table B. — Mobility of Persons Arrested, 1960-1969 



State 



Number of 
offenders 



Number of rearrests 



Total 



Within 
state 



In other 
state 



Rearrest after original arrest 
in other state 



Number 



Percent 
distribution i 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas.. 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia. 

Florida.. 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio.. 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island- 

South Carolina. 

South Dakota.. 

Tennessee 

Texas. 

Utah 

Vermont 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia,, 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming 

Total 



6,791 

852 
6,642 
2,084 
28,713 
2,629 
1,828 

674 
18, 611 
12, 125 
8,630 

490 

805 
9,341 
4,072 
1,023 
2,317 
4,609 
4,676 

324 
4,614 
2,459 
7,009 
1,368 
2,200 
6,696 
1,346 
1,002 
1,698 

630 
6,347 
2,170 
17,416 
9,624 

631 
7,661 
3,319 
1,767 
7,033 

605 
4,191 

800 
5,408 
16, 927 

883 

126 
6,863 
3,062 
1,749 
1,629 



19,163 

2,627 

18, 867 

4,768 

106, 727 

9,636 

6,011 

2,254 

43, 158 

42,341 

19,184 

848 

2,890 

35, 672 

11,678 

2,823 

7,705 

7,952 

15,004 

970 

13, 774 

6,523 

14,304 

2,787 

3,841 

24, 666 

3,483 

3,486 

7,055 

1,766 

17,544 

8,200 

46, 656 

18, 353 

1,245 

19,631 

10, 436 

6,080 

20, 326 

1,347 

6,629 

2,686 

12,094 

43, 966 

2,810 

356 

14,000 

9,718 

3,178 

6,481 

2,275 



12, 136 

1,912 
11,892 
1,463 
76, 866 
4,395 
3,438 
1,079 
35, 176 
24, 029 

10, 952 
173 

1,290 

23,383 

6,006 

898 

3,000 

3,419 

7,714 

315 

6,921 

2,630 

8,430 

1,154 

1,207 

16, 459 

1,716 

1,268 

2,620 

243 

11, 572 
3,066 

33,531 

9,639 

364 

11, 120 

4,955 

2,633 

13, 346 

693 

2,632 

1,434 

6,612 

26, 171 

962 

109 

6,530 

4,767 

1,177 

2,826 

621 



7,017 

715 
6,975 
3,305 
29, 861 
6,241 
2,573 
1,175 
7,982 
18, 312 
8,232 

675 
1,600 
12, 289 
6,572 
1,925 
4,705 
4,633 
7,290 

665 
6.863 
2,893 
5,874 
1,633 
2,634 
8,206 
1,767 
2,218 
4,636 
1,623 
5,972 
6,134 
12, 125 
8,714 

881 
8,511 
6,480 
3,447 
6,980 

654 
3,997 
1,252 
6,682 
17, 786 
1,848 

247 
7,470 
4,961 
2,001 
2,656 
1,754 



6,377 

964 

8,665 

2,615 

34,438 

5,190 

2,266 

1,014 

13,901 

19, 572 

8,328 

360 
1,787 
11,649 
5,705 
1,547 
4,788 
3,933 
6,117 

404 
6,066 
2,368 
6,070 
1,881 
2,244 
8,280 
1,899 
2,279 
5,861 

977 

6,116 

4,079 

13,006 

5,066 

547 
8,170 
6,300 
4,149 
6,298 

616 
2,523 

983 

6,669 

16, 162 

1,946 

214 
6,067 
6,620 
1,664 
2,676 
1,360 



239,342 



692, 862 



416,643 



276, 209 



276,445 



' Does not add due to rounding. 



Profiles 

The offender records processed for new arrests in 
1968 and 1969 include both offenders coming into 
the Federal process for the first time, as well as 
those processed since 1963 and now being re- 
arrested for primarily local and state violations. 
The extent to which these offenders by type of 



crime had a prior arrest for any offense is set forth 
in the following table. Likewise, percent convicted 
for a prior crime are set forth, along \vith the 
percent of these offenders who previously served a 
prison term of one year or more. 

Keep in mind that this presentation is conserva- 
tive and understates the amount of crime com- 



36 



Table C— Profile of Offenders Arretted 


in 1968-1969 by Ty/te of Crime 










Murder 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Robbery 


Bank 

robbery 


Burglary 


Larceny 


Narcotics 


Auto 
theft 


Gambling 


Tnfftl niiTTibpr of sllhjprts 


1,520 

31 

21 

10 

8 

7 


8,752 
31 
21 
10 
9 
35 


9,343 
28 
20 
8 
8 
32 


2,603 
29 
21 
8 
6 
3 


13,331 
28 
19 
9 
9 
49 


17,917 

31 

22 

9 

9 

42 


12,938 

28 

21 

7 

6 

28 


13,638 

27 

20 

7 

7 

38 


2,038 
44 


Average age at specific charge. 


Average age at first charge 


28 










Percent of subjects previously arrested for same crime 


64 


Frequency of convictions (percent) : 

1 


20.3 
16.3 
10.9 
35.7 


22.6 
15.9 
11.3 
34.0 


21.6 
16.4 
11.5 
32.6 


29.0 
17.7 
11.3 
28.6 


18.6 
16.1 
13.1 
39.9 


26.0 
14.9 
10.3 
33.7 


31.6 

14.0 

9 2 

21.3 


26.6 
16.1 
11.5 
30.7 


26 6 


2 - 




3. 


9.9 


4 or more . . 


22 9 






Frequency ol imprisonment (percent) : 
1 


26.7 
16.0 
8.6 
10.7 


23.8 
12.8 
7.0 
10.2 


27.0 
15.2 
9.2 
12.1 


33.8 
14.7 
9.7 
11.9 


23.6 
16.2 
10.1 
16.6 


21.7 
12.0 
7.6 
13.7 


22.7 
9.1 
5.3 
7.5 


23.4 
12.9 
7.6 
12.3 


21 2 


2 


9 


3 


4.9 


4 or more . . , 


6.7 






MobUity (percent): 

1 State _ 


37.3 
31.2 
31.5 


36.8 
31.4 
31.8 


42.3 

27.9 
29.9 


61.3 
24.2 
24.6 


34.0 
30.7 
36.3 


43.1 

26.9 
30.0 


56.0 
28.0 
16.0 


27.8 
32.3 
39.9 


60.4 


2 States 


26.0 


3 or more States 


13.6 







mitted by these offenders since it is based on police 
detection, arrest and submission of a fingerprint 
card. As indicated in earlier pages of this publica- 
tion law enforcement agencies do not clear or solve 
most crimes. It is also true that the prior conviction 
and imprisonment rates are slightly lower because 
police agencies do not always submit such data 
after arrest and conviction. 

A profile of criminal repeating for selected 
offenders is shown in the follomng table. This is 
based on criminal histories newly processed or 
updated after an arrest in 1968-1969. WhUe 
these samples will vary from year to year, the 
factors being measured, i.e., mobility, average 
arrests, etc., are very consistent. Average age for 
the first arrest is high because of the general 
practice not to submit criminal fingerprint cards 
on juveniles. Criminal career is the average years 
between first and last arrest. 

The offender profile is classified by type of 
crime for which arrested in 1968-1969. 

6 Year Follow-up 

A part of the Careers in Crime Program has 
been the follow-up on 18,567 offenders released 
from the Federal criminal justice system in 1963. 
The records of these releasees were followed for 
new arrests through 1969. Charts and tables are 
presented in this section on the rearrest experience 



by offense, type of release, age, sex and race of 
the offender. 

Of the 18,567 offenders released to the com- 
munity in 1963, 65 percent had been rearrested 
by the end of the sixth calendar year after release. 
Of those persons acquitted or had their cases 
dismissed in 1963, 92 percent were rearrested for 
new offenses. Of those released on probation 57 
percent repeated, parole 63 percent, and man- 
datory release after serving prison time 76 per- 
cent. Offenders receiving a sentence of fine and 
probation in 1963 had the lowest repeating 
proportion with 38 percent rearrest. This type 
of sentence is generally found in connection with 
violations such as income tax fraud and 
embezzlement. 

When criminal repeating is viewed by type of 
crime for which arrested, convicted, or released 
in 1963, rearrests ranged from 25 percent for the 
income tax violators to 82 percent of the auto 
thieves. The predatory crime offenders had high 
repeat rates with 79 percent of the burglars being 
rearrested within 6 years, 76 percent of assault 
offenders, and 66 percent of the robbers released 
in 1963. Likewise, 72 percent of the narcotic 
offenders who are frequently users were rearrested 
after release. The fact that 70 percent of the forgery 
offenders were rearrested for new violations within 



37 



PERCENT OF PERSONS REARRESTED 
NA/ITHIN 6 YEARS 



38% 



BY TYPE OF RELEASE IN 1963 



92% 



57% 



63% 



78% 76% 



65% 



FINE SUSPENDED 

AND SENTENCE 

PROBATION AND/OR 

PROBATION 



PAROLE 



FINE MANDATORY ACQUITTED 

RELEASE OR 

DISMISSED 



TOTAL 



Chart 19 



FBI CHART 



PERCENT REPEATERS 

BY TYPE OF CRIME IN 1963 

PERSONS RELEASED IN 1963 AND REARRESTED WITHIN 6 YEARS 



AUTO THEFT 

BURGLARY 

ASSAULT 

NARCOTICS 

FORGERY 

ROBBERY 

LARCENY 

LIQUOR LAWS 

FRAUD 

GAMBLING 

EMBEZZLEMENT 

ALL OTHERS 

TOTAL 



25% 



48% 
48% 
48% 



82% 



79% 



76% 



72% 
70% 



66% 



62% 



65% 
65% 



Chart 20 



FBI CHART 



38 



PERCENT REPEATERS 

BY AGE GROUP 



74% 



72% 



69°/' 66% 



65% 



56% 



43% 



UNDER 20 20-24 



25-29 30-39 40-49 50 & OVER TOTAL 

ALL AGES 
PERSONS RELEASED IN 1963 AND REARRESTED WITHIN 6 YEARS 



FBI CHART 



Chart 21 



the 6-year follow-up, documents law enforcement 
experience with this type oflFender. 

The younger the age group, the higher the 
repeating rate has been documented many times, 
as it is here. Nevertheless, this fact calls for 
greater rehabilitation efforts directed at the young 
offender, if hardened criminal careers are to be 
aborted. Of the offenders under 20 released in 1963, 
74 percent were rearrested by 1969, 72 percent of 
those 20 to 24 years of age, and 69 percent of the 
offenders 25 to 29 years. When viewed by race the 
Negro rearrest rate, 71 percent, was higher than 
the white offender rate of 61 percent. All other 
races, made up primarily of Indian Americans, had 
a rearrest rate of 82 percent between release in 
1963 and 1969. Of the 1,419 female offenders 
released in 1963, 47 percent had been rearrested for 
new offenses by 1969. 

Table D sets forth the accumulative percentage 
of rearrest by age group by year after release. By 



the end of the second calendar year (1965), after 
release during different months in 1963, 53 percent 
of the offenders had been rearrested. This pattern 
supports prior studies of this kind and is consistent 
for all age groups. Of all offenders rearrested during 
this 6-year follow-up, over one-half were under 
30 years of age and the majority of these rearrests 
occurred within 2 years after release. 

Table D. — Percent of Offenders Arrested on New Chargtt 
after Release in 1963 

[By age group and year] 



Year 


Total 
all ages 


Under 
20 


20-24 


25-29 


30-39 


40-19 


50 and 
over 


1963 


21.8 
43.0 
62.6 
67.9 
60.9 
63.3 
66.1 


23.0 
52.3 
62.8 
67.9 
70.6 
72.6 
74.3 


25.3 
49.3 
69.3 
64.3 
67.5 
69.6 
71.6 


23.6 
45.8 
65.9 
61.9 
64.9 
67.4 
69.0 


22.3 
42.8 
52.4 
67.8 
61.1 
63.9 
66.0 


18.4 
34.2 
43.1 
48.4 
51.8 
64.0 
55.5 


11.4 


1964 


26.4 


196S 

1966 


32.6 
36.7 


1967 . ... 


39.0 


1968 


41.3 


1969 


42.9 



39 



Table E. — 6 Vcar Follow-Up of Persons Released in 1963 by Age, Race and Sex 



Age 



Total AU ages 

Percent with subsequent charge 

Under 20 

Percent with subsequent charge 
20-24. 

Percent with subsequent charge 
25-29 

Percent with subsequent charge 
30-39 

Percent with subsequent charge 
40-49 

Percent with subsequent charge. 
50 and over _._ 

Percent with subsequent charge. 



Total 



18,667 
65.1 



2,004 

74.3 
4,214 

71.5 
3,098 

69.0 
4,808 

66.0 
2,921 

55.5 
1,522 

42.9 



Race 



12, 514 
61.5 



1,462 

73.0 
2,974 

67.6 
2,013 

64.7 
2,986 

61.5 
1,966 

62.7 
1,123 

39.9 



Negro 



5,218 
71.3 



397 
76.6 
1,031 
80.2 

953 
76.2 
1,634 
72.6 

859 
59.3 

344 
48.3 



Other 



835 
81.6 



Sex 



Male 



17, 148 
66.6 



165 
80.6 

209 
85.2 

132 
84.1 

188 

80.3 

96 

80.2 

66 

70.9 



1,899 

75.8 
3,847 

73.2 
2,832 

70.4 
4,417 

67.5 
2,714 

57.0 
1,439 

44.2 



Female 



1,419 
47.4 



105 
46.7 

367 
64.2 

266 
64.1 

391 
48.3 

207 

35.7 

83 

20.5 



Table F. — 6 Year Follow-Up by Age Group and Type of Release in 1963 



Type of release 



Total 

Percent with a subsequent charge. 

Probation and suspended sentence 

Percent with a subsequent charge. 
Fine... _. 

Percent with a subsequent charge. 
Fine and probation. 

Percent with a subsequent charge. 
Acquitted or dismissed.. 

Percent with a subsequent charge. 
Parole and pre-release 

Percent with a subsequent charge. 
Mandatory release and pardons 

Percent with a subsequent charge 



Total Under 20 20-24 



18,567 
65.1 



7,618 

57.4 
1,790 

78.3 
775 

38.1 
1,190 

92.0 
4,049 

62.6 
3,145 

76.1 



2,004 
74.3 



1,100 
69.6 

104 

84.6 

21 

42.9 

153 
94.1 

495 
74.7 

131 
86.3 



4,214 
71.5 



1,795 
65.0 

354 
86.9 

131 
42.7 

257 
95.3 
1,398 
71.5 

279 
87.6 



3,098 
69.0 



1,229 
61.2 

274 
83.2 

114 
49.1 

238 
92.4 

726 
63.4 

617 
81.8 



30-39 



66.0 



1,813 
66.3 

612 
79.7 

196 
43.1 

313 
93.3 

738 
66.2 
1,237 
77.0 



2,921 

65.6 



1,106 
42.6 

365 
72.6 

172 
33.1 

161 
88.8 

437 
48.3 

680 
69.9 



50 and over 



1,522 
42.9 



676 
34.1 

181 
60.2 

142 

23.2 

68 

75.0 

255 
30.6 

301 
61.8 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

This publication has a section on Police Em- 
ployee Data which contains tables showing average 
police employee strength by geographic divisions 
and population group, percentages of civilian 
employees, and an individual Usting of police 
employees for reporting cities. Tables are published 
containing data relative to law enforcement officers 
killed and assaulted in the line of duty to supple- 
ment the narrative material which follows. 

Police Employee Rates 

The average number of police employees per 
1,000 population in 1969 (including civihan em- 
ployees) was 2.2 which is a 5 percent increase 
over the 1968 rate of 2.1. 

Most United States cities continue to operate 
with a poUce employee ratio of less than the 
national average of 2.2 per 1,000. When arrayed 
by quartile, 50 percent of all American cities have 
poUce employee ratios ranging from 1.2 to 2.0 
poUce employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 



Nationally, large cities over 250,000 population, 
as a group, had an average ratio of 3.1, an increase 
of 7 percent over the 1968 figure of 2.9. 

The ratio of police employees to population in 
the suburban areas was 1.7, which is an increase of 
13 percent over the 1968 rate of 1.5. Again it 
should be noted those communities which are 
experiencing rapidly growing and increasing densi- 
ties of population are also recording the largest 
increases in the volume of crime. One-half of the 
suburban police departments have from 1.1 to 1.9 
employees per 1,000 inhabitants. The average 
rate of full-time employees in sheriffs' departments 
was 1.4 per 1,000 population, however, in three- 
fourths of these departments the rate was 1.2 or 
fewer employees. 

Pohce departments in the Middle Atlantic 
States once again had the highest rate of 2.8 
employees per 1,000 inhabitants. Cities in the 
West South Central States had the lowest ratio of 
1.5. 



40 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF POLICE DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES, AND 
RANGE IN NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, PER 1,000 INHABITANTS 

BY POPULATION GROUPS, DECEMBER 31, 1969 



9.8 






4.1 


-^Q 


c 


AV. 
1.6 

.5 






3.5 






AV. 
1.6 


AV. 
1.8 




]A 













i.[.L...i,-. i ..,-,..]..,..nn ; 

AV, 

1.7 
■••*•« 

.1 




FBI CHART 



Chart 22 



41 



Civilian Employees 

In Table 51 the percentage of total law enforce- 
ment personnel represented by civilian employees 
is tabulated by population group. On the average, 
during 1969, 12.5 percent of all city police per- 
sonnel were civilian employees, up from 12.2 
percent in 1968. During the period 1962-1969 the 
total number of sworn employees has increased 
25 percent while civilian personnel has increased 
63 percent. The overall police employee increase 
has been 29 percent. More and more law 
enforcement administrators are making greater 
utilization of civiUan employees, thereby relieving 
sworn personnel for active police duties. Diffi- 
culties in recruiting qualified sworn personnel and 
the increasing demands for poUce service, are 
obstacles which many knowledgeable poUce ad- 
ministrators realize can only be partially over- 
come by employing more civihans for nonpolice 
enforcement functions. 

Sworn Personnel 

When police employee rates are computed on 
the basis of sworn personnel only (excluding 
civiUan employees) the average rate for all cities 
was 1.9 compared to the 1968 rate of 1.8 per 
1,000 inhabitants. The city rates, nationally, 
range from 0.1 to 9.8 per 1,000. The sworn per- 
sonnel rate in the suburban areas was 1.4. The 
rate range of the 1,953 reporting suburban 
agencies was 0.1 to 9.7 per 1,000 population. The 
average strengths of sworn employees in sheriffs' 
departments was 1.1, up from .9, in 1968 and the 
rate range for the 1,158 reporting county agencies 
was 0.1 to 8.7 per 1,000 inhabitants. Caution 
should be exercised, however, in using rates for 
comparative purposes since there is such a wide 
variation in the responsibilities of various law 
enforcement agencies around the country. Just as 
the conditions which affect the amount and type 
of crime that occurs from place to place vary, so 
do the requirements for types of police services 
vary based upon the conditions which exist in a 
given community. For example, the increased 
need for police service in a community which has 
a highly mobile or seasonal population, differs 
from a community which has a relatively stable 
or fixed population. In addition, a smaller com- 
munity situated between two larger areas may 
require a greater number of police personnel to 
handle traffic enforcement due solely to its 
geographic location. The functions of the sheriffs 
also range widely in different sections of the 



country. In certain areas the sheriffs' responsibili- 
ties are limited almost exclusively to civil functions 
and/or the administration of the county jail 
facilities. The sheriffs' departments used in com- 
puting rates, however, are all engaged in police 
activity and are responsible for all phases of 
poUcing in their jurisdiction. 

State Police and State Highway Patrols 

There were 52,812 employees in State Police and 
State Highway Patrol organizations in 1969. This 
was an increase of 4 percent over 1968. Of the total 
employees, 73 percent were sworn personnel, and 
14,094, or 27 percent, were civilian employees. 

The police employee strengths of State Police 
and State Highway Patrol organizations are set 
forth in Table 55. This table provides additional 
data relative to the miles of primary highway and 
the number of state motor vehicle registrations 
per sworn employee, by state. 

Police Activity 

The volume and type of police activity, both 
criminal and noncriminal, vary widely from place 
to place. Likewise, police policy and practice are 
not standardized, resulting in widely differing 
arrest rates from one community to another. The 
table below is provided to show the relative pohce 
workloads by geograpliic region using reported 
Crime Index offenses, criminal arrests made, and 
traffic charges issued per sworn police officer. 

Annual Average Number Per Officer (Geographic Region) 



Police activity 


North- 
eastern 
States 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 




10.7 

3.0 

7.8 
96 


14.9 

6.6 
14.2 
112 


12.7 

13.6 

18.7 
150 


22.8 


Drunkenness and disorderly 
conduct arrests 


15.7 




23.9 




226 







The variations in officer workload set forth 
above result from many factors. It assumes that 
all sworn officers in all regions are assigned to such 
duties. This is not the case. Many police officers 
are fully engaged in administrative functions, 
special assignments and other nonline duties. 
There are also variations by region as to police 
discretion in charging an arrest, as well as mis- 
cellaneous state laws not applicable in other states. 
Enforcement practices also differ, specifically 
with respect to offenses against public decency 
and order. 



42 



It is pointed out the figures set forth in the 
detailed police employee tables (Tables 49 and 50) 
in this publication represent national averages. 
They should be used as a guide and under no 
circumstances should they be considered as recom- 
mended or desirable police strengths. Adequate 
manpower for a specific place can only be deter- 
mined after a careful study and analysis of the 
various factors which contribute to the need for 
police service in that community. 

POLICE KILLED 

1969 brought forth a record high of 86 law 
enforcement officers killed by felonious criminal 
action. This is a 34 percent increase over 1968 
when 64 law enforcement officers were murdered. 
The previous high of 76 was set in 1967. This 
raised the toll of these tragic deaths to 561 
for years 1960 tlirough 1969. The 86 deaths 
exceeded the average of 53 murders a year for 
the period 1960-1968. 

Type of Police Action 

In 1969, the trend established in prior years 
continued in that more law enforcement officers 
met death by criminal action when attempting 
arrests than from any other cause. Twenty-five of 
the 86 officers were attempting to make an arrest 
when they were killed. In 1969, 13 officers were 
killed when their weapons were seized and used 
against them. In these instances, as well as those 
of attempting arrests, many of the police deaths 
could have been averted had the officer victim been 
more vigilant when approaching these individuals 
instead of permitting their assignments to become 
"routine." These deaths demonstrate a misplaced 
trust on the part of the officer with respect to the 
occasional and unpredictable violent nature of 
human behavior. Twenty-six percent of the officers 



met death by robbers whom they interrupted 
during the commission of their crime or while in 
pursuit of these criminal offenders. The number of 
police victims killed by robbers is higher than the 
previous 9-year average of 19 percent. 

In 1969, 8 percent (or seven) of the officer 
victims were killed by mentally deranged in- 
dividuals or shot from ambush with no warning 
given. Sixteen percent of the officers killed met 
death when answering disturbance-type calls such 
as family disputes, man with a gun, etc., and 3 
percent were killed while handling, transporting, 
or through contact with custodial prisoners. 
Another 12 percent met death while pursuing or 
attempting to apprehend burglary suspects, and 
6 percent lost their lives while investigating 
suspicious persons or circumstances. 

The following table contains figures showing 
police murders by geographic region and by type 
of police activity, 1960-1969. 

Weapons Used 

Firearms continued to be the weapons used in 
virtually all of the felonious police killings in 1969 
accounting for the death of 83, or 97 percent, of 
the 86 officers killed. Handguns were used to 
commit 67, or 81 percent, of the murders by gun, 
shotguns in 10 of the killings, and rifles on six 
occasions. One officer was killed when he was at^ 
tacked with a shovel, and two officers were fel- 
oniously killed through the use of automobiles. 

During the period 1960-1969, firearms were used 
by felons to commit 96 percent of the police 
killings. Of this group 78 percent of the weapons 
were handguns. 

Specifically, of the 561 law enforcement officers 
slain by criminal action, the weapons used were 
417 handguns, 68 shotguns, 53 rifles, four knives, 
seven by personal weapons such as hands, fists, 



Police Killed by Felons, 1960-1969 



Type of Police activity 



1. Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man with gun, etc.) 

2. Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects _ . . 

3. Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects 

4. Attempting other arrests 

5. Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 

6. Investigating suspicious persons and circumstances _ 

7. Ambush, deranged persons (no warning — unprovoked attack)... 

Total 



Total 



107 
S3 

n2 

157 
36 
63 
43 



561 



Region 



North- 
eastern 
States 



84 



North 
Central 
states 



143 



Southern 
states 



Western 

States 



16 
M 

22 
23 
2 

14 
7 



43 



397-633 O - 70 - 4 



POLICE KILLED BY FELONS 

BY TYPE OF POLICE ACTIVITY 
1960--1969 



BESPONDING TO "DISTURBANCE" CALLS 
(Fomily quarrels, man with gun, etc.) 



BURGLARIES IN PROGRESS, OR 
PURSUING BURGLARY SUSPECTS 



ROBBERIES IN PROGRESS, OR PURSUING 
ROBBERY SUSPEaS 



AnEMPTING OTHER ARRESTS 



HANDLING, TRANSPORTING, 
CUSTODY OF PRISONERS 


36 

4>\ 














INVESTIGATING SUSPICIOUS PERSONS 
AND CIRCUMSTANCES 


53 

9% 












AMBUSH /DERANGED PERSONS 
(No warnino - unprovoked attack) 


43 

::::::::::::::x::::::::x::::8%:::::::: 





107 

19% 



9% 



T12 



157 



561 POLICE KILLED 

INCLUDES CITY, COUNTY, AND STATE POLICE 



FBI CHART 



Chart 23 



and feet and 12 by other means such as clubs, 
automobiles, etc. 

Years of Service 

The median years of service of police officers 
killed in the line of duty since 1960 remained at 
6 years. Twelve percent of the police officers 
killed had been active in law enforcement 1 year 
or less, 45 percent had 5 years or less police service, 
and 30 percent had 10 years or more of service. 

Types of Assignment 

The officer on car patrol is constantly faced with 
tense situations demanding instant decisions and 
response. He is usually the man first on the scene 
in answer to most calls for pohce service and during 
his routine patrols he is often confronted with the 
need to question suspicious persons on foot and in 
autos. He is the one most likely to come face to 
face with the burglar, robber, and other felonious 
offenders while they are in the act of committing 
a crime or hurriedly fleeing the scene. As a result 
of these confrontations, each of which is unique, 
the officer riding in a patrol car most often becomes 
the victim of the police kiDer. 



This does not imply that law enforcement offi- 
cers engaged in other types of police duty (foot 
patrol, detective, etc.) are not likewise presented 
with similar situations; they are, but not as 
frequently. 

Fifty-seven officers or 66 percent were on car 
patrol duty when killed in 1969, and 16 others 
were detectives or officers assigned to special 
duties. Technically, 10 were oflF-duty officers, and 
three were officers on foot patrol. Due to the fact 
that a law enforcement officer under his oath of 
duty and responsibility must take reasonable and 
proper action at any time when he observes a 
crime being committed, the 10 off-duty sacrificed 
their lives in behalf of the pubhc when they 
attempted to prevent the commission of a crime 
occurring in their presence. Since 1960, 370 or 66 
percent of the deceased officers were assigned to 
car patrols at the time they met death. This 
coincides with the percentage in 1969. 

During 1969, 48 of the officers who lost their 
lives as a result of criminal action were assisted 
by at least one fellow officer or more at the scene 
of the crime and 38 (44 percent) were alone. 



44 



During the past 10 years, 1960-1969, 243 or 43 
percent of the officers died unassisted and 318, or 
57 percent, were receiving assistance from other 
officers at the time they met death. 

The table showing the type of police duty to 
which officers were assigned when they were mur- 
dered, cross-referenced to the type of police ac- 
tivity in which they were engaged, discloses the 
highest incidence of police deaths resulted when 
officers, working in one-man patrol cars were 
attempting to make unassisted arrests. 

Time of Murder 

Contrary to prior 9 years where more officers 
were killed on Friday than any other day of the 
week, Sunday witnessed the deaths of 20 officers 
during 1969. For the 10-year period, 1960-1969, 
97 officers were killed on Friday, followed by 86 on 
Saturday, 83 on Thursday, 80 on Sunday, 77 on 
Monday, 73 on Wednesday, and 65 on Tuesday. 

The hours of darkness continued, of course, to 
be the most dangerous for the officers. Seventy-one 
percent of the officers were killed between the 
hours of 4 p.m. and 4 a.m. The hours from 7 p.m. 
to 3 a.m. have proven to present the greatest risk 
with 309 law enforcement officers being killed 
during these hours. Eleven p.m. to midnight and 
1 a.m. to 2 a.m. were the most dangerous for 
police officers with 45 and 44 police officers being 
murdered by criminal offenders during these two 
time periods. 

Police Killers 

During the 10-year period, 1960-1969, 561 law 
enforcement officers have been feloniously mur- 
dered while protecting life and property. A review 



of the criminal histories of the 74 1 known offenders 
involved in these police murders indicates that 75 
percent had been arrested on some criminal charge 
before becoming involved in the police killings. In 
fact, 54 percent of those offenders with a prior 
criminal arrest had been previously taken into 
custody for a violent crime such as murder, rape, 
robbery, assault with intent to kill, etc. 

Among the 741 persons who were involved in 
these police killings, 63 percent had prior convic- 
tions on criminal charges and, of this gi'oup, two- 
thirds had been granted leniency in the form of 
parole or probation on at least one of these prior 
convictions. It is significant to note that one- 
fourth of the murderers were on parole or proba- 
tion when they killed a police officer. Nineteen or 
nearly 3 percent of these individuals involved in a 
police killing had been con\'icted on a prior occa- 
sion for commission of murder. 

During the period 1960 through 1969, the 741 
individuals responsible for police killings had 
accumulated an average of over four arrests each 
during an average criminal career of 10 years. 

Over the 10-year period 20 females have been 
involved in the murder of police officers and in all 
but one instance these females were with male 
companions at the time of the murder. Consider- 
ing race of police killers, 443 or 60 percent were 
white and 298 or 40 percent were Negro. 

It should be noted that of the 741 individuals 
responsible for police murders, 87 were killed at 
the scene of the crime or soon thereafter by other 
officers, 19 committed suicide shortly after the 
police murder, and four died from other reasons 
while in custody. 



Police Killed by Felons, 1960-1969 












Total 


Type of assignment 


Type of Police activity- 


2-man 
cars 


1-man cars 


Foot 


Detective 

and 

special 

assignment 


Off 




Alone 


Assisted 




duty 


Total . . - 


561 


164 


•153 


53 


34 


111 


46 






1. Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man with 


107 
53 
112 
167 
36 
53 
43 


47 
16 
26 
39 
11 
13 
12 


17 
21 
26 
49 
10 
26 
4 


14 
3 
13 

15 
1 
1 
6 


9 

1 
7 
9 


16 
11 
21 
33 
13 
8 
9 


4 


2. Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects 


1 


3. Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects 


19 




12 




1 


6. Investigating suspicious persons and circumstances _ 


3 

5 


2 


7. Ambush, deranged persons (no warning-unprovoked attack). 


7 



•99 city police officers, 54 county and State poUce officers. 



45 



Ages of Police Killers 

Persons involved in police murders ranged in 
age from a boy of 13 to a man of 82 with a median 
age of 26. Over the 10-year period 1960-1969 
there have been 50 juveniles (7 percent) under 
the age of 18 arrested for the murder of a police 
officer. Almost one-half of the murderers were in 
the 20 to 30 age bracket with the age 25 appearing 
most frequently. 

Assaults on Police 

One of the increasingly serious problems facing 
law enforcement today is the growing attitude of 
disrespect for police and the failure of citizens to 
come to the aid of the officers being attacked as 
they attempt to perform their lawful duties. These 
duties often necessitate confrontations with emo- 
tionally aroused citizens protesting real or imag- 
ined grievances. These situations have certainly, 
in a large measure, accounted for the upward 
trend of assaults on police. There was an increase 
of 7 percent in the rate of assaults on police in 
1969 over 1968. Nationally there were 16.9 
assaults for every 100 officers in 1969 up from 
15.8 in 1968 and 13.5 in 1967. Since 1962 the 
number of assaults on police officers have increased 
144 percent. Geographically the highest assault 
rate occurred in the East North Central States 
with 22 for every 100 officers, followed by 21 in 
the East South Central States. 

While every assault does not result in personal 
injury to the police officer, many of them — 42 
percent in 1968 and 34 percent in 1969 — did 



result in physical harm to the ofl&cer victim and 
usually in loss of duty time. The national assault- 
with-injury rate of 5.7 per 100 officers reflects the 
continuing hazards of the law enforcement pro- 
fession when compared with the rates of 6.6 in 
1968, 5.4 in 1967, and 4.6 in 1966. In 1969, 79 
percent of assaults were by use of hands, fists, 
feet, teeth, etc. Where weapons were used in 
committing these assaults firearms were used in 
25 percent, a knife or cutting instrument in 14 
percent and blunt objects or other weapons in 61 
percent. Table 53 sets out police assault rates for 
geographic divisions and population groups for 
1969. 

Accidental Deaths 

There have been 345 law enforcement officers 
killed in accidents during the past 9 years (1961- 
1969), with 39 of these deaths occurring in 1969. 
These figures, of course, are in addition to the 
officers who lost their lives through felonious 
criminal action. A review of the data on accidental 
deaths discloses 184 of the deaths resulted from 
automobile accidents and 72 from motorcycle 
accidents. An additional 36 officers were killed 
accidentally while directing traffic on foot or at 
the scene of a prior serious accident. The remain- 
ing 53 deaths resulted from other types of acci- 
dents such as accidental discharge of firearms, falls, 
helicopter crashes, drownings, etc. There were 13 of 
these accidents during 1969 and seven occurred 
while the officers were involved in rescue 
operations. 



46 




ICam iEnfnrrpmpnt (^ahs of lEtljtrH 

Aa a Siatii Infnrrpmrnt ®fftrrr, ~j, funJam.niJJui^ i> i„ 

ierve mannina; to iafeauara livei ana property; to protect the Innocent a^alnit 
deception, the wean aaainit oppreiiion or intimidation, and the peaceful 
aaainit violence or diiorder; and to reipect the L^onititutional ri^hti of all 
men to lioertu, eaualitu and juitice. 



tain coura- 



It tUtli keep mu private life uniullied ai an example to all; maintc 
aeoui calm in the face of danaer, icorn, or ridicule; develop ielf-reitraint; and 
be conitantlu mindf-ul of the welfare of otheri. ^J4oneit in thought and deed 
in both mu perional and off icial life, ^ will be exemplary in obe^in^ the lawi 
of the land and the reautationi of mij department. Whatever Jf dee or hear of 
a confidential nature or that ii confided to me in m^ of ficial capacity will be 
kept ever iecret unleii revelation ii neceiiar^ in the performance of my dut^. 

It tlltli never act officiouiiu or permit perianal feelings, prejudiced, animoi- 
itiei or friendihipi to influence m^ deciiioni. lA/ith no compromiie for crime 
and witli relentleii proieculion of criminali, J^ will enforce the law courteouilt^ 
and appropriatelu without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never employing, 
unneceiiaru force or violence and never accepting ^ratuitiei. 

it rPrn^tttSF tke Lad^e of mif office ai a i^mboi of public faith, and 
wV accept it ai a public truit to be held io lon^ ai J' am true to the ethici of 
the police iervice. .y will conitantlu itrive to achieve theie obfectivei and ideali, 
dedicatinq muielf before \jod to mu choien profeiiion . . . law enforcement. 



47 



Introduction 



Background 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program is the 
outgrowth of a need for a national and uniform 
compilation of police statistics. This need was 
expressed by law enforcement executives many- 
years ago. In 1930, crime reports were solicited 
from poUce departments throughout the Nation 
based on uniform classifications and procedures 
developed by the Committee on Uniform Crime 
Records of the International Association of Chiefs 
of PoUce (lACP). In that year the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI), on request of the 
above organization, assumed the role as the 
national clearinghouse. 

The Committee on Uniform Crime Records, 
lACP, continues to serve in an advisory capacity 
to the FBI in the operation of this Program. In 
this connection, the Field Service Division of the 
lACP is also playing an active and effective part 
in quality control through surveys of police record 
and crime reporting systems. Dr. Peter P. Lejins, 
Professor, Department of Sociology, University 
of Maryland, continues as a consultant to the 
FBI in the conduct of this Program. 

The NCIC, since its inception, has been guided 
in its development and operational poUcies by an 
Advisory Group to the Committee on Uniform 
Crime Records. This group meets periodically 
and formulates plans for additional applications 
as well as modifications to improve existing pro- 
grams. The NCIC, a computerized nationwide 
index of documented law enforcement informa- 
tion on crime and criminals became operational 
on January 27, 1967, at FBI Headquarters, 
Washington, D.C., and by the end of 1969 was 
directly servicing local, state and Federal police 
agencies in 49 states as well as the District of 
Columbia and Royal Canadian Mounted Police 
Headquarters in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. De- 
tailed information concerning NCIC policies and 
operating procedures have been published by the 
FBI in the National Crime Infonnation Center 
Operating Manual. This Manual has been widely 



distributed among local, state and Federal law 
enforcement agencies. Also published for the 
information of NCIC network participants is a 
monthly NCIC Newsletter containing timely 
information concerning the system and its use. 

At a meeting of the Advisory Group in May, 
1967, two important resolutions were prepared 
for the parent committee on Uniform Crime 
Records which contained police declarations most 
important to the future of law enforcement com- 
puterized information systems. The first con- 
cerned maintaining the confidentiality of police 
information stored in systems shared with other 
Government entities. It was resolved that the 
controls governing access to police information 
remain as they have been historically placed with 
the law enforcement agencies. The second reso- 
lution concerned the criminal identification record 
which will serve as a source document for any 
integrated information system for all areas of 
criminal justice. This resolution encouraged all 
criminal justice agencies to contribute informa- 
tion for this document and recommended that a 
study be undertaken to determine and recommend 
such standard definitions and formats and to 
develop appropriate procedures to insure the 
completeness of the criminal identification record. 
The executive committee and the entire member- 
ship of the lACP unanimously adopted the fore- 
going resolutions in September, 1967. 

During 1968 the Advisory Group began work 
in the latter area looking toward a standardized 
criminal identification record practical for com- 
puterized storage. This study has concerned 
itself with that portion of the record needed on 
an immediate basis, as well as storage of the entire 
record for use by all agencies in the criminal 
justice system and as a basis for statistical studies. 
This work is continuing. 

Increased attention is being given to participa- 
tion in the Uniform Crime Reporting Program 
by sheriffs throughout the country. This was 
evidenced by a resolution to take affirmative action 

49 



in encouraging such participation at the annual 
conference of the National Sheriffs' Association 
(NSA) in June, 1967. The resolution was drawn 
up and presented by the Committee on Uniform 
Crime Records, NSA, which Committee was 
estabUshed in 1966 to serve in an advisory capacity 
to NSA membership. 

Committees on Uniform Crime Reporting with- 
in state law enforcement associations are active 
in providing service by promoting interest in 
the Uniform Crime Reporting Program, foster- 
ing more widespread and more intelligent use of 
uniform crime statistics and by lending assistance 
to contributors when the need exists. 

In the last several years the FBI has been 
actively assisting individual states in the develop- 
ment of statewide programs of poUce statistics 
compatible with the national system. These statis- 
tical programs have been given impetus by devel- 
oping statewide computerized law enforcement 
information systems, of which they are an essen- 
tial part. Through such mandatory state programs 
more complete and a better quality of reporting is 
envisioned. Likewise, through coordination with 
the state agency the data is available for the use 
of the state, and the collection machinery to the 
national agency is substantially streamUned. In 
1969 the second step in this state and national re- 
lationship was taken when the FBI ceased the 
collection of data directly from municipalities and 
counties in New Jersey and CaUfornia. The Uni- 
form Crime Reports for these two states are now 
obtained from the New Jersey State Police and 
California Department of Justice. Additional 
states will be channeling crime reports to the FBI 
in this way as their systems develop. The condi- 
tions under which these arrangements are agreed 
follow : 

(1) The state program must conform to the 
national Uniform Crime Reports standards and 
information required. This, of course, does not 
prohibit the state from collecting other statistical 
data beyond the national collection. (2) The state 
agency must have a proven effective mandatory 
statewide program with at least 2 years experi- 
ence. (3) Coverage within the state by a state 
agency must at least be equal to that attained by 
Uniform Crime Reports. (4) The state agency 
must have adequate field staff assigned to assist 
local units in record practices and crime reporting 
procedures. (5) The state agency must furnish to 
the FBI all of the detailed data regularly collected 



by the FBI in the form of duplicate returns, com- 
puter printouts or magnetic tape. (6) The state 
must have the proven capability (tested over a 
period of time) to supply all the statistical data 
required to the FBI in time to meet national Uni- 
form Crime Reports publication deadlines. (7) 
The FBI will continue its internal procedures of 
verifying and reviewing individual agency reports 
for both completeness and quality. (8) The FBI 
will continue to have direct contact with individual 
reporting units within the state where necessary 
in connection with crime reporting matters, but 
will coordinate such contacts with the state 
agency. (9) Upon request, the FBI will continue 
its training programs within the state with respect 
to police records and crime reporting procedures. 
For mutual benefit these will be coordinated with 
the state agency. (10) Should circumstances 
develop whereby the state agency cannot provide 
the data required by the national Program, the 
FBI will reinstitute a direct collection of Uniform 
Crime Reports from police units within the state. 

Objectives 

The fundamental objective of this Program is 
to produce a reliable fund of nationwide criminal 
statistics for administrative and operational use 
of law enforcement agencies and executives. At 
the same time, meaningful data is provided for 
other professionals with related interests in the 
crime problem and for scholars, as well as to 
inform the public of general crime conditions. 

Specifically, the means utilized to attain these 
goals are: (1) an attempt is made to measure 
the extent, fluctuation and distribution of serious 
crime in the United States through the use of a 
Crime Index consisting of seven selected offenses. 
This count is based on these seven offenses being 
reported to the poUce or coming directly to their 
attention. (2) The total volume of all types of 
criminal offenses is compiled as they become 
known by police arrests. (3) Since the above are 
also measures of law enforcement activity, re- 
lated data is collected to demonstrate effectiveness 
of enforcement activities, available police strength 
and significant factors involved in crime. 

Reporting Procedure 

Under this national voluntary system each 
contributing law enforcement agency is wholly 
responsible for compiling its own crime reports for 
submission to the FBI. Each contributor is 
supplied with the Uniform Crime Reporting Hand- 



50 



book which outhnes in detail procedures for scoring 
and classifying offenses. The Handbook illustrates 
and discusses the monthly and annual reporting 
forms, as well as the numerous tally sheets made 
available to facilitate the periodic tabulation of the 
desired data. 

The publication of the Uniform Crime Report- 
ing "Newsletter," which was initiated in October 
1963, has continued with issues being published 
when pertinent. This "Newsletter" is utilized to 
explain revisions in the Program as well as to 
present information and instructional material to 
assist contributors. 

Recognizing that a sound records system is 
necessary if crime reporting is to meet desirable 
standards, the FBI furnishes a Manual of Police 
Records to law enforcement agencies upon request. 
Special Agents of the FBI are widely utilized to 
encourage new contributors and to assist them by 
explaining the procedures and definitions necessary 
under this uniform system. 

On a monthly basis, city poUce, sheriffs and 
state police report the number of offenses that 
become known to them in the following crime 
categories: criminal homicide, forcible rape, rob- 
bery, assault, burglary, larceny and auto theft. 
This count is taken from a record of all complaints 
of crimes received by the police from victims or 
other sources or discovered by the police in their 
own operations. Complaints determined by police 
investigation to be unfounded are eUminated from 
this count. The number of "offenses known" in 
these crime categories is reported to the FBI with- 
out regard to whether anyone is arrested, stolen 
property is recovered, local prosecutive policy, or 
any other consideration. Police agencies report on 
a monthly basis the total number of these crimes 
which they clear by arrest and, separately, the 
crimes cleared by the arrest of persons under 18 
years of age. Police additionally report certain 
other analytical data pertaining to specific crime 
categories, including total arrests made for the 
month for all criminal acts separated as to adults 
and juveniles. 

In annual reports, "offenses known" data and 
clearances by arrest are summarized by the 
contributors. Annual forms pi'ovide a report of 
persons arrested for all criminal ofienses with 
respect to age, sex and race of the offender, as 
well as an accounting of the number of persons 
formally charged and their disposition. Police 
employee data are collected annually, including 
the number of police killed and assaulted. 



Reporting Area 

During the calendar year 1969, crime reports 
were received from law enforcement agencies 
representing 98 percent of the total United States 
population Uving in standard metropoUtan statis- 
tical areas, 88 percent of the population in other 
cities, and 75 percent of the rural population. 
The combined coverage accounts for 92 percent of 
the national population. 

Presentation of crime data by areas as used in 
this publication follows as closely as practical the 
definitions used by the Bureaus of the Budget and 
Census for standard metropolitan statistical areas 
and other cities. There is, however, some deviation 
insofar as the rural area is concerned. For crime 
reporting purposes rural is generally the unin- 
corporated portion of a county outside of standard 
metropolitan statistical areas. In addition, sheriffs' 
departments or state police agencies frequently 
pro-vide coverage for small incorporated com- 
munities which do not provide their own police 
service. These places are characteristically more 
rural than urban, thus the crime counts for these 
places are included in the rural tabulations. In 
addition, statistics are presented in certain tables 
relative to "suburban" areas. A suburban area 
consists of cities with 50,000 or less population to- 
gether with counties which are mthin a standard 
metropolitan statistical area. In this use of subur- 
ban the core city experience is, of course, excluded. 
The suburban area concept is used because of 
the particular crime conditions which exist in these 
communities surrounding the major core cities. 
These metropoUtan areas are not rural in nature, 
yet neither are they comparable to large cities al- 
though they have many of the problems identified 
with the latter. 

Standard metropolitan statistical areas are gen- 
erally made up of an entire county or counties 
having at least one core city of 50,000 or more 
inhabitants, with the whole meeting the require- 
ments of certain metropolitan characteristics. 
In New England, "town" instead of "county" is 
used to describe standard metropolitan statistical 
areas. These towns do not coincide generally with 
estabUshed crime reporting units; therefore, metro- 
poUtan state economic areas in New England are 
used in these area tabulations since they encompass 
an entire county or counties. Standard metro- 
poUtan statistical areas make up an estimated 68 
percent of the total United States population. 

Other cities are urban places outside standard 
metropoUtan statistical areas. Most of these 



51 



places of 2,500 or more inhabitants are incor- 
porated and comprise 13 percent of the 1969 
estimated population. Rural areas are made up of 
the unincorporated portions of counties outside of 
urban places and standard metropolitan statistical 
areas and represent 19 percent of our national 
population. Throughout this Program, sheriffs, 
county poUce and many state police report on 
crimes committed within the limits of the counties 
but outside cities, while police report on crimes 
committed within the city limits (urban places). 

Verification Processes 

Uniformity of crime data collected under this 
Program is of primary concern to the FBI as the 
national clearinghouse. With the receipt of reports 
covering approximately 8,500 jurisdictions, pre- 
pared on a voluntary basis, the problems of 
attaining uniformity are readily apparent. Issu- 
ance of instructions does not complete the role of 
the FBI. On the contrary, it is standard operating 
procedure to examine each incoming report not 
only for arithmetical accuracy but also, and 
possibly of even more importance, for reasonable- 
ness as a possible indication of errors. 

Variations in the level and ratios among the 
crime classes established by previous reports of 
each agency are used as a measure of possible 
or probable incompleteness or changes in reporting 
policy. Necessary arithmetical adjustments or 
unusual variations are brought to the attention of 
the submitting agency by correspondence. During 
1969, 21,200 letters were addressed to contributors 
piimarily as a result of verification and evaluation 
processes. Correspondence with contributors is the 
principal tool for supervision of quality. Not only 
are the individual reports studied, but also periodic 
trends for individual reporting units are prepared, 
as are crime rates in descending order for all units 
grouped for general comparability to assist in de- 
tecting variations and fluctuations possibly due to 
some reason other than chance. For the most part, 
the problem is one of keeping the contributors 
informed of the type information necessary to the 
success of this Program. 

The elimination of duplication of crime report- 
ing by the vai'ious agencies is given constant atten- 
tion. In addition to detailed instructions as to 
the limits of reporting jurisdictions between 
sheriffs and police in urban places, lists of urban 
places by county are furnished to sheriffs, county 
poUce and in some instances state police 
organizations. 



Uniform Crime Reporting has been taught to 
all law enforcement officers attending the FBI 
National Academy. The Academy was established 
in 1935 and there are 3,180 graduates who are stiU 
in law enforcement, 28 percent of whom are the 
executive heads of law enforcement agencies. The 
FBI also presents this subject to regional police 
schools throughout the country. 

Contacts by Special Agents of the FBI are 
utilized to enlist the cooperation of new contrib- 
utors and to explain the purpose of this Program 
and the methods of assembling information for 
reporting. When correspondence, including spe- 
cially designed questionnaires fails. Special Agents 
may be directed to visit the contributor to affirma- 
tively resolve the misunderstanding. 

Variations from the desired reporting standards 
which cannot be resolved by the steps indicated 
above are brought to the attention of the Com- 
mittee on Uniform Crime Records of the lACP. 
The Committee may designate a representative 
to make a personal visit to the local department 
to assist in the needed revision of records and 
reporting methods. 

It is clear, of course, that regardless of the extent 
of the statistical verification processes used by the 
FBI, the accuracy of the data assembled under 
this Program depends upon the degree of sincere 
effort exerted by each contributor to meet the 
necessary standards of reporting and, for this 
reason, the FBI is not in a position to vouch for 
the validity of the reports received. 

The Crime Totals 

Communities not represented by crime reports 
are relatively few, as discussed previously and as 
shown by an examination of the tables which 
follow presenting 1969 crime totals for the Index 
of Crime classifications. The FBI conducts a con- 
tinuing program to further reduce the unreported 
areas. 

Within each of the three areas — standard met- 
ropolitan statistical, other urban and rural — it is 
assumed that the unreported portion had the same 
proportionate crime experience as that for which 
reports were received. In lieu of figures for the 
entire year from those agencies, reports for as 
many as 9 months were accepted as sufficiently 
representative on which to base estimates for the 
year. Estimates for unreported areas are based 
on the reported crime experience of similar areas 
within each state. Certain refinements are made of 
this basic estimating procedure as the need arises. 



52 



Crime Trends 

Crime data for trends are homogeneous to the 
extent that figures from identical reporting units 
are used for each of the periods tabulated. In all 
trend tabulations only those reporting units are 
used which have j^rovided comparable data for 
the period under consideration. National, geo- 
graphic and area trends are always established 
on the basis of 2 consecutive years. Exclusions 
from trend computations are made when figures 
from a reporting unit are obviously inaccurate 
for any period or when it is ascertained that 
unusual fluctuations are due to such variables as 
improved records procedures and not to chance. 
As a matter of standard procedure crime trends 
for individual places are analyzed five times a 
year by the FBI. Any significant increase or 
decrease is made the subject of a special inquiry 
with the contributing agency. In 1969 for exam- 
ple, more than 2,100 letters were sent to police 
administrators of contributing agencies inquiring 
as to the reason for significant increases or de- 
creases in pertinent crime classifications. The 
communication containing this inquiry specifically 
directs attention to possible changes in records or 
reporting procedures. When it is found that 
crime reporting procedures are in part responsible 
for the difference in the level of crime, the figures 
for specific crime categories or totals are excluded 
from the trend tabulations. Year-to-year trends 
in Uniform Crime Reports are valid and may be 
used to reasonably establish long-term trends as 
well as to re-estimate crime volume and recon- 
struct crime trends for prior years. It can be 
assumed logically that the current year is the most 
complete in terms of volume. Trend or percent 
change as established by comparable units for 
each 2-year period is then applied as the basis 
for re-estimating the volume of crime for prior 
years. 

On the other hand, crime rate tables by state and 
standard metropolitan statistical area contain the 
most reliable reports available for the current 
year, and care should be exercised in any direct 
comparisons with prior issues. Changes in crime 
level may have been due in part to improved 
reporting or records procedures rather than to 
chance. 

Population Data 

In computing crime rates by state, geographic 
division and the Nation as a whole, population 
estimates released by the Bureau of the Census 



on July 1, 1969 were used. Population estimates 
for individual cities and counties were prepared 
by using Special Census Reports, state sources 
and estimates, commercial sources, and extrapola- 
tion where no other estimate was available. 
Complete 1969 population estimates for indi- 
vidual cities and counties were used from 18 
states while official sources in other states pro- 
vided limited data which was used selectively. 
The estimated United States population increase 
in 1969 was 1 percent over 1968 according to 
figures published by the Bureau of the Census. 

Classification of Offenses 

A stumbling block to a uniform national crime 
reporting system in the United States results from 
variations in definitions of criminal violations 
among the states. This obstacle, insofar as uni- 
formity of definitions is concerned, was removed 
by the adoption of an arbitrary set of crime classi- 
fications. To some extent the title of each classifi- 
cation connotes in a general way its content. 
However, in reading the explanation of each cate- 
gory, it is very important to keep in mind that 
because of the differences among the state codes 
there is no possibility in a system such as this to 
distinguish between crimes by designations such 
as "felony" and "misdemeanor." 

A continuing program is carried out to furnish 
contributors with timely supplemental instruc- 
tions as the need arises in certain classifications. 
These are aimed at the clarification of any mis- 
understandings which may arise and the redirec- 
tion of attention to the proper appUcation of 
classification procedures under this system. 

Brief definitions of crime classifications utilized 
in this Program are listed below: 

1. Criminal homicide.— (a) Murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter: all willful felonious homi- 
cides as distinguished from deaths caused by 
negligence. Excludes attempts to kill, assaults to 
kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or justifiable 
homicides. Justifiable homicides are limited to: 
(1) the killing of a person by a peace officer in 
line of duty; (2) the killing of a person in the act 
of committing a felony by a private citizen. 
(6) Manslaughter by negligence: any death which 
the police investigation estabhshes was primarily 
attributable to gross negligence of some individual 
other than the victim. 

2. Forcible rape. — Rape by force, assault to 
rape and attempted rape. Excludes statutory 

53 



I 



offenses (no force used — victim under age of 
consent) . 

3. Robbery. — Stealing or taking anything of 
value from the person by force or violence or by 
putting in fear, such as strong-arm robbery, 
stickups, armed robbery, assault to rob and 
attempt to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Assault with intent to 
kill or for the purpose of inflicting severe bodily 
injury by shooting, cutting, stabbing, maiming, 
poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids, ex- 
plosives, or other means. Excludes simple assault, 
assault and battery, fighting, etc. 

5. Burglary— breaking or entering. — Burglary, 
housebreaking, safecracking, or any unlawful entry 
to commit a felony or a theft, even though no 
force was used to gain entrance and attempts. 
Burglary followed by larceny is not counted again 
as larceny. 

6. Larceny— theft (except auto theft).— (a) Fifty 
dollars and over in value; (6) under $50 in value. 
Thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, shop- 
lifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property 
or article of value which is not taken by force and 
violence or by fraud. Excludes embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc. 

7. Auto theft. — Stealing or driving away and 
abandoning a motor vehicle. Excludes taking 
for temporary or unauthorized use by those having 
lawful access to the vehicle. 

8. Other assaults. — Assaults and attempted as- 
saults which are not of an aggravated nature. 

9. Arson. — Willful or malicious burning with or 
without intent to defraud. Includes attempts. 

10. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Making, altering, 
uttering or possessing, with intent to defraud, 
anything false which is made to appear true. 
Includes attempts. 

11. Fraud. — Fraudulent conversion and obtain- 
ing money or property by false pretenses. 
Includes bad checks except forgeries and counter- 
feiting. 

12. Embezzlement. — Misappropriation or mis- 
application of money or property entrusted to 
one's care, custody or control. 

13. Stolen property,- buying, receiving, possessing. — 
Buying, receiving, and possessing stolen property 
and attempts. 



14. Vandalism. — Willful or malicious destruc- 
tion, injuiy, disfigurement or defacement of prop- 
erty without consent of the owner or person having 
custody or control. 

15. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — All viola- 
tions of regulations or statutes controlling the 
carrying, using, possessing, furnishing and manu- 
facturing of deadly weapons or silencers and 
attempts. 

16. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Sex of- 
fenses of a commercialized nature and attempts, 
such as prostitution, keeping a bawdy house, 
procuring or transporting women for immoral 
purposes. 

17. Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitu- 
tion, and commercialized vice). — Statutory rape, 
offenses against chastity, common decency, morals 
and the like. Includes attempts. 

18. Narcotic drug laws. — Offenses relating to nar- 
cotic drugs, such as unlawful possession, sale or 
use. Excludes violations limited strictly to Federal 
control. 

19. Gambling. — Promoting, permitting, or en- 
gaging in gambling. 

20. Offenses against the family and children. — 
Nonsupport, neglect, desertion, or abuse of family 
and children. 

21. Driving under the influence. — Driving or op- 
erating any motor vehicle while drunk or under 
the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

22. Liquor laws. — State or local liquor law vio- 
lations, except "drunkenness" (class 23) and 
"driving under the influence" (class 21). Excludes 
Federal violations. 

23. Drunkenness. — Druiikenness or intoxication. 

24. Disorderly conduct. — Breach of the peace. 

25. Vagrancy. — ^Vagabondage, begging, loiter- 
ing, etc. 

26. All other offenses. — All violations of state or 
local laws except classes 1-25. 

27. Suspicion. — Arrests for no specific offense 
and released without formal charges being placed. 

28. Curfew and loitering laws (juveniles). — Offenses 
relating to violation of local curfew or loitering 
ordinances where such laws exist. 

29. Runaway (juveniles). — Limited to juveniles 
taken into protective custody imder provisions of 
local statutes as runaways. 



54 



The Index of Crime, 1969 



In this section, tabulations are shown to indicate 
the probable extent, fluctuation and distribution 
of crime for the United States as a whole, geo- 
graphic divisions, individual states and standard 
metropolitan statistical areas. The measure used 
is a Crime Index consisting of seven important 
offenses which are counted as they become known 
to the law enforcement agencies. Crime classifica- 
tions used in the Index are: murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, 
aggravated assault, burglary — breaking or enter- 
ing, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 

The total number of criminal acts that occur is 
unknown, but those that are reported to the police 
provide the first means of a count. Not all crimes 
come readily to the attention of the police; not all 
crimes are of sufficient importance to be significant 
in an index; and not all important crimes occur 
with enough regularity to be meaningful in an 
index. With these considerations in mind, the 
above crimes were selected as a group to furnish 



an abbreviated and convenient measure of the 
crime problem. 

It is important to remember in reviewing the 
tables in this section that the volume of crime in 
a state or standard metropolitan statistical area 
is subject to the factors set forth on page vi. 
Estimates of current permanent population are 
used to construct crime rates. With our highly 
mobile population all communities, metropohtan 
areas and states are affected to a greater or lesser 
degree by the element of transient population. 
This factor is not accounted for in crime rates 
since no reliable estimates by state are available 
nationwide. 

Tables are presented showing the compara- 
tive crime experience by population group of 
suburba,n cities having 50,000 or less inhabitants 
with cities of the same size isolated from suburban 
areas. The effects of being a part of the metro- 
politan fringe can be readily discerned by a review 
of these tables. 



55 



Table 1 .—Index of Crime, United States, 1969 



Area 


Popula- 
tion 1 


Total 
crime 
index 


Violent 2 
crime 


Property s 
crime 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny 

$50 and 

over 


Auto 
theft 




201,921.000 


4.989,747 

2,471.1 


655,061 
324 4 


4,334,686 

2, 146. 7 


14,587 

7.2 


36,470 

18.1 


297,584 

147.4 


306,420 

151.8 


1,949,843 

965.6 


1,512,913 

749.3 


871,930 


Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 


431.8 


SUndard Metropolitan SUtiatical 
Area 


137,785,000 

97. 7% 
100.0% 






















Area actually reporting ^ 


4,212,466 

4, 265, 595 

3,095.8 


569, 110 

573, 964 

416.6 


3,643.356 

3,691,631 

2,679.3 


11,179 

11,318 

8.2 


30, 257 

30, 616 

22.2 


283,210 

284,578 

206.5 


244,464 

247,452 

179.6 


1,615,300 

1,637,148 

1, 188. 2 


1, 235, 785 

1,254,059 

910.2 


792,271 
800,424 


Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 


580.9 




26,260,000 

88.0% 
100.0% 

37,876,000 

74.7% 
100.0% 




Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated total 


354, 178 
398, 936 
1, 519. 2 


32, 774 

37, 998 

144,7 


321, 404 
360, 938 
1,374.5 


956 

1,151 

4.4 


1,811 

2,054 

7.8 


7,211 

8,099 

30.8 


22,796 

26,694 

101.7 


140, 194 

158,023 

601.8 


142, 078 

158, 986 

605.4 


39, 132 
43, 929 


Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. . 


167.3 


Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 


252,231 

325, 216 

858.6 


28,242 

43,099 

113.8 


223, 989 

282, 117 

744.8 


1,401 

2,118 

5.6 


2,748 

3,800 

10.0 


3,628 

4,907 

13.0 


20,565 

32,274 

85.2 


123,683 

154, 672 

408.4 


78,675 
99,868 
263.7 


21,631 

27, 577 


Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. . 


72.8 



' Population is Bureau of the Census provisional estimates as of July 1, 1969. 

■ Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault; property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto 
theft. 

3 The percentage representing area actually reporting will not coincide with the ratio between reported and estimated crime totals since these data represent 
the S lim of the calculations for individual states which have varying populations, portions reporting and crime rates. 



5t 



Table i.— Index of Crime, United States, 1960-69 



Population ■ 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Violent ' 

crime 


Property = 
crime 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny 

$50 and 

over 


Auto 

theft 


Number of offenses : 

iggO — 179 323 175 


2,014.600 
2, 082, 400 
2, 213, 600 
2, 435, 900 
2, 755, 000 

2, 930, 200 

3, 264, 200 
3, 802, 300 

4, 466, 600 
4, 989, 700 

-H47.7 

1,123.4 
1, 138. 2 
1,191.2 
1, 292. 
1, 439. 9 
1,511.9 

1, 666. 6 
1,921.7 
2,234.8 

2, 471. 1 
4-120 


285,200 
286,100 
298, 200 
313, 400 
360. 100 
383.100 
425, 400 
494.600 
588,800 
655, 100 
-f 129. 7 

159.0 
156.4 
160.5 
166.2 
188.2 
197.6 
217.2 
250.0 
294.6 
324.4 
-1-104.0 


1,729,400 
1, 796, 300 

1, 915, 400 
2, 122, 500 

2. 395. 000 

2, 547, 200 
2, 838, 800 

3, 307, 700 
3,877,700 

4, 334, 700 
-1-160. 6 

964.4 
981.8 
1,030 8 
1,125.8 
1,251.7 
1,314.2 
1,449.4 
1,671.7 
1, 940 2 
2, 146. 7 
-1-122. 6 


9,000 
8,630 
8,430 
8,630 
9,250 
9, 850 
10. 920 
12, 090 
13,650 
14, 590 
-1-62.1 

5.0 
4.7 
4.5 
4.5 
4.8 
5.1 
6.6 
6.1 
6.8 
7.2 
-1-44.0 


16, 860 
16,890 

17. 210 
17,310 

21. 020 

22. 970 
26,330 
27,100 
31,060 
36, 470 

-1-116.3 

9.4 

9.2 

9.3 

9.2 

11.0 

11.9 

12.9 

13.7 

15.5 

18.1 

-1-92.6 


107, 390 
106, 210 
110, 390 
115, 980 
129,830 
138,100 
167, 320 
202. 050 
261, 730 
297,580 
+177. 1 

59.9 
58.1 
59.4 
61.5 
67.9 
71.3 
80 3 
102.1 
131.0 
147.4 
-1-146. 1 


152,000 
154,400 
162, 100 
171,600 
200,000 
212, 100 
231,800 
253,300 
282,400 
306,420 
-1-101.6 

84.7 
84.4 
87.3 
91.0 
104.5 
109.5 
118.4 
128.0 
141.3 
151.8 
-1-79.2 


897, 400 

934,200 

978, 200 

1,068,800 

1, 193, 600 

1,261,800 

1, 387, 200 

1, 605, 700 

1, 828, 900 

1,949,800 

-M17.3 

500.5 
510 6 
526.4 
566.9 
623.8 
651.0 
708.3 
811.5 
915.1 
965.6 
-1-92.9 


506,200 

528,600 

573, 100 

648,600 

732,000 

792, 300 

894, 600 

1,047,100 

1,271,100 

1,612,900 

-1-198.9 

282.3 
288.9 
308.4 
344.0 
382.6 
408.8 
456.8 
529.2 
636.0 
749.3 
-1-165. 4 


325,700 


1961 — 182 953,000 -- 


333, 600 


196'' 185 822 000 


364,100 


1963 — 188 531 000 


406,200 


1964 — 191 334.000 - 


469, 300 


1965 — 193,818.000 - 


493, 100 


1966 — 195 857 OOO 


557, 000 


1967 — 197 864,000 . . 


654,900 


1968 — 199,861,000 


777, 800 


1969 — 201 921 000 


871,900 




-1-167. 7 


Bate per 100.000 inhabitants: ' 

1960 _ ._ _ 


181.6 


1961 


182.3 


1962 


196.0 


1963 


214.9 


1964 ._ _ __ 


245.3 


1965 


254.4 


1966 


284.4 


1967 - 


331.0 


1968 


389.1 


1969 


431.8 


Percent change 1960-1969 ^ 


-t-137. 8 







' Population is Bureau of the Census provisional estimates as of July 1, except Apr. 1, 1960, Census. 

2 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto 
theft. 

3 Percent change and crime rates calculated prior to rounding number of offenses. Revised estimates and rates based on changes in reporting practices. 



57 



Table 3. — Index of Crime by Regions, Geographic 

(Number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants; 



Area 



United States Total 3. 

Percent change. . . 

{Northeast 



Percent change. 
New England 



Percent change. 
Connecticut 



Maine 

Massachusetts... 
New Hampshire. 

Rhode Island 

Vermont 



Middle Atlantic. 



Percent change. 
New Jersey 



New York 

Pennsylvania. 

North Central 



Percent change... 
East North CentraJ. 

Percent change.. 
Illinois. 



Indiana 

Michigan.. 

Ohio 

Wisconsin . 



Year 



1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 



1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 



Population 



199.861,000 
201,921,000 



48.314.000 
48.782.000 



11,411,000 
11,512,000 



2, 959, COO 

3, 000, 000 

979, 000 

978,000 

5, 437, 000 

5,467,000 

702,000 

717, 000 

913, 000 

911,000 

422, 000 

439. 000 



36,904,000 
37,271,000 



7, 078, 000 
7, 148, 000 
18, 113, 000 
18,321,000 
11,712,000 
11,803,000 



Total Crime Index 



Number 



4,466.573 

4.989,747 

+11.7 



Rate per 
100,000 



2,234.8 
2.471.1 

+10.6 



1,199,352 
1.261.399 

+5.2 

232,915 

266,977 

+14.6 

61,451 

70,048 

8,727 

10, 129 

129,651 

149,807 

5,668 

7,036 

24,097 

25,448 

3,321 

4,509 



2,482.4 
2.585.8 

+4.2 
2,041.1 
2, 319. 1 
+ 13.6 
2, 076. 7 
2, 334. 9 

891.4 
1,035.7 
2,384.6 
2, 740. 2 

807.4 

981.3 
2, 639. 3 
2, 793. 4 

787.0 
1,027.1 



Violent crime 2 



Number 



588,837 

655,061 

+11.2 



Rate per 
100,000 



294.6 
324.4 
+10.1 



Property crime 2 



Number 



Rate per 
100,000 






3.877.736 

4.334.686 

+11.8 



1,940.2 

2,146.7 
+10.6 



148.821 
161.188 

+8.3 

15, 021 

17,521 

+16.6 

3,825 

4,415 

590 

681 

8,916 

10, 272 

279 

325 

1,264 

1,594 

157 

234 



308.0 
330.4 

+7.3 
131.6 
152.2 
+15.7 
129.3 
147.2 
60.3 
69.6 
164.0 
187.9 
39.7 
45.3 
137.3 
175.0 
37.2 
63.3 



1.050.531 
1.100.211 

+4.7 

217.894 

249, 456 

+14.5 

57, 626 

65,633 

8,137 

9,448 

120, 735 

139, 535 

5,389 

6,711 

22, 843 

23, 854 

3,164 

4,275 



2,174.4 
2.255.4 

+3.7 

1,909.5 

2, 166. 9 

+13.5 

1,947.5 

2,187.8 

831.2 

966.1 

2, 220. 6 

2, 552. 3 

767.7 

936.0 

2, 502. 

2,618.4 

749.8 

973.8 



966,437 
994,422 
+2.9 
172,532 
175, 722 
642, 041 
653, 405 
151,864 
165, 295 



2 


618.8 


2 


668.1 




+ 1.9 


2 


437.6 


2 


458.3 


3 


644.6 


3,566.4 


1 


296.7 


1 


400.4 



133, 800 
143,667 
+7.4 
16,711 
17, 226 
97, 134 
104,398 
19,955 
22,043 



362.6 
385.5 
+6.3 
236.1 
241.0 
536.3 
569.8 
170.4 
186.8 



832,637 
850, 755 
+2. 2 
155,821 
158, 496 
644, 907 
549, 007 
131,909 
143, 252 



2, 266. 2 
2, 282. 6 
+1.2 
2,201.5 
2,217.3 
3,008.4 
2, 996. 6 
1,126.3 
1,213.7 



55,628,000 
56.078.000 



39. 586, 000 
39, 904, 000 



10, 974, 000 
11,047,000 
5, 067, 000 
5,118,000 
8, 740, 000 
8, 766, 000 
10, 691, 000 
10, 740, 000 
4, 213, 000 
4, 233, 000 



1,052,095 
1,217,113 

+15.7 

784,000 

907, 026 

+16.7 

222, 185 

248, 154 

91,438 

99, 241 

235, 792 

279,883 

182, 113 

223,223 

52, 472 

58, 524 



1,891.3 
2,170.4 

+14.8 
1,980.5 
2, 273. 

+14.8 
2, 024. 6 
2, 228. 2 
1, 804. 6 
1, 939. 1 
2, 697. 8 
3, 192. 8 
1,719.5 
2,078.4 
1, 246. 5 
1,382.6 



143,886 
164.486 

+14.3 

115,375 

132, 150 

+14.5 

44,776 

49,543 

9,849 

9,752 

36, 122 

42, 796 

21,228 

26,648 

3,400 

3,411 



258.7 
293.3 

+13.4 
291.6 
331.2 

+13.6 
408.0 
448.5 
194.4 
190.5 
413.3 
488.2 
200.4 
248.1 
80.7 



908.209 
1,052.627 

+16.9 
668. 625 
774, 876 
+15.9 
177,409 
196,611 
81,589 
89, 489 
199, 670 
237, 087 
160, 885 
196, 575 
49, 072 
55, 113 



1,632.6 
1,877.1 

+15.0 
1,689.0 
1,941.8 

+16.0 
1,616.6 
1, 779. 8 
1,610.2 

1, 748. 6 

2, 284. 6 
2, 704. 6 
1,519.1 
1,830.3 
1, 164. 8 
1, 302. 



Murder and nonneg- 
ligent manslaughter 



Number 



13,648 

14,587 
+6.9 



2,341 
2.521 

+7.7 

333 

350 

+6.1 

73 

86 

29 

16 

188 

191 

10 

18 

22 

28 

11 

11 



2,171 

+8.1 

358 

369 

1,181 

1,320 

469 

482 



3,109 
3,427 

+10.2 

2, 421 

2,703 

+11.6 

893 

950 

240 

252 

634 

729 

562 

685 

92 

87 



See footnotes at end of table. 



58 



Divisions and State, 1968-69 

percent charge over 1968] 



Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larceny $60 and over 


Auto theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




31,057 


15.5 


261,728 


131.0 


282,404 


141.3 


1.828.911 


915.1 


1,271,070 


636.0 


777,755 


389.1 


36,470 


18.1 


297,584 


147.4 


306,420 


151.8 


1.949,843 


965.6 


1,512,913 


749.3 


871,930 


431.8 


+17.4 


+16.8 


+ 13.7 


+ 12.5 


+8.5 


+7.4 


+6.6 


+5.5 


+ 19.0 


+ 17.8 


+ 12.1 


+ 11.0 


5,328 


11.0 


83,974 


173.8 


57,178 


118.3 


472,339 


977.6 


341,049 


705.9 


237,143 


490.8 


6,133 


12.6 


91,984 


188.6 


60,550 


124.1 


480,652 


985.3 


362,780 


743.7 


256.779 


526.4 


+15.1 


+ 14.5 


+9.5 


+8.5 


+5.9 


+4.9 


+1.8 


+.8 


+6.4 


+5.4 


+8.3 


+7.3 


906 


7.9 


6,005 


52.6 


7,777 


68.2 


94,823 


831.0 


68,491 


512.6 


64,680 


565.9 


1,015 


8.8 


7,547 


65.6 


8,609 


74.8 


105, 973 


920.5 


73, 332 


637.0 


70, 151 


609.4 


+12.0 


+11.4 


+25.7 


+24.7 


+10 7 


+9.7 


+11.8 


+ 10.8 


+25.4 


+24.3 


+8.6 


+7.7 


238 


8.0 


1,332 


45.0 


2,182 


73.7 


28,538 


964.4 


17, 958 


606.9 


11,130 


376.1 


260 


8.7 


1,696 


56.5 


2,373 


79.1 


29,624 


987.5 


23,175 


772.5 


12,834 


427.8 


66 


6.7 


86 


8.8 


409 


41.8 


4,429 


452.4 


2.454 


250.7 


1,254 


128.1 


5S 


5.9 


111 


11.3 


496 


50.7 


4,995 


510.7 


3,108 


317.8 


1,345 


137.5 


518 


9.5 


4,039 


74.3 


4,171 


76.7 


47, 210 


868.3 


29, 672 


545.7 


43,853 


806.6 


592 


10.8 


4,955 


90 6 


4,534 


82.9 


66,450 


1,032.6 


36, 135 


661.0 


46, 950 


858.8 


19 


2.7 


72 


10.3 


178 


25.4 


2,605 


371.1 


1,792 


256.3 


992 


141.3 


29 


4.0 


75 


10.5 


203 


28.3 


3,322 


463.3 


2,362 


329.4 


1,027 


143.2 


34 


3.7 


450 


49.3 


748 


81.9 


9,948 


1. 089. 6 


5,906 


646.9 


6,989 


765.5 


36 


4.0 


669 


73.4 


861 


94.5 


8,950 


982.4 


7,405 


812.8 


7,499 


823.2 


31 


7.3 


26 


6.2 


89 


21.1 


2,093 


496.0 


709 


168.0 


362 


85.8 


40 


9.1 


41 


9.3 


142 


32.3 


2,632 


599.5 


1,147 


261.3 


496 


113.0 


4,422 


12.0 


77. 969 


211.3 


49, 401 


133.9 


377, 616 


1.023.0 


282, 568 


766.7 


172, 563 


467.6 


5,118 


13.7 


84,437 


226.5 


51, 941 


139.4 


374, 679 


1, 006. 3 


289,448 


776.6 


186, 628 


500.7 


+ 15.7 


+14.2 


+8.3 


+7.2 


+5.1 


+4.1 


-.8 


-1.7 


+2.4 


+1.4 


+8.2 


+7.1 


801 


11.3 


8,747 


123.6 


6,805 


96.1 


71,621 


1,011.9 


47,500 


671.1 


36, 700 


518.5 


914 


12.8 


9,657 


135.1 


6,286 


87 9 


68,123 


953.0 


53, 131 


743.3 


37, 242 


621.0 


2,481 


13.7 


59,483 


328.4 


33, 989 


187 6 


241, 338 


1,332.4 


200,012 


1,104.2 


103, 557 


571.7 


2,849 


15.6 


64,349 


351.2 


35,880 


195.8 


238,990 


1, 304. 5 


196, 069 


1, 070. 2 


113, 948 


622.0 


1,140 


9.7 


9,739 


83.2 


8,607 


73.5 


64,557 


651.2 


35,046 


299.2 


32,306 


276.8 


1,355 


11.6 


10,431 


88.4 


9,775 


82.8 


67, 566 


572.4 


40, 248 


341.0 


35,438 


300.2 


8,517 


15.3 


71,537 


128.6 


60,723 


109.2 


410,993 


738.8 


294,637 


529.7 


202,579 


364.2 


9.660 


17.2 


83,253 


148.5 


68,146 


121.5 


452,664 


807.2 


366,851 


654.2 


233,112 


415.7 


+13.4 


+12.4 


+16.4 


+15.5 


+12.2 


+ 11.3 


+10.1 


+9.3 


+24.5 


+23.5 


+ 15.1 


+14.1 


6,353 


16.0 


58,813 


148.6 


47, 788 


120.7 


297, 756 


752.2 


216, 633 


547.0 


154,336 


389.9 


7,242 


18.1 


68, 981 


172.9 


53,224 


133.4 


330, 774 


828.9 


267, 747 


671.0 


176, 364 


441.9 


+14.0 


+13.1 


+17.3 


+16.4 


+11.4 


+10.5 


+11.1 


+10 2 


+23.7 


+22.7 


+14.3 


+13.3 


1,798 


16.4 


23,209 


211.5 


18, 876 


172.0 


75, 013 


683.6 


63,996 


492.0 


48,400 


441.0 


2,113 


19.1 


26, 153 


236.7 


20, 327 


184.0 


81, 602 


738.7 


62, 593 


666.6 


52, 416 


474.5 


669 


13.2 


4,990 


98.6 


3,950 


78.0 


36, 012 


691.0 


26, 699 


526.9 


19, 878 


392.3 


780 


15.2 


4,667 


91.2 


4,053 


79.2 


38, 935 


760.7 


31, 327 


612. 1 


19, 227 


375.7 


2,315 


26.5 


18, 412 


210 7 


14, 761 


168.9 


96, 667 


1106.0 


65, 812 


753.0 


37, 191 


425.5 


2,399 


27.4 


23,361 


266.5 


16, 307 


186.0 


109,647 


1250. 8 


83,983 


958.1 


43, 467 


495.7 


1,309 


12.4 


10, 808 


102.0 


8,549 


80.7 


69,839 


659.4 


60,776 


479.4 


40,270 


380.2 


1,645 


16.3 


13,604 


126.7 


10, 714 


99.8 


79. 489 


740.1 


65, 310 


608.1 


51, 776 


482.1 


262 


6.2 


1,394 


33.1 


1,652 


39.2 


21, 226 


503.8 


19, 250 


456.9 


8,597 


204.1 


305 


7.2 


1,196 


28.3 


1, 823 


43.1 


21, 101 


498.5 


24, 534 


579.6 


9, 478 


223.9 



397-633 O - 70 - 5 



59 



Table 3. — Index of Crime by Regions, Geographic 

[Number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants; 



Area 


Year 


Population ' 


Total Crime Index 


Violent 


crime 2 


Property crime : 


Murder and nonneg- 
ligent manslaughter 




Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 




1968 
1969 


16,042,000 
16, 174, 000 


268,096 
310,088 
+15.7 
31,282 
35,340 
34,090 
40,956 
68, 147 
74,842 
104, 811 
127,098 
19,369 
20,622 
3,963 
4,602 
6,433 
6,728 


1,671.2 
1,917.2 
+14.7 
1, 138. 4 
1, 270. 8 
1,480.2 

1, 764. 6 
1,869.1 
2, 022 8 

2, 265. 2 
2,732.7 
1,347.9 
1,416 3 

634.1 

748.3 

979.1 

1,020.9 


28,611 

32,336 

+13.4 

1,882 

1,918 

3,463 

3,873 

5,111 

6,253 

16, 216 

18,260 

2,103 

2,302 

173 

220 

663 

510 


177.7 

199.9 

+12. 5 

68.5 

69.0 

150.4 

166 9 

140.2 

142 

328.9 

392.6 

146.3 

158.9 

27.7 

35.8 

85.7 

77.4 


239,584 

277, 762 

+15.9 

29,400 

33, 422 

30,627 

37,083 

63,036 

69,689 

89, 696 

108, 838 

17,266 

18,220 

3,790 

4, 382 

5,870 

6,218 


1,493.5 

1,717.3 

+15.0 

1,069.9 

1, 201. 8 

1,329.9 

1, 597. 7 

1, 728. 9 

1,880.8 

1,936 4 

2,340.1 

1,201.6 

1, 267. 4 

606.4 

712 5 

893.6 

943.6 


688 

724 

+5.2 

48 

39 

86 

81 

81 

69 

408 

485 

33 

36 

7 

1 

25 

13 


4.3 
4.6 
+4.7 
1.7 
1.4 
3.7 
3.5 
2 2 
1.9 
8.8 
10.4 
23 
2.5 
1.1 
.2 
3.8 
2 






1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 


2,748,000 

2,781,000 

2,303,000 

2,321,000 

3, 646, 000 

3, 700, 000 

4,627,000 

4,651,000 

1,437,000 

1,449,000 

626,000 

615, 000 

667,000 

659, 000 


















1968 
1969 


62,424,000 
63,086,000 


1,167,647 
1,316,765 

+12.8 
629, 894 
702, 992 

+11.6 

10, 378 

11, 966 
178, 736 
201, 160 

71. 699 
82, 750 
123, 741 
123, 562 
69, 102 
80,216 
37, 516 
45,541 
74, 747 
81,070 
14, 197 
13, 910 


1,870.5 
2,087.2 

+11.6 
2,094.3 
2,306.1 

+10.1 
1,943.4 
2,216.9 
2,901.6 
3,166.9 
1,660.6 
1,783.0 
3,293.6 
3,281.6 
1,345.7 
1, 541. 1 
1, 393. 6 
1,691.7 
1,626.0 
1,736.3 
786 5 
764.7 


186,662 
205.766 

+10.2 

111,075 

119, 722 

+7.8 

1,056 

1,276 

27,913 

29,411 

9,903 

11,235 

23,405 

24,295 

17,682 

17, 765 

6,832 

6,429 

10,825 

10,643 

1,959 

1,766 


299.0 
326.2 

+9.1 
369.3 
392 7 
+6 3 
197.8 
236 3 
453.1 
462.9 
216.8 
242.1 
623.0 
645.3 
344.3 
341.1 
216.6 
238.8 
236.5 
228.0 
108.5 
97.1 


980.985 

1,110,989 

+13.3 

518,819 
583, 270 

+12.4 
9, 322 

10, 690 
150,823 
171, 749 

61,696 

71,515 
100, 336 

99,257 

61, 420 

62, 461 
31,684 
39, 112 
63,922 
70,427 
12,238 
12,144 


1,571.5 
1,761.1 

+12. 1 
1, 725. 
1,913.4 

+ 10.9 

1, 746. 7 
1,979.6 
2,448.4 

2, 703. 
1,344.7 

1, 540. 9 

2, 670. 6 
2,636.3 
1,001.4 
1, 200. 
1, 177. 
1,452.9 
1, 390. 5 
1,508.4 

678.0 
667.6 


6,423 
6.577 

+2.4 

3,299 

3,217 

-2.6 

41 

39 

731 

720 

636 

551 

350 

350 

498 

656 

366 

336 

383 

276 

99 

102 


10.3 
10.4 

+1.0 
11.0 
10.6 
-3.6 
7.7 
7.2 
11.9 
11.3 
13.9 
11.9 
9.3 
9.3 
9.7 
10.7 
13.6 
12.6 
8.3 
5.9 
5.5 
6.6 




South Atlantic* 


1968 
1969 


30,077,000 
30, 484, 000 




Delaware -- 


1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 


534,000 

540,000 

6, 160, 000 

6,354,000 

4, 588, 000 
4,641,000 
3, 757, 000 
3,766,000 
5, 135, 000 

5, 205, 000 
2,692,000 
2,692,000 
4,597,000 
4,669,000 
1,805,000 
1,819,000 


Florida 










Vireinia 


West Virginia - 




East South Central 


1968 
1969 


13,113,000 
13, 107, 000 


179, 193 

193,239 

+7.8 

51,386 

55,647 

47, 609 

53, 745 

16,664 

17, 476 

63,535 

66,371 

358,560 

420, 624 

+ 17.3 

24,914 

28, 295 

66,644 

73,544 

40, 606 

43,020 

226,496 

276, 665 


1, 366 5 
1, 474. 3 
+7.9 
1,441.0 
1, 576. 
1,474.4 
1,662.9 
711.5 
740.5 
1, 598 
1,665.6 
1,864 2 
2, 157. 1 
+15.7 
1,238.3 
1,418.3 
1, 785. 7 
1,963.8 
1, 608. 7 
1,676.2 
2,064.3 
2,464.2 


25,768 

27, 176 

+6.6 

8,288 

8,842 

6,317 

5,745 

3,3!)7 

3,354 

8,766 

9,235 

49, 819 

68,868 

+18.2 

4,360 

4,390 

11, 742 

13, 492 

4,361 

4,662 

29,356 

36, 334 


196 5 
207.3 
+5-5 
232.4 
260.4 
164.7 
177.8 
145.0 
142.1 
220.5 
231 7 
259.0 
302.0 
+16.6 
216. 7 
220.1 
314.6 
360.3 
173.2 
181. 2 
267.6 
324.8 


153,425 

166,063 

+8.2 

43,097 

46, 805 

42, 292 

48,000 

13,267 

14, 122 

54,769 

57, 136 

308, 741 

361,656 

+ 17.1 

20,654 

23,905 

54, 902 

60, 052 

36, 146 

38,368 

197, 140 

239,331 


1, 170. 
1,267 
+8.3 
1,208.6 
1, 325. 5 
1,309 8 
1,485.1 
566,6 
698 4 
1,377,6 
1,433 8 
1,605,2 
1, 856, 1 
+ 15.6 
1,021.6 
1, 198. 2 
1,471.1 
1,603.5 
1,436.6 
1, 494. 1 
1, 796. 8 
2,139.4 


1,286 

1,395 

+8.5 

421 

485 

288 

336 

232 

192 

345 

382 

1,838 

1,%5 

+6.9 

163 

197 

364 

366 

162 

148 

1,169 

1,264 


9.8 

10.6 

+8.2 

11.8 

13.7 

8.9 

10.4 

9.9 

8.1 

'8.7 

9.6 

9.6 

10.1 

+5.2 

8.1 

9.9 

9.6 

9.6 

6.4 

5.8 

10.6 

11.3 






1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 


3, 666, 000 
3,631,000 
3, 229, 000 
3, 232, 000 
2, 342, 000 

2, 360, 000 

3, 976, 000 
3, 986, 000 

19,234,000 
19, 496, 000 


Kentucky 




Tennessee 


West South Central 


Percent change 


Arkansas 


1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 


2, 012, 000 

1, 995, 000 

3, 732, 000 
3, 745, 000 

2, 518, 000 
2, 668, 000 

10,972,000 
11,187,000 




Oklahoma - 


Texas 





See footnotes at end of table. 



