(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

BOSTOISI 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




CR ME 



IN THE UNITED STATES 



1974 



ISSUED BY— CLARENCE M. KELLEY, DIRECTOR— FBI 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 




FOR RELEASE 

MONDAY PM NOVEMBER 17, 1975 

PRINTED ANNUALLY 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United States 



PRINTED ANNUALLY— 1974 



Advisory: Committee on Uniform Crime Records 
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
Carl V. Goodin, Chief of Police, Cincinnati Police 
Department, Cincinnati, Ohio, Chairman 




Clarence M. Kelley 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. 



20535 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing ( 
Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $3.60 
Stock Number 027-001-00013-1 



(i^3>oc. 



9UT<,o.l 



FOREWORD 

Cooperation is the hallmark of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program. I 
have been associated with this Program for many years as a Chief of Police 
and as the Director of the FBI, and I firmly believe that it continues to be an 
invaluable aid to law enforcement. Its success is due ])rimarily to the joint 
efforts of the more than 12,000 city, county, and State law enforcement agencies 
that furnish the data for the Program. 

While the information provided law enforcement through this Program 
serves as an administrative and operational tool, it also serves as a measure of 
certain aspects of our society. The Uniform Crime Reporting Program reveals 
the extent of criminal activity in our land. This activity has reached such 
proportions that Americans throughout the Nation consider crime their com- 
munity's most serious problem. It will require the full resources of law enforce- 
ment at all levels of government to deal effectively with this menace. But our 
l)rofession will be unable to cope effectively with the jiroblem of crime without 
the support of every responsible citizen. 

In my more than thirty years in law enforcement, I have become con- 
vinced that if anyone is capable of energizing people to work against crime, 
it is those of us in the law enforcement community. We must make known 
our alarm about crime. We must convey the message that crime erodes the 
very foundation of our Nation. 

To this end, the FBI is participating in Crime Resistance Programs 
designed to involve citizens in the fight against crime. With the s|)irit of co- 
operation so evident in today's law enforcement community, I am sure we 
will see results. We must resolve to lead the attack against this Nation's 
number one concern. All of us in law enforcement must recognize that the 
more friends we have and the better understanding the public has of our 
work, the more effective we will be in the fight against crime. 

Efforts such as the Uniform Crime Re))orling Program can enable us to 
better serve the Nation. We must keep the public, our civic leaders, and the 
legislators at all levels of government informed as to the seriousness of crime. 
Only through such enlightenment will we in law enforcement receive the 
support and cooperation so necessary to carry out our responsibilities. 




Clarence M. Kelley 
Director 



Crime Factors 

Crime is a social problem and the concern of the entire community. The law 
enforcement effort is limited to factors within its control. 

Uniform Crime Reports gives a nationwide view of crime based on police 
statistics voluntarily contributed by local law enforcement agencies. The 
factors which cause crime are man}' and vary from place to place throughout 
the countr}". The reader of this publication is cautioned against comparing 
statistical information of individual communities solely based on a similarity 
in their population counts. Population is only one of many factors which must 
be considered in a comparative study of crime. Some of the conditions which 
afYect the volume and type of crime that occurs from place to place are briefly 
outlined as follows: 

Density and size of the community population and the metropolitan 

area of which it is a part. 
Composition of the population with reference particulai'ly to age, 

sex, and race. 
Economic status and mores of the population. 
Stability of population, inchuling commuters, seasonal, anti other 

transient types. 
Climate, including seasonal weather conditions. 
Educational, recreational, and religious characteristics. 
Effective strength of the police force. 
Standards of appointments to the local police force. 
Policies of the prosecuting officials. 
Attitudes and policies of the courts ami corrections. 
Relationships and attitudes of law enforcement and the community. 
Administrative and investigative efficiency of law enforcement, 

including degree of adherence to crime reporting standards. 
Organization and cooperation of adjoining and overlapping police 
jurisdictions. 



Contents 



Section Page 

1 Summary of Uniform Crime Reporting Program 1-7 

2 Crime and offender information 10-217 

Narrative conmients: 

Crime Index totals 10-11 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 11-19 

Aggravated assaidt 19-22 

Forcible rape 22-24 

Robbery 24-26 

B urglary 26-3 1 

Larcenj' 3 1-34 

Motor vehicle theft 34-42 

Clearances 42 

Persons arrested 42-45 

Persons charged 45-46 

Careers in Crime 46-53 

Tabular presentation: 

The Index of Crime, 1974 (table 1) 55 

Crime in the United States, 1960 to 1974 (table 2) 55 

Crime in the regions, geographic divisions, and states, 1973 

and 1974 (table 3) 56-61 

Crime in the states (table 4) 62-72 

Crime in the standard metropolitan statistical areas (table 5)- 73-90 

Crime in cities with over 10,000 inhabitants (table 6) 91-134 

Crime at universities (table 7) 135-136 

Crime in suburban counties (table 8) 137-146 

Crime in rural counties (table 9) 147-152 

Clime trends, 1973-1974, by population groups (table 10) __ 153-154 
Crime trends, 1973-1974, suburban and nonsuburban cities, 

by population groups (table 11) 155-156 

Crime trends, 1973-1974, suburban and nonsuburban counties 

by population groups (table 12) 157 

Crime trends, 1973-1974, offense breakdown, by population 

groups (table 13) 15S-159 

Crime rates, by population groups (table 14) 160-161 

Crime rates, suburban and nonsuburban cities, by population 

groups (table 15) 162 

Crime rates, suburban and nonsuburban counties, by popula- 
tion groups (table 16) 163 

Crime rates, offense breakdown, by population groups 

(table 17) 164-165 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, by population groups 

(table 18) \ 166-167 

Offenses known, cleared by arrest, by geographic divisions 

(table 19) \ 168-169 



Section 

2 Crime and offender — Continued 

Tabidar presentation — Continued 

Offenses cleared by arrest of persons under 18 years of age Page 

(table 20) 1 70-1 7 1 

Offenses known breakdown, cleared bj' arrest, by population 

groups (table 21) 172-173 

Disposition of persons formally charged by the police 

(table 22) 174 

Persons charged — percent arrested or summoned (table 23).- 175 
Offenses known, cleared, persons arrested, charged, and dis- 
posed of (table 24) 176 

Police disposition of juvenile offenders taken into custody 

(table 25) 177 

Offense analysis (table 26) 178 

Type of value of propertj' stolen and recovered (table 27) 178 

Persons arrested: 

Total estimated arrests, United States, 1974 (table 28) 179 

Number and rate by population group (table 29) 180-181 

Arrest trends, 1960-1974 (table 30) 182 

Arrest trends, 1969-1974 (table 31) 183 

Arrest trends by sex, 1960-1974 (table 32) 184 

Total arrest trends, 1973-1974 (table 33) 185 

Total arrests by age group (table 34) 186-187 

Total arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and under 

25 (table 35) 188 

Total arrests, distribution by sex (table 36) 189 

Total arrest trends by sex, 1973-1974 (table 37) 190 

Total arrests by race (table 38) 191-193 

City arrest trends, 1973-1974 (table 39) 194 

City arrests by age (table 40) 195-196 

Citj^ arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and under 

25 (table41) 197 

City arrests, distribution by sex (table 42) 198 

City arrest trends by sex, 1973-1974 (table 43) 199 

City arrests by race (table 44) 200-202 

Suburban arrest trends, 1973-1974 (table 45) 203 

Suburban arrests by age (table 46) 204-205 

Suburban arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21, and 

under 25 (table 47) 206 

Suburban arrests, distribution by sex (table 48) 207 

Suburban arrests by race (table 49) 208-210 

Rural arrest trends, 1973-1974 (table 50) 211 

Rural arrests by age (table 51) 212-213 

Rural arrests of persons under 15, under 18, under 21 , and under 

25 (table 52) 214 

Rural arrests, distribution by sex (table 53) 215 

Rural arrests by race (table 54) 216-218 

Suburban and rural arrest trends by sex, 1973-1974 (table 55) _ 219 



Section p^g^ 

3 Law enforcement employees 22 1-293 

Narrative comments: 

Law enforcement employees 221-223 

Law enforcement officers killed 223-233 

Law enforcement officers assaulted 233-234 

Tabular presentation: 

Full-time law enforcement employees; number, rate, and range 

(table 56) ^ 235 

Full-time law enforcement officers; nvunber, rate, and range 

(table 57) ■; 236 

Percent distribution of law enforcement employees by male and 

female (table 58) 237 

Law enforcement officers i)atrol and shift assignments 

(table 59) 238 

Law enforcement employees and patrol assignments (table 60) _ 239 
Law enforcement officer shift assignments (table 61 ) 239 

Law enforcement officer patrol types (table 62) 239 

Law enforcement officer patrols, type and shift (table 63) 240 

Civilian employees, percent of total (table 64) 240 

Assaults on law enforcement officers by gecgi-aphic divisions 

and population groups (table 65) 241 

Assaults on law enforcement officers, percent distiibution of 

weapons used (table 66) 241 

Assaults on law enforcement officers; activity bv tvpe of weapon 

(table 67) . _ ^ ^ 242 

Assaults on law enforcement officers, type of weapon and 

activity (table 68) .' 243 

Assaults on law enforcement officers by time of day (table 69) 244 

Assaults on law enforcement officers, type of activitv by percent 

of officer assignment (table 70) 245 

Assaults on law enforcement officers, type of assignment bv 

activity (table 71) \ 246 

Assaults on law enforcement officers and i)ercent cleared 

(table 72) _ 247 

Full-time state police and highway patrol employees (table 73) _ 248 
Law enforcement employees in individual areas: 

Cities with over 25,000 inhabitants (table 74) 249-257 

Cities with under 25,000 inhabitants (table 75) 258-287 

Universities (table 76) 288 

Suburban counties (table 77) 289-291 

Rural counties (table 78) 292-293 



Section I 



►ummary 



SUMMARY OF UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING 
PROGRAM 

Uniform Crime Reports provides a nationwide 
view of crime based on the submission of police 
statistics by city, county, and state law enforce- 
ment agencies throughout the countiy. The extent 
of coverage as demonstrated b}' this pubhcation 
is a tribute to the cooperative and dedicated 
spirit of the law enforcement community in this 
country. 

Historical Background 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program is the 
outgrowth of a need for a national and uniform 
compilation of law enforcement statistics. A volun- 
tary national Program of collection of crime counts 
was initiated in 1930 by the Committee on Uniform 
Crime Records of the International Association 
of Chiefs of Police (lACP). In that same year, the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) was au- 
thorized by the Congress of the United States to 
serve as the national clearinghouse for statistical 
information on crime. Crime reports are obtained 
from law enforcement agencies throughout the 
Nation based on uniform classifications and pro- 
cedures of reporting. Information regarding crime 
is available to law enforcement in a variety of data 
spheres, e.g., offenses, arrests, prosecutions, con- 
victions, and confinements. In an effort to provide 
as complete a picture of crime in the United States 
as possible, the Committee on Uniform Crime 
Records of the lACP chose to obtain data on 
offenses that became known to police. Greater 
numbers of these data were available than in any 
other category of reportable crime information. 
A meaningful overview of crime was available 
through examination of seven offenses which were 
selected because of their seriousness, frequency 
in occurrence, and likelihood of being reported to 
police. These offenses, known as the Crime Index 
offenses, are murder, forcible rape, robbery, 
aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, and 
motor vehicle theft. To provide for uniformity 
nationwide in the reporting of these offenses, 



standardized definitions were adopted. This stand- 
ardization was necessary to overcome the varia- 
tions in definitions of criminal offenses in the states 
and localities. Reporting agencies are required to 
interpret local criminal acts and law violations 
in the context of these definitions prior to sub- 
mission of their counts to the FBI. The Uniform 
Crime Reporting definitions of these offenses are 
set forth later in this section. Because of the 
differences among the state codes, there is no 
possibility in a Program such as this to distinguish 
between crimes by designations such as "felony" 
or "misdemeanor." 

The Committee on Uniform Crime Records, 
lACP, continues to serve in an advisory capacity 
to the FBI in the operation of this Program. In 
this connection, the lACP plays an active and 
effective part in quality control through surveys 
of police records and crime reporting systems. 
Dr. Peter P. Lejins, Director, Institute of Criminal 
Justice and Criminology, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland, continues as a consultant 
to the FBI in the conduct of this Program. 

The National Sheriffs' Association (NSA) in 
June, 1966, established a Committee on Uniform 
Crime Records to serve in an advisory capacity 
to the NSA membership and the national Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program. This Committee 
actively encourages sheriffs throughout the 
country to fully participate in this important 
Program. 

Committees on Uniform Crime Reporting 
within state law enforcement associations are 
active in promoting interest in the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program, fostering widespread and 
more intelligent use of uniform crime statistics, 
and lending assistance to contributors when the 
need exists. 

In recent years, the FBI has actively assisted 
individual states in the development of statewide 
programs of police statistics compatible '^th the 
national system. These state statistical programs 
provide the advantage of increased coverage of 
law enforcement agencies due to state mandatory 



reporting requirements. The state systems alio 
can provide direct and frequent service to law 
enforcement agencies in assuring completeness 
and quality of information provided by them. 
Through coordination by the state data collection 
agency, information is more readily available for 
the use of the state. The collection and reporting 
machinery for the national Program also is sub- 
stantially streamlined. 

With the development of state Uniform Crime 
Reporting Programs, the FBI ceases collection of 
data directly from individual law enforcement 
agencies within the state. Completed information 
from these agencies is forwarded to the national 
Program through the state Uniform Crime Re- 
porting collection agency. As of July 1, 1975, there 
were 32 states operating Uniform Crime Report- 
ing Programs. These include Arizona, Arkansas, 
California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, 
Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Loui- 
siana, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, 
New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Penns^vlvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, 
Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. 
Several other states are in various stages of 
development. The conditions under which these 
systems are developed provide for consistency and 
comparability in the data submitted to the national 
Program. They also permit regular and timely 
reporting of the national crime data. These condi- 
tions are: 

(1) The state Program must conform to the 
national Uniform Crime Reports standards, defini- 
tions, and information required. This, of course, 
does not prohibit the state from collecting other 
statistical data bcA'ond the national collection. (2) 
The state criminal justice agency must have a 
proven, effective, mandatory, statewide Program 
and have instituted acceptable quality control 
procedures. (3) Coverage within the state by a 
state agency must be, at least, equal to that 
attained by national Uniform Crime Reports. 
(4) The state agencj^ must have adequate field 
staff assigned to conduct audits and to assist local 
units in record practices and crime reporting 
procedures. (5) The state agency must furnish to 
the FBI all of the detailed data regularly collected 
by the FBI in the form of duplicate returns, com- 
puter printouts, and/or magnetic tape. (6) The 
state must have the proven capability (tested 
over a period of time) to supply all the statistical 



data required to the FBI in time to meet national 
Uniform Crime Reports publication deadlines. 
(7) The FBI will continue its internal procedures 
of verifying and reviewing individual agency re- 
ports for both completeness and quality. (8) The 
FBI will continue to have direct contact with 
individual reporting units within the state where 
necessarj^ in connection with crime reporting 
matters, but will coordinate such contacts with 
the state agency. (9) Upon request, the FBI will 
continue its training programs within the state 
with respect to police records and crime reporting 
procedures. For mutual benefit these will be co- 
ordinated with the state agency. (10) Should cir- 
cumstances develop whereby the state agency 
cannot provide the data required by the national 
Program, the FBI will reinstitute a direct collec- 
tion of Uniform Crime Reports from law enforce- 
ment agencies within the state. 

Objectives of Uniform Crime Reporting 

The fundamental objective of the Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program is to produce a reliable 
set of criminal statistics on a national basis for 
use in law enforcement administration, operation, 
and management. This compiled data is also in- 
tended for the use and information of other 
professionals and scholars who have an interest 
in the crime problem. At the same time, this 
information is important as a reference source 
for the public as an indicator of the crime factor 
in our societ3^ 

The means utilized to attain these objectives 
are: 

(1) To measure the extent, fluctuation, dis- 
tribution, and nature of serious crime in the 
United States through presentation of data on 
the seven Crime Index offenses. 

(2) To measure the total volume of serious 
crime known to police. 

(3) To show the activity and coverage of law 
enforcement agencies through arrest counts and 
police employee strength data. 

Reporting Procedure 

In the national Uniform Crime Reporting 
Program, contributing law enforcement agencies 
are wholly responsible for compiling their own 
crime reports and submitting them to the FBI. 
The FBI, in an effort to maintain quality and 
uniformity in the data received, furnishes to the 
contributing agencies, upon their request, training 
in Uniform Crime Reporting procedures. All 



contributors, also, are furnished with the 
Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook which outUncs, 
in detail, procedures for scoring and classifying 
offenses. The Handbook illustrates and dis- 
cusses the monthly and annual reporting forms 
as well as the numerous tally forms made avail- 
able to facilitate the periodic tabulation of desired 
data. 

The publication of the Uniform Crime Re- 
porting "Newsletter," which was initiated in 
October, 1963, has continued with issues pub- 
lished when pertinent. This "Newsletter" is 
utilized to explain revisions in the Program as 
well as to present information and instructional 
material to assist contributors. 

A centralized record system is necessary to the 
sound operation of any law enforcement agency. 
The record s>'stem is an essential basis for crime 
reporting by the agency. The FBI makes available 
vipon request to any law enforcement agency the 
Manual of Police Records, which can serve as a 
guide in the establishment or modification of a 
basic, nonautomated police record sj-stem. Special 
Agents of the FBI are utilized to encoiu'age new 
Uniform Crime Reporting contributors and to 
assist them in the established reporting procedures 
of Uniform Crime Reporting. 

On a monthly basis, law enforcement agencies 
(police, sheriffs, and state police) report the number 
of ofTenses that became known to them during the 
month in the following crime categories: nnwder 
and nonnegligent manslaughter, manslavighter by 
negligence, forcible rape, robbery, assault, bur- 
glary, larcenj'-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
This count is taken from a record of all complaints 
of crime received by the law enforcement agency 
from victims, other sources, and/or discovered 
by officers. Whenever complaints of crime are 
determined through investigation to be imfounded 
or false, they are eliminated from the actual count. 
The number of "actual offenses known" in these 
crime categories is reported to the FBI whether or 
not anyone is arrested for the crime; the stolen 
property is recovered; prosecution is undertaken; 
or any other restrictive consideration is in effect. 
Law enforcement agencies, on a monthly basis, 
report the total number of these reported crimes 
which they clear either by arrest or exceptional 
means. A separate count of crimes cleared which 
involve only persons under the age of IS is shown. 
The number of law enforcement officers killed 
and assaulted and the value of property stolen and 
recovered during the month are also reported. 



Arrests are reported monthlj^ for all criminal 
acts, except traffic violations, by crime categorv 
and include the age, sex, and race of each person 
arrested. A report is also submitted on an annual 
basis concerning the number of persons formally 
charged by crime classification and the disposition 
of such charges. 

In January, 1972, a monthly collection in the 
national Program was instituted concerning the 
number of law enforcement officers assaulted by 
type of duty assignment. Additional information 
is collected relative to the type of weapon used, the 
circumstances of the assault, and whether the 
victim officer sustained injurj-. 

Law enforcement employee data specifically 
encompass the number of full-time sworn officers 
and other personnel. This infornuition is collected 
as of October 31 of each calendar year. 

State Uniform Crime Reporting Programs are 
encouraged to maintain the same method and 
scope of data for a reasonable period before 
expanding their efforts. 

Reporting Area 

During calendar year 1974, crime reports were 
received from law enforcement agencies repre- 
senting 97 percent of the United States population 
living in the standard metropolitan statistical 
areas, 91 percent of the population in other cities, 
and 81 percent of the rural population. The com- 
bined coverage accounts for 94 percent of the total 
national popvdation. 

Presentation of crime data by areas, as used 
in this publication, follows as closely as practical 
the definitions used by the Office of Management 
and Budget and the Bureau of the Census for 
standard metropolitan statistical areas and other 
cities. There is, however, some deviation insofar 
as the rural area is concerned. For crime reporting 
purposes rural is generally the unincorporated 
portion of a county outside of standard metro- 
politan statistical areas. In addition, statistics 
are presented in certain tables relative to 
"suburban" areas. A suburban area consists of 
cities with population less than 50,000 together 
with counties which are within a standard metro- 
poUtan statistical area. In this use of suburban, 
the major core city is, of course, excluded. The 
suburban area concept is used because of the 
particular crime conditions which exist in these 
commimities surrounding the major core cities. 

A standard metropolitan statistical area is 
generally made up of a core city with a population 



of 50,000 or more inhabitants and the surrounding; 
county or counties which share certain metropol- 
itan characteristics. In New Enghind, "town" 
instead of "county" is used to describe stanchvrd 
nietropoHtan statistical areas. These towns do 
not coincide generally with established reporting 
units; therefore, metropolitan state economic 
areas in New England are used in these areas' 
tabulations since they encompass an entire county 
or counties. Standard metropolitan statistical 
areas, as used in this publication, make up approxi- 
mately 73 percent of the total United vStates 
population. 

"Other cities" are urban places outside standard 
metropolitan statistical areas. Most of these 
places are incorporated and comprise 11 percent 
of the 1974 population. Rural areas are made up 
of the unincorporated portions of counties outside 
of urban places and standard metropolitan 
statistical areas and represent 16 percent of 
oiu' national population. Throughout this Program, 
sheriffs, county police, and many state police 
report on crimes committed within the limits of 
the counties but outside cities while local police 
report on crime committed within the city limits 
(urban places). 

Verification Procedures 

Uniformity of crime data collected under this 
Program is of primary concern to the FBI as 
the national clearinghouse. With the receipt of 
reports covering over 11,000 jurisdictions, the 
problems of attaining uniformity are readily 
apparent. Issuance of instructions does not com- 
plete the role of the FBI. On the contrary, it is 
standard operating procedure to examine each 
incoming report not only for arithmetical accuracy 
but also, and possibly of even more importance, 
for reasonableness as a possible indication of 
error. 

Variations in the level and ratios among the 
crime classes established by previous rei)orts of 
each agency are used as a measure of possible or 
probable incompleteness or changes in reporting 
procedures. Necessary arithmetic adjustments or 
unusual variations are brought to the attention of 
the submitting agency by correspondence. During 
1974, communications were addressed to con- 
tributors primarily as a result of editing and 
evaluation ])rocesses. Correspondence with con- 
tributors and state Uniform Crime Reporting 
Programs is the principal tool for supervision of 
quality. Not only are individual reports studied, 



but also periodic trends for individual reporting 
units are prejjared. Crime rates for all units are 
grouped for general com])arability to assist in 
detecting variations and fluctuations po.ssibly due 
to some reason other than chance. For the most 
part, the problem is one of keeping the contribu- 
tors aware of the type of information necessary 
for the success of this Program. 

The effort to eliminate du|)lication in crime 
rejjorting by the various agencies is given constant 
attention. In addition to detailed instructions as 
to the limits of reporting jurisdictions between 
sheriffs and police in urban places, lists of urban 
places by comity are furnished to sheriffs, county 
police, and in some instances state iiolice organi- 
zations upon request. 

The FBI schedules Uniform Crime Reporting 
seminars and workshops throughout the country 
for law enforcement personnel. Contacts by Spe- 
cial Agents of the FBI are utilized to enlist the 
cooperation of new contributors and to explain 
the purpose of this Program and the methods of 
assembling information for reporting. When cor- 
respondence, including specially designed ques- 
tionnaires, does not elicit a response. Special 
Agents may be directed to visit the contributor to 
satisfactorily resolve the misunderstanding. 

Variations from the desired reporting standard 
which cannot be resolved by the steps indicated 
above are brought to the attention of the Com- 
mittee on Uniform Crime Records of the lACP. 
The Committee may designate a representative to 
make a personal visit to the agency to coopera- 
tively assist in a needed revision of records and 
reporting methods. 

Regardless of the extent of the statistical veri- 
fication processes used by the FBI, the accuracy 
of the data assembled under this Program depends 
upon the sincere effort exerted by each contributor 
to meet the necessary standards of reporting. 
For this reason, the FBI is not in a position to 
vouch for the validity of individual agency reports. 

The Crime Totals 

Communities not represented by crime reports 
are relatively few. An examination of the tables 
found in this document show 1974 crime totals 
for the Index classifications and the extent of 
coverage of the data for a particular table. The 
FBI conducts a continuing Program to further 
reduce the unreported areas. The continuing 
development and implementation of mandatory 



state Uniform Crime Reporting Programs will 
virtually eliminate unreported areas. 

Within each of the three areas — standard 
metropolitan statistical, other urban, and rural — it 
is assumed that the unrei)orted portion had the 
same proportionate crime experience as that for 
which reports were received. Estimates for un- 
rei)ortcd areas are based on the reported crime 
e.\])erience of similar areas. Certain refinements 
are made in this basic estimating procedure as 
the need arises. 

Crime Trends 

Crime data for trends are homogeneous to the 
extent that figures from similar re])orting units, 
on the basis of population, are used for each of 
tile periods tabulated. In all trend tabulations, 
only those reporting units are used whicii have 
provided comparable data for the period under 
consideration. National, geographic, and area 
trends are always established on the basis of two 
consecutive years. Exclusions horn trend computa- 
tions are made when figures from a rei)orting unit 
are obviously inaccurate for any period or when 
it is ascertained that unusual fluctuations are dvic 
to such variables as improved recortls procedures. 

As a matter of standard procedure, crime trends 
for individual places are analyzed five times a year 
by the FBI. Any significant increase or decrease 
is nuide the subject of a special inciuiry with the 
contributing agency. In 1974, for example, approx- 
imately H,000 letters were sent to police adminis- 
trators of contributing agencies inquiring as to the 
reason for significant increases or decreases in 
pertinent crime classifications. The comnumication 
containing this incjuiry specifically directs atten- 
tion to possible changes in records or reporting 
procedures. When it is found that crime reporting 
procedures are in part responsible for the difference 
in the level of crime, the figures for specific crime 
categories or totals are excluded from the trend 
tabulations. Year-to-year trends in Uniform Crime 
Reports are valid and may be used to reasonably 
establish long-term trends as well as to reestimate 
crime volume and reconstruct crime trends for 
prior j-ears. It can be assumed, logically, that the 
current year is the most complete in terms of 
volume. Trend or percent change as established 
by comparable units for each two-year period is 
then applied as the basis for reestimating the 
volume of crime for prior years. 

On the other hand, crime rate tables by state and 
standard metropolitan statistical area contain the 



most reliable reports available for the current 
year, and care should be exercised in any direct 
comparisons with prior issues. Changes in crime 
level may have been due in part to improved 
reporting or records pr()c(>dures rather than to 
chance. 

Population Data 

In computing crime rates by state, geographic 
division, standard metropolitan statistical area, 
and the Nation as a whole, population estimates 
released by the Bureau of the Census on July 1, 
1974, were used. Population estimates for indi- 
vidvuil cities and counties were prepared using 
special census reports, state sources and estimates, 
commercial sources, and extrapolation where no 
other estimate was available. Complete 1974 popu- 
lation estimates for individual cities and counties 
were used from 17 states while official sources in 
other states provided limited data which was used 
.selectively. The estimated United States popula- 
tion increase in 1974 was 1 percent over 197.3 
according to the figures published by the Bureau 
of the Census 

Recent Developments in Uniform Crime Reporting 

Since 1958, "larceny $50 and over in value" has 
been a Crime Index offense. The problem of dollar 
valuation of larceny has been the subject of dis- 
cussion in the Committee on Uniform Crime 
Records meetings since 1963. During recent years, 
the Committee has considered modification in the 
definition of this offense due to problems of evalua- 
tion of stolen property and inflation factors in 
the $50 value which is basic to the definition of this 
offense. The Committee and the FBI have had 
mutual concern in this matter and have jointlj' 
discussed a variety of possible solutions including 
increasing the dollar valuation from $50 to some 
higher dollar value. This suggestion was seen as 
only a temporarj- solution to the problem. In the 
latter part of 1972 consideration by the FBI, the 
Committee, the operating state programs, and 
several large city poUce departments resulted in 
the adoption of "total larceny-theft" as a replace- 
ment for the Crime Index offense of "larcenj* $50 
and over in value." This new classification includes 
the total number of larceny-theft offenses known 
to police without regard to value. The Index 
offense of "total larceny-theft" was instituted as 
of January, 1973. Information appearing in Table 
2 reflects appropriate adjustments in estimated 
Crime Index data, 1960-1974. 



The lACP Committeo on Uniform Crime 
Records adopted certain changes in the Program 
which were instituted in January, 1974. Due to 
law enforcement's concern over the robbery 
problem, an expansion of the sub-breakdowns of 
robbery incidents was adopted. Prior to 1974, 
robbery was viewed as either armed or strong- 
armed. The breakdowns for 1974 information were 
firearm, knife or cutting instrument, other dan- 
gerous weapons, and strong-arm. The collection 
of the data in this fashion will enhance the speci- 
ficity of type of weapon used in this crime. 

The category of auto theft was renamed motor 
vehicle theft in 1974. To more fully present this 
problem, law enforcement has been asked to 
provide the type of vehicle stolen in three cate- 
gories: autos, trucks and buses, and other vehicles. 

In the past, the collection of Value of Property 
Stolen data was limited to the offenses of Robbery, 
Larceny-theft, Burglary, and Motor Vehicle 
Theft. In January, 1974, the Program expanded 
this collection for the offenses of Homicide and 
Forcible Rape. The collection of this additional 
information projects a more accurate and well- 
rounded picture of the monetary loss suffered by 
the victims of crimes in the United States in 
relation to the Index offenses. 

Also instituted in January, 1974, was a revised 
collection of supplementary data for the offense 
of Larceny-theft. Previously, this was broken 
down into increments of monetary values of under 
$5, $5 to $50, and over $50. The present system 
collects the data in monetary values of under $50, 
$50 to $200, and over $200. 

The Committee, in its February, 1974, meeting, 
adopted a revised collection format for Stolen 
Property by Type and Value. The breakdown 
format for the 1975 collection is: (A) Currency, 
Notes, Etc.; (B) Jewelr}^ and Precious Metals; 
(C) Clothing and Furs; (D) Locally Stolen Motor 
Vehicles; (E) Office Equipment; (F) Televisions, 
Radios, Cameras, Etc.; (G) Firearms; (H) House- 
hold Goods; (I) Consumable Goods; (J) Live- 
stock; (K) Miscellaneous. The changes took effect 
January 1, 1975. 

The first national State Uniform Crime Re- 
porting Program Conference was held on June 2.3- 
26, 1975, at the FBI Academy at Quantico, 
Virginia. Invited to the Conference were repre- 
sentatives from all State Uniform Crime Report- 
ing Programs, as well as the Committee on Uni- 
form Crime Records of the lACP and the Uniform 



Crime Reporting Committee of the National 
Sheriffs' Association. Regional Directors of the 
Law Enforcement Assistance Administration 
and representatives of lACP Headquarters were 
in attendance. 

General assembly and workshop sessions high- 
lighted the need for cooperative efforts on the part 
of all those concerned with the crime problem in 
the United States. Numerous ideas and proposals 
were exchanged to better enhance and improve 
the Uniform Crime Reporting Program. 

Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting 

Offenses in Uniform Crime Re])orting are 
divided into two groupings designated as Part I 
and Port II offenses. Crime Index offenses are 
included among the Part I offenses. Offense and 
arrest information is reported for the Part I 
offenses on a monthly basis, whereas only arrest 
information is reported for Part 11 offenses. 

The Part I offenses are as follows: 

1. Criminal homicide. — (a) Murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter: All willful felonious 
homicides as distinguished from deaths caused 
by negligence. Excludes attempts to kill, assaults 
to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, or justifiable 
homicides. Justifiable homicides are limited to: 
(1) The killing of a ])erson by a law enforcement 
officer in line of duty; and (2) The killing of a 
person in the act of committing a felony by a 
private citizen, (b) Manslaughter by negligence: 
Any death which the police investigation estab- 
lished was primarily attributable to gross negli- 
gence of some individual other than the victim. 

2. Forcible rape. — The carnal knowledge of a 
female, forciblj' and against her will in the cate- 
gories of rape by force, assault to rape, and 
attem])ted rape. Excludes statutory offenses (no 
force used — victim under age of consent). 

3. Robbery. — Stealing or taking anything of 
value from the care, custody, or control of a person 
by force or by violence or by putting in fear, such 
as strong-arm robbery, stickups, armed robbery, 
assaults to rob, and attempts to rob. 

4. Aggravated assault. — Assault with intent to 
kill or for the purpose of inflicting severe bodily 
injury by shooting, cutting, stabbing, maiming, 
poisoning, scalding, or by the use of acids, ex- 
plosives, or other means. Excludes simple assaults. 

5. Burglary — breaking or entering. — Burglary, 
housebreaking, safecracking, or any breaking or 
unlawful entry of a structure with the intent to 



commit a felony or a theft. Includes attempted 
forcible entry. 

6. Larceny-theFt (except motor vehicle theft). — 
The vinlawfid taking, carrying, leading, or riding 
away of property from the possession or construc- 
tive i)ossession of another. Thefts of bicycles, 
automobile accessories, shoplifting, pocket-picking, 
or any stealing of property or article which is 
not taken by force and violence or by fraud. 
Excludes embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, 
worthless checks, etc. 

7. Motor vehicle theft. — Unlawful taking or 
stealing or attem])teil theft of a motor vehicle. A 
motor vehicle is a self-propelled vehicle that 
travels on the surface but not on rails. Specifically 
excluded from this category are motor boats, 
construction equipment, airplanes, and farming 
ecpiipment. 

The Part II oiTenses are: 

8. Other assaults (simple). — Assaults which are 
not of an aggravated nature. 

9. Arson. — Willful or malicious burning with or 
without intent to defraud. Includes attempts. 

10. Forgery and counterfeiting. — Making, alter- 
ing, uttering or possessing with intent to defraud, 
anything false which is made to appear true. 
Includes attempts. 

11. Fraud. — Fraudulent conversion and obtain- 
ing money or property by false pretenses. Includes 
bad checks except forgeries and counterfeiting. 
Also includes larceny by bailee. 

12. Embezilement. — Misappropriation or mis- 
application of money or property entrusted to 
one's care, custodj', or control. 

13. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. — 
Buj'ing, receiving, and possessing stolen prop- 
erty and attempts. 

14. Vandalism. — Willful or malicious destruc- 
tion, injury, disfigurement, or defacement of 
property without consent of the owner or person 
having custody or control. 

15. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. — All vio- 
lations of regulations or statutes controlling the 



carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manu 
facturing of deadly weapons or silencers. Includes 
attempts. 

16. Prostitution and commercialized vice. — Sex 
offenses of a commercialized nature and attempts, 
such as prostitution, keeping a bawdy house, 
procuring or transporting women for immoral 
purposes. 

17. Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitu- 
tion, and commercialized vice). — Statutory rape, 
offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, 
and the like. Includes attempts. 

18. Narcotic drug laws. — Offenses relating to 
narcotic drugs, such as unlawful possession, sale, 
use, growing, manufacturing, and making of 
narcotic drugs. 

19- Gambling. — Promoting, permitting, or en- 
gaging in gambling. 

20. Offenses against the family and children. — 
Nonsupport, neglect, desertion, or abuse of family 
and children. 

21. Driving under the influence. — Driving or 
operating any motor vehicle or common carrier 
while drunk or under the influence of liquor or 
narcotics. 

22. Liquor laws. — State or local liquor law 
violations, except "drunkenness" (class 2.3) and 
"driving under the influence" (class 21). Excludes 
Federal violations. 

2.3. Drunkenness. — Drunkenness or intoxication. 

24. Disorderly conduct. — Breach of the peace. 

25. Vagrancy. — Vagabondage, begging, loiter 
ing, etc. 

26. All other offenses. — All violations of state 
or local laws, except classes 1-25 and traffic. 

27. Suspicion. — Arrests for no specific offense 
and released without formal charges being placed. 

28. Curfew and loitering laws (juveniles). — Offenses 
relating to violation of local curfew or loitering 
ordinances where such laws exist. 

29. Runaway (juveniles). — Limited to juveniles 
taken into protective custody under provisions of 
local statutes as runaways. 



594-259 O - 75 - 2 




Ah a Ham iEuforrpmf nt (3Uutr, «.y funJamentaf Jui^ h to 

5erve ntanhina; to safeauani lives ana properlu; lo protect the innocent againjt 
aeceptiony the wean aqainst oppression or intimidation^ ana tne peaieful 
against violence or disorder; ana to reSpecl tne {constitutional rights of alt 
men to lioertuy eaualitu ana Justice. 



iatn coura- 



jI UJlii keep mu private life unsullied aS an example to all; mainta 
geous calm in tne face of danger, ^corn, or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and 
be constantlu mindful of tne welfare of others, ^^r^onest in tnougnt and deed 
in ootn mu personal and officiaitifef ^ will be exentpiaru in obeuing the laws 
of the land and the regulations of mu department. UL^hatever ^ see or hear of 
a confidential nature or that is confided to me in mu official capacilg wilt be 
hcpt ever secret unless revelation is neceSSaru in the performance of mu dutu. 

II mill never act officiouSlg or permit personal feelingSj prejudices, animos- 
ities or friendships to influence mu decisions. I'Uith no compromise for crime 
and with relentless prosecution of criminals, .^ will enforce the law courteouslg 
and appropriatelu without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never emploging 
unnecessary force or violence and never accepting gratuities. 

I rPrOgntZP iL LJ^e of m^ offue as a i^mLt of puUic failk, anJ 
■^ accept il as a puotic trust to oe /tela so long as jf am true to the ethics of 
tne police seruice. ^ will constantlu strive to acnieue tnese objectiues and ideals, 
dedicating mif self before \-foct to my cnosen profession . . . law enforcement. 



CRIME CLOCKS 



1974 




SERIOUS CRIMES 

19 EACH MINUTE 




VIOLENT CRIMES 

MURDER, FORCIBLE RAPE. 
ROBBERY OR ASSAULT TO KILL 

ONE EVERY 33 SECONDS 




MURDER 

ONE EVERY 26 MINUTES 






FORCIBLE RAPE 

ONE EVERY IQ MINUTES 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

ONE EVERY 70 SECONDS 



ROBBERY 

ONE EVERY 71 SECONDS 






BURGLARY 

ONE EVERY IQ SECONDS 



LARCENY-THEFT 

ONE EVERY ^ SECONDS 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

ONE EVERY 32 SECONDS 



CHART 1 



Section 2 
Crime and Offender 



CRIME INDEX TOTALS 

The offenses of nuirder, forcible rape, robbery, 
aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, and 
motor vehicle theft are used to establish an Index 
in the Uniform Crime Reporting Program, to 
measure the trend and distribution of crime in the 
United States. These crimes are counted by law 
enforcement agencies as they become known and 
are reported on a monthly basis. The Crime Index 
offenses were selected as a measuring device be- 
cause, as a group, they represent the most common 
local crime problem. They are all serious crimes, 
either by their very nature or due to the volume 
in which they occur. The offenses of murder, 
forcible rape, aggravated assault, and robbery 
make up the violent crime category. The offenses 
of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft 
make up the propertj^ crime category. 

Law enforcement does not purport to know the 
total volume of crime, because of the many 
criminal actions which are not reported to official 
sources. Estimates as to the level of unreported 
crime can be developed through costly victim 
surveys, but this does not eliminate the reluctance 
of the victim to report all criminal actions to law 
enforcement agencies. In light of this situation, 
the best source for obtaining usable crime counts 
is the next logical universe, which is the offenses 
known to the police. The crimes used in the Crime 
Index are those considered to be most consistently 
reported and provide the capability to compute 
meaningful crime trends and crime rates. 

The crime counts used in the Crime Index and 
set forth in this publication are based on actual 
offenses established bj' police investigation. When 
the law enforcement agency receives a complaint 
of a criminal matter and the follow-up investiga- 
tion discloses no crime occurred it is "unfounded." 
On a national average, police investigations "un- 
found" 4 percent of the complaints concerning 
Crime Index offenses ranging from 2 percent in the 
larceny classification to 15 percent in the forcible 
rape classification. These unfounded complaints 
are eliminated from the crime counts. 

During calendar year 1974, an estimated 
10,192,000 Crime Index offenses were reported to 



law enforcement agencies. There is an 18 percent 
increase in estimated volume of Index offenses, 
1974 over 197.3. The violent crime category made 
up 10 percent of the Crime Index total and in- 
creased 11 percent in volume over 1973. Murder 
increased 6 percent, forcible rape 8 percent, and 
aggravated assault 8 percent. Robbery increased 
15 percent. The voluminous property crimes as a 
group increased 18 percent. Larceny-theft in- 
creased 21 percent, burglary was up 18 percent, 
and motor vehicle theft was up 5 percent. 

Since 1969, the violent crimes as a group have 
increased 47 percent and the property crimes 37 
percent. Crime, as measured by the Crime Index 
offenses, has risen 38 percent in volume during 
this five-year period. 

The estimated 1974 crime figures for the United 
States are set forth in the following table titled, 
"National Crime, Rate, and Percent Change." 

A study of the volume of crime, as measured by 
the Crime Index, reveals the large core cities 
having population in excess of 250,000 recorded a 
12 percent increase while the suburban and rural 
areas of the United States each registered a 20 
percent increase. The cities over 1,000,000 popu- 
lation reported an increase of 10 percent from the 
])revious year. 

Regionally, in 1974, the Northeastern States 
reported a 16 percent increase in crime, the 
North Central States an 18 percent increase, the 
Southern States a 21 percent increase, and the 
Western States an increase of 14 percent. 

Crime rates relate the incidence of reported 
crime to i)opulation. A crime rate should be 
considered a victim risk rate. Crime rates used are 
based on Crime Index offenses. 

The Crime Index rate of the United States in 
1974 was 4,821 per 100,000 inhabitants. This was a 
17 percent increase from the crime rate of 4,130 
per 100,000 inhabitants in 1973. The national 
crime rate, or the risk of being a victim of one of 
these crimes, has increased 32 percent since 1969. 
Many factors influence the nature and extent of 
crime in a particular community. A number of 
these factors are shown on page v of this pub- 
lication. A crime rate takes into consideration 



10 





National Crime, Rate, and Percent Change 










Estimated crime 1974 


Percent change over 1973 


Percent change over 1969 


Percent change over 1960 


Crime index offenses 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 

inhabitants 


Number 


Rate 


Number 


Rate 


Number 


Rate 




10, 192, 000 


4,821.4 


+17.6 


+ 16.7 


+38.3 


+31.8 


+203.0 








Violent 


969,820 
9, 222, 200 


458.8 
4,362.6 


+ 11.3 
+ 18.3 


+ 10.5 
+17.5 


+47.3 
+37.5 


+40.3 
+31.0 


+238.0 
+ 199.7 


+186. 8 












20,600 
55,210 
441, 290 
452, 720 
3. 020, 700 
5,227,700 
973,800 


9.7 
26.1 
208.8 
214.2 
1,429.0 
2,473.0 
460.6 


+5.5 

+7.8 
+ 15.1 

+8.5 
+18.5 
+21.0 

+5.2 


+4.3 

+7.0 
+14.3 

+7.7 
+ 17.6 
+20.2 

+4.4 


+40.3 
+49.0 
+48.0 
+46.6 
+53.3 
+35.3 
+11.2 


+32.9 
+41.8 
+41.1 
+39.7 
+46.1 
+28.9 
+5.9 


+127.4 
+222. 4 
+310. 2 
+ 195.6 
+233.2 
+ 183.6 
+ 197.7 


+90.2 












+ 150.8 












+152 5 







only the numerical factor of population and does 
not incorporate any of the other elements which 
contribute to the amount of crime in a given area. 
Tables disclose that the varying crime experiences, 
especially in large cities and suburban com- 
munities, are affected by a complex set of involved 
factors and are not solely related to numerical 
population differences. 

Crime Rafe by Region, 1974 

[Rate per 100,000 inhabitants] 



Crime index offenses 



Total 

Violent 

Property 

Murder 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 



North- 
eastern 
States 



7.4 
20.7 
278.4 
189.1 
1,305.2 
1, 975. 5 
601.2 



North 
Central 

States 



409.5 
4, 252. 1 



24.2 
201.9 
174. 9 
1,267.2 
2,560.3 
424.5 



447.0 
3,906.7 



13.3 

26.1 
168.6 
239.0 
1,380.9 
2, 190. 6 
335.2 



507.2 
5, 993. 9 



8.3 
36.3 

199. 4 

263.2 

1,929.9 

3, 507. 7 

5.56.2 



Crime Rate by Area, 1974 

(Rate per 100,000 inhabilanls] 





.\rea 


Crime index offenses 


Total 
U.S. 


Metro- 
politan 
areas 


Rural 


Other 

cities 


Total 


4.821.4 


5,621.6 


1, 746. 5 


4, 027. 2 




458.8 
4.362.6 


558.4 
5,063.2 


151.2 
1,595.3 






3,777.9 






9.7 
26.1 
208.8 
214.2 
1, 429. 
2,473.0 
460.6 


10.8 
31.2 
273.7 
242.6 
1,652.6 
2, 830. 9 
579.6 


7.6 
11.6 
20.4 
111.5 
693.2 
808.3 
93. S 




Forcible rape 


13.4 










Larceny-theft 


2,543.5 







The tables set forth on this page reveal the 
variations in crime experienced by metropolitan 
areas, rural areas, and other cities. 

The crime rates set forth in the National Crime 
Rate and Percent Change table for each of the 
Crime Index offenses show a variation from a 20 
percent increase in larceny-theft to a 4 percent 
increase in murder. The number of crimes per 
unit of population is highest in the large metro- 
politan centers. 

The accompanying charts illustrate the trend 
of crime in the United States from 1969 through 
1974 by showing percent changes in volume and 
crime rate together with the population increase. 
Separate charts provide similar information rela- 
tive to crimes of violence and crimes against prop- 
erty. Since 1969, the violent crime rate has in- 
creased 40 percent and the property crime rate 
increased 31 percent. The violent crime group 
includes murder, forcible rape, robbery, and ag- 
gravated assault offenses. The property crime 
category is made up of burglary, larceny-theft, 
and motor vehicle theft offenses. 

MURDER AND NONNEGLIGENT 
MANSLAUGHTER 

This Crime Index offense is defined in Uniform 
Crime Reporting as the willful killing of another. 
The classification in this offense, as in all of the 
other Crime Index offenses, is based solely on 
police investigation as opposed to the determina- 
tion of a court, medical examiner, coroner, jury, 
or other judicial body. 

Deaths caused by negligence, suicide, accident, 
or justifiable homicide are not included in the 
count for this offense classification. Attempts to 
murder or assaults to murder are scored as ag- 
gravated assaults and not as murder. 



11 



CRIME AND POPULATION 



1969 - 1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 



CRIME = CRIME INDEX OFFENSES 

CRIME RATE = NUMBER OF OFFENSES PER 100.000 INHABITANTS 



+ 60 
+ 50 
+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 































/ 










X'' 






*^^^^^^^«^ 


^^^^^^ ^ 


* 


.fffff^. 






' 






) CRIME 

l ^ UP 38% 



I 



CRIME RATE 
UP 32% 



POPULATION 
UP 5% 



1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 2 



12 



CRIMES OF VIOLENCE 



+ 50 
+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



1969-1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

LIMITED TO MURDER. FORCIBLE RAPE, ROBBERY AND AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 






VIOLENT CRIME 
UP 47% 



RATE 
UP 40% 



1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 3 



13 



CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

1969-1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 



LIMITED TO BURGLARY, LARCENY-THEFT AND MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 




1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



14 



CHART A 



Volume 

In 1974 there were an estimated 20,600 murders 
committed in the United States. This represents 
a numerical increase of 1,070 over the 19,530 
estimated homicide offenses for 1973. The num- 
ber of murders in 1974 is approximate!}' 2 percent 
of the total for violent crime and less than one-half 
of one percent of the total of the seven Crime Inde.x 
offenses. 

An analysis of murder by month in 1974 shows 
that December had the greatest freciuency of mur- 
der as compared to any other month of the year. 

A geographical breakdown of murder by region 
showed 43 percent of the murders occurred in the 
Southern States, 24 percent in the North Central 
States, 18 percent in the Northeastern States, 
and 15 percent in the Western States. 

Trend 

The number of murders increased 6 percent in 
1974 over 1973. The trend in this crime classifica- 
tion reveals an increase from 14,680 in 1969 to 
20,600 in 1974. This is an increase of 40 percent. 

Regionally, the number of murder offenses in 
1974 increased 12 percent in the North Central 
States, 8 percent in the Western States, and 5 
percent in the Southern States. The number of 
murders decreased approximate!}' 3 percent in 
the Northeastern States. 

An analysis, by population grouping, of murder 
shows that large core cities of 250,000 or more 
inhabitants had a 3 percent increase in the number 
of murders in 1974, the suburban areas experienced 
a 14 percent increase in murder offenses, and the 
rural areas liad a 1 percent increase. 

Murder Rate 

In 1974, there were 9.7 victims of murder for 
every 100,000 inhabitants in the Nation. This was 
an increase of 4 i)ercent over the murder rate of 
9.3 per 100,000 inhabitants recorded in 1973. 

By population grouping, the metropolitan areas 
reported a murder rate of 11 victims per 100,000 
inhabitants, the rural areas a rate of 8 per 100,000 
inhabitants, and cities outside metropolitan areas 
reported a murder rate of 6 per 100,000 
inhabitants. 

The number of murder victims in proportion to 
population was highest in the Southern States 
with 13.3 murders per 100,000 inhabitants. This is 
an increase of 3 percent over the murder rate of 
that Region in 1973. In 1974, the North Central 



States showed a murder rate of 8.5, an increase of 
12 percent over the rate in 1973 for that Region. 
The Western States had a rate of 8.3, which was a 
6 percent increase over the 1973 rate for those 
states. The Northeastern States had a rate of 
7.4, a decrease of 3 percent in comparison to the 
1973 rate. 

Nature of Murder 

The law enforcement agencies which participate 
in Uniform Crime Reporting cooperate in provid- 
ing additional information regarding homicide 
so that a more indei)th analysis of this offense 
can be made. Tlirough a supplemental reporting 
system; information is provided regarding the 
age, sex, and race of the victim; the weapon used 
in the murder; and the circumstances surrounding 
the offense. 

The victims of murder in 1974 were male in ap- 
proximately three out of four instances. This 
ratio of male to female victims is similar to the 
experience in the last several years. Approxi- 
mately 48 out of 100 murder victims were wliite, 
50 were Negro, and 2 percent other races. The 
largest number of murders occurring in any ten 
year age bracket was in the 20 to 29 group with 
three of every ten murder victims. 

In 1974, firearms again predominated as the 
weapon most often used in homicide in the nation. 
The accompanying chart illustrates a breakdown 
by type of weapon used in the commission of 
murder in the nation. Firearms were used more 
freciuently in the ^Southern States than in any 
other region with firearms used in more than 
seven of every ten murders. Nationwide, 68 per- 
cent of the homicides were committed through the 
use of firearms and 54 percent were committed 
with handguns. In 1973, 53 percent of the murders 
were through tlie use of handguns. 

Cutting or stabbing weapons were used in 18 
percent of the murders in the nation. The North- 
eastern States reported the greatest use of knives 
or cutting instruments with tliree out of every ten 
murders being committed with this type of 
weapon. The North Central and Southern States 
had the least incidence of use of this type of 
weapon with less than two out of every ten mur- 
ders. Other weapons (blunt objects, poisons, 
explosives, arson, drowning, etc.) were used in 7 
percent of the homicides and the remaining 8 
percent of the murders were the result of use of 
personal weapons such as hands, fists, feet, etc. 



15 



+ 50 
+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



MURDER 

1969-1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 40 PERCENT 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 33 PERCENT 



5^3 



1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 5 



16 



HANDGUN 

RIFLE 

SHOTGUN 

CUniNG OR STABBING 
OTHER WEAPON 

(CLUB. POISON, etc ) 

PERSONAL WEAPON 

(HANDS, FISTS, FEET.etc ) 



MURDER 

BY TYPE OF WEAPON USED 

1974 



■■"" — : ^-r-.'-'-'.'.'-'A'.' 


5% 




9% 










18% 






7% 








M..m.,^% 





54% 



JE TO ROUNDING, DOES NOT ADD TO 100'? 



CHART 6 



Age, Sex, and Rate of Murder Victims, 1974 



Age 


Number 


Percent 


Sex 






Race 








Male 


Female 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Japanese 


All others 


Total 


18,632 




14,289 
76.7 


4,343 
23.3 


9,034 
48.5 


9,266 
49.7 


113 
.6 


49 
.3 


12 
.1 


158 




100.0 


.8 










155 

287 

140 

234 

1,716 

2,932 

2,749 

2,155 

1,740 

1,453 

1.249 

1,129 

725 

624 

393 

270 

388 

293 


.8 
1.5 
.8 
1.3 
9.2 
15.7 
14.8 
11.6 
9.3 
7.8 
6.7 
6.1 
3.9 
3.3 
2.1 
1.4 
2.1 
1.6 


80 

160 

73 

142 

1,268 

2,273 

2,173 

1,696 

1,357 

1,162 

1,020 

913 

579 

492 

279 

176 

225 

221 


75 
127 

67 

92 
448 
659 
576 
459 
383 
291 
229 
216 
146 
132 
114 

94 
163 

72 


94 
167 
82 
139 
814 
1,338 
1,214 
941 
775 
671 
613 
565 
404 
361 
255 
174 
291 
136 


56 
117 
58 
88 
864 
1,549 
1,476 
1,172 
933 
762 
620 
552 
315 
251 
135 
88 
93 
137 


1 
1 






4 


1-4 






2 










10-14 


2 
10 
17 
26 
18 
12 
8 
6 
3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 






5 


15-19- 


6 

7 
6 
5 
6 
2 
6 
2 
2 

2 

1 
2 


3 
3 
3 


19 


20-24 


18 


25-29. 


24 


30-34 


19 


35-39 




14 


40-44. . . 


2 

1 


8 


45-49 


3 


50-54 


7 


55-59 




1 






8 


65-69 






70-74 




6 












20 













17 









Murder Victims 


-Wcopc 


ns Usee/, 


1974 














Number 








Weapons 












AgD 


Ouii 


Cutting 

or 
stabbing 


Blunt 
object 
(club, 
hammer, 
etc.) 


Personal 
weapons 
(hands. 

fists, 

feet, 

etc.) 


Poison 


Explo- 
sives 


Arson 


Nar- 
cotics 


Stran- 
gula- 
tion 


As- 
phyxia- 
tion 


Un- 
known 
weap- 

wcap- 
on not 
stated 




18,632 


12, 474 


3,228 


976 


993 


9 


9 


153 


36 


424 


71 










155 
287 
140 
234 
1,716 
2,932 

2,749 
2,155 
1,740 
1,453 
1,249 
1,129 

725 
624 
393 
270 
388 
293 


3 
43 

50 

127 

1,175 

2,111 

2,066 
1,596 
1,262 
1,005 
836 
734 

443 
380 
214 
136 
109 
184 


5 
19 
18 
43 
320 
536 

434 

364 
298 
267 
230 
207 

144 
113 
67 
50 
67 
46 


14 
31 

11 
13 

60 

99 

86 
78 
83 
64 
78 
90 

56 
55 
41 
30 
73 
14 


73 
131 
15 
13 

60 
71 

72 
50 
53 
75 
59 
51 

47 
47 
38 
35 
84 
19 






4 
18 
16 
10 

8 
8 

13 
13 
11 

8 
9 
12 

4 
2 
5 
1 
11 




12 
24 
19 
14 

47 
62 

45 
31 

19 
14 
20 
22 

14 
13 
18 
12 
30 
8 


6 
9 
7 
9 
6 
5 

5 
3 

5 
3 

1 
1 
4 

5 




n 










5-9 


1 








10-14 






15-19 


1 




10 
11 




20-24 






25-29 


1 
1 






30-34 




16 


35-39 


3 

1 
2 

1 
1 


12 


40-44 


1 




45-19 


13 


50-54 








55-59 


1 






60-&4 




12 


65-69 






70-74 








6 








1 


8 






1 


19 











Murder, Type of Weaport Used, 1974 

[Percent distribution] 



Region 


Total 

all 

weapons 

used 


Fire- 


Knife 
or other 
cutting 
instru- 

28.0 
14.8 
13.2 
20.3 


Other 

weapon; 

club, 

poison, 

etc. 


Personal 
weapons 


Northeastern States 

North Central States.... 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


51.7 
72.6 
75.5 
60.8 


9.8 
5.5 
5.5 

8.7 


10.5 
7. 1 
5 8 




10. 2 








100.0 


67.9 


17.6 


6.8 









Murder, Type of Weapon Used, 1969-1974 

[Percent distribution j 



1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 



Total 


Fire- 


Knife 
or other 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


Other 

weapon; 

club, 

poison, 

etc. 


Number 


Percent 


14,680 


100.0 


64.5 


19.9 


7.4 


15, 910 


100.0 


65.4 


18.9 


7.6 


17,680 


100.0 


65.1 


19.8 


6.5 


18, 570 


100.0 


66.2 


19.0 


6.6 


19, 530 


100.0 


67.0 


17.8 


6.6 


20,600 


100.0 


67.9 


17.6 


6.8 



A comparative study for the past six years shows 
an increase from 65 percent of all homicides 
through use of firearms in 1969 to 68 percent of all 
homicides in 1974. A comparative analysis of 



weapons used to commit murder for 1969 through 
1974 is shown in tabular form. 

The circumstances which result in murder vary 
from family arguments to felonious activities. 
Criminal homicide is largely a societal problem 
which is beyond the control of police. The cir- 
cumstances of murder serve to emphasize this 
point. In 1974, murder within the family made up 
approximately one-fourth of all murder offenses. 
Over one-half of these family killings involved 
spouse killing spouse. The remainder were parents 
killing children and other relative killings. Felony 
murder in Uniform Crime Reporting is defined as 
those killings resulting from robbery, burglary, 
sex motive, gangland and institutional slaying, 
and all other felonious activities. Felony type and 
suspected felon}' type murders in 1974 constituted 
28 percent of all murders, whereas these two cate- 
gories accounted for 27 percent of total murder 
in 1969. An analj'sis of felony murder reveals that 
60 percent of these killings occurred in connection 
with robbery offenses. Prostitution and commer- 
cialized vice, rape, and sex offenses accounted for 
8 percent of the total, while Narcotic Drug Law 
offenses comprise 7 percent of felony murder. 
Tables showang breakdown bj' geographical region 
for murder in 1974 and murder breakdown by 
circumstances for 1969-1974 accompany this 
section. 



18 



Murder Circumstancei, 1969-1974 

[Percent distribution] 



Year 


Total 


Spouse 
killing 
spouse 


Parent 
killing 
child 


Other 
relative 
kiUings 


Romantic 
triangle 

and lovers' 
quarrels 


Other 
argu- 
ments 


Known 
felony 
type 


Suspected 
felony 
type 




Number 


Percent 




14,680 
15, 910 
17,680 
18,570 
19,530 
20,600 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


13.1 

12.1 
12.8 
12.5 
12.3 
12.1 


3.7 
3.1 
3.5 

2.9 
3.2 
2.7 


8.4 
8.1 
8.4 
8.9 
7.7 
8.0 


7.0 
7.1 
6.3 

7.1 
7.5 
6.2 


41.3 

40.8 
41.5 
41.2 
40.3 
43.2 


19.3 
20.4 
20.4 
22.1 
21.6 
22.2 


7.2 
8.4 
7.1 
5.3 
7.4 
5.6 


1970 


1971 


1972 


1973 -.-- - 


1074 





Murder Circumitances, 1974 

[Percent distribution] 



Region 


Total 


Spouse 
kiUing 
spouse 


Parent 
killing 
child 


Other 
relative 
killings 


Romantic 

triangle 

and lovers' 

quarrels 


Other 
arguments 


Known 
felony type 


Suspected 
felony type 




100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


8.9 
11.0 
14.1 
12.0 


3.2 
1.8 
2.5 

3.9 


6.5 

9.7 
6.2 


6.0 
5.8 

3.7 


41.3 
41.7 
45.8 
40.8 


28.8 
25.9 
16.1 
25.0 


5.3 

6.6 
4.1 

8.4 


North Central Slates. 


Southern States 








100.0 


12.1 


2.7 


8.0 


6.2 


43.2 


22.2 


5.6 





During 1974, 6 percent of the murders were 
the result of romantic triangles or lover.s' quarrels. 
In murders involving husband and wife, the wife 
was the victim in 52 percent of the incidents and 
the husband the victim in the remaining 48 
percent. In these incidents involving spouses, 50 
percent of the victims were Negro, 48 percent 
white, and the remaining victims were of other 
races. 

The victims of felony type murder were 63 
percent white, 36 percent Negro, and the remain- 
ing victims were of other races or race not reported. 

Clearances 

Nationally, police continue to be successful 
in clearing or solving by arrest a greater percentage 
of homicides than any other Crime Inde.x offense. 
In 1974, 80 percent of the homicides were solved; 
and in 1973, 79 percent of all murder offenses 
were solved. Persons under 18 years of age were 
involved in 5 jjcrcent of the wailful killings solved 
by police. 

Since 1969, the clearance rate, nationwitle, in 

I homicide has decreased from 86 per 100 offenses 

i to 80 per 100 offenses in 1974. 

Persons Arrested 

Based on reports submitted by law enforce- 
ment agencies, 10 percent of all persons arrested 
for murder were under 18 years of age and 45 



percent were under 25. During the period 1969- 
1974, there was a 51 percent increase in the 
number of persons under 18 years of age arrested 
for murder. The increase in adult arrests for 
murder offenses during this period was 29 percent. 
Numericalh", the 20 to 24 year age group had the 
heaviest involvement during 1974 with 25 percent 
of the total arrests coming from within this age 
group. Negroes made up 57 percent of the arrests 
for murder in 1974 and 50 percent of the victims 
of homicide were also Negroes. 

Persons Charged 

Law enforcement agencies' reports disclose that 
54 percent of all adults arrested for murder in 
1974 were prosecuted during the year. Forty-five 
percent of the adults prosecuted were found guilty 
as charged, and 21 percent were convicted on 
some lesser charge. The remaining won release by 
acquittal or dismissal of the charges against them. 
Of all individuals processed for murder, 9 percent 
were juveniles who had their cases referred to 
juvenile court jurisdiction. 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

Aggravated assault is defined as an unlawful 
attack by one person upon another for the purpose 
of inflicting severe bodilj- injurj' usually' ac- 
companied by the use of a weapon or other means 



19 



likely to i)roduce death or serious bodily harm. 
Attempts are included since it is not necessary 
tluxt an injury result when a gun, knife, or other 
weapon is used which could and probably would 
result in serious i)ersonal injurj' if the crime were 
successfvdly comi)lcted. 

Volume 

In calendar j^ear 1974, there were an estimated 
452,720 aggravated assaults in the Nation. This 
is an 8 percent increase, or .35,300 additional of- 
fenses over 1973. This crime against the i)erson 
made ui) 4 percent of the Crime Index offenses in 
1974 and comjirised 47 percent of the crimes of 
violence. Regionally, the Southern States re- 
ported 35 i)ercent of the total count of these 
crimes followed by the North Central and Western 
States, each with 22 percent, and the North- 
eastern States with 21 percent. As has been the 
ex])erience in previous j'ears, the summer months 
recorded the highest frequencies of aggravated 
assault during 1974. 

Trend 

In 1974, the volume of aggravated assault of- 
fenses increased S percent over 1973 and 47 per- 
cent over 1969. Cities with over 250,000 in- 
habitants had an increase of about 5 percent. 
The suburban areas reported an increase of 12 
percent and the rural areas an increase of 4 percent. 

The Western States had an increase of 14 per- 
cent, the North Central States an increase of 11 
percent, the Northeastern States had an 8 per- 
cent increase, and the Southern States an in- 
crease of approximately 4 percent. 

Aggravated Assault Rate 

For each 100,000 persons in the United States 
during 1974, there were 214 victims of aggravated 
assault. The metrojiolitan areas had an aggravated 
assault rate of 243 per 100,000 inhabitants. The 
rural areas had a victim rate of 112 per 100,000 
inhabitants and the rate in cities outside metro- 
politan areas was 176 per 100,000 inhabitants. 
The victim rate for the Nation for aggravated 
assault increased 8 percent over 1973 and 40 
percent over 1969. 

The Western States were highest with a rate of 
263 per 100,000 followed by the Southern States 
with 239, the Northeastern States with 189, and 
the North Central States 175. 

Nature of Aggravated Assault 

Most aggravated assaults occur within the 
family unit and among neighbors or acquaintances. 

20 



The victim-offender relationshiij, as well as the 
nature of the attack, makes this crime similar to 
murder. In 1974, 25 percent of the serious assaults 
were committed with the use of a firearm. A knife 
or other cutting instrument was used in 24 percent 
of the assaults, 23 percent were committed with 
blunt objects or other dangerous weapons. The 
remaining assaults were with personal weapons 
such as hands, fists, and feet. A comjiarison of 
aggravated assault from 1969 to 1974 indicates 
that firearms as a weapon increased 57 jiercent ; 
assaults with a knife or other cutting instrument 
rose 19 percent; assaults where blunt objects or 
other dangerous weapons were used increased 37 
jiercent; and those aggravated assaults through 
use of personal weapons climbed 86 percent. The 
table which follows demonstrates the regional ex- 
perience of aggravated assault in 1974 by type of 
weajion used. 

Aggravated Assault, Type of Weapon Used, 1974 

[Percent distribution) 



Region 


Total 

all 

weapons 


Fire- 
arms 


Knife 
or other 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


other 

weapon; 

club, 

poison, 

etc. 


Personal 
weapons 


Northeastern States 

North Central States... - 

Southern States 

Western States. _.. 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


18.9 
27.4 
30.0 
23.7 
25.4 


30.7 

21.7 
23.9 
20.3 
24.2 


26.2 
20.7 
20.9 
25.7 
23.2 


24.2 
30.2 
25.2 
30.3 
27.2 







Clearances 

Law enforcement agencies were successful in 
solving 63 of each 100 cases of aggravated assault 
in 1974. This relatively high solution rate is 
con.sistent with high solution rates in other crimes 
against the person. Persons under 18 years of 
age were identified in 11 percent of these clear- 
ances. Due to the nature of these crimes, arrests 
are frequently made upon the response of patrol 
units. This tynpe of patrol call is hazardous to 
the officers. Since 1965, 149 officers have lo.5t 
their lives responding to disturbance-type calls, 
which frequently involve family or neighborhood 
arguments. 

Persons Arrested 

Arrests for aggravated assault in 1974 increased 
43 percent over 1969. Since 1969, arrests of per.,ons 
18 years of age and over for aggravated assault 
have increased 41 percent and arrests of persons 
under 18 years of age for this offense have in- 



I 



+ 50 
+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

1969 - 1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

^H^ NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 47 PERCENT 

---- RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 40 PERCENT 






1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 7 



21 



creased 52 percent. As a group, persons 21 years 
of age and over accounted for 69 percent of the 
arrests for aggravated assault in 1974 and those 
under age 21 accounted for 31 percent. Arrests 
of males outnumbered females by 6 to 1. 

Persons Charged 

Law enforcement agencies have difficulty in 
obtaining convictions based on the original charge 
in the aggravated assault category. The close 
family or other relationship which exists between 
victims and assailants in this category accounts 
for the victims' frequent unwillingness to testify 
for the prosecution. Acquittals and dismissals 
therefore continue to run high, accounting for 4.3 
percent of the dispositions. Seventy-two out of 
everj' 100 adults arrested for aggravated assault 
in 1974 were prosecuted. Fourteen percent of the 
adults prosecuted for this offense were convicted 
of lesser charges. Seventeen percent of all persons 
processed were referred to juvenDe court 
jurisdiction. 

FORCIBLE RAPE 

Forcible rape, as defined under this Program, is 
the carnal knowledge of a female through the use 
of force or the threat of force. Assaults to commit 
forcible rape are also included ; however, statutory 
rape (without force) is not counted in this cate- 
gory. Crime counts in this offense classification 
are broken down by actual forcible rapes and 
attempted forcible rapes. 

Volume 

During 1974, there was an estimated total of 
55,210 forcible rapes. Numerically, the volume 
increased by 3,980 offenses over 1973. Forcible 
rape continues, as in prior years, to comprise less 
than 1 percent of the Crime Index total. It makes 
up nearly 6 percent of the volume of crimes of 
violence. When viewed geographically, the 
Southern States recorded 32 percent of the total 
volume while the North Central States reported 
25 percent. The Western and Northeastern States 
reported 24 and 19 percent, respectively. 

A comparison of the month-to-month variations 
of forcible rape in 1974 with the long-term 
seasonally adjusted trend followed the pattern 
set for many years. Chart 17 reflects the month- 
to-month variations of forcible rape during 1974, 
as well as a comparison with the prior average 
5-year experience. 

22 



Trertd 

The volume of forcible rape offenses in 1974 
increased 8 percent over 1973, and 49 percent: 
over 1969. During 1974, this crime occurred most 
frequently in large cities with 250,000 or more 
inhabitants, which accounted for 43 percent of I 
the forcible rapes. Forcible rape increased 7 
percent in this group of cities and 10 percent in 
the suburban areas surrounding the large core 
cities. The rural areas registered no change over 
1973. Geographically, all regions of the United 
States reported increases in this offense. The 
Southern States reported an increase of 12 percent, 
followed by the North Central and Northeastern 
States with increases of 7 percent each. The West- 'I 
em States reported an increase of 4 percent. |l 

Forcible Rape Rate 

A crime rate, in its proper perspective, is a 
victim risk rate since it equates the number of 
crimes per unit of population. In 1974, 51 out 
of every 100,000 females in this country were 
reported rape victims. Since 1969, the forcible 
rape rate has increased 42 percent. In calendar 
year 1974, the forcible rape rate increased 7 
percent over 1973. 

The 58 core cities with populations in excess of 
250,000 experienced a victim risk rate of 100 per 
100,000 females. This is in marked contrast to 
the suburban areas of the countrj- where the risk 
rate for females was 35 per 100,000 and the rural 
area with a risk rate of 23. In the Western States, 
a rate of 71 per 100,000 females was recorded. 
Females residing in the Southern States were 
victims of forcible rape at the rate of 51 per 100,000. 
The North Central and Northeastern States 
recorded rates of 47 and 40 per 100,000 females, 
respectively. 

Nature of Offenses H 

In 1974, 74 percent of all forcible rape offenses 
were actual rapes by force. The remainder were 
attempts or assaults to commit forcible rape. 
This offense is a violent crime against the person, 
and of all the Crime Index offenses, law enforce- 
ment administrators recognize that this offense 
is probably one of the most under-reported crimes 
due primarily to fear and/or embarrassment on 
the part of the victims. As a national average, 
15 percent of all forcible rapes reported to police 
were determined by investigation to be unfounded. 
In other words, the police established that no 
forcible rape offense or attempt occurred. Crime 



I 



FORCIBLE RAPE 






1969-1974 




PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 42 PERCENT 




+ 50 














1 


^ 




+ 40 
+ 30 










^ 


^ 
_^' 










y^-' 




.-' 










^" 






+ 20 






^^, 


.^ 










L^^^^' 








+ 10 


















^/^' 


\ 










19 




f^ 












69 1970 1971 1972 1973 


1974 



CHART 8 



23 



594-259 O - 75 - 3 



counts in this publication are limited to actual 
offenses established by police investigation. 

Clearances 

Of the total forcible rapes reported in 1974 to law- 
enforcement, 51 percent were cleared bj' arrest. 
This is the same as the clearance rate for 1973. 
The large cities with 250,000 or more people and 
the suburban areas of the country reported a 
51 percent clearance rate while the rural areas 
had a 70 percent clearance rate. Of the total 
clearances for forcible rape, 10 percent were 
by the arrest of persons under the age of 18. 

Persons Arrested 

The age grouping of males 16 to 24 j^ears of 
age constituted the greatest concentration of 
arrests for forcible rape in 1974. Total arrests 
for this offense increased 4 percent, with the arrest 
of persons under 18 years of age up 3 percent 
over 1973. Sixty percent of the arrests for forcible 
rape during the year were of persons under the 
age of 25. All arrests for, forcible rape in 1974 
compared to 1969 indicate an increase of 37 
percent. Figures for the same years indicate that 
arrests of persons under 18 years of age have 
increased 32 percent. In 1974, 49 percent of the 
persons arrested for forcible rape were whites, 
48 percent Negroes, and all other races comprised 
the remainder. 

Persons Charged 

Of all adults arrested for forcible rape in 1974, 
60 percent were prosecuted for this offense. 
Prosecutive problems accounted for acquittals 
and/or dismissals in 49 percent of the cases. 
Thirtj'-five percent of the adults prosecuted were 
found guilty of the substantive offense and 16 
percent were convicted of lesser offenses. Juvenile 
referrals amounted to 23 percent of the persons 
processed on forcible rape charges in 1974. 

ROBBERY 

Robbery is a vicious tj^pe of crime which takes 
place in the presence of the victim to obtain 
property or a thing of value from a person by use 
of force or threat of force. Assaidt to commit 
robbery and attempts are included. This is a 
violent crime and frequently results in injury to 
the victim. Beginning in 1974, information con- 
cerning robbery was collected to show the tjpe 
of weapon used, as well as strong-arm robbery 
where no weapon other than a personal weapon 



is used. The latter category includes crimes such 
as mugging, 3'oking, etc. 

Volume 

The volume of estimated robberies increased in 
1974 bj^ 58,030 offenses from the prior year. There 
was an estimated total of 441,290 robbery offenses 
committed in the United States in 1974. This offense 
makes up 4 percent of the total Crime Index and 
comprises 46 percent of the crimes of violence. In 
1974, these offenses occurred most frequently dur- 
ing the month of December. 

The heaviest volume of robbery offenses occurred 
in the Northeastern States with 31 percent of the 
total. The North Central and the Southern States 
each experienced 26 percent, and the remainder 
was reported in the Western States. 

Trend 

When the total robbery offenses occurring in 
1974 is compared with the 1973 total, a 15 percent 
increase is noted. Since 1969, robberj' has increased 
48 percent. 

Large core cities over 250,000 population re- 
ported a 12 percent increase in robbery offenses 
in 1974 when compared to the reported volume in 
1973. Suburban areas surrounding the large core 
cities reported a 23 percent increase while the rural 
areas recorded an upward trend of 22 percent. 

Geographically, the Southern and North Central 
States each experienced a 21 percent increase in 
robbery offenses. The Western and Northeastern 
States reported 1 1 percent and 9 percent increases 
respectively. 

The accompanying chart depicts the trend in the 
volume of robbery and the robbery rate, 1969- 
1974. 

Robbery Rate 

The 1974 robbery rate of 209 per 100,000 in- 
habitants was 14 percent above the 1973 rate. 
Robbery is primarilj' a large city crime. Two- 
thirds of all robberies in the United States during 
1974 occurred in cities with more than 100,000 
inhabitants. These cities had a robberj' rate of 
648 victims per 100,000 people. 

There were 274 robbery victims per 100,000 
inhabitants in the metropolitan areas during 1974. 
The rural areas experienced a rate of 20 victims 
per 100.000 people. The robbery rate in the cities 
outside metropolitan areas was 54 per 100,000 
inhabitants. 

This crime occurred most frequently in relation 
to population in the Northeastern States where 



24 



ROBBERY 



+ 50 
+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



1969-1974 



PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

■ NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 48 PERCENT 

■ RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 41 PERCENT 



^ • 



1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 9 



25 



tlic rate was 278 per 100,000 inhabitants. The 
North Central States had a rate of 202, the West- 
ern States 199, and the Southern States 169 per 
100,000 people. 

Nature of Robbery 

Supplemental robbery information is obtained 
from law enforcement agencies as a part of the 
monthly collection of statistical data under this 
Program. In 1974, these figures disclosed that half 
of the robberies were committed in the street. 
Nationally, bank robber_y offenses increased from 
2,521 offenses in 1973 to 3,517 in 1974. The average 
bank robbery dollar loss decreased from $4,653 
in 1973 to $3,598 in 1974. 

The 1969-1974 trends in robbery by type, as 
ilhistrated by the following charts, show bank 
robbery has increased 94 percent. During this 
same period, gas or service station holdups have 
decreased 20 percent ; chain store robberies in- 
creased 184 percent; street robberies 29 percent; 
robberies in residences 63 percent; and holdups 
of other commercial or business establishments 
rose 42 percent. 

As it has been pointed out in prior issues of this 
publication, the full impact of this violent crime 
on the victim cannot be completely measured in 
terms of dollar loss alone. While the object of the 
attack is money or property, many victims of the 
mugger and the strong-arm robber, as well as the 
armed robber, suffer serious personal injury. 
During 1974, the average value loss in each robbery 
incident was $321 for a total loss of $142 million. 

Robbery, Type of Weapon Used, 1974 

[Percent distribution) 





Total 


Armed 




Region 


Firearms 


Knife or 
other 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


other 
weapon 


Strong- 


Northeastern States... 
North Central States.. 

Southern States 

Western States. 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


34.0 
51.4 
55.6 
42.5 


20.5 
7.4 
8.0 

12.9 


11.0 

7.6 
5.0 

7.4 


34.5 
33.6 
31.5 
37.2 


Total 


100.0 


44.7 


13.1 


8.1 


34 1 







Clearances 

In 1974, law enforcement agencies were suc- 
cessful in clearing 27 percent of the robbery 
offenses reported. Eighty-two percent of the 
robberies which were cleared by arrest involved 



adults. Of the strong-arm robberies cleared, 30 
percent were by the arrest of persons under 18 
years of age. In robberies where a knife was used, 
persons under the age of 18 were involved in 18 
percent of the clearances, 11 percent in those in 
which a firearm was used, and 10 percent in which 
another dangerous weapon was used. 

Persons Arrested 

Nationally, arrests for robber}^ increased 14 
percent in 1974 when compared to 1973. The 
greatest volume of arrests occurred in cities and 
were up 13 percent. In the rural areas, arrests 
increased 22 percent and in the suburban areas 
arrests increased 21 percent. 

Examination of arrest data discloses that 77 
percent of the persons arrested for robbery were 
under 25 years of age and 56 percent were under 
21 years of age. Of all persons arrested for robbery, 
33 percent were under the age of 18. This greater 
proportion of youthful arrests, compared to 
clearances, is accounted for in part by the fact 
the young-age offenders frequently act in groups. 
Robbery arrests for this young-age group re- 
corded a 10 percent increase in 1974 over 1973. 

In 1974, 7 of every 100 persons arrested for 
robbery were females. Arrests of women for this 
offense rose 14 percent in 1974 when compared to 
1973. 

From a standpoint of race, 62 percent of those 
arrested were Negro, 35 percent were white, and 
all other races made up the remainder. 

Persons Charged 

In 1974, 61 percent of all adults arrested for 
robber}' were prosecuted. Thirty-four percent of 
the persons processed for this crime were juveniles 
whose cases were referred to juvenile court 
jurisdiction. Of the adults prosecuted in 1974, 
45 percent were convicted of the substantive 
offense, 17 percent were convicted for lesser 
charges, and the remainder were acquitted or 
their cases were dismissed. 

BURGLARY 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program defines 
burglary as the unlawful entry of a structure to 
commit a felony or theft. The use of force to 
gain entry is not required to classify the crime 
as a burglary. The offense of burglary in this 
Program is broken down into three subclassifica- 
tions: forcible entry, unlawful entry where no 
force is used, and attempted forcible entry. 



26 



STREET ROBBERY 
1969-1974 



UP 29% 



+ 200% 

+150% 
+100% 

+ 50% 



- 25% 



ROBBERY OF 
COMMERCIAL HOUSE 
1969-1974 

UP 42% 



ROBBERY OF GAS STATION 

1969-1974 



DOWN 20% 



+ 200% 
+150% 
+100% 

+ 50% 



ROBBERY OF CHAIN STORE 
1969-1974 

UP 184% A 


M 





ROBBERY OF RESIDENCE 
1969-1974 



UP 63% 



+ 200% 

+150% 
+100% 

+50% 




BANK ROBBERY 
1969-1974 



UP 94% 




CHART 10 



27 



Volume 

An estimated total of 8,020,700 burglaries 
occurred during 1974. The increase in the number 
of offenses from 1973 to 1974 was 470,800. In 
1973, the large core cities over 250,000 inhabitants 
recorded 33 percent of the total burglary figure. 
For calendar year 1974, this decreased to 32 
percent. Of the Crime Index offenses, burglary 
makes up 30 percent of the total. When viewed 
as a segment of property crime, burglary is found 
to comprise 33 percent of the total. Geographi- 
cally, the Southern wStates reported 31 percent 
of the total volume, the Western and the North 
Central States 24 percent each, and the North- 
eastern States 21 percent. 

Viewed monthly the highest volume of burglary 
occurred in December of 1974. 

Trend 

The five-year trend, 1969-1974, indicates bur- 
glarj' offenses have risen 53 percent. In 1974, bur- 
glary increased 18 percent from 1973. Cities over 
250,000 population reported an increase of 13 
percent. In 1973, these cities experienced an in- 
crease of 4 percent in volume. In 1974, the sub- 
urban and rural areas of the nation reported 
increases of 20 and 23 percent, respectively. 
Viewed regionally, the Southern States reported a 
25 percent increase and the North Central States 
a 21 percent increase in burglary offenses. The 
Northeastern States experienced a 15 percent 
increase and the Western States an 11 percent 
increase for this offense. 

Burglary Rate 

The burglary rate in 1974 was 1,429 per 100,000 
inhabitants. During the period of 1969-1974, this 
rate increased 46 percent. The burglary rate for 
1974 increased 18 percent when compared with 
1973. The metropolitan areas reported a rate of 
1,653 burglaries per 100,000 people. The rural 
areas recorded a rate of 693 offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants, and the cities outside metropolitan 
areas had a rate of 1,025 burglaries per 100,000. 

The Western States recorded the highest 
burglary rate in 1974 with 1,930 offenses per 
100,000 inhabitants followed by the Southern 
States with a rate of 1,381, the Northeastern 
States 1,305, and the North Central States 1,267. 

Nature of Burglary 

Burglary is generally accepted as a crime of 
stealth and opportunity. It is committed by both 



amateurs and professionals. In 1974, 75 percent 
of the burglaries involved forcible entry, 19 
percent were unlawful entry (without force) and 
the remainder were forcible entry attempts. 

Nonresidential offenses accounted for 38 percent 
of total burglaries in 1974; residential burglaries 
accounted for 62 percent. Daytime burglaries of 
residences increased 19 percent in 1974 and 
accounted for over half of the residential bur- 
glaries. Considering the period 1969-1974, there 
has been an increase of 67 percent in the volume 
of daytime residential burglaries. 

Prevention and detection of the burglary 
offense poses a most difficult problem to law 
enforcement. Volume alone is an overriding factor, 
particularly as related to the number of officers 
available for this type investigation. Viewed as a 
group, nighttime burglary represents 61 percent 
of all burglaries. 

Economically, the offense of burglary represents 
a substantial sum. Victims suffered a loss of $1.2 
biUion in 1974 through the offense of burglary; 
this is an increase of about $322 million from the 
1973 loss. During 1974, residential losses amounted 
to $758 million. In 1973, that loss amounted to 
$545 million. Nonresidential losses due to bur- 
glaries amounted to $423 million in 1974 and $314 
million in 1973. In 1974, the average dollar loss 
per burglary was $391. 

Clearances 

As suggested earlier, burglary is a crime of 
stealth. This characteristic tends to make the 
detection of the perpetrator more difficult. In 
1974, law enforcement was successful in clearing 
18 percent of the total burglary offenses. 

Adults were involved in 66 percent of all cases 
cleared while young persons under 18 years of age 
were involved in 34 percent. Law enforcement 
agencies in cities 250,000 and above cleared 18 
percent of these crimes in 1974. In the suburban 
areas 17 percent were solved while 20 percent 
were cleared in the rural areas. 

Persons Arrested 

In this Program, the arrest of one person may 
account for the clearance of numerous offenses. 
Likewise, the arrest of several may clear only one 
offense. In the offense of burglar}^ it has been the 
experience of law enforcement that the arrest of 
one person frequently clears several reported 
offenses. In 1974, total arrests for burglary 
increased by 21 percent. Arrests of persons under 



28 



+ 60 
+ 50 
+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



BURGLARY 

1969-1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 53 PERCENT 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 46 PERCENT 



, . -^ — ^ — - 

X / 



1969 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 1974 



CHART 11 



29 



RESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

NIGHTTIME 

1969-1974 

UP 60% 




+100% 



+ 75% 



+50% 



+ 25% 



-25% 



RESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

DA YTIME 

1969-1974 

UP 67% 



mil] 
I a I (nui 



5;=^ 



1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 



NGNRESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

NIGHTTIME 

1969-1974 

UP 16% 




+ 100% 



+75% 



+50% 



+25% 



NGNRESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

DA YTIME 

1969-1974 

UP 37% 



-25% 

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 




CHART 12 



30 



the age of 18 increased 20 percent while arrests of 
persons 18 years and over increased 22 percent. 
In the cities and suburban areas, increases of 21 
and 22 percent respectively were reported. The 
rural areas experienced a 21 percent increase in 
total arrests for burglary. 

In analj'zing the 1969-1974 period, a 45 percent 
increase in burglary arrests is seen. Anests of 
individuals under the age of 18 increased 44 per- 
cent, while the arrests of adult burglary offenders 
increased 46 percent. 

Nationally, persons under 25 accounted for 85 
percent of all arrests for burglary in 1974. Persons 
under 18 acco-.nted for 5.3 percent of all arrests 
for this crime. Females were involved in five of 
every 100 arrests for burglarj' during 1974. Arrests 
of whites accounted for 67 percent of all burglary 
arrests in 1974. Thirty-one percent of the persons 
arrested for burglary were Negroes. 

Persons Charged 

In 1974, 70 percent of the adults arrested for 
burglary were prosecuted. Of the adults prosecuted, 
5.3 percent were found guilty as charged. Convic- 
tion for lesser offenses accounted for 16 percent 
and 31 percent were freed through acquittal or 
dismissal of charges. Juveniles referred to juvenile 
court jurisdiction accounted for 57 percent of all 
persons processed for burglary in 1974. 

LARCENY-THEFT 

Larceny-theft is the unlawful taking or stealing 
of property or articles without the use of force, 
violence, or fraud. It includes crimes such as 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, thefts 
from motor vehicles, thefts of motor vehicle parts 
and accessories, bicycle thefts, etc. In the Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program this crime category 
does not include embezzlement, "con" games, 
forgery, and worthless checks. Motor vehicle 
theft, of course, is excluded from this category 
for crime reporting purposes inasmuch as it is a 
separate Crime Index offense. 

Volume 

In 1974, there were 5,227,700 offenses of larceny- 
theft, which is an increase from 4,319,100 such 
crimes in 1973. This offense makes up 51 percent 
of the Crime Index total. From a seasonal stand- 
point, the volume of larceny was highest during the 
summer months of 1974. 

Geographically, the volume of larceny-theft was 
liighest in the North Central and Southern States, 



which each reported 28 percent of the total number 
followed by the Western States with 25 percent, 
and the Northeastern States with 19 percent. 

Trend 

Larceny-theft increased 21 percent in 1974 
when compared to the previous year. The large 
cities with over 250,000 inhabitants reported an 
increase of 18 percent in volume. The suburban 
and rural areas both reported a 22 percent increase. 
Nationwide, this offense has increased 35 percent 
since 1969. 

Geographically, the Northeastern and Southern 
States each reported increases of 24 percent, while 
the North Central States had an increase of 20 
percent and the Western States recorded an 
increase of 18 percent. 

Larceny Rate 

During 1974, the larceny crime rate was 2,473 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants, an increase of 
20 percent from the 1973 rate. The rate has 
increased 29 percent since 1969. In 1974, the 
larceny rate in the metropolitan areas was 2,831 
per 100,000 inhabitants, 808 in the rural areas, 
and 2,543 per 100,000 inhabitants in cities 
outside any metropolitan areas. Viewed geo- 
graphically, the Western States reported the high- 
est larceny rate with 3,508 offenses per 100,000 
inhabitants, which was a 16 percent increase over 
1973. The North Central States had a rate of 
2,560 up 20 percent; the Southern States 2,191 
up 22 percent; and the Northeastern States with 
1,976 reported an increase of 24 percent in the 
rate. 

Nature of Larceny-theft 

The average value of property stolen in each 
larceny in 1974 was $156, up from $111 in 1969 
and $74 in 1960. When the average value is 
applied to the estimated crimes in this category, 
the dollar loss to victims is $816 million. It is 
true that a portion of the goods stolen was re- 
covered and returned to victims, but the rela- 
tively low percentage of these crimes cleared by 
arrest and the lack of specific identification 
characteristics on such property indicate these 
recoveries did not materially reduce the overall 
loss. In addition, many offenses in this category, 
particularly where the value of the stolen goods 
is small, never come to police attention. 

In 1974, the average value of goods and property 
reported stolen from victims of pickpockets was 
$117, by purse-snatchers $75, by shoplifters $32, 

31 



+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



1969 



LARCENY-THEFT 

1969-1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 35 PERCENT 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 29 PERCENT 



X / 

. X ' 

X * ' 

X ' 
fc^ X ' 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 1974 



32 



CHART 13 



POCKET-PICKING 

1969-1974 

DOWIM 7% 



I9G9 1970 t97t 1972 1973 1974 



+ 100% 

+ 75% 
+ 50% 
+ 25% 


-25% 



PURSE-SNATCHING 

1969-1974 



UP 3% 



^^ 



1970 1971 1972 1973 



SHOPLIFTING 

1969-1974 

UP 76% 




+100% 

+ 75% 
+ 50% 

+ 25% 


- 25% 



THEFT FROM MOTOR VEHICLES 

1969-1974 



UP 9% 



1970 1971 1972 1973 



1969 1970 



1971 1972 1973 1974 



THEFT OF 

MOTOR VEHICLE ACCESSORIES 

1969-1974 

DOWIM 2% 



1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 



+ 100% 

+ 75% 

+ 50% 

+ 25% 



-25% 



THEFT OF BICYCLES 

1969-1974 



UP 58% 



•T^- 



1970 1971 



1973 1974 



THEFT FROM BUILDINGS 
1969-1974 



UP 30% 



1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 



+ 100% 

+ 75% 
+ 50% 
+ 25% 


-25% 



THEFT FROM COIN MACHINES 

1969-1974 



UP 2% 



1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 



CHART 14 



33 



by thefts from motor vehicles $180, and by 
miscellaneous thefts from buildings $271. 

From year to year, the distribution of larceny as 
to type of theft remains relatively constant. As in 
prior years, a major portion of these thefts, .33 per- 
cent, represented thefts of motor vehicle parts 
and accessories and other thefts from motor ve- 
hicles. Other major types of thefts which con- 
tributed to the large number of these crimes were 
thefts from buildings and stolen bicycles, with 17 
percent each. Miscellaneous types of larcenies, 
not falling into any of the specific categories for 
which data were collected, made up 17 percent 
of the total. The remainder was distributed among 
pocket-picking, purse-snatching, shoplifting, and 
thefts from coin-operated machines. The accom- 
panying table presents the distribution of larceny 
by type within the geographic regions of the 
United States. 

Larceny Analysis by Region, 1974 

IPereent distribution] 





North- 
eastern 
States 


North 
Central 
Stetes 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 




2.6 
3.5 

8.5 

16.9 
17.0 
17.6 
18.5 
.9 
14.5 


.5 
2. 1 
10.3 

15.5 
17.1 
17.4 
19.5 
1.0 
16.6 


.8 
1.8 
11.4 

17.4 
15.9 
15.6 
16.1 
2.0 
19.0 


.5 




1.2 




13.3 


From motor vehicles (except ac- 


20.7 




13 5 




16.8 




15.3 


From coin-operated machines 

All others 


1.6 
17. 1 


Total 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



Clearances 

The nature of larceny, a crime of opportunity, 
sneak thievery, and petty unobserved thefts, 
makes it an extremely difficult offense for law 
enforcement officers to solve. A lack of witnesses 
and the tremendous volume of these crimes work 
in the offender's favor. In 1974, 20 percent of all 
larceny offenses brought to police attention were 
solved. Involvement of the young age group is 
demonstrated by the fact that 37 percent of these 
crimes which were cleared in the Nation's cities 
were solved by arrest of persons under 18 years of 
age. Juvenile clearance figures for suburban areas 
and rural areas were 40 percent and 25 percent, 
respectivelv- 

Persons Arrested 

One-half of the total arrests for Crime Index 
offenses in 1974 were for larceny. Arrests for this 



crime increased 25 percent, 1974 over 1973. 
Forty-nine percent of these arrests were of persons 
under 18 years of age, and when individuals 
under 21 were considered, the ratio rose to two- 
thirds. When examined by sex of arrested persons, 
it was determined that females comprised 31 
percent of all arrests for larceny-theft and had a 
higher involvement in this offense than for any 
of the other Index offenses. In fact, women were 
arrested more often for larceny than any other 
offense in 1974. 

Arrests of females rose 23 percent in 1974; 
while arrests of males increased 26 percent. 
Arrests of whites outnumbered Negroes by more 
than 2 to 1 with all other races comprising about 
2 percent of the arrests for larceny-theft. The 
total volume of arrests for larceny-theft in 1974 
as compared with the 1969 figures indicates a 49 
percent increase. Arrests of individuals under 
18 were 35 percent greater than 1969. The number 
of adult arrests rose 66 percent over the number 
of arrests for this offense in 1969. 

Persons Charged 

As in prior years, law enforcement agencies 
nationally charged more offenders for larceny- 
theft than for any other Crime Index offense. 
Seventy percent of the adults prosecuted for 
larceny-theft were found guilty of this offense, 
6 percent were found guilty of a lesser charge, 
and the remaining had their cases dismissed or 
were acciuitted. Thirty-eight percent of persons 
processed in 1974 for larceny were referred to 
juvenile court jurisdiction. 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

In Uniform Crime Reporting, motor vehicle 
theft is defined as the unlawful taking or stealing 
of a motor vehicle, including attempts. This 
definition excludes taking for temporary use by 
those persons having lawful access to the vehicle. 

Volume 

In 1974, 973,800 motor vehicles were reported 
stolen. This is a 5 percent increase compared to 
1973 when 925,700 motor vehicles were reported 
stolen. 

Geographically, the volume of motor vehicle 
theft in 1974 was highest in the Northeastern 
States which reported 31 percent of the total 
number followed by the North Central States 
with 25 percent. The Southern States reported 
23 percent and the Western States reported the 



34 



remainder. This crime made up 10 percent of the 
total Crime Index offense volume. Seasonal vari- 
ations during 1974 disclosed that the volume of 
motor vehicle theft was highest during the month 
of October. 

Trend 

The number of motor vehicle thefts in 1974 in- 
creased 5 percent compared to 1973. The number 
of motor vehicle thefts has increased 11 percent 
since 1969. 

Motor vehicle theft decreased 2 percent in large 
cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants during 
1974. The rural areas reported an increase of 12 
percent in motor vehicle thefts while the suburban 
areas had an increase of 10 percent. 

Geographically, motor vehicle thefts were up 8 
percent in the Southern States, the North Central 
States reported an increase of 6 percent, the 
Western States an increase of 5 percent, and the 
Northeastern States reported an increase of 3 
percent. The accompanying chart shows the 
trend in motor veliicle thefts; 1969-1974. 

Motor Vehicle Theft Rate 

The 1974 motor vehicle theft rate of 461 
offenses per 100,000 inhabitants is 4 percent higher 
than in 1973. Since 1969, the motor vehicle theft 
rate has risen 6 percent. People in cities with over 
one million population were deprived more often 
of their motor vehicles in 1974 than in any other 
population group with 11 thefts per 1,000 
inhabitants. 

Nationally, the motor vehicle theft rate in the 
metropolitan areas was 580 per 100,000 inhabi- 
tants. The rural areas had a motor vehicle theft 
rate of 94, and cities outside metropolitan areas 
had a rate of 210. 

Regionally, the Northeastern States had the 
highest motor vehicle theft rate in 1974. This rate 
was 601, an increase of 3 percent from 1973. The 
Western States had a rate of 556 per 100,000 
inhabitants which was an increase of 3 percent. 
The North Central States had a rate of 425 which 
was 7 percent higher than the prior year and the 
Southern States reported an increase of 6 percent 
in the motor vehicle theft rate to 335 per 100,000 
inhabitants. 

Across the Nation in 1974, one of every 129 
registered automobiles was stolen. Regionally, 
this rate was the highest in the Northeastern 
States where 12 cars per 1,000 registered vehicles 



were stolen. In the other three regions the figures 
were 8 in the Western States, 7 in the North 
Central States, and 5 in the Southern States. 

Nature of Motor Vehicle Theft 

Motor vehicle theft rates again clearly indicate 
that this crime is primarily a large city problem 
since the highest rates appear in the most heavily 
populated sections of the Nation. In 1974, the 
average value of stolen motor vehicles was $1,246 
at the time of theft. 

Clearances 

Law enforcement agencies were successful in 
solving 15 percent of the motor vehicle thefts by 
arrest of the offender. 

In the Nation's largest cities, 12 percent of 
motor vehicle thefts were cleared during 1974. 
Throughout the Nation, motor vehicle theft 
clearance percentages ranged from 24 percent 
in the South Atlantic States to 7 percent in the 
New England States. 

In all geographic divisions and population 
groups, the participation of the young-age group 
population is indicated by the high proportion 
of these clearances which were through the arrest 
of persons under 18 years of age. In the large 
core cities, 31 percent of the motor vehicle thefts 
cleared were cleared by arrests in this age group 
while juveniles accounted for 37 percent of the 
solutions in the suburbs and 30 percent in the 
rural areas. 

Persons Arrested 

As in prior j^ears, persons arrested for motor 
vehicle theft come primarily from the young-age 
group population. In 1974, 55 percent of all per- 
sons arrested for this crime were under 18 years 
of age. When persong under 21 are included in the 
computations, the proportion of arrests rises to 74 
percent. 

The national trend in motor vehicle theft arrests 
disclosed a decrease of 3 percent in 1974 when 
compared to 1973. Adult arrests decreased 1 per- 
cent while arrests of persons under 18 decreased 
4 percent. During the period 1969-1974 motor 
vehicle theft arrests decreased 11 percent. 

Females under 18 years of age recorded a 
decrease of 4 percent in arrests for motor vehicle 
theft from 1 973. Wliite persons made up 67 percent 
of the arrests for motor vehicle theft, Negroes 30 
percent, and all other races accounted for the 
remainder. 



35 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

1969-1974 

PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 

■"— NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 11 PERCENT 

.---- RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 6 PERCENT 



+ 20 
+ 15 
+ 10 
+ 5 




-5 



1969 






1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 15 



36 



Persons Charged 

Police reports disclosed that of all persons for- 
mally processed for motor vehicle theft in 1974, 
64 percent were referred to juvenile court juris- 
diction. No other Crime Index offense results in 
such a high percentage of juvenile referrals. Wlien 
the remaining adult offenders were considered as 
a group, 48 percent of those prosecuted on charges 
of motor vehicle theft were found guilty as 
charged, 13 percent were convicted of lesser 
charges, and 39 percent were accjuitted or their 
cases were dismissed. 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT SURVEY 

During the months of September and October 
1974, a two-month nationwide survey was con- 
ducted concerning the thefts of motor vehicles 
and the arrests of persons for motor vehicle 
thefts. More than 5,900 law enforcement agencies 
representing 69 percent of the United States' 
population participated in this survey. There 
were 137,975 motor vehicle thefts reported in 
this survey which represented about 85 percent 
of all vehicles reported stolen during a two- 
month period of 1974. 

There were 2,265 law enforcement agencies 
that reported the arrest of 18,492 persons for 
motor vehicle theft during this two-month survey. 
Of the persons arrested, 15,465 were in possession 
of a stolen motor vehicle at the time of arrest. 
In 54 percent of these possession arrests, the 
offender was under 18 years of age. Thirty-one 
percent were 18 to 24 years of age and the re- 
maining 15 percent were 25 years of age and over. 
Police were assisted through the use of law 
enforcement computer systems in one-third of the 
arrests for possession of stolen vehicles. The 
computer was used in 39 percent of the vehicle 
theft arrests of persons 18 years of age and older 
and 29 percent of the persons under 18 years of 
age. 

Motor vehicle theft data was collected within 
three model year groups and by four vehicle types. 
The survey disclosed that nearly 85 percent of the 
reported stolen vehicles during the survey period 
were passenger type vehicles while 6 percent were 
truck and bus type vehicles. Motorcycles ac- 
counted for 8 percent and the remaining 1 percent 
were other type vehicles. Almost one-half of all 
vehicles reported stolen during the survey period 
were 1968 and prior year passenger cars. A signif- 



icant finding in this survey is in the analysis of 
passenger car thefts compared to passenger cars 
in operation. The 1969 and newer model cars make 
up 58 percent of cars in use while 45 percent of the 
cars stolen were of these model years. United 
States automobile manufacturers, since 1969, 
have been equipping their passenger cars with a 
steering column ignition lock designed to prevent 
or deter vehicle movement. The steering column ig- 
nition and key-in warning system appear to have 
made an impact on the passenger car theft prob- 
lem according to the results of this survey. 

A comparison of property crime trends during the 
past five years is another indicator of the impact 
automobile anti-theft devices have had on the 
crime problem. This five-j-ear comparison shows a 
smaller increase in vehicle thefts when compared to 
larceny-theft and burglary trends. 

Mofor Vehicles Reported Stolen 

September-October, 1974 > 



Stolen vehicles by type 


Total 
vehicles 


1972-75 

year 

model 

vehicles 


1969-71 

year 

model 

vehicles 


1968 and 

prior year 

model 

vehicles 




137, 975 
100.0 


41, 542 
30.1 


27, 797 
20.1 




Percent distribution '.. 


49.7 


Passenger cars 


116,409 
100.0 


29,552 
25.4 


23, 169 
19.9 


63,688 
54.7 








8,415 
100.0 


3,455 
41.1 


1,793 
21.3 


3, 167 




37.6 








11,564 
100.0 


7,863 
68.0 


2,512 
21,7 


1,189 










All other vehicles. 


1,587 
100.0 


672 
42.3 


323 

20.4 


592 
37.3 







• Represents only those reported motor vehicle thefts occurring within 
participating agencies. 
2 Due to rounding, percentages may not add to total. 

Motor Vehicles Reported Stolen 

September-October, 1974 i 





Total 
pas- 
senger 
cars 


1972-75 
year 

model 
cars 


1969-71 
year 

model 
cars 


1968 and 
prior 
year 
model 


Passenger cars in operation - 
Percent distribution 


92,607,551 
100.0 


27,848,099 
30.1 


25,730,386 
27.8 


39,029,066 
42.1 


Passenger cars stolen 
Percent distribution 


116,409 
100.0 


29,552 
25.4 


23,169 
19.9 


63,688 
54.7 



* Represents only those reported motor vehicle thefts occurring within 
participating agencies. 

^ Report of R. L. Polk Company's National \'ehicle Registration Service 
on passenger cars in the U.S., 7-1-74. 

37 



The 1972-1975 model passenger cars reported 
stolen during the survey totaled 29,552 cars of 
which 40 percent were produced by Ford, 37 
percent were General Motors makes, 8 percent 
were Chrysler products, and the remaining 15 
percent were foreign and other domestic makes. 
Law enforcement agencies within 44 metropolitan 
areas of the United States examined 10,014 
recovered stolen 1972-1975 passenger cars during 
the survey period. These examinations disclosed 
57 percent of the recovered late-model cars had 
intact ignition systems. This would tend to indi- 
cate use of a key to operate the stolen cars. Vic- 
tims of motor vehicle thefts admitted leaving the 
key in their vehicle in about 14 percent of the theft 
incidents during September and October, 1974. 
The remaining 43 percent of examined, recovered 
stolen 1972-1975 model cars revealed ignition 
systems had been forced or compromised in order 
to steal these cars. Valuable information was 
gathered which will allow automobile manufac- 
turers to evaluate the effectiveness of present auto 
anti-theft devices. 

Motor vehicle theft is an urban crime problem. 
Eighty percent of the vehicles reported stolen in 
this survey were taken in cities of over 50,000 
population and in suburban counties. More than 
one-half of all vehicles stolen were from within 
cities of over 250,000 in population. The survey 
showed the incidence of theft was highest in 
residential areas where over one-half of the motor 
vehicles were stolen. Thirty-three percent were 
taken from streets and parking lots of business or 
commercial areas. Two-thirds of the thefts in 
residential areas were between 6 p.m. and 6 a.m., 
while sUghtly over one-half of the vehicles stolen 



from business or commercial areas were between 
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. 

When comparing the total number of vehicles 
recovered to the total number of vehicles stolen 
during the survey, the recovery percentage was 
69.3 percent. Seventy-five percent of the vehicles 
stolen in cities under 10,000 population were 
recovered and 80 percent of vehicles stolen in rural 
counties were recovered. The study revealed 62.4 
percent of the stolen vehicles recovered were 
located within 48 hours of the time of theft. Three 
out of four instances of the vehicle recovery oc- 
curred within the same jurisdiction where the 
vehicle had been stolen. 

Criminal history information was collected 
during the survey on 15,809 persons arrested for 
motor vehicle theft by 1,988 law enforcement 
agencies. Of these persons, 42 percent had no 
prior arrest history, 36 percent had a prior arrest 
history for offenses other than motor vehicle 
theft, and 22 percent had a prior motor vehicle 
theft arrest. Motor vehicle theft continues to be 
a first offense experience for juveniles embarking 
on what could become serious criminal careers. 
Forty-eight percent of the young offenders 
arrested during the survey had no arrest history 
prior to arrest for motor vehicle theft. 

This survey, as was true in a November 1962 
nationwide vehicle theft survey, disclosed the 
public has a definite responsibility in reducing the 
opportunity for theft by removing the key from 
the car and locking the ignition. A positive 
attitude change in the motoring public in this 
connection could affect the incidence of vehicle 
thefts. A composite finding in this survey will 
reveal most vehicles stolen are 1968 or prior 
year passenger cars which are unlocked with an 



Reported Passenger Car Thefts 

By Make and Model Years September-October, 1974 





Total 

passenger 

cars 


American 
Motors 


Chrysler 


Ford 


General 
Motors 


Other U.S. 
makes 


Foreign 

makes 




116,409 
100.0 


2,541 
2.2 


11,741 
10.1 


29,490 
25.3 


57,735 
49.6 


1,728 
1.5 


13, 174 




11.3 








29,652 
100.0 


621 
2.1 


2,448 
8.3 


11,889 
40.2 


10,895 
36.9 


510 
1.7 


3,189 




10.8 








23,169 
100.0 


506 


3,111 
13.4 


6,971 
30.1 


8,580 
37.0 


359 
1.5 


3,642 




15.7 








63,688 
100.0 


1,414 
2.2 


6,182 
9.7 


10,630 
16.7 


38,260 
60.1 


859 
1.3 


6.343 




10.0 







I Due to rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



38 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT BY LOCATION 

September • October, 1974 



FROM PRIVATE RESIDENCE OR APARTMENT (garage, 
driveway, off-street parking area) 



FROM PUBLIC STREET IN RESIDENTIAL AREA 



FROM PUBLIC STREET IN BUSINESS OR COMMERCIAL 
AREA 

FROM FREE PARKING AREA (includes shopping 
center) 

FROM PAID PARKING AREA (public garage, parking 
lot) 

FROM CAR LOT (new-car sales, used-car sales, 
rental lot) 

FROM OTHER AREAS (farm field, rural road, inter- 
state highway, etc.) 



