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UNITARIAN 
YEAR BOO 



1909 



AMERICAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATION 
Number 26 Beacon Street /Boston, 



sr 



OCT^ 



\^ 



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UNITARIAN 
YEAR BOOK 



July i, 1909 



AltfERI 



BOSTON 

An^rican Unitarian Association 

25 Beacon Street 



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i 772323"^ 

I A«-0<, L5\CX AfO 



PREFACE. 



The list of Unitarian churches in the United States and Canada con- 
tains the names of 489 societies. Since the last Year Book the names 
of 2 churches have been dropped from the list, and eight have been 
added, a net gain of 6. 

The list of ministers contains 563 names. 25 new names have been 

added and 20 have been dropped, 10 of these having died during the 

year, and 10 having withdrawn from our ministry. Of the 25 that 

have been added 15 have come from our Divinity Schools, 3 from the 

Trinitarian Congregationalists, i from the Methodist Episcopal, i from 

the Episcopal, i from the Universalist, i from the Presbyterian, i from 

jth^ I^utheran, i from the Christian, i unrecorded. 

'. /"the Ediiof; (vishes to express his appreciation of the services ren- 

• idered.J?y*'Nlti9«-- Henrietta S. Rogers, whose knowledge and past ex- 

. 4>eriencit' iyt- ihe preparation of Year Books has made the present task 

:Xowp;?[K^iiv.eiy easy, and also his indebtedness to ministers and confer- 

■* fcAce JS^^Vetarfes who have furnished much of the necessary informa 

tion. Any errors or omissions may be communicated to the editor. 

L. G. W. 



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INDEX. 



Academies, 144-147. 

Alliances, Women's, 1 18-120. 

American Unitarian Association, year 
founded, 69; history of, 69; purpose, 
70; government, 71; administration, 
73; departments: finance, 7$; publi- 
cation, 74; publicity, 74; foreign re- 
lations, 74; comity and fellowship, 
74; education, 75; church extension, 
75 ; social and public service, 76; 
New Americans, 76; ministerial aid, 
76; library, 76; Church Building 
Loan Fund, 77; officers and direct- 
ors, 66; life members of, 81-97. 

Appeals, Committee on, 118. 

Appropriations, method of making, 75. 

Associations. See American Unitarian 
and Ministerial. 

Bellows School, 144. 

Benevolent Fraternity of Churches, 131. 

Benevolent Societies, 131-138. 

Berry Street Conference, 129. 

Billings Lectureship Fund, 75. 

Book-rooms, 68. 

Boston Association of Ministers, 128 

Boston Federation, 122. 

Boston Office, 68 

By-laws of American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation, 71, 72. 

By-laws of National Conference, 100- 

IQ2. 

California Unitarian Gub, 126. 
Cambridge Association of Ministers, 

128 
Cape Cod Conference, no. 
Channing Club, Boston, 125. 
Channing Conference, no. 
Channing Conference Sunday- School 

Union, 117. 
Channing Federation, 122. 
Channing, W. R, 70. 



Charitable Society, Massachusetts Con- 
gregational, 135. 

Cheerful Letter Exchange, Committee 
on, 118 

Chicago Associate Alliance, 119. 

Chicago office, 68 

Chicago Unitarian Club, 126. 

Children's Mission, 133. 

Chrisiian Register, 171. 

Christian Union, Boston Young Men's, 
132. 

Church Building Loan Fund, 77 \ offi- 
cers of, 67. 

Church Extension, 75. 

Churches, List of, 9-31; in chrono- 
logical order, 32-43; arranged by 
States, 44-46. 

Comity ana Fellowship, 74. 

Committees, Standing, 67, 

Conference, National, 98-103. 

Conference of Unitarian Sunday- 
School Superintendents, 118 

Conferences, Department, 104-108; 
State, 108-113; local New England, 
110-113. 

Connecticut Valley Conference, no. 

Connecticut Valley Unitarian Club, 126. 

Days to be Remembered, 7. 

Delegate Societies, 78-80. 

Department Conferences, 104-108. 

Departments, American Unitarian As- 
sociation, 73-77. 

Divinity Schools, 139-143. 

Education, 75. 

Education, Theological, 75. 

Essex Conference, in. 

Essex Federation, 122. 

Every Other Sunday, 171. 

Federations of Young People, 122-123. 

Fellowship Committee, 99; rules of, 
102-103. 



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Fellowships for students, 75. 

Executive Staff, 68. 

Finance, 7^. 

Foreign Relations, 74. 

General Unitarian Societies, 123-135. 

Hackley School, 144. 

Hancock Conference, in. 

Harvard Divinity School Unitarian 

Club, 126. 
Harvard University Divinity School, 

139. 

Hayward Fund, 74. 

Historical Society, 123. 

Home School for Girls, 144. 

Howard Seminary, 144. 

Illinois Conference, 108. 

Industrial School for Girls, 134. 

Industrial School (South End, Bos- 
ton), 137. 

International Council, 150-154, 

Iowa Association, 1091 

Japan, 74. 

Joseph Priestley Conference, 105. 

Liberal Christian Club, Lowell. 126. 

Liberal La)mian*s Oub, Connecticut 
Valley, 126. 

Liberal Ministers Association of New 
York, 130. 

Library, y6. 

Life Members of American Unitarian 
Association, 81-97. 

Local New England Conferences, iio- 

"3. 

Lowell Liberal Club, 126. 

MacDuffie School for Girls, 145. 

Maine Conference, in. 

Maine Unitarian Association, ix$, 

Massachusetts Congregational Charita- 
ble Society, 135. 

Massachusetts Convention of Congre- 
gational ministers, 128. 

Massachusetts Evangelical Missionary 
Societv, 135. 

Meadville Alumni Association, 142. 

Meadville Theological School, 14a 

Meadville Unitarian Conference, 105. 

Merrimack Valley Unitarian Club, 127. 

Michigan Conference, 100. 

Middle States and Canada, 104-105. 

Ministerial Aid, 76. 

Ministerial Associations, 128-131. 

Ministerial Conference, 129. 



Ministerial Union, 129. 

Ministers' Institute, 129. 

Ministers, List of, 47-65. 

Minnesota Conference, 109. 

Missionanr Council of New England, 
75 ; of the South, 76; of the West, 76. 

Missionary Society (Massachusetts 
Evangelical), 135. 

Missouri Valley Unitarian Conference, 
109. 

Monday Club (Ministers), 131. 

Nantucket Summer Meetings, 123. 

Natick Unitarian Club, 127. 

National Alliance, 118-119. 

National Bureau of Unity Gubs, 12Q 

National Conference, 98-103. 

National Federation, 148. 

National Guild Alliance, 120. 

Necrology, 154-170. 

New Americans, 76. 

New England Associate Alliance, 11^ 

New Hampshire Unitarian Associa- 
tion, 112. 

Newton Unitarian Club, 127. 

New York League of Unitarian Wom- 
en, 119. 

New York Liberal Ministers Associa- 
tion, 130. 

New York office, 68. 

New York Sunday-School Union, 117. 

New York Unitarian Club, 127. 

Norfolk Conference, 112. 

North Middlesex Conference, 112. 

North Middlesex Federation, 122. 

North Middlesex Ministerial Associa- 
tion, 130. 

North Pacific Conference, 108. 

North Worcester Federation, 123, 

Obituary Notices, 154-170. 

Officers, American Unitarian Associa- 
tion, 66, 67. 

Old and New, 171. 

Oregon Unitarian Club, 127. 

PactHc Unitarian, 172. 

Pacific Unitarian Conference, 107. 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Min- 
istry, 142-143. 

Pension Society, 138. 

Periodicals, 1 71-172. 

Perkins FellowshipSj 75. 

Philadelphia Unitarian Club, 127. 

Pilgrim Federation, 122. 



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Pljrmouth and Bay Association (Min- 
isters), 130. 

Plymouth and Bay Conference, 112. 

Post-office Mission Committee, 118. 

Powder Point School, 146. 

Proctor Academy, 146. 

Providence Unitarian Gub, 128. 

Pulpits. Committee on Supply of, 130. 

Rocky Mountain Conference, 107. 

San Francisco office, 68. 

Schools, 144-147. 

Society for Promoting Theological 
Education, 136. 

Society for Propagating the Gospel 
among the Indians^ 136. 

Society for Ministenal Relief, 135. 

South End Industrial School, 137. 

South Middlesex Conference, 113. 

South Middlesex Federation, 122. 

South Pacific Conference, 108. 

South Worcester Federation, 123. 

Southern Conference, 106. 

Southern Missionary Work, Commit- 
tee orv 119. 

Special Committees of Conference, 118. 

State Conferences, 108-110. 

Study Classes, Committee on, 118. 

Summer Meetings Association, 123. 

Sunday- School Societies, 114-117. 

Temperance Society, 124. 

Theological Schools, 139-143. 

Tuckerman School, 146. 

Union for Christian Work (Provi- 
dence), 137. 

Unitarian, 171. 

Unitarian Association. See American. 

Unitarian Qub, Boston, 125. 

Unitarian Club, California, 126. 

Unitarian Qub, Chicago, 126. 



Unitarian Gub, Harvard Divinity 
School, 126. 

Unitarian Gub, Merrimack Valley, 
127. 

Unitarian Gub, Natick, 127. 

Unitarian Gub, Newton, 127. 

Unitarian Club, New York, 127. 

Unitarian Club, Oregon, 127. 

Unitarain Club, Philadelphia, 127. 

Unitarian Gub, Providence, 128. 

Unitarian Gubs, 125-128. 

Unitarian Educational Society, 138. 

Unitarian Fellowship for Social Jus- 
tice, 124. 

Unitarian Historical Society, 123. 

Unitarian Ministers' Monday Club, 
131. 

Unitarian Service Pension Society, Ij8. 

Unitarian Summer Meetings Assoaa- 
tion, 123. 

Unitarian Sunday-School Society, 114- 

117. 

Unitarian Sunday-School Union, 117. 

Unitarian Temperance Society, 124. 

Unity, 172. 

Western State Conferences, 108-110. 

Western Unitarian Conference, 106. 

Western Headquarters, Unitarian Sun- 
day-School Society, 117. 

Wisconsin Conference, no. 

Women's Alliances, 1 18-120. 

Worcester A ssociation ( Ministers ) , 

131. 
Worcester Conference, 113. 
Worcester League, 120. 
Young Men's Christian Union, 132. 
Young People's Religious Union, 120- 

121. 
Young People's Societies, 120-123. 



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DAYS TO BE REMEMBERED. 



1909. 
Stpt 27-30. National Conference of Unitarian and other Christian 

Churches, in the Fine Arts Building, Chicago, 111. 
Oct 17. Special day for collection for the American Unitarian 

Association. 
Nov. 25. Thanksgiving Day. 
Dec. 22. Forefathers' Day. 

Dec 25. Christmas. 

1910. 

Jan. I. New Year's Day. 

Feb. 9. Ash Wednesday. 

Feb. 12. Lincoln's Birthday. 

Feb. 22, Washington's Birthday. 

March 20. Palm Sunday. 

March 25. Good Friday. 

March 27. Easter Sunday. 

April 19. Patriot's Day. 

April 30. Last day for receiving contributions for the American 
Unitarian Association and the Unitarian Sunday- 
School Society. 

May 18. Graduation Exercises of the Tuckerman School. 

May 23-28. Anniversary Week in Boston. 

May 24. Annual Meeting of the National Alliance. 

May 24-25. Annual Meeting of the American Unitarian Association. 

May 26. Annual Meeting of the Young People's Religious Union. 

May 26. Annual Meeting of the Meadville Alumni Association. 

May 27. Annual Meeting of the Unitarian Sunday-School Society. 

May 27. Unitarian Festival. 

May 30. Memorial Day. 

May 15. Whitsunday. 

June 2. Graduation Exercises of the Meadville Theological 

School. 

June 28. Annual Meeting of the Harvard EMvinity School 

Alumni. 

July 4. Independence Day. 

Aug. 6-10. The International Council of Unitarian and other Lib- 
eral Religious Thinkers and Workers at Berlin, Ger- 
many. 



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LIST OF UNITARIAN CHURCHES IN THE UNITED 
STATES AND CANADA 



This list contains 489 societies, a net increase of 6 over the last report. 

* These churches have discontinued services, but have some hope of resuming 
work. * 

t These churches have ceased to exist save for the fact that corporations 
under these names continue to hold a certain amount of property. 



Place. 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
tsed. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Abington, North, 

Mass. 
Adrian, Minn. . 

Alameda, Cal. . 

Albany, N.Y. . 

Allegheny, Pa. . 

Alton, m. . . 

Amherst, Mass. . 

Andovcr, N.H. . 

Andover, North, 
Mass. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Arcadia, Wis. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Ashby, Mass. 
Athol, Mass. 
Athol, Mass. 
Atlanta, Ga. 



•First Unitarian Society 

People's Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

(See Pittsburgh) 

First Unitarian Church 

Unity Church 

Congregational Unita- 
rian Society 

First Unitarian Church 
and Society 

First Unitarian Society 

People's Church 

First Congregational 

Parish 
First Parish 

•First Congregational 
Unitarian Society 

Second Unitarian So- 
ciety 

The Unitarian Church 
of Atlanta 



1887 
1899 
iSgo 
1842 

1854 
1898 
1879 

1645 
1865 
1884 

1733 
1767 
1750 
1877 
1883 



William S. Morgan, 
Ph.D. 



Arthur H. Cbar 

(Holyoke, Mass.) 
Henry G. Ives 

r Charles Noycs 
\ (Pastor Emeritus) 
l William S. Nichols 
Henry Wilder Foote 



J. L. Greenwood 

C. W. Kilpatrick 

Major Cullcn Bryant 

Peter R. Robson, 
468 Hudson Ave. 



D. R. Sparks 

Prof. Wm. 

Brooks 
C. E. Carr 



P. 



Frederic Gill 
Granville Pierce 

Carence L. Ball 
John W. Rowlett, D.D. 



M. T. Stevens 

Prof. J. R. Effinger 

N. Leihbach 

John L. Taylor 

Miss Ida F. Damon 

Samuel Lee 

Frank E. Wing, 

246 School St. 
Frank Lederle 



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Place, 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
tsed. 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Augusta, Me. 
Aurora, III. . . 
Aycr, Mass. . . 
Baltimore, Md. . 

Bangor, Me. 
Baraboo, Wis. . 
Bar Harbor, Me. 
Barneveld, N.Y. 
Barnstable, Mass. 
Barre, Mass. . . 



Bath. N.H. . . . 

Beachmont, Mass. . 

Bear Creek, N.C. . 

Beatrice, Neb. . . 

Bedford, Mass. . . 

Belfast, Me. . . . 

Bellingham, Wash. . 

Belmont, Mass. . . 

Beloit, Kan. . . . 

Bendon, Mich. . . 

Berkeley, Cal. . . 

Berlin, Mass. . . 
Bemardston, Mass. 



Unitarian Society 
People's Church 

First Unitarian Par 

ish of Ayer 
First Independent 

Christ's Church 



Indei>endent Congre- 
gational Society 
tFrec Congregational 

Society 
Liberal Christian 

Church 
(See Trenton, N.Y.) 

Cong. Ch. and Soc. of 

the East Precinct 
First Parish 



Independent Christian 

Society 
(See Revere) 

(See Hubert, N.C.) 

•Unity Church 

First Congregational 

Society 
First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Congregational Society 

First Unitarian Society 

•Union Church Asso- 
ciation 
First Unitarian CHiurch 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 
Unitarian Society 



1826 
1906 

1855 
1817 

1818 
1861 
1889 

1639 
1753 

1886 



1883 

1730 

1796 

1905 

I 

1905 

1907 

1891 

1872 

1740 



Edwin M. Slocombe 
William M. Forkell 
Edwin Evans 

fChas. R. Weld, 
LL.D., Pastor Emer- 
itus 
Alfred R. Hussey 

Alva R. Scott 



(Summer preaching) 



Robert P. Dorcmus 

Alvin F. Bailey, Pas- 
tor Emeritus 
, Herbert L. Buzzell 



Loren B. Macdonald 

(Concord) 
Adolph Rossbach 



Fred A. Weil 
856 George H. Reed 

George F. Armington 
Burton A. Hills 
John H. Lathrop 
Frank R. Gale 
Merritt S. Bucldngham 



Norman L. Bassett, 

Esq 
Frank H. Hall 

Arthur Fenner 

Thomas J. Morris, 
708 Park Ave. 



Samuel R. Prentiss 
Mrs. Clara Runge 
B. C. Reynolds 

David Crocker, Elsq. 
Harding Jenkins 

Charles W. Jackman 



L. M. Pembcrton 

Charles W. Jenks 

George A. Quimby 

A. J. Craven 

Edwin F. Atkins 

Frank Slack 

William E.Widrig 

W. C. Fife, 

2728 Regent Street, 
Waldo L. Wheeler 

Charles R. Hills 



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Beverly, Mass. . 

Billerica, Mass. . 

Bloomington, 111. 

Boise, Ida. . . 

Bolton, Mass. . 

Boston, Mass.: 
(Meeting - house 
Hill, Dorchester) 
(Berkeley and 
Marlboro Sts.) 
(Eliot Sq., Rox- 
bury) 
(Copley Sq.) . . 

(Tremont and 
School Sts.) 
(West Roxbury). 



(Arlington and 
Boylston Sts.) 
(Brighton) 
((niestnut Hill 
Ave., opposite 
(Hiiswick Rd.) 
(Jamaica Plain) 



(Richmond 
Dorchester) 



St, 



(South Boston) 



(Bulfinch PI.) . 

(Exeter and New- 
bunr Sts.) 
(Warrenton St.) 



(Jersey and Pe- 
terborough Sts.) 



Corporate Name. 



First Parish 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

First Parish and Re- 
ligious Society 

First Parish of Dor- 
chester 
First Church in Boston 

First Religious Socie- 
ty in Roxbury 

Second Church in 
Boston 

King's Chapel 

First Parish, West 

Roxbury 
*New South Church 

Arlington Street 

Church 
First Parish of 

Brighton 



First Congregational 
Society of Jamaica 
Plain 

Third Religious Soci 
ety in Dorchester 

Hawes Unitarian Con- 
gregational Church 

Bulfinch Place Church 

South Congregational 

Society 
Barnard Memorial 



(Thurchof the Disciples 



Or- 
ized. 



1667 Benjamin R. Bulkeley 
1663 Harry Lutz 
1859 John H. MueUer 
1901 John C Mitchell 
1738 Joseph N. Pardee 

^JojRoger S. Forbes 
Charles E. Park 



1630 
1631 
1649 
1686 
1712 
1719 
1730 
1730 

1770 

1813 

1822 

1826 
1827 
1836 

1841 



Minister. 



James De Normandie, 
D.D. 

Thomas Van Ness 

Howard N. Brown 
Ernest S. Meredith 



Paul Revere Froth- 

ingham 
Palfrey Perkins 



Charles F. Dole, D.D. 
Daniel R. Freeman 

James Huxtable 

r Samuel H. Winkley, 
\ Pastor Emeritus 
I Christopher R. Eliot 
Edward Cummings 

Benjamin F. McDaniel 
Charles G. Ames, D.D 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Rodney C. Larcom 

John A. Richardson 

Prof. H. N. Pearce 

C. F. Pike, Esq. 

Lorenzo D. Coch- 
rane 

W. P. Stone 

Delano Wight 

Henry W. Putnam, 

Esq. 
Stephen M. Crosby, 

364 Marlboro St 
Arthur T. Lyman 

Ephraim Harrington, 

Mt Vernon St 
Henry C. Whitcomb 

John Mason Little 

Dr. J. Henry Woods, 
Salisbury Road, 
Brookline 

Hon. Harvey H. 

Baker, Devonshire 

Bldg., Boston 

Dr. M. Ordway 

Daly, 29 Hollis 

St, Boston 

Walter Jenney, 

55 G St. 
Walter J. Young, 
82 Hillside Ave., 
Melrose 
F. Rockwood Hall 

Thomas Hills, 
3a3 K St, 
So. Boston 
Edward A. Church. 



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12 



Place. 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
tzed. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Boston, Mass.: 
(Warren St & 
Elm Hill Ave., 
Roxbuiy) 
(East Boston) 

(Dix St., Dor- 
chester) 
(20 Parmentcr St) 

(Neponset) . . 

(Norfolk St., 
Dorchester) 
(Roslindale) . . 

(Berkeley and 
Appleton Sts.) 
(East Cottage St. 
Dorchester) 

Braintree, Mass. 

Brattleboro, Vt 

Brewster, Mass. 

Bridgewater, Mass. 

Bridgewater, East, 

Mass. 
Bridgewater, West, 

Mass. 
Brighton, Mass. 

Bristol, Fla. . . 

Brockton, Mass. 

Brookfield, Mass. . 

Brookings, S.D. 

Brookline, Mass. 

Brookline, Mass. 

Brooklyn, Conn. 



All Souls' Unitarian 
Church 

CHiurch of Our Father 

CHirist (Thurch of Dor- 
chester 
North End Union 

Church of the Unity 

Norfolk Unitarian 
Church 

Roslindale Unitarian 
Church 

Theodore Parker Me- 
morial 

Channing Church 



All Souls' CHiurch of 

Braintree 
Unitarian Congrega* 

tional Society 
First Parish 

First Congregational 

Society 
First Parish 

First Congregational 

Society 
(See Boston) 

Unitarian (Thurch of 

Bristol 
Unity CHiurch 

First Congregational 

(Unitarian) Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

Second Unitarian So- 
ciety 

First Ecclesiastical So- 
ciety 



1846 



Henry T. Secrist 



1847 
1848 

1853 
1859 
1889 Benjamin 



Alfred D. K. Shurtleff 
(Jeorge F. Pratt 

Samuel F. Hubbard, 

Superintendent. 
George W. Cutter, M.D. 

(Watertown, Mass.) 
F. McDaniel 



[oseph H. Crooker, 
D.D. 



1890 J< 

1893 

1900 Francis R. Sturtevant 

1900 

1831 Edmund Q. S. Osgood 

1700 Ernest A. Chase 

1 7 16 Harold G. Arnold 
1724 Bertram D. Boivin 
165 1 Edward B. Maglathlin 

1900 Jonathan C. Gibson 

(Apalachicola, Fla.) 
i88i Dudley H. Ferrell 

1717 William L. Walsh 
1907 Rett E. Olmstead 
1717 William H. Lyon, D.D 
1896 Arthur W. Littlefield 
1732 Adam J. Culp 



F. N. Nay, 
9 Maple St 

Henry Peterson, 
44 Princeton St. 

L. K. Hull, 
29 Tileston PI. 

Rev. Edw.. A. Hor- 
ton 

Henry P. Oakman 

Horace S. Fowlc 

(jeorgc A. Randall, 
19 Conway St. 



(jeorge C. Irwin 

John W. West 
Dr. S. E. Lawton 
F. B. Crocker 
A. H. Hobart 
Elbridge W. White 
George S. Drake 

M. V. Baker 

Francis E. Shaw, 

326 West Elm St 
R. G. Livermore 

Mrs. Anna Lawshee 

Henry Ware, 

82 High St. 
CHiarles W. Saw- 

telle 
Joseph B. Stetson 



Digitized by 



Google 



13 



Place. 



Brooklyn, Mich. 

Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 
Brunswick, Me. 

Buda, lU. . . . 

Buflfalo, N.Y. . . 

Buflfalo, N.Y. . . 

Burgaw, N.C . . 

Burlington, la. . . 

Burlington, Vt. . . 

Butte, Mont . . 

Cambridge, Mass. . 

Cambridge, Mass. . 

Cafion City, Col. . 

Canton, Mass. . . 

Cape Rozier, Me. . 

Carlisle, Mass. . . 

Castine, Me. . . . 

Champaign, IlL . . 
Charleston, S.C. 

Charlestown, N.H. . 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Chelmsford, Mass. . 

Chelsea, Mass. . , 

Cherokee, la. . . 



Corporate Name. 



Or. 
fan- 
tzed. 



People's Church 
(See New York) 

'Unitarian Society in 
Brunswick 

Union Christian So- 
ciety 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

Parkside Unitarian So- 
ciety 

Shelter Neck Uni- 
tarian Church 

People's Church 

First Congregational 

Society 
First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

Third Congregational 

Society 
'First Unitarian Church 

First Congregational 
Parish 

The Union Church of 

Cape Rozier 
First Religious Society 

First Congregational 

Society 
(See Urbana) 

Unitarian Church 

South Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Societjr 
First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 



ii 

1780 

1798 



1817 

1754 
1889 
1655 
1838 
1894 



Minister, 



1893 

1873 

1858 

1832 

1896 (George 

1900 

1895 
1810 
1903 
1636 
1808 
1894 
1717 



Richard W. Boynton 

Gilmour 
William S. Key 



Charles J. Staples 

Lewis J. Duncan 

Samuel M. Crothers, 

D.D. 
Henry H. Saunderson 



{Henry F. Jenks, 
Pastor Emeritus 
Bradley Oilman 
9o6|Robcrt C. Douthit 
(Castine, Me.) 
Frank H. Billington 



Robert C Douthit 

aifton M. Gray 
Samuel L. Elberfeld 
Hal H. Uoyd 
L. Leroy Greene 



Chairman or Clerk 



Irven L. Hoeg 

F. C Webb 
O. W. Mason 

Isidore Michael, 
62$ Delaware Ave. 

William E. Ashe, 
615 Crescent Ave. 

M. B. Hanchey 

Mrs. Antrobus 

C. W. Richardson. 
346 South Union St. 
diaries L. Smith 

Franklin Hammond 

L. M. Hannum, 

333 Harvard St. 
Mrs. C. W. Burrage 

Charles French 

Arthur W. Howard 
S. James Anthony 
Charles H. Hooper 



B. H. Brown 

George T. Putnam 

George T. White 

Joseph E. Warren 

George M. Stearns, 
125 Shurtleff St. 
J. M. Snidecor 



Digitized by 



Google 



14 



Place. 



Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Chka^, IlL: 
(Michigan Ave. 
and aad St) 

(Woodlawn Ave 
and STth St.) 
(Barry Ave. near 
Evanston Ave.) 
(Monroe St and 
Kedzie Ave.) 
(3930 Langley 
Ave.) 

(Wells Hall 1629 
N. (nark St) 

Chicopee, Mass. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Qinton, Mass. . 

Cohasset, Mass. 

Colorado Springs, 
Col. 

(North Tejon and 
Dale Sts.) 

Concord, Mass. 

Cx>ncord, N.H. 

Cornish, N.H. 

Dalbo, Minn. 
Dallas, Tex. . 
Danvers, Mass. 
Davenport, la. 
Decorah, la. . 



Corporate Name, 



Chestnut Hill Society 



First Unitarian Society 
of Chicago (Church 
of the Messiah) 

Memorial (Thapel 

Unity Church 

Third Unitarian 
Church 

All Souls' Church (In- 
dependent) 

First Swedish Unita- 
rian Church of Chi- 
cago 

First Unitarian Society 

First Ck>ngregational 

Church 
The Church of the 

Unity 
First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Society 
All Souls' Unitarian 

Church 



First Parish 

Second Congregation- 
al Unitarian Society 

Independent Parish of 
Cornish, N.H. 

Dalbo Unitarian So- 
ciety 
First unitarian Cliurch 

Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society 
First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 



Or- 
tzed. 



1862 



1836 W. Hanson Pulsford 

W. Hanson Pulsford 
1858 Fred V. Hawley 
1868 
1882 
1904 



Jenkin Lloyd Jones 
August Dellgren 



1841 



1867 
1850 
1721 
1891 



Minister, 



Edward Hale 



Kenneth E. Evans 
1830 George A. Thayer, D.D. 
Minot Osgood Simons 
James C Duncan 
William R. Cole 
John L. Marsh 



i636Loren B. Macdonald 

1827 

1905 

1909 David Holmgren 

1899 

1867 Edward H. Brenan 

i868|Robert E. Ramsay 

1890 



Chairman or Clerk, 



(Tharles H. Burrage 



Frederick A. Delano, 
200 Adams St 

Garence W. Moore, 

5741 Monroe Ave. 
Joseph W. Hosmer, 

44 Bcllevue PI. 
Francis S. Russell, 

1268 Jackson Boul. 
France Anderson, 

330 Oakwood Boul. 
Benjamin Pehrson, 

5819 Aberdeen St 

(jeorge A. Blaisdall 

Edward (loepper 

Dr. John F. Stephan 

Jonathan Smith 

Edward Nichols 

Simeon J. Dunbar, 
1203 North Tejon 
St 

Prescott Keyes 

Reuben E. Walker 

F. A. Johnson, 
R. D. 4* Windsor, 
Vt 
ErickToUn 

C R. Buddy 

Andrew Nichols, 
Hathome, Mass. 

R. K. Beatty, 
214 Kirkwood Boul 

Miss Edith Daubney 



Digitized by 



Google 



IS 



Place. 



Dedham, Mass. . 
Deerfield, Mass. . 
Denver, Col. 
Derby, Conn. . 
Des Moines, la. 

Detroit, Mich. . - 

Dighton, Mass. . 

Dorchester, Mass. 

Dover, Mass. 

Dover, N.H. . 

Dublin, N.H. . 

Duluth, Minn. . 

Dunkirk, N.Y. . 

Duxbury, Mass. 

Easton, Mass.: 
(Eastondale) . 

(North Easton) 
Eastport, Me. . 

Elizabeth, N.J. . 
Ellsworth, Me. . 



Erie, Pa. . . 
Eureka, Cal. . 
Evanston, 111. 



Corporate Name. 



First Parish 

First Congregational 

Unitarian Church 
First Unitarian Society 

Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Society 



First Congregational 
Unitarian Society 

Pedo^ptist Congrega- 
tional Society 

(See Boston) 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

of Christians 
First Congregational 

Society 
First Unitarian Church 

Independent Congre- 
gation 
First Parish 



Congregational Parish 

Unity Church 

First Congregational 
Society 

All Souls' Church 

First Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian Society 
The Unity Church 
Church of All Souls 



Or- 
izea. 



Minister, 



i636.WUliam H. Parker 
1686 Richard E. Birks 
871 David Utter, D.D. 



1901 
1877 

1850 
1797 

1749 
1827 

1772 
1887 
1880 
1632 

1713 

1855 
1820 

1902 

1865 
1898 
1906 
1891 



Alfred W. Birks 
Mary A. Safford 

A. Judson Rich 

William R. Lord 
William C. Adams 
Josiah L. Seward, D.D. 
CJeorgc R. Gebauer 

Andrew Hahn 



Edwin J. Prescott 
(Rockland) 

f William L. Chaffin 
I Ahram Wjrman 
H. Edward Latham 

Mrs. Antoinette 
BrownBlackweU,D.D. 

Pastor Emeritus 
Arthur H. Grant 



Thomas P. Byrnes 
Nehemiah A. Baker 
James Vila Blake 



Chairman or Clerk, 



W. Harris Fisher 

Harry A. Wells 

J. Guy Smith 

Alfred C. Baldwin 

Miss Florence E. 
Harsh, 
1805 High St. 
Hiram Marks 

F. W. Talbot 



John H. Faulk 
G. Fisher Piper 
M. D. Mason, Esq. 
William Burgess 
D. W. Abell 
Elisha Peterson 



Henry G. Poole, 
51 Ash St., 
Brockton 
John S. Ames 

C. W. Cummings 



Charles M. Horton, 
534 Magie St. 

Frank Call 

Ernest (Gordon, 
227 W. nth St. 

W. P. Ward. 
1303 Harris St. 

John R. Guilliams, 
2324 Harrison St 



Digitized by 



Google 



i6 



Place. 



Everett, Wash. . . 

Exeter, N.H. . . 

Faceville, Ga. . . 

Fairhaven, Mass. . 

Fall River, Mass. . 

Fargo, N.D. . . . 

Farmington, Me. . 

Fitchburg, Mass. . 

FitzwilHam, N.H. . 
Florence, Mass. 

Flushing, N.Y. . . 

Fort Collins, Col. . 

Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Framingham, Mass. 

Francestown, N.H. 

Franklin, N.H. 

Franklin, Pa. 

Fresno, Cal. . 

Gardner, Mass. 

Geneseo, 111. . 

Geneva, 111. . 

Gimli, Man. . 

(Canada) 
Gloucester, Mass. . 

Gouldsboro, W., Me. 



Corporate Name, 



First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Society of 

Fairhaven 
Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

of Fargo 
First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

First Congregational 

Society 
(See Northampton) 

First Unitarian Church 

Unity CHiurch 

Unitarian Church of 
Fort Fairfield, Me. 
First Parish 

Union Congregational 
Society 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

The First Unitarian 
(Thurch of Franklin 

Unitarian Society of 
Fresno 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian CHiurch 
First Parish 
Eliot Unitarian (Thurch 



Or- 
tsied. 



1904 
1854 
1901 
1832 



1 832 John B. W. Day 
890 

1829 

1768 Robert F. Leavens 

1833 (Summer preaching) 



1907 

1897 
1902 
1701 
1823 
1879 
1906 
1903 
1884 
1868 
1842 

1642 
1896 



James H. Ecob, D.D. 



Minister, 



Otto E. Duerr 

Edward Green 

Jonathan C. Gibson 

(Apalachicola, Fla.) 
Frank L. Phalen 



Calvin Stebbins 
Horace R. Hubbard 
Henry C. McDougall 
Charles E. Snyder 

Qement E. Tomlin 

/Milton J. Miller 
\ David M. Kirkpatrick 

Timothy H. Eddowes, 
Pastor Emeritus 

Johann P. Solmunds- 
son 

(jeorgc S. Anderson 

(Summer preaching) 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Dr. J. S. Newcombe 

Albion Burbank 

I. B. TraflFord 

Cxeorge N. Gardiner 

William C. Gray 

Mrs. Harriet P. Sal- 
ter 
J. C Metcalf 

Ira G. Wilkins, 
17 Arlington St 

Mrs. Stephen Batch- 
eller 

Mrs. Ellen L. Har- 
rison, 121 Barclay 
St. 
Leslie F. Paull 

E. L. Guild 

Sidney A. Phillips 

D. W. Duncklec 

Edward G. Leach 

A. R. Osmer 

A. J. Patterson 

Lewis A. Wright, 

249 High St 
Hon. J. P. Fox 

T. H. Eddowes 

Einar S. Jonasson 

Finlay A. Dochcrty 

James Hill 



Digitized by 



Google 



17 



Place, 



Corporate Name. 



Or 
tzcd. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Gouverneur, N.Y. . 
Grafton, Mass. . . 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Grand Rapids, Mich, 

Great Falls, Mont. 
Greeley, Col. . . 
Greenfield, Mass. . 
Green Harbor, Mass, 
Groton, Mass. . . 
Hackensack, N.J. . 

Hamilton, Ont . . 

(Canada) 
Hampton Falls, 

N.H. 
Han ska, Minn. . . 

Ilarrietta, Mich. 

Hartford, Conn. . 

Harvard, Mass. . . 

Haverhill, Mass. . 

Helena, Mont. . . 

Highland Springs, 

Va. 
Hingham, Mass. 

Hingham, So., Mass. 

Hingham, Mass. 

Hinsdale, 111. . . 



First Unitarian Society 
Congregational Society 
First Unitarian Society 

All Souls* Liberal 

Church 
Holland Unitarian 

Church 

First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Society 

Third Congregational 
Society (All Souls') 
(See Marshfield) 

First CHiurch of Christ 

Unitarian Congrega- 
tional (Thurch 
First Unitarian CHiurch 

First Congregational 

Society 
Nora Free Christian 
Church 
People's (Thurch 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

First Congregational 
Parish 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Highland Springs 

IJnitarian Society 
First Parish 

Second Parish 

Third Congregational 

Society 
Unity Church 



1896 
1731 

1875 

I 

1885 

1894 
1880 

1825 

1655 

1897 Jj 

1889 

1819 

1881 

1907 

1844 

1733 

1645 
1891 

1899 
1635 

'74S 
1807 



Everett S. Trcworgy 
Samuel C. Beane, D.D. 



H. H. Bard (Univer- 

salist) 
B. A. Van Sluyters 



Milton R. Kerr 
Samuel R. Maxwell 

Pcmberton H. Cressey 
ames A. Fairley 
Walter D. Smith 



Amandus H. Norman 
Burton A. Hills 
Jabez T. Sunderland 
Joseph P. Sheafe 
John A. Hayes 
Frank A. Powell 
Robert W. Savage 
Louis C. Cornish 
Paul S. Phalen 
Paul S. Phalen 
1886 Joseph M. A. Spence 



G. S. Conger 
Francis M. McGarry 

J. B. Barlow 

Herman P. Hugen- 
holtz, 
208 Clinton St. 
F. A. Bishop 

Mrs. Susan G. 

Adams 
Franklyn F. Allen 

James T. Bennett 

Leverett H. Sage, 

River St. 
Robert K. Palmer, 

21 Bold St. 
Lester B. Sanborn 

Ole Jorgenson 

Mrs. George Curtis 

J. Walton Bissell, 

34 Chapel St. 
James L. Whitney 

Fred S. Mills 

A. K. Prescott 

E. S. Read 

Ebed L. Ripley 

Waher C. Shute 

Morris F. Whiton 

Charles C. Warren 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8 



Place. 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
gan- 
ized, 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Hobart, Ind. . . 

Holyoke, Mass. . . 
Homestead, Pa. 

Hood River, Ore. . 

Hopedale, Mass. . 

Houlton, Me. . . 
Hubbardston, Mass. 

Hubert, N.C. . . 

Hudson, Mass. . . 

Hudson, Wis. . . 

Humboldt, la. . . 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
Ida Grove, la. . . 
Indianapolis, Ind. . 

Iowa City, la. . . 

Iowa Falls, la. . . 

Isles of Shoals, 

N.H. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 

Jackson, Mich. . . 

Jacksonville, Fla. . 

Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Jamestown, N.Y. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 



First Unitarian Church 

Liberal Christian Con- 
gregational Society 

L 1 nc o 1 n Unitarian 
Church 

First Unitarian Society 
of Hood River 

Hopedale Unitarian 
Parish 

Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Society 
Bear Creek Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Society 

The S c a n d i n avian 
Unitarian Society of 
Hudson, Wis. 

Unity Church 

First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

All Souls* Unitarian 
Church 

First Unitarian Society 

of Iowa City 
People's Church 

G o s p o r t Meeting- 
house ( Stone Chapel ) 
First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 
(See Boston) 

Indepnendent Congre- 
gational Church Soc. 
People's Church 



1875 
1874 
1909 
1902 
1867 
1811 

1773 
1906 

i860 John 
1892 

1875 



Arthur H. Coar 
Richard F. Tischer 
John Van Neice Bandy 
Fred R. Lewis 

Joseph M. Seaton 

Charles W. Gillilan 
(Swansboro) 
Baltzly 

A. E. Norman 



Charles P. Wellman 
1867 J. A. C. Fagginger Auer 
1895 
1903 Frank S. C. Wicks 

1879 
1898 

1865 

1875 
1906 

1885 
1858 



Robert S. Loring 

(Summer preaching) 
Cyrus W. Heizer 

Albert J. Coleman 

Walter A. Taylor 

Joseph P. McCarthy, 
Ph.D. 



(^rge Peterson 

M. M. S. Moriarty 

John M. Poorhaugfa 

E. A. Franz 

Miss Anna M. Ban- 
croft 
Aaron A. Putnam 

John Burtch 

James M. Maccaus- 

ley 
Ellsworth S. Locke 

Niels J. Jensson 

C. J. White 

D. G. Thompson 

(Charles S. Macom- 
ber 

Harry Stout 

William R. N. Sil- 
vester 

Prof. Karl E. Guthe 

Fayette Holmes 



Fred Robinson 

J. C. Richardson 

Hon. Duncan U. 
Fletcher 



F. B. Bush, 

412 Winsor St. 
Prof. George S. 

Waite 



Digitized by 



Google 



19 



Place. 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
ized. 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk, 



Kansas City, Mo. . 

Kcenc, N.H. . . 
Kennebunk, Me. 

Kenosha, Wis. . . 

Keokuk, la. . . . 
Kingston, Mass. 

Laconia, N.H. . . 
Lamoine, East, Me. 

Lancaster, Mass. . 
Lancaster, N.H. 

Lancaster, Pa. . . 

La Porte, Ind. . . 
Lawrence, Kan. 

Lawrence, Mass. . 

Lebanon, N.H. . . 

Leicester, Mass. 

Leominster, Mass. . 

Lewiston, Ida. . . 

Lexington, Mass. . 

Lexington, East, 
Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Neb. . . 

Littleton, Mass. .1 



All Souls' Unitarian 

Church 
Keene Congregational 

Society 
First Congregational 

Parish 
First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Parish 
First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Church of Christ 

First Unitarian Society 

Church of Our Father 

•First Unitarian Society 

The Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 



First Congregational 
Unitarian Society 

Second Congregation- 
al Society 

First Congregational 
Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Society 
Follen Church 



Unitarian Congrega 

tional Society 
All Souls* Church 

First Congregational 
Society 



Vernon M. Cady 
H. Sumner Mitchell 



Florence Buck 



Morse, 



M. Rowena 

Ph.D. 
Courtland Y. De Nor- 

mandie 



1868 
1824 
1750 
1865 

1853 

1717 

1867 

1886 (Summer preaching) 

1653 Abbot Peterson 

1854 

1902 Eugene R. Shippen 

1875 

1856 Frederick M. Bennett 

1847I — 

I 
1865 John W. Barker 

i834:Samuel C Beane, Jr., 

I (Worcester) 
i743,Frederic J. Gauld 

igo6 

i692|John M. Wilson 

1845 



Howard A. MacDonald 



184 1 James Dc Normandie, 

D.D. 
1898 



1717 



Arthur L. Weatherly 
Chester A. Drummond 



W. C Root 

Hon. George H. 
Fames, 35 Cross St 
A. W. Meserve 

Harry Skinkle, 

221 Ashland Ave. 
J. M. Shaffer. M.D., 

I2J4 Fourth St. 
Joseph A. Hohnes 

William F. Knight, 

458 Main St. 
Samuel Des Isles 

John C L. Clark 

Frank Smith 

M. T. Garvin 



Prof. W. C. Stevens 

Dr. George P. 
Howe, 
ISS Haverhill St. 
George B. Cough 

Henry O. Smith 

Robert L. Carter 

C. A. Foresman 

Alonzo E. Locke 

Charles H. Spauld- 
ing 

John H. Pierce 

A. J. Sawyer 

Frank B. Priest 



Digitized by 



Google 



20 



Place. 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
gan- 
ized. 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Littleton, N.H. . 
London, Can. . 
Los Angeles, Cal. 

I^uisville, Ky. . 
Lowell, Mass. . 
Luverne, Minn. . 
Lynn, Mass. . . 

Madison, Wis. . 
Maiden, Mass. . 
Manchester, Mass. 

Manchester, N.H. 

Manistee, Mich. 

Marblehead, Mass. 

Marietta, Ohio . 

Marlborough, Mass. 

Marshfield, Mass.: 
(Marshfield Hills) 

(Green Harbor) . 

Mary Hill, P.O. 

Manitoba, C a n- 

ada 
Mattoon, 111. 

McKeesport, Pa. 

Meadvillc, Pa. . 



First Unitarian Church 

The Unitarian Church 

of London 
First Unitarian Church 



C Church of the Messiah 
< Highland Sunday- 
I School Society 
First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

Second Congregation- 
al Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 
First Unitarian Church 



First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Second Congregation 
al Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian Society 

Second Parish 



Second Congregational 

Society 
Grace Chapel 

The Unitarian Society 

of Lake Manitoba 

(Icelandic) 

tUnity Church 

First Unitarian Society 

Independent Congre 
gational Church 



1884 
1904 
1877 

1830 

IQ03 
1S29 

1887 

1822 

1879 
1875 
1958 

1842 
1886 

1715 
185s 
1806 

1738 
1882 
1908 

1867 
1906 
1825 



Perley J. Robinson 

£. Stanton Hodgin 
William H. Ramsay 
Charles T. Billings 



Samuel B. Stewart, 
Pastor Emeritus 
[Albert Lazenby 
Frank A. Gilmorc 



(Summer preaching) 



George E. Hathaway 



Peter H. Goldsmith, 

D.D. (Salem) 
E. Alfred Coil 

Edward F. Hayward 



(Supplies) 
George L. Mason 
Rognvaklur Petursson 

Richard F. Tischer 
William H. Fish 






H. D. Wilkins 

Charles H. Froggett. 

37 Riverview Ave. 
Mrs. Calvert Wilson, 

1403 Burlington 
Ave. 
Mr. Alfred Pirtle 



E. H. Scribner 

Miss Nina Canfield 

William H. Frazier. 
7 Anoka PL, West 
Lynn 
Frank Hinrichs 

William D. Serrat, 
4S Crescent Ave. 
J. Gilbert Peirce, 
713 Washington St., 
Brookline, Mass. 
Frank C. Livingston 

T. J. Ramsdell 

Joseph S. Worm- 

stead 
Ralph E. Toler 

Edward E. Allen 



George H. Wether- 
bee 

Mrs. Adelaide New- 
dick 

Paul Reykdal, Lun- 
dar P.O.. Man. 

Mrs. Susan C. Ben- 
nett 
Miss J. Cronemeyer 

Mrs. Ernest A. 
Hempstead, 
654 N. Main St 



Digitized by 



Google 



21 



Place, 



Medfield, Mass. . . 

Med ford, Mass. 

Melrose, Mass. . . 
Memphis, Tenn. 

Mendon, Mass. . . 

Menomonie, Wis. . 

Middleboro, Mass. . 

Middlesex, Vt. . . 

Midland, Mich. . . 

Milford, N.H. . . 

Millbury, Mass. . 

Milton, Mass. . . 

Milwaukee, Wis. . 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Moline, 111. . . . 

Monroe Bridge, 

Mass. 
Montague, Mass. . 

Montague, Mass. . 

(Turner's Falls) 
Montclair, N.J. 

Montpelier, Vt. 
Montreal, Can. . . 

Mt Pleasant, Mich. 



Corporate Name, 



First Congregational 
Parish 

First Parish 

Congregational Unita 

rian Society 
*First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Parish 
First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 
Free Christian Church 
First Unitarian Society 
Union Church 

First Unitarian Society 

of Montage 
First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

Church of the Messiah 

Church of the Messiah 



First Congregational 
Society (Unity 
Church) 



Or- 
tsea. 



165 1 

1712 
1867 

1893 
1669 
1888 
1889 
1887 
1885 
1870 
1884 
1678 
1842 

1881 
i882 
1886 
1904 
1825 
1880 

1887 
1864 
1842 

1881 



Minister. 



rjohn A. Savage, 
] Pastor Emeritus 
I Albert H. Spence, Jr. 
Henry C. De Long 

Thomas J. Homer 



(Supplies) 
Charies F. Niles 
George E. Macllwain 

(Supplies) 
(Supplies) 
Francis W. Holden 
(Supplies) 
Roderick Stebbins 
Walter F. Greenman 

Wilson M. Backus 

Floyd B. Hardin 

Margaret B. Barnard 
(Rowe) 



Edgar S. Wiers 

J. Edward Wright, D.D. 
(Pastor Emeritus) 

William S. Barnes. 
LL.D. 

( Pastor Emeritus) 
. Frederick R. Griffin 
Hendrik Van Ommeren 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Granville C Mitch- 
ell 

Edw. W. Hayes 

(Jeorgc E. Munroe, 
34 High St 



Julius A. (Jeorge 

P. B. Clark 

Amos H. Eaton, 
25 E. Grove St. 
(Jilbert T. Miles 

F. A. Towsley 

I. H. Carlton 

Nathan H. Sears 

Philip P. Chase 

Horace A. J. Upham, 
cor. Jefferson and 
Martin Sts. 
S. R. Child 

John C. Huseby 

I. A. White 

Lawson Ramage 

George A. Cooke, 

M.D. 
M. B. Allen 

Charles D. Barry 

Fred B. Thomas 

J. S. N. Dougall. 
525 St. Paul St. 

W. E. Preston 



Digitized by 



Google 



22 



Place. 



Morgantown, W. 

Va. 
Nantucket, Mass. . 

Naples, Me. . . . 

Nashua, N.H. . . 

Natick, Mass. . . 

Natick, So., Mass. . 

Needham, Mass. 

NcillsviUc, Wis. . 

Neponset, Mass. 

New Bedford, Mass. 
New Brighton, N.Y. 
Newburgh, N.Y. . 
Newburyport, Mass. 
New Castle, Pa. . 
Newington, N.H. . 
New London, Ct. . 
New Orleans, La. . 
Newport, R.L . . 

New Salem, Mass. . 

Newton, Mass. . . 

Newton Cen., Mass. 

Newton, W., Mass. 

New York, N.Y.: 
(4th Ave. and 20th 
St.. Manhattan 



Corporate Nome, 



First Unitarian Church 

Second Congregational 
Meeting-house 

First Congregational 
Parish 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

Unity Church 

First Unitarian Parish 

First Congregational 

Society 
People's Church 

(See Boston) 

'First Congregational 

Society 
Unity Home 
(See New York) 

Church of Our Father 

First Religious Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society 

The Unitarian Society 
of New London 

First Unitarian Church 

Channing Memorial 
Church 

The Congregational 

Society 
Chan ning Religious 

Society 
The Newton Centre 

Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian Society 



First Congregational 
Church (All Souls') 



Or- 
tsea. 



909 
808 



John Snyder 
839 George 



826 

897 
828 
711 
890 

708 

869 
725 
905 



898 
833 
835 

742 
851 
878 



Minister, 



M. Bodge 
(summer preaching) 
Herbert H. Mott 



John F. Meyer 
Joseph A. Puffer 



William B. (jeoghegan 
Bertland W. Morrison 

Alfred J. WOson 
Laurence Hayward 
(Jeorge Jones 



899 Alfred Gk)oding 

(Portsmouth, N.H.) 
Howard C. Ives 



819 



Harry E. Gilchrist 
William S. Jones 



Perry Marshall 

(summer preaching) 
Adelbert L. Hudson 



Alson H. Robinson 
848 Julian C. Jaynes 



Thomas R. SHcer 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Prof. Charles H. 

Patterson 
William C Gardner 

Enoch Gammon 

Albert J. McKean 

Ralph Sweetland, 

Walnut St 
(korge W. Ingalls 

F. De M. Dunn 

L. B. Ring 

George H. H. Allen 
Charles F. F. Jones 

T. W. Morrison 
Dr. E. H. Noycs 
M. M. Waterman 

Valentine M. Cole- 
man 

Frank B. Rose, 
Waterford, Conn. 

W. B. Gregory, 
630 Pine St. 

Dr. William R. 
Howard, 
409 Broadway 

Agnes Merriam 

(Charles A. Garke 
James Kingman 
Henry Whitmorc 



J. Lawrence Mc- 
Keever 



Digitized by 



Google 



23 



Place. 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
ized. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



New York. N.Y.: 
(Park Ave and 
34th St, Manhat- 
tan) 

( Picrrepont St. 
and Monroe PL, 
Brooklyn) 
(Willow PL, 
Brooklyn) 
(Qinton and (Ton- 
grcss Sts., Brook- 
lyn) 

(Clinton Ave 
and 2d St, New 
Brighton, R i c h- 
mond) 

(Gates Ave., Irv- 
ing PL, Brook- 
lyn) 

(Lenox Ave. and 
i2ist St, Manhat- 
Un) 

(Beverly Rd. and 
East 19th St, 
Flatbush, Brook- 
lyn) 
(South Brooklyn) 

Northampton, Mass. 

Northampton, Mass. 

(Florence) 
Northboro, Mass. . 

North Easton, Mass. 

Northfield, Mass. . 

Northumb e r 1 a n d, 

Pa. 
Norton, Mass. . . 

Norwell, Mass. . . 

Oakland, Ol. . . 

Ogdcn, Utah . . 



Second (Congregational 
Unitarian (Hiurch 

(Church of the Mes- 
siah) 

' First Unitarian 0)n 
gregational Society 

Willow Place (Hiapel 

Second Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

(Hiurch of the Re- 
deemer 



Third Unitarian (Con- 
gregational Society 

Unity (Congregational 
Society (Lenox Ave- 
nue Unitarian 
Church) 

Fourth Unitarian Con- 
gregational Church 



Unitarian Society 

Second Congregational 

Society 
Free Congregational 

Society 
First Congregational 

Church and Society 
(Sec Easton) 

First Parish 

tUnitarian (Thurch and 

Society 
Congregational Parish 

First Parish _,..,^.^ 

First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Church 



1825 



r Robert Collyer, LitD. 
Ijohn Jaynes Holmes 



1842 John P. Forbes 



1865 
1851 

1852 
1867 



Bernard J. Newman 
Caleb S. S. Dutton 

Hobart Qark 
William M. Brundage 



1869 Merle St. Croix Wright, 
D.D. 



1900 



Leon A. Harvey 



1907 Harry S. Baker 
1825 Henry G. Smith 
1863 Ira P. KeUogg, Jr. 
i746Josiah C Kent 

1716 Daniel M. Wilson 
1794 — 



1714 
1642 
1887 



William E. Ennis 
William D. Simonds 



i907|William T. Brown 



Dr. J. H. Parker, 
18 East 69th St 



George C Brackett, 
50 Remsen St 

Albert L. Mason, 
26 Orange St 

Henry A. Famell, 
S23 Fifth St 

John P. Ilsley, 
148 Fourth St., 
New Brighton 

H. D. Donnelly, 
439 Ointon Ave. 

Alfred H. Goodson, 
241 W. i3Sth St 



aifton W. Wilder, 
404 East 21 St St 



Alexander Menzies 
Frank I. Washburn 
H. P. Otis 
O. Elmer Eldrich 

H. C. Holton 

Alden G. Walker 
A. J. Litchfield 
S. E Coleman 
E. A. Uttlefield 



Digitized by 



Google 



24 



Place. 



Corporate Name. 



.Or- 
tzfd. 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Oklahoma, Okla. . 

Omaha, Neb. . . 

Onsted, Mich. . . 

Orange, N.J. . . 

Ord, Neb. . . . 
Ottawa, Canada 

Palo Alto, Cal. . . 

Passaic, N.J. . . 

Peabody, Mass. . . 

Peletier, N.C. . . 

Pembroke, Mass. . 

Pepperell, Mass. . 

Perry, la. . . . 

Peterboro, N.H. . 

Petersham, Mass. . 

Philadelphia, Pa.: 
(Chestnut St., 
above 21st) 

(Germantown) 

(1520 Girard 
Ave.) 

Pink Hill, N.C. . 

Pittsburgh, Pa. . . 



Pittsburgh, Pa. . 
(Allegheny) 



All Souls' Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Church 

People's Church 

First Unitarian Church 
of Essex County 

People's Unitarian As 
sociation 

Church of Our Father 



The Unitarian Church 

of Palo Alto 
Unitarian Society of 

Passaic 
First Unitarian Church 



White Oak Unitarian 

Church 
First Parish 

First Parish 

Unity Church 

The Congregational 
Society 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Parish 

First Unitarian (Thurch 



Unitarian Society of 
Germantown 

Spring Garden Unita- 
rian Church 

Unitarian (Thurch 

First Unitarian Church 



Northsidc Unitarian 
Church 



1906 
1869 
1895 
1890 
1899 
1898 

1905 

1893 
1825 



Newton Mann 



Walter R. Hunt 



Clarence Reed 
Charles Graves 

John W. Hudson 
Pastor Emeritus) 

C. Bertrand Thomp- 
son 
Charles W. Gillilan 

(Swansboro) 



1902 
1712 
1747 Dudley R. Child 

Sarah Louisa Haight 
1799 William H. Branigan 
1738 George B. Spurr 



1796 

1865 
1880 
1908 
1889 

1906 



r Joseph May, LL.D., 
\ Pastor Emeritus 
I Charles E, St. John 
Oscar B. Hawes 

Frederic A. Hinckley 

Charles W. Gillilan 

(Swansboro) 
L. Walter Mason, D.D. 



Thomas Gayton 



Dr. G. Ellison, 
638 W. oth St 
Charles W. Russell 

George Killbury 

Elbridge G. Dudley 

E. P. Ocmcnts 

Albert Horton, 

House of Com- . 
mons 
Prof. Ewald Fliigel, 

1 125 Cowper St. 
Wm. F. Catterfield, 

216 High St 
L. P. Osborn 



Samuel Weeks 

Francis Collamore, 

M.D. 
Mrs. Qara W. Reed 

Miss Katheryne 

Hardy 
Eben W. Jones 

Mrs. E. O. Coolidjfe 



John P. Croasdale, 
ion Chestnut St 

Herbert L. Dark, 

321 (Thestnut St 
Win slow Mason 

George Turner 

William P. Flint, 
5623 Wellesley 
Ave. 

Ole W. Burroughs, 
16 Troy Hill Road 



Digitized by 



Google 



25 



Place, 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
gan- 
ized. 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Pittsfield, Mass. 
Plainficld, NJ. . . 
Plymouth, Mass. . 

Pomona, Cal. . . 
Portland, Me. . . 
Portland, Me. . . 

Portland, Ore. . . 

Portsmouth, N.H. . 

Prcsque Isle, Mc . 

Providence, R.I.: 
(Benefit St, cor. 
Benevolent St.) 
(Adelaide Ave.) 

Pueblo, CoL . . . 

Quincy, lU. . . . 

Quincy, Mass.: 
(Quincy) 

(Wollaston) 

Randolph, Mass. . 

Raynham, Mass. 

Reading, Mass. . . 

Redlands, Cal. . . 

Revere, Mass.: 
(BeaSchmont) 

(Revere) 



Unity Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Parish (founded 
at Scrooby, Eng- 
land, 1606) 

First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

Ministry - at - large, 
Preble Chapel 

First Unitarian Society 

South Parish 

Independent Congre- 
gational Society 

First Congregational 
Church 

Westminster Congre- 
gational Society 

Unity Church 

Second (Congregational 
Society 

First Congregational 

Society 
Wollaston Unitarian 

Society 
The (Thurch of the 

Unitv 
^Second Congregational 

Society 

Christian Union Soci- 
ety 
Unity Church 



•Unity Church 
First Unitarian Society 



1887 
1889 
1620 

1888 

1674 
1850 

1866 

1638 
1886 

1728 
1828 
1898 
1840 

1639 
1888 
1889 
1828 

1869 
1892 

1885 
1715 



Earl C. Davis 
Alfred C. Nickerson 
Melvin Brandow 



John C. Perkins. D.D. 
'William T. Phelan, 
Pastor Emeritus 
Arthur G. Pettengill 
T. L. Eliot, D.D., 

Pastor Emeritus 
William G. Eliot, Jr. 

Alfred Crooding 



Augustus M. Lord, D.D. 

C^eorge W. Kent 

John L. Marsh 

(Colorado Springs) 
Charles F. Elliott 



f Ellery C. Butler 
1 (Tharles B. Ames 
Carl G. Horst 

Harry A. Weston 



George H. Rice 



E. A. Tompkins, 
86 North St 

Warren B. Travell, 
816 Third PI. 

William W. Brew- 
ster 

E. C. Bichowsky 

Richard Webb 

W. G. (Thapman 

William F. Wood- 
ward, 4th & Wash- 
ington Sts. 

(justave Peyser 
Mrs. M. L. T. White 

Robert P. Brown 

Marcus M. Burdick, 
199 Linwood Ave. 
W. D. Keen 

GJeorge Wells 

Henry M. Faxon 

(Jharles S. Adams, 

M.D. 
Henry A. Belcher 

A. W. Shaw, 
No. Raynham, 
I^ass. 
Wilfred A. Bancroft 

Delmont Locke 



Charles F. Perry, 
Bradstreet Ave. 
Stanley S. Fenno 



Digitized by 



Google 



26. 



Place. 



Richmond, Va. . . 

Ridgewood, N.J. . 

Rochester, N.H. . 

Rochester, N.Y. . 

Rockland, Mass. 

Rock Rapids, la. 

Roslindale, Mass. . 

Rowe, Mass. . . 

Roxbury, Mass. 

Rutherford, N.J. . 

Saco, Me. . . . 

Sacramento, Cal. . 

I 

St. Cloud, Minn. . 

St. Joseph, Mo. . . 

St. Louis, Mo. . . 

St. Louis, Mo. . . 

St. Paul, Minn. . . 

St. Paul, Minn. . . 
(St. Anthony Pk.) 

Salem, Mass. . . 

Salem, Mass. . . 

Salem, Mass. . . 



Corporate Name, 



I Or- 
\t2ed. 



First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Society 

Church of the Unity 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

Unitarian Society 

People's Church 

(See Boston) 

First Congregational 
Church 
(See Boston) 

Unitarian Society 

Second Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

Unity Church I 

I Church of the Mes- 
siah 
Mission Free School 

Church of the Unity 

Unity Church 
Church of Our Father 



First Congregational 

Society 
Second Church 

North Meeting-house 



Minister, 



' Chairman or Clerk, 



John L. Robinson 



D. R. Wilson 
F. F. Knothe 



(Tharles Graves 

(Passaic. N.J.) ■ 

William C. Adams ! Wilder B. Neal 

(Dover) | 

rWm.C. Gannett, D.D., 
< Pastor Emeritus 
L Edwin A. Rumball 
Elvin J. Prescott 



Eugene T. Curtis, 
95 So. FitzHogfa 
St 
George W. Kelley 



1903 
1896 
1891 
1841 

1884 
1899 

1780 

1 891 Elizabeth Padgham F. L Armstrong 
1827 Arthur B. Whitney |Edgar H. Minot 
1887 

1888 Paul D. Dansingberg >G. H. Reynolds 

Theo. P. Brown 



Dr. J. E. North 



Margaret B. Barnard IB. T. Henry 



1868 
1834 

1840 

1868 

1872 
1888 

1629 
1717 
1772 



John W. Day 



George R. Dodson, 
Ph.D. 

John D. Reid 

(Supplies) 

Peter H. Goldsmith, 

D.D. 
Alfred Manchester 

Theodore D. Bacon 



John Lawrence 
Mauran, Chemical 
Building 
Mrs. Otto U. Von 
Schrader, Equita- 
ble Bldg. 
J. M. Wulfing, 
3448 Longfellow 
Boul. 
Francis B. TiflFany, 
890 Groodrich Ave, 
Walter L. Chapin, 
215 N. Y. Ufe 
Bldg., St Paul 
Robert Osgood 

Frank S. Perkins 

Horatio P. Peirson 



Digitized by 



Google 



27 



Place. 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
ized. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Salem, Ohio . . . 

Salem, Ore. . . . 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

San Antonio, Tex. 

San Diego, Cal. 

Sandwich, Mass. . 

San Francisco, Cal. 

I 

San Francisco, Cal. 

San Jose, Cal. . . 

Santa Ana, Cal. 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

San Bernardino, Cal. 

Santa Cruz, Cal. . 

Santa Rosa, Cal. . 

Schenectady, N.Y. 

Scituate, Mass. 

Seattle, Wash. . . 

Serena, III. . . . 

Sharon, Mass. . . 

Sheffield, 111. . . 

Shelbyville, 111. . . 

Shelbyville, 111. . . 

Shelter Neck, N.C. 

Sherborn, Mass. . 

Sherwood, Mich. . 



Unity Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Society 

•First Unitarian Society 

Unity Society 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Second Unitarian So- 
ciety 
First Unitarian Church 

Unity Church 

Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

All Souls' Unitarian 

Church 
People's Church of 

Santa Rosa 
First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Pleasant Hill Union 

Church 
First Congregational 

Parish 
First Unitarian Church 

First Congregational 

Unitarian Church 
Jordan Unitarian 

Church 
(See Burgaw, N.C.) 

First Congregational 

Church 
Unity Church 



1901 



A. Irvine Innes 



1890 Paul S. Bandy 

1890 

1893 

1877 

1638 

1850 

1891 

1888 

1891 



William T. Brown 

George A. Hathaway 
Harold L. Pickett 
Bradford Leavitt 



Oliver P. Shrout 

Francis Watry 
1877 Benjamin A. Goodridge 
1909 



George H. Rice 
(Redlands) 
1902 George W. Stone 

1898 William T. Hutchins 

1901 Albert W. Dark 

1634 Hilary Bygrave 

1878 J. D. O. Powers 

i896Celia Parker Woolley 

(supply) 
1740 Thomas J. Homer 

(Melrose) 
1868 Alfred M. Walker 

1868 Jasper L. Douthit 

1882 Jasper L. Douthit 

1685 Isaac F. Porter 
1878 — 



Mrs. I. B. Cooper, 
41 E. Green St 

J. N. Cox, 
312 Winter St. 

Judge D. N. Straup 

I. B. Henyan 
Judge M: A. Luce 
William L. Nye 
Arthur A. Smith 

R. T. Butts, 

1300 Guerrero St 
Col. Philo Hersey, 

650 S. Second St. 
Mrs. Del Andre 

L. Richardson, 
907 State St. 

Henry Willey 

Horace Newton, 
116 Leiand St 

E. G. Conde, 
I III Union St. 

George O. Allen 

C. E. Remsberg 

Miss Emma A. Muf- 
fler 
Fred D. Stanley 

C. H. Townsend 

Robert E. Guilford 

W. F. Douthit 



D. S. Whitney 
W. B. Chiesman 



Digitized by 



Google 



28 



Place. 



Shirley, Mass. . 
Sioux City, la. . 
Sioux Falls, S.D. 
Somerville, Mass. 

Somervillc, West, 
Mass. 

Spokane, Wash. 

Springfield, Mass. . 

Springvale, Minn. . 

Standish, Me. 

Staten Id., i.e.. New 

Brighton, N.Y. 
Sterling, Mass. . . 

Stoneham, Mass. . 

Stow, Mass. . .. 

Stowe, Vt. . . . 

Streator, 111 

Sturbridge, Mass. . 

Sudbury, Mass. . . 

Sullivan, Me. . . 

Summit, N.J. . . 

Swansboro, N.C. . 

Syracuse, N.Y. . . 

Taunton, Mass. 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
tzed. 



First Congregational 

Society 
First Unitarian Society 

tAll Souls' Church 

First Congregational 
Society 

Second Unitarian So- 
ciety 

First Unitarian Society 

Third Congregational 

Society 
Sprin^ale Unitarian 

Society 
First Parish 

(See New York, Rich 

mond) 
First Congregational 

Society 
First Unitarian Church 

First Parish 

Unity Church 

Church of Good Will 
to Men 

Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society 

First Congregational 
Society 

Liberal Christian So 
ciety 

The Unitarian Church 
in Summit 

First Unitarian Church 

The Unitarian Con- 
gregational Society 

(May Memorial 
Church) 

First Congregational 
Society 



1753 
1885 
1886 
1846 

1890 

1886 
1819 
1909 
1768 

1742 

1866 

1700 

I 

1892 

1864 

1636 

1892 

1907 

1902 

1838 



Minister. 



Manley B. Townscnd 

Walter C. Peirce 
George W. Fuller 



Chairman or Clerk. 



C. B. Dunning, 
Mohawk Bldg. 
Augustus P. Reccord 1 Oscar B. Ireland 



E. H. Bucknam 

F. Keeler Rice 



Louis E. Merry, 
41 Dover St 



David Holmgren 
(Summer preaching) 

Henry D. Stevens 
(Tharles N. Myers 
J. Sidney Moulton 



(Tharles R. Tenney 

(Southbridge) 
Ida C. Hultin 

(Summer preaching 

and lay meetings) 
Frederic C. Brown 

Charles W. Gillilan 

Samuel R. Calthrop, 
L.H.D. 



1637 Joel H. Metcalf 



O. H. Olson 
C. S. Phinncy 

Edward P. Bartlett 

Myron Messer 

John A. Rcilly 

P. D. Pike 

David £. Huggans 

Alvin B. Chamber- 
lain 
Ellen O. Qark 



Russell Hinman, 

189 Summit Ave. 
C. B. Frazelle 

Amos Padgham, 
120 Shonnard St. 



Randall Dean 



Digitized by 



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H-5 



/ 



29 



Place, 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
ized. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Templeton, Mass. 
Tiverton, R.I. . 
Toledo, Ohio . 
Topeka, Kan. . 

Toronto, Canada 

Townsend, West, 

Mass. 
Traverse City, Mich. 

Tremont, 111. . . 

Trenton, N.Y. . . 

(Bameveld P.O.) 

Troy, N. Y. . . . 

Turner's Falls, 

Mass. 
T3mgsboro, Mass. . 

Underwood, Minn. 

Union City, Pa. . 

Union Springs, N.Y. 

Upton, West, Mass. 

Urbana, HI. . . . 

Uxbridge, Mass. . 

Valparaiso, Ind. 

Vineland, N.J. . . 

Vineyard Haven, 

Mass. 
Waitsfield, Vt . . 

Walpole, Mass. . . 



First Parish 

•Bowen Memorial 

Chapel 
The First Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Society 



First Unitarian Con- 
gregation 

Liberal Christian So- 
ciety 

Emerson Unitarian 

Society 
'Liberal Christian 
Church 

Reformed C h r istian 
Church 

First Unitarian Society 

(See Montague) 

First Parish 

Free Christian Church 

tUnity Society 

Church of Good Sa- 
maritan 
First Unitarian Society 

Unitarian Church of 
Urbana, III. 

First Congregational 

Society 
Unity Church 

First Congregational 

Unitarian Society 
Unitarian Society 

'Unity Society 

First Parish 



755 
876 

887 
871 

845 



William F. Skerrye 

Abraham M. Rihbany 
Joseph H. Jones 

Robert J. Hutcheon 



908 Burton A. Hills 
866 

803 Samuel C Weatherly 
845 Arthur H. Winn 



731 
871 
865 
898 
888 
725 



F. P. Stone 

Fannie D. Manches- 
ter 
Charles A. Seiders 

Frank H. Foster, 
105 Greenwood 
Ave. 
Prof. F. R. Rose- 
brough, 92 Wal- 
mer Road 



Charles J. Smith 



Lester G. Wauful, 

Barneveld 
William D. Yetto, 

Oakwood Ave. 



755 Napoleon S. Hoagland 

890 

886 

895 

847 

906 Albert R. Vail 



Cyrus A. Roys 
(Occasional supply) 
William M. Gilbert 



Louis C. Dethlefs 



CJharles P. Uttlehale 

Otto Nilsby 

(diaries W. Hayes 

Harriet L. Farley 

Harold Knowlton 

Prof. Thos. E. Oli- 
ver, 912 W. Cali- 
fornia Ave. 
Samuel F. Scott 

A. W. Vincent 

Oliver W. Vernal 

Capt. Gilbert L. 
Smith 

(korge W. Poore 



Digitized by 



Google 



30 



Place. 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
tsed. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Walpolc,N.R . . 

Waltham, Mass. 

Ware, Mass. . . 

Warrcn, Pa. . . . 

Warren, Vt . . . 

Warwick, Mass. . 

Washington, D.C. . 

Washta, la. . . . 

Watertown, Mass. . 

Watcrvillc, Mc. . . 

Wavcrlcy, Mass. . 

Wayland, Mass. 

Welleslcy Hills, 

Mass. 

Wcstboro, Mass. . 

Westerly, R.I. 

West ford, Mass. . 

West Gouldsboro . 

Weston, Mass. . , 

West Superior, Wis. 

Westwood, Mass. . 

Weymouth, E., 

Mass. I 

Wheeling. W. Va. | 

White Oak, N.C j 

Whitman, Mass. . 



Town Congregational 

Society 
First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Parish 
All Souls' Church 

Unity Society 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

Unitarian Society 

First Congregational 

Society 
Church of Our Father 

First Congregational 

Parish 
(See Gouldsboro, Me.) 

Fh-st Parish 

Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

(See Peletier. N.C.) 

First Unitarian Society 



J. G. Townsend, D.D. 

(Jamestown, N.Y.) 
(Summer preaching) 

Edward M Barney 

( Universal ist) 
Ulysses G. B. Pierce, 

D.D. 



i76r Charles K Aimar 

1696 Charles A. Place 

i846|01iver J. Fairfield 

1905 

1888 

1763 

1821 

18^ 

i630Grover G. Mills 

1863 George D. Sanders 

1885 Charles A. Allen 

1638 Seth C Beach, D.D. 

187 

1717 

j896,Howard C Ives 
I (New London) 
1727! Benjamin H. Bailey 

I 

1698 CHiarles F. Russell 
1890 - 

i735|Frank P. Estabrook 

18731 



I 



1907 



i886WilliamD. Wilkie 



Thomas R Pcdc 

F. A. Steams 
36 Harris St 

Charles £. Stevens 

Dr. Hilles M. Baker 

Miss Vaun Bragg 

Miss Oara A. Jones 

Archibald King, 

161 1 aSth St. 
W. B. Chapman 

G. Fred Robinson 

H. D. Bates, 
Silver St. 
John H. Edwards 

A. W. Cutting 

Oarence A. Bunker 

Joseph S. Gates 

F. W. Dewey 

Abiel J. Abbott 



Charies H. Flske 
A. D. Agatin 
C. D. Place 

Charies J. Schuck 

J. C Gilbert 



Digitized by 



Google 



31 



Place. 



Corporate Name, 



Or- 
tzed. 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk, 



Wichita, Kan. . . 
Willimantic, Ct . 
Wilmington, DeL . 

Wilton, N. H. . . 
Wilton Centre, N.H. 
Winchendon, Mass. 
Winchester, Mass. . 
Windsor, Vt . . 

Winnipeg, Man. 

(Canada) 
Winnipeg, Man. 

(Canada) 
Winona, Minn. . . 

Winter Harbor, Mc. 

Winthrop, Mass. . 

Wobtsrn, Mass. . . 

Wolfeboro, N.H. . 

Wollaston, Mass. . 

Woodland, Od. . . 

Worcester, Mass. . 

Worcester, Mass. . 

Worcester, Mass. . 

Yarmouth, Me. . . 

Yonkers, N.Y. . . 

York, Me. . . . 
Youngstown, Ohio 



First Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian Church 
First Unitarian Society 

Liberal Christian 

Church 
First Unitarian Con 

gregational Society 
Church of the Unity 

Winchester Unitarian 

Society 
All Souls' Unitarian 

Society 
First Icelandic Unita 

rian Church 
All Souls' Church 

First Unitarian Society 

Channing Chapel So- 
ciety 
First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Parish 

First Unitarian Church 

(See Quincy, Mass.) 

The Unitarian Church 

Second Parish 

CJhurch of the Unity 

South Unitarian Me- 
morial (Thurch 
Central Parish 

First Unitarian Con- 
gregational (Church 

The York Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Church 



1887 
1895 



Edward Day 



Adam J. Culp 
(Brooklyn) 
i866|Qcero A. Henderson 



1896 William A. Wood 

i763WUliam A. Wood 

(Wilton) 
i866|William W. Peck 

1865 William I. Lawrance 

1876 

1890 Rognvaldt 

1904 

1889 

1889 

1887 



tur Petursson 
Frank W. Pratt 

(Summer preaching) 
William C. Utchfield 



1847 
1886 



Henry C Parker 



1907 Edward G. Spencer 
178$ Austin S. Carver 
i846C:harles B. Elder, D.D. 
1889 Samuel C Beane, Jr. 
i866Leverett R. Daniels 
i8$7 Lyman M. Greenman 



1903 
1904 



(Summer services) 
Wayland L. Beers 



Dr. Rudolf Mat- 
thews 
H. F. Roycc 

A. D. Warner, 
1302 Delaware 
Ave. 

George G. Beau- 
chard 

Henry H. Liver- 
more 

John D. Howard 

Charles A. Baldwin, 
Fairview Terrace 
H. S. Paul 

J. B. SkapUson 

Hon. A. W. Puttee 

Judge H. L. Buck 

Bedford Tracy 

Frank S. Barrett, 
74 Ottage Park 
Rd. 

Herbert B. Dow, 
46 Warren Ave. 

F. W. Prindle 



W. F. Mixon 
James P. Hamilton 

Dr. GJeorge A. Slo- 
comb 

A. H. Silvester. 
14 Montague St. 

Hon. Howard Da- 
vies 

Fisher A. Baker, 
440 North Broad- 
way 

(Seorge F. Richard- 
son, Lowell, Mass. 

F. A. Douglass, 
1520 Elm St. 



Digitized 



Dy Google 



32 

UNITARIAN CHURCHES. 

Arranged in Chronological Order, 



1620 Plymouth, Mass First Parish. 

1629 Salem, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1630 Boston, Mass First Church in Boston. 

Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . First Parish of Dorchester. 

Watertown, Mass First Parish, 

1631 Roxbury (Boston), Mass. . , First Religious Society in Roxbury. 

1632 Duxbury, Mass First Parish. 

1634 Scituate, Mass First Parish. 

1635 Hingham, Mass First Parish. 

1636 Cambridge, Mass First Parish. 

Concord, Mass First Parish. 

Dedham, Mass First Parish. 

Sudbury, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1637 Taunton, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1638 Portsmouth, N.H South Parish. 

Sandwich, Mass First Parish. 

Wayland, Mass First Parish. 

1639 Barnstable, Mass Congregational Church and Society of 

the East Precinct. 

Quincy, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1642 (jloucester, Mass First Parish. 

Norwell, Mass First Parish. 

164S Andovcr, North, Mass. . . . First Unitarian Qiurch and Society. 

Haverhill, Mass First Parish. 

1649 Boston, Mass Second Church in Boston. 

165 1 Bridgewater, West, Mass. . . First Congregational Society. 

Medfield, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1653 Lancaster, Mass First Church of Christ 

1655 Chelmsford, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Groton, Mass First Church of Qirist. 

1663 Billerica, Mass First Parish. 

1667 Beverly, Mass First Parish. 

1669 Mendon, Mass First Parish. 

1678 Milton, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1685 Sherborn, Mass First Congregational Church. 



Digitized by 



Google 



33 

i686 Boston, Mass King's Chapel. 

Dccrfield, Mass First Congregational Church. 

1692 Lexington, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1696 Waltham, Mass First Parish. 

1698 Weston, Mass First Parish. 

1700 Brewster, Mass First Parish. 

Stow, Mass First Parish. 

1 701 Framingham, Mass First Parish. 

1708 New Bedford, Mass First Congregational Society. 

171 1 Needham, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1712 Medford, Mass First Parish. 

Pembroke, Mass First Parish. 

West Roxbury (Boston) Mass. .First Parish, West Roxbury. 

1713 Easton, Mass Congregational Parish. 

1714 Norton, Mass Congregational Parish. 

1715 Marblehead, Mass Second CongregationalUnitarian Society. 

Revere, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1716 Bridgewater, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Northficid, Mass First Parish. 

1717 Brookfield, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Brookline, Mass First Parish. 

Canton, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Kingston, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Littleton, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Salem, Mass Second Church. 

Westboro, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1718 Portland, Me First Parish. 

1719 Boston, Mass New South Church. 

1721 Cohasset, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1724 Bridgewater, East, Mass. . . First Parish. 

1725 Newburyport, Mass First Religious Society. 

Walpole, Mass First Parish. 

1727 Westford, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1728 Providence, R.I First Congregational Church. 

1730 Bedford, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Boston, Mass Arlington Street Church. 

Brighton, Mass First Parish of Brighton. 

173 1 Grafton, Mass Congregational Society. 

Uxbridge, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1732 Brooklyn, Conn First Ecclesiastical Society. 

1733 Arlington, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Harvard, Mass First Congregational Parish. 



Digitized by 



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34 

1735 Westwood, Mass First Parish. 

1738 Marshfield Hills, Mass. . . . Second Congregational Society. 

Petersham, Mass First Unitarian Congregational Parish. 

1740 Bemardston, Mass First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Bolton, Mass First Parish and Religions Society. 

Sharon, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1742 New Salem, Mass The Congregational Society. 

Sterling, Mass First Congr^ational Society. 

1743 Leominster, Mass First Congr^ational Society. 

1745 Hingham (South), Mass. . . Second Parish. 

1746 Northboro, Mass First Congregational Church and Society. 

1747 Pepperell, Mass First Parish. 

1749 Dover, Mass First Parish. 

1750 Athol, Mass First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Kennebunk, Me First Congr^ational Parish. 

T753 Barre, Mass First Parish. 

Shirley, Mass First Congr^ational Society. 

1754 Charlestown, N.H South Parish. 

1755 Templeton, Mass First Parish. 

Tyngsboro, Mass First Parish. 

1761 Walpole, N.H Town Congregational Society. 

1763 Warwick, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Wilton, N.H First Unitarian Congr^ational Society. 

1767 Ashby, Mass First Parish. 

1768 Fitchburg, Mass First Parish. 

Standish, Me First Parish. 

1770 Jamaica Plain (Boston), Mass. .First Congregational Society. 

1772 Dublin, N.H First (Tongr^ational Society. 

Salem, Mass North Meeting-house. 

1773 Hubbardston, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1780 Carlisle, Mass First Religious Society. 

Rowe, Mass First Congr^ational Church. 

1785 Worcester, Mass Second Parish. 

1794 Northumberland, Pa Unitarian Church and Society. 

1796 Belfast, Me First Parish. 

Philadelphia, Pa. First Unitarian Church. 

1797 Dighton, Mass Pedo-Baptist Congregational Society. 

17^ Castine, Me First Congr^ational Society. 

1799 Peterboro, N.H The Congregational Society. 

1803 Trenton, N.Y Reformed Christian Church. 

1806 Marlborough, Mass Second Parish. 

1807 Hingham, Mass Third (Tongregational Society. 



Digitized by 



Google 



35 

i8o8 Cambridge, Mass Third Congregational Society. 

Nantucket, Mass. Second Congregational Meeting-house. 

1810 Burlington, Vt First Congregational Society. 

181 1 Houlton, Me Unitarian Society. 

1813 Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . Third Religious Society in Dorchester. 

1817 Baltunore, Md First Independent Christ's Church. 

Charleston, S.C. Unitarian Church. 

1818 Bangor, Me. Independent Congregational Society. 

1819 Hampton Falls, N.H. . . . First Congr^ational Society. 

New York, N.Y First Congregational Church (All Souls'). 

Springfield, Mass Third Congregational Society. 

1820 Eastport, Me First (Tongr^ational Society. 

1821 Washington, D.C All Souls' Cliurch. 

1822 Lynn, Mass. Second Cx>ngregational Society. 

South Boston, Mass Hawes Unitarian Congregational Church. 

1823 Francestown, N.H Union Congr^ational Society. 

1824 Keene, N.H Keene C^ongr^ational Society. 

1825 Greenfield, Mass Third Congregational Society. 

Meadville, Pa. Independent Congregational Church. 

Montague, Mass First Unitarian Society of Montague. 

New York, N.Y Second Congregational Unitarian Church 

(Church of the Messiah) 

Northampton, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

Peabody, Mass First Unitarian Church 

1826 Augusta, Me. Unitarian Society. 

Boston, Mass Bulfinch Place (Hiurch. 

Nashua, N.H First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1827 Boston, Mass South Congregational Society. 

Concord, N.H Second Congr^ational Unitarian Society. 

Dover, N.H First Unitarian Society of Christians. 

Saco, Me. Second Parish. 

1828 Natick, South, Mass. . . . First Unitarian Parish. 

Providence, RJ Westminster Congregational Society. 

Raynham, Mass Second (Congregational Society. 

1829 Farmington, Me First Unitarian Society. 

Lowell, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1830 Cincinnati, Ohio First Congregational Church. 

Louisville, Ky. Church of the Messiah. 

183 1 Brattleboro, Vt Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1832 Buffalo, N.Y First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Fairhaven, Mass Unitarian Society of Fairhaven. 

Fall River, Mass Unitarian Society. 



Digitized by 



Google 



36 

1833 Fitzwilliam, N.H First Congregational Society. 

New Orleans, La First Unitarian Church. 

1834 Leicester, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

1834 St Louis, Mo Church of the Messiah. 

1835 Newport, R.I Channing Memorial Church. 

1836 Boston, Mass Barnard Memorial. 

Chicago, 111 First Unitarian Society of Chicago 

I (Church of the Messiah). 

1838 Chelsea, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Syracuse, N.Y The Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1840 Quincy, 111 Second Congregational Society. 

1841 Boston, Mass Church of the Disciples. 

Chicopee, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Lincoln, Mass Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Rochester, N.Y First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1842 Brooklyn (New York), N.Y. . First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Geneva, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Manchester, N.H First Unitarian Society. 

Milwaukee, Wis First Unitarian Society. 

Montreal, Canada .... Church of the Messiah. 

1844 Hartford, (Tonn First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1845 Lexington, East, Mass. . . . Follen Church. 

Toronto, Canada First Unitarian Congregation. 

Troy, N.Y First Unitarian Society. 

1846 Roxbury (Boston), Mass. . . All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Somerville, Mass First Congr^ational Society. 

Ware, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Worcester, Mass The Church of the Unity. 

1847 Boston, East, Mass Church of Our Father. 

Lawrence, Mass. First Unitarian Society. 

Upton, West, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Wobum, Mass First Unitarian Parish. 

1848 Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . Christ Church of Dorchester. 
Newton, West, Mass. . . . First Unitarian Society. 

1850 Clinton, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Detroit, Mich First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Portland, Me Preble Chapel. 

San Francisco, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

1851 Brooklyn, N.Y Second Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Newton, Mass Channing Religious Society. 

1852 Richmond (New York), N.Y. . Church of the Redeemer. 



Digitized by LjOOQIC 



37 

i853 Boston, Mass North End Union. 

Keokuk, la. First Unitarian Society. 

1854 Alton, 111 First Unitarian Qiurch. 

Exeter, N.H First Unitarian Society. 

Lancaster, N.H First Unitarian Society. 

1855 Ayer, Mass First Unitarian Parish of Ayer. 

Easton, North, Mass. . . . Unity Church. 

Marietta, Ohio First Unitarian Society. 

1856 Belmont, Mass Congregational Society. 

Lawrence, Kan The Unitarian Society. 

1857 Yonkers, N.Y First Unitarian Congregational Church. 

1858 Buda, 111 Union Christian Society. 

Chicago, 111 Unity Church. 

Kalamazoo, Mich People's Church. 

1859 Bloomington, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Neponset, Mass Church of the Unity. 

i860 Hudson, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1861 Baraboo, Wis Free Congregational Society. 

1862 Chestnut Hill, Mass Chestnut Hill Society. 

1863 Northampton (Florence), Mass. Free Congregational Society 
Waterville, Me First Unitarian Society. 

1864 Montpelier, Vt Church of the Messiah. 

Stowe, Vt Unity Church. 

Sturbridge, Mass Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1865 Ann Arbor, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

Brooklyn (New York), N.Y. . Willow Place Chapel. 

Ellsworth, Me First Unitarian Society. 

Ithaca, N.Y First Unitarian Society. 

Kenosha, Wis First Unitarian Society. 

Lebanon, N.H First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Philadelphia (Germantown), Pa. Unitarian Society of Germantown. 

Vineland, N.J First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Winchester, Mass Winchester Unitarian Society. 

1866 Portland, Ore. First Unitarian Society. 

Stoneham, Mass First Unitarian Church. 

Tremont, 111. Liberal Christian Church. 

Wilmington, Del First Unitarian Society. 

Winchendon, Mass Church of the Unity. 

Yarmouth, Me Central Parish, 

1867 Brooklyn (New York), N.Y. . Third Unitarian Congregational Society. 
Cleveland, Ohio The Church of the Unity. 

Danvers, Mass Unitarian Congregational Society. 



Digitized by 



Google 



38 

i867 Hopedale, Mass. Hopedale Unitarian Parish. 

Hyde Park, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Laconia, N.H First Unitarian Society. 

Mattoon, 111 Unity Church. 

Melrose, Mass Congregational Unitarian Society. 

1868 Chicago, 111 Third Unitarian Church. 

Davenport, la. First Unitarian Society. 

Geneseo, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Kansas Gty, Mo All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Sheffield, 111 First Unitarian Church. 

Shelbyville, 111 First Congregational Unitarian Church 

St. Joseph, Mo Unity Church. 

St. Louis, Mo Church of the Unity. 

1869 Newburgh, N.Y Church of Our Father. 

New York (Lenox Ave.), N.Y. Unity Congregational Society. 

Omaha, Neb First Unitarian Church. 

Reading, Mass Christian Union Society. 

Wilton, N.H Liberal Christian Church. 

1870 Milford, N.H First Unitarian Society. 

187 1 Denver, Col First Unitarian Society. 

Topeka, Kan First Unitarian Society. 

Valparaiso, Ind Unity Church. 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. . . . Unitarian Society. 

1872 Berlin, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

St. Paul, Minn Unity Church. 

1873 Brunswick, Me Unitarian Society in Brunswick. 

Weymouth, East, Mass. . . . First Unitarian Society. 

1874 Holyoke, Mass Liberal Christian Congregational Society. 

1875 Grand Haven, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

Hobart, Ind First Unitarian Church. 

Humboldt, la. Unity Church. 

Jackson, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

La Porte, Ind First Unitarian Society. 

Maiden, Mass First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1876 Tiverton, R.I Bowen Memorial Chapel. 

Windsor, Vt All Souls' Unitarian Society. 

1877 Athol, Mass Second Unitarian Society. 

Des Moines, la First Unitarian Society. 

Los Angeles, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

San Diego, Cal Unity Society. 

Santa Barbara, Cal Unitarian Society. 

1878 Newton Centre, Mass. . . . The Newton Centre Unitarian Society 



Digitized by 



Google 



39 

1878 Providence, R.I Olney Street Congregational Society. 

Seattle, Wash First Unitarian Society. 

Sherwood, Mich Unity Church. 

1879 Andover, N.H Congregational UniUrian Society. 

Franklin, N.H First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Iowa Gty, la. First UniUrian Society of Iowa City. 

Madison, Wis. First Unitarian Society. 

1880 Dunkirk, N.Y. Independent Congregation. 

Greeley, Col First Unitarian Society. 

Philadelphia, Pa. Spring Garden Unitarian Church. 

Turner's Falls, Mass. . . . First Unitarian Society. 

1881 Brockton, Mass Unity Church. 

Hanska, Minn. Nora Free Christian Church. 

Minnneapolis, Minn First Unitarian Society. 

Mount Pleasant, Mich. . . . First Congregational Society (Unity 

Church). 

1882 Chicago, III All Souls' Church (Independent). 

Marshfield, Mass. Grace Chapel 

Minneapolis, Minn Free Christian Church (Scandinavian). 

Shelbyville, 111 Jordan (Unitarian) Church. 

1883 Atlanta, Ga. Unitarian Church of Atlanta. 

Beatrice, Neb Unity Church. 

1884 Arcadia, Wis. People's Church. 

Gardner, Mass. First Unitarian Society. 

Grand Rapids, Mich. .... All Souls' liberal Church. 

Littleton, N. H First Unitarian Church. 

Millbury, Mass. First UniUrian Society. 

Rockland, Mass. UniUrian Society. 

Townsend, West, Mass. . . . Liberal Christian Society. 

1885 Grand Rapids, Mich. . . . Holland Unitarian Church. 
Jamestown, N.Y Independent Congregational Church So- 
ciety. 

Midland, Mich. First Unitarian Society. 

Revere (Beachmont), Mass. . Unity Church. 

Sioux Gty, la, First Unitarian Society. 

Waverley, Mass. UniUrian Society. 

1886 Bath, N.H Independent Christian Society. 

Hinsdale, 111 Unity Cliurch. 

Lamoine, East, Me First UniUrian Society. 

Manistee, Mich First UniUrian (Hiurch. 

Moline, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Presque Isle, Me. Independent G>ngregational Society. 



Digitized by 



Google 



40 

i886 Sioux Falls, So. Dak. . . . AU Souls' Church. 

Spokane, Wash First Unitarian Society. 

Union City, Pa Union Society. 

Whitman, Mass. First Unitarian Society. 

Wolfeboro, N.H First Unitarian Church. 

1887 Abington, North, Mass. . . . First Unitarian Society. 

Duluth, Minn First Unitarian Church. 

Luveme, Minn Unity Church. 

Middlesex, Vt First Unitarian Society. 

Oakland, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

Pittsfield, Mass Unity Church. 

Sacramento, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

Toledo, Ohio The First Unitarian Church. 

Wichita, Kan First Unitarian Society. 

Winthrop, Mass First Unitarian Church. 

1888 Menomonie, Wis First Unitarian Society. 

Pomona, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

Quincy, Mass Wollaston Unitarian Society. 

San Josci Cal First Unitarian Church. 

St. Ooud, Minn Unity Church. 

St. Paul (St Anthony Park), J 

Minn. Church of Our Father. 

Waitsfield, Vt Unity Society. 

Warren, Vt First Unitarian Church. 

1889 Bar Harbor, Me. Liberal Christian Church. 

Boston (Dorchester), Mass. . Norfolk Unitarian Church. 

Chattanooga, Tenn First Unitarian Society. 

Hamilton, Ont (Canada) . . First Unitarian Church. 

Middleboro, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Pittsburg, Pa. First Unitarian Church. 

Plainfield, N.J First Unitarian Society. 

Randolph, Mass Church of the Unity. 

Winona, Minn First Unitarian Society. 

Winter Harbor, Me Channing Chapel Society. 

Worcester, Mass South Unitarian Memorial Church. 

1890 Alameda, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

Boston (Roslindale), Mass. . . Roslindale Unitarian Church. 

Decorah, la . Unity Church. 

Fargo, No. Dak. First Unitarian Society of Fargo. 

Neillsville, Wis People's Church. 

Orange, N.J First Unitarian Church of Essex County. 

Salem, Ore. First Unitarian Society. 



Digitized by 



Google 



41 

iSgo Salt Lake City, Utah .... First Unitarian Society. 

Somcrville, West, Mass. . . . Second Unitarian Society. 

Underwood, Minn Free Christian Church (Scandinavian). 

West Superior, Wis Unitarian Society. 

Winnipeg, Man., Can. . . . First Icelandic Unitarian Church. 

1891 Berkeley, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

Colorado Springs, Col. ... All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Evanston, 111 Church of All Souls. 

Helena, Mont First Unitarian Society. 

Rochester, N.H Church of the Unity. 

Rutherford, N.J Unitarian Society. 

San Francisco, Cal Second Unitarian Society. 

Santa Ana, Cal Unity Church. 

1892 Hudson, Wis Scandinavian Unitarian Society of Hud- 

son, Wis. 

Perry, la Unity Church. 

Redlands, Cal Unity Church. 

Streator, 111 Church of Good Will to Men. 

Sullivan, Me Liberal Christian Society. 

1893 Boston, Mass Theodore Parker Memorial. 

Brooklyn, Mich People's Church. 

Passaic, N.J Unitarian Society of Passaic. 

Memphis, Tenn First Unitarian Society. 

San Antonio, Tex First Unitarian Society. 

1894 Canon City, Col First Unitarian Church. 

Cherokee, la. Unity Church. 

Great Falls, Mont First Unitarian Church. 

Washta, la Unity Society. 

1895 Albany, N.Y First Unitarian Society. 

Burlington, la. People's Church. 

Ida Grove, la Unity Church. 

Manchester, Mass First Unitarian Church. 

Onsted, Mich People's Church. 

Union Springs, N.Y Church of Good Samaritan. 

Willimantic, Conn First Unitarian Church. 

1896 Brookline, Mass Second Unitarian Society. 

Buffalo, N.Y Parkside Unitarian Society. 

Gouldsboro, West, Me. . . . Eliot Unitarian Church. 

Gouverneur, N.Y First Unitarian Society. 

Ridgewood, N.J Unitarian Society. 

Serena, 111 Pleasant Hill Union Church. 

Westerly, R.I Church of Our Father. 



Digitized by 



Google 



43 

i897 Fort Collins, Col Unity Church. 

Hackensack, N J Unitarian Congregational Church. 

Montdair, N.J Unity Church. 

Natick, Mass, Unity Church. 

1898 Amherst, Mass Unity Church. 

Erie, Pa. First Unitarian Society. 

Iowa Falls, la People's Church. 

Lincohi, Neb. All Souls' Church. 

New London, Conn The Unitarian Society of New London. 

Ottawa, Can Church of Our Father. 

Pueblo, Col Unity Church. 

Santa Rosa, CaL People's Church of SanU Rosa. 

Vineyard Haven, Mass. . . . UniUrian Society. 

1899 Adrian, Minn. People's Church. 

Dallas, Tex. First Unitarian Church. 

Highland Springs, Va. . . . Highland Springs Uniterian Society. 

Newington, N.H Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Ord, Neb People's Unitarian Association. 

Rock Rapids, la. .... People's Church. 

1900 Braintree, Mass All Souls' Church of Braintree. 

Bristol, Fla. Unitarian Church of Bristol. 

Burgaw, N.C Shelter Neck Unitarian Church. 

Chicago, IlL Memorial Chapel. 

Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . Channing Church. 

Isles of Shoals, N.H. . . . Gosport Meeting-house (Stone Chapel). 

New York (Brooklyn), N.Y. . Fourth Unitarian Congregational Church. 

1901 Bois^ Ida. Unity Church. 

Derby, Conn Unitarian Church. 

Faceville, Ga, First Unitarian Church. 

Salem, Ohio Unity Church. 

Schenectedy, N.Y First Unitarian Society. 

1902 Elizabeth, N.J All Souls' Church. 

Fort Fairfield, Me Unitarian Church of Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Hood River, Ore. First Unitarian Society of Hood River- 
Lancaster, Pa. Church of Our Father. 

Peletier, N.C. White Oak UniUrian Church. 

Santa Cruz, Cal All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Swansboro, N.C. Unitarian Church. 

1903 Butte, Mont First Unitarian Society. 

Fresno, Cal Unitarian Society of Fresno. 

Indianapolis, Ind All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Richmond, Va First Unitarian (Thurch. 



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43 

I9Q3 York, Mc The York Unitarian Church. 

1904 Chicago, 111 First Swedish Unitarian Church of Chi- 

cago. 

Everett, Wash First Unitarian Church. 

Gimli, Manitoba, Can. . . . First Unitarian Church. 

London, Canada The Unitarian Church of London. 

Monroe Bridge, Mass. . . . Union Church. 

Winnipeg, Manitoba .... All Souls' Church. 

Youngstown, Ohio .... First Unitarian Church. 

1905 Bellingham, Wash First Unitarian Society. 

Beloit, Kan First Unitarian Society. 

Cornish, N.H Independent Parish of Cornish, N.H. 

New Castle, Pa First Unitarian Church. 

Palo Alto, Cal The Unifarian Church of Palo Alto. 

Warren, Pa First Unitarian Society. 

1906 Aurora, 111 People's Church. 

Cape Rozier, Me The Union Church of Cape Rozier. 

Eureka, Cal The Unity Church. 

Franklin, Pa The First Unitarian Church of Franklin. 

Hubert, N.C Bear Creek Unitarian Church. 

Jacksonville, Fla First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Lewiston, Ida First Unitarian Society. 

McKeesport, Pa First Unitarian Society. 

Naples, Me First Congregational Parish. 

Oklahoma, Okla All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Pittsburgh (Allegheny), Pa. . Northside Unitarian Church. 

Urbana, 111 Unitarian Church of Urbana, 111. 

1907 Bendon, Mich Unitarian Church Association. 

Brookings, So. Dak First Unitarian Society. 

Flushing, N.Y First Unitarian Church. 

Harrietta, Mich People's Church. 

Ogden, Utah First Unitarian Church. 

South Brooklyn, N.Y. . . . South Brooklyn Unitarian Society. 

Summit, N. J The Unitarian Church in Summit. 

Wheeling, W. Va First Unitarian Church. 

Woodland, Cal The Unitarian Church. 

1908 Mary Hill, Manitoba, Can. . . The Unitarian Society of Lake Manitoba. 
Pink Hill, N. C Unitarian Church. 

Traverse City, Mich. .... Emerson Unitarian Society. 

1909 Dalbo, Minn. Dalbo Unitarian Society. 

Homestead, Pa Lincoln Unitarian Church. 

Morgantown, W. Va. . . . First Unitarian Church. 

San Bernardino, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

Springvale, Minn Springvale Unitarian Society. 



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44 



LOCATIONS OF UNITARIAN CHURCHES AR- 
RANGED ACCORDING TO STATES. 



MAINE. 26 SoaETiES. — Augusta ; Bangor ; Bar Harbor ; Belfast ; Brunswick ; 
Cape Rozier; Castine; Eastport; Ellsworth; Farmington; Fort Fairfield; 
Gouldsboro, West; Houlton, Kennebunk; Lamoine; East, Naples; Portland 
(2 societies) ; Presque Isle ; Saco ; Standish ; Sullivan ; Waterville ; Winter Har- 
bor; Yarmouth; York. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 29 SoaExiES.— Andover ; Bath; Charlestown; Con- 
cord; Cornish; Dover; Dublin; Exeter; Fitzwilliam ; Francestown; Franklin; 
Hampton Falls; Isles of Shoals; Keene; Laconia; Lancaster; Lebanon; Little- 
ton; Manchester; Milford; Nashua; Newington; Peterboro; Portsmouth; 
Rochester; Walpole; Wilton (2 societies); Wolfeboro. 

VERMONT. 8 SoaETiES.— Brattleboro ; Burlington; Middlesex; Mont- 
pelier; Stowe; Waitsfield; Warren; Windsor. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 191 Societies.— Abington, North ; Amherst ; Andover , 
North ; Arlington ; Ashby ; Athol (2 societies) ; Ayer ; Barnstable ; Barre ; Bed- 
ford; Belmont; Berlin; Bernardston; Beverly; Bill erica; Bolton; Boston (11 
societies), Brighton, Dorchester (5 societies), East Boston, Jamaica Plain, 
Neponset, Roslindale, Roxbury (2 societies), West Roxbury, South Boston; 
Braintree; Brewster; Bridgewater; Bridgewater, East; Bridgewater, West; 
Brockton ; Brookfield ; Brookline (2 societies) ; Cambridge (2 societies) ; Can- 
ton; Carlisle; Chelmsford; Chelsea; Chestnut Hill; Chicopee; Qinton; Cohas- 
set; Concord; Danvers; Deerfield; Dedham; Dighton; Dover; Duxbury; Eas- 
ton; Easton, North; Fairhaven; Fall River; Fitchburg; Framingham; Gardner; 
Gloucester; Grafton; Greenfield; Groton; Harvard; Haverhill; Hingham (3 
societies) ; Holyoke ; Hopedale ; Hubbardston ; Hudson ; Hyde Park ; Kingston ; 
Lancaster; Lawrence; Leicester; Leominster; Lexington; Lexington, East; 
Lincoln; Littleton; Lowell; Lynn; Maiden; Manchester; Marblehead; Marl- 
borough; Marshfield (Marshfield Hills); Marshfield (Green Harbor); 
Medfield; Medford; Melrose; Mendon; Middleboro; Millbury; Milton; 
Monroe Bridge; Montague; Montague (Turner's Falls); Nantucket; Natick; 
Natick, South; Needham; New Bedford; Newburyport; New Salem; Newton; 
Newton Centre; Newton, West; Northampton; Northampton (Florence); 
Northboro; Northfield; Norton; Norwell; Peabody; Pembroke; Peppcrcll; 
Petersham; Pittsfield; Plymouth; Quincy; Quincy (Wollaston) ; Randolph; 
Rajmham; Reading; Revere; Revere (Beachmont) ; Rockland; Rowe; Salem 
(3 societies) ; Sandwich; Scituate; Sharon ; Sherbom ; Shirley ; Somerville ; Som- 



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45 

crville, West; Springfield; Sterling; Stoneham; Stow; Sturbridge; Sudbury; 
Taunton ; Templeton ; Townscnd, West ; Tyngsboro ; Upton ; Uxbridge ; Vineyard 
Haven ; Walpole ; Waltham ; Ware ; Warwick ; Watertown ; Waverley ; Wayland ; 
Wellesley Hills; Westboro; Westford; Weston; Westwood; Weymouth, East; 
Whitman; Winchendon; Winchester; Winthrop; Wobum; Worcester (3 so- 
cieties). 

RHODE ISLAND. 6 Societies.— Newport ; Providence (3 societies); 
Tiverton; Westerly. 

CONNECTICUT. 6 Societies.— Brooklyn ; Derby; Hartford; New 
Haven; New London; Willimantic. 

NEW YORK 26 Societies.— Albany; Buffalo (2 societies); Dunkirk; 
Flushing ; Gouverneur ; Ithaca ; Jamestown ; Newburg ; New York (3 societies) ; 
Brooklyn (6 societies); Richmond; Rochester; Schenectady; Syracuse; Tren- 
ton; Troy; Union Springs; Yonkers. 

NEW JERSEY. 10 Societies.— Elizabeth ; Hackensack; Montclair; Or- 
ange; Passaic; Plainfield; Ridgewood; Rutherford; Summit; Vineland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 15 SoaETiES.— Erie ; Franklin; Homestead; Lancas- 
ter; McKeesport; Meadville; New Castle; Northumberland; Philadelphia (3 
societies); Pittsburg (2 societies); Union City; Warren. 

DELAWARK i Society.— Wilmington. 

MARYLAND, i SoaETY.— Baltimore. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, i Society.— Washington. 

VIRGINIA. 2 Societies. — Highland Springs; Richmond. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 2 Societies.— Morgantown and Wheeling. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 5 Societies.— Burgaw ; Hubert; Peletier; Pink 
Hill; Swansboro. 

SOUTH CAROLINA, i Society.— Charleston. 

GEORGIA. 2 SoaETiBS.— Atlanta; Faceville. 

FLORIDA. 2 SoaETiES.— Bristol ; Jacksonville. 

KENTUCKY, i SoaETY.- Louisville. 

TENNESSEE. 2 Societies.— Chattanooga ; Memphis. 

LOUISIANA. I Society.— New Orleans. 

TEXAS. 2 Societies.— Dallas ; San Antonio. 

OHIO. 6 SoaETiES — Cincinnati ; Cleveland; Marietta; Salem; Toledo; 
Youngstown. 

MICHIGAN. 16 Societies.— Ann Arbor; Bendon; Brooklyn; Detroit; 
Grand Haven; Grand Rapids (2 societies); Harrietta; Jackson; Kalamazoo; 
Manistee; Midland; Mount Pleasant; Onsted; Sherwood; Traverse City. 

INDIANA. 4 Societies. — Hobart; Indianapolis; La Porte; Valparaiso. 

WISCONSIN. 9 SoaETiES. — Arcadia; Baraboo; Hudson; Kenosha; Mad- 
ison; Menomonie; Milwaukee; Neillsville; West Superior. 

ILLINOIS. 24 Societies. — Alton; Aurora; Bloomington; Buda; Chicago 



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46 

(6 societies); Evanston; Geneseo; Geneva; Hinsdale; Mattoon; Moline; 
Quincy; Serena; Sheffield; Shelbyville (2 societies); Streator; Tremont; Ur- 
bana. 

MINNESOTA. 13 Societies.— • Adrian ; Dalbo; Duluth; Hanska; Lnverae; 
Minneapolis (2 societies); Springvale; St. Goad; St. Paul; St. Panl (St An- 
thony Park) ; Underwood ; Winona. 

IOWA. 14 Societies.— Burlington ; Cherokee; Davenport; Decorah; Des 
Moines; Humboldt; Ida Grove; Iowa Falls; Iowa City; Keoktdc; Perry; Rock 
Rapids; Sioux City; Washta. 

MISSOURI. 4 Societies.— Kansas City; St Joseph; St Louis (2 so- 
cieties). 

NORTH DAKOTA, i Society.— Fargo. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 2 Societies.— Brookings ; Sioux Falls. 

KANSAS. 4 Societies.— Beloit ; Lawrence; Topeka; Wichita. 

OKLAHOMA, i Society.— Oklahoma. 

NEBRASKA. 4 Societies. — Beatrice; Lincoln; Omaha; Ord. 

COLORADO. 6 Socmties.— Canon City; Colorado Springs; Denver; Fort 
Collins; Greeley; Pueblo. 

MONTANA. 3 Societies.— Butte; Great Falls; Helena. 

UTAH. 2 Societies.- Ogden; Salt Lake Gty. 

IDAHO. 2 Societies. — Boise; Lewiston. 