60 



Divisions and State, 1968-69 — Continued 

percent change over 19681 



Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larceny $50 and over 


Auto theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


2,164 


13.5 


12, 724 


79.3 


12,936 


80.6 


113, 237 


705! 9 


78,104 


486.9 


48,243 


300.7 


2,418 


14.9 


14,272 


88.2 


14, 922 


92.3 


121, 890 


753.6 


99, 104 


612.7 


66,768 


360.9 


+11.7 


+10.4 


+12.2 


+11.2 


+15.4 


+14.5 


+7.6 


+6.8 


+26.9 


+26.8 


+17.7 


+16.7 


186 


6.8 


686 


25.0 


962 


35.0 


13,027 


474.1 


11,860 


431.2 


4,623 


164.6 


178 


6.4 


622 


Z2.i 


1,079 


38.8 


13, 603 


489.1 


14,882 


535.1 


4,937 


177.5 


305 


13.2 


1,095 


47.5 


1,977 


86.8 


lil78 


615.6 


11,716 


608.7 


4,733 


205.6 


350 


15.1 


1,271 


54.8 


2,171 


93.5 


16,091 


693.3 


15, 701 


676.6 


6,291 


228.0 


398 


10. g 


2,959 


81.2 


1,673 


45.9 


29,232 


801.8 


21,003 


576.1 


12, 801 


351.1 


424 


11.5 


3,016 


81.5 


1,744 


47.1 


28,836 


779.4 


26,533 


717.1 


14,220 


384.3 


1,076 


23.3 


7,108 


153.6 


6,624 


143.2 


45,188 


976.6 


23,761 


613.3 


20,656 


446.4 


1,270 


27.3 


8,483 


182.4 


8,022 


172.6 


52, 037 


1118.8 


29,896 


642.8 


26,906 


578.5 


103 


7.2 


713 


49.6 


1,254 


87.3 


7,292 


507.4 


5,628 


391.6 


4,346 


302.4 


98 


6.8 


751 


61.8 


1,417 


97.8 


6,989 


482.3 


7,109 


490.6 


4,122 


284.6 


29 


4.6 


36 


6.8 


101 


16.2 


1,494 


239.0 


1,792 


286.7 


504 


80.6 


25 


4.1 


44 


7.2 


150 


24.4 


1,633 


249.3 


2,264 


368.1 


585 


96.1 


67 


10.2 


127 


19.3 


344 


52.4 


2,826 


430.1 


2,364 


359.8 


680 


103.6 


73 


11. 1 


85 


12.9 


339 


51.4 


2,801 


425.0 


2,719 


412.6 


698 


105.9 


9.058 


14.5 


58,975 


94.5 


112,206 


179.7 


494.326 


791.9 


314,737 


504.2 


171,922 


275.4 


10,749 


17.0 


70,764 


112.2 


117,676 


186.5 


528.284 


837.4 


388,714 


616.2 


193,991 


307.5 


+18.7 


+17.2 


+20.0 


+18.7 


+4.9 


+3.8 


+6.9 


+5.7 


+23.5 


+22. 2 


+12.8 


+11.7 


4,743 


15.8 


38, no 


126.7 


64,923 


216.9 


264. 119 


878.1 


162,932 


541.7 


91,768 


305.1 


5,44S 


17.9 


44,941 


147.4 


66,116 


216.9 


274, 114 


899.2 


207,759 


681.5 


101,397 


332.6 


+14.9 


+13.3 


+17.9 


+16.3 


+1.8 


+.6 


+3.8 


+2.4 


+27.5 


+26.8 


+10.5 


+9.0 


68 


12.7 


543 


101.7 


404 


75.7 


4,381 


820.4 


2,756 


516.1 


2,185 


409.2 


67 


12.4 


614 


113.7 


566 


103.0 


4,391 


813.1 


3,824 


708.1 


2,476 


468.3 


1,113 


18.1 


9,849 


159.9 


16,220 


263.3 


81,743 


1327. 


49, 374 


801.6 


19. 706 


319.9 


1,347 


21.2 


10,345 


162.8 


16,999 


267.5 


86,308 


1368.3 


61,110 


961.8 


24.331 


382.9 


619 


13.5 


2,181 


47.5 


6,467 


141.0 


30,317 


660.8 


20,633 


447.5 


10,846 


236.4 


794 


17.1 


2,895 


62.4 


6,996 


150.7 


32, 565 


701.5 


26,288 


566.4 


12. 672 


273.0 


978 


26.0 


10,355 


275.6 


11,722 


312.0 


48,886 


1301. 2 


28,721 


754. 6 


22.729 


606.0 


1,125 


29.9 


11,086 


294.4 


11,734 


311.7 


41,970 


1114.7 


34,976 


929.0 


22,311 


692.6 


563 


11.0 


1,814 


35.3 


14,807 


288.4 


26,646 


499.4 


18.709 


364.3 


7,066 


137.6 


602 


11.6 


2,111 


40.6 


14,486 


278.3 


29,429 


565.4 


25,256 


485.2 


7,776 


149.4 


384 


14.3 


1,151 


42.8 


3,931 


146.0 


16,949 


629.6 


9,993 


371.2 


4,742 


176.2 


360 


13.4 


1,345 


50.0 


4,388 


163.0 


19, 293 


716.7 


13,667 


507.7 


6,152 


228.5 


645 


14.0 


2,917 


63.5 


6,880 


149.7 


31,845 


692.7 


20,653 


449.3 


11,424 


248.6 


690 


14.8 


3,645 


78.1 


6,032 


129.2 


31,266 


669.7 


26, 272 


562.7 


12,889 


276.1 


79 


4.4 


460 


25.5 


1,321 


73.2 


6,313 


349.8 


4,265 


236.3 


1,660 


92.0 


93 


5.1 


347 


19.1 


1,224 


67.3 


6,870 


322.7 


4,720 


259.6 


1,654 


86.4 


1,365 


10.4 


6,543 


49.9 


16, 574 


126. 4 


74,857 


570.9 


49,436 


377.0 


29,132 


222.2 


1,584 


12.1 


7,025 


63.6 


17, 172 


131.0 


77, 628 


591.6 


58,366 


445.3 


30, 169 


230.2 


+16.0 


+16.3 


+7.4 


+7.4 


+3.6 


+3.6 


+3.6 


+3.6 


+18.1 


+18.1 


+3.6 


+3.6 


396 


11.1 


1,462 


41.0 


6,009 


168.5 


22, 021 


617.5 


14, 990 


420.4 


6,086 


170.7 


494 


14.0 


1,448 


41.0 


6,415 


181.7 


23,158 


656.8 


17,602 


498.5 


6,046 


171.2 


330 


10.2 


1,941 


60.1 


2,758 


85.4 


16, 872 


622.5 


14,694 


455.1 


10,726 


332.2 


370 


11.4 


2,236 


69.2 


2,803 


86.7 


18,399 


569.3 


18,422 


570.0 


11.179 


345.9 


179 


7.6 


310 


13.2 


2,676 


114.3 


7,348 


313.7 


4,232 


180.7 


1,687 


72.0 


215 


9.1 


345 


14.6 


2,602 


110.3 


7,479 


316. 9 


4,921 


208.6 


1,722 


73.0 


460 


11.6 


2,830 


71.2 


6,131 


129.0 


28,616 


719.7 


16. 620 


390.3 


10,633 


267.4 


605 


12.7 


2,996 


75.2 


5,352 


134.3 


28, 492 


716.0 


17. 421 


437.2 


11,223 


281.6 


2,950 


15.3 


14,322 


74.5 


30,709 


159.7 


155, 350 


807.7 


102, 369 


632.2 


51, 022 


265.3 


3,717 


19.1 


18,798 


96.4 


34,388 


176.4 


176, 642 


906.1 


122, 589 


628.8 


62,425 


320.2 


+26.0 


+24.8 


+31.3 


+29.4 


+12.0 


+10.5 


+13.7 


+12.2 


+19.8 


+18.2 


+22.3 


+20.7 


349 


17.3 


796 


39.6 


3,052 


151.7 


10,341 


514.0 


8,317 


413.4 


1,896 


94.2 


347 


17.4 


885 


44.4 


2,961 


148.4 


11,717 


587.3 


10,168 


609.7 


2,020 


101.3 


613 


16.4 


3,369 


90.3 


7,406 


198.4 


25, 303 


678.0 


19, 052 


510.5 


10,647 


282.6 


829 


22.1 


3,843 


102.6 


8,464 


226.0 


26. 013 


694.6 


21, 899 


584. 8 


12, 140 


324.2 


383 


15.2 


1,221 


48.5 


2,696 


103.1 


17,368 


689 8 


13, 434 


533 6 


5,343 


212.2 


366 


14.3 


1,248 


43.6 


2,890 


112.5 


17,657 


687.6 


14,514 


666 2 


6,197 


241.3 


1,605 


14.6 


8,936 


81.4 


17,656 


160 9 


102,338 


932.7 


61, 566 


561.1 


33,236 


302.9 


2,175 


19.4 


12,822 


114.6 


20,073 


179.4 


121, 255 


1,083.9 


76,008 


679.4 


42,068 


376.0 



61 



Table 3. — Index of Crime by Regions, Geographic 

[Number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants; 



Area 


Year 


Population • 


Total Crime Index 


Violent 


crimed 


Property 


crime 2 


Murder and nonneg- 
ligent manslaughter 




Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


West -- - 


IMS 
1969 


33,494,000 
33, 974, 000 


1, 047, 479 

1,194,480 

+14.0 

174, 041 

209, 348 

+20.3 

46, 568 

62, 233 

49, 179 

63,632 

8,092 
10,874 

9,726 
10,330 
13,684 
16,221 
23, 774 
28, 562 
18, 779 
22, 762 

4,240 

4,834 


3, 127. 4 

3,515.9 

+12.4 

2, 193. 6 

2, 610. 
+19.0 

2,788.5 

3, 085. 2 
2, 401. 3 
3, 026. 3 
1,147.8 
1,614.5 
1,403.3 
1,488.5 
3,020.8 
3, 549. 5 
2,342.3 
2,873.4 
1,816.2 
2, 178. 2 
1,346.0 
1,510.6 


109,468 

123, 621 

+12.9 

16, 102 

19,666 

+22.1 

4,402 

6,742 

5,387 

6,275 

518 

806 

610 

682 

1,261 

1,642 

2,445 

2,772 

1,201 

1,460 

278 

286 


326.8 

363.9 

+ 11.4 

202.9 

245.2 

+20.8 

263.6 

339.2 

263.0 

298.8 

73.6 

112.3 

88.0 

98.3 

278.4 

369.3 

240.9 

278.9 

116.2 

139.7 

88.3 

89.4 


938, Oil 

1, 070, 859 

+14.2 

157, 939 

189,683 

+20.1 

42, 166 

46, 491 

43, 792 

57, 257 

7,574 

10,068 

9,116 

9,648 

12,423 

14, 679 

21,329 

26. 790 

17, 678 

21, 302 

3,962 

4,548 


2,800.5 

3, 152. 

+12.6 

1, 990. 7 
2,364.8 

+18.8 

2, 524. 9 
2, 746. 1 
2, 138. 3 
2, 726. 5 
1,074.3 
1,402.2 
1,315.3 

1, 390. 2 

2. 742. 4 
3, 190. 2 
2,101.4 
2, 694. 6 

1, 700. 

2, 038. 5 
1. 257. 8 
1.421.3 


1,775 

2,062 

+16.2 

392 

414 

+5.6 

105 

102 

110 

112 

16 

14 

23 

25 

25 

41 

63 

61 

30 

26 

20 

33 


6.3 
6.1 
+15.1 
4.9 
5.2 
+6.1 
6.3 
6.0 
5.4 
5.3 
2.3 
1.9 
3.3 
3.6 
5.5 
9.0 
6.2 
6.1 
2.9 
2.5 
6.3 
10.3 


Percent chance 




1968 
1969 


7, 934, 000 

8, 021, 000 




Arizona 


1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 


1, 670, 000 

1, 693, 000 

2, 048, 000 
2, 100, 000 

705, 000 
718, 000 

693, 000 

694, 000 
453, 000 
457, 000 

1,015,000 

994, 000 

1,034,000 

1, 045, 000 

316, 000 

320,000 




Idaho 


Montana 




New Mexico 


Utah - -. 


Wyoming 






1968 
1969 


25, 560. 000 
25,963,000 


873,438 

985, 132 

+12.8 

6,049 

7,462 

723, 445 

799, 202 

21,401 

23, 094 

44, 801 

53,877 

77, 742 

101, 507 


3, 417. 2 

3, 795. 8 

+11.1 

2, 183. 8 

2, 642. 6 

3, 763. 8 
4, 110. 6 
2, 750. 8 
2, 908. 6 
2, 231. 1 
2, 651. 4 
2, 373. 1 
2, 983. 7 


93, 366 

103, 956 

+11.3 

486 

624 

81, 293 

89,878 

662 

684 

3,955 

4,527 

6,970 

8,243 


365.3 
400.6 
+9.7 
176.5 
221.3 
422.9 
462. 3 
85.1 
86.1 
197.0 
222.8 
212.8 
242.3 


780, 072 

881, 176 

+13.0 

5,563 

6,828 

642, 162 

709,324 

20, 739 

22, €10 

40, 846 

49, 360 

70, 772 

93,264 


3. 051. 9 

3, 395. 3 

+ 11.3 

2, 008. 3 
2,421.3 
3, 340. 9 

3, 648. 2 
2, 666. 7 
2, 822. 4 
2, 034. 2 
2, 428. 6 
2, 160. 3 
2, 741. 4 


1.383 

1,648 

+19.2 

29 

30 

1,160 

1,386 

22 

27 

64 

81 

118 

124 


6.4 
6.3 
+16.7 
10.5 
10.6 
6.0 
7.1 
2.8 
3.4 
3.2 
4.0 
3.6 
3.6 




Alaska 


1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 
1968 
1969 


277,000 
282, 000 
19, 221, 000 
19, 443, 000 
778, 000 
794, 000 

2, 008, 000 
2,032,000 

3, 276, 000 
3, 402, 000 




Hawaii 


Oregon 







' Population for each State for 1968 and 1969 is Bureau of the Census provisional estimate as of July 1, and subject to change. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto 
theft. 

3 Offense totals based on all reporting agencies and estimates for unreported areas. 
' Includes the District of Columbia. 



62 



Divisions and Stafe, 1968-69 — Continued 

percent change over 1968] 



Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larceny $50 and over 


Auto theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


8,154 


24.3 


47,242 


141.0 


52, 297 


156.1 


451,253 


1,347.3 


320, 647 


957.3 


166,111 


495.9 


9,928 


29.2 


51,583 


161.8 


60,048 


176.7 


488,243 


1,437.1 


394,568 


1,161.4 


188,048 


553.5 


+21.8 


+20.2 


+9.2 


+7.7 


+14.8 


+ 13.2 


+8.2 


+6.7 


+23.1 


+21.3 


+13.2 


+ 11.6 


1,387 


17.5 


5,170 


66.2 


9,153 


115.4 


70, 115 


883.7 


61,594 


776.3 


26.230 


330.6 


1,664 


20.7 


6,267 


78.1 


11,320 


141.1 


82, 578 


1,029.5 


76,346 


961.8 


30,760 


383.5 


+20.0 


+18.3 


+21.2 


+19.8 


+23.7 


+22.3 


+17.8 


+16.5 


+23.9 


+22.6 


+17.3 


+ 16.0 


313 


18.7 


1,448 


86.7 


2,636 


161.9 


19,496 


1.167.4 


16,636 


936.3 


7,034 


421.2 


390 


23.0 


1,692 


99.9 


3,558 


210.2 


22,053 


1,302.6 


17,012 


1,004.8 


7,426 


438.6 


535 


26.1 


1,977 


96.5 


2,765 


135.0 


18,780 


917.0 


16,398 


800.7 


8,614 


420.6 


605 


28.8 


2,324 


110.7 


3,234 


164.0 


23,798 


1,133.2 


22,812 


1,086.3 


10,647 


507.0 


59 


8.4 


83 


11.8 


360 


51.1 


3,318 


470.6 


3,423 


485.5 


833 


118.2 


72 


10.0 


120 


16.7 


600 


83.6 


4,236 


690.0 


4,888 


680.8 


944 


131.5 


50 


7.2 


126 


18.2 


411 


59.3 


3,935 


567.8 


3,805 


549.1 


1,375 


198.4 


n 


11.1 


154 


22.2 


426 


61.4 


3,899 


561.8 


4,251 


612.5 


1,498 


216.9 


79 


17.4 


647 


142.8 


510 


112.6 


5,808 


1,282.1 


4,578 


1,010.6 


2,037 


449.7 


94 


20.6 


781 


170.9 


726 


168.9 


6,245 


1,366.5 


6,774 


1,263.5 


2,560 


560.2 


208 


20.5 


602 


49.5 


1,672 


164.7 


9,3% 


925.7 


8,666 


853.8 


3,267 


321.9 


242 


24.3 


633 


63.7 


1,836 


184.7 


11,672 


1,174.2 


10,111 


1,017.2 


4,007 


403.1 


115 


11.1 


348 


33.7 


708 


68.5 


7,665 


741.3 


7,274 


703.5 


2,639 


255.2 


147 


14.1 


612 


49.0 


775 


74.2 


8,867 


848.5 


9,324 


892.2 


3,111 


297.7 


28 


8.9 


39 


12.4 


191 


60.6 


1,717 


545.1 


1,814 


576.9 


431 


136.8 


37 


11.6 


51 


15.9 


165 


51.6 


1,808 


565.0 


2.173 


679.1 


567 


177.2 


6,767 


26.5 


42,072 


164.6 


43,144 


168.8 


381, 138 


1,491.2 


269, 053 


1,013.5 


139, 881 


547.3 


8,264 


31.8 


46,316 


174.6 


48,728 


187.8 


405,665 


1,563.1 


318,223 


1,226.2 


157,288 


606.0 


+22.1 


+20.0 


+7.7 


+6.1 


+12.9 


+11.3 


+6.4 


+4.8 


+22.8 


+21.0 


+12.4 


+10.7 


60 


21.7 


146 


52.7 


251 


90.6 


2,070 


747.3 


2,157 


778.7 


1,336 


482.3 


83 


29.4 


190 


67.4 


321 


113.8 


2,455 


870.6 


2,705 


959.2 


1,668 


691.6 


5,744 


29.9 


36, 991 


192.5 


37,408 


194.6 


316, 081 


1,644.6 


206,627 


1,075.0 


119,444 


621.4 


7,053 


36.3 


39, 240 


201.8 


42,199 


217.0 


325, 891 


1,676.1 


261, 490 


1,293.5 


131,943 


678.6 


56 


7.2 


176 


22.6 


408 


52.4 


10, 610 


1,363.8 


6,194 


796.1 


3,935 


506.8 


97 


12.2 


282 


35.5 


278 


35.0 


10,360 


1.304.8 


7,795 


981.7 


4,255 


535.9 


346 


17.2 


1,536 


76.5 


2,009 


100.0 


18,978 


946.1 


16,436 


818.5 


5,433 


270.6 


371 


18.3 


1,760 


86,6 


2,315 


113.9 


22,853 


1,124.7 


20,026 


985.6 


6,471 


318.5 


561 


17.1 


3,223 


98.4 


3,068 


93.7 


33,399 


1,019.5 


27,640 


843.7 


9,733 


297.1 


660 


19.4 


3,844 


113.0 


3,615 


106.3 


44,106 


1,296.5 


36,207 


1,064.3 


12, 951 


380.7 



63 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1969 

[See footnotes at end of table] 



Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


247 


279 


271 


305 


31 


34 


50 


55 


62 


51 


164 


134 


485 


494 


13.7 


14.0 


15 


46 


16 


50 


14 


33 


30 


83 


10.6 


29.4 


82 


324 


82 


324 


10 


31 


10 


32 


10 


33 


10 


34 


102 


390 


6.0 


23.0 


100 


189 


21 


19 


32 


29 


27 


54 


65 


129 


197 


347 


9.9 


17.4 


1,303 


6,755 


1.304 


6,759 


34 


89 


34 


89 


48 


205 


1.386 


7,053 


7.1 


36.3 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



ALABAMA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting _. 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural -.- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

State total... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



ALASKA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 
Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State toUl 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



ARIZONA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural-. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

State tolaL 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



ARKANSAS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities. 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Slate toUl 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



CALIFORNIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. '. - - 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State tola! 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



1,961,000 

9L3% 

100.0% 

615,000 

61. 5% 

100. 0% 

965,000 

37. 9% 

100. 0% 

3.531,000 



None 
98,000 
92.6% 
100.0% 
184,000 
100.0% 
282,000 



1,233,000 
99. 7%, 
100. 0% 
194,000 
97.1% 
100.0% 
267,000 
96. 4% 
100. 0% 
1,693.000 



618,000 
100.0% 
498,000 

65. 4% 
100.0% 
879,000 

41. 7% 
100. 0% 
,995.000 



17, 592. 000 

99.9% 

100. 0% 

815.000 

99. 5% 

100. 0% 

1,036,000 

100. 0% 

19,443,000 



39,405 
41,346 

5,040 
8,197 

2,312 

6,104 

55,647 

1,576.0 



3,862 
4,173 

3,279 

7,452 

2, 642. 6 



44, 554 
44, 663 

4,804 
4,947 

2,629 

2,623 

52,233 

3,085.2 



16, 546 

4,175 
6,385 

2,236 

6,364 

28.295 

1,418.3 



750,600 
751, 260 

23,600 
23,616 

24, 326 
799,202 
4,110.5 



5,142 
5,432 

709 
1,153 

855 
2,257 
8,842 
250.4 



394 
426 

198 

624 

221.3 



4,939 
4,945 

517 
632 

256 

265 

5,742 

339.2 



2,501 

589 
901 

412 

988 

4.390 

220.1 



86,894 
86,947 

1,468 
1,475 

1.456 
89,878 
462.3 



34,263 
35,914 

4,331 

7,044 

1,457 

3,847 

46,805 

1,325.6 



3,468 
3,747 

3,081 

6,828 

2,421.3 



39,615 
39, 718 

4,287 
4,415 

2,273 

2,358 

46,491 

2, 746. 1 



14,045 

3,586 

6,484 

1,824 

4,376 

23,905 

1,198.2 



663, 706 
664, 313 

22,032 
22,141 

22.870 
709.324 
3, 648. 2 



1,115 
1,168 

79 
129 

57 

151 

1,448 

41.0 



143 
155 

35 
190 

67.4 



1,554 
1,555 

107 
110 

26 

27 

1,692 

99.9 



71 
109 

59 

142 

885 

44.4 



38, 487 
38,511 

431 
433 

296 
39.240 

201.8 



3,601 
3,688 

565 
919 

685 
1,808 
6,415 

181.7 



190 
205 

116 

321 

113.8 



2,979 
2,984 

369 

380 

187 

194 

3,558 

210.2 



478 
731 

272 

652 

2,961 

148.4 



40,349 
40,373 

914 

919 

907 
42,199 

217.0 



16,929 
17,820 

2,058 
3,347 

754 

1,991 

23,158 

655.8 



1,104 
1,193 

1,262 
2.455 
870.6 



19, 149 
19, 186 

1,754 
1,806 

1,023 

1,061 

22.053 

1,302.6 



1,785 
2,730 

982 

2,356 

11.717 

587.3 



304,227 
304.492 

9,113 
9,158 

12,241 
325,891 
1,676.1 



12, 465 
13,050 

1,815 
2,952 

606 

1.600 

17.602 

498.5 



1,515 
1,637 

1,068 
2.705 
959.2 



13,781 
13,835 

2,112 
2,175 

966 

1,002 

17,012 

1,004.8 



6,060 

1,538 
2,352 

732 

1,756 

10.168 

509.7 



231.768 
232,012 

10,439 
10, 491 

8,987 
251.490 
1,293.5 



64 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1969 — Continued 



Area 



Population 



Total 

Crime 
Indox 



Violent 
crime 



Property 

crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 
$90 and 



COLORADO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated total --- 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Eural.-- — 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total -- 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



CONNECTICUT 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting... 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural .- 

.\.rea actually reporting 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



DELAWARE 

Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural. 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



FLORIDA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



GEORGIA 

Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural.- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State toUl 

Kate per 100,000 inhabitants 



1,477.000 

95. 0% 

100.0% 

254, 000 

99.1% 

100. 0% 

369, 000 

88. 1% 

100. 0%, 

2,100,000 



2, 572, 000 
97. 7% 
100. 0% 
175,000 
100.0% 
253, 000 
100. 0% 

3,000,000 



378,000 
100.0% 
39,000 
93.2% 
100.0% 
122, 000 
100.0% 
540,000 



4, 357, 000 

98.8% 

100.0% 

956,000 

93. 5% 

100.0% 

1,042,000 

67.8% 

100.0% 

6,354,000 



2, 286, 000 
94.6% 
100.0% 
731,000 
60. 7% 
100.0% 
1, 624, 000 
35.2% 
100.0% 
4,641,000 



53. 184 
54. 702 

4,822 
4,868 

3,492 

3,962 

63.532 

3,025.3 



63,795 
64, 759 

2,535 

2,754 

70,048 

2, 334. 9 



10, 135 

678 
727 

1,104 
11, %6 

2, 215. 9 



156, 018 

157, 720 

19, 386 

20, 730 

15, 401 

22, 710 

201,160 

3, 165. 9 



56,233 
58,584 

6,888 
11,350 

4,505 

12,816 

82,750 

1,783.0 



5,429 
5,489 

363 

366 

370 

420 

6,275 

298.8 



4,075 
4,109 



160 
4,415 

147.2 



1,067 
82 



121 
1,276 
236.3 



23,606 
23,819 

2,255 
2,411 

2,157 
3,181 
29,411 
462.9 



6,202 
6,399 

1,009 
1,663 

1,115 
3,173 
11,235 
242.1 



47, 755 
49,213 

4,459 
4,502 

3,122 
3.542 
57,257 

2, 726. 5 



59, 720 
60,650 

2,389 

2,594 
65,633 

2, 187. 8 



9,068 

596 
639 

983 
10,690 

1, 979. 6 



132,412 
133, 901 

17, 131 
18,319 

13, 244 

19, 529 

171,749 

2, 703. 



50,031 
52, 185 

5,879 
9,687 

3,390 

9,643 

71,515 

1, 540. 9 



11 

12 

112 

5.3 



13 
39 

7.2 



493 

498 

63 

67 

105 

155 

720 

11.3 



335 

342 

56 
92 

41 
117 
551 

11.9 



536 
538 

18 
18 

43 
49 
60S 

28.8 



227 
230 



16 
260 

8.7 



5 
5 

13 
67 

12.4 



992 
1,003 

78 
83 

177 

261 

1,347 

21.2 



493 

516 

34 

56 

78 
222 
794 
17.1 



2,232 
2,243 

42 

42 

34 

39 

2,324 

110.7 



1,619 
1,629 

32 

35 
1,696 
56.5 



574 

13 
14 

26 

614 

113.7 



9,078 
9,149 

613 

656 

366 

640 

10,345 

162.8 



2,334 
2,383 

126 

208 

107 

304 

2.895 

62.4 



2,567 
2,614 

297 
300 

282 

320 

3,234 

154.0 



2,152 
2,173 

97 

103 
2,373 

79.1 



62 
67 

69 

556 

103.0 



13,043 
13, 169 

1,501 
1,605 

1,509 
2,225 
16,999 
267.5 



3,040 
3,158 

793 
1,307 

889 
2,530 
6,995 

150.7 



20,186 
20,427 

1,450 
1,464 

1,681 

1,907 

23,798 

1, 133. 2 



26,384 
26, 795 

1,164 

1,665 
29,624 

987.5 



222 
238 

492 
4,391 

813.1 



64,663 

65,266 

8,894 
9,511 

7,820 

11, 531 

86,308 

1,358.3 



22,962 
23,854 

2,366 
3,899 

1,688 

4,802 

32,555 

701.5 



17,943 
18, 931 

2,618 
2,542 

1,180 

1,339 

22,812 

1,086.3 



21,292 
21, 689 

846 

640 
23,175 

772.5 



3,025 

340 
365 

434 
3,824 

708.1 



47,429 
47,994 

6,623 
7,082 

4,092 

6,034 

61,110 

961.8 



17,839 
18, 735 

2,714 
4,472 

1,083 
3,081 
26,288 

566.4 



9,230 
9,596 

799 
1,316 

619 
1,760 
12,672 

273.0 



65 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1969 — Continued 



Area 



HAWAn 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area_ 
Area actually reporting 

Other cities -- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State toUl 

Eate per 100,000 inhabitants 



IDAHO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting - - 

Other cities. - - 

Area actually reporting.. 

Eural - -- 

Area actually reporting - 

Estimated total - - - 

State tola) 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



ILLINOIS 

Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Other cities. - 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

State loUl - - - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



INDIANA 

Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting- - 

Estimated total 

Eural 

Area actually reporting 

E St iinated total - - - 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



IOWA 

Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural.. 

Area actuaUy reporting 

Estimated total 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



646,000 
100.0% 
62,000 
61.0% 
100.0% 
86,000 
72.9% 
100.0% 
794,000 



102,000 
100.0% 
308,000 
100.0% 
308,000 
83.4% 
100.0% 
718,000 



8, 825, 000 

96. 7% 

100.0% 

980,000 

80. 6% 

100.0% 

1, 241, 000 

63.7% 

100.0% 

11,047,000 



3, 151, 000 

96. 9% 

100.0% 

816,000 

88.1% 

100.0% 

1,151,000 

96.0% 

100.0% 

5,118.000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



968, 000 
98. 6% 

100.0% 

772,000 
89. 67o 

100.0% 

1, 051, 000 

83.0% 

100.0% 
2,781,000 



21, 224 

615 
1,008 

629 

862 

23.094 

2, 908. 6 



2,282 

5, 551 

2,537 

3,041 

10,874 

1,514.5 



220.362 
225, 196 

9,870 
12,257 

5,539 

8,701 

246,154 

2, 228. 2 



76, 691 
78, 389 

11,628 
13, 203 

7,346 

7,649 

99,241 

1, 939. 1 



18, 309 
18,547 

9,084 
10, 137 

5,524 

6,656 

35,340 

1,270.8 



Violent 
crime 



37 

61 

46 

63 

684 

86.1 



172 

411 

186 

223 

806 

112.3 



47, 037 
47, 584 

925 
1,149 

515 

810 

49,543 

448.5 



8,034 
8,153 

918 
1,043 

534 

556 

9,752 

190. 6 



1,144 
1,154 

465 
518 

204 

246 

1,918 

69.0 



Property 
crime 



20,664 

578 
947 

583 

799 

22,410 

2, 822. 4 



2,110 

5,140 

2.351 
2,818 
10.068 

1, 402. 2 



173, 325 
177, 612 

8,945 
11,108 

6,024 

7, 891 

196,611 

1, 779. 8 



68,657 
70, 236 

10, 710 
12, 160 

6,812 

7, 093 

89.489 

1, 748. 6 



17, 165 
17, 393 

8, 619 
9,619 

5, 320 

6,410 

33,422 

1,201.8 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



23 



3 

4 

27 

3.4 



7 
8 
14 

1.9 



895 
906 

16 
20 

15 
24 
950 
8.6 



201 
203 

20 
23 

25 
26 
252 

4.9 



39 
1.4 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



82 



97 
12.2 



28 

24 

29 

72 

10.0 



1,962 
1,997 

46 
56 

38 

60 

2.113 

19.1 



639 

647 



72 

75 

780 

15.2 



113 
113 

29 
32 

27 
33 
178 
6.4 



Robbery 



282 
35.6 



26 

59 

30 
36 
120 

16.7 



25,362 
25,545 

379 
471 

87 

137 

26,153 

236.7 



4,229 
4.278 



258 
293 



92 



4,667 
91.2 



483 
486 

90 
100 

30 
36 
622 

22.4 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



183 

27 
44 

37 

51 

278 

35.0 



130 

320 

126 

160 

600 

83.6 



18, 818 
19, 136 

486 
602 

375 

689 

20,327 

184.0 



2,965 
3,025 

589 
669 

345 

359 

4,053 

79.2 



626 
532 

339 

378 

140 

169 

1,079 

38.8 



Burglary 



9,417 

332 
544 

291 

399 

10.360 

1,304.8 



1,923 

1,146 
1,374 
4,236 
690.0 



70, 791 
72,654 

4,098 
5,089 

2,521 

3,959 

81,602 

738.7 



29,433 
30,061 

4,196 
4,764 

3,947 

4,110 

38,935 

760.7 



6,260 
6,323 

3,492 
3,897 

2,808 
3,383 
13.603 

489.1 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



251 
344 

7,795 
981.7 



980 

2,641 

1,057 
1,267 
4,888 
680.8 



62,589 
54,368 

3,904 
4,848 

2,150 

3,377 

62,593 

666.6 



22,483 
23,150 

6,063 
6,749 

2,332 

2,428 

31.327 

612.1 



7,464 
7,582 

4,116 
4,594 

2,246 
2,706 
14,882 
636.1 



66 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by Sfate, 1969 — Continued 



KANSAS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated total -. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

Stole total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



KENTUCKY 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting , , 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total. 

Slate total.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



LOUISIANA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 
Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rural. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



MAINE 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities. 

Areaactuallyreporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting. 

State total... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



MARYLAND 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting , 

Estimated total. 

Rural.-.- 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



982,000 
99.6% 
100.0% 
635,000 
98. 5% 
100.0% 
704,000 
94.2% 
100.0% 
2,321,000 



1, 197, 000 

96. 5% 

100.0% 

556,000 

75.4% 

100.0% 

1, 479, 000 

93. 8% 

100.0% 

3,232,000 



2, 014, 000 

100.0% 

498,000 

79.9% 

100.0% 

1,233,000 

62.3% 

100.0% 

3.745,000 



276,000 
94.2% 
100.0% 
449,000 
82. 8% 
100.0% 
253,000 
100.0% 
978,000 



3, 157, 000 
99.9% 
100.0% 
157,000 
94.8% 
100.0% 
451,000 
100. 0%, 
3.765,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



25, 827 
25, 920 

9,995 
10, 146 

4,604 
4,890 
40.956 

1,764.6 



38,789 
39,667 

6,044 
8,013 

5,689 

6,065 

53,745 

1, 662. 9 



60, 171 

4,990 
6,245 

4,444 

7,128 

73,544 

1, 963. 8 



3,672 
3,841 

3,053 
3,688 

2,600 
10,129 

1, 035. 7 



117,376 
117,412 

2,303 
2,427 

3,713 
123,552 
3, 281. 6 



Violent 
crime 



2,732 
2,742 

720 
731 

376 

40O 

3,873 

166.9 



3,772 
3,841 



759 
1,005 



843 



5.745 

177.8 



10, 207 

948 
1,186 

1,309 
2,099 
13.492 
360.3 



220 
229 

168 
203 

249 
681 

69.6 



23,686 
23,586 

399 
420 

289 

24,295 

645.3 



Property 
crime 



23.095 
23,178 

9,275 
9,416 

4,228 

4,490 

37,083 

1, 597. 7 



35,017 
35, 826 

5,285 
7,008 

4,846 

5,166 

48,000 

1, 485. 1 



49,964 

4,042 
5,059 

3,135 

5, 029 
60,052 
1, 603. 5 



3,452 
3,612 

2,885 
3,485 

2,351 
9.448 

966.1 



93, 790 
93, 826 

1,904 
2,007 

3.424 
99,257 
2, 636. 3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


58 


218 


68 


219 


13 


65 


13 


66 


9 


61 


10 


65 


81 


350 


3.5 


15.1 


126 


256 


128 


258 


35 


22 


46 


29 


152 


78 


162 


83 


336 


370 


10.4 


11.4 


229 


634 


18 


41 


23 


51 


65 


90 


104 


144 


356 


829 


9.5 


22.1 


5 


14 


5 


14 


4 


15 


6 


18 


6 


26 


16 


58 


1.6 


5.9 


314 


1,068 


314 


1,068 


8 


18 


8 


19 


28 


38 


350 


1,125 


9.3 


29.9 



Robbery 



983 
987 

197 
200 

79 

84 

1,271 

54.8 



1,902 
1,926 

115 

152 

148 

158 

2,236 

69.2 



3,495 

141 
176 

107 

172 

3,843 

102.6 



66 
67 

25 
30 

14 

111 

11.3 



10,903 
10,903 

97 
102 

81 
11,086 
294.4 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,473 
1,478 

445 
452 

227 

241 

2,171 

93.5 



1,488 
1,529 

587 
778 

465 

496 

2,803 

86.7 



5,849 
748 



1,047 
1,679 
8,464 
226.0 



135 
143 

124 
150 

203 
4% 
50.7 



11, 301 
11, 301 

276 
291 

142 
11.734 
311.7 



Burglary 



10,423 
10,464 

3,445 
3,497 

2,006 
2,130 
16,091 

693.3 



12, 205 
12,566 

2,203 
2,921 

2,731 
2,912 
18,399 
569.3 



21,236 

2,015 
2,522 

1,406 

2,255 

26,013 

694.6 



1,704 
1,786 

1,358 
1,640 

1,569 
4. 995 
510.7 



39, 339 
39, 356 

887 
935 

1,679 
41.970 
1,114.7 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



8,682 
8,705 

4,887 
4,901 

1,916 
2,035 
15,701 

676.5 



13,850 
14,138 

2,387 
3,165 

1,050 
1,119 
18,422 
570.0 



17,650 

1,645 
1,934 

1,443 

2,315 

21.899 

684.8 



1,191 
1,250 

1,057 
1,277 

581 
3.108 

317.8 



32,847 
32,860 

740 
780 

1,336 
34,976 
929.0 



67 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1969 — Continued 



Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting.. 

State tola] 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



MISSISSIPPI 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting. - - . 

Estimated total. - 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



MISSOURI 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



5, 328, 000 
93. 8% 
100. 0% 
116, 000 
92. 9% 
100. 0% 
23,000 
100. C% 
5,467,000 



MICHIGAN 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estunated total.. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

MINNESOTA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



6, 783, 000 
99.7% 
100. 0% 
793,000 
94. 3% 
100.0% 
1, 190, OCO 
98. 1% 
100.0% 
8.766.000 



2,016,000 

99. 8% 

100. 0% 

623,000 

95. 6% 

100. 0% 

1,062,000 

96.5% 

100. 0% 

3.700.000 



403,000 
100.0% 
712,000 
81. 5%, 
100. 0% 
1, 246, 000 
29.5% 
100.0% 
2,360,000 



3, 016, 000 

98. 1% 

100. 0%, 

687,000 

84. 6%, 

100. 0% 

1,048,000 

61. 4% 

100. 0% 

4.651.000 



140, 088 
146, 730 

2,642 
2,845 

232 
149,807 

2, 740. 2 



246, 666 
247, 277 

11,805 
12, 520 

19,702 

20,086 

279,883 

3, 192. 8 



60,540 
60,596 

7,160 
7,488 

6,524 

6,768 

74.842 

2, 022. 8 



6,790 
8,335 

1,261 
4,245 
17.476 
740.6 



108, 844 
109,823 

6,749 
7,977 

6,709 

9,298 

127.098 

2, 732. 7 



9,809 
10,116 

112 
121 

35 
10,272 

187.9 



39, 739 
39,804 

1,240 
1,316 

1,645 

1,677 

42,796 

488.2 



4,703 
4,794 

213 
223 

229 

236 

5.253 

142.0 



483 

1,253 
1,538 

393 
1,333 
3.354 
142.1 



16, 474 
16,544 

620 
614 

677 

1,102 

18.260 

392.6 



130, 279 
136, 614 

2,630 
2,724 

197 
139.635 

2, 562. 3 



206, 927 
207, 473 

10,566 
11.206 

18, 057 

18,409 

237.087 

2, 704. 6 



65,748 
55, 802 

6,947 
7,265 

6,295 
6,622 
69.589 



4,413 

5,637 
6, 797 

858 
2,912 
14.122 
698. 4 



92, 370 
93, 279 

6,229 
7,363 

5,032 

8,196 

108,838 

2, 340. 1 



176 
181 



191 

3.5 



664 
664 

24 

25 

39 
40 
729 

8.3 



66 
66 

1 
1 

12 

12 

69 

1.9 



43 

42 
51 

29 
98 
192 

8.1 



415 

417 

18 
21 

29 

47 

485 

10.4 



569 
579 



3 
592 

10.8 



2,052 
2,066 

91 

97 

241 

246 

2.399 

27.4 



366 
365 

18 
19 

39 

40 

424 

11.6 



32 



102 
215 

9.1 



1,161 
1,168 

29 
34 

42 

68 

1,270 

27.3 



4,827 
4,926 



5 
4.955 

90.6 



22,799 
22,823 

336 
366 

179 

182 

23.361 

266.6 



2,921 
2,922 

61 
64 

29 

30 

3.016 

81.6 



127 
166 



345 
14.6 



8,172 
8,190 

147 

174 

73 

119 

8.483 

182.4 



4,247 
4,430 

79 
86 

19 
4,534 

82.9 



14, 224 
14, 261 

789 
837 

1,186 

1,209 

16,307 

186.0 



1,450 
1,451 

133 
139 

149 

164 

1.744 

47.1 



1,018 
1,250 

308 
1,046 
2.602 

110.3 



6,726 
6,769 



326 
386 



8.022 
172.5 



52.006 
54,836 

1,397 
1,604 

111 
56,460 

1, 032. 6 



93,400 
93,609 

5,129 
6,440 

10, 396 
10, 698 
109.647 
1. 250. 8 



22.895 
22, 913 

2,580 
2,698 

3,113 
3,225 
28.836 

779.4 



2,084 

2,963 
3,637 

518 
1.758 
7.479 
316.9 



43,991 
44,410 

2,677 
3,164 

2,740 

4,463 

52.037 

1,118.8 



33, 306 
36,184 

834 



53 
36,135 

661.0 



72, 974 
73,220 

4,132 
4,382 

6,269 

6,381 

83.983 

968.1 



20, 212 
20, 240 

3,388 
3,543 

2.664 

2.750 

26.633 

717.1 



1,676 

2,005 
2,461 

231 

784 

4,921 

208.5 



22,800 
23,147 

2,915 
3,446 

2,028 
3,303 
29.896 

642.8 



68 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by Sfate, 1969 — Continued 



Area 



MONTANA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting — 

Estimated total 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total- 

Slate total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEBRASKA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Other cities -- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total- 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEVADA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting- -- 

Estimated total 

Other cities -- 

Area actually reportmg 

Rural --- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

State loUl - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting -.. 

Estimated total -. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total - - -- 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEW JERSEY 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



166,000 
100.0% 
239,000 

92. 6% 
100. 0% 
289,000 

89. 6% 
100. 0% 
694,000 



620, 000 

99. 5% 

100.0% 

325,000 

91. 6% 

100.0% 

504,000 

72. 5% 

100. 0% 

1.449,000 



405,000 
94.2% 

100. 0% 
28,000 

100. 0% 
25,000 
83.7% 

lOfl. 0% 

457,000 



217,000 
95. 2% 
100. 0% 
319, 000 
80.3% 
100. 0% 
182,000 
100. 0% 
717.000 



5, 586, 000 
100. 0% 

1,422,000 
100.0% 
139,000 
100. 0% 

7,148,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



3,117 
3,369 

2,682 

2,995 

10.330 

1, 488. 5 



14, 707 
14, 724 

2,908 
3,176 

1,903 

2,623 

20,522 

1, 416. 3 



13,338 
14, 619 

674 

777 

928 

16.221 

3, 549. 5 



2,076 
2,171 

2,973 
3,704 

1,161 
7.036 
981.3 



143, 592 

29,383 

2,747 
175.722 
2, 458. 3 



Violent 
crime 



106 
115 

277 
310 
682 
98.3 



2,013 
2, 013 

135 
148 

103 

141 

2.302 

158.9 



1,338 
1,451 

58 

111 

133 

1,642 

359.3 



95 
100 

126 
157 

68 

325 

45.3 



15, 105 

1.967 

154 
17,226 
241.0 



Property 
crime 



3,709 

3,011 
3,254 

2,405 

2,685 

9.648 

1, 390. 2 



12, 694 
12,711 

2,773 
3,027 

1,800 

2,482 

18,220 

1, 257. 4 



12,000 
13,168 

616 

666 

795 

14,579 

3, 190. 2 



1,981 
2.071 

2,847 
3,547 

1,093 
6,711 

936.0 



128,487 

27,416 

2.593 
158,496 
2.217.3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


4 


29 


3 


20 


3 


22 


16 


23 


18 


26 


25 


77 


3.6 


U. 1 


35 


78 


35 


78 




7 
8 

9 




1 


1 


12 


36 


98 


2.6 


6.8 


32 


81 


34 


88 


5 


2 


2 


3 


2 


4 


41 


94 


9.0 


20.6 


1 


10 


1 


10 


3 


6 


4 


7 


13 


12 


18 


29 


2.5 


4.0 


325 


751 


34 


140 


10 


23 


369 


914 


6.2 


12.8 



Robbery 



36 
39 

33 
37 
154 

22.2 



710 
710 

24 

26 

11 

15 

751 

51.8 



709 
763 



10 

781 

170.9 



32 
33 

25 
31 

11 

75 

10.5 



8,643 

953 

61 
9.657 
135.1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



146 

47 
61 

205 
229 
426 
61.4 



1,190 
1,190 

104 
114 

82 

113 

1.417 

97.8 



616 

566 



117 

726 

158.9 



62 
56 

92 
115 

32 
203 
28.3 



5,386 

840 

60 
6.286 

87.9 



Burglary 



1,006 
1,087 

1,161 
1,296 
3,899 

561.8 



4,665 
4,673 

1,062 
1,169 

839 
1,167 
6.989 
482.3 



5,265 
5,737 

220 

241 

288 

6.245 

1,366.5 



995 
1,036 

1,248 
1,555 

731 
3.322 
463.3 



54,787 

11,724 

1,612 
68.123 
953.0 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



1,477 
1,596 

970 
1,083 
4,251 

612.5 



4,408 
4,416 

1,428 
1,569 

823 
1,135 
7.109 
490.6 



4,560 
6,047 

319 

342 

408 

5,774 

1, 263. 6 



664 
590 

1,237 
1,541 

231 
2,362 
329.4 



40,903 

11,514 

714 

53,131 

743.3 



69 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by Sfate, 1969 — Continued 



Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


16 


126 


26 


69 


26 


60 


19 


55 


19 


66 


61 


242 


6.1 


24.3 


1,260 


2,690 


1,262 


2,695 


20 


47 


21 


50 


37 


104 


1,320 


2,849 


7.2 


15.6 


250 


253 


261 


264 


103 


85 


123 


102 


90 


124 


172 


236 


556 


602 


10.7 


11.6 




5 
10 

9 




1 


1 


10 


1 


25 


0.2 


4.1 


635 


1,464 


641 


1,490 


20 


67 


23 


78 


16 


59 


21 


77 


685 


1.645 


6.4 


15.3 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 
$50 and 



NEW MEXICO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities... 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. _ 



NEW YORK 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total. 

O ther cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total.... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

SUtetoUl 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



OHIO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total. 

Rural. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



316, 000 
100. 0% 
477, 000 

98. 9% 
100. 0% 
201,000 

98. 0% 
100. 0% 
994,000 



15,880,000 

99. 4% 

100. 0% 

989, 000 

94.8% 

100.0% 

1,453,000 

100. 0% 

18,321.000 



1,890,000 

94.3% 

100. 0% 

959, 000 

83. 6% 

100. 0% 

2, 356, 000 

52. 4% 

100. 0% 

5,205,000 



68,000 
100. 0% 
209, 000 
100. 0% 
338, 000 

87. 1% 
100.0% 
615,000 



8,314,000 

95. 9% 

100. 0% 

1,072,000 

85.9% 

100. 0% 

1,363,000 

76.8%, 

100. 0% 

10,740,000 



9,902 

2,764 

2,822 

28,562 

2,873.4 



623, 730 
625,331 

12, 163 
12, 823 

15,251 
653,405 

3, 566. 4 



43,065 
44,661 

14, 176 
16, 966 

9,743 
18, 589 
80.216 
1,541.1 



2,432 

1,143 
1,312 
4,602 
748.3 



195, 054 
199,127 

12, 013 
13,978 

7,771 

10,118 

223.223 

2, 078. 4 



797 
806 

353 

360 
2,772 

278.9 



102,208 
102, 325 

1,184 
1,249 

824 
104.398 

569.8 



8,411 
8,677 

2,996 
3,586 

2,879 

5,492 

17.755 

341.1 



42 

61 

102 

117 

220 

35.8 



24,373 
24,712 

990 
1,152 

602 

784 

26.648 

248.1 



8,995 
9,096 

2,411 

2,462 

25.790 

2, 594. 6 



521, 522 
523, 006 

10, 978 
11,674 

14,427 
549.007 
2, 996. 6 



34, 654 
35, 984 

11,180 
13, 380 

6,864 
13,097 
62,461 
1,200.0 



816 

2,371 

1,041 
1,195 
4,382 
712.5 



170,681 
174,415 

11,023 
12, 826 

7,169 

9,334 

196.575 

1,830.3 



449 

141 
143 

40 

41 

633 

63.7 



63,870 
63,921 

286 
302 

126 
64.349 

351.2 



1,419 
1,456 

270 
323 

174 

332 

2.111 

40.6 



12 
14 
44 

7.2 



13,194 
13,297 

212 
247 

46 

60 

13.604 

126.7 



571 
577 

239 

244 

1.836 

184.7 



34,388 
34, 447 

831 
876 

557 

35,880 

195.8 



6,489 
6,696 

2,538 
3,038 

2,491 

4,752 

14,486 

278.3 



24 

34 

80 
92 
150 

24.4 



9,080 
9,284 

691 
804 

481 

626 

10,714 



3,918 
3,962 

815 

832 

11,672 

1, 174. 2 



223, 677 
224, 229 

5,104 
5,381 

9,380 
238,990 

1,304.5 



16, 146 
16,812 

4,585 
5,487 

3,737 

7,130 

29,429 

565.4 



263 

596 

687 

674 

1.533 

249.3 



66,347 
67,942 

5,269 
6,131 

4.160 
5,416 
79.489 
740.1 



5,169 

4,174 
4,221 

706 

721 

10.111 

1,017.2 



186,947 
187,619 

4,531 

4,777 

3,673 
196,069 

1,070.; 



14,259 
14,784 

5,016 
6,003 

2,342 
4,469 
25.256 

485.2 



425 

1,425 

361 

414 

2.264 

368.1 



55,620 
57, 095 

4,237 
4,930 

2,623 
3,285 
65.310 
608.1 



70 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1969 — Continued 



OKLAHOMA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities. _ 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total.. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



OREGON 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities... 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



RHODE ISLAND 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities. 

Area actually reporting 

Rural. 

Area actually reporting 

Sute total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Sute total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



1,256,000 

99. 2% 

100. 0% 

622, 000 

84.8% 

100.0% 

690,000 

74.2% 

100.0% 

2,568,000 



1,234,000 
99. 9% 
100. 0% 
365, 000 
99.3% 
100.0% 
433,000 
97. 2% 
100. 0% 
2,032,000 



9, 329, 000 

92. 6% 

100.0% 

960,000 

85. 6% 

100. 0% 

1, 514, 000 

100. 0% 

11.803,000 



755,000 
100.0% 
127,000 
100.0% 
29,000 
100. 0% 
911.000 



1, 036, 000 

93. 1% 

100. 0% 

515, 000 

76.7% 

100. 0% 

1,141,000 

54.8% 

100.0% 

2.692,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



30, 368 
30,513 

6,581 
7,759 

3,523 
4,748 
43.020 

1,675.2 



41,915 
41,918 

6,800 
6,846 

4,967 

5,113 

53.877 

2, 651. 4 



136, 436 
144, 817 

7,656 
8,942 

11,636 
165,295 

1,400.4 



21,918 

3,354 

176 
25.448 

2, 793. 4 



25, 035 
26,322 

7,265 
9,470 

5,338 

9,749 

45.541 

1,691.7 



Violent 
crime 



3,429 
3,439 

500 
590 

462 

623 

4.652 

181.2 



3,585 
3,585 

450 
452 

476 

490 

4.527 

222.8 



20,040 
20,716 

534 
623 

704 
22.043 

186.8 



1,355 

221 

18 
1,594 

175.0 



2,956 
3,071 

1,004 
1,309 

1,122 
2,049 
6.429 
238.8 



Property 
crime 



26. 939 
27, 074 

6,081 
7,169 

3,061 
4,125 
38,368 

1, 494. 1 



38,330 
38,333 

6,350 
6,394 

4,491 
4,623 
49,350 

2,428.6 



116, 396 
124, 101 

7,122 
8,319 

10,832 
143.252 

1, 213. 7 



20,563 

3,133 

158 
23,854 
2, 618. 4 



22,079 
23,251 

6,261 
8,161 

4,216 

7,700 

39.112 

1, 452. 9 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



39 
148 

5.8 



53 
53 

9 
9 

18 
19 
81 

4.0 



447 
456 



18 
482 
4.1 



24 

3 

1 
28 
3.1 



127 
135 

66 
86 

63 
115 
336 

12.5 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



249 
249 

33 
39 

58 

78 

366 

14.3 



280 
280 

37 
37 

52 

54 

371 

18.3 



1,170 
1,215 

32 
37 

103 
1,355 

11.5 



29 

5 

2 
36 
4.0 



172 
178 



53 



62 
113 
360 
13.4 



Robbery 



1,080 
1,082 

79 
93 

54 

73 

1.248 

48.6 



1,640 
1,640 



50 

51 

1,760 

86.6 



9,839 
10,084 

143 

167 

180 
10,431 

88.4 



625 

40 

4 

669 

73.4 



932 

960 

134 
175 

115 

210 

1,345 

50.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2,015 
2,023 

368 
434 

321 

433 

2,890 

112.5 



1,612 
1,612 

335 
337 

356 

366 

2,315 

113.9 



8,584 
8,961 

352 
411 

403 
9.775 

82.8 



677 

173 

11 
861 
94.5 



1,725 
1,798 

751 
979 

882 
1,611 
4,388 
163.0 



Burglary 



12,519 
12,568 

2,482 
2,926 

1,605 
2,163 
17.657 

687.6 



17,756 
17, 757 

2,805 
2,824 

2,207 

2,272 

22,853 

1, 124. 7 



53,165 
56, 659 

3,183 
3,718 

7,289 
67,566 

572.4 



7,452 

1,378 

120 
8.950 
982.4 



10,295 
10,835 

2,979 
3,883 

2,505 
4,676 
19,293 

716.7 



Larceny 

$60 and 

over 



9,384 
9,464 

2,934 
3,459 

1,188 

1,601 

14.514 

565.2 



15,216 
16,216 

2,870 
2,890 

1,866 

1,920 

20.026 

985.5 



31, 612 
34,214 

2,799 
3,269 

2,765 

40.248 

341.0 



5,959 

1,419 

27 
7.405 

812.8 



7,587 
8,039 

2,495 
3,252 

1,301 
2,376 
13,667 

607.7 



71 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1969 — Continued 



Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forci- 
ble 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated total-. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Stale total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . - 



TENNESSEE 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



VERMONT 

Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Area. 
Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural , 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Slate total 

RateperlOO.OOO inhabitants 



90,000 
100. 0% 
222,000 

89. 6% 
100. 0% 
347, 000 

59.4% 
100. 0% 
659,000 



1,952,000 

96. 9% 

100. 0% 

623, 000 

72.4% 

100.0% 

1,410,000 

21. 1% 

100. 0% 

3.985.000 



TEXAS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

O ther cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

UTAH 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total — 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



8,138,000 

94. 2% 

100. 0% 

1,441,000 

87.4% 

100.0% 

1,608,000 

60. 0% 

100. 0% 

11.187.000 



809,000 
99.4% 

100.0% 
80,000 
91. 7% 

100. 0% 

157,000 
81. 9% 

100. 0% 
1.045,000 



None 
212,000 

80. 8% 
100.0% 
227,000 

98. 6% 
100. 0% 
439,000 



2,575 
2,876 

1,466 

2,470 

6,728 

1, 020. 9 



81,119 
61,807 

4,899 
6,767 

1,646 

7,797 

66.371 

1,665.5 



233, 691 
242, 159 

16, 101 
18,413 

9,054 

15,093 

275.665 

2, 464. 2 



20,653 
20, 738 

713 

776 

1.021 

1, 248 

22.762 

2, 178. 2 



1,839 
2,276 

2,203 
2,233 
4.609 

1, 027. 1 



127 
142 

178 
300 
510 

77.4 



6,118 
6,192 

639 

883 

456 
2,160 
9.235 

231.7 



30, 756 

31, 782 

1,631 
1,866 

1,611 

2,686 

36.334 

324.8 



1,345 
1,351 

33 

35 

61 

74 

1.460 

139.7 



133 
164 

70 

70 

234 

53.3 



1,314 

2,448 
2,734 

1,288 
2,170 
6,218 
943.6 



45,001 
45,615 

4,260 
5,884 

1,190 

5,637 

57.136 

1,433.8 



202, 935 
210,377 

14, 470 
16,547 

7,443 

12, 407 

239.331 

2, 139. 4 



19, 308 
19, 387 

680 
741 

960 

1,174 

21,302 

2,038.5 



1,706 
2,112 

2,133 
2,163 
4.275 

973.8 



2 
2 

6 
10 
13 

2.0 



245 

248 

28 
39 

20 
95 
382 
9.6 



975 
1,014 

80 
92 

95 

158 

1.264 

11.3 



19 
19 

1 
1 

5 

6 

26 

2.5 



14 
16 

28 

47 

73 

11.1 



315 
321 

34 

47 

29 
137 
505 
12.7 



1,734 
1,835 

90 
103 

142 

237 

2,175 

19.4 



137 
138 

2 
2 

6 

7 

147 

14.1 



24 

33 
37 

14 
24 
85 

12.9 



2,650 
2,665 

113 

156 

37 

175 

2.996 

75.2 



12,072 
12, 257 

272 
311 

152 

254 

12.822 

114.6 



501 
502 



11 
11 
11 

2.5 



33 
33 
40 

9.1 



7 
512 

49.0 



25 
31 

10 

10 

41 

9.3 



33 

78 
87 

130 
219 
339 
51.4 



2,908 
2,958 

464 
641 

370 
1,753 
5.352 
134.3 



15,975 
16,676 

1,189 
1,360 

1,222 

2,037 

20.073 

179.4 



692 

27 
29 

44 

54 
775 

74.2 



102 
126 

16 

16 

142 

32.3 



1.061 
1.185 

691 
1,164 
2.801 

425.0 



22,542 
22,903 

2,030 
2,804 

588 

2,785 

28.492 

715.0 



103, 108 
107,047 

7,013 
8,020 

3,712 

6,188 

121.255 

1,083.9 



7,916 
7,948 

279 
304 

503 

615 
8,867 

848.5 



822 
1,018 

1,692 
1,614 
2.632 

599.6 



658 

1,114 
1,244 

485 

817 

2,719 

412.6 



13, 178 
13,335 

1,545 
2,134 

412 
1.952 
17.421 
437.2 



60. 591 
63,492 

6,298 
7,202 

3,188 
5,314 
76.008 
679.4 



8,451 
8,487 

314 
342 

405 

495 

9.324 

892.5 



685 

724 

417 

423 

1.147 

261.3 



72 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 7969 — Continued 



Area 



VIRGINIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. . 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - - 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



WASHINGTON 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Other cities... 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

State total 

Rale per 100,000 inhabitants 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total... 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estunated total 

Rural 

.\rea actually reporting. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



WISCONSIN 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area... 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total... 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Stale totol 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



WYOMING 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 
Other cities.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totaL 

SUtetotel 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



2, 718, 000 
99. 5% 
100.0% 
505,000 
92. 5% 
100.0% 

1, ae, 000 

99. 7% 

100. 0% 

4,669,000 



2, 194, 000 
99.4% 
100. 0% 
632,000 
94.6% 
100. 0% 
676,000 
91. 9% 
100. 0% 
3,402,000 



566,000 
94. 4% 
100. 0% 
366,000 
65. 0% 
100. 0% 
888,000 
100. 0% 
1,819,000 



2, 132, 000 

99.9% 

100. 0% 

1,005,000 

96. 6% 

100. 0% 

1,096,000 

85. 8% 

100. 0% 

4,233,000 



None 
214.000 

94.0% 
100.0% 
106,000 

96. 7% 
100. 0% 
320,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



67, 947 

68, 246 

6,794 
7,343 

5,463 

5,481 

81,070 

1, 736, 3 



78, 555 
78,889 

11,756 
12,439 

9,357 
10, 179 
101,607 

2,983.7 



7,371 
7,619 

1,823 
2,802 

3,489 
13,910 

764.7 



39, 851 
39, 867 



9,371 



7,684 

8,959 

58.524 

1, 382. 6 



3,198 
3,401 

1,385 

1,433 

4,834 

1,510.6 



Violent 
crime 



8,180 
8,210 

1,082 
1.169 

1,260 
1,264 
10,643 

228.0 



6,758 
6,778 

781 
826 

588 

639 

8.243 

242.3 



882 
901 

174 
267 

598 
1.766 
97.1 



2,639 
2,639 

304 
314 

393 

458 

3.411 

80.6 



131 
139 

142 

147 

286 

89.4 



Property 
crime 



69,767 
60,036 

6.712 
6,174 

4,203 

4,217 

70,427 

I, 508. 4 



71, 797 

72, 111 

10,976 
11,613 

8,769 

9.540 

93.264 

2, 741. 4 



6,489 
6,718 

1,649 
2, 535 

2,891 
12.144 

667.6 



37, 212 
37,228 

9.067 
9,384 

7,291 

8,501 

55.113 

1,302.0 



3,067 
3,262 

1,243 

1,286 

4.548 

1.421.3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


185 


531 


185 


533 


26 


55 


28 


69 


63 


98 


63 


98 


276 


690 


5.9 


14.8 


100 


643 


100 


545 


6 


58 


6 


61 


17 


50 


18 


54 


124 


660 


3.6 


19.4 


26 


36 


26 


36 


19 


8 


29 


12 


47 


45 


102 


93 


5.6 


6.1 


62 


181 


62 


181 


10 


25 


10 


26 


13 


84 


15 


98 


87 


305 


2.1 


7.2 


12 


18 


13 


19 


19 


17 


20 


18 


33 


37 


10.3 


11.6 



Robbery 



3,218 
3,228 

232 
261 

165 

166 

3,645 

78.1 



3,505 
3,610 

220 
233 

93 

101 

3.844 

113.0 



240 
241 

37 
57 

49 
347 

19.1 



1,052 
1,052 

90 
93 

44 

51 

1. 196 

28.3 



37 
39 

12 
12 
51 

15.9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4,246 
4,264 

769 
831 

934 

937 

6,032 

129.2 



2,610 
2,623 

497 
526 

428 

466 

3.615 

106.3 



580 
598 

110 
169 

457 
1.224 
67.3 



1,344 
1,344 

179 
185 

252 

294 

1,823 

43.1 



64 
68 

94 
97 
165 

51.6 



Burglary 



26,176 
26,275 

2,696 
2,913 

2,071 

2,078 

31,266 

669.7 



34,239 
34.387 

4.433 

4,691 

4,622 

6,028 

44,106 

1, 296. 6 



2,857 
2,961 

754 
1,159 

1,750 
5.870 

322.7 



12.408 
12,414 

3,697 
3,826 

4,169 
4,861 
21.101 

498.6 



1,304 
1.387 

407 

421 

1,80S 

566.0 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



22,700 
22,829 

2,265 
2,448 

992 

996 

26.272 

562.7 



26,434 
26,554 

6,440 
5,756 

3,682 
3,897 
36,207 

1,064.3 



2.766 
2,853 

704 
1,082 

785 
4,720 
259.5 



17,088 
17.096 

4,323 
4,474 

2,542 

2,964 

24.534 

579.6 



1,400 
1,489 

661 

684 

2,173 

679.1 



For standard metropolitan statistical areas in this table the percentage actually reporting may not coincide with the ratio between reported and esti- 
mated crime totals since these data represent the sum of such calculations for individual areas varying in size, portions reporting and crime rates. 

Population by area tor each state is 1969 estimate; total population for each state is Bureau of the Census provisional estimate as of July 1 , 1969, and subject 
to change. 

Violent crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants for the offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime rate per 100,000 inhabitants for the offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



73 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 
$50 and 



Abilene, Tex -- 

(Includes Taylor and Jones Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Akron, Ohio - 

(Includes Summit and Portage Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N.Y 

(Includes Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga 
and Schenectady Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 iniiabitants 

Albuquerque, N. Mex 

(Includes BernallUo County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

AUentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa.-N.J — 
(Includes Lehigh and Northampton 
Counties, Pa. and Warren County, 
N.J.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Altoona, Pa . - 

(Includes Blair Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting _ 

Estimated total.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Amarillo, Tex 

(Includes Potter and Randall Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden Grove, Calif. 
(Includes Orange County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Anderson, Ind.. 

(Includes Madison County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

(Includes Washtenaw County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Asheyille, N.C 

(Includes Bmicombe County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Atlanta, Ga 

(Includes Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, 
Fulton and Gwinnett Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 mhabitants. 

Atlantic City, N.J. 

(Includes Atlantic County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 mhabitants 

Augusta, Ga.-S.C 

(Includes Richmond County, Ga. and 
Aiken County, S.C.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Austin, Tex 

(Includes Travis County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 mhabitants. 



123,000 

100. 0% 



685,000 



81.4% 
100. 0% 



708,000 



100. 0% 



316,000 
100.0% 
532,000 



96. 1% 
100. 0% 



06.2%, 
100.0% 



200,000 

100.0% 



1,311,000 

100.0% 

139,000 

87. 1% 
100.0% 



213,000 

100.0% 



148,000 

100.0% 

1,331,000 

96. 6% 
100.0% 

185,000 

100.0% 



274,000 



100. 0% 



271,000 

100.0% 



1,804 
, 469. 3 



16, 651 

17,814 

2, 602. 3 



9,820 
1, 387. 7 



15,838 
5, 018. 3 



6,042 
6,290 
,181.9 



835 

901 

626.3 



3,616 
1, 765. 6 



43,803 
3,341.2 



1,470 

1,783 

1,281.2 



7,603 
3,616.8 



2,412 
1,625.3 



36, 427 
37,331 

2, 805. 2 



7,626 
4, 116. 6 



4,396 
1,607.1 



7,667 
2, 830. 



137 
111.6 



1,766 
1,883 
275.1 



723 
102.2 



1,606 
508.9 



497 

516 

97.0 



64 

69 

48.0 



336 
167.3 



2,771 
211.4 



122 
87.7 



574 
269.0 



180 
121.3 



3,839 
3,917 
294.3 



408 
220.2 



746 
272.7 



1,286 
474.7 



1,667 
1, 357. 7 



14, 785 

15, 931 

2, 327. 3 



9,097 
1,286.6 



14,232 
4, 509. 6 



6,545 

6,774 

1, 086. 



771 

832 

578.3 



3,180 
1,588.2 



41,032 
3, 129. 8 



1,371 

1,661 

1, 193. 5 



6,929 
3, 247. 7 



2,232 
1,604.0 



32,588 
33, 414 
2, 510. 9 



7,218 
3, 896. 4 



3,650 
1,334.4 



6,381 
2,356.3 



37 
39 
6.7 



13 
1.8 



16 
5.1 



13 
13 

2.4 



33 
2.6 



11 

6.2 



13 

8.8 



217 
219 
16.5 



17.5 



30 
11.1 



7 
5.7 



131 

144 

21.0 



48 
6.8 



126 



36 
37 
7.0 



9 

9 

6.3 



23 
11.5 



270 
20.6 



8 

10 

7.2 



53 
24.8 



9 
6.1 



322 
330 
24.8 



34 

18.4 



46 
16.8 



64 
23.6 



845 

878 

128.3 



274 
38.7 



449 
142.3 



109 

116 

21.8 



17 

19 

13.2 



72 
36.0 



1,136 
86.7 



39 

48 

34.5 



231 
108.3 



67 
45.1 



1,400 
1,416 
106.4 



208 
112. 3 



204 
74.6 



763 

822 

120.1 



54.8 



1,015 
321.6 



339 

350 
65.8 



38 

41 

28.5 



237 
118.4 



1,332 
101.6 



52 

63 

45.3 



279 
130.8 



91 
61.3 



1,900 
1,952 
146.7 



150 
81.0 



448 
163.8 



827 
673.5 



6,295 
6,867 
857.1 



4,314 
609.6 



6,878 
2, 179. 3 



2,481 
2,582 
485.2 



455 

482 

335.0 



1,480 
739.2 



19, 179 
1,462.9 



784 

899 

646.0 



3,102 
1,453.9 



7% 
536.4 



14,601 
14, 797 
1,111.9 



2,950 
1, 692. 5 



1,882 
688.0 



696 
666.9 



5,637 
6,083 
888.6 



2,390 
337.7 



5,169 
1, 637. 8 



2,327 
2,407 
452.3 



177 

198 

137.6 



1,337 
667.8 



17,617 
1,343.8 



364 

487 

349.9 



2,607 
1, 221. 9 



924 
622.6 



11,685 
12,041 
904.8 



2,803 
1, 513. 1 



1,107 
404.7 



254 938 3,687 1,634 1,060 
93.8 346.2 1,360.9 603.1 391.3 



74 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



BakersSeld, Calif. 

(Includes Kem County.) 

Area actually reporting - - . . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Baltimore, Md 

(Includes Baltimore City and Anne 
Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, How- 
ard and Harford Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Baton Rouge. La 

(Includes East Baton Rouge Parish.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Bay City, Mich 

(Includes Bay County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Beaumont-Port Arthur, Tex 

(Includes Jefferson and Orange Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting ._ 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Biloxi-Gulfport, Miss. 

(Includes Harrison County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Binghamton, N.Y.-Pa 

(Includes Broome and Tioga Counties. 
N.Y, and Susquehanna County, 
Pa.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. .-. 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Birmingham. Ala 

(Includes Jefferson. Shelby and Walker 
Comities.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Boise, Idaho 

(Includes Ada County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants.. 

Boston-Lowell-Lawrence, Mass 

(Includes Essex. Middlesex, Norfolk 
and Suffolk Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. _. 

Bridgeport-Slamford-Norwalk, Conn 

(Includes Fairfield County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Brockton, Mass 

(Includes Plj-mouth County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Brownsville-Harlingen-^an Benito, Tex.. 
(Includes Cameron County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

BuiTalo.N.Y 

(Includes Erie and Niagara Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Hate per 100,000 inhabitants 



333.000 

100.0% 

2,011,000 

100.0% 



269,000 

100.0% 



115,000 
100.0% 
316,000 



85.3% 
100.0% 



140,000 

100.0% 
304,000 



99. 1% 
100.0% 



768,000 



97.7% 
100. 0% 



102,000 

100.0% 
3,253,000 



94. 1% 
100. 0% 



797,000 
100.0% 



314,000 

89.8% 
100.0% 

152,000 

100.0% 



10, 996 
3,306.1 



85. 579 
4. 256. 3 



11.412 
4. 239. 4 



2,073 
1,800.6 



5,869 

6.699 

2, 117. 3 



1.642 
1, 171. 3 



3.203 
3.234 

1, 062. 6 



17,279 

17,547 

2,284.5 



2.282 
2.229.0 



92 222 
2,834.6 



20,947 
2. 629. 5 



1,330,000 

100.0% 



7,050 

7,781 

2,480.4 



2,587 
1,702.0 



28,881 
2,171.3 



877 
263.7 



20,558 
1,022.5 



1,612 
598.8 



259 
225.0 



1,040 
1,141 
360.6 



200 
142.7 



164 

166 

54.6 



2,775 
2.808 
365.6 



172 
168.0 



7,284 
7,462 
229.4 



1,290 
161.9 



456 

490 

156.2 



209 
137.5 



3,036 
228.2 



10. 119 
3,042.4 



65,021 
3,233.9 



9,800 
3,640.6 



1,814 
1, 575. 6 



4,829 

5,558 

1, 756. 6 



1,442 
1,028.7 



3,039 

3,068 
1,008.1 



14.504 

14.739 

1,918.9 



2,110 
2, 061. 



