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Full text of "United States census of agriculture: 1954"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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vol. Br- pt.n 

1954 Census of Agriculture 



Farmers' 
Expenditures 



A Special 
Cooperative Survey 




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
Agricultural Marketing Service 
Agricultural Research Service 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Bureau of the Census 



WASHINGTON, D.cl 
DECEMBER 1956 




UNITED STATES CENSUS of AGRICULTURE : 1954 

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

SINCLAIR WEEKS, Secretary EZRA TAFT BENSON, Secretary 

Bureau of the Census Agricultural Marketing Service 

Robert W. Burgess, Director O. V. Wells, Administrator 



){'$• fe( ^«L^ &j~ /fit. Ce r 



SPECIAL REPORTS 

FARMERS' 
EXPENDITURES IN 1955 



Cooperative Survey 



VOLUME III PART 11 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 1956 






FAMILY LIVING EXPENSES • FARM 
PRODUCTION EXPENSES 








Boston Publ 
Superintendent 



MAY 27 1957 






BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 
Robert W. Burgess, Director 

AGRICULTURE DIVISION 

Ray Hurley, Chief 

Warder B. Jenkins, Assistant Chief 



AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE 
O. V. Wells, Administrator 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS DIVISION 
Frederick Waugh, Director 

AGRICULTURAL ESTIMATES DIVISION 
S. R. Newell, Director 

and 

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE 
Household Economics Research^Branch 
Gertrude S. Weiss, Chief 



SUGGESTED IDENTIFICATION 

U. S. Bureau of the Census. U. S. Census of Agriculture: 1954. Vol. Ill, Special Reports 

Part 11, Farmers' Expenditures 

U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 1956. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 
25, D. C, or any of the Field Offices of the Department of Commerce. Price 40 cents (paper cover) 



PREFACE 

There has long been need for the comprehensive information on farmers' expenditures 
made available in this report. The rapidly changing character of agriculture in the post- 
World War II period has put a severe strain on the statistical resources available to measure 
these changes. Large agricultural programs have been undertaken, many of which derive 
their meaning from or are related to certain statistical measurements such as parity prices 
for farm products and the level of farm income. It is essential that changes in these statis- 
tical indicators be accurately portrayed in view of the large stakes involved for farmers the 
government, and the people, generally. 

The Department of Agriculture has long been aware that these measurements could be 
improved but resources for doing so had not been in hand previously. For example, the 
Parity Index is based on patterns of farmers' expenditures in the prewar period 1937-41 
largely because information for recent years was lacking. This survey will provide the raw 
materials for up-dating to a recent period the weights used in this important index. More- 
over, the estimates of farm income will be substantially improved by the recent information 
on farmers' expenses for the wide variety of goods and services agriculture requires today in 
producing food and fiber for a growing economy. 

The tables presented in this report also provide the raw materials for a better measure 
of the total farm market than has been available since the beginning of World War II 
The several Censuses of Agriculture which have been conducted in the last 15 years could 
necessarily provide only part of this kind of information essential to those who sell to farmers. 
This joint survey represents a large cooperative undertaking which brings together the 
efforts of two major government statistical organizations. The survey contributes materially 
to the statistical programs of both agencies. A measure of the cooperative spirit of the under- 
taking is reflected in the early publication of the results. 

Plans for the survey and this cooperative report were made by Ray Hurley of the Bureau 
of the Census and Nathan M. Koffsky, Earl E. Houseman, B. Ralph Stauber, and Emerson 
Brooks of the Agricultural Marketing Service. Principal responsibility for the project was 
carried by Albert R. Kendall, Bruno A. Schiro, and Ward Henderson of the Agricultural 
Marketing Service. Technical assistance and review in the planning, field work and the 
summarization stages of the project were provided by Ralph G. Altman, Rex G Butler 
Frederic A. Coffey, Q. Francis Dallavalle, Ernest W. Grove, Roger F. Hale, Robert H 
Masucci, Marvin W. Towne, and Lyman W. Wallin of the Agricultural Marketing Service : 
and Margaret Brew, Elizabeth Davenport, Minnie B. Mcintosh, and Jean L. Pennock'of 
the Agricultural Research Service. Responsibility for machine operations and tabulations 
was carried by Joseph F. Daly, Orvffle M. Slye, and Evelyn Jett of the Bureau of the Census. 

Robert W. Burgess, q y \y ELLS 

Direct °r, Administrator, 

Bureau of the Census Agricultural Marketing Service. 

December 1956. 



UNITED STATES CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE: 1954 
REPORTS 

Volume I. — Counties and State Economic Areas. Statistics for counties include number of farms, acreage, value, and farm operators; 
farms by color and tenure of operator; facilities and equipment; use of commercial fertilizer; farm labor; farm expenditures; livestock 
and livestock products; specified crops harvested; farms classified by type of farm and by economic class; and value of products sold 
by source. 

Data for State economic areas include farms and farm characteristics by tenure of operator, by type of farm, and by economic class. 

Volume I is published in 33 parts. 

Volume II. — General Report. Statistics by Subjects, United States Census of Agriculture, 1954. Summary data and analyses 
of the data for States, for Geographic Divisions, and for the United States by subjects. 



Volume m. — Special Reports 

Part 1. — Multiple-Unit Operations. This report will be similar to 
Part 2 of Volume V of the reports for the 1950 Census of Agricul- 
ture. It will present statistics for approximately 900 counties 
and State economic areas in 12 Southern States and Missouri for 
the number and characteristics of multiple-unit operations and 
farms in multiple units. 

Part 2. — Ranking Agricultural Counties. This special report will 
present statistics for selected items of inventory and agricultural 
production for the leading counties in the United States. 

Part 3.- — Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, and 
U. S. Possessions. These areas were not included in the 1954 
Census of Agriculture. The available current data from various 
Government sources will be compiled and published in this 
report. 

Part 4. — Agriculture, 1954, a Graphic Summary. This report will 
present graphically some of the significant facts regarding 
agriculture and agricultural production as revealed by the 1954 
Census of Agriculture. 

Part 5. — Farm-Mortgage Debt. This will be a cooperative study 
by the Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture and the Bureau of the Census. It will present, 
by States, data based on the 1954 Census of Agriculture and a 
special mail survey conducted in January 1956, on the number 
of mortgaged farms, the amount of mortgage debt, and the 
amount of debt held by principal lending agencies. 

Part 6. — Irrigation in Humid Areas. This cooperative report by 
the Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and the Bureau of the Census will present data ob- 
tained by a mail survey of operators of irrigated farms in 28 
States on the source of water, method of applying water, number 
of pumps used, acres of crops irrigated in 1954 and 1955, the 
number of times each crop was irrigated, and the cost of irriga- 
tion equipment and the irrigation system. 

Part 7. — Popular Report of the 1954 Census of Agriculture. This 
report is planned to be a general, easy-to-read publication for 
the general public on the status and broad characteristics of 
United States agriculture. It will seek to delineate such as- 
pects of agriculture as the geographic distribution and differ- 
ences by size of farm for such items as farm acreage, principal 
crops, and important kinds of livestock, farm facilities, farm 
equipment, use of fertilizer, soil conservation practices, farm 
tenure, and farm income. 

Part 8. — Size of Operation by Type of Farm. This will be a coop- 
erative special report to be prepared in cooperation with the 
Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
IV 



culture. This report will contain data for 119 economic sub- 
regions, (essentially general type-of-farming areas) showing the 
general characteristics for each type of farm by economic class. 
It will provide data for a current analysis of the differences that 
exist among groups of farms of the same type. It will furnish 
statistical basis for a realistic examination of production of such 
commodities as wheat, cotton, and dairy products in connection 
with actual or proposed governmental policies and programs. 

Part 9. — Farmers and Farm Production in the United States. The 
purpose of this report is to present an analysis of the character- 
istics of farmers and farm production for the most important 
types of farms as shown by data for the 1954 Census of Agri- 
culture. The analysis deals with the relative importance, 
pattern of resource use, some measures of efficiency, and prob- 
lems of adjustment and change for the principal types of farms. 
The report was prepared in cooperation with the Agricultural 
Research Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

The list of chapters (published separately only) and title for 
each chapter are as follows: 

Chapter I — Wheal Producers and Wheat Production 
II — Cotton Producers and Cotton Production 
III — Tobacco and Peanut Producers and Production 
IV — Poultry Producers and Poultry Production 
V — Dairy Producers and Dairy Production 
VI — Western Stock Ranches and Livestock Farms 
VII — Cash-Grain and Livestock Producers in the Corn 

Belt 
VIII — Part-Time Farming 
IX — Agricultural Producers and Production in the 
United States — A General View 

Part 10. — Use of Fertilizer and lime. The purpose of this report 
is to present in one publication most of the detailed data com- 
piled for the 1954 Census of Agriculture regarding the use of 
fertilizer and lime. The report presents data for counties, 
State economic areas, and generalized type-of-farming areas 
regarding the quantity used, acreage on which used, and ex- 
penditures for fertilizer and lime. The Agricultural Research 
Service cooperated with the Bureau of the Census in the prep- 
aration of this report. 

Part 11.- — Farmers' Expenditures. This report presents detailed 
data on expenditures for a large number of items used for farm 
production in 1955 and on the living expenditures of farm 
operator's families. The data were collected and compiled 
cooperatively by the Agricultural Marketing Service of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture and the Bureau of the Census. 

Part 12. — Methods and Procedures. This report contains an 
outline and a description of the methods and procedures used 
in taking and compiling the 1954 Census of Agriculture. 



CONTENTS 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES IN 1955 



Summary 

Purpose of the survey 

Agencies participating in the survey 

LIMITATIONS OF DATA 

Expenditure data 

Income data 

METHODS OF SURVEY 

The design of the sample 

Identifying farmers to be interviewed 



METHODS OF SURVEY— Continued 

Page 

Completeness of the field work 3 

Expansion of the sample 3 

Collection procedures 3 

Expenditures recorded 3 

Other data recorded 4 

Separation of family and farm share 4 

DEFINITIONS 

The farm operator's economic family 4 

Income 4 

Other definitions 4 



TABLES 

Table— Page 

1.— Family living expenditures of farm-operator families— total expenditures with percont distribution and average expenditures per family, by groups of expenditures, by 

economic class of farm, for the United States: 1955 5 

2. — Family living expenses of farm-operator families — average expenditures per family and percent of families reporting, for groups and individual items of expenditure, by 

economic class of farm, for the United States: 1955 _ ___ 6 

3. — Farm production expenditures — total expenditures with percent distribution and average expenditure per farm, for major groups of expenditures, by economic class of 

farm, for the United States: 1955 15 

4.— Farm production expenditures— total expenditures, average expenditure per farm, quantity purchased, and percent of farms reporting, for groups and individual items of 

expenditure, by economic class of farm, for the United States: 1955 . 16 

5.— Farm production expenditures— total expenditures and average expenditure per farm for selected groups of expenditures for commercial farms, by economic class of farm, 

by type of farm, for the United States: 1955 38 

6.— Farm expenditures— expenditures for the purchase and operation of automobiles and trucks, as calculated from the survey of family living expenditures, for the United 

States: 1955... 

7.— Farm expenditures— expenditures for the purchase and operation of automobiles and trucks, as calculated from the survey of farm production expenditures, for the United 

States: 1955... 

8.— Off-farm income of farm-operator families, by source of income, by class of farm, aggregato for the United States: 1955. 

9.— Percent distribution of off-farm income of farm-operator families from each source of income, by class of farm, for the United States: 1955 

10.— Average off-farm income per farm-operator family, by source of income, by class of farm, for the United States: 1955 - 

11.— Percent distribution of off-farm income of farm-operator families by source of income, by class of farm, for the United States: 1955 

12.— Average off-farm income per farm-operator family receiving the specified Income, by source of income, by class of farm, for the United States: 1955 _ 

13.— Farm operators by age, number of persons in family, education, and family money income after taxes, for the United States: 1955 

14. — Percent distribution of farm operators by age, number of persons in family, education, and family money Income after taxes, for the United States: 1955 

15. — Farm operators of Class VI, part-time, and residential farms, by age, number of persons in family, education, and family money income after taxes, for the United States: 1955. 
18. — Percent distribution by economic class of farm of operators of Class VI, part-time, and residential farms, by age, number of persons in family, education, and family money 

Income after taxes, for the United States: 1955 

17.— Percent distribution of operators of Class VI, part-time, and residential farms, by age, number of persons in family, education, and family money income after taxes, for the 
United States: 1955 



48 



4<t- 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES, 1955 



Summary. — Summary tabulations of the Survey of Farmers' 
Expenditures in 1955 indicate that total family living expenditures 
of farm-operator families averaged $3,309 in 1955. The largest 
expenditure was for housing (including home furnishings and 
household operation) which averaged $868; the second largest 
was for food, which averaged $833. The food outlays represented 
purchased food only, excluding the value of food consumed on the 
farm where grown. Clothing expenditures, at $427, and trans- 
portation, at $378, ranked third and fourth, respectively. Farm 
family expenditures for medical care averaged $240 in 1955. All 
other outlays combined, including insurance, recreation, and cash 
gifts, amounted to $563, or 17 percent of the total. 

Expenditures for goods and services used in farm production 
(excluding share rent and landlords' expenses for insurance, taxes, 
interest, and improvements) averaged $5,093 per farm. Among 
the outlays for goods and services used in farm production, feed 
for livestock and poultry ranked highest, with expenditures 
averaging $907 per farm in 1955. Other major outlays, in order 
of their importance, were: operating costs of vehicles and ma- 
chinery, including petroleum products ($691); purchase of motor 
vehicles and machinery ($576) ; purchase of livestock and poultry 
($555); cash wages ($548); and fertilizer and lime ($292). The 
foregoing items accounted for 70 percent of all expenditures for 
production purposes. Total marketing expenses, for which rather 
detailed information was obtained for the first time in the 1955 
survey, averaged $238 per farm. Such outlays include the cost 
of containers, freight, and commissions. 

Purpose of the survey. — The major purposes of the survey were 
threefold: (1) To provide a set of weights reflecting expenditure 
patterns of a recent year for use in calculating the Parity Index, 
(2) to improve the basis for estimating farm operators' production 
expenses, and (S) to provide data on many farm expenditures not 
available from the 1954 Census of Agriculture or other periodic 
surveys. The Parity Index and Farm Production Expenses are 
published regularly by the Agricultural Marketing Service. 

The Parity Index — an index of prices paid by farmers for 
commodities used in living and production, including interest, 
taxes, and farm wage rates — is the yardstick used in the calculation 
of parity prices for farm products. Currently, the index is based 
on weights reflecting farmers' expenditure patterns in 1937-41. 
The information obtained in this survey will provide the means for 
bringing up to date the weighting pattern for the Parity Index, 
and thus will provide a more accurate measure of changes in 
prices paid by farmers and in the parity prices of farm products. 

Information on farmers' expenditures for production items was 
also needed as a basis for revising and improving estimates of farm 
production expenses and of net farm income. For some important 
items of production expenses, current estimates are based mostly 
on limited surveys dating back to the mid-1930's. Technological 
changes in production have been a striking feature of agriculture 
in the last 15 years. The increasing dependence on the nonfarm 
sector of the economy for goods and services essential to farm 
production has resulted in a relatively inflexible high cash-cost 
structure in agriculture about which there was insufficient detailed 
information. 

These were the main reasons for undertaking the survey. But 
it was also clear that the information to be obtained would be of 
even wider interest and use. For example, the survey would 



provide the only comprehensive information on farm-family living 
and production expenditure patterns in a recent period. It thus 
offered a means of appraising farm-family levels of living, and the 
cost structure in production, and an opportunity to study some of 
the major factors determining them. The data obtained, by family 
and farm characteristics, will be especially useful in evaluating 
variations in levels of farm-family living and the cost structure in 
farm production associated with differences in these and other 
factors. Such analyses will be used to test and refine existing 
methods used in developing farm-operator level of living indexes. 
They will also be helpful in determining items for which informa- 
tion might be collected in the 1960 Census of Agriculture. Finally, 
the survey provided the first comprehensive information on the 
size of the post-war farm market. 

Agencies participating in the survey. — The Department of 
Agriculture was responsible for initiating, planning, and con- 
ducting the survey. Personnel of the Department developed the 
sample design, prepared the survey forms and instructions to 
enumerators, and did the field work. They also prepared the plans 
for tabulation. The Bureau of the Census provided the basic 
lists from the 1954 Census of Agriculture from which the sample 
was drawn; furnished the personnel, except specialists for the 
editing and coding of questionnaires, and the machines necessary 
to make the tabulations of the survey data; and provided for 
printing the first results of the survey which are included in this 
publication. 

Within the Department of Agriculture, the major responsibilities 
centered in the Agricultural Marketing Service, which regularly 
computes the Parity Index and develops the estimates of farm 
income. Significant contributions at all stages of the survey were 
also made by the staff of the Household Economics Research 
Branch of the Agricultural Research Service. 

Limitations of Data 

Expenditure data. — In the interests of making the survey results 
available promptly, the data are shown in substantially the same 
detail as obtained from the respondents. The survey data have 
not yet been evaluated and checked against independent sources 
of information available from the 1954 Census of Agriculture and 
elsewhere. It is recognized that the error involved for some 
expenditure items which are purchased infrequently by farmers 
could be substantial. Thus, in many cases, the raw survey data 
may have to be adjusted to take account of other available infor- 
mation before they are integrated in the weighting system of the 
Parity Index and in farm production expense estimates. 

Further, experience with earlier expenditure studies uncovered 
many difficult problems, one of the more important of which is 
the difficulty of respondents to accurately recall expenditures 
made during some previous period. Studies of the accuracy of 
reporting expenditures using the recall method have indicated 
underreporting, although the amount of underreporting among 
the items is not uniform and, in fact, occasional items have been 
found to be overreported. The amount of underreporting has 
also been found to be inversely related to the number of recall 
questions used in the interview. In this survey, the recall problem 
was minimized insofar as possible by designing the schedules to 
provide aids to recall. This is not to suggest that the recall bias 
is not reflected in the results of this survey but rather to point 
out that every effort was made to minimize the bias. 

1 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



In the tables presented in this report, croppers in the South were 
included in the economic class of the multiple unit from which 
they were drawn. Such multiple units were largely in Classes I 
and II. Thus, the averages of the 3 major economic class groups, 
as presented, are somewhat different from what they would have 
been if share-cropper farms could have been better identified by 
their own economic class. 

Income data. — While the major objective of the survey was to 
provide expenditure data, the survey also provided the oppor- 
tunity to obtain much-needed information relating to off-farm 
income received by farm people. A considerable body of data 
was obtained on the sources and amounts of off-farm income 
received by farm operators and their families. These data are 
shown in detail in this publication. As an aid in forthcoming 
analytical work in appraising levels of living of farm people, 
information was also obtained on total family income, both from 
farm and off-farm sources. 

In interpreting the family income distributions given in this 
report, it should be kept clearly in mind that serious limitations 
exist regarding the income totals which will need to be carefully 
appraised before they are used in analyses. For example, the 
net income reported as received from the operation of the farm 
was substantially understated, perhaps by one third or more. 1 
This understatement is similar to that experienced in other sur- 
veys relating to farm income. However, the total off-farm in- 
come reported in the survey appears to be about in line with other 
estimates. 

Methods of Survey 

In this survey, the respondent was asked questions about all 
the specific commodities and services he may have purchased in 
1955. This resulted in necessarily lengthy questionnaires and 
interviews. However, naming of the commodities and services 
included in the questions acted as an aid in recalling the purchase 
either of the commodity or service mentioned, or a closely related 
one. 

Because of the large number of expenditure items on which 
information was to be collected, it was considered impractical to 
include all items on a single questionnaire. Production and 
living expenses, therefore, were put on separate questionnaires 
and a different sample was used for each set of questionnaires. 
These two questionnaires were designated "A" and "B," respec- 
tively, and the corresponding samples were called the A and B 



The survey of farm production expenses (Schedule A) was 
intended to represent the money expenditures made or incurred 
in the operation of farms by all farm operators and their landlords 
in the United States during the calendar year 1955. Also in- 
cluded in the survey coverage were selected production expendi- 
tures incurred by farm operators while engaged in farm custom 
work for others. Expenditures made by farm operators while 
engaged in any business other than farm custom work or the 
business of "operating this place" were excluded. 

The survey of family living expenses (Schedule B) was intended 
to determine the money expenditures made or incurred in 1955 
for family living by farm operators and members of their "eco- 
nomic" families. (See definitions below.) 

The design of the sample. — The 1954 Census of Agriculture 
was used as a basis for sampling, primarily because it provided 
an easy method for varying the sampling rate. This approach 
substantially increased the statistical efficiency of the Schedule 
A sample as compared with the use of a uniform sampling rate. 



In the following table, the 1954 Census of Agriculture distribution 
of farms and value of all products sold are shown by economic 
class of farm. Since production expenses tend to be distributed 
by economic class in about the same way as value of sales, the 
advantages of sampling large farms at a heavier rate than small 
ones were incorporated in the sample design. On the other hand, 
many family living expenses tend to remain fairly constant regard- 
less of the economic class of the farm. Accordingly, the Schedule 
B sample to obtain these expenses was drawn more nearly in 
proportion to the total number of farms. Therefore the overall 
sample design, based on information made available by the Agri- 
cultural Census, took into account both the economic class and 
the total number of farms. Furthermore, an enumerating pre- 
test in three areas showed that the selection of the names of farm 
operators from the Agricultural Census lists presented no undue 
farm identification difficulties in terms of time. In consequence, 
the sample was drawn from names of farm operators enumerated 
in the 1954 Census of Agriculture. 

