(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "United States census of agriculture: 1954"

rF 



■- 



■£. 



JV? 



^17^17^ 1 



"3i 










Given By 

H S. SUPT. OF DOCUMENTS 



^ 



Vol. Ill-pt. 3 



ALASKA, HAWAII, 
PUERTO RICO, 
DISTRICT of COLUMBIA, 
and U. S. POSSESSIONS 




SPECIAL REPORTS 




1954 

Census 
Agriculture 






U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE . BUREAU OF THE CENSUS • WASHINGTON . 1956 




\y ■ 

United States 



U. S. Department of Commerce 

Sinclair Weeks, Secretary 

Bureau of the Census 

Robert W. Burgess, Director 



Census 

f 

Agriculture 

1954 



oiume 



SPECIAL REPORTS 

Part 3 

Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, and 
. S. Possessions 



Prepared under the supervision of 

RAY HURLEY 

Chief, Agriculture Division 



FARM CHARACTERISTICS • 

LIVESTOCK and PRODUCTS • CROPS • FRUITS • VALUES • 



■ 



ary 

GuperintoTT-lp.nt of Documents 

JAfM 4 - 1S57 








i 




BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

ROBERT W. BURGESS, Director 

A. Ross Eckler, Deputy Director 
Howard C. Grieves, Assistant Director 

Robert Y. Phillips, Special Assistant 
Conrad Taeuber, Assistant Director 

Jack B. Robertson, Special Assistant 
Morris H. Hansen, Assistant Director for Statistical Standards 
Walter L. Kehres, Assistant Director for Administration 
Calvert L. Dedrick, Coordinator, International Statistics 
A. W. von Struve, Acting Public Information Officer 

Agriculture Division — 
Ray Hurley, Chief 
Warder B. Jenkins, Assistant Chief 

Administrative Service Division — Everett H. Burke, Chief 

Budget and Management Division — Charles H. Alexander, Chief 

Business Division — Harvey Kailin, Chief 

Census Operations Division — Marion D. Bingham, Chief 

Field Division — Robert B. Voight, Chief 

Foreign Trade Division — J. Edward Ely, Chief 

Geography Division — Clarence E. Batschelet, Chief 

Governments Division — Allen D. Manvel, Chief 

Industry Division — Maxwell R. Conklin, Chief 

Machine Tabulation Division — C. F. Van Aken, Chief 

Personnel Division — Helen D. Almon, Chief 

Population and Housing Division — Howard G. Brunsman, Chief 

Statistical Reports Division — Edwin D. Goldfield, Chief 

Statistical Research Division — William N. Hurwitz, Chief 

Transportation Division — Donald E. Church, Chief 



SUGGESTED IDENTIFICATION 

U. S. Bureau of the Census. U. S. Census of Agriculture.- 1954. Vol. Ill, Special Reports, 

Part 3, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, and U. S. Possessions 

U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C, 1956. 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D. C, or any of 
the Field Offices of the Department of Commerce, price 40 cents (paper cover) 



PREFACE 



Volume III, Special Reports, comprises a group of special compilations and summaries 
of data from the 1954 Census of Agriculture and from related surveys. Part 3 of Volume 
III, "Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, and United States Possessions," 
presents statistics relating to agricultural inventories and production for the specified areas. 
The source of these statistics and the method of obtaining and assembling the data are 
described in the Introductory discussion for the several sections of the report. 

The report was prepared in conformity with the act of Congress (Title 13, United States 
Code) approved August 31, 1954, which includes provisions for the mid-decade Censuses of 
Agriculture for the continental United States. 

The compilation of the statistics was supervised by Ray Hurley, Chief, Agriculture 
Division, and Warder B. Jenkins, Assistant Chief. The assembly and the preparation of the 
tables, and much of the analysis of this report, were done under the supervision of Joseph 
A. Correll. 

September 1956 

hi 



UNITED STATES CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE: 1954 

REPORTS 

Volume I. — Counties and State Economic Areas. — Statistics for counties include number of farms, acreage, value, and farm operators; 
farms by color and tenure of operator; facilities and equipment; use of commercial fertilizer; farm labor; farm expenditures; livestock 
and livestock products; specified crops harvested; farms classified by type of farm and by economic class; and value of products sold by 
source. 