81,084 
84,760 
2, 605. 2 



19, 657 
2, 467. 6 



6,594 

7,291 

2, 324. 2 



2,378 
1,564.6 



25.845 
1,943.1 



29 
8.7 



270 
13.4 



36 
13.4 



2 
1.7 



16 

20 

6.3 



9 
6.4 



6 

6 

2.0 



129 

130 

16.9 



2 
2.0 



134 
137 

4.2 



7 

S 

2.6 



3 

2.0 



59 
4.4 



69 
20.7 



837 
4L6 



122 
45.3 



19 
16.5 



24 
34 

10.7 



13 

9.3 



23 
23 

7.6 



160 

152 

19.8 



15 
14.7 



422 
434 
13.3 



41 
13.1 



11 

7.2 



187 
14.1 



293 
88.1 



9,401 
467.6 



321 
119.2 



121 
105.1 



242 
260 
82.2 



29 
20.7 



63 

64 

21.0 



463 

470 

61.2 



25 

24.4 



3,917 
3,974 
122.1 



649 
8L5 



80 

91 

29.0 



10 
6.6 



1,467 
109.5 



486 
146.1 



10,050 
499.8 



1,133 
420.9 



117 
101.6 



768 

827 

26L4 



149 
106.3 



72 

73 

24.0 



2,033 
2.056 
267.7 



130 
127.0 



2,811 
2,917 
89.7 



564 
70.8 



330 

350 

111.6 



185 
121.7 



1,333 
100.2 



4,291 
1,290.1 



27,097 
1,347.7 



5.251 
1, 950. 7 



770 
668.8 



2,953 

3,342 

1,056.3 



733 

622.9 



1,719 
l,ro2 
569.1 



6,040 
6,163 
801.1 



939 
917.2 



30,320 
31,962 
982.4 



8,357 
1. 049. 1 



3,527 

3,838 

1,223.5 



1,189 

782.2 



10,534 
792.0 



4.642 
1,395.7 



22,637 
1, 125. 9 



826 
717.4 



1,286 
1,668 
495.6 



531 

378.8 



1,025 
1,035 
340.1 



6,989 
6.086 
792.3 



967.3 



20,676 
21, 765 
669.0 



7,773 
975.8 



1,900 
2,107 
671.7 



796 
523.7 



9,643 
726.0 



75 



397-633 O - 70 - 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Canton, Ohio 

(Includes Stark County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Cedar Rapids, lowa^.- 

(Includes Linn County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Champaign-Urbana, III.. 

(Includes Champaign County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Charleston, S.C 

(Includes Charleston and Berkeley 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Charleston, W. Va... 

(Includes Kanawha County.) 

Area actually reporting. _ 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Charloltc, N.C 

(Includes Mecklenburg and Union 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Chattanooga, Tenn.-Ga. 

(Includes Hamilton County, Tenn. 
and Walker Comity, Ga.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Chicago, 111 

(Includes Cook, Du Page, Kane, Lake, 
McHenry and Will Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Cincinnati, Ohio-Ky.-Ind... 

(Includes Hamilton, Clermont and 
Warren Counties, Ohio and Camp- 
bell, Kenton and Boone Counties, 
Ky. and Dearborn County, Ind.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Cleveland, Ohio 

(Includes Cuyahoga, Lake, Geauga 
and Medina Coxmties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Colorado Springs, Colo 

(Includes El Paso County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Columbia, S.C 

(Includes Lexington and Richland 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Columbus, Ga.-Ala 

(Includes Chattahoochee and Muscogee 
Counties, Ga. and Russell County, 
Ala.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



367,000 

100.0% 



147.000 

100. c% 



151,000 

100.0% 
321,000 

100. 0% 



244,000 

92. 2% 
100.0% 



403.000 



100.0% 



86. 3% 
100.0% 



6,912,000 



100.0% 



1,402,000 



95. 9% 
100. 0% 

2,095.000 



96. 8% 
100.0% 



220,000 

100.0% 
327.000 



95. 7% 
100.0% 



87. 4% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



6,481 
1,763.6 



2,106 
1,430.2 



2,812 
1, 866. 6 



7,977 
2, 481. 7 



3,349 

3,498 

1, 433. 5 



13,888 
3, 447. 1 



7,536 

8,327 

2, 643. 



181, 664 
185,277 
2, 680. 4 



24, 008 
24, 958 
1, 780. 4 



65, 293 

66, 237 
3, 162. 2 



5,695 
2, 589. 7 



9, 208 

y, 440 

2, 883. 5 



3,146 

3,604 

1, 368. 2 



Violent 
crime 



664 
153.5 



130 
88.3 



413 

274.0 



994 
309.2 



351 

363 

148.8 



2,999 
744.4 



745 

810 

267.1 



42,353 

42, 760 

618.6 



2,720 
2, 794 
199.3 



9,407 
9, 481 
462.6 



502 
228.3 



1,203 
1,215 
371.1 



313 

365 
138.6 I 



Property 
crime 



5,917 
1,610.1 



1,976 
1,341.9 



2,399 
1, 591. 6 



2, 172. 6 



2,998 

3,135 

1, 284. 7 



10,889 
2, 702. 7 



6,791 

7,517 

2, 385. 9 



139, 311 
142, 617 
2, 061. 8 



21,288 
22,164 
1,581.1 



55,886 

56,756 

2, 709. 5 



5,193 
2, 361. 4 



8,005 

8,225 

2, 512. 4 



2,833 

3,239 

1, 229. 7 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny 

$50 and 

over 


11 


45 


317 


191 


2,037 


2,947 


3.0 


12.2 


86.3 


52.0 


564.3 


801.9 


3 


14 


52 


61 


665 


799 


2.0 


9.5 


35.3 


41.4 


451.6 


642.6 


3 


16 


128 


266 


1,196 


923 


2.0 


10.6 


84.9 


176.5 


793.5 


612.4 


45 


70 


327 


552 


3,439 


2,165 


14.0 


21.8 


101.7 


171.7 


1,069.9 


673.6 


13 


12 


115 


211 


1,341 


1,296 


13 


12 


116 


222 


1,403 


1,354 


5.3 


4.9 


47.5 


91.0 


674.9 


554.9 


76 


81 


477 


2,366 


5,687 


3,936 


18.6 


20.1 


118.4 


687.3 


1,411.5 


976.9 


39 


35 


450 


221 


3,699 


965 


42 


43 


468 


257 


4,025 


1,250 


13.3 


13.6 


148.5 


81.6 


1, 277. 6 


396.8 


797 


1,683 


23, 397 


16, 476 


54,506 


40, 797 


806 


1,710 


23,632 


16, 713 


56,835 


42, 124 


11.6 


24.7 


340.4 


241.8 


807.8 


609.4 


101 


240 


1,156 


1,223 


9,622 


8,244 


103 


243 


1,181 


1,267 


9,980 


8,579 


7.3 


17.3 


84.2 


90.4 


712.0 


612.0 


288 


370 


6,047 


2,702 


17, 181 


11, 780 


290 


374 


6,070 


2,747 


17, 610 


12, 127 


13.8 


17.9 


289.8 


131. 1 


836.9 


678.9 


12 


51 


231 


208 


2,202 


2,348 


5.5 


23.2 


105.0 


94.6 


1,001.3 


1, 067. 7 


44 


58 


335 


766 


3,999 


2,361 


46 


68 


339 


772 


4,100 


2,467 


14.1 


17.7 


103.5 


235.8 


1,252.4 


750.5 


27 


17 


117 


152 


1,218 


1,011 


31 


23 


128 


183 


1,419 


1.164 


11.8 


8.7 


48.6 


69.6 


638.7 


441.9 



76 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



StEindard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Columbus, Ohio -- 

(Includes Franklin, Delaware and 
Pickaway Counties.) 

Area actually reporting- 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Corpus Christ!, Tex -- 

(Includes Nueces and San Patricio 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. _ 

Estimated total. _ 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Dallas, Tex 

(Includes Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, 
Kaufman and Rockwall Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Darenport-Rock Island-Moline, Iowa-Ill.. 
(Includes Scott County, Iowa and Rock 
Island and Henry Counties, lU.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Dayton, Ohio 

(Includes Greene, Miami, Montgomery 
and Preble Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Decatur, ni. 

(Includes Macon County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Denver, Colo. 

(Includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, 
Denver and Jefferson Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Des Moines, Iowa 

(Includes Polk County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Detroit, Mich ..- 

(Includes Macomb, Oakland and 
Wayne Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Dnlath-Superior, Minn.- Wis 

(Includes St. Louis County, Minn, and 
Douglas County, Wis.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Dnrham, N.C.... 

(Includes Durham and Orange 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

El Paso, Tei.. 

(Includes El Paso County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Erie, Pa 

(Includes Erie County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



99.6% 
100.0% 



301.000 



99. 8% 
100.0% 

1,508,000 



95. 3% 
100.0% 



340,000 



96.0% 
100.0% 



99.1% 
100.0% 



127,000 

100.0% 

1,132,000 



93.5% 
100.0% 



276,000 

100.0% 

4,223,000 



99.8% 
100. 0% 



98.8% 
100.0% 



179,000 



91.2% 
100.0% 



357,000 

100.0% 
259,000 

100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



27, 076 

27, 121 

3, 036. 9 



9,246 

9,259 

3, 077. 1 



54,540 

55,802 

3, 700. 9 



6,142 

6,380 

1, 877. 2 



19,968 
20, 076 
2, 392. 1 



2,470 
1, 949. 3 



44,833 

46, 351 

4, 095. 3 



6,657 
2, 414. 7 



180, 567 
180,843 
4, 282 6 



4,709 

4,765 

1, 736. 2 



3,336 
3,734 

2,088.8 



8,677 
2,429.9 



3,057 
1, 181. 



Violent 
crime 



2,780 
2,783 
311.6 



1,096 
1,097 
364.6 



7,814 
7,981 
529.3 



489 

499 

146.8 



2,496 
2,604 
298.4 



336 

265.2 



4,616 
4,676 
413.1 



426 
154.5 



31,465 

31,495 

745.8 



235 
237 
86.4 



633 

741 
414.6 



703 
196.9 



312 

120.5 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



24,296 
24,338 
2, 725. 2 



8,160 

8,162 

2, 712. 5 



46,726 
47, 821 
3,171.6 



5,653 

5,881 

1, 730. 4 



17,472 

17,572 

2, 093. 7 



2,134 
1,684.1 



40, 217 

41,675 

3, 682. 1 



6,231 
2,260.2 



149, 102 
149, 348 
3, 636. 7 



4,474 

4,628 

1, 649. 9 



2,703 

2,993 

1,674.3 



7,974 
2,233.0 



2,745 
1,060.6 



53 
53 

5.9 



19 

19 

6.3 



266 
273 
18.1 



7 

7 

2 1 



71 

71 

8.6 



7 
6.5 



78 
6.9 



10 
3.6 



649 
649 

lao 



16 
4.5 



4 

1.5 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



315 
315 
36.3 



47 

47 

15.6 



499 

516 

34.2 



46 

46 

13.5 



129 
129 
15.4 



13 
10.3 



468 

470 

41.6 



38 
13.8 



1,605 
1,507 
35.7 



20 
20 
7.3 



28 

31 

17.3 



44 

12.3 



23 
8.9 



Bobbery 



1,477 
1,478 
166.5 



192 

192 

63.8 



2,740 
2,769 
183.6 



202 

206 

60.3 



1,204 
1,207 
143.8 



102 
80.5 



1,952 
1,963 
173.4 



255 
92.5 



20,131 

20,142 

477.0 



70 

71 

26.9 



123 

133 

74.4 



227 
63.6 



141 
54.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



936 

937 

104.9 



838 

839 

27a 8 



4,309 
4,423 
293.3 



234 

241 
70.9 



1,092 
1,097 
130.7 



214 
168.9 



2,118 
2,166 
191.3 



123 
44.6 



9,280 
9,297 
220.2 



143 
144 

52 5 



466 

558 

312.1 



416 
116.6 



144 
65.6 



Burglary 



10,449 
10,465 
1,171.8 



3,699 

3,704 

1,231.0 



24,536 
26,156 
1,668.4 



2,626 
2,699 
794.1 



8,089 
8,127 
968.4 



1,070 
844.4 



17,123 
17,364 
1,834 2 



2,133 
773.7 



66,022 
66,116 
1,565.7 



2,195 
2,213 
806.3 



1,499 
1,637 
915.7 



4,166 
1,163.8 



1,339 
617.3 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



8,971 

8,988 

1,006.4 



3,388 

3,394 

1, 127. 9 



13, 187 
13,687 
901.1 



2,139 
2,257 
664.1 



6,098 
6,138 
731.4 



732 
577.7 



14,490 
15,478 
1, 367. 5 



3,002 
1,088.9 



49, 827 
49,938 
1, 182. 6 



1,627 
1,655 
666.6 



1,020 
570.6 



2,105 
589.5 



936 
38L6 



77 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — ConHnued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crlnie 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



Eugene, Oreg - 

(Includes Lane County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

EvansTille, Ind.-Ky 

(Includes Vanderburgh and Warwick 
Counties, Ind. and Henderson 
County, Ky.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fall Rirer-New Bedford, Mass 

(Includes Bristol Coiuity.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fargo- Moor head, N. Dak.-Minn 

(Includes Cass County, N. Dak. and 
Clay County, Miim.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fayetleville. N.C. 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Flint, Mich 

(Includes Genesee and Lapeer Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fori Lauderdale-Hollywood. Fla 

(Includes Broward County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fort Smith, Ark.-Okla. 

(Includes Sebastian and Crawford 
Counties, Ark. and Leflore and 
Sequoyah Counties, Okla.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total -.- 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Port Wayne, Ind... 

(Includes Allen County.) 

Area actually reporting --. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fort Worth. Tex 

(Includes Johnson and Tarrant 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fresno, Calif. 

(Includes Fresno Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Galveston-Texas City, Ten 

(Includes Galveston County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Gary-Hammond-East Chicago, Ind 

(Includes Lake and Porter Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Grand Rapids, Mich.. 

(Includes Kent and Ottawa Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



205,000 

100. 0% 



233.000 



97. 7% 
100.0% 



426,000 

97. 1% 
100.0% 



109,000 



100.0% 



204,000 

98. 6% 
100. 0% 



soo.ooo 

100. 0% 



567.000 

99.0% 
100.0% 



158.000 



96.8% 
100.0% 



268,000 

100.0% 
700,000 



97. 7% 
100.0% 



418,000 

100.0% 

169.000 

95.4% 
100.0% 

629.000 

98. 7% 
100.0% 



528.000 

98.5% 
100.0% 



6,397 
2, 632, 7 



5,699 

5,793 

2, 486. 5 



12,632 

12,883 

3, 027. 



1,687 
1, 461. 7 



4,866 

4,886 

2,393.9 



15,806 
3, 163. 8 



20,806 

20,909 

3,687.7 



1,872 

1,946 

1,229.8 



5,880 
2, 192. 2 



20, 189 
20, 492 
2, 926. 6 



16, 129 
3, 863. 2 



5,087 

5,233 

3, 096. 4 



20,668 

20,806 

3,310.3 



11.335 
11,543 

2, 187. 7 



186 
90.2 



749 

766 

324.1 



615 

627 

147.3 



58 
63.4 



764 

764 

369.4 



2,847 
569.9 



2,641 
2,541 
448.1 



285 

290 

183.3 



369 
133.8 



2,115 
2,140 
305.6 



1,121 
268.5 



883 

895 

629.6 



2,433 
2,443 

388.7 



1,130 
1,162 
218.3 



5,212 
2, 642. 5 



4,950 

6,038 

2, 162. 6 



12,017 

12,256 

2, 879. 7 



1,529 
1, 408. 3 



4,102 

4,132 

2,024.4 



12,958 
2, 593. 9 



18, 265 

18,368 

3, 239. 5 



1,687 

1,656 

1, 046. 6 



6,621 
2,068.4 



18, 074 

18, 352 

2,621.0 



15,008 
3, 594. 7 



4,204 

4,338 

2,666.9 



18,236 

18,363 

2, 921. 6 



10, 205 

10, 391 

1,969.3 



1.0 



16 

16 

6.9 



6 
1.4 



36 

36 

17.6 



40 
8.0 



82 

82 

14.5 



14 

14 
8.8 



99 

100 

14.3 



29 



19 

19 

11.2 



70 

70 

11.1 



18 

18 

3.4 



29 
14.1 



60 

60 

21.5 



26 
27 
6.3 



6 

6.5 



29 

29 

14.2 



129 
25.8 



168 

168 

29.6 



24 

24 

15.2 



49 
18.3 



120 
122 
17.4 



94 
22.5 



41 

42 

24.9 



216 

217 

34.5 



98 



63 
30.7 



224 

227 

97.4 



206 
210 
49.3 



15 
13.8 



209 

209 

102.4 



951 
190.4 



857 

857 

151.1 



43 
44 

27.8 



174 

64.9 



1,059 
1,064 
162.0 



448 
107.3 



363 

366 

216.6 



1,216 
1,219 
193.9 



311 

319 

60.6 



91 
44.4 



459 

462 

198.3 



377 
384 
90.2 



37 
34.1 



480 

480 

235.2 



1,727 
345.7 



1,434 
1,434 

252.9 



204 

208 

131.4 



118 
44.0 



837 

864 

122.0 



560 
131.7 



460 

468 

276.9 



932 

937 

149.1 



703 

716 

136.7 



2,289 
1,116.6 



2,180 
2,215 
950.7 



6,338 

6,445 

1,279.4 



613 

472.6 



1,711 
1,717 
841.2 



6,688 
1, 138. 6 



8,454 

8,600 

1, 499. 1 



711 

736 

465.1 



2,129 
793.7 



8,496 

8,609 

1,229.5 



6,518 
1,661.2 



1,888 

1,943 

1, 149. 7 



6,136 
6,186 
984.2 



5,402 

6.473 

1,037.3 



2,469 
1, 199. 5 



1,991 
2,028 
870.5 



2,900 
2,971 
698.1 



837 

770.9 



2,021 

2,041 

1,000.0 



5.776 
1,166.0 



6,009 

6,056 

1,068.1 



635 

671 

424.0 



2,629 
980.2 



5,450 
6,581 
797.1 



5,879 
1,408.1 



1,912 

1,975 

1, 168. 6 



5,630 
6,684 
904.3 



3,609 
3,693 
699.9 



78 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Mefropolitan Slatisfical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaugiiter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



Green Bay, Wis 

(Includes Brown Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Greensboro-High Point, N.C _ - 

(Includes Guilford, Forsj-th, Randolph 
and Yadkin Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Greenrille, S.C 

(Includes Greenville and Pickens 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Hamilton-Middletown, Ohio. 

(Includes Butler County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

Harrisburg, Pa 

(Includes Cumberland, Dauphin and 
Perry Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Hartford-New Britain-Bristol, Conn 

(Includes Hartford County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

(Includes Honolulu County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Hpuston, Tex 

(Includes Harris, Brazoria, Fort Bend, 
Liberty and Montgomery Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Huntington-Ashland, W. Va.-Ky.-Ohio... 
(Includes Cabell and AVayne Counties, 
Vf. Va., Boyd County, Ky. and 
Lawrence County, Ohio.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Huntsville, Ala 

(Includes Madison and Limestone 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Indianapolis ,Ind 

(Includes Marion, Hamilton, Hancock, 
Hendricks, Johnson, Morgan, 
Shelby and Boone Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Jackson , Mich 

(Includes Jackson County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Jackson, Miss.. 

(Includes Hinds and Rankin Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



149.000 

100.0% 



645,000 



90.3% 
100.0% 



293,000 



80. 5% 
100.0% 



227,000 



100.0% 



398,000 



87.3% 
100. 0% 



814,000 

97.2% 
100.0% 

646,000 

100.0% 
,939,000 



85.0% 
100. 0% 



263,000 



76.8% 
100.0% 



261,000 



81. 7% 
100. 0% 



96.9% 
100. 0% 

142,000 

100.0% 



1,800 
1,211.1 



12,061 
12,811 
1, 986. 6 



263,000 

100.0% 



6,560 

7.615 

2, 601. 8 



4, 426 
1,946.3 



4,693 

6,333 

1, 339. 2 



19, 075 

19, 453 

2, 389. 8 



21, 224 
3,283.0 



62,885 

68,096 

3,511.2 



3,055 

3,716 

1,412.7 



4,280 

4,772 

1, 826. 4 



29,446 
30, 027 
2, 797. 5 



2,730 
1,918.5 



3,254 
1,238.7 



28 
18.8 



2,702 
2,782 
431.4 



559 

662 

226.2 



456 
200.5 



479 

531 

133.3 



1,470 
1,483 
182.2 



560 
86.6 



9,427 
10,062 
518.8 



425 

481 

182.9 



431 

611 

195.6 



3,259 
3,300 
307.5 



298 
209.4 



283 
107.7 



1,772 
1, 192. 2 



9,359 

10, 029 

1, 555. 2 



6,001 

6,953 

2, 375. 6 



3,970 
1,745.8 



4,214 

4.802 

1,205.8 



17, 606 

17, 970 

2, 207. 7 



20,664 
3, 196 4 



53,458 

68,034 

2, 992. 4 



2,630 
3,236 

1, 229. 8 



3,849 

4,261 

1,630.8 



26,187 

26,727 

2, 490. 1 



2,432 
1, 709. 1 



2,971 
1, 131. 



80 

85 

13.2 



19 
25 
8.6 



3.6 



9 
2.3 



20 
20 
2.5 



23 
3.6 



300 
325 
16.8 



10 
3.8 



10 

18 

6.9 



74 

75 
7.0 



34 

12.9 



2 
1.3 



73 

78 

12.1 



36 

42 

14.3 



20 
8.8 



33 
36 
9.0 



71 

72 
8.8 



82 
12.7 



452 
615 
26.6 



12 

20 

7.7 



250 

253 

23.6 



34 
23.9 



19 

7.2 



312 
328 
60.9 



231 
255 
87.1 



122 
53.6 



190 

209 

62.5 



547 

551 

67.7 



272 
42.1 



5,497 
5,611 
289.3 



83 

98 

37.3 



75 

89 

34.1 



1,873 
1,890 
176.1 



85 
69.7 



72 
27.4 



16 
10.1 



2,237 
2,291 
366.3 



273 

340 

116.2 



306 
134.6 



248 

277 

69.6 



832 

840 

103.2 



183 
28.3 



3,178 
3,611 

186.2 



316 

351 

133.4 



334 

384 
147.0 



1,062 
1,082 
100.8 



173 
121.6 



158 
60.1 



790 
531.5 



4,251 
4,594 
712.4 



2,243 
2,682 
916.3 



1,720 
756.4 



2,199 
2,458 
617.2 



8,114 

8,275 

1. 016. 6 



9,417 
1, 456. 7 



26,829 
29,268 
1, 508. 6 



1,183 
1,458 
654.3 



1,757 
1,990 
761.6 



13,186 

13,401 

1,248.6 



1,197 
841.2 



1,351 
514.3 



736 
494.5 



3,826 
4,093 
634.7 



2,715 

3,071 

1, 049. 2 



1,822 
801.2 



1,079 
1,285 
322.7 



5,734 
5,890 
723.6 



7,127 
1,102.4 



13, 476 
15,255 
786.6 



1,106 
1,346 
511.3 



1,613 
1,748 
669.0 



6,601 
6,829 
636.2 



939 
659.9 



1,146 
436.9 



79 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 


Violent 
crime 


Property 
crime 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny 

$50 and 

over 


21, 665 


3,440 


18, 125 


74 


219 


1,161 


1.986 


9,450 


5,968 


4,034.6 


643.6 


3, 391. 


13.8 


41.0 


217.2 


371.6 


1, 768. 


1,116.6 


13,990 


1,346 


12,644 


52 


58 


791 


445 


4,412 


1,976 


2, 301. 


221.4 


2, 079. 6 


8.6 


9.5 


130 1 


73.2 


726.7 


324.8 


1,118 


99 


1,019 


4 


9 


37 


49 


608 


300 


1,233 


108 


1,125 


4 


10 


40 


54 


656 


337 


457.8 


40.1 


417.7 


1.5 


3.7 


14.9 


20.0 


243.2 


125.1 


4,861 


738 


4,123 


7 


45 


118 


668 


1,852 


1,832 


2,371.2 


360.0 


2, Oil. 2 


3.4 


22.0 


57.6 


277.1 


903.4 


893.7 


47, 590 


6,789 


40, 801 


138 


548 


3,234 


2,869 


18, 961 


12,123 


47,683 


6,799 


40,884 


138 


549 


3,238 


2,874 


19, 002 


12, 146 


3, 748. 


534.4 


3,213.6 


10.8 


43.2 


254.5 


226.9 


1,493.6 


954.7 


2,419 


147 


2,272 


4 


16 


74 


53 


1,017 


778 


2, 080. 9 


126.5 


1,954.4 


3.4 


13.8 


63.7 


46.6 


874.8 


669.2 


6,351 


687 


5,664 


35 


24 


128 


500 


3,005 


1,607 


6,368 


688 


5,680 


35 


24 


128 


601 


3,013 


1,513 


1, 597. 2 


172.6 


1,424.6 


8.8 


6.0 


32.1 


125.7 


756.7 


379.5 


2,607 


466 


2,141 


7 


29 


83 


347 


969 


890 


2, 643. 5 


464.6 


2,088.8 


6.8 


28.3 


81.0 


338.5 


945.4 


868.3 


1,599 


80 


1,519 


1 


10 


35 


34 


648 


809 


1,583.4 


79.2 


1,504.1 


1.0 


9.9 


34.7 


33.7 


542.6 


801.1 


2,896 


471 


2,426 


U 


30 


103 


327 


1,200 


1,004 


1, 715. 9 


279.1 


1, 436. 8 


6.5 


17.8 


61.0 


193.7 


711.0 


594.9 


1,733 


194 


1,539 


6 


21 


69 


98 


853 


486 


1,869 


205 


1.664 


6 


22 


73 


104 


908 


530 


626.7 


68.7 


668.0 


2.0 


7.4 


24.5 


34.9 


304.5 


177.7 


10,879 


772 


10, 107 


6 


SO 


213 


473 


4,627 


4,374 


10, 919 


776 


10, 143 


6 


80 


215 


475 


4,541 


4,390 


2,991.4 


212.6 


2, 778. 8 


1.6 


21.9 


68.9 


130.1 


1, 244. 1 


1, 202. 7 


9,815 


1,066 


8,749 


29 


72 


568 


407 


3,955 


3,112 


3, 528. 7 


383.3 


3, 146. 5 


10 4 


26.9 


200.6 


146.3 


1, 421. 9 


1,118.8 


2,600 


459 


2,141 


4 


37 


102 


316 


925 


919 


2,086.9 


368.4 


1, 718. 5 


3.2 


29.7 


81.9 


253.6 


742.5 


737.6 


6,794 


498 


6,296 


14 


40 


165 


289 


2,031 


2,440 


3, 422. 1 


294.1 


3,12a0 


8.3 


23.6 


91.5 


170.7 


1, 199. 6 


1,441.1 



Jacksonrille, Fla 

(Includes Duval County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Hate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Jersey City, N.J 

(Includes Hudson County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Johnstown, Pa 

(Includes Cambria and Somerset Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting _ 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Kalamazoo, Mich 

(Includes Kalamazoo Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Kansas City, Mo.>Kans 

(Includes Clay, Jackson, Cass and 
Platte Counties, Mo. and Johnson 
and Wyandotte Counties, Kans.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Kenosha, Wis.. 

(Includes Kenosha County.) 
Area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Knoxrille, Tenn 

(Includes Anderson, Blount and Knox 
Counties.) 
Area actually reporting 

Estunated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lafayette. La.. 

(Includes Lafayette Parish.) 
Area actually reportmg. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Lafayette- West Lafayette, Ind 

(Includes Tippecanoe County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lake Charles, La 

(Includes Calcasieu Parish.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inh abitants 

Lancaster, Pa 

(Includes Lancaster County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lansing, Mich 

(Includes Clinton, Eaton and Ingham 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Las Vegas, Nev 

(Includes Clark County.) 
Area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Uiwton, Okia 

(Includes Comanche County.) 
Area actually reporting. 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lexington. Ky 

(Includes Fayette County.) 
Area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



534,000 

100. 0% 



608,000 
100. 0% 
269,000 

97. 5% 
100.0% 

205,000 

100.0% 

.272,000 



99.7% 
100. 0% 




101,000 

100. 0% 



169,000 

100. 0% 



298,000 

96. 2% 
100.0% 



365,000 



99. 6% 
100.0% 




80 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolifan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Indes 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter. 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



Lima, Ohio 

(Includes Allen, Putnam and Van Wert 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lincoln, Nebr 

(Includes Lancaster County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Little Rock-Norlh Little Rock, Ark 

(Includes Pulaski and Saline Counties.) 

Area actually reporting_ 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Loniin-Elyria, Ohio 

(Includes Lorain County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Los Angeles-Long Beach, Calif. 

(Includes Los Angeles County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

LouisTlUe, Ky.-Ind 

(Includes Jetlerson County, Ky. and 
Clark and Floyd Counties, Ind.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lubbock, Tex 

(Includes Lubbock County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lynchburg, Va 

(Includes Lynchburg City and Amherst 
and Campbell Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Macon, Ga 

(Includes Bibb and Houston Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Madison. Wis 

(Includes Dane County.) 

Area actually reportmg.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Manchester, N.H 

(Includes Hillsboro County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Mansfreld, Ohio 

(Includes Richland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

McAllen-Pharr-Edinburg, Tex 

(Includes Hidalgo County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Memphis, Tenn.- Ark 

(Includes Shelby County, Tenn. and 
Crittenden County, Ark.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants — 



174,000 



98. 4% 
100. 0% 



163,000 

100. 0% 



341.000 

100. 0% 



263,000 

96. 9% 
100.0% 



6,921,000 

100. 0% 
820,000 



95.2% 
100. 0% 



20S,000 
100. 0% 
123,000 

100. 0% 

209,000 

89. 8% 
100.0% 



218,000 

100. 0% 



217,000 

95. 2% 
100. 0% 



98. 1% 
100. 0% 



95. 6% 
100.0% 



793,000 



100.0% 



2,758 

2,797 

1,606.0 



2,528 
1, 561. 7 



11,671 
3,419.8 



4,785 

4,900 

1, 869. 8 



335,814 
4, 862. I 



30,060 
30, 812 
3, 757. 7 



6,634 
2, 705. 3 



1,650 
1,337.4 



5,260 

6,649 

2, 708. 8 



4,281 
1,541.3 



2,076 

2,171 

1,001.6 



2,514 

2.650 

1,904.6 



1,460 
1.612 
864.6 



21,332 
2,691.3 



225 

228 

130 9 



238 
146.1 



1,833 
537.1 



581 

590 

223.9 



48,631 

702.7 



2,988 
3,044 
371.2 



488 
238.6 



369 
299.1 



428 

460 

220.6 



139 
50.0 



96 

100 

46.1 



447 

450 

336.1 



108 

121 

64.9 



2,364 
298.2 



2,633 

2,569 

1, 475. 1 



2,290 
1,406.7 



9,838 
!, 882. 7 



4,204 

4,310 

1, 636. 8 



287,183 
4, 149. 4 



27,072 
27,768 
3, 386. 4 



5,046 
2, 466. 8 



1,281 
1, 038. 3 



4,832 

6,189 

2, 488. 2 



4,142 
1,491.2 



1.981 
2,071 
965.5 



2,067 

2,100 

1,568.5 



1,352 
1,491 
799.7 



18,968 
2, 393. 1 



4 
2.5 



63 

15.5 



3.0 



668 

9.7 



104 
105 
12.8 



17 
8.3 



U 
8.9 



31 

32 

15.3 



3 
1.1 



4 

4 

3.0 



5 

5 

2.7 



100 
12.6 



6 

6 

3.4 



17 
10.4 



125 
36.6 



37 

38 

14.4 



3,684 
51.8 



198 
200 
24.4 



37 

18.1 



19 
15.4 



39 

43 

20.6 



33 
11.9 



15 

16 

11.2 



7 

8 

4.3 



129 
16.3 



116 

116 

66.6 



51 
31.3 



604 
147.7 



221 
224 
85.0 



19, 797 
286.0 



1,700 
1,721 
209.9 



73 
35.7 



79 
64.0 



199 
208 
99.7 



68 
24.6 



32 

33 

15.2 



90 

91 

68.0 



14 

17 

9.1 



1,255 
1S8.3 



102 

104 

59.7 



166 
101.9 



1,151 
337.3 



315 

320 

121.5 



24,582 
365.2 



986 
1,018 
124.1 



361 
176.6 



260 
210.7 



169 

177 

84.9 



35 
12.6 



52 

56 

29.8 



338 

340 

253.9 



82 

91 

48.8 



880 
lU.O 



1,230 
1,244 
714.3 



820 
503.3 



4,641 
1,359.9 



1,825 
1,865 
707.8 



131,636 
1, 902. 



8,704 

9,002 

1, 097. 8 



2,625 
1, 234. 4 



721 
584.4 



2,389 
2,549 
,222.3 



1,449 
521.7 



996 
1,036 
478.0 



1,031 
1,044 
779.8 



956 
512.8 



9,807 
1, 237. 3 



1,063 
1,067 
612.7 



1,122 
688.7 



4,340 
1.271.7 



1,223 
1,266 
480.1 



95,924 
1, 386. 



10,662 

10, 927 

1, 332. 6 



2,146 
1, 049. 1 



460 
372.8 



1,717 
1,862 
892.9 



2,141 
770.8 



664 

590 

272.2 



819 

832 

621.4 



356 

420 

225.3 



6,424 
810.5 



81 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Miami, Fla ..- 

{Includes Dade County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Milwaulcee. Wis 

(Includes Milwaukee, Waukesha, Ozau- 
kee and Washington Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Minneapolis-St. Paul. Minn - 

(Includes Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, 
Ramsey and Washington Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Mobile, Ala 

(Includes Mobile and Baldwin Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

Monroe, La 

(Includes Ouachita Parish.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Mnncie, Ind 

(Includes Delaware County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, Mich 

(Includes Muskegon County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Nashville, Tenn 

(Includes Davidson, Sumner and Wil- 
son Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Newark, N.J. 

(Includes Esses, Morris and Union 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

New Haven-Waterbury, Conn... 

(Includes New Haven County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

New London-Groton-Norwich, Conn 

(Includes New London County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

New Orleans, La. 

(Includes Jefferson, Orleans, St. Ber- 
nard and St. Tammany Parishes.) 

.\rea actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Newport News-Hampton, Va.. 

(Includes Newport News and Hampton 
Cities and York County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



97.8% 
100. 0% 

1,386,000 



99. 9% 
100. 0% 



1,743,000 



99. 9% 
100. 0% 



98. 5% 
100. 0% 



118,000 

100. 0% 



125.000 

100. 0% 



156.000 

97.9% 
100. 0% 



551,000 



89.2% 
100.0% 



1,886,000 

100. 0% 

739,000 

95. 8% 
100. 0% 



222,000 

98. 0% 
100. 0% 



1,035,000 

100. 0% 
299,000 



97. 9% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



65,158 

55, 940 

4, 460. 1 



26, 719 
26, 735 
1,929.0 



56,304 

56,311 

3, 230. 6 



10,483 

10, 680 

2,433.3 



1,395 
1,183.3 



2,220 
1, 772. 6 



3,764 

3,851 

2, 465. 6 



16,881 

17, 562 

3,184.7 



61, 499 
3, 261. 2 



19,642 
20, 165 
2, 726. 3 



4,131 

4.204 
1, 893. 7 



36,889 
3, 467. 1 



6,219 

6,370 

2, 132. 3 



Violent 
crime 



10, 213 
10,304 
821.5 



1,704 
1,704 
122.9 



4,674 
4,674 
268.1 



1,179 
1,191 
273.9 



332 

281.6 



206 
164.5 



621 

630 

403.4 



2,409 
2,482 
450,3 



465.9 



1,050 
1,068 
144.6 



266 

268 

120.7 



6,205 
599.4 



677 

692 

231.6 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



44,946 
45, 636 
3,638.6 



26, 015 
25,031 
1,806.0 



61,6?0 
51,637 
2,962.4 



9,304 

9,389 

2, 159. 4 



1,063 
901.7 



3,143 

3,221 

2, 062. 2 



14, 472 

15, 070 
2, 734. 4 



52. 713 
2, 795. 3 



18,692 

19. 087 

2, 681. 8 



3,866 

3,936 

1, 773. 



29,684 
2. 867. 7 



5,642 

5.678 

1.900.7 



168 

160 

12.8 



46 
46 
3.3 



56 

65 

3.2 



68 

58 

13.3 



10 
8.6 



4 
3.2 



3 
3 

1.9 



75 

78 

14.2 



138 
7.3 



30 
30 
4.1 



4 
4 

1.8 



107 
10.3 



25 

25 

8.4 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



215 
219 
17.6 



105 
106 
7.6 



361 
351 
20.1 



78 

79 

18.2 



13 

11.0 



16 
12.8 



28 

29 

18.6 



133 

139 
25.2 



375 
19.9 



71 
73 
9.9 



31 
31 

14.0 



411 

39.7 



61 

52 

17.4 



Robbery 



4,763 
4,794 
382.2 



727 

727 

52.6 



2,867 
2,867 
164.5 



345 

348 

80.0 



39 
33.1 



94 
76.1 



166 

169 
108.2 



840 

865 

165.1 



5.076 
269.2 



363 
368 
49.8 



60 

61 

27.5 



2,756 
266.2 



237 

242 

81.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



5,077 
6.131 
409.1 



826 
826 
69.6 



1.401 
1.401 
80.4 



706 
162.4 



270 
229.0 



92 
73.5 



424 

429 

274.7 



1.361 
1.410 

255.8 



3.197 
169.5 



586 

697 

80.8 



170 
172 

77.5 



2,931 
283.2 



364 

373 

124.9 



Burglary 



18,820 
19.135 
1. 626. 6 



7,156 
7,162 
516.8 



21,015 
21,017 
1, 205. 7 



6,903 

5.944 

1,367.0 



506 
429.2 



702.7 



1,457 
1,487 
952.1 



6,413 

6,766 

1, 227. 7 



23,568 
1, 249. 8 



7,940 

8,169 

1, 103. 6 



1,973 
2,004 
902.7 



10, 930 
1. 065. 9 



2,396 
2,446 
818.8 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



17, 712 

17,992 

1, 434. 5 



12,046 
12,053 
869.7 



18,600 

18.603 

1. 067. 3 



2.286 
2.321 
533.8 



376 
318.9 



778 
621.2 



1.406 
1.441 
922.6 



4.629 
4.780 
867.3 



16. 310 

864.9 



6,252 
6,463 
874.2 



1.633 
1.663 
704.1 



10. 724 
1.036.0 



2.404 
2.469 
826.6 



82 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



New York, N.Y... 

(Includes Bronx, Kings, Manhattan, 
Queens, Richmond, Nassau, Rock- 
land, Suffolk and Westchester 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Norfolk-Portflmouth, Va.. 

(Includes Norfolk, Chesapeake, Ports- 
mouth and Virginia Beach Cities.) 

Area actually reporting _. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Ogden, Utah 

(Includes Weber County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

(Includes Canadian, Cleveland and Ok- 
lahoma Counties.) 

Area actually reporting... _. 

Estimated total... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Omaha, Nebr.-Iowa ., 

(Includes Douglas and Sarpy Counties, 
Nebr., and Pottawattamie County, 
Iowa.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Orlando, Fla 

(Includes Orange and Seminole Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Oxnard-Ventura, Calif. 

(Includes Ventura County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Paterson-Clirton-Passaic, NJ 

(Includes Bergen and Passaic Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Pensacola, Fla 

(Includes Escambia and Santa Rosa 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Peoria. Ill 

(Includes Peoria, Tazewell and Wood- 
ford Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Philadelphia, Pa.-N.J 

(Includes Bucks, Chester, Delaware, 
Montgomery and Philadelphia 
Counties, Pa. and Burlington, 
Camden and Gloucester Counties, 
N.J.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Phoenix, Ariz.. 

(Includes Maricopa County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



11,732,000 



99.9% 
100.0% 

675.000 



100.0% 
130.000 
100.0% 
612,000 



98. 0% 
100.0% 



530.000 



99.7% 
100. 0% 



419,000 

100.0% 
351.000 

100.0% 



1.371.000 

100.0% 



242,000 

100.0% 
350.000 



96.8% 
100.0% 



4,856.000 



95.9% 
100.0% 



901.000 

99. 6% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



555, 001 
555, 103 
4, 731. 5 



21,321 
3, 160. 1 



2,718 
2, 091. 1 



14, 179 
14,334 

2, 342. 8 



14, 101 

14, no 

2, 662. 7 



10, 723 
2, 559. 9 



9,511 
2, 709. 7 



26,358 
1, 922. 2 



6,869 
2, 837. 3 



7,114 

7,446 

2, 124. 5 



82, 515 
85, 132 
1,753.2 



35,563 
35, 677 
3,961.7 



Violent 
crime 



95,873 

95,880 

817.2 



3,003 
445.1 



218 
167.7 



1,735 
1,735 
283.6 



1,869 
1,859 
360.8 



1,229 
293.4 



559 
159.3 



1,731 
126.2 



603 
207.8 



1,022 
1,061 
302.7 



12,687 
12,894 
265.5 



4,073 
4,079 
453.0 



Property 
crime 



459, 128 
459, 223 
3, 914. 2 



18,318 
2, 715. 



2,500 
1,923.4 



12,444 

12, 599 

2, 059. 2 



12,242 

12, 251 

2,311.9 



9,494 
2, 266. 5 



8,962 
2, 650. 5 



24, 627 
1, 796. 



6,366 
2, 629. 6 



6,092 

6,385 

1,821.7 



69,828 
72,238 
1,487.7 



31,495 
31, 598 
3,608.8 



Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


1,105 

1,105 

9.4 


2,277 

2,277 

19.4 


61,209 

61,212 

621.7 


54 
8.0 


162 
22.5 


1,272 
188.5 


3 

2.3 


19 
14.6 


82 
63.1 


61 

51 

8.3 


106 

106 

17.3 


568 

668 

92.8 


30 
30 

5.7 


65 

65 

12.3 


694 

694 

131.0 


40 
9.5 


92 
22.0 


314 
75.0 


11 
3.1 


71 
20.2 


150 
42.7 


32 
2.3 


69 
5.0 


957 
69.8 


18 
7.4 


32 
13.2 


166 
68.6 


10 

11 

3.1 


50 

52 

14.8 


442 

466 

130.1 


361 
364 

7.5 


770 
784 
16.1 


6,267 
6,344 
130.6 


65 

65 

7.2 


248 

248 

27.6 


1,273 
1,274 
141.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



31,282 
31,286 
266.7 



1,626 
226.0 



114 

87.7 



1,010 
1,010 
165.1 



1,070 
1,070 
201.9 



783 
186.9 



327 
93.2 



673 
49.1 



287 
118.5 



520 

642 

154.6 



6,289 
5,402 
111.2 



2,487 
2,492 
276.7 



Burglary 


Larceny 

$60 and 

over 


196,397 
196,432 
1,674.3 


163,276 
163,319 
1, 392. 1 


7,706 
1, 142. 1 


7,702 
1, 141. 6 


1,044 
803.2 


1,015 

780.9 


6,864 

6,923 

1, 131. 5 


3,046 
3,127 
611.1 


4,534 
4,538 
856.4 


4,145 
4,149 
783.0 


5,310 
1,267.6 


3,260 

775.9 


4,253 
1,211.7 


3,618 
1, 030. 8 


9,295 
677.9 


9,654 
704.0 


2,800 
1, 166. 6 


2,701 
1, 115. 7 


3,023 
3,136 

894.8 


2,204 
2,328 
664.2 


32,988 

34,045 

701.1 


17,092 
17,943 
369.5 


15,144 
15, 181 
1,685.8 


11,270 
11,324 
1,257.6 



83 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Pittsburgh, Pa 

(Includes Allegheny, Beaver, Washing- 
ton and Westmoreland Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

PillsBeld. Mass 

(Includes Berkshire County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Portland, Maine 

{Includes Cumberland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Portland, Oreg.-Wash. 

(Includes Clackamas, Multnomah and 
Washington Counties, Oreg. and 
Clark County, Wash.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Providence-Pa wtucliet- Warwick, R.I 

(Includes Bristol, Kent and Providence 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

ProYO-Orem, Utah 

(Includes Utah County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Pueblo, Colo... 

(Includes Pueblo County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

Racine, Wis 

(Includes Racine County.) 

Area actuaUy reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Raleigh, N.C 

(Includes Wake County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Reading, Pa. 

(Includes Berks County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Richmond, Va 

(Includes Richmond City and Chester- 
field, Henrico and Hanover Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actuaUy reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Roanoke, Va 

(Includes Roanoke City and Roanoke 
County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 mhabitants 

Rochester, N.Y 

(Includes Monroe, Livingston, Orleans 
and Wayne Counties.) 

Area actuaUy reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



2,394.a«0 



87.0% 
100.0% 



148,000 

84.6% 
100.0% 



187,000 

93.5% 
100.0% 



975,000 



99. 9% 
100. 0% 



755.000 



100. 0% 



126,000 

96. 9% 
100. 0% 



125,000 

100. 0% 



160,000 

100. 0% 



207,000 

96. 6% 
100.0% 



296,000 

92.0% 
100.0% 



528.000 



100.0% 



186.000 



100.0% 



853,000 



94.8% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



47, 096 

50, 916 

2, 126. 9 



1,647 

2,006 

1,369.1 



2,664 

2,692 

1. 438. 8 



35,350 

35, 353 

3, 626. 7 



21,918 
2, 903. 1 



1,485 

1.670 

1, 245. 9 



2,656 
2,121.9 



3,423 
2, 137. 2 



3,937 

4,120 

1, 994. 6 



2,827 
3,114 
,051.6 



16, 797 
3, 183. 



3,604 
1,937.0 



14, 787 
16, 632 
1, 820. 1 



Violent 
crime 



6,117 
6,426 
268.4 



60 

81 

54.9 



133 

140 
74.8 



3.199 
3,199 
328.2 



1,355 
179.6 



107 

113 

89.7 



311 

248.5 



488 
304.7 



677 

726 

351.6 



304 

327 

110.4 



1,751 
331.8 



420 
225.7 



1,393 
1,447 
169.6 



Property 
crime 



Murder 

and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 



40, 978 
44,489 
1,858.5 



1,487 

1,926 

1, 304. 2 



2,431 
2,662 
.363.9 



32, 151 

32,164 

3, 298. 6 



20.663 
2, 723. 6 



1,378 

1,457 

,166.3 



2,345 
1,873.5 



2,936 
1, 832 5 



3,260 

3,394 

1, 643. 1 



2,523 
2,787 
941.2 



15,046 

2,851.2 



3.184 
1,711.3 



13, 394 
14,085 
1,650.5 



72 

77 

3.2 



3 
3 

2.0 



4 

4 

21 



49 
49 
6.0 



24 
3.2 



4 
3.2 



7 
4.4 



7 

7 

2.4 



58 
11.0 



13 
7.0 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



334 
364 

14.8 



5 

6 

4.1 



4.3 



224 
224 
23.0 



29 
3.8 



6 

7 

6.6 



17 
13.6 



18 
11.2 



22 

23 

11.1 



33 

35 

11.8 



122 
23.1 



10 
5.4 



79 
81 
9.5 



Robbery 



3,311 
3,423 
143.0 



13 

20 

13.6 



41 

42 
22.4 



1,626 
1,526 
156.5 



626 
82.8 



6 

7 
5.6 



49 
39.1 



165 

%.8 



119 

124 

60.0 



124 

132 

44.6 



844 
159.9 



160 
86.0 



399 
423 

49.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2,400 
2,572 
107.4 



39 

52 

35.2 



80 

86 

46.0 



1,400 
1,400 
143.6 



677 
89.7 



96 

99 

78.6 



241 
192.5 



308 
192.3 



619 

661 

271.6 



140 
153 
51.7 



727 
137.8 



237 
127.4 



868 



Burglary 



16,828 
18,374 
767.6 



778 

974 

659.9 



1,179 
1,241 
663.3 



14,912 
14, 913 
1,629.9 



7, 452 
987.0 



487 

519 

411.9 



861 
687.9 



1,429 
892.2 



1,177 
1,241 
600.8 



1,316 
1,432 
483.6 



7.097 
1,344.9 



1,472 
791.1 



6,203 
5,460 
639.8 



Larceny 

$60 and 

over 



12, 116 
13,347 
667.6 



496 

626 

424.1 



816 

861 

460.2 



12,483 

12,484 

1, 280. 7 



5,969 
789.3 



716 

752 

596.8 



1,105 
882.8 



1,059 
661.2 



1,787 
1,839 
890.3 



809 

902 

304.6 



4,763 
902.6 



997 
535.8 



6,541 
6,854 
803.2 



84 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Rockford, III 

(Includes Winnebago and Boone 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Sacramento, Calif. 

(Includes Sacramento, Placer and Yolo 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Saginaw. Mich 

(Includes Saginaw County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

St. Louis. Mo.-ni. 

(Includes St. Louis City and Jefferson, 
St. Charles, St. Louis and Franklin 
Counties. Mo. and Madison and 
St. Clair Counties, 111.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Salem. Oreg 

(Includes Marion and Polk Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Salinas-Monterey. Calif. 

(Includes Monterey County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Salt Lake City. Utah.. 

(Includes Salt Lake and Davis Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

San Antonio. Tex 

(Includes Bexar and Ouadalupe Coim- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Bernardino-Riverside-Onlario. Calif. 
(Includes Riverside and San Bernar- 
dino Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Diego. Calif 

(Includes San Diego County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Francisco-Oakland. Calif... 

(Includes Alameda, Contra Costa, 

Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Jose, Calif. 

(Includes Santa Clara County.) 

Area actually reporting _, 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Santa Barbara. Calif 

(Includes Santa Barbara Coiuity.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Savannah, Ga 

(Includes Chatham Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



281,000 



96.7% 
100.0% 



783.000 



100.0% 



220,000 

100.0% 

2.463.000 



96.0% 
100.0% 



186.000 
100.0% 



240,000 
100.0% 
553,000 

100.0% 
866.000 

100.0% 



1,101,000 

98. 4% 
100.0% 

1,300.000 

100.0% 



3.043.000 



100. 0% 



995,000 
100.0% 



255,000 

99. 6% 
100.0% 



209, 000 



99.0% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



5,653 

5,806 

', 067. 3 



29, 690 
3, 793. 1 



5,275 
2, 395. 6 



79,635 

81,350 

3, 302. 2 



3,157 
1, 701. 6 



8,300 
3, 452. 1 



16, 450 
2, 976. 5 



29,954 
3, 458. 9 



40, 601 
41,215 
3, 743. 4 



33,623 
2, 587. 3 



165, 675 
5, 44L 1 



29,862 
3,000.0 



7,396 

7,401 

2, 906. 4 



7,385 

7,392 

3,536.8 



Violent 
crime 



612 

627 

223.2 



2,074 
265.0 



871 
395.6 



12,263 
12,409 
603.7 



292 
167.4 



648 
269.5 



1,020 
184.6 



3,675 
412.8 



3,247 
3.296 
299.4 



2,586 
199.0 



20, 256 
665 6 



2,057 
206.7 



438 

438 

172.0 



995 

995 

476.1 



Property 
crime 



5.041 

6,179 

1, 844. 



27, 616 
3, 628. 1 



4,404 

2,000.1 



67, 382 

68,941 

2, 798. 6 



2,865 
1,544.2 



7,652 
3, 182. 6 



15, 430 
2, 792. 



26,379 
3,046.1 



37,354 

37, 919 

3,444.0 



31,037 
2,388.3 



146, 320 
4, 775 4 



27, 805 
2, 793. 3 



6,958 

6,963 

2,734.4 



6,390 

6,397 

3,060.8 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



11 

U 

3.9 



38 
4.9 



19 

8.6 



349 
353 
14.3 



7 
3.8 



17 
7.1 



16 
2.9 



105 
12.1 



62 
S3 

4.8 



54 
4.2 



290 
9.5 



26 
2.6 



31 

31 

14.8 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny 

$50 and 

over 


52 


316 


233 


2,080 


2,107 


54 


319 


243 


2,161 


2,159 


19.2 


113.6 


86.6 


765.9 


768.7 


183 


1,011 


842 


11,935 


11,501 


23.4 


129.2 


107.6 


1, 524. 8 


1,469.3 


43 


436 


373 


2.501 


1.104 


19.6 


198.0 


169.4 


1.136.8 


501.4 


831 


6,058 


5,015 


32.836 


14.343 


842 


6,107 


5,107 


33,604 


14.966 


34.2 


247.9 


207.3 


1,360.0 


607.6 


32 


69 


184 


1,665 


1,002 


17.2 


37.2 


99.2 


843.5 


840.1 


60 


269 


312 


3,458 


3,328 


20.8 


111.9 


129.8 


1,438.3 


1,384.2 


112 


413 


479 


6,385 


6,720 


20.3 


74.7 


86.7 


1, 156. 3 


1,215.9 


257 


962 


2,251 


12,809 


8,171 


29.7 


111.1 


259.9 


1,479.1 


943.5 


279 


1,063 


1,863 


19,200 


13, 712 


283 


1,086 


1,875 


19,447 


13,939 


25.7 


98.6 


170.3 


1,766.3 


1,266.0 


248 


1,098 


1,186 


10, 778 


14,972 


19.1 


84.5 


91.3 


829.4 


1, 152. 1 


1,404 


11, 669 


6,902 


68,210 


41,443 


46.1 


383.1 


226.8 


2,241.6 


1, 361. 9 


316 


706 


1,010 


12, 982 


9,638 


31.6 


70.9 


101.5 


1,3012 


968.3 


41 


99 


292 


3,116 


3,174 


41 


99 


292 


3,120 


3,176 


16.1 


38.9 


114.7 


1,226.2 


1,246.8 


71 


408 


485 


3,061 


2,661 


71 


408 


485 


3,066 


2,661 


34.0 


195.2 


232.1 


1, 467. 


1, 225. 4 



85 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Sfandard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Violent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Aggra- 
Robbery | vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



Scranton, Pa -- 

(Includes Lackawanna County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Seattle-Everett, Wash 

(Includes King and Snohomish Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Shreveport, La - 

(Includes Bossier and Caddo Parishes.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Sioux City, lowa-Nebr.. 

(Includes Woodbury County, Iowa 
and Dakota County, Nebr.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total. _ 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

South Bend, Ind 

(Includes St. Joseph and Marshall 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Spoiiane, Waah 

(Includes Spokane County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Springfield, Dl.. 

(Includes Sangamon County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Spring field. Mo. 

(Includes Greene County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

Springfield. Ohio 

(Includes Clark County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Springfield-Chicopee-Holyoke, Mass 

(Includes Hampden and Hampshire 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Stenbenrille-Weirton. Ohio-W. Va 

(Includes Jefferson County, Ohio and 
Brooke and Hancock Counties, W. 
Va.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Stockton, Calif - 

(Includes San Joaquin County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Syracuse, N.Y 

(Includes Madison, Onondaga, and 
Oswego Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Tacoma, Wash 

(Includes Pierce Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



229, 000 

91. 2% 
100.0% 



1,372,000 

99. 5% 
100.0% 



320,000 

100.0% 
119,000 



98.4 
100.0% 



288,000 



97.2% 
100. 0% 



299,000 

100.0% 



159,000 

100. 0% 



146,000 

100.0% 



149,000 

100.0% 
561,000 

100.0% 
169,000 



95. 1% 
100.0% 



289,000 

100.0% 
633,000 



94.6% 
100.0% 



392,000 

98. 6% 
100. 0% 



2,098 

2,342 

1,021.9 



59, 215 

59,402 

4, 328. 6 



5,972 
1,864.1 



2,523 

2,531 

1,119.6 



6,647 

6.690 

1,973.3 



6,360 
2, 129. 6 



3,220 
2, 028. 2 



2,592 
1, 773. 5 



2,529 
1,697.0 



13,832 
2, 466. 6 



1,658 

1,750 

1, 038. 



11,602 
4,013.8 



9,387 

9,979 

1, 676. 7 



10, 991 

11, 138 

2, 843. 3 



141 

160 

69.8 



5,180 
5,191 
378.3 



1,121 
349.9 



139 

139 

116.4 



578 

588 

203.9 



358 
119.9 



199 
126.3 



69 
47.2 



284 
190.6 



591 
105.4 



195 

202 

119.8 



1,029 
356.0 



878 

922 

145.7 



1,129 
1,138 
290,5 



1,957 
2,182 
952.1 



64,036 

54,211 

3, 950. 3 



4,851 
1,514.2 



2,384 

2,392 

2,003.2 



4,969 

5,102 

1,769.4 



6,002 
1,009.7 



3,021 
1, 902. 8 



2,523 
1, 726. 3 



2,245 
1,606.4 



13,241 
2,361.3 



1,463 
1,548 
918.2 



10, 573 
3, 657. 8 



8,509 

9,067 

1,431.1 



9,862 

10,000 

2, 652. 8 



4 

4 

1.7 



74 

74 

6.4 



68 
18.1 



5 

5 

4.2 



7 

7 

2.4 



3 

1.9 



2 
1.4 



13 
2.3 



14 

15 

2.4 



13 

13 

3.3 



10 

11 

4.8 



412 
413 

30.1 



29 
9.1 



12 

12 

10.0 



13 

8.2 



25 
16.8 



31 
5.5 



7 

7 

4.2 



99 
34.3 



61 

63 

10.0 



101 

102 

26.0 



29 

36 

15.7 



2,867 
2,870 
209.1 



193 
60.2 



19 

19 

15.9 



381 

385 

133.5 



178 
59.6 



100 
63.0 



30 
20.5 



172 
115.4 



178 
31.7 



93 

95 

56.4 



616 
178.5 



424 
443 

70.0 



442 

444 

113.3 



109 
47.6 



1,827 
1,834 
133.6 



841 
262.5 



103 

103 

86.3 



168 

173 

60.0 



147 
49.2 



83 
52.3 



37 
25.3 



81 
54.4 



369 
65.8 



94 

99 

58.7 



391 
135.3 



379 

401 

63.4 



573 

579 

147.8 



886 

985 

429.8 



25,758 
25,841 
1,883.0 



2,380 
742.9 



799 

803 

672.5 



2,063 
2,116 
733.8 



2,737 
916.4 



1,636 
1,030.5 



1,211 
828.6 



1,209 
811.3 



4,966 
885.6 



752 

786 

466.2 



5,161 
1, 785. 5 



4,106 
4.309 
680.8 



4,734 

4,799 

1,225.1 



606 

685 

298.9 



19, 676 
19,649 
1, 431. 8 



1,676 
523.1 



902 
755.4 



2,016 
2,072 
718.6 



2,478 
829.7 



998 
628.6 



1,109 
758.8 



729 
489.2 



3,836 
684.1 



505 

540 

320.3 



3,586 
1,240.6 



3,367 
3,615 
671.2 



3,641 

3,6! 

944.0 



86 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla 

(Includes Hillsborough and Pinellas 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting , 

Estimated total. - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Terre Haute, Ind 

(Includes Vigo, Clay, Sullivan and 
Vermillion Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Texarkana, Tex.- Ark 

(Includes Bowie County, Tex. and 
Miller County, Ark.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Toledo, Ohio-Mich. 

(Includes Lucas and Wood Counties, 
Ohio, and Monroe County, Mich.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Topeka, Kans 

(Includes Shawnee County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

Trenton, N.J 

(Includes Mercer County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Tucaon, Ariz 

(Includes Pima County.) 

Area actually reporting - . . 

Rate per 100,000 inliabitants 

Tulsa, Okla.... 

(Includes Creek, Osage, and Tulsa 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Tuscaloosa , Ala 

(Includes Tuscaloosa County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants _. 

DUca-Rome, N.Y 

(Includes Herkimer and Oneida Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Vallejo-Napa, Calif.... 

(Includes Solano and Napa Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Vineland-MillviUe-Bridgeton, N J 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Waco, Tex 

(Includes McLennan County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



99.6% 
100.0% 



176,000 



97. 4% 
100.0% 



106,000 



75.0% 
100.0% 



684,000 



99. 7% 
100. 0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



170,000 

100.0% 



305,000 

100. 0% 



332,000 

100.0% 
465,000 



99.0% 
100. 0% 



119,000 

100.0% 
352,000 



97. 3% 
100. 0% 



253,000 
100.0% 
127,000 
100.0% 
156,000 



30, 262 

30,371 

3, 247. 2 



2,375 

2.453 

1,390.5 



1,795 

2,261 

2,141.0 



14,003 

14.015 

2, 050. 1 



4,843 
2, 844. 8 



9,443 
3, 098. 1 



8.986 
2, 705. 



13, 125 

13, 196 

2, 839. 8 



2,015 
1, 692. 7 



2,902 
3,064 
869.3 



7,739 
3, 069. 3 



2,460 
1, 932. 3 



Violent 
crime 



96. 8% 3, 
100. 0% I 3, 873 
I 2,478.4 



4,111 
4,124 
440.9 



170 

175 

99.2 



248 

309 

292.6 



1,680 
1,680 
245.7 



679 
398.8 



1,155 
378.9 



866 
260.7 



1,117 
1,122 
241.5 



326 
273.9 



168 

170 

48.2 



605 
239.2 



226 
177.5 



484 

484 

309.7 



Property 
crime 



26, 151 
26, 247 
2, 806. 2 



2,205 

2,278 

1,291.3 



1,547 

1,962 

1, 848. 4 



12, 323 

12, 336 

1, 804. 3 



4, 164 
2, 445. 9 



8,288 
2, 719. 2 



8.120 
2,444.3 



12,008 

12, 074 

2,598.4 



1.689 
1,418.8 



2,744 
2,894 
821.1 



7,134 
2, 820. 1 



2,234 
1, 764. 8 



3,346 

3, 389 

2, 168. 7 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



4 

4 

2.3 



15 

17 

16.1 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



11 

6.5 



25 
8.2 



17 
5.1 



25 
26 
5.4 



18 
15.1 



16 

16 

4.5 



10.7 



9 
7.1 



206 

207 

22.1 



11 

11 

6.2 



6 

12 

11.4 



121 
121 
17.7 



Robbery 



36 



48 
15.7 



76 
22.9 



92 

92 

19.8 



12 
10.1 



15 

16 

4.5 



48 
19.0 



23 
18.1 



27 

27 

17.3 



1,621 
1,525 
163.0 



100 
56.7 



25 

36 

34.1 



880 

880 

128.7 



207 
121.6 



822 
269.7 



281 
84.6 



403 

404 

86.9 



67 
56.3 



48 

53 

15.0 



244 
96.5 



69.9 



113 

113 

72.3 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



2,309 
2,317 
247.7 



57 

60 

34.0 



202 

244 

231.0 



657 

657 

96. 1 



425 
249.6 



260 
85.3 



492 
148.1 



697 

601 

129.3 



229 
192.4 



79 

85 

24.1 



286 
113.1 



105 
82.5 



327 

327 

209.3 



Burglary 



14,936 
14, 980 
1,601.6 



926 

955 

541.3 



613 

842 
797.3 



5,366 
5,377 
786.5 



1,713 
1, 006. 2 



3,839 
1, 259. 6 



4,005 
1, 206. 6 



4,559 
4,583 
986,3 



922 
774.5 



1,577 
1,633 
463.3 



3,524 
1, 393. 1 



959 
753.3 



1,856 

1,885 

1, 206. 2 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



8,388 
8,427 
901.0 



933 

964 
546.4 



776 

924 

875.0 



5,159 
5,159 
754.6 



2,103 
1, 236. 3 



2,849 
934.7 



2,611 
755.9 



5,283 

5,317 

1, 144. 2 



561 
471.3 



761 

829 

235.2 



2, 750 
1, 087. 1 



819 
643.3 



1,131 
1,143 
731.4 



87 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1969, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va .- 

(Includes District of Columbia, Mont- 
gomery and Prince Georges Coun- 
ties, Md., Alexandria, Fairfax, and 
Falls Church Cities and Arlington, 
Fairfax, Loudoun, and Prince 
William Counties, Va.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Waterloo, Iowa 

(Includes Black Hawk County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

West Palm Beach, Fla 

(Includes Palm Beach County.) 

Area actually reportmg 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wheeling, W. Va.-Ohio- 

(Includes Marshall and Ohio Counties, 
W. Va. and Belmont County, Ohio.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wichita, Kans - -.- 

(Includes Sedgwick and Butler Coun- 
ties). 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wichita Falls, Tex 

(Includes Archer and Wichita Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wilkes-Barre-Hazelton, Pa 

(Includes Luzerne County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Wilmington, Del.-NJ.-Md 

(Includes New Castle County, Del., 
Salem County, N.J. and Cecil 
County, Md.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Wilmington, N.C 

(Includes New Hanover and Brunswick 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

Worcester, Mass 

(Includes Worcester County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

York, Pa 

(Includes York and Adams Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Youngstown- Warren, Ohio , 

(Includes Mahoning and Trumbull 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 mhabitants 



Population 



99. 9% 
100. 0% 



127,000 

100.0% 



315,000 

98.3% 
100. 0% 



87. 4% 
100. 0% 



401,000 

100. 0% 
135,000 

100. 0% 



339,000 

91. 8% 
100. 0% 



100. 0% 
105,000 



78. 9% 
100.0% 



90. 0% 
100.0% 



97. 3% 
100.0% 



98. 8% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



112, 457 
112, 493 
4, 018. 8 



1.761 
1, 390. 1 



9,091 
2, 886. 7 



1,314 
1,619 

880.6 



10, 157 
2, 532. 1 



1,880 
1,389.0 



1,737 

2,075 
612.5 



11, 903 
2, 393. 4 



2,545 

2,810 

2,688.8 



16, 659 

18,006 

2, 873. 6 



3,289 

3,393 

1, 062. 3 



9,241 

9,332 

1, 697. 8 



Violent 
crime 



21,863 
21,863 
781.0 



211 
166.6 



1,377 
1,377 
437.2 



133 
166 

84.8 



865 
215.6 



296 
218.7 



97 

124 

36.6 



1,216 
244.5 



466 

495 

473.6 



803 

866 

138.0 



372 

381 

119.3 



1,296 
1,302 
236.9 



Property 
crime 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



90, 594 

90.630 

3, 237. 7 



1,650 
1, 223. 5 



7,611 

7,714 

2, 449. 6 



1,181 
1,463 
795.6 



9,292 
2, 316. 4 



1,584 
1, 170. 3 



1,640 
1,961 
575.9 



10,687 
2, 148. 9 



2,079 

2,316 

2, 215. 1 



16, 856 

17, 141 

2, 735. 6 



2,917 
3,012 
943.0 



7,946 

8,030 

1, 460. 9 



349 
349 
12.6 



3 

2.4 



40 

40 

12.7 



11 

11 

6.0 



20 
5.0 



10 
7.4 



6 

5 

1.5 



34 

6.8 



13 

15 

14.4 



13 

14 
2.2 



34 
34 

6.2 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



773 

773 

27.6 



21 
16.6 



54 

54 

17.1 



10 
11 

6.0 



56 
13.7 



13 

9.6 



5 

7 

2.1 



66 
13.3 



11 
13 

12.4 



36 
40 
6.4 



19 

20 

6.3 



43 
43 

7.8 



Robbery 



14, 670 
14, 670 
524.1 



49 

38.7 



250 
250 
79.4 



48 

65 

29.9 



296 
73.8 



66 
48.0 



31 
41 

12.1 



611 
128.9 



112 

118 

112.9 



433 
453 

72.3 



151 

154 

48.2 



628 

630 

114.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



6,071 
6,071 
216.9 



138 
108.9 



1,033 
1,033 
328.0 



64 

79 

43.0 



494 
123.2 



208 
153.7 



56 

71 

21.0 



476 
95.6 



330 

349 

333.9 



321 
358 
67.1 



190 

195 

61.1 



691 

595 

108.3 



Burglary 



41, 850 
41, 867 
1, 495. 7 



520 
410.5 



4,003 

4,066 

I, 291. 1 



522 

631 

343.2 



3,981 
992.4 



775 
572.6 



618 

755 

222.9 



4,353 
875.3 



1,019 

1,140 

1,090.8 



7,076 

7,660 

1, 220. 9 



1,646 
1,688 
528.5 



3,295 
3,327 
606.3 



Larceny 

$50 and 

over 



28.064 
28,077 
1, 003. 



798 
629.9 



2,870 
2,904 
922.1 



615 

628 

341.5 



3,928 
979.2 



698 
441.8 



768 

867 

255.9 



3,663 
736.6 



837 

931 

890.8 



3,498 
3,879 
619.1 



763 

796 

249.2 



2,627 
2,661 
484.1 



88 



General United States Crime Statistics 



The data presented in this section are primarily 
of value to law enforcement executives, news media 
and others for the purpose of comparing the crime 
experience of a community with the averages 
reported nationally by communities of similar size. 
Crime trends and rates are tabulated by grouping 
places according to population size. Police perform- 
ance in clearing crimes by arrest is presented by 
population group and geographic division. 

National city averages are also shown indicating 
the type and value of the property stolen, by 
offense and tyj^e, and value recovered by police 
investigation. Robbery, burglary and larceny- 
theft arc examined by type, as well as where and 
when they occurred. An analysis is provided 
showing weapons used to commit murders as well 
as a distribution of murder victims by age, sex, 
and race. Dispositions made of persons formally 
charged for all criminal offenses are set forth in 
Table 15 and disposition data on juvenile offenders 
is provided by population group in Table 18. 

City, suburban and rural arrest rates are 
shown for all criminal offenses. Arrest rates by 
population group are also listed for specific 



offenses. This is another step in building totals for 
crime categories other than those in the Crime 
Index and in presenting crimes known to the police 
through arrests. 

Statistical data relating to suburban areas are 
provided for the use of law enforcement officials in 
suburban communities in making limited com- 
parisons. Places used to establish totals for 
suburban areas include cities with 50,000 or less 
popidation together with county law enforcement 
agencies in standard metropolitan statistical areas. 
Of course, the crime experience of the large core 
city is excluded. 

It is important to remember in studying averages 
that usually about half the units used must be 
above and about half below. National averages 
can provide the police administrator with valuable 
guidance in analyzing the local crime count, as 
well as the performance of his force in combating 
crime. The analysis, however, does not end with 
such a comparison, for it is only through an 
appraisal of local conditions that a clear picture of 
the community crime problem or the effectiveness 
of the police operation is possible. 



89 



Table 6. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known fo the Police, 1968-69, by Population Groups 

[1969 estimated population] 



Population group 



TOTAL ALL AGENCIES: 

5,778 agencies; total popu- 
lation 169.298,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent cliange 

TOTAL CITIES: 4,033 cities 
total population 121,408,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change 

GROUP I 

57 cities over 260,000; popu- 
lation 43,346,000: 

1968.- - 

1969- -- 

Percent change--- 

6 cities over 1,000,000; popu- 
lation l;i,537,000: 

1968- 

1969 

Percent change 

20 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; 
population 12,761,000: 

1968 

1969---- -- 

Percent change 

31 cities, 250,000 to 500,000; 
population 11,047,000: 

1968-- 

1969 - 

Percent change 



5,822.141 
6,332,359 

+8.8 



910,193 
5,335,862 

+8.7 



GROUP II 

96 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 
population 14,300,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change - - . 

GROUP III 

261 cities, 60,000 to 100,000; 
population 18,244,000: 

1968 - 

1969 

Percent change 

GROUP IV 

451 cities, 25,000 to 60,000; 
population 16,142,000: 

1968 

1969 -.- 

Percent change. - 

GROUP V 

1,188 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 
population 18,972,000: 

1968 

1969 -... 

Percent change 

90 



Grand 
total 



935,635 
4,385,529 
+ 11.4 



3,289,621 
3.663,519 
+ 11.4 



369, 279 

660, 604 

+8.1 



972. 168 

, 030, 536 

+6.0 



790, 522 

882, 913 

+11.7 



606, 689 

647, 155 

+6.7 



665, 061 

730. 490 

+9.8 



656, 101 

716, 067 

+9.1 



603, 122 

548, 298 

+9.0 



495,3,62 

641,681 

+9.4 



Crime 
Index 
total 



82, 511 
1. 949, 872 
+9.4 



795, 622 

851, 975 

+7.1 



564.687 
640, 262 
+13.4 



422 202 

467, 635 

+8.4 



415.124 

471,727 

+13.6 



398.475 

462, 720 

+13.6 



301,333 

342, 200 

+13.6 



270, 399 

309, 723 

+14.5 



Vio- 
lent 
crime 



538,918 

598,240 

+11.0 



3,396,717 

3,787,289 

+11.5 



477,004 

529.432 

+11.0 



336, 228 

373, 030 

+ 10.9 



182, 121 

199, 310 

+9.4 



96,006 
112,386 
+17.1 



58, 101 
61, 334 

+5.6 



45, 466 
51,276 
+12.8 



36, 999 
41,491 
+12.1 



24, 591 
28,340 

+15.2 



23, 112 

24,765 

+7,1 



Property 
crime 



2,812,617 

3.134,087 

+ 11.4 



1, 446, 283 

1, 576, 842 

+9.0 



613, 501 

662, 665 

+6.4 



468, 681 

627, 876 

+12.6 



364,101 
396,301 

+8.8 



369. 669 

420.451 

+13.7 



361.476 

411, 229 

+13.8 



276, 742 

313, 860 

+13.4 



247, 287 

284, 968 

+15.2 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Criminal homicide 



11,918 
12,800 
+7.4 



9,622 
10,528 
+9.4 



6,315 
6,930 
+9.7 



2,871 
3,127 
+8.9 



2,176 

2,615 

+15.6 



1,268 
1,288 
+1.6 



1.134 
1.190 
+4.9 



786 

887 

+12.8 



+12.4 



563 

613 

+8.9 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



7,688 
7,753 

+.8 



4,662 

4,655 

-.2 



2,440 
2,496 
+2,3 



812 
+3.0 



973 

926 

-4.8 



679 

758 

+11.6 



758 

717 

-5.4 



630 

651 

+3.3 



426 

419 

-1.6 



264 

256 

-3.0 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



27,952 
32,466 
+16.1 



21,576 

25,488 
+18.1 



13.838 
16, 326 
+18.0 



6, 619 
7,392 
+13.4 



4,254 

5,687 

+33.7 



3,065 
3,246 
+5.9 



2,407 
2,865 
+19.0 



2,067 
2,411 
+16.6 



1.448 
1.706 

+17.8 



1,227 
1,649 
+26,2 



Rob- 
bery 



253,254 

286,783 

+13.2 



237,990 

269,728 

+ 13.3 



188, 798 
212, 763 

+12.7 



106, 900 
120, 206 
+ 12.4 



53, 408 
62, 719 

+17.4 



28, 490 

29, 839 

+4.7 



18,431 
21,689 
+17.1 



14. 946 
16,835 
+12.6 



8.315 
10. 034 
+20,7 



6,796 
6,667 
+14.9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



245,794 
266,191 

+8.3 



207,816 

223,688 

+7.6 



127, 277 

137, 012 

+7.6 



66,831 

68, 686 

+4.2 



36, 168 
41,466 
+14.6 



26, 278 

26, 961 

+6.7 



23.493 

25, 632 

+9.1 



19. 200 
21,368 
+11.2 



14, 241 
15, 940 
+11.9 



15, 526 

15,936 

+2.6 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



1,659,986 

1,754,800 

+5.7 



1.347,589 
1,425,954 

+5.8 



722, 331 
756, 962 

+4.8 



343, 922 

352, 384 

+2.5 



206, 668 

227, 551 

+10.1 



171,741 

177,017 

+3.1 



174. 284 

189, 719 

+8.9 



158, 241 
170, 154 

+7.5 



120,993 

126,646 

+4.6 



117, 873 

126, 190 

+7.1 



Larceny-theft 



$50 and 
over 



.005.671 

,217,207 

+21.0 



811,595 

979,825 

+20.7 



Under 
$50 



1,878,818 

1,939,077 

+3.2 



1,615,910 

1,667,688 
+3.2 



318, 796 584, 328 

368, 069 608, 236 

+16. 6 +4. 1 



90, 970 

100, 929 

+10. 9 



122, 127 
142, 696 
+16.8 



105. 699 

124, 434 

+17.7 



116.842 

141.530 

+22.2 



131,294 

160, 221 

+22.0 



108, 953 
135,371 

+24.2 



93, 094 

119,233 

+28.1 



175, 768 

177, 749 

+1.1 



224, 862 

241, 725 

+7.5 



183, 708 

188,762 

+2.8 



249,179 

258,046 

+3.6 



256, 996 

262,686 

+2.2 



201.363 

205. 679 

+2.1 



224, 689 

231, 702 

+3.1 



Table 6. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1968-69, by Population Groups — Continued 



Population group 



GROUP VI 

1,980 cities under 10,000; 
population 10,40,'),000: 

1968 

1969 ._-. 

Percent change 

SUBURBAN AKEA '. 

2,136 agencies; population 
51,288,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent cliange 

RURAL AREA 

1,438 agencies; population 
22,642,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change 



Grand 
total 



221,278 
238, 732 

+7.9 



1,354,623 
1,483,542 
+9.5 



269, 312 

294, 622 

+9.4 



Crime 
Index 
total 



121.779 

137, 277 

+12.7 



871,929 

984,924 

+13.0 



201,974 

224, 020 

+10. 9 



Vio- 
lent 
crime 



10, 609 

10,540 

-.7 



73,443 

81,829 
+11.4 



21, 279 

22,923 

+7.7 



Property 
crime 



Murder Man- 

and non- slaugh- 

negligent ter by 

man- negli- 

slaughter gence 



111.170 

126, 737 

+14.0 



798, 486 

903, 095 

+13.1 



180, 695 

201, 097 

+11.3 



Criminal homicide 



237 

248 

+4.6 



1,714 
1,890 
+10 3 



1,208 
1,089 
-9.9 



144 

116 

-19.4 



1,772 
1,754 
-1.0 



1,751 
1,827 
+4.3 



Forc- 




Aggra- 


ible 


Rob- 


vated 


rape 


bery 


assault 


589 


1,704 


8,079 


632 


1,850 


7,810 


+7.3 


+8.6 


-3.3 


6,105 


23,135 


42,489 


6,823 


26,111 


47,005 


+11.8 


+12.9 


+10.6 


2,239 


2,841 


14,991 


2,465 


3,149 


16,220 


+101 


+10.8 


+8.2 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



53, 867 

56, 393 

+4.7 



386,125 
406,231 

+5.2 



105,565 

112,394 

+6.5 



Larceny-thett 



$50 and 
over 



43,616 
55,411 
+27.0 



287. 567 

356, 833 

+24.1 



57, 133 
69,257 
+21.2 



Under 
$50 



99,355 

101,339 

+2.0 



480, 922 

496,864 

+3.3 



65, 587 

68,775 

+4.9 



Auto 
theft 



13,687 

14,933 

+9.1 



124,794 

140,031 

+12.2 



17,997 

19,446 

+8.1 



1 Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropohtan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 
Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



91 



397-633 O - 70 - 7 



Table 7. 



■fimc Trends, Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1968-69, for Suburban and Nonsuburban Cities ' by Population Groups 

(1969 estimated population] 



Population group 



Grand 
total 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Vio- 
lent 
crime 



Property 
crime 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Rob- 
bery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 



Larceny-theft 



$50 
and 
over 



Under 
$50 



Suburban Cities 

TOTAL SUBURBAN 
CITIES; 1,829 cities: total 
population 26,039,000 : 

1968 

1969... 

Percent change.. 

GROUP IV 

274 cities, 26,000 to 50,000; 
population 9,815,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change. 

GROUP V 

708 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 
population 11,508,000; 

1968 - 

1969... 

Percent change 

GROUP VI 

847 cities under 10,000; 
population 4,717,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change 

Nonsuburban Cities 

TOTAL NONSUBURBAN 
CITIES: 1,790 cities: total 
population 19,481.000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change 

GROUP IV 

177 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; 
population 6,328,000: 

1968 

1969... 