Number of Farms and Value of Products Sold by Economy 
Class, 1954 Census of Agriculture 





Farms 


All products sold 


Economic class 


Number 


Percent 
of total 


Total value 
(000 dollars) 


Percent 
of total 


I _ _ 


134,003 
448,945 
706, 929 
811, 965 
763, 348 
462, 427 

574, 575 

878, 136 

2,693 


2.8 
9.4 
14.8 
17.0 
16.0 
9.6 

12.0 
18.3 
0.1 


7, 767, 926 
6, 683, 636 
5, 084, 640 
3, 008, 611 
1,413,660 
349, 618 

356, 695 
63, 851 
85, 133 


31.3 


II _ 


26.9 


Ill 


20.5 




12.1 


V _ 


6.7 




1.4 




1.5 




0.3 




0.3 








4, 783, 021 


100.0 


24, 813, 570 


100.0 







Source: V. S. Bureau of the Census, U. S. Census oj Agriculture: 1964: Vol. II, 
General Report, Chapter XI, Table 2, p. 1154. 

In all, 11,869 farms were selected in 306 primary sampling 
units — 7,378 and 4,491 for the A and B samples, respectively. 
For multiple-unit operations in the South, a sample of heads of 
such operations was selected, so the above numbers do not 
include croppers on these units. Multiple-unit operators were so 
designated on the lists sent to field personnel. The interviewers 
were instructed to list all subunits of the designated multiple 
units and to fill in schedules for a subsample of the subunits, 
objectively chosen, not counting the "home farm" as a subunit. 
The sample was designed to provide estimates for eight geo- 
graphic regions, although no regional estimates are presented in 
this report. These regions are coextensive with the nine Census 
Divisions except that the New England and Middle Atlantic 
States, including Maryland and Delaware, were combined to form 
the Northeastern region. The allocation of the sample to these 
eight regions represented a compromise between what was con- 
sidered the most efficient allocation for national statistics and the 
most efficient allocation for regional statistics. 

The A and B samples were allocated within each region to three 
economic groups of farms, which were formed by combining the 
nine economic classes used in the Census of Agriculture as follows: 
Group I — Economic Classes I and II 
Group II — Economic Classes III, IV, and V 
Group III— Economic Classes VI, VII, VIII, and IX 



' Income received from the operation of the farm was obtai ned by asking the following question on the family living questionnaire. "After taking into account the production 
expenses and the wear and tear on buildings, equipment and machinery, about how much was the net money income from this farm In 1955 (before payment of Income taxes 
and living expenses)? ..." 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



The A sample was allocated to the three economic groups approx- 
imately in proportion to value of sales whereas the B sample was 
distributed more nearly in proportion to number of farms. In 
both cases, the objective was to obtain optimum allocation in the 
sense of minimum variance. The number of farms to be selected 
from an economic group for both samples combined was divided 
by the corresponding Census number of farms to obtain an overall 
sampling rate for the group. Hence, in each region there were 
three overall sampling rates, one for each of the three economic 
groups of farms. 

The number of primary sampling units used in the sample was 
determined primarily by the work (the coverage of about 40 farms) 
that could be accomplished by one interviewer in the time allotted 
for the field work. The use of only one interviewer to a primary 
sampling area was desirable in view of the investment in the train- 
ing of interviewers and the goal of minimum sampling error. In 
essence, one primary sampling unit (usually a single county) was 
selected from a stratum with a probability proportional to size. 
The strata were approximately equal in size, and each stratum, 
formed on the basis of type of farming, was usually comprised of 
geographically contiguous counties. The sampling rate applied 
to a particular economic group in a county drawn in the sample 
was equal to the overall sampling rate for that economic group 
divided by the probability the county had of being drawn. Farms 
selected by the application of this rate were assigned in the appro- 
priate proportions to the A and B samples. 

Identifying farmers to be interviewed. — If a farm operator 
drawn from the 1954 Census of Agriculture continued to operate 
in 1955 any part of the farm he operated in 1954, he was eligible 
for inclusion in the survey regardless of the size of his 1955 opera- 
tions. In the event that the 1954 operator did not operate in 
1955 any part of the farm he operated in 1954, the schedules 
provided spaces to record who the 1955 operator was and his 1954 
status. In order to avoid double sampling, the "new" operator(s) 
was eligible for inclusion in the survey only if he did not farm at 
all in 1954, or if he did not operate in 1955 any part of the farm 
he operated in 1954. By use of this procedure the survey reflected 
consolidations and split-ups of farms, permitted some new opera- 
tors to fall into the sample, and at the same time prevented any 
one operator from having two chances of being drawn into the 
sample. Omitted from the sample were 1955 farms consisting 
entirely of tracts of land not farmed in 1954 and operated in 1955 
by someone who did not operate a farm in 1954. This omission 
was not considered to be serious. 

With respect to the family living sample, a schedule was obtained 
for the partner of a sample operator as well as for the sample 
operator, if the partner did not operate a farm separate from the 
partnership farm, and if his dwelling was located on the partner- 
ship farm. 

Completeness of the field work. — Among the 11,869 farm 
operators selected, the interviewers were successful in identifying 
all but 89. They classified 646 as "ineligible," which was con- 
siderably more than expected and reflected some error in the 
classification of "borderline" farms. By procedural rules, 186 
farm operators were "ineligible" because they were located more 
than 25 miles outside the sample county during the entire field- 
work period of the survey. Of the remaining 10,948 eligible 
farms, questionnaires were enumerated for 10,028. In addition, 
there were 466 completed questionnaires for su bun its of multiple 
landlord-cropper units and 69 completed B questionnaires for 
eligible partners giving a total of 10,563 usable questionnaires. 
Of these, 6,578 covered production expenditures and 3.985 were 
for family living expenses. 

Expansion of the sample. — The estimates contained in this 
report correspond, in concept and farm coverage, to the popula- 
tion of farms actually enumerated in the 1954 Census of Agricul- 
ture with an allowance for the downward trend in number of 
412355—57 2 



farms but with no adjustments for underenumeration of farms 
in the 1954 Census of Agriculture. 

The classification of farms by economic groups used in this 
publication is in terms of their 1954 status as determined in the 
1954 Census of Agriculture. Information necessary to determine 
economic class in 1955 was not collected in the survey. Hence, 
a farmer in Economic Class III in 1954, for example, might have 
been in Class II with respect to his 1955 operations. Another 
limitation in the interpretation of the data is the failure to ascer- 
tain the economic class of subunit farms in multiple-unit operations. 
For purposes of weighting they belonged in the same groups as 
their respective home farms and were left in such groups when 
the tables in this report were prepared. 

Collection procedures. — The survey was conducted during 
February and March 1956. All of the information was obtained 
by direct interviews with the farm operator and the housewife. 
Local interviewers were hired and trained under the supervision 
of the State Statisticians of the Agricultural Marketing Service. 
State supervisors were trained at 4 regional training schools; 
interviewers were in turn trained by State supervisors. 

The average interview time for the A Schedule was about 
2J-S hours; for the B schedule, about 3 hours. Interviewers 
asked for expenditures (and income) for the calendar year 1955, 
and recorded this information for "the place" or the "family" 
as it existed during the year. Thus, when a person was a member 
of the family for only part of the year 1955, income and expendi- 
ture for that person were recorded only for that part of the year 
during which he was a family member. Again, if an operator 
extended his operations to newly acquired acreage, say at mid- 
year, the expenditures recorded were restricted to those made 
by the current operator and did not include any expenditures on 
the new acreage made by its former owner. 

Expenditures were reported in detail under 15 major groups of 
goods and services for the family living questionnaire, and under 
27 groups for the production questionnaire. Space was provided 
for reporting the amount spent for each item or group of related 
items. Where experience had indicated that the best estimate 
was secured by obtaining the number bought and the unit price 
paid, space also was provided to report these data on family 
living items. Price and quantity were obtained for most of the 
production expense items. On the production questionnaire, 
expenditures usually shared by landlords and tenants were 
reported separately for the landlord. Expenditures ordinarily 
made by landlords and not shared by tenants were collected from 
a subsample of the reported landlords, and recorded on a special 
questionnaire for landlords. The subsample consisted of the 
first two landlords (if more than two for each farm) for a sub- 
sample of farms in the sample for production expenses. A total 
of 671 usable special landlord questionnaires were obtained in 
the survey. Information obtained from this questionnaire is 
not included in the tables presented in this report. 

Expenditures recorded. — The expenditures recorded included 
the total money expense paid or incurred in 1955, whether or 
not all payment was made during the year. Financing charges 
and interest on installment purchases, delivery and installation 
charges, and sales and excise taxes were included as part of the 
expenditure for the item to which they applied. Expenditures 
recorded and tabulated were net, after trade-in allowances, and, 
for a limited list of major consumer durable goods, and for autos, 
trucks, tractors and major farm machines, space was provided 
for recording these allowances separately. 

The expenditure amounts recorded did not include estimates 
for the value of home-produced food or clothing, etc. However, 
materials or services purchased in 1955 for the production of such 
items were recorded as an expense. 

Details of expenditures for the entire year 1955 were obtained 
for all goods and services except food purchased for consumption 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



at home. Past experience has demonstrated that it is not pos- 
sible to obtain by the direct interview method reliable reports 
on the amounts spent on specific food items over periods longer 
than a week or two. Detailed weekly expenditures for items of 
food were obtained in the Survey of Household Food Consumption 
made in the spring of 1955 by the Department of Agriculture. 
Because of the availability of data from that detailed surve3 f , 
considerable savings in interview time were achieved by excluding 
the weekly food check list from the family expenditure schedule. 
However, to obtain complete coverage of all expenditures for 
the families covered in the B Schedule an estimate of the annual 
amount spent for all food purchased for consumption at home 
was recorded. 

Other data recorded. — In addition to expenditures, selected 
characteristics by which the data could be analyzed were col- 
lected on the questionnaires. On the production expense sched- 
ule, for example, information was obtained on such characteristics 
as color of operator, tenure, size and type of farm, value of prod- 
ucts sold, and year farm was acquired. On the family living 
schedule, information was obtained on color, tenure, education 
of operator, age of operator and spouse, number of years mar- 
ried, farm residence, value of products sold, family income, fam- 
ily size, and family type. Subsequent publications will present 
family expenditures according to these characteristics, many of 
which have been found to be important factors affecting family 
expenditures. 

Separation of family and farm share. — Several types of expend- 
iture serve the dual purpose of family living and production. 
For example, automobiles and trucks are commonly used for 
both farm business purposes and for personal travel, and the 
cost of their purchase and operation cannot, therefore, be wholly 
assigned to either production costs or family living expenses. 
This is also true of expenditures for fuel, utilities, insurance, 
interest, taxes, and some other expenses. Such expenses are often 
billed to the farm as a whole. It is often difficult to separate 
them into expenditures for the farm dwelling, which for many 
purposes are considered to be living expenses, and expenditures for 
other farm structures and land, which are clearly production costs. 

Various methods, described briefly below, were used to allocate 
such combined expenditures to either family living or production. 
Tables 1 and 2 present the family share of these expenses; tables 
3 and 4 contain the production share only. Table 5, which sum- 
marizes production expenses for farms classified by type of farm, 
shows for such dual purpose expenditures only the total expend- 
iture, including both family and business shares, since the tabu- 
lation procedure did not lend itself to segregating these shares 
by type of farm. For electricity and telephone services, table 5 
shows only the farm business share. 

For expenditures for coal, oil, water, electricity, etc., and for 
telephone, telegraph, and certain other items, the respondent 
was asked to estimate the breakdown as between farm production 
and living. 

Expenditures for farm real estate taxes, fire insurance, mort- 
gage interest, and for legal and settlement fees in connection with 
purchase or sale of farm real estate were allocated to living and 
production on the basis of the ratio of farm dwelling valuation 
to total farm valuation in 1955. Since no allocation was made 
of cash rent, the total was included under production expenses. 

Outlays for purchase, upkeep, and running expenses for auto- 
mobiles and trucks were allocated between farm and family on 
the basis of mileage driven for farm business, family business, and 
other business (including custom hauling). Family business was 
defined to include travel for shopping, visiting, church, school, 
clubs, recreation and vacations, and travelling to and from work 
for wages or salaries off the farm. Because it was necessary to 
obtain individual family estimates for transportation expense, 
this allocation was made on each family schedule. On the other 
hand, for production expenditures this allocation was made by 



economic class within regions. Total expenditures for autos and 
motortrucks as derived from the A and the B schedules are shown 
separately in tables 6 and 7. 

Expenditures made by landlords for taxes and insurance on 
real estate and personal property, interest, and for construction, 
repair, and maintenance of farm improvements are not included 
in any of the tables. 

In the tables shown in this report item entries or class group 
components may not add to totals shown because no adjustments 
were made after rounding. 

Definitions 

The farm operator's economic family is that group of people 
who occupy the same dwelling and are related financially by pool- 
ing their income and drawing from the common fund for the things 
they buy. The group always included the operator, his wife and 
never-married children. In cases where other persons are present 
in the household, the payment of board or its equivalent was 
taken to indicate the financial independence of the person or 
persons covered by this payment. More particularly, the mem- 
bers of the farm operator's economic family are: 

(1) The operator. 

(2) The spouse and never-married children (including adop- 
tions) living in the household. 

(3) Never-married children away at school, if dependent 
upon the farm operator for two-thirds of their support, 
but not a son or daughter away in the Armed Services 
or at work. 

04) Other persons (except domestic and farm labor help) 
living in the household as their regular place of residence 
if they did not pay board or the equivalent or were 
dependent upon the farm operator. 

Income was defined to include net money income received dur- 
ing 1955 from the sale of products of the farm, for work done, and 
for use of property, as well as money received from such other 
sources as unemployment compensation, relief, alimony, regular 
contributions from others, pensions, etc. It included money 
received from wages and salaries or professional fees, interest 
earned on money lent out, dividends on corporation stocks, rents, 
royalties, income from trust funds, and unincorporated business. 
For income from the farm, from other business, or from profes- 
sional services, only net income — business receipts minus busi- 
ness expenses — was recorded. 

Certain other kinds of receipts such as gifts received in single 
payment, inheritance, and lump sum receipts from insurance 
policies were not considered as regular income for purposes of 
this survey. Neither was money received from sale of personal 
assets (bonds, real estate, car, etc.) or money borrowed considered 
as regular income. 

Income from "this farm" was not recorded for farms operated 
by hired managers unless the hired manager had farming opera- 
tions of his own. Hired managers' earnings for operating the 
place were recorded as wages or salaries. 

Other definitions and classifications employed in the production 
expenditure survey were essentially the same as those used in the 
1954 Census of Agriculture for such concepts as farm, farm oper- 
ator, farm size, tenure, value of sales, etc. However, for two 
items there are differences in classification. In the 1954 Census 
of Agriculture feed expenditures were reported as including ex- 
pense for grinding and mixing. In this survey, grinding and 
mixing expenditures are included under machine hire and custom 
work. In the 1954 Census of Agriculture, expenditures for lime 
specifically excluded expenditures for gypsum; in this survey, 
gypsum and lime were reported in combination. 

For a definition of a farm, economic class of farm, and type of 
farm, reference should be made to the Introduction of Volume II 
of the reports of the 1954 Census of Agriculture. 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 5 

Table 1. — Family Living Expenditures of Farm-Operator Families — Total Expenditures With Percent Distribution and Aver- 
age Expenditures Per Family, By Groups of Expenditures, By Economic Class of Farm, for the United States: 1955 ' 



Number of farm-operator families. 
Total expenditures for family living : 



Food and nonalcoholic beverages at 

home _ 

Food away from home 



Housing _ 

Shelter 

Housefurnishiugs and equipment. 
Household operations 



Clothing 

Women and girls, ages 1G and over 

Girls, ages 2-15 __ 

Men and boys, ages 16 and over 

Boys, ages 2-15 _ 

Infants and children under 2 years 

Material and services... 



Transportation 

Auto and truck purchase _ 

Auto and truck upkeep and running 
expenses 

Other travel and transportation 

Medical care _ 

Personal care 

Tobacco and alcoholic beverages 

Recreation 

Reading and education _.. 

Miscellaneous _. 

Personal insurance 

Cash gifts and contributions _ 



Aggregate expenditures 



15,749,105,194 
3,903,518,816 



4,133,183,583 
1,672,109,086 
1,020,923,688 
1,440,150,809 

2,034,501,937 
677, 360, 604 
204, 128, 443 
686, 890, 639 
200, 737, 345 
32, 916, 563 
232, 468, 343 



1, 144, 007, 641 
332, 375, 470 
322, 600, 056 
590, 599, 734 
207,281,366 
289, 983, 735 
409, 467, 868 
523, 428, 285 



Economic class of farm 



I and II III to V VI to VIII 



3,327,392,185 
709,424,517 



975, 178, 807 
431, 826, 653 
232,048,671 
311,303,483 

415,520,903 
140,452,390 

44,921,789 
135, 979, 697 

38,911,969 
7, 749, 792 

47, 505, 266 



214, 099, 307 
67, 670, 142 
56, 752, 349 

137, 960, 193 
50, 410, 782 
60,362,515 

144, 464, 788 

139,034,152 



6, 936, 169, 715 
1,734,204,659 



1,811,441,649 
708, 808, 914 
441,270,079 
661,362,656 

939, 449, 773 

311,340,021 
90, 107, 545 

318, 817, 320 
94, 520, 145 
15, 500, 640 

109, 164, 102 



520, 869, 866 
152, 232, 548 
146, 801, 257 
269, 777, 535 
94, 417, 791 
134, 906, 794 
172, 569, 024 
242, 356, 289 



Dollars 
1,944,357 



6, 485, 542, 965 
1,519,889,640 



1,346,563,020 
531,473,519 
347,604,843 
467, 484, 658 

679, 531, 053 
225, 568, 144 

69, 099, 057 
232, 093, 574 

67, 305, 190 
9, 666, 131 

75, 798, 957 



409, 038, 468 
112,472,762 
119,046,450 
182, 862, 006 
62, 452, 793 
94, 714, 430 
92, 434, 056 
142, 037, 844 



Average expenditures per family 



3, 308. 60 
832.66 



868. 31 
351. 28 
214. 48 
302. 55 

427. 41 
142. 30 
42.88 
1 14. 30 



240.34 
69.83 
67.77 

124.07 
43.55 
60.92 
86.02 



Economic class of farm 



I and II III to V 



1,485.95 
658. 00 
353. 59 
474. 35 

633.16 
214. 02 
68.45 
207. 20 
59.29 
11.81 
72.39 



326.24 
103. 11 
86.48 

210. 22 
76.81 
91.98 

220. 13 

211. 86 



838.85 
328. 24 
204. 35 
306. 27 

435. 05 
144. 18 

41.73 
147. 64 

43.77 
7.18 

50.55 



241.21 
70.50 
67.98 

124. 93 
43.72 
62.47 
79.91 

112. 23 



692. 55 
273. 34 
178. 78 
240.43 

349. 49 
116.01 

35.54 
119. 37 

34.62 
4.97 



210. 37 
57.85 
61.23 
94.05 
32.12 
48.71 
47.54 
73.05 



Percent of total 



Percent 

XXX 

100.0 



Economic class of farm 



100.0 

25.0 

21.6 
3.4 



2.2- 
3.3 



1 For items included in each group see table 2. 

' Family living expenditures include all money expenditures or obligations incurred in 1955 for family living purposes, except income taxes, and cash rent for on-farm rental dwell- 
ings. Total on-farm cash rental expenditures are included under production expenses. 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of Farm-Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States: 1955 





All fam- 
ilies 


Economic class of farm 


All fam- 
ilies 


Economic class of farm 


Expenditure item 


I and II 


III to V 


VI to VIII 


I and II 


III to V 


VI to 
VIII 




4, 760, 050 


656, 267 


2, 159, 426 


1, 944, 357 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 










Average family expenditures (dollars) 