WASHINGTON. 4 SoaETiES.— Bellingham ; Everett; Seattle; Spokane. 

OREGON. 3 Societies.— Hood River; Portland; Salem. 

CALIFORNIA. 20 SoaETiEs.— Alameda ; Berkeley; Eureka; Fresno; Los 
Angeles; Oakland; Palo Alto; Pomona; Redlands; Sacramento; San Bernar- 
dino; San Diego; San Francisco (2 societies); San Jose; Santa Ana; Santa 
Barbara; Santa Cruz; Santa Rosa; Woodland. 

CANADA. 9 Socibtiss.— Gimli; Hamilton; Mary Hill; London; Mon- 
treal; Ottawa; Toronto; Winnipeg, Manitoba (2 societies). 



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47 
LIST OF MINISTERS, 

WITH THEIR ADDRESSES. 



This list gives the names of all ministers in the Unitarian Fellowship who are or have 
been settled as pastors of Unitarian churches. The list contains 563 names. 

The insertion of names in the list, as well as the withdrawal of any, is wholly in 
charge of the Executive Committee of the National Conference Committee on Fellowship. 
(See page 102.) 

For the statistics given with the names and the form of their publication the editor 
of the Year Book is alone responsible. 

Under the heading " Settled " are given for convenience the dates at which a few who 
were not duly installed began their present service, and also the dates at which a few 
whose work is closely akin to pastoral service began their work. 

Those ministers for whom no date stands under " Settled " were without settlement 
at the date of the preparation of this list (June, 1909). 



Name. 
Abbott, Andrew Jackson 
Abbott, Edgar Cummins 
Abbott, Mrs. Eliza M. Hickok 
Adams, William Cushing 

Aimar, Charles Emile . . 
Aitken, Mrs. Martha Chapman 
Allen, Charles Adams . . 
Allen, Joseph Cady . . . 
Ames, Charles Bulkley . . 
Ames, Charles Gordon, D.D. 

Anderson, George Sheed 
Applebee, John Henry . . 

Armington, George FitzGerald 
Arnold, Harold Greene . . 
Atkinson, Frederick William 
Auer, Johannes Abraham Christof- 
fel Fagginger 



Address. Ordained. Settled. 

Ashland, Mass 1867 

Boston, Mass 1874 

Stowe, Vt 1893 

Box 202, Dover, N. H. (Societies in Dover 

and Rochester, N. H.) 1897 1909 

Walpole, N. H 1909 1909 

4 Berlin Street, Wollaston, Mass. . . . 1894 

Waver ley. Mass 1865 1901 

Hubbardston, Mass 1895 

86 Greenleaf Street, Quincy, Mass. . . 1908 1908 
12 Chestnut St., Boston, Mass. (Ch. Dis- 
ciples), 1849 1889 

26 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, Mass. . . 1895 1904 
188 County Street, Attleboro, Mass. (Pil- 
grim Church) 1894 1905 

Beloit, Kan 1898 1905 

152 South Street, Bridgewater, Mass. . . 1908 1908 

34 King Street, Santa Cruz, Cal. . . . 1901 

Hyde Park, Mass 1906 1909 



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Nam0. 
Babcock, William Gustavus 
Backus, Wilson Marvin . 



Address. Ordmnsd, StHUd. 

. 75 Clarkson Street, Dorchester, Mass. . 1846 
. 803 Mary Place, Minneapolis, Minn. (First 

Unitarian Society 1888 1908 

Bacon, Theodore Davenport . . 128 Federal Street, Salem, Mass. . . . 1892 1907 

Badger, George Henry .... 104 East 20th Street, New York, N.Y. . 1886 1903 
(SecreUry of the Conference of the Middle States and Canada). 

Bailey, Alvin Freeman .... Barre, Mass 1867 1879 

Bailey, Benjamin Hollaway . . West ford, Mass 1861 1903 

Baker, Harry Spencer .... 324 55th Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . . 1892 1907 

Baker, Nehemiah Addison . . . Eureka, Cal 1908 1909 

Ball, Qarence Leon Athol, Mass. (Second Unitarian Society) 1894 I907 

Baltzly, John Hudson, Mass 1881 1898 

Bandy, John Van Ndce . . . Hood River, Ore 1906 1907 

Bandy, Paul Stathem .... Salem, Ore 1903 1907 

Barber, Henry Hervey .... 671 Alden Street, Meadville, Pa. ... 1861 1884 
(Professor Emeritus Meadville Theological School.) 



Barker, John William . . . 
Barnard, Miss Margaret Bowers 
Barnes, William Sullivan, LL.D. 
Barrett, Edward Hughes 
Barrow, Reuben Shaw 
Batchelor, Ckorge . . 



(Editor of the Christian Register.) 



Beach, Seth Curtis, D.D. 
Beals, Oliver Brainard 
Beane, Samuel Collins, D.D. 
Beane, Samuel Collins, Jr. 

Beers, Wayland Lewis . 
Bellows, John Adams 
Bellows, Russell Kevins 
Bennett, Frederick Marsh 
Bidwell, John Belden 
Billings, Charles Towne . 
Billington, Frank Herbert 
Birks, Alfred William . 
Birks, Richard Elliott . 
Bixby, James Thompson, Ph.D. 



Lebanon, N.H 1898 

Rowe, Mass 1897 

14 Lome Avenue, Montreal, Can. . . . 1864 

Greenville, Ohio 1900 

270 South Jackson Street, Jackson, Mich. . 1904 

272 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. . . 1866 



Wayland, Mass 1873 

Cedarville, N.Y 1879 

Grafton, Mass 1862 

2 Ripley Place, Worcester, Mass. (Socie- 
ties in Worcester and Leicester, Mass) 1900 
1406 Elm Street, Youngstown, Ohio . . 1896 
115 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1878 
247 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. . . 1872 
1209 Oread Avenue, Lawrence, Kan. . . 1895 

235 College Avenue, Elgin, 111 1874 

73 Mansur Street, Lowell, Mass. . . . 1890 

Carlisle, Mass 1902 

156 Hawthorne Avenue, Derby, Conn. . 1902 

Deerfield, Mass 1872 

150 Wood worth Avenue, Yonkers, N.Y. . 1870 

Blackwell, Mrs. Antoinette Brown 348 Bay Way, Elizabeth, N.J 1853 

Blake, James Vila 122 North Ashland Boulevard, Chicago, 111. 

(Society in Evanston) 1867 



1907 
1902 
1880 



1902 
1890 
1909 

1900 
1907 



1899 

1896 
1907 
1907 
1901 



1892 



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Name. 
Bodge, George Madison 



Address, Ordained, Settled. 

Meredith Street, W. Roxbury, Mass. 
(Society in Naples, Me.) .... 1878 



Boivin, Bertram D. East Bridgewater, Mass. . . 

Boughter, James Grant .... Healdsburg, Sonoma Co., Cal. 
Bowen, Clayton Raymond . . • 671 Alden Street, Meadville, Pa. 
(Assistant Professor in the Meadville Theological School.) 



1898 
1891 
1903 



Bowser, Alexander Thomas 
Boyd, Nicholas Emery . 
Boynton, Richard Wilson 



. . St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada . 1881 

. . 2823 Garber Street, Berkeley, Cal. . . 1895 
. . 83 Ashland Avenue, Buffalo, N.Y. (First 

Unitarian Congregational Society) . 1895 

. . 152 Court Street, Plymouth, Mass. . . 1905 

. . Peterboro, N.H 1885 

. . Danvers, Mass 1898 

. . Greeley, Col 1896 

. . 146 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 1885 

. . 687 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. . . 1894 

. . Bryn Mawr, Pa 1893 

College.) 

. . 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1907 

. . 22 Oak Ridge Avenue, Summit, N.J. . . 1896 
. . 295 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (King's 

CThapel 1872 

. . 150 Trenton Street, Melrose, Mass. . . 1852 

. . Tyngsboro, Mass 1863 

. . 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1895 
(Field Secretary of the American Unitarian Association for New England.) 

Brown, William Thurston ... 212 Fifth Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah . 1888 
(Field Secretary of the American Unitarian Association for the Rocky 
Mountain Department.) 

778 Carroll Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. (Third 

Society) 1884 

2 Worcester Street, Belmont, Mass. . . 1862 

427 Congress Street, Kenosha Wis. . . 1893 

Bemardston, Mass 1892 

Battle Creek, Mich 1892 

Concord, N.H 1896 



Brandow, Melvin . . . 
Branigan, William Henry 
Brenan, Edward Henton 
Brock way, Thomas Ointon 
Brooks, Arthur Anderson 
Brown, Alfred Hodgdon 
Brown, Carleton Fairchild 

(Professor Bryn Mawr 
Brown, Edwin G. . . . 
Brown, Frederic Curtis- . 
Brown, Howard Nicholson 

Brown, Thomas William 
Brown, William . . . 
Brown, William Channing 



Brundagc, William Milton, Ph.D. 



Buck, Charles Wentworth . 
Buck, Miss Florence . . . 
Buckingham, Merritt Scott . 
Buckley, George Wright 
Buckshom, Louis Henry 
Bulkeley, Benjamin Reynolds 
Butler, Ellery Channing . . 
Buzzell, Herbert Leslie . . 
Bygrave, Hilary .... 
Byrnes, Thomas Patrick . . 



25 Hale Street, Beverly, Mass. 
38 Russell Park, Quincy, Mass. 

Barre, Mass 

Scituate, Mass 

714 West Ninth Street, Erie, Pa. 



1882 
1869 
1893 
1872 
1888 



1901 
1906 

1905 



1908 
1908 
1900 
1908 



1907 
1895 

1905 
1906 

1905 

1901 
1908 

1900 
1897 
1894 
1909 
1909 
190S 



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so 



Name, 
Cady, Vernon Mosher . . . 
Calthrop, Samuel Robert, L.H.D. 
Canfield, Charles Taylor . . 
Carpenter, Carlos Clement . . 
Casson, Charles Wesley . . . 



Addnss. Ordaintd, 

SS27 Baltimore Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. 1908 

1821 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, N.Y. . i860 

29A Everett Street, Cambridge, Mass. i860 

402 Williams Street, Owasso, Mich. . . 1861 

25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1898 
(Secretary of the Publicity Department of the American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation.) 

Northumberland, Pa 1867 

North Easton, Mass 18^ 

Salem, Mass 1862 

Brewster, Mass 1885 



SettUd. 
1908 
1868 



Catlin, Hasket Derby . . 
Chaffin, William Ladd . . 
Chaney, George Leonard 
Chase, Ernest Abbott . . 
Chase, Joseph Aubrey . . 
Child, Dudley Richards . . 
Claflin, Mrs. Adelaide Avery 
Qark, Albert Willard . . 
Clark, Charles Clifton . . 
Clark, Hobart 



Qarke, Ward Robinson 



636 Carlton Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 1882 

Peppercll, Mass 1906 

12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1897 

609 Union Street, Schenectady, N.Y. . . 1902 

Fallston, Md 1894 

"The Parsonage," Clinton Avenue, New 
Brighton, S.I., N.Y. (Church of the 

Redeemer) 1880 

Warren, N. H 1900 



Coar, Arthur Herbert 



Dayton, Thomas P. O. Box 1728, Pittsburgh, Pa. (North- 
side Unitarian Church) 1885 

6 Magnolia Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. (So- 
cieties in Holyoke and Amherst) . . 1899 

Cochrane, Mrs. Cora Sexton . . Bolton, Mass 1890 

Cochrane, Lorenzo Darwin . . . Bolton, Mass 1889 

Coil, E. Alfred Marietta, Ohio 1882 

Cole, William Roswell .... P. O. Box 555, Cohasset, Mass 1891 

Coleman, Albert John .... 39 Lancaster Terrace, Jacksonville, Fla. . 1897 

Collyer, Robert, Ut.D 201 West 55th Street, New York, N.Y. 

(Church of the Messiah) .... 1859 

Cooke, George Willis 49 Park Avenue, Wakefield, Mass. . . 1872 

Cornish, Louis Craig Hingham, Mass. (First Parish) . . . 1899 

Cowan, William Edward . . . Burgaw, N. C. (Circuit Work) . . . 1904 

Crane, Mrs. Caroline Bartlett . . Kalamazoo, Mich 1889 

Cressey, (George Croswell,Ph.D.,D.D. (In Europe) 1885 



Cressey, Pemberton Hale . . . Groton, Mass. 

Cron3m, David Bernardston, Mass 

Crooker, Joseph Henry, D.D. . . 820 South Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

Cross, Alfred Scotland, Mass 

Crothers, Samuel McChord, D.D., 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Mass. 



1899 
1868 

1873 
1884 
1874 



1868 
1908 
1909 
1906 

1897 

1905 
1907 



1895 
1896 

1905 

1879 

1900 
1902 



I9Q3 
I9t^ 
1894 



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SI 

Name, Address, Ordained. Settled, 

Cruzan, John Alexander . . . i960 Summit Street, Oakland, Cal. . . 1871 1909 
(Field Agent of the American Unitarian Association in the Pacific De- 
partment.) 

Gulp, Adam Joshua Brooklyn, Conn 1881 1904 

Cummings, Edward 104 Irving Street, Cambridge, Mass. (South 

\ Congregational Church, Boston) . . 1900 1900 
Cutter, (jeorge Webber, M.D. . . Watcrtown, Mass. (Society in Neponset, 

Mass.) 1870 1901 

Dan forth, James Tyngsboro, Mass 1884 

Daniels, Francis Potter .... Mt. Vernon, la. (Professor Cornell Col- 

j lege) 1898 

Daniels, Lcverett Richmond . . Yarmouth, Me 1885 1909 

Davidson, John Mitchell . . . Xenia, Ohio 1901 

Dansingberg, Paul D St Ooud, Minn 1909 1909 

Davis, Earl Cement 14 Stoddard Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. 1905 1905 

Day, Edward 3215 East Douglas Avenue, Wichita, Kan. 1886 1908 

Day, John Boynton Wilson . . 527 Cherry Street, Fall River, Mass. . . 1900 1906 

Day, John William 320 North Newstead Avenue, St. Louis, 

Mo. (Church of the Messiah) . . 1886 1899 

DcUgren, August 831 E. Wellington Avenue, (Chicago, 111. 

(First Swedish Unitarian Church) . 1886 1904 

De Long, Henry Qay .... 141 High Street, Medford, Mass. . . . 1863 1869 

Dc Normandie, Courtland Yardley, Kingston, Mass 1852 1873 

Dc Normandie, James, D.D. . . 45 Lambert Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. 

(First Religious Society) .... 1862 1883 

Dethlefs, Louis Oaus .... Walpole, Mass 1907 1907 

Dillingham, Pitt 178 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Mass. 1876 

Dodson, George Rowland, Ph.D. . 48 Nicholson Place, St Louis, Mo. 

(Church of the Unity) 1886 1903 

Dole, Charles Fletcher, D.D. . . 14 Roanoke Avenue, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 1874 ^^7^ 

Doremus, Robert Proudfit . . . Barnstable, Mass 1908 1908 

Douthit, Jasper Lewis .... Shelbyville, 111 1862 1868 

Douthit, Robert Collyer .... Castine, Me 1894 1907 

Dnimmond, Chester Arthur . . Littleton, Mass 1906 1908 

Duncan, James Cameron ... 168 Walnut Street, Clinton, Mass. . . 1886 1886 

Duncan, Lewis Johnston ... 301 West Granite Street, Butte, Mont. . 1889 1902 
Dutton, Caleb Samuel Simeon . . "5 Montague Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

(Second Society) 1902 1907 

Duerr, Otto Eugene Everett, Wash 1909 1909 



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52 

Name, Address, Or domed. Settled. 

Eddowcs, Timothy Harold . . . Geneva, III 1865 

Elbcrfeld, Samuel Louis . . . Charlestown, N.H 1897 1908 

Elder, Charles Brown, D.D. ... 55 Cedar Street, Worcester, Mass. (Church 

of the Unity) 1880 1905 

Eliot, Christopher Rhodes ... 2 West Cedar Street, Boston, Mass. (Bul- 

finch Place Church) 1882 1894 

Eliot, Samuel Atkins, D.D. . . 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1889 1900 

(President of the American Unitarian Association.) 

Eliot, Thomas Lamb, D.D. ... 227 West Park Street, Portland, Ore. . 1865 1867 

Eliot, William Greenleaf, Jr. . .346 Yamhill Street, Portland, Ore. . . 1894 1906 

Elliott, Charles Florian .... 1426 Vermont Street, Quincy, 111. . . . 1870 1906 

Ellis, Arthur Blake Burley, Wash 1899 

Ennis, William Edwin .... Norwell, Mass 1904 1908 

Estabrook, Frank Philip .... Westwood, Mass 1893 1906 

Evans, Edwin Ayer, Mass 1908 1908 

Evans, Kenneth Edward .... 48 Fairview Avenue, Chicopee, Mass. . 1897 190a 

Fairfield, Oliver Jay 24 Cottage Street, Ware, Mass. . . . 1892 1901 

Fairley, James A 12 Waldorf Court, Brooklyn, N.Y. (So- 
ciety in Hackensack, N.J.) . . . 1894 1904 
Farwell, Herbert Cunningham . . 16 Orne Square (Salem Fraternity), 

Salem, Mass 1899 

Fenn, William Wallace, D.D. . . 25 Quincy Street, (Cambridge, Mass. . . 1890 1901 
(Dean of Harvard Divinity School and Bussey Professor of Theology.) 

Ferguson, Charles National Arts Club, Gramercy Park, New 

York, N.Y 1887 

Ferrell, Dudley Hays 244 West Elm Street, Brockton, Mass. . 1902 1906 

Fish, William Henry .... 953 South Main Street, Meadville, Pa. . 1871 1905 

Fisk, Richmond, D.D Ogdensburg, N.Y. (Universalist Society) . 1861 1908 

Foote, Henry Wilder .... Ann Arbor, Mich 1902 1906 

Forbes, Elmer Severance ... 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1890 1908 
(Secretary of the Department of Social and Public Service of the Ameri- 
can Unitarian Association.) 
Forbes, John Perkins .... 98 Picrrepont Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. (First 

Society) 1878 1898 

Forbes, Roger Sawyer .... 60 Virginia Street, Upham's Corner, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (First Parish in Dorches- 
ter) 1903 1908 

Forkell, William Aurora, 111 1880 1908 

Free, Alfred, Ph.D. 60 North Maple Street, Florence, Mass. . 1871 1897 

Free, Samuel R Willimantic, Conn 1870 



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S3 

Nam^, AddrM, Ordaingd, SettUd. 

Freeman, Daniel Roy .... 304 Eliot Street, Milton, Mass. (Third 

Religious Society in Dorchester) . . 1907 1907 
Frothingham, Paul Revere ... 294 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (Arling- 
ton Street (Church) 1889 1900 

Fuller, George Washington . . . The Espanola, Oak Street and 2d Avenue, 

" ' * Spokane, Wash 1902 1907 

Furman, William Franklin . . . Westfield, N.Y 1886 

Gale, Frank Randall Berlin, Mass 1899 1903 

Gannett, William Channing, D.D. . 15 Sibley Place, Rochester, N.Y. . . . 1879 1889 
Garver, Austin Samuel . . . .41 Lancaster Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Second Parish) 1872 1885 

Gauld, Frederic John .... Leominster, Mass 1894 1899 

Gebauer, George Rudolph . . . 1209 East Third Street, Duluth, Minn. . 1895 1908 

Geoghegan, William Bernard . . 47 South Sixth Street, New Bedford, Mass. 1892 1902 

Gibb, Mrs. Sophie I47 Avenue 32, Los Angeles, Cal. . . 1876 

Gibson, Jonathan Christopher . . Apalachicola, Fla. (Societies in Bristol, 

Fla., and Faceville, Ga.) .... 1870 1890 

Gifford, Elisha 25 Oread Place, Worcester, Mass. . . 1867 

Gifford, Franklin Kent .... 241S Church Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. . 1893 

GUbert, William McFaul . . . Vineland, N.J 1875 1887 

Gilchrist, Harry Elmer .... Casa Grande, 4900 St Charles Ave., New 

Orleans, La 1887 1906 

Gile, Fred Henry IS Avon Street, Cliftondale, Mass. . . 1890 

Gill, Frederic 29 Academy Street, Arlington, Mass. . 1892 189a 

Gillilan, Charles Wallace . . . Swansboro, N.C. (Circuit Work) . . . 1902 1907 

Gilman, Bradley C^anton Corner, Mass 1884 1905 

Gilman, Nicholas Paine . . . • 537 Chestnut Street, Meadville, Pa. . . 1872 1895 

(Professor in the Meadville Theologkal School.) 
Gilmore, Frank Albert . . . . 117 West Gorham Street, Madison, Wis. . 1892 1900 
Gilmour, George Y. M. C A. Building, Buffalo, N.Y. (Park- 
side Unitarian Society) 1905 1908 

Gilpin, Victor James 327 St. James Street, London, Ont., Can. . 1900 

Ck)ldsmith, Peter Hair, D.D. . . 12 Summer Street, Salem, Mass. (First 

Church, Salem, and Society in Mar- 

blehead) 1887 1903 

(Jooding, Alfred 10 Middle Street, Portsmouth, N.H. . . 1882 1884 

Goodridge, Benjamin Asbury . . 17 E. Micheltorena Street, Santa Bar- 
bara, C:al 1892 1901 

(jordon. Miss Eleanor Elizabeth . Roadside Settlement, Des Moines, la. . . 1889 

Gorton, James S3^ Cuyler Avenue, Chicago, 111. . . . 1858 



Digitized by 



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54 

Nam^* Addrtss, Ordaimtd. SetiUd, 

Grant, Arthur Hastings .... 356 Bay Way, Elizabeth, NJ 1890 1904 

Graves, Charles 57 Paulison Avenue, Passaic, N.J. (So- 
cieties at Passaic and Ridgewood . . 1894 iS)07 
Gray, Clifton Merxitt .... 4 Archdale Street, Charleston, S.C. . . 1899 1901 
Greeley, Qarence De Vere ... 81 Ashland Boulevard (People's Church), 

Chicago, III 1891 1908 

Green, Edward Exeter, N.H 1881 1897 

Green, Walter Cox Meadville, Pa 1892 1904 

(Librarian and Secretary of the Faculty of the Meadville Theological 
School.) 

Greene, Lovinzo Leroy .... Chelmsford, Mass 1880 1908 

Greenman, Lyman Manchester . 55 High Street, Yonkers, N.Y 1896 1904 

Greenman, Walter Folger . . . 684 Astor Street, Milwaukee, Wis. . . 1890 1908 

Griffin, Frederick Robertson . . Montreal, Onada 1901 1909 

Hahn, Andrew Duxbury, Mass 1897 1905 

Haight, Miss Sarah Louisa . . . Perry, la . 1899 1907 

Hale, Edward Chestnut Hill, Mass 1886 1897 

Hall, Edward Henry, D.D. ... 14 Craigie Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1859 

Hall, Hedley Rock Island, 111 1898 

Ham, Marion Franklin 1897 

Hamlet, Samuel 75 Hancock Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1885 

Hardin, Floyd Barnes .... Moline, III 1908 

Harrington, Miss Emeline . . . 275 Kent Street, St. Paul, Minn. . . . 1895 

Harvey, Leon Addison .... 798 Elmore Place, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 1890 1907 

Hathaway, George Adclbert . . San Diego, Ol 1904 1909 

Hathaway, George Edgar . . - 337 Walnut Street, Manchester, N.H. . . 1904 1905 
Hawes, Oscar Brown 5224 Greene Street, Germantown, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 1897 1901 

Hawley, Fred Vermillia .... 2429 North Hermitage Avenue, Chicago, 

I 111. (Unity Church) 1893 1904 

Hayden, Charles Adelbert, D.D. . Oakland, Me. (Universalist Society) . . 1866 1908 

Hayes, John Alexander .... 44 Arlington Street, Haverhill, Mass. . 1890 1903 

Hayward, Edward Farwell ... 41 Pleasant Street, Marlborough, Mass. . 1874 1890 

Hay ward, Laurence 12 Essex Street, Newburyport, Mass. . 1905 1905 

Headle, Edwin Charles . . . . R. F. D. 62, Bolton, Mass 1881 

Heddaeus, Johannes 106 Kosciusko Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. . 1882 

Heizer, Cyrus Whittlesay . . . Ithaca, N.Y 1878 1901 

Henderson, Cicero Adolphus . .211 West 19th Street, Wilmington, Del. . 1902 1908 

Hills, Burton Alfred 303 West 12th Street, Traverse City, Mich. 

(Societies at Traverse City, Harrietta 

and Bendon, Mich.) 1905 1906 



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Google 



55 



Namt, Address, Ordaintd. 

Hinckley, Frederic Allen ... 201 1 Green Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

(Spring Garden Church) .... 1878 

Hoagland, Napoleon Stage . . . Tyngsboro, Mass 1885 

Hodgin, Edwin McMasters Stanton 925 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, 

Cal 1898 

Hodgins, James Cobourg . . . Milwaukee, Wis 1890 

Holmgren, David Dalbo, Minn 1870 

Holden, Francis Wilder .... Milford, N.H 1893 

Holmes, John Haynes . . . . i Van Sice Avenue, Yonkers, N.Y. 

(Church of the Messiah, New York) 
Homer, Thomas Jay 15 Oakland Street, Melrose, Mass. (So- 
cieties in Melrose and Sharon) . . 

Horst, (3arl Georg 4 Berlin Street, Wollaston, Mass. . . . 

Horton, Edward Augustus ... 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 
(President of the Unitarian Sunday-School Society.) 



Settled. 

1896 
1908 

1908 

1909 
1906 



1904 1907 



1890 
1891 
1868 



Hosmer, Frederic Lucian, D.D. 
Howard, Burt Estes . . . 
Howard, Thomas Dwight 
Howe, Mrs. Marie Jenney . 
Hubbard, Horace Richmond 
Hudson, Adelbert Lathrop . 
Hudson, Jay William . . 



(Professor University of Missouri.) 



Hudson, John William . . 

Hultin, Miss Ida C . . . 
Humphreys, Charles Alfred 

Hunt, Ernest Walter . . 

Hunt, Walter Reid . . . 

Hussey, Alfred Rodman . . 

Hutcheon, Robert James . 

Hutchins, William Tucker . 

Huxtable, James . . . . 



Innes, Alexander Irvine 
Ives, Henry (Woodson 
Ives, Howard Colby . 



2427 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. . . 1869 

Stanford University, (3al. . . . . . 1886 

Peterboro, N.H 1852 

1844 E. 86th Street, Oeveland, Ohio . . 1898 

Francestown, N. H 1897 

Newton, Mass 1895 

Columbia, Mo 1895 



Peabody, Mass 1863 

Sudbury, Mass 1886 

3 Monadnock Street, Dorchester, Mass. . 1863 

144 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. . 1892 

82 Hillside Avenue, Orange, N.J. . . . 1894 

I W. Hamilton Street, Baltimore, Md. . 1895 

3 Edgedale Road, Toronto, Can. . . . 1895 

Santa Rosa, Cal 1876 

568 E. Fifth Street, South Boston, Mass. . 1^4 



1899 
1909 
1892 



1908 
1901 



1873 



1898 
1902 
1906 
1906 
1890 



181 Garfield Avenue, Salem. Ohio . . . 1901 1907 

Andover, N.H 1904 1904 

114 Hempstead Street, New London, 

Conn 1905 1906 



Jackson, Abraham Willard, D.D. . 98 West Emerson Street, Melrose, Mass. . 1873 
Jaynes, Julian Qifford .... 76 Prince Street, West Newton, Mass. . 1885 1885 
Jenks, Henry Fitch Canton Corner, Mass 1867 1885 



Digitized by 



Google 



Name, 
Jennings, Allen Gary 



Johonnot, Rodney Fuller, D.D. 

Jones, Charles Joshua Ketcham 
Jones, George . . . 
Jones, Jenkin Uoyd . 



Jones, Joseph Henry 
Jones, William Marion 
Jones, William Safford 
Judy, Arthur Markley 



Kampmeier, August . 
Kellogg, Ira Phelp, Jr. 
Kennedy, Albert Joseph 



Kent, Frederic Houston 
Kent, George William 



Kent, Josiah Coleman 
Kerr, Milton Royce . 
Key, William Simpson 
Kimball, John C. . . 
Kirkpatrick, David M. 
Knapp, Arthur May . 



Lane, Walter Eustace 
Latham, Horatio Edward 
Lathrop, John Howland . 

Latimer, George Dimmick 
Lauer, Solon .... 
Lawrance, William Inrin 
Lazenby, Albert . . . 
Leavens, Robert French . 
Leavitt, Bradford . . . 



Leggett, Miss Mary Lydia 



S6 

Address, Ordaimed. Settled, 

22^ Fulton Street, Toledo, Ohio (in 

charge of Adams Street Qty Mission) 1870 igos 
234 So. Ken il worth Avenue, Oak Park, 111. 

(Unity Church) 1886 1892 

Public Library, Los Angeles, Cal. . . 1872 

115 East Falls Street, New Castle, Pa. . . 1900 1908 

3939 Langley Avenue, Chicago, 111. (All 

Souls' Church) 1870 1882 

706 Tyler Street, Topeka, Kan. . . . 1898 1906 

Oakland, Ol 1877 

29 Kay Street, Newport, R.1 1897 1905 

Montpelier, la 1882 

930 East Washington Street, Iowa City, la. 1879 

Florence, Mass 1909 1909 

South End House, 20 Union Park, Boston, 

Mass. 1904 

Springfield, Mass 1899 

125 Adelaide Avenue, Providence, R. I. 
(Westminster Congregational So- 
ciety) 1878 1900 

Northborough, Mass 1896 1895 

901 Sixth Street, Greeley, Col 1889 1908 

Watha, Pender Co., N.C. (Circuit Work) 1878 

Greenfield, Mass 1859 

Geneseo, 111 1889 1905 

42B Bluff, Yokohama, Japan .... 1868 

Spencer, Mass 1892 

Eastport, Me 1894 J9P7 

Dane Street and Bancroft Way, Berkely, 

Cal 1905 1905 

(In Europe) 1890 

San Diego, Cal 1889 

475 Main Street, Winchester, Mass. . . 1875 1899 

57 Breed Street, Lynn, Mass 1876 1905 

Box 216, Fitchburg, Mass 1907 190B 

251 1 Octavia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

(First Unitarian Society) .... 1893 1900 

77 Pinckney Street, Boston, Mass. . . 1888 



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57 

Name, Address, Ordained. Settled, 

Leiby, Israel Stcigcrwolt . . . Tamaqua, Pa igoo 

Leonard, William James . . . . jo Rockland Street* Boston, Mass. . . 1865 

Lewis, Fred Rinaldo Hopedale, Mass 1898 1909 

Lilliefors, Manfred 1896 

Limbaugh, Daniel Christian . . . Fort Worth, Tex 1900 

Litchfield, William Cummings . . S2 Hermon Street, Winthrop, Mass. . . 1879 1905 
Littlefield, Arthur Warner ... 87 Francis Street, Brookline, Mass. (Sec- 
ond Unitarian Society) 1891 1908 

Littlefield, George Elmer . . . Westwood, Mass 1891 

Lloyd, Hal Horace Station A, Chattanooga, Tenn 1908 

Locke, Calvin Stoughton . . . Westwood, Mass 1854 

Locke, James Ellis i8?5 

Locke, John Francis 3 Elmont Street, Dorchestter Center, 

Afass 1870 

Locke, William Ware .... Wellcsley Hills, Mass 1886 1905 

(Preacher at Rock Ridge Hall.) 

Lombard, Charles Parker . . . 236 A Street, Boston, Mass. ..... 1878 

Lord, Augustus Mendon, D.D. . . 34 Cushing Street, Providence, R.I. (First 

Church) 1887 1890 

Lord, William Rogers .... Dover, Mass 1878 1909 

Loring, Robert Sprague .... Iowa City, la 1897 1907 

Lusk, James Thompson .... 124 Chandler Street, Boston, Mass. . . 1870 

Lutz, Harry Billerica, Mass 1900 1906 

Lyon, William Henry, D.D. . . 353 Walnut Street, Brookline, Mass. (First 

Parish) 1873 i8g6 

MacCarthy, Joseph P., Ph.D. . . 429 W. Lovell Street, Kalamazoo, Mich. 

MacCauley, Clay Shikokumachi, Shiba, Tokyo, Japan . 

(Representative of the American Unitarian Association in Japan.) 

MacDonald, Howard Austin . . East Lexington, Mass 1906 

Macdonald, Loren Benjamin . . Concord, Mass. (Societies in Concord 

and Bedford, Mass.) 1882 

Macllwain, Cjeorge Edward . . Middleboro, Mass 1894 

Maglathlin, Edward Bartlett . . Ralphton, West Bridgewater, Mass. . . 
Malick, John loio Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, 

Mass 

Manchester, Alfred 15 Forrester Street, Salem, Mass. (Second 

Church) 

Mann, Newton 421 N. 17th Street, Omaha, Neb. . . . 

Marsh, John Lewis 219 R Monument Street, Colorado Springs, 

Col 1875 1909 



1895 
1866 


1906 


1906 


1906 


1882 

1894 
I88I 


III 


1904 




1873 

186s 


1897 
1889 



Digitized by 



Google 



58 



Namg, 
Marshall, Perry . . . . 
Mason, George Lincoln . . 
Mason, L. Walter, D.D. . . 
Maxwell, Samuel Raymond 
May, Joseph, LL.D. . . . 



McDaniel, Benjamin Franklin 



McDougall, Henry Clay . 
Mcaker, William Lathrop 
Meredith, Ernest Sidney 
Metcalf, Joel Hastings . 
Meyer, John Frederick . 
Miller, Kerby Sinclair . 
Miller, Milton Jennings . 
Mills, Benjamin Fay . . 
(Minister of the Los 
Mills, Thornton Anthony 



Angel 



Mills, Grover George 
Mitchell, Harry Sumner 
Mitchell, John Cyrus 
Morgan, William Sacheus, 
Morison, Robert Swain . 

(Librarian Emeritus of 
Morrison, Bertland Worth 
Morse, M. Rowena, Ph.D. 
Morton, James Ferdinand 
Mott, Herbert Henry . 
Moulton, Joseph Sidney 
Mueller, John Henry 
Mullet, Alfred Edgar . 
Murdoch, Miss Marion . 
Myers, Charles Norman . 

Nelson, Oscar Jamison . 
Newbcrt, Elmer Ellsworth 
Newman, Bernard Joseph 



Ph 



D. 
the 



Address, Ordmngd, 

New Salem, Mass 1875 

Lock Box 302, Green Harbor, Mass. . . 1894 

339 Pacific Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. . . 1886 

15 Crescent Street, Greenfield, Mass. . 1906 
The Gladstone, nth and Pine Streets, 

Philadelphia, Pa 1865 

21 Edson Street, Dorchester Center, Mass. 
(Norfolk Unitarian Church and Bar- 
nard Memorial) 1869 

40 Highland Avenue, Franklin, N.H. . 1886 

79 Broad Street, Bethlehem, Pa. . . . 1907 

1977 Center Street, West Roxbury, Mass. . 1895 

54 Summer Street, Taunton, Mass. . . 1890 

South Natick, Mass 1898 

Central Point, Ore 1896 

Gcneseo, 111 1863 

Station M., Los Angeles, Cal 1878 

es Fellowship.) 

Rockford, 111. (Church of the Christian 

Union) 1902 

. 12 Phillips Street, Watertown, Mass. . 1908 

. 75 Washington Street, Keenc, N.H. . . 1896 

. 1610 Franklin Street, Boise, Ida. . . . 1881 

150 Knox Street, Albany, N.Y. . . . 1890 

17 Farrar Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1874 

Harvard Divinity School.) 

. 328 Coffin Avenue, New Bedford, Mass. . 1909 

. 507 North 4th Street, Keokuk, la. . . 1906 

. Andovcr, N.H 1869 

. 9 Mount Pleasant Street, Nashua, N.H. 1886 

. Stow, Mass 1878 

. 506 E. Chestnut Street, Bloomington, 111. 1889 

. 89 Pearl Street, Charlestown, Mass. . . 1874 

. 427 Congress Street, Kenosha, Wis. . . 1885 

. 345 Main Street, Stoneham, Mass. . . 1902 



SetiUd. 

1893 
1909 
1900 

1909 

1876 



1899 
1899 

1905 
1904 
1903 

1868 
1905 



1907 
1908 
1906 
1906 
1907 



1909 
1906 

1900 
1885 
1892 



1909 



19CQ 
1892 



Augusta, Me 

483 Greene Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. (Wil- 
low Place Chapel) 1901 1902 



Digitized by 



Google 



59 



Name. 
Nichols, William Ichabod . 

(General Secretary of the 
Nichols, William Stanley . 
Nicholson, Charles Frederick 
Nickcrson, Alfred Chase 
Niles, Charles Fremont . . 
Norman, Amandus Halvdon 
Noyes, Charles 



Olmstead, Mrs. Margaret Titus 
Olmstead, Rett Elmer 
Ordway, Qydc Elbert 
Osgood, Edmund Quincy Sewall 
Owen, Thomas Grafton 

Padgham, Elizabeth . 
Pardee, Joseph Nelson 
Park, Charles Edwards 



Parker, Henry Carlton 
Parker, William Henry 
Patten, George Wilbcr 
Payne, Edward Byron 
Pcabody, Francis Greenwood, 
D.D., L.L.D. 



Address. Ordained. Settled. 

. 280 Prospect Place, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 1882 
Brooklyn Bureau of Charities.) 

. North Andover, Mass 1899 

. 396 Tremont Street, Taunton, Mass. . . 1861 

. 768 Kensington Avenue, Plainfield, N.J. . 1871 

. Menomonie, Wis 1891 

. Hanska, Minn 1893 

. Carroll Avenue, Norwich, Conn. (Pastor 

Emeritus, North Andover, Mass.) . i860 

. Brookings, S.D 1894 

. Brookings, S.D 1894 

. 42 Holbrook Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 1897 

39 High Street, Brattleboro, Vt. . . . 1878 

Whitehall, Wis 1856 

91 Home Avenue, Rutherford, N.J. . . 1901 

Bolton, Mass 1872 

347 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass. 

(First Church) 1899 



546 Main Street, Wobum, Mass. 
24 Marion Street, Dedham, Mass. . 
48 Brattle Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
Glen Ellen, Cal 



1878 
190S 
1871 
1874 

1874 



13 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Mass. 
(Plummer Professor of Christian Morals in Harvard University.) 
Peck, William Willett .... Murdock Parsonage, Winchendon, Mass. 1897 

Peebles, Stephen CJoshen, Ore. 189a 

Peirce, Walter Catlin West Somerville, Mass 1888 

Pendleton, Aubrey M Milford, N.H 

Perkins, (Tharles Edwin .... Keosauqua, la. (Congregational Society) 1886 
Perkins, John C^irroll, D.D. . . 108 High Street, Portland, Me. (First Par- 
ish), 1891 

Perkins, Palfrey (First Parish, Brighton) 1909 

Peterson, Abbot Lancaster, Mass 1907 

Pcttengill, Arthur Gooding ... 69 Woodford Street, Portland, Me. 

I (Preble (Hiapel) 1889 

Petursson, Rognvaldur .... 533 Agnes Street, Winnipeg, Man. . . 1903 

Phalen, Frank Lowe Fairhaven, Mass 1886 

Phalcn, Paul Stephens .... Hingham, Mass. (Second Parish and 

Third Society) 1908 



1909 

1897 
1893 
1893 

1884 



1904 
1897 

1905 
1901 

1906 
1888 
1909 

1881 

1908 

1909 

1896 

1891 
1909 
1907 

1905 
1903 
1906 

1908 



Digitized by 



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6o 

Name. Address. Ordained. Settled. 

Phelan, William Taft .... 48 Alder Street, Portland, Me. (Preble 

J Chapel) 1863 i86q 

Pickett, Harold Lionel .... Sandwich, Mass 1909 1909 

Pierce, Granville Box 116, Ashby, Mass 1873 1909 

Pierce, Ulysses Grant Baker, D.D., 1616 Riggs Place, Washington, DC. . . 1891 1901 

Pierson, William Henry, D.D. . . 29 Central Street, Somerville, Mass. . . 1868 1891 

Piper, George Fisk Bedford, Mass 1864 

Place, Charles Alpheus .... 90 Church Street, Waltham, Mass. . . 1897 1902 

Porter, Isaac Francis Sherborn, Mass 1868 1903 

Potter, William Frank .... Beach Street, Revere, Mass 1868 

Powell, Frank Abram .... Box 165, Helena, Mont 1889 1906 

Powers, Jesse Daniel Orlando . 916 R Mercer Street, Seattle, Wash. . . 1897 1908 
Pratt, Frank Wright 405 Qu' Appelle Avenue, Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba, Canada 1891 1908 

(Field Secretary of the American Unitarian Association and the British and 
Foreign Unitarian Association for Onada.) 
Pratt, George Franklin .... 43 Mill Street, Dorchester, Mass. (Christ 

Church) 1881 1904 

Pratt, William Austin .... Cedar Rapids, la. (Universalist Society) . 1879 1902 
Prescott, Elvin James .... Rockland, Mass. (Societies in Rockland 

and Eastondale, Mass.) 1890 1908 

Pressey, Edward Pearson . . . Montague, Mass 1896 

Preston, Frederick 154 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 1891 

Puffer, Joseph Adams .... Needham, Mass. . . . . . - . . . 1906 1908 

Quimby, Israel Paul Vineyard Haven, Mass 1879 I9P7 

Quinby, John William .... East Bridgewater, Mass 1871 

Ramsay, Robert Ewart .... 2104 Grand Avenue, Davenport, la. . . 1903 1907 

Ramsay, William Henry . . . 509 West Ormsby Avenue, Louisville, Ky. 1886 1902 

Reccord, Augustus Phineas . . 207 State Street, Springfield, Mass. . . 1895 1905 

Reeby, William Henry .... 147 Congress Street, Milford, Mass. . . 1878 

Reed, Clarence Palo, Alto, Cal 1897 1909 

Reed, George Hale j6 Common Street, Belmont, Mass. . . 1902 1902 

Reed, Willard 26 Walker Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1898 

Reid, John Dumont 656 Portland Avenue, St. Paul, Minn. . 1888 1908 

Rice, (Jeorge Damon .... Fort Sheridan, 111 1899 1901 

(Chaplain United States Army.) 

Rice, (korge Heber Redlands, Cal 1887 1905 

Rich, Adoniram Judson .... Dighton, Mass. (Segreganset) .... 1864 1899 

Rihbany, Abraham Mitrie ... 4 Ashland Place, Toledo, Ohio . . . 1900 1902 



Digitized by 



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6i 



Namt, 
Roberts, Abram Adams . . . 
Robinson, Alson Haven . . . 
Robinson, John Lunsford . . 
Robinson, Perlcy Joseph . . 
Ross, Hope Fleming MacKenzie 



Rossbach, Adolph . . 
Rowlett, John Wesley, D.D. 
Roys, Cyrus Austin . . 
Rmnball, Edwin Alfred . 
Russell, Charles Frank . 

Safford, Miss Mary Augusta 
St John, Charles Elliott . 

Sallaway, James .... 
Sanders, George Dana . . 
Sannderson, Henry Hallam . 
Savage, John Arthur . . . 



Savage, Maxwell .... 
Savage, Minot Judson, D.D. 
Savage, Robert Wellesley . 
Schermerhorn, Martin Kellogg 
Schneider, Otto Emanuel . 
Scott, Alva Roy . . 
Scott, John Milton . 
Seaton, Joseph Marion 
Seavcr, Nathanael 
Secrist, Henry Thomas 

Seward, Josiah Lafayette, D.D. 

Sbeafe, Joseph Pease 
Shippen, Eugene Rodman 
Shrout, Oliver Porter . 
Shippen, Rush Rhees 
Shurtleff, Alfred Dewey Keegan 
Simonds, William Day 
Simons, Minot Osgood 



Addrtss, Ordained, Settled, 

213 Birch Street, Baraboo, Wis. . . . 1866 

Newton Center, Mass 1905 1909 

1017 Park Avenue, Richmond, Va. . . 1883 1904 

Littleton, N.H 1882 1907 

297 Redwood Avenue, Winnipeg, Mani- 
toba, Canada 1891 

7 Church Street, Belfast, Me 1901 1907 

186 East Pine Street, Atlanta, Ga, . . 1908 1909 

Uxbridge, Mass 1879 1893 

1056 South Avenue, Rochester, N.Y. . . 1903 1908 

Weston, Mass 1882 1882 

696 19th Street, Des Moines, la. . . . 1880 1899 

32 South 21 St Street, Philadelphia, Pa. . 1883 1908 

(First Unitarian Society.) 

Bedford, Mass 1863 

SO Pleasant Street, Waterville, Me. . . 1885 1905 

47 Lee Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . . 1898 1903 
R.D. I, Plainfield, N.J. (Society in Med- 

field, Mass.) 1870 1892 

Redlands, Cal I9Q3 

1867 Crawford Road, Qcveland, O. . . 1864 

Highland Springs, Va 1881 1908 

14 Garfield Ridge, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. . 1867 

Pepperell, Mass 1906 

128 Cumberland Street, Bangor, Me. . . 1891 1905 

New York, N.Y 1881 

Hubbardston, Mass 189S i899 

Scituate, Mass 1865 

3 Abbotsford Street, Roxbury, Mass. (All 

Souls) 1891 1896 

47 Emerald Street, Keene, N.H. (Society 

in Dublin) 1874 1902 

Harvard, Mass 1874 1895 

Lancaster, Pa 1892 1908 

160 North Third Street, San Jose, Cal. . 1889 1909 

29s Ash Street, Brockton, Mass. . . . 1849 

422 Meridian Street, East Boston, Mass. . 1898 1907 

14th and Castro Streets, Oakland, Cal. . 1885 1908 

1867 Crawford Road, Qeveland, Ohio . 1895 1900 



Digitized by 



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62 



Singsen, Antone Gerhardt . 

Skerrye, William Frederick 
Slicer, Thomas Roberts . . 

Slocombe, Edwin Mitchell . 
Smith, Augustus Daniel . . 
Smith, Ernest Charles . . 

(Secretary of the Western 
Smith, Frederic William 
Smith, Henry Goodwin . . 
Smith, John Stilman . . 
Smith, Walter Delos . . . 
Snow, Sydney Bruce . . . 
Snyder, Charles Edward . 

Snyder, John 

Solmundsson, Johann Pjetur 
Somers, Amos Newton . . 
Southworth, Franklin Chester 



Address, ' Ordaintd. 

12 Tobey Street, Providence, R.I. (Bell 

Street Chapel) 1887 

Templeton, Mass 1896 

156 E. 38th Street, New York, N.Y. 

(Church of All Souls) 1871 

49 Western Avenue, Augusta, Me. . . 1907 

148 Henry Street, Brooklyn, N.Y. . . 1886 

17s Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111. . . . 1888 
Unitarian Conference.) 

Peterboro, N.H 1900 

16 Columbus Avenue, Northampton, Mass. 1886 

42 Wren Street, West Roxbury, Mass. . 1861 

167 East Main Street, Hamilton, Canada . 1905 

Windsor, Vt 1906 

715 Liberty Street, Franklin, Pa. . . . 1908 

Nantucket, Mass 1870 

Gimli, Manitoba, Can 1903 

Montague, Mass 1886 

Meadville, Pa 1892 



SettUd. 

1906 
1907 

1897 
1907 

1909 



1909 

1906 

1908 
1909 
1903 

1902 



(President of the Meadville Theological School.) 



Spalding, Samuel Charles 
Spaulding, Henry George 
Spence, Albert Hague, Jr. 
Spence, Joseph M. A. . 
Spencer, Edward Glen faun 
Spencer, William Henry 
Sprague, George L. . . 
Spurr, George Browning 
Staples, Charles Jason . 
Stebbins, Calvin . . . 
Stebbins, Roderick . . 
Stevens, Henry Davis . 
Stewart, James Monroe . 
Stewart, Samuel Barrett 

Stone, George Whitefield 

Stowell, George Leverett 
Stuart, Reed .... 
Sturtevant, Francis Raymond 



542 W. 159th Street, New York City . 1903 

1470 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. . 1868 

Box 32, Medfield, Mass 1900 

Hinsdale, 111 1892 

Woodland, Cal 1893 

135 East 15th Street, New York, N.Y. . 1869 

Dunkirk, N.Y 1902 

Box 93, Petersham, Mass igo7 

21 Williams Street, Burlington, Vt. . . 1882 

Framingham, Mass 1865 

96 Morton Road, Milton, Mass. . . . 1886 

Sterling, Mass 1889 

Box 343, Grand Junction, Col. . . . 1898 
Ballston Spa, N.Y. (pastor emeritus, So- 
ciety in Lynn, Mass.) 1863 

137 High Street, corner of Storey Street, 

Santa Cruz, Cal 1898 

Lexington, Mass 1877 

76 Stimson Place, Detroit, Mich. . . . 1872 
12 Willis Street, Dorchester, Mass. (Chan- 

ning Church) 1906 



1908 
1908 
1907 



1907 
1904 
1900 
1886 
1905 



1865 



1908 



1906 



Digitized by 



Google 



63 

S9m€, Addrtu. Ordaintd, Sttilid. 

Stmderland, Jabez Thomas ... 65 Oxford Street, Hartford, Conn. . . 1870 1906 

Sntton, Silas Wright .... Ellsworth, Me. 1875 

Taylor, Walter Alexander . . . Spring and 5th Streets, Jamestown, N.Y. 1895 1900 

Thachcr, Francis Storer ... 19 Brewster Street, Cambridge, Mass. . 1875 

Thachcr, Philip Slaney .... Jamacha, San Diego, Co., Cal. . . . 1877 
Thayer, George Augustine, D.D. . 304 Oak Street, Mt Auburn, Cincinnati, 

Ohio 1869 1882 

Thooipson, Clarence Bertrand . Peabody, Mass 1906 1906 

Todd, William Gage East Bridgewater, Mass 1869 

Tomlin, Cement Exnest .... Gardner, Mass 1893 1909 

Towle, Edward David ..... Hillsboro, N.H 1876 

Townc, Edward C. Watertown, Mass i860 

Townsend, James Graham, D.D. . Jamestown, N.Y. (Society in Warren, 

Pa.) 1867 1907 

Townsend, Manley Bacon . . • Sioux City, la. 18^ 1908 

Trcworgy, Everett Somes . . . Gouverneur, N.Y . 1905 1907 

Tapper, Nathan Wells .... 642 Pine Grove Avenue, Chicago, 111. . 1907 

Utter, David, D.D. 329 Broadway, Denver, Col 1871 1896 

Vail, Albert Ross Urbana, 111 1907 1907 

Van Ness, Thomas 3 Garrison Road, Brookline, Mass. (Sec- 
ond Church, Boston) 1884 1893 

Van Ommeren, Hendrik . . .217 Washington Street, Mt. Pleasant, 

Mich 1886 1905 

Van Sluyters, Bernard Antony . R. F. D. 9, Grand Rapids, Mich. (Holland 

Unitarian Church) 1894 1900 

Walbridge, William Henry . . . Milford, N.H 1874 

Walker, Alfred Marshall . . . Sheffield, 111 1903 1906 

Walkley, Albert Marblehead, Mass 1875 

Walsh, William Lorison . . . Brookfield, Mass 1893 i^3 

Ward, Duren James Henderson, 

Ph.D. 2442 Glenarm Place, Denver, Col. .. . 1879 

Watry. Francis Santa Ana, Cal 1880 1904 

Watson, Elijah Roberts .... Eureka, Cal 1883 1909 

Weatherly, Arthur L. . . . . 1928 Prospect Street, Lincoln, Neb. . . 1893 1908 

Weatherly, Samuel C . . . . Bameveld, N.Y 1907 1907 

Weeks, Joseph Hatton .... Provincetown, Mass 1873 

Weil, Fred Alban Box 465 Bellingham, Wash 1904 1907 

Weld, Charles Richmond, LL.D. . 119 West Franklin Street, Baltimore, Md. 1873 1873 



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West, James Harcourt 

Westall, Henry Addison 
Weston, Harry Augustus 
White, Albert Corydon . 
White, Harry .... 
White, William Ome 
Whitman, Henry Arthur 
Whitmore, James Herman 
Whitney, Arthur Bryant 
Whitney, Herbert . . 



Whitney, Mrs. Mary TraflFam 
Wicks, Frank Scott Corey 
Wiers, Edgar Swan . . . 
Wilbur, Earl Morse . . . 



i860 
1869 



1883 
1881 



Nome, Address. Ordmnsd. SH$Ud. 

Wellman, Charles Phelps . . . Humboldt, la 1903 1907 

Wells, Andrew Jackson .... 621 O'Farrcll Street, San Francisco, Cal. 1869 

Wells, John Doane 27 Everett Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 

Wendte, Charles William, D.D. . 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 
(Secretary of the Department of Foreign Relations of the American Uni- 
tarian Association.) 

. . . 93 Milton Avenue, Dorchester (Boston), 

Mass 

7 Pemberton Square, Boston, Mass. . . 

Randolph, Mass 1905 190B 

Clintonville, Ohio 1880 

Oklahoma City, Okla 1897 

222 High Street, Brookline, Mass. . . . 1848 
1524 Plain Street, Columbia, S.C . . . 1878 

Stoneham, Mass 1869 

374 Main Street, Saco, Me. .... 1902 
Rochester, Vt. (Independent Church, Rob- 
inson, Vt.) 1873 

Rochester, Vt. (Universalist Society) . 1887 
17 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, Ind. 1894 
105 Orange Road, Montdair, N.J. . . . 1900 
81 Hillcrest Road, Berkeley, Cal. . . . 1892 
(Dean of the Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry and Field Secre- 
tary of the American Unitarian Association for the Pluufic Department) 
Wilkie, William Daniel .... 48 Linden Street, Whitman, Mass. . . 
Willard, William Augustus Put- 2277 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 

Mass 

278 Walnut Street, Brookline, Mass. . 
99 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston, Mass. . 

Newburgh, N.Y 1909 

Northfield, Mass 1872 1904 

Lexington, Mass 1891 1905 

25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1883 1907 



nam 

Williams, Francis Charles . 
Williams, Theodore (dickering 

Wilson, Alfred J 

Wilson, Daniel Munro . . 
Wilson, John Mills . . . 
Wilson, Lewis Gilbert . . 



(Secretary of the American Unitarian Association.) 



Winkley, Jonathan Wingate 
Winkley, Samuel Hobart 

Winn, Arthur Harmon . . 
Withington, (Jeorge Gardner 
Wood, William Augustus . 



1907 

190B 
190S 

1905 
1906 

I9<M 



1894 1902 

1869 
1850 
1882 



331 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, Mass. 1876 
II Louisburg Square, Boston, Mass. (Bul- 

finch Place Church) 1846 iat6 

150 Eighth Street, Troy, N.Y 1897 1902 

North Eaton, Mass 1855 

Wilton, N.H 1896 1907 



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NmM. Addrgss, Ordained, Settled, 

WooUey, Mrs. Celia Parker . . 3032 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III. . . 1894 
(President of the Frederick Douglass Center.) 



Woudc, Henry H. . . . 
Wright, George Charles . . 

Wright, James Edward, D.D. 
Wright, Merle St. Croix, D.D. 



Wyman, Abram . . 
Young, George Henry 



Poughkeepsie, N.Y 1880 

33 Fairview St., Lowell, Mass. (Free 

Church) 1884 1886 

Montpelier, Vt 1866 1869 

215 West 126th Street, New York, N.Y. 

(Lenox Avenue Church) .... 1887 1887 

North Easton, Mass 1894 I905 

Guild Row, Dedham, Mass 1866 



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AMERICAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATION. 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 
1909-1910. 

t>xcsibenU 
Rev. SAMUEL A. ELIOT, D.D. 

Wcc*t>xcBibcntB. 

Hon. WALLACE HACKETT, of Portsmouth, N. H. 

Hon. EBEN S. DRAPER, of Hopedale, Mass. 

Miss EMMA C. LOW, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hon. DUNCAN U. FLETCHER, of Jacksonville, Fla. 

CHARLES W. AMES, Esq., of St. Paul, Minn. 

Hon. HORACE DAVIS, LL.D., of San Francisco, Cal. 

Sectetans* 
Rev. LEWIS G. WILSON. 

B00f0tant Sectetan?. 
GEORGE W. FOX, Esq. 

XLxCABntcx. 
FRANCIS H. LINCOLN, Esq. 

Dftectotd. 
Term expires May, 19 10. 

Mrs. J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr Boston, Mass. 

Hon. Leslie C. Cornish, LL.D Augusta, Me. 

Rev. John P. Forbes Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Eleazer B. Homer, Esq Providence, R. I. 

Charles A. Murdock, Esq San Francisco, Cal. 

Henry M. Williams, Esq Cambridge, Mass. 



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Term expires May, 191 1. 

Rev. Wilson M. Backus Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Paul R. Frothingham Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Prescott Keyes Concord, Mass. 

Henry B. Little, Esq Newburyport, Mass. 

Hon. John D. Long, LL.D Hingham, Mass. 

President Franklin C. South worth Meadville, Pa. 

Term expires May, 191 2. 

Percy A. Atherton, Esq Boston, Mass. 

Clarence E. Carr, Esq.., Andover, N. H. 

Hon. George Hutchinson West Newton, Mass. 

Mrs. John W. Loud ,. Montreal, Can. 

William P. Olds, Esq Portland, Ore. 

Rev. Augustus P. Reccord Springfield, Mass. 

Standing Commfttecd. 

Finance. — Messrs. Hutchinson, Lincoln, Little, Long, and Wiluams. 
Publication. — Messrs. Forbes, Frothingham, Murdoch, Reccord, and Mrs. 

Keyes. 
New England. — Messrs. Carr, Cornish, Homer, Little, and Mrs. Keyes. 
Middle. — Messrs. Carr, Forbes, Hutchinson, South worth, and Mrs. Loud. 
Southern. — Messrs. Backus, Homer, Wiluams, Mrs. Coolidge, and Mrs. Loud. 
Western. — Messrs. Backus, Little, Olds, Southworth, and Wiluams. 
Rocky Mountain. — Messrs. Atherton, Carr, Long, Murdock, and Olds. 
PaciHc. — Messrs. Frothingham, Murdock, Olds, Reccord, and Mrs. Cooudge. 
Foreign. — Messrs. Cornish, Long, Murdock, Southworth, and Mrs. Keyes. 
Education. — Messrs. Atherton, Backus, Forbes, Frothingham, and Homer. 
Comity and Fellowship. — Messrs. Forbes, Homer, Long, Reccord, and Mrs. 

Cooudge. 
New Americans. — Messrs. Backus, Cornish, Reccord, Southworth, and Mrs. 

Loud. 
Publicity. — Messrs. Atherton, Frothingham, Lfttle, Murdock, and Mrs. 

Keyes. 
Social and Public Service. — Messrs. Forbes, Hutchinson, Murdock, Wiluams, 

and Mrs. Cooudge. 
Executive. — Messrs. Atherton, Carr, Hutchinson, Lincoln, and Williams. 

Church Building Loan Fund. — Messrs. Lincoln, Hutchinson, and Wiluams. 
Ministerial Aid Fund. — Messrs. Eliot, Lincoln, and Frothingham. 



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EXECUTIVE STAFF. 
President, Rev. Samubl A. EuoT, D.D.; Secretary, Rev. Lewis G. Wilson; 
Treasurer, Francis H. Lincx>ln ; Assistant Secretary, George W. Fox ; Sec- 
retary of the Department of Foreign Relations, Rey.CHAn.Es'W.'WzsvTE,D.D. ; 
Secretary of the Department of Social and Public Service, Rev. Elmer S. 
Forbes; Secretary of the Publicity Department, Rev. Charles W. Casson; 
Field Secretary for New England, Rev. William Channing Brown; Su- 
perintendent for the Middle States and Canada, Rev. George H. Badger;! 
Field Secretary for the Rocky Mountain States, Rev. Wiluam Thurston 
Brown; Field Secretary for the Pacific States, Rev. Earl M. Wilbur; 
Field Secretary for Canada, Rev. Frank W. Pratt. Auditors, Grenvole 
H. NoRCROSS,* Walter S. Fox*; Publication Agent, C. L. Stebbins; 
Librarian, Louis C. Cornish.* 

J9o0ton ^fllce. 

25 Beacon Street. 

President's Secretary, Miss Helen F. Pettes; Treasurer's Clerk, Miss Flora L. 
Close; Reception Room Clerk, Miss Henrietta S. Rogers; Stenographers, 
Mrs. Alice B. Hatheway ; Miss M. Louise Paon ; Miss Marie W. John- 
son; Assistant Librarian, Miss Louise Garland; Telephone Clerk, Miss 
Edwina H. Jewett; Shipping and Billing Clerk, J. Henry Sonntag; En- 
gineer and Janitor, Washington Mills; Assistant Janitor, Wendell P. 
Smith. 

(For officers in charge of Unitarian Book-room, see page ii6.) 

Cbicago 9(Rce. 

175 Dearborn Street. 

Clerk of Book-room and Stenographer, Miss Lin a Scheible.|| 

104 East soth Street. 
Clerk of Book-room and Stenographer, Miss Florence M. Bischoff. 

San #tancf0co ^fnce* 

Corner Geary and Franklin Streets. 
Clerk of Book-room, Mrs. Mary B. Presson. 

* Without stipend. t One-half salary from Middle States Conference. 

t Salary paid by Western Conference. 

II Salary paid by Unitarian Sunday-School Society and Western Conference 



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AMERICAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATION. 



Historv '^^ American Unitarian Association was formally organ- 
^* ized on May 25, 1825. Before the year 1825 there existed 
in Boston a club of some twenty liberal-minded and public-spirited 
citizens organized for social and philanthropic purposes. This club 
was in the habit of meeting fortnightly for the discussion of subjects 
relating to religion, morals, and civic order. At a meeting held in 
January, 1825, at the residence of Hon. Josiah Quincy, a discussion 
arose concerning the advisability of forming an association to publish 
books and tracts setting forth the opinions and principles of the liberal 
party in the Congregational churches. On motion of Andrews Norton 
a committee of the club was appointed to consider the expediency of 
forming such an association. This committee reported at a meeting 
held in the vestry of the Federal Street Church on Jan. 27, 1825. 
There were present at the meeting Dr. Channing, Henry Ware, An- 
drews Norton, Joseph May, Charles Lowell, Charles G. Loring, John 
G. Palfrey, James Walker, Robert Rantoul, Richard Sullivan, George 
Bond, Josiah Quincy, Joseph Tuckerman, Robert Waterston, Samuel 
A. Eliot, Jared Sparks, John Pierpont, David Reed, Aaron Bancroft, 
James Freeman, Joseph Story, Leverett Staltonstall, and Stephen Hig- 
g^nson, with others prominent in the intellectual and social life of the 
city. These were men of conservative habit, and wont to lay more 
stress upon the virtues of breadth of mind, moderation, integrity, hos- 
pitality and generosity than upon doctrinal accuracy. They were not 
men who cared to try hazardous experiments, but they believed that 
the time had arrived for the organization of the liberal forces of the 
New England churches. The object of the proposed association was 
declared to be " to promote the growth of Christian truth and Christian 
charity, and the increase of religion in the land." 

The proposal of the Club to organize a Unitarian Association was 
brought before the ministers of the Berry Street Conference on the 



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morning of May 25, 1825. The Conference did not think it proper to 
take any action on the subject, but notice was given that a meeting of 
gentlemen would be held for the consideration of the proposition in the 
vestry of the Federal Street Church at four o'clock in the afternoon. 
Rev. Henry Ware, D.D., was chosen moderator at this meeting; and 
after discussion it was voted " that it is expedient to form a new society 
to be called the American Unitarian Association." Rev. James Walker, 
Rev. Ezra S. Gannett, and Mr. Louis Tappan were appointed a 
committee to carry the preceding vote into effect On the following 
morning, at a meeting of which Rev. Nathaniel Thayer, D.D., was 
moderator, this committee reported a constitution which, with slight 
modifications, is still in force. The object of this Association was by 
this constitution declared to be ** to diffuse the knowledge and promote 
the interest of pure Christianity." Dr. Channing was elected president. 
Rev. Ezra S. Gannett, secretary, and Mr.' Louis Tappan, treasurer. 
The vice-presidents were Joseph Story, of Salem, Joseph L3rman, of 
Northampton, Stephen Longfellow, of Portland, and six others ; while 
James Walker, Henry Ware, Jr., and Samuel Barrett were chosen an 
executive committee. Dr. Channing was obliged by ill-health to de- 
cline to serve; and Dr. Aaron Bancroft, of Worcester, was chosen 
president in his place. The Association thus organized has ever since 
been the executive arm of the Unitarian body. It was incorporated 
in 1847, ^^^ made a delegate body in 1885. 

The objects of the Association as defined in the origi- 
Purpose. nal report of the Committee on Organization are as. fol- 
lows : — 

First, — To collect and diffuse information respecting the state of 
Unitarian Christianity in our coimtry. 

Second. — ^To produce union, sympathy, and co-operation among 
Liberal Christians. 

Third. — To publish and distribute books and tracts, inculcating cor- 
rect views of religion, in such form and at such price as shall afford 
all an opportunity of being acquainted with Christian truth. 



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Fourth. — To supply missionaries, especially in such parts of our 
country as are destitute of a stated ministry. 

Fifth. — ^To adopt whatever other measures may hereafter seem ex- 
pedient, such as contributions in behalf of clergymen with insufficient 
salaries or in aid of building churches. 

Government* The Association is governed by the following By- 
laws : — 

Article I. The object of the American Unitarian Association shall 
be to diffuse the knowledge and promote the interests of pure Chris- 
tianity; and all Unitarian Christians shall be invited to unite and co- 
operate with it for that purpose. 

Art. II. A subscription of fifty dollars shall constitute a person a 
member of this Association for life. 

Art. III. Those contributing to the funds of this Association shall 
be entitled to representation under the following conditions, namely : — 

Any church or missionary association, of at least two years* stand- 
ing, not being in arrears of debt to the American Unitarian Association 
or the Church Building Loan Fund, shall, upon sending a contribution 
for missionary uses to the Treasurer of the Association for two succes- 
sive years, be entitled to representation at all business meeting^ of the 
Association by the persons or its minister or president and two addi- 
tional lay del^^ates; provided that such contributions shall be placed 
in the hands of the officers of the Association on or before May i, to 
entitle a church to be represented in the following annual meeting. 

Art. IV. The Board of Directors may by a unanimous vote at a 
regular meeting, two-thirds of their number being present, elect Honor- 
ary Members of this Association, who shall have the same rights and 
privileges as other members. Such elections shall be by ballot, and 
nominations shall lie over at least one month. 

Art. V. The officers shall be a President, six Vice-Presidents, — 
one of whcHn at the time of his election shall be from Northern New 
England, one from Southern New England, one from the Middle 
States, one from the Southern States, one from the Central West, and 
one from the Pacific Coast, — a Secretary and one or more Assistant 
Secretaries, a Treasurer, and eighteen other persons, who, with them, 
shall constitute a Board of Directors. These officers, of whom sixteen 
shall be la3rmen, shall be chosen by ballot at the annual meeting. The 
President, Vice-Presidents, Secretaries, and Treasurer shall be chosen 



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annually, to serve for one year or until their successors shall be chosen. 
The eighteen other persons, of whom three shall be women, shall be 
chosen for three years or until their successors shall be chosen; and 
one-third shall be chosen annually. 

Art. VI. This Board shall meet at least once in three months, eight 
constituting a quorum, and shall have charge of all the business and 
interests of the Association, the direction of its funds and operations, 
with power to fill any vacancies that may occur in their number be- 
tween any two annual meetings and to call special meetings of the Cor- 
poration whenever they shall deem it necessary or expedient. 

They may choose from their own number an Executive Committee, 
which shall meet at the call of the President or Secretary, and shall 
have charge of such business as may be intrusted to it by the Board 
of Directors. 

Art. VII. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep a full 
record of the meetings of the Corporation and of the Board of 
Directors; to conduct the correspondence of the Association, and 
to keep an accurately arranged file of the same; and, in general, to 
perform such services, to suggest, devise, and execute, under the 
direction of the Board of Directors, such plans and measures as shall, 
in their judgment, tend to promote the objects of the Association, 
increase its usefulness, and enlarge the sphere of its influence; and 
the Assistant Secretaries shall render such service as shall be specified 
by the Board of Directors. The salaries of the Secretaries shall be 
determined annually by the Board of Directors, the Secretaries not 
voting. 

Art. VIII. The annual meeting of the Association shall be held in 
the month of May, at such time and place as the Board of Directors 
may appoint, of which due notice shall be given, by circulars to the 
churches and by advertisement in two or more newspapers published 
in Boston at least ten days previous. 

Art. IX. Any amendment of these articles proposed at one annual 
meeting may be adopted at the next, if a majority of the members 
present vote in favor of it. 

In practice the Board of Directors meets on the second Tuesday of 
every month except July and August. 

The Association at its national headquarters, 25 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass., furnishes office room, without rent, to the Unitarian 
Sunday-School Society, the National Alliance of Unitarian Women, the 



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Unitarian Temperance Society, the Young People's Religious Union, 
the Committee on the Supply of Pulpits, and other denominational and 
benevolent societies. 

The building also contains a Reception Room, a Library and Read- 
ing-room, Channing Hall, with seats for three hundred, and Committee 
Rooms of various sizes. The Hall anH Committee Rooms are at the 
service of Unitarians for denominational meetings of all kinds, arrange- 
ments for such use to be made with the Assistant Secretary. 

The Association is the chief executive arm of the 
Administration. Unitarian churches. It works in close co-operation 
with the National Conference and other denomina- 
tional organizations, and it accepts the platform of the National Con- 
ference as a declaration of its own spirit and purpose. 

The Association is a representative body. It is the expression of 
the working purposes and hopes of its constituents. It has no power 
beyond that which is derived from the support and co-operation of the 
churches. 

The Association is thoroughly national in its spirit and missionary 
endeavor. The governing board represents all parts of the country. 

The work of the Association is supported by the voluntary contribu- 
tions of the churches and individuals interested in the cause it repre- 
sents. The income of the unrestricted endowment suffices to pay all 
the expenses of administration. 

The work of the Association is carried on in ten de- 
Dcpartments. partments under the direction of the Standing Com- 
mittees of the Board of Directors. 

The Committee on Finance, in co-operation with the Treas- 
FiNANCE. urer, has charge of the property of the Association. The 

members of the Committee by their advice assist the Treas- 
urer in his investments and in the conduct of the business side of the 
corporation as distinguished from missionary endeavors. The Com- 
mittee considers and reports to the Board on matters relating to the 
financial conditions, requirements, and prospects of the Association. 



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The Gofcmittce oo Psbuc ati oos has charge of all mat- 
PUBUCATiox. ters rcJatin*;^ to the prirrtirsg and cfistribntioa of books 
and tracts ixiten<^ed for free <fis 4ii bmioo^ and exercises 
a genera] snperrtsioa over the affairs cf the PdbGcatioa Department 
The fist of publications of the Assodatica and of the free tracts will 
be sent npon application to the Pabacatioa Agent. The Association 
distribotes about 40oxxx> tracts anmnUr together with 45,000 copies of 
the monthly boDetin IFord and U^crk, 13.000 copies of the Amraal Re- 
port, and 3/xx> copies of the Un i tarian Year Book. Charnitng^s Works 
are given away to settled ministers and theological students who apply 
for them. The pablications of the Association and all religioas works 
by Unitarian writers may be obtained at the Book-rooms in Boston, 
. New York, Chicago, and San Francisco. 

The Publicity Department has for its special work the 
PUBUCITY. diffusion of Unitarian principles throt^ the medium of 
the puUic press. It establishes and extends the Paragraph 
Pulpit method of declaring the liberal religious message. It cooperates 
with ministers and churches in carrying out plans of local publicity 
work. It provides the press with a monthly news sheet of articles 
pertaining to the Unitarian movement It sedcs in all ways to reach 
the larger audience and to get a wider hearing for the Unitarian gospel. 
This department has charge of the relations of 
FOREIGN RELATIONS, the American Unitarian churches with religious 
liberals in all parts of the world. With the in- 
come of the Ha)rward Fund it aids the Japan Unitarian Association 
and the work of the Hungarian Unitarian churches. It co-operates 
with the International Council of Liberal Religious Thinkers and 
Workers and provides for the administrative expenses of the Council. 
This department has jurisdiction over matters connected 

COICITY AND • 

with the interdenominational interests of the Association. 

VEL.LjOWSH IP 

It co-operates with the State Federations of churches in 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New York, and is repre- 
sented as often as possible by fraternal delegates at the official con- 
ventions of other Christian commtmions. It seeks to substitute co- 
operative for competitive methods in Christian work and to carry out 



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the purpose of the Association to foster union and sympathy among 
Liberal Christians. 

The G>nimittee on Education deals with matters con- 
EDUCATiON. nected with the preparation of young men for the min- 
istry, and the increase of efficient ministers in the denomi- 
nation. It administers the income of the Perkins Fellowship Fund, 
the Billings Lectureship Fund, and the Frothingham Fund for schools 
for the colored people in the South. It aids in the work of the 
churches established at academic centres and at the seats of the leading 
State imiversities. It encourages the maintenance of non-sectarian 
schools for boys and girls, and administers endowments for such pur- 
poses. 

This department represents the work under the 
CHURCH EXTENSION, care of the Committees on New England States, 
Middle States and Canada, Southern States, 
Western States, Rocky Motmtain States, and Pacific States, and has 
jurisdiction in all matters relating to the organization and assistance of 
churches and the opening of new fields of missionary labor. 

More than one-half of all the existing Unitarian churches owe their 
being to the work of the Association, and nearly all Unitarian churches 
have at one time or another known the fostering care of the national 
organization. At present the Association aids in supporting over one 
hundred churches and missions as centres of Unitarian thought and in- 
fluence. 

In making appropriations, the committees of the directors of the As- 
sociation have the systematic advice of the officers of all local con- 
ferences, and particularly of four special boards which meet annually 
before the meetings of the directors at which appropriations are to be 
made, or of tener if there be special need of their counsel. These special 
boards are : — 

I. The New England Missionary Council, which meets in Boston and 
which consists of the presidents and secretaries of the local conferences 
in New England, together with the officers of the Association and the 
field secretary for New England. 



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2. The directors of the Unitarian Conference of the Middle States 
and Canada. 

3. The Southern Missionary Council, which consists of duly elected 
delegates from the States comprised in the Southern Conference and 
the President, Secretary, or other representative of the Association. 

4. The Western Missionary Council, which consists of duly elected 
delegates from all State or local conferences within the territory of the 
Western Conference, the secretary of the Western Conference, and an 
officer of the Association. 

The aim of this Department is to promote in our 
SOCIAL AND PUB- ^y^ches the study of social problems ; to encourage 

L.IC SERVICE 

them to undertake positive and definite works which 
will contribute to their solution ; and to cultivate closer and more sym- 
pathetic relations between the churches and the wage earners. It 
serves as a bureau of information on social subjects. It maintains a 
library for the use of those who are interested in social questions. It 
publishes a monthly bulletin designed chiefly to give a more general 
circulation to articles having social value which otherwise may not be 
easily accessible. It affiliates with social and philanthropic movements, 
and strives to interpret them to the churches. 

The Committee on New Americans cares for mat- 
NEW AMERICANS, tcrs conucctcd with missionary work and the estab- 
lishment of churches among Americans of foreign 
birth or speech, and particularly aids in the work of the Norwegian, 
Swedish, and Icelandic Unitarian churches in the North-western States. 
The Committee on Ministerial Aid administers the 
MINISTERIAL AID. iucomc of the Ministerial Aid Fund and the Re- 
becca Bennett Warren Fund, and seeks to relieve 
the necessities of poor and worthy ministers and the widows of min- 
isters. 

The Library of the Association, housed in the building at 
LIBRARY. 25 Beacon Street, aims to maintain a complete collection of 
books and pamphlets written by Unitarians or concerned 
with Unitarian activities and history. 



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The Committee on the Church Building Loan 
CHURCH BUILDING ^yxvid. administers the income of a fund whose 

LOAN FUND .... ^ ^ o r .i. r 

pnnapal is now $147,269.08 for the puqxjse of 
aiding Unitarian societies in the erection of church buildings. The 
fund is administered imder the following rules: 

1. The Church Building Loan Fund shall be kept as a separate fund, 
and shall be administered by a standing committee of the board of di- 
rectors, consisting of the treasurer and two other directors appointed by 
him annually at the June meeting of the board, and who shall serve for 
one year and until their successors are appointed. No executive officer 
of the board other than the vice-presidents shall be eligible to such ap- 
pointment. 

2. No money from the fund shall be bestowed as a gift, and all loans 
shall be made on security satisfactory to the committee. 

3. Every application for a loan shall be submitted by the treasurer, 
before action thereon, to the president and to the secretary of the 
Association for the purpose of securing to the committee information 
and suggestions from them upon the application. 

4. Loans from the fund and changes in the terms thereof shall be 
made only by the unanimous vote of the committee upon such terms 
and conditions as it determines. 

5. Not more than half the whole value of the building and the land on 
which it stands shall be loaned from this fund ; nor shall any loan be 
made unless it suffices to clear the property of all other indebtedness. 

6. Loans not exceeding $10,000 may be made from this fund, with 
or without interest, as shall be determined in each case ; but, in every 
case, provision shall be made for the annual repayment of not less than 
ten per cent, of the sum loaned, and interest may be charged at a rate 
not exceeding six per cent, per annum on such portion as may be in de- 
fault from the time it falls due until its payment. 

7. In return for every loan the committee shall take the note of the 
society, with such personal indorsement or guaranty thereof as it shall 
deem satisfactory, said note to be secured also by a mortgage on the 
church property. 

8. The committee shall report at each monthly meeting of the board 
of directors the loans made by it since the last prior meeting, with a 
brief statement of the terms of each loan, a statement of each loan re- 
jected by it and the reason therefor, and the condition of each loan in 
default. 

9. All votes of the board instructing the committee, or modifying or 
reversing its action, shall be taken by a yea and nay vote. 

All communications concerning loans should be addressed to Francis 
H. Lincoln. Treasurer, 53 State Street, Boston, Mass. 



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DELEGATE SOCIETIES. 



The following societies, having sent "a contribution for missionary uses to the Treas- 
urer of the Association for two successive years/' are entitled to representation at all 
business meetings of the American Unitarian Association during the year: — 



Alameda, Cal. 
Albany, N.Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Andover, N.H. 
Andover, North, Mass. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Ashby, Mass. 
Athol, Mass.: — 

Second Unitarian Society. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Augusta, Me. 
Ayer, Mass. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bangor, Me. 
Barnstable, Mass. 
Barre, Mass. 
Bath, N.H. 
Bedford, Mass. 
Belfast, Me. 
Belmont, Mass. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Berlin, Mass. 
Bemardston, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Billerica, Mass. 
Bolton, Mass. 
Boston, Mass.: 

First Parish. Dorchester. 

First Church. 

First Religious Society, 
Roxbuiy. 

Second Church. 

King's Chapel. 

First Parish, W. Roxbury. 

Arlington Street Church. 

First Parish, Brixton. 

First Congregational So- 
ciety, Jamaica Plain. 



Third Religious Society, 

Dorchester. 
Hawes Unitarian Congi 

Church, South Boston. 
Bulfinch Place Church. 
South Cong! Church. 
Church of the Disciples. 
Church of Our Father, 

East Boston. 
Christ Church, Dorchester. 
All Souls* Church, Rox- 
bury. 
Church of the Unity, Ne- 

ponset. 
New South Church. 
Norfolk Unitarian Church. 
Unitarian Church, Roslin- 

dale. 
Channing Church, Dor- 
chester. 
Braintree, Mass. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Brewster, Mass. 
Bridge water, Mass. 
Bridgewater, East, Mass. 
Bridgewater, West, Mass. 
Brockton, Mass. 
Brookfield, Mass. 
Brookline, Mass.: — 
First Parish. 

Second Unitarian Society. 
Brooklyn, Conn. 
Buffalo, N.Y.:— 
First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society. 
Burlington, Vt 
Cambridge, Mass.: — 
First Parish. 
Third Cong! Society. 



Canton, Mass. 
Carlisle, Mass. 
Castine, Me. 
Charleston, S.C. 
Charlestown, N.H. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
Chicago, 111.: — 

Unity Church. 

Third Unitarian Church. 

All Souls* Church. 

Swedish Unitarian Church. 
Chicopee, Mass. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Geveland, Ohio. 
Ginton, Mass. 
Cohasset, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 
Concord, N.H. 
Cornish, N.H. 
Dallas, Tex. 
Danvers, Mass. 
Davenport, la. 
Dedham. Mass. 
Deerfield, Mass. 
Denver, Col. 
Derby^ Conn. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Dighton, Mass. 
Dover, Mass. 
Dover, N.H. 
Dublin, N.H. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Duxbury. Mass. 
Easton, Mass.: — 

Congregational Parish. 

Society at North Easton. 
Eastport, Me. 
Elizabeth, N.J. 



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Ellsworth, Me. 
Eric, Pa. 
Exeter. N.H. 
Fairhaven, Mass. 
Fall River, Mass. 
Fannington, Me. 
Fitcfabarg, Mass. 
rttzwUHam, N.H. 
Flushing, N.Y. 
Framingham, Mass. 
Franklin, N.H. 
Gardner, Mass. 
Gencseo, III. 
Gloucester, Mass. 
Gouvemeur, N.Y. 
Grafton, Mass. 
Greclw, Col. 
Greenfield, Mass. 
Groton, Mass. 
Hackensack, NJ. 
Hanska, Minn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Harvard, Mass. 
Haverhill, Mass. 

Highland Springs, Va. 

Hingham, Mass.: — 
First Parish. 
Second Parish. 
Third Cong'l Society. 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Hopedale, Mass. 

Houlton, Me. 

Hubbardston, Mass. 

Hudson. Mass. 

Hyde Park, Mass. 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ithaca, N.Y. 

Jacksonville, Fla. 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Kansas Citr. Mo. 

Kecie, N.H. 

Kennebunk. Me. 

Kingston, Mass. 

Laconia, N.H. 

Lancaster, Mass. 

Lancaster. Pa. 

Lawrence, Kan. 

Lawrence. Mass. 

Lebanon. N.H. 

Leominster, Mass. 

Lexington, Mass. 

Lexington, East, Mass. 



Littleton, Mass. 
Littleton, N.H. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Luverne, Minn. 
Lynn, Mass. 
Nfadison, Wis. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Manchester, Mass. 
Manchester, N.H. 
Marietta, Ohio. 
Marlboro, Mass. 
Marshfield, Mass.: — 

Second Cong'l Society. 

Grace Chapel. 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Meadvifle, Pa. 
Medfield. Mass. 
Med ford, Mass. 
Melrose, Mass. 
Middleboro. Mass. 
Middlesex, Vt. 
Milford, N. H. 
Millbury, Mass. 
Milton, Mass. 
Milwaukee. Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn. : — 

First Unitarian Church. 

Free Christian Church. 
Montague, Mass.: — 

First Unitarian Society. 
Montclair, N.J. 
Montpelier. Vt. 
Montreal. Can. 
Nantucket. Mass. 
Naples, Me. 
Nashua, N.H. 
Natick, Mass. 
Natick. South. Mass. 
Needham. Mass. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Newburgh, N.Y. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
New London, Conn. 
New Orleans, La. 
Newport, R.I. 
Newton, Mass.: — 

Channing Religious Soc'y. 

Chestnut Hill Society. 

Society at Newton Centre. 

Society at West Newton. 



New York, N.Y.:— 

Church of All Souls. 

Church of the Messiah. 

First Unitarian Society, 
Brooklyn. 

Second Unitarian Society, 
Brooklyn. 

Church of the Redeemer, 
New Brighton. 

Third Unitarian Society, 
Brookljm. 

Fourth Unitarian Society, 
Brookljrn. 
Northampton, Mass.: — 

Second Cong'l Ch. 

Society at Florence. 
Northboro, Mass. 
Northfield, Mass. 
Norton. Mass. 
Norwell, Mass. 
Oakland, Cal. 
Ogden, Utah. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Orange, N.J. 
Ottawa, Can. 
Palo Alto, Cal. 
Passaic, N.J. 
Peabody, Mass. 
Pembroke, Mass. 
Pepperell, Mass. 
Peterboro, N.H. 
Petersham, Mass. 
Philadelphia, Pa.:— 

First Unitarian Church. 

Unitarian Society of Ger- 
mantown. 
Pittsburgh, Pa.:— 

Northside Unitarian Ch. 
Pittsfield. Mass. 
Plainfield, N.J. 
Plymouth, Mass. 
Portland. Me.:— 

First Parish. 
Portland, Ore. 
Portsmouth, N.H. 
Presque Isle. Me. 
Providence, R.I. : — 
First Cong'l Church. 

Westminster CongT Soc'y. 
Quincy, Mass.: — 
First Cong'l Society. 

Wollaston Unit. Soc. 



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Randolph, Mass. 
Reading, Mass. 
Redlands, Cal. 
Richmond, Va. 
Rochester, N.H. 
Rochester, N.Y. 
Rockland, Mass. 
Rowc, Mass. 
Rutherford, N.J. 
Saco, Me. 
St. Louis, Mo.: — 

Church of the Messiah. 

Qiurch of the Unity 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Salem, Mass.: — 

First Conff'l Society. 

Second Church. 

North Society. 
Salem, Ohio. 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 
San Diego, Cal. 
Sandwich, Mass. 
San Francisco, Cal. : — 

First Unitarian Society. 
Santa Ana, Cal. 
Santa Barbara, Cal. 
Schenectady, N.Y. 
Scituate, Mass. 
Shelbyville, 111. 

Jordan Unitarian Church. 
Sherbom, Mass. 
Shirley, Mass. 



Sioux City, la. 
Somerville, Mass.: — 

First Cong'l Society. 

Second Unitarian Society. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Sterling, Mass. 
Stoneham, Mass. 
Stowe, Mass. 
Stowe, Vt. 
Sturbridge, Mass. 
Sudbury, Mass. 
Sullivan, Me. 
Syracuse, N.Y. 
Taunton, Mass. 
Templeton, Mass. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Topeka, Kan 
Toronto, Can. 
Townscnd, West, Mass. 
Trenton, N.Y. 
Troy, N.Y. 
Tjmgsboro, Mass. 
Upton, Mass. 
Urbana, 111. 
Uxbridgc, Mass. 
Vineland, N.J. 
Vineyard Haven, Mass. 
Walpole, Mass. 
Walpole, N.H. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Ware, Mass. 



Warwick, Mass. 
Washington, D.C. 
Watertown, Mass. 
Waterville, Me. 
Waverlcy, Mass. 
Wayland, Mass. 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Westboro, Mass. 
West ford, Mass. 
Weston, Mass. 
Westwood, Mass. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 
Whitman, Mass. 
Wichita, Kan. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Wilton, N.H.:— 

First Congi Church. 

Liberal Christian Church. 
Winchendon, Mass. 
Winchester, Mass. 
Windsor, Vt. 
Winnipeg, Can.: — 

First Icelandic Unitarian 
Church. 
Winthrop, Mass. 
Wobum, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass.:— 

Second Parish. 

Church of the Unity. 

South Unitarian Society. 
Yarmouth, Me. 
Youngstown, Ohio. 



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LIFE MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN UNITARIAN 

ASSOCIATION. 



The By-laws of the Association provide that "a subscription of $50 shall constitute 
a person a member for life"; and the following named 2483 persons now occupy that 
position, of whom 67 (those whose names are in Italics) have been added since the list 
was last printed in the Year Book for 190B. Should any one find in the list the name 
of a person not living, a favor will be conferred by communicating the fact to the Sec- 
retary of the Association. 



Allen, Charles A. 
Ames, Charles G., D.D. 
Anderson, George S. 
Austin, J. Worsiey 
Backus, Wilson M. 
Badger, George H. 
Baglcy, Mrs. Blanche P. 
Bailey, Alvin F. 
Bailey, Benjamin H. 
Baker, Seward 
Baltzly, John 
Barber, Henry H. 
Barker, John W. 
Barnes, William S. 
Batchelor, George 
Beach, Seth C, D.D. 
Beane, Samuel C, D.D. 
Beane, Samuel C, Jr. 
Beers, Wayland L. 
Bellows, Russell N. 
Billings, Charles T. 
Birks, Alfred W. 
Bixby, James T., Ph.D. 
Blake, James Vila 
Blanchard, Henry, D.D. 
Bodge, George M. 
Bolles, Edwin C, D.D. 
Bowen, Duane V. 
Bowser, Alexander T. 
Boynton, Richard W. 
Branigan, William H. 
Brooke, Stopford Wentworth 
Brooks, Arthur A. 
Brown, Alfred H. 



MINISTERS. 

Brown, Howard N. 
Brown, Lincoln E. 
Brown, Thomas W. 
Brown, William 
Brown, William C. 
Buck, Charles W. 
Buckshorn, Lduis H. 
Bulkeley, Benjamin R. 
Burton, William S. 
Butler, Ellery C. 
Bygrave, Hilary 
Calthrop, Samuel R. 
Carpenter, Carlos C. 
Catlin, Hasket D. 
Chaffin, William L. 
Chaney. George L. 
Chase, Joseph A. 
Qark, Hobart 
Collier, H. Price 
Collyer, Robert 
Colman, Richard 
Cooke, George W. 
Coolidge, James I. T., D.D. 
Cornish, Louis C. 
Cressey, George C, D.D. 
Cronvn, David 
Crooker, Joseph H.. D.D. 
Crothers. Samuel M., D.D. 
Culp, Adam J. 
Cummings, Edward 
Cutter, George W. 
Day, Edward 
Day, John B. W. 
Day, John W. 



De Long, Henry C 
De Normandie, Courtland Y. 
De Normandie, James, D.D. 
Dinsmore, Edward F. 
Dole, Charles F., D.D. 
Douthit, Jasper L. 
Drummond, Chester A. 
Duncan, James C. 
Dutton, Caleb S.S. 
Eells, James 
Elder, Charles B.. D.D. 
Eliot, Christopher R. 
Eliot, Samuel A., D.D. 
Eliot, Thomas L., D.D. 
Farwell, Herbert C. 
Fenn, William W., D.D. 
Fish, William H. 
Foote, Henry W. 
Forbes, John P. 
Forbes, Roger S. 
Freeman, D. Roy 
Frothingham, Paul R. 
Furman, William F. 
Gallagher, George W. 
Gannett, William C, D.D. 
Garver, Austin S. 
Gauld, Frederic J. 
Geoghegan, William B. 
GifFord, Elisha 
Gill, Frederic 
Gilman, Bradley 
Gilman, Nicholas P. 
Gilmore, Frank A. 
Goldsmith, Peter H., D.D. 



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82 



Gooding, Alfred 
Goodridge, Benjamin A. 
Green, Edward 
Green, Henry M. 
Greenman, Lyman M. 
Greenman, Walter F. 
Hale, Edward 
Hall, Edward H., D.D. 
Hamlet, Samuel 
Hathaway, George A. 
Hayward, Edward F. 
Hayward, Lawrence 
Hodgins, James C. 
Holden, Francis W. 
Holmes, John H. 
Horner, Thomas J. 
Horton, Edward A. 
Hosmer, Frederick L., D.D. 
Howard, Thomas D. 
Hudson, John W. 
Hultin. Miss Ida C 
Humphreys, Charles A. 
Hussey, Alfred R. 
Huxtable, James 
Jackson, Abraham W., D.D. 
Jaynes, Julian C. 
Jenks, Henry F. 
Jones, Jenkin L. 
Jones, William M. 
Jones, William S. 
Kent, Frederick H. 
Kent, George W. 
Kent, Josiah C 
Kimball, John C 
Kirkpatrick, David M. 
Knapp, Arthur M. 
Lamb, Francis P. S. 
Latham, H. Edward 
Lathrop, John H. 
Latimer, George D. 
Lawrence, William L 
Leavens, Robert F, 
Leavitt, Bradford 
Lewis, Fred R. 
Limbaugh, Daniel C. 
Littlefield, Arthur W 
Littlefield, George E. 
Locke, Calvin S. 
Lombard, Charles P. 
Lord, Augustus M., D.D. 
Lusk, James T. 
Lutz, Harry 



Lyon, William H., D.D. 
MacCauley, Clay 
Macdonald, Loren B. 
Maglathlin, Edward B. 
Malick, John 
Manchester, Alfred 
Mangasarian, Mangasar M. 
Marsh, John L. 
Mason, L. Walter, D.D. 
McDaniel, Benjamin F. 
McDougall, Henry C. 
Meakin, Frederick 
Metcalf, Joel H. 
Meyer, John F. 
Miller, Milton J. 
Mitchell, H. Sumner 
Mitchell, John C 
Morrison, Robert S. 
Mott, Frederick B. 
Mott, Herbert H. 
Moulton, J. Sidney 
Mullett, Alfred E. 
Newbert, Elmer E. 
Newman, Bernard J. 
Nichols, William L 
Nicholson, Charles F. 
Nicker son, Alfred C. 
Nowell, William G. 
Noyes, Charles 
Osgood, Edmund Q. S. 
Pardee, J. Nelson 
Park, Charles E. 
Parker, Henry C. 
Parker, William H. 
Parrot, William J. 
Patten, George W. 
Payne, Edward B. 
Peabody, Francis G., D.D., 

LL.D. 
Pendleton, Aubrey M. 
Perkins,Charles E. 
Perkins, John C, D.D. 
Phalen, Frank L. 
Phalen, Paul S. 
Phelan, William T. 
Pierce, Granville 
Pierson, William H., D.D. 
Porter, Isaac F, 
Powers, Jesse D. O. 
Pratt, Frank W. 
Prescott, Elvin J. 
Putnam, John J. 



Ramsay, William H. 
Reccord, Augustus P. 
Reid, John D. 
Rich, A. Judson 
Roberts, John W. 
Robinson, Alson H. 
Roys, Cyrus A. 
Russell, Charles F. 
St. Johns, Charles E. 
Sanborn, Moore 
Saunderson, Henry H. 
Savage, John A. 
Savage, Minot J., D.D. 
Savage, Robert W. 
Schermerhom, Martin K. 
Scott, Alva R. 
Scott, John M. 
Seaver, Nathaniel 
Secrist, Henry T. 
Seward, Josiah L., D.D. 
Sheafe, Joseph P. 
Shippen, Eugene R. 
Shippen, Rush R. 
Shurtleff, Afred D. K. 
Simons, Minot O. 
Skerrye, William F. 
Slicer, Thomas R. 
Smith, Augustus D. 
Smith, Ernest C. 
Smith, John S. 
Snyder, John 
Southworth, Franklin C 
Spaulding, Henry G. 
Spence, Albert H., Jr. 
Spencer, Edward G. 
Spencer, William H. 
Sprague, Leslie W. 
Spurr, George B. 
Staples, Charles J. 
Stebbins, Calvin 
Stebbins, Roderick 
Stevens, Henry D. 
Stewart, Samuel B. 
Stone, George W. 
Stoughton, Lewis H. 
Thacher, Philip S. 
Thayer, George A., D.D. 
Thomson, John S. 
Thompson, C. Bertrand 
Tindell, Charles H. 
Towle, Edward D. 
Towne, Edward C. 



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Townscnd, Manley B. 
Utter, David, D.D. 
Van Ness, Thomas 
Walkley, Albert 
Walsh, William L. 
Weathcrly, Arthur L. 
Weld, Charles R., LL.D. 
Wcllman, Charles P. 
Wells, John D. 
Wendte, Charles W., D.D. 
Westall, Henry A. 



White, Albert C 
White, William O. 
Whitmore, James H. 
Whitney, Arthur B. 
Wiers, Edgar S. 
Wilbur, Earl M. 
Williams, Francis C. 
Williams, Theodore C. 
Wilson, D. Munro 
Wilson, John M. 
Wilson, Lewis G. 



Winkley, J. Wingate 
Winkley, Samuel H. 
Withington, George G. 
Wood, Roland A. 
Wood, William A. 
Woude, Henry H. 
Wright, George C. 
Wright, J. Edward, D.D. 
Wright, Merle St C,D.D. 
Young, George H. 



Abbot, Abiel J. 
AWx>tt, Mrs. Elizabeth S. 
Abbot, Miss Margaret J. 
Abbot, William F. 
Abbot, Mrs. William F. 
Adams, Miss Ann D. 
Adams, Austin F. 
Adams, Charles P. 
Adams, Mrs. Charles P. 
Adams, Mrs. Ellen W. 
Adams, Mrs. Emily K. 
Adams, Ernest G. 
Adams, George D. 
Adams, George E. 
Adams, Horatio 
Adams, John F. 
Adams, Mrs. Mary E. 
Adams, Mrs. Mary G. 
Affeld, Miss Charlotte L. 
Agge, William 
Aldrich, Mrs. Clara W. 
Aldrich, Henry M. 
Allen, Miss Abbie H. 
Allen, Charles 
Allen, Charles 
Allen, Edward E. 
Allen, Mrs. Franklin R. 
Allen, George L. L. 
Allen, George O. 
Allen, Mrs. Hannah J. 
Allen, Miss Katherine 
Allen, Miss Linnie M. 
Allen, Mrs. Margaret A. 
Allen, Richard M. 
Allen, Russell C. 
AUen, William S. 



LAY MEMBERS 

Allison, Tames 
Ames, Mrs. Catherine H. 
Ames, Charles W. 
Ames, Mrs. Fanny B. 
Ames, Mrs. Mary Leslie 
Andrews, Miss Abby B. 
Andrews, Mrs. Addison F. 
Andrews, Mrs. Fannie S. 
Andrews, Mrs. Judith W. 
Andrews, Wallace G. 
Angell, Henry C. 
Angell, Mrs. Henry C. 
Annabel, Miss Sarah 
Appleton, Miss Anna E. 
Appleton, Frederick H. 
Apsley, Lewis D. 
Archbald, Edward 
Archer, Frederick W. 
Argo, Mrs. Ernest 
Arnold, Artemas W. 
Arnold, Frederick W. 
Arnold, Mrs. Henrietta 
Ashley, George A. 
Asplin, Mrs. John H. 
Atherton, Percy A. 
Austin, Miss Harriet 
Austin, Herbert 
Ayer, Mrs. Anne M. 
Backus, Mrs. Wilson M. 
Bacon, Miss Mary P. 
Bailey, Mrs. Alvin F. 
Bailey, Mrs. Ella B. 
Bailey, Miss Ellen H. 
Bailey, Mrs. James A. 
Baker, Charles H. 
Baker, Charles T. 



Baker, Mrs. Ellen T. 
Baker, Mrs. George K 
Baker, James M. 
Balch, Alonzo W. 
Balch, Mrs. Mary S. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Anne K 
Baldwin, Miss Charlotte A. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Maud P. 
Baldwin, Thomas W. 
Baldwin, Mrs. William H., Jr. 
Ball, Miss Helen A. 
Ballard, Francis K 
Ballard, John F. 
Ballou, A. A. 
Baltzly, Mrs. John 
Bancroft, Mrs. William H. 
Barker, Mrs. Alice M. 
Barker, Mrs. Annie W. 
Barker, Mrs. Carrie K 
Barker, Charles R. 
Barker, Daniel F. 
Barker, Edward D. 
Barker, Mrs. Emily P. 
Barker, Mrs. Mabel F. 
Barker, Miss Sarah R. 
Barnabee, Henry C. 
Barnard, Mrs. Amelia M. 
Barnard, Mrs. Ethel H. 
Barnard, George A. 
Barnard, Mrs. George A. 
Barnard, George F. 
Barnard, Mrs. George F. 
Barnard, Miss Mary F. 
Barnes. Mrs. Elizabeth F. 
Barrett, Mrs. Edwin S. 
Barrett, Miss Jeanie S. 



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Barrett, Richard F. 
Barrett, Mrs. Richard F. 
Barry, Mrs. Eugene 
Barrv, Mrs. Florence W. 
Bartholomew, John C 
Bartlett, Mrs. D. Bradford 
Bartlett, Miss Fannie 
Bartlett, John J. 
Bartlett, Miss Mary F. 
Bartlett, Schuyler, S. 
Bartley, Frank E. 
Bartley, Mrs. Helen M. 
Batchclder, Mrs. F. Winthrop 
Batchelder, Justus L. 
Batchellor, Daniel 
Batchelor, Mrs. Priscilla C. 
Bates, Harvey C. 
Bates, Horatio D. 
Bates, Samuel W. 
Bates, William C. 
Bazeley, Mrs. Margaret C. 
Beach, Mrs. Seth C. 
Beal, Mrs. Tames H. 
Beals, David T. 
Bean, Henry S. 
Beane, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Beard, Mrs. Jennie L. 
Beard, Miss Stella P. 
Bearsc, Horace M. 
Beatley, Mrs. Oara B. 
Beatley, James A. 
Bedlington, Giarles B. 
Beers, Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Belcher, Henry A. 
Belcher, Mrs. Henry A. 
Bellows, John 
Beman, Roy D. 
Bemis, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Benneson, Mrs. Phoebe N. 
Benson, Henry H. 
Bent, George W. 
Bent, Miss Nathalia 
Bigelow, Mrs. Alexander 
Bigelow, Mrs. Giarles R 
Bigelow, Edward L. 
Billings, Miss Abby S. 
Billings, Miss Gara E. 
Billings, Mrs. Fanny A. 
Billings, William R. 
Bingham, Harry F. 
Bingham, Mrs. Kate S. 
Binney, Mrs. Josephine A. 



Birks, Mrs. Alfred W. 
Birtwell, Miss Mary L. 
Bishop, Frederick H. 
Bishoprick, Mrs. Nicholas J. 
Bisco, Henry 
Blackman, Mrs. Edwin 
Blackmar, Mrs. Wilmon W. 
Blaisdell, George A. 
Blakely, Mrs. Florence W. 
Blanchard, Miss Alice 
Blanchard, Miss Alice 
Blanchard, Mrs. Arabella 
Blanchard, Mrs. Charles F. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Frances A. 
Blanchard, Fred 
Blanchard, Mrs. Fred 
Blanchard, Gardner 
Blanchard, George G. 
Blanchard, Mrs. George G. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Lizzie 
Blanchard, Mrs. Lucy K. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Mary R. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Walter S. 
Blight, Atherton ^ 
Blood, Charles H. 
Blossom, Harold H. 
Blossom, Miss Katherine E. 
Bodge, Mrs. George M. 
Bond, Mrs. Charles H. 
Bond, Charles L. 
Bond, Daniel W. 
Bond, Miss Edith L. 
Bond, Mrs. Henry F. 
Bond, Miss Mildred M. 
Bond, Miss Nanney S. 
Borden, Nathaniel B. 
Bothfeld, Henry E. 
Bothfeld, Mrs. Henry E. 
Bourne, James N. 
Bouve, Walter L. 
Bouvc Mrs. Walter L. 
Bowditch. Mrs. Elizabeth F. 
Bowen, Mrs. Cordelia J. 
Bowen, Miss Lilian 
Bowen, Mrs. Tully D. 
Bowers, Miss Marietta H. 
Bowker, Mrs. Carrie H. 
Bowles, Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Bowles, Samuel 
Boyd, Miss Caro B. 
Boyd, Mrs. Harriet T. 
Boyd, Mrs. Joseph 



Boyden, Albert 
Boyden, Mrs. Amy L. 
Boyden, Roland W. 
Brackett, Miss Ellen 
Brackctt, Mrs. Frank D. 
Brackett, George C 
Brackctt, Harry B. 
Brackett, Miss Mary A. 
Bradford, Miss Annie 
Bradford, Edward E. 
Bradford, Mrs. Ruth A. 
Bradley, Miss Abby A. 
Bradley, Mrs. Arthur 
Bradley, Miss Harriet 
Bradley, Mrs, Peter B. 
Bradstreet, Josiah F. 
Bradt, David H. 
Branigan, Mrs. Eunice W. 
Brazer, Ralph F. 
Brazer, William P. 
Brazer, Mrs. William P. 
Brewer, Miss Fanny 
Brickelmaier, John B. 
Brigffs, Lyman P. 
Brigham, Albert W. 
Brigham, Caleb L, 
Brigham, Charles F. 
Brigham, Mrs. Edwin H. 
Brigham, Miss Lucy F. 
Brigham, William T. 
Brigham, William T. 
Bright, Joseph M. 
Bright, Mrs. Nellie C 
Brock, Mrs. Eli 
Brooks, Edwin L. 
Brooks, Miss Martha H. 
Brooks, Mrs. Sumner A. 
Brotchie, Miss Ella M. 
Brotchie, Everett A. 
Brotchie, Miss Harriet M. 
Brown, Andrew C. 
Brown, Earle 
Brown, Edwin 
Brown, Frederick H. 
Brown, Miss Elizabeth W. 
Brown, Miss Ethel J. 
Brown, Mrs. Frank F. 
Brown, George P. 
Brown, George W. 
Brown, Gerdon A. 
Brown, Henry A, 
Brown, Henry L. 



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Brown, Mrs. Howard N. 
Brown, Howard W. 
Brown, Mrs. John 
Brown, John, 2d 
Brown, J. Conklin 
Brown, J. Stewart 
Brown, Lorenzo F. 
Brown, Mrs. MariannaM. £. 
Brown, Miss Mary 
Brown, Miss Mary L. 
Brown, Mrs. Rosa H. 
Brown, Mrs. Sylvia R. 
Brown, William H. 
Brown, Mrs. William H. 
Browne, T. Quincy 
Brownell, Mrs. M. R. 
Brush, Mrs. Mary K 
Bryant, Charles B. 
Buck, Waldo E. 
Bock, Mrs. Waldo E. 
Buckishom, Mrs. Louis H. 
Buffington, Miss Mabel 
Buffum, Charles C. 
Bulkeley, Mrs. Benjamin R. 
Bullard, Alfred M. 
Bullard, Mrs. Florence E. 
Bullock, Alexander H. 
BuUock, Chandler 
Bullock, Mrs. Florence A. 
Bullock, Rockwood H. 
Bullock, Mrs. Rockwood H. 
Bunker, Alfred 
Bunker, Mrs. Cordelia M. 
Burbank, Albion 
Burdick, Marcus M. 
Burgess, Miss Ella T. 
Burleigh, Mrs. Sarah D. 
Burrage, Charles H. 
Burrill, Charles L. 
Burton, Mrs. Frances V. 
Bush, Miss Elodie 
Bush, Miss Natalie 
Bush-Brown, Mrs. Margaret 

L. 
Buss, Mrs. George S. 
Butler, Mrs. Caroline M. 
Butler, Howard F. 
Butler, Miss Maria C 
Butler, William A. 
Butrick, Frank D. 
Buttcrficld, Miss Agnes B. 
Butterick, Miss Mary E. 



Butters, Miss Kate 

Butter worth, Mrs. Antoinette 

S. 
Button, Mrs. Conyers 
Butts, Thomas W. 
Cabot, Mrs. Ella 
Cabot, Miss Harriet S. 
Cain, Aldo 

Calder, Mrs. Albert L. 
Calder, Miss Dora G. 
Calder, George B. 
Caldwell, Frank C. 
Calef, Mrs. A. Howard 
CaU, Mrs. Sarah E. J. 
Callender, Miss Caroline S. 
Camp, Thomas J. 
Campbell, James L. 
Canl^, Miss Louisa P. 
Capen, Charles J. 
Carpenter, Mrs. H. Bernard 
Carpenter, Miss Lena L. 
Carret, Miss Josephine F. 
Carswell, Mrs. Charles W. 
Carter, Charles E. 
Carter, Mrs. Charles E. 
Carter, Miss Edith H. 
Carter, Solon A. 
Carver, Mrs. Mary L. 
Cary, Miss Alice B. 
Cary, George L. 
Cary, Isaac H. 
Case, Mrs. James B. 
Case, Miss Louisa W. 
Case, Miss Marion R. 
Cassels, Arthur F. 
Cassels, Mrs. John 
Castle, Miss Kaiherine 
Gate, Mrs. Delia E. 
Catlin, Mrs. Charles T. 
Chadboume, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Chadwick, Mrs. Annie H. 
Chadwick, Austin K. 
Chailin, Mrs. Rebecca H. 
Chamberlain, Charles A. 
Chamberlain, Frank H. 
Chamberlain, Miss Maria 
Chamberlain, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Chamberlin, Mrs. E. F. P. 
Chamberlin, Thomas E. 
Chandler, Charles L. 
Chandler, Garencc A. 
Chandler, Mrs. Clarence A. 