Percent change 

GROUP V 

480 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 
population 7,465,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change 

GROUP VI 

1,133 cities under 10,000; 
population 5,688,000: 

1968 

1969 

Percent change 



711.987 
781,667 

-f9.8 



300, 052 

328, 312 

-t-9. 4 



300, 126 

331, 612 

-1-10.5 



111, 809 
121, 743 

-1-8.9 



507,765 
547,044 

-t-7.7 



203. 070 
219. 986 

-1-8.3 



195. 226 

210, 069 

-i-7.6 



109. 469 

116,989 

-1-6.9 



427,889 

486,934 

-H3.8 



32,808 

35,944 

-t-9. 6 



395.081 

450,990 

-1-14.2 



626 

707 

4-12.9 



497 

483 

-2.8 



1.968 
2,310 

-t-17.4 



10,712 
12,205 
-1-13.9 



19,502 

20,722 

4-6.3 



179,293 
189,779 

-t-5.8 



150,624 
188,708 
-1-25.3 



283,601 
294,250 

-1-3.8 



189, 386 

214, 385 

-1-13.2 



174, 227 
199, 024 
-1-14.2 



64,276 
73, 525 
4-14.4 



265,622 

302.266 

-t-13.8 



14, 195 
16, 426 
4-15.7 



13,620 
14,383 
4-5.6 



4, 993 
5,135 

4-2.8 



25.504 

27,691 

4-8.6 



175, 191 
197, 959 
4-13.0 



160, 607 
184,641 
4-15.0 



59.283 
68, 390 
4-15.4 



240.118 

274.575 
4-14.4 



261 

306 

4-17.2 



273 

295 

4-8.1 



92 

106 

4-15.2 



761 

814 

4-7.0 



254 
252 



160 

155 

-3.1 



855 

991 

4-15.9 



802 

1,004 

4-25.2 



311 

315 
4-1.3 



5,603 
6,645 
4-18.6 



3,999 
4,337 
4-8.5 



1,110 

1,223 

4-10.2 



337 

308 

-8.6 



1,296 

1,577 

4-21.7 



5,103 

6,336 

4-24.2 



7,476 
8,484 
4-13.5 



8,546 
8,747 

4-2.4 



3,480 
3,491 

4-. 3 



18,344 

18,964 

4-3.4 



75,609 

79,304 

4-4.9 



76, 105 

81,299 

4-6.8 



27, 579 

29,176 

4-5.8 



113,440 
119,350 

4-5.2 



67,043 
82, 438 
4-23.0 



59,930 

76,079 
4-26.9 



23,651 
30, 191 
4-27.7 



95,039 
121,307 
4-27.6 



110,412 

113,675 

4-3.0 



125, 739 

132, 433 

4-5.3 



47,450 

48, 142 

4-1.5 



241.806 

244,470 

4-1.1 



111, 947 

127.815 

4-14.2 



96. 172 

110,699 

4-15.1 



57, 503 
63.752 
4-10.9 



10, 396 
11,914 
4-14.6 



9,492 

10, 372 

4-9.3 



5,616 
5.405 
-3.8 



101,551 

115, 901 

4-14.1 



86.680 
100, 327 
4-15.7 



61,887 
68.347 
4-12.5 



326 

354 

4-8.6 



290 
318 

4-9.7 



145 

142 

-2.1 



172 

167 

-2.9 



104 
101 

-2.9 



61 

40 

-34.4 



593 

715 

4-20.6 



425 
545 

4-28.2 



278 

317 

4-14.0 



2,712 
3,389 
4-25.0 



1,797 
2,320 
4-29.1 



594 

627 

4-5.6 



6.765 
7,456 
4-10.2 



6.980 
7.189 
4-3.0 



4,599 
4,319 
-6.1 



45,384 

47,242 

4-4.1 



41,768 

44,891 

4-7.5 



26,288 

27, 217 

4-3.5 



41,910 
62, 933 
4-26.3 



33,164 
43.154 
4-30.1 



19,965 
25,220 
4-26 3 



90, 951 

92,004 

4-L2 



98, 950 

99, 269 
4-. 3 



51, 905 

53,197 

4-2.5 



' Suburban places are within Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Areas and includes suburban city and county police agencies within the metropolitan area. 
Excludes core cities; nonsuburban places are outside S.M.S.A.'s. Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property 
crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



92 



Table 8. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1968-69, for Suburban and Nonsuburban Counties by Population Groups 

[1969 estimated population] 













Criminal homicide 










Larceny-theft 






Grand 
total 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Vio- 
lent 
crime 


Property 
crime 






Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 






Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$60 
and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Suburban Counties 




























Over 100,000 




























61 counties, population 
14,767,000: 
1968 


479,987 

624,281 

+9.2 


323,929 

364,296 

+12.6 


28,481 
32,288 
+13.4 


295,448 

332,008 

+12.4 


638 

700 
+9.7 


436 

409 
-6.0 


2,729 
2,997 
+9.8 


9,805 
10,991 
+12.1 


15,309 
17,600 
+15.0 


146,526 


102.092 


156,623 

159,576 

+2.5 


46,830 
53,473 


1969 


161,920 126.615 


Percent change. 


+3.7 


+24.0 


+14.2 


IS.OOO to 100,000 




























127 counties, population 
6,927,000: 
1968 


111,428 

123,367 

-H0.7 


80,670 
91,262 
+13.1 


8,588 
9,574 
+11.5 


72,082 
81,688 
+13.3 


300 

329 

+9.7 


308 
307 
-.3 


977 
1,082 
+10.7 


1,698 
1,986 
+16.9 


5,613 
6,178 
+10.1 


39,210 

42,737 

+9.0 


24,496 
29,677 
+20.7 


30,450 

31,788 

+4.4 


8,376 


1969 


9,374 


Percent change 


+11.9 


10,000 to 15,000 




























47 counties, population 
873,000: 
1968 -.-- -.- 


13,311 
14,960 
-1-12.4 


10,445 
12,020 
+15.1 


1,182 
1,308 
+10.7 


9,263 
10, 712 
+15.6 


39 
43 

+10.3 


24 

27 
+12.6 


157 

151 

-3.8 


171 

173 

+1.2 


815 

941 

+15.6 


6,228 
6,068 
+16.1 


3,309 
3,806 
+15.0 


2,842 
2,913 
+2.5 


726 


1969 


838 


Pprppnt phange 


+15.4 


Nonsuburban Counties 




























SS,000 to 100,000 




























163 counties, population 
6,440,000: 
1968 


72.275 
82,330 
-1-13.9 


60,563 
68,890 
+16.5 


6,466 
7,092 
+9.7 


44,097 
61,798 
+17.5 


306 

246 

-19. 6 


91 

118 

+29.7 


521 

667 

+28.0 


729 

810 

+11.1 


4,910 
6,369 
+9.3 


25,857 
28, 813 
+11.4 


14,285 
18,333 
+28.3 


21,621 

23,322 

+7.9 


3,965 


1969 


4,652 




+17.6 


10,000 to iS,000 




























393 coimties, population 
6,159,000: 
1968 


69,801 
64,111 

+1.2 


44,860 

48,478 

+8.1 


6,402 
6,745 
+6.3 


39,458 

42, 733 

+8.3 


320 

258 

-19.4 


120 

122 

+1.7 


481 

547 

+13.7 


509 

597 

+17.3 


4,092 
4,343 
+6.1 


22,403 

23,163 

+3.4 


14,070 
16,475 
+17.1 


14,821 
15,611 

+4.7 


2,986 


1969 


3,095 


Percent change 


+3.7 


Under 10,000 




























538 counties, population 
2,945,000: 
1968 - 


34,007 

36,353 

+6.9 


25,692 

27,910 

+8.6 


2,666 
2.736 
+2.6 


23,026 

25, 174 

+9.3 


145 

131 

-9.7 


74 

67 

-9.6 


268 

256 

-4.6 


283 

300 

+6.0 


1,970 
2,049 
+4.0 


12,636 

13,182 

+4.3 


8,798 
10,427 
+18.6 


8,241 
8,376 
+1.6 


1,693 


1969 - - 


1,565 


Percent change 


-1.8 







Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



93 



Table 9. — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to tlie Police, 1969, by Population Groups 

[1969 estimated population. Rate: Number of crimes par 100,000 inhabitants] 





Grand 
total 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Vio- 
lent 
crime 


Property 
crime 


Criminal homicide 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burg- 
lary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny-theft 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 


$50 and 
over 


Under 
$60 


Auto 
theft 












man- 
slaughter 


gence 
















TOTAL ALL AGENCIES: 




























6,307 agencies; total popu- 




























lation 178.083,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known 


6,849,903 


1,717.011 


620.029 


4.096.982 


13.174 


7.888 


34.041 


291,912 


280.902 


1.836.285 


1,421,705 


2,125.004 


838.992 


Rate --- 


3.846.5 


2.648.8 


348.2 


2.300.6 


7.4 


4.4 


19.1 


163.9 


157.7 


1,031.1 


798.3 


1.193.3 


471.1 


TOTAL CITIES: 4,317 






, 






















cities; total population 




























IJI.630,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known. 


5.747,579 


3.913.039 


542.041 


3.370.998 


10.594 


4.822 


26.153 


273.185 


232, 109 


1.470.912 


1,157,354 


1.829.718 


742,732 


Rate 


4.611.7 


3.139.7 


434.9 


2,704.8 


8.5 


3.9 


21.0 


219.2 


186.2 


1,180.2 


928.6 


1,468.1 


595.9 






GROUP I 




























58 Cities over 250,000; popula- 




























tion 44,159,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known 


2, 863. 556 


2. 130, 567 


379, 658 


1.750,909 


6,930 


2,604 


16. 756 


215, 294 


140, 678 


776, 800 


514,577 


730, 385 


459, 632 


Rate 


6, 484. 6 


4,824.7 


859.7 


3, 965. 


15.7 


5.9 


37.9 


487.5 


318.6 


1, 769. 1 


1,165.3 


1, 664. 


1, 040. 6 


6 cities over 1,000,000; popu- 




lation 19,537,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known 


1, 221, 076 


981, 111 
5.021.8 


199,310 
1.020 2 


781. 801 
4.001.7 


3.127 
16.0 


812 
4.2 


7,392 
37.8 


120, 205 
615.3 


68,586 
351.1 


352, 384 
1.803.7 


230,065 
1, 177. 6 


239, 163 
1, 224. 1 


199, 352 


Rate 


6, 250. 1 


1, 020 4 


21 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; 




population 13,576,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known 


968,067 
7,130.9 


688.185 
5, 069. 3 


119,014 
876.7 


569. 171 
4, 192. 6 


2,615 
18.6 


1,034 
7.6 


6,118 
46.1 


65, 250 
480. 6 


45, 131 
332.4 


247, 399 
1,822.4 


156, 442 
1,152.4 


278,848 
2, 054. 


165,330 


Rate 


1,217.8 


31 cities, 250,000 to 500,000; 




population 11,047,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known 


674, 413 
6, 105. 


461.271 
4.175.6 


61, 334 

555.2 


399, 937 
3, 620. 4 


1,288 
11.7 


758 
6.9 


3,246 

29.4 


29,839 
270.1 


26, 961 
244.1 


177, 017 
1,602.4 


128, 070 
1,159.3 


212.384 
1,922.6 


94,850 


Rate 


858.6 


GROUP 11 




97 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 




























population 14,413,000: 




























Number of offenses 




























known 


737,392 


477,418 


51, 678 


425, 740 


1,190 


725 


2,877 


21,649 


25, 962 


190,341 


146, 963 


259,249 


89,436 


Rate 


6, 116. 


3,312 3 


358.6 


2, 953. 8 


8.3 


6.0 


20.0 


150.2 


180.1 


1.320.6 


1,012.7 


1, 798. 7 


620.5 



94 



Table 9. — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the Police, 1969, by Population Groups— Continued 



Population group 



GROUP in 

265 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 

population 18,536,000: 

Number of offenses 

known 

Rate... 



GROUP IV 

462 cities, 25.000 to 50,000; 

population 16.520,000: 

Number of offenses 

known.- 

Rate.. 



1,233 cities, 10.000 to 25,000; 
population 19,647,000: 
Number of offenses 

known. 

Rate 



2,202 cities under 10,000; 

population 11,354.000; 

Number of offenses 

known 

Rate 



SUBURBAN AREA • 

2,341 agencies; population 
55,485,000; 
Number of offenses 

known — 

Rate 



RURAL AREA 

1,620 agencies; population 
25,196.000: 
Number of offenses 

known 

Rate 



Grand 
total 



762, 233 
4, 058. 2 



561,801 
3, 400. 7 



668,341 
2, 892. 8 



264,256 
2,327.3 



1,611,158 
2, 903. 8 



318, 977 
1,266.0 



Crime 
Index 
total 



475, 550 
2. 565. 5 



350, 341 
2, 120 7 



326. 269 
1. 660. 7 



152,894 
1,346.6 



1, 076, 853 
1, 940. 8 



242, 650 
963.1 



Vio- 
lent 
crime 



42, %7 
231.8 



28.735 
173.9 



26, 667 
135.7 



12. 336 
108.6 



90,201 
162.6 



25,923 
102.9 



Property 
crime 



432,583 
2,333.7 



321,606 
1,946.7 



299. 602 
1, 624. 9 



140, 558 
1,237.9 



986, 652 
1, 778. 2 



216, 727 
860.2 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



897 
4.8 



669 
4.0 



635 
3.2 



273 
2.4 



2,074 
3.7 



1,241 
4.9 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



664 
3.6 



426 
2.6 



272 
1.4 



131 
1.2 



1,868 
3.4 



1,702 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



2,466 
13.3 



1,727 
10.5 



1,621 
8.3 



706 
6.2 



7,621 
13.7 



2,680 
10.6 



Rob- 
bery 



17,166 
92.6 



10, 119 
61.3 



6,893 
35.1 



2,064 
18.2 



27,942 
50.4 



3,383 
13.4 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



22,438 
121.1 



16, 220 

98.2 



17, 618 
89.2 



9,293 
81.8 



52,564 
94.7 



18,619 
73.9 



Burg- 
lary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



178,810 
964.7 



129,483 
783.8 



132. 791 
675.9 



62,687 
652.1 



446,424 
804.6 



120, 121 
476.8 



Larceny-theft 



$50 and 
over 



170,275 
918.6 



139,213 

842.7 



125,943 
641.0 



61,383 
540.6 



389, 774 
702.5 



75,330 
299.0 



276, 019 
1, 489. 1 



211,034 

1,277.4 



241, 800 
1,230.7 



111,231 
979.6 



532,437 
959.6 



74, 625 
296.2 



Auto 
Under theft 
$50 



' Includes subiurban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. AU rates were calculated on the population before rounding. Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible 
rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



95 



Table 10. — Crime Rates, Offemes Known to the Police, 1969, for Suburban and Nonsuburban Cities by Population Groups 

(1969 estimated population. Rate: Number of crimes per 100,000 Inbabitants] 





Grand 
total 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Vio- 
lent 
crime i 


Property 
crime - 


Criminal homicide 


For- 
cible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Larceny-theft 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Snbnrban Cities 




























TOTAL SUBURBAN 




























CITIES: 1,971 cities; toUl 




























populaUon 27,228,000: 




























Number oroffenses known- 


827,811 


515,531 


38.136 


477,395 


735 


504 


2.413 


12.598 


22,390 


201,172 


200,753 


311,776 


75,470 


Rate 


3.040.3 


1,893.4 


140.1 


1.753.3 


2.7 


1.9 


8.9 


46.3 


82.2 


738.8 


737.3 


1.145.1 


277.2 






GROUP IV 




























282 cities, 25,000 to 60,000: pop- 




























ulation 10,111,000: 




























Number of oflenses Icnown . 


340. 400 


221,672 


16.764 


204.908 


310 


259 


1,004 


6,716 


8,734 


81.947 


86,861 


118.489 


37,100 


Rate 


3,366.7 


2, 192. 4 


166.8 


2,026.6 


3.1 


2.6 


9.9 


66.4 


86.4 


810.5 


849.2 


1, 171. 7 


366.9 


GEOtrP V 


























737 cities, 10,000 to 25.000; pop- 




























ulation 11,931,000: 




























Number of oflenses known. 


349,916 


210. 743 


15,336 


195, 407 


306 


164 


1,054 


4,513 


9,463 


86,216 


80,859 


139,009 


28,333 


Rate 


2, 932. 9 


1, 766. 4 


128.6 


1, 637. 8 


2.6 


1.4 


8.8 


37.8 


79.3 


722. 6 


677.7 


1, 165. 1 


237.5 


OKOUP VI 




























962 cities, under 10,000; popula- 




























tion 5,186,000: 




























Number of oflenses known . 


137,495 


83.116 


6.036 


77.080 


119 


81 


355 


1,369 


4,193 


33, 010 


34,033 


54,298 


10, 037 


Rate - - 


2,651.2 


1,602.7 


116.4 


1,486.3 


2.3 


1.6 


6.8 


26.4 


80.9 


636.6 


656.2 


1, 047. 


193.5 


Nonsabnrban Cities 
























TOTAL NONSUBURBAN 




























CITIES: 1,926 cities; total 




























population 20,294,000: 




























Number ofofTenses known. 


566,587 


313.973 


29.602 


284.371 


842 


325 


1.641 


6.478 


20.641 


123.789 


125,786 


252,289 


34,7% 


Bate 


2,791.9 


1.547.1 


145.9 


1.401.3 


4.1 


1.6 


8.1 


31.9 


101.7 


610.0 


619.8 


1,243.2 


171. S 






GROUP IV 




























180 Cities, 25,000 to 60,000; pop- 




























ulation 6,409,000: 




























Number of oflenses known . 


221,401 


128, 669 


11.971 


116.698 


359 


167 


723 


3,403 


7,486 


47,636 


53.352 


92. 665 


16,810 




3, 454. 3 


2, 007. 5 


186.8 


1,820.7 


5.6 


2.6 


11.3 


53.1 


116.8 


741.7 


832.4 


1,444.2 


246.7 


GROUP V 




496 cities, 10,000 to 26,000; pop- 




























ulation 7,716,000: 




























Number of offenses known . 


218,425 


115, 526 


11,331 


104. 195 


329 


108 


567 


2,380 


8,055 


46.576 


45,084 


102. 791 


12,535 


Rate 


2,830.7 


1,497.2 


146.8 


1,350.3 


4.3 


1.4 


7.3 


30.8 


104.4 


603.6 


584.3 


1.332.1 


162.6 


GROUP VI 




























1,280 cities, under 10,000; pop- 




























ulation 6,168,000: 




























Number of offenses known . 


126. 761 


69, 778 


6,300 


63,478 


154 


50 


361 


695 


5,100 


29, 677 


27,350 


66,933 


6,461 




2, 055. 


1,131.2 


102.1 


1,029.1 


2.5 


.8 


6.7 


11.3 


82.7 


481.1 


443.4 


923.0 


104.6 



1 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
> Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



96 



Table 11. — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the Police, 1969, Suburban and Nonsuburban Counties by Population Groups 

(1969 estimated population. Rate: Number of crimes per 100,000 inhabitants) 



Population group 


Grand 
total 


Crime 
Index 

total 


Vio- 
lent 
crime ' 


Property 
crime ' 


Criminal homicide 


For- 
cible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Larceny-theft 




Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


$50 
and 
over 


Under 
$50 


Auto 
theft 


Surburban Counties 




























Over 100,000 




























66 counties, population 
16,804,000: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate. -.- 


550, 161 
3,481.2 


385,030 
2,436.4 


34, 081 
215.7 


350,949 
2, 220. 7 


719 
4.5 


438 

2.8 


3,196 
20.2 


11,408 

72.2 


18,768 
118.7 


161,003 
1,018.8 


133,683 
845.9 


164,693 
1,042.1 


56,263 
356.0 


26,000 to 100,000 




























166 counties, population 
8,468,000: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate -. - 


161, 794 
1,910.7 


120, 390 
1,421.7 


12,701 
150.0 


107, 689 
1,271.7 


417 

4.9 


348 
4.1 


1.400 
16.5 


2,614 
30.9 


8,270 
97.7 


56,316 
665.0 


39, 198 
462.9 


41,056 

484.8 


12, 175 
143.8 


10,000 to 15,000 




65 counties, population 
1,217,000: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate. 


20, 367 
1, 673. 6 


16,548 
1,369.8 


1.811 

148.8 


14, 737 
1,210.9 


70 
5.8 


46 
3.8 


218 
17.9 


297 
24.4 


1,226 
100.7 


8,454 
694.7 


5,014 
412.0 


3,773 
310.0 


1,269 
104.3 


Nonsurburban Counties 




























16,000 to 100,000 




























183 counties, population 
7,168,000: 
Number of offenses known . 


91.386 
1,276.8 


65,287 
912.1 


7,787 
108.8 


57,500 
803.3 


279 
3.9 


125 
1.7 


744 
10.4 


905 
12.6 


5,859 
81.9 


31, 639 
440.6 


20, 924 
292.3 


25,974 
362.9 


5,037 
70.4 


10,000 to t6,000 




469 counties, population 
7,192,000: 
Number of offenses known. 
Rate . . 


76,242 
1,060.1 


58,318 
810.9 


7.290 
101.4 


51,028 
709.5 


346 
4.8 


139 

1.9 


662 
9.2 


750 
10.4 


5,532 
76.9 


28,003 
389.4 


19,367 
269.3 


17,785 
247.3 


3,658 
50.9 


Under 10,000 




619 counties, population 
3,408,000: 
Number of offenses known. 


42,038 
1,233.7 


32,450 
952.3 


3,487 
102.3 


28,963 
850.0 


168 
4.9 


77 
2.3 


327 

9.6 


364 
10.7 


2,628 
77.1 


15,204 
446.2 


11,899 
349.2 


9,511 
279.1 


1,860 
54.6 







' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 






97 



Table 12. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1969, by Population Groups 

[1969 estimated population] 



Population group 



TOTAL CITIES 

3,882 cities: toul popalation 
103.936,000: 

Offenses linown 

Percent cleared by arrest 

GROUP I 

51 cities; total population 
30,728,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest , . 
4 cities over 1,000,000; total 
population 8,465,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest . . 
19 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; 
total population 12, 362,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest _ . 
28 cities, 250,000 to 600,000; 
total population 9,911,000: 

Offenses known. 

Percent cleared by arrest . . 

GROUP II 

94 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 
total population 14,036,000: 

Offenses known — 

Percent cleared by arrest - - 

GROUP m 

238 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 
total population 16,633,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest . 



Grand 
total 



4,511,646 
20.6 



1, 925, 325 
21.5 



464, 278 
24.6 



867, 822 
20.6 



593,225 
20.5 



719. 131 
20.6 



645, 477 
18.9 



Crime 
Index 
total 



2.950.396 
20.1 



1. 368. 021 
21.1 



333, 010 
24.1 



621, 250 
20.7 



403. 761 
19.4 



465,323 
20.1 



408, 107 
17.8 



Violent 
crime 



384,877 
46.5 



238,845 
41.7 



78, 077 
41.1 



107, 016 
39 5 



53, 752 
47.0 



60,659 
53.3 



36, 980 
51.0 



Property 
crime 



2.565.519 
16.1 



1, 119. 176 
16.8 



264,933 
18.9 



514,234 
16.8 



350, 009 
15.2 



414,664 
16.1 



371,127 
14.5 



Criminal bomicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaugh- 
ter 



8,427 
86.1 



6,122 
84.1 



1,707 
84.6 



2,322 
86.1 



1.093 
81.3 



1,162 
90.4 



779 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



4,230 
83.5 



2,157 
85.2 



533 
91.2 



691 
76.1 



715 
77.3 



614 
80.1 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



19,645 
55.9 



11,271 
63.8 



3,167 
54.9 



5,341 
53.2 



2,773 
53.5 



2,800 
56.8 



2,091 
67.9 



Rob- 
bery 



184.780 
26.9 



133.091 
26.3 



49.144 
27.8 



67,888 
23.9 



26,059 
28.6 



21, 127 
29.6 



14,257 
25.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



172.025 
64,7 



89,361 



24,069 
63.3 



41.465 
57.1 



23,827 
64.7 



25,670 
70.8 



19,853 
66.8 



Burg- 
lary- 
breaking 
or en- 
tering 



1.115,360 
18.9 



493, 447 
19.7 



116,476 
19.1 



223,694 
20.2 



163.277 
19.4 



185.605 
19.5 



164.092 
17.3 



Larceny-theft 



Total 



2.439.700 
17.9 



$60 
and 
over 



882.680 
11.4 



879,691 314,544 
18. 6 11. 9 



187. 785 
23.0 



390. 214 
17.1 



301. 692 
17.7 



394.324 
17.7 



380,877 
16.9 



67.050 
17.2 



144. 676 
11.6 



112,919 



141,231 
11.3 



144, 121 
10.7 



Auto 
theft 



567,479 
17.9 



311, 185 
17.0 



81.407 
19.8 



145,965 
16.6 



83.813 
16.0 



87,928 
16.7 



72, 914 
16.2 



98 



Table 12. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1969, by Population Groups — Continued 





Grand 
total 


Crime 
Indei 
total 


Violent 
crime 


Property 
crime 


Criminal homicide 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burg- 
lary- 
breaking 
or en- 
tering 


Larceny-theft 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Total 


$50 
and 
over 


Auto 

theft 


GROUP IV 




























410 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 




























population 14,622,000: 




























Offenses known 


487, 865 
19.9 


299. 920 
18.3 


24,997 
51.3 


274.923 
15.3 


574 


385 


1,467 
62.2 


8,698 
27.3 


14,358 
63.1 


110, 422 
18.6 


306, 960 
17.8 


119,400 
10.7 


45,101 
19.6 


Percent cleared by arrest.. 


88.7 


80.8 


GROUP V 




























1,110 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 




























total population 17,672,000: 




























Offenses known 


503. 378 


286, 427 


23,057 


263,370 
15.9 


556 


242 


1,399 
59.5 


6,987 
30.6 


15,115 


116,724 
17.6 


327, 148 
17.6 


110,439 
11.3 


36,207 
24.5 


Percent cleared by arrest.. 


20.1 


19.5 


60.0 


89.2 


95.0 


70.7 


GROUP VI 




























1,979 cities under 10,000; total 




























population 10,247,000: 




























Offenses known 


230, 470 


132,598 
20.9 


10,339 
67.3 


122. 259 
17.0 


234 


117 


617 


1,720 


7,768 
74.5 


55, 170 


160,700 
17.7 


52,945 
11.8 


14 144 


Percent cleared by arrest. . 


21. n 


85.9 


94.0 


64.8 


33.1 


18.5 


30.5 


SUBURBAN AREA > 




























2,045 agencies ; total population 




























46,079,000: 




























Offenses known 


1,247,330 


814, 142 


64,349 

52.8 


749, 793 
15.9 


1,501 


1,677 


5,231 
57.5 


20,288 
30.6 


37,329 
62.9 


330,880 
18.2 


733, 713 
16.2 


302,202 
10.9 


116,711 


Percent cleared by arrest . . 


19.2 


18.8 


85.7 


71.9 


22.2 


RURAL AREA 




























1,321 agencies; total population 




























20,903,000: 




























Offenses known 


254,455 


195,307 
25.3 


18,422 


176,885 
21.0 


964 


1,743 


2,041 
63.8 


2,600 
44.4 


12,817 
70.4 


98,248 
20.8 


118, 169 
18.5 


60,764 
16.6 


17,873 
37.3 


Percent cleared by arrest.. 


24.5 


66.6 


82.9 


62.4 



' Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



k 



99 



Table 13. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1969, by Geographic Divisions 

[1969 estimated population] 





Grand 
total 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime 


Property 
crime 


Criminal homicide 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Rob- 
bery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burg- 
lary- 
breaking 
or en- 
tering 


Larceny-theft 




Geographic division 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 
man- 
slaugh- 
ter 


Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 


Total 


$60 
and 
over 


Auto 

theft 


TOTAL ALL DIVLSIONS 




























3,882 cities; total populUion 
103,936,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest . . 


4,511,646 
20.6 


2, 950.. 396 
20.1 


384,877 
46.5 


2,565.519 
16.1 


8,427 
86.1 


4.230 
83.5 


19,645 
55.9 


184.780 
26.9 


172,025 
64.7 


1,115,360 
18.9 


2,439.700 
17.9 


882,680 
11.4 


567,479 
17.9 


NEW ENGLAND STATES 




























3 30 cities; total population 
8,492, 000: 
Otfenses known 


303, 138 
18.4 


224, 765 
18.2 


15,263 

51.4 


209,502 
15.8 


269 
82.2 


267 
75.5 


810 
64.6 


7,076 
31.4 


7,109 
68.6 


85, 476 
17.2 


138, 688 
16.2 


60, 672 
13.1 


63,464 


Percent cleared by arrest - . 


16.4 


MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 




























994 cities; total population 
18. 808,000: 
Offenses known 


555. 017 
17.9 


390, 782 
17.8 


44,553 
45.0 


346,229 
14.3 


913 
83.5 


548 
81.9 


2,375 
61.6 


22,831 
26.2 


18, 434 
64.2 


146, 409 
17.6 


280,280 
14.8 


116. 593 
10.3 


83,227 


Percent cleared by arrest - - 


14.3 


EAST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 




























860 Cities; total population 
25,043,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest . . 


1, 124, 272 
21.1 


724, 927 
20.4 


116, 185 
42.0 


608, 742 
16.2 


2,318 
82.5 


985 
85.4 


5,287 
52.8 


64.863 
26.1 


43, 727 
62.0 


246, 638 
19.1 


604. 126 
18.7 


205. 766 
12.0 


166.438 
17.3 


WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 




























431 cities; total population 
9,234,000: 
Offenses known _ _ 


419,329 
21.3 


251, 147 
21.1 


28,111 
46.8 


223,036 
17.9 


577 
89.1 


265 
83.4 


1,958 
58.1 


13,612 
28.2 


11,964 
64.2 


94,687 
20.6 


244,646 
18.6 


76,729 
11.9 


51,720 


Percent cleared by arrest . . 


22.0 


SOUTH ATLANTIC STATES 




























339 cities; total population 
12,181,000: 
Offenses known 


629,948 
21.7 


432,328 
21.4 


82,464 
45.3 


349,874 
15.7 


1,847 
90.1 


623 
91.2 


2,995 
57.5 


36.920 
21.2 


40, 692 
64.2 


162,201 
18.1 


320,406 
17.8 


123,409 
11.1 


64,264 


Percent cleared by arrest . . 


18.6 


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 




























132 cities; total population 
4,398,000: 
Offenses known. 


154,392 
19.9 


114,058 
18.4 


13,014 
66.2 


101,044 
13.6 


615 

87.4 


299 
76.9 


608 
60.2 


5,226 
26.9 


6,666 
74.4 


45,676 
16.0 


75, 138 
17.3 


36, 103 
9.6 


20,265 


Percent cleared by arrest.. 


16.2 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 




























286 cities; total population 
11,602,000: 
Offenses known 


523,581 
23.2 


332,700 

22.7 


44,557 

65.4 


288,143 
17.6 


1,304 

88.0 


659 
86.5 


2,492 
58.2 


16,844 
34.0 


23,917 
68.6 


140,098 
20.1 


283,005 
20.3 


92,783 
12.6 


55,262 


Percent cleared by arrest. . 


19.9 


MOUNTAIN STATES 




























199 cities; total population 
4,691,000: 
Offenses known 


253, 174 
19.8 


149,780 
18.2 


14,344 
51.0 


135,436 
14.7 


251 
89.2 


256 
83.6 


1,051 
46.1 


5,073 
31.4 


7,969 
62.8 


58, 459 
17.9 


156,991 
17.7 


53,863 
9.5 


23, 124 


Percent cleared by arrest . . 


19.0 


PAOFIC STATES 




























321 cities; total population 
9,487,000: 
Offenses known 


648, 796 
20.3 


329,909 
19.7 


26,396 
48.3 


303,613 
17.2 


433 

83.6 


338 
73.1 


2,069 
60.2 


12, 347 
33.2 


11,547 
62.8 


135,916 
21.4 


336,420 
17.6 


117.872 
10.9 


49,725 


Percent cleared by arrest. . 


20.6 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape 
Property crime is offenses of burglary', larceny $50 



robbery and aggravated assault, 
and over and auto theft. 



100 



Table 14. — Offenses Cleared, 1969, by Arrest of Persons Under 78 Years of Age 

(Percent of total cleared; 1969 estimated population] 



Population group 



TOTAL CITIES 

3,814 cities; total populalion 
98.44-l,000; 

Total clearances ., 

Percent under 18 



GROUP I 

60 cities over 250,000; total 
population 27,188,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

3 cities over 1,000,000; total 
population 4,915,000: 

Total clearances.. 

Percent under 18 

19 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; 
total population 12,362,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

28 cities, 250,000 to 500,000; 
total population 9,911,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18. 



GROUP n 

92 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; 
total population 13,706,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 



GROUP ni 

228 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; 
total population 16,826,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 



GROUP IV 

400 cities, 25,000 to 60,000; 
total population 14,280,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 



OEOUP V 

1,087 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; 
total population 17,304,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18. 



GROUP VI 

1,967 cities under 10,000; total 
population 10,140,000: 

Total clearances. 

Percent under 18 



SUBURBAN AREA ' 

2,006 agencies; total population 
44,818,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

RURAL AREA 

1,286 agencies; total population 
20,227,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 



Grand 
total 



855,015 
37.0 



365, 096 
34.0 



64.465 
33.8 



179, 112 
32.6 



121, 519 
36.1 



142, 900 
34.6 



116,646 
38.2 



94,271 
41.0 



98, 347 
43.0 



47. 765 
43.9 



233, 531 

38.2 



59, 216 
27.7 



Crime 
Index 
total 



541.216 
32.0 



246,984 
30.7 



40,047 
30.2 



128,444 

29.4 



78, 493 
33.1 



91,158 
30.3 



68,804 
32.0 



62, 974 
34.8 



63,892 
36.7 



27,404 
36.9 



148.253 
33.2 



46,833 
27.2 



Vio- 
lent 
crime 



159,406 
14.0 



82,588 
15.7 



16,040 
20.2 



42,297 
15.3 



25, 251 
13.8 



26,675 
11.6 



17, 662 
13.1 



12,430 
12.1 



13,267 
12.3 



6,884 
10.9 



32, 918 
13.6 



11,390 
7.0 



Property 
crime 



381,810 
39.5 



164, 396 
38.2 



25.007 
36.3 



86, 147 
36 3 



53.242 
42. 2 



64,583 
38.1 



51, 142 
38.5 



40.544 
41.7 



40,626 
43.3 



20,520 
45.6 



115,335 
38.9 



35, 443 
33.7 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



6.515 
6.1 



3.695 
6.8 



831 

7.2 



1,975 
6.7 



1,028 
5.3 



611 
4.7 



602 
5.4 



479 
6.4 



200 
6.6 



1,253 
6.9 



767 
5.2 



Man- 
slaugh- 
ter by 
negli- 
gence 



3.184 
5.0 



1,618 
4.7 



166 

4.2 



826 
5.8 



526 
3.0 



541 
5.2 



479 
3.3 



309 
6.8 



227 
7.5 



110 
6.4 



1,193 
7.9 



1,065 
4.7 



For- 
cible 
rape 



10.011 
14.2 



6,277 
14.4 



949 
20.1 



2,844 
13.0 



1,484 
13.6 



1,527 
12.1 



1,125 
13.3 



883 
16.7 



804 
16.5 



396 
16.2 



2,899 
13.6 



1,226 
9.1 



Rob- 
bery 



41,302 
23.3 



27,241 
24.5 



6,982 
26.2 



13, 808 
24.7 



7.451 
22.6 



6.161 
20.3 



3,336 

22.9 



2,233 

18.9 



1,776 
22.7 



566 
18.7 



5,996 
20.0 



1,078 
9.7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bvu-- 
glary— 
breaking 

or 
entering 



101.578 
10.6 



46,375 
11.6 



7,278 
16.6 



23,670 
10.8 



16, 427 
10.0 



17. 869 



12, 690 
10.8 



8,812 
10.3 



10,209 
10.6 



5,723 
10.0 



22,770 
12.2 



8,319 
6.6 



196.916 
40.3 



87, 172 
37.0 



12,281 
34.2 



46. 217 
36.1 



29,674 
40.9 



34,678 
38.3 



25,198 
40.7 



19, 782 
44.7 



20,020 
47.7 



10,066 
51.5 



68,490 
42.6 



19,513 
36.7 



Larceny-theft 



403.270 
42.3 



138,609 
38.1 



18,408 
39.6 



66,568 
36.6 



63,633 
39.4 



66,672 
39.5 



62. 131 
43.0 



63,320 
46.4 



66,227 
48.3 



26, 411 
50.2 



115,810 
42.9 



20,880 
29.2 



$50 
and 
over 



92.655 
29.4 



31, 915 

24.8 



4,166 
24.0 



16, 726 
22.8 



11, 033 
28.2 



15, 471 
30.3 



14,768 
28.0 



12,332 
32.8 



11,999 
34.2 



6,170 
38.7 



31,726 
31.4 



9,562 
26.1 



1 Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 
Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of biu^lary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 

101 



Table 1 5. — Dispoiition of Persons Formally Charged by the Police, 1969 

[2,640 cities; 1969 estimated population 66,155,000] 



Offense 



Charged 

(held for 

prosecution) 



Guilty 



Offense 
charged 



Lesser 
offense 



Acquitted or 
dismissed 



Referred to 
juvenile court 



TOTAL.. 



2,402.979 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter.. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 



2,608 

1,000 

4.118 

19, 065 

33,786 

87, 960 

198, 732 

49,033 



Violent crime... 
Property crime. 



69, 666 
335, 726 



Subtotal tor above offenses.. 



396,291 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing.. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against the family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness.. 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses 



113,968 
2,775 
11,923 
22,666 
2,828 
15, 535 
34,868 
33, 940 
12,237 
20, 357 
63.668 
27, 320 
21,341 
148, 692 
106, 322 
806, 961 
209, 376 
33, 389 
319, 642 



62.3 



36.3 
37.3 

25.7 
26.4 
36.8 
23.0 

42.7 
17.6 



32.7 
33.9 



33.7 



48.3 


16.4 


54.1 


66.1 


62.3 


36.1 


26.1 


66.3 


71.1 


62.0 


36.9 


61.9 


63.9 


77.0 


63.2 


86.2 


62.0 


64.7 


47.7 



3.2 



19.7 

12.5 

12.3 

9.6 

14.7 

6.4 

3.3 

4.8 



13.1 
4.3 



6.7 



3.9 
6.1 
9.6 
4.3 

2.9 
7.2 
1.8 
7.5 
2.2 
7.4 
7.0 
6.1 
2.6 
13.0 
1.4 
.7 
1.6 
3.2 
1.6 



31.6 
41.0 
34.7 
22.1 
30.7 
11.4 
13.6 
11.6 



28.3 
12.7 



15.1 



35.0 
14.5 
22.2 
26.7 
29.7 
20.1 
18.4 
21.8 
24.2 
19.8 
24.6 
31.7 
28.0 
9.2 
12.6 
11.4 
22.1 
24. 2 
14.2 



18. S 



12.4 
9.2 
27.2 
41.8 
17.9 
69.3 
40.4 
66.1 



26.0 
49.1 



46.5 



12.9 
64.0 
14.2 

3.8 

6.0 
36.6 
54.7 
14.3 

2.4 
20.9 
31.7 

1.3 

15.5 

.8 

22.8 

1.6 
14.3 

7.9 
36.5 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



102 



Table 16. — Persom Charged — Percent Arrested or Summorted — 1969 

[1,2M cities; 1969 estimated population 29,838,000] 



Offense 



Number of 
persons 
charged 


Percent of charged 


Arrested 


Summoned 


1,156,835 


88.3 


11.7 


1,364 


97.6 


2.4 


791 


89.6 


10.6 


2,448 


94.9 


5.1 


11,064 


95.2 


4.8 


18, 931 


89.3 


10.7 


44,466 


88.9 


13.1 


99,424 


79.4 


20.6 


23,823 


89.1 


10.9 


33,807 


92.0 


8.0 


167, 713 


82.7 


17.3 


202,311 


84.3 


16.7 


69,897 


849 


15.1 


1,458 


81.3 


18.7 


6,695 


90.0 


10.0 


13,910 


81.4 


18.6 


1,529 


88.6 


11.4 


11, 142 


91.9 


8.1 


18, 159 


69.1 


30.9 


16,712 


94.7 


5.3 


6,189 


99.1 


.9 


11,128 


91.5 


8.6 


37,864 


94.5 


6.5 


10,306 


93.4 


6.6 


11,600 


75.3 


24.7 


62,540 


92.9 


7.1 


45,270 


74.2 


25.8 


352,740 


96.6 


3.4 


124,232 


87.8 


12.2 


12,618 


95.1 


4.9 


151,535 


78.0 


22.0 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape _ 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft _ 

Auto theft 

Violent crime 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud... 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing... 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commerciahzed vice 

Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

OambUng 

Offenses against the family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct.. 

Vagrancy... 

All other offenses 



Table 17. — Offenses Known, Cleared,- Persons Arrested, Charged and Disposed of in 1969 

[2,344 cities; 1969 estimated population 59,267,000] 



Type 



Offenses known 

Offenses cleared 

Percent cleared 

TOTAL ARRESTS 

Per 100 offenses 

Arrests under 18 

Per 100 offenses 

Persons charged 

Per 100 offenses 

Persons guilty as charged 

Per 100 offenses 

Persons guilty of lesser offenses 

Per 100 offenses 

Persons acquitted or dismissed 

Per 100 offenses 

Juveniles referred to juvenile court 

Per 100 offenses 



TOTAL 



2,497,957 

492.033 

19.7 



485 
253 
427 
117 
20 
52 
164 



620 
19.4 
372 
10.1 
455 
17.1 
.497 
4.7 
086 
.8 
.378 
2.1 
915 
6.6 



Violent 
crime 



189, 085 

88,195 

46.6 



78.126 

41.3 

18,432 

9.7 

73,450 

38.8 

16,982 

9.0 

7,107 

3.8 

16,331 

8.1 

14,332 

7.6 



Property 
crime 



2,308,872 

403,838 

17.5 



407,494 

IT. 6 

234, 940 

10.2 

354,005 

15.3 

100,515 

4.4 

12, 979 

.6 

37.047 

1.6 

150.683 

6.5 



Murder 




and non- 


Forcible 


negligent 


rape 


man- 




slaughter 




4,101 


10.344 


3,477 


6,761 


84.8 


55.7 



Robbery 



92, 332 

23, 782 

25.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



82,308 

55, 175 

67.0 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



614,339 

113,322 

18.4 



Larceny- 
theft 



1,373,065 

235,201 

17.1 



4,050 


5.558 


26.532 


41,986 


98.8 


53.7 


28.7 


51.0 


430 


1,221 


9.406 


7,375 


10.5 


11.8 


10.2 


9.0 


3,870 


5,379 


24,510 


39, 691 


94.4 


52.0 


26.6 


48.2 


812 


905 


4,413 


10,852 


19.8 


8.7 


4.8 


13.2 


458 


461 


1,678 


4,510 


11.2 


4.5 


1.8 


5.5 


765 


1,323 


3,749 


9,494 


18.7 


12.8 


4.1 


11.5 


296 


1,036 


7,371 


5,629 


7.2 


10.0 


8.0 


6.8 



103,453 

16.8 

60, 266 

9.8 

93,536 

15.2 

17, 592 

2.9 

4,955 

.8 

8,732 

1.4 

46,880 

7.6 



248.370 

18.1 

137,905 

10.0 

210,306 

15.3 

75,386 

5.5 

5,955 

.4 

23,377 

1.7 

74,538 

5.4 



Auto 
theft 



321,468 

55,315 

17.2 



55,671 

17.3 

36, 769 

11.4 

50,163 

15.6 

7,537 

2.3 

2,069 

.6 

4,938 

1.5 

29,165 

9.1 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



103 



Table 18. — Police Ditposition of Juvenile Offenders Taken Into Custody, 1969 

[1969 estimated population] 



Population group 


Total 1 


Handled 

within 

department 

and released 


Referred to 
juvenile 

court juris- 
diction 


Referred to 
welfare 
agency 


Referred to 
other 
police 
agency 


Referred to 
criminal or 
adult court 


TOTAL, ALL AGENCIES 














3,738 agencies; total population 106,776,000: 
















1.277,481 


672.685 


652,132 


16,653 


25.769 


10,342 




MOO.O 


44.8 


51.0 


1.3 


2.0 


0.8 






TOTAL CITIES 














3.006 agencies; total popuUtion 85,399,000: 
















1,125,357 


510,771 


568,084 


15.065 


22,411 


9,026 


Percent 


100.0 


45.4 


50.5 


1.3 


2.0 


.8 






QBOUF I 














42 cities over 260,000; population 24,200,000: 














Number - - 


309, 795 


104,810 


194,963 


6,689 


3,714 


719 


Percent - - - 


100.0 


33.8 


62.9 


1.8 


1.2 


.2 


OEOUP n 




81 cities, 100,000 to 260,000; population 11,967,000: 














Number .... 


174, 078 


75,634 


92,051 


2,715 


2,579 


1,199 




100.0 


43.4 


62.9 


1.6 


1.6 


.7 


ORODP m 




216 cities, 60,000 to 100,000; population 14,994,000: 














Number 


212, 669 


108,250 


95,967 


2,053 


4,723 


1,676 




100.0 


50.9 


45.1 


1.0 


2.2 


.7 


GEOUP IV 




367 cities, 26,000 to 60,000; population 12,764,000: 
















174, 746 


92,681 


73,660 


2,669 


4,303 


1,633 




100.0 


63.0 


42.2 


1.6 


2.6 


.9 


OEOUP V 




872 cities, 10,000 to 26,000; population 13,917,000: 














Nnmhpr 


163,657 


84,989 


70, 618 


1,339 


4,330 


2,381 


Percent. _ ..... 


100.0 


52.0 


43.1 


.8 


2.6 


1.5 


OEOUP VI 




1,439 cities, under 10,000; population 7,667,000: 














Number 


90,612 


44,607 


40,926 


800 


2,762 


1,618 


Percent .. . . . 


100.0 


49.2 


45.2 


.9 


3.0 


1.7 


SUBUBBAN AREA ' 




1,650 agencies; population 32,310,000: 














Number 


362,696 


196,289 


160,939 


2,869 


9,473 


3,026 


Percent. . - 


100.0 


54.1 


41.6 


.8 


2.6 


.8 


RURAL AREA 




628 agencies; population 9,703,000: 
















47,591 


15,811 


28,351 


911 


1.592 


926 




100.0 


33.2 


59.6 


1.9 


3.3 


1.9 







' Includes all offenses except trafBc and neglect cases. 

2 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

' Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 



104 



Table 19. — Offeme Analysis 1969 — Percent Distribution, Average Value, and Percent Change 

Over 1968 

[1,027 cities 2,S00 and over; 1969 estimated population 84,023,000] 



Classification 



Number of 
offenses 



Percent 

change over 

1968 



Percent dis- 
tribution * 



Average 
value 



TOTAL. 



Highway 

Commercial house 

Gas or service station. 

Chain store 

Residence 

Bank! 

Miscellaneous 



BDRGLART— BEEAKINQ OK ENTERING 
TOTAL... 



Residence (dwelling): 

Night 

Day... 

Nonresidence (store, office, etc.): 

Night 

Day — 



LARCENY — THEFT (EXCEPT ADTO THEFT) 
TOTAL 



By type: 

Pocket-picking... 

Purse -snatching 

Shoplifting 

From autos (except accessories). 

Auto accessories 

Bicycles 

From buildings 

From coin-operated machines. . - 
All others 



By value: 

$50 and over.. 
Under $50 



Auto theft. 



234,528 



129,262 
39,402 
10,855 

6,688 
24,053 

1,162 
23,204 



1.123.794 



282,689 
341,789 



429,880 
69, 436 



2,155,824 



32, 468 
71,419 
178.633 
463. 924 
455, 955 
279, 610 
372, 970 
36, 517 
264,328 



862, 344 
1,293,480 



-I-I2.8 



-1-16.2 
-1-4.6 
-1-9.3 

-1-22.3 

-1-16.9 
-6.9 

-1-10.6 



-1-6.1 



-1-9.4 
-1-11.3 

(>) 
-1-7.8 



-1-9.0 



-1-2.4 
-1-18.8 
-1-17.1 
-H6.4 
-1-12.3 
-4.1 
-t-7.6 
-H.3 
-1-6.6 



-1-19.8 
+3.5 



100.0 



66.1 
16.8 
4.6 
2.8 
10.3 
.5 
9.9 



26.2 
30.4 



38.3 
6.2 



100. 



1.5 
3.3 
8.3 
21.6 
21.1 
13.0 
17.3 
1.7 
12.3 



40.0 
60.0 



$288 



176 
602 
123 
397 
279 
,526 
225 



324 
344 



304 
250 



111 



100 
54 

28 
146 

65 

34 
197 

24 
164 



253 
16 



992 



' Because of rounding the percentages may not add to total. 

» For total U.S., bank robbery decreased from 1,840 offenses in 1968 to 1,813 In 1969 or 1.5 percent. 

' Increase of less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



Table 20. — Type and Value of Property Stolen and Recovered, 1969 

[1,026 cities 2,500 and over; 1969 estimated population 75,871,000] 



Type of property 


Value of property 


Percent 




Stolen 


Recovered 


recovered 


TOTAL!. 


$978,200,000 


$456,300,000 


47 






Currency, notes, etc 


87,100,000 

68, 100, 000 

9,300,000 

30,300,000 

498, 800, 000 

284, 700, 000 


8,100.000 

5,700,000 

500,000 

4,200,000 

400,900,000 

36, 900, 000 




Jewelry and precious metals . 


8 


Furs 




Clothing 


14 


Locally stolen automobiles 


80 


Miscellaneous 


13 







' Because of rounding, the values may not add to total. 



105 



Table 21. — Murder Victims— Weapons Used, 1969 





Number 


Weapons 


Age 


Gun 


Cutting 

or 
stabbing 


Blunt 

object 

(club, 

hammer, 

etc.) 


Personal 
weapons 
(strangu- 
lations and 
beatings) 


Poison 


Explosives 


Other 
(drownings, 
arson, etc.) 


Unknown 
and not 
stated 


TOTAL 


13,575 
100.0 


8,876 
65.4 


2,534 
18.7 


613 
4.5 


1,039 

7.7 


9 
0.1 


0.1 


322 
2.4 


175 


Percent 1- 


1.3 








111 

278 
116 
183 

1,261 
1,979 
1,852 
1,523 

1,407 

1,246 

1,010 

738 

591 
400 
279 
175 

205 
221 


4 
35 
47 
111 

929 
1,445 
1,336 
1,076 

985 
809 
621 
456 

353 

229 
155 
84 

65 
136 


4 

12 
13 
26 

223 
354 
373 

292 

281 
283 

206 
145 

108 
78 
47 
25 

31 
33 


6 

38 

9 

3 

27 
47 
46 
43 

52 
62 
73 
60 

44 
34 
27 
17 

29 
6 


63 
133 
16 
23 

48 
84 
67 
75 

61 
71 

77 
67 

68 
38 
38 
33 

68 
19 


1 




27 
SO 
24 
14 

27 
30 
17 
18 

14 
16 
17 
9 

8 
10 
9 
9 

4 

19 


6 


1-4 -.- 


1 


9 


5-9 


3 


4 


10-14 




6 


15-19 - 






7 


20-24 ---- 






19 


25-29 _ 




1 


12 


30-34 


1 

1 
1 
1 


18 


35-39 




13 


40-44 


1 


13 


45-49 


15 


50-54 


2 


9 


55-S9 




10 


60-64 




2 


9 


65-69 




3 


70-74 


1 




6 


75 and over 




8 


TTnlTTioWi 






8 











1 Because of rounding the percentages may not add to total. 







Table 22.- 


—Murder Vicfims by Age, Sex, 


and Race, 


7969 










Number 


Percent 


Sex 


Race 


Age 


Male 


Female 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Japanese 


All others 
(includes 

race 
unlniown) 


TOTAL 


13,575 




10.550 
77.7 


3,025 
22.3 


5.965 
43.9 


7,413 
54.6 


89 
0.7 


20 
0.1 


8 
0.1 


80 


Percent - 


• 100.0 


0.6 








Tnf?int (iiiider 1) 


111 
278 
116 
183 

1,261 
1,979 
1,852 
1,523 

1,407 

1,246 

1,010 

738 

691 
400 
279 
175 

205 
221 


.8 
2.0 

.9 
1.3 

9.3 
14.6 
13.6 
11.2 

10.4 

9.2 
7.4 
5.4 

4.4 
2.9 
2.1 
1.3 

1.5 
1.6 


59 
138 
64 

105 

1,004 
1,586 
1,489 
1,190 

1,121 

974 
789 
697 

480 
312 
223 
129 

123 
167 


52 
140 

52 
78 

257 
393 
363 
333 

286 
272 
221 
141 

HI 
88 
56 
46 

82 
54 


75 
178 
82 
93 

473 
785 
735 
604 

554 
497 
441 
362 

309 
261 
173 
111 

169 
73 


30 
97 
34 

89 

777 
1,161 
1,091 

896 

835 
741 

. 560 
369 

273 
134 
101 
62 

41 
122 


1 
2 






5 


1-4 






1 


fi-9 








10-14 








1 


16-19. 


7 
23 
16 
11 

11 
4 
4 
6 

2 


2 
2 
3 




2 


2(}-24.. . 


2 


6 


26-29 


8 


30-34 


2 

1 
2 


10 


35-39 




6 


40-44 


1 
2 
1 

2 


1 


45-49 


3 


60-54 




1 


65-59... 


1 


3 


60-64 


3 


65-69. 


1 




4 


70-74.. 


1 
3 




1 




1 
2 




1 


Unknown 




24 











I Because of rounding the percentages may not add to total. 



106 



Arrest Data 



Tables in the following section provide certain 
personal characteristics of individuals arrested for 
all criminal acts. Arrest rates and trends are shown 
for city, suburban and rural areas, as well as the 
United States as a whole. Tabulations are pub- 
lished containing characteristics of persons ar- 
rested by age, sex and race. 

Arrest statistics are collected annually from con- 
tributing law enforcement agencies and the figures 
used in the tables this year were submitted by 
agencies representing 71 percent of the United 
States population. In using these arrest figures it 
is important to remember that the same person 
may be arrested several times during 1 year for 
the same type or for different offenses. Each arrest 
is counted. Further, the arrest of one person may 
solve several crimes and, in other instances, two 



or more persons may be arrested during the solu- 
tion of one crime. 

Arrests are primarily a measure of police ac- 
tivity, as it relates to crime. Although police arrest 
practices vary, particularly with respect to 
juveniles, contributors to this Program are in- 
structed to coimt one arrest each time an individ- 
ual is taken into custody for committing a specific 
crime. A juvenile is counted as a person arrested 
when he commits an offense and the circumstances 
are such that if the offender were an adult, an 
arrest would be made. 

Arrest data, while primarily a measure of law 
enforcement activity, is also a gauge of criminality 
when used within its limitations, as must be done 
with all forms of criminal statistics, including 
court and penal. 



107 



397-633 O - 70 - 8 



Table 23. — Arrests, Number and Rate, 1969, by Population Groups 







[Rate per 100,000; 1969 estimated population] 












Cities 


Other 


areas 


Offense charged 


Total 

(4,759 
agencies; 

total 
population 
143,815,000) 


Total city 

arrests 
(3,500 cities; 
population 
108,898,000) 


Group I 

(62 cities 

over 250,000: 

population 

41,126,000) 


Group II 
(88 cities 
100.000 to 
260,000; 
population 
13,013,000) 


Group III 
(230 cities, 
50,000 to 
100.000; 
population 
16,009,000) 


Group IV 
(380 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
population 
13,620,000) 


Group V 

(1,001 cities, 

10,000 to 

25,000; 

population 

16,022,000) 


Group VI 
(1,749 cities 
under 
10,000; 
population 
9,108,000) 


Suburban 

areai 

(1.790 

agencies; 

population 

39,896,000) 


Rural area 

(1,094 
agencies; 
population 
17,578,000) 


TOTAL 


5,773.988 
4.014.9 


5,049,396 
4.636.8 


2,267,701 
5.514.1 


647,106 
4.972.9 


667.653 
4,170.5 


527,423 
3,872.4 


593,502 
3,704.2 


346.011 
3,798.8 


1,106,043 
2,772.4 


308,070 


Rate per 100.000 
inhabitants.- -. 


1,752.6 


Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegli- 
gent manslaughter. 

Rate per 100,000 

(6) Manslaughter by 


11,609 
8.0 

3,197 

2.2 

14, 428 

10.0 

76, 633 

63.2 

113,724 

79.1 

265, 937 

178.0 

510. 660 

356.1 

125,686 

87.4 


9,743 
8.9 

2,239 
2.1 

11,697 

10.7 

69, 675 

64.0 

96, 723 

88.8 

208,043 

191.0 

456,521 

418.3 

108, 706 

99.8 


6,651 
16.2 

967 

2.4 

7,322 

17.8 

51,076 

124.2 

64,881 

133.4 

100, 867 

246.2 

182, 195 

443.0 

59, 120 

143.8 


1,112 
8.5 

316 

2.4 

1,194 

9.2 

6,764 

52.0 

11,098 

85.3 

27, 270 

209.6 

60,264 

463.0 

13, 760 

105.7 


802 
5.0 

363 

2.3 

1,186 

7.4 

6,321 

33.2 

10, 699 

66.8 

27,091 

169.2 

71, 165 

444.5 

13, 614 

85.0 


524 
3.8 

232 
1.7 

845 

6.2 

3,279 

24.1 

7,514 

65.2 

20, 610 

161.3 

57, 237 

420.2 

9,167 

67.3 


448 
2.8 

243 

1.5 

716 

4.5 

2,353 

14.7 

7,686 

48.0 

20, 751 

129.5 

56, 730 

354.1 

8,638 

63.9 


206 
2.3 

■ 118 
1.3 
434 
4.8 

882 

9.7 

4,845 

53.2 

11,464 

125.9 

27,950 

306.9 

4,417 

48.5 


1,487 
3.7 

659 

1.7 

2,764 

6.9 

9,267 

23.2 

20, 701 

51.9 

58,848 

147.5 

114,548 

287.1 

24,314 

60.9 


837 

4.8 

669 


Rate per 100,000 

Forcible rape 


3.7 
1,098 




6.2 


Robbery 


1,867 




10.6 




6,147 


Rate Der 100 000 


35.0 


Burglary-breaking or entering. 
Rate per 100 000 . .. 


19,362 
110.1 




19, 122 


Rate per 100,000 


108.8 




6,720 


Rate per 100,000 


38.2 








216. 194 
150.3 

892, 283 
620.4 


187,838 
172.5 

772, 270 
709.2 


119,930 
291.6 

342. 172 
832.0 


20, 168 

156.0 

101, 274 

778.3 


18.008 

112.5 

111,860 

698.7 


12, 162 

89.3 

87, 014 

638.9 


11,203 

69.9 

86, 119 

637.5 


6,367 

69.9 

43,831 

481.2 


34,219 

85.8 

197, 710 

495.6 


9,949 


Rate per 100 000 


56.6 




45,204 


Rate per 100,000 


257.2 






Subtotal for above 


1,111,674 
773.0 


962, 347 
883.7 


463,069 
1, 126 


121,758 
935.7 


130, 231 
813.5 


99,408 
729.9 


97, 565 
608.9 


60, 316 
662.4 


232,688 
683.0 


55,812 


Rate per 100,000 


317.6 


Other assaults 


259, 825 

180.7 

8,692 

6.0 

36,727 

25.5 

63,445 

44.1 

6,312 

4.4 


227,469 

208.9 

7,042 

6.6 

29, 893 

27.5 

45, 630 

41. n 

4,867 

4.5 


101,958 

247.9 

3,183 

7.7 

13,999 

34.0 

17, 527 

42.6 

1,426 

3.6 


32,982 

253.5 

835 

6.4 

4,386 

33.7 

7,866 

60.4 

1,096 

8.4 


30,288 

189.2 

1,049 

6.6 

4,204 

26.3 

6,347 

39.6 

583 

3.6 


24, 031 

176.4 

734 

5.4 

2,922 

21.5 

5,207 

38.2 

1,294 

9.5 


25, 205 

157.3 

850 

6.3 

3,124 

19.5 

6,186 

38.6 

283 

1.8 


12, 995 

142.7 

391 

4.3 

1,268 

13.8 

2,497 

27.4 

177 

1.9 


52, 315 

131.1 

2,207 

5.5 

7,417 

18.6 

16,062 

40.3 

1,732 

4.3 


11,278 


Rate per 100,000 


64.2 




757 


Rate per 100,000 


4.3 


Forgery and counterfeiting 

Rate per 100,000 


2,971 
16.9 




8,600 


Rate per 100,000 


48.4 


Embezzlement 


464 


Rate per 100,000 


2.6 



See footnote at end of table. 



108 



Table 23. — Arresfs, Number and Rate, 1969, by Population Groups — Continued 

[Bate per 100,000; 1969 estimated population] 



Offense charged 



Stolen property; buying, 
receiving, possessing- 

Rate per 100,000 

Vandalism 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc - - 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commer- 
cialized vice 

Rate per 100,000 

Sex offenses (except forcible 
rape and prostitution) 

Rate per 100,000 

Narcotic drug laws-. -- 

Rate per 100,000 --- 

Gambling... 

Rate per 100,000 

Offenses against family and 
children - 

Rate per 100,000... 

Driving under the influence, . 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws 

Rate per 100,000 

Drunkenness.- 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct 

Rate per 100,000. 

Vagrancy 

Rate per 100,000 

AU other offenses (except 
traffic) 

Rate per 100,000 

Suspicion (not included in 
totals) 

Rate per 100,000. 

Curfew and loitering law 
violations .- 

Rate per 100,000 

Runaways. 

Rate per 100,000... 



Cities 



Total 

(4,759 
agencies; 

total 
population 

143.815,000) 



4«,176 

32.1 

106,892 

74.3 

88,973 
61.9 

46,410 
32.3 

50,143 

34.9 

232,690 

161.8 

78,020 

54.3 

50,312 

35.0 

349,326 

242.9 

212,662 

147.9 

1,420,161 

987.6 

573,503 

398.8 

106,269 

73.9 

664,634 
462.1 

88,265 
61.4 

101,674 

70.7 

159,468 

110.9 



Total city 

arrests 
(3,500 cities; 
population 
108,898,000) 



40,189 
36.9 

92, 753 
85.2 

80,541 
74.0 

44,367 
40.7 

43,093 

39.6 

200,061 

183.7 

73,329 

67.3 

34,581 
31.8 

287,042 
263.6 

173, 786 

159.6 

1,313,063 

1,205.8 

530,154 
486.8 

100,155 
92.0 

539,337 
495.3 

83,466 
76.6 

94,279 

86.6 

125,438 

115.2 



Group I 

(52 cities 
over 250.000; 
population 
41,126,000) 



21,801 
63.0 

32, 718 
79.6 

46,464 
113.0 

40, 756 
99.1 

23,533 

57.2 

120, 264 

292.4 

61,235 

148.9 

12, 518 

30.4 

114,522 

278.5 

33,510 

81.5 

566, 802 

1,378.2 

255, 430 

621.1 

67, 326 

163.7 

192, 172 
467.3 

51.296 
124.7 

33,582 

81.7 

43,907 

106.8 



Group II 
(88 cities 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
population 
13,013,000) 



4,329 

33.3 

10,943 

84.1 

9,956 
76.5 

2,160 
16.6 

5,974 
45.9 
20, 752 
159.5 
5,136 
39.5 

6,651 
60.3 

27,202 

209.0 

16,671 

128.1 

206, 478 

1.586.8 

58.785 

461.8 

9,658 

74.2 

66.610 
611.9 

6,462 
49.7 

7,682 

69.0 

19,297 

148.3 



Group III 
(230 cities, 
50.000 to 
100,000; 
population 
16,009,000) 



4,711 

29.4 

13, 612 

85.0 

8,676 
54.2 

712 
4.4 

5.372 
33.6 
24,502 
153.1 
3,059 
19.1 

5,053 

31.6 

37, 571 

234.7 

24,113 

150.6 

181.844 

1, 135. 9 

59,221 

369.9 

7,169 

44.8 

81,254 
507.6 

9.272 
57.9 

16.127 

94.5 

22,965 

143.4 



Group IV 

(380 cities, 

26,000 to 

60,000; 

population 

13,620,000) 



3,754 

27.6 

12,233 

89.8 

5.943 
43.6 

438 
3.2 

3,579 

26.3 

15,944 

117.1 

1.854 

13.6 

3,786 

27.8 

35, 325 

259.4 

27,494 

201.9 

124, 767 

916.0 

56, 799 

417.0 

6.263 

46.0 

67, 435 
495.1 

7.211 
52.9 

12, 577 

92.3 

15,636 

114.8 



Group V 

(1,001 cities, 

10,000 to 

25,000; 

population 

16,022,000) 



3,581 

22.3 

14,664 

91.5 

6,235 
38.9 

157 
1.0 

3,185 

19.9 

13,210 

82.4 

1,481 

9.2 

4,522 

28.2 

42, 971 

268.2 

40, 998 

265.9 

148. 712 

928.2 

61, 037 

380.9 

6.151 

38.4 

82,007 
611.8 

4.881 
30.5 

15, 969 
99.7 

15,409 
96.2 



Group VI 

(1,749 cities 

under 

10,000; 

population 

9,108,000) 



2,013 
22.1 

8,583 
94.2 

3,267 
35.9 

144 
1.6 

1,450 
15.9 
6,389 
69.2 
564 
6.2 

2,151 
23.6 

29,451 
323.3 

31,000 
340.3 

84.460 
927.3 

38.882 

426.9 

3.588 

39.4 

49,859 
547.4 

4.344 

47.7 

9.342 

102.6 

8,234 

90.4 



Other areas 



Suburban 

area ' 

(1,790 

atjcncics; 

population 

39,896,000) 



Rural area 

(1,094 

agencies; 

population 

17,578,000) 



9,124 

22.9 

30,428 

76.3 

12,819 
32.1 

2,008 
5.0 

9,610 

24.1 

51,611 

129.4 

4,216 

10.6 

13,472 
33.8 

80, 575 

202.0 

55,383 

138.8 

168, 742 

423.0 

102, 880 

257.9 

9,222 

23.1 

168,837 
423.2 

13, 962 
35.0 

26,606 

66.7 

48,189 

120.8 



2, 701 
15.4 

5,710 
32.5 

3,404 
19.4 

352 
2.0 

2,391 
13.6 

7,084 
40.3 

2,534 
14.4 

7,637 

42.9 

32, 777 

186.5 

25,514 

145.1 

48,458 

275.7 

16,943 

96.4 

2, 681 

14.7 

58, 507 
332.8 

1,623 



1,967 
11.2 

9,828 
65.9 



' Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are aslo included in other city groups . 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 
Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



109 



Table 24.— Tofal Arrest Trends, 1960-69 

(2,474 agencies; 1969 estimated population 94,853,000) ' 



Oflense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter - 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape -- 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault -- 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft .-- 

Autotheft - 



Violent crime... 
Property crime. 



Subtotal for above oflenses.. 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and fraud 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 
ing.... 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc — 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex oflenses (except forcible rape and prosti- 
tution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence... 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All otlier oflenses (except traflic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1960 



3,323,741 



4,809 

1,931 

6,862 

32, 638 

64, 893 

117, 359 

192, 460 

54,369 



99, 102 
364, 178 



465,211 



1969 



4,126.216 



121, 179 
20, 529 
33, 114 

9,476 
30, 736 
25,633 

45,246 

30,904 
118, 299 

37, 010 
138, 390 

81, 029 

,, 204, 668 

396, 155 

127, 319 

438, S43 

89, 449 



8,827 
2,016 
10, 747 
63, 534 
84, 673 
178, 334 
353, 897 
94,329 



167, 681 
626, 560 



796, 257 



187,381 
26,911 
49,540 

34,405 
66, 750 
41,265 

37, 462 
182, 909 

67, 690 

35, 690 
239, 776 
130, 946 
1, 040, 493 
426,588 

83,980 
678,284 

72, 391 



Percent 
change 



-1-24.1 



-f83.6 
-1-4.4 
-f56.6 
■f95.3 
4-54.1 
-1-52.0 
-(-83.9 
4-73.6 



-1-69.2 
-1-72.0 



-1-71.2 



-f-54.6 
-t-31. 1 
-f49.6 

-1-263.1 
-1-117. 2 
-1-61.0 

-17.2 

-t-491. 9 

-42.9 

-3.6 
+73.3 
-f61.6 
-13.6 

-1-7.7 
-34.0 
-1-64.6 
-19.1 



Under 18 years of age 



1960 



1969 



477,262 



364 
139 

1,191 

7,837 

6,383 

54,392 

91,844 

32, 781 



15, 775 
179,017 



194, 931 



12, 558 

1,509 

787 

2,503 

6,413 

393 

9,297 

1,662 

1,441 

488 

1,080 

16,564 

12,500 

44,506 

6,540 

164,090 

19, 416 



980,453 



914 

152 
2,214 
21,713 
14, 209 
93,728 
184, 091 
53, 567 



39, 060 
331,376 



370, 578 



31, 627 
2,937 
2,605 

10,343 

10, 969 

860 

7,321 
42, 434 

1,333 
466 

2,503 
40, 256 
30, 221 
78, 374 

7,752 

339, 975 

14, 525 



Percent 
change 



-H05.4 



-i-161. 1 
-i-9.4 

•i-85 9 
-1-177. 1 
-i-122. 6 

•t-72.3 
-flOO.4 

-1-63.4 



-1-147.5 
-(-85.1 



-f90. 1 



-H61.8 
-1-94.6 
-1-218. 3 

-1-313. 2 

-1-71.0 

-1-118.8 

-21.3 

-1-2,453.2 

-7.6 

-4.7 

-1-131.8 

-1-143. 

-1-141.8 

4-76.1 

4-18.5 

4-107. 2 

-25.2 



18 years of age and over 



1960 



2,846,479 



4,445 
1,792 
6,671 
24, 701 
48, 510 
62, 967 
100,606 
21,588 



83,327 
186, 161 



270, 280 



108, 621 
19, 020 
32, 327 

6,973 
24,323 
26, 240 

35, 949 
29, 242 

116,858 

36, 522 
137.310 

64,466 

1, 192, 168 

351,649 

120, 779 

274, 763 

70,033 



1969 



3,145,763 



7,913 

1,864 

8,633 

41,821 

70,364 

84,606 

169, 806 

40, 772 



128,631 
296, 184 



425, 679 



165, 754 
23,974 
47,035 

24,062 
55, 781 
40,405 

30, 131 
140, 475 

66, 257 

35, 225 
237, 273 

90,689 

1, 010, 272 

348, 214 

76, 228 
338, 309 

57,866 



Percent 
change 



4-10.5 



4-78.0 
4-4.0 
4-50.5 
4-69.3 
4-46.1 
4-34.4 
4-68.8 
4-88.9 



4-54.4 
4-69.4 



4-57.6 



4-43.4 

4-26.0 
4-45.5 

4-245. 1 

4-129. 3 

4-60.1 

-16.2 

4-380. 4 

-43.3 

-3.6 
4-72.8 
4-40.7 
-15.3 

-1.0 
-36.9 
4-23.1 
-17,4 



' Based on comparable reports from 1,832 cities representing 78,027,000 population and 642 counties representing 16,826,000 population. 
Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



110 



Table iS.— Total Arrest Trends by Sex, 1960-69 

|2,474 agencies; 1969 estimated population 94,853,000] ' 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal liomicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter - - 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape .-- 

Eobbery.. 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft - 



Violent crime... 
Property crime. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting... 

Embezzlement and fraud. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 



mg. 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prosti- 
tution) 

Narcotic drug laws... 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 



2,963,664 



Males 



Total 



1960 



3,564,368 



3,986 
1,736 
6,862 
30,953 
46, 698 
113,559 
160, 696 
52,381 



88,499 
326, 636 



416, 871 



1969 



109,336 
17, 187 
28,088 

8,664 

29,033 

7,452 

36,904 

26,384 
107, 640 

33,963 
130,288 

68, 967 
, 110, 400 
343, 189 
117, 840 
371, 358 

79, 693 



7,466 
1,794 
10, 747 
59, 479 
73, 318 
170, 557 
259, 802 
89, 261 



151,010 
519, 620 



672, 424 



164,338 
20, 766 
36, 662 

31, 460 

62, 326 
8,512 

32,400 
156, 035 

62, 116 

32, 237 
224, 663 
113, 927 
968, 746 
364,211 

74, 361 
540, 194 

61, 352 



Percent 
change 



+20.3 



406,473 



•+-87.3 
+3.3 
+56.6 
+92.2 
+57.0 
+50.2 
+«1.7 
+70.4 



+70.6 
+59.1 



Under 18 



1960 



785,188 



340 

132 

1,191 

7,471 

5,722 

52, 762 

78,483 

31, 521 



1969 



838 

136 

2,214 

20, 179 

12,341 

89, 830 

140, 414 

50, 632 



14,724 I 35,572 
162,756 280,876 



+6L3 177,612 316,583 



Percent 
change 



+93.2 



360,177 



+146. 5 

+2.3 

+85.9 

+ 170. 1 

+ 115.7 

+70.3 

+78.9 

+60.6 



+141.6 
+72.6 



+78. 



+60.3 


10, 701 


25,411 


+20.8 


1,161 


2,236 


+30.6 


642 


2,001 


+263.1 


2,336 


9,638 


+ 114.7 


6,226 


10,460 


+14.2 


121 


261 


-12.2 


6,669 


6,747 


+487. 6 


1,421 


33,835 


-42.3 


1,399 


1,288 


-6.1 


328 


361 


+72.4 


1,026 


2,401 


+65.2 


14, 195 


33,664 


-12.8 


11,210 


26, 267 


+6.1 


38,374 


65, 612 


-36.9 


5,885 


6,636 


+45.5 


127, 180 


242, 798 


-23.0 


16, 830 


12,500 



+137. 6 
+92.6 
+211.7 

+312.8 

+68.0 

+ 115.7 

-13.7 

+2, 281. 1 

-7.9 

+7.0 

+134. 2 

+ 137.2 

+ 134.3 

+71.0 

+12.8 

+90.9 

-25.7 



Females 



Total 



561,848 



823 
195 



1,585 
8,196 
3,800 
31, 764 
1,988 



10. 603 
37, 642 



1,361 
222 



4,055 
11,265 

7,777 
94, 096 

5,068 



16,671 
106, 940 



48,340 123,833 



11.843 
3,342 
5,026 

812 
1,703 
18, 181 

8.342 
4,620 
10, 669 
3,047 
8,102 
12,062 
94.268 
52,966 
9,479 
67, 485 
9, 7.56 



23,043 
6,145 
12, 878 

2,945 

4,424 

32, 753 

5,052 
27, 874 

5,474 

3,463 
16,113 
17, 018 
71, 747 
62, 377 

9,629 
138, 090 
11,039 



Percent 
change 



+56.0 



+66.4 
+13.8 



+155. 8 
+37.3 
+104.7 
+196.3 
+154.9 



+57.2 
+184.9 



+166.2 



+94.6 

+83.9 

+156. 2 

+262. 7 
+169. 8 
+80.1 

-39.4 

+616. 7 

-48.6 

+13.3 

+86.6 

+41.1 

-23.9 

+17.8 

+L6 

+104.6 

+13.2 



Under 18 



70,789 



195,265 



366 
661 

1,640 
13,361 

1,260 



1,051 
16,261 



17,319 



1,857 
348 
145 



272 

2,638 

241 

42 

160 

55 

2,369 

1,290 

6,132 

655 

36, 910 

2,586 



1969 



1,634 
1,868 
3,898 
43,677 
2,925 



3,478 
50,500 



63,995 



6,216 
702 
504 

705 
509 
599 

1,574 

8,699 

46 

114 

102 

6,692 

3,954 

12, 762 

1,116 

97, 177 

2,026 



Percent 
change 



+175.8 



+216. 7 
+142.9 



+319. 1 

+182.6 
+137. 7 
+226.9 
+132. 1 



+23a9 
+210.6 



+211.8 



+234. 7 
+101.7 
+247.6 

+319. 6 
+170. 7 
+120. 2 

-40.3 

+3, 468. 

+7.1 

-28.8 

+85.5 
+178. 3 
+206. 5 
+108.1 

+70.4 
+163.3 

-21.7 



' Based on comparable reports from 1,832 cities representing 78,027,000 population and 642 counties representing 16,826,000 population. 
Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



Ill 



Table i6.— Total Arrest Trends, 1968-69 

[3,999 agencies; 1969 estimated population 128,095,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 



4,9lg,0«2 



Criminal homicide: 

(o) Murder and nonnegUgent 
manslaughter. _- 

(6) Manslaughter by negUgence.. 

Forcible rape. 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft 



Violent crime 

Property crime.. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
possessing 

Vandalism. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 
prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children . 

Driving under the influence. . - 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness.. 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations. .. 
Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1968 



5,167.450 



9,223 
2,508 
11,070 
59, 673 
92,808 
223,906 
428,053 
IDS, 055 



172, 774 
760,014 



935,2% 



1969 



10, 118 
2,765 
12,499 
67,290 
96, 945 
225,217 
467, 166 
108,300 



186,852 
800,683 



990,300 



Per- 
cent 
change 



+5.1 



+9.7 

+10.2 

+12.9 

+12.8 

+4.5 

+.6 

+9.1 

+.2 



+8.1 
+5.4 



+5.9 



216, 965 

8,149 

28,822 

50,249 

5,106 

33,425 

99,096 
75,923 
38,104 

40,883 

131,606 

72, 014 

43,829 

246,944 

184, 713 

1, 274, 021 

548,416 

91, 177 

569,277 

85,816 

87,660 

136,388 



237, 515 

7,836 

31, 137 

56,487 

5,749 

42,531 
96, 416 
81,609 
42,862 

43,579 

190,920 

74,143 

45,005 

285,510 

191,312 

1, 273, 323 

538,164 

97, 824 

595, 894 

84,899 

93,243 

146, 091 



+9.5 
-3.8 
+8.0 
+12.4 
+12.6 

+27.2 
-2.7 
+7.5 

+12.6 

+6.6 

+45.1 

+3.0 

+2.7 

+15.6 

+3.6 

-. 1 

-1.9 

+7.3 

+4.7 

-1.1 

+6.4 

+7.1 



Under 15 years of age 



517.378 



147 

26 

457 

7,597 

5,561 

60,648 

130, 699 

18,090 



13, 762 
209,437 



223,225 



15,430 

3,656 

733 

741 

44 

4,074 

49,023 

3,937 

80 

4,082 

5,200 

295 

110 

48 

4,829 

3,848 

47,226 

1,573 

72,645 

6,008 

22,479 

54,101 



517,250 



144 

28 

494 

8,434 

5,624 

59, 218 

132, 156 

17,786 



14,596 
209,159 



223,783 



16,648 

3,486 

774 

895 

39 

4,472 

46,990 

3,722 

79 

4,061 

6,606 

263 

155 

64 

5,485 

4,703 

38,162 

1,754 

72, 695 

5,162 

24,292 

58,132 



-2.0 

+7.7 
+8.1 
+11.0 
-.7 
-2.4 
+1.1 
-1.7 



+6.1 
-. 1 



+.2 



+7.9 
-4.6 
+5.6 
+20.8 
-11.4 

+9.8 
-4.1 
-5.5 
-1.3 

-.5 

+27.0 

-14.2 

+40.9 

+33.3 

+13.6 

+22.2 

-19.2 

+11.6 

+. 1 

-14.1 

+8.1 

+7.5 



Under 18 years of age 



1968 



1,301.985 



949 

202 

2,381 

21,001 

15,920 

124, 716 

239, 427 

66,690 



40,251 
430, 732 



471, 186 



1969 



1.349,776 



221 
2,601 
23,709 
16, 701 
124, 314 
252,278 
64,330 



43,996 
440,922 



486, 139 +3. 



Per- 
cent 
change 



+3.7 



3,616,077 



+3.8 
+9.4 
+9.2 
+12.9 
+4.9 
-.3 
+5.4 
-3.4 



+9.3 
+2.4 



38,544 

5,264 

3,652 

2,313 

200 

11,661 

76,066 

13,603 

769 

10,326 

35,082 

1,831 

546 

2,505 

59, 326 

33,528 

120,643 

9,705 

182, 189 

21,061 

87,660 

136,388 



41,999 

4,941 

3,714 

2,842 

220 

13,503 

71,254 

14, 049 

864 

10,237 

46,612 

1,631 

724 

3,216 

64,066 

38,892 

109, 191 

10, 187 

187, 261 

20,165 

93,243 

146,091 



+9.0 

-ai 

+1.7 
+22.9 
+10.0 

+15.8 
-5.1 
+3.3 

+12.4 

-.9 

+32.9 

-16.4 

+32.6 

+28.4 

+8.0 

+16.0 

-9.5 

+6.0 

+2,8 

-4.3 

+6.4 

+7.1 



18 years of age and over 



1968 



3.817,674 



8,274 
2,306 
8,689 
38, 672 
76,888 
99, 191 
188, 626 
41, 465 



132, 523 
329,282 



464, 111 



178, 421 

2,885 

25, 170 

47, 936 

4,906 

21,764 
24,030 
62,320 
37,335 

30,568 
96,523 
70,183 
43,283 

244.439 

125, 387 
1, 240, 493 

427, 773 
81, 472 

387,088 
64,765 



1969 



9,133 

2,544 

9,898 

43,681 

80,244 

100,903 

214,888 

43,970 



Per- 
cent 
change 



142, 856 
359, 761 



606, 161 



196. 616 
2,895 
27,423 
53,645 
5,529 

29,028 
25,162 
67,660 
41, 998 

33,342 
144,308 

72, 612 

44,281 
282,294 
127, 246 
1, 234, 431 
428,973 

87,637 
408, 633 

64,734 



+5.6 



+10.4 

+10.3 

+13.9 

+12.7 

+4.4 

+1.7 

+13.9 

+6.0 



+7.8 
+9.3 



+8.8 



* Decrease of less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



112 



Table il.— Total Arrests by Age, 1969 

(4,759 agencies; 1969 estimated population 143,815,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Percent distribution ' 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nomiegUgent man- 
slaughter - 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery... 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Violent crime 

Percent distribution ' 

Property crime... 