Data for State economic areas include farms and farm characteristics by tenure of operator, by type of farm, and by economic class. 

Volume I is published in 33 parts as follows: 



Part 


State or States 


Part 


State or States 


Part 


State or States 


1 


New England States: 


West North Central: 




East South Central — Continued 




Maine. 


8 


Minnesota. 


21 


Alabama. 




New Hampshire. 


9 


Iowa. 


22 


Mississippi. 




Vermont. 


10 


Missouri. 




West South Central: 




Massachusetts. 


11 


North Dakota and South 


23 


Arkansas. 




Rhode Island. 




Dakota. 


24 


Louisiana. 




Connecticut. 


12 


Nebraska. 


25 


Oklahoma. 


2 


Middle Atlantic States: 


13 


Kansas. 


26 


Texas. 




New York. 




South Atlantic: 




Mountain: 




New Jersey. 


14 


Delaware and Maryland. 


27 


Montana. 




Pennsylvania. 


15 


Virginia and West Virginia. 


28 


Idaho. 




East North Central: 


16 


North Carolina and South 


29 


Wyoming and Colorado. 


3 


Ohio. 




Carolina. 


30 


New Mexico and Arizona. 


4 


Indiana. 


17 


Georgia. 


31 


Utah and Nevada. 


5 


Illinois. 


18 


Florida. 




Pacific: 


6 


Michigan. 




East South Central: 


32 


Washington and Oregon. 


7 


Wisconsin. 


19 
20 


Kentucky. 
Tennessee. 


33 


California. 



Volume II. — General Report. — Statistics by Subjects, United States Census of Agriculture, 1954. Summary data and analyses of 
the data for States, for Geographic Divisions, and for the United States by subjects as illustrated by the chapter titles listed below: 



Chapter 


Title 


Chapter 


Title 


I 


Farms and Land in Farms. 


VII 


Field Crops and Vegetables. 




II 


Age, Residence, Years on Farm, Work Off Farm. 


VIII 


Fruits and Nuts, Horticultural Specialties, 


Forest 


III 


Farm Facilities, Farm Equipment. 




Products. 




IV 


Farm Labor, Use of Fertilizer, Farm Expenditures, and 


IX 


Value of Farm Products. 






Cash Rent. 


X 


Color, Race, and Tenure of Farm Operator. 




V 


Size of Farm. 


XI 


Economic Class of Farm. 




VI 


Livestock and Livestock Products. 


XII 


Type of Farm. 





Volume III. — Special Reports 

Part 1. — Multiple-unit Operations. — This report will be similar to 
Part 2 of Volume V of the reports for the 1950 Census of Agri- 
culture. It will present statistics for approximately 900 counties 
and State economic areas in 12 Southern States and Missouri 
for the number and characteristics of multiple-unit operations 
and farms in multiple units. 

Part 2. — Ranking Agricultural Counties. — This special report will 
present statistics for selected items of inventory and agricultural 
production for the leading counties in the United States. 

Part 3. — Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, and 
TJ. S. Possessions. — These areas were not included in the 1954 
Census of Agriculture. The available current data from vari- 
ous Government sources will be compiled and published in this 
report. 

Part 4. — Agriculture, 1954, a Graphic Summary. — This report will 
present graphically some of the significant facts regarding agri- 
culture and agricultural production as revealed by the 1954 
Census of Agriculture. 

Part 5. — Farm-mortgage Debt. — This will be a cooperative study 
by the Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture and the Bureau of the Census. It will present, 
by States, data based on the 1954 Census of Agriculture and a 
special mail survey to be conducted in January 1956, on the 
number of mortgaged farms, the amount of mortgage debt, and 
the amount of debt held by principal lending agencies. 

Part 6. — Irrigation in Humid Areas. — This cooperative report by 



the Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture and the Bureau of the Census will present data ob- 
tained by a mail survey of operators of irrigated farms in 28 
States on the source of water, method of applying water, num- 
ber of pumps used, acres of crops irrigated in 1954 and 1955, 
the number of times each crop was irrigated, and the cost of 
irrigation equipment and the irrigation system. 