Percent of families purchasing 




3,308.60 

832.66 
715. 33 

117. 33 
16.85 
12.12 
4.73 
2.70 

61.85 
27.59 
17.59 
7.90 
8.77 

35.93 
24.39 
11.54 

868.31 
351.28 
207.27 
38.80 
16.08 
19.86 
1.03 
131.49 

2.67 
124.69 
7.50 
6.37 
2.66 
0.84 
2.86 
7.24 

0.56 
2.78 
14.43 
8.82 
3.36 
2.92 

4.95 
0.17 
4.08 
4.85 
0.46 
3.96 

4.15 
16.66 

8.82 
15.00 

1.23 

16.65 
1.78 
2.90 
5.17 
5.84 
0.96 

214. 48 
26.35 
4.89 
1.19 
1.41 
1.32 
0.55 

0.31 
0.38 
2.50 
0.41 
1.98 

0.79 
0.19 
1.26 
4.90 
0.75 

1.32 
0.11 
0.67 
1.51 


5, 070. 18 

1,081.00 
916. 82 

164.18 
23.01 
21.80 
1.21 
5.77 

85.81 
36.24 
11.13 
20.28 
18.16 

49.58 
30.74 
18.84 

1, 485. 95 
658. 00 
422. 53 
74.88 
26.46 
39.12 
0.96 
281. 11 

3.45 
199. 79 
13.33 
9.46 
4.57 
1.89 
5.01 
5.96 

0.66 
3.24 
15.53 
11.41 
3.84 
6.91 

5.77 
0.49 
3.15 
7.29 
0.42 
10.40 

3.12 
28.79 
17.59 
37.95 

4.09 

32.20 
3.56 
1.37 
10.38 
16.51 
0.38 

353. 59 
43.46 
6.34 
1.59 
1.65 
1.30 
0.82 

0.40 
0.44 
3.71 
0.83 
3.20 

1.10 
0.27 
1.76 
11.10 
1.77 

3.00 
0.38 
0.88 
2.91 


3,212.04 

803.09 
692.44 

110.65 
15.28 
11.21 
4.07 
3.41 

56.91 
27.83 
14.11 
6.98 
7.99 

35.04 
23.75 
11.30 

838.85 
328.24 
195. 68 
42.49 
15.66 
18.66 
1.55 
117. 31 

2.83 

114.97 
6.96 
6.43 
2.89 
0.86 
2.27 
7.16 

0.77 
2.61 
13.14 
8.81 
2.78 
2.72 

5.07 
0.20 
4.92 
6.65 
0.41 
4.03 

3.68 
10.31 

8.11 
13.37 

0.82 

14.75 
0.84 
1.73 

6.08 
5.64 
1.46 

204.35 
25.84 
4.81 
1.16 
1.44 
1.29 
0.51 

0.28 
0.42 
2.29 
0.38 
2.04 

0.69 
0.27 
1.24 

4.38 
0.67 

1.45 
0.10 
0.73 
1.69 


2, 821. 26 

781. 69 
672. 74 

108. 95 
16.53 
9.86 
6.66 
0.86 

59.25 
24.40 
23.64 
4.74 
6.47 

32.30 
22.95 
9.35 

692. 55 
273.34 
147. 47 
22.52 
13.06 
14.69 
0.48 
96.72 

2.21 
110. 14 
6.13 
5.26 
1.77 
0.47 
2.79 
7.77 

0.33 
2.81 
15.50 
7.94 
3.84 
2.15 

4.54 
0.03 
3.47 
2.03 
0.54 
1.70 

5.00 
19.62 
6.65 
9.05 
0.73 

13.52 
2.24 
4.71 
3.51 
2.47 
0.59 

178. 78 
21.15 
4.49 
1.09 
1.30 
1.37 
0.51 

0.31 
0.31 
2.33 
0.29 
1.51 

0.79 
0.08 
1.11 
3.38 
0.50 

0.62 
0.04 
0.29 
0.84 


100.0 

(NA) 
99.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 
4.2 
2.6 
1.2 

(NA) 
34.3 
13.6 
15.3 

20.0 

(NA) 
72.3 
43.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
75.8 
55.6 
24.8 
3.1 
2.2 

0.8 
(NA) 
13.7 
28.1 
14.2 
2.2 
3.9 
8.1 

1.3 
2.9 
10.2 
4.3 
3.9 
8.1 

5.3 
0.4 
2.6 
10.1 
2.0 
2.9 

2.0 
2.7 
2.4 
21.6 

5.1 

(NA) 
1.3 
2.4 
3.4 
12.0 
0.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
45.6 
26.0 
10.5 
16.8 
1.9 

2.9 
3.2 

24.1 
6.1 

36.9 

19.1 
5.1 
33.2 
30.2 
4.5 

9.2 
0.6 
3.2 
14.1 


100.0 

(NA) 
99.6 

(NA) 

(NA) 
7.0 
0.8 
1.5 

(NA) 
40.5 
12.1 
29.7 
31.9 

(NA) 
75.8 
54.8 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
64.4 
55.2 
27.6 
4.4 
2.9 

0.9 
(NA) 
14.4 
31.0 
14.0 
2.3 
4.2 
5.6 

1.6 
2.6 

12.4 
6.0 
4.4 

10.5 

4.7 
1.1 
2.1 
11.5 
1.2 
3.4 

1.3 
2.8 
3.9 
19.3 
9.2 

(NA) 

1.6 
1.9 
6.0 
26.4 
0.5 

(NA) 
(NA) 
54.7 
32.1 
10.8 
15.8 
2.4 

3.7 
3.2 

29.8 
9.1 
48.0 

20.6 
7.3 
33.7 
36.3 

7.7 

11.8 
1.4 
3.4 

21.5 


100.0 

(NA) 
99.5 

(NA) 

(NA) 
4.3 
2.5 
1.6 

(NA) 
36.9 
11.1 
15.5 
20.7 

(NA) 
74.3 
45.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
74.7 
59.3 
28.3 
3.0 
1.9 

0.7 
(NA) 
13.9 
30.3 
15.0 
2.6 
3.8 
7.6 

1.5 
2.9 
10.2 
4.0 
3.4 
8.7 

5.2 
0.4 
2.5 
12.2 
2.3 
2.8 

1.7 
2.5 
2.2 
21.1 
4.9 

(NA) 

1.3 
2.1 
3.5 
12.0 
0.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
47.3 
26.7 
11.1 
16.9 
1.8 

3.0 
3.5 

23.0 
4.9 

40.4 

17.2 
6.0 
33.5 
33.0 
4.5 

11.2 
0.6 
3.4 

15.8 




FOOD 
All food 


(NA) 






(NA) 

(NA) 
















(NA) 


















(NA) 








HOUSING 


■ (NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 






























(NA) 












































































Structural additions, unitemized 




General remodeling, unitemized 














(NA) 






















(NA) 
(NA) 


























Comforters, quilts, afghans _ 
















Other towels, bath mats 




















Drapery materials 












Gifts of household textiles 


9.7 



See footnotes at end of table. 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 7 

Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of FarM'Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States: 1955 — Continued 



Expenditure Item 



HOUSING— Continued 



Housefurnishings and equipment— Continued 

Furniture 

Living room suites 

Dining room suites 

Dinette, breakfast sets _ 

Bedroom suites _ 

Beds, cots, cribs .. _... 

Mattresses, innerspring 



Mattresses, other 

Bedsprlngs _ 

Studio couches, sofa beds.. 

Other sofas, couches 

Dressers, chests, vanities 

Sideboards, buffets, kitchen cabinets... 



Tables, desks, bookcases, etc 

Upholstered lounge chairs.. 

Upholstered platform rockers 

Upholstered occasional chairs.. 

Other chairs, benches, hassocks, stools. 
Porch and garden furniture 



Unpalnted furniture 

Other furniture 

Rental of furnishings 

Repairs and cleaning of furniture and equipment _ 

Insurance on furniture 

Gifts of furniture 



Floor coverings 

Rugs and carpets, mostly wool 

Rugs and carpets, cotton 

Other rugs, including pads 

Linoleum, other non-textile floor coverings- 
Gifts of floor coverings _ 



Glassware, china, and silverware. 

Table glassware 

Dishes 

Knives, forks, spoons 

Servers, bowls, pitchers, etc... 

Other tableware... 

Gifts of tableware.. 



Kitchen equipment.. 

Refrigerators, mechanical. 

Refrigerators, ice. 

Home freezers 

Cook stoves 



Hot plates 

Toasters, electric 

Small electrical equipment 

Pressure canners, 8 qt. and over- 



pressure canners, 6 qt. and under. 

Canning equipment, jars, cans, lids, etc. 

Pots and pans _ 

Kitchen crockery and glassware 



Knives, ladles, can openers, etc _. 

Thermos bottles, lunch kits, etc 

Other kitchen equipment 

Gifts of kitchen equipment 

Cleaning and laundry equipment 

Vacuum cleaners, upright 

Vacuum cleaners, tank 

Vacuum cleaners, canister 

Vacuum cleaner attachments 

Floor waxers 

Carpet sweepers 

Brooms. 

Brushes, mops, palls, dust pans, etc 

Washing machines 

Clothes dryers, mechanical 

Hand Irons, total. __ 

Irons, dry.. _ 

Irons, steam 

Irons, dry and steam combinations.. 

Ironing machines _ 

Washtubs, boilers, boards, wringers. 

Ironing boards, covers, baskets, pins, poles, lines.. 

Other cleaning and laundry equipment 

Gifts of cleaning or laundry equipment 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Average family expenditures (dollars) 



Percent of families purchasing 





Economic class of farm 




Economic class of farm 










All fami- 
lies 








All families 


I and II 


III to V 


VI to VIII 


I and II 


III to V 


VI to 
VIII 


53.71 


102. 02 


48.36 


43.35 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


10.80 


18.15 


9.67 


9.57 


6.1 


7.3 


6.6 


6.2 


2.87 


3.09 


3.00 


2.65 


2.0 


1.7 


2.3 


1.9 


4.03 


7.30 


3.93 


3.05 


4.0 


6.7 


4.0 


3.1 


7.97 


13.50 


5.36 


9.01 


4.2 


6.6 


3.2 


4.6 


1.75 


2.34 


1.79 


1.51 


5.3 


6.8 


5.3 


4.8 


4.88 


6.96 


4.83 


4.23 


9.6 


12.3 


9.4 


8.8 


0.86 


1.50 


0.86 


0.66 


3.1 


3.4 


3.3 


2.9 


1.21 


2.21 


1.15 


0.93 


4.2 


5.2 


4.1 


4.0 


1.58 


3.37 


1.22 


1.38 


2.1 


3.7 


1.7 


1.9 


1.00 


2.56 


0.87 


0.61 


1.0 


2.1 


0.7 


0.9 


0.78 


1.47 


0.77 


0.57 


2.5 


3.2 


2.5 


2.3 


1.48 


2.85 


1.47 


1.03 


2.4 


2.9 


2.6 


2.1 


1.61 


4.03 


1.43 


0.99 


5.1 


8.9 


5.1 


3.8 


1.47 


4.66 


1.26 


0.63 


2.1 


5.1 


2.2 


1.1 


1.46 


2.56 


1.78 


0.75 


3.2 


4.9 


3.7 


2.0 


0.76 


2.29 


0.61 


0.40 


1.8 


2.9 


1.6 


1.8 


0.58 


1.35 


0.59 


0.31 


4.1 


6.0 


3.7 


3.9 


1.04 


2.79 


0.81 


0.69 


4.4 


7.5 


3.5 


4.3 


0.16 


0.28 


0.07 


0.22 


0.9 


1.5 


0.5 


1.0 


1.14 


2.44 


0.86 


1.00 


1.9 


3.9 


1.6 


1.5 


0.06 


0.04 


0.11 


0.01 


0.4 


0.8 


0.6 


(Z) 


2.39 


8.64 


1.90 


0.82 


6.3 


10.8 


7.4 


3.6 


2.75 


5.47 


2.97 


1.58 


17.6 


26.3 


20.6 


11.3 


1.07 


2.14 


1.03 


0.76 


3.2 


7.0 


3.8 


1.2 


16.53 


36.63 


14.30 


12.21 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


6.87 


19.46 


6.21 


3.35 


5.3 


8.6 


5.7 


3.7 


0.66 


1.61 


0.61 


0.39 


4.3 


7.1 


4.4 


3.2 


1.94 


7.52 


1.02 


1.07 


3.2 


5.5 


3.3 


2.2 


6.93 


7.74 


6.33 


7.33 


22.2 


17.4 


23.3 


22.7 


0.13 


0.30 


0.13 


0.07 


1.1 


2.0 


1.5 


0.4 


5.79 


11.48 


6.15 


3.46 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


0.46 


0.98 


0.47 


0.27 


12.6 


16.2 


14.0 


9.8 


2.36 


4.55 


2.51 


1.46 


24.9 


30.8 


27.1 


20.5 


1.36 


2.43 


1.45 


0.89 


9.6 


10.0 


10.0 


8.9 


0.41 


0.72 


0.41 


0.30 


12.6 


16.4 


13.6 


10.3 


0.11 


0.27 


0.10 


0.06 


1.1 


2.2 


1.1 


0.7 


1.09 


2.53 


1.20 


0.49 


9.1 


16.1 


10.6 


5.2 


57.09 


68.03 


55.73 


54.91 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


11.91 


14.36 


9.39 


13.89 


5.4 


6.0 


4.4 


6.4 


0.39 


0.02 


0.09 


0.86 


0.4 


0.4 


0.4 


0.4 


18.97 


18.40 


21.22 


16.68 


5.7 


5.5 


6.4 


5.0 


13.39 


15.29 


11.92 


14.39 


7.7 


7.6 


6.8 


8.9 


0.11 


0.21 


0.13 


0.05 


1.0 


1.2 


1.3 


0.6 


0.66 


0.81 


0.71 


0.56 


3.9 


4.5 


4.1 


3.5 


2.52 


4.51 


2.67 


1.69 


10.8 


17.6 


11.2 


8.1 


0.22 


0.12 


0.25 


0.22 


1.3 


0.7 


1.3 


1.4 


0.19 


0.19 


0.23 


0.14 


1.6 


1.1 


2.0 


1.5 


2.67 


2.62 


2.74 


2.61 


51.9 


49.1 


54.7 


49.7 


2.40 


2.81 


2.93 


1.67 


19.8 


21.6 


21.5 


17.2 


0.28 


0.47 


0.27 


0.22 


7.3 


11.6 


8.6 


4.5 


0.45 


0.78 


0.49 


0.30 


16.0 


20.4 


17.5 


12.9 


0.63 


0.97 


0.63 


0.52 


16.4 


21.4 


17.3 


13.7 


0.23 


0.48 


0.10 


0.30 


1.2 


2.6 


1.1 


0.8 


2.04 


6.00 


1.96 


0.80 


10.0 


20.5 


12.2 


4.0 


29.54 


47.58 


28.69 


24.40 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1.38 


1.65 


1.18 


1.51 


1.7 


2.0 


1.5 


1.9 


2.18 


3.59 


2.51 


1.33 


3.2 


4.6 


3.6 


2.3 


0.64 


1.69 


0.70 


0.21 


0.9 


2.1 


1.0 


0.4 


0.08 


0.19 


0.07 


0.04 


1.5 


3.0 


1.5 


0.9 


0.34 


0.73 


0.27 


0.29 


4.9 


7.1 


4.8 


4.2 


0.04 


0.03 


0.04 


0.04 


0.4 


0.3 


0.6 


0.2 


2.23 


2.49 


2.34 


2.02 


76.8 


75.1 


77.5 


76.5 


1.64 


2.00 


1.77 


1.38 


52.9 


53.6 


55.0 


50.4 


13.81 


19.13 


11.82 


14.22 


9.4 


10.8 


8.9 


9.5 


3.81 


10.05 


4.75 


0.65 


2.0 


5.0 


2.6 


0.4 


1.26 


1.57 


1.17 


1.25 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


0.51 


0.51 


0.49 


0.54 


4.6 


4.3 


4.3 


5.1 


0.39 


0.53 


0.39 


0.35 


2.5 


3.2 


2.5 


2.2 


0.35 


0.53 


0.29 


0.36 


2.2 


3.3 


1.7 


2.4 


0.22 


1.04 


0.09 


0.09 


0.2 


0.9 


0.1 


0.1 


0.54 


0.42 


0.54 


0.58 


13.3 


7.9 


13.4 


15.1 


0.93 


1.43 


1.08 


0.61 


30.2 


38.4 


34.8 


22.3 


0.17 


0.83 


0.07 


0.06 


0.3 


0.7 


0.2 


0.4 


0.29 


0.74 


0.31 1 


0.12 1 


1.8 


3.4 


1.8 1 


1.3 



8 FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 

Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of Farm-Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States : 1955 — Continued 



Expenditure item 



HOUSING— Continued 



Housefurnishings and equipment — Continued 

Miscellaneous house furnishings 

Heating stoves, portable heaters 

Sewing machines 

Air conditioning units, dehumidifiers.. 

All lamps - 

Table lamps 

Floorlamps 



Electric light bulbs, lamp chimneys- 
Electric fans 

Electric fans, attic 

Electric fans, window... 

Electric fans, portable 



Clocks, mirrors, pictures, ash trays, etc 

Shades and blinds 

Baby equipment, bathinette, carriage, pen, etc. 
Baby bottles, sterilizers, nipples 

Suitcases, trunks, other baggage.. 

Fireplace equipment 

Other furnishings and equipment 

Gifts of miscellaneous items 



Household operation 

Fuel, electricity, and water 

Coal.. 

Coke, briquettes 

Wood, sawdust, prestologs, kindling. 



Kerosene. . . 

Gasoline 

Fuel oil 

Gas, piped.. 



Gas, L. P., bottled. 

Electricity 

Maintenance of home electric plant.. . 
Water charges, repairs to pumps, etc.. 



Rental of freezer locker — 

Bags, wrappings, and boxes for frozen foods.. 
Service charge on food for lockers 



Household services 

Telephone, local 

Telephone, long distance, telegrams.. 
Laundry, sent out, diaper service — 



Wages for household help 

Moving of household equipment, furniture, personal effects. 

Freight and express for household goods 

Other household service 



Laundry supplies, cleaning, and other supplies 

Laundry soaps and detergents 

Other laundry supplies, starch, bluing 

Cleaning supplies, scouring powder, steel wool, etc.. 
Paper supplies, toilet paper, napkins, towels, etc... 



Postage: stamps, parcel post, stamped envelopes, etc. 

Stationery, pencils, ink, greeting cards, etc 

Floor wax, furniture polish, etc 

Insect sprays, powders, air deodorizers, etc 

Potted plants, cut flowers, seeds 



Matches, candles, traps, etc 

Household tools, hammers, paint brushes, etc.. 

Garden, lawn tools, lawn mowers, etc — 

Household materials, unitemized.. 

Gifts of household materials 



CLOTHING 



All clothing 

Clothing: Women and girls, ages 16 and over- 
coats and jackets. 

Light weight coats, capes 

Heavy coats without fur 

Heavy coats with fur 



Raincoats, rain capes 

Jackets, cloth or leather 

Snowsuits, ski suits, leggings 

Fur coats, fur scarves, muffs, etc.. 
Other outerwear 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Average family expenditures (dollars) 



Economic class of farm 



25.46 
4.92 
5.12 
2.38 
0.81 
0.59 
0.22 

3.31 



1.02 
0.21 
0.67 
0.84 



302. 55 

176. 71 

23.56 

0.72 

2.62 

7.87 
0.72 
29.44 
4.70 

25.51 
75.00 
0.36 
6.21 

13.06 
0.80 
3.87 
3.20 
5.19 

39.91 
16.13 
5.87 
3.61 

11.78 
0.50 
0.09 
1.92 

72.86 
15.82 
5.92 
3.57 
8.91 



6.29 
4.48 
3.40 
2.55 



427. 41 
142. 30 
15.70 
5.72 
6.54 
0.98 

0.53 
1.09 
0.03 
0.73 
0.07 



I and II III to V VI to VIII 



44.36 
5.89 
6.49 

11.10 
2.12 
1.49 
0.62 

4.82 
3.87 
0.28 



474. 35 

269. 91 

28.20 

0.50 

2.23 



104.42 
0.94 
10.75 

20.94 
0.40 
5.00 
5.15 

10.39 

81.40 
24.79 
10.43 
6.56 

34.72 
1.06 
0.19 
3.64 

102. 09 
18.98 
7.30 
5.14 
12.40 

10.14 



12. 26 
4.12 
0.47 



633.16 
214.02 
24.33 
7.65 
9.36 
1.52 

0.82 
1.51 

0.09 
3.27 
0.10 



25.28 
5.44 
6.23 
1.37 
0.67 
0.48 
0.19 

3.58 
1.97 
0.21 
0.83 
0.93 

1.28 
1.72 
0.30 
0.54 

0.99 
0.14 
0.04 
1.00 



306.27 
183.14 
25.89 



25.53 
75.71 
0.32 
5.25 

14.84 
0.48 
4.76 
3.44 
6.16 

34.55 
15.22 
5.59 



7.72 
0.53 
0.07 
2.12 



7.71 
6.34 
4.65 
3.55 



3.15 
1.16 
8.82 
1.75 
0.26 



435. 05 

144.18 

15.79 

6.11 



0.48 
1.05 
0.03 
0.53 
0.08 



19.29 
4.03 
3.41 
0.57 
0.52 
0.41 
0.11 

2.50 
2.22 
0.02 
1.19 
1.01 



240. 43 

138. 10 

19.40 

0.61 



8.40 
0.86 
10.70 
3.70 

21.10 
64.28 
0.21 
5.75 



8.43 
1.29 

2. 50 



0.29 
0.08 
1.11 

62.02 
15.06 
5.44 
2.97 
7.45 



1.14 
5.77 
1.27 
0.13 



349. 49 

116.01 

12.69 

4.65 

5.44 



(). 4') 
II 99 
(Z) 
0.10 
0.06 



Percent of families purchasing 



(NA) 
(NA) 
31.6 



22.3 
35.5 
21.9 

(NA) 



Economic class of farm 



85.5 
27.8 
19.6 



and II 


into v 


(NA) 


(NA) 


8.7 


11.9 


4.2 


4.8 


3.4 


1.0 


(NA) 


(NA) 


8.5 


5.1 


2.8 


1.4 


90.7 


90.3 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1.0 


0.6 


3.6 


2.1 


7.8 


4.6 


20.3 


19.1 


20.0 


16.9 


2.8 


2.1 


9.9 


9.7 


10.3 


6.8 


0.8 


0.8 


0.6 


0.5 


7.2 


5.6 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


27.3 


33.6 


1.8 


1.6 


4.4 


7.1 


16.4 


26.9 


2.6 


3.2 


36.5 


24.4 


7.6 


5.0 


40.5 


38.1 


95.2 


94.8 


2.1 


1.5 


26.3 


21.2 


(NA) 


(NA) 


3.7 


5.8 


28.6 


28.2 


50.9 


40.5 


33.4 


27.8 


(NA) 


(NA) 


75.0 


53.0 


51.0 


39.4 


9.9 


6.2 


18.4 


7.0 


2.4 


1.4 


2.5 


1.2 


14.5 


11.1 


(NA) 


(NA) 


92.2 


93.5 


86.7 


87.6 


82.9 


76.7 


89.6 


88.0 


97.4 


95.3 


94.8 


91.6 


83.9 


75.4 


83.9 


81.9 


47.8 


32.4 


85.7 


87.3 


40.7 


28.8 


29.9 


21.2 


6.4 


3.2 


3.9 


2.8 


(NA) 


(NA) 


97.3 


96.3 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of Farm-Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States: 1955 — Continued 



Expenditure Item 



Average family expenditures (dollars) 



Economic class of farm 



I and II III to V VI to VIII 



Percent of families purchasing 



Economic class of farm 



I and II III to V 



CLOTHING— Continued 

Clothing: Women and girls, ages 16 and over — Continued 

Suits, dresses, skirts, blouses, etc 

Suits, cotton 

Suits, wool - 

Suits, rayon - 

Suits, other fabrics --- - 

Skirts, cotton - 

Skirts, wool 

Skirts, other fabrics 

Housedresses 

Other dresses, cotton 

Other dresses, wool -. 