3.4% 

4.4% 



■I 4.4 
|_] 3.0% 



23.8% 



35.2% 



13.3% 
]16.9% 



CHART 16 



39 



594-259 O - 75 - 



CRIMES 



KEY: ..1969-1973 MOVING AVERAGE 



AGAINST THE PERSON 



+ 30% 

+ 20% 
+ 10% 

ANNUAL 



AVERAGE 

- 10% 
- 20% 



MURDER 



^ • ■>^* ' 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



+ 20% - HiGUGENT MAHSLAGGHTER 



+ lo; 
ANNUAL 




JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 




JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



+ 30% 



+ 10% 

ANNUAL 
AVERAGE 

- 10% 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 



CHART 17 



40 



BY MOIMTH 



VARIATION FROM 1974 ANNUAL AVERAGE 

AGAINST PROPERTY 



+ 30% 

+ 20% 

^ 10% 

ANNUAL 



AVERAGE 



ROBBERY 



•^ - ^fc^^ — 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 




- 30% 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 




JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 




30% 



CHART 17 



41 



open switch ignition or with the key having been 
left in the car. The typical theft occurs from a 
residential area within a large city or surrounding 
suburb during the night. These cars are recovered 
in the same city within 48 hours of the theft. The 
offender is most likely to be under 18 years of 
age and have no arrest record. 

CLEARANCES 

Law enforcement agencies clear a crime when 
they have identified the offender, have sufficient 
evidence to charge him and actually take him into 
custody. Crime solutions are also recorded in 
exceptional instances when some element beyond 
police control precludes the placing of formal 
charges against the offender, such as the victim's 
refusal to prosecute after the offender is identified 
or local prosecution is declined because the subject 
is being prosecuted elsewhere for a crime committed 
in another jurisdiction. The arrest of one person 
can clear several crimes or several persons may be 
arrested in the process of clearing one crime. 

The nationwide clearance information as re- 
ported by law enforcement agencies shows that 
21 percent of the Index crimes were cleared during 
1974. In 1974 law enforcement agencies cleared 
80 percent of the murder offenses, 51 percent of 
forcible rapes, 63 percent of aggravated assaults, 
and 27 percent of the robberies. Solutions in the 
property crime categories showed police cleared 
18 percent of the burglaries in 1974, 20 percent 
of the larcenies, and 15 percent of the motor 
vehicle thefts. Police are able to clear a higher 
percentage of the crimes against the person, not 
only because of the more intense investigative effort 
afforded these violent crimes requiring police 
attention, but more importantly, because witnesses 
are usually available who can identify the 
perpetrators. 

The highest overall Crime Index clearance rate 
regionally was recorded by the Southern States 
with 24 percent, followed by the North Central 
States with 22 percent, the Western States with 
21 percent, and the Northeastern States with 18 
percent. 

The accompanying chart reveals crime and 
police clearance experience for the last five j'ears. 
From 1969 to 1974 the Crime Index offenses rose 
38 percent. Police response to this upward trend 
was a 42 percent increase in the number of Crime 



Index offenses cleared and a 40 percent increase 
in the number of arrests for Crime Index offenses. 
The clearance rate for Crime Index type offenses 
for 1969 was 21 of every 100, which is approxi- 
mately the same rate reported in 1973 and 1974. 

Offenses Cleared by Arrest of Juveniles 

One means of measuring the involvement of the 
young-age group in crime is to identify the number 
of crimes in which they are the offenders. In 1974, 
31 percent of all Crime Index offenses solved 
involved only persons under 18 years of age, 
while persons 10 to 17 years of age account for 
about 16 percent of the total United States 
population. 

PERSONS ARRESTED 

In 1974, law enforcement agencies made an esti- 
mated 9.1 million arrests nationally for all criminal 
acts except traffic offenses. The arrest rate was 46 
arrests for each 1,000 persons. In 1973, there were 
42 arrests for each 1,000 inhabitants. The arrest 
rate for big cities as a group was 57 per 1,000 
inhabitants, for suburban areas 38, and in the rural 
areas the arrest rate was 28. 

Arrests are primarily a measure of police ac- 
tivity. Arrest practices, policies, and enforcement 
emphasis will vary from place to place and within 
a community from time to time. The volume of 
police arrests for certain unlawful conduct such as 
drunkenness, disorderly conduct, and certain local 
ordinances is particularly influenced by the above. 
On the other hand, robbery, burglary, and other 
arrests for serious crimes are more likely the result 
of standard procedures. Arrests are first a measure 
of police activity as it relates to crime. Arrests do, 
however, provide a useful index to indicate in- 
volvement in criminal acts by the age, sex, and 
race of the perpetrators, particularly for those 
crimes which have a high solution rate. Procedures 
used in this Program require that an arrest be 
counted on each separate occasion when a person 
is taken into custody', notified, or cited. Arrests do 
not measure the number of individuals taken into 
custody since one person may be arrested several 
times during the year for the same or different 
offenses. As noted above, this happens frequently 
for certain types of offenses against public order 
such as drunkenness, vagrancy, disorderly con- 
duct, and related violations. 



42 



CRIMES CLEARED BY ARREST 

1974 



AGAINST THE PERSON 



NOT CLEARED 



CLEARED 








MURDER 80% 






NEGLIGENT -.qo, 
MANSLAUGHTER '^^'^ 


ii: 


FORCIBLE r.o/ 
RAPE ^'^° 








I: 


AGGRAVATED coo, 
ASSAULT D''/*» 





AGAINST PROPERTY 



NOT CLEARED 

f ™-^ 



ROB&ERY 



BURGLARY 



LARC£NY 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 



CLEARED 



27% 



18% 



20% 



15% 



CHART 18 



43 



CRIME AND CRIMES CLEARED 



1969 



1969-1974 
PERCENT CHANGE OVER 1969 




CRIMES 
CLEARED 

UP 42% 



INDEX-TYPE 

ARRESTS 

UP 40% 



CRIME INDEX 
UP 38% 

CLEARANCE 
RATE 

UP 3% 



1970 



1971 



1972 



1973 



1974 



CHART 19 



44 



Arrest Trends 

In 1974, police arrests for all offenses except 
traffic increased 3 percent over 1973. During this 
time, arrests of persons under 18 j^enrs of age in- 
creased 9 percent and arrests of persons 18 years 
of age and over increased 1 percent. When only 
Crime Index offenses are used to compute this 
trend, there is an 18 percent increase for all ages. 

During the five-year period, 1969-1974, i)olice 
arrests for all offenses except traffic increased 9 
l)ercent, with the arrests of persons under 18 
years of age up 16 percent and the arrests of 
persons 18 years of age and over up 7 percent. 
When only the Crime Index offenses are used in 
computing this five-year trend, the increase is 
40 percent. Arrests of persons under 18 years of 
age increased 32 percent while the atlult arrests 
increased 49 percent. Violent crime arrests for 
persons under 18 j'ears of age increased 49 i)eiceiit 
while the property crime arrests increased 30 
percent. 

Arrests for Narcotic Drug Law violations, 1974 
over 1973, were up 2 percent nationally. From 
1969 to 1974, arrests for this violation increased 
80 percent. There is set forth a tabulation by 
geographic region showing the type of narcotic 
drug involved in the arrest of the offender during 
1974. 

Narcotic Drug Laws 

[Percent dislribution) 



Region 


Total 


Heroin or 


Mari- 
juana 


Synthetic 
narcotics 


Other 


Northeastern Statcs__ 
Norlh Central States 

Southern States 

Western Slates 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


18.5 
17.2 
10.8 
10.3 


71.1 
69.8 
74.0 
65.2 


4.5 
3.8 
3.7 
6.0 


5.9 
9.2 
11.5 
18.5 


Total 


100.0 


15.8 


69.4 


4.3 


10.5 



Age 

Nationally, persons under 15 years of age made 
up 10 percent of the total police arrests; under 
18, 27 percent; under 21, 43 percent; and under 
25, 58 percent. In the suburban areas, the involve- 
ment of the young age groups in police arrests 
is markedly higher than the national figures, 
with the under 15 age group represented in 12 
percent; under 18, 33 percent; under 21, 50 
percent; and under 25, 64 percent. In the rural 
areas the distributions were lower for the younger 



age groups, with the under 15 group being involved 
in 5 percent; under 18 in 19 percent; under 21 
in 37 percent; and those under 25 in 53 percent 
of total police arrests. When only the Index 
crimes are considered, 19 percent of all persons 
arrested in 1974 were under the age of 15 and 
45 percent were under 18 years of age. 

Sex 

Male arrests outnumbered female arrests by 5 
to 1 in 1974. Male arrests in 1974 rose bj- 2 per- 
cent while female arrests were up 9 percent. 
Nineteen percent of the arrests for Crime Index 
offenses were of female persons. Ten [lercent of 
the arrests for violent crimes in 1974 involved 
females and arrests of females for these types of 
crimes increased 13 percent over 1973. Again, as 
in prior j'ears, their involvement was primarily 
for larceny which accounted for 23 percent of all 
female arrests. Females accounted for 26 percent 
of the embezzlement and 14 ])ercent of the nar- 
cotics arrests. Over one-half of the runaway — 
])olice custodj" cases — were females under 18 
years of age. 

The five-year arrest trends, 1969-1974, revealed 
that arrests for young females under 18 j'ears of 
age increased 21 percent while arrests for young 
males under 18 rose 15 percent. When the serious 
crimes as a group are considered, arrests of males, 
1969-1974, were up 35 percent and female arrests 
increased 68 percent. 

Arrest Rates 

The following table sets forth arrest rates by 
geographic regions for Crime Index offenses. 
Arrest rates indicate law enforcement activity' in 
response to crime. 

Arrests by Region, 1974 

IRato per 100,000 inhabitanM) 



Offense 


U.S. 
Total 


North- 
eastern 
SUtes 


North 
Central 
.•states 


South- 
States 


Western 
States 




10.3 
13.3 

80.9 
115.2 
2.54.1 
544.2 

80.0 


6.5 
12.3 
87.2 
108.6 
207.9 
398.0 
67.3 


10.2 
11.1 
69.0 
74.7 
213.5 
586.0 
62.3 


14.3 
15.2 
75.5 
134.1 

269.5 
542.5 
66.7 


11.1 




15.8 




96.9 


Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft.- 

Motor vehicle theft... 


164.7 
361.5 
680.9 
139.9 


Crime Index 
total 


1,098.0 


887.8 


1,026.7 


1,117.9 


1,470.7 



45 



PERSONS CHARGED 

Disposition data reveals the results of cases in 
which law enforcenaent agencies have made an 
arrest and subsequently formally charged the 
offender in a court of jurisdiction. This informa- 
tion is important to the law enforcement adminis- 
trator in evaluating the quality of investigations 
and court presentation functions. 

In 1974, 81 percent of the adults arrested for 
Crime Index offenses were prosecuted in the 
courts. Of the adults prosecuted for Crime Index 
offenses, 61 percent were found guilty as charged 
and 9 percent of a lesser charge. 

It must be recognized that not all arrested 
persons are turned over to the courts for prosecu- 
tion. There are various reasons for this: failure 
of the victim to cooperate or appear for the 
prosecution, persons arrested are released with a 
warning, evidence is obtained which discloses 
the arrested person did not commit the offense, 
or there is not sufficient evidence available to 
support either a formal charge or a subsequent 
prosecution. 

For example, about one-half of the juveniles 
arrested are handled by the individual law enforce- 
ment agencies without preferring a formal charge 
or referring them directly to juvenile authorities. 
All contributors to this Program are urged to 
obtain and report final disposition in cases in- 
volving persons they arrest. Tables containing this 
data commence on page 174. Keep in mind that 
police methods of handling juvenile offenders 
differ widely from place to place. Also, the tables 
concerning juveniles (local age limit) refer to those 
who were arrested and turned over to juvenile 
authorities in connection with specific criminal 
acts. 

Forty-one percent of the persons processed for 
Crime Index offenses were young persons referred 
to juvenile court jurisdiction. Similar to prior 
years, juvenile referrals for motor vehicle theft 
were significant. Sixty-four percent of those 
processed for motor vehicle theft were juveniles. 
Juvenile referrals for burglary were 57 percent, 
larceny 38 percent, robbery 34 percent, forcible 
rape 23 percent, aggravated assault 17 percent, 
and murder 9 percent. 

During 1974, as in past years, motor vehicle 
theft, arson, burglary, and vandalism recorded 
high percentages of juvenile referrals. When all 



crime categories are reviewed, it is noted that 
convictions on original charges remained high in 
the offenses against public order and decency — 
driving under the influence, drunkenness, dis- 
orderljr conduct, and vagrancy. As in prior years, 
offenses against trust, such as fraud and embezzle- 
ment, also recorded a high percentage of convic- 
tion on original charges. 

Of the adults who were prosecuted for Crime 
Index offenses, 29 percent were acquitted or their 
cases were dismissed. In 1974, 34 percent of the 
murder defendants were either acquitted or their 
cases dismissed at some prosecutive stage. Forty- 
nine percent of those charged with forcible rape 
were acquitted or had their cases dismissed, and 
43 percent of the persons charged with aggravated 
assault were released either through acquittal or 
dismissal . 

Seventy percent of those persons prosecuted for 
the offense of larceny were found guilty of that 
offense in 1974. This was followed by burglary with 
53 percent found guilty of the original charge, 48 
percent for motor vehicle theft, 45 percent for 
robbery, 45 percent for murder, 43 percent for 
aggravated assaidt, and 35 percent for forcible 
rape. 

The offense which had the highest percentage 
guilty of a lesser charge was murder where 21 
percent of the defendants were convicted on some 
charge other than murder. 

CAREERS IN CRIME 

From January, 1963, through December, 1969, 
the Uniform Crime Reporting Program processed 
criminal history data on some 240,000 offenders 
for statistical use. This study was used to docu- 
ment the extent to which criminal recidivism based 
on arrest information over a period of time con- 
tributes to annual crime counts. The study has 
also been used to show the need for the centraliza- 
tion of law enforcement information at the state 
and national level in view of criminal repeating 
and mobility. This offender based study was 
made possible by the cooperative exchange of 
criminal fingerprint data among local, state, and 
Federal law enforcement agencies. While the basis 
of selection in this study was a Federal offense, it 
should be kept in mind that most Federal criminal 
violations are also violations of local and state 
laws. The offender transaction records examined 



46 



in this study are, therefore, believed to be similar 
to the local and state experience for the more 
serious violators. 

The Careers in Crime study brought to the 
Uniform Crime Reporting Program valuable 
statistical experience in the field of criminal 
histories, and has demonstrated the use of offender 
based transaction information to indicate the 
success or failure of the entire criminal justice 
system. The key to the effectiveness of the system 
is in knowing what happened to the people who 
were handled or treated by the criminal justice 
process, specifically, whether they were deterred 
from further criminal acts and /or rehabilitated. 

In January, 1970, the FBI began converting 
offender records to computer form for the opera- 
tional Computerized Criminal History File of 
the National Crime Information Center. Although 
this is an operational program, it was designed and 
established with full recognition of the statistical 
and research potential of offender based data. 

A summary of 207,748 offenders in the Com- 
puterized Criminal History file who were arrested 
during the period 1970-1974 is set out in the 
following tables. Of these 207,748 individuals, 
135,470 (65 percent) had been arrested two or more 
times. These individuals had an average criminal 
career of five years and five months (number of 
years between first and last arrest) during which 
time they were arrested an average of four times 
each. The 207,748 offender? had a total of 835,000 
documented charges during their criminal careers, 
with 277,014 reported convictions and 109,657 
imprisonments of six months or more. 

Of the 135,470 repeat offenders, 68,430 or 51 
percent were rearrested in states other than that 
where first arrested. Of the 68,430 "mobile" 
offenders, 14,212 were arrested in a total of three 
different states and 10,503 were arrested in four 
or more different states. 

It should be kept in mind that this presentation 
is conservative and understates the amount of 
crime committed by these offenders since it is 
based on police detection, arrest, and submission 
of a fingerprint card. As indicated in earlier pages 
of this publication, law enforcement agencies do 
not clear or solve most crimes. Only one-fifth of the 
serious crimes committed during 1974 were solved 
by arrest. It is also true that the prior conviction 
and imprisomnent rates are slightly lower than 
actual because criminal justice agencies do not 



always submit such data after arrest, conviction, 
and release. In fact, disposition data has not been 
received on over 372,000 of the 835,000 charges. 

A profile of criminal repeating for selected 
offenders is shown in the following table. Average 
age for the first arrest is high because of the general 
practice not to submit criminal fingerprint cards 
on juveniles. Criminal career is the average j-^ears 
between the first and last arrest. 

The offender profile is classified by type of 
crime for which last arrested during the 1970's. 

Wlien criminal repeating is viewed by type of 
crime for which arrested in the 1970's, repeaters 
ranged from 28 percent for the embezzler to 79 
percent for the robbers and auto thieves. 

fo//ow-up 

A follow-up study was made of the 62,236 
offenders in the CCH File who were released during 
calendar year 1972. These offenders were followed 
through 1974 for any subsequent arrest in which a 
fingerprint card was submitted. Charts and tables 
are shown in this section on the rearrest experi- 
enced by offense; t^-pe of release; and age, sex, and 
race of the offender. 

When criminal repeating is checked by type of 
crime from which released in 1972, rearrest ranged 
from 22 percent for the embezzler to 76 percent 
for the burglars. Largest repeater rates in the 
same crime were for the narcotic offenders with 
28 percent being rearrested for the same crime 
and gambling law violators with 20 percent being 
rearrested on a gambling violation within three 
years. Of the 3,203 offenders being released in 
1972, from a weapons violations, 11 percent were 
rearrested for a violent crime within three years. 
Forty-eight of these offenders were rearrested for 
murder. Two hundred eighty-one were rearrested 
for a weapons violation and 267 were rearrested 
for a narcotics violation. Of all persons rearrested 
during the follow-up study, 24 percent were re- 
arrested on a charge more serious than one from 
which released in 1972. 

Sixty-seven percent of the offenders released 
after serving their prison time were rearrested 
within three years. Of those persons released on 
parole, 64 percent repeated and 48 percent of those 
placed on probation repeated. Of those persons 
acquitted or who had their cases dismissed in 
1972, 59 percent were rearrested for new offenses 
within three years. 



47 



Profile of Offenders Arrested, 1970-1974 

[By last charge in K)70-1974] 





Total 


Murder 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Rape 


Robbery 


Burglary 


Larceny 


Motiir 
vehirl,. 
th.'tt 




207,748 
31 
26 
5 
4 


1,180 
31 

25 
6 

4 


7,060 
33 

26 
7 
3 


784 
27 
23 
4 
3 


8,914 
27 
22 
5 
5 


3,533 
28 
23 
5 
4 


17,016 

29 
25 
4 
3 


9,247 




29 




23 




6 


Average number ot charges during criminal career _ . 


5 


Frequency ot charges (percent of total subjects) : 


34.8 
18.1 
10.9 
36.2 


31.5 

19.2 
13.8 
35.4 


35.4 
20.8 
11.6 
32.2 


35.1 
21.0 
11.5 
32.4 


21.3 
16.1 
13.3 

49.3 


36.1 
15.1 
10.7 
38.1 


44.5 
18.1 
9.5 

27.9 


20.7 


Two 


16.5 




12.0 




50.8 






Frequency of convictions (percent of total subjects) : 


34.3 
12.7 
6.3 
9.5 


31.4 
13.1 

5.5 
5.4 


23.8 
9.3 
4,3 
6.3 


25.1 
9.2 
5.0 
3.6 


32.8 
16.3 

8.8 
12.8 


26.6 
10.2 
5.3 
8.0 


40.2 
10.8 
4.6 
7.5 


30.8 




16.6 




9.5 




18.9 






Mobility (percent of persons rearrested): 


49.5 
32.3 
10.5 
7.8 


54.5 
32.4 
9.5 
3.6 


56.8 
32.3 
7.4 
3.6 


56.4 
31.0 
6.7 
5.9 


53.4 
30.1 
9.7 
6.8 


53.1 
31.4 
9.5 
8.1 


60.0 
28.3 
7.3 
4.5 


.24.1 




38.2 




18.4 




19.2 








Forgery 


Embezile- 
ment 


Fraud 


Weapons 


Narcotics 


Gambling 


Stolen 
property 


All other 
offenses 




11,055 
30 

24 
6 
5 


5,779 
32 
30 


9,043 
36 
30 
6 
4 


16, 543 
33 

26 

7 
4 


42,215 

27 
23 
4 
3 


4,822 
47 
37 

10 
4 


11,775 
30 
24 
6 
5 


58,782 




33 




27 


Average criminal career (years) 


6 
4 


Frequency of charges (percent of total subjects) : 


26.6 
17.5 
11.5 
44.5 


71.6 
16.1 
5.1 

7.2 


41.7 
17.9 
10.2 
30.1 


28.0 
19.7 
12.2 
40.1 


41.3 
20.1 
10.7 
28.0 


34.6 

21.0 
12.8 
31.6 


26.6 
18.0 
11.8 
43.6 


31.9 




16.7 




10.8 




40.6 






One 


38.3 
16.0 
8.3 
15.1 


60.8 
5.5 
1.4 
1.6 


38.5 
11.8 
5.7 
8.1 


30.3 
14.1 
7.0 
9.5 


37.1 
10.4 
4.6 
5.2 


30.6 
11.3 
4.8 
5.9 


35.7 
14.9 
7.6 
12.7 


30.3 




13.7 




7.4 




11.5 






Mobility (percent of persons rearrested): 


55.8 
27.0 
9.2 
8.0 


64.2 
26.6 
5.7 
3.5 


46.9 
31.8 
11.7 
9.6 


51.4 
32.2 
10.1 
6.3 


52.0 
35.8 
8.7 
3.5 


72.5 
21.4 
4.2 
1.8 


£3.0 
29.1 
10.1 

7.8 


43.5 




33.3 




12.5 




10.7 







Due to rounding percentages may not add to 100.0. 



Percent Repeaters by Race and Sex 
Persons Arrested 1970-1974 



Sex 


Total 


Race 




White 


Negro 


Other 


Total: 

Number of persons arrested 


207,748 
65.2 


119,000 
61.6 


84, 917 
71.0 


3,831 
48.5 






Male: 

Number of persons arrested 


179,500 
67.9 

28,248 
47.8 


105,380 
64.0 

13,620 
43.0 


70,840 
74.5 

14,077 
53.3 


3,280 
51.6 


Female: 

Number of persons arrested 


551 
29.6 







48 



PERCENT REPEATERS 

BY TYPE OF CRIME 

PERSONS ARRESTED, 1970-1974 



Auto Theft 
Robbery 
Stolen Property 
Forgery 
Weapons 
Murder 
Gambling 
Rape 
Assault 
Burglary 
Narcotics 
Fraud 
Larceny 
Embezzlement 
All others 
TOTAL 



28% 



79% 



79% 



73% 



73% 



72%] 



68% 



65% 



65% 



65% 



64% 



59% 



58% 



55% 



68% 



65% 



CHART 20 



49 



Three-Year Follow-Up of Persons Released in 1972 by Age, Race and Sex 





Total 


Race 


Se.K 




White 


Negro 


Other 


Male 


Female 




62, 236 

35,710 

57.4 


38,954 

20,913 

53.7 


22,393 

14,369 

64.2 


889 
428 
48.1 


53,796 

32,091 

59.7 






3,619 




42.9 






Under 20 - -- 


7,025 
4,523 
64.4 


4,847 
2,931 
60.5 


2,077 
1,538 
74.0 


101 

54 

53.5 


5,999 
4,072 
67.9 


1,026 




451 




44.0 






20-24 -- ---- 


22, 170 

13,633 

61.5 


13,893 
7, 935 
.57.1 


7.931 
5,518 
69.6 


346 
180 
52.0 


18,947 

12,110 

63.9 


3,223 




1,523 




47.3 






25-2'l - 


12,912 
7,759 
60.1 


7,790 
4,361 
56.0 


4,939 
3,302 
66.9 


183 

96 

52.5 


11, 126 
6,923 
62.2 


1,786 




836 




46.8 








6,655 
3.846 
57.8 


3,936 
2,141 
54.4 


2,631 
1,667 
63.4 


88 

38 

43.2 


5,845 
3,487 
59.7 


810 




359 




44.3 






35-39 - 


4,338 
2,207 
50.9 


2,599 
1,250 
48.1 


1,664 
932 
56.0 


75 

25 

33.3 


3.802 
2,028 
53.3 


.536 




179 




33.4 








5,726 
2,654 
46.3 


3,669 
1.628 
44.4 


1,997 
1.003 
50.2 


60 

23 

38.3 


5,028 

2.447 
48.7 


698 




207 




29.7 








3,410 
1,088 
31.9 


2,220 
667 
30.0 


1,154 
409 
35.4 


36 

12 

33.3 


3.049 
1,024 
33.6 


361 




64 




17.7 







50 



PERCENT REPEATERS 

BY TYPE OF CRIME IN 1972 

PERSONS RELEASED IN 1972 AND 
REARRESTED WITHIN 3 YEARS 



Burglary 

Robbery 

Auto Theft 

Rape 

Murder 

Stolen Property 

Forgery 

Assault 

Narcotics 

Larceny 

Weapons 

Fraud 

Gambling 

Embezzlement 

Others 



76% 



70% 



68% 



64^% 



63% 



61% 



60% 



60% 



57% 



55% 



55% 



54% 



40% 



22%: 



54% 



CHART 21 



51 



PERCENT OF PERSONS REARRESTED 
NA^ITHIN 3 YEARS 

BY TYPE OF RELEASE IN 1972 



48% 







SUSPENDED 

SENTENCE 

AND/OR 

PROBATION 



PAROLE 



FINE 



MANDATORY 

RELEASE AND 

PARDONS 



ACQUITTED 

OR 
DISMISSED 



CHART 22 



52 



Three-Year Follow-Up by Age Group and Type of Release in 1972 



Type of release 


Total 


Under 20 


20-24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-49 


60 and 
over 




62,236 

35,710 

57.4 


7,025 
4,523 

64.4 


22, 170 
13,633 

61.5 


12, 912 

7,759 
60.1 


6,655 
3,846 
57.8 


4,338 

2,207 
50.9 


5,726 
2,654 
46.3 


3,410 

1,088 
31.9 










13,383 
6,381 

47.7 


1,169 
754 
64.5 


4,595 
2, 495 
54.3 


2,789 
1,372 
49.2 


1,535 
674 
43.9 


1,077 
419 
38.9 


1,350 
486 
36.0 


868 
181 
20.9 








Fine 


12,602 
7,468 
59.3 


1,645 
1,063 
64.6 


3,993 
2,545 
63.7 


2,295 
1,473 
64.2 


1,358 
817 
60.2 


930 
515 
55.4 


1,432 
706 
49.3 


949 
349 
36.8 










29,400 

17,388 

59.1 


4,067 
2,589 
63.7 


11,396 
7,060 
62.0 


5,965 
3,671 
61.5 


2,795 
1,711 
61.2 


1,722 
900 
52.3 


2,215 
1,046 
47.2 


1.249 
411 
32. 9 










4,363 
2,806 
64.3 


103 

89 
86.4 


1,584 
1, 099 
69.4 


1,242 
801 
64.5 


559 
376 
67.3 


341 

187 
54.8 


368 
196 
53.3 


166 

58 

34.9 










2,479 
1,667 
67.2 


41 

28 

68.3 


602 
434 
72.1 


621 
442 

71.2 


408 
268 
65.7 


268 
186 
69.4 


361 
220 
60.9 


178 

89 

50.0 









53 



CRIME INDEX TABULATIONS 

III this section, tabulations are shown to in- 
dicate the probable extent, fluctuation, and 
distribution of crime for the United States a.? a 
whole; geographic divisions; individual states; 
standard metropolitan statistical areas; and cities, 
towns, and counties. The measure used is a Crime 
Index consisting of ^even important offenses 
which are counted as they become known to the 
law enforcement agencies. Crime classifications 
used in the Index are: mui'der and nonnegligent 
manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated 
assault, bvu'glaiy-breaking or entering, larceny- 
theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

The total number of criminal acts that occur is 
unknown, but those that are reported to law en- 
forcement provide the first means of a count. 
Not all crimes come readily to the attention of 
law enforcement; not all crimes are of sufficient 
importance to be significant in an index; and not 
all important crimes occur with enough regularity 
to be meaningful in an index. With these considera- 
tions in mind, the above crimes were selected as a 
group to furnish an abbreviated and convenient 
measure of the crime problem. 

It is important to remember in reviewing the 
tables in this section that the volume of crime in 
any area is subject to the factors set forth on 
page V. Estimates of current permanent popula- 
tion are used to construct crime rates. With our 
iiighly mobile population all communities, metro- 
politan areas, and states are affected to a greater 
or lesser degree by the element of transient 
population. This factor is not accounted for in 



crime rates since no reliable estimates by state 
are available nationwide. 

CVime trend and rate tables group places ac- 
cording to population size. Law enforcement's 
performance in clearing crimes by arrest is pre- 
sented by population group and geographic 
division. 

National city averages are also shown indi- 
cating the type and value of the property stolen, 
by offense and type, and value recovered by 
police investigation. Robbery, burglary, and 
larceny-theft are examined by type, as well as 
where and when thej^ occurred. Dispositions made 
of persons formally charged for all criminal 
offenses are also set forth. 

Statistical data relating to suburban areas are 
provided for the use of law enforcement officials in 
suburban communities in making limited com- 
parisons. Places used to establish totals ' for 
suburban areas include cities with 50,000 or less 
population together with coimty law enforcement 
agencies in standard metropolitan statistical areas. 
Of course, the crime experience of the large core 
city is excluded. 

It is important to remember in studying 
averages that usually about half the units used 
must be above and about half below. National 
averages can provide the law enforcement ad- 
ministrator with valuable guidance in analj'zing 
the local crime count, as well as the performance 
of his force in combating crime. The analysis, 
however, does not end with such a comparison, 
for it is onl}^ through an appraisal of local con- 
ditions that a clear picture of the community 
crime problem or the effectiveness of the law 
enforcement operation is possible. 



54 







Table 1. — Index of Crimt 


> — United States, 


1974 










Area 


Population i 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Violent - 
crime 


Property ^ 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 




211.392,000 


10, 192, 034 
4,821.4 


969,823 
458.8 


9,222,211 
4,362.6 


20,600 
9.7 


55,209 
26.1 


441, 290 
208.8 


452,724 
214.2 


3,020,742 
1,429.0 


5,227,696 
2, 473. 


973,773 


Rale per lOO.OOO inhabilants- 


460.6 






SUndard Metropolilan Statistical 


154,095,271 

07. k; 
100. ore 


8.515,137 

8,662,603 

5, 621. 6 


850,719 

860, 470 

558.4 


7,664,418 

. 7,802,133 

5, 063. 2 


16. 398 

16,690 

10.8 


47,332 

48,125 

31.2 


418.722 

421,753 

273.7 


368,267 

373,902 

242.6 


2.498.217 

2,546,649 

1,652.6 


4,288,854 

4,362,298 

2,830.9 




Area actually reporting ' - 


877.347 
893,186 




579.6 




23,183,092 

91. 3% 

100. 0";^ 




Area actually reporting 


85'J, 013 
033.625 
4, 027. 2 


52,657 
57,772 
249.2 


806,356 
875. 853 
3,777.9 


1,176 
1.313 

5.7 


2,838 
3,111 
13.4 


11.503 

12, 567 

54.2 


37,140 
40,781 
175.0 


217,984 
237.608 
1.024.0 


543, 859 
589,654 
2,543.5 


44,513 
48,591 




209.6 




34,113,637 

81. 27^ 
100. (f,-^ 




Area actually reporting 


509,765 
595,806 
1,746.5 


41,389 
51, 581 
151. 2 


468,376 
544,225 
1.595.3 


1,996 

2,597 

7.6 


3,272 
3,973 

11.6 


5,696 
6,970 
20.4 


30.425 
38,041 
111.5 


202,655 

236,485 

693.2 


239, 153 

275,744 
808.3 


26,568 
31,996 




93 8 









' Population is Bureauof the Census provisional estimate as of July 1, 1974. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault; property crime is odenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle 



' The percentage representing area actually reporting will not coincide with the ratio between reported and estimated crime totals s 
the sum of the calculations for individual states which have varj-ing populations, portions reporting and crime rates. 



; these data represent 



Table i.— Index of Crime, United States, 1960-1974 



Number of offenses: 

1960—179,323,175 -. 

1961—182,992,000. 

1962—185,771,000 ... 

1963—188,483,000 

1964—191,141,000 

1965—193,526,000 

1966—195,576,000 

1967—197,457,000 

1968—199,399,000. 

1969—201 ,385,000 

1970—203,235,298 

1971—206,212,000 

1972—208,230,000 

1973—209,851,000.. 

1974—211,392,000 

Percent change 1960-1974 ' 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants: 

1960... 

1961 

1962 



1964. 
1965. 
1966. 
1967. 



1969 

1970 

1971... 

1972 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 1960-1974 ' 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



363, 700 
, 466, 800 
, 729, 500 
,084,400 
, 537, 100 
, 710. 800 
,192,000 
, 868, 100 
,680,300 
, 366, 900 
,049,900 
,537,100 
, 199, 700 
, 666, 200 
,192,000 

-1-203.0 

1,875.8 
1,894.5 
2. 007. 6 
2, 167. 
2.373.7 
2, 434. 2 
2,654.7 
2,971.8 
3, 350. 2 
3,658.1 
3, 960. 9 
4, 140. 
3, 937. 8 
4, 129. 7 
4,821.4 
-1-157.0 



286, 890 
287,800 
299. 860 
315. 230 
362, 210 
385,260 
427, 840 
497, 290 
591,980 
658.530 
735,160 
812,480 
830.690 
871,450 
969, 820 
-1-238.0 

160.0 
157.3 
161.4 



218.8 
251.8 
296.9 
327.0 
361.7 
394.0 
398.9 
415.3 
458.8 
-1-186.8 



3, 076, 800 
3. 179. 000 
3, 429, 600 
3, 769. 200 
4.174,800 
4, 325. 500 
4.764.100 
5, 370, 800 
6,088,300 
6, 708, 300 
7,314,700 
7. 724. 600 
7. 369. 000 
7, 794, 800 
9, 222, 200 
-(-199.7 



715.8 
737.2 



1, 
I, 

1,846.2 
1,999.8 
2, 184. 2 
2. 235. 1 
2, 435. 9 
2, 720. 
3, 053. 3 
3,331.1 
3, 599. 1 
3, 746. 
3, 538. 9 
3,714.4 
4, 362. 6 
-1-154.3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



8, 590 
9,310 
9.010 
10.980 
12, 170 
13, 730 
14,680 
15,910 
17,680 
18, 570 
19, 530 
20,600 
-1-127.4 

5.1 



Forcible 


Robbery 


rape 




17, 130 


107,570 


17.160 


106,400 


17.490 


110,580 


17,590 


116,180 


21.350 


130.060 


23. 330 


138.340 


25. 730 


157.590 


27,530 


202, 400 


31,560 


262, 180 


37, 050 


298, 100 


37,860 


348. 980 


42, 120 


386, 730 


46,690 


375. 350 


51,230 


383,260 


55, 210 


441, 290 


-1-222.4 


-f 310. 2 


9.5 


60.0 


9.4 


58.1 


9.4 


59.5 


9.3 


61.6 


11.2 


68.0 


12.1 


71.5 


13.2 


80.6 


13.9 


102. 5 


1.5.8 


131.5 


18.4 


148.0 


18.6 


171.7 


20.4 


187.5 


22.4 


180.3 


24.4 


182.6 


26.1 


208.8 


.174.7 


-1-248. 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



153, 140 
155,560 
163,310 
172, 880 
201.. 500 
213. 680 
233.530 
255. 190 
284,510 
308, 710 
332.410 
365,940 
390.080 
417.430 
452, 720 
-f 195. 6 

85.4 
85.0 
87.9 
91.7 
105.4 
110.4 
119.4 
129.2 
142.7 
153.3 
163.6 
177.5 
187.3 
198. 9 



906,600 
943,800 
988,300 
1.079,800 
1.205.800 
1. 274. 700 
1.401.500 
1,622,200 
1,847,600 
1,969,900 
2,191.600 
2. 384, 700 
2.361.100 
2. 549. 900 
3. 020. 700 
-1-233.2 

505.6 
515.7 
532.0 
572.9 
630.9 
658.7 



926.6 
978. 2 
1.078.4 
1.156.4 
1.133.9 
1, 21.5. 1 
1.429.0 
-1-182. 6 



1, 843, 100 
1,900,300 
2, 075, 800 
2, 282, 600 
2, 497, 800 
2, 555, 600 
2, 803, 300 
3,091,000 
3. 459, 700 
3, 862, 900 
4, 197, 900 
4, 394, 900 
4,123,700 
4,319,100 
5, 227, 700 
-H83. 6 

1,027.8 
1,038.5 
1,117.4 
1,211.0 
1,306.8 
1,320.5 
1.433.4 

1. 565. 4 
1.735.1 
1,918.2 
2, 065. 5 
2,131.3 
1.980.4 

2, 058. 2 
2, 473. 
-1-140.6 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



327, 100 
334,900 
365,600 
40(.900 
471,200 
495, 200 
559, 300 
657,600 
781,000 
875,600 
925,300 
945,000 
884,200 
025,700 
973,800 
4-197.7 

182.4 
183.0 
196.8 
215.9 
246.5 
255.9 
286.0 
333.0 
391.7 
434.8 
455.3 
458.3 
424.6 
441.1 
460.6 
-1-152.5 



I Population is Bureau of the Census provisional estimates as of July 1, except Apr. 1, 1960 and 1970, census. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle 



' Percent change and crime rates calculated prior to rounding number of offenses. Revised estimatesand rates based on changes in reporting practices. 



55 



594-259 O - 75 - 5 



Table 3. — Index of Crime by Regions, 

(Number and rate per 100,000 



Violent crime ^ 



United Slates Total ' 

Percent change . - - 
Northeast - - - - 

Percent change . 

New England-- - -. 

Percent change 

Connecticut- 

Maine - 

Massacliusetts - 

New Hampshire- - - 

Rhode Island 

Vermont-- -. . 

Middle Atlantic . 

Percent change - . 

New Jersey- - . - - - 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

North Central 

Percent change 

East North Central 

Percent change 

Illinois--- 

Indiana - 

Michigan 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 
1973 

1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 

1973 

1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



209,851,000 
211,392,000 



49,678,000 
49,426,000 

12,150,000 
12,150,000 

3, 076, 000 

3, 088. 000 

1, 028. 000 

1,047.000 

5, 818, 000 

6.800,000 

791,000 

808.000 

973. 000 

937.000 

464,000 

470.000 



37, 528. 000 
37. 276. 000 

7, 361, 000 
7. 330. 000 
18. 265, 000 
18.111.000 
11,902.000 
11,835.000 



57, 600, 000 
57,544,000 

40, 896, 000 
40, 862, (XX) 

11.230,000 
11,131,000 
5,316.000 
5, 330, 000 
9,044,000 
9, 098, 000 
10,731.(X)0 
10, 737, 000 
4, .569, 000 
4, 566. 000 



8, 666, 206 
10, 192, 034 

+ 17.6 

1,865,394 
2,163,646 
+16.0 
480,504 
672, 824 
+ 19.2 
112,717 
136, 087 
29,220 
37, 694 
263,031 
312,211 
18, 425 
26,403 
45, 520 
47, 918 
11.591 
13, 511 



1,384,890 
1, 590, 822 
+14.0 
300, 612 
349, 764 
786, 620 
879, 673 
297, 758 
361, 385 



:, 269, 463 

1, 682, 452 

+ 18.2 

, 700, 810 

:, 021, 093 

+18.1 

485, 949 

577,060 

198,111 

231, 155 

496, 459 

593, 153 

375, 140 

453,471 

145, 151 

166, 254 



4,129.7 
4,821.4 
+ 16.7 

3,755.0 
4,377.5 

+16.6 
3, 954. 8 
4, 714. 6 

+ 19.2 
3, 664. 4 

4, 407. 
2,842.4 
3, 600. ; 
4,521.0 

5, 382. 9 

2, 329. ; 

3, 143. 9 

4, 678. 3 
6.114.0 



3, 690. 3 

4, 267. 7 
+16.6 

4, 082. 5 
4,771.7 
4,306.7 
4, 867. 1 

2, 601. 7 

3, 053. 5 



3,940.0 

4. 661. 6 
+ 18.3 

4, 158. 9 
4, 946. 1 
+ 18.9 
4, 324. 9 
5, 184. 3 

3. 726. 7 
4, 336. 9 
5, 489. 4 
6, 519. 6 
3, 495. 9 
4, 223. 4 
3, 176. 9 
3,641.1 



871,445 
969,823 
+ 11.3 

226,682 
244,9% 

+8.1 
31, 879 
34, 773 

+9.1 
6,421 
7,045 
1,258 
1,440 
20,476 
22, 546 



649 

739 



194, 803 
210,223 
+7.9 
28,846 
29,668 
133,561 
143, 374 
32, 397 
37, 281 



204,061 
235,643 
+ 15.5 
165,651 
190,935 
+ 15.3 
62, 457 
69,806 
13, 696 
15,631 
52, 921 
59, 993 
31,304 
39,094 
5,273 
6,411 



415.3 
458.8 
+ 10.5 

456.3 
495.7 

+8.6 
262.4 
286.2 
+9.1 
208.7 
228.1 
122.4 
137.5 
351.9 
388.7 
82 
91.6 
282.5 
282.9 
70.6 
75.1 



519.1 
564.0 
+8.6 



731.2 
791.6 
272.2 
315.0 



354.3 
409.5 

+ 15.6 
405.1 
467.3 

+16.4 
665.9 
627.1 
257.6 
293.3 
585.2 
659.4 
291.7 
364.1 
115.4 
140.4 



7,794,761 

9,222,211 

+ 18.3 

1,638,712 

1,918,650 

+ 17.1 

448, 625 
538, 061 
+ 19.9 
106,2% 
129,042 
27,962 
36, 254 
242, 566 
289, 666 
17, 776 
24, 664 
42,771 
45,267 
11,264 
13, 158 



1, 190, 087 
1, 380, 599 
+16.0 
271, 667 
320, 196 
663, 059 
736,299 
265,361 
324, 104 



2, 065, 402 
2, 446, 809 

+ 18.5 
1, 535, 159 
1, 830, 158 
+19.2 
423, 492 
507, 254 
184,415 
215, 524 
443, 538 
533,160 
343, 836 
414. 377 
139, 878 
1,59, 843 



Rate per 
100,000 



3,714.4 
4,362.6 
+ 17.5 

3,298.7 
3,881.9 

+ 17.7 
3, 692. 4 
4, 428. 4 

+19.9 
3, 465. 7 
4, 178. 8 

2, 720. 

3, 462. 7 

4, 169. 1 
4, 994. 2 
2, 247. 3 

3, 052. 5 

4, 396. 8 
4, 831. 1 
2, 427. 6 
2, 799. 6 



3,171.2 
3. 703. 7 
+16.8 
3. 690. 6 
4, 368. 3 
3, 575. 5 
4. 066. 6 
2. 229. 6 
2, 738. 5 



3, 585. 8 
4,252.1 

+ 18.6 
3, 753. 8 
4, 478. 9 

+ 19.3 
3, 769. 1 
4, 557. 1 
3, 469. 1 
4,043.6 
4, 904. 2 
5.860.2 
3, 204. 1 
3, 859. 3 
3,061.5 

3, r,m. 7 



Murder and nonneg- 
Ugcnt manslaughter 



19,526 
20,600 

+5.5 

3,774 
3,672 



3,334 
3,205 
-3.9 



2,034 
1,913 



4,381 
4,895 

+ 11.7 
3,549 
4,022 

+13.3 
1,163 
1,319 



56 



Gcoffi-op'iic Diviiions and States, 1973-1974 

inhabitants, percent change over 1973) 



Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larceny-theft 


-Motor vehicle theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 




100,000 




1C0,000 




100,000 




100.000 




100,000 




100,000 


51.232 


24.4 


383,260 


182.6 


417,427 


198.9 


2.549,930 


1,215.1 


4,319.118 


2,058.2 


925,713 


441.1 


55.209 


26.1 


441,290 


208.8 


452,724 


214.2 


3,020,742 


1,429.0 


5.227,696 


2,473.0 


973,773 


460.6 


+7.8 


+7.0 


+15.1 


+14.3 


+8.5 


+7.7 


+ 18.5 


+17.6 


+21.0 


+20.2 


+5.2 


+4.4 


9.601 


19.3 


126.445 


254.5 


86.862 


174.9 


560.302 


1.127.9 


788.738 


1.587.7 


289.672 


583.1 


10,235 


20.7 


137.612 


278.4 


93.477 


189.1 


645. 100 


1,305.2 


976,419 


1,975.5 


297,131 


601.2 


+6.6 


+7.3 


+8.8 


+9.4 


+7.6 


+8.1 


+ 15.1 


+ 15.7 


+23.8 


+24.4 


+2.6 


+3.1 


1,579 


13.0 


14.478 


119.2 


15,382 


126.6 


139,770 


1,160.4 


215. 729 


1, 775. 5 


93,126 


766.5 


1,538 


12.7 


16, 586 


136.5 


16,182 


133.2 


169,072 


1,391.5 


259,166 


2, 133. 1 


109. 813 


903.8 


-2.6 


-2.3 


+14.6 


+14.5 


+5.2 


+5.2 


+21.0 


+21.0 


+20.1 


+20.1 


+17.9 


+17.9 


342 


11.1 


2,589 


84.2 


3,388 


110.1 


31,661 


1,029.3 


58,742 


1,909.7 


16, 893 


516.7 


345 


11.2 


2,850 


92.3 


3,749 


121.4 


41,808 


1,353.9 


70. 262 


2, 275. 


16, 982 


549.9 


80 


7.8 


213 


20.7 


943 


91.7 


10.007 


973.4 


16, 107 


1,566.8 


1,848 


179.8 


91 


8.7 


292 


27.9 


1,027 


98.1 


13,809 


1.318.9 


20,375 


1,946.0 


2,070 


197.7 


949 


16.3 


10,686 


182.0 


8.684 


149.3 


77,395 


1,330.3 


100,606 


1,729.2 


M.556 


1, 109. 6 


907 


15.6 


12, 317 


212.4 


9,065 


166.3 


89, 891 


1, 549. 8 


120, 672 


2,078.8 


79,203 


1,365.6 


75 


9.5 


105 


13.3 


452 


67.1 


5,418 


685.0 


10,863 


1,373.3 


1,496 


189.0 


68 


8.4 


209 


25.9 


434 


53.7 


6,629 


820.4 


15,942 


1,973.0 


2,093 


259.0 


81 


8.3 


944 


97.0 


1,691 


173.8 


11,570 


1, 189. 1 


22,499 


2,312.3 


8,702 


894.3 


69 


7.4 


853 


91.0 


1,693 


180.7 


12, 144 


1,296.1 


24, 474 


2, 612. 


8,649 


923.1 


52 


11.2 


41 


8.8 


224 


48.3 


3,719 


801.5 


6.913 


1,489.9 


632 


136.2 


58 


12.3 


65 


13.8 


214 


45.5 


4. 791 


1.019.4 


7.551 


1,606.6 


816 


173.6 


8,022 


21.4 


111,967 


298.4 


71,480 


190.5 


420, 532 


1,120.6 


573,009 


1, 626. 9 


196, 646 


523. 7 


8,697 


23.3 


121,026 


324.7 


77,295 


207.4 


476. 028 


1.277.0 


717.253 


1,924.2 


187, 318 


502.5 


+8.4 


+8.9 


+8.1 


+8.S 


+8.1 


+8.9 


+13.2 


+14.0 


+25.2 


+26.0 


-4.7 


-4.0 


1.383 


18.8 


15, 179 


206.2 


11,737 


169.4 


91,609 


1, 244. 6 


137, 899 


1,873.4 


42,159 


572.7 


1,441 


19.7 


15, 879 


216.6 


11,761 


160.3 


IW, 774 


1,429.4 


175, 349 


2, 392. 2 


40,073 


646.7 


4,764 


26.1 


80,290 


439.6 


46,473 


264.4 


236,845 


1, -296. 7 


305,300 


1.671.6 


110,914 


607.2 


5,145 


28.4 


86,271 


476.3 


60,045 


276.3 


261. 446 


1,443.6 


372,068 


2, 054. 4 


102.785 


667.6 


1,875 


15.8 


16. 498 


138.6 


13,270 


111.6 


92,078 


773.6 


129, 810 


1, 090. 7 


43, 473 


365.3 


2,111 


17.8 


18,876 


159.5 


15,499 


131.0 


109,808 


927.8 


169, 836 


1,435.0 


44,460 


375.7 


12.947 


22.5 


96, 199 


167.0 


90,534 


157.2 


603, 160 


1,047.2 


1,232.835 


2,140.3 


229,407 


398.3 


13.918 


24.2 


116, 175 


201.9 


100,655 


174.9 


729,220 


1,267.2 


1,473.302 


2,560.3 


244, 287 


424.5 


+7.5 


+7.6 


+20.8 


+20.9 


+ 11.2 


+ 11.3 


+20.9 


+21.0 


+ 19.5 


+ 19.6 


,+6.5 


+6.6 


9,897 


24.2 


79.628 


194.7 


72.577 


177.5 


447, 215 


1,093.5 


909.680 


2, 224. 4 


178, 264 


435.9 


10,793 


26.4 


%.281 


235.6 


79,839 


195.4 


544,835 


1,333.4 


1, 093, 947 


2,677.2 


191, 376 


468.3 


+9.1 


+9.1 


+20.9 


+21.0 


+10.0 


+ 10.1 


+21.8 


+21.9 


+20.3 


+20.4 


+7.4 


+7.4 


2,694 


24.0 


30.651 


272 8 


27,949 


248.7 


115, 183 


1,025.1 


251,263 


2, 236. 2 


57,046 


507.7 


3,082 


27.7 


34.882 


313.4 


30.523 


274.2 


140, 717 


1, 264. 2 


307,382 


2,761.5 


59, 155 


531.4 


1,239 


23.3 


5,785 


108.8 


6,284 


118.2 


55,064 


1,035.8 


108,623 


2,043.3 


20,728 


389.9 


1,255 


23.5 


7,166 


134.4 


6,783 


127.3 


66,870 


1,254.6 


127,706 


2,396.0 


20,948 


393.0 


3,173 


35.1 


25,569 


282 7 


23.083 


255.2 


143,311 


1,584.6 


250,638 


2,771.3 


49, 589 


548.3 


3,377 


37.1 


30,679 


337.2 


24, 751 


272.0 


173, 215 


1,903.9 


303,110 


3,331.6 


56,835 


624.7 


2,299 


21.4 


15, 397 


143.5 


12,825 


119.5 


101, 190 


943.0 


202,203 


1,884.3 


40,443 


376.9 


2.565 


23.9 


20,529 


191.2 


15,048 


140.2 


125, 821 


1,171.8 


245, 354 


2,285.1 


43,202 


402 4 


492 


10.8 


2,226 


48.7 


2,436 


53.3 


32, 467 


710.6 


96,953 


2, 122. 


10,458 


228.9 


514 


11.3 


3,025 


66.3 


2,734 


59.9 


38,212 


836.9 


110,395 


2,417.8 


11,236 


246.1 



57 



Table 3. — Index of Crime by Regions, 



West North CentraL 

Percent change.. 
Iowa 

Kansas 

Minnesota 

Missouri 

Nebraska 

North Dakota 

South Dakota 



Percent change 

South Atlantic <_ - 

Percent change 

Delaware . . 

Florida 

Georgia 

Maryland 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

\'irginia 

West \'irginia 

East South Central 

Percent change 

Alabama 

Kentucky 

Mississippi 

Tennessee __ .. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 

1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 

1973 

1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



16, 704, 000 
16, 682, 000 

2,904,000 
2, 855, 000 
2, 279, 000 

2, 270, 000 
3, 897, 000 

3, 917, 000 

4, 757, 000 
4, 777, 000 
1,542,000 
1,. 543, 000 

640,000 
637,000 
685,000 
682, 000 



66,006.000 
67,177.000 

32, 460, 000 

33, 206, 000 

576, 000 
573, 000 

7. 678, 000 

8. 090, 000 
4, 786. 000 
4, 882, 000 
4, 070, 000 

4, 094. 000 
6, 273, 000 

5. 363, 000 
2, 726, 000 
2, 784. 000 
4,811,000 
4, 908, 000 
1, 794, 000 
1,791,000 



13, 288, 000 
13, 387, 000 

3, 639, OOO 
3,577,000 
3, 342, 000 
3, 357, 000 
2,281,000 
2, 324, 000 
4,126,000 
4,129,000 



Total crime index 



568,653 
661,359 
+ 16.3 
82,230 
97,460 
80,079 
97, 619 
137, 781 
153,976 
197,008 
228, 726 
43, 349 
51,603 
13,302 
13, 760 
14,904 
18,215 



2.407.429 

2.924.680 

+21.5 

1,316,379 
1, 632, 930 
+24.0 
26, 396 
34, 091 
457, 631 
697, 636 
164, 175 
191,004 
195,010 
231,316 
148, 269 
188, 307 
90, 694 
116,961 
165, 814 
187, 225 
26, 399 
31,689 



337,292 
403.314 
+19.6 
91,389 
107,314 
75,705 
92,644 
43, 939 
52,271 
126,259 
151,085 



3,404.3 
3, 964. 5 
+ 16.5 
2,831.6 
3,413.7 
3, 513. 8 
4, 300. 4 

3, 535. 6 
3,931.0 
4,141.4 

4, 788. 1 
2,811.2 
3,344.3 
2, 078. 4 
2, 160. 1 
2, 175. 8 
2, 670. 8 



3,647.3 
4.353.7 

+ 19.4 
4, 055. 4 
4,917.6 

+21.3 

4, 582. 6 

5, 949. 6 
5, 960. 3 
7, 387. 3 
3, 430. 3 
3, 912. 4 
4,791.4 
5, 650. 1 
2,811.9 
3,511.2 

3, 327. 

4, 165. 3 
3, 238. 7 
3,814.7 
1,471.6 
1, 769. 3 



2, 538. 3 
3, 012. 7 
+ 18.7 
2, 582. 3 
3,000.1 
2, 265. 3 
2, 759. 7 
1,926.3 

2, 249. 2 
3,060.1 

3, 659. 1 



Violent crime ' 



38, 410 
44,708 
+16.4 
2,970 
3,455 
4,956 
6,272 
6,926 
8,119 
19,441 
21,612 
2,859 
3,697 
389 
319 



271.789 
300.287 
+ 10.5 
156. 062 
176. 920 
+ 13.4 
2.016 
2,639 
46, 419 
54, 821 
19, 738 
21, 587 
26, 093 
29, 439 
23,086 
26, 220 
10, 757 
12. 688 
13,744 
15, 164 



42,251 
44, 946 
+6.4 



7,857 
7,734 
7.782 



229.9 
268.0 
+16.6 
102.3 
121.0 
217.5 
276.3 
177.7 
207.3 
408.7 
452.4 
185.4 
239.6 
60.8 
50.1 
126.9 
180.9 



411.8 

447.0 
+8.5 
480.8 
532. 8 
+ 10.8 
350.0 
443.1 
604. 6 
677.6 
412. 4 
442. 2 
641.1 
719.1 
437.8 
488. 9 
394. 6 
455.7 
285. 7 
309. 



318.0 
335.7 



372. 9 
220.1 
234.0 
339.1 
334.9 
3.58.0 
386.8 



530. 243 
616, 651 
+16.3 
79,260 
94,005 
75,123 
91,347 
130, 855 
145, 857 
177, 567 
207,114 
40, 490 
47,906 
12, 913 
13,441 
14,035 
16, 981 



2,135,640 
2.624.393 
+22.9 
1.160.317 
1, 456, 010 
+25.5 
24, 380 
31, 552 
411,212 
542, 815 
144, 437 
169, 417 
168,917 
201, 877 
125, 183 
162, 087 
79, 937 
103, 273 
142, 070 
172, 061 
24, 180 
29, 229 



295,041 
358,368 
+21.5 
78,999 
93, 976 
68, 349 
84. 787 
36, 205 
44, 489 
111,488 
135, 116 



3,174.3 
3, 696. 5 
+ 16.5 
2, 729. 3 
3, 292. 6 
3, 296. 3 
4, 024. 1 
3, 357. 8 
3, 723. 7 
3, 732. 8 
4, 335. 6 
2, 625. 8 
3, 104. 7 
2, 017. 7 
2, 110 
2, 048. 9 



3,235.5 
3.906.7 

+20.7 
3,674.6 
4, 384. 8 

+22. 

4, 232. 6 

5, 506. 5 

6, 355. 7 
6, 709. 7 
3, 017. 9 

3, 470. 2 
4,150.3 

4, 931. 

2, 374. 

3, 022. 3 

2, 932. 4 

3, 709. 5 

2, 963. 

3, 505. ■ 
1,347.8 
1. 632. 



2, 220. 4 
2, 677 

+20.6 
2, 232. 2 
2, 627. : 
2, 045. 2 
2, 525. ■ 
1,587.: 
1,914.3 



Murder and nonneg- 
ligent manslaughter 



8.504 
8.926 
+5.0 
4,362 
4,488 
+2.9 
34 
59 
1,180 
1,191 



1,737 
+2.0 



58 



Geographic Divisions and States, 1973-1974 — Continued 



Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larcenj 


-theft 


Motor vehicle theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


3,050 


18.3 


16,571 


99.2 


17,957 


107.5 


155,945 


933. 6 


323, 155 


1, 934. 6 


51, 143 


306.3 


3,125 


18 7 


19, 894 


119.3 


20, 816 


124.8 


184,385 


1,105.3 


379, 355 


2,274.0 


52,911 


317.2 


+2.5 


+2.2 


+20. 1 


+20.3 


+ 15.9 


+ 16.1 


+18.2 


+ 18.4 


+ 17.4 


+ 17.5 


+3.5 


+3.6 


329 


11.3 


954 


32.9 


1,624 


55.9 


18,412 


634.0 


55,310 


1,904.6 


5,538 


190. 7 


287 


10.1 


1,390 


48 7 


1,724 


60.4 


22,597 


791.5 


65,153 


2,282.1 


6,255 


219. 1 


411 


18.0 


1,781 


78.1 


2. 627 


115.3 


23,485 


1,030.5 


46,840 


2,055.3 


4,798 


210. 5 


447 


19.7 


2,447 


107.8 


3,221 


141.9 


28,797 


1,268.6 


57, 134 


2,516.9 


5.416 


238.6 


579 


14.9 


3,455 


88.7 


2,785 


71.5 


39. 610 


1,016.4 


78. 122 


2,004.7 


13,123 


336.7 


692 


17.7 


4.079 


104.1 


3,230 


82.5 


43,939 


1,121.8 


87,280 


2,228.2 


14,638 


373.7 


1,342 


28.2 


9,201 


193. 4 


8,471 


178.1 


58, 740 


1, 234. 8 


97,640 


2,052.6 


21, 187 


445.4 


1,285 


26.9 


10, 353 


216.7 


9, 508 


199.0 


70,283 


1.471.3 


116,428 


2,437.3 


20,403 


427.1 


254 


16.5 


964 


62.5 


1,574 


102. 1 


9. 828 


637.4 


25, 994 


1,685.7 


4,668 


302.7 


291 


18.9 


1,404 


91.0 


1,947 


126. 2 


11,939 


773.8 


31,685 


2,053.5 


4,282 


277.5 


47 


7.3 


47 


7.3 


■290 


45.3 


2,454 


383.4 


9,618 


1,502.8 


841 


131.4 


50 


7.8 


82 


12. 9 


178 


27.9 


2, 758 


433.0 


9,840 


1,544.7 


843 


132.3 


88 


12.8 


169 


24.7 


586 


85.5 


3,416 


498.7 


9,631 


1,406.0 


988 


144. 2 


73 


10.7 


139 


20.4 


1,008 


147.8 


4,072 


597.1 


11,835 


1,735.3 


1,074 


1.57. 5 


15,716 


23.8 


93.485 


141.6 


154.084 


233.4 


739,880 


1.120.9 


1,187..'!01 


1.798.8 


208.459 


315.8 


17,534 


26.1 


113.244 


168.6 


160.583 


239.0 


927,636 


1.380.9 


1,471.561 


2,190.6 


225.196 


335.2 


+ 11.6 


+9.7 


+21.1 


+ 19.1 


+4.2 


+2.4 


+25.4 


+23.2 


+23.9 


+21.8 


+8.0 


+6.1 


8,150 


25.1 


56, 127 


172. 9 


87,423 


269.3 


395, 550 


1. 218. 6 


652, 543 


2,010.3 


112,224 


345.7 


9,026 


27.2 


69, 744 


210.0 


93, 662 


282.1 


503, 108 


1.615.1 


832, 737 


2, 507. 8 


120, 165 


361.9 


+10.7 


+8.4 


+24.3 


+21.5 


+7.1 


+4.8 


+27.2 


+24.3 


+27. 6 


+24.7 


+7.1 


+4.7 


91 


15.8 


520 


90.3 


1,371 


238.0 


7. 024 


1.219.4 


14, 552 


2, 526. 4 


2,804 


486.8 


99 


17.3 


733 


127. 9 


1,648 


287.6 


8, 697 


1.517.8 


19, 825 


3, 469. 9 


3,030 


628.8 


2,447 


31.9 


17, 069 


222.3 


25,723 


335.0 


142,597 


1,857.2 


234, 073 


3, 048. 6 


34, 542 


449.9 


2,910 


36.0 


22,263 


276.2 


28, 467 


361.8 


186. 042 


2, 287. 3 


318. 708 


3, 939. 5 


39, 065 


482.9 


1,236 


25.8 


7,565 


158.1 


10, 103 


211. 1 


60, 726 


1,268.8 


66,668 


1, 390. 7 


17,153 


358. 4 


1,323 


27.1 


8,617 


176.5 


10, 779 


220.8 


71, 394 


1,462.4 


81, 078 


1,660.8 


16, 945 


347.1 


1,131 


27.8 


12, 274 


301.6 


12, 228 


300.4 


46,584 


1,144.6 


100, 036 


2, 467. 9 


22, 297 


547.8 


1,219 


29.8 


14,765 


360.6 


12, 974 


316.9 


57, 433 


1, 402. 9 


120, 562 


2.944.8 


23,882 


583.3 


847 


16.1 


3.766 


71.4 


17, 790 


337.4 


47, 036 


892. 


68. 984 


1. 308. 2 


9,163 


173.8 


833 


15.5 


4, 948 


93.3 


19,810 


369.4 


63,654 


1.186.9 


88, 336 


1,647.1 


10, 097 


188.3 


612 


22.5 


2, 158 


79.2 


7,495 


278.6 


32. 567 


1.194.3 


40, 675 


1,492.1 


6.706 


246.0 


730 


26.2 


3.547 


127.4 


7,959 


285.9 


43. 497 


1.562.4 


51,914 


1, 864. 7 


7,862 


282.4 


991 


20.7 


4,861 


101.0 


7,481 


155.5 


39, 731 


826. 8 


89, 440 


1, 859. 1 


12, 899 


268.1 


1,143 


23.3 


6, 026 


122.8 


7.572 


154.3 


49, 324 


1, 006. 


109, 681 


2, 234. 7 


13. 056 


266.0 


166 


9.3 


501 


27.9 


1,449 


80.8 


7, 459 


415.8 


14. 799 


824. 9 


1,022 


107.1 


179 


10.0 


631 


35.2 


1. 542 


86.1 


9,883 


661.8 


17, 074 


953. 3 


2,272 


126. 9 


2,793 


21.0 


12, 103 


91.1 


25,652 


193.0 


109, 677 


825.4 


153. 550 


1,155.6 


31,814 


239. 4 


2,870 


21.4 


14,268 


106.6 


26, 071 


194.7 


139, 013 


1,038.4 


185, 150 


1,383.1 


34. 205 


255. 5 


+2.8 


+1.9 


+ 17.9 


+ 17.0 


+ 1.6 


+.9 


+26.7 


+25.8 


+20.6 


+ 19.7 


+7.5 


+6 7 


751 


21.2 


2,809 


79.4 


8,362 


236.3 


31,754 


897.3 


39. 206 


1,107.8 


8.039 


227. 2 


811 


22.7 


3, 562 


99.6 


8,429 


235.6 


37,841 


1,057.9 


46,813 


1,308.7 


9,322 


260.0 


545 


16.3 


2,843 


85.1 


3,645 


109.1 


22, 716 


679.7 


38,072 


1,139.2 


7,561 


226.2 


592 


17.6 


3,100 


92.3 


3,818 


113.7 


27,865 


830.1 


49, 240 


1,466.8 


7,682 


228.8 


389 


17.1 


1.0t» 


46.8 


5,909 


259.1 


13,544 


593.8 


20, 066 


879. 7 


2. 595 


113.8 


405 


17.4 


1,116 


48.0 


5.962 


256.5 


17,562 


755.7 


24,042 


1,034.5 


2,885 


124. 1 


1,108 


26.9 


5,383 


130.5 


7.736 


187.5 


41,663 


1, 009. 8 


56,206 


1,362.2 


13, 619 


330.1 


1,062 


2.5.7 


6, 490 


157.2 


7,862 


190. 4 


55, 745 


1,350.1 


65, 055 


1,. 57.5. 6 


14,310 


346.7 



59 



Table 3. — Index of Crime by Regions, 



West South Central 



Percent elianpe. 
Arkansas . 



Louisiana_- 
Oklalionia. 
Texas 



Percent change . 
Mountain — 



Percent change _ 
Arizona.-- 



Colorado 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico. 

Utah 

Wyoming 



Percent change . 
Alaska 



California 

Hawaii 

Oregon 

Washington. 



Puerto Rico. 



1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1U73 



1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 
1973 



1974 
1973 
1974 
1973 
1974 



1973 
1974 



20, 258, 000 
20,584,000 



2, 037, 000 
2, 062, 000 
3,764,000 
3, 764, 000 
2, 663, 000 
2, 709, 000 
1,794,000 
2, 050, 000 



36,567.000 
37,244.000 



I, 150, 000 
1,411,000 



2. 058, 000 

2, 153, 000 

2, 437, 000 

2, 496. OOO 

770, 000 

799, 000 

721,000 

735, 000 

548,000 

573, 000 

1, 100. 000 

1, 122. 000 

1, 157. 000 

1, 173. 000 

353, 000 

359, 000 



27,417.0(X) 
27, 833, 000 



330, 000 

337, 000 

20,601,000 

20, 907, 000 

832, 000 

847,000 

2, 225, 000 

2, 266, 000 

3, 429, 000 

3, 476, 000 



2, 952, 000 
3, 045, 000 



Total crime index 



753, 758 
888, 436 
+ 17.9 
56, 149 
68,060 
128,087 
143, 649 
92,311 
110,960 
477,211 
565, 767 



:, 123, 920 
,421,256 
+ 14.0 
475, 084 
508, 056 
+ 19.6 
137, 966 
177,013 
133, 933 
153, 898 
26,625 
32, 620 
24, 480 
30, 016 
36, 344 
44, 849 
54, 549 
58, 489 
49, 139 
58, 066 
12,048 
13, 105 



. 648. 836 

. 8.53, 200 

+ 12.4 

16,313 

17, 658 

, 298, 872 

,431,468 

41,257 

51, 427 

117,860 

143, 772 

174, 534 



3, 720. 8 
4, 316. 1 
+ 16.0 
2, 756. 5 
3, 300. 7 

3. 402. 9 
3, 816. 4 
3, 466. 4 
4,096.0 
4, 046. 2 

4, 695. 2 



5,808.3 
6,501.1 
+11.9 

5, 192. 2 
6, 036. 1 

+16.3 

6, 703. 9 
8, 221. 7 

5, 495. 8 
6, 165. 8 
3, 457. 8 
4, 082. 6 

3, 395. 3 

4, 083. 8 

6, 632. 1 

7, 827. 1 
4, 932. 1 
5,212.9 
4, 247. 1 
4, 050. 2 
3, 413. 
3, 650. 4 



6, 013. 9 
6, 658. 3 
+ 10.7 
4, 943. 3 
5, 239. 8 
6, 304. 9 
6, 846. 8 
4, 958. 8 
6,071.7 
5, 297. 1 
6, 344. 7 
5, 089. 9 
0, 009. 1 



,451. 



Molcnt crime - 



73, 476 
78,421 
+6 7 
5,905 
6,521 
16, 020 
17, 794 
6,556 
7,588 
44, 995 
46,518 



168,913 
188,897 
+ 11.8 
33, 965 
37, 588 
+ 10.7 
9,877 
12, 202 
10, 088 
10, 728 
1,264 
1,465 
1,207 
1, 194 
3,135 
3, 910 
5, 219 
5,053 
2,412 



134,948 

151,309 

+ 12. 1 

1,269 

1,527 

116,563 

127, 658 

1, 295 

1,762 

6,512 

8,326 

9, 309 

12, 036 



15, 640 
15, 428 



461.9 
507.2 
+9.8 
371.2 
399. 4 
+7.0 
479.9 
566.7 



183.4 
167.4 



682.4 
471.9 
4.50. 4 
208. 5 
214. 6 
216.1 
144.6 



680, 282 
810, 015 
+19.1 
50, 244 
61,539 
112,067 
12.5,855 
85, 755 
103, 372 
432.216 
519, 249 



1.955,007 
2, 232, 359 
+ 14.2 
441, 119 
.530, 468 
+20.3 
128, 089 
164,811 
123, 845 
143, 170 
25, 361 
31, 155 
23, 273 
28, 822 
33, 209 
40, 939 
49. 330 
53, 436 
46. 727 
.55, 549 
11,285 
12, .586 



3, 3.58. 1 
3, 935. 2 
+ 17.2 
2, 466. 6 
2, 984. 4 
2, 977. 3 
3, 343. 7 
3, 220. 2 
3, 815. 9 
3, 664. 7 
4, 309. 1 



5,346.4 
5,993.9 
+ 12.1 
4,821.0 

5, 636. 7 
+16. 9 

6, 224. 

7, 654. 9 
5, 081. 9 

5, 736. 
3, 293. 6 
3, 899. 2 

3, 227. 9 
3,021.4 

6, 060. 

7, 144. 7 

4, 460. 2 
4, 762. 6 
4, 038. 6 
4, 735. 6 
3, 196. 9 
3, 505. 8 



1,513.1 
1,701,1 



16,1 
1,182, a 
1,303,8 



5,521.7 
6,114.7 
+10.7 
4, 558. 8 
4. 786. 6 
5, 739. 1 
6, 236. 2 

4, 803. 1 
5, 863. 6 
5, 004. 4 
5. 977. 3 
4,818.5 

5, 662. 8 



1.921.8 



Murder and nonnog- 
ligent manslaughter 



2,867 
3,107 
+8.4 



2,186 
2,407 
+10.1 



1,862 
1,985 



' Population for each state for 1973 and 1974 is Bureau of Census provisional estimate as of July 1st and subject to change. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcil)le rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Property crime is oflenses of burglary, larceny-theft, 

t. 

3 Offense totals based on all reporting agencies and estimates for unreported areas. 

' Includes the District of Columbia. 



nd motor vehicle 



60 



Geographic Divisions 


and States, 


J 973- T 974— Continued 














Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated assault 


Burglary 


Larceny-theft 


Motor vehicle theft 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 


Number 


Rate per 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 




100,000 


4,773 


23.6 


25, 255 


124.7 


41,009 


202. 4 


234,653 


1, 1.58. 3 


381,208 


1,881.8 


64,421 


318.0 


5,638 


27.4 


29, 232 


142.0 


40, 8.50 


198. 5 


285, 515 


1,387.1 


453, 674 


2, 204. 


70, 826 


344.1 


+ 18.1 


+ 16.1 


+ 1.5.7 


+13.9 


-.4 


-1.9 


+21.7 


+19.8 


+19.0 


+ 17.1 


+9.0 


+8.2 


398 


19.5 


1,456 


71.5 


3,871 


190. 


18,088 


888.0 


29,204 


1,433.7 


2,952 


144.9 


4!G 


23. 9 


1,664 


80.7 


4,134 


200. 5 


22, 170 


1,075.2 


35,989 


1,745.3 


3,380 


163.9 


837 


22.2 


5, 218 


138.6 


9,384 


240. 3 


36,212 


962.1 


63,625 


1, 690. 4 


12,230 


324.9 


049 


2.5.2 


5,885 


156.3 


10,356 


275. 1 


30,362 


1,045.7 


73,633 


1,956.2 


12. 860 


341.7 


532 


20.0 


1,816 


68.2 


4,031 


151.4 


30, 095 


1,163.9 


46,475 


1,745.2 


8.285 


311.1 


676 


2.5.0 


2,263 


83.5 


4,429 


163.5 


39,421 


1.4.55.2 


54, 152 


1,999.0 


9.799 


361.7 


3,006 


25. 5 


16,765 


142. 1 


23,723 


201.1 


149. 358 


1. 266. 4 


241,904 


2,051.1 


40,954 


347. 2 


3, .521 


29. 2 


19, 42(1 


161.2 


21,931 


182.0 


184.562 


1.531.6 


289, 900 


2,405.8 


44,787 


371.7 


12,968 


35.5 


67,131 


183.6 


85,947 


235.0 


646,588 


1,768.2 


1,110.244 


3,036.2 


198. 175 


542.0 


13,522 


36.3 


74.259 


199.4 


98,009 


263.2 


718,786 


1,929.9 


1.306,414 


3,507.7 


207. 159 


556.2 


+4.3 


+2.3 


+ 10.6 


+ 8.6 


+14.0 


+ 12.0 


+ 11.2 


+9.1 


+ 17.7 


+15.5 


+4.5 


+2.6 


2,746 


30.0 


11, 170 


122.1 


19, 368 


211.7 


133, 546 


1, 459. 5 


267, 732 


2, 926. 


39. 841 


435. 4 


2,901 


30.8 


13, 130 


139. 5 


20, 857 


221.6 


163, 166 


I, 733. 8 


32.5, 555 


3,450.3 


41. 747 


443.6 


+5.6 


+2.7 


+ 17.5 


+ 14.3 


4 7.7 


+4.7 


+22. 2 


+18.8 


+21. 6 


+18.2 


+4.8 


+ 1.9 


637 


31.0 


3,031 


147.3 


6,042 


293. 6 


40.301 


1,0.58.3 


76,560 


3, 720. 1 


11.228 


545.6 


807 


37.5 


4, 396 


204.2 


6, 793 


31.5. 5 


.54. 557 


2, 534. 


97, 286 


4,518.6 


12. 068 


602.3 


944 


38.7 


3, 970 


162. 9 


4. 981 


204.4 


38. 963 


1. 598. 8 


70, 931 


2, 910. 6 


13.951 


572.5 


910 


36.5 


4.137 


105.7 


5,530 


221. 6 


46. 005 


1,843.1 


83, 722 


3.354.2 


13. 443 


538.6 


109 


14.2 


207 


26. 9 


928 


120.5 


6. 536 


848.8 


17,231 


2, 237. 8 


1.594 


207.0 


128 


16.0 


303 


37.9 


989 


123.8 


8.004 


1,001.8 


21,441 


2, 683. 5 


1.710 


214.0 


118 


16.4 


262 


36.3 


784 


108. •/ 


5.448 


755.6 


16, 163 


2.241.7 


1.662 


230.5 


90 


12.2 


262 


35.6 


811 


110.3 


6. 526 


887.9 


20, 216 


2, 750. 5 


2.080 


283.0 


352 


46.0 


1,436 


262. 


1,380 


251. 8 


11.781 


2, 149. 8 


18,079 


3, 290. 1 


3. 349 


611.1 


259 


45.2 


1,.592 


277. 8 


1. 974 


344. 5 


14.a53 


2, 4.52. 5 


23, 413 


4.086.0 


3.473 


606.1 


366 


33.1 


1, 424 


128.8 


3, 299 


208.3 


16.601 


1.501.0 


28,914 


2.614.3 


3,815 


344.9 


391 


34.8 


1.398 


124.6 


3.137 


279.6 


17, 762 


1.583.1 


32,240 


2,873.4 


3,431 


306.1 


265 


22. 9 


724 


62.6 


1,38b 


110.8 


11,446 


089. 3 


31,796 


2, 748. 1 


3,485 


301.2 


261 


22.3 


889 


75.8 


1,330 


113.4 


13, 289 


1. 132. 9 


38, 391 


3, 272. 


3,869 


329.8 


55 


15.6 


116 


32.9 


568 


160. 


2. 470 


690.7 


8,058 


2, 282. 7 


757 


214.4 


55 


15.3 


1.53 


42.6 


293 


81.6 


2, 'iTH 


827, 3 


8,846 


2, 464. 1 


770 


214.5 


10,222 


37.3 


55,961 


204.1 


66, .570 


242.8 


513. CM2 


1.871.3 


842,512 


3,073.0 


158,334 


577.5 


10,621 


38.2 


61, 129 


219.6 


77, 152 


277.2 


555, 620 


1.906.3 


980, 859 


3,524.1 


165,412 


594. 3 


+3.9 


+2.4 


+9.2 


+7.6 


+ 15.9 


+ 14.2 


+8.3 


+6.7 


+16.4 


+14.7 


+4.5 


+2.0 


147 


44.5 


221 


67.0 


868 


263.0 


3.852 


1.167.3 


9,456 


2.865.5 


1,736 


526.1 


166 


49.3 


298 


88.4 


1.017 


301.8 


3. 932 


1.166.8 


10,016 


2. 972. 1 


2,183 


647.8 


8. 3.57 


40.6 


49, 531 


240. 4 


56,813 


275.8 


407. 824 


1,979.6 


643,488 


3. 123. 6 


130.997 


635.9 


8,494 


40.6 


52,822 


252.7 


M,357 


307.8 


433. 194 


2,072.0 


737,067 


3,525.5 


133.549 


638.8 


168 


20.2 


696 


83.7 


387 


46.5 


12. 775 


1,535.5 


23,552 


2.830.8 


3.635 


436. 9 


221 


26.1 


1,030 


121.6 


441 


52.1 


15.117 


1,784.8 


20,584 


3,492.8 


4.964 


586.1 


653 


29.3 


2,211 


99. 4 


3,538 


159.0 


35.772 


1,607.7 


66, 404 


2,988.5 


9.082 


408.2 


732 


32.3 


2, 9M 


130.8 


4,503 


198.7 


41.766 


1,843.2 


83,060 


3,665.5 


10. 620 


468.7 


897 


26.2 


3,302 


96.3 


4,973 


145.0 


52,810 


1,540.4 


09,522 


2.902.4 


12.884 


375.7 


1,008 


29.0 


4,015 


115.5 


6,834 


196.6 


61,611 


1, 772. 5 


121.132 


3, 484. 8 


14.096 


405.5 


687 


22.6 


3,549 


120.2 


11,003 


372.8 


23, 030 


780.3 


20,896 


708.0 


12.797 


433.6 


681 


22.4 


5,013 


164.7 


9,216 


302.7 


31,598 


1,037.8 


22, 245 


730.6 


13,021 


427.7 



61 



Table A.— Index of Crime by State, 1974 



ALABAMA 3 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 2,206,670 

Area actually reporting 82. 4' 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Other cities 484,377 

Area actually reporting 81. 1% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Rural... 886,963 

Area actually reporting 40. 1% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

State total 3.577,000 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



ALASKA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. None 

Other cities 146,698 

Area actually reporting. 100. 0% 

Rural... 191,302 

Area actually reporting 100. 0% 

State tola! 337,000 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

ARIZONA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 1,611,200 

Area actually reporting 99. 5% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Other cities. 223,325 

Area actually reporting . _ 96. 1% 

Estimated totals.. 100.0% 

Rural.. 318,476 

Area actually reporting 90.7% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Slate total 2,153,000 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

ARKANSAS 3 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. "96,922 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Other cities 482,279 

Area actually reporting 76. 1% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Rural. 782,799 

Area actually reporting 30. 4% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

State total 2,062.000 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

CALIFORNIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 19, 444, 278 

Area actually reporting 99. 9% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Other cities 696,608 

.\rea actually reporting. 99. 3% 

Estimated totals 100.0% 

Rural. 866,214 

Area actually reporting 100. 0% 

State total 20.907,000 

Rate per 100, 000 Inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



8,874 
10, 937 

2,722 

6,793 

107.314 

3,000.1 



6,153 
17.658 



151, 430 
152, 185 

15, 178 
15,802 

8,183 

9,026 

177.013 



38, 926 
42, 070 

11,142 
14.646 

3,464 
11,344 
68.060 
3, 300. 7 



1,348,629 
1,349,339 

44, 613 
44, 818 

37, 311 
1,431,468 

6, 846. 8 



1,357 
1,673 



13,338 
372.9 



1.527 
453.1 



10, 131 
10, 170 



3,660 
3, 919 



1.270 
1, 669 



6,521 

316,2 



122, 444 
122, 496 



127.658 
610.6 



93,976 

2, 627. 2 



4,628 
16,131 

4, 786. 6 



13. 956 

14, 630 



8,266 
164.811 

7, 664. 9 



35, 366 
38, 161 



9,872 
12, 977 



10,411 
61,539 

2, 984. 4 



1,226,186 
1, 226, 844 



41,973 
42, 261 



34.705 
1,303.810 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


297 


526 


339 


688 


49 


56 


60 


68 


55 


62 


137 


166 


536 


811 


15.0 


22.7 


22 


106 


24 


60 


46 


166 


13.6 


49.3 


175 


663 


176 


665 


14 

16 


75 

78 


14 
15 
206 

9.6 


68 

64 

807 

37.6 


114 
125 


313 
351 


26 
34 


56 
72 




21 




6tl 


231 

11.2 


492 

23.9 


1,887 
1,887 


8,124 
8,127 


36 
36 


140 
141 


63 
1,985 

9.5 


226 
8,494 
40.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



3.562 

99.0 



4,048 
4,061 



1,275 
1,357 



51,805 
51, 826 



62,822 

262.7 



5,000 
6,650 



1,044 
1,287 



1,592 
8.429 
236.6 



5,245 
5.268 



6,793 
315.5 



1,041 
1,368 



4,134 

200.5 



60,628 
60,655 



28,078 
31, 634 



3,038 
3,744 



2,463 
37,841 
1, 057. ! 



1,628 

3,932 

1,166.8 



3,676 
3,827 

2,677 

2,953 

54,557 

2, 634. 



11,977 
13, 153 



3.342 
4, 393 



4,624 
22,170 

1.075.2 



409,151 
409,363 



11,231 
11,308 

1, 957 12, 633 
64,357 433,194 

I 2, 072. 



36,838 
39, 934 



4,049 
4,990 



2.423 
10,016 

2. 972. 1 



82, 244 
82, 702 

9, 462 
9,851 

4,291 

4,733 

97.286 

4, 518. 6 



21,457 
22, 930 



5,163 
35,989 
1, 745. 3 



687,589 
687, 989 

28,587 
28,783 

20,295 
737,067 
3, 525. 5 



62 



Table 4. — Indtx of Crime by Staf«, 1974 — Continued 



COLORADO 

standard Metropolitan Statistical Area., 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - — 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



CONNECTICUT 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area-, 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities - - _ . . 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



DELAWARE 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural.... 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



FLORIDA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting 

State total.- 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



GEORGIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1, 804, 942 
08. 1% 
100.0% 
304, 8S6 
91. 7% 
100.0% 
386,202 
"9.6% 
100.0% 
2, 4%, 000 



2, 734, 714 

96. 1% 
100.0% 
143,336 

86.2% 
100.0% 
209,960 

26.0% 

100.0% 

3,088,000 



398, 124 
100. 0% 

75,513 
100.0% 

99,363 
100.0% 
573,000 



6, 780, 222 
100.0% 
498,836 
100.0% 
810, 942 
100. 0% 

8,090,000 



2, 770, 045 

91. 7% 
100.0% 



100.0% 
1,431,827 



100.0% 
4,882,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



124,337 
126,809 

16.486 
17,982 

7,490 

9,407 

153,898 

6, 166. 8 



122, 926 
127,891 



136, 087 

4, 407. 



26,160 

3,674 

4,257 
34,091 

5, 949. 6 



538,876 

27,406 

31,354 
597, 636 
7, 387. 3 



133,226 
141,632 

15,932 
23,305 

12,536 
26,067 
191,004 
3, 912. 4 



9,109 
9,109 



10,728 

429.8 



6,396 
6.634 



7,045 

228.1 



2,539 
443.1 



50,372 

1,944 

2, .505 
54,821 

677.6 



15, 743 
16,401 

1,361 
1,991 

1,537 
3.195 
21,587 

442.2 



Prop- 
erty - 
crime 



116,228 
117,400 

15.606 
17.021 

6,967 

8.749 

143,170 

6, 736. 



116.630 
121,357 



4,478 
5.196 



129,042 

4, 178. 8 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



3,891 
31,552 

5,506.5 



488,504 

25,462 

28,849 
542,815 

6, 709. 7 



117,483 
125,231 

14.571 
21,314 

10,999 
22, 872 
169,417 
3,470.2 



2,910 
36.0 



1,323 

27.1 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



3,926 
3.926 



4,137 

165.7 



2,850 

92.3 



22,263 

275.2 



4,262 
4,262 



5,530 

221,6 



3.289 
3.370 



3,749 
121.4 



8,617 
176.5 



1,648 

287.6 



25.520 
1,102 



1,635 
28,457 



6,943 
7,245 



2,345 
10, 779 



2,639 
3,314 
46,005 

1, 843 1 



37, 671 
39,000 



1,339 
1,664 



1,254 
41,808 
1,353.9 



164,995 

8,298 

11, 749 
185,042 

2, 287. 3 



49,856 
53,378 

4,827 
7,061 

5,268 
10,955 
71,394 
1, 462. 4 



11,187 
12,202 



4.891 
83,722 
3. 364, 2 



63.148 
66,117 



1,042 
70,252 

2, 276. 



2,206 
19,825 
3,459.9 



287, 307 

16,069 

15,332 
318,708 
3, 939. 5 



55.166 
58,518 

8,734 
12, 776 

4.705 

9,784 

81,078 

1, 660. 8 



63 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by Sfafe, 1974 — Continued 



HAWAn 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities -- 

Area actually reporting 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting . - 

Estimated totals 

Sute total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 




IDAHO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities --^ 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - - 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Stale tctal 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

ILLINOIS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated totals 
Rural - - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 
State toUI.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

INDIANA > 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - 

Rural 

A rea actually reporting - 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

IOWA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area_ 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other citles_ _ 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated totals 

Rural - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - .- 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



690, 446 
100. 0% 

32,275 
100.0% 
124, 279 

74. 4% 
100. 0% 
847,000 



130,412 
99.5% 
100.0% 
332, 174 
98.8% 
100.0% 
336, 414 
99.1% 
100. 0% 
799,000 



3, 427, 343 
85.4% 
100. 0% 
756, 645 
83.5% 
100.0% 
1, 146, 012 
56.0% 
100.0% 
5,330,000 



1,053,109 
98. 3% 
100.0% 
747,665 
89. 9% 
100.0% 
1,054,226 
77. 6% 
100. 0% 
2,855,000 



Total 
Crime 
Indej 


Violent 1 
crime 


Prop- 
erty 2 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


43,753 


1,560 


42, 193 


62 


189 


981 


328 


13,091 


24,463 


1,653 


52 


1,601 


5 


8 


9 


30 


460 


1,094 


4,483 

6,021 
51,427 

6,071.7 


112 

150 

1,762 

208.0 


4,371 

5,871 

49, 665 

5,863.6 


2 

3 

70 

8.3 


18 

24 

221 

26.1 


30 

40 

1,030 

121.6 


62 
83 
441 

52.1 


1,166 
1,566 
15, 117 

1,784.8 


2,998 

4,027 

29,584 

3,492.8 


6,816 
6,854 


282 
283 


6,534 
6,571 


S 
5 


26 
26 


74 
74 


177 
178 


1,351 
1,361 


4,751 
4,775 


18,396 
18,610 


684 
691 


17,712 
17,919 


21 
21 


42 
42 


171 
173 


450 
455 


3,995 
4,042 


12,845 
12,995 


7,089 

7,156 

32,620 

4,082.6 


486 

491 

1,465 

183.4 


6,603 
6,66.5 
31, 155 

3,899.2 


19 
19 
45 

5.6 


59 

60 

128 

16.0 


55 
56 
303 

37.9 


353 

356 
989 

123.8 


2,577 

2,601 

8,004 

1,001.8 


3,637 

3,671 

21,441 

2,683.5 


521,807 
523,227 


66,241 
66,356 


455,566 
456, 871 


1,266 
1,267 


2,917 
2,920 


33,950 
33,991 


28,108 
28,178 


126,357 
126,710 


272,804 
273,644 


37,466 
39,047 


2,517 
2,623 


34,949 
36, 424 


27 
28 


101 
105 


724 
755 


1,665 
1,735 


9,056 
9,438 


23,927 
24,937 


14, 676 
14, 786 
577, 060 
5,184.3 


821 

827 

69,806 

627.1 


13,855 
13, 959 
507,254 
4,557.1 


24 

24 

1,319 

11.8 


57 

57 

3,082 

27.7 


135 

136 

34,882 

313.4 


605 

610 

30,523 

274.2 


4,535 

4,569 

140,717 

1, 264. 2 


8,735 

8,801 

307,382 

2,761.5 


155. 087 
173, 516 


11,898 
12,820 


143, 189 
160,696 


319 
348 


938 
1,042 


6,079 
6,423 


4,562 
6,007 


44.056 
50,031 


83,065 
92, 891 


30,254 
36,232 


1,443 
1,727 


28,811 
34,505 


23 


123 
147 


457 

547 


840 
1,006 


6,544 

7,837 


20.678 
24, 765 


11,988 
21,407 
231, 155 
4, 336. !) 


607 
1,084 
15,631 
■293 3 


11,381 
20.323 
215,521 
4, 043. 6 


29 
62 
427 

8.0 


37 

66 

1.255 

■23.5 


110 

196 

7,166 

134.4 


431 

770 
6,783 
127.3 


5,U41 

9,002 

66,870 

1,254.6 


5,628 
10, 050 
127,706 
2, 396. 


53,798 
64,236 


2.384 
2.402 


51,414 
51,833 


34 
34 


178 
180 


1,117 
1,121 


l.OSS 

1,067 


11,289 
11,404 


36,108 
36,378 


27,656 
30,748 


629 
699 


27,027 
30,049 


6 
6 


63 
69 


183 
203 


388 
431 


5,660 
6.282 


19,948 
22,178 


9,682 
12, 477 
97,460 
3,413.7 


274 

354 

3,455 

121.0 


9,408 
12, 123 
94,005 
3, 292. 6 


11 

14 
54 
1.9 


37 

48 
287 
10.1 


51 

66 

1,390 

48.7 


175 

226 

1,724 

60.4 


3,811 
4,911 
22,597 
791.5 


5,120 
6,597 
65,153 

2,282.1 



64 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by Sfafe, 1974 — Continued 



KANSAS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated totals 

Other cities.- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

.\rea actually reporting 

Estimated totals. 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



KENTUCKY 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural . 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



LOUISIANA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area., 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals.. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals.. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



MAINE 3 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area., 

.\rea actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

.\rea actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total . 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 



MARYLAND 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical .\rea- 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

-\rea actually reporting 

State total... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



984,753 
99.1% 
100.0% 
664,183 
99. 3% 
100. 0% 
621, 064 
94.0% 
100. 0% 
1,270,000 



1.563,816 
100.0% 
542,322 
99. 9% 
100. 0% 

1, 250. 862 
100. 0% 

3,357,000 



2. 366, 031 
92. 3% 
100.0% 
383,953 
83.9% 
100.0% 
1.014.016 
86.8% 
100. 0% 
3,764,000 



295.838 
94. 9% 
100. 0% 
447.303 
87.0% 
100.0% 
303,859 
81. 3% 
100.0% 
1,047,000 



3, 605. 532 
99.9% 
100.0% 
162. 082 
98. 3% 
100.0% 
436,386 
100.0% 
4,094,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



59, 431 
69,838 

28. 695 
28,906 

8,346 

8,876 

97,619 

4.300.4 



11.977 
11.995 



92, 644 
2. 759. 7 



114.896 
121.262 



9.574 

11.128 
12. 813 
143, 649 
3, 816. 4 



13,327 
14.035 

14.535 

16. 827 

5,359 
6.832 
37, 694 

3,600.2 



7,343 
7,467 

9,621 
231,316 
6.650.1 



4.236 
4.254 



1.381 
1.391 



6,272 
276.3 



1,766 
7,857 
234.0 



14,033 
14,697 



2.110 
17, 794 
472.7 



1,440 

137.5 



27.930 
27.947 



29.439 

719.1 



65. 195 
55.584 



27.314 
27.514 



S.249 
91,347 
4, 024. 1 



11.183 
11.200 



100.863 
106.565 

7,207 
8,587 

9.295 
10,703 
125.855 
3. 343. 7 



12.671 
13. 379 



14. 026 
16,310 



6,559 
36,254 
3, 462. 7 



186,102 
186,281 

6,818 
6,933 

8.663 
201.877 
4,931.0 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



32 


104 


36 


46 


38 


49 


157 


447 


6.9 


19.7 


176 


408 


27 


44 


27 


44 


144 


140 


347 


592 


10.3 


17.6 


398 


671 


419 


718 


32 


47 


38 


56 


128 


152 


147 


175 


604 


949 


16.0 


25.2 


11 


35 


11 


35 


12 


31 


12 


31 


- 


25 


7 


25 


30 


91 


2.9 


8.7 


448 


1.136 


448 


1,137 


7 


19 


7 


19 


26 


63 


481 


1,219 


11.7 


29.8 



1.844 
1.849 



2,447 
107.8 



3,100 
92.3 



5,885 
156.3 



14.442 
14.449 



14,765 
360.6 



17.756 
17, 870 



3,265 
3.462 
28,797 



141.9 I 1,268.6 



3.078 
3,083 

1,252 
3,818 
113.7 



7,662 
8,120 



1,512 
10,356 
275.1 



11,904 
11,913 



31,140 
33.092 



2,637 

3,155 

3,633 

39, 362 

1,045.7 



4.663 
4.970 



3.795 
13,809 
1,318.9 



52.368 
62.396 



1.656 
1.684 

3,353 
12,974 57,433 
316.9 1 1.402.9 



See footnotes at end of table. 



65 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by Sfate, 1974 — Continued 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural -. 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated totals- - - - - . 

Slaletotal. . 

Rata per 100,000 Inhabitants 

MICHIGAN 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. . 

Area actually reporting.- 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State toUl 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

MINNESOTA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals. 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated totals _. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



MISSISSIPPI 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

MISSOURI 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated totals.. 

State total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants.... 

See footnotes at end of table. 



6, 619. 095 
87.9% 

100.0% 

141, 160 
70.9% 

100.0% 
39, 765 
68.3% 

100.0% 
5,800,000 



7. 467. 253 
99.9% 
100.0% 

705. 373 
98. 8% 

100.0% 

926. 374 
100.0% 

9,098,000 



2, 602, 035 
09. 1% 
100.0% 
516.810 
98.2% 
100. 0% 
898, 155 
97.0% 
100. 0% 
3.917,000 



491, 719 
89.8% 

100. 0% 

689, 691 
83.7% 

100. 0% 

1,142,590 

61.4% 

100. 0% 
2,324.000 



3,114.625 
98.2% 
100. 0% 
613. 349 
79.3% 
100. 0% 
1,149,026 
52. 6% 
100.0% 
4.777.000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



272, 162 
301, 674 



8,222 
10, 286 



312,211 

6, 382. 9 



614,604 
615,240 

36, 317 
36, 761 

42, 152 
593, 153 

6,619.6 



17, 176 

13, 067 
13, 468 
153,976 

3,931.0 



21, 061 
25, 144 



196, 078 
198.410 

14. 664 
18,362 

6.273 
11,954 
228.726 
4. 788. 1 



20,960 
22. 197 



66,843 

66,886 



1.461 
1,479 



1,629 
59,993 



1, 098 
2,137 
7.782 
334.9 



19. 526 
l!i, 645 



21.612 

452.4 



Prop- 
erty' 
crime 



261, 192 
279, 477 



289,666 

4, 994. 2 



467, 761 
468,365 



33,866 
34, 282 



40.623 
533, 160 



116,272 
116,843 

16,560 
16, 860 

12, 761 
13, 154 
145.857 



16, 281 
17,299 

17,935 
21,422 

2,962 

6,768 

44,489 

1,914.3 



176,662 
178.766 



11.012 
207,114 
4, 335. 6 



.Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,136 
1,136 



3,050 
3,062 



1.131 
1. 139 



1.285 

26.9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



11,744 
12,235 



12,317 
212. 4 



30,160 
30,178 



30,679 
337.2 



3.917 
3.922 



4,079 

104.1 



1,116 

48.0 



9, 821 
9,863 



9,065 

156 3 



22, 497 
22, 619 



1,266 
24,751 
272.0 



3,230 

82.6 



1,141 
1,308 



1,606 
5.962 
256.5 



77,644 
86,096 



2,024 
3,658 



89,891 
1, 649. 8 



144, 248 
144,400 



20,512 
173,215 

1,903.9 



3,711 

5,288 
5,461 
43,939 

1.121. 



7,562 

1,6 
3,242 
17,562 

755.7 



59.093 
59. 782 

3,891 
4,906 

2.936 
5,596 
9,508 I 70,283 
199.0 I 1,471.3 



101, 866 
114,893 



4,484 
6,609 



120,572 

2, 078. 8 



269, 161 
269,643 

24,409 
24, 716 

18,861 
303, 110 
3, 331. 6 



34, 688 67, 606 13, 078 
34, 777 67, 947 13, 119 



12, 027 
12, 245 

6,876 

7,C 

87,280 

2, 228. 2 



8,790 
9,188 



10. 693 
12, 772 



24.042 

1, 034. 5 



98,637 
99, 978 

9,151 
11,538 

2, 578 

4,912 

116,428 

2, 437. 3 



20.403 
427.1 



66 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1974 — Continued 



MONTANA 

standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEBRASKA 

Standard Meropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting. _ 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEVADA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Ares... 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural.. 

A rea actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area... 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural. i 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



NEW JERSEY 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area... 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

.\rea actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



179,897 
100.0% 
212,204 

87.2% 
100. 0% 
343,199 

81. 1% 
100.0% 
735,000 



685,181 
100.0% 
433,368 
97. 9% 
100.0% 
424, 464 
100.0% 
1,543,000 



460, 118 
100. 0% 

28,622 
100. 0% 

84,360 
100.0% 
573,000 



254,782 
95.8% 
100.0% 
384,599 
77. 2% 
100.0% 
168, 619 
100.0% 
808,000 



6, 855, 053 
100. 0% 
420, 803 
100.0% 
54,144 
100.0% 

7,330,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



10,412 
11,946 



6,876 
30, 016 
4,083.8 



10,287 
10,608 

4,240 
51,603 
3. 344. 3 



39, 716 

1,372 

3,762 
44,849 

7, 827. 1 



8,208 
8,472 

11,851 
15,349 

1,682 
25,403 
3, 143. 9 



326, 629 
21, 177 



349,764 
4, 771. 7 



1,194 

162.4 



3,697 
239.6 



3,910 

682.4 



29,568 
403.4 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 



10,089 
11,674 

4,447 

6,482 

28,822 

3, 921. 4 



9,909 
10. 121 

4,046 
47.906 
3, 104. 7 



36,274 

1.269 

3,396 
40, 939 
7. 144. 7 



8,030 
8,288 

11,504 

14,899 

1,477 
24,664 
3, 052. 5 



297,881 
20,446 



320, 196 
4,368.3 



Miu-der 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,404 

91.0 



15,879 

216.6 



263 



1,947 

126.2 



1,974 
344.6 



11,751 
160.3 



2,097 



1,610 
1.985 
6,526 
110.3 887.9 



1.692 
1,728 



1.413 
11,939 

773.8 



1.144 
14, 053 



1,916 
1,996 



2,851 
3,692 



6,629 

820.4 



96,225 

7,497 

1,052 
104,774 
1, 429. 4 



7.477 
8.678 

2,618 

3.104 

20,216 

2, 760. 6 



7,744 
7.910 

2.463 
31,685 
2,063.5 



2,029 
23,413 

4, 086. 



5,293 
5,451 



7,728 
10,009 



15,942 

1,973.0 



162, 751 
11,888 



175,349 

2, 392. 2 



67 



Table 4. — Index ofCrimt by State, 1974 — Continued 



NEW MEXICO > 

standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. . 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NEW YORK 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area... 

Area actually reportUig 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

RateperlOO.OOOinhabitants 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area-. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals. 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area... 

Area actually reporting. . _ 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



OHIO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals _ 

Slate total 

RateperlOO.OOOinhabitants 



380,712 
96.0% 
100.0% 
458,509 
98.1% 
100.0% 
282, 779 
100. 0% 
,122,000 



16, 195, 963 
99. 3% 
100.0% 
736,446 
93.9% 
100. 0% 
1,178,591 
100.0% 
18,111,000 



8,616,900 
93. 6% 
100.0% 
900,364 
80. 6% 
100.0% 
1, 219, 736 
76. 6% 
100.0% 
10,737,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



26,525 
27,045 

26,130 
26,637 

4,807 
58,489 
5,212.9 



822,424 
826, 337 

23,474 
25,010 

28, 326 
879, 673 
4, 857. 1 



114, 678 
119, 160 

37, 913 
38,983 

25,873 
30,164 
188,307 
3, 511. 2 



78,803 




100.0% 


3,573 


205,474 




100.0% 


7,718 


352, 723 




76. 5% 


1,890 


100. 0% 


2,469 


637,000 


13,760 



382, 690 
400, 160 

26,447 
32, 870 

15, 432 
20,441 
453,471 
4, 223. 4 



2,200 
2,244 



2.167 
2,209 



5,053 
450.4 



140,284 
140, 484 

1,475 

1,572 

1,318 

143,374 

791.6 



14. 132 
14.684 

5,319 
5.468 

5.205 
6.068 
26,220 
488.9 



36, 216 
36.193 



1,549 
1.925 



39,094 

364.1 



Prop- 
erty! 
crime 



24,325 
24,801 

23,963 
24, 428 

4,207 
53,436 
4. 762. 6 



682. 140 
685,853 



21, 999 
23,438 



736,299 

4,065.5 



100, 546 
104, 476 

32, 594 
33,515 

20,668 
24.096 
162,087 
3, 022. 3 



13, 441 

2,110.0 



347. 474 
363.967 

24,898 
30. 945 

14. 696 
19.466 
414,377 
3, 869. 3 



Murder 
and non. 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,851 
1,851 



4,955 
4,963 



5,145 

28.4 



1,398 
124.6 



85.631 
85.V16 



86,271 
476.3 



3,577 
3. 688 



4,948 
92.3 



19,386 
19, 773 



20,529 

191.2 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1.066 
1,090 



3,137 

279.6 



47,847 
47,954 



1,079 
1,150 



50,045 

276.3 



9.764 
10. 162 

4.329 
4.451 

4,458 
5,197 
19,810 



12,666 
13,168 



15,048 

140.2 



7,973 
8,205 



7,530 
7,676 



17,762 

1, 583. 1 



241,512 
242, 495 

5,629 
5,997 

12, 954 
261, 446 
1, 443. 6 



38,742 
40,566 

10,645 
10, 946 

10, 415 
12, 142 
63,654 



106, 348 
110,780 



7,651 

5,679 

7,390 

125,821 

1,171.8 



14, 627 
14,830 



15, 133 

15, 427 



32, 240 

2. 873. 4 



341,352 
343. 776 

14. 782 

15, 749 

12, 543 
372,068 
2, 054. 4 



55.366 
57, 217 

20,053 
20, 619 

9,006 
10,500 
88,336 
1, 647. 1 



607 


2,599 


1,014 


6,111 


870 


865 


1,137 


1,130 


2,758 


9,840 


433.0 


1, 544. 7 



201, 797 
212, 6U 

17,398 
21, 624 

8,437 
11, 176 
245,354 

2, 285. 1 



See footnotes at end of table. 



68 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1974 — Continued 



OKLAHOMA 

standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

SUtetoUl 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitant"; 

OREGON 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

SU(e total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



PENNSYLVANIA* 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. 

Rural 

Area actually reporting... 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



PUERTO HICO 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. . . 

Area actually reporting , 

Other agencies 

Area actually reporting 

SUte Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



RHODE ISLAND 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

SUte total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



1,502.684 

99.2% 
100.0% 
646.866 

97.0% 
100.0% 
669,690 

93.8% 

100.0% 

2,709,000 



1,373,16(1 
99.4% 
100.0% 
412, 686 
98.3% 
100.0% 
480, 266 
88.6% 
100.0% 
2,266,000 



9. 669, 726 

99.2% 

100.0% 

1,017,231 

100.0% 

1,248,044 

100. 0%, 

11,835,000 



1,337,400 
100. 0% 

1, 707, 200 
100.0% 

3,045,000 



840,989 
100.0% 
96,011 
100.0% 



937,000 



Total 
Crime 
Indei 


Violent 1 
crime 


Prop- 
erty 2 
crime 


81,947 


6,480 


76,467 


82,487 


6,606 


76,981 


19,721 


1,162 


18,659 


20,321 


1,197 


19, 124 


7,744 


885 


6,859 


8,162 


886 


7.267 


110,960 


7,588 


103,372 


4, 096. 


280.1 


3.815.9 


99,686 


6,694 


92,992 


100,031 


6,609 


93,422 


28,072 


806 


27,267 


28,667 


819 


27,748 


14,766 


898 


13,868 


16, 174 


898 


14,276 


143,772 


8,328 


135.446 


6,344.7 


367.4 


5,977.3 


316, 663 


34,998 


281,665 


318. 162 


35.098 


283.064 


22.623 


1,165 


21,458 


20,600 


1,018 


19,582 


361,385 


37,281 


324,104 


3,063.6 


316.0 


2,738.5 


62,962 


8,668 


44,284 


29,340 


6,760 


22,680 


82,292 


15,428 


66,864 


2,702.9 


606.7 


2. 196. 2 


43,467 


2,414 


41, (M3 


4,427 


233 


4.194 


34 


4 


30 


47,918 


2,651 


45,267 


6, 114. 


