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Full text of "Uniform crime reports for the United States"

9WM 




BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 




Jnited States 
Deportment 
Df Justice 

^ / 



FBI 

Uniform 
Crime 
Reports 



Release dote 
Wednesday PM 
October 24, 1979 



Bostca Publ-, u:^ 
Si:per:ntc-dc-t of Dccuinci 

DEPOSITORY 




OTHER UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING PUBLICATIONS: 

Assaults on Federal Officers ( published annually) 

Bomb Summary ( published annually ) 

Law Enforcement Officers Killed Summary ( published annually ) 



UNIFORM 

CRIME 

REPORTS 

for the United States 



SUMMARY 



CRIME INDEX 



PRINTED ANNUALLY- 1978 



CRIMES CLEARED 



Advisory: Committee on Uniform Crime Records 
International Association of Chiefs of Police 
D. N. Cassidy, Director General 
Police and Security 
National Harbours Board 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 



PERSONS ARRESTED 



LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL 



William H. Webster 

Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation 

U.S. Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. 20535 

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing OfTice, Washington, D.C. 20402 



APPENDICES 




FOREWORD 

This year's publication. Crime in the United States— 1978, is the 49th such annual 
document issued by the FBI on behalf of the law enforcement community. The 
information contained in this book is a social statement. In many respects it represents 
one of the darker sides of human behavior in this country and should not be taken 
lightly. 

Since 1930, the FBI has been collecting crime-related statistics submitted 
voluntarily by the law enforcement agencies of this Nation. The great volume of 
information thus received is correlated periodically and published for the information 
of the American people and to provide law enforcement and other areas of the criminal 
justice community with both an insight to criminaUty throughout the United States 
and a sound basis for studies of criminal activity. 

In the late 1960s, the severity of the crime problem caught the attention of the 
American people, as well as the Congress of the United States. The result was a 
concerted effort on the part of city, county, state, and Federal agencies to improve 
their crime-fighting capabilities. Massive sums of money have been infused into the 
criminal justice system during the past decade. Statistically, it appears that these 
remarkable efforts have not had the impact on the incidence of crime envisioned 
earlier in this decade. It is a matter of record, however, that the various elements of the 
criminal justice community have made great strides by improving their efficiency and 
professionalism. Studies exist which indicate that the educational levels and the 
requisite training of police officers have dramatically improved over the years, better 
preparing those empowered to enforce the law. Other studies document the changes 
and improvement for progress within other elements of the criminal justice 
community. 

But delegation of this problem to law enforcement agencies, however professional, 
has not been enough. Unless we as citizens collectively and individually join the 
crusade against crime, the vast resources of our respective governments will apparently 
have little or no effect on this Nation's crime situation. A mere perusal of the statistics 
in this publication conceivably attests to that fact. There are many programs initiated 
at the community level by law enforcement agencies which actively solicit the support 
of the citizenry. It is now up to us to respond to this solicitation and work hand-in- 
hand with law enforcement if we are to make any inroads in this Nation's crime 
problem. 



(aj^UU^ i^CpiA^~^ 



WiUiam H. Webster 
Director 



Crime Factors 

The presence of crime in our Nation's communities is a serious concern not only of 
the law enforcement profession, but of society at large. Historically, the causes and 
origins of crime have been the subjects of investigation by many disciplines. However, 
no definitive conclusions have yet been reached. Instead, a number of factors affecting 
the volume and type of crime that occurs from place to place have been delineated. 
Some of these are as follows: 

Density and size of community population and its surrounding area. 

Variations in composition of the population, particularly age structure. 

Stability of population with respect to transient factors. 

Economic conditions, including job availability. 

Cultural conditions, such as educational, recreational, and religious 
characteristics. 

Climate. 

Effective strength of law enforcement agencies. 

Administrative and investigative emphases of law enforcement. 

Policies of other components of the criminal justice system (i.e., 
prosecutorial, judicial, correctional, and probational). 

Attitudes of citizenry toward crime. 

Crime reporting practices of citizenry. 
The Uniform Crime Reports give a nationwide view of crime based on police 
statistics contributed by state and local law enforcement agencies. Population size is 
the only correlate of crime utilized in this publication. While the other factors hsted 
above are of equal concern, no attempt is made to relate them to the data presented. 
The reader is, therefore, cautioned against comparing statistical data of individual 
communities solely on the basis of their population size. 



Contents 



Page 

Section I— Summary of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program 1-5 

Section II— Crime Index Offenses Reported 6-174 

Narrative comments: 

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 7-13 

Forcible rape 14-15 

Robbery 16-19 

Aggravated assault 20-22 

Burglar)' 23-26 

Larceny-theft 27-31 

Motor vehicle theft 32-34 

Crime Index total 35-37 

Charts: 

Crime clock, 1978 6 

Murder, monthly variation from annual average 8 

Murder, 1974-1978 8 

Murder, type of weapon used, 1978 12 

Forcible rape, monthly variation from annual average 15 

Forcible rape, 1974-1978 15 

Robbery, monthly variation from annual average 17 

Robbery, 1974-1978 17 

Robbery analysis, 1974-1978 18 

Aggravated assault, monthly variation from aimual average 21 

Aggravated assault, 1974-1978 21 

Burglary, monthly variation from annual average 24 

Burglary, 1974-1978 24 

Burglary analysis, 1974-1978 25 

Larceny-theft, monthly variation from annual average 28 

Larceny-theft, 1974-1978 28 

Larceny analysis, 1974-1978 29 

Larceny analysis, 1978 30 

Motor vehicle theft, monthly variation from aimual average 33 

Motor vehicle theft, 1974-1978 33 

Crime Index total, 1974-1978 35 

Tables: 

Murder: 

Circumstance by relationship, 1978 9 

Age, sex, and race of victims, 1978 9 

Victim/Offender relationship, sex and race, 1978: 

Single victim/single offender 10 

Single victim/multiple offender 11 

Victims— weapons used, 1978 12 

Type of weapon used, 1978 13 

Type of weapon used, 1974-1978 13 

Circumstances/motives, 1976-1978 13 



Page 

Tables — Continued 
Robbery: 

Percent distribution, region, 1978 17 

Type of weapon used, 1978 19 

Percent distribution, population group, 1978 19 

Aggravated assault, type of weapon used, 1978 21 

Larceny analysis, region, 1978 31 

Motor vehicle theft, 1978 33 

National crime, rate, and percent change 35 

Regional offense and population distribution, 1978 36 

Crime rate, 1978: 

Region 36 

Area 36 

Index of Crime: 

United States, 1978 38 

United States, 1969-1978 39 

Region, geographic division, and state, 1977-1978 40-45 

State, 1978 46-57 

Standard MetropoHtan Statistical Area, 1978 58-84 

Number of offenses known to the police, 1978: 

Cities and towns 10,000 and over in population 85-134 

Universities and colleges 135-139 

Suburban counties 140-152 

Rural counties 25,000 and over in population 153-160 

Crime trends, offenses known to the police, 1977-1978: 

Population group 161-162 

Suburban and nonsuburban cities, population group 163-164 

Suburban and nonsuburban counties, population group 165 

Offense breakdown, population group 166-167 

Crime rates, offenses known to the police, 1978: 

Population group 168-169 

Suburban and nonsuburban cities, population group 170 

Suburban and nonsuburban counties, population group 171 

Offense breakdown, population group 172-173 

Offense analysis, 1978, and percent change from 1977 174 

Type and value of property stolen and recovered, 1978 174 

Section III— Crime Index Offenses Cleared 175-183 

Narrative comments 175 

Chart: 

Crimes cleared by arrest, 1978 176 

Tables: 

Offenses known and percent cleared by arrest, 1978: 

Population group 177-178 

Geographic division 179 

Offense breakdown, population group 180-181 

Offenses cleared by arrest of persons under 18 years of age, 1978 ... 182-183 

Section IV— Persons Arrested 184-228 

Narrative comments 184-1 85 

Chart: 

Distribution by age, persons arrested and total population, 1978 185 



Page 

Tables: 

Arrests for drug abuse violations, 1978 184 

Arrests, region, 1978 185 

Total estimated arrests, United States, 1978 186 

Arrests, number and rate, population group, 1978 186-187 

Total arrest trends: 

1969-1978 188 

Sex, 1969-1978 189 

1974-1978 190 

Sex, 1974-1978 191 

1977-1978 192 

Sex, 1977-1978 193 

Total arrests, 1978: 

Distribution by age 194-195 

Of persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 years of age 196 

Distribution by sex 197 

Distribution by race 198-200 

City arrest trends, 1977-1978 201 

City arrests, 1978: 

Distribution by age 202-203 

Of persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 years of age 204 

Distribution by sex 205 

City arrest trends, sex, 1977-1978 206 

City arrests, distribution by race, 1978 207-209 

Suburban arrest trends, 1977-1978 210 

Suburban arrests, 1978: 

Distribution by age 211-212 

Of persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 years of age 213 

Distribution by sex 214 

Suburban arrest trends, sex, 1977-1978 215 

Suburban arrests, distribution by race, 1978 216-218 

Rural arrest trends, 1977-1978 219 

Rural arrests, 1978: 

Distribution by age 220-22 1 

Of persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 years of age 222 

Distribution by sex 223 

Rural arrest trends, sex, 1977-1978 224 

Rural arrests, distribution by race, 1978 225-227 

Police disposition of juvenile offenders taken into custody, 1978 228 

Section V— Law Enforcement Personnel 229-313 

Narrative comments: 

Law enforcement employees 230 

Assaults on law enforcement officers 300-301 

Law enforcement officers killed 307-311 

Charts: 

Law Enforcement Code of Ethics 229 

Police employee data, population group, 1978 231 

Law enforcement officers killed: 

1969-1978 306 

Situations, 1969-1978 308 



Page 

Charts— Continued 

Law enforcement officers killed— Continued 

Hour of day, 1969-1978 312 

Criminal history of persons identified in the killing of law 313 

enforcement officers, 1969-1978 

Tables: 

Full-time law enforcement employees, October 31, 1978: 

Employees, number and rate per 1,000 inhabitants, geographic 232 

division and population group 

Officers, number and rate per 1,000 inhabitants, geographic division 233 

and population group 

Employees, percent male and female 234 

Civilian employees, percent of total, population group 234 

State police and highway patrol 235 

Number in cities 25,000 and over in population 236-244 

Number in cities with populations under 25,000 245-281 

Number in universities and colleges 282-284 

Number in suburban counties 285-288 

Number in rural counties 289-300 

Law enforcement officers assaulted, 1978: 

Geographic division and population group 300 

Weapon used 301 

Police activity and type of weapon 302 

Type of weapon and police activity 302 

Time of day, population group 303 

Percent distribution of officer activity 304 

Percent distribution of officer assignment 304 

Percent cleared, type of activity, population group 305 

Law enforcement officers killed: 

Officers feloniously killed, 1978 307 

Circumstances and type of assignment, 1969-1978 309 

Type of weapon, 1969-1978 310 

Profile of victim officers 310 

Persons identified in the killing of law enforcement officers: 

Profile, 1969-1978 310 

Disposition, 1967-1976 311 

Section VI— Appendices 314-323 

Appendix I— Table Methodology 314-318 

Appendix II— Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting 319-320 

Appendix III— Uniform Crime Reporting Area Definitions 321-323 



SECTION I 

SUMMARY OF THE UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING 

PROGRAM 



Based on a cooperative effort by over 15,000 law 
enforcement agencies across the Nation, the Uniform 
Crime Reporting (UCR) Program provides periodic 
assessments of crime in the United States as mea- 
sured by offenses coming to the attention of the law 
enforcement community. The Program's foremost 
objective is to produce a reliable set of criminal 
statistics for use in law enforcement administration, 
operation, and management. However, data emanat- 
ing from the Program are widely utilized by other 
criminal justice professionals, legislators, and schol- 
ars who have an interest in the crime problem. 
Additionally, the statistics have historically provided 
the general public an indication of fluctuations in the 
level of crime in our society. 

Historical Bacligroiuid 

The Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the 
International Association of Chiefs of Police (lACP) 
initiated this voluntary national data collection effort 
in 1930. During that same year, the Congress of the 
United States authorized the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) to serve as the national clearing- 
house for statistical information on crime. Since that 
time, data have been obtained from law enforcement 
agencies throughout the Nation based on uniform 
classifications and procedures of reporting. 

In an effort to provide as complete a picture of 
crime in the United States as possible, the Committee 
on Uniform Crime Records of the lACP chose to 
obtain data on offenses that come to the attention of 
law enforcement agencies, since these data were 
more readily available than any other reportable 
crime information. Seven offenses, because of their 
seriousness, frequency of occurrence, and likelihood 
of being reported to police, were selected to serve as 
an Index for evaluating fluctuations in the volume of 
crime. These crimes, known as the Crime Index 
offenses, are murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, 
forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, 
larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



To provide nationwide uniformity in the reporting 
of data, standardized definitions were adopted for all 
offenses. Such standardization was necessary to 
overcome the variations in definitions of criminal 
offenses in different sections of the country. Without 
regard for local statutes, reporting agencies are 
required to submit their data in accordance with the 
UCR definitions of offenses as set forth in Appendix 
II of this publication. Because of variances in 
punishment for the same offenses in different state 
codes, there is no possibility in a program such as 
this to distinguish between felony and misdemeanor 
crimes. 

The Committee on Uniform Crime Records, 
lACP, continues to serve in an advisory capacity to 
the FBI concerning the operation of the UCR 
Program. In this connection, the lACP, through 
surveys of poUce records and crime reporting sys- 
tems, plays an active and effective part. The National 
Sheriffs' Association (NSA) in June, 1966, establish- 
ed a Committee on Uniform Crime Reporting to 
serve in an advisory role to the NSA membership 
and the national UCR Program. This Committee 
actively encourages sheriffs throughout the country 
to fully participate in the Program. 

Committees on Uniform Crime Reporting within 
state law enforcement associations are also active in 
promoting interest in the UCR Program, fostering 
widespread and more intelligent use of uniform 
crime statistics and lending assistance to contributors 
when the need exists. 

Methods of Data Collection 

Agencies contributing to the UCR Program are 
responsible for compiling and submitting their crime 
data in one of two means, either directly to the FBI 
or through their state UCR Programs. Those which 
submit directly to the FBI are provided, on an 
individual basis, continuing guidance and support 
from the national Program. 



Presently, there are 45 operational state-level UCR 
Programs and others are in various stages of develop- 
ment. These Programs are very effective in producing 
increased coverage of law enforcement agencies due 
to state mandatory reporting requirements; provid- 
ing more direct and frequent service to law enforce- 
ment agencies in assuring completeness and quality 
of information provided by them; and through 
coordination efforts, making information more readi- 
ly available for use at the state level. In addition, 
these state-level agencies have resulted in vastly more 
efficient operations at the national level. 

With the development of a state UCR Program, 
the FBI ceases collection of data directly from 
individual law enforcement agencies within the state. 
Instead, completed information from these agencies 
is forwarded to the national Program through the 
state data collection agency. 

The conditions under which these systems are 
developed ensure consistency and comparability in 
the data submitted to the national Program, as well 
as provide for regular and timely reporting of 
national crime data. These conditions are: (1) The 
state Program must conform to the national Uniform 
Crime Reports' standards, definitions, and informa- 
tion required. These requirements, of course, do not 
prohibit the state from collecting other statistical 
data beyond the national collection. (2) The state 
criminal justice agency must have a proven, effective, 
mandatory, statewide Program and have instituted 
acceptable quality control procedures. (3) Coverage 
within the state by a state agency must be, at least, 
equal to that attained by national Uniform Crime 
Reports. (4) The state agency must have adequate 
field staff assigned to conduct audits and to assist 
contributing agencies in record practices and crime 
reporting procedures. (5) The state agency must 
furnish to the FBI all of the detailed data regularly 
collected by the FBI in the form of duplicate returns, 
computer printouts, and/or magnetic tapes. (6) The 
state must have the proven capability (tested over a 
period of time) to supply all the statistical data 
required in time to meet national Uniform Crime 
Reports' publication deadlines. 

To fulfill its responsibilities in coimection with the 
UCR Program efforts, the FBI continues its internal 
procedures of editing and reviewing individual agen- 
cy reports for both completeness and quality; has 
direct contact with individual contributors within the 
state when necessary in connection with crime 
reporting matters, coordinating such contact with the 
state agency; and upon request, conducts training 
programs within the state on law enforcement rec- 



ords and crime reporting procedures. These training 
sessions are, of course, coordinated with the state 
agency. Should circumstances develop whereby the 
state agency does not comply with the aforemen- 
tioned requirements, the national Program may 
reinstitute a direct collection of Uniform Crime 
Reports from law enforcement agencies within the 
state. 

Reporting Procedures 

On a monthly basis, law enforcement agencies 
report the number of Crime Index offenses (murder 
and nonneghgent manslaughter, forcible rape, rob- 
bery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny-theft, and 
motor vehicle theft) that become known to them. A 
count of these crimes, which are also known as Part I 
offenses, is taken from records of all complaints of 
crime received by law enforcement agencies from 
victims, officers who discovered the infractions, or 
other sources. 

Whenever complaints of crime are determined 
through investigation to be unfounded or false, they 
are eliminated from the actual count. The number of 
"actual offenses known" in Part I is reported to the 
FBI whether anyone is arrested for the crime, the 
stolen property is recovered, or prosecution is under- 
taken. Additionally, each month law enforcement 
agencies report the total number of these crimes 
cleared. Crimes are "cleared" in one of two ways: (1) 
at least one person is arrested, charged, and turned 
over to the court for prosecution; or (2) by exception- 
al means when some element beyond police control 
precludes the physical arrest of an offender. The 
number of clearances which involved only the arrest 
of offenders under the age of 18; the value of 
property stolen and recovered in connection with 
Part I offenses; and detailed information pertaining 
to criminal homicide are also reported. 

Arrest data, which include the age, sex, and race of 
persons arrested, are reported monthly for both Part 
I and Part II offenses, by crime category. Part II 
offenses, while excluding traffic violations, include 
all other crimes except those classified as Part I. 

Various data on law enforcement officers assaulted 
or killed are collected on a monthly basis. Other law 
enforcement employee data, specifically the number 
of full-time sworn officers and other personnel, are 
reported as of October 31 of each calendar year. 

Editing Procedures 

Data reliability is a matter of high priority to the 
UCR Program. Each incoming report is examined 
not only for arithmetical accuracy but for deviations 
from the experiences of similar agencies or unusual 



variations in crime levels as established by the 
reporting agency's previous submissions which may 
indicate errors. 

Variations in reported crime levels and ratios may 
indicate possible incompleteness in reporting or 
changes in reporting procedures. Necessary arithmet- 
ical adjustments or noted deviations are brought to 
the attention of the submitting agency through 
correspondence. Not only are individual reports 
studied, but also, periodic trends for individual 
reporting units are prepared and evaluated. As a 
standard procedure, crime levels for each reporting 
agency are analyzed five times a year by the FBI. 
Any significant increase or decrease is made the 
subject of a special inquiry to the contributing 
agency, either directly or through its state Program. 
The communications containing these inquiries spe- 
cifically direct attention to possible changes in 
records or reporting procedures. When it is found 
that crime reporting procedures are in part responsi- 
ble for the difference in the level of crime, the figures 
for specific crime categories, or if necessary, totals 
are excluded from the trend tabulations. 

Variations from reporting standards which cannot 
be resolved may be brought to the attention of the 
Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the lACP. 
In turn, the Committee may designate a representa- 
tive to make a personal visit and cooperatively assist 
the agency in authenticating records and reporting 
methods. 

Regardless of the extent of the statistical editing 
processes used by the FBI, the accuracy of the data 
assembled under this Program depends primarily on 
the adherence of each contributor to the established 
standards of reporting. For this reason, the FBI is 
not in a position to vouch for the validity of 
individual agency reports. 

Although the final responsibihty for data submis- 
sions rests with individual law enforcement agencies, 
the UCR Program endeavors to maintain data 
validity not only through its editing practices, but 
also, by providing training seminars and instruction- 
al materials in UCR procedures. All contributing 
agencies are supplied with the Uniform Crime Report- 
ing Handbook which outlines, in detail, procedures 
for classifying and scoring offenses. The Handbook 
illustrates and discusses the reporting forms, as well 
as the tally forms which facihtate the periodic 
tabulation of statistics. 

In addition, the FBI conducts UCR seminars and 
workshops throughout the country for law enforce- 
ment personnel. National and state UCR Program 
personnel are utilized to enlist the cooperation of 



new contributors and to explain the purpose of the 
Program and methods of assembling information for 
reporting. When reporting problems exist in the 
individual agencies and remedial efforts are unsuc- 
cessful, FBI Headquarters' personnel may visit the 
contributor to aid in resolving the problem. 

Since a good records system is essential for 
accurate crime reporting, the FBI makes available 
the Manual of Police Records, which can serve as a 
guide in the establishment of a sound law enforce- 
ment records system. The Manual is currently 
undergoing extensive revision and updated copies 
should soon be available to law enforcement agen- 
cies. 

To enhance communication among Program par- 
ticipants, the UCR "Newsletter" and State UCR 
Program Bulletins are utilized to explain revisions in 
the Program, as well as present information and 
instructional material. Newsletters are produced 
periodically as needs arise. 

Reporting Area 

The presentation of crime data by reporting areas 
is one method of analyzing the statistics submitted to 
the UCR Program. Nationwide, the United States is 
divisible by regions and geographic divisions. Fur- 
ther breakdowns by city size rely on population 
figures and proximity to metropolitan areas. The 
Program follows as closely as practical the defini- 
tions for geographical entities used by the Office of 
Federal Statistical Policy and Standards, United 
States Department of Commerce. 

A Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA), 
generally, is made up of a core city or cities with a 
combined population of 50,000 or more and the 
surrounding county or counties which share certain 
metropolitan characteristics. "Other cities" are those 
outside SMSAs, most of which are incorporated. For 
crime reporting purposes, rural areas are made up of 
the unincorporated portions of counties outside 
urban places and SMSAs. As a general rule, sheriffs, 
county police, and many state police report on 
crimes committed within the limits of the counties 
but outside cities, while local police report on crimes 
committed within the city limits (urban places). 

Certain tables within this pubUcat->in present 
statistics relative to "suburban" areas. A suburban 
area consists of cities with populations less than 
50,000 together with counties which are within an 
SMSA. In this context, the major core city 's, of 
course, excluded. The concept of suburban area is 
especially important in a study of this nature because 



of the particular crime conditions which exist in these 
communities surrounding the Nation's largest cities. 

During 1978, the law enforcement agencies active 
in the UCR Program represented 99 percent of the 
United States population living in the SMSAs, 96 
percent of the population in other cities, and 94 
percent of the rural population. When considering 
the national population, as estimated by the Bureau 
of the Census, the combined coverage accounted for 
98 percent of the total. 

More detailed information concerning the geo- 
graphical entities used in this publication can be 
found in Appendix III. 

The Crime Totals 

Communities which do not submit crime reports to 
the UCR Program represent a relatively small per- 
cent of the total population. In each of the tabular 
presentations in this publication, the extent of popu- 
lation coverage represented by the data included is 
shown. The FBI conducts an ongoing effort to 
further increase the reporting areas. 

Population Data 

In computing crime rates by state, SMSA, geo- 
graphic division and region, and the Nation, popula- 
tion estimates released by the Bureau of the Census 
on July 1, 1978, were used. Population estimates for 
individual cities and counties were prepared using 
special census reports, state sources and estimates, 
commercial sources, and interpolation where no 
other estimate was available. The estimated United 
States population increase in 1978 was 1 percent over 
1977. 

Offense Estimation 

It is possible that a law enforcement agency would 
submit fewer than the solicited 12 months of offense 
reports. Tables 1 through 5 of this publication 
represent total crime in the United States; therefore, 
offense counts here are estimated for agencies which 
fail to submit complete reports for the year. Offense 
estimation occurs within each of three areas: Stand- 
ard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, other cities, and 
rural areas. It is assumed that unreported portions of 
these areas have the same proportionate crime 
experience as that for which reports were received. 
Estimates for unreported areas are based on the 
reported crime experience of similar areas within a 
state. 

Crime Trends 

A further means of studying crime throughout the 
Nation is to examine trends. Percent change tabula- 
tions presented in this publication are homogeneous 



to the extent that only figures for reporting units 
which have provided comparable data for the periods 
under consideration are included. National, geo- 
graphic, and area trends are computed for 2 consecu- 
tive years. Exclusions from trend computations are 
made when figures from a reporting unit are obvious- 
ly inaccurate for any period or when it is ascertained 
that unusual fluctuations are due to such variables as 
improved records procedures. 

The current year's reporting is the most complete 
in terms of volume. Valid 2-year trends in Uniform 
Crime Reports may be used to reasonably establish 
long-term trends. In addition, these year-to-year 
trends can be applied as the basis for reestimating the 
volume of crime and in reconstructing crime trends 
for prior years. 

The most reliable reports available for the current 
year are found in the crime rate tables by state and 
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area. Care should 
be exercised in any direct data comparisons with 
statistics in prior issues of Crime in the United States. 
Changes in the crime level may have been due in part 
to improved reporting or records procedures, redefin- 
ition of reporting areas, or other variables. 

Recent Developments 

In October, 1978, the United States Congress 
passed legislation mandating that arson be classified 
as a Part I, Crime Index offense in the UCR 
Program. To fulfill the mandate, the staff of the 
Program established liaison with members of the law 
enforcement, fire service, and insurance communities 
in order to design a collection form which would 
provide meaningful information to all concerned. 
UCR contributors have since commenced submitting 
data on all arson offenses coming to their attention. 

In accordance with standard classifications estab- 
lished by the Office of Management and Budget for 
all Federal administrative reporting and statistical 
activities, the UCR Program will modify its collec- 
tion of data concerning the age, sex, and race of 
persons arrested effective January 1, 1980. The 
material solicited concerning race will be condensed 
from the current categories to encompass only 
White, Black, American Indian or Alaskan Native, 
and Asian or Pacific Islander. In addition, a collec- 
tion of ethnic origin, i.e., Hispanic or not Hispanic, 
will be instituted. Information collected on arrests of 
persons under the age of 18 will also change slightly. 
New age breakdowns will be used to show the total 
number of arrests of persons under the age of 10 and 
those of persons aged 10 to 12. 



Compliance with the new Federal standards re- 
garding the collection of race and ethnicity data will 
also require modifications to the Supplementary 
Homicide Report (SHR). The same revised catego- 
ries used on the Age, Sex, and Race of Persons 
Arrested form will be employed on the SHR to 
gather statistics on murder victims and offenders. 

In the recent past, a number of the state UCR 
Programs have found it advantageous to modify their 
existing system of Uniform Crime Reports to a 
transactional or incident-based mode. Such a system, 
in many cases, enables the state agency to better 
meet the information needs of individual law en- 
forcement agencies by collecting data using state 
statute terminology and then converting the informa- 
tion at the state level to national UCR format. In 
many states, this approach substantially lessens the 
reporting burden on individual agencies, and at the 
same time, provides locally oriented data for com- 
parison within the state and externally with the 
Nation. Additionally, a much higher level of detail is 
captured from which state agencies are able to 
perform specific analyses upon request. While inci- 
dent-based crime reporting may not be practical for 
all states, for many it could be a very desirable goal. 
Extreme caution is needed in the development of an 
incident-based crime reporting system to ensure the 
state agency undertaking such a project is thoroughly 
cognizant of standard UCR procedures and has 
demonstrated a proficiency in handling UCR data. It 
is necessary to coordinate the transition from the 



traditional or summary system of crime reporting to 
incident-based reporting with the national Program 
in order to ensure that both state and national 
information needs are addressed. 

The fourth national State Uniform Crime Report- 
ing Conference was held on June 25 — June 28, 
1979, at the FBI Academy, Quantico, Virginia. 
Attendees included representatives from state UCR 
Programs and from law enforcement agencies devel- 
oping Programs within their states; members of the 
Committee on Uniform Crime Records of the lACP 
and the Uniform Crime Reporting Committee of the 
NSA; representatives from the Law Enforcement 
Assistance Administration and lACP Headquarters; 
and members of the fire service community. Major 
topics of discussion were the collection of arson data 
and the revised categories for the gathering of 
statistics on race and ethnicity. 

These conferences provide a forum atmosphere for 
the resolution of data collection problems which are 
national in scope. Further, the bringing together of 
those responsible for crime statistics collection within 
the states allows for an exchange of ideas. 

The 1979 conference was exceptionally important 
since the UCR Program, for the first time in 49 years, 
is faced with a change in the basic structure of the 
Crime Index. The contributions made by various 
state UCR Program representatives were of inestima- 
ble value in giving the national Program direction in 
arson data collection strategies. 



CRIME CLOCK 

1978 




one 
VIOLENT CRIME < 
every 30 seconds 



one 
CRIME INDEX OFFENSE < 
every 3 seconds 



one 
PROPERTY CRIME < 
^ every 3 seconds 



one 

MURDER 

every 27 minutes 

one 
FORCIBLE RAPE 
every 8 minutes 

one 

ROBBERY 

every 76 seconds 

one 

AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

every 57 seconds 

one 

BURGLARY 

every 10 seconds 

one 
LARCENY-THEFT 
every 5 seconds 

one 

MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

every 32 seconds 



The crime clock should be vl 


ewed with ca 


re. Being the mos 


aggregate representation of 


UCRdata. It 


s designed 


convey ihe annual reporlcd cri 


ic experienc 


c byshowingthe rt 


lative frequency of occurre 


ccofthclnde 


Otfcnscs 


This mode of display should nol be taken lo 


,mply a regularity 


in the commission of the Pa 


rt 1 Oftenses; 


diher. It 




ime to rixed 


time intervals. 









SECTION II 
CRIME INDEX OFFENSES REPORTED 



MURDER AND NONNEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER 



DEFINITION. 



Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, as defined in the Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program, is the willful (nonnegligent) killing of one human being 
by another. 

The classification of this offense, as in all other Crime Index offenses, is 
based solely on police investigation as opposed to the determination of a 
court, medical examiner, coroner, jury, or other judicial body. Not included 
in the count for this offense classification are deaths caused by negligence, 
suicide, or accident; justifiable homicides, which are the killings of felons by 
law enforcement officers in the line of duty or by private citizens; and 
attempts to murder or assaults to murder, which are scored as aggravated 
assaults. 



I 





TRFNn 








Rate per 100,000 


Year 


Number of offenses 


inhabitants 


1977 


19,121 


8.8 


J978 


19,555 


9.0 


Percent change .... 


+ 2.3 


+ 2.3 



Volume 

In the United States during 1978, there were an 
estimated 19,555 murders which represented approxi- 
mately 2 percent of the total violent crimes. 

A geographic breakdown of murder by region 
revealed that 42 percent of the murders occurred in 
the Southern States, which account for the largest 
regional population; 21 percent in the North Central 
States; 20 percent in the Western States; and 17 
percent in the Northeastern States. 

In 1978, December had a higher frequency of 
murder offenses than any other month of the year. 









' 


,{MtmBHBY¥mn 








jV^U«,F^^An^,MA.„^ 




/ 






/ 






-^ ^-^ '^ — 




J 


J 




NOV. 





EC. 



Trend 

Nationally, the number of murders increased 2 
percent from 1977 to 1978. 

Regionally, the number of murder offenses in 1978 
rose 5 percent in the Western States and 4 percent in 
the Southern States. The North Central States 
reported a 1 -percent decrease, while the Northeast- 
ern States showed virtually no change. 

Large core cities of 250,000 or more inhabitants 
and suburban areas experienced increases in the 
number of murders in 1978, 2 and 4 percent, 
respectively. In the rural areas the volume of murders 
was down 3 percent. 

The following chart reveals a decline of 6 percent 
from 1974 to 1978 in the murder counts. 




Rate 

In 1978, there was an average of 9 murder victims 
for every 100,000 inhabitants in the Nation. 

The number of murder victims in relation to 
population was highest in the Southern States with 12 



murders per 100,000 inhabitants, a 3-percent ra 
increase over the previous year. The Western State 
rate was 10 per 100,000, a 2-percent rise over tl 
1977 rate. Both the North Central and Northeastei 
States experienced rates of 7 per 100,000 populatioi 
however, the North Central Region's rate represen 
ed a 1 -percent decrease, while the Northeast's rai 
showed no change from the previous year. 

Collectively, the SMSAs reported a murder rate c 
10 victims per 100,000 inhabitants; the rural areas, 
rate of 8 per 100,000 inhabitants; and cities outsid 
metropolitan areas (Other Cities) reported a murde 
rate of 5 per 100,000 inhabitants. 

Nature 

To allow for a more detailed analysis of murdei 
the Uniform Crime Reporting Program collect 
supplemental information on this offense. Data an 
collected monthly on the age, sex, and race o 
murder victims and offenders; the types of weapon; 
used in murders; the circumstances surrounding th( 
offenses; and the relationships between victims anc 
offenders. 

As has consistently been the experience in recen 
years, murder victims were male in approximately : 
of every 4 instances in 1978. On the average, 54 ol 
each 100 victims were white, 44 were Negro, and 2 
were other races. 

During 1978, 15,856 offenders were identified in 
connection with the murders of 14,279 victims. Most 
of the victims (13,329) were slain in single victim 
situations. Of these, 11,916 were killed by single 
offenders and 1,413 were murdered by multiple 
offenders. Concerning homicides involving multiple 
victims, 749 persons were killed by 322 offenders in 
incidents involving one assailant and multiple vic- 
tims and 201 victims were slain by 215 offenders in 
multiple victim/multiple offender situations. 

In 1978, firearms again predominated as the 
weapons most often used in the commission of 
murders throughout the Nation. The accompanying 
chart illustrates a breakdown by type of weapon used 
in murder offenses in the United States. In the 
Southern States, firearms were used in 70 percent of 
the murders; in the North Central States, 67 percent; 
in the Western States, 57 percent; and in the 
Northeastern States. 52 percent. Nationwide, 64 
percent of the murders were committed through the 
use of firearms. Handguns were the weapons used in 
49 percent of the total murders. 

Cutting or stabbing instruments were used in 19 
percent of the murders. The Northeastern States, 
where 1 of every 4 murders was committed with a 



by Relationship, 1978 



ercent distribution) 




















Total 


Felony 
type 


Suspected 
felony type 


Romantic 
tnangle 


Argument 
over money 
or property 


Other 
arguments 


Miscellaneous 

non-felony 

type 


Unable to 
determine 


Total' 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 




4.3 
5.6 
.6 
1.0 
1.0 
1.6 
.9 
.2 
3.4 
26.3 
3.7 
1.3 
1.7 
1.7 
2.9 
13.5 
30.1 


.2 


.3 
1.2 
.2 
.4 


4.2 
3.4 


2.7 
4.7 

.5 


9.4 
9.1 

.7 
1.7 

.3 
1.1 
1.6 

.3 
5.5 
33.8 
5.0 
2.8 
3.2 
2.4 
2.4 
8.8 
11.9 


3.2 
8.3 
1.2 
1.4 
3.4 
4.8 
1.0 

.2 
4.5 
30.7 
4.1 

.9 
1.5 
1.6 
6.2 
13.3 
13.6 




ift 








°' 

* " 


.2 
.2 


.2 
.2 










.7 

.3 
4.6 

.5 
.5 
.2 
.7 
4.5 
85.6 


.8 
2.0 

.2 
3.9 
50.3 
12.0 

.8 

.3 
3.8 
3.5 
7.3 
7.3 




'" 


.4 




™ " 


.1 

1.0 
18.5 
1.5 

.4 
1.6 
1.4 
35.0 
39.6 






1.1 
52.9 
7.5 
2.5 
4.6 
2.3 
6.3 
8.0 
6.3 












f rf 
















'^ 




nknown relationship 





■Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



Lge, Sex, and Race of Murder Victims, 


1978 


















Number 


Percent 


Sex 


Race 


Age 


Male 


Female 


White 


Negro 


Indian 


Chinese 


Japanese 


All Others 


Total 


18,714 




14,263 
76.2 


4,451 
23.8 


10,111 
54.0 


8.201 
43.8 


118 
.6 


59 

.3 


21 

.1 


204 


Percent 


100.0' 


1.1 




207 

339 

158 

247 

1,619 

3,093 

3,025 

2.188 

1,707 

1,378 

1,091 

1,000 

761 

555 

412 

272 

411 

251 


1.1 

.8 
1.3 
8.7 
16.5 
16.2 
11.7 
9.1 
7.4 
5.8 
5.3 
4.1 
3.0 
2.2 
1.5 
2.2 
1.3 


195 

87 

125 

1,181 

2,385 

2,411 

1,741 

1,371 

1,079 

876 

796 

611 

424 

302 

177 

194 

194 


93 
144 

71 
122 
438 
708 
614 
447 
336 
299 
215 
204 
150 
131 
110 

95 
217 

57 


119 

178 
92 
158 
928 
1,555 
1,479 
1,058 
880 
739 
639 
587 
451 
359 
267 
189 
300 
133 


85 

152 

62 

83 

659 

1,475 

1,486 

1.079 

790 

615 

436 

401 

304 

186 

141 

80 

98 

69 


2 








nfant (under 1) . 




' 




























15 

23 
17 
20 
12 
10 
2 
4 
2 
4 


5 
2 
1 

2 






' 






5 to 29 












10 to 44 










"* 






SO to 64 










3 
2 




















75 and over 

Unknown 


1 


43 



'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



I g; 2 2 i £ 2 ■- •" ^ g S ' 



21 



I III 



; g ^ a R «> -° -^ 5; ! 



ooo<*ioo^»N(N irir4 — 



: S '^ ^ •^ ^ '^ S S 8 g B I I 





1 




'"i^NMrMp 




J 




^1 "-" "'" = 




A \ 




5 




J ^ 


1 


g| 


J 






J 








1 S^" M~ U M' ;' - 




^1 p.'3-^r| = ". ^ 




D ■••■••■■ 


d 


1 MM 




« |5|ss-^— ia-R 1 


b 


3| |£^BS-^— :s«s 1 

■1 " ^ . " 




if i 


§? 


^ 155'-'°°'" |-'- i 


1 

i 


1 

> 

1 


ll 


Unknown 

Race/Sex: 

White male 

White female 

Negro male 

Negro female 
Indian male 
Indian female 
Chinese male 
Chinese female 
Japanese male 
Japanese female 
Other mal« 
Other female 
Unknown 

Total OPTenders 



MURDER 

TYPE OF WEAPON USED 

1978 



HANDGUN 

RIFLE 

SHOTGUN 



CUTTING OR STABBING 
OTHER WEAPON 

(CLUB, POISON, etc) 

PERSONAL WEAPON 

(HANDS, FISTS, FEET,etc ) 












i6% 








8% 








1 


19% 






112% 








6% 









Because of rounding, percentages will not add to 100%. 



Murder Victims- 


Weapons 


Used, 1978 






















Number 






Weapons 


Age 


Gun 


CutUng or 
stabbing 


Blunt ob- 
ject (club, 
hammer, 
etc.) 


Personal 
weapons 
(hands, 
fists, feet, 
etc.) 


Poison 


Explosives 


Arson 


Narcotics 


Strangu- 
lation 


Asphyxia- 
tion 


Other 
weapon oi 

weapon 
not stated 




18,714 


11,910 


3.526 


896 


1,070 


10 


6 


255 


18 


352 


92 






57S 


Infant (under 1) ... 


207 
339 
158 
247 
1,619 
3.093 
3,025 
2,188 
1,707 
1,378 
1,091 
1,000 
761 
555 
412 
272 
411 
251 


8 

30 

57 

112 

1,047 

2,098 

2.161 

1,552 

1,223 

945 

718 

605 

438 

313 

217 

117 

120 

149 


6 
19 
18 
43 
345 
659 
575 
390 
297 
239 
210 
208 
151 
102 
84 
67 
78 
35 


6 
30 
14 
19 
49 
84 
93 
73 
65 
67 
58 
66 
67 
54 
47 
23 
66 
15 


105 
159 

27 
23 
52 

76 
71 
59 
60 
57 
56 
48 
45 
32 
31 
81 
7 






3 
33 
11 

24 
28 
19 
18 
16 
24 

4 
13 

7 
10 

8 

6 
15 

5 




4 
9 
11 
21 
45 
59 

29 
13 
13 
14 
24 
14 

9 

8 

8 
23 

4 








f 








5 to 9 










13 








15 to 19 


1 




5 
4 

2 
2 




20 to 24 


I 




25 to 29 


69 


30 to 34 


2 

2 




46 




2 




27 










1 


1 




50 to 54 


23 


55 to 59 


1 




1 




60 to 64 




21 








1 


70 to 74 






17 
15 
36 


Unknown 


1 2 


2 



knife or cutting instrument, reported the most wide- 
spread use of such weapons. In 1 of every 5 murders 
in the Western States these types of weapons were 
employed, while the North Central and Southern 
States had the least incidence of use of such weapons, 
1 of every 6 murders. Nationwide, other weapons 
such as blunt objects, poisons, explosives, etc., were 
used in 12 percent of the murders. In the remaining 6 
percent, personal weapons such as hands, fists, and 
feet were used. 

Murder, Type of Weapon Used, 1978 

[Percent distribution] 



Region 


Total 

all 

weapons 

used' 


Fire- 


Knife 
or other 
cutung 
instru- 


Other 

weapon; 

club, 

poison, 

etc. 


Personal 
weapons 


Northeastern States ... 
North Central States . 

Southern States 

Western States 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


51.7 
67.2 
69.5 

57.2 


25.2 
16.0 

15.7 
22.2 


13.7 
11.3 
10.3 
14.5 


9.4 
5.5 
4.5 
6.1 


Total 


100.0 


63.6 


18.8 


11.8 


5.7 



'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 

A comparative study for the past 5 years showed a 
decrease from 68 percent of all murders through use 
of firearms in 1974 to 64 percent of all murders in 
1978. An analysis of weapons used to commit murder 
for 1974 through 1978 is shown in tabular form. 

Murder, Type of Weapon Used, 1974-1978 

[Percent distribution] 





Total 


Fire- 


Knife or 
other 
cutting 
instru- 


Other 

weapon: 

club, 

poison. 




Year 


Number 


Percent- 


Personal 
weapons 


1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 


20,710 
20,510 
18,780 
19,120 
18,710 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
1 00.0 
100.0 


67.9 
65.8 
63.8 
62.5 
63.6 


17.6 
17.7 
17.8 
19.1 
18.8 


6.8 
7.5 
12.2 
12.9 
11.8 


7.7 
9.0 
6J 
5.5 
5.7 



'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 

The activities resulting in murder varied from 
arguments to felonies. That murder is largely a 
societal problem beyond the control of law enforce- 
ment is emphasized by the relationship of the murder 
victim to the offender. 

Fifty-six percent of the murder victims in 1978 
were acquainted with their assailants and 1 of every 5 
victims was related to the offender. Nearly half of the 
murders resulted from arguments, while 17 percent 



occurred as a result of felonious activity and 6 
percent were suspected to be the result of some 
felonious act. 

The accompanying table shows murder circum- 
stances/motives for the past 3 years. 



FEIX)NY TOTAL 

Robbery 

Narcotics* 

Sex OfTenses 

Other Felony 

SUSPECTED FELONY 

ARGUMENT TOTAL 

Romantic Triangle 

Influence of Alcohol or Narcotics* 

Property or Money 

Other Arguments 

OTHER MOTIVES OR 
CIRCUMSTANCES 

UNKNOWN MOTIVES 



■Because of rounding, details may not add to totals. 

'Murders committed during argiunents while under influence of narcotics 
not counted in felony murders. 



Clearances 

The clearance rate for murder in 1978 was higher 
than for any other Crime Index offense. Law 
enforcement agencies were successful in clearing 76 
percent of the murders during the year, as compared 
to 75 percent in 1977. Only persons under 18 years of 
age accounted for 5 percent of the willful killings 
cleared by police in 1978. 

Nationally, the clearance rate for murder between 
the years 1974 and 1978 decUned from 80 percent to 
76 percent. 

Persons Arrested 

In 1978, 43 percent of all persons arrested for 
murder were under age 25 and 9 percent were under 
18. Arrests of youthful offenders under 18 years of 
age for murder decreased 18 percent during the 
period 1974-1978, and adult arrests for that offense 
fell 13 percent in the same period. The 18- to 22-year 
age group, accounting for 25 percent of the total 
arrests for murder, showed the heaviest involvement 
in this offense. Negroes made up 49 percent of the 
total arrests for murder in 1978, whites comprised 47 
percent, and the remaining 4 percent were of other 
races. 



FORCIBLE RAPE 
— DEFINITION 



Forcible rape, as defined in the Program, is the carnal knowledge of a 
female forcibly and against her will. Assaults or attempts to commit forcible 
rape by force or threat of force are also included; however, statutory rape 
(without force) and other sex offenses are not included in this category. 



.TREND. 



Year Number of offenses 

1977 63,022 

1978 67,131 

Percent change +6.5 



Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

29.1 

30.8 

+ 5.8 



^olume 

During 1978, there was an estimated total of 
7,131 forcible rapes. Forcible rape continued, as in 
irior years, to comprise less than 1 percent of the 
'rime Index total and accounted for 6 percent of the 
olume of violent crimes. When viewed geographi- 
ally, the Southern States, the region with the highest 
lopulation, recorded 34 percent of the total volume; 
he Western States reported 27 percent; the North 
Central States, 22 percent; and the Northeastern 
tates, 17 percent. 

The accompanying chart indicates that more rapes 
ccur in the summer months of the year. 




APR. MAY lUNE JULY 



The number of forcible rape offenses in 1978 was 
ip nearly 7 percent over 1977 and 21 percent over 
974. During 1978, 40 percent of the forcible rapes 
iccurred in cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants; a 
i-percent increase in volume over the previous year 
/as seen in this group. In the suburban areas forcible 
ape offenses rose 5 percent, and the rural areas 
egistered a 2-percent increase over 1977. Geographi- 
;ally, all regions indicated upswings in the volume of 
brcible rape offenses. In the South they increased 10 
)ercent; in the West, 8 percent; in the North Central, 
\ percent; and in the Northeast, 1 percent. 



FORCIBLE RAPE 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 21% 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 18% 






























^-r 


rr::^^^^"" 






.<<^ 













Rate 

For Uniform Crime Reporting purposes the vic- 
tims of forcible rape are always female. In 1978, an 
estimated 60 out of every 100,000 females in this 
country were reported rape victims, a 5-percent rate 
increase over 1977. Since 1974, the forcible rape rate 
has risen 18 percent. 

The SMSAs experienced a rate of 72 victims per 
100,000 females. Cities outside metropolitan areas 
(Other Cities) experienced a rate of 31 per 100,000 
females, and the rural areas followed closely with 27 
per 100,000 females. Geographically, the Western 
States reported females were rape victims at the rate 
of 89 per 100,000. In the South this rate was 63 per 
100,000; in the North Central States, 50 per 100,000; 
and in the Northeast, 45 per 100,000. 

Nature 

Of all reported offenses in this category during 
1978, 75 percent were rapes by force. Attempts or 
assaults to commit forcible rape comprised the 
remainder. Forcible rape, a violent crime against the 
person, has been recognized by law enforcement as 
one of the most underreported of all Index crimes, 
primarily because of victims' fear of their assailants 
and their embarrassment over the incident. 

Clearances 

Fifty percent of the total forcible rapes reported to 
law enforcement in 1978 were cleared by arrest or 
exceptional means. The rural areas indicated a 64- 
percent clearance rate, while large cities with popula- 
tions of 250,000 or more and the suburban areas 
reported clearances in 50 and 49 percent of the 
forcible rapes, respectively. Of the total clearances 
for forcible rape, 9 percent involved solely persons 
under the age of 18. 

Persons Arrested 

Total 1978 arrests for forcible rape increased 2 
percent from 1977 figures and 8 percent from those 
for 1974. Arrests of persons under 18 years of age for 
this offense decreased 10 percent from 1974. During 
the year, 54 percent of the forcible rape arrests were 
of males under the age of 25, and 28 percent of the 
arrestees were in the 18- to 22-year age group. Forty- 
eight percent of the persons arrested for forcible rape 
in 1978 were white, 48 percent Negro, and all other 
races comprised the remainder. 



15 



ROBBERY 
• DEFINITION. 



Robbery is the taking or attempting to take anything of value from the 
care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or 
violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. 





TRFNfr* 




Year 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 


Number of offenses 
404,847 
417,038 
+ 3.0 


Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

187.1 

191.3 

+ 2.2 



«^oluine 

In 1978, the estimated robbery total was 417,038 
or the United States, amounting to 4 percent of the 
otal Crime Index and 39 percent of the crimes of 
iolence. During the year, robberies occurred most 
requently during the month of December. 

The Northeastern States experienced the highest 
iroportion of robberies, 31 percent of the total. The 
louthern States followed with 25 percent; the North 
:^entral States reported 21 percent; and the Western 
itates accounted for the remainder. 




>end 

The 1978 robbery volume increased 3 percent from 
he previous year and decreased 6 percent from the 
974 experience. 

Suburban areas reported a 5-percent rise in rob- 
lery offenses in 1978 when compared with the 1977 
olume. Increases were also recorded by the rural 
reas and cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants, 2 
nd 1 percent, respectively. 

Geographically, the Western and Southern States 
ach experienced a 9-percent upswing in robbery 
rom 1977 to 1978. The Northeastern States had a 1- 
lercent rise, while in the North Central States a 6- 
lercent decrease was recorded. 

The accompanying chart depicts the trend in the 
olume of robbery, as well as the robbery rate for the 
ears 1974^1978. 



ROBBERY 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES DOWN 6% 

RATE PER ItW.OOO INHABITANTS DOWN 9% 




30 






t40 






+ 30 






110 






*" , - 






I """"^l 





late 

The 1978 rate of 191 robberies per 100,000 
nhabitants was 2 percent above the 1977 rate, 
lobbery is primarily a large-city crime with 7 out of 



10 occurring in those cities with populations of 
100,000 or more. The robbery rate for these cities was 
498 per 100,000 people in 1978. 

There were 249 robberies per 100,000 inhabitants 
in the SMSAs during 1978. The cities outside 
metropolitan areas (Other Cities) experienced a rate 
of 50 robbery offenses per 100,000 population, and in 
the rural areas, the robbery rate was 21 per 100,000 
inhabitants. 

Regionally, robbery occurred most frequently in 
the Northeastern States where the rate was 265 per 
100,000 inhabitants. The rate per 100,000 inhabitants 
for the Western States was 228; for the North Central 
States, 152; and for the Southern States, 151. 

Nature 

During 1978, the average value loss per robbery 
was $434, for a total reported loss of $181 million. 
The impact of this violent crime on the victim cannot 
be measured in terms of monetary loss alone. While 
the object of a robbery is money or property, many 
victims of tliis crime suffer serious personal injury. 

Nationally, nearly half of the reported robberies 
committed in 1978 were perpetrated on the streets or 
highways. During the year, 4,676 bank robberies 
were reported, with an average loss of $2,866. 

From 1974 to 1978, bank robberies increased 43 
percent; gas or service station holdups rose 52 
percent; convenience store robberies fell 5 percent; 
and holdups of other coimnercial or business estab- 
lishments were down 20 percent. For the 5-year 
period, residential robberies were down 3 percent, 
while street robberies declined 4 percent. 

In 1978, 41 percent of all reported robberies were 
committed through use of firearms; 37 percent by 
strong-arm tactics (hands, fists, feet, etc.); 13 percent 
by use of knives or cutting instruments; and 9 
percent through the use of other weapons. 

Robbery, Percent Distribution, 1978 

[By region) 





Total 


North- 
eastern 
States 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 


Total' 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


Highway 

Commercial house .... 
Gas or service station 

Convenience store 

Residence 

Bank 

Miscellaneous 


47.1 

14.4 
5.6 
7.0 

11.3 
1.2 

13.4 


58.4 
12.6 
3.4 
2.1 
13.8 
1.0 
8.7 


42.7 

11.3 
7.2 
5.3 

10.9 
.6 

21.9 


43.7 

14.8 
6.1 

12.9 
9.4 
1.1 

12.1 


38.8 
19.8 
6.9 

8.5 
10.3 

2.2 
13.5 



^Because of rounding, percentages may not add to totals. 



STREET ROBBERY 

1974-1978 

DOWN 4% 



200% I 

ROBBERY OF 
+ 150% COMMERCIAL HOUSE 

1974-1978 

DOWN 20% 
+ 100% """" *•"'" 

+ 50%, 

I 

': -^:i— ^ 

— 9RO/ ' ^ — ■- i 

a ^3 /o.oii <aic ..-., rrn 



ROBBERY OF 
GAS STATION 

1974-1978 

UP 52% 



+ 200% 

+ 150% 

+ 100% 

+ 50% 



,-25%, 



ROBBERY OF 
CONVENIENCE STORE 

1974-1978 

DOWN 5% 



ROBBERY OF RESIDENCE 

1974-1978 

DOWN 3% 



+ 200% 

+ 150% 

+ 100% 

+ 50% 



,- 25%, 



BANK ROBBERY 

1974 1978 

UP 43% 



Robbery, Type of Weapon Used, 1978 

Percent distnbulionj 





Total 

all 

weapons' 


Armed 




Region 


Fire- 


Kmfe or 
other 
cutting 

ment 


Other 
weapon 


Strong- 
armed 


^lortheaslem States . 
Morlh Central Stales 

outhern States 

Vestern Stales 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


29.9 
46.5 
47.7 
43.1 


17.7 
8.3 
9.9 

12.9 


12.1 
9.4 
6.6 

7.1 


40.3 
35.9 
35.8 
36.9 


Total 


100.0 


40.8 


12.7 


9.0 


37.5 



■Because of rounding, percentages may not add to totals. 

Clearances 

In 1978, law enforcement agencies were successful 
n clearing 26 percent of the robbery offenses 
■eported. Eighty-four percent of the total robberies 
;leared involved adults. Only persons under 18 years 
)f age were involved in 24 percent of strong-arm 
■obberies cleared; 15 percent of robberies cleared in 



which knives or other cutting instruments were used; 
10 percent in which firearms were employed; and 14 
percent of those involving other dangerous weapons. 

Persons Arrested 

Nationally, arrests for robbery rose 1 percent in 
1978 when compared to 1977. Arrests in cities 
increased 2 percent, while they decreased 5 percent 
in the rural areas and 1 percent in the suburban 
areas. 

Data on arrests disclosed that 75 percent of the 
persons arrested for robbery were under 25 years of 
age and 56 percent were under 21. Of all persons 
arrested for robbery in 1978, 34 percent were under 
the age of 18, a 1-percent decrease from 1977. 

An average of 7 out of every 100 persons arrested 
for robbery during 1978 were female. Arrests of 
women for this offense declined 4 percent when 
compared to 1977. 

From the standpoint of race, 59 percent of those 
arrested were Negro, 38 percent were white, and 3 
percent were other races. 



ilobbery. Percent Distribution, 1978 



By population group] 





Group 1 (56 
cities 250,000 
and over; 
population 
41,533,000) 


Group II (113 
cities 100.000 to 
249,999; popula- 
tion 16,168,000) 


Group III (275 
cities 50.000 to 
99,999; popula- 
tion 18,810,000) 


Group IV (633 
ciUes 25,000 to 
49,999; popula- 
tion 21,481,000) 


Group V (1,519 
aues 10,000 to 
24,999; popula- 
tion 23,479,000) 


Group VI (5,843 

cities under 
10.000; popula- 
tion 20,978,000) 


Other areas 

(3,371 agencies; 

population 

59,027,000) 




52.9 

12.9 
3.4 
4.2 

12.0 
.9 

13.6 


46.6 
15.9 
6.8 
9.6 
10.4 
1.2 
9.5 


43.9 
16.9 
7.6 
9.6 
9.4 
1.3 
11.3 


38.2 
16.3 

11.9 

1.6 
I3.I 


31.2 
16.5 
11.8 
13.7 
9.6 
1.7 
15.6 


26.3 
15.9 
12.6 
13.7 
10.9 
1.9 
18.8 


31.1 


I^mmercial house 


17.6 


3as or service station 


9.8 
12.0 


J H 


11.3 


Jank 


2.0 


Miscellaneous 


16.3 







AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 
DEFINITION 



Aggravated assault is an unlawful attack by one person upon another for 
the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of 
assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to 
produce death or great bodily harm. Attempts are included since it is not 
necessary that an injury result when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used 
which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the crime 
were successfully completed. 





TRFMn 








Rate per 100,000 


Year 


Number of offenses 


inhabitants 


1977 


522,509 


241.5 


1978 


558,102 


255.9 


Percent change 


+ 6.8 


+ 6.0 



20 



During calendar year 1978, there were an estimat- 
d 558,102 aggravated assaults in the Nation. This 
rime against the person made up 5 percent of the 
jtal Crime Index in 1978 and comprised 53 percent 
f the crimes of violence. Regionally, the Southern 
tates, accounting for the largest proportion of the 
Jnited States population, reported 36 percent of the 
)tal count of these crimes. The Western States 
jUowed with 23 percent; the Northeastern States 
rith 21 percent; and the North Central States with 
percent. As has been the experience in previous 
ears, the highest frequency of aggravated assaults 
uring 1978 occurred in the summer months. 



■ 










ABGIUmm ASSAULT BY mHTH 






VankMw r-»m A,mml A.mn^ 


a 


^ ^""^^ -^ 


. 




—^•^^ " 




^'"^ 




-' 


M 


M. FEB. MM. APIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT. 


MOV. D 


EC. 



Since 1974, the volume of aggravated assaults 
icreased 22 percent, and a 7-percent rise occurred 
rem 1977 to 1978. Rural areas and cities with 
50,000 or more population each were up 5 percent 
ver the previous year, and suburban areas reported 
6-percent increase during the same period. 

A rise was also seen in the volume of aggravated 
ssaults in each geographic region. The North 
-cntral States had an upswing of 9 percent; the 
Vestem States rose 7 percent; and the Southern and 
Northeastern States each showed increases of 6 
ercent. 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

— NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 22% 

RATE PER 100,000 INHABITANTS UP 19% 
























^___^ 






-I— «« 


t-=::?^^^^^^^^ 




U — 




1 







tate 

During 1978, there were 256 victims of aggravated 
.ssault per 100,000 United States' inhabitants. In 
IMSAs the aggravated assault rate was 288 per 
00,000 inhabitants; in cities outside metropolitan 



areas (Other Cities) it was 214 per 100,000 inhabi- 
tants; and in rural areas it was 132 per 100,000 
inhabitants. Nationwide, the rate for aggravated 
assault increased 6 percent over 1977 and 19 percent 
over 1974. 

Of the four geographic regions, the Western States 
had the highest rate, 325 per 100,000, followed by the 
Southern States with 284; the Northeastern States 
with 233; and the North Central States with 193. 

Nature 

In 1978, 22 percent of the serious assaults were 
committed with the use of firearms; knives or other 
cutting instruments were used in 23 percent; 28 
percent were committed with blunt objects or other 
dangerous weapons; and the remaining 27 percent 
were committed with personal weapons such as 
hands, fists, and feet. A comparison of aggravated 
assault from 1974 to 1978 revealed that the use of 
firearms as weapons increased 7 percent; assaults 
with knives or other cutting instruments rose 16 
percent; assaults where blunt objects or other dan- 
gerous weapons were used increased 48 percent; and 
those aggravated assaults committed through the use 
of personal weapons climbed 19 percent. The accom- 
panying table exhibits the regional experience of 
aggravated assault in 1978 by type of weapon used. 

Aggravated Assault, Type of Weapon Used, 1978 

[Percent distribution] 



Region 


Total" 

aU 

weapons 


Fire- 


Knife or 
other 
cutting 
instru- 
ments 


Other 

weapons; 

club, 

poison. 


Personal 
weapons 


Northeastern States ... 
North Central States . 

Southern States 

Western States 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


2i.i 
26.9 
21.8 


24.8 
23.6 
24.3 
18.8 


29.8 
30.3 

25.8 
28.7 


31.3 
22.8 
23.0 
30.6 


Total 


100.0 


22.4 


22.6 


28.3 


26.6 



"Because of rounding, percentages may not add to totals. 

Clearances 

Collectively, law enforcement agencies cleared an 
average of 62 per 100 cases of aggravated assault in 
1978. This relatively high clearance rate was consis- 
tent with high rates for other crimes against the 
person. Persons under 18 years of age, exclusively, 
were identified in 10 percent of the aggravated 
assault clearances. 
Persons Arrested 

Arrests for aggravated assault, during the period 
1974-1978, were up 8 percent. Since 1974, arrests of 
persons 18 years of age and over for aggravated 



21 



assault have risen 9 percent, and arrests of persons ed for 31 percent. Arrests of males for this offe; 

under 1 8 years of age for this offense have increased outnumbered females by a 7 to 1 ratio. 

2 percent. Whites made up 58 percent of the arrests 

As a group, persons 21 years of age and over aggravated assault, Negroes 39 percent, and all ot 

accounted for 69 percent of the 1978 arrests for ^^^^^ accounted for the remainder, 
aggravated assault, and those under age 21 account- 



BURGLARY 
DEFINITION. 



The Uniform Crime Reporting Program defines burglary as the unlawful 
entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft. The use of force to gain entry 
is not required to classify an offense as burglary. Burglary in this Program is 
categorized into three subclassifications: forcible entry, unlawful entry where 
no force is used, and attempted forcible entry. 





TREND 


Rale per 100,000 


Year 


Number of offenses 


inhabitants 


1977 


3,052,189 


1,410.9 


7975 


3,104,496 


1,423.7 


Percent change 


+ 1.7 


+ .9 



23 



Volume 

An estimated total of 3,104,496 burglaries oc- 
curred in the United States during 1978. For the 
year, large cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants 
accounted for 29 percent of the total burglary figure. 

Burglary made up 28 percent of the total Crime 
Index offenses and was found to comprise 31 percent 
of the property crimes. Geographically, the Southern 
States, the most populous region, experienced 31 
percent of all reported burglaries; the Western States, 
25 percent; and the Northeastern and North Central 
States, 22 percent each. 

Viewed monthly, the highest volume of burglaries 
was recorded in August of 1978. 




Trend 

The 5-year trend, 1974-1978, indicated burglary 
offenses rose 2 percent. Nationally in 1978, the 
burglary volume increased 2 percent over 1977. For 
the year, cities 250,000 and over in population and 
the rural areas each reported decreases of I percent 
while the suburban areas recorded a 2-percent rise 
Regionally, the Southern States registered a 4-per 
cent upswing, the Western States a 3-percent in 
crease, and the North Central States a 1 -percent rise 
Only the Northeastern States recorded a decrease, 2 
percent. 



BURGLARY 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 2% 

RATE PER 100.000 INHABITANTS DOWN 1% 


































1..^ 


~ 















Rate 

In 1978, the burglary rate increased 1 percent over 
1977 to 1,424 burglaries per 100,000 inhabitants. 
During the period 1974-1978, the rate fell 1 percent. 
For 1978, the SMSAs reported a rate of 1,627 
burglaries per 100,000 people. Cities outside metro- 



politan areas (Other Cities) had a rate of 1,032 fc 
every 100,000 in population, and the rural arej 
recorded a lower rate of 746 per 100,000 inhabitant 

The Western States recorded the highest 19'7 
burglary rate with 1,958 offenses per 100,000 inhab 
tants. Following were the Northeastern States with 
rate of 1,381; the Southern States with 1,370; and tfc 
North Central States with 1,157. 
Nature 

Seventy-three percent of the burglaries in 197 
involved forcible entry, 19 percent were unlawfi 
entries (without force), and 8 percent were forcib); 
entry attempts. 

Residential offenses accounted for 65 percent < 
the total burglaries in 1978; nonresidential burglari<( 
made up the remaining 35 percent. Daytime occu:j 
rences increased 5 percent for both the residentiij 
and nonresidential categories in 1978 from 197' 
Nonresidential nighttime burglaries also rose ( 
percent), while residential nighttime burglarid 
showed the only decrease, 3 percent. 

During the period 1974-1978, daytime burglarid 
rose in volume, while nighttime incidents decline* 
Residential burglaries were up 10 percent during th 
day, but decreased 1 percent for the nighttim« 
Nonresidential daytime occurrences increased 1 
percent, while nighttime occurrences fell 15 percen' 

Burglary represents a substantial financial loss. I 
1978, burglary victims suffered losses totaling $1. 
billion. The average dollar loss per burglary w£ 
$526. 

Clearances 

In 1978, 16 percent of the total burglary offens* 
were cleared. Adults were involved in 66 percent c 
all cases cleared; and in 34 percent of the tot* 
burglary clearances only young persons under 1 
years of age were the offenders. 

Law enforcement agencies in rural areas cleared 1. 
percent of the burglaries reported within their jurisi 
dictions in 1978, while those in the suburban area 
recorded a clearance rate of 16 percent. Agencies ii 
cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants obtaine* 
clearances in 14 percent of these crimes. 
Persons Arrested 

In the UCR Program, the arrest of one person ma; 
account for the clearance of numerous crimes 
Likewise, the arrest of several may clear but om 
offense. In the case of burglary, law enforccmen 
agencies frequently clear several reported offenses b}j 
the arrest of one individual. When the 1978 and 197/ 
burglary figures were compared, increases of les! 
than 1 percent were seen for total burglary arrests. 



RESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

NIGHTTIME 

1974-1978 

DOWN 1% 



noo% 



■75% 



+50% 



+ 25% 



■25% 



RESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

DA YTIME 

1974-1978 
UP 10% 



1975 1976 1977 1978 



100% 



+75% 



-50% 



+25% 



■25% 

1976 1977 1971 1974 1975 1976 

BURGLARIES OF UNKNOWN TIME OF OCCURRENCE ARE NOT INCLUDED. 



NONRESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

NIGHTTIME 

1974-1978 

DOWN 15% 






^ 


WmiyMi 





NONRESIDENCE 
BURGLARY 

DA YTIME 

1974-1978 
UP 18% 






mmm 


W!::MM 


iiiil-ii 











for arrests of persons under the age of 18, and for Nationally, in 1978, persons under 25 years ol 

arrests of persons aged 18 and over. Arrests for accounted for 84 percent of all arrests for burg 

burglary were up 1 percent in both the suburban and and 52 percent of all arrested for this crime 

rural areas, while they decreased less than 1 percent under the age of 18. An average of 6 of each 

in the Nation's cities. p^^^^^j ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^-^ ^^^^ ^^ ,9^3 

In analyzing the 1974-1978 period, a 5-percent ^^^^j^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^j ^ ^^^^^^ ^^^ 

decline in burglary arrests was seen. Arrests of , r ^c ,>t '^ -.^ 

individuals under the age of 18 dropped 7 percent, l!;!',!!.^!^'!!!!^;^^'' ^°' ^^ P"'"""'' '"'^ ' 
and arrests of adult burglary offenders fell 4 percent. 



races for the remainder. 



26 



LARCENY-THEFT 



DEFINITION. 



Larceny-theft is the unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of 
property from the possession or constructive possession of another. It 
includes crimes such as shoplifting, pocket-picking, purse-snatching, thefts 
from motor vehicles, thefts of motor vehicle parts and accessories, bicycle 
thefts, etc., in which no use of force, violence, or fraud occurs. In the 
Uniform Crime Reporting Program, this crime category does not include 
embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, and worthless checks. Motor vehicle 
theft is also excluded from this category for crime reporting purposes 
inasmuch as it is a separate Crime Index offense. 





TUFlVn 




Year 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 


Number of offenses 
5.905.731 
5,983.401 
+ 1.3 


Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

2,729.9 

2,743.9 

+ .5 



Volume 

In 1978, there were an estimated 5,983,401 offenses 
of larceny-theft. This high-volume ofiense made up 
54 percent of the Crime Index total. As in 1977, the 
volume of larceny-theft was highest during August of 
1978. 

Geographically, the Southern States, which are the 
most populous, reported the highest number of 
larceny-thefts, accounting for 3 1 percent of the total. 
The North Central States followed with 26 percent, 
while the Western States recorded 24 percent and the 
Northeastern States 19 percent. 



' [lAKBNY-THCn BY MONTH 




Trend 

Larceny-theft rose 1 percent in volume from 1977 
to 1978. The large cities with 250,000 or more 
inhabitants reported a decrease of 1 percent. The 
rural and suburban areas increased, 2 and I percent, 
respectively. 

When viewed regionally, larceny-theft showed 
varying trends. The Southern and Western States 
experienced upswings of 4 and 3 percent, respective- 
ly, while the Northeastern States reported a 3-percent 
decline. In the North Central States, the volume of 
larceny-theft showed virtually no change from the 
year before. 

Nationwide, larceny-thefts climbed 14 percent 
since 1974. 



LARCENY-THEFT 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP 14% 

RATE PER 100.000 INHABITANTS UP 10% 






















^^^^^ 








=— ■ 













Rate 

During 1978, there were 2,744 larceny-thefts per 
100,000 United States' inhabitants, an increase of less 
than 1 percent from the 1977 rate. The rate increased 
10 percent since 1974. In the SMSAs, the 1978 



larceny-theft rate was 3,101 per 100,000 inhabitants 
2,812 per 100,000 inhabitants in cities outside metro 
politan areas (Other Cities); and 953 in the rura 
areas. 

The Western States reported the highest 1971 
larceny-theft rate with 3,555 offenses per 100,00< 
inhabitants, a 1 -percent increase over 1977. Thi 
North Central States had a rate of 2,687, down 
percent; the Southern States 2,597, up 3 percent; am 
the Northeastern States, with a rate of 2,360, report 
ed a decrease of 2 percent. 



For each reported larceny-theft in 1978 the aver 
age value of property stolen was $219, up from $19: 
in 1977. When the average value was applied to the 
estimated number of larceny-thefts, the loss t< 
victims nationally was $1.3 billion. While a portio: 
of the goods stolen is recovered, the relatively lov 
clearance percentage for larceny-thefts (20 percent 
and the frequent absence of owner identification oi 
recovered property indicate the overall loss due t( 
this criminal activity is not reduced. In addition 
other studies have indicated many offenses in thi 
category, particularly if the value of the stolen good 
is small, never come to police attention. 

In 1978, the average value of goods and propert; 
reported stolen as a result of pocket-picking wa 
$152; by purse-snatching, $114; and by shoplifting 
$49. Additionally, miscellaneous thefts from build 
ings and thefts from motor vehicles averaged $33' 
and $254, respectively. 

As in prior years, a large portion of these offenses 
36 percent, was comprised of thefts of motor vehicli 
parts, accessories, and contents. Other major types o 
thefts which contributed to the large number of thes( 
crimes were those from buildings, 17 percent, am 
stolen bicycles and shoplifting, 1 1 percent each. Th< 
remainder was distributed among pocket-picking 
purse-snatching, thefts from coin-operated machines 
and miscellaneous types of larceny-thefts. The ac 
companying table presents the distribution of larce 
ny-theft by type and geographic region. i 

Oearances 

In 1978, 20 percent of all larceny-thefts brought t< 
the attention of law enforcement were cleared. On< 
of every 3 of these crimes cleared in the Nation'! 
cities and suburban areas involved persons under 1{ 
years of age exclusively. In the rural areas, larceny^ 
theft clearances for this age group represented 21 
percent of the total. 



28 




PURSE-SNATCHING 
1974-1978 

DOWN 11% 



SHOPLIFTING 
1974-1978 

UP 19% 




..^X . 'T ■■ 


: 'i':^ 




74 1975 1976 


1977 191 



+ 100% 

+ 75% 

+ 50% 

+ 25% 



-25% 



THEFT FROM 
MOTOR VEHICLES 
1974-1978 

UP 6% 



^r:::! 



X. 



THEFT OF MOTOR VEHICLE 
ACCESSORIES 
1974-1978 

UP 36% 




THEFT OF BICYCLES 
1974-1978 

DOWN 27% 



THEFT FROM BUILDINGS 
1974-1978 

UP 9% 



->--^R-----:v;v ; :-^--vv;::v:v:-:- 



+ 100% ( 

^,5y THEFT FROM 

COIN MACHINES 
+ 50% 1974-1978 

DOWN 19% 

+ 25% 

-25% ..L — — — 





LARCENY ANALYSIS 
1978 


/ 




^:^—- PURSE-SNATCHING 1% 
^^\^^ PQCKFT-PICKING 1% 










^^^^^ COIN MACHINES 1% 
SHOPLIFTING 11% 




III 


^^^^^ BICYCLES 11% 




^^"^ FROM MOTOR VEHICLES 17% 




jji'i'x:::::::: 


^^""^^ FROM BUILDINGS 17% 


1 




:•■■::§:!■:•:• 

illl 

P 


^^"^ MOTOR VEHICLE ACCESSORIES 19% 




^^^ ALL OTHERS 21% 


PERCEI 


fTAGE 


S DO NOT ADD TO 100% DUE TO ROUNDING. 



Larceny Analysis by Region, 1978 

Percent dislnbution) 





Total > 


North- 
States 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 


Total' 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


ocket-ptckmg 

•urse-snatching 

hopl'f'ing 

rom motor vehicles 
;excepl accessories) . . 
lotor vehicle 


1.1 
1.5 
11.4 

17.0 

19.1 
10.7 
16.7 

1.0 
21.4 


3.4 

9.3 

17.9 

19.3 
12.4 
18.8 

.8 
15.6 


10.1 

13.3 

19.4 
11.8 
18.9 

.7 
24.0 


.6 
1.3 
10.9 

17.1 

21.1 
8.9 

14.5 

1.5 
24.1 


.6 
1.0 
15.4 

20.2 

16 1 


icycles 

rom buildings 

rom coin-operated 


10.5 
15.4 

9 











'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to totals. 

'ersons Arrested 

The larceny-theft category not only comprised the 
argest portion of the total Crime Index offenses 



reported, it also accounted for 50 percent of the total 
arrests for Index crimes in 1978. Arrests for this 
offense increased 2 percent, 1978 over 1977. Forty- 
two percent of these arrests were of persons under 18 
years of age, and 59 percent of the arrestees were 
under 2 1 . More females, accounting for 32 percent of 
all arrests for larceny-theft, were arrested for this 
offense than any other in 1978. Arrests of both males 
and females for larceny-theft violations increased in 
1978, 2 and 3 percent, respectively. Arrests of whites 
outnumbered Negroes by more than 2 to 1, with all 
other races comprising approximately 3 percent of 
total larceny-theft arrests. 

During the period 1974-1978, the total volume of 
larceny-theft arrests rose 5 percent. Adult arrests 
were up 16 percent for this 5-year period, while those 
of persons under 1 8 years of age decreased 6 percent. 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 
DEFINITION 



In Uniform Crime Reporting, motor vehicle theft is defined as the theft or 
attempted theft of a motor vehicle. This definition excludes the taking of a 
motor vehicle for temporary use by those persons having lawful access. 





TnFMn 




Year 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 


Number of offenses 
968,358 
991,611 
+ 2.4 


Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

447.6 

454.7 

+ 1.6 



32 



Volume 

In 1978, an estimated total of 991,611 thefts of 
motor vehicles occurred. These offenses comprised 9 
percent of all Index crimes. Geographically, the 
volume of motor vehicle thefts in 1978 was highest in 
the Northeastern States, which reported 30 percent of 
the total. The Southern States accounted for 24 
percent, and the North Central and the Western 
States each reported 23 percent. The volume of 
motor vehicle thefts was highest during the month of 
August. 



MOTOR VCHICLE WEFT BY MONTH 



JAN. FEB. MAR. APR. MAY JUNE lULV AUG. SEPT. OCT. NOV. DEC. 



Trend 

The number of motor vehicle thefts rose 2 percent 
from 1977 to 1978. 

During the 1977-1978 period, thefts of motor 
i-ehicles decreased 3 percent in large cities with 
Z50,000 or more inhabitants, while the suburban and 
rural areas recorded increases of 4 and 7 percent, 
respectively. 

Geographically, motor vehicle thefts were up 10 
percent in the Southern States and 7 percent in the 
Western States. The Northeastern States reported a 
3-percent decrease, and the North Central States, a 
1 -percent decline from the prior year. The accompa- 
nying chart shows that the number of motor vehicle 
thefts has increased 1 percent since 1 974. 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 

NUMBER OF OFFENSES UP I % 

RATE PER 100.000 INHABITANTS UP DOWN 2% 




































^ 








— -^ 








Rate 

The 1978 motor vehicle theft rate of 455 offenses 
3er 100,000 inhabitants rose 2 percent from 1977, 
while showing a 2-percent decrease from the 1974 
experience. In 1978, 1,114 thefts per 100,000 inhabi- 



tants occurred in cities with populations over one 
million. 

Nationally, the motor vehicle theft rate in the 
SMSAs was 559 per 100,000 inhabitants. Cities 
outside metropolitan areas (Other Cities) had a 
motor vehicle theft rate of 234, and the rural areas 
recorded the lowest rate, 124. 

Regionally, the Northeastern States had the high- 
est motor vehicle theft rate, 607 per 100,000 inhabi- 
tants, a decline of 3 percent from 1977. The Western 
States followed with 570, up 4 percent; and the 
North Central States experienced a 1 -percent de- 
crease from the prior year, or 396 thefts per 100,000 
inhabitants. The Southern States' rate of 332 per 
100,000 population represented a 9-percent increase. 

Nationwide in 1978, an estimated average of 1 of 
every 145 registered motor vehicles was stolen. 
Regionally, this rate was greatest in the Northeastern 
States where 11 of every 1,000 registered motor 
vehicles were stolen. In the other three regions the 
figures were 8 per 1,000 in the Western States, 6 in 
the North Central States, and 5 in the Southern 
States. 

Nature 

The average value of motor vehicles stolen during 
1978 was $2,325 at the time of theft. Of all motor 
vehicle thefts reported during the year, 78 percent 
were automobiles, 11 percent were trucks or buses, 
and 1 1 percent were other types of motor vehicles. 
The continuing high motor vehicle theft rates in the 
most heavily populated municipalities of the Nation 
clearly indicate this crime is primarily a large-city 
problem. 

Motor Vehicle Theft, 1978 

(Percent distribution] 



Region 


Total" 


Autos 


Trucks 
and 
buses 


Other 
vehicles 


Northeastern States .. 
North Central States 

Southern States 

Western States 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


89.6 
77.5 
69.2 
71.4 


5.3 
11.4 
16.3 
13.7 


5.1 

14.5 
14.9 


Total 


100.0 


77.8 


11.3 


11.0 



'Because of rounding, percentages may r 

Clearances 

Fifteen percent of the motor vehicle thefts in 1978 
were cleared by arrest of the oflfender(s) or by 
exceptional means. Geographically, motor vehicle 
theft clearance percentages ranged from 24 percent 
in the South Atlantic States to 9 percent in the New 
England States. 



33 



In all geographic divisions and population groups, 
a high proportion of the clearances involved only 
persons under 18 years of age. In the Nation's cities 
and suburbs, persons in this age group accounted for 
29 percent of the motor vehicle thefts cleared, while 
they accounted for 27 percent in the rural areas. 

Persons Arrested 

As in prior years, motor vehicle theft arrests 
primarily involved the younger segment of the 
Nation's population. Seventy percent of all persons 
arrested for motor vehicle theft during 1978 were 



under 2 1 years of age, and those under 1 8 accounted 
for 5 1 percent of the total. 

When the total volume of arrests for this offense 
during 1978 was compared with that of the previous 
year, an increase of 5 percent was evident. Adult 
arrests rose 10 percent over 1977, while arrests of 
persons under 18 were up less than 1 percent. 
However, during the period 1974-1978, motor vehi- 
cle theft arrests decreased 3 percent. 

Whites made up 69 percent of the arrests for motor 
vehicle theft, Negroes 27 percent, and all other races 
accounted for the remainder. 



34 



CRIME INDEX TOTAL 



+ 40 
+ 30 
+ 20 
+ 10 



CRIME INDEX OFFENSES UP 9% 

RATE PER lOOMO INHABITANTS UP 5% 

POPULATION UP 3% 





1974 







1 

1 




















1975 



1976 



1977 



1978 



rrime Index Total 

In 1978, an estimated 11,141,334 Crime Index 
•ffenses, 2 percent more than during 1977, were 
eported to law enforcement agencies. The violent 
ind property crime categories each showed increases. 
Collectively, violent crimes, which comprised 10 
•ercent of the total Crime Index, were up 5 percent 
nd property crimes 2 percent. 

All offenses within the Index increased in volume 
luring the year. Among the violent crimes, murder 
/as up 2 percent; forcible rape and aggravated 

iatiooal Crime, Rate, and Percent Change 



assault, 7 percent each; and robbery, 3 percent. In 
the property crime category, larceny-theft rose 1 
percent, while burglary and motor vehicle theft each 
increased 2 percent. 

Since 1974, the total volume of Crime Index 
offenses increased 9 percent. Likewise, rises of 9 
percent were seen in both the violent and property 
crime categories for this 5-year period. 

The estimated 1978 crime figures are set forth in 
the table entitled "National Crime, Rate, and Per- 
cent Change." 





Estimated 


crime 1978 




Percent change over 1974 


Percent change over 1969 


Crime Index OfTenses 


Number 


100,000 
inhabitants 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 

inhabitants 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 
inhabitants 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 

inhabitants 


Total' 


11,141,300 


5,109.3 


+ 1.9 


+ 1.1 


+ 8.7 


+ 5.3 


+ 50.3 


+ 38.8 


Violent 
Property 


1,061,830 
10,079,500 


486.9 
4,622.4 


+ 5.2 
+ 1.5 


+ 4.4 
+ .7 


+ 8.9 
+ 8.6 


+ 5.6 
+ 5.3 


+ 60.4 
+ 49.3 


+ 48.1 
+ 37.9 


lurder 
orcible rape 


19,560 

67,130 

417,040 

558,100 

3,104,500 

5,983,400 

991,600 


9.0 

30.8 

191.3 

255.9 

1,423.7 

2.743.9 

454.7 


+ 2.3 
+ 6.5 
+ 3.0 
+ 6.8 
+ 1.7 
+ 1.3 
+ 2.4 


+ 2.3 
+ 5.8 
+ 2.2 
+ 6.0 
+ .9 
+ .5 
+ 1.6 


-5.6 

+ 21.2 
-5.7 
+ 22.3 

+ 2.1 
+ 13.7 

+ 1.5 


-8.2 
+ 17.6 

-8.6 
+ 18.6 

-1.0 
+ 10.2 

— 1.6 


+ 32.5 
+ 80.6 
+ 39.5 
+ 79.4 
+ 56.6 
+ 53.9 
+ 12.9 


+ 23.3 
+ 665 


obbery 


+ 28.9 


urglary 
arceny- theft 


+ 44.7 
+ 42.1 







'Due to rounding, offenses may i 



t add to Crime Index totals. 



Regional OfTense and Population Distribution, 1978 



Region 


Population 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Murder 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


United States total- 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


100 




22.5 
25.7 
32.4 
18.4 


21.5 
24.1 
30.3 
24.1 


17.3 
21.1 
42.0 
19.6 


16.8 
22.1 
33.8 
27.2 


31.2 
21.3 
25.5 
22.0 


20.5 
20.2 
36.0 
23.3 


21.8 
21.7 
31.2 
25.3 


19.4 
26.2 
30.7 
23.8 


30 


North Central States 


23 















'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to totals. 



Provided in the table, "Regional OfTense and 
Population Distribution, 1978," are data showing the 
estimated geographical distribution of Index crimes 
and population. When utilizing figures presented on 
a regional basis in this publication, the reader is 
cautioned to consider each region's proportion of the 
total United States population. For example, while 
the Southern States accounted for the largest volume 
of Crime Index offenses in 1978, they also represent- 
ed the greatest regional population. 

Based on the Crime Index offenses, crime rates 
relate the incidence of reported crime to population. 
However, many factors, some of which are shown on 
page V of this publication, influence the nature and 
extent of crime in a particular community. A crime 
rate takes into consideration only the numerical 
factor of population and does not incorporate any of 
the other elements which contribute to the amount of 
crime in a given area. 

The table, "Crime Rate, Region, 1978," lists the 
crime rates for the four geographic regions of the 
United States. 

Crime Rate, Region, 1978 

(Rate per 100,000 inhabitants] 



This table illustrates the higher crime rates in th 
metropolitan areas. 



Crime Index offenses 


North- 
eastern 

states 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 


Total 


4.877.1 


4,617.8 


4,778.0 


6,691.2 


Violent 

Pfop'f'y 


528.6 
4,348.5 


378.3 
4,239.5 


478.7 
4,299.3 


608.3 
6,082.9 


Murder 


6.9 
23.0 
265.4 
233.3 
1,381.2 
2.360.3 
607.0 


7.1 
25.5 
152.5 
193.2 
1,156.6 
2,686.6 
396.3 


11.6 

32.2 

150.5 

284.3 

1,370.5 

2,597.2 

331.7 


9.5 


Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor Vehicle theft .... 


228.4 
324.8 
1,957.5 
3,555.4 
569.9 



Crime Rate, Area, 1978 



(Rate per 100,000 inhabitants] 



Cnme Index offenses 


Total 
United 
States 


Metropolitan 
area 


Rural 


Other 
cities 


Total 


5,109.3 


5,870.2 


1,997.9 


4,363 


Violent 


486.9 
4,622.4 


583.9 
5,286.3 


174.8 
1,823.1 


285 
4,078 






Murder 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 


9.0 

30.8 

191.3 

255.9 

1,423.7 

2,743.9 

454.7 


9.9 

36.7 
249.2 
288.1 
1,626.7 
3,101.1 
558.6 


7.5 
14.0 
20.9 
132.3 
746.3 
953.3 
123.5 


5 
15 
50 
214 
1,031 
2,812 
234 



The table, "Crime Rate, Area, 1978," presents the 
crime experience in SMSAs, rural areas, and cities 
and towns outside metropolitan areas (Other Cities). 



Crime Index Tabulations 

In the accompanying tables, data on crime in th 
United States as a whole; geographic divisions 
individual states; Standard Metropolitan Statistica 
Areas; and cities, towns, and counties are presented 
The measure used is a Crime Index consisting o 
seven offenses: murder and nonnegligent man 
slaughter, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault 
burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

Although the total number of criminal acts occur 
ring is unknown, offenses reported to law enforce 
ment agencies represent an indicator of crimina 
activity. Considering that not all crimes come to thi 
attention of law enforcement; not all crimes are o 
sufficient importance to be significant in an index 
and not all important crimes occur in sufTicien 
volume and frequency to be meaningful in an index 
the above-mentioned crimes were selected as a grouj 
to furnish an abbreviated and convenient measure o 
the crime problem. 

In reviewing the tables in this report it must b< 
remembered that many factors can cause the volum< 
and type of crime to vary from place to place 



36 



'opulation, one of these factors, is used in computing 
rime rates; however, all communities are affected to 
ome degree by seasonal or transient populations, 
ince estimates of current permanent population are 
sed to construct crime rates, short term population 
ariabihty is not accounted for in these rates. 
In addition to the presentations outlined above, 
ational averages for the value of property stolen in 
annection with each offense are presented in the 
ibles. Further breakdowns by type for the robbery, 
urglary, and larceny-theft classifications are listed. 



Also, data on the type and value of property stolen 
and recovered are provided. 

National averages can serve as a valuable guide for 
the law enforcement administrator in analyzing the 
local crime count, as well as the performance of his 
force in combating crime. The analysis, however, 
should not end with such a comparison, for it is only 
through an appraisal of local conditions that a clear 
picture of the community crime problem or the 
effectiveness of the law enforcement operation is 
possible. 



37 



TaWe l.-Index of Crime, United SUtes, 1978 




















Area 


Population' 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Vkolenl 
crime2 


Property 
crime' 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forci- 
ble 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


United Stales Total 


218.059,000 


11.141334 
5.1093 


1.061.826 
486.9 


10,079,508 
4,622.4 


19.555 
9.0 


67.131 
30.8 


417,038 
1913 


558,102 
255.9 


3,104.496 
1,423.7 


5,983.401 
2,743.9 


991,611 

454.7 


Rate per 100.000 

inhabitants 


SUndard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 


159388,199 

99.0% 
100.0% 


9,282,753 
9,356,438 

5,870.2 

1,085.750 
1,129,850 

4,363.9 

627,488 
655,046 

1,997.9 


925.984 
930.629 

583.9 

71,060 
73,882 

285.4 

54,255 
57315 

174.8 


8,356,769 
8,425,809 

5.286.3 

1.014,690 
1.055,%8 

4,078.6 

573,233 
597,731 

1,823.1 


15,683 
15,740 

9.9 

1,299 
1,347 

5.2 

2.302 
2.468 

7.5 


58,168 
58,468 

36.7 

3,901 
4.059 

15.7 

4.332 
4.604 

14.0 


395,892 
397,219 

249.2 

12.490 
12,963 

50.1 

6.394 
6,856 

20.9 


456,241 
459,202 

288.1 

53,370 
55,513 

214.4 

41,227 
43,387 

132.3 


2,573.406 
2,592,698 

1,626.7 

256.604 
267,110 

1,031.7 

233,778 
244,688 

746.3 


4,900,044 
4,942,712 

3,101.1 

699,591 

728,152 

2,812.4 

300.828 
312,537 

953.3 




Area actually reporting^ 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 


883,319 
890,399 

558 6 




25,890.583 

96-3% 
100.0% 

32,786,218 

93.8% 
100.0% 




Area actually reportings 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

Rural 


58,495 
60,706 

234.5 


Area actually reporting^ 

Estimated total 

Rate per 100,000 


38,627 
40,506 

123 5 









'Populations are Bureau of the Census provisional estimates a; 

'Violent cnmes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery 

^The percentage representing area actually reporting will not cc 

the calculations for individual slates which have varying populations, 



of July 1. 1978. 

and aggravated assault. Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft 
omcide with the ratio between reported and estimated crime totals, since these data represent the sum ol 
portions reporting, and crime rates. 



38 



fable 2.-Index of Crime, United SUtes, 1969-1978 
























Murder 














Population' 


Cnme2 
Index 
total 


Violent^ 


Property^ 
crime 


and non- 
negligent 

sla"gh".er 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


umber of ofTenses: 






















1969-201,385.000 


7,410,900 


661,870 


6,749,000 


14,760 


37,170 


298,850 


311,090 


1,981,900 


3,888,600 


878,500 


1970-203.235.298 


8,098,000 


738.820 


7,359,200 


16,000 


37,990 


349,860 


334,970 


2,205,000 


4,225,800 


928,400 


1971-206,212.000 


8,588,200 


816,500 


7,771.700 


17.780 


42,260 


387.700 


368,700 


2,399,300 


4,424,200 


948,200 


1972-208,230,000 


8,248.800 


834,900 


7.413.900 


18,670 


46,850 


376.290 


393,090 


2,375,500 


4,151,200 


887,200 


1973-209,851,000 


8,718,100 


875.910 


7.842,200 


19,640 


51,400 


384.220 


420,650 


2,565,500 


4,347,900 


928,800 


1974-211,392,000 


10,253.400 


974.720 


9.278.700 


20,710 


55,400 


442,400 


456,210 


3,039,200 


5,262,500 


977,100 


1975-213,124,000 


11.256.600 


1.026.280 


10.230.300 


20.510 


56.090 


464,970 


484,710 


3,252,100 


5,977,700 


1,000,500 


1976-214,659.000 


11. .304.800 


986.580 


10.318.200 


18,780 


56,730 


420,210 


490,850 


3,089,800 


6,270,800 


957,600 


1977-216,332.000 


10,935.800 


1.009,500 


9,926.300 


19.120 


63,020 


404,850 


522,510 


3,052,200 


5,905,700 


968,400 


1978-218,059,000 


11.141.300 


1.061.830 


10,079.500 


19.560 


67,130 


417,040 


558,100 


3,104,500 


5,983,400 


991,600 


ate per 100,000 inhabitants:" 






















1969 


3.680.0 


328.7 


3.351.3 


7.3 


18.5 


148.4 


154.5 


984.1 


1,930.9 


436.2 


1970 


3,984.5 


363.5 


3.621.0 


7.9 


18.7 


172.1 


164.8 


1,084.9 


2,079.3 


456.8 


1971 


4.164.7 


396.0 


3.768.8 


8.6 


20.5 


188.0 


178.8 


1,163.5 


2,145.5 
1,993.6 


459.8 
426.1 


1972 


3^96 1.4 


401.0 


3!560.4 


9.0 


22^5 


180.7 


188.8 


U40.8 


1973 


4,154.4 


417.4 


3,737.0 


9.4 


24.5 


183.1 


200.5 


1,222.5 


2,071.9 


442.6 


1974 


4.850.4 


461.1 


4,389.3 


9.8 


26.2 


209.3 


215.8 


1,437.7 


2,489.5 


462.2 


1975 


5.281.7 


481.5 


4,800.2 


9.6 


26.3 


218.2 


227.4 


1,525.9 


2,804.8 


469.4 


1976 


5.266.4 


459.6 


4.806.8 


8.8 


26.4 


195.8 


228.7 


1,439.4 


2.921.3 


446.1 


1977 


5,055.1 


466.6 


4,588.4 


8.8 


29.1 


187.1 


241.5 


1,410.9 


2,729.9 


447.6 


1978 


5,109.3 


486.9 


4.622.4 


9.0 


30.8 


191.3 


255.9 


1,423.7 


2.743.9 


454.7 



^Populations are Bureau of Census provisional estimates as of July 1, except Apnl I. 1970, censiis. 
2Due to rounding, the offenses may not add to Crime Index totals. 

^Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Property crimes s 
*Crime rales calculated prior to rounding number of offenses. 



: offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and r 



39 



Table 3.-Index of Crime: Region, Geographic Division, and Sute; 1977-1978 

(Number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants; percent change over 1977] 





Year 


Population. 