Chandler, Mrs. Lydia F. 
Chandler, Mrs. Mary M. 
Chandler, Mrs. William E. 
Chaney, Mrs. George L. 
Channing, Miss Ellen 
Chapman, Miss Isabel M. 
Chapman, Mrs, Jessie S, 
Chapman, Marvin A. 
Chapman, William O. 
Chapman, William O. 
Chase, Mrs. Caleb 
Cheever, Miss Almira L. 
Chenery, Winthrop L. 
Chickering, Munroe 
Child, Mrs. Charlotte A. 
Child, Henry L. 
Childs, Mrs. Hannah M. 
Childs, William K. 
Christie, Francis A., D.D. 
Church, Edward A. 
Churchill, Mrs. C M. S. 
Gapp, Miss Abby C. 
Qapp, Miss Ann E. 
Qapp, Miss Charlotte E. C. 
Clapp, Mrs. Frederick W. 
Gapp, Miss Helen 
Gapp, J. Wilkinson 
Gapp, Robert P. 
Clark, Alvah W. 
Gark, Dayton P. 
Clark, Mrs. Ella A. 
Gark, Mrs. Everett O. 
Gark, Mrs. Frederick S. 
Gark, Mrs. Harriet R 
Gark, Miss Harriet E. 
Gark, Mrs. Hattie P. 
Gark, Lowell 

Clarke, Miss Ann Frances 
Garke, Miss Cora H. 
Clarke, Eliot C. 
Clarke, Miss Lilian F. 
Clarkson, Miss Annie L. 
Geveland, Mrs. Mary E. 
Gewley, Mrs. Lucy 
Clifford, Charles W. 
Gose, Miss Flora L. 
Goyes, Mrs. Joseph C. 
Cohh, John Candler 
Cobum, Mrs. Albert E. 
Cobum, Alonzo A. 
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Coburn, Giarles H. 
Cobarn, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Coburn, Miss Emily F. 
Coburn, Mrs. Fanny L. 
Coburn, Miss Florence M. 
Coburn, Miss Harriet 
Coburn, Miss Hattie B. 
Coburn, Mrs. Horace B. 
Coburn, Raymond W. 
Coburn, Thomas E. 
Coburn, Walter 
Coburn, Mrs. William H. 
Codman, Mrs. Abbie F. T. 
Coffin, Miss Mary E. 
Coffin, Winthrop O. 
Coggins, Paschal H. 
Cogswell, Mrs. Helen B. P. 
Colburn, Mrs. Anna S. 
Colhy, William R, 
Cole, Miss Charlotte C. 
Cole, E. Edward 
Collamore, Miss Helen 
Collins, Charles A. 
Collins, Edward, Jr. 
Collins, Mrs. Helen A. 
Collyer, Mrs. Gertrude 
Comstock, Mrs. Philip 
Conant, Mrs. Annie F. 
Conant, Miss Emily 
Conant, Mrs. Lewis K. 
Connor, Miss Mabel 
Connor, Selden 
Cook, Ebed S. 
Cook, George W. 
Cooley, Mrs. Frances A. 
Coolidge, Francis L. 
Coolidge, Mrs. Henry O. 
Coolidge, J. Randolph, Jr. 
Cooper, Henry C. 
Copeland, William A. 
Copeland, Mrs. William A. 
Cordner, Miss Caroline 
Cordner, Miss Elizabeth P. 
Cormerais, John 
Cornish, Leslie C. 
Couch, Benjamin W. 
Coy, Mrs. Lucien W. 
Cram, Mrs. William A. 
Crandell. William T. 
Crane, Amos S. 
Crane, Mrs. Amos S. 
Crane, John P. 
Creesy, Miss Lizzie F. 



Crehorc, Miss Ellen H. 
Cresscy, Mrs. Annette M. R. 
Cressey, Frank 
Crosby, Miss Addie L. 
Crosby, Mrs. Eleanor F. 
Crosby, Mrs. Hannah A. 
Crosby, William S. 
Grossman, Miss Alice 
Crothers, Mrs. Samuel M. 
Cruft, George T. 
Cruft, Miss Harriet O. 
Cuckson, Mrs. John 
Cullum, Edgar P. 
CuUum, Miss Martha S. 
Cullum, Mrs. Mary S. 
Gulp, Mrs. Belle 
Cumings, Miss Annie W. 
Cumings, Mrs. Margaret C. 
Cummings, Miss Louise S. 
Cummings, Mrs. Margaret KL 
Cummins, Mrs. Eleanor S. 
Cummins, Mrs. Mary F. 
Curtis, Charles F. 
Curtis, Mrs. Charles F. 
Curtis, Mrs. Charles W. 
Curtis, Miss Frances H. 
Curtis, Miss Sarah L. 
Curtiss, Elmer L. 
Cutler, Nahum S. 
Cutter, Mrs. Abram E. 
Gutter, Mrs. George B. 
Cutter, Mrs. James P. 
Cutter, Miss Susan E. 
Cutting, Charles A. 
Cutting, Edward L. 
Cutting, Mrs. Edward L. 
Cutting, Miss Emma L. 
Cutting, Marshall J. 
Cutting, Miss Sadie M. 
Dadmun, William E. 
Dakin. Alfred B. C. 
Dall, Mrs. Caroline H. 
Daly, Mrs. Clara K. 
Daly, Mrs. Elizabeth T. 
Daly, James H. 
Daly, James M. 
Daly, M. Ordway 
Dalzell, Mrs. Helen L. 
Damon, Mrs. David H. 
Damon, Mrs. Edward C. 
Damon, Miss Emily F. 
Damon, Miss Fannie C. 
Damon, Mrs. Lizzie E. 



Damon, Mrs. Samuel G. 
Dane, Mrs. Nathan, Jr. 
Dane, Mrs. Zerviah B. 
Daniel, Miss Mary E. 
Daniel, Warren F. 
Davenport, Mrs. Elizabeth W. 
Davis, Albert 
Davis, Albert H. 
Davis, Mrs. Anna M. 
Davis, Miss Catalina 
Davis, Dwight A. 
Davis, Mrs. Emma W. 
Davis, Frank E. 
Davis, Mrs. Frank E. 
Davis, George O. 
Davis, Horace 
Davis, Mrs. J. Edgar 
Davis, Joel N. 
Davis, Miss Mary L. 
Davis, William F. 
Davison, Miss Emily F. 
Davol, Frank H., Jr. 
Day, Mrs. Frank E. 
Day, Mrs. John W. 
Day, Miss Lucr B. 
DeLong, Edwin R. 
Deane, Mrs. Adams C. 
Dearborn, Frank A. 
Dearborn, Sam S. 
Delano, Miss Ada E. 
Delano, Miss Julia 
Derby, Urbane 
Derby, Mrs. Urbane 
Dewey, Francis H. 
Dewey, Mrs. Lizzie B. 
Dexter, Mrs. Elizabeth B. 
Dickerman, Miss Luella A. 
Dickinson, Francke W. 
Dickson, Brenton H., Jr. 
Dinsmore, Miss Mary B, 
Dix, Miss Harriet E. 
Dodge, Edward M. 
Dodge, Mrs. Helen 
Dodge, Mrs. John E. 
Dodge, Mrs. Katherine S. 
Doe, Freeman J. 
Dolbeare, Herman A. 
Doty, Ethan A. 
Dougall, James S. N. 
Dow, Herbert B. 
Dow, Miss Jane F. 
Dow, Mrs. Louis H. 
Dow, Mrs. Vanic B, 



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Downey Mrs. O. Anna 
Downing, Miss Gertrude 
Draper, Miss Bessie H. 
Draper, Edward B. 
Draper, Mrs. Joseph 
Draper, Joseph P. 
Draper, Thomas B. 
Dresser, Frank 
Dresser, Mrs. Josephine R. 
Dresser, Miss Louise 
Driver, Andrew B. 
Driver, Mrs. Andrew B. 
Driver. Miss Emily F. S. 
Drummond, Mrs. James F. 
Duley, Mrs, Louisa R, 
Dunbar, Kinsley 
Dunbar, Miss Louisa 
Dunbar, Miss Mary E. 
Dunn, Miss Sarah H. S. 
Dunwoody, William P. 
Dupec, Miss Octavia G. 
Durgin, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Durland, Mrs. Catherine M. 
Dutch, Marshall H. 
Du Val, aive L. 
Du Val, Mrs. Florence F. 
Du Val, Guy 
Dwight, George. Jr. 
Eager, Mrs, Rufus 
Eames, George H. 
Eastman, Joseph 
Eastman, Mrs. Lucy P. 
Easton, Miss Elizabeth B. 
Eaton, Charles M. 
Eaton, Mrs. Charles M. 
Eaton. Mrs. Florence T. 
Eddowes, Aiiss Eleanor 
Eddy. William H. 
Edmands, J. Rajmer 
Edson. Mrs. Mary A. 
Edwards, Ogden R, Jr. 
Rgntr, Miss Emma C. 
Elder, Mrs. Charles B. 
Eliot. Miss Emily B. 
Eliot, Mrs. Henrietta R. 
Eliot, Henry W. 
Eliot. Miss Mary L. 
Eliot, Mrs. Mary May 
Eliot, Mrs. Samuel A. 
Eliot, Samuel A.. Jr. 
Elliott, Thomas H. 
Ellis, Mrs. Eva L. 
Ellis, George H. 



Ellsworth, Albert W. 
Emerson, Warren F. 
Emerton, Mrs. Ephraim 
Emery, George A. 
Emmons, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Endicott, Arthur L. 
Endicott, Miss Clara T. 
Endicott, Frederic E. 
Endicott, Mrs. Henry 
Endicott, Robert R. 
Endicott, William 
Ernst, Mrs. Abbie S. 
Esdale, Mrs. Ada Roberts 
Estabrook, Arthur F. 
Estabrook, Mrs. Arthur F. 
Estey, Mrs. Mary P. 
Eustis, Mrs. Qara E. 
Evans, Mrs. Bailey W. 
Evans, Miss Lucretia E. 
Evans, Robert D. 
Everett, Miss Anna S. 
Everett, Mrs. George D. 
Everett, William 
Ewart, Mrs. Fanny T. 
Ewer, Alfred 
Ewer, Mrs. H. Elsie 
Fairbaim, Mrs. Edith 
Fairbanks, Miss Maria B. 
Fairfield, Hamden 
Fales, Mrs. Charlotte E. 
Famham, Mrs. Eliza C. 
Farrington, Mrs. Ira P. 
Farwell, Arthur D. 
Farwell, Mrs. Asa 
Farwell, Mrs. Henry A. 
Faucon, Miss Catherine W. 
Faucon, Mrs, Martha W. 
Faulkner, Herbert K. 
Fay, Mrs. Harriet K. 
Fay, Mrs. Henry J. 
Fay, John S. 
Fay. Mrs. Sarah A. 
Felker, James V. 
Fenner, Arthur 
Fenno, Mrs. Almira T. 
Fenollosa, Mrs. William S. 
Fernald. Mrs. Albert A. 
Fessenden, Mrs. Kate H. 
Fettyplace, Mrs. Sarah B. 
Field, Edward B. 
Field, Miss Fanny 
Field, James F. 
Filoon, Henry H. 



Finney, Mrs. Ida C. 
Fish, Mrs. William H. 
Fisher, Edward T. 
Fisher, Mrs. Frances D. 
Fisher, Herbert 
Fiske, Mrs. Annie F. W. 
Fiskc, Charles H. 
Fiske, Edward 
Fitch, A. Perley 
Fitz, Mrs. Walter S. 
Flagg, Mrs. George A. 
Flagg, Miss Sarah A. 
Fletcher, D. Howard 
Fletcher, Miss Emily Frances 
Fletcher, George M. 
Fletcher, George V. 
Fletcher, Henry J. 
Fletcher, Horatio R. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Horatio R. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Katherine S. 
Fletcher, Louis E. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Luke 
Fletcher, Robert S. 
Fletcher, Sherman H. 
Flint. Mrs. David B. 
Floyd, Garence B. 
Folsom, Miss Ellen M. 
Folsom. Mrs. John G. 
Foote, Oscar P. 
Forbes, J. Murray 
Forbes, Mrs. J. Murray 
Forbes, John Low 
Forbes, Mrs. John P. 
Forbes, Mrs. Roger S. 
Forbes. Mrs. Sarah A. 
Ford, Mrs. George B. 
Ford, Mrs. Ida H. 
Ford. Miss Mary A. 
Forsman, William 
Fosdick, Charles 
Foster, Mrs. Anna S. 
Foster, Miss Eliza E. 
Foster, Mm. George A. 
Foster, Mrs. Mary E. 
Foster, Mrs. Mary W. 
Foster, Mrs. Robert 
Foster, Stetson 
Fowle, Miss Harriet A. 
Fowler, Miss Clara M. 
Fowler, Miss Laura D. 
Fowler, Mrs. Moses H. 
Fowler, William P. 
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Fowler, William P., Jr. 
Fox, Miss C. Edith 
Fox, Charles J. 
Fox, George W. 
Fox, Miss Margaret E. 
Fox, Thomas A. 
Fox, Walter S. 
Francis, George E. 
Francis, Mrs. Rebecca N. 
Frazier, Mrs. William H. 
Freeborn, Miss Eliza 
Freeman, Charles A. 
Freeman, Miss Harriet E. 
Freeman, Mrs William 
French, Abbott E. 
French, Allen 
French, Charles H. 
French, Edward 
French, Frederic W. 
French, Mrs. John J. 
French, Mrs. Lucretia G. 
Friend, John C. 
Friend, Mrs. Preston 
Frosty Miss Bertha 
Frost, Mrs. Edward 
Frost, Miss Mable 
Frothingham, Channing, Jr. 
Frothingham, Lawrence P. 
Frothingham, Mrs. Paul R. 
Frothingham, William I. 
Frye, John A. 
Frye, Mrs. John A. 
Frye, Walter P. 
Fuller, Mrs. Arthur O. 
Fuller, Mrs. Charles S. 
Fuller, Eben S. 
Fuller, Miss Hannah B. 
Fuller, Mrs. John K. 
Fuller, Mrs. Moses 
Furbush, Mrs. Everett W. 
Furman, Mrs. William F. 
Gaffield, Mrs. Thomas 
Gage, Mrs. Florence D. 
Gage, Miss Katherine A. 
Gage, T. Hovey Jr. 
Gage, Mrs. T. Hovey, Jr. 
Gage, Walter B. 
Gale, Mrs. Henry H. 
Gale, Justin E. 
Gale, Mrs. Justin E. 
Gale, Lsrman W. 
Gale, Mrs. Lyman W. 
Gamage, Miss Amy O. 



Gammans, George G. 
Gane, Mrs. Thomas F. 
Gardner, Miss Mary B. 
Gardner, Ralph E. 
Gardner, William C. 
Garfield, James F. D. 
Garland, Mrs. J. Everett 
Garver, Mrs. Austin S. 
Gates, Julius K. 
Gauld, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Gerry, Mrs. Chester /. 
Gerrv, Mrs. G. A. 
Getchell, Mrs. Albert C. 
Getchell, Miss Ellen P. 
Giddings. Mrs. Mary J. 
Gill, Augustus H. 
Gillett, Herbert A. 
Gilliford, Robert H. 
Gilman, Mrs. M. R. F. 
Gilman, Warren R. 
Gilman, Mrs. Warren R. 
Glasgow, Edward B. 
Gleason, Mrs. Jennie S. 
Goddard, Mrs. Cynthia B. 
Godfre]^. Mrs. Abby P. 
Goldsmith, Mrs. Peter H. 
Goodrich, Miss Elisabeth ^f . 
Goodrich, Henry A. 
Gordon, Mrs. George H. 
Gordon, Mrs. Rebecca 
Gould, Mrs. Fred H. 
Gould, Mrs. Irene C. 
Gould, Miss Sarah B. 
Gould, Mrs. William F. 
Gove, William H. 
Gowen, Mrs. Alice F. 
Gowing, Charles W. 
Grammer, Miss Alice M. 
Gray, Albert M. 
Gray, Mrs. Mary N. 
Gray, William C. 
Green, Miss Alice M. 
Green, Mrs. John B. 
Green, Miss Mary L 
Green, Samuel S. 
Greene, Chauncy O. 
Greene, James S. 
Greene, Mrs. Laura T. 
Greenlaw, Frank M. 
Greenleaf, Mrs. Abbie M. 
Greenleaf, Miss Lilian W. 
Greenwood, Miss Helen W. 
Gregg, David A. 



Grew, Henry S. 
Grew, Mrs. Henry S. 
Grinnell, Charles E. 
Grinnell, Mrs. Frederick 
Griswold, Mrs. Jerusha F. 
Guild, Miss Abby E. 
Guild, Curtis 
Guild, Curtis, Jr. 
Guild, Mrs. Henry C 
Guild, Miss Orra E. 
Hackett, Miss Anna D. 
Hackett, Mrs. Susan E. 
Hackley, Mrs. Frances A. 
Hadley, Mrs. Charles E. 
Haff, Delbert J. 
Hagar, Miss Addie 
Hagar, Eugene B. 
Hagar, Miss Sarah B. 
Hanman, William 
Hale, Mrs. Edward 
Hale, Mrs. Elizabeth P. 
Hale, Mrs. Emily P. 
Hale, Miss Kate S. 
Hall, Miss Anna 
Hall, Charles F. 
Hall, Edward H. 
Hall, Mrs. Ellen B. 
Hall, Mrs. Frederic P. 
Hall, Mrs. Harriet A. 
Hall, George W. 
Hall, Harrison C. 
Hall, Henry C 
Hall, Miss Julia E. 
Halstead, Daniel B. 
Ham, Mrs. Martha J. 
Hamblen, Lyn 
Hamilton, Benjamin F. 
Hamilton, Charles A. 
Hamilton, Miss Edith 
Hamilton, James P. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Mary A. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Sarah F. 
Hamlin, Mrs. Ellen V. 
Hammond, Mrs. Anna C 
Hammond, Winthrop 
Hannum, Leander M. 
Hardy, Mrs. John H. 
Harlow, Miss Margaret 
Harlow, Mrs. Martna H. 
Harlow, William T. 
Harriman, William D. 
Harrington, Miss Clara W. 
Harrington, Edward B. 



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Harrington, Miss Ellen R 
Harrington, Henry P. 
Harrington, Miss Jennie M. 
Harrington, Miss Lucy I. 
Harris, Frederick 
Harris, Frederick H. 
Harris, Levi 
Harris, Walter C 
Harrison, Mrs. Fanny G. 
Hart, Thomas N. 
Harte, Mrs. Maria A. 
Hart^ Richard H. 
Hartshorn, Miss Alice S. 
Hartshorn, Calvin G. 
Hartwcll, Charles P. 
HartweU, Mrs. Effie M. F. 
Hartwell, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Hartwell, Frank N. 
Hartwell, John M. 
Hartwell, Mrs, Minnie R. 
Harwood, Harry A. 
Harwood, Herbert J. 
Harwood, Mrs. Joseph A. 
Haskell, Mrs. Edwin B. 
Haskell, Jacob M. 
Hastings, Mrs. Anna C. 
Hastings, Francis H. 
Hastings, Mrs. Henry C. 
Hatch, Miss Lavina A. 
Haven, Miss Cassie 
Hawes, Mrs. Mary S. 
Hawkins, Asahel S. 
Haynes, Frederick M. 
Haynes, Miss Susan F. 
Hayward, Mrs. Edward F. 
Hayward, Mrs. John W. 
Hazeltine, Mrs. George KL 
Hazclton, Mrs. Carrie M. 
Hazclton, Herbert M. 
Hazen, Mrs. Kate E. 
Heald, Mrs. Leander S. 
Hcald, Miss Lucy D. 
Heard, Ralph P. 
Heath, Mrs. Sarah E. P. 
Hedge, Frederic H. 
Hcmcnway, Mrs. Charles A. 
Hempstead, Earnest A. 
Hcndcc, Mrs. George E. 
Hcndlcy, Mrs. Anna M. 
Herscy, Ira G. 
Hcrscy, Mrs. Ira G. 
Hewcs, Joseph J. 
Hcwctt, Billings 



Hewett, Henry B. 
He wins, Mrs. Margaret R 
Hews, Mrs. Albert H. 
Heywood, Mrs. Abby B. 
Hibbard, A. G. 
Hibbard, George A. 
Hibbard, Mrs. M. Addie 
Higgins, Miss Alice L. 
Hill, Mrs. Alfred 
Hill, Daniel 
Hill, Mrs. Ellen D. 
Hill, Miss Frances A. 
Hill, William M. 
Hills, Miss Elizabeth 
Hills, Mrs. Ellen G. 
Hills, Mrs. Sophronia E. 
Hills, Thomas 
Hitch, Frederic D. 
Hitch, Mrs. Frederic D. 
Hoar, Miss Qara D. 
Hoar, Miss Mary 
Hoar, Mrs. Samuel 
Hobart, Miss Mary F. 
Hobart, Miss Olive M. 
Hobart, Mrs. Rowena W. 
Hobbs, Miss Eliza E. 
Hobbs, George S. 
Hobbs, Mrs, Mary P. 
Hobson, Charles H. 
Hodgdon, Andrew H. 
Hodgdon, Miss Ellen W. 
Hodgdon, Frank W. 
Hodgins, Mrs. James C. 
Holbrook, Mrs. Henry C 
Holbrook, S. Pickncy 
Holden, Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Holden, Mrs. William 
Holder, Miss Caroline H. 
Holder, William C. 
Hollis, Henry F. 
Holman, Frank E. 
Holmes, Mrs. A. L. B. 
Holmes, Mrs. John H. 
Holmes, Joseph A. 
Holmes, Mrs. Vesta 
Holyoke, Edward A. 
Holyoke, Mrs. Mary E. 
Homer, Mrs. Horace H. 
Homer, Mrs. Mary F. W. 
Honeywell, Floyd H. 
Hooper, Mrs. Martha H. 
Hooper, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Hopkins, Mrs. Reuben W. 



Home, Edwin T. 
Horton, Mrs. Edward A. 
Horton, I. Chester 
Horton, William A. 
Horton, Mrs. William H. 
Hosmer, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Hosmer, Fred A. 
Hosmer, Mrs. George Herbert 
Hosmer, James K. 
Hosmer, John E. 
Hough, Miss Annie A. 
Houghton, Miss Carrie M. 
Houghton, Mrs. L. Maria 
Houghton, Mrs. M. Alice 
Houghton, Miss Mary J. 
Houghton, Mrs. Naomi W. 
Howard, Miss Annie E. 
Howard, Miss Emily W, 
Howard, Frank E. 
Howard, Miss Sophia W. 
Howe, Archibald M. 
Howe, Miss Emily B. 
Howe, George A. 
Howe, Henry F. 
Howe, Mrs. Julia Ward 
Howe, Louis P. 
Howe, Mrs. Louis P. 
Howe, Mrs. Octavius T. 
Howe, S. Herbert 
Howe, Mrs. S. Herbert 
Howe, Warren G. 
Howell, Mrs. Maria H. 
Howes, A. Newell 
Howes, Mrs. Benjamin T. 
Howland, Mrs. Mary P. 
Hubbard, Miss Helen 
Hubbard, Miss Nathalie D. 
Hubbard, Samuel T. 
Hubbard, S. Hildreth 
Hubby, Miss Ella F. 
Hudson, Mrs. Divine P. 
Hudson, Miss Mary E 
Huidekoper, Arthur C. 
Huidekoper, Edgar 
Humbert, Alfred 
Hume. Mrs. William S. 
Humphreys, Miss Anna 
Humphreys, Qarence B. 
Humphreys, James H. 
Humphreys, Mrs. James H. 
Humphreys, Richard C. 
Humphreys, Mrs. Susan M. 
Hunneman, Mrs. W. C. 



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Hunt, Miss Anstiss 
Hunt, Mrs. Evelina K. 
Hunt, Mrs. Mary A. 
Hunt, Miss Mary £. 
Huntington, Mrs. Alma J. 
Huntington, Mrs. Rebecca M. 
Huntress, Miss Harriet L. 
Hurd, Mrs. John 
Hurd, Mrs. Phineas H. 
Hussey, Mrs. Mary W. 
Hussey, Mrs. Reuben B. 
Huston, William 
Hutchins, Frederick L. 
Hutchinson, Edward L. 
Hutchinson George 
Hyde, Frederick T. 
Hyde, Mrs. L. M. 
Hyde, Mrs. R. W. 
Hyde, Salem 
Hyde, Miss Sophie L. 
Hylan, Eugene S. 
Inches, Charles E. 
Ingalls, Edwin W. 
Ireland, Gordon 
Ireland, James W. 
Ireland, Mrs. Jeannie G. 
Ireland. Oscar B. 
Irish, Mrs. Mary A. 
Jackman. Mrs. Joseph V. 
Jacobs Miss Gertrude T. 
Jacobs, Mrs. Janet S. 
James, Brigham D. 
Janes, Mrs. Henry 
Jaquith, Miss Abby 
Jaquith, Joseph 
Jaynes, Mrs. Julian C. 
Jefferson, Mrs. Meta R. 
Jencks, Howard W. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Frederick W. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Harding 
Jenkins, Miss Leura £. 
Jcnks, Mrs. Henry F. 
Jenney, Bernard 
Jenney, Walter 
Jennison, Henry J. 
Jennison, Mrs. Henry J. 
Johnson, Mrs. Caroline G. 
Johnson, A. Dudley 
Johnson, Hiram 
Johnson, John W. 
Johnson, Joseph C. 
Johnson, William R, 
Johonnot, Albert 



Jolliffe, James H. 

{olliffe, Mrs. James H. 
ones. Miss Alice E. 
Jones, Benjamin M. 
Jones, Mrs. Clarence W. 
Jones, Edward C. 
Jones, Miss Ella H. 
Jones, Miss Ellen M. 
Jones, Mrs. Frank H. 
Jones, Mrs. Frederick M. 
Jones, Jerome 
Jones, Leonard A. 
Jones, Mrs, Lyman A. 
Tones, William P. 
Jones, Mrs. William S. 
Jordan, Mrs. Daniel S. 
Jordan, William H. 
Joslin, James T. 
Judd, Miss Nina 
Judkins, Mrs. Ella P. 
Kay, Tames Murray 
Kay, Mrs. Mary Prentiss 
Keene, Mrs. Georgia W. 
Keene, William G. 
Kelly, John B. 
Kendall, Miss Ellen M. 
Kendall, Miss Hannah W. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Charles E. 
Kenney, Charles C 
Kenney, Mrs. Charles C 
Kenney, Mrs. George W. 
Kenney, Ralph 
Kenney, Mrs. Ralph 
Kenney. William C. 
Kent, Miss Ella 
Kenyon, William H. 
Keyes, Nelson C. 
Keyes, Mrs. Nelson C. 
Keyes, Prescott 
Keyes, Mrs. Prescott 
Keyou, Mrs. Edwin J. 
Kidder, Charles A. 
Kidder, Mrs. Henry P. 
Kidder, Nathaniel T. 
Kilham, Charles H. 
Kimball, David P. 
Kimball, Mrs. David P. 
Kimball, Eben 
Kimball, Edmund 
Kimball, Miss Gertrude 
Kimball, Miss Hannah H. 
Kimball. Miss Helen F. 
Kimball, Howard A. 



Kimball, John F. 
Kimball, Mrs. John F. 
Kimball, Miss Lulu S. 
King, Mrs. Charles F. 
King, Mrs. Dark 
King, D. Webster 
King, Edward P. 
King. Mrs. Edward P. 
King, Tarrant P. 
King, William H. 
Kingsbury, George L, 
Kingsbury, Waldo E. 
Kingsbury, Warren E. 
Kingsbury, Mrs. Warren E. 
Kinnicutt, Mrs. Edith P. 
Kinnicutt, Leonard P. 
Kinnicutt, Lincoln N. 
Kirkman, Alexander S. 
Kittredge, Miss S. Frances, 
Knapp, Mrs. Ellen F. 
Knapp, Mrs. Fanny F. 
Kneeland, John 
Knight, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Knowles, Miss Grace L. 
Knowlton, Mrs. Isabelle M. 
Kohler, Otto 
Krum, Mrs. Chester H. 
Lamb, Henry L. 
Lamb, William D. 
Lambert, Charles 
Lamson, A. Ward 
Lamson, Mrs. Rebecca L. 
Lamson, Will S. 
Lane, Ralph E. 
Langley, John W. 
Langmaid, Miss Bertha 
Lanning, Edward 
Lapham, Mowry 
Larrabce, Miss Katherine P. 
Lathrop, John 

Lawrance, Mrs. Caroline B. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Charles 
Lawrence, Mrs. George A. 
Lawrence. Miss Gertrude M. 
Lawson, Walter U. 
Lawton, Mrs. Susan E. R, 
Leahy, Mrs. Carrie A. 
Learned, Mrs. Emily K. 
Leavitt, Mrs. Bradford 
Lee, Mrs. Elizabeth W. 
Lee, Mrs. Francis H. 
Leeds, Mrs. Mary A. 
Legate, Burton J. 



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Leonard, Miss Eliza 6. 
Lewis, Mrs. R Frank 
Lewis, Henry M. 
Lewis, Miss Lucy 
Lewis, Miss Marian 
Lewis, Mrs. Mary B. 
Lewis, Russel B. 
L'Hcurcux, George H. 
Ubby, Henry F. 
Libl^, Mrs. Henry F. 
Lilly, Alonzo 
Lincoln, Mrs. Abby L. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Arthur 
Lincoln, Miss Frances M. 
Lincoln, Francis H. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Francis H. 
Lincoln, Merrick 
Lincoln, Richard C. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Waldo 
Linder, Mrs. Alice B. 
Linscott, A. Roscoe 
Linscott, Arthur H. 
Lippitt, Mrs. Louisa G. 
Lithgow, Mrs. Pauline C 
Little, Edward H. 
Little, Miss Eleanor J. 
Little, Henry B. 
Little, John Mason 
Little, Mrs. John Mason 
Livermore, Mrs. John W. 
Livermorc, Oliver C. 
I-ocke, Alonzo E. 
Locke, Miss Mary I. 
Long, John D. 
Lord, Mrs. Augustus M. 
Lord, Miss M. Agnes 
Loring, Augustus P. 
Loring, Miss Katherine P. 
Loring, Miss Louisa P. 
Loring, Mrs. Mary H. 
Lothrop, Thornton K. 
Lovett. Arthur T. 
Lovett, Miss Caroline A. 
Lovett, Mrs. George L 
Lovett, Miss Louise W. 
Low, Mrs. Daniel 
Low, Miss Emma C. 
Low. Hennr C, Jr. 
Low, Josian O. 
Low, Miss Nathalie F. 
Lowell, A. Lawrence 
Lowell, Francis C. 
Lowell, Miss Lucy 



Luce, Mrs. Charles C. 
Luke, Arthur F. 
Luke, Eugene R. 
Lunt, Miss Hannah R 
Lunt. William W. 
Lunt, Mrs. WUliam W. 
Lyford, James O. 
Lyman, Arthur T. 
Lyman, Herbert 
Lyman, Miss Julia 
Lyman, Miss Mabel 
Lyman, Miss Mary 
Lsmde, Miss Sarah A. 
Lyon, Mrs. William H. 
MacArthur, Mrs. C L. 
Macdonald, Mrs. Loren B. 
Macfarland, Henry J. 
MacGowan, Henry A. 
Mackintosh, Mrs. Henry S. 
Macullar, Mrs. Emma J. 
Malick, Mrs. John 
Manchester, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Mandell, Samuel P. 
Manning, Mrs. David 
Mansfield, Miss Susan 
Manson, Rufus H. 
March, Mrs. Abby 
Marquand, Miss Elizabeth 
Marsh, George S. 
Marsh, Henry A. 
Marsh, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Marshal], Mrs. Delia S. 
Marshall, Henry E. 
Marshall, Thomas 
Marsters, James A. 
Martin, James D. 
Martin, Miss Sarah E. 
Mason, Albert L 
Mason, Atherton P. 
Matchett, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Maxwell, Samuel A. 
Mayberry, Mrs. Amanda L 
Mayo, Hamilton 
Mayo, Mrs. Hamilton 
McCollester. J. Q. A. 
McDaniel, Mrs. Benjamin F. 
McDougall, Mrs. Marion G. 
McDowell, Edward G. 
McKean, Albert J. 
McKean, Mrs. Clara A. 
McKendry, Davis 
McKenna, Miss Abby 
McKenna, Miss Mary E. 



McKenna, Miss Rebecca 
McKittrick, Mrs. Hugh 
McQuesten, Mr? . Anna E 
Meiggs, Oarence U. 
Melcher, Mrs. Angelia O. 
Melcher, Mrs. Charles C. 
Melcher, George 
Mellen, Walter B. 
Mentzer, Cyrus 
Merriam, Mrs. Dora R. 
Merriam, Herbert 
Merritt, Miss Blanche L. 
Merrill, Louis C. 
Messer, Myron W. 
Metcalf, Edgar W. 
Metcalf, Mrs. Ellen E. 
Metcalf, Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
Metcalf, Robert C 
Meyer, Mrs. John F. 
Miller, George T. 
Miller, Henry F. 
Miller, Leslie W. 
Miller, Marion M. 
Miller, Miss Mary 
Milliken, Mrs. Emily A. 
Mills, William S. 
Mitchell. Mrs. Edwin V. 
Mitchell, Miss Emma R. 
Mitchell, Frank R. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Harriet S. 
Mitchell, Miss Helena 
Mitchell, Henry C. 
Mitchell, Henry L. 
Mixer, Charles H. S. 
Moen, Mrs, Grace H. 
Moody, C. Mason 
Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth J. 
Moot, Adelbert 

Morehouse. Mrs. M. Adelaide 
Morrill, Frank F. 
Morris, Mrs. Alice L. 
Morris, Mrs. Rachel A. 
Morris, Thomas J. 
Morse, Miss Alice G. 
Morse, Miss Ellen C. 
Morse, E. Irving 
Morse, Mrs. John W. 
Morse. Miss Margaret F. 
Morse, Mrs. Robert M. 
Morse, WaUer B. 
Morton, Mrs. Emily C. 
Morton, Mrs. John D. 
Moseley, Mrs. Julia M. 



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Moss, Mrs. Charles L. 
Mott, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Mott, Mrs. Herbert H. 
Mulliken, Miss Amelia M. 
Mulliken. Everett M. 
Munroe, James P. 
Murphy, Mrs. Gardner 
Muzzey, David P. 
My rick, Mrs. Pauline J. 
Nason, Arthur C. 
Nealley, Mrs. Mary E. 
Needham, Boynton 
Needham, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Needham, Mrs. Ines G. 
Nelson, Granville D. 
Nesmith, Joseph A. 
Nesmith, Miss Mary 
Nevers, Miss Lucy A. 
Nevins, Mrs. David 
Newbert, Mrs. Elmer E. 
Newhall, Miss Annie L. 
Newhall, James S. 
Nichols, Miss Adelaide 
Nichols, Andrew 
Nichols, Mrs. Arthur H. 
Nichols, Frank A. 
Nichols, Mrs. Harriet S. 
Nichols, J. Carlton 
Nichols, Mrs. Julia A. 
Nichols, Mrs. Minerva P. 
Nickerson, Mrs. Alfred C. 
Nickerson, Phineas A. 
Noble, Mrs. Henry C. 
Norbury, Mrs. John F. 
Norcross, Grenville H. 
Norcross, Mrs. Mary E. 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis 
Norris, Miss Kate T. 
North, James N. 
North, Mrs. James N. 
Norton, Miss Mary E. 
Noyes, Ernest H. 
Noyes, Lewis B. 
Nowell, Mrs. Laura H. 
Nuttingr. Warren A. 
Nye, William L. 
Nve, Mrs. William L. 
O Connor. Edward G. 
Odiorne, Mrs. Emma L. 
Odin, James E. 
Olys, Thomas J. 
Osborne, Thomas M. 
Osgood, Mrs. Edmund Q. S. 



Osgood, Miss Ellen L. 
Osgood, Miss Emily L. 
Osgood, Robert 
Otis, Miss Elizabeth M. 
Otis, Harry P. 
Owen, Charles D. 
Owen, Mrs. Delia S. 
Packard, Winthrop 
Page, Mrs. Samuel 
Paige, Elijah F. 
Paine, Charles Edward 
Paine, Charles. J., Jr. 
Paine, Mrs. Charles J., Jr. 
Paine, John B. 
Paine, Mrs. John B. 
Paine, Tohn F. 
Paine, Miss Marianne 
Paine, Nathaniel 
Paine, Miss Rose 
Paine, Miss Sarah C. 
Paine, Mrs. Seth T. 
Palmer, Charles D. 
Palmer, Grant M. 
Palmer, Mrs. Grant M. 
Palmer, John S. 
Park, A. Heady 
Parker, Austin W. 
Parker, Mrs. Charles S. 
Parker, Mrs. Henry C. 
Parker, Mrs. Emmeline W. 
Parker, Mrs. Harriet T. 
Parker, James H. 
Parker, Mrs. James H. 
Parker, Mrs. Mary R 
Parker, Mrs. William H. 
Parsons, Miss Oara P. 
Parsons, Mrs. James H. 
Partridge, Allen 
Patch, Frank A. 
Patch, Mrs. Frank A. 
Patch, Frank W. 
Patten, Mrs. George W. 
Patterson. James H. 
Patton, Miss Anna J. 
Patton, Miss Sarah L. 
Pajme, Mrs. Samuel B. 
Payson, William H. 
Peabody, Miss Lucia M. 
Peach, Miss Mabel A. 
Peale, Richard S. 
Peck, Mrs. Roswell K. 
Peckham, Miss Sarah W. 
Peircc, Miss Caroline P. 



Pcirce, Charles F. 
Peirce, Miss Mary F. 
Perham, Perley P. 
Perkins, Mrs. John C. 
Perrin, Franklin 
Perry, Miss Abby S. 
Perry, Franklin W. 
Perry, Miss Harriet S. 
Perry, Walter A. 
Peters, Mrs. Aravesta 
Peterson, Mrs. Abby A. 
Pettee, Miss Amy E. 
Pettee, Mrs. Sybil C 
Pettes, Miss Mary E. 
Phalen, Mrs. Frank L. 
Phelan. Mrs. William T. 
Phelps, Levi W. 
Phelps, Miss Mary R, 
Phelps, Mrs. Robert W. 
Phelps, Miss Sarah D. 
Phillips, Mrs. Albert N. 
Phillips, Mrs. Anna T. 
Phillips, James, Jr. 
Phillips, Mrs. Katherine M. 
Phillips, Sidney A. 
Pickman, Dudley L. 
Pierce, Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
Pierce, Miss Katherine C. 
Pierce, Mrs. Lucy H. 
Pierce, Miss Margaret 
Pierce, Phineas 
Pike, Daniel L. 
Pindar, Mrs. Albert 
Pingrec, David 
Piper, William T. 
Place, Griffin 
Plant, Albert R. 
Poor, Miss Agnes B. 
Poor, Miss Lulian B. 
Poor, Miss Lucy T. 
Poor, Mrs. Mary W. 
Porritt, Mrs. Mary E. 
Porter, Charles H. 
Porter, Frank L. 
Porter, Mrs. Isaac F. 
Porter, Mrs. John W. 
Porter, Mrs. Lucy C. 
Potter, Miss Frances E. F. 
Potts, Horace T. 
Pousland, Arthur P. 
Powers, Albert E. 
Powers, Lewis J. 
Powers, Mrs. Lewis J. 



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Powers. Wilbur H. 
Prait, Charles H. 
Pratt, Mrs. Enoch 
Pratt. Mrs. Frank W. 
Pratt, Laban 
Pratt, Mrs. Laban 
Pratt, Mrs. Lucius G. 
Pratt, Miss Sarah E. 
Prentiss, Mrs. Maria W. 
Prescott, Mrs. Benjamin F. 
Prcscott, Miss Henrietta 
Prescott, Miss Olive Adams 
Presson, Mrs. Mary B. 
Preston, Mrs. George H. 
Priest, Frank B. 
Priest, George L. 
Priest, Mrs. Joseph A. 
Priestley, Miss Jean B. 
Priestley, Mrs. Neville 
Proctor, Warren 
Proud foot, David 
Pronty, Mrs. Alice J. 
Prouty, Mrs. Frank E. 
Pushaw, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Pushee, George D. 
Putnam, Mrs. Diana F. 
Putnam, Henry H. 
Pynchon, Edward 
Raeder, Mrs. Gara 
Ramsdcll, Julius F. 
Ramsdell, Mrs. Fannv V. N. 
Ramsdell, Mrs. S. Elmira 
Rand, Charles A. B. 
Rand, Mrs. Grace L. 
Rand, Roland B. 
Rand, Mrs. Roland B. 
Ranlett, Orrin B. 
Ranney, Miss Maria F. 
Ranstead, Miss Kate A. 
Rawson, Mrs. Oscar F. 
Raymond, Miss Alice 
Raymond, Edward T. 
Raymond, Francis H. 
Raymond, Mrs. Maria W. B. 
Reardon, Miss Helen A. 
Reccord, Mrs. Augustus P. 
Reed. Hammon 
Reed, Mrs. Persis L. 
Reed, William Howell 
Reed, Mrs. William Howell 
Reeve, Mrs. Leila A. 
Remidk, James W. 
Reynolds, Miss Anne F. 



Reynolds, Henry R. 
Reynolds, Vinton I. 
Rhoades, Miss Mary L. 
Rice, Miss Adalyn E. 
Rice, Mrs. Benjamin T. 
Rice, Daniel H. 
Rice, Miss Elizabeth M. C. 
Rice, Miss Florence E. 
Rice, Miss Louisa A. M. 
Richards, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Richards, Daniel H. 
Richards, Henry W. 
Richardson, Alfred W. 
Richardson, Mrs. Alice M. 
Richardson, Charles E. 
Richardson, Charles F. 
Richardson, Mrs. Charles F. 
Richardson, Charles L. 
Richardson, Charles O. 
Richardson, Daniel M. 
Richardson, George E. 
Richardson, George F. 
Richardson, Mrs. George F. 
Richardson, Henry 
Richardson, Mrs. Isabel B. 
Richardson, Miss Mary A. 
Richardson, Miss Mary E. 
Richardson, Mrs. M. Grace 
Richardson, Rosell L. 
Richardson, Miss Sara F. 
Richardson, Miss Sarah E. 
Richardson, Mrs. S. M. 
Richmond, George F. W. 
Ricker, Mrj*. Emeline C. 
Ripley, Ebed L. 
Ripley, Edward P. 
Ripley, Miss Emma F. 
Ripley, Mrs. Francis B. 
Robbins, Miss Caira 
Robbins, F. N. 
Robbins, Miss Ida F. 
Robbins, Mrs. Mary F. 
Roberts, Miss Frances A. 
Robertson, Miss S. Ellen 
Robins, Edward B. 
Robinson, Mrs. Alexander 
Robinson, Miss Frances M. 
Robinson, Mrs. George D. 
Robinson, Mrs. Henry 
Robinson, Miss Mary P. 
Robinson, Mrs. Thomas D. 
Roddy, Thomas 
Rodman, Warren A. 



Rogers, Miss Alice C. 
Rogers, Allan 
Rogers, Miss Annette P. 
Rogers, Miss Catharine L. 
Rogers, Miss Clara B. 
Rogers, Henry M. 
Rogers, Mrs. Henry M. 
Rogers, Mrs. Jacob 
Rogers, Miss Mary J. 
Rolfe, William J. 
Rood, Stanley H. 
Rood, Mrs. Stanley H. 
Root, Henry A. 
Rorer, Mrs. Mabel M. 
Ross, Miss Mary A. 
Ross, Mrs. Pamelia T. 
Rotch, Miss Joanna 
Rotch, William 
Rotch, Mrs. William 
Rotch, Mrs. William J. 
Rugg, Arthur P. 
Rumrill, Chapin 
Rumrill, Mrs. James A. 
Rusbatch, Mrs. Alfred 
Russell, Arthur J. 
Russell, Mrs. Arthur J. 
Russell, Miss Edith 
Russell, James F. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary O. 
Rust, Miss Fanny I. 
Rust, William A. 
Sackett, Mrs. Emma L. 
Sackett, Myron W. 
St. John, Mrs. Charles E. 
Salter, Miss Annie K. 
Salter, John L., Jr. 
Salter, Robert S. 
Sampson, Mrs. Augustus N. 
Sampson, Mrs. Calvin C. 
Sampson, Charles E. 
Sampson, Mrs. Ellen C. 
Sanborn, Jason B. 
Sands, Mrs. F. Josephine 
Sargent, Mrs. George W. 
Sargent, Mrs. J. Bradford 
Sargent, Miss Mary F. 
Sargent, Mrs. Sumner 
Saunderson, Mrs. Henry H. 
Savage, Mrs. Minot J. 
Savage, William C. 
Savary, Mrs. William H. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Evelina J. 
Sawyer, Miss Julia 



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Sawyer, Mrs. Louise J. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Martha P. 
Sawyer, Miss Mary C. 
Sawyer, Miss Mary E, 
Sawyer, Warren 
Schmidt, Henry F. A. 
Schmidt Mrs. Henry F. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Alberta G. 
Scott, Miss Alice 
Scott, Charles K 
Scott, Mrs. Edgar 
Scott, James M. 
Sears. Miss Annie L. 
Sears, Francis P. 
Sears, Horace S. 
Sears, Miss Margaret A. 
Seaver, Benjamin F. 
Seaver. Mrs. Ellen M. 
Seaver, Francis E. 
Seaver, Mrs. M. M. W. 
Seavey, Mrs. Mary L. 
Secrist, Mrs. Anna B. 
Semple, Miss Mary P. 
Sewall, Miss Alice O. 
Sewall, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Shattuck, Mrs. Isabel A. 
Shattuck, Joseph 
Shattuck. Mrs. Lydia M. 
Shaw, Mrs. Frank E. 
Shaw, Mrs. George S. 
Shaw, Lorenzo L. 
Shaw. Miss Mary E. 
Shaw, Mrs. Robert Gould 
Shaw. Wallace S. 
Sheafe, Mrs. Joseph P. 
Shedd, Freeman B. 
Shedd, Mrs. Freeman B. 
Sheldon, Charles H., Jr. 
Sheldon, Mrs. Chauncey C. 
Sheldon, Miss Gertrude 
Sheldon, Mrs. Joel W. 
Sheldon. Nicholas 
Shepherd, Thomas M. 
Sherman, Mrs. Alfred P. 
Sherman, John H. 
Shippen, Mrs. Rush R. 
Sholes, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Sholes. Charles H. 
Shuman. Abraham 
Shumway, Miss Ellen 
Shurtleff. Asahel M. 
Shute, Mrs. Henry B. 
Sibley, Albert H. 



Sibley, Mrs. Albert H. 
Sibley, Andrew J. 
Silsbee, Miss Elizabeth W. 
Silsbee, Mrs. Maria P. 
Simmons, Walter E. 
Simonds, George R. 
Simonds, Nathaniel G. 
Simons, Mrs. Helen L. 
Simons, Mrs. L. Eudora 
Skerrye, Mrs. William F. 
Skinner, Mrs. Frances M. 
Slicer, Mrs. Thomas R. 
Small, George 
Smith, Mrs. Abby F. 
Smith, Miss Agatha 
Smith, Albert W. 
Smith, Arthur A. 
Smith, Mrs. Cephas 
Smith, Charles C 
Smith. Charles F. 
Smith, Charles William 
Smith, Miss C. Louise 
Smith, Duncan 
Smith, Mrs. E. Elizabeth 
Smith, Miss Ellen 
Smith, Miss Emma F. 
Smith, Mrs. Ernest C 
Smith, Mrs. Fayette 
Smith, Miss Harriet S. 
Smith, Henry F. 
Smith, Mrs. Henry F. 
Smith, Henry F., Jr. 
Smith, Jonathan 
Smith, Mrs. Mary C. 
Smith, San ford Sidney 
Smith, Miss Susanna 
Smith, Thomas P. 
Smith, William Eliot 
Snow, C. W. 
Snyder, Mrs. John 
Somerville. Louis J. 
Somes, Miss Cordelia 
Souther, Horatio H. 
Southworth. Mrs. Alice B. 
Spalding, Mrs. Alice F. 
Spalding, Mrs. Harriet M. 
Spalding, Mrs. Katharine A. 
Spalding, Miss Louise M. 
Spalter, Mrs. Alice J. 
Spalter, Miss Mabel J. 
Sparhawk, Mrs. Mary E. 
Spaulding, Miss Edith R. 
Spaulding, Mrs. Lucy W. 



Spaulding, Ralph 
Spcnce, Mrs. Albert H., Jr. 
Spencer, Henry F. 
Spencer, Mrs. Sarah D, 
Spooncr, Mrs. Hannah A. 
Spooner, J. Winthrop 
Spooncr, Mrs. J. Winthrop 
Sprague, Mrs. A. B. R. 
Sprague, Charles E, 
Sprague, Isaac 
Sprague, Mrs. Marvin 
Sprague, Miss Nellie L. 
Spring, Mrs. Zilpah W. 
Stackpole, Mrs. Frederic D. 
Stackpole, Miss Martha D. 
Stanhope, Mrs. Frederic A. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Ellen W. 
Stanwood, Henry P. 
Staples, Mrs. Carlton A. 
Staples, Mrs. Charles £. 
Staples, John W. 
Staples, Sylvanus N. 
Stark, John F. 
Steams, Charles H. 
Steams, Mrs. Charles H. 
Stearns, Ephraim 
Stearns, Mrs. Jessie C 
Stebbins, Mrs. Calvin 
Stebbins, Mrs. Edith E. 
Stedman. Mrs. George R. 
Steele, Miss Edith D. 
Steer, Robert 
Stelley, Leonard M. 
Stetson, Mrs. George 
Stevens, Miss Catherine A. 
Stevens, Charles E. 
Stevens, Charles W. 
Stevens, Mrs. Ella A. 
Stevens, Ephraim A. 
Stevens, Mrs. Grace S. 
Stevens, Mrs. Harriet L. 
Stevens, Henry C. 
Stevens, Mrs. Henry D. 
Stevens, Isaac F. 
Stet'cns, Mrs. Isaac F. 



Stevens, Toseph W. 

s, Mrs. J. 
Stevens, Miss Julia W. 



Stevens, Mrs. J. Tyler 



Stevens, Stillman R. 
Stewart, Mrs. Samuel B. 
Stickney, Mrs. Joseph 
Stiles, Sumner B. 
Stillman, Mrs. Addie N. 



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ckton, Mrs. James A. 
oe, Mrs. Abbie E. 
lie, Mrs. Ellen C 
me^ Miss Fanny C. 

^oe, James B. 

me, Mrs. James B. 

me, John L. 

nnc. Miss Lordia 

one. Miss Margaret M. 

one. Miss S. May 

one, William 

orer. Miss Abby M. 
torer, Mrs. James 
torer, Mrs. Samuel C. 
tooghton, Mrs. Sarah G. 
towe, Arthur N. 
towe, Horace E. 
4owe, Mrs. Tessie B. 
itowe, Mrs. Mary C. 
kratton, Mrs. Annie M. 
^T^tton, George L. 
.'kratton, Solomon P. 
Streeter, Frank S. 
Stapell, Mrs. Charlotte R. 
Sturtevant, Arthur F. 
Sturtcvant, Mrs. Lucy J. 
SnWoway, Alvah W. 

Sumner, Arthur F. 

Sumner, Mrs. Frederic W. 

Sumner, George F. 

Swan, Mrs. Annie E. 

Swan, Qiarles F. 

Swan, Charles W. 

Swan, Mrs. Sarah H. 

Swan, William B. 

Swascy, Isaac 

Swascy, William H. 

Swcctser, Mrs. Frank E. 

Swctt, Mrs. Lizzie J. 

Swift, Henry M. 

Symmes. Miss Alice F. 

Symonds, Joseph W. 

Taft. Mrs. Henry G. 

Taft, Miss Sarah F. 

Tagsrard. Afrs. B. W. 

Tayjfard, Henry 

Talbot. John 

Talbot, Mrs. Julian 

Talbot, Mrs. Thomas 

Taplcy, Henry F. 

Taplcy. Mrs. Henry F. 

Taylor. Samuel 

Tewksbury. Francis W. 



Thacher, Miss Elizabeth B. 
Thacher, George W. 
Thacher, Mrs. George W. 
Thaxter, Mrs. Elizabeth N. 
Thaxter, Mrs. Joseph B. 
Thayer, Mrs. Annie R. 
Thayer, Arthur W. 
Thayer, Charles M. 
Thayer, Mrs. Earl F. 
Thayer, Edward W. 
Thayer, Frank B. 
Thayer, Mrs. John M. 
Thayer, Miss Katherine M. 
Thayer, Miss Lucy F. 
Thayer, Mrs. Mary O. 
Thomas, Harry L. 
Thompson, Henry T. 
Thomson, Mrs. Mary L. 
Thomdike, Mrs. Albert 
Throop, Miss Lucy A. 
Throop, Mrs. Mary J. C. 
Thurber, Walter 
Thurlo, Mrs. Philene O. • 
Thurlow, Charles 
Tibbits, Mrs. Frederic R. 
Tilden, George T. 
Tilden, Mrs. M. Louise 
Tileston, Mrs. Mary W. 
Tillinghast, James 
Tilton, Mrs. Samuel 
Timpson, Miss Helen K. 
Tindell, Mrs. Charles H. 
Tingley, Mrs. Louisa P. 
Tingley, S. H. 
Tisdale, E. D. 
Tolman, Edward F. 
Tolman,' Mrs. Edward F. 
Toppan, Miss Margaret 
Toppan, Miss Serena D. 
Torr, Miss Grace R. 
Torrcy, Mrs. Charles 
Towle, Mrs. Edward D. 
Tracy, Carlos C. 
Trafton. Mrs. Frank E. 
Tripp, Tob C. 
Tripp, Nathaniel G. 
Trow, Thomas F. 
True. Mrs. Hilton W. 
Trull. Mrs. Evelyn M. 
Truman, Nathan H. 
Trumbull, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Truscott. Charles J. W. 
Tucke, Edward M. 



Tucker, Miss Alice 
Tucker, Herman 
Tucker, Robert W. 
Tufts, James A. 
Tufts, Miss Martha B. 
Turner, Arthur H. 
Turner, Miss Caroline C. 
Turner, Mrs. Edward C. 
Turner, George C 
Turner, Miss Harriet J. 
Turner, Henry A. 
Turner, Nathan S. 
Tuttle, Julius H. 
Twing, Miss Mary A. 
Twitchell, Miss Margaret W. 
Twombly, Samuel W. 
Tyler, Mrs. James M. 
Tyler, Mrs. John F. 
Tyler, Warren P. 
Udell, Corwin S. 
Underbill, Mrs. George F. 
Upham, Mrs. Eliza D. 
Upson, Mrs. Henry S. 
Utley, Samuel 
Utley, Mrs. Samuel 
Van Duzee, Mrs. Jane S. 
Van Nason. Martin 
Van Ness. Mrs. Addie S. 
Vamey, D. A. 
Vamey, William H. 
Vamey, Mrs. Rebecca K, 
Vialle, George E. 
Vialle, Mrs. George E. 
Vidaud. Robert P. 
Vilas, Charles H, 
Viles. Miss Elizabeth J. 
Viles. Mrs. Henry L. 
Vinal, Mrs. Charles C. 
Vogel, Mrs. Louise F. 
Von Utassy, A. W. 
Vorse, Mrs. Albert B. 
Vose, Miss Sarah M. 
Wadlin, Horace G. 
Wadsworth, Henry H. 
Wahlberg. Axel A. 
Waldo, Miss Phebe M. 
Waldron, George D. 
Waldron. Mrs. Sarah E. 
Wales, Mrs. M. A. D. 
Walker, Miss Cecilia M. 
Walker, Elmer W. 
Walker, Miss Louisa D. 
Walker, Reuben E. 



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Walklcy, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wall, Mrs. James H. 
Wallace, Mrs. Jackson 
Walsh, Mrs. William L. 
Warder, Mrs. Mary C. 
Wardwell, William T. 
Ware, Charles E. 
Warner, John G. 
Warner, Mrs. John G. 
Warner, William R. 
Warren, Miss Annabel 
Warren, Charles H. 
Warren, Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Warren, James. 
Waterhousc, Mrs. Ivory F. 
Waterman, Dependence S. 
Waterman, Marcus M. 
Watson, Mrs. Abby W. 
Watson, Miss Mattic S. 
Wattles, Joseph W. 
Wattles, Mrs. Joseph W. 
Weatherbee, Miss Emma 
Weatherly, Mrs. Arthur L. 
Webb, Miss Janet 
Webb, Miss Mary E. 
Webb, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Webber, Frederic W. 
Webster, Edmund G. 
Webster, Mrs. Priscilla H. 
Weeden, William B. 
Weeks, Mrs. Martha O. 
Weis, Miss A. Lora 
Weis, Mrs. Georgina L. 
Welch, Mrs. Thomas J. 
Weld, Mrs. A. Davis 
Weld, Stephen M. 
Weld, Mrs. William G. 
Wellington, Aaron H. 
Wellington, Mrs. Austin C. 
Wellington, Charles W. 
Wellington, Waher J. 
Wellman, Mrs. Charles P. 
Wells, Edward 
Wells, Miss Frances E. 
Wells, Mrs. Gardner F. 
Wells, Mrs. John C 
Wells, Mrs. Kate Gannett 
Wentworth. Mrs. Philip H. 
Wesson, Miss Madeline 
Wesson, Miss Vera W. 
Wheeler, Alden H. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Alden H. 
Wheeler. Baxter F. 



Wheeler, Mrs. Clara F. 
Wheeler, Edwin M. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Elizabeth E. 
.Wheeler, Mrs. Fannie E. 
Wheeler, Harvey, 
Wheeler, Miss H. Eliza 
Wheeler, Leonard 
Wheeler, Mrs. Sarah K 
Wheeler, William 
Wheelock, Arthur 
Wheelock, Charles E. 
Wheelwright, George W., Jr. 
Whipple, Mrs. George M. 
Whitcher, Frank W. 
Whitcomb, Franklin D. 
Whitcomb, Henry C. 
Whitcomb, Henry L. 
Whitcomb, Mrs. Peter S. 
White, Albert H. 
White, Alfred T. 
White, Mrs. Alfred T. 
White, Miss Annie J. 
White, Charles G. 
White, Mrs. Charles T. 
White, Miss Frances E. 
White, Franklin B. 
White, Miss Katherine L. 
White, Mrs. Uoyd K 
White, Miss Phoebe L. 
White, Miss Sarah D. H. 
White, Miss Sarah F. 
Whitehouse, William P. 
Whiting, Frederic A. 
Whiting, Mrs. Frederic A. 
Whiting, George O. 
Whiting, Mrs. Laura B. 
Whiting, Miss Margery 
Whiting, Mrs. Mary E. 
Whiting, Mrs. Mary G. 
Whitney, Mrs. Helen G. 
Whitney, James L. 
Whiton, Charles F. 
Whiton, Miss Laura 
Whiton, Morris F. 
Whittemore. Edward S. 
Whittier, Miss Helen A. 
Wiers, Mrs. Edgar S. 
Wiggin, Miss Tosie M. 
Wiggin, Mrs. Laura N. 
Wilder, Charles W. 
Wilder. Mrs. Charles W. 
Wiley, Miss Mary A. 
Willard, Miss Susan B. 



Williams, A. Gilbert 
Williams, Miss C. Amelia 
Williams, Channing 
Williams, Charles K. 
Williams, Enos D. 
Williams, Franklin D. 
Williams, Frederick B. 
Williams, George B. 
Williams, Mrs. George F. 
Williams, Henry B. 
Williams, Mrs. Manr E. 
Williams, Mrs. Orella A. 
Williams, Robert B. 
Williams, Miss Sarah B. 
Williams, Mrs. Sarah C. 
Williams, Mrs. Sarah G. 
Williams, Mrs. Velma C. 
Williams, Mrs. Webster 
Willis, Miss Hannah W. 
Willis, Henry A. 
Willis, John W. 
Willis, Sarell J. 
Willson, Miss Lucy B. 
Wilson, Miss Mary J. 
Wilmarth, Arthur R. 
Wilmarth, Mrs. Henry D. 
Wilson, Miss Annie E, 
Wilson, Edwin 
Wilson, Mrs. Frances L. 
Wilson, Franklin A. 
Wilson, Mrs. Lewis G. 
Wing, Mrs. Henry T. 
Wing, Wilson D. 
Winkley, Hobart W. 
Winkley, Mrs. J. Wingate 
Winkley. Mrs. Samuel H. 
Winship, J. P. C. 
Winsor, Kobert 
Winsor, Mrs. Robert 
Winsor, Robert, Jr. 
Winton, Henry D. 
Witherbee, Frank B. 
Witherell, Mrs. E. A. Phillips 
Withington. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Wood, Alva S. 
Wood, Charles G. 
Wood, Mrs. Charlotte 
Wood, Mrs. Charlotte R 
Wood, Gorham H. 
Wood. Mrs. Ellen S. 
Wood, Mrs. Henry A. 
Wood, Miss Mary L. 
Wood, Mrs. Sarah J. 



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S. Lonise Wright, Mrs. J. Edward Wyman, Ferdinand A. 

liss Jennie F. Wright, Jerome E. Yeaton, Mrs. John C. 

..han H. Wright, Mrs. Paul R. Young, Mrs. Fred H. 

"redcrick F. Wright, Miss Rebecca W. Young, John F. 

Mrs. Hetty D. Wright, Miss Sabra Young, Mrs, Hannah L. 

, Alex Wrightington, Mrs. Stephen C. Young, Mrs. Lizzie E. 

. Annie R. Wycth, Mrs. Hannah Young, Miss M. Emma 

:. George C Wylie, Eugene C Young, Mrs. Samuel 

^. George H. Wyman, Mrs. Franklin Zwissler, Miss Eleanora 



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NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF UNITARIAN AND 
OTHER CHRISTIAN CHURCHES. 



The National Conference owes its organization to a special meeting of 
the American Unitarian Association, held Dec. 7, 1864, at which, in 
view of the need of enlarged dencmiinational activity, a resolution was 
adopted calling " a convention, to consist of the pastor and two dele- 
gates from each church or parish in the Unitarian denomination, to meet 
in the city of New York, to consider the interests of our cause, and to 
institute measures for its good." 

This Convention was held in New York on the 5th and 6th of April, 
1865, and organized the National Conference. 

Subsequent meetings were held in Syracuse, New York (twice), 
Boston, Saratoga (eleven times), Philadelphia, Washington (twice), 
and Atlantic City (twice). The twenty-second meeting was held in 
Boston, Mass., Sept. 23, 1907, in connection with the meeting of the 
International Council. The twenty-third meeting will be held in Chi- 
cago, 111., Sept. 27-30, 1909. 

Officers, , President; Hon. (Jeorge E. Adams, Chi- 
cago, III, Hon. Thomas J. Morris, Baltimore, Md., Hon. George C. 
Perkins, San Francisco, Cal., Hon. Francis C. Lx>well, Boston, Mass., 
Hon. Marcus P. Knowlton, Springfield, Mass., Alfred T. White, New 
York, Vice-Presidents; Rev. Walter F. Greenman, 684 Astor Street, 
Milwaukee, Wis., General Secretary; Richard C. Humphreys, Boston, 
Mass., Treasurer. 

Council, — Rev. Paul Revere Frothingham, Boston, Mass., Chairman; 
Henry W. Sprague, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Miss Helen S. Garrett, Wilmington, 
Del.; Rev. John W. Day, St. Louis, Mo.; Rev. Clifton M. Gray, 
Charleston, S.C. ; Hon. Horace Davis, LL.D., San Francisco, Cal. : Mrs. 
Emma N. Delano, Chicago, 111. ; Rev. John C. Perkins, D.D., Portland, 



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Me. ; Rev. W. W. Fenn, D.D., Cambridge, Mass. ; Mr. John W. Loud, 
Montreal, Can. ; Rev. Walter F. Greenman, Milwaukee, Wis., General 
Secretary; Richard C. Humphreys, Boston, Mass., Treasurer. 

Committee on Fellowship. — Executive Committee: Rev. Edward A. 
Horton, Boston, Mass.; Rev. George H. Badger, New York, N. Y.; 
Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111. 

New England States: Rev. Edward A. Horton, Boston, Mass. ; Rev. 
Austin S. Garver, Worcester, Mass.; Rev. Augustus M. Lord, D.D., 
Providence, R. L Middle States: Rev. George H. Badger, New York, 
N. Y. ; Rev. John P. Forbes, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Rev. Alfred C. Nicker- 
son, Plainfield, N.J. Western States: Rev Ernest C. Smith, Chicago. 
111. ; Rev. W. Hanson Pulsford, Chiuago, 111. : Rev. "Mary A. Safford, 
Des Moines, la. Southern States: Rev. George A. Thayer, D.D., 
Gndnnati, Ohio ; Rev. Marion F. Ham, Dallas, Tex. ; Rev. William H. 
Ramsay, Louisville, Ky. Rocky Mountain States: Rev. William 
Thurston Brown, Ogden, Utah ; Rev. David Utter, D.D., Denver, Col. ; 
Rev. Frank A. Powell, Helena, Mont. PaciHc States: Rev. Eari M. 
Wilbur, Berkeley, Cal; Rev. Thomas L. Eliot, D.D., Portland Ore., 
Rev. Benjamin A. Goodridge, Santa Barbara, Cal. 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS. 
Constitution. 

Preamble. The Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches was formed in the year 1865, with the purpose of strengthen- 
ing the churches and societies which should unite in it for more and 
better work for the kingdom of God. These churches accept the re- 
ligion of Jesus, holding, in accordance with his teaching, that practical 
religion is stmuned up in love to God and love to man. 

The Conference recognizes the fact that its constituency is Congrega- 
tional in tradition and polity. Therefore, it declares that nothing in 
this Constitution is to be construed as an authoritative test; and we 
cordially invite to our working fellowship any who, while differing 
from us in belief, are in general sympathy with our spirit and our 
practical aims. 

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Article I. The churches and other organizations here represented 
unite themselves in a common body to be known as the National Q>n- 
ference of Unitarian and Other Christian Churches. 

Art. II. This National Conference shall be composed of such dele- 
gates, elected once in two years, not exceeding three from any church 
or other affiliated organization, as may be invited by the Council, and 
accredited to it by a certificate of their appointment. 

Art. III. The Conference shall meet biennially, at such time and 
place as it may designate at its successive biennial sessions, unless 
otherwise directed by the Council. 

Art. IV. Its officers shall consist of a President ; Six Vice-Presi- 
dents ; a General Secretary ; a Treasurer ; a Council of twelve, includ- 
ing the General Secretary and Treasurer, of whom not more than half 
shall be ministers; and a Committee on Fellowship, consisting of fif- 
teen, — three from the Eastern States, three from the Middle States, 
three from the Southern States, three from the Central Western States, 
and three from the Pacific States, — who shall be elected at each meet- 
ing to hold their offices for two years, or until their successors are ap- 
pointed. 

Art. V. The Council, during the intervals of the biennial sessions, 
may fill vacancies in the board of government, and shall have charge 
of all business having reference to the interests of the Conference, and 
intrusted to it by that body, which is hereby declared a purely advisory 
one. 

Art. VI. The National Conference, until further advised by its 
experience, adopts the existing organizations of the Unitarian body as 
the instruments of its activities, and confines itself to recommending 
to them such undertakings and methods as it judges to be in the heart 
of its constituency. 

Art. VII. This Constitution may be amended, at any regular meet- 
ing of the Conference, by a vote of not less than two-thirds of the 
delegates accredited thereto, provided public announcement of the pro- 
posed amendment has been given three months in advance. 

By-laws. 

I. Three months at least before the time fixed by the National 
Conference for its biennial meeting, the Council shall issue a circular 
letter of call to the churches and organizations in its fellowship, ac- 
companying it with a form of certificate, the production of which shall 
be the proof of membership of the Conference until others are elected, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Conference. 



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2. The General Secretary shall keep a full report of the proceedings 
of the body, which shall be published at the expense of the Conference, 
and a copy sent to every delegate. 

3. The Council, at the conclusion of each Conference, shall issue an 
address to the churches and organizations in our body, whether mem- 
bers of this Conference or not, to be published with the proceedings 
of the Conference, containing such advice and encouragement as it 
may deem appropriate, but especially communicating to the churches 
and organizations the recommendations of the Conference in regard to 
plans and methods of work, the amount of money required for the uses 
of the year, the special objects to which they would advise its appro- 
priation, with such suggestions, as to a just apportionment of the bur- 
den, as they may judge expedient and becoming. 

4. The Council shall have it for its duty to keep itself accurately in- 
formed of the plans and operations of the various organizations in our 
body, and of the state of the individual churches ; inviting correspond- 
ence and soliciting reports, to be sent in one month before the biennial 
meeting, in which the general condition of the parish, its Sunday 
School, charities, and general working may be set forth, to the end that 
the Conference may know what the wants and the wishes of the 
churches are, somewhat more particularly than it is possible to learn 
in the necessary hurry of the biennial meeting. 

5. The General Secretary of the National Conference shall be the 
person to whom all letters and communications shall be addressed ; and 
he shall be, ex ofticxo, a member of the Council, and constitute its 
Secretary. 

6. The list of delegates, churches, and organizations represented in 
each Conference shall be part of the Biennial Report. The archives of 
the Conference shall be in the keeping of the General Secretary, subject 
to inspection and temporary possession by the Council. 

7. A collection shall be taken up among the delegates at each Con- 
ference, to which any others may contribute, to defray the incidental 
expenses of the Conference, such as printing the Report, etc. 

8. Each church in this Conference is recommended to defray the 
expenses of its delegates. 

9. All motions and resolutions, not merely of a formal or incidental 
character, which propose any action or declaration on the part of the 
Conference shall, unless the Conference shall otherwise specifically 
order, be referred without debate to the Committee on Business, whose 
duty it shall be to make seasonable reports thereon. In case any 
action by the Conference shall be recommended in a report, a suitable 
time for the same shall be therein designated; and, unless objection 



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shall be made to any report, it shall be deemed approved by the G>n- 
ference. 

ID. The Fellowship Committee shall include in its scope the extend- 
ing of fellowship to ministers from other countries coming to America, 
and desiring to engage in ministerial work among our Unitarian 
churches. 

II. No one admitted by the Fellowship Committee shall be entitled 
to claim insertion in the list of ministers until after being settled in 
some parish or other regular ministerial employment for at least one 
year. 



RULES OF THE UNITARIAN FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE. 

Revised and adopted at the National Conference, Atlantic City, N. J., 

September 23, 1903. 

The Fellowship Committee, elected by the National Conference of 
Unitarian and other Christian Churches, under the provision of its con- 
stitution and by-laws, and acting under the authority of instructions 
embodied in votes passed by the Conference and by the American 
Unitarian Association, shall consist of an executive committee of three 
and six sub-committees. 

Executive Committee. 

The Executive Committee shall have jurisdiction over the authorized 
list of Unitarian ministers published in the Year Book of the denomi- 
nation, co-operating with the editor. 

This committee has power to cause the name of any person to be 
removed from the list, when it is satisfied that, in conduct and char- 
acter, said person has become unworthy to continue to hold the office 
of a minister in the Unitarian fellowship. 

In no case shall unfavorable action be taken till a minister has had 
full opportunity to be heard in the matter, a review of his case having 
been submitted to the sub-committee of the department which origi- 
nally admitted him. 

The Executive Committee also has power to add to the list of min- 
isters the names of those who are, in its judgment, worthy to be en- 
rolled. 

All churches are hereby warned of the serious danger they incur by 
settling a minister whose name does not appear in the authorized list, 
or who has not received the approval of the Feltowship Committee. 



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The executive Committee through its secretary shall keep a full and 
accurate list of admissions, issue certificates, and publish the names of 
approved applicants. 

Sub-committees. 

1. Each sub-committee shall consist of three members. 

2. Applicants for recognition as Unitarian ministers are requested to 
make lox^wn their desire to the chairman of the sub-committee having 
jurisdiction over the territory in which they reside. 

^ Each sub-committee, after thorough investigation, shall report its de- 
cision, together with all material facts in the case, to the secretary of 
the Executive Committee. 

The applicants who may be accepted by the action of a sub-committee 
shall be provisionally admitted for the period of six months. 

Publication of that fact shall be made in one or more of our de- 
nominational papers over the names of the sub-committee which has 
passed on the applicant. 

At the expiration of the said six months he shall be received into 
full fellowship unless meanwhile the Executive Committee has taken 
adverse action. 

3. In deciding upon the fitness of a candidate for admission to the 
Unitarian fellowship, the committee will be guided, above all, by such 
proofs of the moral earnestness and inte^ty of the applicant as may 
be discovered under a careful investigation, and there being a prob- 
ability that he will be able to do good work thereafter. 

It may also take into account the amount and kind of preparation 
that has been made for the work of the ministry, and may advise with 
the candidate as to any further course of study that he may seem to 
require. 

In all cases, however, the committee may at its discretion refuse to 
put the name of a student or candidate upon the list of the Year Book 
before he has been regularly settled over a Unitarian church. 



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DEPARTMENT CONFERENCES. 



The Unitarian Omference of the Middle States and Canada.— 
Organized under the name of the New York State Conference of Uni- 
tarian Churches at New York, April 29, 1(885, — the New York and 
Hudson River Local Conference, which preceded it, having been or- 
ganized at the same place, Dec. 6, 1866. This Conference was en- 
larged, and the name changed to the Unitarian Conference of the Mid- 
dle States and Canada, at Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1890. Annual 
meeting between the first day of November and the first day of De- 
cember. Other meetings at option of Directors. The headquarters 
arc at 104 East 20th Street, New York, where the publications of the 
American Unitarian Association and other Unitarian books and tracts 
are kept on sale and for distribution. 

Societies: Albany, Buffalo (two societies), Dunkirk, Gouvcmeur, 
Ithaca, Jamestown, Newburgh, New York (including Brooklyn, Flush- 
ing, and Staten Island) (eleven societies), Rochester, Schenectady, 
Syracuse, Trenton, Troy, and Yonkcrs, N.Y. ; Elizabeth, Hackensack, 
Montclair, Orange, Passaic, Plainfield, Ridgewood, Rutherford, Sum- 
mit, and Vineland, N.J. ; Erie, Homestead, Lancaster, Meadville, New- 
castle, Pittsburg (two societies), and Philadelphia, Pa. (three so- 
cieties) ; Wilmington, Del.; Baltimore, Md. ; Washington, D.C. ; Mor- 
gantown and WheeHng, W.Va. ; and Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ot- 
tawa, and Toronto, Can. 

Officers: Adelbert Moot, Esq., Buffalo, N.Y., President; Rev. 
Thomas R. Slicer, New York, N.Y., Rev. U. G. B. Pierce, Washington, 
D.C, Mrs. Franklin W. Hooper, Brooklyn, N.Y., W. W. Justice, 
Germantown, Pa., Rev. John Haynes Holmes, New York, N.Y., Rev. 
Franklin C Southworth, Meadville, Pa., Vice-Presidents; Rev. George 
H. Badger, 104 East 20th Street, New York, Secretary; Fisher A. 
Baker, Esq., New York, N.Y., Treasurer. 

Trustees. — Term expires in 1909: Fisher A. Baker, Esq., New 



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York, N.Y.; Milton T. Garvin, Esq., Lancaster, Pa.; Emerson P. 
Harris, Montclair, N.J. 

Term expires in 1910 : Rev. William M. Bnindage, Brooklyn, N.Y. ; 
Rev. Charles E. St. John, Philadelphia, Pa., Rev. Leon A. Harvey, 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Term expires in 191 1: Cyril H. Burdett, Esq., Brooklyn, N.Y. ; 
George R. Bishop, Esq., New York, N.Y. 

Directors, — Term expires in 1909: Mrs. J. Burdet Nash, New 
York, N.Y.; Rev. Alfred R. Hussey, Baltimore, Md.; William G. 
Williams, Rutherford, N.J. 

Term expires in 1910: Rev. John P. Forbes, Brooklyn, N.Y.; Rev. 
Elizabeth Padgham, Rutherford, N.J.; Rev. Arthur H. Winn, Troy, 
N.Y. 

Term expires in 191 1: Rev. Richard W. Boynton, Buffalo, N.Y.; 
Mrs. Sarah A. Kenney, Troy, N.Y. ; William A. Abom, Esq., Orange, 
N.J. 

Within the limits of the Middle States Conference are the two 
following Local Conferences: — 

Meadville Unitarian Conference. 

Orgfanized at Pittsburg, Pa., April 19, 1904. 

Societies: Buffalo (two societies), Dunkirk, and Jamestown, 
N.Y.; Erie, Franklin, McKeesport, Meadville, Newcastle, Pittsburg 
(two societies), Qeveland, Conneaut, Marietta, Salem, and Youngs- 
town, Ohio; Morgantown, W.Va. 

Prof. F. C. Doan, Secretary and Treasurer. 



Joseph Priestley Conference. 

Organized at Wilmington, Del., April 20, 1904. 

Societies: Lancaster, and Philadelphia (three societies). Pa.; Wil- 
mington, Del. ; Baltimore, Md. ; Washington, D.C. ; and Vineland, N.J. 

Officers: Milton T. Garvin, Lancaster, Pa., President; Mrs. J. T. 
Rorer, Philadelphia, Pa., Secretary and Treasurer. 



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The Southern Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches. — Organized at Atlanta, Ga., April 24, 1884. 

Societies: Louisville, Ky. ; Chattanooga and Memphis, Tenn.; 
Baltimore, Md. ; Richmond, Va. ; Atlanta and Faceville, Ga. ; Burgaw, 
Peletier, and Swansboro, N.C.; Charleston, S.C. ; Bristol and Jack- 
sonville, Fla. ; New Orleans, La. ; Dallas, Fort Worth, and San Antonio, 
Tex.; and Oklahoma, Okla. 

Charles H. Behre, Atlanta, Ga., President; C. H. Patterson, New 
Orleans, La.; L. S. Thorne, Dallas, Tex.; Arthur D. Stevens, Jack- 
sonville, Fla., Vice-Presidents; Rev. Marion F. Ham, Dallas, Texas, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Western Unitarian Conference. — Organized at Qncinnati, 
Ohio, May 7, 1852. Incorporated May 20, 1882. Annual meeting 
in May. 

The headquarters are at 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111., where 
the publications of the American Unitarian Association, Unity Pub- 
lishing Committee, the Unitarian Sunday-School Society, and other 
books and tracts are kept on sale and for distribution. The State 
Conferences of Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and 
Missouri Valley are within the limits of the Western Conference. 

Morton D. Hull, Chicago, 111., President; Rev. George A. Thayer, 
D.D., Gncinnati, Ohio, and Hon. A. J. Sawyer, Lincoln, Neb., Vice- 
Presidents; Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111., Secretary; Herbert 
W. Brough, Chicago, 111., Treasurer. 

Directors. — To May, 1910: F. A. Delano, Chicago, 111.; Rev. 
Frank A. Gilmore, Madison, Wis. ; J. W. Hosmer, Chicago, 111. ; Mrs. 
S. F. Lynn, Chicago, 111.; Herbert W. Brough, Chicago, 111.; Rev. 
Frederick M. Bennett, Lawrence, Kan. ; Rev. Florence Buck, Kenosha, 
Wis. 

To May, 191 1 : F. F. Temple, Hinsdale, 111. ; Rev. W. Hanson Puls- 
ford, Chicago, 111.; Rev. Fred V. Hawley, Chicago, 111.; C. S. Udell, 
Grand Rapids, Mich.; Hon. Morton D. Hull, Chicago, 111.; Edwin 
C. Mason, Milwaukee, Wis. ; Rev. George R. Gebauer, Duluth, Minn. 

To May, 1912: Rev. Minot O. Simons, Qeveland, Ohio; Rev. 



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Wilson M. Backus, Minneapolis, Minn.; Rev. Mary A Safford, Des 
Moines, la.; Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111.; Rev. Henry W. 
Foote, Ann Arbor, Mich.; Mrs. C. V. Mersereau, St. Louis, Mo.; 
Mrs. Emma N. Delano, Chicago, 111. 

Rocky Mountain Conference of Unitarian and Other Liberal 
Christian Churches. — Organized at Denver, Col., May 17, 1890. 

Annual meeting in October. Headquarters at Unity Church, Denver. 

Societies: Colorado Springs, Denver, Fort Collins, Greeley, and 
Pueblo, Col.; Ogden and Salt Lake City, Utah; Butte, Great Falls, 
and Helena, Mont. ; Boise and Lewiston, Ida. 

Francis B. Hill, Colorado Springs, Col., President; William T. 
Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah, Secretary; William E. Hutton, Denver, 
Col., Treasurer. 

Pacific Unitarian Conference. — The first session of this Confer- 
ence was held Nov. 2, 1885, at San Francisco. It was organized at 
the same place, Nov. 9, 1886. It meets annually. 

The Conference has its office at Unitarian Headquarters, comer 
of Franklin and Geary Streets, San Francisco, where all Unitarian 
literature can be secured. 

The Pacific Unitarian is the organ of the Conference. It has its 
office at Unitarian Headquarters, — Editor, Charles A. Murdock; Edi- 
torial Committee, Rev. Clarence Reed, Rev. William D. Simonds, Rev. 
John Howland Lathrop, and William Maxwell. 

Societies : Alameda, Berkeley, Eureka, Fresno, Los Angeles, Oak- 
land, Palo Alto, Pomona, Redlands, San Diego, San Francisco (two 
societies), San Jose, Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Santa 
Rosa, and Woodland, Cal. ; Hood River, Portland, and Salem, Ore. ; 
Bellingham, Everett, Seattle, and Spokane, Wash. 

Officers of the Conference: W. H. Gorham, Esq., Seattle, 
Wash., President; J. Conklin Brown, Berkeley, Cal., W. H. Baur- 
hyte, Los Angeles, Cal., Vice-Presidents; Mrs. Mary B. Presson, 
San Francisco, Cal., Secretary and Treasurer, 

Directors: Francis Cutting, Oakland, Cal.; Hon. Horace Davis, 



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San Francisco, Cal.; Rev. B. A. Goodridge, Santa Barbara, Cal. ; 
Mrs. C. S. Hamilton, Salem Ore. ; Rev. Bradford Leavitt, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. ; W. F. Mixon, Woodland, Cal. ; George H. Murdock, Ala- 
meda, Cal. ; W. P. Olds, Portland, Ore. ; W. H. Payson, Esq., Berke- 
ley, Cal.; Miss Estelle Shepard, Redlands, Cal. 

Within the limits of the Pacific Unitarian Conference are the two 
following Local Conferences: — 

North Pacific Conference. 

Organized at Portland, Ore., Oct. i, 1902. 

Societies: Hood River, Portland, and Salem, Ore.; Bellingham, 
Everett, Seattle, and Spokane, Wash. ; and Boise, Ida. ; Butte, Great 
Falls, and Helena, Mont. 

Hon. E. L. Smith, Hood River, Ore., President; Rev. William G. 
Eliot, Jr., Portland, Ore., Corresponding Secretary; E. C. Stuart, Port- 
land, Ore,, Recording Secretary and Treasurer, 

South Pacific Conference. 

Organized at Santa Ana, Cal., Jan. 6, 1903. 

Societies: Los Angeles, Pomona, Redlands, San Diego, Santa 
Ana, and Santa Barbara, Cal. 
W. L. G. Haskins, President; Rev. E. Stanton Hodgin, Secretary. 



WESTERN STATE CONFERENCES. 



Illinois Conference. — Organized at Bloomington, 111., Nov. 11, 
1875. One meeting a year. 

Societies: Alton, Aurora, Bloomington, Buda, Chicago (six so- 
cieties), Evanston, Geneseo, Geneva, Hinsdale, Mattoon, Moline, 
Quincy, Sheffield, Shelby County Mission, Shelbyville (two societies), 
Streator, and Urbana. 



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Rev. Fred V. Hawley, Chicago, President; Rev. Albert R. Vail, 
Urbana, Vice-President; Rev. John H. Mueller, Bloomington, Secre- 
tary. 

Iowa Association. — Organized at Burlington, la., June i, 1879. 
Incorporated at Dcs Moines, June 5, 1879. Headquarters, Dcs 
Moines. 

Societies: Burlington, Cherokee, Davenport, Decorah, Des 
Moines, Humboldt, Ida Grove, Iowa City, Keokuk, Perry, Rock 
Rapids, Sioux City, and Washta. 

Granville B. Healy, President; Rev. Eleanor E. Gordon, Des 
Moines, Secretary. 

Michigan Conference. — Organized at Jackson, Mich., Oct. 21, 1875. 

Societies: Ann Arbor, Brooklyn, Detroit, Grand Haven, Grand 
Rapids (two societies), Harrietta, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Manistee, 
Midland, Mt. Pleasant, Ousted, Sherwood, Sturgis, Mich. ; Cincinnati 
and Toledo, Ohio. ; and Indianapolis, Ind. 

C. S. Udell, Grand Rapids, President; A. C. Kingman, Battle Creek, 
Secretary. 

Minnesota Conference. — Organized at St. Paul, Nov. 17, 1887. 

Societies: Adrian, Duluth, Hanska, Luveme, Minneapolis (two 
societies), St. Anthony Park, St. Ooud, St. Paul, Underwood, and 
Winona, Minn.; Fargo, No. Dak.; and Brookings, So. Dak. 

Ole Jorgensen, Hanska, President; Rev. George R. Gebauer, Duluth, 
Secretary. 

Missouri Valley Conference. — Organized, as the Kansas Unitarian 
Conference, Dec. 2, 1880. 

Societies : Beloit, Lawrence, Topeka, and Wichita, Kan. ; Lincoln, 
Omaha, and Ord, Neb. ; and Kansas City, Mo. 

Paul F, Clark, Lincoln, Neb., President; Rev. J. H. Jones, Topeka, 
Kan., Secretary. 



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Wisconsin Conference of Unitarian and Independent Societies.^ — 
Organized at Sheboygan, Wis., Oct. 24, 1866. 

Societies: Arcadia, Greenwood, Hillside, Kenosha, Madison, 
Menomonie, Milwaukee, Monroe, Neillsville, and West Superior. 

Rev. Frank A. Gilmore, Madison, Secretary, 



STATE, COUNTY, AND LOCAL CONFERENCES IN 
NEW ENGLAND. 



Cape Cod Conference of Unitarian Congregational and Other 
Liberal Christian Churches. — Organized at Barnstable, Mass., Nov. 
30, 1870. Annual meeting in June. A September meeting optional 
with the Executive Board. 

Societies: Barnstable, Brewster, and Sandwich. 

J. Henry Sears, Brewster, President; Rev. Robert P. Doremus, 
Barnstable, Secretary, 

Channing Conference. — Organized at Providence, R.I., April 17, 
1867. Meetings held semi-annually; annual meeting in April. 

Societies : Brooklyn and New London, Conn. ; Attleboro, Dighton, 
Fairhaven, Fall River, Nantucket, New Bedford, Norton, Taunton, 
and Vineyard Haven, Mass.; Newport, Providence (four societies), 
Tiverton, and Westerly, R.I. 

J. C. Tripp, Fairhaven, Mass., President; Rev. George W. Kent, 
Provilence, R.L, Secretary. 

Connecticut Valley Conference of Unitarian Congregational and 
Other .Christian Churches. — Organized at Greenfield, Mass., Jan. 16, 
1867. Meetings held in May and October, the latter being the annual 
meeting. 

Societies: Amherst, Bemardston, Chicopee, Deerfield, Florence, 



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Greenfield, Holyoke, Monroe Bridge, Montague, Northampton, North- 
field, Pittsfield, Rowe, Springfield, Turner's Falls, and Warwick, 
Mass. ; Brattleboro and Windsor, Vt. ; Hartford, New London, WilH- 
mantic, and Derby, Conn. 

B. T. Henry, Rowe, President; Rev. Alfred Free, Florence, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, 

Essex Conference of Unitarian Churches. — Organized at Salem, 
Mass., Dec. ii, 1866. Three meetings a year. 

Societies: Beverly, Danvers, Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, 
Lynn, Marblehead, Newburyport, North Andover, Peabody, Salem : — 
First Church, Second Church, North Church. 

Edward C. Browne, Salem, President; Joseph Wormstead, Marble- 
head, Vice-President; Rev. Peter H. Goldsmith, D.D., Salem, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer, 

Hancock Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches. — Organized at Bar Harbor, Aug. 8, 1889. A conference 
of the local and summer Liberal churches in Hancock County, Maine. 

Societies: Bar Harbor, Ellsworth, Lamoine, Prospect Harbor, 
Sullivan, Winter Harbor, and West Gouldsboro. 

Rev. Henry H. Saunderson, President; Mr. B. C. Reynolds, Bar 
Harbor, Me., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Maine Conference of Unitarian Churches. — Organized at 
Waterville, June 28, 1864. 

Societies : Augusta, Bangor, Bar Harbor, Belfast, Brunswick, Ca- 
lais, Cape Rozier, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Farmington, Fort 
Fairfield, West Gouldsboro, Houlton, Kennebunk, East Lamoine, 
Naples, Portland (two societies), Presque Isle, Saco, Standish, Sul- 
livan, Waterville, Winter Harbor, Yarmouth, and York. 

Rev. Alva R. Scott, Bangor, President; Hon. Norman L. Bassett, 
Augusta, Vice-President, Rev. Edwin M. Slocombe, Augusta, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 



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The Norfolk Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches. — Organized at Dedham, Mass., Dec. 5, 1866. Not less 
than two meetings during the year. 

Societies: Canton, Dedham, Dorchester (six societies), Dover, 
Hyde Park, Medfield, MiUon, Needham, Quincy, Randolph, Roslin- 
dale, Sharon, Sherbom, South Natick, Walpole, West Roxbury, West- 
wood, Wollaston. 

George Kuhn Clarke, President; Rev. George M. Bodge, 11 Mere- 
dith Street, West Roxbury, Secretary and Treasurer, 

New Hampshire Unitarian Association. — Organized at Man- 
chester, Feb. 25, 1863. Incorporated Sept. 11, 1883. One meeting 
a year, in June. 

Societies : Andover, Bath, Charlestown, Concord, Cornish, Dover, 
Dublin, Exeter, Fitzwilliam, Francestown, Franklin, Hampton Falls 
Keene, Leconia, Lancaster, Lebanon, Littleton, Manchester, Milford, 
Nashua, Newington, Peterboro, Portsmouth, Rochester, Walpole, 
Wilton, East Wilton, Wolfboro. 

Clarence E. Carr, Andover, President; Rev. Henry C. McDougall, 
Franklin, N.H., General Secretary; Rev. H. Sumner Mitchell, Keene, 
Recording Secretary; Dr. John W. Staples, Franklin, Treasurer. 

The North Middlesex Congregational Conference of Unitarian 
and Other Christian Churches. — Organized Dec. 18, 1866. Meet- 
ings held in June and October, the latter being the annual meeting. 

Societies: Ashby, Ayer, Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, Lowell, 
Pepperell, Shirley, Stow, Tyngsboro, Westford, West Townsend, 
Mass.; Dublin, Francestown, Milford, Nashua, Peterboro, Wilton, 
East Wilton, N.H. 

Abiel J. Abbot, Westford, President; Rev. George C. Wright, 
Lowell, Secretary. 

Plymouth and Bay Conference. — Organized at Hingham, Mass., 
Feb. 5, 1867. Meetings held in spring and autumn. The annual meet- 
ing at the spring session. 



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Societies: Braintree, Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, West 
Bridgewater, Brockton, Cohasset, Duxbury, Eastondale, East Wey- 
mouth, Green Harbor, Hingham (three societies), Kingston, Marsh- 
field, Middleboro, North Abington, North Easton, Norwell, Pem- 
broke, Plymouth, Rockland, Scituate, Whitman. 

Hon. William S. Kyle, Plymouth, President; George O. Wales, 
Braintree, Rev. C. Y. De Normandie, Kingston, Vice-Presidents; Rev. 
William R. Cole, Cohasset, Secretary; Edward Nichols, Cohasset, 
Treasurer. 

South Middlesex Conference of Congregational (Unitarian) and 
Other Christian Societies. — Organized at Cambridgeport, Mass., Dec. 
12, 1866. Two meetings a year, the first being the annual meeting. 

Societies: Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Billerica, Cambridge 
(two societies), Carlisle, Concord, Framingham, Lexington, East Lex- 
ington, Lincoln, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Natick, Newton, Newton 
Centre, West Newton, Reading, Somerville (two societies), Stone- 
ham, Sudbury, Waltham, Watertown, Waverly, Wayland, Wellesley 
Hills, Weston, Winchester, Wobum. 

Archibald M. Howe, Esq., Cambridge, President; Rev. Harry Lutz, 
Billerica, Secretary. 

The Worcester Conference of Congregational (Unitarian) and 
Other Christian Societies. — Organized at Worcester, Mass., Dec. 12, 
1866. Meetings in January, May, and October, the first being the 
annual meeting. 

Societies: Athol (two societies), Barre, Berlin, Bolton, Brookfield, 
Qinton, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Harvard, Hopedale, Hubbards- 
ton, Hudson, Lancaster, Leicester, Leominster, Marlboro, Mendon, 
Millbury, Northboro, Petersham, Sterling, Sturbridge, Templeton, 
Upton, Uxbridge, Ware, Westboro, Winchendon, Worcester (three 
societies). 

Hon. Jonathan Smith, Clinton, President; Rev. James C. Duncan, 
Qmton, Secretary. 



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UNITARIAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL SOCIETY. 



The Unitarian Sunday-School Society was organized in 
History. Boston, April i8, 1827. Its members were pastors, 
teachers, and officers from the ten Unitarian Sunday Sdiools 
in the city. Dr. Tuckerman was its first President, and Rev. Frederic 
T. Gray, the Secretary. Some of the workers at this period were 
such ministers as Dr. Channing, Henry Ware, Jr., Rev. Ezra Gannett, 
Rev. John Pierpont, Rev. N. L. Frothingham, and such laymen as Dr. 
John Ware, Dr. H. I. Bowditch, Francis Jackson, Ellis Gray Loring, 
and Artemas Carter. 

When, in 1 83 1, the Society expanded, other prominent characters 
entered into the work, such as Rev. Joseph Allen, of Northboro ; Rev. 
Samuel Gilman, Charleston, S.C. ; Rev. S. G. Bulfinch, Augusta, Ga. ; 
Hon. Samuel Hoar, Concord, Mass. ; Hon. Stephen C. Phillips, Salem, 
Mass. ; John W. Foster, Portsmouth, N.H. 

The first annual meeting was held Dec. 14, 1827, in the Federal 
Street Church. Mr. Horace Mann was among those who took part in 
the public exercises at a later date. In the year 1852 a series of manu- 
als was issued, prepared by these ministers : Ephraim Peabody, S. G. 
Bulfinch, Rufus Ellis, E. E. Hale, F. D. Huntington, Dr. John H. 
Morison, George W. Briggs. In 1854 the Society was reorganized. 
Among the devoted secretaries who have passed away were Warren H. 
Cudworth, James P. Walker, L. J. Livermore. In 1885 the Society 
was incorporated. 

The publication scope of the Society has made steady 
lo* • advance the past fifteen years. The record may very 
Publications, ^^jj ^^ jHustrated in the growth from a slender list of 
manuals and text-books to a large descriptive catalogue, which con- 
tains the titles of over one hundred and fifty different publications, 
These represent working material constantly in demand in our Sun- 



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day Schools, covering all phases of Sunday-School activity. Attention 
has been given to modern methods of pedagogy, the latest scholarship 
has been drawn upon, and pictorial aids have been wisely employed. 
Every Other Sunday has obtained a wide circulation in all our Sunday 
Schools, and the " Song and Service Book " is so widely used as to 
act as a uniting element throughout the denomination. 

A Western Headquarters is maintained in Chicago 

by the National Society, where a complete supply of 

^ publications is kept. The catalogue of the Unitarian 

Sunday-School Society contains the titles of all the publications hitherto 

issued by the Western organization. 

The object of the Unitarian Sunday-School Society is " to 
^^^ promote moral and religious education," and this it seeks 
to do greatly through the Sunday Schools. The Society not only 
publishes the regular manuals, service bocJcs, and appliances, and is- 
sues Every Other Sunday, the only paper in our denomination for 
young people, but it also serves in the following channels: i. It sup- 
plies tracts and different statements of faith, in any ntunber of copies, 
without charge. 2. It acts as a missionary and recruiting agency for 
the denomination in all parts of the country. 3. It joins with local 
Conferences in planning and carrying on forward movements. 4. It 
sustains courses of instruction and lectures. 5. It indorses and helps 
the various Sunday-School Unions now doing such good work. 6. 
It maintains a Book Department where the appliances for Sunday- 
School work can be obtained. 7. It provides some one at the head 
of the organization to respond to calls for addresses and consultation. 
The Society's primary object being a co-operative one, for the welfare 
of the Sunday Schools, all the business transactions are at the smallest 
profit. 

A payment of ten dollars ($10) at any one time constitutes 

a person a Life Member of the Society. A contribution to 

the funds of the Society, small or large, by any parish or Sunday 



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School, constitutes a membership for the current year. Said Sun- 
day School is entitled to appoint three persons who become voting 
members of the corporation for that year, beginning with the annual 
meeting of the Society next following the receipt of said contribution. 
Such persons are denominated Delegate Members. 

The Society holds two sessions during the year, one, the Annual 
Meeting, in Boston, Anniversary Week, the other in different places, 
usually some date in October. 

Board of Directors, — Rev. Edward A. Horton, President; 

^ ' Charles A. Murdock, San Francisco, Cal., Rev. Augustus 

M. Lord, D.D., Providence, R.I., Vice-Presidents; Miss Louisa P. 

Parker, Cambridge, Mass., Clerk; Richard C. Humphreys, Dorchester, 

Mass., Treasurer, 

Term expires 1910: Rev. William M. Brundage, Brooklyn, N.Y. ; 
Miss Anna M. Bancroft, Hopedale, Mass.; Charles H. Johnson, 
Quincy, Mass. ; Rev. A. M. Rihbany, Toledo, Ohio ; Mrs. Chandler W. 
Smith, Manchester, N.H. 

Term expires 191 1 : John H. Edwards, Waverly, Mass. ; Rev. 
Richard W. Boynton, Buffalo, N.Y. ; Allen French, Concord, Mass.; 
Rev. Frank S. C. Wicks, Indianapolis, Ind. ; Mrs. Herbert J. Gumey, 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Term expires 191 2: Rev. William I. Lawrance, Winchester, Mass. ; 
Frank H. Burt, Newton, Mass. ; Rev. Clifton M. Gray, Charleston, 
S.C. ; Benjamin James, South Boston, Mass.; Miss Sara C. Bullard, 
Dorchester, Mass. 

Standing Committees, — Publication, Messrs. Horton, Lord, Miss 
Bullard, Miss Bancroft, and Miss Parker; Finance, Messrs. Humph- 
reys, Edwards, Murdock, Brundage, and Mrs. Gurney; Meetings, 
Messrs. Lawrance, Wicks, with President and Clerk, ex ofHciis; Out- 
look and Missions, Messrs. French, Gray, Boynton, James, and Mrs. 
Smith; Book Department, Messrs. Johnson, Burt, and Rihbany. 

The President's office, salesroom of the Society, and publication of- 
fice of Every Other Sunday are at the American Unitarian Associa- 
tion Building, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, and are open daily from 9 a.m. 



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till 5 P.M. Philip C. McMurdie, H. W. Packard, and Miss E. S. Hos- 
mer, Book Dq)artment ; Louis C. Dubord, Shipping Clerk. Miss H. E. 
Stevenson, President's office. 

Western Headquarters of the Sunday-School Society, 175 Dearborn 
Street, Chicago. Full assortment of the puWications. Orders filled 
promptly. Miss Lina Scheible in charge. 

Western Advisory Board. — Rev. W. Hanson Pulsford, Chicago, 111. ; 
Mrs. F. C. Southworth, Meadville, Pa.; Mrs. Charles Hayward, Chi- 
cago, 111.; W. A. Barnes, Chicago, 111.; B. F. Felix, Chicago, 111.; 
Prof. W. H. Carruth, Lawrence, Kan. ; Rev. J. H. Crooker, D.D., Ros- 
lindale, Mass. 

A descriptive catalogue of the Society's publications will be fur- 
nished to any one applying for the same. 



SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNIONS. 



The Unitarian Sunday-School Union, Boston, Mass. — Organized 
Nov. 12, 1883. 

Meetings on the third Monday of each month, from October to 
April, inclusive. Annual meeting in April. Officers: Clarence B. 
Humphreys, Dorchester, President; Louis P. Nash, Vice-President; 
Mrs. C. L. Stebbins, Cambridge, Mass., Secretary; Amasa W. B. 
HuflF, Treasurer. 

The Channing Conference Sunday-School Union. — Organized at 
Taimton, Mass., Nov. 7, 1900. Meetings, November and February. 

Rev. Joel H. Metcalf, Taunton, President; Miss Carrie M. Bright- 
man, Fall River, Secretary. 

New York Unitarian Sunday-School Union. — Organized at New 
York, N.Y., Nov, 9, 1892. Meetings are held in November, January, 
March, and May. Annual meeting in May. 



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Officers. O. Ellery Edwards, Jr., President ; Rev. Charles Graves, 
Passaic, N.J., Secretary; John L. Salter, Jr., Treasurer, 

Conference of Unitarian Sunday-School Superintendents, Boston, 
Mass. — Organized June 3, 1897. Reorganized April 30, 1906. 

Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of November and April, 
with a third meeting at the option and call of the Executive Com- 
mittee. OfKcers: Charles Johnson, President; Mrs. Clara B. Beatley, 
Vice-President; Samuel Thurber, Jr., Newton, Mass., Secretary-Treas- 
urer. 



THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE. 



National Alliance of Unitarian and Other Liberal Christian 
Women. — Organized Oct. 24, 1890; incorporated January, 1902. An- 
nual meeting in May. 

National Officers, 1909-11. — Miss Emma C. Low, Brooklyn, N.Y., 
President; Mrs. Emily A. Fifield, 4 Ashland Street, Dorchester, Mass., 
Recording Secretary; Mrs. Mary B. Davis, 19 East 44th Street, New 
York, N.Y., Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. Lucia Clapp Noyes, Mat- 
tapan, Mass., Treasurer. 

Committee on Appeals. — Mrs. Prescott Keyes, Concord, Mass., 
Chairman. 

Committee on Cheerful Letter Exchange. — Miss Helen L. Bayley, 
Cambridge, Mass., Chairman. 

Committee to confer with the American Unitarian Association. — 
Mrs. Percy G. Bolster, Chairman; Mrs. Mary B. Davis, Mrs. C. W. 
Clifford, Mrs. Myles Standish, and President, ex officio. 

Post-office Mission Committee. — Mrs. Frederick T. Lord, Boston, 
Chairman. 

Committee on Study Classes. — Mrs. J. A. Tufts, 27 Pine Street, 
Exeter, N.H., Chairman. 

Committee on Finance. — Mrs. George G. Saville, Saville Street. 
Quincy, Mass., Chairman. 



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Committee on Southern Missionary Work. — Mrs. Abby A. Peter- 
son, Jamaica Plain, Mass., Chairman. 

The objects of the Alliance are: — 

1. Primarily, to quicken the religious life of our Unitarian churches, 
and to bring the women of the denomination into closer acquaintance, 
co-operation, and fellowship. 

2. To promote local organizations of women for missionary and de- 
nominational work, and to bring the same into association. 

3. T# collect and disseminate information regarding all matters of 
interest to the denomination, namely : — 

Needs of local societies ; facilities for meeting these needs ; work to 
be done; collection and distribution of money, etc. 

4. And to devise ways and means for more efficient usefulness. 

For further information see Manual. 

Chicago Associate Alliance. — Composed of the branches in the 
four Chicago churches and those of Evanston, Geneva, and Hinsdale. 

It has two hundred and three members, and holds six meetings 
each year between the first of October and the first of June. 

Mrs. Ernest C. Smith, President; Miss Ethel W. Mason, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

New England Associate Alliance. — Organized at Boston, Mass., 
Oct. 22, 1891. 

It holds at least three meetings a year, two of which usually are 
held outside of Boston, and, when possible, in some other State than 
Massachusetts. Each New England State is represetnted upon its 
Executive Board. Its object is to promote religious fellowship among 
its members and to increase the co-operation of the branches in the 
missionary work of the denomination. 

Mrs. Alma Faunce Smith, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, President; 
Mrs. Alice D. Sanborn, 166 Washington Street, Quincy, Mass., Secre- 
tary. 

New York League of Unitarian Women. — Meetings held on the 
first Friday of each month, from November to May, inclusive. 



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It is composed of the Alliance branches in the three Unitarian so- 
cieties in Manhattan, New York City, the five in Brooklyn, and those 
in Flushing, Newburg, Yonkers, and Staten Island, N.Y., and Eliza- 
beth, Orange, Passaic, Plainfield, Rutherford, Hackensack, Montclair, 
and Ridgewood, N J. 

Mrs. Edwin M. Wheeler, President; Mrs. Walter U. Lawson, lo 
Delaven Terrace, Yonkers, N.Y., Recording Secretary; Miss Ida Grib- 
ben, 314 Halsey Street, Brooklyn, N.Y., Corresponding Secretary, 

Worcester League of Unitarian Women. — Organized in Wor- 
cester, May 24, 1889. 

Fifteen churches of the Worcester Conference, besides the three 
Worcester churches, are represented in its membership. 

Meetings are held on the third Wednesday of each month, from No- 
vember to May, inclusive. 

Mrs. Joseph M. Davis, President; Mrs. Samuel P. Capen, Secretary, 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES. 



The Young People's Religious Union. — Organized at Boston, May 
28, 1896, comprising 130 unions. 

The Young People's Religious Union is the successor of the National 
Bureau of Unity Clubs, organized May 26, 1887, and of the National 
Guild Alliance, organized Nov. 18, 1889. 

The objects of the Union are: (o) to foster the religious life; (ft) 
to bring the young people of our several churches into closer re- 
lations with one another; and (c) to spread rational views of religion, 
and to put into practice such principles of life and duty as tend to 
uplift mankind. The cardinal principles of the Union are truth, wor- 
ship, and service. 

Any young people's society may become a member of the Union by 
affirming in writing its sympathy with the general objects of the 



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Union, adopting its cardinal principles, making a contribution to its 
treasury, and sending to the secretary a list of its officers. 

The annual meeting is held in May at such day and place as the 
Executive Board may appoint. Special union meetings are held as 
often as several societies niay arrange. 

The Union has its headquarters at Room ii in the American 
Unitarian Association Building, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, in charge 
of the Secretary, whose office hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; 
Saturdays, 9 to i. Organization hints, hymnals, helps, and other 
suggestive material are supplied to societies. The national officers 
furnish speakers for initial meetings, visit unions, and help in all ways 
possible. 

The Union maintains a department in the Christian Register and 
an occasional one in the Pacific Unitarian, under the charge of the 
Secretary, for notes, notices, helps, and all matters of interest to 
the union. 

It also publishes, in connection with the American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation and the Women's Alliance, Word and Work, which is a bulletin 
of work. 