Other dresses, rayon - - --- 

Other dresses, other fabrics 

Slack suits, slacks 

Sun suits, playsuits, shorts 

Blouses, knitted shirts 

Sweaters, pullovers, cardigans 

Jeans, overalls, coveralls, overall jackets. _._ 

Aprons, smocks, uniforms 

Underwear, nightwear 

Slips, petticoats, rayon 

Slips, petticoats, nylon ._ 

Slips, petticoats, other fabrics.. 

Corsets, girdles, brassieres, garter belts 

Panties, briefs, bloomers, etc., rayon 

Panties, briefs, bloomers, etc., other material 

Undershirts, union suits, etc _ 

Nightgowns, pajamas.. 

Housecoats, bathrobes, dusters 

Underwear, nightwear, unitemized 

Hosiery 

Nylon hose. -- 

Rayon and silk hose - 

Cotton anklet socks 

Cotton stockings- 

Other stockings or hose 

Footwear.. 

Oxfords and ties - 

Pumps and straps 

Other shoes, beach, sneakers, loafers, etc 

Rubbers, arctics, galoshes, etc 

Hats, gloves, accessories 

Felt hats.... 

Straw hats 

Other hats, ear muffs, scarves, other head wear.. 

Dress or school gloves, mittens... 

Work gloves: rubber, cloth, etc... _ _ 

Handbags, purses. 

Umbrellas 

Handkerchiefs 

Belts, dickies, collars, hair ribbons, flowers, etc... 

Jewelry (including costume jewelry), watches 

Clothing expense, unitemized 

Clothing gifts for girls and women 

Clothing: Girls, ages 2-15 

Coats and jackets 

Light weight coats, capes 

Heavy coats without fur 

Heavy coats with fur 

Raincoats, rain capes 

Jackets, cloth or leather 

Snowsuits, ski suits, leggings 

Fur coats, fur scarves, muffs, etc 

Other outer wear 

Suits, dresses, skirts, blouses, etc 

Suits, cotton 

Suits, wool 

Suits, rayon. __ 

Suits, other fabrics 

Skirts, cotton ... 

Skirts, wool 

Skirts, other fabrics _ 

Housedresses 

Other dresses, cotton. 

Other dresses, wool 

Other dresses, rayon 

Other dresses, other fabrics 

Slack suits, slacks. 

Sun suits, playsuits, shorts 

Blouses, knitted shirts _ 

Sweaters, pullovers, cardigans 

Jeans, overalls, coveralls, overall jackets 

Aprons, smocks, uniforms _ _ 

See footnotes at end of table. 



0.57 
6.58 
6.22 
1.75 
3.48 
3.01 

0.71 

0.72 
3 53 
3.38 
1.83 
0.77 



1.52 
6.13 
3.53 

0.54 
0.39 
3.46 
1.53 
0.37 

10.66 
8.47 
0.19 
1.46 
0.43 
0.12 

21.17 

8.04 
8.45 



15.22 
1.81 
1.34 



2.77 
0.18 
0.67 
1.16 
5.17 

2.09 
10.54 

42.88 
5.41 
1.58 
2.22 
0.28 
0.18 
0.76 
0.36 
0.01 
0.04 

15.78 
0.32 
0.23 
0.08 
0.08 
1.04 
0.90 
0.21 
0.74 
3.79 
0.21 
0.49 
0.49 



2.09 
2.03 
0.06 



66. 42 
2.15 
7.31 
1.45 
1.24 
2.50 
3.17 

0.88 



3.33 
5.01 
5.34 

1.49 
1.22 
5.44 



29.90 
2.56 
3.81 
1.32 



0.81 
0.42 
4.49 
2.20 
0.48 

13.44 

10.85 
0.21 
1.77 
0.33 
0.28 

28.22 
9.60 

12.61 
4.21 
1.79 

24.95 
3.21 
2.29 
1.32 
1.43 
0.68 



6.53 
20.22 

68.45 
8.70 
2.54 
3.51 
0.28 
0.39 
1.34 
0.60 
0.02 
0.01 



0.58 
0.07 
0.13 
1.63 
1.37 
0.45 
0.95 
6.18 
0.47 
0.85 
0.72 



3.37 
2.95 
0.11 



1.69 
3.52 
1.02 
0.50 



0.51 
6.41 
6.45 
1.91 
4.05 
2.81 



3.43 
3.37 
2.03 
0.74 



0.50 
0.40 
3.32 
1.36 
0.56 

11.43 
9.14 
0.20 
1.49 
0.48 
0.12 

21.50 
8.26 
8.51 
3.23 
1.50 



1.34 
0.87 
0.93 
0.56 

2.78 
0.12 
0.73 
1.28 
5.59 
1.68 
11.24 

m 

41.73 
5.42 
1.61 
2.09 
0.31 
0.13 
0.83 
0.38 
(Z) 
0.07 

15.01 
0.35 
0.21 
0.10 
0.09 
1.10 
0.84 

0.16 
0.68 
3.37 
0.21 
0.45 
0.57 



1.81 
2.11 
0.07 



0.78 
0.49 
1.87 
2.25 



4.70 
1.06 
2.33 
2.45 

0.40 
0.68 
3.00 



20.36 
2.54 
2.31 
1.75 



6.91 
0.17 
1.32 
0.41 
0.07 



10.99 
1.27 
1.01 
0.54 
0.59 
0.26 
2.15 
0.26 
0.56 
0.86 
3.47 
1.05 
6.48 
*!#> 
35.54 
4.30 
1.22 
1.92 
0.24 
0.15 
0.49 
0.25 
(Z) 
0.01 



0.24 
0.13 
0.05 
0.05 
0.78 
0.82 
0.18 
0.73 
3.45 
0.13 
0.41 
0.32 
0.31 
0.52 
1.35 
1.97 
1.63 
0.02 



NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

NA) 
NA 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

NA) 
NA) 

NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 

JUfBS. 8 

NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 
NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

44.7 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

35.0 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NAS 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



10 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of FarM'Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States : 1955 — Continued 



Expenditure Item 



CLOTHING— Continued 

Clothing: Girls, ages 2-15 — Continued 

Underwear, nightwear 

Slips, petticoats, rayon. 

Slips, petticoats, nylon 

Slips, petticoats, other fabrics -- 

Corsets, girdles, brassieres, garter belts 

Panties, briefs, bloomers, etc., rayon 

Panties, briefs, bloomers, etc., other material 

Undershirts, union suits, etc 

Nightgowns, pajamas 

Housecoats, bathrobes, dusters. 

Underwear, nightwear, unitemized 

Hosiery - 

Nylon hose 

Rayon and silk hose 

Cotton anklet socks 

Cotton stockings 

Other stockings or hose 

Footwear... 

Oxfords and ties - - 

Pumps and straps - - 

Other shoes, beach, sneakers, loafers, etc 

Rubbers, arctics, galoshes, etc 

Hats, gloves, accessories 

Felt hats 

Straw hats -- — 

Other hats, ear muffs, scarves, other head wear 

Dress or school gloves, mittens 

Work gloves, rubber, cloth, etc 

Handbags, purses 

Umbrellas. - 

Handkerchiefs.. -- 

Belts, dickies, collars, hair ribbons, flowers, etc 

Jewelry (including costume jewelry), watches 

Clothing expense, unitemized 

Clothing: Men and boys, ages 16 and over 

Coats and jackets 

Overcoats, topcoats 

Leather Jackets — 

Mackinaws, lumber jackets, overall jackets, etc 

Sweaters 

Raincoats 

Snowsuits, ski suits, leggings 

Suits and trousers 

Dress or business suits, wool 

Dress or business suits, wool mised with nylon, dacron, rayon, etc 
Dress or business suits, cotton or cotton mixed with other fibers... 
Dress or business suits, other synthetic fibers 

Dress slacks and trousers, wool 

Dress slacks and trousers, cotton 

Dress slacks and trousers, other 

Sport coats, light weight sport jackets _ 

Slack suits, play and sunsuits, shorts 

Bib overalls, dungarees, jeans, levis, work pants 

Uniforms, matching shirt-pants uniforms 

Shirts. 

Cotton dress shirts 

Cotton work shirts 

Sport shirts, wool shirts, other shirts. __ 

Underwear and nightwear 

Shorts, briefs 

Drawers 

Undershirts (sleeveless) 

T-shirts 

One-piece underwear, cotton 

One-piece underwear, other 

Pajamas, nightshirts 

Bathrobes, lounging robes 

Underwear, nightwear, unitemized 

Socks 

Wool socks 

Cotton socks 

Other socks 

See footnotes at end of table. 



Average family expenditures (dollars) 



0.90 
0.57 
0.91 
0.48 
1.57 

0.38 
0.32 
1.22 
0.24 



0.02 
1.94 
0.07 
0.12 



4.57 
1.71 
1.64 
0.74 

3.46 
0.16 
0.22 
0.54 
0.3S 
0.03 

0.41 
0.02 
0.18 
0.59 
0.91 



144. 30 
12.34 
3.29 
1.51 
6.76 

1.23 
0.53 
0.02 

43.28 
10.85 
2.84 
0.41 
0.19 

5.13 
1.77 

1.40 

2.49 
0.05 
15.20 
2.94 



12.04 
3.59 
0.55 
1.87 



1.94 
55 
1.35 
0.27 
0.02 

6.53 
1.05 
3.85 
1.63 



Economic class of farm 



I and II HI to V VI to VIII 



10.49 
1.24 
1.06 
1.12 
0.81 
2.04 

0.69 
0.53 
2.24 
0.60 
0.18 

3.63 

0.68 
0.04 
2.55 
0.12 
0.25 



2.97 
2.37 
1.29 

6.10 

0.38 
0.40 
0.85 
0.70 
0.05 

0.77 
0.04 
0.29 
0.92 



207. :■!) 

18.66 
6.30 
2.30 
7.65 



(Z) 

61.31 
17.23 
4.82 
0.58 
0.42 

7.47 



4.29 
0.07 
19.27 
3.43 



7.29 
8.44 
7.23 

16.36 
4.97 
0.65 



2. OR 
0.62 
2.51 
0.46 
0.05 

8.37 
1.50 
4.34 
2.52 



6. 3S 
0.74 
0.67 



0.33 
0.36 
1.16 
0.20 
0.09 

2.49 
0.38 
0.02 



8.47 
4.36 
1.81 
1.51 
0.78 

3.49 
0.15 
0.26 
0.55 



0.37 
0.02 
0.18 
0.58 
0.96 



147.64 
13.13 
3.23 
1.47 
6.62 

1.38 
0.41 
0.02 

43.39 
9.76 
2.48 



5.25 
1.82 
1.63 

2.64 

0.07 
16.52 
2.62 



12.41 
3.65 
0.67 
1.82 



2.11 
0.57 
1.26 
0.23 
0.01 



5.72 
0.95 
0.30 
0.94 
0.38 
1.45 

0.33 
0.20 
0.94 
0.15 
0.07 

2.12 
0.18 
0.03 
1.79 
0.07 
0.04 

7.50 
4.30 
1.17 
1.53 
0.51 

2.54 
0.09 
0.12 
0.44 
0.28 
0.02 

0.34 
0.03 
0.13 
0.50 
0.60 



119.37 
9.33 
2.35 
1.29 
4.16 

0.90 
0.61 
0.01 



2.58 
0.26 
0.08 

4.21 
1.62 
1.19 

1.71 
0.03 
12.36 
3.12 



10.16 
3.06 
0.39 
1.73 
1.45 



5.55 
0.84 
3.41 
1.29 



Percent of families purchasing 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



97.3 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Economic class of farm 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



99.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



98.5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA1 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



95.4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



11 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of Farm-Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States : 1955 — Continued 





Average family expenditures (dollars) 


Percent of families purchasing 


Expenditure item 


All families 


Economic class of farm 


All fami- 
lies 


Economic class of farm 




I and II 


III to V 


vitovni 


I and II 


III to V 


VI to 
VIII 


CLOTHING— Continued 
Clothing: Men and boys, ages 16 and over— Continued 


25.99 
10.61 
8.30 
0.92 

1.92 
1.69 
0.74 
1.80 

17.92 
3.14 

1.15 
1.41 

4.26 
0.42 
1.19 
1.21 
1.71 
3.41 

1.46 

7.92 

42.17 
4.40 
0.54 
0.49 

2.45 

0.67 
O.OS 
0. IS 

12.04 
1.00 
0.40 
0.19 
0.05 

1.08 
0.83 
0.40 

0.73 
0.67 
6.53 
0.15 

5.15 
1.72 
0.98 
2.45 

4.43 
1.46 
0.12 
0.54 
1.12 

0.34 
0.01 
0.75 
0.07 
0.01 

2.32 
0.15 
1.59 
0.58 

9.94 
2.56 
4.73 
0.89 

0.59 
0.30 
0.16 
0.72 

3.44 
0.09 
0.20 
0.73 

0.46 
0.20 
0.31 
0.21 
0.58 
0.67 

0.45 


35.47 
13.17 
10.60 
1.17 

3.07 
3.18 
1.29 
2.99 

26.77 
4.61 
1.64 
2.15 

6.18 
0.72 
1.57 
2.19 
2.39 
5.34 

3.07 

14.21 

59.29 
6.48 
0.90 
0.76 
3.34 

1.00 
0.08 
0.41 

16.65 
1.68 
0.72 
0.32 
0.13 

1.42 
1.15 
0.69 

1.00 
1.10 
8.18 
0.26 

6.99 
2.54 
1.04 
3.41 

6.81 
2.13 
0.19 
0.64 

1.75 

0.30 
0.03 

1.54 
0.15 
0.07 

3.19 
0.25 
2.11 
0.84 

13.70 
2.62 
6.52 
1.42 

1.13 
0.58 
0.29 
1.14 

5.21 
0.18 
0.26 
1.10 

0.75 
0.38 
0.31 
0.37 
0.73 
1.13 

0.25 


26.62 
11.06 
7.75 
0.89 

2.05 
1.75 
0.95 
2.17 

18.44 
3.03 
1.21 
1.53 

4.76 
0.46 
1.21 
1.21 
1.66 
3.37 

1.60 

7.95 

43.77 
4.57 
0.64 
0.43 
2.59 

0.63 
0.09 
0.19 

12.43 
1.03 
0.39 
0.24 
0.02 

1.09 
0.82 
0.52 

0.75 
0.66 
6.76 
0.15 

5.26 
1.80 
0.97 
2.49 

4.63 
1.52 
0.16 
0.56 
1.17 

0.36 
0.02 
0.78 
0.06 
(Z) 

2.43 
0.17 
1.55 
0.71 

10.08 
2.64 
4.64 
0.92 

0.61 
0.32 
0.16 
0.79 

3.82 
0.08 
0.21 
0.74 

0.53 
0.22 
0.41 
0.21 
0.63 
0.79 

0.55 


22.09 
9.24 
8.14 
0.88 

1.38 
1.12 
0.33 
0.99 

14.34 
2.78 
0.92 
1.03 

3.06 
0.28 
1.04 
0.89 
1.55 
2.81 

.77 

5.77 

34.62 
3.51 
0.30 
0.46 
2.00 

0.61 
0.06 
0.08 

10.04 

0.74 
0.30 
0.10 
0.05 

0.95 
0.74 
0.18 

0.62 
0.53 

5.72 
0.11 

4.40 
1.34 
0.97 
2.08 

3.40 
1.17 
0.05 
0.48 
0.85 

0.34 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

39.1 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

44.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

39.2 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


















(NA) 
















(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 












(NA) 




















(NA) 




(NA) 




37.2 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 








(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 


Shirts... 


(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 


Underwear and nightwear. 


(NA) 


Shorts, briefs. 


(NA) 


Drawers 


(NA) 




(NA) 


T-shirts 


(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 




0.45 
0.05 
0.01 

1.91 
0.10 
1.46 
0.34 

8.51 
2.45 
4.23 
0.68 

0.39 
0.17 
0.11 
0.49 

2.43 
0.06 
0.16 
0.60 

0.27 
0.12 
0.21 
0.14 
0.48 
0.37 

0.41 


(NA) 




(NA) 




(NA) 


Socks. 


(NA) 


Wool socks.. 


(NA) 


Cotton socks 


(NA) 


Other socks... 


(NA) 


Footwear 


(NA) 


Work shoes 


(NA) 


Street or dress shoes. . 


(NA) 




(XA) 


Leather boots... 


(NA) 


Rubber boots 


(NA) 


Rubbers 


(NA) 


Arctics, galoshes 


(NA) 


Hats, gloves, accessories 


(NA) 


Hats, felt 


(XA) 


Hats, straw... 


(XA) 




(NA) 


Work gloves or mittens ... 


(NA) 




(NA) 


Handkerchiefs. __ 


(NA) 


Ties and scarfs 


(NA) 




(NA) 




(XA) 


Clothing expense, unitemized . 


(XA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 
412355—57 3 



12 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of Farm-Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States: 1955 — Continued 





Average family expenditures (dollars) 


Percent of families purchasing 


Expenditure item 


All families 


Economic class of farm 


All fami- 
lies 


Economic class of farm 




I and II 


III to V 


VI to VIII 


I and II 


III to V 


VI to 

vni 


CLOTHING— Continued 


6.92 
0.28 
0.35 
0.10 
0.24 
0.53 
0.20 
0.16 
0.09 

0.26 
0.42 
0.16 
0.45 
0.19 
0.14 
3.36 

48.84 
16.75 
1.28 
2.96 
0.45 
1.90 
1.78 
0.75 

0.53 
1.43 
0.94 
4.01 
0.09 
0.64 

32.08 
21.68 
0.89 
3.07 
3.16 
0.34 

2.22 
0.35 
0.34 
0.05 

377. 76 
166.95 
148. 94 
18.01 

193. 80 
166.76 

81.61 
7.07 

16.08 

0.82 
0.12 
1.82 
2.64 

0.93 
3.64 
0.39 
1.00 

16.59 
2.97 
7.48 

23.38 
0.22 

27.03 

13.32 
1.13 
3.10 

0.18 
0.03 
0.31 
0.53 

0.18 
0.47 
0.07 
0.23 

2.76 
0.48 
1.70 
2.55 


11.81 
0.19 
0.65 
0.15 
0.35 
0.96 
0.39 
0.25 
0.14 

0.56 
0.55 
0.24 
0.81 
0.25 
0.55 
5.77 

72.39 
22.22 
1.93 
4.03 
0.37 
2.11 
2.11 
1.04 

0.62 
2.16 
1.42 
5.15 
0.38 
0.90 

50.16 
33.66 
1.80 
5.64 
4.86 
0.58 

2.60 
0.59 
0.33 

0.12 

543.24 

269. 92 

262. 49 

7.43 

240. 34 
228.76 
107. 43 
9.08 
22.22 

0.80 
0.15 
2.16 

3.04 

1.16 

5.39 
0.52 
1.13 

22.43 
8.04 
11.30 
33.80 
0.10 

11.58 
4.99 
0.41 
1.26 

0.06 
0.01 
0.13 
0.21 

0.06 
0.15 
0.03 
0.08 

1.56 
0.65 
0.77 
1.23 


7.18 
0.25 
0.43 
0.11 
0.27 
0.54 
0.21 
0.20 
0.11 

0.27 
0.48 
0.17 
0.51 
0.19 
0.09 
3.36 

60.55 
18.82 
1.54 
3.09 
0.54 
2.12 
2.06 
0.89 

0.59 
1.59 
0.98 
4.52 
0.07 
0.84 

31.73 

20.91 
0.77 
3.24 
3.31 
0.31 

2.42 
0.39 
0.31 
0.07 

332. 10 
135. 05 
122.42 
12.63 

183.87 
159. 57 

78.23 
6.91 

16.11 

0.77 
0.14 
1.86 
2.63 

0.96 
3.52 
0.34 

0.86 

15.09 
1.41 
7.49 

22.82 
0.42 

24.30 
12.02 
1.04 
2.45 

0.13 
0.03 
0.27 
0.46 

0.21 
0.40 
0.06 
0.14 

2.74 
0.20 
1.66 
2.50 


4.97 
0.33 
0.16 
0.08 
0.17 
0.38 
0.11 
0.08 
0.05 

0.16 
0.32 
0.11 
0.27 
0.18 
0.05 
2.54 

38.98 
12.61 
0.77 
2.45 
0.38 
1.59 
1.36 
0.51 

0.42 
1.00 
0.73 
3.07 
0.01 
0.33 

26.37 
18.48 
0.71 
2.00 
2.42 
0.29 

1.87 
0.22 
0.39 


(NA) 
1.1 
4.2 
4.4 
5.8 
6.4 
4.0 
6.0 
2.7 

7.0 
6.2 
7.2 
7.3 
4.7 
0.4 
33.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
9.7 
30.2 
8.8 
23.5 
21.2 
8.2 

8.7 
15.9 
16.0 
72.5 
0.3 
9.2 

(NA) 
84.7 
10.1 
33.7 
57.0 
9.5 

83.5 
19.4 

1.4 
0.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
21.8 
4.8 

(NA) 
74.1 
73.0 
69.8 
46.1 

18.1 
2.3 
60.1 

27.7 

27.8 
62.0 
16.9 
9.1 

50.8 
2.2 
73.2 
63.1 
0.4 

19.6 
19.4 
18.3 

10.1 

4.8 
0.7 
15.3 

7.8 

6.9 
14.2 
3.8 
2.8 

11.8 
0.5 
19.0 
13.0 


(NA) 
0.7 
6.2 
5.4 
7.2 
9.0 
7.2 
7.8 
3.3 

9.5 
6.6 
9.2 

10.2 
6.6 
1.3 

46.6 

(NA) 
(NA) 
11.7 
32.2 
6.3 
25.4 
20.9 
10.0 

9.2 
18.6 
19.6 
76.9 

0.5 
11.1 

(NA) 
94.8 
16.0 
51.7 
68.7 
14.4 

87.2 
28.6 
1.9 
0.4 

(NA) 
(NA) 
28.5 
2.6 

(NA) 
91.9 
89.6 
83.6 
58.5 

19.1 
2.9 
71.9 
33.2 

36.6 
77.0 
23.3 
9.2 

64.6 
4.9 
90.4 
86.4 
0.7 

10.2 
10.1 
7.9 
5.7 

2.7 
0.3 

8.0 
4.7 

4.3 
7.0 
2.5 

1.4 

7.0 
0.5 
10.2 
8.9 


(NA) 
0.9 
5.1 
4.5 
6.1 
6.0 
4.5 
6.9 
3.4 

7.5 
6.7 
8.0 
8.0 
4.6 
0.4 
36.9 

(NA) 
(NA) 
11.6 
30.9 
9.9 
26.4 
22.7 
8.9 

9.5 
17.5 
17.1 
76.2 

0.4 
11.2 

(NA) 
87.3 

8.8 
36.2 
60.6 

8.8 

87.3 
21.9 
1.0 
0.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
19.8 
4.6 

(NA) 
79.4 
78.6 
74.9 
51.2 

19.3 
2.6 
66.2 
30.6 

30.7 
66.3 

17.7 
8.8 

55.8 
1.8 
78.3 
70.7 
0.4 

19.5 
19.2 
18.2 
10.4 

4.3 
0.7 

15.3 

7.7 

7.5 
13.2 
3.6 
1.9 

12.6 
0.4 
19.0 
14.5 


(NA) 
1.4 
2.4 
4.0 
5.1 
5.9 
2.5 
4.4 
1.8 

5.5 
5.6 
5.7 
5.6 
4.2 
0.2 
24.0 

(NA) 
(NA) 
6.8 
28.9 
8.4 
19.7 
19.5 
6.8 

7.5 








Sweaters, sacques, T-shirts 














Stockings, socks, booties 




Bibs, shawls, receiving blankets, muffs- - 




Clothing gifts for infants 


Clothing: Materials and services 


Clothing materials. 