Percent distribution ' 

Subtotal for above offenses. 

Percent distribution ' 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and coimterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property: buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism, 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. . 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

. prostitution).. 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations... 
Runaways. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



5, 862, 246 
100.0 



Grand 

total 

all ages 



11,509 

3,197 

14,428 

76,633 

113, 724 

255,937 

610, 660 

125,686 



216, 194 
100.0 

892,283 
100.0 



,111,674 
100.0 



259, 825 
8,691 
36,727 
63.445 
6,309 

46.176 
106,892 
88.973 
46,410 

50,143 
232,690 

78,020 

50,312 
349.326 
212,660 
1.420,161 
573.502 
106.269 
664.634 

88.265 
101.674 
159.468 



566, 406 

9.7 



Ages 

under 

15 



157 

29 

541 

9,022 

6,019 

64,723 

141,426 

19, 970 



15, 739 

7.3 

226,119 

25.3 



241,887 
21.8 



18, 147 

3,770 

850 

923 

44 

4,792 
51,426 
3,989 



4.313 

8,109 

272 

173 

77 

6,084 

5,123 

41, 069 

1,951 

78,793 

5,279 

26, 147 

63,100 



Ages 

under 

18 



1,500,215 
25.6 



1,083 

241 

2,902 

25, 599 

18,612 

137, 558 

271,094 

72, 843 



48, 196 

22.3 

481, 495 

54.0 



529, 932 
47.- 7 



45, 7-28 

5,398 

4,146 

2.997 

247 

14, 598 

78, 519 

15,211 

948 

10, 927 

57, 475 

1,700 

807 

3,891 

71, 159 

42, 903 

117,245 

11,056 

■303, 395 

20, 791 

101, 674 

159, 468 



Ages 
18 and 
over 



I, 362. 031 
74.4 



10,426 

2,956 

11.526 

50. 934 

95.112 

118,379 

239, 566 

52, 843 



167, 998 
77.7 

410, 788 
46.0 



581, 742 
52.3 



214, 097 

3,293 

32, 581 

60,448 

6,062 

31, 578 
28,373 
73, 762 
45, 462 

39,216 
175. 215 

76.320 

49,505 
345, 435 
141,501 
, 377, 258 
456, 257 

95, 213 
461,239 

67, 474 



Age 



10 and 
under 



76,429 
1.3 



14 

1 

29 

661 

691 

9,061 

20, 985 

407 



1,395 

.6 

30,453 

3.4 



31,849 
2.9 



2.444 

1,264 

44 

104 

3 

346 

13,164 

273 



604 

158 

16 

68 

18 

97 

123 

5.698 

133 

12, 541 

725 

1,248 

5,402 



11-12 



128,664 

2.2 



25 

7 

64 

2,122 

1,421 

16, 393 

39, 056 

2,228 



3,632 

1.7 

67, 677 

6.5 



61,316 
5.5 



4,520 

979 

149 

266 

10 

1,037 

14, 967 

765 

8 

879 

793 

34 

28 

7 

454 

404 

9,869 

313 

16,168 

1,072 

4,375 

10, 153 



13-14 



361,413 

6.2 



292, 479 
5.0 



118 

21 

448 

6,239 

3,907 

39, 269 

81,385 

17,335 



10, 712 

5.0 

137, 989 

16.5 



148, 722 
13.4 



11,183 

1,527 

657 

554 

31 

3,409 

23,295 

2,951 

72 

2,930 

7,158 

222 

77 

52 

6,533 

4,596 

25, 302 

1,507 

60,084 

3,482 

20,524 

47, 545 



328,733 
5.6 



176 
38 
677 
4,931 
3,362 
26, 396 
48,917 
19, 485 



9,046 

4.2 

94, 798 

10.6 



103,881 
9.3 



7,973 

654 

674 

471 

32 

2,981 

11,147 

2,870 

108 

2,140 

10,320 

289 

101 

194 

10, 977 

7,306 

21,204 

1,649 

40,984 

3,174 

22, 378 

40, 973 



341 

68 

810 

6,631 

4,354 

25,092 

44,107 

19, 191 



11, 136 
6.2 

88,390 
9.9 



99,584 
9.0 



9,532 
622 

1,137 
634 
64 

3,412 

9,346 

3,854 

265 

2,239 

16,905 

493 

167 

1,082 
22, 333 
12,692 
26,973 

2,790 
43,218 

4,246 
30, 947 
37,319 



312, 597 
5.3 



410 

116 

974 

6,016 

4,877 

21,347 

36,644 

14, 197 



12, 276 
5.7 

72,188 
8.1 



84,580 
7.6 



10, 076 

452 

1,485 

969 

117 

3,413 

6,600 

4,498 

497 

2,235 

22,141 

646 

366 

2,538 
31,765 
17, 783 
28,999 

4,666 
40,400 

8,093 
22, 202 
18, 076 



307, 474 
6.2 



630 

195 

1,162 

6,641 

6,616 

19,673 

32, 849 

10, 776 



13,949 
6.6 

63,298 
7.1 



77,442 
7.0 



11,463 

331 

2.154 

1,700 

183 

3,661 
4,393 
5,172 
1,664 

2,164 

25,536 

1,080 

1,791 

6,085 

37,208 

28,557 

37,320 

7,546 

43,168 

8,867 



259,366 

4.4 



684 

182 

1,035 

6,873 

6,011 

14,146 

24,135 

7,503 



12,503 
6.8 

45, 784 
6.1 



58,469 
5.3 



10,341 

276 

2,244 

2,177 

210 

3,145 
3,043 
4,497 
2,683 

1,932 

24, 372 

1,161 

1,769 

6,864 

29,656 

25,984 

30,988 

6.019 

36,680 

6,857 



20 



215,541 

3.7 



556 
176 
968 
4,913 
4,661 
10,835 
18,318 
6,323 



11,088 
6.1 

34,476 
3.9 



46, 739 
4.1 



10,144 

202 

2,174 

2,436 

239 

2,508 
2,165 
4,015 
2,932 

2,024 

20,190 

1,082 

1,909 

7,579 

20,188 

24,227 

24,402 

4,694 

31,231 

6,461 



113 



Table 27. — Total Amits by Age, 1969 — Continued 



Offense charged 



Age 



23 



>24 



25-29 



30-34 



35-39 



4(M4 



45-49 



50-54 



60-64 



65 and 
over 



Not 
known 



TOTAL 

Percent distribution '-. 



214,961 
3.7 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent 
manslaughter - . . 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence. . 

Forcible rape 

Robbery - 

Aggravated assault — 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft - -. 



Violent crime 

Percent distribution '.. 

Property crime 

Percent distribution '. 



Subtotal tor above offenses.. 
Percent distribution ' 



Other assaults -.. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
Prostitution and conmiercialized vice 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) .-. 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling -. 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws.. 

Drunkenness — 

Disorderly conduct... 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



203,057 
3.5 



165,909 

2.8 



148,000 
2.5 



560,732 
9.6 



429,529 
7.3 



406,454 

6.9 



416.714 

7.1 



363,709 

6.2 



271,398 
4.6 



188,044 
3.2 



112,227 

1.9 



98.032 
1.7 



549 
181 
917 
4,675 
4,874 
9,616 
16, 010 
4,542 



550 
178 
893 
4,217 
4,961 
8,680 
13,858 
3.860 



535 
159 
791 
4.121 
6.604 
7,328 
11,852 
3,097 



463 
117 
723 
2,735 
4,137 
5,782 
9,474 
2,315 



1.872 
494 

2,199 

8,685 
16,708 
18.468 
32,901 

7,025 



1,252 
306 

1,156 

4,018 
11, 952 

9,508 
21,081 

3,349 



962 
250 
704 
2,277 
9,609 
5,983 
16, 017 
2,062 



829 
179 
435 
1,446 
8.089 
3,697 
13, 475 
1,394 



648 

167 

261 

733 

6,646 

2,341 

10,160 

845 



439 

134 

122 

319 

3.553 

1.132 

7,342 

448 



278 
96 
77 
137 
2,215 
661 
5,082 
190 



166 

61 

35 

71 

1,262 

271 

3,169 

62 



208 

78 

42 

71 

1.220 

253 

3,820 

56 



11,015 
5.1 

30,168 
3.4 



10,621 
4.9 

26,398 
3.0 



11,051 
6.1 

22,277 
2.5 



8,058 

3.7 

17, 571 

2.0 



29,464 

13.6 

58,394 

6.5 



41,364 
3.7 



37, 197 
3.3 



33,487 
3.0 



25,746 
2.3 



88.352 
7.9 



11,202 

207 

2,332 

3,038 



2,296 
1,928 
4,358 

4,986 

2,331 
17,846 

1,575 

2,170 
11,160 

6,864 
34,683 
27,319 

5,618 
29,194 

5,302 



11,381 

174 

2,450 

3,301 

410 

2,190 
1,742 
4,260 

5,879 

2,412 
15,448 

1,621 

2,418 
12,607 

4,408 
32, 705 
25,799 

4,794 
27,243 

4,718 



10,343 
152 

1,948 

2,956 

275 

1,677 
1,339 
3,506 
4,401 

1,930 
10,563 

1,598 

2,289 
10, 470 

2,954 
27,531 
19, 736 

3,754 
21,416 

3,584 



9,515 

132 

1,817 

3,064 

363 

1,544 
1,153 
3,382 
3,636 

1,828 
8,251 
1,642 
2,327 

10,329 
2,341 

27,623 

17,608 
3,173 

19, 515 
3,111 



39,185 
470 

6,661 
12, 770 

1,143 

5,732 
4,351 
13,606 
9,401 

6,727 
25,961 

9,306 
10,185 
45,839 

7,416 
120,284 
62, 705 
11,402 
69,503 

9,833 



18, 378 
8.5 

33,938 
3.8 



13, 552 
6.3 

24, 052 
2.7 



10, 799 
6.0 

18, 566 
2.1 



7,291 

3.4 

13, 336 

1.5 



4,433 
2.1 

8,922 
1.0 



2,707 

1.3 

5,933 

.7 



1,534 

.7 

3,502 

.4 



1,541 
.7 

4,129 
.5 



52, 622 
4.7 



37,854 
3.4 



29,544 
2.7 



20,794 
1.9 



13, 489 
1.2 



8,736 
.8 



5,097 
.6 



6,748 
.6 



28,833 

377 

3,900 

9,294 

904 

3,079 
2,417 
8,826 
3,874 

4,733 
12,049 

9,447 

7,861 
41,507 

5,571 
127, 460 
46,065 

8,175 
46,499 

6,036 



23,270 

275 

2,705 

7,028 

671 

2,122 
1,878 
6,742 
2,294 

3,799 
7,073 
9,228 
6,236 

43,044 

.5,223 

154.345 

41,846 
7,578 

39,035 
4,208 



19,053 

237 

1,919 

5,408 

527 

1,545 
1,523 
5,487 
1,463 

3,167 
4,175 
9,668 
4,826 

45, 195 

5,640 

192, 085 

40,041 
8,219 

33,471 
3,521 



13, 143 

178 

1,214 

3,609 

434 

914 
1,083 
4,047 

905 

2,321 
1,943 
8,365 
2,950 

40,156 

4,976 

190,082 

31,718 
7,714 

24, 907 
2,356 



7,747 
123 
691 

1,905 
204 

576 

613 

2,527 

673 

1,438 
905 

6,773 

1,548 
28,823 

3,961 
153,300 
21,623 

6,181 
17, 196 

1,402 



4,161 

70 

263 

991 

106 

328 

346 

1,635 

345 

940 

477 

5,653 

712 

18,990 

2,758 

112,035 

13,448 

4,813 

10, 373 

%5 



2,206 

44 

130 

454 

57 

142 
186 
892 
186 

667 

219 
3,687 

306 
10,264 
1,663 
68, 771 
7,848 
2,945 
5,878 

595 



2,090 

45 

77 

361 

49 

119 
210 
899 
193 

797 

204 
4,502 

201 
6,614 
1,645 
57, 141 
7,954 
2,662 
5,882 

649 



884 



(2) 



4 
3 
2 
4 
5 
33 
6 



(=) 



(») 



62 



m 



20 
1 
2 

66 



3 

11 
47 



3 
32 

7 
19 
29 
446 
37 
27 
68 



1 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary. larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



114 



Table 28. — Tofal Arrests of Persons Under 15, Under 18, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1969 

[4,759 agencies; 1969 estimated population 143,816,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegllgent manslaughter. . 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering , 

Larceny— theft , 

Autotheft... 

Violent crime 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses , 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting. 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. . . 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

GambUng 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness.. 

Disorderly conduct... 

Vagrancy... 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 

Runaways 



Gimnd total 
all ages 



5,862,246 



11, SOS 
3,197 
14,428 
76,533 
113,724 
255.937 
510.660 
125,686 



216.194 
892,283 



1,111,674 



259,825 

8,691 

36,727 

63,445 

6,309 

46,176 

106,892 

88,973 

46,410 

50,143 

232,690 

78,020 

50,312 

349,326 

212,660 

1,420,161 

573,502 

106,269 

664,634 

88,265 

101,674 

159,468 



Number of persons arrested 



Under 
15 



566,406 



157 

29 

Ml 

9,022 

6,019 

64,723 

141, 426 

19,970 



15, 739 
226, 119 



241,887 



18,147 

3,770 

850 

923 

44 

4,792 

51, 426 

3,989 

88 

4,313 

8,109 

272 

173 

77 

6,084 

5,123 

41,069 

1,951 

78,793 

5,279 

26,147 

63,100 



Under 
18 



1,500.215 



Under 
21 



2,282,596 



1,083 

241 

2,902 

25, 599 

18, 612 

137, 558 

271, 094 

72,843 



2,753 

793 

6,067 

43, 026 

33,890 

182, 212 

346, 396 

96,445 



48, 196 
481, 495 



629, 932 



85, 736 
625,063 



711,582 



Under 
25 



3,014,523 



4,850 
1,428 
9,391 
58, 774 
53,466 
213,618 
397, 690 
110, 259 



126, 481 
721, 467 



849,376 



45,728 

5,398 

4,146 

2,997 

247 

14, 598 

78, 519 

16,211 

948 

10,927 

57, 475 

1,700 

807 

3,891 

71, 159 

42,903 

117, 245 

11,056 

203, 395 

20, 791 

101, 674 

159, 468 



77, 676 

6,206 

10, 718 

9,310 

879 

23,912 

88,120 

28,895 

8,227 

17,047 

127, 673 

5,023 

6,276 

24, 419 

158,211 

121,671 

209, 955 

29, 314 

314,464 

41,976 

101, 674 

169, 468 



120, 117 

6,871 

19, 266 

21,669 

2,215 

31,619 

94,282 

44,401 

27, 129 

25,548 

179, 681 

11,469 

15, 480 

68,885 

173, 778 

244, 213 

300,317 

46,653 

411,832 

58,691 

101, 674 

159, 468 



Percentage 



Under 
16 



9.7 



1.4 
.9 

3.7 
11.8 

5.3 
25.3 
27.7 
15.9 



7.3 
25.3 



21.8 



Under 
18 



25.6 



9.4 
7.5 
20.1 
33.4 
16.4 
53.7 
53.1 
58.0 



22.3 
54.0 



47.7 



7.0 

43.4 

2.3 

1.5 

.7 

10.4 

48.1 

4.6 

.2 

8.6 

3.5 

.3 

.3 

(') 

2.9 

.4 

7 2 

1.8 

11.9 

6.0 

25.7 

39.6 



17.6 

62.1 

11.3 

4.7 

3.9 

31.6 

73.5 

17.1 

2.0 

21.8 

24.7 

2.2 

1.6 

1.1 

33.5 

3.0 

20.4 

10.4 

30.6 

•23.6 

100.0 

100.0 



Under 
21 



38.9 



23.9 
24.8 
42.1 
56.2 
29.8 
71.2 
67.8 
76.7 



39.7 
70.1 



64.0 



29.9 
71.4 
29.2 
14.7 
13.9 
51.8 
82.4 
32.5 
17.7 
34.0 
54.8 

6.4 
12.5 

7.0 
74.4 

8.6 
36.6 
27.6 
47.3 
47.6 
100.0 
100.0 



Under 
25 



51.4 



42.1 
44.7 
65.1 
76.8 
47.0 
83.5 
77.9 
87.7 



58.5 
80.9 



76.4 



46.2 
79.1 
52.6 
34.2 
35.1 
68.6 
88.2 
49.9 
58.5 
51.0 
77.2 
14.7 
30.8 
19.7 
81.7 
17.2 
52.4 
43.8 
62.0 
66.5 
100.0 
100.0 



' Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



115 



Table 29.— Total Arreits, Distribution by Sex, 1969 

[4,759 agencies; 1969 estimated population 143,815,000] 



OSense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal liomicidc: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

(6) M anslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Bobbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larcency— theft . - - - 

Auto theft... 



Violent crime... 
Property crime. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud - 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 
Vandalism 

Weapons; canning, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) . 

Narcotic drug laws..- 

Gambling, - 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence.. _ 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness.. 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion - 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



ToUl 



5,862,246 



11,509 
3,197 
14,428 
76,533 
113,724 
255,937 
510,660 
125,686 



216,194 
892.283 



1.111,674 



259.825 
8,691 
36.727 
63,445 
6.309 
46.176 
106,892 
88.973 

46.410 
50.143 

232,690 
78,020 
50,312 

349,326 

212,660 
1,420,161 
573,502 
106,269 
664,634 
88.265 
101.674 
159.468 



Male 



9,763 
2,871 
14,428 
71, 757 
99, 402 
244, 786 
375, 530 
119,058 



195, 350 
739, 374 



937, 595 



228, 330 
7,901 
28,383 
46, 813 
4,997 
42,249 
99,142 
83,172 

9,448 
43, 551 

196, 538 
71,965 
45, 675 

327, 198 

185, 485 
1,319,275 

491, 065 
94, 137 

661,338 
75, 140 
81, 204 
77, 599 



Female 



804,046 



1,746 
326 



4,776 

14, 322 

11, 151 

135, 130 

6,628 



20,844 
152, 909 



174, 079 



31, 495 

790 

8,344 

16,632 
1,312 
3,927 
7,750 
5,801 

36, 962 
6,592 

36, 152 
6,055 
4,637 

22.128 

27, 175 
100, 886 
82, 437 
12, 132 
103, 296 
13, 125 
20. 470 
81,869 



Percent 
Male 



86.3 



84.8 
89.8 
100.0 
93.8 
87.4 
95.6 
73.5 
94.7 



90.4 
82.9 



84.3 



87.9 
90.9 
77.3 
73.8 
79.2 
91.5 
92.7 
93.5 

20.4 
86.9 
84.5 
92.2 
90.8 
93.7 

87.2 
92.9 
85.6 
88.6 
84.5 
85.1 
79.9 
48.7 



Percent 
Female 



15.2 
10.2 



6.2 
12.6 

4.4 
26.5 

5.3 



9.6 
17.1 



15.7 



12.1 

9.1 

22.7 

26.2 

20.8 

8.5 

7.3 

6.5 

79.6 
13.1 
15.5 
7.8 
9.2 
6.3 

12.8 
7.1 
14.4 
11.4 
15.6 
14.9 
20.1 
51.3 



Percent of total ' 



ToUl 



100.0 



.2 
.1 
.2 
1.3 

1.9 
4.4 
8.7 
2.1 



3.7 

16.2 



19.0 



4.4 
.1 
.6 

1.1 
.1 
.8 

1.8 

1.5 



.9 
4.0 
1.3 

.9 
6.0 

3.6 
24.2 
9.8 
1.8 
11.3 
1.5 
1.7 
2.7 



Male 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

■ Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



100.0 



.2 
.1 
.3 

1.4 
2.0 
4.8 
7.4 
2.4 



3.9 
14.6 



18.5 



4.5 
.2 
.6 
.9 
. 1 
.8 
2.0 
1.6 

.2 
.9 
3.9 
1.4 
.9 
6.5 

3.7 
26.1 
9.7 
1.9 
11.1 
1.5 
1.6 
1.5 



Female 



(^) 



1.8 

1.4 

16.8 

.8 



116 



Table 30.— Total Arrest Trends by Sex, 1968-69 

[3,999 agencies; 1969 estimated population 128,095,000] 



Offense charged 



Males 



Total 



1968 



Per- 
cent 
change 



Under 18 



1968 



1969 



Females 



Total 



Per- 
cent 
change 



1968 



Per- 
cent 
chapge 



Under 18 



1968 



Per- 
cent 
change 



TOTAL - 

Drimlnal homicide: 

(a) Murder and normegligent 
manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence-. 

IPtorcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft.. 

Vuto theft .-- 

Violent crime... 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

3 ther assaults 

Vrson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (eicept forcible rape and 
prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

' Gambling 

' Offenses against family and children. 

Driving under influence 



4,280,490 4.4Si,4l8 



-1-4.0 



1.061.558 



1.075.101 



-fl.3 



637.572 



716.032 -1-12.3 



274.675 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals)... 
Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



7,762 
2,248 
11,070 
56,531 
81,119 
214, 799 
324,627 
102, 829 



156,482 
642,255 



800,985 



191, 833 

7,472 

22, 619 

38,224 

4,063 

30,809 
92,525 
71,089 



35, 794 
112,688 
66,064 
40,005 
231,253 

162,387 
1,184,898 

474, 789 
81, 750 

483, 181 
72,081 
71,001 
68,972 



8,579 
2,480 
12,499 
63,161 
84,654 
215, 649 
342. 630 
102, 669 



-1-10.5 

-flO.3 

-H2.9 

-1-11.7 

-f4.4 

-f.4 

-1-5.5 

-.2 



168,893 
660,948 



4-7.9 
-1-2.9 



832,321 



-f3.9 



208,581 

7,108 

24,245 

41,689 

4,489 

38, 895 
89,568 
76,254 

8,364 

37,996 
162, 525 
68,473 
40,898 
267,442 

166,560 
1, 182, 709 

460,369 
86, 498 

501,276 
72, 174 
74,444 
70, 814 



-1-8.7 
-4.9 
-t-7. 2 
-1-8.8 
-t-10.5 

-1-26.2 
-3.2 
-1-7.3 

-1-3.4 

-f6.2 
+44.2 
-f3.6 
-1-2.2 
-fl5.6 

-1-2.6 
-.2 
-3.0 
-1-5.8 
-1-3.7 
+.1 
-1-4.8 
-f2.7 



885 
178 
2,381 
19,883 
14,025 
119,789 
189,400 
63,179 



903 
193 
2,601 
22,130 
14, 591 
119.013 
192, 056 
60,829 



-1-2.0 
-1-8.4 
-1-9.2 
-H1.3 
-1-4.0 
-.6 
-1-1.4 
-3.7 



1,461 
260 



1,539 
285 



-f5.3 
-1-9.6 



64 
24 



3,142 
11,689 
9,107 
103, 426 
5,226 



4,129 
12,291 
9,568 
124, 536 
5,631 



+31.4 

+5.2 
+5.1 
+20.4 
+7.7 



1,118 
1,895 
4,926 
50,027 
3,411 



1,579 
2,110 
5,301 
60,222 
3,601 



37, 174 
372,368 



40,225 
371, 898 



+8.2 
-. 1 



16,292 
117, 759 



17,959 
139, 735 



+10.2 
+18.7 



3,077 
58,364 



3,771 
69,024 



409,720 



412, 316 



+.6 



134,311 



157,979 +17.6 



61,465 



32,040 

4,905 

2,918 

1,870 

167 

10,917 
70,682 
13,054 

262 

8,069 

28,457 

1,775 

407 

2,391 

49,912 
29,768 

103, 385 
8,378 

142, 518 
18,287 
71,001 
68,972 



34,168 

4,549 

2,843 

2,266 

155 

12, 516 
66,846 
13,389 

270 

7,901 

37,027 

1,480 

544 

3,063 

53,130 
33,719 
91,293 
8,708 
143,661 
17, 148 
74,444 
70, 814 



+6.6 
-7.3 
-2.6 
+21.2 
-7.2 

+14.6 
-5.4 
+2.6 

+3.1 

-2.1 
+30.1 
-16.6 
+33.7 
+28.1 

+6.4 
+13.3 
-11.7 
+3.9 
+.8 
-6.2 
+4 8 
+2.7 



25,132 
677 

6,203 
12,025 

1,043 

2,616 
6,671 
4,834 

30,015 

5,089 
18,917 
5, 9.50 
3,824 
15, 691 

22,326 
89,123 
73,627 
9,427 
86,096 
13, 735 
16, 659 
67, 416 



28,934 


+15.1 


728 


+7.6 


6,892 


+11.1 


14,898 


+23.9 


1,260 


+20.8 


3,636 


+39.0 


6,848 


+4.2 


5,355 


+10.8 


34,498 


+14.9 


5,583 


+9.7 


28,395 


+50.1 


5,670 


-4.7 


4,107 


+7.4 


18,068 


+16.1 


24,762 


+10.9 


90,614 


+1.7 


77, 795 


+5.7 


11,326 


+20.1 


94,618 


+9.9 


12,725 


-7.4 


18,799 


+12. 8 


76,277 


+11.7 



6,604 

359 

734 

443 

33 

744 

4,384 

549 

607 

2,256 

6,625 

66 

139 

114 

9,414 
3,770 

17,258 
1,327 

39, 671 
2,774 

16, 659 

67, 416 



72,823 



7,831 

392 

871 

576 

66 

987 

4,409 

660 

594 

2,336 

9,585 

51 

180 

153 

10,936 
6,173 

17, 898 
1,479 

43,600 
3,017 

18,799 

75,277 



+14.2 



+28.1 
+16.7 



+41.2 
+11.3 

+7.6 
+20.4 

+2.6 



+22.6 
+18.3 



+18.6 



+20.4 
+9.2 
+18.7 
+30.0 
+97.0 

+32.7 

+.6 

+20.2 

+17.2 

+3.6 
+44.7 

-8.9 
+29.6 
+34.2 

+16.2 

+37.2 

+3.7 

+11.5 

+9.9 

+8.8 

+12.8 

+11.7 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



117 






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120 



Table 32.— Cify Arrest Trends, 1968-69 

(3,058 Cities over 2,500; 1969 estimated population 98,789,000] 



Oflense charged 



TOTAL, 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape --- 

Robbery -.. 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— brealting or entering 

Larcency— theft 

Auto theft - 



Violent crime . . , 
Property crime- 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement , 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 
ing - 

Vandalism., 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex oflenses (except forcible rape and 
prostitution) . _ 

Narcotic drug laws - 

Gambling 

Oflenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence... 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy - 

All other offenses (except trafBc) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1968 



4,342,515 



7,952 

1,846 

8,981 

54,338 

79, 917 

184. 068 

383,310 

94, 142 



151,188 
661, 520 



814, 554 



191, 107 

6,651 

22,844 

37, 474 

3,877 

29,352 
85, 402 
69, 071 
36,641 

34, 957 

110, 637 

67, 982 

30, 496 

202, 179 

151,951 

1, 185, 970 

513, 085 

84,297 

474, 742 

82,332 

80, 791 

108, 565 



1969 



4,556,674 



8,824 

2,080 

10, 266 

61,400 

83,058 

184, 161 

419,516 

94,665 



163,648 
698, 332 



863, 960 



210.687 
6,469 
25,686 
42,027 
4,510 

37,406 
84,088 
74, 692 
40, 897 

37,415 

160, 967 

69, 796 

31,906 

233, 214 

158, 124 

1, 182, 014 

602, 802 

92,702 

494, 334 

81, 142 

86, 840 

116, 139 






Percent 
change 



-1-4.9 



-t-11.0 
4-12.7 
-f-14.3 
-1-13.0 
-1-3.9 

m 

-f9.4 
-f.6 



-1-8.2 
-1-5.6 



-(-6.1 



-1-10.2 
-2.7 
-1-12.4 
-1-12.1 
-1-16.3 

-)-27. 4 
-1.6 
-f8.1 

-1-11.9 

-1-7.0 

-1-45.5 

-1-2.7 

-1-4.6 

-fl5.4 

-1-4.1 

-.3 

-2.0 

4-10.0 

-1-4.1 

-1.4 

-1-7.5 

4-7.0 



Under IS years of age 



1968 



1,137,489 



843 

162 

2,055 

19, 812 

14,353 

103,446 

218, 262 

58, 721 



37,063 
380, 429 



417, 644 



34,853 

4,437 

3,177 

2,080 

182 

10,648 

65, 122 

12, 252 

746 

8,784 

28, 989 

1,734 

443 

2,059 

48,089 

28,288 

112,423 

8,691 

157, 602 

20, 252 

80, 791 

108, 556 



1969 



1,181,626 



910 

184 

2,263 

22,368 

14,930 

102, 602 

231, 189 

56,826 



40,461 
390,617 



Percent 
change ' 



4-3.9 



4-7.9 
4-21.1 

4-9.6 
4-12.9 

4-4.0 
-.8 

4-5.9 



4-9.2 

4-2.7 



431,262 



4-3.3 



38,246 

4.220 

3.176 

2,694 

198 

12, 148 

62, 561 

12, 916 

840 

8,766 

39, 587 

1,459 

679 

2,473 

52,342 

32,468 

100, 607 

9,645 

162. 671 

18.638 

86, 840 

116, 139 



4-9.7 

-4.9 

-. 1 

4-24 7 

4-8.8 

4-15.2 
-3.9 
4-6.4 

4-12.6 



4-36.6 
-15.9 
4-30.7 
4-20.1 
4-8.8 
4-14.8 
-10.5 
4-9.8 
4-3.2 
-8.0 
4-7.5 
4-7.0 



18 years of age and over 



1968 



3, 205, 026 



7,109 

1.694 

6.926 

34. 526 

65.664 

80. 622 

165.048 

35. 421 



114, 125 
281, 091 



396, 910 



3,375,048 



7,914 

1,896 

8,013 

39, 032 

68, 128 

81,549 

188,327 

37,839 



123, 087 
307, 715 



432, 698 



156,264 

2,214 

19, 667 

35.394 

3.696 

18.804 
20, 280 
56, 819 
35, 796 

26, 173 
81,648 
66, 248 
30,053 

200, 120 

103. 862 
1, 157, 682 

400. 662 
75,606 

317,140 
62,080 



172, 441 

2.249 

22, 511 

39,433 

4,312 

25, 268 
21,537 
61, 776 
40, 057 

28,649 
121,380 

68, 336 

31.327 

230. 741 

105, 782 

1,149,546 

402,195 

83,157 
331,663 

62,504 



Percent 
change ' 



4-5.3 



4-11.3 

4-11.9 

4-15.7 

4-13.1 

4-3.9 

4-1.1 

4-14.1 

4-6.8 



4-7.9 
4-9.6 



4-9.0 



4-10.4 
4-1.6 
4-14.5 
4-11.4 
4-16.7 

4-34.3 

4-6.2 
4-8.7 
4-11.9 

4-9.5 

4-48.7 

4-3.2 

4-4.2 

4-15.3 

4-1.8 

-.7 

4-. 4 

4-10.0 

4-4.6 

4-. 7 



1 In 692 cities over 25,000 population, arrests of persons under 18 years of age increased 2.9 percent and arrests of persons 18 and over increased 4.9 percent; 
in 2.366 cities under 25,000 population, arrests of persons under 18 increased 8.0 percent and arrests of persons 18 and over increased 7.3 percent. 
' Increase of less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is oflenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



121 



Tabic 33.— City Arrests by Age, 1969 

3,500 cities over 2,600; 1969 estimated population 108,898,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Percent distribution '_ 



5,132,855 
100. 



Criminal homicide: 

(n) Murder and nonnegllgent 
manslaughter 

(6) Manslaughter by neghgence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breakmg or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft _ 



Violent crime 

Percent distribution '.. 

Property crime. 

Percent distribution L 



Subtotal for above offenses.. 
Percent distribution ' 



Other assaults... 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Prostitution and commerciaUzed 

vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution)... 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling. 

Offenses against family and children- 
Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws. 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Grand 

total all 

ages 



9,743 

2,239 

11,697 

69,675 

96,723 

208,043 

455.521 

108.706 



187,838 
100.0 

772,270 
100.0 



962,347 
100. 



227,459 

7,041 

29,893 

45,630 

4,854 

40,189 
92.753 
80,541 

44,367 

43.093 

200,061 

73,329 

34,581 

287,042 

173,784 

1,313,063 

530.153 

100.155 

539,337 

83,466 

94,279 

125.438 



Ages 
under 15 



505,911 



144 

■23 

489 

8,645 

6,482 

56, 016 

131, 762 

17,887 



14, 760 

7.9 

204, 655 

26.5 



219, 438 
22.8 



16, 724 

3,296 

768 

880 

42 

4,425 
45, 796 
3,668 

87 

3,787 

7,080 

253 

137 

62 

5,111 

4,366 

37, 986 

1,843 

69, 783 

4,834 

24, 726 

50, 819 



Ages 
under 18 



1,307,850 

25.5 



3.825,005 
74.5 



986 

190 

2,503 

24, 119 

16, 626 

113,214 

247, 612 

63, 867 



44, 234 

23.5 

424, 603 

55.0 



469, 117 
48.7 



41, 576 

4,585 

3,535 

2,700 

215 

13, 071 
68, 680 
13, 963 

923 

9. 341 

49, 773 

1,617 

614 

3,027 

67, 796 

36, 876 

107, 639 

10,326 

174, 670 

19,099 

94, 279 

125, 438 



Ages 
18 and 
over 



8,757 

2,049 

9,194 

45, 560 

80, 097 

94. 829 

207, 909 

44, 839 



143, 604 
76.5 

347, 677 
45.0 



493. 230 
61.3 



185, 883 

2,456 

26, 358 

42, 930 
4,639 

27, 118 
24, 073 
68, 688 

43, 444 

33, 752 
150. 288 

71,712 

33, 967 
284, 015 
115,988 
1, 277, 187 
422, 514 

89, 829 
364, 667 

64, 367 



Age 



10 and 
under 



68,364 
1.3 



13 
1 

27 

632 

624 

7,840 

19, 814 

380 



1,296 

.7 

28,034 

3.6 



29, 331 
3.0 



2,252 

1,111 

42 

99 

3 

328 

11,664 

248 



435 

140 

13 

51 

18 

72 

111 

5,343 

126 

10, 909 

675 

1, 222 

4,263 



11-12 



116,798 
2.3 



23 

6 

56 

2,034 

1,302 

14, 185 

36, 679 

2,035 



3,415 

1.8 

52, 899 

6.8 



66, 319 
6.9 



4,205 

874 

141 

260 

10 

965 
13, 411 

725 



775 

686 

31 

23 

6 

371 

366 

9,194 

301 

14,581 

992 

4.219 

8,336 



13-14 



320,749 
6.2 



108 

17 

406 

5,979 

3,566 

32, 991 

75,259 

15, 472 



10,049 

6.3 

123, 722 

16.0 



133, 788 
13.9 



10, 267 

1,311 

685 

521 

29 

3,132 

20, 821 

2,695 

71 

2,577 

6,255 

209 

63 

38 

4,668 

3,889 

23,449 

1,416 

44, 293 

3,167 

19, 285 

38, 220 



254,641 
5.0 



165 
34 
505 
4,625 
3,061 
21, 639 
44,765 
17, 080 



8,346 
4.4 

83, 374 
10.8 



91, 754 
9.5 



7,232 
546 
581 
437 
30 

2,699 
9,732 
2,664 

107 

1,816 

8,969 

273 

82 

129 

9,068 

6,071 

19, 600 

1,546 

35, 332 

2,825 

20 960 

32, 198 



16 



281,683 

5.6 



303 

44 
708 
5,273 
3,864 
19, 949 
39, 242 
16. 599 



10, 148 
6.4 

75, 790 
9.8 



85, 982 
8.9 



8,568 

433 

954 

556 

46 

2,982 
7,826 
3,605 

242 

1,866 

14,640 

477 

130 

866 

18, 290 

10,544 

23,636 

2,613 

36, 386 

3,828 

28, 634 

28,681 



265,615 

6.2 



384 

89 

801 

5,576 

4,219 

16, 710 

31, 863 

12, 301 



10, 980 
5.8 

60, 874 
7.9 



71, 943 
7.5 



9,052 
310 

1,232 
828 
97 

2,965 
5,326 
4,116 

487 

1,872 

19,094 

614 

266 

1,970 

25, 327 
14, 895 

26, 417 
4,324 

33, 170 
7,612 
19, 959 
13, 740 



258,912 
5.0 



451 

138 

918 

5.920 

4.569 

15, 086 

28,088 

9,086 



11, 858 
6.3 

62, 259 
6.8 



64,255 
6.7 



10,039 

219 

1,703 

1,334 

125 

3,001 
3,444 
4,618 

1,617 

1,781 

21, 167 

1,046 

1,425 

4,900 

29, 743 

24, 217 

33, 925 
6,913 

34, 935 
8,415 



219,233 
4.3 



498 

119 

798 

5,270 

4,189 

10, 892 

20,588 

6,393 



10, 755 

5.7 

37, 873 

4.9 



48,747 
5.1 



8,979 

172 

1,849 

1,681 

171 

2,670 
2,416 
4,049 

2, 610 

1,610 

20,317 

1, 112 

1,373 

5,588 

23, 856 

22, 256 

28,321 

5,543 

29,397 

6,516 



20 



182,957 
3.6 



477 
118 

753 
4,370 
3,849 
8,492 
16, 745 
4,523 



9,449 

5.0 

28, 760 

3.7 



38, 327 
4.0 



8,885 

143 

1,799 

1.838 

170 

2,129 
1,741 
3,597 

2,862 

1,739 

16,929 

1,026 

1,455 

6, 201 1 

16, 556 1 

21, 082 < 

22, 243 » 

4, 349 1 

24,7031 

5,184 



See footnotes at end of table. 



122 



Table 33. — City Arrests by Age, 1969 — Continued 



Offense charged 



Age 



23 



25-29 



30-34 



35-39 



40-44 



45-49 



50-54 



60-64 



65 and 
over 



•Not 
known 



TOTAL 

Percent distribution '- 



185.287 
3.6 



174,595 
3.4 



143,491 

2.8 



127,910 

2.5 



486,629 

9.5 



375,577 
7.3 



359,117 

7.0 



372,524 

7.3 



327,571 

6.4 



245,312 

4.S 



171,453 

3.3 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter.. 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence . 

Forcible rape. 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft 



460 
127 
697 
4,163 
4,053 
7,700 
13,854 
3,873 



465 
110 
702 
3,697 
4,077 
6,889 
11,960 
3,300 



463 
101 
647 
3,754 
4, 921 
6,021 
10, 343 
2,668 



392 
90 

581 
2,438 
3,480 
4,695 
8,153 
1,977 



Violent crime 

Percent distribution '.. 

Property crime 

Percent distribution '.. 



Subtotal for above offenses,. 
Percent distribution • 



9,373 

5.0 

25, 427 

3.3 



34, 927 
3.6 



Other assaults. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting. 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc, . . 
Prostitution and commerciaUzed 

vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape 

and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling. 

Offenses against family and children. 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct- 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Eimaways 



9,881 

147 

1,902 

2,214 

215 

1,966 
1,623 
3,929 

4,793 

1,975 

15,093 

1,514 

1,565 

9,274 

4,763 

30, 982 

25, 157 

5,182 

23, 087 

5,098 



8,931 

4.8 

22,149 

2.9 



9,785 

5.2 

19, 032 

2.5 



6,891 

3.7 

li825 

1.9 



31, 190 
3.2 



28,918 
3.0 



21,806 
2.3 



9,911 

129 

2,030 

2,372 

342 

1,887 
1,478 
3,818 

5,618 

2,071 
13,044 

1,558 

1,718 
10,344 

3,629 
29,034 
23,783 

4,470 
21,688 

4,481 



9,119 

118 

1,600 

2,122 

209 

1,448 
1,128 
3,122 

4,170 

1,615 
9,099 
1,527 
1,660 
8,675 
2,439 
24, 542 
18, 168 
3,554 
16, 843 
3,425 



8,345 

100 

1,467 

2,180 

281 

1,333 

999 
3,024 

3,437 

1,564 
7,201 
1,558 
1,674 
8,532 
1,961 
24,894 
16,104 
2,986 
15, 513 
2,951 



1,550 
332 

1,787 

7,781 
14, 099 
15, 105 
28,473 

5,980 



1,071 
212 
936 
3,604 
10, 125 
7,960 
18, 371 
2,845 



828 

176 

584 

2,032 

8,079 

4,996 

13,880 

1,729 



699 
132 
349 
1,325 
6,880 
3,086 
11, 870 
1,156 



25, 217 

13.4 

49,668 

6.4 



15, 736 
8.4 

29,176 
3.8 



11,623 
6.1 

20, 605 
2.7 



9,253 

4.9 

16, 112 

2.1 



76, 107 
7.8 



46, 124 
4.7 



32,304 
3.4 



25, 497 
2.6 



34,207 

350 

5,462 

9, 216 

914 

5,064 
3,861 
12, 252 

8,896 

5,846 
22, 905 

8,868 

6,864 
38, 262 

6.268 
lOy, 015 
58, 024 
10, 776 
54, 494 

9,379 



24. 989 

312 

3,104 

6,408 

706 

2,704 
2,174 
7,987 

3,669 

4,139 
10. 816 

8,937 

5,167 
34. 421 

4,723 
117, 727 
42. 746 

7,714 
36,244 

6,776 



20,049 

209 

2,129 

4,844 

510 

1,839 
1,684 
6,136 

2,211 

3,246 
6,496 
8,701 
4,150 

36, 595 

4,444 

143, 768 

39,040 
7,246 

30, 486 
4,031 



16, 272 

186 

1,498 

3,685 

387 

1,311 
1,368 
4,987 

1,400 

2,779 
3,809 
9.037 
3,119 

37, 266 

4,853 

180, 060 

37, 471 
7,834 

26, 316 
3,390 



645 

117 

217 

658 

4,832 

1,978 

8,956 

684 



337 
100 
100 
283 

2,979 
928 

6, 539 
364 



220 
68 
64 
128 
1,858 
558 
4,604 
163 



6,252 

3.3 

11,618 

1.5 



3,699 
2.0 

7,831 
1.0 



2,270 

1.2 

6,315 



17, 987 
1.9 



11, 630 
1.2 



,663 



103,037 

2.0 



90,569 

1.8 



137 
41 
30 
64 
1,057 
229 
2,900 
54 



169 
64 
28 
67 
1,046 
210 
3,552 
48 



1,288 
.7 

3,183 
.4 



1,310 
.7 

3,810 
.6 



4,612 
.6 



6,184 
.6 



11,312 

143 

918 

2.435 

311 

771 

960 

3,667 

869 

2,062 
1,759 
7,736 
1,924 

32, 875 

4,272 

178, 604 

29, 703 
7,368 

19. 629 
2,266 



6,566 
98 

441 
1,306 

136 

482 

542 

2,266 

660 

1,232 
818 

6,277 

1,059 
23,296 

3,238 
144,282 
20, 146 

5,911 
13, 710 

1,328 



3,585 

54 

203 

609 



289 



329 

820 

436 

6,142 

475 

15,241 

2, 387 

105, 943 

12.066 

4,693 

8,166 

919 



1,894 

36 

100 

329 

49 

121 
162 
834 

182 

674 

203 
3,414 

215 
8,270 
1.4-25 
65,244 
7,404 
2,822 
4,673 

575 



1,831 
40 
61 
240 
35 

103 
182 
316 



193 

i227 

141 

6,257 

1,405 

54, 492 

7,594 

2,542 

4,725 

624 



C^) 



5 
4 
3 
2 
4 
5 
33 



m 



(2) 



(') 



20 
1 
2 

28 



3 
10 



6 

3 
32 

3 

19 
27 
446 
29 
27 
58 

9 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



123 



397-633 O - 70 ■ 



Table 3A.—Cify Arrests of Persons Under 15, Under 18, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1969 

[3, 500 cities over 2, 500; 1969 estimated population 108, 898, 000] 



Oflense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape - 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft - - 



Violent crime... 
Property crime.. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults ,. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice... 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) . 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct. 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Runaways 



Grand 

total 

all ages 



5.132,855 



9.743 

2,239 

11,697 

69,675 

96,723 

208,043 

455,521 

108,706 



187,838 
772.270 



962.347 



227,459 
7,041 
29,893 
45.630 
4.854 
40,189 
92.753 
80,541 

44,367 
43,093 

200.061 
73.329 
34.581 

287,042 

173.784 
1.313,063 
530,153 
100,155 
539,337 
83,466 
94,279 
125,438 



Number of persons arrested 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



605,911 



144 

23 

489 

8,645 

5,482 

55, 016 

131, 752 

17.887 



14, 760 
204, 656 



219, 438 



16, 724 

3,296 

768 

880 

42 

4,425 

45, 796 

3,668 

87 

3,787 

7,080 

253 

137 

62 

5,111 

4,366 
37, 986 

1,843 
69, 783 

4,834 
24, 726 
50,819 



1,307.850 



190 

2,503 

24, 119 

16. 626 

113. 214 

247. 612 

63.867 



44,234 
424, 693 



469, 117 



41. 576 
4.585 
3.535 
2,700 
215 
13, 071 
68.680 
13,953 

923 

9.341 

49. 773 

1.617 

614 

3,027 

57, 796 
36, 876 

107, 639 
10, 326 

174, 670 
19,099 
94.279 

125. 438 



1,968,952 



2,412 

665 

4,972 

39, 679 

29, 233 

147, 683 

312. 033 

83.869 



76,296 
543, 585 



620, 446 



69, 479 
5,119 
8,976 
7,553 
681 
20,871 
76,281 
26, 217 

8.012 
14, 471 
108, 186 
4,801 
4,867 
19. 716 

127, 950 
103, 431 
192, 128 
27. 131 
263, 705 
39. 214 
94, 279 
125,438 



2,600,235 



4,182 

993 

7,599 

53. 731 

45. 764 

172. 988 

356. 343 

95,687 



111,276 
625, 018 



737, 287 



106. 735 
5,613 
15, 975 
16.441 
1.728 
27.505 
81.509 
40, 110 

26. 030 
21, 696 
152. 623 
10,958 
U, 474 
56,541 

140, 742 
212,883 
275, 340 
43,323 
340, 836 
55. 169 
94. 279 
125, 438 



Percentage 



Under 16 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



1.5 

1.0 
4.2 

12.4 
5.7 
26.4 
28.9 
16.5 



7.9 
26.5 



22.8 



7.4 
46.8 

2.6 

1.9 

.9 

11.0 

49.4 

4.6 



3.5 
.3 

.4 

{') 

2.9 
.3 

7 2 

1.8 
12.9 

5.8 
26.2 
40.5 



25.5 



10.1 
8.5 
21.4 
34.6 
17 2 
54.4 
54.4 
58.8 



23.5 
55.0 



48.7 



18.3 
65.1 
11.8 
5.9 
4.4 
32.5 
74.0 
17 3 

2.1 
21.7 
24.9 
2.2 
1.8 
1.1 

33.3 
2 7 
20.3 
10.3 
32.4 
22.9 
100.0 
100.0 



38.4 



24.8 
25.2 
42.6 
56.9 
30.2 
71.0 
68.5 
77.2 



40.6 
70.4 



64.5 



30.5 
72.7 
30.0 
16.6 
14.0 
51.9 
82.2 
32.6 

18.1 
33.6 
54.1 

6.5 
14.1 

6.9 

73.6 

7.9 
36.2 
27.1 
48.9 
47 
100.0 
100.0 



50.7 



42.9 
44.4 
66.0 
77.1 
47.3 
83.2 
78.2 
88.0 



80.! 



76.6 



46.9 
79.7 
53.4 
36.0 
36.6 
68.4 
87.9 
49.8 

58.7 
60.3 
76.3 
14.9 
33.2 
19.7 

81.0 
16.2 
51.9 
43.3 
63.2 
66.1 
100.0 
100.0 



' Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



124 



Table 35. — City Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1969 

[3,500 cities over 2,500; 1969 estimated population 108,898,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL --- 

Criminal homicide; 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter.-, 
(t) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape - 

Robbery .- --- 

Aggravated assault 

Burglarj' — breaking or entering 

Larceny— thelt. -.- 

Autotheft - - 

Violent crime --- — 

Property crime - 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson. 

Forgery and counterfeiting — 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses {except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

O ffenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws .-- 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



5,132,855 



9,743 

2,239 

11,697 

69,675 

96,723 

208.043 

455,521 

108,706 



187,838 
772,270 



962,347 



227,459 
7,041 
29.893 
45,630 
4,854 
40,189 
92,753 
80,541 

44,367 
43,093 

200,061 
73,329 
34,581 

287,042 

173,784 

1,313.063 

530,153 

100,155 

539,337 

83,466 

94,279 

125,438 



Male 



4,423,215 



8,227 

1,980 

11,697 

65, 289 

83.920 

199, 034 

331,379 

103, 120 



169, 133 
633, 533 



804, 646 



199. 326 
6.361 
22,964 
33.378 
3,807 
36, 748 
85,994 
75,251 

9,117 
37,330 

169,017 
67,713 
30, 624 

268, 345 

151, 654 
1,222,042 

453, 202 
88,659 

451. 994 
70. 965 
75, 529 
68,649 



Female 



709,640 



1,516 
259 



4,386 
12,803 
9,009 
124. 142 
5,586 



18, 705 
138,737 



157, 701 



28,133 

680 

6,929 

12, 252 
1,047 
3,441 
6,759 
5,290 

35, 250 
5.763 

31.044 
5.616 
3,957 

18, 697 

22, 230 
91,021 
76, 951 
11,496 
87,343 
12. 501 
18, 750 
66, 789 



Percent 
Male 



86.2 



84.4 
88.4 
100.0 
93.7 
86.8 
95.7 
72.7 
94.9 



90.0 
82.0 



83.6 



87.6 
90.3 
76.8 
73.1 
78.4 
91.4 
92.7 
93.4 

20.5 
86.6 
84.5 
92.3 
88.6 
93.5 

87.2 
93.1 
85.5 
88.5 
83.8 
85.0 
80.1 
46.8 



Percent 
Female 



13.8 



15.6 
11.6 



6.3 
13.2 

4.3 
27.3 

5.1 



10.0 
18.0 



16.4 



12.4 

9.7 

23.2 

26.9 

21.6 

8.6 

7.3 



79.5 
13.4 
15.5 

7.7 
11.4 

6.5 

12.8 
6.9 
14.5 
11.5 
16.2 
15.0 
19.9 
53.2 



Percent of total ' 



100.0 



C) 



1.4 
1.9 
4.1 
8.9 
2.1 



3.7 

15.0 



4.4 
.1 
.6 



1.8 
1.6 



3.9 
1.4 

. I 

5.6 

3.4 

25.6 
10.3 
2.0 
10.5 
1.6 
1.8 
2.4 



Male 



(2) 



.3 
1.5 
1.9 
4.5 
7.5 
2.3 



3.8 
14.3 



4.5 
.1 
.5 
.8 
.1 
.8 
1.9 
1.7 

.2 
.8 
3.8 
1.5 
.7 
6.1 

3.4 

27.6 

10.2 

2.0 

10.2 

1.6 

1.7 

1.3 



Female 



n 



1.8 
1.3 

17.5 



19.6 
22.2 



4.0 
.1 

1.0 

1.7 
.1 
.5 

I.O 
.7 

5.0 
.8 

4.4 
.8 
.6 

2.6 

3.1 
12.8 
10.8 
1.6 
12.3 
1.8 
2.6 
9.4 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

3 Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of bin"glary , larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



125 



Tabic 36.— City Arrest Trends by Sex, 1968-69 

(3,068 cities over 2,600; 1969 estimated population 98,789,000] 



Oflense charged 



Males 



Total 



1968 



Percent 
change 



Under 18 



1968 



1969 



Percent 
change 



Females 



Total 



1968 



1969 



Percent 
change 



Under 18 



1968 



1969 



Percent 
change 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(o) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter- . 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft.- 

Autotheft 

Violent crime... 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement... 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drag laws 

Gambling.. 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



3,777,255 



3,923,287 



-t-3.9 



927.918 



942,019 



-H.5 



565,260 



633,387 



-1-12.1 



209,571 



239,607 



6,660 

1,642 

8,981 

61, 529 

69,422 

176, 809 

288,360 

89, 719 



7,456 
1,849 
10, 266 
57, 622 
72, 078 
176, 497 
305, 267 
89,947 



+U.9 

-4-12.6 

-fl4.3 

-1-11.8 

+3.8 

-.2 

-)-5.9 

•f.3 



788 

130 

2,065 

18, 776 

12, 622 

99,424 

171, 689 

65, 777 



836 
160 
2,253 
20, 869 
13,028 
98, 325 
175, 020 
63,802 



-t-6.1 
-t-23. 1 
+9.6 

-l-n.i 

-1-3.2 
-1.1 
+ 1.9 
-3.5 



1,292 
204 



1,369 
231 



-f6.0 
-1-13.2 



2.809 
10, 496 

7,259 
94, 950 

4,423 



3,778 
10,980 
7,654 
114, 249 
4,718 



-1-315 
+4.6 
-t-5.4 

-H20.3 
-1-6.7 



1,036 
1,731 

4,022 
46,573 
2,944 



1,499 
1,902 
4,277 
56, 169 
3,024 



136, 592 
554,888 



147, 421 
571,711 



-1-7.9 
-1-3.0 



34,211 I 36,986 
326,890 327,147 



693, 122 



720, 981 



-1-4.0 



361, 261 



168,630 
6,094 
17, 874 
28,140 
3,109 
2?, 050 
79,606 
64,670 

7,862 
30,446 
94, 799 
62, 430 
27, 258 
189, 020 

133, 660 
1, 104, 675 

443, 693 
75,633 

401, 057 
68,914 
65, 614 
52,923 



184,648 
5,832 
19, 940 
30, 797 
3,499 
34,194 
78,058 
69, 776 

8,065 
32, 678 

137, 306 
64, 539 
28,372 

218, 171 

137, 652 
1, 100, 187 

429,693 
81,901 

413, 222 
68,974 
69,560 
54,316 



-1-9.5 

-4.3 

-t-11.6 

-1-9.4 

-fl2.5 

-1-26.4 

-1.9 

-1-7.9 

4-2.7 
-1-7.0 

+44.8 
+3.4 
+4.1 

+15.4 

+3.1 
-.4 
-3.2 
+8.3 
+3.0 
+. 1 
+6.0 
+2.6 



28,896 

4,149 

2,608 

1,672 

149 

9,879 

61,289 

11, 769 

253 

6,829 

23,584 

1,692 

318 

1,975 

40, 729 
25, 146 
96,532 
7,572 
123, 179 
17, 596 
65,614 
62,923 



+8.0 
+. 1 



14, 696 16, 127 
106.632 126,621 



364, 293 



121, 432 



31, 073 
3,877 
2,421 
2,067 
137 
11,274 
68, 739 
12,319 

262 

6,775 

31, 506 

1,418 

436 
2,370 

43,640 
28, 318 
84,403 
8,168 
124, 648 
16,988 
69,560 
64, 316 



+7.6 
-6.6 
-3.5 

+23.6 
-8.1 

+14.1 
-4.2 
+4.7 

+3.6 
-.8 
+33.6 
-16.2 
+36.8 
+20.0 

+7.1 
+ 12.6 
-12.6 
+7.9 
+1.2 
-9.1 
+6.0 
+2.6 



22, 477 
657 
4,970 
9,334 
768 
2,302 
5,796 
4,401 

28,689 
4,611 

15,838 
5,552 
3, 238 

13, 159 

18, 391 
81, 296 
69, 392 
8,664 
73,685 
13,418 
15, 177 
55,632 



+10.5 
+18.7 



2,822 
53,539 



3,476 
63,470 



142, 979 



+17.7 



56,383 



66,969 



26,039 

637 

5,746 

11,230 
1,011 
3,212 
6,030 
4,916 

32,832 
4,837 

23,661 
5,256 
3,534 

15, 043 

20, 472 
81, 827 
73, 109 
10, 801 
81,112 
12,168 
17,280 
61,823 



+15.8 
+14.4 
+15.6 
+20.3 
+31.6 
+39. 5 
+4.0 
+11.7 

+14.4 
+7.2 

+49.4 
-6.3 
+9.1 

+ 14.3 

+ 11.3 
+.7 

+5.4 
+24.7 
+10.1 

-9.3 
+13.9 
+11.1 



5,967 
288 
669 
408 
33 
669 

3,833 
483 



1,955 
6,406 

42 
125 

84 

7,360 

3,142 
15, 891 

1,119 
34,423 

2,666 
15, 177 
56,632 



7,173 
343 

754 
527 
61 
874 
3,812 
597 

578 
1,991 
8,081 
41 
144 
103 

8,702 

4,160 
16,204 

1,377 
38,023 

2,660 
17,280 
61,823 



+14.3 



+34.6 
+9.1 



+44.7 
+9.9 
+6.3 

+20.6 
+2.7 



+23.1 
+18.5 



+18.8 



+20.4 
+19.1 
+12.7 
+29.2 
+84.8 
+30.6 
-.5 
+23.6 

+17.2 
+L8 

+49.5 
-2.4 

+15.2 

+22.6 

+18.2 
+32.1 
+2.0 
+23.1 
+10.5 
-.2 
+13.9 

+n.i 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



126 



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Tabk 38.— Subufbon Arrest Trends, 1968-69 

[1,653 agencies, 1969 estimated population 35,563,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Cruninal homicide: 

(o) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter... 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery... 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering... 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 

Violent crime. 

Property crime... 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws -... 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways.. 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1968 



903.804 



1,201 

676 
2,251 
7.588 
16.048 
61,679 
92,806 
21,906 



27,088 
166.290 



193,964 



42,748 

1,976 

6,442 

12,306 

1,606 

6,460 

26.798 

10,668 

1,469 

8.433 

34,223 

3,999 

11,312 

61,681 

44,164 

142,364 

88,880 

9,303 

132.967 

10.419 

22.891 

39,270 



977,254 



1,233 
680 
2,366 
8,123 
17,681 
62,246 
102, 371 
21,640 



29.403 
176, 257 



206,240 



Percent 
change 



45, 493 

1.960 

6,181 

13,288 

1,588 

8,124 

25, 987 

11, 070 

1,934 

8.753 

47,228 

3,785 

11,438 

72,380 

48.634 

149, 991 

90,796 

7,782 

147, 494 

12,415 

23,673 

43, 435 



+8.1 



+2.7 
+.7 

+5.1 

+7.1 
+ 10 2 

+ 1.3 
+ 10.3 

-1.2 



+8.6 
+6.0 



+6.3 



+6.4 

-.8 

-4.1 

+8.0 

-1.1 

+ 26.0 

-3.0 

+3.8 

+31.7 

+3.8 

+38.0 

-6.4 

+ 1.1 

+ 17.5 

+ 10.1 

+5.4 

+2.2 

-16.3 

+ 10.9 

+ 19.2 

+3.4 

+ 10.6 



Under 18 years of age 



1968 



324,068 



133 
43 

420 

2,039 

2,640 

30, 259 

64,237 

13, 985 



5,232 
98,481 



103,756 



8,049 

1,446 

737 

362 

44 

2,502 

22,630 

3.040 

22 

2,450 

12,044 

200 

202 

757 

18, 059 

9,692 

26,633 

1,469 

47.813 

3,619 

22,891 

39, 270 



342,949 



81 

61 

425 

2,193 

3,012 

30.359 

57. 715 

13,222 



6,711 
101,296 



107,058 



8,348 

1,414 

758 

448 

40 

2.977 

21.683 

2,849 

28 

2,343 

14, 396 

137 

288 

1,003 

20, 450 

12, 118 

27, 641 

1,239 

50.623 

5,145 

23, 673 

43, 435 



Percent 
change 



+5.8 



-39.1 

+ 18.6 

+ 1.2 

+ 7.6 

+ 14.1 

+.3 

+6.4 

-5.5 



+9.2 
+2.9 



+3.2 



+3.7 

—2. 2 

+2.8 
+23.8 

-9.1 
+ 19.0 

-4.2 

-6.3 
+27.3 

-4.4 
+ 19.5 
-31.5 
+42.6 
+32.5 
+ 13.2 
+25.0 

+3.8 
-15.7 

+5.9 
+42.2 

+3.4 
+10.6 



18 years of age and over 



1968 



1,068 
533 

1,831 

5,649 
13,408 
21. 320 
38,668 

7,921 



21,856 
67.809 



90, 198 



34,699 
630 

5,705 

11,944 

1,662 

3,948 

4,168 

7,628 

1,447 

5,983 

22, 179 

3,799 

11,110 

60, 824 

26,105 

132, 672 

62.247 

7,834 

85,154 

6,800 



634,305 



1,162 
529 

1,941 

5,930 
14, 669 
21, 887 
44,656 

8,418 



23,692 
74,961 



99,182 



37, 145 

646 

5,423 

12,840 
1,548 
5,147 
4,304 
8,221 
1,906 
6,410 

32. 832 
3.648 

11,150 

71.377 

28,184 
137, 873 

63, 155 
6.543 

96,871 
7,270 



Percent 
change 



+9.4 



+7.9 
-.8 
+6.0 
+6.9 
+9.4 
+2.7 
+ 15.8 
+6.3 



+8.4 
+10.5 



+10.0 



+7.0 
+3.0 
-4.9 
+7.6 
-.9 

+30.4 
+3.3 
+7.8 

+31.7 
+7.1 

+48.0 
-4.0 
+.i 

+17.4 
+8.0 
+3.9 
+1.6 

-16.5 

+13.8 
+6.9 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



130 



Offense charged 



TOTAL - 



Percent distribution '. 



Criminal homicide: 

(q) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft -. 



Violent crime.. 

Percent distribution L. 

Property crime 

Percent distribution *.. 



Subtotal for above offenses.. 
Percent distribution ' - . 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism.. 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc. . . 
Prostitution and commercialized 

vice - 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence. 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct. 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Grand 

toUl 

all ages 



,120,002 
100. 



1,4«7 

659 

2,764 

9,267 

20,701 

Sg,848 

114,548 

24.314 



34,219 

100.0 

197,710 

100.0 



232,588 
100.0 



52.315 
2.207 
7.417 

16,062 
1,732 

9.124 
30.428 
12.819 

2.008 

9.610 

51.611 

4.216 

13.472 

80.575 

55.381 

168.742 

102,879 

9,222 

168,837 

13,962 

26,606 

48.189 



Table 39.— Suburban Arrests by Age, 1969 

(1,790 agencies: 1969 estimated population 39.895,000] 



Ages 
under 
15 



144,683 

12.9 



II 

7 

63 

736 

1,006 

16, 219 

32, 769 

3,779 



1,816 

5.3 

51, 767 

26.2 



53,690 
23.0 



3,703 

1, 135 

166 

108 

3 

1,063 

16, 478 

1,024 



954 

2,322 

36 

84 

8 

2,082 

1,819 

11,604 

246 

22, 334 

1,666 

6,871 

18, 397 



Ages 

under 

18 



389,232 

34.8 



96 

54 

474 

2,428 

3,425 

33, 497 

64,128 

14. 699 



6,423 

18.8 

112,324 

56.8 



118, 801 
61. 1 



9,507 

1.686 

846 

495 

44 

3,309 

25, 265 
3,232 

34 

2,645 

15, 766 

162 

326 

1.116 
23, 227 
13, 357 
31, 263 

1,318 
56, 723 

5. 625 

26. 606 
48. 189 



Ages 
18 and 
over 



730,770 

65.2 



1,391 
605 

2, 290 

6. 839 
17. 276 
25. 361 
60. 420 

9.615 



27. 796 
81.2 

85. 386 
43.2 



113.787 
48.9 



42. 808 
621 

6. 571 
15.567 

1,688 

6,815 
6.163 
9,587 

1,974 

7,066 

36, 855 

4,054 

13, 146 

79. 459 

32,164 

156, 385 

71,616 

7.904 

112,114 

8,437 



Age 



10 and 
under 



20,115 
1.8 



2 

62 

126 

1.927 

5, 075 

64 



184 

,5 

7,066 

3.6 



7,260 
3.1 



621 

407 

6 

11 



74 

4,263 

80 



118 
28 

2 
28 

2 

26 

25 

1,794 

22 

3,482 

188 

198 

1,591 



U-12 



31.831 

2.8 



169 

228 

3.610 

8,961 

361 



395 
1.2 

12, 932 
6.5 



13,329 

5.7 



896 

285 

17 

19 



4,601 
221 



177 

221 

3 

16 



139 
125 

2,738 
43 

4,752 
319 
821 

2,901 



13-14 



92.737 

8.3 



7 

5 

53 

525 

652 

9,682 

18. 733 

3,354 



1,237 

3.6 

31, 769 

16.1 



33, Oil 
14.2 



2,286 
443 
133 

78 
3 

781 

7,614 

723 



659 

2,073 

31 

40 

6 

1,917 

1,669 

7,072 

180 

14, 100 

1,159 

4,852 

13, 905 



77,355 

6.9 



19 

2 

88 

459 

582 

6,678 

11, 396 

4,175 



1,148 
3.4 

22,249 
11.3 



23,399 
10.1 



1,712 

182 

138 

80 

7 

668 

3,761 

580 



519 

2,960 

31 

46 

50 

3,748 

2,691 

5,861 

237 

11, 512 
1,107 
5,667 

12, 494 



87.925 

7 9 



30 

15 

132 

557 

854 

6,318 

10, 969 

4,020 



1,673 

4.6 

21, 307 

10.8 



22, 895 
9.8 



79,269 
7.1 



73,781 

6.6 



36 

30 

191 

676 

983 

5. 282 

8,994 

2,725 

1,886 

5.5 

17, 001 



18, 917 
8.1 



1,994 

147 

253 

114 

10 

796 

3,033 

789 

18 

565 

4,671 

48 

69 

334 

7,492 

4,011 

7,072 

318 

12, 307 

1,392 

7,912 

11,685 



2,098 

122 

300 

193 

24 

782 

1,993 

839 



507 

5,803 

47 

127 

724 
9,905 
4,936 
6,726 

518 
10, 670 
1.360 
7.166 
5.613 



68 

47 

257 

977 

1,311 

4,897 

7,726 

2,221 



2,613 

7.6 

14,844 

7.5 



17,504 
7.5 



2,345 
108 
416 
326 
60 

855 

1,109 

905 

44 

481 

6,846 

54 

404 
1,719 

10, 905 
7,044 
8,277 

998 

11, 774 
1,607 



S6.948 
5.1 



74 

34 

214 

832 

1,099 

3,320 

5,186 

1,469 



2,219 
6.5 

9.975 
5.0 



12, 228 
5.3 



2,070 

67 

432 

495 

57 

668 
702 
731 

70 

407 

5,983 

71 

393 
1,774 
7,941 
5,741 
6,184 

743 
9,056 
1, 135 



45,423 
4.1 



76 

46 

196 

721 

902 

2,477 

3,953 

1.061 



1,895 
5.5 

7,481 
3.8 



9,421 
4.1 



1,936 

43 

459 

571 

87 

506 
449 
640 

71 

401 

4,753 

57 

427 
1,830 
5.141 
4.830 
4.800 

528 
7.733 

740 



See footnotes at end of table. 



131 



Tabic 39. — Suburban Arrests by Age, 1969 — Continued 



Oflense charged 



TOTAL. 



Percent distribution ' . 



Criminal liomicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaugliter 

(6) Manslaugliter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery .._ 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft 



Violent crime 

Percent distribution ' . 

Property crime - 

Percent distribution i . 



Subtotal for above offenses.. 
Percent distribution * 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement — 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

VandaUsm 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Prostitution and commercialized 

vice - - 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape 

and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

OambUng _ 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct... 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses {except traffic) 

Suspicion.. 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaw ays 



Age 



41,369 



3.7 



31 

203 

68S 

1,044 

2,144 

3,242 

820 



2,000 
5.8 

6,206 
3.1 



8,237 
3.6 



22 



38.810 



3.6 



77 
34 
199 
606 
999 
1,903 
2,926 
678 



1,880 
6.6 

5,606 
2.8 



7,420 
3.2 



29,808 



2.7 



27,037 



68 
37 
166 
466 
747 
1,385 
2,265 
466 



1,426 
4.2 

4,116 
2.1 



6,678 
2.4 



63 
21 
142 
407 
749 
1,239 
2,046 
410 



1,361 
4.0 

3,696 
1.9 



6,077 
2.2 



25-29 



97,623 



8.7 



267 
93 

443 
1,117 
3,002 
3,830 
6,842 
1,116 



4,819 

14.1 

11,788 

6.0 



16,700 

7.2 



30-34 



69,759 



217 

497 

2,081 

1,717 

4,389 

518 



2,976 
8.7 

6,624 
3.4 



4.2 



35-39 



62,532 



6.6 



126 
62 

115 

239 
1,722 
1,111 
3,363 

367 



2,202 
6.4 

4,831 
2.4 



7,086 
3.0 



59,024 



6.3 



112 

61 

67 

163 

1,399 

630 

2,695 

243 



1,731 
6,1 

3,568 
1.8 



5,350 
2.3 



46-49 



48,933 



4.4 



76 
29 
37 
74 
921 
365 
2,062 
147 



1,107 
3.2 

2,664 
1.3 



3,690 
1.6 



34,434 



3.1 



65-69 



22,266 



2.0 



61 
21 
21 
40 
686 
163 
1,463 
71 



708 

2.1 

1,697 

.9 



2,426 
1.0 



37 
19 
10 
11 

366 
97 

979 



423 

1.2 

1,109 

.6 



1,561 

.7 



2,101 

44 

487 

767 

71 

462 
383 
639 

186 

481 

3,886 

90 

629 
2,708 
1,261 
6,056 
4,862 

473 
6,996 

670 



602 
868 
162 

397 
304 
616 

261 

471 

3,283 

82 

682 
2,991 

884 
6,816 
4,401 

410 
6,682 

572 



1,884 

23 

409 

796 

70 

329 
206 
499 



389 

2,111 

93 

595 
2,401 

580 
4,466 
3,348 

291 
5,098 

428 



1,820 

32 

380 

769 

83 

307 
208 
458 

216 

371 
1,542 

104 

613 
2,603 

427 
4,008 
3,024 

248 
4,461 

387 



7,739 

74 

1,262 

3.349 

267 

918 

646 

1,664 

505 

1,208 

4,119 

626 

2,753 

10,486 

1,205 

16, 143 

9,917 

813 

16, 369 

971 



6,816 
46 

817 
2,475 

244 

476 

345 

1,062 

201 

765 

1,624 

611 

2,166 

9,311 

735 

14,587 

6,616 

669 

11,166 

561 



4,838 
53 

677 
1,926 

198 

330 
267 
780 

85 

638 
796 
496 

1,720 

9,924 

653 

16, 151 

6,627 
469 

9,619 
401 



4,144 
39 

396 
1,450 

129 

257 
195 
626 

46 

447 

449 

500 

1,378 

10, 262 

633 

18,429 

6,071 

498 

8,403 

324 



2,786 
27 
260 
912 
132 

160 
162 
441 

29 

346 
226 
616 
861 

9,096 

614 

17,882 

3,896 
634 

6,134 
241 



1,569 

12 

103 

489 

68 

89 
90 
280 

19 

236 
132 
366 
409 

6,631 

461 

14, 016 

2,681 
448 

3,861 
149 



830 

7 

39 

213 

28 

36 
42 
186 

12 

162 
58 

257 

202 
4,192 

322 
9,731 
1,484 

392 
2,434 



60-64 



12,784 



1.1 



27 
13 
7 
11 
178 
42 
613 
8 



65 and 
over 



10,291 



.9 



223 
.7 

663 
.3 



31 

9 

6 

6 

171 

41 

681 

8 



213 



730 

.4 



962 
.4 



396 
7 
19 



118 

28 

151 

76 

2,227 

198 

5,886 

869 

257 

1,346 

67 



345 
4 
14 
71 
16 

19 
28 
95 



164 

19 

181 

38 

1,404 

194 

4,603 

658 

233 

1,170 

86 



Not 
known 



(') 



25 



> Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 
' Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



132 



Table 40. — Suburban Arrests of Persons Under IS, Under 18, Under 27, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1969 

[1,790 agencies; 1969 estimated population 39,895,000| 



Offense charged 



TOTAL - 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. . . 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcitile rape --- 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault - 

Burglary — brealiing or entering - 

Larceny— theft 

Auto theft - -. 

Violent crime - - - 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Ai3on 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling ._. 

Offenses against family and children _ 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws --- 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curlew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



TOTAL 



1,120,002 



1.487 

659 

2.764 

9,267 

20.701 

68,848 

114,548 

24.314 



34.219 
197.710 



232.588 



52.315 
2.207 
7.417 

16.062 
1.732 
9.124 

30.428 

12.819 

2.008 
9.610 
51.611 
4.216 
13.472 
80.575 

55.381 

168.742 

102.879 

9.222 

168.837 

13.962 

26.606 

48,189 



Under 
15 



144,683 



11 

7 

63 

736 

1,006 

16,219 

32, 769 

3,779 



1,816 
51, 767 



63, 590 



3,703 
1,135 

155 

108 

3 

1,063 

16, 478 

1,024 

2 

954 

2,322 

36 

84 



2,082 
1,819 

11,604 
245 

22, 334 
1,666 
5,871 

18, 397 



Under 
18 



389, 232 



96 

M 

474 

2,428 

3,425 

33,497 

64,128 

14,699 



6,423 
112,324 



118,801 



9,607 

1,686 

846 

496 

44 

3,309 

25, 265 

3,232 

34 

2,545 

16, 766 

162 

326 

1,116 

23,227 
13,357 
31, 263 

1,318 
66,723 

6,525 
26,606 
48, 189 



Under 
21 



665,384 



314 

180 
1,141 
4,958 
6,737 
44, 191 
80,993 
19,440 



13,150 
144, 624 



167,954 



15,858 
1,804 
2, 163 
1,887 
248 
5,338 

27,526 
6,608 

219 

3,834 

33, 338 

344 
1,550 
6,439 

47, 214 
30, 972 
50,624 

3,587 
85, 286 

9,007 
26,606 
48, 189 



Under 
26 



702,408 



580 

303 

1,841 

7,120 

10, 276 

60,862 

91,471 

21, 813 



19,817 
164, 146 



184, 266 



23,853 
1,939 
3,931 
5,067 
634 
6,823 

28,625 
7,720 

1,097 
5,546 

44, 160 

713 

3,869 

17,042 

50, 366 
51,307 
66, 159 
6,009 
108, 423 
11,064 
26,606 
48, 189 



Percentage 



Under 
15 



12.9 



.7 

1.1 

2.3 

7.9 

4.9 

25.9 

28.6 

15.5 



6.3 

26.2 



23.0 



7.1 
61.4 
2.1 
.7 
.2 
11.7 
54.2 
8.0 



4.5 
.9 
.6 
(') 

3.8 
1.1 
11.3 
2.7 
13.2 
11.9 
22.1 
38.2 



Under 
18 



34.8 



6.5 
8.2 
17.1 
26.2 
16.5 
66.9 
56.0 
60.5 



18.8 
56.8 



51.1 



18.2 
71.9 
11.4 
3.1 
2.5 
36.3 
83.0 
25.2 

1.7 
26.6 
30.5 
3.8 
2.4 
1.4 

41.9 

7.9 
30.4 
14.3 
33.6 
39.6 
100.0 
100.0 



Under 
21 



60.5 



21.1 
27.3 
41.3 
63.5 
32.6 
75.1 
70.7 
80.0 

38.4 
73.1 



67.9 



30.3 
81.7 
29.0 
11.7 
14.3 
58.5 
90.5 
43.0 

10.9 
39.9 
64.6 

8.2 
11.6 

8.0 

86.3 
18.4 
49.1 
38.9 
60.5 
64.5 
100.0 
100.0 



Under 
26 



62.7 



39.0 
46.0 
66.6 
76.8 
49.6 
86.4 
79.9 
89.7 

57.9 
83.0 



79.2 



45.6 
87.9 
53.0 
31.6 
36.6 
74.8 
94.1 
60.2 

54.6 
57.7 
86.6 
16.9 
28.7 
21.2 

90.9 
30.4 
64.3 
54.3 
64.2 
79.2 
100.0 
100.0 



* Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robber^' and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



133 



Table 41. — Suburban Arrests, Distribufion by Sex, 1969 

(1,790 agencies; 1969 estimated population 39,895,000] 



Oflense charged 



TOTAL.. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

(6) Manslaugliter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault.. 

Burglary— brealiing or entering 

Larceny— tlieft 

Auto theft .- .- 



Violent crime.... 
Property crime.. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting. 

Fraud 

Embezzlement. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution). 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gamljling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws... 

Drunlienness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



TOTAL 



1,120,002 



1,487 
659 
2,764 
9,267 
20,701 
58.848 
114,548 
24,314 



34,219 
197,710 



232,588 



Male 



958,312 



1,260 
602 
2,764 
8,761 
18, 741 
66, 246 
84,454 
22, 966 



31,826 
163,666 



195, 794 



Female 



161,690 



52,315 


46,440 


2.207 


2,060 


7,417 


6,674 


16.062 


11,650 


1.732 


1,327 


9,124 


8,466 


30,428 


28,390 


12,819 


12, 138 


2,008 


294 


9,610 


8,529 


51.611 


43,210 


4,216 


3,788 


13.472 


12,564 


80.575 


76,104 


55,381 


48,724 


168,742 


164,012 


102.879 


90,038 


9.222 


8,378 


168.837 


143, 791 


13,962 


12,221 


26,606 


20,468 


48.189 


26,252 



227 
67 



506 

1,960 

2,602 

30,094 

1,348 



2,693 
34,044 



36, 794 



5,875 
147 

1,743 

4,412 
405 
668 

2,038 
681 

1,714 
1,081 
8,401 
428 
908 
5,471 

6,667 

14, 730 

12,841 

844 

25,046 

1,741 

6,138 

22, 937 



Percent 
Male 



85.6 



84 7 
91.4 
100.0 
94.5 
90.5 
95.6 
73.7 
94.5 



92.1 
82.8 



Percent 
Female 



15.3 

8.6 



5.5 
9.5 
4.4 
26.3 
5.6 



7.9 
17.2 



88.8 


93.3 


76.5 


72.5 


76.6 


92.8 


93.3 


94.7 


14.6 


88.8 


83.7 


89.8 


93.3 


93.2 


88.0 


91.3 


87.6 


90.8 


85.2 


87.5 


76.9 


52.4 



11.2 

6.7 

23.5 

27.6 

23.4 

7.2 

6.7 

6.3 

85.4 
11.2 
16.3 
10.2 
6.7 
6,8 

12.0 
8.7 
12.6 
9.2 
14.8 
12.5 
23.1 
47.6 



Percent of total ' 



Total 



.1 
.1 

.2 
.8 
1.8 
5.3 
10.2 
2.2 



3.1 
17.7 



4.7 
.2 
.7 

1.4 
.2 
.8 

2.7 

1.1 

.2 
.9 
4.6 
.4 
1.2 
7.2 

4.9 

16.1 

9.2 

.8 

15.1 

1.2 

2.4 

4.3 



Male 



.1 
.1 
.3 
.9 
2.0 
6.9 
8.8 
2.4 



3.3 

17.1 



4.8 

.2 



.1 

.9 

3.0 

1.3 

.9 
4.5 

.4 
1.3 

7.8 

5.1 

16.1 

9.4 

.9 

15.0 

1.3 

2.1 

2.6 



Female 



(=) 



.3 

1.2 

1.6 
18.6 



1.7 
21.1 



3.6 
.1 

1.1 

2.7 
.3 
.4 

1.3 
.4 

1.1 
.7 

5.2 
.3 
.6 

3.4 

4.1 
9.1 
7.9 
.5 

15.5 
1.1 
3.8 

14.2 



> Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 
' Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary , larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



134 



Table 42. — Suburban Arrtsts by Race, 1969 

[1,7M agencies; 1969 estimated population 39,759,000] 



Offense charged 



Total arrests 



TOTAL 



White 



Negro 



Indian 



Chinese 



Japa- 
nese 



All others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 



Percent distribution 



White 



Negro 



Indian 



Chinese 



Japa- 



AU others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(0) Murder and noimegUgent man- 
slaughter - 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence — 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft - 

Auto theft... 