Executive Board, 1909-10. — Rev. Henry H. Saunderson, Cam- 
bridge,, Mass., President; Rev. John Haynes Holmes, New York, 
N.Y., Miss Isabelle F. Walter, Charleston, S.C., Rev. Henry Wilder 
Foote, Ann Arbor, Mich., Rev. John H. Lathrop, Berkeley, Cal., 
Rev. A. D. K. Shurtleff, East Boston, Mass., Rev. Frances R. Sturte- 
vant, Dorchester, Mass., Vice-Presidents; Miss Grace R. Torr, Pea- 
body, Mass., Secretary; O. Arthur McMurdie, Boston, Mass., 
Treasurer, 

Directors, — Term expires 1909: Maine, Rev. Edwin M. Slocombe, 
Augusta; New Hampshire, Miss Ethel Everett, Franklin; Vermont, 
Rev. Charles J. Staples, Burlington; Massachusetts, Miss Emily J. 
aine, Dorchester; H. Houghton Schumacher, Quincy; Miss Eula 
Faxon, Brockton; Miss Caroline S. Burrage, West Newton; Sanford 
Bates, Dorchester; Mr. Joseph A. Harwood, Littleton; Harold S. 
Lyon, West Bridgewater; Miss Harriet C. Stimson, Fitchburg; New 
York, Mrs. Mary G. White, Syracuse; Fennsylvania, Mrs. Oscar B. 
Hawes, Germantown; Canada, Dakers Cameron, Montreal. 



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Federations of Young People's Societies. 



Boston Federation. — Organized December 12, 1902. Meetings 
held in November, February, and April, the latter being the annual 
meeting. Eighteen unions. 

O. Arthur McMurdie, 60 State Street, Boston, President; Herbert 
C. Beck, Vice-President; Miss Harriet E. Underbill, 53 State Street, 
Secretary; John B. Babcock, 3rd, Treasurer. 

Channing Federation. — Organized April 21, 1907. Meetings held 
twice a year. Eleven unions. 

Arthur W. Sampson, Fall River, Mass., President; Miss Florence' 
L. Cowles, Norton, Mass., Secretary. 

Essex Federation. — Organized November 19, 1901. Meetings 
held twice a year. Seven unions. 

Sidney H. Holden, Salem, President; Miss Mercedes H. Torr, 
Peabody, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Federation of Young People's Societies in North Middlesex 
County and Vicinity. — Meetings held in September and April, the 
latter being the annual meeting. Organized Feb. 24, 1900. Three 
unions. 

Rev. L. L. Greene, Chelmsford, President; Miss Lucy Adams, 
Littleton, Secretary. 

South Middlesex Federation. — Organized March 7, 1902. Fif- 
teen unions. Meetings held first Sunday of May and second Simday 
of October. 

Rev. Harry Lutz, Billerica, President; Miss Josephine Bruorton, 
Bedford, Secretary. 

Pilgrim Federation of Unitarian Young People. — Organized 
March i, 1906. Includes unorganized young people in its member- 



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ship. Young people from nine churches belong. Meetings: March, 
June, September, December ; the annual meeting being in December. 

Harold Lyon, West Bridgewater, President; Miss Helen I. Keith, 
North Easton, Secretary. 

North Worcester Federation. — Meetings held twice a year. 
Eleven unions. 

Rev. Abbot Peterson, President; Miss Helen Greenwood, Leom- 
inster, Secretary. 

South Worcester Federation. — Meetings held some Sunday in 
January, April, and October, with election at the January meeting. 
Nine unions. 

Edwin L. Clarke, Worcester, President; Miss May A. Leland, 
Worcester, Secretary and Treasurer. 



GENERAL UNITARIAN SOCIETIES. 



Unitarian Historical Society. — The purpose of this society is to 
collect and preserve books, manuscripts, periodicals, pamphlets, pic- 
tures, and memorabilia which describe and illustrate the history of 
the Unitarian movement, and to stimulate an interest in the writing 
of the history and preparing of the records of Unitarian churches. 

Henry H. Edes, Esq.fPresident ; Rev. George H Reed, Belmont 
Mass., Secretary; Rev. Louis C. Cornish, Librarian. 

Isles of Shoals Summer Meetings Association. — Holds meetings 
one week in July, each year, at the Isles of Shoals. Thomas H. El- 
liott, President; Miss Florence Everett, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Mass., Secretary. 

Nantucket Summer Meetings. — Holds meetings the first week of 
July every two years, alternating with the National Conference. Rev. 



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Edward Day, President; Rev. John F. Meyer, South Natick, Mass., 
Secretary, 

The Unitarian Temperance Society. — Organized at the meeting 
of the National Conference at Saratoga, N.Y., Sept. 23, 1886. In- 
corporated Nov. 12, 1894. 

Its purpose is " to work for the cause of temperance in whatever 
ways may seem to it wise and right ; to study the social problems of 
poverty, crime, and disease, in their relation to the use of intoxicating 
drinks, and to diffuse whatever knowledge may be gained ; to discuss 
methods of temperance reform; to devise and, so far as possible, 
to execute plans for practical reform; to exert by its meetings and 
by its membership such influence for good as by the grace of God 
it may possess." 

The society is composed of such persons as may be willing to 
express their co-operation by the payment of one dollar annually. 
A payment of twenty-five dollars (or that sum within five years from 
the date of the first instalment) constitutes one a life-member. The 
annual meeting is held in Boston in the month of May, in Anniversary 
Week, the hour and place to be fixed by the Executive Board. 

The headquarters of the Society are at the American Unitarian 
Association Building, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Room 5, where C. L. 
Stebbins, the Publication Agent of the Society, may be consulted. 
The Society's literature may be obtained in Room i of the Association 
Building. 

Rev. Joseph H. Crooker, D.D., Roslindale, Mass., President; Rich- 
ard C. Humphreys, Dorchester, Mass., Vice-President; Rev^A. D. K. 
Shurtleff, East Boston, Secretary; Charles H. Stearns, Brookline, 
Mass., Treasurer; Charles E. Nott, Boston, Assistant Treasurer. 

The Unitarian Fellowship for Social Justice. — Organized at the 
Anniversary meetings held in Boston, Mass., May 29, 1908. Its pur- 
pose is " to provide a fellowship for united action against all forms 
of social injustice, and to sustain one another in the application of 
our religious ideals to the needs of the present day." The Fellowship 



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is composed of those Unitarians, ministers and laymen, who are in 
sympathy with its purpose, and who pay the annual dues of one 
dollar. The officers are Rev. John Haynes Holmes, New York, Pres- 
ident; Hon. Oarence E. Carr, Andover, N.H., Rev. Oscar B. Hawes, 
Germantown, Pa., Rev. Jenkin Lloyd Jones, Chicago, 111., Rev. William 
T. Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah, and Rev. John W. Rowlett, D.D., 
Atlanta, Ga., Vice-Presidents ; Rev. W. W. Peck, Winchendon, Mass., 
Secretary-Treasurer ; Executive Committee, officers, and Rev. D. Roy 
Freeman, Rev. Earl C. Davis and Rev. John H. Applebee. The 
annual meeting will be held in Anniversary Week. 



UNITARIAN CLUBS. 



Boston: The Channing Club, Boston, Mass. — Organized March 
26, 1887. 

Membership is limited to one hundred and twenty-five, and any 
regular attendant at a Unitarian church is eligible. Meetings on the 
fourth Monday of January, February, April, and October, the last 
being the annual meeting. Albert H. Hall, President; Frederick W. 
Porter, 66 Walnut Street, Dorchester, Secretary. 

Boston: The Unitarian Club, Boston, Mass. — Organized Jan. 
26, 1882. 

The membership is limited to two hundred and fifty Unitarian lay- 
men. 

Meetings on the second Wednesday of the month, October to 
April inclusive, at the Hotel Vendome, at which dinner is served, and 
some denominational, religious, or philanthropic subject, or some 
other topic of public moment, is discussed. The annual meeting 
occurs on the second Wednesday of January. 

Walter Channing, M.D., President; Charles W. Birtwell, 43 Charity 
Building, Boston, Secretary; Francis H. Brown, M.D., 28 State Street, 
Boston, Treasurer. 



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California: Unitarian Club of California. — Organized at San 
Francisco, February, 1890. 

Composed of gentlemen from churches of all creeds in San Fran- 
cisco and other churches throughout the State. Membership limited 
to two hundred. Five banquets a year. 

Joseph Hutchinson, President; Edward Bonnell, loi Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, Cal., Secretary. 

Chicago : The Unitarian Club of Chicago, 111. — Organized April, 
1881. 

Membership open to the members and ministers of the Unitarian 
congregations of Chicago and vicinity. Meetings held monthly, except 
during the summer. 

The President is chosen for each meeting by a Committee of Man- 
agers. 

Connecticut Valley: The Liberal Layman's Club of the Con- 
necticut Valley. — Organized at Northampton, Mass., Nov. 15, 1898. 

The membership consists of gentlemen of Unitarian and other 
Liberal churches of the valley. Meetings held in Northampton three 
times a year. 

Herbert C. Parsons, Greenfield, President, , Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

Harvard Unitarian Club. — Organized November i, 1894. Its ob- 
ject is to bring Unitarian Students of the Divinity School of Harvard 
University into more immediate contact with the actual working min- 
istry. Its membership includes, besides students of the school, min- 
isters not more than five years in service since ordination and 
twenty-five associate members from the older ministers. Meetings 
are held on the third Thursday of each month, from October to May, 
inclusive. 

Officers. — Palfrey Perkins, President; Charles E. Aimar, Vice- 
President; Herman Peters, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Lowell: Liberal Christian Club (of Unitarian and Universalist 
men) of LowelL — Organized 1899. Meets four times a year. 



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Hon. George F. Richardson, Honorary President; Rev. Caleb E. 
Fisher, President; Rev. George C. Wright, Secretary. 

Merrimack Valley Unitarian Club. — The membership is derived 
from the Unitarian churches of the Merrimack Valley. 

Hon. G. Byron Chandler, Manchester, President; Rev. George C. 
Wright, Lowell, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Natick: Natick Unitarian Club. — Composed of members from 
the two churches in Natick. President, James E. White. 

Newton: Unitarian Club of Newton. — Members from the three 
churches of Newton. 
President, Fred W. Stone; Secretary, Frank H. Burt. 

New Yoric: The Unitarian Club of New York.— Organized De- 
cember, 1887. 

Membership limited to two hundred persons, ministers and laymen, 
including women. 

The annual meeting is the final spring meeting in each year. All 
meetings are designated by the Council of the club, and are usually 
four in number. 

Cyril H. Burdett, 135 Broadway, New York, N.Y., President; Wil- 
liam S. Miller, 141 East 40th Street, New York, N.Y., Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

Oregon: The Unitarian Club of Oregon. — William F, Wood- 
ward, President; James D. Hart, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Philadelphia: The Unitarian Club of Philadelphia, Pa.-- Meet- 
ings of the Gub are subject to the call of the President or of any 
ten members. 

Henry L. Child, President; Alvan T. Janes, 4716 Windsor Avenue, 
Recording Secretary; Paschal H. Coggins, Corresponding Secretary. 



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Providence: The Unitarian Club, Providence, ILL — Organized 
Dec. 28, 1886. 

Meetings are held at various intervals from November to April. 
The annual meeting is held in April. The membership is limited 
to one hundred and twenty-five persons. 

Oiester W. Barrows, President; Prescott O. Oarice, Vice-President; 
Augustus R. Pierce, Treasurer; Russell C Lowell, 420 Hope Street, 
Secretary. 

Besides the above clubs, which cover a larger territory than one 
church, there are about four score men's clubs, besides many mis- 
cellaneous organizations directly related to our individual parishes. 



MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATIONS. 



Boston Association of Ministers. — Formed before 1686. Meet- 
ings on the second Monday of each month, October to May, inclusive. 

Its members are the ministers of Boston and vicinity (including 
Suffolk County, Brookline, Milton, and Quincy) and, by election in 
the past, from a few places more remote. 

Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, Moderator; Rev. James Huxtable, Scribe. 

The Association of Ministers in and about Cambridge, Mass. — 
Organized April 11, 1809. Meetings on the first Monday of every 
month except July, August, and September. 

Rev. George Hale Reed, Scribe. 

Massachusetts Convention of Congregational Ministers. — Dates 
from the earliest times of the colony. Annual business meeting in 
the court-room of the Supreme Judicial Court in Boston at 5 p.m. 
on the last Wednesday in May. Public service in the South Congre- 
gational Church, Boston, at 11 a.m. on Thursday of Anniversary 
Week. At this service a collection is taken, which, with the income 



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of the Convention Fund, is distributed to the needy widows and 
daughters of deceased Congregational ministers of Massachusetts. 
(See Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society, page 135.) 
Every minister of a Congregational church in Massachusetts (whether 
Trinitarian or Unitarian) is ex officio a member of the Convention. 

There is a reporting Committee of twenty-five, selected by counties 
throughout the State, by which recommendations are made to a 
Central Committee of seven, which decides on all applications for aid. 

Permanent Officers. — Rev. Benjamin F. Hamilton, D.D., Roxbury, 
Scribe, Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverley, Treasurer, to either of 
whom applications for aid may be addressed. 

Ministerial Conference (Berry Street Conference). — Organized 
Aug. 29, 1819. 

The annual meeting for address and discussion is held in Boston 
on Tuesday of Anniversary Week. 

Rev. Julian C. Jaynes, Scribe, Executive Committee: Rev. George 
Batchelor, Boston, Mass. ; Rev. Augustus M. Lord, D.D., Providence, 
R.I. ; and Rev. Charles T. Billings, Lowell, Mass. 

The Ministers' Institute. — Organized under the auspices of the 
Council of the National Conference. First meeting, Oct. 9, 1876, 
at Springfield, Mass. Meets biennially, alternating with the meetings 
of the National Conference. Its purpose is to assemble the Unitarian 
ministers for the discussion of all subjects that bear upon their thought 
and work. 

Rev. Merle St. C. Wright, D.D., President; Directors: Rev. How- 
ard N. Brown, Rev. Alfred C. Nickerson, Rev. Adelbert L. Hudson, 
Rev. John C. Perkins, D.D., Rev. Roderick Stebbins ; Rev. J. T. Sun- 
derland, Rev. John M. Wilson, Treasurer; Rev. Charles T. Billings, 
Secretary. 

The Ministerial Union. — Organized Jan. 12, 1864. It is designed 
to promote ministerial fellowship, welcome and assist those entering 
the Liberal ministry, protect the profession and parishes from in- 



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competent and unworthy men, contribute to the edification of its mem- 
bers, and assist in the diffusion of the gospel. 

The Annual meeting is held on the Monday of Anniversary Week. 
Other meetings are held on the last Mondays of the seven months 
beginning with October. 

Rev. Seth C. Beach, D.D., President; Rev. Theodore D. Bacon, 
Salem, Mass., Secretary and Treasurer, 

Committee on Supply of Pulpits. — Rev. Henry T. Secrist, Roxbury, 
Mass. ; Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverly, Mass. ; Rev. Thomas J. 
Homer, Melrose, Mass.; Rev. Alfred Manchester, Salem, Mass., 
Secretary. 

This committee, appointed by the Ministerial Union, does not wish 
to exercise any power in the choice of candidates for any particular 
church, but will afford such aid as it may in bringing candidates and 
churches together. 

To further this purpose, the Secretary will be at the office of the 
committee, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, on Mondays and Saturdays, 
from 10 A.M. to I P.M., when he will be glad to consult with any one 
whom he may be able to serve. 

The Liberal Ministers' Association of New York and Vicinity. — 

Meetings on the first Monday of every month save July, August, and 
September. The meetings are now held at the City Club, 55 West 
44th Street, New York, at 12:30 p.m. 

Officers. — Rev. Alfred Chase Nickerson, Plainfield, N.J., President; 
Rev. Edgar S. Wiers, Montclair, N.J., Secretary-Treasurer. 

North Middlesex Ministerial Association. — Organized May 4, 
183 1. Meetings on first Monday in January, April, and October. 

Rev. Charles T. Billings, Lowell, Mass., Moderator; Rev. William A. 
Wood, Wilton, N.H., Scribe. 

Plymouth and Bay Ministerial Association, Mass. — Organized 
previous to 1780. Meetings on the first or second Tuesday in Jan- 
uary, April, June, and October. 



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Rev. William L. ChafEn, North Easton, Moderator; Rev. E. B. 
Maglathlin, West Bridgewater, Scribe. 

Unitarian Ministers' Monday Club. — Established 1883. Meetings 
in Boston on the second Monday of each month except June, July, 
August, and September. A chairman is appointed at each meeting 
for the next. Rev, Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverly, Mass., Chairman 
of Executive Committee. 

Worcester Association, Mass. — Organized May 18, 1820. Six 
meetings are held in the year. 

Rev. Alvin F. Bailey, Barre, Moderator; Rev. Frederic J. Gauld, 
Leominster, Scribe. 



BENEVOLENT AND OTHER SOCIETIES. 



Benevolent Fraternity of Chiurches in the City of Boston. — Or- 
ganized 1834; incorporated 1839. 

This association represents a ministry-at-large in Boston for the 
Unitarian churches, through philanthropy, education, worship, and 
free church privileges. It originated with the labors of Dr. Joseph 
Tuckerman in 1826. At present the corporation is composed of del- 
egates from different Unitarian churches in Boston, who hold at least 
four meetings a year. The supervision of the work is in the hands 
of an Executive Committee consisting of twelve members. There are 
now five chapels, or centres of missions, with fifteen ministers and 
assistants, some fifty paid workers, and over two hundred efficient 
volunteer helpers. The spirit and aims of Tuckerman, Gannet, 
Channing, and Robbins, and others who guided the Fraternity in 
the past, are preserved. The great object is to meet the moral and 
religious needs of those who are not attached to the regular churches, 
and to organize the unstable elements of the city into character and 
citizenship. 



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Those who come under the ministrations of this ministry-at-large 
are encouraged to maintain self-respect and self-government. The 
central aim of the Fraternity is to work and worship with the people, 
not for them. Young and old are incited to do all they can for 
themselves within reason and brotherhood. 

The chapels are as follows: Buliinch Place Church, at the West 
End; North End Union (Parmenter Street), for the North End; 
Morgan Chapel (Shawmut Avenue) and Theodore Parker Memorial 
(Berkeley Street), both for the South End; and Channing Church 
(East Cottage Street), for South Boston and Dorchester. 

The annual meeting of the Fraternity is on the first Sunday in May, 
at which time officers are chosen for the year. The other r^[ular 
meetings are on the second Sunday in October, second Sunday in De- 
cember, and the second Sunday in March. The funds for carr3ring on 
this large work are derived in part from annual contributions and in 
part from permanent investments. Executive Committee: Rev. Ed- 
ward Cummings, President; Courtenay Guild, Vice-President; William 
P. Fowler, Treasurer; Ernest Jackson, Recording Secretary; Rev. 
Thomas Van Ness, Rev. Paul R. Frothingham, Arthur W. Moors, F. 
O. North, Mrs. Charles E. Lincoln, Rev. Howard N. Brown, and Dr. 
K Peabody Gerry, Delano Wright, Directors. 

The office of the Fraternity is in the Parker Memorial Building, 
corner of Berkeley and Appleton Streets. 

The churches represented in the Benevolent Fraternity are: First 
Church; Second Church; King's Chapel; Arlington Street Church; 
South Congregational Church ; Church of the Disciples ; First Parish, 
Brighton; First Parish, Dorchester; Third Religious Society, Dorches- 
ter ; First Congregational Society, Jamaica Plain ; All Souls' Unitarian 
Church, Roxbury; Hawes Unitarian Congregational Church, South 
Boston ; First Parish, West Roxbury. 

Boston Yotmg Men's Christian Union. — Organized in 185 1; in- 
corporated in 1852. The objects of this organization are: ist. To 
furnish to the young men of Boston and vicinity a home and club 
with cheerful surroundings, where they will meet agreeable compan- 



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133 

ions, and where the influences will be beneflcial and elevating. 2d, 
To provide them with every possible attraction in the way of books, 
newspapers, magazines, evening classes, religious services, lectures, 
entertainments, games, physical education, and other means for in- 
struction and recreation. 3d, To give them opportunities to do good, 
by engaging in charitable and benevolent work. The rooms at 48 
Boylston Street (near Tremont Street and the Common) are open 
every day, Sundays included, from 8 a. m. to 10 p. m. 

Annual membership, one dollar per year. Life membership, twenty- 
five dollars. Subscription membership, five dollars per year. Sus- 
taining membership, ten dollars. (A subscription member^p for five 
successive years constitutes a life membership.) All young men 
residing in Boston and the vicinity are cordially invited to become 
members of the society. 

Board of Directors. — Frank L. Locke, President, office at the 
Union Rooms ; George S. Baldwin, Vice-President; Charles L. Burrill, 
Secretary; Edward A. Church, Treasurer; Walter H. Dugan, John R. 
Ainsley, William H. Brown, Robert W. Frost, W. Rodman Peabody, 
and Herbert D. Heathfield. 

Trustees of Permanent Fund. — Walter Hunnewell, Treasurer; Ed- 
win L. Sprague, Secretary; William Endicott and William L. Rich- 
ardson. 

Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute in the City 
of Boston. — Instituted 1849 ; incorporated 1864. 

This society, as its name indicates, is a work of children of the 
more favored families for the children of the poor ; but it appeals to 
all for aid in carrying on its work. It receives no aid from public 
funds. 

Its objects are: first, the care of orphan, homeless, destitute, or 
n^lected children, the provision of homes for them in the country, 
and the adoption of such measures as will save them from vice, igno- 
rance and degradation; and, second, to excite and encourage in the 
young a spirit of Christian s)anpathy and active benevolence, by inter- 
esting them in this work which appeals so strongly to their hearts. 



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The Mission welcomes applications for help to children of any age, 
race, or creed, and their circumstances and needs are diligently and 
broadly studied, that action may be efficient as well as prompt 

Whether it seems wise or not to receive the child into the custody of 
the Mission, his wants are ministered to until relieved. 

Children taken are placed at board, or free of charge, in carefully 
selected private families, out of town, and are there under the con- 
stant supervision of the visitors from the office, with whom closest 
relations are preserved. Brothers and sisters are rarely separated; 
and many are thus tided over the time of family stress until they may 
be restored to suitable parents or friends, who, throughout the 
period of care by the Mission, have been kept in touch with the chil- 
dren, and encouraged to aid as far as possible in their support 
Others grow to maturity under the watchful care of the Mission. A 
few are given for adoption when there is no possibility of future help 
from relatives. 

Applications should be made at the office, 277 Tremont Street, 
Boston, between 9 a. m and 5 p. m., on any day except Sunday or a 
holiday. 

The annual meeting for the choice of officers occurs on the second 
Wednesday in May. 

Henry M. Williams, President; Christopher R. Eliot, Secretary; 
William H. Slocum, Treasurer; Parker B. Field, Superintendent. 

Industrial School for Girli, Boston (Dorchester) — Organized 
1853; incorporated 1854. 

lliis institution is for training to good conduct and self-support 
destitute and neglected girls, also girls who cannot be taken care of 
at home, but whose relatives or friends can aflford to pay a small sum 
for board. The time they are kept in the school is determined by the 
needs and circumstances of each child. The school is supported by 
donations and subscriptions and the income of invested funds. Ap- 
plications for admission to be made in writing to the Admission Com- 
mittee. 

Miss A. R. Anthony, President; William S. Hall, 53 State Street, 



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Treasurer; Miss Helen Gilbert, Assistant Treasurer; Miss Mary G. 
Stone, Secretary; Miss Ruth Greeley, 7 Lime Street, Boston, Mass., 
Chcdrtnan of Admission Committee; Mrs. F. K. Nash, Chairman of 
Placing-out Committee, 

Maine Unitarian Association. — Its purpose is "the maintenance 
and teaching of Unitarian Christianity." Incorporated in 1875, and 
organized at Saco, Oct. 8, 1878. 

Hon. Joseph W. Symonds, LL.D., Portland, President; George A. 
Emery, Saco, Secretary; H. Fairfield, Treasurer. 

Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society. — Incorporated 
in 1786. Organized to hold the funds of the Massachusetts Conven- 
tion of Congregational Ministers. (See page 128.) Composed of 
fifteen clergymen and fifteen laymen, elected from both branches of 
the Congregational body. Aids the widows and orphans of deceased 
Congregational dergjrmen in Massachusetts. 

William Endicott, Boston, President; Rev. Edward Hale, Chestnut 
Hill. Secretary; Grenville H. Norcross, Boston, Treasurer; Rev. 
Alexander McKenzie, D.D., Rev. James De Normandie, D.D., Rev. 
Edward Hale, Committee on Appropriations. 

Applications for aid should be made to Rev. Edward Hale, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass. 

Massachusetts Evangelical Missionary Society. — Instituted in 
1806. The object of this society is to aid feeble parishes to support 
preaching. 

Rev. Samuel C. Beane, D.D., President; Rev. Henry F. Jenks, 
Canton Comer, Vice-President; Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverly, 
Secretary; Rev. Roderick Stebbins, Milton, Treasurer. 

Society for Ministerial Relief, Boston, Mass. — Formed 1848; in- 
corporated 1850 as the Society for the Relief of Aged and Destitute 
Oergymen; the name changed to the Society for Ministerial Relief 
by an Act of the Massachusetts State Legislature, March 9, 1905. 



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This society was organized to aflford pecuniary relief to aged Uni- 
tarian clergjrmen who need such help. The interest of the invested 
fund is distributed semi-annually, in May and November, by the 
Executive G)mmittee, to such perscms as are qualified, according to 
the requirements of the constitution, to receive aid, as follows : " All 
Unitarian clergymen who have been ordained as pastors or evangelists, 
and who have reached the age of fifty-five years, who have retained 
an unspotted moral character, and who need pecuniary assistance, 
may be placed on its list of beneficiaries. The claims of each appli- 
cant shall be set forth in writing by two of his clerical brethren who 
are well acquainted with his condition and circumstances." The 
names of beneficiaries are never published. The society is also au- 
thorized to hold a special fund, the income of which may be used to 
aid the widows of Unitarian clergymen in necessitous circumstances; 
but this fund is still small in comparison with the needs which it is 
expected to meet. 

Rev. James De Normandie, D.D., Boston, President; Rev. Edward 
Hate, Chestnut Hill, Secretary; Henry Endicott, Boston, Treasurer. 

Society for Promoting Theological Education* Boston* Mass. — 
Organized 1816; incorporated 1831. This society has aimed to 
accomplish the twofold object of enlarging the apparatus of theologi- 
cal instruction and of aflfording assistance to meritorious theological 
students in the Divinity School of Harvard University, to which in- 
stitution its aid is restricted by the terms of its trust for the funds now 
in its hands. 

Rev. William H. Lyon, D.D., Brookline, President; Rev. Benjamin 
R. Bulkeley, Beverly, Secretary; Grenville H. Norcross, Boston, 
Treasurer. 

Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and 
Others in North America, Boston, Mass. — Incorporated Nov. 19, 
1787. 

This society administers the funds which it holds for the benefit of 
Indians and colored people chiefly, working, for the most part, in 



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connection with established institutions. The membership is not to 
exceed fifty. 

Rev. James De Normandie, D.D., President; Winslow Warren, 
Vice-President; Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., Secretary; Rev. 
Charles E. Park, Assistant Secretary; Francis H. Brown, M.D., Treas- 
urer; Henry H. Edes, Vice-Treasurer. 

The South End Industrial School, 45 Bartlett Street, Boston 
(Roxbury). — Planned in the Women's Auxiliary Conference, 1882; 
organized May, 1883; incorporated November, 1884. The indus- 
trial departments are supported by Unitarian churches and individ- 
uals. The aim of the school is to improve the homes of the neighbor- 
hood, by practical training, and also by clubs for social intercourse. 
Five hundred (500) pupils attended in 1906-07. 

Miss Louise Howe, President; William H. Vamey, 54 Lincoln 
Street, Boston, Treasurer; Mrs. Arthur C. Wise, 9 Claflin Road, 
Brookline, Clerk; Mrs. A. R. Damon, 45 Bartlett Street, Roxbury, 
Superintendent. 

Union for Christian Work, Providence, R. I. — Organized March 
3, 1868. 

The aim of this society is to furnish such occupation, amusements, 
and surroundings as shall weaken the power of temptation and 
arouse the higher nature of all who come within its influence. 

Its present work is as follows : i. A library and pleasant room for 
reading and amusement. Open daily from 3 to 9 p. m. Sundays from 
2 to 9 p. M. 2. A well-selected library of 6,000 volumes. 3. Boys' 
Qub. 4. Depot for collecting books, magazines and papers, and dis- 
tributing them to seamen sailing from this port, and to such others 
as need them. 5. Fruit and flower mission, for the distribution of 
fruit and flowers to the sick and infirm, the hospitals, the homes for 
the aged, etc. 6. Suburban rides and health excursions for invalids 
and others. 7. Men's Club. 8. Women's Club. A varied line of Set- 
tlement Work, including classes in sewing, millinery, dancing, house- 
keeping, nature study, etc. 



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Rev. George W. Kent, President; Miss L. H. Vaughn, Secretary; 
Dr. A. A. Barrows, Treasurer; Mr. Carol Aranovili, Head Worker. 

Unitarian Educational Society. — Incorporated under the laws of 
New Hampshire, July 19, 1879. 

The object of the corporation is to maintain and permanently en- 
dow Proctor Academy, Andover, N.H. (See page 146.) 

Rev. Henry C. McDougall, President; Gen. George T. Cruft, Vice- 
President; Clarence E. Carr, Andover, Treasurer; Theodore P. Farr, 
Principal of the Academy. 

Rev. Henry G. Ives, Financial Agent, will receive contributions, or 
they may be sent direct to the Treasurer named above. 

Unitarian Service Pension Society. — Organized May, 1907, under 
name of The Society for Old Age Pensions for (Unitarian Ministers, 
to provide service pensions for all Unitarian clergymen, whether mem- 
bers of this society or not, who are sixty-five years of age and have 
a record of at least twenty years' active honorable Unitarian profes- 
sional service. A " Permanent Fund " is to be established and placed 
in the hands of either the Society for Ministerial Relief or the Ameri- 
can Unitarian Association as trustee, to be made up of ten per cent, of 
the annual contributions received, of all gifts of $1,000 or over, and 
all bequests. Ultimately, it is expected that the income of this fund will 
meet all requirements. At present the society must rely upon voluntary 
yearly contributions from ministers, churches, and generous friends. 
President, Rev. Thomas R. Slicer ; Vice-Presidents, Rev. Paul Revere 
Frothingham, Rev. Robert S. Loring; Secretary, Rev. G. W. Kent, 
125 Adelaide Avenue, Providence, R.I.; Treasurer, Rev. J. H. Apple- 
tree, Attleboro, Mass. 



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DIVINITY SCHOOLS. 



Divinity School of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. — Thi^ 
institution was established about 1817, though instruction in theology 
had previously been given in connection with Harvard College. The 
school was founded and endowed by Unitarians. Its constitution pre- 
scribes that " every encouragement be given to the serious, impartial, 
and unbiassed investigation of Christian truth, and that no assent to 
the peculiarities of any denomination of Christians shall be required 
either of the instructors or students." 

Graduates of theological schools are admitted as resident graduates ; 
persons who have received the degree of Bachelor of Arts are ad- 
mitted as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity; holders 
of other academic degrees may be admitted as special students, pro- 
vided in all these cases that the previous courses of study are satisfac- 
tory to the faculty. 

The Theological Library numbers about 37,000 volumes. Students 
have also access to the College Library, which contains about 496,000 
volumes, and is rich in theological literature. 

Students may attend exercises in other departments of the Uni- 
versity and in Andover Theological Seminary without extra charge. 

The charges for instruction are $150 per year. The price of rooms 
varies, according to their location and desirableness, from $45 to $90 a 
year. The price of board at Memorial Hall averages about $4.50 and 
at Randall Hall about $4 a week. 

Pecuniary aid is furnished to students who need such help, and 
whose character and scholarship justify it. 

Faculty.— Chsirlts William Eliot, A.M., LL.D., M.D., President 
Emeritus; Abbott Lawrence Lowell, A.B., LL.D., President; William 
Wallace Fenn, A.M., D.D., Dean and Bussey Professor of Theology; 
Francis Greenwood Peabody, A.M., D.D., LL.D., Plutnmer Professor 
of Christian Morals; Ephraim Emerton, Ph.D., Winn Professor of 



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Ecclesiastical History; George Foot Moore, A.M., D.D., LL.D., Froth- 
ingham Professor of the History of Religion; David Gordon Lyon, 
Ph.D., D.D., Hollis Professor of Divinity and Curator of the Semitic 
Museum; Edward- Caldwell Moore, Ph.D., D.D., Parkman Professor 
of Theology; James Hardy Ropes, A.B., D.D., Bussey Professor of 
New Testament Criticism and Interpretation and Dexter Lecturer on 
Biblical Literature, 

Instructors. — Irvah Lester Winter, A.B., Assistant Professor of 
Public Speaking; Philip Benjamin Kennedy, A.B., B.L., Instructor in 
Public Speaking; William .Robert Parkhouse Davey, S.T.B., Ph.D., 
Austin Teaching Fellow in Semitic Languages. 

Crawford Howell Toy, A.M., LL.D., Professor Emeritus, 
Robert Swain Morison, A.M., S.T.B., Librarian Emeritus, 
Association of Alumni, — ^Rev. William H. Fish, President; Rev. 
Paul R. Frothingham, Vice-President; Rev. Roderick Stebbins, Milton, 
Mass., Secretary, 

The Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa.— This institu- 
tion was first opened to students in the autumn of 1844. Its charter 
provides that "no doctrinal test shall ever be made a condition of 
enjoying any of the opportunities of instruction in the school." Al- 
though students from various religious denominations have been con- 
nected with the institution, by far the larger number of its graduates 
have entered the Unitarian ministry. 

The requirements for admission are a good moral character and 
seriousness of purpose, with such a degree of intellectual ability and 
preparatory education as shall afford a reasonable prospect of suc- 
cess in the work undertaken in the school. Men and women are ad- 
mitted upon equal terms. It is desirable that those who intend to 
apply for admission should address the President some time in ad- 
vance, as an opportunity is thus given for suggestions which may be of 
importance to the applicant. While in cases of inevitable delay stu- 
dents may be admitted after the beginning of the school year, nothing 
short of urgent necessity should be allowed to stand in the way of en- 
tering at the very opening of the first term, in September. 



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The course of study is substantially the saine as that of the other 
institutions in this country and Great Britain in which candidates are 
prepared for the Liberal Christian ministry. The regular term of 
residence for college graduates is three years; for others, four. The 
degree of B.D. is given to those completing the required conditions. 

Tuition is free to all members of the School. G>mmodious rooms 
are provided for men in Divinity Hall free of all expense for rent 
and attendance. The only charge made by the school is a fee of $20 
per annum for those who room in Divinity Hall, for heat and light. 
Graduates may become candidates for the Cruft Traveling Fellow- 
ship, jrielding $810 a year, and tenable at some European university. 
Prizes, in elocution and Hebrew, amounting to $180 are annually 
awarded. Graduates on becoming settled ministers are entitled to 
receive $25 worth of liberal religious books from the income of the 
Brookes Fund. 

The library of the school consists of thirty-four thousand volumes, 
and is increased annually from the income of the " Robert CoUyer 
Library Fund." 

The gymnasium in Hunnewell Hall is thoroughly equipped with 
modem appliances for physical culture, and includes bowling alleys, 
a fives court, and apparatus for basket-ball, fencing, boxing, and other 
sports. Two clay tennis courts adjoin the gymnasium. 

The Meadville Theological School Quarterly Bulletin is published 
by the school, and any one making application to the Editor will be 
placed upon the mailing Hst. 

Faculty.— President, Franklin C. Southworth, A.M., S.T.B., Dean 
and Professor of Practical Theology; George L. Gary, A.M., L.H.D., 
Professor Emeritus; Henry H. Barber, Professor Emeritus; Francis 
A. Christie, D.D., James Freeman Clarke Professor of Church History 
and the Theology of the New Testament; Nicholas Paine Gilman, 
Caleb Brewster Hackley Professor of Sociology and Ethics; Henry 
Preserved Smith, D.D., Professor of the Language and Literature of 
the Old Testament and the History of Religions; Frank C. Doan, 
Ph.D., Professor of Systematic Theology and the Philosophy of Re- 



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liffion; Clajrton R. Bowen, A.B., B.D., Assistant Professor in New 
Testament Interpretation, 

Instructors, — Clementine Qilvin, A.M., Instructor in Voice Culture 
and German; William H. Fish, A.B., Instructor in German; Harry 
Waithe Manville, Instructor in Music; Peter B. Graham, Instructor in 
Physical Training. 
Walter C Green, A.M., S.T.B., Librarian and Secretary of the Faculty, 

Adin Ballou Lecturers on Sociology, 1908-09. — Rev. Bernard J. 
Newman, of Brooklyn, N.Y., " Social Betterment in England" (four 
lectures) ; Rev William H. Fish, Meadville, Pa., " Unitarianism and 
Philanthropy " (two lectures) ; Rev. Elmer S. Forbes; of Boston, 
Mass., " The Institutional Church ;" Rev. A. M. Rihbany, of Toledo, 
Ohio, " The Church's Macedonian Call to the Modem Ministry." 

Shaw Lecturer, 1908-09. — Rev. William Channing Gannett, of 
Rochester, N.Y., " The Conduct of Public Worship " (two lectures). 

Cruft Fellow, — Gudmundur Amason. 

Meadville Alumni Association. — Rev. Joel H. Metcalf, President; 
Rev. William L. Walsh, Rev. Robert S. Loring, Vice-Presidents; Rev. 
John H. Applebee, Secretary and Treasurer; Rev. Samuel R. Maxwell, 
Rev. H. Sumner Mitchell, Rev. Albert W. Qaric, Executive Committee. 

The annual meeting of the Association is held on Thursday of An- 
niversary Week in Boston. 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry, Berkeley, Cal.— This 
institution was established at Oakland in 1904 (incorporated in 1906) 
by Mr. and Mrs. Francis Cutting, of Oakland, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Horace Davis, of San Francisco. While students are admitted from 
any part of the country, and without regard to denominational con- 
nections, the particular aim of the school is to prepare students for the 
ministry of Unitarian churches on the Pacific slope. 

Candidates for admission must show evidence of irreproachable 
moral character, serious purpose, and such intellectual preparation as 
will enable them to pursue the courses of the school with advantage. 

Students holding a college degree will be graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Theology after a course of study covering three 



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years : others will be graduated after a course of four years, but with- 
out a degree. The course of study is elective, within certain restric- 
tions, and the courses oflFered are those usual to similar institutions. 

Arrangements are made so that students may without charge take 
courses adapted to their purpose at other divinity schools at Berkeley, 
and at the University of California. 

The school is located at the corner of Dana Street and Allston Way, 
facing the University, and near the other schools. 

Tuition is free, and rooms and commons for students are provided 
in the school building. The necessary expenses for a year need not 
exceed $300. A limited amount of aid can be furnished to students of 
promise who could not pursue their studies without it. 

The library of the school consists of about 6,000 bound volumes, 
besides pamphlets, and is especially rich in the history and literature 
of Unitarianism. 

The academic year of the school coincides with that of the Uni- 
versity of California, beginning at the middle of August and ending 
at the middle of May. Intending students should, in all cases, cor- 
respond with the Dean in advance. 

The school is controlled by a board of fifteen Trustees, elected with 
the approval of the Directors of the American Unitarian Association. 
Officers: President, Rev. Earl M. Wilbur; Vice-President, Daniel 
Rowen ; Secretary, W. H. Payson, Esq. ; Treasurer, Mr. Francis Cut- 
ting. 

Faculty. — Earl M. Wilbur, A.M., S.T.B., Dean and Professor of 
Theology; Gifford H. G. McGrew, Librarian and Assistant; Mrs. 
Louise Humphrey Smith, Instructor in Public Speaking; Rev. John 
Howland Lathrop, Lecturer in New Testament Theology. 



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ACADEMIES 



The Hackley School, Tanytown-on-Hudson, N.Y, — Head Mas- 
ter, Walter Boutwell Gage, A.B. Trustees: 

, President; Charles H. Levermore, Ph.D., 
Vice-President; Rev. Thomas R. Sheer, Secretary; Walston H. 
Brown, Treasurer; Mrs. C. B. Hackley, Mrs. C. C. Goodhue, Rev. 
Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., J. A. H. Hopkins, Prof. Horatio S. White, 
George lies, William S. Kyle, A. Emerson Palmer. Fisher A. Baker, 
Chairman Executive Committee, 

Upper School — Students are received at twelve years of age and 
prepared for college. Tuition, $900 for school year. 

Lower School, — Boys as young as ten are received. The three 
years* course gives careful and constructive elementary training. Tui- 
tion, $800 for school year. 

Home School for Girls, West Newton, Mass. — The Misses Allen, 
daughters of the late Nathaniel T. Allen, founder and principal for 
forty-eight years of the Allen School, will reopen at their residence in 
West Newton, Mass., their School for Girls, Sept. 29, 1909. 

They study the needs of each girl intrusted to their care, so that 
the physical, educational, and social training may make of each a 
healthy, refined, and intelligent woman, and are assisted by able 
teachers. 

Home for Schoolgirls and Special Students. — Mr. and Mrs. John 
A. Bellows, 115 Beacon Street, Boston, will receive into their family 
a limited munber of girls who are either attending one of the day 
schools in Boston or who wish to do special work in Art, Music, Lit- 
erature, or the Languages. 

Howard Seminary, West Bridgewater, Mass. — This is an unsec- 
tarian school for girls, founded by Benjamin B. Howard, a native of 



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the town. It is noted for the high mental development of its pupils, 
the earnest spirit of its teachers, and for the wide range of its courses. 
Advanced courses are offered for high-school graduates and others 
not wishing full college course; also college preparations and special 
advantages in art, music, elocution, and domestic science. The build- 
ings are spacious and attractive, having sanitary plumbing, modem 
heating and lighting. The ample grounds and well-equipped gym- 
nasium give excellent opportunity for exercise. The school is situated 
on the line of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, only 
an hour's ride from Boston. Electric cars connect West Bridgewater 
with Brockton and Providence. For full information address Miss 
Sarah E. Laughton, Principal. 

The MacDuffic School for Girls, Springfield, Mass.-:- While this 
school is not denominational, the fact that its principals are active 
Unitarians naturally makes the religious influences sympathetic to- 
wards Unitarianism. It offers to girls of all ages a broad education 
and a pleasant home. This, however, is not the ultimate object, which 
is rather the development of character and a careful guidance from 
young girlhood to responsible womanhood. The course of study is 
planned to give older girls that broader outlook in life which comes 
from culture, and to younger girls the regular disciplinary studies of a 
high-school course. In the upper classes it places the emphasis upon 
English, History, Modern Languages, College Preparation, Music and 
Art. It is placed on the list of approved college fitting schools by 
the New England College Entrance Certificate Board, and has the priv- 
ilege of admision to college without examination. The school is 
housed in a generously furnished mansion built by the late Rev. Francis 
Tiffany when minister of the Church of the Unity, and afterwards 
the home of the late Samuel Bowles, of the Springfield Republican. 
It was built on ample dignified lines of architecture, and it has since 
been somewhat enlarged. Adjacent to the Mansion House are two 
dormitories, the Senior House and the Challis House. The class- 
rooms are in Howard Hall, a separate modern building, planned espe- 
cially for its purpose by the school architects, Gardner, Pyne & Gard- 



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ner. The building is named in honor of Miss Catharine L. Howard, 
and her sisters, who founded the school in 1865, and established its rep- 
utation for the quiet home discipline and emphasis upon the substan- 
tial accompHshmcnts of life, which continue to mark the school and give 
it a large and cultivated clientelle. The school grounds are beautiful, 
having been laid out by the elder Olmsted. The principals are John 
MacDuffie, Ph.D., and Mrs. John MacDuffie, A.B. The secretary is 
Mrs. D. W. Morehouse, to whom all correspondence should be ad- 
dressed. 

Powder Point School, Duxbury, Mass. — This school combines 
home and school life, a great deal of personal attention being given to 
each boy. The principal and his wife are Unitarians; the teachers, of 
various denominations. The aim is to give the boys a high sense of 
honor and duty, but to leave doctrinal questions to the parents and 
churches. The younger boys are taught to be exact and earnest in 
their elementary work ; and the older ones are prepared for scientific 
school, college, or business, and by an elementary course in forestry 
for higher study in that profession. There is no fixed curriculum, 
but studies are selected according to the needs of each boy. Scholar- 
ships are given where needed and deserved. -Fredrick B. Knapp, 
PrincipaL 

Proctor Academy, Andover, N.H. — This academy is under the 
management of the Unitarian Educational Society. (See pa.s^e 138.) 
Andover is on the Concord Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
twenty-nine miles north of Concord. The location is pleasant and 
healthful, and comparatively free from influences which divert the 
mind from study. There are five courses — English and Classical — 
all of which excellent instruction is furnished. Theodore P. Farr, 
Principal. 

The Tuckerman School, Inc., Boston, Mass. — Board of Directors: 
Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., President; Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, Rev. 
Paul Revere Frothingham, Rev. Lewis G. Wilson, Mr. Louis P. Nash ; 
Mr. John H. Edwards, Treasurer; Mrs. Caroline S. Atherton, Secre- 



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tary; Mrs. Clara B. Beatly, Mrs. Robert Gould Shaw, Miss Zilpha D. 
Smith, Mrs. John G. Walker. A school for the training of Sunday- 
School Superintendents and Teachers, Parish Assistants and Visitors, 
Managers of Church Charities, and Superintendents of Clubs for Boys 
and Girls. 

The complete course of study is designed to cover two years, and 
will include a study of social questions and special work with Sim- 
mons College, as well as more distinctively Sunday-School and Parish 
work. 

In addition to a course leading to a diploma, shorter and special 
courses may be taken by qualified students. 

Opportunity is given for practical experience by observation and 
work in churches, missions, industrial schools, settlements, and char- 
itable institutions in Boston and vicinity. 

The course of study for 1909-10 will include Study of the Bible, 
Psychology, History of Education, Principles and Practice of Teach- 
ing, Review of Church History, Hymnology, Development and Prin- 
ciples of the Unitarian Church, Household Economics, and Voice 
Training. 

Students will be prepared to serve as visitors in the homes, as ad- 
visers and helpers to people in distress, as organizers in clubs and 
young people's societies, as teachers and friends, and in whatever other 
way they may be of aid to a parish minister or the community. The 
aim of the school is wholly practical, to increase the number of availa- 
ble and efficient persons, paid or volunteer, who wish to give them- 
selves to practical Christian work. 

Admission to the school will be limited to candidates who can sat- 
isfy the Board of Directors of their ability to profit by its oppor- 
tunities. 

The tuition fee is $60 a year, one-half payable in October and one- 
half payable February i. Fees for special courses will be decided by 
special arrangement. 

The school year will open October 5th and close May i8th. 

The headquarters of the school will be at 25 Beacon Street. 

Further information may be obtained of the Dean, Mrs. Clara T. 
Guild, 25 Beacon Street, Boston. 



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THE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF RELIGIOUS 

LIBERALS 

was organized at Philadelphia, December 2, 1908, at a private confer- 
ence of representative liberal religious thinkers and social workers of 
the United States. Its purpose is to unify and concentrate the forces 
which make for religious sincerity, freedom and tolerance, in America, 
and bring them, so far as may be, into council and co-operation con- 
cerning the spiritual and ethical interests they possess in ccnnmon. 
This Federation may be considered as the offspring of the International 
Council of Unitarian and other liberal and religious thinkers and 
workers with which it will be affiliated, and whose liberalizing and rec- 
onciling influences it is intended to conserve and further in the Ameri- 
can community. 

Participation in the Federation will leave each individual responsible 
for his own opinions alone, and affect in no degree his relations with 
other religious bodies or schools of thought. 

The Federation will hold from time to time, alternately with the Inter- 
national Congresses referred to, extended public meetings of religious 
liberals in centers of American thought and life, at which united and 
earnest testimony will be given in behalf of the great universal affirma- 
tions of the moral and religious life. It will seek to increase the faith 
of free and reasoning men in tne underlying principles of pure religion 
held in the spirit of perfect liberty ; to foster the sentiments of toler- 
ance and good-will, both religious and racial, in the community; and 
to promote a fellowship of the spirit based on religious character and 
conduct, and not on creed and rite. 

Furthermore, the Federation will labor for the paramount interests 
of social reform and good citizenship. It will strive for the awakening 
of the public conscience, the promotion of social justice, and a better 
performance of social service and obligation. 

By invitation of the liberal branch of the Society of Friends in Phil- 



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adelphia the first Congress of the new association convened in their 
Meeting House on Race Street on April 27th to 30th, 1909. The Con- 
gress was a remarkable gathering from every point of view. More than 
a thousand paid memberships were taken. The attendance at the ses- 
sions ranged from 500 to 1,500. Besides the pronouncedly liberal de- 
nominations, such as the Universalists, Unitarians, Liberal Friends, 
Reformed Jews, and German Evangelical Churches, and such associa- 
tions as the Free Religious Association of America, the Congress of 
Religion, the Ethical Culture Association, there participated in it also, 
imofficially. Baptists, Congregationalists, Christians, Disciples, Episco- 
palians, Lutherans, Swedenborgans and Roman Catholics. At the clos- 
ing symposium on " The Fellowship of the Spirit " the speakers be- 
longed to fourteen different religious fellowships. This large inclusive- 
ness, the intellectual weight of the addresses, the strong insistance on 
the affirmative and practical aspects of the liberal faith, the large pro- 
portion of lay speakers and of gifted women, together with the uniform 
harmony of the meetings, made this Congress a notable event in the 
religious life of our time, and full of promise for the future usefulness 
of the new Federation. The papers and proceedings appeared in a 
volume, " The Unity of the Spirit," 275 pp. 75 cts. 

The affairs of the Federation are in charge of a committee of 
twenty-five, widely representative in character. The President is 
Henry W. Wilbur, of Philadelphia ; Treasurer, Henry Justice, of Phil- 
adelphia; Executive Secretary, Rev. Charles W. Wendte, D.D., 25 
Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., to whom communications may be ad- 
dressed 



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THE INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNITARIAN 

AND OTHER LIBERAL RELIGIOUS THINKERS 

AND WORKERS. 



President, Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D. ; General Secretary, Rev. 
Charles W. Wendte, D.D., 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., U. S. A. 

This Council was organized on May 25, 1900, at Boston, in the 
United States, by foreign delegates and others in attendance on the 
seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of the American Unitarian 
Association. 

Its purpose is ** to open communication with those in all lands who 
are striving to unite pure religion and perfect liberty, and to increase 
fellowship and co-operation among them." 

The International Council seeks to bring into closer union for ex- 
change of ideas, mutual service and the promotion of their common 
aims the historic liberal churches, the liberal elements in all churches, 
scattered liberal congregations, and isolated workers for religious free- 
dom and progress in many lands. 

It aims to be a source of encouragement and strength to them in 
their struggles against dogmatic intolerance and ecclesiastical tyranny. 

It cultivates large and fraternal relations with the great liberal move- 
ments in religion now going on under various names and auspices 
throughout the world. 

To promote these ends, it holds a triennial Congress in some ac- 
knowledged seat of religious enlightenment and freedom. 

Some eighty-eight religious associations are now affiliated with the 
Council, send official delegates to its meetings, and make it the inter- 
national organ of their fraternal relations with each other. 

The First Congress of the International Council, by invitation of the 
British and Foreign Unitarian Association, was held under their aus- 
pices at the end of May, 1901, in London. Fifteen different nationali- 



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151 

ties and twenty-one different church connections were represented offi- 
cially or unofficially by those participating. The attendance at the ses- 
sions, held for two days or more, ranged from five hundred to two 
thousand. Papers and addresses were presented by the President of 
tlie Council, Rev. J. Estlin Carpenter, M.A., of Oxford; Prof. Otto 
Pfleiderer, D.D., Berlin; Rev. James Drummond, M.A., LL.D., Ox- 
ford; Rev. R. A. Armstrong, B.A., Liverpool; M. Ernest Fontanes, 
Paris ; Rev. F. C. Fleischer, Holland ; Prof. Jean Reville, D.D., Paris ; 
Prof. G. Bonet-Maury, D.D., Paris; Rev. James Hocart, Brussels; 
Prof. Edward Montet, D.D., Geneva ; Prof. George Boros, D.D., Hun- 
gary; Rev. Tony Andre, Florence; Prof. B. D. Eerdmans, D.D., 
Leyden ; Rev. C. Schieler, Ph.D., Prussia ; Rev. R. H. Cambley, Aus- 
tralia; Mr. Vladimir Tchertkoff, Russia; Mr. Graham Wallas, M.A., 
London; Rev. P. H. Wicksteed, London; Rev. Stopford Brooke, 
London ; Rev. S. M. Crothers, D.D., Cambridge, Mass. ; Rev. Charles 
W. Wendte, Boston, Mass. 

Communications were also received, expressing sympathy with the 
aims of the Council, from the Protestantenverein of Germany and the 
Protestanten Bond of Holland. 

All the papers and proceedings of this first session of the Interna- 
tional Council in London have been published in a volume procurable 
from the Unitarian Associations of America and England. 

The Second Congress of the International Council was held, by in- 
vitation of the Vergadering van Moderne Theologen of Holland, an 
association of liberal ministers, in Amsterdam, Sept. i to 4, 1903. 
Again the meetings were successful, the spirit harmonious and enthusi- 
astic. Nearly a thousand paid membership tickets, a delegation of 176 
persons from the British Isles, 26 from the United States, and others, 
representing in all sixteen different religious fellowships, showed the 
wide-spread interest in the movement. Dutch, English, French, and 
German were the languages used at the Congress. In deference to 
the large number of English-speaking persons present, all the proceed- 
ings were held in that tongue. Printed translations into English and 
German of a number of the papers were also provided. The Dutch 
newspapers gave extended and often sympathetic reports of the ses- 



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sions. Many of the speakers who took part in the London meetings 
of 1901 participated also in this Second Congress, with the addition 
of Prof. Karl Andresen, of Germany ; Rev. G. Schoenholzer, of Ziirich ; 
Rev. A. Bourrier, of Sevres, France ; Rev. S. A. Eliot, D.D., Rev. J. H. 
Crooker, D.D., and Edwin D. Mead, of the United States; Rev. N. 
Jozan, of Hungary; V. R. Shinde, of India; Z. Toyosaki, of Japan; 
Rev. Drs. H. Oort, P. H. Hugenholtz, T. Cannegieter, T. Van Loenen 
Martinet, A Bruining, S. Cramer, Prof. M. A. Gooszen, and others of 
Holland. 

The proceedings and papers of this Second Congress have been is- 
sued in a volume of 555 pages, procurable from the American Unitarian 
Association. 

The Third Congress took place at Geneva, Switzerland, Aug. 28-31, 
1905. The general sessions were held in the aula of the University. 
The five religious services, in French, German, and English, conducted 
by Rev. E. Roberty, and Pastor Charles Wagner of Paris, Rev. Karl 
Furrer of Zurich, Revs. Minot J. Savage of New York and Joseph 
Wood of Birmingham, were held in the ancient Cathedral of St. Peter. 

Five hundred sixty-eight persons enrolled themselves as members of 
the Congress. Papers were read by Prof. Otto Pfleiderer, of Berlin 
University; Father Hyacinthe Loyson, Profs. Albert Reville, of the 
College of France, and Jean Reville, of the University of Paris ; Profs. 
Chantre, Montet, and Gourd, of the University of Geneva ; Rev. Dr. L. 
G. Levy, of Dijon, France ; Prof J. Estlin Carpenter, of Oxford ; Rev. 
Messrs. W. C. Bowie and W. G. Tarrant, of London ; Rev. P. H. Hu- 
genholtz, of Amsterdam ; Prof. B. D. Eerdmans, of the University of 
Leyden; Rev. Tony Andre, of Florence, Italy, Prof. Nath Sen, of 
Calcutta University; Rev. F. C. Southworth, President of the Mead- 
ville Theological School ; Rev. S. J. Barrows, of New York ; Rev. C. W. 
Wendte, of Boston ; and others. 

A volume of three hundred and fifty pages, containing the papers and 
proceedings of the Geneva Congress, has been published. Over four 
hundred reports of this Congress have appeared in newspapers, jour- 
nals, and reviews. 



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The Fourth G)ngress was held Sept. 22 to 25, 1907, in Boston, 
U.S.A. 

In point of attendance and wide representation this was the most suc- 
cessful congress yet held by the International Council. 2,391 persons 
enrolled themselves as members, belonging to sixteen different nationali- 
ties. 33 separate church fellowships, 88 religious associations other 
than single churches, sent official delegates. There were 122 delegates 
from Great Britain. The meetings overflowed the largest halls and 
churches in the city. Section and overflow meetings were held, to- 
gether with excursions to Concord, Plymouth, and Fairhaven. The 
concluding session was held in Sanders Theatre, Harvard University. 
The Congress sermon was preached by Rev. John Hunter, D.D., of 
Glasgow, Scotland. Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., presided over the 
meetings. Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, Rev. Frederick L. Hosmer, D. D., 
and others, contributed original hymns. Addresses were made and 
papers read by Rev. Exlward Everett Hale, D.D.; Rev. Thomas R. 
Sheer, D.D. ; Dr. Booker T. Washington ; Ex-Secretary John D. Long ; 
Governor Curtis Guild, Jr.; Judge James M. Morton; Hon. Arthur 
Lord ; F. H. Lincoln, Esq. ; Sir William B. Bowring ; H. Lawford, Esq. ; 
F. Maddison, M. P. ; Presidents Charles W. Eliot and F. W. Hamilton; 
Profs. Drs. Jean Reville, of Paris ; Otto Pfleiderer, of Berlin ; E. Mon- 
tet, of Geneva; Martin Rade, of Marburg; R. Eucken, of Jena; T. G. 
Masaryk, of Prague; G. Bonet-Maury, of Paris; H. Meyboom, of 
Groningen ; H. Y. Groenewegen, of Leiden ; G. Subba Rau, of India ; 
O. E. Lindberg, of Sweden; Goldwin Smith, of Toronto; and F. G. 
Peabody, of Harvard University. 

Among clergymen participating were Revs. George A. Gordon, F. A. 
Bisbee, C. G. Ames, U. G. B. Pierce, F. C. Southworth, C. W. Wendte, 
Jenkin Lloyd Jones, S. M. Crothers, J. H. Crooker, C. F. Dole, C. F. 
Carter, W. G. Puddifoot, H. T. Cope, J. M. Whiton, Rabbi Fleischer, 
J. B. Weston, S. S. Summerbell, and H. W. Wilbur, of the United 
States ; W. Copeland Bowie, W. G. Tarrant, A. Webster, C. J. Street, 
V. D. Davis, Miss Gertrude Von Petzold, and others of Great Britain ; 
Abbe A. Houtin, of Paris ; Dr. Max Fischer, of Berlin ; P. H. Hugen- 
holtz and F. C. Fleischer, of Holland ; L. E. T. Andre, of Florence, 



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Italy; J. Schoenholzer, E. Rochat, and L. Ragaz, of Switzerland; N. 
Jozan, of Budapest ; Charles Strong, of Australia ; Miss Mary E. Rich- 
mond, of New Zealand; J. L. Joshi and M. BarakatuUah, of India. 

The Fifth International Congress will be held in Berlin, Germany, 
August 6-ioth, 1910. The preparations for it by our German allies 
are extensive, and it bids fair to be a worthy successor of previous 
meetings. Applications for membership and communications concern- 
ing the International Council and its approaching Congress at Berlin, 
may be addressed to the General Secretary, Rev. Charles W. Wendte, 
25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

A full report of the proceedings and papers of the Boston Congress 
has been published in a large octavo, with sixty illustrations, under the 
title, " Freedom and Fellowship in Religion." The cost is one dollar, 
and 23 cents postage. Address the American Unitarian Association, 
25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 



NECROLOGY. 



SAMUEL JUNE BARROWS. 

Samuel June Barrows was born in New York, May 26, 1845. 
At a very early age he was thrown upon his own resources and before 
he was nine years old entered the employ of the famous printing press 
builders R. Hoe & Co. where he not only earned his own living but 
helped materially in the support of his widowed mother. 

Mr. Barrows was brought up a Baptist and he always retained the 
kindest feelings for his former household of faith. The change from 
the old faith to the new was not a sudden conversion but a gradual de- 
velopment of his religious convictions. In speaking of his respect 
for his former household of faith and his love and reverence for the 



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new he would quote these words of Paul, " If that which was done 
away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious." 

He was a man of deep religious feeling with a heart filled with 
Christian charity and love, with a firm belief in the Fatherhood of 
God and the brotherhood of man. His pulpit ministrations were 
marked by great originality and in his two years' service in Congress, 
representing the Tenth Massachusetts District, he gave proof of his 
statesmanship and devotion to the best interests of the people. He 
was a reraaricable linguist speaking and writing five languages, and 
on several occasions he delivered extemporaneously two addresses in 
one day in diflFerent languages on dissimilar subjects. 

The work which Mr. Barrows did for prison reform, not only in 
this country but throughout Europe, would make the life of an ordi- 
nary man well rounded in good works. He labored diligently in 
season and out of season for the reform of our penal laws and became 
an authority on the subject of penology. He was the President of the 
International Prison Congress, and he was chosen by Congress a 
Commissioner to represent the United States at the meetings of this 
Association in foreign countries. He also represented our nation as 
a member of the International Parliamentary Union, taking charge of 
the European delegation at the time of the St. Louis Exposition when 
its members were entertained at the expense of our government. 

While in the Harvard Divinity School from 1873 ^^ 1875 he sup- 
ported himself by writing for the newspapers and his vacations were 
spent, one with Gen. Stanley in the Yellowstone region and the other 
with Gen. Custer among the Black Hills, as correspondent for the New 
York Tribune. He also studied one year in Leipzig and in 1897 he 
received from Howard University, District of Columbia, the degree of 
S.T.D. 

He was first settled over the First Parish in Dorchester, his only 
pastorate, but a few years later he was called to a wider field of duty, 
the editorship of the Christian Register. But he never ceased to 
be a minister. His sermons were very original and were marked by 
great breadth of thought. "There was thought enough in that ser- 
mon for several discourses " is a remark that was often repeated by 



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those who listened to his preaching. His generous impulses, his 
loveable disposition, his sympathy and courtesy made him equally the 
friend of the rich and poor but he was the happiest when he was min- 
istering to the unfortunate and friendless. He was a loyal and de- 
voted layman in the church over which he had been pastor and was 
ever ready to step from the pew to the pulpit and do any ministerial 
service wherever and whenever he was needed. 

Mr. Barrows was a born journalist writing extensively for the New 
York Sun, World Tribune, Independent, The Outlook and many other 
magazines and periodicals. As editor of the Christian Register from 
1881 to 1897 he had full scope for his genius and whether writing of 
theology, ethics, science or literature he was perfectly at home. As 
a controversationalist he was quick to see any weak point in his op- 
ponent's argument and was ever ready with his strong vigorous Eng- 
lish and by use of sarcasm if necessary, to present strongly his side 
of the argument. He was a positive and unhesitating advocate of 
Temperance and Woman's Suffrage. 

He was an indefatigable worker for better laws concerning prisons 
and prisoners and an effective lobbyist of the right sort. He would 
travel by night from New York to Albany in the sleeping car and 
labor all day with the Lawmakers at the Capitol to have enacted prison 
laws that would help to reform as. well as ptmish. This he would 
do often times twice a week and it was a fair sample of his work 
year in and year out. Many of his friends pleaded with him to be 
more careful of his physical health, telling him that so much traveling 
by night with hard work all day would wear him out, but he felt that 
he was strong and was so filled with the desire to accomplish his pur- 
pose that he persisted in sacrificing himself and laid down his life in 
his efforts to alleviate the sufferings and advance the best interests of 
his fellow men. 

His keen sense of hiunor was proverbial. He could always sec 
the jocose and hiunorous side of everything and it added much to the 
happiness of his life ; this with his youthful spirit, his happy disposi- 
tion, his loyalty to friends and his loveable character made him dear 
to all who really knew him. 



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It is not by accident, neither is it a coincidence that his eulogists so 
universally say " Few men have known so many things worth knowing 
and have done so many things worth doing." His versatility was mar- 
vellous. He was equally at home in the Editor's chair, the pulpit, in the 
halls of legislation, on the field of battle, at the Peace Congress arguing 
for International Arbitration, at Lake Mohonk pleading for the rights 
of the Indian, singing in Oratorio, making expert stenographic reports, 
writing hymns or composing music. He was an interpreter of Greek 
art and poetry. His book entitled " The Isles and Shrines of Greece," 
with illustrations reproduced from photographs taken with his own 
camera, is in some respects a unique voliune as he was the only Ameri- 
can who accompanied Dr. Dorpfeld in his very successful explora- 
tions and excavations at Troy in 1893. The beautiful illustrated 
volume published by the United States Treasury Department giving 
a very full record of the journey of the Interparliamentary Union 
through the East, South and West, when it was the guest of our Nation 
is also a remarkable book. 

Dr. Barrows was an uncompromising believer in civic righteousness 
and was always to be found with voice and pen advocating a higher 
standard of morality in public as well as in private life. He was ever 
ready to champion a good object however unpopular and he exemplified 
his belief in the Brotherhood of man by espousing the cause of the 
down trodden whether Negro or Armenian, Greek or Russian. His 
purity of character, his deep religious feeling, his faith in God and 
his love of humanity seemed to grow stronger by his closer con- 
tact with the business world. 

His noble life closed April 21, 1909 in his native city. As we 
might expect, his last hours were peaceful and serene as he repeated 
some of his favorite hymns and sent loving messages to his wife who 
was in a distant land on an errand of mercy. While regretting that 
he could not go on with his many philanthropic works of charity and 
social reform especially the International Prison Congress for which 
he had labored so unceasingly, yet, he was able to say " Thy will be 
done." R. C. H. 



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WILLIAM AUGUSTINE CRAM. 

Mr. Cram's life began at Hampton Falls, N. H., July lo, 1837, and 
ended there on the 13th of August, 1908. He had a good inheritance 
in his lineage ; in the charming town of his nativity which according to 
its size is almost unequalled for the number of men and women, able 
and true, whom it has given to the world ; and in the industrial school- 
ing and discipline that gave his character a vigorous life-basis. 

From the Phillips Exeter Academy near by, he passed through the 
" Boston School for the Ministry," and was ordained in 1868. He 
gave successful proof of himself as man and minister in two pastorates, 
at Augusta, Me., and Westford, Mass. From the latter church in 1876 
he retired, greatly to the regret of his people, under a pledge made in 
earlier years that he would return to the old home whenever his 
parents in advancing years should need his care. There he remained 
happy and active to the end of his life. His name has never ceased 
to be enrolled in the Year Book, and his real ministry continued with- 
out abatement of efficiency. 

Mr. Cram's occasional services in the pulpit in later life were of ex- 
cellent quality ; his home, with wife and husband equally earnest and 
studious for the best, was a center and source of enlightenment; his 
manly sincerity, his refined tastes and feelings, and his unfaltering faith 
in things spiritual, especially in personal immortality — confirmed by 
much thinking and research — made him a comforter or when severe 
adversity of any kind fell within the reach of his helpfulness. As citi- 
zen, as promoter of education and friend of all good causes, and as 
representing in himself the highest life-standards, he was invaluable. 
Mr. Cram's intellectual acquisitions were not hindered by his other 
cares and labors. In English literature, in the German and French 
classics, and in the world's philosophies, he was a persistent scholar, 
and his mental treasures were held in democratic modesty and sim- 
plicity for the benefit of those around him. 

Of his three children, Ralph Adams Cram has a national reputation 
as an architect and writer on architecture. The home-son, William 
Everett Cram, a naturalist and author of reputation, and the daughter 



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and her family, nearby, with their mother, continue the best traditions 
of the family and the town. S. C. B. 



RICHARD ANDREW GRIFFIN. 

Richard Andrew Griffin died very Suddenly at his home in Bedford, 
Mass., on Wednesday, July 28, 1909. Mr. Griffin was bom at Read- 
ing, England, February 6, 1844. He was one of four brothers all of 
whom were ministers. He received his education in London; was 
ordained at twenty-one years of age; was first settled in the Baptist 
church at Sandhurst in Kent and then at Weymouth. 

In 1872 he came to America and for four years was minister of the 
Baptist church in Zanesville, Ohio. In 1876, finding that his religious 
convictions were no longer in harmony with the accepted teachings of 
the Baptists, he affiliated with the Unitarian body in which he has ren- 
dered service of exceptional merit. The change in his religious thought 
was the occasion for a book entitled " From Traditional to Rational 
Faith." This book was cordially received and exerted a wide influence. 

He preached his first sermon in a Unitatian church in New York, at 
All Souls' Church, during the ministry of Dr. Beltows, and soon after 
was installed at Marlborough, Massachusetts, where for thirteen years 
he worked with conspicuous success. Subsequently he was settled over 
the churches at Augusta, Me., and Northampton, Mass. 

In 1895 he was obliged by poor health to abandon active pastoral 
work and took up his residence at Bedford where he pursued with un- 
abating zeal his reading, his writing and his avocation of painting, 
hoping at all times to return to the active ministry which he loved with 
a passionate zeal. He did not, however, settle again although he sup- 
plied many pulpits and on various occasions. 

Mr. Griffin's genius was of a brilliant intellectual type, leading him to 
wide reading and tireless endeavor as a painstaking student of human 
life. His memory was always alert and tenacious, giving to his con- 
versation a charm and breadth of charity which never failed to give a 
spiritual uplift to those with whom he came in contact. He was richly 
endowed for the ministry, and from the preaching of his first sermon 



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when he was but sixteen years of age to his last day he was ardently 
devoted to his profession. He exalted the pastoral opportunities of his 
life and was deeply beloved by those who were helped by his generous 
hand and comforting counsels. One of his brother ministers writes 
of him : " I have felt the highest respect for his high professional 
ideals and the courage with which he always clung to them. Few of 
our clergy were so well equipped with all the information pertaining 
to our calling, so widely read, or so much at home in the important 
problems of the hour." 

Many will remember him for his ready and abounding wit — and 
for the versatility and freshness of his intellectual interests. 

By nature he was aflFectionate and lovable, modest in demeanor, and 
noble in his moral as well as in his religious life. F. R. G. 

MARY HANNAH GRAVES. 

Mary Hannah Graves. With this name a rare personality has 
passed from this our daily sphere of life. Unpretending almost to a 
fault, yet endowed with true dignity of character, capable of enjoying 
the greatest good in life, with fine taste and feeling for literary beau- 
ties, her days were divided between congenial study and the offices of 
friendship. 

A farmer's daughter, her slender thread of strength was nourished 
by the simple, rural life. This, however, was not for her. She aspired 
to the ministry, and in process of time studied under the guidance of 
Rev. Olympia Brown of the Universalist persuasion. She was or- 
dained by James Freeman Clarke as a Unitarian minister, and passed 
some happy years in several pastorates, the earliest of which was at 
Mansfield, Mass. She preached with acceptance in various places in 
the west, in Peoria, Earlville, Manitou in Colorado, etc. She also 
gave to friends valuable assistance in the education of their children. 
As the years wore on, her strength proved unequal to the arduous 
duties of the ministry, and her time was filled with literary work. She 
contributed occasionally to the pages of the Christian Register, and 
edited a volume on the eminent women of Massachusetts. She also 



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took great interest in the genealogy of New Zealand, and her patient 
labor has disentangled many a family puzzle of descent. The wise care 
which she took of her health enabled her to reach and pass beyond the 
scriptural term of human life ; for her years numbered threescore and 
eleven, when, like a dream, she faded from our midst, leaving only lov- 
ing and tender memories. J. W. H. 



EDWARD EVERETT HALE, D.D. 

EUlward Everett Hale was bom in Boston on April 3, 1822. 
Through a long line of distinguished ancestors he inherited all the 
finest qualities of the New England character. At nine he entered 
the Boston Latin School, and in 1835 Harvard College. After grad- 
uating he was appointed an usher in the Latin School, and while 
teaching began his theological studies with Rev. John G. Palfrey, and 
Rev. Samuel K. Lothrop, two of the prominent ministers of Boston. 

During these years he was also interested in journalism, learning to 
set type in the office of his father who was the owner and editor of 
the Boston Daily Advertiser, for a long time the only daily paper of 
the city, and this interest he carried with him through life. He says 
that he was " cradled in the sheets of his father's Boston Daily." Mr. 
Hale's mother was a sister of Hon. Edward Everett. 

Without what would be called the training of a Divinity School, but 
what in some respects was better, the daily direction in ministerial 
and pastorial work by successful clergymen, he was licensed to preach 
by the Boston Association of Ministers in 1842, and after preaching in 
various churches for four years, he was settled over the Church of the 
Unity in Worcester in 1846. Here he began that long and intimate 
friendship with Senator Hoar through whose influence he became 
Chaplain of the United States Senate. 

Mr. Hale grew up in Boston to the age of twenty, through the 
very years in which Channing was giving a higher tone and a sweeter, 
deeper spirituality to the Christian ministry than any preacher for cen- 
turies, and yet Mr. Hale never heard him. " I was under his power " 
he said, " was made by what he was saying, moulded as was a whole 



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generation by his mighty influence, and yet I never saw him in the 
pulpit, nor heard him speak there. I could do it at any time, I thought, 
and so I never did it" 

In 1856 Mr. Hale came to be the minister of the South Congrega- 
tional church in Boston, then on Washington Street, at the comer of 
Motte. When the large new church of this parish was built for him 
on Union Park Street, it at once became one of the largest and most 
flourishing congregations in Boston. It was one of the earliest to have 
a Vesper Service which drew large nimibers of young persons, and 
under the humanitarian zeal of Mr. Hale was most active in every 
philanthropy. He remained the minister or Pastor Emeritus of this 
church until his death. 

In 1852 Mr. Hale married Miss Emily Baldwin Perkins, a grand- 
daughter of Lyman Beecher, and a niece of Henry Ward Beecher, who 
survives him. In the midst of a large family, brilliant, cultivated, 
deeply spiritual, given to hospitality and every good work, here for a 
long life Dr. Hale was the centre and inspiring genius of a happy 
and ideal New England home. No one could be in that blessed home 
circle and hear Dr. Hale at his morning service "with patriarchal 
grace" without having brought to mind Bums' picture of the scene 
that made Scotia ** lov'd at home, rever'd abroad," and from which 
too New England's " grandeur springs." 

Dr. Hale's life was one of great physical vigor, so that never feeling 
the limitations of illness or weakness which hinder so many, he was 
enabled to do much more than most persons. But this power of rest- 
less activity had joined to its remarkable gifts of mind and of soul, for 
it was all the time strictly under the guard of what Socrates called his 
daemon or the spirit of God. His intellectual energy was ceaseless 
and untiring and ran riot through every realm. There is no space 
here to even name the works of his pen, but the books he wrote, the 
articles he sent to magazines and periodicals of every nature out of 
that early love of journalism which never left him: the myriads of 
letters ; the untold addresses he gave upon historical, literary or philan- 
thropic subjects, arc beyond the comprehension of most of us. Some 



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of them were very transient ; some of them have an enduring place in 
our literature. He went one day to one of our banks and wanted to 
make a deposit of forty-five cents. When told they could not open 
an account for so small an amount he said, " but I want it for that is 
the net income of one of my books." Pervading all these interests was 
his unfailing interest in hiunanity. His desire to help humanity was a 
consuming flame which grew by what it fed upon. He was the great 
htimanitarian of our age, and of all ages. There have been philanthro- 
pists who have spent their lives in some one beneficent work, but with 
Dr. Hale love for humanity ran into every sphere of human welfare, 
and he planned for it and pleaded for it with the ringing voice of the old 
prophets. It was in everything and at all times a cry for righteousness. 
Righteousness was so real to him, so filled his being that he carried 
with him an atmosphere of the reality of religion. He loved the 
world and all things in it intensely, but there was no touch of worldli- 
ness in that love. 

There are many ministers who give to worship and religion a busi- 
ness-like air, a great rattle of machinery, and no breath of the spirit : 
others who give a feeling of fashionable popularity, but where you 
mark at once an undertone of worldliness, open proof of absence of 
any consecration to the deep things of the spirit ; others who make a 
show of eloquence which is often mere loquacity, whose manner or 
rhetoric may please for awhile, but when it is over it is all over, and 
there remains no thought of the unseen things which are eternal. 
There was not a trace of the ascetic, or the ritualist type of religion, 
religion chiefly of the outside which has so dominated the priesthood of 
the world, about our preacher of righteousness: nothing of dress or 
voice to make his office prominent, but his whole walk and being gave 
the impression that here was one who lived on the heights to whom the 
things of the spirit were first, familiar, constant. He gave himself to 
philanthropy, to righteousness, to the Kingdom of God all unmindful 
whether money, or the comforts of life, or the honors of the world 
came or went. 

With the exception of Dr. Bellows he was the most ardent and en- 



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thusiastic proclaimer and defender of Unitarianism we have ever had. 
He might be called a High Church Unitarian, but he was broad 
enough to be a conspicuous figure in the Church Universal. 

As he grew older, the experience of life gave to his preaching just 
one message. As St. John in his old age summed up the Gospel in 
one sentence, " little children love one another," how have we seen 
this striking and venerable preacher, bending over the pulpit, and saying 
again and again, " Ye are the children of God : God is your father : 
live as his children." 

It was a most appropriate tribute to the closing years of this national 
character, that he was chosen to be Chaplain of the United States 
Senate. He had been almost a yearly visitor to Washington for over 
sixty years. He was known there as perhaps no other American 
outside of official prominence. At once the office of Chaplain as- 
sumed a dignity, a reverence, a significance it never had before. 
Those of us who have marked the utter formality and meaninglessness 
of the function were amazed at the seriousness, the simplicity, the 
spirituality, and the impressiveness it at once took on. 

In the midst of that remarkable literary and humanitarian activity 
which took in the world, he was never too busy to lay it all aside for 
any act of kindness you might ask of him. A gracious courtesy and 
sympathy, born of the worth and dignity of human nature were the 
law of his life. It was as fitting as it was touching, that surrounded 
by all the treasures of literature, the books he loved and read and 
wrote, in the library where he had been so industrious a gleaner and 
worker ; talking freely of the certainty of another world, and the peace 
of departing, — he should fall asleep on June loth, 1909. 

Who can think of our friend and leader as we have seen him go in 
and out among us without feeling what a striking resemblance there 
was to the rugged forms of the old prophets, as they sent out their 
mighty words amidst the frivolities and transgressions of their day, 
warning Israel of her sins and calling her back to obedience. 

Courage, truth, faith, hope, strength, righteousness, what words to 
apply to a human life, and yet without any reservation they may all 
be written over the name of Edward Everett Hale. 



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ALBERT ALPHONSO HOSKIN. 

Albert A. Hoskin was born in Chatauguay, N.Y., August 2, 1839, 
and died at Mont fort, Wisconsin, July 21, 1908. Being of Quaker 
ancestry, his mind early dwelt upon religious matters. While an 
infant, his parents went overland and settled in Wisconsin. His 
college education was cut short by enlistment as a volunteer at the out- 
break of the Civil War. At the close of the great conflict, he was given 
his first pastorate in the Methodist church, and successively filled three- 
year periods at Milton, Shopiere, Menononee Falls, Milwaukee and 
Geneva Lake. His health breaking down from overwork at the last- 
named place, he was granted a year's vacation and removed to Mil- 
waukee for medical attention. All unconsciously, his religious views 
had been changing so that, when he requested a new assignment, he 
was refused. With the support of many former Methodist friends, 
he inaugurated an independent church, which was called the Union 
Gospel Church, in Milwaukee, and in this he preached a number of 
years until a second breakdown in health cut his work short. 

In 1890, he moved to Colorado, living for various periods at Idaho 
Springs, Denver, Pueblo and again in Denver. Being in feeble health, 
most of the time was occupied in the study of deep scientific, religious 
and philosophical problems. It was during his first residence in 
Denver that he organized the thriving Denver Philosophical Society. 
He also fathered the legislation in Colorado that created a reserve of 
the southwestern part of the state containing the Cliff Dwellings. In 
Pueblo, he started the Pueblo Philosophical Society, which did work 
of a nature similar to that of the Denver society. He also pushed the 
legislation that instituted the Juvenile Courts for which Colorado be- 
came noted and he worked actively in the Pueblo branch. 

He became a Mason in his early life and but for his ill-health would 
have been an active worker in the order. He was ardent, also, in the 
Work of the G.A.R., and held numerous honorary positions in the 
order. He was a charter member of the organization known as The 
Survivors of Shiloh. In Pueblo he organized a Unitarian society and 
acted as its pastor for over two years. 



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He had a truly scientific mind and he could not therefore accept any- 
thing as truth until it was so proven. He studied deeply. He wrote a 
great deal at times when he was not strong enough to maintain a pulpit, 
and his manuscripts all show that he was always of the most liberal of 
the deeply religious type of men. 

Despite his evolution in theological matters, he never antagonized 
friends, for he reasoned that humans are constituted to entertain indi- 
vidual views and faiths, each to the best of his conscience. He thus 
maintained the love of former Methodist brethren during his more 
intimate relations with his brothers of liberal Christianity. The serv- 
ices of his funeral at Mont fort were conducted by the Rev. Alfred 
Verran, in the local Methodist Church, while at the grave in Fair- 
mount Cemetery, Denver, the rites were performed by the Rev. David 
Utter, of Unity Church. 

His widow and daughter, Alice A., are now residing at Janesville, 
Wisconsin, while Arthur, J., a son, lives in Goldten, Colo. 

A. J. H. 

JOHN HENRY PALMER. 

John Henry Palmer was bom at Akron, Ohio, November 23, 1838. 
He attended the common schools of his native town until 1859, when he 
won a scholarship in Hillsdale College, and at once entered that insti- 
tution. He earned his money as he went along, alternating study with 
hard work in various occupations — part of the time teaching school. 
While thus engaged the call of Lincoln for " three hundred thousand 
more " reached him, and he enlisted as a private in the One Hundredth 
Ohio volimteer infantry. He was soon commissioned first lieutenant, 
and later promoted to a. captaincy ; but a severe illness put an end to his 
military life. After three years of invalidism, he moved to Nashville, 
Mich. In 1871 he entered the Universalist ministry, and subsequently 
held pastorates at Fenton, Rochester, Lapeer, Charlotte and Lansing, 
in that state. In 1889 he accepted a call to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where 
he remained for nearly eleven years. After two year's service in the 
Unitarian Church at Lucerne, Minn., and a six years' pastorate at 



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Monroe, Wis., he was compelled by illness to relinquish active work. 
But these bare facts give no inkling of the simple, strong, noble manli- 
ness of the man, his valiant and tender spirit, or the grace and beauty 
of his ministry. 

The first impression of Dr. Palmer was an unmistakable impression 
of character, of a certain fine strength and solidity of manhood. He 
was a man of positive nature, of firm faith, of high ideals, but withal 
of large charity and genuine love of his fellow men. In the pulpit he 
was always deeply thoughtful, instructing, and inspiring, bringing the 
fruits of a wide studentship and a rich experience to bear upon the 
tasks and duties of the common lot. Touch him on any point of 
principle or conduct, and he rang clear and true, and he knew no com- 
promise with wrong. Companionable he was supremely, brotherly in 
spirit, tender in sympathy, wise in counsel, charming in conversation. 
He was — he is a man, for though he has vanished from among us, 
he is still and ever must be, to those who knew him, not only a bright 
memory, but a fruitful inspiration to goodness. J. N. 

GEORGE STETSON SHAW. 

George S. Shaw, who died in Ashby on February i, 1909, was born 
in Bristol, R.I., April 8, 1837, the son of E. T. Shaw, of Mattapoisett, 
and Mary Ann Stetson, of Fairhaven. When he was two years old 
his father moved to New Bedford. When the boy was less than eight 
he was put out to live on a farm in East Freetown, receiving his 
board and clothes and schooling in the winter. At the age of sixteen 
his father took him as an apprentice into his shipyard, and in New 
Bedford the youth showed strong religious inclinations. When he 
was twenty-one, the way was opened for him to go to Meadville 
Theological School, and after four years of the hardest kind of study 
he was graduated June 26, 1861. Returning to New England he 
preached as an itinerant for about six months, when by the recom- 
mendSation of a friend, he received an appointment as chaplain of the 
Missouri State penitentiary. 

In Civil War days he went into the service and afterward for two 



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years was in the West, acting as missionary or settled pastor, and 
was also settled over a new church in Wisconsin a year and a half, 
and for some months at Whitehall, Mich. Returning East he went to 
Ashby for a single Sunday, July i8, 1869, and continued to stay on 
and on. There was no formal settlement or installation as pastor of 
the First Parish of Ashby, yet there was no break since he first arrived 
and began his preaching. 

For twenty-two years Mr. Shaw held services in West Townsend 
on Sunday afternoons the whole or a part of the year. For thirty 
years or more he served as secretary of the Ashby Magazine Club 
and was instrumental in founding the free public library. He was 
always interested in the schools, and whether on the committee or 
otherwise he visited them freely. In order that he might encourage 
young folks to save, he acted for several years as an agent for two 
co-operative banks in Fitchburg. He was a member of the G.A.R. 
and Mt. Roulstone Lodge, I.O.O.F., of Fitchburg. On June i, 1870, 
he was married to Mary E. Gates, daughter of Perley Gates and Mary 
Burr, of Ashby, who survives him. 

FRANCIS TIFFANY. 

Francis Tiffany was bom at Baltimore, Md., February 16, 1827. 
He early manifested a student's zeal, a love for literature ; and, with 
a high, pervading moral purpose and wide human interest, he turned 
to the work of the ministry. He graduated from Harvard in 1847 
and was ordained at Springfield, Mass., in 1852, and remained the 
minister of that church, rapidly increasing in numbers and influence 
until 1864. During that exciting period of our history he was a 
prominent, outspoken, and forcible speaker with the great anti-slavery 
leaders, and with no uncertain voice upon every question which con- 
cerned a truer liberty and an undivided country. 

For a brief period he was professor of English literature and rhetoric 
at Antioch College; but the air of New England was more congenial 
to his literary tastes and gave a larger opportunity for their employ- 
ment, and in 1866 he returned to the settled ministry at West Newton, 



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where, with a brief interruption, he remained until 1883, when he 
resigned and gave himself more exclusively to literary pursuits. 

Mr. Tiffany entered the Unitarian ministry at a time when the move- 
ment which was led by Dr. Channing had gathered a body of preachers 
who at once raised the standard of the American pulpit. Never since 
the introduction of Christianity has there been within so small a circle 
or in so brief a period such a company of cultivated, earnest, spiritu- 
ally-minded clergymen. In the bitterness of the theological contro- 
versy their great merit was overlooked and' never has been fully ac- 
knowledged. Into this body Mr. Tiffany came as a worthy member. 
He aspired to their ideal, and it suffered nothing at his hands. If his 
preaching aroused no wide personal enthusiasm, it had great charm of 
literary style, of graceful expression, of beautiful imagery, of richly 
stored mind, of high moral purpose, and of true spiritual vision ; and 
it appealed to those who loved these traits in preaching. 

Even those of us who knew his gifts could hardly escape surprise 
at the keenness of his criticism and the strength of his reasoning when 
two articles of his appeared as " The Fourth Gospel " and the " Theory 
of Evolution." 

The Examiner Club is one of the most interesting of the literary 
clubs in Boston, and most varied in its constituency. Here Mr. Tif- 
fany was a most welcome member, genial, witty, entertaining, often 
brilliant. Two of his books, " The Life of Dorothea Lynde Dix " and 
** The Life of Charles Frances Barnard," are among the best examples 
of the biography of philanthropists, for they are written from the 
sympathetic view of a philanthropist. 

The tree that was fruitful so early ceased not bearing in its old age, 
and until within a few weeks of his death on September 3rd, 1908, he 
wrote his sermonette for the Herald. 

He had a manly simplicity and an honest heart. Age instead of 
contracting seemed only to mellow and ripen his nature, which to the 
end continued open to the reception and defence of liberal views, and 
with a wider and deeper human sympathy. J. DeN. 



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170 

JABEZ NELSON TRASK. 

Mr. Trask, who died on March 15th at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital in Boston, was born in Freedom, Me., Oct. 19, 1831, He 
graduated from Harvard College in 1862. Among his classmates 
were Rev, J. Vila Blake, Rev. Frederick L. Hosmer, Charles E. Grin- 
nell, Robert S. Peabody, and Prof. Charles Sprague Sargent. His 
class in the Harvard Divinity School (1866) had eight members, all 
of whom were college graduates. It included Rev. S. C. Beach, D.D. 
J. Vila Blake, William Ellery Copeland, Henry F. Jenks, and Henry 
G. Spaulding. Mr. Trask was the minister of the Congregational 
(Unitarian) Society of New Salem, Mass., from May, 1868, to No- 
vember 1869, and preached in 1873 for four months at West Cum- 
mington as pastor of the Universalist church. The rest of his post- 
graduate life was given to literary and philanthropic work. For a 
little over a year (March, 1871, to June, 1872) he was United States 
Indian Agent of Utahs at Los Pinos Agency in Colorado. When re- 
siding in Cambridge he is said to have assisted in preparing the notes 
to the poet Longfellow's translation of Dante's " Divine Comedy." 

His varied learning gave him the reputation of being the best edu- 
cated man in the coimtry in which he lived, and where he was best 
known as a civil engineer. Astronomy and botany were among his 
favorite studies, and, at the time of his death, he was a contributor 
to the United States Weather Department. As a frequent writer for 
the Springfield Republican and other leading newspapers he was widely 
known. In many ways his life was a useful one, and his interest in 
the religious body to which he belonged continued to the end. 



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171 



PERIODICALS. 



The Christian Register, Rev. George Batchelor, Editor, is published by the 
Giristian Register Association, at 272 Congress Street, Boston. By its history, 
its traditions, and the conviction of its editorial board and publishers, it is com- 
mitted to the principles which characterize the Unitarian churches of America. 
With them it aims to make religion a source of strength, comfort, and instruc- 
tion in the common life of man. But it has a constituency reaching far beyond 
all Unitarian churches, and does missionary work among people remote from 
all Unitarian fellowship. It reports news from the churches, the proceedings 
of the National Conference, the Unitarian Association, the Women's Alliance, 
the Sunday-School Society, the Young People's Religious Union, and kindred 
associations. Its editorial board consists of Rev. Charles G. Ames, D.D., Rev. 
Howard N. Brown, Rev. George Batchelor, Rev. Samuel M. Crothers, D.D., 
Rev. Charles F. Dole, D.D., Rev. John W. Day, George H. Ellis, Rev. Julian C 
Jaynes, Rev. William H. Lyon, D.D., William Howell Reed. Subscription, $3.00 
per year. 

Every Other Sunday, illustrated, fortnightly, Boston. Editor, Rev. Edward 
A. Horton. This is the only paper published for the young people of the 
Unitarian churches. There are now over two hundred and twenty-five different 
contributors. In addition to its universal use in our Sunday Schools, the paper 
has been found very helpful reading for the home, and useful supplementary 
literature in the day school. Published by the Unitarian Sunday-School Society, 
at 2$ Beacon Street. Price 40 cents a year. Single subscribers residing within 
the Boston Postal District pay 20 cents additional for postage. The same re- 
quirement applies to single Canadian subscribers. 

The Unitarian, monthly, New York Unitarian Headquarters, New York, 
N. Y. Rev. George H. Badger, Editor. Contributing Editors, Rev. Thomas R. 
Slicer, of New York ; Rev. Jabcz T. Sunderland, of Hartford, Conn. ; President 
Franklin C. Southworth, of Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa.; Rev. 
Thomas Van Ness, of Boston, Mass. ; Rev. Wilson M. Backus, of Chicago, 111. ; 
Rev. Henry W. Foote, of Ann Arbor, Mich. ; Rev. Harry E. Gilchrist, of New 
Orleans, La. Subscription, $1.00 per year. 

Old and New. Published monthly at Humboldt, la., except during July 
and August, by the Iowa Association of Unitarian and Other Independent 



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172 

churches. Editor, Rev. Charles P. Wellman, Humboldt, la. Associate Editors, 
Johnson, Brigham, Melida Pappe, Rev. Eleanor E. Gordon, Arthur D. Crom- 
well, and Ruth I. Preston. Subscription, $i.oo per year. 

Pacific Unitarian, monthly, San Francisco, Cal Published by the Pacific 
Unitarian Conference. Editor, Charles A. Murdock; Editorial Committee: Rev. 
Qarence Reed, Rev. William D. Simonds, Rev. John H. Lathrop, and William 
Maxwell. Business address, Cor. Franklin and Geary Streets. Editorial ad- 
dress, 68 Fremont Street. Price $i.oo a year. Single copy, lo cents. 

Unity. Published weekly by the Unity Publishing Company, Abraham 
Lincoln Centre, Chicago, 111. $2.00 per annum. Editor, Jenkin Lloyd Jones; 
Assistant Editor, Edith Lackersteen. Editorial Contributors, Jane Addams, 
Wilson M. Backus, James A. Blaisdell, Francis A. Christie, Joseph H. Crookcr, 
Robert C. Denison, John Faville, William C. Gannett, Fred V. Hawley, Charles 
R. Henderson, Emil G. Hirsch, Newton Mann, Joseph Newton, Granville Ross 
Pike, E. P. Powell, William M. Salter, Albion W. Small, Frederick Starr, Jo- 
seph Stolz, Hiram W. Thomas, Eugene G. Updike, Fred A. Weil, James H. 
West, R. A. White, Charles Zeublin. 



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ITARIAN 
EAR BOOK 



1910 



aERtOAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATI 
mber 25 Beacon Street F 



1 






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TARIAN 

^EAR 

BOOK 



JULY I 1910 





Boston: AMERICAN UNITARIAN 
ASSOCIATION, 25 Beacon Street 



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PREFACE 

The list of Unitarian churches in the United States and Canada con- 
tains the names of 504 societies. Since the last Year Book the names 
of 2 churches have been dropped from the list, and 17 have been added, 
a net g^in of 15. 

The list of ministers contains 538 names. 21 new names have been 
added and 47 have been dropped, 11 of these having died during the 
year, and 36 having withdrawn from our ministry. Of the 22 that 
have been added 5 have come from our Divinity Schools, 2 from the 
Trinitarian Congreg^tionalists, i from the Methodist Episcopal, 2 
from the Episcopal, 5 from the Universalist, i from the Presbjrterian, 
I from the Disciples of Christ, 2 from the Baptists, i from the 
Spiritualists, and 2 Unitarians. 

The Editor wishes to express his appreciation of the services ren- 
dered by Miss Henrietta S. Rogers, whose knowledge and past ex- 
perience in the preparation of Year Books has made the present task 
comparatively easy, and also his indebtedness to ministers and confer- 
ence secretaries who have furnished much of the necessary informa- 
tion. Any errors or omissions may be communicated to the editor. 

L. G. w. 



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INDEX 



Academies, 137-141. 

Alliances, Women's, 111-113. 

Allied Headquarters, 64. 

American Unitarian Association, year 
foimded, 65; history of, 65 j purpose, 
66; government, 67; admmistration, 
69; departments: finance, 69; publi- 
cation, 69; publicity, 70; foreign re- 
lations, 70; comity and fellowship, 
70; education, 70; chiu-di extension, 
71; social and public service, 71; New 
Americans, 72; ministerial aid, 72; 
library, 72; Church Building Loan 
Fimd, 72; officers and directors, 61; 
life members of, 76-91. 

Appeals, Committee on, in. 

Appropriations, method of making, 71. 

Associations. See American Unitarian 
and Ministerial. 

Bay Association of Unitarian Ministers, 
124. 

Bellows School, 138. 

Benevolent Fraternity of Churches, 125. 

Benevolent Societies, 1 25-131. 

Berpr Street Conference, 122. 

Billings Lectureship Fimd, 70. 

Book-rooms, 64. 

Boston Association of Ministers, 122. 

Boston Federation, 114. 

Boston Office, 63. 

By-laws of American Unitarian Associa- 
tion, 67-68. 

By-laws of National Conference, 94-96. 

California Unitarian Club, 119. 

Cambridge Association of Ministers, 122. 

Cape Cod Conference, 104. 

Channing Club, Boston, 119. 

Planning Conference, 104. 

Channing Conference Sunday-School, in. 

Channing Federation, 115. 

Chaiming, W. E., 66. 

Charitable Society, Massachusetts Con- 
gregational, 128. 

Cheeriul Letter Exchange, Committee on, 
III. 

Chicago Associate Alliance, 112. 

Chicago headquarters, 64. 

Chicago Unitarian Club, 119. 



Children's Mission, 127. 

Christian Register ^ 166. 

Christian Union, Boston Young Men's, 

126. 
Church Building Loan Fund, 72; officers 

of, 63. 
Chiu-ch Extension, 71. 
Churches, List of, 9-28; in chronological 

order, 29-40; arranged by States, 

41-43- 

Comity and Fellowship, 70. 

Conmiittees, Standing, 62. 

Conference, National, 92-98. 

Conferences, Department, 98-102; State, 
102-104; local New England, 110-113. 

Connecticut Valley Conference, 104. 

Connecticut Valley Unitarian Club, 120. 

Days to be Remembered, 7. 

Delegate Societies, 74-76. 

Department Conferences, 98-102. 

Departments, American Unitarian As- 
sociation, 69-73. 

Divinity Schook, 133-137. 

Education, 70. 

Education, Theological, 70. 

Essex Conference, 105. 

Essex Federation, 115. 

Every Other Sunday ^ 166. 

Federations of Young People, 114-116. 

Fellowship Committee, 93; rules of, 96-97. 

Fellowships for students, 70. 

Executive Sta£f, 63. 

Finance, 69. 

Foreign Relations, 70. 

General Unitarian Societies, 116-118. 

Hackley School, 137. 

Hancodc Conference, 105. 

Harvard Divinity School Unitarian Club, 
120. 

Harvard University Divinity School, 133. 

Hayward Fund, 70. 

Historical Society, 116. 

Home School for Girls, 138. 

Howard Seminary, 138. 

Icelandic Unitarian Conference, 102. 

Illinois Conference, 102. 

Industrial School for Girls, 1 28. 

Industrial School (South End, Boston), 131. 



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International Council, 143-154. 

Iowa Association, 103. 

Japan, 70. 

Joseph Priestley Conference, 99. 

Liberal Christian Club, Lowell, 120. 

Liberal La>Tnan's Club,. Connecticut Val- 
ley, 120. 

Liberal Ministers Association of New 
York, 124. 

Library, 72. 

Life Members of American Unitarian As- 
sociation, 76-91. 

Local New England Conferences, 104-107. 

Lowell Liberal Club, 120. 

Lowell: Men's Club, 120. 

MacDuiBe School for Girls, 138. 

Maine Conference, 105. 

Maine Unitarian Association, 128. 

Manitoba Conference, 102. 

Massachusetts Congregational Charitable 
Society, 128. 

Massachusetts Convention of Congrega- 
tional Ministers, 122. 

Massachusetts Evangelical Missionary So- 
ciety, 129. 

Meadville Alumni Association, 136. 

Meadville Theological School, 134-136. 

Meadville Unitarian Conference, 99. 

Merrimack ^'alley Unitarian Club, 120. 

Michigan Conference, lo^. 

Middle States and Canada, 98-99. 

Ministerial Aid, 72. 

Ministerial Associations, 122-124. 

Ministerial Conference, 122. 

Ministerial Union, 123. 

Ministers' Institute, 123. 

Ministers, List of, 44-60. 

Minnesota Conference, 103. 

Missionary Council of New England, 71; 
of the South, 71; of the West, 71. 

Missionary Society (Massachusetts Evan- 
gelical), 129. 

Mission Free School, St. Louis, Mo., 129. 

Missouri Valley Unitarian Conference, 103. 

Monday Club (Ministers), 124. 

Nantucket Summer Meetings, 116. 

Natick Unitaiian Club, 120. 

National Alliance, 111-112. 

National Bureau of Unity Clubs, 113. 

National Conference, 92-98. 

National Federation, 141-143. 

National Guild Alliance, 113. 

National Lca:,^uc of Unitarian La>Tnen, 116, 

Necrology, 154-166, 

New Americans, 72. 



New England Associate Alliance, 112. 
New Hampshire Unitarian Association, 106. 
Newton Unitarian Club, 120. 
New York League of Unitarian Women, 

112. 
New York Liberal Ministers Association, 

124. 
New York headquarters, 64. 
New York Sunday-School Union, 11 1. 
New York Unitarian Club, 121. 
Norfolk Conference, 105. 
North Middlesex Conference, 106. 
North Middlesex Federation, 115. 
North Middlesex Ministerial Association, 

124. 
North Pacific Conference, 102. 
North Worcester Federation, 115. 
Obituary Notices, 154-166. 
Ollicers, American Unitarian Association, 

61-62. 
Oregon Unitarian Club, 121. 
Pacific Unitarian f 166. 
Pacific Unitarian Conference, loi. 
Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry, 

136-137. 

Pension Society, 132. 

Pcriodicab, 166-167. 

Perkins Fellowships, 70. 

Philadelphia Unitarian Club, 121, 

Pilgrim Federation, 115, 

Plymouth and Bay Association (Ministers), 
124. 

Plymouth and Bay Conference, 106. 

Post-office Mission Committee, in. 

Powder Point School, 139. 

Proctor Academy, 140. 

Providence Unitarian Club, 121. 

Pulpits, Committee on Supply of, 123. 

Rocky Mountain Conference, loi. 

San Francisco headquarters, 64. 

Schools, 137-141. 

Social and Public Service, 71. 

Society for Promoting Theological Educa- 
tion, 130. 

Society for Propagating the Gospel among 
the Indians, 131. 

Society for Ministerial Relief, 130. 

South End Industrial School, 131. 

South Middlesex Conference, 107. 

South Middlesex Federation, 115. 

South Pacific Conference, 102. 

South Worcester Federation, 116. 

Southern Conference 99. 

Southern Missionary Work, Committee on. 



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Special Committees of Conference, iix. 
State Conferences, 102-104. 
Study Classes, Committee on, 111. 
Summer Meetings Association, 116. 
Sunday-School &)cieties, 107-110. 
Temperance Society, n6. 
Theological Schools, 133-137. 
Tuckerman School, 140. 
Tuckerman School Association, 141. 
Um'on for Christian Work (Providence), 

131. 
UniiariaHy 166. 

Unitarian Association, See American. 
Unitarian Club, Boston, 119. 
Unitarian Club, California, 119. 
Unitarian Club, Chicago, 119. 
Unitarian Club, Harvard Divinity School, 

120. 
Unitarian Club, Merrimack Valley, 120. 
Unitarian Club, Natick, 120. 
Unitarian Club, Newton, 120. 
Unitarian Club, New York, 121. 
Unitarian Club, Oregon, 121. 
Unitarian Club, Philadelphia, 121. 
Unitarian Club, Providence, 121. 
Unitarian Clubs, 119-121. , 



Unitarian Educational Society, 132. 

Unitarian FeUowship for Social Justice, 
117. 

Unitarian Historical Society, 116. 

Unitarian Ministers' Monday Club, 124. 

Unitarian Service Pension Society, 132. 

Unitarian Summer Meetings Association, 
116. 

Unitarian Sunday-School Society, 107-110. 

Unitarian Sunday-School Union, no. 

Unitarian Temperance Society, 116. 

Unity y 167. 

Western Conference News-Letter, 167. 

Western State Conferences, 102-104. 

Western Unitarian Conference, 100. 

Western Headquarters, Unitarian Sunday- 
School Society, 108. 

Wisconsin Conference, 104. 

Women's Alliances, 111-113. 

Worcester Association (Ministers), 124. 

Worcester Conference, 107. 

Worcester League, 113. 

Young Men's Christian Union, 126. 

Young People's Religious Union, 113-114. 

Young People's Societies, 113-116. 



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1910 


1911 


JAV. 


JULY 


JAN. 


JULT 


B M T W T F B 
1 


B M T W T F B 
12 


8 M T W T F 8 
13 8 4 6 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 18 14 
16 16 17 18 19 30 21 
22 88 34 36 36 27 88 
29 80 81 


8 M T W T F 8 
1 


2 8 4 6 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 18 14 16 
16 17 18 19 30 21 22 
28 34 26 26 27 28 29 
80 81 ... 


8 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 18 14 16 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 28 
34 36 26 27 28 29 80 
81 


8 8 4 6 6 7 8 

9 10 11 18 18 14 16 
16 17 18 19 30 81 22 
28 34 35 36 27 88 29 
30 81 










FIB. 


AUG. 


FIB. 


AUG. 


B M T W T F B 

.... 12 8 4 6 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 16 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 34 36 36 
27 28 


..128466 
7 8 9 10 11 12 18 
14 16 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 26 36 27 
28 29 80 81 


8 M T W T F 8 
12 8 4 

6 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 18 14 16 16 17 18 
19 20 31 83 88 34 26 
26 87 88 


.... 1 8 8 4 6 
6 7 8 9 10 11 18 
IS 14 16 16 17 18 19 
30 8182 28 34 96 36 
27 88 89 80 31 .. .. 












MAB. 


BSPT. 


MAB. 


BKPT. 


B M T W T F B 
.... 1 2 8 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 U 12 
13 14 16 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 28 24 26 36 
27 28 29 80 31 .. .. 


B M T W T F B 
12 8 

4 6 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 18 14 15 16 17 
18 19 30 21 22 38 24 
25 36 27 28 29 80 .. 


B M T W T F 8 

18 8 4 

6 6 7 8 9 10 11 

18 18 14 16 16 17 18 

19 30 21 22 28 24 26 
26 27 38 29 80 81 .. 


8 M T W T F 8 
12 


8 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 IS 14 16 16 
17 18 19 20 81 22 28 
94 26 36 87 38 29 80 






'* 




▲PBIL 


OCT. 


AFBIL 


OCT. 


B M T W T F B 

12 


B M T W T F B 
.. .. 1 


8 M T W T F 8 
1 


8 M T W T F 8 
12 8 4 6 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 18 14 
16 16 17 18 19 30 21 
22 23 34 35 36 27 38 
89 80 81 


8 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 13 18 14 16 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 26 26 27 28 29 80 


2 8 4 6 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 16 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 34 36 26 27 28 29 
30 81 


8 8 4 6 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 18 14 16 
16 17 18 19 30 21 22 
23 24 26 26 87 28 29 

80 


MAT 


NOV. 


MAT 


HOT. 


B M T W T F B 

12 8 4 6 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 18 14 
16 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 28 24 26 26 27 28 
29 80 81 


8 M T W T F B 
... 12 8 4 6 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
18 14 16 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 26 36 
27 28 29 80 


8 M T W T F 8 
..188466 

7 8 9 10 11 12 18 
14 16 16 17 18 19 20 
2122 28 34 26 36 27 
28 29 80 81 


8 M T W T F 8 

18 8 4 

6 6 7 8 9 10 11 
13 18 14 16 16 17 18 
19 30 31 22 88 94 26 
26 27 88 29 80 .. .. 










JUHB 


DEC. 


JUVE 


DIG. 


12 8 4 

6 6 7 8 910 11 
12 18 14 16 16 17 18 
19 30 31 32 28 24 25 
36 27 38 29 80 .. .. 


8 M T W T F 8 

12 8 

4 6 6 7 8 910 
11 12 18 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 28 34 
25 26 27 28 29 80 81 


12 8 

4 6 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 18 14 16 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 28 34 
26 36 27 28 29 80 .. 


8 M T W T F 8 
12 


8 4 6 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 18 14 16 16 
17 18 19 30 81 82 28 
34 25 26 87 88 29 80 
81 











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DAYS TO BE REMEMBERED. 



I9IO 

Aug. 6-10. The International Council of Unitarian and other Liberal Religious 

Thinkers and Workers at Berlin, Germany. 

Aug. 19-21. Four Hundredth Anniversary of the Founding of Unitarianism 

in Hungary. International Meetings at Kolozsvar, Hungary. 

Sept 26-29. Ministers' Institute at Marblehead, Mass. 

Oct. 4. Opening of Tuckerman School. 