282.9 


4,831.1 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,899 
1,9M 



2,263 
83.6 



2,671 
2,676 



32.3 


130.8 


1.904 


18,228 


1.913 


18,268 


70 


363 


128 


266 


2,111 


18,876 


17.8 


169.5 


302 


3,961 


379 


1,062 


681 


5,013 


22.4 


164.7 


62 


792 


7 


61 


69 


853 


7.4 


91.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4,429 
163.6 



14,123 
14, 181 



15,499 

131.0 



5,128 
9,216 
302.7 



Burglary 



29,628 
29,810 

6,986 
6,167 

3,239 
3,444 
39, 421 

1, 465. 2 



30,332 
30,449 

6,237 
6,347 

4,766 

4,970 

41,766 

1, 843. 2 



93,823 
94. 477 



9,771 
109,808 

927.8 



11,628 
31,598 

1, 037. 8 



1.628 


10,667 


21,979 


162 


1,478 


2,482 


3 


9 


13 


1,693 


12,144 


24,474 


180.7 


1,296.1 


2,612.0 



38,681 
38,971 

11,637 
11,888 

3,124 
3.293 
54, 152 

1,999.0 



64,468 
64,764 



19, 673 
19,918 



83,060 
3, 665. 5 



146, 788 
146, 518 



8,787 
169,836 
1,435.0 



8,631 
22,245 

730.6 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Table 4. — Index of Crime by State, 1974 — Continued 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Area actually reporting. 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Stele total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants. - 

TENNESSEE 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - . . 

0th er cities - 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals - 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

State total 

Bate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



TEXAS 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area.. 

Area actually reporting _ . 

Estimated totals - _ 

Other cities 

.\rea actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporttag 

Estimated totals 

Stole total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



1,332,330 

96.8% 
100. 0% 
634,965 

92. 7% 
100. 0% 
916, 70fi 

96. 0% 

100.0% 

2,784,000 



UTAH 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 

.\rea actually reporting _-. 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Slate total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnotes at end o( table. 



98, 147 

93. 4% 
100.0% 
223,246 

81.7% 
100.0% 
360.608 

53.4% 
100.0% 
682,000 



2, 464, 146 
92.2% 
100.0% 
601,560 
82. 4% 
100.0% 
1, 163, 304 
38.2% 
100.0% 
4,129,000 



929,129 
98.6% 

100.0% 
87, 776 
83.3% 

100. 0% 

156, 095 
67. 7% 

100.0% 
1, 173, 000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



71,364 
73,607 

22, 014 
23,766 

17, 942 
18,698 
115,961 
4, 166. 3 



2,600 

4,871 

18,215 

2, 670. 8 



120.606 
125,202 

11,326 
13, 736 

4,636 
12.147 
151,085 
3,669.1 



493, 996 
612, 616 

30,261 
35, 207 

11,651 
18,044 
665,767 
4, 696. 2 



52. 730 
53,441 



1.997 
2,451 



58,066 

4, 950. 2 



2.397 
2,586 

2.636 
2.642 
12,688 

456.7 



1,234 

180.9 



11,985 
12, 392 



2,521 
15,969 



40,363 
41,817 



2,190 
46,518 
386.0 



Prop- 
erty 2 
crime 



64, 131 
66. 047 

19. 617 
21. 170 

16. 407 
16.056 
103,273 
3, 709. 6 



3,303 
3,603 

7,288 
8,923 

2,378 
4,455 
16,981 

2, 489. 9 



108, 621 
112,810 



12,680 

3,674 

9.626 

135,116 

3, 272. 4 



453.632 
470. 699 

28.093 
32. 696 

10.237 
15.854 
519,249 
4.309.1 



1.938 
2,353 



67 


1,406 


99 


2,075 


!,517 


55,549 


>14.6 


4,735.6 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 
man- 
slaughter 



1,260 
1,332 



1,646 

13.7 



1,062 

26.7 



2,967 
3,160 



3,547 

127.4 



6,490 

167.2 



18,401 
18, 737 



19, 420 

161.2 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



3,869 
3.995 



7,959 
285.9 



Burglary 



2,007 
7,862 
190.4 



17, 745 
18,588 



1,638 
1,906 



1,437 
21,931 

182.0 



1,170 
1,181 



1,330 
113. 4 



43,497 
1, 562. 4 



1,481 
1,813 



45,230 
47, 241 

3,675 
4,336 

1.591 

4.1 

55,745 

1, 350. 1 



158, 172 
165,362 

9,666 
11,260 

5,140 

7,960 

184,562 

1,531.6 



11,943 
12,067 



13,289 
1, 132. 9 



31.228 
32. 305 

11.536 
12,449 

6,870 
7.160 
51,914 

1.864.7 



2,436 
2,663 



6,410 
6,624 



819 1,360 

1, 534 2, 

4,072 11,835 

597. 1 1, 735. 3 



51,875 
53,687 

6,026 
7.309 

1,549 

4,059 

65,055 

1,676.6 



17, 172 
19,985 

4,460 

6,907 

289,900 

2, 405. 8 



34, 964 
35,487 



1,120 
38,391 

3, 272. 9 



70 



Table 4. — Indtx of Crime by State, 1974 — Continued 



VERMONT 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area- 
Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Stale lotal 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



VIRGINIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Stale total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



WASHINGTON 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 

Area actually reportlne 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting. . 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

SUte total.. 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. 

.\rca actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

SUte total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



WISCONSIN 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State lotal 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



None 
233.808 

64.7% 
100.0% 
236, 192 
100. 0% 
470, 000 



3, 267, 103 

98. 8% 
100.0% 
398, 485 
94. 1% 
100. 0% 
1,242.412 
100. 0% 
4,908,000 



2, 621, 638 

98. 8% 
100.0% 
411, IM 

98. 3% 
100.0% 
843.311 

86. 6% 

100.0% 

3,476,000 



668,738 
99.9% 
100.0% 
372, 981 
96.2% 
100.0% 
782, 281 
98. 9% 
100.0% 
1,791,000 



2, 637, 268 
100.0% 
777, 719 
100.0% 

1,161,013 
100. 0% 

4,566,000 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



4,652 
I3,S11 

2, 874. 7 



162,206 
163,918 

15,318 
16, 274 

7,033 
187, 225 
3. 814. 7 



161, 748 
164,338 

28,066 
26,293 

16,613 
IS, 244 
208,875 
6,009.1 



18, 702 
18,719 

6,619 
8,739 

6,933 

7.231 

31,689 

1, 769. 3 



116,398 

29,368 

20,604 
166, 254 
3, 641. 1 



13,084 
13, 158 



15,164 

309.0 



10,176 
10,274 



12,036 
346.3 



1,423 
1,423 



2,460 
137.4 



6,411 

140.4 



Prop- 
erty - 
crime 



5,583 
8,634 



4. 524 
13,158 



149, 152 
150. 760 

14.341 

15.236 

6,065 
172,061 
3, 505. 7 



151. 673 
154,064 

24. 112 
25. 303 

14. 982 
17.472 
196,839 
6, 662. 8 



17,279 
17,296 

6,134 
5,338 

6.323 

6.695 

29,229 

1.632.0 



Murder 
and non- 
neglipent 

man- 
slaughter 



20. 016 
159,843 

3. 600. 7 



1.028 
1.037 



1,143 

23.3 



6,026 

122.8 



3,733 
3.767 



4,015 

116.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



7,572 
154.3 



5.441 
8.608 



6,834 

196.6 



2,734 

69.9 



2,555 
4,791 

1,019.4 



42,854 
43,291 

3,377 
3,588 

2,445 
49,324 

l.OftS.O 



49, 493 
60, 162 

6,360 
6,626 

4,984 
6.824 
61,611 

1. 772. 6 



23.997 

6.613 

8,702 
38, 212 
836.9 



3.800 
5. 877 



1.674 
7.551 



94, 697 

95, 731 

10, 227 
10,865 

3,085 
109,681 

2. 234. 7 



90.363 
92, 031 

17,662 
18,429 

9,133 
10,672 
121,132 
3,484.8 



4,972 


10,987 


4.976 


10.999 


1.664 


3, 14S 


1.730 


3.273 


3.046 


2.686 


3,177 


2.802 


9,883 


17,074 


851.8 


963.3 



10,802 
110,395 11.236 

2. 417. 8 246. 1 



71 



594-259 O - 75 - 6 





Table 


♦, — Index of Crimt 


by Stale, 1974— Continued 










Area 


Popu- 
lation 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Violent ' 
crime 


Prop- 
erty! 
crime 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


WYOMING 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. . . 


None 
199, Ml 

86. 2% 
100.0% 
169.469 

93. 6% 
100.0% 
359,000 


8,889 
10, 439 

2,497 

2,666 

13, 105 

3,660.4 


271 
318 

188 

201 

519 

144.6 


8,618 
10, 121 

2,309 

2,465 

12,586 

3, 606. 8 


6 
6 

11 
12 
18 

6.0 


30 
36 

19 

20 

55 

l.'i.3 


106 
123 

28 
30 
153 

42.6 


131 

164 

130 
139 
293 

81.6 


1,898 
2,229 

694 

741 

2,970 

827.3 


6,269 
7,362 

1,390 

1,484 

8,846 

2,464.1 






461 




630 








225 





















' violent crime Is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

2 Property crime Is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

3 Additional reporting occurred in 1974 due to State Uniform Crime Programs being activated or due to revised figures being submitted for agencies pre- 
viously reported. Accordingly, figures are not comparable to data published In prior Issues. See table 3 for adjusted figures. 



72 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Mefropolitan Sfatistieal Areas 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Abilene, Tex 

(Includes Callahan, Jones and Taylor 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Akron, Ohio 

(Includes Portage and Summit Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Albany, Ga 

(Includes Dougherty and Lee Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

E stimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Albany-Schenectady-Troy, N. Y. 

(Includes Albany, Montgomery, Rens- 
selaer, Saratoga and Schenectady 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Albuquerque, N. Mex 

(Includes Bernalillo and Sandoval 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated tot al 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, Pa.-N.J. . . 
(Includes Carbon, Lehigh and North- 
ampton Counties, Pa., and Warren 
County, N.J.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Alloona, Pa 

(Includes Blair County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Amarlllo, Tei 

(Includes Potter and Randall Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting _ . . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Anaheim-Santa Ana-Garden OroTe, Calif. 
(Includes Orange County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Ann Arbor, Mich 

(Includes Washtenaw County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Anniston, Ala 

(Includes Calhoun County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Appleton-Oshkosh, Wis 

(Includes Calumet. Outagamie and 
Winnebago Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

ABherille, N.C 

(Includes Buncombe and Madison 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



Population 



98. 2% 
100. 0% 



92. 5% 
100.0% 



99.6% 
100.0% 



96.0% 
100.0% 



100.0% 



136, 638 
100.0% 
153,972 

100.0% 



,646,300 

100.0% 

244. M4 

100. 0% 

105.251 

87. 6% 
100. 0% 



100. 0% 
167.361 



88.6% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



3,918 
3,000.0 



35,664 
36, 116 
5,351.7 



4, 367 

4,650 

4,417.5 



21, 358 
21, 469 
2, 774. 4 



26,525 
27.045 
7, 103. 8 



19,380 
3, 198. 4 



109, 393 
6,644.8 



19, 703 
8, 046. 2 



3,652 
3, 374. 8 



11,069 
3, 918. 7 



3,884 

4,481 

2, 677. 4 



2,511 
2,535 
375.6 



1,128 
1,133 
146.4 



6,010 
365.1 



1,478 
603.5 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 



3,661 
2,803.3 



33,153 
33,581 
4, 976. 1 



3,776 

4,037 

3, 835. 2 



20.230 
20.336 
2,628.0 



24,325 
24,801 
6, 514. 4 



18, 382 
3, 033. 7 



8.196 
5, 323. 



103, .183 
6,279.7 



18,225 
7, 441. 7 



3,186 
3, 026. 1 



10, 773 
3, 817. 3 



3.639 

4,169 

2, 486. 



Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,092 
161.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,169 
1,182 
175.2 



1,090 
286.3 



343 

222.8 



2,956 
179.6 



9,649 

9,746 

1, 444. 2 



1,676 

1,797 

1, 707. : 



7,025 
7,053 
911.5 



7,973 

8,205 

2, 155. 2 



5,467 
902.3 



2,583 
1,677.6 



1,228 

1,436 

1,364.4 



2,101 
744.6 



20, 939 
21,234 
3, 146. 5 



1.911 

2.022 

1, 920. 9 



11, 742 
U, 811 
1, 526. 3 



14, 627 
14, 830 
3, 895. 3 



11,793 
1. 946. 3 



1,396 
1,021.7 



5,060 
3, 286. 3 



61, 847 
3, 756. 7 



11,128 
4, 543. 8 



1,148 

1,390 

1, 320. 7 



8,381 
2, 969. 7 



1,364 

1, 580 2, 191 
108.7 944.1 I 1,309.1 



73 



Tables. — Indtx of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statisfical Artat — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Atlanta. Ga - 

(Includes Butts, Cherokee, Clayton, 
Cobb, De Kalb, Douglas, Fayette, 
Forsythe, Fulton, Owlnnett, Henry, 
Newton, Paulding, Rockdale and 
Walton Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - - 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Atlantic Clly, NJ 

(Includes Atlantic County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Augusta, Ga.-S.C 

(Includes Columbia and Richmond 
Counties, Oa. and Aiken County, 
S.C). 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

AuBtin, Tci 

(Includes Hays and Travis Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants. -- 

Bakersfleld. Calif 

(Includes Kern County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Baltimore. Md 

(Includes Baltimore City and Anne 
Arundel, Baltimore, Carroll, Har- 
ford and Howard Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Baton Rouge. La 

(Includes Ascension, East Baton Rouge, 
Livingston and West Baton Rouge 
Parishes.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Battle Crcelt. MIcli 

(Includes Barry and Calhoun Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated tot al 

Kate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Bay City, Mich 

(Includes Bay County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Bcaumont-Port Arthur-Orange, Tei 

(Includes Hardin, Jeflerson and Orange 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Billings. Mont 

(Includes Yellowstone County.) 

Area act ually report ing 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Biloxi-Gulrport, Miss.. 

(Includes Hancock, Harrison and Stone 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



93.4% 
100. 0% 

178,607 

100. 0% 
273,218 



97.9% 
100. 0% 



361,775 
100.0% 
342,900 
100.0% 
2,149,735 

100. 0% 

401,515 



92. 2% 
100. 0% 



99. 1% 
100. 0% 



118,988 
100.0% 
356, 437 



93. 1% 
100.0% 

94, 187 

100. 0% 

173,273 



96.9% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



97, 269 
101, 629 
6, 767. 9 



10,909 
6,111.2 



7,183 

7,474 

2, 735. 5 



23,587 
6,519.8 



27, 795 
8, 105. 9 



141,479 
6,581.2 



25,004 
26. 119 
6, 505. 1 



10,909 
11,007 
6, 052. 9 



6,914 
5, 810. 7 



15, 622 
16,103 
4, 517. 8 



6,438 
6,835.3 



6,436 

6,668 

3, 790. 6 



12,106 
12, 460 
706.6 



1,017 
372.2 



1,254 
346.6 



1,739 
507.1 



22,059 
1,026.1 



2,706 
2,823 
703.1 



794 
436.6 



1.419 
1,465 
411.0 



763 

778 
449.0 



Prop- 
erty! 
crime 



85, 163 
89, 179 
6,061.3 



6,197 

6,457 

2, 363. 3 



22,333 
6, 173. 2 



26, 056 
7, 598. 7 



119,420 
5, 555. 1 



22,298 
23,296 
5, 802. 



10, 121 
10, 213 
5, 616. 3 



6,656 
5, 593. 8 



14,203 
14,638 
4, 106. 8 



6,242 
6, 627. 2 



6,682 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



6,937 
6,078 
346.0 



11,674 
.543.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



6.091 
6,262 



9,255 
430.5 



37, 020 

38, 818 
2, 203. 1 



3,547 
1,987.0 



2,556 
2,651 
970.3 



7,383 
2, 040. 8 



8,179 
2, 385. 2 



35,552 
1, 653. 8 



6,943 
7,288 
, 815. 1 



3,440 

3,464 

1, 904. 9 



1,763 
1, 481. 7 



4,613 

4,821 
1,352.6 



1,263 
I, 340. 9 



2,242 
2.304 
.329.7 



74 



Tables. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Blnghamton, N.Y..P« 

(Includes Broome and Tioga Counties, 
NY. and Susquehanna County, Pa.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. _ 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Birmingham, Ala 

(Includes Jefferson. St. Clair, Shelby 
and Walker Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Bloomington-Normal. Ill 

(Includes McLean County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Kate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Boise Cily, Idaho 

(Includes Ada County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Boston, Mass — 

(Includes Esses, Middlesex, Norfolk, 
and Suffolk Counties.) 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



Bridgeport. Conn 

(Includes Fairfield County.) 

Area actual 1 y reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



Brockton. Mass 

(Includes Plymouth County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Brownsville-Harllngen-San Benito, Tei.. 

(Includes Cameron County.) 

Area actually reporting, _ 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Bryan-College Station, Te» 

(Includes Brazos County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Kate per 100,000 inhabitants 

BnfTalo. N.Y 

(Includes Eric and Niagara Counties.) 

Area actuaUy reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Canton. Ohio 

{Includes Carroll and Stark Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

(Includes Linn County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Champalgn-Urbsna-Rantoul, III. 

(Includes Champaign County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Population 



94.8% 
100. 0% 



88.2% 
100.0% 



103,196 

100. 0% 

130,412 

99.5% 
100. 0% 



89. 0% 
100. 0% 



818,100 

100.0% 



97.9% 
100.0% 



66,307 

100. 0% 



98. 6% 
100.0% 



88.1% 
100,0% 



169, 700 
100.0% 
162, 29S 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 


Violent 1 
crime 


Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


8,342 

8,894 

3,021.0 


196 
223 

76.7 


8,147 

8, 671 

2,946.3 


6 

6 
2.0 


20 
21 

7.1 


66 

68 

23.1 


113 
128 
43.5 


36,111 
36, 984 
4, 700. 6 


4,687 
4,789 
608.7 


30,624 
32, 195 
4,091.8 


129 
139 
17.7 


279 
294 
37.4 


1,602 
1.666 
210.6 


2.577 
2.700 
343.2 


4,770 
4.622.3 


310 

300.4 


4,4«0 
4,321.9 


1 
I.O 


19 
18.4 


72 
69.8 


218 
211.2 


6,816 

6,854 

5, 255. 7 


282 

283 

217.0 


6,634 

6,671 

6,038.6 


5 

6 

3.8 


26 

26 

19.9 


74 
74 

86.7 


177 

178 

136.6 


172.960 
189, 231 
6,663.7 


16, 492 
16, 174 
476.6 


167,468 
173, 057 
6,088.2 


186 
192 
6.6 


696 
628 

18.6 


9.338 
9.609 

282.5 


5,372 
6,748 

168.9 


37,260 
4, 663. 2 


1,815 
221.9 


35.436 
4,331.4 


27 
3.3 


88 
10 8 


821 
100.4 


879 
107.4 


16, 135 
19, 660 
6, 363. 4 


494 
637 

174.8 


16,641 
18,913 
6, 188. 6 


5 

6 

1.6 


27 
34 
9.3 


205 
262 
71.9 


267 
335 

91.9 


6,086 

6,220 

4, 393. 


317 
323 

228.1 


6.769 

6.897 

4. 164. 9 


16 

16 

11.3 


17 

17 

12.0 


25 

27 

19.1 


289 

263 

186.8 


3,280 

4, 946. 7 


172 
269.4 


3.108 
4.687.3 


9 
13.6 


13 

19.6 


33 

49.8 


117 

176.6 


52,086 
52,739 
4, 014. 8 


4,141 
4,174 

317.7 


47,945 
48,565 
3.697.0 


79 
79 
6.0 


262 
263 
20.0 


2,493 

2,507 
190.8 


1,307 
1,325 
100.9 


12, 921 
14,425 
3,663.7 


1,058 
1,143 

290.3 


11,863 
13,282 
3,373.4 


19 
21 
5.3 


96 
102 
25.9 


633 

667 

169.4 


310 
353 

89.7 


9, 427 
5,555.1 


220 
129.6 


9,207 
5, 425. 5 


5 

2.9 


15 

8.8 


112 
66.0 


88 
51.9 


9,138 
5,630.5 


779 
480.0 


8,359 
5, 150. 5 


4.3 


29 
17.9 


124 
76.4 


619 
381.4 



11,897 
12.716 
1.616.1 



1,056 
1.022.3 



1.351 

1,361 

1.043.6 



46.311 

60.025 
1, 470. 8 



10. 391 
1. 270. 1 



5.306 

6.296 
1, 727. 



1,939 
1,369.6 



1,106 
1,666.6 



14,334 
14, 498 
1.103.7 



3,782 

4,140 

1,051.5 



2,056 
1,211.5 



1,762 
,085.7 



4.909 

6.251 

1. 783. 6 



13,983 
14, 676 



3.220 
3. 120. 3 



60,108 
67,288 
1.978.4 



18. 721 
2,288.4 



8,067 

9,574 

2, 626. 6 



3,403 
3,484 



1.920 
2, 895. 6 



6,978 

7,906 

2, 008. 



6,524 
3,844.4 



6,239 
3,844.2 



See footnote at end of table. 



75 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Charleston. S.C - 

(Includes Berkeley, Charleston and 
Dorchester Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total -. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Charleston, W. Va ---. 

(Includes Kanawha and Putnam Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Charlotte-Gastonia, N.C 

(Includes Gaston, Mecklenburg and 
Union Counties.) 

Area actually reporting... 

Estimated total — 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .- 

Chattanooga, Tenn.-Gs 

(Includes Hamilton, Marion and Se- 
quatchie Counties, Tenn. and 
Catoosa, Dade and Walker Counties, 
Ga.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Chicago, ni -- 

(Includes Cook, Du Page, Kane, Lake, 
McHenry and Will Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total. - 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Clndnnati, Ohio-Ky.-Ind. 

(Includes Clermont, Hamilton and 
Warren Counties, Ohio, and Boone, 
Campbell and Kenton Counties, Ky. 
and Dearborn County, Ind.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

ClarkBville-HopkinsTille. Tenn.-Ky 

(Includes Christian County, Ky. and 
Montgomery County, Tenn.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Cleveland, Ohio 

(Includes Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake and 
Medina Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Colorado Springs, Colo 

(Includes El Paso and Teller Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Columbia. S.C 

(Includes Lexington and Richland 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Columbus, Ga.-Ala 

(Includes Chattahoochee County and 
Columbus ConsoUdated Ooverrmient, 
Ga., and Russell County, Ala.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



95. 8% 
100.0% 



100. 0% 
695,584 



99.9% 
100. 0% 



74.8% 
100.0% 



100. 0% 
1,382,475 



95. 6% 
100.0% 



96.0% 
100.0% 

285, 314 

100. 0% 
353.835 



99. 3% 
100. 0% 



86. 6% 
100. 0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



20,285 
21,041 



6,743 
2, 617. 9 



37,062 
37,104 
6, 229. 9 



15, 169 
18,346 
4,719.7 



421,407 
421, 870 
5, 965. 9 



60,758 
63,044 
4, 660. 2 



4,709 
3, 522. 5 



92,552 
94,816 



17,438 
6,111.9 



20, 721 
20, 846 
6, 891. 4 



6,321 

7,156 

3,118.6 



2,460 
2,540 
703.4 



1,192 
1,446 
372.0 



56,103 
56, 142 
793.9 



12, 147 
12, 274 



1,014 
355.4 



1,818 
1.831 
617.6 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 



17,825 
18,501 
5,123.3 



6,295 
2,443.9 



32,924 
32, 960 
0, 534. 1 



13, 977 
16,900 
4,347.7 



365,304 
365,728 
5, 171. 9 



56, 161 
58, 328 
4,219.1 



4,302 
3, 218. 1 



80,405 
82,542 



16, 424 
5, 756. 5 



18, 903 
19.016 
6, 374. 



6,722 
6,486 
I, 826. 6 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
thelt 


55 


165 


987 


1,253 


7,473 


8,906 


57 


170 


1,015 


1,298 


7,721 


9,286 


15.8 


47.1 


281.1 


359.4 


2,138.1 


2,571.5 


13 


25 


154 


256 


2,078 


3,633 


5.0 


9.7 


59.8 


99.4 


806.7 


1,410.5 


107 


109 


1,349 


2,573 


14,279 


16,695 


107 


109 


1,350 


2,578 


14,291 


16, 617 


18.0 


18.3 


226.7 


432.9 


2,399.5 


2,790.0 


54 


48 


428 


662 


4,940 


7,124 


63 


70 


525 


788 


6,303 


8,357 


16.2 


18.0 


135.1 


202.7 


1,621.5 


2, 149. 9 


1,123 


2,458 


30,478 


22,044 


95,537 


220,194 


1,124 


2.459 


30, 492 


22,067 


95,652 


220,467 


15.9 


34.8 


431.2 


312.1 


1,352.7 


3, 117. 7 


106 


361 


2,275 


1,855 


18,651 


32, 269 


108 


370 


2,323 


1,915 


19,232 


33,664 


7.8 


26.8 


168.0 


138.5 


1, 391. 1 


2,435.1 


21 


31 


202 


153 


1,677 


2,331 


15.7 


23.2 


151.1 


114.4 


1,264.5 


1, 743. 7 


345 


550 


7,270 


3,982 


21, 752 


40,233 


348 


562 


7,319 


4,045 


22, 414 


41,550 


17.2 


27.8 


361.8 


199.9 


1, 108. 


2,053.9 


16 


142 


614 


342 


5,491 


9,524 


5.6 


49.8 


180.2 


119.9 


1,924.5 


3, 338. 1 


69 


144 


709 


896 


7,826 


9,423 


69 


146 


714 


903 


7,867 


9,486 


19.6 


41.0 


201.8 


266.2 


2, 223. 4 


2, 680. 9 


46 


36 


290 


228 


2,378 


2,639 


49 


41 


316 


264 


2,747 


2,961 


21.4 


17.9 


137.7 


116.1 


1,197.3 


1, 286. 2 



76 



Tables. — IndtxofCrimt, 1974, Standard Mefropolifan Stafistical Artas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Colnmbos, Ohio 

(Includes Delaware. Fairfield, Franklin, 
Madison, and Pickaway Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Corpus Christi, Tex 

(Includes Nueces and San Patricio 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Dallas-Fort Worth. Tex 

(Includes Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, 
Hood, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, 
Rockwall, Tarrant and Wise 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

DaTenport-Rock Island-Mollne. lowa-Ill.. 

(Includes Scott County, Iowa, and 

Henry and Rock Island Counties, 111.) 

Area actually report! ng 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Danon. Ohio. 

(Includes Greene, Miami, Montgomery 
and Preble Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Daytona Beach. Fla 

(Includes Volusia County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Decatur. HI 

(Includes Macon County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants. 

Denver-Boulder, Colo 

(Includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder. 
Denver, Douglas, Ollpin, and Jeffer- 
son Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 InhabltanU. 



Des Moines, Iowa 

(Includes Polk and Warren Counties.; 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 



Detroit, Mich 

(Includes Lapeer, Livingston, Macomb, 
Oakland, St. Clair and Wayne 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total . 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Duiuth-Snperior, Minn.-Wia 

(Includes St. Louis County, Minn., and 
Douglas Connty, Wis.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

El Paso, Tex 

(Includes El Paso County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants. 

See footnote at end ot table. 



Population 



96.3% 
100.0% 



98. 8% 
100. 0% 



95.6% 
100.0% 



202, 977 

100.0% 



99.1% 
100.0% 



318.787 
100. 0% 



99. 9% 
100.0% 



380,200 

100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



63,787 
(S,263 
6. 249. 3 



17.906 
18,068 
6,110.6 



158, 672 
163,005 
6,356.7 



17,531 

17,928 



45.257 
46.330 
5. 445. 1 



18,254 
8,993.1 



5,817 

5,877 

4,653.1 



17, 486 
6, 485. 2 



329, 664 
329, 668 
7. 383. 



9.627 
3. 720. 1 



24, 877 
6, 643. 1 



3,980 
4.063 
386.9 



11.679 
11,980 
467.2 



1,379 
1,400 
388.1 



4,253 

499.8 



1,301 
641.0 



7,616 
638.6 



42, 367 
42, 374 

949.0 



1.771 
466.8 



Prop- 
erty' 
crime 



49.807 
61.200 
4,863.4 



16. 166 
16,310 
6,616.9 



146. 993 
151.025 
5. 889. 5 



16. 152 
16. 528 
4.581.4 



41.064 
42,077 
4. 945. 2 



16.953 
8. 352. 2 



5.344 

5.399 

4. 274. 6 



94. 677 
6. 782. 8 



16, 646 
6. 190. 3 



287. 187 
287. 284 
6. 434. 



9.397 
3.631.2 



23.106 
6. 077. 3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


431 
436 
41.3 


2.081 
2.115 
200.9 


106 
107 
36.2 


426 

428 

144.7 


1.008 
1.045 
40.8 


4.832 
4.904 
191.2 


67 

69 

19.1 


545 

550 

152.5 


227 
230 
27.0 


2.445 
2.469 
290.2 


96 
47.3 


534 

263.1 


14 

14 

11.1 


134 

136 
107.7 


617 
44.2 


3.264 
233.1 


78 
24.6 


607 
169.0 


2.039 
2.039 

45.7 


26.736 
26.739 
676.4 


29 
11.2 


104 
40.2 


134 

36.2 


840 
220.9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,429 
136.7 



1.179 
1.183 
400.1 



5.660 
220.7 



1.406 
1.438 
169.0 



3,642 
263.8 



13,688 
13. 692 

306.6 



Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


16.496 
16.811 
1. 696. 9 


29.339 
30,300 

2. 878. 1 


6.640 

5.686 

1, 923. 


9. 62-' 

9. 6'.'1 

3. 253. 7 


48,776 
50,338 
1.963.0 


86.174 
88.381 
3.446.6 


5.181 

5.295 

1, 467. 7 


9.897 
10.130 
2.807.9 


14.019 
14. 248 
1. 674. 5 


23.678 
24.377 
2.865.0 


5.725 
2, 820. 5 


10,250 
5,049.8 


1.433 

1.448 
1.146.4 


3,620 

3,655 

2,893.8 


31. 649 
2,260.2 


63, 176 
3, 809. 5 


3,362 
1,054.6 


11, 869 
3, 723. 2 


89. 732 
89. 767 
2. 010. 2 


151. 572 
151.634 
3. 396. 


2.881 
1.113.3 


6.610 

2.167.8 


7.183 
1. 889. 3 


13.201 
3. 472. 1 



77 



Table 5. — Indtx ofCrimt, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



&le, P* 

(Includes Erie County.) 

Area actually reporting - 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Eugene-Sprincfleld. Oreg 

(Includes Lane County.) 

A rea actually reporting - . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

EranBrilie, lnd.>Ky 

(Includes Gibson, Posey, Vanderburgh, 
and Warwick Counties, Ind. and 
Henderson County, Ky.) 

Area actually reporting — 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Fugo-Moorhcad, N. Dak. -Minn 

(Includes Cass County. N. Dak., and 
Clay County, Minn.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

FkyetteHlle, N.C 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

FUnt, Mich 

(Includes Genesee and Shlawasiiee 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood , Fla 

(Includes Broward County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fort Myers, Fla 

(Includes Lee County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fort Smith. Ark.-Okia 

(Includes Crawlord and Sebastian 
Counties, Ark., and Le Flore and 
Sequoyah Counties, Okla.) 

Area actually reporting.. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

(Includes Adams, Allen, De Kalb and 
Wells Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Fresno, Calif 

(Includes Fresno County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - — 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Gadsden, Ala . 

(Includes Etowah County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Gainesrille, Fla 

(Includes Alachua County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



268,884 

100.0% 



237,000 
100.0% 
291,061 



100.0% 



219,045 

100. 0% 
Sr, 477 



99.9% 
100.0% 



812,221 

100.0% 



145,635 

100. 0% 
173,024 



77. 8% 
100.0% 



96.0% 
100.0% 



99.2% 
100.0% 



94. 4% 
100.0% 



122,725 

100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



9,729 
3, 618. 3 



16, 513 

6, 967. 6 



12,816 
14,160 



5,095 
3,955.7 



9,811 
4, 479. 



37,884 
37, 914 
7, 187. 8 



75,144 
9,261.7 



6,013 
4. 128. 8 



3,976 

8,178 

2, 992. 6 



16, 773 
I6,4(M 
4,405.6 



34, 749 
34,988 
7, 926. 6 



3,687 
3,821 



11,448 
9, 328. 2 



3,734 
3,736 
708.3 



6,226 
643.3 



2,297 
2,314 
624.2 



Prop- 
erty! 
crime 



9,166 
3,408.6 



16,842 
6,684.4 



11,379 
12.667 



4,971 
3, 859. 4 



7,843 
3, 680. 5 



34,150 
34.178 
b, 479. 5 



6.666 
3,883.0 



3.616 

4,719 

2, 727. 4 



15, 242 
15,838 
4.253.5 



32,462 
32, 674 
7.402.4 



3,383 

3,589 
3, 741. 6 



10,690 
8, 629. 



Murder 

and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



2,894 
366.3 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,031 
1,067 
363.2 



2,370 
2,371 
449.5 



2,947 
1,096.0 



4,617 
1,948.1 



3,823 
1, 745. 3 



11,017 
11, 024 



1, 964 20. 643 
240. 6 2, 629. 2 



2,172 
1,491.4 



1,319 
762.3 



140 


3,332 


158 


3,660 


42.4 


956.1 


1,106 


11,203 


1,114 


11,271 


252.4 


2,853.5 



1,376 
1,433.5 



See footnote at end of table. 



78 



Tables. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



GalTeslon-Texas City, Tex . 

(Includes Galveston County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Gary-Hammond-East Chicago, Ind 

(Includes Lake and Porter Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

(Includes Kent and Ottawa Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Great Falls. Mont 

(Includes Cascade County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Green Bay, Wis 

(Includes Brown County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Greensboro-Winston-Salem-HIgh Point, 

N.C 

(Includes Davidson, Forsyth, Guilford, 
Randolph, Stokes and Yadkin Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Greenville-Spartanburg. S.C 

(Includes Greenville, Pickens and 
Spartanburg Counties.) 

Area actually reporting,.. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Harrisbarg, Pa 

(Includes Cumberland, Dauphin and 
Perry Counties.) 

Area actually reporting... 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Hartford, Conn 

(Includes Hartford and Tolland 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estim ated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Honolulu, Hawaii 

(Includes Honolulu County.) 

Area actually reporting - . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Houston, Tex 

(Includes Brazoria. Fort Bend, Harris, 
Liberty, Montgomery and Waller 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated t otal. 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants .. 

Bantington-Ashland, W. Va.-Ky.-Ohlo. . . 
(Includes Cabell and Wayne Counties, 
W. Va., Boyd and Greenup Counties, 
Ky. and Lawrence County, Ohio.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

HantsviUe, Ala 

(Includes Limestone, Madison and 
Marshall Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



76. 4% 
100.0% 



99. 4% 
100.0% 



656,110 

100.0% 
86,410 
100. 0% 
167.671 

100.0% 



767,929 



89. 1% 
100. 0% 



96.2% 
100.0% 



96. 4% 
100.0% 



690,446 

100.0% 

2,202,019 



80.1% 
100.0% 



98.7% 
100.0% 



87. S% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



9,012 
10,033 
5,609.8 



33,348 
33,623 
6, 213. 



24, 073 
4, 328. 8 



6,768 
6,741.6 



3,966 
I, 360. 8 



33,074 
35, 252 
4, 690. 6 



27,417 
28,388 
6.428.3 



16. 149 
3.601. 



42,670 
43.888 
4, 749. 9 



106,299 
116,876 
5, 262. 3 



8,016 

8,144 

2, 810. 7 



9,006 

9,796 

3, 369. 4 



1,364 
1,445 
793.6 



3,284 
3,290 
611.6 



1,439 
258.8 



4,926 
6, 183 
674.9 



2.621 
2,624 
601.8 



1,841 
438.0 



2,743 

2,777 
300.6 



1,660 
226.9 



10,689 
11.390 
517.3 



30,064 
30,233 
4, 701. 4 



22, 634 
4. 070. 1 



6,624 
6. 467. 6 



3.9<H 
2, 329. 8 



28,149 
30, 069 
3, 916. 6 



24, 896 

25. 764 
4, 926. 5 



13,308 
3, 166. 



39,927 
41,111 
4. 449. 3 



42,193 
6,111.0 



95,710 
104,486 
4, 745. 



7,233 

7,356 

2,638.7 



9,092 
3, 127. 5 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,698 
1,601 
249.0 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,063 
1.066 
116.3 



7,670 
7,761 
362.0 



1,360 
1,363 

210.4 



3,864 
4,046 
526.9 



1,401 
1.468 
278.8 



1,649 
1,669 



2,663 

2,966 

1, 623. 3 



8,717 

8,768 

1,361.9 



6,984 
1,265.9 



1,181 
1. 382. 7 



1,032 
616.9 



9,838 
10,768 
1, 402. 2 



10, 773 
11,091 
2, 120. 8 



4,611 
1. 097. 



12,726 
13, 076 
1, 416. 2 



13,091 
1,896.0 



42,229 
1,917. 



2,160 
2,188 
766.1 



2,864 

3,203 

1, 101. 8 



4,412 

4,889 
2,684.9 



15,485 
16,600 
2,426.9 



14, 668 
2, 617. 8 



3,916 
4,584.9 



2,686 
1, 602. 9 



16, 698 

17, 661 



11,632 
12, 020 
2, 298. 4 



7,451 
1, 772. 6 



22, 891 
23,619 
2, 666. 2 



24,463 
3, 643. 1 



4,626 
4,711 
, 626. 9 



4,916 

6,213 

1, 793. 2 



79 



Tables. — Indtx of Crimt, 1974, Standard Mtfropolifan Statlttical Areas — Continued 



standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Indianapolis, Ind 

(Includes Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, 
Hendricks, Johnson, Marlon, Morgan 
and Shelby Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Jackson, Mich.. 

(Includes Jackson County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Jackson, Miss 

(Includes Hinds and Rankin Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total . 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Jacksonville, Fla 

(Includes Baker, Clay, Duval, Nassau, 
and St. Johns Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. — 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Jersey City, N.J 

(Includes Hudson County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Johnstown, Pa 

(Includes Cambria and Somerset 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants. 

Kalamazoo-Portage, Mich 

(Includes Kalamazoo and Van Buren 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Kansas City, Mo.-K«ns 

(Includes Cass, Clay, Jackson, Platte 
and Ray Counties, Mo. and Johnson 
and Wyandotte Counties, Kans.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Kenosha, Wis - -. 

(Includes Kenosha County.) 

Area acttially reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Kllleen-Temple, Ten 

(Includes Bell and Coryell Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants. 

Klngsport-Brislol, Tenn.- Va 

(Includes Hawkins and Sullivan 
Counties, Tenn., Bristol City and 
Scott and Washington Counties. Va.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

KnoxTllle, Tenn 

(Includes Anderson, Blount, Knox and 
Union Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 



79. 7% 

100.0% 



99. 2% 
100.0% 



275, 179 



98. 3% 
100.0% 



100.0% 



604,736 

100.0% 
267, 80« 

100.0% 



98.8% 
100.0% 



98. 3% 
100. 0% 



125,471 

100.0% 



82. 8% 
100.0% 



no. 4% 

100.0% 



98. 9% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



56, 498 
64,165 
5, 632. 5 



11,626 
11,642 
4, 230. 7 



46,879 
6,901.1 



25, 160 
4, 158. 8 



3,119 
1,164.6 



18,933 
19, 126 
7,297.9 



80,041 
80,899 
6, 030. 1 



7,811 
6, 225. 3 



6,943 

7.684 
4,105.8 



4,568 

5,478 

2, 169. 1 



16.595 
16,738 
3,897.9 



4.722 
5,143 
451.5 



5,167 
760.6 



3,037 
602.2 



1,584 
1.697 
609.4 



9,070 
9,108 
678.9 



1.546 
360.0 



Prop- 
erty' 
crime 



60.776 
69,022 
5, 181. 1 



7,487 

7,660 

5, 260. 7 



10. 680 
10,684 



41,712 
6, 140. 4 



22,113 
3,656.6 



2,875 
1, 073. 6 



17, 349 
17,629 
6, 688. 6 



70,971 
71,791 
5,361.2 



7,480 
5,961.6 



6,414 
6,997 



4.191 

6,064 

1,995.9 



15,069 
16, 192 
3, 637. 9 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



2,773 
2,933 
267.6 



2,117 
311.6 



1,945 
321.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,591 
139.7 



2,494 
367.1 



1,120 
1,127 
430.0 



4,264 

4,289 
319.7 



17, 672 
20,402 
1, 790. 9 



2,794 

2,810 

1, 954. 3 



3,936 

3,979 

1,446.0 



15,082 
2, 220. 2 



7,407 
1, 224. 8 



5,064 

5,110 

1, 949. 8 



26, 715 
25, 991 
1,937.3 



1,610 
1,283.2 



1,486 
1,731 
682.2 



6,059 

6,102 

1,421.0 



See footnote at end of table. 



80 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Mefropolitan Statistical Areas — Confinued 



standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



lafsretle. La 

(Includes Lafayette Parish.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per lOO.OOfl inhabitants 

Lafayette- West Lafayette, Ind 

(Includes Tippecanoe County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lake Charles, La 

(Includes Calcasieu Parish.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Lakeland-Winter Haven, Fla 

(Includes Polk County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rale per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Lancaster, Pa 

(Includes Lancaster County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lansing-East Lansing, Mich 

(Includes Clinton, Eaton, Ingham and 
Ionia Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Las Vegas, Ne? 

(Includes Clark County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Lawton, Okia 

(Includes Comanche County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lexington-Fayelte. Ky 

(Includes Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, 
Jessamine, Scott, and Woodford 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Lima, Ohio 

(Includes Allen, Auglaize, Putnam and 
Van Wert Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lincoln, Nebr. . 

(Includes Lancaster County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Little Rock-North Little Bock, Ark 

(Includes Pulaski and Saline Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per lOO.OOfl inhabitants 

Long Branch-Asbury Park. N.J 

(Includes Monmouth County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants. 

Loraln-Elyria. Ohio 

(Includes Lorain County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rat • per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Los Angeles-Long Beach. Calif. 

(Includes Los Angeles County.) 

Arci actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



119,885 

100.0% 
113,600 
100.0% 
149, 457 
100. 0% 
263, 175 
100. 0% 
329,545 
100.0% 
437, 192 



99. 6% 
100.0% 



311,153 

100.0% 



106,315 
100. 0% 
284, 303 

100. 0% 
213,115 



85. 6% 
100. 0% 



181, 208 

100. 0% 



93. 8% 
100. 0% 



474,488 
100. 0% 



97. 3% 
100.0% 



6,964,946 

100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



5,362 
4, 472. 6 



4,119 
3, 629. 1 



4,996 
3, 342. 8 



19, 673 
7, 476. 3 



7,396 
2, 244. 3 



24, 079 
24,223 
5. 640. 6 



28,993 
9,317.9 



7,281 
6, 848. 5 



13,828 
4, 863. 8 



5, 838 

6,984 

3. 277. 1 



S. 777 
4, 843. 6 



2.5, 134 
25,590 
7. 22.5. 



22, S.M 
4. 7.53. 3 



6,465 
6,731 

2, 588. 7 



486, 999 
6, 992. 1 



1,164 
1,174 

268.5 



2,496 
2. .556 
721.7 



1,206 
2.54. 2 



Prop- 
erty! 
crime 



17,617 
6,666.0 



7,081 
2. 148. 7 



22,916 
23, (M9 
5, 272. 1 



26,218 
8, 426. 1 



6,618 
6, 224. 9 



13, 019 
4, 679. 3 



5,529 

6,611 

3, 102. 1 



8,360 
4,613.5 



22,638 
23, 034 
6, 503. 4 



5,856 
6,107 
I, 348. 7 



424,985 
6,101.8 



Murder 
and non- 
neghgent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



3,795 
64.5 



1,006 
284.0 



26,211 
376.3 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,313 
422.0 



7,029 

7,063 

1,615.6 



9,926 
3, 189. 7 



2,418 
2, 274. 4 



444 


3,863 


166.2 


1,366.2 


118 


1,592 


1.52 


1,836 


71.3 


861.5 


310 


1,563 


171.1 


862.5 


1,216 


7,933 


1,255 


8,121 


354.3 


2,292.9 


650 


6,980 


137.0 


1,471.1 


279 


2,902 


287 


2,959 


110.4 


1,138.0 


31, 108 


166, 695 


446.6 


2, 249. 8 



1,659 


2,813 


1,300.4 


2,346.4 


1.288 


2,494 


1, 134. 8 


2, 197. 4 


1,616 


2,803 


1,081.2 


1,876.6 


6,694 


9,654 


2,643.6 


3.66S.3 


2,119 


4,668 


643.0 


1,386.2 



14,768 
14,844 
3, 396. 3 



13,816 
4, 439. 9 



3,834 366 

3, 606. 3 344. 3 



8,667 
3, 046. 



3,729 

4,476 

2, 100. 3 



6,419 
3, 542. 3 



13,400 
13,589 
3, 836. 7 



12, 977 
2, 734. 9 



2,297 
2,470 
950.0 



205,716 62,574 
2,963.6 I 898.4 



See footnote at end of table. 



81 



Table 5. — Indtx of Crimt, 1974, Standard MttropolHan Statistical Anas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



LoulBTllle, Ky.-Ind 

(Includes Bullitt. Jefferson and Oldham 
Counties, Ky. and Clark and Floyd 
Counties, Ind.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Lubbock, Ten 

(Includes Lubbock County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lynchburg, Va 

(Includes Lynchburg City and Am- 
herst, Appomattox, and Campbell 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Macon, Ga 

(Includes Bibb, Houston, Jones and 
Twiggs Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Madison, Wis 

(Includes Dane County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Manchester, N.H 

(Includes Hillsborough County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Mansfleld. Ohio. 

(Includes Richland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

McAlien-Pharr-Edlnburg, Texas 

(Includes Hidalgo County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Melbourne-Tltusyllle-Cocoa, Fla 

(Includes Brevard County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Memphis, Tenn.- Ark .-Miss 

(Includes Shelby and Tipton Counties, 
Tenn., Crittenden County, Ark. and 
De Soto County, Miss.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Miami, Fla 

(Includes Dade County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants. 

Milwaukee, Wis 

(Includes Milwaukee. Ozaukee, Wash- 
ington and Waukesha Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

MInneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.-Wis 

(Includes Anoka, Carver, Chisago, 
Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Scott. 
Washington and Wright Counties, 
Minn, and St. Croix County. Wis.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



100.0% 



190,053 
100.0% 
Ul,752 



97.9% 
100.0% 



94.3% 
100. 0% 



299,463 

100.0% 



95. 8% 
100.0% 



131!, 600 

100.0% 



97. 6% 
100.0% 



244,126 

100.0% 
865,005 



96. 3% 
100.0% 



l,3S5,g89 

100.0% 

1,421.96S 

100.0% 



99.1% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 


Violent ' 


Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 


Murder 

negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


42,264 
44.097 
4,969.9 

10.900 
6,736.2 


3.476 
3.680 
402.7 

928 
488.3 


38,778 
40, 617 
4,667.3 

9,972 
6, 247. 


118 
122 
13.7 

32 
16.8 


304 
317 
35.7 

91 
47.9 


2.119 
2.165 
242.4 

220 
116.8 


936 

986 
110.9 

686 
307.8 


11.741 
12.406 
1.396.4 

3,668 
1,872.1 


22.288 
23.179 
2.607.1 

6,886 
3,097.0 


3,266 

3,427 

2,417.6 


266 

268 

189.1 


3.010 

3.169 

2, 228. 6 


19 

19 

13.4 


26 

28 

18.3 


97 
103 
72.7 


114 

120 

84.7 


1,117 
1,166 
816.5 


1,776 

1,873 

1,321.3 


9,931 
10,422 
4, 370. 3 


876 

913 

382.9 


9.066 

9,609 

3,987.6 


46 

46 
19.3 


69 

63 

28.4 


313 

329 
138.0 


468 

476 

199.2 


3.747 

3.967 

1,669.3 


4,272 

4,464 

1,871.9 


16.021 
6. 360. 1 


444 
148.3 


16, 677 
6,201.8 


6 
2.0 


68 
19.4 


220 
73.6 


160 
53.4 


3,669 
1, 188. 6 


11,361 
3,793.9 


8.208 

8,472 

3,326.2 


178 
184 
72.2 


8,030 

8,288 

3, 263. 


8 

R 

3.1 


17 
17 
6.7 


74 

76 
29.4 


79 

84 

33.0 


1.916 
1,996 
783.4 


6,293 

5,461 

2. 139. 6 


4,979 
3,671.8 


381 

281.0 


4,698 
3, 390. 9 


6 
4.4 


19 
14.0 


88 
64.9 


268 
197.6 


1,434 
1.067.5 


2,960 
2. 182. 9 


6,790 

6,998 

3, 198. 3 


308 

318 

169.6 


6,482 

6,680 

3, 028. 7 


12 
12 
6.4 


20 

21 

11.2 


48 
61 

27.2 


228 

234 

124.8 


1.948 

2.007 

1.070.2 


3.166 

3,291 
1,754.8 


16,397 
6.716.6 


976 
399.4 


16,422 
6, 317. 2 


22 
9.0 


74 
30.3 


354 

146.0 


626 
215.1 


4,628 
1,895.7 


10,169 
4,161.4 


66,812 
66.796 
6.666.9 


6,899 
6,076 
702.4 


49,913 
60,719 
6, 883. 4 


161 
167 
19.3 


679 
692 
68.4 


3,147 
3,167 
366.1 


2.012 
2,150 
248.6 


21,664 
22.026 
2.646.3 


24,266 
24,667 
2.840.1 


126,636 
9, 130. 2 


16,704 
1,206.3 


109.831 
7,924.9 


241 
17.4 


464 
32.8 


7,779 
661.3 


8,230 
593.8 


38, 618 

2, 642. 1 


62.515 
4, 510. 8 


69,212 
4, 164. 1 


3,216 
226.1 


65,997 
3,938.0 


73 
6.1 


246 
17.3 


1.829 
128.6 


1.067 
75.0 


11.122 
782.2 


38,664 
2, 719. 


108.626 
108.947 
6.318.7 


7,131 
7,143 
348.7 


101, 395 
101. 8(M 
4. 970. 


85 
86 
4.2 


680 
681 

28.4 


3,772 
3.776 
184.3 


2.694 
2.701 
131.9 


30,814 
30,966 
1.611.7 


58,616 
58, 846 
2, 872. 8 



See footnote at end of table. 



82 



Table 5. — /nc/ex ofCrimt, 1974, Standard Mttro/yolifan Statisiical Areas — Continued 



standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Mobile. AU 

(Includes Baldwin and Mobile Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total . 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Modesto, Calif- - 

(Includes Stanislaus County). 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Monroe, La 

(Includes Ouachita Parish.) 

Area actually roporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Muskegon-Muskegon Heights, Mich 

(Includes Muskegon and Oceana 
Counties.) 

.^rea actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

Nashville-Davidson. Tenn 

(Includes Cheatham, Davidson, Dick- 
son, Robertson, Rutherford, Sumner, 
Williamson and Wilson Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

NsMau-SuffoIk. New York 

(Includes Nassau and Suffolk Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Newark, N.J . 

(Includes Essex, Morris, Somerset and 
Union Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants... 

New Brunswick-Penh Amboy-Sayre- 

vllle, NJ 

(Includes Middlesex County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

New Haven-West Haven, Conn 

(Includes New Haven County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

New London-Norwich. Conn 

(Includes New London County.) 

Area actually roporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

New Orleans. La 

(Includes Jeflerson, Orleans, St. Ber- 
nard and St. Tammany Parishes.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Newport News-Hampton. Va 

(Includes Hampton. Newport News 
and Williamsburg Cities and Glou- 
cester, James City and York Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



Population 



ToUl 
Crime 
Index 



83.9% 
100.0% 



210,400 

100. 0% 



122, 183 

lOO. 0% 
177,728 

100. 0% 
737.617 



78.6% 
100.0% 



99.9% 
100.0% 



600.529 

100,0% 



87.0% 
100.0% 



98. 7% 
100.0% 



355,513 



16,2i8 
17, 492 
4,429.5 



15,323 

7, 282. 8 



5,088 
4,164.2 



10,624 
5, 977. 7 



29,448 
33,279 
4,811.7 



93,328 
93,425 
3, 621. 5 



106,609 
5,145.6 



27,482 
4, 576. 3 



34,744 
38,376 
5, 075. 4 



8,262 

8,377 

3,641.9 



66,777 
68,766 
6,381.7 



15, 661 
4, 402. 4 



1,979 
2,112 
634.8 



Prop- 
erty' 
crime 



14,269 
16,380 
3, 894. 7 



14,441 

6, 863. 6 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



448 


4,640 


15 


366.7 


3, 797. 6 


12.3 


976 


9,648 


14 


549.2 


5, 428. 5 


7.9 


3,068 


26,380 


117 


3,402 


29,877 


135 


461.2 


4, 060. 5 


18.3 


3,164 


90, 164 


67 


3,169 


90,266 


67 


119.4 


3, 402. 


2.6 


12,127 


94, 482 


198 


585.3 


4. 560. 3 


9.6 


1,561 


26,931 


22 


268.3 


4,318.0 


3.7 


1,386 


33,358 


27 


1,487 


36,889 


28 


196.7 


4,878.7 


3.7 


452 


7,810 


5 


465 


7,922 


5 


192.4 


3, 349. 5 


2.1 


8,206 


48,671 


242 


8,414 


50,352 


248 


770.6 


4,611.2 


22.7 


1,260 


14,391 


40 


364.4 


4.048.0 


11.3 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



1,600 
1,685 
228.4 



1,691 
1,693 



7,075 
341.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4,310 
4,354 



1,234 
1,444 



1,226 
1.228 
46.3 



4,362 
210.1 



738 
122.9 



3,286 
3,428 
313.9 



6,184 

6. 733 7, 671 

1,705.0 1,942.6 



4,001 
1.901.6 



3,327 

1,872.0 



12,978 
1,759.4 



21,696 
21, 720 
818.7 



30,990 
1,496.8 



7,662 
1,269.2 



11,703 
12, 748 
1,686.0 



15,686 
16,202 
1,483.8 



4,630 
1,274.2 



9.612 
4, 568. 4 



3,707 
3,034.0 



5.913 
3, 327. 



12, 189 
13,650 
1, 850. 6 



69,805 
59,865 
2, 266. 6 



49, 787 
2, 403. 



16, 170 
2, 692. 6 



17, 152 
19, 324 
2, 665. 7 



4, a 

4,453 

1, 882. 8 



24,959 
25,967 
2, 378. 



83 



Table 5. — Indtx ofCrimt, 1974, Standard Mttropolttan Sfatistical Artat — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



New York. N.Y.-NJ 

(Includes Bronx, Kings, New York, 
Putnam, Queens, Richmond, Rock- 
land and Westchester Counties, N.Y. 
and Bergen County, N.J.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated to tal 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Norfolk-Virginia Beuh-PortsmoDlh, Va.- 

N.C 

(Includes Chesapeake, Norfolk, Ports- 
mouth, Suflolk and Virginia Beach 
Cities, Va. and Currituck County, 
N.C.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Northeast Pennsylvania 

(Includes Lackawanna, Luzurne and 
Monroe Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Oklahoma City, Okia 

(Includes Canadian, Cleveland, 
McCIaIn, Oklahoma and Pottowat- 
omle Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Omaha, Nebr.-Iowa 

(Includes Douglas and Sarpy Counties, 
Nebr.. and Pottawattamie County, 
Iowa.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Orlando, Fla 

(Includes Orange, Osceola and Seminole 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Oniard-Simi Valley- Ventura, Calif 

(Includes Ventura County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Parkersburg-Marielta, W. Va.-Ohio 

(Includes Wirt and Wood Counties, 
W. Va. and Washington County, 
Ohio.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Paterson-Clirion-Paasaic, N.J 

(Includes Passaic County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Pensaeola, Fla 

(Includes Escambia and Santa Rosa 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Peoria. Ill 

(Includes Peoria, Tazewell and Wood- 
ford Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



9,828,130 



99.6% 
100.0% 



89. 2% 
100. 0% 



100. 0% 
676.347 



100. 0% 



427,570 
100. 0% 
149.713 

100. 0% 



466.010 
100. 0% 
263,917 

100. 0% 



98. 4% 
100. 0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



694,887 
696,669 
6, 072. 2 



43,091 
6,681.7 



14,226 
15, 469 
2, 468. 8 



44, 156 
5, 803. 2 



32, 469 
5, 633. 6 



44. 761 

7, 667. 9 



23,218 
5, 430. 2 



28,211 
6, 053. 7 



18, 403 
6, 973. 



17, 719 
18.001 
5, 179. 8 



128,387 
128, 479 
1, 307. 6 



4,672 
602.8 



2,677 
351.8 



3,793 
649.8 



3.046 
653.6 



1,681 
636.9 



2,087 
2, 110 
607.2 



466,600 
468, 180 
4, 764. 6 



38,619 
6, 078. 9 



13.597 
14, 764 



41,479 
5.451.4 



29,615 
5, 138. 4 



40,968 
7,018.1 



4,260 
2, 845. 4 



25,165 
5, 400. 1 



16, 722 
6, 336. 1 



15,632 
15,891 
4, 572. 7 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,604 
1,605 
16.3 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



4,206 
4,209 
42.8 



Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


79,728 


42,860 


178,464 


207, 367 


79, 767 


42,898 


178,909 


208,464 


811.8 


436.6 


1, 820. 7 


2, 121. 6 


1,686 


2,409 


11, 078 


24,764 


222.2 


317.6 


1, 460. 7 


3,263.9 


172 


380 


4,951 


7,541 


192 


425 


5,499 


8,070 


30.6 


67.8 


877.6 


1,287.9 


1,117 


1,217 


15,941 


20,332 


146.8 


159.9 


2, 095. 


2,672.1 


1,369 


1,222 


8,271 


17.614 


237.5 


212.0 


1,435.1 


3.056.1 


1,224 


2,202 


14, 702 


23, 458 


209.7 


377.2 


2,518.6 


4,018.5 


484 


724 


7,310 


13,043 


113.2 


169.3 


1, 709. 7 


3,050.5 


72 


124 


1,109 


2,920 


48.1 


82.8 


740.8 


1,950.4 


1,564 


1,387 


8,281 


12, 435 


335.6 


297.6 


1,777.0 


2,668.4 


532 


1,002 


5,871 


9,407 


201.6 


379.7 


2, 224. 6 


3,564.4 


552 


1,437 


5,730 


8,913 


5«0 


1,451 


5,800 


9.080 


161.1 


417.5 


1.669.0 


2.612.8 



84 



Tabl«3. — litdtKotCtlmt, 1974, Standard MttropoUfan StatMlcal Artat — Continued 



standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Peteraburg-Colantal Heighla-Hopewell, 
Va 



(Includes Colonial Heights, Hopewell 
and Petersburg Cities and Dinwiddle 
and Prince Oeorge Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Philadelphia. P«.-N J 

(Includes Bucks, Chester, Delaware, 
Montgomery and Philadelphia Coun- 
ties, Pa., and Burlington, Camden 
and Gloucester Counties, N.J.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Phoenix, Arlr 

(Includes Maricopa County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Pittabnriih. Pa 

(Includes Allegheny, Beaver, Washing- 
ton and Westmoreland Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Pittafletd, Maaa 

(Includes Berkshire County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Portland, Maine 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

A roa actually reporting . . 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Portland, Oreg.- Wash 

(Includes Clackamas, Multlnomah and 
Washington Counties, Oreg., and 
Clark County, Wash.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Poughkeepsle, N. Y 

(Includes Dutchess County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

ProTidenee-WarwIck-Pawtuckel, B.I 

(Includes Bristol, Kent, Providence and 
Washington Counties.) 

Area actually reporting . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

ProTo-Orem, Utah 

(Includes Utah County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants - 

Pueblo, Colo 

(Includes Pueblo County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Racine, Wis 

(Includes Racine County.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Ralelgh-Dorham. N.C 

(Includes Durham, Orange and Wake 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting- 

Estimated total. . . 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

See footnote at end of table. 



100. 0% 
4.818.076 



99.3% 
100. 0% 



99.69t 
100.0% 



83.9% 
100.0% 



200.824 

100.0% 
1.072.724 



99.3% 
100.0% 



228, SS4 
100.0% 
840,989 

100.0% 



161,807 

100.0% 



123.782 

100.0% 



17S.579 

100.0% 
462,304 



98.4% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crtme 
Indei 



4,966 
3, 828. 5 



201, 245 
201,349 
4. 179. 



114,173 
114.928 
9, 795. 3 



68,814 
69, 076 
2, 934. 8 



4,&8fi 

6,624 

3, 779. 



10,317 
6, 137. 3 



79,180 
79, 678 
7,418.3 



6,676 
2,920.6 



43,487 
6. 167. 4 



6,437 
3,360.2 



6.878 
6,666.6 



11,462 
6, 628. 1 



21,746 
22.126 
4.788.8 



24,943 
24,950 
517.8 



7,628 
7,667 
653.5 



6.816 
8.830 
643.6 



2,414 
287.0 



1,949 
421.6 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 



4,503 
3,471.6 



176, 302 
176,399 
3,661.2 



106,545 
107.261 
9,141.8 



61,458 
61, 703 
2,621.6 



4,460 

6,446 

3, 659. 4 



9,863 
4,911.3 



73,338 
73,748 
6, 874. 8 



6,121 
1, 677. 8 



41,043 

4,880.3 



5,343 
3,302.1 



6,299 
6,088.8 



10,606 
6, 983. 1 



19,864 
20,176 
4,364.2 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



1.353 
1,353 



13,568 
13,571 



3,075 
3.088 
263.2 



3,825 
3.832 
162.8 



2.478 
2,482 
231.4 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



9,451 
9,455 



3,977 
4.000 
340.9 



2,997 
127.3 



2,808 
261.8 



1,219 
1,266 
273.6 



1,265 
975.2 



58,321 
58,351 



35,834 
36, 043 
3,071.9 



20,898 
20,974 



1,836 

2,1 

1,436.3 



3,774 
1,879.3 



28,306 
26,418 
2, 369. 6 



2,684 
,130.4 



10,667 
1, 267. 2 



1.828 
1. 476. 8 



3,262 
1. 862. 2 



6,681 

6,689 

1,446.9 



3,042 
2,345.2 



88.107 
88,164 



61,913 
62,371 
5,315.9 



29,484 
29,628 
1,258.8 



2,265 
2, 724 



5,474 
2. 726. 8 



40,968 
41,240 
3, 844. 4 



21,979 
2, 613. 6 



4.267 
2,630.9 



3,930 
3,174.9 



6,639 
3, 781. 2 



11.981 
12, 177 
2, 634. 



85 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolifan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Reading, Pa 

(Includes Berks County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Reno, Nev 

(Includes Washoe County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Rich mond, Va . . , 

(Includes Richmond City and Charles 
City, Chesterfield. Goochland, Han- 
over, Henrico. and Powhatan 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, Calif. 
(Includes Riverside and San Bernardino 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

EstI mated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Roanoke. Va 

(Includes Roanoke and Salem Cities and 
Botetourt, Craig and Roanoke 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Rochester, N.Y 

(Includes Livingston, Monroe, Ontario, 
Orleans and Wayne Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants , 

Rockford, HI 

(Includes Boone and Winnebago Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 Inhabitants 

Sacramento, Calif, 

(Includes Placer, Sacramento and Yolo 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting _ . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Saginaw, Mich 

(Includes Saginaw County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

St. Cloud, Minn 

(Includes Benton, Sherburne and 
Steams Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

St. Louis, Mo.-m 

(Includes St. Louis City and Franklin, 
Jefferson, St. Charles and St. Louis 
Counties, Mo. and Clinton, Madison, 
Monroe and St. Clair Counties, 111.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Salem, Oreg 

(Includes Marion and Polk Counties.) 

Area actually reporting. 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants. 



303,110 

100.0% 



148,965 

100.0% 
571,818 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



99. i% 
100. 0% 



99.0% 
100.0% 



99.6% 
100.0% 



100.0% 



227, 131 
100.0% 
141,900 



97.3% 
100. 0% 



98. 4% 
100.0% 



99.9% 
100.0% 



See footnote at end of table. 



10, 722 
7, 197. 7 



31,259 
5, 466. 6 



8.5, S31 
86. 302 
7, 145. 7 



10,363 
4, 803. n 



44.839 
45, 197 
4, 672. 1 



13, 424 
13. 472 



62,116 
7,099.8 



18, 818 
8, 286. 1 



3,325 

3,491 

2, 460. 2 



151,770 
163. 659 
6. 422. 5 



11,53!) 
11.656 
6, 638. 4 



2,252 
2.271 
229.7 



4.531 
617.9 



1,841 
810.5 



16,062 
16,169 
676.3 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crimp 



6,136 
2, 024. 3 



10,056 
6, 760. 6 



28, 379 
4. 962. 9 



79, 565 
80,002 
6,624.0 



9,817 
4. 549. 9 



42.587 
42,926 
4, 342. 4 



12.662 
12, 607 
4.734.0 



67,586 
6,581.9 



16,977 
7. 474. 5 



3,269 

3,421 

2, 410. 9 



135, 708 
137, 390 
5, 746. 3 



11,137 
11,154 
5, 442. 3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,464 
256.0 



2,020 
167.3 



8.024 
8.065 
337.3 



1,122 
196. 2 



3,687 
3,705 
306.8 



1,101 
1,111 
112.4 



2,544 
290.8 



Burglary 



1,977 
662.2 



2,671 
1,793.0 



9,625 
1, 683. 2 



28, 841 
28,975 



3,138 
1,454.4 



12,862 
12, 952 
1,310.2 



4,462 

4,474 

176.7 1.680.0 



18, 197 
2, 079. 9 



6,723 
2, 619. 7 



3,693 
1,218.4 



6 875 46, 215 73, 363 
6!936 «.683 74,436 
290.1 1,952.6 3,113.3 



2,863 
1,396.9 



86 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forc- 
ible 
rape 


24 


89 


0.3 


34.4 


28 


228 


28 


229 


3.6 


29.8 


160 


391 


161 


394 


16.8 


41.1 


111 


418 


7.4 


27.7 


368 


1.334 


11.6 


42.2 


65 


367 


4.7 


31.3 


9 


74 


3.2 


26.4 


9 


58 


6.3 


40.3 


.5 


67 


2.1 


28.4 


7 


49 


4.5 


31.7 


41 


94 


42 


96 


20.4 


46.5 


90 


526 


91 


531 


6.4 


37.2 


63 


65 


16.4 


18.8 


6 


19 


6.1 


16.1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Salinas-Seaside- Monterey, Calif. 

(Includes Monterey County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Salt Lake Clty-Ogden. Utah 

(Includes Davis, Salt Lake, Tooele and 
Weber Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Antonio, Tex 

(Includes Bexar, Comal and Guadalupe 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

San Diego, Calif.. 

(Includes San Diego County.) 

Area actually reporting.. 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Francisco-Oakland, Calif. 

(Includes Alameda. Contra Costa, 
Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.. 

San JoEe, Calif... 

(Includes Santa Clara County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants.. 

Santa Barbara-Santa Maria-Lompoc, Calif 
(Includes San'a Barbara County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Santa Cruz, Calif 

(Includes Santa Cruz County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Santa Rosa, Calif 

(Includes Sonoma County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Sarasota, Fla 

(Includes Sarasota County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Savannah, Ga 

(Includes Bryan. Chatham and Effing- 
ham Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Seattle- Everett, Wash 

(Includes King and Snohomish Coim- 
ties-) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total , 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants... 

Shreveport, La. . — 

(Includes Bossier. Caddo and Webster 
Parishes.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Sioux City, Iowa-Neb 

(Includes Woodbury County, Iowa, 
and Dakota County, Neb.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rata per 100.000 inhabitants 



258,600 
100.0% 
767,322 



98.3% 
100.0% 



98. 6% 
100.0% 



1,507,783 

100.0% 

3, 161, 193 

100.0% 

1,171,025 

100.0% 



279,969 

100. 0% 



143, 994 
100. 0% 



235.911 

100. 0% 



154,700 

100. 0% 
206, 236 



96. 4% 
100. 0% 



98. 0% 
100. 0% 



100.0% 
118,210 



14.665 
6. 632. 3 



47.293 
48.004 
6. 256. 



66.201 
66.599 
6, 897. 5 



92.302 
6.121.7 



236, 377 
7. 477. 5 



15. 423 
5. 508. 8 



14,711 
6. 235. 8 



11.793 
7, 623. 1 



11,476 
11,744 
5. 694. 4 



94, 666 
96,601 
6. 776. 



13. 375 
3, 876. 



6.243 
5, 281. 3 



2.226 
290.1 



4.876 
4.903 
510.9 



3.675 
306.3 



1. 113 
1.134 
549.9 



6.093 
6.167 
432.6 



1.141 
330.7 



13. 570 
5, 247. 5 



45.084 
45. 778 
5, 965. 9 



61. 325 
61.696 
6, 386. 6 



86,264 
6. 721. 2 



214,624 
6, 789. 3 



76,623 
6, 543. 2 



14,640 
5, 229. 2 



9,461 
6. 570. 4 



14, 044 
5. 953. 1 



11.261 
7. 279. 3 



10, 363 
10.610 
5. 144. 6 



88. 573 
90,434 
6, 343. 5 



12. 234 
3. 645. 4 



5,987 
6,064.7 



1,854 
1,861 
193.9 



2,999 
198.9 



10,665 
337.1 



2.548 
2.566 
180.0 



1,125 
1.136 
148.0 



2.471 
2,487 
269.1 



2,610 
166.6 



9,396 
297.2 



1.681 
143.6 



2,929 
2.979 
209.0 



3.983 
1.640 2 



11.118 
11,242 
1, 465. 1 



19.066 
19. 196 
2.000.2 



67,835 
2, 146. 9 



21.383 
1. 824. 3 



3. 904 
1,394.4 



4.417 
1, 872. 3 



3.879 
2. 507. 4 



3.517 

3.631 

1. 760. 6 



30.135 
30.635 
2, 148. 9 



3,724 
1. 079. 2 



1.110 
939.0 



8,870 
3, 430. 



30. 707 
31.230 
4. 070. 



27,841 
28,048 
2. 922. 6 



52, 865 
3, 606. 1 



124, 749 
3, 946. 3 



49,099 
4. 192. 8 



9.818 
3. 506. 8 



5.923 
4,113.4 



8.761 
3,713.7 



6,866 
4. 438. 3 



51.096 
52, 342 
3.671.5 



7,807 
1, 262. 4 



4,349 
3,679.0 



See footnote at end of table. 



87 



S94-259 O - 75 - 7 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolian Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Sonlh B«nd, Ind 

(Includes Marshall and St. Joseph 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Spokane. Wash 

{Includes Spokane County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Ra te per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Sprl ngfleld. Ill 

(Includes Menard and Sangamon 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Springfield. Mo... 

(Includes Christian and Greene Coun- 
ties.) 

A rea actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants - - . 

Springfield. Ohio 

(Includes Champaign and Clark Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants - . - 

Springfleld-Chlcopee-Holyoke, Mass 

(Includes Hampden and Hampshire 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Stockton. Calif 

(Includes San Joaquin County.) 

Area actually reporting - 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Syracuse. N.Y 

(Includes Madison, Onondaga and 
Oswego Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Tacoma, Wash 

(Includes Pierce County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Tallahassee, Fla 

(Includes Leon and Wakulla Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Tampa-SI. Petersburg. Fla 

(Includes Hillsborough, Pasco and 
Pinellas Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Terre Haute, Ind 

(Includes Clay, Sullivan, Vermillion 
and Vigo Counties.) 

.^rea actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Texarkana, Tex.-Texarkana, Ark 

(Includes Bowie County, Tex., and 
Little River and MUler Counties, 
Ark.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



97. 3% 
100.0% 



296,600 

100.0% 
177, 123 



99.1% 
ICO.0% 



100.0% 
186,407 



96.6% 
100.0% 



694 989 

100.0% 
301, 135 

100.0% 



631,846 



414,684 

100.0% 



136,870 

100.0% 



100.0% 
176,647 



89.8% 
100.0% 



90. 1% 
100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



13, 621 
13,886 
4,911.6 



21,078 
7.107.9 



8,710 

8,793 

4,964.3 



11,490 
6, 296. 



8,468 

8,706 

4, 670. 4 



29,143 
4, 898. 1 



22,824 
7, 679. 3 



21,638 
3, 408. 7 



23,216 
6,699.6 



9,331 

6, 8«7. 6 



97, 620 
7,309.0 



8.760 

6,397 

3,621.3 



3,74« 

4,062 

3. 478. 4 



1,174 
396.0 



2.317 
389.4 



1,777 
890.1 



1,169 

188.0 



1,889 
448.4 



7,673 
674.4 



Prop- 
erty' 
crime 



12,666 
13,007 
4. 600. 6 



19. 901 
6, 712. 



8,081 

8,168 

4.606.8 



11,068 
6, 062. 1 



8.006 

8.240 

4. 420. 4 



21.047 
6. 989. 2 



20.369 
3.223.7 



21.386 
6,161.2 



89. 948 
6, 734. 6 



8,688 

6.169 

3, 492. 3 



3,291 

3.678 

3,061.3 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



3.138 
234.7 



1,362 

228.9 



1,066 
286.9 



3,877 
290.3 



Burglary 



3,768 

3,840 

1, 368. 2 



4,997 
1,685.3 



3,460 
1, 890. 1 



1,776 
1,828 



9,429 

1,584.7 



6,839 
1,939.0 



7,417 
I, 789. 



2,639 
1, 942, 3 



32, 376 

2, 424. 



1.007 
862.3 



8.115 

8,356 

2, 988. 2 



13, 376 
4,811.3 



3,691 
3,740 
i. 111.6 



7,149 
3, 916. 7 



6,866 

6,026 

3, 232. 7 



12,991 
2, 183. 4 



13,875 

4,607.9 



12, 346 
1,984.0 



12.186 
2.939.3 



6,464 
4,014.1 



81,837 
3, 881. 1 



3.134 
3,469 



2.227 

2,387 

2, 044. 



.See footnote at end of table. 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Statistical Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Toledo, Ohio-Mich - 

(Includes Fulton, Lucas, Ottawa and 
Wood Counties, Ohio and Monroe 
County, Mich.) 

A rca actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Topeka, Kana 

(Includes Jefferson, Osage and Shawnee 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting - . - 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants - - . 

Trenton, N J - . 

(Includes Mercer County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Tucson, Ariz - 

(Includes Pima County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Tulsa. Olih 

(Includes Creeli, Mayes, Osage, Rogers, 
Tulsa and Wagoner Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Tuscaloosa. Ala 

(Includes Tuscaloosa County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Ulica-Romc, N.Y 

(Includes Herkimer and Oneida 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants.- 

ValleJo-FairBeld-Napa. Calif - - . . 

(Includes Napa and Solano Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Vineland-MilWille-Bridgeton. N J 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Waco, Tex 

(Includes McLennan Coimty.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Washington, D.C.-Md.-Va 

(Includes District of Columbia, Charles, 
Montgomery and Prince Georges 
Coimtles, Md., Alexandria, Fairfax 
and Falls Church Cities and Arling- 
ton, Fairfax, Loudoun and Prince 
William Counties, Va.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per lOO.OOO inhabitants. - 

Waterloo-Cedar Falls, Iowa .-. 

(Includes Black Hawk County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

West Palm Beach-Boca Raton. Fla 

(Includes Palm Beach County.) 

Area actually reporting _ 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



94.0% 
100.0% 

192,362 

100.0% 
316, 403 

100.0% 



437, 9«0 

100.0% 
576,625 



99.4% 
100.0% 

120,600 

100.0% 
325.732 



96.8% 
100.0% 



268.500 

100.0% 
126,966 

100.0% 



166,429 



91.6% 
100.0% 



99.6% 
100.0% 



140,000 

100.0% 

450.325 

100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



40,699 
42,066 
6, 401. 1 



9.171 
4. 767. 8 



17, 322 
6, 474. 7 



29,897 
30,042 
6,219.0 



3,482 
2, 887. 2 



16,683 
6, 176. 2 



6,396 
6,038.0 



8,097 

8,696 

5, 669. 1 



179,663 
180, 499 
5, 940. 3 



6,442 
3,887.1 



36,626 
8, 133. 



3,233 
3,310 
426.0 



2,603 
671.6 



2.071 
2,078 
361.0 



1.018 
379.1 



20,811 
20.882 
687.2 



3,163 
702.4 



Prop- 
erty! 
crime 



37,466 
38,766 
4, 976. 1 



8,676 
4, 458. 6 



16,396 
4, 866. 9 



34,764 
7, 936. 6 



27,826 
27,964 
4,868.0 



3,148 
2, 610. 3 



6,617 
6.869 



15.565 
6,797.0 



6,024 
4, 746. 



7.443 

8,016 
6,123.7 



168.862 
169,617 
6, 263. 



6.232 
3, 737. 1 



33,462 
7, 430. 6 



Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



408 
13.4 



1,242 
1,246 
41.0 



Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


1,893 
1,923 

246.9 


1,049 
1,088 
139.7 


10, 373 
10,761 
1, 380. 4 


24.977 
25, 791 
3,311.4 


176 
91.6 


338 

175.7 


2,473 
1,286.7 


5,770 
2,999.7 


1,164 
364.7 


649 
206.1 


6,431 
1,716.6 


8,305 
2, 624. 8 


973 
222.2 


1,268 
289.6 


11,734 
2,679.6 


20, 331 
4,642.8 


631 

532 
92.4 


1,327 
1,332 
231.4 


10,976 
11,026 
1.916.3 


14,309 
14, 387 
2, 499. 4 


98 
81.3 


211 
176.0 


1,310 
1,086.2 


1,643 
1,362.4 


127 
135 

41.4 


99 
109 
33.6 


2,444 
2,637 

778.9 


3,702 

3,932 

1,207.1 


293 

109.1 


632 
236.4 


4,444 
1,666.1 


10.310 
3,839.9 


143 

112.6 


170 
133.9 


1,693 
1,333.6 


3,869 
3, 047. 5 


205 

213 

136.2 


398 

414 

264.7 


2,466 

2,625 

1,678.1 


4,688 

4,952 

3,166.7 


12,400 
12,431 
409.1 


6,762 
6,797 
223.7 


42,446 
42,637 
1,403.2 


99,862 
100,364 
3,303.0 


75 
63.6 


109 
77.9 


986 
704.3 


3,966 
2, 832. 1 


960 
211.0 


2,021 
448.8 


10,980 
2,438.2 


20,805 
4,620.0 



See footnote at end of table. 



89 



Table 5. — Index of Crime, 1974, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas — Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Wheeling, W. VB.-Oliio 

(Includes Marshall and Ohio Counties, 
W. Va., and Belmont County, Ohio.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wichita, Kans 

(Includes Butler and Sedgwick Coun- 
ties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wichita Falls, Tex 

(Includes Clay and Wichita Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Williamsport, Pa - 

(Includes Lycoming County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wilminirton. Dcl.-N.J,-Md 

(Includes New Castle County, Del., 
Salem County, N.J.. and Cecil 
County, Md.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Wilmington. N.C 

(Includes Brunswick and New Hanover 
Counties.) 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Worcester, Mass 

(Includes Worcester County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants... 

Yakima. Wash 

(Includes Yakima County.) 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

York. Pa 

(Includes Adams and York Counties.) 

Area actuall y reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

You ngstown- Warren. Ohio 

(Includes Mahoning and Trumbull 
Counties.) 

E stimated total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Caguas. Puerto Rico - 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 Inhabitants 

Mayaguez. Puerto Rico 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Ponce. Puerto Rico 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

San Juan, Puerto Kico 

Area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



93, 3% 
100. 0% 



363. 462 

100.0% 
133.055 

100.0% 



115,058 

100.0% 
515,876 



100. 0% 
124,020 

100. 0% 

648,561 

87. 6% 
100.0% 



93. 4% 
100. 0% 

339.705 

100. 0% 

544.721 

100. 0% 



108,000 

100.0% 



96.000 

100.0% 



179. 000 

100.0% 



955.000 

100.0% 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



3,156 

3,618 

1,953.6 



24, 973 
6, 870, 9 



6,146 
4, 618. 4 



6,213 
4, 630. 8 



29,931 
o, 802. 



6,972 
5.621.7 



31, 772 
35, 259 
5, 436. 5 



10,977 
11,632 
7.941.8 



11, 169 
3, 287. 9 



17,464 
3, 204. 2 



3,471 
3, 219. 9 



9,008 
5, 040. 9 



37,786 
3, 967. 6 



2, 1.58 
418.3 



1,591 
1,737 
267.8 



1,344 

762.1 



6.144 
643.6 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 



3,006 
3,442 



23,636 
6, 476. 2 



5,586 
4, 1«8. 3 



6,060 
4, 389. 1 



27, 773 
5. 383. 7 



6,181 
4, 983. 9 



30,181 
33, 522 
5, 168. 7 



10, 365 
10, 993 
7, 506. 9 



16, 662 
2,873.4 



2,760 
2, 660. 3 



2, 218 
2.308,0 



31.642 
3, 314. 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forc- 
ible 
rape 



3,072 
321.7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



1,322 
256.3 



2,693 
271,6 



7,072 
1,945.7 



1,629 
1,224.3 



1,964 
1,698.3 



10,254 
11,264 
1,736.8 



3,335 

3,504 

2, 392. 4 



3,624 
1, 066. 8 



1,332 
1,235.6 



■1,101 
2,294.9 



13, 616 

1,426.1 



1,946 

2,246 

1,212.7 



14, 703 
4, 046. 3 



3,622 
2, 722. 2 



2,857 
2,483.1 



17, 026 
3, 300. 4 



10,710 
12, 249 
1,888.6 



6,610 

7,032 

4, 801. 1 



1,071 
1,114.6 



8,711 
912.3 



' Violent crime Is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle 



90 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population 

Individual cities are listed in this table alphabetically by state. Population of each city is designated by group: 1- over 250,000; 2- 100,000 to 250,000; 
3- 50,000 to 100,000; 4- 25,000 to 50,000; 5- 10,000 to 25,000. 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


ALABAMA 


5 
5 
5 
5 
4 

1 
4 
4 

5 
3 

5 
2 
5 
2 

4 
4 
5 

4 
5 

5 
3 

3 
5 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
4 
3 

3 

1 
5 
3 
3 

1 
4 

5 


234 
208 
217 
738 
2,069 

23,301 
644 

1,848 

862 

2,772 

1,429 
7,342 
466 
11,212 
8,407 

988 
2,778 

393 
1,581 

516 

292 
3,126 

5,032 

2,002 

499 

1,898 

424 
1,399 
1,644 
2,511 
5,138 

7.630 
77.321 
934 
5,930 
7,468 

28,608 
2,910 

227 
476 

1,076 
561 

1,302 

1,173 

3,116 

1,430 

674 

385 






1 


2 
3 

2 

7 

102 

1.193 
26 
43 
36 
54 

63 

128 

9 

427 
196 

33 

107 
2 
33 
13 

10 
95 

124 
47 
3 
51 

2 
24 
41 
47 
94 

121 

2,436 

17 

98 

133 

754 
76 

1 
6 

10 
6 

18 

10 
67 
43 
11 

9 




113 

56 
48 
283 
699 

7,161 
263 
678 
232 
905 

348 

2,290 

189 

3,948 

2,392 

228 
1,318 
100 
505 
141 

92 
1,165 

909 
276 
88 
468 

134 
452 
425 
420 
1,571 

1,869 
25,048 
269 
1,935 
2,328 

8,924 
698 

55 
164 
270 
175 
376 

432 

550 
545 
234 
182 


101 
110 
145 
387 
845 

9,314 
277 
924 
439 

1,463 

836 
4,194 

205 
5.426 
5,026 

556 
633 
219 
872 
315 

140 
1,433 

3,062 

1,239 

313 

1,079 

255 

753 

979 

1,777 

2,820 

4,989 
40,659 
557 
3.448 
4.280 

15.905 
1,698 

140 
263 
667 
275 
728 

630 
2,229 
619 
357 
130 


17 




2 




27 

35 
230 

2,100 
35 
124 
23 

47 

21 

172 

4 

576 

91 

78 
573 

41 
103 

33 

28 
206 

253 

95 
17 

78 

12 
94 
61 
133 
251 

122 
2.492 
39 
127 
225 

807 
198 

29 
8 
84 
84 
107 

35 

79 
129 
16 
11 


10 








15 


. ■' 


4 

9 

76 
1 

11 
2 

12 

1 
22 

1 
43 
36 

6 
10 

8 

1 

1 
16 

11 
3 

1 
2 




1 
18 

188 


21 




18 
3 


166 




3,269 


Decatur 


42 




7 
12 
3 

3 
37 

1 
61 
45 

5 
29 


61 




1 

1 


118 




288 




157 






499 






57 




13 
4 


731 




621 




82 




4 


108 




29 






12 


48 






13 








21 






IS 

41 
13 
3 

19 

1 
3 
8 
21 
9 

16 
310 
7 
15 
35 

153 

9 


193 


ALASKA 


1 


632 




329 




1 


74 




201 


ARIZONA 
Blsbee 




20 




2 


1 
1 


71 




128 




113 




5 

2 
89 
4 
2 
4 

25 
2 


8 

9 
93 


388 


Mesa 


511 




6,287 




41 




6 
5 

23 

2 


305 




463 




2,040 




229 


ARKANSAS 












35 




5 
2 

3 
3 




3 
3 

10 

3 

10 
13 

8 

2 


37 




1 


16 




61 






61 




3 


179 




78 




1 


45 


Jonesboro 


51 



See footnote at end of table. 



91 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 

10 
18 
1 
1 

5 
14 

9 

1 
1 
2 
5 

1 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


ARKANSAS— Continued 


3 
3 

5 

5 

5 
5 
4 

3 

5 
3 

2 
4 

4 

5 
5 
5 
4 

3 
4 
5 
5 
5 

3 
4 
5 

2 
4 

5 
5 
3 
3 
4 

5 
4 
5 
3 
5 

5 
5 
3 
5 
5 

5 
5 
3 
3 
4 

5 
3 
4 
5 
4 


4,199 
3,139 

509 
583 

917 
1,307 
1,759 

4,230 
716 
3,253 
15,683 
2,670 

2,161 

1,048 

723 

907 
1,770 

10, 198 
2,316 

833 
1,003 

926 

3,076 
1,836 
841 
12,867 
2,026 

960 

667 

3,734 

3,760 

1,623 

1,057 
2,375 
1,516 
5,033 
2,611 

1,669 
1,385 
5,073 
1,723 
793 

1,405 
1,471 

10,227 
7,209 
2,158 

1,338 
6,152 
2,213 
677 
2,749 


2 
1 


26 

22 


122 
74 
3 
9 

10 
34 

59 

129 
35 
133 
462 
33 

53 

8 
31 

9 
47 

326 

82 
30 
28 
42 

110 
72 
10 
537 
109 

10 
14 
97 
99 
32 

6 
40 
24 
244 
54 

14 

18 
130 
16 
15 

36 
37 
748 
113 

28 

10 
94 
46 
23 
165 


140 
86 
14 

26 

28 
60 
107 

69 
40 
94 
527 
40 

43 

26 
62 
19 
119 

284 
166 
97 
25 
29 

198 
109 

47 
309 

13 

59 
27 
170 
109 
46 

14 

75 
80 
485 
67 

21 
67 
91 
71 
27 

62 
118 
796 
185 

80 

19 
98 
135 
107 
142 


1,037 

1,232 

120 

185 

255 
293 
417 

959 

197 

1,112 

5,151 

574 

397 
206 
259 
196 
674 

3,086 
937 
259 

242 
352 

958 

647 

239 

4,396 

575 

270 
186 
1,167 
995 
451 

209 
589 
382 
2,049 
814 

333 

538 

1,178 

441 

226 

416 

400 

4,247 

1,988 

549 

184 
1,975 
685 
232 
566 


2,645 

1,566 

357 

338 

569 

856 

1,052 

2,812 
386 
1,578 
8,344 
1,918 

1,569 
751 
298 
652 
781 

5,797 
899 
401 
634 
361 

1,469 

787 

480 

6,814 

1,137 

574 
403 

2,049 

2,063 

937 

724 
1,518 

922 
1,513 
1,440 

1,195 

687 

3,350 

1,137 

463 

810 

691 

2,629 

4,582 

1,341 

1,071 
3,666 
1,207 
234 
1,515 
























4 
10 
15 

14 
2 
12 
90 

7 

6 
3 
1 

5 
9 

18 
21 
2 






3 
3 

2 
1 








CALIFORNIA 


246 




55 




322 




21 
1 

1 


1,104 




97 




93 






54 




2 




70 






26 




2 

11 

5 
3 

2 

1 
3 




138 






676 






206 






41 




2 

1 


72 




7 

23 

10 

7 
77 
8 

1 

9 
10 

2 

1 
11 

10 
42 
U 

9 
5 
20 
9 
3 

3 

7 
77 
31 

6 

4 

17 
11 
8 
12 


133 




317 




4 

7 


208 




58 




10 
4 


724 




180 




5 


46 






35 




2 
6 
1 


5 
4 


240 




478 




154 




1 


103 




2 


140 






98 




10 

1 

1 




690 






224 




1 
4 

5 

1 


96 




70 




4 
1 


300 




48 


Clovis 


59 




1 




77 




1 

2 
6 


218 




23 
4 

2 


1,707 




306 




152 






50 




4 




298 




1 


129 




1 


72 


Culver City 




349 



Table 6. — Number of Ofhnses Known io the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Confinued 



City by State 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



CALIFORNIA— ContiBoed 



Cypress 

Daly City 

Davis 

Delano 

Downey. 

Duarte 

El Cajon 

El Centro 

El Cerrito 

El Monte 

El Segundo 

Escondido 

Eureka 

Fairfield 

Fontana. 

Foster City. 

Fountain Valley. 

Fremont 

Fresno 

FuUerton. 

Gardens 

Garden Grove 

OiU-oy 

Glendale 

Qlendora 

Han/ord 

Havrthome 

Hayward 

Hemet 

Hermosa Beach 

Huntington Beach 

Huntington Park 

Imperial Beach 

Indio 

Inglewood 

Lafayette 

Laguna Beach 

La Habra 

Lakewood 

La Mesa 

LaMlrada 

La Palma 

La Puente 

Larkspur 

La Verne 

Lawndale 

LIvermore 

LodI 

Lomlts 

Lompoc 

Long Beach 

Los Alamitos 

Los Altos 

Los Angeles 

Los Banos 

See footnote at end of table. 



1,601 
3.715 



815 
4,070 
1.743 
1.740 
4,747 

1,391 
3,054 
2,578 



7,809 
1S,1«5 
6,205 

3,077 
8,8«4 
1,262 
5,835 
1,70« 

1,439 
3,714 
6,424 
726 
1,078 

8,194 
3,053 
1,067 
1,664 

9,278 

744 
1,274 
2.437 
3,472 
2,210 

1,435 



331 
813 



2,328 
5,052 
1,259 



1,176 
1,414 



2,133 
1,526 



2,543 
1,333 

1,070 



2,365 
1,335 

534 

1,782 
4,692 
9,825 
4,297 

1,298 
4.421 



1,554 

3,987 



4,787 
1.387 



1,084 
3,307 



1,511 
1,885 
1,346 



2,031 
1,852 



93 



Table 6. Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



CALIFORNIA— Con. 



Los Gatos 

Lynwood - 

Madera.. 

Manhattan Beach. 
Manteca 



Martinez 

Maywood 

Meiilo Park.. 

Merced 

Millbrae 



Mill Valley. 

Milpitas 

Modesto 

Monrovia... 
Montclair... 



Montebello 

Monterey. _ 

Monterey Park.. 
Mountain View. 



National City... 

Newark. 

Newport Beach., 

Norwalk 

Novato 



Oakland... 
Oceanside. 

Ontario 

Orange 

Oxnard 



Paciflca.. -- 

Pacific Grove.. 

Palm Springs 

Palo Alto 

Palos Verdes Estates 

Paramount --- 

Pasadena - 

Petaluma - 

Pico Rivera — 

Piedmont - 

Pinole 

Pittsburg -- -. -.- 

Placentia 

Pleasant Hill 

Pleasanton. 

Pomona 

Porterville 

Port Hueneme 

Redding 

Redlands .- 

Redondo Beach 

Redwood City 

Rialto - 

Richmond 

Ridgecrest 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,051 
2,170 



1,984 

2,278 
2,718 
1,743 
4,460 
2,585 



5,737 


4,516 


1,629 


40. 507 


4,354 


4.419 


5,231 


6,908 


1.209 


1,035 


3,029 


5,166 


588 


2,360 


10,649 


2,016 


2,290 



1,904 
1, 293 
2,273 



2,015 
1,956 

4,293 
3,389 
2,147 
7,672 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



728 I 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



1,334 

2,047 



1,376 
4,955 
1,202 



821 


3,200 


678 


1,716 


903 


1,969 


502 


1,126 


1,667 


3,746 


1,424 


1,980 


455 


1,087 


14, 144 


16. 702 


1.130 


2,415 


1,480 


2,169 


1,130 


3,538 


2,080 


3,590 



1,542 
3,724 



5,315 
1,374 



3,329 
1,209 
306 
1,346 
1,242 

2,016 
1,894 
1,167 



94 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known fo the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



CALIFOKNIA— Con. 



Riverside 

Rohnerl Park. 

Rosemead 

Roseville 

Sacramento 



Salinas 

San Anselmo 

San Bernardino. 

San Bruno 

San Carlos 



San Clemenie. 

San Diego 

San Dimas 

San Fernando. 
San Francisco. 



San Gabriel 

Sanger 

San Jose 

San Leandro 

San Luis Obispo. 



San Marino. 
San Mateo . . 
San Pablo.. 
San Rafael.. 
Santa Ana.. 



Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara _ 

Santa Cruz 

Santa Fe Springs 

Santa Maria 

Santa Monica 

Santa Paula 

Santa Rosa 

Seal Beach 

Seaside 

Sierra Madre 

Sitni Valley.- 

South El Monte 

South Gate 

South Lake Tahoe 

South Pasadena 

South San Francisco _.. 

Stanton 

Stockton 

Simnyvale ._ 

Temple City 

Torrance _ 

Tracy 

Tulare 

Turlock 

Tustin 

Ukiah 

Union City 

Upland 

Vacaville 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2.248 
1,214 

22,588 



11.414 
2,261 
1.135 

1,108 

52,845 

899 

1,585 
55,911 



39, 789 
4,079 
1,439 

373 
6.043 
3,502 
3,547 

16,488 

4.851 
6,100 
3,275 

1,822 
1,958 



5,760 
1,246 
1,633 



3,130 
1,153 
3,327 



1,044 
2,229 
1,665 
10,872 
5,559 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



11,180 
1,117 



2,597 
1,330 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



6,349 
1,362 



23,239 
2,502 



1,629 


3,719 


763 


2,105 


765 


2,428 


.5,608 


8,296 


1,056 


3,096 


1,419 


3,867 



1,448 
1,499 



6,318 
3,659 



4,665 
1,032 



1,433 

1,266 



Table 6.— Number cf Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
ladex 

5,124 
3,857 
3,351 
2,783 
1,691 

4,105 
4,384 
3,388 

2,117 
527 

1,141 

2,679 
7,092 
4,276 
761 
13, 787 

47,744 

948 

3,461 

2,554 

812 

1,772 
2,325 
7,703 
1,484 
1,827 

969 
2,111 
6,442 

542 
2,761 

660 
2.304 
1,377 

378 

592 

152 

1,327 

13, 138 

1,736 
477 

1,948 
672 

2,533 

1,159 

2,118 

2,781 

560 

988 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breakmg 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
Slaughter 

by 

negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


CALIFORNIA— Con. 


3 
3 

4 
4 
5 

3 
3 
3 

5 
6 

5 

3 

3 

5 

1 
5 
4 
3 

5 
3 

4 
4 

5 
4 
2 
5 
5 

5 
5 
4 

5 

5 

5 

3 

3 

5 
3 

5 
4 
3 
5 
5 


5 

4 

1 




23 

20 
5 
5 
2 

15 
20 
22 
12 
3 

9 
40 
20 

110 

403 

■J 
13 
4 

4 
17 
24 

4 


183 

56 
44 
30 
31 

86 
113 
94 
38 

8 

8 

25 
137 
83 

457 

2,307 
8 
82 
13 
6 

29 
26 
166 
14 
17 

23 

154 

3 

53 

3 

40 
47 

12 

2 
14 
457 

13 

27 
2 
40 

19 
14 
27 
6 
3 


113 

73 
163 
134 

60 

99 
135 

72 

27 
40 

39 
244 
111 

317 

1,918 
79 
65 
214 
38 

28 
86 
298 
11 

85 

23 
35 
353 
13 

165 

36 
14 
36 

10 
16 
3 
53 

246 

185 

137 
26 
15 

7 
18 
12 
6 
4 


1,406 

1,220 

772 

658 

300 

1,259 

1,487 

1,059 

527 

160 

243 

625 

2,060 

878 

146 

4,160 

17, 140 
162 
76i 
424 
211 

381 
589 
1,837 
319 
154 

160 
382 
1,692 
117 
585 

265 
620 
459 

106 
190 
76 
256 
2,756 

582 
128 
409 
125 
596 

500 
670 
772 
139 
310 


3,056 
2,266 
2,254 
1,780 
1,195 

2,331 
2,332 
1,881 
1,340 
311 

781 

1,865 
4,132 
3,033 
559 
7,625 

19,506 

658 

2,215 

1,745 

482 

1,254 
1,403 
4,929 
1,054 
1,500 

744 
1,557 
3,688 

379 
1,753 

307 

1,443 

751 

202 
337 
59 
930 
5,837 

843 
299 

1,222 
480 

1,713 

498 

1,202 

1,625 

353 

626 


338 


a ejo... 


1 


220 




109 






175 






103 




2 
3 
6 


1 
1 


313 




294 




254 




1 


128 






18 




2 




63 


COLORADO 




116 




4 


3 


475 




151 




15 
74 




38 




12 
1 


1,103 




6,396 




36 








326 




1 




144 






71 






1 


76 




2 
9 
1 


202 






440 




1 


81 




71 










33 








1 
35 

8 
13 

4 
9 
3 


113 




6 


8 


514 




22 




1 
1 




191 




1 
1 


44 




178 




2 


79 


CONNECTICUT 




53 






2 


4 

3 
31 

5 

2 
4 
1 
4 


33 






10 








71 




18 


1 


3,793 




108 




1 
2 




38 






147 






38 




1 


2 


164 




135 




2 






212 






4 

1 


341 






1 
3 


55 


Glastonbury 




45 



See footnote at end of table. 



96 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Polite, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — ConHnued 



CONNECTICUT— Con. 

Greenwich 

Hamden 

Hartford 

Manchester 

Meriden _ 

Middletown 

Monroe 

Naugatuck... 

New Britain 

New Canaan 

New Haven 

Newington 

New London 

North Haven 

Norwalk 

Norwich 

Orange 

Plalnvillc 

Ridgefleld Town 

Seymour 

She! ton 

Slmsbury 

Southlngton 

Stamford 

Stratford 

Torn ng ton 

TrumbuU 

Vernon 

Wallingford... - 

Waterbury ' 

Wateriord 

West Hartford 

West Haven. 

Westport - 

Wethersfleld 

Wilton 

Windsor 

Windsor Locks 

Wolcott 

DELAWARE 

Dover 

Newark 

Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington 

FLORIDA 

Bartow 

Belle Glade 

Boca Raton 

Boynt on Beach 

Bradenton. 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,217 
1,657 
15,357 
2,794 
2,780 

2,042 



3,553 
330 



14, 936 
1,259 



1,073 
4,057 
2,081 

654 
1,118 
1,072 
1,379 
6,349 

297 
2,219 
1,686 
1,985 



1,651 
1,«93 
7,069 



1,022 
1,496 
2,411 
1,959 
1,255 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



7,025 
1,676 
1,612 



413 
132 



1,131 
1,165 



1,202 
1,414 
3.733 



1,554 
1,196 



97 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities 


and Towns 10,000 and O 


ver in Pcpulafion- 


— Confinued 




Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Jiggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

entering 


Lar- 
ceny— 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 

by 

negh- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


FLORIDA— Con. 


6 
5 
3 
5 
5 

4 
5 

5 
3 

5 

5 
4 
5 
2 
4 

4 
5 
3 
5 
4 

2 

5 
1 
5 

4 
5 
5 
4 
4 

4 
5 
4 
5 

5 

5 
4 
1 
3 
5 

4 
5 
5 
4 
4 

5 
5 
4 
5 
5 

2 
5 
4 
5 
3 


481 

639 

6,404 

1.205 

1,125 

4,508 
923 
1,143 
9.330 
1,257 

1,415 
2,359 
1,295 
18, 261 
3, 135 

2,927 
1.279 
6,731 
659 
3,382 

7,691 
13, 426 

2.172 
40, 986 

1,353 

2,813 

986 

326 

5,212 

2,392 

2,363 
1,691 
1,894 
1,085 
692 

1,337 
3,372 
38,337 

5, .500 
1,148 

1,710 
1,592 
618 
4,184 
2,923 

410 
2,978 
2,430 
2,073 

426 

11, 898 

752 

2,718 

1,099 

5,778 




3 




3 

11 
132 
56 
15 

86 
14 
87 
339 
30 

41 
.58 
10 
785 
54 

138 
27 

218 
14 

202 

267 
482 
122 
1,960 
48 

53 

11 
19 
241 
50 

22 
38 
62 
26 
5 

12 
65 
3,312 
207 
33 

34 

27 
10 
202 
129 

102 
64 

184 
13 

353 

20 
62 
26 
224 


6 
4 
144 
22 
22 

55 
10 
79 
265 
16 

64 
212 

69 
237 

53 

165 
22 

272 
15 

184 

478 
397 
213 
2,201 
41 

81 
13 

94 
109 

1? 
10 
49 
3 

15 
148 
2.946 
73 
39 

18 
52 
23 
96 
64 

73 
65 
136 
20 

631 
14 

136 
22 

268 


143 
212 
1,788 
282 
225 

820 
207 
283 
2,655 
302 

419 

726 

341 

5,562 

1,154 

1,097 
287 

2,010 
168 
807 

1,712 
3,319 

393 
13,476 

337 

842 
369 
91 
1,349 
682 

793 

279 
293 
260 
188 

341 

903 

12.050 

1,742 

250 

591 
385 
205 
1,129 
615 

47 
690 
671 
576 
104 

3,530 
152 
694 
222 

1,910 


310 
372 
4.102 
752 
816 

3,333 

657 

550 

5,536 

835 

830 
1,232 

821 
10, 126 
1,672 

1,371 
877 

3,821 
444 

1,832 

4,338 
8,064 
1,234 
20, 113 
805 

1,732 

557 

175 

3,150 

1,441 

1,356 
1,198 
1,333 

688 
468 

867 

2,110 

16,822 

2,975 

751 

929 
1,065 

351 
2.428 
1,841 

340 
1,833 
1,529 
1,000 

266 

6,706 
523 

1,686 
771 

3,027 


19 






2 
14 

1 

6 


38 




5 

5 
1 

5 
1 
3 

7 
4 

1 
6 


1 


219 




81 




1 
1 


45 




203 




34 




1 
3 
1 


3 

41 
8 

3 
3 
6 
61 
9 

27 


138 




487 




62 




52 






122 




2 
23 
3 

3 


48 




28 
6 

19 


1,46? 




187 




110 




66 




8 


2 


28 


374 




18 


Hallandale -.. - 


9 

4 

8 

4 

127 

8 

1 

1 
4 
8 
2 

2 




12 

14 
34 
11 
354 
13 

20 


336 


15 
4 


878 




1,122 




195 




18 


2.755 




101 




1 


84 




35 








30 




2 


3 

10 

9 


367 




93 




1 


109 




159 








6 
2 


190 




3 




57 






28 




2 

4 
94 

7 
2 

2 
2 




4 
16 
153 
13 

1 

5 
3 

5 
9 
5 


96 




2 

28 
6 


126 




2,960 




483 




72 






131 






58 






24 








320 




2 


2 


267 




14 




2 
7 

1 

24 
3 


2 
4 


12 

4 
6 


266 




95 




164 






22 




5 


35 
3 

10 
1 


610 




38 






127 






57 


Pensaoola 


10 




312 



See footnote at end of table. 



98 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



FLOKIDA— Con. 



Pinellas Park 

Plantation 

Plant City 

Pompano Beach 

Riviera Beach 

Rockledge 

Saint Augustine -- 

Saint Petersburg 

Saint Petersburg Beach 

Sanford 

Sarasota 

South Miami 

Sunrise 

Tallahassee 

Tamarac 

Tampa 

Temple Terrace 

Titusville 

Venice , 

Vero Beach 

West Palm Beach 

Wilton Manors 

Winter Haven 

Winter Park 

GEORGIA 

Albany 

Athens 

Atlanta 

Augusta _ 

Carrollton 

Chamblee 

College Park 

Columbus 

Covington 

Decatur 

East Point 

Forest Park 

Fort Valley 

Gainesville 

Griffin 

La Grange 

Macon 

Marietta 

Milledgeville 

Newnan 

Rome... 

Savannah 

Smyrna 

Statesboro 

Tifton 

Valdosta 

Warner Robins 

Waycross 

See footnote at end of table. 