Part 7. — Popular Report of the 1954 Census of Agriculture. — This 
report is planned to be a general, easy-to-read publication for 
the general public on the status and broad characteristics of 
United States agriculture. It will seek to delineate such as- 
pects of agriculture as the geographic distribution and dif- 
ferences by size of farm for such items as farm acreage, prin- 
cipal crops, and important kinds of livestock, farm facilities, 
farm equipment, use of fertilizer, soil conservation practices, 
farm tenure, and farm income. 

Part 8. — Size of Operation by Type of Farm. — This will be a co- 
operative special report to be prepared in cooperation with the 
Agricultural Research Service of the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture. This report will contain data for 119 economic sub- 
regions (essentially general type-of-farming areas) showing the 
general characteristics for each type of farm by economic class. 
It will provide data for a current analysis of the differences 
that exist among groups of farms of the same type. It will 
furnish statistical basis for a realistic examination of produc- 
tion of such commodities as wheat, cotton, and dairy products 
in connection with actual or proposed governmental policies 
and programs. 



VOLUME III, PART 3 

ALASKA, HAWAII, PUERTO RICO, DIS- 
TRICT OF COLUMBIA, AND UNITED 
STATES POSSESSIONS 

CONTENTS 

Pas 

Introduction 

Source of data 

Presentation of statistics 

Comparability of data 

Alaska 3 

American Samoa 13 

District of Columbia 19 

Guam 21 

Hawaii 29 

Puerto Rico 37 

Virgin Islands of the United States 45 



ALASKA, HAWAII, PUERTO RICO, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 

AND UNITED STATES POSSESSIONS 



Introduction. — This publication brings together statistics relat- 
ing to agricultural inventories and production for Alaska, Hawaii, 
Puerto Rico, District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, and 
the Virgin Islands. Wherever a choice was possible, the data for 
inventories represent the status near the close of 1954 while those 
for production are for the calendar year 1954. In this respect, they 
are complementary to the data gathered in the 1954 Census of 
Agriculture for the continental United States. Comparative data 
from earlier Censuses are presented for many of the items. In a 
few cases, pertinent data are given for an item for an earlier year 
when no data were available for 1954. This procedure was 
followed if the additional figures gave a more complete picture of 
the agriculture of the area. 

This report was prepared in accordance with the act of Congress 
which provides for the mid-decade Censuses of agriculture for the 
United States mainland. That act states, in part: 

"(a) The Secretary shall take, beginning in the month of 
October 1954, and in the same month of every tenth year there- 
after, a census of agriculture. The census provided for by this 
section shall include each State, but, except as provided iii sub- 
section (b) of this section, shall not include the District of Colum- 
bia, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, or such other areas or terri- 
tory over which the United States exercises sovereignty or 
jurisdiction. 

"(b) As to the areas excluded from the census provided for in 
subsection (a) of this section, the data available from various 
Government sources shall be included as an appendix to the 
report of such census." 

Source of data. — As just mentioned, the act of Congress, while 
excluding these specified areas from the 1954 Census of Agriculture, 
provided that the data available for these areas from various 
Government sources should be brought together and published. 
Therefore, early in 1955 a request was made by the Director of 
the Census to an official source — Experiment Station, Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, or Governor — to obtain all available data 
similar to those collected in previous periodic Censuses. As an 
example, the two significant paragraphs in the request made to 



the Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station in Alaska 
are quoted verbatim: 

"The act of Congress providing for the 1954 Census of 
Agriculture specifies that enumeration is to be conducted only 
in the continental United States, but that data available for 
Alaska and some other areas from 'various government sources 
shall be included as an appendix to the report of such census.' 

"Accordingly, we would like to receive from you any avail- 
able data for Alaska similar to those collected for the periodic 
censuses of agriculture. We would appreciate it very much if 
you could provide for our report the available data for 1954 
indicated in the enclosed tables for Alaska. We would also 
like to have a statement explaining how the data for 1954 
were collected and compiled." 