Nov. 24. Thanksgiving Day. 

Dec 22. Forefathers' Day. 

Dec. 25. Christmas. 

191 1 

Jan. I. New Year's Day. 

March l. Ash Wednesday. 

Feb. 12. Lincoln's Birthday. 

Feb. 22. Washington's Birthday. 

April 9. Palm Sunday. 

April 14. Good Friday. 

April 16. Easter Sunday. 

April 19. Patriots' Day. 

April 30. Last day for receiving contributions for the American Unitarian 

Association and the Unitarian Sunday- School Society. 

May 16. Commencement of the Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry. 

May 17. Graduation Exercises of the Tuckerman School. 

May 22-27. Anniversary Week in Boston. 

May 23. Annual Meeting of the National Alliance. 

May 23-24. Annual Meeting of the American Unitarian Association. 

May 25. Annual Meeting of the Young People's Religious Union. 

May 25. Annual Meeting of the Meadville Alumni Association. 

May 26. Annual Meeting of the Unitarian Sunday-School Society. 

May 26. Unitarian Festival. 

May 30. Memorial Day. 

June I. Graduation Exercises of the Meadville Theological School. 

June 4. Whitsunday. 

June 27. Annual Meeting of the Harvard Divinity School Alumni. 

July 4. Independence Day. 



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LIST OF UNITARIAN CHURCHES IN THE 
UNITED STATES AND CANADA 



This list contains 504 societies, a net increase of 15 over the last report. 
* These churches have discontinued services, but have some hope of resuming work. 
t These churches have ceased to exist save for the fact that corporations under 
these names continue to hold a certain amount of property. 



Place, 

Abington, North, 

Mass. 
Adrian, Minn 

Alameda, Cal 

Albany. N.Y 

Allegheny, Pa. . . . 

Alton, m 

Amherst, Mass. . . . 

Andover, N.H. . . . 

Andovcr, N.H.: 
(Potter Place) 
Andover, North, Mass. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. . . 

Arcadia, Wis 

Arlington, Mass. . . . 

Arnes, P. 0., Manitoba, 

Canada 
Ashby. Mass 

Atbol, Mass 

Athol,Mass 

Atlanta, Ga 

Attleboro, Mass. . . 



Corporate Name, 



•First Unitarian Sodety 

People's Church 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Sodety 

(See Pittsburgh) 

First Unitarian Church 

Unity Church 

Congregational Unitarian 

Sodety 
All Souls' Union Church 

First Unitarian Church and 
Sodety 

First Unitarian Sodety 

People's Church 

First Congregational Parish 

Unitarian Sodety at Ames 

(Icelandic) 
First Parish 

•First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Sodety 
Second Unitarian Sodety 

The Unitarian Church of 

Atlanta 
Pilgrim Church 



O- 
gan- 
ited. 



1887 
1899 
1890 
1843 

I8S4 
1898 
1879 
1910 
1645 

1865 
1884 
1733 
1909 
1767 
I7SO 
1877 
1883 
1903 



Minister, 



William S. Morgan, Ph.D. 



Arthur H. Coar 

(Holyoke, Mass.) 
Henry G. Ives 

Henry G. Ives 

Charles Noyes 

Pastor Emeritus 
William S. Nichols 
Henry Wilder Footc 



Frederic GiO 
RSgnvaldur Petursson 
Granville Pierce 

William D. Wilkie 
John W. Rowlett. D J>. 
John H. Applebee 



Chairman or Clerk, 



J. L. Greenwood 

C. W. Kilpatrick 

Major Cullen Bryant 

Peter R. Robson, 
468 Hudson Ave. 

S. F. Connor 
Prof. Wm. P. Brooks 
George W. Stone 
Fred E. Weed J 

M. T. Stevens 
Mrs. B. A. Finney 
N.Ldhbach 
John L. Taylor 
S. Petursson 
Miss Ida F. Damon 
SamudLee 
Frank E. Wing 
Wade P. Harding 
William MarshaU 



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lO 



Plau, 


Corporate Nam$, 


Or- 

S3- 


Minister. 


Chairman or Clerk, 


Augusta, Me 


Unitarian Society 


1826 


Edwin M. Slocombe 


Norman L. Bassett, Esq. 


Aurora, IlL 


People's Church 


1906 


William M. ForkeU 


Frank H. Han 


Aycr, Mass. 


First Unitarian Parish of 

Ayer 
First Independent Christ's 

Church 

Independent Congregation- 
al Society 

fFree Congregational So- 
ciety 

Liberal Christian Church 


i8ss 


Ridmiond Fisk 


Arthur Fenner 


Baltimore, M(L . . . 
Bangor. Me 


1817 
1818 


( Chas. R. Weld, LLX)., 

Pastor Emeritus 
( AUrcd R. Husscy 
Alva R. Scott 


Thomas J. Morris» 
708 Park Ave. 

John Wilson. Esq. 


Baraboo, Wis. .... 


x86i 


— 


Mrs. Ckra T. Range, 

433 4th St. 
B. C. Reynolds 


Bar Harbor, Me. . . 


1889 


(Summer preaching) 


Bamcvcld, N. Y.. . . 


(See Trenton. N.Y.) 








Barnstable, Mass. . . 
Barre,Mas8. . . . . 

Bath,N.H 


Cong. Ch. and Soc of the 

East Prednct 
First Parish 

Independent Christian 

Society 
(Sec Revere) 


1639 
I7S3 

1886 


Robert P. Doremus 

■"AhrinF. BaUey, 
-< Pastor Emeritus 
C Herbert L. Buzzell 


David Crodcer, Esq. 
Harding Jenkins 

Charles W. Jackman 


Beachmont, Mass. . . 








Bear Creek. N. C. . . 


(See Hubert, N. C.) 








Beatrice, N^. . . . 


•Unity Church 


1883 


— 


L. M. Pemberton 


Bedford, Mass. . . . 

Belfast, Me 

Bellingham, Wash. . . 


First Congregational So- 
ciety 
First Parish 

First Unitarian Society 


1730 
1796 
190S 


Loren B. MacdOnald 

(Concord) 
Adolph Rossbach 

Fred A. WeU 


Charles W.Jenks 

George A. Quimby, 

34 Miller St. 
A. J. Craven 


Belmont, Mass. . . . 


Congregational Society 


1856 


George H. Reed 


Edwin F. Atkins 


Beloit, Kan 


First Unitarian Society 


190S 


George F. Armington 


Frank Slac^ 


Bendon,Mich. . . . 


Union Church Association 


1907 


Burton A. Hills 




Berkeley, Cal 

Berlin, Mass 


First Unitarian Church 
First Unitarian Society 


1891 
1873 


John H. Lathrop 
Frank R. Gale 


W. C. Fife. 

2728 Regent St. 
Waldo L. Wheeler 


Bemardston, Mass. . 


First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Society 
First Parish 


1740 


Merritt S. Buckingham 


Charies R. Hnis 


Beverly, Mass 


1667 


Benjamin R. Bulkeley 


Rodney C. Larcom 


Billerica, Mass. . . . 


First Parish 


1663 


Lyman V. RuUedge 


John A. Richardson 


Bloomington, HL . . 


First Unitarian Society 


1859 


John H. MueUer 


Prof. H. N. Pcarce 


Boia6,Ida. 


Unity Church 


1901 


— 


Mrs. John E. Yates 


Bolton, Mass. .... 


First Parish and Religious 
Society 


1738 


Joseph N.Pardee 


LorensoD. Codmne 



Digitized by 



Google 



II 



Place, 



Boston. Mass.: 
(Meeting-hoase Hill, 
Dorchester) 
(Bericeley and Marl- 
boro Sts.) 
(Eliot Sq., Rozbury) 

(Cq)Iey Sq. . . . 



(Tremont and 
School Sts.) 
(West Roxbuiy) . 



(Arlington and 
Boylston Sts.) 
(Brighton) . . . 
(Chestnut Hill Ave., 
opp. (Thiswick Rd.) 
(Jamaica Plain) 



Corporate Name. 



(Richmond St., Dor- 
chester) 
(South Boston) 



(BulfinchPl.) . 

(Exeter and New- 
bury Sts.) 
(Warrenton St.) . . 

(Jersey and Peter- 
borough Sts.) 
(Warren St. 6* Elm 
HiU Ave., Roxbury) 
(East Boston) . . . 

(Dix St., Dorchester) 

(20 Parmenter St.) 

(Neponset) .... 

(Norfolk St., Dor- 
chester) 
(Roslindalc) . . . 

(Berkeley and Ap- 
pleton Sts.) - 
(East Cottage St, 
Dorchester) 

Braintree, Mass. . 

Brattldwro, Vt. . 



First Parish of Dorchester 

First Church in Boston 

First Religious Society in 

Roxbuiv 
Second Church in Boston 

King's Chapel 

First Parish, West Roxbury 

*New South Church 

Arlington Street Church 

First Parish of Brighton 

First Congregational Soci- 
ety of Jamaica Plain 

Third Religious Society in 
Dorchester 

Hawes Unitarian Congre- 
gational Church 

Bulfinch Place Church 

South Congregational So- 
ciety 
Barnard Memorial 

Church of the Disdples 

All Souls' Unitarian Church 

Church of Our Father 

Christ Church of Dorches- 
ter 
North End Union 

Church of the Unity 

Norfolk Unitarian Church 

Roslindale Unitarian 

Church 
Theodore Parker Memorial 

Channing Church 



All Souls' Church of 

Braintree 
Unitarian Congregational 

Society 



Or- 
gan- 
ized. 



1630 
1630 
1631 
1649 
1686 
1713 
17x9 
1730 
1730 

1770 

1813 
1833 

1836 
1837 
1836 
1841 
1846 
X847 
1848 
i8S3 
i8S9 
1889 
1890 
1893 
1900 

1900 
183 1 



Minister, 



Roger S. Forbes 
Charles E. Paric 
James De Normandie, D.D. 
Thomas Van Ness 
Howard N. Brown 
Ernest S. Meredith 

Paul Revere Frothingham 
Palfrey Perkins 

Charles F. Dole, D.D. 

Charles W. Casson 
James Huztable 

{Samuel H. Winkley, 
Pastor Emeritus 
Christopher R. Eliot 
Edward Cummings 

Benjamin F. McDaniel 

Charles G. Ames^DD. 

Alfred D. K. ShurUeff 
George F. Pratt 

Samuel F. Hubbard, 

Superintendent 
George W. Cutter, M J). 

(Watertown, Mass.) 
Benjamin F. McDaniel 

Joseph H. Crooker, D.D. 

Francis R. Sturtevant 

Daniel R. Freeman 
Edmund Q. S. Osgood 



Chairman or Clerk. 



W. P. Stone 

Delano Wight 

Henry W. Putnam, Esq. 

Francis H. Brown, M J). 

38 State St. 
Arthur T. Lyman 

Ephraim Harrington 

Mt. Vernon St. 
Henry C. Whitcomb 

John Mason Little 

William Howe Downes 



Hon. Harvey H. Baker, 

Devonshire Bldg., 
Boston 
Dr. M. Ordway Daly, 

30 Hollis St., Boston 
Walter Jenney, 

55 G St. 
Walter J. Young, 

83 Hillside Ave., 
Melrose 
F. Rockwood Hall 

Thomas Hills, 

333 K St., So. Boston 
Edward A. Church 

Frank N. Nay, 

9 Maple St. 
Henry Peterson, 

{A Princeton St. 
L. K. Hull, 

39 Tileston PI. 
Rev. Edward A. Horton 

Henry P. Oakman 

Horace S. Fowlc 

Henry A. Fbher 

Rev. Edward Cummings 

George C. Irwin 



JohnW. West, 

£^st Braintree 
Dr. S. E. Lawton 



Digitized by 



Google 



12 



Place, 



Brewster, Mass. . . . 
Bridgewater, Mass. . 

Bridgewater, East, 

Mass. 
Bridgewater, West, 

Mass. 
Brighton, Mass. . 

Bristol, Fla. . . . 

Brockton, Mass. . 

Brookfield, Mass. 

Brookings, S. D. . 

Brookline, Mass. 

Brookline, Mass. 

Brooklyn, Conn. 

Brooklyn, Mich. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brunswick, Me. 

Buda, lU. . . . 

Buffalo, N. Y. . 

Buffalo, N. Y. . 

Burgaw, N. C. 

*^urlington, la. . 

Burlington, Vt. 

Butte, Mont. . 

Calgary, Alberta, Can. . 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 

CaBon City, Col. 

Canton, Mass. . 

Cape Rozier, Me. 

Carlisle, Mass. . 



Corporate Name, 



First Parish 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
First Parish 

First Congregaticmal So- 
ciety 
(See Boston) 

Unitarian Church of Bristol 

Unity Church 

First Congregational (Uni- 
tarian) Society 
First Unitarian Society 

First Parish 

Second Unitarian Society 

First Ecclesiastical Society 

People's Church 

(See New York) 

•Unitarian Society in 

Brunswick 
Union Christian Society 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society 
Parkside Unitarian Society 

Shelter Neck Unitarian 

Church 
People's Church 

First Congregational Soci- 
ety 
First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church, 

First Parish 

Third Congregational So- 
ciety 
•First Unitarian Church 

First Congregational Parish 

The Union Church of Cape 

Rozier 
First Religious Society 



Or- 
ued. 



1700 
1716 
1724 
1651 

1900 
1881 
1717 
1907 
1717 
1896 
1732 
1893 

1873 
1858 
183a 
1896 
1900 
189s 
18x0 
1903 
19x0 
1636 
1808 
1894 
17x7 
1906 
1780 



Mmister, 



Ernest A. Chase 
Harold G. Arnold 
Bertram D. Bdvin 
Edward B. Maglathlin 



Jonathan C. Gibson 

(Apalachicola, Fla.) 
Dudley H. Ferrell 

William L. Walsh 



William H. Lyon, D.D. 
Arthur W. Uttlefield 
Adam J. Culp 



Carl A. Poison 

(Sheffield, lU.) 
Richard W. Boynton 

Richard W. Boynton 

William S. Key 



Charles J. Staples 

Frank W. Pratt 

Samuel M. Crothers, D J). 

Henry H. Saunderson 

r Henry F. Jenks, 
! Pastor Emeritus 
V Bradley Oilman 

Robert C. Douthit 

(Castine, Me.) 

Frank H. Billington 



Ckatrman or Clerk, 



F. B. Crocker 
A. H. Hobart 
Elbridge W. White 
George S. Drake 

M. V. Baker 

Francis E. Shaw, 

326 West Elm St 
R. G. Livcrmore 

Mrs. J. H. Bushndi 

Henry Ware, 
82 High St. 
John K. Whiting 

Joseph B. Stetson 

Irven L. Hoeg 

F. C. Webb 
Horace Mason 

Carleton Sprague, 
810 West Fcrr>' St. 

William E. Ashe, 
615 Crescent Ave. 

M. B. Hanchey 

Mrs. Antrobus 

M. E. Somboycr, 
48 Brooker Ave, 
Charles L. Smith 



Franklin Hammond 

Francis E. Seaver, 
262 Franklin St 
Mrs. C. W. Burrage 
Charles French 



Arthur W. Howard 
S. James Anthony 



Digitized by 



Google 



13 



Place, 



Ofrporale Name, 



Or- 
gan- 
ised, 



Minister, 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Casdne, Me. . . . 

Champaign, HL . . 

Charleston, S. C. . 

Charlestown, N. H.. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Chehnsford, Mass. . 

Chelsea, Mass. . . 

Cherokee, la. . . . 

Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Chicago, 111.: 
(Woodlawn A v e., 
and 57th St.) 

(Woodlawn Ave. and 
S7th St.) 
(Barry Ave. near 
Evanston Ave.) 
(Monroe St. and 
Kedzie Ave.) 
(3939 Langley Ave.) 

(Wells Hall, 1629 
N. Clark St.) 

Chicopee, Mass. . 

Cincinnati, Ohio , 

Cleveland, Ohio , 

(^Hnton, Mass. 

Cohasset, Mass. , 

Colorado Springs, Col. 

(North Tejon and 

Dale Sts.) 
Concord, Mass. . 

Concord, N.H. . 

Cornish, N.H.. . 

Dalbo, Minn. 

Dallas, Tex. . . 

Danvers, Mass. . 



First Congregational Sod- 

cicty 
(See Urbana) 

Unitarian Church 

South Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

First Church 



First Unitarian Society of 
Chicago (Church of the 
Messiah) 

Memorial Chapd 

Unity Church 

Third Unitarian Church 

All Souls* Church (Inde- 
pendent) 

First Swedish Unitarian 
Church of Chicago 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Congregational 

Church 
The Church of the Unity 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First (Congregational So- 
dety 
All Souls' Unitarian Church 



First Parish 

Second Congregational So- 
dety of Concord 

Independent Parish of 
Cornish, N. H. 

Dalbo Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Congregational 
Sodety 



1798 

1817 
I7S4 
1889 
i6S5 
1838 
1894 
1861 

1836 

1858 
1868 
i88a 
1904 

Z841 
1830 
1867 
1850 
1721 
1891 

1636 
1827 
190S 
1909 
1899 
1867 



Robert C. Douthit 

Clifton M. Gray 
Samud L. Elberfdd 
Hal H. Lloyd 
L. Leroy Greene 

Edward Hale 

W. Hanson Pulsford 

W. Ehnson Pulsford 

Fred V. Hawlcy 

Prof, (jeorge B. Foster (sup- 
ply) 
Jenkin Lloyd Jones 



Charies H. Hooper 

B H. Brown 

Miss Anne L. West 

George T. White 

Joseph £. Warren 

Cjeorge M. Steams, 
125 Shurtleff St. 
Mrs. A. S. Ballard 

George P. Dike 



August Dellgren 

Kenneth E. Evans 
George A. Thayer, D.D. 
Minot Simons 
James C. Duncan 
William R. Cole 
John L. Marsh 

Loren B. Macdonald 

Sydney B. Snow 

Reuben S. Barrow, 

(Windsor, Vt.) 
David Holmgren 

George Gilmour 

Edward H. Brenan 



Frederick A. Delano, 
510 Wellington Ave, 

Clarence W. Moore, 

574 X Monroe Ave. 
Joseph W. Hosmer, 

44 Bellcvue PI. 
Francis C. Russell, 

2835 Jackson Boul. 
France Anderson, 

330 Oakwood Boul. 
Benjamin Pehrson, 

5819 Aberdeen St. 

(korge A. Blaisdall 

Joseph Wilby 

Dr. John F. Stephan ] 

Jonathan Smith 

Edward Nichob 

Simeon J. Dunbar, 
1203 North Tejon St. 

Prescott Keyes 

Hon. Reuben E. Walker 

Mrs. Ella I. Richardson, 
R. D. 4, Windsor, Vt. 
Eric Tolin 

C. R. Buddy 

Andrew Nichols, 
Hathome, Mass. 



Digitized by 



Google 



14 



Place. 



Davenport, la.. . . 

Dayton, O 

Decorah, la. . . . 

Dedham, Mass. . . 

Deerfield, Mass. . . 

Denver, Col. . . . 

Denver, Col. . . . 

Derby, Conn. . . . 

Des Moines, la. . . 

Detroit, Mich. . . 

Dighton, Mass. . . 

Dorchester, Mass. . 

Dover, Mass. . . . 

Dover, N.H. . . . 

Dublin, N. H. . . . 

Duluth, Minn. . . 

Dunkirk, N.Y. . . 

Duxbury, Mass. . . 

Easton, Mass.: 
(Eastondale) . . 

(North Easton) . 

Eastport, Me. . . . 

Elizabeth, N. J. . . 

Ellsworth, Me. . . 

Erie, Pa 

Eugene, Ore. . . . 
Eureka, Cal. . . . 
Evanston, III. . . . 



Corporate Name, 



First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Unity Church 

First Parish 

First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Church 
First Unitarian Society 

Bethany Baptist Church 

Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Society 

Pedobaptist Congregational 
Society 

(See Boston) 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Society of 
Christians 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 

First Unitarian Church 

Independent Congregation 
First Parish 

Congregational Parish 

Unity Church 

First Congregational Sodety 

All Souls' Church 



First Unitarian Sodety 
First Unitarian Sodety 
First Unitarian Church 
The Unity Church 
Church of All Souls 



Or- 

JOJI- 

ited. 



868 
910 
890 
636 
686 
871 
910 
90X 
877 
850 
7Q7 

749 
827 
77a 
887 
880 
632 

713 
8SS 
820 

902 

86s 
898 
910 
906 
891 



Minister, 



Robert E. Ramsay 



William H. Parker 
Richard E. Birks 
Da-.-id Utter, DX). 
Henry W. Pinkham 
GusUv H. Zastrow 
Mary A. Safiford 

Eugene R. Shippen 

I A. Judson Rich 
Pastor Emeritus 
J. Van Ndce Bandy 

William R. Lord 
William C. Adams 
Josiah L. Seward, D.D. 
George R. Gebauer 

Andrew Hahn 



Dudley H. Ferrell 

(Brockton) 
{ William L. Chaffin 
« Abram Wyman 
H. Edward Latham 
/Mrs. Antoinette Brown 
BlackweU, D.D.. 
Pastor Emeritus 
Arthur H. Grant, 
Rev. Herbert Whitney, 
Associate Minister 



Chainman or Clerk. 



R. K. Beatty, 

2x4 Kirkwood BouL 
Russell Elliott, 

273 Lexington Ave. 
Miss Edith Daubney 

W. Harris Fisher 

Harry A. Wells 

J. Guy Smith 

Mrs. Margaret B. 

Thornton 
Alfred C. Baldwin 

Miss Florence E. Haish, 

1805 High St. 
Hon. T. W. Pahncr 

Fred W. Talbot 



George H. Walker 
G. Fisher Piper 
M. D. Mason, Esq. 
Dr. H. V. Goetchins 
D. W. Abdl 
Elisha Peterson 



Henry G. Poole, 

SI Ash St.. Brocktoo 
John S. Ames 

W. S. Hume 



Thomas P. Byrnes 
Arthur H. Sargent 
Nehemiah A. Baker 
James Vila Blake 



E. H. Ingram, 
S28 Magic St. 

Frank Call 

Ernest Gordon, 

227 W. nth St. 
C. H. Brown 

IW. P. Ward, 
X46S B St. 
H. H. Badger 



Digitized by 



Google 



15 



PlQ£4, 


CorponU Name. 


Or- 


Minister, 


Chairman or Clerk, 


Everett, Wash. . . . 


First Unitarian Churdi 


1904 


Otto E. Duerr 


Dr. J. S. Newcomb 


Exeter, N. H. . . . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 


1854 


E)dward Green 


Albion Burbank 


FaceviDe, Ga. . . . . 


First Unitarian Chnrdi 


zgoi 


Jonathan C. Gibson 

(Araaladiicola. Fla.) 
Frank L. Phalen 


L B. Trafford 


Fairfaaven, Mass. . . 


Unitarian Sodety of Fair- 
haven 
Unitarian Sodety 


183a 


George N. Gardiner 


FaU River, Mass. . . 


1832 


John B. W. Day 


Wlliam C. Gray 


Fatgo,N.D 


First Unitarian Sodety of 

Fargo 
First Unitarian Sodety 


1890 


— 


Mrs. Harriet P. Salter 


Farmingtoo, Me. . . 


1829 


(Universalist) 
Robert F. Leavens 


J. C. MetcaU 


Fitchburg, Mass. • . . 


First Parish 


1768 


Ira G. Wilkfns, 

17 Arlington St. 
Mrs. Stephen Batcheller 


ntzwiffiam, N. H. . . 


First Congregational So- 
dety 
(See Northampton) 


1833 


— 


Florence, Bfass. . . . 








Flashing, N. Y. . . . 


(See New York) 








Fort Collins, CoL . . 


Unity Churdi 


1897 


John C. MitdieU 


LesUe F. PauU 


Fort Fairfidd, Me. . . 
Framingham, Mass. . 


Unitarian Churdi of Fort 

Fairfield. Me. 
First Parish 


1903 
1701 


_^ 


E. K. Guild 

Sidney A. Phillips, 

South Framingham 
D. W. Duncklce 


Francestown, N. H. . 


Union Congregational So- 
dety 

tional Sodety 
The First Unitarian Churdi 

of Franklm 
Unitarian Sodety of Fresno 

First Unitarian Sodety 
First Unitarian Sodety 


1823 


Horace R. Hubbard 


Franklin. N. H. . . . 


1879 


Henry C. McDougall 


Edward G. Leach 


FrankKn, Pa. . . . . 


1906 


Charles E. Snyder 


A. K.. (jsmer 


Fresno, Cal 

Gardner, Mass. . . . 

Geneseo,in 


1903 
1884 

1868 


Thomas Clajrton 

Clement E. Tomlin 

iMflton J. Miller, 
i Pastor Emeritus 
( David M.Kirkpatrick 
Timothy H. Eddowes, 

Pastor Emeritus 
Johann P. Sohnundsson 


A. J. Patterson. 

1227 R St. 
Lewb A. Wright, 

249 High St. 

Hon. J. P. Fox 


Geneva, m. 


First Unitarian Sodety 


1842 


T. H. Eddowes 


Gmi]i,Man. . . . . 

(Canada) 
Gloucester, Mass. . . 


First Unitarian Churdi 


— 


Einar S. Jonasson 


First Parish 


1642 


George S. Anderson 


Henry S. McCuUoch 


Gookiaboio, W., Me. . 


EHot Unitarian Churdi 


1896 


(Summer preaching) 


James Hill 


Gouvemeor, N. Y. . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 


1896 


— 


G. S. Conger 


Graf ton, Biass. . . . 


Congregational Sodety 


1731 


Samud C. Beane, D J). 


Frauds M. McGarry 


Grand Haven. Midi. . 


First Unitarian Sodety 


187s 


— 


— 


Grand Rapids, Midi. . 


AH Souls' Liberal Churdi 


1884 


H. H. Bard (Universalist) 


John B. Barlow, 
97 Pcari St. 



Digitized by 



Google 



i6 



Place. 



Gnuid Rai»d8, Mich. 

Great Falls, Mont. . 

Greeley, CoL ... 

Greenfidd, Mass. . , 

Green Harbor, Mass. 

Groton, Mass. . . . , 

Hackensack, N. J. . . 

Hamilton, Ont. . . . 

(Canada) 
Hampton Falls, N. H. 

Hanford, Gal 

HanAi^, Minn. . . . 

Harrietta, Mich. . • . 

Hartford, Conn. . . . 

Harvard, Mass. . . . 

Haverhill, Mass. . . . 

Helena, Mont. . . . 

Highland Springs, Va. 

Hingham, Mass. . . . 

Hingham, So., Mass. . 

Hingham, Mass. . . . 

Hinsdale, 111 

Hobart,Ind 

Hoi yoke, Mass. . . . 

Homestead, Pa. . . . 

Hood River, Ore. . . 

Hopedale, Mass. . . . 

Houlton, Me 

Huansa, P. O., Mani- 
toba, Can. 
Hub bardston, Mass. . 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
tied. 



Holland Unitarian Churdi 

First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Third Congregati<mal So- 
ciety (All Souls') 
(See Marshfield) 

First Church of Christ 

Unitarian Congregational 

Church 
First Unitarian Church 

First Congregational So- 
dety 
*First Unitarian Church 

Nora Free Christian 

Church 
People's Church 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Sodety 

First Congregational Par- 
ish 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Highland Springs Unitarian 

Sodety 
First Parish 

Second Parish 

Third Congregational So- 
dety 
Unity Church 

First Unitarian Church 

Liberal Christian Congre- 
gational Sodety 
Lincoln Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Sodety of 

Hood River 
Hopedale Unitarian Parish 

Unitarian Sodety 

Unitarian Sodety at Hu 

ansa (Icelandic) 
First (Congregational So- 

dety 



i88s 
1894 
1880 
1835 

i6ss 
1897 
1889 
1819 
189s 
1881 
1907 
1844 
1733 
164s 
189Z 
1899 
163s 
1745 
1807 
1886 
1875 
1874 
1909 
190a 
1867 
181 1 
1909 
1773 



Mimtkr. 



B. A. Van Shytera 
Wayland L. Beers 
Biilton R. Keir 
Samuel R. Maxwell 

Pemberton H. Cresaey 
James A. FairlQr 
Fdiz Taylor 



Amandus H. Norman 

Burton A. Hills 
(Traverse City) 
Jabez T. Sunderland 



John A. Hayes 
Frank A. Powell 
Robert W. Savage 
Louis C. Cornish 
Paul S. Phalen 
Paul S. t^halen 
Joseph M. A. Spence 

Arthur H.Coar 
Richard F. Tischer 
Howard A. MacDonald 
Fred R.Lewis 
Joseph H. Weeks 
R^valdur Petursson 
Joseph C. Allen 



Ckairmatt or Qak. 



Herman P. Hugenhdtz, 

25 Cod^ Plaos 
Hon. Pans Gibson 

Mrs. Susan G. Adams 

Franklyn F. Allen 



James T. Bennett 

Leverett H. Sage, 

River St. 
W. S. Scrton. 

28 Stanley Ave. 
Lester B. Sanborn 

Mrs. C H. Coe. 

Ole J6rgenson 

Mrs. George Curtis 

J. Walton Bissdl, 
23 Marshall St. 
James L. Whitney 

Fred S.Mills 

E. F. Cameron 

E. S. Read 

Ebed L. Ripley 

Walter C. Shute 

Morris F. Whitcm 

Dana Slade, Jr. 

George Peterson 

M. M. S. Moriarty 

William A. Negky, 

lincoln Place, Pa. 
E. A. Franz 

Miss Anna M. Bancrolt 

Dr. H. L. Putnam 

Sigurdar Vidal 

John Burtch 



Digitized by 



Google 



17 



Place, 



Cordate Name. 



Or- 
^an- 
tied. 



Minister. 



Chairman or Clerk. 



Hubert, N. C 

Hudson, Mass. . . . 
Hudson, Wis. . . . . 

Humboldt, la. . . . . 
Hyde Paifc, Mass. . . 
Ida Grove, la. . . . 
TndianapoIK Ind. . . 
Iowa Gty, la. ... . 
IowaFaOa,Ia. . . . 
Isks of Shoals, N. H. 

Ithaca, N.Y 

Jackson, Mich. . . . 
JtckaonTiUe, Fla. . . 
Jamaica Plain, Mass. . 
Jamestown, N. Y. • . 
Kalamasoo, Mich. . 
Kansas Gty, Mo. . . 

Keene,N.H 

Kennd>nnk, Me. . 
Kenosha, Wis. . . 
Keokuk, la. ... . 
Kingston, Mass. . . . 
Laconia,N.H. . . 
Lamoine, East, Me. 



Lancaster, N. H. 
Lancaster, Pa. . 
La Porte, Ind. . 



Bear Creek Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Society 

The Scandinavian UniU- 
tarian Society of Hudson, 
Wis. 

Unity Church 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Unity Church 

All Souls' Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Sodety of 

Iowa City 
Peoi^'s Church 

Gossport Meeting-house 

(Stone Chapel) 
First Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Sodety 
(See Boston) 

Independent Congrega- 
tional Church Sodety 
People's Church 

All Souls' Unitarian Church 

Keene Congregational So- 
dety 
First Congregational Parish 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First UniUrian Sodety 

First Congregational Parish 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Church of Christ 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Church of Our Father 

*First Unitarian Sodety 



906 
860 
892 

87s 
867 
89s 
903 
879 
898 

865 
87s 
906 

885 
858 
868 
824 
7SO 
86s 
853 
717 
867 
886 
6S3 
854 
90a 

875 



William S. Key 

John Baltaly 

Amandus H. Norman 
(Hanska, Minn.) 

Charles P. WeUman 

Louis C. Dethlefs 

Frank S. C. Wicks 
Robert S. Loring 

(Summer preaching) 
Cyrus W. Hdzer 

Albert J. Coleman 

Walter A. Taylor 

Joseph P. McCarthy, Ph.D. 

Vernon M. Cady 

H. Sumner Mitchell 

Daniel M. Wilson 

Florence Buck 

M. Rowena Morse, Ph.D. 

George L. Thompson 
(Summer preaching) 
Abbot Peterson 

John W. Cooper, Ph.D. 



James M. McCausley 
Ellsworth S. Locke 
Niek J. Jensson 

William J. Taft 
Charles A. CaU 
Charles S. Macomber 
Charles N. Andrews 
Leroy P. Elliott 
Fayette Hohnes 



Fred Robinson, 

SUte St. 
J. C. Richardson 

Hon. Duncan U. 
Fletcher 



F. B. Bush, 

41a Winsor St. 
Prof. George S. Waite 

W. C. Root 

Hon. Geoige H. Eames, 

35 Cross St. 
Joseph Dane 

William P. Robinson, 

373 Market St. 
J. M. Shaffer, M.D., 

12H Fourth St. 
Joseph A. Hohnes 

J. H. Gingras 

Samud Des Isles 

John C. L. Clark 

Frank Smith 

Milton T. Garvin 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8 



Place. 



Lawrence, Km. • • 
Lawrence, Mass. . 
Lebanon, N. H. • • 
Lecdster, Mass. . . 
Leominster, Mass. . 
Lewiston, Ida. . • 
Lexington, Mass. . 
Lexington, East, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. . . 

Lincoln, Neb. . . . 

Littleton, Mass. . , 

Littleton, N. H. . . 

London, Can. . . . 

Los Angeles, Cal. . 

Louisville, Ky. . , 

Lowell, Mass. . • , 
Luveme, Minn. . . 
Lynn, Mass. . • . 

Madison, Wis. . , 
Maiden, Mass. . . 
Manchester, Mass. . 

Manchester, N. H. . 

Manistee, Mich. . . 

Marblehead, Mass. 

Marietta, Ohio . . 

Marlborough, Mass. 

Marshfidd, Mass.: 
(Marshfield HiUs) 



Corporate Name, 



The Unitarian Society 
First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Society 

Second Congregational So- 
ciety 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 

First Unitarian Society 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
FoUen Church 



Unitarian Congregational 

Society 
All Souls' Church 

First Congregational So- 



O- 
gan- 
tzed. 



%. 



ael 
First Unitarian Church 

The Unitarian Church of 

London 
First Unitarian Church 

(Church of the Messiah 
Highland Sunday-School 
Society 
First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

Second Congregational 
Society 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Sodety 
First Unitarian Church 



First Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Church 

Second Congregational 

Unitarian Sodety 
First Unitarian Society 

Second Parish 

Second Congregational So- 
dety 



1856 
1847 
1865 
1834 
1743 
1906 
1692 
184s 

184Z 

1898 

1717 

1884 

1904 

1877 

1830 

1903 
1839 

1887 

1822 

1879 
187s 
189s 

1842 
1886 
171S 
1855 
1806 
1738 



Uinitkr, 



Frederi<^ M. Bennett 



John W. Barker 

Samud C. Beane, Jr. 

(Worcester) 
Frederic J. Gauld 



John M. Wilson 

James De Normandie, D J> 
Arthur L. Weatheriy 

Periey J. Robinson 

E. Stanton Hodgin 
MaxweU Savage 

Charles T. Billings 



t Samud B. Stewart, 
Pastor Emeritus 
Albert Lazenby 
Frank A. Gihnore 



(Summer preaching) 
George E. Hathaway 



Peter H. Goldsmith, 

(Salem) 
E. Alfred CoU 

Edward F. Hayward 

(Supplies) 



DJ>. 



Chatrmon or Clerk. 



Prof. W. C. Stevens 

Dr. George P. Howe, 

155 Haverhill St. 
Ge<vge B. Clough 

Heoiy O. Smith 

Robert L. Carter 

C. A. Foresnmn 

Alonxo £. Loc^e 

Charles H. Spaulding, 
233 Massachuscitts 
Ave. 
John H. Pierce 

A. J. Sawyer 

Frank B. Priest 

H.D.WI]kins 

Charies H. Froggett, 
37 Rivcrvicw Ave. 

Richard J. Heimaim, 
2722 La Salle St. 

Mr. Alfred Pirtle 

Edward B. Carney 

Miss Nina Canfield 

William H. Fraaer, 
7 Anoka PL, West 
Ljmn 
Frank Hlnridis 

William D. Serrat, 
45 Crescent Ave. 

J. Gilbert Peirce, 
713 Washmgton St., 
BrookHne, Mass. 

William K. Robbfais 

T.J.Ramsddl 
Joseph S. Wormstead 
Ralph E. Toler 
Edward £. Allen 
George H. Wetherbee 



Digitized by 



Google 



19 



Plau. 


Cor poraU Name. 


Or- 


Mimster, 


Chairman or Clerk, 


3ianhfi£ld, BCass.: 
(Green Harbor) . . 

Maiy Hill, P. O. 
Manitoba, Canada . 


Grace Chapd 

The Unitarian Sodety of 
Lake Manitoba (Ice- 
landic) 

fUnity Church 


i88a 
1908 


George L. Mason 
Rognvaldur Petursson 


Mrs. Adelaide Newdick 
John Sigurdsson 


Mtttoon, ni 


1867 


— 


Mrs. Susan C. Bennett 


McKeesport, Pa. . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 


1906 


— 


Miss J. Croncmeycr- 
Hunter 

Mrs. Ernest A. Hemp- 
stead, , 


MeadviUe, Pa. . . . 


Independent Congrega- 
ti<mal Church 


1835 


Henry T. Secrist 


Medfidd. Mass. . . . 


First Congregational Parish 


Z651 


(John A. Savage, 
Pastor Emeritus 
Albert H. Spence, Jr. 
Henry C. De Long 


654 No. Mam St. 
Granville C. Mitchell 


Medioid^Mass. . . . 


First Parish 


1712 


Edw. W. Hayes 


Melrose, Mass. . . . 
Memphis, Tenn. . . . 


Congregational Unitarian 

Society 
*First Unitarian Sodety 


1867 
1893 


Thomas J. Homer 


Charles E. Gassett, 
Z7 Bellevue Ave. 


Mendon,Mas8. . . . 


First Parish 


1669 


(Supplies) 


Julius A. George 


Mcnomonie, Wis. . . 


First Unitarian Society 


z888 


Charles F. NOes 


P. B. Clark 


Mlddleboro, Mass. . . 
Middlesex, Vt. . . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 
First Unitarian Sodety 


1889 
Z887 


GecM^e E. MacHwain 
(Suw>Ues) 


Amos H. Eaton, 

25 E. Grove St. 
Gflbert T. MUes 


Midland, Mich. . . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 


Z885 


(SuppUes) 


F. A. Towsley 


Milford,N.H. . . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 


1870 


Francis W. Hdden 


I. H. Carlton 


MiDbnry, Mass. . . . 


First UniUrian Sodety 


1884 


(Supplies) 


Nathan H. Sears 


Mnton. Mass. .... 


First Congregational Parish 


1678 


Roderick Stebbins 


PhiUp P. Chase 


MOwankee, Wis. . . 


First Unitarian Sodety 
First Unitarian Society 


184a 
1881 


Walter F. Greenman 
Wilson M. Backus 


Horace A. J. Upham, 
cor. JeflFerson and 
Martin Sts. 
S. R. ChUd 


Minneapolis, Minn. . 


Free Christian Church 


1882 


— 


John C. Huseby 


MoKncDL 


First Unitarian Sodety 


1886 


Edwin G. Brown 


I. W. GoodeU 


Monroe Bridge, Mass. 


Union Church 


1904 


Margaret B. Barnard 
(Rowe) 


Lawson Ramage 


Montague, Mass. . . 


First Unitarian Society of 

Montague 
First Unitarian Sodety 


1835 


George A. Cooke, M.D. 


Montagne, Mass. . . 

(Turner's Falls) 
Montdair, N. J. . . . 


1880 


— 


M. B. AUen 


Unity Church 


1887 


Edgar S. Wiers 


Charles D. Barry 


MontpeKer, Vt. . . . 


Church of the Mesaah 


1864 


(J. Edward Wright, D.D. 
} Pastor Ementus 
( Ward R. Clarke 


Fred B. Thomas 











Digitized by 



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20 



Place, 



Corporate Name. 



Montreal, Can. . . . 
Sherbrooke West, 
and Simpson Sts. 

Mt. Pleasant, Mich. . 

Mt. Vernon. N. Y. . . 

Morgantown, W. Va. . 

Nantucket, Mass. . 

Naples, Me. . . . 

Nashua, N.H. . , 

Natick, Mass 

Natick, So., Mass. . . 

Needham, Mass. . . 

NeiUsvillc, Wis . . . 

Neponset, Mass. . . . 

New Bedford, Mass. . 

New Brighton. N. Y. 

Newburgh, N. Y. . . 

Newburyport, Mass. . 

New Castle, Pa. . . . 

Newington, N. H. . . 

New London, Ct. . . 

New Orleans, La. . . 

Newport, R. I 

New Salem, Mass. . . 

Newton, Mass. . . . 

Newton Cen., Mass. . 

Newton. W., Mass . . 

New York, N. Y.: 
Uth Ave. and aoth 
St., Manhattan) . . 



Church of the Messiah 



First Congregational So- 
ciety (Umty Church) 
Plymouth Church 

First Unitarian Church 

Second Congregational 

Meeting-house 
First Congregational Parish 

First Unitarian Congrega 

tional Society 
Unity Church 

First Unitarian Parish 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
People's Church 

(See Boston) 

(First Congregational So- 
ciety 
Unity Home 
(See New York) 

Church of Our Father 

First Religious Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Congregational 

Society 
AU Souls' Church 
(Unitarian-Universalist) 

First Unitarian Church 

C h a n n i n g Memorial 

Church 
The Congregational So- 

detjr 
Channing Religious Society 

The Newton Centre Uni- 
tarian Society 
First Unitarian Sodety 



First Congregational 
Church (AU Souls') 



Or- 
tMed. 



184a 

88z 
910 
(>09 
808 
839 
8a6 
897 
828 
711 
890 

708 

869 
725 
905 
899 
898 

833 
83s 
74a 
851 
878 



Minister. 



{William S. Barnes, LLJD. 
Pastor Emeritus 
Frederick R. Giiflln 

Hendrik Van Ommeren 

William B. AUis 

Alfred Free, PhJ>. 

John Snyder 

George M. Bodge 

(Summer preaching) 
Herbert H. Mott 

Alfred W. BiriLS 

John F. Meyer 

Joseph A. Puffer 



^^lliam B. Geoghegan 



Alfred J. Wilson 
Laurence Hayward 



Alfred Gooding 

(Portsmouth. N. H.) 
Howard C. Ives 



Harry E. Gilchrist 

William S. Jones 

Perry Marshall 

(Summer preaching) 
Harry Luts 

Alson H. Robinson 



848 Julian C. Ja3mes 



819 



Chairmam or Oerk. 



Thomas R. Slicer 



John W. Loud, 
634 Sherbrooke St., 
West 

Wilbur £. Prestoa 

Geo. W. Perkins 

xxo So. loth Ave. 
Prof. Charles H. Patter- 
son 
Mrs. Maria T. Swain 

Enoch GammoQ 

Albert J. McKean 

Ralph Sweetland, 

4S Wahiut St. » 

George W. Ingalls 

F. De M. Dunn 

L.B.Ring 

George H. H. AIle& 
Charles F. F. Jones 

T. W. Morrison 

Edward H. Little, 
6 Toppan's Lane 
M. M. Waterman 

Valentine M. Coleman ^^ 

Dr. Cari A. Williams, 
cor. Hempstead and 
Mercer Sts.: 

A. W. Newlin, 
2135 SUte St. 

Dr. William R. Howard. 
409 Broadway 

A^oesMerriam 

Dr. Frederic W. Webber 

Sumner Clement 

John S. AH^, 
330 Chestnut St. 

J. Lawrence McKeever 



Digitized by 



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21 



FUce. 



CtrporaU Name, 



Or- 
iMed, 



iiittisttf. 



Chairman or CUrk, 



New York. N. Y.: 
(Paik Ave. and 34th 
St^ Manhattan) 

(Pkirepont St. and 
Monroe PL 

Brookhm) 
(Willow PI. 
Brooklyn) 
(Clinton and Om- 
greas Sts., Brookl3m) 
(Clinton Ave. and 
2d St., New Brigli- 
ton, Richmond) 
(Gates Ave., Irving 
PL, Brooklyn) 
(Lenox Ave. and 
X2xst St., Manhat- 
tan) 

(Beverly Rd. and 
East 19th St., Flat 
bush, Broddyn) 
(South Brooklyn) . 
(Flashing) 



Northampton, Mass. . 

NorthamptiMi, Mass. . 

(Florence) 
Northbofo, Mass. . . 

North Easton, Mass. . 

Northfieid, Mass. . . 



Northmnberiand, 
Norton, Mass. 
Norwdl, Mass. 
Oakland, Cal. . 
Ogden,Utah . 
Oklahoma, Okla. 
Omaha, Neb. . 
ODSted,Mich. . 
Orange, N.J. . 
Ord.Neb. . . 
OtUwa, Canada 



Pa. 



Second Congregational 
Unitarian Church 
(Church of the Messiah) 
First Unitarian Congre- 
gational Society 

Willow Place Chapel 



Second Unitarian Congre- 
gational Society 
Church of the Redeemer 



Third Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Sodety 

Unity Congregational So- 
ciety (Loioz Avenue 
Unitarian Church) 

Fourth Unitarian Congre- 
gational Church 

Unitarian Sode^ 
First Unitarian Church 

Second Congregational So- 
dety 

Free Congregational So- 
dety 

First Congregational 
Church and Sodety 

(See Easton) 

Fhrst Parish 

fUnitarian Church and So- 
dety 
Congregational Parish 

First Parish 

Hrst Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Church 

AU Soub' Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Church 

People's Church 

First Unitarian Church of 

Essex County 
People's Unitarian Assod- 

ation 
Church of Our Father 



82s 

865 
851 
8sa 

867 
869 

900 

907 
907 

82s 

863 

746 

716 
794 
714 
642 
887 
907 
906 
869 
89s 
890 
899 
898 



J Robert CoUyer, Lit J>. 
I John Haynes Holmes 



Bernard J. Newman 
Caleb S. S. Dutton 
Hobart Clark 

William M. Brundage 

Merle St. Croix Wright, 
DJ>. 

Leon A. Harv^ 

Harry S. Baker 
James H. Ecob, D J>. 

Henry G. Smith 

Ira P. Kellogg, Jr. 

Jodah C. Kent 

Arthur E. Wilson 



William E. Ennis 
William D. Simonds 
William T. Brown 



Walter R. Hunt 



George W. H. Troop 



Dr. J. H. Parker, 
18 E. 69th St. 

(jeorge C. Brackett, 
50 Remsen St. 

Albert L. Mason, 

26 Orange St. 
Henry A. Famell, 

523 Fifth St. 
John P. Usley, 
148 Fourth St., 
New Brighton 



H. D. DonneUy, 
753 Carroll St. 
Alfred H. (joodson. 



241 W. 135th St. 

Clifton W. Wilder, 
404 East 2ist St. 

Alexander Mendes 
Mrs. Ellen L. Harrison, 

121 Barclay St. 
Frank I. Washburn 

H.P.Otis 

O. Elmer Eldrich 



Benj. F. Fidd 

Rev. H. D. Catlin 

Alden G. Walker 

Harrison Wilder 

(George S. Meredith 

£. A. Littlefidd 

Dr. G. Ellison, 

628 W. 9th St. 
Charles W. Russell 

George Killbury 

Elbridge G. Dudley 

Edwin P. ClemenU 

S. L. Kyle 



Digitized by 



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22 



Place. 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 

^an- 
ised. 



liittisUr. 



Chairman or CUrk. 



Otto, P. 0., Manitoba, 

Can. 
Palo Alto, CaL 



PasaaicN.J. . 

Peaboiity, Mass. 

Pdetier, N. C. 
Pembroke, Mass. 
Veppat^l, Mass. 
Peny, la. . . . 
Peteiboro, N. H. 
Peteraham, Mass. 



Philadelphia, Pa.: 
(Chestnut St., above 

3ISt) 

(Germantown) 



(1530 Girard Ave.) . 
Phoenix, Ariz. . 
Pink HOI, N. C. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Pittabt 
(AU( 



;h,Pa. 



Pittsfield, Mass. . 
Plainfield, N. J. f 
Plymouth, Mass. 
Pomona, CaL . . 
Portland, Me. . . 
Portland, Me. . . 



Portland, Ore. . . 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
Potter Place, N. H. 



The Unitarian Society of 
Shoal Lake. (Icelandic) 

The Unitarian Church of 
Palo Alto 

Unitarian Society of Pas- 
saic 

First Unitarian Church 

White Oak Unitarian 

Church 
First Parish 

First Parish 

Unity Church 

The Congregational So- 
ciety 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Parish 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Society of Ger- 
mantown 

Spring Garden Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Society of 

Phoenix 
Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Church 

Northside Unitarian 

Church 

Unity Church 

First Unitarian Sodety 

First Parish (founded at 
Scroob^, EngUnd, 1606) 
First Umtarian Society 

First Parish 

Ministiy-at-Iarge, Prd>le 
Chapel 

Furst Unitarian Sodety 

South Parish 

(See Andover, N. H.) 



909 
90s 
893 

825 
:903 
712 
747 
892 
799 
738 

796 

865 

880 
909 
908 
889 
906 

887 
889 
620 
888 
674 
850 

866 
638 



RognvaMur Petursson 

Clarence Reed 

Charies Graves 

{ John W. Hudson, 
\ Pastor Emeritus 

William S.K^ 



Dudley R. Child 
Sarah Louisa Haight 
William H. Branigan 
George B. Spurr 

(Joseph May, LLJD., 
Pastor Emeritus 
Charies E. St. John 
Oscar B. Hawes 



Mrs. L. M. Cac^ 

^y worker) 
WUliamS. Key 

L. Walter Mason, D J>. 



Eari C. Davis 
Alfred C. Nickerson 



John C. Peridns, D J>. 

Arthur G. Pettengill 

T. L. Eliot. D.D., 
Pastor Eineritus 
William G. EUot, Jr. 
Alfred Gooding 



Einar Johnson 

Prof. Ewald Fliigd, 
1 1 25 Cowpcr St. 

William Adams, 
155 Pennington Ave. 

L. P. Osbom 



Daniel S. Weeks 

Francis Collamore, 

MJ>. 
Mrs. Clara W. Reed 

Miss Katheryne Hardy 

Eben W.Jones 

Mrs. E. 0. Coolidge 

John P. Croasdak, 
zoix Chestnut St. 

£. L H. Howell, 
52x8 Germantown 
Ave. 
Vt^lliam B. Eptxng 

Miss Elva L. Blount 

George Turner 

Cd. H. C. Newcomer, 

5816 RiM)ey St. 
Ole W. Burroughs, 

x6 Troy HiU Road 

E. A. Tompkins, 

86 North St. 
Warren B. Travell, 

816 Third PI. 
William W. Brewster 

Emelie C. Brady 

Richard Wd>b 

W. G. Chapman 

William F. Woodward, 
4th and Washington 
Sts. 
(justave Peyser 



Digitized by 



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23 



Plau. 



CwpofoU Name, 



Or- 
tied. 



Mimskr, 



Chairman or Oerk. 



Presque lale, Me. 

Providence, R. I.: 
(Benefit St^ cor. 
Benevolent St.) 
(Adelaide Ave.) 

Paeb]o,(>)L . . 

Qinncy, SL . . . 



(2aincy, Mass: 
(Qmncy) . 



(WoOaston) . 



Raynham, Mass. 

Reacfing, Mass. 

RedlandisCaL 

Revere, Mass.: 
(BeaduDont 

(Revere) . . 

Ridunottd, Va. 

Ridgewood. N. J. 

Rochester, N. H. 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Rockland, Mass. 
Rm^ Rapids* la. 
Rowlfndalp, Mass. 
Rowe, Mass. . . 
Ruabury, Mass. . 
Rutherford, N. J. 
Saco^Me. . . . 
Saoamento, CaL 
St. Cload, Minn."! 
St. Joseph, Mo. . 



Independent Congrega^ 
tional Society 

First C>>ngregational 

Church 
Westminster Congrega 

tional Society 
Unity Church 

Second CVmgregatfamal So- 
ciety 

First C>>ngregational So- 
ciety 

WoUaston Unitarian So- 
ciety 

The Church of the Unity 

^Second Omgregational So- 
ciety 
Christian Union Society 

Unity Church 



njnity Church 

First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Society 

Church of the Unity 

First Unitarian C>>ngrega- 
tional Society 

Unitarian Society 

People's Church 

(See Boston) 

First Congregational 

Church 
(See Boston) 

Unitarian Society 

Second Parish 

First Unitarian Society 

Unity Church 

Unity Church 



886 

728 
828 
898 
840 

639 
888 

889 
828 
869 
893 

885 
71S 
903 
896 
891 
841 

884 
899 

780 

891 
827 
887 
888 
868 



Augustus M. Lord, DJD. 
George Kent 

Charles F. Elliott 



( EUery C. Butler 
) CHiailes B. Ames 
CariG.Horst 

Harry A. Weston 



Marion F.Ham 
HeberRice 



Charles Graves 

(Passaic, N. J.) 
>^lliam C. Adains 

(Dover) 

)Wm. C. (Gannett, D J)., 
Pastor Emeritus 
Edwin A. RumbaH 
Samuel C. Weatherly 



Marsaret B. Barnard 

Elizabeth Padgham 
Arthur B. Whitney 

Paul D. Dansingberg 



Mrs. M.L. T.White 



Robert P. Brown 

Marcus M. Burdick, 
199 Linwood Ave. 
W. D. Keen 

Oorge Wells 



Heniy M. Faxon 

Charies S. Adams MJ>. 

Heniy A. Belcher 

A. W. Shaw, 

No. Rasmham, Mass. 
Wilfred A. Bancroft 

Delmont Locke 

Charles F. Perry, 
Bradstreet Ave. 

William J. Stanton, 
170 Reservoir Ave. 

D. R. Wilson 

F. F. Knothe 

Wilder B. Neal 

Eugene T. Curtis, 
95 So. FitzHuj^ St. 

(jeorge W. Kelley 

Dr. J. E. North 



B. T. Heniy 

Fred L Armstrong 

Dr. Edgar H. Minot • 

Dr. Henry L. Nichols, 

426i J St. 
George H. Reynolds 

Theo. P. Brown 



Digitized by 



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24 



Place. 
St. Louis, Mo. . . . 

St. Louis, Mo. . . . 

St Paul, Minn. . . . 

St. Paul, Minn. . . . 
(St. Anthony Park) 

Salem, Mass. .... 

Salem, Mass. .... 

Salem, Mass. .... 

Salem, Ohio 

Salem, Ore. 

Salt Lake Dty, Utah . 

San Antonio, Tex. . . 

San Diego, CaL . . . 

Sandwich, Mass. . . 

Sanford, Me. .... 

San Francisco, CaL 

San Frandsco, CaL 

San Jos6, CaL ... . 

Santa Ana, CaL . . . 

Santa Barbara, CaL . 

San Bernardino, CaL . 

SanU Cruz, CaL . . 

Santa Rosa, CaL . . 

Schenectady, N.Y. . 

Sdtuate, Mass. . . . 

Seattle, Wash. . . . 

Serena,IIL 

Sharon, Mass. . . . . 



Carporaie Nam: 

/Church of the Messiah 
iMission Free School 

Church of the Unity 
Unity Church 
Church of Our Father 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
Second Church 

North Meeting-house 

Unity Church 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Fust Unitarian Society 

•First Unitarian Society 

Unity Society 

First Parish 

Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Second Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Church 

Unity Church 

Unitarian Sodety 

First Unitarian Church 

All Souls' Unitarian Church 

People's Church of Santa 

Rosa 
First Unitarian Sodety 

First Parish 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Pleasant HQl Union Church 

First Congregational.Parish 



Or- 

834 
840 

868 
872 



629 
717 
77a 
901 
8go 
8go 
893 
877 
638 
909 
850 
891 
888 
891 
877 
909 
902 
898 
901 
634 
878 
896 
740 



John W. Day 

George R. Dodson, PhJ). 
John D. Rdd 
(Supplies) 

Peter H. Goldsmith, D JD. 
Alfred Manchester 
Theodcm D. Bacon 

Pauls. Bandy 
William T. Brown 

Clarence J. Harris 
Harold L. Pickett 
Elvin J. Prescott 
Bradford Leavitt 

Oliver P. Shrout 
Frauds Watry 
Benjamin A. Goodridge 

George W. Stone 

Albert W.Ckrk 

EShuy Bygrave 

J. D. O. Powers 

CeHa Paricer Woolley 
(Supply) 
liomas J. H 
(Melrose) 



Chairmam or Clerk. 



John Lawrence Kaman. 

Chemical Building 
Mrs. Otto U. Von 

Schrador, Equitable 
Building 
J. M. Wulfing. 

3448 Longf oloiw BooL 
J. Steams Smith., 

447 Marshall Ave. 
Walter L. Chapin, 

215 N. Y. LScBldg., 
St. Paul 
Robert Osgood 

Frank S. Perkins 

Horatio P. Peiraoa 

Mrs. I. B. CooMT, 

41 E. Green St. 
J.N. Cox. 

312 Winter St. 
Judge D. N. Stiaup 

L B. Henyan 

Judge M. A. Luce, 
KeatmgBlodL 

William L. Nye 

Eugene Hewett 
Arthur A. Smith 

R. T. Butts, 

1309 Guerrero St. 
Cd. Phik> Hersey, 

650 S. Second St. 
Mrs. Del Andre 

L. Richardson, 
907 State St. 
Hon. Henry GoodceU 

H. W. H. Penniman 

Horace Newton, 
1x6 Ldand St. 
L. L.Peny 

George O. Allen 

Mrs. Harry S. Stuff 

Miss l*^i«w»^ Muffler 

John G. Phniipsl 



Digitized by 



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25 



Place. 



CorporaU Name. 



Or- 
tMed, 



Minister. 



Chatrman or Clerk. 



Shefllekl,IIL . . . 

ShelbjrvUle, QL . . 

Shdbyvflle, OL . . 

Shdter Neck, N. C. 

Shecborn, Mass. . . 

Sherwood, Mich. . 

Shirley, Maas. . . . 

SouzOty, la. . . 

SioQz Falls, S. D. . 

Somerville, Mass. . 

Somerville, West, 
Mass. 

Spokane, Wash. . . . 

Spriogfield, Mass. . . 

Springvale, Blinn. . . 

Standish, Me. ... . 

Staten Id., ix.. New 

Brighton, N. Y. 
Sterimg, Mass. . . 

Stoneham, Mass. . 

Stow, Mass. . . . 

Stowe,Vt. .... 

Streator, m . . . 

Sturforidge, Mass. . 

Sudbury, Mass. . . 

Sullivan, Me. . . . 

Summit, N. J. . . . 

Swansboro, N. C. . 

Syracuse, N. Y. . . 



Taunton, Mass. 



Fust Unitarian Church 

First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Gburch 
Jordan Unitarian Church 

(See Burgaw, N. C.) 

First Congregational 

Church 
Unity Church 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
First Unitarian Society 

fAU Souls' Church 

First Congregational So- 
ciety 
Second Unitarian Sodety 



First Unitarian Society 

Third Congregational So- 
ciety 

Springvale Unitarian So- 
dety 

First Parish 

(See New Yoric, Richmond) 

First Congregational So- 
dety 
First Unitarian Church 

First Parish 

Unity Church 

Church of Good Will to 
Men 

Unitarian Congregational 
Sodety 

First Congregational So- 
dety 

Liberal Christian Society 

The Unitarian Church in 

Summit 
First Unitarian Church 

The Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society (May 
Memorial Church) 

First Congregational So- 
dcty 



1868 
1868 
Z882 

1685 
1878 
1753 
1885 
1886 
1846 
i8qo 

1886 
1819 
1909 
1768 

1742 
1866 
1700 
1864 
1892 
1864 
1636 
1892 
1907 
190a 
1838 

1637 



Cari A. Poison 
Jasper L. Douthit 
Jasper L. Douthit 

Isaac F. Porter 



Manl^ B. Townsend 

Chester A. Drummond 
Walter C. Pdrcc 

Geoige W. Fuller 
Augustus P. Reccord 
David Holmgren 
(Summer preaching) 

Henry D. Stevens 
Charles N. Myers 
J. Sidney Moulton 



Charles R. Tenney 

(Southbridge) 
Ida C. Hultin 

(Summer preaching and lay 

meetings) 
Frederic C. Brown 

William S. K^ 

Samud R. Calthrop, L.HJD 

JodH.Metcalf 



F. W. Morasqr 
Robert E. Guilford 
W. F. Douthit 

D. L. Whitn^ 
W. B. Chiesman 



R. J. Andrews, 
1407 Summit Ave. 



F. Keder Rice 

Louis E. Meny, 
41 Dover St. 

C. B. Dunning, 

Mohawk Bldg. 
Oscar B. Ireland 

0. H. Olson 

C. S. Phinn^ 



Edward P. Bartlett 
Miss Alice V. Peyton 
Henry P. Smith 
P. D. Pike 
David E. Huggans 
Ahrin B. Chamberlain 
Ellen 0. Clark 



Russell Hinman, 

189 Summit Ave. 
C. B. Fracelle 

Charles F. Bennett 



HeniyAtweU, 
Vernon St. 



Digitized by 



Google 



26 



Place, 



Templeton, Mass. 
Tiverton, R. I. . 
Toledo, Ohio , . 
Topeka, Kan. . . 
Toronto, Canada 
Townsend, West, Mass. 
Traverse Oty, Mich. 
Tremont, m. . . . 



Trenton. N.Y. . . 

(Bameveld P. 0.) 

Troy, N.Y 



Turner's Falls, Mass. . 
lyngsboro, Mass. . . 
Underwood, Minn. . . 
Union aty. Pa. . . . 
Union Springs, N. Y. 
Upton, West, Mass. . 
Urbana, HI 



Uzbridge, Mass. . . . 
Vancouver, B. C, Can. 
Valparaiso, Ind. . . . 
Victoria, B. C, Can. . 
Vineland, N. J. , . . 



Vineyard Haven, 

Mass. 

Waitsfield, Vt. . . . 

Walpole, Mass. . . . 

Walpole,N.H, . . . 

Waltham, Mass. . . . 

Ware, Mass. .... 



CorporaU Name. 



First Parish 

*Bowen Memorial Chapd 

The First Unitarian 

Church 
First Unitarian Society 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tion 
liberal Christian Society 

The-Natural-Way 
*Lib^ Christian Churdi 

Reformed Christian Church 

First Unitarian Society 

(See Montague) 

First Parish 

Free Christian Church 
tUnity Society 

Church of Good Samaritan 

First Unitarian Sodety 

Unitarian Church of 
Urbana, m 

First Congregational So- 
dety 
First Unitarian Church 

Unity Church 

First Unitarian Church 

First Congregational Uni- 
tarian Sodety 
Unitarian Sodety 

•Unity Sodety 

First Parish 

Town Congregational So- 

dety 
First Parish 

l^rst Unitarian Sodety 



Or- 
gat*- 
ued. 



755 
876 
887 
871 
845 
884 
:go8 
866 
803 
845 

755 
8go 
886 
895 
847 
906 

731 
909 
871 
910 
865 
898 
888 
725 
761 
696 
846 



Afittistefm 



William F. Skerrye 

Abraham M. Rihbany 
Joseph H. Jones 
Robert J. Hutcheon 

Burton A. Hills 

John L. Robinson 
Arthur H.Winn 

Napoleon S. Hoagland 



\VrilliamA.Wood 
Albert R.Vafl 

Cyrus A. Roys 

Albert J. Pineo, M. A. 

(Lay^ worker) 
(Occasional supply) 

Herbert £. Kellington 

William M. Gilbert 

Louis H. Buckshom 



CEmile Aimar 



OHver J. Fairfield 



Chairman or Qerk. 



F. P. Stone 

Fannie D. Manchester 

Charles A. Sdders 

Frank H. Foster, 
IDS Greenwood Ave. 

Prof. T. R. Rofid>rough, 
93,Walnier Road 

Fred Bartholomew 



Lester G. Wauful, 

Bamevdd 
Wlliam D. Yctto, 

Oakwood Ave. 



Charles P. Littlehale 

OttoNilsby 

Charles W. Hayes 

Harriet L. Farley 

Harold Knowlton 

Prof. Thos. E. OKver, 
913 W.California 
Ave. 
Samud F. Scott 

Walter Matheson, 
336 Cambie St. 
A. W. Vincent 

John Gunn, 

483 Gorge Road 
OUver W. Vernal 

Capt. Gilbert L. Smith 



George W. Poore, 

East Walpole 
Thomas B. Peck 

H. P. Buncher 

Charles £. Stevens 



Digitized by 



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27 



Place. 


Corporate Name. 


Or- 

S3: 


Minuter. 


Chairman or Clerk. 


Warrea,Pa. . . . . 


First Unitarian Church 


190S 


J. G. Townsend, D J>. 
Qamestown, N. Y.) 
(Summer preaching) 


Dr. Hnies M. Baker 


Warren. Vt. 


First Unitarian Society 


z888 


Miss Vaun Bragg 


Warwick, Mass. . . . 


First Congregational Parish 


1763 


Edward^. Barney 

(Universalist) 
Ulysses G. B. Pierce, D J>. 


Miss Clara A. Jones 


WashinsUMi, D. C. . . 


AH Souls' Church 


182Z 


Archibald King, 

x6ii 28th St. 

W. B. Chapman 


Washta, la. 


Unity Society 


1894 


— 


Watobnxy, Conn. . . 
Watcrtown, Mass. . . 


An Souls' Church 

(Universalist-Unitarian) 
First Parish 


X910 
1630 


William F. Dickerman, D J). 

(Universalist) 
Grover G. Mills 


Heri>ert:H. Laridn 
G. Fred Robuison 


WaterviDe, Me. . . . 


First Unitarian Society 


1863 


Oorge D. Sanders 


H. D. Bates, 
Silver St. 
John H. Edwards 


Waveiky, Mass. . . 


Unitarian Sodety 


1885 


ChariesA.Allen 




First Parish 


1638 


Seth C. Beadi, D J>. 


A. W. Cutting 


WeOesleyHills^Mass.. 


Unitarian Sodety 


1871 


William H. Ramsay 


Schuyler S. Bartlett 


Westboio, Mass. . . 


First Congregati<mal So- 
First Congregational Parish 


1717 


R. Edward Griffith 


Joseph S. Gates 


Westf ord. Mass. . . . 


1727 


Benjamin H. Bailey 


Abid J. Abbott 


West GouWAoro. . . 


(See Gouldsboco, Me.) 








Weston, Mass. . . . 


First Parish 


1698 


Charles F. Russell 


Charles H. Fiske 


West Supenor, Wis. . 


Unitarian Society 


18Q0 


— 


A. D. Agatin 


Westwood, Mass. . . 


First Parish 


I73S 


— 


C. D. Place 


Weymoath, £., Mass.. 


First Unitarian Society 


1873 


— 


— 


Whecfing. W. Va. . . 


First Unitarian Church 


1907 


Peter A. Molyneaux 


Charles J. Schuck 


WhiteOak,N.C. . . 


(SecPdeUer,N.C.) 








White Plains, N.Y. . 


AU Souls' Church 


1908 


— 


Joseph AUen 


Whitman, Mass. . . . 


Fust Unitarian Sodety 


1886 


— 


J. C. Gilbert 




First Unitarian Sodety 


Z887 


Edward Day 


Theodore L. Bergen, 
ZS26N. Lawrence 
Ave. 

A. D. Warner, 
Grant Ave. and Fair- 


Wlbnington, Del. . . 


First Unitarian Society 


z866 


Cicero A. Henderson 


Wilton, N. H 


Liberal Christian Church 


1869 


— 


way 
George G. Blanchard 


Wilton Centre, N.';H. 
Windiendon, Mass. . 


tional Society 
Church of the Unity 


1763 
z866 


William W. Peck 


Henry H. Livermore 
John D. Howard 


Windiester, Mass. . . 


Winchester Unitarian So- 
dety 


z86s 


— 


Charles A. Baldwin, 
Fairview Terrace 



Digitized by 



Google 



28 



Plau. 



Corporate Name. 



Or- 
ued. 






Chairmam or Oah. 



Winnipeg, Man. 

(Canada) 
Winnipeg, Man. 

(Canada) 
Winona, Minn. 

Winter Haibor, Me. 

Winthrop, Mass. 

Wobum, Mass. . 

Wolfboro, N. H. 

WoUaston, Mass. 

Woodland, CaL . 

Worcester, Mass. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Worcester, Mass. 

Yarmouth, Me. . 

Yonker8,N.Y. .. 

York, Me. . . . 

Youngstown, Ohio 



AH Soub' Unitarian So- 
ciety 

First Icelandic Unitarian 
Church 

AU Souls' Church ' 

First Unitarian Society 

Channing Chapel Society 

First Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Parish 

First Unitarian Church 

(See (^ufaicy, Mass.) 

The Unitarian Church 

Second Parish 

Church of the Unity 

South Unitarian Memorial 

Church 
Central Parish 

First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Church 
The York Unitarian Church 

First Unitarian Church 



876 
8go 
904 
889 
889 
887 
847 
886 

907 
78s 
846 
88g 
866 
857 
903 
904 



Reuben S. Barrow 
Gudmundur Amason 
William A. Vrooman 

(Summer preadiing) 

Heniy C. Parker 



Edward G. Spencer 
Austin S. Garver 
Charies B.^lder, D J>. 
Samud C. Beane, Jr. 
Leverett R. Daniels 

(Summer services) 
Horace Westwood 



Henry S.Paul 

J. B. Skaptason 

Hon. A. W. Puttee, 
317 CoQege Ave. 
Judge H. L. BudL 

Bedford Ttacy 

George R. W. Battis, 

45 >^nthrop St 
Heibert B. Dow, 

46 Warren Ave. 
F. W. Prindle 



W. F. Mixon 

Francis H. Dewey 

Dr. George A. SkKomb 

A. C. Haradon, 

47 Hollywood St 
Hon. Howard Davies 

Fisher A. Baker, 

440 North Broadway 
George F. Richardson, 

Lowdl, Mass. 
E. K.HU11. 

824 Biyson St 



Digitized by 



Google 



29 

UNITARIAN CHURCHES. 

Arranged in Chronological Order. 

1620 Plymouth, Mass. First Parish. 

1629 Salem, Mass. First G>ngregational Society. 

1630 Boston, Mass. First Church in Boston. 

Dorchester (Boston), Mass. • • First Parish of Dorchester. 

Watertown, Mass First Parish. 

1631 Roxbury (Boston), Mass. . . . First Religious Society in Roxbury. 

1632 Duxbury, Mass. First Parish. 

1634 Scituate, Mass. First Parish. 

1635 Hingham, Mass First Parish. 

1636 Cambridge, Mass First Parish. 

Concord, Mass First Parish. 

Dedham, Mass. First Parish. 

Sudbury, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1637 Taunton, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1638 Portsmouth, N. H South Parish. 

Sandwich, Mass First Parish. 

Wayland, Mass First Parish. 

i^ Barnstable, Mass Congregational Church and Society of 

the East Precinct 

Quincy, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1642 Gloucester, Mass First Parish. 

Norwell, Mass First Parish. 

1645 Andover, North, Mass First Unitarian Church and Society. 

Haverhill, Mass First Parish. 

1649 Boston, Mass Second Church in Boston. 

1651 Bridgewater, West, Mass. . . . First Congregational Society. 

Medfield, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1653 Lancaster, Mass First Church of Christ 

165s Chelmsford, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Groton, Mass First Church of Christ. 

1663 Billerica, Mass First Parish. 

1667 Beverly, Mass First Parish. 

1669 Mendon, Mass First Parish. 

1674 Portland, Me First Parish. 

1678 Milton, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1685 Shcrborn, Mass First Congregational Church. 



Digitized by 



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30 

i686 Boston, Mass. King's Chapel. 

Deerfield» Mass. First G)ngregational Church. 

1693 Lexington, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1696 Waltham, Mass. First Parish. 

1698 Weston, Mass First Parish. 

1700 Brewster, Mass First Parish. 

Stow, Mass. First Parish. 

1701 Framingham, Mass First Parish. 

1708 New Bedford, Mass. First Congregational Society. 

171 1 Needham, Mass. First Congregational Society. 

1712 Mcdford, Mass. First Parish. 

Pembroke, Mass. First Parish. 

West Roxbury (Boston), Mass. First Parish, West Roxbury. 

1713 Easton, Mass. Congregational Parish. 

1714 Norton, Mass Congregational Parish. 

1715 Marblehead, Mass. Second Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Revere, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1716 Bridgewater, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Northfield, Mass First Parish. 

1717 Brookfield, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Brookline, Mass First Parish. 

Canton, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Kingston, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Littleton, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Salem, Mass Second Church. 

Westboro, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1719 Boston, Mass New South Church. 

1721 Cohasset, Mass. First Congregational Society. 

1724 Bridgewater, East, Mass. . . . First Parish. 

1725 Newburyport, Mass First Religious Society. 

Walpole, Mass First Parish. 

1727 West ford, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1728 Providence, R. I First Congregational Church. 

1730 Bedford, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Boston, Mass Arlington Street Church. 

Brighton, Mass First Parish of Brighton. 

1731 Grafton, Mass Congregational Society. 

Uxbridge, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1732 Brooklyn, Conn First Ecclesiastical Society. 

1733 Ariington, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Harvard, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1735 Westwood, Mass First Parish. 

1738 Marshfield Hills, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

Petersham, Mass First Unitarian Congregational Parish. 



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31 

I740 Bernardston, Mass First G)ngregational Unitarian Society. 

Bolton, Mass First Parish and Religious Society. 

Sharon, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

1742 New Salem, Mass The Congregational Society. 

Sterling, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1743 Leominster, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1745 Hingham (South), Mass. • . . Second Parish. 

1746 Northboro, Mass. First Congregational Church and Society. 

1747 Pepperell, Mass. First Parish. 

1749 Dover, Mass First Parish. 

1750 Athol, Mass First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Kennebunk, Me First Congregational Parish. 

1753 Barre, Mass First Parish. 

Shirley, Mass - First Congregational Society. 

1754 Charlestown, N. H South Parish. 

175s Templeton, Mass First Parish. 

Tyngsboro, Mass. First Parish. 

1 761 Walpole, N. H Town Congregational Society. 

1763 Warwick, Mass First Congregational Parish. 

Wilton, N. H First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1767 Ashby, Mass First Parish. 

17^ Fitchburg, Mass. First Parish. 

Standish, Me First Parish. 

1770 Jamaica Plain (Boston), Mass. . First Congregational Society. 

1772 Dublin, N. H First Congregational Society. 

Salem, Mass. North Meeting-house. 

1773 Hubbardston, Mass First Congregational Society. 

1780 Carlisle, Mass First Religious Society. 

Rowe, Mass First Congregational Church. 

1785 Worcester, Mass Second Parish. 

1794 Northumberland, Pa. Unitarian (Thurch and Society. 

1796 Belfast, Me First Parish. 

Philadelphia, Pa. ....... First Unitarian Church. 

1797 Dighton, Mass Pedo-Baptist Congregational Society. 

1798 Castine, Me First Congregational Society. 

1799 Peterboro, N. H The Congregational Society. 

1803 Trenton, N. Y Reformed Christian Church. 

1806 Marlborough, Mass Second Parish. 

1807 Hingham, Mass Third Congregational Society. 

1808 Cambridge, Mass Third Congregational Society. 

Nantucket, Mass Second Congregational Meeting-house. 

1810 Burlington, Vt First Congregational Society. 

181 1 Houlton, Me Unitarian Society. 

1813 Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . . Third Religious Society in Dorchester. 



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Google 



32 

i8i7 Baltimore, Md First Independent Christ's Church. 

Charleston, S. C Unitarian Church. 

1818 Bangor, Me Independent Congregational Society. 

1819 Hampton Falls, N. H First Congregational Society. 

New York, N. Y First Congregational Church (All Souls'). 

Springfield, Mass. Third Congregational Society. 

1820 Eastport, Me First Congregational Society. 

1821 Washington, D. C All Souls' Church. 

1822 Lynn, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

South Boston, Mass Hawes Unitarian Congregational Church. 

1823 Francestown, N. H Union Congregational Society. 

1824 Keene, N. H Keene Congregational Society. 

1825 Greenfield, Mass. Third Congregational Society. 

Meadville, Pa Independent Congregational Church. 

Montague, Mass. First Unitarian Society of Montague. 

New York, N. Y Second Congregational Unitarian Church 

(Church of the Messiah). 

Northampton, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

Peabody, Mass First Unitarian Church. 

1826 Augusta, Me Unitarian Society. 

Boston, Mass Bulfinch Place Church. 

Nashua, N. H First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1827 Boston, Mass South Congregational Society. 

Concord, N. H Second Congregational Society of Con- 
cord. 

Dover, N. H First Unitarian Society of Christians. 

Saco, Me Second Parish. 

1828 Natick, South, Mass First Unitarian Parish. 

Providence, R, I Westminster Congregational Society. 

Raynham, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

1829 Farmington, Me First Unitarian Society. 

Lowell, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1830 Cincinnati, Ohio First Congregational Church. 

Louisville, Ky Church of the Messiah. 

1831 Brattleboro, Vt Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1832 Buffalo, N. Y First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Fairhaven, Mass Unitarian Society of Fairhaven. 

Fall River, Mass Unitarian Society. 

1833 Fitzwilliara, N. H First Congregational Society. 

New Orleans, La. First Unitarian Church. 

1834 Leicester, Mass Second Congregational Society. 

St. Louis, Mo Church of the Messiah. 

183s Newport, R. I Channing Memorial Church. 

1836 Boston, Mass Barnard Memorial. 



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33 

1836 Chicago, 111 First Unitarian Society of Chicago 

(Church of the Messiah). 

1838 Chelsea, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Syracuse, N. Y The Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1840 Quincy, 111 Second Congregational Society. 

1 841 Boston, Mass Church of the Disciples. 

Chicopee, Mass First Unitarian»Society. 

Lincoln, Mass Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Rochester, N. Y First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1842 Brooklyn (New York), N. Y. . First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Geneva, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Manchester, N. H First Unitarian Society. 

Milwaukee, Wis First Unitarian Society. 

Montreal, Canada Church of the Messiah. 

1844 Hartford, Conn First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1845 Lexington, East, Mass Follen Church. 

Toronto, (Canada First Unitarian Congregation. 

Troy, N. Y First Unitarian Society. 

1846 Roxbury (Boston), Mass. . . • All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Somerville, Mass First Congregational Society. 

Ware, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Worcester, Mass The Church of the Unity. 

1847 Boston, East, Mass Church of Our Father. 

Lawrence, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Upton, West, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Wobum, Mass First Unitarian Parish. 

1848 Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . . Christ Church of Dorchester. 
Newton, West, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1850 Qinton, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Detroit, Mich First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Portland, Me Preble Chapel. 

San Francisco, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

1851 Brooklyn, N. Y Second Unitarian Congregational Society 

Newton, Mass Channing Religious Society. 

1852 Richmond (New York), N. Y. . Church of the Redeemer. 

1853 Boston, Mass North End Union. 

Keokuk, la First Unitarian Society. 

1854 Alton, 111 First Unitarian Church. 

Exeter, N. H First Unitarian Society. 

Lancaster, N. H First Unitarian Society. 

1855 Ayer, Mass First Unitarian Parish of Ayer. 

Easton, North, Mass Unity Church. 

Marietta, Ohio First Unitarian Society. 

1856 Belmont, Mass Congregational Society. 



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34 

1856 Lawrence, Kan The Unitarian Society. 

1857 Yonkers, N. Y First Unitarian G)ngregational Church. 

1858 Buda, 111 • • Union Christian Society. 

Chicago, 111 Unity Church. 

Kalamazoo, Mich People's Church. 

1859 Bloomington, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Neponset, Mass Church of the Unity. 

i860 Hudson, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1861 Baraboo, Wis Free Congregational Society. 

1862 Chestnut Hill, Mass Chestnut Hill Society. 

1863 Northampton (Florence), Mass. Free Congregational Society. 
Waterville, Me First Unitarian Society. 

1864 Montpelier, Vt Church of the Messiah. 

Stowe, Vt Unity Church. 

Sturbridge, Mass Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1865 Ann Arbor, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

Brooklyn (New York), N. Y. . Willow Place Chapel. 

Ellsworth, Me First Unitarian Society. 

Ithaca, N. Y First Unitarian Society. 

Kenosha, Wis First Unitarian Society. 

Lebanon, N. H First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Philadelphia (Germantown), Pa. Unitarian Society of Germantown. 

Vineland, N. J First Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Winchester, Mass Winchester Unitarian Society. 

1866 Portland, Ore First Unitarian Society. 

Stoneham, Mass First Unitarian Church. 

Tremont, 111 Liberal Christian Church. 

Wilmington, Del First Unitarian Society. 

Winchendon, Mass Church of the Unity. 

Yarmouth, Me Central Parish. 

1867 Brooklyn (New York), N. Y. . Third Unitarian Congregational Society. 
Cleveland, Ohio The Church of the Unity. 

Danvers, Mass Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Hopedale, Mass Hopedale Unitarian Parish. 

Hyde Park, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Laconia, N. H First Unitarian Society. 

Mattoon, 111 Unity Church. 

Melrose, Mass Congregational Unitarian Society. 

1868 Chicago, 111 Third Unitarian Church. 

Davenport, la. First Unitarian Society. 

Geneseo, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Kansas City, Mo All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Shefl&eld, 111 First Unitarian Church. 

Shelb)rville, 111 First Congregational Unitarian Church. 



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Google 



35 

i868 St Joseph. Mo Unity Church. 

St. Louis, Mo Church of the Unity. 

1869 Newburgh, N. Y Church of Our Father. 

New York (Lenox Ave.), N. Y. Unity Congregational Society. 

Omaha, Neb First Unitarian Church. 

Reading, Mass Christian Union Society. 

Wilton, N. H Liberal Christian Church. 

1870 Milford, N. H First Unitarian Society. 

1871 Denver, Col First Unitarian Society. 

Topeka, Kan First Unitarian Society. 

Valparaiso, Ind Unity Church. 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. Unitarian Society. 

1872 Berlin, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

St Paul, Minn Unity Church. 

1873 Brunswick, Me Unitarian Society in Brunswick. 

Weymouth, East, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1874 Holyoke, Mass Liberal Christian Congregational Society. 

1875 Grand Haven, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

Hobart, Ind. First Unitarian Church. 

Humboldt, la. Unity Church. 

Jackson, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

La Porte, Ind First Unitarian Society. 

Maiden, Mass First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

1876 Tiverton, R. I Bowcn Memorial Chapel. 

Windsor, Vt All Souls' Unitarian Society. 

1877 Athol, Mass Second Unitarian Society. 

Des Moines, la First Unitarian Society. 

Los Angeles, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

San Diego, Cal Unity Society. 

Santa Barbara, Cal Unitarian Society. 

1878 Newton Centre, Mass The Newton Centre Unitarian Society. 

Providence, R. I Olney Street Congregational Society. 

Seattle, Wash First Unitarian Society. 

Sherwood, Mich Unity Church. 

1879 Andover, N. H Congregational Unitarian Society. 

Franklin, N. H First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Iowa City, la. First Unitarian Society of Iowa City. 

Madison, Wis. First Unitarian Society. 

1880 Dunkirk, N. Y. Independent Congregation. 

Greeley, Col First Unitarian Society. 

Philadelphia, Pa Spring Garden Unitarian Church. 

Turner's Falls, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

1881 Brockton, Mass Unity Church. 

Hanska, Minn Nora Free Christian Church. 



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36 

i88i Minneapolis, Minn First Unitarian Society. 

Mount Pleasant, Mich. .... First Congregational Society (Unity 

Church). 

1882 Chicago, 111 All Souls' Church (Independent). 

Marshfield, Mass Grace Chapel. 

Minneapolis, Minn Free Christian Church (Scandinavian). 

Shelbyville, III Jordan (Unitarian) Church. 

1883 Atlanta, Ga Unitarian Church of Atlanta. 

Beatrice, Neb Unity Church. 

1884 Arcadia, Wis People's Church. 

Gardner, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Grand Rapids, Mich All Souls' Liberal Church. 

Littleton, N. H First Unitarian Church. 

Millbury, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Rockland, Mass Unitarian Society. 

Townsend, West, Mass Liberal Christian Society. 

1885 Grand Rapids, Mich Holland Unitarian Church. 

Jamestown, N. Y Independent Congregational Church So- 
ciety. 

Midland, Mich First Unitarian Society. 

Revere (Beachmont), Mass. . . Unity Church. 

Sioux Falls, So. Dak. First Unitarian Society. 

Waverley, Mass Unitarian Society. 

1886 Bath, N. H Independent Christian Society. 

Hinsdale, 111 Unity Church. 

Lamoine, East, Me First Unitarian Society. 

Manistee, Mich First Unitarian Church. 

Moline, 111 First Unitarian Society. 

Presque Isle, Me Independent Congregational Society. 

Sioux Falls, So. Dak. All Souls* Church. 

Spokane, Wash First Unitarian Society. 

Union City, Pa Union Society. 

Whitman, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Wolfeboro, N. H First Unitarian Church. 

1887 Abington, North, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Duluth, Minn First Unitarian Churdi. 

Luveme, Minn Unity Church. 

Middlesex, Vt First Unitarian Society. 

Oakland, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

Pittsfield, Mass Unity Church. 

Sacramento, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

Toledo, Ohio The First Unitarian Church. 

Wichita, Kan First Unitarian Society. 

Winthrop, Mass First Unitarian Church. 



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37 

i888 Menomonie, Wis First Unitarian Society. 

Pomona, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

Quincy, Mass. , Wollaston Unitarian Society. 

San Jose, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

St Qoud, Minn Unity Church. 

St. Paul (St. Anthony Park), Church of Our Father. 

Minn. Church of Our Father. 

Waitsfield, Vt Unity Society. 

Warren, Vt First Unitarian Church. 

1889 Bar Harbor, Me Liberal Christian Church. 

Boston (Dorchester), Mass. . . Norfolk Unitarian Church. 

Chattanooga, Tenn First Unitarian Society. 

Hamilton, Ont (Canada) • . . First Unitarian Church. 

Middleboro, Mass First Unitarian Society. 

Pittsburg, Pa First Unitarian Church. 

Plainfield, N. J First Unitarian Society. 

Randolph, Mass Church of the Unity. 

Winona, Minn First Unitarian Society. 

Winter Harbor, Me Channing Chapel Society. 

Worcester, Mass South Unitarian Memorial Church. 

1890 Alameda, Cal First Unitarian Society. 

Boston (Roslindale), Mass. . • Roslindale Unitarian Church. 

Decorah, la Unity Church. 

Fargo, No. Dak First Unitarian Society of Fargo. 

Neillsville, Wis People's Church. 

Orange, N. J First Unitarian Church of Essex County. 

Salem, Ore First Unitarian Society. 

Salt Lake City, Utah First Unitarian Society. 

Somerville, West, Mass Second Unitarian Society. 

Underwood, Minn Free Christian Church (Scandinavian). 

West Superior, Wis Unitarian Society. 

Winnipeg, Man., Can First Icelandic Unitarian Church. 

1891 Berkeley, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

Colorado Springs, Col All Souls* Unitarian Church. 

Evanston, 111 Church of All Souls. 

Helena, Mont First Unitarian Society. 

Rochester, N. H Church of the Unity. 

Rutherford, N. J Unitarian Society. 

San Francisco, Cal Second Unitarian Society. 

Santa Ana, Cal Unity Church. 

1892 Hudson, Wis Scandinavian Unitarian Society of Hud- 

son, Wis. 

Perry, la Unity Church. 

Redlands, Cal Unity Church. 



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38 

1892 Streator, 111 Church of Good Will to Men. 

Sullivan, Mc Liberal Christian Society. 

1893 Boston, Mass Theodore Parker Memorial. 

Brookljm, Mich People's Church. 

Passaic, N. J Unitarian Society of Passaic 

Memphis, Tenn First Unitarian Society. 

San Antonio, Tex First Unitarian Society. 

1894 Canon City, Col First UniUrian Church, 

Cherokee, la Unity Church. 

Great Falls, Mont First Unitarian Church. 

Washta, la Unity Society. 

1895 Albany, N. Y First Unitarian Society. 

Burlington, la. People's Church. 

Han ford, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

Ida Grove, la. Unity Church. 

Manchester, Mass First Unitarian Church. 

Ousted, Mich People's Church. 

Union Springs, N. Y Church of Good Samaritan. 

Willimantic, Conn First Unitarian Church. 

1896 Brookline, Mass Second Unitarian Society. 

Buffalo, N. Y Parkside Unitarian Society. 

Gouldsboro, West, Me Eliot Unitarian Church. 

Gouvemeur, N. Y. First Unitarian Society. 

Ridgewood, N. J Unitarian Society. 

Serena, III Pleasant Hill Union Church. 

Westerly, R. I Church of Our Father. 

1897 Fort Collins, Col Unity Church. 

Hackensack, N. J Unitarian Congregational Church. 

Montclair, N. J Unity Church. 

Natick, Mass Unity Church. 

1898 Amherst, Mass Unity Church. 

Erie, Pa. First Unitarian Society. 

Iowa Falls, la. People's Church. 

Lincoln, Neb All Souls' Church. 

New London, Conn All Souls' Church (Unitarian-Univer- 

salist). 

Ottawa, Can Church of Our Father. 

Pueblo, Col Unity Church. 

Santa Rosa, Cal People's Church of Santa Rosa. 

Vineyard Haven, Mass. .... Unitarian Society. 

1899 Adrian, Minn People's Church. 

Dallas, Tex First Unitarian Church. 

Highland Springs, Va Highland Springs Unitarian Society. 

Newington, N. H Unitarian Congregational Society. 



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39 

1899 Ord, Neb People's Unitarian Association. 

Rock Rapids, la. People's Church. 

1900 Braintree, Mass. ..*.... All Souls' Church of Braintrec. 

Bristol, Fla. Unitarian Church of Bristol. 

Burgaw, N. C. Shelter Neck Unitarian Church. 

Chicago, III Memorial Chapel. 

Dorchester (Boston), Mass. . . Channing Church. 

Isles of Shoals, N. H Gosport Meeting-house (Stone Chapel). 

New York (Brooklyn), N. Y. • Fourth Unitarian (Congregational Church. 

1901 Bois^ Ida. Unity (3iurch. 

Derby, Cotm, Unitarian Church. 

Faceville, Ga. First Unitarian Church. 

Salem, Ohio Unity Church. 

Schenectady, N. Y First Unitarian Society. 

1902 Attleboro, Mass Pilgrim Church. 

Elizabeth, N. J All Souls' Church. 

Fort Fairfield, Me. Unitarian Church of Fort Fairfield, Me. 

Hood River, Ore First Unitarian Society of Hood River. 

Lancaster, Pa. Church of Our Father. 

Peletier, N. C White Oak Unitarian Church. 

Santa Cruz, Cal All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Swansboro, N. C Unitarian Church. 

1903 Butte, Mont First Unitarian Society. 

Fresno, CaL Unitarian Sodety of Fresno. 

Indianapolis, Ind. All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Richmond, Va. First Unitarian Church, 

York, Me The York Unitarian Church. 

1904 Chicago, lU First Swedish Unitarian Church of Chi- 

cago. 

Everett, Wash. First Unitarian (Church. 

Gimli, Manitoba, Can First Unitarian Church. 

London, Can The Unitarian Church of London. 

Monroe Bridge, Mass Union Church. 

Winnipeg, Manitoba All Souls' Church. 

Youngstown, Ohio First Unitarian Church. 

1905 Bellingham, Wash First Unitarian Society. 

Beloit, Kan First Unitarian Society. 

(Cornish, N. H Independent Parish of Cornish, N. H. 

New Castle, Pa First Unitarian Church. 

Palo Alto, Cal The Unitarian Church of Palo Alto. 

Warren, Pa. First Unitarian Society. 

1906 Aurora, 111 People's (Church. 

Cape Rozier, Me The Union Church of Cape Rozier. 

Eureka, Cal The Unity Church. 



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40 

i9o6 Franklin, Pa The First Unitarian Church of Franklin. 

Hubert, N. C Bear Creek Unitarian Church. 

Jacksonville, Fla. First Unitarian Congregational Society. 

Lewiston, Ida First Unitarian Society. 

McKeesport, Pa. First Unitarian Society. 

Naples, Me First Congregational Parish. 

Oklahoma, Okla All Souls' Unitarian Church. 

Pittsburgh (Allegheny), Pa. . . Northside Unitarian Church. 

Urbana, 111 Unitarian Church of Urbana, IlL 

1907 Bendon, Mich Unitarian Church Association. 

Brookings, So. Dak First Unitarian Society. 

Flushing, N. Y First Unitarian Church. 

Harrietta, Mich People's Church. 

Ogden, Utah First Unitarian Church. 

South Brooklyn, N. Y South Brookl3m Unitarian Society. 

Summit, N. J The Unitarian Church in Summit 

Wheeling, W. Va. First Unitarian Church. 

Woodland, Cal The Unitarian Church. 

1908 Mary Hill, Manitoba, Can. . . . The Unitarian Society of Lake Manitoba. 
Pink Hill, N. C Unitarian Church. 

Traverse City, Mich Emerson Unitarian Society. 

White Plains, N. Y Souls' Church. 

1909 Ames, Manitoba, Can. .... Unitarian Society of Ames. 

Dalbo, Minn Dalbo Unitarian Society. 

Homestead, Pa Lincoln Unitarian Church. 

Huansa, Manitoba, Can Unitarian Society at Huansa. 

Morgantown, W. Va First Unitarian Church. 

Otto, Manitoba, Can Unitarian Society of Shoal Lake. 

Phoenix, Ari First Unitarian Society of Phoenix, 

San Bernardino, Cal First Unitarian Church. 

San ford. Me Unitarian Church. 

Springvale, Minn Springvale Unitarian Society. 

Vancouver, B. C, Can First Unitarian Church 

Victoria, B. C, Can First Unitarian Church. 

1910 Andover, N. H. (Potter Place) . All Souls* Union Church. 

Calgary, Alberta, Can First Unitarian Church. 

Dayton, Ohio First Unitarian Church. 

Denver, CTol Bethany Baptist Church. 

Eugene, Ore First Unitarian Church. 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y Plymouth Church. 

Waterbury, Conn All Souls* Church (Universalist-Uni- 

t ari an). 



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41 



LOCATIONS OF UNITARIAN CHURCHES 
ARRANGED ACCORDING TO STATES 

MAINE. 27 Societies. — Augusta; Bangor; Bar Harbor; Belfast; Bruns- 
wick; CapeRozicr; Castine; Eastport; Ellsworth; Farmington; Fort Fairfield ; 
Gouldsboro, West; Houlton; Kennebunk; Lamoine, East; Naples; Portland 
(2 societies) ; Presque Isle; Saco; San ford; Standish; Sullivan; Waterville; 
Winter Harbor ; Yarmouth ; York. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 30 Societies. — Andover ; Andover (Potter Place); 
Bath; Charlestown; Concord; Cornish; Dover; Dublin; Exeter; Fitzwilliam ; 
Francestown; Franklin; Hampton Falls; Isles of Shoals; Keene; Laconia; 
Lancaster; Lebanon; Littleton; Manchester; Milford; Nashua; Newington; 
Peterboro; Portsmouth; Rochester; Walpole; Wilton (2 societies); Wolfeboro. 

VERMONT. 8 Societies. — Brattleboro ; Burlington; Middlesex; Mont- 
pelier; Stowe; Waitsfield; Warren; Windsor. 

MASSACHUSETTS. 192 Societies. — Abington, North; Amherst; An- 
dover, North; Arlington; Ashby; Athol (2 societies) ; Attleboro; Ayer; Barn- 
stable; Barre; Bedford; Belmont; Berlin; Bemardston; Beverly; Billerica; 
Bolton; Boston (11 societies), Brighton, Dorchester (5 societies). East Boston, 
Jamaica Plain, Neponset, Roslindale, Roxbury (2 societies), West Roxbury, South 
Boston; Braintree; Brewster; Bridgewater; Bridgewater, East; Bridgewater, 
West ; Brockton ; Brookfield ; Brookline (2 societies) ; Cambridge (2 societies) ; 
Canton; Carlisle; Chelmsford; Chelsea; Chestnut Hill; Chicopee; Ointon; 
Cohasset; Concord; Danvers; Dedham; Deerfield; Dighton; Dover; Duxbury; 
Easton; Easton, North; Fairhaven; Fall River; Fitchburg; Framingham; Gard- 
ner; Gloucester; Grafton; Greenfield; Groton; Harvard; Haverhill; Hingham 
(3 societies) ; Holyoke ; Hopedale ; Hubbardston ; Hudson ; Hyde Park ; Kings- 
ton; Lancaster; Lawrence; Leicester; Leominster; Lexington; Lexington, 
East; Lincoln; Littleton; Lowell; Lynn; Maiden; Manchester; Marblehead; 
Marlborough ; Marshfield (Marshfield Hills) ; Marshfield (Green Harbor) ; 
Medfield; Medford; Melrose; Mendon; Middleboro; Millbury; Milton; Mon- 
roe Bridge ; Montague ; Montague (Turner's Falls) ; Nantucket ; Natick ; 
Natick, South ; Needham ; New Bedford ; Newburyport ; New Salem ; Newton ; 
Newton Centre ; Newton, West ; Northampton ; Northampton (Florence) ; 
Northboro; Northfield; Norton; Norwell; Peabody; Pembroke; Pepperell; 
Petersham ; Pittsfield ; Plymouth ; Quincy ; Quincy ( Wollaston) ; Randolph ; 
Ra3mham; Reading; Revere; Revere (Beachmont) ; Rockland; Rowe; Salem 
(3 societies) ; Sandwich; Scituate; Sharon; Sherbom; Shirley; Somerville; 
Somerville, West ; Springfield ; Sterling ; Stoneham ; Stow ; Sturbridge ; Sudbury ; 
Taunton ; Templeton ; Townsend, West ; Tyngsboro ; Upton ; Uxbridge ; Vineyard 
Haven ; Walpole ; Waltham ; Ware ; Warwick ; Watertown ; Waverley ; Wayland ; 



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Wclleslcy Hills; Wcstboro; Wcstford; Weston; Wcstwood; Weymouth, East; 
Whitman; Winchendon; Winchester; Winthrop; Woburn; Woixrester (3 
societies). 

RHODE ISLAND. 4 Societies. — Newport; Providence (2 societies); 
Tiverton. 

CONNECTICUT. 5 Societies. — Brooklyn ; Derby; Hartford; New 
London; Waterbury. 

NEW YORK 28 Societies. — Albany; Buffalo (2 societies); Dunkirk; 
Flushing; Gouvemeur; Ithaca; Jamestown; Mt Vernon; Newburg; New 
York (3 societies) ; Brooklyn (6 societies) ; Richmond; Rochester; Schenec- 
tady; Syracuse; Trenton; Troy; Union Springs; White Plains; Yonkers. 

NEW JERSEY. 10 Societies. — Elizabeth ; Hackensack; Montdair; Or- 
ange; Passaic; Plainfield; Ridgewood; Rutherford; Summit; Vincland. 

PENNSYLVANIA. 15 Societies. — Erie ; Franklin; Homestead; Lancas- 
ter; McKeesport; Meadville; New Castle; Northumberland; Philadelphia 
(3 societies) ; Pittsburg (2 societies) ; Union Gty ; Warren. 

DELAWARE, i Societv. — Wilmington. 

MARYLAND, i SoaETv. — Baltimore. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 1 Society.— Washington. 

VIRGINIA. 2 Societies. — Highland Springs; Richmond. 

WEST VIRGINIA. 2 Societies. — Morgantown ; Wheeling. 

NORTH CAROLINA. 5 Soobties. — Burgaw ; Hubert; Peletier; Pink 
Hill; Swansboro. 

SOUTH CAROLINA, i Society. — Charleston. 

GEORGIA. 2 Sooeties. — Atlanta ; Faceville. 

FLORIDA. 2 Societies. — Bristol; Jacksonville. 

KENTUCKY, i Society.— Louisville. 

TENNESSEE. 2 Societies. — Chattanooga ; Memphis. 

LOUISIANA. I Society. — New Orleans. 

TEXAS. 2 Societies. — Dallas ; San Antonio. 

OHIO. 7 Societies. — Cincinnati; Cleveland; Dayton; Marietta; Salem; 
Toledo ; Youngstown. 

MICHIGAN. 16 Societies. — Ann Arbor; Bendon; Brooklyn; Detroit; 
Grand Haven ; Grand Rapids (2 societies) ; Harrietta ; Jackson ; Kalamazoo ; 
Manistee; Midland; Mount Pleasant; Ousted; Sherwood; Traverse City. 

INDIANA. 4 Societies. — Hobart; Indianapolis; La Porte; Valparaiso. 

WISCONSIN. 9 Societies. — Arcadia ; Baraboo ; Hudson ; Kenosha ; Mad- 
ison; Menomonie; Milwaukee; Neillsville; West Superior. 

ILLINOIS. 24 Societies. — Alton ; Aurora ; Bloomington ; Buda ; Chicago 
(6 societies) ; Evanston ; Geneseo ; Geneva ; Hinsdale ; Mattoon ; Moline ; 
Quincy; Serena; Sheffield; Shelb)rville (2 societies)'; Streator; Tremont; Urbana. 

MINNESOTA. 13 Societies. — Adrian ; Dalbo; Duluth; Hanska; Lu- 
veme ; Minneapolis (2 societies) ; Springvale ; St Goud ; St. Paul ; St Paul 
(St Anthony Park) ; Underwood; Winona. 



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43 

IOWA. 14 Societies. — Burlington ; Cherokee ; Davenport ; Decorah ; Des 
Moines; Humboldt; Ida Grove; Iowa City; Iowa Falls; Keokuk; Perry; Rock 
Rapids: Sioux City; Washta. 

MISSOURI. 4 Societies. — Kansas City; St. Joseph; St Louis (2 societies). 

NORTH DAKOTA, i Society. — Fargo. 

SOUTH DAKOTA. 2 Societies. — Brookings ; Sioux Falls. 

KANSAS. 4 Societies. — Beloit; Lawrence; Topeka; Wichita. 

OKLAHOMA, i Society. — Oklahoma. 

NEBRASKA. 4 Societies. — Beatrice; Lincoln; Omaha; Ord. 

COLORADO. 7 Societies. — Ca&on City; Colorado Springs; Denver (2 
societies) ; Fort Collins ; Greeley ; Pueblo. 

MONTANA. 3 Societies. — Butte; Great Falls; Helena. 

UTAH. 2 Societies. — Ogden; Salt Lake City. 

IDAHO. 2 Societies. — Bois^ ; Lewiston. 

ARIZONA. I Society. — Phoenix. 

WASHINGTON. 4 Societies. — Bellingham ; Everett; Seattle; Spokane. 

OREGON. 4 Societies. — Eugene; Hood River; Portland; Salem. 

CALIFORNIA. 21 Societies. — Alameda; Berkeley; Eureka; Fresno; Han- 
ford; Los Angeles; Oakland; Palo Alto; Pomona; Redlands; Sacramento; 
San Bernardino ; San Diego ; San Francisco (2 societies) ; San Jos^ ; Santa 
Ana; Santa Barbara; Santa Cruz; Santa Rosa; Woodland. 

CANADA. 1$ Societies. — Ames; Calgary; Gimli; Hamilton; Huansa; 
Mary Hill; London; Montreal; Ottawa; Otto; Toronto; Vancouver; Vic- 
toria; Winnipeg, Manitoba (2 societies). 



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LIST OF MINISTERS WITH THEIR ADDRESSES 

This list gives the names of all ministers in the Unitarian Fellowship who are or have 
been settled as pastors of Unitarian churches. The list contains 538 names. 

The insertion of names in the list, as well as the withdrawal of any, is wholly in charge 
of the Executive Committee of the National Conference Committee on Fellowship. (See 
page 96.) 

For the statistics given with the names and the form of their publication the editor of the 
Year Book is alone responsible. 

Under the heading '* Settled " are given for convenience the dates at which a few who 
were not duly installed began their present service, and also the dates at which a few whose 
work is closely akin to pastoral service began their work. 

Those ministers for whom no date stands under " Settled " were without settlement at 
the date of the preparation of this list (June, 1910). 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Abbott, Andrew Jackson Ashland, Mass 1867 

Abbott, Mrs. Eliza M. Hickok ... 26 Essex Street, Melrose, Mass 1893 

Adams, William Cushing Box 304, Dover, N. H. (Societies in Dover 

and Rochester, N. H.) 1897 1909 

Aimar, Charles Emile Box 233, Walpole, N. H 1909 1909 

Aitken, Mrs. Martha Chapman . . 67 Winthrop Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. . 1894 

Allen, Charles Adams Waverley, Mass 1865 1901 

Allen, Joseph Cady Hubbardston, Mass 1895 1910 

Allis, William B 22 Archer Avenue, Mt. Vernon, N. Y. . . 1893 1910 

Ames, Charles Bulkley 121 Goffe Street, Quincy, Mass 1908 1908 

Ames, Charles Giordon, D.D. ... 12 Chestnut Street, Boston, Mass. (Ch. 

Disciples) 1849 1889 

Anderson, George Sheed 26 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, Mass 1895 1904 

Applebee, John Henry 188 County Street, Attleboro, Mass. . . . 1894 1905 

Armington, George Fit2(jerald . . Beloit, Kan 1898 1905 

Arnold, Harold Greene 152 South Street, Bridgewater, Mass. . . 1908 1908 

Amason, Gudmundur 577 Sherbrooke St, Winnipeg, Man. Can. 1909 1909 

Babcock, William Gustavus .... 75 Clarkson Street, Dorchester, Mass. . . 1846 

Backus, Wilson Marvin 803 Mary Place, Minneapolis, Minn. (First 

Unitarian Society) 1888 1908 

Bacon, Theodore Davenport ... 128 Federal Street, Salem, Mass 1892 1907 



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45 

Name Address Ordained Set 

Badger, George Henry 104 East 20th Street, New York, N. Y. . 1886 

(Secretary of the Conference of the Middle States and Canada.) 

Bailey, Alvin Freeman Barre, Mass 1867 

Bailey, Benjamin Hollaway .... Westford, Mass 1861 

Baker, Harry Spencer 324 ssth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 1892 

Baker, Nehemiah Addison .... Box 196, Eureka, Cal 1908 

Ball, Clarence Leon Athol, Mass 1894 

Baltzly, John Hudson, Mass i^i 

Bandy, John Van Neice Dighton, Mass 1906 

Bandy, Paul Stathem Salem, Ore 1903 

Barber, Henry Hervey 671 Alden Street, Meadville, Pa. 1861 

(Professor Emeritus in the Meadville Theological School.) 

Barker, John William Lebanon, N. H 1898 

Barnard, Miss Margaret Bowers . Box 42, Rowe, Mass 1897 

Barnes, William Sullivan, LL.D. . . Sherbrooke West and Simpson Streets, 

Montreal, Can 1864 

Barrett, Edward Hughes Greenville, Ohio 1900 

Barrow, Reuben Shaw Box 656, Windsor, Vt 1904 

Batchelor, George 272 Cx>ngrcss Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1866 

(Editor of the Christian Register,) 

Beach, Seth Curtis, D.D Wayland, Mass 1873 

Beane, Samuel Collins, D.D. . . . Grafton, Mass 1862 

Beane, Samuel Collins, Jr 2 Ripley Place, Worcester, Mass. (So- 
cieties in Worcester and Leicester, 

Mass.) 1900 

Beers, Wayland Lewis Great Falls, Mont 1896 

Bellows, John Adams 115 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1878 

Bellows, Russell Nevins 247 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. . . . 1872 

Bennett, Frederick Marsh 1209 Oread Avenue, Lawrence, Kan. . . . 1895 

Bidwell, John Belden 235 College Avenue, Elgin, 111 1874 

Billings, Charles Towne 73 Mansur Street, Lowell, Mass 1890 

Billington, Frank Herbert .... Carlisle, Mass 1902 

Birks, Alfred William Box 3, Natick, Mass 1902 

Birks, Richard Elliott Deerfield, Mass 1872 

Bixby, James Thompson, Ph.D. . . 2 Arthur Street, Yonkers, N. Y. 1870 

Blackwell, Mrs. Antoinette Brown 348 Bay Way, Elizabeth, N. J 1853 

Blake, James Vila 122 North Ashland Boulevard, Chicago, 

111. (Society in Evanston) 1867 

Bodge, (jeorge Madison 11 Meredith Street, W. Roxbury, Mass. 