Crime Index total 


Violent crimed 


Property crime^ 


Murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter 




Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 




1977 
1978 


216332,000 
218,059,000 


104*35,777 

11,141334 

+ 1.9 


5,055.1 

5,1093 

+ 1.1 


1,009,499 
1,061,826 

+ 5.2 


466.6 
486.9 

+4.4 


9,926,278 

10,079308 

+ 13 


4388.4 
4,622.4 

+ .7 


19,121 
19355 

+ 23 






9.0 

+ 23 






Northeast 


1977 
1978 

"l'977 
1978 

'1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 


49,280,000 
49,081,000 

'V2,242!000 
12,256,000 

"3, 108^000 

3,099,000 

1,085,000 

1,091,000 

5,782,000 

5,774,000 

849,000 

871,000 

935,000 

935,000 

483,000 

487,000 


2,442,878 
2393,743 

-2.0 
609,542 
610,017 

150,493 
152,765 
44.218 
45,151 
312,751 
308,933 
32,195 
35,428 
50,739 
49,202 
19,146 
18,538 


44>57.1 

4377.1 
— 1.6 
4,979.1 
4,977.3 


251,454 
259,466 

+ 3.2 

40,307 

43,801 

+ 8.7 

8,774 

9,762 

2,438 

2,266 

24,593 

26,673 

960 

1,035 

2,820 

3,255 

722 

810 


5103 
528.6 

+ 3.6 
329.3 
357.4 
+ 8.5 
282.3 
315.0 
224.7 
207.7 
425.3 
462.0 
113.1 
118.8 
301.6 
348.1 
149.5 
166.3 


2,191,424 

2,134,277 
-2.6 
569,235 
566,216 
-.5 
141,719 
143,003 
41,780 
42,885 
288,158 
282,260 
31,235 
34,393 
47,919 
45,947 
18,424 
17,728 


4,446.9 
43483 

-2.2 
4,649.9 
4,619.9 
-.6 
4,559.8 
4,614.5 
3,850.7 
3,930.8 
4,983.7 
4,888.5 
3,679.0 
3,948.7 
5,125.0 
4,914.1 
3,814.5 
3,640.2 


3386 
3383 

404 
440 
+ 8.9 
132 
129 
26 
30 
178 
216 
27 
12 
34 
37 
7 
16 


6S 


Percent change 

New England 

Percent change 

Connecticut 


&9 


33 
3.6 


4,842.1 
4,929.5 
4,075.4 
4,138.5 
5,409.0 
5,350.4 
3,792.1 
4,067.5 
5,426.6 
5,262.2 
3,964.0 
3,806.6 


42 


Maine 

Massachusetts 


4.2 
2.4 
2.7 
3.1 
3.7 




1.4 


Vermont 


4.0 

1.4 
3.3 


Middle Atlantic 


1977 
1978 

1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 


37,038,000 
36,825,000 

7,329,000 
7,327,000 
17,924,000 
17,748,000 
11,785,000 
11.750,000 


1,833,336 
1,783,726 
-2.7 
374,795 
381,528 
1,091,144 
1,027,993 
367,397 
374,205 


4,949.9 
4,843.8 
-2.1 
5,113.9 
5,207.2 
6,087.6 
5,792.2 
3,117.5 
3,184.7 


211,147 
215,665 
+ 2.1 
28,732 
31,027 
149,087 
149,257 
33,328 
35,381 


570.1 
585.6 
+ 2.7 
392.0 
423.5 
831.8 
841.0 
282.8 
301.1 


1,622,189 
1.568,061 
-3.3 
346.063 
350,501 
942,057 
878,736 
334,069 
338,824 


4,379.8 
4,258.1 
-2.8 
4,721.8 
4,783.7 
5,255.8 
4,951.2 
2,834.7 
2,883.6 


2,982 
2,943 
— 1.3 
408 
398 
1,919 
1,820 
655 
725 


8 1 




8.0 
1 2 


New Jersey 


5.6 

5.4 


Pennsylvania 


10.3 
5.6 
6.2 


North Central 


1977 
1978 

1977 
1978 

1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 


57,940.000 
58,251,000 

41,056,000 
41,233,000 

11,245,000 
11,243,000 
5,330,000 
5,374,000 
9,129,000 
9,189,000 
10,701.000 
10,749,000 
4,651.000 
4,679,000 


2,685,888 
2,689,904 

1,991,097 
1,993,723 

550.341 
564,196 
227.743 
233,153 
530,577 
514,042 
505,074 
500,776 
177,362 
181,556 


4,635.6 
4,617.8 

— .4 
4,849.7 
4,835.3 

— .3 
4,894.1 
5,018.2 
4,272.9 
4338.5 
5,812.0 
5,594.1 
4,719.9 
4,658.8 
3,813.4 
3,880.2 


216,416 
220358 

+ 1.8 

170,401 

173,327 

+ 1.7 

50,829 

52,363 

16,553 

17.383 

53,381 

53,040 

43,521 

44,357 

6,117 

6,184 


3733 
3783 

+ 1.3 
415.0 
420.4 
+ 1.3 
452.0 
465.7 
310.6 
323.5 
584.7 
577.2 
406.7 
412.7 
131.5 
132.2 


2,469,472 
2,469346 


4,262.1 
4,2393 

-.5 
4,434.7 
4,414.9 

— .4 
4,442.1 
4,552.5 
3,962.3 
4,015.1 
5,227.3 
5,016.9 
4313.2 
4,246.2 
3.681.9 
3,748.1 


4,189 
4.134 

— 1.3 
3320 
3,273 

— 1.4 
1,109 
1,108 

395 
334 
853 
972 
833 
741 
130 
118 


12 


Percent change 

East North Central 

Percent change 


7.1 
1 4 


1,820,6% 
1,820,396 


8.1 

11 


499,512 
511,833 
211,190 
215,770 
477,196 
461,002 
461,553 
456,419 
171,245 
175,372 




Indiana 


9.9 

7.4 
62 
9.3 
10.6 

7.8 
6.9 

2.8 
2.5 


Michigan 

Ohio 

Wisconsin 



Sec footnoles at end of tabic. 



Forcible 


rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burgar, 


Larceny-theft 


Motor vehicle theft 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 

100,000 


«S3,022 


29.1 


404,847 


187.1 


522,509 


2413 


3,052,189 


1,410.9 


5.905,731 


2.729.9 


968358 


447.6 


67,131 


30.8 


417,038 


191J 


558,102 


255.9 


3.104,496 


1.423.7 


5.983,401 


2.743.9 


991.611 


454.7 


+ 6.5 


+ 5.8 


+ 3.0 


+ 2J 


+ 6.8 


+ 6.0 


+ 1.7 


+ S 


+ 13 


+ 3 


+ 2.4 


+ 1.6 


11.182 


22.7 


128,705 


26U 


108,181 


2193 


691,678 


1,403.6 


1,191.115 


2,417.0 


.308,631 


6263 


11307 


23.0 


130,282 


265.4 


114,494 


2333 


677,888 


1381.2 


1.158,444 


23603 


297X5 


607.0 


+ 1.1 


+ 1.3 


+ 1.2 


+ 1.6 


+ 5.8 


+ 63 


-2.0 


-1.6 


-2.7 


-23 


-33 


-3.1 


2,137 


17.5 


15,423 


126.0 


22,343 


182.5 


173,306 


1,415.7 


297,720 


2.432.0 


98,209 


802.2 


2,217 


18.1 


16.321 


133.2 


24,823 


202.5 


172.495 


1.407.4 


296,150 


2,416.4 


97371 


796.1 


+ 3.7 


+ 3.4 


+ 5.8 


+ 5.7 


+ 11.1 


+ 11.0 


-.5 


-.6 


-3 


-.6 


-.6 


-.8 


521 


16.8 


4,026 


129.5 


4.095 


131.8 


41,833 


1.346.0 


81,450 


2,620.7 


18,436 


593.2 


533 


17.2 


4,798 


154.8 


4,302 


138.8 


42.207 


1.362.0 


80,500 


2,597.6 


20,296 


654.9 


147 


13.5 


420 


38.7 


1,845 


170.0 


13.596 


1,253.1 


25,505 


2.350.7 


2,679 


246.9 


121 


11.1 


359 


32.9 


1.756 


161.0 


13.542 


1,241.2 


26.579 


2.436.2 


2,764 


253.3 


1,203 


20.8 


9,822 


169.9 


13,390 


231.6 


88,594 


1,532.2 


133,642 


23113 


65,922 


1,140.1 


1,307 


22.6 


9,947 


172.3 


15.203 


263.3 


87,482 


1315.1 


131319 


2.277.8 


63.259 


1.095.6 


91 


10.7 


197 


23.2 


645 


76.0 


8.844 


1,041.7 


19,900 


2.343.9 


2.491 


293.4 


82 


9.4 


229 


26.3 


712 


81.7 


10,101 


1,159.7 


21,630 


2,483.4 


2.662 


305.6 


98 


10.5 


809 


86.5 


1,879 


201.0 


13,927 


1,489.5 


26,592 


2.844.1 


7.400 


791.4 


103 


11.0 


918 


98.2 


2,197 


235.0 


13,021 


1,392.6 


25,379 


2,7143 


7,547 


807.2 


77 


15.9 


149 


30.8 


489 


101.2 


6312 


1,348,2 


10,631 


2,201.0 


1.281 


265.2 


71 


14.6 


70 


14.4 


653 


134.1 


6,142 


1,261.2 


10,543 


2.164.9 


1.043 


214.2 


9,045 


24.4 


113,282 


305.9 


85,838 


231.8 


518.372 


1,399.6 


893,395 


2.412.1 


210,422 


568.1 


9,090 


24.7 


113,961 


309.5 


89,671 


243.5 


505,393 


1372.4 


862,294 


2,341.6 


200,374 


544.1 


+ .5 


+ 1.2 


+ .6 


+ 1.2 


+ 4.5 


+ 5.0 


-2.5 


-1.9 


-33 


-2.9 


-4.8 


— 4.2 


1,537 


21.0 


13,223 


180.4 


13.564 


185.1 


105,229 


1.435.8 


203,345 


2,774.5 


37.489 


5113 


1,727 


23.6 


14,112 


192.6 


14,790 


201.9 


106,700 


1,456.3 


202,726 


2,766.8 


41,075 


560.6 


5,272 


29.4 


84,703 


472.6 


57,193 


319.1 


309,735 


1,728.0 


498,653 


2,782.0 


133,669 


745.8 


5,168 


29.1 


83,78S 


472.1 


58,484 


329.5 


292,956 


1,650.6 


466316 


2,628.6 


119,264 


672.0 


2,236 


19.0 


15,356 


130.3 


15,081 


128.0 


103,408 


877.5 


191,397 


1,624.1 


39,264 


333.2 


2,195 


18.7 


16,064 


136.7 


16,397 


139.5 


105.737 


899.9 


193,052 


1,643.0 


40,035 


340.7 


14326 


24.7 


94,287 


162.7 


103,614 


178.8 


668.457 


1,153.7 


1368,866 


2,707.7 


232.149 


400.7 


14,849 


253 


88,826 


1523 


112349 


193.2 


673.723 


1.156.6 


1364.957 


2,686.6 


230.866 


3963 


+ 3.7 


+ 3.2 


-5.8 


-63 


+ 8.6 


+ 8.1 


+ .8 


+ 3 


-.2 


-.8 


-.6 


— 1.1 


10,942 


26.7 


77.048 


187.7 


79,091 


192.6 


488,415 


1,189.6 


1,149,797 


2,800.6 


182,484 


444.5 


11,387 


27.6 


71,687 


173.9 


86,980 


210.9 


490,499 


1.189.6 


1,148,056 


2.784.3 


181,841 


441.0 




+ 3.4 


— 7.0 


— 7.4 


+ 10.0 


+ 9.5 


+ .4 




— .2 


— .6 


— .4 


— .8 


2,454 


21.8 


23,766 


2113 


23.500 


209.0 


122,004 


' l,085.o' 


318,062 


2,828.5 


59,446 


528.6 


2,676 


23.8 


23,045 


205.0 


25.534 


227.1 


128,080 


1.139.2 


326.276 


2,902.0 


57,477 


511.2 


1,412 


26.5 


6,565 


123.2 


8,181 


153.5 


57,894 


1.086.2 


133,179 


2,498.7 


20,117 


377,4 


1,451 


27.0 


6,526 


121.4 


9,072 


168.8 


59,561 


1,1083 


134,119 


2,495.7 


22,090 


411.1 


3,555 


38.9 


23,905 


261.9 


25,068 


274.6 


139,006 


1,522.7 


288,387 


3,159.0 


49,803 


545.5 


3.636 


39.6 


20,153 


2193 


28,279 


307.7 


132,716 


1,444.3 


279,958 


3.046.7 


48,328 


525.9 


2,921 


27.3 


20,386 


190.5 


19381 


181.1 


130,121 


U16.0 


288,581 


2.696.8 


42,851 


400.4 


2.947 


27.4 


19,627 


182,6 


21,042 


195.8 


130,543 


1,214.5 


282,666 


2,629.7 


43,210 


402.0 


600 


12.9 


2,426 


52.2 


2,%1 


63.7 


39,390 


846.9 


121,588 


2,614.2 


10.267 


220.7 


677 


14.5 


2,336 


49.9 


3,053 


65.2 


39,599 


846.3 


125,037 


2,672.3 


10,736 


229.5 



Table 3.— Index of Crime: Region, Geographic Division, and SUte; 1977-1978— Continued 

[Number and rate per 100,000 inhabitants; percent change over 1977] 





Year 


Population' 


Crime Index total 


Violent crime^ 


Property crime^ 


Murder and non- 
negligent manslaughter 




Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


West North Central 


1977 
1978 

"l'977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 


16,884,000 
17,018,000 

"'2,879;000 

2,896,000 

2,326,000 

2,348,000 

3,975,000 

4,008,000 

4,801,000 

4,860.000 

1,561,000 

1,565,000 

653,000 

652,000 

689,000 

690,000 


694,791 
696,181 
+ .2 
111,172 
115,263 
106,154 
106,696 
168,176 
166,096 
219,946 
220,031 
55,019 
53,856 
16,331 
15,683 
17,993 
18,556 


4,115.1 
4.090.9 
-.6 
3.861.5 
3,980.1 
4,563.8 
4,544.1 
4,230.8 
4,144.1 
4,581.3 
4,527.4 
3,524.6 
3,441.3 
2,500.9 
2,405.4 
2,611.5 
2,689.3 


46,015 

47,031 

+ 2.2 

4,145 

4,674 

7,206 

7,471 

7,705 

7,601 

22,105 

22,738 

3,113 

2,982 

438 

437 

1,303 

1,128 


272.5 
276.4 
+ 1.4 
144.0 
161.4 
309.8 
318.2 
193.8 
189.6 
460.4 
467.9 
199.4 
190.5 
67.1 
67.0 
189.1 
163.5 


648,776 
649,150 

107,027 
1 10,589 
98,948 
99,225 
160,471 
158,495 
197,841 
197,293 
51,906 
50,874 
15,893 
15,246 
16,690 
17,428 


3,842.5 
3,814.5 
-.7 
3,717.5 
3,818.7 
4,254.0 
4,225.9 
4,037.0 
3,954.5 
4,120.8 
4,059.5 
3,325.2 
3,250.7 
2.433.8 
2,338.3 
2,422.4 
2,525.8 


869 
861 
— .9 
67 
74 
153 
133 
106 
81 
462 
505 
61 
47 
6 
8 
14 
13 


5. 




5. 


. ^ 




Kansas 


2. 
6 


Minnesou 


2. 


Nebraska 


10. 
3 


North Dakota . . 


3. 




1. 




1. 




1977 
1978 

1977 
1978 

1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 


69,848.000 
70.626,000 

"34,306!000 
34,579,000 

582,000 
583,000 
8,452,000 
8,594,000 
5,048,000 
5,084,000 
4,139,000 
4,143,000 
5,525,000 
5,577,000 
2,876,000 
2,918,000 
5,135,000 
5,148,000 
1,859,000 
1,860,000 


3.225.661 

3374.523 
+ 4.6 

1,704,484 
1.791,339 
+ 5.1 
36,143 
37,043 
569,546 
607,552 
214,998 
242,573 
235,922 
240,858 
209,460 
216,506 
139,120 
142,863 
206.636 
209,677 
41,915 
42,224 


4.618.1 

4.778.0 
+ 3,5 

4,968.5 
5,180.4 
+ 4.3 
6,210.1 
6,353.9 
6,738.6 
7,069.5 
4,259.1 
4,771.3 
5,700.0 
5,813.6 
3,791.1 
3,882.1 
4,837.3 
4,895.9 
4,024.1 
4,073.0 
2,254.7 
2,270.1 


315,559 
338,069 

+ 7.1 
179,841 
192,654 
+ 7.1 
2,224 
2,569 
58,052 
65,792 
22,203 
24,545 
28,716 
30,328 
22,492 
23.054 
18,297 
18,604 
14,893 
14,743 
2,832 
3,120 


451,8 

478,7 
+6,0 
524.: 
557.1 
+6.3 
382.1 
440.7 
686.8 
765.6 
439.f 
482.! 
693.t 
732.0 
407.1 
413.4 
636.: 
637.6 
290.0 
286.4 
152.3 
167.7 


2,910,102 
3,036,454 

+ 4J 

1,524,643 
1,598,685 
+ 4.9 
33,919 
34,474 
511,494 
541,760 
192,795 
218,028 
207,206 
210.530 
186,968 
193,452 
120,823 
124,259 
191,743 
194,934 
39,083 
39,104 


4,166J 

4.299J 

+ 3.2 

4,444.2 
4,623.3 
+ 4.0 
5,828.0 
5,913.2 
6,051.8 
6,303.9 
3,819.2 
4,288.5 
5,006.2 
5,081.6 
3,384.0 
3,468.7 
4,201.1 
4,258.4 
3,734.0 
3,786.6 
2.102.4 
2,102,4 


7.905 
8.210 
+ 3.9 

3.513 
3,761 
+ 7.1 
35 
39 
859 
949 
593 
731 
333 
338 
586 
600 
343 
336 
460 
452 
112 
127 






11. 

+ 2. 


South Atlantic^ 

Percent change 

Delaware 

Florida 


10. 
10. 
+ 6. 
6. 
6. 
10. 




11. 


Maryland 


14. 

8. 
8. 
10. 




10. 




11. 
9. 


WestV,rgima 


8. 
6. 
6. 




1977 
1978 

1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 
1977 
1978 


13,836,000 
14,001,000 

3,690.000 
3,742,000 
3,458,000 
3,498,000 
2,389,000 
2,404,000 
4,299,000 
4,357,000 


463,805 
475,346 
+ 2.5 
136.995 
147,389 
104,201 
105,746 
61,841 
61,419 
160,768 
160,792 


3,352.2 
3,395.1 
+ 1.3 
3,712.6 
3,938.8 
3,013.3 
3,023.0 
2,588.6 
2,554.9 
3,739.7 
3,690.4 


47,009 
47,881 
+ 1.9 
15,293 
15,682 
8,077 
7,807 
6,896 
7,721 
16,743 
16,671 


339.S 
342.0 

414.4 
419.1 
233.6 
223.; 
288.- 
321.: 
389..' 
382.-, 


416,796 
427.465 
+ 2.6 
121,702 
131,707 
96,124 
97,939 
54,945 
53,698 
144,025 
144,121 


3,012.4 

3,053.1 

+ 1.4 

3.298.2 
3,519.7 
2,779.8 
2,799.9 
2,299.9 
2,233.7 
3,350.2 
3,307.8 


1.649 
1,528 
— 7.3 
524 
499 
349 
316 
342 
302 
434 
411 


11. 


Percent change 

Alabama 


10. 
14. 




13. 


MississioDi 


9.( 

14. 




12,< 
10. 




9A 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Forcible rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 


Burglary 


Larceny-theft 


Motor vehicle theft 


Number 


100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


3,384 


20.0 


17,239 


102.1 


24,523 


145.2 


180.042 


1,066.3 


419,069 


2,482.0 


49,665 


294.2 


3,462 


20.3 


17,139 


100.7 


25,569 


150.2 


183.224 


1.076.6 


416,901 


2,449.8 


49,025 


288.1 


+ 2.3 


+ 1.5 


-.6 


— 1.4 


+ 4.3 


+ 3.4 


+ 1.8 


+ 1.0 


-.5 


-1.3 


— 1.3 


-2.1 


306 


10.6 


1,187 


41.2 


2.585 


89.8 


23,392 


812.5 


77.304 


2,685.1 


6,331 


219.9 


300 


10.4 


1,357 


46.9 


2,943 


101.6 


25,214 


870.6 


78,567 


2,712.9 


6,808 


235.1 


511 


22.0 


2,343 


100.7 


4,199 


180.5 


29,549 


1,270.4 


63,716 


2,739.3 


5,683 


244.3 


586 


25.0 


2,201 


93.7 


4,551 


193.8 


30,215 


1,286.8 


63,194 


2,691.4 


5,816 


247.7 


774 


19.5 


3,413 


85.9 


3,412 


85.8 


45,103 


1,134.7 


101,731 


2,559.3 


13,637 


343.1 


797 


19.9 


3,411 


85.1 


3,312 


82.6 


43,837 


1,093.7 


101,646 


2,536.1 


13,012 


324.7 


1,359 


28.3 


9,076 


189.0 


11,208 


233.5 


63,290 


1,318.3 


116,386 


2,424.2 


18,165 


378.4 


1,360 


28.0 


8.943 


184.0 


11,930 


245.5 


65,375 


1,345.2 


113.992 


2,345.5 


17,926 


368.8 


282 


18.1 


1,010 


64.7 


1,760 


112.7 


11,864 


760.0 


36.154 


2,316.1 


3.888 


249.1 


286 


18.3 


1,015 


64.9 


1,634 


104.4 


11.687 


746.8 


35.794 


2,287.2 


3,393 


216.8 


59 


9.0 


87 


13.3 


286 


43.8 


2,913 


446.1 


12.035 


1,843.0 


945 


144.7 


58 


8.9 


102 


15.6 


269 


41.3 


2.758 


423.0 


11.522 


1,767.2 


966 


148.2 


93 


13.5 


123 


17.9 


1,073 


155.7 


3.931 


570.5 


11.743 


1,704.4 


1,016 


147.5 


75 


10.9 


110 


15.9 


930 


134.8 


4,138 


599.7 


12,186 


1.766.1 


1,104 


160.0 


20^54 


29.4 


97365 


140J 


189,135 


270.8 


933,221 


U36.1 


1,763,430 


2,524.7 


213,451 


305.6 


22.711 


32.2 


106323 


150.5 


200,825 


284J 


967,919 


U70.5 


1,834,2*3 


2397.2 


234,252 


331.7 


+ \0S 


+ 9.5 


+ 8.5 


+ 73 


+ 6.2 


+ 5.0 


+ 3.7 


+ 2.6 


+ 4.0 


+ 2.9 


+ 9.7 


+ 83 


10,258 


29.9 


54,739 


159.6 


111,331 


324.5 


476,695 


1,389.5 


947,668 


2.762.4 


100.280 


292.3 


11,468 


33.2 


58,871 


170.3 


118,554 


342.8 


498.825 


1,442.6 


990,285 


2.863.8 


109.575 


316,9 


+ 11.8 


+ 11.0 


+ 7.5 


+ 6.7 


+ 6.5 


+ 5.6 


+ 4.6 


+ 3.8 


+ 4.5 


+ 3.7 


+ 9.3 


+ 8.4 


145 


24.9 


914 


157.0 


1.130 


194.2 


9,793 


1,682.6 


21,408 


3,678.4 


2.718 


467.0 


119 


20.4 


848 


145.5 


1.563 


268.1 


9.466 


1,623.7 


22,111 


3,792.6 


2.897 


496.9 


3,348 


39.6 


15,885 


187.9 


37,960 


449.1 


157,195 


1,859.9 


324,601 


3,840.5 


29,698 


351.4 


3,960 


46.1 


17,701 


206.0 


43,182 


502.5 


170,061 


1,978.8 


338,299 


3,936.5 


33.400 


388.6 


1,570 


31.1 


7,094 


140.5 


12,946 


256.5 


68,205 


1,351.1 


109,554 


2,170.2 


15,036 


297.9 


1,928 


37.9 


8.454 


166.3 


13,432 


264.2 


75.022 


1.475.6 


124,880 


2,456.3 


18,126 


356.5 


1,439 


34.8 


12,088 


292.1 


14,856 


358.9 


57,946 


1,400.0 


131,526 


3.177.7 


17,734 


428.5 


1,476 


35.6 


12,828 


309.6 


15.686 


378.6 


58,907 


1,421.8 


134,024 


3,235.0 


17,599 


424.8 


937 


17.0 


3,385 


61.3 


17.584 


318.3 


63,765 


1,154.1 


112,591 


2,037.8 


10,612 


192.1 


1.024 


18.4 


3,673 


65.9 


17.757 


318.4 


66,031 


1,184.0 


116,193 


2,083.4 


11,228 


201.3 


950 


33.0 


3.046 


105.9 


13.958 


485.3 


46,407 


1,613.6 


67,368 


2,342.4 


7,048 


245.1 


1.032 


35.4 


2.955 


101.3 


14.281 


489.4 


43,729 


1,498.6 


72,472 


2,483.6 


8,058 


276.1 


1,199 


23.3 


4.727 


92.1 


8.507 


165.7 


50.640 


986.2 


129,464 


2,521.2 


11.639 


226.7 


1,168 


22.7 


5.000 


97.1 


8.123 


157.8 


51,006 


990.8 


132,140 


2,566.8 


11,788 


229.0 


246 


13.2 


784 


42.2 


1.690 


90.9 


11.106 


597.4 


24,942 


1,341.7 


3,035 


163.3 


273 


14.7 


862 


46.3 


1,858 


99.9 


12,059 


648.3 


23,776 


1,278.3 


3,269 


175.8 


3,332 


24.1 


14,213 


102.7 


27,815 


201.0 


148,090 


1,070.3 


232,912 


1,683.4 


35,794 


258.7 


3,539 


25.3 


14,880 


106.3 


27,934 


199.5 


150,164 


1,072.5 


239,269 


1,708.9 


38,032 


271.6 


+ 6.2 


+ 5.0 


+ 4.7 


+ 3.5 


+ .4 


— .7 


+ 1.4 


+ .2 


+ 2.7 


+ 1.5 


+ 6.3 


+ 5.0 


929 


25.2 


3,572 


96.8 


10,268 


278,3 


41,901 


1,135.5 


69,442 


1.881.9 


10,359 


280.7 


954 


25.5 


3,708 


99.1 


10,521 


281.2 


46,001 


1,229.3 


74,387 


1,987.9 


11,319 


302.5 


659 


19.1 


2,806 


81.1 


4,263 


123.3 


30,162 


872.2 


57,477 


1,662.1 


8,485 


245.4 


725 


20.7 


2,845 


81.3 


3,921 


112.1 


30,942 


884.6 


58,231 


1,664.7 


8,766 


250.6 


468 


19.6 


1,569 


65.7 


4,517 


189.1 


21,873 


915.6 


29,622 


1,239.9 


3,450 


144.4 


525 


21.8 


1,688 


70.2 


5,206 


216.6 


20,345 


846.3 


29,703 


1,235.6 


3,650 


151.8 


1,276 


29.7 


6,266 


145.8 


8,767 


203.9 


54,154 


1,259.7 


76,371 


1.776.5 


13,500 


314.0 


1,335 


30.6 


6,639 


152.4 


8,286 


190.2 


52,876 


1.213.6 


76,948 


1,766.1 


14,297 


328.1 



Table 3.— Index of Crime: Regioit, Geographic Division, and State; 1977-1978— Continued 

(Number and rate per 100,000 inhabitanls; percent change over 1977) 



Crime Index total 



West South Central 

Percent change 
Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

West 

Percent change 

Mountain 

Percent change 
Arizona 

Colorado 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico 

Utah 

Wyoming 

Pacific 

Percent change 

California 

Hawaii 

Oregon 

Washington 



2,186,000 
3,921,000 
3,966,000 
2,811,000 
2,880,000 
12,830,000 
13,014,000 



1,057,372 
1,107,838 
+ 4.8 
71,633 
75,673 
176,362 
190,062 
116,927 
118,939 
692,450 
723,164 



4,871.3 

5,025.1 

+ 3.2 

3,341.1 



1,497.9 



4,129.8 
5,397.1 
5,556.8 



97,534 
+ 9.9 
6,924 
7,522 
20,577 
23,197 
8,899 
10,165 
52,309 
56,650 



155,785 
166,865 
108,028 



353.0 
407.7 
435.3 



+ 2.7 
3,018.1 
3,117.6 
3,973.1 
4,207.4 
3,843.0 
3,776.9 
4,989.4 
5,121.5 



1,212,000 
1,268,000 
1,307,000 



2^U50 

2,683,164 

+ 3.9 

612,359 
629,019 
+ 2.7 
177,875 
178,994 
178,812 
182,426 
35,350 
35,250 
31,241 
30,739 
50,437 
54,693 
61,733 
62,786 
60,238 
65,074 
16,673 
19,057 



7,747.2 
7,603.8 
6,827.5 
6,832.4 
4,124.9 
4,014.8 
4,105.3 
3,915.8 
7,967.9 
8,286.8 
5,187.6 
5,180.4 
4,750.6 
4,978.9 
4,106.7 
4,494.6 



+ 7.9 

43,128 
46,529 
+ 7.9 
1 1,347 
12,996 
13,407 
13,296 
2,030 
2,076 
1,659 



5,153 
5,961 
6,402 
3,043 
3,552 
978 



430.0 
452.2 
+ 5.2 
494.2 
552.1 
511.9 



218.0 
237.6 
743.0 
780.8 
500.9 
528.2 



2355,280 
2,439,231 



+ 2.3 
166,528 
165,998 
165,405 
169,130 
33,320 
33,174 
29,582 
28,874 
45,734 
49,540 
55,772 
56,384 
57,195 



,522 



7,253.0 
7,051.7 
6,315.6 
6,334.5 
3,888.0 
3,778.4 
3,887.3 
3,678.2 
7,225.0 
7,506.1 
4,686.7 
4,652.1 
4,510.6 
4,707.1 
3,865.8 
4,214.2 



407,000 

403,000 

21,896,000 

22.294,000 

895,000 

897,000 

2,376,000 



1,968,991 

2,054,145 

+ 4.3 

24,005 

24,366 

1,534,621 

1,586,483 

58,588 

64,011 

142,256 

148,483 



6,735.7 
6,890.6 
+ 2.3 
5,898.0 
6,046.2 
7,008.7 
7,116.2 
6,546.1 
7,136.1 
5,987.2 
6,075.4 
5,727.7 
6,115.6 



182,942 

197,404 

+ 7.9 

1,804 

1,781 

154,582 

165,626 

2,012 

2,423 

10,830 

12,278 

13,714 

15,296 



625.8 
662.2 
+ 5.8 
443.2 
441.9 
706.0 
742.9 
224.8 
270.1 
455.8 
502.4 
374.9 
405.3 



22,201 
22,585 
1,380,039 
1,420,857 
56,576 
61,588 
131,426 
136,205 
195,807 
215,506 



6,228.4 
+ 1.9 
5,454.8 
5,604.2 
6,302.7 
6,373.3 
6,321.3 
6,866.0 
5,531.4 
5,573.0 
5,352.8 
5,710.3 



'Population for each state for 1977 and 1978 are Bureau of Census provisional 
^Violent cnmes are otTenscs of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated as 
^OfTense totals based on all reporting agencies and estimates for unreported areas. 



Forcible 


rape 


Robbery 


Aggravated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny-theft 


Motor vehicle theft 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


Number 


Rate per 
100,000 


6,964 


32.1 


29,013 


133.7 


49,989 


2303 


308,436 


1,421.0 


582,850 


2,685.2 


77,377 


356.5 


7,704 


34.9 


32,572 


147.7 


54,337 


246.5 


318,930 


1.446.7 


604,729 


2,743.0 


86,645 


393.0 


+ 10.6 


+ 8.7 


+ 12.3 


+ 10.5 


+ 8.7 


+ 7.0 


+ 3.4 


+ 1.8 


+ 3.8 


+ 2.2 


+ 12.0 


+ 10.2 


592 


27.6 


1,784 


83.2 


4,360 


203.4 


20.852 


972.6 


39,924 


1,862.1 


3,933 


183.4 


505 


23.1 


1,748 


80.0 


5,070 


231.9 


21,140 


967.1 


42,647 


1,9509 


4.364 


199.6 


1,213 


30.9 


5,602 


142.9 


13,153 


335.5 


45,701 


1,165.5 


96,843 


2,469.9 


13.241 


337.7 


1,379 


34.8 


6,887 


173.7 


14,306 


360.7 


50,587 


1,275.5 


101,937 


2,5703 


14,341 


361.6 


821 


29.2 


2.075 


73.8 


5,762 


205.0 


36.211 


1,288.2 


62,632 


2,228.1 


9,185 


326.8 


893 


31.0 


2,542 


88.3 


6,486 


225.2 


37,433 


1.299,8 


61,222 


2,125.8 


10,119 


351.4 


4,338 


33.8 


19,552 


152.4 


26,714 


208.2 


205,672 


1.603.1 


383.451 


2.988.7 


51,018 


397.6 


4,927 


37.9 


21,395 


164.4 


28,475 


218.8 


209.770 


1.611.9 


398,923 


3,065.3 


57,821 


444.3 


16^ 


43.2 


83,890 


213.7 


121,579 


309.7 


758,833 


1,932.7 


1382320 


3.520.8 


214,127 


545.4 


18,264 


45.5 


91.607 


228.4 


130,234 


324.8 


784,966 


1,957.5 


1,425,717 


3,555.4 


228.548 


569.9 


+ 7.7 


+ 5J 


+ 9.2 


+ 6.9 


+ 7.1 


+ 4.9 


+ 3.4 


+ 1-3 


+ 3.1 


+ 1.0 


+ 6.7 


+ 4.5 


3,302 


32.9 


12,664 


126.3 


26,420 


263.4 


170,241 


1,697.3 


360,000 


3,589.2 


38,990 


388.7 


3,928 


38.2 


13,524 


131.4 


28,270 


274.8 


167,027 


1,623.4 


373,361 


3,628.7 


42,102 


409.2 


+ 19.0 


+ 16.1 


+ 6.8 


+ 4.0 


+ 7.0 


+ 4.3 


— 1.9 


-4.4 


+ 3.7 


+ 1.1 


+ 8.0 


+ 5.3 


786 


34.2 


3,173 


138.2 


7,171 


312.3 


53.866 


2,346.1 


102.571 


4.467.4 


10,091 


439.5 


1.040 


44.2 


3,835 


162.9 


7,900 


335.6 


49,023 


2,082.5 


106,042 


4,504.8 


10.933 


464.4 


1,100 


42.0 


4,471 


170.7 


7,670 


292.9 


50,684 


1,935.2 


102,225 


3,903.2 


12,496 


477.1 


1,323 


49.6 


4,251 


159.2 


7,526 


281.9 


49,917 


1,869.6 


106,185 


3,977.0 


13,028 


487.9 


166 


19.4 


339 


39.6 


1,478 


172.5 


9,005 


1,0508 


22,279 


2,599.6 


2,036 


237.6 


169 


19.2 


351 


40.0 


1,509 


171.9 


9,117 


1,038.4 


21,917 


2,496.2 


2,140 


243.7 


127 


16.7 


298 


39.2 


1,193 


156.8 


6,125 


804.9 


21,104 


2,773.2 


2,353 


309.2 


124 


15.8 


289 


36.8 


1.414 


1801 


6,170 


786.0 


20,293 


2,585.1 


2,411 


307.1 


311 


49.1 


2,045 


323.1 


2,247 


355.0 


15,528 


2,453.1 


26,666 


4,212.6 


3,540 


559.2 


356 


53.9 


2,373 


359.5 


2,322 


351.8 


17,551 


2,659.2 


28,018 


4,245.2 


3,971 


601.7 


465 


39.1 


1.304 


109.6 


4,087 


343.4 


16,882 


1,418.7 


35,802 


3,008.6 


3.088 


259.5 


517 


42.7 


1,352 


111.6 


4,409 


363.8 


16,188 


1,335.6 


36,393 


3.002.7 


3.803 


313.8 


258 


203 


873 


68.8 


1,868 


147.3 


14,856 


1,171.6 


38,098 


3.004.6 


4,241 


3345 


299 


22.9 


869 


66.5 


2,335 


178.7 


15,516 


1,187.1 


41,642 


3.186.1 


4,364 


333.9 


89 


21.9 


161 


39.7 


706 


173.9 


3,295 


811.6 


11,255 


2,772.2 


1.145 


282.0 


100 


23.6 


204 


48.1 


855 


201.7 


3,545 


836.1 


12,871 


3,035.6 


1.452 


342.5 


13.658 


46.7 


71.226 


243.7 


95,159 


325.5 


588,592 


2,013.5 


1.022,320 


3.497.3 


175.137 


599.1 


14,336 


48.1 


78,083 


261.9 


101,964 


342.0 


617,939 


2,072.9 


1,052,356 


3,530.1 


186,446 


625.4 


+ 5.0 


+ 3.0 


+ 9.6 


+ 7.5 


+ 7.2 


+ 5.1 


+ 5.0 


+ 3.0 


+ 2.9 


+ .9 


+ 6.5 


+ 4.4 


210 


51.6 


394 


96.8 


1,156 


284.0 


5,420 


1,331.7 


13,715 


3,369.8 


3,066 


753.3 


224 


55.6 


368 


91.3 


1.137 


282.1 


5,397 


1,339.2 


14,522 


3,603.5 


2.666 


661.5 


10,825 


49.4 


62,852 


287.0 


78,390 


358.0 


468,452 


2,139.4 


766,317 


3.499.8 


145.270 


663.5 


11.316 


50.8 


68,235 


306.1 


83,464 


374.4 


488,966 


2,193.3 


777,783 


3.488.8 


154,108 


691.3 


228 


25.5 


1,146 


128.0 


574 


64.1 


17,108 


1,911.5 


35,088 


3,920.4 


4,380 


489.4 


232 


25.9 


1,557 


173.6 


574 


64.0 


17,381 


1,937.7 


39,087 


4,357.5 


5,120 


570.8 


948 


39.9 


2,948 


124.1 


6,817 


286.9 


38,880 


1,636.4 


83.306 


3,506.1 


9.240 


388.9 


1,008 


41.2 


3,204 


131.1 


7,943 


325.0 


39,523 


1,617.1 


87,033 


3,561.1 


9,649 


394.8 


1,447 


39.6 


3,886 


106.2 


8,222 


224.8 


58,732 


1,605.6 


123,894 


3.386.9 


13,181 


360.3 


1,556 


41.2 


4,719 


125.0 


8,846 


234.4 


66,672 


1,766.6 


133,931 


3,548.8 


14,903 


394.9 



45 



Table 4.-Index of Crime, State, 1978 



Population 



Index 

total 



man- 
slaughte 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
assaull 



ALABAMA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Sute total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

ALASKA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Other cities 

Area actirally reporting 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Sute total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

ARIZONA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Sute total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

ARKANSAS 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Suie total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

CALIFORNIA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Sute total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 

747,300 

96.5% 

100.0% 

3,742,000 



None 
265,617 

100.0% 
137,383 

100.0% 
403,000 



1,749,689 
100.0% 
296,008 
100.0% 
308,303 
100.0% 
2J54,000 



100.0% 

544,535 

96.4% 

100.0% 

799,864 

92.0% 

100.0% 

2,186,000 



20,620,424 
99.7% 
100.0% 
674,145 
100.0% 
999,431 
100.0% 
22,294,000 



7,295 

7,558 

147389 



150,806 
17,999 



45,211 
19,486 



9,424 
10,243 
75,673 



1,525 
1,580 
15,682 



5,770 

5,978 

131,707 



8,506 
9,245 
68,151 



61 
1.040 



11316 

50.8 



3,455 
245 



135 
3,S35 



66,798 
66,935 



5,800 
1,063 



2,898 
ffi,464 



able 4.— Index of Crime, State, 1978— Continued 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 



Robbery 



vated 
assault 



COLORADO 

andard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

ther cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ural 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ale total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

CONNECnCUT 

andard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Iher cities 

Area actually reporting 
ural 

Area actually reporting 
ale total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

DELAWARE 

andard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Iher cities 

Area actually reporting 

Area actually reporting 

ate lolal 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

FLORIDA 

andard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
ther cities 

Area actually reporting 
aral 

Area actually reporting 
ate total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

GEORGIA 

andard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ther cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

aral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ate total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

See footnotes at end o( table. 



2,154,753 

100.0% 

261,021 

97.1% 

100.0% 

254,226 

92.3% 

100.0% 

2.670.000 



2,729,021 
95.4% 
100.0% 
199,674 
100.0% 
170,305 



lOO.O 



398,689 
100.0% 
66,247 
100.0% 

118,064 
100.0% 

583,000 



7,383,129 
100.0% 
382,035 
100.0% 
828,836 
100.0% 
8,594,000 



909,849 
93.9% 
100.0% 
1,268,321 
93.8% 
100.0% 
5,084,000 



7,600 

8,238 

182,426 



152,765 

4,929.5 



552,009 
25,051 



23,280 
24,827 
242,573 



432 

469 

13,296 

498.0 



9,762 

315.0 



507 
2,569 

440.7 



60,322 
2,607 



2,496 
2,661 
24345 



7,168 

7,769 

169,130 



34,474 

5,913.2 



491,687 
22,444 



20,784 
22,166 
218,028 



3,636 
113 



213 

227 

1,928 



4,251 

159.2 



848 

145.5 



16,817 

463 

421 
17,701 

206.0 



333 

355 

8,454 



341 

370 

7326 



97 
4302 



1363 

268.1 



13,432 

264.2 



2,073 
2,247 
49,917 



6,935 

922 

1,609 
9,466 

1,623.7 



9,108 
9,714 
75,022 



47 



Table 4.-Index of Crime, State, 1978— Continued 



Area 


Population 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 
neghgent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 

assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


HAWAII 

Standard Metropolitan 


725,259 
100.0% 
33,678 
100.0% 

138,063 
100.0% 

897,000 

145,006 
100.0% 

372,332 
100.0% 

360,662 
100.0% 

878,000 

9.140,740 

99.7% 

100.0% 

1,052,595 

95.6% 

100.0% 

1,049,665 

100.0% 

11,243,000 


51,892 

2,175 

9,944 
64,011 

7,136.1 

9,079 

18,504 

7,667 
35,250 

4,014.8 

497,858 
506.598 

40,128 
43,250 

14,348 
564,196 

5,018.2 

167,890 
184,101 

25,307 
29,890 

13,476 
19,162 
233.153 

4,338.5 

66,448 

34,162 
34,416 

14.399 
115,263 

3,980.1 


2,044 

63 

316 
2,423 

270.1 

536 

1,018 

522 
2,076 

236.4 

48,322 
48,808 

2,514 
2.710 

845 
52363 

465.7 

13,142 
14,151 

1.444 
1,705 

1,073 
1.527 
17383 

323.5 

3,465 

910 
916 

293 
4,674 

161.4 


49,848 

2,112 

9,628 
61,588 

6,866.0 

8,543 

17,486 

7,145 
33,174 

3,778.4 

449.536 
457,790 

37,614 
40,540 

13,503 
511,»3 

4,552.5 

154,748 
169,950 

23.863 
28.185 

12.403 
17.635 
215,770 

4,015.1 

62,983 

33,252 
33,500 

14,106 
110,589 

3.818.7 


38 

1 

21 
60 

6.7 

3 

17 

27 
47 

5.4 

1,058 
1.062 

20 

22 

24 
1,108 

9.9 

247 
260 

18 
21 

37 
53 
334 

6.2 

49 

9 
9 

16 
74 

2.6 


187 

9 

36 
232 

25.9 

57 

62 

50 
169 

19.2 

2,490 
2,516 

99 

107 

53 
2,676 

23.8 

1,109 
1,183 

99 

117 

106 

151 

1,451 

27.0 

223 

47 
47 

30 
300 

10.4 


1.473 

63 
1,557 

173.6 

120 

188 

43 
351 

40.0 

22,245 
22,419 

473 
510 

116 
23,045 

205.0 

5,644 
5,920 

325 
384 

156 

222 

6,526 

121.4 

1.159 

158 
159 

39 
1357 

46.9 


346 

32 

196 

574 

64.0 

356 

751 

402 
1,509 

171.9 

22,529 
22.811 

1,922 
2,071 

652 
25334 

227.1 

6,142 
6,788 

1.002 
1,183 

774 
1,101 
9,072 

168.8 

2,034 

696 

701 

208 
2,943 

101.6 


13,878 

648 

2,855 
17381 

1,937.7 

2,671 

3.879 

2,567 
9,117 

1,038.4 

111,945 
113.981 

8,808 
9,495 

4,604 
128,080 

1,139.2 

41,759 
45,982 

5,284 
6,241 

5,161 
7,338 
59361 

1,108.3 

13,910 

6,382 
6,430 

4.874 
25^14 

870.6 


31.567 

1,361 

6,159 
39,087 

4,357.5 

5,314 

12,558 

4,045 
21,917 

2.4%.2 

283,605 
289.069 

26,889 
28.980 

8,227 
326,276 

2.902.0 

95,815 
105,122 

17,208 
20,325 

6,099 

8,672 

134,119 

2,495.7 

45,086 

24,831 
25,016 

8,465 
78367 

2.712.9 




Area actually reporting ... 
Other cities 


4,403 


Area actually reporting ... 


103 


Area actually reporting ... 
Stale total . . 


614 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

IDAHO 

Standard Metropolitan 


570.8 


Area actually reporting ... 
Other cities 


558 


Area actually reporting ... 
Rural 


1,049 


Area actually reporting ... 
State total 


533 
2,140 

243.7 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

ILLINOIS 

Standard MetropoUtan 


Area actually reporting .... 


53,986 
54,740 




Area actually reporting .... 


1.917 
2,065 




Area actually reporting .... 
Stale total 


672 
57,477 

511.2 


Rate per 100,000 


INDIANA 

Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 


3,629,997 

88.0% 

100.0% 

694,812 

84.7% 

100.0% 

1,049,191 

70.3% 

100.0% 

5374,000 

1,087,200 

100.0% 

783,068 

99.3% 

100.0% 

1.025,732 

100.0% 

2,8<>6,000 


Area actually reporting .... 


17,174 
18,846 




Area actually reporting .... 


1,371 
1,619 




Area actually reporting .... 


1,143 
1,625 
22,090 

411.1 


State total 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

IOWA 

Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 


Area actually reporting .... 


3.987 


Area actually reporting .... 
Estimated totals 


2,039 
2.054 


Rural 


Area actually reporting .... 
State total 


767 
6,808 

235.1 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 



See footnotes at end of table. 



48 



•Me 4.— Index of Crime, Stote, 1978— Continued 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 



Burglary 



KANSAS 

andard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ural 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

tale total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

KENTUCKY 

andard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Area actually reporting 

Area actually reporting 

late total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

LOUISIANA 

andard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ther cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Area actually reporting 

late total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

MAINE 

andard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
ther cities 

Area actually reporting 
ural 

Area actually reporting 
tate total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

MARYLAND 

Andard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
ther cities 

Area actually reporting 
ural 

Area actually reporting 
late total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1,093,900 

100.0% 

671,260 

95.1% 



1,607,016 
100.0% 
654,280 



2,504,448 
99.9% 
100.0% 
512,932 
98.7% 
100.0% 
948,620 



303,545 
100.0% 

483,374 
100.0% 

304,081 

100.0% 

1.091,000 



3,513,872 
100.0% 
205,140 
100.0% 
423,988 
100.0% 
4,143,000 



8,051 

8,751 

106,696 



72,568 
16,425 



17,890 
19,969 



7,292 
45,151 



218,677 
11,938 



5,129 
830 



30328 

732.0 



7,632 
8,295 
99,225 



67,439 
15,595 



12,745 
166,865 



16,681 
19,293 



190,302 
10,921 



193 
U79 



77 
1,476 



62 
2,201 



2,328 

243 

274 
2,845 

81.3 



220 
6,887 



130 
12,828 



335 
4,551 



2,1% 
491 



2,261 
14306 



1,756 

161.0 



708 
15,686 

378.6 



3,382 
30,215 



20.144 

4,217 

6,581 
30,942 

884.6 



4,719 
50,587 



3,423 
58,907 



Table 4.-Index of Crioie, SUte, 1978— Continued 



Area 


Population 


Crime 
Index 


Violent 
crimei 


Property 
crimed 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Urceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


MASSACHUSETTS 

Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 


5,562,302 
96.7% 
100.0% 
199,299 
100.0% 
12,399 
100.0%, 

5,774,000 

7,455,153 

99.9%, 

100.0%, 

776,771 

99.8%, 

100.0%, 

957,076 

100.0% 

9,189,000 

2.607,142 

99.8% 

100.0%, 

505,075 

99.4% 

100.0%, 

895,783 

98.8% 

100.0%. 

4.008.000 

638,059 
97.3% 
100.0% 
641,771 
88.5% 
100.0%, 
1,124,170 

47.4%: 

100.0% 
2,404,000 


285,518 
293,107 

15,566 

260 
308.933 

5,350.4 

442.328 
442.415 

36,081 
36,160 

35,467 
514,042 

5,594.1 

128,978 
129,187 

20,171 
20,293 

16,416 
16,616 
166,096 

4.144.1 

27,295 
27,847 

20,802 
23,506 

4.770 
10.066 
61,419 

2,554.9 


25,489 
25,951 

700 

22 
26,673 

462.0 

48.999 
49,005 

2,041 
2,045 

1,990 
53,040 

577.2 

6,861 
6,865 

345 

347 

384 

389 

7,601 

189.6 

2,686 

2,751 

2,279 
2,575 

1,135 
2,395 
7,721 

321.2 


260,029 
267,156 

14,866 

238 
282,260 

4,888.5 

393,329 
393,410 

34,040 
34.115 

33,477 
461,002 

5,016.9 

122,117 
122,322 

19,826 
19,946 

16.032 
16,227 
158,495 

3,954.5 

24,609 
25,096 

18,523 
20.931 

3,635 
7.671 
53,698 

2,233.7 


200 
204 

II 

1 
216 

3.7 

887 
887 

26 
26 

59 
972 

10.6 

69 
69 

2 
2 

10 
10 
81 

2.0 

70 
72 

84 
95 

64 
135 
302 

12.6 


1,236 
1,257 

50 


9,739 
9,846 

98 

3 
9,947 

172.3 

19,527 
19.529 

358 
359 

265 
20,153 

219.3 

3,263 
3,265 

98 
99 

46 

47 

3,411 

85.1 

839 
853 

347 
392 

210 
443 

70.2 


14,314 
14,644 

541 

18 
15,203 

263.3 

25,392 
25,396 

1,470 
1,473 

1,410 
28,279 

307.7 

2,825 
2,827 

198 
199 

283 

286 

3312 

82.6 

1,603 
1,649 

1,723 
1,947 

763 
1,610 
5.206 

216.6 


79,400 
81,617 

5,758 

107 
87,482 

1,515.1 

1 10,279 
1 10,297 

7,931 
7,948 

14,471 
132,716 

1,444.3 

34,515 
34,558 

3,464 
3.485 

5,724 
5,794 
43437 

1,093.7 

9,626 
9,849 

6,017 
5,799 

1,752 
3,697 
20345 

846.3 


1 19,767 
123,329 

8,109 

81 
131.519 

2,277.8 

237,851 
237,906 

24,503 

24,557 

17.495 
279,958 

3,046.7 

77,097 
77,244 

15,044 
15,135 

9,156 

9,267 

101,646 

2,536.1 

13,179 
13,407 

11,528 
13,027 

1,549 
3,269 
29,703 

1,235.6 




Area actually reporting .... 


60,862 
62,210 






Area actually reporting .... 


999 


Area actually reporting .... 
Stale total 




1J07 

22.6 

3,193 
3,193 

187 
187 

256 
3,636 

39.6 

704 
704 

47 
47 

45 
46 
797 

19.9 

174 

177 

125 
141 

98 
207 
525 

21.8 


63,2SS 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

MICHIGAN 

Standard Metropolitan 


1,095.< 


Area actually reporting .... 


45,19! 
45.20- 






Area actually reporting .... 


l,60e 
1,61( 


Rural 




Area actually reporting .... 


1,51 
4832« 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

MINNESOTA 

Standard Metropolitan 


525. 


Area actually reporting .... 


10.50 
10,52 


Other cities 




Area actually reporting .... 


1,31 
1,32< 


Rural 




Area actually reporting .... 


1.15 
1,16( 


Stale total 


13.01 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

MISSISSIPPI 

Standard Metropolitan 


324. 


Area actually reporting .... 


1,80- 
1,84( 






Area actually reporting .... 


97 
1.10 


Rural 




Area actually reporting .... 
Estimated totals 


33- 
70 




3.6S 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 


151. 



50 



-Index of Crime, State, 1978— Continued 



MISSOURI 

ndard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ler cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated touls 

ite total 

Rate per 100.000 
inhabitants 

MONTANA 

ndard Metropolitan 

itatistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

ler cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

te total 

Rate per 100,000 
mhabitants 

NEBRASKA 

ndard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

ler cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

te total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

NEVADA 

ndard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Area actually reporting 

ral 

Area actually reporting 

te total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



3,079.616 

97.7% 

100.0% 

542,578 

89.1% 

100.0% 

1,237,806 

63.4% 

100.0% 

4,860,000 



188,174 
100.0% 

265,262 
98.6% 
100.0% 

331,564 



1.5% 



689,767 

100.0% 

448,176 

97.9% 

100.0% 

427,057 

93.2% 

100.0% 

1^5,000 



533.153 
100.0% 
32,611 
100.0% 
94,236 
100.0% 

660,000 



Crime 

total 



8,540 
13,479 
220.031 



6,673 
6,705 
30,739 



4,510 
4,841 
53,856 



697 

631 
639 

527 

529 

1,865 

237.6 

2,377 

400 
409 

183 

196 

2,982 

190.5 



5,153 

780.8 



7,847 
12,386 
197,293 



6.146 
6.176 
28,874 



50,874 

3,250.7 



Forcible 
rape 



1,015 

64.9 



2J73 
359.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



4,103 
6,476 
6S37S 



2.461 
1.972 



1,709 
6,170 



11,687 

746.8 



17,551 
2,659.2 



Table 4.— Index of Crime, State, 1978— Continued 



Area 


Population 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 
crirae2 


Murder 
and non- 
negUgent 

sla^u^^'ter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Mou 
vehic 
thef 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Standard MetropoUtan 


261,640 
99.6% 
100.0% 
475,815 
97.3% 
100.0% 
133,545 
100.0% 
871,000 

6,747,723 
100.0% 
524,786 
100.0% 
54,491 
100.0% 

7327,000 

402,451 

95.3% 

100.0% 

538,272 

87.6% 

100.0% 

271,277 

98.6% 

100.0% 

1,212,000 

15,707,692 

99.8% 

100.0% 

1.141,955 

99.2% 

100.0% 

898,353 

100.0% 

17,748,000 


10,890 
10,924 

21,828 
22,431 

2,073 
35,428 

4,067.5 

350,694 

29,390 

1,444 
381,528 

5,207.2 

26,702 
27,492 

25.699 
29,355 

5,857 
5,939 
62,786 

5.180.4 

954.179 
955.455 

41,937 
42,261 

30,277 
1,0274*93 

5,792.2 


284 
285 

617 
633 

117 
1,035 

118.8 

29.877 

1,066 

84 
31,027 

423.5 

2,823 
2.905 

2,238 
2.557 

927 

940 

6,402 

528.2 

144,944 
144,998 

2.307 
2,325 

1.934 
149,257 

841.0 


10,606 
10,639 

21,211 
21,798 

1,956 
34393 

3,948.7 

320,817 

28.324 

1,360 
350,501 

4,783.7 

23,879 
24,587 

23,461 
26,798 

4,930 
4,999 
56384 

4,652.1 

809,235 
810,457 

39,630 
39,936 

28,343 
878,736 

4,951.2 


1 
1 

9 
9 

2 
12 

1.4 

378 

18 

2 
398 

5.4 

46 
48 

33 
38 

37 
38 
124 

10.2 

1,762 
1,763 

20 
20 

37 
1,820 

10.3 


28 
28 

47 
48 

6 
82 

9.4 

1.618 

100 

9 
1,727 

23.6 

232 
242 

149 
170 

104 
105 
517 

42.7 

4,981 
4,984 

84 
85 

99 
5,168 

29.1 


89 
89 

117 
120 

20 
229 

26.3 

13,788 

306 

18 
14,112 

192.6 

788 
808 

378 
432 

110 

112 

U52 

111.6 

83,133 
83.152 

427 
430 

203 
83.785 

472.1 


166 
167 

444 
456 

89 
712 

81.7 

14.093 

642 

55 
14,790 

201.9 

1.757 
1.807 

1.678 
1,917 

676 

685 

4,409 

363.8 

55,068 
55.099 

1,776 
1,790 

1,595 
58,484 

329.5 


3.150 
3,161 

5,677 
5,834 

1,106 
10,101 

1.159.7 

97,649 

8,279 

772 
106.700 

1,456.3 

7.457 
7,719 

5.751 
6,569 

1,874 
1,900 
16.188 

1,335.6 

270,028 
270.391 

9,846 
9,922 

12.643 
292,956 

1.650.6 


6.562 
6,582 

13.897 
14.282 

766 
21,630 

2,483.4 

183,649 

18,581 

4% 
202,726 

2,766.8 

14,884 
15,288 

16,257 
18,569 

2,501 
2,536 
36393 

3,002.7 

423,685 
424.434 

27,638 
27,851 

14,231 
466,516 

2.628.6 




Area actually reporting .... 


( 


Other cities 




Area actually reporting .... 
Estimated totals 


I.« 


Rural 








Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

NEW JERSEY 

Standard MetropoUtan 


30 


Area actually reporting .... 
Other cities 


39.5 


Area actuaUy reporting .... 
Rural 


1,4 


Area actuaUy reporting .... 




Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

NEW MEXICO 

Standard Metropolitan 


561' 


Area actually reporting .... 


1,5 


Other cities 




Area actually reporting .... 
Estimated totals . . 


1,4 
l.« 


Rural .... 


Area actually reporting .... 


5. 


State total 


3,» 

313 


Rate per 100.000 
inhabitants 

NEW YORK 

Sundard MetropoliUn 


Area actually reporting .... 


115,52 
115,63 




Area actuaUy reporting .... 


2,14 
2.16 


Rural 


Area actually reporting .... 
State total 


1,46 
I19J4 

672 


Rate per 100,000 


See footnotes at end of table. 





52 



ible 4.— Index of Crime, SUte, 1978-Continued 



NORTH CAROLINA 

indard Metropolitan 

Jtatistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

her cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

lie total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

NORTH DAKOTA 

ndard Metropolitan 

iutistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
lie total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

OHIO 

ndard Metropolitan 

ilatistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ler cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ite total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

OKLAHOMA 

ndard Metropolitan 

ilatistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ler cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ral 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

ite total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of uble. 



100.0% 

1,065,845 

97.1% 

100.0% 

1,990,545 

98.0% 

100.0% 

5^77,000 



146,227 
100.0% 
187,830 



8,581,432 

96.1% 

100.0% 

953,132 

93.1% 

100.0% 

1,214,436 

97.9% 

100.0% 

10,749,000 



1,588,073 
99.5% 
100.0% 
754,055 
97.8% 
100.0% 
537,872 
95.2% 
100.0% 



Index 

total 



36,199 
36,935 
216,506 



8,690 

9,125 

118,939 



437 
67.0 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



31,422 
32,061 
193,452 



19,312 
19,731 
456,419 



7,988 

8,387 

108,774 



Forcible 
rape 



171 

174 

1,024 



135 
2>»7 



243 
I9,«27 



99 

104 

2,542 



4,408 
4,540 

4,015 
4,097 
17,757 

318.4 



269 

41.3 



17,813 
18,340 



1,103 
21,042 



822 
2,758 



7,315 

7,474 

130,543 



6,673 
6,824 

3,496 
3,671 
37,433 



Table 4.— Index of Crime, State, 1978— Continued 



Crime 
total 



Property 



Forcible 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



OREGON 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State tolal 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

PUERTO RICO 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Other agencies 

Area actually reporting 

Total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

RHODE ISLAND 

Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

State tolal 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Stale total 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of Ubie. 



1.460,854 

99.5% 

100.0% 

510,191 

99.3% 

100.0% 

472,955 

100.0% 

2,444,000 



9,554,298 

99.3% 

100.0% 

1,164,961 

99.1% 

100.0% 

1.030,741 

100.0% 

11,750,000 



852,356 
98.3% 
100.0% 
82,644 
100.0% 



935,000 



1.410,400 

99.2% 

100.0% 

543,132 

98.6% 

100.0% 

964,468 

100.0% 

2,918,000 



49,202 

5,262.2 



15,149 

451.2 



126 
2,195 



245 
16,064 



5,785 

172.3 



7,943 

325.0 



>le 4.-lndex of Crime, SUte, 1978-Continued 




















Area 


Population 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 
negl.gent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
Ihefl 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


SOUTH DAKOTA 

idard Metropolitan 


190,816 
100.0% 
187,073 
95.4% 
100.0% 
312,111 
80.6% 
100.0% 
690.000 

2,745,813 

99.6% 

100.0% 

567,481 

98.5% 

100.0% 

1,043,706 

93.0% 

100.0% 

4357,000 

10,248,543 

99.4% 

100.0% 

1,421,245 

98.4% 

100.0% 

1,344,212 

95.7% 

100.0% 

13,014,000 


9,227 

6,227 
6,525 

2,260 
2,804 
18,556 

2,689.3 

127,483 
127,763 

19,503 
19,801 

12,306 
13,228 
160,792 

3,690.4 

653,631 
656,075 

44,733 
45,468 

20,687 
21,621 
723,164 

5.556.8 

57,916 

4,643 
4,669 

2,457 
2,489 
65,074 

4,978.9 


659 

278 
292 

143 

177 

1,128 

163.5 

13,656 
13,676 

1,637 
1,662 

1,241 
1,333 
16,671 

382.6 

50,643 
50,821 

3.872 
3,936 

1,811 
1,893 
56,650 

435.3 

3,161 

218 
219 

170 

172 

3,552 

271.8 


8,568 

5,949 
6,233 

2,117 
2,627 
17,428 

2,525.8 

113,827 
1 14,087 

17,866 
18,139 

11,065 
11,895 
144,121 

3,307.8 

602,988 
605,254 

40,861 
41,532 

18.876 
19,728 
666314 

5,121.5 

54,755 

4,425 
4,450 

2,287 
2,317 
61322 

4,707.1 


5 

2 
2 

5 
6 
13 

1.9 

295 
295 

37 
38 

73 
78 
411 

9.4 

1,613 
1.620 

92 
94 

133 

139 

1.853 

14.2 

36 

2 

11 
49 

3.7 


41 

11 
12 

18 

22 
75 

10.9 

1,181 
1,182 

63 
64 

83 

89 

1335 

30.6 

4,562 
4,581 

188 
191 

148 

155 

4,927 

37.9 

265 

19 
19 

15 
15 
299 

22.9 


81 

19 
20 

7 

9 

110 

15.9 

6,147 
6,152 

293 
297 

177 

190 

6,639 

152.4 

20,664 
20,706 

436 

443 

235 

246 

21395 

164.4 

835 

18 
18 

16 
16 
869 

66.5 


532 

246 

258 

113 
140 
930 

134.8 

6,033 
6,047 

1,244 
1,263 

908 

976 

8,286 

190.2 

23,804 
23,914 

3.156 
3.208 

1.295 
1.353 
28,475 

218.8 

2.025 

179 
180 

128 

130 

2335 

178.7 


2,200 

940 

985 

768 

953 

4.138 

599.7 

41,751 
41.848 

5,371 
5,453 

5,186 
5,575 
52,876 

1,213.6 

187,438 
188,259 

12,3% 
12.600 

8,526 

8.911 

209,770 

1,611.9 

14,001 

812 
817 

689 

698 

15316 

1,187.1 


5,802 

4,693 
4,917 

1,182 
1,467 
12,186 

1,766.1 

60,106 
60,245 

11,272 
11,444 

4,892 
5.259 
76>« 

1.766.1 

361.431 
362,672 

26.310 
26.742 

9.098 

9.509 

398,923 

3.065.3 

36,858 

3.321 
3.339 

1,426 
1,445 
41,642 

3,186.1 




Area actually reporting .... 




Area actually reporting .... 


331 






Area actually reporting .... 


207 




1,104 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

TENNESSEE 

ndard Metropolitan 


160.0 


Area actually reporting .... 


11,994 






Area actually reporting .... 


1,242 






Area actually reporting .... 


1,061 






Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

TEXAS 

ndard Metropolitan 


328.1 


Area actually reporting .... 


54.323 






Area actually reporting .... 


2.190 


ral 




Area actually reporting .... 


1,308 






Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 


444.3 


UTAH 

ndard Metropolitan 


1,024,629 
100.0% 
139,249 
99.4% 
100.0% 
143,122 
98.7% 
100.0% 
1307,000 




Area actually reporting .... 




Area actually reporting .... 


294 






Area actually reporting .... 


174 


1 




Rate per 100,000 


333.5 



See footnotes at end of Uble. 



55 



Table 4.— Index of Crime, SUte, 1978— Continued 



Population 



Property 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



VERMONT 

Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

SUte total 

Rate per 100,000 

VIRGINIA 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Stale total 

Rate per 100,000 

WASHINGTON 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Estimated totals 

State total 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Standard Metropolitan 
Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 
Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Estimated totals 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 
Stale lolal 

Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 

WISCONSIN 

Standard Metropolitan 

Statistical Area 

Area actually reporting 

Other cities 

Area actually reporting 

Rural 

Area actually reporting 

Stale lolal 

Rate per 100,000 

inhabitants 

Sec footnotes at end of table. 



34.] 
100.0% 
248,962 
83.2% 
100.0% 
487,000 



3,366,058 
100.0% 
487,560 
100.0% 

1,294,382 
100.0% 

5,148,000 



2,689,391 

98.2% 

100.0% 

449,607 

88.6% 

lOO.C 

635,002 

92.6% 

100.0% 

3,774,000 



675,197 
100.0% 
384,774 
99.1% 
100.0% 
800,029 
100.0% 
1.860,000 



2,938,731 
100.0% 
636,509 
100.0% 

1,103,760 
100.0% 

4,679,000 



5,277 
6,341 
18,538 



171,240 
19,831 



20,411 
22,047 
230,802 



136,058 
25,347 



14,743 

286.4 



6,184 

132.2 



5,098 
6,125 
17,728 



159,346 

18,706 

16,882 
194,934 

3,786.6 



19,145 
20,679 
215,506 



4,719 

125.0 



8,123 

157.8 



1,858 

99.9 



2.203 


2,345 


85 


324 


48 
2336 


384 
3,053 


49.9 


65.2 



able 4.— Index of Crime, SUte, 1978— Continued 



Area 


Population 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 


Property 
crime^ 


Murder 
and non- 

"m'af" 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


WYOMING 

andard Metropolitan 


None 
281,364 
92.9% 
100.0% 
142,636 
94.1% 
100.0% 
424,000 


13,449 
14,469 

4,317 
4,588 
19,057 

4.494.6 


713 
767 

397 
422 
1,189 

280.4 


12,736 
13,702 

3,920 
4,166 
17,868 

4,214.2 


9 
10 

19 
20 
30 


69 

74 

24 
26 

too 

23.6 


155 
167 

35 
37 
204 

48.1 


480 
516 

319 
339 
855 

201.7 


2.365 
2,544 

942 
1,001 
3,545 

836.1 


9,474 
10,193 

2,520 
2,678 
12,871 

3,035.6 








Area actually reporting .... 

Estimated totals 

iiral 


897 
965 


Area actually reporting .... 


458 
487 
1,452 

342.5 


ate total 


Rate per 100,000 
inhabitants 



'Violent crimes arc offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Aieas, 1978 



Standard Melropolitan Statistical 



loul 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Tex. 



(Includes Callahan, Jones and Taylo 
Counties.) 

City of Abilene 

Total area actually reporting . . . 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Akron, Ohio 

(Includes Portage and Summit 
Counties.) 

City of Akron 

Total area actually reporting . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Albany, Ga 

(Includes Dougherty and Lee 
Counties.) 

City of Albany 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Estimated Toul 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Albany— Schenectady— Troy, N.Y 

(Includes Albany, Montgomery, 
Rensselaer, Saratoga and 
Schenectady Counties.) 
City of: 

Albany 

Schenectady 

Troy 

Total area actually reporting . . . 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Albuquerque, N. Mex 

(Includes Bernahllo and Sandoval 
Counties.) 

City of Albuquerque 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Alexandria, La 

(Includes Grant and Rapides 
Parishes.) 

City of Alexandria 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 
Allentown— Bethlehem— Easton, Pa.— 

NJ 

(Includes Carbon, Lehigh and 
Northampton Counties, Pa., 
and Warren County, N.J.) 
City of: 

Allentown 

Bethlehem 

Total area actually reporting — 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Alloona, Pa 

(Includes Blair County.) 

City of Altoona 

Total area actiially reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 



Tex. 



(Includes Potter and Randall 

Counties.) 

City of Amarillo 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
659,259 



4,584 

5,239 

3,887.6 



15,606 
30,885 
32,278 
4,896.: 



4,822 

5,564 

5,595 

5,346.4 



3,253 

3,436 

30,379 

3,839.7 



22,866 
26,702 
27,492 



1,702 
18,754 
18,897 
3,116.5 



8,874 

9,466 

5,963.9 



2,561 
2,650 
402.0 



2,434 
2,823 
2,905 
721.8 



4,337 

4,922 

3.652.' 



14,309 
28,324 
29,628 



4.239 
3,051 

2,972 
28,343 
3,582.' 



20,432 
23,879 
24,587 
6.109.3 



3,668 
5,244 

3,744.1 



2,271 
1,591 
17,879 
18,012 
2,970.5 



8,178 

8,718 

5,492.7 



5.-Index of Crime, Standard MetropolMa" Stotistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



ndard Melropolitan Statistical Area 



telm— Sania Ana— Gaiden Grove, 



ncludes Oranpc County 1 



Anaheim 

Santa Ana 

Garden Grove 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Arbor, Mich 

ncludes Washtenaw County.) 

City of Ann Arbor 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 



inhabitants 



ncludes Calhoun County.) 

City of Anniston 

Total area actually reporting .. 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants . 

lelon— Oshkosh, Wis 

ncludes Calumet, Outagamie and 
Winnebago Counties.) 

City of: 

Appleton 

Oshkosh 

Total area actually reporting .. 

Rate per 100,000 inliabitants . 

eville, N.C 

ncludes Buncombe and Madison 
Counties.) 

City of Asheville 

Total area actually reporting .. 

Estimated Total 



inhabitants 



Ga. 



Includes Butts. Cherokee. Clayton, 
Cobb. De Kalb, Douglas, 
Fayette, Forsythe, Fulton. 
Gwinnett. Henry, Newton. 
Paulding, Rockdale, and Walton 
Counties.) 

City of Atlanta 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .. 

intlc City. NJ 

Includes Atlantic County.) 

City of Atlantic City 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

pista, Ga.— S.C 

Includes Columbia and Richmond 
Counties. Ga. and Aiken 
County, S.C.) 

City of Augusta 

Total area actually reporting .. 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 

stin, Tex 

Includes Hays, Travis and 
Williamson Counties.) 

City of Austin 

Total area actually reporting .. 
Rate per 100,000 inliabitants . 

kersHeld, CaUf. 

[Includes Kem County.) 

City of Bakersfield 

Total area actually reporting .. 
Rate per 100,000 inhabiunts . 
See footnotes at end of table. 



Crime 
Index 
total 



15,417 
16,250 
8,866 
117.699 
6.423.7 



3,101 
2,750 
12.002 
»,095.8 



53,870 
127,594 
128,789 
6.917.3 



5.531 
13,560 
7,165.6 



3.524 
15,225 
15,505 
5,332.6 



24.719 
31,388 
6,632.6 



10,997 

29,352 
7.962.0 



1,126 
1,180 
690 

7,586 
414.0 



8,845 
13,327 
13,408 



Murder 
and non- 
legligent 
man- 
laughter 



14.291 
15,070 
8,176 
110,113 
6,009.7 



7,060 
14,368 
5,569.6 



2.545 

3.655 

3.225.3 



Forcible 
ipe 



45.025 
114.267 
115,381 
6.197.1 



3.202 
13,646 
13.899 
4.780.2 



23,306 
29.628 
6,260.7 



10,205 
26,709 
7,245.1 



Aggra- 
assault 



4,119 

5,765 
5,793 
311.1 



234 

704 

272.9 



3,990 
6,232 
6,276 



5,630 
5,515 
3,384 
40,900 
2,232.2 



1,683 
3,504 
1,358.3 



15,185 


25.874 


38,350 


65,231 


38,690 


65,906 


2,078.1 


3,539.8 


1,742 


2,545 


4,290 


7.070 


2,267.0 


3,736.1 


1,241 


1,767 


5,241 


7,481 


5,318 


7,638 


1,829.0 


2,626.9 


6,886 


15,079 


9.147 


18,872 


1.932.9 


3,987.9 


3,298 


6,012 


8,754 


15,790 


2.374.6 


4,283.2 



59 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, StaDdard MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Crime 
Index 

total 



Murder 
ind non- 
negligent 



ForcibU 
rape 



Baltln 



Md. 



(Includes Baltimore City and Anne 
Arundel. Baltimore. Carroll, 
Harford and Howard Counties.) 

City of Baltimore 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Baton Rouge, La 

(Includes Ascension. East Baton 
Rouge. Livingston and West 
Baton Rouge Parishes.) 

City of Baton Rouge 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .. 

Bailie Creek, Mich. 

dude*: Barry and ' 



Com 



Cily of Battle Creek 

Tola! area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Bay City, Mich 

(Includes Bay County.) 

City of Bay City 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 
Beaumont— Port Arthur— Orange, Tex. 
(Includes Hardin, Jefferson and 
Orange Counties.) 
City of: 

Beaumont 

Port Arthur 

Orange 

Total area actually reporting . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 



(Includes Yellowstone County.) 

City of Billings 

Total area actually reporting , 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

niloxl— Gulfport, Miss 

(Includes Hancock, Harrison and 
Stone Counties.) 
City of: 

Biloxi 

Gulfport 

Total area actually reporting . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

BInghamtoD. N.Y.— Pa 

(Includes Broome and Tioga 
Counties, N.Y., and Susquehann 
County, Pa.) 

City of Binghamton 

Total area actually reporting , 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



(Includes Jefferson, St. Clair, Shelby 
and Walker Counties.) 

City of Birmingham 

Total area actually reporting . . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 



(Includes Monroe County.) 

City of Bloomington 

Total area actually reporting , 
Rate per 100,000 inhabiUnts 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
183,809 



100.0% 
123,000 



100.0% 
363,691 



69,463 
140.486 
6,568.8 



21,969 
32,689 
7,352.0 



3,058 

5,845 

4,752.0 



9,068 
2,883 
1,728 
18,613 
19,508 
5,363.9 



2,576 
1,931 
8,032 
8,265 
4,696.0 



2,828 

9,802 

3,255.2 



26,659 
44,953 
45,032 
5,491.1 



2,024 

4,655 

5,055.3 



14,659 

21,858 
1,022.0 



1,948 
3.174 
713.9 



1,885 
1,956 

537.8 



1,089 
1,122 

637.5 



54,804 
118,628 

5,546.8 



2,902 
8,221 
J,472.6 



2,676 
5,302 
1,310.6 



16,728 
17.552 
4,826.1 



3,822 
4,934 
1,819.6 



2,359 
1,650 
6,943 
7,143 
1,058.5 



2,716 

9.472 

3,145.6 



23,690 
39,996 
40,068 
4,885.8 



38 
207 
213 
121.0 



1,351 
1,353 
165.0 



301 

408 

331.7 



288 


655 


127 


133 


77 


156 


548 


1,183 


565 


1,226 


55.4 


337.1 


61 


126 


69 


215 


67.4 


210.0 



232 
812 

837 
475.6 



3,192 
3,197 
389.8 



127 

154 

167.2 



TaUe 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



ForcibU 
rape 



(Includes Ada County.) 

City of Boise 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



(Includes Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk 
and Suffolk Counties.) 

City of Boston 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Bradenlon, Fl*. 

(Includes Manatee County.) 

City of Bradenton 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Bridgeport, Conn 

(Includes Fairfield County.) 

City of Bridgeport 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 



(Includes Plymouth County.) 

City of Brockton 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Tex 

(Includes Cameron County) 
City of: 

Brownsville 

Harlingen 

San Benito 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Bryan— College Sutlon, Tex 

(Includes Brazos County.) 
City of: 

Bryan ., , 

College Station 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

(Includes Erie and Niagara Counties.) 

City of Buffalo 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitanU .... 

Burlington, N.C 

(Includes Alamance County.) 

City of Burlington 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

CuloB, Ohio 

(Includes Carroll and Stark Counties.) 

City of Canton 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

(Includes Linn County.) 

City of Cedar Rapids 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
3329 JM 



100.0% 
798,272 



100.0% 
384034 



100.0% 
77,429 



100.0% 
I,299,4<>7 



100.0% 
419,441 



1664W0 

100.0% 



6,555 
9,079 



65,366 
183,484 
186,958 
5,615.4 



7,063 
19,499 
21,046 

5,477.4 



592 

9,043 

4,978.0 



1,355 
4,306 
5,561.2 



6,103 
14,897 
16,090 
3,836.1 



8,909 
10,697 
6,409.2 



10,035 
18,603 
18,815 



1,039 
2,367 
296.5 



III 

303 

391.3 



3,181 
5,396 
5,399 
415.5 



55,331 
164,881 
168,143 
5,050.3 



11,428 
37,499 
4,697.5 



6,522 
18,149 
19,602 
5,101.6 



2,013 

504 

8,383 

1,614.7 



24,132 
56,345 
56,415 



1,427 

2,735 

2,757.0 



5,494 
13,622 
14.733 
3,512.5 



8,582 
10,298 
6,170.2 



5,635 
7,997 
8,046 
241.7 



1,721 
2,268 
2,269 
174.6 



3,853 
9,590 
9,741 



1,195 
2,757 
2,759 
212.3 



214 
272 
163.0 



15,064 
48,014 
49,029 



2,847 
10,826 
1,356.2 



1,936 
6,201 
6,653 

;,731.5 



17,374 
17,392 
1,338.4 



3,962 
4,267 
1,017.3 



1,981 
2,368 
1,418.8 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



-North 

(Includes Berkeley. Charleston, and 
Dorchester Counties.) 
City of: 

Charleston 

North Charleston 

Total area actually reporting . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Charleston, W. Va 

(Includes Kanawha and Putnam 
Counties.) 

City of Charleston 

Tola! area actually reporting ... 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Charlotte— Gaslonia, N.C 

(Includes Gaston, Mecklenburg and 
Union Counties.) 
City of: 

Charlotte 

Gaslonia 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Chattanooga, Tenn.— Ga 

(Includes Hamilton, Marion, and 
Sequatchie Counties, Tenn. and 
Catoosa. Dade and Walker 
Counties, Ga.) 

City of Chattanooga 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Chicago, III 

(Includes Cook, Du Page, Kane, 
Uke, McHenry and Will 
Counties.) 

City of Chicago 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Cincinnati, Ohio— Ky.— Ind 

(Includes Clemiont, Hamilton and 
Warren Counties, Ohio and 
Boone, Campbell and Kenton 
Counties, Ky. and Dearborn 
County. Ind.) 

City of Cincinnati 

Total area actually reporting . . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitant ... 
Clark-svllle- Hopklnsvllle, Tenn.— Ky. .. 
(Includes Christian County, Ky. and 
Montgomery County. Tenn.) 
City of: 

Clarksville 

Hopkinsville 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

Cleveland, Ohio 

(Includes Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake 
and Medina Counties.) 

City of Cleveland 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



Populati< 



Index 
total 



25.961 
25,987 
6,776.1 



6,486 
10.340 
3.968.9 



12.109 
17.365 
17.693 
4,348.6 



190,815 
386.831 
390,224 
5.555.7 



30.296 
68.103 
68.845 
4.999.2 



50.952 
94.170 
96.330 
4.952.6 



3.303 
5.644 
5.687 
413.0 



9.697 
12.592 
12.729 

654.4 



Properly 



22.556 
22,579 
5.887.5 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



20.684 

3,990 

32.193 

5.343.3 



10.849 
15.790 
16.093 
3.955.4 



163.129 

348.270 
351,475 
5,004.0 



26,993 
62,459 
63,158 
4,586.2 



2,409 

1,478 

5,376 

3,710.0 



41,255 
81,578 
83,601 
4.298.1 



Forcibis 



15.233 
19.211 
19.280 
274.5 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



423 
2,353 
2,355 
614.1 



10,325 
16,528 
16,635 
236.8 



3,161 
3,189 
231.6 



2,623 
4.288 
4.378 



7.670 

7,677 

2,001.8 



34,165 
80.835 
81.598 
1.161.7 



8.551 
17.540 
I7.< 



486 
1.963 

1.354.7 



14,234 14,364 

23.443 39.969 

23.881 41,387 

1,227.8 I 2.127.8 



62 



rable 5.— Index of Crime, SUndard Metropolitan StatisHcal Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical 



Crime 
Index 
total 



legligent 

man- 
slaughter 



ForcibU 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



Colorado Springs, Colo 

(Includes El Paso and Teller 
Counties.) 

City of Colorado Springs — 
Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



(Includes Boone County.) 

City of Columbia 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



S.C. 



and Richland 



(Includes Lexingti 
Counties.) 

City of Columbia 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Toul 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

(Includes Chattahoochee County 
and Columbus Consolidated 
Government. Ga. and 
Russell County, Ala.) 

City of Columbus 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

(Includes Delaware, Fairfield, 
Franklin, Madison and Pickaway 
Counties.) 

City of Columbus 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

:oipiis Christi, Tex 

(Includes Nueces and San Patricio 
Counties.) 

City of Corpus Christi 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

l«ll«s-For1 Worth, Tex 

(Includes CoUin, Dallas, Denton, 
Ellis, Hood. Johnson. Kaufman, 
Parker. Rockwall. Tarrant and 
Wise Counties.) 
City of: 

Dallas 

Fort Worth 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

Iiyton, Ohio 

(Includes Greene. Miami, 

Montgomery and i'reble Counties.) 

City of Dayton 

Total area actually reporting 

Estunated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

laytona Beach, Fla. 

(Includes Volusia County.) 

City of Daytona Beach 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
S«e footnotes at end of table. 



13,259 
17.661 
5,972.8 



3.802 

5.485 

6,319.1 



27.204 
27.395 
7.256.2 



17,326 
20.320 
6,555.9 



831 

860 

374.2 



9.884 
2.670 
16.424 
16.446 
606.0 



2.976 
4.648 
4.708 
557.5 



12.303 
16,304 
5,513.9 



3,534 

5.170 

5.956.2 



9,555 
23.904 
24,075 
6,376.8 



6,299 

8.164 

8.602 

3.743.0 



41.486 
59.640 
61.012 
5.520.6 



15,902 
18,606 
).002.9 



76,685 
33,338 
179.186 
179,537 
6,615.5 



20.836 
47,120 
47.994 
5,683.3 



8,834 
18.935 
8,616.7 



1,923 
2.281 
2,308 
208.8 



2.353 
2.368 
627.2 



1.054 
1,541 
1.602 
145.0 



1.101 
8.619 
8,633 
318.1 



3.849 
5.269 
1.781.9 



3.555 

8.629 

8.681 

2.299.4 



2,440 
3.073 
3,225 
.403.3 



13.869 
18,158 
18.455 
1,669.9 



54,754 
54.851 
2.021.1 



7.364 
14.627 
14.816 

1.754.5 



2.600 

6.107 

2.779.1 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Decatur, HI 

(Includes Macon County.) 

City of Decatur 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Denver— Boulder, Colo 

(Includes Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, 
Denver, Douglas, Gilpin, and 
Jefferson Counties.) 
City of; 

Denver 

Boulder 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Des Moines, Iowa 

(Includes Polk and Warren Counties.) 

City of Des Moines 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Detroit, Mich 

(Includes Lapeer, Livingston, 

Macomb, Oakland, St. Clair and 
Wayne Counties.) 

City of Detroit 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Dubuque, Iowa 

(Includes Dubuque County.) 

City of Dubuque 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Duluth— Superior, Minn.— Wis 

(Includes St. Louis County, Minn., 
and Douglas County, Wis.) 
City of; 

Duluth 

Superior 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Eau Claire, Wis 

(Includes Chippewa County and Eau 
Claire County.) 

City of Eau Claire 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Elmlm, N.Y 

(Includes Chemung County.) 

City of Elmira 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

El Paso, Tex 

(Includes El Paso County.) 

City of El Paso 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Erie, Pa 

(Includes Erie County.) 

City of Erie 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Eugene— Springfleld, Oicg 

(Includes Lane County.) 
City of: 

Eugene 

Springfleld 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
See footnotes at end of uble. 



100.0% 
4,407,179 



100.0% 
98,061 



100.0% 
431,826 

100.0% 
266,675 



5,136 
5,848 
6,102 

4,833.3 



50,993 

5,277 

119,140 

7,954.1 



16,827 
22,761 
6,670.0 



110,511 
277,945 
6,306.6 



5,828 

2,099 

11,789 

4,529.1 



23,609 
24,736 
5,728.2 



8,864 
2,743 
16.821 



341 

355 

281.2 



1,490 
1,558 
360.8 



4,851 

5,507 

5,747 

4,552.2 



46,116 

4.993 

1 10,239 

7.359.8 



15.708 
21.314 
6,246.0 



88,909 
243,549 
5,526.2 



3.146 
3.998 

1,373.5 



5,613 


3 


11,438 
4,394.2 


4 
1.5 


971 

2,942 

2.340.9 


2 
2.4 


2.809 

4.414 

4.501.3 


2 
2.0 


22,119 
23,178 
5,367.4 


21 
24 
5.6 


5.168 

9.660 

3.622.4 


6 
9 

3.4 


8,377 

2.652 

15,994 

6.167.5 


6 

II 
4.2 



1,288 
2,127 
48.3 



2,362 

50 

3,508 

234,2 



12.283 
16.251 
368.7 



221 
4,366 
291.5 



7,533 
15.347 
348.2 



36 

53 

58.0 



rable 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statisticai Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Mclropolitan Statistical Area 



Popula 



Cnme 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcibly , 



vated 
assault 



Lvansvllle, Ind.— Ky 

(Includes Gibson. Posey. 
Vanderburgh and Warrick 
Counties, Ind. and 
Henderson County, Ky.) 

City of Evansville 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

•'all River, Mass 

(Includes Bristol County.) 

City of Fall River 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

"■argo— Moorhead, N. Dak.— Minn 

(Includes Cass County, N. Dak., and 
Clay County, Minn.) 
City of: 

Fargo 

Moorhead 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

?ayetteville, N.C 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

City of Fayetteville 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

fayetteville— Springdale, Ark. 

(Includes Benton and Washington 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Fayetteville 

Springdale 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Flint, Mich 

(Includes Genesee and Shawassee 
Counties.) 

City of Flint 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Florence, Ala 

(Includes Colbert and Lauderdale 
Counties.) 

City of Florence 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Fort Collins, Colo 

(Includes Larimer County.) 

City of Fort Collins 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitante ... 

Fort Uuderdale-Hollywood, Fla. 

(Includes Broward County.) 
City of: 

Fon Lauderdale 

Hollywood 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Fort Myers— Cape Coral, Fla. 

(Includes Lee County.) 
City of: 

Fort Myers 

Cape Coral 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
233,468 



100.0% 
158,018 



100.0% 
173,6«« 



8,923 
12,309 
13,625 
4,659.7 



2,761 

1,093 

4,583 

3,567.5 



7,209 
14,849 
6,360.2 



19,167 
33,854 
6.655.3 



3,429 

3,484 

2,756.6 



3,030 

7,182 

5,591.8 



16,726 
10,719 
70,564 
7,920.6 



956 
1,834 
785.5 



3,063 
4,067 
799.5 



687 
5,479 
615.0 



8,044 
11,200 
12,431 
4,251.4 



5,637 
19,977 
21,224 
4,592.^ 



6.253 
13,015 
5,574.6 



16,104 
29,787 
5,855.7 



1,256 

3,235 

3,285 

2,599.1 



2,8i 

6,839 

5,324.7 



15,805 
10,032 
65,085 
7,305.6 



663 

717 
245.2 



2,298 
3,080 
3,434 
1,174.4 



2,041 

5,290 

2,265.8 



4,765 
8,313 
1,634.2 



65 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Stati 



Index 
total 



Murder 
and non 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forciblt 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Fort Smith, Ark.— Okia 

(Includes Crawford and Sebastian 
Counties, Ark. and Le Flore and 
Sequoyah Courses, Okla.) 

City of Fori Smith 

Total area actually reporting . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants . 

Fort Wayne, Ind 

(Includes Adams, Allen, De Kalb and 
Wells Counties.) 

City of Fort Wayne 

Total area actually reporting ,.. 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .. 

Fresno, Calif. 

(Includes Fresno County.) 

City of Fresno 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .. 

Gadsden, Ala 

(Includes Etowah County.) 

City of Gadsden 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Gainesville, Fla 

(Includes Alachua County.) 

City of Gainesville 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Galveston— Texas City, Tex 

(Includes Galveston County.) 
City of: 

Galveston 

Texas City 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
Gary— Hammond— East Chicago, Ind. ., 
(Includes Lake and Porter Counties.) 
City of: 

Gary 

Hammond 

East Chicago 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Grand Forks, N.D.— Minn 

(Includes Grand Forks County. N.D. 
and Polk County, Minn.) 

City of Grand Forks 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Grand Rapids, Mich 

(Includes Kent and Ottawa Counties. 

City of Grand Rapids 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

Great Falls, Mont 

(Includes Cascade County.) 

City of Great Falls 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Greeley, Colo 

(Includes Weld County.) 

City of Greeley 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
130303 



100.0% 
192,599 



100.0% 
654,271 



100.0% 
577,198 

100.0% 
85,801 

100.0% 
109,442 



22,997 
40,206 
40,474 
8,473.8 



5,968 
10,725 
8,230.8 



2,598 
11,451 
5,945.5 



10,009 
6,947 
2,553 



12,544 
25,570 
4,430.0 



5,416 

5,778 
6,734.2 



3,511 

6,040 

5,518.9 



3,708 
3,732 
781.3 



3,707 
3,726 
569.5 



1.274 
1,852 
320.9 



4.2Ui 

5,354 

5.915 

3,167.6 



12,272 
16,014 
16.161 
4,347.0 



21.000 
36.498 
36,742 
7,692.5 



3,141 

3,892 

3.979.8 



5.390 

9,697 

7,441.9 



4,862 

2,437 

10,235 

5,314.2 



8,361 
6,272 
2,385 
29.241 
29.642 
4,530.5 



2.124 

3,253 

3,252.7 



3,340 

5,592 

5,109.6 



1,102 
1,528 
1,537 
321.8 

91 



739 
1,883 
1,896 
397.0 



1,209 
1,338 
716.5 



2,361 
3,546 

3.577 



7,397 
13,646 
13,725 
2,873.5 



440 
7.621 
7.705 
,177.6 



2% 

437 

437.0 



66 



Fable 5.— Index of Crime, StaDdard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Index 
total 



3reen Bay, Wis 

(Includes Brown County.) 

City of Green Bay 

Total area actually reporting .. 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 
3reensboro— Winston-Salem— High 

»olnl. N.C 

(Includes Davidson, Forsyth, 
Guilford, Randolph, Stokes and 
Yadkin Counties.) 
City of: 

Greensboro 

Winston-Salem 

High Point 

Total area actually reporting .. 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Jreenville— Spartanburg, S.C 

(Includes Greenville. Pickens and 
Spartanburg Counties.) 
City of: 

Greenville 

Spartanburg 

Total area actually reporting . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

iamllton— Mlddletown, Ohio 

(Includes Butler County.) 
City of; 

Hamilton 

Middletown 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Pa, 



(Includes Cumberland, Dauphin and 
Perry Counties.) 

City of Harrisburg 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

riartford, Conn 

(Includes Hartford and Tolland 
Counties.) 

City of Hartford 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitanU .... 

flonolulu, Hawaii 

(Includes Honolulu County.) 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Houston, Tex 

(Includes Brazona, Fort Bend, Harris, 
Liberty, Montgomery and Waller 
Counties.) 

City of Houston 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
fluntlngton— Ashland, W. Va.— Ky.— 

Ohio 

(Includes Cabell and Wayne 
Counties, W. Va., Boyd and 
Greenup Counties, Ky. and 
Lawrence County, Ohio.) 
City of: 

Huntington 

Ashland 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



9,742 
10,971 

5,078 
36,017 



28,972 
29,229 
5,291.5 



6,139 

2,901 

13,849 

5,565.1 



6,026 
16,765 
3,956.1 



18,594 
51,804 
5,574.0 



132,000 
177,699 
178,793 
7,212.6 



2,946 
2,973 
538.2 



10,852 
14,059 
14,140 



3,752 

6,040 

3,458.4 



8,749 
9,472 
4,821 
32,536 
32,574 
4,163.5 



5,127 
4,055 
26,026 
26,256 

4,753.3 



5,756 

2,777 

13,047 

5,242.8 



5,159 
15,334 
3,618.4 



16,005 

47,824 
5.145.8 



121,148 
163,640 
164,653 
6,642.2 



7,352 
8,324 
8,343 
336.6 



747 


2,303 


,143 


2,621 


140 


1,528 


2,554 


10,262 


2,558 


10,273 


327.0 


1,313.0 



1,918 
3,732 
3,782 
152.6 



1,129 
7,924 
7,994 
,447.2 



70 
243 
97.6 


42 
482 
193.7 


884 
3,799 
1,526.6 


439 
581 
137.1 


367 
726 
171.3 


2,096 
4,723 
1,114.5 


1,560 
2,010 
216.3 


876 
1,714 
184.4 


4,231 
12,928 
1,391.0 


1,473 
203.1 


346 

47.7 


13,878 
1,913.5 



1,033 
1,040 
351.6 



37,894 
50,988 
51,363 
2,072.0 



2,946 
2,%9 
1,003.9 



67 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Population 



Index 
total 



Property 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
assault 



(Includes Limestone. Madison and 
Marshall Counties.) 

City of Huntsville 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 



iDd. 



(Includes Boone, Hamilton, Hancock, 
Hendricks, Johnson, Marion, 
Morgan and Shelby Counties.) 

City of Indianapolis 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

Jackson, Mich 

(Includes Jackson County.) 

City of Jackson 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

Jackson, Miss 

(Includes Hinds and Rankin 
Counties.) 

City of Jackson 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

(Includes Baker. Clay, Duval, Nassau, 
and St. Johns Counties.) 

City of Jacksonville 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Janesville— Beloit, Wis 

(Includes Rock County.) 
City of: 

Janesville 

Beloit 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Jersey City, NJ 

(Includes Hudson County.) 

City of Jersey City 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
Johnson City— Klngsport— Bristol, 

Tenn.— Va 

(Includes Carter, Hawkins, Sullivan, 
Unicoi, and Washington Counties, 
Tenn., Bristol City, and Scott and 
Washington Counties, Va.) 
City of: 

Johnson City 

Kingsport 

Bristol 

Total area actually reporting , 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Johnstown, Pa. 

(Includes Cambria and Somerset 

City of Johnstown 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitanU 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
138,965 




10,770 
14,372 
4,845.9 



34,837 
57,820 
64,010 
5,588.1 



12,366 
13,752 
14,071 

4.756.7 



36,274 
44,837 
6,519.3 



2,853 
2,333 
6,462 



15,863 
31,452 
5,592.2 



1,291 
4,245 
1.692.4 



10,138 
13,324 
4,492.5 



31,906 
39,674 
5,768.6 



2,823 
2,250 
6,291 
1,527.0 



13,903 
28,380 
5,046.0 



1,100 
3,829 
1,526.6 



l,%3 
2,446 

2,555 
223.1 



1,353 
1,919 
2,176 
190.0 



8,738 
14,380 
16,057 
1,401.8 



4.599 

4,724 
1,597.0 



10,385 
12,852 
1,868.7 



68 



TaUe 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Kalanuuoo— Portage, Mich 

(Includes Kalamazoo and Van Buren 

Counties.) 
City of: 

Kalamazoo 

Portage 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Kansas City, Mo.— Kans 

(Includes Cass, Clay, Jackson. Platte 
and Ray Counties, Mo. and 
Johnson and Wyandotte 
Counties, Kans.) 
City of: 

Kansas City, Kansas 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Kenosha, Wis 

(Includes Kenosha County.) 

City of Kenosha 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

KUIeen-Temple, Tex 

(Includes Bell and Coryell Counties.) 
City of: 

Killeen 

Temple 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

KnoxvIIIe, Tenn 

(Includes Anderson, Blount, Knox 
and Union Counties.) 

City of Knoxville 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

La Crosse, Wis 

(Includes La Crosse County.) 

City of La Crosse 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitanU .... 

Lafayette, La 

(Includes Lafayette Pansh.) 

City of Lafayette 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Lafayette— West Lafayette, Ind 

(Includes Tippecanoe County.) 
City of; 

Lafayette 

West Lafayette 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Lake Charles, La 

(Includes Calcasieu Parish.) 

City of Lake Charles — 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Lakeland-WlDler Haven, Fla. 

(Includes Polk County.) 
City of: 

Ukeland 

Winter Haven 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Lancaster, Pa. 

(Includes Lancaster County.) 

City of Lancaster 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabiunts .... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
IJI3,299 



98.4% 
100.0% 

126,518 



100.( 



100.0% 
454,015 



100.0% 
134,160 



100.0% 
157,723 



100.0% 
272,552 



100.0% 
332,816 



15,459 
37,729 
80,857 



11,031 
18,627 
18,652 



5,161 
6,564 

1,892.7 



5,029 
8,970 
9,032 
687.7 



72,786 
5,542.2 



5.433 

7,962 

6,293.2 



3,516 

2,219 

8.452 

3,995.7 



9,816 
16,948 
16,972 
3,738.2 



3,258 
4,216 
1,768.9 



3,756 
7,166 

1,543.4 



764 


1.215 


5.009 


1,864 


2,708 


11,478 


2,940 


5,275 


23,981 


2,%1 


5,311 


24,225 


225.5 


404.4 


1,844.6 


142 


49 


1.258 


168 


87 


1,870 


132.8 


68.8 


1,478.1 



3,794 
6,100 
6,106 
1,344.9 



421 

620 

701.3 



835 
2,349 
705.8 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Stati 



.ansing— East Lansing. Mich. ... 