The statistics shown in this volume were compiled from the 
responses to these letters and, in a limited degree, from other 
published reports of agriculture for these areas. A more detailed 
account of the source of data and how they were collected may 
be found in the introductory text for each area. 

Presentation of statistics. — Each area, for which statistics are 
presented in this report, is treated as an entity. It's statistics 
are apart from those of other areas. There are no totals for all 
the areas as a group. For ease of reference, the areas have been 
arranged in alphabetical sequence. 

In the case of Alaska and Guam data are presented for sub- 
divisions of the area; both judicial divisions and geographic areas 
for Alaska, and municipalities for Guam. Percentages and 
averages have been utilized to make the information more useful. 

Comparability of data. — The comparability of the data for an 
area is affected by the period of the year in which the enumeration 
or survey was made; the definition of a farm; and the number 
and the wording of the questions. The method used in obtaining 
agricultural information also has a direct bearing on the com- 
parability of data. The most recent information was obtained 
partly by mail, partly by personal interview, and partly by esti- 
mation. Some information is presented regarding these factors 
in the discussion for each area. 



ALASKA 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 7 

Censuses of agriculture 7 

Presentation of statistics 7 

Livestock and livestock products 7 

Cropland and crops harvested 10 

Value of agricultural production 12 

Comparability of data 12 

Tables 

1. — Number of specified classes of livestock on farms: 1900 to 1955 8 

2. — Selected data for livestock and livestock products, by judicial divisions: 1954 

and 1950 8 

3. — Livestock and livestock products: number of livestock on hand; and production 

and sales of livestock and livestock products: 1954 and 1953 9 

4. — Acreage of cropland and of specified crops harvested: 1900 to 1954 10 

5. — Selected data for cropland and crops, by judicial divisions: 1954 and Census of 

1950 11 

6. — Land distribution and acres, production, and value of crops sold: 1954 and 1953- - 11 
7. — Value of agricultural production for home use and for sale, by geographic areas: 

1954 and 1953 11 

3 



399909—56- 



u 

•c 

en 



o 

u 
2« 

3" 

C 

o 

*> 

Q 
"[5 

"w 



*»T 



g 



rf" 



* 

'* 



/• / 
/I / 

"571 <W ! 









S Vi$ . 







\- % ~- _ '; | -I— - A 






\ 



— p-i 



>?,' 



* \ 




//■ $ 



it 



Vr 






ALASKA 



Introduction. — The most recent agricultural statistics for Alaska 
were furnished by the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station 
and the Alaska Department of Agriculture, a cooperative effort 
by the two Territorial Agencies. In reply to the Bureau's letter 
for available statistics for Alaska, an official of the Agricultural 
Experiment Station replied to the effect that a series of publica- 
tions on annual agricultural production for key items had been 
initiated in 1953. 

The procedure for obtaining the statistics for 1954 and 1953 in 
Alaska encompassed a mailed questionnaire to all persons known 
to be engaged in any agriculture. About 25 percent of the reports 
are obtained in this manner. For those who did not reply, a 
personal visit was made to all commercial farmers and to as many 
others as time and personnel permitted. It is estimated that 98 
percent of the commercial production and 90 percent of all pro- 
duction in Alaska is recorded by these two procedures. The final 
published figures were weighted by the judgment of produce 
inspectors and economists based on the nature of the replies 
received and the specialized knowledge these men had of market- 
ings and supplies. 

Two reports were furnished to the Census Bureau by these 
Territorial Agencies. Each was entitled, Agricultural Produc- 
tion — Alaska. One was designated as the 1953 report and the 
other as the 1954 report. The 1953 report covered the amount 
and value of agricultural production for the calendar year 1953 
but contained a few livestock inventory items as of January 1, 
1954. The 1954 report, in less detail, related to the year subse- 
quent to the 1953 report. For publication, in this Census report 
it was decided to use the same time reference as was used in the 
publications received from Alaska. Since the 1953 Alaska report 
gives information in more detail than the 1954 report, data are 
given herein from both. 