(Society in Naples, Me.) 1878 

Boivin, Bertram D East Bridgewater, Mass 1898 

Bowen, Clayton Raymond .... 671 Alden Street, Meadville, Pa 1903 

(Assistant Professor in the Meadville Theological School.) 



led 
903 

879 
903 
907 
909 

898 

907 
884 

907 
902 

880 

910 

898 

902 
909 



909 
909 



899 

896 

907 
910 
901 



892 

901 
906 
90s 



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Name Address Ordained Settled 

Bowser, Alexander Thomas ... St Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada . ; 1881 

Boyd, Nicholas Emery 2823 Garber Street, Berkeley, Cal 1895 

Boynton, Richard Wilson 83 Ashland Avenue, Bufifalo, N. Y. (First 

Unitarian Congregational Society) . 1895 1908 

Branigan, William Henry Pcterboro, N. H 1885 1900 

Brenan, Edward Henton 26 Berry Street, Danvers, Mass 1898 1908 

Brockway, Thomas Qinton .... Greeley, Col 1896 

Brooks, Arthur Anderson 146 Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y 1885 

Brown, Carleton Fairchild .... Br)m Mawr, Pa 1893 

(Professor in Bryn Mawr College.) 

Brown, Edwin G 181 1 Seventh Avenue, Moline, 111 1907 1909 

Brown, Frederic Curtis 22 Oak Ridge Avenue, Summit, N. J. . . 1896 1907 

Brown, Howard Nicholson .... 295 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (King's 

Chapel) 1872 1895 

Brown, Thomas William 150 Trenton Street, Melrose, Mass. . . . 1852 

Brown, William Channing 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1895 1905 

(Field Secretary of the American Unitarian Association for New 

England.) 

Brown, William Thurston .... 212 Fifth Avenue, Salt Lake City, Utah . 1888 
Brundage, William Milton, Ph.D. . 778 Carroll Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Third 

Society) 1884 1905 

Buck, Charles Wentworth 2 Worcester Street, Belmont, Mass. . . . 1862 

Buck, Miss Florence 426 Park Avenue, Kenosha, Wis. .... 1893 1901 

Buckingham, Merritt Scott .... Bernardston, Mass 1892 1908 

Buckshom, Louis Henry Vineyard Haven, Mass 1896 1909 

Bulkeley, Benjamin Reynolds ... 25 Hale Street, Beverly, Mass. 1882 1897 

Butler, Ellery Channing 38 Russell Park, Quincy, Mass 1869 1894 

Buzzell, Herbert Leslie Barre, Mass 1893 1909 

Bygrave, Hilary Belmont, Mass. (Society in Sdtuate, 

Mass.) 1872 1909 

Byrnes, Thomas Patrick 714 West Ninth Street, Erie, Pa. 1888 1905 



Cady, Vernon Mosher 227 Bayard Avenue, Kansas City, Mo. . . 1908 1908 

Calthrop, Samuel Robert, L.H.D. . 1821 S. Salina Street, Syracuse, N. Y. . . i860 1868 

Canfield, Charles Taylor 29A Everett Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . i860 

Carpenter, Carlos Clement .... 402 Williams Street, Owasso, Mich. . . . 1861 

Casson, Charles Wesley Dorchester, Mass. (Third Society) . . . 1898 1910 

Catlin, Hasket Derby Northumberland, Pa 1867 

Chaffin, William Ladd North Easton, Mass 1862 1868 

Chaney, George Leonard Salem, Mass 1862 

Chase, Ernest Abbott Brewster, Mass 1885 1908 

Child, Dudley Richards Pepperell, Mass 1906 1909 



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47 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Qark, Albert Willard 609 Union Street, Schenectady, N. Y. . . 1902 1906 

Qark, Charles Clifton Fallston, Md 1894 

Clark, Hobart Clinton Avenue, New Brighton, S. I., 

N. Y. (Church of the Redeemer) . 

Qarke, Ward Robinson Montpelier, Vt 1900 1909 

Qayton, Thomas Fresno, Cal 1885 1910 

Gear, Arthur Herbert 6 Magnolia Avenue, Holyoke, Mass. (So- 
cieties in Holyoke and Amherst) . . 1899 1907 

Cochrane, Lorenzo Darwin . • • . Bolton, Mass 1889 

Coil, E. Alfred Marietta, Ohio 1882 1895 

Cole, William Roswell P. O. Box 555, Cohasset, Mass 1891 1896 

Coleman, Albert John 39 Lancaster Terrace, Jacksonville, Fla. . 1897 1905 

Collyer, Robert, LitD 201 West S5th Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Church of the Messiah) 1859 1879 

Cooke, George Willis 49 Park Avenue, Wakefield, Mass 1872 

Cooper, John Wallace, Ph.D. ... 433 College Avenue, Lancaster, Pa. . . . 1901 1910 

Cornish, Louis Craig Hingham, Mass. (First Parish) 1899 1900 

Cowan, William Edward Watha, N. C. (Circuit Work) 1904 

Crane, Mrs. Caroline Bartlett . . . Kalamazoo, Mich 1889 

Cressey, (JeorgeCroswell, Ph.D.,D.D. (In Europe) 1885 

Cressey, Pemberton Hale Groton, Mass 1899 1903 

Cronyn, David Bernardston, Mass 1868 

Crooker, Joseph Henry, D.D. ... 26 Conway Street, Roslindale, Mass. . . 1873 1905 

Cross, Alfred Scotland, Mass 1884 

Crothers, Samuel McChord, D.D. . 20 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Mass. . • . 1874 1894 

Cnizan, John Alexander i960 Summit Street, Oakland, Cal 1871 1909 

(Field Agent of the American Unitarian Association in the Pacific De- 
partment) 

Culp, Adam Joshua Brooklyn, Conn 1881 1904 

Cummings, Edward i04lrvingStreet, Cambridge, Mass. (South 

Congregational Church, Boston) . . 1900 1900 
Cutter, (George Webber, M.D. . • • Watertown, Mass. (Society in Neponset, 

Mass.) 1870 1901 

Dallam, John R Fort McKinley, Rizal, P. 1 1891 1904 

(Chaplain United States Army.) 

Danforth, James Tyngsboro, Mass 1884 

Daniels, Leverett Richmond .... Yarmouth, Me 1885 1909 

Davidson, John Mitchell Xenia, Ohio 1901 

Dansingberg, Paul D 723 Fifth Avenue, South, St Cloud, Minn. 1909 1909 

Davis, Earl Clement 14 Stoddard Avenue, Pittsfield, Mass. . . 1905 1905 

Day, Edward 3215 East Douglas Avenue, Wichita, Kan. 1886 1908 

Day, John Boynton Wilson .... 527 Cherry Street, Fall River, Mass. . . . 1900 1906 

Day, John William 320 North Newstead Avenue, St Louis, 

Mo. (Church of the Messiah) .... 1886 1899 



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48 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Dellgren, August 1529 Wellington Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

(First Swedish Unitarian Church) . 1886 1904 

De Long, Henry Qay 141 High Street, Medford, Mass 1863 1869 

De Normandie, James, D.D 45 Lambert Avenue, Roxbury, Mass. 

(First Religious Society) 1862 1883 

Dethlefs, Louis Claus Franklin Terrace, Hyde Park, Mass. . . 1907 1910 

Dickerman, William Frederick , . 86 Euclid Avenue, Waterbury, Conn. . . 1871 1910 

Dillingham, Pitt 178 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Mass. i^ 

Dodson, George Rowland, Ph.D. • • 48 Nicholson Place, St Louis, Mo. 

(Church of the Unity) 1886 1903 

Dole, Charles Fletcher, D.D. ... 14 Roanoke Avenue, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 1874 1876 

Doremus, Robert Proudfit Barnstable, Mass. 1908 1908 

Douthit, Jasper Lewis Shelbyville, III 1862 1868 

Douthit, Robert Cx)llyer Castine, Me 1894 1907 

Drummond, Chester Arthur .... 29 Ontral Street, Somerville, Mass . . . 1906 1910 

Duncan, James Cameron 168 Walnut Street, Clinton, Mass 1886 1886 

Dutton, Caleb Samuel Simeon • . • 115 Montague Street, Brookl3m, N. Y. 

(Second Society) 1902 1907 

Duerr, Otto Eugene 3529 Rockefeller Avenue, Everett, Wash. 1909 1909 

Eddowes, Timothy Harold .... (Geneva, 111 iSSs 

Elberfeld, Samuel Louis Charlestown, N. H 1897 1908 

Elder, Charles Brown, D.D. .... 55 Cedar Street, Worcester, Mass. (Church 

of the Unity) 1880 1905 

Eliot, Christopher Rhodes 2 West Cedar Street, Boston, Mass. (Bui- 

finch Place Church) 1882 1894 

Eliot, Samuel Atkins, D.D 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1889 1900 

(President of the American Unitarian Association.) 

Eliot, Thomas Lamb, D.D 227 West Park Street, Portland, Ore. . . 1865 1867 

Eliot, William Greenleaf, Jr. . . . 346 Yamhill Street, Portland, Ore. . . . . 1894 1906 

Elliott, (Hiarles Florian 1426 Vermont Street, Quinpy, III 1870 1906 

Ellis, Arthur Blake Buriey, Wash. 1899 

Ennis, William Edwin Norwell, Mass 1904 1908 

Estabrook, Frank Philip ..... 8 Cx)ngress Street, Boston, Mass 1893 

Evans, Edwin Fort Plain, N. Y. (Universalist Society) 1908 1910 

Evans, Kenneth Edward 48 Fairview Avenue, Chicopee, Mass. • . 1897 1902 

Fairfield, Oliver Jay 35 Pleasant Street, Ware, Mass. 1892 1901 

Fairley, James A. « 12 Waldorf Court, Brooklyn, N. Y. (So- 
ciety in Hackensack, N. J.) 1894 1904 

Farwell, Herbert Cunningham ... 16 Ome Square, Salem, Mass. (Salem 

Fraternity) 1899 

Fenn, William Wallace, D.D. ... 25 Quincy Street, C^ambridge, Mass. . . . 1890 igoi 
(Dean of Harvard Divinity School and Bussey Professor of Theology.) 



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49 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Ferguson, Charles National Arts Qub, Gramercy Park, New 

York, N. Y 1887 

Fcrrcll, Dudley Hays 244 West Elm Street, Brockton, Mass. . . 1902 1906 

Fish, William Henry 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 1871 

Fisk, Richmond, D.D Ayer, Mass. 1861 1910 

Foote, Heniy Wilder Ann Arbor, Mich 1902 1906 

(Secretary of the Department of Education of the American Unitarian 
Association.) 

Forbes, Elmer Severance 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1890 1908 

(Secretary of the Department of Social and Public Service of the Ameri- 
can Unitarian Association.) 
Forbes, Roger Sawyer 60 Virginia Street, Upham's Comer, Bos- 
ton, Mass. (First Parish in Dorches- 
ter) 

Forkcll, William Aurora, 111 

Free, Alfred, Ph.D Morgantown, W. Va. 

Freeman, Daniel Roy 459 Washington Street, Braintree, Mass. . 

Frothingham, Paul Revere . . . • 294 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. (Arling- 
ton Street Church) 1889 1900 

Fuller, Ckorge Washington . . . • The Espanola, Oak Street and 2d Avenue, 

Spokane, Wash 1902 1907 

Furman, William Franklin .... Westfield, N. Y. . 1886 



(jale, Frank Randall Berlin, Mass. . • • 1899 1903 

Gannett, William Channing, D.D. . 15 Sibley Place, Rochester, N. Y 1879 1889 

(Jarver, Austin Samuel 41 Lancaster Street, Worcester, Mass. 

(Second Parish) 1872 1885 

(jauld, Frederic John 81 Merriam Avenue, Leominster, Mass. . 1894 i^ 

Gebauer, (Jeorge Rudolph 1209 East Third Street, Duluth, Minn. . . 1895 1908 

(reoghegan, William Bernard ... 47 South Sixth Street, New Bedford, Mass. 1892 1902 
(jibson, Jonathan Christopher . • • Apalachicola, Fla. (Societies in Bristol, 

Fla., and Faceville, Ga.) 1870 1890 

(jifford, Elisha 21 Maywood Street, Worcester, Mass. . . 1867 

(jifFord, Franklin Kent Melrose, Mass 1893 

Gilbert, William McFaul Vineland, N. J 1875 1887 

Gilchrist, Harry Elmer Casa Grande, 4900 St Charles Ave., New 

Orleans, La 1887 1906 

(Jill, Frederic 29 Academy Street, Arlmgton, Mass. . . .1892 1892 

Gillilan, Charles Wallace Tulson, Okla 1902 

(Oilman, Bradley Canton Comer, Mass 1884 1905 

Gilman, Nicholas Paine 537 Chestnut Street, Meadville, Pa. . . . 1872 1895 

(Professor in die Meadville Theological School.) 



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50 

Name Address Ordained Settl 

Gilmore, Frank Albert 117 West Gorham Street, Madison, Wis. . 1892 

Gilmour, George 183 No. Harwood Street, Dallas, Tex. . . 1905 

Goldsmith, Peter Hair, D.D 12 Summer Street, Salem, Mass. (First 

Q>ngregational Society, Salem, and 

Society in Marblehead) 1887 

Gooding. Alfred 10 Middle Street, Portsmouth, N. H. . . . 1882 

Goodridge, Benjamin Asbury . . • 17 £. Micheltorena Street, Santa Barbara, 

Cal 1892 

Gordon, Miss Eleanor Elizabeth • • Roadside Settlement, Des Moines, la. . . 1889 

Gorton, James 1814 Cuyler Avenue, Chicago, III 1858 

Grant. Arthur Hastings 356 Bay Way, Elizabeth, N. J 1890 

Graves, Charles 57 Paulison Avenue, Passaic, N. J. (Soci- 
eties at Passaic and Ridgewood) . . 1894 

Gray. Clifton Merritt 4 Archdale Street, Charleston, S. C . . . 1899 

Greeley, Clarence De Vere .... 20 No. Ashland Boulevard (People's 

Church), Chicago, III 1891 

Green, Edward Exeter, N. H i88r 

Green, Walter Cox Meadville, Pa 1892 

(Librarian and Secretary of die Faculty of the Meadville Theological 
School.) 

Greene, Lovinzo Leroy Chelmsford, Mass 1880 

Greenman, Lyman Manchester . . 55 High Street, Yonkers, N. Y 1896 

Greenman, Walter Folger .... 684 Astor Street, Milwaukee, Wis. . . . 1890 
Griffin, Frederick Robertson . • . Sherbrooke West and Simpson Streets, 

Montreal, Canada 1901 

Griffith, Roy Edward Westboro, Mass 1906 



Hahn, Andrew Duxbury, Mass 1897 

Haight. Miss Sarah Louisa .... Perry, la. 1899 

Hale. Edward 4 Circuit Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. . . 1886 

Hall. Edward Henry, D.D 14 Craigie Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . . 1859 

Ham, Marion Franklin Reading, Mass 18^ 

Hamlet, Samuel 75 Hancock Street, Boston, Mass 1885 

Harris, Clarence J 943 i8th Street, San Diego, Cal 1896 

Harvey, Leon Addison 798 Elmore Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 1890 

Hathaway, George Adelbert .... San Diego. Cal 1904 

Hathaway, George Edgar 337 Walnut Street, Manchester, N. H. . . 1904 

Hawes, Oscar Brown 5224 Greene Street, (iermantown, Phila- 
delphia, Pa 1897 

Hawley, Fred Vermillia 4232 North Hermitage Avenue, (Chicago, 

III. (Unity Church) 1893 

Hay den, Charles Adelbert, D.D. . . Oakland, Me. (Universalist Society) . . . 1866 



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1874 


1890 


1905 


1905 


1881 




1882 




1878 


1901 


1902 


1908 



SI 

Name Address Ord 

Hayes, John Alexander 44 Arlington Street, Haverhill, Mass. . . 

Hay ward, Edward Farwell . . . • 41 Pleasant Street, Marlborough, Mass. . 

Hayward, Laurence 12 Essex Street, Newburyport, Mass. . . 

Headle, Edwin Charles R. F. D. 62, Bolton, Mass 

Heddaeus, Johannes 106 Kosciusko Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . 

Heizer, Cyrus Whittlesay Ithaca, N. Y 

Henderson, Cicero Adolphus ... 211 West 19th Street, Wilmington, Del. . 

Hills, Burton Alfred 303 West 12th Street, Traverse City, Mich. 

(Societies at Traverse City, Harrietta 

and Bendon, Mich.) 1905 1906 

Hinckley, Frederic Allen 201 1 Green Street, Philadelphia, Pa. . . . 1878 

Hoagland, Napoleon Stage .... Tyngsboro, Mass 1885 1908 

Hodgin, Edwin McMasters Stanton 925 South Flower Street, Los Angeles, 

Cal 

Hodgins, James Cobourg Waban, Mass 

Holmgren, David Dalbo, Minn 

Holden, Francis Wilder Milford, N. H 

Holmes, John Haynes 28 Garden Place, Brookljm, N. Y. (Church 

of the Messiah, New York) 1904 

Homer, Thomas Jay 26 Oakland Street, Melrose, Mass. (Soci- 
eties in Melrose and Sharon) .... 

Horst, Carl (jeorg 67 Winthrop Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. . 

Horton, Edward Augustus .... 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1868 

Hosmer, Frederic Lucian, D.D. . . 2427 Channing Way, Berkeley, C^il. . . . 1869 

Howard, Burt Estes Stanford University, Cal 1886 

(Professor of Political Science in Stanford University.) 

Howard, Thomas Dwight 99 School Street, Springfield, Mass. . • . 1852 

Hubbard, Horace Richmond .... Francestown, N. H 1897 1908 

Hudson, Adelbert Lathrop • . . • Ellsworth, Me 1895 

Hudson, Jay William Columbia, Mo 1895 

(Professor in the University of Missouri.) 

Hudson, John William Peabody, Mass 

Hultin, Miss Ida C Sudbury, Mass 

Humphreys, Charles Alfred . . • . 3 Monadnock Street, Dorchester, Mass. 

Hunt, Walter Reid 21 Clarendon Place, Orange, N. J. . . 

Hussey, Alfred Rodman i W. Hamilton Street, Baltimore, Md. . 

Hutcheon, Robert James 3 Edgedale Road, Toronto, Can 

Hutchins, William Tucker .... Santa Rosa, Cal 1876 

Huxtable, James 568 E. Fifth Street, South Boston, Mass. . 1874 1890 

Innes, Alexander Irvine 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1901 

Ives, Henry Goodson Andover, N, H 1904 1904 

Ives, Howard Colby 22 Cleveland Street, New London, Conn. . 1905 1906 



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1886 


1903 


1863 




1894 


1898 


1895 


1902 


1895 


1906 



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52 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Jackson, Abraham Willard, D.D. • 98 West Emerson Street, Melrose, Mass. . 1873 

Jayncs, Julian CliflFord 76 Prince Street, West Newton, Mass. . . 1885 1885 

Jenks, Henry Fitch Canton Comer. Mass 1867 1885 

Jennings, Allen Gary 2236 Fulton Street, Toledo, Ohio (in 

charge of Adams Street City Mission) 1870 1903 
Johonnot, Rodney Fuller, D.D. . • 234 So. Kenilworth Avenue, Osk Park, III. 

(Unity Church) 1886 1892 

Jones, Charles Joshua Ketcham . . Fremont Hotel, Los Angeles, C^ 1872 

Jones, (jeorge 157 East Wallace Avenue, New Castle, Pa. 1900 

Jones, Jenkin Lloyd, LL.D 3939 Langley Avenue, Chicago, III (All 

Souls' Church) 1870 1882 

Jones, Joseph Henry 706 Tyler Street, Topcka, Kan. 1898 1906 

Jones, William Marion The Rangeley, 723 W. Third Street, Los 

Angeles, Cal 1877 

Jones, William Safford 29 Kay Street, Newport, R. 1 1897 1905 

Jfudy, Arthur Markley Montpelier, la. 1882 

Kampmeier, August 930 East Washington Street, Iowa City, la. 1879 

Kellington, Herbert Edgar .... 223 Queen's Avenue, New Westminster, 

B. C, Can. (Society in Victoria, B. C.) 

Kellogg, Ira Phelp, Jr 57 Park Street, Florence, Mass. 

Kennedy, Albert Joseph South End House, 20 Union Park, Boston, 

Mass 

Kent, Frederic Houston 86 High Street, Northampton, Mass. . . . 

Kent, GJeorge 125 Adelaide Avenue, Providence, R. I. 

(Westminster Congregational So- 
ciety) 

Kent, Josiah Coleman Northborough, Mass. 

Kerr, Milton Royce 1809 Eleventh Avenue, Greeley, Col. . . . 

Key, William Simpson Watha, Pender Co., N. C (Circuit Work) 

Kirkpatrick, David M Geneseo, 111 1889 1905 

Knapp, Arthur May 44 Clark Road, Brookline, Mass 1868 

Lane, Walter Eustace Spencer, Mass 1892 

Lappala, Risto Duluth, Minn. (Finnish Mission) .... 1907 1910 

Lathrop, John Howland Dana Street and Bancroft Way, Berkeley, 

Cal 1905 1905 

Latimer, George Dimmick .... 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1890 

Lawrance, William Irvin 475 Main Street, Winchester, Mass. . . . 1875 1910 

(President of the Unitarian Sunday-School Society.) 

Lazenby, Albert 57 Breed Street, Lynn, Mass 1876 190S 

Leavens, Robert French Box 216, Fitchburg, Mass 1907 1908 



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1908 


1878 





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53 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Leavitt, Bradford 2511 Octavia Street, San Francisco, CaL 

(First Unitarian Society) 1893 igoo 

I^ggett, Miss Mary Lydia . . . • 77 Pinckney Street, Boston, Mass. .... 1888 

Leiby, Israel Steigerwolt Tamaqua, Pa. 1900 

Leonard, William James 30 Rockland Street, Boston, Mass. . • • . 1865 

Lewis, Fred Rinaldo Hopedale, Mass 1898 1909 

Lilliefors, Manfred Davenport, la. 1896 

Limbaugh, Daniel Christian . . • • Fort Worth, Tex. 1900 

Litchfield, William Cummings • • • i Southwick Street, Middleboro, Mass. . 1879 
Littlefield, Arthur Warner .... 87 Francis Street, Brookline, Mass. (Sec- 
ond Unitarian Society) 1891 1908 

Lloyd, Hal Horace Station A, Chattanooga, Tenn 1908 

Locke, Calvin Stoughton Westwood, Mass 1854 

Locke, John Francis 3 Elmont Street, Dorchester Center, Mass. 1870 

Locke, William Ware Wellesley Hills, Mass. 1886 1905 

(Preacher at Rock Ridge Hall.) 

Lombard, Charles Parker 236 A Street, Boston, Mass. 1878 

Lord, Augustus Mendon, D.D. • • • 34 Cushing Street, Providence, R. I. (First 

Church) 1887 1890 

Lord, William Rogers Dover, Mass. 1878 1909 

Loring, Robert Sprague Iowa City, la. 1897 1907 

Lusk, James Thompson 124 Chandler Street, Boston, Mass. • • . 1870 

Lutz, Harry 91 Park Street, Newton, Mass 1900 1910 

Lyon, William Henry, D.D 353 Walnut Street, Brookline, Mass. (First 

Parish) 1873 1896 

MacCarthy, Joseph P., Ph.D. ... 429 W. Lovell Street, Kalamazoo, Mich. . 1895 1906 

MacCauley, Clay 2 Shikokumachi, Mita, Tokyo, Japan . . 1866 

(Representative of the American Unitarian Association in Japan.) 

McDonald, Howard Austin . • . 721 Cascade Avenue, Hood River, Ore. . 1906 1910 
Macdonald, Loren Benjamin . • • Concord, Mass. (Societies in Concord 

and Bedford, Mass.) 1882 1895 

Macllwain, George Edward .... Middleboro, Mass 1894 1902 

Maglathlin, Edward Bartlett . . . Ralphton, West Bridgewater, Mass. . . . 1881 1894 

Malick, John loio Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, 

Mass 1904 

Manchester, Alfred 15 Forrester Street, Salem, Mass. (Second 

Church) 1873 1897 

Mann, Newton 528 South 26th Avenue, Omaha, Neb. . . 1865 

Marsh, John Lewis Corner Dale and North Tejon Street, 

Colorado Springs, Col 1875 1909 

Marshall, Perry New Salem, Mass 1875 1893 

Mason, George Lincoln Lock Box 302, Green Harbor, Mass. . . . 1894 '909 



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54 
Name Address Ordained Settled 

Mason, L. Walter, D.D 339 Pacific Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa. . . . 1886 1900 

Maxwell, Samuel Raymond . • . . 15 Crescent Street, Greenfield, Mass. . . 1906 1909 

May, Joseph, LL.D. The Gladstone, nth and Pine Streets, 

Philadelphia, Pa. i8fe 1876 

McDaniel, Benjamin Franklin ... 21 Edson Street, Dorchester Center, Mass. 

(Norfolk Unitarian Church and Bar- 
nard Memorial) 1869 1899 

McDougall, Henry Qay 40 Highland Avenue, Franklin, N. H. . . 1886 1899 

Meredith, Ernest Sidney 75 Park Street, West Roxbury, Mass. . . 1895 1905 

Metcalf, Joel Hastings 54 Summer Street, Taunton, Mass. . . . 1890 1904 

Meyer, John Frederick South Natick, Mass. 1898 1903 

Miller, Kerby Sinclair Central Point, Ore 1896 

Miller, Milton Jennings Geneseo, 111 1863 1868 

Mills, Benjamin Fay Station M., Los Angeles, Cal 1878 I9Q5 

(Minister of the Los Angeles Fellowship.) 
Mills, Thornton Anthony . . . , • Rock ford. III (Church of the Christian 

Union) 1902 I907 

Mills, Grover (George 12 Phillips Street, Watertown, Mass. . . 1908 1908 

Mitchell, Harry Sumner ..... 75 Washington Street, Keene, N. H. . . . 1896 1906 

Mitchell, John Cyrus Fort Collins, Col 1881 1910 

Molyneaux, Peter Aloysius .... Wheeling, W. Va 1910 1910 

Morgan, William Sacheus, Ph.D. , 150 South Knox Street, Albany, N. Y. . . 1890 1907 

Morison, Robert Swain 17 Farrar Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . . 1874 

(Librarian Emeritus of the Harvard Divinity School.) 

Morrison, Bertland Worth .... Fairhaven, Mass 1909 

Morse, M. Rowena, Ph.D 126 North 4th Street, Keokuk, la. ... . 1906 1906 

Morton, James Ferdinand .... Andover, N. H 1869 

Mott, Herbert Henry 9 Mount Pleasant Street, Nashua, N. H. 1886 1900 

Moulton, Joseph Sidney Stow, Mass 1878 1885 

Mueller, John Henry 506 R Chestnut Street, Bloomington, 111. i^ "i892 

Mullett, Alfred Edgar 89 Pearl Street, Charlestown, Mass. . . . 1874 

Murdoch, Miss Marion 426 Park Avenue, Kenosha, Wis 1885 

Myers, Charles Norman 15 Hersam Street, Stoneham, Mass. . . . 1902 1909 

Newman, Bernard Joseph .... 483 Greene Avenue, Brookljm, N. Y. (Wil- 
low Place Chapel) 1901 1902 

Nichols, William Ichabod 280 Prospect Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. . . . 1882 

(General Secretary of the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities.) 

Nichols, William Stanley 35 Chestnut Street, North Andover, Mass. 1899 1909 

Nicholson, Charles Frederick . . . 396 Tremont Street, Taunton, Mass. . . . 1861 
Nickerson, Alfred Chase ..... 768 Kensington Avenue, Plainfield, N. J. . 1871 1897 

Niles, Charles Fremont Menomonie, Wis 1891 1893 



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55 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Norman, Amandus Halvdon . • • • Hanska, Minn. (Societies in Hanska, 

Minn., and Hudson, Wis.) 1893 1893 

Noyes, Charles Carroll Avenue, Norwich, Conn. (Pastor 

Emeritus, North Andover, Mass.) • i860 1884 



Olmstead, Mrs. Margaret Titus • • Brookings, S. D 1894 

Olmstead/Rett Elmer Brookings, S. D 1894 

Osgood, Edmund Quincy Sewall . . 39 High Street, Brattleboro, Vt 1878 1897 

Owen, Thomas Grafton Whitehall, Wis 1856 



Padgfaam, Elizabeth 65 Ames Avenue, Rutherford, N. J. . . . 1901 

Pardee, Joseph Nelson Bolton, Mass 1872 

Park, Charles Edwards 347 Marlborough Street, Boston, Mass. 

(First Church) 1899 

Parker, Henry Carlton 546 Main Street, Wobum, Mass 1878 

Parker, William Henry 24 Marion Street, Dedham, Mass 1905 

Peabody, Francis Greenwood, D.D., 

L.L.D. 13 Kirkland Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1874 
(Plummer Professor of Christian Morals in Harvard University.) 

Peck, William Willett Murdock Parsonage, Winchcndon, Mass. 1897 

Peebles, Stephen (Joshen, Ore 1892 

Peirce, Walter Catlin 102 Curtis Street, West Somerville, Mass. 1888 

Pendleton, Aubrey M Milford, N. H 

Perkins, (Tharles Edwin Keosauqua, la. (Congregational Society) 1886 

Perkins, John C:arroll, D.D. .... 108 High Street, Portland, Me. (First Par- 
ish) 1891 

Perkins, Palfrey 284 Foster Street, Brighton, Mass. (First 

Parish) 1909 

Peterson, Abbot Lancaster, Mass 1907 

Pettengill, Arthur (hooding .... 69 Woodford Street, Portland, Me. 

(Preble Chapel) 1889 

Petursson, Rognvaldur 533 Agnes Street, Winnepeg, Man. Can. . 1903 

(In charge of the Icelandic Missions.) 

Phalen, Frank Lowe Fairhaven, Mass 1886 

Phalen, Paul Stephens Hingham, Mass. (Second Parish and 

Third Sodety) 1908 

Phelan, William Taft 48 Alder Street, Portland, Me. (Preble 

^ Chapel) 1863 

Pickett, Harold Lionel Sandwich, Mass 1909 

Pierce, Granville Box 116, Ashby, Mass 1873 

Pierce, Ulysses Grant Baker, D.D. 1616 Riggs Place, Washington, D. C . • 1891 



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891 

909 
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906 

908 

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909 
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56 

Name Address Ordained Settled 

Pierson, William Henry, D.D. ... 779 Broadway, West Somerville, Mass. . 1868 

Pinkham, Henry Winn 2528 Clay Street, Denver, Col 1891 i8q6 

Piper, George Fisk 548 Park Street, Dorchester, Mass. . . . 1864 

Place, Charles Alpheus Pratt's Junction, Mass. 1897 

Poison, Carl Axtell Sheffield III 1901 1909 

Porter, Isaac Francis Sherbom, Mass. 1868 1903 

Potter, William Frank Beach Street, Revere, Mass. 1868 

Powell, Frank Abram Box 562, Helena, Mont 1889 1906 

Powers, Jesse Daniel Orlando ... 916 E. Mercer Street, Seattle, Wash. . . 1897 1908 

Pratt, Frank Wright 1602 Fourteenth Street, West, Calgary, 

Alberta, Canada 1891 1908 

(Field Secretary of the American Unitarian Association and the British and 
Foreign Unitarian Association for Northwestern Canada.) 
Pratt, George Franklin 14 King Street, Dorchester Center* Mass. 

(Christ Church) 1881 1904 

Pratt, William Austin ....... Cedar Rapids, la. (Universalist Society) 1879 i9^ 

Prescott, Elvin James ...... Sanford, Maine 1890 1910 

Preston, Frederick 154 A Hicks Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. . • . i^ 

Puffer, Joseph Adams Needham, Mass 1906 1906 

Pulsford, William Hanson .... 1174 East 57th Street, Chicago, IlL (First 

Unitarian Society) 1883 ipoi 

Quimby, Israel Paul 65 Tremont Street, Maiden, Mass. • . • 1879 

Quinby, John William Box 68, East Bridgewater, Mass. .... 1871 

Ramsay, Robert Ewart 2104 Grand Avenue, Davenport, la. • • . 1903 1907 

Ramsay, William Henry Wellesley Hills, Mass 1886 1910 

Reccord, Augustus Phineas .... 207 State Street, Springfield, Mass. . . . 1895 1905 

Reeby, William Henry 147 Congress Street, Milford, Mass. • . • 1878 

Reed, Qarence Palo Alto, Cal 1897 1909 

Reed, George Hale 76 Common Street, Belmont, Mass. . . . 1902 1902 

Reed, Willard 26 Walker Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . . 1898 

Reid, John Dumont 656 Portland Avenue, St Paul, Minn. . . 1888 1908 

Rice, George Damon Fort Sheridan, IlL 1899 ^9^^ 

(Chaplain United States Army.) 

Rice, Heber Redlands, Cal 1887 190S 

Rich, Adoniram Judson Dighton, Mass. 1864 1899 

Rihbany, Abraham Mitrie 4 Ashland Place, Toledo, Ohio 1900 1902 

Robinson, Alson Haven 35 Pleasant Street, Newton Center, Mass. 1905 1909 

Robinson, John Lunsford Barneveld, N. Y. 1883 1910 

Robinson, Perley Joseph Littleton, N. H 1882 1907 

Rossbach, Adolph 7 Church Street, Belfast, Me 1901 1907 

Rowlett, John Weslqr, D.D 186 East Pine Street, Atlanta, Ga. • . . . 1908 1909 



Digitized by 



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57 
Name Address Ordained Settled 

Roys, Cyrus Austin Uxbridge, Mass 1879 1893 

Rumball, Edwin Alfred 1056 South Avenue, Rochester, N. Y. . . 1903 1908 

Russell, Charles Frank Weston, Mass 1882 1882 

Rutledgc Lyman Vincent .... Billerica, Mass. 1910 i9io 

Safford, Mary Augusta 696 19th Street, Des Moines, la 1880 1899 

St John, Charles Elliott 32 South 21st Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 1883 1908 

(First Unitarian Church) 

Sallaway, James Bedford, Mass » . . 1863 

Sanders, George Dana 50 Pleasant Street, Waterville, Mc . . . 1885 1905 

Sargent, Arthur Hayes Eugene, Ore 1910 1910 

Saunderson, Henry Hallam .... 47 Lee Street, Cambridge, Mass. .... 1898 1903 

Savage, John Arthur R. D. i, Plainfield, N. J. (Society in Mcd- 

field, Mass.) 1870 1892 

Savage, Maxwell Louisville, Ky 1903 1910 

Savage, Minot Judson, D.D. .... 1867 Crawford Road, Qeveland, O. . . . 1864 

Savage, Robert Wellesley Highland Springs, Va. 1881 1908 

Schermerhom, Martin Kellogg . . 12 Hanscom Avenue, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 1867 

Schneider, Otto Emanuel 50 Foxall Street, Ridgewood, Brooklyn, 

N. Y 1906 

Scott, Alva Roy 128 Cumberland Street, Bangor, Me. . . . 1891 190S 

Scott, John Milton 1881 

Seaton, Joseph Marion Hubbardston, Mass. 189S 1899 

Seaver, Nathanael Scituate, Mass 1865 

Sccrist, Henry Thomas 953 South Main Street, Meadville, Pa. . . 1891 1910 

Seward, Josiah Lafayette, D.D. . . 47 Emerald Street, Keene, N. H. (Society 

in Dublin) 1874 i9oa 

Sheafe, Joseph Pease Harvard, Mass 1874 

Shippen, Eugene Rodman 926 Cass Avenue, Detroit, Mich. .... 1892 1910 

Shippen, Rush Rhees 295 Ash Street, Brockton, Mass 1849 

Shrout, Oliver Porter 160 North Third Street, San Jos^, Cal. . 1889 1909 

ShurtleflF, Alfred Dewey Keegan . 422 Meridian Street, East Boston, Mass. . 1898 1907 

Simonds, William Day 14th and Castro Streets, Oakland, CaL . . 1885 1908 

Simons, Minot 1867 Crawford Road, Cleveland, Ohio . . 189S 1900 

Skerrye, William Frederick .... Templeton, Mass 1896 1907 

Slicer, Thomas Roberts 156 E. 38th Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Church of All Souls) 1871 1897 

Slocombe, Edwin Mitchell .... 49 Western Avenue, Augusta, Mc . . . 1907 ^907 

Smith, Ernest Charles 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111 1888 1909 

(Secretary of the Western Unitarian Conference.) 

Smith, Frederic William Peterboro, N. H 1900 

Smith, Henry (xoodwin 16 Columbus Avenue, Northampton, Mass. 1886 1909 



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Name Address Ordained Settled 

Smith, John Stilman 42 Wren Street, West Roxbury, Mass. . . 1861 

Smith, Walter Delos 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. .... 1905 

Snow, Sydney Bruce 21 Merrimack Street, Concord, N. H. . . 1906 1910 

Snyder, Charles Edward 715 Liberty Street, Franklin, Pa. ... . 1908 1908 

Snyder, John Nantucket, Mass 1870 1909 

Solmundsson, Johann Pjetur , • . Gimli, Manitoba, Can 1903 1903 

Somers, Amos Newton R. D. 2, Westboro', Mass 1886 

Southworth, Franklin Chester . . . Meadville, Pa. 1892 1902 

(President of the Meadville Theological School.) 

Spalding, Samuel Charles 542 W. 159th Street, New York City . . . 1903 

Spaulding, Henry George 1470 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. . . 1868 

Spence, Albert Hague, Jr.. Box 32, Medfield, Mass. 1900 1908 

Spence, Joseph M: A Hinsdale, 111 1892 1908 

Spencer, Edward Glen faun • . . . Woodland, Cal 1893 IW 

Spencer, William Henry 135 East 15th Street, New York, N. Y. . 1869 

Sprague, George L. Dunkirk, N. Y 1902 

Spurr, George Browning Box 93, Petersham, Mass 1907 1907 

Staples, Charles Jason 21 Williams Street, Burlington, Vt . . . 1882 1904 

Stebbins. Calvin Framingham, Mass 1865 

Stebbins, Roderick 96 Morton Road, Milton, Mass 1886 1886 

Stevens, Henry Davis Sterling, Mass 1889 1905 

Stewart, Samuel Barrett Ballston, Spa, N. Y. (pastor emeritus, So- 
ciety in Lynn, Mass.) 1863 1865 

Stone, George Whitefield 137 Hig^ Street, Santa Cruz, C:aL . . • . 1898 1908 

Stowell, George Leverett Lexington, Mass 1877 

Sturtevant, Francis Raymond ... 12 Willis Street, Dorchester, Mass.(Chan- 

ning Church) 1906 1906 

Sunderland, Jabez Thomas .... 65 Oxford Street, Hartford, Conn. , . . 1870 1906 

Sutton, Silas Wright Ellsworth, Me. 1875 



Taylor, Felix 36 Hess Street, S., Hamilton, Ont., Can. . 1887 1910 

Taylor, Walter Alexander 4 Chandler Street, Jamestown, N. Y. . . 1895 1900 

Thacher, Francis Storer 19 Brewster Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . 1875 

Thacher, Philip Slaney Jamacha, San Diego Co., Cal 1877 

Thayer, (jeorge Augustine, D.D. . . 304 Oak Street, Mt. Auburn, Cincinnati, 

Ohio 1869 1882 

Thompson, Qarence Bertrand ... 3 Dana Street, Cambridge, Mass 1906 

Thompson, George Linnaeus ... 88 Bowman Street, Laconia, N. H. ... 1897 1910 

Tischer, Richard Ferdinand .... Homestead, Pa 1909 190) 

Tomlin, Clement Ernest ..... 63 Union Street, Gardner, Mass. .... 1893 IW 

Towle, Edward David Hillsboro, N. H 1876 

Towne, Edward C Westboro, Mass i860 



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Name Address Ordained Settled 

Townscnd, James Graham, D.D. . . Jamestown, N. Y. (Society in Warren, 

Pa.) 1867 1997 

Townsend, Manley Bacon Sioux City, la. 1892 1908 

Treworgy, Everett Somes .... Gouvemeur, N. Y 1905 

Troop, George William Hill ... 254 Elgin Street, Ottawa, Can 1905 1910 

Tuppcr, Nathan Wells 526 N. Elmwood Avenue, Oak Park, IlL . 1907 

Utter, David, D.D 1330 Elizabeth Street, Denver, Col. . . . 1871 1896 

Vail, Albert Ross 1109 W. California Avenue, Urbana, 111. . 1907 1907 

Van Ness, Thomas 3 Garrison Road, Brookline, Mass. (Sec- 
ond Church, Boston) 1884 ^^3 

Van Ommeren, Hendrik 217 Washington Avenue, Mt Pleasant, 

Mich 1886 190S 

Van Sluyters, Bernard Antony . • . Grand Rapids, Mich. (Holland Unitarian 

Church) 1894 1900 

Vrooman, William Albert 147 Furby Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, 

Can 1892 1910 

W^albridge, William Henry .... Milford, N. H. 1874 

Walker. Alfred Marshall Sheffield, 111 1903 1906 

Walsh, William Lx>rison Brookfield, Mass 1893 1893 

Ward, Duren James Henderson, 2442 Glenarm Place, Denver, Col 1879 

Ph.D 

Watry, Francis Santa Ana, Cal 1880 1904 

Watson, Elijah Roberts 3504 A Street, San Diego, Cal 1883 

Weatherly, Arthur L. 1784 South 2Sth Street, Lincoln, Neb. . . 1893 1908 

Weatherly, Samuel C Rockland, Mass 1907 1910 

Weeks, Joseph Hatton Houlton, Maine 1873 

Weil, Fred Alban Box 465, Bellingham, Wash 1904 1907 

Weld, Charles Richmond, LL.D. . . 119 West Franklin Street, Baltimore, Md. 1873 1873 

Wellman, Charles Phelps Humboldt, la. 1903 1907 

Wells, Andrew Jackson 621 OTarrell Street, San Francisco, Cal. 1869 

Wells, John Doane 27 Everett Street, Cambridge, Mass. . . . i860 

Wendte, Charles William, D.D. . . 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass 1869 

(Secretary of the Department of Foreign Relations of the American Uni- 
tarian Association.) 

West, James Harcourt 93 Milton Avenue, Dorchester (Boston), 

Mass 1883 

Westall, Henry Addison 7 Pemberton Square, Boston, Mass. . . . 1881 

Weston, Harry Augustus Randolph, Mass 1905 1908 

Westwood, Horace 321 Kensington Avenue Youngstown, O. . 1906 1910 

White, Albert Corydon Clintonville, Ohio 1880 



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Name Address Ordained Settled 

White, William Orne 222 High Street, Brookline, Mass 1848 

Whitman, Henry Arthur 1524 Plain Street, Columbia, S. C . . . . 1878 

Whitmore, James Herman • . • • 330 Main Street, Stoneham, Mass. • . . 1869 

Whitney, Arthur Bryant 374 Main Street, Saco, Me 1902 1907 

Whitney, Herbert Y. M. C A., Elizabeth, N. J 1873 

Whitney, Mrs. Mary TraflFam . . . Rochester, Vt 1887 

Wicks, Frank Scott Corey 17 East Michigan Street, Indianapolis, 

Ind 1894 1905 

Wiers, Edgar Swan The Mountain House, Montdair, N. J. . 1900 1906 

Wilbur, Earl Morse 81 Hillcrest Road, Berkeley, CaL .... 1892 1904 

(Dean of the Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry and Field Secre- 
tary of the American Unitarian Association for the Pacific Department) 
Wilkie, William Daniel 259 Crescent Street, Athol, Mass. (Second 

Unitarian Society) 1894 1910 

Willard, William Augustus Putnam 2277 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, 

Mass 1869 

Williams, Francis Charles 278 Walnut Street, Brookline, Mass. . . • 1850 

Williams Theodore Chidcering . . 99 Mt Vernon Street, Boston, Mass. . . . 1882 

Wilson, Alfred J 130 Third Street, Newburgh, N. Y. . . . 1903 1909 

Wilson, Arthur Edward Northfield, Mass. 1898 1910 

Wilson, Daniel Munro Kennebunk, Me. 1872 1909 

Wilson, John Mills • • • Lexington, Mass 1891 1905 

Wilson, Lewis Gilbert 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 1883 1907 

(Secretary of the American Unitarian Association.) 

Winkley, Jonathan Wingate .... 331 Massachusetts Arenue, Boston, Mass. 1876 
Winkley, Samuel Hobart • . • • • 11 Louisburg Square, Boston, Mass. (Bul- 

finch Place Church) 1846 1846 

Winn, Arthur Harmon 186 Second Avenue, Troy, N. Y. . . , . 1897 1902 

Withington, George Gardner . . . North Easton, Mass 1855 

Wood, William Augustus West Upton, Mass 1896 1909 

Woolley, Mrs. Celia Parker .... 3032 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 111. . . . 1894 
(President of the Frederick Douglass Center.) 

Woude, Henry H Poughkecpsic, N. Y 1880 

Wright, George Charles 33 Fairview St, Lowdl, Mass. (Free 

Church) 1884 1886 

Wright, James Edward, D.D. ... 19 Baldwin Street, Montpdier, Vt . . . . 1866 1869 
Wright, Merle St Croix, D.D. . • 215 West 126th Street, New York, N. Y. 

(Lenox Avenue Church) 1887 1887 

Wsrman, Abram North Easton, Mass 1894 1905 

Young, George Henry • Guild Road, Dedham, Mass. 1866 

Zastrou, Gustav Henry Derby, Conn ; 1910 1910 



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AMERICAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS. 
1910-1911 

|9re«ileBt. 
Rev. SAMUEL A. ELIOT, D.D. 

eicr*Prtfiliattt. 
Hon. WALLACE HACKETT, of Portsmouth, N. H. 
Hon. EBEN S. DRAPER, LL.D., of Hopedale, Mass. 
Miss EMMA C. LOW, of Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hon. DUNCAN U. FLETCHER, of Jacksonville, Fla. 
CHARLES W. AMES, Esq., of St. Paul, Minn. 
Hon. PARIS GIBSON, of Great Falls, Mont. 
Hon. HORACE DAVIS, LL.D., of San Francisco, CaL 
Hon. G. W. STEPHENS, of Montreal, Canada. 

ftecntarp. 
Rev. lewis G. WILSON. 

^trittiM ftetrttarp, Cmeritvc. 
GEORGE W. FOX, Esq. 

9Mi0t«U ftttretat;. 
F. STANLEY HOWE, Cambridge, Mass. 

Creacitrtr. 
FRANCIS H. LINCOLN, Esq. 



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Term expires May, 191 1. 

Rev. Wilson M. Backus Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Paul R. Frothingham Boston, Mass. 

Mrs. Prescott Keyes Concord, Mass. 

Henry B. Little, Esq Newburyport, Mass. 

Hon. John D. Long, LL.D Hingham, Mass. 

President Franklin C. Southworth Meadville, Pa. 

Term expires May, 1912. 

Percy A. Atherton, Esq Boston, Mass. 

Clarence E. Carr, Esq Andover, N. H. 

Hon. George Hutchinson West Newton, Mass. 

Mrs. John W. Loud Montreal, Canada 

William P. Olds, Esq Portland, Ore. 

Rev. Augustus P. Reccord Springfield, Mass. 

Term expires May, 1913. 

Mrs. J. Randolph Coolidge, Jr Boston, Mass. 

Hon. Leslie C. Cornish, LL.D Augusta, Me. 

Eleazer B. Homer, Esq Providence, R. L 

Charles A. Murdock, Esq San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. Ulysses G. B. Pierce Washington, D. C. 

Henry M. Williams, Esq Cambridge, Mass. 

Fimincf. — Messrs. Hutchinson, Lincoln, LrrrLE, Long, and Williams. 
Publication.-^ Messrs. Frothingham, Murdock, Pierce, Reccord, and Mrs. 

Keyes. 
New England. — Messrs. Carr, Cornish, Homer, LrrrLE, and Mrs. Keyes. 
Middle. — Messrs. Carr, Hutchinson, Pierce, Southworth, and Mrs. Loua 
Southern. — Messrs. Backus, Homer, Wiluams, Mrs. Coolidge, and Mrs. Loud. 
Western. — Messrs. Backus, Little, Olds, Southworth, and Wiluams. 
Rocky Mountain. — Messrs. Atherton, Carr, Long, Murdock, and Olds. 
Paci/ic. — Messrs. Murdock, Olds, Pierce, Reccord, and Mrs. Coolidge. 



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Canadian Northwest. — Messrs. Backus, Murdock, Olds, Southworth, and 
Mrs. Loud. 

Foreign. — Messrs. Cornish, Long, Murdock, Southworth, and Mrs. Keyes. 
Education. — Messrs. Atherton, Backus, Frothingham, Homer, and South- 
worth. 

Comity and Fellowship. — Messrs. Homer, Long, Pierce, Reccord, and Mrs. 

CdOUDGE. 

New Americans. — Messrs. Backus, G>rnisb, Reccord, Southworth, and Mrs. 

Loud. 
Publicity, — Messrs. Atherton, Frothingham, LrrrLE, Murdock, and Mrs. 

Keyes. 
Social and Public Service. — Messrs. Carr, Cornish, Hutchinson, Williams, 

and Mrs. Coolidge. 
Executive. — Messrs. Atherton, Carr, Hutchinson, Lincoln, and Williams. 
Church Building Loan Fund. — Messrs. Lincoln, Hutchinson, and Williams. 
Ministerial Aid Fund. — Messrs. Eliot, Lincoln, and Frothingham. 



EXECUTIVE STAFF. 

President, Rev. Samuel Eliot, D.D. ; Secretary, Rev. Lewis G. Wilson; 
Treasurer, Francis H. Lincoln; Assistant Secretary, Emeritus, George W. 
Fox; Assistant Secretary, F. Stanley Howe; Secretary of the Department 
of Foreign Relations, Rev. Charles W. Wendte, D.D; Secretary of the 
Department of Social and Public Service, Rev. Elmer S. Forbes ; Secretary 
of the Department of Education, Rev. Henry W. Foote ; Field Secretary for 
New England, Rev. Wiluam Channing Brown; Superintendent for the 
Middle States and Canada, Rev. George H. Badger!; Field Secretary for 
the Pacific States, Rev. Earl M. Wilbur; Field Secretary for Canada, Rev. 
Frank W. Pratt; Auditors, William P. Fowler*; Walter S. Fox*; 
Publication Agent, C. L. Stebbins; Librarian, Louis C Cornish.* 

%o0t(m Office. 

25 Beacon Street. 

President's Secretary, Miss Helen F. Pettes; Treasurer's Clerk, Miss Flora 
L. Close; Reception Room Clerk, Miss Edwina H. Jewett; Stenographers, 
Miss Henrietta S. Rogers, Mrs. Alice B. Hatheway, Miss M. Louise 
Paon, Miss Marie W. Johnson, Miss Mary L. Bucknam; Telephone 
Clerk, Miss Elizabeth De Ferari; Shipping and Billing Clerk, J. Henry 
Sonntag; Assistant Shipper, Thomas J. Crowne; Engineer and Janitor, 
Washington Mills; Assistant Janitor, Wendell P. Smith. 

(For officers in charge of Unitarian Book-room, see page iio.) 



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ALUED HEADQUARTERS 

175 Dearborn Street. 
Clerk of Book-room and Stenographer, Miss Lin a Scheible.|I 

104 East 20th Street. 
Clerk of Book-room and Stenographer, Miss Florence M. Bischoff. 

ftaft SxwmUm* 

376 Sutter Street. 
Clerk of Book-room, Mrs. Mary B. Presson. 



t One-half salary from Middle States Gjnference. ♦Without stipend 
II Salary paid by Unitarian Sunday-School Society and Western Conference. 



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AMERICAN UNITARIAN ASSOCIATION 

The American Unitarian Association was formally organ- 
History, ized on May 25, 1825. Before the year 1825 there existed 

in Boston a club of some twenty liberal-minded and public- 
spirited citizens organized for social and philanthropic purposes. This 
club was in the habit of meeting fortnightly for the discussion of sub- 
jects relating to religion, morals, and civic order. At a meeting held in 
January, 1825, at the residence of Hon. Josiah Quincy, a discussion 
arose concerning the advisability of forming an association to publish 
books and tracts setting forth the opinions and principles of the liberal 
party in the Congfregational churches. On motion of Andrews Norton 
a committee of the club was appointed to consider the expediency of 
forming such an association. This committee reported at a meeting 
held in the vestry of the Federal Street Church on Jan. 27, 1825. 
There were present at the meeting Dr. Channing, Henry Ware, An- 
drews Norton, Joseph May, Charles Lowell, Charles G. Loring, John 
G. Palfrey, James Walker, Robert Rantoul, Richard Sullivan, George 
Bond, Josiah Quincy, Joseph Tuckerman, Robert Waterston, Samuel 
A. Eliot, Jared Sparks, John Pierpont, David Reed, Aaron Bancroft, 
James Freeman, Joseph Story, Leverett Saltonstall, and Stephen Hig- 
ginson, with others prominent in the intellectual and social life of the 
city. These were men of conservative habit, and wont to lay more 
stress upcm the virtues of breadth of mind, moderation, integrity, hos- 
pitality and generosity than upon doctrinal accuracy. They were not 
men who cared to try hazardous experiments, but they believed that 
the time had arrived for the organization of the liberal forces of the 
New England churches. The object of the proposed association was 
declared to be " to promote the growth of Christian truth and Christian 
charity, and the increase of religion in the land." 

The proposal of the Qub to organize a Unitarian Association was 
brought before the ministers of the Berry Street Conference on the 
morning of May 25, 1825. The Conference did not think it proper to 
take any action on the subject, but notice was given that a meeting of 



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gentlemen would be held for the consideration of the proposition in the 
vestry of the Federal Street Church at four o'clock in the afternoon. 
Rev. Henry Ware, D.D., was chosen moderator at this meeting; and 
after discussion it was voted " that it is expedient to form a new society 
to be called the American Unitarian Association." Rev. James Walker, 
Rev. Ezra S. Gannett, and Mr. Louis Tappan were appointed a com- 
mittee to carry the preceding vote into effect. On the following morn- 
ing, at a meeting of which Rev. Nathaniel Thayer, D.D., was moderator, 
this committee reported a constitution which, with slight modifications, 
is still in force. The object of this Association was by this constitution 
declared to be " to diffuse the knowledge and promote the interest of 
pure Christianity." Dr. Channing was elected president, Rev. Ezra 
S. Gannett, secretary, and Mr. Louis Tappan, treasurer. The vice- 
presidents were Joseph Story, of Salem, Joseph Lyman, of Northamp- 
ton, Stephen Longfellow, of Portland, and six others; while James 
Walker, Henry Ware, Jr., and Samuel Barrett were chosen an execu- 
tive committee. Dr. Channing was obliged by ill-health to decline to 
serve; and .Dr. Aaron Bancroft, of Worcester, was chosen president 
in his place. The Association thus organized has ever since been the 
executive arm of the Unitarian body. It was incorporated in 1847, ^tnd 
made a delegate body in 1885. 

The objects of the Association as defined in the origi- 
Purpose. nal report of the Committee on Organization are as fol- 
lows : — 

First. — To collect and diffuse information respecting the state of 
Unitarian Christianity in our country. 

Second. — To produce union, sympathy, and co-operation among 
Liberal Christians. 

Third. — To publish and distribute books and tracts, inculcating cor- 
rect views of religion, in such form and at such price as shall afford 
all an opportunity of being acquainted with Christian truth. 

Fourth. — To supply missionaries, especially in such parts of our 
country as are destitute of a stated ministry. 

Fifth. — To adopt whatever other measures may hereafter seem ex- 
pedient, such as contributions in behalf of clergymen with insufficient 
salaries or in aid of building churches. 



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Govemxxient. The Association is governed by the following By- 
laws : — 

Article I. The object of the American Unitarian Association shall 
be to diffuse the knowledge and promote the interests of pure Chris- 
tianity ; and all Unitarian Christians shall be invited to unite and co- 
operate with it for that purpose. 

Art. II. A subscription of fifty dollars shall constitute a person a 
member of this Association for life. 

Art. hi. Those contributing to the funds of this Association shall 
be entitled to representation under the following conditions, namely : — 

Any church or missionary association, of at least two years' stand- 
ing, not being in arrears of debt to the American Unitarian Association 
or the Church Building Loan Fund, shall, upon sending a contribution 
for missionary uses to the Treasurer of the Association for two succes- 
sive years, be entitled to representation at all business meetings of the 
Association by the persons or its minister or president and two 
additional lay delegates; provided that such contributions shall be 
placed in the hands of the officers of the Association on or before 
May I, to entitle a church to be represented in the following annual 
meeting. 

Art. IV. The Board of Directors may by a unanimous vote at a 
regular meeting, two-thirds of their number being present, elect Honor- 
ary Members of this Association who shall have the same rights and 
privileges as other members. Such elections shall be by ballot, and 
nominations shall He over at least one month. 

Art. V. The officers shall be a President, eight Vice-Presidents, — 
one of whom at the time of his election shall be from Northern New 
England, one from Southern New England, one from the Middle 
States, one from the Southern States, one from the Central West, one 
from the Rocky Mountain States, one from the Pacific Coast, and one 
from the Dominion of Canada, — a Secretary and one or more Assistant 
Secretaries, a Treasurer, and eighteen other persons, who, with them, 
shall constitute a Board of Directors. These officers, of whom sixteen 
shall be laymen, shall be chosen by ballot at the annual meeting. The 
President, Vice-Presidents, Secretaries, and Treasurer shall be chosen 
annually, to serve for one year or until their successors shall be chosen. 
The eighteen other persons, of whom three shall be women, shall be 
chosen for three years or until their successors shall be chosen; and 
one-third shall be chosen annually. 

Art. VI. This Board shall meet at least once in three months, eight 
constituting a quorum, and shall have charge of all the business and 
interests of the Association, the direction of its funds and operations, 



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with power to fill any vacancies that may occur in their number be- 
tween any two annual meetings and to call special meetings of the Cor- 
poration whenever they shall deem it necessary or expedient. 

They may choose from their own number an Executive Committee, 
which shall meet at the call of the President or Secretary, and shall 
have charge of such business as may be intrusted to it by the Board 
of Directors. 

Art. VII. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep a full record 
of the meetings of the Corporation and of the Board of Directors ; to 
conduct the correspondence of the Association, and to keep an accurately 
arranged file of the same; and, in general, to perform such services, 
to suggest, devise, and execute, under the direction of the Board of 
Directors, such plans and measures as shall, in their judgment, tend to 
promote the objects of the Association, increase its usefulness, and en- 
large the sphere of its influence; and the Assistant Secretaries shall 
render such service as shall be specified by the Board of Directors. The 
salaries of the Secretaries shall be determined annually by the Board 
of Directors, the Secretaries not voting. 

Art. VIII. The annual meeting of the Association shall be held in 
the month of May, at such time and place as the Board of Directors 
may appoint, of which due notice shall be pven, by circulars to the 
churches and by advertisement in two or more newspapers published 
in Boston at least ten days previous. 

Art. IX. Any amendment of these articles proposed at one annual 
meeting may be adopted at the next, if a majority of the members 
present vote in favor of it. 

In practice the Board of Directors meets on the second Tuesday of 
every month except July and August. 

The Association at its national headquarters, 25 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass., furnishes office room, without rent, to the Unitarian 
Sunday-School Society, the National Alliance of Unitarian Women, the 
Unitarian Temperance Society, the Young People's Religious Union, 
the Committee on the Supply of Pulpits, and other dencwninational and 
benevolent societies. 

The building also contains a Reception Room, a Library and Read- 
ing-room, Channing Hall, with seats for three hundred, and Committee 
Rooms of various sizes. The Hall and Committee Rooms are at the 
service of Unitarians for denominational meetings of all kinds, arrange- 
ments for such use to be made with the Assistant Secretary. 



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The Association is the chief executive arm of the 
Administration. Unitarian churches. It works in close co-operation 
with the National Conference and other denomina- 
tional organizations, and it accepts the platform of the National Con- 
ference as a declaration of its own spirit and purpose. 

The Association is a representative body. It is the expression of 
the working purposes and hopes of its constituents. It has no power 
beyond that which is derived from the support and co-operation of the 
churches. 

The Association is thoroughly national in its spirit and missionary 
endeavor. The governing board represents all parts of the country. 

The work of the Association is supported by the voluntary contribu- 
tions of the churches and individuals interested in the cause it repre- 
sents. The income of the unrestricted endowment suffices to pay all 
the expenses of administration. 

The work of the Association is carried on in twelve de- 
Departments, partments under the direction of the Standing Com- 
mittees of the Board of Directors. 

The Committee on Finance, in co-operation with the Treas- 
FiNANCE. urer, has charge of the property of the Association. The 

members of the Committee by their advice assist the 
Treasurer in his investments and in the conduct of the business side 
of the corporation as distinguished from missionary endeavors. The 
Committee considers and reports to the Board on matters relating 
to the financial conditions, requirements, and prospects of the As- 
sociation. 

The Committee on Publications has charge of all mat- 
PUBLiCATioN. ters relating to the printing and distribution of books 
and tracts intended for free distribution, and exercises 
a general supervision over the affairs of the Publication Department. 
The list of publications of the Association and of the free tracts will 
be sent upon application to the Publication Agent. The Association 
distributes about 450,000 tracts annually together with 45,000 copies of 
the monthly bulletin Word and Work, 13,000 copies of the Annual Re- 
port, and 3,000 copies of the Unitarian Year Book. Channing's Works 



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are given away to settled ministers and theological students who apply 
for them. The publications of the Association and all religious works 
by Unitarian writers may be obtained at the Book-rooms in Boston, 
New York, Chicago, and San Francisco. 

The Publicity Department has for its special work the 
PUBUCITY. diffusion of Unitarian principles through the medium of 
^ the public press. It co-operates with ministers and 
churches in carrying out plans of local publicity work. It conducts 
and publishes the Unitarian Calendar. It seeks in all ways to reach 
the larger audience and to get a wider hearing for the Unitarian gospel 
This department has charge of the relations of 
FOREIGN RELATIONS, the American Unitarian churches with religious 
liberals in all parts of the world. With the in- 
come of the Hayward Fund it aids the Japan Unitarian Association 
and the work of the Hungarian Unitarian churches. It co-operates 
with the International Council of Liberal Religious Thinkers and 
Workers and provides for the administrative expenses of the 
Council. 

This department has jurisdiction over matters connected 
COMITY AND with the interdenominational interests of the Association. 
FELLOWSHIP. It co-operates with the State Federations of Churches in 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and New 
York, and is represented as often as possible by fraternal delegates at 
the official conventions of other Christian communions. It seeks to sub- 
stitute co-operative for competitive methods in Christian work and to 
carry out the purpose of the Association to foster union and sympathy 
among Liberal Christians. 

The Committee on Education deals with matters con- 
EDUCATiON. nected with the preparation of young men for the ministry, 

and the increase of efficient ministers in the denomination. 
It administers the income of the Perkins Fellowship Fund, the Billings 
Lectureship Fund, and the Frothingham Fund for schools for the col- 
ored people in the South. It aids in the work of the churches established 
at academic centres and at the seats of the leading State universities. It 
encourages the maintenance of non-sectarian schools for boys and girls, 
and administers endowments for such purposes. 



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This department represents the work under the 
CHURCH EXTENSION, care of the Committees on New England States, 
Middle States and Canada, Southern States, 
Western States, Rocky Mountain States, Pacific States, and Canadian 
Northwest, and has jurisdiction in all matters relating to the organiza- 
tion and assistance of churches and the opening of new fields of mis- 
sionary labor. 

More than one-half of all the existing Unitarian churches owe their 
being to the work of the Association, and nearly all Unitarian churches 
have at one time or another known the fostering care of the national 
organization. At present the Association aids in supporting over one 
hundred churches and missions as centres of Unitarian thought and 
influence. 

In making appropriations, the conunittees of the directors of the As- 
sociation have the systematic advice of the officers of all local confer- 
ences, and particularly of four special boards which meet annually 
before the meetings of the directors at which appropriations are to be 
made, or oftener if there be special need of their counsel. These special 
boards are : — 

1. The New England Missionary Council, which meets in Boston and 
which consists of the presidents and secretaries of the local conferences 
in New England, together with the officers of the Association and the 
field secretary for New England. 

2. The directors of the Unitarian Conference of the Middle States 
and Canada. 

3. The Southern Missionary Council, which consists of duly elected 
del^^ates from the States comprised in the Southern Conference and 
the President, Secretary, or other representative of the Association. 

4. The Western Missionary Council, which consists of duly elected 
del^;ates from all State or local conferences within the territory of the 
Western Conference, the secretary of the Western Conference, and an 
officer of the Association. 

The aim of this Department is to promote in our 
SOCIAL AND PUB- churches the study of social problems ; to encourage 
Lie SERVICE. them to undertake positive and definite works which 

will contribute to their solution; and to cultivate 



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closer and more s)rmpathetic relations between the churches and the 
wage earners. It serves as a bureau of information on social subjects. 
It maintains a library for the use of those who are interested in social 
questions. It publishes a monthly bulletin designed chiefly to give a 
more general circulation to articles having social value which otherwise 
may not be easy accessible. It affiliates with social and philanthropic 
movements, and strives to interpret them to the churches. 

The Committee on New Americans cares for mat- 
NEW AMERICANS, ters Connected with missionary work and the estab- 
lishment of churches among Americans of foreign 
birth or speech, and particularly aids in the work of the Norw^an, 
Swedish, and Icelandic Unitarian churches in the North-western States. 
The Committee on Ministerial Aid administers the 
MINISTERIAL AID. iucome of the Ministerial Aid Fund and the Re- 
becca Bennett Warren Fund, and seeks to relieve 
the necessities of poor and worthy ministers and the widows of ministers. 
The Library of the Association, housed in the building at 
LIBRARY. 25 Beacon Street, aims to maintain a complete collection of 
books and pamphlets written by Unitarians or concerned 
with Unitarian activities and history. 

The Committee on the Church Building Loan Fund 
CHURCH BUILDING administers a fund amounting to $148,675.38 for 
LOAN FUND. the purposc of aiding Unitarian societies in the 

erection of church buildings. The fund is admin- 
istered under the following rules: 

1. The Church Building Loan Fund shall be kept as a separate fund, 
and shall be administered by a standing committee of the board of di- 
rectors, consisting of the treasurer and two other directors appointed by 
him annually at the June meeting of the board, and who shall serve for 
one year and until their successors are appointed. No executive oflBcer 
of the board other than the vice-presidents shall be eligible to such 
appointment. 

2. No money from the fund shall be bestowed as a gift, and all loans 
shall be made on security satisfactory to the committee. 

3. Every application for a loan shall be submitted by the treasurer, 
before action thereon, to the president and to the secretary of the 
Association for the purpose of securing to the committee information 
and suggestions from them upon the application. 



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4. Loans from the fund and changes in the terms thereof shall be 
made only by the unanimous vote of the conmiittee upon such terms 
and conditions as it determines. 

5. Not more than half the whole value of the building and the land 
on which it stands shall be loaned from this fund ; nor shall any loan be 
made unless it suffices to clear the property of all other indebtedness. 

6. Loans not exceeding $10,000 may be made from this fund, with 
or without interest, as shall be determined in each case ; but, in every 
case, provision shall be made for the annual repayment of not less than 
ten per cent, of the sirni loaned, and interest may be charged at a rate 
not exceeding six per cent, per annum on such portion as may be in 
default from the time it falls due until its payment. 

7. In return for every loan the committee shall take the note of the 
society, with such personal indorsement or guaranty thereof as it shall 
deem satisfactory, said note to be secured also by a mortgage on the 
church property. 

8. The committee shall report at each monthly meeting of the board 
of directors the loans made by it since the last prior meeting, with a 
brief statement of the terms of each loan, a statement of each loan re- 
jected by it and the reason therefor, and the condition of each loan in 
default. 

9. All votes of the board instructing the committee, or modifying or 
reversing its action, shall be taken by a yea and nay vote. 

All communications concerning loans should be addressed to Francis 
H. Lincoln, Treasurer, 53 State Street, Boston, Mass. 



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DELEGATE SOCIETIES. 



The following societies, having sent <^a contribution for missionary uses to the 
Treasurer of the Association for two successive years," are entitled to representation at 
all business meetings of the American Unitarian Association during the year : — 



Albany, N. Y. 
Amherst, Mass. 
Andovcr, N. H. 
Andover, North, Mass. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Arlington, Mass. 
Ashbv, Mass. 
Athol, Mass.: — 

Second Unitarian Society 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Augusta, Me. 
Ayer, Mass. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bangor, Me. 
Barnstable, Mass. 
Barre, Mass. 
Bath, N. H. 
Bedford, Mass. 
Belfast, Me. 
Beknont, Mass. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Berlin, Mass. 
Bemardston, Mass. 
Beverly, Mass. 
Billerica, Mass. 
Bolton, Mass. 
Boston, Mass.: — 

First Parish, Dorchester 

First Church 

First Religbus Society, Rozbury 

Second Church 

Song's Chapel 

First Parish, W. Roxbury 

New South Church 

Arlington Street Church 

First Parish, Brighton 

First Conditional Society, 
Jamaica Plam 

Third Religious Society, Dor- 
chester 

Hawes Unitarian Congi Church, 
South Boston 



Bulfinch Place Church 
South Cong'l Church 
Church of the Disdples 
Church of Our Father, East 

Boston 
; Christ Church, Dorchester 
All Souls' Church, Rozbury 
Church of the Unity, Neponset 
Unitarian Church, Roslindale 
Channing Church, Dorchester 

Braintree, Mass. 

Brattleboro, Vt. 

Brewster, Mass. 

Bridgewater, Mass. 

Bridgewater, East, Mass. 

Bridxewater, West, Mass. 

Brodkton, Mass. 

Brookfield, Mass. 

Brookline, Mass.: — 
First Parish 
Second Unitarian Society 

Brooklyn, Conn. 

Buffalo, N.Y.: — 
First Unitarian Congregational 
Sodety 

Burlin^n, Vt 

Cambndge, Mass.: — 
First Pansh 
Third Congi Society 

Canton, Mass. 

Carlisle, Mass. 

Castine, Me. 

Charieston, S. C. 

Chariestown, N. H. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Chicago, m.: — 
Unity Church 
All Souls' Church 
Swedish Unitarian Church 

Chioopee, Mass. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

Cleveland, Ohio 



Clinton, Mass. 

Cohasset, Mass. 

Cobrado Springs, Col. 

Concord, Mass. 

Concord, N. H. 

Dallas, Texas 

Danvers, Mass. 

Davei^)ort, la. 

Dedham, Mass. 

Deerfield, Mass, 

Denver, Col. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Dighton, Mass. 

Dover, Mass. 

Dover, N. H. 

Dublin, N.H. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Duxbury, Mass. 

Easton, Mass.: — 
Congregational Parish 
Sodety at North Easton 

Eastport, Me. 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Erie, Pa. 

Eureka, Cal. 

Everett, Wash. 

Exeter, N. H. 

Fairhaven, Mass. 

Fall River, Mass. 

Farmington, Me. 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

FitzwiUiam, N. H. 

Framingham, Mass. 

Franklm, N. H. . 

Franklin, Pa. 

Gardner, Mass. 

Geneseo, lU. 

Gloucester, Mass. 

Gouvemetu', N. Y. 

Grafton, Mass. 

GredejT, CoL 

Greenfield, Mass. 



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Groton, Mass. 
Hackctifflck, N. J. 
Han^a, Minn. 
Hartford, Conn. 
Harvard, Mass. 
Haverfaill, Mass. 
Helena, Mont. 
Highland Springs, Va. 
Hingham, Mass.: — 

First Parish 

Secx>nd Parish 

Third Cong^l Society 
H<^yoke, Mass. 
Hood Rnrer, Ore. 
Hopedale, Mass. 
Houiton, Me. 
Hubbardston, Mass. 
Hudson, Mass. 
Hyde Park, Mass. 
Indian^wtis, Ind. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Keene, N. H. 
Kenn^unk, Me. 
Kingston, Mass. 
Laconia, N. H. 
Lancaster, Mass. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Lawrence, Kan. 
Lawrence, Mass. 
Lebanon, N. H. 
Leominster, Mass. 
Lexington, Mass. 
Lexington, East, Mass. 
Linoom, Neb. 
Littleton, Mass. 
Littleton, N. H. 
Los Angeles, CaL 
Louisville, Ky. 
Lowell, Mass. 
Ljmn, Mass. 
Madison, Wis. 
Maiden, Mass. 
Manchester, Mass. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Marietta, Ohio. 
Marlboro, Mass. 
Marshfidd, Mass.: — 

Second Cong*l Society 

Grace Chapel 
Mcadville, Pa. 
Medfidd, Mass. 
Medford, Mass. 



Melrose, Mass. 
Middleboro, Mass. 
Middlesex, Vt. 
Milford, N. H. 
Milton, Mass. 
Milwaukee^ Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn.: — 

First Unitarian Church 

Free Christian Church 
Montague, Mass.: — 

First Unitarian Society 
Montdair, N. J. 
Montpdier, Vt. 
Montreal, Can. 
Morgantown, W. Va. 
Nantucket, Mass. 
Naples, Me. i. 
Nashua, N. H. 
Natick, Mass. 
Natick, South, Mass. 
Needham. Mass. 
New Bedford, Mass. 
Newburgh, N. Y. 
Newburyport, Mass. 
New London, Conn. 
New Orleans, La. 
Newport, R. I. 
Newton, Mass.:— ' 

Channing Religious Sodety 

Chestnut Hill Sodety 

Sodety at Newton Centre 

Sodety at West Newton 
NewYork,N. Y.: — 

Church of All Souls 

Church of the Messiah 

First Unitarian Sodety, Brook- 
lyn 

Second Unitarian Sodety,Brook- 
lyn 

Chtirch of the Redeemer, New 
Brighton 

Third Unitarian Sodety, Brook- 
lyn 

Fourth Unitarian Sodety,Brook- 
lyn 

First Unitarian Church, Flush- 
ing 

Unitarian Church, South Brook- 
lyn 
Northampton, Mass.: — 

Second Cong'l Church 

Sodety at Florence 
Northboro, Mass. 
Northfidd, Mass. 
Norton, Mass. 



Norwell. Mass. 
Oakland, CaL 
Ogden, Utah 
Orange, N. J. 
Ottawa, Can. 
Palo Alto, Cal. 
Passaic, N. J. 
Peabody, Mass. 
Pembroke, Mass. 
Pepperell, Mass. 
Peterboro, N. H. 
Petersham. Mass. 
Philade^hia, Pa.: — 

First Unitarian Church 

Unitarian Sodety of German- 
town 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Northside Unitarian Church 
Pittsfidd, Mass. 
Plainfidd, N. J. 
Plymouth, Mass. 
Portland, Me.: — 

First Pariah 
Portland, Ore. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
Providence, R. I.: — 

First Conga Church 

Westminster Cong'l Sodety 
Quincy, Mass.: — 

First Cong'l Sodety 

Wollaston Unitarian Sodety 
Randolph, Mass. 
Reading, Mass. 
Redlands, Cal. 
Richmond, Va. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Rowe, Mass. 
Rutherford, N. J. 
Saco, Me. 
St. Louis, Mo.: — 

Church of the Messiah 

Church of the Unity 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Salem, Mass.: — 

First Cong'l Sodety 

Second Church 

North Sodety 
Salem, Ore. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
San Diego, Cal. 
San Tos6, Cal. 
Sandwich, Mass. 
San Frandsco, Cal.: — 

First Unitarian Sodety 
SanU Ana, Cal. 



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Santa Barbara, Cal. 

SchenecUdy, N. Y. 

Sdtuate. Mass. 

ShdhyvniCjUL: — 
First Unitarian Church 
Jordan Unitarian Church 

Sherbom, Mass. 

Shirley. Mass. 

Sioux City, la. 

Somerville, Mass.: — 
First Cong*l Society 
Second Unitarian Society 

Spokane, Wash. 

Springfidd, Mass. 

Sterling, Mass. 

Stoneham, Mass. 

Stow, Mass. 

Sturbridge, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 

Sullivan, Me. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 

Taunton, Mass. 

Templeton, Mass. 

Toledo, Ohio 



Topeka, Kan. 
Toronto, Can. 
Trenton, N. Y. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Tyngsboro, Mass. 
Urbaiia,IlL 
Uzbridge, Mass. 
Vineyard Haven, Mass. 
Walpole, Mass. 
Walpole, N. H. 
Waltham, Mass. 
Ware, Mass. 
Warwick, Mass. 
Washington, D. C. 
Watertown, Mass. 
Waterville, Me. 
Waverlev, Mass. 
Wayland, Mass. 
Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
Westboro, Mass. 
Westford, Mass. 
Weston, Mass. 
Westwood, Mass. 
Wheeling, W. Va. 



Whitman, Mass. 

Wichita, Kan. 

Wilmington, Dd. 

WUton,N.H.:-- 
First Cong'l Church 
Liberal Christian Church 

Winchendon, Mass. 

Winchester, Bfass. 

Wmdsor, Vt 

Winnipeg, Can.: — 
First Icelandic Unitarian 
Church 

Winthrop, Mass. 

Wobum, Mass. 

Woodland, Cal. 

Worcester, Mass.: — 
Second Parish 
Church of the Unity 
South Unitarian Society 

Yarmouth, Me. 

Yonkers, N. Y. 

Youngstown, Ohio 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN UNITARIAN 

ASSOCIATION 

The By-Laws of the Association provide that " a subscription of $50 shall constitute a person a man- 
ber for life"; and the following named 2,496 persons now occupy that position, of whom 71 (those whose 
names are in Italics) have been added since the list was last printed in the Year Book for 19o9. Should 
any one find in the list the name of a person not living, a favor will be conferred by communicating 
the fact to the Secretary of the Association. 



Allen, Charles A. 
Ames, Charles C, D.D. 
Anderson, George S. 
Austin, J. Worriey 
Backus, Wilson M. 
Badger, George H. 
Bagley, Mrs. Blanche P. 
Bafiey, Alvin F. 
Bailey, Benjamin H. 
Baker, Seward 
Baltzly, John 
Barber, Henry H. 
Barker, John W. 
Barnes, William S. 



MINISTERS 

Batchelor, George 
Beach, Seth C, D.D. 
Beane, Samuel C, D.D. 
Beane, Samuel C, Jr. 
Beers, Wayland L. 
Bellows, Russell N. 
Billings, Charles T. 
Birks, AMred W. 
Bixby, James T., Ph.D. 
Blake, James Vila 
Blanchard, Henry, D.D. 
Bodge, George M. 
Bolles, Edwin C, D.D. 
Bowen, Duane V. 



Bowser,' Alexander T. 
Boynton, Richard W. 
Branigan, William H. 
Brooke, Stopford Wentworth 
Brooks, Arthur A. 
Brown, Alfred H. 
Brown, Howard N. 
Brown, Lincoln E. 
Brown, Thomas W. 
Brown, William C. 
Buck, Charies W. 
Buckshom, Louis H. 
Bulkdey, Benjamin R. 
Burton, William S. 



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Butler, EUenr C. 
Bygrave, Hiiary 
BvadX^ Herhtri L. 
CaUhiop, Samud R. 
Carpenter, Carlos C. 
Catlin, Basket D. 
Chaffin, William L. 
Chaii^, George L.^ 
Chase, Josq>h A. 
aark,Hobart 
Collier, H. Price 
Cdlyer, Robert 
Colman, Richard 
Cooke, George W. 
Coolkdge, James I. T., D.D. 
Cornish, Louis C. 
Cressey, George C, D.D. 
Cronvn, David 
Crooker, Joseph H., D.D. 
Crothers, Samuel M., D.D. 
Culp, Adam J. 
Cnmmings, Edward 
Cutter, George W. 
Day, Edwardf 
Day, John B. W. 
Day, John W. 
De Long, Henry C. 
De Normandie, James, D.D. 
Dinsmore, Edward F. 
Dole, Charles F., D J). 
Douthit, Jaq>er L. 
Drummond, Chester A. 
Duncan, James C. 
Dutton, Caleb S. S. 
Edls, James 
Elder, Charles B., D.D. 
EUot, Christopher R. 
Eliot, Samuel A., D.D. 
EBot, Thomas L., D.D. 
Farwell, Herbert C. 
Fenn, William W., D.D. 
Fish, William H. 
Foote, Henry W. 
Forbes, Roger S. 
Freeman, D. Roy 
Frothingham, Paul R. 
Furman, William F. 
Gallagher, George W. 
Gannett, William C, D.D. 
Garver, Austin S. 
GauM, Frederic J. 
Geoghegan, William B. 
G^ord, Elisha 
Gill, Frederic 
Gilman, Bradley 



Gilman, ^Hcholas P. 
Gilmore, Frank A. 
Goldsmith, Peter H., D.D. 
Gooding, Alfred 
Goodridge, Benjamin A. 
Green, Edward 
Green, Henry M. 
Greenman, Lyman M. 
Greenman, Walter F. 
Hale, Edward 
Hall, Edward H., D.D. 
Hamlet, Samuel 
Hathaway, George A. 
Hayward, Edward F. 
Ha)rward, Lawrence 
Hodgins, James C. . 
Holden, FrandswW. 
Holmes, John H. 
Homer, Thomas J. 
Horton, Edward A. 
Hosmer, Frederick L., D.D. 
Howard, Thomas D. 
Hudson, John W. 
Hultin,.Miss Ida C. 
Humphreys, Charles A. 
Hussey, Alfred R. 
Huxtable, James 
Jackson, Abraham W., D.D. 
Jaynes, Julian C. 

ienks, Henry F. 
ones, Jenkin L. 
ones, .William M. 
ones, William S. 
Kent, Frederick H. 
Kent,. George 
Kent, Jostah C. - 
Kirkpatrick. David M. 
Knapp, Arthur M. 
Lamb, Frauds P. S. 
Lathrop,. John H. 
Latimer, George D. 
Lawrance, WiUiam I. 
Lazenby, Albert 
Leavens, Robert F. 
Leavitt, Bradford 
Lewis, Fred R. 
Limbaugh, Danid C. 
Littlefidd, Arthur W. 
Littlefidd, George E. 
Locke, Calvin S. 
Lombard, Charles P. 
Lord, Augustus M., D.D. 
Lusk, James T. 
Lutz, Hany 
Lyon, William H., D.D. 



MacCauley, Clay 

Macdonald, Loren B. 

Madathlin, Edward B. 

MaBck, John 

Manchester, Alfred 

Mangasarian, Mangasar M. 

Mar^ John L. 

Mason, L. Walter, D.D. 

McDanid, Benjamin F. 

McDougail, Henry C. 

Meakin, Frederick 

Metcalf , Jod H. 

Meyer, John F. 

Miller, Milton J. 

Mitchell, H. Sumner 

Mitchell, John C. 

Morison, Robert S. 

Mott, Frederick B. 

Mott, Herbert H. 

Moulton, J. Sidney 

MuUett, Alfred E. 

Newbert, Ebner E. 

Newman, Bernard J. 

Nichols, William I. 

Nicholson, Charles F. 

Nickerson, Alfred C. 

Nowell, William G. 

Noyes, Charles 

Osgood, Edmund Q. S. 

Pardee, J. Nelson 

Park, Charles E. 

Parker, Henry C. 

Parker, William H. 

Parrot, William J. 

Payne, Edward B. 

Peabody, Francis G. , D.D., LL.D. 

Pendleton, Aubrey M. 

Perkins, Charles E. 

Perkins, John C, D.D. 

Phalen, Frank L. 

Phalen, Paul S. 

Phelan, William T. 

Pierce, Granville 

Pierson, William H.,. D.D. 

Porter, Isaac F. 

Powers, Jesse D. 0. 

Pratt, Frank W. 

Prescott, Elvin J. 

Putnam, John J. 

Ramsay, William H. 

Reccord, Augustus P. 

Reed, George H. 

Rdd, John D. 

Rich, A. Judson 

Roberts, John W. 



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Robinson, Alson H. 
Roys, Cyrus A. 
Russell, Charles F. 
St. John, Charles E. 
Sanborn, Moore 
Saunderson, Henry H. 
Savage, John A. 
Savage, Minot J., D.D. 
Savage, Robert W. 
Schermerhom, Martin K. 
Scott, Alva R. 
Scott, John M. 
Seaver, Nathaniel 
Secrist, Hewy T. 
Seward, Josiah L., D.D. 
Sheafe, Joseph P. 
Shippen, Eugene R. 
Shippen, Rush R. 
ShurUeff, Alfred D. K. 
Simons, Minot 
Skerrye, William F. 
Slicer, Thomas R. 
Smith, Augustus D. 
Smith, Ernest C. 
Smith, John S. 
Snow, Sydney B, 



Snyder, John 
Southworth, Franklin C. 
Spaulding, Henry G. 
Spence, Albert H., Jr. 
Spencer, Edward G. 
Spencer, )raiiam H. 
Spurr, George B. 
Staples, Charles J. 
Stebbins, Calvin 
Stebbins, Roderick 
Stevens, Henry D. 
Stewart, Samuel B. 
Stone, George W. 
Stougnton, Lewis H. 
Thacher, Philip S. 
Thayer, George A., D.D. 
Thomson, John S. 
Thompson, C. Bertrand 
TindeU, Charles H. 
Towle, Edward D. 
Towne, Edward C. 
Townsend, Manley B. 
Utter, David, D.D. 
Van Ness, Thomas 
Walsh, William L. 
Weatherly, Arthur L. 



Weld, Charles R., LL.D. 
WeUman, Charles P. 
Wells, John D. 
Wcndte> Charics W., D.D. 
Westall, Henry A. 
White, Albert C. 
White, William O. 
Whitmore, James H. 
Whitney, Arthur B. 
Wiers, Edgar S. 
WUbur, Earl M. 
Williams, Francis C. 
Williams, Theodore C. 
Wilson, D. Munro 
Wilson, John M. 
Wilson, Lewis G. 
Winkley, J. Wingate 
Winkley, Samuel H. 
Withington, George G. 
Wood, Roland A. 
Wood, William A. 
Woude, Henry H. 
Wright, George C. 
Wright, J. Edward, D.D. 
Wright, Merle St. C, D.D. 
Youne, George H. 



Abbot, Abiel J. 
Abbot, Mrs. Elizabeth S. 
Abbot, Miss Margaret J. 
Abbot, William F. 
Abbot, Mrs. William F. 
Adams, Miss Ann D. 
Adams, Austin F. 
Adams, Charles P. 
Adams, Mrs. Charles P. 
Adams, Mrs. Ellen W. 
Adams, Mrs. Emily K. 
Adams, Ernest G. 
Adams, George D. 
Adams, George E. 
Adams, Horatio 
Adams, John F. 
Adams, Mrs. Mary E. 
Adams, Mrs. Mary G. 
Afiteld, Miss Charlotte L. 
Agge, William 
Aldrich, Mrs. Clara W. 
Aldrich, Heniy M. 
Allen, Miss Abbie H. 
Allen, Charles 
Allen, Charles 
Allen, Edward E. 



LAY MEMBERS 

Allen, Mrs. Franklm R. 
Allen, George L. L. 
Allen, George O. 
Allen, Mrs. Hannah J. 
Allen, Miss Katherine 
Allen, Miss Linnie M. 
Allen, Mrs. Margaret A. 
Allen, Richard M. 
Allen, Russell C. 
Allen, William S. 
Allison, James 
Ames, Mrs. Catherine H. 
Ames, Charles W. 
Ames, Mrs. Fanny B. 
Ames, Mrs. Mary Leslie 
Andrews, Miss Abb^ B. 
Andrews, Mrs. Addison F. 
Andrews, Mrs. Fannie S. 
Andrews, Mrs. Judith W. 
Andrews t Miss Julia M, 
Andrews, Wallace G. 
Angell, Henry C. 
Angell, Mrs. Henry C. 
Annabel, Miss Sarah 
Appleton, Miss Anna E. 
Appleton, Frederick H. 



Apsley, Lewis D. 
Archbald, Edward 
Archer, Frederick W. 
Argo, Mrs. Ernest 
Arnold, Artemas W. 
Arnold, Frederick W. 
Arnold, Mrs. Henrietta 
Ashley, George A* 
Asplin, Mrs. John H. 
Atherton, Percy A. 
Austin, Miss Harriet 
Austin, Herbert 
Ayer, Mrs. Anne M. 
Backus, Mrs. Wilson M. 
Bacon, Miss Mary P. 
Bailey, Mrs. Alvin F. 
Bailey, Mrs. Ella B. 
Bailey, Miss Ellen H. 
Bailey, Mrs. James A. 
Baker, Charles H. 
Baker, Charles T. 
Baker, Mrs. Ellen T. 
Baker, Mrs. George E. 
Baker, James M. 
Balch, Alonzo W. 
Balchy Miss Georpana E 



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Balch, :Mrs. Mary S. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Anne E. 
Baldwin, Miss Charlotte A. 
Baldwin, Mrs. Maud P. 
Baldwin, Thomas W. 
Baldwin, Mrs. William H., Jr. 
BaU, Miss Helen A. 
Ballard, Francis £. 
Ballard, John F. 
Ballou, A. A. 
Baltzly, Mrs. John 
Bancroft, Mrs. William H. 
Banister f Mrs. Edwin H, 
Barker, Mrs. Alice M. 
Barker, Mrs. Annie W. 
Barker, Mrs. Carrie E. 

Barker, Charles R. 

Barker, Daniel F. 

Barker, Edward D. 

Barker, Mrs. Emily P. 

Barker, Mrs. Mabel F. 

Barker, Miss Sarah R. 

Bamabee, Henry C. 

Barnard, Mrs. Amelia M. 

Barnard, Mrs. Ethel H. 

Barnard, George A. 

Barnard, Mrs. George A. 

Barnard, George F. 

Barnard, Mrs. George F. 

Barnard, Miss Mary F. 

Barnes, Mrs. Elizabeth F. 

Barrett, Mrs. Edwin S. 

Barrett, Miss Jeanie S. 

Barrett, Richard F. 

Barrett, Mrs. Richard F. 

Barry, Mrs. Eugene 

Barry, Mrs. Florence W. 

Bartholomew, John C. 

Bartlett, Mrs. D. Bradford 

Bartlett, Miss Fannie 

Bartlett, John J. 

Bartlett, Miss Mary F. 

Bartlett, Schuyler S. 

Bartley, Frank E. 

Bartley, Mrs. Helen M. 

Bassetl, Mrs. Norman L, 

Batchelder, Mrs. F. Winthiop 

BaUkelder, Henry M, 

Batchelder, Justus L. 

Batchellor, Daniel 

Batchelor, Mrs. Prisdlla C. 

Bates, Harvey C. 

Bates, Horatio D. 

Bates, Samuel W. 

Bates, William C. 



Bazeley, Mrs. Margaret C. 
Beach, Mrs. Seth C. 
Beal, Mrs. James H. 
Beals, David T. 
Bean, Henry S. 
Beane, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Beard, Mrs. Jennie L. 
Beard, Miss Stella P. 
Bearse, Horace M. 
Beatley, Mrs. Clara B. 
Beatley, James A. 
Bedlington, Charles B. 
Beers, Mrs. Elizabeth C. 
Belcher, Henry A. 
Belcher, Mrs. Henry A, 
Bellows, John 
Beman, Roy D. 
Bemis, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Benneson, Mrs. Phebe N. 
Benson, Henry H. 
Bent, George W. 
Bent, Miss Nathalia 
Bigelow, Mrs. Alexander 
Bigelow, Mrs. Charles E. 
Bigelow, Edward L. 
Billings, Miss Abby S. 
Billings, Miss Claia E. 
Billings, Mrs. Fanny A, 
Billings, William R. 
Bingham, Harry F. 
Bingham, Mrs. Kate S. 
Binney, Mrs. Josephine A. 
Birks, Mrs. Alfred W. 
Birtwell, Miss Mary L. 
Bishop, Frederick H. 
Bishoprick, Mrs. Nicholas J. 
Bisco, Henry 
Blackman, Mrs. Edwin 
Blackmar, Mrs. Wilmon W. 
Blackwood, John A. 
BlaisdeU, George A. 
Blakeley, Mrs. Florence W. 
Blanchard, Miss Alice 
Blanchard, Miss Alice 
Blanchard, Mrs. Arabella 
Blanchard, Mrs. Charles F. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Frances A. 
Blanchard, Fred 
Blanchard, Mrs. Fred 
Blanchard, Gardner 
Blanchard, George G. 
Blanchard, Mrs. George G. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Lizzie 
Blanchard, Miss Lucretia T, 
Blanchard, Mrs. Lucy K. 



Blanchard, Miss Lucy 5. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Mary R. 
Blanchard, Mrs. Walter S. 
Blood, Charles H. 
Blossom, Harold H. 
Blossom, Miss Katherine E. 
Bodge, Mrs. George M. 
Bond, Mrs. Charles H. 
Bond, Charles L. 
Bond, Daniel W. 
Bond, Miss Edith L. 
Bond, Miss Mildred M. 
Bond, Miss Nanney S. 
Borden, Nathaniel B. 
Bothfeld, Henry E. 
Bothfeld, Mrs. Henry E. 
Bourne, James N. 
Bouv^, Walter L. 
Bouv^, Mrs. Walter L. 
Bowditch, Mrs. Elizabeth F. 
Bowen, Mrs. Cordelia J. 
Bowen, Mrs. TuUy D. 
Bowers, Miss Marietta H. 
Bowker, Mrs. Carrie H. 
Bowles, Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Bowles, Samuel 
Boyd, Miss Caro B. 
Boyd, Mrs. Harriet T. 
Boyd, Mrs. Joseph 
Boyden, Albert 
Boyden, Mrs. Amy L. 
Boyden, Roland W. 
Brackett, Miss Ellen 
Brackett, Mrs. Frank D. 
Brackett, George C. 
Brackett, Harr>' B. 
Brackett, Miss Mary A. 
Bradbury, Frank E. 
Bradford, Miss Annie 
Bradford, Edward E. 
Bradford, Mrs. Ruth A. 
Bradley, Miss Abby A. 
Bradley, Mrs. Arthur 
Bradley, Miss Harriet 
Bradley, Mrs. Peter B. 
Bradstreet, Josiah F. 
Bradt, David H. 
Branigan, Mrs. Eunice W. 
Brazer, Ralph F. 
Brazer, Mrs. William P. 
Brewer, Miss Fanny 
Brickelmaier, John R 
Briggs, Lyman P. 
Brigham, Albert W. 
Brigham, Caleb L. 



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Brigham, Charles F. 
Brigham, Mrs. Edwin H. 
Brigham, Miss Lucy F. 
Brigham, William T. 
Brigham, William T. 
Bright, Joseph M. 
Bright, Mrs. Nellie C. 
Brock, Mrs. Eli 
Brooks, Edwin L. 
Brooks, Miss Martha H. 
Brooks, Mrs. Sumner A. 
Brotchie, Miss Ella M. 
Brotchie, Everett A. 
Brotchie, Miss Harriet M. 
Brown, Andrew C. 
Brown, Earle 
Brown, Edwin 
Brown, Frederic H. 
Brown, Miss Elizabeth W. 
Brown, Miss Ethel J. 
Brown, Mrs. Frank F. 
Brown, George P. 
Brown, George W. 
Brown, Gerdon A, » 

Brown, Henry A. 
Brown, Henry L. 
Brown, Mrs. Howard N. 
Brown, Howard W. 
Broufjtf Mrs. Isabel B, 
Brown, Mrs. John 
Brown, John, 2d 
Brown, J. Conklin 
Brown, J. Stewart 
Brown, Lorenzo F. 
Brown, Mrs. Marianna M. E. 
Brown, Miss Mary 
Brown, Miss Mary L. 
Brown, Mrs. Rosa H. 
Brown, Mrs. Sylvia R. 
Brown, William H. 
Brown, Mrs. William H. 
Browne, T. Quincy 
Brownell, Mrs. M. R. 
Brush, Mrs. Mary E. 
Bryant, Charles B. 
Bryant, Mrs. Clara M, 
Buck, Waldo E. 
Buck, Mrs. Waldo E. 
Buckshom, Mrs. Louis H. 
Buffington, Miss Mabel 
Bu£fum, Charles C. 
Bulkeley, Mrs. Benjamin R, 
Bullard, Alfred M. 
BuUard, Mrs. Florence E. 
Bullock, Alexander H. 



Bullock, Chandler 
Bullock, Mrs. Florence A. 
Bullock, Rockwood H. 
Bullock, Mrs. Rockwood EL 
Bunker, Alfred 
Bunker, Clarence A. 
Bunker, Mrs. Cordelia M. 
Bunker, Mrs. Mary H, 
BurbaoJ^, Albion 
Burdick, Marcus M. 
Burgess, Miss Ella T. 
Burleigh, Mrs. Sarah D. 
Burrage, Charles H. 
Burrill, Charles L. 
Burton, Mrs. Frances V. 
Bush, Miss Elodie 
Bush, Miss Natalie 
Bush-Brown, Mrs. Margaret L. 
Buss, Mrs. George S. 
Butler, Mrs. Caroline M. 
Butler, Howard F. 
Butler, Miss Maria C. 
Butler, William A. 
Butrick, Frank D. 
Butterfield, Miss Agnes B. 
Butterick, Miss Mary E. 
Butters, Miss Kate 
Butterworth, Mrs. Antoinette S. 
Button, Conyers 
Butts, Thomas W. 
Cabot, Mrs. Ella 
Cabot, Miss Harriet S. 
Cain, Aldo 

Calder, Mrs. Albert L. 
Calder, Miss Dora G. 
Calder, George B. 
CaldweU, Frank C. 
Calef, Mrs. A. Howard 
Call, Mrs. Sarah E. J. 
Callender, Miss Caroline S. 
Camp, Thomas J. 
Campbell, James L. 
Canby, Miss Louisa P. 
Capen, Charles J. 
Carleim, /. Osgood 
Carpenter, Mrs. H. Bernard 
Carpenter, Miss Lena L. 
Carpenter, John B, 
Carret, Miss Josephine F. 
Carter, Charles E. 
Carter, Mrs. Charles E. 
Carter, Miss Edith H. 
Carter, Solon A. 
Carver, Mrs. Mary L. 
Cary, Miss Alice B. 



Cary, George L. 
Cary, Isaac H. 
Case, Mrs. James B. 
Case, Miss Louisa W. 
Case, Miss Marion R. 
Cassels, Arthur F. 
Casseb, Mrs. John 
Castle, Miss Katherine 
Catlm, Mrs. Charles T. 
Chadboume, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Chadwick, Mrs. Annie H. 
Chadwick, Austin K. 
Chaflftn, Mrs. Rebecca H. 
Chamberlain, Charles A. 
Chamberlain, Frank H. 
Chamberlain, Miss Maria 
Chamberlain, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Chamberlin, Mrs. E. F. P. 
Chamberlin, Thomas E. 
Chandler, Charles L. 
Chandler, Clarence A. 
Chandler, Mrs. Clarence A* 
Chandler, Mrs. Lydia F. 
Chandler, Mrs. Mary M. 
Chandler, Mrs. William E. 
Chaney, Mrs. George L. 
Chanmng, Miss Ellen 
Chapman, Mrs. Alice L. 
Chapman, Miss Isabel M. 
Chapman, Mrs. Jessie S. 
Chapman, Marvin A. 
Chapman, William O. 
Chapman, William O. 
Cheever, Miss Ahnira L. 
Chenery, Winthrop L. 
Chickering, Mimroe 
Child, Mrs. Charlotte A, 
Child, Henry L. 
Childs, Mrs. Hannah M. 
Childs, William K. 
Christie, Francis A., D.D. 
Church, Edward A. 
ChurchiU, Mrs. C. M. S. 
Clapp, Miss Abby C. 
Clapp, Miss Ann E. 
Clapp, Miss Charlotte E. C. 
Clapp, Mrs. Frederic W. 
Clapp, Miss Helen 
Clapp, J. Wilkinson 
Clapp, Robert P. 
Clark, Alvah W. 
Clark, Dayton P. 
Clark, Mrs. Ella A. 
Clark, Mrs. Everett O. 
Clark, Mrs. Frederic S. 



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Clark, Miss Harriet £. 
Clark, Mrs. Hattie P. 
Claik, Lowell 
Clarke, Miss Ann Frances 
Clarke, Miss Cora H. 
Clarke, Eliot C. 
Clarke, Miss Lilian F. 
Clarkson, Miss Annie L. 
ClayUm, H, Helm 
Cleveland, Mrs. Mary £. 
Clewley, Mrs. Lucy 
Clifford, Charles W. 
Close, Miss Flora L. 
Cloyes, Mrs. Joseph C. 
Cobb, Frederic C. 
Cobb, John Candler 
Cobum, Mrs. Albert E. 
Cobum, Alonzo A. 
Cobum, Arthur L. 
Cobum, Mrs. Arthur L. 
Cobum, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Cobum, Miss Emily F. 
Cobum, Mrs. Fanny L. 
Cobum, Miss Florence M. 
Cobum, Miss Harriet 
Cobum, Miss Hattie B. 
Cobum, Mrs. Horace B. 
Cobtim, Raymond W. 
Cobum, Thomas E. 
Cobum, Walter 
Cobum, Mrs. William H. 
Codman, Mrs. Abbie F. T. 
Coffin, Miss Mary E. 
Coffin, Winthrop O. 
Coggins, Paschal H. 
Cogswell, Mrs. Helen B. P. 
Colbum, Mrs. Anna S. 
Colby, WiUiam R. 
Cole, Miss Charlotte C. 
Cole, E. Edward 
CoUamore, Miss Helen 
Collins, Charles A. 
Collins, Edward, Jr. 
Collins, Mrs. Helen A. 
CoUyer, Mrs. Gertmde 
Comstock, Mrs. Philip 
Conant, Mrs. Annie F. 
Conant, Miss Emily 
Conant, Mrs. Lewis K. 
Connor, Miss Mabel 
Connor, Selden 
Cook, Ebed S. 
Cook, George W. 
Cooley, Mrs. Frances A. 
Coolidge, Francis L. 



Coolidge, Mrs. Henry O. 
Coolidge, J. Randolph. Jr. 
Cooper, Henry C. 
Copeland, William A. 
Copeland, Mrs. William A. 
Cordner, Miss Caroline 
Cordner, Miss Elizabeth P. 
Cormerais, John 
Cornish, L^e C. 
Corson, EJben S. 
Couch, Benjamin W. 
Coy, Mrs. Luden W. 
Cram, Mrs. William A. 
CrandeU, William T. 
Crane, Amos S. 
Crane, Mrs. Amos S. 
Crane, John P. 
Creesy, Miss Lizzie F. 
Crehore, Miss Ellen H. 
Cressey, Mrs. Annette M. R. 
Cressey, Frank 
Croasdoie, John P, 
Crosby, Miss Addie L. 
Crosby, Mrs. Eleanor F. 
Crosby, Mrs. Hannah A. 
Crosby, Miss Helen B. 
Crosby, William S. 
Grossman, Miss Alice 
Crothers, Mrs. Samuel M. 
Cruf t, George T. 
Cruft, Miss Harriet O. 
Cuckson, Mrs. John 
Cullum, Edgar P. 
CuUum, Miss Martha S. 
Cullum, Mrs. Mary S. 
Culpj Mrs. Belle 
Cimungs, Miss Annie W. 
Cuming, Mrs. Margaret C. 
Ciunmmgs, Miss Louise S. 
Cummings, Mrs. Margaret K. 
Cimmiins, Mrs. Eleanor S. 
Cummins, Mrs. Mary F. 
Curtis, Charles F. 
Curtis, Mrs. Charles F. 
Curtis, Mrs. Charles W. 
Ciurtis, Miss Frances H. 
Curtis, Miss Sarah L. 
Curtiss, Elmer L. 
Cutler, Nahum S. 
Cutter, Mrs. Abram E. 
Cutter, Mrs. George B. 
Cutter, Mrs. James P. 
Cutter, Miss Susan E. 
Cutting, Charles A. 
dating, Mrs. Charles H. 



Cutting, Edward L. 
Cutting, Mrs. Edward L. 
Cutting, Miss Emma L. 
Cutting, Marshall J. 
Cutting, Miss Sadie M. 
Dadmun, WiUiam E. 
Dakin, Alfred B. C. 
Dall, Mrs. Caroline H. 
Daly, Mrs. Clara K. 
Daly, Mrs. Elizabeth T. 
Daly, James H. 
Daly, James M. 
Daly, M. Ordway 
Dalzell, Mrs. Helen L. 
Damon, Mrs. David H. 
Damon, Mrs. Edward C. 
Damon, Miss Emily F. 
Damon, Miss Fannie C. 
Damon, Mrs. Lizzie E. 
Damon, Mrs. Samuel G. 
Dane, Mrs. Nathan, Jr. 
Dane, Mrs. Zerviah B. 
Daniel, Miss Mary E. 
Daniel, Warren F. 
Davenport, Mrs. Elizabeth W. 
Davis, Albert 
Davis, Albert H. 
Davis, Mrs. Anna M. 
Davis, Miss Catalina 
Davis, Dwight A. 
Davis, Mrs. Emma W. 
Davis, Frank E. 
Davis, Mrs. Frank E. 
Davis, George O. 
Davis, Horace 
Davis, Mrs. J. Edgar 
Davis, Joel N. 
Davis, Miss Mary L. 
Davis, William F. 
Davison, Miss Emily F. 
Davol, Frank H., Jr. 
Day, Mrs. Frank E. 
Day, Mrs. John W. 
Day, Miss Lucy B. 
DeLong, Edwin R. 
Deane, Mrs. Adams C. 
Dearborn, Frank A. 
Dearborn, Sam S. 
Decker, Miss L. AdeU 
Delano, Miss Ada E. 
Delano, Miss Julia 
Derby, Urbane 
Derby, Mrs. Urbane 
Dewey, Francis H. 
Dewey, Francis H., Jr. 



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Dewey, Mrs. Lizzie B. 
Dexter, Mrs. Elizabeth B. 
Dickerman, Miss Luella A. 
Dickinson, Francke W. 
Dickson, Brenton H., Jr. 
Dinsmoor, Miss Mary B. 
Dodge, Edward M. 
Dodge, Mrs. Helen 
Dodge, Mrs. John E. 
Dodge, Mrs. Katherio«» S 
Doe, Freeman J. 
Dolbeare, Herman A. 
Doty, Ethan A. 
Dougall, James S. N. 
DoWf Miss Ellen M. 
Dow, Herbert B. 
Dow, Miss Jane F. 
Dow, Miss Julia 
Dow, Mrs. Louis H. 
Dow, Mrs. Vanie B. 
Downes, Mrs. O. Anna 
Downing, Miss Gertrude 
Draper, Miss Bessie H. 
Draper, Edward B. 
Draper, Mrs. Joseph 
Draper, Joseph P. 
Draper, Thomas B. 
Dresser, Frank F. 
Dresser, Mrs. Josephine R 
Dresser, Miss Lomse 
Driver, Andrew B. 
Driver, Mrs. Andrew B. 
Driver, Miss Emily F. S. 
Dnmmiond, Mrs. James F. 
Duley, Mrs. Louisa R. 
Dunbar, Kinsley 
Dunbar, Miss Louisa 
Dunbar, Miss Mary E. 
Dunn, Miss Sarah H. S. 
Dunwoody, William P. 
Dup€«, Miss Octavia G. 
Durgin, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Durland, Mrs. Catherine M. 
Dutch, Marshall H. 
Du Val, Clive L. 
Du Val, Mrs. Florence F. 
Du Val, Guy 
Dwight ,George, Jr. 
Eager, Mrs. Rufus 
Fames, George H. 
Eastman, Joseph 
Eastman, Mrs. Lucy P. 
Easton, Miss Elizabeth B. 
Eaton, Charles M. 
Eaton, Mrs. Charles M. 