1,824 
2,197 
1,284 



20,860 

462 

2,437 



727 

30,378 
756 

2,226 

793 

1,735 

8,809 

755 

1,862 



4,181 
2,426 
48,650 
1,470 
449 



2,189 
1,193 



1,075 
1,207 



1,371 
8,276 
1,000 



1,377 
1,034 



2,824 
1,440 



218 
1,736 



2,563 
328 



1,174 
1,774 



1,817 
1,183 
19,320 



2,956 
1,329 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known fo f/ie Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population— ConWnued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 

by 

negu- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


HAWAU 


4 

1 

3 

5 
5 
4 
4 

5 
5 
4 
5 
5 

4 
5 
4 
3 
3 

4 
5 
5 
5 
3 

4 

5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
4 
5 
4 
5 

5 
4 
5 
5 
6 

3 

5 

1 
4 
5 

3 
5 
5 
4 
3 


1,652 
43,753 

5,328 
935 
1,385 
2,793 
1,313 

571 
1,674 
2,933 

322 
1,499 

1,272 
644 
2,813 
2,802 
5,040 

1,639 
1,016 
59 
1,049 
1,759 

2,137 

1,291 

637 

962 

506 

471 
1,023 

1,270 

3,387 

426 

271 

1,400 

1,207 

812 

122 

4,472 

330 

243,236 

3,158 
630 

1,638 
1,308 
902 
3,054 
5,290 


5 
62 

3 

1 




8 
189 

17 
3 
4 
4 
3 


9 
981 

66 
14 
19 
22 

7 

3 

10 
47 
1 
9 

12 

6 

128 

24 
201 

22 
27 


29 
328 

83 

27 

84 
29 

4 

1 
24 
69 
13 
24 

97 
16 
81 
45 
254 

17 
50 
5 
26 
38 

109 
18 
8 
18 
11 

67 
30 
98 
74 
19 


460 
13,091 

838 
187 
312 
492 
229 

63 
306 
743 

48 
356 

310 
232 
924 
771 
1,216 

373 
343 

2 
441 
568 

463 

419 
155 
173 
114 

100 
279 
326 
731 

109 

44 
297 
284 
94 
49 

1,035 

77 

50, 722 

1,068 

193 

260 
332 
139 
654 
1,213 


1,094 
24,463 

4,007 

671 

905 

2,111 

1,015 

471 

1,269 

1,908 

245 

1,019 

790 

266 

1,523 

1,839 

2,969 

1,089 
524 
45 
480 
797 

1,362 
561 
451 
697 
335 

286 
577 
731 
1,829 
231 

183 
966 
832 
604 
14 

2,820 

219 

114,792 

1,244 
319 

552 

816 

721 

1,779 

3,374 


47 




71 

3 
3 
3 

2 

1 


4,639 


IDAHO 


314 




32 




61 




2 
5 


133 




50 




33 




1 
2 




11 

2 


63 




3 


153 




14 




4 




86 


ILLINOIS 




61 




3 

2 
1 
6 

2 

1 
1 
1 
5 




121 


sip 




6 
5 
15 

3 
1 


149 




1 


117 




379 






133 






70 






6 


e Ti ere 






16 
60 

52 
54 
4 
8 
14 

1 

21 
12 
98 
21 

3 

30 
6 
13 

4 

67 

5 

26, 172 

179 

10 

113 

25 

S 

125 

131 


85 


^ 




6 

9 
5 

1 


285 






141 


ooming on 




233 






17 


g roo ... 




65 






3 

5 

2 
6 

1 


29 








15 






3 

1 
1 


111 




2 
3 


99 




646 




45 








41 




1 


1 


6 
5 
6 
3 

12 


56 
29 
39 
26 

316 

13 

13, 218 

303 

26 

66 
23 
14 
305 

297 


44 




51 








56 




6 
5 




20 






217 






16 




970 
11 


254 
2 


1,920 
21 
2 

4 
4 
1 

12 
11 


35,442 




332 




80 




8 




635 






108 




2 
2 
4 


1 


20 




177 


Decatur - - - - 




260 



See footnote at end of table. 



100 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City by State 



ILLINOIS— Con. 

Deerfleld 

DeKalb 

Des Plaines 

Dixon 

Dolton 

Downers Grove 

East Moline 

East Peoria --- 

East Saint Louis 

Edwardsville - 

Effinghiam 

Elgin 

Elk Grove Village 

Elmhurst 

EUnwood Park 

Evanston 

Evergreen Park 

Fairview Heights 

Forest Park 

Franklin Park 

Freeport 

Galesburg 

Glencoe 

Glendale Heights 

Glen EUyn 

Glenview 

Granite City 

Hanover Park - 

Harvey 

Hazel Crest 

Hickory HiUs 

Highland Park 

Hinsdale 

Hoffman Estates 

Homewood 

Jacksonville 

Joliet - 

Kankakee 

Kewanee 

La Grange 

La Grange Park 

Lake Forest 

Lansing 

LaSaUe. 

Lincoln 

Lincolnwood . _ 

Lock port 

Lombard 

Loves Park 

Macomb _ 

Marion .,_ 

Markham 

Mattoon 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 


Total 


lation 


Crime 


group 


Index 


5 


1,075 


4 


1,190 


3 


2,309 


S 


457 


4 


1,264 


4 


1,561 


5 


1,052 


5 


744 


3 


9, 223 


5 


710 


S 


346 


3 


3,321 


5 


1,198 


4 


1,929 


4 


950 


3 


5,658 


4 


1,843 


5 


615 


5 


669 


5 


1,029 


4 


1,483 


4 


1,760 


5 


555 


5 


612 


5 


927 


4 


647 


4 


2.621 


5 


1,069 


4 


3.399 


5 


366 


5 


580 


4 


927 


5 


512 


4 


668 


5 


940 


5 


1,141 


3 


6,753 


4 


2,686 


5 


391 


5 


741 


5 


219 


5 


305 


4 


1,350 


5 


342 


5 


647 


5 


378 


5 


3'27 


4 


1,501 


5 


620 


5 


479 


5 


308 


5 


990 


5 


563 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



3,744 
1,436 



1,041 
1,212 



1,455 

698 

1,337 



3,073 

1,458 



101 



Tabic 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



ILLINOIS— Con. 

Maywood - -- 

Melrose Park 

Midlothian - 

Moline - --- --- 

Morton --- 

Morton Grove 

Mount Prospect - 

Mount Vernon 

Mundelein - -- 

Murphysboro 

NaperviUe --- - --- 

Niles - - 

Normal — 

Norridgc 

Northbrook -. --- 

North Chicago 

Northlake --. - 

Oak Forest 

Oak Park 

O'FaUon ---. 

Orland Park 

Ottawa - 

Palatine --- 

Paris 

Park Forest --- 

Park Ridge - - 

Pekin 

Peoria 

Peru -- - --. 

Pontiac - 

Quincy - --- 

Rantoul 

Riverdale.-- --- 

River Forest 

River Grove 

Riverside — 

Rock Falls.-- ---- 

Rocklord 

Rock Island - 

Rolling Meadows 

Romeo vi lie -- 

Saint Charles 

Schaumbiu'g 

Schiller Park 

Skokie --. 

South Holland 

Springfield - 

Sterling 

Streamwood — 

S treator - . - 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,167 
1,470 
1,032 



1,367 
1,724 
10, 821 



9,795 
3,957 



6,042 
1,102 



Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 



Criminal homicide 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



1,041 
5,224 



5,472 
2,002 



102 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population Continued 



ILLINOIS— Con. 



Summit... 

Taylorville 

Tiiiley Park 

Urbaiia 

Villa Park 

Waukegan 

Westchester 

West Chicago 

Western Springs. 
Wheaton 

Wheeling 

W'ilmette 

W'innetka 

Woodridge 

Wood River 

Woodstock 

Worth 

Zion - 



Anderson 

Bedford 

Beech Grove. .. 
Bloomington... 
Carmel 

Columbus 

Crawtordsville . 
Crown Point.. - 

East Gary 

Elkhart 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1.621 
1,121 



1,011 
1,417 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



EvansviUe. . 
Fort Wayne, 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Gary 



9,613 

11,916 



5,37; 
8,52; 



Goshen 

Greenwood-, 

Griffith , 

Hammond.. 
Highland... 



Huntington.. 
IndianapoUs.. 
Jeflersonville. 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 



833 
34,203 
1,396 
3,445 
2,592 



2,421 
1,666 



La Porte 

Lawrence 

Madison 

Michigan City. 
Mishawaka 



749 



2,248 
2,200 



Muncie 

Munster _ 

New Albany 

New Castle 

Portage 

See footnote at end of table. 



103 



594-259 O - 75 - 8 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Oyer in Population — Continued 



City by State 



INDIANA— Con. 



Richmond.... 

Seymour 

South Bend.. 

Speedway 

Terre Haute.. 



Valparaiso 

Vincennes 

West Lafayette. 



Ames 

Bettendorf... 

Boone 

Burlington. . 
Cedar Falls.. 



Cedar Rapids'. 

Clinton 

Council Bluffs.. 

Davenport 

Des Moines 



Dubuque 

Fort Madison. 

Indianola 

Iowa City 

Keokuk 



Marion 

Marshalltown . 
Mason City . . . 

Muscatine 

Newton 



Oskaloosa.. 
Ottumwa.- 
Sioux City.. 

Spencer 

Urbandale . 



Waterloo 

West Des Moines. 



Atchison 

El Dorado 

Emporia 

Garden City. 
Great Bend. . 



Hays 

Hutchinson 

Independence. 
Junction City. 
Kansas City... 



Lawrence 

Leavenworth. 

Leawood 

Liberal.- 

Manhattan... 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2,072 
4,512 



2,066 
1,262 



1,592 
2,367 



1,000 
5,192 



1,901 
14,986 



2,602 
1.350 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



2,012 
2,675 



250 


528 


145 


491 


618 


1,799 


124 


179 


522 


1,043 


5,090 


6,881 


649 


1,662 


366 


733 


156 


181 


188 


665 


423 


1,173 



See footnote at end o£ table. 



104 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Populaficn — Continued 



KANSAS— Con. 



Mcpherson. 

Merriam 

Newton 

Olatlie 

Ottawa 



Overland Park. 

Parsons.- 

Pittsburg- 

Prairie Village-. 
Salina 



Shawnee.. 
Topeka.. . 
Wichita— . 
Winfield-. 



KENTUCKY 



Ashland 

Bowling Green. 

Covington 

Danville- 

Elizabethtown.. 



Erlanger. 

Florence 

Fort Mitchell. 
Fort Thomas. 
Frankfort 



Glasgow. - 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville.- - 

Jeffersontown 

Lexington 

Louisville- -.- 

MadisonvlUe 

Mayfield - 

Middlesboro- 

Murray - -.- 

Newport- 

Owensboro 

Paducah.- - 

Richmond 

Saint Matthews - 

Shively -.-«._. 

Somerset 

Winchester 

LOUISIANA 

Abbeville - 

Alexandria 

Baton Rouge 

Bogalusa 

Bossier City 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,113 
7,924 
20, 602 



1,465 
1,518 



1,072 
2,071 



17, 428 

689 

1,409 



Miu-der 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Bm-- 
glary— 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



4 


156 


17 


280 


13 


109 


90 


842 


4 


154 


18 


351 


28 


372 


24 


332 


27 


332 


290 


2,000 


449 


5,744 


2 


43 


7 


247 


152 


572 


129 


940 


9 


92 


19 


101 


14 


82 


6 


163 


1 


73 


3 


140 


23 


180 


1 


23 


189 


371 


69 


525 


15 


116 


370 


3,149 


610 


6,213 


21 


110 


24 


66 


26 


83 


3 


59 


44 


392 


34 


480 


52 


161 


21 


152 


12 


135 


17 


160 


3 


57 


10 


112 


20 


85 


272 


1,044 


,302 


4,841 


16 


252 


64 


326 



780 


68 


318 


9 


2,397 


189 


338 


17 


509 


35 


471 


21 


1,550 


71 


681 


48 


5,117 


286 


12, 003 


1,586 


220 


11 


606 


47 


1,553 


200 


1,865 


562 


298 


16 


289 


30 


323 


51 


391 


94 


164 


7 


231 


15 


516 


33 


74 


6 


805 


60 


791 


61 


185 


14 


7,736 


450 


9,029 


2,669 


185 


14 


120 


2 


159 


9 


226 


22 


479 


112 


1,440 


94 


533 


49 


456 


26 


496 


57 


627 


92 


55 


14 


240 


15 


87 




2,586 


229 


9,541 


1,417 


381 


31 


874 


117 



105 



Table 6. Number of Offenses Known fo the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City by State 



LOUISIANA— Con. 



Crowley 

De Rldder. 

Eunice 

Hammond. 
Harahan... 



Lafayette 

Lake Charles.. 

Minden 

Monroe 

Morgan City.. 



New Iberia... 
New Orleans. 

Ruston 

Shreveport . . . 
Sulphur 



Thlbodaux... 
West Moiuroe. 



Auburn 

Augusta 

Bangor 

IMddeford . . 
Brunswick . 



Caribou 

Kittery 

Lewiston.. 
Limestone. 
Orono 



Portland 

Saco 

Santord - 

South Portland. 
Waterville 



Westbrook. 



MARYLAND 



Aberdeen 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Cambridge... 
Cumberland. 



Frederick 

Grcenbelt - 

Hagerstown 

Havre de Grace 

Hyattsville 

Laurel 

Salisbury.-- 

Sparrows Point 

Takoraa Park 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



4.549 
3,523 



3R,877 

708 

9,416 



1,117 
1,165 
1,661 



1,164 
1,055 



3,184 
76,235 
1,011 
1,155 

1,308 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Criminal homicide 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 



1,313 
1,118 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



2,341 
2,000 



255 
301 


804 
649 


164 


410 


165 


624 


613 


2,115 


8,790 


30,865 


233 


610 


102 


900 


246 


900 


65 


540 


506 


1,122 


115 


206 


197 


486 


115 


377 


267 


520 


5 


404 


310 


565 



106 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



MASSACHUSETTS 

Abington 

Acton - 

Adams 

Amesbury 

Amherst 

Andover. _ 

Arlington 

Athol- 

Barnstable 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Bourne 

Rralntrco 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Canton 

Chelmsford 

Chelsea 

Chlcopee 

Clinton 

Concord 

Danvers 

Dedham.. 

Easthampton 

East Longmeadow 

Everett 

Fall Rlvor. 

FItchburg 

Foxboro 

Framingham 

Oralton 

Greenfield 

Hanover 

Hlngham 

Holden 

Holliston 

Hoiyoke 

Lawrence 

Leicester 

Leominster 

Lexington 

Longmeadow - 

Lowell 

Ludlow 

Lynnfleld 

Maiden 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 

Marlborough 

Marshfleld 

Maynard 

Medford 

Melrose.- 

Methucn 

See footnote at end of tabic. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



236 

1.026 



1,872 
65,722 



2,448 

4,706 



1.201 
1.154 
I, .522 



1,425 
7,149 
2,520 



3,433 

2,712 



1,825 
1,240 



1,006 
1,423 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negll- 



Forciblp 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



1,074 


272 


16,686 


22,371 


426 


39 


1,053 


7.S4 


1.975 


1.2.15 


2,306 


5.203 


50 





2,836 
1,250 



107 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


MASSACHUSETTS— Con. 


5 
6 
4 
4 
4 

2 
3 

5 
4 
5 

5 
5 
3 
3 

5 

3 

4 
4 
4 
4 

5 
5 
5 
5 
3 

5 
5 

5 
5 

5 
6 
4 
3 
5 

4 
5 
5 
5 
4 

5 
5 
5 
4 

5 

3 

5 
5 
5 
5 

2 


506 

383 

1,016 

1,172 

932 

6,293 

3,501 

1,089 

745 

528 

1,070 
283 
2,201 
2,695 
2,093 

4,850 
1,231 
2,575 
1,712 
1,458 

993 
529 

1,403 
416 

5,201 

422 
499 
13,682 
770 
357 

435 
232 
851 

2,039 
728 

1,497 
481 
415 
513 

1,444 

479 
290 
544 
1,676 
685 

2,012 
597 

1,072 
716 
468 

17,954 


1 




1 


3 

19 
10 
14 

232 
30 
10 
9 
4 

3 

14 
36 
55 
5 

125 
18 
90 
19 
11 

4 
3 
17 
3 
206 

4 

3 

657 

14 

1 

2 


2 
3 
20 
19 
11 

199 
99 
6 
7 
13 

34 
10 
41 
23 

5 

126 
23 
39 
60 
9 

19 
19 
34 
5 
187 

7 

1,078 
9 


234 
153 
439 
411 

228 

1,756 
852 
348 
169 
138 

236 
101 
918 
1,158 
901 

1.435 
248 
570 
599 
122 

318 
177 
480 
115 
1,523 

162 
150 
4,377 
225 
131 

98 
76 
198 
673 
349 

381 
131 

117 
187 
380 

114 
136 
215 
570 
264 

574 
134 
350 
215 
108 

5,484 


199 
174 
436 
537 
607 

2,836 

1,718 

626 

461 

259 

657 

124 

778 

1,256 

1,015 

2,071 
685 
569 
632 
707 

590 
284 
549 
259 
792 

242 
303 
5,158 
400 
208 

274 
112 
547 
913 
323 

740 
292 
200 
192 
893 

300 
134 
286 
725 
316 

997 
426 
548 
375 
177 

4.400 


66 




































1 
3 


2 

1 


26 
9 
6 
3 
4 

4 
2 
8 

1 


1,243 




790 




93 




1 




95 






110 


North Attleboro 






136 


Northbrtdge 






32 




1 
2 










200 






167 




1 
2 
2 


2 
1 


8 


1 084 








13 

4 


1 292 




















2 


2 


60 




1 
2 


45 






2 
1 
3 

1 


319 






33 




2 




9 488 






6 






2 
1 


41 




10 


26 


2,376 




122 










17 




1 






4 
10 

4 
32 

6 

87 
22 

5 
12 

4 

24 
4 
4 
18 
14 

26 
6 

54 
7 


56 








34 










6 
25 
15 

19 
10 

4 
23 

4 
1 
4 
25 
5 

31 

9 
12 

667 


96 




1 




2 

1 

1 
1 


393 


Warcham 


1 


34 






269 








25 








86 










118 






2 


3 

5 
4 


141 






32 




1 


2 


10 




35 








3 

1 

3 


335 








85 






3 

1 

2 


381 






29 






1 


110 






107 






1 

24 




181 


Worcester _ - 


15 


42 


299 


7,047 



See footnote at end of table. 



108 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



MICHIGAN 



Adriiiii 

Albion 

Allen Park. 

Alma 

Alpena 



Ann Arbor.. 

Battle Creek.. 

Battle Creek Township. 

Bay City 

Bedford Townsliip. 



Benton Harbor 

Benton Township. 

Berkley 

Beverly Hills 

Big Rapids 



Birminghara 

Bloomflcld Township... 
Bridgeport Township.., 
Bueiia \'ista Township. 
Burton 



Cadillac 

Center Line 

Clawson... 

Clinton Township.. 
Dearborn .. 



Dearborn Heights... 

Detroit 

East Detroit 

East (}rand Rapids. 
East Lansing 



Ecorse 

Emniett Township.. 

Escanaba 

Farmington , 

Farmington Hills. _, 



Ferndale 

Flint 

Flint Township. 

Fraser 

Garden City 



Grand Blanc Township. 

Grand Haven 

Grand Rapids.. ; 

Grand ville .' 

Grosse Pointe Farms 



Grosse Pointe Park. 

Grosso Pointe Woods 

Hamtramck 

Harper Woods. 

Hazel Park 

Highland Park _ 

Holland 

Inkstcr 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



10,058 
4,451 



3,009 
2.125 
1,001 



1.371 

1,407 



3, 228 
7,354 



4,351 
139, 308 



1,695 
20,130 



1,324 
2,183 



1,331 
4,174 
4,521 
8,814 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
geuce 



Forcible 
rape 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



2,913 
1,531 



1,487 
1,115 

2,380 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



6,015 
2,342 



2,578 
42,305 
1,571 



1,546 
2,593 
5,144 



109 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



MICHIGAN— Con. 



Novi...- 

Oak Park 

Oscoda-Ausable Township.. 

0\v osso 

Plymouth. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



negli- 
gence 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



Kalamazoo Township. 

Kentwood. 

Lansing 

Lincoln Park... 

Livonia 



1,020 
10, 157 
3,725 
5.697 



6,029 
2,284 
3,067 



Madison Heights. 

Marquette 

Melvindale 

Menominee 

Midland... 



3,017 
1.057 
1,175 
569 
2,026 



Monroe 

Mount Clemens 

Mount Morris Township,. 

Mount Pleasant 

Muskegon 



1,224 
2,417 
1,114 
1,114 
4,488 



Muskegon Heights — 
Muskegon Township. 

Niles.. 

Niles Township 

Norton Shores 



1,5 



Pontiac... 

Ponliac Township.. 

Portage.. - 

Fort Huron 

Rcdford Township. 



3,299 
3,461 



1,284 
2,157 
2.221 



River Rouge 

Roscville. 

Royal Oak... 

Saginaw 

Saginaw Township. 



1,100 
3,587 
4,559 
11,2.52 
1,924 



580 
2,160 
3,073 
5,993 
1,467 



Saint Clair Shores 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Joseph Township.. 

Sault Sainte Marie 

Shelby Township... 



4,156 



1.095 
1,434 



1.633 



Southfield.. 

Southgate 

Sterling heights.. 

Taylor.. 

Traverse City... 



6.191 
2,230 
4.003 
5.644 
1.309 



3.658 
1.458 
2,481 



Trenton 

Troy 

Walker 

Warren. 

Waterford Township.. 



1.044 
4,009 



11,062 
5.081 



6.338 
3.050 



Wayne 

W est B loomfield Townshi p 

Westland - - 

While Lake Township 

Wyandotte 

See footnote at end of table. 



1.973 
1,244 
5.949 
1.259 
2.090 



1,172 
803 

3, 375 
718 

1,453 



110 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



MICHIGAN— Con. 



Wyoming,. 
Ypsilanti.. 



MINNESOTA 



Albert Lea. 

Anoka 

Austin 

Bemidji 

Blaine. 



Bloomin(;ton 

Brainerd. 

Brooklyn Center. 
Brooklyn Park... 
BumsviUe 



Columbia Heights 

Coon Rapids 

Cottage Grove Village. 

Coastal 

Duluth.. 



Eagan Township 

Edina 

Fairmont 

Faribault 

Fergus Falls 

Fridley 

Golden Valley 

Hastings. _. 

Hibbing 

Hopkins 

Inver Grove Heights- 

Mankato . 

Maplewood 

Marshall.. 

Minneapolis 

Minnetonka 

Moorhead 

New Brighton 

New Hope 

New Ulm 

North Saint Paul 

Owatonna _ 

PljTnouth 

Red Wing.. .., 

Richfield 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



3,200 
2,204 



Criminal homicide 



and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



slaughter 

by 

negli- 
geneo 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



1,477 
203 



Motor 
vehicle 
the(t 



Robbinsdale 

Rochester 

RoseviUe. 

Saint Cloud 

Saint Louis Park. 



2,473 
1,822 
2,360 



451 

1,932 
1,352 
1,810 
1,312 



Saint Paul 

Shore view 

South Saint Paul 

Stillwater 

Virginia - 

See footnote at end of table. 



8,633 



111 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



MINNESOTA— Con. 



West Saint Paul.. 
White Bear Lake. 

Willmar 

Winona 

Worthington 



MISSISSIPPI 



Biloxi 

Brookhaven. 
Clarksdale. . 
Cleveland... 
Columbus... 



Greenville... 

Grenada 

Gulfport 

Hattiesburg . 
Jackson 



Laurel 

Meridian 

Moss Point 

Natchez 

Ocean Springs. 



Oxford 

Pearl 

Picayune.. 

Tupelo 

\'icksburg. 



Yazoo City.. 



Arnold 

Bellelontaine Neighbors. 

Berkeley 

Blue Springs. 

Brent wood 



Bridgeton 

Cape Girardeau. 

Carthage 

Clayton. 

Columbia 



Crestwood. 

Excelsior Springs. 

Ferguson 

Florissant 

Gladstone 



Grandview 

Hannibal 

Hazelwood 

Independence. 
Jefferson City. 



Jennings 

Joplin. 

Kansas City 

Kirkwood 

Ladue 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,506 
1,834 
10,098 

1,781 
1,567 



1,645 
1,618 



1,252 
3,Q44 



1,008 
4,055 
1,330 



2,182 
40, 675 
1,601 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



811 

1,515 
1,523 
17,643 
1,107 
I'JO 



112 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Poike, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Oyer in Population — Continued 



City by State 



MISSOURI— Con. 

Lees Summit- 

Liberty. 

Maplewood 

Marshall 

Mexico -- - 

Nevada --. 

Overland- 

Poplar Bluff - 

Raytown 

Richmond Heights 

Saint Ann 

Saint Charles 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Louis -- 

Sedalia..- -.- - 

Sikcston... - 

Springfield 

University City... 

Warrensburs 

Webster Groves 

MONTANA 

Billings. 

Bozeman. 

Great Falls 

Havre - 

Helena 

Missoula 

NEBRASKA 

Beatrice 

Bellevue.. 

Columbus , 

Fremont 

Grand Island -.. , 

Hastings 

Kearney _ 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

North Platte ..- 

Omaha 

Scottsblufl 

NEVADA 

Henderson 

Las Vegas. 

North Las Vegas. 

Reno 

Sparks. 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



4,290 
66,400 
1.598 



10,367 
3.461 



5,360 
990 

5,319 
519 

1.778 

2,809 



1.155 
23, 458 
4,185 
6,812 
1.996 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Fcrcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



2,943 
1,230 



7, 991 
1.480 
1,720 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



2,967 
28,441 



652 
11, 130 

1,945 
4,199 
1.413 



113 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Claremont. . 

Concord 

Exeter 

Lebanon 

Manchester. 



Nashua 

Portsmouth. 
Rochester... 
Salem 



NEW JERSEY 



Asbury Park. 
Atlantic City. 

Audubon 

Bayonne. . ... 
Belleville 



Bellmawr. 

Bergcnfleld 

Berkeley Heights 

Berkeley Township.. 
Bernards Township. 



Bloomfield . 

Bound Brook. 

Brick Township.. 

Bridgelon 

Bridgewater Township. 



Burhngton 

Burlington Township 

Camden 

Carteret 

Cedar Grove Township. 



Cherry Hill , 

Cinnaminson Township. 

Clark 

Cliflside Park 

Clifton 



CoUingswood 

Cranford Township.. 

D elran Township 

Denville Township.. 
Depttord Township. 



Dover 

Dover Township 

Dumont 

East Brunswick Township 

East Orange 

East Windsor Township 

Eatontown 

Edison 

Egg Harbor Township 

Elizabeth 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



2,166 
1,200 



1,829 
4,625 



1,510 
1,241 



1,862 
1,334 
1,131 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



114 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known fo fhe Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



NEW JERSEY — Con. 



Elmwood Park 

Englewood 

Evesham Township.. 

Ewing Township 

Fair Lawn 



Fairview 

Fort Lee 

Franklin Township. 

Freehold...- 

Freehold Township. 



Garfield 

Glassboro 

Glen Rock 

Gloucester City 

Gloucester Township. 



Hackcnsack... 

Haddonfield 

Hadilon Township. 

Ilamillon 

Hammonton 



Hanover Township.. 

Harrison 

Hasbrouck Heights., 

Hawthorne 

Hazlet Township 



Highland Park 

Hillsborough Township. 

Hillsdale 

Hillside Township 

Hoboken 



Hopalcong 

Hopewell Township. 
Howell Township... 

Irvington 

Jackson Township... 



Jefferson Township. 

Jersey City 

Keansburg 

Kearny 

Lakewood 



Lawrence Township... 

Linden 

Linden wold 

Little Falls Township. 
Livingston.. 



Lodi - 

Long Branch 

Lower Township 

Lyndhurst Township.. 
Madison 



Madison Township 

Mahwah Township. 

Manalapan Township 

Manchester Township 

Mantua Township 

Sec footnote at end of table. 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,451 
1,726 



1,187 
1,952 



1,005 
2,414 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 




152 


34 


552 


8 


201 


47 


386 


15 


284 


1 


66 


22 


472 


80 


608 


43 


169 


g 


139 


10 


154 


7 


242 


1 


6S 


26 


186 


19 


536 


27 


561 


2 


126 


4 


162 


17 


1,001 


6 


85 


6 


100 


3 


108 


3 


89 


10 


136 


7 


117 


15 


119 


4 


74 


2 


63 


36 


506 


173 


801 


8 


92 


1 


80 


35 


275 


132 


768 


9 


400 


12 


263 


544 


3,954 


67 


144 


8 


232 


115 


588 




259 


26 


328 


20 


267 


5 


143 


1 


210 


27 


388 


81 


922 


10 


321 


17 


165 


6 


61 


51 


610 


13 


162 


11 


88 


11 


91 


14 


90 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



115 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Manville 

Maple Shade Township.. 
Maplewood Township, .. 
Margate City 

M arlboro 



Matawaii Township 

May wood --. 

Metucheii.. 

Middlesex... 

Middletown Township.. 



Millburn Township 

Millville --- 

Monroe Township (Gloucester County). 
Monroe Township (Middlesex County). . 
Montclair 



Montville Township 

Moorestown Township.. 

Morristown 

Morris Townshi p 

Mount Holly 



Mount Laurel Township. 
Mount Olive Township... 

Neptune Township 

Newark... 

New Brunswick... 



New Milford 

New Providence 

North Arlington 

North Bergen Township 

North Brunswick Township.. 



North Plainfield.. 
Nutley 

Oakland 

Ocean City 

Ocean Township. 



Orange 

Palisades Park 

Paramus 

Parsippany-Troy Hills. 
Passaic 



Paterson 

Pemberton Township... 

Pennsauken 

Pennsville Township. .. 
Pcquannock Township.. 



Perth Aniboy 

Phillipsburg 

Piscataway Township., 

Pitman 

Plainfield 



Pleasantville 

Point Pleasant 

Pompton Lakes 

Princeton 

Princeton Township 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
latioi I 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,551 
32, 690 
4,114 



1,042 

3.299 
318 
3,144 
1,842 
4,221 



533 

638 

1,655 
919 

2,760 
393 

4,087 

1,038 
432 
549 

759 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

^laughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



10, 122 
1,225 



1,002 


1,584 


3,564 


305 


1,520 



1,543 

286 

1,939 



116 



Table 6. — Number of Offensei Known to fhe Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Railway...- --- 

Ramsey 

Randolph Township — 

Red Bank - 

RidBPfield 

Ridscfield Park 

Ridgiwood 

Ringwood - 

River Edge - 

Rockaway Township 

Rosclle ■ 

Roselle Park - 

Roxbmy Township 

Runnemede 

Rutherford 

Saddle Brook Township 

Sayreville 

Scotch I'lains-- 

Secaucus 

SomcrviUe.- — 

South Brunswick Township 

South Orange 

South Plainfield 

South River 

Sparta Township 

Springfield 

Stratford 

Summit 

Teaneck Township 

Tenatly.- 

Totowa - 

Trenton 

Union City 

Union Township 

Ventiior City, 

Verona 

Vineland... 

Waldwick 

Wallington _ _ 

Wall Township- 

Washington Township (Bergen County) 

Washington Township (Gloucester County) 

Wayne Township. 

Weehawken Township 

West Caldwell 

West Deptford Township. 

Westfield.. 

West Milford Township 

West New York 

West Orange 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Index 


4 


1,236 


5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
4 
5 
5 
5 


415 
842 
810 
301 

522 
365 
385 
430 
570 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 


834 
404 
823 
431 
602 

485 


4 


1,056 


5 


1,004 


5 

.•> 

5 


299 
456 

613 


5 


834 


5 


1, 189 


5 


479 


5 


403 


5 


528 


5 


340 


.5 


528 


4 


1,741 


5 


321 


5 


635 


2 


8,254 


3 


2,206 


3 


2.445 


5 


570 


5 


380 


3 


2,883 


5 


421 


5 


434 


5 


650 


5 


183 


5 


546 


4 


3,210 


5 


365 


5 


286 


5 


831 


4 


1,093 


5 


913 


4 


1,005 


4 


1,200 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

by 

negli- 



Aggra- 
vatcd 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



117 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known fo the Police, 1974, Cifies and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



West Paterson. 

Westwood -- 

WiUingboro Township.. 

Winslow Township 

Woodbridge Township. 

Woodbury 

Wyckoff 



NEW MEXICO 



NEW YORK 

Albany 

Amherst.. 

Amity ville 

Auburn. 

Batavia... 

Beacon 

Bedford.. 

Bethlehem 

Binghamton 

Brighton 

Buffalo 

Canandaigua 

CarmeL. 

Cheektowaga 

Clarkstown 

Cohoes 

ColoniP Town 

Corning 

Cortland 

Depew 

Dewitt.. 

Dobbs Ferry 

Dunkirk 

Eastchester 

Elmira 

Evans 

Floral Park 

Fredonia. 

Freeport 

Fulton 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Alamogordo.. 
Albuquerque. 

Carlsbad 

Clovis 

Farmington.. 



1,373 
22, 694 
1,191 
1,964 
2,000 



Gallup 

Hobbs 

Las Cruces 

Las Vegas City. 
Los Alamos 



1,253 
1,825 
2,554 
1,257 
385 



Roswell.. 
Santa Fe. 



1,874 
3,941 



118 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City by Statp 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
{ and non- 

legligent 
man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughtei 
hy 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



NEW YORK— Con. 



Garden City 

Glen Cove 

Gloversville 

Greece 

Greenburgh 

Hamburg 

Hamburg Town. 

Harrison 

Hempstead 

Hornell 



1,594 
1.235 



Irondequoit.. . 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Johnson City. 
Johnstown 



1.850 
1.422 



Kingston 

Lackawanna... 

Lockport. 

Long Beach 

Lynbrook 

Malverne , 

Mamaroncck Town.. 
Mamaroneck Village. 

Massena 

Middletown 



Mount Pleasant. 
Mount Vernon... 

Newburgh 

New Castle 

New Rochelle .. 



2,153 
1,053 



New York City 

Niagara Falls 

North Tonawanda.. 

Ogden 

Ogdensburg 



519, 825 
5.809 
1.102 



158, 321 
1,544 



163, 157 
3,385 



Olean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Orangetown . 
Ossining 



Oswego , 

Plattsburgh 

Poughkeepsie 

Poughkeepsie Town, 
Queensbury 



.'. 119 
1,467 



1.007 
1,009 



Ramapo Town 

Ri verhead Town , 

Rochester _ 

Rome 

Rotterdam _ 

See footnote at end ot table. 



1,213 
22, 589 
1,014 



119 



Table 6. — Number of Offemes Known to fhe Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



rnpu- 
latioii 
group 



Total 
Crimo 
In(i(>x 



Criminal hoinicide 



Murder 
ami uoii- 

I lll'KliROllt 

slaughtc-r 



Man- 

slauKhlei 

by 

ncRli- 

gciico 



Bur- 

Aggra- clary— 
vatcd I breaking 
assault 

entering 



NEW YORK— Con. 



Rye 

Saratoga Springs. 

Scavsdale 

Schenectady 

Spring Valley 



Syracuse ; 

Tarry town 

Touawanda. 

Tonauanda Town, 
Troy 



1,3.53 
1,464 



L'lica..- 

Vestals 

Walertown.- 
Watervliet.-- 
West Seneca. 



White Plains., 

Yonkers 

Yorktown 



;i,883 
1.002 



NOHTII CAHOLINA 



.\ll)i'niarl.' 
Asiielmrn . 

.\slieviUe -- 

Boone 

Burlington 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte - , 

Concord 

Durham ' 

Eden 

Elizabeth Cily 

yayetteville 

(iastonia 

(loldsboro 

Greensboro 

Greenville 

Henderson 

Hickory 

High Point 

Jacksonville 

Kannapolis 

Kinston -. 

Lenoir. 

Lexington 

Lumberton 

Monroe - .- 

Morganton 

New Bern 

North Kannapolis 
Raleigh - 

l{i-idsville 

Rocky Mount. __ 
Salisbury. 
Santord. . 
Shelby... 

See tootnote at end of table. 



MO I 



1.387 
1.136 



1.W3 



1,007 
10, 671 



120 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



NORTH CAROLINA-Con. 



Statesville. 

ThomasviUe 

Wilmington 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem. 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Mandan.. 

Minot 

Williston. 



Beavercreck Township, 

Bedford 

Bedford Heights 

Berea 

Bexley _ 

Bowling Green 

Broadview Heights 

Brooklyn. 

Brook Park. 

Brunswick 

Bucyrus 

Cambridge 

Canton... 

Centerville.. 

Cheviot 



Delaware 

D elhi Township 

Dover _ _ 

East Cleveland 

EasUake 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



Bismarck 

Dickinson 

Fargo 

Grand Forks. 
Jamestown... 



2,934 
2,042 



2. 132 
1,678 



Akron. 

Ashland 

Ash tabula. -- 
Barberton... 
Bay Village.. 



1,597 
1,938 



Chillicothe 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Heights.. 
Columbus.. 

Copley 

Coshocton 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Dayton.. 

Defiance 



901 
30,800 
52,022 
3,041 
39. 320 

305 

156 

1.471 

23, 446 



1,653 
6,113 



1,203 

2,728 



10, 511 
12,791 



629 
14, 253 
16,003 
1,970 
20. 138 

205 

34 

1,040 

10.147 



121 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 

562 
1,490 
2,109 
1,474 

494 

406 
621 
918 
839 
522 

666 

1,135 

384 

337 

512 

4,993 

173 

400 

1,197 

3,208 

1,7,50 
1, 219 
2,829 
2,496 
479 

2,885 
1,259 
668 
2,299 
1,657 

890 

522 

949 

1,761 

1,327 

774 
3,223 
1,778 

529 
1,059 

206 
355 
899 
253 
666 

1, 192 
532 

2,516 
690 

1,356 

620 
498 
483 
2,081 
269 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 

•'V 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


OHIO— Con. 


5 
3 
3 

4 
5 

5 

5 
5 
5 

5 
4 
5 

5 
5 

3 

4 
3 

3 
4 
3 
3 

5 

3 

4 
5 
4 
4 

5 
5 

4 
5 

5 
3 
4 

5 
5 
4 

4 
5 

4 
5 

5 
5 
5 
4 






1 
13 
3 

4 

1 

2 


14 
116 
43 
27 
8 

5 
8 
19 
30 
6 

4 
50 
12 

1 
18 

117 

12 
25 
75 

40 
17 
111 
110 
6 

83 
32 
1 
30 

84 

13 

8 
6 
3 
28 

6 
74 
65 

3 

21 

3 
6 

4 
4 

78 
11 
33 

8 
U 

14 
4 

6 
78 


10 
115 
32 
U 
14 

20 
24 

8 
38 

5 

20 
48 
27 
12 
8 

170 
1 
8 
17 

122 

44 
51 
61 
86 
6 

263 
61 
14 
40 

28 

12 
15 
29 
17 
13 

8 
34 

39 
29 
17 

1 

13 

67 

37 
4 

97 
8 

10 

39 

1 
36 
76 
15 


144 

710 
319 
201 
93 

110 
171 
237 
195 
132 

130 
324 
73 
64 
93 

1,180 
49 
117 
262 
599 

271 
162 
751 
1,321 
177 

685 
223 
159 
441 
389 

151 
66 

226 
457 
391 

791 
496 
110 
226 

77 
65 

148 
67 

217 

275 
76 
562 
166 
319 

90 
165 

549 
89 


301 

318 
1,320 
1,160 

306 

245 
399 
601 
542 
366 

485 
585 
242 
234 
358 

3,285 
107 
229 
799 

2,263 

1,210 
906 

1,812 
603 
267 

1,715 

737 

466 

1,691 

1,047 

662 
339 
660 
1,183 
738 

541 

2,108 

1.064 

358 

732 

115 
271 
664 
151 
343 

622 
435 
1,544 
441 
966 

439 
290 
338 
1.310 
156 


92 




3 
1 


4 


215 




391 




1 


71 






72 








24 




1 

1 




18 




1 


4 
4 


48 




30 








13 










27 




4 


2 


6 


118 




38 








26 








11 

1 

14 

9 

3 

3 
32 
3 

10 
3 

10 
6 


33 




1 
1 


3 

1 
1 


228 




12 




31 




80 




1 

3 
3 

4 
5 

1 


1 


139 




179 




1 

1 


78 




87 




339 




19 






127 






203 








26 




1 
1 

3 


1 


86 




102 






47 






94 








2 


26 








101 




1 




2 
14 
18 


154 




1 


95 




8 
1 
1 
1 


194 




1 


95 




28 






1 

1 

2 
1 


61 






8 






1 


10 




1 


72 






17 






5 


35 




2 


4 


174 






6 




2 


3 


4 


274 




65 






8 


42 




1 
1 




35 




1 


37 




1 
8 

1 


27 




3 


1 


57 


Seven Hills _ 


8 



See footnote at end of table. 



122 



Table 6. — Number of Offemei Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towm 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



OHIO— Con. 



Shaker Heights 

Sharonville 

Sheffield Lake. 

Shelby 

Sidney 



Solon. 

South Euclid 

Springfield 

Springfield Township. 
Stow.. 



Strongsville 

Tiffin 

Toledo 

Troy 

University Heights. 



Upper Arhngton 

Urbana 

Wadsworth _ . 

Warren _ 

Warrensvillc Heights 



Washington Court House. 

Westerville. 

Wcstlake 

Whitehall 

Wicklide 



Willoughby... 

Willowick 

Wooster 

Worthington.. 
Xenia 



Youngstown. 
Zanesville 



OKLAHOMA 



Ada 

Altus , 

.•Vrdniore 

Bartlesville. 
Bethany 



Chlckasha.. 
Claremoro.. 
Del City... 

Duncan 

Durant 



Edmond.. 
El Reno.. 

Enid 

Lawlon... 
.Miami 



Midwest City 

Moore 

Muskogee. 

Norman. 

Oklahoma City 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



4,882 
1,277 



1,007 
29, 623 



3,032 
1,225 



1,229 
1,066 



1,016 

286 

1,618 



2,381 
6,851 



■2, 330 
3,2-28 
27, 401 



and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Criminal homicide 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



025 


1,538 


2, 244 


3,635 


118 


303 


677 


1,151 


301 


532 


726 


1,309 


1, lU'J 


1,683 


10, 144 


11,588 



123 



Table 6. — Numt?f of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
neRligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bm-- 
glary— 
breaking 



OKLAHOMA— Con. 



Okmulgee-. 
Ponca City. 

Sapulpa 

Shawnee — 
Stillwater... 

Tahlequah . 

Tulsa 

Village 

W'arr Acres . 
Yukon 



Albany 

Ashland.. - 

Astoria 

Beaverton. 
Bend 



Coos Bay 

Corvallis 

Eugene.. 

Forest Grove. 
Grants Pass.. 



1,182 
2, 464 
8,350 



2.076 
5,345 



Gresham 

Hillsboro 

Klamath Falls. 

La Grande 

Lake Oswego. -. 



1,026 
1,643 



McMinnvillc. 

Mcdford 

Milwaukie 

Oregon City. 
Portland 



1,063 
41,814 



Roscburp..- 

Salcm 

Springfield. 
The Dalles. 
Tigard 



4,361 
1,755 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Abington Township.- - -- - 

Aliquippa -- 

AUentown 

A Itoona 

Ambridge 

Asfon Township 

B aldwin Borough 

Beaver Falls 

Bellevue 

Bensalem Township. 

Berwick 

Bethel Park. 

Bethlehem 

Bloomsburg Town... 

Bradford 

See footnote at end of tabic. 



124 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



PENNSYLVANIA— Con. 



Bristol Township, 

Butler 

Butler Township.. 



Camp Hill... 
Canonsburg. 
Carbondale,, 

Carlisle 

Carnegie 



Castle Shannon 

Center Township 

C^hambersburg- 

Cheltenham Township- 
Chester. ._ 



Clairton 

Coal Township. 

Coalcsville 

Collingdale 

Columbia 



Connellsville 

Conshohocken 

Darby 

Darby Township.. 
Dorry Township.. 



Dormonl. 

Dun more 

Duquesne 

East Ilempfleld Township.. 
Kast Norriton Township... 



Easlon... 

East Pennsboro Township.. 

East town Township 

Elizabeth Township 

Ellwood City 



Enimaus. 
Ephrata.. 



Exeter Township 

Fairview Township.. 

Falls Township 

Farrell 

Folcroft 

Franklin Bore... 

Ureensburg 

Greenville 

Hampden Township. 
Hampton Township.. 
Hanover 

Hanover Township... 



H Lirrisburg 

Harrison Township 

Haverford Townshiii 

Hazleton 

Hempfield Township 

See footnote at end of tabic. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2,406 
4,136 



7,043 

187 
1, 04.5 



Criminal homicide 




Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 



1,52'J 
1,164 



125 



Tabic 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Confinucd 



PENNSYLVANIA- -Con. 

Hickory Township 

Hopewell Township 

Horsham Township 

Indiana 

Jeannette 

Johnstown 

Kingston Boro 

Lancaster 

Lancaster Township 

Lansdale. 

Lansdowne 

Latrobe .._ 

Lebanon 

Lewistown 

Lock Haven 

Logan Township 

Lower Allen Township 

Lower Burrell 

Lower Makefield Township 

Lower Merion Township 

Lower Moreland Township 

Lower Pajcton Township 

Lower Providence Township 

Lower Southampton Township 

Manheim Township 

Manor Township 

Marple Township... ...._ 

McCandless Township 

Mc Kecsport 

Mc Kees Rocks 

Meadville 

Middlelown 

Mlddletown Township 

Millcreek Township 

Monessen 

Monroeville 

Moon Township 

Morrisville 

Mount Lebanon Township 

Muhlenberg Township _. 

Munhall 

N anticoke 

Nether Providence Township 

New Castle.. 

New Cumberland 

New Kensington 

Newtown Township 

Norristown 

Northampton Township 

North Braddock.. 

North Huntingdon Township 

North Versailles Township 

Oil City 

Palmer Township 

Penn Hills Township.. 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2,026 
1,568 



Criminal homicide 



Mmder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughte 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bm-- 
glary— 
breaking 



496 
289 


73 
28 


2,065 


184 


189 


11 


622 


42 


146 


52 


242 


■8 


832 


81 


341 


17 


255 


18 


236 


7 


181 


10 


138 


31 


226 




1,173 


216 


233 


29 


683 


.56 


28,5 


49 


315 


79 


399 


30 


177 


5 


402 


67 


284 


35 


670 


134 


148 


63 


333 


21 


130 


19 


1,090 


238 


1,016 


72 


1.56 


24 


663 


137 


147 


56 


327 


49 


439 


36 


22.5 


36 


42 


«3 


89 


9 


316 


22 


492 


138 


90 


15 


450 


70 


219 


21 


1,036 


289 


80 


13 


3 


38 


348 


44 


300 


68 


211 


7 


442 


15 


417 


164 



126 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



PENNSYLVANIA— Con. 



Penn Townsnip.. 
Peters Township. 

Philadelphia 

Phoenixville 

Pitlsburgh 



Pittston 

Plains Township 

Pleasant Hills 

Plum 

Plymouth Township. 



Pottstown 

Pottsvillc 

Radnor Towniihip- . 

Reading 

Richland Township. 



Ridley Township... 

Ross Township 

Rostraver 

Salisbury Township. 
.'icott Township 



Scranton 

Shaler Township 

Shamokin 

Sharon 

South Whitehall Township. 



Springettsbur y Township 

Springfield Township (Delaware County) 

Sprinel'ield Township (Montgomer>' County). 

Sprini; (iarden Township 

Spring Township 



.State College. 

Sunbury 

Susquehanna Township. 

Swatara Township 

Swissvale 



Tredyffrin Township 

Uniontown 

Upper Chichester Township. 

Upper Darby Township 

Upper Dubhn Township 



Upper Merion Township 

U pper Moreland Township 

Upper Saint Clair Township 

Upper Southampton Township. 
Warminster Township 



Warren 

Washington 

West Chester. 

West Goshen Township 

West Manchester Township 

West Mifflin 

West Norriton Township. 

Whitehall 

Whitehall Township 

Whitemarsh Township 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



333 

4, 199 



Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 






1 
1 

796 
2 

274 


4 
3 

10,069 

19 

2.501 


9 
10 

5,237 
32 

1,611 

1 
4 

11 
2 

11 

50 
36 
20 
78 
27 

44 
14 

4 
2 
9 

111 
10 
23 
15 
30 

10 
14 
24 
12 
1 

21 
10 
12 
24 
13 

10 
18 
5 
96 
20 

23 
3 

6 






444 


58 


70 


27 
1 




2 

1 


4 

10 
14 

49 
19 
18 
160 

S 

33 

10 
6 
4 

1 

58 






1 


6 

2 




3 

11 
3 
1 

23 


1 






2 

1 

3 


7 




10 
6 


1 






2 


1 


1 
1 


4 


17 






1 
1 
2 

2 

1 
I 

1 


2 




40 

4 

12 
12 

14 
2 

8 
7 
14 
32 

IS 

6 
38 

4 
98 
10 

18 
11 








4 
4 


1 


2 


2 




3 


9 




2 




3 
3 

4 

5 
4 
1 
13 

2 

4 

1 




3 




2 


2 




■' 


1 

1 


2 










1 






5 


24 


32 

6 
31 
95 
16 






2 


1 


2 
6 


33 

.V2 
10 
6 

12 
6 
3 

7 


3 

1 


1 


2 








6 
1 
5 
17 


1 


1 
1 


2 
5 





Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



127 



Table 6. — Number of Offensei Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Papulation — Continued 



PENNSYLVANIA— Co 



Wilkes-Barre. 
VVilkinsburg.. 
Williamsport. 

Yeadon 

York 



York Township. 



RHODE ISLAND 



Barrington- 

Bristol 

BurriUville. 

Central Falls 

Coventry 

Cranston 

Cumberland _. 

East Providence 

Johnston 

Lincoln - - 

Middletown ..- 

Newport --- 

North Kingstown 

North Providence 

Paw tucket 

Portsmouth 

Providence - 

Sniithfield 

South Kingstown 

Tiverton 

Warren _-- 

Warwick..- -. 

Westerly. 

West Warwick 

Woonsocket 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

-4iken.._ 

-Anderson 

Beaufort 

Charleston City... - 

Columbia 

Easley 

Florence 

GaJTney 

Georgetown 

Greenville. 

Greenwood 

Greer 

Laurens 

North Charleston. 

Orangebiug 

Rock Hill.. 

Spartanburg.- 

Sumter 

Union 

West Columbia 

See footnote at end o£ table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1.646 
1.466 
3, 054 



1,006 

3,153 

1,235 

2.392 

1,094 

560 



1,079 
3,761 



13, 627 

441 

1,054 



1,045 
1,162 



6,170 
8,703 



2,146 
3,407 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 

negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



1,727 
3,271 



1,110 
1,767 



128 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known tc the Pcliee, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



SOUTH DAKOTA 
TENNESSEE 

TEXAS 

l._ ., 

n 

nt. 

Beeville 

Bellaire. _ 

Big Spring... 

Borger 

Brow nfield 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



11,627 

1,577 

903 



414 
2,073 
1,377 
1,120 
11,124 

229 



3,390 
1,046 



162 
7,256 
19,160 
2,406 

7,529 

304 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 



1,491 


4,965 


5,542 


11,419 


663 


1,399 


2,085 


4,312 



78 I 



129 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



TEXAS— Con. 

Brownsville 

Brownwood 

Brj'an 

CarroUton 

Clebume 

College Station 

Copperas Cove. 

Corpus Christ! 

Corsicana 

Dallas 

Deer Park 

Del Rio 

Denison 

Denton 

Duncanville 

Eagle Pass 

El Paso 

Ennis 

Euless 

Farmers Branch 

Fort Worth 

Galveston. 

Garland 

Grand Prairie 

Greenville 

Groves 

Harlingen 

Henderson 

Hereford 

Houston 

Hurst 

Irving 

Jacinto City _ 

KerrviUe 

Kilgore 

Killeen... 

Kingsville.. 

Lake Jackson 

La Marque 

Lancaster 

Laredo 

LcveUand 

Lewisville 

Longview 

Lubbock 

Lufkin -._ 

Marshall 

Mc.Mlcn 

McKinney 

Mesquite 

Midland. 

Mission 

Nacogdoches 

North Richland HilLi 

Odessa 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



2,384 
1,272 



25,383 
5,608 



3,796 
1,205 



1,712 
6,013 



2,754 
1,415 



1,386 
10,062 

1,111 
986 

2,192 
T94 

3,506 

1,891 
652 
901 
961 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



301 

8,444 
1,442 
1,297 
1,166 
374 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



420 

12, 270 
2,651 
3,050 
2,097 
653 



130 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



City by State 



TEXAS— Con. 



Orange 

Palestine-. 

Pampa 

Paris 

Pasadena. 



Pharr 

Plainview 

Piano 

Port Arthur. 
Port Lavaca. 



Port Neches.. 
Richardson... 

Rob«town 

San Angelo... 
San Antonio. 



San Benito. 
San Marcos. 

Scguin 

Sherman... 
Snyder 



South Houston.. 

Stephenville 

Sulphur Springs- 

Sweetwater 

Temple 



Texarkana 

Texas City 

Tyler. 

University Park., 
^•valde , 



Vernon 

Victoria 

Vidor 

Waco 

Waxahachie . 



Weatherford 

White Settlement. 
Wichita Falls 



American Fork. 

Bountiful 

Brigham City.. 

Cedar City 

La\'ton 



Logan. 
Ogden. 
Orem.. 
Provo . 
Roy. . - 



Saint George 

Salt Lake City.. 

South Ogden 

See footnote at end o£ table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,433 

5,262 



1,415 
2,289 



3.413 
50,549 



1,571 
2,432 
3.778 



6,137 
1,439 
1, 919 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



2,184 
24,765 



1,280 
2,175 



4,196 
1,209 
1,554 



131 



Table 6. — Number of Offemes Known to the Police, 1974, Citie: and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


VERMONT 


5 
4 
5 
5 

5 
4 
3 

5 
4 
5 
5 
5 

2 
5 
3 

5 
2 

1 

4 

5 
5 

3 

5 

4 

5 
2 
5 
5 

5 
5 
3 

4 

4 

5 
5 
3 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
4 
5 


631 

2,437 

326 

253 

9, 405 
9,140 
547 
2,842 
4,319 

172 
1,588 
1,693 
1,018 

964 

6,427 
1,195 
2,368 
1,052 
7,800 

19, 487 

2,973 

7,750 

627 

293 

17,231 

7,15! 

887 

843 

1,890 

772 
9,519 

602 
1,352 

1,356 
1,461 
4,272 
3.437 
1.983 

1,110 
730 

4,023 
701 
940 

902 
1,558 

795 
2,438 
1.481 


1 


2 


1 
1 


12 


18 
4 

473 
146 

151 
202 

11 
113 

21 
89 
53 

161 
71 
62 
39 

385 

1,200 
125 
640 
48 


103 
C04 

58 
80 

2,380 

1.809 

134 

579 
1,485 

33 

241 
286 
96 
236 

1,897 
282 
707 
279 

2,134 

5.156 
766 

2.166 
156 
61 

5.449 

2.032 

258 

151 

575 

94 

1.651 

87 

318 

375 
358 
1.310 
769 
431 

339 
137 
938 
203 

186 
439 
147 
450 
363 


486 

1,661 

223 

159 

6,278 
6,064 
362 
1,908 
2,211 

119 

1.134 

1,186 

725 

584 

3,845 
761 

1,427 
670 

4,344 

10,710 

1,782 

3.679 

371 

215 

8,164 

4,347 

534 

574 

1,004 

585 

7,109 

479 

927 

874 

983 

2, 565 

2,243 

1,349 

695 
524 
2,514 
447 
641 

627 
929 
603 
1.818 
931 


20 




157 




1 




38 






1 

55 
43 
1 
8 
28 


11 


VIRGINIA 


15 

1 
4 
11 

1 


1 
1 
6 


550 
329 
16 
40 
129 

25 
17 
41 
24 

190 
23 
85 
10 

315 

819 

161 

507 

4 

2 

1,222 
198 
20 
20 

72 

5 
154 


744 




742 




26 




152 




253 




6 


Danville - - 


2 


4 
3 


61 




180 




1 
4 

9 
2 

12 
5 

29 

46 
11 
30 
3 




66 






1 

40 
4 

12 
3 

46 

179 
10 
82 
3 


62 




7 


285 




52 




1 

1 
18 

13 
3 


63 




46 




547 


Norfolk.. -.-- 


1,377 




118 




646 




42 






15 




64 
9 
3 

2 


14 


153 

20 
1 

24 


835 

227 

5 

66 

147 

40 

190 

4 

19 

29 
16 
222 
180 
94 

17 
26 
127 
24 
16 

9 
14 
13 
43 
24 


1,344 




318 




1 
1 
6 


66 




23 


Suffolk ---- 


61 




48 




16 
1 

1 


22 


53 


346 




31 






1 

6 

7 
13 
10 

1 

21 


16 

9 
8 
27 
23 

22 

8 
3 

58 
4 
11 

13 
23 
3 
16 


70 


WASHINGTON 




63 








89 




2 
1 




139 






208 






77 




1 




48 






39 


Everett 


2 


3 


363 




23 




1 

1 

1 

3 




6 

1 
8 
3 


43 


Kenncwick 




64 


Kent 


1 


145 




26 




1 


100 


Ly nnwood 


138 



See footnote at end of table. 



132 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known fo the Police, 1974, Cifies and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 



WASHINGTON— Con. 



Mercer Island- 
Moses Lake 

Oak Harbor... 

Olympia 

Port Angeles.. 



Pullman... 
Puyallup.. 
Redmond - 

Renton 

Richland.. 



Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoiiia 

\'ancouver... 
Walla Walla.. 

Wenatchee... 
■^'akima 



WEST VIRGINIA 



Beckley 

Bluefleld 

Charleston 

Clarksburg r 

Fairmont _ 

Huntington 

Martinsburg 

Morgantown 

Moundsville _ 

Parkersburg 

Saint Albans 

South Charleston 

Vienna 

Weirton 

Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Beaver Dam 

Beloit 

Brookfield 

Brown Deer _ 

Caledonia 

Chippewa Falls 

Cudahy 

Do Pere 

Eau Claire -.. 

Fond du Lac 

Franklin... 

CUendalc 

Green Bay 

Greendale 

See footnote at end of table. 



Popu- 
lation 
group 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



463 

46,031 
l.i.013 
11,330 
2,553 
1,910 

1,352 
6.439 



3,440 
236 



3,188 
1,417 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



4.210 


24,308 


3,485 


9,786 


3,416 


6,151 


783 


1,481 


371 


1, 410 


238 


1,028 


1.652 


4, 162 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



133 



Table 6. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Cities and Towns 10,000 and Over in Population — Continued 





Popu- 
lation 
group 


Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




City by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negh- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


WISCONSIN-Con. 


4 
4 
5 
3 

4 

2 
4 
5 
5 
5 

4 
5 
5 
5 
1 

5 
5 
5 
4 
5 

3 
3 

4 
5 
5 

5 
5 
4 
5 
5 

4 
4 
3 
3 

5 

5 
5 
5 

4 
4 
5 
5 
5 


1,328 
2,066 
343 
5,575 
2,790 

10, 222 

1,743 

662 

287 

831 

920 
404 
305 
465 
33,748 

355 

242 

1,481 

784 

543 

3,016 

8,210 

2,342 

668 

901 

1,384 
528 

1,916 
373 
387 

1,447 
1,075 
2,493 
2,742 
753 

413 

460 
1,061 

2,194 

3,076 

821 

275 

520 


2 
2 




1 
6 
1 

11 

31 

1 


11 
33 

129 

9 

198 
2 


6 
5 
6 
65 

25 

31 


254 
373 
73 
1,018 
360 

2,226 
415 
82 
69 
160 

132 
56 

103 

60 

6,672 

110 
45 
169 
319 
148 

407 
2,501 
333 
70 
108 

247 
114 
375 
69 
88 

207 
116 
416 
526 
82 

35 
53 

161 

492 
741 
150 
80 
65 


940 
1,577 

251 
3,542 
2,251 

7,287 

1,291 

549 

191 

616 

741 
322 
178 
378 
19,251 

216 
182 
1,263 
432 
367 

2,523 

4,479 

1,943 

465 

753 

1,088 

378 

1,344 

287 
280 

1,154 

886 

1,904 

2,014 

637 

365 
387 
824 

1,488 

2,074 

633 

153 

423 


114 






70 






10 




6 


4 


808 




134 




6 


3 

1 


443 




34 






14 

24 

8 
2 
11 
3 

827 

5 
3 

4 
6 

2 

2 
378 
3 
8 
3 

7 
12 
6 
4 
1 

11 
32 
18 
31 
10 

4 
3 
32 

38 
23 

9 
11 

8 


17 








1 
6 

5 
3 

2 


19 










25 








1 
2 
4 


'33 








19 








7 








24 




62 

1 


26 


196 

1 
2 


1,647 

3 

1 
9 

4 
4 

11 
377 
8 
6 
9 

4 
1 
36 
1 
3 

4 
3 
33 

26 


5,093 




19 






9 




1 




35 




1 
1 


4 


19 






22 




1 
6 
2 
1 


2 
37 


70 




5 


432 




53 








19 




1 


2 

4 

1 
8 


26 






34 








22 








147 




1 




11 








15 








3 

1 
7 
3 

2 


68 








37 




1 
1 




114 




1 


141 




22 








4 
2 
1 

22 
59 

6 
11 

3 


6 










15 










43 


WYOMING 




1 


9 

1 
1 


145 




2 


170 




21 




2 


1 
1 


17 




20 









' 1974 figures not comparable with prior years, and are not used in trend tabulations. Trends in this report are based on the volume of crimes reported by 
comparable units. Agency reports which are determined to be influenced by a change in reporting practices for all or specific offenses, or annexation, are removed 
from trend tables. 



134 



Table — 7. Number of Offenses Known to Police, 1974, Universities 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Ciiininal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



University of Alabama 

Arizona State University __ 

Arizona Western College 

University of Arizona 

University of Arkansas _ 

Cahfornia State Polytechnic _ 

CaUfornia State University; 

Chico 

FuUerton -. -.. 

San Francisco 

University of California: 

Berkeley 1,424 

Davis 1,068 

Irvine 

Los Angeles 

Riverside - 

Sacramento 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Santa Barbara 

.Santa Cruz 

Colorado State University 

Florida A & M University 

Florida Atlantic University 

Florida International University 

Florida State University ._ 

Florida Tech University 

University of Florida _ 

University of North Florida 

University of South Florida.. 

University of West Florida.. 

Chicago State College, IlUnois 

Eastern Illinois University. 

Illinois Central College 

IlUnois State University.. 

Northeastern Illincis State College.. 

Northern Illinois University 

Southern Illinois University: 

Carbondale 

Edwardsville 

Triton College, Illinois 

University of Illinois: 

Chicago 1,049 

Urbana ._ 1,306 

Western Illinois University 530 

William Rainey Harper College, Illinois 

Indiana University 

University of Indiana: 

Gary _. 

Indianapolis _ _ 

New Albany 

South Bend 



135 



Table 1.— Number of Offenses Known to Police, 1974, Universities — Continued 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



University of Kansas - --- 

Wichita State University, Kansas 

Eastern Kentucky University 

University of Maryland 

Central Michigan University 

Eastern Michigan University - 

Ferris State College, Michigan 

Michigan State University-. --- 

Northern Michigan University.. 

Western Jlichigan University 

University of Minnesota 

Mississippi State University 

University of Mississippi 

University of Missouri. 

University of Nebraska .-. 

University of New Hampshire 

New Mexico State University... 

University of New Mexico 

State University of New York 

Elon College, North CaroUna 

Kent State University, Ohio 

Central State University, Oklahoma 

Oklahoma State University 

University of Oklahoma 

University of Oklahoma Health Science Center. 

Bloomsburg State College, Pennsylvania 

Clarion State College. Pennsylvania.. 

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania... 

Pennsylvania State University 

Shippensburg State College, Pemisylvania 

Slippery Rock State College, Pennsylvania 

West Chester State College, Pennsylvania.. 

Eastfield College, Texas... 

East Texas State University 

Southwest Texas State University 

University of Texas: 

ArUngton 

Austin... 

Dallas 

El Paso.. 

Galveston 

Houston 

Permian Basin.. 

San Antonio 

University of Utah 

University of Virginia 

University of Wisconsin: 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Parkside .- 



1,164 
1,220 



1,095 
1,152 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties 



County by State 



ALABAMA 

Calhoun 

Jefferson 

Madison 

Mobile 

Shelby - 

ARIZONA 

Maricopa - 

Pima 

ARKANSAS 

Miller 

Pulaski - --- --- 

Sebastian 

CALIFORNIA 

Alameda 

Centra Costa 

Fresno - 

Kern 

Los Angeles 

Marin - 

Monterey 

Napa 

Orange _ 

Placer 

Riverside 

Sacramento 

San Bernardino 

San Diego 

San Joaquin _ 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Solano 

Sonoma. 

Stanislaus 

Ventura ._. 

Yolo 

COLORADO 

Adams 

Arapahoe 

Boulder 

Jefferson 

Pueblo 

TeUer 

DELAWARE 

New Castle Police Department 

New Castle State Police 

FLORIDA 

AUchua. . 

Baker 

Brevard. 

Broward 

Clay.... 

Dade 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



6,520 
6,492 



5,169 
8,614 
11.932 
13,898 
54.181 
2,739 
3,513 
1.108 
8.846 
2.948 
14.612 
25.179 
15.2S0 
12.541 
6.480 
5,190 
5,822 
10,203 
4,267 
1,001 
4,247 
4, 499 
7,199 
2,758 



4,427 
1,761 
1,337 
2,866 
494 



ISS 



7.927 
8,527 



2,431 
66 

5,690 
13. 215 

1.004 
53.203 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



318 
2,530 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



2,201 
2,420 



2,073 
3.353 



4.076 
20.885 



3.185 
1,055 
5,888 
6,625 
6,541 
5,238 
2,297 
1,881 
1.714 
3,207 
1,752 
414 
1,890 
1,611 
2,213 



2,052 
2,052 



1,591 
4,576 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



2,991 
2.973 



43 


" 


2,204 


425 


4,716 


10 


5,281 


822 


8,224 


742 


17.612 


6.541 


1.810 


11 


1.870 


5 


522 


10 


4,628 


514 


1,603 


15 


7.135 


718 


15.360 


1.866 


6.479 


1,009 


5.563 


1.026 


3,597 




2,304 


451 


3,801 


25 


5,706 


644 


2,031 


137 


476 


3 


2,062 


14 


2,452 


158 


4,362 


287 


1,376 


109 


2,302 


397 


988 


79 


663 


92 


1,166 


182 


262 


24 


108 


7 


4,182 


860 


5,295 


762 


1,088 


157 


11 


3 


3.611 


177 


6.007 


1.250 


584 


41 


25.352 


4.856 



137 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 





Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




County by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


FLORIDA — Con. 


11,345 

15, 130 

2,397 

2,181 

510 

15,622 

1,346 

9,337 

3,531 

7,847 

9,235 

979 

567 

5.815 

4,334 

3,672 

95 

888 
2,628 

648 
3,924 
6,602 

200 
15, 655 

186 

611 
4.009 
3,276 

588 

2,341 

69 

216 

1,175 

140 
1,233 
5,528 
3,900 

309 
1,534 
3,424 
1,737 

576 

509 
2,398 

140 

114 
1,460 

697 
1,655 
2,380 

622 
3,571 
2,379 

211 


16 

22 
7 
6 
3 
37 
1 
15 
13 
10 
26 
6 
1 
2 

10 




87 
129 
18 
23 
3 
147 
11 
53 
29 
32 
102 
11 
3 
27 
37 
30 


293 
387 
75 
40 
14 
516 
29 
166 
85 
114 
281 
22 
8 
62 
92 
82 
3 

19 
59 
11 
96 
228 

597 
13 
17 
106 
70 
28 
126 
4 
6 

5 

3 
13 

81 
42 

3 
21 
56 

9 
11 

3 
52 

1 


668 
433 

127 
128 

32 
1,035 

58 
853 
186 
2E5 
844 

91 

29 
196 

76 
247 

14 

12 

74 
54 
17 

143 
11 

678 
44 
29 
97 
85 
36 

117 
16 
5 

84 

7 
110 
186 
435 
12 
81 
190 
39 

21 
86 


3,606 

5,146 

875 

719 

184 

5,389 

577 

2.968 

1.281 

2.751 

3.912 

228 

184 

1,953 

1,523 

1,300 

57 

503 

751 

323 

1,901 

3,164 

81 

6,536 

22 

318 

1,573 

1,452 

299 

798 

26 

101 

430 

37 
332 

1,826 

1,261 
107 
666 

1,378 
668 
235 
216 

1,072 
58 
65 
598 
255 
591 

1,131 
236 

1,212 
991 
99 


5.590 
7.605 
1.134 
1.123 

244 
7.177 

615 
4.691 
1.737 
4.178 
3,510 

568 

320 

3,279 

2,313 

1,764 

14 

259 
1,550 

158 

1,518 

2,035 

29 

6,089 

94 

152 
1,891 
1,339 

185 

998 
22 

100 

551 

91 

714 

2,885 

1,796 

176 

605 

1,488 

949 

284 

234 

912 

67 

42 

592 

225 

864 

795 

302 

1,397 

1,172 

98 


1,085 


Hillsborough 




1,408 


5 


161 




142 






30 






1,321 




1 
14 


55 




591 




200 






507 






560 






63 




1 


■ 22 




296 




10 


286 




239 


Wakulla 




7 


GEORGIA 
Bibb . 


7 
10 

2 

4 
10 

3 
26 


3 

8 


11 
20 

5 
18 
48 

2 
106 

1 

5 

17 
9 
48 


77 




164 




95 






370 




4 

2 

1 


974 




67 




1,623 




12 




3 
14 
6 
9 
10 




87 




16 


306 




307 






22 




20 


244 




1 








2 
6 


2 




2 




97 


ILLINOIS 




2 




1 
11 

1 
1 




7 
35 
20 
3 
14 
27 
3 
6 
3 
17 


56 




27 


504 




345 






7 


Kane 




147 


Lake 


3 

2 


4 


282 




67 






18 




1 
9 




31 






250 






7 


Monroe 


1 
1 
2 
3 

2 






6 






7 
6 
5 
6 
2 
29 
18 
1 


24 
6 
23 
67 
17 
46 
33 
3 


139 
179 

29 
105 

39 
571 

66 
1 


99 






24 




2 
3 


140 




274 




26 


Will 


3 

2 


313 






97 






9 



138 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



Adams 

Adams State Police 

AUen 

Allen State Police 

Clark State Police 

Clay 

Clay State Police 

Gibson 

Gibson State Police 

Hancock.._ 

Hancock State Police 

Lake- 

Lake State Police 

Marion 

Marion State Police 

Marshall 

Marshall State Police 

Morgan 

Morgan State Police 

Porter 

Porter State Police 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Joseph State Police.. 

Tippecanoe 

Tippecanoe State Police... 

Vanderburgh 

Vanderburgh State Police. 

Vigo 

Vigo State Police 



Black Hawk 

Dubuque 

Linn 

Pottawattamie. 

Warren 

Woodbury 



Butler 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Osage 

Sedgwick... 
Shawnee... 
Wyandottc- 



KENTUCKY 



Boone 

Boone Police Department 

Boone State Police 

Bourbon 

Bourbon State Police 

Boyd 

Boyd State Police 

Bullitt 

Bullitt State Police 

Campbell PoUce Department. 

Campbell State Police 

Christian Police Department.. 

C hristian _ _ 

Christian State Police 

Clark. . 

Clark Slate Police 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



1,228 

65 

6,751 



139 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



KENTUCKY— Continued 



Daviess 

D aviess State Police 

Greenup 

Greenup State Police 

Henderson 

Henderson State Police 

Jefferson Police Department. 

Jefferson State Police... 

Jessamine 

Jessamine State Police 

Kenton Police Department... 

Kenton State Police 

Oldham 

Oldham State Police 

Scott 

Scott State Police 



Bossier 

Caddo. 

Calcasieu... 

East Baton Rouge.. 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Ouachita 

Saint Tammany... 
West Baton Rouge. 



Androscoggin 

Androscoggin State Police 

Cumberland 

Cumberland State Police 

MARYLAND 

Anne Arundel Police Department 

Anne Arundel State Police 

Baltimore Police Department 

Baltimore State Police 

Carroll State Police 

Cecil State Police 

Charles 

Charles State Police , 

Harford 

Harford State Police 

Howard Police Department 

Howard State Police 

Montgomery Pohce Department 

Montgomery State Police 

Prince Georges Police Department 

Prince Georges State Police 

MICHIGAN 

Barry 

Bay 

Calhoun 

Clinton 

Eaton 

Genesee 

Ingham 

Ionia.. 

Jackson 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



603 
1.005 
1,020 
6,482 
15, 789 
8U 
912 



15, 119 
1,734 

31,912 
1,271 
1,405 
1,216 
1,268 
518 
1,231 
1,775 
4,528 



36,429 
1,527 



2,930 
1,072 
431 
2,128 
7.756 
4,739 



Criminal homicide 



Murder Man- 

and non- slaughter 
negUgent by 

man- negli- 

slaughter gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



1,857 
4,972 



1,937 
1,841 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



3,329 
7,781 



1,456 
4.509 
2.467 



140 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



MICHIGAN— Con. 

MINNESOTA 

MISSOURI 

Boone 

Cass 

Christian : 

Clay 

Franklin 

Greene 

Jackson 

J eCEerson : 

Saint Ciiarles _ 

Saint Louis Police Departmeiit 

MONTANA 

Yellowstone 

NEBRASKA 

Dakota 

Douglas - 

Lancaster 

Sarpy _ 

NEVADA 

Washoe 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Hillsborough State Police 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,940 
1,819 
16,284 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



1,122 
1,087 



752 


1,609 


938 


1,333 


860 


1,106 


345 


719 


790 


793 


2,047 


2,981 


1,377 


2,790 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



1,930 
1,502 



1,066 
8,902 



141 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



NEW JERSEY 



Atlantic State Police 

Bergen State Police 

Burlington State Police... 

Camden State Police 

Cumberland State Police.. 

Essex State Police 

Gloucester State Police 

Hudson State Police 

Mercer State Police 

Middlesex State Police 

Monmouth State Police... 

Morris State Police 

Passaic State Police 

Salem State Police 

Somerset State Police 

Union State Police 

Warren State Police 



NEW MEXICO 



NEW YORK 



Albany State Police,, 
Broome 



Broome State Police 

Chemung. 

Chemung State Police.. 

Dutchess... 

Dutchess State Police 

Erie 

Erie State Police 

Herkimer State Police 

Livingston 

Livingston State PoHce. ... 

Madison 

Madison State Police 

Monroe 

Monroe State Police 

Nassau 

Niagara 

Niagara State Police 

Oneida State Police 

nondaga 

Onondaga State Police — 

Ontario 

Ontario State Police 

Putnam 

Putnam State Police 

Rensselaer State Police 

Rockland 

Rockland State PoUce 

Saratoga State Police 

Schenectady 

Schenectady State Police 

Suffolk Pohcc Department. 

Suflolk State Police 

Tioga 

Tioga State Police 

Wayne 

Wayne State Police 

Westchester State Police 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Criminal homicide 



Man- 
slaughtei 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny — 
theft 


18 


344 


229 


8 


9 


3 


32 


474 


259 


7 


28 


7 


53 


582 


290 


4 


5 


9 


9 


157 


72 


3 


3 


7 


6 


165 


133 


6 


33 


29 


20 


277 


90 


3 


16 


8 


1 


2 


3 


21 


335 


158 


9 


196 


103 




4 
345 


5 
170 


13 


131 


1,261 


1,104 


58 


384 


312 


41 


466 


1,023 


15 


407 


422 


25 


199 


500 


13 


227 


296 


42 


289 


289 


91 


1,004 


681 


67 


355 


921 


19 


489 


560 


11 


331 


209 


76 


185 


454 


7 


84 


69 


11 


23 


28 


9 


333 


196 


54 


1,539 


3,929 


85 


263 


479 


280 


6,887 


21,776 


22 


285 


586 


21 


345 


421 


19 


845 


660 


103 


981 


2,281 


16 


707 


1,245 


26 


259 


638 


23 


235 


273 


S 


143 


159 


17 


254 


149 


16 


570 


376 


3 


23 


52 


8 


30 


83 


21 


577 


398 




64 
106 


53 
83 


6 


511 


11,777 


31,058 


58 


166 


132 


14 


133 


284 


1 


130 


64 


95 


275 


560 


96 


416 


427 


62 


797 


643 



142 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Buncombe 

Cumberland 

Currituck 

Davidson 

Durham 

Forsyth - 

Gaston Police Department. 

Guilford- 

Mecklenburg . , _ 

New Hanover 

Orange 

Union 

Wake 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Allen 

Auglaize. 
Belmont. 
Clark.... 



Delaware 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Geauga 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Lawrence 

Mahoning 

Medina 

Montgomery . 
Pickaway — 

Portage 

Preble 

Richland 

Stark - 

Summit 

Trumbull 

Van Wert 

Warren 

Washington . . 
Wood 



OKLAHOMA 



Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche 

Le Flore 

McClain 

Mayes 

Osage 

Pottawatomie. 

Rogers 

Sequoyah 

Tulsa 



Clackamas 

Clackamas State Police. 

Lane. 

Lane State Police 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1.044 
3,607 



1,742 
3.008 



4,059 
1,473 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



4,424 
312 I 



Forcible 
rape 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



1,380 
1,072 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



398 


20 


277 


60 


515 


87 


2,442 


321 


421 


27 


1.070 


108 


304 


62 


722 


45 


2,118 


391 


1,796 


250 


1,108 


269 


49 


8 


557 


124 


269 


12 


394 


46 


57 


7 


68 


18 


199 


14 


60 
1 


6 


92 


29 


109 


11 


51 


1 


50 


47 


57 


24 


572 


116 


2,467 


366 


161 


68 


2,674 


173 


158 


41 



143 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



OREGON— Con. 



Marion -. 

Marion State Police 

Multnomali - 

Multnomah State Police.. 
Pollt 



Polk State Police 

Washington - 

Washington State Police., 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Adams State Police 

Allegheny Police Department. 

Allegheny State Police 

Beaver State Police 

Berks State PoUce 

Blair State PoUce.. 

Bucks State PoUce 

Cambria State Police 

Carbon State Police 

Chester State Police 

Cumberland State Police 

Dauphin State Pohce 

Delaware State Police 

Erie State Police 

Lackawanna State Pohce 

Lancaster State PoUce 

Lehigh State Pohce 

Luzerne State PoUce 

Lycoming State PoUce 

Monroe State Police 

Montgomery State PoUce 

Northampton State PoUce 

Perry State Police 

Philadelphia State Police 

Somerset State Police 

Susquehanna State PoUce 

Washington State Police 

Westmoreland State Police 

York State Police 



RHODE ISLAND 



Kent State PoUce 

Providence State PoUce.. 
Washington State PoUce.. 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Aiken 

Berkeley 

C harleston Police Department 

Greenville 

Lexington 

Pickens 

Richland 

Spartanbiu'g 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



TENNESSEE 



Anderson... 

Chatham 

Hamilton... 

Knox 

Rutherford.. 
Shelby 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



7,221 
9,975 
2,364 



1,344 

2,763 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negU- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny— 



3,ff72 
4,222 
1,134 



1,258 

285 

1,094 



144 



Table. 8 — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



Bell 

Bexar 

Bowie 

Callahan 

Dallas 

Ector 

El Paso 

Fort Bend... 

Grayson 

Guadalupe. . . 

Hidalgo 

Jefferson 

Lubbock 

McLennan... 

Orange 

Potter 

Randall 

San Patricio. 
Tom Green . . 

Waller 

Webb 

Wichita 



Davis 

Salt Lake. 

Tooele 

Utah 

Weber 



VIRGINIA 



Amherst 

Amherst State Police 

Charles City 

Charles City State Police 

Chesterfield. 

Chesterfield State Police 

Fairfax Police Department 

Fairfax State Police 

Hanover 

Hanover State Police 

Henrico Police Department 

Henrico State Police 

James City 

James City State PoUce 

Prince George 

Prince George State Police 

Prince William Police Department. 

Prince WiUiam State Police 

Roanoke ._ 

Roanoke State Police 

York 

York State Police 



WASHINGTON 



Benton 

Clark 

Franklin... 

King 

Pierce 

Snohomish. 
Spokane . . _ 
Yakima 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



4,601 
490 
20,960 
9,707 
5,919 
5,766 
3,437 



Criminal homicide 



Mtarder 
and non- 
ncgUgent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



1,570 
156 
7,841 
3,441 
2,507 
1,460 
1,556 



1,906 

28 

15,519 



94 


13 


5 


4 


127 
1 


7 


3,232 


562 


46 


28 


1,176 


133 


43 


26 


254 


14 


8 


' 


431 


26 


2,605 


273 


294 


23 


10,443 


1,578 


4,643 


751 


2, 455 


388 


3,388 


349 


1,553 


97 



145 



Table 8. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban Counties — Continued 



County by State 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Brooke .- 

Brooke State Police 

Cabell - 

Cabell State Police 

Hancock 

Hancock State Police 

Kanawha 

Kanawha State Police 

Marshall 

Marshall State Pohce 

Ohio 

Ohio State Police 

Putnam... 

Putnam State PoUce 

Wayne 

Wayne State Pohce 

Wirt 

Wirt State PoUce 

Wood 

Wood State PoUce 

WISCONSIN 

Brown 

Calumet- -. 

Dane 

Douglas 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Milwaukee 

Outagamie 

Ozaukee 

Racine 

Saint Croix 

Washington 

Waukesha 

Winnebago 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



1,206 

177 

1,688 



1,291 
1,162 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 

negli- 
gence 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



146 



Table 9. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Rural Counties over 25,000 in Population 



County by State 



Dallas... 
Jackson. 



Navajo.. 
Pinal.... 
Yuma... 



Butte 

El Dorado 

Humboldt 

Kings 

Mendocino 

Merced 

San Luis Obispo. 

Shasta 

Sutter 

Tulare 

Yuba 



Kent State Police... 
Sussex State Police.. 



Charlotte 

Citrus 

Collier 

Indian River.. 

Jackson 

Lake 

Manatee 

Marion 

Martin 

Okaloosa 

Putnam 

Saint Lucie... 



Floyd 

Glynn... 
WTiitfield. 



Hawaii.. 
Maui 



CAUFORNIA 



DELAWARE 



Canyon. 



Kankakee.. 
La Salle.... 
Vermilion.. 



Total 
Crime 
Indei 



1.553 
2,022 



3,561 
1.530 
2.414 
1,227 
1.586 
1.151 
2.030 
2,362 
1,069 
4,570 
1.583 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1.015 
2.942 
1,822 
154 
1,572 
4,105 
3,161 
1.421 
1,487 
1,061 
2,172 



1,032 
1,305 



1,375 
3.108 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 



Forcible 
rape 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



2,127 
1,023 



2,064 
1,451 



147 



Table 9. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police 


1974, R 


ural Counties over 25,000 


in Population — Continued 






Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
bre^-king 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




County by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negh- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


INDIANA 


657 

43 

1,772 

65 

490 
24 

876 

189 
1,124 

162 

398 

55 
167 
153 
133 
73 
284 
409 
19 
68 
91 
291 
218 
50 

299 
589 
549 
562 
811 
890 
101 

313 

147 
228 
149 
509 
156 

810 

1,156 

1,127 

740 

863 

1,091 

1,789 
2,178 
566 
1,310 
1,324 






1 


4 
1 
9 
1 
8 
1 
2 
8 
8 
1 

9 


10 

2 

143 

4 

13 


236 

13 
646 

17 

161 

9 

321 

77 
441 

78 

124 

17 
61 
44 
60 
12 
141 
185 
4 
18 
57 
123 
107 
17 

85 
119 
141 
128 
228 
311 

37 

122 
69 

146 
66 

304 
66 

248 
431 
342 
194 
282 
388 

753 

872 
210 
528 
518 


361 

14 
884 

29 

274 

9 

469 

47 
608 

53 

224 

19 
53 

101 
39 
19 
48 

174 
4 
25 
25 
91 
96 
14 

155 
391 
355 
371 
312 
443 
50 

160 
37 
79 
49 

169 
41 

462 
564 
631 
367 
464 
534 

814 

1,018 

316 

708 
657 












Elkhart 


4 

1 


2 
2 


10 










2 




Howard State Police 






5 




1 
3 


2 


3 

1 


38 

25 
12 
4 

23 

14 
22 

3 
13 
32 
51 
19 

7 
15 

2 
31 

4 

8 

40 
36 
18 
21 
176 
70 
5 

9 
19 

2 

16 
19 
14 

46 
87 
130 
56 
40 
75 

137 

116 
12 
19 
94 
























KANSAS 
Riley 




4 


2 

5 
3 


16 


KENTUCKY 






Floyd State Police 


6 




4 

1 
5 
2 
4 
10 
1 
1 


18 


Hardin 




4 


Hardin State Police 


3 

2 
9 
2 


2 


1 
2 
2 
2 


12 




4 




5 


29 




17 


McCracken State Police 


2 


3 


Pike 


2 


2 
6 
7 
1 


S 






2 




8 


4 


3 


28 


Pulaski 


10 




3 

4 
1 
7 
4 
21 
4 
2 






8 


LOUISIANA 


2 
2 


6 

1 

11 
7 
3 

1 
3 


7 
23 
11 

6 
18 
18 

1 


6 


Iberia 


13 




IS 




3 

6 
4 


31 




45 




37 




3 


MAINE 




21 




1 


3 


1 


17 




1 






1 


2 


4 
5 

2 
18 
15 
18 

9 
23 

13 
34 
3 


12 






IS 


Penobscot State Police 






5 

3 

6 
7 
4 
13 

21 

20 
4 
3 

7 


25 


MARYLAND 


2 

1 
2 
I 
2 
6 




49 




1 


52 




1 






97 




1 

2 


62 




52 


MICHIGAN 
Allegan 


51 




5 


4 
1 


113 


Hillsdale 


21 






52 


Lenawee 


1 




6 


41 



148 



Table 9. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Rural Counties over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



County by State 



Total 
Crime 
Indci 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



MICHIGAN— Con. 



Midland 

Montcalm 

Saint Joseph. 

Sanilac 

Tuscola 



MINNESOTA 



Itasca 

Otter Tail- 



MISSISSIPPI 



Dunklin.. 
Jasper 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Grafton State PoUce 

Merrimack State Police 

Rockingham State Police. 



NEW JERSEY 



Sussex Slate PoUce. 



NEW MEXICO 



Dona Ana.. 
McKlnley.. 
San Juan... 
Valencia 



Allegany State Police 

Cattaraugus 

Cattaraugus State Police.. 

Cajruga 

Cayuga State Police 

Chautauqua 

Chautauqua State Police.. 

Chenango 

Chenango State Police 

Clinton 

CUnton State PoUce 

Columbia 

Columbia State Police 

Delaware 

Delaware State Police 



Genesee State PoUce 

Jefferson 

Jeflerson State PoUce 

Orange State Police , 

Otsego 

Otsego State PoUce 

Saint Lawrence -.- 

Saint Lawrence State Pcilice_. 

Tompkins 

Tompkins State Police 



149 



Table 9. — Number of Offenses Known to th 


e Police, 


7974, Rural Counties over 


25,000 in Population — Continued 






Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal tiomicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar. 

ceny— 
theft 




County by State 


M urder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


NORTH CAROLINA 


4fi2 
833 
658 
598 
1,097 
1,208 
452 
377 
378 
402 
540 
598 
685 
499 
402 
186 
325 
732 
314 
641 
734 
376 
1,212 
495 

1,000 
280 
318 
1,033 
1,179 
1,000 

1,110 
151 

1,638 
127 

1,579 
138 

770 
596 
623 
1,376 
947 
522 
887 
273 
1,212 
1,494 
707 
437 
553 
919 
376 
868 
324 
507 


2 
5 
1 
2 
3 
4 
10 
2 
4 
5 
2 
4 

3 

1 
1 
1 
4 
9 
2 
1 
3 
8 
2 




1 
7 


7 
16 
12 

9 
19 
14 

3 


253 
105 
70 
16 
127 
371 
59 
101 
55 
151 
78 
80 
67 
20 
19 
31 


100 
379 
238 
364 
390 
399 
196 
123 
126 
123 
265 
267 
278 
133 
226 
67 
142 
247 
219 
354 
294 
159 
452 
313 

425 
139 
98 
504 
361 
331 

423 
28 

469 
34 

546 
45 

380 
230 
345 
640 
441 
238 
367 
130 
604 
607 
307 
201 
307 
408 
181 
332 
137 
219 


86 
261 
309 
159 
538 
346 
159 
146 
162 

81 
178 
207 
273 
296 
138 

73 
169 
341 

29 
212 
344 
158 
558 

70 

504 
104 
194 
440 
760 
524 

599 
97 

995 
56 

861 
70 

328 
324 
232 
614 
408 
258 
455 
118 
484 
552 
317 
189 
199 
447 
177 
433 
154 
230 


13 






60 






28 






2 
5 
8 
2 


46 






15 






66 






23 






6 






6 
2 
3 

5 
6 
1 

1 
8 


8 
11 
4 
3 
7 
9 
5 


17 






29 






10 






32 






47 






37 






12 




1 


6 




7 
14 
13 
13 
15 
17 
19 

8 

6 
1 
3 
6 
6 
8 

4 
2 
8 
2 
8 
2 

7 
6 

18 
4 
1 
9 
5 
12 
60 
13 
10 
8 
10 

17 
5 
6 


6 




1 


4 
3 
5 
3 

1 
12 

1 

2 


88 
26 
51 
46 
16 
90 
38 

10 


34 




15 




1 


4 




31 






22 






73 






63 




1 


53 




1 


35 








7 
18 


16 




2 


2 


5 


68 




52 




1 
1 


3 

5 


11 
10 


66 

24 
5 

78 
5 

91 
6 

8 
14 
22 
36 
34 

6 
14 

6 

48 
58 
32 

7 
17 
14 

4 

22 
15 
10 


59 


OREGON 


49 




19 




2 


8 
8 

1 


9 
3 

9 
1 

5 

4 
4 
3 

4 


77 




27 




2 


62 




14 




1 


10 
4 


41 




20 






20 




3 


16 
8 
4 
5 
9 
6 
15 
12 
3 
3 
6 
4 
7 
1 
3 


61 




56 




1 
1 
1 
3 

1 
1 

1 

1 


15 




37 




13 




9 

23 
8 
2 

2 
2 
4 


52 




187 




29 




27 




19 




36 




9 




60 






13 


Mercer State Police 


1 


8 


33 



150 



Table 9. — Number of Of femes Known to the Police, 1974, Rural Counties over 25,000 in Population — Continued 





Total 
Crime 
Index 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 




County by State 


Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


PENNSYLVANIA-Con. 


436 
513 
711 
329 
904 
386 
380 

1.890 
879 
693 

1,270 
502 
763 
785 
64i 
538 
913 

1.230 

1.991 

176 
469 

587 
55 
201 

22 

618 

2.122 

1.309 

953 

737 

1.135 

69 
229 
246 
178 
1 
509 

45 
165 
172 

72 

16 
330 
149 
151 

62 
257 

22 
112 






2 
8 

8 
3 

1 
21 
6 
5 
7 
5 
3 
1 
3 
16 
11 
10 


J 

30 

19 
16 
27 
12 
14 

11 
5 
16 
36 

22 


8 
16 
41 
23 
33 

4 
15 

139 
89 
40 
99 
63 
72 
9 
44 
5i 

127 
86 

158 

1 
60 

1 
32 

1 

16 
43 
42 
43 
17 
39 

16 
4 
7 
2 


263 
219 
305 
154 
394 
207 
194 

822 
304 
223 
535 
187 
306 
310 
318 
276 
351 
490 
865 

102 
170 

203 
12 
76 
3 

275 
699 
331 
256 
278 
361 

36 

104 
102 
82 


147 
226 
285 
133 
441 
1S5 
146 

839 
383 
278 
537 
197 
320 
420 
257 
183 
353 
553 
832 

63 

210 

346 
35 

83 

9 

287 
1.262 
854 
508 
427 
685 

3 

91 

112 
65 
1 

189 
14 
56 
58 
31 
3 

160 
71 
42 
12 

105 
5 
38 


12 




3 

5 
1 


10 
12 
8 
7 
2 
6 


32 




44 




15 




23 




2 


14 






SOUTH CAROLINA 


10 
5 

10 

12 
7 
2 
2 
2 
3 
7 

10 
4 


49 




2 


58 




20 




19 

1 


55 




29 




44 






39 






11 






13 






43 




1 


44 


York 


100 


TEXAS 


10 




6 
2 


2 


5 


4 

10 

1 


14 


VIRGINIA 


19 


Frederick State Police 


6 




6 


HaUfax 


4 
1 

1 




4 




9 




8 


WASHINGTON 


4 
10 
3 
6 

2 
4 


5 
17 
9 
9 
3 
3 

3 

6 

3 


30 


Kitsap 




91 




1 
3 

1 




69 






128 


Skagit 




9 






43 


WEST VIRGINIA 






11 


Fayett* State Police 


3 


8 


1 
2 


20 




21 






1 


26 












3 

1 
10 


1 


3 
3 

2 
4 
2 
3 


8 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 
4 
4 
3 


3 

12 
41 
12 
1 
1 
26 


218 
11 
42 
76 
20 
8 
95 
73 
59 
37 

102 
9 
44 


85 


McDowell 


1 


McDoweU State Police 


12 
2 


12 




18 






17 












9 

1 


9 


36 










1 


3 
3 
3 
3 

2 


12 
3 

19 
2 
5 


32 




2 
3 
1 
5 


5 


Raleigh State Police 


1 


2 
1 

1 


23 


Wyoming 


1 


Wyoming State Police 


2 


17 



151 



594-259 O - 75 - U 



Table 9. — Number of Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Rural Counties over 25,000 in Population — Continued 



County by State 



WISCONSIN 



Barron 

Chippewa 

Clark 

Columbia 

Dodge. -. 

Fond du Lac.. 

Grant 

Jefferson 

Manitowoc 

Marathon 

Polk 

Portage 

Rock 

Shawano 

Sheboygan 

Walworth 

Waupaca 

Wood 



Alaska 

New Mexico.. 



STATE POLICE 



OTHER AREA 



Total 
Crime 
Index 



5,153 
1,036 



Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by 
negli- 
gence 




7 


2 


2 










1 
2 
2 
3 

1 




1 
8 


2 
2 


1 


1 


1 




1 


3 
3 

6 
2 
4 
10 




3 

1 

1 






4 






1 
15 
5 


2 










1 
3 


3 
6 


2 


11 


1 

24 
17 

4 




2 

60 
17 

13 




35 
12 

1 


59 
33 

77 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



146 


347 


220 


282 


153 


228 


101 


145 


93 


217 


158 


314 


106 


199 


173 


376 


250 


138 


152 


177 


218 


430 


200 


242 


240 


370 


302 


401 


239 


233 


193 


183 


1.628 


2,423 


352 


318 


660 


1,468 



152 



Table 10. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1973-74, by Population Groups 

[1974 estimated population] 



Population group 



TOTAL ALL AGENCIES: 
8,121 agencies; total population 
187,688.000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

TOTAL CITIES: 5,897 cities; 
toUl population 130,780,000: 

1973.. 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP I 

67 cities over 260,000; population 
42,261,000: 

1973 .- 

1974 

Percent change 

6 cities over 1,000,000; population 
18,541,000: 

1973.... 

1974 

Percent change 

20 cities, 600,000 to 1,000,000; popu- 
lation 12,947,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

31 cities, 260,000 to 600,000; popula- 
tion 10,773,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

GKOUP II 

100 cities, 100,000, to 260,000; popu- 
lation 14,479,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP III 

269 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; popu- 
lation 18,733,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change. 



Crime 
Index 
total 



7,955,417 

9,290,781 

-H6.8 



6,585,384 

7,647,051 

-1-16.1 



2, 780, 328 

3, 120, 347 

-fl2.2 



1,174,887 

1, 290, 724 

-f9.9 



877, 640 

1, 004, 233 

-fl4.4 



727,801 
825, 390 
+13.4 



877, 763 

1, 010, 106 

+15.1 



909, 675 

1,078,647 

+18.6 



812,115 
901,432 
+11.0 



697,516 
771,861 
+10.7 



426,858 

463,712 

+9.0 



233,760 
262, 737 

+8.1 



108,944 
120, 237 
+10.4 



82,864 
90,738 
+9.6 



84, 601 
+10.4 



68,330 

77,847 
+13.9 



7,143,302 

8,389,349 

+17.4 



5,887,868 

6,875,190 

+16.8 



2, 354, 770 

2,656,636 

+12.8 



941, 137 

1,037.987 

+10.3 



644,937 
734,662 
+13.9 



801, 117 
925, 604 
+ 15.6 



841,345 

1,000.800 

+ 19.0 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



17,855 
18,757 
+5.1 



14,270 
14,848 
+4.1 



8,964 
9,212 
+2.8 



4,398 
4,496 
+2.2 



2,847 
+3.9 



1,827 
1,869 
+2.3 



1,647 
1,719 
+4.4 



1,190 
1,254 
+5.4 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



8.677 
7,818 



4,439 
4,285 
-3.5 



2,166 
2,003 

-7.5 



Forcible 
rape 



47,342 
50,995 

+7.7 



37,622 
40, 471 

+7.6 



21, 879 
23,413 

+7.0 



10,622 
+6.3 



7,340 
+3.6 



6.651 
+13.6 



366,095 
419,072 
+14.5 



339,530 
386, 220 

+13.8 



241, 692 
270, 832 
+12.1 



141,632 

165,230 

+9.6 



67, 190 
67,064 
+17.3 



42,870 
48,638 
+13.2 



33,716 
37,297 
+10.6 



4,106 26,719 
4,370 31,960 
+6.4 I +19.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



380,823 
412,608 

+8.3 



306,094 
330,322 

+7.9 



153,023 

160, 266 

+4.7 



77, 821 
82, 489 
+6.0 



41,927 
42, 986 
+2.6 



33,276 

34,780 
+4.5 



36,817 
40, 716 
+10.6 



36,315 
40,263 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



2,316,009 
2,716,136 

+17.3 



1,833,967 

2,135,501 

+16.4 



811,669 
914,401 
+12.7 



346,682 
373, 090 

+7.6 



242, 963 
284, 017 
+16.9 



222,124 
267, 294 
+16.8 



296,944 
+14.4 



244,889 
294,452 
+20.2 



3,972,535 

4, 786, 184 

+20.5 



3,307,432 

3,970,868 

+20.1 



1, 137, 081 
1,343,201 

+18.1 



391, 662 
469, 372 
+19.9 



414, 427 
486, 948 



331,102 
386,884 
+16.8 



442,040 
624, 921 
+18.7 



507, 393 
608,838 
+20.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



153 



Table 10. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police 1973-74, by Population Groups — Continued 

[1974 estimated papulation] 





Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime 1 


Property 
crime' 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


GROUP I\- 

539 cities, 25,000 to 50,000. popu- 
lation 18,958,000: 
1973 


815,933 
977,006 
-1-19.7 

750,574 
909,544 
-f21.2 

451,111 
551,402 
-1-22.2 

2,234,133 

2,683.682 

-f20. 1 

367,374 
442,067 
-F20.3 


54, 182 
63.043 
-1-16.4 

44,263 
51.089 
-fl5.4 

28,537 
31, 569 
-1-10.6 

155,320 
179, 049 
-1-15.3 

33. 582 
35,618 
-+6.1 


761.751 
913.963 
4-20.0 

706,311 
858,455 
-f21.5 

422. 574 
519.833 
-t-23.0 

2,078.813 

2,504,633 

-1-20.5 

333,792 
406,449 
-1-21.8 


1.005 
1,095 
+9.0 

880 
1.000 
-fl3.6 

584 

568 

-2.7 

3,132 
3,563 
-M3.8 

1.652 
1,669 
-(-1.0 


462 

438 

-5.2 

392 
434 

-flO.7 

267 
265 

-.7 

2,742 
2,288 
-16.6 

2,176 
1,918 
-11.9 


2,999 
3,350 
-1-11.7 

2,625 
2,829 
-f7.8 

1,547 
1,640 
-f6.0 

11,188 
12,307 
-t-10.0 

2,809 
2,809 


19,841 
23, 873 
-i-20.3 

12,245 
15,416 
-t-25.9 

5.317 
6,842 
-1-28.7 

47, 570 
58,384 
4-22.7 

4.112 
5,008 
-1-21.8 


30,337 
34.725 
-fl4.5 

28,513 
31,844 
-fll.7 

21.089 
22,519 
-1-6.8 

93,430 

104,795 
-H2.2 

25,009 
26, 132 
-1-4.5 


210.244 
254.374 
-1-21.0 

192,653 
232,757 
-t-20.8 

114,927 
142,573 
-1-24.1 

660.246 
791,812 
-t-19.9 

141.833 
174,029 
-f22.7 


478,575 
581,657 
-f21.5 

460,745 
565,881 
+22. S 

281,598 
346.367 
-1-23.0 

1,224,696 

1,499,953 

-f22.5 

172.047 
210. 100 
-f-22.1 


72, 932 


1974 


77,932 




4-6.9 


GROUP V 

1,322 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; popu- 
lation 21,008,000: 
1973 


52,913 




59, 817 




4-13.0 


GROUP VI 

3,610 cities under 10,000; popu- 
lation 15,340,000: 


26,049 




30,893 




4-18.6 


SUBURBAN AREAS 

3,444 agencies; population 
64,921,000: 
1973 


193,871 


1974 


212,868 




4-9.8 


RURAL AREA* 

1,729 agencies; population 
25,120,000: 
1973 


19,912 


1974 


22,320 




4-12.1 









I violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

' Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included 1 

' Includes state police agencies with no county breakdown. 



I other city groups. 



154 



Table 1 1 . — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1973-74, for Suburban and Nonsuburban Cities ' by Population Group 

[1974 estimated population] 



Population group 



Suburban cities 

TOTAL SUBURBAN CITIES: 
2,949 cities; total population 
33,134,000: 

1973 - 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP IV 

330 cities; 26,000 to 60,000; popula- 
tion 11,336,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP V 

868 Cities; 10,000 to 26,000; popula- 
tion 13,769,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP VI 

1,761 cities; under 10,000; popula- 
tion 8,039,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 



Crime 
Index 
total 



1,231,474 

1,482,019 

-(-20.3 



470, 667 
668, 781 
-t-18.7 



492, 998 
696, 196 
-1-20.9 



267, 809 
327, 043 
-f-22.1 



74, 303 
85.096 
-fl4.5 



30,929 
36,263 
-1-14.0 



28,032 
32, 614 

-fl6.0 



15, 342 
17,329 
-1-13.0 



1,157.171 

1.396,923 

-1-20.7 



439, 738 
623,628 
•fl9. 1 



464,966 
663,681 
-(-21.2 



262. 467 
309, 714 
+22.7 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1.199 
1,323 
-(■10.3 



Man- 
slaughter 
by neg- 
ligence 



Forcible 
rape 



4,277 
4,592 
-(-7.4 



1,629 
1,819 
4-11.7 



1,760 
1,824 
-(-4.2 



25,117 
30, 640 
-(-21.6 



12, 710 
14,813 

-(-16.6 



8,661 
10,946 
+26.4 



3,746 
4,781 
+27.6 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



43.710 
48,641 
+ 11.3 



16,114 
18, 076 
+12.2 



17,166 
19,228 
+12.1 



10, 440 
11,338 
+8.6 



Bur- 
glary- 
break, 
ingor 
entering 



320, 037 
385, 206 
+20.4 



122, MO 
144, 831 
+18.7 



129,886 
166, 169 
+20.2 



68,111 
84,206 
+23.6 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



731,640 
894,737 
+22.3 



268, 697 
326,614 

+21.2 



296, 897 
363,456 
+22.8 



167,046 
208,668 
+23.1 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



105,494 
116,980 
+10.9 



49,001 
63,083 

+8.3 



39, 183 
44,067 
+12.4 



17,310 
19,840 
+14.6 



See footnotes at end of table. 



155 



Table 11. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to fhe Police, 1973-74, for Suburban and Nonsuburban 
Cities ' by Population Group — Continued 

11974 estimated poptilation) 



Population group 



Nonsabnrban cities 

TOTAL NONSUBURBAN 
CITIES: 2,522cities: total popu- 
lation 22,173,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP IV 

209 cities: 25.000 to 50,000; popu- 
lation 7,623,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP V 

464 cities: 10,000 to 25,000; popu- 
lation 7,249,000: 

1973... 

1974 

Percent change 

GROUP VI 

1,849 cities; under 10,000; popu- 
lation 7,301,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 



Crime 
Index 
total 



786, 144 
955,933 
-1-21.6 



345, 266 
418,225 
-1-21.1 



257, 576 
313,349 

-(-21.7 



183, 302 
224,359 
-t-22.4 



52,679 
60,605 
-1-15.0 



23,253 
27, 790 
■(-19.5 



16,231 
18, 575 
-f-14.4 



13, 195 

14, 240 

-t-7.9 



733, 465 
895,328 
-1-22.1 



322, 013 
390. 435 
-(-21.2 



241,345 
294. 774 
-(-22.1 



170, 107 
210, 119 
-1-23.5 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,270 
1,340 

-(-5.5 



Man- 
slaughter 
by neg- 
ligence 



Forcible 
rape 



2,894 
3,227 
-1-11.5 



1.370 
1,531 
4-11.8 



1.005 
-M4.9 



12,286 
15,591 

-f26.9 



7.131 
9,060 
+27.1 



3,584 
4,470 
+24.7 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



36,229 
40, 447 
+11.6 



14,223 
16, 650 
+17.1 



11,357 
12,616 
+11.1 



10,649 
11,181 
+5.0 



Bur- 
glary- 
break, 
ing or 
entering 



197,787 
244, 498 
+23.6 



88,204 
109,543 
+24.2 



62, 767 
76,588 
+22.0 



46, 816 
58, 367 
+24.7 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



489, 278 
699, 168 
+22.5 



209, 878 
256,043 
+22.0 



164,848 
202. 426 
+22.8 



114,552 
140,699 
+22.8 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



46, 400 
51,662 
+11.3 



23, 931 

24,849 
+3.8 



13, 730 

15. 760 
+14.8 



8,739 
11,053 
+26.5 



» Suburban places are within Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas and Include suburban city and county police agencies within the metropolitan area. 
Excludes core cities. Nonsubiu-ban places are outside S.M.S.A.'s. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
3 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle Iheft. 