For 1953 the data for the Matanuska Valley, the Anchorage 
Area, and the Tanaua Valley were based on personal interviews. 
These three geographic areas contributed nearly 80 percent of the 
total income from farm sales. Data for other areas were estimates 
based on returned mail questionnaires and other information. The 
number of contacts in each area upon which the data for 1953 were 
based is as follows: 



Area 


Number of contacts ' 




353 reporting farms or farmers. 




48 reporting farms. 
225 reporting farmers. 
3 23 reporting farmers. 
3 35 reporting farmers. 
5 reporting farmers. 
* 17 reporting farmers. 















1 As given ill Alaska published information. 

3 Additional information obtained from informed sources. 

a Estimates based on available records for an additional 23 rural families. 

* Estimates based on available information for the remaining farm operations. 

For the following year, 1954, the data for Matanuska Valley and 
the Anchorage area were obtained by mail questionnaires and 
personal interviews. Data for all other areas were estimates 
based on returned mail questionnaires, personal interviews, and 
other information gathered during 1954. 



Censuses of Agriculture. — The data given for years prior to 
1953 are from the perodic Censuses of Agriculture taken by the 
Bureau of the Census. The first United States Census of Agricul- 
ture of Alaska was taken in 1900 as part of the Twelfth Decennial 
Census. Since that date a Census of Agriculture has been taken 
in conjunction with the Census of Population in decennial enumera- 
tion. 

These Census enumerations furnished some information which 
is not obtainable from the available statistics for 1954 and 1953. 
A part of this information for these earlier Censuses, such as the 
number of farms and the acreage of land in farms, is given below. 



Farms number. 

Land in farms 

aeres. 



1960 
(Apr. 1) 



525 
421,799 



1939 
(Oct. 1) 



625 
1,775,752 



1929 
(Oct. 1) 



1920 
(Jan. 1) 



500 
525, 942 



364 
90, 652 



1910 
(Jan. I) 



222 
42,544 



1900 
(June 1) 



12 
159 



Presentation of statistics. — Only limited comparisons are pos- 
sible between the data for 1954 and 1953 on the one hand and the 
data for 1950 and earlier Censuses on the other. In the 1950 and 
earlier Censuses, statistics conformed to judicial division bound- 
aries. Data for 1954 and 1953 were published by geographic 
areas. Only a few of the comparative data are presented herein, 
for all years. This historical series is given only for the Territory. 
A more extended comparison is made for 1954 and 1950, by 
judicial divisions. A full presentation is made of all available 
data for 1954 and 1953, by geographic areas. 

For this report, in order to make subdivision comparisons, it 
was necessary to assemble the 1954 data for geographic areas by 
judicial divisions. 

Southeastern Alaska, for which data are presented for 1954 and 
1953, includes Judicial Division 1 and a part of Judicial Division 
3. The part of Judicial Division 3 included is Valdez and the 
area to the South. Therefore, in considering Southeastern Alaska 
statistics as representative of Judicial Division 1, an overstate- 
ment is made to the extent that the Valdez area is included. 
Likewise, the 1954 and 1953 statistics, which are presented to 
represeut Judicial Division 3, are understated to the extent 
that the Valdez area is exluded. Thus, if there were any items 
produced in appreciable amounts in the Valdez area, data for 
these two Divisions are affected accordingly. 

The geographic areas which were combined to compare with 

each judicial division are as follows: Judicial 

Geographic area division 

Southeastern Alaska 1 

Tanana Valley ' 2, t 

Matanuska Valley ~| 

Anchorage Area I , 

Kenai Peninsula [ 

Kodiak and Aleutian Islands J 

' For the 1950 Census, the data for these two divisions were combined. 

Livestock and livestock products. — The classification of live- 
stock by age and sex for the recent years has been made on a 
different basis than for former years. The major part of the 

7 



8 



SPECIAL REPORTS 



change has been to differentiate between dairy and beef animals. 
Because of the varying classes, a comparison of inventory numbers 
only has been made for all years for which data are available. 
These data are shown in Table 1. 