Eaton, Mrs. Florence T. 
Eddowes, Miss Eleanor 
Eddy, WilUam H. 
Edson, Mrs. Mary A. 
Edwards, Ogden E., Jr. 
Egner, Miss Emma C. 
Elder, Mrs. Charles B. 
Eliot, Miss Emily B. 
Eliot, Mrs. Henrietta R. 
Eliot, Henry W. 
Eliot, Miss Mary L. 
Eliot, Mrs. Mary May 
Eliot, Mrs. Samuel A. 
Eliot, Samuel A., Jr. 
Elliott, Thomas H. 
Ellis, Mrs. Eva L. 
Ellis, George H. 
Ellsworth, Albert W. 
Emerson, Warren F. 
Emerton, Mrs. Ephraim 
Emery, George A. 
Endicott, Arthur L. 
Endicott, Miss Clara T. 
Endicott, Frederic E. 
Endicott, Mrs. Henry 
Endicott, Robert R. 
Endicott, William 
Ernst, Mrs. Abbie S. 
Esdale, Mrs. Ada Roberts 
Estabrook, Arthur F. 
Estabrook, Mrs. Arthur F. 
Estey, Mrs. Mary P. 
Eustb, Mrs. Clara E. 
Evans, Mrs. Bailey W. 
Evans, Miss Lucretia £. 
Evans, Robert D. 
Everett, Mrs. George D. 
Ewart, Mrs. Fanny T. 
Ewer, Alfred 
Ewer, Mrs. H. Elsie 
Fairbaim, Mrs. Edith 
Fairbanks, Miss Maria B. 
Fairfield, Hamden 
Fales, Mrs. Charlotte E. 
Famham, Mrs. Eliza C. 
Farrington, Mrs. Ira P. 
Farwell, Arthur D. 
Farwell, Mrs. Asa 
Farwell, Mrs. Henry A. 
Faucon, Miss Catherine W. 
Faucon, Mrs. Martha W. 
Faulkner, Herbert K. 
Fay, Mrs. Harriet K. 
Fay, Mrs. Henry J. 
Fay, John S. 



Fay, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Felker, James V. 
Fenner, Arthur 
Fenno, Mrs. Almira T« 
Fenollosa, Mrs. William S. 
Femald, Mrs. Albert A. 
Fessenden, Mrs. Kate H. 
Fettyplace, Miss Sarah B. 
Field, Edward B. 
Field, Miss Fanny 
Field, James F. 
Filoon, Henry H. 
Finney, Mrs. Ida C. 
Fish, Mrs. William H. 
Fisher, Edward T. 
Fisher, Mrs. Frances D. 
Fisher, Herbert 
Fbke, Mrs. Annie F. W, 
Fiske, Charles H. 
Fiske, Edward 
Fitch, A. Perley 
FiU, Mrs. Walter S. 
Flagg, Mrs. George A. 
Flagg, Miss Sarah A. 
Fletcher, D. Howard 
Fletcher, Miss Emily Frances 
Fletcher, George M. 
Fletcher, George V. 
Fletcher, Henry J. 
Fletcher, Horatio R. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Horatio R. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Katherine S. 
Fletcher, Louis E. 
Fletcher, Mrs. Luke 
Fletcher, Robert S. 
Fletcher, Sherman H. 
Flint, Mrs. David B. 
Floyd, Clarence B. 
Folsom, Miss Ellen M. 
Folsom, Mrs. John G. 
Foote, Oscar P. 
Forbes, John Low 
Forbes, Mrs. John P. 
Forbes, Mrs. Roger S. 
Forbes, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Ford, Mrs. George B. 
Ford, Mrs. Ida H. 
Ford, Miss Mary A. 
Forsman, William 
Fosdick, Charles 
Foster, Mrs. Anna S. 
Foster, Miss Eliza E. 
Foster, Mrs. George A. 
Foster, Mrs. Mary E. 
Foster, Mrs. Mary W. 



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Foster, Mrs. Robert 
Foster, Stetson 
Fowle, Miss Harriet A. 
Fowler, Miss Clara M. 
Fowler, Miss Laura D. 
Fowler, William P. 
Fowler, Mrs. William P. 
Fowler, William P., Jr. 
Fox, Miss C. Edith 
Fox, Charles J. 
Fox, George W. 
Fox, Miss Margaret E. 
Fox, Thomas A. 
Fox, Walter S. 
Francis, George E. 
Frands, Mrs. Rebecca N. 
Frazier, Mrs. William H. 
Freeborn, Miss Eliza A. 
Freeman, Charles A. 
Freeman, Miss Harriet E. 
Freeman, Mrs. William 
French, Abbott K 
French, Allen 
French, Charles H. 
French, Edward 
French, Frederic W. 
French, Mrs. John J. 
French, Mrs. Lucretia G. 
Friend, John C. 
Friend, Mrs. Preston 
Frost, Miss Bertha 
Frost, Mrs. Edward 
Frost, Miss Mabel 
Frotlungham, Channing, Jr. 
Frothingham, Lawrence P. 
Frothingham, Mrs. Paul R, 
Frothingham, William L 
Frye, John A. 
Frye, Mrs. John A. 
Frye, Walter P. 
Fuller, Mrs. Arthur O. 
Fuller, Mrs. Charles S. 
Fuller, Eben S. 
Fuller, Mrs. Moses 
Furbush, Mrs. Everett W. 
Furman, Mrs. William F. 
Gaffield, Mrs. Thomas 
Gage, Mrs. Florence D. 
Gage, Miss Katherine A. 
Gage, T. Hovey, Jr. 
Gage, Mrs. T. Hovey, Jr. 
Gage, Walter B. 
Gale, Mrs. Henry H. 
Gale, Justin E. 
Gale, Mrs. Justin E. 



Gale, Lyman W. 
Gale, Mrs. Lyman W. 
Gamage, Miss Amy O. 
Gammans, George G. 
Gane, Mrs. Thomas F. 
Gardner, Miss Mary B. 
Gardner, Ralph E. 
Gardner, William C. 
Garfield, James F. D. 
Garland, Mrs. J. Everett 
Garver, Mrs. Austin S. 
Gates, Julius K. 
Gauld, Mrs. Harriet B. 
Geoghegany Mrs. William B, 
Gerry, Mrs. Chester J. 
Gerry, Mrs. G. A. 
Getchell, Mrs. Albert C. 
Getchell, Miss Ellen P. 
Gibbs, Frank E. 
Giddmgs, Mrs. Mary J. 
Gill, Augustus H. 
Gillett, Herbert A. 
Gilliford, Robert H. 
Gibnan, Mrs. M. R. F. 
Gilman, Warren R. 
Gilman, Mrs. Warren R. 
Gilmore, Mrs, Jessie W. 
Glasgow, Edward B. 
Gleason, Mrs. Jennie S. 
Glenton, Mrs. Pederico 
Godfrey, Mrs. Abby P. 
Goldsmith, Mrs. Peter H. 
Goodrich, Miss Elizabeth M. 
Goodrich, Henry A. 
Gordon, Mrs. Gfeorge H. 
Gordon, Mrs. Rebecca 
Gould, Mrs. Fred H. , 
Gould, Mrs. Irene C. 
Gould, Miss Sarah B. 
Gould, Mrs. William P. 
Gove, William H. 
Gowen, Mrs. Alice F. 
Gowing, Charles W. 
Grammer, Miss Alice M. 
Gray, Albert M. 
Gray, Mrs. Mary N. 
Gray, William C. 
Green, Miss Alice M. 
Green, Mrs. John B. 
Green, Miss Mary L 
Green, Samuel S. 
Greene, Chauncy O. 
Greene, James S. 
Greene, Mrs. Laura T. 
Greenlaw, Frank M. 



Greenleaf, Mrs. Abbie M. 
Greenleaf , Miss Lilian W. 
Greenwood, Miss Helen W. 
Gregg, David A. 
Grew, Mrs. Henry S. 
Grinnell, Charles E. 
Grinnell, Mrs. Frederick 
Griswold, Mrs. Jerusha F. 
Guild, Miss Abby E. 
Guild, Curtis 
Guild, Curtis, Jr. 
Guild, Mrs. Henry C. 
Guild, Miss Orra E. 
Hackett, Miss Anna D. 
Hackett, Mrs. Susan E. 
Hackley, Mrs. Frances A. 
Hadley, Mrs. Charles E. 
Hafif, Delbert J. 
Hagar, Miss Addie 
Hagar, Eugene B. 
Hagar, Miss Sarah B. 
Hahman, William 
Hale, Mrs. Edward 
Hale, Mrs. Elizabeth P. 
Hale, Mrs. Emily P. 
Hale, Miss Kate S. 
Hall, Miss Anna 
Hall, Charles F. 
Hall, Edward H. 
Hall, Mrs. Ellen B. 
Hall, Mrs. Frederick P. 
HaU, George W. 
Hall, Mrs. Harriet A. 
Hall, Harrison C. 
Hall, Henry C. 
Hall, Miss Julia E. 
Halstead, Daniel B. 
Ham, Mrs. Martha J. 
Hamblen, Lynne A. 
Hamilton, Benjamin F. 
Hamilton, Charles A. 
Hamilton, Miss Edith 
Hamilton, James P. 
Hamlton, Mrs. Mary A. 
HamUn, Mrs. Ellen V. 
Hammond, Mrs. Anna C. 
Hammond, Winthrop 
Hardy, Mrs. John H. 
Harlow, Miss Margaret 
Harlow, Mrs. Martha H. 
Harlow, William T. 
Harriman, William D. 
Harrington, Miss Clara W. 
Harrington, Edward B. 
Harrington, Miss Ellen E. 



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Harrington, Henry P. 
Harrington, Miss Jennie M. 
Harrington, Miss Lucy I. 
Harris, Mrs. Adeline E, 
Harris, Frederick 
Harris, Frederick H. 
Harris, Levi 
Harris, Walter C. 
Harrison, Mrs. Fanny G. 
Hart, Thomas N. 
Harte, Mrs. Maria A. 
Harte. Richard H. 
Hartshorn, Miss Alice S. 
Hartshorn, Calvin G. 
Hartwell, Charles P. 
Hartwell, Mrs. Effie M. F. 
Hartwell, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Hartwell, Frank N. 
Hartwell, John M. 
Hartwell, Mrs. Minnie R. 
Harwood, Harry A. 
Harwood, Mrs. Joseph A. 
Haskell, Mrs. Edwin B. 
Haskell, Jacob M. 
Hastings, Mrs. Anna C. 
Hastings, Francis H. 
Hastings, Mrs. Henry C. 
Hatch, Walter M. 
Haven, Miss Cassie 
Haven, Miss Rebecca E, 
Hawes, Mrs. Mary S. 
Hawkins, Asahel S. 
Haynes, Frederick M. 
Haynes, Miss Susan F. 
Hayward, Mrs. Edward F. 
Hayward, Mrs. John W. 
Hazeltine, Mrs. George K. 
Hazelton, Mrs. Carrie M. 
Hazel ton, Herbert M. 
Hazen, Mrs. Kate E. 
Heald, Miss Lucy D. 
Heard, Ralph P. 
Heath, Mrs. Sarah E. P. 
Hedge, Frederic H. 
Hemenway, Mrs. Charles A. 
Hempstead, Ernest A. 
Hendee, Mrs. George E. 
Hendley, Mrs. Anna M. 
Hersey, Ira G. 
Hersey, Mrs. Ira G. 
Hewes, Joseph J. 
Hewett, Henry B. 
Hewins, Miss Alice E. 
Hewins, Mrs. Margaret E. 
Hews, Mrs. Albert H. 



Heywood, Mrs. Abby B. 
Hibbard, A. G. 
Hibbard, Mrs. M. Addie 
Higgins, Miss Alice L. 
ffiD, Mrs. Alfred 
Hill, Daniel 
Hill, Mrs. Ellen D. 
Hill, Miss Frances A. 
Hill, William M. 
Hills, Miss Elizabeth 
Hills, Mrs. Ellen G. 
Hills, Mrs. Sophronia E 
Hills, Thomas 
Hitch, Frederick D. 
Hitch, Mrs. Frederick D, 
Hoar, Miss Clara D. 
Hoar, Miss Mary 
Hoar, Mrs. Samud 
Hobart, Miss Mary F. 
Hobart, Miss Olive M. 
Hobart, Mrs. Rowena W. 
Hobbs, Miss Eliza E. 
Hobbs, George S. 
Hobbs, Mrs. Mary P. 
Hobson, Charles H. 
Hodgdon, Andrew H. 
Hodgdon, Miss Ellen W. 
Hodgdon, Frank W. 
Hodgins, Mrs. James C. 
Holbrook, Mrs. Henry C 
Holbrook, S. Pinckney 
Holden, Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Holden, Mrs. William 
Holder, Miss Caroline H. 
Holder, WiUiam C. 
HoUis, Henry F. 
Holman, Frank E. 
Holmes, Mrs. A. L. B. 
Holmes, Mrs. John H. 
Holmes, Joseph A. 
Holmes, Mrs. Vesta 
Holyoke, Edward A. 
Holyoke, Mrs. Mary E. 
Homer, Mrs. Horace H. 
Homer, Mrs. Mary F. W. 
Honeywell, Floyd H. 
Hooper, Mrs. Martha H. 
Hooper, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Hopkins, Mrs. Reuben W. 
Home, Edwin T. 
Horton, Mrs. Edward A. 
Horton, I. Chester 
Horton, William A. 
Hosmer, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Hosmer, Fred A. 



Hosmer, Mrs. George Herbert 
Hosmer, James K. ^ 
Hosmer, John E. 
Hough, Miss Annie A. 
Houghton, Miss Carrie M. 
Houghton, Mrs. L. Maria 
Houghton, Mrs. M. Alice 
Houghton, Miss Mary J. 
Houghton, Mrs. Naomi W. 
Howard, Miss Annie E. 
Howard, Mrs. Ethan H, 
Howara, Miss Emily W. 
Howard, Frank E. 
Howard, Miss Sophia W, 
Howe, Archibald M. 
Howe, Miss Emily B. 
Howe, Henry F. 
Howe, Mrs. Julia Ward 
Howe, Louis P. 
Howe, Mrs. Louis P. 
Howe, Mrs. Octavius T. 
Howe, S. Herbert 
Howe, Mrs. S. Herbert 
Howe, Warren G. 
Howell, Mrs. Maria EL 
Howes, A. Newell 
Howes, Mrs. Benjamin T. 
Howland, Mrs. Mary P. 
Hubbard, Miss Helen 
Hubbard, Miss Nathalie D. 
Hubbard, Samuel T. 
Hubbard, S. Hildreth 
Hubby, Miss Ella F. 
Hudson, Mrs. Divine P. 
Hudson, Miss Mary E. 
Huidekoper, Arthur C. 
Huidekoper, Edgar 
Humbert, Alfred 
Hume, Mrs. William S. 
Humphreys, Miss Anna 
Humphreys, Clarence B. 
Himiphreys, James H. 
Humphreys, Mrs. James H. 
Humphreys, Ricluid C. 
Humphreys, Mrs. Susan M. 
Hunneman, Mrs. W. C. 
Hunt, Miss Anstiss 
Hunt, Mrs. Evelina K. 
Hunt, Miss Mary E. 
Himtington, Mrs. Ahna J. 
Huntington, Mrs. Rebecca M. 
Huntress, Miss Harriet L. 
Hurd, Mrs. John 
Hurd, Mrs. Phineas H. 
Hussey, Mrs. Mary W. 



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Hussey, Mrs. Reuben B. 
Huston, William 
Hutchins, Frederic L. 
Hutdiinson, Edward L. 
Hutcfainsoii, G«>rge 
Hyde, Frederick T. 
Hyde, Mrs. L. M. 
Hyde, Mrs. R. W. 
Hyde, Salem 
Hyde, Miss Sophie L. 
Hylan, Eugene S. 
Inches, Charles E. 
Ingalls, Edwin W. 
Irdand, Gordon 
Ireland, James W. 
Ireland, Mrs. Jeannie G. 
Ireland, Oscar B. 
Irish, Mrs. Mary A. 
Jackman, Mrs. Joseph V. 
Jacobs, Miss Gertrude T. 
Jacobs, Mrs. Janet S. 
James, Brigham D. 
Janes, Mrs. Henry 
Jaquith, Miss Abby 
Jaquith, Joseph 
Jaynes, Mrs. Julian C. 
Jefferson, Mrs. Meta R. 
Jcncks, Howard W. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Frederick W. 
Jenkins, Mrs. Harding 
Jenkins, Miss Leura E. 
Jenks, Mrs. Henry F. 
Jenney, Bernard 
Jenney, Walter 
Jennison, Henry J. 
Jennison, Mrs. Henry J. 
/«fc//, Mrs, HaUie A. 
Jtwett, Arthur H. 
Johnson, Mrs. Caroline G. 
Johnson, A. Dudley 
Johnson, Hiram 
Johnson, John W. 
Johnson, Joseph C. 
Johnson, Wilham R. 
Johonnot, Albert 
JoUiffe, James H. 
Jolliffe, Mrs. James H. 
Jones, Miss Alice E. 
Jones, Benjamin M. 
Jones, Mrs. Clarence W. 
Jones, Edward C. 
Jones, Miss Ella H. 
Jones, Miss Ellen M. 
Jones J Ephraim D. 
Jones, Mrs. Frank H. 



Jones, Mrs. Frederick M. 

{ones, Jerome 
ones, Mrs. Lyman A. 
Jones, William P. 
Jones, Mrs. William S. 
Jordan, Mrs. Daniel S. 
Jordan, William H. 
Joslin, James T. 
Judd. Miss Nina 
Tudkins, Mrs. Ella P. 
Kay, James Murray 
Kay, Mrs. Mary Prentiss 
ELeene, Mrs. Georgia W. 
Keene, William G. 
Kelly, John B. 
Kendall, Miss Ellen M. 
Kendall, Miss Hannah W. 
Kennedy, Mrs. Charies E. 
Kenney, Charles C. 
Kenney, Mrs. Charles C. 
Kenney, Mrs. George W. 
Kenney, Ralph 
Kenney, Mrs. Ralph 
Kenney, William C. 
Kent, Miss Ella 
Kenyon, William EL 
Keyes, Nelson C. 
Keyes, Mrs. Nelson C. 
Keyes, Prescott 
Keyes, Mrs. Prescott 
Keyou, Mrs. Edwin J. 
Kidder, Charles A. 
Kidder, Mrs. Henry P. 
Kidder, Nathaniel T. 
Kilham. Charles H. 
Kimball, David P. 
Kimball, Mrs. David P. 
Kimball, Eben 
Kimball, Edmund 
Kimball, Miss Gertrude 
Kimball, Miss Hannah H. 
Kimball, Miss Helen F. 
Kimball, Howard A. 
Kunball, John F. 
Kimball, Mrs. John F. 
Kimball, Miss Lulu S. 
King, Mrs. Charles F. 
King, Mrs. Clark 
King, D. Webster 
King, Edward P. 
King, Mrs. Edward P. 
Kmg, Tarrant P. 
King, William H. 
Kingsbury, George L. 
Kingsbury, Waldo E. 



Kingsbury, Warren E. 
Kingsbury, Mrs. Warren E. 
Kinnicutt, Mrs. Edith P. 
Kinnicutt, Leonard P. 
Kinnicutt, Lincoln N. 
Kirkman, Alexander S. 
Kittredge, Miss S. Frances 
Knapp, Mrs. Ellen F. 
Kneeumd, John 
Knight, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Knowles, Miss Grace L. 
Knowlton, Mrs. IsabeUe M. 
Kohler, Otto 
Krum, Mrs. Chester H. 
Lake^ Mrs. Alice E. 
Lamb, Henry L. 
Lamb, William D. 
Lambert, Charles 
Lamson, A. Ward 
Lamson, Mrs. Rebecca L. 
Lamson, Will S. 
Lane, Ralph E. 
Langley, John W. 
Langmaid, Miss Bertha 
Lanning, Edward 
Lapham, Mowry 
Larrabee, Miss Katherine P. 
Lathrop, John 
Lawrance, Mrs. Caroline B. 
Lawrence, Mrs. Charles 
Lawrence, Mrs. George A. 
Lawrence, Miss Gertrude M. 
Lawson, Walter U. 
Lawton, Mrs. Susan E. R. 
Leahy, Mrs. Carrie A. 
Learned, Mrs. Emily K. 
Leavitt, Mrs. Bradford 
Lee, Mrs. Francis H. 
Leeds, Mrs. Mary A. 
Legate, Burton J. 
Leonard, Miss Eliza B. 
Lewis, Mrs. E. Frank 
Lewis, Henry M. 
Lewis, Miss Lucy 
Lewis, Miss Marian 
Lewis, Mrs. Mary B. 
Lewis, Russel B. 
L*Heureux, George H. 
Libby, Henry F. 
Libby, Mrs. Henry F. 
Lilly, Alonzo 
Lincoln, Mrs. Abby L. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Arthur 
Lincoln, Miss Frances M. 
Lincoln, Francis H. 



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Lincoln, Mrs. Francis H. 
Lincoln, Merrick 
Lincoln, Richard C. 
Lincoln, Mrs. Waldo 
Linder, Mrs. Alice B. 
Linscott, A. Roscoe 
Linscott, Arthur H. 
Lippitt, Mrs. Louisa G. 
Lithgow, Mrs. Pauline C. 
Little, Edward H. 
Little, Miss Eleanor J. 
Little, Henry B. 
Little, John Mason 
Little, Mrs. John Mason 
Livermore, Mrs. John W. 
Livermore, Oliver C. 
Livingstone^ Frank C. 
Locke, Alonzo E. 
Locke, Miss Mary L 
Long, John D. 
Lord, Mrs. Augustus M. 
Lord, Miss M. Agnes 
Loring, Augustus P. 
Loring, Miss Katherine P. 
Loring, Miss Louisa P. 
Loring, Mrs. Mary H. 
Lothrop, Thornton K. 
Lovett, Arthur T. 
Lovett, Miss Caroline A. 
Lovett, Mrs. George L. 
Lovett, Miss Louise W. 
Low, Mrs. Daniel 
Low, Miss Emma C. 
Low, Henry C, Jr. 
Low, Josiah O. 
Low, Miss Nathalie F. 
Lowell, A. Lawrence 
Lowell, Francis C. 
Lowell, Miss Lucy 
Luce, ilrs. Charles C. 
Luke, Arthur F. - 
Luke, Eugene R. 
Lunt, Miss Hannah E. 
Lunt, William W. 
Lunt, Mrs. William W. 
LutZy Mrs. Mary E, 
Lyford, James O. 
Lyman, Arthur T. 
Lyman, Herbert 
Lyman, Miss Julia 
Lyman, Miss Mabel 
LyTnan, Miss Mary 
Lynde, Miss Sarah A. 
Lyon, Mrs. William H. 
MacArthur, Mrs. C. L. 



Macdonald, Mrs. Loren B. 
Macfarland, Henry J. 
MacGowan, Henry A. 
Mackintosh, Mrs. Henry S. 
Macullar, Mrs. Emma J. 
Malick, Mrs. John 
Manchester, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Mandell, Samuel P. 
Manning, Mrs. David 
Mansfieldy Preston R, 
Mansfield, Miss Susan 
Manson, Rufus H. 
March, Mrs. Abby 
Marquand, Miss Elizabeth 
Marsh, George S. 
Marsh, Henry A. 
Marsh, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Marshall, Mrs. Delia S. 
Marshall, Henry E. 
Marshall, Thomas 
Marsters, James A. 
Martin, James D. 
Martin, Miss Sarah E* 
Mason, Albert L. 
Mason, Atherton P. 
Matchett, Mrs. Sarah A. 
Mayberry, Mrs. Amanda L. 
Mayo, Hamilton 
Mayo, Mrs. Hamilton 
McCoUester, J. Q. A. 
McDaniel. Mrs. Benjamin F. 
McDougall, Mrs. Marion G. 
McDowell, Edward G. 
McKean, Albert J. 
McKean, Mrs. Clara A. 
McKendry, Davis 
McKenna, Miss Abby 
McKenna, Miss M^ry E. 
McKenna, Miss Rebecca 
McQuesten, Mrs. Anna E. 
Meiggs, Clarence U. 
Melcher, Mrs. Angelia O. 
Melcher, Mrs. Charles C. 
Melcher, George 
MeUen, Walter B. 
Mdvin, James C. 
Melvirif Mrs, James C, 
Mentzer, Cjrus 
Merriam, Mrs. Dora R. 
Merriam, Herbert 
Merritt, Miss Blanche L. 
Merrill, Louis C. 
Messer, Myron W. 
Metcalf , Edgar W. 
Metcalf , Mrs. Ellen E. 



Metcalf, Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
Metcalf, Robert C. 
Meyer, Mrs. John F. 
Miller, George T. 
Miller, Henry F. 
Miller, LcsHe W. 
Miller, Miss Marion M. 
Miller, Miss Mary 
Milliken, Mrs. Emily A. 
Mills, William S. 
Mitchell, Mrs. Edwin V. 
Mitchell, Miss Emma R. 
Mitchell, Frank R. 
Mitchell, GranviUe C. 
MitcheU, Mrs. Harriet S. 
Mitchell, Miss Helena 
MitcheU, Henry C. 
Mitchell, Henry L. 
Mixer, Charles H. S. 
Moen, Mrs. Grace H. 
Moody, C. Mason 
Moody, Mrs. Elizabeth J. 
Moore, Mrs. Martha 5. 
Moot, Adelbert 
Morehouse, Mrs. M. Adelaide 
Morrill, Frank F. 
Morris, Mrs. Rachel A, 
Morris, Thomas J. 
Morse, Miss Alice G. 
Morse, Miss Ellen C. 
Morse, E. Irving 
Morse, Mrs. Johii W. 
Morse, Miss Margaret F. 
Morse, Mrs. Robal M. 
Morse, Walter B. 
Morse, Mrs. WalUr B. 
Morton, Mrs. Emily C. 
Morton, Mrs. John D. 
Moseley, Mrs. Julia M. 
Moss, Mrs. Charles L. 
Mott, Mrs. Frederick B. 
Mott, Mrs. Herbert H. 
Moulion, Mrs. Martha C. 
Mulliken, Miss Amelia M. 
Mulliken, Everett M. 
Munroe, James P. 
Murphy, Mrs. Gardner 
Muzzey, David P. 
Myrick, Mrs. Pauline J. 
Nashj Louis P, 
Nason, Arthur C. 
Nealley, Mrs. Mary E. 
Necdham, Boynton 
Needham, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Needham, Mrs. Inez G. 



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Nelson, Granville D. 
NfsmitJi, Joseph A. 
Nesmith, Miss Mary 
NevcTs, Miss Lucy A. 
Nevins, Mrs. David 
Newbert, Mrs. Elmer E. 
Newball, Miss Annie L. 
Newhall, James S. 
Nichols, Miss Adelaide 
Nichols, Andrew 
Nichols, Mrs. Arthur H. 
Nichob, Frank A. 
Nichols, Mrs. Harriet S. 
Nichols, J. Carlton 
Nichols, Mrs. Minerva P. 
Nickerson, Mrs. Alfred C. 
Nickerson, Phineas A. 
Noble, Blrs. Heniv C. 
Norbury, Mrs. John F. 
Norcross, GrenviUe H. 

Norcross, Mrs. Mary E. 
Norcross, Mrs. Otis 

Norris, Miss Kate T. 

Narris, Mrs. Thomas G. 

North, James N. 

North, Mrs. James N. 

Norton, Miss Mary E. 

Noyes, Ernest H. 

Noyes, Lewis B. 

Nowell, Mrs. Laura H. 

Nutting, Warren A, 

Nye, William L. 

Nye, Mrs. William L. 

O'Connor, Edward G. 

Odiome, Mrs. Emma L. 

Odlin, James E. 

Olys, Thomas J. 

Osborne, Thomas M. 

Osgood, Mrs. Edmund Q. S. 

Osgood, Miss Ellen L. 

Osgood, Miss Emily L. 

Osgood, Robert 

Otis, Miss Elizabeth M. 

Otis, Harry P. 

Ouierbridge, Miss Minna S. 

Owen, Charles D. 

Owen, Mrs. Delia S. 

Owen, Mrs. Roscoe P, 

Packard, Winthrop 

Page, Mrs. Samud 

Paige, Elijah F. 

Paine, Charles Edward 

Paine, Charles J., Jr. 

Paine, Mrs. Charles J., Jr. 

Paine, John B. 



Paine, Mrs. John B. 
Paine, John F. 
Paine, Miss Marianne 
Paine, Nathaniel 
Paine, Miss Rose 
Paine, Miss Sarah C. 
Pame, Mrs. Seth T. 
Palmer, Charles D. 
Palmer, Grant M. 
Palmer, Mrs. Grant M. 
Palmer, John S. 
Park, A. Heady 
Parker, Austin W. 
Parker, Mrs. Charles S. 
Parker, Mrs. Enuneline W. 
Parker, Mrs. Harriet T. 
Parker, Mrs. Henry C. 
Parker, James H. 
Parker, Mrs. James H. 
Parker, Mrs. Mary E. 
Parker, Mrs. William H. 
Parks, Miss Mary M. 
Parsons, Miss Clara P. 
Parsons, Mrs. James H. 
Partridge, Allen 
Patch, Frank A. 
Patch, Mrs. Frank A. 
Patch, Frank W. 
Patten, Mrs. George W. 
Patterson, James H. 
Patton, Miss Anna J. 
Patton, Miss Sarah L. 
Payne, Mrs. Samuel B. 
Payson, William H. 
Peabody, Miss Lucia M. 
Peach, Miss Mabel A. 
Peale, Richard S. 
Peck, Miss Elizabeth A. 
Peck, Mrs. Roswell K. 
Peckham, Miss Sarah W. 
Peirce, Miss Caroline P. 
Peirce, Miss Mary F. 
Perham, Perley P. 
Perkins, Mrs. John C. 
Perrin, Franklm 
Perry, Miss Abby S. 
Perry, Franklin W. 
Perry, Miss Harriet S. 
Perry, Walter A. 
Peters, Mrs. Aravesta 
PeterSy Mrs, Richard 
Peterson, Mrs. Abby A. 
Pettee, Miss Amy E. 
Pettee, Mrs. Sybil C. 
Pettes, Miss Mary E. 



Phalen, Mrs. Frank L. 
Phelan, Mrs. William T. 
Phelps, Levi W. 
Phelps, Miss Mary R. 
Phelps, Mrs. Robert W. 
Phelps, Miss Sarah D. 
PhiUips, Mrs. Albert N. 
Phillips, Mrs. Anna T. 
Phillips, James, Jr. 
Phillips, Mrs. Katherine M. 
Phillips, Sidney A. 
Pickman, Ducfley L. 
Pierce, Mrs. Elizabeth L. 
Pierce, Miss Katherine C. 
Pierce, Mrs. Lucy H. 
Pierce, Miss Margaret 
Pierce, Phineas 
Pike, Daniel L. 
Pindar, Mrs. Albert 
Pingree, David 
Piper, William T. 
Place, Griffin 
Plant, Albert R. 
Poor, Miss Agnes B. 
Poor, Miss Lillian B. 
Poor, Miss Lucy T. 
Poor, Mrs. Mary W. 
Porritt, Mrs. Mary E. 
Porter, Charles H. 
Porter, Frank L. 
Porter, Mrs. Isaac F. 
Porter, Mrs. John W. 
Porter, Mrs. Lucy C. 
Potter, Miss Frances E. F. 
Potts, Horace T. 
Pousland, Arthur P. 
Powers, Albert E. 
Powers, Lewis J. 
Powers, Mrs. Lewis J. 
Powers, Wilbur H. 
Pratt, Charles H. 
Pratt, Mrs. Enoch 
Pratt, Mrs. Frank W. 
Pratt, Laban 
Pratt, Mrs. Laban 
Pratt, Mrs. Lucius G. 
Pratt, Miss Sarah E. 
Prentiss, Mrs. Maria W. 
Prescott, Mrs. Benjamui F. 
Prescott, Miss Henrietta 
Prescott, Miss Olive Adams 
Presson, Mrs. Mary B. 
Preston, Mrs. George H. 
Priest, Frank B. 
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Priest, Mrs. Joseph A. 
Priestley, Miss Jean B. 
Priestley, Mrs. Neville 
Proctor, Warren 
Proudfoot, David 
Prouty, Mrs. Alice J. 
Prouty, Mrs. Frank E. 
Pushaw, Mrs. Sarah L. 
Pushee, George D. 
Putnam, Mrs. Diana F. 
Putnam, Henry H. 
Pynchon, Edward 
Raeder, Mrs. Clara * 
Ramsdell, Mrs. Fanny V. N 
Ramsdell, Mrs. S. Elmira 
Rand, Charles A. B. 
Rand, Mrs. Grace L. 
Rand, Roland B. 
Rand, Mrs. Roland B. 
Ranlett, Orrin B. 
Ranney, Miss Maria F. 
Ranstead, Miss Kate A. 
Rawson, Mrs. Oscar F. 
Raymond, Miss Alice 
Raymond, Edward T. 
Raymond, Francis H. 
Raymond, Mrs. John Af . 
Reardon, Miss Helen A. 
Reccord, Mrs. Augustus P. 
Reed, Hammon 
Reed, Mrs. Persis L. 
Reed, William Howell 
Reed, Mrs. William Howell 
Reeve, Mrs. Leila A. 
Remiti, James W. 
Reynolds, Miss Ann F. 
Reynolds, Henry R. 
Reynolds, Vinton I. 
Rhoades, Miss Mary L. 
Rice, Miss Adalyn E. 
Rice, Mrs. Benjamin T. 
Rice, Daniel H. 
Rice, Miss Elizabeth M. C. 
Rice, Miss Florence E. 
Rice, Miss Louisa A. M. 
Richards, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Richards, Daniel H. 
Richards, Henry W. 
Richardson, Alfred W. 
Richardson, Mrs. Alice M. 
Richardson, Charles E. 
Richardson, Charles F. 
Richardson, Mrs. Charles F, 
Richardson, Charles L. 
Richardson, Charles O. 



Richardson, Daniel M. 
Richardson, George E. 
Richardson, George F. 
Richardson, Mrs. George F. 
Richardson, Henry 
Richardson, Mrs. Isabel B. 
Richardson, Miss Mary A. 
Richardson, Miss Mary E. 
Richardson, Mrs. M. Grace 
Richardson, Rosell L. 
Richardson, Miss Sara F. 
Richardson, Miss Sarah E. 
Richardson, Mrs. S. M. 
Richmond, George F. W. 
Ricker, Mrs. Emeline C. 
Ripley, Ebed L. 
Ripley, Edward P. 
Ripley, Miss Emma F. 
Ripley, Mrs. Francis B. 
Rohbe^ Mrs. Maria E, 
Robbms, Miss Caira 
Robbins, F. N. 
Robbins, Miss Ida F. 
Robbins, Mrs. Mary F. 
Roberts, Miss Frances A. 
Robertson, Miss S. Ellen 
Robins, Edward B. 
Robinson, Mrs. Alexander 
Robinson, Miss Frances M. 
Robinson, Mrs. George D. 
Robinson, Mrs. Henry 
Robinson, Miss Mary P. 
Robinson, Mrs. Thomas D. 
Roddy, Thomas 
Rodman, Warren A. 
Rogers, Miss Alice C. 
Rogers, Allan 
Rogers, Miss Annette P. 
Rogers, Miss Catharine L. 
Rogers, Miss Clara B. 
Rogers, Henry M. 
Rogers, Mrs. Henry M. 
Rogers, Mrs. Jacob 
Rogers, Miss Mary J. 
Rolfe, William J. 
Rood, Stanley H. 
Rood, Mrs. Stanley BL 
Root, Henry A. 
Rorer, Mrs. Mabel M. 
Ross, Miss Mary A. 
Ross, Mrs. Pamelia T. 
Rotch, Miss Joanna 
Rotch, William 
Rotch, Mrs. William 
Rotch, Mrs. William J. 



Rugg, Arthur P. 
Rumrill, Chapui 
Rumrill, Mrs. James A. 
Rusbatch, Mrs. Alfred 
Russell, Arthur J. 
Russell, Mrs. Arthur J. 
Russell, Miss Edith 
Russell, James F. 
Russell, Mrs. Mary O. 
Rust, Miss Fanny L 
Rust, William A. 
Sackett, Mrs. Emma L. 
Sackett, Myron W. 
St. John, Mrs. Charles E. 
Salter, Miss Annie K. 
Salter, John L., Jr. 
Salter, Robert S. 
San^)son, Mrs. Augustus N. 
Sampson, Mrs. Calvin C. 
Sampson, Charies E. 
Sampson, Mrs. Ellen C 
Sanborn, Jason B. 
Sands, Mrs. F. Josephine 
Sargent, Mrs. George W. 
Sargent, Mrs. J. Bradford 
Sargent, Miss Mary F. 
Saimderson, Mrs. Henry H. 
Savage, Mrs. Minot J. 
Savage, William C. 
Savary, Mrs. William BL 
Sawyer, Miss Esther W. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Evelina J. 
Sawyer, Miss Julia 
Sawyer, Mrs. Louise J. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Martha P. 
Sawyer, Miss Mary C. 
Sawyer, Miss Mary E. 
Sawyer, Mrs. Sopfne M, 
Sawyer, Warren 
Schmidt, Henry F. A. 
Schmidt, Mrs. Henry F. A. 
Scott, Mrs. Alberta G. 
Scott, Miss Alice 
Scott, Charles E. 
Scott, Mrs. Edgar 
Scott, James M. 
Sears, Miss Annie L. 
Sears, Francis P. 
Sears, Horace S. 
Sears, Miss Margaret A. 
Seaver, Benjanun F. 
Seaver, Mrs. Ellen M. 
Seaver, Francis E. 
Seaver, Mrs. M. M. W. 
Seavey, Mrs. Mary L. 



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Secrist, Mn. Anna B. 
Semple, Miss Mary P. 
Sewall, Miss Alice O. 
Sewall, Miss Elizabeth S. 
Shattuck, Mrs. Isabel A. 
Shattuck, Joseph 
Shattuck, Mrs. Lydia M. 
Shaw, Mrs. Frank E. 
Shaw, Mrs. George S. 
Shaw, Lorenzo L. 
Shaw, Miss Mary E. 
Shaw, Mrs. Robert Gould 
Shaw, Wallace S. 
Sheafe, Mrs. Joseph P. 
Shedd, Freeman B. 
Shedd, Mrs. Freeman B. 
Sheldon, Charles H., Jr. 
Shddon, Mrs. Chauncey C- 
Sheldon, Miss Gertrude 
Sheldon, Mrs. Jod W. 
Sheldon, Nicholas 
Shqpherd, Thomas M. 
Shaman, Mrs. Alfred P. 
Sherman, John H. 
Skipiey, Mrs, Samuel R. 
Sholes, Mrs. Caroline A. 
Sholes, Charles H. 
Shuznan, Abraham 
Shumway, Miss Ellen 
Shurtleff, Asahel M. 
Shute, Mrs. Henry B. 
Sibley, Albert H. 
Sibley, Mrs. Albert H. 
Sibley, Andrew J. 
SOsbee, Miss Elizabeth W. 
Silsbee, Mrs. Maria P. 
SitmSf William 
Simmons, Walter E. 
Simonds, George R. 
Simonds, Nathaniel G. 
Simons, Mrs. Helen L. 
Simons, Mrs. L. Eudora 
Skerrye, Mrs. William F. 
Skinner, Mrs. Frances M. 
Slicer, Mrs. Thomas R. 
Small, George 
Smith, Mrs. Abby F. 
Smith, Miss Agatha 
Smith, Albert W. 
Smith, Arthur A. 
Smith, Mrs. Cephas 
Smith, Charles C. 
Smith, Charles F. 
Smith, Charles William 
Smith, Miss C. Louise 



Smith, Duncan 
Smith, Mrs. £. Elizabeth 
Smith, Miss Ellen 
Smith, Miss Emma F. 
Smith, Mrs. Ernest C. 
Smith, Mrs. Fayette 
Smith, Miss Harriet S. 
Smith, Henry F. 
Smith, Mrs. Henry F. 
Smith, Henry F., Jr. 
Smith, Jonathan 
Smith, Mrs. Mary C. 
Smith, Sanford Sidney 
Smith, Miss Susanna 
Smith, Thomas P. 
Smith, William Eliot 
Snow, C. W. 
SnaWf Mrs. Sydney B. 
Snyder, Mrs. John 
Somerville, Louis J. 
Somes, Mis0 Cordelia 
Souther, Horatio H. 
Southworth, Mrs. Alice B. 
Spalding, Mrs. Alice F. 
Spalding, Mrs. Harriet M. 
Spalding, Mrs. Katharine A. 
Spalding, Miss Louise M. 
Spalter, Mrs.|Alice T. 
Spalter, Miss Mabd, J. 
Sparhawk, Mrs. Mary E 
Spaulding, Miss Edith R. 
Spaulding, Ralph 
Spence, Mrs. .Adbert H., Jr. 
Spencer, Henry F. 
Spencer, Mrs. Sarah D. 
Spooner, Mrs. Hannah A. 
Spooner, J. Winthrop 
Spooner, Mrs. J. Wmthrop 
Sprague, Mrs. A. B. R. 
Sprague, Charles E. 
Sprague, Isaac 
Sprague, Mrs. Marvin 
Sprague, Miss Nellie L. 
Spring, Mrs. Zilpah W. 
Stackpole, Mrs. Frederic D. 
Stackpole, Miss Martha D. 
Stanhope, Mrs. Frederic A, 
Stanwood, Mrs. Ellen W. 
Stanwood, Henry P. 
Staples, Mrs. Carlton A. 
Staples, Mrs. Charles £. 
Staples, John W. 
Staples, Sylvanus N. 
Stark, John F. 
Steams, Charles H. 



Steams, Mrs. Charles H. 
Steams, Ephraim 
Steams, Mrs. Jessie C. 
Stebbins, Mrs. Calvin 
Stebbins, Mrs. Edith E. 
Stedman, Mrs. George R. 
Steele, Miss Edith D. 
Steer, Robert 
Stelley, Leonard M. 
Stevens, Miss Catherine A. 
Stevens, Charles E. 
Stevens, Mrs. Ella A. 
Stevens, Ephraim A. 
Stevens, Mrs. Grace S. 
Stevens, Mrs. Harriet L. 
Stevens, Henry C. 
Stevens, Mrs. Henry D. 
Stevens, Isaac F. 
Stevens, Mrs. Isaac F. 
Stevens, Joseph W. 
Stevens, Mrs. J. Tyler 
Stevens, Miss Julia W. 
Stevens, Stillman R. 
Stevens, Mrs. Stillman R. 
Stewart, Mrs. Samud B. 
Stickney, Mrs. Joseph 
Stiles, Sumner B. 
Stillman, Mrs. Addie N. 
Stockton, Mrs. James A. 
Stone, Mrs. Abbie E. 
Stone, Mrs. Ellen C. 
Stone, Miss Fanny C. 
Stone, James B. 
Stone, Mrs. James B. 
Stone, John L. 
Stone, Miss Lydia 
Stone, Miss Margaret M. 
Stone, Miss S. May 
Stone, William 
Storer, Miss Abby M. 
Storer, Mrs. James 
Storer, Mrs. Samuel C. 
Stoughton, Mrs. Sarah G. 
Stowe, Arthur N. 
Stowe, Horace E. 
Stowe, Mrs. Jessie B. 
Stowe, Mrs. Mary C. 
Stratton, Mrs. Annie M. 
Stratton, George L. 
Stratton, Solomon P. 
Streeter, Frank S. 
Stupell, Mrs. Charlotte R. 
Sturtevant, Arthur F. 
Sturtevant, Mrs. Lucy J. 
Sulloway, Alvah W. 



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Sumner, Arthur F. 
Sumner, Mrs. Frederic W. 
Sumner, George F. 
Swan, Mrs. Annie E. 
Swan, Charles F. 
Swan, Charles W. 
Swan, Mrs. Sarah EL. 
Swan, William B. 
Swasey, Isaac 
Swasey, William H. 
Sweetser, Mrs. Frank E. 
Swett, Mrs. Lizzie J. 
Swift, Henry M. 
Synunes, Miss Alice F. 
Symonds, Joseph W. 
Taft, Mrs. Henry G. 
Taft, Miss Sarah F, 
Taggard, Henry 
Talbot, John 
Talbot, Mrs. Julian 
Talbot, Mrs. Thomas 
Tapley, Henry F. 
Tapley, Mrs. Henry F. 
Taylor, Samud 
Tewksbury, Francis W. 
Thacher, Miss Elizabeth B. 
Thacher, George W. 
Thacher, Mrs. George W. 
Thaxter, Mrs. Elizabeth N. 
Thaxter, Mrs. Joseph B. 
Thayer, Mrs. Annie R. 
Thayer, Arthur W. 
Thayer, Charles M. 
Thayer, Mrs. Earl F, 
Thayer, Edward W. 
Thayer, Frank B. 
Thayer, Mrs. John M. 
Thayer, Miss Katherine M. 
Thayer, Miss Lucy F. 
Thayer, Mrs. Mary O. 
Thomas, Harry L. 
Thompson, Henry T. 
Thomson, Mrs. Mary L. 
Thomdike, Mrs. Albert 
Throop, Miss Lucy A. 
Throop, Mrs. Mary J. C 
Thurber, Walter 
Thurlo, Mrs. Philene O. 
Thurlow, Charles 
Tibbits, Mrs. Frederic R. 
Tilden, George T. 
Tilden, Mrs. M. Louise 
Tileston, Mrs. Mary W. 
Tillinghast, James 
Tilton, Mrs. Samud 



Timpson, Miss Helen K. 
Tmdell, Mrs. Charles H. 
Tingiey, Mrs. Louisa P. 
Tingley, S. H. 
Tisdale, E. D. 
Tohnan, Mrs. Edward F. 
Toppan, Miss Margaret 
Toppan, Miss Serena D. 
Torr, Miss Grace R. 
Torrey, Mrs. Charles 
Towle, Mrs. Edward D/ 
Tracy, Carlos C. 
Trafton, Mrs. Frank £. 
Tripp, Job C. 
Tripp, Nathaniel G. 
Trow, Thomas F. 
True, Mrs. Hilton W. 
TruU, Mrs. Evelyn M. 
Truman. Nathan H. 
Trumbull, Mrs. Sarah H. 
Truscott, Charles J. W. 
Tucke, Edward M. 
Tucker, Miss Alice 
Tucker, Herman 
Tucker, Mrs. Martha Hyde 
Tucker, Robert W. 
Tufts, James A. 
Tufts, Miss Martha B. 
Turner, Arthur H. 
Turner, Miss Caroline C. 
Turner, Mrs. Edward C. 
Turner, George C. 
Turner, Miss Harriet J. 
Turner, Henry A. 
Turner, Nathan S. 
Tuttle, Julius H. 
Twing, Miss Mary A. 
Twitchell, Miss Margaret W. 
Twombly, Samuel W. 
Tyler, Mrs. James M, 
lyier, Mrs. John F. 
lyier, Warren P. 
Udell, Corwin S. 
Underbill, Mrs. George F. 
Upham, Mrs. Eliza D. 
Upson, Mrs. Henry S. 
Utley, Samuel 
Utley, Mrs. Samuel 
Van Duzee, Mrs. Jane S. 
Van Nason, Martin 
Van Ness, Mrs. Addie S. 
Vamey, Daniel A. 
Vamey, Mrs. Rebecca K. 
Vamey, William H. 
Vialle, Geoige E. 



Vialle, Mrs. George E. 
Vidaud, Robert P. 
Vilas, Charles H. 
Viles, Miss Elizabeth J. 
Viles, Mrs. Henry L. 
Vinal, Mrs. Charles C. 
Vogel, Mrs. Louise F. 
Von Utassy, A. W. 
Vorse, Mrs. Albert B. 
Vose. Miss Sarah M. 
Wadlin, Horace G. 
Wadsworth, Henry H. 
Wahlberg, Axel A. 
Waldo, Miss Phebe M. 
Waldron, George D. 
Waldron, Mrs. Sarah E. 
Wales, Mrs. M. A. D. 
Walker, Miss Cecilia M. 
Walker, Ehner W. 
Walker, Miss Louisa D. 
Walker, Reuben E. 
Walkiey, Mrs. Mary A, 
Wall, Mrs. James H. 
Wallace, Mrs. Jackson 
Walsh, Mrs. William L. 
Warder, Mrs. Mary C. 
WardweU, Wlliam T. 
Ware, Charies E. 
Warner, John G. 
Warner, Mrs. John G. 
Warner, William R. 
Warren, Miss Annabel 
Warren, Charles H. 
Warren, Miss Elizabeth C 
Warren, James 
Waterhouse, Mrs. Ivory F. 
Waterman, Dependence S, 
Waterman, Marcus M. 
Watson, Mrs. Abby W. 
Watson, Miss Mattie S. 
Wattles, Joseph W. 
Wattles, Mrs. Joseph W. 
Weatherbee, Miss Emma 
Weatherly, Mrs. Arthur L, 
Webb, Miss Janet 
Webb, Miss Mary E. 
Webb, Mrs. Saiah A, 
Webber, Frederic W. 
Webster, Edmund G. 
Webster, Mrs. Prisdlla H. 
Weeden, William B. 
Weeks, Mrs. Martha O. 
Weis, Miss A. Lora 
Weis, Mrs. Georgina L. 
Welch, Mrs. Thomas J. 



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Weld, Mrs. A. Davis 
Weld, Stephen M. 
Weld, Mrs. WUliam G. 
Wellington^ Mrs. Austin C. 
Wellington, Charies W. 
Wellington, Walter J. 
Wellman, Mrs. Charles P. 
Wdls, Edward 
Wells, Mrs. Gardner F. 
Wells, Mrs. John C. 
Wells, Mrs. Kate Gannett 
Wesson, Miss Maddine 
Wesson, Miss Vera W. 
Wheeler, Alden H. 
Wlieeler, Mrs. Alden H. 
Wheels, Baxter F. 
Wheeler, Mrs. Clara F. 
Wheeler, Edwin M. 
W heeler, Mrs. Elizabeth E. 
WTieeler, Mrs. Fannie E. 
Wheeler, Harvey 
\Vlieeler, Miss U. Eliza 
Wheeler, Leonard 
Wheeler, Mrs. Sarah E. 

Wheeler, William 

Wheelock, Arthur 

Wheelock, Charles E. 

Wheelwright, George W., Jr. 

Whipple, Mrs. George M. 

Whitcher, Frank W. 

Whitcomb, Franklin D. 

Whitcomb, Henry C. 

Whitcomb, Henry L. 

Whitcomb, Mrs. Peter S. 

White, Albert H. 

White, Alfred T. 

White, Mrs. Alfred T. 

White, Miss Annie J. 

White, Charles G. 

White, Mrs. Charles T. 

White, Miss Frances E. 

White, Franklin B. 

White, Miss Katherine L. 

White, Mrs. Lloyd E. 

White, Miss Phoebe L. 

White, Miss Sarah D. H. 

White, Miss Sarah F. 

Whitehouse, William P. 

Whiting, Frederic A. 

Whiting, Mrs. Frederic A. 

Whiting, George O. 



Whiting, Mrs. Laura B. 
Whiting, Miss Margery 
Whiting, Mrs. Mary E. 
Whiting, Mrs. Mary G. 
Whitney, Mrs. Helen G. 
Whitney, James L. 
Whiton, Charles F. 
WkUon, Harry F. 
Whiton, Miss Laura 
Whiton, Morris F. 
Whittemore, Edward S. 
Whittier, Miss Helen A, 
Wiers, Mrs. Edgar S. 
Wiggin, Miss Josie M. 
Wiggin, Mrs. Laura N. 
Wilder, Charles W. 
WUder, Mrs. Charles W. 
Wiley, Miss Mary A. 
Willard, Miss Susan B. 
WiUiams, A. Gilbert 
WiUiams, Alfred B, 
WiUiams, Miss Alice M, 
Williams, Miss C. Amelia 
Williams, Channing 
Williams, Charles K. 
Williams, Enos D. 
Williams, Franklin D. 
Williams, Frederick B. 
Williams, George B. 
Williams, Mrs. George F. 
Williams, Henry B. 
Williams, Mrs. Mary E. 
Williams, Mrs. Orella A, 
Williams, Robert B. 
Williams, Miss Sarah B. 
Williams, Mrs. Sarah C. 
Williams, Mrs. Sarah G. 
Williams, Mrs. Vehna C. 
Williams, Mrs. Webster F. 
Willis, Miss Hannah W. 
Willis, Henry A. 
Willis, John W. 
Willis, Sarell J. 
WiUson, Miss Lucy B. 
Willson, Miss Mary J. 
Wihnarth, Arthur R. 
Wilmarth, Mrs. Henry D. 
Wilson, Miss Annie E. 
Wilson, Edwin 
Wilson, Mrs. Frances L. 
Wilson, Franklin A. 



Wilson, Mrs. Helen B. 
Wilson, Mrs. Lewis G. 
Wing, Mrs. Henry T. 
Wing, Wilson D. 
Wmkley, Hobart W. 
Winkley, Mrs. J. Wmgatc 
Winkley, Mrs. Samuel H. 
Winsor, Robert 
Winsor, Mrs. Robert 
Winsor, Robert, Jr. 
Winton, Henry D. 
Witherbee, Frank B. 
WithereU, Mrs. E. A. Phillips 
Withington, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Wood, Alva S. 
Wood, Charles G. 
Wood, Mrs. Charlotte 
Wood, Mrs. Charlotte R, 
Wood, Gorham H. 
Wood, Mrs. Ellen S. 
Wood, Mrs. Henry A, 
Wood, Miss Mary L. 
Wood, Mrs. Sarah J. 
Wood, Miss S. Louise 
Woodbury, Miss Jennie F. 
Woods, Jonathan H. 
Woodward, Frederick F. 
Woodward, Mrs. Hetty D. 
Wright, Mrs. Alex 
Wright, Mrs. Annie R. 
Wright, Mrs. George C. 
Wright, Mrs. George H. 
Wright, Mrs. J. Edward 
Wright, Jerome E. 
Wright, Mrs. Paul R. 
Wright, Miss Rebecca W. 
Wright, Miss Sabra 
Wrightington, Mrs. Stephen C. 
Wyeth, Mrs. Hannah 
Wylie, Eugene C. 
Wyman, Mrs. Franklin 
Wyman, Ferdinand A 
Yeaton, Mrs. John C. 
Young, Mrs. Fred H. 
Young, John F. 
Young, Mrs. Hannah L* 
Young, Mrs. Lizzie E. 
Young, Miss M. Emma 
Young, Mrs. Samuel 
Younglovey Eugene 
Zwissler, Miss Eleanora 



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NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF UNITARIAN AND 
OTHER CHRISTIAN CHURCHES 

. .The National Conference owes its organization to a special meeting of 
the American Unitarian Association, held Dec. 7, 1864, at which, in 
view of the need of enlarged denominational activity, a resolution was 
adopted calling " a convention, to consist of the pastor and two dele- 
gates from each church or parish in the Unitarian denomination, to 
meet in the city of New York, to consider the interests of our cause, 
and to institute measures for its good." 

This Convention was held in New York on the 5th and 6th of April, 
1865, and organized the National Conference. 

Subsequent meetings were held in Syracuse, New York (twice), 
Boston, Saratoga (eleven times), Philadelphia, Washington (twice), 
and Atlantic City (twice). The twenty-second meeting was held in 
Boston, Mass., Sept. 23, 1907, in connection with the meeting of the 
International Council. The twenty-third meeting was held in Chicago, 
111., Sept. 27-30, 1909. 

Officers. — Hon. Horace Davis, LLD., San Francisco, Cal., Presi- 
dent; Hon. George E. Adams, Chicago, 111., Hon. Thomas J. Morris, 
Baltimore, Md., Hon. George C. Perkins, San Francisco, Cal., Hon. 
Francis C. Lowell, Boston, Mass., Hon. Marcus P. Knowlton, Spring- 
field, Mass., Alfred T. White, New York, Vice-Presidents; Rev. Walter 
F. Greenman, 684 Astor Street, Milwaukee, Wis., General Secretary; 
Richard C. Humphreys, Boston, Mass., Treasurer. 

Council. — Rev. U. G. B. Pierce, D.D., Washington, D. C, Chair- 
man; Henry W. Sprague, Esq., Buffalo, N. Y.; Rev. William W. 
Fenn, D.D., Cambridge, Mass.; Mrs. E. A. Delano, Chicago, 111.; 
L. S. Thome, Esq., Dallas, Texas ; Rev. John C. Perkins, D.D., Port- 
land, Me. ; Mrs. John P. Forbes, Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Rev. Paul Revere 
Frothingham, Boston, Mass.; John W. Loud, Esq., Montreal, Canada; 



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Rev. W. W. Peck, Winchendon, Mass.; Rev. Walter F. Greenman, 
Milwaukee, Wis., Secretary; Richard C. Humphreys, Esq., Boston, 
Mass., Treasurer. 

Committee on Fellowship. — Executive Committee: Rev. George H. 
Badger, New York, N. Y., Chairman; Rev. William Chamiing Brown, 
Boston, Mass., Secretary; Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111. 

New England States: Rev. Augustus M. Lord, D.D., Providence, 
R. I. ; Rev. Austin S. Garver, Worcester, Mass ; Rev. William Chan- 
ning Brown, Boston, Mass. 

Middle States: Rev. George H. Badger, New York, N. Y.; Rev. 
William M. Brundage, Ph.D. ; Rev. Alfred C. Nickerson, Plainfield, N. J. 

Western States: Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111. ; Rev. William 
H. Pulsford, Chicago, 111.; Rev. Florence Buck, Kenosha, Wis. 

Southern States: Rev. Clifton M. Gray, Charleston, S. C. ; Rev. 
Albert J. Coleman, Jacksonville, Fla.; Rev. John W. Rowlett, D.D., 
Atlanta, Ga. 

Rocky Mountain States: Rev. William T. Brown, Ogden, Utah ; Rev. 
John L. Marsh, Colorado Springs, Col. ; Rev. Frank A. Powell, Helena, 
Mont. 

Pacific States: Rev. Earl Morse Wilbur, Berkeley, Cal. ; Thomas L. 
Eliot, D.D., Portland, Ore.; Rev. Benjamin A. Goodridge, Santa 
Barbara, Cal. 



CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS 

Constitution 

Preamble. The Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches was formed in the year 1865, with the purpose of strengthen- 
ing the churches and societies which should unite in it for more and 
better work for the kingdom of God. These churches accept the re- 
ligion of Jesus, holding, in accordance with his teaching, that practical 
religion is summed up in love to God and love to man. 

The Conference recognizes the fact that its constituency is Congrega- 
tional in tradition and polity. Therefore, it declares that nothing in 
this Constitution is to be construed as an authoritative test; and we 
cordially invite to our working fellowship any who, while differing 



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from us in belief, are in general sympathy with our spirit and our 
practical aims. 

Article I. The churches and other organizations here represented 
unite themselves in a common body to be known as the National Con- 
ference of Unitarian and Other Christian Churches. 

Art. II. This National Conference shall be composed of such dele- 
gates, elected once in two years, not exceeding three from any church 
or other affiliated organization, as may be invited by the Council, and 
accredited to it by a certificate of their appointment. 

Art. III. The Conference shall meet biennially, at such time and 
place as it may designate at its successive biennial sessions, unless 
otherwise directed by the Council. 

Art. IV. Its officers shall consist of a President; six Vice-Presi- 
dents ; a General Secretary ; a Treasurer ; a Council of twelve, including 
the General Secretary and Treasurer, of whom not more than half shall 
be ministers ; and a Committee on Fellowship, consisting of eighteen, — 
three from the Eastern States, three from the Middle States, three from 
the Southern States, three from the Central Western States, three from 
the Rocky Mountain States, and three from the Pacific States, — who 
shall be elected at each meeting to hold their offices for two years, or 
until their successors are appointed. 

Art. V. The Council, during the intervals of the biennial sessions, 
may fill vacancies in the board of government, and shall have charge 
of all business having reference to the interests of the Conference, and 
intrusted to it by that body, which is hereby declared a purely advisory 
one. 

Art. VI. The National Conference, until further advised by its 
experience, adopts the existing organizations of the Unitarian body as 
the instruments of its activities, and confines itself to recommending 
to them such undertakings and methods as it judges to be in the heart 
of its constituency. a 

Art. VI I. This Constitution may be amended, at any regular meet- 
ing of the Conference, by a vote of not less than two-thirds of the 
delegates accredited thereto, provided public announcement of the pro- 
posed amendment has been given three months in advance. 



By-laws 

I. Three months at least before the time fixed by the National 
Conference for its biennial meeting, the Council shall issue a circular 
letter of call to the churches and organizations in its fellowship, ac- 
companying it with a form of certificate, the production of which shall 



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be the proof of membership of the Conference until others are elected, 
unless otherwise ordered by the Conference. 

2. The General Secretary shall keep a full report of the proceedings 
of the body, which shall be published at the expense of the Conference, 
and a copy sent to every del^[ate. 

3. The Council, at the conclusion of each Conference, shall issue an 
address to the churches and organizations in our body, whether mem- 
bers of this Conference or not, to be published with the proceedings 
of the Conference, containing such advice and encouragement as it 
may deem appropriate, but especially communicating to the churches 
and organizations the recommendations of the Conference in r^ard to 
plans and methods of work, the amount of money required for die uses 
of the year, the special objects to which they would advise its appro- 
priation, with such suggestions, as to a just apportionment of the bur- 
den, as they may judge expedient and becoming. 

4. The Council shall have it for its duty to keep itself accurately in- 
formed of the plans and operations of the various organizations in our 
body, and of the state of the individual churches ; inviting correspond- 
ence and soliciting reports, to be sent in one month before the biennial 
meeting, in which the general condition of the parish, its Sunday School, 
charities, and general working may be set forth, to the end that 
the Conference may know y\rhat the wants and the wishes of the 
churches are, somewhat more particularly than it is possible to learn 
in the necessary hurry of the biennial meeting. 

5. The General Secretary of the National Conference shall be the 
person to whom all letters and communications shall be addressed ; and 
he shall be, ex officio, a member of the Council, and constitute its 
Secretary. 

6. The list of delegates, churches, and organizations represented in 
each Conference shall be part of the Biennial Report. The archives of 
the Conference shall be in the keeping of the General Secretary, subject 
to inspection and temporary possession by the Council. 

7. A collection shall be taken up amon^ the delegates at each Con- 
ference, to which any others may contribute, to defray the incidental 
expenses of the Conference, such as printing the Report, etc. 

8. Each church in this Conference is recommended to defray the 
expenses of its delegates. 

9. All motions and resolutions, not merely of a formal or incidental 
character, which propose any action or declaration on the part of the 
Conference shall, unless the Conference shall otherwise specifically 
order, be referred without debate to the Committee on Business, whose 
duty it shall be to make seasonable reports thereon. In case any 
action by the Conference shall be recommended in a report, a suitable 



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time for the same shall be therein designated; and, unless objectidn 
shall be made to any report, it shall be deemed approved by the 
Conference. 

10. The Fellowship Committee shall include in its scope the extend- 
ing of fellowship to ministers from other countries coming to America, 
and desiring to engage in ministerial work among our Unitarian 
churches. 

11. No one admitted by the Fellowship Committee shall be entitled 
to claim insertion in the list of ministers until after being settled in 
some parish or other regular ministerial employment for at least one 
year. 



RULES OF THE UNITARIAN FELLOWSHIP COMMITTEE 

Revised and adopted at the National Conference, Chicago, III, 
September 29, 1909. 

The Fellowship Committee, elected by the National Conference of 
Unitarian and Other Christian Churches, under the provision of its con- 
stitution and by-laws, and acting under the authority of instructions 
embodied in votes passed by the Conference and by the American 
Unitarian Association, shall consist of an executive committee of three 
and six sub-committees. 

Executive Committee. 

The Executive Committee shall have jurisdiction over the authorized 
list of Unitarian ministers published in the Year Book of the denomi- 
nation, co-operating with the editor. 

The Executive Committee shall, in the absence of special reason 
to the contrary, add to this list each year the names of persons who have 
been approved by the Fellowship Committee, and who have been settled 
as pastors of Unitarian Churches or duly appointed to denominational 
service by one of our national or district organizations since the prepara- 
tion of the previous list. 

The Executive Committee shall remove from the list each year names 
coming under the following classes : — 

1. Those who have died. 

2. Those who have formally withdrawn from the Unitarian Church 
or its ministry. 

3. Those who have accepted pastorates in other denominations to the 
exclusion of service in the Unitarian body. 



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4. Those who have withdrawn from the ministry to engage in secular 
pursuits, or who for five years have had no active connection with our 
churches or our work. This does not apply to those who are temporarily 
out of service or who have retired from the same by reason of age or 
infirmity. 

5. Those dismissed from their churches on moral grounds and also 
sudi as, in the judgment of the Committee, shall, after due investi- 
gation, be considered morally unfit for the office of a minister in the 
Unitarian Denomination. 

6. Those whose addresses the Committee has for two consecutive 
years been unable to discover. 

The Executive Committee through its secretary shall keep a full and 
accurate list of admissions, issue certificates, and publish the names of 
approved applicants. 



Sub-committees. 

1. Each sub-committee shall consist of three members. 

2. Applicants for recognition as fit persons for our ministry must 
make laiown their desire to the chairman of the sub-committee having 
jurisdiction over the territory in which they reside. 

Each sub-committee, after thorough investigation, shall forward its 
decision, together with all material facts in the case, to the Executive 
Committee. 

3. In the case of unfavorable action the committee responsible for 
the same shall at once, for their guidance, send a report of the case to 
the other sub-C(xnmittees. 

4. All names on which favorable action shall have been taken by any 
sub-committee shall be forthwith published in one or more of our de- 
nominational papers over the names of the sub-committee passing upon 
the application. 

5. If, after the approval of an applicant, sufficient cause shall appear 
therefor, the sub-committee which gave the original approval and the 
Executive Committee shall both have the right to reopen the case and 
to withdraw the approval. If an approved person shall fail to find a 
place of service in the Unitarian body within two years, the committee's 
recommendation shall lapse. 

6. It shall be the duty of each committee to decide upon the fitness of 
a candidate for admission, guided to its dedsion by evidence with regard 
to the character and record of the applicant, by such proofs of his 
moral earnestness and integrity as may be discovered under a careful 
investigation, and by the probability of his being able to render useful 
service. 



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7. It shall also take into account the amount and kind of preparation 
that has been made for the work of the ministry, and may advise with 
the candidate as to any further course of study that he may seem to need. 

All churches are hereby xvamed of the serious danger they incur by 
settling a minister whose name does not appear in the Year Book List, 
or v(fho has not received the approval of the Fellowship Committee. 



DEPARTMENT CONFERENCES 

The Unitarian Conference of the Middle States and Canada. — 

Organized under the name of the New York State Conference of Uni- 
tarian Churches at New York, April 29, 1885, — the New York and 
Hudson River Local Conference, which preceded it, having been or- 
ganized at the same place, Dec. 6, 1866. This Conference was en- 
larged, and the name changed to the Unitarian Conference of the Mid- 
dle States and Canada, at Brookl)m, N. Y., Nov. 19, 1890. Annual 
meeting between the first day of November and the first day of De- 
cember. Other meetings at option of Directors. The headquarters 
are at 104 East 20th Street, New York, where the publications of the 
American Unitarian Association and other Unitarian books and tracts 
are kept on sale and for distribution. 

Societies: Albany, Buffalo (two societies), Dunkirk, Gouvemeur, 
Ithaca, Jamestown, Mt. Vernon, Newburgh, New York (including 
Brookl)m, Flushing, and Staten Island) (eleven societies), Rochester, 
Schenectady, Syracuse, Trenton, Troy, White Plains, and Yonkers, 
N. Y.; Elizabeth, Hackensack, Monclair, Orange, Passiac, Plainfield, 
Ridgewood, Rutherford, Summit, and Vineland, N. J. ; Erie, Franklin, 
Homestead, Lancaster, Meadville, Newcastle, Pittsburg (two societies), 
and Philadelphia, Pa. (three societies) ; Wilmington, Del.; Baltimore, 
Md. ; Washington, D. C. ; Morgantown and Wheeling, W. Va. ; and 
Hamilton, London, Montreal, Ottawa, and Toronto, Canada. 

Officers: Adelbert Moot, Esp., Buffalo, N. Y., President; Rev. 
Thomas R. Slicer, New York, N. Y., Rev. U. G. B. Pierce, Washigton, 
D.C, Mrs. Franklin W. Hooper, Brooklyn, N.Y., W. W. Justice, 
Germantown, Pa., Rev. John Haynes Holmes, New York, N.Y., Rev. 
Franklin C Southworth, Meadville, Pa., Mrs. M. A. Thomas, Toronto, 



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Canada, Vice-Presidents; Rev. George H. Badger, 104 East 20th Street, 
New York, Secretary; Cyril H. Burdett, New York, N. Y., Treasurer. 

Trustees. — Term expires in 1910; Rev. William M. Brundage, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. ; Rev. Charles E. St. John, Philadelphia, Pa. ; Rev. 
Leon A. Harvey, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Term expires in 191 1: Cyril H. Burdett, Brookl)m, N.Y.; 
George R. Bishop, New York, N.Y. 

Term expires in 1912: Milton T. Garvin, Lancaster, Pa.; Emerson 
P. Harris, Montclair, N.J. ; Walter U. Lawson, Yonkers, N.Y. 

Directors. — Term expires in 1910 ; Rev. Elizabeth Padgham, Ruth- 
erford, N.J. ; Rev. Arthur H. Winn, Troy, N.Y. 

Term expires in 191 1: Rev. Richard W. Boynton, Buflfalo, N.Y. ; 
Mrs. Sarah A. Kenney, Troy, N. Y. ; William A. Aborn, Orange. N. J. 

Term expires in 1912: Rev. Alfred R. Hussey, Baltimore, Md. ; 
William G. Williams, Rutherford, N. J. ; Mrs. Robert H. Davis, New 
York, N.Y. 

Within the limits of the Middle States Conference are the two fol- 
lowing Local Conferences: — 

Meadville Unitarian Conference. — Organized at Pittsburg, Pa., 
April 19, 1904. 

Societies: Buffalo (two societies), Dunkirk and Jamestown, 
N. Y. ; Erie, Franklin, Homestead, Pa. ; McKeesport, Meadville, New- 
castle, Pittsburg (two societies), Cleveland, Conneaut, Marrietta, Salem, 
and Youngstown, Ohio ; Morgantown and Wheeling, W. Va. 

Rev. Minot Simons, Cleveland, O., Chairman; Rev. Charles E. 
Snyder, Franklin, Pa., Secretary and Treasurer. 

Joseph Priestley Conference. — Organized at Wilmington, Del., 
April 20, 1904. 

Societies: Lancaster, and Philadelphia (three societies). Pa.; Wil- 
mington, Del.; Baltimore, Md.; Washington, D. C. ; and Vineland, 
N.J. 

Officers : Milton T. Garvin, Lancaster, Pa., President; Mrs. J. T. 
Rorer, Philadelphia, Pa., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Southern Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches. — Organized at Atlanta, Ga,, April 24, 1884. 

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Societies: Louisville, Ky.; Chattanooga and Memphis, Tenn.; 
Baltimore, MA ; Ricmond, Va. ; Atlanta and Faceville, Ga. ; Burgaw, 
Pdetier, and Swansboro, N. C; Charleston, S. C; Bristol and Jack- 
sonville, Fla,; New Orleans, La,; Dallas, Fort Worth, and San An- 
tonio, Tex.; and Oklahoma, Okla. 

Charles H. Behre, Atlanta, Ga., President; C. H. Patterson, New 
Orieans, La,; L. S. Thome, Dallas, Tex.; Arthur D. Stevens, Jack- 
sonville, Fla., Vice-Presidents; Rev. Albert J. Coleman, Jacksonville, 
Fla., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Western Unitarian Conference Organized at Cincinnati, 

Ohio, May 7, 1852. Incorporated May 20, 1882. Annual meeting 
in May. 

The headquarters are at 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 111., where 
the publications of the American Unitarian Association, Unity Pub- 
lishing Committee, the Unitarian Sunday-School Society, and other 
books and tracts are kept on sale and for distribution. The State 
Conferences of Michigan, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and 
Missouri Valley are within the limits of the Western Conference. 

Morton D. Hull, Chicago, 111., President; Rev. George A. Thayer, 
D.DU Cincinnati, Ohio, and Hon. A. J. Sawyer, Lincoln, Neb., Vice- 
Presidents; Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111., Secretary; C. K. 
Pittman, Evanston, 111., Treasurer. 

Directors. — To May, 191 1: Dana Slade, Jr., Hinsdale, 111.; Rev. 
W., Hanson Puis ford, Chicago, 111. ; Rev. Fred V. Hawley, Chicago, 111. ; 
C. S. Udell, Grand Rapids, Mich.; Hon. Morton D. Hull, Chicago, 
IlL; Edwin C. Mason, Milwaukee, Wis.; Rev. George R. Gebauer, 
Duluth, Minn. 

To May, 1912: Rev. Minot Simons, Cleveland, Ohio; Rev. Wilson 
M. Backus, Minneapolis, Minn.; Rev. Mary A. Safford, Des Moines, 
la.; Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111.; Rev. Henry W. Foote, 
Ann Arbor, Mich.; Mrs. C. V. Mersereau, St. Louis, Mo.; Mrs. 
Emma N. Delano, Chicago, 111. 

To May, 191 3: F. A. Delano, Chicago, 111.; Rev. Frank A. Gil- 
more, Madison, Wis.; J. W. Hosmer, Chicago, 111.; C. K. Pittman, 
Evanston, 111. ; Rev. Frederick M. Bennett, Lawrence, Kan. ; Rev. Eu- 
gene R. Shippen, Detroit, Mich. ; Mrs. S. F. Lynn, Chicago, 111. 



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Rocky Mountain Conference of Unitarian and Other Liberal 
Christian Churches. — Organized at Denver, Col., May 17, 1890. 
Annual meeting in October. Headquarters at Unity Church, Denver. 

Societies: Colorado Springs, Denver, Fort Collins, Greeley, and 
Pueblo, CoL; Ogden and Salt Lake City, Utah; Butte, Great Falls, 
and Helena, Mont. ; Bois^ and Lewiston, Ida. 

Francis B. Hill, Colorado Springs, CoL, President; Rev. William T. 
Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah, Secretary; William E. Hutton, Denver, 
Col., Treasurer. 

Pacific Unitarian Conference. — The first session of this Confer- 
ence was held Nov. 2, 1885, at San Francisco. It was organized at 
the same place, Nov. 9, 1886. It meets annually. 

The Conference has its office at Unitarian Headquarters, 376 Sutter 
Street, San Francisco, where all Unitarian literature can be secured. 

The Pacific Unitarian is the organ of the Conference. It has its 
office at Unitarian Headquarters, — Editor, Charles A. Murdock; Edi- 
torial Committee, Rev. Clarence Reed, Rev. William D. Simonds, Rev. 
John Howland Lathrop, William Maxwell, and Rev. Bradford Leavitt. 

Societies : Alameda, Berekeley, Eureka, Fresno, Los Angeles, Oak- 
land, Palo Alto, Pcxnona, Redlands, San Diego, San Francisco, San 
Jose, Santa Ana, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and Wood- 
land, Cal. ; Eugene, Hood River, Portland, and Salem, Ore. ; Belling- 
ham, Everett, Seattle, and Spokane, Wash. 

Officers of the Conference: Hon. Horace Davis, LL.D., San 
Francisco, Cal., President; J. Conklin Brown, Berkeley, Cal., W. F. 
Mixon, Woodland, Cal., Vice-Presidents; Mrs. Mary B. Presson, San 
Francisco, Cal., Secretary and Treasurer. 

Directors; Francis Cutting, Oakland, Cal.-; Hon. Horace Davis, 
San Francisco Cal.; Rev. B. A. Goodridge, Santa Barbara, Cal; 
Prof. Kari G. RendtorflF, Palo Alto, Cal.; Rev. Bradford Leavitt, 
San Francisco, Cal.; W. F. Mixon, Woodland, Cal.; George H. 
Murdock, Alameda, Cal. ; W. P. Olds, Portland, Ore. ; W. H. Payson, 
Berkeley, Cal.; W. H. Gorham, Seattle, Wash.; Rev. Sarah Pratt, 
Carr, Seattle, Wash. 

Within the limits of the Pacific Unitarian Conference are the two 
following Local Conferences : — 



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North Pacific Conference. — Organized at Portland, Ore., Oct. i, 
1902. 

Societies: Eugene, Hood River, Portland, and Salem, Ore.; Bel- 
lingham, Everett, Seattle, and Spokane, Wash.; Boise, Ida; Butte, 
Great Falls, and Helena, Mont 

Harry H. Ells, Bellingham, Wash., President; Rev. William G. 
Eliot, Jr., Portland, Ore., Corresponding Secretary; E. C. Stuart, 
Portland, Ore., Recording Secretary and Treasurer. 

South Pacific Conference. — Organized at Santa Ana, Cal., Jan. 
6, 1903. 

Societies: Los Angeles, Pomona, Redlands, San Diego, Santa 
Ana, and Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Hon. M. A. Luce, San Di^o, Cal., President; Rev. Qarence J. Har- 
ris, San Diego, Cal., Secretary; Dr. Bessie E. Peery, San Diego, Cal., 
Treasurer. 

Iceland Unitarian Conference. — Organized at Gimli, Manitoba, 
Canada, 1901. 

Societies: Ames, Foam Lake, Huansa, Lake Manitoba, Shoal 
I^ke, and Winnip^, Man. 

Hon. Skapt. B. Brynjolfsson, President; Th. Thorvaldsson, Secre- 
tary. 

The Manitoba Conference. — Organized at Winnipeg, Manitoba, 
Canada, January, 1910. The object of this Conference is to assemble 
the Unitarian forces of Manitoba and vicinity for the purposes of 
practical co-operation. Rev. William A. Vrooman, Winnipeg, President; 
Rev. Gudmundur Amason, 577 Sherbrooke Street, Winnip^, Secre- 
tary, 

This Conference is composed of all ministers in charge of Unitarian 
churches in Manitoba and two lay representatives from each church or 
mission. 

WESTERN STATE CONFERENCES 

Illinois Conference. — Organized at Bloomington, 111., Nov. 11, 
1875. One meeting a year. 
Societies: Alton, Aurora, Bloomington, Buda, Chicago (six so- 



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cieties), Evanston, Geneseo, Geneva, Hinsdale, Mattoon, Moline, 
Quincy, Sheffield, Shelby County Mission, Shelbyville (two societies), 
Streator, and Urbana. 

Rev. Fred V. Hawley, Chicago, President; Rev. Albert R. Vail, 
Urbana, Vice-President; Rev. John H. Mueller, Bloomington, Secre- 
tary. 

Iowa Association. — Organized at Burlington, la., June i, 1879. 
Incorporated at Des Moines, June 5, 1879. Headquarters, Des Moines. 

Societies: Burlington, Cherokee, Davenport, Decorah, Des Moines, 
Humboldt, Ida Grove, Iowa City, Keokuk. Perry, Rock Rapids, and 
Sioux City. 

Granville B. Healy, Sioux City, President; Rev. Eleanor E. Gordon, 
Des Moines, Secretary, 

Michigan Conference. — Organized at Jackson, Mich., Oct. 21, 

1875. 

Societies: Ann Arbor, Bendon, Brooklyn, Detroit, Grand Haven, 
Grand Rapids (two societies), Harrietta, Jackson, Kalamazoo, Manistee, 
Midland, Mt. Pleasant, Ousted, Sherwood, Sturgis, Mich.; Cincinnati 
and Toledo, Ohio; Hobart and Indianapolis, Ind. 

C. S. Udell, Grand Rapids, President; Rev. Eugene R. Shippen, 
Detroit, Secretary. 

Minnesota Conference. — Organized at St. Paul, Nov. 17, 1887. 

Societies: Adrian, Duluth, Hanska, Luveme, Minneapolis (two 
societies), St. Anthony Park, St. Cloud, St. Paul, Underwood, and 
Winona, Minn. ; Fargo, No. Dak. ; and Brookings, So. Dak. 

Ole Jorgensen, Hanska, President; Rev. George R. Gebauer, Duluth, 
Secretary. 

Missouri Valley Conference. — Organized, as the Kansas Unitarian 
Conference, Dec. 2, 1880. 

Societies : Beloit, Lawrence, Topeka, and Wichita, Kan. ; Lincoln, 
Omaha, and Ord, Neb.; and Kansas City, Mo. 



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Paul F. Clark, Lincoln, Neb., President; Rev. J. H. Jones, Topeka, 
Kan., Secretary. 

Winconsin Conference of Unitarian and Independent Societies. — 
Organized at Sheboygan, Wis., Oct 24, 1866. 

Societies: Arcadia, Kenosha, Madison, Menomonie, Milwaukee, 
Neillsville, and West Superior. 

Rev. Frank A. Gilmore, Madison, Secretary. 



STATE, COUNTY, AND LOCAL CONFERENCES 
IN NEW ENGLAND 

Cape Cod Conference of Unitarian Congregational and Other 
Liberal Christian Churches. — Organized at Barnstable, Mass., Nov. 
30, 1870. Annual meeting in Jime. A September meeting optional 
with the Executive Board. 

Societies: Barnstable, Brewster, and Sandwich. 

J. Henry Sears, Brewster, President; Rev. Robert P. Doremus, 
Barnstable, Secretary. 

Channing Conference. — Organized at Providence, R. I., April 17, 
1867. Meetings held semi-annually; annual meeting in April. 

Societies : Brooklyn and New London, Conn. ; Attleboro, Dighton, 
Fairhaven, Fall River, Nantucket, New Bedford, Norton, Taunton, 
and Vineyard Haven, Mass.; Newport, Providence (four societies), 
Tiverton, and Westerly, R.I. 

J. C. Tripp, Fairhaven, Mass., President; Rev. George Kent, Prov- 
idence, R. I., Secretary. 

Connecticut Valley Conference of Unitarian Congregational and 
Other Christian Churches. — Organized at Greenfield, Mass., Jan. 16, 
1867. Meetings held in May and October, the latter being the annual 
meeting. 

Societies: Amherst, Bemardston, Chicopee, Deerfield, Florence, 
Greenfield, Holyoke, Monroe Bridge, Montague, Northampton, North- 
field, Pittsfield, Rowe, Springfield, Turner's Falls, and Warwick, 



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Mass. ; Brattleboro and Windsor, Vt. ; Derby, Hartford, New London, 
and Willimantic, Conn. 

W. S. Allen, Greenfield, President; Rev. Kenneth E. Evans, Chic- 
opee. Secretary; Rev. Arthur H. Coar, Holyoke, Treasurer. 

ESssex Conference of Unitarian Churches. — Organized at Salem, 
Mass., Dec. ii, 1866. Three meetings a year. 

Societies: Beverly, Danvers, Gloucester, Haverhill, Lawrence, 
Lynn, Marblehead, Newburyport, North Andover, Peabody, Salem : — 
First Church, Second Church, North Church. 

Gardner M. Jones, Salem, President; Henry F. Tapley, Lynn, 
Vice-President; Rev. Peter H. Goldsmith, D.D., Salem, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

Hancock Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches — Organized at Bar Harbor, Aug. 8, 1889. A conference 
of the local and siunmer Liberal churches in Hancock County, Me. 

Societies: Bar Harbor, Ellsworth, Lamoine, Prospect Harbor, Sul- 
livan, Winter Harbor, and West Gouldsboro. 

Rev. Henry H. Saunderson, Cambridge, President; B. C. Reynolds, 
Bar Harbor, Me., Secretary and Treasurer. 

The Maine Conference of Unitarian Churches. — Organized 
at Waterville, June 28, 1864. 

Societies: Augusta, Bangor, Bar Harbor, Belfast, Bnmswick, Ca- 
lais, Cape Rozier, Castine, Eastport, Ellsworth, Farmington, Fort 
Fairfield, West Gouldsboro, Houlton, Kennebunk, East Lamoine, Na- 
ples, Portland (two societies), Presque Isle, Saco, Sanford, Standish, 
Sullivan, Waterville, Winter Harbor, Yarmouth, and York. 

Rev. Alva R. Scott, Bangor, President; Hon. Norman L. Bassett, 
Augusta, Vice-President; Rev. Edwin M. Slocombe, Augusta, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

The Norfolk Conference of Unitarian and Other Christian 
Churches. — Organized at Dedham, Mass., Dec. 5, 1866. Not leas 
than two meetings during the year. 



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Societies: Canton, Dedham, Dorchester (six societies), Dover, 
Hyde Park, Medfield, Milton, Needham, Quincy, Randolph, Roslin- 
dale, Sharon, Sherbom, South Natick, Walpole, West Roxbury, West 
wood, Wollaston. 

George Kuhn Qarke, Needham, President; Rev. George M. Bodge, 
1 1 Meredith Street, West Roxbury, Secretary and Treasurer. 

New Hampshire Unitarian Association. — Organized at Man- 
chester, Feb. 25, 1863. Incorporated Sept. 11, 1883. One meeting 
a year, in June. 

Societies: Andover, Bath, Charlestown, Concord, Cornish, Dover, 
Dublin, Exeter, Fitzwilliam, Francestown, Franklin, Hampton Falls, 
Keene, Laconia, Lancaster, Lebanon, Littleton, Manchester, Milford, 
Nashua, Newington, Peterboro, Portsmouth, Rochester, Walpole, Wil- 
ton, East Wilton, Wolfeboro- 

Qarence E. Carr, Andover, President; Rev. Henry C. McDougall, 
Franklin, N. H., General Secretary; Rev. H. Sumner Mitchell, Keene, 
Recording Secretary; Dr. John W. Staples, Franklin, Treasurer. 

The North Middlesex Congregational Conference of Unitarian 
and Other Christian Churches. — Organized Dec. 18, 1866. Meet- 
ings held in June and October, the latter being the annual meeting. 

Societies: Ashby, Ayer, Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton, Lowell, 
Pepperell, Shirley, Stow, Tyngsboro, Westford, West Townsend, 
Mass.; Dublin, Francestown, Milford, Nashua, Peterboro, Wilton, 
East Wilton, N. H. 

Abiel J. Abbot, Westford, President; Rev. George C. Wright, 
Lowell, Secretary. 

Plymouth and Bay Conference Organizer at Hingham, Mass., 

Feb. 5, 1867. Meetings held in spring and autumn. The annual meet- 
ing at the spring session. 

Societies : Braintree, Bridgewater, East Bridgewater, West Bridge- 
water, Brockton, Cohasset, Duxbury, Eastondale, Green Harbor, 
Hingham (three societies), Kingston, Marshfield, Middleboro, North 
Abington, North Easton, Norwell, Pembroke, Plymouth, Rockland, 
Scituate, Whitman. 



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Hon. William S. Kyle, Plymouth, President; George O. Wales, 
Braintree, Rev. Edward B. Maglathlin, West Bridgewater, Vice- 
Presidents; Rev. William R. Cole, Cohasset, Secretary; Edward 
Nichols, Cohasset, Treasurer. 

South Middlesex Conference of Congregational (Unitarian) and 
Other Christian Societies. — Organized at Cambridgeport, Mass., Dec. 
12, 1866. Two meetings a year, the first being the annual meeting. 

Societies: Arlington, Bedford, Belmont, Billerica, Cambridge 
(two societies), Carlisle, Concord, Framingham, Lexington, East Lex- 
ington, Lincoln, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Natick, Newton, Newton 
Centre, West Newton, Reading, Revere, Somerville (two societies), 
Stoneham, Sudbury, Waltham, Watertown, Waverley, Wayland, 
Wellesley Hills, Weston, Winchester, Wobum. 

Allen French, Concord, President; Rev. Harry Lutz, Newton, Sec- 
retary. 

The Worcester Conference of Congregational (Unitarian) and 
Other Christian Societies. — Organized at Worcester, Mass., Dec. 12, 
1866. Meetings in January, May, and October, the first being the 
annual meeting. 

Societies: Athol (two societies), Barre, Berlin, Bolton, Brookfield, 
Qinton, Fitchburg, Gardner, Grafton, Harvard, Hopedale, Hubbards- 
ton, Hudson, Lancaster, Leicester, Leominster, Marlboro, Mendon, 
Millbury, Northboro, Petersham, Sterling, Sturbridge, Templeton, 
Upton, Uxbridge, Ware, Westboro, Winchendon, Worcester (three 
societies). 

Hon. Jonathan Smith, Clinton, President; Rev. James C. Duncan, 
Clinton, Secretary. 

UNITARIAN SUNDAY-SCHOOL SOCIETY 

The Unitarian Sunday-School Society was organized in 
History. Boston, April 18, 1827. Its members were pastors, teach- 
ers, and officers from the ten Unitarian Sunday Schools 
in the city. Dr. Tuckerman was its first President, and Rev. Frederic 
T. Gray, the Secretary. Some of the workers at this period were 



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such ministers as Dr. Channing, Henry Ware, Jr., Rev. Ezra Gannett, 
Rev. John Pierpont, Rev. N. L. Frothingham, and such laymen as Dr. 
John Ware, Dr. H. I. Bowditch, Francis Jackson, Ellis Gray Loring, 
and Artemas Carter. 

When, in 183 1, the Society expanded, other prominent characters 
entered into the work, such as Rev. Joseph Allen, of Northboro ; Rev. 
Samuel Gilman, Charleston, S. C. ; Rev. S. G. Bulfinch, Augusta, Ga. ; 
Hon. Samuel Hoar, Concord, Mass. ; Hon. Stephen C. Phillips, Salem, 
Mass. ; John W. Foster, Portsmouth, N. H. 

The first annual meeting was held Dec. 14, 1827, in the Federal 
Street Church. Mr. Horace Mann was among those who took part in 
the public exercises at a later date. In the year 1852 a serious of man- 
uals was issued, prepared by these ministers : Ephraim Peabody, S. G. 
Bulfinch, Rufus Ellis, E. E. Hale, F. D. Huntington, Dr. John H. 
Morison, George W. Briggs. In 1854 the Society was reorganized. 
Among the devoted secretaries who have passed away were Warren H. 
Cudworth, James P. Walker, L. J. livermore. In 1885 the Society 
was incorporated. 

«^ . The publication scope of the Society has made steady 

IT^^ ^ advance the past eighteen years. The record may very 
' well be illustrated in the growth from a slender list of 
manuals and text-books to a large descriptive catalogue, which con- 
tains the titles of over one hundred and fifty different publications. 
These represent working material constantly in demand in our Sun- 
day Schools, covering all phases of Sunday-School activity. Attention 
has been given to modem methods of pedagogy, the latest scholarship 
has been drawn upon, and pictorial aids have been wisely employed. 
Every Other Sunday has obtained a wide circulation in all our Sunday 
Schools, and the " Song and Service Book " is so widely used as to 
act as a tmiting element throughout the denomination. 

W te ^ Western Headquarters is maintained in Chicago 

„ - by the National Society, where a complete supply of 

^ publications is kept. The catalogue of the Unitarian 

Sunday-School Society contains the titles of all the publications hith- 
erto issued by the Western organization. 



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ntiiM^tfi ^^ object of the Unitarian Sunday-School Society is " to 
^^^ promote moral and religious education," and this it seeks 
to do greatly through the Sunday Schools. The Society not only 
publishes the r^;ular manuals, service books, and appliances, and is- 
sues Every Other Sunday, the only paper in our denomination for 
young people, but it also serves in the following channels: i. It sup- 
plies tracts and different statements of faith, in any number of copies, 
without charge. 2. It acts as a missionary and recruiting agency for 
the denomination in all parts of the country. 3. It joins with local 
Conferences in planning and carrying on forward movements. 4. It 
sustains courses of instruction and lectures. 5. It indorses and helps 
the various Sunday-School Unions now doing such good work. 6. 
It maintains a Book Department where the appliances for Sunday- 
School work can be obtained. 7. It provides some one at the head 
of the organization to respond to calls for addresses and consultation. 
The Society's primary object being a co-operative one, for the welfare 
of the Sunday Schools, all the business tranactions are at the smallest 
profit. 

A payment of ten dollars ($10) at any one time constitutes 
erms. ^ person a Life Member of the Society. A contribution to 
the funds of the Society, small or large, by any parish or Simday 
School, constitutes a membership for the current year. Said Sim- 
day School is entitled to appoint three persons who become voting 
members of the corporation for that year, beginning with the annual 
meeting of the Society next following the receipt of said contribution. 
Such persons are denominated Del^ate Members. 

The Society holds two sessions during the year, one, the Annual 
Meeting, in Boston, Artliiversary Week, the other in different places, 
usually some date in October. 

^^^^ Board of Directors. — Rev. William I. Lawrance, Winches- 

ter, Mass., President; Charles A. Murdock, San Francisco, 
Cal., Rev. Julian C. Jaynes, West Newton, Mass., Vice-Presidents; 
Miss Louisa P. Parker, Cambridge, Mass., Clerk; Richard C Hum- 
phreys, Dorchester, Mass., Treasurer. 

Term expires 191 1: John H. Edwards, Waverley, Mass.; Rev. 



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Richard W. Boynton, Buffalo, N. Y. ; Allen French, Gmcord, Mass. ; 
Rev. Frank S. C. Wicks, Indianapolis, Ind.; Mrs. Herbert J. Guiney, 
Wollaston, Mass. 

Term expires 1912: Rev. Charles W. Casson, Dorchester, Mass.; 
Frank H. Burt, Newton, Mass.; Rev. Clifton M. Gray, Charleston, 
S. C. ; Benjamin James, South Boston, Mass. ; Miss Sara C Bullard, 
Dorchester, Mass. 

Term expires 1913: Rev. Roger S. Forbes, Dorchester, Mass.; 
George W. Woodbury, Gloucester, Mass.; Mrs. Clara T. Guild, 
Medford, Mass. ; Mr. O. Ellery Edwards, Jr., New York City ; Rev. 
Eugene R. Shippen, Detroit, Mich. 

The President's office, salesroom of the Society, and publication of- 
fice of Every Other Sunday are at the American Unitarian Associa- 
tion Building, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, and are open daily from 9 
A.M. till 5 P.M. Philip C. McMurdie, H. W. Packard, and Miss E. S. 
Hosmer, Book Department; William A. Mulcahy, Shipping Qerk. 
Miss H. E. Stevenson, President's office. 

Western Headquarters of the Sunday-School Society, 175 Dearborn 
Street, Chicago. Full assortment of the publications. Orders filled 
promptly. Miss Lina Scheible in charge. 

Western Advisory Board. — Rev. W. Hanson Pulsford, Chicago, 111. ; 
Mrs. F. C. Southward, Meadville, Pa.; Mrs. Charles Hayward, Chi- 
cago, 111.; W. A. Barnes, Chicago, 111.; B. F. Felix, Chicago, 111.; 
Prof. W. H. Carruth, Lawrence, Kan. ; Rev. J. H. Crooker, D.D., Ros- 
lindale, Mass. 

A descriptive catalogue of the Society's publications will be fur- 
nished to any one applying for the same. 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL UNIONS 

The Unitarian Sunday-School Union, Boston, Mass. — Organized 
Nov. 12, 1883. 

Meetings on the third Monday of each month, from October to 
April, inclusive. Annual meeting in April. Officers: Louis P. Nash, 
President; Charles H. Johnson, Vice-President; Mrs. C. L. Stebbins, 
Cambridge, Mass., Secretary; Amasa W. B. HuflF, Treasurer. 



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The Channing Conference Sunday-School Union. — Organized at 
Taunton, Mass., Nov. 7, 1900. Meetings, November and February. 

Rev. Joel H. Metcalf, Taunton, President; Miss Carrie M. Bright- 
man, Fall River, Secretary. 

New York Unitarian Sunday-School Union. — Organized at New 
York, N. Y., Nov. 9, 1892. Meetings are held in November, January, 
March, and May. Annual meeting in May. 

Offiers: O. EUery Edwards, Jr., President; Rev. Leon A. Har- 
vey, 798 Elmore Place, Brooklyn, N. Y. Secretary; John L. Salter, 
Jr., Treasurer. 

THE NATIONAL ALLIANCE 

National Alliance of Unitarian and Other Liberal Christian 
Women. — Organized Oct. 24, 1890; incorporated January, 1902. 
Annual meeting in May. 

National Officers, 1909-11. — Miss Emma C. Low, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
President; Mrs. Emily A. Fifield, 4 Ashland Street, Dorchester, Mass., 
Recording Secretary; Mrs. Mary B. Davis, 19 East 44th Street, New 
York, N. Y., Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. Lucia Clapp Noyes, 11 
St. John Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass., Treasurer. 

Committee on Appeals. — Mrs. Prescott Keyes, Concord, Mass., 
Chairman. 

Committee on Cheerful Letter Exchange. — Miss Helen L. Bayley, 
Cambridge, Mass., Chairman. 

Committee to confer with the American Unitarian Association. — » 
Mrs. Percy G. Bolster, Chairman; Mrs. Mary B. Davis, Mrs. Myles 
Standish, and President, ex officio. 

Post-office Mission Committee. — Mrs. Frederick T. Lord, Boston, 
Chairman. 

Committee on Study Classes. — Mrs. J. A. Tufts, 27 Pine Street, 
Exeter, N. H., Chairman. 

Committee on Finance. — Mrs. George G. Saville, Saville Street, 
Quincy, Mass., Chairman. 

Committee on Southern Missionary Work. — Mrs. Abby A. Peter- 
son, Jamaica Plain, Mass., Chairman. 



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The objects of the Alliance are : — 

1. Primarily, to quicken the religious life of our Unitarian churches, and 
to bring the women of the denomination into closer acquaintance, co-opera- 
tion, and fellowship. 

2. To promote local organizations of women for missionary and denomina- 
tional work, and to bring the same into association. 

3. To collect and disseminate information regarding all matters of interest to 
the denomination, namely: — 

Needs of local societies; facilities for meeting these needs; work to be 
done; collection and distribution of money, etc. 

4. And to devise ways and means for more efficient usefulness. 

For further information see Manual. 

Chicago Associate Alliance. — Composed of the branches in the 
four Chicago churches and those of Evanston, Geneva, and Hinsdale. 

It has two hundred and fifty members, and holds seven meetings 
each year between the first of October and the first of June. 

Mrs. Ernest C. Smith, President; Mrs. T. R. Fleming, 33 S. Stone 
Avenue, La Grange, 111., Secretary and Treasurer. 

New England Associate Alliance. — Organized at Boston, Mass., 
Oct. 22, 1891. 

It holds at least three meetings a year, two of which usually are 
held outside of Boston, and, when possible, in some other State than 
Massachusetts. Each New England State is represented upon its 
Executive Board. Its object is to promote religious fellowship among 
its members and to increase the co-operation of the branches in the 
missionary work of the denomination. 

Mrs. Alma Faunce Smith, 2$ Beacon Street, Boston, President; 
Miss Jessie M. Fisher, 217 Church Street, Newton, Mass., Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

New York League of Unitarian Women. — Meetings held on the 
first Friday of each month, from November to May, inclusive. 

It is composed of the Alliance branches in the three Unitarian so- 
cieties in Manhattan, New York City, the five in Brooklyn, and those 
in Flushing, Newburg, Yonkers, and Staten Island, N. Y., and Eliza- 



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bethy Orange, Passaic, Plainiield, Rutherford, Hackensack, Montclair, 
and Ridgewood, N. J. 

Mrs. Edwin H. Wheeler, President; Mrs. George M. Strout, 327 E. 
i8th Street, Brodclyn, N. Y., Recording Secretary; Miss Ida Grib- 
ben, 314 Halsey Street, Brooklyn, N. Y., Corresponding Secretary; 
Mrs. J. H. Ambrose, Treasurer. 

Worcester League of Unitarian Women. — Organized in Worces- 
ter, May 24, 1889. 

Fifteen churches of the Worcester Conference, besides the three 
Worcester churches are represented in its membership. 

Meetings are held on the third Wednesday of each month, from No- 
vember to May, inclusive. 

Mrs. Joseph M. Davis, President; Mrs. Samuel P. Capen, Secretary. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES 

The Young People's Religious Union. — Organized at Boston, May 
28, 1896. 

The Young People's Religious Union is the successor of the National 
Bureau of Unity Clubs, organized May 26, 1887, and of the National 
Guild Alliance, organized Nov. 18, 1889. 

The objects of the Union are: (a) to foster the religious life; (&) 
to bring the young people of our several churches into closer re- 
lations with one another; and (c) to spread rational views of religion 
and to put into practice such principles of life and duty as tend to 
uplift mankind. The cardinal principles of the Union are truth, wor- 
ship, and service. 

Any young people's society may become a member of the Union by 
affirming in writing its sympathy with the general objects of the 
Union, adopting its cardinal principles, making a contribution to its 
treasury, and sending to the Secretary a list of its officers. 

The annual meeting is held in May at such day and place as the 
Executive Board may appoint. Special union meetings are held as 
often as several societies may arrange. 

The Union has its headquarters at Room 11 in the American 



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Unitarian Association Building, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, in charge 
of the Secretary, whose office hours are from 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily ; 
Saturdays, 9 to i. Organization hints, hymnals, helps, and other 
suggestive material are supplied to societies. The national officers 
furnish speakers for initial meetings, visit tmions, and help in all ways 
possible. 

The Union maintains a department in the Christian Register and 
an occasional one in the Pacific Unitarian, imder the charge of the 
Secretary, for notes, notices, helps, and all matters of interest to 
the Union. 

It also publishes, in connection with the American Unitarian Asso- 
ciation and the Women's Alliance, Word and Work, which is a bulletin 
of work. 

Executive Board, 1910-11. — Rev. Henry H. Satmderson, Cam- 
bridge, Mass., President; Mrs. Joseph Abbott, Charleston, S. C, San- 
ford Bates, Dorchester, Mass., Rev. Haynes HoUnes, New York, 
N. Y., Rev. John H. Lathrop, Berkeley, CaL, Rev. Abbot Peterson, 
Lancaster, Mass., Rev. Albert R. Vail, Urbana, 111., Vice-Presidents; 
Miss Grace R. Torr, Peabody, Mass., Secretary; O. Arthur McMurdie, 
West Somerville, Mass., Treasurer. 

Directors. — Term expires 191 1: Maine: Rev. Arthur B. Whitney, 
Saco; New Hampshire: Rev. Henry G. Ives, Andover; Vermont: 
Rev. Charles J. Staples, Burlington ; Massachusetts : Miss Caroline S. 
Burrage, West Newton ; Miss Emily J. Qine, Dorchester ; Harold S. 
Lyon, West Bridgewater; Philip C. Nash, AUston; H. Houghton 
Schumacher, Quincy; Miss Almira E. Simmons, Wollaston; Miss 
Harriet C. Stimson, Fitchburg; John H. Wilson, Cambridge; New 
York: Mrs. Mary G. White, Syracuse; Pennsylvania: Miss Elsa 
Waldie, Germantown; Canada: Dakers Cameron, Montreal. 



FEDERATIONS OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S SOCIETIES 

Boston Federation. — Organized December 12, 1902. Meetings 
held in November, February, and April, the latter being the annual 
meeting. Eighteen unions. 

Sidney L. Kimball, Little's 7, Cambridge Mass., President; Frank 



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E. Cook, 32 Saratoga Street, East Boston, Vice-President; Miss 
Edwina B. Reynolds, 50 Congress Street, Boston, Secretary; Fred- 
erick B. Elliot, 44 Matthews Hall, Cambridge, Mass., Treasurer, 

Channing Federation. — Organized April 21, 1907. Meetings held 
twice a year. Eleven unions. 

Arthur W. Sampson, Fall River, Mass., President; Miss Florence 
L. Cowles, Norton, Mass., Secretary. 

'Essex Federation. — Organized November 19, 1901. Meetings 
held twice a year. Seven unions. 

Sidney H. Holden, Salem, President; Miss Mercedes H. Torr, 
Peabody, Secretary and Treasurer, 

Federation of Young People's Societies in North Middlesex 
County and Vicinity. — Meetings held in September and April, the 
latter being the annual meeting. Organized Feb. 24, 1900. Three 
unions. 

Rev. L. L. Greene, Chelmsford, President; Miss Lucy Adams, 
Littleton, Secretary; Mrs. Bessie A. Sherwin, Easton, Treasurer. 

South Middlesex Federation. — Organized March 7, 1902. Fif- 
teen unions. Meetings held first Sunday of May and second Sunday 
of October. 

Rev. Harry Lutz, Newton, President; Miss Josephine Bruorton, 
Bedford, Secretary. 

Pilgrim Federation of Unitarian Young People. — Organized 
March i, 1906. Includes unorganized young people in its member- 
ship. Young people from nine churches belong. Meetings: March, 
June, September, December; the annual meeting being in December. 

Arthur Ryder, West Bridgewater, President; Miss Mildred Hall, 
Newbui^ Street, Brockton, Secretary. 

North Worcester Federation. — Meetings held twice a year. 
Eleven unions. 

Rev. Abbot Peterson, President; Miss Rena Carter, West Berlin, 
Secretary. 



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South Worcester Federation. — Meetings held s<Hne Sunday in 
January, April, and October, with election at the January meeting. 
Nine unicxis. 

Harry G. Newman, Hopedale, President; Miss May A. Leland, 
Worcester, Secretary and Treasurer, 



NATIONAL LEAGUE OF UNITARIAN LAYMEN 

National League of Unitarian Laymen. — Organized May 25, 
1909. Annual meeting in May. 

National Officers, 1909-10. — Hem. William H. Taft, Honorary 
President; Prof. William H. Carruth, Kansas University, Lawrence, 
Kansas, President; Hon. Eben S- Draper, LL.D., Hopedale, Massa- 
chusetts, 1st Vice-President; Milton T. Garvin, Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania, 2d Vice-President; Cyril H. Burdett, 135 Broadway, New York 
City, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Executive Committee: Mr. Courtenay Guild, 41 India Street, Bos- 
ton, Mass. ; Mr. Delbert H. Decker, Loan and Trust Building, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; Hon. Duncan U. Fletcher, Jacksonville, Fla. ; Mr. 
Morton D. Hull, 181 La Salle Street, Chicago, 111.; Mr. Ralph W. 
Wilbur, Board of Trade Building, Portland, Ore.; Mr. Charles W. 
Ames, St. Paul, Minn. 

The general purposes of the League are as follows : 

To promote the organization of men's clubs in all our churches and 
to suggest and supervise methods for their activity Hoag tfie following 
lines: 

1. To bring the men of the separate churches into closer acquaint- 
ance, co-operation, and fellowship through the various forms of social 
and church work; 

2. To bring about an increasing participation by our laymen, not 
only in the work of their local church, but also in the affairs of the 
denomination at large; 

3. To extend the activities of the church to the advancement of the 
social, civic, moral, and religious interests of the community. 

For further information communicate with the Secretary, at address 
given above. 



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GENERAL UNITARIAN SOCIETIES 

Unitarian Histcnical Society. — The purpose of this society is to 
collect and preserve books, manuscripts, periodicals, pamphlets, pic- 
tures, and memorabilia which describe and illustrate the history of 
the Unitarian movement, and to stimulate an interest in the writing 
of the history and preparing of the records of Unitarian churches. 

Henry H. Edes, Esq., President; Rev. George H. Reed, Belmont, 
Mass., Secretary; Rev. Louis C. Cornish, Librarian. 

Isles of Shoals Summer Meetings Association. — Holds meetings 
one week in July, each year, at the Isles of Shoals. Thomas H. El- 
liott, President; Miss Florence Everett, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, 
Mass., Secretary. 