Yard goods, cotton, percale _ 








Yard goods, other fabrics 




13.7 
67.0 








6.5 

(NA) 
78.5 






Paid help for dressmaking, tailoring, alterations, and repairs. 






Shoe repairs _ 






8.8 


Shoe polishes, laces, etc 


Fabric cleaning fluids-. 








Total clothing services, unitemized 




TRANSPORTATION (FAMILY SHARE) 


372. 62 
167. 61 
140. 06 
27.55 

189. 11 
153.83 

76.64 
6.56 

13.99 

0.87 
0.09 
1.67 
2.52 

0.82 
3.18 
0.40 

1.12 

16.29 
2.99 
6.17 

20.49 
0.05 

35.28 
17.58 
1.48 

4.44 

0.28 
0.03 
0.41 
0.71 

0.19 
0.65 
0.09 
0.38 

3.18 
0.73 
2.06 
3.06 


(NA) 
(NA) 


Purchase of autos and trucks 


Purchase of autos 


Purchase of trucks 




Upkeep and running expenses - 


(NA) 


Autos 


Gasoline 




Oil. _ 








Inner tubes 




Tire chains 




Anti-freeze 




Batteries - 




Spark plugs 




Lubrication jobs._ _-_ 




Brake adjustments 
















Registration and fees 












Trucks. 




Gasoline 




Oil 








Inner tubes 




Tire chains 




Anti-freeze 




Batteries 




Sparkplugs 




Lubrication jobs 




Brake adjustments __- 




Brake relining 




Other parts, service, repairs 




Upkeep and running expenses, unitemized __ 


0.5 






Insurance 


12.7 



See footnotes at end of table. 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



13 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of Farm-Operator Families — Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States : 1955 — Continued 



Expenditure Item 



Average family expenditures (dollars) 



Economic class ol farm 



I and II III to V VI to VIII 



Percent of families purchasing 



Economic class ol farm 



I and II III to V 



TRANSPORTATION (FAMILY SHARE)— Continued 

Other travel and transportation 

Local travel 

Bus, trolley fares 

Taxi fares . - - 

Other travel . 

Bus fares 

Railroad fares - - 

Pullman fares 

Airplane fares - 

Boat fares - 

Trip and travel insurance 

Vehicles ... 

Bicycles, purchase 

Bicycles, upkeep 

Motorcycles and scooters, purchase 

Motorcycles and scooters, upkeep. 

Airplanes, purchase .. ... 

Airplanes, upkeep - 

Boats or outboard motors, purchase.. 

Boats or outboard motors, upkeep 

Other transportation expense _ -__ - 

Tolls, parking fees, etc 

Gifts of vehicles 

MEDICAL CARE 

All medical care 

Prepaid medical care or insurance premiums 

Medical services 

Hospital. -. 

Surgeon's fees 

Other physicians, M. D 

Osteopaths 

Dentist services, X-ray, dentures, etc 

Eye tests and glasses 

Nurses, private duty, practical, and visiting 

Other practitioners, chiropractors, midwives, etc 

Laboratory tests and X-rays. 

Ambulance and emergency room 

Combined hospital and surgeon's fees 

Other medical services, unitemized 

Medical drugs and supplies.. _ 

Prescribed medicines and drugs 

Vitamins, mineral tablets. 

Medicines and drugs, not prescribed .. 

Medical appliances and supplies 

PERSONAL CARE 

All personal care. 

Personal services. _ 

Haircuts . _ 

Shaves _ _ _ 

Permanent waves _ 

Other waves __ 

Shampoos 

Wave and shampoo , 

Other personal services _ _ 

Personal care materials ___ 

Toilet soap 

Men's shaving cream, powder, lotion. . 

Electric razors, repairs 

Supplies for home permanents. 

Cosmetics, creams, rouges, lipsticks, deodorants, perfumes, etc 

Cleansing tissues and sanitary supplies 

Shampoo, bath salts, etc 

Toothpaste, or powder, mouth wash, etc 

Combs and personal brushes 

Nail files, scissors, other manicure equipment... 

Other personal care items (including razors and razor blades) 

Gifts of personal care items. 

TOBACCO AND ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 

All tobacco and alcoholic beverages 

Total tobacco expense 

Cigarettes _ 

Cigars 

Smoking tobacco 

Other tobacco products, chewing, snuff, etc... 

Smokers' supplies, pipes, cleaners, lighters, fluid, etc 

Total alcoholic beverage expense 

Alcoholic beverages used at home 

Alcoholic beverages purchased in restaurants and bars 

Gifts of tobacco, alcoholic beverages, and supplies 

See footnotes at end of table. 



7.13 
2.30 
1.92 



1.91 
0. 72 
0.20 

5.57 
1.7S 
0.22 
0.37 
0.15 



153. 75 
31.39 
10.86 
48.52 
2.54 
27.60 
12.04 

1.63 
3.02 
3.00 
0.37 
3.53 
9.25 



69. S3 
28.45 
19.26 
0.46 



0.46 
0.76 
2.05 
0.08 

41.37 
7.35 
3.04 
1.37 
2.31 



67.77 
52.03 
38.85 
2.78 
4.67 
5.23 
0.51 



13. 69 
1.55 
3.32 
0.27 



0.94 

14.67 
3.44 
0.31 
0.53 
0.51 

1.84 
0.13 
7.45 
0.46 

3.23 
2.12 
1.12 



214.40 
38.27 
16.16 
65.86 
3.63 
50.26 
17.59 



5.10 
5.56 
il. 18 
1.15 
8.33 



103. 11 
44.85 
27.41 
0.64 
9.15 

0.82 
1.35 
5.19 
0.29 



4.15 
2.67 
2.68 
12.28 



58. 79 
46.23 
6.41 
3.16 



13.18 
2.24 
1.75 
0.49 

5.16 
1.72 
1.48 
0.02 

1.58 
0.23 
0.13 

4.00 
1.65 
0.31 
0.32 
0.13 



0.03 
1.47 
0.07 

1.79 
1.45 
0.34 



154. 37 
30.86 
11.41 
47.77 



1.21 
3.28 
3.47 
0.41 
5.24 
7.67 

42.59 
27.42 
5.71 
8.07 
1.39 



70.50 
28.58 
19.50 
0.37 



1.36 
2.42 
7.82 
5.51 

3.56 
5.43 
2.14 
0.36 
2.17 
0.83 



67.98 
53.18 
37.99 
2.61 



0.54 
14.80 



15. 90 
3.26 
2.29 
0.97 



0.42 
1.44 
0.04 

4.25 
1.37 
0.09 
0.36 
0.04 



132. 59 
29.66 
8.45 
43.49 



1.87 
2.05 
1.63 
0.39 
2.44 
11.31 

42.70 
29. OS 
3.79 
8.35 



57.85 
22.78 
16.24 
0.51 



0.30 
0.61 
1.19 

0.05 



2.75 
0.94 
2.07 



1.72 
0.25 
1.87 
0.43 



61.23 
48.47 
37.32 
1.72 
3.61 
5.44 
0.39 



3.4 

(NA) 
57.7 
29.5 
85.1 
12.6 



(NA) 
(NA) 



0.6 

(NA) 
95.6 
74.1 
11.6 
41.8 
80.1 
71.5 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
25.4 
13.6 



(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
92.8 



(NA) 
24.8 
16.2 



74.0 
93.0 
71.5 
26.4 
45.3 
20.1 



(NA) 
(NA) 
50.3 
17.7 
16.6 
8.7 
15.5 

(NA) 
37.8 
24.0 
13.4 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
17.7 
0.3 



(NA) 
23.0 
10.0 



(NA) 
58.2 
32.0 



(NA) 
(NA) 
87.9 



is. 1 
50.4 
12. 5 



(NA) 
(NA) 
47.1 
11.4 
19.5 
19.0 
14.2 

(NA) 
27.6 
18.3 



14 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



Table 2. — Family Living Expenses of FarM'Operator Families— Average Expenditures Per Family and Percent of Families 
Reporting, For Groups and Individual Items of Expenditure, By Economic Class of Farm, For the United States: 1955— Con. 





Average family expenditures (dollars) 


Percent of families purchasing 


Expenditure Item 


All families 


Economic class of farm 


All fami- 
lies 


Economic class of farm 




I and II 


III to V 


VI to VIII 


I and II 


m to v 


VI to 
VIII 


RECREATION 


124.07 
15.86 
5.62 
3.11 
1.05 
6.09 

55.10 
2.01 

36.36 
0.74 
2.36 
2.36 

1.29 
1.58 
0.10 
7.91 
0.38 

53.11 
1.35 
1.47 
4.52 
9.49 

5.83 
2.24 
2.14 
0.75 
5.96 

0.92 
12.08 
3.86 
1.00 
1.50 

43.55 
18.77 
11.57 
5.72 
1.49 

24.77 
4.74 

14.97 
4.33 
0.39 
0.34 

60.92 
13.78 
2.48 
3.49 
0.31 
1.92 

7.21 
6.55 
0.17 
0.04 
18.79 
6.18 

86.02 

109. 96 
84.35 
10.48 
0.98 
6.22 
7.92 


210.22 
26.86 
7.74 
3.85 
1.23 
14.05 

76.00 
2.96 

40.21 
0.96 
4.88 
5.46 

2.82 
1.70 
0.31 
15.83 
0.88 

107. 36 
3.19 
1.67 
9.98 
17.86 

9.95 
3.48 
4.82 
1.36 
9.52 

2.80 
25.30 
9.89 
3.84 
3.68 

76.81 
32.13 
16.87 
11.68 
3.58 

44.68 
6.84 
24.39 
12.71 
0.36 
0.37 

91.98 
10.43 
4.63 
7.40 
0.80 
3.73 

9.42 
3.99 
0.16 
0.07 
38.98 
12.35 

220. 13 

211. 86 
157. 89 
20.59 
1.97 
20.07 
11.32 


124. 93 
17.04 
6.39 
3.04 
0.96 
6.65 

55.55 
2.36 

37.46 
0.76 
1.42 
2.45 

1.12 
1.73 
0.08 
7.79 
0.37 

52.34 

1.10 
0.90 
4.80 
9.51 

5.63 
2.37 
2.01 
0.81 

5.66 

0.87 
12.80 
3.71 
0.53 
1.64 

43.72 
19.51 
11.75 
6.04 
1.71 

24.21 
4.73 

14.35 
4.07 
0.66 
0.40 

62.47 
13.22 
2.15 
3.85 
0.22 
1.08 

8.49 
5.13 
0.17 
0.03 
21.89 
6.25 

79.91 

112.23 
85.97 
9.99 
1.00 
5.05 
10.22 


94.05 
10.85 
4.04 
2.95 
1.08 
2.78 

47.54 
1.30 

33.85 
0.64 
2.55 
1.20 

0.95 
1.38 
0.06 
5.38 
0.23 

35.66 
1.00 
2.04 
2.36 
6.65 

4.65 
1.67 
1.38 
0.48 
5.08 

0.37 
6.81 
1.98 
0.56 
0.62 

32.12 
13.44 
9.57 
3.34 
0.53 

18.68 
4.03 

12.48 
1.80 
0.11 
0.26 

48.71 
15.54 
2.12 
1.77 
0.24 
2.25 

5.03 
9.00 
0.17 
0.03 
8.54 
4.01 

47.54 

73.05 
57.73 
7.62 
0.63 
2.85 
4.22 


(NA) 

(NA) 
34.7 
22.1 
10.5 
31.8 

(NA) 
7.4 
15.2 
2.1 
1.6 
3.0 

12.5 
19.6 

1.3 
28.3 

2.4 

(NA) 
12.8 
10.7 
35.3 
34.4 

21.3 
38.0 
11.8 
2.9 
22.9 

9.9 
15.2 
24.3 

2.3 

8.7 

(NA) 
(NA) 
78.2 
62.7 
10.6 

(NA) 
21.7 
23.5 

7.9 
1.8 
3.4 

(NA) 
19.4 
10.8 
38.5 
8.1 
2.0 

13.7 
15.3 
1.7 
0.4 
59.2 
36.6 

63.6 

(NA) 
84.9 
73.6 
5.3 
9.8 
3.2 


(NA) 

(NA) 
46.1 
27.1 
14.4 
52.4 

(NA) 
9.1 
15.2 

2.9 
2.9 
4.6 

23.9 
20.9 

2.8 
46.3 

5.9 

(NA) 
23.3 
16.9 

57.1 
47.1 

26.1 
44.8 
15.6 
4.6 
31.2 

23.3 
22.7 
44.4 
5.6 
15.2 

(NA) 
(NA) 
89.2 
81.5 
17.2 

(NA) 
28.5 
29.6 
16.5 
1.9 
5.1 

(NA) 
25.3 
17.3 
60.5 
11.5 
3.5 

10.4 
11.8 

1.8 
0.4 
67.4 
51.6 

73.6 

(NA) 
92.8 
88.4 

9.6 
16.4 

4.1 


(NA) 
(NA) 
40.4 
22.6 
11.3 
37.7 

(NA) 
8.5 
16.2 
2.3 
1.5 
3.1 

13.5 
21.0 

1.2 
29.5 

2.1 

(NA) 
12.6 
12.1 
39.2 
35.6 

24.0 
42.1 
13.1 
2.8 
23.7 

11.1 
16.9 
27.8 
2.1 
10.3 

(NA) 
(NA) 
83.5 
70.4 
11.7 

(NA) 
23.6 
24.2 
8.6 
2.0 
3.7 

(NA) 
19.8 
12.4 
45.5 
7.6 
1.9 

15.9 
14.2 
1.5 
0.5 
64.3 
40.4 

65.0 

(NA) 
85.6 
79.5 

5.9 
10.0 

3.5 


(NA) 




(NA) 




24.6 




19.8 




8.2 




18.2 




(NA) 




5.8 




14.1 




1.5 




1.3 




2.3 




7.4 




17.6 




0.8 




20.9 




1.5 




(NA) 




9.5 




7.0 




23.7 




28.8 




16.5 




31.1 




9.1 




2.3 




19.2 




4.0 




10.7 




13.7 




1.3 




4.6 


READING AND EDUCATION 


(NA) 




(NA) 




68.6 




47.9 




7.1 




(NA) 




17.3 




20.7 




4.2 




1.4 




2.5 


MISCELLANEOUS 


(NA) 




17.1 




6.7 




23.4 




7.5 




1.5 




12.4 




17.8 




1.7 




0.4 




50.7 




27.2 


PERSONAL INSURANCE 


57.9 


CASH GIFTS AND CONTRIBUTIONS 


(NA) 




81.5 




62.1 




3.1 




7.3 




2.5 







FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



15 



Table 3. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures With Percent Distribution and Average Expenditure per 
Farm, for Major Groups of Expenditures, by Economic Class of Farm, for the United States: 1955 



Expenditure category 



Livestock and poultry purchased. 
Feed for livestock anil poultry 



Seeds, plants, and trees _ 

Commercial fertilizer and liming ma- 
terials. - - 



Petroleum products, farm business share . 

Repair and other operating costs for 

motor vehicles and farm machinery. . . 



Marketing costs 

Miscellaneous current operating ex- 
penses, not elsewhere included [ 



Cash rent 

Property taxes, farm business share. 
Interest, farm business share 



Construction and land improvement 3 .. 

Purchase of motor vehicles and farm 

machinery and equipment 



Expenditures all farms 



Total 

(000 

dollars) 



848, 576 

1, 363, 086 

1, 767, 040 

1, 466, 068 

1, 113, 655 

1, 682, 053 

458, 314 
638, 041 
458, 443 

1, 339, 862 

2,691,811 



Average 
per farm 
(dollars) 



181.48 
291. 52 
378.11 
313. 33 
238. 16 
359. 74 

98.02 

130. 46 
98.06 

286.56 

575. 70 



Percent 
of total 

(percent) 



Expenditures by economic class of farm 



Class I and II 



Total 

(000 

dollars) 



372, 591 
628, 101 
666, 765 
634, 079 
622, 635 



•.MS, 228 
267, 346 
210,622 



Average 
per farm 
(dollars) 



570. 73 
962. 13 

1,021.35 
971.28 
953. 75 

1,323.46 

380. 24 
409. 52 
322. 63 

899. 09 

1,673.18 



Percent 
of total 

(percent) 



100.0 
14.4 



Classes III to V 



Total 
(000 

dollars) 



563, 889 

885,083 

689, 204 

412, 689 

654,442 

151, 658 
299, 069 
204, 852 

563,858 

1,285,185 



Average 
per farm 
(dollars) 



Percent 
of total 
(percent) 



Total 

(000 

dollars) 



94, 147 
171,096 
216, 092 
141, 785 

78, 331 

163, 621 

58, 428 
71, 626 
42, 969 

189, 056 

314, 331 



Average 
per farm 

(dollars) 



113.64 

74.56 

41.19 

86.05 

30.73 
37.66 
22.60 



Percent 
of total 
(percent) 



1 Includes veterinarian services, medicines and disinfectants; grazing fees; livestock 
services; pesticides; hired trucking other than marketings; irrigation; farm business 
share of electricity, telephone service, and insurance; hand tools and miscellaneous 
supplies; miscellaneous farm business expenses. 



2 Includes fencing; farm building repair and remodeling; new building construction; 
other improvements. 



16 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



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XXX 

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920 

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166 
13 
15 

399 
4,845 

XXX 

30,541 
1,024 
1,160 
4,662 
3,557 
2,075 


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1.7 
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18 



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9,080 
7,253 
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18,453 
1,907 
3,560 
1,820 
1,820 
1,318 


1115 


5,217 
1,282 
2,300 
3,565 
2,225 


1,751 
6,815 
3,967 
3,480 
1,168 


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1,963 
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20 



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6.52 
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2.50 
12.75 
5.34 

7.72 

8.80 
1.08 

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0.48 

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12,389 
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1,217 

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4,758 
24,247 
10, 151 

14, 685 

16, 740 
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1,857 

3,008 
1,151 

9,755 

10, 659 
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1,195 

1,878 


30, 418 

12,939 
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182 
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131 
502 
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1,115 
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1,902 

2,801 
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17,479 

1,054 
102 
232 


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6,946 

1,480 

1,424 

257 

493 

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6,164 


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27 



23.71 

18.09 
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38 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



Classes III to VI 



Cash wages paid hired farm workers: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms ... 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms __ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock... 

Miscellaneous farms. 

Perquisites furnished hired workers, total : ' 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms _ 

Fruit-and-nut farms. _. 

Dairy farms.. _ 

Poultry farms _ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock.. 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms _ _ 

Board: 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms __ ZZZZZ! 

Cotton farms. __ 

Other field-crop farms '..'... 