Table 1. — Number of Specified Classes of Livestock on 
Farms: 1900 to 1955 



Year and date of 
enumeration 


Horses 
and 

mules 


Cattle 

and 

calves 


Hogs 
and 
Pigs 


Sheep 

and 

lambs 


Chickens 


1955 (Jan. 1) 


Number 

(NA) 

' 106 

207 

496 

319 

395 

218 

5 


Number 

5. 757 

5,160 

2,236 

3.749 

1,869 

640 

811 

18 


Number 

1.062 

589 

1,201 

959 

310 

273 

165 

10 


Number 
9,110 
9, 1R3 
6.046 
17,076 
6, 858 
132 
184 


Number 

43, 026 

31. 350 

20,278 

18, 374 

10, 979 

4,563 

5.436 

' 176 


1954 (Jan. 1) .. 


1950 (Apr. 1) 


1939 (Oct. 1) -. 


1929 (Oct. n 


1920 (Jan. 1) 


1910 (Jan. 1) 


1900 (June 1) 




NA— Not available. 

1 Horses. 

: Chickens and guinea fowl 


^. 











The judicial division comparisons of data for livestock and live- 
stock products are restricted to 2 years. These are shown in Table 
2. The numbers of livestock on hand were taken from the 1954 
Alaska report (inventories as of Jan. 1, 195.5) and from the 1950 
Census report (inventories as of Apr. 1, 1950). Since the subclasses 
of cattle are not comparable for the two periods of observation, no 
attempt has been made to show data for cows, heifers, calves, etc., 
by judicial divisions. The quantities of products and income data 
were obtained from the same sources but cover the calendar years 
1954 and 1949, respectively. 

Table 3 presents all livestock data contained in the 1954 and 
1953 reports submitted by Alaska official sources. The available 
figures are given by geographic areas, not by judicial divisions. 

According to these reports milk was the most important source 
of farm income. In 1954, milk accounted for 47 percent of the 
total farm income. Of the total milk production, 67 percent 
came from the Matanuska Valley, 16 percent from the South- 
eastern area, 7 percent from the Tanana Valley, and 10 percent 
from all other areas. All areas except Southeastern Alaska showed 
substantial increases from 1953 to 1954. 



Table 2. — Selected Data for Livestock and Livestock Products, by Judicial Divisions: 1954 and 1950 



Item 




Alaska, 
total 


Judicial division 


' 1 


2 and 4 


'3 


CATTLE AND DAIRY PRODUCTS 


.number Jan. 1, 1955.- 

number Apr. 1, 1950. . 
dollars 1954.. 


5,757 

2,236 

1,257,906 

663, 725 

11,429,802 

6,551,032 

1,062 
1,201 

9,110 
6,046 
60,115 
57, 016 
30, 056 
28,241 

43, 020 
20, 278 
411,840 
237. 541 
357, 340 
180,222 
348, 450 
160, 297 

61.000 
39, 705 


478 

443 

200, 000 

182. 771 

2. 000, 000 

1.919.769 


282 

178 
93, 500 
121,076 
850, 000 
791.630 

125 
347 

20 
20 


4,997 

1,615 

964,406 

359, 878 

8, 579, 802 

3, 839, 633 

937 
854 

9,090 
6.026 
60,115 
56,791 
30,056 
28,151 

32,400 
14,732 
286,565 
144, 460 
248,340 
127, 752 
238, 550 
114,935 




dollars 1949- - 
pounds 1954-. 


HOGS 


pounds 1949- - 


SHEEP AND WOOL 
Sheep and lambs on hand 


number Apr. 1, 1950-- 

.number Jan. 1, 1955.. 

number Apr. 1, 1950. . 










POULTRY AND POULTRY PRODUCTS 


pounds 1950.. 
value— dollars 1954. . 
value— dollars 1950- - 

jiumber Jan. 1, 1955.. 

number Apr. 1, 1950. . 
dollars 1954.. 




225 






90 

1,120 

2,168 
11,275 
18,907 

9,000 
19, 690 

9, 900 
16, 779 


9,500 
3,378 
112,000 
74, 174 
100, 000 
32, 780 
100, 000 
28,583 

61.000 
38,584 


FUR ANIMALS 


dollars 1950.. 