Nantucket Summer Meetings Holds meetings the first week of 

July every two years, alternating with the National Conference. Rev. 
Edward Day, President; Rev. John F. Meyer, South Natick, Mass., 
Secretary. 

The Unitarian Temperance Society. — Organized at the meeting 
of the National Conference at Saratoga, N. Y., Sept 23, 1886. In- 
corporated Nov. 12, 1894. 

Its purpose is "to work for the cause of temperance in whatever 
ways may seem to it wise and right ; to study the social problems of 
poverty, crime, and disease, in their relation to the use of intoxicating 
drinks, and to diffuse whatever knowledge may be gained ; to discuss 
methods of temperance reform; to devise and, so far as possible, 
to execute plans for practical reform; to exert by its meetings and 
by its membership such influence for good as by the grace of God 
it may possess." 

The society is composed of such persons as may be willing to 
express their co-operation by the payment of one dollar annually. 



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A payment of twenty-five dollars (or that sum within five years from 
the date of the first instalment) constitutes one a life-member. The 
annual meeting is held in Boston in the mcxith of May, in Anniversary 
Week, the hour and place to be fixed by the Executive Board 

The headquarters of the Society are at the American Unitarian 
Association Building, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. The Society's 
literature may be obtained in Rocxn i of the Association Building. 

Rev. Joseph H. Crooker, D.D., Boston (Roslindale), Mass., Presp- 
dent; Richard C. Humphreys, Dorchester, Mass., Vice-President; 
Rev. A. D. K. ShurtleflF, East Boston, Secretary; Charles H. Steams, 
Brookline, Mass., Treasurer. 

The Unitarian Fellowship for Social Justice. — Organized at the 
Anniversary meetings held in Boston, Mass., May 29, 1908. Its pur- 
pose is ''to provide a fellowship for united action against all forms 
of social injustice, and to sustain one another in the application of 
our religious ideals to the needs of the present day." The Fellowship 
is composed of those Unitarians, ministers and laymen, who are in 
sympathy with its purpose, and who pay the annual dues of one 
dollar. Rev. John Haynes Holmes, New York, President; Rev. 
Charles W. Casson, Dorchester, Mass., Rev. Henry G. Ives, Andover, 
N. H., Rev. Arthur L. Weatherly, Lincoln, Neb., Rev. Henry W. Foote, 
Ann Arbor, Mich., Rev. C. Bertrand Thompscm, Cambridge, Mass., 
and Rev. William T. Brown, Salt Lake City, Utah, Vice-Presidents; 
Rev. W. W. Peck, Winchendon, Mass., Secretary-Treasurer; Execu- 
tive Committee: OflScers, and Hon. Clarence E. Carr, Andover, N. H., 
Rev. Earl C. Davis, Pittsfield, Mass*, and Rev. John H. Applebee, 
Attleboro, Mass. The annual meeting will be held in Anniversary 
Week. 



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UNITARIAN CLUBS 

Boston: The Channing Club, Boston, Mass. — Organized March 
26, 1887. 

Membership is limited to one htmdred and twenty-five, and any 
regular attendant at a Unitarian church is eligible. Meetings on the 
fourth Monday of January, February, April, and October, the last 
being the annual meeting. Arthur W. Moors, President; Frederick W. 
Porter, 66 Walnut Street, Dorchester, Secretary. 

Boston: The Unitarian Club, Boston, Mass. — Organized Jan. 
26, 1882. 

The membership is limited to two himdred and fifty Unitarian lay- 
men. 

Meetngs on the second Wednesday of the month, October to April 
inclusive, at the Hotel Vendome, at which dinner is served, and some 
denominational, religious, or philanthropic subject, or other topic of 
public moment, is discussed. The annual meeting is held on the second 
Wednesday of January. 

Charles W. Eliot, LL.D., President; Charles W. Birtwell, 43 
Charity Building, Boston, Secretary; Francis H. Brown, M.D., 28 
State Street, Boston, Treasurer, 

California: Unitarian Club of California. — Organized at San 
Francisco, February, 1890. 

Composed of gentlemen from churches of all creeds in San Fran- 
cisco and other churches throughout the State. Membership limited 
to two hundred. Five banquets a year. 

Joseph Hutchinson, President; Edwin Bonnell, loi Mon^omery 
Street, San Francisco, Cal., Secretary. 

Chicago : The Unitarian Club of Chicago, lU. — Organized April, 
1881. 

Membership open to the members and ministers of the Unitarian 
congregations of Chicago and vicinity. Meetings held occasionally. 



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The President is chosen for each meeting by a Committee of Man- 
agers. 

Connecticut Valley: The Liberal Layman's Club of the Con- 
necticut Valley. — Organized at Northampton, Mass., Nov. 15, 1898. 

The membership consists of gentlemen of Unitarian and other 
Liberal churches of the valley. Meetings held in Northampton three 
times a year. 

Herbert C. Parsons, Greenfield, President^ — — , Secre* 

tary and Treasurer. 

Harvard Unitarian Club. — Organized November i, 1894. Its ob- 
ject is to bring Unitarian Students of the Divinity School of Harvard 
University into more immediate contact with the actual working minis- 
try. Its membership includes, besides students of the school, ministers 
not more than five years in service since ordination and twenty- 
five associate members from the older ministers. Meetings are held 
on the third Thursday of each month, from October to May, inclusive. 

Officers. — H.H. Schumacher, President; L. Rutkdge, Vice-Presi- 
dent; C. R. Joy, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Lowell: Liberal Christian Club (of Unitarian and Universalist 
men) of Lowell. — Organized 1899. Meets four times a year. 

Hon. George F. Richardson, Honorary President; Rev. Caleb E. 
Fisher, President; Rev. George C Wright, Secretary. 

Lowell: Men's Club of First Unitarian Society. — Rev. Charles 
T. Billings, President; J. W. Crawford, Secretary; Albert S. Guild, 
Treasurer. 

Merrimack Valley Unitarian Club The membership is derived 

from the Unitarian churches of the Merrimack Valley. 
Rev. George C. Wright, Lowell, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Natick: Natick Unitarian Club. — Composed of members from 
the two churches in Natick. President, James E. White. 

Newton: Unitarian Club of Newton. — Members from the three 
churches of Newton. 
President, Charles A. Clarke; Secretary, Frank H, Burt. 



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New York: The Unitarian Club of New York. — Organized De- 
cember, 1887. 

Membership limited to two hundred persons, ministers and laymen, 
including women. 

The annual meeting is the final spring meeting in each year. All 
meetings are desig^ted by the Council of the club, and are usually 
four in number. 

Cyril H. Burdett, 135 Broadway, New York, N. Y., President; 
William S. Miller, 141 East 40th Street, New York, N. Y., Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

Oregon: The Unitarian Club of Oregon. — W. P. Olds, Presi- 
dent; S. G. Lathrop, Secretary and Treasurer. 

PhUadelphia: The Unitarian Club of Philadelphia, Pa. — Meet- 

ings of the Qub are subject to the call of the President or of any 
ten members. 

Henry L. Child, President; Alvan T. Janes, 4716 Windsor Avenue, 
Recording Secretary; Paschal H. Coggins, Corresponding Secretary^ 

Providence: The Unitarian Club, Providence, R. I. — Organized 
Dec. 28, 1886. 

Meetings are held at various intervals from November to April. 
The annual meeting is held in April. The membership is limited 
to one hundred and twenty-five persons. 

Chester W. Barrows, President; Prescott O- Qarke, Vice-President; 
Augustus R. Pierce, Treasurer; Russell C. Lowell, 420 Hope Street, 
Secretary. 

Besides the above clubs, which cover a larger territory than one 
church, there are about four score men's clubs, besides many mis- 
cellaneous org^izations directly related to our individual parishes. 



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MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATIONS 

Boston Assodation of Ministenk — Formed before 1686. Meet- 
ings on the second Monday of each month, October to May, inclusive. 

Settled ministers of Boston, Brookline, Milton, and Quincy are eligi- 
ble to membership. Others may be elected honorary members. 

Rev. Christopher R Eliot, Moderator; Rev. James Huxtable, South 
Boston, Scribe. 

The Association of Ministers in and about Cambridge, Mass. — 
Organized April 11, 1809. Meetings on the first Monday of every 
month except July, August, and September. 

Rev. George Hale Reed, Belmont, Scribe. 

Massachusetts Convention of Congregational Ministers. — Dates 
from the earliest times of the colcmy. Annual business meeting in 
the court-room of the Supreme Judicial Court in Boston at 5 p. m. 
on the last Wednesday in May. Public service in the South Congre- 
gational Church, Boston, at 11 a. m. on Thursday of Anniversary 
Week. At this service a collection is taken, which, with the income 
of the Convention Fund, is distributed to the needy widows and 
daughters of deceased Congregational ministers of Massachusetts. 
(See Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society, page 128.) 
Every minister of a Congregational church in Massachusetts (whether 
Trinitarian or Unitarian) is ex officio a member of the Convention. 

There is a reporting Committee of twenty-five, selected by counties 
throughout the State, by which recommendations are made to a 
Central Committee of seven, which decides on all applications for aid. 

Permanent Officers. — Rev. William E. Strong, Newtonville, Mass., 
Scribe, Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverly, Treasurer, to either of 
whom applications for aid may be addressed. 

Ministerial Conference (Berry Street Conference). — Organized 
Aug. 29, 1819. 

The annual meeting for address and discussion is held in Boston 
on Tuesday of Anniversary Week. 



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Rev. Julian C Jaynes, Scribe. Executive Committee: Rev. George 
Batchelor, Boston, Mass.; Rev. Augustus M. Lord, D.D., Providence, 
R. I. ; and Rev. Charles T. Billings, Lowell, Mass. 

The Ministers' Institute* — Organized under the auspices of the 
Council of the National Conference. First meeting, Oct. 9, 1876, 
at Springfield, Mass. Meets biennially, alternating with the meetings 
of the National Conference. Its purpose is to assemble the Unitarian 
ministers for the discussion of all subjects that bear upon their thought 
and work. 

Rev. Merle St. C. Wright, D.D., President; Directors: Rev. How- 
ard N. Brown, Rev. Alfred C. Nickerson, Rev. Adelbert L. Hudson, 
Rev. John C. Perkins, D.D., Rev. Roderick Stebbins, Rev. J. T. Sun- 
derland; Rev. John M. Wilson, Treasurer; Rev. Charles T. Billings, 
Lowell, Mass., Secretary. 

The Ministerial Union. — Organized Jan. 12, 1864. It is designed 
to promote ministerial fellowship, welcome and assist those entering 
the Liberal ministry, protect the profession and parishes from in- 
competent and unworthy men, contribute to the edification of its mem- 
bers, and assist in the diffusion of the gospel. 

The annual meeting is held on the Monday of Anniversary Week. 
Other meetings are held on the last Mondays of the seven months 
b^;inning with October. 

Rev. Edward Cummings, President; Rev. Charles W. Casson, 
Dorchester, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Committee on Supply of Pulpits. — Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, 
Beverly, Mass. ; Rev. Thomas J. Homer, Melrose, Mass. ; Rev. Harry 
Lutz, Newton ; Alfred Manchester, Salem, Mass., Secretary. 

This committee, appointed by the Ministerial Union, does not wish 
to exercise any power in the choice of candidates for any particular 
church, but will afford such aid as it may in bringing candidates and 
churches together. 

To further this purpose, the Secretary will be at the office of the 
committee, 25 Beacon Street, Boston, on Mondays and Saturdays, 
from 10 A. M. to I p. M., when he will be glad to consult with any one 
whom he may be able to serve. 



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The Liberal Ifiaistcn' Aswcuition of New York and Vidnity. — 
Meetings on the first Monday of every montfi save July, August, and 
September. The meetings are now hdd at the City Qub, 55 West 
44A Street, New York, at 12.30 p.m. 

Officers. — Rev. Alfred Chase Nickerson, Plainfield, N. J., President; 
Rev. Edgar S. Wiers, Montclair, N. J., Secretary-Treasurer. 

North Middlesex Ministerial Association. — Organized May 4, 
183 1. Meetings on first Monday in January, April, and October. 

Rev. Charles T. Billings, Lowell, Mass., Moderator; Rev. Napoleon 
S. Hoagland, Tyngsboro, Mass., Scribe. 

Pljrmouth and Bay Ministerial Association, Mass. — Organized 
previous to 1780. Meetings on the third Monday in January, April, 
June, and October. 

Rev. William L. Chaffin, North Easton, Moderator; Rev. E. B. 
Maglathlin, West Bridgewater, Scribe. 

Unitarian Ministers' Monday Club. — Established 1883. Meet- 
ings in Boston on the second Monday of each month except June, 
July, August, and September. A chairman is appCMnted at each meet- 
ing for the next. Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverly, Mass., Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee. 

Worcester Association, Mass. — Organized May 18, 182a Six 
meetings are held in the year. 

Rev. Alvin F. Bailey, Barre, Moderator; Rev. Frederic J. Gauld, 
Leominster, Scribe. 

Bay Association of Unitarian Ministers. — Established 1910, by 
the ministers in the churches about San Francisco Bay to promote 
ministerial fellowship. Meetings once a month, with luncheon, at 
University Club, San Francisco. Rev. Bradford Leavitt, President. 



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BENEVOLENT AND OTHER SOCIETIES 

Benevolent Fraternity of Churches m the City of Boston. — Or- 
ganized 1834; incorporated 1839. 

This association represents a ministry-at-large in Boston for the 
Unitarian churches through philanthropy, education, worship, and 
free church privil^es. It originated with the labors of Dr. Joseph 
Tuckerman in 1826. At present the corporation is composed of del- 
egates from different Unitarian churches in Boston, who hold at least 
four meetings a year. The supervision of the work is in the hands 
of an Executive Committee consisting of twelve members. There are 
now five chapels, or centres of missions, with fifteen ministers and 
assistants, some fifty paid workers, and over two hundred efficient 
volunteer helpers. The spirit and aims of Tuckerman, Gannett, 
Channing, and Robbins, and others who guided the Fraternity in 
the past, are preserved. The g^eat object is to meet the moral and 
religious needs of those who are not attached to the regular churches, 
and to organize the unstable elements of the city into character and 
citizenship. 

Those who come under the ministrations of this ministry-at-large 
arc encouraged to maintain self-respect and self-government The 
central aim of the Fraternity is to work and worship with the people, 
not for them. Young and old are incited to do all they can for 
themselves within reason and brotherhood. 

The chapels are as follows: Bulfinch Place Church, at the West 
End; North End Union (Parmenter Street), for the North End; 
Morgan Chapel (Shawmut Avenue) and Theodore Parker Memorial 
(Berkeley Street), both for the South End; and Channing Church 
(East Cottage Street), for South Boston and Dorchester. 

The annual meeting of the Fraternity is on the first Sunday in May, 
at which time officers are chosen for the year. The other regular 
meetings are on the second Sunday in October, second Sunday in De- 
cember, and the second Sunday in March. The funds for carrying on 
this large work are derived in part from annual contributions and in 



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part from permanent investments. Executive Committee: Rev. Ed- 
ward Cummings, President; Courtenay Guild, Vice-President; Wil- 
liam P. Fowler, Treasurer; N. WinArop Robinson, 242 Savin Hill 
Avenue, Dorchester, Mass., Recording Secretary; Rev. Thomas Van 
Ness, Rev. Paul R. Frothingham, Arthur W. Moors, F. O. North, 
Mrs. Charles E. Lincoln, Rev. Howard N. Brown, Dr. E. A. Peabody 
Gerry, and Delano Wright, Directors. 

The office of the Fraternity is in the Parker Memorial Building, 
comer of Berkeley and Appleton streets. 

The churches represented in the Benevolent Fraternity are: First 
Church; Second Church; King's Chapel; Arlington Street Church; 
South Congregational Church; Church of the Disciples; First Parish, 
Brighton; First Parish, Dorchester; Third Religious Society, Dor- 
chester; First Congregational Society, Jamaica Plain; All Souls' 
Unitarian Church, Roxbury ; Hawes Unitarian Congregational Church, 
South Boston ; First Parish, West Roxbury. 

Boston Young Men's Christian Union. — Organized in 1851; in- 
corporated in 1852. The objects of this organization are: ist. To 
furnish to the young men of Boston and vicinity a home and club 
with cheerful surroundings, where they will meet ag^reeable compan- 
ions, and where the influences will be beneficial and elevating. 2d, 
To provide them with every possible attraction in the way of books, 
newspapers, magazines, evening classes, religious services, lectures, 
entertainments, games, physical education, and other means for in- 
struction and recreation. 3d, To give them opportunities to do good, 
by engaging in charitable and benevolent work. The rooms at 48 
Boylston Street (near Tremont Street and the Conmion) are open 
every day, Sundays included, from 8 A. m. to 10 p. m. 

Annual membership, one dollar per year. Life membership, twenty- 
five dollars. Subscription membership, five dollars per year. Sus- 
taining membership, ten dollars. (A subscription membership for five 
successive years constitutes a life membership.) All young asen 
residing in Boston and the vicinity are cordially invited to become 
members of the society. 

Board of Directors. — Frank L. Locke, President, office at the 
Union Rooms; George S. Baldwin, Vice-President; Oiarles L. Bur- 



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rill, Secretary; Edward A. Church, Treasurer; Walter H. Dugan, 
John R. Ainsley, William H. Brown, Robert W. Frost, W. Rodman 
Peabody, and Herbert D. Heathfield. 

Trustees of Permanent Fund. — Walter Hunnewell, Treasurer; Ed- 
win L. Sprague, Secretary; William Endicott and William L, Rich- 
ardson. 

Children's Mission to the Children of the Destitute in the City 
of Boston. — Instituted 1849; incorporated 1864. 

This society, as its name indicates, is a work of children of the 
more favored families for the children of the poor; but it appeals to 
all for aid in carrying on its work. It receives no aid from public 
funds. 

Its objects are: first, the care of orphan, homeless, destitute, or 
n^lected children, the provision of homes in the country, for such 
as cannot be properly helped in the homes of parents or relatives and 
the adoption of such measures as will save them from vice, igno- 
rance, and d^^dation; and, second, to excite and encourage in the 
young a spirit of Christian sympathy and active benevolence, by inter- 
esting them in this work which should appeal so strongly to their 
hearts. 

The Mission welcomes applications for help to children of any age, 
race, or creed, and their circumstances and needs are diligently and 
broadly studied, that action may be efficient as well as prompt. 

Whether it seems wise or not to receive the child into the custody of 
the Mission, his wants are ministered to until relieved. 

Children taken are placed at board, or free of charge, in carefully 
selected private families, out of town, and are there tmder the con- 
stant supervision of the visitors from the office, with whom closest 
relations are preserved. Brothers and sisters are rarely separated; 
and many are thus tided over the the time of family stress until they 
may be restored to suitable parents or friends, who, throughout the 
period of care by the Mission, have been kept in touch with the chil- 
dren, and encouraged to aid as far as possible in their support. 
Others grow to maturity under the watchful care of the Mission. A 
few are pven for adoption when there is no possibility of future help 
from relatives. 



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Applications should be made at the office, 279 Tremont Street, 
Boston, between 9 a. m. and 5 p. m., on any day except Sunday or a 
holiday. 

The annual meeting for the choice of officers occurs on the second 
Wednesday in May. 

Henry M. Williams, President; Christopher R. Eliot, Secretary; 
William H. Slocum, Treasurer; Parker B. Field, Superintendent. 

Industrial School for Girls, Boston (Dorchester). — Organized 
1853; incorporated 1854. 

This institution is for training to good conduct and self-support 
destitute and n^lected prls, also girls who cannot be taken care of 
at home, but whose relatives or friends can aflFord to pay a small simi 
for board. The time they are kept in the school is determined by the 
needs and circumstances of each child. The school is supported by 
donations and subscriptions and the income of invested ftmds. Ap- 
plications for admission to be made in writing to the Admission Com- 
mittee. 

Miss E. S. Parker, President; William S. Hall, 53 State Street, 
Treasurer; Miss Helen Gilbert, Assistant Treasurer; Miss Mary G. 
Stone, Secretary; Miss Ruth L. Greeley, 15 Pinckney Street, Boston, 
Mass., Chairman of Admission Committee; Mrs. F. K. Nash, Chair- 
man of Placing'Out Committee. 

Maine Unitarian Association. — Its purpose is ''the maintenance 
and teaching of Unitarian Christianity." Incorporated in 1875, ^uid 
organized at Saco, Oct. 8, 1878. 

Hon. Joseph W. Symonds, LL.D., Portland, President; George A. 
Emery, Saco, Secretary; H. Fairfield, Treasurer. 

Massachusetts Congregational Charitable Society. — Incorporated 
in 1786. Organized to hold the funds of the Massachusetts Conven- 
tion of Congregational Ministers. (See page 122.) Composed of 
fifteen clergymen and fifteen laymen, elected from both branches of 
the Congregational body. Aids the widows and orphans of deceased 
Congregational clergymen in Massachusetts. 

William Endicott, Boston, President; Rev. Edward Hale, Chestnut 



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Hill, Secretary; Grenville H. Norcross, Boston, Treasurer; Rev. 
James De Normandie, D.D., Rev. Charles L. Noyes, D.D., Rev. Ed- 
ward Hale, Committee on Appropriations. 

Applications for aid should be made to Rev. Edward Hale, Chest- 
nut Hill, Mass. 

Massachusetts Evangelical Missionary Society. — Instituted in 
1806. The object of this society is to aid feeble parishes to support 
preaching. 

Rev. Samuel C. Beane, D.D., President; Rev. Henry F. Jenks, 
Canton Corner, Vice-President; Rev. Benjamin R. Bulkeley, Beverly, 
Secretary; Rev. Roderick Stebbins, Milton, Treasurer. 

Mission Free School of the Church of the Messiah, St. Louis, 

Mo. — Instituted in 1836. A free school for children " who had no 
other means of instruction." It was the first free school west of the 
Mississippi. In response to urgent need it became also a home for 
children in 1856, and in 1863 was incorporated as the " Mission Free 
School." Since 1856 it has been a temporary home for destitute 
children, employing a teacher who gives to the inmates daily instruc- 
tion in the common branches of learning, and also domestic science 
and manual training. Over five hundred children enter and leave the 
home each year, about one-fourth of which number consist of n^- 
lected children from the Juvenile Court. The greater number are 
brought by parents or relatives because of sickness or poverty, and 
are returned to their homes when conditions are favorable. Each case 
is studied individually, and much outside missionary work in the fam- 
ilies of the children performed by the matron with the assistance of 
other charitable associations. The aim is, whenever possible, to pre- 
vent disintegration of the family. Cases of abuse and neglect are 
referred to the Juvenile Court, and the custody of children transferred. 

The Mission Free School has an endowment of $120,000 from be- 
quests of former church members. The income resulting, $6,000, very 
nearly provides for maintenance. The building occupied since 1906, 
which with the grounds represents a value of $50,000, is the gift of a 
church member. 

The business affairs of the Mission Free School are conducted by 



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a board of seven managers, who are also trustees of the Church of the 
Messiah. The superintendence and government of the home are in 
charge of a board of twelve lady managers. 

Mrs. Arthur E. Ewing, President; Mrs. William L. Huse, Vice- 
President; Mrs. Henry W. Eliot, Secretary; Mr. R. McKittrick Jones, 
Treasurer; Mrs. E. A. DeWolf, Assistant Treasurer. 

Society for Ministerial Relief, Boston, Mass. — Formed 1848 ; in- 
corporated 1850 as the Society for the Relief of Aged and Destitute 
Qerg3rmen; the name changed to the Society for Ministerial Relief 
by an Act of the Massachusetts State Legislature, March 9, 1905. 

This society was organized to aflFord pecuniary relief to aged Uni- 
tarian clergymen who need such help. The interest of the invested 
fund is distributed semi-annually, in May and November, by the 
Executive Committee to such persons as are qualified, according to 
the requirements of the constitution, to receive aid, as follows : " All 
Unitarian clerg3rmen who have been ordained as pastors or evangelists, 
and who have reached the age of fifty-five years, who have retained 
an unspotted moral character, and who need pecuniary assistance, 
may be placed on its list of beneficiaries. The claims of each appli- 
cant shall be set forth in writing by two of his clerical brethren who 
are well acquainted with his condition and circumstances." The 
names of beneficiaries are never published. The society is also au- 
thorized to hold a special fund, the income of which may be used to 
aid the widows of Unitarian clerg3rmen in necessitous circumstances; 
but this fund is still small in comparision with the needs which it is 
expected to meet, and additions to it are greatly desired. 

Rev. James De Normandie, D.D., Boston, President; Rev. Edward 
Hale, Oiestnut Hill, Secretary; Henry Endicott, Boston, Treasurer. 

Society for Promoting Theological Education, Boston, Mass. — 

Organized 1816; incorporated 1831. This society has aimed to 
accomplish the twofold object of enlarging the apparatus of theologi- 
cal instruction and of affording assistance to meritorious theological 
students in the Divinity School of Harvard University, to which in- 
stitution its aid is restricted by the terms of its trust for the funds now 
in its hands. 



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Rev. William H. Lyon, D.D., Brookline, President; Rev. Benjamin 
R. Bulkeley, Beverly, Secretary; Grenville H. Norcross, Boston,! 
Treasurer. 

Society for Propagating the Gospel among the Indians and 
Others in North America, Boston, Mass Incorporated Nov. 19, 

1787. 

This society administers the funds which it holds for the benefit of 
Indians and colored people chiefly, working, for the most part, in 
connection with established institutions. The membership is not to 
exceed fifty. 

Rev. James De Normandie, D.D., President; Winslow Warren, 
Vice-President; Rev. Alexander McKenzie, D.D., Secretary; Rev. 
Charles E. Park, Assistant Secretary; Francis H. Brown, M.D., Treas- 
urer; Henry H. Edes, Vice-Treasurer. 

The South End Industrial School, 45 Bartlett Street, Boston 
(Roxbury). — Planned in the Women's Auxiliary Conference, 1882; 
organized May, 1883; incorporated November, 1884. The indus- 
trial departments are supported by Unitarian churches and individ- 
uals. The aim of the school is to improve the homes of the neighbor- 
hood, by practical training, and also by clubs for social intercourse. 
Eight hundred and fifty (850) pupils attended in 1909-10. 

Miss Louise Howe, President; William H. Vamey, 54 Lincoln 
Street, Boston, Treasurer; Miss Margaret Thatcher, 69 Alleghany 
Street, Roxbury, Clerk; Mrs. A. R. Damon, 45 Bartlett Street, Rox- 
bury. Superintendent. 

Union for Christian Work, Povidence, R. I. — Organized March 
3, 1868. 

The aim of this society is to furnish such occupation, amusements, 
and surroundings as shall weaken the power of temptation and arouse 
the higher nature of all who come within its influence. 

Its present work is as follows: i. A library and pleasant room for 
reading and amusement. Open daily from 3 to 9 p. m. Sundays from 
2 to 9 p. M. 2. A well-selected librarv of 6,000 volumes. 3. Boys' 
Qub. 4. Depot for collecting books, magazines and papers, and dis- 



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tributing them to seamen sailing from this port, and to such others 
as need them. 5. Fruit and flower mission, for the distribution of 
fruit and flowers to the sick and infirm, the hospitals, the homes for 
the aged, etc. 6. Suburban rides and health excursicms for invalids 
and others. 7. Men's Qub. 8. Women's Club. A varied line of Set- 
tlement Work, including classes in sewing, millinery, dancing, house- 
keeping, nature study, etc. 

Rev. George Kent, President; Miss L. H. Vaughn, Secretary; 
Dr. A. A. Barrows, Treasurer; Mr. Carol Aranovili, Head Worker. 

Unitarian Educational Society. — Incorporated under the laws of 
New Hampshire, July 19, 1879. 

The object of the corporation is to maintain and permanently en- 
dow Proctor Academy, Andover, N. H. (See page 140.) 

Rev. Henry C. McDougall, President; Gen. George T. Cruft, Vice- 
President; Clarence E. Carr, Andover, Treasurer; Theodore P. Farr, 
Principal of the Academy. 

Rev. Henry G. Ives, Financial Agent, will receive contributions, or 
they may be sent direct to the Treasurer named above. 

Unitarian Service Pension Society. — Organized May, 1907, under 
name of The Society for Old Age Pensions for Unitarian Ministers, 
to provide service pensions for all Unitarian clergymen, whether mem- 
bers of this society or not, who are sixty-five years of age and have 
a record of at least twenty years* active honorable Unitarian profes- 
sional service. A " Permanent Fund " is to be established and placed 
in the hands of either the Society for Ministerial Relief or the Ameri- 
can Unitarian Association as trustee, to be made up of ten per cent of 
the annual contributions received, of all gifts of $1,000 or over, and 
all bequests. Ultimately, it is expected that the income of this fund will 
meet all requirements. At present the society must rely upon voluntary 
yearly contributions from ministers, churches, and generous friends. 
President, Rev. Thomas R. SHcer; Vice-Presidents, Rev. Paul Revere 
Frothing^am, Percy A. Atherton; Secretary, Rev. George Kent, 125 
Adelaide Avenue, Providence, R. I. ; Treasurer, Rev. J. H. Applebee, 
Attleboro, Mass. 



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DIVINITY SCHOOLS 

Divinity School of Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. — 
This institution was established about 1817, though instruction in the- 
ology had previously been given in connection with Harvard College. 
The school was founded and endowed by Unitarians. Its constitution 
prescribes that " every encouragement be given to the serious, impartial, 
and unbiassed investigation of Christian truth, and that no assent to 
the peculiarities of any denomination of Christians shall be required 
either of the instructors or students." 

Graduates of theological schools are admitted as resident graduates ; 
persons who have received the degree of Bachelor of Arts are admitted 
as candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Divinity ; holders of other 
academic d^jees may be admitted as special students, provided in all 
these cases that the previous courses of study are satisfactory to the 
faculty. 

The Theological Library numbers about 38,000 volumes. Students 
have also access to the College Library, which contains about 527,000 
volumes, and is rich in theological literature. 

Students may attend exercises in other departments of the University 
and in Andover Theological Seminary without extra charge. 

The charge for instruction is $150 per year. The price of rooms varies, 
according to their location and desirableness, from $45 to $90 a year. 
The price of board averages about $4 a week. 

Pecuniary aid is furnished to students who need such help, and 
whose character and scholarship justify it. 

Faculty. — Abbott Lawrence Lowell, A.B., LL.B., LL.D., President; 
William Wallace Fenn, A.M., D.D., Dean and Bussey Professor of The- 
ology; Francis Greenwood Peabody, A.M., D.D., LL.D., Plummer Pro- 
fessor of Christian Morals; Ephraim Emerton, Ph.D., Winn Professor 
of Ecclesiastical History; George Foot Moore, A.M., D.D., LL.D., 
Frothingham Professor of the History of Religion; David Gordon 
Lyon, Hi.D., D.D., Hollis Professor of Divinity and Curator of the 
Semitic Museum; Edward Caldwell Moore, Ph.D., D.D., Parkman Pro- 



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fessor of Theology; James Hardy Ropes, A.B., D.D., Bussey Professor 
of New Testament Criticism and Interpretation and Dexter Lecturer on 
Biblical Literature. 

Instructors. — Irvah Lester Winter, A.B., Assistant Professor of 
Public Speaking; William Robert Parkhouse Davey, S.T.B., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Semitic Languages; Philip Benjamin Kennedy, A.B., 
B.L., Instructor in Public Speaking. 

Charles William Eliot, A.M., LL.D., MJD., Honorary President, 
Emeritus. 

Crawford Howell Toy, A.M., LL.D., Professor Emeritus. 

Robert Swain Morison, A.M., S.T.B., Librarian Emeritus. 

Association of Alumni. — Rev. William H. Fish, President; Rev. 
Paul R. Frothingham, Vice-President; Rev. Roderick Stebbins, Milton, 
Mass., Secretary. 

The Meadville Theological School, Meadville, Pa. — This institu- 
tion was first opened to students in the autumn of 1844. Its charter 
provides that " no doctrinal test shall ever be made a condition of enjoy- 
ing any of the opportunities of instruction in the school." Although 
students from various religious denominations have been connected 
with the institution, by far the larger number of its g^duates have 
entered the Unitarian ministry. 

The requirements for admission are a good moral character and 
seriousness of purpose, with such a degree of intellectual ability and 
preparatory education as shall afford a reasonable prospect of success 
in the work undertaken in the school. Men and women are admitted 
upon equal terms. It is desirable that those who intend to apply for 
admission should address the President some time in advance, as an 
opportunity is thus g^ven for suggestions which may be of importance 
to the applicant. While in cases of inevitable delay students may be 
admitted after the beginning of the school year, nothing short of urgent 
necessity should be allowed to stand in the way of entering at the very 
opening of the first term, in September. 

The course of study is substantially the same as that of the other 
institutions in this country and Great Britain in which candidates are 
prepared for the Liberal Christian ministry. The regular term of resi- 



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dence for collie graduates is three years; for others, four. The 
degree of B.D. is given to those completing the required conditions. 

Tuition is free to all members of the School. Commodious rooms 
are provided for men in Divinity Hall free of all expense for rent 
and attendance. The only charge made by the school is a fee of $20 
per annum for those who room in Divinity Hall, for heat and light. 
Graduates may become candidates for the Cruft Traveling Fellowship, 
yielding $810 a year, and tenable at some European university. Prizes, 
in elocution and Hebrew, amounting to $180 are annually awarded. 
Graduates on becoming settled ministers are entitled to receive $25 
worth of liberal religious books from the income of the Brookes Fund. 

The library of the school consists of thirty-four thousand volumes, 
and is increased annually from the income of the "Robert CoUyer 
Library Fund." 

The gymnasium in Hunnewell Hall is thoroughly equipped with 
modem appliances for physical culture, and includes bowling alleys, 
apparatus for basket-ball, fencing, boxing, and other sports. Two clay 
tennis courts adjoin the g3annasium. 

The Meadville Theological School Quarterly Bulletin is published 
by the school, and any one making application to the Editor will be 
placed upon the mailing list. 

Faculty. — President, Franklin C. Southworth, A.M., S.T.B., Dean 
and Professor of Practical Theology; George L. Gary, A.M., L.H.D., 
Professor Emeritus; Henry H. Barber, Professor Emeritus; Francis 
A. Christie, D.D., James Freeman Clarke Professor of Church History 
and the Theology of the New Testament; Nicholas Paine Gihnan, 
Caleb Brewster Hackley Professor of Sociology and Ethics; Henry 
Preserved Smith, D.D., Professor of the Language and Literature of 
the Old Testament and the History of Religions; Frank C. Doan, 
Hi.D., Professor of Systematic Theology and the Philosophy of Re- 
ligion; Clayton R. Bowen, A.B., B.D., Assistant Professor in New 
Testament Interpretation. 

Instructors. — Qementine Calvin, A.M., Instructor in Voice Culture 
and German; Peter B. Graham^ Instructor in Physical Training. 

Walter C. Green, A.M., S.T.B., Librarian and Secretary of the Faculty. 

Adin Ballou Lecturers on Sociology, 1909-10. — Stanton Coit, Ph.D., 



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of London, England, on " Eugenics and Heredity " (two lectures) ; 
Mrs. Anna Garlin Spencer, of New York, on " Marriage and Divorce " 
(two lectures) ; Edwin D. Mead, of Boston, Mass. (two lectures), 
on " The Evolution of Peace " and " The United States as a World 
Power"; The Rev. Joseph Nelson Pardee, of Bolton, Mass. (two 
lectures), on " The Country Minister and the Country Church." Presi- 
dent Charles F. Twing, of Qeveland, O., " Education in the Far East." 

The Meadville Theological School is a member of the organization 
known as " The American Committee for Lectures on the History of 
Religions." The Course of six lectures for 1909-10 was g^ven by 
Professor Morris Jastrow, Jr., of the University of Pennsylvania, on 
" The Religion of Babylon and Assyria." 

Meadville Alumni Association. — Rev. Joel H. Metcalf, President; 
Rev. William L. Walsh, Rev. Robert S. Loring, Vice-Presidents; Rev. 
John H. Applebee, Secretary and Treasurer; Rev. Samuel R. Maxwell, 
Rev. H. Sumner Mitchell, Rev. Albert W. Clark, Executive Committee. 

The annual meeting of the Association is held on Thursday of An- 
niversary Week in Boston. 

Pacific Unitarian School for the Ministry, Berkeley, Cal. — This 
institution was established in 1904 (incorporated in 1906). While 
students are admitted from any part of the country, and without re- 
gard to denominational connections, the particular aim of the school 
is to prepare students for the ministry of Unitarian churches on the 
Pacific slope. 

Candidates for admission must show evidence of irreproachable 
moral character, serious purpose, and such intellectual preparation as 
will enable them to pursue the courses of the school with advantage. 

Students holding a college degree will be graduated with the degree 
of Bachelor of Theology after a course of study covering three years ; 
others will be graduated after a course of four years, but without a 
d^ree. The course of study is elective, within certain restrictions, and 
the courses offered are those usual to similar institutions. 

Arrangements are made so that students may without charge take 
courses adapted to their purpose at other divinity schools at Berkeley, 
and at the University of California, 



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The school is located at the corner of Dana Street and Allston Way, 
facing the University, and near the other schools. 

Tuition is free, and rooms for students are provided in the school 
building. The necessary expenses for a year need not exceed $300. 
A limited amount of aid can be furnished to students of promise 
who could not pursue their studies without it. 

The library of the school consists of about 6,600 bound volumes, 
besides pamphlets, and is especially rich in the history and literature 
of Unitarianism. 

The academic year of the school coincides with that of the Uni- 
versity of California, beginning at the middle of August and ending 
at the middle of May. Intending students should, in all cases, cor- 
respond with the Dean in advance. 

The school is controlled by a board of fifteen Trustees, elected with 
the approval of the Directors of the American Unitarian Association. 
Officers: President, Rev. Earl M. Wilbur; Vice-President, Daniel 
Rowen; Secretary, W. H. Payson, Esq.; Treasurer, Mr. Francis 
Cutting. 

Faculty. — Eari M. Wilbur, A.M., S.T.B., Dean and Professor of 
Theology; Gifford H. G. McGrew, Librarian and Assistant; Mrs. 
Louise Htunphrey Smith, Instructor in Public Speaking; Rev. John 
Rowland Lathrop, Lecturer in New Testament Theology. 



ACADEMIES 

The Hacklcy School, Tarrytown-on-Hudson, N. Y, — Head Mas- 
ter, Walter Boutwell Gage, A.B. 

Trustees: Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., President; Charles H. Lever- 
more, Ph.D., Vice-President; Rev. Thomas R. Slicer, Secretary; Walston 
H. Brown, Treasurer; Mrs. C. B. Hackley, Mrs. S. C. Goodhue, Prof. 
Horatio S. White, George lies, William S. Kyle, A. Emerson Palmer, 
William S. Miller, Mrs. Charies Goodhue King. Fisher A. Baker, 
Chairman Executive Committee. 

Upper School. — Students are received at twelve years of age and 
prepared for college. Tuition, $900 for school year. 



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Lower School — Boys as young as ten arc received The three years' 
course gives careful and constructive elementary training. Tuition, 
$800 for school year. 

Home School for Girls, West Newton, Blass. — The Misses Allen, 
daughters of the late Nathaniel T. Allen, founder and principal for 
forty-eight years of the Allen School, will reopen at their residence in 
West Newton, Mass., their School for Girls, Sept 29, 1910. 

They study the needs of each girl intrusted to their care, so that 
the physical, educatic«ial, and social training may make of each a 
healthy, refined, and intelligent woman, and are assisted by able 
teachers. 

Home for Schoolgirls and Special Students. — Mr. and Mrs. John 
A. Bellows, 115 Beacon Street, Boston, will receive into their family 
a limited number of girls who are either attending one of the day 
schools in Boston or who wish to do special wcH-k in Art, Music, Lit- 
erature, or the Languages. 

Howard Seminary, West Bridgewater, Mass. — This is an unsec- 
tarian school for prls, founded by Benjamin B. Howard, a native of 
the town. It is noted for the high mental development of its pupils, 
the earnest spirit of its teachers, and for the wide range of its courses. 
Advanced courses are offered for high-school graduates and others 
not wishing full collie course; also college preparations and special 
advantages in art, music, elocution, and domestic science. The build- 
ings are spacious and attractive, having sanitary plumbing, modem 
heating and lighting. The ample grounds and well-equipped gym- 
nasium give excellent opportunity for exercise. The school is situated 
on the line of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, only 
an hour's ride from Boston. Electric cars connect West Bridgewater 
with Brockton and Providence. For full information address Miss 
Sarah E. Laughton, Principal, 

The MacDuffie School for Girls, Springfield, Mass. — While this 
school is not denominational, the fact that its principals are active 
Unitarians naturally makes the religious influences sympathetic towards 



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Unitarianism. It offers to g^rls of all ages a broad education and a 
pleasant home. This, however, is not the ultimate object, which is 
rather the development of character and a careful guidance from 
young girlhood to responsible womanhood. The course of study is 
planned to give older girls that broader outlook in life which comes 
from culture, and to younger g^rls the regular disciplinary studies of a 
high-school course. In the upper classes it places the emphasis upon 
English, History, Modem Languages, Collie Preparation, Music and 
Art. It is placed on the list of approved collie fitting schools by the 
New England College Entrance Certificate Board, and has the priv- 
ilege of admission to college without examination. The school is 
housed in a generously furnished mansion built by the late Rev. Francis 
Tiffany when minister of the Church of the Unity, and afterwards 
the home of the late Samuel Bowles, of the Springfield Republican. 
It was built on ample dignified lines of architecture, and it has since 
been somewhat enlarged. Adjacent to the Mansion House are two 
dormitories the Senior House and the Challis House. The class- 
rooms are in Howard Hall, a separate modem building, planned espe- 
cially for its purpose by the school architects, Gardner, P)me & Gard- 
ner. The building is named in honor of Miss Catharine L. Howard, 
and her sisters, who founded the school in 1865, and established its rep- 
utation for the quiet home discipline and emphasis upon the substan- 
tial accomplishments of life, which continue to mark the school and give 
it a large and cultivated clientele. The school grounds are beautiful, 
having been laid out by the elder Olmsted. The principals are John 
MacDuffie, Ph.D., and Mrs. John MacDuffie, A.B. The secretary is 
Mrs. D. W. Morehouse, to whom all correspondence should be ad- 
dressed. 

Powder Point School^ Duxbury, Mass* — This school combines 
home and school life, a great deal of personal attention being given to 
each boy. The principal and his wife are Unitarians ; the teachers, of 
various denominations. The aim is to give the boys a high sense of 
nonor and duty, but to leave doctrinal questions to the parents and 
churches. The younger boys are taught to be exact and earnest in 
their elementary work; and the older ones are prepared for scientific 



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school, college, or business, and by an elementary course in forestry 
for higher study in that profession. There is no fixed curriculum, 
but studies are selected according to the needs of each boy. Scholar- 
ships are given where needed and deserved. Frederick B. Knapp, 
Principal. 

Proctor Academy, Andover, N. H. — This academy is under the 
management of the Unitarian Educational Society. (See page 132.) 
Andover is on the Concord Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
twenty-nine miles north of Concord. The location is pleasant and 
healthful, and comparatively free from influences which divert the 
mind from study. There are five courses — English and Classical — 
in all of which excellent instruction is furnished. Theodore P. Farr, 
Principal. 

The Tuckerman School, Inc., Boston, Mass. — Board of Directors: 
Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., President; Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, Rev. 
Paul Revere Frothingham, Rev. Lewis G. Wilson, Mr. Louis P. Nash, 
Vice-Presidents; Mr. John H. Edwards, Treasurer; Mrs. Caroline S. 
Atherton, Secretary; Mrs. Clara B. Beatley, Mrs. Robert Gould Shaw, 
Miss Zilpha D. Smith, Mrs. John G. Walker. A school for the training 
of Sunday-School Superintendents and Teachers, Parish Assistants, and 
Visitors, Managers of Church Charities, and Superintendents of Qubs 
for Boys and Girls. 

The complete course of study is designed to cover two years, and 
will include a study of social questions and special work with Sim- 
mons College, as well as more distinctively Sunday-School and Parish 
work. 

In addition to a course leading to a diploma, shorter and special 
courses may be taken by qualified students. 

Opportunity is given for practical experience by observation and 
work in churches, missions, industrial schools, settlements, and char- 
itable institutions in Boston and vicinity. 

The course of study for 1910-11 will include Study of the Bible, 
Psychology, Principles and Practice of Teaching, Review of Church 
History, Hymnology, Household Economics, and Voice Training. 



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Students will be prepared to serve as visitors in the homes, as ad- 
visers and helpers to people in distress, as organizers in clubs and 
young people's societies, as teachers and friends, and in whatever other 
way they may be of aid to a parish minister or the commimity. The 
aim of the school is wholly practical, to increase the number of availa- 
ble and efficient persons, paid or volunteer, who wish to give them- 
selves to practical Christian work. 

Admission to the school will be limited to candidates who can sat- 
isfy the Board of Directors of their ability to profit by its opportunities. 

The tuition fee is $60 a year, one-half payable in October and one- 
half payable February i. Fees for special courses will be decided by 
special arrangement. 

The school year will open October 4 and dose May 17. 

The headquarters of the school will be at 25 Beacon Street. 

Further information may be obtained of the Dean, Mrs. Clara T. 
Guild, 25 Beacon Street, Bostcxi. 

The Tuckerman School Association. — Organized May, 1910. 
The members of the Association are the Directors of the Tuckerman 
School, its Faculty, past and present students and others engaged in 
similar work. 

Miss Hope Fagan, President; Miss Marian Cole, Secretary-TreaS' 
urer. Directors, Mrs. Clara T. Guild, Mr. John H. Edwards, and 
Miss Harriet E. Johnson. 



THE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF RELIGIOUS 

LIBERALS 

This Federation was organized at Philadelphia, December 2, 1908, 
at a private conference of representative liberal religious thinkers and 
social workers of the United States. Its purpose is to unify and concen- 
trate the forces which make for religious sincerity, freedom, and toler- 
ance in America, and bring them, so far as may be, into council and 
co-operation concerning the spiritual and ethical interests they possess in 
common. This Federation may be considered as the offspring of the 



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International Council of Unitarian and other liberal and religious 
Thinkers and Workers with which it will be affiliated, and whose liberal- 
izing and reconciling influences it is intended to conserve and further 
in the American community. 

Participation in the Federation will leave each individual responsible 
for his own opinions alone, and affect in no d^^ee his relations with 
other religious bodies or schools of thought 

The Federation will hold from time to time, alternately with the Inter- 
national Congresses referred to, extended public meetings of religious 
liberals in centers of American thought and life, at which united and 
earnest testimony will be g^ven in behalf of the g^eat universal affirma- 
ticMis of the moral and religious life. It will seek to increase the faith of 
free and reasoning men in the underlying principles of pure religion 
held in the spirit of perfect liberty ; to foster the sentiments of toler- 
ance and good-will, both religious and racial, in the community; and to 
promote a fellowship of the spirit based on religious character and 
conduct, and not on creed and rite. 

Furthermore, the Federation will labor for the paramount interests 
of social reform and good citizenship. It will strive for the awakening 
of the public conscience, the promotion of social justice, and a better 
performance of social service and obligation. 

By invitation of the liberal branch of the Society of Friends m Phila- 
delphia the first Congress of the new association convened in their 
Meeting House on Race Street on April 27 to 30, 1909. The Con- 
gress was a remarkable gathering from every point of view. More 
than a thousand paid memberships were taken. The attendance at the 
sessions ranged from 500 to 1,500. Besides the pronouncedly liberal 
denominations, such as the Universalists, Unitarians, Liberal Friends, 
Reformed Jews, and German Evangelical Churches, and such associa- 
tions as the Free Religious Association of America, the Congress of 
Religion, the Ethical Culture Association, there participated in it also, 
unofficially, Baptists, Congr^^tionalists, Christians, Disciples, Episcopa- 
lians, Lutherans, Swedenborg^ans, and Roman Catholics. At the closing 
symposium on " The Fellowship of the Spirit " the speakers belonged 
to fourteen different religious fellowships. This large indusive- 
ness, the intellectual weight of the addresses, the strong insistence on 



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the affirmative and practical aspects of the liberal faith, the large pro- 
portion of lay speakers and of gifted women, together with the uniform 
harmony of the meetings, made this Congress a notable event in the 
religious life of our time, and full of promise for the future usefulness 
of the new Federation. The papers and proceedings appeared in a 
volume, "The Unity of the Spirit," 275 pp. 75 cts. 

The affairs of the Federation are in charge of a committee of twenty- 
five, widely representative in character. The President is Henry W. 
Wilbur, of Philadelphia; Treasurer, Henry Justice, of Philadelphia; 
Executive Secretary, Rev. Charles W. Wendte, D.D., 25 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass., to whom communications may be addressed. 

A meeting in commemoration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the 
death and the One Hundredth year after the birth of Theodore Parker, 
was held under the auspices of the Federation May 10 and 11, 1910, 
in Philadelphia. A second Congress will be held at New York in the 
spring of 191 1. 



THE INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF UNITA- 
RIAN AND OTHER LIBERAL RELIGIOUS 
THINKERS AND WORKERS 

President, Hon. Carl Schrader, Berlin, Prussia; General Secretary, 
Rev. Charles W. Wendte, D.D., 25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., 
U. S. A.; Prof. G. Bonet-Maury, Paris, France; Prof. G. Boros, D.D., 
Kolozsvar, Hungary; Rev. W. Copeland Bowie, London, England; 
Prof. J. Estlin Carpenter, D.D., Oxford, England; Prof. B. D. Eerd- 
mans, D.D., Leiden, Holland; Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., Rev. 
George A. Gordon, D.D., Boston, U. S. A. ; Rev. P. H. Hugenholtz, 
Jr., Amsterdam, Holland; Prof. E. Montet, D.D., Geneva, Switzer- 
land; Prof. Martin Rade, D.D., Marburg, Germany; Rev. J. Emile 
Roberty, Paris, France; Rev. G. Schoenholzer, Zurich, Switzerland; 
Miss M. B. Westenholz, Copenhagen, Denmark; Rev. Max Fischer, 
D.D., Berlin, Germany. 

This Council was organized on May 25, 1900, at Boston, in the 
United States, by foreign delegates and others in attendance on the 



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seventy-fifth anniversary of the founding of the American Unitarian 
Association. 

Its purpose is " to open communication with those in all lands who 
are striving to unite pure religion and perfect liberty, and to increase 
fellowship and co-operation among them." 

The International Council seeks to bring into closer tmion for ex- 
change of ideas, mutual service, and the promotion of their common 
aims the historic liberal churches, the liberal elements in all churches, 
scattered liberal congregations, and isolated workers for religious free- 
dom and progress in many lands. 

It aims to be a source of encouragement and strength to them in 
their struggles against dogmatic intolerance and ecclesiastical tyranny. 
It cultivates large and fraternal relations with the great liberal move- 
ments in religion now going on imder various names and auspices 
throughout the world. 

To promote these ends, it holds a triennial Congress in some ac- 
knowledged seat of religious enlightenment and freedom. 

Some one hundred religious associations are now affiliated with the 
Council, send official delegates to its meetings, and make it the inter- 
national organ of their fraternal relations with each other. 

The First Congress of the Intematiwial Council, by invitation of 
the British and Foreign Unitarian Association, was held under their 
auspices at the end of May, 1901, in London. Fifteen different nation- 
alities and twenty-one different church connections were represented 
officially or unofficially by those participating. The attendance at the 
sessions, held for two days or more, ranged from five hundred to 
two thousand. 

Communications were also received, expressing sympathy with the 
aims of the Council, from the Protestantenverein of Germany and the 
Protestanten Bond of Holland. 

All the papers and proceedings of this first session of the Interna- 
tional Council in London have been published in a volume procurable 
from the Unitarian Associations of America and England. 

The Second Congress of the International Council was held, by in- 
vitation of the Vergadering van Modeme Theologen of Holland, an 
association of liberal ministers, in Amsterdam, Sept. i to 4, 1903. 



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Again the meetings were successful, the spirit harmonious and enthusi- 
astic. Nearly a thousand paid membership tickets, a del^^ation of 176 
persons from the British Isles, 26 from the United States, and others, rep- 
resenting in all sixteen different religious fellowships, showed the wide- 
spread interest in the movement. Dutch, English, French, and German 
were the languages used at the Congress. In deference to the large 
number of English-speaking persons present, all the proceedings were 
held in that tongue. Printed translations into English and German 
of a number of the papers were also provided. The Dutch newspapers 
gave extended and often sympathetic reports of the sessions. 

The proceedings and papers of this Second Congress have been 
issued in a volume of 555 pages, procurable from the American 
Unitarian Association. 

,The Third Congress took place at Geneva, Switzerland, Aug. 28-31, 
1905. The general sessions were held in the aula of the University. 
The five religious services, in French, German, and English, conducted 
by Rev. E. Roberty, and Pastor Charles Wagner of Paris, Rev. Karl 
Furrer of Ziirich, Revs. Minot J. Savage of New. York and Joseph 
Wood of Birmingham, were held in the ancient Cathedral of St. Peter. 

Five hundred sixty-eight persons enrolled themselves as members 
of the Congress. 

A volume of three hundred and fifty pages, containing the papers and 
proceedings of the Geneva Congress, has been published. Over four 
hundred reports of this Congress have appeared in newspapers, journals, 
and reviews. 

The Fourth Congress was held Sept. 22 to 25, 1907, in Boston, 
U. S. A. 

In point of attendance and wide representation this was the most 
successful congress yet held by the International Council ; 2,391 persons 
enrolled themselves as members, belonging to sixteen diflferent nationali-^ 
ties; 33 separate church fellowships, 88 religious associations other 
than single churches sent official delegates. There were 122 delegates 
from Great Britain. The meetings overflowed the largest halls and 
churches in the city. Section and overflow meetings were held, to- 
gether with excursions to Concord, Plymouth, and Fairhaven. The 
concluding session was held in Sanders Theatre, Harvard University. 



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The Congress sermon was preached by Rev. John Hunter, D.D., of 
Glasgow, Scotland. Rev. Samuel A. Eliot, D.D., presided over the 
meetings. 

A full report of the proceedings and papers of the Boston Congress 
has been published in a large octavo, with sixty illustrations, under the 
title, " Freedom and Fellowship in Religion." The cost is one dollar, 
and 23 cents postage. Address the American Unitarian Association, 
25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

,The Fifth International Congress will be held in Berlin, Germany, 
August 6-10, 1910. The preparations for it by our German allies 
are extensive, and it bids fair to be a worthy successor of previous 
meetings. Over two hundred del^;ates will attend from the United 
States. 

Its proceedings will be published in the German and English tongues. 

Applications for membership, and communications concerning the 
International Council and its approaching Congress at Berlin, may be 
addressed to the General Secretary, Rev. Charles W. Wendte, D.D., 
25 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 



UNITARIANISM AND ITS CO-WORKERS IN 
FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Great Britain and Ireland. — There are 372 places of Unitarian 
worship in Great Britain. Of these 293 are in England, 38 in Ireland, 
34 in Wales, and 7 in Scotland. The names of 372 ministers are given 
in their Year Book, of whom a few are lay-workers. The first definitely 
Unitarian Church service in England was held in London in 1774 by 
Rev. Theophilus Lindsey, although Unitarian ideas in theology had 
found lodgement in the minds of advanced thinkers centuries earlier. 
It is said that a distinguished American, Benjamin Franklin, attended 
Lindsey's first service. About 150 of the existing Unitarian chapels 
were founded by people who did not entertain what would now be 
called Unitarian opinions, and a number still bear their ancient names, 
as Presb)rterian, General Baptist, Remonstrant, etc. ; Manchester Collie, 
Oxford, of which Rev. J. Estlin Carpenter, D.D., is principal; The 
Unitarian Home Missionary College, Manchester, Rev. Alexander Gor- 
don, M.A., Principal, and Presbyterian College, Carmarthen, Wales, 



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Rev. Walter J. Evans, M.A., Principal, are the training schools for 
British Unitarian ministers. 

The British and Foreign Unitarian Association was organized on May 
25, 1825, the same day and year in which, by a happy coincidence, the 
American Unitarian Association was founded. It is a national and 
international missionary organization which seeks to promote the prin- 
ciples which Unitarians believe are essential to civil and religious liberty 
and progress. Its president is Rev. Chas. Hargrove, and its executive 
secretary Rev. W. Copeland Bowie. There is also a Sunday School 
Association, whose honorary secretary is Mr. Ion Pritchard. Both these 
associations have their book-room and headquarters in Essex Hall, 
Essex Street, Strand, London, W. C, the very edifice in which Theoph- 
ilus Lindsey began his emancipating work one hundred and thirty-six 
years ago. It is the center and clearing-house of many missionary and 
benevolent activities, district associations, conferences, charitable and 
educational agencies, leagues, clubs, etc., similar to those by which the 
Unitarian cause is carried on in the United States. 

The National Triennial Conference of Unitarian Liberal Christian, 
Free Christian, Presbyterian, and other Non-Subscribing or Kindred 
Congregations, was organized in 1881, and is an important adjunct in 
the promulgation of the principles and missionary endeavors of the Uni- 
tarians of Great Britain. Its president is Rev. H. Enfield Dowson, B.A., 
and its secretary Rev. James Harwood, B.A., 105 Palace Road, Tulse 
Hill Park, London, So. West. More recently a British League of Uni- 
tarian Women has been established. Post Office Mission Work is con- 
ducted by a central and local agencies. The Unitarian Mission Vans 
(open air preaching) in 1909 visited 119 towns in England, Scotland, 
and Wales. All these activities and much other interesting information 
are chronicled in The Essex Hall Year Book, published at i shilling 
(30 cents, including postage) by the British and Foreign Unitarian 
Association, Essex Hall, Strand, London, W. C, where visitors are 
always welcome. The leading denominational journals are The Chris- 
tian Life, 5 Fetter Lane, London, E. C. {6s, 6d,) ; The Inquirer, 3 Essex 
Street, Strand {6s. 6d.) ; Young Days, Essex Hall, Essex Street, Strand, 
London, W.C (u.6d.). 

The New Theology, a progressive movement in religion and social 
ethics, has much in common with Unitarian Christianity and works 
along similar lines. Among its representative men are Rev. R. J. Camp- 
bell, M.A., Minister of the City Temple, High Holbom, London ; Rev. 
E. W. Lewis, M.A., Minister King's Weigh House Church, Thomas 
Street, Grosvenor Square, London, W. ; Rev. K. C. Anderson, D.D., of 
Dundee ; Rev. T. Rhondda Williams, Brighton ; Rev. F. R. Swan, Lon- 
don; Rev. W. E. Orchard, D.D., Enfield. Its organ is The Christian 



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Commonwealth (Ss. Sd.), 133 Salisbury Square, Fleet Street, Lon- 
don, E. C. 

Canada. — In Canada there are nine Unitarian congregations : Mon- 
treal, Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton, London, Winnipeg, Calgary, Van- 
couver, and Victoria, and the churches of the Icelandic Conference in 
Manitotwi. The first five of these societies are affiliated with the Uni- 
tarian Conference of the Middle States and Canada. 

Hungary. — Ever since the year 1568 there has existed a fully 
organized Unitarian Church in Hungary. In the sixteenth century it 
consisted of more than 400 congregations in Transylvania, and also a 
considerable number in several parts of Hungary Proper. The number 
was greatly reduced by protracted and bitter persecution which lasted 
about 200 years. The present number of Unitarian congr^^tions with 
ordinary ministers is 116; there are also fifty places where the minister 
of the neighboring congregation renders occasional services. The oldest 
congregation is the Kolozsvar one. There is a congregation at Budapest 
which was established in 1869. The roll of membership in the churches 
of Hungary is nearly 80,000. The churches are organized under a 
Bishop, at present Joseph Ferencz, Kolozsvar, and two curators (lay- 
presidents). The churches are distributed into nine districts presided 
over by a dean, and are governed by a representative consistory at 
Koloszvar. A chief consistory is convened once a year. In the fourth 
year a synod is held. There is an elementary school attached to each 
congregation, and during the three summer months Sunday School 
teaching is going on in most of the congregations. Higher education 
is carried on by the Church in three collies. There are at Kolozsvar a 
theological college, a gymnasium, and two elementary schools. The 
college was established about 1556 by John Sigismund, Prince of Tran- 
sylvania. The theological college was reorganized in 1896, its dean 
being Professor G. Boros, D.D. The Francis David Association, which 
was established in 1884, is doing a good work for the promotion of 
religious and moral culture; it has upwards of 1850 members and 
eleven branches. Catholics and Jews, as well as orthodox Protestants, 
gladly attend the meetings of the Francis David Association, and often 
read papers there on social, religious, and educational subjects. In 
most of the Reformed and Lutheran churches of Hungary there is a 
growing tendency towards liberal opinions in religion. Unitarian liter- 
ature is most welcome among the cultivated members of the various 
churches. Four periodicals are published : The Christian Seed Sower 
(1861) ; Unitarian Magazine (1887) ; Woman's World (1902) ; Uni- 
tarian Church (1905). 

Africa. — Free Protestant (Unitarian) Church, Hout Street, Cape 
Town (1867-1890) ; Minister, Rev. Ramsden Balmforth, Daisy Bank, 
Upper Camp Street, Cape Town. 



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Australia. — There are Unitarian churches at the following places : 
South Australia: Adelaide, Rev. Wilfred Harris, M.A., Clwydd, York 
Street, South Kensington. Victoria: Melbourne, Rev. F. Sinclaire, 
M.A., 123 Gipps Street, East Melbourne. New South Wales, Sydney : 
Rev. George T. Walters, 6 Hampden Street, North Sydney. The 
Church of Australia, Melbourne, Rev. Dr. Charles Strong, pastor, is a 
free congr^^tion promulgating essentially Unitarian principles. Its 
organ is The Commonweal, a monthly. 

New Zealand. — There are Unitarian churches at Auckland, Rev. 
W. Jellie, B.A., minister, and at Wellington. 

Tasmania. — Unitarian services are held at Hobart, conducted by 
laymen. 

Denmark. — Det fri Kirksamfund (The Free Church Association) 
of Kopenhagen, Rev. Uffe Birkedal, Minister, is an independent reli- 
gious society holding Unitarian views. Miss Mary B. Westenholz and 
Mr. Theo. Berg edit a journal, Protestantisk Tidende, which upholds 
these principles. Editorial office, 53 Kobmagergade, Kopenhagen. 

Norway. — There is a Unitarian Society in Christiania, founded by 
Rev. Kristofer Janson, a lecturer and author, who was formerly pastor 
of Norwegian Unitarian churches in the United States, and later pro- 
moted Unitarian views by public addresses throughout Norway and 
Denmark. The present pastor of the Christiania Congregation is Rev. 
Herman Haugerud, who publishes a monthly Unitarian journal. In 
Bergen Rev. Carl Konow, a Lutheran pastor, has recently undergone 
no little persecution because of his radical and brave utterances on reli- 
gious topics. The late Bjoemstjeme Bjoemson, eminent as a poet and 
leader in public affairs, sympathized with the Unitarian point of view, 
as do many other scholars and public men of the Kingdom. There are 
four Unitarian churches among the Norwegians in the United States. 

Iceland. — A goodly portion of the population of this island is 
reported to be in sympathy with Unitarian opinions in religion. Rev. 
Matthias Jochumsson, of Akureyri, a prominent poet and writer, for- 
merly a Lutheran pastor, is an avowed liberal Christian. There are six 
Unitarian parishes among the Icelanders in the Province of Manitoba. 

Sweden. — There is no organized Unitarian movement in Sweden, 
but an increasing number of religiously inclined, thoughtful, and lib- 
eral-minded persons in the community hold similar views of religion 
and duty. Rev. Beskow, Djuersholm, is pastor of a liberal society in 
Stockholm. Prof. C. G. Santessen, 2 Bergsgatan, Kh. Stockholm, and 
Prof. G. Lindberg, Gothenburg, are large-minded and progressive 
Christians, as is Dr. Samuel Fries, the learned and liberal pastor of the 
Oscar parish, Stockholm. 

Japan. — In 1887 The American Unitarian Association sent Rev. 
Arthur M. Knapp to Tokio as its missionary. The Unitarian principles 



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of religion and life powerfully appealed to the Japanese imagination 
and reason. The movement rapidly crystalized into a mission, employ- 
ing a number of American as well as native teachers. Had the Uni- 
tarians been possessed of larger financial resources and a more ardent 
missionary spirit they might have attained to large influence in the reli- 
gious concerns of the Empire. As it was, Unity Hall, a commodious 
and handsome structure and center of their movement, has been built, 
at which Sunday and week-day activities have been carried on unin- 
terruptedly; a monthly magazine, the Rikugo-Zasshi (Cosmos) is 
published under the present editorship of H. Minami, and through cor- 
respondence, Postal Mission work, and personal visitation the Unitarian 
principles are further promulgated. In 1900 Rev. Clay MacCauley, 
D.D., the head of the mission, after a service of nine years, returned to 
America, and it was thought advisable to commit the future of the 
movement to the Japanese themselves, who were desirous of assuming 
its direction. More recently Dr. MacCauley has returned to Japan and 
resumed his relations with the Unitarian work in that country with ex- 
cellent results. Rev. S. Kanda is Secretary. The development of 
native Japanese Christianity has of late years been in the direction of 
Unitarian theological opinion, which under various names and churches 
promises to exert a large influence on the nation's life and thought. 
To sustain this work is for American Unitarians a duty of the first 
order. The address of Dr. MacCauley is Unity Hall, 2 Shikokimiachi, 
Mita, Shiba, Tokio. 

Palestine. — In Jerusalem, Haifa, and Jaffa the Society of Friends 
of the Temple, founded in 1853 in Germany by Chr. Hoffman and others, 
and transferred in 1868 to the Holy Land, has founded successful agri- 
cultural colonies for the worship of the one God. They deny the Trinity, 
Pre-existence of Jesus, and His Atoning Sacrifice. Freedom from the 
yoke of dogma and a pure and living Christianity is the aim of these 
colonists, whose settlements are reported to be in a flourishing condi- 
tion. Their organ is : Die Worte des Tempels ( for Germany) , Stutt- 
gardt, Germany, also Axis Abend und Morgen (for America), Buffalo, 
N. Y. 

India. — In the year 1855 the American Unitarian Association sent 
the Rev. Chas. H. Dall to Calcutta as its missionary. For thirty-one 
years he rendered faithful and admirable service, not only as the teacher 
and representative of Unitarian Christianity, but in promoting all forms 
of human service and religious co-operation. On his death in 1886 the 
mission was suspended. It was felt that the Brahmo Somaj, or Asso- 
ciation of Hindu Theists, whose principles so largely resemble Unitari- 
anism, especially as regards the nature of the Deity, would better be 
intrusted with the religious future of their country. With this associ- 
ation the Unitarians have ever held friendly relations, the late Hindu 



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teacher, Protap Chunder Mozoomdar, especially, by repeated visits to 
America and England, bringing them into sympathy and co-operation. 
In 1895, Rev. J. T. Sunderland, an American minister, but under the 
auspices of the British and Foreign Unitarian Association, visited the 
BraJimo societies and wrought much good among them. In Madras 
Rev. Wm. Roberts, a Hindu preacher, and his son and successor, have 
long maintained a Unitarian mission. Under the supervision of the 
British and Foreign Unitarian Association there are representatives of 
the Unitarian faith in several parts of India. In the Kliasi Hills there 
are stations at Jowai, at Nong^long, and other places, at each of which 
there is a small meeting-house where regular Sunday services are held, 
and also day and Sunday schools. The Banda Mission, conducted by 
Mr. Akbar Masih, works chiefly through correspondence and the publi- 
cation of tracts and books on Unitarianism. There are Unitarian Postal 
Mission agencies at Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, and Shillong. 

The Brahmo Somaj has societies and houses of prayer all over India. 
Its central office is at 211 G>mwallis-street, Calcutta. It publishes a 
number of weekly journals in the English tongue besides others in the 
vernaculars of India. Among these are The Indian Messenger, pub- 
lished at 211 Cornwallis-street, Calcutta, The World and the New Dis- 
pensation, published at 3 Ramanath Mozumdar-street, Calcutta, and 
Subodha Patrika, published at Bombay. A number of their leading 
speakers and writers have been students in Unitarian theological schools 
in England and this country. At present the interchanges of thought 
and good-will between the two bodies are increasing, and offer large 
opportunities for religious and brotherly service. 

Switzerland. — About half of the Protestants of the republic are 
Liberal Christians. The liberal religious congregations are found in 
the Protestant Cantons especially, in Zurich, St. Gall, Geneva, and 
Basle. The Free Christian Association (Der Verein fuer freies Chris- 
tentum), with 4,000 members and 13 cantonal sections, is the chief 
bond of union and center of activity. The popular religious literature 
issued under its auspices has assisted greatly in spreading the knowl- 
edge of liberal Christian doctrines, while the free religious organs, 
especially the Schweizerische thcologische Zeitschrift, Religioses Volks- 
blatt, Schweizerische Reformbldtter, le Protestant liberal, and the old 
established Schweizerischcs Protestantenblatt do excellent work in pro- 
moting religious enlightenment. In Zurich Rev. G. Schoenholzer 
(Kreuz-Kirche) and Profs. Schmiedel and Ragaz of the Theological 
Faculty of the University; in Berne, Rev. E. Ryser, of the Heilige 
Geist Kirche; in Basel, Rev. Alfred Altherr (the German biographer 
of Theodore Parker), pastor of the St. Leonhard's Church; in Geneve, 
Pastors E. Rochat and L. Maystre, and Prof. Dr. E. Montet, rector of 
the University, are prominent advocates of liberal Christianity. 



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Holland. — About one third of the Protestants of Holland are 
avowed Liberal Christians. The Nederlandsche Protestantenbond 
(Protestant Union of Holland), with 20,000 members in its 156 dis- 
trict associations, was established in 1870 as a converg^ing point for 
Liberals belonging to every church of the country — Reformed, Lu- 
theran, Remonstrant, Mennonite, and Free. It has 19,500 members. 
It also conducts many Sunday schools. The Vergadering van mod- 
erne Theologen (a meeting of liberal Protestant ministers and scholars) 
is a yearly meeting of liberal ministers of various denominations. The 
liberal party in the Dutch Reformed Church is organized in several 
Provincial Unions. The Universities of Leyden and Amsterdam are 
the educational centres of free Protestantism in Holland ; Leyden for 
the Dutch Reformed and Remonstrants, Amsterdam for the Mennon- 
ites and Lutherans. The Universities of Groningen and Utrecht have 
also Liberal Professors and a number of Liberal students. In Amster- 
dam the Vrije Gemeente is a free congregation founded by the Hugen- 
holtz brothers, gifted and earnest upholders of radical principles in 
religion. It is housed in a handsome and commodious temple in the 
Weteringschans, near the Leidsche Pldn. Rev. F. C. Fleischer, Winter- 
swyk, a prominent Mennonite, and Rev. Et. Giran, pastor of the French 
Walloon Church, are pronounced liberals. The Dutch liberal organ is 
De Hervorming, Rev. J. van Loenen Martinet, editor, published at 
Keizersgracht 333, Amsterdam (2 florins, 40). There are two Uni- 
tarian congregations among Hollanders in the United States. 

Belgium. — There is a Free Christian Church at Brussels, 21 rue 
des Minines, of which Rev. J. Hocart, 272 Chausee de Waterloo, Uccle, 
near Brussels, is minister. 

France. — Nearly half of the Protestant (Calvinistic) churches of 
France are liberal in their theology; 120 congregations and 115 min- 
isters, organized under the name of Eglises Reformees Unies, hold 
essentially Unitarian principles. The principal churches of liberal in- 
clination in Paris are L'Oratoire, rue de TOratoire du Louvre, Revs. 
J. Emile Roberty, D.D., and Dr. Wilfred Monod, pastors ; and Foyer 
de TAme, 7 bis rue Daval (near the Column of July), Pastor Charles 
Wagner, D.D. The central agency of the liberal Protestant churches 
in France is at 20 Rue de Vienne. The liberal organ, Le Protestant, 
is published weekly at the foregoing address (8 francs), Rev. A. 
Reyss, editor. M. le professeur G. Bonet-Maury, 32 rue de Bac, is 
a prominent liberal Christian, member of the Free Faculty of Protestant 
Theology, whose seat is at 83 Boulevard Arago, Paris, 146. 

Germany. — There are no distinctly Unitarian churches in Ger- 
many. An English Unitarian service (The Church of the Liberal 
Faith) is held on Sundays in the Logenhaus, Welckerstrasse, in Ham- 
burg, by Rev. Gardner Preston. The members of the national or state 



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churches of Germany are, however, deeply imbued with religious liber- 
alism. In every considerable community are to be found preachers who 
are filled with the new spirit of the time, and whose message discloses 
the influence of natural science, historical criticism, comparative reli- 
gion, idealistic philosophy, and social readjustments. The German 
Protestantenverein (Protestant Unicm) forms the chief bond of union 
among the Liberal Christians of the Empire. It was formed in 1865, 
and has about forty branch societies, and some 27,000 members. The 
Protestantenverein consists mainly of members of the national Church. 
Its headquarters are at 68 Steglitzerstrasse, Berlin, W. Its chief organ 
is the Protestantenbhtt, a weekly published at 45 Eisenacherstrasse, 
Berlin-Schoeneberg (8 marks annually). The Freunde der Christlichen 
Welt is an association founded to support the liberal and influential 
weekly of that name, and its editor. Prof. Martin Rade, D.D., of the Uni- 
versity of Marburg (Marburg, 12 marks annually). The Freunde der 
Evangelischen Fretheit in den Rheinlanden (Friends of Protestant Free- 
dom in the Rhinelands) is an association for the vindication of congre- 
gational and personal freedom in the National Church. It counts 4,000 
members. Its president is Prof. Dr. H. GefFcken of Cologne ; its organ, 
Christliche Freiheit, is edited by Pastor G. Traub of Dortmund. A sim- 
ilar association exists in Hanover, whose president is Prof. W. Bousset 
of the University of Goettingen. In Berlin, Rev. Dr. Max Fischer of 
St. Mark's Qiurch, Rev. Alfred Fischer of the Jerusalem (Crusader) 
Church ; Rev. W. Nithack-Stahn, Emperor William Memorial Church ; 
Rev. Dr. Kirmss, New Qiurch, Rev. Lempfuhl, St. Andrew's Church, 
are prominent in the liberal cause. In Bremen, the center of Liberal 
Christianity in Germany, Revs. Otto Veeck, A. Baars, H. Sonntag, H. 
Emde, Koenig, Steudel, and Burggraf represent what may be called 
Unitarian sentiments. In Hamburg, Revs. Dr. Grimm, Hanne, Rode, 
Stage, Klapp, and others ; in Cologne, Pastor Jatho ; in Dresden, Pastor 
Graue; Wiesbaden, Dean Bickel; Frankfurt a. M., Revs. Andriessen, 
Battenberg, Kuebel, Zurhellen and Dr. Foerster; Stuttgart, Rev. Ge- 
rock ; Strassburg, Rev. Dr. Ceroid ; Leipzig, Revs. Scheibe and Nau- 
mann ; in Hannover, Pastors Doerries and C£ippuzeau ; in Jena, Pastors 
Spinner and Arper ; in Jena, Supt. Braasch, — are Liberal Christians. 
The Free Religious Congregations of Germany, once centers of liberal 
Christianity, have mostly gone out of existence, or are materialistic in 
their philosophy. Notable exceptions are the Freie Evangelische Ge- 
meinde in Koenigsberg, Prussia, founded by Dr. Julius Rupp in 1846, 
the kindred societies of Dantzig and Tilsit, of which Dr. C. Schieler is 
minister, and the society at Mannheim, Geo. Schneider, minister. The 
liberal faculties of theology are at the imiversities of Jena, Marburg, 
Heidelberg, Giessen, and Strassburg. 
Italy. — Protestantism in Italy, having been mainly promoted by 



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the Waldensian Church, is orthodox in its leanings, but many hold 
liberal views. Especially in the larger towns those who break with 
Catholicism and maintain a religious conviction are rarely content with 
the old dogmatic position. Thousands hold Unitarian opinions. The 
late Professor Bracciforti, Milan, was long identified widi the promo- 
tion of Unitarian principles. Rev. Tony Andre, D.D., Lungo Mug- 
none, Florence, is minister of the San Spirito Evangelical Church of 
that city, in whose cemetery Theodore Parker lies buried. Dr. Andre 
is a scholarly and brave exponent of liberal Christianity. 

Russia. — The dissenting sect known as Molokans are reported to 
hold essentially Unitarian views. In St. Petersburg, the Dutch Re- 
formed Church, Rev. F. C. A. Pantekoek, pastor, is liberal and pro- 
gressive in spirit. 



NECROLOGY 

WILLIAM BROWN. 

William Brown was bom in Concord, Mass., September lo, 1838. 
He was the eighth in descent from Thomas Browne, one of the original 
settlers of the town of Concord, and all his people, both on his father's 
and mother's side, were closely associated with the life and history of 
the community. One of his ancestors in Colonial days served as town 
clerk for a long term of years, another died from wounds received in 
the Indian wars. His maternal gjeat grandfather, with three brothers 
and their father, were in the fight at the old North Bridge. Two 
brothers served in Concord companies in the Civil War. 

William Brown was born and reared on the old homestead and 
trained in the Concord schools. While a student at Amherst College 
his violent revolt from the Calvinism of that day sent him to Harvard 
Divinity School and into the Unitarian ministry. He was settled in 
Sherbom in 1863, ^md remained for nine years minister of that church. 
Then he took up a pastorate in Walpole, N. H., at that time the sum- 
mer home of Dr. Bellows. His work here terminated in 1883, when 
he went to West Bridgewater to preach in the church and to teach in 
Howard Seminary, at that time just opened as a private school. After 
five years in West Bridgewater he was settled for a year in Marshfield 
Hills. In 1900 he took up the pastorate in Tyngsboro, which lasted for 
twelve years. He was for nearly forty years in the almost unbroken 
service of the ministry. 

He was married to Salome Stephens Williams, a descendant of Rich- 
ard Williams, the first settler of Taunton, who was reared under the 
ministry of Charles Henry Brigham, for twenty-one years minister of 



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the First Parish of Taunton. The older ministers will remember Mrs. 
Brown, who now survives her husband, as an interesting hostess and an 
ardent supporter of every Unitarian cause. 

Both William Brown and his wife were bound up in the welfare of 
the Unitarian movement. They were constant attendants at the meet- 
ings of the National Conference and the Ministers' Institute. They 
held warm personal friendships with Dr. Bellows, John W. Chadwick, 
and most of the generation now past of Unitarian ministers. Through 
all changes that came their relations were invariably sweet and cordial 
with all parties and schools of thought, though their sympathies were 
invariably with the sanely radical side. 

Unitarian organized life meant much to them and every progressive 
step in its development was welcomed. 

William Brown died in T3mgsboro, his home, on March 25, 1910. 
He had been for some years, since his retirement frcmi the T)mgsboro 
pulpit, the chairman of the parish committee. Of his two surviving 
brothers one is a deacon in the old home church, the First Parish of 
Concord, and the other is president of the board of trustees of die Sec- 
ond Unitarian Society in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The interest and loyalty of these three brothers to the cause of organ- 
ized liberal religion recalls the fact that the brother of their first Amer- 
ican ancestor, Thomas, was Edmund Browne, who settled as the first 
minister of the neighboring town of Sudbury in 1638. 

William Brown's body lies in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, Concord, in 
the soil which holds the dust of his ancestors — ground which he loved 
well and to the memories and traditions of which he sought to be true. 

W. C. B. 



COURTLAND YARDLEY De NORMANDIE. 

Rev. Courtland Yardlcy De Normandie was born at Fallsington, 
Pa., February 16, 1827. He was educated at the Williamsport Academy 
and at the Meadville Theological School, from which he graduated in 
1852. In that year he settled over the Unitarian Church in Brooklyn, 
Conn., where he remained four years, and where, on May 22, 1853, he 
gained the crowning blessing of his life by his marriage to Miss Myra 
B. Stetson, who has been a perfect helpmeet to him in all his intellec- 
tual, social, and practical work as a Christian minister, sharing with 
him the respect, gratitude, and affection of the several communities 
blessed by their helpful ministry. He has had three daughters, two of 
whom are living. In 1856 he was settled in Fairhaven, Mass., where 
he remained for thirteen years. His next parish was at Laconia, N. H., 
to which he went in 1869. ^^ ^^7^ ^^ settled in Kingston, Mass., 



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continuing pastor there for thirty-eight years, until his death, which 
occurred on February 25. 

Mr. De Normandie was a consecrated Christian minister with an 
exalted ideal of ministerial work. His preaching was characterized by 
intense earnestness, devout religious feeling, and practical wisdom; 
and this made him a welcome preacher in the Unitarian pulpits of the 
Old Colony, where he lived for so many years. He was also a most 
faithful parish pastor, deeply interested in the welfare of all, old and 
young, never sparing himself when any service was needed by others. 
His sphere of service and influence was not bounded by the limits of 
his own parish. Living so long in Kingston while ministers of other 
churches were coming and going, he was well known in all the sur- 
rotmding towns, and few country ministers were so often called upon 
as he, for funeral services, in which he was especially earnest and com- 
forting. His long ministry in the town, his interest in the schools and 
in all public welfare, his friendly spirit, and his interesting, high- 
minded personality have left many sweet and wholesome influences 
behind him. 

The strength and warmth of his personal attachments, his spirit of 
genial companionship, his social gifts, and his hearty hospitality made 
his home one of the happiest ; and many of us, who knew him well, and 
consequently loved him well, will have among our pleasantest recollec- 
tions our visits in that dear home, recalling as we do his friendly greet- 
ing, his earnest conversation, his ringing laughter, his living interest in 
important themes. Strong in character and decided in his convictions, 
he was yet modest and humble in his estimate of himself, — an able, 
pure-hearted, unselfish, genuine man, his supreme service consisting as 
much in the influence of his noble personality as in his word and work. 

W. L. C 

JOHN PERKINS FORBES. 

John Perkins Forbes, minister of the First Unitarian Congrega- 
tional Society of Brooklyn, N. Y., died in Brooklyn, April 16, 1910. 

He had been the minister of this church for twelve years. It was 
his fourth parish. His first pastorate was in Westboro, Mass. After 
preaching there a few years he was called to Arlington, Mass. He 
served the First Congregational Church of this town nearly five years. 
A call to Taunton, Mass., resulted in a ministry of eleven years. From 
Taunton he went to Brookljm, to the parish which he was serving at the 
time of his death. 

Mr. Forbes's life was spent in single-hearted devotion to the pro- 
fession of the ministry and the cause of liberal Christianity. He was 
bom in Middleboro, Mass., March 25, 1855. He attended the public 



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and the private schools of his native town. Moving to Westboro, he 
b^an there, in early manhood, the study of law, with the idea of mak- 
ing the practice of law his life work. The call of the ministry, how- 
ever, was too insistent to be disobeyed. He abandoned the legal studies, 
and went to the Harvard Divinity School to study for the ministry. At 
the same time he felt obliged to leave the orthodox commtmion in 
which he had been brought up. When he came back to Westboro, it 
was to be not a lawyer but a minister, and a minister of tl^e Unitarian 
faith. 

He was ordained in 1878. From that time until his death Mr. Forbes 
served the cause of Unitarianism not only in his four parishes, but in 
other ways. He was for several years on the Board of Directors of 
the American Unitarian Association. He was a member of the Board 
at the time of his death. Two years ago he was appointed Billings 
Lecturer, and spent many weeks in the West, speaking at student 
meetings in collie towns. 

Mr. Forbes was by nature a man of studious habits and scholarly 
tastes. There was never any dead line in his library. He liked to have 
the best books about him and to read them. Through them his prepa- 
ration for the ministry went on so long as that ministry lasted. The 
single mind and teacher, however, to whom he always looked back with 
the deepest feeling of indebtedness was Dr. Charles C. Everett, dean 
of the Harvard Divinity School when he took his theological course. 

The work of Mr. Forbes, as preacher and pastor, was in all of his 
parishes singularly happy and fruitful. He did not shirk the duties 
that commtmities sometimes lay upon resident ministers. He filled 
various offices in the towns and cities where he was doing his work. 
Now he acted as trustee of the Public Library, now he took part in the 
work of the Associated Charities, but he kept continually before him 
the task of bringing a message to his people on Sunday mornings. 
This was the " one thing " that he held it was for him to do. There 
was never any sign of unpreparedness in his preaching. Every detail 
of the service was considered with scrupulous care. The result was 
something that people heard gladly. Mr. Forbes had unusual gifts as 
a public speaker and he used and developed those gifts like a faithful 
servant. His presence was manly and winning. His gestures were 
varied and graceful. His voice was rich and musical. Dignity, sanity, 
and sincerity were characteristic of his pulpit utterance. His preaching 
was full of charm and persuasiveness. 

As a pastor he came close to his people. He made friends of his 
parishioners. In every one of his four parishes he formed friendships 
that were never left behind him. In fact he grew to be a kind of Min- 
ister-at-Large to very many outside of his own church, to some outside 
of any church. 



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At a memorial service, held in a parish that he served twelve years 
ago, gathered a large company of all sorts and conditions of men with 
whom Mr. Forbes had come into friendly contact as he had lived out 
his life in that place years before. 

In him the cause of liberal religion had a brave soldier, ready to " en- 
dure hardness," the denomination a patient, balanced counsellor; the 
young man thinking of going into the ministry a generous adviser ; the 
parishes he served a loyal, eflfective servant, and many lives far and 
wide, a beloved friend. 

He is survived by Mrs. Forbes, and one son, Roger S. Forbes, min- 
ister of the First Parish in Dorchester. 

G. H. R. 

VICTOR JAMES GILPIN. 

Victor James Gilpin was bom in the Methodist Parsonage in Bosan- 
quet, Canada, on March lo, 1872. He attended school in the various 
localities whither his father's ministerial appointments took him, and, 
on his decision to enter the ministry, became a student of Victoria Col- 
lie, Toronto, from which institution he graduated in 1898. In 1900 
he was ordained to the ministry of the Methodist Church and held 
charges at Grand Valley, Dyer's Bay, Onondago, and Sheffield. 

During his college course he had done advanced work in Biology, 
and the revolutionary hypothesis concerning man's origin which his 
studies in that science made familiar, gradually transformed his entire 
theological view point. Being frank and outspoken by nature, his pro- 
nounced radicalism became in time unacceptable to conservative people 
in the Methodist Church and, on the advice of Rev. J. T. Sunderland 
of Toronto, he resolved to enter the Unitarian ministry, and by way 
of preparation spent the session of 1903-1904 in Meadville School 

On the completion of his year in Meadville, he asked to be sent, if 
possible, to some new center in Ontario, and through the assistance of 
the American Unitarian Association began work in London and sur- 
roimding towns in October, 1904. No Unitarian service had ever been 
held there before, and so slow was the response to his appeal that it 
was impossible to hold a service for severd months after his arrival. 
But in true apostolic fashion he persevered in his mission, and in the 
course of two years had gathered forty or fifty intelligent progressive 
people around him. As his work grew, the need of a building was 
felt, and with the aid of the American Unitarian Association a 
splendid Chapter House was purchased from the Anglicans and 
fitted up as a Unitarian Church. The lack of Sunday street cars 
proving a gjeat hindrance to the growth of the congregation, Mr. Gil- 
pin organized a campaign for Sunday cars and secured a majority of 



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votes at the polls. But this movement brought him gjeat unpopularity 
among religious circles, and he resigned his charge in December, 1908. 
In May, 1910, he removed with his family to Toronto with the inten- 
tion of starting a weekly journal for the propagation of liberal thought ; 
but before he could mature his plans he took tjrphoid fever and died 
after a few days' illness. 

Nature made Mr. Gilpin in a large mold. His erect, active, and 
powerful physical frame was a true index of the dimensions of his 
imagination and heart. He lived in a large world and planned for the 
doing of large things. He could not work in a collar of conventions. 
Freedom was the demand of his whole spiritual being, but he was cut 
off before his powers had matured and before he had foimd time to use 
the freedom he had gradually won for himself. 

His widow and child are now residing in Ottawa, Ontario. 

R.J. R 

JOHN C KIMBALL. 

John C. Kimball was bom at Ipswich, Mass., May 23, 1832, and died 
at Greenfield, February 16, 1910. Educated in the Ipswich schools, he 
went to Amherst College and was graduated in 1854, later receiving the 
degree of A.M. He entered the Harvard Divinity School in 1856, and 
upon graduation was ordained over the First Church in Beverly, in 
1859, and continued his pastorate for nearly eleven years. During the 
earlier part of the Civil War he served nine months as Chaplain of the 
Eighth Regiment Infantry, Massachusetts Volimteers. Three years 
after leaving Beverly he was settled four years or more over the Chan- 
ning Memorial Church, at Newport, R. I. ; ten years over Unity Churdi, 
Hartford, Conn.; for some years afterwards he supplied at Sharon 
and elsewhere. 

Mr. Kimball was a zealous and faithful minister, a vigorous expo- 
nent of liberal theology, an untiring pleader for social rights and jus- 
tice. His aversion to Calvinism was probably the occasion of his offi- 
cially suppressing all but the initial C from his middle name, Calvin. 
During IMvinity School days he lived frugally and studiously, and was 
reputed for his wide and constant reading. His great love of nature 
developed the study of scientific literature ; the new philosophy of evo- 
lution deeply interested him ; and in its relation to religious beliefs took 
a somewhat conspicuous place in his teachings. With maturing years 
the social problems came uppermost. His sympathy seems to have been 
more and more deeply awakened for those who were weak and unhappy 
and struggling under oppressive conditions. He was an enemy to 
war and imperialism, and awake to the danger of a sodden materialism. 
Interested in all reforms, progressive, independent, speaking his mind 



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f reely, sometimes unpractical, possibly too insistent upon his own point 
of view where matters were in ferment, the peace of his ministry was at 
certain times disturbed. But his intelligence, ability, quick conscience, 
and sympathy were always recognized A classmate's testimony is that 
" he was thoroughly uprirfit, loyal, true-hearted, doing the will of God 
from the heart ; afraid of nothing ; with a spice of quixotism, though 
that never hurt him nor hindered him from fighting a good fight and 
finishing his course with joy." 

His urgent missionary spirit led him, at intervals, to some pioneer 
preaching and lecturing. He printed a few sermons, wrote some 
articles for religious periodicals, and of late years was a valued con- 
tributor to the Springfield Republican. Two papers in the Christian 
Register, under the nom de plume of " Seventy-seven," written just 
previous to his death, described his experiences with pastors and par- 
ishes, and show his interesting perception of human nature, his humor 
and optimism. 

S. B. S* 

GEORGE WILBER PATTEN. 

George Wilbcr Patten was bom in Stockholm, N. Y., July 6, 1843. 
He served in the Civil War as a member of the Elevaith New York 
Cavalry. Soon after the conclusion of the war he entered the Harvard 
Divinity School, where he graduated in 1871. On July 15, 1871, he 
was ordained at Topeka, Kan., and served as minister of the Unitarian 
Church in that city until 1874. The following year he settled as min- 
ister of the First Parish of Haverhill, Mass. In 1875 Mr. Patten mar- 
ried Miss Sarah Taylor of Sanbomton, N. H., and she survives hinu 
Mr. Patten also served the churches at Newport, N. H., Cboperstown, 
N. Y., Walpole, Dublin, and Bemardston, N. H. 

For some time, however, he had been in failing health, and for six 
years he had lived in comparative retirement in Ounbridge. 



ABRAM ADAMS ROBERTS. 

Abram Adams Roberts was bom at Goffstown, N. H., July 4, 1831. 
There he was educated and married. With his bride of less than a year 
he emigrated to Kansas in 1857. He first took a claim in Johnson 
County, and in 1858 got a claim near Stanton, where he was " discov- 
ered " by Judge E. W. Robinson, and induced to go to Paola and teadi 
school. He taught there in 1858, 1859, and i860, and at the same time 
was acting deputy sheriff. The sheriff having received a commission 
of major in the army, Mr. Roberts completed his term. 



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After his wife and chfldren died in Paola, Mr. Roberts went to Mead- 
ville, Pa., and graduated at the Theological School in 1865. He settled 
at Baraboo, Wis., where he built a church. He did missionary work 
for a time in Kansas, later returning to Wisconsin. He went to Kan- 
sas again in 1869 and lived on a claim in Montgomery County, and later 
was engaged in general merchandising at Baraboo, where he died. 

He was a re&ied and scholarly gentleman. He had much sorrow, 
which he bore with patience. His faith was firm and clear. He had 
no enemies but many friends. He is survived by one son. Kirk Roberts, 
of Aberdeen, S. D. 

ANTONE GERHARDT SINGSEN. 

Antone Gerhardt Singsen was bom in Lark, Germany, March 3, 
1863, and died in Providence, R. I., January 15, 1910. When he was 
eight years old his parents emigrated to America, and settled in Monti- 
cello, N. Y. An ambitious and earnest boy, at fourteen he began to 
prepare for college, with the idea of becoming an Episcopal minister. 
In 1886 he graduated with honors from Knox Collie, Galesburg, 111. 
Throuehout his college career he supported himself. While a student 
at the Western Theological Seminary at Chicago he served as assistant 
to the Rev. Theodore N. Morrison (now Bishop Morrison), at the 
Church of the Epiphany. On account of his independent and outspoken 
religious views he was asked by Bishop McLaren to withdraw from the 
seminary before he had finished his course. In May, 1888, however, he 
was ordained to the priesthood, having been given deacon's orders the 
year before. For fourteen years he was in the ministry of the Protes- 
tant Episcopal Church, esteemed and beloved in every parish he served. 
For seven years Bishop Huntington of Central New York was not only 
his bishop, but also his friend and counsellor. During all these years 
Mr. Singsen was groping toward the light, and at last, after gjeat mai- 
tal distress and spiritual suffering, the larger revelation of truth came 
to him. 

" In 1900 there came a Sunday,'' writes one who stood nearest to him, 
"when during the recital of the Apostles' Creed in the service Mr. 
Singsen gulped and swallowed over * He descended into hell, the third 
day he rose again from the dead,' and stopped there, and the congrega- 
tion finished it alone. In the pews I alone knew what was the matter — 
the end had come. Never again did Mr. Singsen conduct a service in 
the church of his first love. He called a meeting of the vestry, and re- 
signed at once, giving his reasons for so doing. To his surprise his 
vestry asked him to remain, knowing his views ; but this, of course, he 
could not do." 

When Mr. Singsen entered the Unitarian fellowship he was deposed 



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from the Episcopal ministry at his own request by Bishop Huntington, 
who never ceased to be his f riencL Four happy and useful years in the 
service of the Unitarian Church at Holyoke, Mass., were followed by- 
four fruitful years at Bell Street Chapel, Providence, R. I., where, alas ! 
his work was so tragically interrupted. 

Mr. Singsen, in 1888, married Miss Helen Michal Allen of Gales- 
burg, 111. His wife and five sons, two of whom are planning to study 
for die Unitarian ministry, survive him. 

Of Mr. Singsen it might be said, " In quietness and in confidence 
shall be your strength." He did not cry aloud nor cause his voice to be 
heard in the streets; but the work which he did for boys and young 
men in the neighborhood of his church, in his comer of the Kingdcwn 
of God, will live on in many lives. He was a zealous worker for tem- 
perance and purity and civic righteousness. The cause of good gov- 
ernment, as well as of public monds, has lost in him a forceful advocate. 
If any man ever put his religion into his daily thinking and feeling and 
acting, that man was Antone G. Singsen. I never loiew a man more 
devoted to his work, more sincere in all that he said and did. His nature 
was transparent : all was clear and beautiful within. He was genuine 
through and through. We must still think of him as helping and serv- 
ing, though behind the veil. Such a life, giving out strength, radiating 
good will, breathing peace, is the best proof of personal immortality. 

W. S. J, 

REED STUART. 

Reed Stuart, pastor of the First Congregational Unitarian Society of 
Detroit, from 1886 until his retirement from the ministry, last summer, 
died at Princeton, N. J., February 7, 1910. 

Mr. Stuart was bom in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia, October 
21, 1845. The community was Presbyterian in religion, and as he once 
said, the staple fireside conversation was on Jacksonian Democratic 
politics and Calvinistic theology. The family moved to Illinois, where 
his father died in Mr. Stuart's early boyhood. His mother continued 
on the farm on which they lived, and he led the life of a farmer's boy 
until he was old enough to enlist in the army in the latter part of the 
civil war. His military experience gave color and background to an 
ardent patriotism, and also induced a profound and abiding aWiorrence 
of war. 

He was graduated from Monmouth College in 1870, and took his the- 
ological course in the Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Chicago. 
In 1872 he married and became pastor of the First Presbyterian Church 
at Oneida, 111., in the fall of that year. Five years later he went to the 
First Congregational Presbyterian Church of Battle Creek, Mich., 



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where he remained for ten years. Midway in this pastorate, having 
grown out of the old theology, he left the Presbyterian organization and 
resigned his pastorate; but the Church preferred the minister to the 
creed, refused to accept the resignation, and became an independent 
Congregational Church. Mr. Stuart remained in charge of it tmtil he 
came to Detroit. 

The facts above given will have little significance to those who did 
not know the subject whose life they sketch. They include nothing 
unusual, but they mark an unusual life and a remarkable character. 
The boyhood experiences of the farm, the early impressions produced 
by the bleak austerities of the old theology, the incidents of march and 
camp and skirmish, the struggles between ancestral creed and individ- 
ual conviction were common to him with thousands of others; but it 
was given to him to see more clearly and feel more deeply the signifi- 
cance of it all, because he was, in the old Greek sense, a poet. 

Partly, it is to be supposed, from temperament, partly as the result 
of the arduous and painful struggle through which he passed out of the 
old faith and the highly organized church by which it is professed, Mr. 
Stuart had little r^^rd for theological differences and denominational 
distinctions, and no great interest in the administrative side of religious 
organization. To him religion was a personal thing, and he spoke with 
spiritual authority. Although he was a learned man and widely read, 
and though his sermons gave abundant evidence of his knowledge and 
of his reading, neither erudition nor culture were of their substance. 
He did not contemplate truth through the long vistas of religious his- 
tory or deduce it by elaborate formal argumentation. His perception 
of it was direct and immediate, like that of the founders of religions. 
His sermons had always something of the prophetic. 

It is true that his conception of the function of religion and of the 
church was other than any popular in the present hour. It may be that 
the Church is to be transformed into one of the many organizations 
working mainly by material means and primarily for improvement in 
material conditions. That the need for such improvement is great and 
increasingly urgent, but never before so fully appreciated, is patent. 
It would be unwise for any one to forecast the results of our great de- 
parture from former theories of society and of the state and of the 
transformations now passing upon every institution of our civil and 
moral order. But it was once generally accepted, and by some is still 
believed that while religion supports and vivifies all material and intel- 
lectual progress, it is chiefly concerned with neither, that its office is not 
to enable us to obtain dominion over the kingdoms of this world, but to 
teach us to live without it, that, in short, it is not for the body but for 
the soul. Of this faith was Reed Stuart. 

H. E. S. 



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ALBERT WALKLEY. 

For more than twenty-five years Mr. Walkley was a vigorous, earnest, 
and successful preacher, pastor, and missionary in the Unitarian body. 
He believed in religion as man's deepjest need; he believed in liberal 
Christianity as the highest form of religion ; he believed in the church 
as second in importance to no institution of society ; he believed in the 
ministry with all his heart, and threw his whole soul into it. He was 
optimistic and courageous in spirit, and could never be content merely 
to hold his own ; he wanted to see growth ; advance tangible results. 

He was pastor of a Reformed Episcopal Church in Chicago, and of 
Unitarian churches in Keene, N. H., Manistee, Mich., Brighton, Mass. 
(Boston), Ottawa, Canada, and Marblehead, Mass. He organized two 
new Unitarian societies, — in Manistee, Mich., and Midland, Mich. A 
third, that in Ottawa, the capital city of Canada, he took when only the 
barest beginnings had been made, completed the organization, gathered 
a congp-egation, and built up a vigorous and prosperous church. He 
was instrumental in the erection of three new church edifices, — at Man- 
istee, Ottawa, and Brighton. All were of stone, sing^ularly tasteful in 
their architecture and admirable in their appointments and their adapta- 
tion to the needs of a working society. He built one parsonage, — at 
Manistee. For a time he was the State missionary and superintendent 
of church extensicm work in Michigan, during which period he infused 
into the general work of the State an extraordinary degree of activity. 

Six of the Manuals published by the Unitarian Sunday School 
Society are from his pen, and they are among the Society's best. As 
a writer of lessons for children he was unusuSly lucid and bright ; he 
had a rare ability to get at the heart of a subject, and to make his 
thought clear and simple, and his words graphic and picturesque. He 
wrote a little book on Theodore Parker, which is one of the most inter- 
esting presentations we have of what is central in the life and teachings 
of that great preacher and reformer. 

Mr. Walkley was bom in Ottawa, Canada, September 15, 1851, and 
died in Boston, March 28, 1910. His early education was obtained in 
Canada. At the age of eighteen he entered the Western University of 
Illinois to study for the ministry, graduating with the degree of A.B. 
in 1874. Later he studied for a year or two in the divinity school of 
Harvard University. He was ordained and began preaching in the Re- 
formed Episcopal Church while yet a college student in Illinois. In the 
course of three or four years he found himself growing away from 
belief in the theology of orthodoxy and into sjrmpathy with the faith 
of liberal Christians, and as a consequence withdrew from connection 
with the Reformed Episcopal body and joined the Fourth Unitarian 



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Church in Chicago, of wfaidi the Rev. J. T. Sunderland was at that time 
pastor. Very soon after this his career as a Unitarian minister began. 

In 1902, at the age of fifty-one, Mr. Walkley settled in Marblehead, 
soon after which he b^an the study of law in the Boston University 
Law School, graduating from the same in 1905. From this time until 
his death he devoted himself to the legal profession in Salem, where 
even in that short time and in spite of serious ill health he won an 
enviable place at the bar and built up a successful practice. Judge C. T. 
Davis of Salem writes of him : " Mr. Walkley was a good lawyer. His 
reading was thorough and laborious, his reasoning keen and analytical, 
his judgment absolutely independent, and his decisions sound and 
always honest. His professional standards were of the highest. His 
fine and highly trained mind, industry and int^rity, both of tfiought and 
action, made him a careful and safe counsellor. He will be missed and 
remembered at the Essex Bar." 

Two things were matters of particular pride and satisfaction to Mr. 
Walkley as he drew near the end of his life : one, that he had built up 
a Unitarian church in his native town, and the other that he had taken 
up a new profession after fifty and " made good." 

Mr. Walkley was a man of marked individuality, independence, and 
force of character. He thought for himself, stood on his own feet, and 
expected others to do the same. He had unusual powers of initiative, 
and an enthusiasm that was contagious. He had the ability to do 
things; to accomplish definite results. While others deliberated and 
debated he achieved. He had remarkable determination and persever- 
ance. This was shown in his early life in gaining for himself a good 
education wholly by his own efforts. It was shown in all his work as a 
minister. It was shown conspicuously in the vigor and success with 
which he took up the practice of law at a time in life so late that most 
men would have thought such an undertaking wholly out of the 
question. 

He was an eloquent preacher; a good organizer and manager in 
church affairs ; a born missionary, who was always on the lookout to 
find new ways of extending the influence of the gospel which he believed 
in. As to his theological position, he was neither an extreme radical 
nor an extreme conservative ; he was progressive, but he cared for the 
good that had come from the past ; he believed in reason, but he also 
believed tremendously in religion ; he heartily accepted evolution, but it 
was evolution with God behind it and in it and through it ; he welcomed 
the method and the main results of the higher criticism of the Bible, 
but he prized deeply the moral and religious spirit of the Bible and its 
gjeat lessons of life; and he believed that the world has in Jesus an 
incomparable prophet and leader whose life and teachings it cannot 
neglect or ignore or minimize without disaster. All his work as a 



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preacher, pastor, and missionary was thoroughly constructive and 
deeply religious, and therefore it was enduring. 

Mr. Walkley left a wife, Mary A. Walkley, and two sons, James 
Arthur Walkley, of Los Angeles, California, and Edward J. Walkley, 
of Boston. 

J. T. S. 

PERIODICALS 

The Christian Begister, Rev. George Batchdor, Editor, is published by the 
Christian Register Association, at 272 Congress Street, Boston. By its history, 
its traditions, and the conviction of its editorial board and publishers, it is com- 
mitted to the principles which characterize the Unitarian diurches of America. 
With them it aims to make religion a source of strength, comfort, and instruc- 
tion in the common life of man. But it has a constituency reaching far beyond 
all Unitarian churches, and does missionary work among people remote from 
all Unitarian fellowship. It reports news from the churches, the proceedings 
of the National Conference, the Unitarian Association, the Women's Alliance, 
the Sunday-School Society, the Young People's Religious Union, and kindred 
associations. Its editorial board consists of Rev. Charles G. Ames, D.D., Rev. 
Howard N. Brown, Rev. George Batchelor, Rev. Samuel M. Crothers, D.D., 
Rev. Charles F. Dole, D.D., Rev. John W. Day, George H. Ellis, Rev. Julian C 
Jaynes, Rev. William H. Lyon, D.D., William Howell Reed. Subscription, $3.00 
per year. 

Every Other Sunday, illustrated, fortnightly, Boston. Editor, Rev. Edward 
A. Horton. This is the only paper published for the young people of the Unita- 
rian churches. There are now over two hundred and twenty-five diflFerent con- 
tributors. In addition to its universal use in our Sunday Schools, the paper 
has been found very helpful reading for the home, and useful supplementary 
literature in the day school Published by the Unitarian Sunday-School Society, 
at 25 Beacon Street Price 50 cents a year. Single subscribers residing within 
the Boston Postal District pay 20 cents additional for postage. The same re- 
quirement applies to single Canadian subscribers. 

The TTnitariany monthly. New York Unitarian Headquarters, New York, 
N. Y. Rev. George H. Badger, Editor. Rev. John Haynes Holmes, Rev. Charles 
W. Casson, Rev. Henry Wilder Foote, Rev. Edgar S. Wiers, Rev. Frederic R. 
Griffin, and Rev. Alson H. Robinson, Associate Editors. Subscription, $1.00 
per year. 

Pacific TTnitarian, monthly, San Francisco, Cal. Published by the Pacific 
Unitarian Conference. Editor, Charles A Murdock. Editorial Committee, Rev. 



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Qarence Reed, Rev. Willfam D. Simonds, Rev. John H. Lathrop, Rev. Bradford 
Leavitt, and William Maxwell. Business address, 376 Sutter Street, San Fran- 
cisco. Editorial address, 68 Fremont Street, San Francisco. Price $1.00 a year. 
Single copy, 10 cents. 

Unity. Published weekly by the Unity Publishing G)mpany, Abraham 
Lincoln Centre, Chicago, 111. $2.00 per annum. Editor, Jenkin Lloyd Jones; 
Assistant Editor, Edith Lackcrsteen. Editorial Contributors, Jane Addams, 
Wilson M. Backus, James A. Blaisdell, Francis A. Christie, Joseph H. Crookcr, 
Robert C. Denison, John Favillc, William C Gannett, Fred V. Hawley, Charles 
R Henderson, Emil G. Hirsch, Newton Mann, Joseph Newton, Granville Ross 
Pike, E. P. Powell, William M. Salter, Albion W. Small, Frederick Starr, Joseph 
Stolz, Eugene G. Updike, Fred A. Weil, James H. West, R. A. White, Charles 
Zeublin. 

The Western Conference Kews-Letter. Published monthly, except July 
and August, by the Western Unitarian Conference, 175 Dearborn Street, Chicago, 
111. Editor, Rev. Ernest C. Smith, Chicago, 111. Associate Editors, Rev. Charles 
P. Wellman, Johnson Brigham, Rev. Frederick M. Bennett Rev. J. P. MacCarthy, 
and Mrs. E. A. Delano. Subscription 50 cents a year. Single copy, 5 cents. 



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