Vegetable farms... 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily lives! nek 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms __, 

Housing and lodging: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms Z.ZZI 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms ZZZ 

Vegetable farms ~_, 

Fruit-and-nut farms _ 

Dairy farms _ 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms _. 

Other : ! 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms Z. 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms , 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock. __ 

General farms, crop and livestock , 

Miscellaneous farms. 

Machine hire and custom work: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms ZZZZZZI 

Cotton farms "_ 

Other field-crop farms. ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ 

Vegetable farms _. 

Fruit-and-nut farms ZZZZ 

Dairy farms.. _ 

Poultry farms __ 

Livestock farms other than dairv and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock.. 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

See footnotes at end of table. 



2, 445, 263 
254, 451 
501, 261 
244, 107 
123,416 
250, 187 

259, 690 
69, 174 

418,615 
91, 903 
17, 378 
83, 102 

131,979 



25. Ml" 
16,841 
7,548 
12, 202 



103,090 
18,124 
1,974 
5,413 
1,952 
3,194 

22, 791 
2,180 

36,841 
1,286 
1,924 
6,280 
1,131 



113,214 
15.056 
19,014 



7,832 

16,363 
3.229 

29. 222 
2,519 
1.941 
4,497 
2,018 



51). 362 

6,710 
4.905 
3,979 
1,522 
1,176 

10, 054 
1,114 
16,973 



1,273 
251 
393 

4,414 



1,706,995 
162, 147 
329,111 
174, 965 
94, 959 
191, 049 

160, 586 
58, 270 

291, 873 
68, 758 
9,052 
49,649 

116, 576 



173, 260 
26, 994 
19, 074 
9,765 
4,771 
7,960 

25, 527 
4,651 

58, 382 
3,772 
2,543 
6,831 
2,990 



9,616 

939 

24,119 



81,701 
10, 782 
14, 248 
5,848 
2,735 
5,939 

9,654 
2,771 
21.040 
2,166 
1,307 
2,883 
1,728 



36, 251 
4,810 
4,201 
2,412 



6,257 

941 

12, 623 



198.664 
46,243 
33, 233 
13,345 
3,078 
4,874 

19, 086 
4,912 

49, 539 

10, 737 
1,831 

11,254 
532 



2,615 
1,173 
4,453 
7,674 
10,551 



1,935 
1,267 
1,597 
4,709 
1,078 
1,280 
10, 502 



738, 268 
92, 304 

172, 150 
69, 142 
28, 457 
59,138 

99, 104 
10, 904 
126, 742 
23, 145 
8,326 
33, 453 
15,403 



93, 406 
12, 896 
6,819 
7,076 
2,777 
4,242 



13,175 
1,241 

12, 722 



31,513 
4,274 
4,766 
1,601 
1,339 
1,893 



329. ir/j;; 
70, 103 
28, 421 
21,802 
1,957 



69, 195 
5,482 

80, 536 
8,447 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



39 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures— Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



Classes III to VI 



Total (000 Average per 
dollars) farm (dollars) 



Feed for livestock and poultry : 

All farms _ - 

Cash-grain farms -- 

Cotton farms -- 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms. 

Fruit-and-nut farms _ 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

Oeneral farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms. 

Livestock and poultry purchased: 

All farms. _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms __ 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms. 

Poultry farms. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock- 

General farms, crop and livestock- _ 

Miscellaneous farms --. 

Seeds, plants, and trees : 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms. 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms - 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock _ 

Miscellaneous farms 

Commercial fertilizer: 

All farms — 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms. 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Lime and liming materials : 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms.- 

See footnotes at end of table. 



3, 90S, S93 
265, 840 
66, 658 
63,911 
6,229 
21,633 

892, 346 

1,015,588 

1,303,001 

19, 787 

93, 501 

161,745 

8,654 



2,440,929 
305, 561 
76, 445 
38, 001 
4,356 
10, 993 

188, 290 
222, 703 
1,431.368 
23,886 
28,092 
107,915 
3,319 



780, 755 
169,119 
74, 432 
69,215 
28, 198 
16, 506 



12, 225 
169, 182 
26, 445 
13, 384 
50, 008 
52, 213 



1,142,064 
232, 457 
146, 585 
136, 907 
42,249 
65,040 

129, 133 
18, 624 

228,878 
46, 731 
17, 160 
73, 451 
14, 849 



88,529 
17, 848 
4,727 
3,582 
1,993 
2,830 

19, 521 
2,648 

27, 403 
1,128 
1,200 
5,228 
621 



1,526 
6,292 
1, 756 



2,177,617 
118,910 
21, 808 
13, 850 
3,056 
11, 638 

418, 455 
713, 100 
775, 242 
7,764 
27, 240 
64, 559 
1,995 



1, 637, 787 
151,867 
38, 648 
17, 795 
2,130 
9,337 

76,168 
145, 123 
1,107,179 
16,924 
7,523 
62, 769 
2,324 



373, 403 
82, 494 
41,196 
37, 161 
14, 403 
7,497 

30, 597 
5,294 
78, 309 
14,880 
3,147 
16, 807 
41,618 



687, 366 
132. 538 
78, 908 
58,757 
32, 432 
37, 329 

48, 455 

8,229 

112,534 

28,326 



IW.S66 
8,786 
3,455 
1,238 



6,758 
1,064 
12,178 



3,336 


1,731,276 


860 


146, 930 


295 


44,850 


607 


40, 061 


340 


3,173 


481 


9,996 


6,042 


473, 891 


15, 502 


302, 488 


4,241 


627. 759 


532 


12, 023 


3,243 


66, 261 


1,664 


97, 186 


180 


6,659 


2,509 


803,142 


1,099 


163,694 


523 


37, 797 


780 


20, 206 


237 


2,226 


386 


1,656 


918 


112, 122 


3,155 


77, 580 


6,057 


324, 189 


1, 159 


6,962 


896 


20, 569 


1,618 


45, 146 


209 


995 


572 


407, 352 


597 


86, 625 


657 


33, 236 


1,630 


32, 054 


1,600 


13, 795 


310 


9,009 


369 


69, 231 


115 


6,931 


428 


90. 873 


1,019 


11,565 


375 


10, 237 


433 


33, 201 


3,749 


10, 595 


900 


554, 758 


959 


99,919 


1,068 


67, 677 


2,577 


78, 150 


3,604 


9,817 


1,543 


17, 711 


584 


80, 678 


179 


10, 395 


616 


116,344 


1,940 


18,405 


756 


10, 806 


854 


40,318 


929 


4,538 


61 


48, 663 


64 


9,059 


47 


1,272 


54 


2,344 



40 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Petroleum products, total: 3 

All farms - 

Cash-grain farms --- — 

Cotton farms - - -- -- 

Other field-crop farms _ - - — 

Vegetable farms - — -- 

Fruit-and-nut farms. .. -- - 

Dairy farms - - - - 

Poultry farms -- - -- -- 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry - -- - 

General farms, primarily crop... - - - 

General farms, primarily livestock - 

General farms, crop and livestock - - - 

Miscellaneous farms — --- - 

Gasoline from tank trucks: 

All farms - -- -- 

Cash-grain farms - - -- - 

Cotton farms - -- -- 

Other field-crop farms. -- - - 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms - 

Poultry farms - - 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry - 

General farms, primarily crop.. - - 

General farms, primarily livestock - 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms -- - - - 

Gasoline from filling stations: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms - 

Cotton farms - - 

Other field-crop farms -- - 

Vegetable farms - 

Fruit-and-nut farms --- 

Dairy farms - - 

Poultry farms - 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop - 

General farms, primarily livestock. 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms - - 

Other petroleum products: 

All farms -_- 

Cash-grain farms — 

Cotton farms - 

Other field-crop farms - 

Vegetable farms -- - -- 

Fruit-and-nut farms - 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms - 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop - 

General farms, primarily livestock.. 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Tax refunds : 

All farms - 

Cash-grain farms - 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms - 

Vegetable farms - 

Fruit-and-nut farms -- 

Dairy farms - 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry - 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock -- 

General farms, crop and livestock — 

Miscellaneous farms - 

Repair and operating costs, other than fuel and oil, for motor vehicles and machinery : > * 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms __ _ 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms - 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms.. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock _ 

Miscellaneous farms _ 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1, 927, 877 
454, 865 
206, 816 
124, 168 
26, 416 
48, 569 

298, 743 
66, 153 

464, 457 
51,455 
38, 977 

123,675 
23,583 



80, 853 
50, 441 
13. 443 
23,128 

182, 091 
20, 722 

273, 846 
25. 680 
23,831 
79, 400 
7,584 



574, 130 
113,370 
70, 217 
43, 307 
6.141 
13, 767 

95. 606 
29, 018 
139, 5S0 
12, 392 
11, 789 
32, 273 
6,670 



405, 151 
97, 969 
64,605 
34, 387 
8,419 
14,083 

37,085 
17,432 
80, 605 
15, 474 

5,962 
19,290 

9,840 



3,967 
1,587 
2,409 

16, 039 
1,019 

29,574 
2,091 
2,605 
7,288 
511 



1, 388, 527 
352, 466 
149, 757 
83,823 
21, 822 
38, 152 

205, 841 
35, 569 

343, 368 
33, 214 
25,050 
88, 115 
11,350 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



746, 209 
191, 681 
95, 394 
34, 221 
12, 869 
28, 008 



30,116 
19S, 027 
25, 260 
7,675 
36,088 
13, 567 



441, 820 
115, 510 
37, 299 
21, 249 
7,013 
14,863 

53,645 
11.0S0 
131,091 
14, 050 
5,707 
26,364 



134, 791 
31,566 
16,964 
3,872 
1,411 
3,995 

13. 400 
9,760 

40, 516 
3,605 
1,586 
5.659 
2,457 



217,008 
57, 996 
45,738 
11,225 
5,378 
10, 291 

11.378 
9,780 

41,279 
8,873 
1,076 
6,507 
7,487 



47,410 
13,391 
4,607 
2,125 



617,970 
167,292 
79, 785 
31, 445 
12, 890 
24,770 



15,978 
165, 557 
19, 693 

6,105 
29,504 

5,357 



1,143 
1.3S7 
1,291 
1,501 
1,430 
1,157 



Classes III to VI 



1, 181, 668 
263. 184 
111,422 
89. 947 
13,547 
20, 561 

225, 440 
36, 037 

266, 430 
26, 195 
31, 302 
87, 587 
10,016 



616, 988 
162, 279 
43, 554 
29, 192 
6,430 
8,265 

128,446 
9.642 
142, 755 
11,630 
18, 124 
53.036 
3,635 



439, 339 
81,804 
53, 253 
39, 435 
4,730 
9,772 

82, 206 
19, 258 
99, 064 

8,787 
10,203 
26, 614 

4,213 



188, 143 
39,973 
18, 867 
23,162 
3,041 
3,792 

25,707 
7,652 

39, 326 
6,601 



62. 802 
20, 872 
4, 252 
1,842 



83 


1,911 


63 


4,846 


29 


185 


947 


770, 557 


1,210 


185, 174 


1,080 


69, 972 


1,379 


52,378 


1,432 


8,932 


1,024 


13, 382 


718 


146, 247 


347 


19, 591 


906 


177.811 


1,349 


13, 521 


727 


18,945 


760 


58,611 


483 


6,993 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



41 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and typo of farm 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



Classes III to VI 



Marketing costs, total: 

All farms 

Cash-Rrain farms 

Cotton farms , 

Other field-crop farms. 

Vegetable farms 

Frnit-and-nut farms... 



Dairy farms _ 

Poultry farms. ___ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop. _. 

General farms, primarily livestock _ 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms — 



Marketing containers: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms... 



Dairy farms.. _ 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock _ 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Trucking : 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms.... 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry.. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock., 

Miscellaneous farms 



Freight: 

All farms... 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms.. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms.... 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry- 
General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Other marketing costs: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms... 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms.. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry- 
General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Veterinarian services, medicines and disinfectants : 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms -- 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms.. - 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry.. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms.. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



1,060,727 

102, 3S6 
175,072 
72, 410 
80. 038 
125, 587 

173,916 
31,043 

177, 547 
31,957 
14, 099 
48, 561 
27,541 



138, 534 
2,493 
3,653 
17, 456 
34, 261 
43, 889 

3,806 
10, 067 
2,256 
9,856 



19. 545 
13, 709 
6,453 
7,538 

135, 827 
8,329 
82, 190 



36, K2s 
2,214 
2.255 
2,343 
1,644 
6,557 



3,268 



525,312 
55, 857 

149,619 
38, 902 
37,680 
67,603 

31,015 
12, 252 
81,324 
14, 730 

3,511 
23,551 

9,268 



192, 261 
20,928 
6,758 
4,340 
425 
1,238 

45,180 
21,876 
71,840 
1,440 
5,304 
12, 227 
705 



331 


623, 697 


187 


63, 944 


416 


106, 001 


284 


40, 273 


2,741 


66,024 


1,620 


103, 293 


297 


63, 474 


192 


19, 844 


239 


96, 736 


443 


27, 004 


212 


3,849 


230 


21, 533 


921 


21, 722 


43 


114, 072 


5 


1,177 


9 


3,313 


68 


15, 565 


1,173 


28,982 


566 


38, 511 


7 


2,423 


62 


6,006 


3 


1,262 


137 


9,482 


7 


103 


14 


2,145 


246 


5,103 


113 


159, 408 


77 


18, 478 


46 


11,078 


54 


6,097 


221 


4,442 


97 


4,016 


232 


45, 229 


62 


5,312 


111 


42,606 


101 


6,340 


155 


2,959 


103 


8,217 


162 


4,634 


12 


26, 991 


4 


1,283 


5 


2,205 


9 


2,247 


56 


650 


85 


3,714 


6 


1,073 


2 


375 


16 


10,250 



323. 226 
33, 006 
89, 405 
16,364 
31,950 
57, 052 

14, 749 
8,151 
42, 618 
11,110 



17, 408 
15, 333 
41,623 



955 


437, 030 


390 


48,412 


1,434 


69, 071 


1,766 


32, 137 


7, 336 


14,014 


4,268 


22, 294 


765 


110,442 


431 


11, 199 


529 


80,811 


1850 


4,953 


458 


10, 850 


655 


27, 028 


1957 


5,819 


175 


24,462 


9 


1,316 


45 


340 


683 


1,891 


3,220 


5,279 


1,591 


5,378 


29 


1,383 


131 


4,061 



200,645 
23, 314 
8,467 
7,612 
2,011 
3,522 



50 
96 

994 
2,843 

2,195 
20 

1,527 



495 


202, 086 


239 


22, 851 


1,210 


60, 214 


1,718 


22, 538 


3.550 


5,730 


2,358 


10, 551 


178 


16, 266 


177 


4,101 


233 


38, 706 


761 


3,620 


94 


2,724 


286 


12,444 


624 


2,341 


145 


97,838 


66 


11,820 


27 


4,757 


39 


3,452 


18 


260 


29 


535 


210 


27,772 


333 


6,543 


228 


30, 217 



42 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 





All farms 


Farms by economic class 


Item of expenditure and type of farm 


Classes 1 and II 


Classes III and IV 




Total (000 
dollars) 


Average per 
farm (dollars) 


Total (000 
dollars) 


Average per 
farm (dollars) 


Total (000 
dollars) 


Average per 
farm (dollars) 


Fees for grazing and pastnre : 


56, 545 

8,458 

1,150 

730 

228 

97 

10, 333 

287 

31, 578 

1,141 

787 

1,738 

18 

26, 382 
1, 654 
121 
310 
74 
92 

7,919 

2,126 

12,126 

87 

609 

1,219 

45 

232,430 
32, 204 
59,585 
25,282 
14, 540 
32, 097 

8,689 
3,045 
29,242 
14, 225 
1,186 
8,932 
3,403 

45, 651 
6,296 
2,750 
1,367 
98 
363 

8,040 

1,641 

21,933 

957 

476 

1,641 

89 

56, 867 
7,923 

13, 600 
3,481 
1,393 
7,155 

4,775 
1,167 
11,410 
3,522 
3 
2,399 
39 

253, 718 
40,504 
30, 304 
9,143 
5,944 
10, 927 

59, 121 
13, 369 
54,290 
8,406 
5,429 
13,432 
2,849 


18 
15 
3 
3 
8 
1 

18 
2 
43 
16 
11 
8 
1 

8 
3 
(Z) 

1 
3 
1 

14 
13 
16 
1 
9 
6 
2 

73 
59 
142 
99 
498 
414 

15 
19 
39 

197 
17 
42 

114 

14 
12 
7 
5 
3 
5 

14 
10 
30 
13 
7 
8 
3 

18 
15 
32 
14 
48 
92 

8 
7 
15 
49 
(Z) 
11 
1 

79 
74 
72 
36 
204 
141 

101 
S3 
73 

116 
78 
64 
95 


34, 611 
4,627 
719 
357 
228 
80 

6,053 
197 
20,619 
955 
64 
712 


53 
33 
10 
16 
25 
3 

73 

4 

113 

65 
8 

18 


21, 934 

3,831 

431 

373 






















17 

4,280 
90 
10, 959 
186 
723 
1,026 
18 

10, 333 
806 
83 
147 
74 
32 

3,139 
526 
4,517 
21 
231 
727 
30 

77, 227 
12,335 
14, 904 
9,972 
2,690 
8,685 

4,334 
1,051 
14, 755 
2,817 

868 
4,381 

435 

20,038 

3,584 

1,195 

626 

31 

94 

5,163 
945 

6,567 
301 

410 

1,097 

25 

16,062 
2,383 
1,861 
791 
866 
2,388 

2,312 
506 

3,725 
979 


(Z) 




























Miscellaneous livestock services : 6 


16,049 
848 
38 
163 


25 
6 
1 
7 


4 








(Z) 












60 

4,780 
1,600 
7,609 
66 
378 
492 
15 

155, 203 
19,869 
44,681 
15,310 
11,850 
23,412 

4,355 
1,994 
14,487 
11,408 
318 
4,551 
2,968 

25, 613 

2,712 

1,555 

741 

67 

269 

2,877 
696 
15, 366 
656 
66 
544 
64 

40, 805 
5,540 

11,739 

2,690 

527 

4,767 

2,463 

661 

7,685 

2,543 

3 

2,148 

39 

129, 969 
17,926 
26, 976 
5,988 
4,454 
7,007 

18.592 
8,475 

26, 357 
6,428 
1,226 
4,644 
1,896 


2 

58 
35 
42 

5 
45 
13 

1 

23S 
144 
605 
671 
1,317 
967 

52 
43 
79 

781 
38 
117 
267 

39 
20 
21 
32 

7 
11 

35 
15 
84 
45 

8 
14 

6 

63 
40 
159 
118 
59 
197 

30 
14 
42 
174 
(Z) 
55 
4 

199 
130 
365 
263 
495 
290 

224 
184 
144 
440 
146 
120 
171 


1 








5 




8 




(Z) 




4 




4 




2 


Pesticides: 


30 




30 




43 




43 




133 




163 




9 




9 




26 




49 




14 




25 




23 


Miscellaneous trucking not elsewhere included : 


8 




9 




3 




3 




2 




2 




10 




8 




12 




5 




7 




6 




1 


Irrigation charges : s 


6 




6 




5 




3 




43 




45 




5 




4 




7 




17 








251 


1 






Electricity, farm business share : 


123, 749 
22, 578 
3,328 
3,155 
1,490 
3,920 

40,529 
4,894 

27,933 
1,978 
4,203 
8,788 
953 


49 




55 




10 




14 




74 




74 




81 




42 




50 




34 




69 




51 


Miscellaneous farms 


51 



See footnotes at end of table. 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



43 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



Classes III to VI 



Telephone service, farm business share: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms. - 

Other field-crop farms _ _ 

Vegetables farms - 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms - 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop.. - 

General farms, primarily livestock __ — 

Genera] farms, crop and livestock. _ 

Miscellaneous farms 

Insurance premiums, net cost: 7 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms _ 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms — 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms . --- 

Poultry farms _ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

Genera] farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Premiums paid: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms - _ 

Vegetable farms - 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock _. 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Claims collected : 

All farms _ ___ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock.- 

General farms, crop and livestock.- 

Miscellaneous farms 

Miscellaneous farm business expenses not elsewhere included: B 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms _.. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry.. _ 

Genera! farms, primarily crop. 

General farms, primarily livestock 

Genera] farms, crop and livestock 

M iscellaneous farms 

All property taxes paid by operator: fl 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms _ 

Poultry farms _ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

See footnotes at end of table. 