(Includes Clinton. Eaton, Ingha 
Ionia Counties.) 
Cily ot: 



East Lansing 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Laredo, Tex 

(Includes Webb County.) 

City of Laredo 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Las Vegas, Nev 

(Includes Clark County.) 

City of Las Vegas 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



(Includes Douglas County.) 

City of Lawrence 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Lawton, Okia 

(Includes Comanche County.) 

City of Lawton 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Lewiston— Auburn, Maine 

(Includes Androscoggin County.) 
City of: 

Lewiston 

Auburn 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants , 

-Fayette, Ky 

(Includes Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, 
Jessamine. Scott, and Woodford 
Counties.) 

City of Lexington 

Total area actually reporting .. 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 

Lima, Ohio 

(Includes Allen, Auglaize, Putnam 
and Van Wert Counties.) 

City of Lima 

Total area actually reporting . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants . 

Lincoln, Nebr 

(Includes Lancaster County.) 

City of Lincoln 



Total 



ctually 



reporting 



Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 
LKfle Rock— North Little Rock, Ark. 

(Includes Pulaski and Saline 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Little Rock 

North Little Rock 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 

Long Branch— Asbury Park, NJ 

(Includes Monmouth County.) 
City of: 

Long Branch 

Asbury Park 

Total area actually reporting ,, 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants . 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
3674>05 



100.0% 
65,277 



100.0% 
12L497 



Crime 
Index 
toul 



20.399 
20.456 
4.528.5 



3,029 

3.226 

3,803.6 



29,371 
34,647 
9,417.4 



3,121 

4,197 

6,429.5 



2,869 
1,162 

100.0% 4,874 



3.892 
8.206 
8,814 



8,062 

9,225 

5,055.7 



16,071 

4.302 

27.049 

7.145.8 



19.125 
19.178 
4,245.6 



26,485 
31,049 
8,439.4 



2,897 

3,940 

6,035.8 



1,129 




4,404 
4,612.5 


I.O 


12,679 
14,690 
5.000.3 


II 
17 

5.8 


3,662 

7,831 

8,401 

3,985.2 


5 

5 

2.4 


7,791 

8,918 

4,887.4 


3 
3 
1.6 


13,969 

3,902 

24,016 

6,344.5 


25 

10 

48 

12.7 


2,316 




1,700 
23.475 
4,789.4 


13 

2.7 



192 


1.548 


249 


1.731 


67.7 


470.5 


27 


70 


29 


75 


44.4 


114.9 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



10.308 
12,017 
3,266.3 



3,416 
4,064 
1,383.3 



2,200 
2.323 
I.102.C 



1. 155 

7.805 

2.061.9 



533 
6.783 
1,383.9 



fable 5.— Index of Crime, Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



ligen 

lan- 

slaughte 



Forcible 
rape 



ongview— Marshall, Tex 

(Includes Gregg and Harrison 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Longview 

Marshall 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

oraln— Elyila, Ohio 

(Includes Lorain County.) 
City of: 

Lorain 

Elyria 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

OS Angeles— Long Beach, Calif. 

(Includes Los Angeles County.) 
City of: 

Los Angeles 

Long Beach 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

oulsvllle, Ky.-Ind 

(Includes Bullitt, Jefferson and 
Oldham Counties, Ky. and Clark 
and Floyd Counties, Ind.) 

City of Louisville 

Total area actually reporting . . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

ubbock. Tex 

(Includes Lubbock County.) 

City of Lubbock 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

ynchburg, Va 

(Includes Lynchburg City and 
Amherst, Appomattox and 
Campbell Counties.) 

City of Lynchburg 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

lacon, Ga. 

(Includes Bibb, Houston, Jones and 
Twiggs Counties.) 

City of Macon 

Total area actually reporting . . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

ladlson, Wis 

(Includes Dane County.) 

City of Madison 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

lanchester, N.H 

(Includes Hillsborough County.) 

City of Manchester 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rale per 100,000 inhabitante ... 

lansneld, Ohio 

(Includes Richland County.) 

City of Mansfield 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
261,640 



2,969 
2,479 
8,652 
8,928 
3.448.3 



233,344 
27,776 
520,480 
521,797 
7,341.7 



19,253 

43,737 
45,000 
4,843.2 



14,259 
16,166 

7,843.1 



4,029 

5,660 

3,817.0 



12,294 
18,815 
5,865.8 



5,214 
10,890 
10,924 



6,207 
6,444 
1,953.3 



76,838 
76,956 
1,082.8 



284 
285 
108.9 



2,608 
2,331 
7,777 
8,035 
3,103.4 



196,547 
24,088 
443,642 
444,841 
6,258.9 



3,705 

5,141 

3,467.0 



7,163 
10,840 
11,225 
4,515.6 



12,064 
18,409 
5,739.2 



5,093 
10,606 
10,639 



4,750 
4.758 
66.9 



17,105 
2,130 
33,155 
33,201 



37,697 
37,760 
531.3 



166 
167 
63.8 



2.758 
2,814 
1,086.9 



69,876 
9,894 
165,493 
165,881 
2,333.9 



1,437 
3,150 
3,161 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical 



Popula 



Property 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Aggra- 
assault 



McAllen— PhaiT— Edlnburg, Tex 

(Includes Hidalgo County.) 
City of: 

McAllen 

Pharr 

Edinburg 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Melbourne— TitusvlUe— Cocoa, Fla 

(Includes Brevard County.) 
City of: 

Melbourne 

Titusville 

Cocoa 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Memphis, Tenn.— Ark.— Miss. 

(Includes Shelby and Tipton 

Counties, Tenn., Cnttenden County, 
Ark. and De Soto County, Miss.) 

City of Memphis 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 



100.0% 
897,332 



Fla. 



(Includes Dade County.) 

City of Miami 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Midland, Tex 

(Includes Midland County.) 

City of Midland 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Milwaukee, Wis 

(Includes Milwaukee, Ozaukee, 
Washington and Waukesha 
Counties.) 

City of Milwaukee 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Mtnneapolls-St. Paul. Minn.— Wis 

(Includes Anoka, Carver, Chisago, 
Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey. Scott, 
Washington and Wright Counties. 
Minn, and St. Croix County, Wis.) 
City of: 

Minneapolis 

Saint Paul 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 



(Includes Baldwin and Mobile 
Counties.) 

City of Mobile 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Modesto, Calif. 

(Includes Stanislaus County.) 

City of Modesto 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
1,432,086 

100.0% 
73349 

100.0% 
1,407,180 



2.936 
2.163 
1. 119 
15.989 
6.311.6 



43.542 
50.209 
5.595.4 



34.860 
120,388 
8.406.5 



2,014 

2.584 

3,522.9 



33,822 
63,524 
4.514.3 



30,542 
20.162 
111.229 
111.337 
5,293.6 



15,210 
24,301 
5,665.0 



9,152 
17,915 
18,087 
7.311.8 



5.412 
6.324 
704.8 



2,438 
3.194 
227.0 



3,098 
1,752 
6.327 
6,329 
300.9 



1,938 
3,015 
702.8 



38,130 
43.885 
4,890.6 



28,588 
102,135 
7,131.9 



31,384 
60,330 
4,287.3 



27.4 
18.410 
104.902 



13,272 
21,286 
4,962.1 



8,559 
16.622 
16.779 
6.783.0 



2,897 
3,062 
341.2 



1.212 
1,448 
102.9 



1,688 
790 
3.085 
3.086 
146.7 



1.738 
2.425 
270.2 



3,137 
10,983 
766.9 



2.562 
2.563 
121.9 



1.107 
1.806 
421.0 



able 5.— Index of Crime, Standard MetropoUtaD Statisticai Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
negligent 
slaughter 



Forciblf 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



(Includes Ouachita Parish.) 

City of Monroe 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rale per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

loolgomery, Ala 

(Includes Autauga, Elmore and 
Montgomery Counties.) 

City of Montgomery 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
luskegon— Norton Shores— Muskegon 

liigbts, Mkh 

(Includes Muskegon and Oceana 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Muskegon 

Norton Shores 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

ishvlile— Davidson, Tenn 

(Includes Cheatham, Davidson, 
Dickson. Robertson, Rutherford, 
Sumner, Williamson and Wilson 
Counties.) 

City of Nashville 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

issau-Suffolk, N.Y 

(Includes Nassau and Suffolk 
Counties.) 

Total area actually reporting 

Rale per 100.000 inhabitants ... 



NJ. 



100.0% 
I4>63,457 



(Includes Essex, Morris, Somerset 
Union Counties.) 

City of Newark 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



NJ. 



(Includes Middlesex County.) 
City of: 

New Brunswick 

Perth Amboy 

Sayreville 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants 
ew Haven— West Haven, Conn. .., 
(Includes New Haven County.) 
City of: 

New Haven 

West Haven 

Total area actually reporting . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



(Includes Jefferson, Orleans, 
St. Bernard and St. Tammany 
Parishes.) 

City of New Orleans 

Total area actually reporting , 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 
See footnotes at end of table. 




11,988 
13,973 
5,413.8 



10,533 
10,563 
5,923.0 



26,444 
35,056 
35,163 
4,488.8 



32,057 
109,116 

5,557.3 



17,524 
2,565 
40,021 
44,974 
5,930.8 



45,823 
78,284 
6,861.0 



3,153 
3,907 
3,913 
499.5 



2,243 
2,428 
320.2 



7,635 
10,715 
939.1 



3,829 
5,618 

5,674 
1,341.3 



9,542 

9,570 

5,366.2 



23,291 
31,149 
31,250 
3,989.3 



25,214 
96,216 
4,900.3 



16,330 
2,386 
37,778 
42,546 
5,610.6 



38,188 
67,569 
5,921.9 



731 

736 

563.1 



2,737 
5,681 
289.3 



3,731 
4,435 

1,718.3 



1,150 
145 
2,534 
2,540 
1,424.3 



8,860 
28,788 
1,466.2 



12,174 
13,477 
1,777.2 



10,514 
19,845 

1,739.3 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Populatii 



Property 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 



Robbery 



Newpon News— Hampton, Va 

(Includes Hampton, Newport News, 
Poquoson, and Williamsburg 
Cities and Gloucester, James City, 
and York Counties.) 
City of: 

Newport News 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

New York, N.Y.-NJ 

(Includes Bronx, Kings, New York, 
Putnam, Queens, Richmond, 
Rockland and Westchester 
Counties, N.Y. and Bergen 
County, N.J.) 

City of New York 

Total area actually reporting .... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
Norfolk— Virginia Beach— Portsmouth, 

Va.-N.C 

(Includes Chesapeake, Norfolk, 
Portsmouth, Suffolk, and Virginia 
Beach Cities, Va.. and Currituck 
County, N.C.) 
City of: 

Norfolk 

Virginia Beach 

Portsmouth 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

North East, Pa 

(Includes Lackawanna, Luzerne and 
Monroe Counties.) 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Odessa, Tex 

(Includes Ector County.) 

City of Odessa 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Oklahoma City, Okia 

(Includes Canadian, Cleveland, 
McClain, Oklahoma and 
Pottawatomie Counties) 

City of Oklahoma City 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Omaha, Nebr.— Iowa 

(Includes Douglas and Sarpy 
Counties, Nebr., and 
Pottawattomie County. Iowa.) 

City of Omaha 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Orlando, Fla 

(Includes Orange, Osceola and 
Seminole Counties.) 

City of Orlando 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
9300.743 



100.0% 
592,822 



19,472 
12,812 
5,869 



16,227 
16,265 
2,683.9 



5,401 

6,318 

5,493.9 



12.992 
50,007 
8.435.4 



447,669 
530,782 
531,934 
5,719.3 



17,306 
12,347 
5,169 



15,477 
15.512 
2.559.6 



5,121 

5,982 

5,201.7 



24,031 
39,993 
40.078 
5,089.4 



19.603 
28.923 
4,988.3 



74,029 
76,154 
76,172 



43,271 
45,640 
45.669 



2,902 
2,907 
369.2 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Murder 
and non- 
negligenl 



ForcibU 



Ky. 



(Includes Daviess County.) 

City of Owensboro 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rale per 100,000 inhabitants .. 
Oxnard— Siml Valley— Ventura, Calif. 
(Includes Ventura County.) 
City of: 

Oxnard 

Simi Valley 

Ventura 

Total area actually reporting . . . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Panama City, Fla 

(Includes Bay County.) 

City of Panama City 

Total area actually reporting ... 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Parkersburg- Marietta, W. Va.— Ohio 

(Includes Wirt and Wood Counties, 

W. Va. and Washington County, 

Ohio.) 

City of: 

Parkersburg 

Marietta 



Pascagoula— Moss Point, Miss 

(Includes Jackson County.) 
City of. 

Pascagoula 

Moss Point 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Pllerson—Clirton— Passaic, NJ 

(Includes Passaic County.) 
City of: 

Paterson 

Clifton 

Passaic 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Pensacoia, Fla. 

(Includes Escambia and Santa Rosa 
Counties.) 

City of Pensacoia 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 



(Includes Peoria, Tazewell and 
Woodford Counties.) 

City of Peoria 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
Petersburg— Colonial Heights— Hopewell, 



(Includes Colonial Heights, Hopewell 
and Petersburg Cities and 
Dinwiddie and Prince George 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Petersburg 

Colonial Heights 

Hopewell 

actually reporting 



Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
482,035 



100.0% 
92,508 

100.0%. 
153,890 



100.0% 
114,700 



100.0% 
460,230 



100.0% 
359,048 



3,331 

3,848 

25,697 

5,330.9 



808 

5,689 

3,696.8 



2,176 

675 

4.991 

1,351.4 



9,985 
3,105 
3,624 



10,929 
17,169 
17,374 
4,838.9 



2,492 

3,007 

3,712.3 



8,323 
3,190 
3,529 
23,616 
4,899.2 



8,504 
2,968 
3,206 
22.811 
4,956.4 



4.552 
18,042 
6,689.6 



9,113 
15,002 
15,196 

1,232.3 



1,249 
5,214 
1,175.6 



360 
1,269 

470.5 



1,379 
1,633 
1,639 

456.5 



1,010 
8,560 

1,775.8 



1,386 

5,606 

2,078.6 



321 

1,323 

1,059.5 



75 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, SUindard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolilan Statistical Area 



Index 

total 



ForcibU 
rape 



Aggra- 
assault 



P«.-NJ 

(Includes Bucks, Chester, Delaware. 
Montgomery and Philadelphia 
Counties, Pa. and Burlington, 
Camden and Gloucester Counties, 
N.J.) 

City of Philadelphia 

Total area actually reporting . . . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Phoenix, Ariz 

(Includes Mancopa County.) 

City of Phoenix 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Pine Bluff, Art 

(Includes Jefferson County.) 

City of Pine Bluff 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitanU .. 



100.0% 
86.554 



100.0% 
2344,441 



(Includes Allegheny, Beaver, 
Washington and Westmoreland 
Counties.) 

City of Pittsburgh 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Plttsfleld, Mass 

(Includes Berkshire County.) 

City of Pittsfield 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Portland, Maine 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 

City of Portland 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Porlland, Oreg.— Wash 

(Includes Clackamas, Multnomah and 
Washington Counties, Oreg., and 
Clark County, Wash.) 

City of Portland 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Poughkeepsie, N.Y 

(Includes Dutchess County.) 

City of Poughkeepsie 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
Providence— Warwick— Pawlucket, R.I. .. 
(Includes Bnstol, Kent, Providence 
and Washington Counties.) 
City of: 

Providence 

Warwick 

Pawlucket 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Prove— Orem, Utah 

(Includes Utah County.) 
City of: 

Orem 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
1,142,646 



100.0% 
852356 




71,575 
112,793 
8,716.3 



3,001 

6,018 

6,296 

4,270.8 



6,331 
13,016 
6,255.7 



2,254 

8,372 

3,646.3 



12,403 
5,432 
2,943 
43,772 
44,227 
5,188.8 



12.368 
22,184 
22.276 
453.2 



5,401 
8,037 
621.1 



8,010 
8,034 
342.7 



2.909 
2.935 
344.3 



179,116 
180,435 
3,671.2 



66,174 
104,756 
8,095.2 



3,158 
3,732 
1,311.8 



2,813 
5,677 
5,938 
1,027.9 



31,597 
71,057 
71,607 
6,266.f 



2,083 

7,702 

3,354.5 



11,422 
5,062 
2,781 
40,863 
41,292 



2.049 
1.715 
6,370 
3,451 



1,338 
1,343 

27.3 



10,452 
10,480 
213.2 



2,450 
2,457 
215.0 



4.224 
9,915 
9,973 
202.9 



162 

197 

227.6 



3,832 
3,861 
337.9 



1,922 
1,943 
228.0 



19,154 
55,024 
55,383 
1,126.8 



20.340 
30,721 
2,374.0 



1,141 

2,282 
2,363 



9,734 
22,193 
22,337 
1,954.8 



696 
2,598 
1,131.5 



able 5.— Index of Crime, StandanI MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Crime 
total 



Property 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



»ieblo, Colo 

(Includes Pueblo County.) 

City of Pueblo 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 

aclne. Wis 

(Includes Racine County.) 

City of Racine 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

alelgh— Durham, N.C 

(Includes Durham, Orange and Wake 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Raleigh 

Durham 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

■pid City, S.D 

(Includes Meade and Pennington 
Counties.) 

City of Rapid City 

Total area actually reporting 

per 100,000 inhabitants 



Pa. 



(Includes Berks County.) 

City of Reading 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

eno, Nev 

(Includes Washoe County.) 

City of Reno 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 
Jchland—Keiuiewick— Pasco, Wash. 
(Includes Benton and Franklin 

City of: 

Richland 

Kennewick 

Pasco 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabiunts 



Va. 



(Includes Richmond City and Charles 
City, Chesterfield, Goochland, 
Hanover, Henrico, New Kent 
and Powhatan Counties.) 

City of Richmond 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



100.0% 
17M38 



100.0% 
491,372 



100.0% 
298,458 



100.0% 
120,991 



(Includes Riverside and San 
Bernardino Counties.) 
City of: 

Riverside 

San Bernardino 

Ontario 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabiunts 
Sec footnotes at end of table. 




6,439 

7.7 1 1 

6,252.0 



6,612 
10,004 
5,609.6 



8,448 
8,178 
24,266 
24,543 
4,994.8 



4,820 

8,975 

9,029 

3,025.2 



8,882 
14,232 
8,612.5 



16,943 
32,746 
5,504.4 



13,394 
13,668 
6,340 
100,626 
7,299.1 



5,639 
6,708 
5,438.8 



7,538 
22,533 
22,778 
4,635.6 



3,196 

4,479 

5,010.7 



4,337 
8,315 
8,366 



15,107 
30,359 
5,103.1 



12,043 
12,242 

5,325 



272 
2,905 
210.7 



832 
1,252 
1,400.6 



1,779 
3,120 
3,134 
1,050.1 



2,449 

3,975 

2,405.5 



303 
294 
1,433 



4,447 
8,462 
1,422.4 



3,872 

2,057 

33,621 

2,438.8 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Stall 



Index 
total 



Murder 

negligeni 

man- 
slaughtci 



ForcibU 



Va. 



(Includes Roanoke and Salem Cities 
and Botetourt, Craig and Roanoke 
Counties.) 

City of Roanoke 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per I(X),000 inhabitants . . . . 

Rochester, Minn 

(Includes Olmsted County.) 

City of Rochester 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per IOO,(X)0 inhabitants .... 

Rochester, N.V 

(Includes Livingston, Monroe, 
Ontario, Orleans and Wayne 
Counties.) 

City of Rochester 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per IOO,(X)0 inhabitants .... 

Rockford, III 

(Includes Boone and Winnebago 
Counties.) 

City of Rockford 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per lOO.OCX) inhabitants .... 

Sacramento, Calif. 

(Includes Placer, Sacramento and 
Yolo Counties.) 

City of Sacramento 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per IOO,0(X) inhabitants .... 

Saginaw, Mich 

(Includes Saginaw County.) 

City of Saginaw 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

St. Cloud, Minn 

(Includes Benton, Sherburne and 
Stearns Counties.) 

City of Saint Cloud 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

St Joseph, Mo 

(Includes Andrew and Buchanan 
Counties.) 

City of Saint Joseph 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

St. Uuls, MO.-III 

(Includes St. Louis City and 

Franklin, Jefferson, St. Charles and 
St. Louis Counties, Mo. and 
Clinton, Madison, Monroe and 
St. Clair Counties, 111.) 

City of Saint Louis 

Total area actually reporting ..... 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Salem, Greg 

(Includes Marion and Polk Counties.) 

City of Salem 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



lOO.O^o 
269,723 



100.0% 
951,073 



100.0% 
225,925 



100.0% 
2,402,259 



8,656 
12,042 
5,404.7 



2,974 
3,730 
»,063.2 



25,285 
52,964 
5,487.5 



9,684 
14,512 
14,823 
5,495.6 



29,188 
79,039 
8,310.5 



3,475 

3,576 

2,310.3 



5,415 

5,775 

5,736.5 



54,485 
134,621 
139,170 
5,793.3 



6,710 
13,225 
13.255 
5,796.5 



2,334 
3,326 
344.6 



10,095 
16,506 
16,766 
697.9 



2,877 

3,605 

3,927.0 



22,951 
49,638 
5,142.9 



7,042 
12,908 

5,713.4 



2,440 

3,406 

3,505 

2,264.5 



6,528 
12,406 
12,434 
5,437.5 



1,582 
2,948 
310.0 



1,337 
3,402 

357.7 



2,210 
3,062 

1,374.3 



636 

873 

951.0 



9,460 
22,918 
2,409.7 



5,025 


4,363 


16,688 


7,306 


7,891 


38,803 


7,400 


8,040 


39,854 


308.0 


334.7 


1,659.0 


100 


40 


1,625 


162 


550 


3,423 


162 


552 


3,430 


70.8 


241.4 


1,500.0 



78 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Index 
total 



Forcible 
rape 



Sallnas-Seaslde-Monterey, Calif. 

(Includes Monterey County.) 
City of: 

Salinas 

Seaside 

Monterey 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

Salt Lake City-Ogden, Utah 

(Includes Davis, Salt Lake. Tooele 
and Weber Counties.) 
City of: 

Salt Lake City 

Ogden 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

San Angelo, Tex 

(Includes Tom Green County.) 

City of San Angelo 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

San Antonio, Tex 

(Includes Bexar, Comal and 
Guadalupe Counties.) 

City of San Antonio 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

San Diego, Calif. 

(Includes San Diego County.) 

City of San Diego 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated ToUl 

Rate per 100.000 inhabitants ... 

San Francisco — Oaldand, Calif. 

(Includes Alameda, Contra Costa, 
Marin, San Francisco and San 
Mateo Counties.) 
City of: 

San Francisco 

Oakland 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

San Jose, Calif. 

(Includes Santa Clara County.) 

City of San Jose 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
Santa Barbara— Santa Maria— Lompoc, 

Calif. 

(Includes Santa Barbara County.) 
City of; 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Maria 

Lompoc 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Santa Cruz, Calif. 

(Includes Santa Cruz County.) 

City of Santa Cruz 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Santa Rosa, Calif, 

(Includes Sonoma County.) 

City of Santa Rosa 

Total area actually reporting — 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
79327 



100.0% 
1,737,766 



100.0% 
1,227335 



1,559 

2.507 
14,512 
5,277.8 



16,103 

5,643 

51.312 

6,108.2 



4,510 

4,840 

6,101.3 



52,526 
60,776 
5,947.1 



66,838 
115,277 
117,450 
6,758.7 



70,385 
38,854 
256,015 
8,046.8 



41,831 
79,304 
6,461.5 



5,535 
3,428 
2,291 
19,145 
6,546.2 



7,175 
17,218 
6,340.3 



3,446 
3,983 
389.7 



10.509 
5,374 

26,080 
819.7 



2,755 
4,967 
404.7 



1,429 

2,365 
13,406 
1,875.6 



15,041 

5.377 

48,385 

5,759.8 



62,31 
106,736 
108.715 
6.256.0 



59,876 
33,480 
229.935 
7,227.1 



39,076 

74,337 
6.056.8 



5,285 
3,204 
2,103 
18,002 
6,155.4 



4,039 
10,857 
6,244.1 



6,881 
16,271 
5,991.6 



2,530 
3,815 
3,891 
223.9 



6,509 

2,774 
13,183 



3,986 
4,089 
235.3 



3,299 
2,152 
10,856 
341.2 



1,131 
12,914 

1,537.3 



16,795 
19,362 
1,894.6 



20,158 
35,455 
36,095 
2,077.1 



18,054 
12,501 
71,555 
2,249.0 



13,749 
24,040 
1,958.7 



955 
3,231 

1,858.2 



Table S.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Sutistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Index 
total 



Murder 
negligent 
slaughter 



ForcibU 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglar)' 



FU. 



(Includes Sarasota County.) 

City of Sarasota 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Savannah, Ga 

(Includes Bryan, Chatham and 
EfTingham Counties.) 

City of Savannah 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Seattle— Everett. Wash. 

(Includes King and Snohomish 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Seattle 

Everett 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

Shennan— Denison, Tex 

(Includes Grayson County.) 
City of: 



100.0% 
215,586 



100.0% 
356,175 



(Includes Bossier, Caddo and Webster 
Parishes.) 

City of Shreveport 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

SkHix City, Iowa— Nebr 

(Includes Woodbury County, Iowa, 
and Dakota County, Nebr.) 

City of Sioux City 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Sioux Falls, S. Dak 

(Includes Minnehaha County.) 

City of Sioux Falls 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 



100.0% 
121349 



100.0% 
101,427 



100.0% 
277,247 



(Includes Marshall and St. Joseph 
Counties.) 

City of South Bend 

Total area actually reporting . 

Rale per 100,000 inhabitants 

Spokane, Wash 

(Includes Spokane County.) 

City of Spokane 

Total area actually reporting . 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



100.0% 
320,275 



100.0% 
I84*M 



(Includes Menard and Sangamon 
Counties.) 

City of Springfield 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 
See footnotes at end of table. 



3,848 
10,021 
5,813.9 



9,473 
15,462 
15,520 
7,199.0 



4,389 
99,437 
101,658 
6,873.2 



1,259 

3,204 

3,640.9 



14,030 
20,064 
5,633.2 



5,405 

6,277 

5,164.2 



3,775 

4,243 

4,183.3 



8,468 
13,703 
1,942.5 



12,582 
18,295 
5,712.3 



1,547 
2,024 
2,027 



7,758 
7,863 
531.6 



3,623 
9,257 
5,370.7 



7,926 
13,438 
13,493 
6,258.8 



91,679 
93,795 
6,341.6 



12,933 
18,277 
5,131.5 



5,216 
6,070 
1,993.9 



2,257 

53 

2,894 



1,392 
1,394 
646.6 



4,212 
4,229 
1,961.6 



1,260 
29.061 
29,611 



3,937 
5,784 
1,623.9 



4,312 

5,442 

5,540 

3,002.0 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Cnme 
total 



Murder 
negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Springfield, Mo 

(Includes Christian and Greene 
Counties.) 

City of Springfield 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Springneld, Ohio 

(Includes Champaign and Clark 
Counties.) 

City of Springfield 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated ToUl 

Rale per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
SleubenviUe— Welnon, Ohio— W. Va. ... 
(Includes JefTerson County. Ohio, and 
Brooke and Hancock Counties, 
W. Va.) 
City of: 

Steubenville 

Weirton 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Stockton, Calif. 

(Includes San Joaquin County.) 

City of Stockton 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 



N.Y. 



(Includes Madison, Onondaga and 
Oswego Counties.) 

City of Syracuse 

Total area actually reporting , 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 

facoma. Wash 

(Includes Pierce County.) 

City of Tacoma 

Total area actually reporting . 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants 



Fla. 



(Includes Leon and Wakulla 
Counties.) 

City of Tallahassee 

Total area actually reporting . . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 

rampa— St. Petersburg, Fla. 

(Includes Hillsborough, Pasco and 
Pinellas Counties.) 
City of: 

Saint Petersburg 

Total area actually reporting . . 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 

ferre Haute, Ind 

(Includes Clay. SuUivan, Vermilhon 
and Vigo Counties.) 

City of Terre Haute 

Total area actually reporting .. 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 
See footnotes at end of table. 



12,123 
12,807 
6,777.5 



4,598 

7,192 

7,258 

3,986.3 



540 

3,413 

3,625 

2,173.4 



15,174 
32,581 
5,075.8 



13,463 
26,829 
27,285 
6,164.8 



6,771 
10,638 

7,755.5 



27,002 
16,272 
95,990 
6,794.7 



3,922 

6,331 

7.493 

4,303.7 



1,214 
2,095 
667.9 



3,510 
2,070 
9,941 
703.7 



6,761 
6,823 

3,747.^ 



506 
2.954 
3,152 

1,889.8 



14,208 
31,164 
4,855.0 



12,501 
24,912 
25.347 
5,727.0 



23.492 
14,202 
86,049 
6,091.0 



3,816 
6,150 
7,236 
t,156.l 



242 
243 
133.5 



2,136 
1,301 
6,584 



1,214 
1,257 
753.6 



3,709 

7,173 

2,286.9 



4,293 
9,294 
9.407 

2.125.4 



1,928 

2,934 

2,139.0 



7,532 
4,095 
27.894 
1,974.5 



1.005 

1,806 

2,120 

1,217.6 



Table S.— Index of Crime, Standard MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



Crime 
Index 

total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



ForcibU 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 



Texarkana, Tex.— Texarkana, Ark 

(Includes Bowie County, Tex., and 
Little River and Miller Counties, 
Ark.) 
City of: 

Texarkana, Texas 

Texarkana, Arkansas 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Toledo, Ohio-Mich 

(Includes Fulton, Lucas, Ottawa and 
Wood Counties, Ohio and Monroe 
County, Mich.) 

City of Toledo 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Topeka, Kans 

(Includes Jefferson, Osage and 
Shawnee Counties.) 

City of Topeka 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Trenton, NJ 

(Includes Mercer County.) 

City of Trenton 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Tucson, Ariz 

(Includes Pima County.) 

City of Tucson 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Tulsa, Okia 

(Includes Creek. Mayes, Osage, 
Rogers, Tulsa and Wagoner 
Counties.) 

City of Tulsa 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Tuscaloosa, Ala 

(Includes Tuscaloosa County.) 

City of Tuscaloosa 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Tyler, Tex 

(Includes Smith County.) 

City of Tyler 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

UJlca- Rome, N,Y 

(Includes Herkimer and Oneida 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Utica 

Rome 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Vallejo-Falrileld-Napa, Calif. 

(Includes Napa and Solano Counties.) 
City of: 

Vallejo 

Fairfield 

Napa 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
784,000 



100.0% 
315,960 



100.0% 
612,415 



100.0% 
112,062 



100.0% 
302,259 



44,183 
45,837 
5,846.6 



9,711 
20,202 
6,393.8 



29,111 
38,013 
8,342.9 



24,742 
32,149 
32,196 
5,257.2 



4,898 

6,727 

5,381.3 



6,723 

6,805 

6,072.5 



5,1. "12 
3,327 
3,288 
18.013 
5,959.5 



2,489 
3,554 
3,673 



2.160 
2,594 
2,597 
424.1 



26,922 
40,629 
42,164 
5,378.1 



8,378 
18,502 
5,855.8 



27,457 
35,735 
7,842.9 



22,582 
29,555 
29,599 
4,833.2 



6,393 
6,471 

5,774.5 



3,074 

3,002 

16,466 

5,447.6 



1,514 
1,588 
202.6 



1,313 
1,622 
1,624 
265.2 



236 
1,071 
354.3 



2,374 
2,924 
1,409.5 



7,070 
9,581 
9,595 

1,566.7 



889 
4,783 
1.582.4 



r«ble 5.— Index of Crime, Standaid MetropoUtan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical 



negligent 

man- 
siaughtei 



vated 
assault 



/Ineland— Millville— Bridgeton, NJ. .. 

(Includes Cumberland County.) 
City of: 

Vineland 

Millville 

Bridgeton 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .. 

Vaco, Tex 

(Includes McLennan County.) 

City of Waco 

Total area actually reporting ... 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants .. 

Vgshlngton, D.C.-Md.-Va 

(Includes District of Columbia, 
Charles. Montgomery, and Pnnce 
Georges Counties. Md.. Alexandria. 
Fairfax. Falls Church. Manassas, 
and Manassas Park Cities, and 
Arlington. Fairfax, Loudoun, and 
Prince William Counties, Va.) 

City of Washington 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 

Valerloo— Cedar FaUs, Iowa 

(Includes Black Hawk County.) 
City of; 

Waterloo 

Cedar Falls 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. 
Vest Palm Beach— Boca Raton, Fla. .. 
(Includes Palm Beach County.) 
City of: 

West Palm Beach 

Boca Raton 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

Vheeyng, W, Va,-Olilo 

(Includes Marshall and Ohio 
Counties, W. Va., and Belmont 
County, Ohio.) 

City of Wheelmg 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rale per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

VfchiU, Kaos 

(Includes Butler and Sedgwick 
Counties.) 

City of Wichita 

Total area actually reporting .... 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants ... 

VkhiU Falls, Tex 

(Includes Clay and Wichita Counties.) 

City of Wichita Falls 

Total area actually reporting . 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 



lOO.C 



(Includes Lycoming County.) 

City of Wilhamsport 

Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100.000 inhabitants 
See footnotes at end of table. 



100.0% 
135,573 



lOO.C 
S12J06 



100.0% 
134,200 

100.0% 
113,456 



50.950 
181,621 
5,982.5 



19,894 
24,241 
6,285.7 



9.515 
18.909 
622.9 



1,466 
6,961 

5.337.7 



41,435 
162,712 

5,3597 



8,739 

3,079 

37,420 

7,304.2 



18,663 
22,663 
5.876.5 



6,333 
10,795 
355.6 



2,546 
6,616 
217.9 



1.882 
2.282 
1,426.7 



83 



Table 5.— Index of Crime, Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1978— Continued 



Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area 



ForcibU 



Wllmlngfon, Del.— NJ.— Md 

(Includes New Castle County, Del.. 
Salem County, N.J., and Cecil 
County, Md.) 

City of Wilmington 

Total area actually reporting .. 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitants . 
N.C 



(Includes Brunswick and New 
Hanover Counties.) 

City of Wilmington 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabiunts .... 

Worcester, Mass 

(Includes Worcester County ) 

City of Worcester 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

Yakima, Wash 

(Includes Yakima County.) 

City of Yakima 

Total area actually reporting 

Estimated Total 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .. . 

York, Pa 

(Includes Adams and York Counties.) 

City of York 

Total area actually reporting 

Rate per 100,000 inhabitants .... 

YoungstowD — Warren, Ohio 

(Includes Mahoning and Trumbull 
Counties.) 
City of: 

Youngslown 



Total area actually reporting 
Rate per 100,000 inhabitanU 



100.0% 
131,622 



100.0% 
539,239 



7,270 
32,073 
6,210.9 



8,222 

8,287 

6,296.1 



12,577 
26,501 
26,945 
4,182.5 



3,076 
21,056 
3,904.8 



6,748 
30,069 
5,822.8 



7,471 

7,529 

5,720.2 



11,770 
24,842 
25,260 
3,921.0 



5,507 

9,697 

10,220 

6,522.5 



2,832 
19,248 
3,569.5 



1,823 
8,382 
,623.2 



2,528 
2,545 
1,933.6 



3,707 
8,277 
8,407 
1,305.C 



4,231 
18,937 
3,667.1 



11,643 
11,852 

1,839.7 



6,258 
6.612 
1,219.9 



' Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault. 
' Property crimes arc offenses of burglary, larceny — theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



84 



Table 6.— Nuinber of Offienses Known to the Police, Qties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978 

Individual cities are listed in this table alphabetically by state. Population of each city is designated by group: 1— over 250,( 
249,999; 3-50,000 to 99,999; 4-25,000 to 49,999; 5-10.000 to 24,999 



Popula- 
group 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
slaughter 



Forcible 



Robbery 



vated 
assault 



Albertville 

Alexander City 
Anniston 
Athens 
Atmore 



291 

612 

6,859 



Dothan 
Enterpnse 



Hueytown 
HuntsviUe 
luper 
Leeds 



North port 

Opelika 

Oark 



3,731 
45 
157 



Phenix City 

Prattville 

Prichard 

Saraland 

Scottsboro 

Selma 

ShefTield 

Sylacauga 

ralladega 

Froy 

ruscaloosa 
ruskegee 



ALASKA 



Anchorage 

Fairbanks 

luneau 

ARIZONA 

Zut Grande 

Chandler 

Douglas 

^agstafT 

jlendale 



Table 6.— Number of OfTenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non 
negligenl 

man- 
slaughtei 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Burglary 



Mesa 

Nogales 

Paradise Valley 

Peoria 

Prescott 

Scottsdale 

Sierra Vista 

Tempe 

Tucson 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 



Arkadelphia 

Benton 

BIytheville 

Camden 

Conwav 



El Dorado 
Fayetteville 
Forrest City 
Fort Smith 
Hot Springs 

Jacksonville 
Jonesboro 
Little Rock 
Magnolia 
Malvern 

North Little Rock 

Paragould 

Pine Bluff 

RussellviUe 

Searcy 
Springdale 
Stuttgait 
Texarkana 
West Helena 



West Memphis 

CALIFORNU 

Alameda 

Albany 

Alhambra 

Anaheim 

Antioch 

Arcadia 

Areata 

Arroyo Grande 

Atwater 

Azusa 

Bakersfield 

Banning 

Barstow 



990 
3,766 
15,417 
3,666 



-Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in PafNilalion, 1978— Continued 



CALIFORNIA- 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



2,597 
1,567 
1,321 

3,377 
3,884 



1,949 
5,653 
1,413 
1,463 



9,142 
7,662 
2,511 



6,272 
2,111 
648 
4,403 
1,576 

2,039 
3,558 
2,320 
1,650 
4,300 



3,843 
2,612 
3,327 



2,698 
8,486 
22,997 
6,510 



Murder 
and non- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
assault 



145 


158 


1,536 


56 


46 


507 


18 


87 


432 


42 


71 


441 


63 


126 


426 


828 


905 


3,344 


112 


234 


2,199 


56 


98 


656 


25 


19 


269 


140 


103 


2,401 


66 


120 


677 



252 
1,007 

2,573 
7,397 



Table 6.-Number of CMfenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in 


Population. 1978-Contimied 










Murder 














City by State 


Popula- 
tion 


Crime 
Index 


and non- 
negligent 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 




group 


total 






assault 




theft 








sla'll^hier 














CALIFORNIA-CbndDued 




















Cardena 




2,922 


10 


22 


287 


135 


843 


1,170 


455 


Garden Grove 




8.866 


3 


55 


309 


323 


3,384 


4,127 


665 


Gilroy 




1,748 


4 


5 


22 


167 


421 


1,064 


65 


Glcndale 




6,527 


8 


16 


216 


173 


2,052 


3,363 


699 


Glendora 




1,649 


1 


2 


29 


64 


586 


894 


73 


Hanford 




1,823 


1 


7 


30 


62 


538 


1,108 


77 


Hawthorne 




4,830 


7 


44 


460 


219 


1,212 


2,209 


679 


Hayward 




8,053 


2 


41 


239 


272 


2,209 


4,727 


563 


Hemet 




980 




2 


11 


27 


230 


665 


45 


Hermosa Beach 




1.062 


1 


16 


51 


30 


526 


278 


160 


Huntington Beach 




9.710 


2 


52 


166 


287 


3,206 


5,199 


798 


Huntington Park 




2.878 


9 


8 


274 


191 


917 


1,095 


384 


Impenal Beach 




1,220 


1 


8 


26 


142 


330 


562 


151 


Indio 




2.507 


3 


14 


73 


182 


550 


1,499 


186 


Inglewood 




10.402 


29 


109 


1,275 


420 


3,506 


3,393 


1.670 


Irvine 




2,361 


2 


14 


19 


102 


985 


1,075 


164 


Lafayette 




941 


1 


2 


8 


10 


284 


590 


46 


Laguna Beach 




1,497 


3 


10 


32 


25 


593 


727 


107 


La Habra 




2,420 




8 


70 




680 


1,392 


201 


Ukewood 




3,771 


3 


11 


108 


231 


1,056 


2,050 


312 


U Mesa 




2,644 




16 


50 


71 


904 


1,405 


198 


La Mirada 




1,766 




5 


68 


128 


681 


759 


125 


U Palma 




469 


1 


3 


16 


20 


157 


232 


40 


La Puente 




2,016 


3 


II 


110 


321 


686 


688 


197 


Larkspur 
La Verne 




555 




1 


6 


50 


119 


341 


38 




875 




9 


21 


65 


315 


416 


49 


Uwndale 




1.533 


3 


13 


78 


127 


632 


512 


168 




* 


2,802 




12 


25 


88 


797 


1,755 


125 


Lodi 




2!609 


1 


9 


47 


136 


446 


l!799 


171 


Lomita 




943 




10 


42 


108 


366 


333 


84 


Lompoc 




2,291 


, 


16 


27 


144 


647 


1,344 


112 


Long Beach 




27,776 


68 


246 


2,130 


1,244 


9,894 


10,064 


4.130 


Los Alamitos 




537 




3 


13 


6 


194 


298 


23 


Los Altos 




854 






10 


14 


349 


444 


36 


Los Angeles 




233.344 


651 


2.467 


17,105 


16,574 


69,876 


90,240 


36.431 


Los Gatos 




1.816 




5 


17 


97 


495 


1,079 


123 


Lynwood 




4.027 


9 


62 


317 


524 


1,274 


1.365 


476 


Madera 




842 


1 


9 


48 


70 


213 


434 


67 


Manhattan Beach 




1.695 


1 


19 


51 


33 


667 


778 


146 


Manteca 




1,198 




3 


15 


14 


306 


765 


95 


Manna 




542 




3 


15 


34 


150 


313 


27 


Martinez 




1.055 


1 


10 


16 


53 


356 


540 


79 


Maywood 




681 


3 


4 


54 


31 


192 


266 


131 


Menlo Park 




1.780 


3 


9 


49 


49 


503 


1,088 


79 


Merced 




3.568 


2 


20 


93 


117 


876 


2.320 


140 


Millbrae 




992 






17 


10 


240 


640 


85 


Mill Valley 




851 


1 


3 


8 


6 


219 


536 


78 


Milpitas 




2.130 


1 


9 


46 


50 


675 


1,220 


129 


Modesto 




9.152 


10 


38 


134 


411 


1,%2 


6,038 


559 


Monrovia 




2.102 


2 


20 


98 


91 


673 


1,068 


150 


Montclair 




2.289 


8 


24 


71 


84 


581 


1.285 


236 


Montebello 




3,272 


6 


16 


161 


146 


1,029 


1,509 


405 


Monterey 




2.507 


1 


14 


60 


67 


512 


1,705 


148 


Monterey Park 




2.626 


1 


9 


104 


86 


908 


1.235 


283 


Moraea 




415 


1 


1 


1 


5 


130 


263 


14 



rable 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Crime 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



3,288 
4,605 
2,006 

5.346 
4,891 
1,927 
38,854 
4,884 

6,340 
5,845 
9,215 
1,517 



10,275 
1,934 
2,507 



757 

13,394 
1,215 
2,429 
1,663 

29,188 

4,450 

620 

13,668 

2,213 
%8 

1,305 

66,838 

974 



28 


51 


36 


204 


3 


23 


51 


2,774 


76 


249 



51 


809 


236 


889 


210 


1.066 


52 


714 


98 


1,670 


527 


1.802 



571 


2,057 


221 


1,775 


101 


3,081 


25 


526 


43 


158 


78 


1,166 


48 


907 


29 


192 


71 


324 



683 


2,163 


54 


225 


815 


4,446 


68 


271 


253 


819 


45 


426 


1,337 


9,460 


136 


1,267 


20 


128 


688 


3,872 


39 


695 


17 


319 


51 


387 


1,606 


20,158 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in 


Popuiatio., 


1978— Continued 




City by State 


Popula- 
tion 
group 


Crime 
Index 


Murder 
and non- 

"'i^f"' 
slaTgMer 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
then 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


CALIFORNU-Continued 




















San Gabnel 

Sanger .. 

San Jose 

San Juan Capistrano 

San Leandro 


5 


1,385 

651 

41,831 

508 

4,679 


2 
2 
44 


6 


58 
15 
1,155 
11 
181 


101 
70 
1,189 
11 
101 


535 

256 

13,749 

174 

1,110 


594 

277 

21,731 

268 

3,007 




367 

5 
11 


3,59 
26 


San Luis Obispo 
San Marino 




1,904 
494 

5,113 
3,269 

3,558 




13 

1 
19 
10 
23 


26 

6 

109 

110 

65 


44 

194 
266 

77 


496 
212 
1,271 
690 
841 


1,210 
258 
3,127 
2,024 
2,266 






, 


San Mateo 
San Pablo 
San Rafael 


4 


39 
16 

28 


Santa Ana 
Santa Barbara 
Santa Clara 




16,250 
5,535 
6,109 
4,346 
1,956 


22 
3 


63 
25 
43 
29 
12 


598 
101 
123 

83 
62 


497 
123 
185 
195 
173 


5,515 
1.392 
1,734 
955 
589 


8,405 
3,524 
3,575 
2.754 
911 


1,15 
36 
44 
33 


Sanu Fe Spnngs 


1 


20 


Santa Mana 
Santa Monica 
Santa Paula 
Santa Rosa 
Saratoga 

Seal Beach 
Seaside . 
Sierra Madre 
Simi Valley 
South El Monte 




3,428 
8,473 
1,180 
7,175 
698 


14 

2 
6 


16 

47 
10 
25 
5 


60 
485 

39 

125 

9 


147 
285 
135 
138 
21 


1,033 
2,459 

281 
1,813 

315 


1.985 
4.066 

649 
4.513 

306 


18 

1,11 

6 

55 




1,117 
1,559 
294 
3,331 
1,394 


2 
2 

3 
3 


12 
18 
3 
13 
II 


37 
52 
2 
47 
58 


28 
58 
12 
78 
187 


364 
573 
126 
1,037 
410 


599 
750 
134 
1.942 
588 


7 
IC 

1 
21 


South Gate 
South Lake Tahoe 




3,018 
2,768 
1,250 
2,664 
1,954 


8 


17 
II 

6 
12 

6 


205 
78 
41 
60 

77 


156 
43 
37 
57 

118 


917 
786 
542 
855 
898 


1,214 
1,705 

533 
1,453 

650 


5C 

14 


South Pasadena 
South San Francisco 
Stanton . 


2 


9 
22 
20 


Stockton 
Sunnyvale 
Temple City 
Thousand Oaks 
Torrance 




12,611 
5,370 
899 
2,731 
6,769 


31 

5 


102 
26 
5 
17 
56 


607 
122 
35 
38 
266 


474 
125 
60 
65 
261 


3,709 
1,144 
293 
983 
1,770 


6.188 
3.466 
464 
1.392 
3.600 


1,50 
48 
4 


' 2 
9 


23 
80 


Tracy ... 
Tulare .. 
Turlock . 
Tustin .. 




1,187 

897 

1,591 

2,980 

958 


3 
3 
3 


2 
5 
9 
14 

2 


20 
26 
23 
64 


66 

55 
57 
54 
39 


211 
306 
385 
907 
206 


831 
416 
984 
1.725 
648 


5 
8 
13 
21- 


Ukiah .. 




5 


Union City 
Upland . 
Vacaville 




2,107 
2,191 
2,050 
5,152 
3,848 


2 
2 


6 
14 

8 
30 


38 
57 
28 
195 
89 


71 
70 
87 
201 
187 


852 
845 
402 
1,439 
1,010 


1.01 1 
1.053 
1,434 
2,898 
2,225 


12 
151 
9 


Vallejo . 
Ventura 


5 
2 


38- 
29. 


Visalia .. 
Walnut . 




3,642 
483 
2,593 
1,866 
5.351 


2 


5 
4 
6 
9 
29 


39 
17 
25 
67 
153 


158 
43 
41 
108 
162 


686 
191 
561 
353 
1,793 


2,591 
189 
1.800 
1.184 
2.842 


16 

y. 


Walnut Creek 




16( 


Watsonville 
Westminster 


1 
3 


14' 
36! 


Whittier 

Woodland 

Yorba Linda 

Yuba City 




3.972 

2,163 

642 

1.339 


2 
1 
1 


15 

2 
2 
1 


133 
43 
12 
18 


158 
81 
14 
36 


1,257 
677 
273 
299 


2,123 
1,243 
309 
900 


28^ 
IK 
31 
8* 



90 



Table 6.— Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Crime 
total 



and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 



COLORADO 

Arvada 

Boulder 

Brighton 

Broomfield 

Canon City 

Colorado Springs 

Commerce City 

Denver 

Durango 

Englewood 

Fort Collins 

Golden 

Grand Junction 

Greeley 

Lakewood 

Littleton 

Longmont 

Loveland 

Northglenn 

Pueblo 

Sterling 

Thornton 

Trinidad 

Westminster 

Wheat Ridge 

CONNECTICUT 

Ansonia 

Beriin 

Bethel 



Branford 



3.445 
9,548 
5,277 
715 
1,012 

589 
13.259 
1,572 
50,993 

877 



3,030 
1,020 
2,048 



7,935 
1,832 
2,881 



Bristol 
Brookfield 
Cheshire 
Clinton 



Danbury 

Danen 

Derby 

East Hartford 

Enfield 



2,415 
628 
363 

3,427 



Farmington 
Glastonbury 
Greenwich 
Groion City 
Groton Town 

Guilford 
Hartford 
Madison 
Menden 
Middletown 



242 

4,231 

221 

830 



Table 6.— Number of OfTenses Known to the PoUce, aties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



CONNECnCUT- 



Monroe 

Naugatuck 
New Bntain 
New Canaan 
New Haven 



Newtown 
North Branford 
North Haven 

Norwalk 

Norwich 

Orange 

Plainville 

Plymouth 

Ridgefield 
Focky Hill 
Seymour 
Shelton 
Simsbury 



Stamford 
Stoningtor 



SufTield 
Tornngton 



Vernon 
Wallmgford 

Waterbury 
Waterford 
Watertown 
West Hartford 
West Haven 

Westport 

Wethersfield 

Willimantic 

Wilton 

Windsor 

Windsor Locks 

Winsted 

Wolcott 

DELAWARE 

Dover 

Newark 

Wilmington 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBU 

Washington 



Popula- 



Index 
total 





5,120 




722 




2,577 




233 




907 




946 




1,564 




1,573 




7,335 




471 




411 




3,146 




2,565 




1,755 




870 




729 




297 




1,198 



2,080 
2,424 
7,270 



Murder 
negligent 
slaughter 



10 


251 


97 


1,540 


67 


590 


20 


197 


22 


104 


25 


137 


32 


185 


4 


117 


7 


125 


4 


278 



2,018 
157 
90 



92 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoHce, Otles and Towns 10,000 and over in 


Population, 


1978-Conttaued 




City by State 


Popula- 
group 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


FLORIDA 




















Altamonte Springs 

Bartow 
Belle Glade 
Boca Raton 
Boynton Beach 

Bradenton 
Cape Coral 
Casselberry 
Clearwater 
Cocoa 




1.840 
960 
1,691 
3,186 
2,166 




9 
2 

14 
6 

10 


24 
18 
80 

35 


51 
106 
160 

63 
168 


343 
215 

728 
753 
637 


1.342 

579 

666 

2,168 

1,220 


71 


2 
5 
3 


38 
38 
158 
90 




1,890 

609 

787 

6,657 

1,119 


1 


9 
2 
3 
35 
6 


28 


33 

45 
409 
30 


658 
182 
192 
1,547 
351 


1,063 
402 
490 

4,350 
663 


98 
15 




10 
99 
10 


47 


3 
3 


214 
56 


Cocoa Beach 




1.187 
3,664 
1.077 
1.320 
1,013 




II 

7 
3 
11 

3 


23 
70 
13 
54 
22 


73 
116 

33 
101 

37 


172 
651 
281 
319 
299 


818 
2,659 
711 
682 
576 


90 


Coral Gables 
Coral Spnngs 
Dania 
Davie 


1 

2 
1 


157 
35 
151 

75 


Daytona Beach 
Deerrield Beach 




9,698 
1,496 
1,669 
2,549 
1,449 


7 


64 
10 

2 
17 
6 


312 
28 
42 
89 
13 


481 

83 
70 
127 
57 


2,600 
461 
494 
657 
401 


5,665 
796 
1,010 
1,506 
934 


569 
118 


De Land 




51 


Delra> Beach 
Dunedin 


6 


147 
38 


Fort Lauderdale 
Fort Myers 
Fort Pierce 
Fort Walton Beach 
Gainesville 




16,726 
4,209 
3,432 
648 
5,968 


26 
9 
II 

8 


79 
13 
12 
3 
42 


491 
75 
93 
17 

182 


325 
544 
394 
33 
346 


4,972 
875 

1.036 
282 

1.764 


9,871 
2,591 
1,706 
256 
3,383 


962 
102 
180 
56 
243 


Gulfport 

Hallandale 

Hialeah 

Hollywood 

Homestead 




583 
3,138 
6,219 
10,719 
2,654 




6 
20 
11 
50 
19 


6 
122 
187 
289 

72 


36 
210 
560 
342 
314 


141 

592 

1,187 

2,680 

589 


383 
1.932 
3.700 
6.630 
1.506 


II 


2 
5 
6 
6 


260 
569 
722 
148 


Jacksonville 
Jacksonville Beach 
Key West 
Kissimmee 
Lakeland 




36,274 
2,062 
2,841 
1,584 
4,595 


79 
6 

3 


278 
15 
26 
9 
28 


1,347 
62 
71 
24 
95 


2,664 
112 
140 
168 
333 


10,385 
632 
810 
390 
1,100 


19.707 
1.105 
1.556 
950 
2.837 


1.814 
135 
232 
42 
199 


Lake Worth 
Largo 
Uuderhill 
Leesburg 
Lighthouse Point 




2,369 
2,582 
1,894 
1,175 
594 


2 
2 
4 


13 
9 
2 
6 


49 
30 
45 
20 
8 


78 
122 
74 
59 


593 
795 
367 
280 
82 


1.522 
1,538 
1,256 
775 
476 


112 
86 

148 
31 

24 


Margate 
Melbourne 
Miami 

Miami Beach 
Miami Spnngs 




1,455 
2,936 
34,860 
6,063 
1,098 




9 
16 

207 
15 

7 


22 
38 
2,832 
258 
39 


72 
234 
3.137 
140 
83 


244 

696 

9,635 

2,016 

251 


1,037 
1,830 
16,473 
3,269 
653 


71 


1 
96 
9 

2 


121 

2.480 

356 

63 


Miramar 

Naples 

New Smyrna Beach 

North Lauderdale 




1,321 
1,367 
1,018 
452 
3,156 


3 
1 


2 
12 


20 
17 
14 


77 
35 
61 
32 
168 


445 
336 
251 
134 
721 


682 
919 
630 
267 
1,889 


83 
51 
60 


5 


17 


North Miami 


122 


239 


North Miami Beach 
North Palm Beach 




2,684 
437 
2,650 
3,612 


4 


9 

13 
15 


93 
5 
79 
77 
161 


153 
25 
94 
419 
307 


579 
83 
625 
985 
458 


1,644 

308 

1,635 

2,003 

783 


202 
15 


Oakland Park 

Ocala 

Opa Locka 


3 
8 


201 
102 
121 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in 


PopuUtion, 


1978-Continued 










Murder 














City by State 


Popula- 
tion 


Crime 
Index 


and non- 
negligent 


Forcible 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 




group 


total 


man- 


rape 




assault 




theft 








slaughter 


































Orlando 




12,992 


13 


107 


410 


1,090 


3,372 


7,318 


6 


Ormond Beach 




1,222 


1 


2 


25 


34 


189 


912 




Palm Bay 




545 


2 


6 


5 


20 


175 


323 




Palm Beach Gardens 




575 


1 


1 


10 


14 


152 


376 




Panama City 




2,752 


3 


7 


52 


121 


709 


1.703 


I 


Pembroke Pmes 




1,278 


1 


5 


23 


83 


352 


775 




Pensacola 




5.088 


11 


36 


129 


360 


1.386 


2.942 


2 


Pinellas Park 




1,933 


2 


7 


16 


43 


455 


1.331 




Planution 




3,262 


1 


22 


52 


% 


747 


2.138 


2 


Plant City 




1,512 


1 


3 


29 


77 


414 


930 




Pompano Beach 




4.789 


4 


18 


63 


353 


1,128 


2.969 


2 


Port Orange 
Riviera Beach 




681 








17 


222 


394 






2,989 


3 


19 


58 


352 


988 


1.448 


1 


Rockledge 
Saint Augustme 




898 








39 


167 


664 






1,019 


1 


6 


21 


72 


288 


582 




Saint Petersburg 




16,272 


22 


136 


611 


1,301 


4,095 


9.656 




Saint Petersburg Beach 
Sanford 




555 




3 




22 


171 


325 






1,946 


4 


16 


48 


113 


4% 


1.178 




Sarasota 




3,848 


4 


38 


49 


134 


961 


2.473 


1 


South Miami 




1,214 


3 


4 


49 


164 


365 


596 




Sunrise Village 




894 


, 


g 


4 


32 


190 


607 




Tallahassee 




6,771 


4 


60 


140 


471 


1,928 


3.872 


3 


Tamarac 




534 


1 


3 


15 


3 


215 


276 




Tampa 




27,002 


41 


253 


1,080 


2,136 


7,532 


14,653 


1.- 


Tarpon Spnngs 




818 


' 


5 


8 


64 


246 


472 




Temple Terrace 
TitusviUe 




653 




1 


4 


23 


167 


439 






2,163 


1 


6 


30 


126 


523 


1.386 




Venice . 




830 




1 


3 


23 


139 


628 




Vero Beach 




1,526 


1 


4 


11 


42 


379 


1.020 




West Palm Beach 




9,696 


17 


43 


418 


479 


2,865 


5.405 


•* 


Wilton Manors 




652 


3 




20 


4 


172 


406 




Winter Haven 




2.021 




14 


35 


61 


555 


1.269 




Winter Park 




1,967 


3 




41 


72 


395 


1,370 




GEORGU 




















Albany 




4,822 


11 


40 


131 


288 


1.579 


2,586 


1 


Americus 




656 


1 


6 


10 


20 


177 


419 




Athens 




3,550 


7 


33 


83 


272 


895 


2.089 


1 


Atlanta 




53,870 


144 


592 


4,119 


3,990 


15.185 


25,874 


3,9 


Augusta 




3,524 


17 


21 


167 


117 


1.241 


1.767 


1 


Bainbridge 




462 


2 


3 


5 


56 


135 


250 




Brunswick 




833 


6 


20 


25 


170 


190 


354 




Carroll ton 




710 


3 


2 


19 


43 


208 


386 




Cartersville 




696 


2 


3 


10 


63 


203 


361 




Chamblee 




791 




2 


10 


21 


271 


410 




College Park 




2,141 


4 


23 


55 


73 


596 


1.192 


, 


ColuAbus 




6,989 


39 


28 


313 


310 


2.440 


3.152 


7 


Conyers 
Cordele 




334 




1 


9 


11 


84 


211 






594 






4 


93 


178 


292 




Covington 




498 


6 


3 


7 


38 


155 


270 





Table 6.— Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



GEORGU- 



Dalton 

Decatur 

DoraviUe 

Douglas 

Douglasville 

Dublin 

East Point 

Forest Park 

Gainesville 

GrifTin 

Hinesvilte 

La Grange 

Lawrenceville 

Macon 

Marietta 

Milledgeville 

Moultrie 

Newnan 

Roswell 

Savannah 

Smyrna 

Snellville 

Statesboro 

Thomaston 

Thomasvillc 

Tifton 

Valdosta 

Vidaha 

Warner Robins 

Waycross 

HAWAB 

Hilo 

Honolulu 



1,292 

397 

7,764 

3,237 



182 

113 

2,436 



IDAHO 



Blackfoot 

Caldwell 
Coeur d'Alene 
Idaho Falls 



Lewiston 

Moscow 

Nampa 

Pocatello 

Rexburg 

Twin Falls 

ILLINOIS 

Addison 

Alton 

Arhngton Heights 

Aurora 

Batavia 



1,685 

2,204 

401 



1,737 
3,539 
2,452 
5,660 
657 



Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over In Population, 



Popula 



Crime 
Index 
total 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



933 

2,838 
5,136 



566 
3,459 
1,547 

363 
5,243 



409 
2,395 



Known to the PoUce, aties and Towns 10,000 and over in Po|iul>ti<M>> 1978— Continued 



City by State 



ILLINOIS-C 



Popula- 
group 



Index 
total 



817 
2,086 
1.146 



1,895 
1,591 
1,305 



10,929 

565 

2,867 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Burglary 



76 

160 

2,648 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Oties and Towns 10,000 and over in PopuUtioii, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



negligent 
slaughter 



ILLINOIS- 

Wheeling 

Wilmette 

Wood Dale 

Woodridge 

Wood River 

Worth 

Zion 



INDUNA 



Anderson 
Bedford 
Beech Grove 
Bloomington 
Carmel 



774 



276 

528 

10,009 



34,837 

261 

2,411 



234 
2,605 
1,045 
3,183 

2,325 

6,500 

707 

3,035 



259 


1,303 




117 


25 


127 


127 


497 




68 



Ue 6.-Nuiiiber of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 


10,000 and over in 


Population, 


1978— Continued 




City by State 


Popula- 
group 


Cnme 
Index 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 






481 
8,468 

545 
3,922 

876 

431 
756 
743 

1,590 
569 

1,127 
559 

1.859 

1,659 
8,909 
2,078 
5,384 
7,185 

16.827 

3,218 

1,995 

605 

323 

2,412 
1,025 
599 
1,183 
2,418 

1,204 
811 
704 
984 

5,405 

588 

773 

5,876 

1,207 

613 
424 
338 
939 
1,305 

504 
1,447 
1,323 
803 
710 




5 
64 

2 
15 


8 
357 
II 
64 
4 

2 
2 
9 

6 
2 
9 

15 

10 
92 
10 
89 
224 

445 
35 
10 

14 
12 

4 
14 

9 

4 

3 
4 
II 

55 

8 

128 
9 

5 
10 

3 
17 

9 

7 
7 
18 

2 


7 
107 

8 
23 
27 

23 
48 
4 

50 
15 
20 

2 
88 

44 
214 

44 
188 
305 

579 
36 
2 
4 

2 

76 


161 

2,637 

53 

1,005 

172 

124 
195 
183 

122 
65 

239 
51 

275 

252 
1,981 

292 
1,535 
2,077 

2,779 
588 
408 
130 
39 

561 
246 
105 
187 
519 

266 
135 
178 
303 
1,006 

93 

137 

1,096 

190 

108 
167 

78 
288 
323 

268 
317 
143 
119 


242 
4,936 

371 
2,455 

628 

251 

473 
523 

1,322 
452 
824 
474 

1.409 

1,271 
6,076 
1,608 
3.148 
4.194 

11,816 

2,350 

1,382 

444 

269 

1,635 
684 
447 
909 

1,684 

822 
613 
455 
562 
3.833 

455 

571 

4,294 

861 

432 
226 
235 
533 
833 

292 
1,070 
880 
592 
509 


58 




12 

1 


355 
















2 


29 





' 






1 


23 


IOWA 


4 

1 


86 


keny 
tendorf 




34 




31 


1 


3C 


Ungton 

dar Falls 
dar Rapids 


4 

18 

5 
21 
40 

67 
1 


68 




81 


3 


525 
119 


uncil BlufTs 
venport 

s Moines 
buque 
rt Dodge 
rt Madison 
ianola 

va City 


5 
6 

28 


398 
339 

1,113 
208 




193 
25 
12 


2 


10 

2 

3 

1 

2 

25 

16 

2 


114 
83 




10 
17 
67 

11 
7 
10 
11 
107 

7 
28 
89 
60 

41 
4 
13 
48 
40 

39 
32 
39 
29 
42 


32 


irshalltown 
ison City 

wton 
kaloosa 

ux City 

bandale 
aterloo 
est Des Moines 

KANSAS 


1 


53 
135 

99 
53 
5' 


2 


91 

371 

3. 

2 




25 




8< 


; 


2 












ffeyville 
[xJge City 

Dorado 
npona 
arden City 
real Bend 


' 


2 
12 

5 

3 
3 
3 


5 
8 




2 


2 


6 
6( 




> 




3 



99 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Qties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Hutchinson 
Independence 
Junction City 
Kansas City 
Lawrence 

Leavenworth 
Leawood 

Liberal 
Manhattan 

McPherson 

Merriam 

Newton 

Olathe 

Ottawa 

Overland Park 
Parsons 
Pittsburg 
Prairie Village 
Salina 

Shawnee 
Topeka 
WichiU 
Winfield 



Ashland 
Bowling Green 
Corbin 
Covington 
Danville 

Elizabethtown 
El langer 
Flalwoods 
Florence 
Fort Thomas 

Fi ankfort 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Henderson 

Hopkinsville 

Jcffersontown 

Lexington 

Louisville 

MadisonviUe 

Mayfield 

Middlesboro 

Murray 

Newport 

Nicholasville 

Owensboro 

Paducah 
RadchfT 
Richmond 
Russellville 
Saint Matthews 



2,702 
388 
2,268 
15,459 
3,121 

1,692 
326 
815 



1,758 
437 

3,%9 



875 

143 

2,631 



472 

2,374 

5,421 

51 



5 


82 


•1 


179 


20 


486 


9 


202 


26 


3,416 


56 


5,588 


7 


162 


3 


92 


5 


63 


5 


68 


« 


374 


2 


38 



100 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to tbe Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 



Popula- 
group 



Index 

total 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
assault 



KENTUCKY- 

Shively 

Somerset 

Winchester 

LOUISIANA 

Abbeville 

Alexandria 

Baker 

Bastrop 

Baton Rouge 

Bogalusa 

Bossier City 

Crowley 

De Ridder 

Eunice 

Frankhn 

Hammond 

Harahan 

Houma 

Jennings 

Kenner 

Lafayette 

Lake Charles 

Minden : 

Monroe 

Morgan City 

Natchitoches 

New Iberia 

New Orleans 

Opelousas 

Pineville 

Ruston 

Shreveport 

Slidell 

Sulphur 

Thibodaux 

West Monroe 

Westwego 

MAINE 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Biddeford 
Brunswick 

Caribou 
Gorham 
Kittery 
Lewiston 
Old Town 

Portland 

Presque Isle 

Saco 

Sanford 

Scarborough 



79 


373 


1.157 


88 


369 


1,786 


70 


174 


1,021 


2 


27 


87 


40 


617 


794 


14 


80 


206 


4 


25 


185 


21 


22 


221 


4,164 


2,849 


10,514 



S64 


3,937 


40 


328 


31 


110 


79 


128 


51 


62 


27 


110 



101 



T»ble 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 



MAINE-( 

South Portland 

WaterviUe 

Westbrook 

MARYLAND 

Aberdeen 

Annapolis 

Baltimore 

Bel Air ]', 

Cambridge 

Cumberland 

Frederick 

Greenbelt 

Hagerstown 

Havre de Grace 

HyattsvUle 

Laurel 

Mount Rainier 

Salisbury 

Takoma Park (Montgomery County) . 

Takoma Park (Prince Georges County) 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Acton 

Agawam 

Amesbury 

Amherst 

Andover 

Arlington 

Athol 

Auburn 

Barnstable 

Bedford 

Bellingham 

Belmont 

Beverly 

Boston 

Bourne 

Braintree 

Bridgewater 

Brockton 

Brookline [[[ 

Burlington 

Cambridge 

Canton ]]][ 

Chelmsford 

Chelsea Z .[..'.'.'.'.'. 

Chicopee 

Clinton 

Concord 

Danvers 

Dedham 



Popula- 
group 



and over in PopuUtion, 1^78— Continued 



69,463 
621 
711 



1,953 
65,366 



1,852 

7,268 

208 



520 
1,222 
1,270 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
assault 



Burglary 



55 


266 


80 


280 


5,811 


15,793 


22 


140 


105 


150 


II 


218 


157 


454 


11 


85 


178 


457 


23 


177 


29 


213 


16 


151 


23 


95 


11 


389 


77 


170 


21 


67 


58 


167 


11 


85 


12 


163 


15 
29 


163 
198 



102 



-Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 



Popula- 
tion 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 



vated 



Burglary 



IS 


159 


85 


1,074 


74 


894 


44 


350 


39 


418 


33 


207 



103 



Table 6.-Nuniber of Offenses Kaowp to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978-CoDtinued 



MASSACHUSETTS- 



T*Jorthboro 
Northbndge 
North Readin 
Norton 
Norwood 

Oxford 

Pembroke 

Pittsneld 

Plymouth 

Quincy 

Reading 

Revere 

Salem 

Saugus 

Scituate 

Seekonk 
Sharon 
Shrewsbury 



Southbridge 
South Hadley 
Spencer 
Spnngrield 
Stoneham 

Stoughton 

Sudbury 

Swampscott 

Swansea 

Taunton 

Wakefield 

Waltham 

Wareham 

Webster 

Wellesley 

Westboro 

Westfield 

Westford 

Weston 

Westport 

West Springfield 

Westwood 

Weymouth 

Wilbraham 

Wilmington 

Winchester 

Winthrop 

Wobum 

Worcester 

Yarmouth 



Adrian 
Albion 
Allen Park 
Alpena 
Ann Arbor 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
total 



3,001 
1,900 
4,085 



766 
4,353 

251 
351 
183 
12,511 
698 

579 
519 
364 
946 

2,584 

848 



607 

1,958 

578 

2,061 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



12 


11 


44 


83 


6 


39 


3 


2 


'» 


6 


1 


20 


10 


25 


3 


25 


2 


3 


3 


50 


24 


69 


2 


24 


25 


61 


1 


10 


14 


30 


4 


6 


15 


51 


380 


384 


8 


60 


15 


89 


24 


55 


44 


38 


3 


9 



Burglary 



Me 6.-Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over In Population, 1978-Contlnued 



City by State 



ttle Creek 

ttle Creek Township 

y cii) 

dford Township 
nton Harbor 

nton Township 
rkley 

verly Hills 
J Rapids 
rmingham 

ickman Township 
oomfield Township 
idgeport Township 
lena Vista Charter Township 



inton Township 

lesterfield Township 

awson 

inton Township 



avison Township 
earbom 
earborn Heights 



ast Detroit 

ast Grand Rapids 

ast lansing 



scanaba 
armington 
armington Hills 
emdale 



'lint Township 
'orsyth Township 

jardtn City 

jrand Blanc Township 

jrand Haven 

jrand Rapids 

jrandville 

jreen Oak Township 

jrosse Pointe Farms 

jrosse Pointe Park 
jfosse Pointe Woods 
rtamlramck 
Harper Woods 
Hazel Park 

Highland Park 

Holland 

Independence Township 

Inkster 

Jackson 



Popula- 



Crime 
Index 

total 



3,262 

362 

7,449 

3,824 

110,511 

298 



Aggra- 
assault 



193 


636 


,533 


32,575 


20 


90 


95 


378 


3 


65 


32 


151 


195 


301 



664 

504 

4.765 



602 

7,049 

261 



105 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 10,000 and 



City by State 



MICHIGAN- 



Kalamazoo 

Kalamazoo Township , 

Kentwood 

Lansing 

Lansing Township 



Leoni Township 
Lincoln Park ... 

Livonia 

Madison Heights 
Marquette 



Melvindale 

Menominee 

Midland 

Monroe 

Mount Clemens 



Mount Morris Township 

Mount Pleasant 

Muskegon 

Muskegon Heights 

Muskegon Township 



NUes 

Niles Township 

Northville Township 

Norton Shores 

Novi 



Oak Park 

Oscoda-Ausable Township 

Owosso 

Pittsfield Township 

Plymouth 



Pontiac 

Pontiac Township . 

Portage 

Port Huron 

Redford Township 



River Rouge 

Riverview 

Romulus Township 

Roseville 

Royal Oak 



sagmaw 

Saginaw Township ... 
Saint Clair Shores ... 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Joseph Townshij 

Sault Sainte Marie ... 

Shelby Township 

Southfield 

Southgate 

Steriing Heights 

Summit Township .... 
Sumpter Township ... 

Taylor 

Thomas Township 

Traverse City 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



1,649 

2,574 
3.384 



795 I 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 



13 

22 


11 
40 

78 


5 


27 


2 


6 


19 


38 


9 


29 


17 


54 


76 


287 


1 


21 


7 


35 


2 


3 




2 


3 


3 


10 


15 


137 


5 


44 


9 


35 


2 


2 


4 


4 


19 


103 



Burglary 



1.004 
472 
140 



106 



lUe 6.— Number of OfTenses Known to the 



City by State 



atJes and Towns 10,000 and over in Population. 1978— Continued 



Crime 
Index 
total 



negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Motor 
vehicle 
theft 



ayne 



Bloomfield Township 

'estland 

Tiite Lake Township 

'oodhaven 



3,147 

555 

9.575 



1,764 
1,241 
4,646 
1,031 



2,198 

377 

5,873 

2,925 



'yandotle 
'yoming . 
psUanti . 



Jbert Lea ..- 

noka 

.pple VaUey 



emidji 



ilaine 

iloomington 

Irainerd 

Irooklyn Center 
IrookJyn Park .. 



lumsville 

;ioquet 

:olumbia Heights 

:oon Rapids 

:ottage Grove Village 

;rystal 

3ululh 

=agan Township 

Edina 

Fairmont 



1,413 

3,142 

533 

1,329 



Faribault 

Fergus Falls 

Fridley 

Golden Valley 

Hastings 

Hibbing 

Inver Grove Height! 

UkeviUe 

Mankato 

Maple Grove 

Maplewood 

MarshaU 

Minneapolis 

Minnelonka 

Moorhead 



14,072 
995 
805 



Mounds View 
New Brighton 
New Hope ... 

New Ulm 

Northfield .... 



Table 6.-Nuinber of Offenses Known to the PoMce, atles and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978-Continued 



City by State 


Popula 
group 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Murder 
and non 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


MINNESOTA-ContfDued 

North Saint Paul 




465 
466 
635 
1,076 
605 

1,358 
741 
2.974 
2,015 
2,486 

1,932 
20,162 
571 
625 
820 

505 
441 
1,174 
883 
464 

1,524 
320 

2,576 
100 
943 
528 
383 

1,611 

273 

3,529 

2,006 

368 

1,931 
1,725 
12,366 
1,276 
1,809 

675 
360 
2,176 
369 
120 

984 
762 
720 

745 
318 
352 
530 
1,374 




1 
1 

7 

5 

19 
6 
11 

7 
139 

3 
1 

2 

3 


6 
5 

7 
6 
2 

26 
11 

38 
24 
10 

36 
790 

5 
12 


2 
5 
11 
15 
4 

27 
6 

40 
6 

25 

15 
808 

5 
7 
7 

7 
2 
15 
10 

5 

5 
89 

n 

35 
16 

25 

52 

1 

305 

448 

37 

232 

82 

359 

6 

57 

37 
28 
119 
17 
18 

52 
38 
81 

64 

5 
14 
27 
58 


69 
123 
86 

287 
151 

237 
187 
636 
255 
349 

479 
7,145 
68 
230 
169 

107 
86 
140 
201 
42 

303 

74 

707 
5 
457 
148 
124 

363 
75 
1,264 
476 
131 

563 
520 
4,106 
294 
524 

232 
85 
1,010 
98 
31 

161 
196 
211 

149 
66 
49 

145 
523 1 


360 
311 
503 
681 
413 

933 

500 

2,063 

1,536 

1,937 

1,252 
9,449 
447 
339 
581 

363 
321 
935 
614 
370 

1,133 
223 

1,415 
78 
380 
352 
208 

1,078 
167 

1,736 
923 
186 

904 

%7 
6,646 

903 
1,064 

359 

227 
774 
223 
45 

701 
477 
386 

437 
216 
258 
325 
629 


i 

r 

18 
15 

14 

1.81 

4 

3 
5 


Oakdale 




Owatonna 


1 


Plymouth 






Richfield 


Robbinsdale 




Rochester 




Roseville 




Saint Cloud 




Saint Louis Park 






15 


Shakopee 


Shoreview 




South Saint Paul 


' 


Sullwater 


Virginia 


1 


1 
22 
6 

2 

6 

3 

89 

21 

2 
5 

44 
6 
65 

35 

5 

38 
26 
449 
19 
36 

21 
2 
69 

3 
3 

5 
13 
12 

14 
3 
8 

5 
44 


West Saint Paul 


White Bear Lake 


Willmar 




Winona 




1 

35 

1 
9 
2 

13 


'* 


Worthington 






MISSISSIPPI 

Biloxi 
Brookhaven 


23- 


Clarksdale 
Cleveland 
Clinton 

Columbus 
Connth 


6 
4 


3.' 
21 

57 


Greenville 
Greenwood 
Grenada 

Gulfport 

Hattiesburg 

Jackson 

Laurel 

Meridian 

Moss Point 

Oxford 

Fascagoula 

Pearl 

Picayune 

Tupelo 
Vicksburg 
Yazoo cfty 

MISSOURI 

Arnold 


8 
6 

2 
3 
32 

5 
7 

2 
2 
4 

1 

2 
4 


19 
20 

9 
16 
68 

4 

7 

11 

5 
11 

3 
2 

3 
2 

2 

6 

1 

I 


132 
98 

7 

183 

706 
45 
114 

13 
11 
189 
24 
20 

61 

34 
24 


Ballwm 






Bellefontaine Neighbors 


I 
1 


23 


Berkeley | 


25 




110 



108 



Known to the Police, Odes and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 



City by State 



Crime 
Index 
total 



1,027 
5,787 
1,160 
2,106 



1,271 
1,437 
5,181 
54,485 
1,242 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



,231 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



108 

128 

4,363 



188 


300 


405 


975 


359 


1,227 


151 


360 


359 


1,037 


862 


2,496 



45 


169 


98 


260 


73 


232 


70 


195 


293 


788 


253 


615 



Helena 
Kalispell 
Miles City 
Missoula 



1,802 
873 
340 

3,501 



583 

196 

2,634 



Table 6.— Number of OfTenses Known 



City by State 



to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 



Beatrice 

Bellevue 

Fremont 

Grand Island 
Hastings 



Kearney 

Lincoln 

Norfolk 

North Platte 
Omaha 



ScottsblufT 



NEVADA 



Henderson 

Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department 

Jurisdiction 

North Las Vegas 

Reno 

Sparks 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Berlm 

Claremont 

Concord 

Derry 

Dover 

Exeter 

Goffstown 

Hudson 

Keene 

Laconia 

Lebanon 

Londonderry 

Manchester 

Merrimack 

Nashua 

Portsmouth 
Rochester 
Salem 
Somersworth 



NEW JERSEY 



Aberdeen Township 
Asbury Park 
Atlantic City 
Bayonne 
Belleville 

Bellmawr 
Bergenfield 
Berkeley Heights 
Berkeley Township 
Bernards Township 

Bloomfield 
Brick Township 
Bridgeton 

Bridgewdter Township 
Burlington 



Popula- 
tion 
group 



Crime 
Index 
total 



10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



2,015 
5.531 
2,178 
1,553 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



261 
142 


1,177 
548 


154 
1,640 

135 

228 

5,048 


718 

5,749 

594 

1,012 

12,811 


90 


729 


284 


603 


10,308 

1,378 

2,449 

720 


13,818 
1,850 
5,129 
1,762 


62 


131 



320 


1,244 


249 


515 


339 


1,006 


150 


358 


99 


201 


189 


297 


290 


1.102 



3,168 
322 
1,588 



516 

998 

2,545 



941 

I 'ill 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Crime 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



NEW JERSEY— Continued 

Burlington Township 

Camden 

C:edar Grove Township 

Cherry Hill 

Cinnaminson Township 

:iark 

:;iifTside Park 

Clifton 

CoUingswood 

Cranford Township 

Delran Township 

DcnviUe Township 

Deptford Township 

Dover 

Dover Township 

Dumont 

East Brunswick Township 

East Orange 

East Windsor Township 

Eatontown 

Edison 

Egg Harbor Township 

Elizabeth 

Elmwood Park 

Englewood 

Evesham Township 

Ewing Township 

Fair Lawn 

Fairview 

Fort Lee 

Franklin Township (Gloucester County) 
Franklin Township (Somerset County) 

Freehold 

Freehold Township 

Galloway Township 

Garfield 

Glassboro 

Glen Rock 

Gloucester City 

Gloucester Township 

Hackensack 

Hackettstown 

Haddonfield 

Haddon Township 

Hamilton 

Hammonton 

Hanover Township 

Harrison 

Hasbrouck Heights 

Hawthorne 

Hazlet Township 

Highland Park 

Hillsborough Township 

Hillsdale 



Table 6.-Number of Offenses Kaown to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and 



over in Population, 1978— Continued 



NEW JERSEY - 



Hillside Township .... 
Hoboken 
Hopatcong 
Hopewell Township 
Howell Township 

Irvington 

Jackson Township 
Jefferson Township 
Jersey City 
Kearny 

Lacey Township 
Lakewood 

Lawrente Township 
Linden 
Lindenwold 

Little Falls Township 
Livingslon 
Lodi .. 
Long Branch 
Lower Township 

Lyndhursl Township 

Madison 

Mahwah Township 

Manalapan Township 

Manchester Fownship 



Maple Shade Township 
Maplewood Township 
Margate City 

Marlboro 
Maywood 
Medford Township 
Metuchen 
Middlesex 

Middle Township 

Middletown Township 

Millburn Township 

Miliville 

Monroe Township (Gloucester County) 



Montville Township 
Moorestown Township 
Morristown 

Morris Township 
Mount Holly .... 
Mount Laurel Township 
Mount Olive Township 
Neptune Township 

Newark 

New Brunswick . 
New Milford .... 
New Providence . 
North Arlington . 




TaWe 6.— Number of Offenses Known to 



NEW JERSEY-Contlnued 

North Bergen Township 

North Brunswick Township 

North Plainfield 

Nutley 

Oakland 

Ocean City 
Ocean Township 
Old Bridge 

Palisades Park 

Paramus 

Parsippany-Troy Hills 

Passaic 

Paterson 

Pembeiton Township 

Pennsauken 
PennsviUe Township 
Pequannock Township 
Perth Amboy 
Phillipsburg 

Piscalaway Township 
Plainfield 
Pleasantville 
Point Pleasant 
Pompton Lakes 

Princelon 

Princelon Township 

Rahway 

Ramsey 

Randolph Township 

Red Bank 
Ridgefield 
Ridgefield Park 
Ridgewood 
Ringwood 

River Edge 
Rockaway Township 
Roselle 
Roselle Park 
Roxbury Township 

Rutherford 

Saddle Brook Township 

Sayreville 
Scotch Plains 
Secaucus 

Somen, ille 

South Brunswick Township 

South Orange 

South Plainfield 

South River 



die PoUce, atles and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Sparta Township 
Springfield 



Teaneck Township 
Tenafly 



Index 
total 



3,579 
2,092 
3,624 
9,985 



and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Aggra- 
assault 



22 


146 


12 


167 


18 


295 


9 


250 


29 


137 


9 


175 


9 


96 


12 


95 


35 


580 




122 



Table 6.— Number of OfTenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over In Population, 



Popula- 
group 



Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



NEW JERSEV- 

Toiowa 

Trenton 

Union City 

Union Township 

Ventnor City 

Vernon Township 

Verona 

Vineland 

Voorhees Township 

Waldwick 

Wallington 

Wall Township 

Warren 7 ownship 

Washington Township (Bergen County) ... 
Washington Township (Gloucester County) 

Wayne Township 
Weehawken Township 
West Caldwell 
West Deptford Township 

Wcstfidd 



West Orange 
West Paterson 
Westwood 

Willingboro Township 
Winslow Township 
Woodbndge Township 
Woodbury 
Wyckon 



NEW MEXICO 



Albuquerque 

Carlsbad 

Deming 

Farmington 
Gallup 

Hobbs 

Las Vegas City 

Los Alamos 
Lovingfon 
Portales 
Roswell 
Santa Fe 



Albany 

Amherst 

Amsterdam 

Auburn 

Aurora— East Aurora 



1,516 


6.191 


II 


73 


52 


393 


90 


274 



114 



Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Murder 
and non- 
negligenl 



Forcible 
rape 



vated 



3.747 

109 

2,354 

1,026 

769 

2,518 
419 
780 



2,489 
1,849 
2,228 



2,188 

72 

1,390 



735 


972 


148 


629 


221 


610 


390 


1,193 


67 


254 


134 


492 


242 


497 


198 


385 


no 


278 


230 


593 


617 


2.058 



Table 6.— Number of Oflenses Known to die PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 



Johnson City 

Johnstown 
Kenmore 
Kent 
Kingston 

Lackawanna 
Lancaster Village 
Lockport 
Long Beach 
Lynbrook 

Mamaroneck Town 
Mamaroneck Village 
Massena 
Middletown 
Mount Pleasant 



Mount Vernon 
Newark 
Newburgh 
Newburgh Town 
New Castle 

New Hartford Town 
New Rochelle 
New Windsor 
New York 
Niagara Falls 

Niskayuna 
North Castle 
North Greenbush 
North Tonawanda 
Ogden 

Ogdensburg 

Olean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Orangetown 

Orchard Park 

Ossining 

Oswego 

Peekskill 

Plattsburgh 

Port Chester 
Port Wabhington 



Poughkeepsie Town 

Queensbury 
Ramapo Town 
Riverhead 
Rochester 
Rockville Centre 



Rome 

Rotterdam 

Rye 

Saratoga Springs 

Saugcrtics Town 



able 6.-Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 10,000 and over in 




1978-ConHnued 










Murder 














City by Slate 


Popula- 
Uon 


Cnme 
Index 


and non- 
negl.gent 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 




group 


total 


man- 




assault 




theft 








slaughter 














NEW YORK-Conttaued 




















:^rsdale 




499 






3 


15 


127 


328 


26 


.henectady 




3,253 


2 


12 


136 


52 


980 


1.797 


274 


Duthampton 
outhold 




1,362 




1 


18 


20 


517 


721 


85 




467 








11 


136 


318 


1 


outhport 




87 






' 




15 


70 












pring Valley 




1,724 




10 


56 


118 


418 


1.007 


115 






ony Point 
yracube 




485 








30 


193 


243 


17 




15.174 


6 


41 


624 


295 


4,841 


8.412 


955 


arryto»n 
onawanda 




371 




3 


6 


4 


107 


228 


23 




724 


1 




5 


52 


178 


430 


57 


onawanda Town 




2,351 


3 


5 


35 


93 


533 


1.490 


192 


roy 




3,436 


1 


14 


44 


405 


1,285 


1.474 


213 


Ister 




458 






1 


30 


129 


285 


13 


tica 




2,517 


5 


5 


124 


28 


1.001 


1.128 


226 






480 




1 


2 


4 


126 


319 


28 


/arwick Town 




207 






1 


9 


97 


81 


19 


/atertown 




1,153 


2 


4 


10 


16 


277 


798 


46 


/atervhet 




348 




1 


8 


24 


103 


197 


15 


/ebster 
/est Seneca 




1,141 




1 


8 


31 


283 


765 


53 




1,834 


1 


2 


16 


61 


355 


1.135 


264 


/hite Plains 




3,221 


1 


10 


80 


46 


535 


2.257 


292 


onkers 




10,344 


10 


19 


603 


231 


2.483 


5,293 


1,705 


orktown 

NORTH CAROLINA 




1.118 




3 


7 


18 


282 


753 


55 




















Jbemarle 

sheboro 




609 






4 


49 


180 


357 


18 




421 


2 


2 


4 


24 


106 


250 


33 


sheville 




2.525 


6 


12 


65 


146 


766 


1,240 


290 


elmont 




202 


1 


2 


3 


12 


51 


121 


12 


oone 
urlington 




254 








7 


71 


160 


15 




1,568 


1 


, 


15 


124 


311 


1,037 


79 


arv 




475 


1 


1 


2 


9 


88 


354 


20 


hapel Hill 
harlotte 




1,608 




15 


10 


74 


452 


1,005 


52 




23.119 


51 


114 


709 


1,561 


7.009 


12.429 


1.246 


uncord 




832 


2 


' 


14 


22 


183 


569 


41 


>urham 




8.178 


16 


57 


184 


383 


2,084 


5.063 


391 


4en 




604 


1 


1 


10 


56 


162 


328 


46 


lizabeth City 




657 


2 


2 


4 


55 


55 


522 


17 


ayetteville 




7,209 


18 


47 


260 


631 


2,041 


3,728 


484 


jastonia 




4,534 


5 


8 


50 


481 


1,054 


2,722 


214 


joldsboro 




1,640 


7 


10 


22 


61 


434 


992 


114 


jreensboro 




9.742 


14 


42 


190 


747 


2.303 


6.055 


391 


jreenville 




2.266 


5 


23 


22 


69 


537 


1.521 


89 


lenderson 




669 


2 




6 


60 


166 


419 


16 


iickory 




1,526 


5 


5 


19 


162 


346 


912 


77 


ligh Point 




5,078 


15 


15 


87 


140 


1,528 


3.014 


279 


acksonviUe 




1,732 


1 


12 


41 


169 


323 


1.111 


75 


vannapolis 




1.194 


2 


3 


11 


59 


275 


791 


53 


vinston 




1,512 


9 


2 


20 


149 


376 


910 


46 


aunnburg 




766 


' 


7 


3 


74 


173 


471 


37 


^noir 




983 


1 


3 


6 


76 


265 


573 


59 


^xington 




771 


2 


3 


34 


60 


281 


357 


34 


-umberton 




1,628 


1 


1 


9 


154 


348 


1,049 


66 






637 
560 




3 


6 
3 


112 

27 


154 
106 


331 
394 


31 


i«organton 


1 


29 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Popula- 
group 



Cnme 
total 



and non- 
negligent 
man- 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



NORTH CAROLINA- 

New Bern 

North Kannapolis 

Raleigh 

Reidsville 

Roanoke Rapids 

Rocky Mount 

Salisbury 

Sanford 

Shelby 

Statesville 

Tarboro 

Thomasville 

Wilmington 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck 
Dickinson 
Fargo 

Grand Forks 
Jamestown 

Mandan 

Minot 

WiUiston 

OHIO 

Akron 

Alliance 

Ashland 

Ashtabula 

Athens 

Avon Lake 

Barberton 

Bay Village 

Beavercreek Township 

Bedford 

Bedford Heights 

Bellefontaine 

Berea 

Bexley 

Blue Ash 

Boardman Township 

Bowling Green 

Broadview Heights 

Brookfield Township 

Brooklyn 

Brook Park 

Brunswick 

Bucyrus 

Cambridge 

Canton 

Centerville 

Cheviot 

Chillicothe 

Cincinnati 

CircleviUe 



145 


130 


75 


223 


35 


110 


60 


308 


271 


1.262 



fable 6.— Number of Offenses Known to tbe Police, Qties and Towns 10,000 and 



in Population, 1978-Continued 



ladeira 

ladison Township (Montgomery County) 

ladison Township (Lake County) 

lansfield 

laple Heights 



Popula- 
tion 
group 



Crime 

total 



2,479 

527 

2,057 

1,497 



3,892 
2,%9 

371 



1,903 

574 

4,662 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



6,354 
69 

1,923 



36 


64 


4,234 


14,364 


355 


1,290 


110 


513 


3,869 


23.946 


137 


357 


130 


402 


244 


1,030 


7,364 


12,260 


168 


565 


145 


680 


116 


380 


52 


135 


643 


841 



86 


326 


680 


3,871 


144 


295 


144 


529 


200 


883 


227 


656 



141 


2,417 


774 


1,407 


105 


228 


41 


146 


553 


1,170 


144 


364 


138 


2,429 


205 


295 



119 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Popiilation, 1978— Continued 



Mentor 
Miamisburg 
Miami Township 

Middlrburg Heights 

Middlftown 

MounI Vernon 

Newark 

New Philadelphia 

Niles 

North Canton 

North Olmsted 

North Ridgeville 

North Royalton 

Norton 

Norwalk 

Norwood 

Oregon 

Oxford 

Painesville 
Parma 

Parma Heights 
Perkins Township 
Perrysburg 

Perry Township 
Piqua 

Portsmouth 
Randolph Township 



Reading 
Reynoldsburg 
Richmond Heights 
Salem 
Sandusky 

Seven Hills 
Shakei Heights 
Sharonville 
Shawnee Township 
Sidney 

Solon 

South Euchd 
Springfield Township 
Springfield 
Steubc nville 

Stow 

Streets boro 

Strongsville 

Sylvania 

Sylvania Township 

Tiffin 

Toledo 

Troy 

Union Township (Butler County) 

Union Township (Clermont County) 



Crime 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Burglary 



394 
1,070 



16 


90 


103 


200 


43 


123 


732 


7,588 


69 


238 


16 


176 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, aties and Towns 10,000 and over in PopulatioD, 1978— Continued 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
vated 



OHIO- 

University Heights 

Upper Arlington 

Urbana 

Vandaha 

Vermilion 

Wadsworth 

Warren 

Warrensville Heights 

Washington Court House ... 
Wayne Township 

West Carrollton 

Westerville 

Westlake 

Whitehall 

Wickliffe 

Willoughby 

Willowick 

Wilmington 

Wooster 

Worthington 

Xenia 

Youngstown 

Zanesville 

OKLAHOMA 

Ada 

Altus 

Ardmore 

Bartlesville 

Bethany 

Broken Arrow 

Chickasha 

Claremore 

Del City 

Duncan 

Edmond 

Elk City 

El Reno 

Enid 

Guthrie 

Lawton 

McAlester 

Miami 

Midwest City 

Muskogee 

Norman 

Oklahoma City 

Okmulgee 

Ponca City 

Sand Springs 

Sapulpa 

Seminole 

Shawnee 



1,488 
9,124 
1,617 



528 

5,467 

860 



3,216 
3,195 
27,638 



121 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Popula 



Crime 
total 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



OKLAHOMA- 



Stillwater 
Tahlequah 



Albany 
Ashla nd 
Astoria 
Bakei 
Beavrrton 

Bend 
Coos Bay 
Corvallis 
Eugene 
Forest Grove 

Grants Pass 
Gresham 
Hillsboro 
Klamath Falls 
La Grande 

Lake Oswego 
McMinnville 
Medford 
Milwaukie 
North Bend 

Oregon City 

Pendleton 

Portland 

Roseburg 

Salem 

Springfield 
The Dalles 
Tigard 
West Linn 
Woodburn 



PENNSYLVANU 



Abington Township 

Aliquippa 

Allentown 

Altoona 

Ambridge 

Aston Township 
Baldwin Borough 
Beaver Falls 
Bellevue 
Bensalem Township 

Berwick 
Bethel Park 
Bethlehem 
Bloomsburg Town 
Bradford 



35,614 
1,096 
6,710 



109 


1.388 


85 


707 


' 


83 


36 


107 


5 


78 


23 


145 


70 


77 


150 


666 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and 



in Population, 1978— Continued 



Popula- 
tion 
group 



total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



rape 



PENNSYLVANIA- 



Brentwood 

Bristol 

Bristol Township 

Bumham— Derry Township 

Butler 

Butler Township 
Canonsburg 
Carbondale 
Carlisle 

Castle Shannon 
Center Township 
Chambersburg 
Cheltenham Township 
Chester 

Clairton 

Coal Township 

Coatesville 



Conemaugh Town 

Connellsville 

Darby 

Darby Township 

Derry Township 

Dormont 



East Hemprield Township 
East Nomton ^ 
Easton 



East Pennsboro Township 
Elizabeth Township 
EUwood City 
Emmaus 



Ephrata 

Ene 

Exeter Township 

Fairview Township 

Falls Township 

Folcioft 
Greensburg 
Greenville 

Hampden Township 
Hampton Township 

Hanover 

Hanover Township 
Hamsburg 
Hamson Township 
Hatfield Township 

Haverford Township 
Hazleton 

HempHeld Township 
Hermitage 
Hopewell Township 



672 

325 

6,026 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and 



in Population, 1978— Continued 



PENNSVLVANIA- 



Horsham Township 



Jeannettr 
Johnstown 
Kingston 



Lebanon 

Lewistown 

Lock Haven 

Logan Township 

Lower Allen Township 



Lower Buirell 

Lower Makefield Township 
Lower Menon Township 
Lower Moreland Township 
Lower Paxton Township 

Lower Providente Township 
Lower Southampton Township 
Manheim Township 
Manor Township 
Marpte Township 

McCandless Township 
McKeesport 
MeadviUe 

Middletown Township 
Millcreek Township 

Monessen 
Monroeville 
Moon Township 
Momsville 
Mountaintop Regional 

Mount Lebanon Township 
Muhlenberg Township 



Nether Providence Township 
New Castle 
New Kensington 
Newtown Township 
Nomstown 

Northampton 

Northern York Regional 

North Huntingdon Township 

North Versailles Township 

Oakmont 

Oil City 

Palmer Township 
Penn Hills Township 
Penn Township 
Peters Township 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
total 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



7 


III 


5 


118 


95 


478 


8 


116 


19 


459 


54 


281 



riMe 6.— Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, aties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
total 



slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



PENNSYLVANU— Continued 

'hiladelphia 

'hocnixville 

Ittsburgh 

lains Township 

leasanl Hills 

'lura 

lymouth Borough 

'lymouth Township 

•ottstown 

otlsville 

Ladnor Township 

Leading 

Jchland Township 

jdley Township 

:obinson Township 

;oss Township 

.ostravcr 

alisbury Township 

cott Township 

haler Township 

hamokin 

outh Park Township 

outh Whitehall Township 

pringettsbury Township 

pringfield Township (Delaware County) 
pringfield Township 

(Montgomery County) 

pring Garden Township 

pring Township 

tate College 

unbury 

usquehanna Township 

watara Township 

wissvale 

redyfTrin Township 

Iniontown 

Ipper Allen Township 

Ipper Chichester Township 

Ipper Darby Township 

'pper Dublin Township 

Ipper Merion Township 

Ipper Moreland Township 

Ipper Providence Township 

Ipper Saint Clair Township 

Ipper Saucon Township 

Ipper Southampton Township 

barren 

/ashington 

/est Chester 

/est Deer Township 

/est Goshen Township 

/est Manchester Township 

/est Mifflin 



72,948 

524 

26,776 



4,224 

32 

1,475 



19,154 

161 

7,808 



1 


40 


107 


13 


181 


513 


80 


324 


763 


40 


157 


315 


22 


178 


680 


222 


1,779 


2,180 


26 


76 


154 


29 


302 


712 


8 


73 


183 


21 


376 


448 


16 


67 


195 



Table 6.— Number of OfTenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



Index 
total 



Forcible 
rape 



vated 
assault 



Burglary 



PENNSYLVANU- 

West Norriton Township 

Whitehall 

Whitehall Township 

Whitemarsh Township 

Wilkes Barre 

Wilkinsburg 

Williamsport 

Yeadon 

York 

York Township 

RHODE ISLAND 

Barrington 

Bristol 

Central Falls 
Coventry 
Cranston 

Cumberland 
East Greenwich 
East Providence 
Johnston 
Lincoln 

Middletown 
Newport 

North Kingstown 
North Providence 
North Smithfield 

Pawtucket 
Portsmouth 
Providence 
Smithfield 
South Kingstown 

Tiverton 
Warren 
Warwick 
Westerly 
West Warwick 

Woonsocket 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Aiken 

Anderson 

Cayce 

Charleston 

Columbia 

Easley 

Florence 

GafTney 

Georgetown 

Greenville 

Greenwood 

Greer 

Hanahan 

Lancaster 

Laurens 



674 
3,167 
1,010 
1,314 

333 

2,943 

318 

12,403 



27 


312 


79 


489 


17 


124 


31 


1,203 


9 


145 



87 


291 


■)9 


430 


2 


88 


83 


804 


2 


91 


»38 


3,531 


18 


70 



67 
688 
1,008 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Qties and Towns 10,000 and 



City by Stale 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



in Population, 1978— Continued 



SOUTH CAROLINA- 



Mount Pleasant 

Myrtle Beach 

North Augusta 

North Charleston 

Orangeburg 

Rock Hill 

Spartanburg 

Sumter 

West Columbia 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Aberdeen 

Brookings 

Huron 

Mitchell 

Pierre 

Rapid City 

Sioux Falls 

Vermillion 

Watertown 

TENNESSEE 

Athens 

Bristol 

Chattanooga 

Clarksville 

Cleveland 

Columbia 
Cookeville 
Dyersburg 
East Ridge 
Eliiabethton 



Humboldt 
Jackson 
Johnson City 
Kingsport 
Knoxville 



433 
3,091 
1,895 
1,675 



Lawrenceburg 

Lebanon 

Maryville 

McMinnville 

Memphis 



Momstown 
Murfreesboro 
Nashville 
Dai Ridge 

Pans 

Shelbyville 
Soddy — Daisy 
Spnngfield 
Tullahoma 

Union City .. 