156 



Table 12. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, 1973-74, for Suburban and Nonsubt/rban 
Counties by Population Groups 

[1974 estimated population] 



Population group 



Suburban Counties ^ 

Over 100,000 

70 counties; population 16,406,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

!t,000 to 100,000 

203 counties; population 10,490,000 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

Under 16,000 

129 counties; population 1,669,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

Nonsuburban Counties^ 

Over 16,000 

198 counties; population 7,806,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

10,000 to 15,000 

582 counties; population 9,039,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 

Vnder 10,000 

761 counties; population 4,171,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change 



Crime 
Index 
total 



636, 129 
759.769 
+ 19.4 



261,715 
320,484 
+22.5 



32,635 
38,887 
+19.2 



125.904 
154,867 
+23.0 



118,610 
143, 289 
+20.8 



51, 241 
61,076 
+19.2 



51. 345 
60.782 
+18.4 



21,445 
23,824 
+11.1 



3,277 
3,533 

+7.8 



11,839 
12,829 
+8.4 



11,937 
12,056 
+1.0 



4,405 
4,434 

+.7 



Prop- 
erty ' 
crime 



240,270 
296,660 
+23.5 



29,358 
35, 354 

+20.4 



114,065 
142,038 
+24.5 



106,673 
131,233 
+23.0 



56, 642 
+20.9 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



1,025 
1,196 
+16.7 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



3,921 
4,611 
+17.6 



2,201 
+.7 



350 

+.9 



16,301 
20,432 
+25.3 



4,299 
5,203 
+21.0 



1,588 
2,008 
+26.4 



1,211 
1,360 

+ 12.3 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



30,098 
34,543 
+14.8 



14,364 

1.5,748 
+9.6 



2,171 
2,247 
+3.5 



8,919 
9,398 
+5.4 



9.227 
9.255 
+.3 



3.342 
3,307 
-1.0 



Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



208, 202 
245, 758 
+18.0 



93,751 
115,198 

+22.9 



11,427 
13,709 

+20.0 



45, 897 
56,295 
+22.7 



45, 413 
56,847 
+25.2 



19,422 
24,963 
+28.5 



318, 332 
388, 479 
+22.0 



129,536 
161, 928 

+25.0 



16, 112 
19,468 
+20.8 



62, 277 
78, 746 
+26.4 



55,996 
68,512 

+22.4 



25,134 
29,010 
+15.4 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



58,250 
64,750 
+11.2 



16,983 
19,534 
+15.0 



1,819 
2,177 
+19.7 



5,891 
6,997 
+18.8 



5.264 
5.874 
+11.6 



> Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

2 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

' Crime offenses include sheriffs' and county pohce departments. State poUce offenses are not included. 



157 



Table 13. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known Breakdown 1973-74, by Population Groups 

(1974 estimated population) 





Forcible rape 1 


Robbery 1 


Aggravated assault 




Burglary 




Population group 


Rape 

by 

force 


Assault 

to 
rape- 
attempts 


Armed 


Strong- 
armed 


Gun 


Knife or 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 


Otlier 
weapon 


Hands, 
fists, 
feet, 
etc. 


Forcible 
entry 


Unlaw- 
ful 

entry 


At- 
tempted 
forcible 
entry 


TOTAL ALL AGENCIES: 8,114 agen- 
cies; total population 186,088,000: 


33,784 
36,654 

+8.5 


12,356 
12,958 

+4.9 


236,451 
272, 165 
+15.1 


122,422 
138,408 
+ 13.1 


95,249 

102,681 

+7.8 


90,713 
96.958 
+6.9 


83,439 
95,040 
+13.9 


104,029 
109,537 

+5.3 


1,688,729 

1,975,435 

+ 17.0 


405,549 
484, 102 
+19.4 


155,642 




177,401 




+ 14.0 






TOTAL CITIES: 5,894 cities; total popu- 
lation 130,250,000: 


27,066 
29,451 
+8.8 


9,859 
10,280 
+4.3 


218,501 
249, 162 
+ 14.0 


115,001 
129,945 
+13.0 


77, 136 
82,828 
+7.4 


79,212 
84,825 
+7.1 


70,293 
79,164 
+12.6 


74,714 
78,570 

+5.2 


1,344,842 

1,557,853 

+15.8 


321,797 
385,448 
+19.8 


131,413 




148,745 




+13.2 






GROUP I 

56 cities over 250,000; population 
41,860,000: 


16, 628 

17, 957 
+8.0 

7,608 
8,172 
+7.4 

6,412 
5,658 
+4.6 

3,608 
4,127 

+14.4 

3,092 
3,269 
+5.7 


4,825 
5,022 
+4.1 

2,067 
2,147 
+4.4 

1,676 
1,682 
+.4 

1,092 
1,193 
+9.2 

1,246 
1.427 
+ 14.6 


159, 377 
177,219 
+11.2 

98, 917 

106, 073 

+7.2 

35,836 
42,994 
+20.0 

24, 624 
28, 162 
+ 14.3 

19, .%5 
22, 771 
+17.6 


78,144 
88,695 
+13.4 

40, 214 
46,214 
+14.9 

21.354 
24, 070 

+12.7 

16, 576 
18.311 
+ 10.5 

13,386 
13, 421 

+.3 


44,974 
46, 551 
+3.5 

21, 336 

21,243 

-.4 

13,886 
14, 705 

+6.9 

9,762 
10, 603 
+8.7 

9,912 
11, 186 
+12.9 


46,998 
49,571 

+5.5 

26, 398 
28, 257 
+7.0 

11,610 
11,954 
+3.0 

8,990 
9,360 
+4.1 

8,848 
9,789 
+10.6 


40,399 
43,605 

+7.7 

21, 482 
23,170 
+7.9 

10,889 
11.628 
+5.9 

8,028 
8,807 

+9.7 

8,753 
10, 251 
+ 17.1 


18,106 

18,148 

+.2 

7, 439 
8,681 
+ 15.4 

5.642 
4,799 
-13.4 

5,125 
4,768 
-7.0 

8,122 
8,292 
+2.1 


618, 107 
684, 349 
+10.7 

268, 112 

282, 477 

+5.4 

188, 664 
215, 237 
+ 14.1 

161,431 
186, 636 
+16.6 

189, 167 
220. 632 
+16.6 


130, 740 
160,029 
+22. 4 

52, 491 
62,340 
+18.8 

40,545 
54, 105 
+33.4 

37, 704 
43. 584 
+15.6 

43, 684 
46, 726 

+7.2 


45,334 




48,922 




+7.9 


18,541,000: 


20,235 




21,768 




+7.6 


20 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; population 
12,947,000: 


13,854 




14, 675 




+5.9 


30 cities, 250,000 to 600,000; population 
10,372,000: 


11, 245 




12, 489 




+ 11.1 


GROUP II 

100 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; population 
14,479,000: 


18, 107 


1974 -- 


19, 435 


Percent change — - 


+7.3 



158 



Table 13. — Crime Trends, Offenses Known Breakdown, 1973 — 74, by Population Groups — Continued 

(1974 estimated population) 



Population group 



GROUP III 

268 cities, SO.OOO to 100,000; population 
18,654,000; 

1973 - 

1974 - 

Percent change 

GROUP IV 

538 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; population 
18,909,000: 

1973 .-, 

1974., ._ 

Percent change 

GROUP V 

1,322 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; population 
21,008,000: 

1973- ._ , 

1974 

Percent change _ , 

GROUP VI 

3,610 cities, under 10,000; population 
15,340,000: 

1973 

1974... -- 

Percent change 

SUBURBAN .4REA1 

3,440 agencies; population 64,048,000: 

1973 

1974 

Percent change. 

RURAL AREA 

1,728 agencies; population 24,874,000: 

1973.. 

1974... 

Percent change 



Rape 
by 
force 



2, 816 
3.029 
+7.6 



1,045 

+15.9 



7,44« 
8,255 
+ 11.0 



1,955 
1,956 
+.1 



1,223 
1,280 

+4.7 



1,047 
+5.4 



3,294 
3,499 
+6.2 



16,265 
19.468 
+19.7 



12,287 
15,136 
+23.2 



7,847 
10, 198 

+30.0 



3,360 
4.370 
+30.1 



31, 778 
39.846 

+25.4 



2,692 
3,490 
+29. 6 



9,983 
11,930 

+19.5 



7,243 
8,461 
+ 16.8 



4,321 
5,087 



14,401 
16,994 
+18.0 



1,285 
1,347 
+4.8 



Aggravated assault 



8,700 
+10.4 



6,248 
7.047 
+12.8 



5,933 

+ 16.6 



3,032 
3,411 

+ 12.5 



19,785 
22,005 
+ 11.2 



6,188 
6,519 
+5.3 



Knife or 
cutting 
instru- 
ment 



7,840 
8.567 
+9.3 



6,712 
7.235 

+7.8 



5,513 
6,101 
+ 10.7 



3,301 
3.562 
+7.9 



16,665 
16, 954 

+8.2 



3,654 
3,717 
+1.7 



Other 
weapon 



8,322 
9,678 
+ 16.3 



4.723 
5,611 
+19.4 



2,435 
3,039 
+24.8 



17,981 
22, 141 
+23.1 



2,931 
3,408 
+16.3 



Hands 

fists, 
feet. 



11,410 
12,968 
+13.7 



12,963 
13,860 
+6.9 



12,263 
12, 439 

+1.4 



37,720 
40, 711 

+7.9 



11,533 

11,593 

+.5 



Burglary 



174, 026 
207, 733 
+ 19.4 



147, 902 
179, 376 
+21.3 



135, 945 
166,282 
+22.3 



79, 695 
99, 481 
+24.8 



457, 565 
.551, 731 
+20.6 



108, 137 
133, 974 
+23.9 



Unlaw- 
ful 
entry 



46, 262 
57,744 
+24.8 



40,288 
47,886 
+18.9 



37,303 
43,851 



23,620 
29, 213 
+23.7 



126,633 

149, 717 
+18.2 



20,803 
25,225 
+21.3 



At- 
tempted 
forcible 
entry 



20, 146 
23,605 
+ 17.2 



18, 820 
22,880 
+21.6 



17, 848 
20,645 
+15.7 



11, 158 
13,258 
+18.8 



49,268 
58,144 
+ 18.0 



5,750 
6,384 
+11.0 



1 Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups 



159 



Table 14. — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, by Population Groups 

11974 estimated population. Rate: Numljer of crimes per 100.(100 inhabitants] 





Crime 
Indes 
total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 
crime 2 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 


Larcenv- 
theft 




Population group 


Miuder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


TOTAL ALL AGENCIES 

7.787 agencies; total population 
179,756,000: 
Number ofofTenses known . . . 
Rate 


9,293,139 
5,169.9 


902.482 
502.1 


8, 390. 657 
4.667.8 


18,619 
10.4 


8,044 
4.5 


50,988 

28.4 


422,989 
235.3 


409,886 
228.0 


2.731,230 
1,519.4 


4,759,153 
2,647.6 


900.274 
500.8 


TOTAL CITIES 

5,868 cities: total population 
130,096.000: 
Number of olTenses known 


7,760.825 
5,965.5 


784.341 
602.9 


6, 976, 484 
5.362.6 


14.883 
11.4 


4,347 
3.3 


40,929 
31.5 


394,620 
303.3 


333,909 
256.7 


2.185,680 
1,680.1 


4,000,249 
3,074.9 


790,555 
607.7 






GROUP I 

58 cities over 250,000; population 
42,879,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Hate -- 


3,215,424 
7,498.8 

1, 290, 724 
6,961.4 

1, 089, 183 
8,029.4 

835,517 
7,755.4 

1,101,348 
7,111.0 

1,008,773 
5, 747. 4 


475,043 
1,107.9 

252, 737 
1,363.1 

130,365 
961.0 

91,941 
853.4 

92, 935 
600.0 

71.227 
405.8 


2, 740, 381 
6,390.9 

1,037,9.87 
5.598.3 

968,818 
7,068.4 

743,576 
6,902.0 

1.008.413 
6.511.0 

937, 546 
5,341.6 


9,212 
21.5 

4.496 
24.2 

2,847 
21.0 

1.869 
17.3 

1.S19 
11.7 

1,179 
6.7 


2.003 
4.7 

571 
3.1 

811 
6.0 

621 
5.8 

670 
4.3 

457 
2.6 


23, 764 
55.4 

10, 522 
56.7 

7,691 
56.7 

5,551 
51.5 

5,308 
34.3 

4,053 
23.1 


278,027 
648.4 

155. 230 
837.2 

74. 259 
547.4 

48, 538 
4.50.5 

41,033 
264.9 

29.416 
167.6 


164, 040 
382. 6 

82. 489 
444.9 

45. 568 
336.9 

35, 983 
334.0 

44, 775 
289.1 

36. 579 
208.4 


959,090 
2.236.7 

373.090 
2,012.2 

319, 762 
2,357.4 

266, 218 
2,471.1 

321, 964 
2,078.8 

275, 258 
1,668.3 


1.359,890 
3,171.4 

469, 372 
2.531.5 

503.634 
3,712.8 

386,884 
3,591.1 

576, 120 
3.719.8 

571,424 
3,255.6 


421.401 
982. 8 


6 cities over 1,000,000; population 
18,541.000: 
Number ot olTenses known 


195,525 
1.054.5 


21 cities, 500,000 to 1,000,000; popu- 
lation 13,565,000: 
Number ot offenses known — 


135,402 
998.2 


31 cities, 250,000 to 500,000; popu- 
lation 10,773,000: 
Number of offenses known 


90,474 
839.8 


GROUP II 

107 cities. 100,000 to 250,000; popu- 
lation 15.488,000: 
N umber of offenses known 


110,329 
712.4 


GROUP III 

253 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; popula- 
tion 17,552,000: 
Number of offenses known ... 
Rate 


90.864 
517.7 



See footnotes at end o£ table. 



160 



Table. 14 — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, by Population Groups — Continued 
(1974 estimated population. Rate: Number ot crimes per 100,000 inhabitants] 



Population group 



GROUP IV 

51'J cities, 25,000 to 50,000; popula- 
tion 18,228,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate - 

GROUP V 

1,300 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; popu- 
lation 20,623,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Kate 

GROUP VI 

3,631 cities under 10,000; popula- 
tion 15,325,000: 
Number of offenses known.. . 
Rate 

SUBURBAN AREAS 

3,440 agencies; population 
61,541,000: 
Number ot offenses known.. . 
Rate. 

RURAL AREA* 

1.483 agencies; population 
21,233,000: 
Number of offenses known. . , 
Rate 



Crime 
Index 
total 



939, 041 
5,151.6 



011,088 
4.417.8 



585, 151 
3.818.2 



2,618,710 
4,255.2 



427,085 
2,011.4 



60, 269 
330.6 



51,495 

249.7 



33,372 

217.8 



170, 617 

27V. 2 



34,316 
161.6 



878,772 
4.820.9 



859, 593 
4, 168. 1 



551,779 
3.600.5 



2,448,093 
3,978.0 



392, 769 
1.849.8 



Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negU- 

gence 


1,066 


429 


3,236 


23,270 


32,697 


5.8 


2.4 


17.8 


127.7 


179.4 


1,009 


464 


2,838 


15,646 


32, 002 


4.9 


2.2 


13.8 


75,9 


155.2 


598 


324 


1,730 


7,228 


23,816 


3.9 


2.1 


11.3 


47.2 


155.4 


3.437 


2,452 


11,965 


54,672 


100.543 


5.6 


4.0 


19.4 


88.8 


163.4 


1,662 


1,990 


2,771 


4,828 


25,055 


7.8 


9.4 


13.1 


22.7 


118.0 



Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 



244,436 
1.341.0 



234,786 
1,138.5 



150, 146 
979.7 



769, 959 
1.251.1 



168, 078 
791.6 



559,342 
3,068.5 



564,702 
2,738.2 



202,936 
955. 8 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



74,994 
411.4 



60,105 
291.4 



32,863 
214.4 



21, 755 
102.5 



1 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

^ Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

3 Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 

* Includes state police agencies with no county breakdown. 

Population ligures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



161 



Table 15. — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, for Suburban and Nonsuburban 
Cities by Population Groups 





(1974 estimated population. Rate 


Number of crimes per 100,000 inhabitants) 










Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime ' 


Property 
crime 2 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 
glary- 
breaking 

or 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by neg- 
ligence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


Suburban Ciliea 

TOTAL SUBURBAN CITIES 
3,004 cities: total papulation 
33,114,000: 

Number of offenses known 


1,513,481 
4,570.5 


86,792 
262.1 


1,426,689 
4,308.4 


1,363 
4.1 


745 
2.2 


4,677 
14.1 


31,131 
94.0 


49,621 
149.8 


392,487 
1,185.3 


915,026 
2,763.3 


119,176 
359.9 






GROUP IV 

326 cities; 25,000 to 50,000; popula- 
tion 11,222,000; 
Number of offenses known 


556,211 
4,956.4 

599,763 
4, 393. 

357,507 
4.339.1 

921,799 
4,376.5 


35,022 
312.1 

33,043 

242.0 

18,727 
227.3 

58,344 
277.0 


521, 189 
4, 644. 3 

566,720 
4,151.0 

338.780 
4,111.8 

863,455 
4,099.5 


545 
4.9 

531 
3.9 

287 
3.5 

1,310 
6.2 


248 
2.2 

310 
2.3 

187 
2.3 

472 
2.2 


1,812 
16.1 

1,838 
13.5 

1.027 
12.5 

3,127 
14.8 


14,821 
132.1 

11,158 
81.7 

5,152 
62.5 

15,013 
71.3 


17,844 
169.0 

19, 516 
142.9 

12,261 
148.8 

38,894 
184.7 


143,870 
1,282.0 

157,733 
1,165.3 

90,884 
1, 103. 1 

236,881 
1,124.7 


324,324 
2,890.0 

364,560 
2,670.2 

226, 142 
2, 744. 7 

577,789 
2,743.2 


52,995 
472.2 


GROUP V 

855 cities; 10,000 to 25,000; popula- 
tion 13,653,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


44,427 
325.4 


GROUP VI 

1,823 cities; under 10,000; popula- 
tion 8,239,000: 
Number of offenses known 


21,754 


Nonsubiu-ban Cities 

TOTAL NONSUBURBAN 
CITIES 

2,446 cities: toUl population 
21,062,000: 
Number of offenses known 


48,785 
231.6 






GROUP IV 

I'.iS cities; 25,000 to 50,000; popula- 
tion 7,006,000: 
Number of offenses known 


382,830 
5,464.3 

311,325 
4,466.5 

227,644 
3,212.6 


25,247 
360.4 

18,452 
264.7 

14,645 
206.7 


357, 583 
6.103.9 

292, 873 
4,201.7 

212, 999 
3,005.9 


521 
7.4 

478 
6.9 

311 

4.4 


181 
2.6 

1.14 

2.2 

137 
1.9 


1,424 
20.3 

1,000 
14.3 

703 

9.9 


8.449 
120.6 

4,488 
64.4 

2.076 
29.3 


14,853 
212.0 

12,486 
179.1 

11,555 
163.1 


100, 566 
1,435.4 

77,053 
1,105.5 

59, 262 
836.3 


235,018 
3,354.5 

200,142 
2,871.4 

142,629 
2, 012. 8 


21, 999 
314.0 


GROUP V 

445 cities; 10,000 to 25,000; popula- 
tion 6,970,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 

GROUP VI 

1,808 cities; under 10,000; population 
7,036,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


15, 678 

224.9 

11,108 
156.8 



' violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated a.-^sault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



162 



Table 16. — Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the Police, 1974, Suburban and Nonsuburban 
Counties by Population Groups 





11974 estimated popu 


iition. Rate: Number 


of crimes I 


er liXi.OOO inhabitants] 










Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime ' 


Property 
crime 2 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
.^sault 


Bur- 
glary— 
break- 
ing or 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negU- 

gence 


Motor 
vehicle 

theft 


Suburban Counties ' 
























Over 100,000 
























65 counties, population 14,659,000: 


667, 031 
4, 550. 3 


61,467 
351.1 


615, 664 
4, 199. 2 


1,052 
7.2 


407 
2.8 


4,190 
28.6 


16, 607 


29, 718 


216,837 


342, 501 


56, 226 
383.6 




SS.OOO to 100,000 






















193 counties, population 9,990,000: 

Number of oflenses known 

Rate 


318,284 
3,186.0 


23,376 
234.0 


294,908 
2, 962. 


656 
6.6 


288 
2.9 


2,261 
22.6 


6,084 
60.9 


15,385 
164.0 


115,501 
1, 166. 1 


160,020 
1,601.8 


19,387 


Under tS.OOO 
























124 counties, population 1 ,847,000: 


39,114 
2,118.1 


3,221 
174.4 


35,893 
1, 943. 7 


153 
8.3 


68 
3.1 


328 
17.8 


678 
31.3 


2,162 
117.1 


14, 472 


19,061 
1, 032. 2 








Nonsuburban Counties ^ 






















Over IS.OOO 
























182 counties, population 7,012,000: 


147,086 

2, 097. 7 


11,786 
168.1 


136,300 
1,929.6 


461 

6.6 


166 
2.4 


976 
13. U 


1,886 
26.9 


8,463 

120.7 


63,622 
763 3 


78,210 


6,668 


Rate - -. 


10,000 to 15,000 
























620 counties, population 8,075,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


138,606 
1,716.8 


11,898 
147.3 


126,707 
1.669.1 


570 
7.1 


193 

2.4 


839 
10.4 


1,337 
16.6 


9,162 
113.3 


65,098 
682.3 


65,840 
816.4 


6,769 
71.4 


Under 10,000 
























705 counties, population 3,823,000: 


60,058 
1,570.9 


4,472 
117.0 


65,686 
1.453.9 


230 
6.0 


780 
20.4 


386 
10.1 


626 
13.7 


3,331 

87.1 


24,401 
638.2 


28,493 
746.3 


2.692 


Rate 







1 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

2 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

3 Crime oflenses include sheriffs' and county police departments. State police oflenses are not included. 



163 



O I 



Cf I 



egs 






iBS-i 



'S 






Si '^ 

Z. S 



S E 



5 S 



is 



164 







1 = 


5 




r- c 






Sc 




3 c£ 




1 s 
















. cc 


















r-T 






If 




S^'^ 






re 






s =■ 






i! 






S _• 


?j - 






sr 






-H ^ 




















— 1.-5 






" 






'^ 






""' 




^ 






"" 






















^ 






































fj ' 






— cc 






o ^ 




1 a 






3C re 


















^ e 
















5 •■' 






^ ■ 






?■ - 




•" 






w 


^^"■" 




_ _ 






o - 






■• ^ 




re y. 






re "tf" 






















o* 


































re ed 












Zr ■= 
















. O) 






?, '" 












- 




^. 






*c 






gg = 






g- 






5 Z 




2 - 






S 3 






51 






- j; 






cT ^ 




c* c 






re — . 






5 






" 






ro 




- 












X t- 






^ X 






















X = 






12 ^ 






g f- 




g ■•- 






o « 












c" r 










re y 






30 L'S 


















7- 7 




^ 1- 




























t ^ 






»^ 5 






n X 






^ « 










40 3C 






io 


















. X 




. 0= 






. kO 






















00 






o 






















re 












— -«• 






N t- 






1' c 




-^ OC 






X « 












f^ 










OC 


















^ t- 










« -w 


















- CJ 










. c- 












t^ " 












« 










re 













-^ r. 






=1 5= 




- t.- 






re re 






x 






i =- 






".? 




g — 






5 h: 






















. ?5 












«:' ' 
















in 






re 






^ „ 






w c 






t ■^ 




sc o 






r- O 












re 










re 






S ^ 












r- c 






2; w 




tN -V 
























. r^ 




- re 
























n 




Ci 










^^ 


:- t- 






_ _ 






•- = 




>.- = 






^ (N 


































y ^- 






















C» CO 


















-' 




-" 






'^" 






^ _ 






„ ^ 






■ff- -«■ 




IN I- 






^ ,-^ 




























c5 ". 






o ^ 






I- :- 






r^ ? 




■;S -«■ 






M — « 






















..- 












o- X 






, 






!=J « 




= ^ 






».-. ^ 






3^ 












CI 






















c: X 










--" 












u^ - 






Ti ^ 






oC 'tf- 




■«• CC 






3C « 






36 "* 






?* _ 






c 
















t^ C^ 




























^- !£; 


































r>r ■• 


















































^ .- 






= -- 






:? " 




^3 * 






rj ra 












3C -IT 










«"' 






^ re 






g " 






g c^ 






re o 




8 ^ 






S3 ^ 


















O I^ 










CO Ci 






''" 






'^" 










t-T 






'^ 




^ 






I" 








T" 
















































































































































































3 






3 
































a 






a 








E 
























a 


1 




a 


1 






1 




l| 


<; 




> 




> 


i' 


^ 


> 


1" 


^ 


> 


1" 


^ 


< 


§ -^^ 


m 




,S 


























< 








~ 


s 


g. 


" 


-i 


g 


^ 


o 


« 


z 


e; S 


^ 


^ 






















^ 












1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


^ 




"z ^ 


< 


1 


^ 




































1 
? 


3-e 




1 


§1, 




1 


ill 


g 


tc 5 * 

^ Z tf 




1 


11 
z s 


















c 
















? 






2" 
















re 






T. 






1 



165 



TablelS. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1974, by Population Groups 

[1974 estimated population) 





Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime ' 


Property 
crime 2 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 


Larceny- 
thelt 




Population group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


TOTAL CITIES 
























5,582 cities; total population 
























120.601,000: 
Offenses known 


7,226,079 
21.3 


750.341 
45.2 


6.475.738 
18.5 


12.707 
79.9 


3.995 
78.0 


37.845 
51.1 


371,750 
27.3 


328.039 
63.4 


2.006,532 
17.6 


3,682,285 
19.8 


786,921 


Percent cleared by arrest 


14.6 


GROUP I 
























51 cities over 250,000; total popula- 
























tion 39,387,000: 
Otf enses known 


2, 963, 926 
21,4 


447,010 
40.3 


2, 606, 916 
18.0 


7,762 
77.0 


1,806 
77.0 


21,848 
60.6 


262, 537 
26.3 


164. 873 
60.7 


867, 683 
17.8 


1, 217, 600 
20.4 


421.833 


Percent cleared by arrest 


11.6 


e cities over 1,000,000; total popula- 
























tion 18,541,000: 
ffenses known .^ 


1,317,342 
21.3 


256, 444 
38.3 


1, 061, 898 
17.2 


3.841 
73.8 


571 
86.1 


10, 622 

47.7 


155, 230 
25.6 


86, 861 
68.7 


373.090 
16.3 


469,372 
21.0 


219, 436 


Percent cleared by arrest 


10.6 


18 cities, 600,000 to 1,000,000; total 
























population 11,469,000: 
Offenses known 


932, 203 
20.8 


115,037 
39.3 


816, 866 
18.2 


2,462 
77.9 


702 
71.9 


6.506 
52.8 


67, 608 
26.4 


38. 861 
58.6 


273, 402 
19.2 


421, 993 
19.3 


121,471 


Percent cleared by arrest 


12.3 


27 cities, 260,000 to 500,000; total 
























population 9,387,000: 
Offenses known - 


704, 381 
22.2 


76, 229 
48.4 


628, 162 
19.0 


1,449 
83.9 


633 
75.0 


4,820 
63.7 


39, 799 
31.0 


30, 161 

68.8 


221,091 
18.6 


326, 136 
20.8 


80,926 


Percent cleared by arrest 


13.1 


GROUP II 
























97 cities, 100,000 to 260,000; total 
























population 14,016,000: 
Offenses known .- 


1,014,417 
20.9 


90, 481 
60.9 


923, 936 
18.0 


1,477 
83.1 


601 
70.9 


4,870 
60.9 


37. 526 
29.4 


46, 608 
67.1 


291,422 
17.2 


621, 099 
19.0 


111,415 


Percent cleared by arrest 


16.2 


GROUP III 
























237 cities, 60,000 to 100,000; total 
























population 16,503,000: 
Offenses known 


965, 078 


72, 335 


892, 743 


1,066 


447 


3,863 


28,236 


39, 180 


269,846 


641,064 


91,833 


Percent cleared by arrest 


21.3 


49.1 


19.0 


86.6 


80.6 


49.8 


29. 6 


62.1 


17.8 


20.1 


16.6 



See footnotes at end of table. 



1G6 



Tablets. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1974, by Population Groups — Continued 





Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent ' 
crime 


Prop- 
erty 3 
crime 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Bur- 

glary- 

break- 

ing or 

entering 


Larceny- 
theft 




Popuhitioii group 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


GROUP IV 
























478 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total 
population 16,851,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest - 


878, 536 
21.6 


58,386 
51.0 


820, 150 
19.5 


928 
84.4 


401 

89.0 


2,972 
50.4 


21,763 
29.2 


32,723 
64.6 


226, 916 
17.6 


520, 358 
20.7 


72, 876 
17.3 


GROUP V 
























1,206 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total 
population 19,151,000: 


855,828 
21.3 


49, 7M 
55.5 


806,064 
19.2 


924 
86.8 


428 
78.3 


2,645 
55.7 


14, 751 
30.8 


31,444 
66.1 


218, 373 
17.5 


530, 189 
19.7 


57,502 
21.1 


Percent cleared by arrest 


GROUP VI 
























3,613 cities, under 10,000; total 
population 14,690,000: 

Offenses known . - 

Percent cleared by arrest 


558,294 
20.9 


32,365 
62.2 


525,929 
18.3 


560 
80.9 


312 
79.2 


1,657 
56.4 


6,937 
31.8 


23,211 
71.3 


142,392 
17.6 


352.075 
17.7 


31,462 
28.3 


SUBURBAN AREA' 
























3,237 agencies; total iwpulation 
55,530,000: 


2,406,111 
19.5 


165,304 
50.0 


2, 240. 807 
17.3 


2. 869 
76.7 


2,196 
84.4 


10, 673 
,50.6 


50,017 
29.1 


101,715 
59.5 


694, 324 
16.8 


1, 348, W8 
17.4 


197, 835 
17.7 


Percent cleared by arrest 


RURAL AREA 
























1,371 agencies; total population 
19,438,000: 


400,830 
24.0 


34.534 

69.7 


366, 296 
19.7 


1,383 

86.2 


1,741 

74.9 


2,487 
69.8 


4,312 
49.3 


26,352 
72.1 


157, 240 
19.7 


187, 505 
17.6 


21,551 
37.7 


Percent cleared by arrest 



' Violent crime is offenses of miu"der, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

2 Property crime is offenses of burgalry , larceny-theft , and motor vehicle theft. 

' Includes suburban city and county poUce agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 



534-259 O - 75 - 13 



Table 19. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1974, by Geographic Divisions 

11974 estimated populationl 



aeopraphic division 



TOTAL ALL DIVISIONS 

5,582 cities; total population 
120,601,000: 

OITenacs known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

NEW ENGLAND STATES 

274 Cities; total population 
7,422,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

MIDDLE ATLANTIC STATES 

l,3til cities; total population 
28,053,000: 

Offenses known.. - 

Percent cleared by arrest 

EAST NOHTH CENTRAL STATES 

1,170 cities; total population 
24,946,000; 
Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

WEST NORTH CENTRAL STATES 

502 cities; total population 
8,952,000: 

Offenses known.. 

Percent cleared by arrest 

See footnotes at end of 



Crinie 
Index 
total 



7, 22B, 079 
21.3 



418,632 
16.1 



1, 356. 488 
18.3 



1, 547, 347 
22.5 



607, 246 
21.9 



750,341 
45.2 



28, 973 
43.3 



199, 760 
37.2 



6,475,738 
18.5 



389, 669 
14.1 



1, 166, 728 
16.1 



1, 374, 172 
19.6 



Criminal homicide 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



12,707 
79.9 



2,454 

76.7 



Man 
slaughter 
by negli 

gcnce 



3,995 
78.0 



37,845 
51.1 



7,802 
62.1 



8,046 
48.6 



2,423 
63.9 



Robbery 



371,750 
27.3 



14,761 
22.2 



117,676 
22. 6 



86, 864 
29.0 



18,335 
27.3 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



12,690 
65.6 



71,381 
68.0 



76, 811 
63.4 



Burglary 

breaking or 

entering 



2,006,532 
17.6 



116, 634 
16.2 



396, 225 
16.3 



373, 139 
18.6 



133, 577 
18.6 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



3,682,285 
19.8 



689, 692 
16.3 



808, 128 
21.3 



292,237 
20.6 



786,921 
14.6 



170,811 
10.7 



192,905 
14.0 



43, 938 

18.9 



168 



Table 19. — Offenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest, 1974, by Geographic Divisions — Continued 





Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime ' 


Property 


Criminal homicide 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary- 
breaking or 
entering 


Larceny- 
theft 




Qcographic division 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


SOUTH ATLANITC STATES 
























836 cities; total population 
11,810.000: 


771,708 
24.4 


93, 112 
■ 61.5 


678, 696 
20.7 


2,131 

88.4 


481 
76.6 


3,985 
60.2 


42,071 
29.7 


44,926 
69.4 


217,907 
20.3 


406,260 
20.4 


54,429 
24.4 


Percent cleared by arrest 


EAST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
























366 Cities; total population 
6,216,000: 


269, 577 
22.1 


27,507 
66.8 


232, 070 
18.0 


698 
88.0 


265 
65.9 


1,629 
55.4 


10, 765 
30.1 


14,416 
76.4 


83,921 
16.8 


123, 647 
19.7 


24,502 
16.9 


Percent cleared by arrest 


WEST SOUTH CENTRAL STATES 
























377 cities; total population 
10,371,000: 


687, 410 
24.7 


60,168 
62.8 


637, 262 
22.1 


1,439 
82.3 


482 
86.7 


3,166 
64.6 


21,413 
35.3 


24, 140 
66.2 


181,318 
19.1 


304, 964 
24.3 


60,970 
19.1 


Percent cleared by arrest. 


MOUNTAIN STATES 
























205 cities; total population 
5,461,000: 


424, 987 
21.4 


28,016 
48.4 


396,971 
19.5 


431 

75.9 


275 
66.2 


2,101 
46.8 


11,235 
30.8 


14,249 
61.7 


120, 126 
16.2 


244,364 
21.6 


32, 492 
19.2 


Percent cleared by arrest 


PACIFIC STATES 
























602 cities; total population 
18,371,000: 


1,362,684 
20.8 


112, 146 
46.9 


1, 240, 638 
18.5 


1,669 
78.6 


704 
70.2 


7,632 
44.9 


49,630 
30.2 


63,315 

59.6 


383,786 
18.6 


728,233 
18.8 


128, 619 
16.7 


Percent cleared by arrest 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^ Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



169 



Table 20. — Offenses Cleared, 1974, by Arrest of Persons Under 18 years of Age 

IPercent of total cleared; 1974 estimated population] 



Population group 



TOTAL CITIES 

5,396 cities; lolal popuktion 
110,286,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 



GROUP I 

48 cities over 260,000; total population 
34,184,000: 

Total clearances 

Percen t under 18 

4 cities over 1,000,000; total population 
13,791,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 - - - - 

18 cities, 600,000 to 1,000,000; total 
population 11,469,000: 

Total clearances. 

Percent under 18 

26 cities, 260,000 to 600,000; total popu- 
lation 8,934,000: 

Total clearances.. - 

Percent under 18 - - 

GROUP II 

86 cities, 100,000 to 250,000; total popu- 
lation 12,366,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

GROUP III 

222 cities, 50,000 to 100,000; total popu- 
lation 16,471,000: 

Total clearances. 

Percent under 18 - 

Seo footnotes at end of tabic 



Crime 
Index 
total 



1,343,773 
31.3 



630, 381 
24.4 



184, 814 
16.3 



194, 176 
28.6 



161, 391 
30.0 



177, 289 
31.1 



182, 938 
36.5 



279,743 
12,5 



45, 292 
16.2 



34, 470 
11. S 



34, 788 
12.9 



1,064,030 
36.3 



383, 996 
29.6 



118,191 
19.9 



148. 884 
32.7 



116,921 
35.3 



142, 601 
36.6 



163, 104 
40.6 



Criminal homicido 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



Forcible 
rape 



17,112 
10.1 



2,489 
10.0 



84,214 
17.8 



64, 643 
16.3 



17, 168 
22.6 



9,686 
19. 1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



169, 196 
10.5 



22, 779 
11.4 



21,876 
10.6 



19, 437 
13.6 



Bur- 

glary- 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



318,945 
34.3 



137, 216 
26.8 



44, 712 
16.7 



39, 953 
34.4 



42, 357 
34.7 



42,170 
38.8 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



649,362 
37.4 



206, 416 
31.1 



68, 162 
23.6 



81, 387 
33.4 



6, 867 
35.0 



99,004 
41.0 



95,723 
35.3 



40,365 
30.9 



15, 317 
17.9 



14, 947 
37.4 



10, 101 
41.0 



13, 286 
39.2 



11, 930 
42.1 



170 



Table 20. — Offens^i Cleared, 1974, by Arrest of Persoiti Under 78 years of Age — Continued 

[Percent of total cleared; 1974 estimated population] 



Population group 



GROUP IV 

446 cities, 25,000 to 50,000; total popula- 
tion 15,689,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

GROUP V 

1 ,151 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; total popu- 
lation 18,225,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

GROUP VI 

3,443 cities, under 10,000; total popula- 
tion 14,350,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

SUBURBAN AREA s 

3,120 agencies; total population 
51,770,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

RURAL AREA 

1.284 agencies; total population 
17,828,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 



Crime 
Index 
total 



169, 415 
37.2 



170, 986 
38.0 



422, 174 
35.5 



77,682 
23.2 



24,865 
15.4 



24,843 
14.8 



19,028 
12.6 



71,347 
14.7 



144, 550 
40.9 



146, 143 
42.0 



93,736 
41.9 



58,625 
28.8 



Criminal homicide 



Mtirder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Man- 
slaughter 
by negli- 
gence 



1.152 
10.0 



Forcible 
rape 



1,385 
13.2 



1,370 
15.4 



4,960 
11.8 



1,530 
10.8 



4,288 
23.7 



13,464 

22.1 



1.822 
11.9 



16,888 
13.2 



18,420 
13.1 



16,509 
11.3 



50,773 
13.3 



Bur- 

glary- 
break- 
ing or 
entering 



36,538 
41.3 



36,392 
43.5 



24,273 
43.5 



106, 296 
40.2 



25,282 
32.6 



Lar- 
ceny- 
theft 



97,360 
40.9 



98,725 
42.0 



60,999 
42.3 



26, 930 

24.8 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



10,652 
39.3 



8,464 
34.2 



6,413 
30.3 



1 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

2 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

3 Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropohtan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 



171 



Bi3 






S 1 2 : 



"- « g S „- 3 



". O Ph .2 o o 



172 



" « .s , 



173 



Table 28. — Disposition of Persons Formally Charged by the Police, 1974 

12,440 cities; 1974 population 41,773,000) 



Number of 
persons 
charged 
(held for 

prosecution) 



Percent of charged ' 



Offense 
charged 



Referred to 

luvenilo 

court 



ToCal 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

U urglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft -- 

Motor vehicle thelt___ 



Violent crime '. . 
Property crime ' 



Subtotal for above offenses.. 



Other assaults _ 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Enbezzlement. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 
Vandalism.- 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.-. 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution). 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling-.- 

Offenses against family and cliildren... 



Driving under the influence. 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses 



2,265 
371 
2,948 
15,921 
28.810 
72, 367 
198,544 
23,238 



49, 934 
294, 149 



344. 454 



82,384 

2,382 
9,427 
27, 077 
1,933 
15, 127 
30,290 

31, 302 
10, 682 
10, 103 
88,991 
13, 184 
11,095 

174, 478 
65, 320 
355,385 
160, 455 
7,242 
235,608 



40.8 
45.6 
28.0 
31.2 
40.1 
24.3 
43.8 
18.4 



36.8 
37.0 



42.9 
19.9 
50.6 
60.7 
66.0 
35.6 
26.8 

57.2 
47.3 
49.2 
44.3 
76.3 
50.7 

73.3 
63.3 
88.1 
65.4 
60.2 
49.6 



18.5 
12.9 
12.1 
10.5 
10.5 



32.2 
31.8 
37.2 
24.7 
34.5 
12.8 
14.6 
14.2 



31.4 
14.1 



41.9 
17.7 
23.3 
32.4 

22.9 



26.8 
41.3 
24.5 
26.6 
17.4 
32.9 



13.4 
10.2 
23.0 



14.8 
56.0 
38.0 
62.6 



21.0 
44.4 



12.0 
56.2 
15.9 



30.8 
48.6 



18.4 
23.7 



10.5 
15.3 

27.7 



I Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100%. 

3 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



174 



Table 23. — Persons Charged — Percent Arrested or Summoned — 1974 

(1,170 cities; 1974 estimated population 18,696,000] 



Total. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaugtiter. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape _.. 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft .-_ 

Motor vehicle theft 



Violent crime • . 
Property crime ^ 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 
Vandalism 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice.. 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution). 

Narcotic drug laws. 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct. 
Vagrancy 

All other offenses 



Number of 
persons 
charged 



Percent of charged 



1,913 


91.3 


8.7 


9,262 


90.6 


9.4 


17, 732 


87.3 


12.7 


42, 685 


81.1 


18.9 


112,071 


72.6 


27.6 


13, 618 


83.8 


16.2 


30, 09S 


88.9 


11.1 


168,374 


76.6 


24.4 


198, 694 


77.6 


22.4 


46, 048 


72.7 


27.3 


1,311 


75.3 


24.7 


6,177 


83.7 


16.3 


16,880 


74.7 


25.3 


1,629 


96.4 


4.6 


8,863 


80.6 


19.5 


17, 977 


66.6 


34.4 


16, 231 


87.2 


12.8 


3,354 


90.2 


9.8 


6,414 


81.2 


18.8 


57,610 


86.6 


14.4 


3,864 


79.8 


20.2 


6,931 


70.3 


29.7 


95, 186 


87.8 


12.2 


35.626 


69.2 


30.8 


136,215 


93.6 


6.6 


88,380 


78.3 


21.7 


4,352 


89.7 


10.3 


123, 378 


67.2 


32.8 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglarj-, larceny— theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



175 



Table 24. — Offenses Known, Cleared, Persons Arresfed, Charged, and Disposed of in 1974 

[1,496 cities; 1974 estimated population 31,976,000) 



Offenses known- 
Offenses cleared. 
Percent cleared . . 



TOTAL AKKESTS- 

Per 100 offenses... 

Arrests under 18 

Per 100 offenses... 



Persons charged 

Per 100 offenses.. 



Persons guilty as charged 

Per 100 offenses 

Persons guilty of lesser offenses. 
Per 100 offenses. 



Persons acquitted or dismissed . 
Per 100 offenses 



Juveniles referred to juvenile court. 
Per 100 offenses... 



Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime i 


1,916,685 

424,583 

22.2 


173, 032 

84, 660 

48.9 


371,491 

19.4 

178, 353 

9.3 


67, 620 

33.3 

12,823 

7.4 


336, 179 
17.5 


64, 624 
31.6 


96, 063 

5.0 

14,870 

.8 


12,837 

7.4 

4,615 

2.7 


46,064 
2.4 


12,218 
7.1 


110.425 
6.8 


8,806 
6.1 



1, 743, 653 

33'J, 933 

19.6 

313, 874 

18.0 

165, 530 



83,220 

4.8 

10, 265 



3,469 
2,668 
76.9 

3,467 
99.9 



Forcible 
rape 



9,668 
6,162 
53.9 

3,993 
41.8 



Robbery 



76, 666 

20, 654 

27.3 

21,043 
27.8 
6, 399 



19, 459 
25.8 



3,978 

5.3 

1,614 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



84,439 

66, 176 

66.6 

29, 117 
34.5 
5,362 



28, 347 
33.6 



7,428 

8.8 

2,438 



Bur- 
glary 



514, 636 

95,983 

18.7 

79, 657 

16.6 

44,773 



72,297 
14.0 



12,864 

2.6 

3,951 



1, 013, 318 

212, 113 

20.9 

209, 667 
20.7 

105, 226 
10.4 

187, 178 
18 6 

67, 164 

6.6 

6,446 



23,667 
2.3 

68, 197 



Motor 
vehicle 
thrft 



216,699 

31,837 

14.8 

24,650 

11.4 

16, 531 



22,180 
10.3 



5.7 



I Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^ Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



176 



Table 25. — Police Disposition of Juvenile Offenders Taken Into Custody, 1974 

{VJ74. estimated population] 



Population group 


Total ' 


Handled 

within 

department 

and released 


Referred to 

juvenile 

court 

jurisdiction 


Referred to 
welfare 
agency 


Referred to 

other police 

agency 


Referred to 
criminal or 
adult court 


TOTAL. ALL AGENCIES 














8.649 agencies; total popolation 159.887.000: 
















1.709.564 


759,137 






40.788 
2.4 


63,527 




100.0 


44.4 


47.0 


2.5 






TOTAL CITIES 














6,i40 agencies; total population 114,017,000: 
















1,437,132 


656,786 


668.226 






48.144 
3.4 




100.0 


45.7 


46.5 


2.3 


2.1 




GROUP I 














48 cities over 250,000; population 27,972,000: 
















346, 487 


125. 107 


196.840 


16,783 


4,842 
1.4 


2.915 




100.0 


36.1 


56.8 


4.8 


GROUP II 




91 cities, 100,000 to 260,000; population 12,951,000: 
















168,010 


70, 462 


80,288 


2,200 




3,066 




100.0 


44.6 


50.8 


1.4 


1.3 




GROUP III 




250 cities, 60,000 to 100,000; population 17,410,000: 
















205, 360 


102. 296 


88.289 


2,666 


6.437 


6.763 




100.0 


49.8 


43.0 


1.2 


2.6 


3.3 


GROUP IV 




519 cities, 25,000 to 60,000; population 18,160,000: 
















241, 029 


117,419 


105. «4 


2.166 


6,402 


9.608 




100.0 


48.7 


43.7 


.9 


2.7 


4.0 


GROUP V 




1,316 cities, 10,000 to 25,000; population 20,729,000: 
















268,187 


132. 013 


111.030 


7,413 


6.467 


12,274 




100.0 


49.2 


41.4 


2,8 


2.0 


4.6 


GROUP VI 




4.117 cities under 10,000; population 16,796,000: 
















218, 069 


109, 499 


86.336 


2,620 


6,187 


13.528 




100.0 


50.2 


39.6 


1.2 


2.8 


6.2 


SUBURBAN AREA' 




3,863 agencies; population 67,129,000: 
















743, 574 


370, 696 






20, 673 


36.446 




100.0 


49.9 


40.3 


2.2 


2.8 


4.9 


RURAL AREA 




1,758 agencies; population 21,283,000: 
















86, 669 


32,720 


43. 780 


2,079 


4.341 


3.749 




100.0 


37.8 


60.5 


2.4 


6.0 


4.3 







1 Includes all offenses except traffic and neglect cases. 

* Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

' Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities also included in other city groups. 



177 



Table 26. — Offense Analysis 1974 — Percent Distribution, Average Value, and Percent 
Change Over 1973 

(7,826 agencies; 1974 estimated population 164.846,000) 



Classification 



MURDER- 
RAPE 



ToUl- 



Higliway 

Commercial house 

Gas or service station. 

Chain store.. 

Residence 

Bank' -. 



Miscellaneous - 

BURGLARY— BREAKING OR ENTERING 
Total. 



Residence (dwelling): 

Night 

Day 

Nonresidence (store, office, etc.): 

Night 

Day. 



LARCENY— THEFT (EXCEPT MOTOR VEHICLE 
THEFT) 



Totol. 



By type: 

Pocket-picking.. 

Purse-snatching 

Shoplifting 

From motor vehicles (except accessories) . 

Motor vehicle accessories 

Bicycles 

From buildings 

From coin-operated machines. 

All others. 



By value: 

$50 and over 

Under $50 

Motor vehicle theft. 



Number of 

offenses 

1974 



17,723 
40,212 



375,901 



187,519 
64. 145 
11,653 
24, 227 
43, 402 
2,868 
42,087 



656,111 
756, 786 



729, 094 
141,343 



4,091,787 



Percent 

change over 

1973 



+10.2 
+14.1 
-7.3 

+29.8 
+ 16.1 
+40.1 
+22,1 



+15.4 
+16.1 



38,674 


+15.9 


.9 


83,485 


+15.3 


2.0 


454,463 


+23.1 


11.1 


722, 935 


+21.4 


17.7 


645, 144 


+20.5 


15.8 


687,820 


+19.8 


16.8 


705,228 


+23.8 


17.2 


57,408 


+22.7 


1.4 


696,630 


+15.2 


17.0 


2,108,796 


+26.6 


51.5 


1,982,991 


+13.4 


48.5 



Percent 
distribu- 
tion' 



49.9 
17.1 



33.1 
31.9 



» Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 For total U.S., bank robbery increased from 2,521 offenses in 1973 to 3,517 in 1974 or 39.5 percent. 

Table 27. — Type and Value of Property Stolen and Recovered, 1974 

[7.826 agencies: 1974 estimated population 104.816,000] 





Value of Property 


Percent 




Stolen 


Recovered 


recovered 


ToUl' 


$2,616,600,000 


$821,200,000 


31 






Currency, notes, etc. 

Jewelry and precious metals 

Furs -.--.. 


245, 500, 000 
241,200,000 
16, 600, 000 
64,000,000 
954, 000. 000 
1.095.300.000 


22,900,000 
17,600,000 
1,400,000 
9, 200, 000 
628, 600, 000 
141.600.000 


9 
8 


Clothing- . 


14 


Locally stolen motor vehicles - --- 

Miscellaneous-.. 


66 
13 



' AU totals and percentages calculated before rounding. 



178 



Arrest Tabulations 



Tables in the foUow'ing section provide certain 
personal characteristics of individuals arrested 
for all criminal acts. Arrest rates and trends are 
shown for city, suburban, and rural areas, as well 
as the United States as a whole. Tabulations are 
published containing characteristics of persons 
arrested by age, sex, and race. 

Arrest statistics were collected monthly from 
contributing law enforcement agencies this year. 
In using these arrest figures, it is important to 
remember that the same person may be arrested 
several times during one year for the same type 
or for different offenses. Each arrest is counted. 
Further, the arrest of one person may solve 
several crimes and in other instances two or more 
persons may be arrested during the solution of one 
crime. 



Arrests are jirimarily a measure of law enforce- 
ment activity as it relates to crime. Although 
arrest practices vary, particularly with respect to 
juveniles, contributors to this Program are in- 
structed to count one arrest each time an 
individual is taken into custody for commiting a 
specific crime. A juvenile is counted as a person 
arrested when he commits an offense and the 
circumstances are such that if the offender were 
an adult, an arrest would be made. 

Arrest data, while primarily a measure of law 
enforcement activity, is also a gauge of criminality 
when used within its limitations as must be done 
with all forms of criminal statistics including 
ccurt and penal. 



Tgble 28.— Total Estimated Arrests,' Urtited States, 1974 



Total 2 9,055,800 



Criminal homicide; 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter.. 

Manslaughter by negligence... 

Forcible rape - 

Robbery -- 

Aggravated assault _ 

Burglary— breaking or entering... 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft _.. 



Violent crime 2.. 
Property crime ^ 



Subtotal for above offenses ^ 



other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and count«rfeiting 

Fraud. 

Embezzlement . _ 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 
Vandalism 



20,200 
3,770 
26,3S0 
148,720 
234,060 
S16, 100 
l,0S6,3O0 
158,600 



429,350 
1, 731, 000 



391, 100 
16,900 
60,600 

148,600 
13,000 

113,200 

221, 100 



Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 
Narcotic drug laws 

Opium or cocaine and their derivatives 

Marijuana - 

Synthetic or manufactured narcotics 

O ther— dangerous narcotic drugs. 

Gambling 

Bookmaking.. 

Numbers and lottery -. 

All other gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkemiess 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy... 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in total) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



170,300 
68,400 
64,600 

642,100 



101,500 
445,600 
27,600 
67,400 
61,900 



5,100 

8,200 

48,600 

61,000 

843,600 

310,000 

,332,600 

767,600 

44, 700 

,169,700 

45,900 

151,000 

239,600 



> Arrest totals based on all reporting agencies and estimates for unreported areas. 
2 Because of rounding, items may not add to totals. 



179 



Table 29. — Arrests, Number and Rate, 1974, by Populatiort Groups 





Cities 


Other areas 


Offense charged 


Total 

(5,298 
agencies; 

toUl 
population 
134,082,000) 


Total city 

arrests 
(4,237 cities; 
population 
103,652,000) 


Group I 
(43 cities 

over 

250,000: 

population 

34,669,000) 


Group II 
(81 cities 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
population 
11,461,000) 


Group III 
(211 cities 
60,000 to 
100,000; 
population 
14,668,000) 


Group IV 
(425 Cities 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
population 
14,951,000) 


Group V 
(1,056 cities 

10,000 to 

25,000: 

population 

16,719,000) 


Group VI 
(2,421 cities 
under 
10,000; 
population 
11,183,000) 


Suburban 
area,' (2,636 
agencies; 
population 
47,034,000) 


Rural area 
(806 agen- 
cies pop- 
ulation 
12,829,000) 


TOTAL - 

Rate per 100,000 inhab- 
itsnls.- -- 


6,146,043 
4.583.8 


5.152,844 
4,971.3 


1,987,734 
5,733.4 


587,457 
5.125.5 


657,259 
4.480.8 


646.209 
4,322. 1 


718,831 
4,299. 5 


555.354 
4,966.2 


1,788,279 
3,802. 1 


353,826 
2.757.9 


Criminal homicide: 
(a) Murder and nonnegligent 


13.818 
10.3 

2,226 

1.7 

17,804 

13.3 

108, 481 

80.9 

154, 514 

115.2 

340,697 

254.1 

729, 661 

544.2 

107,226 

80.0 


11,579 
11.2 

1,500 

1.4 

14,659 

14.1 

98, 822 

95.3 

124. 198 

119.8 

277.939 

268.1 

649, 633 

626.7 

89,625 

86.5 


7,199 
20.8 

544 

1.6 

8.346 

24.1 

63,067 

181.9 

60, 062 

173.2 

110,314 

318.2 

217.608 

627.7 

41, 920 

120.9 


1,244 
10.9 

160 

1.4 

1,684 

14.7 

9,585 

83.6 

12,614 

110.1 

33.040 

288.3 

80, 119 

699.0 

10, 892 

95.0 


1,039 
7.1 

197 

1.3 

1,505 

10.3 

9,625 

65.6 

15,427 

105.2 

39, 497 

269.3 

97, 146 

662.3 

11,287 

76.9 


856 
5.7 

204 

1.4 

1,172 

7.8 

7,605 

50.9 

12, 736 

8.5.2 

35, 295 

236.1 

99, 415 

664.9 

9,362 

62.6 


703 
4.2 

206 

1.2 

1.150 

6.9 

5,522 

33.0 

13, 240 

79.2 

34,594 

206.9 

96,088 

574.7 

9.076 

54.3 


538 
4.8 

189 

1.7 

802 

7.2 

3,418 

30.6 

10.113 

90.4 

25, 199 

225.3 

59, 257 

529.9 

7,088 

63.4 


2,646 
5.6 

792 

1.7 

4,101 

8.7 

19,283 

41.0 

41,997 

89.3 

103,018 

219.0 

219,918 

467.6 

28,927 

61.5 


915 




7.1 


(b) Manslaughter by negli- 


355 




2.8 




1,165 




9.1 




2,281 




17.8 




10,583 




82.5 


Burglary— breaking or entering. 


22,344 
174.2 




24,859 




193.8 




5,242 


Rate per 100,000 


40.9 








294,617 

219.7 

1, 177, 584 

878.3 


249,258 

240.5 

1. 017. 197 

981.4 


138.674 

400.0 

369, 842 

1,066.8 


25, 127 

219.2 

124, 051 

1,082.3 


27,596 

188.1 

147, 930 

1,008.5 


22, 369 

149.6 

144, 072 

963.6 


20, 621 

123.3 

139, 758 

835.9 


14,871 
133.0 

91,544 
818.6 


68, 027 

144.6 

351,863 

748.1 


14,944 




116.5 




52,445 


Eate per 100,000 


408.8 






Subtotal tor above 


1,474,427 
1,099.6 


1.267,955 
1,223.3 


509,060 
1,468.3 


149,338 
1,303.0 


175,723 
1, 198. 


166, 645 
1,114.6 


160,585 
960.5 


106,604 
953.3 


420,682 
894.4 


67. 744 


Rate per 100,000 


528.0 




269,643 

201.1 

10, 756 

8.0 

39,741 

29.6 

91.176 

68.0 

5,891 

4.4 

76, 943 
57.4 


238,809 

230.4 

8,786 

8.5 

32, 495 

31.4 

67,061 

64.7 

4,972 

4.8 

65,660 
63.3 


96,860 

279.4 

2,825 

8.1 

11.539 

33.3 

21,566 

62.2 

1,590 

4.6 

26,110 
75.3 


30,820 

268.9 

1,083 

9.4 

4,131 

36.0 

9,362 

81.7 

489 

4.3 

6.913 
60.3 


30, 116 

205.3 

1.324 

9.0 

4.876 

33.2 

10, 085 

68.8 

492 

3.4 

9,456 
64.5 


28, 715 
192.1 
1,185 
7.9 
4,267 

28.5 
8,953 

59.9 
1,741 

11.6 

9, 129 
61.1 


32, 195 

192.6 

1,381 

8.3 

4,606 

27.5 

10,848 

64.9 

395 

2.4 

8,583 
51.3 


20, 103 

179.8 

988 

8.8 

3,076 

27.5 

6,247 

55.9 

265 

2.4 

5,469 
48.9 


70,742 

150.4 

3.821 

8.1 

11,033 

23.5 

26,583 

56.5 

2,508 

5.3 

24,558 
52.2 


12, 622 




98.4 




662 




5.2 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


3,055 
23.8 




13,390 




104.4 




410 




3.2 


Stolen property; buying, re- 

cei ving, possessing - . 

Rate per 100,000 


3,468 
27.0 



See footnotes at end of table. 



180 



Table 29. — Arrests, Number and Rate, 1974, by Population Groups — Continued 



Offense charged 



Vandalism - - - 

Rate per 100,000 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, 
etc _,. 

Rate per 100,000 

Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice 

Kate per 100,000 

Sex offenses lexcept forcible 
rape and jirostitution). 

Rate per lOO.OOU..- 

Narcotic drug laws 

Rate per 100,000 

Gambling _ , 

Rate pcrl00,000 

Offenses against family and 
children - 

Rate per 100,000 

Driving under the influence . . . 

Rate per 100,000 

Liquor laws 

Rate per 100,000 

Druiikermess.- 

Rate per 100,000 

Disorderly conduct _ 

Rate per 100,000 

Vagrancy - - - 

Rate per 100,000 

All other offenses (except 
traffic).-. 

Rate per 100,000 

Suspicion (not included in 
totals) _ _ . . 

Rate per 100,000.. - 

Curfew and loitering law 
violations 

Rate per 100,000 

Runaways 

Rate per 100,000... 



Total 

(5, 298 
agencies; 

total 
population 
134.082,000) 



146, 261 
109.1 

119, 189 
88.9 

53,309 
39.8 

44,375 
33.1 

454, 948 

339.3 

45,900 

34.2 

34.902 
26.0 

616, ma 

4.W. 8 

191,213 

142. 6 

911,837 

680.1 

544,321 

406.0 

32,802 

24.5 

756. 931 
564. 5 

33,363 

24.9 

70, 247 

52.4 

154,682 

115.4 



Total city 

arrests 
(4,237 cities; 
population 
103,652,000) 



124, 861 
120.5 

105, 277 
101.6 

52,002 
50.2 

38,060 

36.7 

360.903 

318.2 

42, G4U 

41.1 

20, 701 

20.0 

413, 949 

399.4 

154. 999 

149.5 

813. 102 

784.5 

506.507 

488.7 

31, 107 

30.0 

616, 260 
594.5 

31,705 
30.6 

63.331 
61.1 



250,000: 
population 
34,660,000) 



35,794 
103.2 

.54, 081 
156. 

42,948 
123.9 

17, 492 

50.5 

134, 691 



7,510 

21.7 

152. 475 

439.8 

22,529 

65.0 

312, 784 

902.2 

238.148 

686.9 

17, 173 

49.5 

209, 153 



11,763 
33.9 

10, 262 
29.6 

33,048 
95.3 



Group II 

(81 Cities 
100,000 to 

2.'iO,000; 
population 
11,461,000) 



12. 178 
106.3 



11,242 
98.1 



4,924 
43.0 



4,688 
40.9 

2, 792 

24.4 

38,642 

337.2 

10, 495 

91.6 

122.095 

1,065.3 

42, 945 

374.7 

4,582 

40.0 

65.844 
574.5 

3.359 
29.3 

4,884 

42.6 

15.727 

137.2 



Qroup III 
(211 Cities 
50,000 to 
100,000: 
population 
14,668,000) 



16,633 
113.4 



1,992 
13.6 

.5, 117 
34.9 
52. 819 
360.1 
2,815 
19.2 

2,703 

18.4 

47, 997 

327.2 
19,965 

136.1 
96,734 

659.5 
53,634 

365.6 

3,486 



7,179 
48.9 



21,318 
145.3 



Group IV 
(425 Cities 
25,000 to 
60,000: 
population 
14,951,000) 



19, 1S7 
128.3 



10, 398 
69.5 



4,184 
28.0 
45,331 
303.2 
2,062 
13.8 

2,010 

13.4 

54,431 

364.1 
25,742 

172.2 
89, 622 

599.4 
.53, 269 

3.'>6.3 

2,276 
15.2 

85,037 
568.8 



20.7 

10.989 

73.5 

20,103 

134.5 



Group V 
(1,056 cities 

10,000 to 

25,000: 

population 

16,719,000) 



23, 321 
139.5 



10, 190 
60.9 



4,177 

25.0 

51,435 



9.4 

3,054 

18.3 

65,613 

392.5 

38, 157 

228.2 

103,886 

621.4 

65,248 

390.3 

1,924 

11.5 

96, 670 
578.2 

4.578 
27.4 



19,344 
115.7 



Group VI 
(2,421 cities 
under 
10,000; 
population 
11,183,000) 



7,670 
68.6 



7.2 

2,720 
24.3 
36, 714 
328.3 
1,415 
12.7 

2,632 

23.5 

54,791 

490.0 
38. Ill 

340.8 
87, 981 

786.8 
53.263 

476.3 



81.669 
730.3 

1,730 
15.5 

11,561 
103.4 
13,858 



Other areas 



Suburban 
area,! (2,636 

agencies: 
population 
47,034,000) 



56, 267 
119.6 



27, 717 
58.9 



11,864 
25.2 
158, 694 
337.4 
5,513 
11.7 

12, 627 

26.8 

251,272 

534.2 

76, 915 

163.5 

165,058 

350.9 

125. 120 

266.0 

4,412 



246,811 
524.8 



15.1 

29,019 

61.7 

54,639 

116.2 



Rural area 
(806 agen- 
cies; pop- 
ulation 
12,829,000) 



7,547 
59.5 



1,729 
13.5 



6.3 

5, 554 

43.3 

50.284 

391.9 

18,388 

143.3 

48, 192 

375.6 

16,185 

126.2 

882 

6.9 

58,438 
455.5 



6.2 

1,422 

11.1 

10,768 

83.9 



' Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropoUtan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities also included in other city groups. 
Population ligures rounded to the nearest thousand. AU rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 
' N'iolent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft. 



181 



Table 30— Total Arrest Trends, 1960-74 

11,824 agencies; 1974 estimated population 69,222,000 '] 





Number of persons arrested 


Offense charged 


Total all ages 


Under 18 years of age 


18 years of age and 


over 




1960 


1974 


Percent 
change 


1960 


1974 


Percent 
change 


1960 


1974 


Percent 
change 


TOTAL 


2,414,197 


3,206,326 


+32.8 


339,627 


807,555 


+137.8 


2,074,570 


2,398,771 


+15.6 






Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 


3,487 
1,176 
5,059 
25,180 
40,057 
88,140 
143,685 
42, 029 


8,1M 
1,004 
10,546 
70, 273 
92,540 
185, 901 
387, 787 
63,147 


+134.1 
-14.6 
+108. 5 
+179. 1 
+ 131.0 
+ 110.9 
+ 169.9 
+50.2 


254 
109 
837 
5,708 
4.899 
40,082 
68,620 
25,360 


824 
79 
2. 074 
23.251 
15. 276 
95.786 
182. 692 
33.835 


+224.4 
-27.5 
+147.8 
+307. 3 
+211.8 
+139. 
+166. 2 
+33.4 


3,233 
1,066 
4,222 
19,472 
35, 158 
48.058 
75.065 
16.669 


7,340 
925 
8,472 
47,022 
77,264 
90,115 
205,095 
29,312 


+127.0 




-13.2 




+100.7 




+141.5 




+119.8 




+87.5 




+173.2 




+75.8 








73,783 
273,854 


181,523 
636,835 


+146.0 
+132. 5 


11,698 
134,062 


41.425 
312.313 


+254.1 
+133.0 


62.085 
139.792 


140,098 
324,522 


+125.7 




+132.1 




. 




348,812 


819,362 


+134.9 


145,869 


353, 817 


+142.6 


202.943 


465,545 


+129.4 








88,334 
15,862 
24,503 

6,941 
21,681 

19, 161 

30,515 
25,534 
87,418 
28,263 
102, 797 

58,154 
920,375 
260,573 

78,068 
297,206 

71,323 


149, 434 
23,889 
47, 946 

45,090 
65,917 

35, 625 

26, 170 
238, 959 
28,218 
15, 516 
273,041 

81.579 
520,669 
264, 613 

17.377 
552,922 

17.009 


+69.2 
+50.6 
+95.7 

+549. 6 
+204.0 

+85.9 

-14.2 
+835.8 
-67.7 
-45.1 
+165. 6 

+40.3 
-43.4 
+1.6 
-77.7 
+86.0 
-76.2 


9,070 

1,157 

621 

1,905 
4,740 

321 

6,512 

1,453 

1,093 

416 

812 

12,425 
8,936 

34,726 

5.250 

104. 321 

15.867 


27,180 
2,877 
1,957 

14,052 

9,777 

1,518 

6,211 
56,343 
839 
1,869 
3,898 

30,360 
14, 469 
43, 619 

2,324 
237,445 

4,904 


+199. 7 
+148. 7 
+215. 1 

+637.6 
+106.3 

+372.9 

-20.0 

+3,777.7 
-23.2 
+349.3 
+380.0 

+144.3 
+61.9 
+25.6 
-55.7 

+127.6 
-69.1 


79.264 
14,705 
23,882 

5,036 
16, 941 

18,840 

24,003 
24,081 
86,325 
27,847 
101.985 

45.729 
911.439 
225.847 

72. 818 
192,885 

55, 456 


122,254 
21,012 
45.989 

31.038 
56.140 

34,107 

20.959 
182.616 
27.379 
13,646 
269, 143 

51,219 
506,200 
220,994 

15. 053 
315.477 

12.105 


+54.2 




+42.9 




+92.6 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, pos- 


+516.3 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.-. - 

Prostitution and conmiercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 


+231.4 
+81.0 
-12.7 




+658.3 




-68.3 


Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 


-51.0 
+163.9 

+12.0 




-44.5 




-2.1 




-79.3 




+63.6 




-78.2 







' Based on comparable reports from 1,441 cities representing 59,834,000 population and 383 counties representing 9,388,000 population. 
' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



182 



Table 3i .—Total Arnst Trends, 1969-74 

|2,732 agencies; 1974 estimated population 94,672,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL_ 



Criminal homicide-. 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter 

( b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Foroi ble rape 

Robbery - 

Aggravated assault - - . 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft - 

Motor vehicle thett - 



Violent crime '.. 
Property crime ^ 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson.- - 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud - 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, posses- 
sing - 

Vandalism - 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and pro- 
stitution) — - - 

Narcotic drug laws - 

Gambling - 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunijenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) . . . 
Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Runaways. 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



8,189 
1,915 
9,913 
59.464 
80,819 
175.083 
373, 102 
92,209 



158,385 
640.394 



177,344 
6,044 

27.324 



35.083 
77,673 
64,628 

38,728 

36,022 
183, 724 
56,157 
31,569 
241,917 

141,478 
989,128 
429, 461 
63,757 
437,490 
78,727 
60,845 
113,076 



10, 745 
1,442 

13,582 

89,832 
115,717 
253,766 
555,740 

82,052 



229.876 
891.558 



58,421 
102, 5>9 
92,403 

49, 898 

34,027 
331,064 
39, 471 
19,938 
350,177 

119,010 
674,507 
426,359 
28,671 
523,568 
25.101 
49,362 
107,932 



Percent 
change 



-1-31.2 
-24.7 
-1-37.0 
-1-51.1 
-1-43.2 
-1-44.9 
-1-49.0 
-11.0 



-f45.1 
-1-39.2 



+W.2 



-1-13.6 
-1-26.7 

-1-7.9 
-1-69.4 

+7.5 

-t-66.5 
-1-32.0 
■f43.0 



-1-80.2 
-29.7 



-55.0 
-1-19.7 



Under 18 years of age 



765 
153 
2,082 
20,050 
13,750 
94, 016 
201,430 
52, 578 



36,647 
348,024 



384,824 



33,277 
3.821 
3,010 
2,292 
204 

11,324 
57,383 
11,060 



44,579 
1,271 



49,313 

29,990 
86, 572 
8,360 

135,667 
17, 240 
60,845 

113,076 



150 
2,741 
29,777 
20,929 
135,253 
271,502 
44,819 



54.601 
451,574 



506,325 



42,742 
4,467 
3,816 
3.882 
357 

20,191 
69,517 
14,852 



7,600 
85,474 
1,551 
2,564 
5,367 

50,003 
20,680 
81, 136 
3,702 
136, 613 
6,739 
49, 362 
107, 932 



-f50.8 
-2.0 
-1-31.7 
-f-48.5 
^-52.2 
-1-43.9 
-1-34.8 
-14.8 



-1-49.0 
-1-29.8 



-1-31.6 



-1-28.4 
-1-16 9 
•1-26 8 
-1-69.4 
4-7.5. 

-1-78.3 
+21.1 
+34.3 



+91.7 
+22.0 
+422. 2 
+98.7 

+1.4 
-31.0 



-60.9 
-18.9 
-4.5 



18 years of age and over 



7,831 
39. 414 
67,069 
81,067 
171,672 
39,631 



121,738 
292, 370 



415,870 



144,067 
2,223 
24,314 
34, 872 
4,235 

23,759 
20,290 
53. 568 

37. 907 

28.354 
139, 145 
54,886 
31,078 
239, 216 

92, 165 
959, 138 
342, 889 

55,397 
301, 823 

61, 487 



9.591 
1,292 
10,841 
60,055 
94, 788 
118,513 
284,238 
37,233 



175, 275 
439, 984 



616, 551 



158, 766 
3,191 
25, 675 
59,089 
4,414 

38. 230 
33,012 

77. 551 

47, 980 

26,427 
245. 590 
37,920 
17,374 
344,810 

69,007 
653, 827 
345,223 

24. 969 
386. 955 

18, 362 



+29.2 
-26 7 
+38.4 
+52.4 
+41.3 
+46 2 
+65.6 
-6.1 



+44.0 
+50.5 



+48.3 



+10.2 
+43.5 

+5.6 
+69.4 

+4.2 

+60.9 
+62.7 
+44.8 



+76.5 
-30.9 
-44.1 

+44.1 

-25.1 
-31.8 
+.7 
-54.9 
+28.2 
-70.1 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



183 



Tabic 32.— Tofo/ Arrest Trends by Sex, 1960-74 

[1,824 agencies; 1974 estimated population 69,222,000 >] 



Offense charged 



Percent 
change 



Percent 
change 



Percent 
change 



Percent 
change 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 
slaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence- - 

Forcible rape -- 

Robbery -- 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft — 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults - - - 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud and embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws. 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 
Driving under the influence. 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct... 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 



49,631 



2,910 
1,073 
6,059 
23,933 
34,318 
86,188 
118,916 
40, 458 



66,220 
244,662 



79, 418 
13,228 
20,832 

6,406 
20, 525 

6,266 

26,047 
21,927 
80,506 
26,994 
96,704 

49,582 
846, 261 
226, 367 

71, 423 
262, 818 



6,917 
872 
10,646 
65, 214 
79, 126 
176, 689 
262, 949 



+137. 7 
-18.7 
+108.6 
+172. 6 
+130. 6 
+106.2 
+121. 1 
+46.9 



107 
837 
6,409 
4,381 
38,871 
68,168 
24,377 



2,074 
21,684 
12,660 
90,866 
129,026 
31,576 



+225.2 
-36.4 
+147.8 
+299.0 
+189. 
+133.7 
+121.9 
+29.6 



102 



132 



+116. 1 
+ 29.4 



11 



1,247 
6,739 
2,962 
24, 769 
1,671 



6,069 
13, 414 
10, 212 
124,838 

4,109 



+305. 7 
+133.7 
+246. 9 
+404.0 
+161. 6 



1,211 
10,462 



1,6 
2,616 
4,931 
53,666 
2,260 



161,803 
497, 676 



+144.3 
+103.6 



10,861 
121,406 



37, 079 
251,456 



+241. 4 
+107. 1 



7,563 
29,292 



19, 720 
139, 169 



+160. 7 
+376. 1 



4,346 

60,867 



127, 697 
16,864 
32,090 

40,451 
60,246 



24,464 
204, 313 
26, 807 
13,642 
251, 765 

68,796 
484,266 
188,711 

14, 722 
442,133 

14,668 



+60.7 
+27.6 
+64.0 

+631.6 
+193. 6 

+75.3 

-6.1 
+831.8 
-67.9 
-47.9 
+160.3 

+38.8 
-42.8 
-16.6 
-79.4 
+74.9 
-77.0 



1,779 
4,627 



4,900 
1,263 
1,065 



10,760 
8,012 

29,380 
4,677 

81, 010 

13,606 



20,984 
1,919 
1,407 

12,946 

9,229 



4,722 
46,964 
801 
1,168 
3,594 

24, 436 
12,513 
35,764 

1,928 
168,820 

4,124 



+176.3 
+120.3 
+186. 4 

+627.7 
+99.5 



+304.2 
+363.2 

+127.1 
+66.2 
+21.7 



8,916 
2,634 
3,671 



3,607 
6,912 



8,672 
74,114 
34,206 

6,645 
44,388 

7,977 



21,837 
7,026 
16,856 

4,639 
5,672 



1,706 
34,646 
2,411 
1,973 
21, 276 

12,783 
36, 413 

75, 902 

2,656 

110,789 

2,441 



+144.9 
+166.7 
+331.9 

+767. 1 
+390.7 



-13.0 
+249. 2 



+121.9 
-60.0 
+149.6 



6,196 
958 
660 

1,106 
648 

1,017 



5,926 
1,956 
7,866 



23,311 
2,261 



+265.9 
+111.7 
+46.9 
-30.9 
+194.4 
-66.6 



' Based on comparable reports from 1,441 cities representing 69,834,000 population and 383 counties representing 9,388,000 population. 

2 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

3 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 



184 



Table 33.— Total Arrest Trends, 1973-74 

[3,948 agencies; 1974 estimated poptilatioii 113,918,000] 



Offeiise charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide; 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery. 

.Aggravated assault. 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime '.. 

Property crime - 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud. 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

VandaUsm 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.. 

Prostitution and commercialized 

vice. 

Sex offense (eicept forcible rape and 

prostitution)... 

Narcotic drug laws 

GambUng 

Offenses against family and chil- 
dren 

Uriving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

^'agrancy 

All o ther offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) . . , 
Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



1973 1974 Percent 

change 



11,655 
2,319 

15,142 

86,999 
119,970 
245, 797 
512, 375 

95, 105 



233,766 
853,277 



259,429 
1.028,284 



220,773 
8,665 
29,598 
62,382 
3,701 

54,728 
100,504 
96,156 



39,342 
380,246 
48,576 



479,798 

138,842 
876, 602 
441,598 
41,635 
637,259 
30,087 
57,947 
139, 959 



12,229 
1,811 

15, 740 

98, 826 
132.634 
296. 194 
639, 367 

92,723 



233.933 
9,191 
33,751 
71,735 
3,884 



124,634 
104,972 



38,953 
388,154 
43,207 

28.332 
427,472 

152,880 
765, 377 
482,352 
28,624 
637,306 
28,884 
57.903 
129,326 



+4.9 
-21.9 

+3.9 
+13.6 
+10.6 
+20.5 
+24.8 

-2.5 



+11.0 
+20.5 



+18.4 



+6.0 
+6.1 
+14.0 
+15.0 

+4.9 

+25.0 
+24.0 
+9.2 



+2.1 
-11.1 

-10.4 
-10.9 

+10.1 
-12.7 

+9.2 
-31.3 

(') 

-4.0 



Under 15 years of age 



9,919 
6,873 



119, 098 
14,202 



17,627 
190,648 



18,714 
3,581 



43,087 
4,048 



5,744 
3,288 

32, 798 
943 

67,337 
3,483 

14,314 

56,873 



1974 Percent 
change 



65,361 
146, 446 
13,742 



17,543 
22.5,549 



19,699 
3,504 



7,129 
52,778 
4.136 



3,077 
13,144 



6,349 
2,826 

32, 019 
928 

66,196 
2,745 

14,(V13 

53,750 



+7.0 
-4.6 
+4.3 
+14.0 
+23.0 
-3.2 



+4.7 
+1.5 
+18.3 



+10.5 
-14.1 



-21.2 
-1.9 
-5.5 



Under 18 years of age 



1973 1974 Percent 

change 



1,277 
464 
3,040 
29,919 
21,604 
133,063 
250,053 
53, 267 



55,840 
436,383 



3,339 

4,222 



19, 198 
69,326 
15, 671 



8,048 
100,310 



1,413 
6,754 

58,659 
27,072 
91,749 
4,081 

175,654 
10,351 
57,947 

139,959 



1,282 
179 
3,116 
32, 913 
23. 397 
159, 059 
314, 339 
51,203 



60,708 
524,601 



4,448 
4,241 



23,711 
85,527 
17,000 



8,807 

102, 113 

1,771 

3,180 
6,608 

64,242 
24,389 
94, 799 
3,843 
171,743 
8,851 
57,963 
129,326 



+.4 
-61.4 

+2.5 
+10.0 

+8.3 
+ 19.5 
+25.7 

-3.9 



+8.7 
+20.2 



+2.7 
+33.2 

+.5 
+7.7 

+23.5 

+23.4 
+8.5 



+9.4 
+1.8 
+6.3 



+9.5 
-9.9 
+3.3 



18 years of age and over 



1973 1974 Percent 

change 



10, 378 
1,855 
12, 102 
57,080 
98. 366 
112, 734 
262, 322 
41,838 



177, 926 



596, 675 



175, 707 
3,426 
26,259 
58,160 
3,325 

35,530 
31, 178 
80,485 



31,294 
279,936 
46,910 

30,204 
473.044 



849, 530 
349,849 



461.605 
19,736 



10, 947 
1,632 

12,621 

65,913 
109, 237 
137, 135 
325, 028 

41,520 



704,036 



185,446 
3,812 
29,303 
67, 494 
3,479 

44,684 
39,107 
87,972 



30,146 
286, (Ml 
41,436 

25, 1.52 
420,864 



740, 988 
387,553 

24,781 
405. 563 

20,033 



+5.5 
-12.0 

+4.3 
+15.5 
+11.1 
+21.6 
+23.9 



+11.7 
+20.8 



+18.0 



+5.5 
+11.3 
+11.6 
+16.0 

+4.6 

+25.8 
+25.4 
+9.3 



-16.7 
-11.0 

+10.5 
-12.8 
+10.8 
-34.0 
+.9 
+1.5 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
- Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 
' Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



185 



Table 24.— Total Arrests by Age, 1974 

[6,298 agencies; 1974 estimated population 134,082,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Percent dJBtribution i... 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter - - - . 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence... 

Forcible rape 

Robbery. 

Aggravated assault 

Burglar>'— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime 2... — 

Percent distribution ' 

Property crime ' 

Percent distribution > 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Percent distribution > 

Other assaults — 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting _ 

Fraud. 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing. .■ 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commerciaUzed vice. 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) - 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children. . 
Driving under the influence - 

Liquor laws 

Drimkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curiew and loitering law violations... 
Runaways 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Grand 

toUl 

all ages 



13,818 
2,226 

17, 804 
108, 481 
154, 514 
340, 697 
729, 661 
107, 226 



294,617 

100.0 

1,177,584 

100.0 



1,474,427 
100.0 



269,643 
10, 756 
39, 741 
91, 176 
5,891 

76, 943 
146, 261 
119,189 

53,309 

44, 375 
454, 948 
45,900 
34.902 
616,549 

191,213 
911,837 
544,321 
32,802 
757,040 
33,363 
70, 167 
154, 653 



73, 957 
165,214 
IB, 699 



264, 870 
21.6 



273,814 
18.6 



21.761 
4,098 



7,923 
61,621 
4.643 



254 

7.581 

3,268 
36. 844 

1,070 
75. 998 

3.362 
17, 174 
64,164 



1,683,073 
27.2 



4, 4%, 333 
72.8 



1.399 
223 
3.465 
35. 345 
26.300 
181.689 
356. 695 
69.183 



66.499 

22.6 

597. 567 

60.7 



664. 289 
45.1 



64.206 
6,318 
5.268 
4.764 
464 

26,406 
lOO, 492 
19. OOO 



9,963 
118,460 



79, 323 
28,638 

109,440 
4,619 

199, 401 
10. 672 
70, 167 

164,663 



12,419 
2,003 

14. 349 

73. 136 
128,214 
169. 008 
372. 966 

48.043 



228. 118 
77.4 

680. 017 
49.3 



810. 138 
54.9 



34, 473 

86. 412 
6.437 

60,637 
46, 769 
100. 189 

61.179 

34, 422 
336, 488 
44,004 
31,196 
607, 731 

111.890 
883.199 
434.881 

28.183 
667. 639 

22, 691 



2,849 
1,333 



11 
116 
2,019 
1,696 
17. 220 
43, 662 
1.782 



3,861 



6,434 
1,065 



1,696 
17.928 



2.511 
9,934 



25 
614 
7,394 
6,433 
47,888 
101,168 
13,600 



13,606 



176, 187 
11.9 



5,746 
30,007 
3,521 



2,461 
13. 662 



6.906 
2.8-23 

23. 297 
776 

49, 654 
2,189 

14,046 

60,403 



286,134 



624 
6,999 
4,796 
36, 851 
66,206 
16,212 



64 
891 
8,894 
6,628 
38, 173 
66. 207 
16,144 



33,708 
60,069 
12,128 



170 
1,239 
9,875 
7,782 
28, 415 
61,337 
8.971 



745 
162 
1,139 
8,686 
7.310 
21. 181 
39.384 
6,265 



12,683 



117, 268 
10.0 



16,708 



119,524 
10.1 



18,204 

6.2 

106, 905 



19, 690 

6.6 

88,723 



17,779 



6,334 

15,168 
3,628 



12, 283 
4.358 

19. Ill 
808 

39.111 
2,007 

16,094 

41,708 



1,442 
1,153 



6,611 
13. 349 

4,924 



2,199 
36, 812 



26,538 
8,163 
24, 147 



20, 473 
34,861 



1,973 
1.506 



6,638 
10.364 
6.806 



6,960 

33, 921 
12. 869 
29.338 

1,673 
42, 179 

2,764 
17,426 
13, 930 



2,494 
2,767 



6,693 
6,986 
6,963 



1,919 
15, 085 

27.390 
24.586 
34. 339 

1.963 
49. 913 

3,087 



1,971 

46, 879 

869 

1,543 
18, 392 

19, 752 
23.988 
32.631 

1.790 
44.281 

2.603 



124 
1,086 
7,241 
7,143 
16,385 
31,914 
4,830 



16,176 

5.6 

53,129 



2,699 
4,303 



4,602 
3,794 
5,962 



1,900 

39, 783 

938 

1,455 
19, 496 

13, 978 
23,489 
31,384 

1,660 
41,218 

2,090 



186 



Table 34. — Tofal Arrests by Age, 1974 — Continued 



Offense charged 


Age 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65 and 
over 


Not 
known 


TOTAL 


259,692 
4.2 


235,840 
3.8 


217,693 
3.5 


202, 155 
3.3 


686,747 
11.1 


453,238 
7.3 


349,228 
5.7 


314,705 
5.1 


277,754 
4.5 


222,481 
3.6 


138,223 
2.2 


87,473 
1.4 


72,842 
1.2 


7,978 








Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 


691 
137 
1,058 
6,471 
6,866 
13.048 
26,725 


676 
125 
986 
5,882 
6,893 
11,101 
22,945 
3,273 


632 
97 
901 
5,349 
6,707 
9,923 
20,247 
2,692 


682 
121 
841 
4,671 
6,465 
8,615 
18, 182 
2,405 


2,556 
325 

3,125 
13,447 
24,489 
24, 768 
57,531 

7,283 


1,553 

228 
1,742 
5,631 
16,809 
11,067 
30,780 
3.634 


1,061 
131 

958 
2,695 

11,924 
5,942 

19,948 
1,969 


760 
116 
541 
1,520 
8,962 
3,630 
15,336 
1,213 


610 

81 

361 

851 

6,558 

2,266 

12,238 

781 


413 
66 

196 

426 
4,519 
1,293 
9,726 

430 


236 
46 
82 
173 
2,493 
588 
6,357 
186 


181 
39 
41 
74 
1,625 
268 
4,454 
89 


214 
41 
40 
185 
1,515 
306 
5,400 
112 


9 
4 
13 
60 
154 
212 
462 
76 


(b) Manslaughterby negligence. . 






Burglary— breaking or entering 




3,844 






15,086 
5.1 

43, 617 
3.7 


14,437 
4.9 

37,319 
3.2 


13,589 
4.6 

32,862 
2.8 


12,659 
4.3 

29,202 
2.5 


43,617 

14.8 

89,582 

7.6 


25,735 
8.7 

45,481 
3.9 


16,638 
5.6 

27,859 
2.4 


11,783 
4.0 

20,179 
1.7 


8,380 

2.8 

15,285 

1.3 


5,554 

1.9 

11,449 

1.0 


2,984 

1.0 

7,131 

.6 


1,921 

.7 

4,811 

.4 


1,954 

5,818 
.5 


236 




Property crime 3 


750 




■^ 


Subtotal for above offenses 


58,840 
4.0 


51,881 
3.5 


46,548 
3.2 


41,982 
2.8 


133,524 
9.1 


71,444 
4.8 


44,628 
3.0 


32,078 
2.2 


23,746 
1.6 


17,069 
1.2 


10, 161 

.7 


6,771 
.5 


7,813 
.5 


990 




■ 


Other assaults.... 


12, 216 

243 

2,474 

4,500 

300 

3,957 
3,225 
5,775 

5,559 

1,787 
33,430 

984 
1,4.'J5 
22,050 

5,727 
24,998 
30,882 

1,377 
38,154 

1,759 


11,864 

208 

2,474 

4,773 

535 

3,463 
2,701 
5,546 

5,179 

1,715 
28,485 
1,029 
1,453 
21,694 

4,173 
23,320 
28,512 

1,226 
34,035 

1,544 


11,483 

235 

2,545 

5,046 

325 

3,080 
2,464 
5,228 

4,673 

1,665 
24, 179 
1.051 
1,519 
21,860 

3,364 

22,660 
25,382 

1,224 
31,740 

1,422 


11,256 
188 

2,277 

5,201 

271 

2,814 
2,164 
5,081 

4,198 

1,637 
20,361 
1,112 
1,617 
21,379 

2,898 
22,385 
23,955 

1,147 
28,937 

1,295 


41,789 
750 

7,526 
20, 249 

1,102 

8,517 
7,136 
18,870 

9,648 

6,412 
54,205 
5,539 
6,432 

89,742 

8,746 
93, 276 
69, 801 

3,895 
95,939 

3,649 


27,887 

509 

3,777 

13,115 
744 

4,515 
4,039 
12,511 

3,419 

4,464 
19,809 
5,501 
4,669 
77,739 

5,739 
89,282 
41,441 

2,653 
58,153 

1,828 


20,002 
336 

2,099 

8,696 

530 

2,696 
2,665 
8,314 

1,589 

3,165 

8,928 
5,331 
3,455 
69, 197 

4,565 
90,013 
29,998 

2,151 
39,797 

1,073 


15,017 

268 

1,523 

5,985 

340 

1,837 
2,023 
6,437 

1,028 

2,335 
4,979 
4,922 
2,479 
65,170 

4,260 
102,665 
26,256 
2,273 
31,997 
833 


10,896 

238 

835 

3,962 

295 

1,260 
1,375 
5,029 

745 

1,816 
2,706 
4,603 
1,624 
59,635 

3,682 
106,663 
21,595 
2,281 
24,218 
550 


7,072 
147 
489 

2,318 

141 

811 

904 

3,526 

513 

1,330 
1,370 
3,973 
853 
48,090 

3,096 
95, 247 
16,039 

1,847 

17,267 

379 


3,632 

74 

267 

1,036 

93 

402 

491 

2,044 

288 

822 

527 

2,850 

379 

29,534 

1,888 
63,219 
9,549 
1,208 
9,540 
219 


2,019 
55 
87 
535 
37 

220 

218 

1,242 

173 

546 

276 

2,084 

162 

17,451 

1,297 
42,020 
5,674 

805 
5,643 

158 


1,969 
38 
282 
380 
19 

196 

281 

1,079 

205 

603 

290 

2,281 

153 

10,875 

1,145 

32,872 
5,795 

785 
5,614 

167 


313 

10 

24 
42 

39 
208 
99 

25 

37 
239 
26 
23 
343 

190 

2,516 

1,618 

8 

1,193 

35 


Forgery and counterfeiting 


Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape 






Offenses against family and children. 










All other offenses (except traffic) 


Curfew and loitering law violations.. 


Runaways 





























































' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



187 



Table 35.— Total Arrests of Persons Under 15, Under 78, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1974 

|5,298 agencies; 1974 estimated population 134,082,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and noimegligent manslaughter,,. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape , 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault , 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal (or above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement ,. 

Stolen property: buying, receiving, possessing — 

VandaUsm, 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commerciaUzed vice , 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

GambUng 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

AU other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion, 

Ciufew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of Persons Arrested 



Grand total Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 .Under 25 
all ages 



13,818 
2,226 

17,804 
108,481 
164,514 
340,697 
729,661 
107, 226 



294,617 
1,177,584 



269,643 
10,756 
39,741 
91.176 
5.891 
76.943 
146,261 
119,189 

53,309 
44,375 

454,948 
45, 900 
34, 902 

616,549 

191,213 
911,837 
544,321 
32,802 
757, 040 
33,363 
70, 167 
154,653 



771 
9,984 
7,943 
73, 957 
165, 214 
15, 699 



18, 904 
254, 870 



7,923 
61,621 
4,643 



254 

7,581 

3,258 
36,844 

1.070 
75, 998 

3,362 
17, 174 
64,164 



1,399 
223 
3,455 
35,345 
26,300 
181, 689 
356, 695 
59,183 



664, 289 



54, 205 
6,318 
5,268 
4,764 
454 
26,406 
100, 492 
19,000 



9,953 
118,460 



79, 323 

28,638 

109, 440 

4.619 

_199, 401 

' 10. 672 

70, 167 
154, 653 



3,544 
669 
6,919 
61,046 
48, 535 
247, 670 
479, 330 
79, 239 



120,044 



926, 952 



92,228 
7,457 

13, 062 

15,338 
1,159 

43, 136 
116,367 

38,408 

16, 067 
16,041 
255, 1(H 
4,614 
8,629 
61, 790 

140, 443 
100, 701 
207, 794 
9,922 
334, 813 
18, 452 
70, 167 
154,653 



6,225 
1,149 
10, 705 
83, 419 
75, 466 
290, 357 
567, 429 
91,453 



175, 815 
949, 239 



139, 047 
8,331 

22,832 
34,858 
2,590 
66, 450 
126,921 



36, 676 
22, 845 

361, 619 
8,790 
14, 673 

148, 773 

156. 605 
194. 064 
316. 555 
14. 896 
467, 679 
24, 472 
70, 167 
154, 653 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



10.0 
10.1 



10.1 
10.0 
19.4 



53.3 

48.9 



20.1 
58.7 
13.3 



22,4 
26.0 



3.1 

20.1 
14.1 
26.3 
32.0 
100.0 
100.0 



25.6 
30.1 
38.9 
56.3 
31.4 
72.7 
65.7 
73.9 



69.3 
32.9 
16.8 
19.7 
56.1 
79.6 



.56.1 
10.1 
24.7 
10.0 



55.3 
100.0 
100.0 



45.0 
51.6 
60.1 
76.9 
48.8 
85.2 
77.8 
85.3 



51.6 
77.5 
57.5 
38.2 
44.0 
73.4 



66.9 
51.5 
79.5 
19.2 
42.0 
24.1 

81.9 
21.3 
58.2 
45.4 
61.8 
73.4 
100.0 
100.0 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
- Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 
^ Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



188 



Table 36. — Total Arrests Distribution by Sex, 1974 

15,298 agencies; 1974 estimated population 134,082,000) 



Ofiense charged 



TOTAL.. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and normcgligent manslaughter. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robber^' 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft _ 



Violent crime 3_ . 
Property crime ' 



Subtotal for above offenses. 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting ._ 

Fraud 

Embezzlement _. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Vandahsra 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and ccmmercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution). 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence _ 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness _ 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other oflenses {except traffic) 

Suspicion 

CuLTfew and loitering law violations.. 
Rimaways _. 



Number of Persons Arrested 



13,818 
2,226 

17,804 
108,481 
154,514 
340, 6»7 
729,661 
107,226 



2»4,617 
1,177,584 



269,643 
10,756 
39,741 
91,176 
5,891 
76,943 
146,261 
119,189 

53,309 
44,375 

454,948 
45,900 
34,902 

616,549 

191,213 
911,837 
544,321 
32,802 
757,040 
33,363 
70, 167 
154,653 



11,800 
1,960 

17,804 
101,098 
133,779 
323, 214 
605,701 
100, 270 



264,481 
928,186 



232,088 
9,630 
28,359 
61,437 
4,344 
69, 155 
134,760 
109,433 

13,026 
40,894 

390, 231 
41,968 
30,739 

667,193 

162,350 
846,167 
432,933 
28,691 
637,715 
28,708 
63,794 



20, 736 
18,483 
223,960 



30,136 
249,399 



279,811 



37, 665 
1,126 
11,382 

29,739 
1,647 
7,788 

11,501 
9,766 

40,283 
3.481 

64,717 
3,942 
4.163 

49,356 



65,670 
111,388 
4,111 
119,32.1 
4,668 
16,373 
87,761 



86.4 
87.6 
100.0 
93.2 
86.6 
94.6 



10.2 
21.2 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

5 Violent crime is offenses of miudcr, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 



73.7 
89.9 
92.1 
91.8 

24.4 
92.2 
85.8 
91.4 



84.9 
92.8 
79.6 
87.6 
84.2 
86.0 
76.7 
43.3 



13.9 
10.6 
28.6 
32.6 



15.8 
14.0 
23.3 



Percent of Total ' 



3.0 
25.1 



189 



Table 31.— Total Arrest Trends by Sex, 1973-74 

[3,948 agencies; 1974 estimated population 113,918,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegllgent 

manslaughter - 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence- . 

Forcible rape — — 

Robbery --. --. 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering , 

Larceny — theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime » 

Subtotal for above oftenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeit ing 

Fraud --- 

Embezzlement — 

Stolen property: buying, receiving, 

possessing 

\'andalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sej offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws_ 

Gambling 

Oflenses against family and children.. 
Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws ._ 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations- . 
Runaways 



Males 



9,889 
1,970 
15,142 
81,073 
104,188 
232,539 
351,717 
89,374 



210,292 
673,630 



21,701 
43,723 
3,001 

49,499 
92, 812 
88,266 



444,476 

117, 593 
814, 482 
367,864 
26,409 
537,325 
25,708 
44,663 
61,597 



10,442 
1.581 

15, 740 

92,062 
114,551 
280,270 
441,735 

86,774 



232, 795 
808,779 



200,889 
8,201 
24,031 



61,587 
114,910 
96,323 

12,356 

35,903 
332, 868 
39,503 
24, 878 
394, 360 

129, 597 
711,209 
379, 486 
25,214 
535,471 
24, 817 
44,386 
55,221 



Per- 
cent 
change 



+5.6 
-19.7 

+3.9 
+13.6 

+9.9 
+20. 5 
+25.6 

-2.9 



+10.7 
+20.1 



+17.8 



+5.6 
+6.5 
+10.7 
+11.8 
+3.2 

+24.4 
+23.8 
+9.1 



-1.3 

+2.5 
-U.2 
-12.2 
-11.3 

+10.2 
-12.7 
+3.2 



1,164 

340 

3,040 

27,877 
18. 472 
126.365 
177,884 
49,971 



50, 553 
354, 220 



405,113 



35,853 
4.773 
2,412 
3.513 
302 

17. 781 
64,615 
14, 873 



7,047 
82,252 
1,606 



46,734 
23.314 
75. 912 
3,263 
137,246 
8,479 
44,663 
61,597 



1,177 
156 
3,116 
30,606 
19, 675 
150.881 
224, 871 
47, 787 



Per- 
cent 
change 



54, 574 
423,539 



3.090 
3,361 



21,846 
79,397 
16, 062 



7,759 
84,744 
1,706 
2,036 



51,294 
21,062 
78,743 

3,203 
136.662 

7,485 
44,386 
55,221 



+1.1 
-54.1 
+2.5 
+9.8 
+6.5 
+19.4 
+26.4 
-4.4 



+8.0 
+ 19.6 



+6.5 
+1.8 
+28.1 



+22.9 
+22.9 
+8.0 

+ 67.0 

+10,1 
-(-3.0 
+6.2 
+ 127.2 
-3.0 



-.4 
-11.7 



349 



5,926 
15.782 
13,258 
160,658 

5.731 



23.474 
179,647 



7.897 
18,659 



.55.356 
4.111 
3.291 

35,322 

21,249 
62. 120 
73, 734 
16, 226 
99.934 
4,379 
13,284 
78,362 



Per- 
cent 
change 



Per- 
cent 
change 



230 



+1.2 
-34.1 



23 



-81.5 



6,764 
18.083 

15.924 
197,632 



+14.1 
+14.6 
+20.1 
+23.0 
+3.8 



2,042 
3,132 



72, 169 
3,296 



2,307 
3,722 
8.178 
89,468 
3,416 



+13.0 
+18.8 
+22.1 
+24.0 
+3.6 



26.634 
219, 505 



+13.5 
+22.2 



5,287 
82,163 



6,134 
101. 062 



+16,0 
+23.0 



+21.1 



+22.4 



9.720 
22,832 



+8.4 
+3.2 
+23.1 
+22.4 
+12.3 



6, 808 +30. 2 

9, 724 +26. 4 

8. 649 +9. 6 

38, 280 +14. 3 



3.050 
55.286 
3,704 
3,454 
33,112 



23,283 
54,168 
102.866 
3.410 
101,835 
4,067 
13,517 
74,105 



+5.0 
-6.3 

+9.6 
-12.8 
+39.5 
-77.6 
+ 1.9 
-7.1 
+1.8 
-5.4 



1,417 
4,711 



1,001 

18, 058 



11,925 
3,768 
15,837 



1,872 
13,284 
78,362 



1,865 
6,130 



1,048 
17.369 



12,948 
3,327 
16.056 



13,517 
74,105 



+11.8 
+12.2 
+46.5 
+24.1 
+27.0 

-P31.6 
+30.1 

+17.5 



+8.3 
+ 121.3 

+9.7 

+8.6 
-11.5 

+1.4 
-21.8 

-8.7 
-27.0 

+1.8 

-5.4 



^ Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny — theft and motor vehicle theft. 



190 



^ 8 



^ a 



^ 6 



I. .- 
CO |i 







■^ 


.o m 


M 


<c 


n 


n 


■^ 


00 


m 


^ 


^ 


^ 


o 


in 


o 


n 


o 


(N 


a> 


-H 


CO O 


n 


CTJ 


00 


o> 


o 


rt 


ri 


to 


^ 


o 


^f 


1 




1 




,M N -^ -.--.- -H 


-. ^ 


*" 


-H .^ rH .- 


"■"■"" ^ 


- M M « - - 




5 


















3 


_ 


rt 


^ 


- „ ^ 




- 


^ 


_ -. - 


_ 




-, 


- - - « 


<N 










- 










^^ 










































^ 
















































































>-l 








































































g 


S 


". 


=^ 




" "^ 


Cl ^ 


"^ "^ 


"■ 


1 ■ 


'^ 




" ~ - 


": ■; "1 '^ ": " 








■^ '^ 








3 










































•c 


O 
















1 


























=5 


<a 


oot-01-cr-x.e. 


o> t^ 


t^ 


00(D«O*OtJ*^®4O 




t^O-'J'C^CliOOO 




s 


" 


- 








^ 


..< -fl* w eo t- M 




*-* 


































fc 




t- 




OS r- 




mcJ^ww»i03» 








« 


s 


as^s'sss^ 


^S 


S 


sssssssss 


sssess 


"■SSSSSSS 




:<5 
















<2 


« 


too>-c.)-»*(»=> 


lO o 


■« 


o^-*«>co»io 


o r- o w CO o 


c-iior.ram-vm.0 




s 


g 


gsssssss 


^!n 


?? 


sssssss? 


SfrFSgSSS 


sssggsss 




is 
















_ 


o 


oooooooo 


o o 


o 


oooooooo 


C O O O O O 


oooooooo 






s 


S8S888S8 


s s 


8 


§8888888 


§ 2 2 g § g 


88888888 




H 


















» 


- 


2^S|5ffiS2 


s g 


- 


Ifsg'-lll 




SiSgsSis 


















t. 






rf w 






■^ — o 






° 








■^ 




'"' 


'"' ^ 




^ 




1 












» 


ft 


■""'-SSSSS 


gs 


r? 


1 g'-SS"S!gS 


5S:3 £:*««? 


sgs = g-s?s 




















■i 


■^ 




r-< 


^ 




^ 










































■^ 
















s 


3 


s 


=■ g 8 § g SS 


o r- 


s 


g-'SS'^SKK 


s ? fi s s 5 


lr:§O^S''''c5S 




c 


^ 




« 


-. 


- 










" 










1 








1 


=; 


S 


S-siiiil 


Si 


§ 


2ss§?i|ss 


Ssi^Si 






































•3 


c 






















































^ 


t-' 


1 Sgigiisi 


IS 


g 


SiiSiiSi 


siissi 


Iggsggii 




& 




■- ^S3 S S;::S 


^ s; 


s 


g-^as-^SJiK 


s ■» S S 2 g 


s^sss^n°°2 




Z 
















s 


S 


|§|ggS2§ 


t^ •^ 


- 




sigiii 


iisiisis 




2 


a 


■^-.t^^JftMtJ^ig 


s u 




S-SS"SSS? 


^ « c8 ^ S5 ^ 


S||2SSS§ 




# 


"» 




— r- 










„ 


•»f<o>n<o-<so 


lO t- 


^ 






a.-.««(«N«)0 






$ 


$£:S?n!!<c$r§ 




s 






S3SgSSS5S 
















" 


2~SSSJ=3?S 


s^ 


s 


SS^S^SJ^S 


ssgssss 


SoSSSS^iSSS 




t- 


















w 


i 




- 




















































































J 


















































































































































































































































































s 






























i 






i^ 
































s 






























o 






a. 


























































































X 

t 






s s 
- s 

p 

3 te 






•c 










X 






_E 






1 
•s 


c 


1 i 

, II 




1 

ii 














1 
1 










Ills 
■c i 


X 


If. 

If! 






■ J 


s 


i 




j 


Q. ^ 

_3 t: 


t 

E 
2 


rostitution and co 
X offenses (except 
arcotic drug laws 


Is 

•3 •= 
.SI 


■ 




3 

Is 


1 

2 .1 


■c 










o 


p> 






' B 


1- 










c 




ii 


d 


b 


» 


> 


s 


&. 


A 2 


'- 


c 


i- 


»- 


C 


c 


> 


<s 


a 


L 


» 





191 











O OJ 


t- 




-a- 


cc 


-«■ 


X 


oc 


f 


"<f 


c 


oc 


t^ 






c- 


o 


rt 


c- 


Cl ~ 


-^ 


r~ 


=■ 


ir 


I- 


r- 






c^ 


o 










1 




„w-w^^^^ 


-. ^ 


^ 


- •^ " " 


,- ^ to ,-H 


^^ 






5 


















S 




^ ^ 




^ ^ ^ 




^ 


^ 












^ 


- 




^ ^ in ^ 


^ 






^ 


„ _ 








© 


' ^ 












































g. 




-' 


























































































a> 




^ 


^ ^ 


^ ^ 


^ .- 


^ 


„ 












^ 




^ ; « -, 








_ 




















































































































.2 






^ 














































^ 


O 






































































•c 


c: 




iOCOCO-*CO«OCOCO 


^ CD 


«= 


<D«=0.«0^^^ 


O, ^ ^ <>. 00 c- 


--^■noot-^oo 












































1 




















e 




CC-*4OCO^CO00<N 


CC OO 


M 




■* CD OV ■^f ttS .- 


<o^u,o>tt)Oino 








fS 








g§2?15^S323 




"'''S8SSS2 






















z 


















» 




MOdOODt-OO 


eo o 


O 


.-cc-.-*ccBoo=r 


■* ifi l^ t- Oi -^ 


t-ooc-i-rti'mu. 








in 


























































oooooooo 


o o 


O 


oooooooc 


o o o o o c 


oooooooo 






■s 


s 


8 8 8 8 § S 8 8 


88 


s 


8 8 8 8 8 S 8 S 


8 8 8 8 8 S 


S8S8 8888 






H 
























(DiOCMr-OOOMCC 


M (O 


^ 


__^^ 


o CO «D rt T-. e 


•^ '^i X '^t a -v in ~> 










" "^ Eg « S3 S & 




S8 






sss-^s^gs 
























































A» 




















C 




< 
















c 








^ 




M T» 


CD 




00 r- QC 






S=>S5'^S'-5$ 




















































V 




^, 






















1 




















































f? 
































.o 


^SSS?5 3: 


S 5 


^ 


S ^ ''"'' 




- O g ^. ^ Cv 


-- (C M « Cs 


s s 


«i 




S! 










CD 












<S 




c 

IS 
o 




































































? 




^, 


s 




ii 


i 


i^^^^Si^ 


- S S " gi ^ 


SSS5S"S?'"^^S? 




