68, 940 
11,912 
3,229 
2,993 
2,241 
2,979 

13,341 
3,395 

II',, 429 
1,383 
1,797 
3,982 
3,259 



205, 424 
51,545 
14,014 
9,373 
4,246 
12, 121 



4,218 
4,494 
14, 779 
3,863 



2s7, 375 
71, 252 
17, 204 
19,584 
4,269 
12, 620 

46,546 
11,620 
70, 670 
5,330 
5,726 
17, 708 



81,951 
19, 707 
3,190 



16,875 
3,469 

21,721 
1,112 
1,232 
2,929 



210, 5S1 
31,936 
15,234 
11,182 
4,088 
20,441 

37, 372 
6,604 

57,837 
3,713 
3,114 
8,479 

10, 581 



726, 119 
150,638 
31,018 
29,113 
13,600 
30, 450 

133,312 
24,035 

235,916 
13,225 
15,189 
40, 378 
9,245 



29, 487 
4,821 
1,936 
1,864 
889 
1,787 

3,918 

2,006 

7,578 

829 

265 



113,992 
27,883 
8,356 
8,502 
3,135 
9,338 

12, 357 
4,618 

27, 620 
2,867 
1,132 
4,326 



140, 104 
35, 963 
10. 403 
9,137 
3,158 
9,837 

16, 077 
6,889 

35,015 
3,059 
1,193 
5,381 
3,992 



26,112 
8.0S0 
2,047 



3,720 
2,271 
7,395 



121. 527 
16,549 
11, 366 
7,178 
2,464 
17, 250 

13, 717 
4,483 

32,346 
2,594 



320, 405 
62,159 
17,950 
14,976 
6,767 
20, 407 

37, 269 
12, 767 
119, 174 
6,765 
3,197 
13,158 
5,816 



37, 453 
7,091 
1,293 
1,129 
1,352 
1,192 

9,423 
1,389 
8,851 



91,432 

23, 6(12 
5,658 



17,314 
3,633 

21,329 
1,351 
3.362 

10, 453 



147, 271 
35, 289 
6,801 
10,447 
1,111 
2,783 

30. 469 
4,731 

35, 655 
2,271 
4,533 

12,327 
854 



55,839 
11,627 
1,143 
9,576 



89,054 
15,387 
3,868 
4,004 
1,624 
3,191 

23,655 
2,121 

25,491 
1,119 
2,179 
4,383 
2,032 



405, 714 
88,479 
13,068 
14, 137 
6,833 
10,043 

96,043 
11,268 
116,742 

6,460 
11,992 
27, 220 

3,429 



44 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Interest on debt secured by farm real estate : 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms... 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry _ 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock - 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Interest on debt not secured by farm real estate : 10 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms - 

Cotton farms — 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms ._ 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms .- 

Poultry farms - 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Purchase of hand tools, equipment and supplies, not elsewhere included 

All farms - 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms _ 

Fruit-and-nut farms _ _. 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General fnrms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

Fencing, repairs, and construction: " 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms _ 

Cotton farms _ 

Other field-crop farms _ 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms _._ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primaiily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock... _ 

Miscellaneous farms _ 

Farm buildings, construction : n I3 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms _ 

Vegetable farms. __ 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 

See footnotes at end of table. 



293, 957 
54,470 
21, 785 
14,440 
4,223 
10,345 

59,334 
15, 622 
85, 112 
4,493 
5,249 
15, 974 
2,910 



12, 750 
2,345 
2,957 

32, 721 
7,149 

74, 177 
5,377 
3,553 

11,952 
1,614 



213,712 
31, 701 
15, 999 
28,992 
5,462 
8,924 

38,454 



68, 22S 
3,042 
2,895 

11,352 



352, 345 
48, 145 
17, 085 
18,605 
9,775 
11,288 

82,119 
37, 700 
89, 605 
4,310 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



12,999 
6,300 
2,724 
6,093 



17, 584 
9,357 

40, 847 
2,263 



116,130 
16, 617 
14,239 
5, 692 
1,698 
2,037 

12,641 
5,742 

47,494 
2,733 



103, a33 
14, 759 
8,210 
18, 624 
1.820 



12, 363 
5,104 

22, 391 
5,126 
1,447 
5,551 
2,838 



66,560 
11,175 
4,357 
1,181 



165, 755 
23,262 
11,447 
6,778 
2,454 
7,9 

26,237 
22,011 
45,428 
2,505 



Classes III to VI 



165, 281 

33, 777 
8,786 
8,140 



41,750 
6,265 

44,265 
2, 230 



107,271 

23,311 

14,639 

7,058 

647 

920 

20,080 
1,407 

26, 683 
2,644 
2,863 
6,882 
137 



110.079 
16, 942 
7,789 
10, 368 
3,642 
3,524 

26, 091 
2,792 

23,537 
4,348 
2,248 
6,981 
1,817 



1,574 

18, 691 
2,757 

38, 362 
2,156 
2,140 
6, 685 



186, 590 
24,883 
5,638 
11, 827 
7,321 
3,325 

55, 882 
15, 689 
44,177 
1,805 
4,229 
11,188 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



45 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 





A 11 farms 


Farms by economic class 


Item of expenditure and type of farm 


Classes I and II 


Classes III to VI 




Total 
(000 dollars) 


Average per 
farm (dollars) 


Total 
(000 dollars) 


Average per 

farm ('lullnrs'j 


Total 
(000 dollars) 


Average per 
farm (dollars) 


Farm buildings, remodeling, repair, painting, etc.: ]I ta 


183, 967 
27,603 
8,799 
18, 273 
1,393 
2,785 

38, 785 
12,045 
47, 899 
4,101 
5,062 
10, 987 
6,235 

491, 168 
91,897 
63,764 
32, 929 
13,341 
23, 080 

50, 825 
11,657 
135, 790 
18, 601 
8,593 
29, 489 
11, 202 

821, 375 
194,928 
111,096 

46, 467 
6,568 

27, 836 

124, 178 
32, 422 

190, 450 
19, 104 
22, 634 
35, 343 
10,349 

1,210,252 
307, 995 
152, 781 
63, 681 
10, 673 
43, 958 

169, 745 
45, 746 

283, 271 
31,663 
32, 854 
52, 136 
15, 749 

388, 877 
113,067 
41, 685 
17,214 
4,105 
16, 122 

45, 567 
13,324 
92, 821 
12, 559 
10, 220 
16, 793 
5,400 


57 
51 
21 
72 
48 
36 

66 
75 
65 
57 
73 
52 
209 

153 
168 
151 
129 
457 
298 

87 
72 
183 
258 
124 
139 
375 

257 
357 
264 
182 
225 
359 

212 
201 
257 
265 
327 
167 
346 

378 
564 
363 
249 
366 
567 

290 
283 
382 
439 
475 
247 
527 

122 
207 
99 
67 
141 
208 

78 
83 
125 
174 
148 
79 
181 


89, 975 
14, 048 
4, 658 
10,114 
1,083 
2,055 

12, 835 
8,902 

23,651 
1,696 
1,737 
3,931 
5,265 

269, 377 
53, 167 
40, 219 
19,909 
9,216 
16,004 

23,210 
7,115 
64, 870 

13, 587 
2,833 

11,010 
8,238 

317,370 
82, 739 
38, 191 
9,400 
4,082 
15, 712 

33,684 
17,670 
86, 324 
7,957 
4,942 
11,517 
5,152 

490, 392 
133, 983 
61,356 
13, 567 
6,022 
24,476 

50, 945 
25, 453 
132, 993 
11, 799 

6,678 
15,832 

7,288 

173, 022 
61, 244 
23, 165 
4,167 
1,940 
8,764 

17, 261 
7,783 

46, 669 
3,842 
1,736 
4,315 
2,136 


138 
102 

63 
444 
120 

85 

155 
194 
129 
116 
207 
101 
474 

413 
385 
644 
873 
1,024 
661 

280 
155 
355 
931 
337 
284 
742 

486 
599 
517 
412 
454 
649 

406 
384 
472 
645 
688 
297 
464 

751 
969 
830 
595 
669 
1,011 

614 
553 
728 
808 
795 
408 
657 

265 
371 
313 
183 
216 
362 

208 
169 
255 
263 
207 
111 
192 


93, 992 
13, 555 
4,141 
8,159 
310 
730 

25. 950 
3,143 

24,248 
2, 405 
3,325 
7,056 
970 

221, 791 
38. 730 
23, 545 

13, 020 
4,126 
7,076 

27,615 
4,542 

70, 920 
5,014 
6,760 

18, 479 
2,964 

504, 005 
112,189 
72, 905 
37, 067 
2,486 
12,124 

90, 494 

14, 752 
104, 126 

11,147 

17, 692 
23,826 

6,197 

719, 860 
174,012 
91,425 
50, 114 
4,651 
19,482 

118, 800 
20,293 

150, 278 
19,864 
26. 176 
36, 304 
8,461 

215,855 
61,823 

18, 520 
13, 047 

2,165 
7,358 

28, 306 
5,541 

46, 152 
8,717 
8,484 

12, 478 
3,264 


37 




33 




12 




35 




15 




14 




52 




27 




43 




42 




65 




41 




52 


Other improvements: " 


87 




95 




68 




56 




204 




133 




55 




39 




127 




87 




95 




107 




158 


Automobiles purchased (new and used), net cost: 13 


198 




275 




210 




159 




123 




227 




180 




128 




186 




194 




291 




138 




276 


Purchase cost : •* 


283 




426 




263 




215 




230 




366 




237 




176 




269 




345 




431 




210 




450 


Value of automobiles traded or sold : 


85 




151 




53 




66 




107 




138 




56 




48 




83 




151 




140 




72 




174 



See footnotes at end of table. 



46 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures — Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Motortrucks purchased (new and used) net cost: 13 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms.-- _ 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry- 
General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock , 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Purchase cost : » 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms- 
Vegetable farms __. 

Fruit-and-nut farms.... 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Value of motortrucks traded or sold: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms ___ 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms """""""" 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Tractors purchased (new and used) net cost : 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms . 

Cotton farms "2 

Other field-crop farms I_ ZZZZZZZZZ 

Vegetable farms _ 

Fruit-and-nut farms 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms. ™I~~™ 

Livestock farms other than dairy and" poultry- 
General farms, primarily crop __ 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock. 

Miscellaneous farms 



Purchase cost: '* 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms.. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms.... 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms !.""! 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry- 
General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock , 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Value of tractors traded in or sold : 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms.. _ 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms _. 



Dairy farms 

Poultry farms ZIZZ. 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 1 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



Total 
(000 dollars) 



304, 375 
72,233 
38, 176 
27,744 
3,834 
12,264 

45, 741 
9,030 

70,230 
7,566 



417,814 
98, 337 
55, 341 
36,367 
6,301 
14, 120 

61, 791 
12, 716 

96, 787 
11, 795 



113,439 
26,104 
17,165 



Set footnotes at end of table. 



29, 810 
4,052 

68, 852 
4,762 
2,664 

17, 862 
2,405 



Farms by economic class 



Classes I and II 



Total 
(000 dollars) 



(Z) 



124, 907 
32, 008 
15,349 
8,123 



10, 925 
6,253 

32,647 
3,521 
465 
3,818 
3,367 



168, 819 
44,978 
22, 046 
10, 330 
2,031 
8,106 

13,543 
8,274 

45, 034 
4,234 



34, 249 
9,347 
5,342 
9,467 

27,987 
7,447 

66, 661 
9,496 
3,483 

16, 508 
2,132 



391, 663 
123, 625 
47, 002 
12,111 
7,161 
11, 942 

39, 600 
9,981 

97, 486 

12,003 
4,901 

22, 937 
2,914 



113,136 
37,217 
12, 753 
2,764 
1,819 
2,475 

11, 613 
2,534 

30, 825 
2,507 
1,418 
6,429 
782 



Classes III to VI 



Total 
(000 dollars) 



179, 468 
40, 225 
22, 827 
19, 621 
2,475 
5,192 

34,816 
2,777 

37, 583 
4,045 



24S, 995 
53, 359 
33, 295 
26, 037 
4,270 
6,014 

48, 248 
4,442 

51,753 
7,561 



69,527 
13, 134 
10, 468 
6,416 
1,795 
822 

13,432 
1,665 

14, 170 
3,516 



362, 643 
87, 136 
45, 434 
32, 052 
2,215 
2,375 

75, 328 
5,531 
70,284 
10,900 



499, 245 
126, 196 
61, 473 
38, 501 
2,215 
3,130 

93, 525 

7,049 

108,311 

13, 155 
6,930 

33, 022 
5,738 



136, 602 
39, 060 
16, 039 
6,449 



755 

18, 197 
1,518 

38, 027 
2,235 
1,246 

11,433 
1,623 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



47 



Table 5. — Farm Production Expenditures— Total Expenditures and Average Expenditure per Farm for Selected Groups of 
Expenditures for Commercial Farms, by Economic Class of Farm, by Type of Farm, for the United States: 1955 — Con. 



Item of expenditure and type of farm 



Total Average per 

(000 dollars) farm (dollars) 



Farm? by economic class 



Classes I and II 



Totnl Average per Total Average per 

(000 dollars) farm (dollars) (000 dollars) farm (dollars) 



Classes III to VI 



Machinery and implements (excluding automobiles, motortrucks, and tractors) purchased 
net cost : 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms _ 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms. 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms _ 

Dairy farms... 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms . 

Purchase cost: 1 * 

All farms ___ _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms _ 

Vegetable farms _ 

Frult-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

Geneial farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms _. 

Value of machinery traded in or eold: 

All farms _ 

Cash-grain farms 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry 

General farms, primarily crop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock. 

Miscellaneous farms 

livestock equipment: 

All farms 

Cash-grain farms ___ 

Cotton farms 

Other field-crop farms 

Vegetable farms 

Fruit-and-nut farms _ _ 

Dairy farms 

Poultry farms 

Livestock farms other than dairy and poultry. 

General farms, primal ily ciop 

General farms, primarily livestock 

General farms, crop and livestock 

Miscellaneous farms 



1,195,618 
315,713 
107. 540 



2ir:. cur, 
23, 358 

272, 220 
28, 454 
28,144 
79, 186 
4,380 



1,413,074 
376, 697 
117,365 
60, 205 
7,494 
39, 332 

291,807 
27, 246 

331, 896 
31,608 
32,817 
91,622 
4,985 



217, 456 
60. 984 
9,825 
11,019 



48, 201 
3,888 

69, 670 
3,154 
4,673 

12, 436 
605 



121, 089 

13, 344 

3,925 

3,191 

292 

752 

33, 551 
21, 394 
32, 668 
1,047 
3,462 
7,109 
354 



636. 820 
135. 652 
61.496 
20.934 
4,899 
16, 080 

91, 879 
15. 523 
132. 685 
19, 139 
7,463 
28, 482 



25, 712 
5,344 
18, 242 

108. 784 
17,554 

168. 045 
20. 937 



113,699 
36. 216 
6,777 
4,778 



16. 905 
2,031 
35.360 



55. SOS 
5,647 
1,842 



12. 666 
13.674 
16, 697 



822 


658, 798 


982 


180, 061 


832 


46, 044 


918 


28,252 


544 


2,093 


664 


20, 753 


1,107 


151,727 


337 


7,835 


726 


139, 541 


1,311 


9,315 


888 


20,681 


734 


60,704 


233 


1,792 


996 


762, 555 


1,244 


204. 829 


924 


49, 092 


1,128 


34, 493 


594 


2,150 


754 


21,090 


1,311 


183, 023 


382 


9.692 


919 


163, 851 


1,434 


10. 671 


1,059 


23,919 


868 


67. 931 


286 


1,814 


174 


103, 757 


262 


24, 768 


92 


3,048 


210 


6,241 


49 


57 


89 


337 


204 


31,296 


44 


1,857 


193 


24,310 


123 


1,356 


171 


3,238 


134 


7,227 



20, 8S5 
7,720 
15, 971 



Z Total expenditures $500 or less; average per farm $0.50 or less. 

i Estimated value; excludes home consumption of family workers living at home. 

'Includes farm food products, feed for livestock, firewood, laundry services, and 
any other goods or services furnished as pay to hired workers. 

3 Expenditures minus tax refunds. Includes expenditures attributable to uses other 
than farm business. 

* Includes repairs, replacement parts, and accessories, but does not include registration 
fees, and Insurance on vehicles. Includes expenditures attributable to uses other than 
farm business. 

a Includes cow testing, breeding fees, livestock registration, sheep shearing, and 
miscellaneous services. 

• Charges for water furnished by multiple-unit enterprises (enterprises serving four 
or more farms). 



1 Insurance on property (other than motor vehicles), growing crops, employees, and 
liability (other than on motor vehicles). Premiums paid by operator minus claims 
collected. Includes insurance attributable to family living expenses. 

8 Management services, record keeping, legal fees, dues, advertising expenses, etc. 

9 Includes some property taxes on furniture and other household goods attributable 
to family living expenses. 

i° Includes Interest on debt contracted for family living expenses. 

" Excludes expenditures by landlords. 

13 Excludes operator's dwelling except for multiunit tenant farms. 

13 Purchase cost minus value of trade-in and sales. Includes expenditures attribu- 
table to uses other than farm business. 

» Includes sales tax, financing charges, and prices before subtracting trade-in 
allowances. 



48 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



Table 6. — Farm Expenditures — Expenditures for the Pur' 
chase and operation of automobiles and trucks, as 
Calculated From the Survey of Family Living Expenditures; 
for the United States: 1955 l 



Autos and motortrucks 

Purchased, net cost _ -. 

Upkeep and running expense _-. 

Autos, total _ 

Purchased, net cost 

Upkeep and running expense, total 

Gasoline.. _ _ 

Motor oil - ■ 

Tires, including recapping 

Inner tubes 

Tire chains 

Anti-freeze. 

Batteries.-- 

Sparkplugs 

Lubrication jobs 

Brake adjustments 

Brake relining 

Other parts, services, and repairs. 

Unitemized expenses. _ 

Registration and license fees 

Insurance.. 

Gifts of auto and truck accessories 
and supplies 

Motortrucks, total ._ 

Purchased, net cost.. 

Upkeep and running expenses, total.. 

Gasoline-.- 

Motor oil 

Tires, including recapping 

Inner tubes 

Tire chains 

Anti-freeze 

Batteries- _ 

Spark plugs 

Lubrication jobs 

Brake adjustments- 

Brake relining 

Other parts, services, and repairs. 

Unitemized expenses 

Registration and license fees 

Insurance 



3, 882, 925 
1, 599, 571 
2,283,354 

2, 639, 791 
1,220,616 
1,419,175 



Total expenditures 



Total, all 
families 
(000 dol- 
lars) 



31,163 

3,268 

8,403 

140, 939 

24,342 
64,445 
199, 440 



1, 243, 134 
378, 955 
864, 179 

401, 762 
34, 722 
90, 492 



10, 051 
16,160 
5,306 
13, 403 



104, 572 
23,676 
61,005 
89,258 



Economic class of farm 



I and II 
(000 dol- 
lars) 



981,129 
423, 229 
557, 600 



140,217 
11,892 
29,136 
1,055 



10,063 
14,815 
43, 901 



105,317 
8,706 
25,921 



721 

1,444 
38, 974 
15,504 
20, 381 
28,911 



III to V 
(000 dol- 
lars) 



1,132,812 
477, 699 
655, 113 

321,707 
28,447 
66, 650 
3,196 



7,812 
10,824 
3,976 

14,490 
1,376 
3,531 

61,784 

5,511 
31,044 
93,285 



564, 186 
168, 975 
395,211 

193, 036 
17,273 
38,071 
2,030 



3,473 
27, 801 
41,805 



VI to 
VIII (000 
dollars) 



1, 204, 799 
529, 669 
675, 130 



232, 056 
19, 782 
42, 167 



5,079 
7,592 
2,496 



8,768 
18,585 
62,254 



317,861 
108,185 
209, 676 

103,409 
8,743 
26, 501 
1,625 



603 

2,185 
18, 970 

4,699 
12,823 
18,541 



i The data given in this table represent the total expenditures for the purchase and 
operation of automobiles and trucks; the share allocated as part of the expenditures 
for the farm operator's family is given in table 2. 



Table 7- — Farm Expenditures — Expenditures for the Pur' 
chase and Operation of Automobiles and Trucks, as 
Calculated From the Survey of Farm Production Ex' 
penditures; for the United States: 1955 ' 



Autos and motortrucks 

Purchased, net cost _ 

Upkeep and running expense 3 

Insurance claims collected 

Autos, total 

Purchased, net cost-. 

Upkeep and running expenses, total.. . 

Gasoline 

Motor oil __ 

Tires, including recapping 

Inner tubes 

Tire chains 

Anti-freeze 

Batteries- 

Spark plugs.. 

Lubrication jobs 

Brake adjustments. 

Brake relining 

Other parts, services and repairs 

Unitemized expenses 

Registration and license fees 

Insurance 

Motortrucks, total __ 

Purchased, net cost 

Upkeep and running expenses, total.. . 

Gasoline 

Motor oil 

Tires, including recapping 

Inner tubes.. _ 

Tire chains 

Anti-freeze 

Batteries 

Spark plugs 

Lubrication jobs.. 

Brake adjustments _ 

Brake relining 

Other parts, services, and repairs.. 

Unitemized expenses 

Registration and license fees 

Insurance.. 



Total expenditures 



Total, all 
farms 

(000 dol- 
lars) 



3, 688, 460 

1,468,797 

2,219,663 

21,848 



649,953 

50.158 

144, 596 

7,324 



32, 302 

3,058 

8,766 

156, 012 

18, 691 
57, 492 
189, 779 

1, 239, 807 
363, 524 
876, 283 

385,961 
31,845 
92, 367 
4,783 
1,220 

11,999 
15, 360 
6,042 
13, 396 



6,648 
128, 343 
19, 396 
64,526 
93, 111 



Economic class of farm 



I and II 

(000 dol- 
lars) 



1, 028, 844 
441,982 
586,862 
10, 225 

627, 491 
317,076 
310,415 

138, 106 
10, 389 
30, 034 
1,252 



3,021 
4,019 
1,596 



13,966 
14,293 
45,863 

411, 678 
124, 906 
286, 672 

108,952 
8,632 
27, 701 
1,291 



2,975 
4,318 
1,487 
3,483 



2,005 
48, 943 
16,683 
24, 173 
35, 022 



III to V 
(000 dol- 
lars) 



1, 666, 875 

630, 057 

1,036,318 



1,116,900 
462, 777 
654, 123 

310, 159 
22,337 
69,747 
3,659 



4,184 
28,070 
90, 987 

659, 434 
167. 280 
392, 154 

176, 207 
13, 552 
42,764 
2,062 



4,765 
7,478 
2,253 
6,131 
960 

3,169 
60, 802 

2,438 
28,409 
40,635 



VI to 
VIII (000 
dollars) 



993,241 

396, 758 

596, 483 

1,664 

728, 110 
325,420 
400, 690 

201, 688 
17, 432 
44,815 
2,413 



4,800 
7,032 
2,409 



268, 795 
71,338 
197, 457 

100, 802 
9,661 
21,902 
1,430 



4,259 
3,564 
1,302 
3,782 



1 The data given in this table represent the total expenditures for the purchase and 
operation of automobiles and trucks; the share allocated as a part of the expenditures 
for the operation for the farm business is given in table 4. 