1,365 
26,444 
1,346 



2,897 
30 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Populatioii, 1978— Continued 



City by Sute 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Aggra- 
assaull 



Abilene 

Alice 

Alvin 



Angleton 
Arlington 



Balch Spnngs 

Bay City 

Baytown 

Beaumont 

Bedford 

Beeville 

Bellaire 
Belton 
Benbrook 
Big Spnng 
Borger 

Brenham 

Brownfield 

Brownsville 

Brownwood 

Bryan 

Burkbumett 
Burleson 
Carroll ton 
Cleburne 
Clute 

College Station 
Conroe 

Copperas Cove 
Corpus Chnsu 
Corsicana 

Dallas 
Deer Park 
Del Rio 
Denison 
Denton 

Desoto 
Dumas 
DuncanviUe 
Eagle Pass 
Edinburg 

El Paso 
Ennis 

Farmers Branch 
Forest Hill 

Fort Stockton 
Fort Worth 
Freeport 
Fnendswood 
Gainesville 



1,159 

599 

8,874 



988 

3,554 

9,068 

642 

476 



36.008 
1,080 
385 




2 


110 


7 


82 


14 


460 


25 


115 


21 


88 


99 


465 


26 


211 


17 


254 


il3 


5,368 



128 



Known to the PoUce, Oties and Towns 10,000 and 



in Population, 1978— Continued 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
lota] 



5,671 
5,815 
5,038 



3,788 
1,264 
594 
412 



14,259 
1,379 
659 



1,041 

373 

3,590 

2,014 



930 
1,271 
5,401 
1,728 

709 



negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



7,352 
5 
27 



1,558 
1,697 
1,430 



129 



Table 6.— Number of OHenses Known to the PoUce, aties and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 197S— Continued 



Popula- 
group 



Cnme 
total 



negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



TEXAS-CoDdnued 

Pharr 

Plainview 

Piano 

Port Arthur 

Portland 

Port Lavaca 

Port Neches 

Raymondville 

Richardson 

Robstown 

Rosenberg 

Round Rock 

San Angelo 

San Antonio 

San Benito 

San Marcos 

Segum 

Sherman 

Snyder 

South Houston 

Stephenville 

Sulphur Springs 

Sweetwater 

Taylor 

Temple 

Terrell 

Texas City 

Tyler 

Universal City 

University Park 

Uvalde 

Vernon 

Victoria 

Vidor 

Village 

Waco 

Waxahachie 

Weatherford 

Weslaco 

West University Place 

White Settlement 

Wichita Falls 

UTAH 

American Fork 

Bountiful 

Brigham City 

Cedar City 

Clearfield 

Lay ton 

Logan 

Midvale 



1,049 
2,498 
2,883 



534 

745 

271 

4,510 

52,526 

592 

1,342 



43 


142 


49 


325 


02 


692 


49 


1,612 


4 


78 


10 


99 


18 


79 



130 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to tbe Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and 



Popula- 
group 



neghgen 
staughie 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
assaull 



UTAH-CoDtinued 

Orem 

Provo 

Roy 

Sainl George 

Salt Lake City 

South Ogdcn 

Springville 

VERMONT 

Brattleboro 

Colchester 

South Burlington 

VIRGINIA 

Alexandria . . 
Alexandria State Police 

Arlington 

Arlington State Police 
Blacksburg .. 

Bristol 

Bristol Sute Police 
Charlottesville 
Charlottesville State Police 
Chesapeake . 

Chesapeake State Police 
Colonial Heights 

Danville 

Danville State Police 
Fairfax City 

Fairfax City State Police 
Fredericksburg 
Fredencksburg State Police 
Front Royal 
Hampton .... 

Hampton Stale Police 
Harrisonburg 

Hopewell 

Lynchburg .. 
Lynchburg State Police 

Manassas .... 
Manassas Park 
Martinsville . 
Martinsville State Police 

Newport News 

Newport News State Police 

Norfolk 

Norfolk Sute Police 
Petersburg ... 
Petersburg State Police 

Portsmouth . 
Portsmouth State Police 

Pulaski 

Radford 

Radford Sute Police 



5 


1,234 


8 


5 


2 


7,350 


9 


21 


1 


19,472 


9 


28 


4 


3,252 


9 


15 



Table 6.— Number of OfTenses Known to the Police, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over in Population, 



City by State 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



VIRGINIA- 

Richmond 

Richmond Slate Police 

Roanoke 

Roanoke State Police 

Salem 

Salem State Police 

Staunton 

Staunton State Police 

Suffolk 

Suffolk State Police 

Vienna 

Virginia Beach 

Virginia Beach State Police .. 

Waynesboro 

Waynesboro State Police 

Williamsburg 

Williamsburg State Police 

Winchester 

Winchester State Police 

WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen 

Auburn 

Bellevue 

BeMingham 

Bremerton 

Edmonds 

Ellensburg 

Everett 

Hoquiam 

Kelso 

Kennewick 

Kent 

Kirkland 

Lacey 

Longview 

Lynnwood 

Mountlake Terrace 

Mount Vernon 

Oak Harbor 

Pasco 

Port Angeles 

Pullman 

Puyallup 

Redmond 

Renton 

Richland 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoma 

Vancouver 

Walla Walla 

Wenatchee 





1,405 




1,815 




4,715 




3,865 




2,689 




1,386 




801 




4,389 




500 



1,191 
1,238 
3,772 



4 
1 
2 

2 


1,137 
44,084 
12,582 
13,463 

2,605 


5 

5 
3 


2,344 
1,480 
5,991 



2,257 
288 
385 



2,229 
503 
457 



500 

357 
11.476 
3,015 
4,293 



Fable 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Cities and Towns 10,000 and over In Population, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



lion 



Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
a^sault 



WEST VIRGINU 



Jeckley 
Sluefield 
Charleston 
:;Urksburg 



ilartinsburg 
^organtown 
■loundsviUe 
'arkersburg 



Veirton 
Vheeling 



WISCONSIN 



Moil 
Irookfield 
Irown Deer 

^ledonia 
>darburg 
Chippewa Falls 
Cudahy 
)e Pere 

^u Claire 
Michburg 
'ond du Lac 
'ranklin 
jlendale 

}reen Bay' 

jreendale 

jteenfield 

anesville 

Caukauna 

Unosha 
A Ciosse 
r4adi&on 
ilanitowoc 



rlarshneld 
ilenasha 
ifenasha Town 
ilenomonee Falls 
>1enomonie 

-lequon 

p4iddlelon 

rlilwaukee 

i4ount Pleasant Town 

ifuskego 

Jeenah 
Jew Berhn 
)ik Creek 
>conomowoc 
>shkosh 

See footnote at end of table. 



5,661 
3,280 
12.294 
1,706 



47 


28 


13 


8 








3 




18 


12 


3 


j2 


16 







133 



Table 6.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Oties and Towns 10,000 and over In Population, 1978— Continued 



Popula- 
group 



Crime 
Index 
lotal 



man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Burglary 



6,612 
519 

2,391 
544 
991 



1,161 

2,500 

3,928 

971 



vehicle 
theft 



Racine 

Saint Fiancis 
Sheboygan 
Shorewood 
South Milwaukee 

Stevens Point 5 1,559 3 3 28 266 1,221 

Sun Prairie 5 466 3 4 68 379 

Superior 4 2,099 6 19 22 482 1,433 

Two Rivers 
Watertown 

Waukesha 

Wausau 

Wauwatosa 

West Allis 

West B«nd 

Whitefish Bay 
Whitewater 
Wisconsin Rapids 

WYOMING 

Casper 4 2,695 

Cheyenne 4 3,030 

Gillette 5 640 

Laramie 

Riverton 

Rock Springs 

'1978 figures not comparable with prior years, and are not used in trend tabulations. Trends in this report are based on the volume of crimes reported by comparable 
units. Agency reports which are determined to be influenced by a change in reporting practices for all or specific offenses or annexation are removed from trend tables. 



TaUe 7.— Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, Universities and Coiieges, 1978 



University/College 



Violent 
cnme 
total 



Violent Crime 



Murder 
neghgen 
slaughtei 



Forcible 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



Property 
total 



Property Crime 



Burglary 



Auburn University. Alabama 

University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa ... 

Arizona State University 

Central Arizona College 

Eastern Arizona College 

Northern Arizona University 

Pima Community College, Arizona ... 

University of Arizona 

University of Arkansas 

California State College: 

Bakersfield 

Dominguez Hills 

San Bernardino 

Stanislaus 

California State Polytechnic University 

Pomona 

San Luis Obispo 

California State University: 

Chico 

FuUerton 

Hayward 

Sacramento 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

San Jose 

Humboldt State University. California 
University of California: 

Berkeley 

Davis 

Irvine 

L.awrence Livermore Laboratory . 

Riverside 

Sacramento Medical Center 

San Diego 

San Francisco Medical Center ... 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Cruz 

Colorado State University 

University of Colorado: 

Boulder 

Colorado Springs 

University of Southern Colorado 

Central Connecticut State College .... 

University of Connecticut 

Flonda A & M University 

Flonda Atlantic University 

Flonda International University 

Flonda State Univeristy 

University of Central Florida 

University of Florida 

University of North Florida 

University of South Florida 

University of West Florida 

Georgia State University 

University of Georgia 

Valdosta State College, Georgia 

West Georgia College 

Governors State University, Illinois ... 

Illinois State University 

Northern Illinois University 

Sangamon State University, Illinois ... 
Southern Illinois University: 

Carbondale 

Edwardsville 



16,578 
14,850 
21,350 
2,623 
2,033 
9,684 
10,692 
24,052 
12,529 

1,950 
4,699 

2,776 
2,093 



15,079 
22,230 
15,933 



27,537 
16,146 
8,873 



14.076 
5.364 
16.935 



135 



Table 7.— Number of Oflenses Known to the Police, Unlvefslties and Colleges, 1978— Continued 



Universiiy/CoUege 



Violent 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



vated 
assault 



Property 
total 



Burglary 



University of Illinois, Chicago 

Indiana University: 

Bloomington 

Indianapolis 

New Albany 

South Bend 

Iowa State University 

Iowa University 

Fort Hays State University 

Kansas State University, Manhattan 
Pittsburg State University, Kansas 

University of Kansas 

University of Kansas, Medical Center 
Wichita State University, Kansas 
Eastern Kentucky University 
Jefferson Community College, Kentucky 
Morehead State University, Kentucky 
Northern Kentucky State University 
University of Kentucky .. 
University of Louisville, Kentucky 
Western Kentucky University 
Louisiana State University 

Southeastern Louisiana Umversily 

University of Maine: 

Portland-Gorham 

Bowie State College, Maryland 

Frostburg State College, Maryland 

Morgan State University, Maryland 

Saint Mary's College of Maryland 

Salisbury State College, Maryland 

Towson State University, Maryland 

University of Baltimore, Maryland 

University of Maryland: 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore County 

College Park 

Eastern Shore 

Bentley College, Massachusetts 

Boston College, Massachusetts 

Boston University, Massachusetts 

Brandeis University, Massachusetts 

Clark University, Massachusetts 

Filchburg Stale College, Massachusetts 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

North Adams Stale College, Massachusetts 
Northeastern University, Massachusetts .... 

Springfield College, Massachusetts 

Tufts University, Massachusetts 

University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 

Boston 

Westfield State College, Massachusetts 

Central Michigan University 

Eastern Michigan University 

Michigan State University 

Northern Michigan University 

Oakland University, Michigan 

Western Michigan University 

University of Minnesota 

Mississippi State University 

University of Mississippi 

University of Missouri: 

Columbia 

Saint Louis 

See footnotes at end of table. 



27,905 

(n 
3.047 

21.296 

20.006 
4,242 

15,021 
4.220 

19.420 
1.726 
9.841 

11,148 

5.598 
4.853 
19,051 
13,022 
10,341 
21.763 
6.128 

9,609 

1,810 
3,190 
4,316 
1,164 
3,366 
1 1,349 
3,114 



30,453 

953 

4,373 



4,286 
8.580 
2.313 
25.655 
2.489 
6.262 

22.012 
6,881 
3,303 
15,190 
11,666 
39,606 
7,508 
7,965 
17,406 
45,759 
10,686 
8,980 





71 


13 


383 




341 


17 


1,624 


12 


316 




220 


16 


1,009 




1,378 




223 



136 



fable 7.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Universities and CoUeges, 1978— Continued 



University/College 



Violent 
crime 
total 



Violent Crime 



and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



Property 
crime 
total 



Jniversity of Nebraska, Lincoln 

Jniversity of Nevada, Reno 

Jniversity of New Hampshire 

Irookdale Community College, New Jersey . 

lurlington County College, New Jersey 

ilassboro Slate College, New Jersey 

lean College, New Jersey 

liddlesex County College, New Jersey 

donmouth College, New Jersey 

lontclair State College, New Jersey 

Lutgers University, New Jersey 

tockion State College, New Jersey 

'renton State College, New Jersey 

k'illiam Paterson College, New Jersey 

Jew Mexico Highlands University 

Jew Mexico Slate University 

Jniversity of New Mexico 

k'estern New Mexico University 

tate University of New York: 

Amherst 

Binghamton 

Buffalo 

Stony Brook 

tate University of New York A & T Colleg( 

Alfred 

Canton 

CobleskiU 

Delhi 

Morrisville 

tate University of New York College: 

Brockport 

Buffalo 

Cortland 

Fredonia 

Genesee 

New Paltz 

Old Westbury 

Oneonta 

Pittsburgh 

Potsdam 

Purchase 

Utica-Rome 

tate University of New York: 

Environmental Science and Forestry .... 

Downstate Medical Center 

Maritime College 

tate University of New York, Upstate 

Medical Center 

last Carolina University. North Carolina .... 

'leveland State University, Ohio 

kcnt State University, Ohio 

diami University, Ohio 

)hio State University 

Vright State University, Ohio 

Central State University, Oklahoma 

Jortheastem Oklahoma Stale University 

)klahoma Stale University 

■utnam City Campus, Oklahoma 

Jniversity of Oklahoma 

Jniversity of Oklahoma, Health Sciences 

Center 

)regon State University 

Iloomsburg State College, Pennsylvania 

^lifomia Slate College, Pennsylvania 

Seyney Stale College, Pennsylvania 

See footnotes at end of table. 



19,214 
5,993 

10,347 
5,056 
3.097 
8,057 
8,785 
6,573 
2,678 

10,646 

27,082 



8,654 
17,551 
12,010 

3,999 
2,355 
2,587 
2,512 
2,773 



8,877 
8,241 
4,443 
20,258 



2,769 
15,575 
5,382 
3,639 
2,121 



33 


7 


217 


33 


146 


21 


53 


3 


180 


36 


265 


23 


,134 


124 


171 


18 


197 


12 


222 


12 



Table 7.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Universities and Colleges, 1978— Continued 



Violent 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



Property 
toul 



Clarion State College, Pennsylvania 

East Stroudsburg State College, Pennsylvania 

Edinboro Sute College, Pennsylvania 

Elizabethtown College. Pennsylvania 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania 

Lock Haven State College, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State University: 

Altoona Campus 

Behrend College 

Capitol Campus 

McKeesport Campus 

University Park 

Shippensburg State College, Pennsylvania .... 
Slippery Rock State College, Pennsylvania ... 
West Chester State College. Pennsylvania .... 

Clemson University, South Carohna 

University of South Carolina 

Austin Peay State University. Tennessee 

East Tennessee State University 

Middle Tennessee State University 

Tennessee Technological University 

University of Tennessee: 

Knoxville 

Martin 

Memphis 

Baylor University, Texas 

Eastfield College, Texas 

East Texas State University 

Lamar University, Texas 

Midv»estem State University, Texas 

Moody College, Texas 

North Texas State University 

Pan Amencan University. Texas 

Southern Methodist University, Texas 

Southwest Texas State University 

Stephen F. Austin State University, Texas ., 

Sul Ross State University. Texas 

Texas A & M University 

Texas Christian University 

Texas State Technical Institute 

Texas Technological University 

University of Houston, Texas 

University of Texas: 

Arhngton 

Austin 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Houston 

Permian Basin 

San Antonio 

University of Texas Health Science Center, 

San Antonio 

University of Texas Medical Branch, 

Galveston 

University of Texas Southwest Medical 

School, Dallas 

University of Utah 

College of William and Mary, Virginia 

James Madison University, Virginia 

Longwood College, Virginia 

Mary Washington College, Virginia 

Radford College, Virginia 

See footnotes at end of table. 



4,701 
3,480 
4,902 
1,561 
10,854 
1,024 
2,160 



8,921 
4,005 
6,514 
9,322 
3,236 



18,132 

13,946 
39,455 

2,957 
12,075 

2,188 
761 

6,723 



17,547 
5,682 
7,503 
2,303 
2,092 
4,954 



raMe 7.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Universities and CoUeges, 1978— Continued 



University/College 



Violen 
crime 
total 



Violent Crime 



Murder 
negligen 
slaughtei 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
assault 



Property 
total 



Burglary 



Motor 
theft 



Jiiiversity of Richmond, Virginia 

Jniversity of Virginia 

Virginia Commonwealth University .... 
('irginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University 

Central Washington State College 

Vashington State University 

»larshall University, West Virginia ,... 

Vest Virginia University 

Jniversity of Wisconsin: 

Eau Claire 

Madison 

Milwaukee 

Oshkosh 

Parkside 

River Falls 

Whitewater 

Jniversity of Wyoming 



3,472 
18,161 
13,191 

19,667 
5,890 

15,690 
8,023 

17,978 

9,525 
34,839 
17,293 
7,850 
3,417 
4,518 
7,766 
8,070 



' The! 



ident enrollment figures a 
omputation. 

2 Student enrollment not available. 



: adjusted by converting part-time students into full-time equivalents (FTEs). See Appendix I for a detailed cxpla 



139 



Table 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Suburban Counties, 1978 



ALABAMA 



CALIFORNIA 



negligent 
slaughter 



Burglary 



Autauga 

Baldwin 

Calhoun 

Colbert 

Elmore 

Etowah 

Jefferson 

Lauderdale 

Limestone 

Madison 

Marshall 

Mobile 

Montgomery 

Russell 

Saint Clair 

Shelby 

Tuscaloosa 

Walker 

ARIZONA 

Maricopa 

Pima 

ARKANSAS 

Benton 

Crawford 
Crittenden 
Little River 
Pulaski 



Alamedd Highway Patrol 

Alameda State Police 

Contra Costa 

Contra CosU Highway Patrol 

Contra Costa Stale Police 

Fresno 

Fresno Highway Patrol 

Fresno State Police 

Kern . 

Kern Highway Patrol 

Kern State Police 

Los Angeles 

Los Angeles Highway Patrol 

Los Angeles State Police 

Mann 

Marin Highway Patrol 

Monterey 

Monterey Highway Patrol 

Napa Highway Patrol 

Orange 

Orange Highway Patrol 

Orange State Police 

Placer 

Placer Highway Patrol 

Riverside 

Riverside Highway Patrol 

Riverside State Police 



3,723 

191 

17,693 



2,929 

12 
48 



140 



Table 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Suburban Counties, 1978— Continued 



total 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Burglary 



CALIFORNIA- 

Sacramenlo . 

Sacramento Highway Patrol 

Sacramento State Police 

San Bernardino 

San Bemadino Highway Patrol 

San Bemadino State Police 

San Diego .. 

San Diego Highwav Patrol 

San Diego State Police 

San Francisco Highway Patrol 

San Francisco State Police 

San Joaquin 

San Joaqvin Highway Patrol 

San Joaquin State Police 

San Mateo . . 

San Mateo Highway Patrol 

San Mateo Sute Police 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Barbara Highway Patrol 

Santa Clara . 

Santa Clara Highway Patrol 

Santa Clara State Police 

Santa Cruz . 

Santa Cruz Highway Patrol 

Solano 

Solano Highway Patrol 

Sonoma 

Sonoma Highway Patrol 

Stanislaus ... 

Stanislaus Highway Patrol 

Ventura 

Ventura Highway Patrol 

Yolo 

Yolo Highway Patrol 
Yolo State Police 



Arapahoe 
Boulder .. 
Douglas . 
El Paso . 
Gilpin ... 
Jefferson 

Pueblo ... 
Teller .... 
Weld .... 



Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Brevard 

Broward 

Clay 

Dade 

Escambia 

Hillsborough 

Lee 



21 

7 

6.158 



3,014 

119 

759 

5,965 

13,973 

956 

53,712 

13,240 

19,859 

3,072 



36 


22 


226 


53 


271 


1,505 


519 


914 


3,909 


8 


23 


261 


2,431 


5,576 


14,496 


315 


789 


3,742 


386 


1,195 


7.075 


83 


135 


1,142 



141 



Table 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Suburtmn Counties, 1978— Continued 



Manatee 

Nassau 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Pasco 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Saint Johns 

Santa Rosa 

Sarasota 

Seminole 

Volusia 

WakuUa .... 



Bibb 

Butts 

Catoosa 

Chatham 

Cherokee 

Clayton 

Cobb 

Cobb Police Department 

Columbia 

Dade 

De Kalb 

De Kalb Police Department 

Dougherty 

Dougherty Police Department 

Douglas 

Effingham 

Fulton Polite Department 

Gwinnett 

Henry Police Department 



Lee 

Newton 

Paulding 

Richmond 

Rockdale 

Walker 

Walton 

IDAHO 

Ada 



ILLINOIS 



Champaign 

Du Page 

Kane 

Kankakee 

McHenry 

McLean 

Madison 

Saint Clair 



Index 

total 



11,165 
4,624 
8,278 

11,195 
1,843 
947 
5,305 
3,802 
3,731 



610 
5,903 
4,618 



1.182 
3,749 

1,572 



1,270 
2,439 
3,042 
2,702 
189 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



435 


1,744 


6,405 


9 


U 


723 


156 


1,038 


3,277 


55 


427 


1,671 


98 


492 


2,564 


200 


1,638 


2,888 


18 


164 


489 


13 


88 


298 


33 


445 


1.456 



Burglary 



25 


234 


314 


2,327 


43 


287 


1 


367 




88 



142 



TaUe 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Suburban Counties, 



County by Stau 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
slaughter 



rape 



Robbery 



vated 
assault 



Burglary 



INDIANA 

Adams 

Adams Sute Police 

Allen 

Allen State Police 

Boone State Police 

Clark State Police 

Clay Slate Police 

Dearborn 

Dearborn State Police 

De Kalb 

De Kalb State Police 

Delaware State Police 

Floyd State Police 

3ibson State Police 

Hamilton State Police 

Hancock 

Hancock State Police 

Hendricks State Police 

Howard 

Howard State Police 

lohnson State Police 

Lake State Police 

Vladison Sute Police 

\4anon 

Vlanon State Police 

Vdarshall 

Vlarshall State Police 

Slonroe 

Vlonroe State Police 

Morgan State Police 

Porter 

Porter State Police 

Posey State Police 

Saint Joseph 

Saint Joseph State PoUce 

Shelby 

Shelby State Police 

Sullivan State Police 

rippecanoe State Police 

riplon State Police 

l/anderburgh 

i'anderburgh State Police 

k^ermillion State Police 

«go 

^igo State Police 

iVarrick State Police 

iVells State Pohce 

IOWA 

Black Hawk 

Dubuque 

Linn 

Polk 

Pottawattamie 

Warren 

iVoodbury 

KANSAS 

Butler 

Douglas 

lefTerson 

lohnson 

Dsage 

Sedgwick 

Shawnee 




45 


227 


10 


74 


11 


97 


61 


290 



143 



Table 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Suburban Counties, 1978— Continued 



KENTUCKY 



Boone Police Department 

Boone State Police 

Bourbon 

Bourbon Slate Police 

Boyd . 

Boyd State Police 

Bullitt 

Bullitt Police Department 

Bullitt State Police 

Campbell Police Department 

Campbell State Police 

Christian 

Christian Police Department 

Christian State Police 

Clark . 

Clark Sute Pobce 

Daviess 

Daviess State Police 

Greenup 

Greenup Sute Police 

Henderson 

Henderson State Police 

Jefferson Police Department 

Jefferson State Police 

Jessamine 

Jessamine State Police 

Kenton Police Department 

Kenton State Police 

Oldham 

Oldham Police Department 

Oldham State Police 

Scott .. 

Scott State Police 

Woodford 

Woodford Police Department 

Woodford State Police 



Caddo 

Calcasieu 

East Baton Rouge 

Grant . 

Jefferson 

Lafayetie 

Livingston 

Ouachita 

Rapides 

Saint Bernard 

Saint Tammany 

Webstei 

West Baton Rouge 

MAINE 

Androscoggin 

Androscoggin State Police 

Cumberland 

Cumberland State Pohce 



Crime 
Index 
total 



1,515 
3,040 
6,115 



Robbery 



Burglary 



57 


206 


in 


523 


343 


960 


503 


1,822 


36 


44 


.070 


5,622 


103 


695 


75 


188 


63 


272 


88 


291 



TaUe 8.— Number of Offenses Known (o the Police, Suburitan Counties, 1978— Continued 



County by State 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
rape 



MARYLAND 

Anne Arundel Police Department ... 

Anne Arundel Stale Police 

Baltimore Police Department 

Baltimore State Police 

Carroll State Police 

Cecil 

Cecil State Police 

Charles 

Charles State Police 

Harford 

Harford State Police 

Howard Police Department 

Howard Slate Police 

Montgomery Police Department 

Montgomery State Police 

Prince Georges Police Department ... 
Prince Georges State Police 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Berkshire State Police 

Bristol Sute Pohce 

Essex State Police 

Hampden State Police 

Hampshire Sute Police 

Middlesex State Police 

Norfolk State Police 

Plymouth State Pohce 

Suffolk State Pohce 

Worcester State Police 

MICHIGAN 

Barry 

Bay 

Calhoun 

Clinton 

Eaton 

Ionia 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Kent 

Lapeer 

Livingston 

Macomb 

Monroe 

Muskegon 

Oakland 

Oceana 

Ottawa 

Saginaw 

Saint Clair 

Shiawassee 

Van Buren 

Washtenaw 

Wayne 

MINNESOTA 

Anoka 

Benton 

Carver 

Chisago 

Clay 

Dakota 

Hennepin 



1.812 

5,028 

631 

24,570 



384 
2,031 
3,456 
2,738 



51 


193 


640 


48 


127 


850 


12 


155 


506 


71 


201 


1,721 


3 


16 


160 


16 


46 


506 


II 


72 


434 


24 


58 


708 


9 


35 


332 



145 



Table 8.— Number of OfTenses Known to the Police, Subuiban Counties, 1978— Continaed 



County by State 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

sla""u^;er 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
then 


MINNESOTA— Continued 




















630 
215 
232 

1.319 
340 
183 
372 

1,104 
716 




8 


4 


13 
31 

11 

22 


219 
69 
79 
685 
83 
81 
118 
317 
188 


338 
119 
115 
499 
227 
88 
235 
694 
436 






2 




Ramsey 
Sa.nt Lou.s 


3 

7 




31 


1 


9 
1 
1 

2 
7 


87 


Sherburne 




9 




4 

2 




Washington 
Wnght 

MISSISSIPPI 


2 
4 


71 
66 


















Harrison 

Hinds 

Jackson 

Rankin 

Stone 


2,886 
477 

1,530 
136 
71 


9 

6 

5 


7 
7 
10 
4 


61 

14 
31 
24 

2 


444 
53 
51 
26 

7 


1,114 
212 
771 
51 
43 


1,095 
161 
532 
15 
15 


156 
26 

129 
11 
4 


MISSOURI 


















Andrew 

Boone 

Cass 

Clay 

Fiankhn 


234 
660 
354 
283 

1,060 

1,091 
911 

1.537 
338 
157 

1,315 
15,973 


1 
1 


70 


2 
6 
2 
2 
10 
12 
8 
26 
5 

189 


2 
19 
13 
27 
49 
45 
134 
13 
13 
2 
146 
511 


71 
299 
155 
129 
497 
433 
206 
729 
164 

60 

506 

4,553 


148 
303 
155 
106 
364 
553 
513 
504 
122 
81 
490 
8,799 


11 
31 

23 


2 


129 








JefTerson 

Platte 

Ray 

Saint Charles 

Saint Louis Police Department 


6 

1 
2 

10 


254 
31 
10 
158 
1,841 


MONTANA 


















Yellowstone 


990 


3 


3 


6 


83 


191 


634 


70 


NEBRASKA 


















Dakota 


129 
1,699 
427 
709 




1 
8 
10 

2 


19 

2 




50 
396 
117 
119 


63 
1,027 
253 
510 


14 


Douglas 


1 


100 
18 
12 


148 


Sarpy 


. 


64 


NEVADA 


















Washoe 


2,327 


8 


14 


49 


102 


714 


1,303 


137 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 






113 




4 


2 


9 


76 


14 










NEW JERSEY 


















AtlanUc State Police 
Bergen State Police 
Burlington State Police 
Camden State Police 
Cumberland State Police 


692 
426 
892 
67 
1,114 
35 
18 
12 
275 
96 
358 
22 


4 

5 


3 

2 

4 
II 

1 


9 

9 
21 

3 
16 

6 


34 
16 
43 

7 
59 

7 

5 


275 
73 
387 
20 
640 
5 
5 

72 
31 
168 

7 


321 
254 
333 
27 
335 

7 
4 

156 
31 

135 
8 


46 
71 
89 

5 
52 

5 








Hudson State Police 


6 


Mercer Stale Police 




7 

1 
3 

1 




28 
6 
21 

2 


12 






15 
8 

1 




Monmouth State Police 




23 


Morris State Police 


1 


2 



able 8.-Number of Oflenses Known to tbe Poike, Suburban Counties, 



NEW JERSEY- 

assaic State Police 

ilem State Police 

DHierset Slate Police 

'nion State Police 

(■arren Slate Police 

NEW MEXICO 

.eraalillo 



NEW YORK 



Jbanv 

Jbany Stale Police 

roome 

roome Stale Police 

iemung 

hemung Stale Police 

)ulchess 

)utchess Suie Police 

ne Slate Police 

lerkimer Slate Police 

ivingslon 

ivingslon Slate Police 

ladison 

ladison Slate Police 

Monroe 

donroe State Police 

4onlgoraei7 

Montgomery Stale Police 

■Jassau 

'Niagara Stale Police 

)neida 

Jneida Slate Police 

)nondaga 

)nondaga Stale Police 

)nlano 

Jntano State Police 

Means 

Jrleans State Police 

Jswego 

Dswego Stale Police 

Putnam 

Putnam Slate Police 

Rensselaer 

Rensselaer Sute Police 

Rockland 

Rockland Sute Police 

Saratoga 

Saraloga Sute Police 

Schenectady 

Schenectady Sute Police 

Suffolk 

Suffolk Police Department 

Suffolk Stale Police 

Tioga 

Tioga State Police 

Wayne 

Wayne Slate Police 

Wesi Chester State Police 



NORTH CAROUNA 



Alamance 

Brunswick 

Buncombe 

Cumberland 

Cumtuck 



Crime 
total 



796 
2,032 
1,057 



36,330 
730 
2,146 
911 
1,438 
3,639 
1,770 
1,099 



Murder 
negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



vated 
assault 



Burglary 



14 


199 


225 


1,176 


37 


80 


41 


398 


3 


398 


10 


395 


55 


228 


22 


157 


62 


280 


232 


850 


36 


483 


25 


334 


34 


221 


9 


141 


6 


52 


17 


263 


54 


1,366 


54 


241 


9 


5 


5 


66 


293 


8,489 


38 


311 


115 


720 


1 


391 


25 


782 


35 


1.217 


28 


659 


53 


286 


24 


133 


36 


148 


15 


94 


21 


233 


30 


426 


15 


241 


40 


149 


79 


272 


13 


485 


5 


4 


4 


28 


6 


473 


72 


474 




4 


10 


126 


1,255 


18,259 


44 


128 


40 


137 


6 


117 


102 


288 


42 


394 


59 


450 


37 


389 


144 


277 


155 


515 


611 


2,991 


39 


89 



657 
22 
140 
22,251 
346 
1,096 
457 



319 
1,095 

2,755 



147 



Table 8.— Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, Suburban Counties, 1978— Continued 







Murder 














County by Sute 


Crime 
Index 
total 


and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


"IT. 

assault 


Burglary 


Urceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


NORTH CAROUNA-Contlnued 


















Davidson 


1,280 


6 




6 


6 


545 
357 
655 
1,091 






Durham 


L003 


5 


661 
530 
1,095 
1,154 




Forsyth 


2,074 




2 


20 


161 

337 




Gaston 


2,801 


9 


10 


20 


1 
1 


Guilford 


2,495 


6 


15 


45 


72 


990 


1,257 




Mecklenburg 


2,741 


6 


18 


41 


195 


1,005 


1.301 


1 


New Hanover 


2,040 


3 


9 


18 


98 


698 


1,093 


1 


Orange 


730 


3 


II 


2 


10 


360 


307 




Randolph 


1,112 


4 


7 


14 


29 


550 


449 




Stokes 


328 


2 


1 


2 


23 


137 


145 




Union 


804 


4 


9 


4 


107 


330 


293 




Wake 


2,386 


13 


14 


34 


93 


1,025 


1,025 


I 


Yadkin 


312 








25 


92 


169 




NORTH DAKOTA 
















Cass 


264 




2 




42 


54 
8 


140 
135 




Grand Forks 


168 




7 




8 




OHIO 








Allen 


2,361 


1 


8 


25 


49 


467 


1,741 




Auglaize 


354 


1 


7 


5 


6 


130 


190 




Belmont 


575 


2 


7 


10 


29 


199 


299 


' 


Butler 


880 
445 


2 


9 
1 


2 




441 
196 


377 
216 




Champaign 


13 


1 


Clark 


1,404 


1 


2 


30 


2 


506 


806 




Clermont 


869 


1 


8 


3 


45 


280 


416 


1 


Cuyahoga 


12 
687 








17 








Delaware 


2 


11 


11" 


233 


377 




Franklin 


3,627 


9 


26 


126 


64 


979 


2,078 


M 


Fulton 


300 










125 
263 


158 
388 




Geauga 


792 


2 


6 


6 


60 


t 


Gretne 


615 






g 


35 


247 
1,807 


292 
4,339 




Hamilton 


6,973 


4 


26 


138 


203 


45 


Jefferson 


385 


5 


1 


84 


52 


126 


84 


3 


Lake 


629 


1 


3 


12 


5 


149 


418 


4 


Lawrence 


1,139 


5 


3 


20 


113 


322 


612 


6 


Lorain 


1,401 


5 


8 


51 


186 


677 


327 


14 


Lucas 


1,436 


2 


24 


27 


66 


454 


758 


10 


Madison 


292 
469 




3 




47 


129 
144 


159 
246 




Mahoning 


3 


""6 


2 


Montgomery 


5,071 


g 


39 


195 


161 


1,888 


2,479 


30 


Ottawa 


867 




2 




46 

77 


334 
289 


453 
451 


2 
J, 


Pickaway 


861 




2 


8 


Portage 


2,238 


3 


21 


26 


319 


721 


999 


14 


Preble 


705 


1 


6 


14 


31 


242 


362 


4 


Putnam 


135 
889 










62 
240 
982 


71 
495 
1,335 




Richland 




3 


15 


70 


21 


Stark 


2,649 


1 


22 


53 


37 


Summit 


2,634 


1 


9 


36 


163 


585 


1,636 


2* 


Trumbull 


1,600 
223 

1,832 
648 




5 


29 

2 
20 


68 

99 
4 


488 
101 
448 

287 


861 

114 

1,152 

314 




Van Wert 


7 


Warren 


7 


9! 

3 


Washington [.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 






OKLAHOMA 










Canadian 


237 
249 




2 


3 
2 
14 
4 


15 
7 

39 
9 


99 
129 
209 
132 


99 
96 

173 
158 


IS 
11 

27 
57 
19 

3 


Cleveland 


■ ■ 


Comanche 


472 
361 


5 


5' 

] 


Creek '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'."" 


U Flore 


208 
117 


3 

3 


4 

1 




19 


81 
67 


82 
42 


McClain '..Z 





148 



Table 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the Police, Suburban Counties, 



negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



OKLAHOMA- 

Mayes 

Osage 

Pottawatomie 

Rogers 

Tulsa 

OREGON 

Clackamas ... 
Clackamas State Police 

Lane 

Lane State Police 

Marion 

Marion Slate Police 
Multnomah . . 
Multnomah State Police 

Polk 

Polk State Police 



Washington Slate Police 

PENNSYLVANU 

Adams Slate Police 

Allegheny 

Allegheny Police Depanment 
Allegheny Stale Police 

Beaver State Police 
Berks State Police 
Blair Sute Police 
Bucks State Police 
Cambna State Police 
Carhon Stale Police 
Chester Deled ive 
Chester State Police 
Cumberland State Pohce 
Dauphin State Police 
Delaware State Police 
Ene State Police 
Lackawanna Stale Police 
Lancaster Slate Police 
Lehigh State Police 
Luzerne State Police 
Lycoming State Police 
Monroe Slate Police 
Montgomery Detective 
Montgomery State Police 
Northampton State Police 
Perry State Police 
Philadelphia State Police 
Somerset State Police 
Susquehanna Stale Police 
Washington Sute Police 
Westmoreland Detective 
Westmoreland State Pohce 
York Deleclive 
York State Police 

RHODE ISLAND 

Kent Stale Police 
Providence Stale Police 
Washington Sute Pohce 



34 

4,746 

222 



798 
1,108 
1,580 

338 
1,223 



27 


36 




7 


29 


39 


9 


8 


78 


282 


3 


5 



149 



Table 8.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Suburban Counties, 1978— ( 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Aiken 

Berkeley 

Charleston Police DeparlmenI 

Dorchester 

Greenville 

Lexington 

Pickens 

Richland 

Spartanburg 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Meade 

Minnehaha 

Pennington 



Anderson 

Blount 

Carter 

Cheatham 

Dickson 

Hamilton 

Hawkins 

Knox 

Marion 

Montgomery 

Robertson 

Rutherford 

Shelby 

Sullivan 

Sumner 

Tipton 

Unicoi 

Washington 



8,123 
1,374 
8,695 
4,284 
884 
8,274 
5,682 



negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Burglary 



2,680 
522 

2,514 

1,463 
283 

2,776 



Bexar 

Bowie 

Brazona 

Brazos 

Callahan 

Cameron 

Clay 

Collin 

Comal 

Coryell 

Dallas 

Denton 

Ector 



El Paso 

Fort Bend 

Galveston 

Grayson 

Gregg 

Guadalupe 

Harris 

Harrison 

Hays 

Hidalgo 

Hood 



150 



8.-Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, Suburtmn Counfles, 1978— Continued 



TEXAS-Condnued 



les 

bbock 

diand 
jntgomery 



indall 

n Patricio 
uth 



ppomatlox State Police 

Dtetourt 

otetourl State Police 

ampbell 

ampbell State Police 

harles City 

harles City State Police 

hesterfield Police Department 

hesterfield State Police 

raig 

raig State Polite 

linwiddie 

linwiddie State Police 

airfax Police Department 

airfax State Police 

rloucester 

rloucester State Police 

ioochland 

ioochland State Police 

lanover 

lanovcr State Police 

lenrico Police Department 

lennco Suie Polite 

ames City 

ames City Slate Police 

x>udoun 

xjudoun State Police 



Crime 
Index 
total 



264 

330 

2,468 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Robbery 



Aggra- 
assault 



151 



Table 8.-Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Suburban Counties, 1978- 


Continued 










County by Slate 


Crime 
Index 

total 


Murder 
and non- 
neghgent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motoi 
vehicli 
theft 


VIRGINIA-Continued 

Powhatan 


47 

18 

349 

6 

5,652 

104 

1,499 

36 

74 

15 

505 

15 

678 

18 

966 
5,922 
399 
22,641 
10,760 
6,028 
5,543 
2,923 

2 
807 
218 
507 
1,181 
110 

84 
125 
115 
221 
205 

32 
599 

65 

1.741 
131 
521 

1,677 
480 
416 

2.256 
704 
478 
950 
241 

1,449 
680 
474 

1,059 

1.606 








3 

8 
8 


24 
122 


19 

4 

192 

5 

3,493 

74 

1,102 

19 

10 

6 

269 

9 

366 

10 

475 
3.590 

244 
11,620 
4,904 
2.426 
3.277 
1.413 

76 




Powhatan State Pohte 










Prince George 




" 


7 




Prince George State Pohce 






Prince Wilham Pohce Department 
Prince Wilham State Police 


7 


19 


70 
5 
25 


97 
5 

25 
3 
9 

2 
1 
87 
1 

65 
138 

23 
561 
365 
488 

89 
133 

105 
3 
23 
15 


1.599 
10 
276 
8 
49 
3 
189 

180 


3 


Roanoke 

Roanoke State Pohce 


5 


7 




Scott 

Scott State Police 


2 
1 


2 




Washington 


' 


7 
15 




Washington State Police 






York 

York State Police 


2 


12 




WASHINGTON 

Benton 

Clark 

Frankhn 


2 


11 

27 
2 
171 
144 
47 
44 
23 


11 
65 
3 
325 
258 
49 
71 
33 


325 
1,758 
99 
8,337 
4,332 
2,620 
1,716 
1.131 

29 


3 


King 

Pierce 

Snohomish 

Spokane 

Yakima 


17 
10 
6 
6 

5 


1.6 


WEST VIRGINU 

Brooke 




Brooke Stale Pohce 




3 
12 

4 






Cabell 

Cabell State Police 


2 


10 
11 
9 

15 

3 
3 
6 
7 


175 
51 
140 
436 
33 
22 
36 
36 
102 
103 
10 
159 
29 

378 
37 
168 
557 
204 
132 
547 
156 
16 
192 
51 
245 
185 
148 
337 
281 
310 


478 

223 
572 
66 
32 
59 
50 
96 
72 
12 
367 
18 

1.243 
85 
309 
947 
244 
257 

1.394 
485 
378 
681 
177 
971 
426 
292 
644 

1.193 
489 




Kanawha 

Kanawha Sute Pohce 

Ohio 


5 

5 


i: 


Ohio State Pohce 


3 

1 
1 
4 
7 
5 
42 
2 

30 

3 




Putnam 


1 
2 




Putnam Slate Police 
Wayne 






Wayne State Pohce 
Wirt State Pohce 


6 


1 
3 
2 




Wood 




3 

2 

3 
3 




Wood State Police 

WISCONSIN 

Brown 




1 

8 


Calumet 


1 






4 

8 
2 

2 


Dane 




13 

2 
25 
2 
5 
4 


69 
6 

33 
25 
47 
9 
3 
103 
31 
2 
17 
11 
18 


Douglas 




Eau Claire 




1 
12 

2 




' 


La Crosse 


y 


Milwaukee 


' 


Outagamie 


6 
1 


Ozaukee 




Racine 


2 


6 

3 

1 
3 

2 


19 


Rock 


3 


Saint Crou 


2 


4 


Washington 


5 




Winnebago 


4 







152 



Table 9.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 and over bi PopuUtion, 1978 



Crime 
lotal 



Murder 
negligent 
slaughter 



Forcible 
Rape 



ALABAMA 

Chambers 

ballas 

be Kalb 

fVlorgan 

Talladega 

ARIZONA 

Apache 

Coconino 

Mohave 

Navajo 

Pinal 

Yavapa, 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 

Craighead 

Mississippi 

CAUFORNU 

El Dorado 

El Dorado Highway Patrol 

Humboldt 

Humboldt Highway Patrol 

Imperial Highway Patrol 

Imperial State Police 

Kings 

Kings Highway Patrol 

Uke 

Lake Highway Patrol 

Madera 

Madera Highway Patrol 

Mendocino 

Mendocino Highway Patrol 

Merced 

Merced Highway Patrol 

Merced State Police 

Nevada 

Nevada Highway Patrol 

San Luis Obispo 

San Luis Obispo Highway Patrol , 

Shasta 

Shasta Highway Patrol 

Shasta State Pohce 

Sutter 

Sutter Highway Police 

Tulare Highway Police 

Tuolumne 

Tuolumne Highway Patrol 

Yuba 

Yuba Highway Patrol 

COLORADO 

Mesa 

DELAWARE 

Kent Stale Police 

Sussex State Police 



2,063 

175 

2,065 



T«ble 9.— Number of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 and over in Populatioa, 1978— Continued 







Murder 














County by State 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


FLORIDA 


















Charlotte 


927 


3 


7 


13 


68 


407 


372 


5 


Citrus 


1,188 


3 


6 


g 


35 


456 


628 




Collier 


3,684 


13 


21 


74 


173 


991 


2,184 


22 


Hernando 


828 


1 


4 


10 


2 


316 


439 




Highlands 


716 


4 




23 


49 


272 


330 
849 




Indian River 


1,537 


3 


14 


18 


124 


426 


IC 


Jackson 


377 


2 


2 


7 


60 


127 


161 


1 


Lake 


2,018 


6 


26 


29 


221 


830 


790 


11 


Manon 


2,798 


6 


12 


33 


301 


1,033 


1,290 


12 


Martin 


2,318 


1 


15 


21 


137 


689 


1,359 


9 


Monroe 


2,294 


3 


11 


28 


102 


774 


1,260 


11 


Okaloosa 


1,552 


3 


9 


32 


36 


425 


925 


12 


Putnam 


1,061 


4 


12 


18 


63 


353 


576 


3 


Saint Lucie 


2,652 


7 


18 


27 


114 


1,032 


1,331 


12 


GEORGU 


















Carroll 


688 


4 


6 


g 


78 


346 


215 


3 


Clarke 


1,365 


4 


5 


15 


56 


420 


772 


9 


Floyd 


990 


4 


1 


18 


40 


387 


426 


11 


Glynn 


1,791 


6 


15 


29 


52 


699 


937 


5 


Hall 


2,013 


4 


15 


22 


85 


744 


970 


17 


Lowndes 


966 


4 


12 


22 




308 


519 


6 


HAWAII 


















Hawaii 


2,341 






19 
17 


44 
82 
70 


690 
707 
1,458 




10 

10 
4C 


Kauai 


2,406 


5 


9 


L480 
3,213 


Maui 


5,197 




19 




IDAHO 










Canyon 


708 






6 


53 


334 


249 




ILLINOIS 








5 


La Salle 


142 


5 


3 


g 


25 
127 


35 
317 


58 
441 




Vermilion 


971 




9 


12 


6 


INDIANA 
















Bartholomew 


554 


1 


, 


4 


1 


185 


358 




Bartholomew State Poliie 


67 
1,037 






2 
3 


2 
107 


20 
346 


26 

485 


I 


Elkhart 


1 


ij 


Elkhart State Police 


73 


1 


1 




6 


16 


34 


1 


Henry 


500 


1 


3 


2 


16 


116 


333 


2' 


Henry State Police 


51 


I 


1 


1 


5 


19 


15 




Kosciusko 


553 


1 


2 


2 


3 


261 


255 


2' 


Kosciusko State Police 


55 




1 




3 


23 


18 




La Porte 


1,034 


2 


11 


4 


84 


321 


542 


7( 


La Porte Sute Police 


128 


2 


2 


5 


15 


39 


46 




KENTUCKY 


















Floyd 


16 
290 








8 
26 


5 
112 


75 


6( 


Floyd State Police 


10 


j' 


6' 


Hardin 


111 

257 








4 
14 


30 
120 


77 
76 




Hardin State Police 




6 


6 


35 

i 


Harlan 


100 




2 


1 


28 


11 


50 


Harlan Sute Police 


683 


11 




14 


101 


246 


190 


12c 


Laurel 


96 




1 






37 


50 


7 


Laurel State Police 


533 


3' 




12 


29 


228 


125 


136 


Pike 


108 




5 




40 


5 




6 
2 


Pike Police Department 


30 










10 


18 


Pike State Police 


599 


13' 


3' 


12 


56 


237 


178 


100 


Pulaski 


329 


2 


4 


3 


21 


143 


139 


17 


Pulaski State Police 


102 


2 


2 


2 


3 


63 


14 


16 



154 



Me 9.-N»mber of Offenses Known to fl.e Police, Rural Counties 25.000 and over h. Population, iy78-Cootlnued 




Dunklin 
Jasper 



Table 9.— Number of Oflenses Known to the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



County by State 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 
Rape 



Robbery 



vated 
assault 



Burglary 



MONTANA 

Flathead 

Missoula 

NEVADA 

Carson City 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Rockingham 

Rockmgham Slate Police 

NEW MEXICO 

Don? Ana 

McKinley 

San Juan 

NEW YORK 

Allegany State Police 
Cattaraugus 
Ca'laraugus Sta'e Police 

Cayuga State Police 

Chautauqua Slate Police 

<_henangv, 

Chenango State Police 

Clinton 

Clinton State Police 

Columbia 

Columbia State Pohce 

Delaware 

Delaware State Police 

Genesee 

Genesee State Police 

JeTerson 

Jefferson State Pohce 

Ora jT 

Orange S'ate Police 

Saint Lawrence 

Saint I awrence State Police 

Steuben 

Steubei State Police 

Sullivan 

Sullivan Slate Police 

Tompkii.s 

Tompkin. Stale Police 

Ulster 

Ulster State Police 

Washington 

Washington Slate Pohce 



NORTH CAROLINA 



Beaufort 

Burke 

Cabarrus 

Caldwell 

Catawba 

Cleveland 

Columbus Pohce Department 

Craven 

Duphn 

Halifax 

Harnett 

Haywood 

Henderson 



2.221 
454 
761 



73 


382 


285 


517 


276 


296 


61 


372 


30 


241 


05 


214 


04 


117 


67 


436 



156 



lUe 9.— Number of Offenses Known to 



County by State 



the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



NORTH CAROLINA— CondDued 



ash 

itt 

ichmond 

obewn 

ockingham 

owan 

utherford 

unpson 

lanly 

urry 

/ayne 

/ilkes 



NORTH DAKOTA 



)arke 
lolmes 

Cnox 
kicking 

ilanon 

fiercer 

hluskmgum 

loss 

Sandusky 

icioto 

ruscarawas 

iVayne 



Benton 

Benton Stale Police 

Deschutes 

Deschutes State Pohce 

Douglas 

Douglas State Police 

Jackson 

Jackson State Police 

Josephine 

Josephine State Police 

Klamath 

Klamath Slate Pohce 

Linn 

Linn State Pohce 



Crime 
Index 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

roan- 
slaughter 



802 

1,698 

119 



Forcible 
Rape 



23 


382 


26 


259 


191 


279 


26 


109 


16 


241 


46 


272 



157 



Table 9.-Nuinber of Offenses Known to the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 



and over in Population, 1978— Continued 



County by Stale 



PENNSYLVANU 



Armstrong Stale Police . 
Bedford State Police .... 
Bradford State Police ... 

Butler State Police 

Centre State Police 

Clanon State Police .... 
Clearfield State Police .. 
Crawford State Police .. 

Fayetle Stale Police 

Franklin State Police .... 
Huntingdon Stale Police 

Indiana State Police 

Lawrence State Police ... 

Mercer Stale Police 

Schuylkill State Police ... 

Tioga Stale Police 

Venango Slate Police .... 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Anderson 

Beaufort 

Clarendon 

Darlington 

Florence 

Greenwood 

Horry Police Department 

Kershaw 

Lancaster 

Laurens 

Oconee 

Orangeburg 

Sumter 



Accomack 

Accomack State Police 

Albemarle 

Albemarle State Police 

Augusta 

Augusta State Police 

Bedford 

Bedford Stale Polite 

Buchanan 

Buchanan Slate Police 

Fauquiei 

Fauquiei State Police 

Franklin 

Franklin Stale Police 

Frederick 

Frederick Slate Police 

Halifax 

Halifax Slate Police 

Henry . 

Henry Slate Police 

Lee .... 

Lee State Police 

Montgomery 

Montgomery State Police 



Index 
total 



Forcible 
Rape 



390 


385 


269 


301 


390 


351 


218 


135 


432 


326 


.113 


1,329 


680 


985 


262 


201 


316 


381 


545 


903 


289 


484 


694 


768 


315 


333 


178 


306 


275 


222 


383 


375 


534 


655 


742 


858 


51 


54 


688 


840 


195 


280 


164 


189 



99 


191 


14 


38 


341 


603 


6 


22 


246 


417 


6 


22 


212 


162 


4 


9 


54 


13 


28 


34 


165 


143 


14 


38 


145 


175 






81 


315 


4 


24 


168 


215 


4 


5 


453 


620 


4 


19 


60 


19 


5 


11 


89 


164 


2 


8 



158 



j,,e a Ni-"-' "^ "ff-n«s Known to the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 and over in Population, 1978-Continued 




County by State 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
Rape 


Robbery 


assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


VIRGINIA-Cootlnued 

isylvania 


700 

30 
380 

48 
625 

54 
835 

24 
208 

66 
223 

46 

460 

2,742 
1,542 

644 

868 
3,325 
1,391 

426 

237 

358 

172 

7 

78 

83 

608 

25 

175 

2 

196 

68 

193 

209 

186 

11 

60 

185 
417 
678 
380 
542 
411 
408 
315 
526 
569 
445 
376 
548 
342 
1,168 
538 
420 


6 


1 


14 

2 


63 
4 
16 

2 
14 

13 

1 
10 

2 
66 

6 

1 
44 

134 
56 
36 

202 
70 

7 
74 

2 


273 

2 

130 


327 
7 

221 
20 

339 
34 

479 
16 
93 
33 
76 
20 

262 
1,332 
993 
284 
439 
1,509 
669 

275 
102 
117 
77 
2 
27 
40 
270 
14 
46 

77 

13 

63 
76 


13 
14 


Hjlingham 


3 


5 
26 


jckingham State Pobce 
otsylvania 


6 


2 


13 


217 
9 
261 
2 
85 
13 
63 
7 

167 
1,203 

311 

225 

351 
1,397 

548 

133 
99 
116 
55 
4 
32 
9 
216 
9 
55 

85 
23 
61 
102 
70 
10 
29 

70 
131 
233 
152 
172 
121 
101 
110 

59 
182 
187 
138 
117 

72 
251 
249 


34 
10 


iolsyl\dnia Sutc Police 




6 

2 
1 


12 

2 
3 

3 
2 

23 
10 

5 
4 
7 
8 


64 


anord Sute Police 
izewell 


1 


15 
14 


is< 


6 


11 


WASHINGTON 


2 




27 


and 
lUap 


23 
14 

7 

45 
12 

1 
3 
18 

2 


124 
76 


ewis 




66 


kanogan 

Z'on 
Whatcom 

WEST VIKGINM 


1 

3 

2 


146 

80 

8 


erkeley State Police 

ayette 

ayetle State Police 


2 
2 
9 

4 


2i 
1? 


reenbner 






5 
22 
18 

1 
16 


K 


reenbner State Police 






1 


^gan 

*gan State Police 


1 


6 


9( 


dcDowell 

dcDowell State Police 


12 

2 

2 
3 
5 


3 


2 
3 




/lercer 

4ercer State Police 


3 
26 

18 
10 

1 
1 


2 


4mgo 




f* 


rfingo Sute Police 

Uleigh 

laleigh State Police 


6 


4 
10 


1 


Vyoming 


1 






21 

245 
394 
170 
297 
249 
247 
191 
399 
310 
221 
215 
398 
232 
850 
249 
1 207 




Wyoming Sute Police 

WISCONSIN 








:iarlc 


2 

1 
2 

3 


2 
2 
8 
3 

3 


11 

27 
31 

7 
23 

2 
10 

5 

6 




w^lumbia 






Dodgs 












Jefferson 


1 




Manitowoc 


' 


11 
6 

2 


2 
2 

3 




Marathon 










Shawano 

Sheboygan 


1 


2 
3 


2 
7 
4 

1 




Trempealeau 





1 






1 ' 













159 



Table 9.-Namber of Offeiues Known to the PoUce, Rural Counties 25,000 and over In PopiiUtloa, 1978-Coatinued 




County by State 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Murder 
and non- 
neghgent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
Rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


STATE AGENCIES 


6,438 

42 

5,036 

627 
2,052 


22 


77 


72 


424 
22 
106 

180 
41 


2,023 
2,365 

198 
390 


3.065 

15 

2,092 

188 
1,347 








Vermont State Police 


12 

3 

2 


39 

28 
16 


19 

11 
171 


40 















fable 10.— Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, Population Group, 1977-1978 

1978 estimated popula 



Population group 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 
negligeni 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Urceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


rOTAL ALL AGENCIES: 12,023 
sgencies. tot.l populadon 
207.768,000: 


10,579,458 

10,719,993 

+ 1J 


979.452 

1,029.645 

+ 5.1 


9,600,006 

9,690348 

+ .9 


18,530 
18,745 
+ 1.2 


61,187 
65.084 
+ 6.4 


1 
1 

397,925 

410,224 

+ 3.1 


501.810 

535392 

+ 6.7 


1 
1 

2,947,664 

2,982398 

+ 1J 


5,708,758 
5,748,209 

+ .7 


943,584 















TOTAL CrriFS: 8.465 cities; total 
population 144,413,000: 


8,559,513 

8,660,232 

+ 1.2 


812.423 
854,495 

+ 5.2 


7.747,090 

7.805.737 

+ .8 


14.062 
14,252 
+ 1.4 


47,496 
50,984 

+ 7J 


361,768 

372,194 

+ 2.9 


389,097 
417,065 

+ 7.2 


2,268,762 

2,297,954 

+ 13 


4,677,864 
4,698,189 

+ .4 


800,464 




809394 


. 




ercen c ge 





Group I 

57 cuies, 250,000 and over; 
population 41,342,000: 


3.278.585 

3,258,118 

— .6 

1.344.616 

1.309,973 

-2.6 

959,893 

971.971 

+ 1.3 

974,076 
976.174 

1.190.643 

1.210.859 

+ 17 

1,118,150 
1.145.897 

+ 2.5 

1.160.047 

1.182.703 

+ 2.0 


449.895 

463.341 

+ 3.0 

229.886 
231.991 

+ .9 

112.662 

119,501 

+ 6.1 

107.347 
111.849 

97.642 

105.712 

+ 8.3 

83.402 

90.918 

+ 9.0 

75.01 1 
80.610 

+ 7.5 


2.828.690 

2.794.777 

-1.2 

1.114,730 

1.077.982 

-3.3 

847.231 

852,470 

+ .6 

866.729 

864.325 
— .3 

1.093.001 

1.105,147 

+ 1.1 

1.034.748 

1.054.979 

+ 2.0 

1.085.036 

1.102.093 

+ 1.6 


8.198 

8,384 
+ 2.3 

4.134 

4,275 
+ 3.4 

2.158 
2.204 
+ 2.1 

1,906 
1,905 

1,841 
1,736 

-.5.7 

1.204 
1.294 

f7.5 

1,088 
1.088 


25.089 
26.709 
+ 6.5 

10,478 
10.800 

+ 3.1 

7.037 
7.808 
+ 11-0 

7,574 
8.101 
+ 7.0 

6.776 
7.388 
+ 9.0 

5.374 
5.714 
+ 6.3 

4.544 
4.947 
+ 8.9 


245.276 

248.567 

+ 1.3 

135,146 

133,071 

- 1.5 

60.763 
63.921 
+ 5.2 

49.367 
51,575 
+ 4.5 

38.660 
41.195 
+ 6.6 

30.286 
32,799 
+ 8.3 

24.137 
24.720 


171.332 

179.681 

+ 4.9 

80,128 
83.845 
+ 4.6 

42.704 
45.568 
+ 67 

48.500 
50.268 

+ 3.6 

50.365 
55.393 
+ 10.0 

46,538 
51,111 
+ 9.8 

45,242 
49.855 
+ 10.2 


921,135 

915,678 

-.6 

368,677 

358.111 

-2.9 

263.471 

268.042 

+ 1.7 

288.987 
289.525 

+ .2 

324.182 

330.678 

+ 2.0 

2%.726 
307.002 

+ 3.5 

289,824 

298.574 

+ 3.0 


1.501.155 

1,483,889 

-1.2 

538,782 
521.750 

-3.2 

473,163 

476,288 

+ 7 

489,210 
485,851 

— .7 

669.000 
669.281 


406.400 


!<J78 


-2.8 


6 cities. I.OUO.OOO and over; 
population 17,783.000; 

1977 


207.271 


|97g 








18 cuies. 500.000 to 999,999; 
population 11,846,000: 
1977 


110.597 










33 cities. 250.000 to 499,999; 
population 11.712,000: 


88.532 










Group 11 

1 17 Cities. inO.OCO to 249,999; 
population 16,863,000: 


99,819 


1978 








"e.-'ent change 

Group HI 

276 . ities. 50.000 to 99.999: 
population 18,889,000: 

1977 


644,718 
649,384 

+ 7 

706.247 

712,214 

1 +.8 


93.304 


1978 




Percent change 

Group IV 

649 cities. 25.000 to 49.999; 
population 22.203.000: 

1977 


88.965 


1978 








See footnotes at end of uble. 









161 



Cnme 
Index 
total 



Table 10.— Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, Population Group, 

Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 



Group V 

1,550 cities, 10 000 to 24,999; 
population 24,101,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Group VI 

5,816 cities under 10,000: populi 
21,016,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 



-1978— Continued 



Suburban Area^ 

5,072 agencies; population 
75,913,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Rural Area* 



2,651 agencies 
28,648,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 



popula 



1,033,818 

1,057,560 

+ 2.3 



778,270 

805,095 

+ 3.4 



3,266,216 

3,329,009 

+ 1.9 



),732 



60,840 
65,159 

+ 7.1 



h4.0 



972,978 

992,401 

+ 2.0 



3,726 
3,875 
+ 4.0 



Forcible 
rape 



16,024 
16,824 
+ 5.0 



3,917 
4,013 

+ 2.5 



15,444 
16,424 
+ 6.3 



7,965 
8,489 
+ 6.6 



Aggra- 
vated 



143,996 

153,009 

+ 6.3 



36,303 
38,111 
+ 5.0 



Burglary 



250,294 

257,459 

+ 2.9 



910,791 

926,838 

+ 1.8 



503,326 

521,465 

+ 3.6 



1,878,853 

1,902,837 

+ 1.3 



Motoi 
theft 



•Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated ass 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
^Includes suburban city and county law enforcement agencies withm metropolil 
^Includes state police agencies with no county breakdown. 



1 areas. Excludes < 



. Suburban cit 



also included in other city grouf 



'able 11.— Crime Trends, OfTenses Known to the Police, Subiiri>an and Nonsuburban atles^. Population Group, 1977-1978 

978 estimated population] 



Population group 


Cnme 
Index 
total 


Violent 
cnrne^ 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


Suburban Cities 
OTAL SUBURBAN CITIES: 

,206,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 


1,819,126 
1,849,980 

+ 1.7 


107,681 
114,448 

+ 6J 


1.711,445 

1,735,532 

+ 1.4 


U99 
1,459 

+ 4J 


6J50 

6,737 
+ 7.8 


32.446 
33,659 

+ 3.7 


67,586 

72393 
+ 7.4 


449,051 

457320 

+ 1.8 


1,122338 

1,133,093 

+ .9 


139,856 
145.119 

+ 3.8 






Group IV 

21 cities, 25,000 to 49,999; 
population 14,195,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Group V 

025 cties, 10,000 to 24,999; 
population 16,113,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Group VI 

719 cities under 10,000; population 
10,898,000: 

1977 

1978 


698,525 

707,057 

+ 1.2 

677,516 
686,584 

+ 1.3 

443,085 

456,339 

+ 3.0 

1,153,009 
1,195378 

+ 3.7 


45,478 
47,866 
+ 5.3 

38,615 
41,292 
+ 6.9 

23,588 
25,290 
+ 7.2 

73,803 
80,076 
+ 8S 


653,047 

659,191 

+ .9 

638.901 

645,292 

+ 1.0 

419,497 

431,049 

+ 2.8 

1,079,206 
1,115J02 

+ 3 J 


581 

564 

-2.9 

521 
569 
+ 9.2 

297 
326 
+ 9.8 

1,420 
1379 
-23 


2.725 
2,907 
+ 67 

2,169 
2,378 
+ 9.6 

1,356 
1,452 
+ 7.1 

4,007 
4,436 
+ 10.7 


16,095 
16,416 
+ 2.0 

11,114 
11,765 
+ 5.9 

5,237 
5.478 
+ 4.6 

15,100 
15.974 
+ 5.8 


26,077 
27,979 
+ 7.3 

24,811 
26,580 
+ 7.1 

16,698 
18,034 
+ 8.0 

53,276 
58,287 
+ 9.4 


178,407 

181,922 

+ 2.0 

166,547 

169,727 

+ 1.9 

104,097 

105.671 

+ 1.5 

277,668 

287,276 

+ 33 


412,435 
413,654 

+ .3 

421,088 

422,432 

+ 3 

289,015 

297,007 

+ 2.8 

740,453 

762342 

+ 3.0 


62,205 
63,615 

+ 23 

51,266 

53,133 
+ 3.6 

26,385 
28371 


Nonsuburtan Cities 

OTAL NONSUBURBAN CITIES: 

26,114.000: 

1977 


61,085 


1978 


65,484 

+ 7 J 







-Crime Trends, Offenses Known to the Police, Sulxirban and Nonsuburtran Otiesi, Population Gitxip, 1977- 



Group IV 

228 cities, 25,000 to 49,999; 
population 8,008.000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Group V 

525 cities, 10,000 to 24,999; 
population 7,988,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Group VI 

3,097 cities under 10,000; population 
10,119,000: 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 



Index 
total 



431,989 

442,902 

+ 2.5 



313,140 

325,291 

+ 3.9 



negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



1,819 
2,040 
+ 12.1 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



'Suburban places are within Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas and inc 
Excludes core cities. Nonsuburban places are outside SMSAs. 
'Violent crimes are olTenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated a: 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-thefi, and motor vehicle theft 



232,330 

239,524 

+ 3.1 



Motoi 
vehicle 
theft 



lude suburban city and county law enforcement agencies within the metropolitan e 



aUe 12.-Criine Trends, 

978 estimated population) 



Offenses Known to the Police, Suburban and Nonsuburban Counties, Population Group, 1977-1978 



100,000 and o 
population 



1977 

1978 

Percent change 



25.000 to 99,999 

pulation 12,660,C 



1977 

1978 

Percent change 

Under 25,000 

>2 counties; population 3,409,C 

1977 

1978 

Percent change 



Nonsuburban Counties^ 

25,000 and over 

population 10,800,000: 



1977 
1978 
Percent change 



10,000 to 24,999 



1978 

Percent change 



1978 

Percent change 



Cnme 

total 



366,305 

377,963 

+ 3.2 



20,153 
21,525 
+ 6.8 



5,916 
6,229 

+ 5.3 



22,480 
23,885 
+ 6.3 



5,378 
5,695 

+ 5.9 



2,607 
2,658 
+ 2.( 



2,454 
2,597 
+ 5.8 



Aggra- 
vated 
assault 



47,382 
51,461 
+ 8.6 



8.482 
8,337 
— 1.7 



8.400 
8.581 
+ 2.2 



284,676 

292,587 

+ 2.8 



126.289 

128.826 

+ 2.0 



54.721 
52,797 
-3.5 



498.125 
506,250 



113.1% 

118,631 

+ 4.8 



Motor 
vehicle 
thefl 



72,825 
74,906 
+ 2.9 



22,816 
24,945 
+ 9.3 



14,418 
14,759 



9,616 
10.438 
+ 8.5 



10,5% 
11,466 
+ 8.2 



'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assi 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
3Crime offenses include sheriffs' and county law enforcement agencies. State poUc 



1^1 



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<Nff(^ ^(N*N OrJ— (NW^r- rn- 

?api ssr ss?; 25;.:; ss 

SR+ cfic+ '"2+ 2::+ °° ; 



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«t change':::;::;::::::;;;. 

Group 11 

, 100,000 to 249,999; 
tion 16,863,000: 


it 



Ils^i 



167 



Table 14.-Crime Rates, Offenses Known to the PoUce, Population Group, 1978 












(1978 estimated population. Rate: Number of criir 


es per 100,000 inhabitants) 






















Murder 














Population group 


Crime 
Index 

total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 


and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Urceny- 
theft 


Molo 
vehicl 
then 


TOTAL ALL AGENCIES: 11.627 






















total population 201.441,000: 






















Number of offenses known 


10,635,130 


1,022,803 


9,612J27 


18,686 


64,753 


408358 


531,006 


2,964,050 


5.693,872 


954,4 


Rate 


5,279^ 


507.7 


4,771.8 


93 


32.1 


202.7 


263.6 


1,471.4 


2,826.6 


47 







TOTAL CITIES: 7,980 cities; total 
Number of offenses known 






















8,600.246 


849314 


7,750402 


14,174 


50,782 


370,673 


413,685 


2J86,603 


4,659,058 


805,2 


Rate 


6,099.8 


602.4 


5,497.4 


IO.I 


36.0 


262.9 


293.4 


1,621.8 


3304.5 


57 






Group I 






















57 cities, 250,000 and over; 






















population 41,342,000: 






















Number of ofTenses known 


3,258,118 


463,341 


2.794.777 


8.384 


26.709 


248.567 


179.681 


915.678 


1.483.889 


395.2 


Rate 


7,881.0 


1.120.8 


6,760.2 


20.3 


64.6 


601.3 


434.6 


2.214.9 


3,589.3 


95 


6 cities, 1,000,000 and over; 






















population 17,783,000: 






















Number of offenses known 


1,309,973 


231.991 


1.077,982 


4.275 


10.800 


133,071 


83.845 


358.111 


521.750 


198. 


Rate 


7,366.2 


1.304.5 


6,061.7 


24.0 


60.7 


748.3 


471.5 


2,013.7 


2.933.9 


I.U 


18 cities, 500,000 to 999,999; 






















population 11,846,000: 






















Number of offenses known 


971,971 


119.501 


852,470 


2.204 


7,808 


63.921 


45.568 


268,042 


476.288 


108. 


Rate 


8,204.7 


1.008.7 


7,196.0 


18.6 


65.9 


539.6 


384.7 


2,262.6 


4.020.5 


91 


33 cities, 250,000 to 499,999; 






















population 11,712,000: 






















Number of ofrenses known 


976,174 


111.849 


864,325 


1.905 


8.101 


51.575 


50.268 


289.525 


485.851 


88, 


Rate 


8,335.1 


955.0 


7.380,0 


16.3 


69.2 


440.4 


429.2 


2.472.1 


4.148.4 


75 


Group II 






















117 cities, 100,000 to 249,999, 






















population 16,863,000: 






















Number of offenses known 


1,210,859 


105.712 


1.105.147 


1.7.36 


7.388 


41,195 


55.393 


330.678 


669,281 


105, 


Rate 


7,180.7 


626.9 


6,553.8 


10.3 


43.8 


244.3 


328.5 


1.961.0 


3.969.0 


62 


Group III 




271 cities, 50,000 to 99,999; 






















population 18,636,000: 






















Number of offenses known 


1,148.300 


90.593 


1.057.707 


1.279 


5.674 


32.806 


50.834 


308.597 


649.951 


99. 


Rate 


6,161.8 


486.1 


5.675.6 


6.9 


30.4 


176.0 


272.8 


1.655.9 


3.487.6 


53 



See footnotes at end of uble. 



■Me 14.— Crime Rates, Oflenses Known to the Police, Population Group, 1978— Continued 



Index 
total 



Property 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 



Forcible 



Aggra- 
assault 



Motor 
theft 



Group IV 

14 cities. 25,000 to 49.999; 

population 21.324.000: 

Number of offenses known 
Rate 



494 cities. 10,000 to 24.999; 
population 23,284,000: 



417 cities under 10,000; population 
19.543.000: 
Number of offenses known . 
Rate 

Suburban Area^ 

801 agencies; population 
72,704.000: 

Number of offenses known . 



?I4 agencies; population 

26.923.000: 

Number of offenses known 
Rate 



'Violent cnmes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

^Includes suburban city and county law enforcement agencies within metropoliun areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities a 

^Includes state police agencies with no county breakdown. 

Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



Table 15.— Crime Rates, OfTenses Kdowd to the Police, Suburban and Nonsuburi>an Qties, Population Group, 1978 



[1978 estimated population. Rate: Number of crin 


les per 100.000 inhabitan 
















Population group 


Crime 
Index 


Irime"' 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 

"laf"' 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Moto 
vehicl 
theft 


Suburban Cities 

TOTAL SUBURBAN CITIES: 
3,868 cities; total population 
39,179,000: 

Number of otTenses luiown 

Rate 


1,810,158 
4,620.2 


110,894 
283.0 


1,699,264 

4337.2 


1,404 
3.6 


6392 
16.8 


32,462 
82.9 


70,436 
179.8 


448,920 
1,145.8 


1,109325 
2331.4 


141,0 

3Si 






Group IV 

402 cities, 25.000 lo 49,999; 
population 13,561.000: 

Number of offenses Icnown 

Rate 

Group V 

991 cities, 10,000 to 24.999; 
population 15,598,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 

Group VI 

2.475 cities under 10.000; 
population 10,019.000: 

Number of offenses Icnown 

Rate 

Nonsuburban Cities 

TOTAL NONSUBURBAN CITIES: 
3,667 cities; total population 
24,973,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


686,855 
5.064.8 

678.756 
4,351.5 

444,547 
4,436.8 

1,172,811 
4,696J 


45.817 
337.9 

40.624 
260.4 

24,453 
244.1 

78,774 
315.4 


641,038 
4,727.0 

638,132 
4,091,1 

420,094 
4,192.8 

1.094,037 
4380.9 


531 

3.9 

567 
3.6 

306 
3.1 

1371 
55 


2,821 
20.8 

2.355 
15.1 

1.416 
14.1 

4,419 

17.7 


15.683 
115.6 

11,559 
74.1 

5,220 
52.1 

15,643 
62.6 


26.782 
197.5 

26.143 
167.6 

17,511 
174.8 

57341 
229.6 


176.909 
1,304.5 

168,207 
1,078.4 

103,804 
1,036.0 

282,730 
1,132.1 


402,820 
2,970.4 

417,471 
2,676.4 

289,034 
2,884.7 

746,612 
2,989.7 


613 
452 

52.4 
33< 

27,2 
272 

64,6' 

259 


Group IV 

222 cities, 25.000 to 49,999; 
population 7.763.000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 

Group V 

503 cities, 10,000 to 24,999; 
population 7.686,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 

Group VI 

2,942 cities under 10,000; 
population 9,524.000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


465,253 
5,993.3 

364,475 
4.742.0 

343.083 
3.602.3 


31.852 
410.3 

23.522 
306.0 

23.400 

245.7 


433,401 

5,583.0 

340.953 
4.436.0 

319.683 
3.356.6 


517 
6.7 

444 

5.8 

410 
4.3 


2,015 
26.0 

1.283 
16.7 

1.121 
11.8 


8.073 
104.0 

4.589 
59.7 

2.981 
313 


21,247 
273.7 

17,206 
223.9 

18,888 
198.3 


113,802 
1,466.0 

86,484 
1,125.2 

82.444 
865.6 


292,269 
3,765.0 

234,812 
3,055.0 

219,531 
2,305.0 


27,3 
352 

19,6 

255 

17,7 
185 



'Violent crimes are ofTenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the popula 



170 



Table 16.— Crime Rates, OfTeiises Known to the Police, Suburban and Nonsuburban Counties, Population Group, 1978 

[1978 estimated population. Rate: Number of crimes per 100,000 inhabitants] 



Population group 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime' 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 

"mT"' 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


Suburbw Counties' 






















100,000 and over 






















71 counties; popuIaUon 18,362,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


949,159 
5,169.1 


82,197 
447.6 


866.962 

4.721.4 


1.259 
6.9 


6.187 
33.7 


23,809 
129.7 


50,942 
227.4 


290,008 
1,579.4 


502.787 
2.738.1 


74,167 
403.9 


25,000 to 99,999 






















226 counties; population 11,944,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


365,087 
3,056.6 


28,859 
241.6 


336,228 
2,814.9 


771 
6.5 


2,641 

22.1 


5,555 
46.5 


19,892 
166.5 


125,040 
1,046.8 


187.129 
1.566.7 


24,059 
201.4 


Under 25,000 






















536 counties; population 3,218,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


145,701 
4,527.1 


12,524 
389.1 


133,177 
4,137.9 


365 
11.3 


1.124 
34.9 


2,556 
79.4 


8,479 
263.5 


48,126 
1,495.3 


69.949 

2.173.4 


15,102 
469.2 
























25,000 and over 






















153 counties; population 10,527,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


236,399 
2,245.6 


21,533 
204.6 


214.866 
2.041.1 


685 
6.5 


1.683 
16.0 


2,629 
25.0 


16,536 
157.1 


84,960 
807.1 


117.260 
1.113.9 


12,646 
120.1 


10,000 to 24,999 






















700 counties; population 11,172,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


185,038 
1,656.3 


15,607 
139.7 


169,431 
1.516.6 


685 
6.1 


1,236 
11. 1 


1.596 
14.3 


12,090 
108.2 


71,350 
638.7 


87,834 
786.2 


10,247 
91.7 


Under 10,000 






















,756 counties; population 5,087,000: 

Number of offenses known 

Rate 


140,408 
2,759.9 


11,573 
227.5 


128.835 
2.532.4 


701 
13.8 


951 
18.7 


1,413 
27.8 


8,508 
167.2 


53,152 
1.044.8 


64,168 
1,261.3 


11,515 
226.3 



' Violent crimes arc offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

^Offenses include sheriffs' and county law enforcement agencies. State police offenses are not included. 

Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding- 



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173 



Table 18.— OfTense Analysis, 1978, and Percent Change from 1977 

[11,490 agencies; 1978 estimated population 201,476,000] 



'Because of rounding, the percenUges may not add to total. 

Table 19.— Type and Value of Property Stolen and Recovered, 1978 

[11,490 agencies; 1978 estimated population 201,476,000) 





Number of 


Percent 


Percent 


Average 
value 


Classification 


offenses 


change over 


distribu- 




1978 


1977 


tion' 


Murder 


18,340 
62 525 


+ 2.8 
+ 7 7 




$46 






30 


Robbery 












393,814 


+5.0 


100.0 








Highway 


185,313 
56,772 
22,209 


+ 8.6 
+ 3.7 
+ 3.8 


47.1 
14.4 
5.6 


31 








23 




27,575 


+ 3.2 


7.0 


46 




44,458 
4,676 
52,811 


+ 2.7 
+ 20.2 
-2.8 


11.3 
1.2 
13.4 








Miscellaneous 


277 


Burglary 






2,929,403 


+ 2.1 


100.0 








Residence (dweUing): 












644,708 
769,768 
479,005 


-2.5 
+ 5.4 
+ 1.6 


22.0 
26.3 
16.4 




Day 


566 






Nonresidence (store, ofTice, etc.): 




Night 


594,070 
159,914 
281,938 


+ .5 
+ 5.1 

+ 7.7 


20.3 
5.5 
9.6 




Day 


444 






Larceny-Theit (ExCEn^ Motor Vehicle Theft) 




TOTAL 


5,676J49 


+ 1.1 


100.0 


219 


Pocket-picking 


63,166 


+ 9.5 




152 


Purse-snatching 


85,059 


+ 3.0 


1.5 


IM 


Shoplifting 


649,551 


+4.3 


11.4 


49 


From motor vehicles (except accessories) 


966,176 






254 


Motor vehicle accessories 


1,086,908 


-5.4 






Bicycles 


606,971 


-4.0 


10.7 


9i 


From buildings 


945,414 


+ 3.1 


16.7 


337 












All others 


1,215,520 


+ 5.9 


21.4 


341 


By value: 










Over $200 


1,262,968 


+ 10.4 


22.3 


77: 


$50 to $200 


1,988,576 


— 2 1 


35.0 


112 


Under $50 


2,424,705 


-.5 


42.7 


18 




942,232 


+ 4.6 















Value of property 


Percent 


Type of property 


Stolen 


Recovered 


recovered 




$5,147,25A000 


$1,658,965,000 










406,207,000 


36,737,000 


9.0 


Jewelry and precious metals 


465,050,000 


35,191,000 


7.6 


Clothing and furs 


131,941.000 


17,885,000 






2,216,557,000 


1,343,410,000 


60.6 




63,496,000 


8,877,000 


14( 


Televisions, radios, stereos, etc 


459,532,000 


31,860,000 


6.9 


Firearms 


67,639,000 


8,533,000 




Household goods 


107,451,000 


9,914,000 




Consumable goods 


47,865,000 


6,389,000 


13.3 


Livestock 


12,784,000 






Miscellaneous 


1,168,729,000 


157,982,000 





■All totals and percentages calculated before rounding. 



SECTION III 
CRIME INDEX OFFENSES CLEARED 



Law enforcement agencies clear a crime when they 
have identified the offender, have sufficient evidence 
to charge him, and actually take him into custody, or 
in exceptional instances, when some element beyond 
police control precludes taking the offender into 
custody. Examples of circumstances resulting in 
exceptional clearances would be the refusal of a 
victim to prosecute after an offender is identified or 
because a subject is being prosecuted elsewhere for a 
crime committed in another jurisdiction and extradi- 
tion is not imminent. It should be noted that the 
arrest of one person can clear several crimes or 
several persons may be arrested in the process of 
clearing one crime. 

In 1978, law enforcement agencies reported that, 
nationally, 21 percent of the Index crimes were 
cleared. With respect to violent crimes, 76 percent of 
murder offenses, 50 percent of forcible rapes, 62 
percent of aggravated assaults, and 26 percent of 
robberies were cleared by law enforcement agencies. 
In connection with property crimes, police cleared 20 
percent of the larceny-thefts, 16 percent of the 



burglaries, and 1 5 percent of the motor vehicle thefts. 
Clearances for crimes against persons are generally 
higher not only because more intense investigative 
efforts are often afforded these offenses, but because 
witnesses who can identify the perpetrators are 
frequently available. 

Regionally, the highest overall Crime Index clear- 
ance rate was recorded by the Southern States with 
23 percent, followed by the Western and North 
Central States, each with 2 1 percent, and the North- 
eastern States with 1 8 percent. 

Clearances Involving Only Persons Under 18 
Years of Age 

In 1978, 28 percent of all Crime Index offenses 
cleared were those in which only persons under 18 
years of age were the offenders. Clearances for the 
violent and property crimes involving only youths in 
the aforementioned age group were 12 and 33 
percent, respectively. During the same year, persons 
10 to 17 years of age accounted for approximately 14 
percent of the total United States population. 



175 



CRIMES CLEARED BY ARREST 
1977 



CRIMES OF VIOLENCE 

NOT CLEARED CLEARED 



MURDER 



76% 



AGGRAVATED n«o/ 
ASSAULT °^^ 



FORCIBLE 
RAPE 3U7o 



26% 



CRIMES AGAINST PROPERTY 

NOT CLEARED CLEARED 



SUK^Ut^Y 



16% 



URCENY-THm 



20% 



tmXOk "^iHKri^ THEFT 



15% 



176 



Fable M.-Offenses 

1978 estimated population 



rOTAL CITIES: 7^3 cities; total 
138.729,000: 

Perceot cleared by arrest 

Groltp I 

SS cities, 250,000 and over; total 
population 40,4$0,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

5 cities, 1,000,000 and over; totol 
population 17,783,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

18 cities, 500,000 to 999,999; total 
population 11,846,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

Jl ciUes, 250,000 to 499,999; total 
population 10,850,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

Group II 

113 cities, 100,000 to 249,999; total 
population 16,218,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

Croup III 

!69 cities, 50,000 to 99,999; total 
population 18,472,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Known and Percent Oeared by Arrest', Population Group, 



Crime 
Index 
total 



man- 
slaughter 



Forcible 
rape 



Motor 
theft 



177 



Table ZO.-Offenses Known and Percent Qeared by Airest', Population Group, 1978-Continued 








Population group 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 
crime^ 


Property 
crimes 


Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


Group IV 






















619 cities, 25,000 to 49,999: total 
population 21,161,000: 


1,144,171 
20.9 


77,033 
49.9 


1,067,138 
18.8 


1,031 
79.1 


4,784 
47.3 


23,603 
28.8 


47,615 
60.0 


288,219 
16.4 


690,714 
19.8 




Percent cleared by arrest 


18. 


Group V 






















1,479 cities, 10,000 to 24,999; total 
population 23,041,000: 


1,032,207 
21.1 


63,565 
53.5 


968,642 
19.0 


999 
79.2 


3,581 
51.4 


16,016 
29.1 


42,969 
62.2 


252,033 
16.0 


645,341 
19.6 




Percent cleared by arrest 


23. 


Group VI 






















5,368 cities under 10,000; total 
population 19,358,000: 


779,535 
21.5 


47,213 
62.5 


732,322 
18.8 


700 
81.9 


2,502 
52.6 


8.054 
31.6 


35,957 
69.7 


184.177 
17.5 


503,777 
18.4 




Percent cleared by arrest 


29. 


Suburban Area< 






















4,613 agencies; total population 
72,102,000: 


3,247,852 
19.4 


233,800 
49.9 


3,014,052 
17.0 


3,735 
73.2 


16,385 
48.8 


63,878 
28.3 


149,802 
58.6 


903,281 
16.2 


1,856,453 
17.1 




Percent cleared by arrest 


19. 


Rural Area 






















2,135 agencies; total populauon 
26,352,000: 

Offenses known 

Percent cleared by arrest 


568,128 

22.7 


49,180 
67.9 


518,948 
18.4 


2,062 
84.0 


3,947 
64.4 


5,678 
42.9 


37,493 
71.2 


211,531 
18.3 


272,136 
16.5 


35,28 
34. 



Uncludes offenses cleared by exceptional means. 

^Violent cnmes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated ass; 
^Properly crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
^Includes suburban city and county law enforcement agencies within metropoht 



Excludes core cities. Suburban cities arc also included in other city group* 



rable 21.— OfTenses Known and Percent Cleared by Arrest^, Geographic Division, 1978 

1978 estimated population] 



Geographic division 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 


Property 


Murder 
and non- 

"mT"' 
sla^hter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


TOTAL ALL DIVISIONS 






















,903 cities: total population 
138,729.000: 
OfTenses known 


8,431,644 
20.8 


830,565 

45.5 


7,601,079 
18.1 


13,862 

76.2 


49,462 
49.8 


363,216 
25.9 


404,025 
61.6 


2,241,410 
15.6 


4,566,092 
19.8 


793,577 
15J 


Percent cleared by arrest 


New England States 






















02 cities; total population 
0,093,000: 


539.307 
17.4 


39.001 
50.8 


500,306 
14.8 


371 
74.9 


1,905 
58.4 


15,160 
26.7 


21.565 
66.6 


149,136 
15.8 


261,878 
16.0 




Percent cleared by arrest 


9.5 


MiDDi^ Atlantic States 






















854 cities; total population 
29.634,000: 


1,536,679 

18.2 


203,205 
36.6 


1,333,474 


2,688 
71.7 


8,184 
48.0 


1 10,484 
19.7 


81,849 
57.2 


423,706 
13.3 


729,037 
17.9 




Percent cleared by arrest 


10.0 


East North Central States 






















085 cities; total population 
24,639,000: 


1,417,292 
21.3 


131,822 
45.7 


1,285,470 
18.8 


2.564 

75.8 


8,210 
51.9 


61,280 
29.6 


59,768 
60.0 


325.990 
16.5 


817,644 
20.6 




Percent cleared by arrest 


14.0 


West North Central States 






















88 cities: total population 9,796,000: 


557,230 
20.7 


40,076 
48.5 


517,154 
18.5 


632 
79.9 


2.867 
54.1 


15,992 

27.7 


20,585 
62.9 


137,807 
15.0 


340,226 
19.7 


39,121 


Percent cleared by arrest 


20.8 


South Atlantic States 






















246 cities; total population 
15,228.000: 


1,019,289 
23.6 


112,396 
51.9 


906,893 
20.1 


1,902 
82.9 


5,868 
55.2 


39,262 
28.4 


65,364 
64.8 


260,374 
19.4 


589,029 
20.1 


57,490 


Percent cleared by arrest 


23.9 


East South Central States 






















61 cities: total population 6,972,000: 


347,256 
19.0 


33,246 
51.3 


314,010 
15.5 


797 
86.1 


2,417 
51.3 


12,063 

28.5 


17.969 
65.1 


101.522 
13.2 


184,849 
16.5 


27,639 


Percent cleared by arrest 


17.5 


West South Central States 






















64 cities; total population 
15,300,000: 


936,839 

23.2 


80,896 

54.7 


855,943 
20.2 


2,185 
80.0 


6,234 
53.0 


29.638 
34.5 


42,839 
67.7 


258,572 
17.4 


523,332 
21.5 


74,039 


Percent cleared by arrest 


20.7 


Mountain States 






















44 cities; total population 6,711,000: 


491,635 
21.8 


35,481 
52.3 


465,154 
19.5 


530 
68.5 


2,977 
41.7 


11,847 
28.1 


20,127 
67.6 


127.821 
13.1 


295,369 
21.9 


32,964 


Percent cleared by arrest 


22.3 


Pacific States 






















59 cities: total population 
20,357,000: 


1,586,117 
21.0 


154,442 
42.8 


1,431,675 
18.6 


2,193 
70.3 


10.800 
44.0 


67,490 
25.8 


73,959 

57.2 


456,482 
15.1 


824,728 
20.9 


150,465 


Percent cleared by arrest 


16.9 



Mnctudes offenses cleared by exceptional means. 

'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and i 

'Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor 



.ggrav 
vThicl. 



179 



1 

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11 


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23.184 
13.6 

7,395 
13.3 

8,346 
12.9 

7.443 
14.8 


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181 



TaWe 23.— Offenses Cleared by Arrest' of Persons Under 18 Years of Age, 1978 

[Percent of lotal cleared; 1978 estimated population] 



Crime 
total 



Murder 
and non- 
negligent 

man- 
slaughter 



TOTAL OTIES: 7,876 cities; lotal 
population 134,485,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

Group I 

53 cities. 250.000 and over; total 
population 36,908,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

5 cities. 1,000,000 and over; total 
population 14,697,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

18 cities, 500,000 to 999,999; total 
population 11,846,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

30 cities, 250,000 to 499,999; total 
population 10.365,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

Group II 

1 10 cities, 100.000 to 249.999; total 
population 15,802,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

Group III 

269 cities, 50,000 to 99,999; total 
population 18,472,000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

Group IV 

616 cities, 25,000 to 49,999; total 
population 21.061.000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

Group V 

1.471 cities. 10.000 to 24,999; total 
population 22,921.000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

Group VI 

5.357 cities under 10.000; lotal 
population 19.321.000: 

Total clearances 

Percent under 18 

See footnotes at end of table. 