Violent crime 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement - - 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

GambUng 

Offenses against family and children. . 
Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct- 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion. 

Ciu^few and loitering law violations.. . 
Runaways. 



1.114.085 



953,056 



150.8«4 



5.688 



230 



85.5 



13.6 



1,487 

655 

2.754 

9,229 

20.677 

68,628 

114.135 

24.218 



941 

655 

1,994 

5,212 

14, 939 

48, 432 

92,439 

19, 497 



627 
93 

722 
3,943 
5,512 
9,814 
20,921 
4,471 



9 
1 
13 
34 
91 
155 
257 
97 



ID 

6 

23 

36 

122 

180 

404 

138 



63.3 

84.7 
72.4 
56.5 
72.2 
82.6 
81.0 
80.5 



34.147 
196.981 



23,086 
160,368 



10,704 
35,206 



147 
509 



15 
106 



191 

722 



67.6 
81.4 



231,783 



184,009 



46,003 



657 



74 



121 



79.4 



51.993 
2.207 
7.387 

16.057 
1.705 

9,073 
30,325 
12.752 

2,007 

9.655 
51.202 

4.189 
13,295 
80.183 

55,139 
166,599 
102,760 
9,221 
167,965 
14.193 
26.420 
48.075 



41, 051 
1,924 
5, 869 

13,345 
1,445 

7,084 
27, 877 
9,317 

1,422 

8,637 
46, 871 

2,624 
10,882 
72, 577 

51, 951 
143, 942 

86,677 
7,750 
145. 855 
12,270 
25,231 
44,546 



10,599 

264 

1,471 

2,656 

249 

1.927 
2,337 
3,352 

667 

937 
4,068 
1.635 
2,326 
6,906 

2,815 
19,193 
15, 362 
1,365 
20,823 
1,879 
1,022 
3,228 



147 
15 
16 
30 
4 

10 
30 
22 



46 
366 

216 
2,910 

266 
73 

521 
30 
90 

152 



14 


7 




1 


3 


2 


2 




1 




4 




2 


5 




6 



175 

3 

26 

24 

6 

48 
74 
56 



47 
141 
26 
40 
290 

142 
501 
432 
32 
683 
11 
54 
106 



79.0 
87.2 
79.5 
83.1 

84.8 

78.1 
91.9 
73.1 

70.9 

89.3 
91.5 
62.6 
81.9 
90.5 

94.2 
86.4 
84.3 
84.0 
86.8 
86.5 
95.6 
92.7 



35.4 
14.2 
26.2 
42.7 
26.7 
16.7 
18.3 
18.5 



31.3 
17.9 



19.1 



20.4 
12.0 
19.9 
16.5 
14,6 

21.2 

7.7 

26.3 

28.3 

9.8 
7.9 
36.6 
17.5 
8.6 

5.1 
11.6 
14.9 
14.8 
12.4 
13.2 
3.9 
6.7 



.3 

.5 

.4 
1.7 
.3 
.8 
.3 
.2 
.3 
.3 



0.3 



135 



Table 42. — Suburban Arreiti by Race, 1969 — Continued 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide: 

(o) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter. _ 

(I)) Manslaughter by negligence- . 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering _ 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft 



Violent crime... 
Property crime- 



Subtotal for above offenses.. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc — 



Arrests under 18 



TOTAL 



Prostitution and conunercialized vice.. 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 
Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkeimess 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy -- 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion-- 

Curfew and loitering law violations-. 
Runaways 



387,719 



94 
53 
471 
2,419 
3,409 
33,384 
63,943 
14,630 



6,393 
111,957 



118.403 



9,494 

1,679 

844 

491 

43 

3,287 
25,171 
3,217 

34 

2,536 

16,683 

163 

317 

1,094 

23,100 
13,252 
31,199 

1,319 
66,481 

5,517 
26,420 
48,075 



344,748 40,862 



White 



Negro 



62 

49 

344 

1,182 

2,511 

28,137 

53,434 

12,123 



4,099 
93,694 



97,842 



7,279 

1,392 

710 

396 

35 

2,671 

23,372 

2,728 

22 

2,228 

14,902 

123 

283 

1.055 

22,467 
12,378 
27,067 

1,160 
61,928 

5,033 
25,231 
44,546 



31 

2 
126 
1,221 
864 
5.078 
10.158 
2,378 



Indian 



Chinese 



2.242 
17, 614 



19,858 



,194 
180 
128 
95 



704 

1,727 

476 

12 

296 
695 
40 
30 
30 

602 

747 
4,012 

149 
4,260 

472 
1,022 
3,228 



895 



10 
67 
113 
56 



14 
236 



25 



Japa- 
nese 



All others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 



197 



10 
19 
74 
191 
66 



30 
330 



2 
2 

77 

84 

48 

5 

116 
10 
90 

152 



Percent distribution 



White 



66.0 
92.6 
73.0 
48.9 
73.7 
84.3 
83.6 
82.9 



64.1 
83.7 



82.6 



Negro 



10.5 



33.0 
3.8 
26.8 
50.6 
25.3 
16.2 
15.9 
16.3 



35.1 
15.7 



16.1 



Indian 



0.2 



Chinese 



1 

7 

51 
37 
61 
6 
138 



54 
106 



76.7 
88.2 
84.1 
80.7 
81.4 

78.2 
92.9 
84.8 

64.7 

87.9 
95.0 
75.6 
89.3 
96.4 

97.3 
93.4 
86.8 
87.9 
91.9 
91.2 
96.6 
92.7 



23.1 
11.4 
16.2 
19.3 
14.0 

21.4 
6.9 
14.8 

35.3 

11.7 
4.4 

24.6 
9.5 

2.7 

2.2 
5.6 
12.9 
11.3 
7.6 
8.6 
3.9 
6.7 



2.3 



Japa- 
nese 



All others 
(includes 
race im- 
known) 



0.1 



1.1 

3.8 



.4 
.6 
.2 
.3 
.4 



.6 
.3 



.3 



.1 
.2 
.6 



2.3 



.2 
.2 



136 



Table 42. — Suburban Arnsts by Race, 1969 — Continued 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter. . - 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence... 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft 



Violent crime... 
Property crime- 



Subtotal for above offenses.. 



Other assaults. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism... 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laves 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 
Driving under the influence. 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness , 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Arrests 18 and over 



TOTAL 



726,366 



1,393 
602 

2,283 

6,S10 
17.268 
25,244 
50,192 

9.588 



27,754 
85,024 



42.499 
628 

6.S43 
15,566 

1,662 

5,786 
5,154 
9,535 

1,973 

7,019 
35,519 

4,026 
12,978 
79,089 

32,039 
153.347 
71,561 
7.902 
111.484 
8.676 



White 



879 

506 

1,650 

4,030 

12,428 

20,295 

39,005 

7,374 



18,987 
66,674 



Negro 



33, 772 
632 

6,169 
12.949 

1,410 

4,513 

4,605 
6,689 

1,400 

6.309 
31.969 

2,601 
10, 599 
71,622 

29,484 

131,664 

59,610 

6,590 

93,927 

7.237 



496 
91 
596 
2.722 
4,648 
4,736 
10,763 
2,093 



8.462 
17, 692 



26, 145 



Indian 



4,793 



1 
12 
31 
81 
88 
144 
41 



133 

273 



407 



8.405 

84 

1.343 

2.561 

243 

1.223 

610 

2.877 

555 

641 
3,373 
1,495 
2.296 
6.876 

2.313 
18.446 
11,360 

1,216 
16.663 

1.407 



137 

12 

16 

30 

3 

9 
12 
19 



44 
364 



2,826 
218 

68 
405 

20 



Chi- 
nese 



166 



Japa- 
nese 



186 



49 



55 



AU 
others 
(includes 
race tin- 
known) 



2,891 



4 
23 
26 
103 
106 
213 
73 



161 
392 



166 



44 
97 
26 
39 
283 

91 
464 
371 

27 
545 

11 



Percent distribution 



83.7 



63.1 
84.1 
72.3 
69. 2 
72.0 
80.4 
77.7 
76.9 



Negro 



35.6 
15.1 
26.1 
40.0 
26.9 
18.8 
21.4 
21.8 



68.4 
78.4 



76.0 



30.6 
20.7 



23.1 



Indian 



Chi- 
nese 



79.6 
84.7 
78.8 
83.2 
84.8 

78.0 
87.4 
69.1 

71.0 

89.9 
90.0 
62.1 
81.7 
90.4 

92.0 
85.8 
83.3 
83.4 
84.3 
83.4 



19.8 
13.4 
20.5 
16.6 
14.6 

21.1 
11.8 
30.2 

28.1 

9.1 
9.5 
37.1 
17.7 
8.7 

7.2 
12.0 
16.9 
16.4 
14.9 
16.2 



.3 
1.9 
.2 
.2 
.2 



.3 

.6 

.4 
1.8 
.3 
.9 
.4 
.2 



Japa- 
nese 



AU 
others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 



0.4 



.3 
.6 
.3 
.4 

.3 
.3 
.6 
.3 
.6 
.1 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



137 



Table 43. — Rural Arrest Trends, 1968-69 

[800 agencies; 1969 estimated population 13,863,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL- 



Criminal homicide; 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

((>) Manslaughter by negUgence 

Forcible rape -- 

Robbery - 

Aggravated assault - 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Auto theft - -- 



Violent crime... 
Property crime.. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults... 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting . 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and cormnercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) . 

Narcotic drug laws 

Oambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkeimess 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1968 



234,665 



1969 



560 
414 

858 
1,203 
4,798 
14,513 
14,564 
4,570 



7,419 
33,647 



41,480 



8,685 
623 
2,541 
6,295 
279 
1,959 
5,696 
2,646 

256 
1,806 
3,151 
1,747 
6,551 
21,997 

21,967 

39,982 

13, 552 

2,712 

41,603 

1,153 

1,673 

7,664 



244,061 



Percent 
change 



536 

429 
847 
1,416 
4,676 
15, 672 
15,221 
4,320 



7,475 
35, 113 



43,017 



8,949 
566 
2,427 
7,135 
315 
2,167 
4,953 
2,625 

301 

1.878 
5,823 
2,375 
6,439 
26,275 

21,828 

39,168 

12,862 

2,114 

44,533 

1,216 

1,564 

7,757 



+4.0 



-4.3 

+3.6 
-1.3 

+17.7 
-2.6 
+7.3 
+4.5 
-5.6 



+.8 
+4.4 



+3.7 



+3.0 
-9.1 
-4.6 
+13.3 
+12.9 
+10.6 
-11.5 



+17.6 
+4.0 

+84.8 

+35.9 
-1.7 

+14.9 

-.6 
-2.0 
-6.1 
-22.1 
+7.3 
+5.4 
-7.1 
+1.2 



Under 18 years of age 



1968 



50,285 



37 

28 

123 

157 

332 

6,643 

5,423 

2,387 



649 
14,463 



15, 130 



672 

278 

241 

88 

10 

460 

3,522 

307 

11 
347 
637 
39 
57 
199 

7,210 
1,653 
1,888 

227 
8,082 

438 
1,673 
7,664 



51,732 



Percent 
change 



+2.9 



19 
14 

101 

194 

343 

7,263 

5,319 

2,270 



-48.6 

-60.0 

-17.9 

+23.6 

+3.3 

+9.3 

-1.9 

-4.9 



657 
14, 852 



15,523 



+1.2 
+2.8 



+2.6 



619 

210 

269 

95 

6 

572 

3,077 

263 

14 

325 

1,044 

16 

86 

398 

7,178 
1,709 
1.733 

196 
9,089 

562 
1,654 
7,767 



-7.9 
-24.5 
+11.6 

+8.0 
-40.0 
+27.1 
-12.6 
-14.3 

+27.3 
-6.3 
+63.9 
-59.0 
+49. 1 
+100.0 

-.4 

+ 10.0 

-8.2 

-13.7 

+ 12.5 

+26 

-7.1 

+1.2 



18 years of age and over 



184,380 192,329 



Percent 
change 



523 
386 
735 
1,046 
4,466 
7,870 
9,141 
2,183 



6,770 
19, 194 



26, 350 



517 
416 
746 
1,222 
4,333 
8,309 
9,902 
2,050 



6,818 
20, 261 



27, 494 



8,013 
345 
2,300 
6,207 
269 
1,509 
2,074 
2,339 

245 
1,459 
2,614 
1,708 
6,494 
21, 798 

14, 757 
38,429 
11,664 
2,486 
33,421 
715 



8,330 
356 
2,158 
7,040 
309 
1,695 
1,876 
2,362 

287 
1,553 
4,779 
2,359 
6,354 
24, 877 

14, 660 
37, 459 
11, 129 
1,918 
36, 444 



Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



+4.3 



-1.1 

+7.5 
+1.5 
+16.8 
-3.0 
+6.6 
+8.3 
-6.1 



+.7 
+5.6 



+4.3 



+4.0 
+3.2 
-6.2 
+13.4 
+14.9 
+6.7 
-9.6 
+1.0 

+17.1 
+6.4 

+90.1 

+38.1 
-2.2 

+14.1 

-.7 
-2.6 
-4.6 
-22.8 
+6.1 
-7.3 



138 



Table 44.— Rural Arrests by Age, 1969 

[1,094 agencies; 1969 estimated population 17,578,000] 





Grand 

toUl 

all ages 


Ages 

under 

15 


Ages 
under 

18 


Ages 

18 and 

over 


Age 


Offense charged 


10 and 
under 


11-12 


13-14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


TOTAL 


309,693 
100.0 


15.386 
5.0 


64,688 
20.9 


245,105 
79.1 


2,147 

.7 


2,885 
.9 


10.364 
3.3 


12.095 
3.9 


17,365 
5.6 


19,742 
6.4 


21.496 

6.9 


18.167 
6.9 


14,792 


Percent distribution ' 


4.8 






Criminal homicide; 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent 


837 
659 
1,098 
1,867 
6,147 
19,362 
19,122 
6,720 


6 

1 

16 

31 

57 

2,796 

1,863 

692 


32 

27 

139 

260 

440 

8,736 

6,466 

3,275 


806 
632 
959 
1,607 
5,707 
10, 626 
12, 657 
3,445 




2 


4 

1 
11 
26 
38 
1,829 
1,176 
616 


4 
4 

26 

49 

61 

1,668 

1,105 

825 


14 

5 

37 

79 

118 

2,143 

1,625 

1,002 


8 

17 

60 

101 

204 

2,129 

1,872 

■756 


36 

37 

91 

194 

358 

2,118 

2,166 

680 


42 

46 

101 

141 

248 

1,635 

1,638 

448 


28 


(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 


31 


1 

3 

7 

337 

226 

12 


4 

2 

12 

630 

462 

64 


95 


Robbery 


149 




311 


Burglary— breaking or entering 


1,090 
1,087 


Auto theft- 


313 






Violent crime 


9,949 
100.0 


110 
1.1 


871 
8.8 


9.078 
91.2 


11 
.1 


20 
.2 


79 
.8 


140 
1.4 


248 
2.6 


373 
3.7 


679 
6.8 


532 
5.3 


683 




5.9 








45,204 
100.0 


5,351 
11.8 


18,476 
40.9 


26,728 
59.1 


676 
1.3 


1,166 
2.6 


3,620 
8.0 


3,698 
8.0 


4,770 
10.6 


4,757 
10.5 


4,964 
11.0 


3,621 
8.0 


2,490 


Percent distribution ' - - 


5.6 






Subtotal /or above offenses 


55.812 
100.0 


S,462 
9.8 


19, 374 
34.7 


36, 438 
65.3 


686 
1.0 


1,176 
2.1 


3,700 
6.6 


3,742 
6.7 


5,023 
9.0 


5,147 
9.2 


5,680 
10.2 


4,198 

7.5 


3,104 
6.6 






Other assaults . . 


11,278 

757 

2,971 

8,500 

464 

2,701 
6,710 
3,404 

352 

2,391 

7,084 

2.634 

7,537 

32,777 

26,514 

48,458 

16,943 

2.581 

68,507 

1,623 

1,967 

9,828 


147 

125 

37 

12 

2 

131 

1,624 

74 

1 

114 

109 

7 

28 

12 

508 

159 

486 

26 

3,125 

177 

390 

2,630 


762 
265 
311 
131 
14 

701 

3,603 

308 

14 

401 

1,309 

22 

113 

498 
8,223 
2,073 
2,220 

236 
11,695 

620 
1,967 
9,828 


10, 616 

492 

2,660 

8,369 

460 

2,000 
2,207 
3,096 

338 

1,990 

6,775 

2,612 

7,424 

32, 279 

17,291 

46,386 

14,723 

2,346 

46,812 

1,003 


22 
40 

1 


32 

32 

6 

2 


93 
53 
31 

9 
2 

103 

706 

67 

1 

76 

91 

4 

9 

11 

437 

139 

290 

23 

1,910 

101 

323 

2,185 


124 

29 
56 
9 

1 

131 
554 
44 

1 

68 

191 

1 

11 

47 

1,069 

284 

352 

34 

2,274 

124 

410 

2,540 


232 

40 

91 

42 

4 

215 

670 
82 

6 

104 

391 

4 

26 

128 

2,401 

673 

640 

51 

2,815 

164 

638 

2,926 


259 
71 

128 

68 

7 

224 
656 
108 

6 

115 

618 

10 

49 

311 

4,245 
957 
742 
125 

3,481 
155 
529 

1,732 


489 

60 

166 

204 

8 

320 
541 
192 

14 

162 

944 

12 

168 

632 

4,985 

1,219 

1,317 

226 

3,982 

175 


459 

61 

189 

250 

12 

211 
366 
162 

18 

132 

1,036 

16 

201 

643 

4,030 

1,183 

992 

192 

3,707 

110 


455 




34 




180 




295 




14 


Stolen property; buying, receiving. 


6 

466 
9 


22 

452 

8 


171 




243 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized 


163 
14 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 


14 
1 

2 
16 

17 

7 

88 

2 

704 

34 

8 

124 


24 

17 

1 

3 

1 

64 

13 

108 

1 

611 

42 

69 

321 


104 




837 




23 


Offenses against family and children. 
Driving under the Inffuence. 


233 
728 


Liquor laws 


2,573 


nninkpnnp5yi 


1,171 


Disorderly conduct- 


898 


Vagrancy- 


122 


All other offenses (except traffic) 


3,341 

89 


Curfew and loitering law violations.. 























See lootnotes at end of table. 



139 



397-633 O - 70 - 10 



Table 44. — Rural Arrests by Age, 1969 — Continued 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Percent distribution '. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence - 

Forcible rape 

Kobbery 

Aggravated assault 

Buglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Autotheft 



Violent crime 

Percent distribution ' . 



Property crime... 

Percent distribution '. 



Subtotal for above offenses. 
Percent distribution '. 



Other assaults 

Arson. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud. 

Embezzlement. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. .. 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution). 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children. 
Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Dnmkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion... 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Age 



21 



12,754 

4.1 



43 

42 
105 
149 
283 
876 
910 
286 



680 
6.8 



2,072 
4.6 



2,694 
4.8 



483 
33 
162 

394 
26 

140 
149 

197 

29 

107 

716 

26 

309 

1,012 

768 

1,331 

939 

133 

3,047 

60 



22 



12,226 
3.9 



41 

66 
69 
167 
332 
828 
760 
244 



699 
6.0 



1,832 
4.1 



2,487 
4.5 



698 
26 
171 
419 
21 

139 
147 
197 

32 

127 

697 

24 

372 

1,104 

513 

1,601 

889 

127 

2,666 

71 



9,948 
3.2 



33 
39 
67 
110 
314 
693 
618 
197 



524 
6.3 



1,408 
3.1 



1,971 
3.5 



486 

26 

136 

389 

17 



116 
172 



107 
362 

29 
299 
962 

367 

1,296 

691 

72 

2,306 

42 



24 



8,889 
2.9 



40 
20 
62 
81 
263 
469 
514 
148 



436 
4.4 



1,121 
2.5 



1,677 
2.8 



453 

17 

142 

411 

31 



83 

166 



223 
43 

329 
917 

266 

1,310 

646 

73 

1,973 

39 



26-29 



31.719 
10.2 



149 
115 
140 
279 
982 
1,359 
1,672 
462 



1,660 
16.6 



3,493 

7.7 



6,158 
9.2 



1,816 

78 

463 

1,646 
76 

275 
208 
638 

74 

292 

601 

210 

1,646 

3,888 

736 
4,804 
2,044 

248 
7,012 

109 



30-34 



23,817 

7.7 



80 
59 
91 
161 
673 
687 
969 
244 



996 
10.0 



1,890 
4.2 



2,944 
6.3 



1,405 

42 

306 

1,382 
66 

177 

94 

354 

35 

200 

198 

261 

1,270 

3,688 

529 
4,6M 
1,482 

189 

4,670 

81 



36-39 



21,247 



65 
62 
63 
100 
561 
416 
736 
150 



769 
7.7 



1,302 
2.9 



2,123 
3.8 



1,164 
32 
237 

1,043 
43 

116 
71 
264 

19 

200 
114 
280 
976 
3,620 

609 
6,064 
1,204 

160 

3,968 

60 



40-44 



20,755 

6.7 



69 
26 
46 
41 
497 
293 
574 
108 



662 



976 
2.2 



1,663 
3.0 



1,000 

24 

196 

838 

61 

109 
68 
228 

24 

160 

84 

323 

800 

4,061 

623 
5,886 
1,165 

196 

3,330 

47 



45-49 



17.396 

5.6 



60 
36 
27 
32 
316 
184 
403 
88 



434 
4.4 



676 
1.5 



1,146 
2.1 



664 

19 

155 

640 

37 

61 
49 

191 

14 

92 
38 
327 
470 
3,836 

448 

6,646 

909 

180 

2,637 

38 



60-54 



13,480 
4.4 



61 

26 
8 

16 
243 
109 
286 

60 



327 
3.3 



446 
1.0 



798 
1.4 



617 
19 
96 

316 
21 

47 
27 
14" 



90 

16 

308 

249 

2,982 

611 

4,661 

673 

138 

1,834 

40 



8.905 

2.9 



35 
22 
6 
4 
147 
41 
173 
21 



191 
1.9 



236 
.6 



448 
.8 



234 
13 
36 

165 
10 

24 
16 
73 



64 

11 

278 

112 

2,215 

228 

3,221 

432 

134 

1,170 

22 



60-64 



5.052 
1.6 



109 
1.1 



108 
.2 



232 
.4 



142 

6 

17 

69 

4 

6 
13 

32 



39 
3 

184 

46 

1,180 

163 

1,953 

240 

76 

636 

10 



65 and 
over 



4,409 

1.4 



118 
1.2 



226 
.4 



161 
3 

8 
71 

6 

8 
17 
46 



38 

6 

179 

41 
921 

161 

1,607 

201 

73 
635 

10 



Not 
known 



53 



(') 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

' Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



140 



Table 45. — Rural Arrests of Persons Under IS, Under 18, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1969 

11,094 agencies; 1969 estimated population 17,678,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal liomicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter.. 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence _ 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault. 

Burglary— breaking or entering- 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft 

Violent crime 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism.- 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws - 

Gambling.- 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence --- 

Liquor lawS- 

Drunkenness.- -- -.. 

Disorderly conduct- - 

Vagrancy-- 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion-- -- 

Curfew and loitering law violations - - 

Runaways -.. 



Grand 

total 

all 

ages 



837 
659 
1,098 
1.867 
6,147 
19,362 
19,122 
6.720 



9,949 
45,204 



65,812 



11,278 
757 
2,971 
8,500 
464 
2,701 
5,710 
3,404 

352 
2,391 
7,084 
2,534 
7,537 
32,777 

25,514 

48.458 

16,943 

2,581 

58,507 

1,623 

1,967 

9,828 



Number of persons arrested 



Under 
15 



15,386 



16 
31 

57 

2,796 

1,863 

692 



110 
5,361 



6,462 



147 

126 

37 

12 

2 

131 

1,624 

74 

1 

114 

109 

7 

28 

12 

608 

169 

486 

26 

3,125 
177 
390 

2,630 



Under 
18 



64,588 



32 

27 

139 

260 

440 

8,736 

6,466 

3,276 



871 
18, 476 



19, 374 



762 
266 
311 
131 
14 
701 
3,603 



14 

401 

1,309 

22 
113 
498 

8,223 
2,073 
2,220 

236 
11, 696 

620 
1,967 
9,828 



Under 
21 



119,043 



138 

140 

426 

744 

1,367 

13, 479 

11,366 

4,716 



2,666 
29, 661 



32, 356 



2,165 

420 

846 

880 

48 

1,403 

4.663 

826 

60 

799 

4,126 

72 

716 

2,601 

19,811 
5,646 
5,421 

782 
22,726 

994 
1,967 
9,828 



Under 
25 



162,860 



296 
297 
719 
1,241 
2,549 
16,236 
14,158 
6,691 



1,804 
35,984 



41,086 



4,185 
621 
1,467 
2,493 
142 
1,878 
6,147 
1,647 

164 
1,236 
6,014 

194 
2,024 
6,4% 

21, 706 
11,083 

8,686 
1,187 
32, 716 
1,206 
1,967 
9,828 



Percentage 



Under 
16 



.7 

.2 

1.6 

1.7 

.9 

14.4 

9.7 

10.3 



1.1 

11.8 



9.8 



1.3 

16.6 

1.2 

.1 

.4 

4.9 

28.4 

2.2 

.3 

4.8 

1.5 

.3 

.4 

(■) 

2.0 
.3 
2.9 
1.0 
6.3 
10.9 
19.8 
26.8 



Under 
18 



20.9 



4.1 
12.7 
13.9 

7.2 
45.1 
33.8 
48.7 



8.8 
40.9 



34.7 



6.8 
36.0 
10.6 

1.6 

3.0 
26.0 
61.3 

9.0 

4.0 
16.8 
18.5 
.9 
1.6 
1.5 

32.2 
4.3 
13.1 
9.1 
20.0 
38.2 
100.0 
100.0 



Under 
21 



38.4 



16.6 
21.2 
38. « 
39.9 
22.1 
69.6 
69.4 
70.2 



26.8 
66.4 



58.0 



19.2 
65.6 
28.5 
10.4 
10.3 
51.9 
81.6 
24.2 

17.0 
33.4 

68.2 
2.8 
9.6 
7.6 

77.6 
11.7 
32.0 
30.3 
38.8 
61.2 
100.0 
100.0 



Under 
26 



52.6 



35.2 
46.1 
65.5 
66.6 
41.5 
83.8 
74.0 
83.2 



48.3 
79.6 



73.6 



37.1 
68.8 
49.0 
29.3 
30.6 
69.6 
90.1 
46.4 

46.6 
61.7 
84.9 
7.7 
26.9 
19.8 

85.1 
22.9 
50.7 
46.0 
66.9 
74.3 
100.0 
100.0 



' Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $60 and over and auto theft. 



141 



Table 46.— Rural Arrests, Distributioit by Sex, 1969 

[1,094 agencies; 1969 estimated population 17,678,0001 



Offense charged 



TOTAL - - 

Criminal homicide: 

(0) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. . . 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape --- 

Robbery -- 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering _ 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft 

Violent crime 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults .-- 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement -. --- 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and conmiercialized vice — 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws — 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws., - — 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

AU other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



Total 



837 
659 
1,098 
1,867 
6,M7 
19.362 
19,122 
6,720 



9,949 
46,204 



65,812 



11,278 
757 
2,971 
8,600 
464 
2,701 
5,710 
3,404 

352 
2,391 
7,084 
2.534 
7,537 
32,777 

25,614 

48,468 

16,943 

2.581 

58.507 

1.623 

1,%7 

9,828 



Male Female 



279,870 



735 
614 
1,098 
1,767 
6,732 
18, 669 
17, 220 
6,384 



9,332 
42,273 



52. 219 



10,454 
713 
2.460 
6,744 
398 
2,606 
6,396 
3,208 

119 
2,186 
6,117 
2,381 
7,228 
31,316 

22,469 
44,866 
15, 242 
2,358 
62, 372 
1,432 
1,636 
6,161 



29,823 



102 
45 



100 
416 
693 
1,902 
336 



617 
2,931 



3,693 



824 

44 

611 

1,766 

66 

196 

314 

196 

233 
205 
967 
153 
309 
1,461 

3,045 

3,603 

1,701 

223 

6,135 

191 

431 

3,667 



Percent 
Male 



87.8 
93.2 
100.0 
94.6 
93.2 
96.4 
90. 1 
95.0 



93.8 
93.6 



93.6 



92.7 
94.2 
82.8 
79.3 
86,8 
92.8 
94.6 
94.2 

33.8 
91.4 
86.3 
94.0 
96.9 
96.6 

88.1 
92.6 
90.0 
91.4 
89 6 
88.2 
78.1 
62.7 



Percent 
Female 



12.2 
6.8 



5.4 
6.8 
3.6 
9.9 
6.0 



6.2 
6.5 



6.4 



7.3 
6.8 
17.2 
20.7 
14.2 
7.2 
6.5 
6.8 

66.2 
8.6 

13.7 
6.0 
4.1 
4.6 

11.9 
7.4 
10.0 
8.6 
10.6 
11.8 
21.9 
37.3 



Percent of total ' 



Total 



.3 
.2 
.4 
.6 
2.0 
6.3 
6.2 
2.2 



3.2 
14.6 



18.0 



3.6 

.2 
1.0 
2.7 
.1 
.9 
1.8 
1.1 

.1 
.8 

2.3 
.8 

2.4 
10.6 

8.2 

16.6 

6.6 

.8 

18.9 

.6 

.6 

3.2 



Male 



.3 
.2 
.4 
.6 

2.0 
6.7 
6.2 
2.3 



3.3 
16.1 



18.7 



.9 
2.4 
.1 
.9 
1.9 
1.1 

m 

.8 
2.2 

.9 
2.6 
11.2 

8.0 

16.0 

6.4 

.8 

18.7 

.6 

.5 

2.2 



Female 



.3 
.2 



.3 

1.4 
2.3 
6.4 
1.1 



2.1 
9.8 



12.0 



2.8 
.1 

1.7 

6 9 
.2 
.7 

1.1 
.7 



.7 
3.2 

.5 
1.0 
4.9 

10.2 

12.1 

5.7 

.7 

20.6 

.6 

1.4 

1Z3 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

' Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



142 



Table 41.— Rural Arrests by Race, 1969 

(981 agencies; 1969 estimated population 16,105,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegllgent man- 
slaughter - — 

(6) Manslaughter by negligence... 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— brealcing or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Autotheft -. 

Violent crime 

Property crime 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting - 

Fraud - 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice, 
Sei offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling. 

Offenses against family and children. - 
Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness.. 

Disorderly conduct - 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. .- 
Runaways 



Total arrests 



Total 



679 

625 

1.043 

1,724 

5,962 

18,242 

18,434 

6,912 



9,408 
42,588 



62,621 



10,880 

695 

2,975 

8.291 

463 

2,560 
5,685 
3,232 

351 

2.263 
6.976 
2.469 
7.522 
32.611 

24.518 

48.245 
16.109 
2.570 
57.082 
1.684 
1.946 
9,782 



White 



253.215 



443 

490 
827 
1,235 
4,286 
15, 990 
15,954 
5,034 



6,791 
36, 978 



44,259 



Negro 



195 

105 

177 

439 

1,404 

1,613 

1,899 

545 



2,215 
4,057 



6,377 



Indian 



22 
11 
20 
32 
194 
491 
450 
262 



268 
1,203 



1,482 



Chi- 



8,168 


2,181 


347 


615 


68 


6 


2,542 


353 


60 


7,422 


749 


86 


436 


18 


8 


1,946 


614 


36 


6.362 


202 


75 


2,160 


976 


39 


201 


141 


4 


2,022 


180 


38 


6,430 


454 


43 


2,119 


306 


1 


6,404 


967 


136 


27,899 


2,944 


1,602 


22,910 


755 


701 


36, 070 


4,490 


7,106 


12,681 


2,603 


763 


2,253 


197 


99 


49,129 


6.051 


1,494 


1,464 


107 


69 


1,715 


66 


123 


9,018 


228 


454 



Japa- 
nese 



All 
others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 



2,686 



19 
17 
19 
18 
77 
144 
123 
68 



133 
336 



181 

6 

19 

34 

1 

65 
43 



23 
42 
33 
24 
155 

151 
530 
161 
20 
389 
44 
31 
76 



Percent distribution 



White 



84.0 



65.2 
78.4 
79.3 
71.6 
71.9 
87.7 
86.6 
85.1 



72.2 
86.8 



84.1 



75.1 
88.5 
86.4 
89.6 
94.2 

76.0 
94.3 
66.6 

57.3 

89.4 
92.2 
86.2 
85.1 
86.6 

93.4 
74.8 
78.7 
87.7 
86.1 
86.9 
88.1 
92.2 



Negro 



10.2 



28.7 
16.8 
17.0 
26.5 
23.6 

8.8 
10.3 

9.2 



23.6 
9.6 



12.1 



20.0 
9.8 

11.9 
9.0 
3.9 

20.1 

3.6 

30.2 

40.2 

8.0 
6.5 
12.4 
12.7 
9.0 

3.1 
9.3 

15.5 
7.7 

10.6 
6.4 
3.4 
2.3 



Indian 



3.2 
1.8 
1.9 
1.9 
3.3 
2.7 
2.4 
4.4 



2.8 
2.8 



2.8 



Chi- 
nese 



3.2 

.9 
2.0 
1.0 
1.7 

1.4 
1.3 

1.2 

1.1 
1.7 



1.8 
4.9 

2.9 
14.7 
4.7 
3.9 
2.6 
4.1 
6.3 
4.6 



Japa- 
nese 



AU 

others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 



2.8 
2.7 
1.8 
1.0 
1.3 
.8 
.7 
1.2 



.4 

.2 

2.6 

.8 

2.1 

1.4 

1.0 
.6 

1.3 
.3 
.6 

.6 

1.1 
1.0 
.8 
.7 
2.6 
1.6 



143 





Table 47.- 


—Rural Arrests by Race, T969— Continued 














Arrests under 18 1 


Percent distribution 


Offense charged 


Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chi- 
nese 


Japa- 
nese 


All 
others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chi- 
nese 


Japa- 
nese 


AU 
others 
(includes 
race un- 
known) 




62,619 


56.222 


3,576 


2.304 


4 


30 


483 


89.8 


5.7 


3.7 






0.8 










Criminal homicide: 

(n) Murder and nonnegligent man- 


21 

25 

125 

238 

431 

8.311 

6,254 

2,891 


14 

18 

89 

172 

326 

7,401 

5,543 

2,582 


6 
4 
32 
59 
83 
604 
556 
165 


1 

1 

4 

5 

16 

230 

111 

103 








66.7 
72.0 
71.2 
72.3 
75.6 
89.1 
88.6 
89.3 


28.6 

16.0 

25.6 

24.8 

19.3 

7.3 

8.9 

5.7 


4.8 
4.0 
3.2 
2.1 
3.7 
2.8 
1.8 
3.6 








(6) Manslaughter by negligence..-- 






2 






8 


















2 

6 

73 

40 

38 






.8 












1.4 


Burglary — breaking or entering 


1 



2 
4 
3 






.9 




.1 
.1 


.6 




1.3 








815 
17.456 


601 
15, 526 


180 
1,325 


26 
444 






8 
151 


73.7 
88.9 


22.1 
7.6 


3.2 
2.5 






1.0 




1 


9 




.1 


.9 






Subtotal for above offenses.. 


18,296 


16, 145 


1,609 


471 


1 


9 


161 


88.2 


8.2 


2.6 






.9 










731 
248 
312 
117 
14 

677 

3,479 

307 

14 

377 

1,290 

21 

113 

495 

8,133 
2,062 
2,114 

235 
11,243 

613 
1.946 
9.782 


560 
220 
282 
108 
14 

533 

3,313 

246 

12 

314 

1,248 

6 

108 

471 

7,813 
1,569 
1,743 

221 
9,984 

579 
1,715 
9,018 


128 

22 

21 

6 


20 
2 

7 






23 
4 
1 
3 


76.6 
88.7 
90.4 
92.3 
100.0 

78.7 
95.2 
80.1 

85.7 

83.3 
96.7 
28.6 
95.6 
95.2 

96.1 
76.1 
82.5 
94.0 
88.8 
94.5 
88.1 
92.2 


17.5 
8.9 
6.7 
5.1 


2.7 

.8 

2.2 






3.1 












1.6 






1 




.3 


.3 




2.6 


















Stolen property; buying, receiving, pos- 


122 
94 
61 

2 

44 
25 
15 
4 
10 

49 
73 

228 
5 

855 
19 
66 

228 


8 

44 

8 






14 

26 

2 


18.0 
2.7 
16.6 

14.3 

11.7 
1.9 

71.4 
3.5 
2.0 

.6 
3.5 
10.8 
2.1 
7.6 
3.1 
3.4 
2.3 


1.2 
1.3 
2.6 






2.1 






2 




.1 


.7 


Sex oflenses (except forcible rape and 


.7 












13 

7 






6 
10 


3.4 
.6 






1.6 












.8 














Offenses against family and children... 








1 
2 

27 
8 

10 
4 

72 
2 

31 

76 








.9 


12 

244 
412 
133 
6 
328 
13 
123 
454 






2.4 

3.0 
20.0 
6.3 
2.1 
2.9 
2.1 
6.3 
4.6 






.4 












.3 












.4 












.5 












1.7 


All other oflenses (except traffic) 




4 






.6 






.3 


Curfew and loitering law violations 


3 


11 
3 




.6 


1.6 

.8 











144 



Table 47. — Rural Arreifs by Race, 1969 — Continued 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide: 

(o) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter _ - 

(d) Manslaughter by negligence. _ 

Forcible rape - 

Eobbery 

Aggravated assault - - 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— thett - 

Autotheft -.. 



Violent crime... 
Property crime. 



Subtotal (or above offenses. 



Other assaults --- 

Arson - 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud - - 

Embezzlement -- 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 



Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 



Prostitution and conamercialized vice . . 
Bex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) - 

Narcotic drug laws 

Qambling _. - 

Offenses against family and children.. 
Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws -. 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaw ays ..- 



Arrests 18 and over 



Total 



658 
600 
918 
1.486 
6.631 
9.931 
12.180 
3.021 



8,593 
25.132 



34,325 



10,149 

447 

2,663 

8,174 

449 

1,883 
2,206 
2.926 

337 

1.88« 
5.686 
2,438 
7,409 
32,116 

16,385 
46,183 
13,995 

2,336 
45,839 

1,071 



White 



238.901 196.993 27,240 12,466 



Negro 



Indian 



Chinese 



429 
472 
738 
1,063 
3,960 
8,689 
10. 411 
2,452 



6,190 
21,452 



28,114 



7,608 

396 

2,260 

7,314 

422 

1,413 

2,049 
1,904 

189 

1,708 
5,182 
2,113 
6,296 
27,428 

16,097 
34,501 
10,938 
2.032 
39, 145 
885 



189 

101 

145 

380 

1,321 

1,009 

1.343 

380 



2,035 
2,732 



21 

10 

16 

27 

178 

261 

339 

169 



242 
759 



1,011 



2,063 

46 

332 

743 

18 

392 
108 
924 

139 

136 
429 
291 
963 
2,934 

706 
4,417 
2.276 

192 

5,1% 

88 



327 
4 
63 

85 
S 

27 
31 
31 



26 

36 

1 

136 

1,690 

467 

6,694 

630 

94 

1,166 

66 



Japa- 



All others 
(includes 

race 

un- 
known) 



125 
184 



168 

2 

18 

31 

1 

61 
17 
66 



33 
23 
163 

124 
622 
161 

16 
317 

42 



Percent distribution 



White 



82.6 



Negro 



11.4 



Indian 



5.2 



Jfipa- 
Chlnese nese 



66.2 
78.7 
80.4 
71.6 
71.6 
86.6 
85.5 
81.2 



28.7 
16.8 
15.8 
25.6 
23.9 
10.2 
11.0 
12.6 



72.0 
85.4 



81.9 



23.7 
10.9 



3.2 
1.7 
1.7 
1.8 
3.2 
2.6 
2.8 
5.3 



2.8 
3.0 



14.2 



2.9 



75.0 
88.4 
84.9 
89.5 
94.0 

76.0 
92.9 
65.1 

66.1 

90.6 
91.1 
86.7 
85.0 
85.4 

92.1 
74.7 
78.2 
87.0 
85.4 
82.6 



20.2 
10.3 
12.5 
9.1 
4.0 

20.8 
4.9 
31.6 

41.2 

7.2 
7.5 
11.9 
12.9 
9.1 

4.3 

9.6 
16.3 

8.2 
11.3 

8.2 



3.2 
.9 
2.0 
1.0 
1.8 

1.4 
1.4 
1.1 

1.2 

1.3 



1.8 
5.0 

2.8 
14.5 
4.6 
4.0 
2.6 
6.2 



All others 
(includes 
race 
un- 
known) 



3 



2.9 
2.6 
2.1 
1.1 
1.3 
.7 
.7 
1.0 



1.6 

.7 



1.6 
.4 
.7 
.4 
.2 

2.7 

.8 

2.3 

1.6 



.6 
1.4 
.3 
.6 

.8 
1.1 
1.1 

.7 

.7 

3.9 



Violent crime Is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime Is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



145 



Table 48.— Suborbon and Rural Arrest Trends^ by Sex, 1968-69 





1,553 suburban agencies; 1969 estimated population 35,663,000 


800 rural 


igencies; 1969 estimated population 13,853,000 


Offense charged 


Males 


Females 


Males 1 


Females 




1968 


1969 


Percent 
change 


1968 


1969 


Percent 
change 


1968 


1969 


Percent 
change 


1968 


1969 


Percent 
change 


TOTAL 


781,097 


833,630 


+6.7 


122,707 


143,624 


+17.0 


213,335 


220,088 


+3.2 


21.330 


23.973 


+12.4 






Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 


1,024 

514 

2,244 

7,167 

14,469 

49,371 

71,074 

20,854 


1,052 

531 

2,366 

7,659 

15,934 

49, 894 

74,882 

20, 399 


+2.7 
+3.3 
+5.4 
+6.9 
+ 10.1 
+ 1.1 
+5.4 
—2. 2 


177 

62 

7 

421 

1,579 

2,208 

21,731 

1,052 


181 
49 


+2.3 
-21.0 


487 
387 
868 
1.140 
4.442 
13.967 
13.234 
4,312 


467 

395 

847 

1.339 

4.352 

15.018 

13.615 

4,082 


-4.1 
+2.1 
-1.3 
+17.6 
-2.0 
+7.5 
+2.9 
-5.3 


73 

27 


69 
34 


-6.5 


(h) Manslaughter by negligence. 


+25.9 


Robbery 


464 

1.747 

2. 3.62 

27. 489 

1.241 


+10.2 
+10.6 
+6.5 
+26.5 
+18.0 


63 

356 

546 

1.330 

258 


77 

324 

564 

1.606 

238 


+22.2 


Aggravated assault . .. 


-9.0 


Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 


+1.5 
+20.8 


Auto theft 


-7.8 








24,904 
141,299 


27, Oil 
145, 176 


+8.6 
+2.7 


2,184 
24,991 


2,392 
31.082 


+9.6 
+24.4 


6.927 
31.513 


7,005 
32. 715 


+1.1 
+3.8 


492 
2.134 


470 
2,398 


-4.5 




+12.4 






Subtotal for above oflenses 


166,717 


172, 717 


+3.6 


27,237 


33. 523 


+23.1 


38.827 


40. 115 


+3.3 


2.653 


2.902 


+9.4 




38,295 
1,861 
4,950 
9,279 
1,207 

5,990 
25,220 
10,183 

220 

7,673 
29,055 
3,586 

10,585 
57,243 

39,094 

130,301 

78.458 

8.287 

113.466 

9.376 

17.908 

21,519 


40, 363 
1,819 
4,694 
9,571 
1,199 

7,526 
24,381 
10,472 

278 

7,762 
39, 510 
3,385 

10, 660 
67,432 

42,805 

136, 684 

79.488 

7,028 

125,078 

10,870 

18. 128 

22, 770 


+5.4 
-2.3 

-6.2 
+3.1 

-.7 

+25.6 
-3.3 

+2.8 

+26.4 

+1.0 

+36.0 

-5.6 

+.6 
+17.8 

+9.6 
+4.8 
+ 1.3 
-16.2 
+ 10.2 
+ 15.9 
+ 1.2 
+6.S 


4,453 

115 

1,492 

3,027 

399 

460 

1,578 

485 

1.249 

760 

5.168 

413 

727 
4,338 

6,070 
12, 063 
10,422 

1,016 
19, 501 

1,043 

4,983 
17.761 


5.130 

141 

1,487 

3,717 

389 

598 

1,606 

598 

1,666 

1.001 

7.718 

400 

788 
4,948 

5,829 

13.407 

11.308 

754 

22.416 

1.545 

5.545 

20, 665 


+16.2 

+22.6 

-.3 

+22.8 
-2.5 

+30.0 
+1.8 
+23.3 

+32.6 

+31.7 

+49.3 

-3.1 

+8.4 
+14.1 

+ 15.0 
+11.1 
+8.5 
-26.8 
+ 14.9 
+48.1 
+11.3 
+ 16.4 


8,009 

560 

2,144 

5,179 

246 

1,813 
5.336 

2,484 

70 

1.665 
2.695 
1,651 

6,264 
21,005 

19,601 

37.219 

12.311 

2.605 

37.325 

1.004 

1.361 

5.065 


8.279 

537 

2.004 

5.608 

258 

2.014 
4.681 
2,478 

96 

1,726 
5,031 
2.236 

6,171 
24.100 

19, 172 

36, 175 

11,560 

1,942 

39,893 

1,065 

1,223 

4,800 


+3.4 
-4.1 
-6.5 
+8.3 
+4.9 

+11.1 
-12.3 

+37.1 

+3.6 
+86.7 
+35.4 

-1.5 
+14.7 

-2.8 
-6.2 

-22.5 
+6.9 
+5.1 

-10. 1 
-5.2 


676 

63 

397 

1.116 

33 

146 
260 
162 

186 

141 

456 

96 

287 
992 

2.366 

2,763 

1,241 

207 

4,178 

149 

312 

2,699 


670 
29 

423 

1.527 

57 

153 

272 
147 

205 

153 
792 
139 

268 
1.175 

2,656 

2,993 

1,312 

172 

4,640 

160 

331 

2,957 


-.9 


Arson 


-54.0 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


+6.6 


Fraud 


+36.8 


Embezzlement 


+72.7 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, 


+4.8 




+4.6 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. - 
Prostitution and commercialized 


-9.3 

+10.2 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape 
and prostitution) 


+8.5 




+73.7 


Gambling 


+44.8 


Offenses against family and chil- 
dren 


-6.6 


Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 


+18.4 
+12.3 


Drunkenness 


+8.3 


Disorderly conduct . 


+5.7 


Vagrancy 


-16.9 


All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals).. 
Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 


+11.1 
+7.4 
+6.1 

+13.8 



1 In suburban agencies male arrests under 18 increased 2.8 percent and female arrests under 18 increased 19.7 percent. In rural agencies male arrests under 
18 increased 0.9 percent and female arrests under 18 increased 13.7 percent. 

Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny $50 and over and auto theft. 



146 



Police Employee Data 



This section contains tables relating to police 
personnel. Figures showing police strength by 
number of full-time police officers and civilian em- 
ployees are based on national averages. These 
figures should not be interpreted as indicating 
recommended or desirable police strength. Ade- 
quate police requirements for a specific place can 
only be determined follouing careful study and 
analysis of the local situation together with a 
thorough evaluation of the numerous factors which 
affect local police needs. 

Two tables containing police employee rates are 
set forth. In the first, total employees including 
civilian personnel are used, whereas in the second 
table only sworn personnel are used to compute 
rates. 

The police employee rate ranges in Table 49, 
which include civilians, show the interquartile 
range between the upper limits of the lowest 
quartile and the lower limits of the highest quar- 
tile. In other words, 50 percent of the cities shown 
in each population group and geographic division 
have a police strength within the rate ranges 
shown. By arraying rates in this manner, extremes 
are eliminated. 

In Table 50 where rates are published for police 
officers, complete rate ranges are provided as sup- 
plemental data for those who may be interested 
in using these figures to make limited comparisons. 

Another table is presented showing police 
strength for all state police and state highway 
patrol organizations. This table is designed to 



show, by state, the number of miles of state and 
Federal highway per sworn employee, as well as 
the number of registered vehicles per officer. These 
rates are only a rough yardstick as to comparative 
workload and personnel strength because of widely 
differing functions and other .factors. The wide 
variations in sworn and civilian personnel among 
the various states can be accounted for in part 
by the differences in responsibilities assigned to 
the departments. It is pointed out, for instance, 
that state police generally are responsible not 
only for traffic patrol, but also conduct a major 
portion of the criminal investigative work in the 
unincorporated areas of the states. On the other 
hand, the activities of the state highway patrol 
organizations for the most part are Hmited to 
traffic and highway patrol, which includes han- 
dling all types of crime which come to their 
attention during the performance of their patrol 
functions. Many of these state highway patrol 
groups also are authorized to and do participate 
in criminal investigative work when requested to 
do so by local departments or sheriffs' oflSces. 

The annual collection of police employee data 
provides figures for police killed and assaulted. 
Collection of these data is supplemented with 
respect to police killed in the line of duty through 
the use of a special questionnaire, by means of 
which additional details on this important subject 
are accumulated. Data relative to police killed 
and assaulted are also presented in the Summary 
Section of this publication. 



147 



Table 49. — Full-Time Police Department Employees,' December 31, 1969, Number and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants, by Geographic 

Divisions and Population Groups 

11969 estimated population) 



Geographic division 



TOTAL: 3,832 dties; population 117,815,000: 

Number of police employees. 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Interquartile range _ _ 

New England: 331 cities; population 8,493,000: 

Number of police employees. 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

Middle Atlantic: 927 cities; population 26.529,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

East North Central: 817 cities; population 25,116,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range , 

West North Central: 405 cities; population 8,792,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

South Atlantic: 346 cities; population 12.217,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

East South Central: 139 cities; population 4,698,000: 

Number of poUce employees 

Average number of employees per l.OOOinhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

West South Central: 267 cities; population 11,142,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

Mountain: 190 cities; population 4,797,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per l,000inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

PadSc: 410 cities; population 16,030,000: 

Number of police employees. 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 



TOTAL 

(3,832 cities: 
population 
117,815,000) 



254,984 

2.2 

1.2-2.0 



17,685 

2.1 

1.3-1.9 

73,964 

2.8 

1.1-2.0 

54,731 

2.2 

1.2-1.8 

14,957 

1.7 

1.1-1.7 

28,460 

2.3 

1.6-2.3 

8,307 

1.8 

1.4-2.0 

17,231 

1.5 

1.1-1.7 

8,177 

1.7 

1.2-1.9 

31.472 

2.0 

I. 5-2. 1 



Population group 



Group I 

(66 cities over 

250,000; 

population 

43,186,000) 



131.723 

3.1 

1.7-2.8 



48,863 

4.0 

3.6-4.1 

30, 339 

3.3 

2. 0-2. 9 

6,391 

2.4 
1. 7-1. 9 

13,036 

3.2 

1. 9-2. 2 

3,287 

1.9 

1. 8-2. 

8.684 

1.7 

1.4-1.8 

2,661 
2.0 

1. 9-2. 

15,633 

2.4 

2. 0-2. 4 



Group II 
(93 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
population 
13,794,000) 



25,293 

1.8 

1.5-2.0 



3,070 

2.7 

2. 6-2. 8 

3,515 

2.3 

1. 9-2. 5 

4,198 

1.7 

1.6-1.9 

1,446 

1.6 

1.3-1.6 

4,695 

1.8 

1. 6-1. 9 

1,634 

1.7 

1.8-1.9 

2,291 

1.6 

1. 3-1. 4 

1,443 

1.7 

1. 6-1. 6 

3,102 

1.7 

1. 4-1. 8 



Group III 

(252 cities, 

60,000 to 

100,000; 

population 

17,631,000) 



29,029 

1.6 

1.3-1.9 



4,332 
2.0 

1. 7-2. 1 

5,317 

1.8 

1. 2-2. 1 

6,097 

1.5 

1. 2-1. 8 

1,221 

1.3 

1. 1-1. 5 

3,396 

2.0 

1. 7-2. 

760 

2.1 

1.8-2.1 

2,137 

1.3 

1. 1-1. 6 

970 

1.4 

1. 1-1. 4 

4,800 

1.6 

1. 4-1. 9 



Group IV 
(439 cities, 
25,000 to 
60,000; 
population 
15,709,000) 



24.662 

1.6 

1.3-1.8 



3.413 

1.8 

1. 5-2. 

6,678 

1.7 

1. 3-2. 2 

4,706 

1.4 

1. 2-1. 6 

1,687 

1.2 

1.1-1.4 

2,621 

1.8 

1. 6-1. 9 

1,083 

1.6 

1.4-1.8 

1,603 

1.3 

1.1-1.4 

1,070 

1.5 

1.3-1.7 

3,102 

1.6 

1. 3-1. 7 



Group V 

(1,085 cities, 

10,000 to 

25,000; 

population 

17,373,000) 



27.154 

1.6 

1.3-1.8 



3,012 

1.5 

1. 3-1. 7 

6,278 

1.6 

1. 2-1. 9 

6,868 

1.6 

1. 3-1. 7 

2,392 

1.4 

1. 2-1. 6 

2,943 

1.9 

1. 6-2. 2 

981 

1.6 

1. 4-1. 8 

1,668 

1.3 

1. 1-1. 6 

886 

1.6 

1. 2-1. 7 

3,147 

1.7 

1.5-1.9 



Group VI 
(1,907 cities 
under 10,000; 
population 
10,122,000) 



17,123 

1.7 

1.2-2.1 



919 

1.4 

.9-1.7 

4,423 

1.6 

.9-2.0 

3,634 

1.7 

1. 2-1. 9 

1,821 

1.6 

1. 2-1. 9 

1,870 

2.0 

1.6-2.6 



1.8 
1.6-2.0 

9S8 

1.6 

1.1-1.9 

1,148 

1.7 

1. 3-2. 1 

1,788 

2.1 

1. 6-2. 6 



Suburban Police and County Sheriff Departments 



Suburban: ^ 1.953 agencies; population 44.445.000: 

Number of poUce employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants 
Interquartile range 



74,040 

1.7 

1. 1-1. 9 



Sheriffs: 1.158 agencies; population 32.716,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Interquartile range 



44,624 

1.4 

0. 4-1. 2 



' Includes civilians. 

' Only one city this size in geographic division. 

' Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



148 



Table 50. — Full-Time Polite Department Officers, December 31, 1969, Number and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants, by Geographic 

Divisions and Population Groups 

[1969 estimated population] 



Geographic division 



TOTAL: 3,832 cities; population 117.815.000: 
. Number of police oft.cers — 



Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 
Rate range 



New England: 331 cities ; population 8,493,000: 

Number of police officers _ , 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

Middle Atlantic: 927 cities: population 26,529,000: 

Number of pohcc officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

East North Central: 817 cities; population 25,116,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range 

West North Central: 405 cities: population 8,792,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range 

South Atlantic: 346 cities; population 12,217,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range 

East South Central: 139 cities; population 4,698,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range 

West South Central: 267 cities: population 11,142,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range 

Mountain: 190 cities; population 4,797,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range _ 

Pacific: 410 cities; population 16,030,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Rate range 



TOTAL 

(3,832 

cities ; 

population 

117,815,000) 



223.135 

1.9 

0.1-9.8 



16,342 

1.9 

0.1-4.5 

68,360 

2.6 

0.1-9.8 

47,515 

1.9 

0.2-^.6 

12.56S 

1.4 

0.4-5.1 

24,449 

2.0 

0.4-6.9 

7,109 

1.5 

0.4-3.9 

14,733 

1.3 

0.4-7.2 

6,723 

1.4 

0.3-5.0 

25,335 

1.6 

0.5-«.l 



Population group 



Group I 

(56 cities 

over 

250,000; 

population 

43,186,000) 



114,280 

2.6 

1.1-1.8 



2,610 
4.5 

(') 

45, 118 

3.7 

2. 2-3. 9 

26,014 

2.8 

1.4-3.4 

8,131 

2.0 

1. 2-3. 

10,991 

2.7 

1.3-4.8 

2,794 

1.6 

1. 2-2. 

7,326 

1.5 

1. 1-2. 

2,130 

1.6 

1. 2-2. 

12,166 

1.9 

1. 2-2. 3 



Group II 

(93 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
population 
13,794,000) 



21,750 

1.6 

1.0-3.0 



2,760 

2.4 

2. 1-2. 9 

3,129 

2.1 

1. 3-3. 

3,725 

1.5 

1.0-1.9 

1,190 

1.2 

1. 0-1. 5 

4,052 

1.6 

1. 0-2. 2 

1,209 

1.3 

1.0-1.9 

1,968 

1.3 

1.0-1.8 

1,175 

1.4 

1. 2-2. 1 

2,542 

L4 

1. 0-1. 8 



Group III 

(252 cities, 

50,000 to 

100,000; 

population 

17,631,000) 



25,373 

1.4 

0.4-3.5 



4,029 
1.8 

1. 1-2. 8 

4,832 

1.6 

.5-3.5 

5,331 

1.3 

.4-1.8 

1,084 

1.1 

.7-1.8 

2,902 

1.7 

.8-3.2 

645 

1.8 

1. 4-2. 4 

1,891 

1.2 
.8-1.9 

802 

1.2 

.9-2.4 

3,857 

1.3 

.8-2.0 



Group IV 
(439 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
population 
15,709,000) 



22,108 

1.4 

0.3-3.3 



3,211 

1.7 

1. 1-2. 8 

5,220 

1.6 

.5-3.2 

4,202 

1.3 

.3-2.9 

1,508 
1.1 

. 7-1. 6 

2,211 

1.6 

.8-3.0 

969 

1.4 

1. 1-1. 9 

1,305 

1.1 

.6-2.0 

OOO 

1.2 

.9-1.7 

2,682 

1.3 

.5-3.3 



Group V 

(1,085 cities, 

10.000 to 

25,000; 

population 

17,373,000) 



24,579 

1.4 

0.1-5.5 



2,892 

1.4 

.1-2.6 

5,947 

1.5 

. 1-5. 5 

5,200 

1.3 

.3-3.1 

2,115 

1.2 

.6-2.9 

2,651 

1.7 

.5-5.4 

905 

1.4 

.4-2.3 

1,437 

1.2 

.5-2.5 

773 

1.3 

.6-2.2 

2,659 

1.4 

.7-3.2 



Group VI 
(1,907 cities 
imder 
10,000; 
population 
10,122,000) 



15.045 

1.5 

0.1-9.8 



840 

1.2 

.2-4.1 

4,114 

1.6 

. 1-9. 8 

3,043 

1.4 

.2-4.6 

1,541 

1.3 

. 4-5. 1 

1,642 

1.8 

.4-6.9 

687 

1.6 

. 7-3. 9 

806 
1.3 

.4-7.2 

943 

1.4 

.3-5.0 

1,629 

1.8 

. 7-6. 1 



Suburban Police anci County Sheriff Departments 



Suburban: ' 1,953 agencies: population 44,445,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants 
Rate range 



63,661 

1.4 

0. 1-9. 7 



SherilTs: 1,158 agencies: population 32,716,000: 

Number of officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Rate range 



36, 771 

1.1 

0. 1-a 7 



' Only one city this size in geographic division. 

! Includes suburban, city and coimty police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



149 



Table 51. — Civilian Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Percentage of Total by Population Groups 


Population group 


Percentage 

civilian 
employees 


Population group 


Percentage 

civUian 
employees 


TOTAL, ALL CITIES 


12.5 


Group IV (25,000-50,000).. 


10 4 




Group V (10 000-25 000) 


9.6 
12 3 


Group I cover 250,000). . 


13.2 
11.9 
14.2 
16.2 
14.0 
12.6 


Group VI (2,500-10,000). . 


(Over 1,000,000) . 


Suburban agencies 




(500,000-1,000,000) 


14 


(250,000-600,000) 


Sheriffs 


17 4 


Group II (100,000-250,000) 






Group III (50,000-100,000). 









Table 52. — Number of Police Officers Killed,^ 1969, by Geographic Division and Population Groups 





Total 


Population group 


Geographic division 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Group rv 


Group V 


Group VI 


County, 
State 




Over 
250,000 


100,000 

to 
250,000 


60,000 

to 
100,000 


25,000 

to 
60,000 


10,000 

to 
26,000 


Under 
10,000 


PoUce, 

and 

Highway 

Patrol 


TOTAL . 


125 


39 


16 


6 


3 


9 


10 


42 








3 
15 
31 
10 
15 

9 
19 

6 
17 


1 
3 
15 
5 
4 
4 
2 


1 
3 
4 

1 
2 
1 
2 






1 






Middle Atlantic 


3 




4 

2 


2 


East North Central 




5 


6 


West North Central 


1 
1 




3 


South Atlantic 


1 


1 
1 
1 


1 


5 


East South Central 


3 


West South Central . . . 


1 


1 


1 
1 
1 


11 


Mountain 


6 


Pacific 


6 


2 




1 




8 











' 86 killed by felons; 39 killed hi accidents. 



Table 53. — Assaults on Police Officers, 1969, by Geographic Divisions and Population Groups 

[4,807 agencies; 1969 estimated population 123,638,000) 



Geographic 
division 


ToUl 
assaults 


Rate 
per 100 
police 
officers 


Assaults 
with 
injury 


Rate 
per 100 
pohce 
officers 


Population group 


Total 
assaults 


Rate 

per 100 

police 

officers 


Assaults 
with 
hijury 


Rate 
per 100 
police 
officers 


TOTAL 


35,202 


16.9 


11,949 


5.7 


TOTAL 


35,202 


16.9 


11,949 


6.7 




Group I (Over 260,000) 




New England 


2.207 
8,661 
9,042 
1.792 
4,843 
1,034 
2,664 
1,517 
3,652 


16.4 
12.8 
22.0 
13.3 
18.3 
20.8 
18.8 
18.9 
18.1 


760 

3,652 

2,726 

676 

1,426 

244 

629 

660 

1,276 


6.6 
5.5 
6.6 
5.0 
5.4 
4.9 
4.6 
7.0 
6.3 


17.110 
4.100 
3.499 
2.809 
3.392 
1.906 

6,992 
2,386 


19.1 
29.1 
16.7 
14.1 
14.0 
12.8 

12.1 
9.9 


6,723 
1,612 
1,370 

976 
1,156 

542 

1,914 
671 


6.4 


Middle Atlantic 


Group II (100,000 to 250,000) 

Group III (50,000 to 100,000) 

Group IV (25,000 to 50,000) 

Group V (10,000 to 25,000) .. . . 


10.7 


East North Central. 


6.6 


West North Central 


4.9 


South Atlantic 


4.8 


East South Central 


Group VI (Under 10,000) 


3.6 


West South Central 


Suburban agencies • 




Mountain ... 


3.9 


Pacific 


Sheriffs 


2.8 









' Includes suburban, city, and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 



150 



I 



Table 54. — Assaults on Police Officers, 1969, Percent Distribution of Weapons Used 

14,750 agencies; 1969 estimated population 117,405,000) 



Population group 


ToUl 
assaults 


Fire- 
arms 


Knife 

or 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


Other 
danger- 
ous 
weapon 


Hands, 
fists, 
feet, 
etc. 


Geographic division 


Total 
assaults 


Fire- 
arms 


Knife 

or 
cutting 
Instru- 
ment 


Other 
danger- 
ous 
weapon 


Hands, 
fists, 
feet, 
etc. 




31,634 
100.0 


1,637 
5.2 


929 
2.9 


3,959 
12.5 


25,109 
79.4 


TOTAL 


31,634 
100.0 


1,637 
5.2 


929 
2.9 


3,959 
12.5 


25,109 


AGENCIES 




79.4 


Group I (Over 250,000) 

(Over 1 000 000) 


15,502 
9,958 
2,422 
3,122 
2,547 
3,302 
2.802 
3,320 
1,877 
6.885 
2.284 


6.1 
5.3 
9.7 
5.6 
2.6 
4.0 
2.7 
3.7 
5.3 
4.4 
8.7 


3.3 
3.4 
4.3 

2.2 
2.0 
2.8 
2.2 
2.0 
2.7 
2.9 
4.2 


17.8 
21.5 
14.5 
8.6 
10.2 
8.8 
4.9 
6.0 
4.3 
6.9 
11.6 


72.8 
69.8 
71.5 
83.5 
85.2 
84.4 
90.1 
89.3 
87.7 
85.7 
75.6 


1.862 
9.261 
6.455 
1.498 
4.616 
1.019 
2.249 
1.442 
3.232 


4.4 
2.6 
8.4 
6.6 
6.0 
5.1 
6.1 
8.3 
4.8 


2.6 
3.0 
3.6 
1.7 
3.1 
2.4 
2.8 
4. 1 
2.4 


9.9 
16.7 
16.3 
6.9 
9.2 
5.2 
9.7 
8.8 
11.0 


83.2 


Middle Atlantic 


77.8 


(600,000 to 1,000,000) 

(250 000 to 500 000) 


East Nortli Central 


71.7 




84.8 


Group II (100,000 to 250,000).. 
Group III (60,000 to 100,000).. 
Group I\' (25,000 to 50,000) . - . 
Group V ( 10,000 to 25,000) ... . 

Group VI (under 10,000) 

Suburban agencies ' 

Sheriils 




81.7 


East South Central 


87.3 


West South Central 


82.4 




78.7 


Pacific --- 


81.8 











' Includes suburban, city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 



Table 55. — Full-Time State Police and Highway Patrol Employees, December 31, 1969 



State 



ToUl 



Total 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado... 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho 

IlUnois 

Indiana 

Iowa - 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts.. 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 



52,812 

825 
218 
755 
499 
7.026 

672 

976 

401 

1,802 

1.167 

188 

2,057 

1,149 

638 

400 

853 
899 
354 
1.572 
995 

2.222 
555 
741 

1.373 
240 



Police 
officers 



CivU- 
ians 



38,718 14.094 



Police 
killed 



599 


226 


139 


79 


683 


172 


377 


122 


5,398 


1,628 


446 


226 


740 


236 


331 


70 


887 


915 


706 


461 


167 


21 


1,551 


506 


877 


272 


410 


228 


308 


92 


589 


264 


646 


254 


301 


53 


1,087 


485 


845 


150 


1,721 


501 


458 


97 


516 


225 


745 


628 


177 


63 



Miles of 

primary 

highway 

per 

pohce 

officer 



12.3 



16.6 
15.5 

9.3 
37.7 

2.7 

19.5 

1.7 

1.9 

13.1 

24.6 

29.1 
10.6 
12.7 
24.8 
33.8 

41.7 
7.1 

12.9 
1.9 
3.2 

5.4 
26.3 
20.7 
10.5 
34.3 



State 
motor 
vehicle 
registra- 
tion per 
police 
officer 



2.706 



3,106 
946 
1,757 
2,521 
2,149 

3,080 
2,266 
896 
4,391 
3,623 

2,854 
3,328 
3,392 
4,278 
4,919 

2,908 
2,714 
1,647 
1,652 
2,871 

2,608 
4,681 
2,104 
3,105 
2,701 



State 



Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island... 
South Carolina- 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee.- 

Texas.- 

Utah... ---- 

Vermont --- 

Virginia 

Washington 

West Virginia... 

Wisconsin 

Wyoming.- 



Total 



379 
109 
181 
1.853 
373 

3.577 

1.102 

95 

1.839 

539 

712 
3.743 
175 
663 
161 

874 

3.710 

303 

263 

1.223 

1.077 
528 
656 
100 



PoUce 
officers 



292 

81 

147 

1,439 

263 

3,129 

862 

80 

990 

463 

608 
3,229 
147 
577 
116 

673 
2,044 
297 
180 
899 

673 

372 

477 

97 



Civil- 
ians 



87 
28 
34 
414 
110 

448 
250 

16 
849 

86 

104 
614 
28 
86 
46 

201 

1.666 

6 

83 

324 

404 

166 

179 

3 



PoUce 
killed 



Miles of 

primary 

highway 

per 

police 

officer 



33.0 
26.5 
13.4 
1.4 
41.5 

4.3 
16.5 
83.9 
19.0 
26.3 

7.9 
4.9 
7.0 
16.6 
72.6 

13.9 
32.1 
19.2 
13.7 
10.4 

10.2 
14.2 
24.9 
59.3 



State 
motor 
vehicle 
registra- 
tion per 
police 
officer 



3,182 
4,061 
2,564 
2,426 
2,322 

2,079 
3,189 
5,247 
5,934 
3,643 

2,195 
1,784 
3,196 
2,273 
3,603 

2,929 
3,183 
2,025 
1,192 
2,404 

3,130 
2,248 
4,349 
2,462 



151 



Table 56. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities 25,000 and over in Population 



City by State 



ALABAMA 

Annlston 

Bessemer 

Birmingham 

Dothan 

Florence 

Gadsden 

Huntsville 

Mobile 

Montgomery... 

Phenix City 

Selma 

ALASKA 

Anchorage 

ARIZONA 

Glendale 

Mesa .- 

Phoenix 

Scottsdale. - 

Tempe 

Tucson 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 

BlythevUIe 

El Dorado 

Fayetteville 

Fort Smith 

Little Rock 

North Little Rock.. 
Pine Bluff.-- 

CALIFORNIA 

Alameda....,, 

Alhambra .-. 

Anaheim 

Arcadia 

Azusa 

Bakersfield 

Baldwin Park 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills 

Burbank 

Burlingame 

Chula Vista 

Compton 

Concord 

Coronado --. 

Costa Mesa --. 

Covina 

Daly City 

Downey 

El Cajon 

ElCerrito 

El Monte , 

Escondido 

Eureka 

Fairfield 

Fremont 

Fresno.- 

Fullcrton 



Number of police 
department employees 


Total 


Police 
officers 


Civil- 
ians 


77 


67 


10 


59 


57 


2 


628 


549 


79 


73 


66 


8 


69 


56 


4 


89 


86 


4 


239 


171 


68 


346 


265 


91 


283 


221 


62 


45 


41 


4 


48 


46 


2 


94 


83 


11 


57 


48 


9 


67 


61 


6 


1,030 


827 


203 


78 


64 


14 


68 


57 


11 


382 


304 


78 


57 


47 


10 


31 


29 


2 


45 


37 


8 


36 


34 


2 


91 


87 


4 


210 


190 


20 


115 


109 


6 


75 


72 


3 


89 


79 


10 


103 


85 


18 


297 


244 


53 


77 


68 


9 


63 


46 


7 


189 


147 


42 


64 


63 


11 


246 


212 


34 


105 


94 


11 


194 


136 


68 


43 


33 


10 


93 


76 


18 


169 


119 


40 


119 


89 


30 


34 


26 


8 


127 


109 


18 


49 


40 


9 


82 


65 


18 


122 


98 


24 


76 


57 


18 


46 


38 


8 


102 


77 


25 


60 


42 


8 


41 


39 


2 


65 


43 


12 


120 


103 


17 


306 


253 


53 


141 


104 


37 



City by State 



CALIFORNIA— Con. 

Gardena 

Garden Grove 

Glendale 

Glendora 

Hayward 

Huntington Beach 

Inglewood 

La Habra 

La Mesa 

Livermore 

Lodl -. 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles -- 

Lynwood 

Manhattan Beach 

Modesto 

Monrovia 

Montebello 

Monterey - 

Monterey Park 

Mountain View 

Napa 

National City.. 

Novato 

Oakland- 

Oceanside - - - 

Ontario 

Orange 

Oxnard 

Pacifica.- - 

Palo Alto.-- --.. 

Pasadena 

Pleasant HUl 

Pomona .- 

Redlands - 

Redondo Beach 

Redwood City 

Rialto 

Richmond --- 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

Salinas 

San Bernardino 

San Bruno 

San Carlos 

San Diego 

San Francisco -.. 

San Gabriel - 

San Jose 

San Leandro - 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

San Rafael--- 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara -- 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Maria 

Santa Monica 

Santa Rosa 

South Gate 

South San Francisco.. - 

Stockton 

Sunnyvale. 

Torrance 

Upland 



Number of police 
department employees 


Total 


Police 
officers 


Civil- 
ians 


69 


58 


11 


146 


119 


27 


192 


149 


43 


43 


37 


6 


117 


98 


19 


161 


120 


31 


167 


130 


37 


55 


43 


12 


48 


41 


7 


36 


29 


7 


42 


32 


10 


821 


680 


141 


8,235 


6,194 


2,041 


63 


50 


13 


57 


47 


10 


105 


80 


25 


59 


51 


8 


68 


59 


9 


61 


47 


14 


69 


69 


10 


75 


58 


17 


53 


42 


11 


59 


60 


9 


32 


26 


6 


929 


694 


235 


72 


59 


13 


90 


69 


21 


119 


98 


21 


102 


88 


14 


33 


25 


8 


107 


94 


13 


256 


191 


65 


13 


13 




136 


116 


20 


60 


49 


11 


83 


62 


21 


79 


68 


11 


33 


30 


3 


187 


153 


34 


208 


169 


39 


556 


454 


102 


96 


68 


28 


233 


194 


39 


45 


36 


9 


30 


27 


3 


1,147 


950 


197 


2,095 


1,795 


300 


49 


42 


7 


667 


608 


59 


107 


79 


28 


43 


34 


9 


126 


104 


21 


69 


51 


18 


260 


190 


60 


134 


109 


25 


107 


94 


13 


66 


47 


9 


53 


43 


10 


174 


133 


41 


60 


57 


3 


106 


93 


13 


62 


49 


13 


222 


196 


26 


100 


76 


25 


228 


179 


49 


46 


37 


9 



City by State 



CALIFORNIA— Con. 

Vallejo -. 

Ventura - - 

Walnut Creek 

West Covina.- 

Westminster 

Whittier 

COLORADO 

Arvada 

Aurora 

Colorado Springs 

Denver 

Englewood 

Fort Collins 

Greeley 

Pueblo 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport 

Bristol 

Danbury 

East Hartford 

Enfleld 

Fairfield 

Greenwich 

Hamden 

Hartford 

Manchester Township- 

Meriden- 

Middletown 

Milford Town - 

New Britain 

New Haven.- 

New London 

Norwalk- 

Norwich 

Southington Town 

Stamford 

Stratford. 

Torrington. _ - 

Trumbull 

Wallingford 

Waterbury 

West Hartford 

West Haven - 

West port 

Wethersfleld 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington-- 

DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 

Washington -- 

FLORIDA 

Clearwater. 

Coral Gables 

Daytona Beach 

Fort Lauderdale-- 

Fort Myers 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



106 
83 
76 
89 
73 

104 



58 
83 

202 
1,176 
58 
50 
56 

150 



461 

68 

87 

91 

50 

94 

149 

90 

461 

72 

95 

74 

106 

165 

456 

76 

158 

57 

37 

238 

101 

60 

46 

41 

264 

124 

84 

.53 

40 



120 
129 
136 
392 
68 



Police 
officers 



50 
71 
161 
975 
48 
43 
42 
141 



439 
63 
84 
84 
47 
91 

129 
87 

409 
67 
85 
71 
96 

145 

391 
72 

134 
63 
36 

229 
97 
57 
40 
38 

253 

116 
80 
50 
36 



3,868 



84 
110 

96 
303 

55 



152 



Table 56. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Con. 



City by State 



FLORIDA— Con. 



Fort Pierce 

Gainesville 

Hlaleah 

Hollywood 

Jacksonville 

Key West 

Miami 

Miami Beach 

Nortli Miami 

North Miami Beach. 

Orlando 

Panama City 

Pensacola -. 

Pompano Beach 

St. Petersburg 

Sarasota. 

Tallahassee 

Tampa 

Titusville.. 

West Palm Beach 

Winter Park 



GEORGIA 



I Albany 

Atlanta 

Augusta 

Columbus 

Decatur 

East Point 

La Grange 

Macon 

Marietta 

J Rome 

! Savannah 

V'aldosta 

Warner Robins. 



HAWAH 



HUo 

Honolulu. 



Boise 

Idaho Falls. 
Pocatello 



ILUNOIS 



Alton 

Arlington Heights. 

Aurora 

Belleville 

Berwyn 

Bloomington 

Calumet City 

Champaign 

Chicago 

Chicago Heights. -- 

Cicero 

Decatur. 

De Kalb 

DesPlalnes 

Downers Grove 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



66 
124 
1« 

277 
928 

51 
878 
292 

59 

56 
274 

61 
127 



116 
687 
44 
171 

49 



100 
1,055 

148 

247 
34 
79 
49 

174 
62 
62 

240 
45 
80 



108 
1,049 



lOS 
66 
61 



59 
65 
114 
54 
62 
55 
40 
71 
15,124 
76 
105 
120 
42 
75 
38 



Police 
officers 



40 

97 
102 
196 
663 

40 
678 
231 

48 

49 
233 

50 
109 

76 
300 

72 
108 
559 

36 
134 

40 



906 

132 

229 

30 

76 

48 

167 

55 

54 

208 

44 

78 



90 
854 



51 
68 

102 
48 
58 
48 
32 
66 
12,205 
58 

101 
96 
33 
72 
37 



Civil- 
ians 



16 
27 
42 
81 

266 
11 

200 
61 
11 
7 
41 
U 
18 
22 

118 
26 



2 

149 

16 

18 

4 

3 

1 

7 

7 

8 

32 

1 

2 



18 
195 



8 
7 

12 
6 
4 
7 
8 
6 
2,919 

18 
4 

24 



City by State 



ILLINOIS— Con. 

East St. Louis 

Elgin 

Elmhurst 

Evanston 

Evergreen Park 

Freeport 

Galesburg 

Granite City 

Harvey 

Highland Park 

Joliet 

Kankakee 

Lombard 

Maywood 

Moline 

Morton Grove 

Mount Prospect 

NUes 

North Chicago 

Oak Lawn 

Oak Park... 

Park Forest 

Park Ridge 

Fekin 

Peoria. 

Qulncy 

Rantoul 

Rocklord 

Rock Island 

Skokle 

Springfield 

Urbana 

VlUaPark 

Waukegan 

Wheaton.. 

Wllmette - 

INDIANA 

Anderson 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Elkhart... 

Evansvllle 

Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Hammond. 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo.. 

Lafayette 

Michigan City 

Mishawaka 

Muncle 

New Albany 

Richmond — 

South Bend... 

Terre Haute 

IOWA 

Ames 

Burlington 

Cedar Falls 

Cedar Rapids 

Clinton 

Council Blufls 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



126 
91 
67 

161 
35 
39 
48 
43 
52 
58 

133 
52 
40 
46 
65 
37 
39 
53 
29 
79 

101 
31 
49 
44 

228 
54 
17 

242 
87 

130 

142 
37 
32 
88 
49 
45 



131 

59 

50 

122 

249 

272 

387 

203 

1,225 

99 

75 

79 

58 

124 

56 

77 

233 

114 



40 
47 
35 
149 
48 
84 



Police 
officers 



109 
68 
61 

127 
30 
35 
43 
41 
46 
48 

120 
51 
32 
44 
58 
33 
34 
46 
25 
67 
88 
26 
47 
38 

199 
S3 
12 

212 
72 

113 

114 
33 
27 
78 
39 
36 



119 

48 

49 

104 

234 

254 

342 

181 

1,089 

98 

71 

71 

66 

109 

51 

71 

209 

109 



37 
37 
32 
123 
45 
73 



Civil- 
ians 



12 

11 

1 

18 

15 

18 

45 

22 

136 

1 

4 

8 

2 

15 

4 

6 

24 

6 



City by State 



Number of police 
department employees 



IOWA— Con. 