_ dozens 1954.. 

dozens 1950. . 
dollars 1954 
dollars 1950.. 

dollars 1954.. 

dollars 1950.. 




1,121 





i Part of Judicial Division 3 included with Judicial Division 1. See text. 

i No age limit mentioned for 1955; 1950 data are for chickens 4 months old and over. 

Poultry products were third in importance as a source of farm 
income. They contributed about 15 percent of the total in 1954 
and 13 percent in 1953. Both milk and potatoes ranked above 
poultry products as sources of farm income. According to the 
1954 Alaska report, "The disastrously low statewide egg prices 



were responsible for lower egg prices in Alaska. Production of 
local eggs increased 25 percent, however, over 1953. The most 
severe price competition occurred during the latter part of the 
year and carried into 1955. Broiler and fryer production was 
down considerably in 1954." 



ALASKA 



Table 3. — Livestock and Livestock Products: Number of Livestock on Hand; and Production and Sales of Livestock and 

Livestock Products: 1954 and 1953 



Item 



HORSES' 

Horses on hand- - number Jan. I. 1 9"..s 

Jan. 1, 1954. 

cattle and calves 

Cattle and calves on hand, total number Jan. 1, 1955. 

1B54. 

Animals other than bee! animals, total number 1955. 

1954. 

M ilk cows number 1 955. 

1954- 

Helfers, 1 year and over number 1955. 

19.54. 

Heifer calves number 1955. 

1954. 

Dairy bulls — number 1955 

19.54. 
Beef animals, total .number 1955. 

1954. 

Bcef cows - - - number 1955. 

1954. 
Heifers, over I year .number 1955. 

1954. 
Heifer calves number 1955- 

1954 
Beef type hulls number 1955 

1954. 
Other beef animals number 1955 

1954. 
DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Milk produced, other than goat milk, total. pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 

Farm use - pounds 1954 . . 

1953.- 

Sokl pounds 1954 . 

1953. . 

dollars 1954.. 

1953- . 

Ooat milk , total pounds 1954 . . 

1953.. 

Farm use - pounds 1954 . . 

1953.. 

Sold pounds 1954 . . 

1953.. 

dollars 1954. - 

1953.. 

Other dairy products sold - dollars 1954 . . 

1953. . 

Total dairy products sold dollars 19.54. . 

1953.. 
HOGS AND PIGS 

Hogs and pigs on hand number Jan. 1, 1955.. 

Jan. 1. 1954 
SHEEP AND WOOL 

Sheep on hand number Jan. 1, 1955.- 

Jan. 1. 1954.. 

Wool shorn pounds 1954- . 

1953.. 
dollars 1954.. 
1953.. 
POULTRY AND POULTRY PRODUCTS 

Poultry on hand, total number Jan. 1, 1955.. 

Jan. 1, 1954.. 

Hens number 1955 . 

1954.. 

Chickens.- number 1955. 

1954.. 

Other poultry number 1955.. 

1954.. 

Poultry meat produced, total pounds 1954. 

1953.. 

Farm use pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 

Sold pounds 1954 . . 

1953.. 

value o[ sales— dollars 1954 . . 

1953.. 

Eggs produced, total . dozens 1954 

1953.. 

Farm use... dozens 1954.. 

1953.. 

Sold dozens 1954. . 

1953.. 

value of sales— dollars 1954. . 

1953.. 

Poultry and poultry products sold dollars 1954 . 

1953.. 
GOATS 

Milk goats on band number 1955 

1954.. 
OTHER LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 

Beef produced, total.. pounds Jan. 1, 1954 

1953.. 

Farm use pounds 1954 

1953.. 

Sold pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 

value of sales— dollars 1954. . 

1953.. 