182 



Table 23.-Ofleiises Cleared by Arrest' of Persons Under 18 Years of Age, 


1978-CootUiued 










Population group 


Crime 
Index 
total 


Violent 


Property 
cnme^ 


Murder 
and non- 
negltgent 

sla"gh"ter 


Forcible 
rape 


Robbery 


Aggra- 
vated 
assault 


Burglary 


Larceny- 
theft 


Motor 
vehicle 
theft 


Suburban Area'' 

4,595 agencies; total population 
71,282.000: 


191,299 
30.8 

26,640 
20.8 


16,078 
14.0 

2,175 
6.6 


175,221 
34.6 

24,465 
25.8 


202 

7.4 

99 

5.7 


833 
10.6 

210 
8.4 


3,675 
20.5 

333 
13.8 


11,368 

13.2 

1,533 
5.8 


54,910 

38.2 

11,673 
30.4 


106,307 
33.8 

9,559 
21.4 


14,004 


Percent under 18 


28.8 


Rural Area 

2,122 agencies; total population 
26,141,000: 




Percent under 18 


27.1 



'Includes offenses cleared by exceptional means. 

^Violent crimes are ofTenscs of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny- theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
^Includes suburban city and county law enforcement agencies within metropolitan ai 



. Excludes core cities. Suburban cities are also included in other city groups. 



183 



SECTION IV 
PERSONS ARRESTED 



Primarily an indication of law enforcement activi- 
ty, the number of arrests provides a limited profile of 
the perpetrators of crime. This is especially true for 
those crimes which have a high clearance rate. Arrest 
practices, policies, and enforcement emphases which 
often differ within and among agencies influence the 
volume of arrests for various offenses, particularly 
those against public order such as drunkenness, 
vagrancy, disorderly conduct, and related violations. 
Arrests for serious crimes, e.g., robbery or burglary, 
are more likely to be consistent and uniform 
throughout all jurisdictions. Annual arrest statistics 
do not measure the number of persons taken into 
custody, but rather the number of arrests made in the 
year. Because a single person may be arrested more 
than once during the year, this person will be 
counted for each arrest. Procedures employed in this 
Program require that an arrest be counted on each 
separate occasion an individual is taken into custody, 
notified, or cited. 

Law enforcement agencies in the United States 
effected an estimated 10.3 million arrests in 1978 for 
all criminal infractions other than traffic violations. 
Nationally, the arrest rate per 1,000 inhabitants was 
47; for cities with populations over 250,000, the rate 
was 67; for suburban counties, 45; and in rural 
counties, 32. 

Arrest Trends 

Arrests by law enforcement for all crimes other 
than traffic violations increased 2 percent in 1978 
from 1977. In this same period, arrests of persons 18 
years of age and over were up 3 percent, while arrests 
of persons under 18 years of age decreased 2 percent. 
When only arrests for Crime Irxdex offenses were 
used to compute a trend for all ages, a 2-percent 
increase was evident for 1978 as compared to 1977. 

During the 5 years from 1974 to 1978, arrests for 
all offenses except traffic decreased 2 percent, with 
arrests of persons under 18 years of age down 10 
percent. However, arrests of persons 18 years of age 
and over increased 1 percent. When restricted to 
Crime Index offenses, a rise of 1 percent in total 



arrests and an increase of 8 percent in adult arrests 
occurred during the 5-year period. In this same time, 
arrests of persons under 1 8 years of age dropped 7 
percent. Violent and property crime arrests for 
persons under 1 8 years of age both declined, 8 and 7 
percent, respectively. 

Arrests for drug abuse violations in 1978 decreased 
1 percent nationwide from 1977. In the period 1974 
to 1978, arrests for these violations were down 17 
percent. The types of drugs involved in violations 
resulting in arrests during 1978 are shown by 
geographic region in the accompanying table. 

Arrests for Drug Abuse Violations 

[Percent distnbution] 





Total 


Heroin 


Mari- 
juana 


Syn- 
thelic 


Other 


Northeastern States . . . 

Sale/manufacture ... 

Possession 

North Central States . 

Sale/manufacture ... 

Possession 

Southern States 

Sale/manufacture ... 

Possession 

Western States 

Sale/manufacture . . . 

Possession 


100.0 
20.1 
79.9 

100.0 
18.5 
81.5 

100.0 
18.7 
81.3 

100.0 
15.0 
85.0 


19.1 
5.9 

13.2 
8.8 
3.2 
5.6 
5.8 
1.9 
3.8 

21.7 
4.6 

17.1 


71.2 
11.5 
59.8 
74.0 

9.1 
65.0 
80.6 
11.0 
69.6 
55.5 

6.8 
48.7 


3.4 
1.0 
2.3 
2.6 
.8 
1.8 
4.0 
1.5 
2.5 
.7 
.2 
.5 


6.3 
1.7 
4.6 

14.6 
5.4 
9.2 
9.6 
4.3 
5.3 

22.1 
3.4 

18.7 


Total 

Sale/manufacture . . . 


100.0 
18.0 
82.0 


13.2 
3.7 
9.5 


70.9 
9.6 
61.3 


2.7 
.9 
1.8 


13.1 
3.8 
9.4 







Age 

In the Nation, 7 percent of all persons arrested I 
were under the age of 1 5, 23 percent were under 1 8, 
40 percent were under 21, and 57 percent were under 
25. In the suburban areas the volume of arrests of 
persons in the young-age groups was greater than the 
national figures, with the under 15 age group 
representing 9 percent; under 18, 28 percent; under 
21, 46 percent; and under 25, 62 percent. The 
distributions of arrests in the rural areas were lower 
for the younger age groups, with the under 15 group 
being involved in only 3 percent; under 18, 14 



184 



PERSONS ARRESTED 

DISTRIBUTION BY AGE, 1978' 



TOTAL POPULATION 

DISTRIBUTION BY AGE, 1978' 





/ 


^ 


65 AND OVER 






i 






60-64 






L 






55 
50 
45 
40 
35 
30 
25 
22 
19 
16 
13 


59 
54 
49 
44 
39 
34 
29 
24 
21 
18 

1 c 




1 








_J 


























t 


















F^'^ 




1 


^ 




r^ 












5 


jm. 


12 AND UNDER 


' ^ 1 


15 10 

(PERCENT) 


c 


) 





5 


10 15 

(PERCENT) 


20 



'PERSONS ARRESTED IS BASED ON REPORTS 
RECEIVED REPRESENTING POPULATION. 



■THE TOTAL POPULATION IS 218,059,000 FOR 
THE U,S.. BASED ON BUREAU OF CENSUS 
PROVISIONAL ESTIMATES, JULY 1, 1978. 



>ercent; under 21, 31 percent; and those under 25 in 
19 percent. 

Considering only the Crime Index offenses, the 
)ercent of all arrestees in the Nation during 1978 
vho were under the age of 15 was 15 percent; under 
he age of 18, 41 percent; under 21, 58 percent; and 
inder 25, 72 percent. 



Male arrests increased 1 percent in 1978 over 1977, 
ind even though female arrests rose 2 percent, arrests 
)f males outnumbered those of females by 5 to 1, 
lationally. Males also accounted for 80 percent of 
he arrests for Index crimes and 90 percent of the 
irrests for crimes of violence. 

Female arrests for Index crimes were up 3 percent 
)ver 1977. As in previous years, their criminal 
nvolvement was mainly for larceny, which account- 
ed for 80 percent of all female arrests for Index 
)ffenses. 

Arrests of males and females under 1 8 years of age 
iecreased 10 percent for both sexes from 1974 to 
1978. Arrests for Crime Index offenses during this 5- 



year period declined 4 percent for females under age 
18 and 7 percent for males in the same age group. 

Arrest Rates 

Arrest rates are a measure of law enforcement 
activity in response to crime. The accompanying 
table presents the arrest rates per 100,0(X) inhabitants ^m 
in the United States, by geographic region, for Crime ^M 
Index offenses. ^" 

Arrests, Region, 1«»78 



[Rate per 100,000 inhabitants) 










Offense 


United 
States 
total 


North- 
States 


North 
Central 
States 


Southern 
States 


Western 
States 


Murder 

Forcible rape 

Aggravated assault .. 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft . 


9.1 
13.6 
68.3 
124.4 
234.6 
523.6 
74.0 


7.4 
15.1 
110.7 
149.2 
259.6 
475.7 
77.9 


7.3 
10.9 
46.7 
57.9 
166.7 
485.9 
55.4 


11.5 
14.2 
52.5 
144.7 
231.5 
515.9 
57.5 


9.2 
14.8 
75.3 
152.1 
304.5 
646.2 
124.0 


Crime Index total 


1,047.6 


1.095.4 


830.6 


1,027.9 


1,326.1 



185 



Table 24.— Total Estimated AirestsS United SUtes, 1978 



TOTAL2 

Murder ai 



Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault . 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 



nonnegligent manslaughte 



Violent crime* 
Property crime 



Crime Index total 



Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 



29,660 
148,930 
271,270 
511,600 



468,600 
19,000 
77,200 
262,500 
8,100 
118,200 
235,300 
157,900 
94,200 



Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Opium or cocaine and their denvatives 

Marijuana 

Synthetic or manufactured narcotics 
Other-dangerous nonnarcotic drugs 



Bookmaking . . . 
Numbers and lottery 
All other gambhng 



Offenses against famil) 
Driving under the induence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other ofTenses (except trallic) 
Suspicion (not included in total) 
Curfew and loitering law violations 
Runaways 



for unreported areas. 



Table 25.— Arrest, Number and Rate, Population 


Group, 19- 


78 
















Total 

(11,872 

agencies; 

total 

207^060,000) 


Total city 

arrests 

(8,705 

cities 

population 

144,062,000) 


Cities 


Counties 


Offense charged 


Group I 
(55 cfties 
250,000 
and over; 
population 
40,619,000) 


Group II 

(115 cities 
100,000 to 
249,999; 

i6,483^oS5) 


Group III 
(275 cities 
50,000 to 
99,999; 
population 
[8,847,000) 


Group IV 
(647 cities 
25,000 to 
49,999; 


Group V 
(1,559 

10,000 to 

24,999; 

population 

i4,246,000) 


Group VI 
(6,(f54 

under 
10,000 

5l,723,000) 


Suburban 

counties' 

(819 

population 
k 100,000) 


Rural 
counties 

(2,348 
agencies; 

S',?98^cS5 


TOTAL 


9,753,437 
4,710.4 


730439 
5,0703 


2,701.720 
6,651.4 


839.770 
5,094.9 


848,132 
4300.2 


943,437 
4,2603 


984.811 
4,061.7 


986.519 
4,541.4 


1.518325 
4.452.5 


930,72 


Rate per 100.000 
inhabitants 


3,220. 






Murder and nonnegligent 


18,755 

9.1 

28,257 

13.6 

141,481 

68.3 

257,629 

124.4 

485,782 

234.6 

1,084,088 

523.6 

153,270 

74.0 


12,755 

8.9 

20,093 

13.9 

108.666 

75.4 

180.349 

125.2 

345,808 

240.0 

891,623 

618.9 

110,960 

77.0 


7,338 

18.1 

10,718 

26.4 

66,042 

162.6 

74,037 

182.3 

124,988 

307.7 

285,014 

701.7 

48,549 

119.5 


1,617 

9.8 

2,439 

148 

11,658 

70.7 

23,213 

140.8 

43,554 

264.2 

120,418 

730.6 

12,050 

73.1 


1,254 

6.7 

2,105 

11.2 

11,142 

59.1 

21,508 

1141 

48,289 

256.2 

128,590 

682.3 

14,001 

74.3 


989 

4.5 

2,011 

9.1 

9,553 

43.1 

21,102 

95.3 

49,240 

222.4 

140,471 

634.3 

13.438 

60.7 


906 

3,7 

1,564 

6.5 

6,535 

27.0 

20,736 

85.5 

43,692 

180.2 

128,101 

528.3 

12,063 

49.8 


651 

3.0 

1,256 

5.8 

3,736 

17.2 

19,753 

90.9 

36,045 

165.9 

89,029 

409.8 

10,859 

50.0 


3.695 

10.8 

5,476 

16.1 

28,121 

82.5 

50,740 

148.8 

93,766 

275.0 

140,530 

412.1 

29,634 

86.9 


2,30: 


Rate per 100,000 

Forcible rape 

Rate per 100,000 

Robbery 

Rate per 100,000 

Aggravated assault 

Rale per 100,000 


8.1 
2,681 

9.: 

4,69- 

16.: 

26,54< 

91.f 

46,20! 


Rate per 100,000 

Larceny theft 


159.' 
51,93.' 


Rate per 100,000 


179.' 
12,67e 


Rate per 100.000 


43.S 


Violent crime* 


446,122 

215.5 

1,723,140 

832.2 


321,863 

223.4 

1,348,391 

936.0 


158,135 

389.3 

458,551 

1,128.9 


38,927 

236.2 

176,022 

1,067.9 


36,009 

191.1 

190,880 

1,012.8 


33,655 

152.0 

203,149 

917.4 


29,741 

122.7 

183,856 

758.3 


25,3% 

116.9 

135,933 

625.8 


88,032 

258.2 

263,930 

774.0 


36,227 


Rate per 100,000 

Property crime^ 

Rate per 100,000 


125.4 

110,819 

383.5 


Crime Index total 

Rate per 100,000 


2,169,262 
1,047.6 


1,670,254 
1,159.4 


616,686 
1,518.2 


214,949 
1,304.1 


226,889 
1,203.9 


236,804 
1,069.3 


213,597 
881.0 


161,329 

742.7 


351,%2 
1,032.1 


147,(M6 
508.8 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Table 25.— Arrest, Number and Rate, Population Group, 1978— Continued 



Total 
(11,872 
agencies; 

total 
population 
207,060,000; 



Total city 
(8,705 



population 
144,062,000) 



(115 cities 
100,000 to 
249,999; 

16.483.000) 



Group III 

(275 cit.es 
50,000 to 
99,999; 
population 
18,847,000) 



Group IV 
(647 cities 
25,000 to 
49,999; 
population 
22,145,000) 



10,000 to 

24,999; 

population 

24,246,000) 



10,000 
population 



(819 
agencies; 
[x>pulation 
34,100,000) 



(2,348 
agencies; 
population 
28,898,000) 



3ther assaults 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
\rson 

Rate per 100,000 .,.. 
Forgery and counterfeiting . 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Fraud 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Embezzlement 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Stolen property; buying, 
receiving, possessing 

Rate per 100,000 ..,. 
i/andalism 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
iVeapons; carrying, 
jossessing, 
etc 

Rate per 100,000 .... 

Prostitution and commercial- 

-ized vice 

Rate per 100,000 .... 

iex offenses (except forcible 

rape and prostitution) .... 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
3rug abuse violations 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
3ambling 

Rate per 100,000 .... 

Dffenses against family and 

children 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Driving under the influence 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Liquor laws 

Rate per 100.000 .... 
Orjnkenness 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Disorderly conduct 

Rate per 100,000 .... 

Rale per 100,000 . ... 
Ml other offenses (except 

traffic) 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Suspicion (not included in 

totals) 

Rate per 100,000 .... 
Curfew and loitering law 

violations 

Rate per 100,000 .... 

Runaways 

Rate per 100,000 .... 



249,207 
120.4 
7,670 



112,317 

54.2 

223,391 

107.9 



596,940 
288.3 
53,066 

25.6 



,204,733 

581.8 

357.450 



338.187 

234.8 

12,450 

8.6 

50,238 

34.9 

122,794 

85.2 

5,022 

3.5 



56.8 

175,979 

122.2 



50,483 

35.0 

440,235 

305.6 

46,839 

32.5 

22,092 

15.3 

752,822 

522.6 
286,604 

198.9 
911,992 

633.1 
601,536 

417.6 



1,794 



4,030 

9.9 

15,009 

37.0 

33,924 

83.5 

1,587 

3.9 



22,865 

56.3 

161,392 

397.3 

34,347 

84.6 



14.7 

195,082 

480.3 

42,107 

103.7 

292,348 

719.7 

238,197 



83.5 



28,744 
70.8 

31,219 
76.9 



1.574 

9.5 

6,749 

40.9 

24,502 

148.7 

708 



9,526 

57.8 

19,190 



79.920 
484.9 
18.465 



3,697 

22.4 

19,179 

116.4 



3.9 

1 1,672 

61.9 

23,876 

126.7 



6,194 
32.9 
57.110 
303.0 
2.605 
13.8 

2.437 

12.9 

89,300 

473.8 
30,657 

162.7 
1 10,229 

584.9 
59,455 

315.5 

3,976 



21.1 



I6.i 



8,889 

47.2 

20,375 

108.1 



3.8 

12,141 

54.8 

29,870 

134,9 



6,445 
29.1 
55,327 
249.8 
2,715 
12.3 

3,282 

14.8 

107,996 

487.7 

50,702 

229.0 

101,233 

457.1 

75,825 

342.4 

2,221 



46,560 

192.0 

1,845 

7.6 

7,373 

30.4 

20,212 

83.4 

631 

2.6 



46.8 
31.148 
128.5 



3.992 

16.5 

127,743 

526.9 

59,645 

246.0 

124,974 

515.4 

83,259 



11,049 

45.6 

20,508 



37.658 
173,4 
1.558 

7.2 
6,685 
30.8 
12.425 
57.2 
523 



8.400 

38.7 

29.590 

136.2 



3,914 

18.0 

57,301 

263.8 



152,781 
703.3 
85,028 



99.0 



10,199 
47.0 

14,309 
65.9 



67,390 
197.6 
3,656 
10.7 

13,961 



21,953 
64.4 

32,242 



11,703 
34.3 
99,127 
290.7 
4,706 
13.8 



3,861 

11.3 

29,355 



Uncludes only suburban county law enforcement agencies and is not comparable to suburban 

'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 

Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All rates were calculated on the population before rounding. 



totals found in other arrest tables. 



Table 26.-Total Arrest Trends, 1969-1978 

[3,608 agencies; 1978 eslimaled population 114,764.000) 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



Percent 
change 



Under 18 years of age 



18 years of age and 



Percent 



TOTAL 

Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime' 

Property crime^ 

Crime Index total 

Other assaults 

Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. , 

Prostitution and commercialized 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape an 

prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 
Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) ... 
Suspicion (not included in totals) ... 
Curfew and loitering law violations 
Runaways 



9,230 
11.705 
59,361 
90,839 
207,497 
427,333 
102,566 



29,953 

53,525 
4,903 

32,363 
87,445 
73,738 



35,315 

41,976 
174,926 
54,376 
45,753 
297,268 

176,820 
1,267,672 

488,604 
75,123 

555,720 
85,499 
86,980 



10,570 
16,018 
79,774 
135,667 
278,610 
684,111 
86,269 



930 
2,355 
18,981 
14,393 
112,837 
222,961 
59,858 



1,057 
2,691 
25,480 
23,541 
148,498 
293,787 
45,648 



76.446 
94.660 
204,372 
42,708 



9,513 
13,327 
54,294 
112,126 
130,112 
390,324 
40.621 



136,-; 



62,572 
134,202 
92,177 



60,394 

38,651 
349,405 
36,221 
23,790 
549,469 

184,550 
678,154 
456,972 
20,725 
767,964 
11,752 
56,854 
110,719 



-46.5 
-6.5 
-72.4 
+ 38.2 
-86.3 
-34.6 
-19.0 



3,523 

2,305 

188 



9,210 
45,257 
1,353 
712 
3,250 

59,311 

37,332 
100,835 
7,378 
169,026 
18,379 
86,980 
136,761 



55,198 
5,319 
5,833 
3,799 
579 

22,580 
78,669 
15,467 



7,202 
87,168 
1,365 
1,841 
12,671 

70,337 
25,065 
86,356 
3,306 
177,649 
3,785 
56,854 
110,719 



+ 42.6 
+ 20.3 
+ 65.6 
+ 64.8 
+ 208.0 

+ 99.2 
+ 23.4 
+ 18.6 



181,385 
2,465 
26,430 
51,220 
4,715 



32,766 
129,669 

53,023 
45.041 



117,509 

1,230,340 

387,769 

67,745 



34,895 

105,518 

3,583 



31,449 
262,237 
34,856 
21,949 
536.798 

114,213 
653,089 
370,616 
17,419 
590,315 
7,967 



'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and s 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-thcfl, and motor vehicle t 



abk 27.— Total Arrest Trends, Sex, 1969-1978 

1,608 agencies; 1978 estimated population 114.764,000] 





Males 


Females 


OfTense charged 


Total 


Under 18 


Total 


Under 18 


1969 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1969 


1978 


Percent 

change 


1969 


1978 


Percent 

change 


1969 


1978 


Percent 
change 


TOTAL 


4,195,086 


4,424,628 


+ 5.5 


975356 


1,074,142 


+ 10.1 


659,638 


917,618 


+ 39.1 


252,2% 


297,099 


+ 17.8 






urder and nonnegligent 


7,777 
11.705 
55.827 
79.565 
198.496 
312.139 
97.101 


8,988 
15,877 
74.035 
117.849 
261.321 
459,261 
78,724 


+ 15.6 
+ 35.6 
+ 32.6 
+ 48.1 
+ 31.7 
+ 47.1 
-18.9 


845 
2,355 
17,833 
12,718 
108,128 
169,722 
56,705 


960 
2,643 
23,773 
20,082 
139,524 
209,342 
41,202 


+ 13.6 
+ 12.2 
+ 33.3 
+ 57.9 
+ 29.0 
+ 23.3 
-27.3 


1,453 

3,534 
11.274 
9,001 
115,194 
5,465 


1,582 
141 
5,739 
17,818 
17,289 
224,850 
7,545 


+ 8.9 

"+'62.4 
+ 58.0 
+ 92.1 
+ 95.2 
+ 38.1 


85 

"i,'l48 
1,675 
4,709 
53,239 
3,153 


97 
48 
1,707 
3,459 
8,974 
84,445 
4,446 


+ 14.1 








+ 48.7 


ggravated assault 


+ 106.5 
+ 90.6 




+ 58.6 


lotor vehicle then 


+ 41.0 








154,874 
607,736 


216,749 
799.306 


+ 40.0 
+ 31.5 


33,751 
334,555 


47,458 
390,068 


+ 40.6 
+ 16.6 


16,261 
129,660 


25,280 
249,684 


+ 55.5 
+ 92.6 


2,908 
61.101 


5,311 
97,865 


+ 82.6 


Property crime^ 


+ 60.2 




762,610 


1,016,055 


+ 33.2 


368,306 


437,526 


+ 18.8 


145.921 


274,964 


+ 88.4 


64,009 


103,176 


+ 61.2 








193,664 
6,280 
22.895 
39.467 
3,839 

29.562 
81,028 
68,936 

7,816 

36.044 
145.864 
50.010 

41,521 
277.972 

153.995 
1.178,850 

422,959 
67,818 

468,358 
72,802 
69,788 
65.810 


226,830 
8,881 
27,621 
64,514 
3,050 

55,350 
122,801 
84,753 

19,588 

35,154 
298,220 
32,928 

20,638 
500,299 

155,295 
626,369 
380,070 
16,633 
637.951 
10,070 
45,499 
46,129 


+ 17.1 
+ 41.4 
+ 20.6 
+ 63.5 
-20.6 

+ 87.2 
+ 51.6 

+ 22.9 

+ 150.6 

— 2.5 
+ 104.5 
-34.2 

— 50.3 
+ 80.0 

+ .8 
-46.9 
-10.1 
-75.5 
+ 36.2 
-86.2 
-34.8 
-29.9 


31,438 
4,076 
2,721 
1,850 
131 

10,514 
59,703 
12,441 

236 

7,020 
35,182 
1,309 

531 
3,112 

49,182 
32,652 
84,138 
6.279 
129,137 
15,805 
69,788 
65,810 


43,942 
4,800 
4,058 
2,669 
434 

20,545 
72.645 
14,546 

814 

6,515 

72,412 
1,297 

1,109 
11,370 

54,268 
21,399 
71,301 

2,733 
138,131 

3,232 
45,499 
46,129 


+ 39.8 
+ 17.8 
+ 49.1 
+ 44.3 
+ 231.3 

+ 95.4 
+ 21.7 
+ 16.9 

+ 244.9 

-7.2 

+ 105.8 

— .9 

+ 108.9 
+ 265.4 

+ 10.3 
-34.5 
-15.3 
-56.5 
+ 7.0 
-79.6 
-34.8 
-29.9 


26,422 
606 

7,058 
14,058 

1,064 

2,801 
6,417 
4,802 

27,499 

5,932 
29,062 
4,366 

4,232 
19,296 

22,825 
88,822 
65,645 
7,305 
87,362 
12,697 
17,192 
70,951 


37,226 
1,264 
13,107 
44,803 
1.112 

7.222 
11.401 
7.424 

40,806 

3,497 
51,185 
3,293 

3,152 
49,170 

29,255 
51,785 
76,902 
4,092 
130,013 
1,682 
11,355 
64,590 


+ 40.9 
+ 108.6 

+ 85.7 

+ 218.7 

+ 4.5 

+ 157.8 
+ 77.7 
+ 54.6 

+ 48.4 

-41.0 
+ 76.1 

— 24,6 

-25.5 
+ 154.8 

+ 28.2 

— 41.7 
+ 17.1 

— 44.0 
+ 48.8 
-86.8 
-34.0 

-9.0 


7,263 
345 
802 

455 
57 

819 

4.068 

596 

617 

2,190 

10,075 

44 

181 
138 

10,129 
4,680 

16,697 
1,099 

39,889 
2,574 

17,192 

70,951 


11,256 
519 

1,775 

1,130 

145 

2,035 

6,024 

921 

1,748 

687 

14,756 

68 

732 
1,301 

16,069 
3,666 
15,055 

573 
39,518 

553 
11,355 
64,590 


+ 55.0 




+ 50.4 


orgery and counterfeiting 


+ 121.3 
+ 148.4 


mbeulement 


+ 154.4 


tolen property; buying, receiving, 


+ 148.5 




+ 48.1 


/eapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
rostitution and commerciaUzed 


+ 54.5 
+ 183.3 


ex offenses (except forcible rape 
rug abuse violations 


-68.6 
+ 46.5 

+ 54.5 


ffenses against fanuly and 


+ 304.4 


riving under the influence 


+ 842.8 
+ 58.6 




-21.7 




-9.8 




-47.9 


dl other offenses (except traffic) .. 
uspicion (not included in totals) .. 
urfew and loitering law violations 


— .9 
-78.5 
-34.0 
-9.0 







Table 28.-Total Airest Trends, 1974-1978 

[7,056 agencies; 1978 estimated population 153,356,000] 





Number of persons arrested 


Offense charged 


Total all ages 


Under 18 years of age 


18 years of age and over 




1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 


TOTAL 


69f»»n 


6,838,286 


-2.2 


1,905,102 


1,711,079 


-10 J 


5,084345 


5,127,207 








Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 
Forcible lape 
Robbery 

Aggravated assault 
Burglary 
Larceny-theft 
Motor vehicle theft 


14.818 
18,467 
103,147 
161.486 
372,778 
796,010 
112,825 


12,780 
19,873 
91,228 
173,877 
352,447 
836.639 
109,641 


-13.8 
+ 7.6 

-11.6 
+ 7.7 
— 5.5 
+ 5.1 
-2.8 


1,459 
3,615 
33,571 
28,486 
201,377 
384,928 
64,458 


1,190 
3,240 
28,631 
29,006 
187,957 
360,644 
57,891 


-18.4 
-10.4 
— 14.7 
+ 1.8 
-6.7 
— 6.3 
-10.2 


13.359 
14,852 
69,576 
133,000 
171,401 
411,082 
48,367 


11,590 
16,633 
62,597 
144,871 
164,490 
475,995 
51,750 


-13 
+ 12 
-10 
+ 8 
— 4 
+ 15 
+ 7 




297,918 
1,281,613 


297,758 
1,298,727 


+ L3 


67,131 
650,763 


62,067 
606,492 


-7.5 
-6.8 


230,787 
630,850 


235,691 
692,235 




Property critne^ 


+ 9 


Crime Index total 


1,579,531 


1,5%,485 


+ 1.1 


717,894 


668,559 


-6.9 


861,637 


927,926 


+ 7 






Other assaults 


294,959 
11,710 
44,722 

111,923 
4,756 

79,379 
154,893 
124,926 

51,883 

46,366 

525,975 
54,203 
48,713 

785,996 

218,963 
1,103,463 
522,528 

40,214 
890,162 

36,130 
115,076 
179,606 


328,385 
12,901 
51,361 

140,185 
5,259 

77,764 
174,400 
110,230 

69,022 

47,795 
434,541 
41,183 
36,050 
878,384 

269.008 
809.825 
540.358 
25.579 
984.467 
14.515 
66.474 
138.630 


+ 11.3 
+ 10.2 
+ 14.8 
+ 25.3 
+ 10.6 

-2.0 
+ 12.6 
-11.8 

+ 33.0 

+ 3.1 
-17.4 

— 24.0 
-26.0 
+ 11.8 

+ 22.9 

-26.6 

+ 3.4 

-36.4 

+ 10.6 

— 59.8 
-42.2 
-22.8 


60,101 
6,872 
6,060 
5.116 

473 

28,351 
106,072 
20,439 

2,327 

10,777 

140,268 

2,285 

3,934 

12,214 

90,612 
35,463 

114,135 
5,681 

241,346 
10,588 

115,076 

179,606 


66,306 
6.607 
7,462 
4,725 
712 

27,587 
101,887 
18,256 

2.942 

8,995 
109,077 
1,566 
2,140 
19.726 

100,529 
31,327 
100,731 
3,956 
222,885 
4.195 
66,474 
138 630 


+ 10.3 
-3.9 

+ 23.1 
-7.6 

+ 50.5 

-2.7 
-3.9 
-10.7 

+ 26.4 

-16.5 
-22.2 
-31.5 
-45.6 
+ 61.5 

+ 10.9 
-11.7 
-11.7 
— 30.4 
-7.6 
-60.4 
-42.2 
22 8 


234,858 
4,838 
38,662 

106,807 
4,283 

51,028 
48,821 
104,487 

49,556 

35,589 

385,707 
51,918 
44,779 

773,782 

128.351 
1,068,000 
408,393 

34,533 
648,816 

25,542 


262,079 
6,294 
43.899 

135.460 
4,547 

50,177 
72,513 
91,974 

66.080 

38,800 
325,464 
39,617 
33,910 
858,658 

168,479 
778.498 
439,627 

21,623 
761,582 

10,320 


+ 11 


Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving. 


+ 30 
+ 13 
+ 26 
+ 6 

-1 


vi:^Sr,.:;:::::;::;:::::::;:::::::::::::: 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 
prostitution) 


+ 48 
-12 

+ 33 

+ 9 
— 15 


Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 


-23 
-24 
+ 11 




+ 31 


Drunkenness 


— 27 


Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 


+ 7 
-37 
+ 17 


Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitenng law violations 

Runaways 


-59 











190 



Fable 29.-Total Arrest Trends, Sex, 1974-1978 

7,056 agencies; 1978 estimated population 153,356,000) 





Males 


Females 


Offense charged 


Total 


Under 18 


Total 


Under 18 




1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1974 


1978 


Percent 
change 




S4»13,437 


5,695,159 


-3.7 


1,497,831 


1342,821 


— 10 J 


1.076310 


1,143,127 


+ 6,2 


407,271 


368,258 










12,616 
18,301 
96,278 
140,488 
352,395 
548,371 
105,403 


10,876 
19,692 
84.599 
151,650 
330,360 
564,818 
99,945 


-13.8 
+ 7.6 

-12.1 
+ 7.9 
-6.3 
+ 3.0 
— 5.2 


1,342 
3,554 
31,283 
24,015 
190,715 
275,053 
60,077 


1,073 
3,175 
26,677 
24,681 
176,408 
258,012 
52,118 


— 20.0 
-10.7 
-147 

+ 2.8 
-7.5 
-6.2 

— 13.2 


2,202 
166 
6.869 
20,998 
20,383 
247,639 
7,422 


1,904 

181 

6,629 

22,227 

22.087 

271.821 

9,696 


-13.5 
+ 9.0 

— 3.5 
+ 5.9 
+ 8.4 
+ 9.8 
+ 30.6 


117 
61 
2.288 
4,471 
10,662 
109,875 
4,381 


117 
65 
1,954 
4,325 
11,549 
102,632 
5,773 




"orcible rape 

lobbery 

Aggravated assault 

"rg'a^ 

greeny-theft 
^otor vehicle theft 


+ 6.6 
— 14.6 
-3.3 
+ 8.3 
— 6.6 
+ 31.8 


Violent crime' 

Property cnme^ 


267,683 
1,006,169 


266,817 
995.123 


-.3 
— 1.1 


60,194 

525.845 


55,606 
486,538 


-7.6 

-7.5 


30,235 
275,444 


30,941 
303,604 


+ 2.3 
+ 10.2 


6,937 
124,918 


6,461 
119,954 


-6.9 
-4.0 


Crime Index total 


1,273,852 


1,261,940 


— .9 


586,039 


542,144 


— 7.5 


305,679 


334,545 


+ 9.4 


131,855 


126,415 


-4.1 




254,361 
10,495 
31,913 
74.487 
3,830 

71,085 
142,621 
115,033 

12,926 

42,521 
451,248 
49,419 

43,289 
724,510 

186,267 
1,024,287 

448,679 
34,740 

745,642 
31,293 
92,447 
79,785 


282,623 
11,333 
35,008 
84,312 
3,889 

68,836 
159,838 
101,502 

22,376 

43,669 

372,147 
37,500 

32,017 
800,264 

227,777 
749,179 
452,591 
18,908 
818.847 
12.465 
52,449 
58,154 


+ 11.1 
+ 8.0 
+ 9.7 

+ 13.2 
+ 1.5 

-3.2 
+ 12.1 
-11.8 

+ 73.1 

+ 2.7 
-17.5 
-24.1 

-26.0 
+ 10.5 

+ 22.3 
-26.9 
+ .9 
-45.6 
+ 9.8 
— 60.2 
-43.3 
-27.1 


47,613 
6,228 
4.253 
3,974 
375 

25,943 
98,273 
19.282 

754 

9,356 

116,201 

2,195 

2,534 
11,321 

72,495 
30,810 
94,564 

4,759 
188,630 

8,970 
92,447 
79,785 


52,894 
5,967 
5.175 
3,325 
536 

25,135 
94,121 
17,177 

945 

8,154 
90,474 
1,493 

1,358 
17,691 

78,084 
26,784 
83,536 

3,263 
173,962 

3,557 
52,449 
58.154 


+ 11.1 
-4.2 
+ 21.7 
-16.3 
+ 42.9 

-3.1 
-4.2 
-10.9 

+ 25.3 

-12.8 
-22.1 
-32.0 

-46.4 
+ 56.3 

+ 7.7 
-13.1 
— 11.7 
-31.4 

-7.8 
-60.3 
-43.3 
-27.1 


40,598 
1,215 
12,809 
37,436 
926 

8,294 
12,272 
9,893 

38,957 

3.845 
74,727 
4,784 

5.424 
61,486 

32,696 
79,176 
73.849 

5,474 
144,520 

4,837 
22.629 
99,821 


45,762 
1,568 
16,353 
55,873 
1,370 

8,928 
14,562 
8,728 

46.646 

4.126 
62,394 
3,683 

4,033 
78,120 

41,231 
60.646 
87,767 

6,671 
165,620 

2,050 
14,025 
80,476 


+ 12.7 
+ 29.1 
+ 27.7 
+ 49.2 
+ 47.9 

+ 7.6 
+ 18.7 
-11.8 

+ 19.7 

+ 7.3 
-16.5 
-23.0 

-25.6 

+ 27.1 

+ 26.1 
-23.4 
+ 18.8 
+ 21.9 
+ 14.6 
-57.6 
-38.0 
-19.4 


12,488 

644 

1.807 

1.142 

98 

2,408 
7,799 
1,157 

1,573 

1,421 

24,067 

90 

1.400 
893 

18,117 
4,653 

19,571 
922 

52,716 
1,618 

22,629 

99,821 


13,412 

640 

2,287 

1,400 

176 

2.452 
7.766 
1,079 

1,997 

841 
18,603 

73 

782 
2,035 

22,445 
4,543 
17,195 

693 
48,923 

638 
14,025 
80,476 


+ 74 


Arson 


-.6 


raud 


+ 22.6 


tolen property; buying, receiving, 
possessing 


+ 1.8 


Veapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
rostitution and commercialized 


-6.7 


ex offenses (except forcible rape 


408 






rambling 

)nfenses against family and 


-18.9 


Jriving under the influence 

iquor laws 


+ 127.9 
+ 23.9 




12.1 


^gf^"'=y 

\1\ other offenses (except Irafiic) .. 
uspicion (not included in totals) .. 
urfew and loitering law violations 


— 248 
-7.2 
-60.6 
-38.0 







191 



Table 30.-Total Airest Trends, 1977-1978 

110,319 agencies; 1978 estimated population 179,569,000] 



Number of persons arrested 



Percent 
change 



Percent 
change 



Under 18 years of age 



Percent 
change 



18 years of age and 



Murder and nonnegligeni 

manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 



Violent crime' . 
Property crime* 



Crime Index total 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, 

receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, 



Prostitution and 



Sex offenses (except forcible 

rape and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 



Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except trafiic) 
Suspicion (not included in 

totals) 

Curfew and loitering law 

violations 

Runaways 



14,798 
22,318 
95,307 
185,352 
400,698 
917,707 
112,915 



14,970 
22,794 
95,839 
197,882 
401,959 
935,921 
118,120 



925 
7,099 
8,477 
79,048 
175,431 
16,421 



867 
7,041 
8,503 
79.301 
170.229 
16,433 



1,456 
3,702 
29,438 
30,219 
211,524 
401,319 
62,219 



212,175 
398,210 
62,452 



155,133 
189,174 
516,388 
50,696 



369,721 
14,868 
60,566 

182,837 
6,063 



52,703 
499,995 
43,402 



584,256 

26,274 

,184,407 

22,173 

81,919 
175,562 



385,347 
15,186 
61,308 

205,126 



194,623 
125,905 



51,941 
4%,029 
41,348 



319,895 
994,097 
618,321 
25,046 
,221,938 

18,075 



32,466 
1,291 
92,010 



467 

8,850 
3,797 

31,959 
1,261 

85,224 

1,560 



70,684 
7,548 
7,627 
5,513 
735 



2,882 
10,248 



23,101 

115,793 
46,042 
111,835 
5,239 
268,568 



70,966 
7,585 
8,254 
5,622 
781 



115,383 
39,330 
113,034 
4,657 
256,772 

5,083 



299,037 
7,320 
52,939 

177,324 
5.328 



42.455 
378.909 
41.547 



190.796 

,042,614 

472,421 

21.035 



915.i 



Table 31.— Total Airest Trends, Sex, 1977-1978 

[10,319 agencies; 1978 estimated population 179,569,000] 



Percent 
change 



Percent 



Percent 
change 



Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 



Violent crime' . 
Property crime^ 



Crime Index total 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 



Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, 

receiving, possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing. 



Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible 
rape and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Driving under the influence .... 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except 

traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in 

totals) 

Curfew and loitering law 

violations 

Runaways 



88,123 
161,795 
376,233 
626,194 
103,413 



318,511 
13,231 
42,753 

113,120 



261,068 

,008,105 

485,983 

20,125 

987.070 

19,012 



172,849 
376,982 
636,550 
107,690 



1,321 
3,618 
27,294 
25,669 
198,758 
287,981 
56,423 



1,197 
3,526 
27,272 
26,452 
199,105 
285,416 
56,121 



2,240 
231 
7,184 
23,557 
24,465 
291,513 
9,502 



2.234 
186 
6,911 
25,033 
24,977 
299,371 
10,430 



4,550 
12,766 
13,338 

5,796 



332,081 
13,400 
42,682 

122,039 



56,144 
6,853 
5,435 
3,962 
576 



47,825 
426,682 
37,566 



919,200 
518,816 
17,954 

,023,489 

15,717 



90,724 
39,706 
90,655 



56,607 
6,866 
5,734 
3,941 
574 



8,953 

101,855 

1,547 



89,991 
33,949 
93,452 
3.849 

201,172 

4,327 

57,048 



51,210 
1,637 
17,813 
69,717 
1,365 



4,664 
69,410 
3,976 



45,521 
80,551 
98,273 
6,149 



53,266 
1,786 
18,626 
83,087 
1,693 



4,116 
69,347 
3,782 

5,169 
92,076 

47,291 
74,897 
99,505 
7,092 



2,192 

1,551 

159 



25,069 
6,336 
21,180 



),515 



'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated asj 
^Property crimes arc offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



193 



Table 32.— Total Arrests, Distribution by Age, 1978 

(11,872 agencies; 1978 estimated population 207,060,000) 





Grand 

total 

all ages 


Ages 

under 

15 


Ages 

under 

18 


Ages 
18 and 
over 


Age 


Offense charged 


10 and 
under 


11-12 


13-14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


TOTAL 

Peroal distribution" 


9,775,087 
100.0 


728,198 

7.4 


2479365 
233 


7,495,722 

76.7 


79,007 
.8 


152317 
1.6 


496,874 
5,1 


432.078 
4.4 


542,459 


576,630 
5J> 


589,767 
6.0 


540,790 


499,585 
5.1 


471,078 
4i 


Murder and nonnegligenl 


18,755 
28,257 
141.481 
257,629 
485,782 
1,084,088 
153,270 


244 
1,102 
13,086 
11,508 
93,652 
194,680 
20,146 


1,735 
4,517 
48.088 
41.253 
250,649 
454,994 
77,534 


17,020 
23,740 
93,393 
216376 
235,133 
629,094 
75,736 


26 

75 

534 

1,014 

9,806 

23,850 

507 


20 
185 
2,428 
2,433 
20,012 
49,098 
2,409 


198 

842 
10,124 
8,061 
63,834 
121,732 
17,230 


281 
820 
9,835 
7,454 
51.785 
83,888 
19,178 


540 
1,156 
12,171 
10,135 
54,487 
90,121 
20,660 


670 
1.439 
12.9% 
12.156 
50,725 
86305 
17,550 


931 

1,598 
12,511 
12,974 
41,262 
74,182 
12.681 


924 
1,558 
10,474 
12,564 
30,285 
58,465 
9,524 


929 

1,593 
8,860 
12.577 
23,926 
49,108 
7,231 


93 




l,63( 


Robbery 


8,19 

n.5% 


Burglary 

Urceny-thefl 

Motor vehicle theft 


19,76 
42,58-: 
6,25 






Violent crime' 


446,122 

100.0 

1,723,140 

100.0 


25,940 

5.8 

308,478 

17.9 


95.593 

21.4 

783.177 

45.5 


350,529 
78.6 

939,%3 
54.5 


1,649 

34,163 
2.0 


5,066 
1.1 

71,519 
4.2 


19,225 

4.3 

202,796 

11,8 


18,390 

4.1 

1H851 

9.0 


24,002 

5.4 

165,268 

9,6 


27,261 

6.1 

154,580 

9.0 


28,014 

6.3 

128,125 

7.4 


25,520 

5.7 

98.274 

5.7 


23,959 
5.4 

80,265 
4.7 


23,35- 


Property crime^ 

Percent distribution' 


5. 
68.59 

4. 


Cnme Index total 

Percent distnbution- 


2,169.262 
100.0 


334,418 
15.4 


878,770 
40.5 


1,290,492 
59.5 


35,812 
1.7 


76,585 
3.5 


222,021 
102 


173,241 
8.0 


189,270 
8.7 


181,841 
8.4 


156.139 

7.2 


123,794 
5.7 


104,224 
4.8 


91,95 




445,020 
18,114 
73,269 

249,207 
7,670 

112J17 
223391 

149,957 

89365 

65,666 
596>»0 
53,066 

54,014 
1J04,733 

357,450 

1,117349 

679,112 

46,896 

1,788,794 
21,650 

78,972 
172,873 


28,496 
5,129 
1,680 
7,084 
185 

10,997 
66,586 

5,504 

659 

4,427 

20,771 

300 

1,230 
513 

9,761 
4,195 
34,978 
1,960 

96,735 
1,987 

20,723 
69,880 


82,425 
8,760 
9,991 

18,874 
909 

37,490 
127,973 

23,689 

4,212 

11,842 

141,186 

2,137 

2,871 
27,494 

127,069 

43,210 

124,307 

6,578 

341,579 
6,154 

78,972 
172,873 


362,595 
9,354 
63,278 

230,333 
6,761 

74.827 
95.418 

126,268 

85,153 

53,824 
455,754 
50,929 

51,143 
1,177,239 

230,381 

1,074,139 

554,805 

40,318 

1,447,215 
15,496 


3,181 
1,502 

74 
293 

17 

664 
14,018 

323 

33 

426 
430 

23 

671 
142 

281 

301 

3,695 

198 

11,595 
256 

1,028 
4,044 


6,622 
1313 
243 
1,216 

37 

2,029 
17,635 

922 

78 

892 

1,714 

42 

161 
50 

656 

332 
7.543 
401 

19,172 
398 

3,462 
10,714 


18,693 
2314 

1,363 

5,575 

131 

8,304 
34,933 

4.259 

548 

3,109 

18,627 

235 

398 
321 

8,824 
3,562 
23,640 
1,361 

65,%8 
1,333 

16,233 

55,122 


14,505 
1,412 

1,741 

5,445 

109 

7,686 
21,038 

4,286 

735 

2,248 

26312 

360 

476 
1,062 

18,149 
6,136 

21.844 
1353 

57.833 
1,110 

17,446 
47,551 


18,303 
1,148 
2,692 
2,228 
226 

9,047 
21.037 

6,059 

851 

2,444 

41,602 

606 

530 
7,002 

39,840 
11,995 
29,040 
1,499 

93,590 
1,388 

22.950 
39,112 


21,121 
1,071 
3,878 
4,117 
389 

9,760 
19,312 

7,840 

1,%7 

2,723 

52,501 

871 

635 
18.917 

59,319 
20,884 
38,445 
1.766 

93,421 
1,669 

17,853 
16,330 


21,743 

820 

4,170 

7,268 

411 

9,273 
14,006 

9,084 

5.390 

2.829 
57,933 
1.253 

2,442 
42,789 

54,695 
40,430 
47,321 
2,578 

107,562 
1,631 


22,070 

804 

4,367 

9,190 

385 

7,642 
10,529 

8,498 

7,837 

2,774 
53.621 
1.331 

2,265 
50,673 

41,337 
40,113 
45,361 
3,071 

103,590 
1.538 


21,894 

629 

4,240 

10,980 
383 

6.544 
8,439 

7,843 

8.128 

2,846 
48,395 
1,346 

2,241 
53,636 

30,406 

40,527 
42,757 
2,840 

100,009 
1,278 


22,36! 


Arson 

Forgery and counterfeiting ... 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen properly; buying, 
receiving, possessmg 


53 

4,36) 

12,55 

44 

5,65 
7,44( 


Weapons, carrying, 


7,95( 


Prostitution and 

commerciahzed vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible 

rape and prostitution) 


8,94 

2,85 
42,89 


Gambling 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Driving under the influence .. 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except 
traffic) 


1,45 

2,42 
57.93 

12,89 
45,80 
40,57 
3,17 

97,64 
1,19 


Curfew and loitering law 

violations 

Runaways 













See footnotes at end of table. 



194 



>le 32.-Total Arrests, Distribution by Age, 


1978— Continued 






















Age 








Offense charged 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45^9 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


i5 and 


Not 
known 




20321 . 
4J 


82,602 3 


52354 
3.6 


IJ83.448 
13.1 


827>48 
8,5 


>86,293 
6.0 


50,570 
4.6 


166,798 
3.8 


I02,r6 1 
3.1 


99,119 
2.0 


U,311 
\2 


99.564 
1.0 


8,898 




.1 






der and nonnegligent 


925 
1,558 
6,963 
12,142 
16,228 
36,992 
5,079 


892 
1,452 
6,176 
11,553 
13,784 
32,644 
4,358 


867 
1.325 
5.429 
10,823 
11,864 
29,059 
3,793 


3,445 
5,308 
18,139 
43,173 
38,562 
108,186 
12.430 


2,237 
3,207 
8,384 
28,934 
17,595 
61,392 
6,138 


1,575 
1,916 
3,909 

19,545 
8,937 

38,235 
3,326 


1,095 
1,055 
1,919 

13,565 
5,210 

26,613 
1,958 


786 
676 
1.127 
9.498 
3,324 
21,015 
1,309 


602 

398 

646 

7,090 

2,057 

17,747 

808 


360 
224 
304 

4,255 
1,054 

12,637 
415 


224 
104 
107 

2,470 
433 

8,357 
160 


285 
126 
212 

2,457 
572 

11,279 
194 


10 




12 




41 




157 


', 


278 
















21,588 
4.8 

58,299 
3.4 


20,073 
4.5 

50,786 
2.9 


18,444 
4.1 

44,716 
2.6 


70,065 

15.7 

159,178 

9.2 


42,762 
9.6 

85,125 
4.9 


26,945 
6.0 

50,498 
2.9 


17,634 
4.0 

33,781 
2.0 


12,087 
2.7 

25,648 
1.5 


8,736 

2.0 

20,612 

1.2 


5,143 

1.2 

14,106 

.8 


2,905 

.7 

8,950 

.5 


3,080 

.7 

12,045 

.7 


220 




(*) 




958 












79,887 
3.7 


70,859 
3.3 


63,160 
2.9 


229,243 
10.6 


127,887 
5.9 


77,443 
3.6 


51,415 
2.4 


37,735 
1.7 


29,348 


19,249 
.9 


11,855 

.5 


15,125 

.7 


1,178 




.1 









21,073 

569 

4,292 

12,722 

366 

4,850 
5,994 

7,339 

8,408 

2,814 
36,433 
1,470 

2.489 
H819 

9,898 
40,748 
H821 

2,879 

87,922 
1,028 


20,156 

506 

3,861 

12,997 

337 

4,383 
5,267 

6,754 

7,392 

2,543 
30,739 
1,407 

2,948 
51,059 

7.578 
37,558 
30,550 

2,749 

82,027 
932 


18,924 

443 

3,868 

13,078 

355 

3.700 
4,681 

6,241 

5,990 

2,398 
27,151 
1,246 

2,628 
48,655 

6,303 
35,397 
27,542 

2,109 

78,144 
841 


73,738 
1,600 
14,746 
53,775 
1,294 

13,346 

15,577 

23,864 

16,612 

9,826 
85,515 
6,592 

11,231 
197,230 

19,589 
142,636 
%,624 

7,185 

260,351 

2,874 


48,372 
1,051 
8,320 

37,426 
936 

7,480 
8,903 

15,568 

7,001 

7,573 
37,318 
6,247 

8,395 
148,257 

11,614 

116,635 

57,494 

3,972 

166,006 
1,493 


31,873 

804 

4,468 

23,845 
648 

4,417 
5,199 

10,598 

3,471 

5,356 
16.613 
5,616 

5,830 
118,872 

8.752 
105.446 
38,628 

2,774 

114,754 
886 


22,004 
566 
2,773 

15,193 
496 

2,886 
3,304 

7,383 

2,115 

3,698 
8.369 
5,270 

3,562 

98,527 

7.356 

100,501 

28,614 

1,970 

83,992 
576 


15,023 

410 

1,748 

9,410 

324 

1,957 
2,319 

5,414 

1,402 

2,819 
5,013 
5,208 

2,178 
84,862 

6,184 
97,544 
22,682 

1,658 

62,473 
435 


10,588 

264 

1,101 

6,061 

185 

1,275 
1,584 

4,150 

1.018 

2,186 
2,827 
4,442 

1,357 
71,342 

5,057 
93,747 
17,509 

1,419 

46,486 
330 


6,063 
163 
503 

3,106 
111 

729 
940 

2,581 

662 

1,485 
1,355 
3,243 

631 
48,436 

3,732 

66,096 

11,092 

936 

27,844 
162 


3,240 
92 
168 

1,480 
47 

353 
454 

1,414 

353 

874 

5% 

2,221 

257 
27,047 

2,248 

39,696 

6,085 

462 

14,250 
119 


3,106 

85 

167 

1,216 

18 

294 
511 

1,512 

390 

920 
648 

2,572 

205 
20,034 

2,084 

31,106 

6,624 

521 

12,302 
124 


360 






. „rf,i,i„„ 








her/lement 






43 






apons; carrying, 


75 


stitution and commercialized 


39 




30 


h Its 




'^hr "^ 






64 








653 






. 1 conduct 




K) e y 




olher offenses (except 


1,855 


. . 




rfew and loitering law ( 

iolations ' 

inaways 





'Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

^Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
'Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
<Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



Table 33.— Total Arrests of Persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 Years of Age, 1978 

(11,872 agencies; 1978 estimated population 207,060,000] 



OfTense charged 


Grand total 
aU ages 


Number of persons arrested 


Percent of total all ages 


Under 15 


Under 18 


Under 21 


Under 25 


Under 
15 


Under 
18 


Under 
21 


Und 

25 


TOTAL 


9,775,087 


728,198 


2J79365 


3,909,507 


5436362 


7.4 


233 


40.0 








Forcible rape 


18,755 
28,257 
141.481 
257,629 
485,782 
1,084.088 
153,270 


244 
1,102 
13,086 
11,508 
93,652 
194,680 
20,146 


1,735 
4,517 
48.088 
41,253 
250,649 
454,994 
77,534 


4.519 
9,266 
79,933 
79,368 
346,122 
636.749 
106.970 


8.136 
15.231 
106,693 
126.485 
407,760 
778,028 
126.451 


1.3 
3.9 
9.2 
4.5 
193 
18.0 
13.1 


93 
16.0 
34.0 
16.0 
51.6 
42.0 
50.6 


24.1 
32.8 
56.5 
30.8 
713 
58.7 
69.8 


4 


Robbery 




Aggravated assault 








Larceny-theft 


8 


Motor vehicle theft 








Violent crime" 


446,122 
1,723,140 


25,940 
308,478 


95,593 
783.177 


173.086 
1.089.841 


256.545 
1312.239 


5.8 
17.9 


21.4 
45.5 


38.8 
63.2 














2,169.262 


334,418 


878,770 


1,262.927 


1.568.784 


15.4 


40.5 


58.2 








Other assaults 


445,020 
18,114 
73,269 
249,207 
7,670 
112317 
223391 
1494W7 

89365 

65,666 
5964*40 
53,066 
54,014 
1,204,733 

357,450 
1,117349 
679,112 
46,896 
1,788,794 
21.650 
78,972 
172,873 


28,496 
5,129 
1,680 
7,084 
185 
10,997 
66,586 
5.504 

659 

4,427 

20,771 

300 

1,230 

513 

9,761 

4,195 
34,978 

1,960 
96,735 

1,987 
20.723 
69,880 


82,425 
8,760 
9.991 
18,874 
909 
37,490 
127,973 
23,689 

4,212 

11,842 
141,186 
2,137 
2,871 
27,494 

127,069 
43,210 
124,307 
6,578 
341.579 
6,154 
78,972 
172,873 


148,132 
11,013 
22.768 
46,312 
2,088 
60.949 
160,947 
49,114 

25,567 

20,291 

301,135 

6.067 

9,819 

174,592 

253,507 
164.280 
259.746 
15,067 
652.740 
10,601 
78.972 
172.873 


230,653 
13,068 
39.157 
97,666 
3,591 
79,537 

184,329 
77.398 

56.302 

30,899 
438,353 
11,648 
20,304 
387,061 

290,181 
323.791 
393,232 
25,983 
998.481 
14,599 
78,972 
172.873 


6.4 
28.3 
2.3 
2.8 
2.4 
9.8 
29.8 
3.7 

.7 

6.7 
3.5 
.6 
2.3 
(') 

2.7 
.4 
5.2 
4.2 
5.4 
9.2 
26.2 
40.4 


18.5 
48.4 

13.6 
7.6 

11.9 
33.4 
573 
15.8 

4.7 

18.0 
23.7 
4.0 
5.3 
23 

35.5 
3.9 
183 
14.0 
19.1 
28.4 
100.0 
100.0 


33.3 
60.8 
31.1 
18.6 

27.2 
54.3 
72.0 
32.8 

28.6 

30.9 
50.4 
11.4 
18.2 
14.5 

70.9 
14.7 
38.2 
32.1 
36.5 
49.0 
100.0 
100.0 




Arson 












Embezzlement 






7 


Weapons; carrying, possessing etc 


8 






Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 








Gambling 




Offenses against family and children 








Liquor laws 




Drunkenness 








Vagrancy 




All other offenses (except traffic) 








Curfew and loitering law violations .. . 




Runaways 









'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated as; 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
^Less than one-tenth of I percent. 



196 



ible 34.— Total Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1978 

,872 agencies; 1978 estimated population 207,060,000| 



Offense charged 


Number of persons arrested 


Percent 
male 


Percent 
female 


Percent distribution' 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 




9,775,087 


8,227^28 


1347,859 


84,2 


15,8 


100.0 


100.0 








rder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

rc.blf rape 

gravaied assault 
tor vehicle then 


18,755 
28,257 
141,481 
257,629 
485,782 
1,084,088 
153,270 


16,103 
28,013 
131,563 
225.018 
455.933 
740.335 
140,488 


2.652 
244 
9.918 
32.611 
29.849 
343.753 
12.782 


85.9 
99.1 
93.0 
87.3 
93.9 
683 
91.7 


14.1 
.9 

7.0 
12.7 

6.1 
31.7 

83 


3 
1.4 
2.6 
5.0 
II. 1 
1.6 


3 
1.6 

2.7 
5.5 
9.0 
1.7 


.2 

.6 
2.1 
1.9 
22.2 
.8 




446,122 
1,723,140 


400.697 
1,336,756 


45.425 
386.384 


89.8 

77.6 


10.2 

22.4 


4.6 
17.6 


4.9 
16.2 








P 






2,169,262 


1,737,453 


431,809 


80.1 


19.9 


22.2 


21.1 








lier assaulu 

rger^ and counteifeiung 

ud 

bezzlemenl 

len property buying receiving, possessing 

ndalism 

^pons carrying, possessing etc 


445,020 
18,114 
73,269 
249,207 
7,670 
112317 
22331 
1494>57 

89J65 
65,666 
596>t0 
53,066 
54,014 
1,204,733 

357,450 
1,117349 
679,112 
46,896 
1,788,757 
21,650 
78,986 
172,8% 


384,182 
15,900 
51,502 

157,580 
5.742 
99.946 

204.664 

138.482 

28,900 
60,493 
515,230 
48.452 
48.502 
1.103.386 

304.875 
1.034.412 
570,020 
33.099 
1.530,098 
18,748 
61,890 
73,672 


60,838 
2,214 
21,767 
91,627 
1,928 
12,371 
18,727 
11.475 

60.465 
5.173 

81,710 

4,614 

5,512 

101,347 

52,575 
82,937 

109,092 
13,797 

258,659 
2,902 
17,096 
99,224 


86.3 
87.8 
70.3 
63.2 
74.9 
89.0 
91.6 
92.3 

32.3 
92.1 
86.3 
913 
89.8 
91.6 

85.3 
92.6 
83.9 
70.6 
85.5 
86.6 
78.4 
42.6 


13.7 
12.2 
29.7 
36.8 
25.1 
II.O 
8.4 
7.7 

67.7 
7.9 

13.7 
8.7 

10.2 
8.4 

14.7 
7.4 
16.1 
29.4 
14.5 
13.4 
21.6 
57.4 


4.6 
.2 

.7 
2.5 

I.I 

2.3 
1.5 

.9 

.7 
6.1 
.5 
.6 
123 

3.7 
11.4 
6.9 
.5 
183 
.2 
.8 
1.8 


47 
.2 
.6 

1.9 

1.2 
2.5 
1.7 

.4 
.7 
6.3 
.6 
.6 
13.4 

3.7 
12.6 
6.9 

18^6 
.2 
.8 
.9 


3.9 

.1 

5^9 
.1 
.8 

1.2 

.7 

39 


offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 


.3 
5.3 


-bling 

tenses against family and children 


.3 
.4 






unkenness 


5.4 
7.0 




.9 




167 












6.4 







^Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 
2Less than one-icnth of 1 percent. 

^Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and a 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larccny-thefl, and motor i 



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Ue 36.-City Arrest Trends, 1977-1978 

1978 estimated population 123,347,000] 











Number of persons 


arrested 








OfTense charged 


Total all ages J 


Under 


18 years of age | 


18 years of age and over 




1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 




6,045,874 


6,095,981 


+ ,8 


1,597,251 


1,5(3,556 


— 2.1 


4,448,623 


4,532,425 


+ 1.9 






rder and nonnegligenl manslaughter .. 


10,507 
15,816 
78,790 
131,258 
292,991 
768,566 
83,713 


10,415 
16,542 
80,077 
141,567 
292,566 
782,747 
86,911 


-.9 
+ 4.6 
+ 1.6 
+ 7.9 

+ 1.8 
+ 3.8 


1,101 
2,835 
25,359 
23,425 
159,966 
346,794 
47,596 


995 
2,798 
25,599 
24,101 
159,089 
343,567 
47,312 


-9.6 
-1.3 
+ .9 
+ 2.9 
-.5 
— .9 
-.6 


9,406 
12,981 
53,431 
107,833 
133,025 
421,772 
36,117 


9,420 
13,744 
54,478 
117,466 
133,477 
439,180 
39,599 


+ .1 
+ 5.9 


bbery 


+ 2.0 








+ .3 






tor vehicle theft 


+ 9.6 








236,371 
1,145,270 


248,601 
1,162,224 


+ 5.2 
+ 1.5 


52,720 
554,356 


53,493 
549,968 


+ 1.5 
-.8 


183,651 
590,914 


195,108 
612,256 


+ 6.2 




+ 3.6 


Property cnme 






1,381,641 


1,410,825 


+ 2.1 


607,076 


603,461 


— .6 


774,565 


807,364 


+ 4.2 








289,645 
10,581 
40,893 
98,174 
4,065 

68,882 
146,380 
100,518 

62,429 

40,614 
366,384 
38,378 
21,638 
635,971 

246,069 
896,836 
518,654 
23,062 
848,301 
18,714 
77,394 
129,365 


297,580 
10,695 
42,153 

104,978 
4,351 

67,283 
156,371 
102,928 

65,251 

40,566 
368,290 
36,461 
20,171 
660,863 

256,902 
812,991 
553,179 
22,180 
876,951 
15,870 
68,296 
116,716 


+ 2.7 
+ 1.1 
+ 3.1 
+ 6.9 
+ 7.0 

-2.3 
+ 6.8 
+ 2.4 

+ 4.5 

-.1 

+ .5 

-5.0 

-6.8 

+ 3.9 

+ 4.4 
— 9.3 
+ 6.7 
-3.8 
+ 3.4 
-15.2 
-11.8 
-9.8 


59,900 
5,865 
5,665 
4,300 
623 

25,263 
90,308 
16,791 

2,771 

8,225 
93,781 
1,692 
2,254 
15,606 

92,809 
36,684 
101,104 
4,396 
215,379 
4,831 
77,394 
129,365 


60,032 
5,726 
6,178 
4,256 
666 

24,966 
92,150 
16,849 

2,761 

7,929 
96,480 
1,500 
1,998 
16,756 

93,479 
30,911 
103,157 
3,876 
205,413 
4,470 
68,2% 
116,716 


+ .2 
-2.4 

+ 9.1 
-1.0 

+ 6.9 

-1.2 
+ 2.0 

+ .3 

— .4 

-3.6 

+ 2.9 

-11.3 

+ 1.4 

+ .7 
-15.7 

+ 2.0 
— 11.8 

-4.6 

-7.5 
-11.8 

— 9.8 


229,745 
4,716 
35,228 
93,874 
3,442 

43,619 
56,072 
83,727 

59,658 

32,389 
272,603 
36,686 
19,384 
620,365 

153,260 
860,152 
417,550 

18,666 
632,922 

13,883 


237,548 
4,969 
35,975 

100,722 
3,685 

42,317 
64,221 
86,079 

62,490 

32,637 
271,810 
34,961 
18,173 
644,107 

163,423 
782,080 
450,022 

18,304 
671,538 

11,400 


+ 3.4 






. nterfeitinfi 




rgery a g 


+ 7.3 


, . . 




len property; buymg, receiving. 


-3.0 






capons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Dstitution and commercialized 


+ 4.7 


n offenses (except forcible rape and 


+ .8 


h olation^ 








Tenses against family and children 


+ 3.8 




+ 6.6 


nkenness 




H 1 nducl 




^ 




1 other offenses (except traffic) 

ispicion (not included m totals) 

jrfew and loitering law violations 


-17^9 















'Violent crimes arc offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
'Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



201 



Table 37.-Clty Arrests DlstrlbuHon by Age, 1978 

(8,705 agencies; 1978 estimated population 144,062,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 
Percent 

Murder and nonneglige 

manslaughter . . . . 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault .... 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft .... 



Violent crime' 

Percent distribution' 
Property crime^ .... 
Percent distribution' 



Crime Index total . 
Percent distribution' 



12,755 
20.093 
108,«66 
180349 
345,808 
891,623 
110,960 



321,863 

100.0 

1348J91 

100.0 



nterfeiting 



Other assaults 

Forgery and co 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property: buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and commercialized 



Sex offenses (except forcible rape 
and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and 
children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 
Suspicion 



Curfew and loitering law violations 73,472 

Runaways 



338,187 
12.450 
50,238 

122,794 
5,022 

81,871 
175,979 
118,815 



50,483 
440,235 
46,839 



286,604 
911,992 
601,536 

39,794 
131.861 

18,532 



167 
868 
9,890 
8,667 
71,151 
169.419 
15,546 



1,238 
3,416 
36,707 
30,623 
183,897 
385,327 
58,080 



Ages 
18 and 
over 



71,984 

22.4 

627,304 



350 

8,123 

3,386 
32,238 

1,695 
80,91 1 

1,817 



67,548 
6,438 
7.579 
6,805 



29,559 
102,391 
19,515 



9,307 

110,371 

1,871 



102,648 
33,720 
112,147 
5,397 
260,209 
5.499 
73,472 
127,485 



11,517 
16,677 
71,959 
149,726 
161,911 
506,296 
52,880 



249,879 

77.6 

721,087 



3.866 

1.2 

60.655 



343381 423,455 
5.8 



195 
612 
7.488 
5.605 
38.051 
70.871 
14.363 



3.900 

4.3 

123.285 



See footnotes at end of table. 



42.659 

1 15.989 

4.254 


57 
101 
14 




52.312 
73.588 
99.300 


558 

11.744 

267 




79.853 


30 




41.176 
329.864 
44,%8 


339 
276 
22 




19.920 

734.352 


583 
99 




183.956 
878.272 
489,389 

34,397 
,031,652 

13.033 


235 
190 

3.426 

183 

10.082 

238 

997 

3.195 













403 
872 
9.275 
7.517 
39.140 
74.636 
15.361 



473 
1,064 
10,054 
8,834 
35,555 
70,401 
12,810 



20,425 

6.3 

118,766 



45,869 



21,700 

1,153 
54,38: 

1,205 
15,158 16,184 I 20,935 
8,328 41,369 34,682 28,528 



14,831 16,683 I 16,660 17,019 

704 530 

2,801 2,812 2,977 

2,548 4,021 4.776 

324 

7.452 



4.809 

32.155 
9.492 

25.831 
1.165 

68.220 



2.103 

19.687 

766 



47.379 
15.880 
34.096 

1.395 
65.209 

1.450 
16.880 



28.507 

43.803 
30.475 
41.705 

2.218 
75.006 

1.394 



)le 37.-City Arrests, Distribution by Age, 1978-Contlnued 
























Age 






Offense charged 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40^ 


45-49 


50-54 


55-59 


6(W4 %:^ 


Not 
known 




148,213 
4.8 


11385 
43 


,g2,665 
3.9 


2*0,118 
3.6 


(37,433 < 
12,8 


96,317 4 
8.1 


20,(»I 326.057 

5.7 4,5 


r71,099 227,990 
3.7 3.1 


51,407 
2,1 


86,780 
U 


77,148 


4,476 










der and nonnegligeni 


666 
1,165 
6,361 

8,854 
13,529 
34,153 

4,457 


644 
1,100 
5.416 

8.579 
11,263 
29.697 

3,587 


644 
1,049 

4,818 
8,076 
9,566 
26,260 
3,077 


605 
935 
4.160 
7.613 
8.317 
23.404 
2,735 


2,335 
3,761 
14.166 

30,244 
27.522 
87.199 
8.756 


1,518 
2,219 
6,466 
19,695 

12,286 
48,902 
4,133 


1.021 
1.307 
2.931 

13,120 
6.013 

30,181 
2.153 


674 
696 
1.418 

8,987 
3,413 
20,952 
1,184 


503 

465 

784 

6,337 

2.141 

16,842 

793 


387 
266 
446 

4.787 

1,291 

14.622 

467 


240 
140 
217 
2,815 
711 
10,660 
250 


150 
71 
78 
1,695 
305 
7,232 
114 


179 
77 

141 
1.660 

377 
9.971 

121 


6 










"^ J 1, 












or vehicle theft 










17,046 
5.3 

52,139 
3.9 


15,739 
4.9 

44,547 
3.3 


14,587 
4.5 

38.903 
2.9 


13,313 
4.1 

34,456 
2.6 


50.506 

15.7 

23.477 

9.2 


29,898 
9.3 

65,321 
4.8 


18.379 
5.7 

38.347 
2.8 


11,775 
3.7 

25,549 
1.9 


8,089 

2.5 

19,776 

1.5 


5,886 

1.8 

16,380 

1.2 


3,412 

11,621 
.9 


1,994 
.6 

7,651 
.6 


2.057 

.6 

10,469 

.8 


170 


Percent distribution' 

Property crime^ 

Percent distribution" 


704 




69,185 
4.1 


60,286 
3.6 


53.490 
3.2 


47,769 
2.9 


173.983 
10.4 


95,219 

5.7 


56,726 
3.4 


37,324 
2.2 


27,865 
1.7 


22,266 
1.3 


15,033 
.9 


9,645 
.6 


12,526 

.7 


874 










er assaults 


17.241 

336 

2,991 

6,516 

282 

4,025 
5,804 
6,322 

8,467 

2,190 
30,598 
1,320 

1,077 
37,287 

10,566 
36.411 
36.190 

2,874 
67,506 

1,025 


16,169 

363 

2,894 

6,624 

258 

3,411 
4,706 
5,82! 

7,943 

2.108 
26,059 
1.325 

976 
34.938 

8.109 
32.200 
31.108 

2.588 

62.816 

883 


15.336 

324 

2,693 

6,675 

214 

3.133 
4,119 
5.315 

6,979 

1,970 
22,052 
1,258 

1,301 
32.360 

6.128 
29.670 
27,306 

2.483 

59,086 

773 


14,470 

294 

2,669 

6,728 

237 

2,644 
3,637 
4,921 

5.633 

1.842 
19,587 
1,116 

974 
30,631 

5,061 
28,114 
24,527 

1.884 

56,660 

720 


55.580 
1.066 
10.220 
27.793 
831 

9,579 
12,300 
18.927 

15.655 

7,632 
62,688 
5,831 

4,166 

123,237 

15,568 
115.247 
85.822 
6,133 
182,684 
2,491 


35,604 

6% 

5,655 

18,307 

551 

4,993 
6,809 
12,154 

6.446 

5,845 
27,399 
5,465 

2,861 
91,176 

9,156 
94,921 
50.473 

3.192 
118.130 

1,265 


22,870 

503 

2,849 

11,376 

377 

2,849 
3,966 
8,155 

3,149 

4,006 
12,273 
4,912 

1,989 
72,260 

6,794 
86,119 
33,487 

2,137 

82,584 

710 


15,522 

357 

1,689 

7,118 

247 

1,810 
2,527 
5,719 

1,929 

2,774 
6,076 
4,595 

1,210 
60.221 

5.670 
82,944 
24.650 

1.558 

61.676 

441 


10,587 

262 

1,013 

4,540 

180 

1,240 
1,787 
4,216 

1,267 

2,174 
3,548 
4,612 

792 
52,205 

4,843 
82,095 
19.661 

1,336 

46.573 

303 


7,567 
161 
666 

3,029 
99 

799 
1,198 

3,223 

926 

1,728 
1,931 
3,914 

495 
44,383 

3,913 
80,122 
15,183 

1.160 

34,985 

242 


4,356 
110 
303 

1,553 

55 

507 
726 
2,026 

619 

1,198 
922 
2,859 

243 
29,998 

2,854 
56,823 
9.492 
785 
20.821 
124 


2,269 

55 
116 

709 
24 

243 
351 
1,0% 

328 

687 
428 
1,970 

111 
16,580 

1,677 
34,472 
5,210 
379 
10325 
105 


2,261 
50 
105 

657 
10 

184 
387 
1.181 

358 

710 
415 

2.276 

101 
12.299 

1.554 

26.941 

5.850 

416 

8.783 
84 


292 
8 




° , , • ■ 




gery an c g 


11 


. . 


en property; buying, receiving, 


29 
226 
58 

29 




apons; carrying, possessing, etc. ... 
stilution and commercialized 


offenses (except forcible rape 


21 
248 

7 


ug abuse violations 


enses against family and 


33 

324 






455 
42 

456 

14 

1.210 

48 


. 


sorderly conduct 


other offenses (except traffic) 

spicion 

rfew and loitering law violations ... 

M*»ys 



■Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

^Violent cnmes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



203 



Table 38.— City Airests of Persons uoder IS, 18, 21, and 25 Years of Age, 

[8,705 agencies; 1978 estimated population 144,062,0001 



Offense charged 



Murder and i 
Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 



:gligent manslaughter 



Violent crime' . 
Property crime^ 



Crime Index total 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing 

Vandahsm 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



Prostitution and commercialized vice 
Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 

prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children .. 
Driving under the influence 



338,187 
12,450 
50,238 

122,794 
5,022 
81,871 

175,979 

118,815 

83,564 

50,483 
440,235 
46,839 
22,092 
752,822 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 91lj>92 

Disorderly conduct 601,536 

^agfan'^y 39,794 

All other offenses (except traffic) 1,291,861 

Suspicion 18,532 

Curfew and loitering law violations 73 472 

'^"la^ays 127!485 



12,755 
20,093 
108,666 
180349 
345,808 
891,623 
110,960 



Number of persons arrested 



868 
9,890 
8,667 



1,238 
3,416 
36,707 
30,623 
183,897 
385,327 
58,080 



8.123 
3,386 
32,238 



offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated i 
.•_«■ <-v.__i-_ , .. . . vehiclethef 



3,183 
6,835 
61,230 

57,764 
248,887 
531,082 

79,082 



29,559 
102,391 
19,515 

3,711 

9,307 
110,371 
1,871 
2,172 
18,470 



112,147 
5,397 

260,209 
5,499 
73,472 

127,485 



'Violent , „,,,„„ ,„^, ,„„„^,j,, ^„ , 

'Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor 
^Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



118,063 
7,865 
16,306 



46,425 
127,436 
39,681 

23,836 

15,598 

226,011 

5,379 

5,763 

1 14,923 

204,256 
125,871 
232,121 

12,855 

478,022 

9,318 

73,472 
127,485 



5,742 
11,084 
81,985 
90,886 
291,562 
644,596 
92,938 



Percent of total all ages 



181,279 
9,182 

27,553 

47,690 
2,637 

59,638 
145,702 

62,060 

52,858 

23,708 
324,307 
10,398 
10,091 
250,139 

234,120 
252,266 
351,252 
22,684 
724,090 
12,719 
73,472 
127,485 



13.6 
20.1 
29.7 
100.0 
100.0 



20.0 


34.9 


51.7 


63.2 


15.1 


32.5 


5.5 


17.2 


15.3 




36.1 


56.7 


58.2 


72.4 



71.3 
13.8 


81 
27 


38.6 


58 


32.3 


57 


37.0 


56 


50.3 


68 


100.0 


100 


100 


100 



204 



ble 39.-aty Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1978 

roS agencies; 1978 estimated po pulation 144.062.0001 
OfTense charged 



urder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

ircible lape 

jbbery 

^avat(d assault 

irglary 

irceny-iheft 

otor vehicle theft 



Number of persons ; 



Percent distribuuon' 



Violent crime' 
Property crime* 



Crime Index total 



Ither assaults 

irson • 

orgery and counterfeiting 

Taud 

imbezzlement 

Itolen property; buying, receiving, possessmg 

Vandalism 

Veapons; carrying, possessing, etc 



12,755 
20,093 
108,666 
180349 
345,808 
891.623 
110,960 



321,863 
134^391 



>rosiitution and commercialized vice 

iex offenses (except forcible rape and prostituuon) 



Drug abuse violations 

jamblmg 

Offenses against family and children 
Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) .. 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 
Runaways 



338,187 
12,450 
50038 

122,794 
5,022 
81371 

1754>79 

118,815 

83,564 
50,483 

440,235 
46,839 
22,092 

752,822 

286,604 
911,992 
601,536 
39,794 
1,291,861 
18432 
73,472 
127,485 



10.9 

19.908 
100,872 
156,1 
324,175 
5%.637 
101,369 



1.849 
185 
7,794 
23,901 
21.633 
294.986 
9.591 



92.8 
86.7 
93.7 
66.9 
91.' 



290.539 
10,880 
34,589 
76,697 
3.651 
72,392 
160,850 
109,312 



42,865 
18,377 
685,824 

244.361 
843.793 
502.534 
26.551 
1.100,264 
15.996 
57,881 
53,124 



■Because of rounding, the percentages may i 
^Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



iOi ol i pcrccni. , 

'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and agpf*"'" f 
Violent crimes ^ ^^^^ ^^ bm^^, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle thef 



15,( 
46.097 
1,371 



56.8 
4.233 

61.207 
3.974 
3.715 

66.998 

42.243 
68.199 
99.002 
13,243 
191,597 
2.536 
15,591 
74,361 



85.9 
87.^ 
68.9 
62.5 
72.7 
88.4 



85.3 
92.5 
83.5 
66.7 
85.2 
86.3 



•Property crimes i 



205 



Table 40.-Clty Airest Trends, Sex, 1977-1978 

[7,615 agencies; 1978 estimated population 123,347,000) 



Offense charged 



TOTAL 

Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime' 

Property crime' 



Crime Index total 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and commercialized 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape 

and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) . 
Suspicion (not included in totals) . 
Curfew and loitering law violations 
Runaways 



8,917 
15,649 
72,852 
113,616 
275,224 
514,950 
76,655 



8,811 
16,395 
74,295 
122,714 
274,316 
522,813 
79,102 



077,863 1,098,446 



248,240 
9,375 
28,389 
60,503 
3,081 

61,055 



37.427 
314,843 
34,931 



209,847 
830,368 
429,146 
17,371 
699,290 
16,092 
60,932 
53.408 



Percent 
chang< 



255,313 
9,376 
28,773 
62,226 
3,130 

59,224 
143,033 
94,460 



37,048 
316,397 
33,204 



218,927 
751,423 
462,277 
15,520 
727,715 
13,783 
53,872 



999 
2,774 
23,568 
19,809 
150,658 
246,296 
43,225 



47,449 
5,312 
3,942 
3,123 
485 

23.034 



7,371 
78,373 
1,615 



2,751 
23,891 
20,477 



Percent 
change 



1,590 
167 
5,938 
17,642 
17,767 
253,616 
7,058 



47,714 
5,183 
4,186 
3,003 
481 

22,649 
85,093 
15,826 



7,175 
80.266 
1,432 



73,012 
26,625 
85,423 

3.227 
161,289 

3,827 
53,872 
48,708 



'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated asj 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft 
'Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



147 

5,782 

18,853 

18,250 

259,934 



7.827 
12.613 
8.532 



42.267 
1.319 
13,380 
42,752 
1,221 

8,059 
13,338 
8.468 



Percent 
change 



102 
61 
1.791 
3,616 
9,308 
100,498 
1,371 



3,187 


3,518 


51,541 


51.893 


3.447 


3.257 


3.598 


3.471 


55,673 


59.345 


36,222 


37.975 


66,468 


61.568 


89,508 


90,902 


5,691 


6,660 


49,011 


149,236 


2,622 


2,087 


16,462 


14,424 


75.957 


68,008 



5,570 
14,177 



104 

47 
1,708 
3,624 
9,641 
99,952 
4,754 



+ 2.1 


12,451 


12.318 


+ 9,4 


553 


543 


+ 7.0 


1,723 


1,992 


1-13.5 


1,177 


1.253 


H24.1 


138 


185 


+ 3.0 


2,229 


2.317 


+ 5.7 


6.950 


7,057 



19.810 
5.145 
19.118 



1.023 


— 4.9 


1,950 


+ 2.0 


754 


-11.7 


16,214 


+ 5.2 


68 


-11.7 


763 


-I5.I 


1,670 


+ 12.5 


20,467 


+3.3 


4,286 


-16.7 


17,734 


-7,2 


649 


-21.6 


44,124 


-7.6 


643 


— 6.7 


14,424 


-12.4 


68,008 


-10.5 



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209 



Table 42.— Suburban Arrest Trends, 1977-1978 

[4,466 agencies; 1978 estimated population 68,483,000) 





Number of persons arrested 


Offense charged 


Total all ages 


Under 18 years of age 


18 years of age and over 




1977 


1978 


Percent 

change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 

change 


1977 


1978 


Perce 
chani 




2,513,675 


2,555,850 


+ 1.7 


717,104 


709,040 


-l.I 


1,796,571 


1,846310 






+ 


Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 


3.338 
6,414 
23,886 
59,542 
136.330 
289,853 
37.331 


3,588 
6,376 
23,547 
63,189 
137,472 
295,259 
39,082 


+ 7.5 
-.6 

+ 6^1 
+ .8 
+ 1.9 

+ 4.7 


315 
1,034 
6,991 
11.436 
76,779 
133,145 
21,058 


354 
%1 
6.826 
11,904 
77,486 
132,031 
21.319 


+ 12.4 
-7.1 
-2.4 

+ 4.1 
+ .9 

-.8 
+ 1.2 


3,023 
5,380 
16,895 
48,106 
59,551 
156.708 
16.273 


3,234 
5,415 
16.721 
51,285 
59,986 
163,228 
17,763 





Forcible rape .. 


+ 


Robbery 




Aggravated assault 


— 


Burglary 


+ 








+ 




+ 


Violent crime' 


93,180 
463,514 


96,700 
471,813 


+ \.S 


19,776 
230.982 


20,045 
230,836 


+ 1.4 


73,404 
232,532 


76,655 
240,977 






+ 




+' 


Crime Index total 


556,694 


568,513 


+ 2.1 


250,758 


250,881 




305,936 


317,632 












109,559 
5,659 
21,342 
58,176 
1,892 
34,065 
71,510 
32,466 

3,923 

16,881 

174.530 

5,401 

21,082 

396,456 

115,837 
238,719 
145,430 
5,698 
410,131 
7,044 
22,724 
65,500 


118,141 
5.693 
21,605 
68,700 
2,369 
34,255 
77,579 
33,350 

4,761 

16,750 
173,099 
5,991 
21,398 
409,644 

120,678 
214,350 
151,864 
6,035 
422.661 
5,474 
21,000 
57,414 


+ 7.8 
+ .6 
+ 1.2 
+ 18.1 
+ 25.2 
+ .6 

+ 2.7 

+ 21.4 

-.8 
-.8 
+ 10.9 
+ 1.5 
+ 3.3 

+ 4.2 

-10.2 

+ 4.4 

+ 5.9 

+ 3.1 

-22.3 

-7.6 

— 12.3 


23,412 
3,324 
2,462 
1,582 
226 
12,304 
49,517 
6,883 

313 

3,740 
50,168 
167 
1,140 
9,486 

51,179 
16.833 
40,066 

2.058 
103,262 

2,289 
22,724 
65,500 


24,147 
3,270 
2,802 
1.732 
242 
12,467 
51,602 
6,751 

298 

3,745 
52,008 
199 
1.016 
9,789 

50,536 
13,549 
41,755 
2,173 
101,664 
1,587 
21,000 
57,414 


+ 3.1 
-1.6 
+ 13.8 
+ 9.5 
+ 7.1 
+ 1.3 
+ 4.2 
-1.9 

-4.8 

+ .1 

+ 3.7 

+ 19.2 

-10.9 

+ 3.2 

— 1.3 
-19.5 
+ 4.2 
+ 5.6 
-1.5 
-30.7 
-7.6 
-12.3 


86,147 
2,335 
18,880 
56,594 
1.666 
21,761 
21,993 
25,583 

3,610 

13,141 

124,362 

5,234 

19,942 
386,970 

64,658 
221,886 
105,364 

3,640 
306,869 

4,755 


93,994 
2,423 
18,803 
66.968 
2,127 
21.788 
25,977 
26.599 

4.463 

13,005 
121,091 
5,792 
20,382 
399,855 

70,142 
200,801 
110,109 

3,862 
320,997 

3,887 




Arson 


+» 




+.« 


Fraud 


— 


Embezzlement 


+ 1; 


Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing .... 




Weapons; carrying, possessing etc 


+ i: 


Prostitution and commercialized vice . 


+. 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 
prostitution) 






— 


Gambling :::::;.:::': 


— . 




+ 1« 








"*■■ 




+i 




— s 


Vagrancy 




All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion (not included in totals) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 


+ 6 

+ 4 

-18 


Runaways 









'Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, aggravated assault. 
'Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



210 



le 43— Suburban Arrests, Distribution by Age, 1978 

1978 estimated population 78,916,0001 





Grand 

total 

all ages 


Ages 

under 

15 


Ages 

under 

18 


Ages 
18 and 


Age 


Offense charged 


and 
under 


11-12 


13-14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


TOTAL 


3,226,455 
100.0 


283,513 
8.8 


892,960 

27.7 


2333,495 
72J 


29JM7 


57,960 
1.8 


95,606 
6.1 


73,548 
5.4 


212,601 
6.6 


223,298 
6.9 


216,958 

6.7 


89J71 
5.9 


169,176 




S2 







der and nonnegligent 


5,108 
8,659 
42,589 
88,233 
178,086 
367,339 
52,777 


85 
333 
4,155 
4,659 
35,511 
68,199 
6,934 


513 
1,344 
15,288 
16,434 
97,608 
163,209 
27,373 


4,595 
7,315 
27.301 
71.799 
80,478 
204,130 
25,404 


17 
139 

437 
3.531 
8.151 

155 


5 

55 
734 
995 
7,080 
16,660 
813 


76 
261 
3,282 
3,227 
24,900 
43,388 
5,966 


93 
264 
3,115 
2,986 
21,019 
30,706 
6,964 


158 
324 
3,929 
3,983 
21,684 
33,123 
7,373 


177 
423 
4,089 
4,806 
19,394 
31,181 
6,102 


246 
477 
4.006 
4,833 
14,953 
25,726 
4,392 


261 
474 
3.113 
4,5% 
10,666 
19,414 
3,218 


258 




485 


, "^ 










8,313 




16,120 


or vehicle thefl 








Violent crime' 


144389 
100.0 

598,202 
100.0 


9,232 

6.4 

110,644 

18.5 


33,579 

23.2 

288,190 

48.2 


111,010 
76.8 

310,012 
51.9 


597 

.4 

11,837 

2.0 


1.789 

1.2 

24,553 

4.1 


6,846 

4.7 

74,254 

12.4 


6,458 

4.5 

58,689 

9.8 


8,394 

5.8 

62,180 

10.4 


9,495 
6.6 

56,677 
9.5 


9,562 
6.6 

45,071 
7.5 


8,444 

5.8 

33,298 

5.6 


7,908 




















742,791 
100.0 


119,876 
16.1 


321,769 
43.3 


421,022 
56.7 


12,434 

1.7 


26,342 

3.5 


81,100 
10.9 


65,147 
8.8 


70,574 
9.5 


66,172 
8.9 


54.633 
7.4 


41,742 
5.6 


34,759 











er assaults 


150,471 
7,155 
26,478 
95,022 
2,833 

44,810 
94,432 
44,653 

7,829 

22,070 

211,072 

7,819 

24,059 
453,430 

140,760 
2514*82 
1884»13 
10,910 
600486 
6,804 
24,543 
67,233 


10,897 

2,408 

557 

5,743 

61 

4,609 
31,715 
2,122 

229 

1.676 

9,343 

68 

406 
220 

4,194 
1,484 
15,236 
791 
38,759 
603 
5,954 
26,562 


31,187 
3,%9 
3,424 

12,563 
294 

15,990 
61,188 

8,477 

673 

4,698 
60,030 

357 

1,252 
10,821 

56,323 
15,295 
49,111 

2,881 
139,064 

1.818 
24,543 
67,233 


119,284 
3.186 
23,054 
82,459 
2,539 

28,820 
33,244 
36,176 

7,156 

17,372 

151,042 

7,462 

22,807 
442,609 

84,437 
236,687 
139,802 

8,029 
461,322 

4.986 


1.333 

702 

27 

210 

4 

279 

6,251 

162 

15 

133 

134 

1 

177 
87 

128 

75 

1,703 

57 

4,109 

93 

189 

1,644 


2.538 

602 

77 

1,005 

12 

825 

8,337 

363 

34 

320 

789 

6 

70 
19 

283 
115 

3,358 
152 

7,698 
122 
919 

3,974 


7,026 
1,104 
453 
4,528 
45 

3,505 
17,127 
1,597 

180 

1,223 

8,420 

61 

159 
114 

3,783 
1,294 
10,175 
582 
26,952 
388 
4,846 
20,944 


5,387 
632 
590 

4,313 
31 

3,269 
10,262 
1,498 

177 

906 

11,596 

65 

266 
350 

8,001 
2,258 
8,940 
603 
24,355 
352 
5,763 
18,787 


6,805 
485 
921 
842 
71 

3,928 
10,167 
2,117 

89 

1.002 

17,549 

104 

277 
2,649 

17,619 
4,309 
11,418 
705 
37,385 
383 
7,812 
15,390 


8,098 
444 
1,356 
1,665 
131 

4,184 
9,044 
2,740 

178 

1,114 

21,542 

120 

303 
7,602 

26,509 
7,244 
13,517 
782 
38,565 
480 
5,014 
6,494 


7,909 

312 

1,409 

2,597 

132 

3,819 
5,864 
3,116 

442 

1,108 

21,815 

165 

1,100 
17,244 

24.290 
12,662 
15,480 

683 
41,700 

478 


7,909 

332 

1,447 

3,189 

159 

3,080 
4,061 
2,697 

668 

1,050 

19,374 

169 

923 

19,776 

17,816 
11,966 
13,417 

629 
38,510 

457 


7,524 






" ■■ , rf , 






3,835 






en property; buying, receiving. 


2,650 






pons; carrying, possessing, etc 

titution and conunerciaUzed 


644 


offenses (except forcible rape 


1,111 










enses against family and 


927 


H th fluence 




^ 


12,606 






















rfew and loitering law violations 

Mways 









See footnotes at end of table. 



211 



Table 43.— Suburban Arrests, DistributioD by Age, 1978— Continued 



Offense charged 



Murder and no 
manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 



legligent 



6,716 
13.898 
2,021 



3,556 
4,073 
9,146 
1.217 



955 
1,645 
4,994 
13,889 
12,654 
33,585 
3,900 



633 
1,001 
2,304 
9,388 

5,e 

19,778 
2,060 



6,357 
2,922 
12,531 



3.057 
1,130 
6,954 



2,157 

758 

5,725 



1,229 

327 

4,156 



Violent crime^ 

Percent distribution' 

Property crirae^ 

Percent distribution' 



7,489 

5.2 

22,635 



6.274 

4.3 

16,325 



13,326 

9.2 

27.524 



5.625 

3.9 

11.187 



3,887 

2.7 

8,587 



Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buying, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and commercialized 
vice 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape 
and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and 
children 

Driving under the influence 



Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 



Curfew and loitering law violations 
Runaways 



2,232 
2,607 
2,365 



1,848 
2,063 
2,210 



3,536 
10,815 
9,165 



2,713 
9,778 
7,673 



1,356 
1.474 
1.774 



2.152 
9.220 
6.754 



5.924 
33.605 
22.378 



1,9% 
21.261 
9,045 



2.387 

170 

7.154 



'Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

^Violent crimes are olTenscs of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

^Property crimes are ofTenses of burglary. larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



^e 44.— Suburban Arrests of Persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 Years of Age, 1978 

10 agencies; 1978 estimated population 78,916,000) 





Grand total 
all ages 


Number of persons arrested | 


Percent of total all ages 


Offense charged 


Under 15 


Under 18 


Under 21 


Under 25 


Under 
15 


Under 
18 


Under 
21 


Under 
25 




3,226,455 


283313 


892,960 


1,468,465 


1,985,943 


8,8 


27.7 


453 


61.6 








5,108 
8,659 
42,589 
8833 
178,086 
367339 
52,777 


85 
333 
4,155 
4,659 
35,511 
68,199 
6,934 


513 
1,344 
15,288 
16,434 
97,608 
163,209 
27,373 


1,278 
2,780 
25,083 
30,352 
131,540 
224,469 
37,401 


2,209 
4,597 
32,798 
46,271 
152,338 
269,482 
43,714 


1.7 
3.8 
9.8 
5.3 
19.9 
18.6 
13.1 


10.0 
15.5 
35.9 
18.6 
54.8 
44.4 
51.9 


25.0 
32.1 
58.9 
34.4 
73.9 
61.1 
70.9 


43.2 


cible rape 
bery 

^avated assault 
glary 

ceny-theft 
tor vehicle theft 


53.1 
77.0 
52.4 
85.5 
73.4 
82.8 


Violent crime' 
Property crime* 


144389 
598,202 


9,232 
110,644 


33,579 
288,190 


59.493 
393.410 


85,875 
465,534 


6.4 
18.5 


23.2 
48.2 


41.1 
65.8 


59.4 

77.8 




742,791 


119,876 


321.769 


452.903 


551,409 


16.1 


43.3 


61.0 


74.2 








150,471 
7,155 
26,478 
95,022 
2,833 
44,810 
94,432 
44,653 

7,829 

22,070 

211,072 

7,819 

24,059 
453,430 

140,760 
251,982 
188,913 
104*10 
600386 
6,804 
24343 
67,233 


10,897 
2,408 
557 
5,743 
61 
4,609 
31,715 
2,122 

229 

1,676 

9,343 

68 

406 

220 

4,194 
1,484 
15,236 
791 
38,759 
603 
5.954 
26,562 


31,187 
3,969 
3,424 

12,563 
294 

15,990 

61,188 
8,477 

673 

4,698 

60,030 

357 

1,252 
10,821 

56,323 
15,295 
49,111 
2.881 
139,064 
1,818 
24,543 
67,233 


54.529 
4,833 
7,657 
22,184 
726 
25,539 
74,365 
16,712 

2,427 

7,967 

118,004 

869 

4,202 

68,495 

111,035 
51,593 
89,844 
4,711 
254,954 
3,140 
24,543 
67,233 


81,153 
5,580 
13,454 
39.917 
1,275 
32,664 
82,286 
25,012 

4,744 

11,574 

162,946 

1.640 

8,907 

150,387 

124,339 
93,236 
124,086 
6,351 
368,829 
4,378 
24,543 
67.233 


7.2 
33.7 
2.1 
6.0 
2.2 
10.3 
33.6 
4.8 

2.9 

7.6 

.9 

1.7 
P) 

3.0 
.6 
8.1 
7.3 
6.5 
8.9 
24.3 
39.5 


20.7 
55.5 
12.9 
13.2 
10.4 
35.7 
64.8 
19.0 

8.6 

21.3 
28.4 
4.6 
5.2 
2.4 

40.0 
6.1 
26.0 
26.4 
232 
26.7 
100.0 
100.0 


36.2 
67.5 
28.9 
23.3 
25.6 
57.0 
78.7 
37.4 

31.0 

36.1 
55.9 
11.1 
17.5 
15.1 

78.9 
20.5 
47.6 
43.2 
42.5 
46.1 
100.0 
100.0 


53.9 




78.0 


. nterfeitine 


50.8 




42.0 




45.0 


en property; buying, receiving, possessing .... 


72.9 
87.1 


. , 


56.0 




60.6 


offenses (except forcible rape and 


52.4 


abuse violations 


77.2 


mbling 


21.0 




37.0 




33.2 




88.3 




37.0 




65.7 


orancv 


58.2 




61.4 




64.3 




100.0 




100.0 







'Violent crimes are oflenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^Property crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
*Less than one-tenth of I percent. 