% 


2 


^ 
















n 


























lOt^r^ioec-^ojt- 




j^ 


<D(DOooeovoOcr 


oi «: •* (N .^ 


OOOit-«tM<DOeO 




o 




^'"SSoSmS 


s s 


s 




E;Sfi 3 PS 


cit^Sc3im?oS 


1 




s 




-• :s =■• ?■ g 3 


g s 


<c 


o -T cm' 00 cs (C 


-r CT tc -- 


^^^ ^<NC0O 


00 




z 








" 




























-o 








|SSgg|S| 


s s 


p 


S5§?:?5«KSS 


S S ff g 3 3 


S:5SSS|g5S 






































JJu^^M^l^gC^ 
























s 






















lo^cowtDin-o-oa 




o> 




W O « CM OT ^ 


-W-lMONsOt-gOO 














































<r 


-- " g S S g !8 






g" <"» " S S E 


























t^ 






























































































iJ 








































































2 






























& 






S 


































3 






























i 






1 




































































« ^ 




































































s ^ 


























•c 






6 S 
















c 












bo 


^ 


•p c 
























% 






^ Si 

It 
5 >* 

g o 






c 
g 








i 






1 








1 


3 S 

pi 




2 










1 


1 
1 

1 






























































■° i M 




■3-S 


"fl 


1 E 


a 






c 






^ 


=^ S-S 


3 i 






ii 


CO 


r 










c 


I'S c c 

lis ^ 
|3al 


> 


ggravated assa 
urglary— break 
arceny— theft. 


CJ > 

|| 

1 £ 

> 0- 


s 


i 


i 


•o 


* £ ■? 
6 ° i 


■E 

1 


restitution anc 
X offenses (exe 
arcotic drug la 
ambline 


c ^ 
'3 '^ 
be c 

i c 


s 


1 

C 


•a 

■E > 

•a = 

Is 
















o 


\i. 


PC 


< 


ff 


.-J 


»s 








c 


< 


fc 


1^ 


[I. 


V 


> 




ft. 


w Z 


C 


c 


n. 


J 






> 


-< 


K 


U 







192 



S 8 8 g 8 g g § 



8 8 8 8 § 8 8 8 8 S S 8 8 S 8 8 8 8 g : 






s-' ?!S" as 



ISS SSSS2i 3:21 



sa: 









I: 
i 

. ---i Ui 

llllil 



_2 a 



a I 



0-<££wm>^ £mZOoQ 3Q5>5mQ« 



§5SS 

ra J > cC 



193 



Table 29.— City Arresf Trends, 1973-74 

[3,197 cities; 1974 estimated population 90,981,000) 



Number of persons arrested 



Offense charged 



Total all ages 



Percent 
ctiange 



Under 18 years of age 



Percent 
change 



18 years of age and over 



TOTAL.. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. 

(h) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape -- 

Robbery... 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft. — 



Violent crime '.. 
Property crime ' 



Subtotal tor above oflenses. 



Other assaults -. — 

Arson... — 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud... 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex oflenses (except forcible rape and prostitu- 
tion) 

Narcotic drug laws... — 

GambUng... 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other oflenses (except traflSc) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) . . . 
Curfew and loitering law violations- 
Runaways .- 



10,209 
1,724 
12,747 
80,617 
100,673 
203,519 
461,960 



204,246 
748,548 



954, 518 



197,854 
7,335 
24,938 
48,052 
2,948 
47,980 
86,218 



43,021 

34,445 
313,588 
46,103 
19,096 
402,135 

114,273 
800,375 
414, 997 
40,621 
528,013 
29,136 
52,180 
110, 493 



10,641 
1,300 

13,411 

91, 307 
109, 914 
246,071 
575,577 

80,543 



+4.2 
-24.6 

+5.2 
+13.3 

+9.2 
+20.9 
+24.6 

-3.0 



1,158 

401 
2,M8 
28,391 
18,796 
110, 819 
227,581 
46,729 



1,141 
143 
2,702 
31,024 
19,604 
132,240 
285,156 
44,516 



-1.5 
-64.3 
+2.0 
+9.3 
+4.3 
+19.3 
+25.3 
-4.7 



9,051 
1,323 
10,099 
52, 226 
81,877 
92,700 
234,379 



9,500 
1,157 
10,709 
60,283 
90, 310 
113,831 
290, 421 
36,027 



225,273 
902, 191 



+10.3 
+20.5 



50,993 
385,129 



54,471 
461,912 



+6.8 
+19.9 



153, 253 
363,419 



170,802 
440,279 



+18.3 



436,523 



516, 526 



211, 886 
7,672 
28,613 
56,224 
3,263 
59,525 
107,446 
94,589 

49, 521 

33,726 
318,939 
40,579 
16, 987 
360,274 

122,426 
695,240 
453,824 
27,311 

527, 445 
28,244 
52,050 

104,823 



+7.1 
+4.6 
+14.7 
+17.0 
+10.7 
+24.1 
+24.6 
+8.8 

+15.1 

-2.1 
+1.7 
-12.0 
-11.0 
-10 4 

+7.1 
-13.1 

+9.4 



41,451 
4,634 
2,855 
3,968 
324 
17,247 
59,564 
14,183 



1,137 
5,630 

47,364 

23,225 
85,229 
3,902 

151,737 
10,206 
52,180 

110,493 



45,059 
4,640 
3,849 
3,931 
350 
21,216 
73, 620 
15, 215 

1,881 

7,451 
85,059 
1,751 
2,627 
5,449 

52,231 
20,516 
87, 470 
3,524 
149, 762 
8,640 
52,050 
104,823 



+8.7 
+.1 
+34.8 
-.9 
+8.0 
+23.0 
+23.6 
+7.3 

+36.0 

+9.5 
+1.4 
+7.9 
+131.0 
-3.2 

+10 3 
-11.7 
+2.6 
-9.7 
-1.3 
-15.3 



517,995 
156, 403 



44,084 
2,624 
30,733 
26,654 
72,786 

41,638 

27,642 
229,744 
44,480 
17,959 
396,505 

66.909 
777, 150 
329, 768 

36,719 
376, 276 

18, 930 



166, 827 
3,032 
24,764 
52,293 
2,913 
38,309 
33,826 
79,374 

47,640 

26, 275 
233,880 
38,828 
14,360 
354,825 

70, 195 
674,724 
366,354 

23,787 
377,683 

19,604 



+5.0 
-12.5 
+6.0 

+15.4 
+10.3 
+22.8 
+23.9 
-.9 



+11.5 
+21.1 



-20.0 
-10.5 

+4.9 
-13.2 
+11.1 
-35.2 

+.4 
+3.6 



1 Violent crime is oflenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

2 Property crime is oflenses of bua^lary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



194 



Table 40.— City Arrests by Age, 1974 

14,237 cities; 1974 estimated population 103,652,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Percent distribution ' 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Percent distribution ' 

Property crime' 

Percent distribution i 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Percent distribution ' 

Other assaults ..- 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; bujing, receiving, 

possessi ng 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized 
vice -. 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 
prostitution! 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Runaways 

See footDotes at end of table. 



11,579 
1,500 

14,659 

98,822 
124, 198 
277,939 
649,633 

89,625 

249, 258 

100.0 

1,017,197 

100.0 

1,267,955 
100.0 

238,809 
8,786 
32,495 
67,061 
4,972 

65,660 
124,861 
105,277 



52,002 

38,060 
360,903 
42,649 
20,701 
413,949 

154,999 
813, 102 
506,507 
31, 107 
616,347 
31,705 
63, 266 
123,376 



539, 108 
10.4 



31 

696 
9,528 
6,766 
62, 124 
152, 058 
13,443 

17,166 

6.9 

227,625 

22.4 

244, 822 
19.3 

20, 397 
3,534 



7,253 
54,004 
4,194 



2,973 
12,879 



6,490 

2,844 
34,562 

1,012 
68,183 

3,186 
15, 819 
52, 671 



1,216 
165 
2,921 
33,015 
21,756 
149, 376 
321,215 
49, 990 

58,908 

■23.6 

520, 581 

51.2 

579, 654 
45.7 

49,758 
5,379 
4,454 
4, 359 
390 

23, 336 

8.5, 905 
16, 875 



2,084 

8.352 
96,832 
1,841 
2, 970 
6,267 

65,285 
23, "24 

100, 582 
4, 254 

172, 737 
10,123 
63,266 

123, 376 



10, 363 
1.335 

11.738 

65,807 
102. 442 
128,563 
328,418 

39,635 

190, 350 
76.4 

496,616 
48.8 

688,301 
54.3 

189,051 
3,407 
28. 041 
62, 702 
4.582 

42, 324 
38,956 
88,402 



29.708 
264. 071 
40.808 
17,731 
407,682 

89.714 
789, 378 
405. 925 

26, 853 
443,610 

21,582 



Age 



64,689 
1.2 



7,567 
19, 070 



14, 599 
40,423 
1,532 



5,112 
908 



1,490 

15, 669 

728 



2,351 
8,330 



319,033 
6.2 



553 
7,038 
4,614 
39, 958 
92,565 
11,538 

12, 346 



6,569 
4,032 



59,902 
12, 897 



102, 407 
10.1 



156. 428 
12.3 



12, 589 
1,457 



5,229 
26, 287 
3,207 



2,071 
11,718 



5,923 
2,465 

21,827 
733 

44,206 
2,078 

12, 907 

40, 997 



4,741 
12, 991 



743 
8,285 
5,360 
31,012 
57, 201 
13,566 

14,731 

5.9 

101,779 

10.0 



10,371 
3,652 

17, 737 
750 

33, 885 
1,899 

13.646 

33,095 



5,655 
10,760 
4,362 



1,824 
30, 079 



20,886 
6,739 

22,011 
1,065 

35, 427 
2.393 

18, 267 

27, 037 



946 
8,633 
5,598 
26.632 
52,054 
10,084 

15,644 

6.3 

88,770 



1,650 
1,295 



5,687 
8,150 
5,053 



1,947 
35, 958 



4,257 

27, 538 
10,489 
26, 272 

1,427 
35, 242 

2,645 
15, 534 
10, 573 



237,513 
4.6 



599 
103 
1,014 
8,901 
6,253 
22, 186 
44,394 
7,351 

16,767 



97 
918 
7,667 
5,834 
16,647 
34,155 
5,147 



15, 057 



2,023 
2,192 



5,5 

5,652 

6,139 



1,302 
10,870 

22, 405 
20, 614 
31,625 
1,801 
40, 716 



2,167 
2,687 



1,663 

35, 272 

832 

1,013 
12,812 

15,980 
20, 230 
30, 264 

1,667 
35,611 

2,504 



13,163 
27,967 
4,025 



2,127 
3,207 



3,783 
3,203 
5,249 



1,616 
30, 495 



13, 482 

11,383 
19, 854 
29, 258 
1,479 
33,133 



195 







Table 


40.— City Arresfi by /ge, 7974— Continued 














Age 


Offense charged 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65 and 
over 


Not 
known 




215,583 
4.2 


196,088 
3.8 


180,698 
3.5 


168,246 
3.2 


568,409 
11.0 


370,337 
7.1 


285,263 
5.5 


260,256 
5.0 


232,381 
4.5 


187,133 
3.6 


117,127 
2.3 


74,809 
1.4 


63,887 
1.2 


7,272 




.1 






Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 


574 
98 
848 
5,813 
5,486 
10,502 
23,515 
3,182 


584 
82 
787 
5,294 
5,491 
8,976 
20, 162 
2,673 


544 
63 
741 
4,807 
6,370 
8,116 
17,879 
2,221 


580 
77 
693 
4,241 
5,215 
7,017 
16, 150 
1,995 


2,120 
228 

2,566 
12, 178 
19, 694 
20,664 
50,987 

6,055 


1,309 
160 

1,416 

5,041 
13,377 

9, 160 
27,063 

2,996 


859 
89 
793 
2,413 
9,431 
4,910 
17,509 
1,628 


617 

87 

461 

1,373 

7,109 

3,028 

13,532 

991 


490 

46 

290 

796 

5,214 

1,894 

10,954 

626 


341 
41 

170 

381 
3,625 
1,077 
8,754 

348 


188 
32 
63 
146 
1,946 
500 
5,803 
153 


151 
23 
35 
68 
1,259 
225 
4,097 
73 


171 
30 
36 
177 
1,269 
283 
5,066 
99 


7 


(b) Manslaughter by negligence.. 


3 

11 




57 




124 


Burglary— breaking or entering 


185 
431 




72 








12,721 
5.1 

37, 199 
3.7 


12, 156 
4.9 

31,811 
3.1 


11, 462 
4.6 

28,216 
2.8 


10,729 
4.3 

25,192 
2.5 


36,558 

14.7 

77,706 

7.6 


21,143 

8.5 

39,219 

3.9 


13,496 
5.4 

24,047 
2.4 


9,560 

3.8 

17,551 

1.7 


6,790 

2.7 

13,474 

1.3 


4,517 

1.8 

10, 179 

1.0 


2,343 

.9 

6,456 

.6 


1,513 
.6 

4,395 
.4 


1,653 

.7 

5,448 

.5 


199 


Percent distribution i 


.1 

688 


Percent distribution i 


.1 


Subtotal for above offenses 


50,018 
3.9 


44,049 
3.5 


39,741 
3.1 


35,998 
2.8 


114,492 
9.0 


60, 522 
4.8 


37,632 
3.0 


27, 198 
2.1 


20,310 
1.6 


14,737 
1.2 


8,831 
.7 


5,931 
.5 


7,131 
.6 


890 
.1 








10,710 

195 

2,053 

3,304 

270 

3,357 

2,705 
5,054 

5,421 

1,509 

25,630 

927 

860 

15,093 

4,377 
21,337 
29. 056 

1,301 
30,729 

1,677 


10, 494 

157 

2,066 

3,567 

491 

2,939 
2,309 
4,892 

5,059 

1,481 

22, 070 

965 

863 

14,538 

3,161 
20,001 
26, 987 

1,160 
27,350 

1,489 


10,091 

166 

2,093 

3,759 

284 

2,609 
2,122 
4,625 

4,541 

1,447 

18,942 

995 

857 

14,710 

2,541 
19,409 
23,939 

1,161 
25,308 

1,358 


10, 016 

129 

1,901 

3,905 

233 

2.444 
1,884 
4,491 

4,105 

1,425 
15,945 

1,012 

881 

14,310 

2,240 
19,213 
22,552 

1,079 
23, 224 

1,229 


36,971 

579 

6,125 

14,921 
919 

7,138 
6.224 
16, 727 

9,401 

5,531 
43,441 
5,193 
3,566 
59,763 

6,708 
81, 624 
65,361 

3,697 
76,555 

3,473 


24,482 

399 

3,049 

9,282 

614 

3,757 
3,506 
11,024 

3,312 

3,858 
16, 178 
5,070 
2,528 
51,563 

4,482 
79,385 
38,409 

2,530 
44, 674 

1,713 


17,327 

262 

1,668 

5,994 

417 

2,138 
2,323 
7,341 

1.546 

2,738 
7,427 
4,933 
1,854 
45,826 

3,618 
80, 571 
27,782 

2,075 

30,792 

999 


12,974 

216 

1,195 

4,127 

280 

1,503 
1,766 
5,654 

1,006 

2,036 
4,167 
4,559 
1,305 
43,655 

3,435 

92,825 
24,366 
2,203 
25,005 
781 


9,473 
198 
633 

2,762 
231 

1,026 
1,227 
4,435 

733 

1,584 
2,279 
4,243 
871 
40,041 

3,026 
97,313 
20, 136 

2,212 

19, 133 

515 


6,141 
122 
382 

1,614 
113 

670 

805 

3,074 

497 

1,161 
1,161 
3.654 
479 
32, 122 

2,532 
87, 031 
14,944 

1,795 

13,731 

365 


3,138 

54 
206 
674 

79 

327 

422 

1,813 

283 

740 

448 

2,597 

218 

19,589 

1,584 
58, 186 
8,911 
1,167 
7,651 
209 


1,739 
44 
63 

377 
28 

176 

194 

1,106 

172 

473 

243 

1,908 

90 

11,701 

1,087 
38,794 
5,271 
775 
4,490 
147 


1,742 
31 
267 
290 

15 

161 
251 
931 

199 

525 
266 

2,090 
114 

7,330 

984 
30,532 
5,488 

743 
4,637 

160 


284 




6 




23 




40 








39 




175 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Prostitutlon and commercialized 


95 
25 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 


36 




224 




25 


Offenses against family and children. 


13 




171 




2,459 




1,576 




8 


All other offenses (except traffic) 


871 
35 





























































' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

3 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



196 



Table 41. — City Arrests of Persons Under 15, Under 78, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1974 

[4,237 cities, 1974 estimated population 103,652,000] 



O Sense charged 



TOTAL. 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. ., 

(b) Manslaughter by neghgence 

Forcible rape. _ 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault _. 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' --. 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal for above offenses '. 

Other assaults 

Arson _ 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement _ 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

VandaUsm 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sei offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws.. 

GambUng 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (eicept traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Grand 

toul all 

ages 



11,579 
1,500 

14,659 

98,822 
124,198 
277,939 
649,633 

89,625 



249,258 
1,017,197 



238.809 
8,786 
32,495 
67,061 
4,972 
65,660 
124, 861 
105, r7 

52,002 
38,060 

360,903 
42,649 
20,701 

413,949 

154,999 
813, 102 
506,507 
31, 107 
616,347 
31,705 
63,266 
123,376 



Number of Persons Arrested 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



31 

696 
9,628 
6,766 
62, 124 
162,058 
13,443 



20,397 
3.634 



7,263 
54.004 

4,194 



2.973 
12,879 



34,662 
1,012 

68,183 
3,186 

16, 819 

62, 671 



1,216 
165 
2,921 
33, 015 
21,766 
149, 376 
321,216 
49,990 



68,908 
520, 581 



679,654 



49.768 
5,379 
4,454 
4.359 
390 
23,336 
85,905 
16.876 

2,084 
8,352 
96.832 
1.841 
2.970 
6.267 

66,286 
23, 724 

100.582 
4.254 

172,737 
10. 123 
63.266 

123.376 



441 
6.749 
66.037 
39,588 
201.372 
427,731 
66,513 



104, 418 
696,616 



800,475 

83,227 
6.228 
10, 771 
12,445 
998 
37.376 
98.948 
34,015 

16. 702 
13,513 
202.482 
4,44$ 
6,202 
43.431 

116.053 
84.422 

191,729 
9.201 

282, 197 
17,655 
63.266 

123,376 



8,818 
76, 192 
61,160 
236, 013 
605,437 
76,684 



151,486 
818.034 



970,281 

124,638 
6,876 
18,884 
26,980 
2,276 
48,725 
107,968 
53,077 

34,828 
19,375 
286,069 
8,377 
9,663 
102, 082 

127, 372 
164,382 
294,263 
13.902 
388.808 
23,308 
63.266 
123,376 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



22.4 
23.4 
16.0 



11.0 
43.3 



10.0 
25.0 
42.7 



10.6 
11.0 
19.9 
33.4 
17.5 
63.7 
49.4 
56.8 



23.6 
61.2 



35.6 
68.8 
16.0 



42.1 
2.9 
19.9 
13.7 
28.0 
31.9 
100.0 
100.0 



26.3 
29.4 
39.2 
66.7 
31.9 
72.5 



34.9 
70.9 
33.1 
18.6 
20.1 
66.9 
79.2 
32.3 

30.2 
35.6 
66.1 
10.4 
30.0 
10.6 

74.2 
10.4 
37.9 
29.6 
46.8 
56.4 
100.0 
100.0 



46.0 
50.7 
60.2 
77.1 
49.2 
84.9 
77.8 



62.1 
78.2 
68.1 
40.2 
45. S 
74.2 
86.6 
60.4 

67.0 
60.9 
79.0 



82.2 
20.2 
68.1 



73.6 
100.0 
100.0 



1 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 
I Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



197 



Table 42. — City Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1974 

[4,237 cities; 1974 estimated population 103,652,000] 



Oflenso cliarged 



Number ol persons arrested 



Percent of total > 



Male- Female 



Total Male Female 



TOTAL 

Criminal tiomicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. .. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape,. - - 

Robbery. 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary-breaking or entering 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft -. 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime * 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults - 

Arsjn 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement - - 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism - 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling.. 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy- - - 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways -.. 



11,579 
1,500 

14,659 

98,822 
124, 198 
277, 939 
649, 633 

89,625 
249,258 
,017,197 



238,809 
8,786 
32,495 
67,061 
4,972 
65, 660 
124,861 
105, 277 

52,002 
38,060 

360,903 
42,649 
20,701 

413,949 

154,999 
813, 102 
506, 507 
31, 107 
616, 347 
31,705 
63, 266 
123,376 



9,865 
1.303 
14, 659 
92, 078 
106,710 
262, 934 
443, 627 
83,801 
223,312 
T90, 262 



197 



6,744 
17, 488 
15,006 
206,106 
6,824 
25, 946 
226, 935 



263, 078 



204,673 
7,821 
22. 897 
46,092 
3,507 
68, 864 
114,908 
96,397 

12,793 
36, 051 

309,100 
39, 037 
17,332 

380, 795 

131,217 
756, 209 
400,085 
27, 239 
616, 898 
27,263 
48, 669 
61, 968 



21,989 
1,405 
6,806 



39,209 
3,009 

51,803 
3,612 
3,369 

33, 154 

23, 782 
57, 893 
106,422 
3,868 
100, 449 
4,462 
14, 697 
71,408 



85.2 
86.9 
100.0 
93.2 
85.9 
94.6 
68.3 
93.6 
89.6 
77.7 



14.8 
13.1 



10.4 
22.3 



89.0 
70.5 



89.6 
92.0 
91.6 

24.6 
92.1 
86.6 
91.5 



84.7 
92.9 
79.0 
87.6 
83.7 
86.0 



14.3 

u.o 

29.6 
32.8 
28.3 
10.4 



21.0 
12.4 
16.3 
14.0 
23.1 
67.9 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

3 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 



198 



Table 43.— City Arrest Trends by Sex, 1973-74 

[3,197 cities: 1974 estimated population 90,981,000] 



OSense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Mm-der and nonnegligent man- 

slaughter - 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault.. 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ^ 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal tor above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting... 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing. 

Vandalism 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 

Sex offenses (eicept forcible rape and prosti- 
tution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 

Driving under the influence , 

Liquor laws... 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



8,670 
1,428 
12,747 
75,086 
86,858 
192, 799 
312, 740 



183,361 
583,617 



169,849 
6,483 
18, 187 
33,807 
2,401 
43,331 
79,602 
79,658 

10,557 

31,893 
267, 382 
42,257 
16, 372 
371,874 



744, 143 
344,830 
25, 501 
442,621 
24, 862 
40,307 
47,807 



9,065 
1,127 
13,411 
85,045 
94,302 
232, 970 
392,668 



201,823 
700,947 

903,897 

181,240 
6,812 
20,156 
38,159 
2,570 
53,483 
98,940 
86,562 

12,184 

31,083 
273,255 
37, 161 
14,092 
331,612 

103,351 
646,444 
354,790 
24,051 
440,446 
24,263 
40,059 
43,667 



Per- 
cent 
change 



4-4.6 
-21.1 

-1-5.2 
•1-13.3 

4-8.6 
4-20.8 
4-25.6 

-3.5 

4-10.1 
4-20.1 



4-6.7 

4-5.1 
4-10.8 
4-12.9 

4-7.0 
4-23.4 
4-24.3 

4-8.7 

4-15.4 

-2.5 
4-2.2 
-12.1 
-13.9 
-10.8 

4-6.6 
-13.1^ 

4-2.9" 



1,059 
282 
2,648 
26,445 
16,000 
105,435 
160, 324 
43,866 

46,152 
309,625 

356,059 

32,889 
4.214 
2,044 
3,318 
256 
15,968 
55. 577 
13,455 



5,944 
68,-59 
1,569 



19,919 
70.823 
3.130 

119,205 
8,361 
40,307 
47,807 



Per- 
cent 
change 



1.054 
125 
2,702 
28,873 
16,448 
125,583 
202.249 
41.519 

49,077 
369,351 



418, 553 

35,396 
4.175 
2,624 
3,138 
261 
19, 552 
68,381 
14, 359 



-55.7 
4-2.0 
4-9.2 
4-2.8 
4-19.1 
4-26.2 
-5.4 

4-6.3 
4-19.3 



4-7.6 

-.9 

4-28.4 



6.553 

70,765 



5,015 

41,823 
17,609 
72,996 
2,935 
119,715 
7,308 
40,059 
43,667 



-5.4 

4-2.0 
4-22.4 
4-23.0 

4-6.7 

4-67.6 

4-10.2 
4-2.9 
4-7.6 
4-140.7 
-4.0 

4-9.8 
-11.6 
4-3.1 
-6.2 

4-.4 
-12.6 



296 

5,531 
13,815 
10, 720 
149, 220 

4,991 

20,885 
164,931 



6,751 
14, 245 
547 
4,649 
6,616 
7,311 



2,552 
46,206 



30, 261 

17,336 
56,232 
70, 167 
15, 120 

85,392 
4,274 
11,873 
62,686 



Per- 
cent 
change 



4-2.4 
-41.6 



Per- 
cent 
change 



6,262 
15, 612 
13, 101 
182,909 

5,234 

23,450 

201,244 



8,457 
18,065 
693 
6,042 
8,506 
8,027 



45,684 
3,418 
2,895 

28,662 

19,075 
48,796 
99,034 

3,260 
86,999 

3,981 
11,991 
61, 156 



4-13.2 
4-13.0 



4-22.6 
4-4.9 



4-12.3 
4-22.0 



4-9.4 
4-. 9 
4-25.3 
4-26.8 
4-26.7 
4-30.0 
4-28.6 

4-9.8 

4-15.0 

4-3.6 
-1.1 
-11.1 
4-6.3 
-5.3 

4-10.0 
-13.2 

4-41.1 



4-LO 
-2.4 



119 

1,946 
2,796 
5,384 
67,257 



4,841 
75,504 



14,406 
772 
32,532 
1,845 
11,873 
62,686 



18 

2,151 
3,156 

6,657 
82,907 
2.997 

5,394 

92, 561 



9,663 

465 

1,225 



10,408 
2,907 

14, 474 
589 

30,047 
1,332 

11,991 

61, 156 



-12.1 
-84.9 

4-10.5 
4-12.9 
4-23.6 
4-23.3 

4-4.7 

4-11.4 
4-22.6 

4-21.8 

4-12.9 
4-10.7 
4-51.0 
4-22.0 
4-30.9 
4-30.1 
4-31.4 
4-17.6 

4-24.6 



4-14.8 

4-116.3 

4-7.2 

4-12.3 
-12.1 

4-. 5 



-27.8 
4-LO 
-2.4 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
* Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny — theft and motor veliicle theft. 



199 



88888883 



isss: 



8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 1 






3 g ■§, 
111 



•sis - £.1 Ll'f 



I I I o 

I j j _n 

I ; ; •?. 

g i J i; i 

" ; o " 1 

5 i I S E 



g-g es s^ 

d, K «! « ij g 



5 ; '^ 



0<fLtU<fLlW>^ 



■2 g T) 
•-Go 



200 






888888 8 S 



ll 



f? 






201 



202 



51 



I r> ^ CO lo S «o I 



I g 3 II 



sss 



88 



^ .-rt ^ n -^ -Hclt- --( 



si i 

■sSS 



ill' 



"" I ■§ gS S I o 

li, « <; PQ tj S 



i 8 






35 









li 



I ij > £ 



JZOOO 3o5><mOBi 



Table 45.— Suburbon Arrest Trends, 1973-74 

[1,925 agencies; 1974 estimated population 35,795,000] 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide- 
fa) Murder and nonne^llgent manslaughter. . . 
(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— brealjing or entering 

Larceny— theft _ 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime i 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults --. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice _ 

Sex ofTcnses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Qambling 

OtTenses against family and children 

Driving under the Influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness _ 

Disorderly conduct _ 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included In totai'=)__ 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Total all ages 



1,644 
720 
3,016 
12,317 
27,375 
65,111 
135,229 
20,422 
44.352 
220, 762 



265,834 



50,650 
2,625 
7,012 
17,772 
1,033 
14,893 
34,528 
16,742 

1,676 
8,455 

113,815 
3,745 
11,106 

131, 303 

44.742 
124,839 
83,019 
2,748 
180,006 
6,697 
21,550 
45,602 



1,904 
530 
3,088 
14,917 
31.413 
79,561 
170, 196 
21,261 
51.322 
271,018 



322, 870 



52.952 
2,890 



19.122 
42,704 
20,104 

1.614 
9,354 

119,292 
4,043 
10,026 

114,224 

54,266 
111,633 
89,209 
3,359 
183,680 
5.310 
22,255 
40,826 



+15.8 
-26.4 

+2.4 
+21.1 
+14.8 
+22 2 
+25.9 

+4.1 
+15.7 
+22.8 



+2L5 



+4.5 
+10.1 
+14.6 

+4.6 
-15.1 
+28.4 
+23.7 
+20.1 

-3.7 
+10.6 
+4.8 
+8.0 
-9.7 
-13.0 

+21.3 
-10.6 

+7.5 
+22.2 

+2.0 
-20.7 

+3.3 
-10.5 



Under 18 years of 



132 
681 
3.747 
5.428 
37,852 
73,041 
12,521 
9,999 
123,414 



133,545 



11,317 
1,817 



27,080 
3,872 



2,287 
36,702 



23,166 
8.458 

28.941 
732 

56,070 
3,029 

21,650 

45,602 



1974 Percent 
change 



52 
682 
4,565 
6.823 
46,656 
90,688 
12,839 
12,236 
150. 183 



162.471 

12. 177 
1,930 
1,120 



7,594 
33.263 



2,843 
37, 982 



2,360 

26, 919 
8,411 

30,069 
1,089 

56,401 
1,956 

22,255 

40,826 



+16.1 
-60.6 
+.1 
+21.8 
+2,5.7 
+23.3 
+24.2 
+2.5 
+22.4 
+21. 



1,501 

588 
2,335 
8,570 
21,947 
27,259 
62,188 
7,901 
34,353 
97,348 



1,738 

478 
2,406 
10,352 
24, 590 
32,905 
79,508 
8,422 
39,086 
120,835 



+7.6 
46.2 
+33.2 
+8: 
-24.: 
+26.4 
+22.8 
+25.7 

+2.7 
+24.3 

+3.5 
-28.8 
+62.7 

-2.5 

+ 16.2 
-.6 
+3.9 
+48.8 
+.6 
-35.4 
+3.3 
-10.5 



6,171 
17,099 



7,448 
12, 870 

1,601 
6.168 

77.113 
3.599 

10,538 
128,883 

21,576 
116,381 
54,078 
2,016 
123,936 
3,668 



160,399 



6,913 

17,857 

773 

11,528 

9,441 
15,236 

1,537 
6,511 
81,310 
3,939 
9,102 
111,864 

27,347 
103,222 
59,140 
2,270 
127, 279 
3,354 



+15.8 
-18.7 

+3.0 
+20.8 
+12.0 
+20.7 
+27.9 

+6.6 
+13.8 
+24.1 



+21.2 

+3.7 
+18.8 
+12.0 

+4.4 
-13.7 
+29.8 
+26.8 
+18.4 

-4.0 
+5.6 
+5.4 
+9.4 
-13.6 
-13.2 

+26.7 
-11.3 

+9.4 
+12.6 
+2.7 
-8.6 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
" Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



203 



Table 46. — Suburban Arresfs by Age, 1974 

[2,636 agencies; 1974 estimated population 47,034,000] 





Grand 

toUI 

all ages 


Ages 

under 

15 


Ages 

under 

18 


Ages 
18 and 
over 


Age 


Offense charged 


10 and 
under 


11-12 


13-14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


TOTAL --- 


1,795.372 
100.0 


207,119 
11.5 


592,2% 
33.0 


1.203.076 
67.0 


24,244 
1.4 


46,289 
2.6 


136.586 
7.6 


113,672 
S.3 


137,500 
7.7 


134,005 

7.5 


120,066 
6.7 


100,666 
5.6 


85.000 




4.7 






Criminal liomicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent 


2,646 
792 
4,101 
19,283 
41,997 
103,018 
219,918 
28,927 


40 
8 
174 
1,240 
2,496 
23, 431 
52,800 
4,503 


222 

81 

865 

5,653 

8,471 

59,650 

116,282 

17, 147 


2,424 
711 
3,236 
13,630 
33,526 
43,368 
103, 636 
11,780 


1 

8 

64 

251 

2,632 

6,467 

107 


12 

1 

23 

232 

.576 

5,148 

13,984 

493 


26 

6 

143 

944 

1,669 

15,651 

32, 349 

3,903 


41 

6 

145 

1,055 
1,488 
12,027 
20, 933 
4,449 


56 
24 
222 
1,526 
2,098 
li, 869 
22, 414 
4,758 


85 
43 
324 
1,832 
2,389 
11,323 
20,135 
3,437 


135 
68 
303 
1,999 
2,402 
8,808 
16, 081 
2,433 


155 
60 
279 
1,697 
2,219 
6,337 
11,719 
1,619 


126 


(b) Manslaughter by negligence. - 


43 

245 




1,450 




2,049 


Burglary— brealdng or entering 


4,758 
8,927 




1,175 








68,027 

100.0 

351,863 

100.0 


3,950 

5.8 

80,734 

22.9 


15,211 

22.4 

193,079 

54.9 


52,816 

77.6 

158, 784 

45.1 


325 

9,206 
2.6 


843 

1.2 

19,625 

5.6 


2,782 

4.1 

51,903 

14.8 


2,729 

4.0 

37,409 

10.6 


3,902 

5.7 

40,041 

11.4 


4,630 

6.8 

34,895 

9.9 


4,839 

7.1 

27,322 

7.8 


4,350 

6.4 

19,675 

5.6 


3,870 




5.7 




u.sto 




4.2 






Subtotal for above offenses 


420,682 
100.0 


84,692 
20.1 


208,371 
49.5 


212,311 
50.5 


9,532 
2.3 


20,469 
4.9 


54, 691 
13.0 


40,144 
9.5 


43,967 
10.5 


39,568 
9.4 


32,229 

7.7 


24,085 

5.7 


18,773 
4.5 








70,742 
3,821 
11.033 
26,583 
2,508 

24,558 
56,267 
27,717 

2,424 

11.864 

158.694 

5.513 

12.627 
251.272 

76,915 
165,058 
125.120 
4,412 
246,898 
7,093 
28,952 
54,619 


6,074 

1,612 

244 

168 

29 

2,850 
26,466 
1,640 

10 

1,201 

5,889 

37 

353 

123 

3,393 

1,234 

13,307 

345 

27,734 

787 

7,017 

21,914 


15, 696 

2,565 

1,575 

976 

124 

9,564 
43, 506 
6, 102 

108 

3,544 
48, 173 
170 
1,193 
3,819 

36,767 
10, 746 
39, 081 

1,392 
72,594 

2,659 
28,952 
54, 619 


55,046 
1,256 
9,458 

25,607 
2,384 

14, 994 
12,761 
21,615 

2,316 

8,320 
110, 521 

5,343 
11,434 
247,453 

40, 148 
154,312 
86, 039 
3, 020 
174,304 
4,434 


889 
492 
13 
15 

214 

5,815 

130 

1 

91 
73 
2 
95 
76 

53 
43 

1,769 
25 

3,315 
86 
248 

1,267 


1,553 
423 
37 

38 
10 

563 

7,693 

338 

1 

224 
414 
6 
62 
11 

235 
119 

85 

6,256 

158 

1,034 

3,338 


3,632 

697 
194 
115 
19 

2.073 
12,958 
1, 172 

8 

886 
5,402 

29 
196 

36 

3,105 
1,072 
8,316 
235 
18,163 
543 
5,735 
17,309 


2,647 
393 
256 
146 
15 

1,945 
6,514 
1,156 

14 

679 
8,658 
30 
213 
137 

5,735 
1,813 
6.677 
247 
14,377 
533 
6,412 
14, 931 


3,310 
332 

478 
259 
36 

2,340 
5,985 
1,534 

29 

813 
15,046 
38 
228 
934 

11,873 
3,044 
8.795 
338 
15,891 
671 
8,866 
12, 693 


3,665 
228 
597 
403 
44 

2,429 
4,541 
1,772 

55 

851 

18,580 

65 

399 

2,625 

15,766 
4,655 
10,302 
462 
14, 592 
668 
6,657 
5,081 


3,767 
166 
705 
743 
76 

2,252 
2,651 
1,909 

177 

663 

19,845 

97 

779 

6,271 

11,915 

7,205 

10,260 

431 

17, 198 
727 


3,551 
143 

765 

1,024 

87 

1,933 
1,759 
1,676 

233 

557 

16,973 

100 

576 

7,884 

8,428 
6,546 
8,647 

333 
14,825 

541 


3,315 




100 




766 




1,284 




79 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, 


1,420 




1,126 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc — 
Prostitution and commercialized 


1,443 
233 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 


539 




14, 168 




108 


Offenses against family and children. 


537 
8,210 




5,431 




6,131 




7,205 




262 


All other offenses (except traffic) 


13,454 
413 


Cm-few and loitering law violations... 























See footnotes at end of table. 



204 



Table 46. — Suburban Arretts by Age, 1974 — Continued 





Age 


Offense charged 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65 and 
over 


Not 
known 


TOTAL 


72.219 
4.0 


64.905 
3.6 


S8.I20 
3.2 


53.172 
3.0 


179.069 
10.0 


119,601 
6.7 


90.795 
5.1 


78,406 
4.4 


65.7S8 
3.7 


50.933 
2.8 


30.435 
1.7 


18.423 
1.0 


14.053 

.8 


1,4S5 








Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent 


137 
49 

260 
1,232 
1,963 
3.563 
7,398 

920 


122 
44 

240 
1.111 
1.881 
3.067 
6,262 

870 


110 
35 

213 
1,008 
1,799 
2.637 
5,430 

646 


120 
39 

187 

870 
1,709 
2.328 
4,700 

555 


498 
113 
695 
2.341 
6.222 
6.141 
15.049 
1,674 


304 
70 

389 

974 
4.231 
2,612 
8,277 

803 


224 
49 

184 

464 
2,992 
1.342 
5.354 

441 


160 
45 
94 
231 
2,205 
762 
4,052 
246 


133 
32 
81 
119 
1,542 
460 
3,178 
182 


75 
27 
38 
75 
1.041 
254 
2,594 
100 


56 
11 
12 
30 
578 
117 
1.786 
44 


26 
10 
10 
8 
367 
60 
1,212 
18 


41 
15 
3 
12 
294 
39 
1,441 
27 


2 
1 
3 
9 
32 
83 
176 
27 


(b) Manslaughter by negligence 


Robbery 




Burglary— breaking or entering 








3,592 

5.3 

11,881 

3.4 


3,354 

4.9 

10,199 

2.9 


3,130 
4.6 

8,713 
2.5 


2,886 
4.2 

7,583 
2.2 


9,756 

14.3 

22,864 

6.5 


5,898 

8.7 

11,692 

3.3 


3,864 
5.7 

7,137 
2.0 


2,690 
4.0 

.5,060 
1.4 


1,875 
2.8 

3,820 
1.1 


1,229 

1.8 

2.948 

.8 


676 

1.0 

1,947 

.6 


411 

.6 

1,290 

.4 


350 

.5 

1,507 

.4 


46 


Percent distribution '. . 




286 
.1 


Percent distribution ' 


Subtotal tor above offenses 


15,622 
3.7 


13,597 
3.2 


11,878 
2.8 


10,508 
2.5 


32,733 

7.8 


17,660 
4.2 


11,050 
2.6 


7,795 
1.9 


5,727 
1.4 


4,204 
1.0 


2,634 
.6 


1.711 
.4 


1,872 
.4 


333 




• 




3,168 
75 
6.56 

1,228 
147 

1.163 

884 

1,327 

226 

497 

11,400 

103 

508 

9,066 

1,898 
5,940 
6,155 

181 
11,727 

348 


3,(H5 
63 

668 

1,376 

366 

1,049 

747 

1,240 

222 

452 

9,411 

113 

553 

9,047 

1,420 
5,393 
5,184 

172 
10,478 

309 


2,784 
60 

728 
1,450 

149 

828 

663 

1,171 

219 

413 

7,628 
111 
548 

8,939 

1,064 
5,080 
4,434 

153 
9,571 

249 


2,768 
53 

637 
1,466 

128 

787 

535 

1,124 

201 

399 

6,303 

134 

585 
8,843 

922 
4,863 
4,011 

147 
8,520 

238 


9,955 

202 

2.085 

6,014 

491 

2,394 
1.594 

3,877 

425 

1,532 

15,304 

645 

2,378 
36,708 

2,588 
18,373 
12,583 

446 
28,129 

615 


7.119 

135 

1,012 

4.052 

308 

1,205 

905 

2,559 

171 

1,006 
5,089 
732 
1,710 
32,346 

1,605 
15,397 
7,788 
255 
18,209 
338 


5,103 
83 

577 
2,709 

234 

747 

598 

1,680 

81 

700 
2,088 

680 
1,274 
28,557 

1,132 
15, 103 
5,. TO 
153 
12,474 
199 


3,974 
60 

403 
1,929 

130 

457 

448 

1,250 

47 

482 

1,108 

606 

895 

26,508 

1,023 
16,016 
4,663 
154 
10,264 
164 


2,748 
54 

230 
1,177 

lOS 

356 
298 
938 

23 

381 
606 
553 
60t 
23,997 

861 

15,652 

3,622 

107 

7,594 

122 


1,806 
20 
123 
626 
43 

203 
221 
662 

38 

271 
313 
463 
290 
19,024 

773 

13,706 

2,593 

85 

5,395 

74 


962 
15 
69 

312 
26 

100 
101 
345 

10 

162 
113 
379 
116 
11,529 

443 

8,554 
1,547 

66 
2,911 

42 


501 
12 
17 

134 

9 

55 
44 
210 

2 

118 
43 

244 

39 

6,542 

289 
5,883 
851 
34 
1,653 
32 


421 
11 
14 
76 
4 

42 
55 
192 

6 

143 
62 

274 

35 

3,953 

278 
4,333 
772 
39 
1,451 
20 


59 
4 
3 

7 






Fraud 




Stolen property; buying, receiving, 


3 

132 
12 

2 




Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. .. 
Prostitution and commercialized 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 




67 




Offenses against family and children. 


7 
29 






107 








AU other offenses (except traffic) 


451 
3 


Curiew and loitering law violations.. 































































• Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

3 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 



205 



Table 41. —Suburban Arrests of Persons Under 15, Under IB, Under 21, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1974 

(2,636 agencies; 1974 estimated population 47,034,0001 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. . , 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape -. - - 

Robbery - 

Aggravated as'sault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft _ - 

Violent crime ' - 

Property crime '_ 

Subtotal for above offenses.. _. 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement.. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism .._. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic dnig laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws.. 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion. 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



3,646 
792 
4,101 
19,283 
41,997 
103.018 
219. 918 
28,927 



68,027 
351,863 



420,682 



70,742 
3,821 
11,033 
26,583 
2,508 
24.558 
56,267 
27,717 

2,424 
11,864 
158,694 
5.513 
12.627 
251,272 

76.915 
165.058 
125.120 
4,412 
246,898 
7.093 
28,952 
54.619 



Number of Persons Arrested 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



174 
1,240 
2.496 
23. 431 
52,800 
4,503 



3.950 
80, 734 



6.074 
1,612 



2,850 
26, 466 
1,640 



1,201 
5,889 



3,393 
1,234 

13,307 



7,017 
21, 914 



81 
865 
5.653 
8.471 
59. 650 
116. 282 
17, 147 



15, 211 
193. 079 



IS. 696 
2,565 
1,575 



9.564 
43.506 
6,102 



3,544 
48. 173 
170 
1,193 
3.819 

36,767 
10. 746 
39, 081 

1,392 
72, 594 

2,659 
28,952 
54, 619 



638 
252 
1,692 
10, 799 
15. 141 
79. 553 
153.009 
22. 374 



28,270 
254. 936 



283. 458 



1 Violent crime is ofTenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime Is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 
3 Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



26.329 
2.974 
3.811 
4.027 

366 I 
15, 169 
49.042 
11,130 



5.303 
90, 159 



26.184 

62,544 
30. 628 
65, 193 
2,418 
118,071 
4,340 
28,952 
54,619 



1.127 
419 
2,592 
15, 020 
22,493 
91.148 
176, 799 
25,365 



41,232 
293,312 



334.963 



38.094 
3,225 
6.500 
9.547 
1.156 
18. 996 
51.871 
15.992 

1.619 



62, 079 

67,848 
51,904 
84,977 

3.071 
158, 367 

5,484 
28, 952 
54,619 



Percentage 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



22.7 
24.0 



11.6 
47.0 



11.1 
24.2 
40.1 



10.2 
21.1 
29.3 
20.2 
57.9 
52.9 
59.3 



22.4 
54.9 



22.2 
67.1 
14.3 



38.9 
77.3 
22.0 



29.9 
30.4 



31.2 
31.6 
29.4 
37.5 
100.0 
100.0 



24.1 
31.8 
41.3 
56.0 



41.6 
72.5 



37.2 
77.8 
34.5 
15.1 
14.6 
61.8 
87.2 
40.2 

31.0 

44.7 
62.5 
8.6 
24.4 
10.4 

81.3 
18.6 
52.1 
54.8 
47.8 
61.2 
100.0 
100.0 



42.6 
.52.9 
63.2 
77.9 
53.6 
88.5 
80.4 
87.7 



60.6 
83.4 



53.8 
84.4 
58.9 
35.9 
46.1 
77.4 
92.2 
57.7 



59.5 
84.4 
17.0 
41.8 

24.7 



31.4 
67.9 
69.6 
64.1 
77.3 
100.0 
100.0 



206 



Table 48. — Suburban Arresit, Diifribution by Sex, 1974 

[2,636 agencies; 1974 estimated population 47,034,0001 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. .. 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime' 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults _ 

Arson 

Forgerj' and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence _; 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness _ 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



2,646 
792 
4,101 
19, 283 
41,997 
103,018 
219,918 
28, 927 



68, 027 
351, 863 



420,682 



70, 742 
3,821 
11,033 
26,583 
2,508 
24,558 
56, 267 
27,717 

2,424 
11,864 
158, 694 
5,513 
12, 627 
251, 272 

76,915 
165,058 
125, 120 
4,412 
246, 898 
7,093 
28,952 
54,619 



2,248 
694 
4,101 
18,052 
37. 322 
97, 432 
154,270 
27,032 



61,723 
278. 734 



61,516 
3.482 



22.252 
52,296 
25,938 

445 
11,155 
136, 328 

4,894 
11,524 
229, 647 

66,184 
150,942 
108,779 
3,825 
211.731 
6,234 
22, 014 
24,723 



1,231 

4,675 
5,586 
65,648 
1,895 



6,304 
73, 129 



3.090 
8,940 
872 
2.306 
3,971 
1,779 



10. 731 
14, 116 
16,341 



85.0 
87.6 
100.0 
93.6 
88,9 
94.6 



87.0 
91.1 



90.6 
92.9 
93.6 

18.4 
94.0 
85.9 
88.8 
91.3 
91.4 

86.0 
91.4 



85.8 
87.9 



Percent of total ' 



15.0 
12.4 



28.0 
33.6 
34.8 



14.1 
11.2 



13.1 
13.3 

14.2 
12.1 
24.0 
54.7 



1 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

' Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

3 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 



207 



594-259 O - 75 - 1 



Table 49.— Suburban Arrests by Race, 1974 

[2,600 agencies; 1974 estimated population 46,030,000] 



Oflfense charged 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegli- 

gent manslaughter 

(h) Manslaughter by negli- 
gence - 

Forcible rape. 

Robborj- 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime' 

Property crime * 

Subtotal for above of- 
fenses 

Other assaults 

Arson.. .. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement. 

Slolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
ing, etc 

Prosutution and commercial- 
ized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible 
rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gamliling 

Offenses against family and 
childrin 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traf- 
fic) 

Suspicion - 

Curfew and loitering law viola- 
tions 

Runaways 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Total arrests 



776 
4,013 
19,049 
41,273 
100, 942 
214,677 
28,276 



66,955 
343,895 



411,626 



69,671 
3,742 
10, 736 
26, 195 
2,489 

23, 999 
55,346 



11,623 

156, 155 

5,469 

12,366 
248, 114 

75,675 

161,651 

123, 176 

4,334 

241, S75 
7,011 

28,739 
53,470 



649 
2,716 
10, 219 
30, 102 
S3, 008 
166,694 
22, 906 



317,911 



54,246 
3,358 

7,941 
20,750 
1,845 

17, 028 
51,228 



10,254 
130,303 



9,338 
218,305 

71,585 

139, 643 

104, 0S.5 

3,659 

201, 801 
5,713 

26,968 
49,902 



109 
1, 261 
R.619 
10, 620 
17,133 
45, 930 
4,964 



21,529 
68,029 



2,727 
5,209 



5,896 
3,800 



1.243 

15,864 
2,5S3 



3, 030 
19, 032 
17, 036 



i,.5es 

3,039 



7,219 



Percent distribution' 



Total White Negro Indian Chi 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 



100.0 



100.0 
100.0 

100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100. 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 



77.6 
81.3 



91.6 
86.4 



93.8 
93.3 



14.0 
31.3 
45.4 
25.7 
17.0 
21.4 
17.6 



25.4 
20.2 
25. 5 



10.7 
10.2 
47. ■_> 



11.8 
14.6 
14.2 



208 



Table 49. — Suburban Arresfi by Race, 1974 — Continued 



Offense charged 


Arrests under 18 


Percent distribution 




Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Jap- 
anese 


All 
others 


Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Jap- 
anese 


All 
others 


TOTAL 


581,107 


510.242 


66,657 


1,468 


172 


246 


2,322 


100.0 


87.8 


11.5 


.3 


W 


W 








Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegli- 


222 

81 

859 

5,593 

8,349 

58,425 
113,378 
16,725 


153 

66 

549 

2,820 

6,232 

49,642 
91.920 
14,168 


68 

15 

299 

2,734 

2,034 

8,344 
20,625 
2.392 


1 








100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


68.9 

81.5 
63.9 
50.4 
74.6 

85.0 
81.1 
84.7 


30.6 

18.5 
34.8 
48.9 
24.4 

14.3 
18.2 
14.3 


.5 








(b) Manslaughter by negU- 
















3 

18 
34 

153 
224 
62 


4 
2 

20 
65 
6 


2 
2 
2 

31 

72 
3 


6 
15 
45 

235 

472 
94 


.3 
.3 

.4 

.3 
.2 
.4 


.1 


.2 












Burglary— breaking or enter- 


.1 


.1 
.1 




Larceny— theft 


.4 












15,023 
188,528 


9,754 
155, 730 


5.135 
31,361 


56 
439 


6 
91 


lo: 


66 
801 


100.0 
100.0 


64.9 
82.6 


34.2 
16.6 


.4 
.2 












.1 








Subtotal for above of- 


203,632 


165,550 


36,511 


495 


97 


112 


867 


100.0 


81.3 


17.9 


.2 




.1 










15,464 

2,527 

1,521 

963 

124 

9,352 
42,907 

6,014 

106 

3,462 

47,300 

168 

1,185 
3,719 

36,105 
10,446 
38,579 
1,359 

71,342 
2,623 

28,739 
53,470 


11,983 

2,293 

1,294 

819 

110 

7,186 
40,160 

4,922 

65 

2,988 

44,677 

87 

1,049 
3,549 

35,374 
9,976 

33,591 
1.204 

64,194 
2,301 

26,968 
49,902 


3,349 
212 
218 
138 
13 

2.100 
2.571 

1,034 

41 

453 
2,442 

79 

124 
88 

499 

357 

4,790 

142 

6,575 
314 

1,568 
3,039 


44 
11 
6 
4 

1 

9 
65 

16 


6 


7 
2 

1 


75 
9 
2 

2 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 

100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100. 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 


77.5 
90.7 
85.1 
85.0 

88.7 

76.8 
93.6 

81.8 

61.3 

86.3 
94.5 
51.8 

88.5 
95.4 

98.0 
95.5 
87.1 
88.6 

90.0 
87.7 

93.8 
93.3 


21.7 
8.4 
14.3 
14.3 

10.5 

22.5 
6.0 

17.2 

38.7 

13.1 
5.2 
47.0 

10.5 
2.4 

1.4 
3.4 
12.4 
10.4 

9.2 
12.0 

5.5 
5.7 


.3 

.4 
.4 
.4 
.8 

.1 
.2 

.3 












.1 
.1 




Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 


.1 
2 














Stolen property; buying, re- 


3 

10 

3 


6 
8 

3 


48 
93 

36 




.1 


.5 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc 






6 


Prostitution and commercial- 








Sex offenses (except forcible 
rape and prostitution) 


8 
47 
1 

3 

20 

88 
82 
77 

174 
2 

54 
254 


2 
6 


25 


10 

103 

1 

9 
60 

123 

30 

112 

4 

374 

126 
233 


.2 
.1 
.6 

.3 

.5 

.2 
.8 
.2 
.5 

.2 
.1 

.2 
.5 


.1 


.1 


.3 

2 




.6 


Offenses against family and 














1 
3 

5 

1 

9 

6 
20 


18 

16 

17 






1.6 








.3 








.3 








.3 




.1 


.1 


.3 


All other offenses (except traf- 
fic) 


.5 








.2 


Curfew and loitering law viola- 




.1 


.4 















See footnotes at end of table. 



209 



Table 49. — Suburban Arrests by Race, 1974 — Continued 



Offense charged 



TOTAL.. 



Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegU- 

gent manslaughter — 

(b) Manslaughter by neg- 

ligence. .- 

Forcible rape... 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering. 

Larceny— thcit 

Motor vehicle theft 



Violent crime '. . 
Property crime ' 



Subtotal for above of- 
fenses 



Other assaults. 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud.... 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, re- 
ceiving, possessing.. 

VandaUsm 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 
etc. 



Prostitution and commercial- 
ized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible 
rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

GambUng 

Offenses against family and 
children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traf- 



fic). 



Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law vio- 
lations 

Runaways 



Arrests 18 and over 



3,184 
13,456 
32, 924 
42,517 
101,299 
11,551 

51,932 
155, 3G7 



207, 994 



54, 207 
1,215 
9.215 

25, 232 
2,365 

14,647 
12, 439 



8,161 

108, 855 

5,301 

11,181 
244,395 

39, 570 

151,205 

84,597 

2,975 

170, 533 



583 
2,167 
7,309 
23, 870 
33,366 
74,774 



34, 810 
116,968 



152,361 



42, 263 
1,065 
6,647 

19, 931 
1,735 

10, 742 
11,068 



94, 626 
2,472 

8,289 
214,756 

36,211 

129,667 

70, 494 

2,455 

137,607 
3,412 



94 
965 
5,915 
8,586 
8,791 
25, 305 
2,572 



16, 394 
36,668 



2,500 
5,161 



3,796 
1,229 



2,754 
22, 370 

2,537 
18, 695 
13,146 



Percent distribution ' 



100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 



100.0 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 



55.0 
72.5 
78.5 
73.8 
76.4 



13.5 
30.3 
44.0 
26.1 
20.7 
25.0 
22.3 



67.0 
75.3 



87.7 
72.1 
79.0 
73.4 

73.3 
89.0 



8<i. 
86.9 
46.6 



91.5 
85.8 



11.4 

27.2 
20.5 
26.3 



12.3 

47.2 



12.4 
15.5 
16.0 

17.1 
21.9 



1 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

s Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
* Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. 



210 



Table 50.— Rural Arrest Trends, 1973-1974 

[554 agencies; 1974 estimated population 9,379,000] 



Oflense charged 



TOTAL... 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

(b) ManMaugbter by negligence 

Forcible rape.. 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering _ 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime • 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property: buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism... 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sei oflenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 


Under 18 years 


of age 


18 years of age and over 


1973 


1974 


Percent 
change 


1973 


1974 


Percent 
change 


1973 


1974 


Percent 
change 


237,525 


248,492 


+4.6 


49.747 


51.893 


+4.3 


187,778 


196,599 


+4.7 


601 


611 


+1.7 


49 


53 


+8.2 


552 


558 


+1.1 


289 


265 


-8.3 


35 


18 


-48.6 


254 


247 


-2.8 


880 


805 


-8.5 


121 


87 


-28.1 


759 


718 


-5.4 


1,357 


1,651 


+21.7 


260 


291 


+11.9 


1.097 


1,360 


+24.0 


6.244 


7,108 


+13.8 


449 


458 


+2.0 


5.795 


6,650 


+14.8 


13,918 


16,867 


+21.2 


6.472 


7,880 


+21.8 


7,446 


8,9S7 


+20.7 


15, 170 


18,661 


+23.0 


5,544 


6,703 


+20.9 


9,626 


11,958 


+24.2 


3.727 


3,625 


-2.7 


1,930 


1,861 


-3.6 


1,797 


1,764 


-1.8 


9,082 


10. 175 


+12.0 


879 


889 


+1.1 


8,203 


9,286 


+13.2 


32,815 


39, l.'i3 


+19.3 


13,946 


16,444 


+17.9 


18,869 


22,709 


+20.4 


42,186 


49,593 


+17.6 


14.860 


17.351 


+16.8 


27,326 


32.242 


+18.0 


8.357 


8.698 


+4.1 


662 


696 


+5.1 


7.695 


8.002 


+4.0 


453 


493 


+8 8 


125 


162 


+29.6 


328 


331 


+.9 


1,857 


2.014 


+8.5 


212 


272 


+28.3 


1,645 


1.742 


+5.9 


6,869 


8.716 


+26.9 


104 


159 


+52.9 


6,765 


8.557 


+26.5 


255 


242 


-5.1 


22 


12 


-45.5 


233 


230 


-1.3 


2.168 


2,659 


+22.6 


567 


572 


+.9 


1,601 


2.087 


+30.4 


5.003 


6.018 


+20.3 


3.007 


3.598 


+19.7 


1,996 


2.420 


+21.2 


2.783 


3,028 


+8.8 


248 


253 


+2.0 


2,535 


2.775 


+9.5 


55 


82 


+49.1 


1 


2 


+100.0 


54 


80 


+48.1 


1.241 


1,361 


+9.7 


180 


242 


+34.4 


1.061 


1.119 


+5.5 


18.682 


20.973 


+12.3 


4.006 


4,225 


+3.1 


14.586 


16,748 


+14.8 


758 


656 


-13.5 


14 


5 


-64.3 


744 


651 


-12.5 


4.531 


4,008 


-11.5 


75 


130 


+73.3 


4.456 


3.878 


-13.0 


32.566 


28,456 


-12.6 


463 


457 


-1.3 


32,103 


27,999 


-12.8 


12,684 


14,921 


+17.6 


5.631 


5.576 


-1.0 


7,ft'>3 


9,345 


+32.5 


34,751 


32,393 


-6.8 


1.108 


993 


-10.4 


33,643 


31,400 


-6.7 


11,465 


11,716 


+2.2 


1.498 


1.547 


+3.3 


9,967 


10, 169 


+2.0 


670 


674 


+.6 


114 


100 


-12.3 


556 


574 


+3.2 


39,921 


42,759 


+7.1 


6.490 


6.509 


+.3 


33,431 


36,250 


+8.4 


894 


455 


-49.1 


133 


142 


+6.8 


761 


313 


-58.9 


1,074 
9,196 


1,037 
7,995 


-3.4 
-13.1 


1.074 
9,196 


1.03'' 
7.995 


-3.4 
-13.1 















' Violent crime is oflenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



211 



Table 51 .—Rural Arrests by Age, 1974 

[806 agencies; 1974 estimated population 12,829,000] 





Grand 

toUl 

all ages 


Ages 

under 

16 


Ages 

under 

18 


Ages 
18 and 
over 










Age 










Offense charged 


10 and 
under 


11-12 


13-14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


TOTAL. 


354,619 
100.0 


16,972 

4.8 


67,691 
19.1 


286,928 
80.9 


1,634 
.5 


3,355 
.9 


11,983 
3.4 


12,349 
3.5 


18,080 
5.1 


20,290 
5.7 


23,451 
6.6 


21,500 
6.1 


18,756 










Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent 


915 
355 
1,165 
2,281 
10,583 
22,344 
24,859 
5,242 


11 

5 

21 

36 

96 

3,332 

2,478 

610 


70 

26 

136 

308 

638 

9,081 

8, 642 

2,613 


84.5 
329 
1,029 
1,883 
9,945 
12,363 
16, 217 
2, 629 


1 
1 

11 

397 
264 
18 


1 

4 
5 
20 
783 
598 
77 


9 

2 

17 

31 

65 

2,152 

1,616 

515 


11 

17 
.59 
70 
1,812 
1,459 
654 


24 

8 

38 

114 

179 

2,352 

2,232 

722 


24 
11 
60 
189 
293 
2,485 
2,473 
627 


32 
35 
94 
245 
448 
2,527 
2,594 
491 


38 
31 
83 
249 
475 
1,923 
2,013 
333 




(b) Manslaughter by negUgence.. 


28 










Burglary— breaking or entering 


1,336 

1,562 










14,944 
100.0 

52,445 
100.0 


164 
1.1 

6,420 
12.2 


1,242 

8.3 

21, 236 

40.5 


13,702 
91.7 

31,209 
59.5 


12 
.1 
679 
1.3 


30 

.2 

1,458 

2.8 


122 
.8 

4,283 
8.2 


157 
1.1 

3,925 
7.5 


355 

2.4 
5,306 
10.1 


566 

3.8 

5,585 

10.6 


819 

5.5 

5,612 

10.7 


845 

5.7 

4,269 

8.1 




















Subtotal for above oflenses 


67,744 
100.0 


6,589 
9.7 


22,504 
33.2 


45, 240 
66,8 


692 
1.0 


1,490 
2.2 


4,407 
6.5 


4,084 
6.0 


5,669 
8.4 


6,162 
9.1 


6,466 
9.5 


5, 145 
7.6 


4,029 








12,622 

662 

3,055 

13,390 
410 

3,468 
7,647 
4,110 

130 

1,729 

27,932 

814 

5,554 

50,284 

18,388 
48,192 
16,185 

882 
58,444 

793 
1,416 
10,768 


226 
107 
48 
14 
5 

131 

2,193 

61 


098 
202 
398 
195 
15 

715 

4,457 

308 

4 

292 

5,481 

5 

176 

808 

6,676 
1,466 
1,937 

123 
8,560 

178 
1,416 
10, 768 


11,624 

460 

2,657 

13, 195 
395 

2,753 

• 3, 190 

3,802 

126 

1,437 

22, 451 

809 

5,378 
49, 476 

11.712 
46, 726 
14,248 

759 
49, 875 

615 


18 
44 

1 


48 
25 

2 

1 


160 
38 
45 
13 

5 

101 

1.094 

43 


144 
13 

89 
20 
3 

128 
639 
42 


248 
33 

102 
51 
5 

199 
860 
89 

1 

65 

1.754 

1 

45 

214 

2,229 
403 
496 
51 
2,281 
41 
401 
2,842 


380 

49 
159 
110 

2 

257 
765 
116 

3 

83 
2,514 

64 

529 

3,141 
742 
777 
50 
2,532 
42 
389 
1, 422 


595 
53 
225 
331 

12 

333 

657 
192 

6 

09 

3, 657 

9 

245 
1,284 

2,542 
1,490 
1,168 

56 
3,959 

72 


577 
50 
266 
462 
11 

321 

448 
194 

12 

107 

3,652 

11 

233 
1,603 

1,999 
1,564 
1,078 

63 
3,652 

52 












Fraud... . . . . 








Stolen property; buying, receiving, 


10 

429 

4 


20 
670 
14 




Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 

Prostitution and commercialized 


286 
223 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 


84 
465 
1 
37 
29 

481 
140 
396 
10 
2,089 
58 
319 
3, 480 


6 

21 


14 

42 


64 
402 
1 
23 
13 

430 

119 

270 

4 

1,497 

38 

251 

2, 956 


60 
748 
1 
30 
36 

825 
181 
268 
12 
1,667 
37 
307 
3, 015 


103 










Offenses against family and children.. 


11 
16 

7 

9 
49 

3 
192 

1 
23 
98 


3 

35 
12 
77 
3 

400 
19 
45 

435 


225 
1,657 








1,537 








32 


All other oflcnses (except traffic) 


3,333 

62 



























See footnotes at end of table. 



212 







Table 


51 .—Rural Arrests by Age, 


7974— Continued 














Age 


Offense charged 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65 and 
over 


Not 
known 


Total 


16,770 
4.7 


14.774 
4.2 


13.666 
3.9 


12,455 
3.5 


42.277 
11.9 


29.785 
8.4 


23.302 
6.6 


20,261 
5.7 


17,182 
4.8 


13.782 
3.9 


8.617 
2.4 


5,456 
1.5 


4.332 
1.2 


562 
.2 






Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegllgent 


46 
23 
82 
164 
504 
1.048 
1,200 
209 


35 
23 
76 
171 
552 
883 
1,033 
165 


32 

15 
59 
123 
510 
757 
845 
144 


44 
21 
66 
105 
469 
588 
730 
124 


182 
42 

223 

295 
1,873 
1,565 
2,292 

383 


93 
34 
118 
149 
1,346 
766 
1,328 
216 


87 
15 
65 
75 
986 
396 
851 
109 


61 
13 
36 
46 
744 
254 
625 
91 


53 

14 
28 
10 
569 
142 
438 
52 


37 
10 
11 
19 

390 
95 

296 
31 


18 
7 
14 
9 
242 
36 
172 
11 


16 
9 
3 

2 

169 

18 

107 

5 


24 
8 

127 

12 

105 

3 


2 

1 


(b) Manslaughter by negUgence- 








27 
17 
20 
4 


Burglary — breaking or entering 








79« 

5.3 

2,457 

4.7 


834 

5.6 

2,081 

4.0 


724 

4.8 

1,746 

3.3 


684 

4.6 

1,442 

2.7 


2,573 

17.2 

4.240 

8.1 


1,706 

11.4 

2,310 

4.4 


1,213 
8.1 

1,356 
2.6 


887 
5.9 
970 
1.8 


660 
4.4 
632 
1.2 


457 
3.1 

422 
.8 


283 
1.9 
219 
.4 


190 
1.3 

130 
.2 


155 
1.0 
120 
.2 


31 
.2 

47 












Subtotal for above offenses 


3,276 
4.8 


2,938 
4.3 


2,485 
3.7 


2,147 
3.2 


6,855 
10.1 


4,050 
6.0 


2,584 
3.8 


1.870 
2.8 


1,306 
1.9 


889 
1.3 


509 
.8 


329 
.5 


283 
.4 


79 








656 
20 
178 
691 
16 

210 
244 
229 

13 

97 
2,704 

24 

247 

1,808 

688 
1,553 
890 
42 
3,140 
44 


562 
23 
167 
641 
23 

195 
192 
212 

11 

75 
2,123 

24 

222 

1,779 

509 
1,475 

755 

30 

2,794 


613 
36 

171 
687 
19 

160 
167 
204 

7 

65 
1,688 

17 

261 

1,802 

407 
1,448 
736 
34 
2,623 
36 


519 
23 
141 

706 
17 

126 
132 
185 

3 

62 
1,369 

25 

303 

1.698 

321 
1,472 
712 
35 
2,427 
32 


2,191 
75 
543 

2,84i 
85 

429 
398 

678 

29 

272 

2,896 

85 

1,053 

6,777 

1.033 

5,381 

2,2M 

104 

8,254 

91 


1,518 
46 
299 

2,141 
61 

261 
211 
504 

11 

174 
729 
112 
818 
5,707 

653 

5,(M3 

1.487 

69 

5,824 

67 


1,179 

31 

173 

1.558 

53 

198 
154 
322 

11 

104 
236 
79 
648 
5,184 

541 
4,912 
1,079 

51 
4.155 

50 


926 
24 
139 

995 
27 

107 
110 
274 

5 

99 
127 

85 

495 

4,989 

483 
5,222 
970 
48 
3,228 
38 


663 
13 

74 
703 
30 

80 
67 
216 

1 

52 
72 
83 
302 
4,882 

403 
4.972 
770 
57 
2,418 
18 


435 
16 

48 
429 

18 

40 
35 
157 

4 

53 

48 

67 

170 

4,225 

333 

4,508 
568 

42 
1,686 

11 


245 

9 

197 
8 

23 
34 

91 


150 
6 
14 

106 
5 

14 
16 
53 


127 
4 
8 
61 
3 

13 

19 
65 

2 

22 
7 
71 
24 
1,314 

110 
1,413 
184 
37 
562 
3 






3 




Fraud . 








Stolen property; buying, receiving, 








Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc... 
Prostitution and commercialized 


3 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 


24 
17 
56 
81 
2,854 

194 

2,890 

336 

34 

971 
7 


29 
13 
48 
44 
1,814 

127 
1,791 
238 
25 
596 
8 












Offenses against family and children. 


7 


















All other offenses (except traffic) 


253 



































































' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 

' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



213 



Table 5i.— Rural Arrests of Persons Under 75, Under 18, Under 27, and Under 25 Years of Age, 1974 

[806 agencies; 1974 estimated population 12,829,000] 



Offense cliarged 



TOTAL.. 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonncgligcnt manslaugliter 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime ' 

Subtotalfor above offenses.-- -. 

Other assaults — 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting... 

Fraud 

Embezzlement. 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandahsm 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and conimorciallzed vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness... 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Kunaways , 



915 

355 
1,165 
2,281 
10,583 
22,344 
24,859 
5,242 



14,944 
52,445 



3,055 

13,390 

410 

3,468 

7,617 

4,110 

130 

1,729 

27,932 

814 

5,554 

50,284 

18,388 
48,192 

16,185 



1,416 

10,768 



Number of persons arrested 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



3,332 

2,478 



9,981 
8,642 
2,613 



1,242 
21,236 



6,676 
1,466 
1, 937 



1,416 
10, 768 



120 
381 
1,110 
2,075 
15,767 
14.811 
3, 695 



3,751 



2,817 
333 



1,612 
5,848 



12, 571 
6,057 
5,224 



1,416 
10,768 



202 
664 
1,673 
4,110 
I'J, 043 
18,619 
4,337 



6,789 



1,730 
4,354 



0,583 
1.747 



1, 912 
12, 43',l 



1.416 
10,708 



Percentage 



Under 15 Under 18 Under 21 Under 25 



14. 9 
10.0 
11.6 



44.7 
34.8 
49.8 



30.5 
13.0 



20.6 
58.3 



16.9 
19.6 



3.0 
12.0 
13.9 
14.7 
22.4 
100.0 
lUO.O 



22.3 
50.3 
35.1 
12.2 
11.0 
46.6 



25.4 
34.8 
56.9 
4.6 
15.8 
10.6 



12.6 
32.3 
31.1 
33.4 
45.9 
100.0 
lUO.O 



37.4 
56.9 
67.0 
73.3 
38.8 
85.2 
74.9 
82.7 



60.6 
32.5 
29.3 



42.5 
51.5 
52.1 
85.1 
15.6 
34.4 
24.7 



24.9 
61.4 
47.1 
62.2 
63.1 
100.0 
IM.O 



' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
2 Property crime is offenses of burglai'y, larceny and motor vehicle theft. 



214 



Table 53. — Rural Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1974 

[806 agencies; 1974 estimated population 12,829,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL - - 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter. . 

(b) Manslaughter by negligence 

Forcible rape - - 

Robbery -- 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— brealiing or entering 

Larceny— theft --- - --■ 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime ' 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud -.- 

Embezzlement -.- 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism -.. 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex oflenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the lufluence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

\'agrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion,- _.. 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 



Number 


of persons 


arrested 


Percent 
male 


Percent 
female 


Percent of total i 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


354,619 


313,961 


40.658 


88.5 


11.5 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


915 


814 


101 


89.0 


11.0 


.3 


.3 


.2 


355 


323 


32 


91.0 


9.0 


.1 


.1 


.1 


1,165 
2,281 


1.165 
2.121 




100.0 
93.0 




.3 

.6 


.4 

.7 




160 


7.0 


.4 


10,583 


9,636 


947 


91.1 


8.9 


3.0 


3.1 


2.3 


22,344 


21,205 


1,139 


94.9 


5.1 


6.3 


6.8 


2.8 


24,859 


21,827 


3.032 


87.8 


12.2 


7.0 


7.0 


7.5 


5,242 


4,929 


313 


94.0 


6.0 


1.5 


1.6 


.8 


14,944 


13,736 


1,208 


91.9 


8.1 


4.2 


4.4 


3.0 


52,445 


47,961 


4,41*4 


91.6 


8.5 


14.8 


15.3 


11.0 


67,744 


62,020 


5,724 


91. 6 


S.4 


19.1 


19.8 


14.1 


12,622 


11,450 


1,172 


90.7 


9.3 


3.6 


3.6 


2.9 


662 


614 


48 


92.7 


7.3 


.2 


.2 


.1 


3,055 


2,405 


650 


78.7 


21.3 


.9 


.8 


1.6 


13,3!10 


9,273 


4,117 


69.3 


30.7 


3.8 


3.0 


10.1 


410 


350 


60 


85.4 


14.8 


.1 


.1 


.1 


3,468 


3,204 


261 


92.4 


7.6 


1.0 


1.0 


.6 


7.647 


7,181 


466 


93.9 


6.1 


2.2 


2.3 


1.1 


4,110 


3,889 


221 


94.6 


5.4 


1.2 


1.2 


.5 


130 


39 


91 


30.0 


70.0 


(') 


(') 


.2 


1,729 


1.594 


135 


92.2 


7.8 


.5 


.5 


.3 


27,932 


24,627 


3,305 


88.2 


11.8 


7.9 


7.8 


8.1 


S14 


748 


66 


91.9 


8.1 


.2 


.2 


.2 


5,554 


5.251 


303 


91.5 


5.5 


1.6 


1.7 


.7 


50,284 


47, 194 


3,090 


93.9 


6.1 


14.2 


15.0 


7.6 


18,388 


15,822 


2,566 


86.0 


14.0 


5.2 


5.0 


6.3 


48,192 


45,002 


3,190 


93.4 


6.6 


13.6 


14.3 


7.8 


16, 185 


14,517 


1,668 


89.7 


10.3 


4.6 


4.6 


4.1 


882 


770 


112 


87.3 


12.7 


.2 


.2 


.3 


58,444 


50,773 


7,671 


86.9 


13.1 


16.5 


16.2 


18.9 


793 


691 


102 


87.1 


12.9 


.2 


.2 


.3 


1,416 


1,062 


354 


75.0 


25.0 


.4 


.3 


.9 


10,768 


5,485 


5,283 


50.9 


49.1 


3.0 


1.7 


13.0 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and agpravated assault. 
' Property crime is offenses of burglary, larcen> -theft and motor vehicle theft. 
* Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



215 



Table 54.— Rural Arrests by Race, 1974 

1798 agencies; 1974 estimated population 12,733,000] 





Total arrests 


Percent distribution ■ 


Offense charged 


Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Jap- 
anese 


All 
others 


Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Cliinese 


Jap- 
anese 


All 
others 


TOTAL 


331,036 


294,846 


41,100 


10,547 


98 


183 


4,262 


100.0 


84.0 


11.7 


3.0 


(') 


0.1 


1.2 






Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 


907 

353 
1,159 
2,216 
10,477 
22,089 
24,594 
5,186 


552 

200 
882 
1,475 
7,281 
19, 076 
21,003 
4,515 


301 

37 

225 

703 

2,869 

2,401 

3,118 

429 


44 

9 
34 
43 
265 
440 
310 
185 






17 
17 
21 
58 
154 
131 
47 


100.0 

100.0 
100. 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


00.9 

82.2 
70. 1 
65.7 
09.5 
86.4 
85.4 
87.1 


33.5 

10.5 
19.4 
31.3 
27.4 
10.9 
12.7 
8.3 


4.0 

2.5 
2.9 
1.9 
2.5 
2.0 
1.3 
3.6 






.8 


(h) Manslaughter by ncgli- 










4.8 




2 
4 
13 
4 


1 

14 
16 
6 


.1 


.1 
.1 


1.5 


Roblicry 


.9 
.6 


Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 


.1 
.1 


.1 
.1 
.1 


.7 
.5 
.9 








14,789 
51,869 


10, 190 
44,594 


4,101 
5,948 


386 

935 


4 
21 


5 
36 


103 
335 


100.0 
100.0 


68.9 
86.0 


27.7 
11.5 


2.6 
1.8 






.7 






.1 


.6 






Subtotal for above offenses.. 


67,011 


65,074 


10,086 


1,330 


25 


41 


455 


100.0 


82.2 


15.1 


2.0 




.1 


.7 




12,533 

656 

3,016 

13,255 
407 

3,443 

7,577 
4,082 

130 

1,720 

27,560 

814 

5,505 
49, 913 

18, 165 
47,757 
15, %7 

873 
57,866 

805 
1,409 
10,572 


9,586 

509 

2,406 

10,417 

379 

2,983 
7,0'J2 
3,003 

92 

1,552 

25,850 

386 

4,509 
43,067 

16,804 
37,6(» 
12,717 
700 
48, 243 
696 
1,224 
9,863 


2,482 
38 
533 

2,687 
18 

376 
295 
998 

38 

140 

1,346 

258 

913 

3,688 

791 

6,333 

2,241 

59 

7,384 

76 

24 

296 


375 

16 

54 

124 

6 

54 
151 
52 


7 


3 


80 
3 

18 
21 
3 

29 
36 
29 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


76.5 
91.3 

79.8 
78.6 
93.1 

86.6 
93.6 
73.6 

70.8 

90.2 
93.8 
47.4 

81.9 
86.3 

92.5 
78.7 
79.6 
80.2 
83.4 
86.5 
86.9 
93.3 


19.8 
5.8 
17.7 
20.3 
4.4 

10.9 
3.9 
24.4 

29.2 

8.1 
4.9 
31.7 

16.6 

7.4 

4.4 
13.3 
14.0 
6.8 
12.8 
9.4 
1.7 
2.8 


3.0 

2.4 
1.8 
.9 
1.5 

1.0 
2.0 
1.3 


.1 




.6 




.5 




1 
1 


4 
6 
1 

1 




.1 


.6 




.2 






.2 


.7 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, 


.8 








.5 


Weapons; carrjing, possessing, etc- 
Prostitution and commercialized 






.7 












Sex offenses (except forcible rape 


15 

174 

1 

61 
1,339 

417 
3,593 
892 
47 
1.408 
21 
81 
336 






13 

160 
151 

21 
1,774 

150 
214 
107 

67 
770 

11 

69 


.9 
.6 
.1 

1.1 

2.7 

2.3 
7.5 
5.6 
5.4 
2.4 
2.6 
5.7 
3.2 






.8 




8 
4 

1 

8 

3 

11 
3 


14 
37 

7 


.5 


.1 

1.7 


.6 




18.6 


Oflcnscs against family and 


.4 


Driving under the influence 




.1 


3.6 

.8 








.4 








.7 








7.7 


All other offenses (except traffic) 


17 
1 
3 
3 


35 

5 
5 


.1 


.1 
.4 


1.3 

1.4 


Curfew and loitering law violations 


5.1 

.7 











See footnotes at end of table. 



216 







Table 


54. — Rural Arrests by Race, 


7974— Continued 














Arrests under 18 


Percent distribution ' 




Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Jap- 
anese 


All 
others 


Total 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Jap- 
anese 


AU 
others 


TOTAL 


66,794 


60, 449 


3,723 


1,964 


19 


49 


590 


100.0 


90.5 


5.6 


2.9 


m 


0.1 








Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaug hter 


69 

26 

136 

392 

632 

9,891 

8,579 

2,583 


45 

17 

102 

288 

480 

8,769 

7,614 

2,318 


13 
5 
29 
94 
132 
768 
742 
147 


11 
2 
3 
5 
15 
241 
146 
83 








100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


65.2 
65.4 
75.0 
73.5 
7,^9 
88.6 
88.8 
89.7 


18.8 
19.2 
21.3 
24.0 
20.9 
7.8 
8.6 
5,7 


15.9 
7.7 
2.2 
1.3 
2.4 
2.4 
1.7 
3.2 








(b) Manslaughter by negliger.je 






2 
2 
5 
5 
102 
67 
26 






7.7 
1.5 
1.3 
.8 
1,0 


Forcible rape. 










Robbery _ 










Aggravated assault 










Burglar>'~brealung or entering 


1 
4 


14 
9 
5 


.2 


.1 
.1 
.2 










Violent crime ' 


1,229 
21,056 


915 
18,701 


268 
1,657 


34 

470 






12 

195 


100.0 
100.0 


74.5 
88.8 


21.8 
7.9 


2.8 
2.2 






1,0 




5 


28 




.1 






Subtotal for above oflenses. . . 


22,311 


19.633 


1,930 


506 


5 


28 


209 


100.0 


88.0 


8.7 


2.3 




.1 


.9 


Other assaults 


981 
204 
396 
193 
15 

711 

4,421 

306 

4 

290 

5,341 

5 

175 

802 

6,561 
1,449 
1,919 

123 
8,438 

168 
1,409 
10,572 


775 
192 
327 
168 
13 

636 

4,206 
266 

2 

261 

5,111 

2 

152 
736 

6,405 
1.134 
1,663 

102 
7,42-2 

156 
1,224 
9,863 


151 
S 

54 

23 

52 
125 
32 

2 

26 

134 

3 

22 
20 

25 
48 
148 
2 
592 
9 
24 
296 


52 
7 

12 
2 
2 

14 
82 
5 






3 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


79.0 
94.1 
82.6 
87.0 
86.7 

89.5 
95.1 
86.9 

50.0 

90.0 
95.7 
40.0 

86.9 
91.8 

97.6 
78.3 
86.7 
82.9 
88.0 
92.9 
86.9 
93.3 


15.4 
2.5 
13.6 
11.9 

7.3 

2.8 
10.5 

.50.0 

9.0 
2.5 
60.0 

12.6 
2.5 

.4 
3.3 

7.7 
1.6 
7.0 
5.4 
1.7 
2.8 


5.3 
3.4 
3.0 
1.0 
13.3 

2.0 
1.9 
1.6 






.3 


Arson,. - 










Forgery and counterfeiting 






3 






.8 


Fraud 










Embezzlement 














Stolen property; buying, receiving, 
possessing 






9 
3 






1.3 

.2 


Vandalism 




1 






Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.. 






Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 












Sex offenses (except forcible rape 
and prostitution) 


3 
46 








1.0 
.9 










1 


6 


43 




.1 


.8 


Gambli ng 


Oflenses against family and 
children 


1 
32 

100 
254 
93 
2 
332 
2 
81 
336 








.6 

4.0 

1.5 

17.5 
4.8 
1.6 
3.9 
1.2 
5.7 








Driving undci the influence 






14 

29 
10 
13 

17 
88 
1 
72 
69 








Liquor laws 


2 
3 


2 










.2 


.1 


.7 

.7 

13.8 

1.0 






All other offenses (except traffic) 


2 


2 












.6 
5.1 

.7 


Curfew and loitering law violations. 


3 
3 


5 
5 


.2 


.4 











See footnotes at end of table. 



217 



Table 54. — Rural Arrests by Race, 1974 — Continued 



Offense charged 



TOTAL. 



Criminal homicide" 

(a) Murder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 

(h) Manslaughter by negligence. 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary — breaking or entering 

Larceny— theft 

Motor vehicle theft. 



Violent crime '. . 
Property crime < 



Subtotal for above offenses... 



Other assaults 

Arson.. 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc.. 



Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape 
and prostitution)... 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children. 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic).. 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations. 
Runaways 



Arrests 18 and over 



2,620 
13,062 



2,732 
3,156 
3,776 



1,430 

22,219 

809 

5,330 
49,111 

11,604 
46, 308 
14,048 



10, 307 
13, 389 



2,079 
10, 249 



1,291 

20, 739 

384 

4.357 
42,331 

10,399 
36, 470 
11,054 



2,737 
1,633 
2,376 



3,833 
4,291 



6,285 
2,093 



2 2 

2 2 

4 

2 7 



Percent distribution ' 



Total White Negro Indian Chinese Jap- AU 
anese others 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 



100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



60.5 
83.5 



68.4 
84.0 




90.3 
93.3 
47.5 
81.7 



13.4 

14.8 



13.6 

11.9 



13.7 
10.5 



1 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2 Less than one-tenth of one percent. 

' Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
* Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny — theft and motor vehicle theft. 



218 



Table 55. — Suburban and Rural Arreiti Trends ' by Sex, 1973-74 



Oaense charged 



1,925 suburban agencies: 1974 estimated population 
35,795,000 



1973 1974 Percent 

change 



554 rural agencies; 1974 estimated population 9,379,000 



1974 Percent 
change 



1973 1974 Percent 

change 



TOTAL 

Criminal homicide: 

(a) Murder and nonnegUgent 
manslaughter 

(b> Manslaughter by negligence. . 

Forcible rape _. 

Robbery ._ _ 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary— breaking or entering 

Larceny — I heft , 

Motor veliicle theft 

Violent crime ■ 

Property crime ' 

Subtotal for above offenses 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons: carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice. 
Sex offenses (escept forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Narcotic drug laws 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children.. 
Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Driuikenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations.. 
Runaways 



1,391 
&42 

3,016 
11,529 
24,492 
61,529 
93,636 
19, 145 



40,428 
174, 310 



215,380 



44,324 
2,365 
5.087 

12,242 
816 

13,525 
32, 175 
15,669 



7,867 
98,015 
3,380 
10,3(M 
121,087 

38,291 
114,558 
72,219 
2,431 
153,224 
5,859 
16,503 
20,784 



1.622 
461 
3,088 
13,950 
27,960 
75, 174 
118,346 
19,939 



+16.6 
-28.2 

+2.4 
+21.0 
+14. 2 
+22.2 
+26.4 

+4.1 



+ 11.5 
-11.5 



3,582 
41,593 
1,277 



3,453 

4,387 
51,850 



+22.7 
+19. S 
+22.5 
+24.7 
+3.5 



269 
880 
1,283 
5,667 
13, 127 
13,268 
3,482 



242 
805 
1,532 
6,484 
16,006 
16,451 
3,412 



-10.0 
-8.5 
+19.4 
+14.4 
+21.9 
+24.0 
-2.0 



46,620 
213, 459 



+15.3 

+22.5 



3,924 
46,452 



+ 19.8 
+23.9 



8,341 

29,877 



9,369 
35, 872 



+12.3 

+20.1 



260,540 



+18.2 



46,073 
2.622 
5,733 

12,551 



17.361 
39,801 
18,868 

307 

8,772 

102,556 

3,576 

9,231 

1(W,900 

46,692 
101,989 
77,710 
2.935 
156, 517 
4.684 
16,952 
18,518 



+3.9 
+10.9 
+12.7 



+28.4 
+23.7 
+20.4 

-9.4 

+11.5 
+4.6 
+5.8 
-10.4 
-13.4 

+21.9 
-11.0 

+7.6 
+20.7 

+2.1 
-20.1 



1,925 
5,530 



2,353 
1,073 



2,300 
6.031 



6,451 
10.281 
10,800 



5,017 
24,818 



7,574 
9, 644 
11,499 



+8.7 
+3.1 

+19.5 
+9.1 

-16.6 

+28.7 
+23.4 
+ 15.2 



-1.0 

+5.9 
+27.9 



+6.5 
+33.8 

+1.4 
-25.3 

+5.1 
-10.1 



1.455 
4.810 



2,018 
4,681 
2,636 



1,162 

16,266 

7W 

4,315 
30,751 

10,718 
32, 437 
10,265 



1,591 
6,160 



2,451 
5,656 
2,879 



1,243 
18, 443 

599 
3,819 
26,837 

12,870 
30,337 
10, 497 



+3.6 
+7.1 
+9.3 
+28.1 
-5.4 

+21.5 
+20.8 
+9.2 

+42.9 

+7.0 
+13.4 
-14.9 
-11.5 
-12.7 

+20.1 
-6.5 
+2.3 
+.5 
+5.9 

-51.1 
-2.8 

-14.5 



2.059 
32 



-30.0 
+15.0 



+60.8 
+8.1 
+8.8 
+16.0 
-13.1 



+8.8 
+11.7 



+11.1 



+8.9 
+34.5 

+5.2 
+24.1 

-3.1 

+38.7 
+ 12.4 
+ 1.4 



57 


+5.6 


189 


-12.5 


1,619 


-10.8 


2.051 


+4.3 


2,056 


-11.1 


1,219 


+1.6 


72 


+1.4 


5,422 


+15.9 


64 


-32.6 


272 


-5.2 


3,976 


-11.6 



> In suburban ^encies male arrests under 18 increased 11.7 percent and female arrests under 18 increased 5.3 percent. In rural agencies male arrests under 
18 increased 6.7 percent and female arrests under 18 decreased 4.7 percent. , 

- Violent crime is offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
3 Property crime is offenses of burglary, larceny— theft and motor vehicle theft. 



219 



Section 3 
Law Enforcement Employee Data 



This publication has a section with tables of 
Law Enforcement Employee Data which shows 
average police employee strength bj- geographic 
division and population group. This data is sub- 
divided bj' sex of emploj^ees, percentage of civilian 
employees, number and type of patrol assign- 
ments, and an individualized listing of police 
employees by reporting cities and surrounding 
suburban counties. Tables containing data rela- 
tive to law enforcement officers assaulted in the 
line of duty are published to supplement the fol- 
lowing narrative material 

Employee Rates 

The average number of law enforcement era- 
plo3-ees per 1,000 inhabitants (including civilian 
employees) was 2.5. Male employees represented 
88.9 percent of total police employee strength. 

Many cities in the United States continue to 
operate with a police employee ratio of less than 
the national average of 2.5 per 1,000. Fifty percent 



of all law enforcement agencies in cities had police 
ratios ranging from 1.4 to 2.5 police employees 
per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Nationally, large cities with 250,000 or more 
inhabitants as a group had an average ratio of 3.5 
emplojees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

The average ratio of police employees to popula- 
tion in the suburban ai-eas was 2.1 per 1,000 in- 
habitants; an increase from the 1.9 rate in 1973. 
One-half of the suburban police departments 
had from 1.3 to 2.4 emplo3"ees per 1,000 inhabit- 
ants. The average rate of full-time emploj-ees in 
sheriffs' departments was 1.6 per 1,000 inhabit- 
ants; however, in three-fourths of the depart- 
ments the rate was 1 .3 or less. 

Police departments in the Middle Atlantic and 
South Atlantic States continued to have the high- 
est average rate \vith 3.0 employees per 1,000 in- 
habitants. Cities in the West South Central and 
West North Central States had the lowest average 
ratio wdth 2.0. 



2211 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF POLICE DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES, AND 
RANGE IN NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, PER 1,000 INHABITANTS 

BY POPULATION GROUPS, OCTOBER 31, 1974 



8.2 


8.2 






7.1 






AV. 

as 




AV. 
2.5 




4.9 




5.1 




5.1 






AV. 
2,3 




AV. 
1.9 




4.4 












^■ 




AV. 




JUb 


AV, 
1.9 


AV. 
2,1 


.2 


1,1 


1,9 


wMm 


A 














,5 


,2 















ALL 


CITIES 


CITIES 


CITIES 


CITIES 


CITIES 


CITIES 


CITIES 


OVER 


100,000 


50,000 


25,000 


10,000 


LESS 




250,000 


TO 


TO 


TO 


TO 


THAN 






250,000 


100,000 


50,000 


25,000 


10,000 



CHART 23 



222 



Civilian Employees 

In Table 64, the percentage of total law enforce- 
ment personnel represented by civilian employees 
is tabulated by population group. On the average 
during 1974, 15.3 percent of all city police person- 
nel were civilian employees; up from 14.6 percent 
in 197.3. Of all civilian employees, 61 percent were 
female and 39 percent were male personnel. Law 
enforcement administrators are continuing to 
utilize greater numbers of civiUan emploj-ees 
thereby relieving sworn personnel for active police 
duties. 
Sworn Personnel 

Law enforcement employee rates based on sworn 
personnel only (excluding civilian employees) 
show that the average for all cities was 2.1 per 
1,000 inhabitants in 1974. The city rates, nation- 
ally, range from 0.1 to 9.6 per 1,000 inhabitants. 
In city agencies, males represented 98 percent of 
all sworn personnel, while males in suburban 
agencies constituted 97 percent and in county 
sheriff and police departments 94 percent. The 
average ratio of sworn employees in shcrifl''s de- 
partments was 1.3 per 1,000 inhabitants and the 
rate range for the 2,503 reporting county agencies 
was 0.1-11.2 per 1,000 inhabitants. Caution should 
be exercised, liowever, in using rates for com- 
parative purposes since there is a wide variation 
in the responsibilities of various law enforcement 
agencies throughout the country. Just as the con- 
ditions which affect the amount and type of crime 
tiuit occurs vary from place to place, so do the 
retjuirements for types of police service based upon 
the coiuiitions which exi^t in a given connnunity. 
I'or examj)le, the increased neetl for police service 
in a comiiuniity which has a highly mobile or 
seasonal jjojjulation, differs from a connnunity 
which has a relatively stable or fixed pojnilation. In 
iiildition, a small community situated between 
two large cities may require a greater number of 
law enforcement personnel to handle crime con- 
ditions based solely on its geographic location. 

The functions of the sheriffs also vary widely in 
different sections of the country. In certain areas 
the sheriffs' responsibilities are limited almost 
exclusively to civil functions and/or the adminis- 
tration of the county jail facilities. The sheriffs' 
departments used in computing rates, however, 
are all engaged in law enforcement activity and 
are responsible for all phases of policing in their 
jurisdiction. 



It is pointed out that the figures set forth in 
detailed police employee tables (Tables 56 and 57) 
represent national averages. They should be used 
as a guide or indicator and not considered as 
recommended or desirable police strengths. Ade- 
quate manpower for a specific place can only be 
determined after a careful study and analysis of 
the various factors which contribute to the require- 
ment for police service in that community. 
Police Patrols 

In 1974, 88 percent of the police patrol assign- 
ments utilized in cities were vehicle patrols, and 
12 percent were foot patrols. In cities with over 
250,000 inhabitants 82 percent were vehicle 
patrols and 18 percent were foot patrols. In the 
areas covered by sheriffs and count^^ police depart- 
ments, 95 percent were vehicle patrols and 5 
percent were foot patrols. For all cities, patrol 
distribution indicated that 35 percent of the 
patrol activity was during the day, 35 percent 
during the evening hours, and after midnight 
30 percent. Large cities over 250,000 inhabitants 
showed that approximately 40 percent of the 
patrol activity was during the day, 33 percent 
tluring the evening hours, and 27 percent after 
midnight. In the areas covered by sheriffs and 
county police, 41 percent of the patrol activity 
was duiing the da}^ 31 percent during the evening 
hours, and 28 percent after midnight. 

The distribution of one- and two-man vehicle 
patrol assignments for all cities indicated that 85 
percent of the vehicle patrols during the day in- 
volved onc-num cars, 81 percent during the even- 
ing hours, and after midnight 76 percent. In the 
large cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants, 64 
percent of the daytime patrols involved the use of 
one-man cars, 66 percent during the evening 
hours, and after michiight 52 percent. In the areas 
covered by sheriffs and comity police departments, 
94 percent of the daytime patrols involved the use 
of one-man cai-s, 85 percent during the evening 
hours, and after midnight 81 percent were one- 
man vehicles. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 

In 1974, a total of 132 local, county, state, and 
Federal law enforcement officers were killed due to 
felonious criminal action in the United States 
and Puerto Rico. During the ten-year period 
1965-1974, 947 ofl^cers were killed. The number of 
law enforcement officers from Puerto Rico for the 
period 1971-1974 and the number of Federal 



223 



officers for the period 1972-1974 have been in- 
cluded in the tabulations with the local, county, 
and state officers for the ten-year period. Specif- 
ically, there were 5.3 officers killed in 1965; 57 in 
1966; 76 in 1967; 64 in 1968; 86 in 1969; 100 in 
1970; 129 in 1971; 116 in 1972; 134 in 1973; and 
132 in 1974. 
Circumsfances Surrounding Deaths 

There were more law enforcement officers killed 
attempting arrests than in any other police activity 
in 1974. This trend was established in prior years 
and continues as one of the most dangerous situa- 
tions the police officer faces today. Twenty-eight 
officers were killed while attempting arrests for 
crimes other than robbery or burglary. In connec- 
tion with robbery offenses, 25 officers were slain 
by persons encountered during the commission of 
a robbery or during the pursuit of robbery sus- 
pects. Eight officers were killed at the scene of 
burglaries or while pursuing burglary suspects. No 
arrest situation can be considered routine and 
officers must utilize extreme caution with all indi- 
viduals they contact. 

In 1974, nine officers were killed in ambush 
situations. During the period 1970-1974, 62 officers 
have been slain in ambush situations. One-half of 
these officers were entrapped and slain through 
premeditated action. The other 31 officers were 



killed in unprovoked attacks which did not involve 
any apparent element of entrapment. 

Twenty-nine officers were slain in 1974 respond- 
ing to "disturbance calls" which include family 
quarrels, man with gun, bar fights, etc. Twelve 
officei's were killed while investigating suspicious 
persons or circumstances. Eleven officers were 
slain while making traffic stops, and ten officers 
were killed while transporting or otherwise en- 
gaged in custody of prisoners. 

Fifty-four of the officers killed in 1974 utilized 
their service firearms while in contact with their 
assailants. Thirty-four of these officers discharged 
their service firearms while attempting to protect 
themselves. Fifty-five percent (or 71) of the officers 
killed by firearms were within five feet of their 
assailants. Ninety-nine of the 128 officers slain by 
firearms were within ten feet of their assailants. 

In 1974, 57 officers were slain in the Southern 
States, 37 in the North Central States, 20 in the 
Western States, and 14 in the Northeastern States. 
The following chart shows the number of law en- 
forcement officers killed bj' region for each of the 
two five-year periods, 1965-1969 and 1970-1974. 
An accompanying table shows the officers feloni- 
ously killed in 1974 by geographic division and 
population grouping. 



Number of Law Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed in 1974 







[By geographic division 


and populat 


ion groups] 










Geographic division 


Total 


Group I 

over 
250,000 


Group II 
100,000 to 
250,000 


Group III 
50,000 to 
100,000 


Group IV 

25,000 to 

50,000 


Group \' 
10,000 to 
25,000 


Group VI 
under 
10,000 


County, State 

Police and 
Highway Patrol 


Federal 
Agencies 




132 


46 


10 


7 


5 


8 


15 


30 


2 








1 

13 
34 

3 
35 

7 
15 

13 

4 


1 
7 
18 
1 
6 


















1 

5 


3 

2 








2 
3 
1 
17 
2 
5 
3 
5 
1 






3 


2 


1 
1 
5 
4 
2 
1 
1 










3 


1 




3 






1 
1 






4 
I 
5 
3 




1 


2 








2 




1 






1 



























224 



LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 

BY REGIONS OF THE UNITED STATES 
(excludes Puerto Rico) 

1965-1974 



19651969 r I 336 KILLED 

1970-1974 llsaiiil 598 KILLED 



NORTHEAST 



NORTH CENTRAL 



SOUTH 



WEST 



46 



91 



94 



61 



151 



135 



107 



249 



CHART 24 



225 



Weapons Used 

One liundred twenty-eight, or 97 percent, of 
the law enforcement officers killed in 1974 were 
slain with firearms. Handguns were used in 95 
of these deaths, shotguns in 21, and rifles were 
vised to kill twelve of the officers. Eleven officers 
were slain with their own firearms. Three officers 
were killed through the use of automobiles and one 
officer met death as a result of an assault with a 
knife. 

During the period 1965-1974, 96 percent of 
the officers were killed with firearms. Seventy-one 
percent of all weapons used were handguns. 
Specifically, of the 947 law enforcement officers 
slain by criminal action during this period, 675 
were killed through the use of handguns, 119 with 
shotguns, HI mth rifles, 18 by means such as 
clubs, automobiles, etc., 13 with knives, eight 
with personal weapons such as hands, fists, and 
feet, and three were killed with, bombs. One 
hundred five officers, or 11 percent, were slain 
with their own firearms. 

Law Enforcemenf Officers Killed, 1965-1974 

[By type o( weapon) 





1965-1974 


1965-1969 


1970-1974 


Type of weapons 


Total 
Number 


Per- 
cent 


Number 


Per- 
cent 


Number 


Per- 
cent 




675 
119 
111 


71.3 
12.6 
11.7 


240 
44 
38 


71.4 
13.1 
11.3 


435 
73 


71.2 




12.3 


Rifle 


11.9 






Total firearms,. 
Kiiife 


905 

13 
3 

8 
18 


95.6 

1.4 
.3 

.8 
1.9 


322 
2 


95.8 
.6 


583 

11 
3 
3 

11 


95.4 
1.8 




.5 


Personal weapons 

other (clubs, etc.).... 


5 


1.5 
2.1 


.5 
1.8 


Total 


947 


100.0 


336 


100.0 


611 


100.0 







Profile of Victim Officers 

Eighty-six percent of the officers slain during 
the period 1965-1969 were white, 13 percent were 
Negro, and 1 percent were of other races. The 
median year of service was five and one-half. 
Fourteen percent of the officers killed had one 
year or less of law enforcement service. Thirty- 
nine percent had less than five years of service, 31 
percent had five to ten years of service, and 30 
percent had more than ten years service as law 
enforcement officers. 

During the period 1970-1974, 88 percent of the 
officers killed were white, 11 percent were Negro, 



and 1 percent were of other races. The median 
years of service was four and one-half. Fourteen 
percent of the victim officers had one year or 
less of service, 48 percent had less than five years 
of service, 27 percent had five to ten years of 
service, and 25 percent over ten years of service. 

For the entire ten-year period, 1965-1974, 87 
percent of the victim officers were white, 12 
percent were Negro, and 1 percent were of other 
races. The median year of law enforcement service 
for the entire period was five. Fourteen percent 
had one year or less of ser\4ce, 45 percent had less 
than five years, 28 percent had five to ten years, 
and 27 percent had over ten years of service. 

Profile of Victim Officers 



Law enforcement officers 


1965-74 


1965-69 


1970-74 




87 
12 

1 

14 
45 
28 
27 


86 
13 

1 

5M 
14 
39 
31 
30 


88 












Hi 

14 
48 
27 
25 


Percent with 1 year or less service 

Percent with less than 5 j'ears service 

Percent with 5 to 10 years of service 







Types of Assigrtmertt 

Patrol duties within law enforcement organiza- 
tions are the most hazardous type of assignment for 
officers. The patrol officer is frecjuently in contact 
with suspicious or dangerous individuals during the 
course of these duties. Thus, each of these situa- 
tions constitutes a threat to the officer's personal 
safety. The patrol officer is readily identifiable 
because of his uniform and/or patrol vehicle. He 
cannot hide his presence or official capacity and 
frequently must determine quickly and accurately 
if a person is involved in a criminal act. If the 
suspect constitutes a danger to the officer's 
personal safety, he must afford himself reasonable 
protection. The patrol officer places himself in a 
variety of dangerous situations by reacting to 
circumstances as they occur without the benefit 
of detailed information or planning. He often risks 
attack through frequent encounters with criminal 
offenders at or near crime scenes. These perils 
are substantiated by the fact that officers assigned 
to patrol duty are the most frequent targets of the 
police killer. Law enforcement officers assigned in 
other capacities are confronted with equally 
tense and dangerous types of situations while 
performing their duties but not with the same 
frequency. 



226 



Law Enforcement Officers Killed — Percentage of Victim Officers Assisted, 1965-1974 



Type of activity 



Grand total 

Total five-year period. 
Total five-year period. 



Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man with gun, 
etc.) 



Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects 

Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects 

Attempting other arrests (excludes robbery and burglary arrests). - 

Civil disorders (mass disobedience, riot, etc.) 

Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 

Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances 

Ambush (entrapment and premeditation) 

Ambush (unprovoked attack) 

Mentally deranged 

Tralhc pursuits and stops 



1965-1974 
1905-1969 
1970-1974 



1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-19C9 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1909 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1909 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 



Type of assignment ot victim 



30.7 
27.6 



47.4 
42.9 
13.3 
21.1 
43.5 
34.4 



14.3 

42.9 



27.3 
71.4 
50.0 
12.5 



43.6 
21.4 
56.0 



50.0 
40.0 
33.3 
50.0 



Detective 
or special 
a.ssigrunent 



81.8 
100.0 
71.4 
55.6- 
54.2 
77.5 
83.6 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
71.4 
33.3 
77.8 



42.9 
85.7 
100.0 



227 



LAW imORCmENT Off KIRS KILLED 
by Type of Activity 

1965-1974 



Responding to disturbance 
calls (family quarrels, 
man with gun, etc.) 

Burglaries in progress or 
pursuing burglary suspects 

Robberies in progress or 
pursuing robbery suspects 

Attempting other arrests 
(excludes arrests for 
Burglaries and Robberies) 

Civil disorders (mass 
disobedience, riot, etc.) 



57 



~|92 



Il37 



61 




123 



125 



i 



Handling, transporting. 


^19 


]79 




custody of prisoners 


MM:/ J29 




Investigating suspicious 


|21 




persons or circumstances 


-■■■■^■■--■■31143 




Ambush (entrapment 


n9 




and premeditation) 


, .J 31 




Ambush 


15 




(unprovoked attack) 


> - _J31 












119 




Mentally deranged 


siiffii|l6 
|l3 


















1965-1969 E 


1 336 


KILLED 




1970-1974 1 


in 611 


KILLED 



1965-1974 total: 947 KILLED 



228 



CHART 25 



Law Enforcement Officers Killed — Type of Assignment of Victim Officers, 1965-1974 





Years 


Type of assignment 


Type of law enforcement officer activity 


Total 
ofTicers 
killed 


2-man 
vehicle 


1-man 
vehicle 


Foot 
patrol 


Detective 
or special 
assignment 


Off duty 




1965-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 


947 
336 
611 


243 
94 
149 


352 
127 
225 


39 
14 

25 


216 
71 
145 


97 
30 
67 








Bcspoiiding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man -vilh gun, 
etc) - 


1965-19C9 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1909 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1969 
1970-1974 
1965-1%9 
1970-1974 


57 
92 
25 
37 
61 
123 
99 
125 
8 
5 
19 
29 
21 
43 
9 
31 
5 
31 
19 
16 
13 
79 


24 
36 
5 
6 
17 
23 
25 
24 
1 


19 
35 
15 
19 
23 
32 
33 
38 


3 
3 


9 
11 

4 

9 
24 
27 
55 
5 
5 
6 
14 
3 
9 


2 
7 






1 
2 
6 
5 
3 
2 


4 
10 
33 
9 
5 












5 
8 
4 

10 
7 

16 


7 
7 
11 
15 
1 
3 
3 
11 

4 

8 
61 




" 










1 
1 


2 

8 






3 


7 


2 




3 

2 
5 
4 
18 


8 

1 


6 

7 
7 

1 


3 

2 

























Eiphlj'-seven patrol officers were slain in 1974. 
Eighty-lhree of these officers were assigned to 
palrol vehicles and four were foot patrolmen. 
Twenty-nine officers were detectives or oiricers 
on sjiccial assignments. In the highest tradition 
of the law enforcement profession, 10 officers, 
while in an off-duty status, were taking appropriate 
police action concerning crimes committed in their 
piesence when the}' were slain. Nine of the off- 
duty officers were killed by persons they en- 
countered during the commission of a i-obbery or 
while in pursuit of robbery suspects. During the 
period 1965-1974, 67 percent (or 6.34) of the 947 
officers slain were assigned to patrol duties. 