* Expenditures minus insurance claims collected. 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



49 



Table 8.- 



-Off'Farm Income of Farm-Operator Families by Source of Income, by Class of Farm, Aggregate for the United 

States: 1955 





United 

States 

(000 

dollars) 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Source of Income 


Total 

(000 

dollars) 


Class I 

(000 
dollars) 


Class II 

(000 
dollars) 


Total 

(000 

dollars) 


Class III 

(000 
dollars) 


Class IV 

(000 
dollars) 


Class V 

(000 
dollars) 


Total 

(000 

dollars) 


Class VI 

(000 
dollars) 


Part-time 

(000 

dollars) 


Residen- 
tial (000 
dollars) 


Total off-farm Income of farm-operator families: 

Total from all sources 

Total farm income (except this farm) 


8, 006, 472 
1,066,728 
6, 939, 744 

1, 267, 414 
205, 521 
65, 485 
996, 403 

3, 423, 210 

229, 593 

3, 193, 617 

455, 880 
173,014 
53,183 

450, 052 
189, 832 

325, 559 
45, 480 

828, 916 
22, 401 
806, 614 

793, 932 
87,848 
706,084 


1,009.530 
343, 918 
665, 612 

243, 624 

81,366 

7,819 

164, 339 

236, 129 
91, 972 
144, 167 

126, 153 
24,460 
4,205 

150, 927 
11,749 

8,766 
6,967 

83,159 
3,145 
80,015 

113,490 
33,463 
80, 027 


392, 575 
170, 731 
221,844 

121,617 
46, 415 


616. 956 
173, 188 
443, 768 

121,907 
34, 951 
7,819 
79, 137 

141, 122 

30, 938 
110, 184 

70, 445 
14,889 
3,006 

93,388 
10,074 

7,480 
4,559 

69, 872 
2,994 
56, 877 

90. 213 
26,039 
64,174 


2. 876, 423 

447,077 

2, 429, 347 

462, 309 
110, 074 
29,258 
322, 977 

1, 043, 567 
68, 876 
974, 691 

200, 064 
73, 279 
20, 032 

212, 789 
77, 955 

64,420 
25, 499 

350, 153 
11,731 
338, 422 

356, 355 
27, 073 
329, 282 


835,290 
179,116 
656, 175 

122, 460 
48, 268 
6,008 
69, 185 

202, 809 
20, 155 
182, 656 

90.920 
32, 420 
7,443 

114,943 
25, 212 

8,270 
5,948 

93,715 
3.391 
90, 325 

131, 150 
11,376 
119, 775 


1,008,824 
151,107 
857, 717 

175, 042 
31,483 
13, 523 

130, 036 

360, 0361 
27. 396 
332,640 

63,296 
22, 395 
6,288 

68,839 
22, 596 

15,410 
12, 437 

154, 278 

6,952 

147, 326 

108, 207 
8,467 
99,750 


1,032,303 
116,856 
916, 454 

164, 807 
30.323 
10,727 

123, 756 

430, 722 
21,326 
459, 396 

45, 848 
18, 465 
6,300 

29,007 
30,148 

30, 740 
7,114 

102, 160 

1,389 

100, 771 

116,998 

7,241 

109, 757 


4,120,518 

276, 733 

3, 844, 785 

561, 581 
14,081 
28,408 

619, 092 

2, 143, 514 

68, 745 

2, 074, 769 

129, 6P3 
75,274 
28,946 

86, 336 
100, 128 

262, 372 
13,015 

395, 603 

7,626 

388, 078 

324. 087 
27,311 
296, 776 


390, 731 
64,056 
326, 676 

43, 676 
3,557 
2,852 

37, 267 

82, 325 
12. 778 
69, 547 

32. 070 
6,120 
2,336 

6,330 

26,378 

43, 704 
3,118 

62, 909 
4.996 
67, 912 

83,766 
7,802 
75, 964 


1, 683. 006 

99,247 

1, 5K3, 769 

201,682 
7,249 
6,141 

248, 292 

922, 179 
27, 029 
895, 150 

49,160 
44.323 
13, 278 

17, 025 
27, 908 

77, 956 
3,795 

173, 672 

830 

172, 842 

92, 028 
8,837 
83, 191 


2,046,781 

112,430 

1,934,351 


Income received by farm operator: 
Income from off-farm business or self-em- 


256, 224 




3,275 




19,416 




75,202 

95, 006 
61,034 
33, 973 

56, 708 
9,572 
1,200 

57,538 
1,675 

1,286 
2,408 

23,287 

150 

23,137 

23,277 
7,424 
15,853 


233,534 


Income from working for others for wages or 


1, 139, 009 




28,938 




1,110,072 


Income from rental of farm real estate 

Income from rental of nonfarm real estate. - 


48, 433 
25. 831 
13, 331 


Income from interest, dividends, trust 


63,981 


Income from veteran's pensions and com- 
pensation, veteran's school allotment. 


45,843 


Income from retirement pay, unemploy- 
ment compensation, old ape pension, an- 
nuities, alimony, regular contributions, or 


140, 713 


Any other personal income 


6,102 
159, 023 




1,699 




167, 324 


Income received by other family members 


148, 293 
10, 671 




137, 622 







Table 9. — Percent Distribution of Off-Farm Income of Farm-Operator Families From Each Source of Income, by Class of 

Farm, for the United States: 1955 





United 
States 


Group I 


Group II 


Group III 


Source of income 


Total 


Class I 


Class II 


Total 


Class III 


Class IV 


Class V 


Total 


Class VI 


Part- 
time 


Resi- 
dential 


Total off-farm Income of farm-operator families: 


100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 


12.6 
32.2 
9.6 

19.2 
39.6 
11.9 
15.5 

6.9 
40.1 
4.5 

27.7 
14.1 

7.9 

33.6 
6.2 

2.7 
15.3 

10.0 
14.0 
9.9 

14.3 
38.1 
11.3 


4.9 
16.0 
3.2 

9.6 
22.6 


7.7 
16.2 

6.4 

9.6 
17.0 
11.9 

7.9 

4.1 
13.6 
3.6 

15.5 
8.6 
5.7 

20.8 
5.3 

2.3 

10.0 

7.2 
13.4 
7.1 

11.4 
29.6 
9.1 


35.9 
41.9 
35.0 

36.5 
63.6 
44.7 
32.4 

30.5 
30.0 
30.5 

43.9 
42.4 
37.7 

47.3 
41.1 

16.7 
56.1 

42.2 
52.4 
42.0 

44.9 
30.8 
46.6 


10.4 
16.8 
9.5 

9.7 
23.6 
7.6 

6.9 

5.9 
8.8 
5.7 

19.9 
18.7 
14.0 

25.5 
13.3 

2.6 
13.1 

11.3 
15.1 
11.2 

16.5 
12.9 
17.0 


12.6 
14.2 

12.4 

13.8 
15.3 
20.7 
13.1 

10.5 
11.9 
10.4 

13.9 
12.9 
11.8 

15.3 
11.9 

4.7 
27.3 

18.6 
31.0 
18.3 

13.6 
9.6 
14.1 


12.9 
11.0 
13.2 

13.0 
14.8 
16.4 
12.4 

14.0 
9.3 

14.4 

10.1 
10.7 
11.8 

6.4 

15.9 

9.4 
15.6 

12.3 
6.2 

12.6 

14.7 
8.2 

15.5 


61.5 
25.8 
55.4 

44.3 
6.9 
43.4 

62.1 

62.6 

29.9 
65.0 

28.4 
43.5 
54.4 

19.2 

52.7 

80.6 
23.6 

47.7 
33 6 
48.1 

40.8 
31.1 
42.0 


4.9 
6.0 
4.7 

3.4 
1.7 
4.4 
3.7 

2.4 
5.6 
2.2 

7.0 
3.0 
4.4 

1.2 
13.9 

13.4 
6.9 

7.6 
22.3 
7.2 

10.6 
8 9 
10.8 


21.0 
9.3 
22.8 

20.6 
3.5 
9.4 

24.9 

26.9 
11.8 
28.0 

10.8 
25.6 
25.0 

3.8 
14.7 

23.9 
8.3 

21.0 
3.7 
21.4 

11.6 
10.1 
11.8 


25.6 


Total farm income (except this farm) 


10.5 
27.9 


Income received by farm operator: 

Income from off-farm business or self-em- 


20.2 




1.6 




29.6 




7.5 

2.8 
26.6 
1.1 

12.2 
5.6 
2.3 

12.8 
.9 

.4 
5.3 

2.8 
.7 
2.9 

2.9 
8.5 
2.2 


23.4 


Income from working for others for wages 


33.3 




12.6 




34.8 


Income from rental of farm real estate 

Income from rental of nonfarm real estate- 
Income from roomers and boarders 

Income from interest, dividends, trust 


10.6 
14.9 
25.1 

14.2 


Income from veteran's pensions and com- 
pensation, veteran's school allotment, 


24.1 


Income from retirement pay, unemploy- 
ment compensation, old age pension, 
annuities, alimony, regular contrlbu- 


43.2 




13.4 




IS. 2 




7.6 




19.6 


Income received by other family members 


18.7 
12.1 




19. S 







50 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 10. — Average Off-Farm Income per Farm-Operator Family by Source of Income, by Class of Farm, for the United 

States: 1955 



Source of income 



United 
States 
(dollars) 



Class I 
(dollars) 



Part- 
time 
(dollars) 



Resi- 
dential 
(dollars) 



Average off-farm income of farm-operator families: 

Total from all sources 

Total farm income (except this farm) 

Total nonfarm income 

Income received by farm operator: 

Income from off-farm business or self-em- 
ployment 

Farm custom work___ 

Farm trucking and hauling 

Nonfarm business 

Income from working for others for wages 

or salary 

Farm work 

Nonfarm work 

Income from rental of farm real estate 

Income from rental of nonfarm real estate- 
Income from roomers and boarders 

Income from interest, dividends, trust 

funds, or royalties 

Income from veteran's pensions and com- 
pensation, veteran's school allotment, 

serviceman's family allotment 

Income from retirement pay, unemploy- 
ment compensation, old age pension, 
annuities, alimony, regular contribu- 
tions, or welfare received 

Any other personal income 

Income received by wife 

From farm sources 

From nonfarm sources 

Income received by other family members 

From farm sources 

From nonfarm sources 



1,682 

224 

1,458 



2,779 
1,209 
1,571 



1,102 

35 

1,067 



1,496 

44 

1,452 



Table 11.- 



-Percent Distribution of Off-Farm Income of Farm-Operator Families by Source of Income, by Class of Farm, for 

the United States: 1955 



Source of income 



Group I 



Total Class I 



Total off -farm Income of farm-operator families: 

Total from all sources 

Total farm Income (except this farm) 

Total nonfarm income 

Income received by farm operator: 

Income from off-farm business or self-em- 
ployment 

Farm custom work 

Farm trucking and hauling 

Nonfarm business 

Income from working for others for wages 

or salary 

Farm work 

Nonfarm work 

Income from rental of farm real estate 

Income from rental of nonfarm real estate 

Income from roomers and boarders 

Income from Interest, dividends, trust 

funds, or royalties 

Income from veteran's pensions and com- 
pensation, veteran's school allotment, 

serviceman's family allotment _-. 

Income from retirement pay, unemploy- 
ment compensation, old age pension, 
annuities, alimony, regular contribu- 
tions or welfare received 

Any other personal income 

Income received by wife 

From farm sources 

From nonfarm sources „. 

Income received by other family members 

From farm sources 

From nonfarm sources 



100.0 
34.1 
65.9 



24.1 
8.1 
0.8 

15.3 

23.4 
9.1 
14.3 

12.5 



100.0 
28.1 
71.9 



100.0 
15.6 
84.5 



100.0 
21.4 
78.6 



100.0 
15.0 
85.0 



52.0 
1.7 
50.4 



21.1 
3.3 
17.8 



54.8 
1.6 
53.2 



10.3 
(Z) 
10.3 



Z 0.05 percent or less 



FARMERS 1 EXPENDITURES 



51 



Table 12.- 



-Average Off'Farm Income per Farm-Operator Family Receiving the Specified Income, by Source of Income, by 
Class of Farm, for the United States: 1955 



Source of income 



Average off-farm income per farm-operator 
family receiving the specified income: 
Income received by farm operator: 
Income from off-farm business or self-employ- 
ment: 

Farm custom work 

Farm trucking or hauling 

Nonfarm business 

Income from working for others for wages or 
salary: 

Farm work 

Nonfarm work 

Income from rental of farm real estate 

Income from rental of nonfarm real estate 

Income from roomers and boarders 

Income from interest, dividends, a trust fund, 
or royalties _ ___ 

Income from veteran's pensions and compen- 
sation, veteran's school allotment, service- 
man's family allotment 

Income from retirement pay, unemployment 
compensation, old age pension, annuities, 
alimony, regular contributions, or welfare 
received. 

Any other personal Income 

Income received by wife: 

From farm work 

From nonfarm work 

Income received by other family members: 

From farm work 

From nonfarm work 



United 

States, 

t tal 

(dollars) 



1,089 

981 

3, 3U0 



Group I 



Class I 
(dollars) 



Group III 



Total 
(dollars) 



Part- 
time 
(dollars) 



Resi- 
dential 
(dollars) 



704 
466 

111 
1,036 

195 

1,197 



Table 13. — Farm Operators by Age, Number of Persons in 
Family, Education, and Family Money Income After 
Taxes, for the United States: 1955 



Farm operators by age: 

Total operators ... 

Under 35 years 

35 to 64 years... _ , 

65 years and over 

Farm operators by number of persons In family: 

Total operators 

1.9 persons or less 

2.0 to 4.9 persons _ 

5.0 to 5.9 persons _ 

6.0 or more persons 

Farm operators by education: 

Total operators _._ 

Not completing eighth grade __ 

Completing eighth grade but not completing high school 

Completing high school ___ _. 

Operators not reporting as to education 

Farm operators by family money Income after taxes: 

Total operators. 

Negative income 

$0 to $999 _ 

$1,000 to $1,999.. _ 

$2,000 to $2,999 

$3,000 to $3,999 

$4,000 to $4,999 _ 

$5,000 to $5,999 _ _ 

$6,000 to $7,499.. 

$7,500 to $'.1,999 _ 

$10,000 and over 

Operators not reporting family Income 



United 
States, 
total 



4, 760, 050 
613,801 

3, 209, 546 
936, 703 



4, 760, 050 
244, 520 

3, 126, 786 
673, 472 
815, 272 



4, 760, 050 
1,535,263 
2, 083, 240 
1,081.407 
60, 140 



4, 760, 050 

189, 133 

1,031,746 

1,003.694 

840, 136 

605, 229 

322, 017 
212, 970 
137, 102 
90, 835 
85, 550 
241,638 



Table 14. — Percent Distribution of Farm Operators by Age, 
Number of Persons in Family, Education, and Family 
Money Income After Taxes, for the United States: 1955 



Farm operators by age: 

Total 

Under 35 years _ 

35 to 64 years __ 

65 years and over 

Farm operators by number of persons In family: 

Total 

1.9 persons or less 

2.0 to 4.9 persons.. 

5.0 to 5.9 persons 

6.0 or more persons.. 

Farm operators by education: 

Total 

Not completing eighth grade 

Completing eighth grade but not completing high school 

Completing high school 

Operators not reporting as to education 

Farm operator by tamlly money Income after taxes: 

Total _ _ 

Negative Income 

$0 to $999 _ 

$1,000 to $1,999 

$2,000 to $2,999 

$3,000 to $3,999 

$4,000 to $4,999 _ _ _ 

$5,000 to $5,999 

$6,000 to $7,499 _ 

$7,500 to $9,999.. _ 

$10,000 and over.. 

Operators not reporting , 



United 
States, 
total 



100.0 
12.9 
67.4 
19.7 



65.7 
12.0 
17.1 



100.0 
32.3 
43.8 
22.7 



21.7 
21.1 
17.6 
12.7 



52 



FARMERS' EXPENDITURES 



Table 15. — Farm Operators of Class VI, Part'Time, and Residential Farms, By Age, Number of Persons in Family, 
Education, and Family Money Income After Taxes, for the United States: 1955 



Farm operators by age: 

Total operators 

Under 35 years 

35 to 64 years 

65 years and over 

Farm operators by number of persons in 
family: 

Total operators 

1.9 persons or less 

2.0 to 4.9 persons 

5.0 to 5.9 persons 

6.0 or more persons 

Farm operators by education: 

Total operators 

Not completing eighth grade 

Completing eighth grade but not 

completing high school 

Completing high school 

Operators not reporting as to 
education _ 



part- 
time, 
and 
residen- 



1, 944, 357 
204, 971 

1, 180, 754 
558, 632 



1, 944, 357 
144,410 

1, 249, 306 
193, 117 
357, 524 



468, 350 
24, 473 
260, 167 
183, 710 



468, 350 
37, 563 

309, 777 
43, 352 
77, 658 



Part- 
time 
farms 



616, 571 
30,830 

399, 713 
64, 143 

121, 885 



Resi- 
dential 
farms 



Farm operators by family money income 
after taxes: 

Total operators 

Negative income 



$10,000 and over 

Operators not reporting family 
income 



VI, 
part- 
time, 
and 
residen- 
tial 
farms 



Part- 
time 
farms 



5,708 
30,887 



Resi- 
dential 
farms 



138, 161 
130, 021 

67, 474 
43,901 



4,128 
49,530 



Table 16. — Percent Distribution by Economic Class of Farm 
of Operators of Class VI, Part-Time, and Residential 
Farms, by Age, Number of Persons in Family, Education, 
and Family Money Income After Taxes, for the United 
States: 1955 



Farm operators by age: 

Total operators _ 

Under 35 years 

35 to 64 years._ 

65 and over 

Farm operators by number of persons in family: 

Total operators 

1.9 persons or less 

2.0 to 4.9 persons 

5.0 to 5.9 persons 

6.0 or more persons . 

Farm operators by education: 

Total. _ 

Not completing eighth grade 

Compli'tinj eighth tirade but not complet- 
ing high school 

Completing high school 

Operators not reporting as to education.. 



Farm operators by family money income after 

Total. __ 

Negative Income 

$0 to $999 

$1,000 to $1,999... _ 

$2,000 to $2,999. 

$3,000 to $3,999 _ _ 

$4,000 to $4,999 

$5,000 to $5,999 

$6,000 to $7,499.. 

$7,500 to $9,999 

$10,000 and over 

Operators not reporting 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



11.9 
22.0 
32.9 



24.1 
26.0 
24.8 
22.4 
21.7 



22.9 
13.6 
20.6 



26.4 
18.8 
10.1 



31.7 
42.3 
35.6 
19.6 



31.7 
21.3 
32.0 
33.2 
34.1 



32.9 
44.3 
30.4 



31.7 
43.8 
19.1 
33.0 
32.1 
30.2 

45.4 
42.5 
49.6 
57.0 
6S.0 
31.8 



44.2 
45.8 
42.4 
47.5 



44.2 
52.6 
43.2 
44.3 
44.2 



44.2 
42.1 
43.0 



44.2 
19.9 
39.0 
40.6 
49.0 
63.7 

49.5 
49.5 
44.5 
40.5 
42.0 
51.0 



Table 17. — Percent Distribution of Operators of Class VI, 
Part-Time, and Residential Farms, by Age, Number of 
Persons in Family, Education, and Family Money Income 
After Taxes, for the United States : 1955 





Percent distribution of operators of— 


Item 


Class VI, 
part-time, 
and resi- 
dential 
farms 


Class VI 
farms 


Part- 
time 
farms 


Resi- 
dential 
farms 


Farm operators by age: 


100.0 
10.5 
60.7 
28.7 

100.0 
7.4 

64.3 
9.9 

18.4 

100.0 
43.8 

40.5 
14.2 

1.4 

100.0 
2.3 
28.7 
20.6 
14.5 
12.5 

7.0 
4.6 
3.0 
1.3 
0.5 
5.0 


100.0 
5.2 
55. S 
39.2 

100.0 
8.0 
66.1 
9.3 

16.6 

100.0 
51.9 

38.6 
8.0 

1.5 

100.0 
3.4 
49.9 
22.6 
11.3 
5.2 

1.5 

1.5 
0.7 
0.1 


100.0 
14.1 
68. 2 
17.8 

100.0 
5.0 
64.8 
10.4 
19.8 

100.0 
36.8 

42.0 
19.9 

1.3 

100.0 
3.1 
17.3 
21.5 

14.7 
14.2 

10.0 
6.1 
4.7 
2.4 
0.9 
5.0 










58.2 






Farm operators by number of persons in 
family: 






8.8 




62.8 








18.4 


Farm operators by education: 

Total 

Not completing eighth grade 

Completing eighth grade but not 


100.0 
44.6 

40.5 






Operators not reporting as to 


1.4 


Farm operators by family money income 
after taxes: 
Total 


100.0 




1.0 




25.4 




19.0 




16.1 




15.1 




7.9 




5.1 




3.0 




1.2 




0.5 




3.6 


5.8