Table 45.— Suburban Arrests,Distributioii by Sex, 

[5,210 agencies; 1978 estimated population 78,916,000) 



Offense charged 


Number of persons arrested 


Percent 

male 


Percent 
female 


Percent distribution' 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Fem 


TOTAL 


3,226,455 


2,728,663 


497,792 


84.6 


15.4 


100.0 


100.0 


. 


Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 


5,108 
8,659 
42389 
88,233 
178,086 
367,339 
52,777 


4,418 
8,603 
39,884 
78,004 
167,179 
252,756 
48,454 


690 
56 
2,705 
10,229 
10.907 
114,583 
4,323 


86.5 
99.4 
93.6 
88.4 
93.9 
68.8 
91.8 


13.5 

.6 

6.4 

11.6 

31.2 


.3 
13 
2.7 
5.5 
11.4 
1.6 


.3 
1.5 
2.9 
6.1 
9.3 
1.8 






144389 
598,202 


130,909 
468,389 


13,680 
129,813 


90.5 
78.3 


9.5 
21.7 


4.5 
18.5 


4.8 
17.2 




Property crime^ 






742,791 


599,298 


143,493 


80.7 


19.3 


23.0 


22.0 








Other assaults 
Arson 

Fraud 

Stolen property buymg, receivmg possessmg 

Vandalism 

Weapons carrving possessing etc 

Prostitution and commercialized vice 

Sex offenses (except foicible rape and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitenng law violations 

Runaways 


150,471 
7,155 
26,478 
95,022 
2,833 
44,810 
94,432 
44.653 

7,829 
22,070 
211,072 
7,819 
24,059 
453,430 

140,760 
251,982 
188.913 
104>10 
600386 
6304 
24343 
67,233 


130,354 
6,357 
19,175 
60.963 
2.140 
40,204 
87.249 
41.732 

2,976 
20,442 
182,555 
6,987 
22,017 
412,673 

120.299 
231.614 
163.299 
9.813 
514,240 
6,063 
18,419 
29,794 


20.117 
798 
7.303 
34.059 
693 
4.606 
7.183 
2.921 

4.853 
1.628 

28,517 

832 

2,042 

40,757 

20.461 
20.368 
25.614 

1,097 

86.146 

741 

6.124 
37.439 


86.6 
88.8 
72.4 
64.2 
75.5 
89.7 
92.4 
93.5 

38.0 
92.6 
86.5 
89.4 
91.5 
91.0 

85.5 
91.9 
86.4 
89.9 
85.7 
89.1 
75.0 
44.3 


13.4 
11.2 
27.6 
35.8 
24.5 
10.3 
7.6 
6.5 

62.0 
7.4 
13.5 
10.6 
8.5 
9.0 

14.5 
8.1 
13.6 
10.1 
14.3 
10.9 
25.0 
55.7 


4.7 
.2 
.8 

2.9 

1.4 
2.9 
1.4 

.7 
6.5 
.2 
.7 
14.1 

4.4 
7.8 
5.9 
.3 
18.6 
.2 
.8 
2.1 


4.8 
.2 

.7 
2.2 

1.5 
3.2 
1.5 

.7 
6.7 
.3 
.8 
15.1 

4.4 
8.5 
6.0 
.4 
18.8 
.2 
.7 
1.1 





^Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

2Lcss than one-tenth of 1 percent. 

^Violent crimes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 

■•Property crimes are ofTenses of burglary, larceny- theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



46— Suburban Arrest Trends, Sex, 1977-1978 
agencies; 1978 estimated population 68,483,000) 





Males 


Females 


Offense charged 


Total 


Under 18 


Total 


Under 18 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


rOTAL 


2,119,191 


2,151,529 


+ 1,5 


568,358 


565,228 


— .6 


394,484 


404J21 


+ 2.5 


148,746 


143,812 


-33 






er and nonnegligenl 


2,855 
6,349 
22,115 
52,848 
127,684 
198,576 
34,201 


3,067 
6,337 
21,961 
56,106 
128,687 
201,476 
35,593 


+ 7.4 
-.2 
— .7 

+ 6.2 
+ .8 

+ 1.5 

+ 4.1 


287 
1,005 
6,413 
9,863 
71,922 
97,290 
19,076 


319 
949 
6.365 
10,309 
72,609 
96,331 
19,084 


+ 11.1 
-5.6 

— .7 
+ 4.5 
+ 1.0 
-1.0 


483 
65 
1.771 
6.694 
8.646 
91.277 
3,130 


521 
39 
1.586 
7,083 
8,785 
93,783 
3,489 


+ 7.9 
-40.0 
— 10.4 
+ 5.8 
+ 1.6 
+ 2.7 
+ 11.5 


29 
578 
1.573 
4,857 
35,855 
1,982 


35 

12 

461 

1.595 

4.877 
35,700 
2,235 


+25.0 




-58.6 




-20,2 




+ 1.4 




+ .4 




-.4 


r vehicle theft 


+ 12.8 








84,167 
360,461 


87,471 
365,756 


+ 3.9 
+ 1.5 


17,568 
188.288 


17.942 
188.024 


+ 2.1 

-.1 


9,013 
103,053 


9,229 
106.057 


+ 2.4 
+ 2.9 


2,208 
42.694 


2,103 
42,812 


-4.8 


l^operty cnme 


+ .3 








444,628 


453,227 


+ 1.9 


205,856 


205.966 




1 12,066 


115,286 


+ 2.9 


44,902 


44,915 










94,846 
5,151 
15,264 
35,239 
1,491 

30,560 
66,084 
30,274 

1,495 

15,053 

150,550 

4,860 

19,403 
361,508 

98,858 
219,373 
125.970 
5,018 
347,586 
6,107 
17,169 
28,811 


102,092 
5,102 
15,458 
40,087 
1,792 

30,617 
71,746 
31,156 

1,702 

15,580 

148,985 

5.367 

19,686 
372.536 

102,912 
196,928 
131,561 

5,173 
358,61 1 
4,875 
15,776 
25,435 


+ 7.6 

— 1.0 
+ 1.3 

+ 13.8 
+ 20.2 

+ .2 
+ 8.6 
+ 2.9 

+ 13.8 

+ 3.5 

— 1.0 
+ 10.4 

+ 1.5 
+ 3.1 

+ 4.1 

-10.2 

+ 4.4 

+ 3.1 

+ 3.2 

-20.2 

-8.1 

— 11.7 


18.918 
3,065 
1,772 
1,182 
180 

11,256 
45,948 
6,533 

210 

3,377 

41.677 

153 

739 

8,660 

40.313 
14.454 
33.584 

1,720 
82,781 

1,962 
17,169 
28,811 


19,667 
2,967 
2,004 
1,238 
182 

11.350 
47,862 
6,453 

166 

3,456 

43.123 

188 

683 

8,832 

39.650 
11.686 
34.971 

1.792 
81,781 

1.351 
15.776 
25.435 


+ 4.0 
-3.2 
+ 13.1 

+ 4.7 

+ .8 
+ 4.2 
-1.2 

-21.0 

+ 2.3 
+ 3.5 
+ 22.9 
-7.6 
+ 2.0 

-1.6 

-19.2 

+ 4.1 

+ 4.2 

-3L1 
-11.7 


14.713 

508 

6.078 

22,937 

401 

3,505 
5,426 
2,192 

2,428 

1,828 

23,980 

541 

1.679 
34,948 

16,979 
19,346 
19.460 

680 
62,545 

937 
5.555 
36.689 


16,049 

591 

6,147 

28,613 

577 

3.638 
5,833 
2,194 

3,059 

1,170 

24.114 

624 

1,712 
37,108 

17,766 
17,422 
20,303 

862 
64,050 

599 
5,224 
31,979 


+ 9.1 
+ 16.3 

+ 1.1 
+ 24.7 
+ 43.9 

+ 3.8 
+ 7.5 

+ 26.0 

-36.0 
+ .6 

+ 15.3 
+ 2.0 
+ 6.2 

+ 4.6 
-9.9 
+ 4.3 

+ 26.8 
+ 2.4 

— 36.1 
-6.0 

-12.8 


4,494 
259 
690 
400 
46 

1,048 

3,569 

350 

103 

363 
8,491 
14 
401 
826 

10,866 
2,379 
6,482 
338 
20,481 
327 
5.555 
36,689 


4,480 
303 
798 
494 
60 

1,117 

3.740 

298 

132 

289 
8.885 
11 
333 
957 

10.886 
1.863 
6,784 
381 
19,883 
236 
5,224 
31,979 


-.3 




+ 17.0 


, fe tinB 


+ 15.7 


d 


+ 23.5 


ezzlemenl 


+ 30.4 


n property; buying, receiving. 


+ 6.6 


alism 


+ 4.8 


3ons; carrying, possessing, etc. ... 
itution and commercialized 


- 14.9 
+ 28.2 


offenses (except forcible rape 


-20.4 




+ 4.6 




— 21.4 


ises against family and children . 


-17.0 
+ 15.9 




+ .2 




-21.7 


, 1 ^„_Jy„, 


+ 4.7 


' 




nher offenses (except traffic) 

cion (not included in totals) 

ew and loitering law violations .. 


-2.9 
-27.8 

-6.0 
-12.8 




J 



'Violent cnmes are ofTenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
sPropeny crimes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
'Less than one-tenth of I percent. 



51 



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ible 48.-Rural Arrests Trends, 1977-1978 

D13 agencies; 1978 eslimated population 26.233,C 



Number of persons arrested 



Total all ages 



Percent 



Under 18 years of age 



Percent 
change 



Percent 
change 



irder and nonnegligent manslaughK 

ibbery 

gravated assault 

rglary 

rceny-lheft 

>tor vehicle theft 



Violent cnine' 
Proprrty cnme^ 



4,527 
24,082 
42,538 
47,375 
10,943 



Crime Index total 

tier assaults 

son 

rgery and counterfeiting 

jud 

ibezzlement 

Jen property; buymg, receiving, possessing 

ndalism 

^apons ; carrying, possessing, etc 

jstitution and commercialized vice 

I offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

ug abuse violations 

imbling 

fenses against family and children 

iving under the influence 

(uor laws 

unkenness 

sorderly conduct 

grancy 

I other offenses (except traffic) 

spicion (not included in totals) 

rfew and loitering law violations 

inaways 



33,831 
1,703 
8,507 

45,855 

951 

7,506 

13,346 
7,678 

553 
3,546 
53,443 
1,772 
12,901 
152,354 

29,936 
105,360 
33,065 
1,510 
136,650 
1,367 
1,771 
17,515 



4,294 
24,849 
43,025 
47,709 
11,662 



159 
296 
831 
1,693 
16,970 
13,662 
5,113 



124 
273 
752 
1,725 
17,639 
13,602 
5,439 



1,967 
2,342 
3,696 
22,389 
25,568 
33,713 
5,830 



2,007 
2,247 
3,542 
23,124 
25,386 
34,107 
6,223 



36,947 
1,781 
8,154 

51,368 

985 

7,871 

14,016 
8,636 



33,341 
99,043 

32,533 



2,551 
507 
980 



3,048 

10,332 
3,859 
3,662 
224 
17,052 
392 



10,531 
3,345 
3,263 
191 
17,490 
224 



31,498 
1,265 

7,553 
45,272 



532 
3,100 
44,299 
1,686 
12,659 
149,2 

19,604 
101,501 
29,403 
1,286 
1 19,598 
975 



34,396 
1.274 
7,174 

50,757 
959 
6,203 
7,620 
7,878 

393 
2,826 
43,033 



22,810 
95,698 
29,270 



t offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, 
j-e offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 



219 



Table 49.— Rural Arrests, Distribution by Age, 1978 

(2,348 agencies; 1978 estimated population 28,898,000] 



TOTAL 

Murder and nonnegligent 

manslaughter 

Forcible rape 

Robber^' 

Aggravated assault 

Burglary 

Larceny-theft 

Motor vehicle theft 

Violent crime^ 

Percent distribution* 

Property crime^ 

Percent distribution* 

Crime Index total 

Percent distribution' 

Other assaults 

Forgery and counterfeiting 

Embezzlement 

Stolen property; buymg, receiving, 

possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and commercialized 

Sex offenses (except forcible rape 

and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 

Gambling 

Offenses against family and 

children 

Driving under the influence 

Liquor laws 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly conduct 

Vagrancy 

All other offenses (except traffic) . 

Suspicion 

Curfew and loitering law violations 
Runaways 

See footnotes at end of table. 



2J05 
2,688 
4,694 
26340 
46,208 
51,935 
12,676 



9,070 
54,507 



8,493 
15,170 
9,555 



39326 
115,525 
35305 
1,263 
153,167 
1,149 
1,639 
16,038 



135 


2,170 


286 


2,402 


807 


3,887 


1,820 


24,720 


18,621 


27,587 


14,470 


37,465 



116 

254 
3,474 
2,495 
1,443 



1,283 

3.5 

10,927 



3,557 

202 

18,506 



36,756 
1,443 
8,036 

53,839 
1,035 



31,948 

1,061 

134,661 



88 


137 


206 


2,599 


4,400 


6.574 


16 


45 


38 


53 


100 


461 


1,049 


3,004 


6,376 


3,951 


6,073 


5,524 


1,021 


2,289 


4,974 


984 


1,485 


2,399 


52 


64 


72 


4,784 


6,025 


9,012 


66 


90 


99 


530 


359 





Me 49.— RunU Arrests, Distribution by Age, 


1978- 


Continued 






















Age 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25-29 


30-34 


35-39 


40^14 


45^9 


50-54 


55-59 


60-64 


65 and 


Not 
known 


TOTAL 


47,148 
5.1 


42.910 
4.6 


39,117 
4.2 


36,296 
3.9 


132.298 
14.2 


92,714 
9.9 


69,975 

7.5 


54,851 
5.9 


42,937 
4.6 


34,760 

3.7 


23.224 
2.5 


13330 
IS 


11,259 
12 


3444 


Pereenl distribution' 








urder and nonnegligent 
manslaughter 


113 

174 

354 

1,291 

2,427 

2,638 

564 


114 

157 

306 

1,267 

1,952 

2,379 

470 


93 
129 
282 
1,251 
1,628 
1,990 
363 


96 
140 
245 
1,215 
1,223 
1,714 
297 


403 
515 
681 
4,744 
3,698 
5,945 
1,054 


246 
316 
315 
3,464 
1,806 
3,569 
576 


238 
200 
191 

2,530 
974 

2,338 
332 


173 

136 

86 

1,810 

597 
1,668 

219 


120 
59 
49 
1,233 
395 
1,142 
134 


115 
41 

28 
982 
229 
856 

81 


67 
27 
8 
683 
113 
472 
37 


42 
17 
13 
346 

45 
324 
18 


60 
17 
8 
401 
45 
290 
7 


2 


bbery 


3 




9 










Dtor vehicle thefl 


13 








1,932 
5.3 

5,629 
5.1 


1.844 
5.1 

4,801 
4.3 


1,755 
4.8 

3,981 
3.6 


1,6% 
4.7 

3,234 
2.9 


6,343 

17.5 

10,697 

9.7 


4,341 

12.0 

5.951 

5.4 


3,159 
8.7 

3,644 
3.3 


2,205 
6.1 

2,484 
2.2 


1,461 
4.0 

1,671 
1.5 


1,166 
3.2 

1,166 
1.1 


785 

2.2 

622 

.6 


418 

1.2 

387 

.3 


486 

1.3 

342 

.3 


17 




(4) 


Property crime^ 


122 








7,561 


6,645 
4.5 


5,736 
3.9 


4,930 
3.4 


17,040 
11.6 


10,292 
7.0 


6,803 
4.6 


4,689 

3.2 


3,132 
2.1 


2.332 
1.6 


1,407 
1.0 


805 

.5 


828 
.6 






.1 






her assaults 


1,966 
86 

545 

2,830 

52 

472 
675 
521 

41 

148 

5,169 

38 

571 
9,270 

1,380 
4,881 
2.050 

42 
8,786 

64 


1,962 
89 
542 

2,989 
43 

442 
469 
455 

40 

173 

4,301 

28 

627 
8,826 

1,142 
4,399 
1,703 

64 
7,901 

70 


1,932 
78 
498 

3,064 
44 

372 
435 
448 

30 

131 

3,538 
39 

726 
8,135 

894 
4,099 

1,572 
58 

7,225 
63 


1,848 
66 
474 

3,147 
60 

353 
442 
441 

26 

113 
2,881 

713 
7,730 

765 
3,758 
1,480 

37 
6,955 

36 


7,204 

199 

1,558 

11,821 

194 

1,049 
1,184 
1,561 

68 

481 

8,203 

199 

2,957 
31.375 

2,533 
14,756 
5,133 
162 
24,467 
154 


5,143 
155 
947 

8,669 
158 

725 
805 
1,105 

44 

391 

3,030 

185 

2,316 
24.461 

1,676 
12,591 
3,521 
125 
16,289 
86 


3,658 
122 
533 

5,816 
119 

490 

455 
835 

30 

324 

1,129 

166 

1,563 
20,515 

1,349 
11,737 
2,617 
75 
11,603 
36 


2,740 
101 
419 

3,923 
139 

330 

271 
574 

10 

218 
553 
150 

1,004 
17,371 

1,233 
10,743 
2.077 
80 
8,191 
35 


1,913 

71 

278 

2,315 

49 

220 
211 
433 

12 

153 
329 
143 

577 
15,295 

940 
9,310 
1,634 

55 
5,836 

31 


1,293 

189 

1,482 

38 

142 
158 
360 

11 

122 
190 
93 

380 
13,056 

769 
8,484 
1,333 

59 
4,203 

25 


803 
24 
77 

886 
26 

63 
68 
223 

8 

98 
120 
85 

168 
9,160 

624 

5,773 

938 

33 

2,623 

17 


430 
19 
17 

455 
14 

37 
55 
149 

7 

66 

83 
62 

60 
5,586 

411 

3,482 

585 

29 

1,569 

9 


400 
18 

27 
282 

5 

37 
50 
146 

67 
58 
96 

38 
4.335 

377 
2.574 
469 
29 
1,404 
15 


29 




2 


rgery and counterfeiting 


13 


nbezzlement 


3 


jlen property; buying, receiving. 




ndalism 


25 


capons; carrying, possessing, etc. 
ostitution and commercialized 


9 

2 


X offenses (except forcible rape 

and prostitution) 

■ug abuse violations 

imbling 


6 

52 


Tenses against family and 


15 


iving under the influence 

quor laws 


2,620 

95 
95 




42 






1 other offenses (except traffic) .. 


386 


rfew and loitering law violations 
iiaways 





'Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

^Violent cnraes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
^Property cnraes are offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
■*Less than one-tenth of 1 percent. 



Table SO.— Rural Arrests of Persons under 15, 18, 21, and 25 Years of Age, 1978 

[2,348 agencies; 1978 estimated population 28,898,00O| 



Offense charged 


Grand 

total all 

ages 


1 Number of persons arrested 


Percent of total all ages 


Under 
15 


Under 
18 


Under 
21 


Under 
25 


Under 
15 


Under 
18 


Under 
21 


Und 
25 


TOTAL 


931,872 


28,462 


127361 


286,909 


452380 


3.1 


13.7 


30.8 










235 
2,688 
4,694 
26,540 
46,208 
51,935 
12,676 


25 

49 

86 

327 

5,542 

4,052 

1,387 


135 
286 
807 
1,820 
18,621 
14,470 
5.864 


423 
757 
2,125 
5,314 
31,029 
26,548 
8,511 


839 
1,357 
3312 
10,338 
38,259 
35,269 
10,205 


1.1 

1.2 
12.0 

7.8 
10.9 


5.9 
10.6 
17.2 

6.9 
40.3 
27,9 
46.3 


18.4 
28.2 
45.3 
20.0 
67.2 
51.1 
67.1 








Robbery 












Larceny-theft 




Motor vehicle theft 








Violent crimei 


36,227 
110,819 


487 
10,981 


3,048 
38,955 


8,619 
66,088 


15,846 
83,733 


13 
9.9 


8.4 
35.2 


23.8 
59.6 














147,046 


11,468 


42,003 


74,707 


99,579 


7.8 


28.6 


50.8 








Other assaults 


39,443 
2,008 
9,070 

54,507 
1,066 
8,493 

15,170 
9,555 

450 
3,480 
57,578 
1,521 
13,461 
205,412 

39326 
115,525 
35,505 
1,263 
153,167 
1,149 
1,639 
16,038 


535 
249 
121 
43 
2 
352 
2,620 
163 

122 
1,035 

26 

823 
253 
566 
53 
4,270 
54 
410 
5,205 


2,687 
565 

1,034 
668 
31 

1,767 

6,784 
806 

32 
426 
9,401 
75 
202 
4,285 

12,394 
4,009 
3,557 
202 
18,506 
250 
1,639 
16,038 


8,122 
937 
2,953 
6,827 
122 
3,754 
9,867 
2,295 

117 
989 

27,942 

196 

1,746 

27,677 

25,138 
18,843 
10.351 

414 
45,729 

506 
1,639 
16,038 


15,830 
1.256 
5,012 

18.857 

321 

5,393 

11,888 
4,160 

254 
1,554 
43,831 
342 
4,383 
61,638 

29319 
35,980 
17,156 

615 
76,596 

739 
1,639 
16.038 


1.4 
12.4 
13 

173 
1.7 

.9 

3.5 
1.8 
.3 
.2 
e) 

2.1 

.2 
1.6 
4.2 
2.8 
4.7 
25.0 
32.5 


6.8 
28.1 
11.4 

1.2 

2.9 
20.8 
44.7 

8.4 

7.1 
12.2 
16.3 
4.9 
1.5 
2.1 

31.5 
3.5 
10.0 
16.0 
12.1 
21.8 
1 00.0 
100.0 


20.6 
46.7 
32.6 
12.5 
11.4 
44.2 
65.0 
24.0 

26.0 
28.4 
48.5 
12.9 
13.0 
13.5 

63.9 
16.3 
29.2 
32.8 
29.9 
44.0 
100.0 
100.0 








Forgery and counterfeiting . . . 




Fraud 












Vandalism ...'.... ^ 




Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 








Sex offenses (except forcible rape and prostitution) 

Drug abuse violations 


44 


Gambling 








Driving under the influence 












Disorderly conduct 


-' 


Vagrancy 














64 











offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. 
; offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. 
3 of I percent. 



222 



able 51— Rural Arrests, Distribution by Sex, 1978 

,348 agencies; 1978 estimated population 28.898,000] 



OfTense charged 


Number of persons arrested 


Percent 
male 


Percent 
female 


Percent distribution' 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


TOTAL 


931,872 


818,894 


112,978 


87J» 


12.1 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 


urder and nonnegligent manslaughter 

Mcible rape 

obbery 

ggravated assault 

.rglary 

irceny-theft 

otor vehicle theft 


2,305 
2.688 
4,694 
26340 
4638 
51,935 
12,676 


l,%9 
2,668 
4,365 
23,798 
43,533 
43,343 
11,627 


336 
20 
329 

2.742 
2.675 
8.592 
1.049 


85.4 
99.3 
93.0 
89.7 
94.2 
83.5 
91.7 


14.6 
.7 

7.0 
10.3 

5.8 
16.5 

8.3 


.2 
.3 
.5 
2.8 
5.0 
5.6 
1.4 


.2 
.3 
.5 
2.9 
5.3 
5.3 
1.4 


' 


.3 

2.4 
2.4 
7.6 
.9 


Violent crime^ 


36,227 
110,819 


32,800 
98,503 


3.427 
12,316 


90.5 
88.9 


9.5 
11.1 


3.9 
11.9 


4.0 
12.0 


3.0 












147,046 


131,303 


15,743 


89.3 


10.7 


15.8 


16.0 


139 






her assaults 
rson 

argerv and counterfeiting 
aud 

mbeizlement 

olen property, buying, receiving possessing 
andalism 
capons carrying, possessing, etc 


39,443 
2,008 
9,070 

54,507 
1,066 
8,493 

15,170 
9,555 

450 
3,480 
57378 
1321 
13,461 
205,412 

39326 
1 15325 
35,505 
1063 
153,167 
1,149 
1,639 
16,038 


34,883 
1,800 
6,602 

34,032 

838 

7.664 

13.999 
9.063 

189 
3,322 
50,937 
1,407 
12,752 
192,900 

33.917 
108.547 
31.237 
1.097 
132.792 
1.003 
1.120 
7.490 


4,560 
208 

2.468 

20.475 

228 

829 

1,171 
492 

261 
158 
6.641 
114 
709 
12.512 

5,409 

6,978 

4,268 

166 

20,375 

146 

519 

8.548 


88.4 
89.6 
72.8 
62.4 
78.6 
90.2 
92.3 
94.9 

42.0 
95.5 
88.5 
92.5 
94.7 
93.9 

86.2 
94.0 
88.0 
86.9 
86.7 
87.3 
68.3 
46.7 


11.6 
10.4 

27.2 
37.6 
21.4 
9.8 

7.7 
5.1 

58.0 
4.5 

11.5 
7.5 
5.3 
6.1 

13.8 
6.0 
12.0 
13.1 
13.3 
12.7 
31.7 
53.3 


4.2 
.2 
1.0 
5.8 
.1 
.9 
1.6 
1.0 

C) 
.4 

6.2 
.2 

1.4 
22.0 

4.2 
12.4 
3,8 

16.4 

.2 
1.7 


4.3 

.8 
4,2 
.1 
.9 
1.7 
1.1 

(*) 
.4 
6.2 
.2 
1.6 
23.6 

13.3 
3.8 

16.2 

.1 
.9 


4.0 
.2 

2.2 

18.1 

.2 

.7 

1.0 
.4 




1 




5.9 


ambling 


.1 


ffenses against family and children 


.6 




11. 1 


^ 


4.8 


" , 


6.2 




3.8 




.1 




18.0 




.1 




.5 




7.6 


'' 





'Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 
^Violent cnmes are offenses of murder, forcible rape, robbery. 
'Property crimes arc offenses of burglary, larceny-theft, and m 
*Less than one-tenth of I percent. 



223 



Table 52.-Rural Arrests Trends, Sex, 1*77-1978 

[2,013 agencies; 1978 estimated population 26,233,000| 





Males 


Females 


Offense charged 


Total 


Under 18 


Total 


Under 18 




1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percent 
change 


1977 


1978 


Percer 
Chang 


TOTAL 


704,674 


748,752 


+ 6J 


94,245 


94,244 




9938 


105,167 


+5.9 


24.618 


23350 










Murder and nonnegligeni 
manslaughter 


1,790 
2,614 
4,206 
21,634 
40,079 
39,823 
10,025 


1,832 
2,503 
3,989 
22,245 
40,524 
39,774 
10,681 


+ 2.3 
-4.2 
-5.2 

+ 2.8 

-.1 
+ 6.5 


147 
289 
742 
1,472 
15,869 
11,497 
4,572 


106 
268 
686 
1,495 
16,494 
11,427 
4,856 


-27.9 
-7.3 
-7.5 
+ 1.6 
+ 3.9 
— .6 
+ 6.2 


336 
24 

321 
2,448 
2,459 
7,552 

918 


299 
17 

305 
2,604 
2,501 
7,935 

981 


-1 1.0 
-29.2 
-5.0 
+ 6.4 
+ 1.7 
+ 5.1 
+ 6.9 


12 

7 

89 

221 

I.IOl 

2,165 

541 


18 

5 

66 

230 

1,145 

2,175 

583 




Forcible rape 














+ ' 




+ ' 


Motor vehicle theft 


"•■ 




■^ 




30,244 
89,927 


30,569 
90,979 


+ 1.1 
+ 1.2 


2,650 
31,938 


2,555 
32,777 


-3.6 
+ 2.6 


3,129 
10,929 


3,225 
11,417 


+ 3.1 
+ 4.5 


329 
3,807 


319 
3,903 






~- 




+ ' 


Crime Index total . 


120,171 


121,548 


+ 1.1 


34,588 


35,332 


+ 2.2 


14,058 


14,642 


+ 4.2 


4,136 


4,222 






■^* 


Other assaults 


30,050 
1,532 
6,446 

29,583 
764 

6,795 
12,286 
7.267 

181 

3,338 
47,222 
1,596 
12,224 
143,265 

25,549 
98,729 
28,971 
1,292 
17,936 
1,146 
1,236 
8,241 


32,631 
1,609 
5,975 

31,854 
780 

7,095 
12,928 
8,173 

172 

3,070 
45,570 
1,238 
12,102 
181,652 

28,632 

92,847 

28,597 

987 

123,389 

838 

963 

6,940 


+ 8.6 
+ 5.0 
-7.3 
+ 7.7 

+ 4.4 
+ 5.2 
+ 12.5 

— 5.0 

-8.0 
-3.5 

— 22.4 
-1.0 

+ 26.8 

+ 12.1 
-6.0 
-1.3 

-23.6 
+ 4.6 

-26.9 

-22.1 

— 15.8 


1,956 
397 

777 
378 
29 

1,338 
5,755 
658 

6 

402 

7,619 

74 

180 
2,797 

8,048 
3,436 
2,959 
159 
13,212 
279 
1,236 
8,241 


2.118 
461 
749 
406 
22 

1,508 

5,954 

718 

12 

367 

7,134 

67 

160 
3,786 

8,182 

2,989 

2,702 

149 

13,525 

171 

963 

6,940 


+ 16.1 

— 3.6 
+ 7.4 

-24.1 

+ 12.7 
+ 3.5 
+ 9.1 

+ 100.0 

— 8.7 

— 6.4 
-9.5 

+ 35.4 

+ 1.7 
-13.0 

-8.7 
-6.3 
+ 2.4 
-38.7 
-22.1 
-15.8 


3,781 

171 

2,061 

16,272 

187 

711 
1,060 
411 

372 

208 

6,221 

176 

677 

9,089 

4,387 

6,631 

4,094 

218 

18,714 

221 

535 

9,274 


4,316 

172 

2,179 

19,514 

205 

776 
1,088 
463 

248 

151 

6,002 

107 

665 

12,000 

4,709 

6,196 

3,936 

147 

19,162 

115 

465 

8,024 


+ 14.1 

+ .6 
+ 5.7 
+ 19.9 
+ 9.6 

+ 9.1 

+ 2.6 
+ 12.7 

-33.3 

-27.4 
-3.5 
-39.2 

— 1.8 
+ 32.0 

+ 7.3 

— 6.6 
-3.9 

-32.6 
+ 2.4 
— 48.0 
-13.1 
-13.5 


377 
41 
177 
205 

5 

157 
446 
41 

15 

44 
1,525 
12 
62 
251 

2,284 
423 
703 
65 

3,840 
113 
535 

9,274 


433 
46 
231 
205 
4 

160 

442 
40 

15 

28 

1,405 

4 

37 

316 

2,349 
356 
561 
42 
3,965 
53 
465 
8,024 






+ U 




+ li 


Fraud 




Emberzlement . . . 




Stolen property; buying, receiving, 




Vandalism 


+ ' 


Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc 

Prostitution and commercialized 


-' 


Sex offenses (except forcible rape and 








Gambling 




Offenses against family and chUdren 


-40 




+ 2 




Disorderly conduct 




Vagrancy 








Suspicion (not included in touls) 

Curfew and loitering law violations 

Runaways 


-53 
— 13 
-13 



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227 



Table 54.-PoUce Disposition of JuvenUe Offenders Taken into Custody 

(1978 estimated population] 


1978 










Population group 


Total 1 


Handled 

within 

department 

and released 


Referred to 
juvenile 

Jurisdiction 


Referred to 
welfare 
agency 


Referred to 

other pohce 

agency 


Referred tc 
crmunal or 
adult court 


total population 189,895,000: 
Number 


1,770,807 
100.0 


648,282 
36.6 


989,209 
55.9 


34,095 
1.9 


31,417 
1.8 


67,80 




3 






TOTAL CITIES: 8,163 agencies; total 


1,439,127 
100.0 


541.020 
37.6 


787,685 

54.7 


"•?t 


24,599 
1.7 


56,13 


PereenI 


3 






Group I 

50 cities, 250,000 and over; population 31,468,000: 

Number 


355,003 
100.0 

172,217 
100.0 

215,780 
100.0 

250,729 
100.0 

246,027 
100.0 

199,371 
100.0 

772,630 
100.0 

98,937 
100.0 


102,873 
29.0 

67,942 
39.5 

89,111 
41.3 

100,457 
40.1 

102,768 
41.8 

77,869 
39.1 

323,669 
41.9 

27,680 
28.0 


231,653 
65.3 

95,610 

55.5 

109,194 
50.6 

131,462 
52.4 

120,938 
49.2 

98,828 
49.6 

387,0% 
50.1 

61,129 
61.8 


12,871 
3.6 

3,404 
2.0 

4,021 
1.9 

3,623 
1.4 

3,566 
1.4 

2,199 
1.1 

8,550 
1.1 

2,061 
2.1 


4.154 

1,790 
1.0 

5,566 
2.6 

5,086 
2.0 

4,177 
1.7 

3,826 
1.9 

14.431 
1.9 

2,890 
2.9 


3,45 


Percent 

Group II 

112 cities, 100,000 to 249,999; population 15,944,000: 

Number 

Percent 


1 

3,47 

2 


Group III 
270 cities, 50,000 to 99,999; population 18,483,000: 


7,88 


Percent 


3 


Group IV 

616 cities, 25,000 to 49,999; population 21,090,000: 

Number 


10. IC 




4 


Group V 

1,503 cities, 10,000 to 24,999; population 23,358,000: 

Number 

Percent 


14,51 
5 


Group VI 
5,612 cities under 10,000; population 20,462,000: 


16.64 




8 


Suburban Area^ 

5,163 agencies; population 82,899,000: 

Number 


38.88 


Percent 


5 


Rural Area 
2,483 agencies; population 26,379,000: 






5 






' Includes all olTenses except IrafTic and neglect cases. 

2 Because of rounding, the percentages may not add to total. 

3 Includes suburban city and county law enforcement agencies within 


metropolitan a 


reas. Excludes c 


X)re cities. Subu 


rban cities also 


mcluded in ot 


er city group 



228 



Ah a 2jam Enf orrf ment (if f irtr, my funJameniJ Jui^ ,. /» 

Jrrfr mankind; to iafe^uarj fivei ana properlu; lo protect tlie innocent aaainit 
deception, the weak against oppreJiion or intimidation, ana the peaceful 
against violence or disorder; and to respect the (constitutional rights of all 
men to liberty, etfualitg and Justice. 

It Uitll heep mg private life unSutlieJ as an example to all; maintain coura- 
geous calm in the face of danger, scorn, or ridicule; develop self-restraint; and 
oe constantly mindful of the uielfare of others. ^J4onest in thought and deed 
in both mu personal and of ficial life, .Jr will be exemplaru in obeuing the laws 
of the land and the regulations of mg department. Whatever .-f See or hear of 
a confidential nature or that is confided to me in mg officialcapacitg will oe 
kept ever secret unless revelation is necessarg in the performance of mg dutg. 

11 mtll never act officiousig or permit personal feelings, prejudices, animos- 
ities or friendships to influence mg decisions. lA/ith no compromise for crime 
and with relentless prosecution of criminals, Jf will enforce the law courteouslg 
and appropriatelg without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never emploging 
unnecessarg force or violence and never accepting gratuities. 

I rPrOgnt2P tL LJge of mg office as a sgmU of puUic faith, and 
.y accept it as a public trust to be held so long as J/ am true to the ethics of 
the police service. J/ will constantlg strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, 
dedicating mgself before Cfod to mg chosen profession . . . law enforcement. 



229 



SECTION V 
LAW ENFORCEMENT PERSONNEL 



Law Enforcement Employees 

As of October 31, 1978, 11,265 agencies, covering 
more than 203 million inhabitants of the United 
States, reported a total of 431,000 full-time law 
enforcement officers for a rate of 2.1 per 1,000 
inhabitants. When full-time civilians were included, 
the total count of law enforcement employees rose to 
542,000 for a national rate of 2.7 per 1,000 inhabi- 
tants. 

Caution should be exercised in using rates for 
comparative purposes since a wide variation exists in 
the responsibilities of various law enforcement agen- 
cies throughout the country. Just as certain condi- 
tions cause the extent and type of crime to vary from 
place to place, the requirements for types of police 
service are based upon the conditions present in a 
given community. For example, the need for law 
enforcement service in a community having a highly 
mobile or seasonal population differs from a locale 
whose population is relatively stable. In addition, a 
small community situated between two large cities 
may require a greater number of law enforcement 
personnel than a similarly sized community having 
no urban centers nearby. The crime conditions of the 
former are for the most part dictated by its geograph- 
ic location. 

The figures set forth in detailed tabular presenta- 
tions on law enforcement employees represent na- 
tional averages; they should be used as guides or 
indicators, not as recommended or desirable police 
strengths. Adequate manpower for a specific commu- 
nity can only be determined by a careful study and 
analysis of the various factors which contribute to 
the requirements for law enforcement service in that 
locality. 

The functions of sheriffs also vary widely in 
different sections of the country. In certain areas the 
sheriffs' responsibilities are limited almost exclusively 
to civil functions and/or the administration of the 



county jail facilities. Likewise, state police 
highway patrol agencies may have vastly differi 
responsibilities from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. 

Many cities in the United States operate w 
substantially fewer law enforcement employees p 
capita than the national average. For example, t 
average for cities in the 10,000 to 49,999 populati 
range was 2.0 law enforcement employees per 1,0 
inhabitants. This low average rate for smaller cities 
contrasted by the fact that the average rate for lai 
cities, those with populations of 250,000 or more, w 
substantially above the national average, 3.4 1; 
enforcement employees per 1,000 inhabitants. 

Nationally, suburban areas averaged 2.3 full-tii 
law enforcement employees per 1,000 inhabitan 
For sheriffs' or county police departments, 
average rate was 2.0 full-time employees. 

Geographically, the South Atlantic and Mid< 
Atlantic Divisions recorded the highest rates of 1; 
enforcement employees per 1,000 inhabitants, 
and 2.8, respectively. The fewest employees per 1,0, 
population were reported by the West North Centi 
and West South Central Divisions, each with 
average rate of 2. 1 . 

Sworn Personnel 

Rates based on sworn law enforcement personi 
only (excluding civilians) showed the average for 
cities was 2.1 officers per 1,000 inhabitants. T 
average rate of sworn personnel ranged from 1 .6 
cities with populations between 10,000 and 49,999 
2.8 in cities with 250,000 or more inhabitants. F 
sheriffs' or county poHce departments, the averaj 
rate was 1.5 per 1,000 population. In city agencit 
males represented 97 percent of all sworn personni 
while in suburban agencies they accounted for 
percent and in county sheriffs' and police depai 
ments 92 percent. 



230 



POLICE EMPLOYEE DATA 

AVERAGE NUMBER OF POLICE DEPARTMENT EMPLOYEES, AND 
RANGE IN NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES, PER 1,000 INHABITANTS 



BY POPULATION GROUPS, 1978 
9.8 9.8 



6.9 



mm 



mm 



4.7 



iii 



iii 



4.4 



'mm 
iii 



mm 



5.5 5.5 






wm 



mm 
ii: 



iii 



mm mm 



ALL CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES CITIES 

CITIES 250,000 100,000 50,000 25,000 10,000 LESS 

AND TO TO TO TO THAN 

OVER 249,999 99,999 49,999 24,999 10,000 



231 



Table 55.— Full-time Law Enforcement Employees', 
Groups, October 31, 1978 

(1978 eslimaled population) 



Number and Rate per 1.000 Inhabitants, Geographic Divisions and Populado 



Geographic division 



Population Group 



population 
41,342,000) 



Group II 
(116 cities, 

100,000 to 
249,999; 
population 
16,617,000) 



Group III 
(269 cities, 
50,000 to 
99,999; 
population 
18,394,000) 



Group IV 

(626 cities, 
25.000 to 

49,999; 
population 
21,407,000) 



TOTAL: 8,434 cities; population 143,275.000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 



New England: 591 cities; population 10379,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

Middle Atlandc: 1,756 cities; population 
29,123.000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

Interquartile range 

East North Central: 1^)1 cides; population 
27.982,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

West North Central: 693 cities; population 
10313,000: 

Number of pc iice employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

South Atlantic: 1364 cities; population 15,881,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1.000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

East South Central: 725 cities; population 7,621,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

West South Central: 786 cities; population 
15354,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

Mounuta: 373 cities; population 6,767,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

Pacific: 615 cities: population 19,656,000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 



25,021 

2.4 
1.6-23 



68,770 

2.5 
13-2.4 



32,619 

2.1 
1.6-2.6 



8,144 

2.2 
1.5-2.6 



14,776 

4.1 
3.0-5.0 



2.1-2.8 
6.108 



20,407 

2.8 
2.4-2.8 



1.8-2.2 
8,079 



5,753 
2.5 



1.6-2.1 
2314 



5,095 

2.0 
1.8-2.2 



.6-2.0 


1.5-2.0 


1,463 


2,193 


2.0 
.6-2.3 


1.9 

1.5-2.2 


7.136 


5.396 



County 



4387 ageDdes; population 71,059,000: 

N umber of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 inhabitants 
Interquartile range 



County: 2,782 agencies; population 59,748.000: 

Number of police employees 

Average number of employees per 1,000 
Interquartile range 



'Includes civilians. 

^OiUy one city this size in geographic division. 
^Includes suburban city and county law enforcement ag 
Populauon figures rounded to the nearest thousand. Ail rates \ 



Me 56.— Full-ttme Law Enforcement Officers, Number 
tober 31. 1978 



and Rale per 1,000 Inhabitants, Geographic Division and Population Group, 



Geographic division 



Population Group 



Group II 
(116 cilies, 
100,000 to 
249,999; 

16.617,000) 



Group III 
(269 cities. 
50,000 to 
99,999; 
population 
18,394,000) 



Group IV 

(626 cilies, 

25,000 to 

49,999; 

21,407,000) 



Group V 
(1,529 cities, 
10,000 to 
24,999; 
population 
23,651,000) 



TAL: 8,434 cities; 
Number of police onicers 
Average number of offlcers 
Interquartile range 



« England: 591 cities; population 10,579,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 
inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

Idle Adandc: 1,756 cities: populaUoo 29.123,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 
inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

t North Central: 1,531 cities; population 
7,982.000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

St North Central: 693 cities; population 
0313,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

ith Atlantic: 1364 cities; populadon 15,881,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

« South Central: 725 cides: populadon 7,621.000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

St Soudi Cend^: 786 cides; populadon 
5354.000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 

inhabitants 

Inlerquarlile range 

iuntain: 373 cities; populadon 6,767,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per I,0(X) 

inhabitants 

Interquartile range 

:mc: 615 cides; populadon 19,656.000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1.000 
inhabitants 

Interquartile range 



lJ-2.1 

71.278 



58347 

2.1 
13-2.0 



13-1.9 
39.026 



14,440 

1.9 
15-2.6 



3.682 


4,350 


4,309 


2.6 
2.4-2.9 


2.0 
1.8-2.2 


1.9 
1.6-2 1 


3,464 


5,711 


7,055 


2.6 
1.8-3.3 


2.0 
1.5-2.3 


1.9 

1.3-2.3 


4,825 


6,118 


6,796 


1.8 
1.6-2.0 


1.5 
I.2-I.8 


1.4 
1.I-I.7 


1,723 


1,529 


2,308 


1.5 
1.3-1.8 


1.4 
1.3-1.5 


1.3 
1.I-I.5 


6,387 


3,259 


4,605 


2.1 
1.9-2.2 


2.2 
1.9-25 


2.0 
1.7-2.3 


2.287 


511 


1,801 



3,839 

1.5 
1.4-1.8 



1.2-1.8 
5318 



1.1-1.7 
4,141 



4,712 

1.8 
.5-2.0 



2,977 
1.5 



Suburban and County 



urban:' 4.587 agencies; populadon 71,059.000: 

Number oi police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants 
Interquartile range 



County: 2.782 agencies; populadon 59.748,000: 

Number of police officers 

Average number of officers per 1,000 inhabitants 
Interquartile range 



•Only one city this size in geographic division. 
^Includes suburban city and county law enforcement 
Population figures rounded to the nearest thousand. All 



opolitan areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban cilies are also included in other city groups, 
the population before roimding. 



233 



Table 57.— Law Enforcement Employees, Percent Male and Female, October 31, 

(11,216 agencies; 1978 estimated population 203,023,000] 





Total 


police employees 


Folic 


officers (sworn) 


Other 


police employees 


Population group 


Total 


Percent 
male 


Percent 
female 


Total 


Percent 
male 


Percent 
female 


Total 


Percent 
male 


Percen 

female 


TOTAL CITIES 


359313 


85.7 


14J 


294379 


96.8 


32 


64,734 


35.1 


6c 






Group I 






















142,635 
724>15 
38337 


85.8 
87.4 
85.0 


14.2 
12.6 
15.0 


117,079 
61,292 
30,842 


96.1 
96.3 
95.9 


3.9 

3.7 


25,556 
11,623 
7,495 


38.6 
40.6 
40.2 








(500 000 - 999 999) 


5 






Group II 






































J 


Group III 




















(50,000 - 99,999) 


38,016 


85.3 


14.7 


30,768 


97.5 


2.5 


7,248 


33.2 


6. 


Group IV 




















(25 000 - 49 999) 


41,932 


85 8 


14 2 


34 577 


97 7 


2 3 


7 355 


29 9 


7 


Group V 




















(10,000 - 24,999) 


46,675 


86.5 


13.5 


38,815 


97.6 


2.4 


7,860 


31.9 


6 


Group VI 




















(Under 10,000) 


51.731 


86.0 


14.0 


42,298 


96.9 


3.1 


9,433 


37.2 


6 


Suburban 

County 


161,895 
117,248 


83.4 
79.8 


16.6 
20.2 


128,977 
90,237 


95.4 
91.9 


4.6 
8.1 


32,918 
27,011 


36.5 
39.2 


6 
6 



Table 58.-CiviUan Law Enforcement Employees, Percent of Total, Population Group. October 31, 1978 




Population group 


Percent 
civilian 
employees 


Population group 


Percent 

civilian 
employee 




18.0 


Group III (50000 to 99 999) 
Group IV (25 000 to 49 999) 
Group V (10,000 to 24 999) 
Group VI (under 10 000) 

Suburban 
County .. 










17.9 
15.9 
19.6 
20.5 
19.0 


1 






(500000 to 999 999) 




(250 000 to 499 999) 


2 











Civilian Employees 

During 1978, 18 percent of all city law enforce- 
ment personnel were civilian employees. In suburban 
areas they represented 20 percent of the total 
strength and in sheriffs' and cmnty police depart- 



ments 23 percent. Civilian employees in law enforc 
ment agencies can be used effectively to free swoi 
officers for more imperative police duties; th< 
constitute an important aspect of the total la 
enforcement effort. 



234 



le 59.-FiUI-tiiiie State PoUce and Highway Patrol Employees, 


October 31, 1978 












State 


Total 


Police 
officers 


Civilians 


Miles of 
pnmary 
highway 
per 
police 
officer 


State 

vehicle 
registra- 
tion per 
police 
officer 


State 


Total 


PoUce 
officers 


CivUians 


Miles of 
pnmary 
highway 
per 
police 
officer 


State 
motor 
vehicle 
registra- 
tion per 
police 
officer 


Total 


6SJ35 


45.908 


19,427 


lOJ 


3,114 


Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North CaroUna 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 


525 
211 
263 
2.655 
515 

3.902 
1,388 
126 
1,865 
1,147 

1.130 

4,483 

191 

875 
212 

1.172 

4,318 

453 

381 

1.703 

1,299 
815 
637 
175 


406 
155 
196 

1,78! 
357 

3,343 

1,093 

103 

1.098 

572 

960 

3.678 

156 

748 
177 

781 
2,461 
418 
258 
1,216 

784 
549 
485 
142 


119 
56 
67 
874 
158 

559 
295 

23 
767 
575 

170 
805 

35 
127 
35 

391 
1,857 
35 
123 
487 

515 
266 
152 

33 


24.3 
14.9 
10.4 
1.2 
14.8 

4.5 
12.5 
68.7 
17.5 
21.4 

5.1 

4.7 
5.7 
13.4 
51.0 

12.4 
28.4 
13.3 
9.8 

7.4 

8.8 
10.8 
23.5 
43.5 










1,104 
412 

1,342 

592 

6,722 

772 
1,301 

566 
1,710 
1,358 

200 
2,514 
1,475 
782 
557 

1,490 

1.127 

456 

2,050 

1,425 

3,497 
675 
836 

1.615 
316 


660 
282 
845 
444 
5.044 

551 
908 
433 
1,167 
761 

192 
1,871 
953 
563 

414 

951 
864 
326 
1,523 
1,007 

2,200 
499 
561 
752 
220 


444 
130 
497 
148 
1,678 

221 
393 
133 
543 
597 

8 
643 
522 
219 
143 

539 
263 
130 
527 
418 

1,297 
176 
275 
863 
96 


16.2 
14.4 

7.1 
36.0 

3.0 

14.1 
1.3 
1.1 
10.5 
23.9 

26.0 
9.1 
11.8 
18.0 
25.3 

4.9 

5.7 

12.2 

.7 

2.8 

4.3 
24.1 
18.5 
10.5 
30.4 


4,051 
913 
1,839 
3,205 
2,%6 

3,925 
2,301 
864 
5,223 
4,594 

3,738 
3,667 
3,763 
3,947 
4,572 

2,576 
2,803 
2,204 
1.699 
3,495 

2,721 
5,638 
2.663 
4,059 
3,298 


2.975 


ka 






2.874 




2.475 


fomia 


2.541 




2,312 




3,732 








6.835 




4.015 


° 


1.850 




2.203 


°" 


Rhode Island 


4.291 


*"" 


South Carohna 


2.483 








Tennessee 

fexas 


3.836 






''*"* 


Utah 


2.173 


°f ■ ' 




1.242 






2.678 






3.692 




West Virginia 


2.070 


" 


Wisconsin 

Wyoming 


5.499 


SIS pp 




*°"" 











The responsibUit.es of the vanous state pohce and highway patrol agencies range from full law enforcement respons.bUilies to traffic patrol only. The miles of pnmary 
,way from "Highway Statistics. 1977' pSbUshed by iTe US Department of TransponaUon refers lo highways that have been officially designated by states as the 
mary system," or some similar term. The catena for selecung these highways vary among the states 

State motor vehicle registration data include automobiles, buses, and trucks. 

Any companson of these data from state to stale must take these factors and the factors hsted on Page > 



) considerauon. 



235 



Table 60.— Number of FuU-ttme Law Enforcemeiit Employees, Cities 25,000 and over in Population, October 31, 1978 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female Male Female 



tiber of law enforcement employee 



Male Female Male Femal 



Anniston 

Auburn 

Bessemer 

Birmingham 

Decatur 

Dothan 

Florence 

Gadsden 

Huntsville' 

Mobile 

Montgomery 

Phenix City 

Prichard 

Tuscaloosa 

ALASKA 

Anchorage 

Fairbanks 

ARIZONA 

Flagstaff 

Glendale 

Mesa 

Phoenix 

Scottsdale 

Tucson 

Yuma 

ARKANSAS 

El Dorado 

Fayetteville 

Fort Smith 

Hot Springs 

Jacksonville 

Jonesboro 

Little Rock 

North Little Rock 

Pine Bluff 

West Memphis 

CALIFORNIA 

Alameda 

Alhambra 
Anaheim 
Antioch 
Arcadia 

Bakersfield 

Baldwin Park 

Bell Gardens 

Belmont 

Berkeley 

Beveily Hills 

Brea 

Buena Park 

Burbank 

Burlingame 

Campbell 

Carlsbad 

Chico 

Chula Vista 
Clare mont 
Clovis 

See footnote at end of table 



g 








2 








2 




3 












12 




4 




2 




6 












2 




1 








4 









CALIFORNIA— Continued 

Compton 

Concord 

Costa Mesa 

er City 

Cypress 

Daly City 

Davis 

Downey 

El Cajon 

El Monte 

Escondido 

Fairfield 

Fontana 

Fountain Valley 

Fremont 

Fresno 

Fullerton 

Gardena 

Garden Grove 

Glendale 

Glendora 

Hawthorne 

Hayward 

Huntington Beach 

Huntington Park 

Inglewood 

Irvine 

La Habra 

La Mesa 

Livermore 

Lodi 

Lompoc 

Long Beach 

Los Altos 

Los Angeles 

Los Gatos 

Manhattan Beach 

Menio Park 

Milpitas 

Modesto 

Monrovia 

Montebello 

Monterey 

Monterey Park 

Mountain View 

National City 

Newark 

Newport Beach 

Novato 

Oakland 

Oceanside 

Ontario 

Oxnard 

Palm Spnngs 

Palo Alto 

Pasadena 

Petaluma 

Pittsburg 

Placentia 

Pleasanton 

Pomona 

Redding 

Redlands 

Redondo Beach 



3' 


II 


1 


3 


1 


8 




6 


2 


16 




15 


3 


9 




9 



288 


195 


65 


54 


209 


157 


76 


52 


80 


53 


64 


47 


73 


46 


62 


48 


42 


30 


795 


566 


32 


25 


649 


6,815 


34 


26 



236 



FuU-tiine Law Enforcement Employees, Cities 25,000 and over in Population, Octol>er 31, 1978— Continued 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female Male Female 



Number of law enforcement employe' 



Male Female Male 







98 


126 


67 


57 



CONNECTICUT- 



Glastonbury . 
Greenwich . . . 
Groton Town 

Hartford 

Manchester . . 

Meriden 

Middlelown .. 
Naugatuck . . . 
New Britain . 



Ha 



Newmgton .... 
New London . 

Norwalk 

Norwich 

Shelton 

SouthingtoD . . . 

Stamford 

Stratford 

Torrington . . . . 
Trumbull 

Wallingford ... 
Watcrbury . . . . 
West Hartford 
West Haven .. 

Westport 

Wethersfield .. 
Windsor 



Newark . 
Wilmingtc 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBU 



Washington 



Boca Raton 

Boynton Beach 

Bradenton 

Clearwater 

Coral Gables 

Daytona Beach 

Deerfield Beach 

Delray Beach 

Dunedm 

Fort Lauderdale 

Fort Myers 

Fort Pierce 

Gamesville 

Hallandale 

Hialeah 

Hollywood 

Jacksonville 

Lakeland 

Lake Worth 

Largo 

LauderhiU 

Margate 

Melbourne 

Miami Beach 

Miramar 

North Miami 

North Miami Beach 

Ocala 

Orlando 



2 


3 




8 


12 


24 




7 


1 


2 


5 


31 


2 


3 




2 


2 


4 


1 


2 




4 




2 




* 



84 


55 


6 


71 


56 


4 


66 


52 




109 


76 




1,012 


648 


50 


279 


203 


10 


71 


51 


2 


100 


79 


4 


86 


74 


3 


93 


69 


3 


557 


373 


22 



Table 60.— Number of Full-time Law Enforeement Employees, Cities 25,000 and over in Population, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



nber of law enforcement employees 



Male Female Male 



Number of law enforcement employe 



Male Feinale Male Fems 



FLOIUDA— CoDlinued 



Panama City 


82 


Pembroke Pines 


79 


Pensacola 




Pmellas Park 


42 


Plantation 


% 






Riviera Beach 


82 




649 






Sunrise Village 


100 


Tallahassee 


181 






xSiie::::::::::::::::::::::::: 


60 


West Palm Beach 


201 


GEORGU 




Albany 


192 


Athens 


138 




1,379 


Augusta 


178 


Columbus 


412 






East Point 




GnfTin 


56 


La Grange 


68 


Macon 


287 




107 


Rome 


82 




297 


Valdosta 


85 


Warner Robins 


74 


HAWAII 




Hilo 


122 


Honolulu 




IDAHO 




Boise 


186 


Idaho Falls 


80 


Lewiston 


53 


Nampa 


42 


Pocatello 


83 


Twin Falls 


55 


ILLINOIS 




Addison 


60 


Alton 


71 


Arlington Heights 


97 


Aurora 


188 


Belleville 


71 


Berw%n 


65 


Bloomington 


75 


Bolingbrook 


55 


Burbank 


34 


Calumet City 


66 


Carprntersville 


49 


Champaign 


104 


Chicago 


14,324 


Chicago Heights 


107 


Cicero 


113 


Danville 


89 


Decatur 


141 


De Kalb 


53 


Des Plaines 


98 


Dolton 


39 


Downers Grove 


63 



ILUNOIS- 

East Saint Louis . 

Elgin 

Elk Grove Village 

Elmhurst 

Elmwood Park ... 

Evanston 

Freeport 

Galesburg 

Glen Ellyn 

Glenview 

Granite City 

Hanover Park 

Highland Park 

Hoffman Estates . 

Joliet 

Kankakee 

Lansing 

Lombard 

Maywood 

Morton Grove 

Mount Prospect . . . 

Naperville 

Niles 

Normal 

Northbrook 

North Chicago 

Oak Lawn 

Oak Park 

Palatine 

Park Forest 

Park Ridge 

Pekin 

Rockford 

Rock Island 

Schaumburg 

Skokie 

South Holland 

Spnngfield 

Urbana 

Waukegan 

Wheaton 

WUmette 



Anderson 

Bloomington . 

Columbus 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Evansville 

Fort Wayne . 
Gary 



Highland 

Indianapohs ... 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

La Porte 

Lawrence 

Marion 

Merrillville .... 
Michigan City 

Mishawaka 

Muncie 

New Albany .. 





12 


14 






10 


27 


15 




3 


91 


89 




2 




10 




2 




2 




2 




4 




9 



Me 60.-Nuinber of FuU-tln 


^ Law Enforcement Employees. Cities 25,000 and over in Popuiati 


»n, Octol)er 31 


1978- 


-Continued 




Numbe 


r of law enforcement employees | 




Number of law enforcement employees 


Cily by Stale 




OfTicers | 


Civilians | 


City by State 


Total 


OfTicers | 


Civilians 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 




Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


INDIANA-ContlDued 


79 
290 
125 

55 

41 

50 

53 
203 

53 
108 
188 
415 

92 

54 

56 

43 

65 

36 
157 
161 

47 
66 

448 
90 
45 
82 
48 

123 
46 
69 
41 

310 

514 

50 
85 
121 
45 

452 
916 

49 
114 

70 

104 
630 
120 
51 
58 
95 
151 
126 
136 
70 
1,898 
473 
46 


72 
250 
108 

45 

30 

34 

42 
150 

45 

89 
132 
336 

79 

47 

44 

47 

31 
115 
138 

33 
52 
302 
72 
34 
55 
42 
94 
34 
57 
31 
219 
382 

47 
68 
95 
37 
38 
326 
681 
41 
85 
63 

86 
491 
93 
48 
46 
80 
111 
110 
103 
54 
1,478 
355 
36 


6 


2 
1 

2 


5 

33 
14 

10 
11 
8 
10 

32 

7 
11 
37 
41 

9 

6 

9 

5 

2 
32 
16 

11 
9 

85 
10 

7 
16 

5 
17 

7 
7 
45 
82 

14 

17 
3 
1 

63 

150 

4 

23 
6 

60 

15 
1 
6 
1 

30 
5 

20 

8 

148 

65 


MAINE 


80 
90 
167 

105 
3,912 

63 

78 

81 
105 

26 
47 
94 

65 

67 

75 

57 

2,934 

85 

214 

156 

319 

51 

130 

70 

124 

264 

86 

117 

65 

90 

121 

159 

63 

60 

208 

195 

138 

51 

135 

62 

61 

63 

65 

56 

299 

224 

67 

63 

93 

104 

79 

248 

56 

124 

96 

156 

395 

50 

98 

50 

147 


64 
75 
131 

88 
3,264 
60 
71 
66 
84 

24 

40 

84 

66 

65 

63 

72 

53 

2,050 

77 

190 

141 

283 

48 

124 

67 

120 

226 

79 

109 

59 

87 

112 

152 

57 

52 

185 

180 

125 

48 

129 

60 

54 

60 

61 

52 

249 

197 

58 

59 

89 

94 

68 

221 

52 

115 

88 

148 

340 

46 

92 

47 

139 


1 
2 

4 
73 

2 

4 

1 


11 
4 
12 

208 

4 
9 


4 




Lewiston 

Portland 


10 






IOWA 


MARYLAND 

Annapolis 


12 
367 


" , , 






Baltimore City Sheriff 




rlineton 


1 

5 

5' 

8 
8 

2 

2 


7 

" "16 
1 
3 

30 

2 


3 


dar Falls • •■ 


Frederick 


7 
11 


dar Rapids 




MASSACHUSETTS 




uncil Bluffs 








s Moines 


2 






1 
1 
52 

2 

2 
9 

3' 


3 

2 

1 
369 
4 
7 
4 
11 

1 

2 
14 

2 
3 
2 




rl Dodge 


Andover 




vaCUy 


Arlington 


2 








»son City 


2 

35 

67 
10 

54 


7 
3 
9 

5 

3 
3 
57 
4 

9 

11 

6 

3 
2 
41 
35 

6 

3 

46 
50 

2 
3 

5 

12 
2 

2 

7 
8 
7 
10 
3 
218 
44 










2 




ux City 














?°*'°" ^ 




KANSAS 




15 




9 


iDona 


r K H 




tchinson 


"J "f^ J 
Lhelms or 


2 


nsas City 




3 




Jr ""P** 




avenworth 


P^ m"" 


2 






20 






5 




' ? 


5 


airie Village 


ramingnam 


4 






3 




u r' b 


2 

2 

1 

3 
3 
2 

9 
15 

2 

1 

3 

2 

8 

1 
2 

1 


1 
3 
12 

3 

3 

2 
19 

7 

1 

2 
3 
7 
14 

5 
3 
1 
19 

1 
1 


6 




Lawrence 


3 


iS^ ;:;:;:::::::::::::::::::;;: 


5 




Lexington 


4 
8 




I vnn 


12 




Sa^en 


( 


jwling Green 




2 


Medford 


: 


wing on 






enderson 




5 


op ins 


Milton 


2 


Xing on 
Duisville 


Natick 


: 






2 


'"* ° 


New Bedford 


22 






5 


"^^ 


N th 


7 






2 


LOUISIANA 




2 




Pittsfield 


( 






4 




Quincy 


IC 




Randolph 


2 


"^""^ 






""""^ 








SomervUle 








2 


ake Charles 


Stoughton 




'°°'^°' : 


Taunton 






Wakefield 










iHi-11 









239 



Table 60.— Number of FuU-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Cities 25,000 and over in Population, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female Male Female 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female Male 



MASSACHUSETTS-Con. 

Watertown 

Wellesley 

Westfield 

West Springfield 

Weymouth 

Wobum 

Worcester 

MICHIGAN 

Allen Park 

Ann Arbor 

Battle Creek 

Bay City 

Bloomfield Township 

Burton 

Canton Township 

Clinton Township 

Dearborn 

Dearborn Heights 

Detroit 

East Detroit 

East Lansing 

Farminglon Hills 

Ferndale 

Flmt 

Flmt Township 

Garden City 

Grand Rapids 

Highland Park 

Holland 

Inkster 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Kalamazoo Township 

Kentwood 

Lansing 

Lincoln Park 

Livonia 

Madison Heights 

Marquette 

Midland 

Monroe 

Mount Morris Township 

Muskegon 

Oak Park 

Pontiac 

Portage 

Port Huron 

Redford Township 

Romulus Township 

Roseville 

Royal Oak 

Saginaw 

Saginaw Township 

Saint Clair Shores 

Shelby Township 

Southfield 

Southgate 

Sterling Heights 

Taylor 

Trenton 

Warren 

Waterford Township 

West Bloomfield Township ... 

Westland 

Wyandotte 

Wyoming 

Ypsilanti 





3 




12 


1 


57 


3 


6 


770 


254 




5 


2 


7 


2 


6 




10 


33 


51 




2 



Blaine 

Bloommgton 

Brooklyn Center 

Brooklyn Park 

Bumsville 

Coon Rapids 

Crystal 

Duluth 

Edina 

Fridley 

Mankato 

Maple wood 

Minneapolis 

Minnetonka 

Moorhead 

Richfield 

Rochester 

Roseville 

Saint Cloud 

Saint Louis Park 

Saint Paul 

Winona 

Biloiu . 

Columbiis 

Greenville 

Gulfport 

Hattiesburg 

Jackson 

Mendian 

Pascagoula 

Vicksburg 

MISSOURI 

Cape Girardeau 

Columbia 

Ferguson 

Florissant 

Gladstone 

Independence 

Jefferson City 

Joplin 

las City 

Kirkwood 

Raytown 

Saint Joseph 

Sedalia 

Springfield 

University City 

Webster Groves 

MONTANA 

igs 

Bozeman 

:-Silver Bow County 
Great Falls 

Missoula 

NEBRASKA 

Bellevue 

Fremont 





3 




3 












23 




5 




2 
1 




1 
26 




3 








1 


,■ 


"• 



raMe M.-Number of FuU-tin 


K Law Enforeement Employees, Cities 25,000 and over in Population, Octol>er 31 


1978-Continued 




Number of law enforcement employees || 




Number of law enforcement em 


>loyees 


City by State 




Omcers 


Civihans || 


City by Sute 


Total 


omcers 1 


Civihans 




Male Female 


Male 


Female 




Male 


Female 


Male 


Female 


NEBRASKA-Conttnued 


49 
41 
299 

47 
677 

1,022 
144 
330 
89 

71 
190 
147 

60 

56 

343 
207 
83 
57 
138 
77 
57 
400 
138 
150 
60 
40 
219 
88 
270 
175 
343 
62 
56 
83 
69 
74 
84 

162 
151 
50 
176 
65 
896 
122 
93 
134 
50 
96 
97 
121 
78 
1,722 
150 
110 
70 
116 
118 
116 


42 

33 
217 

27 
533 

553 

98 
244 

61 

54 
166 
126 

48 

44 

269 

189 

78 

51 

112 

59 

45 

362 

112 

141 

50 

33 

110 

71 

257 

145 

314 

57 

49 

78 

59 

46 

61 

102 

134 

144 

41 

151 

54 

883 

115 

83 

127 

46 

73 

86 

101 

64 

1,447 

121 

98 

67 

91 

109 

91 






7 

7 
59 

8 
98 

240 
35 
55 
18 

12 
12 

17 

5 
7 

17 
10 

1 

6 
14 
12 

22 
10 
7 
5 
2 
50 
14 
10 
27 
12 
4 
4 

7 

7 
7 

17 
5 
4 

16 

10 
7 
5 

10 
7 
3 

11 
9 

12 

11 
199 

20 
3 

14 
7 
9 


NEW JERSEY-Conanued 

Parsippany-Troy Hills 

Passaic 


101 
215 
484 

49 
113 
115 

92 
140 

79 

52 

78 

90 
425 
167 
151 
117 
121 

64 
109 
101 

67 
179 

57 
653 
43 
84 
112 
94 
84 

441 
154 
40 
70 
156 
48 
1,210 
13 
28 
148 
123 
22 
100 
34 
97 
84 
53 
25 
54 
122 
52 
91 
56 
71 
83 
52 
211 
64 
219 
29,443 
183 
54 


83 
159 
424 

38 

84 
109 

76 
115 

74 

47 

67 

79 
346 
137 
133 

96 
107 

56 
106 

95 

52 

158 

36 
444 
29 
56 
70 
66 
57 

381 
138 
39 
62 
148 
39 
1,077 

27 
136 
102 
15 
80 
32 
93 
80 
43 
21 
50 
104 
51 
88 
46 
63 
76 
50 
171 
54 
172 
23.869 
163 
51 
54 
88 


2 

6 

i 

2 


7 
31 
30 

6 
11 

1 
5 
2 


11 


jrand Island 


1 
5 
2 
17 

24 
8 
9 
4 

2 
3 

3 
3 


18 
10 
29 

205 

3 
22 
6 

3 
9 

3 
4 

5 

54 
8 
4 






Paterson 


24 




Pemberton Township 


5 




Pennsauken 






Perth Amboy 


15 






18 


^ Vegas Metropolitan Police 


Rahway 

Ridgewood 

Sayreville 


3 


Department Jurisdiction 




" 


7 




Teaneck Township 

Trenton 


11 




1 


27 
13 

7 

3 
3 










Umon City 


17 


NEW HAMPSHIRE 


Union Township 


11 
10 






11 


^"'^°^'' 


Westfield 






West New York 


3 




West Orange 


21 
16 

1 


4 
11 

50 
3 
7 
6 
9 

12 

36 
6 


5 




Wilhngboro Township 


11 








NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 


NEW MEXICO 
Alamogordo 










Albuquerque 








11 




1 

2 

5 


5 

16 
16 

2 
5 
5 
58 
3 

2 
12 

3 










34 






15 






14 




NEW YORK 

Albany 




Clifton 

Cranford Township 


23 






10 




, 




East Brunswick Township 


Auburn 


16 


8 
5 
46 

1 












Brighton 






bXio 




Ewing Township 






Fair Lawn 


Carmel 






2 

2 

i' 


3 

21 
14 
8 
11 

2 
5 
7 
1 

5 
2 




2 

2 


1 
6 
3 
13 






Clarkstown 


13 
















Depew 






Elmira 










Howell Township 


Garden City 


, 


2 

2 
3 
4 






Gates 






Glen Cove 






Greenburgh 














Hempstead 


3 

1 


3 




, !° 


6 


11 
2 
8 
3 

70 
9 
9 
2 

2 
16 


Irondequoit 










Long Branch 








, . ^ 






Mount Vernon 


2 
1 

7 

539 

4 


24 
1 
18 
1,600 
9 
2 










^'"^^ ;■ 


New RocheUe 




North Bergen Township 




3,435 






r^M n A 


North Tonawanda 




Old Bndge 


Port Chester 




Paramus 


Poughkeepsie 


2 1 1 





241 



Table 60.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities 25,000 and over in Population, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Female Male 



City by State 



Number of law enforcement 



Male Female Male Femal 



NEW YORK— Continue 

Poughkeepsie Town 

Ramapo Town 

Rochester 

Rockville Centre 

Rome 

Rotterdam 

Schenectady 

Southampton Town 

Syracuse 

Tonawanda Town 

Vestal 

Watertown 

Webster 

West Seneca 

White Plains 

Yonkers 

Yorktown 

NORTH C/VROLINA 

Asheville 

Burlington 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte 

Durham 

Fayetteville 

Gastonia 

Goldsboro 

Greensboro 

Greenville 

High Point 

Kannapolis 

Kinston 

Raleigh 

Rocky Mount 

Salisbury 

Wilmmgton 

Wilson 

Winston-Salem 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bismarck 

Grand Forks 
Minot 

OHIO 

Akron 

Alliance 

Ashtabula 

Barbel ton 

Beavei creek Township 

Boardman Township 

Bowling Green 

Brook Park 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Heights 

Colerain Township 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Delhi Township 

East Cleveland 

Euclid 

Fairborn 





^ 


18 


66 


1 


9 








9 


12 


22 




18 




4 




3 


4 


10 


11 


36 




3 




OHIO-Coni 

Hamilton 

Kettering 

Lakewood 

Lima 

Uram 

Madison Township 

Mansfield 

Maple Heights .... 

Manon 

Massillon 

Mentor 

Miami Township .. 

Newark 

North Olmsted 

Norwood 

Parma Heights 

Perry Township ... 

Portsmouth 

Randolph Township 

Sandusky 

South Euclid 

Springfield 

Steubenville 

Sylvania Township 

Toledo 

Union Township . . , 
Upper Arlington ... 

Wayne Township . , 
Whitehall 

Voungstown 

Zanesville 



OKLAHOMA 



Altus 

Bartlesville 
Del City 
Enid 
Lawton 
Midwest City 

ikogee 
Norman 
Oklahoma City 
Ponca City 
Shawnee 
Stillwater 
Tulsa 



Beaverton 

Corvallis 

Eugene 

Gresham 

Hillsboro 

Medford 

Portland 

Salem 

Springfield 



PENNSYLVANIA 



Me 60— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Qties 25,000 and over in Population, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by Slate 



ENNSYLVANU— ContlniKd 

oona 

dwin Borough 

isalem Township 

hel Park 

hlehem 

stol Township 

:ltenham Township 

is Township 

rrisburg 

verford Township 

wer Menon Township 

wer Paxton Township 

Lrple Township 

iKeesport 

ddletown Township 

llcreek Township 

mroev.lle 

)unt Lebanon Township 

w Castle 

irth Huntingdon Township . 

an Hills Township 

iladelphia 

tsburgh 

im Borough 

dnor Township 

ading 

Jley Township 

iss Township 

aler Township 

ringfield Township 

)per Darby Township 

)per Menon Township 

arminster Township 

est Mimm 

ilkes Barre 

ilhamsport 

)rk 

RHODE ISLAND 

jventry 

imberland 
ist Providence 

orth Providence 

iwtucket 

evidence 

'est Warwick 
oonsocket 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

nderson 

harlesion 

olumbia 

lorence 

Teenv.lle 

reenwood 

orth Charleston 



Number of law enforcement employees 



SOUTH CAROLINA— Con. 



Rock Hill .. 
Spartanburg 



Aberdeen ... 
Rapid City . 
Sioux Falls 



Chattanooga . 
Clarksville .... 

Jackson 

Johnson City 
gsport .... 

Knoxville 

Memphis 

Murfreesboro 

Nashville 

Oak Ridge ... 



SOUTH DAKOTA 



Abilene 

Alice 

Amanllo 

Arlington 

Austin 

Baytown 

Beaumont 

Big Spnng 

Brownsville 

Bryan 

Carrollton 

College Station 

Copperas Cove 

Corpus Christi 

Dallas 

Del Rio 



Denton 
El Paso 

mcrs Branch 
Fort Worth 
Galveston 
Garland 
Grand Praine 
Haltom City 
Harlingen 



Killeen 

Kingsville 

Laredo 

Longview 

Lubbock 

.Luflan 

Marshall 

McAllen 

Mesquite 

Midland 

Nacogdoche 

Odessa 

Orange 

Pampa 

Pans 



Number of law enforcement employees 



Male Female 



178 


3 


50 


1 


90 


3 


W 


1 


41 


3 


34 


1 


19 


5 


298 


II 


1,885 


112 


28 




32 


1 


58 


2 


658 


15 


46 


1 


655 


29 


141 


4 


121 


3 


69 




33 




58 




2,807 


181 


25 




36 




116 


2 


74 


6 


35 




106 


7 


86 


5 


230 


2 


40 


1 


.36 


1 


74 


3 


82 


2 


121 


7 


36 


1 


122 


3 


39 


1 


18 


4 


28 


1 



Table 60.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities 25,000 and 



Id Population, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Number of law enforcement 



Male Female Male Female 



Cily by State 



Number of law enforcement 



Female Male 



TEXAS— Continued 

Pasadena 

Plainview 

Piano 

Port Arthur 

Richardson 

San Angelo 

San Antonio 

San Marcos 

Temple 

Texarkana 

Texas City 

Tyler 

Victoria 

Waco 

Wichita Falls 

UTAH 

Bountiful 

Logan 

Murray 

Ogden 

Orem 

Provo 

Salt Lalte City 

Sandy 

VERMONT 

Burlington 

VIRGINU 

Alexandria 

Arlington 

Blacksburg 

Charlottesville 

Chesapeake 

Danville 

Hampton 

Lynchburg 

Newport News 

Norfolk 

Petersburg 

Portsmouth 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

SufTolk 

Virginia Beach 

WASHINGTON 

Bellevue 



5 


9 


4 


6 




13 


10 


134 


2 


13 


4 


7 





4 




4 








6 




9 


13 


20 




6 



WASHINGTON- 

Bremerton 
Edmonds 

Kennewick 

Longview 

Olympia 

Renton 

Richland 

Seattle 

Spokane 

Tacoma 

Vancouver 

Yakima 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Charleston 

Fairmont 

Huntington 

Morgantown 

Parkersburg 

Weirton 

Wheeling 

WISCONSIN 

Appleton 

Beloit 

Brooktield 

Eau Claire 

Fond du Lac 

Green Bay 

Greenfield 

Jdnesville 

Kenosha 

la Crosse 

Madison 

Manitowoc 

Menomonee Falls 

Milwaukee 

New Berlin 

Oshkosh 

Racine 

Shebovgan 

Supenor 

Waukesha 

Wausau 



Cheyenm 



' Male and female breakdown not available for civilian employees. 



244 



ble 61.-Niimber of FuU-ti 




iT 25,000. October 31, 


1978 








Total police employees | 


City by State 


Total police employees | 


City by State 


Total police employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 




Total 


Male 


Female 




Total 


Male 


Female 


ALABAMA 

beviUe 

amsville 

dison 

baster 

erlville 

xander City 

ceville 




31 
24 

25 
24 
22 


2 
1 

5 

5 

2 
1 

1 

2 

4 
3 

5 

6 

2 

1 

2 


ALABAMA-Con. 

Elkmont 


32 
29 
11 
15 

31 
10 

29 
11 

12 
26 

20 


27 
24 

26 
16 

10 

28 


5 

5 

5 

2 

1 

l' 

3 

1 

7 

2 

1 



3 

2 

1 
2 

1 
4 
5 

4 

4 

4 
14 

2 
3 
3 

4 


ALABAMA— Con. 

Lineville 

Lipscomb 

LittleviUe 

Livingston 

Lockhart 

LouisviUe 

Loxley 

Luveme 

Madison 

MaplesvUle 

Margaret 

Marion 

McKenzie 

Mentone 


12 
20 

22 
10 
22 


10 
20 


, 


Eufaula 


1 


P 




Excel 




Fairfield 




Fairhope 

Falkville 

Faunsdale 

Fayette 


4 


. . 








dmore 




Flomaton 

Florala 

Foley 


1 


«y 




hviUe 




Midfield 

Midland 













Millbrook 

Millry 


4 




Fultondale 




". 


Garden City 


Monroeville 


4 


^ou La Batre 




2 


J. 


Moody 




)untsvil e 


CeraWine 


Morris 


1 


"^ 


Gilbertown 


Moulton 

Moundville 

Mountain Brook 

Mount Vernon 

Muscle Shoals 

Napierfield 

New Brockton 

New Hope 

New Site 

Newton 

NewviUe 

Northport 

Notasulga 

Oakman 

Odenville 

Ohatchee 

Oneonta 

Opelika 

Opp 

Owens Cross Roads 

Oxford 

Ozark 

Parrish 

Pelham 

Pell City 

Phil Campbell 

Piedmont 

Pinckard 

Pine Hill 

Pisgah 

Pleasant Grove 

Powells Crossroads 

Prattville 

Ragland 

Rainbow City 

Rainsville 

Ranbume 

Red Bay 

Red Level 

Reform 

Riverside 

Roanoke 

Robertsdale 

Rockford 

RogersviHe 

Roosevelt City 

Russellville 

Samson 

Saraland 


1 




Glencoe 






7 


dgeport 


Gordon 

Gordo 


3 




Grant 








2 




Greenville 




, . 


Grove Hill 




un g 




1 


1 






. 


Gurley 


5 


H 11 


Hackleburg 


1 


"h H 11 

rbon 1 


Haleyville 








1 


... 


HammondviUe 




ar 


Hance\'ille 


3 






9 






2 




Hartselle 


1 


ero ee 


Hayneville 


2 






3 


.... 






II 


Helena 


1 




Henagar 


1 


*"k"' h 






/ 








Hokes Bluff 

Hollywood 

Homewood 

Hoover 

Hueytown 








}llinsville 


1 




3 


1 h 


2 


■' 


Hurtsboro 

Ider 

Irondale 

Jackson 

Jacksonville 


5 


. 


1 










iiba 

ullman 

adeviUe 

aleville 

aphne 




Kennedy 

Killen 

Kimberly 

Lafayette 

Unett 

Leeds 






2 


ouble Spnngs 




°""^ 




5 


ast Brewton 




5 


Lincoln 




ba 


Linden 


2 



Table 61.-Number 



of Full-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continuedi 



Total poli( 



City by Slate 



City by State 



ALABAMA-Con. 

Sardis City 



Scoltsboro .. 

Section 

ShefTield .... 

Silas 

Silverhill .... 

S'Psey 

Slocomb .... 

Snead 

Southside ... 
Springville .. 

Steele 

Stevenson . . 
Sulligent .... 
Sumiton .... 
Summerdale 
Sylacauga . . 
Sylvania .... 



Tarrant City .. 
Thomaston .... 
Thomasville ... 

Thorsby 

Town Creek .. 

Trinity 

Troy 

Trussville 

Tuscumbia .... 

Tuslcegee 

Union Springs 



Valley Head . 
Vesta via Hills 

Vina 

Vincent 

Wadley 

Warrior 

Weaver 

Wedowee 

West Blocton 
Weston 



Wilmer .... 
Wilsonville 

Wilton 

Winfield ... 
York 



ALASKA 

Bethel 

Cordova 

Homer 

Hoonah 

Juneau 

Kenai 

Ketchikan 

Kodiak 

North Pole 

North Slope Borough 

Palmer 

Petersburg 

Seward 

Sitka 

Skagway 

Soldotna 

Valdez 

Whituer 



ALASKA-Con. 

Wrangell 

ARIZONA 



Bisbee 

Buckeye 

Casa Grande . 

Chandler 

Clarkdale 

Clifton 

Coolidge 

Cottonwood ... 

Douglas 

Duncan 

Eagar 

El Mirage 

Eloy 

Florence 

Fredonia 

Gila Bend 

Gilbert 

Globe 

Goodyear 

Hayden 

Holbrook 

Huachuca City 

Jerome 

Kearny 

Kingman 



Nogales . . . 
Oro Valley 



Patagonia 
Peona ... 



Prescott 

SafTord 

Saint Johns . . 
Show Low ... 
Sierra Vista . . 

Snowflake 

Somerton 

South Tucson 
Springerville . 

Superior 

Surprise 

Taylor 

Thatcher 

Tolleson 

Tombstone ... 
Wickenburg . . 

Willcon 

Williams 

Winslow 

Youngtown . . , 



ARKANSAS 



Arkadelphia 
Ashdown . . 
Bald Knob 
Batesville .. 



ARKANSAS— Con. 



Benton 

BentonviUe 

Berryville 

Blytheville . ... 

Booneville 

Bradford 

Brinkley 

Bryant 

Bull Shoals ... 

Camden 

Clarendon 

Conway 

Coming 

Cotter 

Crossett 

Danville 

De Queen 

Dermott 

Des Arc 

De VaUs Bluff 
De Witt 



Earle 

England 

Eudora 

Eureka Springs 

Fordyce 

Forrest City . . . 

Gentry 

Gillett 

Green Forest .. 

Greenland 

Gurdon 

Hamburg 

Hampton 

Harrisburg 



Hazen 

Heber Springs .. 

Helena 

Hope 

Horseshoe Bend 

Hoxie 

Johnson 

Judsonia 

Kensett 

Lake ViUage .... 

Leachville 

Lincoln 

Magnolia 

Malvern 



Marked Tree .... 

Mayflower 

McCrory 

McGehee 

Monticello 

Morrilton 

Mountain Home 

Nashville 

Newport 

Osceola 

Paragould 

Paris 

Piggott 

Pocahontas 

Prairie Grove 

Prescott 



246 



61.-Nun.ber of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000. October 31 1978-Contlnued 




Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



CALIFORNIA-Con. 



Stanton 

Suisun City . 
Susanville ... 
Sutter Creek 

Taft 

Tehachapi ... 

Tiburon 

Tracy 

Tulelake 

Turlock 

Ukiah 

Vernon 

Wasco 

Waterford ... 
Watsonvilie . 

Weed 

Westmorland 
Wheatland .. 

Williams 

Willits 

Willows 

Winters 

Woodlake ... 
Yreka City .. 
Yuba City .. 



Bow Mar .... 
Breckenridge . 
Broomfield . . . 

Brush 

Buena Vista . 
Canon City .. 

Center 

Central City ., 
Cherry Hill ... 

Cortez 

Craig 

Creede 

Dacono 

Delta 

Dillon 

Dolores 

Durango 

Eaton 

Edgewater 

Estes Park .... 

Evans 

Federal Height! 



Fort Lupton 

Fort Morgan 

Fountain 

Glendale 

Glenwood Springs 

Golden 

Grand Lake 

Greenwood 

Gunnison 

Haxtun 



Total police employees 



7 


1 


9 




13 


2 


28 


12 




I 




1 




2 








3 




8 












7 








1 




3 




9 




8 




,■ 




2 




' 




14 








2 




5 




1 




5 




6 




4 




4 




6 




2 




7 








3 




8 












4 




1 




6 











City by State 



Springs 



COLORADO— Con. 



Louisvill 
Manassa 
Manitou 
Milliken 
Monte Vista 

Natunta 

Norwood 

Olathe 

Ordway 

Otis 

Saguache 

Sheridan 

Steamboat Springs 

Sterling 

Trimdad 

Vail 

Walsenburg 



Total police employees 



CONNECnajT 



Ansonia 



Berlm 

Bethel 

Bloomfield 
Brookfield . 

Cheshire ... 



Coventry 

Danielson 

Darien 

Derby 

East Hampton . 

Windsor .. 
Farmington 

Groton City ... 

Guilford 

Jewelt City .... 

Madison 

Middlebury 

Monroe 

New Milford .. 

Newtown 

rth Branford 
North Haven .. 
Old Saybrook . 

Orange 

Plainville 

Plymouth 

Putnam 



Ridgefield 

Rocky Hill 

Seymour 

msbury 

South Windsor . 
Stafford Springs 

Stonington 

SuflTield 

Thomaston 

Waterford 

Watertown 

Weston 

Willimantic 

Wilton 



City by State 



CONNECnCUT-Con. 



Windsor Locks 

Winsted 

Wolcott 

Woodbndge .... 



31 




31 




34 




31 




44 




19 




14 




29 




20 




9 




10 




45 




24 




7 




9 




10 




30 




9 




26 




26 




9 




21 




9 




29 




44 




28 




28 




18 




42 




21 




30 




31 




12 




15 




31 




28 




18 




30 




24 




4 




27 




12 




10 




35 




29 
II 




30 
31 





DELAWARE 



Bethany Beach .... 

Bethel 

Blades 

Bowers Beach 

Bridgeville 

Camden- Wyoming 

Clayton 

Dagsboro 

Delaware City 

Delmar 

Ellendale 

Felton 

Fenwick Island .... 

Frankford 

Frederica 

Georgetown 

Greenwood 

Harnngton 

Laurel 

Little Creek 

MUford 

Millsboro 

Milton 

New Castle 

Ocean View 

Rehoboth Beach .. 

Selbyville 

South Bethany 



FLORIDA 



Alachua 

Altamonte Springs . 

Altha 

Anna Maria 

Apalachicola 

Apopka 

Arcadia 

Atlantic Beach 

Atlantis 

Aubumdale 

Avon Park 

Bal Harbour 

Bay Harbor Islands 

Belleair 

Belleair Beach 

Belleair Bluffs 

Belle Glade 

Belleview 

Biscayne Park 

Blountstown 

Bonifay 

Bowling Green 

Bradenton Beach .... 
Brooksville 



Bushnell 



rable 61.-Number of Full-ti 


ne Law 


Enforcement Employees, Citie 


s with 


PopulatI 


on undc 


r 25,000, October 31, 


1978- 


Continu 


ed 




Total police employees | 




Total police employees || 


City by State 


Total poUce employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 


y y 


Total 


Male 


Female 




Total 


Male 


Female 


FLORIDA-Con. 


3 
11 
50 
36 

3 
10 

6 

4 
14 
15 
43 
33 
22 

2 
31 
74 

7 

18 

15 

15 

8 
46 
18 

8 
49 
II 

9 

9 
14 

8 

5 
28 
25 

5 
18 
12 
45 
12 

7 

9 

15 
4 
10 
13 

25 
8 
6 

30 
1 
9 

16 
7 
8 

14 

25 
g 

49 
2 

17 

17 
5 

13 
9 

46 
5 
7 

26 
4 

13 


3 

7 
38 
27 

3 

9 

5 

4 
10 

9 
34 
27 
17 

2 
21 
58 

5 
15 

13 

37 

6 
37 
15 

6 
38 

9 

5 

5 
11 

7 

5 
23 
24 

4 
13 

9 
41 

8 

7 

9 

10 

14 

24 
8 
5 

24 
1 
g 

11 
7 
6 

14 

21 
7 

2 
12 
11 

5 
13 

8 
37 

5 

6 
17 

12 


4 
12 
9 

1 

1 

4 
6 
9 
6 

5 

lo' 

16 

2 
3 
2 
7 
4 
2 
9 
3 
2 
11 
2 

4 

3 
1 

5 
1 
1 
5 
3 

4 

1 
1 

2 

6 

1 

5 

2 

4 

8 

5 

6 

1 
9 

1 
9 

3 


FLORIDA— Con. 

Kenneth City 

Keystone Heights 

Key West 


10 

5 
60 
58 
11 
32 

7 

8 
13 
26 
30 
20 

41 
28 
11 

23 
22 

9 

8 
13 

7 
25 

7 

7 
15 

20 
g 
3 
33 
41 
18 
6 
9 
22 
12 
59 
9 
32 
40 
13 
24 
39 
35 
16 
2 
4 
65 
13 
19 
18 
42 
6 
27 
56 
14 
II 
26 
37 
82 
36 
9 
32 
20 
21 
4 

21 
15 
39 


9 

5 
49 
40 

30 
7 

5 

10 
20 
23 
15 
10 
34 
22 
10 
18 
15 

9 

8 
12 

7 
20 

7 

7 
13 

2 
20 

7 

3 
29 
38 
14 

4 

6 
16 

8 
49 

26 
34 
10 
19 
28 
26 
11 

2 

4 
53 

9 
16 
16 
33 

6 
22 
46 
II 

8 
25 
25 
70 
26 

8 
25 
15 
21 

4 

4 
19 
13 
30 


1 

18 

5 

3 
3 
6 

7 
5 
1 
7 
6 

5 
7 

1 

5 

2 

4 

3 

2 
3 
6 

10 

6 
6 

3 
5 
11 
9 
5 

12 

4 

3 

9 

5 

10 
3 

3 
1 

12 
12 
10 
1 
7 
5 

2 
9 


FLORIDA-Con. 


10 
32 
13 
22 
35 
5 
23 
12 

4 
25 

6 
37 
63 
22 
14 
10 

7 
27 

6 
22 

37 
7 
6 
13 
20 
27 
21 
15 
73 
30 
10 
27 
19 
19 
5 
5 
41 
65 
6 
3 
12 
3 
5 
12 

10 
9 
30 

23 
68 
69 
19 
17 

3 
13 
10 
lg 

3 
11 
18 
35 

5 

4 


25 
12 
16 
34 

5 
20 

9 
33 

3 
19 

4 
29 
47 
15 

9 
10 

5 
25 

4 
13 

33 

7 

6 

8 
16 
23 
18 
14 
52 
23 
10 
21 
16 
17 

5 
29 
50 

5 
3 
10 

3 
5 
9 

6 

5 
27 

4 
15 
47 
63 
13 
13 

3 
11 

8 
14 

3 
II 
16 
27 

5 

4 






Port Orange 

Port Saint Joe 

Punta Gorda 




Calloway 

Cape Coral 


1 
6 








1 


Chattahoochee 

Chienand 

Chipley 


Lake City 

Lake Clarke Shores ... 

Uke Hamilton 

Uke Mary 

Uke Park 

Uke Wales 

Untana 


Redington Beach 

Rockledge 

Royal Palm Beach .... 

Saint Augustine 

Saint Augustine Beach 

Samt Cloud 

Saint Leo-San Antonio 
Saint Petersburg Beach 
Sanford 


3 
3 
8 


n 


1 


„ 




° R h 




Coconut Creek 


Uuderdale-by-the-Sea 


8 
16 


Co'""^'cit 


Lighthouse Point 

Live Oak 


Sambel 

Satellite Beach 

Sea Ranch Lakes 

Sebastian 

Sebring 


7 


r °T<; ^ 




r^ P _^ 






Crescent i y 




2 


Crystal River 






MacClenny 

Madeira Beach 


South Bay 

South Daytona 

South Flomaton 

South Miami 


2 


Dania 








Davenport 


Maitland 


4 


Daytona Beach Shores 


Manalapan 


South Palm Beach .... 




Mangonia Park 






Springfield 


5 


De Land 




sUr 


4 


Dundee 


Medley 


Stuart 


4 


Dunnellon 


Melbourne Beach 












C J 






Miami Shores 


Tamarac 


21 


Edgewood 


Miami Spnngs 


Tarpon Spnngs 


7 


°^ 






Fernandina Beach .... 




Temple Terrace 


6 




3 


ci y Beach 


Mount Dora 


Treasure Island 

Umatilla 

Valparaiso 

Venice 

Vero Beach 


2 








Fort Walton Beach ... 
Frostproof 


Naples 




Neptune Beach 

New Port Richey 

New Smyrna Beach .. 
NiceviUe 


12 
15 


GracevUle 

Greenacres City 

Green Cove Springs .. 
Greenville 


Virginia Gardens 

Waldo 

Wauchula 

Webster 

West Melbourne 


1 


North Bay Village .... 

North Lauderdale 

North Palm Beach .... 
North Port 


2 


Groveland 


3 


Gulfport 

Gulf Stream 






Oakland 

Oakland Park 

Ocean Ridge 

Ocoee 

Okeechobee 

Opa Locka 


Wildwood 

Williston 


4 






Haines City 


Wilton Manors 

Windermere 


3 


Havana 


Winter Garden 

Winter Haven 


21 


Highland Beach 


Winter Park 

Winter Spnngs 

ZephyrhiUs 


6 


Orange Park 

Ormond Beach 

Oviedo 

Pahokee 

Palatka 


6 






Holly Hill 


GEORGIA 

Abbeville 




Holmes Beach 




Howey-in-the-Hills .... 






Palm Beach 

Palm Beach Gardens . 
Palm Beach Shores ... 




2 


Indian Harbour Beach 
Indian River Shores .. 
Indian Rocks Beach . . 




2 


Adel 


4 


Alamo 




Palm Spnngs 

Panama City Beach .. 
Parker 






Inverness 










8 


asper . 






Juno eac 


Pembroke Park 


Arlington 




Jupiter Inlet Colony .. 
JuDiter Island 






Plant City 


Attapulgus 





Table 61— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



GEORGIA— Con. 

Fayetteville 

Fitzgerald 

Folkston 

Forest Park 

Forsyth 

Fort Gaines 

Fort Oglethorpe 

Fort Valley 

Franklin 

Gainesville 

Garden City 

Georgetown 

Glennville 

Glenwood 

Gordon 

Grantville 

Greensboro 

Greenville 

Grovetown 

Hahira 

Hampton 

Hapeville 

Harlem 

Hartwell 

Hawkinsville 

Hazlehurst 

Helena 

Hinesville 

Hiram 

Hoboken 

Hogansville 

Homerville 

Irwinton 

Jackson 

Jeffersonville 

Jenkmsburg 

Jonesboro 

Kennesaw 

Kingsland 

Lafayette 

Lake City 

Lakeland 

Lavonia 

Lawrenceville 

Leesburg 

Lilbum 

Lincolnton 

Lithonia 

Locust Grove 

Loganville 

Louisville 

Lumber City 

Lumpkin 

Luthersville 

Lyons 

Madison 

Manchester 

Marshallville 

McCaysville 

McDonough 

McRae 

MidviUe 

Milan 

Milledgeville 

Millen 

Montezuma 



GEORGU-CoD. 



Monticello 

Morrow 

Moultrie 

Mountain View 
Mount Vernon , 

Nahunta 

Nashville 

Nelson 

Newnan 

Norcross 

Norman Park .. 

Oakwood 

Ocilla 

Odum 

Oxford 

Palmetto 

Patterson 

Peachtree City . 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Perry 

Pine Mountain . 



Pooler 

Porterdale 

Powder Springs . 

Quitman 

ReidsvUle 

Reynolds 

Richland 

Rincon 

Ringgold 

Riverdale 

Roberta 

Rochelle 

Rockmart 

Rossville 

Roswell 

Royston 

Rutledge 

Saint Marys .... 