In 1974, 51 of the on-duty officers were alone and 
unassisted when killed. During the period 1965- 
1974, 35 percent (or 330) of the officers were alone 
and unassisted when they gave their lives for the 
communities thej' were sworn to protect. The 
preceding tables set forth the types ol assignment 
and circumstances involved in connection with 
the killings of officers during the periods 1965- 
1969 and 1970-1974. 



Time of Deaths 

In 1974, July was the most dangerous month 
for law enforcement officers. During this month, 
16 officcrr> were feloni()u^^ly killed. 

Saturdtiy was the most dangerous day of the 
week for law enforcement officers in 1974. During 
the period 19(55-1974, 153 officers were killed on 
Fiiday, 146 on Saturday, 139 on Sunday, 139 on 
Monday, 134 on Thursday, 128 on Wednesday, 
and lOS on Tuesday. 

During the period 1965-1974, 68 pei'cent of all 
killings of law enforcement officers occurred be- 
tween 4:00 p.m. and 4:00 a.iu. The most dangerous 
times were between 10:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. 
when 88 officers were slain and from 1 :00 a.m. to 
2:00 a.m. when S6 officers were killed. 

Persons Charged 

L;iw enforcement agencies cleared 119 of the 
132 killings that occurred in calendar year 1974. 
One hundred si.xty-eight persons were identified 
in connection with these crimes. Fifty-two per- 
cent of the persons identified were white, 47 
percent Negro, and 1 percent other races. 



229 



LAW ENfORCmtNT OFflCERS KILLED 

by Hour of Day 

mS-1974 



10:00 



9:00 



8:00 



11:00 



7:00 



Midnight 



1:00 




P.M. 



4:00 ' ^' 1:00 

3:00 2:00 



□ 



A.M. 



230 



CHART 26 



CRIMINAL HISTORY OF 1,329 PERSONS 

IDENTIFIED IN THE KILLING OF 

LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS 

PERCENT OF TOTAL PERSONS IDENTIFIED 
1965-1974 



TOTAL PERSONS 
IDENTIFIED 



PERSONS WITH 
PRIOR ARREST 
FOR CRIMINAL CHARGE 



PERSONS CONVICTED 
ON PRIOR CRIMINAL 
CHARGE 



PRIOR ARREST FOR 
VIOLENT CRIME 



PRIOR ARREST FOR 
WEAPONS VIOLATION 



PRIOR ARREST FOR 
NARCOTIC CHARGE 



PRIOR ARREST FOR 
POLICE ASSAULT 




21% 



15% 



10% 



77% 



57% 



41% 



100% 



CHART 27 



231 



594-259 O - 75 - 15 



Profile of Persons Identified 



Persons charged 



Total - 

Under age 18 

From 20 to 30 years olage 

Male - -. 

Female 

White 

Negro - 

Other race — 

Prior criminal arrest 

Convicted on prior criminal 

charge.- - 

Prior arrest for crime of 

violence 

Convicted on criminal 

charges— granted leniency.. 
On parole or probation at 

time of killing 

Arrested on prior murder 

charge 

Prior arrest on narcotic drug 

law violation 

Prior arrest for assaulting 

policeman or resisting 

arrest... 

Prior arrest for weapons 

violation... 



During the period 1965-1974, 947 officers were 
slain; 1,330 individuals were identified and 
charged, clearing 95 percent of these killings. 
Seventy-seven percent of the persons had prior 
arrests for criminal charges, and 57 percent of the 
individuals had been convicted of those charges. 
Fortj'-one percent had prior arrests for violent 
types of crime such as murder, rape, armed robbery, 
aggravated assault, etc. Sixty-one percent of those 
who had pieviously been convicted on criminal 
charges were granted parole or probation. SLxteen 
percent of the persons identified were on parole or 
probation when an officer was killed. Fifteen per- 
cent of the individuals had a prior arrest for a 
narcotics charge and 10 percent had prior arrests 
for police assault. 

Ninety-six percent were male and 4 percent 
female. During this ten-j'ear period, 47 percent 
of the persons identified were white, 52 percent 
Negro, and 1 percent other races. 

In the period 1961-1972, 1,224 known persons 
were involved in connection with the killing of 87S 
law enforcement officers. One hundred fiftj'-four 
subjects, or 13 percent, were justifiabh' killed at 
the scene of the crime or soon thereafter. Thirty- 
one individuals committed suicide, and 14 sub- 
jects escaped apprehension at the time of the 
incidents. A total of 1,025 individuals, were ar- 



rested and charged in connection with the killings 
of these law enforcement officers. There were 654 
offenders found guilty of murder. Available court 
disposition data regarding the offense related to 
the officers' deaths disclose that 99 were sentenced 
to death, 335 were sentenced to life imprisonment, 
215 received prison terms ranging from one to 
1,000 years, and five offenders received probation. 
Seventy-nine offenders were found guilty of lesser 
offenses such as manslaughter, assault, etc. Sixty- 
four offenders were found guilty of other crimes 
such as robbery, burglary, etc., committed when 
the murders occurred. One hundred forty-one 
individuals we^e found not guilty. Further, 47 
individuals were committed to mental institutions 
and twelve persons died while awaiting trial. 

Disposition of Persons Involved in Murders of Lav/ Enforcement 
Officers, 1961-1972 





Total 


Percent 
distribution 




1,224 


100 








14 

154 

31 

1,025 




Justifiably killed 


13 




2 




81 








1,025 


100 








654 
79 
64 

141 
47 
28 
12 


64 


Guilty of lesser offense related to murder . 

Guilty of crime other than murder 

Acquitted or otherwise dismissed 

Committed to mental institution 


8 
6 
14 
4 
3 




1 







In 1974, 23 subjects were justifiably killed at 
the scene of the police killing or soon thereafter, 
and eight subjects committed suicide. For the 
period 1965-1974, 176 assailants were killed at the 
crime site or within a short time after the officer 
was killed, 33 committed suicide shortly after the 
killing, and eleven died from other causes. 

The pei'sons identified ranged in age from 13 to 
82. The median age of these individuals was 24 
years. Fiftj^-six percent were between the ages of 
20 and 30. Seven percent (or 92) were under the 
age of 18, and 20 was the most common age of the 
persons identified. In 1974, the 168 individuals 
identified with the killings of law enforcement 
officers had a median age of 24. Fifty percent of 
these persons were between the ages of 20 and 30. 
Ten of the individuals identified were under the 
age of 18. The most common age of the persons 
identified in 1974 was 25. 



232 



Geographic Locations 

One hundred twenty-six of the 132 officers slain 
during 1974 were from 100 different local, county, 
and state law enforcement agencies in 32 states 
and the District of Columbia. Four officers from 
Puerto Rico and two United States Customs Serv- 
ice Officers were also killed. Among the agencies, 
the Chicago, Illinois, Police Department ranked 
highest with six officers slain in 1974. The Balti- 
more, Detroit, and New York City Police De- 
partments followed with four officers slain in each 
agency. 

Among the states, Illinois and Michigan ranked 
highest with eleven officers killed in each state. 
The states of California, Florida, New York, and 
Texas followed with nine officers slain in each 
state. 

ASSAULTS ON LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS 

The following information is based on a detailed 
monthly collection of data in the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program regarding the problem of 
assaults on local, county, and state law enforce- 
ment officers in this Nation. The large number of 
reported assaults on sworn officers is in part due 
to a prevalent attitude of disrespect for law 
enforcement in certain elements of our societj'. 

The uniformed officer is the target of persons 
with real or imagined grievances against the 
"system." He also is, in many instances, the first 
person to render aid to mentally deranged indi- 
viduals, to calm disturbances and quarrels, to 
offer protection to those threatened, or to rescue 
those in peril. The officer is the active repre- 
sentative of a society whose members too often 
forget their individual responsibilities to their 
fellow human beings. In this role, he suffers a 
variety of unsolicited and undeserved abuse. 

During 1974, 29,511 assaults on police were re- 
ported by 5,039 agencies covering an estimated 
population of 103,581,000. The rate of assaults on 
poHce for the Nation was 15 assaults per 100 
officers for the year. 

Activity of Police Officers at the Time of Assault 

An examination of the activities of law enforce- 
ment officers at the time of the assaults (Table 68) 
discloses that the greatest number of assaults, 28 
percent, were in responding to disturbance calls. 
The second highest incidence activity, 22 percent 
of the assaults, was "attempting arrests" other 



than burglary or robbery. Any officer who has 
answered disturbance calls remembers the situa- 
tions when he became a substitute target in a 
husband and wife quarrel or an arbitrator in a 
customer-proprietor argument. The high incidence 
of assaults in these common and often repeated 
police activities should serve as an impetus for 
greater alertness to all police personnel. The officer 
must avoid becoming complacent in his pursuit of 
any type of police activity. The police adminis- 
trator or command officer .should consider pro- 
cedures to afford the responding officer the fullest 
possible support in all activities no matter how 
menial or routine they might seem. 

Weapons Used in Assaults on Police Officers 

The distribution of weapons used to assault 
officers is shown by geographic division, popula- 
tion group, and types of activity in Tables 66 and 
67. Nationwide, personal weapons such as hands, 
fists, feet, etc., were used in 81 percent of the 
assaults on officers in 1974. Firearms were used in 
7 percent of the assaults, a knife or cutting instru- 
ment in 3 percent, and some other weapon in 9 
percent of the assaults on law enforcement officers. 
Type of Assignment 

Of those officers assaulted in 1974, Table 71 
shows the type of assignment of the officer 
assaulted as 37 percent in two-man vehicles, 41 
percent in one-man vehicles, 7 percent on detec- 
tive or special assignment, and 14 percent in other 
assignments. In the highest assault incidence ac- 
tivity of police responding to disturbance calls, 
46 percent of the victims were in two-man vehicles, 
46 percent in one-man vehicles, 3 percent in 
detective or special assignment, and 5 percent in 
other assignments. The vehicle patrol officer is the 
\'ictim of assault in 79 percent of the total assaults 
on police. 

Injuries to Law Enforcement Officers 

Assaults on officers resulted in 39 cases of serious 
personal injury to every 100 officers assaulted. 
The rates (Table 65) showed assault with injury 
to 9 officers per 100 in the New England division 
as contrasted with 3 per 100 in the East South 
Central di^nsion. The national rate of injuries to 
law enforcement officers was 6 per 100 officers. 
Cities of 100,000 to 250,000 inhabitants had the 
greatest rate of assault with injury with 9 per 100 
and sheriffs and county police departments had 
the lowest rate with 2 per 100. 



233 



Time of Assault 

Assaults on officers by time and population 
group are set forth in Table 69. Approximately 
one-half of the assaults on officers occurred during 
the hours from 8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. The period 
with greatest incidence was from 10:00 p.m. to 
midnight. More than 17 percent of the assaults 
were recorded for this two-hour period. 

Clearances in Assaults on Police 

Nationwide in 1974, 92 percent of police assaults 
were cleared by arrest. In cities over 250,000, 
this clearance percentage was highest of any 
population group with more than 94 percent 
being cleared. Assaults of police in disturbance 
matters were cleared at the rate of 97 percent in 
cities over 250,000. 

By police activity, the highest clearance rate 
for all agencies was 94 percent, which occurred in 
assaults on officers who were responding to dis- 
turbance calls. Ambush attacks accounted for the 
lowest clearance rate with 69 percent. Table 72 
shows the percentage of assaults cleared by type 
of acti^^ty and population group. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE 
TABULATIONS 

This section contains tables relating to law 
enforcement personnel. Figures showing law en- 
forcement strength by number of full-time officers 
and civilian employees are based on national 
averages. These figures should not be interpreted 
as indicating recommended or desirable police 
strength. Adequate law enforcement requirements 
for a specific place can only be determined follow- 
ing careful study and analysis of the local situation 
together with a thorough evaluation of the 
numerous factors which affect police needs. 

Two tables containing emploj^ee rates are set 
forth. In the first, total employees including 
civilian personnel are used ; whereas, in the second 
table, only sworn personnel are used to compute 
rates. 

The law enforcement employee rate ranges in 
Table 56, which include ci\'ilians, show the inter- 
quartile range between the upper limits of the 
lowest quartile and the lower limits of the highest 
quartile. In other words, 50 percent of the cities 
shown in each population group and geographic 
division have police strength within the rate ranges 



shown. By arraying rates in this manner, extremes 
are eliminated. 

In Table 57, where rates are published for 
police officers, complete rate ranges are provided 
as supplemental data for those who may be 
interested in using these figures to make limited 
comparisons. 

Statistical data indicating the percent distribu- 
tion of police employees by sex, including civilian 
personnel, are included in Table 58. 

Three tables report figures relating to patrol 
activity by population groups and shift as- 
signments. 

Personnel strength for reporting state police 
and state highway patrol organizations is re- 
corded in one table. This table is designed to 
show, by state, the number of miles of state and 
Federal highway per sworn employee, as well as 
the number of registered vehicles per officer. 
These rates are only a rough yardstick as to 
comparative workload and personnel strength 
because of widely differing functions and other 
factors. The wide variations in the numbers of 
sworn and civilian personnel among the various 
states can be accounted for in part by the 
differences in responsibilities assigned to the 
departments. It is pointed out, for instance, 
that state police generallj- are responsible not 
only for traffic patrol, but also conduct a major 
portion of the criminal investigative work in 
the unincorporated areas of the states. On the 
other hand, the activities of the state highway 
patrol organizations for the most part are limited 
to traffic and highway patrol, which include 
handling all types of crime which come to their 
attention during the performance of their patrol 
functions. Many of these state highway patrol 
groups also are authorized to and do participate 
in criminal investigative work when requested 
to do so by city departments or sheriffs' offices. 

The annual collection of law enforcement 
employee data provides personnel counts, sex 
of employees, and whether the employee is 
sworn or civilian. Data with respect to officers 
killed in the line of dutj' is obtained throughout 
the year with use of a special questionnaire. 
Some data relative to police killings and assaults 
are presented in this section of this publication. 
Employee counts for individual agencies are 
presented in tabular format in this section. 



234 



Table 56.— Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees,^ October 31, 7974, Number and Rate per 1,000 Inhabitants by Geographic 

Divisions and Population Groups 

[1974 estimated population] 



Geographic division 



TOTAL: 6,771 cities; population 136.064.000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1.000 inhabitants. 
Interquartile range 



New England : 502 cities; population 10.208,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1 ,000 inhabitants 

Interquarti le range - - 

Middle Atlantic: 1,400 cities; papulation 28,835,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1 ,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range — 

East North Central : 1,443 cities; population 27,882,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range - 

West North Central: 619 cities; population 10,028,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number otemployces per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

South Atlantic: 962 cities: population 14,874,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range - 

East South Central: 498 cities; population 6.500,000: 

Number of police employees - 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

West South Central: 551 cities; population 13,032,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range - 

Mountain: 282 cities: population 6,091,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1 .000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 

Pacific: 514 cities; population 18,614,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Interquartile range 



TOTAL 

(6,771 cities, 
population 
136,064,000) 



338,895 

2.5 

L4-2.5 



23.016 

2.3 

1.5-2.2 

86,659 

3.0 

1.1-2.3 

66.714 

2.4 

1.3-2.2 

20.430 

2.0 

1.4-2.1 

44.024 

3.0 

2. 0-3. 4 

14.942 

2.3 

1.7-2.7 

26.283 

2.0 

1.5-2.3 

13.557 

2.2 

1.7-3.0 

43.270 

2.3 

1.7-2.7 



Population Group 



Group I 

(58 cities 

over 250,000; 

population 

42,879,000) 



151,278 

3.5 

2.2-3.5 



2,877 
4.7 

m 

61, 502 

4.5 

3. 5-4. 7 

31, 256 

3.8 

2. 4-4. 2 

7,322 

3.0 

2. 1-3. 2 

16,043 

4.2 

2. 5-4. 7 

4,402 

2.6 

2. 5-2. 8 

12,009 

2.3 

1. 9-2. 9 

4,654 

2.4 

2.1-3.2 

21,313 

2.9 
2.4-2.7 



Group II 
(104 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
population 
15,158,000) 



1,8-2.5 

3,826 

3.0 

2. 7-3. C 

4,047 

2.9 

1.8-3.8 

6,230 

2.0 

1.9-2.3 

2,310 

1.8 

1.6-2.1 

7,323 

2.5 

2. 1-2. 7 

2,761 

2.3 

2. 2-2. 6 

2,797 

2.1 

1.6-2.5 

2,379 

2.6 

2. 0-2. 4 

4,298 
1.9 



Group III 
(262 cities, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
population 
18,299,000) 



35,574 

1.9 

1. 5-2. 2 



6,274 

2.2 

1.8-2.4 

6,649 

2.2 

1.5-2.9 

0,932 

1.7 

1.4-2.0 

1,367 

1.6 

1.3-1.9 

4, 029 

2.7 

2. 2-3. 1 

308 

2.1 

2. 1-2. 3 

3,036 

1.7 

1.6-1.9 

1,449 

1.5 

1. 3-1. 9 

6,570 

1.8 

1. 5-2. 



Group IV 
(537 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
population 
18,845,000) 



35,265 

1.9 

1. 5-2. 1 



2.1 
1. 4-2, 6 

7,266 

1.7 

1.4-1.9 

2,695 

1.5 

1.3-1.8 

4,228 

2.2 

1.9-2.6 

1,853 

2.1 

1.8-2.4 

1,956 

1.7 

1. 6-2. 

1,431 

1.9 

1.6-2.3 

4,310 

1.8 

1.5-1.9 



Group V 
(1,413 cities, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
population 
22,255,000) 



42,284 

1.9 

1.5-2.2 

4,669 
1.9 

1. 0-2. 1 

9,382 

1.9 

1.4-2.2 

8,261 

1.8 

1. 6-2. 1 

3,239 

1.7 
1.6-2.1 

6,638 

2.6 

2. 1-2. 9 

2,340 

2.0 

1.8-2.3 

3,346 

1.7 

1. 4-2. 

1,664 

1.9 

1.6-2.3 

3,W5 

2.0 

1. 7-2. 2 



Group VI 
(4,397 cities, 
under 10,000; 
population 

18,629,000) 



Suburban Police and County Sheriff Departments 



Suburban: ' 3.761 agencies; population 60.318.000: 

Number of poUce employees 

-Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Interquartile range 



Sheriffs: 2,503 agencies; population 51,649,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Interquartile range _ 



I Includes civilians. 

> Only one city this size In geographic division. 

' Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 

Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



235 



Tgble 57. — Full-Time Law Enforcement Officers, October 31, 1974, Number and Rate per 1,000 inhabitants by Geographic 

Divisions and Population Groups 

(1974 estimated population] 



Geographic division 



TOTAL: 6,771 cities; population 136,064,000: 

Nnmber or police officers. _ 

Average nnmber orofGcers per 1,000 inhabitants... 
Rate range.. 



New England: 502 cities; population 10,208,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

Middle Atlantic: 1,400 cities; population 28,835,000: 

Number of poUce officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

East North Central: 1,443 cities; population 27,882,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

West North Central: 619 cities; population 10,028,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

South Atlantic: 962 cities: population 14,874,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range 

East South Central: 498 cities; population 6,500,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. . 

Rate range 

West Sooth Central: 551 cities; population 13,032,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range.. 

Mountain: 282 cities: population 6,091,000: 

Number of police officers. 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Rate range.. 

Pacific: 514 cities; population 18,614,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 

Bate range 



TOTAL 
(6.771 cities 
population 

136,064,000) 



20,740 
2.0 

0. 3-9. 6 

76,757 

2.7 

0. 1-9. 6 

57,952 

2.1 

0. 1-7. 8 

16,791 

1.7 

0. 2-6. 9 

36,542 

2.5 

0. 3-6. 6 

12,582 

1.9 

0. 5-5. 9 

21,474 

1.6 

0. 6-5. 

10,775 

1,8 

1. 0-5. 4 

33,360 

1.8 

0. 6-6. 3 



Population Qroup 



Group I 

(58 cities 

over 250,000; 

population 

42,879,000) 



4.0 

(') 

45,314 

4.0 

2.2-4.3 

27, 702 

3.3 

1. 7-4. 

5,836 

2.4 

1. 5-3. 9 

13, 125 

3.4 

1.7-6.4 

3,671 

2.1 

1. 9-2. 3 

9,667 

1.8 

1. 5-2. 4 

3,686 

2.0 

1. 7-2. 6 

16,188 

1.3-2.9 



Group II 
(104 cities, 
100,000 to 
250,000; 
population 
15,158,000) 



0.9-3.8 



3,418 

2.7 

2. 3-3. 2 

3,639 

2.6 

1.4-3.8 

4,484 
1.7 

0. 9-2. 1 

1,817 

1.6 

1.1-1.7 

5,916 
2.0 

1. 2-3. 6 

2,184 

1.8 

1. 4-2. 2 

2,338 

1.7 

1.1-3.0 

1,818 

2.0 

1. 3-2. 9 

3,362 

1.6 

0. 9-2. 



Group III 
(262 cities, 
60,000 to 
100,000; 
population 
18,299,000) 



0. 6-4. 1 



4,711 

1.9 

1. 6-2. 6 

6,706 

1.9 

0. 7-4. 1 

5,885 
1.6 

0. 6-2. 4 

1,181 

1.4 

1.0-1.7 

3,279 

1. 0-3. 6 

326 

1.9 

1. 5-2. 

2,506 

1.4 

0. 9-1. 9 

1,137 

1.2 

0.8-1.7 

4,978 

1.4 

0. 8-2. 2 



Group IV 
(537 cities, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
population 
18,846,000) 



0.1-3.5 



3,681 

1.8 

0. 9-2. 8 

6,848 

1.9 

0. 6-3. 6 

6,203 

1.4 

0. 1-3. 6 

2,226 
1.3 

0. 8-2. 4 

3,643 
1.9 

1. 2-3. 

1,630 

1.8 

1. 4-2. 3 

1,624 

1.6 

1.0-2.4 

1.160 

1.6 

0. 7-3. 

3,384 

1.4 

0. 8-3. 1 



Group V 

(1,413 cities, 

10,000 to 

25,000; 

population 

22,266,000) 



0.1-5.2 



4,315 

1.7 

0. 3-2. 7 

8,482 

1.7 

0. 3-5. 2 

7,048 

1.6 

0. 1-3. 7 

2,746 

1.5 

0. 8-3. 2 

4,791 

2.2 

0. 8-4. 1 

2,088 

1.8 

0. 6-3. 9 

2,787 

1.4 

0. 6-3. 

1,248 

1.6 

0. 8-2. 3 

3.160 

1.6 

0. 9-3. 6 



Group VI 
(4,397 cities, 
under 10,000; 
population 

18,629,000) 



33,858 

1.8 

0.1-9.6 



2,117 

1.6 

0. 3-9. 6 

6,868 

1.6 

0.1-9.6. 

6,630 

1.7 

0. 1-7. 8 

2,985 

1.6 

0. 2-6. 9 

6,888 

2.4 

0.3-6.6 

2,783 

2.1 

0. 6-6. 9 

2,663 

1.7 

0. 6-6. 

1,726 

2.2 

1.0-5.4 

2.308 

2.2 

0.6-6.3 



Suburban PoUce and County Sherifi Departments 



Suburban: ' 3,761 agencies; population 60,318,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants. 
Rate range 



Sheriffs: 2,503 agencies: population 51,649,000: 

Number of pohce officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants.. 
Rate range 



• Only one city this size in geographic division. 

' Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also Included in other city groups. 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



236 



Table 58. — Law Enforcement Employees, Percent Distribution, Male and Female 

[9,274 agencies; 1974 estimated population 187,713,000] 



Population group 



TOTAL CITIES 

GROUP I 

Total (over 250,000) 

(Over 1,000,000) 

(600,000-1,000,000) 

(250,000-500,000) 

GROUP II 
(100,000-250,000) 

GROUP III 
(50,000-100,000) 

GROUP rv' 
(25,000-50,000) 

GROUP V 
(10,000-26,000) 

GROUP VI 

(Under 10,000) 

Suburban agencies 

SherifTs 



Total police employees 



151.278 
78.870 
44.386 
28.022 



124.992 
82,972 



89.0 
90.1 
87.7 



87.8 
84.4 



12.2 
15.6 



Police officers (sworn) 



127.587 
67.636 
36.353 
23,598 



105.017 
68,219 



97.9 
98.0 
97.6 
98.0 



96.8 
93.5 



Other police employees 



23,691 
11.234 
8.033 
4,424 



19,975 
14,753 



41.3 
42.6 
42.8 
35.3 



40.7 
42.1 



57.5 
57.2 
64.7 



69.3 
57.9 



237 



Toble 59. — Law Enforcement Patrol and Shift Assignments, October 31, 1974 



Population groups 



Number 

of 
patrols 



Type o( patrol 



One- 
man 
vehicle 



Two- 
man 
vehicle 



Foot 
patrol 



TOTAL CITIES.. 
4,861 Ciliea; total populatii 



GROUP I 
44 Cities over 250.000; popniation 31,665,000.. 



OROUP II 
i Cities 100,000 to 250,000; population 12.872,000. 



OROUP III 
228 Cities 50,000 to 100,000; population 15,980,000. 



GROUP IV 
452 Cities 25,000 to 50,000; population 15,757,000.. 



GROUP V 
1,213 Cities 10,000 to 25,000; population 19,178,000. 



GROUP VI 
2.836 Cities under 10,000; population 13,534,000. 



SHERIFFS AND COUNTY POLICE DEPARTMENTS 
1,522 agencies; population 38,095,000 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 1... 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 



Day 

Evening. 
Night...-. 
Other 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 



Day 

Evening. 
Night.... 
Other 



80,812 

27, 894 
26, 110 
21,913 



49,677 
16, 943 
16,045 
14, 077 
2,612 



6,664 
5,139 
1,678 



2,727 
2,505 



15, 803 

5,191 

5,249 

4,733 

630 



4,852 
4,677 



5,128 
4,532 
1,340 



7,285 
2,740 
2,291 



4,759 
1,620 
1,471 
1,253 



415 



0,122 


6,610 


3,566 


2,247 


3,393 


2,263 


2,645 


1,790 



10,396 


7,147 


3,581 


2,437 


3,447 


2.341 


2,851 


1,999 


517 


370 



11,434 

3,794 

3,769 

3,415 

456 



12,442 

4,105 
3,910 



3,922 
3.317 
1,119 



13,099 

3.256 
4,274 



1,647 
1.965 



8,855 
3,487 
3,066 
1,612 
700 



3,323 
1,334 
1,191 



' Other patrols Include motorcycle, motor scooter, or other specialized assignments; other shifts include overlapping or split shifts. 



238 



Table 60. — Law Enforcement Employees and Patrols 



Population Groups 



TOTAL CITIES (4,861 cities; 1974 estimated population 108.986,000) 

Group I (cities over 250,000 inhabitants). 

Group II (Cities 100,000 to 250.000 inhabitants) 

Group III (cities .50,000 to 100,000 inhabitants) 

Group IV (cities 25,000 to 50,000 inhalMtants).. 

Group V (cities 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants) 

Group VI (cities under 10,000 inliabitants) 

Sheriffs and county police (1,522 agencies; 1974 estimated population 38,095,000) 



Employees 



260,865 

108, 090 
28,747 
30,339 
28,560 
35,636 
29, 493 
64,713 



Civilians Officers 



16,345 
4,889 
4.947 
3.950 
4,774 
4.473 

10, 899 



221,487 



91,745 
23,858 
25, 392 
24, 610 
30. 862 
25, 020 
53, 814 



15,382 
5,995 
8,599 
8,947 
14,448 
14, 118 
15, 830 



One-man Two-man 



54,614 



9,427 
4,919 
7, 223 
7,655 
12,640 
12,750 
13, 867 



12,875 



5,955 
1,076 
1,376 
1,292 
1,808 
1,368 



Table 61 . — Law Enforcement Officer Assignments, October 31, 1974 



Population Groups 



TOTAL CITIES (4,861 cities: 1974 estimated population 108,986,000) 

Group I (cities over 2.50,000 inhabitants) 

Group II (cities 100,000 to 250,000 inhabitants) 

Group III (cities 5fi,000 to 100,000 inhabitants) 

Group IV (cities 25,000 to 50,000 inhabitants) 

Group V (cities 10,000 to 25,000 inhabitants) 

Group VI (cities under 10,000 Inhabitants) 

Sheriffs and county police (1,522 agencies; 1974 estimated population 38,095,000) 



Total 
patrols I 



67,489 



15,382 
5,995 
8,599 
8,947 
14,448 
14,118 

15,830 



Time of shift ' (percent)- 



35.3 
34.2 
33.9 
32.8 
33.5 



33.3 
35.7 
36.4 
35.5 
34,9 
33.7 



28.9 
29.4 
30.6 
32.3 



' Does not Include "other" shift or patrol. 

' Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100%. 



Table 62.— tow Enforcement Patrols, October 31, 1974 



Population Groups 



TOTAL CITIES (4,861 cities; 1974 estimated population 108,986,000) 

Group I (cities over 250,000 inhabitants) 

Group II (cities 100,000 to 250,000 inliabitants) 

Group III (cities 50,000 to 100.000 inliabitants) 

Group IV (cities 25.000 to 50,000 inhabitants) 

Group V (cities 10.000 to 25,000 inhabitants) 

Group VI (cities under 10,000 inhabitants) 

Sheriffs and county police (1,522 agencies; 1974 estimated population 38,095,000) 



67,489 



15,382 
5,995 
8,599 
8,947 
14,448 
14,118 

15,830 



59,334 



12,558 
5,349 
7,628 
8,018 
12, 699 
13,082 

15,053 



239 



Table 63. — Percent One and Two Man Law Enforcement Patrols' October 31, 1974 

(1974 Estimated Population] 



Population Groups 


Total 


Day 


Evening 


Night 




One-Man 


Two-Man 


One-Man 


Two-Man 


One-Man 


Two-Man 


One-Man 


Two-Man 


TOTAL CITIES: 4.861 cities; toul population 
108,986,000. 

GROUP I 


80.9 


19.1 


85.1 


14.9 


80.7 


19.3 


76.3 


23.7 




















61.3 


38.7 


63.9 


36.1 


65.6 


34.4 


61.9 




GROUP II 




















82.1 


17.9 


88.8 


11.2 


78.4 


21.6 


78.3 


21.7 


GROUP III 




















84.0 


16.0 


88.8 


11.2 


82.5 








GROUP IV 




















85.6 


14.4 


92,1 


7.9 


83.6 


16.6 


80.7 


19.3- 


GROUP V 




















87.5 


12.5 


93.1 


6.9 


86.3 


13.7 


83.0 


17.0 


GROUP VI 




















90.3 


9.7 


96.2 


3.8 


88.8 


11.2 


85.8 


14.2 


Sheriffs and County Police: 1,622 agencies; total popula- 


















tion 38 095,000 . . -. 


87.6 


12.4 


94.1 


5.9 


85,3 


14.7 


80.6 


19.4 







' Does not include "other" shift or patrol. 

Table 64. — Civilian Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Percentage of Total by Population Groups 



Population group 



TOTAL CITIES. 



Group I (over 250,000) 

(over 1,000.000)-.- 
(500,000-1,000,000). 
(250,000-500,000) . . 

Group II (100,000-250,000).- 



Percentage 

civilian 
employees 



18.1 
15.6 
17.5 



Population group 



Group III (50,000-100,000). 
Group IV (25,000-50,000).. 
Group V (10,000-2.5,000)... 
Group VI (under 10,000) . . 



Suljurban agencies 

Slieriffs and County Police Departments. 



Percentage 

civilian 
employees 



16.6 
14.1 



16.0 
17.8 



240 



Table 65. — Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, 1974 
Geographic Divisions and Population Groups 

(5,039 agencies; 1974 estimated population 103,581,000] 



Geograpliic division 


Total 
assaults 


Rate 
per 100 

police 
officers 


Assaults 
with 
injury 


Rate 
per 100 

police 
officers 


Population group 


Total 
assaults 


Rate 
per 100 

police 
officers 


Assaults 
witli 
injury 


Rate 
per 100 
police 
officers 


TOTAL..,. 


29,511 


15.1 


11,468 


5.9 


TOT.\L 


29,511 


15.1 


11,468 


5.9 








2,607 
3.294 
4,508 
2,309 
6,543 
916 
3,135 
1,418 
4, 781 


18.1 
10.8 
10.4 
14.6 
19.3 
9.9 
16.3 
15.8 
23.5 


1,248 

1,620 

2,416 

856 

2.236 

231 

879 

517 

1,465 


8.7 
5.3 
.5.6 
5.4 
6.6 

4.6 
5.8 


14, 482 
4,046 
2,418 
2.297 
2.461 
2,090 
4,774 

1,717 


19.1 
22.3 
15.4 
13.9 
11.8 
11.5 
9.5 

5.6 


5,735 
1,621 
858 
876 
849 
796 
1,981 

733 


7.6 
9.0 
5.5 
5.3 
4.1 
4.4 
3.9 




Group II (100,000 to 250,000) 

Group III (50.000 to 100,000) 

Group IV (25,000 to 50,000) 




West Xortli Central. . . 








West Soutli Central 






Siierifls and County police de- 




2.4 







I Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 

Table 66. — Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, 1974 
Percent Distribution of Weapon Used ' 

[5,032 agencies: 1974 estimated population 97,805,000] 



PopvUation group 


Total 
assaulls 


Firearms 


Knife or 

cutting 

instrument 


Other 
dangerous 
weapon 


Hands, 

fists, feet, 
etc. 


TOTAL ALL AGENCIES. 


26,094 
100,0 


1,849 
7.1 


687 
2.6 


2,327 
8.S 


21.231 
81.4 






11,065 


9.1 
4.2 
3.8 
5.1 
5.5 
7.8 
6.4 
9.4 


2.7 
2.8 
2.3 
2.1 
2.1 
2.0 
2.6 
4.7 


10.0 
9.7 
7.4 
6.8 
6.7 
7.6 
8.7 
9.6 


78.1 
83.3 

86.4 
85. 9 
85.8 
82.7 
82.3 
76.4 


Group II (100.000 to 2.50,000) . . 


4,046 
2,418 
2,297 
2,461 
2,090 
4,774 
1,717 


Group III (50,000 to 100,000) 


Group IV (25,000 to 50,000) 


Group V (10.000 to 25,000) 


Group VI (under 10,000) 




Sheriffs and County Police Departments 


Geographic Division 


Toul 
assaults 


Firearmi 


Knife or 

cutting 

instrument 


Other 
dangerous 
weapon 


Hands, 

fists, feet, 

etc. 


TOTAL .... 


26,094 
100.0 


1,849 
7.1 


687 
2.6 


2,327 
8.9 


21.231 

81.4 






2.607 
3,294 
4,508 
2,309 
6,543 
916 
3,135 
1,418 
1,364 


3.6 
3.7 
7.3 
9.4 
7.6 
5.6 
11.2 
9.2 
4.2 


2.0 
2.8 
2.2 
2.4 
2.8 
2.1 
3.5 
3.3 
2.2 


14.0 
9.8 
7.2 
9.8 
8.9 
5.9 
7.5 

11.0 
4.8 


80.4 
83.6 
83.4 
78.4 


Middle Atlantic 






South Atlantic 




86.5 










88.9 





' Includes suburban city and county police agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Subiu-ban cities 
are also included in other city groups. 

2 Due to rounding, percentages may not add to 100%. 



241 



Table 67. — Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, 1974 

Police Acti?ity by Type of Weapon 

[5,032 agencies; 1974 estimated population 97,805,000] 



Type ot activity 



TOTAL ASSAULTS - 

Percent of individual activity - 

Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man with gun) 

Percent of Individual activity 

Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects — 

Percent of individual activity 

Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects. 

Percent of individual activity.. 

Attempting otlier arrests 

Percent of individual activity^ 

Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 

Percent of individual activity 

Handling, transporting, custody cf prisoners... 

Perceirt of individual activity 

Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances 

Percent of individual activity. 

Ambush — no warning 

Percent of individual activity 

Mentally deranged — 

Percent of individual activity 

Traffic pursuits and stops 

Percent of individual activity 

All others. 

Percent of individual activity 



26,094 
100.0 



7,186 
100.0 



100.0 
6,746 
100.0 

577 
100.0 
3,219 
100.0 
1.940 
100.0 

154 
100.0 

344 
100.0 
2,861 
100.0 
3,213 
100.0 



Type of weapon 



Knife or 
cutting in- 
strument 



Other 

dangerous 

weapon 



21,231 
81.4 



43.7 
6,084 

88.5 
331 

57.4 
3,022 

93.9 
1,444 

74.4 
47 

30.6 
263 

73.5 
2,331 

81.5 
2,536 

78.9 



I Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 



242 



Table 68. — Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, 1974 

Type of weapon and Police Activity 

[5,032 agencies: 1974 estimated population 97,805,000] 



Type of activity 



TOTAL ASSAULTS 

Percent of total ' 

Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man with gun) 

Percent of total 

Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects 

Percent of total 

Robberies In progress or pursuing robbery suspects 

Percent of total 

Attempting other arrests 

Percent of total 

Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 

Percent of total 

Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 

Percent of total 

Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances 

Percent of total 

Ambush — no warning 

Percent of total 

Mentally deranged ._ 

Percent of total 

Traffic pursuits and stops 

Percent of total 

All other _ 

Percent of total 



26,094 
100.0 



6,746 
22.0 



3,219 
12.3 
1,940 



2,861 
11.0 
3,213 



Type of weapon 



1,849 
100.0 



Knife or 
cutting in- 
strument 



Other 

dangerous 

weapon 



2,327 
100.0 



21,231 
100.0 



6,766 
27.1 



3,022 
14.2 
1,444 



263 
1.2 
2,331 
11.0 
2,636 
11.9 



' Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



243 



Table 69. — Assaults on Law Enforcement Officers , 1974 





Total 1 




' 




Time of assaults by population group 








Population Group 


12- 
2 a.m. 


2 a.m.- 
4 a.m. 


4 a.m.- 
6 a.m. 


6 a.ra.- 
8 a.m. 


10 a.m. 


10 

a.m.- 

12 


12- 
2 p.m. 


2 p.m.- 
4 p.m. 


4 p.m.- 
6 p.m. 


6 p.m.- 
8 p.m. 


8 p.m.- 
10 p.m. 


10 

p.m.- 

12 


TOTAL 




























5,032 agencies; 1974 estimated population 

97,805.000: 


26,094 
10«.0 


4,364 
16.7 


3,083 
11.8 


1,035 
4.0 


436 
1.7 


576 
2.2 


935 
3.6 


1,127 
4.3 


1,510 

5.8 


1,969 
7.5 


2,547 
9.8 


3,954 
15.2 












GROUP I 




























38 agencies over 250,000; total population 
21,116,000: 


11, 065 
100.0 


1,633 
14.8 


1.276 
11.5 


466 
4.2 


213 
1.9 


247 


437 
3.9 


527 

4.8 


708 
6.4 


919 
8.3 


1.146 
10.4 


1.637 
14.8 


1 856 




16.8 


GROUP 11 




























64 agencies. 100,000 to 250,000; total popula- 
tion 8,993.000: 


4,046 
100 


667 
16.5 


455 
11.2 


168 
4.2 


62 
1.5 


68 
1.7 


143 
3 5 


183 

4 5 


208 
5 1 


349 


412 
10 2 


569 








GROUP III 




























135 agencies, 50.000 to 100,000; total popula- 
tion 9,251,000: 


2.418 
100,0 


458 
18.9 


339 
14.0 


87 
3.6 


28 
1.2 


40 
1.7 


99 
4.1 


98 
4.1 


111 
4.6 


166 
6.9 


242 
10.0 


353 
14.6 


397 




16.4 


GROUP IV 




























298 agencies, 25.000 to 50,000; total population 
10,464,000: 


2.297 
100.0 


424 
18.6 


293 
12.8 


88 
3.8 


31 
1.3 


48 
2.1 


85 
3.7 


93 
4.0 


124 
5.4 


134 
5.8 


222 
9.7 


366 
15.9 


390 




17.0 


GROUP V 




























817 agencies, 10,000 to 25,000; total population 
12,876,000: 


2.461 
100.0 


616 
21.0 


281 
11.4 


100 
4.1 


39 
1.6 


66 
2.3 


42 
1.7 


77 
3.1 


137 
6.6 


126 
5.1 


190 

7.7 


433 

17.6 


464 




18.9 


GROUP VI 




























2,397 agencies under 10,000; total population 
10.493,000: 


2.090 
100.0 


409 
19.6 


267 
12.8 


74 
3.5 


30 
1.4 


50 
2.4 


44 
2.1 


74 
3.5 


98 
4.7 


141 
6.7 


165 

7.4 


347 
16.6 


401 




19.2 


COUNTIES 




1,283 agencies; total population 24,613,000: 


1,717 
100.0 


267 
15.0 


172 
10.0 


82 
3.0 


33 

1.9 


67 
3.9 


85 
5.0 


75 
4.4 


124 


134 

7.8 


180 
10.5 


260 
15.1 


278 




16.2 







I Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



244 



Table 70. — Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, 1974 
Type of Activity by Percent of Officers Assignment 

[5,032 agencies; 1974 estimated population 97,805,000) 



Type ot activity 



Total 

Percent of total ' 

Responding to "disturbance" calls 
(family quarrels, man with gun, 

etc.) 

Percent of total 

Burglaries in progress or piu-suing bur- 
glary suspects - 

Percent of total 

Robberies in progress or pursuing 

robbery suspects. , 

Percent of total 

Attempting other arrests 

Percent of total 

Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 
Percent of total 

Handling, transporting, custody of pris- 
oners 

Percent of total. 

Investigating suspicious persons or cir- 
cumstances. 

Percent of total 

Ambush — no warning 

Percent of total 

Mentally deranged 

Percent of total 

Traffic pursuits and stops , 

Percent of total.. 

AUotlier 

Percent of total 



26,094 
100.0 



2,861 
11.0 
3,213 



Type of assignment 



9,754 
100.0 



2,017 
20.7 



1,020 
10.5 



1, 123 
U.S 



1-man vehicle(s) 



4,868 
100.0 



1,202 
24.7 



1,072 
22.0 



5,948 
100.0 



1,355 
22.8 



Detective or special 
assignment 



1,416 
100.0 



1,518 
100.0 



2,100 
100.0 



I Because of rounding, tlie percentages may not add to total. 



245 



Table 71 . — Low Enforcement Officers Assaulfed, 1974 
Type of Assignment by Police Activity 
15,032 agencies; 1974 estimated population 97,805,000] 



Type of activity 



TOTAL 

Percent of individual activity 

Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, 
man with pun) 

Percent of individual activity 

Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects — 

Percent of individual activity 

Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects 

Percent of individual activity 

Attempting other arrests 

Percent of individual activity 

Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 

Percent of individual activity - - - . 

Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 

Percent of individual activity 

Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances 

Percent of individual activity - 

Ambush (premeditated and without warning or prov 
ocation). _._ 

Percent of individual activity.. 

Mentally deranged.. 

Percent of individual activity 

Traffic pursuits and stops 

Percent of individual activity 

All other 

Percent of individual activity 



26,094 
100.0 



100.0 
5,746 
100.0 
577 
100.0 
3,219 
100.0 
1,94C 
100.0 

154 



100.0 
3.213 
100.0 



Type of assignment 



9,754 
37.4 



3,294 
45.8 



36.6 
2,017 

35.1 
171 

29.6 
1,020 

31.7 



42.7 
1,123 
39.3 



1-man vehicle(s) 



Unassisted Assisted 



4.868 
18.7 



13.5 
1,072 
18.7 



5.948 
22.8 



2,100 
29.2 



16.2 
1,355 
23.6 



Detective or special 
assignment 



Unassisted Assisted 



Unassisted Assisted 



' Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 



246 



Table 72. — Assaults on Law Enforcement Officers and Percent Cleared, 1974 

Type of Activity by Population Group 



Type of activity 



TOTAL ASSAULTS 

PERCENT CLEARED 

Responding to "disturbance" calls 
(family quarrels, man with gun, etc.)- 

Percen t cleared 

Burglaries in progress or pursuing bur- 
glary suspects - - 

Percent cleared 

Robberies in progress or pursuing rob- 
bery suspects , 

Percent cleared 

Attempting other arrests... 

Percent cleared 

Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 

Percent cleared 

Handling, transporting, custody of 
prisoners 

Percent cleared 

Investigating suspicious persons or cir- 
cumstances - 

Percent cleared 

Ambush — no warning 

Percent cleared 

Mentally deranged 

Percent cleared 

Traffic pursuits and stops 

Percent cleared 

All other 

Percent cleared 



Total (5,302 
agencies, 

1974 
estimated 
population 
U" ,803,000) 



7,186 
94.1 



86.0 
5,746 
93.1 



3,219 
92.4 



1,940 
91.6 



344 
83.1 

2,861 
93.1 

3,213 
90.4 



Group I 
(38 agencies, 
over 250.000; 
population 
21,115,000) 



ll.OSS 
94.4 



2,7»t 
96.6 



87.7 
2,243 
95.9 



1,241 

96.6 



67.1 
133 

91.0 
1,263 

95.9 
1,803 

94.1 



Group 11 
(64 agencies, 

100,000 to 

2.'>0,000; 

population 

8.9<j3,a00) 



4.046 
8!). 3 



1,160 
92.9 



89.6 
1,007 
91.4 



Group in 
(135 agencies, 
50,000 to 
100,000; 
population 
9,251,000) 



2.418 
94.2 



Group IV 
(298 agencies, 
25,000 to 
50,000; 
population 
10,464,000) 



2.297 
90.6 



Group ^' 
(S17 agencies, 
10,000 to 
25,000; 
population 
12.876,000) 



2,461 
90. S 



Group VI 

(2,397 

agencies, 

under 10,000; 

population 

10,493,000) 



2,090 
86.7 



Counties 
(1.283 

agencies, 
population 
24,613,000) 



1.717 
87.5 



247 



Table 73. — Full-Time Stafe Police and Highway Patrol Employees, Ocfober 31, 1974 



TOTAL 

Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut... 

Delaware 

Florida 

Georgia 

Idaho.- 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas. 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri -. 

Montana 



61.964 



1,027 
380 

1,192 
569 

7,484 

762 
1,187 



2,264 
1,383 



1,992 
1,147 



Miles of 
primary 
highway per 
police 
officer ' 



17.2 
17.7 



11.0 
26.6 

27.4 
10.0 
12.4 
25.1 
28.0 



24.2 
18.6 
10.1 
29.1 



State motor 
vehicle reg- 
istration per 
police 
officer 2 



1,781 
2,640 
2,415 



4,787 
4,628 

3,225 
3,524 
3,551 
4,934 
4,766 

2,597 



1,553 
3,215 



2,271 
3,551 
2,578 



Nebraska 

Nevada.-- 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina. 
North Dakota... 

Ohio... 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania... 
Rhode Island.. - 
South Carohna.. 
South Dakota... 

Tennessee 

Texas 

Utah 

Vermont- 

Virginia.- 

Washington 

West Virginia 

Wisconsin. 

Wyoming 





Police 


Civil- 


Total 


officers 


ians 


497 


388 


109 


195 


134 


61 


264 


213 


51 


2,448 


1,691 


757 


476 


290 


186 


3,884 


3,369 


515 


1,429 


1,124 


305 


110 


92 


18 


2,159 


1,322 


837 


1,009 


556 


453 


1,049 


912 


137 


4,555 


3,827 


728 


205 


173 


32 


848 


723 


125 


188 


170 


18 


1,109 


781 


328 


4,125 


2,345 


1,780 


396 


384 


12 


345 


228 


117 


1,507 


1,088 


419 


1,261 


761 


500 


647 


447 


200 


624 


473 


151 


142 


121 


21 



Miles of 
primary 
highway per 
pohce 
officer ' 



25.3 
16.8 



12.0 
75.4 
14.5 



13.6 

52.7 

12.3 
29.5 
14.3 
11.5 



12.0 
25.2 
50.2 



State motor 
vehicle reg- 
istration per 
police 
officer 2 



2,827 
3,261 
2,170 
2,409 
2,502 

2,173 
3,065 
5,320 
5,052 



1,761 
1,744 
3,253 
2,215 
2,859 

3,159 
3,333 
1,957 
1,204 



3,115 
2,038 
5,227 
2,429 



' Miles of primary highway taken from U.S. Department of Transportation pubUcation, "Highway Statistics 1973." 

' State motor vehicle registration data, which includes automobile, bus, and truck registrations, taken from U.S. Department of Transportation publication, 
"Highway Statistics 1973." 



248 



Table 74. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population 



Annislon 

Bessemer 

Birmingham. 

Decatur 

Dothan. 

Florence 

Gadsden 

Hunts ville 

Mobile 

Montgomery. 
Phenix City.. 

Prichard 

Selma 

Tuscaloosa... 



Flagstaff.. 
Glendale.. 

Mesa 

Phoenix... 
Scottsdale. 

Tempe 

Tucson 

Yuma 



ARKANSAS 



Blytheville 

El Dorado 

Fayetteville 

Fort Smith 

Hot Springs 

Jonesboro 

Little Rock.. 

North Little Rock. 

Pine Blufl 

West Memphis 



CALIFORNIA 



Alameda ., 

Alhambra 

Anaheim 

Antioch. 

Arcadia 

Azusa 

Bakersfield 

Baldwin Park. 
Bell Gardens.. 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills.. 
Buena Park... 

Burbank 

Burlingame. ._ 

Campbell 

Chula Vista 

Compton 

Concord 

Corona 

Costa Mesa 

Covina 

Culver City... 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 



CALIFORNIA— Con. 

Cypress 

Daly City 

Davis -. 

Downey 

El Cajon 

ElCcrrito 

El Monte 

Escondido. 

Fairfield 

Fountain Valley 

Fremont 

Fresno 

FuUerton 

Gardena 

Garden Grove 

Glendale 

Glendora 

Hawthorne... 

Hayward 

Huntington Beach , 

Huntington Park 

Inglewood 

LaHabra 

La Mesa 

Livermore 

Lodi - , 

Lompoc 

Long Beach 

Los Altos 

Los Angeles 

Lynwood 

Manhattan Beach 

Menlo Park 

Milpitas 

Modesto 

Monrovia 

Montebello 

Monterey 

Monterey Park 

Mountain View 

Napa 

National City 

Newark 

Newport Beach 

Novato 

Oakland 

Oceanside 

Ontario 

Orange 

Oxnard 

Pacifica 

Palm Springs 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Petaluma 

Placentia 

Pleasant Hill 

Pleasanton. 

Pomona 

Redlands 

Redondo Beach 

Redwood City 

Rialto 

Richmond... 

Riverside. 

Sacramento 

Salinas 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



1 


2 




9 




16 


8 


12 




10 

1 





11 


8 


1 


8 


23 


1 


1 

1 
1 
11 




11 


1 


16 

1 


3 


u 

17 




16 



249 



Table 74. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



Number of law enforcement employees 



CALIFORNIA— Con. 

San Bernardino 

San Bruno.-- -. 

San Carlos-- -.- 

San DiegO- 

San Francisco 

San Gabriel 

San Jose 

San Leandro - 

San Luis Obispo - 

San Mateo - 

San Rafael 

Santa Ana. - - 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz -.- 

Santa Maria - 

Santa Monica. 

Santa Rosa - 

Seal Beach 

Seaside 

Simi Valley.- - 

South Gate - --. 

South San Francisco 

Stockton . - 

Sunnyvale 

Torrance -- 

Tustin 

Upland - -- 

Vallejo --- -- -. 

Ventura. . - - . 

Visalia 

Walnut Creek 

West Covina 

Westminster - 

Whittier - -. 

COLORADO 

Arvada 

Aurora - 

Boulder. . - 

Colorado Springs.- - 

Denver 

Englewood 

Fort Collins 

Greeley 

Lakewood - 

Littleton 

Longmont..- 

Northglenn 

Pueblo - 

Wheat Ridge -.. 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport - - 

Bristol - - 

Danbury - 

East Hartford 

Enfield-- 

Fairfield - 

Greenwich . - 

Groton Town 

Hamden - 

Hartford -.- 

Manchester- - 

Meriden -- 

Middletown 



Male Female 



1,051 
1,945 



CONNECTICUT— Con 



Milford 

New Britain... 
New Haven... 

Newington 

Norwalk- 

Norwich 

Sheltou-.- 

Southington... 

Stratford 

Torrington 

Trumbull 

Vernon.-- 

Wallingford 

Waterbury 

West Hartford- 
West Haven-.. 

Westport 

Wethersfield--. 



DELAWARE 

Wilmington - 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 
Washington - 



2 



FLORIDA 



Boca Raton 

Boynton Beach 

Clearwater- - - . 

Coral Gables- -. 

Daytona Beach 

Delray Beach.-- 

Fort Lauderdale 

Fort Myers 

Fort Pierce 

Gainesville-- 

Hallandale- 

Hialeah 

Hollywood -. 

Jacksonville .- 

Key West 

Lakeland 

Lake Worth - 

Largo 

Lauderhill 

Melbourne 

Miami - 

Miami Beach--- 

Miramar 

North Miami 

North Miami Beach - 

Ocala 

Orlando-- -.. 

Panama City 

Pensacola 

Pinellas Park 

Plantation 

Pompano Beach 

Riviera Beach 

Saint Petersburg 

Sarasota 

Tallahassee - 

Tampa 

Titus ville 

West Palm Beach... 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



50 


40 


98 


79 


1,019 


743 


310 


232 


52 


49 
70 


87 


85 


75 


71 


54 


.572 


398 


70 


61 


144 


122 


41 


33 


72 


61 


165 


109 


80 


63 


638 


466 


164 


100 


144 


125 


806 


641 


58 


47 


104 


146 



Male Female 



250 



Table 74. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 





Number of law enlorcement employees 


City by State 


Number of law enforcement employees 


City by State 


Total 


Officers 


Civilians 


Total 


Officers 


CiviUans 




Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


GEORGIA 


186 

97 

1,894 

201 

407 
44 

113 
44 

262 
88 
81 

270 
62 
66 

136 
1,741 

141 
71 
48 
77 

45 
68 
81 

143 
70 
66 
75 
18 
55 
62 
96 
14,935 
89 
87 
80 

132 
54 

102 
37 
52 
95 

105 
78 
34 

173 
49 
40 
51 
51 
55 
77 
60 
48 

175 
70 
33 
59 
53 
83 
43 


165 

88 

1,457 

160 

302 
35 

105 
35 

238 
73 
67 

211 
54 
58 

100 
1,358 

100 
63 
36 
60 

40 
60 
74 

123 
61 
60 
65 
18 
42 
48 
87 
13,076 
70 
84 
66 

105 
43 
87 
32 
42 
75 
83 
66 
31 

138 
40 
36 
45 
41 
48 
63 
48 
38 

136 
62 
32 
47 
48 
63 
38 


8 

129 
4 
9 
1 
3 
6 
4 
1 

9 

1 
1 

1 

8 

1 
1 
12 


3 
3 
111 
17 
24 
4 
3 

4 
4 
4 

15 
2 
3 

19 
156 

8 


10 

6 

197 

20 

72 
4 

3 
16 
10 

3 
35 

5 

4 

16 
219 

32 

7 


ILLINOIS— Con. 


65 
45 
68 
38 
57 
30 

103 

160 
58 
34 
57 
46 

275 
66 
28 

289 
97 
54 

135 
30 

223 
S3 
43 

114 
59 
49 

153 
79 
60 
156 
124 
272 
322 
440 
237 
34 
1,292 
116 
90 

102 
69 

142 
75 

310 

128 

49 
50 
54 
187 
55 
132 
159 
412 
80 
56 
58 
40 
60 
40 
149 


51 
37 
59 
31 
45 
26 
90 

119 
45 
29 
SO 
40 

208 
62 
21 

252 
75 
44 

116 
26 

150 
42 
31 
95 
43 
38 

135 
56 
57 
144 
97 
237 
292 
368 
211 
28 
1,015 
105 
73 
74 
91 
62 
126 
63 
241 
112 

40 
39 
41 
149 
48 
103 
130 
314 
66 
45 
46 
34 
43 
35 
120 


1 


6 
















Niles 


1 


4 
3 
6 


















North Chicago 








1 
4 


4 
13 

9 






Oak Park. 






Palatine 






Park Forest 






Park Ridge 










Pekin 


9 

1 

5 

1 

1 


1 
9 

2 
15 
4 
4 
3 






Peoria 
















Hilo . 


Rockford 






Bock Island 
















Boise 


South Holland 




Idalio Falls 


Springfield 


2 
2 

2 
4 

1 


39 
2 
4 
1 
5 
5 

1 






Urbana 






7 


10 

5 
6 

12 
4 
3 

10 


Villa Park 












Wheaton 






Wilmette 




Alton 


1 
1 
3 


1 
6 
5 
5 
3 


INDIANA 

Anderson 














Blooming ton 






Columbus 






East Chicago 


12 








Elkhart. 


1 

7 

6 

82 
2 
1 

2 

5 

2 


12 
8 
10 
16 
4 

52 
1 
9 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 

30 
4 


14 








13 

6 

8 

983 

12 
2 
5 

20 
8 

12 
5 
8 

12 

21 
6 
1 

16 

4 
3 

5 
3 

6 
6 

4 
20 
4 
1 

2 
17 


Evansville 


20 




1 

190 
2 

3 


1 
686 
5 
1 
9 

3 


Fort Wayne 






Hary 




,,. . ^" 


Hammond 






Highland 






Indianapolis 


143 




Kokomo 






Lafayette 


7 


DeKalb 






Michigan City . 






., 






Dolton 










1 
1 


1 

1 

2 
18 
2 










4 


South Bend 


Elgin 










10 


IOWA 

Ames 


















1 
3 


5 
3 

14 


5 




Cedar Falls 




1 

4 
1 


3 
4 
4 
8 
6 
6 
15 
3 


10 








21 




Clinton 








Council BluBs . 


3 

2 
9 
4 

1 

1 


48 
1 
5 
4 
1 
6 
5 
4 






24 








20 


Highland Park . 


Des Moines 




41 








9 


Joliet- 






6 










Lansing 




' 




2 


12 
3 

1 

5 




o 
















Moline 


Sioux City 






24 




Waterloo 



251 



Table 74.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population— Continued 



Hutchinson 

Kansas City. .. 

Lawrence 

Leavenworth... 

Manhattan 

Overland Park. 
Prairie Village. . 

Salina 

Topeka 

Wichita 



KENTUCKY 



Ashland 

Bowling Green. 

Covington 

Lexington 

Louisville 

Newport 

Owensboro 

Paducah 



LOUISIANA 



Alexandria 

Baton Rouge.. 
Bossier City... 

Lafayette 

Lake Charles.. 

Monroe 

New Orleans. . 
Shreveport... 



Bangor... 
Lewiston. 
Portland - 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



MASSACHUSETTS— Con. 

Haverhill 

Holyoke 

Lawrence 

Leominster 

Lexington. 

Lowell.. 

Lynn 

Maiden... 

Marlborough 

Medford 

Melrose 

Methuen 

Milton 

Natick . _ 

Needham 

New Bedford.. 

Newton 

Northampton 

Norwood - - 

Peabody 

Pittsfield - 

Quincy- 

Randolph 

Salem 

Saugus - 

Somerville . _ 

Springfield 

Taunton.. 

Wakefield 

Walthara 

Watertown 

Wellesley 

Westfield 

West Springfield 

Weymouth 

Woburn 

Worcester . 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 



MARYLAND 



MICHIGAN 



Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Cumberland. 
Hagerstown.. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



Arlington 

Attleboro 

Belmont 

Beverly.. 

Billerica 

Boston 

Braintree 

Brockton 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

Chelmsford 

Chelsea 

Chicopee 

Danvers 

Dedham 

Everett 

Fall River. ... 

Fitch burg 

Framingham. 
Gloucester 



Allen Park 

Bay City 

Birmingham 

Bloomfield Township 

Burton 

Clinton Township 

Dearborn 

Dearborn Heights - - 

Detroit 

East Detroit 

Farmington Hills 

Flint 

Flint Township. 

Garden City 

Grand Rapids 

Highland Park 

Holland 

Inkster 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Lansing 

Lincoln Park.. .- 

Madison Heights 

Mount Morris Township . 

Muskegon 

Pontiac 

Portage 



252 



Table 74. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — ConHnued 



MICHIGAN— Con. 



Port Huron 

Rcdford Township 

Rosevllle 

Royal Oak 

Saginaw 

Saginaw Towns flip 

Saint Clair Shores.. 

Shelby Township 

Southfield 

Southgate 

Sterling Heights 

Taylor 

Trenton 

Troy 

Warren 

Waterford Township 

West Bloomfleld Township. 

Westland 

Wyandotte 

Wyoming 

Ypsilanti 



MINNESOTA 



Austin 

Blaine 

Bloomlngton 

Brooklyn Center. 
Brooklyn Park .. . 

Coon Rapids 

Crystal 

Duluth 

Edlna.. 

Fridley 

Mankato 

Maplewood 

Minneapolis 

Minnetonka 

Moorhead 

Richlield 

Rochester 

RoseviUe 

Saint Cloud 

Saint Louis Park . 

Saint Paul 

South Saint Paul. 
Winona 



MISSISSIPPI 

Blloxl 

Columbus 

Greenville 

Oullport 

Hattlesbuig 

Jaclcson 

Meridian 

Pascagoula 

Vicksburg 

MISSOURI 

Cape Girardeau 

Columbia 

Ferguson 

Florissant. 

Gladstone. 

Independence 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 



MISSOURI— Con. 

Jefferson City 

JopUn 

Kansas City 

Kirkwood 

Ray town 

Saint Charles 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Louis 

Springfield 

University City 

Webster Groves 

MONTANA 

Billings 

Great Falls 

Missoula 

NEBRASKA 

Grand Island 

Lincoln 

Omalia 

NEVADA 

Las Vegas 

North Las Vegas 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Concord 

Manchester 

Nashua 

Portsmouth 

Salem 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Bayonne 

Belleville 

Bergenficld , 

Bloomfleld , 

Brick Township 

Bridgewater Township 

Camden 

Cherry Hill 

Clifton 

Cranford Townstiip 

Dover Township 

East Brunswick Township. 

East Orange 

Edison 

Elizabeth 

Ewlng Township 

Fair Lawn 

Fort Lee 

Franklin TownsUp 

Garfield 

Gloucester Townstiip 

Hackensack 

Hamilton Township 

Hoboken 

Irving ton 

Jersey City 

Kearny 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



2 


4 


1 


4 


1 


5 




36 




10 




3 




3 


1 


20 




3 


3 


7 




3 




19 




2 




12 




4 




4 




5 




15 




4 




4 


3 


22 
1 



253 



Table 74.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employeei, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and oyer in Population— Continued 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Lakewood - 

Linden 

Livingston 

Lodi 

Long Brancli - - - 

Madison Township 

Middlctown Townsliip . . - 

Montclair - 

Neptune Township 

Newarlc - 

New Branswiclj 

North Bergen Township. 

Nutley 

Orange 

Paramus - - 

Parsippany-Troy Hills... 

Passaic 

Paterson 

Pennsauken 

Perth Amboy 

Piscataway Township — 

Plainfield -- 

Rahway 

Ridgewood 

Sayreville -- - 

Teaneck Township 

Trenton - 

Union City,. -- 

Union Township 

Vineland- 

Wayne Township 

Westfield 

West New York 

West Orange. -- 

Willingboro Township... 
Woodbridge Township,. 



NEW MEXICO 



Albuquerque. 

Clovis -. 

Hobbs 

Las Cruces... 

Roswell 

Santa Fe 



Albany - 

Amherst 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Binghamton. 

Brighton 

Buffalo 

Cheektowaga 

Clarkstown 

Colonie Town 

Dewitt 

Elmir'i... 

Freeport 

Garden City 

Gates.- 

Glen Cove , 

Greece 

Greenburgh 

Hamburg Tovim. 

254 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 



Number of law enforcement employees 



NEW YORK— Con. 



Hempstead 

Irondequoit.. 

Ithaca 

Jamestown 

Kingston 

Lackawanna. 

Lockport 

Long Beach 

Lynbrook.. -.. 

Mount Vernon 

Newburgh 

New Rochelle 

New York City 

Niagara Falls 

North Tonawanda... 

Orangetown 

Port Chester 

Poughkeepsie 

Poughkeepsie Town. 

Ramapo Town 

Rochester.. 

Rockville Centre 

Rome 

Rotterdam 

Schenectady 

Syracuse 

Tonawanda Town... 

Troy.,. 

Utica 

Vestal 

Watertown... 

West Seneca 

White Plains 

Yonkers 



NORTH CAROLINA 



AsheviUe 

BurUngton 

Charlotte 

Durham 

Gastonia. 

Goldsboro - - . 

Greensboro - ■ 

G reenville 

High Point 

KannapoUs 

Raleigh — 

Rocky Mount.. .-. 

Wilmington 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck 

Fargo - - - 

Grand Forks.. 

Minot - 

OHIO 

\kron 

\lliance 

Athens. 

Barberton 

Beavercreek Township 

Brook Park.. 

Canton 



Male Female 





4 


12 


37 


4 


3 


4 


1 


2 


30 


2 


1 


1 


6 

1 



Table 74. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



OHIO— Con. 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Heights 

Columbus - - - 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Dayton. 

Delhi Township... 

East Cleveland. 

Elyria 

Euclid 

Fairborn 

Findlay 

Garfield Heights 

Hamilton. 

Kent. 

Kettering 

Lakewood 

Lancaster 

Lima... 

Lorain 

Mansfield 

Maple Heights. 

Marion 

Massillon 

Mentor 

Middletown 

Newark 

North Olmsted 

Norwood 

Parma 

Parma Heights.. 

Portsmouth 

Sandusky 

Shaker Heights 

South Euclid 

Springfield 

Steubenville 

Toledo 

Upper Arlington.. 

Warren 

Whitehall 

Xenia.. 

Youngstown 

Zanesville 

OKLAHOMA 

BartlesvlUe 

Del City 

Enid 

Lawton 

Midwest City 

Muskogee 

Norman 

Oklahoma City 

Ponca City 

Shawnee 

Stillwater.. 

Tulsa 

OREGON 

Corvalhs 

Eugene 

Medford 

Portland 

Salem 

Springfield .,_ 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



1,136 

2,294 



Male Female 



1 


^ 




10 


3 


7 


2 


6 


17 


19 

1 


9 


50 


1 


12 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Abington Township 

Allcntown 

Al toona 

Baldwin Borough. 

Bensalem Township 

Bethel Park 

Bethlehem 

Bristol Township 

Cheltenham Township 

Chester 

Easton 

Erie.. 

Falls Township 

Harrisburg 

Haverford Township 

Hazelton 

Johnstown 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lower Merion Township 

Lower Paxton Township 

Marple Township 

McKeesport 

Middletown Township 

Millcreek Township 

Monroeville 

Mount Lebanon Township. . , 

New Castle 

Norristown 

North Huntingdon Township 

Penn Hills Township 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburgh 

Pottstown . . _ 

Radnor Township 

Reading _ 

Ridley Township 

Ross Township 

Scranton 

Shaler Township 

Springfield Township 

State College 

Upper Darby Township 

Warminster Township.., 

West Mifflin 

Wilkes-Barre 

Wilkinsburg 

Williamsport 

York 

RHODE ISLAND 

Cranston. 

East Providence 

Middletown 

Newport 

North Kingstown 

Pawtucket 

Providence 

Warwick 

Woonsocket 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston City 

Columbia 

Florence 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



8,171 
1,454 



295 



Table 74. Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



SOUTH CAROLINA— Con. 

Greenville 

North Charleston 

Rook Hill 

Spartanburg 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Aberdeen 

Rapid City 

Sioux Falls 



TENNESSEE 



Chattanooga.. 

Clarksville 

Jackson 

Johnson City.. 

Kingsport 

Knoxville 

Memphis 

Murfreesboro., 

Nashville 

Oak Ridgo... 



Abilene 

Amarillo 

Arlington 

Austin 

Baytown 

Beaumont 

Big Spring 

Bryan 

Corpus Christi. 

Dallas 

Denison.. 

Denton 

El Paso 



Number of law enforcement employees 



TEXAS— Con. 



Farmers Branch. 

Fort Worth 

Galveston 

Garland 

Grand Prairie... 

Haltom City 

Harlingen 

Houston 

Hurst 

Irving 

Killeen 

Kingsville 

Laredo — 

Longview 

Lubbock... 

McAUen 

Mesquite 

Midland 

Odessa.. 

Pasadena 

Piano 

Port Arthur 

Richardson 

San Angelo 

San Antonio 

Sherman 

Temple 

Texarkana 

Texas City 

Tyler 

Victoria 

Waco 

Wichita Falls 



Bountiful. 

Ogden 

Orem 



Number of law enforcem«nt employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 



256 



Table 74. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 37, 1974, Cities 25,000 and over in Population — Continued 



UTAH-Con. 

Provo 

Salt Lake City 

VERMONT 

Burlington 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria 

Arlington 

Charlottesville _. 

Chesapeake 

Danville 

Hampton 

Lynchburg 

Newport News 

Norfolk. 

Petersburg 

Portsmouth 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Suffolk 

Virginia Beach 

WASHINGTON 

Bellevue - 

Bellingham 

Bremerton 

Everett 

Longview 

Renton 

Richland 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoma 

Vancouver - - 

Yakima..- -- 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 



WEST VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

Fairmont 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Weirton 

Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Beloit... 

Brookfield 

Eau Claire 

Fond du Lac 

Green Bay 

Greenfield 

Janesville 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Madison 

Manitowoc 

Menomonee Falls 

Milwaukee 

New BerUn 

Oshkosh. 

Racine 

Sheboygan 

Superior 

Waukesha 

Wausau 

Wauwatosa 

West Allis 

WYOMING 

Casper 

Cheyenne 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



Male Female 





9 


3 


6 


1 


10 


1 


3 




5 


26 


6 




2 



257 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25/000 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



ALABAMA— Con. 



Hurtsboro 

Irondale 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Lafayette 

Leeds - 

Leighton 

Level Plains 

Lincoln 

Lineville 

Ltttleville 

Loxley... 

Madison 

Maplesville 

Marion... 

McKende 

Mentone.- 

Midfield 

Midland 

Montevallo 

Mountain Brook- 
Muscle Shoals 

Napierfield 

New Brockton... 

New Hope 

Newton. 

Newville... 

Northport. 

Ohatchee 

Oneonta... 

Opelika 

Opp - 

Oxford.. 

Pelham.- 

Pell City.. 

Phil Campbell... 

Piedmont 

Pine Hill 

Pisgah 

Pleasant Grove.. 

Prattville 

Rainsville 

Ranburne 

Red Bay 

Roanoke. 

Rockford 

Russellville 

Saraland 

Satsuma 

Scottsboro 

Section. 

Sheffield 

Silverhill 

Sylacauga 

Talladega 

Tallassee 

Tarrant City 

Thomasville 

Tuscumbia 

Tuskegee.. 

Union Springs... 

Vestavia Hills 

Wadley 

Warrior. 

Weaver... 

Wedowee 

Wetumpka 

Winfield 

York 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



ALASKA 

Bethel. 

Fairbanks 

Homer 

Juneau.. 

Kenai 

Ketchikan 

Kodiak 

Nome 

Palmer 

Petersburg 

Sitka 

Skagway 

Soldotna 

Spenard ServlceDistrict 

Valdez 

Whlttler_ I 

Wrangell 

ARIZONA 

Avondale 

Benson 

Bisbee 

Buckeye... 

Casa Grande 

Chandler 

Coolidge 

Cottonwood. 

Douglas 

Eloy 

Florence 

Gila Bend 

Globe... 

Goodyear 

Hayden 

Holbrook 

Huachuca City 

Kearny 

Kingman 

Miami 

Nogales. 

Paradise Valley 

Peoria 

Prescott 

Safford 

Show Low 

Sierra Vista. 

South Tucson 

Surprise 

Tolleson 

Tombstone 

Wickenburg.. 

Willcox 

Williams 

WInkelman 

Winslow 

ARKANSAS 

Arkadelphia 

Ashdown 

Batesville 

Beebe 

Benton.. 

Bentonville 

Bradford 

Brinkley 

Camden 

Clarendon 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



258 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



ARKANSAS— Con. 

Conway 

Corning 

De Queen 

Dermott 

De Vails Bluff 

Elaine 

Eudora 

Fordyce 

Harrison 

Heber Springs 

Hope - 

Jacksonville 

LeachviUe 

Magnolia 

Malvern 

Marianna.- 

Marked Tree 

McCrory 

McGehee 

Mena.- 

Monticello - - 

Morrilton... 

Nashville 

Newport 

Osceola -- 

07.ark 

Pangburn 

Paragould 

Paris 

Piggott 

Pocahontas 

Prescott 

Rogers 

Rose Bud.- 

Russellville 

Searcy 

Sherwood 

Siloam Springs 

Stuttgart 

Texarkana 

Van Buren 

Walnut Ridge.- 

Warren 

West Helena- 

Wynne 

CALIFORNIA 

Adelanto- -- 

Albany 

Alturas 

Anderson 

.\ngels Camp 

Areata 

Arroyo Grande 

Arvin 

Atherton 

Atwater - 

Auburn 

Banning --. 

B arsto w 

Beaumont , 

Bell 

Belmont 

Belvedere 

Benicia 

Biggs 

Bishop 

Blytho 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



CAUFORNIA— Con. 

Brawley 

Brea 

Brentwood 

Brisbane 

Broadmoor 

Calexico 

California City 

Calipatria 

Calistoga 

Capitola 

Carlsbad 

Carmel 

Carpinteria 

Ceres 

Chico 

Chino 

ChowchilU 

Claremont 

Clayton , 

Cloverdale 

Clovis 

Coachella 

Coalinga 

Colfax 

Colma 

Coltcn. 

Colusa 

Corcoran 

Corning 

Coronado 

Cortc Madera 

Cotati.. 

Crescent City 

Delano 

Del Key Oaks 

Dinuha. 

Dixon. 

Dorris.. 

Dos Palos 

Dunsmuir 

El Centre 

El Segundo. 

Emeryville 

Escalon 

Eureka 

Exeter. 

Fairfax.. 

Farmers ville.. 

Ferndale 

Fillmore ..- 

Firebaugh 

Folsom 

Fontana .- 

Fort Bragg 

Fort Jones 

Fortiina 

Foster City 

Gait 

Gilroy .- 

Gonzales 

Grass Valley 

Greenfield.. 

Gridley 

Grover City.. 

Guadalupe... 

Gustine 

Half Moon Bay 

Hanford 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



CAUFORNIA-Con. 

Healdsbiug 

Hemet 

Hermosa Beach 

Hillsborough 

Hollister 

Holtville 

Hughson -- _.. 

Huron . 

Imperial 

Imperial Beach 

Indio -.- 

lone - 

Irwindale 

Isleton 

Jackson 

Kensington 

Kerman 

King City 

Kingsburg 

Laguna Beach 

Lakeport 

La Palma 

Larkspur 

La Verne . 

Lemoore 

Lincoln 

Lindsay 

Live Oak.. 

Livingston 

Los Alamitos 

Los Banos 

Los Gatos 

Madera 

Manteca . -. 

Maricopa.. - 
Martinez.. 
Marysville . . - - - - . . 

May wood 

McFarland 

Mendota 

Merced 

Millbrae 

Mill Valley 

Montague 

Montclair. - 

Morgan Hill 

Morro Bay , 

Mount Shasta 

Needles 

Nevada City 

Newman 

Oakdale 

Ojai.. - 

Orange Cove 

Orland 

OroviUe 

Pacific Grove.- - 

Palos Verdes Estates.. 

Parlier 

Paso Robles 

Patterson 

Perris — 

Piedmont . 

Pinole. 

Pismo Beach 

Pittsburg 

Placerville - 

Porterville.. 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total Male Female 



259 



Table 75.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities witf, Population under 25,000— Continued 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



CALIFORNIA— Con. 



Port Hueneme 

Red Blufl 

Redding 

Reedley..- 

Ridgecrest- 

Rio Dell 

Rio Vista 

Ripon 

Riverbank 

Rocklin 

Rohnert Park 

Roseville 

Ross - -- 

Saint Helena.- 

San Anselmo 

San Clemente 

Sand City.- 

San Fernando- - 

San Francisco Harbor 

Police 

Sanger.- -- 

San Jacinto 

San Joaquin 

San Juan Bautista 

San Marino 

San Pablo - 

Santa Paula 

Sausalito 

Scotts Valley.-- 

Sebastopol.- 

Selma - 

Shalter --- 

Sierra Madrc 

Signal Hill -- 

Soledad 

Sonoma - 

Sonora 

South Lake Tahoe 

South Pasadena - 

Stanton - 

Suisun City 

Susanville 

Sutter Creek 

Tatt-- - 

Tehachapi.- - 

Tiburon..- 

Tracy 

Tulare 

Tulclake 

Turlock 

Ukiah 

Union City 

VacaviUe 

\'ernon 

Wasco 

Waterford - 

Watsonville 

Weed 

Westmorland 

Wheatland 

Williams..- 

Willits-- 

Willows- 

Winters 

Woodlake 

Woodland- 

YrekaCity 

Yuba City - 



City by State 



COLORADO 



Alamosa 

Aspen -- 

Berthoud- 

Broomfield 

Brush 

Canon City 

Carbondale 

Cherry Hill 

Commerce City 

Cortez --- 

Delta - 

Durango -- 

Edgewater 

Estes Park 

Federal Heights 

Florence.- — 

Fort Morgan 

Glendale 

Glenwood Springs. - 

Golden 

Grand Junction 

Gunnison- 

Tdaho Springs 

Julesburg 

Kremraling 

Lafayette 

La Junta 

Lamar.- 

Leadville 

Loveland 

Manitou Springs 

Manzanola 

Monte Vista- -- 

Rine 

Rocky Ford-- 

Salida - 

Sheridan 

Steamboat Springs. 

Sterling. 

Thornton 

Trinidad 

Vail 

Walsenbvirg 

Westminster- 



CONNECTICUT 



Ansonia -.- 

Avon--- - 

Berlin - --. 

Bethel 

Bloomfield 

Branford 

Cheshire 

Clinton 

Coventry 

Danielson.- — 

Darien 

Derby 

East Haven Town. 

Easton - -. 

Farmington.,- 

Glastonbury- 

Granby 

Groton City 

Guilford 

Madison Town 

Monroe.- 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



CONNECTICUT— Con. 



Naugatuck 

New Canaan 

North Haven 

Old Saybrook 

Orange --. 

Plainville 

Putnam 

Ridgefield Town, 

Rocky Hill 

Seymour - - . 

Simsbury 

Stafford Springs - . 

Stonington.- 

Suffleld---- 

Waterford , 

Watertown 

Willimantic 

Wilton --. 

Windsor 

Windsor Locks-- - 

Winsted 

Wolcott 

Woodbridge 



Total Male Female 



DELAWARE 



Bethany Beach 

Blades 

Bridgcville 

Camden-Wyoming- 
Clayton - 

Dagsboro 

Delaware City 

Delmar 

Dover 

Elsmcre . - 

Fenwick Island 

Frankford--- 

Frederica- --. 

Georgetown.- 

Harrington- 

Laurel 

Lewes - 

Milford 

Millsborc- 

Milton 

Newark 

New Castle--- 

Newport 

Ocean View. 

Rehoboth Beach- - 

Seaford 

Smyrna. - 

South Bethany 



FLORIDA 

Altamonte Springs . 

Altha - -. 

Anna Maria - 

Apalachicola 

Apopka --. 

Arcadia 

Atlantic Beach 

Atlantis -.. 

Auburndale 

Avon Park - - 

Bal Harbour 



260 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



FLORIDA— Con. 



Bartow 

Bay Harbor Islands 

Belieair 

Belleair Beach 

Belieair Bluffs 

Belle Glade 

Belleview 

Biscayne Park 

Blountstown.- 

Bonifay 

Bowling Green 

Bradenton 

Biadenton Beach 

Brooksville. 

Bunnell 

Bushnell 

Callahan 

Calloway 

Cape Canaveral 

Cape Coral- 

Carrabelle 

Casselberry 

Cedar Grove 

Chattahoochee 

Chicnand 

Chipley 

Clermont 

Clewiston 

Cocoa 

Cocoa Beach 

Coconut Creek 

Coleman 

Cooper City - 

Coral Springs 

Crescent City 

Crest view. 

Crystal River 

Dade City - 

Dania 

Davenport 

Davie - 

Daytona Beach Shores. 

Deerfield Beach 

De Funiak Springs 

De Land 

Dundee. 

Dunedin 

Dunnellon 

Eagle Lake 

Eatonville 

Edgewater.. 

Edgewood 

El Portal 

Eustis 

Fernandina Beach 

Florida City 

Fort Meade 

Fort Walton Beach 

Frostproof , 

Golden Beach 

Grace ville 

Greenacres City 

Green Cove Springs.. 

Greenville 

Groveland 

Gulf Breeze 

Gulfport 

GuU Stream 

Hacienda Village 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Fe 



9 


o 


13 


7 


37 


5 


4 




24 


5 


13 




54 


6 


8 




33 


7 


4 


1 


46 


5 


8 


2 


4 




U 




12 




5 


3 


5 


1 


24 


5 


17 


4 


10 


5 


8 


3 


40 


8 


5 


4 


10 


2 


8 




6 


2 


12 


1 


3 




5 


2 


8 


1 


28 


1 


8 
1 





FLORIDA— Con. 



Haines City 

Havana 

Hialeah Gardens . . 

Highland Beach 

High Springs. . . 

Hillsboro Beach 

Holly Hill 

Holmes Beach. 

Homestead 

Howey-in-the-IIills 

Indialantic 

Indian Harbour 

Indian Rivor Shores 

Indian Rocks Beach... 

Inverness 

Jacksonville Beach 

Jasper. 

Juno Beach 

Jupiter 

Jupiter Island 

Kenneth City... 

Keystone Heights 

Kissimmee 

Lake Alfred.. 

Lake City 

Lake Clarke Shores. . - 

Lake Park 

Lake Wales 

Lantana 

Lauderdale-by-the-Sea 

Lauderdale Lakes 

Leesburg 

Lighthouse Point 

Live Oak 

Longboat Key 

Longwood-- 

Lynn Haven - 

MacClenny. 

Madeira Beach... 

Madison 

Maitland 

Manalapan 

Mangonia Park — 

Margate 

Marianna 

Mascotte. - 

Medley — 

Melbourne Beach 

Miami Shores 

Miami Springs. 

Milton - -- 

Minneola — 

Monticello - 

Mount Dora 

Mulberry 

Naples 

Neptune Beach - 

New Port Richey - 

New Smyrna Beach 

Niceville -. - .- 

North Bay Village 

North Lauderdale 

North Palm Beach 

North Port Charlotte.. 
North Redington 

Beach.. 

OakHiU 

Oakland Park 

Ocean Ridge 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



FLORIDA— Con. 



Ocoee 

Okeechobee 

Oldsmar 

Opa Locka 

Orange Park 

Ormond Beach 

Oviedo.. 

Pahokee 

Palatka 

Palm Bay 

Palm Beach 

Palm Beach Gardens. 
Palm Beach Shores... 

Palmetto.. 

Palm Springs 

Panama City Beach. 

Parker 

Pembroke Park 

Pembroke Pines 

Perry 

Plant City 

Port Orange 

Port Richey 

Port Saint Joe. 

Punta Gorda 



Quincy 

Redington Beach 

Rockledge.. 

Royal Palm Beach 

Safety Harbor .. 

Saint Augustine 

Saint Cloud .. 

Saint Leo 

Saint PetersburgBeach 

Sanford 

Satellite Beach 

Sea Ranch Lakes 

Sebastian 

Scbring 

SoutH Bay... 

South Daytona.. 

South Flomaton 

South Miami 

South Shores 

SpringBeld. 

Starke 

Stuart 

Sunrise 

Surfside 

Sweetwater 

Tamarac 

Tarpon Springs 

Tavares 

Temple Terrace 

Tequesta. 

Treasure Island 

Umatilla.. 

Valparaiso 

Venice 

Vero Beach. 

Virginia Gardens 

Waldo 

Wauchula 

Webster 

West Miami 

Wewahltchka 

Wildwood 

Williston 

Wilton Manors 



Total Male Female 



261 



Table 75. — Numher of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



FLORIDA— Con. 

Windermere 

Winter Garden. 

Winter Haven 

Winter Park.,. 

Winter Springs 

Zephyrhills 

GEORGIA 

Acworth 

Adel 

Alma .- 

Americus.. 

Austell .- 

Bainbridge 

Barnesville 

Baxley 

Bremen 

Brunswick... 

Buford... 

Calhoun 

Camilla 

Canton 

Carrollton 

Cartersville. 

Cedartown _ 

Chamblee 

C larkesville 

Cochran. 

College Park..._ 

Cordele 

Cornelia 

Covington 

Dalton 

Dawson 

Douglas. 

Dublin 

Elberton 

Fairburn 

Fitzgerald 

Forsyth 

Fort Oglethorpe 

Fort Valley 

Gainesville 

Garden City 

Glenn ville.- , 

Gordon 

Greensboro 

Griffln 

Hape ville 

Hartwell... 

Hazlehurst 

Hinesville 

Jackson 

Jesup 

Jonesboro 

Kennesaw. 

Lafayette 

La Grange.. 

Lake City. 

Madison 

Manchester. _ _ 

Mc Donough 

Mc Rae 

Milledgeviile 

Monroe 

Montezuma 

Morrow 

Moultrie 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



GEORGIA— Con. 

Nashville 

Newman 

Pelham 

Perry... 

Port Wentworth 

Powder Springs 

Riverdale 

Rockraart 

Ross ville 

Roswell 

Saint Marys... 

Sandersville 

Smyrna 

Statesboro 

Summerville,. 

Swainsboro 

Sylvania 

Sylvester 

Tallapoosa 

Thomastcn 

Thomasville 

Thomson 

Tifton._ , 

Toccoa 

Trion , 

Union City.. 

Vidalia 

Villa Rica... 

Washington.. 

Waycross 

Waynesboro 

West Point 

Winder 

IDAHO 

American Falls 

Arco 

Blackfoot 

Buhl.. 

Burley.. 

Caldwell 

Chubbuck 

Coeur d'Alene 

Emmett. 

Fruitland 

Garden City 

Gooding 

Grange ville. 

Homedale 

Jerome 

Kellogg -. 

Ketchum 

Kuna. 

McCall. 

Meridian. 

Montpelier. 

Moscow 

Mountain Home 

Nampa 

Orolino. 

Payette.. 

Post Falls... 

Rexburg 

Rigby 

Rupert 

Salmon 

Sandpoint 

Shelley 

Soda Springs 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



IDAHO— Con. 

Sun Valley 

Twin Falls , 

Wallace. 

Weiser 

ILLINOIS 

Abingdon. 

Albany 

Aledo 

Alexis , 

Algonquin 

Alorton 

Alsip 

Andalusia 

Anna 

Antioch 

Arthur 

Auburn 

Augusta. 

Barrington... 

Harrington Hills... 

Bartlett _ 

Bartonville 

Batavia 

Bedford Park 

Beecher. 

Bell wood 

Belvidere 

Bement 

Benld 

Bensen ville 

Benton 

Berkeley 

Bethalto 

Bloomingdale 

Blue Island 

Blue Mound 

Bolingbrook 

Boiu"bonnais 

Bradley 

Bridgeport 

Bridgeview 

Brighton.. 

Broadview 

Brookfield 

Brooklyn 

Buffalo Grove 

Bunker Hill 

Burnham 

Burr Ridge 

Byron 

Cahokia 

Cairo 

Calumet Park 

Canton 

Carlinville 

Carmi.. 

Carol Stream 

Carpentersville 

Carrollton 

Carterville 

Carthage 

Gary 

Casey 

Caseyville — 

Centralis 

Cerro Gordo 

Cbahbahon 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



262 



Tgblc 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



ILUNOIS— Con. 

Charleston 

Chenoa --. 

Chester 

Chlllicothe 

Chrisraan... 

CUnton. ---- 

Coal City 

Coal Valley.-.- 

CollinsvlUe - 

Columbia 

Coulterville 

Country Club mils.. 

Countryside -.. 

Crest Hill 

Crestwood,- -- 

Crete - 

Creve Coeur 

Crystal Lake -- 

DaUasClty- 

Darlen 

Deerfleld.- 

Delavan 

Depue --- 

Diion 

Du Quoin 

Dwlght 

East Alton 

East Dubuque 

East Dundee 

East Moline -- 

East Peoria 

Edwardsville - - 

Effingham 

Elburn 

Eldorado -- 

Elk Grove Village... 

Elwood 

Erie 

Eiu-eka -.. 

Fairbury 

Fairfield 

Fairmont City 

Falrview Heights 

Farmer City --. 

Farmlngton..- 

Flora 

Flossmoor 

Forest Park , 

Forest View 

Forreston 

Fox Lake 

Fox River Grove.-. 

Frankfort 

Franklin Park 

Freeburg 

Fulton 

Galena. 

Oalva. 

Geneseo 

Geneva -. 

Genoa 

Georgetown 

Gibson City 

Gillespie 

Oilman 

Girard.- 

Glencoe 

Glendale Heights.. 
Glen EUyn 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



ILLINOIS— Con. 

Glenwood 

Golf 

Grafton 

Grayslake 

Grayville 

Greenfield 

Greenville 

Gurnee 

Hamilton 

Hampshire 

Hanna City 

Hanover Park 

Harrisburg..- 

Hartford 

Harvard.- 

Harwood Heights 

Havana 

Hazel Crest 

Hebron 

Hecker 

Henry..- 

Herrin 

Hickory HiUs 

HlKhland 

Hlghwood 

HiUsboro 

Hillside -... 

Hinsdale 

Hodgkins 

Hometown 

Homewood 

Hoopeston 

Huntley 

Indian Head Park.. 

Irving - 

Island Lake 

Itasca , 

Jacksonville 

Jerome 

Jerseyville 

Johnston City 

Jonesboro 

Justice 

Kenilworth 

Kewanee - . - 

Klrkland 

Knoxville 

Lacon 

La Grange- 

La Orange Park... 

Lake Bluff.- - 

Lake Forest 

Lake In the Hills... 

Lake Villa 

Lakewood- 

Lake Zurich-- 

Lanark 

LaSaUe-- 

Lawrence vi lie 

Lebanon 

Lemont 

Leniburg 

Lexington 

Libertyville 

Lincoln 

Lincolnshire 

Lincolnwood 

Lindenhurst 

Lisle - 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



ILUNOIS— Con. 

Litchfield 

Lockport - 

Loda 

Loves Park 

Lyndon 

Lynwood 

Lyons - 

Macomb 

Madison 

Manhattan 

Manito -.- 

Manteno - 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marissa 

Markham 

Marquette Heights. . 

Marseilles - 

Marshall 

Martinsville 

Maryville 

Mascoutah 

Mason City 

Matteson 

Mattoon 

McCook 

McLean 

McLeans boro 

Melrose Park 

Mendota 

Merrionette Park 

Metamora 

Metropolis - 

Midlothian 

Milan 

Milford.- 

Milledgeville 

Millstadt- 

Minier 

Mokena 

Momence..- 

Monee 

Motmiouth 

Montgomery. - - 

Monticello 

Morris 

Morrison 

Morton..- 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Carroll 

Mount Morris 

Mount Olive.-- 

Mount Sterling 

Mount Vernon 

Mundelein.- 

Murphysboro 

Nashville 

National City 

New Athens 

New Lenox 

Newton 

Nokomis - 

Norridge 

North Aurora 

Northfield 

Northlake 

North Riverside 

Norwood - 

Oak Brook 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



263 



594-259 O - 75 - n 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 


Total Police Employees 


City by State 


Total PoUce Employees 


City by State 


Total PoUce Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


ILUNOIS— Con. 

Oakbrook Terrace 


1 
33 

14 

5 
17 

8 

4 

I 
19 

3 
28 

1 
22 
23 

3 
14 
18 

5 

3 

6 

2 

8 

7 
20 

4 
4 
1 
6 
5 

10 
4 

20 
9 
1 
3 
9 
3 
3 

11 
23 
33 
17 
22 
19 

8 
13 

4 
19 

4 

38 
31 

4 

1 
21 
17 

9 
17 

4 

6 

4 
36 
14 
11 

7 
14 

9 


1 

25 

14 
5 

16 
8 
4 
1 

15 
3 

26 
1 

15 

20 
3 
9 

15 
4 
3 
6 
2 
8 
5 

19 
2 
4 
4 
1 
6 
5 
6 
3 

20 
6 
1 
3 
9 
3 
3 
2 
8 
19 
28 
17 
22 
19 
8 
13 
4 
19 
4 
32 
26 
4 
1 

16 
17 
4 
17 
4 
5 
4 
34 
14 
8 
7 
12 
9 
25 


8 
1 

4 

2 

7 
3 

5 
3 

1 

1 

4 
1 

3 

3 
4 

5 

6 
5 

5 
5 

1 
2 
3 

2 


ILLINOIS— Con. 


1 

2 

6 
12 

1 

3 

3 
12 

8 

1 

1 

8 
11 
10 

3 
10 

8 

4 

9 

;<3 

14 
6 
11 
30 
27 
1 
7 
20 
1 
8 
8 
1 

13 
1 
5 
1 
34 
2 
4 
7 
5 
1 
3 
11 
W 
11 
4 
3 
4 
2 
14 
9 
5 
7 
17 
2 
24 
26 
7 
23 
10 
23 
3 
44 
5 

n 

4 
10 
10 


10 

24 
14 

11 

26 
24 

20 
30 

10 
4 
3 
3 
2 
9 
9 
5 
7 

14 

24 
19 
7 

19 
10 
19 
3 
44 
5 
9 
4 
6 
9 


3 

1 

4 

1 

3 

2 

3 

1 
9 

3 

4 
3 

4 

1 

3 

1 

1 
5 

3 

7 
4 
4 

1 

4 

1 


ILUNOIS-Con. 

Winnetka. 


30 
11 

1 
23 

1 
30 
19 
21 
23 

5 

13 

9 
6 
14 
12 
8 
34 
30 
3 
6 
17 
8 
16 
9 

10 
17 
4 
20 
14 
6 
4 
15 
27 
10 
12 
44 
4 
20 
16 
10 
8 
13 
20 
18 
8 
4 

26 
23 
11 
13 
34 
15 
9 
21 
18 
27 
24 
11 
31 
7 

28 
4 
15 
34 
14 


28 

8 

1 
19 

1 
25 
15 
21 
19 

4 

12 

9 

6 
13 
10 

4 

29 
29 

3 

5 
16 

8 
16 

7 

6 
14 

4 
18 
10 

6 

4 
14 
27 
10 
12 
44 

4 
17 
16 

5 

8 
16 
15 
4 
4 

25 
23 
9 
9 
31 
13 

20 
12 
27 
19 
10 
26 

7 
27 

4 
15 
33 
13 


2 




Winthrop Harbor 

Witt 


3 










Shelbyville 


Wood Dale 


4 






Woodhull 








Woodridge 


5 






Wood River 


4 




Silvis 


Woodstock 








Worth 


4 






Yorkville 






South Barrington 


Zeigler 


I 




INDIANA 






South Chicago Heights . 
South Elgin 




Palos Hills 






South Jacksonville 






Angola 








Attica 








Auburn 


1 


Park Forest South 






2 




Batesville 


4 


p . 




Bedford 


5 








1 














BicknelL.. 


1 






Blufltcn.. 


1 






Boonville 


















2 








4 








3 






Cambridge City 








2 


















Port Byron 




Chesterfield 

Chesterton 

Clarksvillc.... 

Clinton 














































VaUer 




3 




Valley View. 








VandaUa 


Delphi 


5 




Venice 


Dunkirk... 


1 






Dyer 










4 








3 








4 


Rock Falls 




Fowler 










1 




Washington Park 






Garrett 


2 




Watseka - 


Gas City 


4 








3 








2 








2 








1 








6 




Western Springs 

West Frankfort 






Roxana 


Griffith 


5 






1 




Westville... 

Wheeling 


Hobart... 


5 










White Hall 




1 




Willowbrook 




















1 


Schiller Park 


Winfield - 


KendallviUe 


1 



264 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



Bloomfield 

Boone 

Camanche 

Carroll 

Carter Lake 

Centerville 

Chariton 

Charles City 

Cherokee 

Clarinda 

Clarion -.. 

Clear Lake 

Clive 

Coral ville 

Cresco 

Creston.. 

Decorah 

Denison 

DeWitt 

Dyersville 

Eagle Grove 

Eldora- 

Emmetsburg 

Estherville 

Evansdale 

Fairfield 

Fort Madison 

Glenwood 

Cirinnell 

Hampton.- 

Harlan 

Hawarden 

Humboldt 

Independence 

Indianola -. 

Iowa Falls 

Jeflcrson 

Keokuk 

KnoxviUe 

Le Claire - 

Le Mars 

Manchester 

Maquoketa 

Marcus 

Marion 

Missouri Valley. - 

Monticello 

Mount Pleasant. 
Moimt Vernon... 

Muscatine 

Nevada 

New Hampton.. 

Newton 

Oelwein 

Onawa 

Osage 

Osceola 

Oskaloosa 

Pella 

Perry 

Red Oak 

Rock Rapids... 

Sac City 

Sheldon 

Shenandoah 

Sioux Center 

Spencer 

Spirit Lake 

Storm Lake 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



IOWA— Con. 

Tama 

Urbandale 

Vinton. 

Washington 

Waukon 

VVaverly 

Webster City 

West Burlington 

West Des Moines. .. 

West Union 

Windsor Heights 

WInterset 

KANSAS 

Abilene 

Anthony 

Arkansas City 

Atchison 

Augusta 

Baxter Springs 

Belleville 

Beloit 

Bonner Springs 

Caney 

Chanute 

Cherryvale 

Clay Center 

Cofleyvllle 

Colby 

Columbus 

Concordia 

Council Grove 

Derby 

Dodge City 

El Dorado 

EUinwood 

Ellis 

Ellsworth 

Emporia 

Eureka 

Fairway 

Fort Scott 

Fredonla 

Galena..., 

Garden City 

Gardner 

Gamett 

Qoodland 

Great Bend 

Hays 

Haysville -. 

Herington.-- 

Hiawatha 

Hoisington 

Holton... 

Hugoton 

Humboldt 

Independence 

lola 

Jimction City 

Kingman 

Lansing 

Lamed 

Leawood 

Lenexa 

Liberal 

Lindsborg 

Lyons 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



265 



Table 75. ^Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 



Marquette. 

Marysville 

McPherson 

Merriam --- 

Mission 

Mulvane.- -- 

Neodesha 

Newton. - 

Norton -- 

Oalcley 

Olatlie 

Osage City 

Osawatomie. 

Ottawa 

Paola 

Parsons 

Pliillipsburg .-- 

Pittsburg 

Pratt 

Roeland Park 

Russell - 

Scott City 

Sedan 

Shawnee _ 

Ulysses - 

Valley Center 

WaKeeney 

Wamego 

Wellington 

Westwood -- 

Winfleld 

KENTUCKY 

AdairviUe --. 

Albany 

Alexandria 

Anchorage 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Barbourville 

Bardstown.-- 

Beattyville 

Beaver Dam --- 

Bellevue 

Benton -- 

Berea 

Bloomficld - 

Brandenburg 

Bromley 

BrooksvlUe 

Burkesville. . - 

Burnside 

Cadiz - 

Calvert City 

Campbellsville. 

Carlisle.- 

CarroUton 

Catlcttsburg 

Cave City 

Central City 

Clarkson 

Clinton 

Cloverport--- 

Cold Spring 

Columbia... - 

Corbin.. 

Corydon 

Crescent Park 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



KENTUCKY— Con. 

Crescent Springs 

Crofton. 

Cumberland... 

Cynthiana 

Danville 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

Dry Ridge 

Earlington 

Eddyville. 

Edgewood 

Edmonton 

Elizabethtown 

Elkton... , 

Elsmere 

Eminence 

Erlanger..- 

Evarts 

Fairview 

Falmouth 

Flatwoods 

Fleming. 

Flemingsburg. 

Florence.- 

Fort Mitchell 

Fort Thomas..- 

Fort Wright 

Frankfort 

Franklin - 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Grayson... 

Greensbtirg 

Greenup - 

Greenville. 

Guthrie. 

Hardinsburg 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville... 

Hazard. 

Henderson 

Hickman 

Highland Heights.... 

Hindman 

Hodgenville 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Cave 

HustonviUe 

Independence 

Irvine 

Irvington 

Jamestown 

Jeftersontown 

Jenkins - 

Junction City.. 

La Grange 

Lakeside Park 

Lakeview. 

Lancaster 

Lawrenceburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Leitchfield 

Lewisport 

Liberty 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



KENTUCKY-Con. 

Livermore - 

London.. 

Louisa 

Ludlow.. 

Madisonville 

Manchester 

Marion 

Martin 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Melbourne 

Middlesboro.. 

Midway 

Monticello 

Morehead 

Morganfield 

Morgantowi 

Mount Sterling 

Mount Vernon 

Mount Washington 

Muldraugh... 

Munfordville 

Murray.. 

Neon.. 

New Castle 

New Haven.. 

Nicholasville... 

Nortonville 

Olive Hill 

Owenton 

Owingsville 

Paintsville... 

Paris.- ...-- 

Park Hills. 

Pembroke 

Pewee Valley 

Pikevillc 

Pineville 

Prestonsburg 

Princeton , 

Providence.. 

Raceland ... 

RadcliB 

Ravenna.. 

Richmond .. 

Russell 

Russell Springs...... 

Russellville ... 

Saint Matthews..... - 

Salyersville 

Scottsvillc 

Scbree 

Shelby ville 

Shepherdsville 

Shively 

Somerset 

Southgatc... 

Springfield 

Stanford ... 

Sturgis 

Taylor Mill 

Taylorsville 

Tompkinsvillc 

Vanceburg 

Versailles. 

Vine Grove.. 

Walton 

Warsaw 

West Liberty... 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



266 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law EnforeemQnt Employees, October 37, 7974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 



KENTUCKY— Con. 



LOUISIANA 

Abbeville 

Bastrop 

Berwicit 

Bogalusa 

Crowley 

Delhi 

Denham Springs — 

De Quincy 

De Bidder 

Donaldsonville 

Eunice 

Farmerville 

Ferriday 

Franklin- 

Golden Meadow 

Hammond 

Harahan 

Haynesville- - 

Jennings 

Jonesboro 

Kaplan - 

Leesville 

Loekport 

Mamou 

Mansfield 

Marksville -- 

Minden 

Morgan City 

Natchitoches 

New Roads 

Opelousas 

Pineville 

Plaquemine 

Port Allen -. 

Raync- 

Springhill 

Sulphur 

Thibodaux 

Vidalia 

Ville Platte. _ 

Welsii. 

West Monroe 

Winnfield 

MAINE 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Bar Harbor 

Bath 

Belfast 

Berwick -.. 

Biddetord 

Boothbay Harbor, 

Brewer. 

Bridgton 



Total Police Employe 



Total Male Female 



4 



MAINE 

Brunswick 

Bucksport 

Calais 

Camden 

Cape Elizabeth 

Caribou 

Cumberland 

Dexter 

Dover Foxcroft 

East Millinocket 

Eliot 

Ellsworth 

Fairfield 

Falmouth 

Farmington 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Freeport 

Gardiner 

Gorham 

Hallowell 

Hampden 

Houlton 

Jay 

Kennebunk 

Kennebunkport 

Kittery 

Limestone 

Lincoln 

Lisbon Falls 

Livermorc Falls 

Madawaska 

Madison 

Mexico... 

Milhnocket.. 

Milo 

Newport 

Norway 

Oakland 

Ogunquit 

Old Orchard Beach. 

Old Town 

Orono 

Paris 

Pittsfleld 

Presque Isle 

Richmond.. 

Rockland 

Rumford 

Saco. ... 

Sanford 

Scarborough 

Skowhegan-. 

South Berwick 

South Portland 

Thomas ton 

Topsham 

Van Buren 

Waldoboro.. 

WaterviUe 

WeUs 

VVestbrook 

Wilton.... 

Winslow. 

Winthrop 

Wiscasset 

Yarmouth 

York. 



Total Pohce Employees 



Total Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MARYLAND 

Aberdeen 

BelAir 

Bladensburg... 

Brunswick 

Cambridge 

Chestertown 

Crisfield 

Denton 

District Heights 

Easton 

Elkton 

Forest Heights 

Frederick 

Frostburg 

Greenbelt 

Havre de Grace — 

HyattsviUe 

Laurel 

Moimt Rainier 

Pocomoke City 

Riverdale 

Salisbury 

Seat Pleasant 

Sparrows Point 

Takoma Park 

Thunnont 

University Park... 
Westminster 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Abington 

Acton 

Acushnet-. 

Adams 

Agawam 

Amesbury 

Andover 

Ashburnham 

Ashland 

Athol.. 

Auburn 

Avon - 

Ayer 

Barnstable 

Bedford. 

BeUingham 

Berlin 

Blackstone 

Bourne 

Boiford 

Boylston 

Bridgewater 

BuruTfO" 

Canton 

Carlisle 

Chatham 

CUnton 

Cohasset — 

Concord 

Dalton 

Dartmouth 

Dennis 

Dighton 

Dover 

Dracut 

Dudley 

Duxbury 



267 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



MASSACHUSETTS- 
Con. 



East Bridgewater... 

East Brookfleld 

Easthampton 

East Longmeadow.. 

Easton 

Essex 

Fairhaven 

Falmouth 

Foxboro 

Franklin 

Freetown 

Georgetown 

Grafton 

Great Harrington,. 

Greenfield 

Groton 

Groveland... 

HaUfax.- 

Hamilton.- 

Hampden 

Hanover.. 

Hanson 

Harvard. 

Harwich 

Hingham 

Holbrook 

Holden 

HolUston 

Hopedale 

Hopkinton 

Hudson 

Hull 

Ipswich 

Lakeville 

Lancaster 

Lee 

Leicester. 

Lincoln 

Littleton 

Longmeadow 

Ludlow. 

Lunenburg 

Lynnfield 

Manchester 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 

Marion 

Marshfield 

Mashpee 

Mattapoisett 

Maynard 

Medfield 

Medway 

Mendon 

Merrimac 

Middleborn 



..iilford 

MiUbury 

Millis 

Montague 

Nahant Township. 

Nantucket 

Newbury 

Newbury port 

Norfolk 

North Adams 

North Andover 

North Attleboro... 
Northboro 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



MASSACHUSETTS- 
Con. 