Des Moines 

Dubuque 

Fort Dodge 

Iowa City 

Mason City 

Ottumwa 

Sioux City 

Waterloo 

KANSAS 

Hutchinson 

Kansas City 

Lawrence 

Leavenworth 

Overland Park... 

Prairie Village 

Salina 

Topeka 

Wichita... 

KENTUCKY 

Ashland. 

Covington 

Lexington 

Louisville 

Newport 

Owensboro. 

Faducab 

LOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Baton Rouge 

Bossier City 

Houma 

Lafayette 

Lake Charles 

Monroe 

New Iberia. 

New Orleans 

Shreveport 

MAINE 

Auburn 

Bangor 

Lewiston 

Portland.. 

MARYLAND 

Annapolis... 

Baltimore 

Cumberland 

Hagerstown 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Arlington 

Attleboro 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Braintree 



Total 


Police 




officers 


319 


277 


73 


68 


43 


35 


49 


36 


48 


38 


39 


38 


128 


106 


138 


120 


47 


39 


345 


264 


67 


46 


26 


26 


66 


63 


33 


29 


66 


54 


203 


154 


445 


335 


40 


40 


98 


93 


262 


211 


754 


621 


67 


43 


86 


72 


61 


58 


70 


64 


367 


317 


55 


50 


42 


37 


78 


68 


71 


71 


112 


89 


35 


32 


1,643 


1,388 


368 


306 


38 


36 


63 


52 


81 


71 


126 


112 


69 


64 


3,829 


3,377 


73 


67 


72 


65 


100 


90 


54 


51 


56 


53 


69 


67 


2,939 


2,610 


67 


63 



153 



Table 56. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Con. 



City by State 



MASSACHUSETTS- 
Con. 

Brockton 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Danvers 

Dedham 

Everett 

Fall River 

Fitchburg 

Framingham 

Gloucester 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Lawrence. 

Leominster 

Lexington 

Lowell 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Medford 

Melrose 

Methuen 

MUton 

Natick 

Needham 

New Bedford 

Newton ._, 

Northampton 

Norwood 

Pittsfield... 

Quincy 

Revere 

Salem _ 

Somerville 

Springfield 

Taunton 

Wakefield. 

Waltham 

Watertown 

Wellesley 

Wcstfleld 

West Springfield 

Weymouth 

Wobum.. 

Worcester 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek 

Bay City 

Birmingham ." 

Bloomfleld Township 

Dearborn 

Dearborn Heights 

Detroit 

East Detroit 

Femdale 

Flint 

Garden City 

Grand Rapids 

Hamtramck 

Hazel Park 

Highland Park 

Holland 

Inkster 



Number of police 
department employees 


Total 


Police 
officers 


Civil- 
ians 


175 


166 


9 


165 


152 


13 


281 


246 


35 


79 


76 


3 


107 


104 


3 


33 


32 


1 


54 


52 


2 


119 


115 


4 


249 


232 


17 


79 


73 


6 


99 


97 


2 


51 


49 


2 


81 


77 


4 


114 


HI 


3 


137 


130 


7 


42 


40 


2 


54 


46 


8 


193 


179 


14 


196 


187 


9 


118 


117 


1 


137 


131 


6 


57 


55 


2 


42 


41 


1 


56 


55 


1 


57 


54 


3 


45 


44 


1 


258 


243 


15 


212 


202 


10 


44 


43 


1 


45 


45 




84 


76 


8 


208 


194 


14 


109 


104 


5 


87 


85 


2 


160 


155 


5 


370 


344 


26 


71 


68 


3 


43 


41 


2 


114 


111 


3 


88 


84 


4 


42 


40 


2 


51 


48 


3 


60 


59 


1 


94 


93 


1 


63 


57 


6 


451 


389 


62 


54 


52 


2 


160 


118 


42 


94 


80 


14 


87 


81 


6 


50 


42 


8 


44 


43 


1 


218 


192 


26 


78 


74 


4 


5,431 


4,926 


505 


64 


56 


8 


53 


48 


5 


432 


371 


61 


40 


35 


5 


361 


303 


58 


69 


66 


3 


41 


37 


4 


125 


106 


19 


44 


39 


5 


52 


46 


6 



City by State 



MICHIGAN— Con. 

Jackson.. 

Kalamazoo 

Lansing 

Lincoln Park 

Livonia 

Madison Heights 

Midland 

Monroe 

Muskegon 

Oak Park 

Pontiac 

Portage 

Port Huron 

Redford Township... 

RoseviUe 

RoyalOak 

Saginaw.. 

St. Clair Shores 

Southfield 

Southgate 

Sterling Heights 

Warren 

Waterford Township., 

Westland 

Wyandotte. 

Wyoming 

MINNESOTA 

Austin 

Bloomington 

Brooklyn Center 

Coon Rapids.. 

Crystal 

Duluth 

Edina 

Mankato 

Minneapolis 

Minnetonka 

Moorhead 

Richfield 

Rochester 

RoseviUe 

St. Cloud 

St. Louis Park 

St. Paul... 

Winona 

MISSISSIPPI 

Columbus 

Greenville 

Greenwood 

Gulfport 

Hattiesburg 

Jackson 

Meridian 

Pasoagoula 

Vicksburg 

MISSOURI 

Cape Girardeau 

Columbia 

Ferguson 

Florissant 

Independence. 

Jefferson City 



Number of police 
department employees 


Total 


Police 
officers 


Civil- 
ians 


100 


91 


9 


181 


145 


36 


278 


238 


40 


68 


63 


5 


128 


109 


19 


48 


43 


5 


40 


38 


2 


44 


43 


1 


92 


75 


17 


73 


64 


9 


182 


168 


24 


36 


29 


7 


61 


51 


10 


74 


61 


13 


74 


69 


5 


122 


103 


19 


173 


160 


13 


95 


90 


5 


105 


92 


13 


42 


38 


4 


71 


55 


16 


229 


204 


25 


33 


29 


4 


68 


60 


8 


64 


58 


6 


62 


53 


9 


39 


37 


2 


71 


65 


6 


32 


26 


6 


25 


23 


2 


27 


26 


1 


145 


129 


16 


45 


40 


5 


41 
855 


41 
799 




56 


24 


23 


1 


30 


29 


1 


44 


41 


3 


104 


97 


7 


35 


34 


1 


60 


47 


3 


51 


47 


4 


513 


458 


55 


41 


37 


4 


52 


44 


8 


115 


95 


20 


38 


36 


2 


64 


58 


6 


58 


47 


U 


341 


277 


64 


120 


89 


31 


48 


45 


3 


45 


43 


2 


42 


39 


3 


72 


66 


6 


50 


46 


4 


72 


65 


7 


127 


105 


22 


45 


44 


1 



Number of police 
department employees 




MISSOURI— Con. 

JopUn 

Kansas City.. 

Kirkwood 

Overland- 

St. Charles 

St. Joseph 

St. Louis 

Sedalia. 

Springfield ; 

University City 

Webster Groves... 

MONTANA 

Billings... 

Great Falls 

Missoula 

NEBRASKA 

Grand Island 

Omaha 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

North Las Vegas 

Reno 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Concord - 

Manchester 

Nashua .. 

Portsmouth. 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City... 

Bayonne. 

Belleville 

Bergenfleld. 

Bloomfleld -. 

Bridgewater Town- 
ship - 

Camden.. 

Cherry HiU 

Clifton 

Cranford Township 

Dover Township 

East Brunswick Town- 
ship 

East Orange 

Edison 

Elizabeth 

Englewood 

Ewing Township 

Fair Lawn 

Fort Lee 

Franklin Township 

Garfield 

Hackensack 

Hamilton Township... 

Hoboken 

Irvington 

Jersey City. 

Kearny 

Linden 



71 
1,280 
51 
40 
32 
113 
2,709 
35 
157 
69 
40 



46 

589 



3^5 

76 

233 



47 
146 
97 
48 



256 
240 
83 
46 
119 

33 

408 
89 
135 

4S 

82 

50 

192 

100 

291 

91 

45 

51 

55 

38 

57 

92 

127 

140 

135 



119 
124 



52 
956 
40 
31 
31 
101 
2,068 
35 
148 
66 
36 



>1 
68 


14 


38 


7 


42 


4 


515 


74 


312 


83 


71 


S 


189 


44 


43 


4 


140 


6 


88 


9 


47 


1 


212 


44 


192 


48 


78 


5 


45 


1 


113 


6 


29 


4 


345 


63 


77 


12 


128 


7 


47 


1 


76 


6 


45 


5 


182 


10 


95 


5 


271 


20 


77 


14 


42 


3 


49 


2 


54 


1 


36 


2 


54 


3 


79 


13 


116 


12 


140 




120 


15 


855 


83 


118 


1 


121 


3 



154 



Table 56. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities 25,000 and over iit Population — Con. 



City by State 



NEW JERSEY-Con. 

Livingston 

Lodl 

Long Branch 

Madison Townsliip 

Middletown Township. 

Montclair 

Neptune Township 

Newark 

New Brunswiclc 

North Bergen 

Township 

Nutley 

Orange 

Paramus 

Parslppany-Troy Hills 

Township 

Passaic 

Paterson. 

Pennsauken 

Perth Amboy 

Plscataway Township. 

Plalnfield 

Rahway 

Ridgewood 

SayrevlUe 

Teaneck Township 

Trenton 

Union City 

Union Township 

VIneland 

Wayne Township 

Westfleld 

West New York 

West Orange 

Willingboro Township. 
Woodbridge Township. 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 

Albuquerque 

Carlsbad... 

Clovis 

Farmington 

Hobbs 

Las Cruces 

Roswell 

Santa Fe 

NEW YORK 

Albany.- 

Amherst- 

Auburn 

Blnghamton 

Brighton 

Buflalo. 

Cheektowaga 

Clarkstown 

Colonic Town 

Elmira 

Freeport 

Garden City 

Glen Cove 

Greece 

Grcenburgh 

Hempstead 

Irondequoit 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



43 
46 
60 

67 
68 
103 
43 
1,663 
97 

117 
51 

85 

57 
140 
420 
53 
108 
64 
114 
65 
45 
63 
86 
296 
108 
118 
63 

57 
85 

102 
32 

141 



33 

455 
35 
46 
48 
43 
56 



89 



249 
09 
68 

152 

37 

1,872 

102 
74 
45 

108 
73 
59 
55 
47 
99 
74 
40 



Police Civil- 
ofBcers ians 



42 
45 
55 
66 
62 
96 
42 
1,412 



106 
50 
91 



56 

121 

383 
46 
97 
62 

101 
62 
42 
50 
79 

266 
98 

114 
60 
73 
53 
85 

100 
27 

125 



25 
328 
35 
33 
36 
39 
49 
63 
64 



223 
96 
60 

137 
33 
1,450 
98 
74 
44 

107 
69 
53 
50 
43 
95 
71 
39 



1 
1 

5 
1 
6 
7 
1 
261 



127 



26 
3 

8 
15 

4 

422 

4 



City by State 



NEW YORK-Con. 

Ithaca 

Jamestown _ 

Lackawanna 

Lockport 

Long Beach 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Vernon 

Newburgh 

New York- 

Niagara Falls 

North Tonawanda 

Orangetown 

Port Chester 

Poughkeepsie 

Ramapo Town 

Rochester. 

Rome 

Rotterdam 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

Tonawanda Town 

Troy 

Utica 

Vestal 

Watertown 

West Seneca 

White Plains. 

Yonkcrs 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Asheville 

Burlington 

Charlotte 

Durham 

FayetteviUe 

Gastonia 

Goldsboro 

Greensboro 

Greenville... 

High Point 

Kannapolis 

Kinston 

Raleigh 

Rocky Mount — 

Wilmington 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck.. 

Fargo 

Grand Forks 

Minot 

OHIO 

Akron 

Alliance 

Ashtabula 

Barberton 

Canton... 

Chillicothe... 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Heights 

Columbus 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



67 

75 

79 

46 

82 

33 

204 

70 

1,595 

226 

46 

62 

62 

88 

61 

750 

67 

28 

172 

620 

110 

130 

198 

19 

64 

46 

179 

633 



120 
71 

505 

166 

103 
82 
56 

271 
50 

128 
31 
69 

264 
71 
76 
58 

260 



466 
41 
39 
43 

211 

40 

1,032 

2,600 

78 

951 



Police 
officers 



50 
72 
76 
44 
76 
33 
183 
63 
31, 578 
201 
40 
62 
57 
80 
60 
636 
60 
27 
156 
442 
108 
128 
183 
15 
61 
46 
176 
474 



115 

65 

418 

151 



65 

237 
49 

113 
31 
53 

215 
66 
56 
67 

221 



441 
36 
35 
41 

197 
36 

944 

1,402 

63 



Civil- 
ians 



21 

7 

2,017 

24 
5 



1 

114 

7 

1 

16 

78 
2 
2 

16 
4 
3 
1 
3 

69 



25 
5 
4 
2 

14 
4 

88 
198 

10 
146 



City by State 



OHIO— Con. 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Dayton... ., 

Delhi Township 

East Cleveland 

Elyria 

Fairborn 

Findlay 

Gaifield Heights 

Hamilton 

Kent. 

Kettering 

Lake wood.. 

Lancaster 

Lima 

Lorain 

Mansfield 

Maple Heights 

Marion 

Massillon 

Mentor 

Middletown 

North Olmsted 

Norwood. 

Parma. 

Parma Heights 

Portsmouth 

Sandusky 

Shaker Heights 

South Euclid 

Springfield-. 

Steuben ville 

Toledo. 

Upper .\rlington 

.Warren.. 

Whitehall 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

Zanesville 

OKLAHOMA 

Bartlesville 

Del City- --- 

Enid 

Lawton - 

Midwest City 

Muskogee. - 

Norman 

Oklahoma City 

Ponca City 

Shawnee 

Stillwater , 

Tulsa -- 

OREGON 

Corvallis... 

Eugene 

Medford.- 

Portland 

Salem 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Abington Township. . 

Aliquippa 

Allentown.. 

Altoona 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



61 

612 
8 
71 
49 
40 
47 
45 

102 
24 
73 
80 
45 
91 
74 

103 
47 
53 
43 
33 
01 
33 
50 
93 
26 
46 
60 
72 
44 

126 
54 

795 
35 
93 
36 
38 

316 
51 



38 
149 

59 
894 
138 



74 
32 
171 
99 



Police Clvll- 
offlcers ians 



56 
404 

64 
47 
37 
37 
44 
99 
20 
62 
75 
42 
81 
74 
86 
44 
48 
43 
26 
81 
31 
50 
80 
22 
44 
43 
67 
38 

115 
51 

755 
33 



51 


48 


26 


20 


63 


51 


123 


93 


54 


45 


81 


65 


64 


51 


627 


476 


49 


47 


34 


34 


37 


34 


549 


465 



32 
124 

48 
734 
101 



68 
32 
151 
89 



155 



397-633 O - 70 - 11 



Table 56.— Number of Full-Time Police Deparfment Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities 25,000 and over in Population— Con. 



City by State 



Number ot police 
department employees 



Total 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Continued 

Baldwin Borougli 

Bensalem Townsiiip.-. 

BethelPark 

Bethleliem 

Bristol Township. 

Cheltenham Township- 
Chester --- 

Easton - 

Erie - -- 

Falls Township 

Harrisburg 

Havertord Township— . 

Hazleton 

Johnstown 

Lancaster - - - 

Lebanon 

Lower Merion Town- 
ship 

Marple Township 

McKeesport 

Middletown Township.. 

Millcreek Township 

Mount Lebanon Town- 
ship. 

New Castle 

Norristo wn 

North Huntingdon 
Township 

Penn Hills Township. . 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh. 

Pottstown. 

Radnor Township 

Reading 

Ridley Township 

Ross Township. 

Scranton... 

Shaler Township 

Springfield Township. . 

State College 

Upper Darby 
Township 

Warminster Township. 

West Mifflin 

Willies-Barre 

Wilkinsburg 

Williamsport 

Yorli 



RHODE ISLAND 



Cranston 

East Providence.. 

Newport 

Pawtucket 

Providence 

Warwick 

Woonsocket 



SOUTH CAROUNA 



Anderson 

Charleston — 

Columbia 

Florence 

Greenville 

Rock Hill. . . . 
Spartanburg.. 
Sumter 



Police 
officers 



Civil- 
ians 



23 

38 

33 
136 

69 

62 
112 

53 
238 

40 
171 

73 

42 

89 
121 

40 

137 
33 

82 
37 
35 

49 
61 
72 

15 
61 
8,259 
1,776 
40 
52 
191 
36 
39 
191 
22 
29 
33 

176 
36 
27 
98 
40 
69 

100 



92 
173 
481 
159 
111 



69 
173 
204 

63 
150 

67 
101 

45 



19 
35 
29 

122 
60 
60 
97 
49 

214 
39 

163 
70 
38 



144 
31 
25 
96 
34 
66 
99 



101 
82 
83 
151 
407 
144 
105 



51 

140 

188 

47 

142 

58 

87 

43 



79 


10 


109 


12 


39 


1 


123 


14 


29 


4 


79 


3 


32 


5 


29 


6 


44 


6 


67 


4 


70 


2 


15 




56 


6 


7,439 


820 


1,748 


28 


32 


8 


50 


2 


159 


32 


30 


6 


37 


2 


177 


14 


22 




26 


3 


31 


2 



City by State 



Number ot police 
department employees 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Aberdeen 

Rapid City. 

Sioux Falls. — 



TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Clarksville 

Jackson... 

Johnson City 

Klngsport 

Knoxville 

Memphis 

Nashville... 

Oak Ridge... 



TEXAS 



Abilene 

Amarillo 

Arlington 

Austin 

Baytown 

Beaumont 

Big Spring 

Brownsville 

Bryan. 

Corpus Christi. 

Dallas. 

Denison 

Denton 

El Paso 

Fort Worth 

Galveston 

Garland 

Grand Prairie.. 

Greenville 

Harlingen 

Houston 

Irving 

Killeen 

Kingsville 

Laredo 

Longview 

Lubbock 

Marshall 

McAllen 

Mesquite -. 

Midland 

Odessa 

Orange 

Pampa 

Pasadena 

Port Arthur... 

Richardson 

San Angelo 

San Antonio ... 

Sherman 

Temple 

Texarkana 

Texas City 

Tyler 

Victoria 

Waco 

Wichita Falls. . 



Total 



Police 
officers 



UTAH 



Ogden 

Provo... 

Salt Lake City., 



280 
60 
77 
62 
75 

328 
1,241 

664 
44 



134 
220 
93 
444 
76 
183 
60 
91 
36 
287 
1,886 
35 
52 
450 
724 
108 
91 
57 
26 
55 
1,913 
97 
50 
38 
81 
69 
236 
40 
31 
56 
123 
111 
34 
23 
106 
90 
66 
110 
992 
46 
50 
49 
38 
67 
68 
161 
135 



112 

50 

314 



Civil- 
ians 



252 
68 
71 
56 
65 

254 
1,068 

556 
41 



113 

180 
87 
327 
61 
166 
43 
74 
34 
244 
1,641 
27 
44 
376 
632 
101 
76 
48 
26 
38 
1,609 
81 
39 
26 
81 
65 
208 
38 
30 
48 
114 
89 
30 
15 
93 
79 
61 
95 
849 
38 
49 
42 
37 
66 
54 
134 
111 



92 

48 

267 



28 
2 
6 
6 

20 
74 

173 

108 
3 



21 
40 

6 

117 

14 

18 

7 
17 

2 
43 
345 

8 

8 
74 
92 

7 
15 



17 
304 
16 
11 
12 



4 

28 

2 

1 

8 

9 

22 

4 

8 

13 

11 

5 

15 

143 

8 

1 

7 

1 

1 

14 
27 
24 



City by State 



VERMONT 

Burlington 

VIRGINIA 



Alexandria 

Arlington 

Charlottesville.. 

Chesapeake 

Danville 

Hampton 

Lynchburg 

Newport News. 

Norfolk 

Portsmouth 

Richmond 

Roanoke... 

Virginia Beach.. 



Number of police 
department employees 



Total 



WASHINGTON 



Bellevue 

Bellingham.. 
Bremerton... 

Everett 

Longview 

Richland — 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoma 

Vancouver.. 
Walla Walla. 
Yakima 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

Huntington.. 

Parkersburg 

Weirton 

Wheeling. 

WISCONSIN 



Appleton 

Beloit... 

Eau Claire.... 
Fond du Lac. 
Green Bay.... 

Janes ville 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Madison 

Manitowoc 

Milwaukee 

Oshkosh 

Racine. 

Sheboygan... 

Superior 

Waukesha 

Wausau 

Wauwatosa.- 
West Allis.... 



WYOMING 



Casper 

Cheyenne.. 



Police 
officers 



212 
291 
66 
129 
106 
142 
115 
181 
611 
200 
639 
173 
223 



64 

66 

63 

111 

40 

43 

1,336 

293 

296 

64 

46 

97 



161 
118 
42 
39 



96 
62 
76 
60 

148 
67 

153 
80 

266 

63 

2,203 

81 

237 
99 
65 
79 
55 

102 

152 



176 
246 

66 
121 

94 
124 
105 
171 
522 
182 
487 
162 
203 



CivU- 
ians 



87 
69 
61 
52 

136 
63 

136 
73 

227 

59 

2,042 

79 

176 
90 
61 
72 
M 
91 

132 



36 
46 
1 
8 
12 
18 
10 
10 
89 
18 
52 
11 
20 



62 


2 


45 


11 


66 


7 


98 


13 


40 




40 


3 


,098 


237 


260 


33 


262 


34 


53 


11 


31 


16 


80 


17 


149 


12 


110 


8 


39 


3 


37 


2 


92 


1 



9 
3 

16 
8 

12 
4 

18 
7 

39 

4 

161 

2 

61 
9 
4 
7 
1 

U 

20 



7 
15 



156 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 



City by State 



ALABAMA 

AlbcrtvlUe 

Alexander City 

Athens... 

Boaz 

Chickasaw 

Evergreen 

Fairfield 

Fayette 

Fort Payne 

GraysvlUe 

Hartselle 

Homewood 

Hueytowu 

Irondale 

Jasper 

Leeds 

Midfleld 

Mountain Brook 

Northport 

Oneonta 

Oxiord 

Pleasant Grove 

PrattviUe 

Saraland 

Tallassee 

Troy.. 

Tuscumbla 

Union Springs 

ALASKA 

Fairbanks 

Ketchikan 

Eodiak 

Petersburg 

Sitka... 

ARIZONA 

Avondale 

Blsbee 

Casa Grande 

Chandler 

Douglas 

Globe 

Huacbuca City 

Kingman 

Miami 

Nogales 

Page 

Peoria 

Prescott 

Safford 

Sierra Vista... 

Tolleson 

Willcox.. 

Williams 

Winslow.. 

ARKANSAS 

Arkadelphia 

Bentonville... 

Booneville 

Brinkley 

Camden. 

Conway 

Harrison. 

Hope 

Mena 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



ARKANSAS— Con. 

Monticello 

Morrilton 

Nashv ille 

Prescott 

Rogers. 

RusseUville 

Springdale 

Walnut Ridge 

West Helena 

West Memphis 

CALIFORNIA 

Anderson 

Antioch 

Arroyo Grande 

Arvin. 

Atherton 

Atwater 

Auburn 

Banning 

Barstow 

Beaumont 

Bell 

Belmont 

Belvedere 

Benicia.. 

Bishop. 

Blylhe 

Brea 

Broadmoor 

Calipatria 

Calistoga 

Campbell. 

Carlsbad 

Carmel 

Cai'pinteria 

Ceres... 

Chico 

Chino 

Chowchilla 

Claremont. 

Cloverdale 

Coalinga 

Colfax... 

Colma 

Colton 

Corcoran 

Corning 

Corte Madera 

Crescent City 

Cypress 

Davis 

Delano 

Dinuba 

Dixon 

Dorris 

Dos Palos 

Dunsmuir 

El Centre 

El Segundo.. 

Elsinore 

Emeryville 

Escalon 

Etna 

Exeter 

Fairfax.. 

Farmersvilie. 

Ferndale 

Fillmore 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



CAUFORNIA— Con. 

Firebaugh 

Folsom 

Fontana 

Fort Bragg 

Fortuna 

Gait 

Gilroy 

Gonzales 

Grass Valley 

Greenfield 

Gridley 

Grover City 

Half Moon Bay 

Hanford 

Hemet. 

Hermosa Beach 

Hollister 

Holtville 

Huron 

Imperial 

Imperial Beach 

Indio 

lone. 

Ir^vindale 

Isleton 

Jackson 

Kensington. 

Kerman... 

King City 

Kingsburg 

Lafayette 

Lakeport 

La PaUna.. 

Larkspur. 

Lemoore 

Lindsay 

Live Oak 

Livingston 

Lompoc. 

Los Alamitos 

Los Altos.. 

Los Banos 

Los Gatos 

Madera 

Manteca 

Maywood 

McFarland 

Mendota 

Merced 

Millbrae 

MillValley. 

Milpitas 

Montclair 

Morro Bay 

Needles 

Nevada City 

Newark 

Newman. 

Orange Cove 

Orland.. 

Oroville 

Pacific Grove 

Palm Springs 

Palos Verdes Estates 

Parlier.. 

Perris 

Petaluma 

Piedmont 

Pinole 

Pismo Beach 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



7 
13 

29 
12 

7 

7 
24 

6 
16 

6 
12 
10 

7 
31 
24 
37 
13 
11 

4 
10 
24 
37 

1 
17 

2 

5 

8 

5 
11 
10 
10 

6 
16 
12 
11 
13 

6 

8 
35 
21 
27 
23 
28 
28 
25 
26 

8 

6 
47 
24 
18 
33 
43 
14 
14 

6 
34 

5 

9 

8 
21 
20 
75 
22 

4 
14 
32 
21 
21 
13 



City by State 



CAUFORNIA— Con. 

Pittsburg 

Pleasanton 

Port Hueneme 

Portola 

Red Bluff 

Redding 

Reedley 

Ridgecrest 

Ripon.. 

Riverbank 

RohnertPark 

Roseville 

Saint Helena 

San Anselmo. 

SanClemente 

Sand City 

San Fernando 

Sanger 

San Jacinto 

San Juan Bautista 

San Marino 

San Pablo 

Santa Paula 

Seal Beach 

Seaside 

Sebastopol 

Selma.. 

Shafter 

Sierra Madre 

Signal HUl 

Soledad.. 

Sonoma 

Sonora 

South LakeTahoe 

South Pasadena. 

Stanton 

SuisunCity. 

Susanville 

SutterCreek.... 

Taft... 

Tehachapi 

Tracy... 

Turlock 

Ukiah 

Union City 

Vacaville 

Vernon.. 

Vlsalia 

Wasco.. 

Watsonville 

Westmorland 

Wlieatland 

Willits 

Willows 

Winters.. 

Woodlake. 

Woodland 

Yreka City. 

Yuba City 

COLORADO 

Alamosa 

Aspen 

Brighton 

Broomfield 

Brush 

Cherry HUls 

Cortez 

Delta 



I 



157 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



COLOKADO— Con. 

Durango - 

Florence -- 

Fort Morgan 

Glendale 

Golden 

Grand Junction 

Gunnison 

La Junta -. 

Lamar 

Leadville 

Littleton 

Longmont 

Loveland .- 

Manitou Springs 

Monte Vista 

Montrose 

Rifle 

Roclcy Ford. 

Sallda 

Sterling 

Thornton 

Westminster 

CONNECTICUT 

Avon 

Bethel 

Bloomfield 

Cheshire 

Clinton... 

Danlelson 

Darlen 

East Haven 

Farmington 

Glastonbury 

Granby 

Groton 

Groton Town 

Monroe 

Naugatuck 

New Canaan 

North Haven 

Old Saybrook 

Orange. 

PlalnviUe. 

Putnam 

Rldgefleld 

Seymour... 

Shelton 

Slmsbury 

Sprague Town 

Stafford Springs 

Stonlngton 

Waterford . 

Wilton 

Windsor 

Wolcott 

Woodbrldge 

DELAWARE 

Dover 

Laurel 

MlUord 

Newark 

Seaford 

Smyrna _ 

FLORIDA 

Apopka 

Atlantic Beach 

Auburndale 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



FLORIDA— Con. 

Bartow 

Biscayne Park 

Boca Raton 

Boynton Beach 

Bradenton 

Clewiston 

Cocoa 

Cocoa Beach 

Dania 

De Land 

Dunedin 

Eustis 

Frostproof 

Green Cove Springs 

GuUport 

Hallandale... 

Holly HIU 

Jacksonville Beach 

Kissimmee 

Lake City 

Lake Park 

Lake Wales 

Lake Worth... 

Lantana 

Lighthouse Point 

Maitland.. 

Margate 

Marlanna 

Miami Springs.. 

Miramar 

Mount Dora. 

Neptune Beach 

New Smyrna Beach 

North Palm Beach 

Oakland Park 

Ocala 

Ocoee 

Opa Locka 

Ormond Beach — 

Palatka 

Palm Beach... 

Palm Beach Gardens... 

Palmetto 

Palm Springs 

Perry 

Pinellas Park 

Plantation 

Quincy 

Riviera Beach 

Safety Harbor. 

Saint Augustine 

Saint Cloud 

Saint Petersburg Beach 

Sanford 

South Miami 

South Pasadena 

Stuart 

Tarpon Sprhigs 

Tavares 

Temple Terrace 

Treasure Island 

Vero Beach 

Windermere 

Winter Haven... 

Zephyrhills... 

GEORGIA 

Adel 

BarnesvUle 

Bremen 



Total 
pohce em- 
ployees 



City by State 



GEORGIA — Con. 



Brunswick 

Calhoun 

Canton 

Cartersville 

Dublm 

Elberton 

Gainesville 

Garden City... 

Greensboro 

Griffin 

Hinesville 

Jesup 

Jonesboro 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceville. 

Lyons... 

MlUedgevlUe... 

Monroe 

Montezuma 

Rossville 

Statesboro 

Sylvania 

Thomaston 

VUla Rica 

Waynesboro... 

West Point 

Winder.. 



IDAHO 



American Falls.. 

Blackfoot... 

Buhl 

Caldwell 

Coeur d'Alene 

Emmett 

Grace 

Grangeville 

Jerome 

Kellogg 

Lewlston 

Montpelier 

Moscow 

Mountain Home. 

Nampa 

Payette — 

Preston 

Rexburg 

Rupert 

Saint Anthony... 

Salmon 

Sandpoint 

Shelley 

Soda Springs 

Twin Falls 

Weiser 



Total 
pohce em- 
ployees 



ILLINOIS 



Abingdon... 

Addison 

Algonquin... 

Antioch 

Barrington.. 
Bartonville. . 

Batavia 

Bellwood 

Belvidere 

Benid 

Bcnsenville.. 



City by State 



ILLINOIS— Con. 

Berkeley... 

Bethalto 

Bolingbrook 

Bourbonnais 

Bradley 

Bridgeview 

Broadview 

Brookfleld... 

Cahokia 

Calumet Park 

Canton 

Carbondale.. 

Carmi... 

Carol Stream 

CarpentersvlHe 

Cartervllle 

Cary 

Casey 

Casey vllle 

Centralla... 

Chester 

C hlcago Ridge 

ChlUicothe 

Clarendon Hills 

CoalCity.. 

Columbia 

Crest Hill 

Crete 

Deerfleld 

Dixon.. 

Du Quoin 

East Alton 

East Moline 

East Peoria 

Effingham.. 

Eldorado. 

Elk Grove Village 

Elmwood Park 

Fairmont City... 

Flossmoor 

Forest Park. 

Franklin Park 

Galena 

Galva 

Geneva 

Genoa 

Georgetown 

Gibson City.. 

Glencoe 

GlenEllyn 

Glenvlew.. 

Golf 

Grayslake 

Hanover Park 

Harvard 

Harwood Heights 

Hazel Crest 

Highland 

Hlghwood 

Hillsboro 

Hinsdale.. 

Hoflman Estates 

Homewood 

Hoopeston. 

Huntley 

Itasca 

Jersey vllle 

Justice 

Kenilworth 

La Grange 



158 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 37, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



ILLINOIS— Con. 

La Grange Park 

Lake Forest 

Lakemoor_ 

Lake Zurich 

Lansing 

Lawrenceville 

Lebanon 

Libert yviUe 

Lincolnwood 

Lisle 

Litchfield 

liOvesPark 

Lyons _ 

Macomb 

Maple Park 

Markham 

Matteson 

Mattoon -. 

McHenry 

Melrose Park 

Milan 

Momence 

Morris 

Morton 

Mount Morris 

Mount Olive 

Mount Vernon 

Mundeleln - 

Murphysboro 

Napervllle - 

Nashville.- _.,. 

New Lenox 

Nokomls 

Normal. 

North Aurora 

Northbrook 

Northfleld 

Northlake 

North Riverside 

Oak Forest 

O'Fallon.... 

Oglesby 

Olney 

Orland Park 

Paiton 

Plttsfleld.... 

Piano... 

Polo 

Posen 

Riverdale 

River Forest 

Riverside 

Robinson.. 

Rock Falls 

Rolling Meadows 

Roselle 

Round Lake Beach 

Round Lake Park 

Saint Charles 

Salem. 

Sandwich 

Sauk Village... 

Schaumburg 

Schiller Park 

Shelbyville 

SUvls 

South Beloit 

South Elgin 

South HoUand 

Spring Valley 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



njJNOIS— Con. 

Statmton 

Stone Park 

Streator 

Sycamore 

Tuscola.- 

Vandalia.. 

Venice 

Washington 

Washington Park 

Watseka 

Wauconda 

Westchester.. 

West Dundee 

Western Springs 

Westmont. 

Westville 

Wheeling 

White HaU 

Wilmington 

Winfleld. 

Wiimetka 

Wood Dale 

Woodstock 

Worth 

Zion 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Attica 

Auburn 

Batesvllle 

Bedford 

Beech Grove 

Berne 

Bicknell 

Bluffton 

Brookville 

Brownsburg... 

CBarlestown 

Chesterfield 

Chesterton 

Clinton 

Connersville. 

Corydon 

Crawfordsville 

Crown Point 

Decatur. 

Dunkirk 

East Gary 

Fainnount 

Frankfort 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Greencastle 

Greenfield 

Greenwood 

Griffith 

Hartford City 

Highland 

Hobart 

Huntingburg 

Jasper 

Jefferson ville 

Knox 

La Porte.. 

Lawrence 

Lawrenceburg 

Lebanon 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



INDIANA— Con. 



Logansport. 

Madison 

Mooresville 

Mount Vernon 

Munster 

New Castle. 

New Haven 

New Whiteland 

North Manchester. 

North Vernon 

Plainfield 

Portage 

Portland. 

Princeton 

Rensselaer 

Rochester 

Rushville. 

Sellersburg. 

Seymour 

Shelbyville 

Speedway.. 

Tipton. 

Valparaiso 

Wabash 

Warsaw.. 

West Lafayette 

West Terre Haute.. 
Whiting. 



IOWA 



Algona.. 

Anamosa 

Ankeny 

Atlantic 

Audubon -.. 

Belle Plaine 

Belmond 

Bloomfield 

Boone 

Centerville 

Chariton 

Clarion... 

Clear Lake. 

Coralville 

Decorah 

Eldora 

Estherville. 

Evansdale 

Fort Madison 

Grlnnell.-- 

Hampton 

Harlan 

Humboldt 

Independence... 

Indianola 

Jefferson.. 

Keokuk 

Knoxville 

Le Mars. 

Manchester 

Maquoketa 

Marion 

Marshalltown 

Missouri Valley. . 

Montlcello 

Mount Pleasant.. 
Moimt Vernon.. . 

Muscatine 

Newton 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



9 

4 

8 

9 

7 

4 

3 

S 

15 

U 

9 

6 

14 

6 

15 

3 

12 

7 

24 

9 

11 

9 

10 

11 

13 

7 

26 

11 

11 

7 

13 

17 

34 

3 

8 

12 

2 

27 

22 



City by State 



IOWA— Con. 

Oelwein 

Osceola 

Oskaloosa 

PeUa 

Perry.. 

Red Oak 

Sheldon 

Shenandoah. 

Sibley 

Spencer 

Spirit Lake.. 

Storm Lake 

Tama 

Urbandale 

Washington 

Waverly 

Webster City 

West Burlington 

West Des Moines 

West Union 

Windsor Heights 

Winterset. 

KANSAS 

Abilene 

Anthony. 

Arkansas City 

Atchison 

Augusta 

Belleville 

Caney 

Chanute 

Cberryvale 

Coffeyville 

Colby 

Columbus 

Concordia 

Council Grove 

Derby. 

Dodge City 

Ellinwood 

Ellis 

Emporia 

Eureka 

Fairway 

Fort Scott 

Fredonia 

Garden City 

Gardner 

Gamett 

Qoodland 

Great Bend 

Haysville 

Herlngton 

Hiawatha 

Hillsboro 

Holsington 

Helton 

HortoQ 

Hugoton 

Humboldt 

Independence 

lola 

Junction City 

Larned 

Leawood 

Leneia 

Liberal 

Lyons 



159 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



KANSAS— Con. 



Manhattan 

Marysvllle 

McPhcrson 

Merrlam.- 

Neodesha 

Norton 

Oakley,- 

Olathe 

Osage City 

Osawatomie 

Ottawa --- 

Paola 

Parsons 

PhllUpsburg--- 

Pittsburg 

Pratt 

Roeland Parlc. 

Russell 

Rcott City 

Shawnee 

Ulysses 

Valley Center.. 

WaKeeney 

Wellington 

Westwood 

Winfleld 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



KENTUCKY 



Barbourvllle 

Bardstown 

Benton 

Berea .-. 

CampbellsvUle... 

Catlettsburg 

Cynthlana 

Danville -__ 

Dawson Springs. 

Erlanger 

Falmouth 

Flatwoods 

Florence 

Fort Thomas 

Frankfort. 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greenville 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Lancaster 

Ludlow 

MadlsonviUe 

Maysville 

MIddlesboro 

Monticello 

Morganfield 

Mount Sterling. . 

Murray 

Paris 

Russellville 

Saint Matthews.. 

Somerset 

Winchester 



LOUISIANA 



Berwick.. 
Bogalusa. 
Delhi 



40 
6 
16 
10 

a 

4 

7 
19 
4 

6 
13 
10 
19 

4 
34 
12 

8 
11 

8 
16 

9 

3 

8 
13 

5 
16 



City by State 



LOUISIANA— Con. 



De Bidder 

Donaldsonville. 

Franklin 

Hammond 

Haynesville 

Jonesboro 

Kaplan 

Mamou 

Marksville 

Minden 

New Roads 

Plaquemine 

Rayne 

Ruston 

Sulphur 

Thibodaux 

Vivian 

Welsh... 

West Monroe... 



MAINE 



Bath. 

Brewer... 

Calais. 

Camden 

Caribou 

Dexter.. 

Ellsworth 

Falmouth 

Farmington 

Gardiner 

Hallowell 

Hampden 

Houlton.. 

Kittery 

Limestone 

Lincoln 

Madawaska 

Madison 

Millinocket 

Old Town 

Orono 

Pittsfield 

Presque Isle 

Rockland 

Rumford 

Saco 

Sanford 

Scarborough 

Skowhegan 

South Portland. 

Topsham 

WaterviUe 

WeUs. 

Westbrook 

Winthrop 

Yarmouth 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



MARYLAND 



Aberdeen. 

Bel Air 

Bladensburg 

Brunswick 

Cambridge. 

Chestertown 

Crisfleld 

District Heights.. 
Easton 



City by State 



MARYLAND— Con. 



Elkton 

Frederick 

Frostburg 

Grecnbelt 

Havre de Grace.. 

Hyattsville 

Laurel 

Mount Rainier... 

Salisbury 

Sparrows Point.. 
Takoma Park.... 
Westminster 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Acton.. 

Acushnet 

Adams 

Agawam 

Amesbury 

Amherst 

Andover. 

Ashbumham. 

Athol 

Auburn — 

Avon 

Ayer 

Barnstable 

Bedford 

Berlin 

Blackstone 

Bourne 

Boylston 

Bridgewater 

Burlington.. 

Chatham 

Chelmsford — 

Clinton 

Cohasset 

Concord 

Dalton 

Dartmouth 

Dover 

Dracut.. 

Dudley 

Duxbury 

East Bridgewater , 

East Brookficld... 

Easthampton 

East Longmeadow 

Easton 

Fairhaven 

Falmouth 

Foxboro 

Franklin 

Gardner 

Grafton 

Greenfield 

Groveland 

Harwich.. 

Hingham 

Holden 

HolUston 

Hopkinton 

Hudson 

Hull 

Ipswich 

Lincoln 

Littleton 

Ludlow 

Lynnfield 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



7 
53 
12 
22 
17 
21 
22 
14 
41 
208 
27 
14 



14 

8 
18 
3S 
16 
15 
36 
2 
17 
18 

6 
11 
48 
22 

1 

10 
20 

4 
20 
32 
14 
33 
24 
14 
25 

8 
29 

7 
21 
10 
11 
19 

8 
18 
19 
17 
16 
34 
17 
20 
39 
11 
30 

6 
16 
45 
10 
17 

9 
21 
26 
15 

8 

6 
21 
17 



City by State 



MASSACHUSETTS— 
Con. 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 

Marion 

Marlboro 

Marsbfield 

Mash pee 

Mattapolsett 

Maynard 

Medfield... 

Medway 

Merrimac. 

Middleboro. 

Miltord 

Millbury 

Montague 

Nahant 

Newbury port 

North Adams 

North Andover 

North Attleboro 

Northboro 

Northbridge 

Norwell. 

Orange 

Oxford.. 

Palmer 

Pepperell 

Provincetown 

Reading 

Rehoboth 

Rockport 

Salisbury 

Saugus 

Scituat e 

Seekonk 

Sharon 

Shrewsbury 

Southboro. 

Southbridge. 

South Hadley 

Southwick 

Sterling 

Stoneham... 

Stoughton 

Stow 

Sudbury 

Sutton 

Swampscott 

Swansea. 

Templeton 

Topsfleld 

Tyngsborough 

Uxbridge 

Walpole 

Ware.. 

Wareliam 

Wayland 

Webster. 

West Boylston 

Weston 

Westport 

Westwood 

Wilbraham - 

Williamstown 

Wilmington 

Winchendon 

Winchester — 

Winthrop 

Wrentham 

Yarmouth 



160 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



MICHIGAN 



Adrian 

Algonac 

Alma 

Alpena 

Augusta 

Battle Creek Township . 

Bedford Township _. 

Belding 

Benton Harbor 

Benton Township 

Berkley -.. 

Bessemer 

Beverly Hills 

Big Kaplds.. 

Blissfleld 

Bloomfleld Hills _. 

Buchanan, 

Cadillac -... 

Center Line 

Charlevoix 

Charlotte 

Chelsea... — 

Chesanlng 

Clawson 

Clay Township 

Clinton Township 

Coldwater 

Davison 

Dowaglac 

Durand 

East Grand Rapids 

Ecorse 

Escanaba 

Fenton 

Flat Rock 

Fraser 

Fremont- 

Gibraltar 

Grand Ledge 

Grandville 

Green Oak 

Greenville 

Grosse Pointe 

Grosse Pointe Park 

Grosse Pointe Woods 

Hancock 

Harper Woods 

Hastings 

Hillsdale 

Houghton 

Howell 

Hudson 

Huntington Woods 

Ionia 

Iron River 

Ironw ood _ 

Ishpemlng 

Lake Linden 

Lake Orion 

L'Anse.. 

Lapeer .._ _. 

Lathrup Village 

Laurium 

Lowell 

Mackinaclsland 

Manistique 

Marquette 

Marshall 

Marysville-.- 



Total 
pohce em- 
ployees 



32 

6 

14 

20 

1 

16 

4 

8 

57 

23 

24 

4 

26 

15 

2 

19 

14 

14 

21 

S 

11 

G 

4 

26 

3 

39 

16 

6 

17 

g 

20 

60 

24 

14 

12 

28 

6 

11 

10 

12 

1 

13 

19 

36 

51 

7 

37 

12 

15 

8 

7 

3 

16 

8 

6 

18 

16 

2 

8 

3 

16 

7 

4 

4 

2 

6 

34 

13 

9 



City by State 



MICHIGAN— Con. 



Melvindale 

Menominee 

Middleville 

MUford-- 

Mount Clemens 

Mount Pleasant 

Munising.. 

Muskegon Heights.. 

Nashville... _, 

Negaunee 

New Baltimore 

Niles 

North Muskegon. . _ 

Northville 

Norway 

Otsego 

Owosso. 

Oxford 

Petoskey 

Pleasant Ridge 

Plymouth 

River Rouge 

Riverview 

Rochester 

Rogers City 

Romeo 

Roosevelt Park 

Saint Clair 

Saint Johns. 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Louis 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Scottville 

South Haven 

South Range 

Sparta 

Springfield 

Stambaugh 

Sturgis 

Swartz Creek 

Tecumseh 

Three Rivers 

Traverse City 

Trenton 

Troy 

Utlca 

Vassar 

Wakefield... 

Walled Lake 

Woodhaven 

Wixom 

Ypsllantl 

Zeeland.. 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



MINNESOTA 



Albert Lea 

Alexandria 

Anoka 

Arden Hills 

Aurora 

Babbitt. 

Bayport. 

Bemldjl 

Benson 

Blue Earth 

Brainerd 

Breckenridge 

Brooklyn Park. 
Bumsvllle 



23 
15 

3 
11 
46 
17 

6 
39 

2 
12 

6 
27 

4 
14 

4 

5 
29 

9 
13 

9 

19 
45 
23 
13 

6 

9 

4 

6 

9 
24 

5 
38 

3 
16 

1 

8 
11 

3 
13 

8 
14 
17 
23 
51 
58 
11 

4 

4 
11 
14 

6 
46 

6 



City by State 



MINNESOTA— Con. 



Cloquet 

Columbia Heights 

Cottage Grove 

Crookston 

Crosby 

Deephaven 

Detroit Lakes_ 

Eagan Township 

Ely 

Evelcth.. 

Fairmont 

Faribault 

Forest Lake... 

Fridley 

Glenwood 

Golden Valley 

Grand Rapids 

Hastings 

Hibbing 

Hopkins 

Hoyt Lakes 

Hutchinson 

International Falls 

Inver Grove Heights. 

Jackson 

La Crescent 

Lake City 

Lauderdale 

Little Falls 

Luveme 

Maplewood 

Marshall 

Mendota Heights 

Montevideo 

Morris 

Mound 

Mounds View 

New Brighton 

New Hope 

Newport 

New Prague... 

New Ulm_. 

Northfleld 

North Mankato. 

North Saint Paul 

Orono.. 

OrtonviUe 

Owatonna 

Park Rapids 

Pipestone 

Plymouth 

Redwing 

Redwood Falls 

Robbinsdale 

Saint Anthony 

Saint James 

Saint Paul Park 

Saint Peter 

Sauk Rapids 

Silver Bay 

Sleepy Eye 

South Saint Paul 

Springfield 

Spring Lake Park 

Spring Valley 

Staples 

Stillwater 

Tracy 

Two Harbors 

Virginia 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



MINNESOTA— Con. 

Wabasha 

Wayzata 

West Saint Paul 

White Bear Lake 

Willmar 

Worthington 

MISSISSIPPI 

Aberdeen 

Batesville 

Belzoni 

Brookhaven 

Charleston 

Cleveland 

Clinton 

Durant... 

EUisville... 

Indianola 

McComb 

New Albany 

Newton 

Ocean Springs 

Port Gibson 

Senatobia -. 

Tupelo 

Waynesboro 

MISSOURI 

Ballwin 

Bellefontaine Neighbors. 

Berkeley 

Bonne Terre 

Boonville 

Breckenridge Hills 

Brentwood. 

Bridgelon 

Brookfield. 

Cameron 

CarroUton 

Carthage 

Charlack 

Clayton — 

Clinton 

Crestwood 

Dellwood 

DeSoto 

Eldon. 

Excelsior Springs 

Farmington — 

Fenton 

Frontenac... 

Gladstone. 

Glendale 

Hanley Hills 

Haimibal 

Harrisonville 

Hazelwood 

Higginsville 

Hillsdale 

Jackson. 

Jennings .- 

Ladue 

Lamar. 

Liberty.. 

Maplewood 

Marceline 

Marshall 

Maiyville. 



Total 
poUce em- 
ployees 



161 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



MISSOURI— Con. 



Mexico 

Moberly- 

Moline Acres 

Monett 

Neosho - 

Nevada - 

Normandy --- 

North Kansas City- 
Olivette 

Pagedale 

Poplar Blufl- - 

Potosi 

Eaytown 

Richmond Heights . 

Riverview 

RoclsHiU -- 

Rolla 

Saint Ann 

Sainte Genevieve.-- 

Saint George.. 

Saint John Village. . 

Shrewsbury 

Slater. 

Valley Park.. 

Vinita Park 

Warrensburg 

Warson Woods 

Washington 

Webb City 

Wellston.. 

West Plains 



MONTANA 



Anaconda. . . 

Baker 

Bozeman — 

Choteau 

Conrad 

Cut Bank.. 

Dillon 

Glasgow — 
Glendive... 

Helena 

Kalispell 

Laurel 

X«wistown. 

Libby 

Livingston. - 
Miles City.. 
Red Lodge. 

Shelby 

Sidney 

Wolf Point.. 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



NEBRASKA 



Alliance 

Aurora 

Beatrice. . . 
Bellevue... 
Chadron — 
Columbus. 
Crawford.. 

Crete 

FaUsCity., 
Fremont... 

Qering 

Hastings... 
Holdrege. . . 



City by State 



NEBRASKA— Con. 



Kearney 

Kimball 

McCook 

Nebraska City. 
North Platte... 

Plattsmouth 

Ralston 

Scottsblufl 

Sidney 

Superior 

Valentine 

Wayne 

York 



NEVADA 



Boulder City. 
Carson City.. 

Elko 

Fallon 

Henderson 

Sparks 

Winnemucca.. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



Berlin 

Claremont 

Conway 

Durham 

Exeter 

Gilford 

Goffstown 

Hooksett 

Keene 

Laconia 

Lebanon. 

Littleton 

Millord 

Newmarket . . . 

Newport 

Peterborough. 
Somersworth . 



NEW JERSEY 



Absecon.. 

Allendale 

Allenhurst 

AUentown 

Alpha 

Alpine 

Asbury Park 

Atlantic Highlands 

Audubon. — 

Audubon Park 

Avalon. 

Avon-by-the-Sea 

Harrington 

Bay Head 

Beach Haven. 

Beach wood 

Bedminster Township. 

Bellmawr - 

Belmar 

Belvidere. 

Berkeley Heights 

Berkeley Township 

Berlin - .. 

Bernards Township 



City by State 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Bernardsville 

Beverly 

Bloomingdale 

Bogota 

Boonton 

Boonton Township 

Bordentown 

Bound Brook 

Bradley Beach 

Bridgeton 

Brielle 

Brigantine 

Brooklawn 

Burlington 

Burlington Township 

Butler 

Caldwell 

Cape May 

Carlstadt 

Carteret 

Cedar Grove Township. 

Chatham. 

Chatham Township 

Chester - . . 

Chester Township 

Cinnaminson Township. 

Clark 

Clayton 

Clementon 

Cliflside Park 

Clinton - 

Clinton Township 

Closter 

CoUingswood. 

Cranbury Township 

Cresskill.. 

Deal 

Delanco Township 

Deh-an Township. 

Demarest 

Denville Township 

Deptford Township 

Dover 

Dumont 

Dunellen 

East freenwich 

Township 

East Hanover Township . 

East Newark - 

East Paterson 

East Rutherford.. 

East Windsor Township. 

Eaton town 

Edgewater 

Edgewater Park Town- 
ship .- 

Egg Harbor City 

Emerson 

Englewood Clifls. 

Essex Fells.. .- 

Evesham Township 

Fairfield 

Fair Haven... 

Fairview 

Fanwood .- 

Far Hills 

Flemington 

Florence Township 

Florham Park 

Franklin.. 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



13 

7 

9 

17 

21 

5 

9 

19 

17 

40 

16 

H 

3 

26 

15 

9 

23 

17 

21 

43 

21 

18 

17 

2 

4 

23 

34 

10 

5 

31 

1 

2 

15 

26 

5 

15 

17 

4 

12 

10 

26 

19 

27 



City by State 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Franklin Lakes 

Freehold 

Freehold Township 

Frenchtown 

Galloway Township 

Garwood . 

QIassboro 

Glen Ridge 

Glen Rock 

Gloucester City 

Gloucester Township 

Green Brook 

Greenwich Township 

Guttenberg 

Hackettstown 

Haddonfleld 

Haddon Heights 

Haddon Township 

Haled on 

Hamilton Township 

Hammonton 

Hanover Township 

Harding Township 

Hardyston Township 

Harrington Park... 

Harrison 

Harvey Cedars 

Hasbrouck Heights 

Haworth 

Hawthorne 

Hailet Township. 

Helmetta 

High Bridge Boro 

Highland Park 

Higtilands 

Hightstown. 

HiUsborough Township.. 

Hillsdale 

Hillside Township.. 

Ho-Ho-Kus 

Holland Township 

Holmdel Township 

Hopatcong 

Hopewell 

Interlaken 

Island Heights 

Jackson Township 

Jamesburg 

Jeflerson Township 

Keansburg 

Kenil worth 

Keyport 

Kirmelon 

Lacey Tow nship 

Lakehurst 

Lakew ood 

LambertviUe 

Laurel Springs 

Lavallette 

Lawnside 

Lawrence Township 

(Cumberland County). 
Lawrence Township 

(Mercer County) 

Lebanon Township 



Leonia 

Lincoln Park. 
Lindenwold . . 
Lin wood 



162 



Tgble 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Populatioit uitder 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Little Egg Harbour 
Township 

Little Falls Township... 

Little Ferry 

Little Silver 

Long Beach Township. . 

Longport 

Lower Township 

Lyndhurst Township 

Madison 

Magnolia.. 

Mahwah Township 

Manasquan 

Manchester Township... 

Mantoloking 

Mantua Township 

Manville 

Maple Shade Township.. 

Maplewood Township... 

Margate City. 

Marlboro Township 

Matawan 

Matawan Township 

May wood 

Medford Lakes 

Medford Township 

Mendhara 

Mendham Township 

Merchantville 

Metuchen 

Middlesex. 

Middle Township 

Midland Park 

MUford. 

MiUburn Township. 

Mill town 

MUlviUe.. 

Mine Hill Township 

Monmouth Beach 

Monroe 

Monroe Township 

-Montvale 

Montville Township 

Moonachie - 

Moorestown Township... 

Morris Plains 

Morristown 

Morris Township 

Mountain Lakes 

Mountainside 

Mount Arlington 

Mount Ephraim. 

Mount Holly... 

Mount Laurel Township. 

Mount Olive Township.. 

Mullica Township 

Neptune.. 

Netcong 

New Milford 

New Providence.. 

New Shrewsbury 

Newton... 

North .\rlington 

North Brunswick Town- 
ship... 

North Caldwell... 

Northfield 

North Haledon 

North Hanover Town- 
ship 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



3 
19 
14 
U 
21 

9 
18 
37 
30 

4 
24 
12 
12 

5 

5 
18 
20 
55 
23 
11 
18 
31 
26 

5 
14 

5 

4 

12 
32 
25 
15 
11 

1 
50 

9 
31 

5 

S 

7 
18 
12 
21 

5 
28 
14 
42 
33 
10 
19 

5 

8 
26 
17 
10 

1 
12 

3 
32 
23 
13 
12 



City by State 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



North Plainfield 

Northvale 

North Wildwood 

Norwood 

Oakland 

Oaklyn 

Ocean City 

Ocean Gate 

Ocean Orove... 

Oceanport 

Ocean Township (Mon- 
mouth Comity) 

Ocean Township (Ocean 
County),. 

Ogdensburg 

Old Tappan 

Oradell. 

Oxford Towniship.. 

Palisades Park 

Palmyra 

Park Ridge 

Passaic To%vnship- 

Paulsboro 

Peapack and Gladstone.. 

Pembertou. 

Pembertou Township 

Pennington 

Perms Grove. 

Pennsville 

Pequannock Township.. 

Phillipsburg 

Pine Beach. 

PmeHill 

Pitman 

Pleasantville 

Plumsted Township 

Pohatcong, 

Point Pleasant 

Point Pleasant Beach . . . 

Pompton Lakes 

Princeton 

Princeton Township 

Prospect Park 

Ramsey 

Randolph Township 

Raritan 

Earitan Township 

Readington Township. . . 

Red Bank - 

Ridgefield 

Ridgefleld Park 

Ringwood 

Riverdale 

River Edge. 

Riverside — 

Riverton 

River Vale 

Eochelle Park Township. 

Rockaway 

Eockaway Township 

Roseland 

Eoselle. — 

Eoselle Park 

Roxbury Township 

Eumson 

Eunnemede 

Eutherford 

Saddle Brook Township.. 

Saddle Eiver 

Salem. — 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



5 

2 

6 

19 

1 

25 

13 

16 

18 

15 

3 

1 

24 

1 

14 

19 

20 

25 

2 

7 
18 
36 

1 

4 
23 
19 
22 
28 
27 

5 
21 
18 
13 

1 

3 
38 
28 
27 
12 

6 
20 

9 

4 
18 
16 
10 
26 
13 
45 
29 
16 
14 
16 
46 
23 

8 
19 



City by State 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Scotch Plains... 

Sea Bright.. 

Sea Girt 

Sea Isle City 

Seaside Heights 

Seaside Park 

Secaucus 

Ship Bottom 

Shrewsbury 

Somerdale 

Somers Point 

Somerville 

South Amboy 

South Bolmar. 

South Bound Brook 

South Brunswick 
Township 

South Hackensack 

South Orange. 

South Plainfleld. 

South River 

South Toms River 

Sparta Township 

Spotswood 

Springfield 

Spring Lake 

Spring Lake Heights 

Stafford Township 

Stanhope. 

Stone Harbor 

Stratford 

Summit 

Surf City.... 

Sussex 

Swedesboro. 

Tenafly — 

Teterboro 

Teuksbury Township. . . 

Totowa 

Tuckerton.. 

Union Beach. 

Upper Deerfield Town- 
ship 

Upper Penns Neck 

Upper Saddle Eiver 

Ventnor City 

Verona. 

Voorhees Township 

Waldwick... 

Wallington 

Wall Township 

Wanaque 

Washington 

Washington Township 
(Bergen County) 

Washington Township 
(Gloucester County). .- 

Washington Township 
(Morris County) 

Watchung 

Weehawken Township. . . . 

Wenonah. 

West Caldwell 

West Cape May 

West Deptford Township. 

West Long Branch 

West Milford Township. . . 

West Paterson 

Westville 

West Wildwood 



Tnl.il 

poll!'' <'ni 
plny..,^ 



32 

7 

9 

12 

16 

13 

36 

8 

10 

6 

18 

30 

21 

6 

8 

22 

14 

48 

37 

28 

2 

20 

12 

40 

15 

10 

7 

4 

13 

8 

44 

7 

2 

4 

32 

3 

1 

17 

2 

10 

1 
13 

17 
27 
28 

8 
15 
17 
34 

9 

7 



City by State 



Total 
1 police em- 
I ployees 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



West Windsor Township. 

Westwood 

Wharton. 

Wildwood 

Wildwood Crest 

Winfleld Township 

Winslow Township 

Woodbine. 

Woodbury 

WoodcUfl Lake 

Woodlynne 

Wood Ridge 

Woodstown 

Woolwich 

Wrightstown 

WyckoCf. 

NEW MEXICO 

Artesia 

Aztec. 

Belen 

Bernalillo 

Clayton 

Deming 

Espanola — 

Eunice.. 

Gallup 

Las Vegas City 

Las Vegas Town 

Los Alamos 

Milan 

Portales. 

Eaton 

Silver City 

Socorro 

State University.. 

Truth or Consequences.. 

Tucumcari 

Tularosa 

ZunL 



NEW YORK 
Alfred 

Amityville... 

Amsterdam 

Angola 

Ardsley. 

Asharoken 

Attica 

Baldwinsville 

Ballston Spa 

Batavia 

Bath 

Beacon 

Bethlehem... 

Blasdell 

BriarcUfl Manor 

Bronxville 

Camden 

Canajoharie 

Canandaigua 

Canastota 

Canisteo 

Canton 

Carmel 

Carthage.. 

CatskUL... 

Cayuga Heights. . . . . 

Cazenovla 

Chittenango 

Clyde 



163 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



NEW YORK— Con. 



Cobleskill 

Cohoes — 

Cooperstown 

Corinth 

Corning 

Cornwall 

Cortland 

Coxsackie 

Croton-on-Hudson 

DansviUe 

Delhi 

Depew --. 

Dobbs Ferry 

DolgeviUe... 

Dryden 

Dunkirk 

East Aurora 

Eastchester 

East Rochester 

EUenviUe 

Elmlra Heights 

Elmstord 

Endicott 

Evans 

Falrport 

Fayetteville 

Floral Park 

Fort Edward 

Frankfort — 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Glens Falls - 

GloversvlUe 

Oouvemeur. 

Gowanda 

Green Island 

Greenport 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 

Harrison 

Hastings-on-Hudson. 

Haverstraw 

Haverstraw Town. . . 

Herkimer 

Highland 

Highland Falls. 

Hoosick Falls 

Homell 

Horseheads 

Hudson 

Hudson Falls 

Hion 

Irvlngton-. 

Johnson City 

Johnstown. 

Kemnore 

Lake Placid 

Lancaster Town 

Lancaster Village 

Larchmont.. 

Le Roy. 

Liberty 

Liverpool 

Lynbrook 

Lyons — 

Malone 

Malveme 

Mamaroncck . _ 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



3 
31 

3 

3 
22 

3 
32 

1 

16 
11 

1 
27 
22 

2 

2 
31 
13 
61 

9 
16 

9 
13 
44 
17 

8 

4 
38 

4 

S 
12 
24 
33 



City by State 



NEW YORK— Con. 



Massena 

Medina 

Middletown 

Minoa.. 

Mohawk 

Mount Kisco 

Newark. 

New Castle 

North Castle. 

North Pelham 

Northport 

North Syracuse 

North Tarrytown . . . 

Nunda 

Ogdensburg 

Olean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Orchard Park 

Oswego — 

Owego.. 

Painted Post 

Palmyra 

Pelham 

Pelham Manor. 

Penn Yan 

Plattsburgh 

Pleasantville. 

Port Jervis 

Poughkeepsie Town. 

Queensbury 

Rensselaer. 

Riverhead Town 

Rye 

Sag Harbor 

Saint Johnsville 

Salamanca — 

Sands Point — 

Saranac Lake 

Saratoga Springs 

Scarsdale 

Scotia 

Sherrill. 

Skaneateles — 

Sloan 

Sloatsburg .- 

Sodus Point 

Solvay 

Southampton 

South Glens Falls... 

South Nyack 

Spring Valley-. 

Sprtagville... 

Suflem.. 

Ticonderoga 

Tonawanda 

Tuckahoe 

Tupper Lake 

Tuxedo 

Tuxedo Park.. 

Walton. 

Wappingers Falls 

Warsaw 

Warwick 

Waterloo 

Waverly 

Westfleld 

Whitehall 

YorkviUe 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



26 
11 
51 

1 

3 
20 
19 
26 
21 
18 
20 

9 
26 

2 

22 
29 
24 
25 
IS 
36 
14 

3 

5 
16 
29 
10 
39 
18 
17 
47 

4 
24 
36 
47 

3 

4 
14 
15 
13 
39 
66 
13 

3 

4 

6 

2 

1 

12 
19 

4 

4 
32 

5 
17 

6 
34 
22 
10 

4 

8 

6 

5 

3 

6 
6 

12 
6 
2 
1 



City by State 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Ahoskie 

Albemarle. 

Asheboro 

Ayden 

Belhaven 

Blowing Rock.. 

Brevard 

Canton 

Clayton 

Clinton — 

Concord 

Davidson 

Dunn 

Eden 

Edenton 

Elizabeth City.. 

Elkin 

Enneld 

Forest City 

Gamer 

Granite Falls. . . 

Hamlet 

Henderson 

Henderson ville.. 

Jacksonville 

Kernersville 

Laurinburg 

Lenoir. 

Lexington 

Lincolnton 

Lumberton 

Marion 

Monroe 

Morehead City.. 

Morganton 

Mount Aury 

Mount Holly. - - 
Mount Olive — 

Red Springs 

Rockingham — 

Roxboro 

Salisbury 

Scotland Neck.. 

Shelby 

Siler City 

Smithfield 

Southern Pines. 

Spencer 

Statesville 

Tarboro. 

Thomasville — 

Valdese 

Wake Forest — 

Washington 

Waynesville 

Zebulon 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Bottineau.. 
Devils Lake- 
Dickinson... 

Grafton 

Jamestown. . 

Mandan 

Rugby 

Valley City.. 

Wahpeton... 

West Fargo.. 

I Williston 



Total 
pohce em- 
ployees 



City by State 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



OHIO 



Amberley 

Arlington Heights 

Ashland 

Avon Lake 

Bay Village 

Beachwood 

Beavercrcek Township. 

Bedford 

Bedford Heights 

Bellah-e 

Bellevue.- 

Berea 

Bexley 

Blanchester 

Bowling Green 

Brecksville 

Broadview Heights 

Brunswick 

Bryan 

Bucyrus 

Cambridge 

Campbell 

Canfield... 

CarroUton 

Centerville 

Chagrin Falls. 

Chardon 

Cheviot 

Clyde... 

Coal Grove 

Coldwater 

Columbiana. 

Conneaut. 

Crestline 

Crooksville 

Darbydale. 

Deer Park 

Defiance 

Delaware 

Dover 

Eastlake — 

East Liverpool 

Eaton 

Elmwood Place 

Fairfax 

Fatfield 

Fairview Park. 

Fayette 

Forest Park.. 

Fostorla 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Gahanna.. 

Gallon 

GallipoUs. 

Germantown 

Girard — 

Glendale 

Greenfield 

Greenhills 

Greenville 

Heath 

Highland Heights 

Hillsboro 

Hubbard 

Huron 

IndianHill.. 

Jackson.. 

Leetonia 



164 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



OHIO— Con. 

Iieipsic 

Lockland 

Logan 

Loudon ville.- 

Louisville 

Lvndhurst 

Madeira 

Mariemont. 

Marietta 

Marysville 

Maumee 

Medina 

Mentor-on-the-Lake- 

Miamisburg... 

Middleburg Heights. 

Mlddleport 

Mingo Junction 

Mogadore 

Montgomery 

Moraine 

Mount Gilead 

Mount Healthy 

Mount Vernon 

Napoleon 

Navarre 

New Boston 

Newburgh Heights.. 

Newcomerstown 

New Lexington 

New Philadelphia... 

Newton Falls 

Newtown 

Niles 

North Baltimore 

North Canton 

North Ridgeville 

North Eoyalton 

Oak Harbor 

Oakwood 

Oakwood Village 

Oberlin 

Ontario 

Oregon 

Orrville 

Ottowa Hills 

Oxford 

Painesville 

Perrysburg 

Piqua 

Port Chnton 

Ravenna 

Reading 

Reynoldsburg 

Eocky River 

Rossford 

Russell Township. .. 

Saint Bernard 

Salem 

Sebring 

Seven Hills 

Shadyside 

Sheffield Lake 

Shelby 

Sidney 

Silver Lake 

Silverton.. 

Solon 

South Charleston 

South Russell 

Sprlngdale 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



OHIO— Con. 

Stow 

Strongsville 

Tallmadge 

Tiffin 

Trenton 

Trotwood 

Troy 

Twinsburg 

Uhrichsville 

Vandalia — 

Van Wert.. 

Vermilion 

Wadsworth 

Wapakoneta 

Warrensville Heights 

Washington Court House 

Wauseon 

Waverly 

Wellington 

WellsviUe 

West CarroUton 

Westerville 

Westlake 

WickUfte 

WiUard 

Willoughby 

WiUoughby Hills 

Willowick 

Wilmington 

Windham — 

Woodlawn 

Wooster 

Worthington 

Wyoming 

OKLAHOMA 

Ada 

Alva 

Ardmore 

Blackwell 

Cherokee 

Chickasha 

Cleveland 

Clinton... 

CoUinsville 

Dewey 

Drumright.. 

Duncan.. 

Edmond 

El Reno 

Hominy 

Idabel 

Kingfisher 

Madill... 

McAlestcr 

Miami 

Nichols Hills 

Nowata 

Okmulgee 

Pauls Valley 

Pawhuska 

Purcell 

SaUisaw 

Sand Springs 

Sapulpa 

Tahlequah 

Tecumseh 

Tonkawa 

Village 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



OKLAHOMA— Con. 

Wagoner 

Warr Acres 

Weatherford 

Wewoka 

Woodward 

Yukon 

OREGON 

Albany 

Ashland 

Astoria 

Beaverton 

Bend 

Burns 

Canby 

Cannon Beach 

Canyonville 

Central Point 

Coos Bay 

Coquille 

Cottage Grove 

Dallas 

Drain 

Florence 

Forest Grove 

Grants Pass 

Gresham... 

Hermiston 

Hillsboro 

Hood River.. 

Joseph... 

Klamath Falls 

Lake Oswego 

Lakeview 

Lebanon 

McMinnviUe 

Mill City 

Milton-Freewater 

Milwaukio 

Monmouth 

Myrtle Creek.. 

Newberg 

Newport 

North Bend 

Nyssa 

Ontario 

Pendleton 

Prineville. 

Redmond 

Reedsport 

Roseburg 

St. Helens 

Seaside 

Silverton 

Springfield 

Sweet Home 

The Dalles 

Tigard 

Tillamook.. 

Toledo 

Winston 

Woodburn 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Ambler 

Ambridge 

Annville 

Arnold 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



33 

19 
24 
28 
25 
10 
5 
1 
3 

25 
10 
12 

7 

5 
U 
27 
13 
U 
19 
11 

1 
30 
24 

5 
18 
14 

2 
11 
21 

4 

5 
11 
13 
16 

5 
15 
26 
12 

8 

9 
31 



City by State 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Ashland 

Ashley 

Athens 

Avalon.. 

Baldwin Township 

Bangor 

Barnesboro 

Beaver Falls 

Bedford 

Bellefonte 

Bellevu'e 

Bentley ville 

Berwick. 

Birdsboro 

Boycrtown. 

Bradford 

Brentwood 

Bristol 

Butler Township 

Caernarvon Township.. 

California 

Cain Township 

Cambridge Springs 

Camp Hill.... 

Canonsburg 

Carlisle 

Center Township 

Chambersburg 

Churchill 

Clairton 

Clarion 

Clearfield...- _ 

Columbia 

Conewago Township. . . 

Connells ville 

Coplay. 

Coraopolis 

Corry 

Coudersport 

Cralton - .-- 

Cressona 

Cumru Township 

Curwensville 

Dallastown 

Danville 

Donora 

Du Bois.. 

Duquesne 

East Lansdowne 

East Stroudsburg 

East Whiteland 

Township.. 

Edgewood 

Edgeworth 

EUwood City... 

Emraaus. 

Emporium. 

Ephrata. 

Etna 

Fairview Township 

Farrell.. 

Ferndale 

Fleetwood 

Forest City 

Forty Fort... 

Franklin Township 

Freeland. 

Frceport 

Gallitzin 

Gettysburg.- 



165 



Table 57— Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Citiet with Population under 25,000— Con. 



City by State 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Glassport 

Qreencastle — 

Green Tree 

GreeavUle 

Hamburg 

Hanover 

Hatboro 

Heglns Township 

Heidelberg 

Hellertown 

High Spire 

Honesdale 

Horsham Township 

Hummelstown 

Huntingdon — 

Indiana 

Jeannette — 

Jenkintown 

Jim Thorpe 

Kennedy Township 

Kennett Square .., 

Kingston -. 

Kulpmont 

Kutstown 

Lansdale 

Lansford 

Latrobe 

Lawrence Park 

Township - . 

JLeetsdale 

Lehlgbton - 

Lemoyne 

Lewisburg 

Lewistown 

Ligonier 

Littlestown 

Lock Haven 

Lower Allen Township... 

Lower Burrell.. , 

Lower Makeiieid 

Township 

Lower Paxton Township. 
Lower Providence 

Township - 

Lower Saucon Township. 
Lower Southampton 

Township 

Loyaihanna Township... 

Manheim.. -. 

Mansfield 

Marcus Hook... 

Masontown 

McAdoo 

McCandless Township 

McConneilsburg _ . . 

Meadvllle 

Mechanlcsburg 

Millersvllle 

MUton 

Mlnersville 

Monaca 

Monessen 

Montoursvilie 

Morrisviile 

Mount Oliver 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Union 

Muhlenberg Township 

Munhall 

Myerstown _ 



Total 
pohce em- 
ployees 



10 
2 
9 

13 
3 

24 

IS 
1 
3 
8 
1 
7 

21 
3 

10 

20 

21 

14 
S 

11 
8 

20 
2 
5 

22 
4 

21 

4 

4 

7 
S 
6 

21 
4 
2 

17 
8 



City by State 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



PENNSYLVANIA— 

Con. 

Narberth 

Nether Providence 

Township 

New Brighton -.- 

New Cumberland 

New Eagle _ 

New Holland... 

Northampton Township. . 

North Belle Vernon 

North Braddock 

North Catasauqua ..- 

North East... 

North Versailles 

Township 

Oakmont 

OUCity..- 

Olyphant 

Palmer Township 

Palmyra 

Parkesburg... 

Patton 

Penbrook 

Penn Township 

Pitcahm Township 

Plains 

Pleasant Hills 

Plymouth 

Portage 

Port Allegany 

Port Carbon. 

Pottsvllle 

Prospect Park 

Punxsutawney 

Quakertown 

Republic 

Reserve Township 

Reynoldsvlllc 

Richland Township 

Rochester 

Rockledge 

Rosslyn Farms Boro 

Royersford 

Saint Marys 

Salisbury Township 

Schuylkill Haven 

Scottdale... 

Sellnsgrove 

Sharon _. 

Sharon HUl 

Sharpsburg.- 

Shenandoah 

Shlppensburg 

Slippery Rock 

Somerset. -- 

South Fork 

South Greensburg 

South Lebanon Township. 

Southmont 

South Wllllamsport 

Speers Boro. 

Spring City 

Springdale .-. 

Springettsbury Township. 

Springfield Township 

Spring Garden Township. 

Steelton 

Stowe Township. 

Sunbury 

Swissvale... 

Tamaqua 



City by State 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Titusville 

Towanda 

Traflord 

Trcdyffln Township 

Tyrone.. — 

Union City 

Unlontown 

Upper Gwynedd 

Township 

Upper Merlon 

Township - 

Upper Moreland 

Township - 

Upper Saucon Township. 
Upper Southampton 

Township 

Upper Yoder Township.. 

Vandergrilt 

Verona 

Washington 

Waynesburg 

Wellsboro.- — 

West Chester 

West Goshen Township.. 

West Homestead 

West Lampeter 

Township. .- 

Westmont... -- 

West Newton 

West Norrlton 

Township — 

West Reading. 

West View 

Whitehall 

Whitehall Township 

Whltemarsh Township... 

Whltpain Township 

WUklns Township 

Williamstown 

Willlstown Township 

Wilson 

Windber... 

Winton 

Wyomisslng 

Yeadon 

Youngwood 

Zelicnople 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



RHODE ISLAND 



Barrington 

Bristol 

Burrillvllle 

East Greenwich... 

Jamestown 

Johnston. — 

Lincoln 

Narragansett 

North Kingstown. 

Portsmouth - 

Smithfleld -- 

South Kingstown.. 

Tiverton 

West Warwick 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Bamberg.. 
Barnwell . . 
Batesburg. 



City by State 



Total 
pohce em- 
ployees 



SOUTH CAROLINA- 
Con. 

BennettsvUle 

Camden 

Chester 

Clemson 

Conway 

Darlington 

Duncan 

QaSney 

Great Falls 

Greenwood 

Greer 

Lake City - 

Laurens 

Liberty — 

Marion -. 

Newberry. 

North Augusta 

Orangeburg .- 

Seneca 

Union 

Winnsboro 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Belle Fourche 

Brookings. 

Deadwood 

Flandreau. 

Hot Springs 

Huron 

Lead — 

Madison 

Mitchell 

Pierre 

Vermillion 

Webster. 

Yankton 



TENNESSEE 



Alcoa 

Bristol... 

Columbia 

Cross ville 

Dickson 

Gallatin 

Greeneville 

Humboldt 

Lawrenceburg... 

Lebanon 

Lenoir City 

Lexington 

Loudon 

Mary ville 

McKenzie 

McMirm ville 

MiUington 

Morris town 

Paris — 

Red Bank 

Ripley. -•• 

Savannah 

Sevierville.. 

Signal Mountain. 

South Fulton 

Springfield 



166 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, Detember 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



TEXAS 

Alamo Heigbts... 

AUce 

Andrews 

AngletoD 

Aransas Pass 

Atlanta 

Azle 

Ballinger 

Bellmead 

BellviUe 

Bel ton 

Benbrook,.. 

Borger 

Brady -.. 

Brownfleld 

Brownwood 

Burkbumett 

Cameron 

CarroUton. 

Castle Hills 

Cisco - 

Cleburne 

Clute 

Cockrell Hill 

College Station... 

Comancbe 

Crane - 

Crockett — 

Cuero -.- 

Deer Park 

DlboU 

Dtaunitt 

Donna 

Dumas - . 

Ouncanville 

Eagle Pass 

Eastland 

Edlnburg 

Elgin.. 

Euless 

Fanners Branch.. 

Georgetown 

Ollmer... 

Qrataam 

Grapevine 

Hamlin 

Henderson 

Hereford. 

Highland Park... 

Hlllsboro. 

Huntsville 

Hurst.. 

Ingleslde 

Iowa Park 

JaclntoClty 

Kenedy 

Kennedale 

Kennit 

Lake Jackson 

Lake Worth 

La Marque 

Lamesa. 

Lancaster 

La Porte.... 

League City 

Lewisvllle 

Llttlefield 

LnQdn 



Total 
police em- 



City by State 



TEXAS— Con. 

Mathls 

McGregor 

Mercedes 

Mexia 

Mineola.. 

Mission 

Mount Pleasant 

Muleshoe 

Nacogdoches 

New Braunfels 

North Richland Hills 

Olmos Park 

Olney... 

Palestine 

Paris 

Pear land 

Pecos 

Plain view. 

Piano 

Port Isabel 

Portland 

Port Lavaca.. 

Raymond ville 

Richland Hills 

Richmond.. 

Robstown.. 

Rosenberg 

Rusk 

San Benito 

Seguin — 

Seminole 

Sin ton 

Slaton 

Snyder.. — 

Stamford. 

Stephen vllle 

SwBetwater 

Taft. 

Taylor 

TerreU Hills 

Tulia 

Uvalde — 

Waxahachie 

Weat herlord 

Winters 

Yoakum 



UTAH 

American Fork 

Bountiful 

Helper — 

Layton 

Mldvale 

Pleasant Grove 

Richfield 

Roy 

Saint George 

Sandy 

South Ogden 

South Salt Lake 

Spanish Fork 

Sunset 

Tooele 

Vernal 

Washington Terrace 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



City by State 



VERMONT 

Brattleboro 

Colchester 

Essex Junction 

Hartford 

Manchester Center 

Manchester Village. . . 

Montpeller 

Newport 

Poultney 

Proctor 

Randolph 

Saint Albans 

Saint Johnsbury 

Windsor 

Wlnooskl 

Woodstock 

VIBGINIA 

Abingdon 

Bedford 

Big Stone Gap. 

Bluefleld 

Bristol 

Buena Vista 

Cape Charles 

Chase City 

Christiansburg 

Clifton Forge 

Covington 

Culpeper 

Dublin.. 

Emporia. 