Sandersville 

Shellman 

Smithville 

Snellville 

Soperton 

Springfield 

Statesboro 

Slatham 

Stone Mountain 



Swainsboro 
Sylvama .... 
Sylvester . . . 
Talbotton . . 
Tallapoosa . 

Temple 

Tennille 

Thomaston . 



Thomson . . . 
Thunderbolt 

Tifton 

Tignall 

Trenton .... 



-Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Qtles with Population m.der 25,000. October 31 1978-Contlnued 



Toul police employees 



Total 



Female 



City by State 



Total police employees 



Female 



City by State 



ILLINOIS— Con. 




Carmi 

Carol Stream .... 

Carrollton 

Carterville 

Carthage 

Cary 

Casey 

Caseyville 

Central City 

Centralia 

Centreville 

Cerro Gordo ... 

Chadwick 

Channahon 

Charleston 

Chatham 

Cherry Valley .. 

Chester 

Chicago Ridge . 

Chillicothe 

Chrisman 

Christopher 

Clarendon Hills 

Chnton 

Coal City 

Coal VaUey 

CoUinsville 



Total police employet 



Coulterville 

Country Club Hills 

Countryside 

Crest Hill 

Crestwood 

Crete 

Creve Coeur 
Crystal Lake 
Cutler 

Dallas City 

Darien 

Deerfield 

Delavan 

Depue 

Dixon 

Dupo 

Du Quoin 

Durand 

Dwight 

East Alton 

East Chicago Heights 

East Dubuque 

East Dundee 

East Hazel Crest .... 

East Mohne 

East Peoria 

Edwardsville 

EfTingham 

Elbum 

Eldorado 

Elizabeth 

Elmwood 

Equahty 

Erie 

Eureka 

Evergreen Park 

Fairbury 

Fairfield 

Fairmont City 

Fairview Heights ... 

Farina 

Farmer City 

Farmington 



Female 

















4 








6 




5 




2 




7 









I 






33 


9 


33 


II 


20 


5 


18 


8 


















45 


8 








1 








8 




1 




2 



251 



Table 6t .-Number of Full-i 



Law Enforcement Employees, Cities witb Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Male Female 



City by State 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



ILLINOIS-Con. 

Flora 

Flossmoor 

Forest Park 

Forest View 

Forreston 

Fox River Grove ... 
Fox River Valley 

Gardens 

Frankfort 

Franklin Park 

Freeburg 

Fulton 

Galena 

Galva 

Geneseo 

Geneva 

Genoa 

Georgetown 

Gibson City 

Gillespie 

Gilman 

Girard 

Glencoe 

Glendale Heights .... 

Glenwood 

Golf 

Grafton 

Granville 

Grayslake 

GrayviUe 

Greenfield 

Green Rock 

Grrenup 

Greenville 

Gumee 

Hamilton 

Hampshire 

Hanna City 

Harrisburg 

Hartford 

Harvard 

Harwood Heights ... 

Havana 

Hazel Crest 

Hebron 

Hecker 

Henry 

Herrin 

Herscher 

Hickory HiUs 

Highland 

Highwood 

Hillsboro 

Hillside 

Hinsdale 

Hodgkins 

Hometown 

Homewood 

Hoopeston 

Hopkins Park 

Huntley 

Indian Head Pork .. 

Irving 

Island Lake 

Itasca 

Jacksonville 

Jerome 

Jerseyville 

Johnston City 

Jonesboro 













3 










22 


6 


26 


6 


16 


4 


3 




10 


4 








,• 








5 


15 


5 











ILLINOIS-CoD. 

Justice 

Kenilworth 

Kewanee 

Kildeer 

Kirkland 

Knoxville 

La Grange 

La Grange Park 

Lake Bluff 

Lake Forest 

Lake-in-the-HiUs 

Lake Villa 

Lakewood 

Lake Zurich 

Lanark 

La Salle 

Lawrenceville 

Lebanon 

Leland Grove 

Lemont 

Lenzburg 

Lexington 

Libertyville 

Lincoln 

Lincolnshire 

Lincolnwood 

Lindenhurst 

Lisle 

Litchfield 

Loami 

Lockport 

Loves Park 

Lyndon 

Lynwood 

Lyons 

Mackinaw 

Macomb 

Madison 

Manhattan 

Manito 

Manteno 

Maple Park 

Marengo 

Marion 

Marissa 

Markham 

Marquette Heights .. 

Marseilles 

Marshall 

Martinsville 

Maryvillc 

Mascoutah 

Mason City 

Matteson 

Mattoon 

McCook 

McCullom Lake 

Mc Henry 

McLean 

Melrose Park 

Mendota 

Metamora 

Metropolis 

Midlothian 

Milan 

MUford 

MUledgeville 

MUlstadt 

Mokena 

Momence 



ILLINOIS-Con. 

Monmouth 

Montgomery 

Monticello 

Morris 

Morrison 

Morton 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Carroll 

Mount Moms 

Mount Olive 

Mount Sterling 

Mount Vernon 

Mount Zion 

Mundelein 

Murphysboro 

National City 

Neoga 

New Athens 

New Baden 

New Lenox . . 

Newton 

Nokomis 

Norridge 

North Aurora 

Northfield 

Northlake 

North Riverside 

Norwood 

Oak Brook 

Oakbrook Terrace ... 

Oak Forest 

Oakwood Hills 

OTallon 

Ogleshy 

Okawville 

Olney 

Olympia Fields 

Oregon 

Orland Park 

Oswego 

Ottawa 

Palestine 

Palos Heights 

Palos Hills 

Palos Park 

Pana 

Pans 

Park City 

Park Forest South .. 

Pawnee 

Paxton 

Pecatonica 

Peotone 

Peoria Heights 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Phoenix 

Pinckneyville 

Piper City 

Pittsfield 

Plainfield 

Piano 

Polo 

Pontiac 

Pontoon Beach 

Port Byron 

Posen 

Potomac 

Princeton 

Prophetslown 



252 



Law Enforcement Employees, aHes with Population under 25,000, October 31, 



Total police employees 



City by State 



ILLINOIS— Con. 



Swansea 

Sycamore — 

Tamaroa 

Tampico 

TaylorviUe . . 

Thomson 

Thornton 

Tilden 

Tinley Park . 

Toluca 

Tower Lakes 

Tremont 

Trenton 

Troy 

Tuscola 

Vandalia — 

Venice 

Vernon Hills 



Villa Park 

Virden 

Virginia 

Warren 

Warrenville 

Warsaw 

Washington 

Washington Park . 

Waterloo 

Watseca 

Wauconda 

Wayne 

Westchester 

West Chicago .... 

West Dundee 

Western Springs .. 
West Frankfort ... 

Westhaven 

Westmont 

Wesrville 

Wheeling 

White HaU 

Willowbrook 

Willow Springs ... 

Wilimngton 

Winfield 

Winnetka 

Winthrop Harbor 

Wood Dale 

WoodhuU 

Woodridge 

Wood River 

Woodstock 

Worden 

Worth 

Yates City 

YorkviUe 

Zeigler 

Zion 



INDIANA 

Alexandria 

Angola 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Batesville 

Bedford 

Beech Grove .... 

Berne 

Bickiiell 



Total police employees 



City by State 



INDIANA— Con. 



Blufrton . 
BoonviUe 
Brazil .... 
Bremen . 



Brownsburg 

Cambridge City 



Charlestown 

Chesterfield 

Chesterton 

Clarksville 

Clinton 

Columbia City 

Connersville 

Corydon 

Crawfordsville 

Crown Point 

Decatur 

Delphi 

Dunkirk 

Dyer 

Edinburg 

Elwood 

Fairmount 

Fowler 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Garrett 

Gas City 

Goshen 

Greencastle 

Greendale 

Greenfield 

Greensburg 

Greenwood 

Gnffith 

Hartford City 

Hobart 

Huntingburg 

Huntington 

Jasonville 

Kendallville 

Lake Station 

renccburg 

Lebanon 

Ligomer 

Linton 

Logansport 

Long Beach 

Loogootee 

Lowell 

Madison 

Martinsville 

MitcheU 

Monticello 

Moorcsville 

Mount Vernon .... 

Munster 

Nappanee 

New Castle 

New Haven 

New Whiteland .. 

Noblesville 

North Manchester 
North Vernon .... 

Oakland City 

Peru 

Petersburg 

Plainfield 



n 


,7 


10 


10 


12 




13 


12 


16 


13 


35 


35 


12 




'54 


51 


II 




8 




2.5 


21 


12 




12 




6 




27 


24 


n 




11 


1 ' 



Table M.-Number of Full-Hme Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978 


-Continued 


City by State 


Total 


police e 


nployees 


City by State 


Total 


police employees 


City by State 


Total 


police employee 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Fema 


INDIANA-Con. 

Plymouth 


16 
46 
13 

2 

11 

18 
14 
18 
15 
14 
28 
31 
33 
11 
15 
13 
4 
10 
41 
32 
26 
27 
18 
31 

1 
29 
15 

5 

16 

14 
14 

II 
II 


13 
34 
9 

8 
9 
5 
17 
11 
15 
10 

23 
27 
27 
10 
10 
9 

6 
32 
31 
26 
22 
15 
28 

6 

1 
26 
11 

5 

4 


3 
12 

1 

2 

1 
3 
3 
5 
3 
5 
4 
6 
1 
5 

4 

9 

5 
3 
3 
2 

3 

4 

2 
3 
1 
1 

6 

1 
3 
5 
1 

6 

5 
2 

3 
3 
3 

3 
3 


IOWA— Coo. 

Estherville 


22 

24 

29 

12 
18 

35 

13 
10 


22 

32 
12 

10 
5 


2 
3 
5 

6 

5 

4 
1 

3 

5 

5 
6 

2 

3 
1 

8 
1 

4 

5 

1 
3 
5 

2 

2 

6 
4 

1 

7 

2 
3 

1 

3 
5 


KANSAS-Con. 

Arkansas City 

Atchison 

Augusta 

Baldwin City 

Bauer Springs 

Belleville 


41 
30 

20 
50 

28 
36 
30 

5 

3 

6 
22 

4 
18 

16 
10 
6 
24 


22 
16 






Evansdale 


Portland 




Fayette 


Princeton 


Rensselaer 


Fort Madison 

Gamer 




Rochester 






Rockville 

Rushville 

Salem 


Glenwood 

Gnnnell 

Grundy Center 

Hampton 


Blue Rapids 

Bonner Spnngs 




Schererville 


cane"y'°."..:.:::.:.::::: 

Cawker City 




Scottsburg 

Sellersburg 


Harlan 

Hawarden 

Hiawatha 






Cherryvale 

Clay Center 

Coffevville 

Colby 




Shelbyville 






Independence 

Indianola 




Sullivan 


^ 


Tell City 


Iowa Falls 






Tipton 


Jefferson 

Keokuk 

Knoxville 

Le Claire 

Le Mars 






Trail Creek 


ncor la 




Union City 




6 


Valparaiso 




Vincennes 


Edwardsville 


' 


Wabash 


Manchester 

Maquoketa 

Marion 




7 


Warsaw 


°'^"° 


Washington 






West Lafayette 


Missouri Valley 

Monticello 




' 


West Terre Haute .... 






Whitestown 


Mount Pleasant 

Mount Vernon 

Muscatine 


Fort Scott 


2 


Whitmg 




Winchester 


Fronlenac 




Winona Lake 


Nevada 

New Hampton 

Newton 


Galena 










IOWA 








Norwalk 




2 


Adel 


Oelwein 




Albia 


Onawa 


■' 


8 
4 

5 
3 

3 








Altoona 




Hays 


Anamosa 




Ankeny 






Atlantic 


Pella 




Audubon 




^ 


Belle Plame 


Pleasant Hill 


Hillsboro 




Belmond 




4 


Bloomfield 


Rock Rapids 

Sac City 

Sheldon 


Holton 


Boone 


3 


Camanche 


Hugoton 


Carlisle 


Humboldt 

Independence 

lola 

Junction City 

Kingman 

K.nsley 




Carroll 


Sioux Center 

Spencer 




Carter Lake 


3 
II 


Centerville 

Chariton 


Spint Uke 

Storm Uke 






Cherokee 






Clannda 


Urbandale 


, ° ^ 




Clarion 


Umed 

Leawood 


2 

5 
5 


Clear Uke 




Clive 


Waukon 

Waverly 

Webster City 

West Burlington 

West Des Moines 


Colfax 




Coralville 
Cresco 


Lyons 

Marion 




Creston 
Decorah 


Marysville 

McPherson 

Medicine Lodge 


5 
2 


Denison 
De Witt 


Windsor Heights 

Wmterset 


Dyersville 
Eagle Grove 


KANSAS 

Abilene 

Anthony 


Miltonvale 


Eldora . 


Mulvane 


3 


Eldridge 
Emmet^burg 


Neodesha 

Newton 


6 



254 



of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities witii Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total polic 



City by State 



Total police employees 



Total police employees 



KENTUCKY-Con. 

Corbm 

Crab Orchard 

Crescent Spnngs 

Crofton 

Cumberland 

Cythiana 

Danville 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

Douglas Hill 

Dry Ridge 

Earlington 

Edgewood 

Edmonton 

Elizabethtown 

Elkton 

Elsmere 

Eminence 

Erlanger 

Evarts 

Falmouth 

Flatwoods 

Flemingsburg 

Florence 

Fort Mitchell 

Fort Thomas 

Fort Wright 

Frankfort 

Frankhn 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Grayson 

Greensburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Hardinsburg 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hickman 

Highland Heights .... 

Hindman 

Hodgenville 

Horse Cave 

Hustonville 

Independence 

Irvine 

Irvington 

Jackson 

Jamestown 

Jeflfersontown 

Jenkins 

Junction City 

La Grange 

Lakeside Park 

Uncaster 

l.awrenceburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction . . . . 

Leitchfield 

Lewisburg 

Lewisport 

Livermore 

Lt>ndon 



KENTUCKY— Con. 

Ludlow 

Madisonville 

Manchester 

Marion 

Martin 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Middlesboro 

Monticello 

Morehead 

Morganfield 

Morgantown 

Mount Sterling 

Mount Vernon 

Mount Washington . . 

Muldraugh 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Neon-Fleming 

New Castle 

New Haven 

Nicholasville 

Nortonville 

Oak Grove 

Olive Hill 

Owenton 

Owingsville 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park Hills 

Pembroke 

Pewee Valley 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Prestonsburg 

Princeton 

Prospect 

Providence 

Raceland 

Radcliff 

Ravenna 

Richmond 

Russell 

Russell Springs 

Russellville 

Saint Matthews 

Salyersville 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shively 

Somerset 

'Uthgale 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stanton 

S'urgis 

Taylor Mill 

Taylorsville 

Tompkinsville 

Vanceburg 

Versailles 

Villa Hills 

Vine Grove 

Walton 

Warsaw 



255 



Table 61.— Number oT Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employe 



LOUISIANA-Con. 

Patterson 

Pineville 

Plaquemine 

Ponchatoula 

Port Allen 

Rayne 

Rayville 

Richwood 

Ruston 

Saint Martinville 

Simmesport 

SpringhiU 

Tallulah 

Thibodaux 

Vidaha 

Ville Platte 

Vinton 

Vivian 

Waterproof 

Welsh 

Westlake 

West Monroe 

Westwego 

Winnfield 

Wmnsboro , 

MAINE 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Baileyville 

Bar Harbor 

Bath 

Belfast 

Berwick 

Biddeford 

Boothbay Harbor .... 

Bridglon 

Brunswick 

Bucksport 

Calais 

Camden 

Cape Elizabeth 

Caribou 

Cumberland 

Damariscolta 

Dexter 

Dixfield 

Dover-Foxcroft 

East Millinocket 

Eliot 

Ellsworth 

Fairfield 

Falmouth 

Farmington 

Fort Fairfield 

Fort Kent 

Gardiner 

Gorham 

HaUowell 

Hampden 

Houlton 

J«y 

Kennebunk 

Kennebunkport 

Kittery 

Lebanon 



MAINE— Con. 



Limestone 

Lincoln 

Livermore Falls 

Machias 

Madawaska 

Madison 

Mechanic Falls 

Mexico 

Millinocket 

Mile 

Monmouth 

Newport 

Norridgewock ... 
North Berwick , 

Norway 

Oakland 

Ogunquit 

Old Orchard Bea 
Old Town 

Paris 

Pittsfield 

Presque Isle 

Richmond 

Rockland 

Rockport 

Rumford 

Sabattus 

Sanford 

Scarborough . . . . 

Skowhegan 

South Berwick .. 
South Portland . 
Thomaston 

Van Buren 

Waldoboro 

Washburn 

Waterville 

Wells 

Westbrook 

Wilton 

Windham 

Winslow 

Winthrop 



Wiscasset 



MARYLAND 



Bel Air 

Berlin 

Berwyn Heights 

BladensbiiTg 

Boonsboro 

Brunswick 

Cambndge 

Capitol Heights 

Centreville 

Chesapeake Beach .... 

Chesapeake Qty 

Cheslertown 

Cheverly 

Colmar Manor-Cottage 

Citv 

Crisfield 

Delmar 



256 



Table 61.— Number of FuU-time Law Enforcement Employees, aties with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Male Female 



Total polic 



City by State 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



MASSACHUSETTS- 



MASSACHUSETTS- 



Becket 

Bedford 

Belchertown . . . 
Bellingham .... 

Berlin 

Bemardston . . . 
Bolton 

Boxboro 

Boxford 

Boylston 

Brewster 

Bridgewater ... 

Buckland 

Burlington . . . . 

Carver 

Charlton 

Chatham 

Chilmark 

Clmton 

Cohasset 

Concord 

Cumminglon . . 

Dalton 

Danvers 

Dartmouth .... 

Dighton 

Douglas 

Dover 

Dudley 

Dunstable 

Duxbury 

East Bridgewate 
East Brookfield 

Eastham 

Easthampton .. 
East Longmeadi 
Easton 

Erving 

Falmouth 

Foxboro 

Franklin 

Freetown 

Gardner 

Gay Head .... 
Georgetown ... 
Grafton 

Greenfield 

Groton 

Groveland 

Hadley 

Hamilton 

Hampden 

Hanover 

Hardwick 

Harvard 

Harwich 

Hingham 

Hinsdale 

Holbrook 

Holden 

Holliston 



Hopedale 

Hopkinton 

Hubbardston 

Hudson 

Hull 

Ipswich 

Kingston 

Lakeville 

Lancaster 

Lee 

Lenox 

Lincoln 

Littleton 

Longmeadow 

Ludlow 

Lunenburg 

Lynnfield 

Manchester 

Mansfield 

Marblehead 

Marion 

Marshfield 

Mashpee 

Mattapoisett 

Maynard 

Medfield 

Medway 

Mendon 

Middleboro 

Middleton 

Milford 

Millbury 

Millis 

Monson 

Montague 

Nahant 

Nantucket 

Newbury 

Norfolk 

North Adams .... 
North .Andover .. 
North Attleboro . 

Northboro 

Northbridge 

North Brookfield 

Northfield 

North Reading .. 

Norton 

Norwell 

Oak Bluffs 

Orleans 

Oxford 

Palmer 

Pembroke 

Pepperell 

Petersham 

Plainville 

Plympton 

Provincetown . . . . 

Rayiiham 

Reading 

Rehoboth 

Rochester 

Rowley 

Rutland 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total polu 



Total Male Female 



City by State 



Total polu 
Total 



MICHIGAN-Con. 



Alpena 

Argentine Township 



Auguila 

Bad Axe 

Bancroft 

Bangor 

Baraga 

Barry Township 

Bath Township 

Battle Creek Township 
Beaverlon 



Bedford Township 

Belding 

Bellaire 

Belleville 

Benton Harbor .... 
Benton Township . 

Berkley 

Berrien Springs .... 

Bessemer 

Beverly Hills 

Big Rapids 

Birch Run 

Birmingham 

Blackman Townshif 

Blissfield 

Bloomfield Hills ... 



Boyne City 

Breckenridge 

Bridgeport Township 

Bridgman 

Brighton 

Britton 

Bronson 

Brooklyn 

Brown City 

Buchanan 

Buena Vista Charter 

Township 

Burr Oak 

Byron 

Cadillac 

Caledonia Township . 
Calumet 



Camden 

Camp Dearborn 

Capac 

Carleton 

Caro 

Carrollton Township . 

Carsonville 

Caseville 

Caspian 

Cass City 

Cassopolis 

Cedar Springs 

Cement City 

Center Line 

Charlevoix 

Charlotte 

Cheboygan 

Chelsea 

Chesanmg 

Chesterfield Township 
aming Township . 
Chocolay Township . . . 

Clare 

Clawson 

Clay Township 



2 




1 








5 






2 






7 




1 






3 


2 






7 










, 






19 






5 






4 






4 


















2 






12 


















3 


















1 


















1 






' 






v 






4 






3 


















1 












2 






1 










































3 






1 












2 












1 












, 






2 






3 






1 



MlCHIGAN-Con. 

Clio 

Coldwater 

Coleman 

Coloma Township . . . . 

Colon 

Columbia Township . . 

Constantine 

Coopersville 

Corunna 

Covert Township 

Croswell 

Crystal Falls 

Dalton Township 

Davison 

Davison Township .... 

Decatur 

Deckerville 

De Witt 

De Wilt Township .... 

Douglas 

Dowagiac 

Durand 

East Grand Rapids . . . 

East Jordan 

East Tawas 

Eau Claire 

Ecorse 

Elk Rapids 

Elkton 

Elsie 

Emmett Township 

Ene Township 

Escanaba 

Essexville 

Evart 

Fairgrove 

Fairhaven Township .. 

Farminglon 

Farwell 

Fennville 

Fenton 

Ferrysburg 

Flat Rock 

Forsyth Township 

Fowlerville 

Frankenmulh 

Frankfort 

Franklin 

Eraser 

Fremont 

Frost Township 

Gaastra 

Gaylord 

Gibraltar 

Gladstone 

Gladwin 

Gobies 

Goodrich 

Grand Beach 

nd Blanc 

Grand Blanc Township 

Grand Ledge 

Grandville 

Grayling 

Green Oak Township 

Greenville 

Gros.se Isle Township 
Grosse Pointe 



258 



Table 61.-Number of FuU-tiine Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 


1978— 


Continued 




Total dice employees |: 




Total police employees | 




Total police employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 




Total 


Male 


Female 




Total 


Male 


Female 


MICHIGAN-Con. 

Grosse Pointe Farms . 
Grosse Pointe Park . . . 
Grosse Pointe Shores . 
Grosse Pointe Woods 
Hampton Township ... 


3 




3 
1 

1 
6 

6 
6 

5 

2 

1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

2 

3 

6 

1 
1 

1 


MICHIGAN-Con. 

Manne City 


13 

30 
20 

16 

46 
25 
30 


28 


1 

2 

2 
1 

2 

1 
3 

2 

7 
3 
4 

4 

2 

1 

1 
1 
4 

3 

7 

3 

16 

2 

3 

2 

5 
3 

2 

1 

3 


IvnCHIGAN-Coii. 

Pleasant Ridge 

Plymouth 

Pontiac Township 

Portland 


23 
27 

48 
30 


19 
21 

43 
24 




Marlette 

Marquette Township .. 

Marshall 

Marysvilk 


4 
6 
2 




Potterville 




Hancock 




Mayville 




Harbor Beach 

Harbor Springs 

Harper Woods 

Hart 


Reed City 

Reese 

Republic Township 
Richfield Township 

(Genessee County) . 
Richfield Township 

(Roscommon 

County) 

Richmond 

Richmond Township .. 
River Rouge 








M m nee 








Mesick 

Michiana 


1 






Hazel Park 

Hespena 

Hillsdale 


Middleville 

Midland Township .... 
Milan 






2 


Holly 






Mills Township 


5 


Honor 




Montague 




2 


Howard Township .... 


Rockford 




Montrose Township ... 


Rockwood 


3 


Hudson 






Mount Clemens 




3 


Huntington Woods ... 


Roosevelt Park 




Mount Pleasant 

Munising 






Ross Township 




Imlay City 


Muskegon Heights .... 
Muskegon Township .. 
Napoleon Township . . 






Royal Oak Township . 
Saint Charles 


5 








Saint Clair 




Iron Mountain 




M^* 


Saint Ignace 


1 


Ironwood 


N 




4 


New Baltimore 




3 




Saint Joseph Township 
Saint Louis 




Ishpeming Township . . 




New Buffalo 






New Haven 


Sahne 


1 






Sand Lake 




Kalkaska 


Niles Township 

North Muskegon 








Sandford 














I I I H ' 


1 


Lake Odessa 




Sault Sainle Mane .... 
Schoolcraft 


3 




Norlhville Township .. 

Norton Shores 

Norway 

Novi .' 






Scottville 






<u>hewaini> 














Lapeer 

Lathrup Village 






Onaway 

Ontonagon 

Ontwa Township 

Orchard Lake 

Oscoda-Ausable 

Township 

Otisville 

Otsego 

Ovid 


Somerset Township ... 


3 




South Lyon 

South Range 

South Rockwood 

Sparta 

Spaulding Township .. 
Spring Arbor Township 

Spnngfield 

Spnng Uke 




1 


' 


Lawton 





Uoni Township 

Leslie 




Lexington 


v 


Litchfield 


Owosso 

Oxford 

Parchment 

Paw Paw 








Ludington 

Luna Pier 

Mackinac Island 

Mackinaw City 

Mancelona 

Manchester 

Manistee 


Stambaugh 

Stanton 

Stevensville 

Sturgis 

Summit Township 

Sumpter Township .... 
Swartz Creek 




Pennfield Township ... 
Pentwater 


::::::.: 


p 'Pv 


1 




Pigeon 


Sylvan Lake 

Tecumseh 

Thomas Township .... 




Maple Grove 
Township 


Pin-^kney 


1 


Pittsfield Township ... 
Plainwell 























Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



City by State 



MICHIGAN-Con. 

Tilden Township 

Tittabawassee 

Traverse City 

Tuscarora Township . 

Union City 

Unionville 

Utica 

Vassar 

Vernon 

Vicksburg 

Wakefield 

Walker 

Walled Lake 

Watervhet 

Wayland 

Wayne 

Webberville 

West Branch 

White Cloud 

Whitehall 

White Lake Township 

White Pigeon 

Williamston 

Woodhaven 

Wixom 

Wolverine Lake 

Zeeland 

Zilwaukee Township . 

MINNESOTA 

Albert Lea 

Alexandria 

Andover 

Anoka 

Apple Valley 

Austin 

Babbitt 

Bayport 

Bemidji 

Benson 

Blue Earth 

Brainerd 

Breckenridge 

Buffalo 

Caledonia 

Cambridge 

Cannon Falls 

Champlin 

Chisholm 

Circle Pines-Lexington 

Cloquet 

Cold Spring 

Columbia Heights 

Corcoran 

Cottage Grove 

Crookston 

Crosby 

Dayton 

Deephaven 

Detroit Lakes 

Dilworth 

Eagan Township 

East Grand Forks 

Eden Prairie 

Elk River 

Ely 

Eveleth 

Fairmont 

Faribault 



MINNESOTA-Con. 

Farmington 

Fergus Falls 

Forest Lake 

Gilbert 

Glencoe 

Glenwood 

Golden Valley 

Grand Rapids 

Granite Falls 

Hastings 

Hibbing 

Hopkins 

Hoyt Lakes 

Hugo 

Hutchinson 

Independence 

International Falls 

Inver Grove Heights . . 

Kenyon 

La Crescent 

Lake City 

Lakeville 

Le Sueur 

Lino Lakes 

Litchfield 

Little Falls 

Long Prairie 

Luveme 

Madison 

Maple Grove 

Marshall 

Medina 

Mendota Heights 

Montevideo 

Mora 

Moms 

Mound 

Mounds View 

New Brighton 

New Hope 

Newport 

New Prague 

New Ulm 

Northfield 

North Mankato 

North Saint Paul 

Oakdale 

Olivia 

Ortonville 

Owatorma 

Park Rapids 

Pipestone 

Plainview 

Plymouth 

Princeton 

Prior Lake 

Ramsey Township .... 

Red Wing 

Redwood Falls 

Robbinsdale 

Rosemount 

Saint Anthony 

Saint James 

Saint Paul Park 

Saint Peter 



MINNESOTA-Con. 

SarleU 

Sauk Centre 

Sauk Rapids 

Shakopee 

Silver Bay 

Sleepy Eye 

South International 

Falls 

South Lake 

Minnetonka 
South Saint Paul 
Spnngfield 
Spring l.ake Park 
Staples 
Stillwater 
Thief River Falls 

Two Harbors 

Virginia 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waite Park 

Waseca 

Wayzata 

Wells 

West Saint Paul 

White Bear Uke 

Willmar 

Windom 

Woodbury 

Worthmeton 



Aberdeen 

Baldwyn 
Batesville 
Bay Saint Louis 

Brandon 

Brookhaven 

Canton 

Carthage 

Charleston 

Cleveland 

Clinton 

Columbia 

Corinth 

Crystal Spnngs 

Drew 

Durant 

Edwards 

Ellisville 

Fayette 

Fulton 

Gloster 

Greenwood 

Grenada 

Hazlehurst 

Heidelberg 

Hernando 

Hollandale 

Holly Spnngs 

Indianola 
Itta Bena 
Kosciusko 
Laurel 



260 



Table 61.— Number of FuU-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



MISSOURI-Con. 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Crestwood 

Creve Coeur 

Crystal City 

De Soto 

Des Peres 

Edmundson 

Eldon 

Elhsville 

Eureka 

Excelsior Springs .... 
Farmington 

Festus 

Flat River 

Frontenac 

Garden City 

Glendale 

Grandview 

Hanley Hills 

Hannibal 

Harrisonville 

Hazelwood 

Hermann 

Hillsdale 

Ironton 

Jackson 

Jennings 

Kirksville 

Lake Saint Louis ... 

Lebanon 

Lees Summit 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Louisana 

Maiden 

Manchester 

Maplewood 

Marceline 

Marlborough 

Marshall 

Maryville 

Mexico 

Moberly 

Moline Acres 

Monett 

Mount Vernon 

Neosho 

Newburg 

Normandy 

North Kansas City . 

Northwoods 

Odessa 

O'Fallon 

Olivette 

Overland 

Pacific 

Pagedale 

ParkviUe 

Peerless Park 

Pine Lawn 

Plattsburg 

Pleasant Hill 

Poplar Bluff 



Total police employees 



City by Sute 



MtSSOURl-Coo. 

Potosi 

Rich Hill 

Richmond 

Richmond Heights .... 

Riverside 

Riverview 

Rock Hill 

RoUa 

Saint Ann 

Sainte Genevieve 

Saint George 

Saint John 

Salem 

Savannah 

Shrewsbury 

Sikeston 

Slater 

Sugar Creek 

Sullivan 

Sunset Hills 

Trenton 

Union 

Uplands Park 

Valley Park 

Vandaha 

a Park 

Warrensburg 

Warson Woods 

Webb City 

Wellston 

WentzviUe 

Weston 

West Plains 

Woodson Terrace 

MONTANA 

Anaconda-Deer Lodge 

Baker 

Columbia Falls 

Cut Bank 

Deer Lodge-Powell 

Dillon 

Fort Benton 

Glasgow 

Glendive 

Havre 

Kalispell 

Laurel 

Lewistown 

Libby 

Livingston 

Miles City 

Red Lodge 

Sidney 

Whitefish 

Wolf Point 

NEBRASKA 

Albion 

AlUance 

Alma 

Ashland 

Atkinson 

Auburn 



261 



TaUe 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



Male Female 



NEBRASKA-Coa. 

Shelton 

South Sioux City 
Spencer 
Stanton 
Superior 

Tecumseh 

Tekamah 

Tilden 

Valenlme 

Valley 

Wahoo 

Wausa 

Wayne 

Weepmg Water 

West Point 

WUber 

Wisner 

Wood River 

York 

NEVADA 

Boulder City 

Caliente 

Carlin 

Elko 

Ely 

Fallon 

Henderson 

Lovelock 

Wells 

Winnemucca 

Yenngton 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Allcnstown 

Alton 

Amherst 

Bedford 

Belmont 

Berlin 

Boscawen 

Bow 

Bnstol 

C harlestown 

C laremont 

Conway 

Derr> 

Dover 

Dublin 

Durham 

Enheld 

Epping 

Exeter 

Farminglon 

Fitzwiliiam 

Franklin 

Gilford 

OofTstown 

Gorham 

Greenville 

Hampton 

Haverhill 

Henniker 

Hillsborough 

Hinsdale 

Holdemess 



Hollis 

Hooksett 

Hopkinton 

Hudson 

Jackson 

Jaffrey 

Keene 

Kingston 

Laconia 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Lee 

LitchHeld 

Littleton 

Londonderry 

Meredith 

Merrimack 

Milford 

New Castle 

New Hampton 

Newington 

New London 

Newmarket 

Newport 

Northfield 

North Hampton 

Northumberland 

Pelham 

Pembroke 

Peterborough 

Pittsfield 

Plymouth 

Raymond 

Rochester 

Sanborn ton 

Tilton 

Waterville Valley 

WhJteficld 

Wilton 

Winchester 

Windham 

Wolfeboro 

Woodstock 



NEW JERSEY 

Aberdeen Township 

Absecon 

Allendale 

Allenhurst 

Allentown 

Alpha 

Alpine 

Andover Township .. 

Asbury Park 

Atlantic Highlands .. 

Audubon 

Audubon Park 

Avalon 

Avon-by-the-Sea 

Bamegat Township . 

Barrington 

Bay Head 

Beach Haven 

Beachwood 

linster Township 

Bellmawr 

Belmar 



262 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Cit> by State 



Total police employees 



Total Male Female 



Total police employees 



City by State 



Toul police employees 



Total Male Female 



astampton Township 
ast Greenwich 

Township 

ast Hanover 

Township 

ast Newark 

ast Rutherford 

ast Windsor Townsh 



NEW JERSEY-Con. 

F.dgewater Park 

Township 

Egg Harbor City 

Egg Harbor 

Township 

Elk Township 

Elmwood Park 

Emerson 

Englewood 

Englewood Cliffs 

Englishtown Boro 

Essex Fells 

Evesham Township . . . 

Fairfield 

Fair Haven 

Fairview 

Fanwood 

Far HiUs 

Flemington 

Florence Township ... 

Florham Park 

Frankhn 

Franklin Lakes 

Franklin Township 

(Gloucester County) 
Franklin Township 

(Hunterdon County) 

Freehold 

Freehold Township ... 

Frenchtown 

Galloway Township . . . 

Garwood 

Glassboro 

Glen Ridge 

Glen Rock 

Gloucester City 

Green Brook 

Greenwich Township . 

Guttenberg 

Hackettstown 

Haddonfield 

Haddon Heights 

Haddon Township — 
Hainesport Township . 

Haledon 

Hamburg 

Hamilton Township ... 

Hanover Township .... 
Harding Township — 
Hardyston Township . 

Harrington Park 

Harrison 

Harrison Township ... 

Harvey Cedars 

Hasbrouck Heights ... 

Haworth 

Hawthorne 

Hazlet Township 

Helmetta 

High Bridge Boro 

Highland Park 

Highlands 

Hightstown 

Hillsborough 

Township 

Hillsdale 

Hillside Township 

Hi NeUa 

Ho-Ho-Kus 

Holland Township . . . . 



NEW JERSEY-Con. 

Holmdel Township .... 

Hopatcong 

Hopewell 

Hopewell Township . . . 

Interiaken 

Island Heights 

Jamesburg 

Jefferson Township ... 

Keansburg 

Kenilworth 

Keyport 

Kinnelon 

Knowlton Township .. 

Lacey Township 

Lakehurst 

Lambertville 

Laurel Springs 

Lavallette 

Lawnside 

Lawrence Township 

(Cumberland County) 
Lawrence Township 

(Mercer County) 

Lebanon Boro 

Lebanon Township ... 

Leonia 

Lincoln Park 

Lindenwold 

Linwood 

Little Egg Harbor 

Township 

Little Falls Township . 

Little Ferry 

Little Silver 

Lodi 

Logan Township 

Long Beach Township 

Longport 

Lopatcong Township . 
Lower Alloways Creek 

Township 

Lower Township 

Lumberion Township . 
Lyndhurst Township .. 

Madison 

Magnolia 

Mahwah Township ... 
Manalapan Township . 

Manasquan 

Manchester Township 
Mansfield Township . . 

Mantoloking 

Mantua Township — 

Manville 

Maple Shade Township 
Maplewood Township 

Margate City 

Marlboro 

Matawan 

Maywood 

Medford Lakes 

Medford Township ... 

Mendham 

Mendham Township .. 

Merchantville 

Metuchen 

Middlesex 

Middle Township 

Midland Park 

Milford 

Township . . . 



263 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



NEW JERSEY-Con. 

Milltown 

Millville 

Mine Hill Township . . 

Monmouth Beach 

Monroe Towrship 

(Gloucester County) . 
Monroe Township 

(Middlesex County).. 
Montgomery 

Township 

Montvale 

Montville Township . . 

Moonachie 

Moorestown Township 

Morris Plains 

Morristown 

Morris Township 

Mountain Lakes 

Mountainside 

Mount Arlington 

Mount Ephraim 

Mount Holly 

Mount i.aurel 

Township 

Mouri Olive Township 

MuUica Township 

National Park 

Neptune 

Netcong 

Newfield 

New Milford 

New Providence 

Newton 

North Arlington 

North Brunswick 

Township 

North Caldwell 

Northfield 

North Haledon 

North Plainfield 

Northvale 

North Wildwood 

Norwood 

Oakland 

Oaklyn 

Ocean City 

Ocean Gate 

Oceanport 

Ocean Township 

(Monmouth County) 
Ocean Township 

(Ocean County) 

Ogdensburg 

Old Tappan 

Oradell 

Oxford Township 

Palisades Park 

Palmyra 

Park Ridge 

Passaic Township 

Paulsboro 

Peapack and Gladstone 

Pemberton 

Pennington 

Penns Grove 

Pennsviile Township . . 
Pequannock Township 

Phillipsburg 

Pine Beach 

Pine Hill 

Pitman 

Plaiiisboro Township . 

264 



Total police employees 



NEW JERSEY-Con. 

Pleasantville 

Plumsled Township . . . 

Pohatcong 

Point Pleasant 
Point Pleasant Beach 
Pompton Lakes 
Princeton 

Princeton Township 
Prospect Park 
Ramsey 
Randolph 

Raritan Township 

Readington Township 

Red Bank 

Ridgefield 

Ridgefield Park 

Ringwood 

Riverdale 

River Edge 

Riverside 

Riverton 

River Vale 

Rochelle Park 

Township 
Rockaway 

Rockaway Township 
Roseland 
Roselle . 
Roselle Park 
Roxbury Township 
Rumson 
Runnemede 
Rutherford 
Saddle Brook 

Township 
Saddle River 
Salem ... 
Scotch Plains 
Sea Bright 
Sea Girt 
Sea Isle City 
Seaside Heights 
Seaside Park 
Secaucus 
Ship Bottom 
Shrewsbury 
Somerdale 
Somers Point 
Somerville 
South Amboy 

South Belmar 

South Bound Brook .. 
South Brunswick 

Township 

South Hackensack 

South Orange 

South Plainfield 

South River 

South Toms River 

Sparta Township 

Spotswood 

Spniigfield 

Spring Lake 

Spring Lake Heights .. 

Stafford Township 

Stanhope 

Stillwater Township ... 

Stone Harbor 

Stratford 

Summit 

Surf City 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



NEW JERSEY— Con. 

Swedesboro 

Teterboro 

Tewksbury Township . 

Tinton Falls 

Totowa 

Tuckerton 

Union Beach 

Upper Deerfield 

Township 

Upper Saddle River .. 

Ventnor City 

Vernon Township 

Verona 

Victory Gardens 

Voorhees Township . . 

Waldwick 

Wallington 

Wall Township 

Wanaque 

Warren Township 

Washington 

Washington Township 

(Bergen County) 

Washington Township 

(Gloucester County) 
Washington Township 

(Mercer County) . . . . 
Washington Township 

(Moms County) .... 
Washington Township 

(Warren County) ... 

Watchung 

Waterford Township . . 
Weehawken Township 

Wenonah 

Westampton 

West Caldwell 

West Cape May 

West Deptford 

Township 

West Long Branch ... 
West Milford 

Township 

West Paterson 

Westville 

West Wildwood 

West Windsor 

Township 

Westwood 

Wharton 

Wildwood 

Wildwood Crest 

Winfield Township .... 
Winslow Township — 

Woodbine 

Woodbury 

Woodbury Heights .... 

Woodchff Lake 

Woodlynne 

Wood Ridge 

Woodstown 

Woolwich Township . . 
Wyckoff 

NEW MEXICO 

Artesia 

Aztec 



ble 61.— Number of Full-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Ibtal police employees 



Total police employe 



EW MEXICO-Con. 

yard 

len 

tomfleld 

sque Farms 

narron 

ba 

ming 

arilla Apache Tribal 

>anola 

ancia 

Hup 

ants 

"ley 

rdsburg 

s Alamos 

vington 

isilla 

)riarty 

ton 

d River 

idoso Downs 

1 Juan Tnbal 

ita Clara Tnbal .... 

ita Rosa 

«r City 

:orro 

ringer 

turn 

igon Mound .... 

NEW YORK 

^ms 

idison 

wesasne 

bion 

ien 

sxandria Bay 

rred 

lamont 

nityville 

igola 

cade 

dsley 

haroken 

hens 

irora-East Aurora . . . 

'oca 

on Village 

inbridge 

Idwinsville 

Uston Spa 

tavia 

th 

aeon 

dford 

isdell 

ooming Grove 

ilivar 

ilton 

lonville 

iarcliff Manor 

ockport 

onxville 

icbanan 



NEW YORK— Coo. 



Busti 

Caledonia 

Cambridge 

Camden 

Canajoharie .... 
Canandaigua . . . 

Canastota 

Canisteo 

Canton 

Carthage 

CatskiU 

Cattaraugus — 
Cayuga Heights 

Cazenovia 

Celoron 

Chatham 

Chester 

Chittenango .... 

Clayton 

Clifton Springs 



Clu 

Clyde 

Cobleskill 

Colchester 

Cold Spring 

Cooperstown 

Corinth 

Coming 

Comwall-on-Hudson . . 

Cortland 

Cove Neck 

Coxsackie 

Croton-on-Hudson — 

DansviUe , . 

Deerpark 

Delhi 

DeWitl 

Dobbs Ferry 

Dolgeville 

Dryden 

Dunkirk 

East FishkUl 

East Greenbush 

East Hampton Town . 
East Hampton Village 

East Rochester 

East Syracuse 

Eden 

Ellenville 

EUicott 

Ellicottville 

Elmira Heights 

Elmsford 



hairport 

Falconer 

Fallsburg 

Fayetteville . . 
FishJdU Town 
Floral Park .. 

Florida 

Fort Edward 
Fort Plain ... 

Frankfort 

Frankhnville . 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Geddes 



15 


2 










15 




20 


2 


13 


1 






17 


2 


13 


2 

2 


35 






















16 




35 









NEW YORK— Con. 

Geneseo 

Geneva 

Glens Falls 

Glenville 

Gloversville 

Goshen 

Gouvemeur 

Gowanda 

nd View-on-Hudson 

Granville 

Great Neck Estates .. 

Greene 

Greenport 

Greenwich 

Greenwood Lake 

Groton 

Guilderland 

Hamburg 

Hamilton 

Hammondsport 

Hancock 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Hastings-on-Hudson 

Haverstraw 

Haverstraw Town — 
Head-of-the-Harbor . 

Herkimer 

Highland Falls 

HoUey 

Hoosick Falls 

Hornell 

Horseheads 

Hudson 

Hudson Falls 

Huntington Bay 

Irvington 

Johnson City 

Johnstown 

Kenmore 

Kensington 

Kent 

Kings Point 

Kingston 

Kirkland 

Lackawanna 

Lake Luzerne 

Lake Placid 

Lake Success 

Lakewood 

Lancaster 

Lancaster Village .... 

Larchmont 

Laurel Hollow 

Le Roy 

Lewiston 

Liberty 

Little FaUs 

Liverpool 

Lloyd 

Lloyd Harbor 

Lowville 

Lynbrook 

Lyons 

Macedon 

Malone 

Malveme 

Mamaroneck Town . 
Mamaroneck Village 



265 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities witii Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Total polic 



Male Female 



Total Male Female 



NEW YORK— Coo. 

Marathon 

Marcellus 

Massena 

Maybrook 

Mechamcville 

Medina 

Menands 

Middleport 

Middletown 

Millbrook 

Mill Neck 

Minoa 

Mohawk 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Monticello 

Mount Kisco 

Mount Morns 

Mount Pleasant 

Nassau 

Newark 

Newburgh Town 

New Castle 

New Hartford Town . 
New Hartford Village 

New Paltz 

New Windsor 

New York Mills 

Nissequogue 

Norfolk 

North Castle 

North Greenbush 

Northport 

North Syracuse 

North Tarrytown 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Nunda 

Ogden .'. 

Ogdensburg 

Old Brookville 

Old Westbury 

Olean 

Oneida 

Oneonta 

Orchard Park 

Oriskany 

Ossining Town 

Ossining Village 

Oswego 

Owego 

Oxford 

Oyster Bay Cove 

Painted Post 

Palmyra 

Pawling 

Peekskill 

Pelham Manor 

Penn Yan 

Perry 

Piermont 

Platlsburgh 

Pleasantville 

Port Dickinson 

Port Jervis 

Port Washington 

Potsdam 



NEW YORK— Con. 

Pulaski 

Queensbury 

Randolph 

Red Hook 

Rensselaer 

Richfield Springs 

Riverhead 

Rouses Point 

Rye 

Rye Town 

Sag Harbor 

Saint Johnsville 

Salamanca 

Salem 

Sands Point 

Saranac Lake 

Saugerties Town 

Saugerties Village 

Scarsdale 

Schodack 

Schuylerville 

Scotia 

Seneca Falls 

Sharon Springs 

Shelter Island 

Silver Creek 

Skaneateles 

Sloatsburg 

Solvay 

Southampton 

South Glens Falls 

South Nyack 

Southold 

Southport 

Spring Valley 

Springville 

Stony Point 

Suffern 

Ticonderoga 

Tonawanda 

Trumansburg 

Tupper Lake 

Tuxedo Park 

Ulster 

Vernon 

Walden 

Walton 

Wappingers Falls 

Warsaw 

Warwick Town 

Warwick Village 

Washmgtonville 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watervliet 

Watkins Glen 

Waverly 

Wayland 

Webb Town 

Wellsville 

Westfield 

Westhampton Beach .. 

Wheatland 

Whitehall 

Whitney Point 

Windham 

Windsor 

Wolcott 



NEW YORK-Con. 

Woodbury 

Woodhull 

Woodndge 

Woodstock 

Yorkville 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Aberdeen 

Ahoskie 

Albemarle 

Andrews 

Angler 

Ansonville 

Apex 

Asheboro 

Askewville 

Atlantii. Beach 

Aulander 

Autreyville 

Bakersville 

Banner LIk 

Battleboro 

Beaufort 

Belhaven 

Belmont 

Benson 

Bessemer City 

Bethel 

Beulaville 

Biscoe 

Black Creek 

Black Mountain 

Bladen boro 

Blowing Rock 

Boiling Spnng Lakes 

Boone 

Boonville 

Brevard 

Brookford 

Brunswick 

Bryson City 

Bunn 

Burgaw 

Bumsville 

Burner 

Candor 

Cape Carteret 

Carolina Beach 

Carrboro 

Carthage 

Cary 

Chadboum 

Cherokee 

Cherry ville 

China Grove 

Chocowinity 

Claremont 

Clark ton 

Clayton 

Clinton 

Clyde 

Coats 

Concord 
Conover 
Conway 



266 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total 
Total 



Total poli( 



Male Female 



Total police emplo 



NORTH CAROLINA- 



NORTH CAROUNA- 



Kenly . 
Kemersville 
Kill Devil Hills 
Kings Mountain 
Kittrell 
Knightdale 
La Grange 
Lake Lure 
Lake Watcamaw 
Landis 
Laurinburg 

Lewiston 

Liberty 

Lilesville 

Lillington 

Lincolnton 

Littleton 

Long Beach 

Longview 

Louisburg 

Lowell 

Lucama 

Lumberton 

Macclesfield 

Madison 

Magnolia 

Maiden 



Ma 



Hill 



Marshville 
Matthews 
Max ton 
Mayodan 
McAdenville 
Mebane 
Middlesex 
Mocksville 
Monroe 
Montreal 
MooresviUe 
Morehead Citv 
Morganton 
Morven 
Mount Airy 
Mount Gilcad 
Mount Holly 
Mount Olive 
Murfreesboro 
Murphy 
Nags Head 
Nashville 
Bern 
Newport 
Newton 
Newton Grove 
Norlina 

North Kannapolis 
North Wilkesboro 
Norwood 
Oakboro 

Ocean Isle Beach 
Oxford 
Parkton 
Pembroke 
PikeviUe 



NORTH CAROLINA- 



Pilot Mountain .. 

PineblufT 

Pinehurst 

Pine Knoll Shores 

Pine Level 

Pinetops 

Pineville 

Pink Hill 

Pittsboro 

Plymouth 

Polkton 

Princeton 

Princeville 

Raeford 

Ramseur 

Randleman 

Ranlo 

Red Springs 

Reidsville 

Rhodhiss 

Richlands 

Rich Square 

Roanoke Rapids , 

Robbins 

Robbinsville 

Robersonville 

Rockingham 

Rolesville 

Ronda 

R oper 

Roseboro 

Rose Hill 

Rowland 

Roxboro 

Rutherfordton 

Saint Pauls 

Salemburg 

Saluda 

S.inford 

Saratoga 

Scotland Neck .... 
Seaboard 

Shallotte 

Sharpsburg 

Shelby 

Siler City 

Sims 

Smithfield 

Snow Hill 

Southern Pines ... 
Southport 

s^ncer':;::;::::::: 

Spindale 

Spnng Hope 

Spring Lake 

Spruce Pine 

Stanfield 

Stantonsburg 

Star 

Statesville 

StoneviUe 

Stovall 

Surf City 

Swansboro 

Sylva 

Tabor City 

Tarboro 



267 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities witii Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



NORTH CAROLINA- 



Taylorsvtlle 

Thomasville 

Topsail Beach 

Troy 

Tryon 

Valdese 

Vanceboro 

Vass 

Wadesboro 

Wagram 

Wake Forest 

Wallace 

Walnut Cove 

Warrenton 

Warsaw 

Washington 

Waxhaw 

Waynesville 

Weldon 

Wendell 

West Jefferson 

Whispering Pines .... 

Whitakers 

White Lake 

Whiteville 

Wilkesboro 

Williamston 

Windsor 

Wingate 

Winterville 

Winton 

Woodfm 

Woodland 

WrightsviUe Beach .. 

YadkinviUe 

Yaupon Beach 

Youngsville 

Zebulon 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Bowman 

Carrington 

Devils Lake 

Dickinson 

Grafton 

Hillsboro 

Jamestown 

Langdon 

Mandan 

Mayville 

Rugby 

Valley City 

Wahpeton 

Watford City 

West Fargo 

Williston 

OHIO 

Ada 

Amberley 

Amherst 

Archbold 

Arhngton Heights ... 

Ashland 

Aurora 

Avon Lake 



OHIO-Con. 





Bambndge 




Bay Village 


2 


Bedford 




Bedford Heights 




Bell brook 


2 


Bell aire 


1 


Bellefontaine 




Bellevue 




Bellville 


1 


Belpre 


1 


Berea 




Bethel 


1 


Bexicv 


1 


Blue Ash 




BlutTlon 


3 


Bradford 


2 


Brady lake 




Brecksville 




Bndgeport 


2 


Broadview Heights 




Brookfield Township 




Brooklyn 




Brooklyn Heights 


1 


Brookville 




Bryan 


3 


Bucvrub 


1 


Butler 


5 


Cadiz 




Caldwell 




Cambridge 




Canfield 




Carey 




Carlisle 




Celina 


1 


Cen terville 




Chagrin Falls 




Cinlcville 




Clay Township 


2 


Clear Creek Township 




Clyde 




Columbiana 




Conneaut 


1 


Coshocton 


1 


Covington 


2 


Crestline 


g 


Dalton 


1 


Deer Park 




Defiance 




Delaware 


4 


Delta 




Dennison 




Doylestown 


g 


Dublin 




Eastlake 




Elast Liverpool 


2 


East Palestine 


3 


Eaton 




Elmwood Place 


4 


Englewood 


4 


Evendale 




Fail fax 




Fail lawn 




Fairport Harbor 


4 


Fairview Park 


1 


Forest 


7 


Forest Park 




Fort Shawnee 




Fostoria 


7 


Frankhn 


6 


Fremont 


1 





OHIO-Con. 

Gallipohs 

Gerraantown 

German Township .... 

Glendale 

Grandview Heights ... 

GranviUe 

Greenhills 

Greenville 

Hamson 

Hartville 

Heath 

Hicksville 

Highland Heights 

Hillsboro 

Howland Township . . . 

Hubbard 

Hudson 

Independence 

Indian Hill 

Ironton 

Jackson Township 

Johnston 

Lawrence Township . . 

Lebanon 

Leipsic 

Lexington 

Lincoln Heights 

Lisbon 

Lockland 

Logan 

Loudonville 

Loveland 

Lyndhurst 

Macedonia 

Madeira 

Mariemont 

Manetta 

Marlboro 

Mason 

Maumee 

Mayfield 

Mayfield Heights 

McComb 

Medina 

Mentor-on-the-Lake ... 
Middleburg Heights ... 

Middleport 

MUford 

Mingo Junction 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Montpelier 

Moraine 

Munroe Falls Village . 

Napoleon 

Nelsonville 

New Boston 

Newburgh Heights .... 

New CarUsle 

Newcomerstown 

New Lebanon 

New Philadelhia 

New Richmond 

Newton 

Northampton Township 

North Baltimore 

North Canton 



7 




26 


5 


3 


2 


10 




10 


2 




4 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities wiUi Population under 25.000, October 31, 1978— Continued 

Total police employees 



OHIO-Con. 

W.Uowick 

Wilmington 

Woodlawn 

Woodsfield 

Wooster 

Worthington 

Wyoming 

Yellow Spnngs 

OKLAHOMA 

Ada 

Afton 

Alva 

Anadarko 

Ardmore 

Arkoma 

Atoka 

Bamsdall 

Bethany 

Bixby 

Blackwell 

Blanchard 

Bokoshe 

Boley 

Bristow 

Broken Arrow 

Broken Bow 

Bums Flat 

Carnegie 

Chandler 

Checotah 

Chelsea 

Cherokee 

Chickasha 

Choctaw 

Chouteau 

Qaremore 

Clayton 

Cleveland 

Clinton 

Coalgate 

Colcord 

CoUmsviUe 

Comanche 

Commerce 

Coweta 

Crescent 

Cushing 

Davenport 

Dewar 

Drumright 

Duncan 

Edmond 

Elk City 

Elmore City 

El Reno 

Erick .. 

Eufaula 

Fairfax 

Fairview 

Forest Park 

Fort Gibson 

Frederick 

Geary 



10 


,■ 


4 




33 


1 


29 


4 


16 




9 




3. 




2 




9 




14 




9 




31 




9 




13 




3 




5 




30 




12 




18 




6 




2 




3 




10 




33 




12 




5 




4 




6 




6 




7 




28 




13 




19 




4 




6 




20 




2 




3 




5 




4 




8 




15 




3 
7 




7 
4 




43 




25 




50 




12 




3 




27 




2 




6 




6 




8 




4 





OKLAHOMA- 

Glencoe 

Glenpool 

Goodwell 

Gore 

Gramte 

Grove 

Guthrie 

Guymon 

Haileyville 

Harrah 

Haskell 

Healdton 

Helena 

Hennessey 

Henryetta 

Hobart 

Holdenville 

HoUis 

Hominy 

Hooker 

Hugo 

Hulbert 

Idabel 

Inola 

Jay 

Jenks 

Jones 

Kelchum 

Kingfisher 

Konawa 

Krebs 

Langley 

Lindsay 

Lone Grove . . . 

Luther 

Madill 

Mangum 

Mannford 

Marietta 

Marlow 

Maysville 

McAlester 

McLoud 

McCurtain 

Miami 

Morris 

Muldrow 

Mustang 

Newcastle 

Newkirk 

Nichols Hills .. 
Nicoma Park .. 

Noble 

Nowata 

Okarche 

Okeene 

Okmulgee 

Oologah 

Owasso 

Paoh 

Pauls Valley ... 

Pawhuska 

Pawnee 

Perry 

Piedmont 

Pocola 

Porter 

Poteau 



Table 61.— Number of FuU-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 



Total police emplo 



City by State 



Total polic 



City by State 



OREGON— Con. 



Cannon Beach 
Canyonville . . . 



Carlt< 

Cave Junction 

Central Point . 

Clatskanie 

Coburg 

Condon 

Coos Bay 

Coquille 

Cornelius 

Cottage Grove 

Culver 

Dallas 

Drain 

Dundee 

Eagle Point ... 

Eastside 

Echo 

Elgin 

Enterprise 

Florence 

Forest Grove . 

Garibaldi 

Gaston 

Gearhart 

Gladstone 

Gold Beach ... 
Grants Pass ... 

Hantmond 

Heppner 



Hood River 

Hubbard 

Independence 

Jacksonville 

JefTerson 

John Day 

Joseph 

Klamath Falls ... 

Lafayette 

La Grande 

Lake Oswego — 

Lakeside 

Lakeview 

Lebanon 

Lincoln City 

Madras 

McMinnville 

Merrill 

Milton- Freewater 

Miiwaukie 

Molalla 

Monmouth 

Monroe 

Mount Angel 

Myrtle Creek .... 

Myrtle Point 

Newberg 

Newport 

North Bend 

North Plains 

Nyssa 

Oakland 

Oakridge 

Ontario 

Oregon City 

Pendleton 

Philomath 

Phoenix 



OREGON-Con. 



Pilot Rock .. 

Prairie City . 

Prineville 

Rainier 

Redmond . . . 
Reedsporl . . . 
Rockaway ... 
Rogue River 
Roseburg .... 
Saint Helens 

Sandy 

Scappoose ... 

Shady Cove . 
Sheridan . . . . 

Silverton 

Sisters 

Stanfield .... 

Slaylon 

SuiherUn . . . . 
Sweet Home 

The Dalles .. 



Tillamook . 
Toledo . . . . 
Troutdale . 

Umatilla ... 

Vale 

Vernonia . . 
Wallowa ... 
Warrenton 
West Lirm 
Weston .... 
Willamina . 
Winston . . . 
Woodbum 
Yamhill ... 



PENNSYLVANU 



Akron 

Albion 

Aldan 

Aliquippa 

Allegheny Township 
(Blair County) .... 

Allegheny Township 
(Westmoreland 
County) 



Ambridge 

Amity Township .. 

Annville 

Apollo 

Archbald 

Armagh Township 

Arnold 

Ashland 

Ashley 

Ashville 

Aspinwall 

Aston Township ... 

Athens Township . 

Avalon 

Baden 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Male Female 



Total police employees 



Male Female 



City by State 



Total polu 



PENNSYLVANIA- 



Cam bridge Springs .... 

Camp Hill 

Canonsburg 

Canton 

Carbondale 

Carlisle 

Carmichaels 

Carnegie 

Carrolltown 

Carroll Township 

(Washington County) 
Carroll Township 

(York County) 

Castle Shannon 

Calasauqua 

Catawissa 

Cecil Township 

Center Township 

Centerville 

Central City 

Chalfont 

Chambersburg 

Charleroi 

Chartiers Township ... 

Chester Hill 

Chester Township 

Cheswick 

Clairton 

Clarion 

Clarks Green 

Clarks Summit 

Claysville 

Clearfield 

Clifton Heights 

Coaldale 

Coalport 

Coal Township 

Coatesville 

Colebrookdale 

Township 

Collegeville 

Collier Township 

CoUmgdale 

Columbia 

Conemaugh Township 
Conewago Township 

(Adams County) .... 
Conewago Township 

(York County) 

Conewango Township 

Connuence 

Connellsville 

Conshohocken 

Conway 

Conyngham 

Coolbaugh Township . 
Coopersburg 

Coraopolis 

Cornwall 

Coudersport 

CZourtdale 

Crafton 

Cranberry Township . . 
Crescent Township .... 



PENNSYLVANIA- 



Cressona 

Cresson Township . . . 

Croyle Township 

Cumberland Township 

(Adams County) . . . 
Cumberland Township 

(Greene County) ... 
Cumru Township .... 

Curwensville 

Dallas 

Dallastown 

Dallas Township 

Dalton 

Danville 

Darby 

Darby Township 

Daugherty Township 
Delaware Water Gap 

Boro 

Derry 

Derry Township . . 

Dickson City 

Dillsburg 

Donegal Township . . . 

Donora 

Dormont 

Douglass Township 

(Berks County) .... 
Douglass Township 

(Montgomery 

County) 

Dowmngtown 

Doylestown 

Doylestown Township 

Dravosburg 

Du Bois 

Dunbar 

Duncansville 

Dunmore 

Dupont 

Duquesne 

Dushore 

East Berlin 

East Brady 

East Brandywine 

Township 

East Buffalo 

Township 

East Cocalico 

Township 

East Conemaugh 

East Deer Township . 
East Earl Township . 
East Greenville- 

Peimsburg 

East Hempfield 

Township 

East Lampeter 

Township 

East Lansdowne ...... 

East Manchester 

Township 

East McKeesport 

East Norriton 

Township 

Easton 



271 



Table 61.— Number of Full-dnie Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Contioued 



Male Female 



Male Female 



City by State 



PENNSVXVANIA- 



East Pennsboro 

Township 

East Pittsburgh 

East Rock Hill 

Township 

East Stroudsburg 

East Taylor Township 
Easttown Township ... 

East Washington 

East Whiteland 

Township 

Ebensburg 

Economy 

Eddystone 

Edgewood 

Edgeworth 

Edmboro 

Edwardsville 

Elizabeth 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabeth Township . . . 

Ehzabelhville 

Elkland 

Ellsworth 

Ellwood City 

Emmaus 

Emporium 

Emsworth 

Ephrata 

Ephrala Township .... 

Etna 

Evans City 

Everett 

Exeter 

Exeter Township 

(Berks County) 

Exeter Township 

(Luzerne County) ... 

Fairchance 

Fairview 

Fairview Township .... 
Fallowfield Township . 

Falls Creek 

Farrell 

Fawn Township 

Fayette City 

Ferguson Township ... 

Ferndale 

Findlay Township 

Fleetwood 

Folcroft 

Ford City 

Forest City 

Forest Hills 

Forks Township 

Forty Fort 

Forward Township .... 

Foster Township 

Fountain Hill 

Fox Chapel 

Frackville 

Franconia Township .. 
Franklin (Cambria 

County) 

Franklin (Venango 

County) 

Frankhn Park 

Franklin Township .... 
Freedom 



PENNSYLVANIA- 



PENNSYLVANIA- 



Freedom-Greenfield 

Township 

Freeland 

Freemansburg 

Galeton 

Galhtzin 

Galhtzin Township 

Geistown 

German Township . . . . 

Gettysburg 

Girard 

Girardville 

Glassport 

Glenolden 

Glen Rock 

Granville Township .. 

Greencastle 

Greenfield Township 

Greensburg 

Green Tree 

Greenville 

Grove City 

Hallam 

Hamburg 

Hampden Township . 
Hampton Township . . . 

Hanover 

Hanover Township 

(Luzerne County) .. 
Hanover Township 

(Washington County 
Harmar Township ... 
Harmony Township . . . 

Harris Township 

Harrison Township . . . 

Harveys Lake 

Hastings 

Hatboro 

Hatfield Township .... 

Hawley 

Hegms Township 

Heidelberg 

Heidelberg Township , 

Hellam Township 

Hellertown 

Hemlock Township . . , 
Hempfield Township . 

Hermitage 

High Spire 

Hilltown Township . . , 

HolUdaysburg 

Homer City 

Homestead 

Honesdale 

Hooversville 

Hopewell Township . . . 
Horsham Township ... 

Houston 

Houtzdale 

Hughesville 

Hummelslown 

Huntingdon 

Hyndman 

Independence 

Township 

Indiana 

Indiana Township 

Ingram 

Irwin 

Jackson Township — 
Jamestown 



Jeannette 

JefTerson 

JefTerson Township 

(Fayette County) . . . 
JefTerson Township 

(Mercer County) .... 

Jenkins Township 

Jenkintown 

Jersey Shore 

Jim Thorpe 

Johnsonburg 

Kane .. 

Kenhorst 

Kennedy Township 

Kennett Square 

Kidder Township 

Kilbuck Township 

Kingston 

Kingston Township 

Kittanning 

Kline Township 

Knox .. 

Kulpmont 

Kutztown 

Lake City 

Lake Township 

Lansdale 

Lansdowne 

Lansford 

Larksville 

Latrobe 

Laureldale 

Lawrence Park 

Township 

Lawrence Township . . 

Leechburg 

Leetsdale 

Lehighton 

Lehigh Township 

Lehman Township — 

l^moyne 

Lewisburg 

Lewis Run 

Lewistown 

Liberty 

Ligonier 

Ligonier Township .... 

LiUy 

Limerick Township . . . 

Linesville 

Lititz 

Littlestown 

Lock Haven 

Locust Township 

Logan Township 

Lower Allen Township 
Lower Alsace Township 

Lower Burrell 

Lower Chichester 

Township 

Lower Fredenck 

Township 

Lower Gwynedd 

Township 

Lower Makefield 

Township 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 



Total police employees 



Total Male Female 



Total police employees 



PENNSYLVANU- 



PENNSYLVANIA- 



MiUviUe 

Milton 

Minersville 

Mohnton 

Monaca 

Monessen 

Monongaheia 

Montgomery 

Montgomery Township 

Montoursville 

Montour Township . . . 

Montrose 

Moon Township 

Moore Township 

Moosic 

Morrisville 

Morton 

Moscow 

Mountain Top 

Regional 

Mount Carme! 

Mount Carmel 

Township 

Mount Holly Springs . 

Mount Jewett 

Mount Joy 

Mount Joy Township . 

Mount Oliver 

Mount Penn 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount Pocono 

Mount Union 

Mount Woif 

Muhlenberg Township 

Muncy 

MunhaU 

Murrysville 

Myerstown 

Nanticoke 

Nanty Glo 

Narberth 

Nazareth 

Nescopeck 

Neshannock Township 

Nesquehoning 

Nether Providence 

Township 

Neville Township 

Newberry Township . . 

New Bethlehem 

New Brighton 

New Britain 

New Britain Township 

New Cumberland 

New Eagle 

New Freedom 

New Hanover 

Township 

New Holland 

New Hope 

New Kensington 

New Oxford 

Newport 

Newport Township . . . 
New Sewickley 

Township 

Newton Township . . . . 

Newtown 

Newtown Township ... 
Newville 



New Wilmington 

Northampton 

Northampton Township 
North Belle Vernon .. 

North Braddock 

North Catasaqua 

North Centre 

Township 

North Charleroi 

North Codorus 

Township 

North Cornwall-West 

Lebanon Township . 
North Coventry 

Township 

North East 

Northern York 

Regional 

North Fayette 

North Franklin 

Township 

North Lebanon 

Township 

North Londonderry 

Township 

North Middleton 

Township 

North Strabane 

Township 

Northumberland 

North Versailles 

Township 

North Wales 

Norwegian Township . 

Norwood 

Oakdale 

Oakmont 

O'Hara Township 

Township 

Oil City 

Old Forge 

Old Lycoming 

Township 

Oley Township 

Olyphant 

Orwigsburg 

Osceola Mills 

Oxford 

Palmerton 

Palmer Township 

Palmyra 

Palo Alto 

Parkesburg 

Patterson Township ... 

Fatten 

Fatten Township 

Paxtang 

Pen Argyl 

Penbreok 

Penndel 

Penn Township (Butler 

County) 

Penn Township 

(Lancaster County) . 
Penn Township 

(Westmoreland 

County) 

Penn Township (York 

County) 

Pequea Township 

Perkasie 



273 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



Total Male Female 



Total police employees 



Male Female 



City by State 



PENNSYLVANU- 



Perkiomer Township 

Perryopolis 

Perry Township 

Peters Township 

Philipsburg 

Phoenixville 

Pine Grove 

Pine Township 

Pitcaim 

Pittston 

Pittston Township 

PlainHeld Township .. 

Plains Township 

Pleasant Hills 

Plumstead Township . 

Plymouth 

Plymouth Township . 

Pocono Township 

Point Manon 

Point Township 

Portage 

Port Allegany 

Port Carbon 

Port Vue 

Potter Township 

Pottstown 

Pottsville 

Pringle 

Prospect Park 

Pulaski Township 

Punxsutawney 

Pymatuning Township 

Quakerlown 

Raccoon Township . . 

Ralpho Township 

Rankin 

Red Hill 

Red Lion 

Redstone Township . . 

Renovo 

Reserve Township 

Reynoldsville 

Richland Township 

(Allegheny County) 
Richland Township 

(Cambria County) . 

Ridgway 

Ridley Park 

Riegelsville 

Rimersburg 

Riverside 

Roaring Brook 

Township 

Roaring Spnng 

Robesonia-Heidelberg 
Robeson Township .. 
Robinson Township . 

Rochester 

Rochester Township . 

Rockledge 

Rockwood 

Rosslyn Farms 

Rostraver 

Roulette Township ... 

Royersford 

Rye Township 

Saegerlown 

Saint Clair 

Saint Marys 

Salem Township 

Salisbury Township .. 



PENNSYLVANIA— 



PENNSYLVAMA- 



Saltsburg 

Sandy Lake 

Sandy Township 

Saxonburg 

Saxton 

Sayre 

Schuylkill Haven 

Schuylkill Township 

Scottdale 

Scott Township 

(Allegheny County) 
Scott Township 

(Columbia County) 
Scott Township 

(Lackawanna 

County) 

Selinsgrove 

Sellersville 

Seven Springs 

Sewickley 

Sewickley Heights . 

Shamokin 

Shamokin Dam 

Sharon 

Sharon Hill 

Sharpsburg 

Sharpsville 

Sheffield Township . 

Shenandoah 

Shenango Township 

(Lawrence County) 
Shenango Township 

(Mercer County) . 

Shickshinny 

Shillington 

Shinglehouse 

Shippensburg 

Shiremanstown 

Shoemakersville 

Shrewsbury 

Silver Spring 

Township 

Sinking Spnng 

Slattington 

Slippery Rock 

Smethporl 

Smithfield 

Smith Township 

Snow Shoe 

Snyder Township ... 
Solebury Township . 

Somerset 

Souderton 

South Abington 

Township 

South Centre 

Township 

South CoalesviUe 

South Connellsville . 
South Fayette 

Township 

South Fork 

South Greensburg ... 
South Lebanon 

Township 

South Londonderry 

Township 

Southmont 

South Park Township 
South Strabane 

Township 



South Waverly 

Southwest Greensburg 
South Whitehall 

Township 

South Williamsport ... 

Spangler 

Speers 

Spring City 

Springdale 

Spnngettsbury 

Township 

Springfield Township 

(Bucks County) 

Spnngfield Township 

(Montgomery 

County) 

Spring Garden 

Township 

Spring Township 

(Berks County) 

Spnng Township 

(Centre County) .... 
Steelton 

Stoneytreek Township 

Stowe Township 

Stroud Township 

Stroudsburg 

Sugar Creek 

Sugarloaf Township 

Summil Hill 

Sunbury 

Susquehanna 

Susquehanna Township 

Swarthmore 

Swatara Township 

Swissvale 

Swoyersville 

Sykesville 

Tamaqua 

Tarentum 

Taylor 
Telford 
Thomburg 
Throop 

Tidioute 

Tinicum Township 

(Bucks County) 

Timcum Township 

(Delaware County) . 

Titusville 

Tobyhanna Township . 

Towamencin Township 

Towanda 

Trafford 

Trainer 

TredyfTrin Township .. 

Troy 

TuUytown 

Tunkhannock 

Tunkhannock 

Township 

Turtle Creek 

Union City 

Uniontown 

Union Township 

Upland 



274 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



Male Female 



Total police employees 



City by State 



Total polic 



PENNSYLVANIA— 



West Hazleton 

West Hempfield 

Township 

West Hills Regional . 

West Homestead 

West Lampeter 

Township 

West Lawn 

West Mahanoy 

Township 

West Manchester 

Township 

West Manheim 

Township 

West Middlesex 

West Newton 

West Nomton 

Township 

West Pittston 

West Pottsgrove 

Township 

West Reading 

""'est Roclchill 

Township 

West Taylor Township 
Westtown Township . , 

West View 

West Whiteland 

Township 

West Wyoming 

West York 

Wheatland 

Whitehall 

Whitehall Township .. 

e Haven 

Whitemarsh Township 

"' e Oak 

Whitpain Township . . . 
Wilkes Barre 

Township 

Wilkinsburg 

Wilkins Township 

Williamsburg 

Willistown Township . 

Wilmerding 

Wilson 

Windber 

Wind Gap 

Windsor 



Wormleysburg .... 

WrightsviUe 

Wyoming 

Wyomissing 

Wyomissing Hills 

Yardley 

Yeadon 

York Township ... 

Youngsville 

Youngwood 

Zelienople 

Zerbe 



RHODE ISLAND 

Bamngton 

Bristol 

llvUle 

Central Falls 

Charlestown 



RHODE ISLAND- 



East Greenwich . 

Foster 

Glocesler 

Hopkinton 

Jamestown 

Johnston 

Lincoln 

Little Compton .. 
Middletown 

New Shoreham .. 
North Kingstown 
North Smithfield 

Portsmouth 

Scituate 

Smithfield 

South Kingstown 

Warren 

Westerly 

West Greenwich . 
Wyoming 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



Abbeville . 
Allendale . 
Andrews 
Bamberg . 
Barnwell . 
Batesburg 
Beaufort . . 
Bellon .... 



Bishopville — 

Blackv.lle 

Calhoun Falls 

Camden 

Campobeilo . . . 

Cayce 

Central City .. 

Cheraw 

Chesnee 

Chester 

Chesterfield ... 

City View 

Clemson 

Clinton 

Clover 

Darlington — 

Denmark 

Donalds 

Duncan 

Easlover 

Edgefield 

Estill 



Eutawville 

Folly Beach . 

Fort Mill 

Fountain Inn 

Gaffney 

Gaston 

Georgetown .. 
Goose Creek . 
Great Falls .. 
GreeleyviUe . . 

Hampton 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



Total police employees 



City by State 



SOUTH CAROLINA- 



Hanahan 

Hardeeville 

Hartsville 

Heath Springs 

Holly Hill 

Honea Path 

Inman 

Iva 

Johnsonville 

Jonesville 

Kershaw 

Lake City 

Lakeview 

Lamar 

Lancaster 

Landrura 

LatU 

Laurens 

Leesville 

Lexington 

Liberty 

Lyman 

Marion 

Mauldin 

McBee 

McCormick 

Moncks Comer .... 
Mount Pleasant .... 

Myrtle Beach 

Newberry 

New Ellenton 

Norris 

North Augusta 

North Myrtle Beach 

Olanta 

Orangeburg 

Pacolet 

Pageland 

Pendleton 

Pickens 

Pine Ridge 

Port Royal 

Prosperity 

Ridge Spring 

Ridgeway 

Saint Matthews 

Saint Stephens 

Saluda 

Santee 

Simpsonville 

Society Hill 

South Congaree .... 

Surfside Beach 

Timmonsville 

Travelers Rest 

Turbeville 

Wagenei 

Walterboro 

West Columbia 

Westminster 

West Union 

Whitmire 

Williamslon 

Willislon 

Winnsboro 

York .. 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Brookings 

Canton 

Deadwood 

Fort Pierre 

Hot Springs 

Huron 

Lead 

Madison 

MitcheU 

Mobridge 

Pierre 

Redfield 

Sisseton 

Spearfish 

Sturgis 

Vermillion 

Watertown 

Woonsocket 

Yankton 

TENNESSEE 

Adamsville 

Alamo 

Alcoa 

Algood 

Ardmore 

Ashland City 

Baileyton 

Bartlett 

Baxter 

Bells 

Bolivar 

Brentwood 

Bristol 

Brownsville 

Bruceton 

Bulls Gap 

Camden 

Carthage 

Caryville 

Centerville 

Church Hill 

Cleveland 

Clinton 

CoUegedale 

CoUierville 

Collinwood 

Columbia 

Cookeville 

Comersville 

Covington 

Crossville 

Cumberland Gap — 

Dandridge 

Dayton 

Decatur 

Decalurville 

Decherd 

Dickson 

Dresden 

Dyer 

Dyersburg 

East Ridge 

Elizabethton 

Elkton 

Englewood 

Erwin 

Estill Springs 



6 


,■ 


3 




6 


1 


26 


1 


7 




14 


1 


25 


2 


6 


4 


23 


4 


6 




7 


4 


13 


5 


15 


5 


27 


2 


18 


7 


^ 








21 


1 








4 






26 


6 






23 


5 










13 


5 


17 


1 


49 


4 


15 


5 








1 


10 


2 




1 








2 


12 


1 


46 


5 


9 


2 


22 


2 






41 


6 


44 


3 


20 


1 
1 


15 


3 










10 


1 


10 


1 


17 


1 




1 






36 


5 


27 


3 



TENNESSEE-Con. 

Fairview 

Fayetteville 

Franklin 

Gallatin 

Gallaway 

Gates 

Gatlinburg 

Germantown 

Gleason 

Goodlettsville 

Grand Junction 

Greeneville 

Halls 

Harriman 

Hartsville 

Henderson 

Hendersonville 

Hohenwald 

Hollow Rock 

Humboldt 

Huntingdon 

Huntland 

Iron City 

Jacksboro 

Jasper 

Jefferson City 

Jellico 

Jonesboro 

Kenton 

Kimball 

Kingston 

Lafayette 

La Follette 

Lake City 

La Vergnc 

Lawrenceburg 

Lebanon 

Lenoir City 

Lewisburg 

Lexington 

Livingston 

Loretlo 

Loudon 

Manchester 

Martin 

Maryville 

Mason 

McKenzie 

McEwen 

McMinnviUe 

Middleton 

MUan 

Millington 

Minor Hill 

Monterey 

Morristown 

Moscow 

Mount Carmel 

Mount Juliet 

Mount Pleasant 

Newbem 

Newport 

New Tazewell 

Norris 

Obion 

Oliver Springs 

Paris 

Parsons 

Pigeon Forge 

Pikeville 

Portland 



Table 61.— Number of FuU-tiiiie Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Male Female 



Total polic 



TEXAS-CoB. 

Belton 

Benbrook 

Beverly HiUs 

Big Lake 

Blanco 

Blue Mound 

Bonham 

Bowie 

Brady 

Breckenridge 

Brenham 

Bridge City 

Bridgeport 

Brookshire 

Brownfield 

Brownwood 

Burkbumett 

Burleson 

Burnet 

Caldwell 

Cameron 

Canton 

Carthage 

Castle Hills 

Cedar Hill 

Cedar Park 

Center 

Childress 

Clarendon 

Clarksville 

Cleburne 

Cleveland 

Clifton 

Clute 

Cockrell Hill 

Coleman 

Colleyville 

Colorado City 

Columbus 

Comanche 

Converse 

Conroe 

Corsicana 

Crowley 

Daingerfield 

Dalhart 

Dayton 

Decatur 

Deer Park 

De Kalb 

Denver City 

De Soto 

Devine 

Diboll 

Dimmitt 

Dublm 

DuncanviUe 

Eagle Pass 

Eastland 

Edinburg 

Edna 

EI Campo 

Electra 



TEXAS-Con. 

Ennis 

Everman 

Falfurrias 

Farmersville 

Flower Mound 

Forest Hill 

Fort Gates 

Fort Stockton 

Fredericksburg 

Freeport 

Fnendswood 

Fnona 

Gainesville 

Galena Park 

Gatesville 

Georgetown 

Gladewater 

Gonzales 

Graham 

Granbury 

Grand Saline 

Grapevine 

Greenville 

Groesbeck 

Gruver 

Gun Barrel 

Hallettsville 

Hamlin 

Harker Heights 

Haskell 

Henderson 

Hereford 

Hewitt 

Highland Park 

Hillsboro 

Hitchcock 

Hollywood Park .... 

Hooks 

Humble 

Hutchins 

Idalou 

Ingleside 

Iowa Park 

Jacinto City 

Jacksboro 

Jacksonville 

Jamaica Beach 

Jefferson 

Joshua 

Katy 

Keene 

Keller 

Kennedale 

KerrvUle 

Kilgore 

Kirby 

Kountzfi 

La Feria 

Joya 

Lake Dallas 

Lake Jackson 

Lakeway Village ... 



277 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employei 



Total polic 



City by Stat< 



TEXAS-Con. 

Lake Worth 

La Marque 

Lamesa 

Lampasas 

Lancaster 

La Porte 

League City 

Leon Valley 

Levelland 

Lewisville 

Liberty 

Liltlefield 

Live Oak 

Livingston 

Lockhart 

Lockney 

Lone Star 

Los Fresnos 

Luling 

Madisonville 

Malakoff 

Mansfield 

Marble Falls 

Marfa 

Marlin 

Mathis 

McKinney 

Memphis 

Mercedes 

Merkel 

Mexia 

Midlothian 

Mineral Wells 

Mission 

Missouri City 

Monahans 

Mount Pleasant 

Muleshoe 

Monday 

Naples 

Navasota 

Nederland 

Needville 

New Boston 

New Braunfels 

Nocona 

Nolanvilie 

North Richland Hills 

Olmos Park 

OIney 

Olton 

Overton 

Paducah 

Palacios 

Palestine 

Pantego 

Pearland 

Pearsall 

Pecos 

Perryton 

Pharr 

Pilot Point 

Pittsburg 

Pleasanton 

Port Aransas 

Port Isabel 

Portland 

Port Lavaca 

Port Neches 

Premont 

Princeton 



TEXAS— Con. 

Ranger 

Raymondville 

Richland Hills 

Richmond 

Richwood 

River Oaks 

Robinson 

Robstown 

Rockdale 

Rockport — 

Rockwall 

Rollingwood 

Rosebud 

Rosenberg 

Round Rock 

Rowlett 

Royse City 

Rusk 

Saginaw 

San Benito 

San Juan 

San Saba 

Sansom Park Village 

Schertz 

Seabrook 

Seagraves 

Sealy 

Seguin 

Selma 

Seminole 

Seven Points 

Shallowater 

Shamrock 

Sinton 

Slaton 

Smithville 

Snyder 

Sonora 

South Houston 

Southlake 

South Padre Island . 

Spearman 

Spring Valley 

Spur 

Stafford 

Stamford 

Slephenville 

Sugarland 

Sulphur Springs 

Sweeny 

Sweetwater 

Taylor 

Terrell 

Terrell Hills 

The Colony 

Tomball 

Troup 

Tulia 

Universal City 

University Park 

Uvalde 

Valley Mills 

Van 

Van Horn 

Vernon 

Vidor 

Village 

Wake ViUage 

Watauga 

Waxahachie 



TEXAS-Con. 

Weatherford 

Webster 

Weslaco 

West 

West Columbia 

West Lake Hills 

West Orange 

Westover Hills 

West University Place 

Westworth 

Wharton 

Whitehouse 

White Oak 

Whitesboro 

White Settlement 

Wilmer 

Windcrest 

Winnsboro 

Winters 

Woodville 

Woodway 

Wylie 

Yoakum 

Yorktown 

UTAH 

American Fork 

Beaver 

Blanding 

Brigham City 

Castle Dale' 

Cedar City 

Centerville 

Clearfield 

Clinton 

Draper 

East Carbon 

East Layton 

Ephraim 

Fa 

Gu 
Ha 
Heber City ... 

Helper 

Hurricane 

Hyde Park 

Hyrum 

Kanob 

Kaysville 

L^y<°n 

Uhi 

Manti 

Maplelon 

Midvale 

Moab 

Morgan City . . . 
Mount Pleasant 
North Ogden .. 
North Salt Uke 

Panquitch 

Park City 

Parowan 

Payson 

Pleasant Grove 
Pleasant View . 

Price 

Richfield 

Riverdale 



278 



of Full-tliiie Law Enforcement Employees, Cities with Population under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Tola] police employee: 
Total Male Female 



City by State 



Total police employees 



Male Female 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



Clifton Forge .... 

Coebum 

Colonial Beach .. 
Colonial Heights 

Courtland 

Covington 



Culpeper 



Dan 

Dayton 

Dubhn 

Dumfries 

Elkton 

Emporia 

Fairfax City ... 
Falls Church .. 
Farmville 

Fredericksburg . 

Front Royal ... 

Galax 

Glade Spring .. 
Gordonsville . . . 

Grundy 

Halifax 

Harrisonburg . . 

Haysi 

Hemdon 

HUlsville 

Hopewell 

Kenbridge 

Lawrenceville . . 

Lebanon 

Leesburg 

Lexington 

Luray 

Manassas 

Manassas Park 

Manon 

Martinsville 

Middleburg . . . . 
Middletown .... 
Jackson 

Narrows 

New Market ... 
Norton 

Pearisburg 

Pocahontas 

Poquoson 

Pound 

Pulaski 

Purcellville 

Radford 

Richlands 

Rocky Mount . 

Samt Paul 

Salem 

Saltville 

thfield 

South Boston .. 

South Hill 

Sunley 

Staunton 

Stephens City .. 



VIHGINU-Con. 



Strasburg 

Tappahannock 

Tazewell 

Victoria 

Vinton 

Waynesboro . . 
Williamsburg . 
Winchester .... 



Wise 

Woodstock 

WytheviUe 

WASHINGTON 

Aberdeen 

Anacortes 

Auburn 

Battle Ground 

Blaine 

Bonney I-ake 

Bothell 

Brier 

Buckley 

Burhngton 

Camas 

Castle Rock 

Centralia 

Chehalis 

Chewelah 

Clarkston 

Qe Blum 

Clyde Hill Town . . . . 

Colfax 

College Place 

ColviUe 

Connell 

Cosraopohs 

Dayton 

Des Moines 

Ellensburg 

Enumclaw 

Ephrata 

Fircrest 

Grand Coulee 

Grandview 

Hoquiam 

Issaquah 

Kelso 

Kent 

Kirkland 

Lacey 

Lynden 

Lynnwood 

MarysviUe 

McCleary 

Medma 

Mercer Island 

Milton 

Monroe 

Montesano 

Moses Lake 

Mountlake Terrace .. 

Mount Vernon 

Normandy Park 

Oak Harbor 

Ocean Shores 

Orting 



279 



Table 61.— Number of Full-time Law Enforeement Employees, Cities with Populatioo under 2S,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



City by State 



Total police employe 



Total police employees 



WASHINCTON- 



Othello 

Pacific 

Pasco 

Port Angeles 

Port Orchard 

Port Townsend 

Prosser 

Pullman 

Puyallup 

Quincy 

Raymond 

Redmond 

Ridgefield 

Sedro WooUey 

Selah 

Sequim 

Shelton 

Snohomish 

South Bend 

Steilacoom 

Sumner 

Sunnyside 

Toppenish 

Tukwila 

Tumwater 

Waitsburg 

Walla Walla 

Wapato 

Wenatchee 

Weslport 

Woodland 

WEST VIRGINU 

Alderson 

Anawalt 

Anmoore 

Ansted 

Athens 

Barboursville 

Beckley 

Belington 

Belle 

Benwood 

Berkeley Springs .... 

Bethlehem 

Bluefield 

Bramwell 

Bridgeport 

Buckhannon 

Bumsville 

Cairo 

Cameron 

Cedar Grove 

Ceredo 

Chapmanville 

Charles Town 

Chesapeake 

Chester 

Clarksburg 

Clay 

Clendenin 

Cowen 

Davy 

Delbarton 

Dunbar 

East Bank 

Eleanor 

Elizabeth 

Elk Garden 



WEST VIRGINU- 



WEST VTRGINIA- 



Elkins 

Fairview 

Farmington 

Fayetteville 

Flemington 

FoUansbee 

Fort Gay 

Franklin 

Friendly 

Gary 

Gassaway 

Gilbert 

Glasgow 

Glen Dale 

GlenviUe 

Grafton 

Granttown 

Grantsville 

Hamlin 

Hartford 

Henderson 

Hinton 

Hundred 

Hurricane 

Kenova 

Kermit 

Keystone 

KimbaU 

Kingwood 

Leon 

Lester 

Lewisburg 

Logan 

Lost Creek 

Lumberport 

Mabscott 

Madison 

Man 

Manmngton 

Marlinton 

Marmet 

Martmsburg 

Mason 

Matewan 

Matoaka 

McMechen 

Meadow Bridge . 
Middleboume .... 

Mill Creek 

Milton 

Monongah 

Montgomery 

Moorefield 

Moundsville 

Mount Hope .... 

Mullens 

Newburg 

New Cumberland 

New Haven 

New Martinsville 

Nitro 

Northfork 

Nutter Fort 

Oak Hill 

Oceana 

Osage 

Paden City 



















34 


29 






























15 


11 






24 


19 






















13 


12 


16 


13 










12 

















Parsons 

Paw Paw 

Pax 

Pennsboro 

Petersburg 

Philippi 

Piedmont 

Pine Grove 

Pineville 

Point Pleasant 

Rainelle 

Ranson 

Ravenswood 

Rhodell 

Rjchwood 

Ridgeley 

Ripley 

Rivesville 

Romney 

Ronceverte 

Saint Albans 

Saint Marys 

Salem 

Shepherdstown 

Shinnston 

SistersviUe 

Smilhers 

Sophia 

South Charleston 

Spencer 

Star City 

Stonewood 

SummersviUe 

Sutton 

Terra Alta 

Union 

Valley Grove 

Vienna 

War 

Wardensville 

Wayne 

Webster Springs 

Welch 

Wellsburg 

West Liberty 

West Milford 

Weston 

Westover 

West Umon 

Whitesville 

White Sulphur Springs 

Williamson 

Williamstown 

Worthington 



WISCONSIN 

Algoma 

Altoona 

Ashland 

Baraboo 

Bayside 

Beaver Dam 

Beloit Town 

Beriin 

Black River FaUs . 
Bloomer 



280 



Table 61.— Number of FuU-ttme Law Enforcement Employees, aties with Populatioa under 25,000, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



City by 



Total police employees 



City by State 



Total police i 



WISCONSIN-Con. 

Menasha 

Menasha Town 

Menomonie 

Mequon 

Memll 

Middleton 

Milton 

Mineral Point 

Minocqua 

Monona 

Monroe 

Montello 

Mosinee 

Mount Pleasant Town 

Mukwonago 

Muskego 

Neenah 

Neillsville 

New Holstein 

New Lisbon 

New London 

New Richmond 

North Fond du Lac .. 

Oak Creek 

Oconomowoc 

Oconomowoc Town .. 

Oconto 

Oconto Falls 

Onalaska 

Oregon 

Park Falls 

Peshtigo 

Pewaiiee 

Platteville 

Plymouth 

Portage 

Port Washijgton 

Prairie du Chien 

Prescott 

Reedsburg 

Rhinelander 

Rice Lake 

Richland Center 

Ripon 

River Falls 

Rothschild 

Saint Francis 

Sauk Prairie 

Schofield 

Shawano 

Sheboygan Falls 

Shorewood 

Shorewood Hills 

South Milwaukee 

Sparta 

Stanley 

Stevens Point 



WISCONSIN— Con. 

Stoddard 

Stoughton 

Stiu-geon Bay 

Sturtevant 

Summit Town 

Sun Prairie 

Thicnsville 

Tomah 

Tomahawk 

Town Of 

Oconomowoc 

Twin Lakes 

Two Rivers 

Union Grove 

Washburn 

Waterloo 

Watertown 

Waupaca 

Waupun 

West Bend 

West Milwaukee 

Weston 

Whitefish Bay 

Whitewater 

Wisconsin Dells 

Wisconsin Rapids 

WYOMING 

Afton 

Basin 

BuiTalo 

Cody 

Douglas 

Evanston 

Gillette 

Glenrock 

Green River 

Greybull 

Guernsey 

Jackson 

Lander 

Lusk 

Medicine Bow 

Mills 

Pine Bluffs 

Powell 

RawUns 

Riverton 

Rock Springs 

Saratoga 

Sheridan 

ThermopoUs 

Torrington 

Wheatland 

Worland 



281 



Table 62.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Universities and Colleges, October 31, 



Total Police Employees 
Total Male Female 



iity/College 



Auburn Umversity, Alabama 

University of Alabama, Birmmgham . . . . 

Arizona State University 

Arizona Western College 

Central Arizona College 

Eastern Arizona College 

Northern Arizona University 

Pima Community College, Arizona 

University of Arizona 

University of Arkansas 

California State College: 

Bakersfield 

Dominguez Hills 

San Bernardino 

Sonoma 

California State Polytechnic University: 

Pomona 

San Luis Obispo 

California State University: 

Chico 

Fresno 

FuUerton 

Hayward 

Long Beach 

Los Angeles 

Northridge 

Sacramento 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

San Jose 

Humboldt State University, California . 
University of California: 

Berkeley 

Davis 

Irvine 

Los Angeles 

Riverside 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Cruz 

Adams Stale College. Colorado 

Colorado State University 

University of Colordo, Colorado Spnngs 

Central Connecticut State College 

University of Connecticut 

Florida A & M University 

Florida Atlantic University 

Florida International University 

Florida State University 

University of Central Florida 

University of Florida 

University of North Florida 

University of South Florida 

University of West Florida 

Clayton Junior College, Georgia 

Columbus College, Georgia 

Georgia College 

Georgia Institute of Technology 

Georgia State University 

Medical College of Georgia 

Middle Georgia College 

University of Georgia 

Valdosta State College, Georgia 

West Georgia College 

Black Hawk College, Illinois 

Chicago Stale College. Illinois 

Eastern Ilhnois University 

Governors Slate University, Illinois 

Illinois Central College 

Illinois State University 

John A. Logan College, Illinois 



Lake County College, Illinois 

Lewis and Clark Commumity College, Illinois 

Loyola University of Chicago, Illinois 

Moraine Valley Conununity College, Illinois .. 

Morton Junior College, Illinois 

Northeastern Ilhnois University 

Northern Ilhnois University 

Oakton Community College, Ilhnois 

Rock Valley College, Illinois 

Sangamon State University, Ilhnois 

Southern Illinois University: 

Carbondale 

Edwardsville 

State Community College of East Saint Louis, 



Thornton Community College, Ilhnois 

Triton College, Illinois 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

University of Illinois: 

Chicago 

Urbana 

Waubonsee College. Illinois 

Western Illinois University 

Wilham Rainey Harper College, Illinois ... 
Indiana University: 

Bloomington 

Indianapohs 

New Albany 

South Bend 

Iowa State University 

ersity of Iowa 

Fort Hays State University, Kansas 

Kansas State University, Manhattan 

Pittsburg State University, Kansas 

University of Kansas 

University of Kansas, Medical Center 

Wichita State Univeristy, Kansas 

Eastern Kentucky University 

Jefferson Community College, Kentucky ... 

Morehead State University, Kentucky 

Northern Kentucky State University 

University of Kentucky 

University of Louisville, Kentucky 

Western Kentucky University .. 