Northbridge. 

North Brookfleld 

North Reading 

Norton. 

Norwell 

Orange 

Orleans 

Oxford 

Palmer... 

Paxton.. — 

Pembroke 

Pepperell 

Plainville 

Plymouth 

Provincetown 

Raynham 

Reading 

Rehoboth 

Rockland 

Rockport 

Rowley — 

Salisbury 

Sandwich 

Scituate. 

Seekonk 

Sharon 

Shirley 

Shrewsbury 

Somerset 

Southboro 

Southridge 

South Hadley 

Southwick -. 

Spencer 

Sterling 

Stoneham 

Stoughton 

Stow 

Stiu-bridge 

Sudbury 

Sutton.-. — 

S wampscott 

Swansea 

Topsfleld.. 

Townsend 

Tyngsborough 

Upton 

Uxbridge 

Walpole 

Ware..-- 

Wareham 

Warren 

Wayland 

Webster 

Wenham 

Westboro--- 

West Boylston 

West Bridgewater 

West Brookfleld 

Westtord 

Westminster 

Weston 

Wcstport 

Westwood 

Wilbraham 

Williamstown - . . 

Wilmington 

Winchendon 

Winchester 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MASSACHUSETTS— 
Con. 



Winthrop-. 
Wrentham- 
Yarmouth . 



Adrian--. 

Albion 

Algonac- 
AUegan.. 

Alma 

Almont.- 
Alpena--. 
Armada-. 
Auburn-- 
Augusta-. 
Bad Axe- 
Bancroft. 
Bangor- - 



Bath Township 

Battle Creek Township. 

Bedford Township 

Belding 

Bellaire 

Belleville - 

Benton Harbor 

Berrien Springs -. 

Bessemer 

Beverly Hills 

Big Rapids 

Birch Run - , 

Blissfleld 

Bloomfleld Hills 

Boyne City 

Breckenridge 

Breedsville 

Bridgeport Township- 

Bridgman 

Brighton -- 

Britton 

Bronson 

Brooklyn 

Buchanan 

Buena Vista Township. 

Burr Oak 

Cadillac 

Calumef 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



Capac 

Caro 

CarroUton Township - . 

Carson ville 

Caspian 

Cass City. 

Cassopolis 

Cement City 

Center Line 

Charlotte 

Cheboygan 

Chelsea 

Chesaning 

Chlkaming Township. 
Chocolay Township... 

Clare 

Clawson 

Clay Township 

CUo 

Coldwater 

Coleman 



268 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



MICHIGAN— Con. 

Coloma 

Coloma Township 

Colon - 

Constantine 

Coopersville 

Corunna 

Covert Township 

Crystal Falls 

Davison 

Davison Township . . . 

Decatur 

De Witt.. 

De Witt Township.. - 

Dimondale.. 

Douglas 

Dowagiac 

Durand 

East Grand Rapids. . 

East Jordan 

East Tawas 

Eau Claire 

Elk Rapids 

Erie Township 

Escanaba 

EssexviUe 

Farralngton 

Farwell 

Fenton 

Ferrysburg 

Flat Rock 

Forsyth Township 

Fowlerville 

Frankenmuth 

Frankfort.. 

FrankUn 

Frascr 

Fremont 

Gaastra 

Oagelown 

Gaylord 

Gibraltar 

Gladwin 

Gobies 

Goodrich... 

Grand Beach 

Grand Blanc 

Grand Blanc Township 

Grand Haven 

Grand Ledge 

Grandville 

Grant 

Green Oak Township.. 

Greenville 

Grosse Isle Township.. 

Orosse Pointe Famis.. 

Grosse Pointe Park 

Grosse Pointe Shores.. 

Grosse Pointe Woods. . 

Hamtramck 

Hancock 

Harbor Beach 

Harbor Springs 

Harper Woods 

Hartford 

Hastings 

Hazel Park 

Hesperia.. 

Hillsdale 

Homer... 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



MICHIGAN-Con. 

Houghton 

Howard Township 

Howell 

Hudson 

Hudsonville 

Huntington Woods 

Huron Township 

Imlay City 

Independence Town- 
ship 

Ionia 

Iron Mountain 

Iron River 

Ironwood 

Ishpeming 

Jonesville 

Kalamazoo Township. 

Keego Harbor 

Kentwood 

Kingstord 

Laingsburg 

Lake Linden 

Lake Orion 

L'Anse 

Lapeer 

Lauriura 

Lawton 

Leslie 

Lincoln 

Linden 

Litchfield 

Lowell 

Luding ton 

Luna Pier 

Mackinac Island 

Mackinaw City 

Manchester 

Manistee 

Manistique 

Marcellus 

Marine City 

Marion 

Marlette 

Marquette 

Marquette Township.. 

Marshall 

Marysville 

Mason 

Mattawan 

Mayville 

Melvindale 

Memphis 

Michiana 

MiddleviUe ., 

Milan 

MiUord 

MilUngton 

-Monroe.. 

Montague 

Montrose 

Morrice 

Mount Morris 

Mount Pleasant 

Muni sing 

Muskegon Heights 

Muskegon Township. . 

Nashville... 

Negaunee 

Newaygo 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MICHIGAN— Con. 

New Baltimore 

Newberry 

New Buffalo 

New Haven 

Niles 

Niles Township 

North Branch.. 

North Muskegon 

Northport 

NorlliviUe 

Nonhvillc Township. . 

Norton Shores. 

Norway 

Onaway 

Ontonagon 

Ontwa Township 

Orchard Lake 

Oscoda-Ausable 

Township 

Otisville. 

Otsego 

Ovid 

Owosso 

Oxford 

Paw Paw 

Pennfield Township... 

Perry 

Petoskey 

Pinckney 

Pinconning.. 

Plainwell 

Plymouth 

Pontiac Township 

Portland 

Ouincy 

Reed City 

Richmond 

River Rouge 

Riverview 

Rochester.. 

Rockford 

Rockwood 

Rogers City 

Romeo.. 

Roosevelt Park 

Ross Township 

Saint Charles 

Saint Clair 

Saint Ignace 

Saint Johns 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Joseph Township. 

Saint Louis 

SaUne 

Sandusky 

Saugatuck 

Sault Sainte Marie 

Scottville 

Sebewaing 

Shepherd 

Sheridan 

South Haven. 

South Lyon 

South Rockwood 

Spring Lake 

Stambaugh 

Sturgis 

Sumpter Township 

Swartz Creek 



269 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



MICHIGAN-Con. 

Sylvan Lake. 

Tocumseh 

Throe Oaks 

Three Rivers 

Titlabawassee 

Traverse City 

Tuscarora Township . . 

Union City 

Utica.-- 

\'icksburg 

Wakefield 

Walker... 

Walled Lake 

Watervliet 

Wayland 

Wayne 

Webberville... 

West Branch 

Whitehall 

White Lake Township. 

White Pigeon 

Williamston 

Wixom 

Wolverine Lake 

Woodhaven 

Yale - ---. 

Zeeland 

Zilwaukee Township. . 

MINNESOTA 

Albert Lea. — 

Alexandria 

Anoka 

Apple Valley.. 

Arden Hills 

Aurora 

Babbitt 

Bayport 

Bemidji 

Blue Earth... 

Brainerd 

Breckenridge - . . 

Buffalo 

Bumsville 

Caledonia 

Cambridge 

Cannon Falls 

Champlin - 

Chaska 

Chisholm 

Clara City 

Cloquet... 

Columbia Heights 

Cottage Grove Village. 

Crookston.. 

Crosby 

Deephaven 

Detroit Lake5 

Eagan Township 

East Grand Forks 

Eden Prairie 

Ely 

Eveleth 

Fairmont 

Faribault 

Farmington 

Forest Lake - . 

Gilbert.., 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MINNESOTA— Con. 

Glencoe 

Glenwood 

Golden Valley. 

Grand Rapids 

Hastings 

Hibbing 

Hopkins. 

Hoyt Lakes 

Hugo 

Hutchinson 

International Falls 

Inver Grove Heights... 

Jackson 

Jordan 

La Crescent.. 

Lake City 

Lakeville 

Le Sueur 

Lino Lakes 

Little Falls 

Long Prairie 

Luverne - 

Madison 

Maple Grove 

Marshall 

Medina 

Mendota Heights. 

Metropolitan Airport... 

Montevideo 

Mora... 

Morris 

Mound 

Mounds View 

New Brighton 

Neiv Hope 

Newport 

New Prague 

New Ulm 

Northfield. 

North Mankato 

North Saint Paul 

Oakdale... 

Olivia. 

Orono 

Ortonville 

Osseo 

Owatonna 

Park Rapids 

Pipestone 

Plainview 

Plymouth. _ 

Princeton 

Prior Lake 

Proctor 

Red Wing 

Robblnsdale. 

Roseraount 

Saint Anthony 

Saint James 

Saint Paul Park 

Saint Peter 

Sauk Centre 

Sauk Rapids 

Savage 

Shakopee 

Silver Bay 

Sleepy Eye 

South Lake Minne- 
tonka 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MINNESOTA— Con. 

Springfield 

Spring Lake Park 

Staples 

Stillwater 

Thief River Falls 

Tracy 

Two Harbors. 

Virginia 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waite Park 

Waseca 

Wayzata 

Wells 

West Saint Paul 

White Bear Lake 

Willmar 

Windom 

Woodbury 

Worthington 

MISSISSIPPI 

Aberdeen 

Amory 

Baldwyn 

Batesville 

Bay Saint Louis 

Bay Springs 

Belzonl 

Booneville.. 

Brandon 

Brookhaven 

Canton.. 

Carthage 

Charleston. 

Clarksdale 

Cleveland 

Coliunbia 

Corinth 

Crystal Springs 

Drew 

Durant 

Ellisville. 

Fayette 

Forest 

Fulton 

Gloster... 

Greenwood 

Grenada 

Hazlehurst 

Heidelberg 

Hernando 

HoUandale 

Holly Springs 

Houston 

Indianola 

Itta Bena 

Kosciusko 

Laurel 

Leakesville 

Leland 

Lexington 

Long Beach. 

Louisville 

Macon... 

Magee 

MagnoUa 

McComb 

McLean 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total Male Female 



270 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MISSISSIPPI— Con. 

Morton 

Moss Point 

Natchez 

New Albany 

Newton 

Ocean Springs 

Okolona 

Oxford 

Pearl 

Philadelphia 

Picayune 

Poplarville.-- 

Port Gibson 

Purvis _ 

Ridgeland 

Ripley 

Ruleville 

Senatobia 

Starkville 

Tupelo 

Tylertown 

Utica 

Valden 

Water Valley 

Waveland 

Waynesboro 

West Point 

Wigelns 

Winona-.- 

Yazoo City--- 

MISSOURI 

Arnold 

Aurora _- 

Ballwin 

Bellefontaine Neigh- 
bors- - 

Bel-Ridge.- 

Belton - 

Berkeley 

Beverly Hills 

Blue Springs 

Bolivar- - 

Bonne Terre 

Boonville.- 

Breckenridge Hills 

Brentwood 

Bridgeton 

Brookfleld 

Butler -- 

Cameron 

Canton-- 

CarroUton 

Carthage 

Centralia - . 

Chaffee 

Charlack 

Charleston 

Chillicothe...- 

Claycomo 

Clayton 

Clinton -- 

Crestwood 

Creve Coeur 

Crystal City 

Dellwood 

De Soto - 

Eldon 



MISSOURI— Con. 



Eureka 

Excelsior Springs 

Farmington 

Fayelte 

Fenton 

Festus - 

Flat River 

Frontcnac 

Fulton -. 

Garden City 

Glendale..- 

Grandview 

Hanley Hills-.- 

Hannibal-- 

Harrisonville -- 

Ilazelwood 

Hermann 

Hillsdale 

Ironton 

Jackson - 

Jennings.- 

Kirksville 

Ladue -.- 

Lebanon 

Lees Summit 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Louisiana 

Macon 

Maiden 

Manchester 

Maplewood 

Marcoline 

Marlborough -.. 

Marshall 

.Maryville 

Mexico -.-- 

Moberly 

Moline Acres 

Monett -. 

.Mount Vernon 

Neosho 

Nevada 

New Madrid 

Normandy--- 

North Kansas City. 

Northwoods 

Odessa 

O'Fallon 

Olivette..- 

Overland 

Pacific 



Parkville 

Pine Lawn 

Plattsburg 

Poplar Bluff -- 

Potosi 

Richmond 

Richmond Heights.. 

Riverside.- 

Riverview 

Rock HiU 

Saint Ann 

Sainte Genevieve- .- 
Saint John Village. . 

Salem 

Savannah 

Sedalia 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



MISSOURI— Con. 

Shrewsbury 

Slater 

Sugar Creek 

Sullivan.- 

Sunset Hills 

Trenton 

Union- 

Valley Park 

Vandalia 

Vinita Park 

Warrensburg 

Warson Woods. - 

Washington 

Webb City 

Wellston 

Wentzville -. 

Weston 

West Plains 

Woodson Terrace 

MONTANA 

Anaconda 

Baker 

Bozeman 

Butte 

Columbia Falls 

Conrad 

Cut Bank 

Deer Lodge 

Dillon 

Fort Peck 

Glasgow 

Glendive 

Hardin 

Havre 

Helena .. 

KalispeU 

Laurel 

Lewistown 

Libby 

Livingston 

Miles City 

Red Lodge 

Sidney 

Whiteflsh 

Wolf Point 

NEBRASKA 

Alliance-- 

Alma 

Arapahoe- 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Battle Creek -.. 

Beatrice 

Bellevue 

Blair --. 

Bloomfield 

Boys Town 

Bridgeport- 

Broken Bow 

Burwell 

Central City 

Chadron 

Chappell-- -.. 

Columbus 



Total Police Employees 



Total 


Male 


Female 


12 


10 


2 


3 


3 




8 


8 




12 


10 


2 


16 


11 


5 


9 


8 


1 


12 


10 


2 


6 


6 




3 


3 




8 


7 


1 


14 


13 


1 


7 


7 




19 


16 


3 


12 


12 




30 


25 


5 


U 


11 




2 


2 




12 


11 


1 


12 


12 




13 


11 


2 


4 


4 




31 


25 


6 


56 


47 


9 


9 


6 


3 


5 


5 




7 


5 


2 


5 


5 




11 


7 


4 


5 


5 




12 


8 


4 


14 


11 


3 


9 


9 




20 


18 


2 


38 


29 


9 


27 


20 


7 


10 


5 


5 


14 


12 


2 


10 


8 


2 


13 


9 


4 


16 


16 




5 


4 


I 


11 


8 


3 


7 


7 




5 


5 




21 


16 


5 


2 


2 




3 


2 


1 


5 


4 


1 


11 


8 


3 


8 


7 


1 


2 


2 




27 


21 


6 


29 


27 


2 


14 


11 


3 


3 


3 




9 


9 




3 


3 




11 


7 


4 


2 


2 




5 


5 




14 


10 


4 


2 


2 




29 


22 


7 



271 



Table 75.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 





Total Police Employees 1 


City by State 




Total 


Male 


Female 


NEBRASKA— Con. 


8 
3 

2 
12 

2 
10 

4 

8 
14 
37 

5 
2 

15 
1 
8 
8 
2 
1 
2 
2 

37 

11 
3 
5 
3 

34 

10 
9 

12 
2 
3 

19 
5 
4 
4 

11 
3 

32 

41 
3 

14 
8 
4 
3 
7 
1 

14 
9 
2 
3 
3 
3 
7 

32 
1 
9 

19 

16 
1 
1 
5 
2 
3 
4 
2 
1 
7 
1 


5 
3 

2 
8 

10 
3 
8 

10 

31 
2 
5 
2 

10 
1 
6 
4 
2 
1 
2 
2 

37 

3 
4 
3 

29 
7 
7 
8 
2 
3 

14 
5 
4 
4 

11 
3 

26 

37 
3 
9 
5 
4 
3 
7 
1 

14 
8 
2 
3 
3 
3 
7 

29 
1 
7 

17 

16 
1 
1 
5 
2 
3 
4 
2 
1 
7 
1 


3 

4 

1 

4 
6 

5 
4 

4 

1 

5 
3 

2 
4 

5 

6 
4 

5 
3 

1 

3 

2 
2 


NEBRASKA— Con. 








Wilber.. 






Dakota City 

David City 


Wood River.. 

York 

NEVADA 

Caliente 


Elkhorn. 


Falls City 




Carlin 




Elko 

Ely 












Wells.. . 








NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Amherst 

Berlin 

Claremont 
















Derry 






Exeter 

Farmington 


Kimball 


La Vista 




Gilford 


Loup City - 






Gorham 

Hampton 

Hanover 




MiUord... 




Mitchell 




Nebraska City 


HoUis- 




Hooksett 


Norfolk 




North Platte. -- 








Ogallala 




O'Neill - - 




Ord 




Oshkosh 




Papilllon-- 


Lee 






Plattsmouth 












Red Cloud 




Rushville 




Saint Paul 




Schuyler _ 




Scottsblufl 








Seward ._ . 




Sidney 




South Sioux City , 




Spencer 




Stanton 




Superior 




Syracuse 




Tecumseh. 






Water ville Valley 


Tilden... 


Verdigre 




Wahoo 




Wausa. 





Total Police Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


10 


6 


4 


4 


4 




2 


2 




15 


11 


4 


6 


5 


1 


5 


4 


1 


26 


17 


9 


13 


12 


1 


14 


12 


2 


51 


42 


9 


10 


7 


3 


9 


8 


1 


5 


5 




31 


31 




26 


22 


4 


17 


13 


4 


26 


24 


2 


12 


11 


1 


18 

4 


17 
3 


1 
1 


13 


12 


1 


11 


8 


3 


22 


18 


4 


7 


7 




22 


21 


1 


15 


15 




5 


5 




4 


4 




2 


2 




7 


7 




18 


15 


3 


8 


8 




33 


30 


3 


27 


26 


1 


6 


6 




19 


18 


1 


2 


2 




9 
15 


9 
14 


1 


8 


7 


1 


13 


13 




6 


6 




14 
8 


9 
8 


5 


3 

6 


3 

6 




3 


3 




8 


8 




8 


8 




26 


24 


2 


6 


6 




11 


11 




18 
8 


16 
6 


2 


3 


3 




5 


5 




9 


8 


1 



NEW JERSEY 

Absecon.. 

Allendale 

AUenhurst 

Allentown 

Alpha 

Alpine 

Andovpr Township 

Asbury Park 

Atlantic Highlands 

Audubon. 

Audubon Park 

Avalon .._ _ 

Avon by the Sea 

Harrington _. 

Bay Head 

Beach Haven .,. 

Beachwood 

Bcdminster Township. 

Bcllmawr 

Belmar. 

Belvidere 

Berkeley Heights 

Berkeley Township 

Berlin __.. 

Berlin Township 

Bernards Township 

Bernardsville 

Beverly 

Bloomingdale 

Bogota 

Boonton 

Boonton Township 

Bordentown 

Bcrdentown Township 

Bound Brook 

Bradley Beach 

Bridgeton 

Brielle. 

Brigantine 

Brooklawn 

Buena 

Burlington 

Burlington Township.. 

Butler 

Byram Township 

Caldwell 

Califon 

Cape May.- 

Carlstadt 

Carteret. 

Cedar Grove Township 

Chatham 

Chatham Township. . . 

Chester. 

Chester Township 

Cinnaminson Town- 
ship 

Clark 

Clay ton 

Clementon 

Cliffside Park 

Clinton.. - 

Clinton Township 

Closter 

Collingswood. 

Cranbury Township... 

Cresskill 

Deal.- 

Delanco Township 



Total Police Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


18 


17 


1 


16 


15 


1 


10 


10 




2 


2 




2 


2 




9 


9 




3 


3 




83 


79 


4 


16 


16 




21 


20 


1 


4 


4 




20 


19 


1 


9 


9 




19 


17 


2 


6 


6 




10 


10 




14 


13 


1 


5 


5 




22 


21 


1 


21 


21 




4 


4 




28 


27 


1 


34 


33 


1 


10 


9 


1 


5 


5 




21 


18 


3 


17 


16 


1 


8 


8 




14 


14 




20 


20 




22 


21 


1 


6 


6 




10 


9 


1 


13 


9 


4 


22 


21 


1 


17 


16 


1 


53 


49 


4 


18 


14 


4 


22 


22 




4 


4 




10 


8 


2 


32 


30 


2 


24 


22 


2 


12 


12 




10 


9 


1 


24 


24 




2 


2 




18 


18 




25 


25 




45 


45 




23 


23 




19 


19 




23 


22 


1 


5 


4 


1 


10 


10 




28 


26 


2 


43 


43 




15 


12 


3 


9 


9 




35 


35 




4 


4 




8 


8 




18 


18 




29 


28 


1 


7 


7 




19 


18 


1 


16 


15 


1 


6 


6 





272 



Tgble 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 



Total Police Employees 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Delran Township 

Demarest 

Denville Township 

Deptford Township 

Dover 

Dumont 

Dunellen 

Easthampton Township 
East Greenwich Town- 
ship 

East Hanover Town- 
ship. 

East Newark 

East Rutherford 

East Windsor Town- 
ship 

Eatontown 

Edgewater 

Edgewater Park Town- 
ship 

Egg Harbor City 

Egg Harbor Township. . 

Elm wood Park 

Emerson. 

Englewood 

Englewood Cliffs 

Essei Fells 

Evesham Township 

Fairfield 

Fair Haven 

Fairview 

Fanwood 

Far Hills. 

Flemington 

Florence Township 

Florham Park 

Franklin 

Franklin Lakes 

Franklin Township 
(Gloucester County).. 

Franklin Township 
(Hunterdon County). 

Freehold 

Freehold Township 

Frenchtown 

(3alloway Township 

Garwood 

Glassboro. 

Glen Ridge 

Glen Rock 

Gloucester City 

Green Brook. 

Greenwich Township.. 

Guttenberg 

Hackettstown , 

HaddonHeld 

Haddon Heights 

Haddon Township 

Haledon... 

Hamilton Township... 

Hammonton 

Hanover Township 

Harding Township 

Hardyston Township.. 

Harrington Park 

Harrison 

Harrison Township 

Harvey Cedars 

Hasbrouck Heights 



Total \fale Female 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Haworlh 

Hawthorne 

Hazlet Township 

Helmetta 

High Bridge Boro 

Highland Park 

Highlands. 

Hightstown 

Hillsborough Township. 

Hillsdale 

Hillside Township 

Hohokus 

Holland Township 

Hohndel Township 

Hopatcong 

Hopewell 

Hopewell Township 

Howell Township 

Interlaken 

Island Heights 

Jackson Township 

Jamesburg 

Jefferson Township 

Kcansbiu'g 

Kenilworth 

Keyport 

Kinnelon 

Lacey Township 

Lakehurst , 

Lambertville 

Laurel Springs 

Lavallette 

Lawnside 

Lawrence Township 
(Cumberland 
County) 

Lawrenc ' Township 
(Mercer County) 

Lebanon Township 

Leonla 

Lincoln Park 

Lindenwold 

Linwood. 

Little Egg Harbor 
Township 

Little Falls Township. . 

Little Ferrj' 

Little Silver 

Logan Township 

Long Beach Township. 

Longport 

Lopatcong Township. . 

Lower AUoways Creek 
Township 

Lower Township 

Lumberton Township. 

Lyndhurst Township.. 

Madison 

Magnolia 

Mahwah Township 

Manalapan Township.. 

Manasquan 

Manchester Township. 

Mansfield Township... 

Mantoloking 

Mantua Township 

Manville 

Maple Shade Town- 
ship 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Maplewood Township.. 

Margate City 

Marlboro 

Matawan. 

Matawan Township 

May wood 

Medford Lakes 

Medford Township 

Mendham 

Mendham Township 

McrchantviUe 

Metuchen 

Middlesex 

Middle Township... 

Midland Park 

MiUord 

Millburn Township. . . - - 

Milltown 

Millville 

Mine Hill Township 

Monmouth Beach 

Monroe Township 
(Gloucester County).. 

Monroe Township 
(Middlesex County) . . 

Montvale 

Montville Township 

Moonachie 

Moorestown Township. 

Morris Plains 

Morristown 

Morris Township 

Mountain Lakes 

Mountainside — 

Mount ArUngtoD 

Mount Ephraim 

Mount Holly 

Mount Laurel Town- 
ship 

Mount Olive Township. 

Mullica Township 

Neptune 

Netcong 

New Miliord 

New Providence 

New Shrewsbury 

Newton 

North Arlington 

North Brunswick 
Township 

North Caldwell .. 

Northfleld... 

North Haledon 

North Hanover Town- 
ship 

North Plainfield 

Northvale 

North Wildwood 

Norwood 

Oakland 

Oaklyn 

Ocean City 

Ocean Gate 

Ocean Grove — 

Oceanport 

Ocean Township (Mon- 
mouth County) 

Ocean Towns hip 
(Ocean County) 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total Male Female 



273 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Ogdensburg 

Old Tappan 

Oradcll 

O xford Townshi p 

Palisades Park 

Palmyra -.- --- 

Park Ridge 

Passaic Township — 

Paulsboro 

Peapack and Gladstone 

Pemberton 

Pemberton Township- 
Penning ton -- 

Penns Grove --. 

PennsviUe TowTiship. 
Pequannock Townsliip 

Phillipsburg -- 

Pine Beach 

Pine Hill 

Pitman 

Plainsboro Township.. 

Pleasantville 

Plumsted Townsliip. .. 

Pohatcong 

Point Pleasant 

Point Pleasant Beach.. 

Pompton Lakes 

Princeton 

Princeton Townsliip... 
Prospect Park 

Ramsey _.- - 

Randolph Township... 

Raritan 

Raritan Township 

Readington Township- 

Red Bank. 

Ridgelield- 

Ridgeheld Park 

Ringwood _ 

Riverdale — 

River Edge 

Riverside 

Riverton.- 

River Vale 

Rochellc Park Town- 
ship 

Rockaway 

Rockaway Township. . 

Roseland- 

Roselle 

Roselle Park 

Roxbury Township 

Rum son 

Runnemede 

Rutherford - . . 

Saddle Brook Town- 
ship__ 

Saddle River 

Salem. 

Scotch Plains 

Sea Bright 

Sea Girt 

Sea Isle City 

Seaside Heights 

Seaside Park 

Secaucus 

Ship Bottom 

Shrewsbury. _ _ 

Somerdale 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Somers Point 

Somerville - 

South Araboy 

South Belmar 

South Bound Brook 

South Brunswic'i Town- 
ship 

South Hackensack 

South Orange 

South PlainHeld - 

South River 

South Toms River 

Sparta Township 

Spotswood 

Springfield 

Spring Lake.. 

Spring Lake Heights. . . 

Stafford Township 

Stanhope 

Stillwater Township 

Stone Harbor 

Stratford 

Summit 

Surf City 

Sussex 

Swedesboro 

Tenafly 

Teterboro. 

Tewksbury Township. - 

Totowa 

Tuckerton 

Union Beach 

Union Township 

Upper Penns Neck 

Upper Saddle River 

Ventnor City 

Verona. 

Voorhees Township 

Waldwick.. 

Wallington 

Wall Township 

VVanaque 

Warren Township 

Washington 

Washington Township 
(Bergen County) 

Washington Township 
(Gloucester County). 

Washington Township 
(Mercer County). 

Washington Township 
(Morris County). 

Watchung 

Waterford Township... 

Weehawken Township. 

Wenonah 

Westampton Township . 

West Caldwell.. 

West Cape May 

West Deptford Town- 
ship 

West Long Branch 

West Milford Township. 

West Paterson 

Westville 

West Wildwood 

West Windsor Tow 
ship 

Westwood 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Wharton _ 

Wildwood 

Wildwood Crest- - 

Winfield Township 

Winslow Township 

Woodbine 

Woodbury. 

WoodcliflLake 

Woodlynne 

Wood Ridge.. 

Woodstown 

Woolwich 

Wrightstown 

Wycko£f. - 

NEW MEXICO 

Alamogordo 

Artesia 

Aztec 

Belen 

BernaUllo 

Bloomfleld 

Carlsbad 

Central 

Cimarron 

Clayton 

Corrales 

Cuba - 

Deming 

Espanola 

Eunice 

Farmington 

Gallup 

Grants 

Hurley 

Jal.... 

Las Vegas 

Lordsburg — 

Los Alamos 

Lovington 

Mescalero Apache 

Tribal... 

.Mesilla --- 

Milan 

.Mountalnair 

Portales... 

Questa. -. 

Raton - 

Red River 

Ruidoso. 

San Ildefonso Pueblo. . 

Santa Rosa 

Silver City._ 

Socorro 

Springer — 

Taos 

Taos Pueblo. 

Tatum 

Truth or Consequences 

Tucumcari 

Tularosa 

Vaughn 

Wagon Mound 

NEW YORK 

Addison 

Albion 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



274 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



NEW YORK— Con. 

Alfred 

Altamont 

AmityviUe 

Angola 

Arcada 

Ardsley 

Asharoken 

Attica 

Baldwinsville 

Ballston Spa 

Batavia 

Bath 

Beacon 

Bedford 

Bethlehem 

Blasdell 

Brewster 

Briarclifl Manor 

Brockport 

BronxvlUe 

Camden 1. 

Canajoharie 

Canandaigua 

Canastota 

Canisteo - 

Canton 

Capital Police 

Carmel 

Carthage - 

Catskill -. 

navuga Heights 

Cazenovia 

Chester 

Chi ttenango 

Clyde 

Cobbleskill 

Cohocs 

Cooperstown 

Corinth 

Corning 

Cornwall 

Cortland 

Coxsackie 

Croton on Hudson — 

Dansvillc _. 

Delhi 

Dobbs Ferry 

Dolgeville 

Dunkirk 

East Aurora 

Eastchestcr. 

East Rochester. 

East Syracuse 

Eden 

EUcnTillc --.. 

Elmira Heights 

Eltnsford 

Endicott 

Evans _ 

Fairport - 

Falconer 

Fayetteville 

Floral Park 

Fort Edward 

Fort Plain... 

Frankfort 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Geneva 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



NEW YORK— Con. 

Glens Falls.. 

Gloversville 

Goshen 

Gouverneur 

Gowanda 

Green Island 

Greenport 

Greenwich Village 

Greenwood Lake 

Groton 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 

Harrison 

Hastings on Hudson.. 

Haverstraw 

Haverstraw To\vn 

Herkimer 

Highland 

Highland Falls 

Homer 

Hoosick Falls 

Hornell 

Horseheads 

Hudson 

Hudson Falls 

lUon 

Irvington 

Johnson City 

Johnstown 

Kemnore 

Kent 

Lake Placid 

Lakewood 

Lancaster Town 

J^ij-^l^ter Village 

Larchmont 

Lc Roy 

Lewiston 

Liberty 

Little Falls 

Liverpool 

Lowvllle 

Lyons 

Malone 

Malverne 

Mamaroneck Town. . . 
Mamaroneck Village.. 

Massena 

Mcchanicville 

Medina..-. -.- 

Middletown 

Minoa 

Mohawk 

Monroe 

Monticello 

Mount Kisco 

Mount Pleasant 

Newark - 

New Castle 

New Paltz 

New Paltz Town 

New York Mills 

North Pelham 

North Syracuse 

North Tarrytown 

Norwich 

Nyack.- 

Ogden 

Ogdensbiu'g 



Total Police Employees 



Total .Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



NEW YORK— Con. 

Clean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Orchard Park 

Ossining - . . 

Oswego . - 
Owego- 
Oxford. - 

Painted Pusi - 

PaUsades Interstate 

Park 

Palmyra 

PeekskiU 

Pelham 

Pelham Manor 

Penn Yan 

Perry 

Plattsburgh 

Pleasant ville 

Port Henry 

Port Jervis 

Potsdam 

Qucensbury - 

Ravena 

Rensselaer 

Riverhead Town 

Rye 

Sag Harbor 

Saint Johnsville 

Salamanca 

Sands Point 

Saranac Lake 

Saratoga Springs 

Saugerties 

Scarsdale 

Scotia 

Seneca Falls.. 

SherriU 

Sidnej.. 

Silver Creek -- 

Skaneatelcs 

Sloan 

Sloatsburg 

Solvay 

Southampton - 

South Glens Falls 

South Nyack 

Spring Valley 

Springville 

Stony Point 

Suffern 

Tarrytown 

Tonawanda 

Tuckahoe 

Tupper Lake 

Tuxedo 

Tuxedo Park 

Walden 

Walton 

Wappingers Falls 

Warsaw. 

Warwick 

Washiiigtonville 

Waterford... 

Waterloo 

Watervliet 

Watkins Glen 

Waverly 

Webster 



275 



Table 75. — Number ol FuU-Jime Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Citiet with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



NEW YORK— Con. 



Wellsville _. 

West Elmira , 

WestBeld..._ 

Wosthamptoii Beach 

Whitehall 

Whitesboro 

Whitney Point.. 

Woodbury 

Woodridge 

Yorktown.. 

Yorkville , 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Ahoskie 

Angler 

.4.pes... 

Asheboro 

Atlantic Beach 

Aulander 

Aurora 

Ayden 

Bailey 

Bakersville 

Banner Elk 

Battleboro 

Beaufort 

Belhaven,. 

Belmont 

Benson 

Bessemer City. 

Beulavillo 

Biscoe.. 

Black Creek 

Blowing Rock 

Boihng Spring Lakes. . 

Brevard 

Burgaw 

BurnsviUe 

Butner 

Candor.. 

^anton 

Cape Carteret 

Carolina Beach 

Cary ... 

Chadbourn 

China Grove. 

Chocowinity 

Clayton 

Chnton 

Coats 

Columbia 

Concord 

Conover 

Conway 

Cramerton 

Creedmoor 

Dallas 

Denton .. 

Dobson 

Drexel 

Dunn - 

East Spencer... 

Eden 

Edenton.. 

Elizabethtown 

Elkin... 

Ellerbe 

Enfield 



Total PoUce Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


11 


U 




4 


4 




9 
4 


9 
4 




4 


4 




9 




2 


5 


5 




48 


48 




2 


' 




16 


14 


2 


7 


7 




9 


a 




40 


34 


6 


13 


12 


1 


3 


3 




2 


2 




12 


11 


1 


6 


6 




5 


5 




9 


9 




7 


7 




14 


14 




7 


7 




10 


10 




3 


3 




3 


3 




2 


2 




10 


8 


2 


19 


15 


4 


4 


4 




3 


3 




24 


24 




3 


2 


1 


19 


14 


5 


14 


14 




27 


25 


2 


9 


9 




4 


4 




16 


15 


1 


23 


20 


3 


4 


4 




46 


44 


2 


7 


7 




2 


2 




6 


6 




7 


7 




5 


5 




4 


4 




2 


2 




4 


4 




31 


26 


5 


10 


8 


2 


40 


40 




15 


14 


I 


8 


7 


1 


14 


12 


2 


2 




2 


10 


9 


1 



NORTH 

CAROLINA— Con. 

Erwin. 

Fair Bluff 

Fairmont 

Farmville 

Fountain. 

Fremont 

Fuquay-Varina 

Garner 

Gibson,. 

Gibsonvilie 

Graham _. 

Granite Falls 

rialifax 

Hamlet 

Havelock 

Hazel wood 

Henderson 

Hendersonville 

Hertford.... 

Hickory 

High Shoals,.. 

Hillsborough 

Hope Mills 

Huntersville 

Jackson 

Jacksonville 

Jones ville 

Kenly 

Kerncrsville 

Kill Devil Hills.. 

Kings Mountain 

Kuro Beach 

La Grange 

Lake Lure 

Landis 

Laurinbu!^ 

i-t:;o;r .;::::: 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lilesville 

Lincolnton 

Long Beach 

Louisbui^ 

Lowell 

Lumberton 

Maiden 

Mantco 

Marion 

Mar<!hall 

Marsh ville 

Maxton,.. 

Me Adenville 

Mebane 

Mocksville 

Monroe 

Mooresville 

Morehead City 

Morganton 

Mount Airy 

Mount Gilead 

Mount Olive 

Murphy... 

Nags Head 

Nashville 

New Bern.. 

Newland.. 

Newport 

Newton 

North Wilkesboro 



Total PoUce Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


5 


5 




9 


8 


1 


10 


10 




12 


11 


1 


4 


4 




4 


4 




U 


11 




13 


13 




5 


5 




20 


18 


2 


U 


11 




17 


16 


1 


11 


7 


4 


8 


7 


1 


38 


35 


3 


28 


24 


4 


5 


5 




72 


60 


12 


6 


6 




4 


4 




4 


4 




2 


2 




50 


48 


2 


3 


3 




4 


4 




13 


13 




5 


5 




26 


25 


1 


4 


4 




4 


4 




2 


2 




I 


3 




26 


25 


1 


45 


42 


3 


51 


47 


4 


6 


6 




2 


1 


; 


19 


19 




10 


7 


3 


8 


8 




7 


7 




42 


39 


3 


6 


6 




2 


2 




16 


16 




6 


5 


1 


5 


5 




6 


6 




10 


8 


2 


5 


5 




29 


28 


1 


20 


20 




17 


12 


5 


40 


37 


3 


24 


24 




4 


4 




14 


14 




9 


8 


1 


7 


6 


1 


5 


5 




43 


36 


7 


3 


3 




3 


3 




27 


23 


4 


17 


13 


4 



NORTH 
CAROUNA— Con. 

Norwood... 

Oakboro 

Oxford 

Pembroke 

Pilot Mountain 

Pinehurst... 

Pinetops 

Pineville 

Pittsboro.. 

Plymouth.. 

Polkton 

Randleman 

Ranlo. 

Red Springs. 

Reidsville 

Richlands 

Robbinsville 

Robersonville 

Ronda... 

Roseboro.. 

Rose Hill 

Rowland 

Roxboro 

Ruthcrfordton 

Saint Pauls 

Salisbury. 

SanXord 

Saratoga 

Selma. 

Shallotte 

Shelby 

Siler City 

Sims... 

Smithfield 

Snow Hill.. 

Southern Pines 

Southport 

Spencer 

Spindale 

Spring Lake 

Spruce Pine 

Stanfleld 

Star 

State Capitol Police.. 

Statesville 

Stone ville 

Swansboro 

Tabor City 

Tarboro 

Taylorsvillc 

Thomasville 

Topsail Beach 

Valdese 

Vanceboro 

Vass 

Wadesboro 

Wallace 

Washington 

Wcldon 

Wendell.... 

West Jefferson 

Whispering Pines 

\^'hiteville 

Williamston 

Windsor.. 

Wingate. 

Yadkinville 

Zebulon 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



276 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Devils Lake . 
Dickinson... 

Grafton 

Jamestown . . 

Langdon 

Mandan 

Rugby 

Valley City.. 

Wahpeton 

West Fargo . . 
Williston 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



OHIO 



Ada 

Amberley 

Amherst 

Arlington Heights . . . 

Ashland 

Ashtabula 

Aurora 

Avon 

Avon Lake 

Barnes viUe 

Bath Township 

Bay Village 

Beachwood 

Bedford 

Bedford Heights 

Bellaire 

Bellbrook 

Bellefontaine 

Bellevue 

Belpre 

Berea 

Bexley 

Blanchester 

Blue Ash 

Bluflton 

Bowling Oreen 

Brady Lake 

Brecksvllle 

Bridgeport 

Broadview Heights- 
Brooklyn.... 

Brooklyn Heights . . 

Brunswick 

Bryan 

Bucyrus 

Cadlt 

Cambridge 

Campbell 

Canfleld 

Carey 

Carlisle 

CarroUton 

Cellna 

Centervllle 

Chagrin Falls 

Chardon 

Cheviot 

Chlllicothe 

Circle ville 

Cleves 

Clyde 

Coal Grove 

Coldwater 

Columbiana... 

Coaneaut 



Total Police Employees 



OHIO— Con. 



Copley 

Cortland 

Coshocton 

Crestline 

Crooksville 

Darbydale 

Deer Park 

Defiance , 

Delaware 

Delphos 

Dennison 

Dover.. 

Eastlake 

East Liverpool 

East Palestine 

Eaton 

Elmwood Place 

Englewood 

ndale 

Fairfax.. 

Fairfield 

Fairlawn 

Fairport Harbor 

Fairview Park 

Fayette 

Forest Park 

Fort Shawnee 

Fostorla 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Gahanna 

Gallipolis 

Geneva 

Georgetown 

Oermantown 

Oibsonburg 

Oirard 

Glendale 

Glouster 

Golf Manor 

Grandview Heights.. 

Granville 

Greenfield 

Qreenhills 

Greenville 

Grove City 

Grovepcrt 

Harrison 

Heath 

Hicksville 

Highland Heights... 

Hilliard 

Hillsboro 

Hubbard 

Hudson 

Huron 

Independence 

Indian Hill 

Ironton 

Tarkson 

Johnstown 

Kenton 

Lebanon 

Leetonia 

Leipsic 

Liberty Township.. 

Lisbon 

Lockland 

Logan 



Total Male Female 



OHIO-Con. 



London 

Loudonville 

Louisville 

Loveland 

Lyndhurst 

Macedonia 

Madeira 

Muriomont 

Marietta 

Martins Ferry 

Marysville 

Mascn 

Maumee 

Mayfield 

Mayfield Heights 

McDonald 

Medina 

Mentor-on-the-Lake. . 

Miamisburg 

Middleburg Heights.. 

Middleport 

Millcrsburg 



Minerva 

Mingo Junction 

Mogadoro 

Montgomery 

Montpelier 

Moraine 

Mount Gilead 

Mount Healthy 

Mount \'ernon 

Munroe Falls Village.. 

Napoleon 

Navarre 

Nelsonville 

New Albany 

New Boston 

Newburgh Heights... 

New Carlisle 

Newcomerst own , 

New Lexington 

New Philadelphia 

Newton Falls 

Newtown 

Niles 

North Baltimore 

North Bend 

North Canton 

North College Hill... 

North RIdgeville 

North Royalton 

Norton 

Norwalk 

Oak Harbor 

Oakwood 

Oakwood Village 

Oberlin 

Ontario 

Oregon 

OrrvlUe 

Ottawa 

Ottawa Hills 

Oxford 

Paines ville 

Paulding 

Pepper Pike 

Perrysbuis 

Piqua 

Poland 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



277 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 


Total PoUce Employees 


City by State 


Total Police Employees 


City by State 


Total Police Employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


OHIO— Con. 

Port Clinton 


16 
22 
23 
24 

7 
20 

5 
32 
12 

6 
22 
15 
25 

9 
14 
11 
11 
16 
32 
14 
33 

4 

7 

7 
26 
26 
36 

8 
30 
20 
24 
24 

5 
37 
10 

9 

6 
19 
29 
21 

8 

3 
33 

9 
23 

6 
25 
19 
19 
23 
10 
15 

4 

18 
4 
7 
11 
18 
8 
20 
27 
10 
31 
3 
28 
12 
38 
27 


14 
17 
19 

7 
18 

4 

29 
11 

6 
21 
11 
22 

6 
12 
11 
11 
16 
29 
12 
29 

4 

4 
23 
24 
28 

5 

26 
20 
23 
16 

4 
35 
10 

9 

6 
19 
28 
18 

7 

3 
30 

9 
23 

6 
21 
17 
15 
17 

9 
12 

4 

17 
4 
7 

10 
11 
7 
15 
23 
10 
29 
3 
26 
8 
34 
24 


5 
4 

1 
3 

1 


4 
3 
3 

2 

3 

2 
4 

3 
3 

2 
8 
3 
4 

1 
8 
1 
2 

1 
3 

1 

3 

4 
2 
4 
6 
1 
3 

1 

1 
7 
1 
5 
4 

2 

2 
4 
4 
3 


OHIO— Con. 


22 
9 
7 
13 
42 
35 
15 
12 

32 
36 
13 
19 
9 
41 
1 

15 
7 
27 
10 
19 
1 
11 
25 
7 
3 
7 
2 
5 
5 
3 
31 
6 
24 
3 
1 
5 
21 
4 
9 
3 

6 
15 

8 
1 
4 
8 
44 
24 
31 
13 
5 
19 
2 
7 
5 
3 
13 

4 

6 
16 
14 

2 

3 


19 
9 
6 
12 
35 
30 
15 
10 

29 
34 
9 

17 
9 
38 
1 
14 
4 
25 
7 
18 
1 
9 
22 
6 
2 
5 
1 
5 
5 
3 
29 
6 
22 
3 
1 
5 
16 
4 
5 
3 
2 
5 
14 
2 
8 
1 
3 
8 
41 
22 
28 
12 
2 
15 
2 
6 
5 
2 
13 

4 

5 
16 
11 

1 

3 


3 

1 
1 
7 
5 

2 

3 

2 

4 

3 

1 
3 

3 

1 

2 
3 

1 
1 
2 

1 

2 

5 
4 

1 
1 

1 
3 

3 

1 
3 

4 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 


OKLAHOMA-Con. 


3 

4 
5 
3 
5 
7 

11 

12 
7 

10 
3 

11 
4 

14 
1 
4 
7 
5 
3 
7 
3 
3 

13 
3 
9 
9 
4 
7 
4 

32 

35 
36 

9 
4 

14 
6 

10 
5 
5 

23 
1 
8 
1 

17 

15 
8 

4 

2 
11 

4 
17 
11 

3 

7 
23 
31 

6 
18 

2 

6 

1 
10 

2 

6 

9 
10 


3 

4 
5 
3 
5 
5 
11 
11 
7 
7 

10 
3 

14 
1 
3 
6 
5 

6 
3 
3 
10 

8 
9 
3 
6 
4 

28 
2 

28 

34 
7 
4 

13 
5 
7 
5 
5 

21 
1 
6 
1 

15 

13 
8 
2 

3 

1 
10 

4 
16 

9 

2 

21 
29 

5 
16 

2 

4 

1 

7 

1 

5 

9 
10 








Hartshorne 

Haskell 






Winters ville 




Reynoldsburg 




Healdton 

Heavener 




Richfield.. 






Richmond Heights 
























OKLAHOMA 

Ada 


Hollis 




Russell Township 






















Hulbert.... 

Idabel 




Sebring 


Alva 




Seven Hills 




Inola... 

Jay 




Shadyside 






Sheffield Lake 






Shelby 








Sidney 








Silverton 








Solon 








South Charleston 


Bixby.. 






South Russell 




Lindsay 










Springdale 




Madill 

Mangum 




Springfield Township.. - 






Stow - 






Streetsboro 




Marlow 

Maysville 










Struthers 


Catoosa 

Chandler 

Checotah 

Chelsea 




Sylvania 


McLoud 

Miami 




Tallmadge 




Terrace Park 






Tiffin 






TippCity 








Toronto 




Nichols Hills 


J 


Trenton 












Noble 




Troy... 








Twinsburg 








Uhrichsville 






2 


Union City 








University Heights 






, 


Upper Sandusky 








Urbana 




Pauls Valley 


2 


Valley View 






2 


Vandalia - 








Van Wert 








Vermilion 














1 


Walton Hills 








Wapakoneta 






1 


WarrensviUe Township . 














1 








2 


Waterville 






1 


Wauseon 








Waverly.. 






2 


Wellington 


Fairfax 




2 


Wellsville 






1 


West Carrollton 






2 


WestervlUe 














9 


Westlake 


Granite 


Shidler. . . . 




West Milton 






3 


WickUae 




Spavinaw 


1 


WiUard 




1 


Willoughby.. 


HaileyvlUe 


Stlgler 




Willowick 


Hammon 


StlUweU... 





278 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



OKLAHOMA 



Stonewall 

Stroud 

Sulphur 

Tahlequah 

TaUhlna 

Tecomseh 

Ttshomlngo 

Tonkawa 

ValUant 

Village 

Vlnlta 

Wagoner 

Walters 

Warr Acres 

Watonga 

Waurika 

Weatherford 

Wetumka 

Wewoka 

WUburton 

Woodward 

Wynnewood 

Yukon 

OREGON 

Albany 

Amity 

Ashland 

Astoria 

Baker 

Beaverton 

Bend 

Brookings 

Bums 

Canby 

Cannon Beach 

Canyonville 

Cave Junction 

Central Point 

Coos Bay 

Coqullle 

Cornelius 

Cottage Grove.... 

Dallas 

Drain 

Eagle Point 

Eastslde 

Estacada 

Florence 

Forest Grove 

Gladstone 

Gold Beach 

Grants Pass 

Gresham 

Hennlston 

Hlllsboro 

Hood River 

Independence 

John Day 

Joseph 

Klamath Falls... 

La Grande 

Lake Oswego 

Lakevlew 

Lebanon 

Lincoln City 

McMinnville 

Milton-Freewater. 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



OREGON— Con. 



Milwaukle 

Molalla 

Mcnmouth 

Monroe 

MsTtle Creek... 

Myrtle Point 

Newberg 

Newport 

North Bend 

Nyssa 

Ontario 

Oregon City 

Pendleton 

Philomath 

Pilot Rock 

Powers 

PrineviUe 

Ranier 

Redmond 

Rcedsport 

Roseburg 

Saint Helens 

Sandy 

Seaside 

Silvcrton 

Stayton 

Sutherlin 

Sweet Home 

Talent 

The Dalles 

Tigard 

Tillamook.- 

Toledo 

Vale 

Vcmonia 

West Linn 

Winston 

Woodbum 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Akron 

Aldan 

Aliqulppa 

AUegheny Township. 

Ambler. 

Ambridge 

Amity Township 

Ann vi lie 

Archbald 

Arnold 

Ashland 

Ashley 

Aspinwall 

Aston Township 

Atglen. 

Athens 

Avalon - 

Avoca 

Baden - 

Baldwin Township... 

Bangor... 

Bamesboro 

Barrett Township 

Bath 

Beaver 

Beaver Falls 

Bedford 

Bellefonte 



Total PoUce Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


28 


24 


4 


6 


6 




9 


8 


1 


10 


7 


3 


10 


6 


4 


15 


13 


2 


17 


11 


6 


18 


12 


6 


10 


8 


2 


19 


15 


4 


22 


18 


4 


27 


22 


5 


3 


3 




3 


3 




3 


3 




16 


10 


6 


7 


6 


1 


14 


9 


5 


11 


7 


4 


34 


26 


8 


21 


14 


7 


S 


4 


1 


20 


14 


6 


11 


10 


1 


10 


6 


4 


7 


7 




17 


12 


5 


5 


5 




24 


20 


4 


21 


17 


4 


10 


9 


1 


9 


6 


3 


4 


4 




3 


3 




16 


10 


6 


11 


6 


5 


19 


13 


6 


2 


2 




4 


4 




31 


31 




11 


11 




16 


16 




3 


3 




5 


5 




5 


5 




12 


12 




5 


5 




5 


5 




7 


7 




15 


14 


1 


6 


5 


1 


15 


12 


3 


3 


3 




4 


4 




4 


4 




6 


6 




3 


3 




3 


3 




10 


9 


1 


24 


24 




7 
12 


7 
12 





PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Belle Vernon 

Bellevue , 

Ben Avon 

Benton 

Benzinger Township. . . 

Bern Township 

Berwick 

Bethel Township 

Bethleham Township. . 

BIrdsboro 

Birmingham Township 

BlalrsvlUe.... 

Blakely 

Blawnox 

Bloomsburg 

Blossburg 

Boyertown , 

Brackenrldge 

Braddock 

Braddock Hills 

Bradford 

Bradford Township 

Brentwood 

Bridgeport 

Bridge vllle 

Brighton Township 

Bristol 

Brockway 

Brookhaven 

Brookvllle 

Brownsville 

Bryn Athyn 

Buckingham Township 
Bumham-Derry Town- 
ship 

Butler 

Butler Township 

Caernarvon Township. . 

California 

Cain Township 

Cambria 

CampHIU 

Canonsburg 

Carbondale 

Carlisle 

Carmlchaels Boro 

Carnegie 

Castle Shannon 

Catasauqua 

Catawlssa 

Cecil Township 

Center Township 

CentervlUe 

Chalfont 

Chambersburg 

Charlerol 

Chartlers Township 

Chester Township 

ChurchlU 

Clalrton 

Clarion 

Clarks Summit 

Clearfield 

Cleona 

Clifton Heights 

Coaldale 

Coal Township 

Coatesville 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



279 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



Total Police Employees 



PENNSYLVANIA- 
Con. 



Collegeville 

Collier Township 

CoUingdale 

Columbia - 

Colwyn. 

Conemaugh Township 
Concwago Township . . 
Conewango Township. 

Connellsville 

Conshohocken 

Conway --. 

Conyngham 

Coopersburg 

Coplay - 

Coraopolis 

Corry 

Crafton 

Cranberry Township. 

Cresson 

Cressona 

Cumru Township 

Curwensville 

Dale - 

Dallas - 

Dallas town 

Dallas Township 

Danville 

Darby 

Darby Township 

Daugherty Township. 

Derry 

Derry Township 

Dickson City — 

Donora 

Dormont 

Downingtown 

Doylestown 

Doylestown Township . 

Dravosburg 

Du Bois- 

Dunmore 

Dupont 

Duquesne 

Duryea 

East Buffalo Township. 

East Conemaugh 

East Deer Township... 

East Hempficld Town- 
ship 

East Lansdowne 

East McKeesport 

East Norriton Town- 
ship 

East Pennsboro Town- 
ship 

East Petersburg 

East Pittsburgh 

East Stroudsburg 

East Taylor Township 

Easttown Township. . . 

East Washington 

East Whiteland Town- 
ship.. 

Ebensbuis 

Economy 

Eddystone 

Edgewood _. 

Edgeworth 

Edinboro 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 



Edwardsville 

Elizabeth 

Eliiabethtown 

Elizabeth Township. 

Elkland 

Ellwood City 

Emmaus 

Emsworth 

Ephrata 

Etna 

Evans City 

Everett 

Exeter 

Exeter Township — 

Fairview 

Fairview Township.. 

Falls Creek 

Farrell 

Fawn Township 

Ferguson Township. 

Ferndale 

Fleetwood.- 

Folcroft 

Ford City 

Forest Hills 

Forks Township 

Forty Fort 

Fountain Hill 

Fox Chapel 

Frackville 

Franconia Township 

Franklin 

FrankUnBoro 

Franklin Park 

Franklin Township 
(Carbon County) 

Franklin Township 
(Westmoreland Coun- 
ty) . 

Freeland 

Freemansburg 

Gallitzin 

Geistown 

Gettysburg 

Glassport 

Glenolden 

Greencaslle 

Greensburg 

Green Tree 

Greenville — 

Grove City 

Hallam 

Hamburg 

Hampden Township... 

Hampton Township... 

Hanover 

Hanover Towniship 

Harmar Township 

Harmony Township... 

Harrison Township 

Harveys Lake 

Hatboro 

Hatfield Township 

Hawley 

Hegins Township 

Heidelberg Township.. 

Hellam Township 

Hellertown 

Hempfield Township. . 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



Total Police Employees 



PENNSYLVANIA- 
Con. 



Hickory Township. . 
Hilltown Township. 

Holhdaysburg 

Homer City 

Homestead 

Honesdale 

Hopewell Township. 
Horsham Township. 

Houston - - - 

Hummelstown 

Huntingdon... 

Indiana 

Indiana Township.. 

Ingram 

Irwin 

Jackson Township.. 

Jeannette 

Jefferson 

Jenkintown 

Jersey Shore 

Jessup 

Jim Thorpe... 

Johnsonburg 

Kane.- 

Kennedy Township 

Kennett Square 

Kidder Township 

Kilbuck Township 

Kingston .- 

Kingston Township 

Kittanning 

Knox - 

Kulpmont 

Kutztown 

Lake Township 

Lansdale -.. 

Lansdowne 

Lansford 

Larks vllle 

Latrobe 

Laureldale 

Lawrence Park Town- 
ship 

Lawrence Township 

Leechburg 

Leetsdale 

Lehlghton 

Lehigh Township 

Lehman Township 

Lemoyne 

Lewisburg 

Lewistown 

Liberty Boro 

Llgonler 

LiUy 

Limerick Township 

Lines viUe 

Lititz - 

Littlestown 

Lock Haven 

Logan Township 

Lower Allen Township . 

Lower Alsace Township 

Lower Burrell 

Lower Chichester 
Township... 

Lower Owynedd Town- 
ship - — 



280 



Table 75. — Numbtr of Full-Time Law Enfortement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — ConHnued 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Lower Makefield Town- 
ship 

Lower Morelaiid Town- 
ship 

Lower Pottsgrove 

Township 

Lower Providence 

Township 

Lower Sallord Town- 
ship - 

Lower Southampton 

Township 

Lower Swatara Town- 
ship 

Lower Yoder Township. 

Luzerne 

Luzerne Township 

Lykens 

Macungie 

Mahanoy City.. 

Mahoning Township 

(Carbon County) 

Mahoning Township 

(Montour County) — 

Malvern 

Manhehn 

Manheim Towpj^l'.j; 

ivmnor Township 

Mansfield 

Marcus Hook 

Mars -- 

Martlnsburg .- 

Marysville 

Masontown 

Matamoras 

McAdoo -■ 

McCandless Township.. 

McConnellsburg 

McDonald 

McKees Rocks 

McSherrystown. 

Meadville 

Mechanicsburg 

Media 

Mercer 

Mercersburg. 

Meyersdale 

Middlesex Township 

(Butler County) 

.Vliddleses Township 

(Cumberland County). 

Middletown 

Midland 

Miflllnburg... 

Mllford..-. 

Mlllboume 

MlUcreek-Richland 

Millersburg 

Millers ville 

MlUvale 

Mill ville 

Milton 

Minersville 

Mohnton 

Monaca 

Monessen. 

Monogahela. 

Montgomery _ . 

Montgomery Township 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



26 
10 
3 
6 
1 
1 
3 
6 
1 
2 
26 
3 
4 
19 
2 
29 
11 
14 
4 
2 
4 

3 

1 

13 
14 
3 
2 
4 
3 
3 
3 
8 
2 
10 
6 
3 
5 


1 

2 

1 

3 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
3 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 



MontoursviUe 

Montrose 

Moon Townshl p 

Moosic 

Morris ville 

Morton 

Moscow 

Motmtaln Top Regional. 

Mount Carmel.-- 

Mount Joy 

Mount Oliver 

Mount Peon 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Union 

Muhlenberg Township,. 

.\Iunhall 

Myerstown._ 

Nanticoke,. 

Nanty-Glo 

Narberth ._ 

Nazareth 

Nesquehoning 

Nether Providence 
Township 



Neville T. 



IC^Vuamp. 



New Brighton 

New Britain , 

New Britain Township. 

New Cumberland- 

New Hanover Town- 
ship 

New Holland 

New Kensington 

New Oiford _ 

Newport Township 

New Sewickley Town- 
ship 

Newtown Township 
(Bucks County) 

Newtown Township 
(Delaware County)... 

New Wilmington 

Northampton , 

Northampton Town- 
ship... 

North Belle Vernon 

North Braddock 

North Catasaqua 

North Codorus Town- 
ship 

North Cornwall-West 
Lebanon Townships.. 

North Coventry Town- 
ship 

Nortb East 

Northern York Re- 
gional 

North Fayette Town- 
ship 

North Lebanon Town- 
ship 

North Middleton Town- 
ship - 

North Strabane Town- 
ship - - 

Northumberland 

North Versailles Town- 
ship 

North Wales 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 



Norwood 

Oakmont 

Ohara Township. 

Oil City 

Old Forge 

Oley Township 

Olyphant 

Orwigsburg 

Oxford 

Palmerton 

Palmer Township 

Palmyra 

Parkesburg 

Patterson Township 

Patton 

Penbrook _ 

Pcnn Township (Butler 
County) 

Penn Township (Lan- 
caster County) 

Ponn Township (W'est- 
m.orelaild COUiity) 

Penn Township (York 
County) 

Pequea Township 

Perkasle 

Peters Township 

Philipsburg.. 

Phoenixville 

Pine Grove 

Pine Township _ 

Pitcairn 

Pittston 

Plains Township 

Pleasant Hills 

Plum. 

Plymouth 

Plymouth Township. . 

Pocono Township 

Portage 

Port Vue - 

Potts ville 

Presquelsle 

Prospect Park 

Pulaski Township 

Punxsutawney 

Pymatuning Township 

Quaker! own 

Racoon Township 

Ralpho Township 

R2r.kiii 

Red Lion 

Redstone Township. . . 

Renovo 

Reserve Township. . .. 

Reynoldsville 

Richland Township 
(Allegheny County). 

Richland Township 
(Cambria County) . . 

Ridgeway 

Ridley Park 

Riverside 

Roaring Spring 

Robeson Township 

Robinson Township. . . 

Rochester 

Rockledge 

Rostraver 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



281 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Co^finued 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Royersford 

Saint Clair 

Saint Marys 

Salem Township 

Salisbury Township 

Saltsburg Boro 

Sandy Township 

Sayre. 

Schuylkill Haven 

Schuylkill Township . . . 

Scottdale 

Scott Township 

Selinsgrove _ 

Sellersville 

Sewickley 

Sewlckley Heights 

Shamokin 

Shamokin Dam 

Sharon 

Sharon Hill 

Sharpsburg 

SJisrpsville 

Shenandoah 

Shenango Township 

Shilllngton 

Shippensburg 

Shiremanstown 

Silver Spring Township. 

Sinking Spring 

Slatington 

Slippery Rock 

Solebury Township 

Somerset 

Souderton 

South Abington Town- 
ship 

South Fayette Town- 
ship 

South Fork 

South Greensburg 

South Lebanon Town- 
ship... 

South Londonderry 
Township 

Southmont 

South Park Towniship... 

South Strabane Town- 
ship 

Southwest Oreensburg.. 

South Whitehall Town- 
ship... 

South Williamsport 

Spring City 

Springdale 

Springettsbury Town- 
ship 

Springfield Township 
(Bucks County) 

Springfield Township 
(Montgomery 
County) 

Spring Garden Town- 
ship , 

Spring Township 
(Berks County) , 

Spring Township 
(Centre County) 

SteeUon 

Stoneycreek Township. 



Total Police Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


5 


5 




5 


5 




9 


8 


1 


10 


10 




4 


4 




9 


8 


1 


7 


7 




5 


5 




12 


9 


3 


24 


24 




5 


5 




4 


4 




14 


13 


1 


10 


10 




14 


14 




3 


3 




40 


36 


4 


5 


5 




7 


7 




8 


7 


1 


10 


H 


! 


6 


6 




12 


12 




2 


2 




6 


6 




2 


2 




5 


5 




4 


4 




4 


4 




12 


10 


2 


6 


5 


1 


4 


4 




5 


5 




2 


2 




6 


6 




2 


2 




3 


3 




12 


11 


1 


2 


2 




2 


2 




12 


U 


1 


5 


5 




2 


2 




4 


4 




20 


18 


2 


2 


2 




31 


31 




16 


15 


1 


10 


10 




4 


4 




13 


12 


1 


2 


2 





PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Stowe Township 

Stroudsburg.. 

Stroud Township 

Sugarcreek 

Summit Hill 

Sunbury 

Susquehanna. 

Susquehanna Town- 
ship 

Swarthmore 

Swatara Township 

Svrissvale 

Swoycrsville 

Tamaqua 

Tarentum 

Taylor 

Telford 

Throop 

Tinicum Township 

Titusville 

Tobyhanna Township. 

Topton 

Towanda 

Tratford.... -. 

Trainer 

Tredy£Erin Township.. 

Troy.. 

Tullytown 

Tunkhannock 

Turtle Creek 

Tyrone. 

Union City 

Uniontown 

Union Township 

Upper Allen Township. 

Upper Chichester 
Township 

Upper Dublin Town- 
ship 

UpperGwyneddTown- 
ship 

Upper Makefield 
Township 

Upper Merlon Town- 
ship 

Upper Moreland 
Township 

Upper Pottsgrove 
Township 

Upper Providence 
Township (Delaware 
County) 

Upper Providence 
Township (Mont- 
gomery County) 

Upper Saint Clair 
Township 

Upper Saucon Town- 
ship 

Upper Southampton 
Township 

Upper Yoder Town- 
ship 

Uwchlan-Upper 
Uwchlan Township. 

Vandergrift 

Vanport 

Vernon Township 

Verona 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



PENNSYLVANIA— 
Con. 

Versailles 

Warren 

Warrington Township.. 

Warwick Township 
(Bucks County) 

Warwick Township 
(Lancaster County)... 

Washington 

Washington Crossing . . . 

Watsontown.. , 

Waynesboro 

Waynesburg 

Weatherly 

Wellsboro 

Wesley ville 

West Chester 

West Conshohocken 

West Deer Township . . . 

West Fairview 

West Fellowfleld 
Township 

Westfield 

West Goshen Town- 
ship 

West Hazleton 

West Homestead 

West Lampeter TC""- 
ship 

West Lawn 

West Manchester 
Township 

West Manhelm Town- 
ship 

Westmont 

West Newton 

West Norrlton Town- 
ship 

West Pitts ton 

West Pottsgrove Town- 
ship 

West Reading 

West RockhiU Town- 
ship 

West Taylor Township. 

West View... 

West Whlteland Town- 
ship 

West Wyoming 

West York 

Wheatland 

Whitehall 

Whitehall Township 

White Haven 

Whitemarsh Township. 

White Oak 

Whitpain Township 

Wilkes-Barre Township. 

Wilkins Township 

WiUiamsburg 

WilUstown Township. . . 

Wilmerding 

Wilson 

Windber 

Wind Gap 

Windsor Boro 

Windsor Township 

Wormleysburg 

Wyoming 

Wyomlssing 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



282 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



City by State 


Total Police Employees 


City by State 


Total PoUce Employees 


City by State 


Total Police Employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


PENNSYLVANIA- 
Con. 


2 
11 
20 
15 
3 
3 
5 

29 
38 
18 
39 

4 
41 
39 
24 

4 
12 
53 
27 

7 
11 

2 
47 
16 
21 
15 
33 
42 
23 
18 
31 

3 
48 

42 
7 
2 
4 
6 
7 

33 

23 
2 

12 
6 
3 
1 

24 
2 
3 

23 
4 

23 
6 

17 
5 

14 

20 
3 

10 

27 
5 

25 

16 


U 
20 
15 
3 
3 
5 

28 
35 
17 
39 

4 
37 
39 
22 

4 
12 
51 
26 

7 
11 

45 
16 
20 
13 
33 
39 
22 
17 
29 
2 
44 

37 

7 

3 

6 
7 

25 

20 
2 

11 
6 
2 
1 

24 
2 
3 

22 
4 

6 
16 

5 
12 
20 

3 

8 
24 

5 
23 
16 


1 
3 

1 

4 
2 

2 
1 

2 
1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
2 

5 



1 

8 
3 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
2 

3 

2 


SOUTH CAROLINA— 
Con. 


4 
2 

25 
2 
7 
2 
2 
16 
11 
12 
31 
11 
6 
48 
4 
4 
26 
5 
6 
14 
6 
4 
4 

7 
3 

12 

3 

27 
6 
9 
32 
8 
5 
7 
2 
7 
1 
9 
21 
13 
2 
5 
6 
10 
18 
43 
29 
9 
30 
28 
2 
2 
12 
1 
2 
7 
2 
7 
3 
2 
4 
5 
2 
1 
7 
18 


4 
2 

24 
1 
7 
2 
2 

18 
9 

11 

28 

10 
6 

44 
4 
3 

23 
5 
6 

11 

6 
4 
4 

3 

11 

20 

3 

9 
31 

5 
6 

1 
9 
19 
13 

5 
6 
9 
17 
39 
28 
9 
26 
27 
2 
2 
10 
1 
2 
6 

I 

3 

4 
5 
2 
1 
7 
17 


1 
1 

2 
1 
3 

1 

4 

1 
3 

3 

2 
4 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
4 
1 

4 
1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

1 


SOUTH CAROLINA- 
Con. 

Simpsonville _ 

South Congaree 

Springdale 

SulUvans Island 

Sumter 

Swansea 


12 
1 
3 
3 

57 
3 

10 
5 
2 

24 
3 
9 

24 
9 

23 
9 
2 
1 
6 
7 

13 

19 
1 
8 

7 
4 
24 
4 
4 
4 
6 
24 
9 
12 
23 
11 
25 
8 
7 
9 
19 
18 
22 
3 
8 
23 

22 
27 
15 
40 
13 
10 

3 
48 
10 

7 
22 
45 
37 
20 
13 

7 
18 


12 
1 
3 
3 

47 
3 

10 
4 
2 

24 
3 
9 

21 
8 

22 
9 
2 
1 
6 
7 

13 

18 
1 
8 

7 
4 
20 
4 
3 
4 
6 
23 
7 
11 
18 
7 
21 
8 
7 
8 
14 
18 
22 
3 
8 
19 

21 
25 
13 
39 
12 
10 

3 
43 

9 

22 
39 
33 
20 
11 
7 
15 
























Edgefield 


10 




















RHODE ISLAND 


Fort Mill 
























Goose Creek 


Walhalla 




Burrillville 


Great Falls 










































West Union. .. 






Holly Hill 










WllUston 






















Iva 










York 








SOUTH DAKOTA 










North Smithfleld 








Lake City 












Smithfield 






4 








































1 


West Warwick 
















SOUTH CAROLINA 




Mitchell 


5 




Loris 




4 


Aiken 


Lyman 

Manning 




4 




Redfleld 




Atlantic Beach 






Aynor 


Mauldin 




1 








5 










Beaufort 










Mount Pleasant 

Mullins 








Winner 




Bishopville 




4 


Blackville 




TENNESSEE 




Bonneau 






Branchville... 






Camden 


North Myrtle Beach 

Olar 


1 


Campobello 




2 


CarUsle 






2 


Cayce 






1 


Central City 






1 


Cheraw 








Chesnee 




Church Hill 




Chester 






3 


Chesterfield.... 






1 


Clemson 








Clinton 








Clio 






6 


Clover 






4 


Conway 








Cowpens 


Salley 




2 


Darlington 








Dillon 


Seneca. 


Dickson 


1 



283 



Table 75.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcemenf Employees, Ocfober 31, 1974, Cities wifh Population under 25,000— Continued 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



TEXAS— Con. 

Azle 

Balcones Heights. . . 

Ballinger 

Beeville. .- 

Bellaire 

Bellmead 

Bellville 

Belton.. 

Bcnbrook .. 

Big Lake 

Bishop 

Blanco,.. 

Bonham 

Borgcr 

Bowie 

Brady 

Breckem-idge 

Brenham 

Bridge City 

Bridgeport 

Brownfleld 

Brownwood 

Burkburnett 

Burleson 

Burnet 

Cameron 

CarroUton 

Carthage. 

Castle Hills 

Childress 

Cisco 

Cleburne 

Clute 

CockrcllHill. 

Coleman 

ColleyvlUe 

College Station 

Colorado City 

Columbus 

Comanche 

Commerce 

Converse. 

Copperas Cove 

Corsicana 

Crane 

Crockett 

Crosbyton 

Crowley 

Cuero 

Dai nger field 

Dayton 

Decatur 

Deer Park 

Del Rio 

Denver City 

De Soto 

Diboll 

Dimmitt 

Donna 

Dumas 

Duncanville 

Eagle Lake 

Eagle Pass 

Eastland 

Edcouch 

Edinburg 

El Campo.. 

Electra. 

Elgin... 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



TEXAS— Con. 

Ennis 

Euless 

Everman 

Forest Hill 

Fort Stockton 

Fredericksburg 

Freeport 

Friendswood 

Friona 

Gainesville. 

Galena Park - 

Georgetown 

Gilmer 

Gladewater 

Gonzales 

Graham 

Grapevine 

Greenville 

Groves 

Hamlin 

Heame 

Henderson 

Henrietta -- 

Hereford - 

Highland Park 

Hillsboro 

Hitchcock 

Huntsvillc 

Hutchlns .- 

Ingleside 

Iowa Park 

Jacinto City. 

Jacksonville 

Jasper 

Karnes City. 

Keller 

Kemp 

Kenedy 

Kennedale 

Kermit.. 

Kerrville 

Kilgore 

Lake Jackson 

Lake Worth 

La Marque 

Lamesa 

Lampasas 

Lancaster. 

La Porte 

League City 

Levelland 

Lewisville 

Liberty 

Littlefield 

Live Oak 

Livingston 

Lockncy 

Lorenzo 

Lufkin 

Luling 

Marfa 

Marlin 

Marshall 

Mathis 

McGregor 

Mc Kinney 

Memphis 

Mercedes 

Mexia 



284 



Table 75.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcemenf Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



TEXAS— Con. 

Mineola 

Mineral Wells 

Mission 

Monahans 

Mount Pleasant 

Muleshoe 

Nacogdoches 

Navasota 

Nederland 

New Braunfels 

Nocona 

Nolan viUe 

North Richland HiUs 

Olmos Park 

Orange 

Palestine 

Pampa 

Pantego 

Paris 

Poarland 

Pear Ridge 

Pearsall 

Pecos 

Pharr... 

Pittsburg 

Plainview 

Port Aransas 

Port Isabel 

Portland 

Port Lavaca 

Port Neches 

Premont 

Quitman 

RaUs 

Ranger 

Raymondville 

Richland Hills 

Richmond 

River Oaks 

Robstown 

Rockdale 

Rosenberg 

Rotan 

Rusk.-- 

San Augustine 

San Benito 

San Marcos 

Schertz 

Seabrook _ 

Seagraves 

Seguln 

Seminole 

Shallowater 

Silsbee 

Sinton _, 

Slaton 

Snyder 

South Houston 

Southlake 

Spearman 

Spiu' 

Stamford 

Stephenville 

Sugarland 

Sulphur Springs 

Sweetwater- - _ , 

Taft _. 

Taylor _ 

Teague 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



TEXAS— Con. 

Terrell 

Terrell Hills 

TuUa... ..-. 

University Park 

Uvalde... 

Vernon 

Vidor 

Waxahachie 

Weatherford 

West Columbia 

West Lake Hills 

West University Place 

Whi tehouse 

White Oak 

White Settlement 

Windcrest 

Winters 

Wood way 

WyUe 

Yoakum 

Yorktown 

UTAH 

American Fork 

Brighara City 

Cedar City 

Centerville 

Eureka 

Helper 

Layton 

Lehi 

Logan - 

Midvale 

Murray... 

Nephi 

Park City 

Paj-son 

Pleasant Grove 

Roy.. 

Saint George 

Sandy 

South Ogden 

South Salt Lake 

Spanish Fork 

Springville 

Sunset-. 

Tooele 

Tremonton 

Vernal 

Washington Terrace... 

VERMONT 

Barre 

Bellows Falls 

Bennington 

Brandon 

Brattleboro 

Castleton 

Colchester 

Essex Junction 

Fair Haven 

Hartford.. 

Manchester 

Manchester Village 

Middlebury 

Milton 

Montpelier.- 



Total Police Employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 




24 


19 


5 




11 


10 


1 




5 


5 






37 


35 


2 




17 


12 


5 




21 


17 


4 




15 


10 


5 




32 


28 


4 




24 


20 


4 




8 


5 


3 




3 


3 






22 


20 


2 




2 


2 






4 


4 






17 


13 


4 




7 


7 






5 


3 


2 




10 


7 


3 




8 


5 


3 




11 


9 


3 




6 


6 






U 


10 


1 




24 


21 


3 




11 


9 


3 




4 


4 






4 


3 


1 




4 


4 






18 


17 


1 




6 


6 






36 


33 


3 




13 


U 


1 




40 


37 


3 




5 


5 






7 


6 


1 




6 


6 






8 


7 


1 




19 


17 


2 




18 


14 


4 




27 


23 


4 




13 


13 






18 


16 


2 




11 


9 


3 




11 


10 


1 




7 


7 






32 


20 


3 




4 


4 






13 


10 


2 




9 


8 


1 




17 


17 






10 


10 







33 


33 


1 




10 


9 


1 




31 


26 


5 




4 


3 


1 




13 


11 


3 




14 


11 


3 




2 


2 






20 


19 


1 




12 


8 


4 




7 


6 


1 




5 


3 


2 




17 


14 


3 





City by State 



VERMONT— Con. 

Morrisville 

Newport _ 

Northfield 

Randolph 

Rutland 

Saint Johnsbury 

Shelbume 

South Burlington 

Springfield 

Stowe 

Waterbmy 

Wilmington 

Windsor 

Winooski 

Woodstock 

VIRGINIA 

Abingdon 

AltaVista 

Appalachia 

Bedford 

Big Stone Gap 

Blacksburg 

Blucfleld 

Bristol 

Buena Vista 

Cape Charles 

Chase City 

Chincoteague 

Christiansburg 

Clifton Forge 

Colonial Heights 

Courtland 

Covington... 

Culpeper 

DubUn 

Emporia 

Fairlai City 

Falls Church 

Franklin 

Fredericksburg 

Front Royal 

Harrisonburg 

Herndon 

Hopewell 

Lexington 

Luray 

Manassas Park 

Marion 

Martinsville 

Norton 

Poquoson 

Pulaski 

Radford 

Richlands 

Salem 

Saltville 

South Boston 

South Hill. 

Staunton 

Vienna 

Vinton 

Waynesboro 

Williamsburg . _ 

Winchester 

Wise.... 

WytheviUe 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



285 



Table 75. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities with Population under 25,000 — Continued 



Total Police Employees 



WASHINGTON 



Aberdeen 

Anacortes 

Auburn -. 

Blaine -.. 

Bothell 

Buckley 

Burlington 

Camas -.. 

Castle Rock 

Centralia 

Chehalis 

Cheney 

Clarkston 

CleElum 

Clyde Hill Town... 

Colfax 

College Place 

Colvllle 

Connell 

Dayton 

DCS Moines 

Edmonds 

EUensburg 

Enumclaw 

Ephrata. 

Fircrest 

Grand Coulee 

Grandview 

Hoquiam 

Issaquah 

Kelso 

Kennewick 

Kent 

Kirkland 

Lacey 

Lynden 

Lyimwood 

Marysville 

Medina 

Mercer Island 

Milton 

Monroe 

Moses Lake 

Mountlake Terrace.. 

Normandy Park 

Oak Harbor 

Ocean Shores 

Olympia 

Orting 

Othello 

Pasco 

Pomeroy 

Port Angeles 

Port Orchard 

Port Townsend 

Pulhnan.. 

Puyallup 

Quincy 

Raymond 

Redmond 

Ridgefield 

Sedro Woolley 

Selah 

Shelton 

Snohomish 

Steilacoom 

Sumner 

Sunnyside 

Tukwila 



Total Male Female 



WASHINGTON— Con. 



Tumwater.. 
Walla Walla., 

Wapato 

Wenatchee.. 



WEST VIRGINIA 



Anawalt 

Anmoore 

Ansted 

Athens 

B arbours ville 

Beckley 

Belington 

Belle 

Benwood 

Berkeley Springs. 

Bluefield 

Bramwell 

Bridgeport. 

Buckhannon. 

Burnsville... 

Cameron 

Ceredo 

Charles Town 

Chesapeake 

Chester 

Clarksburg 

Clay 

Clendenin 

Davy 

Delbarton 

Dunbar 

EUzabeth 

Elkins 

Fairview 

Farmington 

FayetteviUe 

FoUansbee 

Franklin 

Gary 



Gilbert 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Olenville 

Grafton 

Grantsville.. 
Granttown.., 

Hinton 

Himdred 

Hurricane 

laeger 

Kenova 

Kermit 

Keyser 

Keystone 

KimbaU 

Kingwood- . . 
Lewisbiu'g... 

Logan 

Lumberport. 

Mabscott 

Madison 

Man 

Mannington. 

Marlinton 

Marmet 

Martinsburg. 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



WEST VIRGINIA- 

Con. 



Mason 

Masontown 

Matewan 

Matoaka 

McMechen 

MiddleboiuTie 

Milton 

Monongah 

Montgomery 

Moorefleld 

Moundsville... 

Mount Hope 

Mullens 

New Cumberland.. 

New Haven 

New Martinsville. . 

Nitro 

Northfork 

Nutterfort 

Oak Hill.... 

Oceana 



Paden City 

Parsons 

Paw Paw — 

Petmsboro 

Petersburg. 

Phllippi 

Piedmont... 

Pine Grove 

PlneviUe 

Point Pleasant 

Princeton 

Rainelle.. 

Ranson 

Ravenswood 

Richwood 

Ridgeley.. 

Ripley 

Rivesville 

Romney 

Ronceverte 

Saint Albans 

Saint Marys 

Salem. 

Shcpherdstown — 

Shiimston 

Sisters ville. 

Smlthers. 

Sophia 

South Charleston. 

Spencer 

Star City.. 

Stonewood - 

Summersville 

Sutton 

Terra Alta 

Thomas 

Tunnel ton 

Union 

Vienna 

War 

Wayne 

Webster Springs. . 

Welch 

Wellsburg 

Weston 

Westover 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total Male Female 



286 



Toble 75— Number of Full-Time L 


aw Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Cities 


with Population unde 


r 25,000 — Continued 


City by State 


Total Police Employees 


City by State 


Total PoUce Employees 


City by State 


Total Police Employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


WEST VIRGINIA— 
Con. 


2 
5 
4 
14 
3 

5 
3 

16 
17 
20 
17 
27 
8 
10 
9 
6 
4 
6 
24 
22 
6 
15 
IS 
5 
33 
10 
4 
4 
38 
6 
13 
5 
22 
6 
9 
10 
21 
9 
9 
18 
21 
24 
17 
38 
16 
32 
14 
13 
5 
6 
12 
11 
20 


2 
5 
4 
14 
2 

5 
3 
16 
17 
19 
16 
26 
8 
10 
7 
5 
4 
5 
23 
20 
6 
13 
14 
5 
27 
10 
4 
4 
34 
6 
13 
5 
21 
6 
9 
9 
17 
9 
7 
13 
21 
22 
13 
34 
12 

13 

12 
5 
6 
10 
10 
20 


1 

1 
1 

I 

2 

1 

1 

1 
2 

2 
4 

6 
4 

1 

1 
4 

2 
3 

^ 

4 

4 
4 
5 
1 

1 

1 


WISCONSIN— Con. 
Kewaunee 


5 
5 

6 
18 
5 
6 
7 
22 
37 
6 
8 
5 
34 
27 
29 
18 
16 
5 
8 
14 
20 
2 
3 
4 
5 
34 
50 
4 
9 
12 

3 
36 

22 

4 

7 
5 
6 
5 
7 
33 
10 
19 
15 
12 
13 
20 
15 
10 
16 
13 
4 
16 
6 


5 

5 
6 
5 
14 
5 
6 
6 

35 

6 

5 
31 
33 

26 
18 
14 
5 
7 
13 
18 
2 
3 
3 
5 
19 
42 
4 
6 
12 
7 
3 
35 
31 

4 
7 
5 
6 
5 
7 
21 
10 
16 
15 
12 
10 
18 
14 
10 
13 
11 
4 
15 
6 


1 
1 
4 

1 

2 

1 

3 
4 
3 

2 

1 
1 

2 

2 

5 

8 

3 

1 
1 

2 
3 

3 

3 

1 

3 

1 


WISCONSIN— Con. 
Schofleld 


5 
16 

9 
26 
34 
12 

4 
42 
14 
12 

4 

4 
21 

6 
12 

9 
11 

6 
7 
29 
5 

5 
4 
30 

11 
12 
33 
26 
6 
27 
27 
10 
45 

5 
12 
U 
27 

4 
13 
19 
32 

5 
11 
12 
15 
22 
26 
24 
12 
15 
16 


5 
14 

9 
26 
32 
12 

4 
38 
14 
12 

4 

4 
19 

6 
12 

9 
10 

5 
6 
25 
4 
6 
5 
4 
28 
10 
12 
31 
23 
6 
25 

6 
41 

3 

11 
8 

18 
4 
9 

16 

26 
4 
6 

13 

15 
20 
18 

10 
10 






Kiel - 




2 






Sheboygan Falls 
















South Milwaukee 


2 




Lake Mills 






WISCONSIN 








Little Chute 




4 










Marshtield 














Ashland 


Mayville 








Medford 




2 
















Beloit Township 










Merrill 


Town of Madison 

Town of Menasha 

Town of OconomowoC- . 


" 




Middleton. . . . 






Milton 




Brillion 


Minocqua 










4 


Brown Deer 








Montello 






























Cliilton 
















Clintonville 


NeillsviUe 










West Milwaukee. 


3 






Cudahv 








Dclafield.. 


North Fond du Lac 
















Wisconsin Rapids 

WYOMING 


4 


















Elkhorn 






Elm Grove 


Park Falls 














Fitchburg 
















Fox Point 




Jackson. 




Franklin 








Port Washington 

Prairie du Chien 








Lovell 




Grafton 










Powell 




Hales Corners 






Hartford.. 


Richland Center 












Horicon 


River Falls 




6 










Jefferson 






5 


Kaukauna.. 




Worland 


6 









287 



Table 76.— Number of Full-Tim« Employets, Ocfober 31, 1974, Univertifitt 



University of Alabama: 

Birmingham 

Arizona State University 

Arizona Western Coilege 

Eastern Arizona College 

Northern Arizona University --- 

University of Arizona - 

University of Arkansas - 

California Polytechnic University 

California State University: 

Chico - 

FuUerton 

University of California: 

Berkeley -- 

Davis -.- 

Irvine - 

Los Angeles 

Riverside 

San Diego 

San Francisco -■ 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Cruz 

Colorado State University 

Florida A&M University 

Florida Atlantic University 

Florida International University 

Florida State University 

Florida Technical University 

University of Florida 

University of North Florida 

University of South Florida 

University of West Florida 

Chicago State University. 

Eastern Illinois University 

Governors State University, Illinois 

IlUnois Central College 

Illinois State University 

Lake County College. Illinois 

Lewis and Clark College, Illinois 

Northeastern Illinois University 

Northern Illinois University 

Rock Valley College, Illinois 

Sangamon State University, IlUnois 

Southern Illinois University: 

Carbondale 

Edwardsville 

State Community College, Illinois 

Thornton Community College, Illinois.. 

Triton College, Illinois 

University of Illinois: 

Chicago 

Urbana 

Waubonsee Junior College, Illinois 

Western Illinois University 

William Rainey Harper College, Illinois.. 
Indiana University: 

Bloomington 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

New Albany 

South Bend - --■ 

University of Kansas 

Wichita State University, Kansas 

Eastern Kentucky University 

University of Kentucky 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total Male Female 



11 


2 


46 


13 


29 


15 


21 


3 


21 


5 


.11 


8 


13 


3 


19 


8 


16 


2 


16 


3 


14 


3 


37 


6 


17 


2 


53 


10 


13 


3 


39 


10 


13 


1 


22 




15 


2 


17 


5 


7 


4 


24 


5 


4 





University of Maine: 

Orono - 

Presque Isle - 

University of Maryland - - 

Central Michigan University 

Delta College, Michigan 

Eastern Michigan University -. 

Ferris State College, Michigan 

Michigan State University 

Northern Michigan University 

Oakland University, Michigan - 

Western Michigan University - 

University of Minnesota - 

East Mississippi Junior College --. 

Mississippi State University -- 

University of Mississippi 

Central Missouri State University 

University of Missouri 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

University of Nevada 

University of New Hampshire 

Eastern New Mexico University 

New Mexico Highlands University 

New Mexico State University 

University of New Mexico 

Western New Mexico University -- 

State University of New York, Albany 

Elon College, North Carolina 

Kent State University, Ohio 

Ohio University - 

Central State University, Oklahoma 

Northeastern Oklahoma State University 

Oklahoma University 

Oklahoma State University 

University of Oklahoma, Health Sciences Center 

Bloomsbiu'g State College, Pennsylvania 

Clarion State College, Pennsylvania. 

Edinboro State College, Pennsylvania 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania 

Lock Haven State College, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State University 

Shippensburg State College, Pennsylvania 

Slippery Rock State College, Pennsylvania 

West Chester State College, Pennsylvania 

Eastfleld College, Texas 

East Texas State University 

Southwest Texas State University 

University of Texas: 

Arlington 

Austin 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Galveston .-- 

Houston — 

Permian Basin 

San Antonio 

University of Texas Health Sclenct Center 

University of Utah 

University of Virginia 

Central Washington State College 

University of Wisconsin' 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Parkside 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total I Male Female 



1 

16 


2 


27 


6 


16 


4 


38 


13 


40 


10 


8 


1 


13 


3 


5 


1 


3 




15 


10 


39 


4 


3 


1 


43 


6 


3 




33 


3 


33 


4 


8 


1 


9 


1 


31 


5 


28 


7 


20 


6 


15 


1 


11 


3 


12 


2 


16 


1 


6 




8 


1 


62 


10 


16 


1 


17 


1 


25 


3 


8 


1 


17 


2 


11 


2 


28 


5 


101 


29 


31 


7 


27 


5 


46 


19 


33 


9 


6 


2 


5 


1 


16 
11 


2 
H 



288 



Table 77. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Suburban Counties 



County by State 


Total Police Employees 


County by State 


Total PoUce Employees 


County by State 


Total Police Employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


ALABAMA 

Autauga 


11 
18 
11 
11 
35 

254 
15 
69 
17 

168 
13 
16 
22 
66 

468 
526 

39 
14 
95 
29 

811 
404 
459 
363 
6.760 
155 
241 
64 
826 
122 
398 
823 
734 
937 
340 
410 
395 
703 
156 
126 
227 
221 
519 
124 

124 
125 
101 
297 
147 
6 
157 
49 
13 

186 


9 
16 
10 
10 
31 

219 
13 
50 
15 

115 
12 
13 
18 
55 

371 
454 

26 
12 
85 
21 

633 
321 
368 

297 


2 
2 
1 
1 
4 

35 
2 

19 
2 

53 
1 
3 
4 

11 

97 
72 

13 

10 

8 

178 
83 
91 
66 


FLORIDA 
Alachua 


156 

14 
213 
415 

46 
2,013 
209 
399 
170 
140 

23 
548 

73 
487 
140 
366 
251 

63 

32 
188 
140 
169 

15 

6 

15 

105 

1 

14 

115 

223 

19 

6 

*^. 

32 

29 

8 

14 

204 

113 

47 

40 

7 

3 

15 

15 

150 

24 

22 

13 

72 

19 
62 
6 
454 
201 
18 
123 
133 
38 
89 


109 

12 
156 
316 

43 
1,604 
175 
331 
133 
113 

23 
419 

56 
381 
110 
318 
213 

51 

24 
142 
106 
128 

10 

14 
88 
1 
12 
95 

193 
17 
4 

358 
27 
26 

13 

187 
96 
42 
30 

3 
13 
14 

132 

19 
12 

48 

18 
44 
6 
399 
173 
17 
105 
133 
38 
82 


47 

57 
99 
3 
409 
34 
68 
37 
27 

129 
17 

106 
30 
48 
38 
12 
8 
46 
34 
41 
5 

1 
1 
17 

2 
20 
30 

86 
5 
3 

1 
1 
17 
17 
5 
10 

1 
18 

3 

1 

24 

1 

18 

55 
28 
1 
18 

7 


ILLINOIS— Con. 


76 
41 
3 

6 
1C4 
59 
41 
28 
40 
120 
132 

8 
147 
10 
5 
8 
13 
32 
1! 
9 
19 
13 
22 
20 
187 
25 
444 
14 
38 
4 
107 
13 

33 

7 
35 
16 

5 

44 
25 
66 
124 
24 
53 
15 
26 

10 

9 

107 

10 
122 

69 

45 

4 
13 


76 
41 
3 

5 
87 
51 
41 
28 
37 
108 
120 


6 
123 

8 
4 

11 

27 
9 

16 

16 
17 

161 
21 

o7b 

11 

33 

4 
97 
10 

6 
28 

5 
31 
13 

4 

33 
23 
50 
98 
22 
42 
8 
22 

10 
7 
89 
6 
99 
55 
36 

3 

12 




Baldwin 


Baker... 






Colbert 


Brevard 






Elmore 


Broward 






Etowah. 


Clay 






Jefferson 


Dade.. 






Limestone — 


Escambia 








Hillsborough.. 

Lee. 


Sangamon.. 




MarshaU 


3 


Mobile 


Leon 




Russell 






'- 


Saint Clair 




^^ 




Shelby 




INDIANA 
















ARIZONA 


PineUas 






Polk 


Allen 


24 


Maricopa 


Saint Johns - 




Pima 


Santa Rosa 


Clay 


~ 




Sarasota - 






ARKANSAS 


Seminole 




2 
5 

2 




Volusia 




Jefferson 


Wakulla 


Floyd 


MiUer 


GEORGIA 
Bryan 




Pulaski - 




3 
6 

e 

3 

26 


Sebastian 








CALIFORNIA 


Catoosa.. 






Chatham 


Lake 


Alameda-- 


Chattahoochee 




Contra Costa 








Fresno 


Clayton 






Kern-.- - 


Cobb 


Porter 












P — 






124 
195 
54 
622 
103 

683 

611 
802 
286 
320 
284 
547 
132 
106 
194 
171 
416 
106 

98 
89 
62 
270 
121 
3 
128 
36 
10 

165 


31 

46 
10 
204 

123 
140 
123 
135 
54 
90 
111 
156 
24 
20 
33 
50 
103 
18 

26 
36 
39 
27 
26 

3 
29 
13 

3 

21 














De Kalb 






Shelby 






Dougherty 

Douela' 






































Fayette 










Sacramento 


Fulton 






San Bemarci^-o 












IOWA 
















Santa Barbara 






















Solano 




Polk 












Stanislaus 


Walker 








Walton 






Yolo.. 


IDAHO 

Ada- 






COLORADO 


KANSAS 






ILLINOIS 










Boulder 






Denver 






El Paso 






23 


Gilpin 


Clinton 




14 










Pueblo... 




KENTUCKY 




TeUer 












DELAWARE 


Lake 


1 






Boone Police Depart- 
ment 




New Castle 


Madison 


1 



289 



Table 71.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Suburban Counties— Conrmued 



County by State 



KENTUCKY— Con. 



Bourbon 

Boyd 

Bullitt 

Campbell 

Christian 

Christian Police De 

partment 

Clark 

Daviess 

Greenup 

Henderson 

Jefferson 

Jessamine 

Kenton 

Oldham 

Scott 

Woodford 



LOUISIANA 



Ascension 

Bossier 

Caddo 

Calcasieu 

Grant 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Ouachita 

Rapides 

Saint Tammany... 

Webster - 

West Baton Rouge., 

MAINE 



Androscoggin. 
Cumberland.. 



Anne Arundel.. 

Baltimore 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Harford 

Howard 

Montgomery 

Prince Georges. 



Calhoun 

Clinton 

Huron 

lonai 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo. 

Macomb 

Monroe 

Muskegon... 

Oakland 

Oceana 

Ottawa 

Saginaw 

Saint Clair.. 
Shiawassee.. 
Wayne 



Total Pohce Employees 



Total Male Female 



County by State 



MINNESOTA 



Anoka 

Benton 

Carver 

Clay 

Dakota 

Hennepin... 

Obnsted 

Ramsey 

Saint Louis., 

Scott 

Sherburne.. 

Stearns 

Washington., 
Wright 



Hancock.. 

Hinds 

Rankin... 
Stone 



Andrew 

Boone 

Buchanan 

Cass 

Christian 

Clay 

Franklin 

Greene 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Sam." r.'"»rtes. 
Saint Louis 



Cascade 

Yellowstone. 



Dakota 

Douglas... 
Lancaster. 
Sarpy 



Washoe. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Hillsborough 

NEW JERSEY 
Atlantic 



Burlington... 

Camden 

Cumberland. 

Essex 

Gloucester... 

Hudson 

Mercer 

Middlesex 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



26 


7 


42 


13 


3 


5 


129 


18 


43 


6 


36 


6 


109 


41 


28 


6 


81 


55 


225 


37 


83 


32 


149 


41 


55 


8 


324 


47 


51 


12 


112 


29 


57 


26 


139 


38 



County by State 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 



Morris 

Passaic . . . 

Salem 

Somerset., 

Union 

Warren... 



NEW MEXICO 
Bernalillo 



Albany 

Broome 

Chemung 

Erie 

Livingston.. 

Madison 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 

Nassau 

Niagara 

Oneida 

Onondaga 

Orleans 

Oswego 

Putnam , 

Rensselaer 

Richmond 

Rockland 

Schenectady. . 

Suffolk 

Tioga 

Wayne. 

Westchester. . . 



NORTH CAROUNA 



Brunswick 

Cumberland... 

CiuTituck 

Dare 

Durham 

Gaston 

Guilford 

Mecklenburg. . 
New Hanover. 

Orange 

Union 

Wake 



NORTH DAKOTA 



Allen _. 

Auglaize 

Belmont 

Butler 

Champaign. 

Clark 

Cuyahoga.. 

Delaware 

Fairfield 

Franklin 

Fulton 



Total Police Employees 



93 


84 


81 


74 


63 


60 


509 


473 


42 


37 


26 


18 


211 


200 


23 


20 


4,425 


4,100 


140 


129 


37 


35 


359 


322 


32 


28 


38 


33 


38 


30 


54 


45 


3 


2 


32 


31 


24 


19 


2,750 


2,554 


43 


36 


56 


46 


170 


145 


33 


27 


146 


124 




■ o 



290 



Table 77 — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Suburban Counf/es— Continued 



County by Stale 



OHIO— Con. 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Jefferson 

Lake 

Lawrence 

Lorain 

Lucas - -- 

Madison 

Mahoning 

Medina,.- 

Miami 

Montgomery 

Ottawa 

Pickaway 

Portage 

Preble 

Putnam 

Richland... 

Stark 

Summit 

Trumbull 

Van Wert 

Warren 

Washington 

Wood 

OKLAHOMA 

Canadian 

Cleveland. 

Comanche 

Creek 

Le Flore 

Mayes 

McClain 

Oklahoma 

Osage 

Pottawatomie 

Rogers 

Sequoyah 

Tulsa 

Wagoner... 



Clackamas 

Lane 

Marion 

Multnomah 

Polk 

Washington 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny 

Cumberland 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Charleston 

Lexington 

Pickens 

Richland... 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Minnehaha 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



County by State 



TENNESSEE 

Anderson 

Blount 

Cheatham 

Hawkins 

Marion' 

Robertson 

Rutherford 

Sequatchie 

Shelby 

Sullivan 

Sumner 

Tipton 

Union 

Williamson. 

Wilson 



BeU 

Bexar.. 

Bowie 

Brazoria 

Brazos 

Cameron 

Clay 

Collin 

Dallas 

Ector 

Ellis 

El Paso 

Galveston 

Grayson 

Guadalupe... 

Harris 

Hays 

Hidalgo 

Hood 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Jones 

Kaufman 

Lubbock 

McLennan 

Midland 

Montgomery. 

Neuces 

Orange 

Parker 

Potter 

Randall 

Rockwall 

San Patricio. 

Tarrant * 

Taylor 

Tom Green.. 

Travis 

WaUer 

Webb 

Wichita. 

Wise 



Davis 

Salt Lake. 
Tooele 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



County by State 



UTAH— Con. 



Utah.. 
Weber . 



Amherst 

Botetourt 

Campbell 

Charles City 

Chesterfield 

Dinwiddie. 

Gloucester 

Hanover 

Henrico 

James City 

Loudoun 

Powhatan 

Prince George 

Prince William 

Roanoke 

Scott 

Washington 

York 

WASHINGTON 

Benton.. 

Clark 

Franklin 

King 

Pierce 

Snohomish 

Spokane 

Yakima 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Bjooke 

Cabell 

Hancock 

Kanawha 

Marshall 

Ohio 

Putnam 

Wayne 

Wirt 

Wood 

WISCONSIN 

Brown 

Calumet 

Dane.. 

Douglas . _ 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Milwaukee 

Outagamie 

Ozaukee 

Racine.. 

Saint Croix 

Washington 

Waukesha 

Winnebago 



Total PoUce Employees 



Total Male Female 



' Male and female breakdown not available. 



291 



Tgble 78.— Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employeet, October 31, 1974, Rural Counties Over 25,000 in Population 



County by State 


Total Police Employees 


County by State 


Total Police Employees 


County by State 


Total Police Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


ALABAMA 

Blount 

Chambers 


9 
12 
12 
31 
17 
21 

8 
21 
22 

16 
69 
105 
24 
85 
57 
72 

27 

101 
107 
133 

72 

87 

77 
117 
109 

51 
211 

44 

55 
36 
37 

72 
30 

151 
76 
25 
75 

128 
84 

108 
41 
53 

100 

22 
20 
52 
63 
64 
32 


8 
11 
11 
28 
16 
21 

7 
19 
19 

15 
60 
71 
21 
71 
51 
68 

19 

80 

85 
101 

59 

85 

65 

95 

89 

43 
1V2 

35 

46 
30 
31 

61 
23 

125 
59 
21 
57 

101 
70 
82 
32 
41 
88 

21 
15 
49 
61 
59 
29 


1 
1 
1 
3 

1 

1 
2 
3 

1 

9 
34 

3 
14 

6 

4 

8 

21 
22 
32 
13 

12 
22 
20 

8 
39 

9 

9 
6 
6 

26 
9 

12 

1 
5 
3 
2 
5 
3 


HAWAn 


120 
116 
186 

50 

39 
44 

13 

65 
12 

9 
36 
15 
32 

9 

93 

5 

6 
17 
10 

10 
11 

27 
98 
118 
58 
97 
39 
68 
67 
90 
47 
26 

25 
13 

17 

8 

17 
9 
22 
12 


112 
108 
171 

32 

34 
38 

11 

49 
11 

30 
13 

28 
8 

91 

3 

6 
5 
15 

10 
8 

22 
86 
109 
50 
84 
34 
57 
50 
79 
43 
23 

24 
11 
16 

8 

16 
6 
18 
11 


8 
8 
15 

18 

5 
6 

2 
16 
1 

6 

2 
4 

1 

2 
1 
1 

3 
3 

5 
12 
9 
8 
13 
5 
11 
17 
11 
4 
3 

1 
2 

1 

1 
3 

4 

1 


MICHIGAN 
Berrien 


100 
52 
42 
36 
30 
28 

19 
37 
17 

8 
32 

49 

12 

6 

37 
15 

26 

9 
23 
39 
65 
21 
32 
27 
16 
39 
39 

6 
29 
17 
52 
41 
27 
27 

25 
38 
25 
25 
21 
36 
22 
21 
34 


82 
45 
34 
32 
24 
21 

17 
29 
16 

7 
26 

42 

9 

4 

33 
13 

18 

6 
20 
37 
61 
18 
27 
24 
12 
35 
35 

5 
26 
14 
49 
34 
23 
23 

24 
30 
22 
23 
20 
28 
21 
18 
28 


18 






Maul 


Midland 


8 




IDAHO 


Montcalm 


4 




Saint Joseph 


6 


Jackson 






MISSISSIPPI 






ILLINOIS 












ARIZONA 








Lee 






INDIANA 


MISSOURI 
Dunklin 














1 




Elkhart 




6 




Grant 


MONTANA 
















ARKANSAS 








NEW HAMPSHIRE 










CALIFORNIA 


KANSAS 
Riley 


3 


NEW JERSEY 






KENTUCKY 
Floyd - 






2 




NEW MEXICO 

Dona Ana - . 

McKinley 










Hardin 




San Lais Obispo 






McCracken 


2 




Pike 


8 




Pike Police Depart- 
ment 

Pulaski 

LOUISIANA 

Avoyelles 

Iberia 


NEW YORK 








COLORADO 


3 


Cattaraugus. 


3 

2 






4 






3 








5 








3 








4 








4 








4 








1 








3 




Vermilion 




3 






SulUvan 


3 




MAINE 




7 






4 






4 




NORTH CAROLINA 




Putnam 




















: 










MARYLAND 






Halifax - 


3 








Clarke 




1 




Iredell 






Frederick - 








1 


Hall 






a 


Whitfield 


Wicomico 


Pitt.... 


« 



292 



Table 78. — Number of Full-Time Law Enforcement Employees, October 31, 1974, Rural Counties Over 25,000 in Population — Con. 



County by State 



NORTH CAROUNA— 
Continued 

Robeson 

Rowan 

Stanly. 

Wayne 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Ward -- 

OHIO 

Ashtabula 

Columbiana 

Darke 

Erie 

Huron 

Knox - 

Licking 

Marion 

Muskingum -. 

Ross --_ 

Sandusky _ 

Scioto --- 

Seneca __ 

Tuscarawas 

Wayne 

OREGON 

Coos 

Douglas 

Jackson 

Josephine 

Klamath 

Linn 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Warren 

SOUTH CAROUNA 

Beaufort 

Darlington 

Florence 



> Male and female breakdown not available. 



Total Police Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


49 


46 


3 


56 


51 


5 


19 


17 


2 


30 


27 


3 


21 


17 


4 


34 


30 


4 


26 


23 


3 


18 


15 


3 


29 


25 


4 


15 


12 


3 


24 


22 


2 


36 


29 


7 


24 


19 


5 


25 


22 


3 


25 


24 


1 


23 


20 


3 


26 


20 


6 


18 


16 


2 


25 


20 


5 


32 


28 


4 


43 


32 


11 


69 


56 


13 


78 


63 


15 


54 


42 


12 


18 


17 


1 


49 


43 


6 


11 


9 


2 


39 


36 


3 


22 


21 


1 


47 


41 


6 



County by State 



SOUTH CAROLINA- 
Continned 

Horry _. 

Kershaw 

Lancaster 

Oconee 

Sumter 

Williamsburg 

York 

TENNESSEE 

Bradley 

Carter 

Gibson 

Greene _-. 

Madison ., 

Sevier 

Washington 

TEXAS 

Angelina 

Matagorda ._ 

Van Zandt 

Wharton ., 

Williamson 

VERMONT 

Chittenden 

VIRGINIA 

Accomack 

Albemarle 

Augusta.. 

Buchanan 

Fauci uier 

Franklin 

Frederick 

Halifax 

Henry 

Pittsylvania 

Rockingham 

Stafford 

Tazewell 

Wise 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



County by State 



WASHINGTON 

Cowlitz 

Grays Harbor 

ICitsap -. 

Lewis 

Okanogan 

Skagit 

Thurston 

Whatcom 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Fayette 

Harrison 

Logan 

Marion 

McDowell 

Mercer 

Monongalia 

Raleigh 

Wyoming 

WISCONSIN 

Barron 

Chippewa 

Clark 

Columbia 

Dodge 

Fond du Lac 

Grant 

Jefferson 

Manitowoc 

Marathon 

Polk 

Portage 

Rock 

Shawano 

Sheboygan.. 

Walworth 

Waupaca 

Wood 

OTHER AREA 

Canal Zone' 



Total Police Employees 



Total Male Female 



293 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1975 0-594-2S9 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 



OFFICIAL BUSINESS 
PENALTY FOR PRIVATE USE $300 



POSTAGE AND FEES PAID 

FEDERAL BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION 

JUS-432 

THIRD CLASS 




DUSrON, MA 02117 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06352 418 3