Falls Church 

Franklin 

Fredericksburg 

Front Royal 

Harrisonburg 

Hopewell 

Lexington 

Luray 

Manassas 

Manassas Park 

Marion 

Martinsville 

Norton 

Pulaski 

Radford 

Saltville 

South Boston 

Staunton 

Suffolk... 

Vienna 

Vinton 

Warrenton 

Waynesboro 

Williamsburg 

Winchester 

WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen 

Anacortes 

Auburn 

Blaine 

Bothcll.. 

Buckley 

Burlington... 



Total 
poUce em- 
ployees 



City by State 



WASHINTGON— Con. 

Camas 

Centralla 

Chehalls 

Clarkston 

Cle Elum 

Clyde HUl Town 

Colfax 

Coriege Place 

Colvllle 

Des Moines _ 

Edmonds 

Eilensburg 

Enumclaw 

Ephrata 

Goldendale 

Grand Coulee 

Grandview 

Hoquiam.. 

Issaquah 

Kennewick 

Kent 

Kirkland 

Lacey 

Marysville 

Mercer Island 

Moses Lake 

Mountlake Terrace 

Mount Vernon 

Oak Harbor 

Ocean Shores 

Othello 

Pasco 

Port Angeles 

Pullman 

Puyallup 

Raymond 

Redmond. 

Renton 

Sedro WooUey 

Selah 

Shelton — 

Sumner 

Toppenish 

Town of Mercer Island... 

Wapato — 

Washougal 

Wenatchee 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Beckley 

Benwood 

Bluefleld 

Bridgeport 

Buckhannon 

Charles Town 

Grafton 

Morgantown 

Moundsville 

Mount Hope 

Philippl 

Point Pleasant 

Ravenswood 

Ripley 

Spencer 

Summetsville 

Williamstown — 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



167 



Table 57. — Number of Full-Time Police Department Employees, December 31, 1969, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Con. 



City by State 



WISCONSIN 



Algoma 

Antigo 

Ashland -- 

Baraboo 

Bayside 

Beaver Dam.. 

Berlin 

Black River Falls. 

Brown Deer 

Burlington... 

Cedarburg... 

Chilton.... 

Chippewa Falls... 

CUntonville 

Columbus 

Cornell 

Cudahy 

De Forest 

Delavan 

DePere 

Dodgeville.. 

Elkhom 

Elm Grove 

Evansvllle... 

Fort Atkinson 

Fox Fohit. 

Franklhi 

Germantown 

Glendale 

Grafton 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



5 

16 

16 

19 

16 

23 

9 

6 

21 

19 

11 

4 

22 

9 

6 

3 

36 

2 

12 

16 

S 

7 

16 

8 

16 

21 

17 

13 

31 

10 



City by State 



WISCONSIN— Con. 

Greendale 

Greenfield.. 

Hales Comers 

Hartford.. 

Horicon 

Hurley 

Jefferson 

Kaukauna 

Kewaunee 

Kiel 

Klmberly... 

Lake Geneva 

Lake Mills 

Lancaster 

Little Chute 

Marinette 

Marshfield 

Mayville 

Menomonee Falls 

Menomonie 

Mequon 

Merriil 

Middleton 

Monona. 

Monroe 

Muskego... -.- 

Neenah 

Nekoosa. - 

New Berlin 

New Holstein 



Total 
poUce em- 
ployees 



City by State 



WISCONSIN— Con. 

Oak Creek 

Oconomowoc 

Oconto 

Onaiaska 

Park Falls. 

Peshtigo... 

Platte vlile... 

Plymouth 

Port Washhigton 

Prairie du Chien 

Reedsburg 

Rbinelander _. 

Rice Lake 

Richland Center... 

Ripon 

River Falls 

Rothschild 

Saint Francis 

Schofleld 

Shawano 

Sheboygan Falls 

Shorewood 

South Milwaukee 

Sparta 

Spooner 

Stevens Point 

Stoughton 

Sturgeon Bay 

Tomah 

Two Rivers 



Total 
poUce em- 
ployees 



City by State 



Total 
police em- 
ployees 



WISCONSIN— Con. 



Viroqua 

Waterford.. 

Watertown _ 

Waupaca 

Waupun 

West Bend... 

West Milwaukee. . . 

Whiteflsh Bay 

Whitewater 

Wisconsin Rapids. 



WYOMING 



Buffalo 

OiUette 

Lander _. 

Laramie 

Newcastle 

Powell 

Rawlins 

Riverton 

Rock Springs. 

Sheridan 

Thermopolis.. 

Torrington 

Worland 



3 
26 

9 
10 
29 
26 
31 
16 
40 



7 
23 
12 
30 
10 
12 
13 
16 
18 
19 
10 
12 
14 



168 



Table 58. — Number of Offensts Known to the Polite, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population 



City 



CUiet over tlOflOO in population 



Airon, Ohio 

Albuquerque, N. Mex- 

Atlants, Oa 

Austin, Tex 

Baltimore, Md 



Blnningham, Ala- 
Boston, Mass 

Buffalo, N. Y 

Charlotte, N.C... 
Chicago, 111 



Cincinnati, Ohlo. 
Cleveland, Ohio.. 
Columbus, Ohio.. 

Dallas, Tex 

Dsyton, Ohio 



Denver, Colo 

Detroit, Mich 

El Paso, Tex 

Fort Worth, Tex... 
Honolulu, Hawaii. 



Houston, Tex 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Jacksonville, Fla . 
Jersey City, N.J.. 
Kansas City, Mo 



Long Beach, Calif. 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Louisville, Ky 

Memphis, Tenn... 
Miami, Fla 



Milwaukee, Wis 

Minneapolis, Minn.. 

Nashville, Tenn 

Newark, N.J. 

New Orleans, La. . . 



New York, N.Y 

Norfolk, Va 

Oakland, Calif. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Omaha, Nebr 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phoenix, Ariz 

Pittsburgh, Pa... 
Portland, Oreg... 
Rochester, N.Y. . 



Sacramento, Calif. 

8t. Louis, Mo 

St. Paul, Minn 

San Antonio, Tex.. 
San Diego, Calif... 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



San Francisco, Calif. 

San Jose, Calif. 

Seattle, Wash 

Tampa, Fla 

Toledo, Ohio 



12,750 
13, 248 
21,254 
6,523 
61,365 

11,»43 
35, 397 
16,783 
11,266 
128,426 

13,164 
49,623 
21,865 
42,446 
12,368 

30,694 

109,638 

8,429 

13,949 

14,428 

67,887 
21,266 
20,782 
6,318 
31,946 

14, 787 
169, 742 
19,869 
18,656 
20,723 

19,219 
A 179 
16, 619 
30,491 
28,383 

478,367 
12, 418 
30,900 
10,640 
11,096 

37,060 
26,980 
32, 113 
20, 260 
9,850 

11, 195 
47,164 
16,718 
26,989 
19,498 

63,781 
12,697 
35,186 
12,297 
10, 178 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 



23 
11 

176 
27 

236 

92 
91 
44 
56 
716 



266 

62 
232 

58 

68 
439 
15 
87 
17 

281 
65 
71 
33 

105 

■ 29 

377 

76 

88 

72 

43 
30 
73 
101 
76 

1,043 
36 
74 
44 
28 

271 
46 
46 
30 
35 

21 
254 
16 
95 
36 

127 
13 
68 
29 
19 



22 
320 

32 
48 
34 
108 
25 

66 
43 
39 
10 
10 

72 
50 



Forcible 
rape 



4 
206 
66 
44 
35 

28 

9 

63 

43 

48 

73 
19 
28 
60 
15 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



91 
98 

173 
44 

676 

87 

253 

140 

67 

1,334 

179 
303 
270 
431 
83 

330 

913 

41 

92 

66 

405 
165 
214 
41 
375 

189 

2,115 

96 

108 



78 
174 
132 
234 
323 

2,120 
82 
197 
95 
61 

506 
166 
249 
118 



47 
604 

88 
215 
165 



161 

248 

64 

76 



747 
402 

1,107 
233 

8,864 

306 

2,984 

1,057 

422 

21, 476 



6,638 
1,384 
2,531 
1,017 

1,702 

17,414 

223 

965 

230 

6,395 
1,651 
1,145 

679 
2,679 

903 

11,909 

1,443 

1,176 

2,749 

643 
1,646 

837 
3,888 
2,539 

69, 152 

917 

2,572 

634 



4,869 
1,167 
2,841 
1,292 
360 



4,957 
984 
895 
763 

6,502 
369 

2,659 
760 
819 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



433 


3,943 


849 


6,427 


1,192 


8,740 


744 


3,091 


9,023 


19,367 


1,500 


3,724 


1,629 


9,002 


780 


5,622 


2,083 


4,392 


2,767 


36,466 


700 


5,068 


2,073 


11,867 


769 


8,124 


3,666 


19,848 


784 


5,068 


1,622 


11,415 


4,934 


41,264 


397 


4,064 


611 


6,571 


118 


6,194 



2,763 
859 

1,948 
231 

1,995 

616 

14,798 

694 

688 

2,548 



682 
1,305 
2,213 
2,283 

29,717 

1,043 

1,118 

783 



3,617 

1,969 

1,739 

793 

508 

385 
3,493 

690 

2,057 

789 

2,960 

547 

1,096 



422 



Larceny— theft 



$60 and 
over 



24,684 
8,926 
9,059 
1,465 

12,269 

6,834 
64,616 
6,166 
8,507 
7,094 

4,381 
9,382 
6,296 
10,884 
8,459 

171, 393 

4,206 

14, 182 

5,666 

3,398 

14,063 
11,669 
10,125 
7,762 
3,391 

4,245 
19,073 

6,015 
11,533 

5,002 

18,637 
6,274 

14,820 
5,608 
3,743 



Under $60 



Auto theft 



4,286 
4,710 
6,859 
1,373 
12,829 

4,230 
6,348 
5,310 
3,148 
19,641 

4,449 
7,197 
6,928 
8,037 
3,077 

8,993 
22,236 
2,006 
2,194 
4,646 

11,796 

4,666 

6,709 

282 

7,597 

4,433 
43,879 
6,692 
6,494 
5,092 

8,350 
5,766 
4,590 
6,826 
8,181 

129,136 
4,224 
6,488 
1,339 
2,860 

3,377 
6,798 
7,867 
7,221 
4,309 

3,607 
4,349 
3,978 
7,058 
9,286 

7,418 
2,263 
10, 614 
3,632 
3,633 



4,646 
6,639 

10,841 
7,073 

17,291 

3,800 
4,385 
5,393 
3,416 
70,859 

7,654 
11,065 

8,187 
29,550 

6,919 

9,595 
25, 970 

7,727 
12,266 

7,064 

16,530 

11,069 

7,673 

651 

10,238 

6,109 
47, 014 
4,404 
6,639 
6,366 

8,640 
8,455 
3,775 
6,749 
7,426 

61,404 
4,139 

13,702 
7,032 
6,423 

17,376 
16,846 
4,689 
8,546 
7,321 

7,047 
29,387 

4,992 
16,060 
13,069 

26.565 

16,549 

13,392 

6,441 

7,889 



3,227 
1,751 
4,008 
1,011 
10,361 

1,905 
15, 190 
3,830 
1,088 
36,028 

1,832 
22,279 
4,338 
7,701 
2,281 

6,564 
22,438 
1,693 
3,429 
3,167 

12, 573 
4,933 
2,636 
3,697 
6,926 

2,863 
32, 149 
5,802 
2,496 
3,079 

6,036 
6,699 
3,387 
7,346 
6,622 

85,796 
1,910 
6,269 
2,180 
3,138 

10,368 
4,176 
9,246 
3,064 
1,188 

2,301 
14,434 
4,047 
6,136 
3,467 

17,633 
3,070 
5,891 
1,318 
1,467 



169 



Table 59.— Number of Offenses Known to tht Polite, 1969, Cities and Townt 25,000 and over in Population— Continued 



City 



Cities over UOflOO in 
population — Con. 

Tulsa, Okla... 

Washington, D.C 

Wichita, Kans 

CUtes 100,000 to 160,000 
in population 

Abilene, Tex 

Albany, N.Y 

Alexandria, Va 

Allentown, Pa 

Amarillo, Tex 

Anaheim, Calif 

Arlington, Va.. 

Baton Rouge, La._ 

Beaumont, Tex 

Berkeley, Calif. 

Bridgeport, Conn 

Camden, N.J 

Canton, Ohio 

Cedar Hapids, Iowa 

Chattanooga, Tenn 

Colorado Springs, Colo 

Columbia, S.C 

Columbus, Ga. 

Corpus Christl, Tex 

Dearborn, Mich 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Duluth, Minn 

Elizabeth, N.J 

Erie, Pa 

EvansTllle, Ind 

Flint, Mich 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

Fresno, Calif 

Garden Grove, Calif 

Gary, Ind 

Glendale, Calif 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

Greensboro, N.C 

Hammond, Ind 

Hampton, Va 

Hartford, Conn 

Huntington Beach, Calif... 

Huntsville, Ala 

Independence, Mo 

Jackson, Miss 

Kansas City, Kans 

Knoxville, Tenn 

Lansing, Mich 

Las Vegas, Nev 

Lincoln, Nebr 

Little Rock, Ark 

Livonia, Mich 

Lubbock, Tex 

Macon, Ga 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



11,431 

62,229 

8, ess 



1,416 
3,163 
3,680 
2,031 
3,327 

6,151 
4,442 
7,976 
3,194 
6, 62,') 

8,246 
6,116 
3,182 
1,696 
4,957 

3,832 
6,616 
2,218 
8,045 
3,428 

6,917 
2,267 
4,624 
1,926 
4,708 

10,936 
6,387 
4,886 
9,012 
4,464 

10,301 
3,838 
6,415 
4,678 
3,696 

2,166 
9,163 
3,666 
4,095 
1,848 

2,642 

7,268 
4,673 
6,442 
3,966 

2,316 
7,269 
2,591 
6,030 
4,673 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



18 

287 

12 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



8 


3 


6 


1 


8 


5 


2 


8 


2 


11 


4 


9 


6 


8 


23 


7 


13 


7 


10 


2 


12 


9 


23 


4 


6 


8 


2 


10 


34 


11 


9 


13 


23 


2 


19 


7 


13 




7 




8 


14 


1 


3 


7 


9 


3 


I 


14 


9 


30 


16 


27 


13 


14 


6 


12 


5 


5 


1 


49 


18 


3 


5 


14 


10 


28 


29 


6 


11 


9 


4 


15 




2 




6 




1 


4 


20 


11 


24 


13 


23 


21 


5 




21 


8 


3 


8 


21 


16 


I 


11 


12 


10 


26 


9 



Forcible 
rape 



79 

336 

46 



3 

4 

45 

12 

15 

33 
32 
76 
12 
111 

8 
36 
23 

7 
18 

32 

28 

8 

37 

10 

36 
10 
38 
16 
43 

69 
48 
40 
36 
20 

126 
27 
49 
22 
27 

19 
32 
29 
10 
19 

14 
104 
11 
27 
28 

16 
69 
8 
34 
30 



Robbery 



362 

12,366 

285 



28 
134 
273 
60 
56 

181 
129 
241 
128 
466 

394 
345 
188 



187 
238 
103 
186 
138 

245 

48 
192 
129 
206 

846 
233 
162 
303 
133 

779 
106 
270 
129 
201 

68 
419 
80 
68 
31 

68 
440 
110 
156 
309 

48 
314 
46 
64 
189 



Aggravated 
assault 



522 

3,609 

371 



348 
119 
207 

143 

84 
616 
666 
193 

192 
203 
130 
47 
169 

144 
343 

80 
761 

68 

100 
14 
299 
102 
384 

1,408 
260 
78 
185 
111 

479 
76 
434 
963 
112 

70 
649 
148 
297 
146 

97 
404 
286 
256 
133 

151 
663 
121 
301 
151 



Burglary — 

breaking 

or entering 



3,817 

22,933 

3,310 



679 
1,276 
1,111 

622 
1,418 

2,783 
1,277 
3,880 
1,688 
3,780 

2,661 

2,101 

809 

490 

2,474 

1,448 

2,318 

828 

3,136 

847 

1,901 
923 

1,882 
753 

1,614 

3,689 
2,434 
1,593 
3,322 
1,766 

3,026 
1,653 
3,327 
1,498 
926 

739 
3,168 
1,338 
1,686 

742 

1,149 
3,470 
2,018 
2,230 
1,733 

729 
2,821 
1,193 
2,264 
2,182 



Larceny — theft 



$60 and 
over 



4,707 
11,608 
3,266 



641 
448 

1,248 
982 

1,269 

2,332 

2,134 

2,034 

432 

793 

3,290 
682 

1,533 
634 
366 

1,631 
1,323 
664 
2,949 
1,414 

2,588 
783 
782 
660 

1,792 

3,842 
2,168 
2,315 
3,336 
2,014 

2,346 
1,373 
1,496 
1,463 
1,402 

1,022 
2,479 
1,713 
1,564 
665 

926 

935 
1,099 
1,964 
1,005 

1,034 
2,927 
890 
2,020 
1,433 



Under $60 



4,470 

20,402 

8,887 



1,430 
466 
2,551 
1,203 
2,004 

4,063 
2,294 
4,011 
3,461 
5,600 

2,254 
1,635 
1,674 
2,285 
1,428 

2,165 
2,702 
961 
3,819 
2,833 

3,633 
1,546 
1,666 
2,118 
1,636 

6,266 
3,613 

4,707 
6,780 
2,182 

2,176 
1,812 
2,536 
2,512 
1,629 

1,626 
4,721 
2,276 
2,132 
1,066 

2,214 
6,128 
1,801 
3,648 
1,699 

2,916 
3,666 
866 
2,489 
1,327 



170 



Table 58. — Number of Offentes Known to the Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



CiUei 100,000 to tlOflOO in 
population — Con. 

Madison, Wis 

MobUe, Ala 

Montgomery, Ala 

New Bedford, Mass 

New Haven, Conn 

Newport News, Va 

Orlando, Fla. 

Pasadena, Calif 

Paterson, N.J 

Peoria, 111. 

Portsmouth, Va_ 

Providence, R.I 

Pueblo, Colo 

Raleigh, N.C 

Richmond, Va 

Riverside, Calif 

Roanoke, Va, 

Rockford, 111 

Saginaw, Mich 

St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Bernardino, Calif. 

Santa Ana, Calif 

Savaimab, Ga 

Scranton, Pa 

Shreveport, La 

South Bend, Ind 

Spokane, Wash 

Springfield, Mass 

Springfield, Mo. 

Stamford, Conn 

Syracuse, N.Y 

Tacoma, Wash 

Topeka, Kans 

Torrance, Calif. 

Trenton, N.J 

Tucson, AHz.. 

mica,N.Y 

Virginia Beach, Va. 

Waco, Teias... 

Warren, Mich 

Waterbury, Conn... 

Wichita FaUs, Tex 

Winston-Salem, N.C 

Worcester, Mass 

Yonk6rs,N.Y 

Yonngstown, Ohio.. 

Citia 60,000 to 100,000 in 
population 



Abington Township, Pa. 

Alameda, Calif 

Albany, Ga 

Alhambra, Calif 

Altoona, Pa 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



3,288 
8,104 
3,766 
4,620 
7,760 

3,830 
4,629 
6,856 
4,868 
4,830 

3,633 
11,322 
2,238 
3.202 
10,947 

7,490 
3,144 
4,293 
3,676 
7,362 

9,234 
6,146 
4,639 
6,778 
1,680 

4,123 
4,097 
4,801 
7,367 
2,283 

2,895 
6,621 
6,007 
4,382 
4,968 

6,628 
7,173 
998 
3,670 
3,446 

4,680 
3,386 
1,429 
4,401 
9,932 

5,936 
4,693 



1,086 
1,164 

713 
1,929 

499 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



66 
300 
140 
126 
180 

174 
171 
420 
456 

408 

239 
604 
42 
110 
763 

216 
163 

264 
390 
610 

346 
267 
184 
366 
20 

161 

363 

164 

66 

27 

116 
376 
362 
199 
162 

724 
263 
40 
61 
96 

132 
111 
46 
121 
346 

237 
416 



Aggravated 
assault 



20 
661 

90 
136 
339 



379 
355 
213 
439 

193 
377 
181 
438 
623 

347 
211 

158 
299 
736 

272 
192 
209 
363 
87 

654 
114 
116 
171 
30 

101 
301 
339 
371 
109 

199 
364 
23 
191 
286 

243 

63 

133 

1,001 

124 

187 
268 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



992 
4,605 
1,712 
1,625 
3,276 

1,628 
2,052 
2,999 
2,079 
1,904 

1,602 

3,809 

698 

816 

4,234 

3,748 
1,262 
1,581 
1,671 
3,626 

3,648 
2,240 
2,623 
2,366 
557 

1,709 
1,414 
2,113 
2,392 

1,072 

1,700 
2,270 
2,448 
1,684 
1,766 

2,357 
3,264 
581 
1,149 
1,681 

1,536 
1,286 
642 
1,489 
3,981 

1,844 
1,738 



466 
531 
425 
717 
266 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



1,770 
1,541 
1,412 
1,084 
1,760 

1,329 
1,467 
1,994 
498 
1,401 

1,088 

1,975 

972 

1,546 

2,788 

2,246 
857 

1,601 
622 

1,903 

3,439 
2,647 

883 
1,950 

502 

894 
1,470 
1,737 
1,866 

967 

375 
2,025 
1,840 
1,872 
2,208 

1,247 
1,791 
204 
1,972 
1,007 

1,990 

903 

421 

1,282 

1,601 

2,212 
692 



Under $60 



3,602 
1,651 
2,117 
1,198 
3,925 

2,336 
2,043 
3,676 
1,051 
2,473 

1,638 
5,096 
1,842 
1,390 
4,904 

3,884 
2,411 
3,175 
3,884 
4,956 

5,855 
2,686 
4,263 
2,122 
633 

4,018 
2,972 
4,716 
2,608 
2,346 

374 
3,901 
2,370 
2,699 
1,938 

1,434 

7,694 

945 

2,478 

2,163 

1,968 
653 
2,298 
1,984 
2,180 

2,582 
3,626 



391 


313 


226 


1,818 


103 


34 


779 


762 


107 


106 



Auto theft 



171 



397-633 O - 70 - 12 



Toble 58.— Number of Ofkntet Known to tht Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



Citiea 60,000 to 100,000 in 
population— Con. 

Amheret, N.Y 

Anderson, Ind 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

AppIetOD, Wis 

Arlington, Mass 

Arlington, Tei 

Arlington Heights, ni 

AshevlUe.N.C 

Atlantic City, N.J 

Augusta, Oa 

Aurora, Colo 

Aurora, 111 

Bakersfield, Calif 

Bay City, Mich 

Bayonne, N.J 

Bensalem Township, Pa 

Berwyn, HI.. 

Bethlehem, Pa 

Billings, Mont 

Blloxl, Miss 

Blnghamton, N.Y 

Bloomfleld, N.J 

Bloomlngton, Minn 

Boise, Idaho 

Boulder, Colo 

Bristol, Conn. 

Bristol Township, Pa 

Brockton, Mass 

Brookline, Mass 

Brownsville, Tex-. 

Buena Park, Calif 

Burbank, Calif 

Cambridge, Mass 

Champaign, 111 

Charleston, S.C 

Charleston, W. Va 

Cheektowaga, N.Y 

Cherry Hill, N.J 

Chesapeake, Va 

Chester, Pa 

Chicopee, Mass 

Chula Vista, Calif 

Cicero, HI 

Clarkstown, N.Y.... 

Clearwater, Fla 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio.... 

ClUton, N.J 

Colonic Town, N.Y 

Columbia, Mo 

Compton, Calif.. 

Concord, Calif. 

Costa Mesa, Calif. 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 

Covington, Ky 

Cranston, R.I 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,163 

1,137 

4,107 

594 

S14 

2,616 
669 

1,677 
6,094 
1,087 

1,975 
1,618 
3,291 
1,298 
993 

825 
807 
988 
1,905 
503 

1,022 
1,015 
1,631 
1,930 



758 
1,727 
2,686 
2,680 
1,376 

1,421 
2,655 
6,175 
1,625 
3,237 

2,463 
907 
2,095 
1,600 
3,142 

703 
1,712 

868 
1,667 

1,389 

1,107 

876 

744 



2,793 
2,900 
1,890 
1,809 
1,368 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



15 

31 

138 

3 

7 

37 
4 
87 
165 
85 

34 

127 

110 

104 

37 

12 
31 
13 
40 

8 



69 
97 

160 
87 

183 



8 

25 

65 

363 



Aggravated 
assault 



33 

39 

147 

6 

27 

55 
10 
84 

101 
236 

86 

217 

139 

47 

19 

12 
9 
86 
56 
69 

24 

4 

12 

102 

Incomplete 

24 
29 
154 
9 
62 



77 
199 
205 
191 

165 
12 
19 
98 

457 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



4 22 

42 67 

Incomplete 

10 8 

67 79 



70 

18 

3 

25 

Incomplete 

62 
64 
65 
66 
37 



478 
545 
1,488 
332 
233 

644 
222 
440 
1,790 
344 

687 
387 
1,115 
438 
376 

281 
331 
341 

707 
277 

601 
373 
311 
719 



433 

730 
1,102 
1,307 

654 

607 
1,107 
2,018 

6% 
1,344 

927 
339 
825 
849 
917 

192 
749 

329 
619 

395 
392 
320 
245 



1,166 

1,259 

622 

701 

509 



Larceny— theft 



$60 and 
over 



467 
331 
1,734 
187 
101 

1,696 
273 
705 

1,864 
96 



602 

1,419 

639 

286 

276 
270 
376 
871 
100 

348 
436 
961 
902 



212 
580 
588 
641 
373 

613 
817 

1,248 
460 

1,065 

973 
345 

746 
418 
292 

197 

667 

430 

712 

349 
299 
461 
350 



1,211 

1,271 
847 
658 
514 



Under $60 



623 

216 

2,628 

1,044 

63 

1,626 
866 
681 
936 
87 

1,319 

824 
3,382 
1,312 

230 

191 
195 
683 
1,622 
194 



358 
1,603 
1,883 



273 
904 
737 
945 
1,197 



1,464 

907 

1,105 

1,906 

1,047 
855 
369 

1,051 
504 

118 
1,647 

373 
1,167 

748 

774 

410 

1,016 



2,235 

1,901 

1,191 

764 

779 



Auto theft 



172 



Table 58. — Number of Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities SOfiOO to 100,000 in 
population — Con. 

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio 

Daly City, Calil 

Davenport, Iowa 

Dearborn Heiglits, Mich 

Decatur, 111 



Des Plaines, 111 

Downey, Calif 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Durham, N.C 

East Chicago, Ind. 



East Detroit, Mich 

East Hartford, Conn. 

East Orange, N.J 

East St. Louis, 111 

Edison, N.J 



Elgin, 111 

El Monte, Calif- 

Elyria, Ohio 

EucUd, Ohio 

Eugene, Oreg 



Evanston, 111 

Everett, Wash 

Fairfield, Conn... 
Fall River, Mass.. 
Fargo, N. Dak... 



Fayetteville, N.C... 

Florissant, Mo 

Fort Smith, Ark.... 
Framingham, Mass. 
Fremont, Calif 



Fullerton, Calif.. 

Qadsden, Ala 

Gainesville, Fla. 
Galveston, Tex._ 
Garland, Tei 



Gastonla, N.C 

Grand Prairie, Tex. 
Great Falls, Mont.. 

Qreece, N.Y 

Green Bay, Wis 



Greenville, Miss 

Greenville, S C 

Greenwich, Conn 

Hamilton Township, N.J. 
Hamilton, Ohio 



Harrlsburg, Pa. 

Haverford Township, Pa.. 

Hawthorne, Calif 

Hayward, Calif 

Hialeah, Fla 



High Point, N.C. -- 

Hollywood, Fla 

Holyoke, Mass 

Huntington, W. Va. 
Inglewood, CalU. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



639 
2,376 
1,984 
1,774 
2,237 

1,078 
3,114 
985 
2.764 
2,222 

1,111 
1,023 
3,300 
4,389 
1,394 

1,135 

2,103 

722 

704 

2,961 

1,620 
2,348 
1,366 
3,324 
723 

2,649 
680 

1,299 
944 

2,463 

2,478 
1,167 
2,629 
3,436 
1,662 

1,687 

1,620 

1,296 

662 

985 

634 
2,9n 

664 
1,674 
1,880 

2,833 
632 
2,263 
4,816 
3,331 

1,469 
4,060 
1,930 
2,094 
4,926 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



17 
1 
8 
1 
1 

3 
7 
9 
13 
1 

11 
4 
2 
1 



Man- 
slaughter 

.by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



4 

7 
18 
12 
13 

1 
11 

1 
22 
27 

6 

5 

25 

49 

3 

7 
20 
2 
3 
16 

13 

11 

1 

2 

3 

18 
2 
8 
2 

13 

10 
2 
6 
26 
IS 

7 

10 

3 

6 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



10 
97 
64 
80 
98 

14 
67 
7 
118 
130 

51 

11 

266 

600 

37 

51 
95 
38 
21 
39 

115 
58 
16 
44 
13 

161 

8 

32 

9 

37 



19 
84 
296 
24 

13 

45 

30 

6 

7 

10 

196 

10 



148 
6 
102 
151 
160 

27 
160 
64 
68 
408 



27 
63 
48 
94 
211 

52 
104 

421 
191 

30 

12 

166 

263 

19 

95 

123 

43 

3 

34 

119 

90 

1 

69 
18 

400 
21 
79 
32 
56 

46 
77 
193 
329 
93 

148 

110 

31 

12 

10 

16 

198 

13 



169 
5 
64 
162 
185 

47 
183 

62 
219 
121 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



166 
767 
903 
739 
935 

342 
1,061 

301 
1,174 

379 

303 

369 

1,276 

1,576 

456 

246 
850 
340 
172 
960 

694 
748 
487 
1,488 
201 

833 
224 
463 
264 
1,139 

688 

461 

1,199 

1,137 

628 

692 
681 
498 
119 
490 

339 
1,156 
274 
682 
647 

1,106 

155 

732 

1,691 

1,096 

652 

1,486 

731 

791 

1,494 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



319 
734 
533 
632 
649 

M6 
1,447 
467 
761 
429 

661 
491 
934 
607 
622 

623 

472 

162 

79 

1,637 

393 
1,161 
646 
544 
390 

972 
329 
611 
434 
950 

1,495 
438 
906 

1,365 
723 

619 
673 
406 
384 
333 

228 
1,003 
276 
657 
829 

684 

268 

923 

2,181 

1,351 

649 

1,346 

448 

744 

1,844 



Under $60 



532 

978 

2,574 

1,230 

1,738 

689 
1,247 
1,004 
1,348 

438 

761 
407 
1,117 
462 
638 



705 

341 

896 

2,466 

2, 461 

1,699 

540 

410 

817 

1,072 
769 
795 
676 

2,799 

2,095 
401 
1,707 
1,117 
1,123 

1,099 
782 

1,236 
525 
649 

660 
799 
273 
677 
1,380 

895 

261 

692 

2,684 

1,268 

764 
2,869 

491 
1,476 
1,346 



Auto theft 



173 



Table 58. — Number of Offenses Known to the Polite, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and oyer in Population— Continued 



City 



Cities 60,000 to 100,000 in 
popu JoHon— Con. 



Irondequolt, N.Y. 

Irving, Tex-- 

Irvlngton, N.J 

Jackson, Mich 

JoUet, 111 



Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kenosha, Wis 

Kettering, Ohio.. 
Key West, Fla.... 
Kokomo, Ind 



La Crosse, Wis 

Lafayette, La 

Lake Charles, La. 

Lakeland, Fla 

Lakewood, Ohio.. 



Lancaster, Pa 

Laredo, Tei 

Las Cruces, N. Mex. 

Lawrence, Mass 

Lawton, Okla 



Lexington , Ky 

Lima, Ohio 

Lincoln Park, Mich. 

Longvlew, Tex 

Lorain, Ohio 



Lowell, Mass 

Lower Merlon Township, Pa. 

Lynchburg, Va 

Lynn, Mass 

Maiden, Mass 



Manchester, N.H. 
Mansfield, Ohio... 

Medford, Mass 

Merlden, Conn... 
Merldlan, Miss 



Mesa, Ariz 

Mesqulte, Tex 

Miami Beach, Fla.. 

Middletown, Ohio 

Middletown Township, N.J. 



Midland, Tex 

Modesto, Calif 

Monroe, La 

Mountain View, Calif.. 
Mount Vernon, N.Y... 



Muncle, Ind 

Muskegon, Mich 

Nashua, N.H 

National City, Calif. 
New Britain, Conn.. 



New Rochelle, N.Y 

Newton, Mass 

Niagara Falls, N.Y 

Norman, Okla 

North Little Rock, Ark. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



676 
2,260 
1,664 
1,462 
2,272 

3,214 

1,636 

1,066 

642 

836 

644 
1,021 
1,311 
1,211 

482 

718 
1,074 
1,246 
1,646 
2,436 

4,429 
1,616 
1,707 
796 
2,733 

2,166 
1,365 

917 
3,867 

863 

1,269 
1,706 

812 
1,133 

403 

1,739 
1,077 
2,694 
1,428 
494 

973 
2,674 

882 
1,320 
1,960 

1,893 
2,187 
416 
1,342 
2,339 

2,012 
1,986 
3,008 
919 
2,370 



Criminal homicide 



Miirder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



.Aggravated 
assault 



100 
68 
199 

101 
62 
28 
30 
20 

4 

63 
62 
47 
16 

45 
16 
26 
23 
100 

116 

84 
66 
33 
166 

67 



120 
22 

22 
69 
11 
9 
7 

12 

23 

130 

36 

6 

26 
(6 
23 

29 
87 

91 
129 
8 
90 
47 



216 

7 

100 



14 
160 

45 
126 
180 

456 

27 

68 

53 

9 

2 
206 
90 
19 
14 

48 
66 
13 
15 
297 

197 
29 
67 
68 

129 

58 
22 
46 
143 
16 



300 



36 
40 

29 
40 
45 
30 
12 

66 
88 
179 
30 
41 

91 

183 

9 

27 

78 

49 
61 

198 
39 

246 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



131 

767 
665 
612 
843 

1,088 
547 
443 
279 
249 

231 
797 
674 
464 

197 

284 
466 
473 
636 
863 

1,388 
678 
364 
339 
946 

714 
493 
424 
1,707 
228 



622 
234 
428 
206 

636 
335 
1,298 
649 
246 

661 

805 
294 
337 
639 

717 
878 
129 
366 
1,172 

796 
888 

1,006 
377 

1,030 



Larceny— theft 



$60 and 
over 



367 
1,003 
420 
586 
745 

1,227 
480 
393 
212 
427 

313 
629 
426 
544 
27 

229 
415 
682 
237 
873 

2,068 
674 
908 
296 
663 

601 
446 
301 
724 
226 

369 
619 
313 
493 
76 

964 
617 
776 
508 
187 

234 
1,360 
226 
666 
776 

663 
816 
126 
638 
597 

786 
639 
1,209 
435 
769 



Under $50 



Auto theft 



802 

1,356 

837 

949 

1,028 

2,824 

1,485 

1,243 

323 

647 

1,103 
807 
847 
942 
600 



422 

797 

160 

1,748 

1,765 

1,180 

1,206 

146 

537 

673 
615 
886 
1,376 
140 

764 
890 
145 
429 
637 

1,615 
968 

1,804 
947 
203 

602 
2,416 
2,007 
1,260 

679 

485 

1,468 

186 

994 



598 
613 
1,460 
494 
936 



174 



Table 58.— Number of Offentet Known to tht Police, 1969, C/fies and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 60,000 to 100,000 in 
population — Con. 

Norwalk, Conn 

Oak Lawn, 111 

Oak Park, 111 

Odessa, Tex 

Ogden, Utah 



Ontario, Calif 

Orange, Callt 

Oshkosh, Wis 

Overland Park, Eans.. 
Owensboro, Ky 



Oxnard, Calif 

Palo Alto, Calif 

Parma, Ohio 

Parsippany-Troy Hills, N.J. 
Pasadena, Tex 



Passaic, N.J 

Pawtucket, R.I 

Penn Hills Township, Pa.. 

Pensacola, Fla 

Pine Bluff, Ark 



Pittsfleld, Mass... 

Pomona, Calif 

Pontlac, Mich 

Port Arthur, Tex. 
Portland, Maine. . 



Prlchard, Ala. 

Qulncy, Mass 

Bacine, Wis 

Reading, Pa 

Redford Township, Mich. 



Redondo Beach, Calif. 
Redwood City, Calif.. 

Reno, Nev 

Richmond, Calif 

Rochester, Minn 



Rock Island, III 

Rome, N.Y 

RoseviUe, Mich 

Royal Oak, Mich 

St. Clair Shores, Mich. 



St. Joseph, Mo 

St. Louis Park, Minn., 

Salem, Oreg 

Salinas, Calif 

San Angelo, Tex 



San Leandro, Calif... 

San Mateo, Calif 

Santa Barbara, Calif.. 

Santa Clara, Calif 

Santa Monica, Calif... 



Schenectady, N.Y... 

Scottsdale, Ariz 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak.. 
Skokie, 111 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2,196 

859 

6S3 

1,262 

2,084 

2,387 
1,946 

667 
1,163 

868 

2,810 
2,161 
1,337 
722 
1,167 

2,743 
1,643 
854 
2,094 
1,829 

817 
3,552 
6,418 
1,620 
1,360 



2,868 
2,741 
1,868 
1,519 

2,879 
1,739 
2,746 
6,068 
810 

1,425 
459 
1,431 
2,055 
1,748 

1,301 
1,053 
1,868 
2,160 
1,248 

2,912 
2,927 
2,175 
2,672 
4,926 

1,152 
2,028 
2,079 
1,192 
1,690 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



S3 
34 
2 
11 
12 

87 
76 
19 
8 
16 

144 
29 
41 



8 

182 

352 

80 

35 



114 
60 
25 
64 
80 

106 
47 



Incomplete 



9 


61 


17 


145 


26 


113 


1 


37 


14 


124 


6 


42 


9 


131 


62 


373 


2 


12 


10 


89 


1 




9 


30 


9 


63 


6 


43 


1 


6 


2 


17 


12 


55 


8 


56 


6 


7 


12 


110 


16 


136 


8 


41 


21 


54 


64 


229 


2 


58 


4 


24 


4 


IS 


10 


22 


1 


20 



31 

68 

180 

38 

45 

4 



179 
15 
16 

127 
83 

11 

2S6 

805 

79 

21 



38 
300 
101 

63 

96 

27 

82 

475 

3 

93 

4 

33 

212 

61 

63 

3 

138 

65 

47 

57 
116 
67 
74 
277 

43 

49 
80 
32 

72 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



316 

263 
803 
822 

930 
1,004 
172 
303 
324 

1,202 
730 
423 
299 
499 

826 
550 
416 
840 
876 

381 

1,413 

2,063 

741 

553 



954 



1,061 

617 

1,045 

2,586 

250 

462 
143 
461 
797 
708 

529 
310 
885 
634 

789 

1,298 

1,218 

915 

902 

1,736 

612 
711 
640 
346 

477 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



842 
353 

189 
226 
716 

982 
710 
305 
704 
404 

904 
1,046 
587 
306 
376 

719 
391 
200 
813 
681 

295 

1,167 

1,425 

543 

432 



876 
818 
486 

752 

1,100 

676 

1,061 

1,586 

376 

693 
168 
606 
743 

767 



603 

589 

1,019 

274 

1,114 

962 

856 

1,249 

1,971 



Under $50 



905 

851 

575 

2,854 

2,608 

1,170 

1,912 

1,276 

801 

644 

1,050 

1,672 

839 

230 

946 

619 
1,042 

143 
1,291 

636 

324 
1,650 
2,383 

692 
1,080 



1,125 

2,427 

738 

1,174 

1,324 
631 
2,041 
2,073 
1,172 

705 

267 

1,434 

1,463 

1,188 

1,497 
727 

1,889 
921 

1,311 

1,238 
2,452 
2,137 
1,971 
1,812 



Anto theft 



282 


935 


,052 


1,147 


716 


1,794 


591 


1,206 


879 


904 



1/75 



Table 58.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population— Continued 



City 



Ciliea 50,000 to 100,000 in 
population — Con. 

Somervllle, Mass 

Southfleld, Mich 

South Gate, Calif 

Spartanburg, S.C 

Springfield, 111 

Springfield, Ohio 

Sterling Heights, Mich 

Stockton, Calif 

Sunnyvale, Calif 

Tallahassee, Fla 

Tempe, Ariz, 

Terre Haute, Tnd,_ 

Tonawanda Town, N.Y 

Troy, N.Y 

Tuscaloosa, Ala.. 

Tyler, Texas 

Union City, N.J 

Union Township, N.J 

University City, Mo 

Upper Darby Township, Pa 

VaUejo, Calif 

Victoria, Texas 

Waltham, Mass... 

Warren, Ohio 

Warwick, R.I 

Waterford Township, Mich.. 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Waukegan, 111 

Wauwatosa, Wis 

West Allis, Wis 

West Covina, Calif 

West Hartford, Conn 

West Haven, Conn 

Westland, Mich 

Westminster, Calif 

West Palm Beach, Fla 

Weymouth, Mass 

White Plains, N.Y. 

Whittier, Calif 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa 

Wilmington, Del 

Woodbrldge Township, N.J. 

Wyoming, Mich 

York, Pa 

Citiei 25,000 to 50,000 in 
population 

Aberdeen, S. Dak 

Alamogordo, N. Mex 

Alexandria, La 

Allquippa, Pa. 

Allen Park, Mich 

Alliance, Ohio 

Alton, 111 

Ames, Iowa 

Anchorage, Alaska 

Anderson, S.C 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2,223 
2,083 
2,335 
1,454 
2,364 

1,727 
1,435 
6,129 
1,565 
1,441 

1,786 
1,794 
979 
1,379 
1,687 

1,391 
1,633 
1,314 
1,292 
1,201 

3,383 

453 

1,223 

1,869 
1,942 

1,724 
1,246 
2,079 
1,006 
991 

2,237 
861 
1,281 
1,675 
1,839 

2,054 

266 

1,805 

2,280 

643 

4,878 
1,551 
1,102 
1,453 



222 

424 

1,561 

938 

680 
927 
588 
2,303 
670 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



2 


5 


2 


6 


2 


1 


1 




7 



3 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



67 
34 
132 
43 
82 

154 
23 

364 
35 
46 

12 

86 
28 
32 
60 

22 
33 

40 
79 
26 

168 
7 
7 

126 
10 

28 
48 
115 
11 
10 



9 
33 

56 

65 
7 

78 
36 
15 

448 
27 
10 

120 



Aggravated 
assault 



48 

16 

33 

117 

77 

61 
57 

193 
60 

134 

102 
35 
16 
82 

170 

147 
31 
6 
22 
34 

69 
63 
8 
108 
72 

84 
116 
150 

12 



67 
13 
7 
127 
60 

137 
7 

160 
71 
24 

92 
17 
59 
76 



4 


10 


6 


11 


78 


126 




Incomplete 


19 


49 


68 


29 


47 


23 


2 


34 


100 


116 


12 


60 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



781 
666 
900 
551 
1,191 

826 
601 
2,127 
664 
681 

483 
612 
373 
666 



672 
749 
411 
673 
620 

1,493 
205 
611 
676 
669 

699 
373 
580 
353 
309 

827 
420 
444 
629 



872 
123 
443 
1,011 
133 

1,663 
668 
367 
660 



100 
169 
763 



182 
484 
81 
707 
180 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



531 

1,066 
770 
628 
665 

424 
669 
1,307 
642 
450 

985 
763 
378 



631 
244 

684 
260 
189 

1,146 
143 
261 
744 
977 

847 
604 
878 
614 
490 

1,017 
249 
542 
683 
640 

736 
80 
909 
908 
243 

1,148 
610 
663 
313 



83 
196 
342 



Under $50 



465 



665 

1,368 

825 

807 

1,189 

1,798 
611 
3,695 
3,046 
1,034 

1,104 

1,677 

643 

466 

422 

937 
183 

606 

860 

1,491 

2,299 
442 
283 
481 
842 

980 

1,364 

964 

696 

1,410 

1,026 

203 

398 

1,182 

1,010 

1,963 

37 

746 

1,233 

227 

1,933 
638 

1,091 
785 



435 
538 

782 



Auto theft 



294 


637 


230 


677 


425 


459 


827 


1,610 


346 


368 



176 



Toble 58.— Number of Offensts Known to the Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities 15,000 to 60,000 in 
population—Con. 

Annapolis, Md 

Annlston, Ala 

Arcadia, Calif 

Arvada, Colo 

Ashland, Ky 



Ashtabula, Ohio.. 

Athens, Ga 

Athens, Ohio 

Attleboro, Mass,. 
Auburn, Maine... 



Auburn, N.Y 

Austin, Minn... 

Azusa, Calif. 

Baldwin Borough, Pa. 
Baldwin Park, Calif... 



Bangor, Maine 

Barberton, Ohio 

BartlesviUe, Okla... 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
Baytown, Tex 



Belleville, III 

BeUeville, N.J 

Bellevue, Wash 

Bellingbam, Wash. 
Belmont, Mass 



Beloit, Wis 

Bergenlield, N.J. 

Bessemer, Ala 

Bethel Park, Pa. 

Beverly, Mass 



Beverly HUls, CaUf 

Big Spring, Tex 

Birmingham, Mich 

Bismarck. N. Dak 

Bloomfleld Township, Mich. 



Bloomlngton, 111 

Bloomington, Ind... 

Blytheville, Ark 

Bossier City, La 

Bowling Green, Ky.. 



Braintree, Mass 

Bremerton, Wash 

Bridgewater Township, N.J. 

Brighton, N.Y 

Brooklyn Center, Minn 

Brook Park 



Bryan, Texas 

Burlingame, Calif. 
Burlington, Iowa.. 
Burlington, N.C.. 



Burlhigton, Vt 

Butte, Mont 

Calumet City, 111 

Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Carlsbad, N.Mex 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,191 
667 

1,112 
670 
477 



1,664 

606 
329 

230 
343 
927 
200 
1,363 

238 

897 

261 

1,680 

1,142 

666 

686 

1,273 

1,066 

246 

903 
296 
1,048 
379 
767 

1,287 
619 
616 
436 
634 

977 
467 
638 
900 
1,028 

877 
832 
305 
357 
738 



678 
869 
227 
690 

657 
560 
1,391 
720 
623 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



39 
95 
20 
5 
15 

68 
65 

Incomplete 
26 
4 

3 

8 
51 
10 
72 



31 

213 
127 



62 
26 
3 

21 

7 

193 

2 

6 




Larceny — theft 



$50 and 
over 



350 
211 
369 
176 
191 

258 
611 

250 
147 

116 
147 
405 
90 
637 



246 
82 
676 
450 

166 
185 
667 
317 
107 

235 
92 
348 
144 
334 

544 

218 

175 

90 

290 

400 
119 
232 
278 
269 

182 
347 
110 
97 
242 



223 
365 
119 
109 

330 
219 
326 
269 
221 



Under $50 



573 


640 


203 


172 


574 


688 


344 


614 


221 


257 


210 


438 


828 


401 


206 


298 


138 


306 


87 


67 


126 


681 


331 


436 


64 


126 


351 


457 


62 


517 


267 


696 


123 


230 


473 


1,223 


416 


479 


281 


387 


234 


75 


453 


1,046 


692 


1,074 


81 


91 


621 


1,003 


148 


221 


296 


271 


178 


139 


250 


415 


474 


422 


204 


329 


258 


481 


275 


614 


270 


663 


363 


622 


231 


304 


221 


303 


420 


621 


421 


277 


396 


210 


341 


816 


159 


89 


225 


187 


391 


628 


1S5 


324 


324 


364 


77 


304 


334 


361 


179 


648 


177 


281 


449 


431 


345 


453 


247 


365 



Auto theft 



177 



Table 59.— Number 


of Offenses Known to the Police, 


1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 




Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 


Larceny— theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negllgcnt 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 


$50 and 
over 


Under $50 


Auto theft 


Cities 15, mo to 60,000 in 
population— Con. 

Casper, Wyo 


838 
302 
763 

884 
1,315 

867 

1,362 
205 

636 

648 
538 
616 
368 
244 

473 
1,647 
809 
511 
298 

873 
214 
540 

1,752 
225 

1,086 
346 

1,085 
917 

2,488 

303 
832 
232 

414 

143 
174 
701 

992 

416 
404 

510 

1,121 

725 

630 
841 
1,194 
438 
637 

1,045 
894 
629 

1,123 
579 


6 




3 


12 
1 
8 
36 
22 

15 
76 
4 

9 

9 
2 
9 
2 
3 

4 
49 
13 

1 




364 
66 
193 
304 
350 

386 

343 

91 

271 

200 
260 
278 
208 
104 

146 
377 
314 
176 
81 

407 
83 
209 
S07 
63 

326 

96 

376 

335 

1 1»R 


340 
193 
422 
146 
690 

330 

331 

83 

219 

325 

238 

212 

81 

84 

246 
930 
360 
292 
186 

323 
95 
223 
725 
91 

689 
181 
475 
382 

826 

100 
279 

147 
209 

60 

46 

389 

468 

172 
188 

265 

77 

412 

201 
306 
461 
233 
369 

413 
266 
246 
619 
266 


660 

406 

659 

96 

687 

1,221 
496 
139 

161 

961 
290 
670 
308 
65 

408 
931 
542 
600 
843 

357 
187 
476 
828 
137 

537 
151 
505 
591 

1,869 

40 

249 
206 
427 

117 
222 
432 

238 

66 
399 

277 
810 
323 

608 
236 
932 
642 
599 

474 
611 
273 
604 
626 


114 


Cedar Falls, Iowa 




13 
45 
29 
12 

22 

279 

9 

Incomplete 

19 

17 
16 
24 
42 


29 


CharlottesTiUe, Va . 


1 
1 


3 

2 


11 
1 

2 

8 
8 

1 
4 


83 
367 
239 


Chelsea, Mass 


Cheltenham Township, Pa 


Cheyenne, Wyo 


2 
4 




Chicago Heights, HI 


1 
1 


311 
18 


Chlllicothe, Ohio 


Clarksburg, W. Va.. 

Clarksville, Tenn 


3 


114 


Clinton, Tnwfl 




93 


Clevis, N.Mex 






22 


Columbus, Ind 

Columbus, Miss 


2 
2 




1 

2 


90 
31 


Concord, N.H 


4 


63 


Coon Rapids, Minn 




2 
3 
5 

2 

1 

5 
1 
1 
10 

2 

4 


20 
26 
23 
2 
16 

28 
1 
8 
46 
17 

31 

7 

32 

100 

158 


66 


Coral Gables, Fla 


2 




160 


Corona, Calif 


1 
2 


94 


Coronado, Calif 




38 


CorvalUs, Oreg 




16 


Covina, Calif 






14 
2 
7 
145 
6 

12 
4 

82 
9 

75 

6 
2 
2 
6 


96 


Cranford Township, N.J 






32 


Crystal, Minn 




1 
6 


92 


Culver City, Calif. . . 


2 


318 


Cnmberland, Mrt 


46 




2 


1 


122 


Danvers, Mass 


68 


Danville, 111 


1 
1 
5 




10 

2 

22 

1 
2 


109 


Danville, Va 


1 

R 


88 


Daytona Beach, Fla 


216 










Decatur, Oa.. 




1 
1 


12 
12 
3 

23 

22 

26 
50 


89 
221 

64 
127 

62 
61 
179 


95 


Dedham, Mass 




316 


DeKalb, 111 




16 


Del City, Okla. 






2 


47 


Delhi Township, Ohio 


4 

1 
1 

5 

1 


1 
1 


5 


Denison, Tex 


1 
10 

3 

1 


10 

9 

15 

7 
7 

4 

90 

4 

14 

17 
21 
3 

6 

18 
53 

9 
S3 

4 


29 




63 


DeWitt, N.Y 


1 

3 






Dothan, Ala 


46 

5 
21 

5 
33 

14 

6 

111 

17 

5 
23 

26 
9 
101 
69 
40 


363 

185 
160 

164 
284 
208 

278 
293 
336 
139 
149 

454 
410 
238 
356 
204 


92 




45 


Downers Grove, 111 


28 


East Brunswick Township, 
N.J 




1 
2 


3 

7 
7 

2 
8 

1 
3 


69 


East Cleveland, Ohio 


4 


626 




80 




3 




126 


East Point, Ga 




106 


East Providence, R.I 




6 


368 


Eau Claire, Wis . . 




65 


Edina, Minn 






90 


El Cajon, Calif 


3 




12 
5 
2 
9 
2 


119 


ElCerrito, Calif 




152 


El Dorado, Ark 


7 
3 
3 




27 


Elkhart, Ind 




114 


Elmhurst, 111 


6 


60 



178 



Table 58.— Number of Offenses Known to tht Po/icc, 1969, Cifies and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



CilU) IB, 000 to 60,000 in 
population — Con. 

Elnilra, N.Y 

Enfleld, Conn 

Englewood, Colo 

Englcwood, N.J 

Enid, Okla 



Escondido, Calif 

Eureka, Calif 

Everett, Mass 

Evergreen Park, 111 

Ewing Township, N.J_ 



Fairboni, Ohio 

Fairfield, Calif. 

Fair Lawn, N.J 

Fairmont, W. Va 

Falls Township, Pa. 



Farmlngton, N. Mex.. 

Fayetteville, Ark 

Ferguson, Mo.. 

Femdale, Mich. 

Findlay, Ohio 



Fltchburg.Mass... 

Flagstaff, Ariz 

Florence, Ala 

Florence, S.C 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Fort Collins, Colo. 
Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

Fort Lee, N.J 

Fort Myers, Fla... 
Fort Pierce, Fla. . . 



Fountain Valley, Calif.... 
Franklin Township, N.J. 

Freeport, Dl- 

Frceport, N.Y 

Galesburg, 111.. 



Gardena, CallX 

Garden City, Mich 

Garden City, N.Y 

Garfield, N.J 

Garfield Heights, Ohio. 



Glen Cove, N.Y.... 

Glendale, Ariz 

Glendora, Calif 

Gloucester, Mass 

Qoldsboro, N.C 



Grand Forks, N. Dak. 
Grand Island, Nebr. _ . 

Granite City, 111 

Greeley, Colo 

GrcenbuTgh, N.Y 



Greenville, N.C. 
Greenville, Tex. _ 
Greenwood, Miss. 

Gulfport, Miss 

Hackensack, N.J. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



706 
S46 
1.099 
815 
800 

693 
662 
690 
603 

778 

402 
798 
476 
130 
682 

661 
418 
616 
1,063 
681 

1,349 

434 

626 
178 

802 
829 
867 
871 



621 

344 

1,666 

462 

1,621 
727 
586 
261 
463 

567 
1.276 
809 
294 
952 

884 
727 

1.287 
980 

1,164 

801 
523 
629 
716 
1,106 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
staugtitcr 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



17 
17 

29 
19 
42 

21 

21 

4 

3 

13 

9 
39 
5 
7 
1 

135 

7 

10 

92 

14 



21 38 

Incomplete 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



26 
2 

1 

18 
25 
14 
Incomplete 



23 
9 
49 

17 
3 
40 
76 
42 

76 
33 
147 
5 
23 



243 
288 
371 
334 
342 

261 
221 
291 
60 
241 

110 
355 
177 
46 
315 

202 
133 
225 

489 
227 

549 

269 

293 

64 

208 
351 
214 
350 



428 
309 
128 
478 
167 

418 
199 
105 
60 
211 

176 
535 
357 
161 
343 

163 
284 
652 
221 



260 
232 
231 
327 
337 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



372 



Under $50 



370 


762 


162 


280 


489 


946 


365 


183 


332 


708 


198 


307 


346 


733 


140 


92 


394 


670 


373 


396 


205 


645 


308 


1,006 


253 


300 


62 


45 


186 


523 


232 


374 


260 


295 


260 


436 


293 


421 


267 


342 



Auto theft 



493 



105 


408 


190 


342 


79 


364 


466 


903 


360 


522 


364 


124 


333 


675 


373 


476 


166 


263 


137 


247 


649 


678 


209 


435 


626 


382 


336 


923 


418 


220 


83 


91 


121 


377 


245 


79 


484 


670 


342 


343 


26 


71 


391 


479 


592 


959 


362 


512 


343 


892 


662 


1,061 


651 


308 


361 


442 


208 


276 


141 


163 


276 


601 


436 


323 



17!9 



Table 59.—Numbtr of Offenses Known to the Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population— Continued 



City 



Cities tSflOO to SOfiOO in 
population— Con. 

Hagerstown, Md 

Haltom City, Tei 

Hamburg Town, N.Y 

Hamden, Conn 

Hamtramck, Mich 

Harllngen, Tex 

Harvey, 111 

Hatticsburg, Miss _ . 

Haverhill, Mass 

Hazel Park, Mich 

Hazleton, Pa 

Hempstead, N.Y 

Highland Park, 111 

Highland Park, Mich 

Hilo, Hawaii 

Hobbs, N. Mex 

Hoboken, N.J 

Holland, Mich 

Hot Springs, Ark 

Houma, La __. 

Hunthigton Park, Callt 

Hutchhison, Eans 

Idaho Falls, Idaho 

Inkster, Mich... 

Iowa City, Iowa 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Jackson, Tenn _ 

Jamestown, N.Y 

Janesville, Wis 

Jefferson City, Mo 

Johnson City, Tenn 

Johnstown, Pa __. 

Jonesboro. Ark.._ 

Joplin, Mo 

Kankakee, III 

Kannapolls, N.C 

Kearny, N.J 

Kent, Ohio 

Killeen, Tex 

EIngsport, Tenn 

Kingston, N.Y 

Kingsville, Tex 

Kinston, N.C 

Klrkwood, Mo 

Lackawanna, N.Y 

Lofayette, Ind 

L« Orange, Ga 

La Habra, Calif 

La Mesa, Calif 

Lancaster, Ohio 

Laurel, Miss.. 

Lawrence, Kans 

Leavenworth, Kans 

Lebanon, Pa 

Leominster, Mass , 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



784 

310 
1,064 
1,647 

800 
1,624 

547 
1,051 



194 
1,864 

503 
3,383 

441 

960 
1,582 
438 
716 
661 

2,086 
515 
989 

2,392 
803 

621 
1.070 
364 
561 
700 

506 

386 

192 

1,028 

1,201 

401 
649 
392 
1,369 
343 

448 
485 
529 
451 
785 

955 
230 
1,156 
860 
600 

570 
1,319 
395 
375 
732 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



1 

6 
12 

1 

24 

3 



36 



Aggravated 
assault 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 





incomplete 


7 


3 


12 


19 


261 


203 


3 


66 


156 


144 


9 


32 


18 







Incomplete 


5 




75 


35 


3 


8 


399 


226 


6 


11 


16 


26 


52 


122 


5 


38 


34 


33 


26 


67 


202 


69 


10 


23 


12 


25 


116 


270 


9 


10 


IS 


30 


47 


111 


3 


2 


5 


4 


7 


39 


18 


69 


29 


21 


6 


2 


12 


81 


126 


166 


3 


97 


25 


10 


1 


7 


52 


104 


16 


41 


10 


27 


6 


39 


17 


99 


7 


12 


48 


49 


22 


10 


1 


37 


28 


24 


5 


12 


8 


61 


12 


113 


16 


62 


20 


48 


2 


7 


7 


6 



357 

102 
369 
353 

371 
467 
214 
676 



80 
486 
108 
949 
261 

355 
716 
130 
355 
240 

747 
280 
296 
1,076 
218 

254 
402 
159 
168 
278 

151 
174 
102 
336 
392 

144 
202 
160 
427 
136 

144 
160 
182 
197 
279 

311 
57 
442 
314 
248 

221 
310 
82 
179 
283 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



226 

166 
525 
420 

291 
484 
232 
236 



84 
820 
344 
1,132 
126 

516 
102 
224 
243 
212 

621 
133 
575 
594 
463 

261 
337 
137 
337 
310 



68 
523 
412 

122 
244 
130 
608 
79 

200 
233 
161 
196 
192 

606 
94 
580 
435 
165 

189 
829 
187 
142 
237 



Under $50 



269 
446 
670 

507 
572 
293 
179 



75 

364 

266 

1,113 

378 

690 
80 
551 
318 
152 

894 

995 

1,065 

645 

559 

442 
483 
168 
804 
484 

213 
178 
143 

917 
423 

221 
183 
496 
546 
358 

176 
388 
246 
396 
196 

697 
207 
625 
723 
377 

265 
1,098 
208 
287 
401 



106 

ss 

45 

198 



180 



Table 58. — Numbtr of Offenses Known to the Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



Ci(ie» 16,000 to 60,000 in 
population— Cob. 



Lcwlston, Maine.. 
Lexington, Mass.. 

Linden, N.J 

Livennore, Cali/.. 
Livingston, N.J. . 



Lockport, N.Y 

Lodi, Calif 

Lodi, N.J 

Lombard, 111 

Long Beach, N.Y_ 



Long Branch, N.J 

Longview, Wash 

Lynwood, Calif 

Madison Heights, Mich.. 
Madison Township, N.J. 



Manchester Township, Conn. 

Manhattan Beach, Calif 

Manitowoc, Wis 

Mankato, Minn 

Maple Heights, Ohio 



Marietta, Oa 

Marion, Ind 

Marion, Ohio 

Marple Township, Pa. 
Marshall, Tex .-.. 



Mason City, Iowa. 

Massillon, Ohio 

Maywood, 111 

McAUen, Tex 

McKeesport, Pa... 



Medford, Oreg 

Melbourne, Fla 

Melrose, Mass 

Menlo Park, Calif. 
Mentor, Ohio 



Methuen, Mass. 

Michigan City, Ind 

Middletown, Conn 

Middletown Township, Pa.. 
Midland, Mich 



Midwest City, Okla 

MiUord Town, Conn 

Millcreek Township, Pa. 

Milton, Mass 

Minnetonka, Minn 



Minot, N. Dak.. 
Mishawaka, Ind. 
Missoula, Mont.. 

Mohne, 111 

Monroe, Mich 



Monrovia, Calif- _ 

Montclair, N.J_ 

Montebello, Calif 

Monterey, Calif _ 

Monterey Park, Calif. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



626 
438 
1,051 
689 
216 

317 
476 
S46 
298 
1,654 

1,177 
437 

2,211 
806 
651 

864 
1,240 
432 
678 
662 

1,118 

1,083 

791 

337 

343 



677 
867 
264 
662 

957 
412 
364 
1,049 
561 

695 
1,208 
699 
626 
461 

848 
1,403 
367 
314 
419 

276 
661 
634 
1,202 
384 

865 
1,169 
1,462 
1,503 
1,192 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



164 
22 
3 

10 
41 

1 
8 
24 

24 

43 

10 

4 

7 

8 
25 
78 

2 
36 

17 
15 

2 
36 

3 

12 
30 
25 
3 
5 

6 
10 
1 
7 
3 

3 
14 

9 
31 
13 

62 
48 
42 
40 
32 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



276 
209 
438 
401 
121 

74 
149 
153 

68 
535 

423 
207 
776 
268 
263 

363 
612 
246 
237 
196 

399 
364 
249 
118 
136 

286 
206 
342 
186 

255 

405 
187 
170 
447 
206 

331 
369 

267 
283 
165 

232 
389 
142 
171 

178 

61 
239 
184 
636 
182 

340 
615 
540 
452 
458 



Larceny— theft 



$60 and 
over 



Under $60 



201 


664 


174 


267 


264 


469 


209 


1,105 


66 


96 


131 


83 


217 


321 


217 


86 


176 


218 


677 


640 


504 


438 


134 


970 


685 


615 


363 


488 


284 


193 


368 


371 


403 


379 


165 


683 


369 


660 


132 


460 


378 


420 


513 


821 


398 


760 


168 


282 


165 


186 


337 


627 


312 


462 


230 


206 


44 


531 


138 


258 


407 


927 


133 


769 


131 


172 


372 


486 


288 


441 


146 


243 


566 


681 


211 


200 


211 


260 


249 


908 


441 


522 


743 


717 


166 


317 


70 


66 


191 


147 


148 


339 


264 


780 


276 


1,164 


444 


783 


125 


339 


265 


314 


438 


280 


563 


375 


808 


641 


609 


447 



Auto theft 



181 



Table 58. — Number of Offenses Known to 


the Police, 


7969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 




Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 


Larceny— theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 


$50 and 
over 


Under $50 


Auto theft 


Citiei 16,000 to 60,000 in 
population—Con. 

Moorhead, Minn 


628 
541 

209 
215 
650 

828 
981 
324 
467 
481 

1,033 
1,144 

2,787 
1,440 

767 
172 

1,107 
697 

1,613 

2,765 
603 

278 
1,228 

619 

296 
1,629 
1,439 
1,215 

316 
304 
1,168 
610 
612 

658 
318 
833 
281 
1,764 

1,387 
677 
561 
350 
670 

1,250 
741 
422 
618 

1,319 








2 
7 

1 
3 

8 

25 

18 

3 

3 

1 

64 
60 


12 
17 

1 


201 
178 

119 
93 
93 

248 
647 
146 
125 
179 

472 
330 

1,026 
446 

311 

72 

434 

350 
556 

1,129 
160 

104 
377 

118 

129 
618 
625 
397 

101 
148 
611 
142 
163 

232 
108 
262 
99 
649- 

426 
327 
171 
123 
263 

745 
216 
156 
223 
194 


372 

290 

52 
107 
331 

350 
286 
81 
232 
230 

323 

498 

673 
430 

230 
66 
433 
177 
744 

1,372 
304 

104 
415 

207 

98 
673 
549 
618 

136 
105 
403 
204 
253 

220 
163 
397 
122 
707 

489 
189 
296 
133 
231 

263 
337 
185 
232 
881 


481 
322 

46 
62 
270 

340 

873 

97 

170 

297 

364 
671 

904 
333 

217 
389 
461 
413 

792 

1,721 
263 

110 
199 

214 

125 
692 
829 
813 

266 
91 
598 
188 
204 

631 
104 
847 
170 
988 

990 
310 
206 
188 
331 

476 
410 
344 
577 
633 


41 


Morton Grove, III 






1 


48 


Mount Lebanon Township, 
Pa 


1 




36 


Mount Pleasant, N.Y 






12 


Mount Prospect, 111 




3 

7 




39 

60 
43 
21 

2 

1 

47 
R 


79 


Muskogee, Okia 


6 
8 
3 


11 


138 


Napa, CalU 


80 


Natchez, Miss 




4 
1 


66 


Natick, Mass 




94 


Needham, Mass 




1 


70 


Neptune Township, N.J 


1 
3 

3 

2 


10 
3 

9 
2 

2 
10 

2 


128 


New Albany, Ind 




262 


Newark, Ohio 


3 






New Brunswick, N.J 


285 
75 

15 
1 
25 
24 
35 

24 
13 


105 
280 

23 
15 
101 

28 
87 

74 
43 


687 


Newburgh, N.Y 


22S 


New Castle, Pa.. 


4 
1 


188 


New Iberia, La 


1 
3 
2 


25 


New London, Conn .. 


101 




1 
3 


114 


Newport, R.I 


192 


Newport Beach, Calif 


1 


17 


138 


Nlles,ni _ 


2 

2 
2 


83 






1 






Northampton, Mass 


6 
21 

22 

9 
81 
89 
40 

4 
4 

19 

6 

33 

9 
3 
34 

1 
83 

102 

26 

1 

5 

9 

8 
8 


6 
12 

42 

6 
73 
49 
52 

1 
5 
19 
16 
6 

39 
2 
31 
24 
73 

64 
90 
37 
11 

7 

32 
43 
62 
105 

2 


58 


North Bergen Township, N.J. . 




403 


North Chicago, 111 


1 

1 
1 


3 

1 

22 

4 

2 

2 

1 

10 


126 


North Huntingdon Township, 
Pa 




52 


North Las Vegas, Nev 


2 


281 


North Miami, Fla. 


223 


North Miami Beach, Fla 




1 


208 


North Oknsted, Ohio 




72 


North Tonawanda, N.Y.. 






41 


Norwich, Conn 


1 




105 


Norwood, Mass 




143 


Norwood, Ohio 


2 

1 


1 

1 


3 

5 
3 
4 
2 
10 

7 


152 


Novato, Calif 


62 


Nutley, N.J 


49 


Oak Park, Mich 




1 

2 

4 


105 


Oak Ridge, Tenn 


2 
5 

2 
1 

1 
1 


31 


Oceanslde, Calif 


237 


Orange, N.J 


297 


Orange, Texas 




46 


Orangetown, N.Y 






65 


Ottumwa, Iowa 


2 


6 

6 
1 
4 


77 




84 


Paclfica, Calif... 


3 

6 




204 


Paducah, Ky .. 


2 


130 


Pampa, Tex 


26 


Panama City, Fla 


3 

1 




19 
17 


36 


Paramus, N.J 


1 


2 


222 



182 



Table 58. — Number o 


{ Offtnses 


Known to the Police, 


1969, Citiet and Towns 25,000 and over in Population— Continued 




Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 


Larceny 


-theft 




City 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 


$50 and 
over 


Under $50 


Auto theft 


Citie) 16,000 to 50,000 in 
population— Con. 


142 
684 
434 
564 

929 
439 
1,315 
965 
919 

415 

642 

2,368 

1,043 

962 

1,298 
319 
610 
616 

1,032 

660 
1,051 

396 
1,213 

431 

418 
732 
590 
663 
626 

165 
1,278 
1,243 
1,665 
1,064 

711 
914 
138 
1,196 
209 

695 
859 
688 
688 
819 

638 
641 
818 
209 
386 

804 
579 
632 
684 
627 


1 






In 

3 
10 

6 
11 

5 

9 
21 
27 
65 

6 

13 

127 

11 

18 

44 

2 

2 
67 
50 

8 
43 
17 
72 

2 

1 
34 
11 
41 
11 

3 
21 
19 
24 
16 

10 

21 

1 

48 

1 

12 
8 

19 
4 

16 

13 

8 
9 


complete 

1 

19 

29 

54 

8 
10 
20 
51 
113 

40 
26 
118 
30 

54 

46 
10 
51 
49 
39 

16 
43 
36 
89 
26 

4 
13 
37 
18 

4 

15 
18 
33 
44 
13 

28 
7 

1 
49 

2 

23 
32 
2 
100 
123 


41 
180 
110 
210 

579 
190 
674 
261 
391 

133 

252 

1,102 

412 

266 

697 
144 
201 
214 
440 

220 
431 
122 
636 
138 

64 
269 
147 
309 
217 

65 
601 
517 
640 
660 

268 
319 
58 
421 
142 

208 
403 
136 
241 

282 

116 
271 
313 
94 
138 

236 
320 
174 
342 
276 


68 
311 
247 
234 

88 
175 
394 
339 
224 

166 
277 
607 
471 
511 

414 
102 
223 
72 
376 

220 
390 
167 
422 
245 

270 
336 
272 
146 
266 

66 
680 
537 
335 
283 

321 
390 

69 
614 

65 

214 
266 
383 
244 

296 

402 
188 
398 
88 
171 

424 
182 
287 
118 
255 


523 
436 
238 
138 

63 

427 
318 
230 
889 

236 

220 
961 
858 
751 

492 
212 
627 
490 
994 

169 
461 
287 
642 
236 

995 
121 
218 

250 
87 

363 

822 
759 
194 
544 

889 
314 
130 
726 
36 

632 
696 
172 
383 

276 

536 
204 
417 
163 
156 

1,231 
344 
929 
366 
325 




Park Forest, 111 ._ 


28 


Park Ridge, lU 




2 

1 


62 


Parma Heights, Ohio 






41 


Pascagoula, Miss 


1 




54 


Peabody, Mass 




1 


248 


Pekin.ni 


2 
2 
3 
6 

8 




63 




8 
1 

2 

12 

1 


6 
2 
14 

6 


298 


Perth Amboy, N.J 


282 




106 


Phenix City, Ala 


67 


Piscataway Township, N.J 


74 


Plamfield,N.J 


2 


7 
6 
6 

11 
2 
6 


406 


Pleasant Hill, Calif 




113 


Pocatello, Idaho 




1 


118 




6 


180 


Ponca City, Okla 




69 


Portage, Mich 




2 


27 


Port Chester, N.Y... 


1 
2 

1 
2 
1 
4 


113 


Port Huron, Mich 


1 


6 

1 
3 
8 
2 
2 

1 
3 
3 
2 
2 

5 

2 
9 
5 
4 

2 
3 

1 


121 


Portsmouth, N.H 


96 


Portsmouth, Ohio 




139 


Pottstown, Pa 


3 


65 




89 


Prau-ie Village, Kans 




18 








78 




1 




76 






120 


Rahway, N.J . .. 




3 


148 


Ramapo Town, N.Y 




26 


Rantoul, 111 .-. 






11 


Rapid City, S. Dak 


2 
1 
2 

1 

1 


1 


164 


Eedlands, Calif 


127 






606 


Rialto, Calif . ... 




97 




2 


81 


Richfield, Minn 


174 


Richland, Wash 






a 


Richmond, Ind 


2 




162 


Rldgewood, N.J.. _. 


1 




9 


Ridley Township, Pa 




4 

7 
1 
6 
3 


134 


Rock Hill, S.C 


10 


2 
1 
3 
1 


133 


RockviUe Centre, N.Y 


14S 


Rocky Mount, N.C 


6 

7 


68 


Rome, Ga 


92 


Rosevllle, Minn 


107 


Ross Township, Pa 






2 


28 

29 

1 

1 

2 
32 
U 
11 

6 


144 


Roswell, N. Mex 


6 


1 


64 


Rotterdam, N.Y 


1 

1 

3 

2 
6 
2 

2 


2£ 


St. Charles, Mo 


1 




9 

4 
13 

7 
20 

8 


6£ 


St. Cloud, Minn 


2 


13; 


Salem, Mass 


1 


K 






4- 


San Bruno, Calif 


3 


7 
1 


18f 


San Carlos. CaUf 


8 



183 



Table 59.— Number of Offentet Known to the Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population— Confinued 



City 



Cities 15,000 to 60,000 in 
population— Con. 

Sandusky, Ohio 

San Gabriel, Calif 

San Luis Obispo, Calif 

San Rafael, Calif.. _ 

Santa Cruz, Calif. _ 

Santa Fe, N. Mex 

Santa Maria, Calif 

Santa Eosa, Calif 

Sarasota, Fla. 

SayrevlUe, N.J.. 

Sedalia, Mo 

Selma, Ala 

Shaker Heights, Ohio 

Shaler Township, Pa 

Shawnee, Okla 

Sheboygan, Wis 

Sherman, Tex 

South EucUd, Ohio 

Southgate, Mich 

Southington Town, Conn.. 

South San Francisco, Calif. 
Springfield Township, Ohio 
Springfield Township, Pa.. 

State College, Pa 

Steubenville, Ohio 

Stillwater, Okla 

Stratford, Conn 

Sumter, S.C 

Superior, Wis. 

Taunton, Mass 

Teaneck Township, NJ 

Temple, Tex 

Texarkana, Tex 

Texas City, Tex.. 

Titusvllle, Fla 

Torrington , Conn 

Trumbull, Conn 

Upland, Calif. 

Upper Arlington, Ohio 

Urbana, 111 

Valdosta, Ga 

Vancouver, Wash 

Ventura, Calif 

Vestal, N.Y 

Vicksburg, Miss. 

Villa Park, 111.. 

Vineland, N.J 

Wakefield, Mass 

Walla Walla, Wash 

Wallingford, Conn 

Walnut Creek, Calif 

Warminster Township, Pa.. 

Warner Robins, Ga 

Watertown. Mass 

Watertown, N.Y 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



607 

845 

468 

1,630 

1,447 

1,323 
1,335 
1,409 
1,499 
330 

364 
736 

286 
422 

434 

250 
211 
956 
399 

1,469 
322 
379 
439 
687 

344 

1,161 
463 
968 

1,310 

761 
763 
936 
616 
742 

225 
301 
563 
308 
520 

657 

846 

1,918 

261 

450 

201 
960 
348 
518 



967 
689 
224 
756 
517 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggravated 
assault 



18 
30 
9 
23 
33 

12 
18 
30 
65 
6 

13 
14 

Incomplete 
3 
1 



97 

4 

21 

7 
1 
2 
32 
10 

20 
16 
10 
31 
12 

9 
22 

22 
96 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



286 
336 
147 
438 
670 

637 
690 
462 
716 

82 

106 
400 

123 
154 

161 
86 
99 
272 
201 

487 
140 
88 
166 
285 

95 
387 
236 
403 
513 

316 
266 
323 

237 
279 

87 
131 
241 
142 
199 

153 



222 

109 
356 
125 
182 
292 

260 
292 
25 
293 
264 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



181 
359 
234 
776 
609 

422 
562 
769 
487 
162 

199 
188 



201 
128 
62 
477 
163 

619 
121 
176 
206 
240 

220 
566 
131 
264 
204 

321 
319 
497 
222 
353 

86 
103 
204 
163 

205 

237 
330 
903 
156 
166 

54 
358 
156 
265 
255 

623 
222 
158 
268 
216 



Under $50 



727 
328 
116 
856 
1,117 

754 

820 

1,662 

1,033 

144 

292 
377 

166 
312 

974 
153 
212 
669 
175 

588 
312 
268 
362 
437 

261 
381 
393 
832 
511 



449 
219 
669 
412 

162 
313 

609 
717 
354 

367 
446 
947 
134 
130 

149 
378 
164 

718 



"858 
293 
193 
195 



184 



Table 58. — Number of Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1969, Cities and Towns 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



City 



Cities SSfiOO to 60,000 in 
population— Con. 



Waukesha, Wis _ 

Wausau, Wis 

Wayne Township, NJ. 

Webster Groves, Mo 

Weirton, W.Va. 



Wellesley, Mass 

Westfield, Mass 

Westfield, N.J. 

West Mifflin, Pa 

West New York, NJ. 



West Orange, N.J 

Westport, Conn., 

West Seneca, N.Y 

West Springfield, Mass.. 
Wethersfleld, Conn 



Wheaton, HI 

Wheeling, W.Va.. 
Whitehall, Ohio.. 
Wilkinsburg, Pa.. 
Williamsport, Pa. 



Willingboro Township, N.J.. 

Wilniette, 111 , 

Wilmington, N.C , 

Wilson, N.C. 

Winona, Minn , 



Winter Park, Fla. 

Woburn, Mass 

Woonsocket, R.I. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 
Xenia, Ohio 



I Yakima, Wash... 

I Yuma, Ariz 

I Zanesville, Ohio. 



Other Areas 
Dade County, Fla 



Guam 

Puerto Rico. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



322 
262 
1,023 
318 
477 

376 
624 
300 

272 
776 

672 
1,169 
613 
932 
373 

312 
783 
673 
630 
723 

468 
447 
1,961 
702 
323 

737 
569 
703 
793 
488 

2,204 

1,511 

657 



21, 370 



942 
54,067 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1 
191 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 
negligence 



14 
422 



Forcible 
rape 



6 
698 



Robbery 



1,3.56 



28 
1,662 



Aggravated 
assault 



44 


54 


8 


20 


3 


12 


2 


6 


92 


263 


16 


152 


4 


2 


20 


37 


3 




15 


2 


20 


16 


11 


25 


77 


155 


55 


97 


18 


7 



1,640 



31 
11,766 



Burglary- 
breaking 
or entering 



101 

72 

394 

135 

224 

124 
232 
120 
110 
260 

201 
553 
223 
308 
171 

139 
216 
292 
228 
309 

339 
179 
810 
177 
86 

239 
239 
207 
290 
147 

897 
502 
346 



7,019 



435 
20, 657 



Larceny— theft 



$50 and 
over 



294 
11,826 



Under $60 



173 


441 


119 


650 


523 


491 


133 


328 


129 


148 


185 


125 


207 


208 


134 


219 


83 


75 


227 


112 


270 


227 


490 


394 


279 


337 


319 


171 


141 


133 


109 


402 


410 


404 


267 


516 


169 


171 


343 


629 


49 


17 


220 


682 


592 


906 


238 


646 


158 


231 


358 


628 


189 


97 


172 


126 


290 


760 


245 


694 


892 


2,375 


705 


797 


171 


397 



601 
9,406 



Auto theft 



185 



U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1970 O - 397-633 



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