Louisiana State University 

Southeastern Louisiana University 
University of Maine, Orono .... 
University of Southern Maine .. 
Bowie Slate College, Maryland . 
Frostburg State College, Maryland 
Morgan State University, Maryland 
Saint Mary's College of Maryland 
Salisbury State College, Maryland 
Towson Slate University, Maryland 
University of Baltimore, Maryland 
University of Maryland: 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore County 

College Park 

Eastern Shore 

Bentley College, Massachusetts . 
Boston College, Massachusetts . 
Boston University, Massachusetts 
Brandeis University, Massachusetts 
Clark University, Massachusetts 
Fitchburg State College, Massachusetts 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
North Adams Slate College, Massachusetts 
Northeastern University, Massachusetts 
Spnngfield College, Massachusetts 
Tufts University, Massachusetts 



282 



Table 62.— Number of FuU-ttme Law Enforcement Employees, Univenities and Colleges, October 31, 1978— Continued 



University /College 



Total Police Employei 



University/College 



Total Police Employees 
Total Male Female 



University of Massachusetts: 

Amherst 

Wellesley College, Massachusetts 

Wentworth Institute, Massachusetts 

Westfield State College, Massachusetts 

Worcester Slate College, Massachusetts 

Central Michigan University 

Delta College, Michigan 

Eastern Michigan University 

Ferns State College. Michigan 

Grand Valley Stale College, Michigan 

Lansing Community College, Michigan 

Michigan State University 

Michigan Technological University 

Northern Michigan University 

Oakland University. Michigan 

Saginaw Valley State College, Michigan 

Western Michigan Umversity 

University of Minnesota 

Mississippi Stale University 

University of Mississippi 

University of Missouri: 

Columbia 

Saint Louis 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln 

University of Nevada, Reno 

University of New Hampshire 

Brookdale Community College, New Jersey .... 

Burlington County College. New Jersey 

Glassboro Stale College, New Jersey 

Kean College, New Jersey 

Middlesex County College, New Jersey 

Monmouth College, New Jersey 

Montciair State College, New Jersey 

Rutgers University, New Jersey 

Stockton State College, New Jersey 

Trenton Slate College, New Jersey 

William Palerson College, New Jersey 

Eastern New Mexico University 

New Mexico Stale University 

University of New Mexico 

Western New Mexico University 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York .... 
Appalachian Slate University, North Carolina . 

East Carolina University, North Carohna 

North Carohna A & T University 

North Carolina Central Umversity 

North Carolina Stale University 

Pembroke Stale University. North Carolina .... 
University of North Carolina: 

Chapel Hill 

Charlotte 

Greensboro 

Wilmington 

Winston-Salem Stale University, North Carohna 

Cleveland State University, Ohio 

Kent Slate University, Ohio 

Miami Umversity, Ohio 

Ohio State University 

Wright State University, Ohio 

Central Stale University, Oklahoma 

Northeastern Oklahoma State University 

Oklahoma State University 

Putnam City Campus, Oklahoma 

University of Oklahoma 

University of Oklahoma, Health Sciences 

Center 

Oregon State University 

Bloomsburg State College, Pennsylvania 

California Stale College, Pennsylvania 

Cheyney State College, Pennsylvania 

Clarion State College, Pennsylvania 

East Stroudsburg State College, Pennsylvania .. 



Edinboro State College, Pennsylvania 

Elizabethtown College, Pennsylvania 

Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

Lincoln University, Pennsylvania 

Lock Haven State College, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State University: 

Altoona Campus 

Behrend College 

Capitol Campus 

McKeesport Campus 

University Park 

Seton Hill College. Pennsylvania 

Shippensburg Slate College, Pennsylvania 

Slippery Rock State College, Pennsylvania 

West Chester Stale College, Pennsylvania 

University of South Carolina 

Austin Peay State University, Tennessee 

East Tennessee Stale Umversity 

Middle Tennessee Stale University 

Tennessee Technological University 

University of Tennessee: 

KnoxviUe 

Martin 

Memphis 

Baylor Umversity. Texas 

Eastfield College, Texas 

East Texas State University 

Lamar Umversity, Texas 

Midwestern Slate University, Texas 

Moody College, Texas 

North Texas Stale University 

Pan American University, Texas 

Southern Methodist University, Texas 

Southwest Texas Slate University 

Stephen F. Austin Stale University, Texas 

Sul Ross State LIniversity, Texas 

Texas A & M University 

Texas Christian University 

Texas State Technical Institute 

Texas Technological University 

University of Houston. Texas 

Umversity of Texas: 

Arhngton 

Dallas 

El Paso 

Penman Basin 

San Antonio 

University of Texas Health Science Center, 

San Antomo 

University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 
University of Texas Southwest Medical School. 

Dallas 

Bngham Young University. Utah 

University of Utah 

LItah Technical College. Provo 

Weber State CoUege, Utah 

College of William and Mary, Virginia 

James Madison Umversity, Virginia 

Longwood College, Virginia 

Mary Washington College, Virginia 

Radford College. Virgima 

University of Richmond, Virginia 

University of Virginia 

Virginia Commonwealth University 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University 

Central Washmgton State College 

Washmgton State University 

Bluefield State CoUege, West Virginia 

Concord College, West Virginia 

Glenville State College, West Virginia 

Marshal] University, West Virginia 



283 



Table 62.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Universities and Colleges, October 31, 1978— Continued 



University/College 


Total Police Employees 


University/College 


Total Police Employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 




3 
4 
17 
10 
34 

10 

88 


31 

9 
76 




Milwaukee 
Oshkosh 
Parkside 
River Falls 
Whitewater 
University of Wyoming 


31 


26 




West Liberty State College. West Virgima 






3 
3 

12 








West Virginia University 




University of Wisconsin: 




Madison 









284 



Table 63.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Suburban Counties, October 31, 



Tolal poli( 



305 


222 


72 


60 


004 


773 


160 


132 


676 


501 


895 


704 


881 


686 


037 


811 


387 


301 


343 


282 



Male Female 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



DELAWARE 

New Castle 

FLORIDA 

Alachua 

Baker 

Bay 

Brevard 

Broward 

Clay 

Dade 

Escambia 

Hillsborough 

Lee 

Leon 

Manatee 

Nassau 

Orange 

Osceola 

Palm Beach 

Pinellas 

Polk 

Samt Johns 

Santa Rosa 

Sarasota 

Seminole 

Volusia 

Wakulla 

GEORGIA 

Bibb 

Butts 

Chatham 

Chatham Police 

Department 

Chattahoochee 

Cherokee 

Clayton 

Clayton Police 

Department 

Cobb 

Cobb Pohce 

Department 

Columbia 

Dade 

De Kalb 

De Kalb PoUce 

Department 

Dougherty 

Dougherty Pohce 

Department 

Douglas 

Effingham 

Fayette 

Forsyth 

Fulton 

Fulton Police 

Department 

Gwinnett 

Gwirmett Pohce 

Department 

Henry 

Henry PoUce 

Department 

Houston 

Jones 



GEORGU-a 

Newton 

Richmond 

Rockdale 

Twiggs 

Walker 

Walton 

IDAHO 

Ada 

ILLINOIS 

Champaign 

Clinton 

Cook 

Du Page 

Henry 

Kane 

Kankakee 

Macon 

Madison 

McHenry 

McLean 

Menard 

Monroe 

Rock Island 

Saint Clair 

Sangamon 

Tazewell 

Will 

Winnebago 

Woodford 

INDIANA 

Adams 

Allen 

Clark 

Clay 

Dearborn 

De Kalb 

Royd 

Gibson 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Hendricks 

Howard 

Johnson 

Lake 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Monroe 

Morgan 

Porter 

Saint Joseph 

Shelby 

Sullivan 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Vanderburgh 

Vermillion 

Vigo 

Warrick 

Wells 



Table 63.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Suburban Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



County by State 



Total police employees 


Total 


Male 


Female 1 


33 




9 


81 


69 


12 


26 


24 


2 


550 


479 


71 


36 


30 


6 


1,336 


1,212 


124 


24 


23 


1 


24 


21 


3 


85 


74 


11 


129 


113 


16 


14 


10 


4 


197 


157 


40 


70 


58 


12 


922 


774 


148 


122 


100 


22 


1.103 


896 


207 


37 


26 


11 


122 


92 


30 


67 


57 


10 


35 


29 


6 


91 


75 


16 


157 


127 


30 


156 


127 


29 


27 


20 


7 


66 


52 


14 


162 


119 


43 


258 


220 


38 


56 


46 


10 


63 


51 


12 


250 


226 


24 


115 


98 


17 


92 


70 


22 


339 


268 


71 


32 


26 


6 


80 


65 


15 


123 


92 


31 


70 


58 


12 


40 


33 


7 


25 


20 


5 


247 


181 


66 


823 


705 


118 


74 


63 


11 


10 


6 


4 


41 


36 


5 


31 


22 


9 


28 


22 


6 


53 


42 


11 


356 


296 


60 


48 


44 


4 


19 


18 


1 


206 


169 


37 


127 


105 


22 


48 


39 


9 


18 


16 


2 



IOWA 

Black Hawk 

Dubuque 

Linn 

Polk 

Pottawattamie .... 

Scott 

Warren 

Woodbury 

KANSAS 

Butler 

Douglas 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Osage 

Sedgwick 

Shawnee 

Wyandotte 

KENTUCKY 

Boone 

Boone Police 

Department .... 

Bourbon 

Boyd 

Bulhtt 

Bullitt Police 

Department — 

Campbell 

Campbell Police 

Department .... 

ChnsUan 

Chnstian Police 

Department .... 
Clark 

Greenup 

Henderson 

Jefferson Police 

Department .... 

Jessamine 

Kenton Police 

Department .... 

Oldham 

Oldham Police 

Department .... 

Scott 

Woodford 

Woodford Police 

Department .... 

LOUISIANA 

Ascension 

Bossier 

Caddo 

Calcasieu 

East Baton Rouge 

Grant 

Lafayette 

Livingston 

Ouachita 

Rapides 

Saint Bernard 

Saint Tammany .. 

Webster 

West Baton Rouge 



MAINE 

Androscoggin 

Cumberland 

MARYLAND 

Anne Arundel 

Anne Arundel Police 

Department 

Baltimore 

Baltimore Police 

Department 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Harford 

Howard 

Howard Police 

Department 

Montgomery 

Montgomery Police 

Department 

Prince Georges 

Prince Georges Polict 

Department 

MICHIGAN 

Barry 

Bay 

Calhoun 

Clinton 

Ingham 

Ionia 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Kent 

Lapeer 

Macomb 

Muskegon 
Oakland 
Oceana 
Ottawa 

Saint Clair 
Shiawassee 
Van Buren 

Washtenaw 

Wayne 

MINNESOTA 

Anoka 

Carver 

Chisago 

Clay 

Dakota 

Hennepm 

Olmsted 

Polk 

Ramsey 

Saint Louis 

Scott 

Sherburne 



MINNESOTA-Con. 

Steams 

Washington 

Wnght 

MISSISSIPPI 

De Soto 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hinds 

Jackson 

Rankin 

Stone 

MISSOURI 

Andrew 

Boone 

Buchanan 

Cass 

Chnstian 

Clay 

Franklin 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Platte 

Ray 

Sami Charles 

Saint Louis PoUcc 
Department 

MONTANA 

Cascade 

Yellowstone 

NEBRASKA 

Dakou 

Douglas 

Uncaster 

Sarpy 

NEVADA 

Washoe 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic 

Atlantic Prosecutor ... 

Bergen Police 

Department 

rgen Prosecutor 

Burlington 

BurUngton Prosecutor 

Camden 

Camden Prosecutor . . . 

Cumberland 

Cumberland Prosecutor 

Essex 

Essex Prosecutor 

Gloucester 

Gloucester Prosecutor 
Hudson 



286 



Table 63.— Number of Full-time Law Enforeement Employees, Suburban Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total 


pol.ce en 


ployees 


Total 


Male 


Female 


91 


81 


10 


156 


109 


47 


90 


62 


28 


81 


45 


36 


185 


140 


45 


133 


87 


46 


122 


103 


19 


23 


20 


3 


130 


86 


44 


70 


41 


29 


239 


189 


50 


147 


102 


45 


39 
11 


35 

5 


4 
6 


79 


65 


14 


53 


31 


22 


202 


167 


35 


167 


96 


71 


4 


3 


1 


9 


6 


3 


159 


115 


44 


96 


85 


11 


452 


417 


35 


20 


16 


4 


43 


39 


4 


15 


11 


4 


412 


358 


54 


23 


18 


5 


4,091 


3.766 


325 


408 


346 


62 


24 


24 




51 


44 


7 


52 


43 


9 


39 


37 


2 


53 


41 


12 


41 


34 


7 


423 


377 


46 


2,875 


2,636 


239 


48 


39 


9 


58 


46 


12 


179 


149 


30 


53 


44 


9 


42 


35 


7 


131 


121 


10 


232 


182 


50 


13 


10 


3 


72 


56 


16 


67 


61 


6 


148 


116 


32 


68 


60 


g 


185 


165 


20 


4 


3 


1 


125 


120 


5 


91 


79 


12 


38 


36 


2 


50 


39 


11 


19 


16 


3 


50 


43 


7 


107 


95 


12 


20 


16 


4 



County by State 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



County by State 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Cass 

Grand Forks 

OHIO 

Allen 

Auglaize 

Belmont 

Butler 

Champaign 

Clark 

Clermont 

Cuyahoga 

Delaware 

Fairfield 

Franklin 

Geauga 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Jefferson 

Lawrence 

Lorain 

Lucas 

Madison 

Mahonmg 

Montgomery 

Pickaway 

Preble 

Stark 

Summit 

Van Wert 

OKLAHOMA 

Canadian 

Cleveland 

Comanche 

Creek 

Le Flore 

Mayes 

McClam 

Oklahoma 

Osage 

Pottawatomie 

Sequoyah 

Tulsa 

Wagoner 

OREGON 

Clackamas 

Marion 

Multnomah 

Polk 

Washington 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Allegheny 

Allegheny Police 

Department 

Beaver 

Blair 

Carbon 

Cumberland 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Montgomery Detective 



PENNSYLVANU- 



Washington 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Berkeley 

Charleston Police 

Department 

Greenville 

Lexington 

Pickens 

Richland 

Spartanburg 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Meade 

Minnehaha 

Pennington 

TENI 

Anderson 

Blount 

Carter 

Cheatham 

Dickson 

Hamilton 

Hawkins 

Manon 

Montgomery 

Robertson 

Rutherford 

Shelby 

Sullivan 

Sumner 

Tipton 

Unicoi 



Bexar 

Brazona 

Brazos 

Callahan 

Cameron 

Qay 

CoUin 

Comal 

Coryell 

Dallas 

Denton 

Ector 

Elhs 

El Paso 

Fort Bend 

Grayson 

Gregg 

Guadalupe 

Hardin 

Hays 

Hidalgo 

Hood 



Table 63.— Number of FuU-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Suburban Counties, October 31, 1978— Coatlnued 



Total Male Female 



County by State 



County by State 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



TEXAS-Coi 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Jones 

Kaufman 

Lubbock 

McLennan 

Midland 

Montgomery 

Nueces 

Orange 

Parker 

Potter 

Randall 

Rockwall 

San Patricio 

Smith 

Tarrant 

Taylor 

Tom Green 

Travis 

WaUer 

Wichita 

Williamson 

Wise 

UTAH 

Davis 

Salt Lake 

Tooele 

Utah 

Weber 

VIRGINU 

Amherst 



VIRGINU-Con. 

Appomattox 

Botetourt 

Campbell 

Charles City 

Chesterfield Police 

Department 

Craig 

Dinwiddle 

Fairfax Pohce 

Department 

Gloucester 

Goochland 

Hanover 

Henrico Pohce 

Department 

James City 

Loudoun 

Powhatan 

Prince George 

Prince William Police 

Department 

Roanoke 

Scott 

Washington 

York 



WASHINGTON 

Benton 

Qark 

Frankhn 

King 

Pierce 

Snohomish 



WASHINGTON-Coo. 

Spokane 

Yakima 

WEST VIRGINU 

Brooke 

CabeU 

Hancock 

Kanawha 

Marshall 

Ohio 

Putnam 

Wayne 

Wirt 

Wood 

WISCONSIN 

Brown 

Calumet 

Chippewa 

Dane 

Douglas 

Eau Claire 

Kenosha 

La Crosse 

Milwaukee 

Outagamie 

Ozaukee 

Racine 

Rock 

Saint Croix 

Washington 

Waukesha 

Winnebago 



Table 64.— Number of FuU-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978 



Total police employ© 



Male Female 



Total police employees 



County by State 



Total 
Total 



Chicot 


12 


aark 


13 


Qay 


10 


CUburae 


16 


Oeveland 


7 


Columbia 


20 


Conway 


10 


Craighead 


20 


Cross 


12 


Dallas 


3 


Desha 


11 


Drew 


9 


Faulkner 


15 


Franlflin 


14 


See footnote at end of 


table 



ARKANSAS-Coo. 

Fulton 

Garland 

Grant 

Greene 

Hempstead 

Hot Spring 

Howard 

Independence 

Jackson 

Johnson 

Lafayette 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Lincoln 

Lonoke 

Madison 

Marion 

Mississippi 

Monroe 

Nevada 

Newton 

Ouachita 

Perry 

PhiUips 

Pike 

Poinsett 

Polk 

Pope 

Prairie 

Randolph 

Saint Francis 

Scott 

Searcy 

Stone 

Van Buren 

White 

Woodruff 

YeU 

CALIFORNU 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Glenn 

Humboldt 

Imperial 

Inyo 

Kings 

Lake 

Lassen 

Madera 

Mariposa 

Mendocino 

Modoc 

Nevada 

San Benito 

San Luis Obispo 

Shasta 



CALIFORNIA-Con. 

Siskiyou 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Yuba 

COLORADO 

Alamosa 

Archuleta 

Baca 

Bent 

Chaffee 

Costilla 

Crowley 

ebert 

Garfield 

Gunnison 

Hinsdale 

Kiowa 

Kit Carson 

La Plata 

Las Animas* 

Lincoln 

Mineral 

Moffat 

Montrose 

Morgan 

Otero 

PhiUips 

Pitkin 

Prowers 

Routt 

Saguache 

San Juan 

San Miguel 

Sedgwick 

Summit 

Yuma 

FLORIDA 

Bradford 

Calhoun 

Charlotte 

Citrus 

Collier 

Columbia 

De Soto 

Dixie 

Hagler 

Franklin 

Gadsden 

Gilchrist 

Glades 

Gulf 

Hamilton 

Hardee 

Hendry 

Hernando 

Highlands 

Holmes 

Indian River 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Lafayette 

Lake 



Table 64.— Number of FuU-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



County by State 



Total pobce employees 



County by Sute 



GEORGU-Con. 

Hall 

Hancock 

Hart 
Heard 

Jacl son 

JefT Davis 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Lamar 

Lamer 

Laurens 

Lib« rty 

Lincoln 

Long 

Lowndes 

Lumpkin 

Madison 

Marion 

Mcintosh 

Menwether 

Miller 

Mite hell 

Monroe 

Montgomerv 

Morgan 

Oconee 

Ogle thorpe 

Peach 

Pickens 

Pierce 

Pike 

Polk 

Polk Police 

Departmenl 
Pulaski 
Putnam 
Quitman 
Randolph 
Schley 
Seminole 
Spalding 
Stephens 
Stewart 

Talbot 

Taliaferro 

Taylor 

Terrell 

Thomas 

Tift 

Tcx>mbs 

Treutlen 

Troup 

Turner 

Union 

Ware 



Wayne 

Wheeler 

White 

Whitfield 

Wilcox 

Wilkes 

WUkinson 

Worth 



IDAHO 

Adams 

BanncKk 

Bear Lake 

Benewah 

Bingham 

Blaine 

Boise 

Bonner 

Bonneville 

Boundary 

Butte 

Canyon 

Caribou 

Cassia 

Qark 

Custer 

Elmore 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Gem 

Gooding 

Idaho 

Jefferson 

Jerome 

Kootenai 

Latah 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Madison 

Minidoka 

Nez PcTce 

Oneida 

Owyhee 

Payette 

Power 

Shoshone 

Teton 

Twin Falls 

Valley 

Washington 



Adams 

Alexander .. 
Bond 

Bureau 

Calhoun .... 

Carroll 

Cass 

Christian . . . 

Clark 

Clay 

Coles 

Crawford ... 
Cumberland 
De Kalb ... 
De Witt .... 
Douglas .... 



Table 64.— Number of FuU-time Uw Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 




291 



Table 64.— Number of FuU-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Rm^ Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



County by Stat. Total police employees 

Total Male Female 



County by State 



KANSAS-Con. 

Rawlins 

Republic 

Rice 

Riley 

Rooks 

Rush 

Russell 

Scott 

Seward 

Sheridan 

Sherman 

Smith 

Stafford 

Stanton 

Sumner 

Thomas 

Trego 

Wabaunsee 

Wallace 

Washington 

Wichita 

Wilson 

Woodson 

KENTUCKY 

Adair 

Allen 

Anderson 

Ballard 

Barren 

Bath 

Bell 

Boyle 

Bracken 

Breathitt 

Breckmndge 

Butler 

Caldwell 

Calloway 

Carlisle 

Carroll 

Carter 

Casey 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crittenden 

Cumberland 

Edmonson 

Elliott 

Estill 

Fleming 

Floyd 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gallatin 

Garrard 

Graves 

Grayson 

Green 

Hancock 

Hardin 

Harlan 

Harrison 

Hart 

Henry 

Hickman 



Total pohce employees 



Male Female 



County by State 



KENTUCKY-Con. 

Hopkins 

Jackson 

Johnson 

Knott 

Knox 

Larue 

Lawrence 

Ue 

Leslie 

Letcher 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Livingston 

Logan 

Lyon Police 

Department 

Madison 

Magoflin 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Mason 

McCracken 

McCracken Police 

Department 
McCreary 
McLean 
Meade 
Menifee 
Mercer 
Metcalfe 
Monroe 
Montgomery 

Muhlenberg 

Nelson 

Nicholas 

Ohio 

Owen 

Pendleton 
Perry 

Pike 

Pike Police 

Department 

Powell 

Pulaski 

Robertson 

Rockcastle 

Rowan 

Russell 

Shelby 

Simpson 

Spencer 

Taylor 

Todd 

Tngg 

Trimble 

Union 

Warren 

Washington 

Wayne 

Webster 

Whitley 

Wolfe 

LOUISIANA 

Acadia 



292 



Fable 64.— Number of FuU-dme Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 

Total pobce employees 
Toul Male Female 



Total police employees 



MARYLAND— Con. 

Fredentk 

Garrett 

Kent 

Queen Annes 

Saint Marys 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washmgton 

Worcester 

MICHIGAN 

Alcona 

Alger 

Allegan 

Alpena 

Antnm 

Baraga 

Bemen 

Cass 

Charlevoix 

Cheboygan 

Chippewa 

Clare 

Crawford 

Delta 

Dickinson 

Emmet 

Gladwin 

Gogebic 

Grand Traverse 

Gratiot 

Hillsdale 

Huron 

Iron 

Isabella 

Kalkaska 

Keweenaw 

Lake 

Leelanau 

Lenawee 

Luce 

Mackinac 

Manistee 

Mason 

Mecosta 

Menomii 
Midland 
Missaukee ... 
Montcalm ... 
Montmorency 

Newaygo 

Ogemaw 

Ontonagon .. 
Osceola 

Otsego 

Presque Isle . 
Roscommon 
Saint Joseph 

Sanilac 

Schoolcraft . . 

Tuscola 

Wexford 



MINNESOTA 

Aitkin 

Becker 

Beltrami 

Big Stone 

Blue Earth 

Carlton 

Cass 

Chippewa 

Clearwater 

Cook 

Cottonwood 

Crow Wing 

Dodge 

Douglas 

Faribault 

Fillmore 

Freeborn 

Goodhue 

Grant 

Houston 

Hubbard 

Itasca 

Jackson 

Kanabec 

Kandiyohi 

Kittson 

Koochiching 

Lac Qui Parle 

Lake-of-the-Woods 

Lake 

Le Sueur 

Lincoln 

Lyon 

Mahnomen 

Marshall 

Martin 

McLeod 

Meeker 

Mille Lacs 

Morrison 

Mower 

Murray 

Nicollet 

Nobles 

Norman 

Otter Tail 

Pennington 

Pine 

Pipestone 

Pope 

Red Lake 

Redwood 

Renville 

Rice 

Rock 

Roseau 

Sibley 

Steele 

Stevens 

Swift 

Todd 

Traverse 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waseca 

Watonwan 

WUkin 

Winona 

Yellow Medicine .. 



293 



Table 64.-Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Rm^ Counties, October 31, 1978-Continued 








County by State 


Total 


police e 


nployees 


County by State 


Total 


police employees 


County by State 


Total 


police employees 




Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Femal 


MISSISSIPPI 

Alcorn 


25 
21 

10 

17 


10 

18 
14 


2 

1 

1' 

3 

2 

2 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 

4 
4 

5 

2 

3 
3 

6 

2 
1 
I 
1 
1 

I 
1 
2 
3 
1 

2 

1 
10 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

3 
2 


MlSSOURl-Con. 


17 
20 

48 
21 

10 

5 
10 
10 

9 
12 
10 

4 

7 

4 
II 

12 
13 
11 

9 
10 

3 

2 

7 

3 

6 
23 

5 
10 

4 

4 
12 


18 
10 


7 
5 
1 

3 
1 

4 
4 

2 
2 
2 

I 

1 
5 

2 
3 

4 

2 
1 

2 

11 

1 

2 

5 

2 

1 

5 

3 
2 

3 

2 
1 

2 
2 

2 

3 
1 
5 

2 

3 

3 

2 

5 

1 

2 


MISSOURl-Con. 


7 
7 
11 
11 
5 
6 
9 
7 
2 

11 
17 

5 
11 
7 
3 

4 
7 
2 
16 
42 
38 
2 
10 

3 

8 
10 

4 
11 
32 

8 
22 
10 

6 

4 
12 
62 

12 

9 

8 

5 
20 

6 
12 
27 
12 

4 
11 
10 
10 
12 

10 
4 

2 

17 
9 


21 

15 






Cape Girardeau 


Stoddard 

Stone 

Taney 

Texas 

Vernon 

Warren 

Wayne 

Webster 








Bolivar 












Chickasaw 






Choctaw 




1 


Claiborne 




1 


Clarke 


Cole 




Clay 


Cooper . 


I 


Coahoma 


Crawford 


MONTANA 




Copiah 


Dade 




Covington 


Dallas 




Forrest 


Daviess 


5 


Franklin 


De Kalb 

Dent 


Big Horn .. 


George 






Holmes 


Douglas 







Humphreys 


Dunklin 




2 


Issaquena 




Jasper 

Jefferson 


Grundy 

Harrison 


Chouteau 


4 


Jefferson Davis 


Henry 







Jones 








Lauderdale 


Howard 

Howell 


Fergus 

Hathead 

Gallatin 

Garfield 

Glacier 

Golden Valley 


4 
9 
6 


Lawrence 

Leake .... 


Jasper 

Johnson 

Knox 

Laclede 

Lafayette 

Lawrence 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Linn 


Lee 




Unore 




Lincoln 


Hill 

Jefferson 




Lowndes 


1 


Madison 






Lake 

Lewis and Clark 

Liberty 




Monroe 




Montgomery 




Neshoba 


Madison 




Newton 


Maries 


'"^° " 




Noxubee 




Madison 




Oktibbeha 


McDonald . 


y,'^ °"^ 


' 


Panola 


Mercer 


^ ^" 


4 
9 


Perry 




r^'"^"^ 1 


Pike 




1^ . ^ .: 


Pontotoc 




usse s e 




Quitman 




"^ 




Sharkey 




p .f 


3 

4 
3 

7 


Sunnower 


New Madrid 


on era 

owder Kiver 


Tate 


Newton 




Tippah 






Tishomingo 


Oregon .... 




Tunica , 


Osage 


"^ ^ 


4 
6 

3 
2 
4 
5 
4 
5 


Union 




B °^K^^ 


Walthall 




Sanders 


Warren 




Washmgton 


Pettis 


Stillwater 


Wayne' 


Phelps 


Webster 


Pike 


Teton 

Toole 

Treasure 

Valley 

Wheatland 

Wibaux 

NEBRASKA 

Adams 

Antelope 

'Vrthur 

Banner 


Winston 


Polk 


Yazoo 








4 
2 


MISSOURI 

Adair 


RaUs 

Randolph 

Reynolds 

R'pi'y • 

Saint Clair 


Audrain 




Barton .... 


Saint Francois 

Sainte Genevieve 

Saline 




Bates 

Benton 

Bollinger 


4 


Butler 


ScoUand 

Scott 




Caldwell 


Boone 


;■ 



294 



64.— Number of FuU-time Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 




Table 64.— Number of Full-time Law Enforeement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



County by State 



Total police employees 



County by State 



Total police employees 



County by Stat( 



NORTH CAROLINA- 



Jones 

Ue 

Lenoir 

Lincoln 

Macon 

McDowell 

Mitchell 

Montgomery 

Moore 

Nash 

Northampton 

Onslow 

Pamlico 

Pasquotank 

Pender 

Perquimans 

Person 

Pitt 

Polk 

Richmond 

Robeson 

Rockingham 

Rowan 

Rutherford 

Sampson 

Scotland 

Stanly 

Surry 

Transylvania 

Tyrrell 

Vance 

Warren 

Washington 

Watauga 

Wayne 

Wilkes 

Wilson 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Adams 

Benson 

Bilhngs 

Bottmeau 

Bowman 

Burke 

Burleigh 

Cavalier 

Dickey 

Dunn 

Eddy 

Emmons 

Foster 

Golden Valley 

Grant 

Hettinger 

Kidder 

La Moure 

Logan 

McHenry 

Mcintosh 

McKenzie 

McLean 

Mercer 

Morton 



NORTH DAKOTA- 



Mountrail 
Nelson ... 
Oliver .... 
Pembina . . 

Pierce 

Ramsey . . 
Ransom . . 
Renville .. 
Richland . 
Rolette . . . 
Sargent ... 
Shehdan 
Sioux 

Stark 

Steele 

Stutsman . 
Towner . . . 

Traill 

Walsh .... 

Ward 

Wells 

Williams .. 



Adams 

Ashland ... 
Athens .... 

Brown 

Clinton .... 
Columbiana 
Coshocton 

Darke 

Fayette .... 

Galha 

Hancock 
Hardin .... 

Henry 

Hocking , . . 

Holmes 

Jackson ... 

Knox 

Licking .... 

Morrow . . . 

Noble 

Paulding . . 

Perry 

Pike 

Scioto 

Shelby 

Tuscarawas 



Union ... 
Wayne ... 
Williams . 
Wyandot 



OKLAHOMA 



Adair .... 
Alfalfa ... 
Atoka . . . 
Beaver ... 
Beckham 

Bryan .... 



OKLAHOMA-Con. 

Carter 

Cherokee 

Choctaw 

Cimarron 

Coal 

Craig 

Delaware 

Ellis 

Garfield 

Grady 

Grant 

Harmon 

Haskell 

Hughes 

Jackson 

JefTerson 

Johnston 

Kay 

Kingfisher 

Lincoln 

Love 

Major 

Marshall 

McCurtain 

Mcintosh 

Murray 

Muskogee 

Noble 

Nowata 

Okfuskee 

Okmulgee 

Ottawa 

Pawnee 

Pittsburg 

Pontotoc 

Pushmataha 

Roger Mills 

Seminole 

Stephens 

Texas 

Tillman 



Baker 

Benton 
Clatsop 
Columbia 
Coos 

Curry 
Deschutes 
Douglas 
Gilliam 

Harney 
Hood River 
Jackson 



296 



able 64.-Niunber of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 








b State 


Total police employees 


County by State 


Total police employees | 


County by State 


Total police employees 


ouny y 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


OREGON-Con. 

fferson 


14 
56 
29 

5 
27 
67 
10 
11 

3 

19 
16 

9 

6 
19 

1 
27 

3 

4 
26 

7 

4 
14 

8 
14 

7 

9 
19 

8 
70 
64 

7 
32 
27 
22 
13 
27 
31 
11 
10 
16 
58 
23 
35 
12 
52 
12 
30 
36 
30 
13 
12 

8 
18 
35 
41 

9 
47 
23 
22 

7 


11 
44 
22 

5 
19 
50 

9 

4 

2 
15 
16 

6 

3 
13 

1 
26 

2 

3 
2 

17 
6 
1 
3 
9 
7 

11 
6 
7 

15 

7 
66 
54 

7 
28 
24 
19 
13 
20 
25 
11 

15 
50 
21 
33 
10 
46 
10 
26 
34 
30 
11 
9 
7 
16 
25 
34 
6 
42 
21 

6 


3 
12 
7 

8 
17 

7 

3 
3 
6 

1 

1 
1 
2 
9 

1 

1 

5 

3 

2 
4 

1 


SOLITH DAKOTA- 
Continued 




•• 


6 
1 

2 
3 
1 

1 

1 
4 

2 

6 
3 

5 

1 

3 

1 

3 
1 

3 

2 

2 
4 

2 

9 

1 
1 
3 

5 
1 
2 

1 
5 

1 
3 


TENNESSEE-Con. 

Hamblen 

Hancock 

Hardeman 

Hardin 

Henderson 

Henry 

Houston 

Humphreys 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Johnson 

Uke 

Uuderdale 

Lawrence 

Lewis 

Lincoln 

Loudon 

Macon 

Madison 

Marshall 

Mauiy 

McMinn 

McNairy 

Meigs 

Monroe 

Moore 

Obion 

Overton 

Perry 

Pickett 

Polk 

Putnam 

Rhea 

Roane 

Scott 

Sevier 

Smith 

Stewart 

Trousdale 

Van Buren 

Warren 

Wayne 

Weakley 

White 

TEXAS 

Anderson 

Andrews 

Angelina 

Aransas 

Archer 

Armstrong 

Atascosa 

Austin 

Bailey 

Bandera 

Bastrop 

Baylor 

Blanco 

Borden 

Bosque 

Brewster 

Briscoe 

Brown 

Burleson 

Burnet 

Caldwell 

Calhoun 

Camp 


26 

2 
13 
13 

8 
24 
10 
10 

6 
15 

9 

4 
11 
27 

4 
13 
17 

8 
34 
11 
25 
23 
13 
10 
14 

3 

7 
12 

7 

13 
20 
17 
29 
20 
32 
8 
13 
9 
6 
16 
10 
10 
10 


21 

19 
12 

23 

16 

32 
22 

13 

18 

24 
20 
26 

14 

9 
10 

13 


5 


amath 

ike 


Bon Homme 

Brookings 

Brown 


4 




5 


alheur 


Clark 

Clay 

Codington 

Corson 

Custer 

Davison 

Deuel 

Dewey 


1 




2 


erman 

illamook 

matUla 


3 

3 
3 


allowa 


4 


Tieller 


1 


Fall River 

Faulk 


4 
1 


PENNSYLVANIA 

edford 

entre 

arion 

earf.eld 


Grant 

Gregory 

Haakon 

Hamlin 


1 
2 

3 


Hand 


1 
2 


Hughes 


3 


ulton 


Jackson 


1 


Jerauld 


1 


fferson 




Lake 

Lawrence 


1 


cKean 

ifflin 


2 


Lincoln 


2 




Marshall 

McCook 

McPherson 




arren 


2 






SOUTH CAROUNA 

Uendale 


Mellette 

Moody 

Perkins 


5 
6 


Sp'nk 




eaufort 


5 


Sully 


3 


herokee 

hester 


3 


Turner 


2 


hesterfield 

larendon 


2 


Walworth 

Yankton 


2 


olleton 


2 


TENNESSEE 
Bedford 




illon 

dgefield 

airfield 


3 




5 




Bledsoe 


3 


^ nd 


Campbell 


5 






4 










Chester 


2 






4 


ancaster 




5 




Cocke 


3 


lanon 


Coffee 


3 






5 






2 


ewberry 


Decatur 






Dekalb 


1 






2 










Fentress 


1 


Jnion 


Franklin 


3 






4 






6 














eadle 


Grundy 





297 



Table 64.-Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 







Lipscomb 
Uano 

Lynn 

Madison .... 

Marion 

Martin 

Mason 

Matagorda . 
McCullough 
McMullen .. 

Medina 

Milam 

Mills 

Mitchell 



Morns 

Motley 

Newton 

Nolan 

Ochiltree 

Oldham 

Palo Pinto ... 

Panola 

Parmer 

Pecos 

Polk 

Presidio 

Rains 

Reagan 

Real 

Red River .... 

Reeves 

Roberts 

Robertson 

Rusk 

.ugustine 

San Saba 

Schleicher 

Scurry 

Shackelford ... 

Sherman 

Somervell 

Starr 

Stephens 

Stonewall 

Swisher 

Terrell 

Throckmorton 

Titus 

Trinity 

Upshur 

' Upton 

Uvalde 

Van Zandt 



Total pohce employees 



County by State 



Victoria 

Walker 

Ward 

Washington 

Wharton 

Wheeler 

Wilbarger 

Willacy 

Wilson 

Winkler 

Wood 

Yoakum 

Young 



Beaver .... 
Box Elder 
Cache .... 
Carbon . . . 



Duchesne 
Garfield . 



Juab 

Kane 

Millard .... 

Piule 

Rich 

San Juan . . 

Sanpete 

Sevier 

Summit . . . . . 

Uintah 

Wasatch .... 
Washington 
Wayne 



VERMONT 

Bennington 



Accomack .. 
Albemarle . . 
Alleghany . . 

Augusta . . . . 

Bath 

Bedford .... 

Bland 

Brunswick .. 
Buchanan . . 
Buckingham 
Caroline .... 

Carroll 

Charlotte ... 

aarke 

Culpeper . . . 
Cumberland 
Dickenson .. 

Essex 

Fauquier ... 
Royd 



rabic 64.— Number of Full-time Law Enforcement Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978— Continued 



Total police employees 



Male Female 



County by State 



Total police employees 
Total Male Female 



WASHINGTON-Con. 



Thurston . . . . 
Wahkiakum . 
Walla Walla 



WEST VIRGINU 



Barbour . . 
Berkeley . . 
Boone .... 
Braxton .. 
Calhoun .. 

Clay 

Doddridge 
Fayette ... 



Grant 

Greenbrier 
Hampshire 

Hardy 

Harrison 
Jackson . . . 
Jefferson . . 

Lincoln .... 

Manon .... 

Mason 

:Dowell . 

Mineral — 

Mingo 

Monongalia 
Monroe . . . 
Morgan . . . 
Nicholas ... 
Pendleton . 
Pleasants .. 
Pocahontas 

Raleigh .... 
Randolph . 
Ritchie .... 

Roane 

Summers . . 
Taylor 

Tyler"..::::: 

Upshur 

Webster ... 

Wetzel 

Wyoming .. 



WISCONSIN 



Ashland . 

Bayfield . 
Buffalo .. 

Clark 

Columbia 



WISCONSIN-Con. 

Crawford 

Dodge 

Door 

Dunn 

Florence 

Fond du Lac 

Forest 

Grant 

Green 

Green Lake 

Iowa 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Juneau 

Kewaunee 

Lafayette 

Langlade 

Lincoln 

Manitowoc 

Marathon 

Marinette 

Marquette 

Menominee 

Monroe 

Oconto 

Oneida 

Pierce 

Polk 

Portage 



Sauk 

Sawyer 

Shawano 

Sheboygan 

Taylor 

Trempealeau 

Vilas 
Walworth 
Washburn 
Waupaca 
Waushara . . . 
Wood 



Albany 

Big Horn .. 
Campbell ... 

Carbon 

Converse . . . 

Crook 

Fremont .... 

Goshen 

Springs 

Johnson 

Laramie .... 

Lincoln 

Natrona .... 
Niobrara ... 

Park 

Platte 

Sheridan 

Sweetwater . 
Teton 



299 



Table 64.— Number of Full-time Law Enforeement 



WYOMING-CoD. 

Weslon 



Employees, Rural Counties, October 31, 1978-Conttnued 



'Male and female breakdown is not available. 

ASSAULTS ON LAW ENFORCEMENT 
OFFICERS 

During 1978, 56,130 assaults on law enforcement 
officers were reported by 9,150 agencies covering an 
estimated 180,948,000 inhabitants, or approximately 

Table 65.-Law 



County by State 


Total police employees 


County by State 


Total police employe 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Fema 


OTHER AREAS 

Canal Zone 


327 
356 


295 
296 


32 
60 


OTHER AREAS-Con. 


10,523 
69 


9.393 

55 




Guam 




Samoa 





83 percent of the United States population. The ra 
of assaults for the Nation was 16 per 100 officer 
illustrating that such incidents continue to pose 
problem for those involved in law enforcement. 



Enforcement Officers Assaulted, Geographic Division and Population Group, 1978 



[9,150 agencies: 1978 estimated population 180,948,000] 



Geographic division 


Total 
assaults 


Rate per 

100 
officers 


Assaults 
with 
injury 


Rate^per 
ofTicers 


Population group 


Total 

assaults 


Rate per 
100 


Assaults 
with 


Ratep 
100 


TOTAL 


56,130 


I6.I 


21,705 


6.2 


TOTAL 


56,130 


16.1 


21,705 









New England 


4.255 
11,827 
5,626 
3,535 
11,081 
1,797 
5,679 
2,929 
9,401 


20.8 
15.3 
9.3 

16.7 
20.8 
11.4 
16.6 
19.8 
18.8 


1,981 
6.261 
3.134 
1,133 
2.664 

466 
1,475 

865 
3,726 


9.7 
8.1 
5.2 
5.4 
5.0 
3.0 
4.3 
5.8 
7.4 


Group 1 (250,000 and over) 

Group 11 (100,000 to 249,999) 
Group III (50.000 to 99,999) .... 
Group IV (25,000 to 49,999) . ... 
Group V (10,000 to 24,999) ... 


21,760 
6,997 
5,172 
5.240 
4,858 
4,862 

14,329 
7,241 


19.2 
24.9 
18.0 
16.6 
13.7 
13.8 
12.8 
9.6 


9,673 
2,365 
1.835 
1,930 
1.781 
1,752 
5,102 




Middle AtlanUc 




East North Central 


8 


West North Central ... 


6 


South Atlantic 


6 


East South Central 




West South Central 




Suburban agencies' 


4> 




County agencies 










law enforo 


ement agen 


ies within 


metropoUta 


n areas. Excludes core cities. Suburban 


cities are also included 


in other city group 



Injuries to Law Enforcement Officers 

Nearly 22,000 cases of personal injury, a rate of 6 
per 100 officers nationwide, resulted from assaults on 
officers in 1978. Geographically, the injury rate 
ranged from 3 per 100 officers in the East South 
Central Division to 10 per 100 in the New England 



Division. Within population groups, law enforcemen 
officers in cities with 250,000 or more inhabitant: 
experienced the greatest rate of assaults with injuries 
9 per 100. Sheriffs' and county pohce department! 
had the lowest injury rate with 3 per 100 officers 



Veapons Used in Assaults on Law Enforcement 
)fncers 

Personal weapons such as hands, fists, feet, etc., 
/ere used in 82 percent of the assaults on officers in 
978. Firearms were used in 5 percent of the assaults, 
nives or cutting instruments in 3 percent, and other 
/capons in 10 percent. Tables 66 and 67 present data 
m the types of weapons used in assaults within 



geographic divisions and population groups and by 
the types of activity in which the officers were 
involved at the time the assaults occurred. 

Time of Assault 

Assaults on officers by time and population group 
are set forth in Table 69. Approximately one-half of 
the assaults on law enforcement officers occurred 
between the hours of 8:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. 



Table 66.— Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, Weapon Used, 1978 



Group I (250.000 and over) .. 
Group II (100,000 to 249.999) 
Group III (50,000 to 99,999) 
Group IV (25,000 to 49.999) 
Group V (10,000 to 24,999) .. 

Group VI (under 10,000) 

Suburban 
County agen 



New England 

Middle Atlantic .... 
East North Central 
West North Central 

South Atlantic 

East South Central , 
West South Central 

Mountain 

Pacific 



4,862 
14,329 
7,241 



4,255 
11,827 
5,626 
3,535 
11,081 
1,797 
5,679 
2,929 
9,401 



Knife < 
cutting 



Knife < 
cutting 



Other 
dangerous 
weapon 



Other 

dangerous 
weapon 



agencies within metropolitan areas. Excludes core ciues. Suburban c 



Activity of Law Enforcement Officers at the Time 
of Assault 

The largest portion of assaults, 30 percent, oc- 
curred while officers were responding to disturbance 
calls (family quarrels, man-with-gun calls, bar fights, 
etc.). The activity resulting in the second highest 
number of assaults was attempting arrests for crimes 
other than robbery or burglary; 22 percent of the 
officers assaulted were performing this duty at the 
time they were attacked. 

Type of Assignment 

Table 71 shows the types of assignment of officers 
assaulted. Thirty-five percent were in two-offiicer 
vehicles, 45 percent in one-officer vehicles, 6 percent 
on detective or special assignments, and 14 percent 



on other assignments. Vehicle patrol officers were 
victims in 80 percent of all assaults on officers. 

Clearances 

Nationwide in 1978, 92 percent of the assaults on 
law enforcement officers were cleared. Cities with 
populations from 50,000 to 99,999 had the highest 
clearance rate, 95 percent. 

By activity, the highest clearance percentages for 
all agencies were recorded for assaults on officers 
attempting arrests for crimes other than robbery or 
burglary and those assaulted by mentally deranged 
persons; in each of these two categories 94 percent of 
the offenses were cleared. Ambush attacks accounted 
for the lowest clearance rate with 62 percent. Table 
72 shows the percentage of assaults cleared by type 
of activity and population group. 



301 



Table 67.— Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, Police Activity 

[9,150 agencies, 1978 estimated population 180,948,000) 



and Type of Weapon, 1978 



Type of activity 



TOTAL ASSAULTS 

Percent of individual activity 

Responding to ' disturbance calls (tamily quarrels man with gu 

Percent of individual activity 
Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects 

Percent of individual activity 
Robbenes in progress or pursuing robbery suspects 

Percent of individual activity 
Attempting other arrests 

Percent of individujl activit\ 
Civil disorder (not mass disobedience) 

Percent of individual activilj 
Handling, transporting custody of pnsoners 

Percent of individual activity 
Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances 

Percent of individual actmiv 
Ambush - no warning 

Percent of individual activity 
Mentally deranged 

Percent of individual activity 
Traffic pursuits and stops 

Percent of individual activity 
All other 

Percent of individual activity 

'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



921 
100.0 

729 
100.0 
12,253 
1000 

925 
100.0 
7,078 
100.0 
4,594 
100.0 

264 
100.0 

976 
100.0 
6,085 
100.0 
5,188 
100.0 



Type of weapon 



Other 
dangerous 
weapon 



Table 68.-Law Enforcement OfHcers Assaulted, Type of Weapon and Police Activity, 1978 

[9,150 agencies, 1978 estimated population 180,948,000] 



Type of activity 



TOTAL ASSAULTS 

Percent of total' !!."!.!!!!!!!!.!! 

Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels, man with gun. 

Percent of total .,, 

Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects .... 

Percent of total 

Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects 

Percent of total 

Attempting other arrests 

Percent of total 

Civil disorder (not, mass disobedience) 

Percent of total 

Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 

Percent of total ' 

Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances 

Percent of total "" 

Ambush - no warning 

Percent of total 

Mentally deranged 

Percent of total 

Traffic pursuits and slops 

Percent of total 

All other 

Percent of total 

'Because of rounding, percenUges may not add to total. 



729 

1.3 

12,253 

21.8 



Type of weapon 



Knife or Other 

Jtting in- dangerous 

strumenl weapon 



1,469 
26.8 
147 



T«ble 69.-UW Enforcement Officers Assaulted, Time of D«y, Population Croup, 1978 
















Total- 








Time of assaults by popul 


Uon group 








Population group 


2 a.m. 


2 a.m.- 
4 a.m. 


4 a.m.- 


6 a.m.- 
8 a.m. 


8 a.m.- 
10 a.m. 


10 a.m.- 
12 


12- 
2 p.m. 


2 p.m.- 
4 p.m. 


ir.: 


6 p.m.- 
8 p.m. 


8 p.m.- 
10 p.m. 


10 ,m.. 


TOTAL 




























9,150 agencies; 1978 estimated 
poputadon 180.948,000: 


56.130 
100.0 


9.595 

17.1 


6,430 
11,5 


2,140 
3.8 


986 
1.8 


1.404 
2.5 


2,0<» 

3.7 


2,764 
4,9 


3,173 

5.7 


4J16 

7.7 


5,653 
10.1 


7355 
14.0 


9,745 


Pereeni distribution 


17.4 


Group 1 




54 agencies, 250,000 and over; total 
populaiioii 39,739,000: 


21,760 
100.0 


3,381 
15.5 


2,382 
10.9 


914 

4.2 


388 
1.8 


563 
2.6 


895 
4.1 


1.233 
5.7 


1,386 
6.4 


1,898 

8.7 


2.300 
10.6 


2.857 
13.1 


3,563 




16.4 


Group II 




























105 agencies, 100,000 to 249,999; total 
population 15,061,000: 


6,997 
100.0 


1,235 

17.7 


793 
11.3 


250 
3.6 


129 


176 

2.5 


227 
3.2 


291 
4.2 


385 

5.5 


585 
8.4 


729 
10.4 


991 
14.2 


1,206 




17.2 


Group III 




























251 agencies, 50,000 to 99,999; total 
population 17,206,000: 

Total assaults 

Percent distribuuon 


5,172 
100.0 


1,030 
19.9 


617 
11.9 


175 
3.4 


84 
1.6 


108 
2.1 


151 
2.9 


215 
4.2 


278 
5.4 


365 
7.1 


505 
98 


701 
13.6 


943 
18.2 


Group IV 




























571 agencies, 25,000 to 49,999 totol 
population 19,508,000: 


5.240 
100.0 


978 
18.7 


635 
12.1 


185 

3.5 


75 
1.4 


124 
2.4 


185 
3.5 


256 
4.9 


265 
5.1 


336 
6.4 


502 
96 


734 
14.0 


965 


Percent distribution 


18.4 


Group V 




























1,391 agencies, 10,000 to 24,999; total 
population 21,589.000: 


4.858 
100.0 


918 
18.9 


586 
12.1 


155 
3.2 


66 
1.4 


116 
2.4 


154 

3.2 


179 

3.7 


234 
4.8 


300 
6.2 


483 
9.9 


807 
16.6 


860 


Percent distribution 


17.7 


Group VI 




























4.613 agencies under 10,000; total 
population 18,323,000: 


4.862 
100.0 


923 
19.0 


628 
12.9 


167 
3.4 


62 
1.3 


85 
1.7 


139 
2.9 


198 
4.1 


226 
4.6 


304 
6.3 


428 
8.8 


781 
16.1 


921 


Percent distribution 


18.9 


Counties 




























2.165 agencies; total population 
49.524.000: 


7,241 
100.0 


1,130 
15.6 


789 
10.9 


294 
4.1 


182 
2.5 


232 
3.2 


318 


392 
5.4 


399 

5.5 


528 

7.3 


706 
98 


984 
13.6 


1,287 




17.8 







'Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



303 



Table 70.— Law Enforcement Ofllcers Aasaulted, 

|9,150 agencies; 1978 estimated population 180,948,000) 



Percent Distribution of Officer Activity, 1978 





Total 


2-man 
vehicMs) 




Type of 


assignment 






Type of activity 


1-man 


«hicle(s) 


Detective or special 
assignment 


Other 




Unassisted 


Assisted 


Unassisted 


Assisted 


Unassisted 




TOTAL 


56,130 
100.0 


19,784 
100.0 


10.113 
100.0 


15.268 
100.0 


873 
100.0 


2,474 
100.0 


2,804 
100.0 






4J8U 




100.t 


Responding to "disturbance" calls (family quarrels. 


17,117 

30.5 

921 

1.6 

729 

1.3 

12,253 

21.8 

925 

1.6 

7,078 

12.6 

4,594 

8.2 

264 

.5 

976 

1.7 

6,085 

10.8 

5,188 

9.2 


6,879 

34.8 

462 

2.3 

309 

1.6 

4,289 

21.7 

258 

1.3 

1,915 

9.7 

1,626 

8.2 

86 

.4 

535 

2.7 

2,057 

10.4 

1,368 

6.9 


2,859 

28.3 

122 

1.2 

79 

.8 

2,234 

22.1 

99 

1.0 

929 

9.2 

962 

9.5 

83 

.8 

101 

1.0 

1,664 

16.5 

981 

9.7 


5.997 

39.3 

227 

1.5 

126 

.8 

3,162 

20.7 

238 

1.6 

1,294 

8.5 

1,043 

6.8 

39 

.3 

199 

1.3 

1,941 

12.7 

1,002 

6.6 


152 

17.4 

7 

.8 

10 

1.1 

246 

28.2 

21 

2.4 

118 

13.5 

99 

11.3 

3 

.3 

12 

1.4 

54 

6.2 

151 

17.3 


280 

11.3 

43 

1.7 

98 

4.0 

844 

34.1 

89 

3.6 

227 

9.2 

434 

17.5 

17 

.7 

12 

.5 

113 

4.6 

317 

12.8 


328 

11.7 

34 

1.2 

66 

2.4 

651 

23.2 

24 

.9 

576 

20.5 

211 

7.5 

23 

.8 

43 

1.5 

117 

4.2 

73! 

26.1 






622 


Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects 
Percent of toul 


12.9 
26 


Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery suspects . 


.5 
41 


Attempting other arrests .... 






827 


Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 


17.2 


Percent of total 




Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 


4.1 
2,019 


Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances .... 
Percent of toUl 


41.9 
219 


Ambush - no warning 


4.5 


Percent of total 


13 




.3 
74 
1.5 
139 
2.9 
638 
13J 


Percent of total 


Traffic pursuits and stops 




All other 


Percent of total 




' Because of roundmg, percentages may not add to total. 



















Table 71.-Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, Percent Distribution of Officer 

[9,150 agencies; 1978 estimated population 180,948,000) 





Total» 


2-man 
vehicle(s) 


Type of assignment 


Type of activity 


1-man vehicle(s) 


Detective or special 
assignment 


Other 




Unassisted 


Assisted 


Unassisted 


Assisted 


Unassisted 


Assisted 


TOTAL 


56,130 
100.0 


19.784 
35.2 


10,113 
18.0 


15J68 

27.2 


873 
1.6 


2,474 
4.4 


2,804 
5.0 






4314 




8.6 


Responding to "disturbance" caUs (family quarrels, 
man with gun, etc.) '.^ 


17,117 
100.0 

921 
100.0 

729 
100.0 
12,253 
100.0 

925 
lOO.O 
7,078 
100.0 
4,594 
100.0 

264 
100.0 

976 
100.0 
6,085 
100.0 
5,188 


6,879 

40.2 

462 

50.2 

309 

42.4 

4,289 

35.0 

258 

27.9 

1,915 

27.1 

1,626 

35.4 

86 

32.6 

535 

54.8 

2,057 

33.8 

1,368 

26.4 


2,859 

16.7 

122 

13.2 

79 

10.8 

2,234 

18.2 

99 

10.7 

929 

13.1 

962 

20.9 

83 

31.4 

101 

10.3 

1,664 

27.3 

981 


5,997 
35.0 
227 
24.6 
126 
17.3 

3,162 
25.8 
238 
25.7 

1,294 
18.3 

1,043 
22.7 
39 
14.8 
199 
20.4 

1,941 
31.9 


152 
.9 
7 
.8 
10 
1.4 
246 
2.0 
21 
2.3 
118 
1.7 
99 
2.2 
3 
1.1 
12 
1.2 
54 
.9 


280 
1.6 
43 
4.7 
98 
13.4 
844 
6.9 
89 
9.6 
227 
3.2 
434 
9.4 
17 
6.4 
12 
1.2 
113 
1.9 
317 
6.1 


328 
1.9 
34 
3.7 
66 
9.1 
651 
5.3 
24 
2.6 
576 
8.1 
211 
4.6 
23 
8.7 
43 
4.4 
117 
1.9 
73! 
14.1 


622 


Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary suspects 


3.6 
26 


Robbenes in progress or pursuing robbery suspects . 
Percent of individual activity .... 




Attempting other arrests .... 


5.6 


Percent of individual activity 


827 


Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) .... 










21.2 


Percent of individual activity 


2,019 


Investigating suspicious persons or circumstances .... 


2!9 


Ambush - no warning 


4.8 


Percent of individual activity 




Mentally deranged 




Percent of individual activity 




Traffic pursuits and stops 


7.6 


Percent of individual activity 




All other ^ 








638 






18.9 .,.. 1 


12.3 


■Because of rounding, percentages may not add to total. 



















304 



Fable 72.-Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted, Percent Qeaied, Type of Activity Population Group, 1978 



Type of activity 



rOTAL ASSAULTS 

Percent cleared 

Responding to "disturbance" calls 
(family quarrels, man with gun, etc.) 

Percent cleared 

Burglaries m progress or pftrsuing 
burglary suspects 

Percent cleared 

Robberies in progress or pursuing 
robbery suspects 

Percent cleared 

Attempting other arrests 

Percent cleared 

Civil disorder (riot, mass disobedience) 

Percent cleared 

Handling, transporting, custody of 
prisoners 

Percent cleared 

Investigating suspicious persons or 
circumstances 

Percent cleared 

Ambush - no warning 

Percent cleared 

Mentally deranged 

Percent cleared 

Traffic pursuits and stops 

Percent cleared 

All other 

Percent cleared 



estimated 
population 



86.7 

12,253 

93.8 



91.8 
5,188 
89.3 



580 
96.7 

2,029 
92.3 

2,136 



Group II 
(105 agen- 
;ies, 100.000 
to 249,999; 
population 
15,061,000) 



Group III 
(251 agen- 
:ies, 50,000 
to 99,999; 
population 
17,206,000) 



Group IV 
(571 agen- 
cies, 25,000 
to 49,999; 
population 
19,508,000) 



Group V 
(1,391 agen- 
:ies, 10,000 
to 24,999; 
population 
21,589,000) 



Group VI 

(4,613 agen- 



Counties 

(2,165 
agencies; 



305 



LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 

1969-1978 



TOTAL, all Regions 

1969-1973 CZ] 565 KILLED 
1974-1978 IH 558 KILLED 



South 



Northeast 




23 



"'Puerto Rico 

U.S. Virgin Islands 

Guam 

Foreign 



*Data not available for years prior to 1971. 



AW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 

In 1978, 93 local, county, state, and Federal law 
nforcement officers were feloniously killed; this 
)tal was the same in 1977. During the 10-year period 
969-1978. 1,123 officers were slain. It should be 
oted that the collection of statistics regarding 
fficers killed in the line of duty was expanded in 
971 to include United States' territories (Puerto 
Lico, the Virgin Islands, and Guam). Also, the 
ashenng of data on slain Federal officers was begun 
1 1972. Therefore, 10-year data on officers killed 
iclude figures for United States' territories since 
971 and Federal officers since 1972. 

Number 
of 
victim 
Year officers 

1969 86 

1970 100 

1971 129 

1972 116 

1973 134 

1974 132 

1975 129 

1976 Ill 

1977 93 

1978 93 

Total 1,123 

Geographic Locations 

During 1978, 47 officers were slain in the Southern 
itates, the most populous region. Twenty were killed 
n the Western States, 12 in the Northeastern States, 
ind 10 m the North Central States. Four officers 
vere killed in Puerto Rico. The accompanying chart 

jiw Enforcement Officers Feloniously Killed, 1978 



shows the number of law enforcement officers killed 
in the geographic regions during each of two succes- 
sive 5-year periods, 1969-1973 and 1974^1978. Addi- 
tionally, information on officers feloniously killed in 
1978 by geographic division and population group is 
presented in tabular form. 

Eighty-nine of the 93 officers slain during 1978 
were from 78 different local, county, state, and 
Federal law enforcement agencies in 32 states and 
the District of Columbia. As indicated above, the 
remaining 4 were from Puerto Rico. 

Among the states, California had the highest count 
with 12 officers killed. The State of Texas followed 
with 9 officers slain. 

Circumstances Surrounding Deaths 

During the year, 15 officers were slain by persons 
engaged in the commission of a robbery or during 
the pursuit of robbery suspects, and 3 officers lost 
their lives at the scene of burglaries or while pursuing 
burglary suspects. Twenty offiicers were killed while 
attempting arrests for crimes other than robbery or 
burglary. 

Ambush situations accounted for 12 offiicers' 
deaths in 1978. Fifteen offiicers were killed while 
enforcing traffiic laws and 10 were slain responding to 
disturbance calls, which include family quarrels, 
man-with-gun calls, bar fights, etc. Eight offiicers 
were killed while investigating suspicious persons or 
circumstances, 7 while transporting or otherwise 
engaged in the custody of prisoners, and the remain- 
ing 3 offiicers were slain while handling mentally 
deranged persons. 



By geographic region and division and 


population 


group] 
















Geographic region and division 


Total 


Group I 
250.000 
and over 


Group II 
100,000 lo 
249,999 


Group III 
50,000 to 
99,999 


Group IV 
25,000 to 
49,999 


Group V 
10,000 to 
24,999 


Group VI 
under 
10,000 


County. State 

Police and 
Highway Patrol 


Federal 
Agencies 


rOTAL 


93 


19 


4 


6 


2 


4 


15 


42 


1 




12 

10 

47 
15 
13 
19 
20 






2 
I 






1 

1 


22 
II 

10 




















1 

1 




























3 


1 


2 
2 


9 

5 
2 










I 


**""" ;••••. 






2 










1 


West 


2 






Mounlam 


I 


2 
1 




2 

3 




Puerto Rico 







307 



SIWATI 
LAW [NfORCEHlh 

19 

Responding to disturbance 
calls (family quarrels, 
man with gun, etc.) 

Burglaries in progress or 
pursuing burglary suspects 

Robberies in progress or 
pursuing robbery suspects 

Attempting other arrests 
(excludes arrests for 
Burglaries and Robberies) 

Civil disorders (mass 
disobedience, riot, etc.) 

Handling, transporting, 
custody of prisoners 

Investigating suspicious 
persons or circumstances 

Ambush (entrapment 
and premeditation) 

Ambush 
(unprovoked attack) 

Handling mentally 
deranged persons 

Traffic pursuits and stops 


OHS IN WHICH 

n OfFICERS WERE KILLED 

169-1978 


177 


noi 




139 


l37 




1120 


191 




1117 


]125 


:7 



122 


J30 




136 


152 




131 


125 




^11 


3f 


173 


162 


1969-1973 CIZ\ 565 KILLED 
1974-1978 m>>^ 558 KILLED 
1969-1978 total: 1,123 KILLED 



308 



La« Enforcement Officers Killed, 1969-1978 

Circumstances at scene of incident by type of assignment] 



Type of assignment 



Alone Assisted 



Foot patrol 



Alone Assisted 



Detective, special 
assignment 



GRAND TOTAL 

Total 5-year penod 

Total 5-year period 

Disturbance calls (family quarrels, man with 
gun) 

Burglaries in progress or pursuing burglary 

Robberies in progress or pursuing robbery 
suspects 

Attempting other arrests 

Civil disorders (mass disobedience, riot, etc.) 

Handling, transporting, custody of prisoners 

Investigating suspicious persons and 

Ambush (entrapment and premeditation) ... 

Ambush (unprovoked attack) 

Mentally deranged 

Traffic pursuits and stops 



1969-1978 

1969-1973 
1974-1978 



1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 

1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 
1969-1973 
1974-1978 



Types of Assignment 

Of the 93 officers slain in 1978, 61 were on patrol 
duty. Fifty-nine of the patrol officers were assigned 
to vehicles and 2 were on foot patrol. The perils 
inherent in patrol duties are substantiated by the fact 
officers assigned in this capacity have consistently 
been the most frequent victims of the police killer in 
recent years. The patrol officer is often placed in 
dangerous situations and must react to circumstances 
as they occur without the benefit of detailed informa- 
tion or planning. He is repeatedly in contact with 
suspicious or dangerous individuals, each of whom 
could constitute a threat to his personal safety. 

While possibly not with the same regularity, law 
enforcement officers assigned in other capacities are 
confronted with equally tense and dangerous situa- 
tions. In 1978, 21 officers slain were detectives or on 
special assignments, and in the highest tradition of 
the law enforcement profession, 1 1 officers were off 
duty but taking appropriate police action in response 
to a criminal act when murdered. 

Of the 82 officers who were slain while on duty 
during 1978, 39 were alone and unassisted when 
killed. Thirty-six percent (401) of the on-duty officers 



killed during the period 1969-1978 were alone at the 
time they were attacked. 

Weapons Used 

Ninety-one (98 percent) of the law enforcement 
officers killed in 1978 were slain with firearms. 
Handguns were used in 67 of these deaths, rifles in 
13, and shotguns were used to kill 1 1 of the officers. 
Fourteen officers were slain with their own firearms. 
Of the 2 officers not slain with firearms, 1 was killed 
with a blunt instrument and 1 with personal weapons 
(hands, fists, feet). 

Forty-six of the officers killed in 1978 attempted to 
utilize their service firearms while in contact with 
their assailants, and 32 of these officers discharged 
their service weapons while attempting to protect 
themselves. Forty-one percent (37) of the officers 
killed by firearms were within 5 feet of their 
assailants at the time they were shot. 

Day and Hour of Attack 

As the accompanying data show, it carmot be 
stated that any one day of the week is more 
hazardous to a law enforcement officer than any 
other. However, more officers are slain during the 



309 



Law Enforcement Officers Killed, 1969-1978 

(By type of weapon) 





1969-1978 


1969-1973 


1974-1978 




Total 
number 


Per- 


Number 


Per- 
cent 


Number 


Per- 
cent 




7SV 

138 

136 

1.061 

16 
8 
3 
35 
1,123 


70.1 
12.3 
12.1 
94.5 

1.4 
.7 
.3 
3.1 
100.0 


407 
67 
64 

538 

10 

12 
565 


72.0 
11.9 
11.3 
95.2 

1.8 
.7 
.2 
2.1 
100.0 


380 
71 
72 

523 

6 

4 

2 

23 

558 




R,ne ....:::.::::7: 


12.7 
12 9 


Shotgun 


Total firearms . .. 


93.7 


Bomb 


■ 


Personal weapons .. 
Other (clubs, etc.) .. 
Total 


.4 

4.1 

100.0 





nighttime hours, especially between 9:00 p.m. and 
3:00 a.m. From 1969-1978, 43 percent (484) of the 
1,123 officers who lost their lives in the line of duty 
were killed during the aforementioned 6-hour period. 
The following table shows the number of law 
enforcement officers killed by day of week for the 
period 1969-1978. 



Day of week officers 

Sunday 159 

Monday 161 

Tuesday 140 

Wednesday 143 

Thursday 164 

Friday 186 

Saturday 170 

Total 1,123 

Profile of Victim Officers 

Eighty-five (9 1 percent) of the officers slain during 
1978 were white and 8 (9 percent) were Negro. The 
average years of service for slain officers was 8. Ten 
percent of the officers killed had 1 year or less of law 
enforcement experience; 30 percent had more than 1 
but less than 5 years of service; 30 percent had 5 
through 10 years of experience; and 31 percent had 
served as law enforcement officers for more than 10 
years. 

Persons Identified 

Law enforcement agencies cleared 84 of the 93 
killings that occurred in calendar year 1978. In 
connection with these crimes, 127 persons were 
identified. Fifty-six percent of the persons identified 
were white, 39 percent Negro, and 5 percent other 
races. Sixty-two percent of the assailants had prior 
arrests, and 50 percent had been previously convict- 



ed. Twenty-four percent had prior arrests for violent 
types of crime such as murder, forcible rape, armed 
robbery, aggravated assault, etc. Forty-five percent 
had been granted parole or probation following 
convictions for prior criminal charges, and 23 per- 
cent were on parole or probation at the time of the 
police killing in which they were involved. Nine 
percent of the persons identified had a prior arrest 
for a narcotics charge, and an additional 9 percent' 
had prior arrests for police assault. Ninety-foun 
percent were male and 6 percent were female. 

Profile of Victim Officers 



Law enforcement officers 


I%9- 
1978 


1969- 
1973 


1974- 
1978 


Percent white 

Percent Negro 


89 
10 

13 
46 
29 
25 


88 

8 
13 
48 
26 
26 


90 
9 






8 
13 
44 
31 
25 


Percent with 1 year 
or less of service 


Percent with less than 


Percent with 5 through 


Percent over 10 years 
of service 





Profile of Persons Identified 



Persons identified 



Under age 18 

From 18 to 30 years of age 



fhior criminal arrest 

Convicted on prior criminal 

charge 

Prior arrest for crime of 

violence 

Convicted on criminal 

charges— granted lemency 
On parole oi probation at 

time of killing 

Arrested on prior murder 

charge 

Prior arrest on narcotic 

dnig law violation 

Prior arrest for assaulting 

policeman 

Prior arrest 
violation 



persons 
identi- 
fied 



310 



In 1978, 14 offenders were justifiably killed at the 
scene of the police killing or in ensuing confronta- 
tions. Three of these assailants were killed by victim 
officers. Eight offenders were wounded by victim 
officers, and 1 offender committed suicide. 

The persons identified ranged in age from 13 to 56. 
The average age of these individuals was 26 years. 
Sixty-two percent were between the ages of 18 and 
30, and 8 percent (10) were under the age of 18. 

In the period 1967-1976, the most recent 10-year 
period for which complete disposition data are 
available, 1,525 known persons were involved in 
connection with the kilHng of 1,077 law enforcement 
officers. Of these known offenders, 1,272 were 
arrested and charged in connection with the killings 
of the officers. Available court disposition data 
regarding the offenders found guilty of the officers' 
murders disclosed that 1 13 offenders were sentenced 
to death, 403 were sentenced to life imprisonment, 
260 received prison terms ranging from 1 to 2,001 



years, 4 offenders received probation, and 1 received 
a suspended sentence. Sentences for 14 offenders 
who were found guilty are unknown. 



Enforcement Officers, 1967-1976 


KUIIng of Law 




Percent 
T^°'*' distribution 












16 
196 
41 

1,272 


1 


JusUfiably kiUed 


13 
3 


Arrested and charged 


83 


Arrested and charged 


1,272 


100 


Guilty of murder 

Guilty of lesser offense related to murder 

Guilty of crime other than murder 

Acquitted or otherwise dismissed 


795 
103 
98 
167 
42 
52 
15 


63 
8 
8 

13 
3 






Died in custody 





311 



L>IIV ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 
Hour of Day 

1969-1978 



MIDNIGHT 

1:00 

2:00 

3:00 

4:00 

5:00 

8:00 

7:00 

8.00 

9.00 

10:00 

11:00 

NOON 

1:00 

2:00 

3:00 

4:00 

5:00 

8:00 

7:00 

8:00 

9KI0 

10:00 

11K)0 

MIDNIGHT 



62 




B8 


; 




79 


40 




24 






|21 




_f« 




14 


26 


■ ■ |24 








37 




43 




43 




3 


\9 
41 
44 

i 


1 






3> 


4 


« 




43 




■ l48 


62 


^72 






^fcllR 


91 


... ... ' '.. ".. ... '^^9 


92 



The hour of the day in which four officers were killed is not known. 



CRIMINAL HISTORY OF 1,573 PERSONS 
IDENTIFIED IN THE KILLING OF 
LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS 

PERCENT OF TOTAL PERSONS IDENTIFIED 

1969-1978 



TOTAL PERSONS 
IDENTIFIED 



PERSONS WITH 
PRIOR ARREST 
FOR CRIMINAL CHARGE 



PERSONS CONVICTED 
ON PRIOR CRIMINAL 
CHARGE 



PERSONS WITH 
PRIOR ARREST FOR 
VIOLENT CRIME 



PERSONS WITH 
PRIOR ARREST FOR 
WEAPONS VIOLATION 



PERSONS WITH 
PRIOR ARREST FOR 
NARCOTIC CHARGE 



PERSONS WITH 
PRIOR ARREST FOR 
POLICE ASSAULT 




100% 



72% 



53% 



36% 



21% 



17% 



313 



SECTION VI 

APPENDIX I 

TABLE METHODOLOGY 



B) 



This appendix is to assist the reader in understand- 
ing the tables presented in this pubUcation. By 
utilizing the following key, the reader will gain a 
better understanding of table construction. 
Key: A) Column 1 shows the table number. This 
appendix will refer to Tables 1 through 
54, Crime in the United States— 1978. 
Column 2 indicates the level of submis- 
sion necessary for an agency's statistics to 
be included in a table. There are three 
levels of agency participation. 

1. Agencies having reported data 
for all 1 2 months of the year. 

2. Agencies having reported data 
for at least one month but less 
than 1 2 months of the year. 

3. Nonreporting agencies. 
The tabulations presented in the publica- 



tion employ statistics from one or more ( 
the above-listed participation levels. Fc 
example. Table 1 includes all three ager 
cy reporting levels, but Table 14 presem 
only the data from agencies having r< 
ported for the entire year. 

C) Column 3 explains how each table wa 
constructed. Data adjustments, if any, ar 
discussed along with various defmitior 
of data aggregation. 

D) Column 4 contains general comment 
regarding the potential use and misuse c 
the statistics presented. 



314 



1 law enforcement agencies in the UCR 
Program (including those submitting less 
than 12 months for 1978). 



All law enforcement agencies in the UCR 
Program (including those submitting less 
than 12 months). 



All law enforcement agencies in the UCR 
Program (including those submitting less 
than 12 months). 



All law enforcement agencies in the UCR 
Program (including those submitting less 
than 12 months for 1978). 



All law enforcement agencies in the UCR 
Program (including those submitting less 
than 12 months in 1978). 



Stati! 



include estimated offense totals for 
submitting less than 12 months of 
offense reports. Population statistics repre- 
sent July 1, 1978. estimations. The tabular 
breakdowns are in accordance with UCR 
crime defimlions (App. II) and population 
classifications (App. III). 

The 1978 statistics are consistent with Table 1, 
Crime in the US. Pre-1978 crime statistics 
have been updated, and hence, may not be 
consistent with pnor publications. Crime 
statistics include estimated offense totals for 
agencies submitting less than 12 months of 
offense reports for 1978. Population statis- 
tics represent July 1 estimations for each 
year except April 1, 1970. The tabular 
breakdowns are according to UCR crime 
definitions (App. II). Cnme volume statistics 
are rounded to the 10th place for violent 
crime and 1 00th place for property crime. 

The 1978 statistics are aggregated from individ- 
ual state statistics as shown in Table 4. 
Crime statistics mclude estimated offense 
totals for agencies submitting less than 12 
months of offense reports for 1978. Popula- 
tion statistics represent July 1 estimations 
for each year. The tabular breakdowns are 
according to UCR crime defmitions (App. 
II). 



Crime statistics include estimated offense totals 
for agencies submitting less than 12 months 
of offense reports. Population statistics rep- 
resent July I, 1978, population estimations. 
Statistics under the heading "Area Actually 
Reporting" represent reported offense totals 
for agencies submitting all 12 months of 
offense reports and estimated totals for 
agencies submitting less than 12 but more 
than 2 months of offense reports. The statis- 
tics under the heading "Estimated Totals" 
represent the above plus estimated offense 
totals for agencies having less than 3 months 
of offense reports. The tabular breakdowns 
are according to UCR definitions (App. II). 

Statistics are published for all Standard Metro- 
poliun Statistical Areas (SMSAs) having at 
least 75% reporting. Figures are listed for 
central cities of the SMSAs if the cities 
submitted 12 months data in 1978 Cnme 
statistics include estimated offense totals for 
agencies submitting less than 12 months of 
offense statistics for 1978. Population statis- 
tics represent July I, 1978, estimations. The 
statistics under the heading "Area Actually 
Reporting" represent reported offense totals 
for agencies submitting all 12 months of 
offense reports plus estimated offense totals 
for agencies submitting less than 12 but 
more than 2 months of offense reports. The 
statistics under the heading "Estimated To- 
tal" represent the above plus the estimated 
offense totals for agencies submitting less 
than 3 months of offense reports. The tabu- 
lar breakdowns are according to UCR defi- 
mUons(App.lI). 



Represents an estimation of national re- 
ported crime activity in 1978. 



Represents an estimation of national re- 
ported crime activity from 1969 to 
1978. 



Represents estimation of reported crin 
activity for all Index offenses at the; 

1. national level 

2. regional level 

3. division level 

4. state level 



Any comparison of UCR statistics should 
take into consideration demographic 
differences. 

Represents estimation of reported crime 
activity for all Index offenses at state 
level. Any comparison of UCR sutis- 
tics should take into consideration 
demographic differences. 



Represents estimation of the reported 
crime activity for all Index offenses at 
individual SMSA level. Any compari- 
son of UCR statistics should take into 
consideration demographic differ- 



I 



315 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com 
plete reports for all months in 1978. 



All university/college law enforcement agencies 
submitting complete reports for all m. 
in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com 
plete reports for all months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting ( 
plete reports for all months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting 



All law enforcement agencies submitting ( 
plete reports for all months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com 
plete reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com 
plete reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 



"Cities and Towns" are defined to be agencies 
in Population Groups 1 through V (App. 
III). The population classification of agen- 
cies IS based on July 1. 1978. population 
estimations of each agency. 



Student enrolhnent figures are adjusted by 
converting part-time students into full-tm 
equivalents (FTEs) as provided by the N 
tional Center for Education Statistics of the 
U.S. Department of Health, Education, 
Welfare. FTEs are computed by taking the 
fraction of part-time students by the pre- 
scribed method in the "Higher Education 
General Information Survey (HEGIS XII)." 

"Suburban Counties" are defmed to be the 
covered by all noncity agencies within an 
SMSA (App. III). 



"Rural Counties" are those outside SMSAs and 
not covered by city police agencies (App 
III). Population classifications of rural coun- 
ties are based on July I. 1978, population 
estimations of individual agencies. 

The 1978 cnme trend statistics are 1-year i 
parisons based on 1978 reported crime a 
ity. Only common reported months for 
individual agencies are included in 1978 
trend calculations. Populations represent 
July 1, 1978, estimations of individual agen 
cies. The tabular breakdowns are according 
to UCR crime definitions (App. II) and 
population classifications (App. III). Note 
that "Suburban and Non-Suburban Cities" 
represents all city agencies other than 
cities in SMSAs. 

The 1978 crime rates are the ratios of the 
aggregated 1978 crime volumes and the 
aggregated 1978 populations of the contrib- 
uting agencies. Population statistics repre- 
sent July I, 1978, estimations of individual 
agencies. The tabular breakdowns ar< 
cording to UCR cnme definitions (App. II) 
and population classifications (App. Ill) 
Note that "Suburban and Non-Suburban" 
represents all city agencies other than 
cities in SMSAs. 

Offense total and value lost total are computed 
for all Index offense categories other than 
aggravated assault. Percent distribution is 
denved based on offense total with each 
Index offense. Trend statistics are derived 
based on agencies with at least 6 common 
months complete for 1977 and 1978. 

The 1978 clearance rates are based on offense 
and clearance volume totals of the contribut- 
ing agencies for 1978. Population statistics 
represent July 1, 1978, estimations of indi- 
vidual agencies. The tabular breakdowns are 
according to UCR crime definitions (App. 
II) and population classifications (App. III). 



Represents reported cnme activity of indi- 
vidual agencies in cities and towns 
10,000 and over in population. Any 
comparisons of UCR statistics should 
take into consideration demographic 
differences. 

Represents reported cnme and FTEs of 
individual university/college law en- 
forcement agencies listed alphabetical- 
ly by state. Totals are supplied for 
violent and property cnmes. 



Represents crime reported to individual 
police agencies in suburban counties. 
Any comparison of UCR statistics 
should lake into consideration demo- 
graphic differences. 

Represents crime reported to individual 
police agencies in rural counties over 
25,000 population. Any companson of 
UCR statistics should take into con- 
sideration demographic differences. 

Shght decrease in national coverage for 
Table 1 3 due to editing procedure and 
lower submission rate. 



Slight decrease in national coverage for 
Table 17 due to editing procedure and 



lower submission i 



Aggravated assault is excluded from the 
table because, for UCR Program pur- 
poses, if money or property is taken in 
connection with the assault the offense 
becomes a robbery. 



316 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com 
plete reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting at least 
6 months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting annual 
reports in 1969 and all months in 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com- 
plete reports for at least 6 common months 
in 1974 and 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com- 
plete reports for at least 6 common months 
in 1977 and 1978. 



All law enforcement agencies submitting com- 
plete reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 



All city law enforcement agencies submitting 
complete reports for at least 6 common 
months in 1977 and 1978. 



The arrest totals presented are national esti- 
mates based on the arrest statistics of agen- 
cies reporting at least 6 months in 1978. A 
corresponding population is used when 6 
through 1 1 months are used. The "Total 
Estimated Arrests" statistic is the sui 
estimated arrest volumes for each of the 29 
offenses. Each individual arrest total is the 
sum of the estimated volumes withm each of 
the eight population groups (App. III). Each 
group's estimate is the reported volum 
shown in Table 25) divided by the percent of 
total group population reporting (as estimat' 
ed for July 1, 1978). 

For example, in the Rural Area, agencies having 
reported 6 or more months represent 46,208 
burglary arrests and 88.1% of the total rural 
population. The rural burglary arrest total is 
estimated to be: 

Reported volume 



The 1978 arrest rates are the ratios, per 100,000 
inhabitants, of the aggregated 1978 reported 
arrest statistics and equivalent population. 
The population statistics represent the July 
I, 1978, estimations of individual agencies. 
The tabular breakdowns are according to 
UCR crime definitions (App. II) and popu- 
lation classifications (App. HI). 

The, 
b< 

gregated from all common agencies. Popula- 
tion statistics represent July 1, 1978, estima- 

The arrest trends are the percentage differences 
between 1974 and 1978 arrest volumes ag- 
gregated from common agencies. Population 
statistics represent July I, 1978, estimations 
for individual agencies. 

The arrest trends are 1-year comparisons be- 
tween 1977 and 1978 arrest volumes aggre- 
gated from common agencies. Population 
statistics represent July 1, 1978, 
of individual agencies. 



The 1978 city arrest trends represent the per- 
centage differences between 1977 and 1978 
arrest volumes aggregated from common 
city agencies. "City agencies" are defined to 
be all agencies within Population Groups I- 
VI (App. III). 



SUght decrease in coverage for Table 35 
due to editing procedure and lower 



317 



All city law enforcement agencies submitting 
reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 

All city law enforcement agencies submitting 
complete reports for at least 6 
months in 1977 and 1978. 



All city law enforcement agencies submitting 
least 6 months 



All suburban law enforcement agencies submit- 
ting complete reports for at lea 
months in 1977 and 1978. 



All suburban law enforcement agencies submit- 
ting reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 

All rural law enforcement agencies submitting 
complete reports for at least 6 common 
monthsin 1977 and 1978. 



All rural law enforcement agencies submitting 
complete reports for at least 6 months in! 
1978. 

All law enforcement agencies submitting com-: 
plete reports for at least 6 months in 1978. 



"City agencies" are defined to be agencies 
within Population Groups 1-VI (App. III). 

The 1978 city arrest trends represent the per- 
centage differences between 1977 and 1978 
arrest volumes aggregated from common 
city agencies. "City agencies" are defined to 
be all agencies within Population Groups I- 
VI (App. III). 

"City agencies" are defined to be agencies 
within Population Groups I-VI (App. III). 

1978 suburban arrest trends represent percent 
age differences between 1977 and 1978 
arrest volumes aggregated from contributing 
agencies. "Suburban area" is defined to be 
all counties and cities with fewer than 50,000 
inhabitants within SMSAs (App. III). 

"Suburban area" is defmed to be counties and 
cities with less than 50,000 population within 
SMSAs (App. III). 

1978 rural trends represent percentage differ- 
ences between 1977 and 1978 volumes aggre- 
gated from contributing agencies. "Rural 
area" is defined to be all noncity agencies 
outside SMSAs (App. III). 

"Rural area" is defined to be noncity agencies 
outside SMSAs (App. III). 



Population statistics represent July 1, 1978, 
estimations of individual agencies. See Ap- 
pendix III for definitions of the populati 
classifications presented. 



General Comments 



Slight decrease in coverage for Table 41 
due to editing procedure and lower 
submission of race data. 



Slight decrease in coverage for Table 47 
due to editing procedure and lower 
submission of race data. 



Slight decrease in coverage for Table 53 
due to editing procedure and lower 
submission of race data. 

Data furnished are based upon individual 
state age definitions for juveniles. 



APPENDIX II 
OFFENSES IN UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING 



Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting are divided 
into two groupings designated as Part I and Part II 
offenses. Offense and arrest information are reported 
for the Part I offenses on a monthly basis, whereas 
only arrest information is reported for Part II 
offenses. 

The Part I offenses are as follows: 

1. Criminal homicide.— a. Murder and nonne- 
gligent manslaughter: the willful (nonnegligent) kill- 
ing of one human being by another. Deaths caused 
by negligence, attempts to kill, assaults to kill, 
suicides, accidental deaths, and justifiable homicides 
are excluded. Justifiable homicides are limited to : 
(1) the kiUing of a felon by a law enforcement officer 
in the line of duty; and (2) the killing of a felon by a 
private citizen, b. Manslaughter by negligence: the 
killing of another person through gross negligence. 
Excludes traffic fatalities. While manslaughter by 
negligence is a Part I crime, it is not included in the 
Crime Index. 

2. Forcible rape.— The carnal knowledge of a 
female forcibly and against her will. Included are 
rapes by force and attempts or assaults to rape. 
Statutory offenses (no force used — victim under age 
of consent) are excluded. 

3. Robbery. — The taking or attempting to take 
anything of value from the care, custody, or control 
of a person or persons by force or threat of force or 
violence and/or by putting the victim in fear. 

4. Aggravated assault.— An unlawful attack by 
one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting 
severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of 
assault usually is accompanied by the use of a 
weapon or by means likely to produce death or great 
bodily harm. Simple assaults are excluded. 

5. Burglary— breaking or entering.— The un- 
lawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a 
theft. Attempted forcible entry is included. 

'In October, 1978, arson was designated as a Part I crime. 
However, data collection did not commence until 1979. 



6. Larceny-theft (except motor vehicle 
theft). — The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or 
riding away of property from the possession or 
constructive possession of another. Examples are 
thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, shoplifting, 
pocket-picking, or any stealing of property or article 
which is not taken by force and violence or by fraud. 
Attempted larcenies are included. Embezzlement, 
"con" games, forgery, worthless checks, etc., are 
excluded. 

7. Motor vehicle theft.— The theft or attempt- 
ed theft of a motor vehicle. A motor vehicle is self- 
propelled and runs on the surface and not on rails. 
Specifically excluded from this category are motor- 
boats, construction equipment, airplanes, and farm- 
ing equipment. 

The Part II offenses are: 

8. Other assaults (simple). — Assaults or at- 
tempted assaults where no weapon was used or 
which did not result in serious or aggravated injury 
to the victim. 

9. Arson.i — Any willful or malicious burning 
or attempts to bum, with or without intent to 
defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor 
vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc. 

10. Forgery and counterfeiting.— Making, al- 
tering, uttering, or possessing, with intent to defraud, 
anything false which is made to appear true. At- 
tempts are included. 

11. Fraud. — Fraudulent conversion and ob- 
taining money or property by false pretenses. Includ- 
ed are larceny by bailee and bad checks except 
forgeries and counterfeiting. 

12. Embezzlement.— Misappropriation or mis- 
application of money or property entrusted to one's 
care, custody, or control. 

13. Stolen property; buying, receiving, possess- 
ing.— Buying, receiving, and possessing stolen prop- 
erty, including attempts. 



319 



14. Vandalism.— Willful or malicious destruc- 
tion, injury, disfigurement, or defacement of any 
public or private property, real or personal, without 
consent of the owner or person having custody or 
control. 

15. Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.— All 
violations of regulations or statutes controlling the 
carrying, using, possessing, furnishing, and manufac- 
turing of deadly weapons or silencers. Included are 
attempts. 

16. Prostitution and commercialized vice.— Sex 

offenses of a commercialized nature, such as prosti- 
tution, keeping a bawdy house, procuring, or trans- 
porting women for immoral purposes. Attempts are 
included. 

17. Sex offenses (except forcible rape, prostitu- 
tion, and commercialized vice).— Statutory rape and 
offenses against chastity, common decency, morals, 
and the like. Attempts are included. 

18. Drug abuse violations.- State and local 
offenses relating to narcotic drugs, such as unlawful 
possession, sale, use, growing, and manufacturing of 
narcotic drugs. 



19. 



-Promoting, permitting, or en- 



gaging in illegal gambling. 



20. Offenses against the family and children.— 

Nonsupport, neglect, desertion, or abuse of family 
and children. 

21. Driving under the influence.- Driving or 
operating any vehicle or common carrier while drunk 
or under the influence of liquor or narcotics. 

22. Liquor laws.— State or local liquor law 
violations, except "drunkenness" (offense 23) and 
"driving under the influence" (offense 21). Federal 
violations are excluded. 

23. Drunkenness. — Drunkenness or intoxica- 
tion. Excluded is "driving under the influence" 
(offense 21). 

24. Disorderly conduct.— Breach of the peace. 

25. Vagrancy.— Vagabondage, begging, loiter- 
ing, etc. 

26. All other offenses.— All violations of state 
or local laws, except offenses 1-25 and traffic 
offenses. 

27. Suspicion.— No specific offense; suspect 
released without formal charges being placed. 

28. Curfew and loitering laws.— Offenses relat- 
ing to violation of local curfew or loitering ordi- 
nances where such laws exist. 

29. Runaway.— Limited to juveniles taken into 
protective custody under provisions of local statutes. 



APPENDIX III 
UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING AREA DEFINITIONS 



The geographic presentation of Uniform Crime 
Reporting (UCR) data consistently rehes on the 
concept of the Standard Metropohtan Statistical 
Area (SMSA). Comprehension of this term is crucial 
to understanding the related UCR concepts of 
"Other Cities" and "Rural Area" to be discussed 
later in this appendix. 

Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas (SMSAs) 

A Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area (SMSA) 
is a statistical construct used to define metropohtan 
areas in a uniform manner. It is an integrated 
economic and social unit with a recognized large 
population nucleus. The SMSA concept was devel- 
oped to facihtate the analysis and dissemination of 
statistical information on metropolitan areas. The 
primary objective in establishing standard definitions 
of these areas was to make it possible for Federal 
statistical agencies to utilize the same boundaries 
when publishing statistical data. 

An SMSA always includes a central city (cities) of 
specified population (generally over 50,000) and the 
county (counties) in which it is located. In addition, 
an SMSA also includes contiguous counties when the 
economic and social relationship between the central 
and contiguous counties meet specified criteria of 
metropolitan character and integration. An SMSA 
may cross state lines. In New England, SMSAs are 
composed of cities and towns instead of counties. 

The Office of Federal Statistical Policy and Stand- 
ards of the U. S. Department of Commerce has 
responsibility for designating and defining SMSAs. It 
in turn is advised by the Federal Committee on 
Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas. The de- 
tailed criteria followed in establishing and defining 
SMSAs are presented in the U. S. Department of 
Commerce publication. Standard Metropolitan Statis- 
tical Areas, revised edition 1975. These criteria are 
outlined below. 

1. Each SMSA must include at least: 

(a) One city with 50,000 or more inhabi- 
tants, or 

(b) A city with at least 25,000 inhabitants, 



which, together with those contiguous 
places (incorporated or unincorporat- 
ed) having population densities of at 
least 1,(X)0 persons per square mile, has 
a combined population of 50,000 and 
constitutes for general economic and 
social purposes a single community, 
provided that the county or counties in 
which the city and contiguous places 
are located has a total population of at 
least 75,000. 

2. A contiguous county will be included in an 
SMSA if 

(a) at least 75% of the resident labor force 
in the county is in the nonagricultural 
labor force, and 

(b) at least 30% of the employed workers 
hving in the county work in the central 
county or counties of the area. 

3. A contiguous county which does not meet 
the requirements of criterion 2 will be 
included in an SMSA if at least 75% of the 
resident labor force is in the nonagricultural 
labor force and it meets two of the follow- 
ing additional criteria of metropolitan char- 
acter and one of the following criteria of 
integration. 

(a) Criteria of metropolitan character. 

(1) At least 25% of the population is 
urban. 

(2) The county had an increase of at 
least 15% in total population dur- 
ing the period covered by the two 
most recent Censuses of Popula- 
tion. 

(3) The county has a population den- 
sity of at least 50 persons per 
square mile. 

(b) Criteria of integration. 

(1) At least 15% of the employed 
workers living in the county work 
in the central county or counties of 



321 



the area, or 

(2) The number of people working in 
the county who hve in the central 
county or counties of the area is 
equal to at least 15% of the em- 
ployed workers living in the coun- 
ty, or 

(3) The sum of the number of workers 
commuting to and from the central 
county or counties is equal to 20% 
of the employed workers living in 
the county. 

Community Types 

Uniform Crime Reporting data are often presented 
using three community type aggregations. These are 
SMSA, Other Cities, and Rural Area. 

The concept of SMSA was explained in the 
preceding paragraphs. SMSAs as used in this publi- 
cation made up approximately 73 percent of the total 
United States' population in 1978. A suburban area 
includes cities with less than 50,000 inhabitants in 
addition to counties (unincorporated areas) within 
the SMSA. Suburban areas therefore can be subdi- 
vided into suburban cities and suburban counties. 

Other Cities are those outside SMSAs. Most of 
these places are incorporated and comprised 12 
percent of the 1978 population of the United States. 

A Rural Area is that portion of a county outside 
the SMSA excluding areas covered by city police 
agencies. For crime reporting purposes, rural areas 
are made up of unincorporated portions of counties 
outside urban places and SMSAs. They comprised 15 
percent of the 1978 national population. 

The following diagram illustrates the aforemen- 
tioned discussion of the community types. ^ 





SMSA 


NON-SMSA 


CITIES 


CITIES OVER 

50.000 


OTHER 
CITIES 


SUBURBAN 
CITIES 


COUNTIES 
(unincorporaled area) 


SUBURBAN 
COUNTIES 


RURAL 
AREA 



Population Groups 

For purposes of statistical presentation, the cities 
and counties in the United States are divided into 
groups based on population size. The population 

iln New England, "town" instead of "county" is used to 
describe SMSAs. These towns do not coincide generally with 
established reporting units; therefore, metropolitan state economic 



group classifications used by the UCR Program are 
as follows: 

Political Population 

Population Group Label Range 

I City 250,000 and Over 

II City 100,000 to 

249,999 

III City 50,000 to 99,999 

IV City 25,000 to 49,999 

V City 10,000 to 24,999 

VI City Less than 10,000 

VIII (Rural Area) County N/A 

IX (Suburban County) ...County N/A 

The major source of UCR data is the individual 
law enforcement agency. The number of agencies 
included in each population group will vary slightly 
from year to year due to population growth, geopoli- 
tical consolidation, municipal incorporation, etc. The 
following table shows the number of UCR contribut- 
ing agencies within each population group for 1978: 

Population Number of Population 

Group Agencies Covered 

I 57 41,340,000 

II 117 16,862,000 

III 282 19,253,000 

IV 666 22,779,000 

V 1,620 25,146,000 

VI 7,311 24,034.000 

VIII (Rural Area) 3,632 32,786,000 

IX (Suburban County) ... 1,350 35,859.000 

Total 15,035 218,059,000 

Regions and Divisions 

The United States is divided into four regions: the 
Northeastern States, the North Central States, the 
Southern States, and the Western States. These 
regions are further divided into nine divisions. The 
following table delineates the regional, divisional, 
and state configuration of the country. 

NORTHEASTERN STATES 



Middle Atlantic 
New Jersey 
New York 
Pennsylvania 



New England 
Connecticut 
Maine 

Massachusetts 
New Hampshire 
Rhode Island 
Vermont 



areas are used in tabulations for New England since they 
encompass an entire county or counties. 



322 



NORTH CENTRAL STATES 



WESTERN STATES 



East North Central 


West North Central 


Mountain 


Pacific 


Illinois 


Iowa 


Arizona 


Alaska 


Indiana 


Kansas 


Colorado 


California 


Michigan 


Minnesota 


Idaho 


Hawaii 


Ohio 


Missouri 


Montana 


Oregon 


Wisconsin 


Nebraska 


Nevada 


Washington 




North Dakota 


New Mexico 






South Dakota 


Utah 
Wyoming 




SOUTHERN STATES 






South Atlantic * 


East South Central 






Delaware 


Alabama 






Florida 


Kentucky 






Georgia 


Mississippi 






Maryland 


Tennessee 






North Carolina 


West South Central 






South Carohna 


Arkansas 






Virginia 


Louisiana 






West Virginia 


Oklahoma 
Texas 







'Includes District of Columbia. 



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