See footnotes at end of table, 



Alaska, total 



(NA) 
106 



5.757 
5. 160 

2. 6S2 
2,479 
1,628 
1,430 

545 
529 
442 
451 
67 
69 

3, 075 
2,681 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



12. 156, 408 

10,141,592 

"26, 606 

620, 200 

1 1, 429, 802 

9,521,392 

(NA) 

1,016,248 

(NA) 

14, 400 

(NA) 

12,000 

(NA) 

2, 400 

(NA) 

288 

(NA) 

341 

1. 257, 906 

1,016,877 



1.062 



9,110 
9, 1S3 
60,115 
77,000 
30,056 
38, 500 



43, 020 

31.559 

32, 200 

25, 654 

10,820 

5.696 

(NA) 

209 

111,540 

112.611 

21,430 

19.085 

90,110 

93. 526 

63, 390 

71.431 

:iss. s.;r 

303. 661 

31,527 

27. 043 

357, 340 

276, 618 

348. 450 

279. 505 

(11,840 

350, 936 

(NA) 
159 



206.914 
224, 617 
68, 534 
52, 779 
138.380 
171.838 
57. 121 
73.146 



Tnnana 
Valley 



(NA) 



282 

184 

222 

171 

138 

107 

20 

29 

50 

30 

14 

5 

60 

13 

(NA) 



(NA) 
"(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 
13 



880,000 
642, 700 
30, 000 
17,700 
850. 000 
625, 000 
(NA) 
ii\ 750 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
93, 500 
68,750 



125 
127 



20 
21 



1.120 

1. 138 

1,000 

1,000 

120 

120 

(NA) 

18 

6.500 

6.755 

2,000 

1,900 

4.500 

4. 855 

3, 375 

3.641 

10.000 

13.076 

1.000 

1,076 

9.000 

12,000 

9.900 

14,160 

13. 275 

17.801 

(NA) 
65 



6,500 
5. 041 
3,000 
2.625 
3.500 
2.416 
1.400 
966 



Matanuska 

Valley 



(NA) 
46 



1.860 

1.772 

L665 

1. 578 

1.000 

881 

310 

347 

295 

312 

30 

38 

195 

194 

(NA) 

57 

(NA) 

14 

(NA) 

14 

(NA) 

(NA) 
102 



8. 171,481 

6,514,304 

555, 506 

469, 000 

7,615,975 

6, 045, 304 

(NA) 

649, 871 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

235 
837. 644 

650. 106 



90 

S7 

10 
241 

115 

2,000 

56 

1.000 



16.800 

13, 927 

13.900 

13.604 

2,900 

216 

(NA) 

107 

36.240 

30. 636 

11,530 

12.490 

24. 710 

18, 146 

12, 825 

13,610 

169.000 

149.718 

20. (WO 

20. 300 

148.340 

129. 418 

135.550 

128. 125 

148. 375 

141.735 

(NA) 
17 



104,044 
103, 806 
41.534 
39,884 

62, 510 

63, 922 

24. 036 

25, 570 



Anchorage 

A lea 



(NA) 
10 



105 
75 
55 
17 
30 
39 
20 
18 



1 
35 
23 

(NA) 
5 

(NA) 
5 

(NA) 
3 

(NA) 

(NA) 



274, 743 
151,498 

25, 100 
12. nod 

249. 643 
139. 498 
(NA) 
14,968 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

26. 985 
14.968 



820 
375 



Kauai Pen- 

insula 



S. Nil 

3.410 
3.800 

1, 550 
6.000 
1.800 
(NA) 

60 
43,000 
45. 165 
3,000 
640 
40.000 
44, 525 
32,000 
35, 620 
32. 467 
20. 912 

2, 467 
712 

30,000 
20.200 
33.000 
22.220 
65, 000 
57. 840 

(NA) 



5,100 
3.500 
3,100 
1,400 
2,000 
2,100 
1.000 
1.050 



(NA) 
II 



323 

267 

168 

154 

100 

100 

30 

31 

35 

IS 

3 

5 

155 

113 

(NA) 

41 

(NA) 

32 

(NA) 

11 

(NA) 

9 

(NA) 

20 



588, IM 

526, 000 

49, 000 

86, 000 

539, 184 

440. 000 

(NA) 

52,800 

(NA) 

14, 400 

(NA) 

12. 000 

(NA) 

2, 400 

(NA) 

288 

(NA) 

106 

64.777 

53.194 



KO 

90 



5,800 

6,080 

5,000 

4. 500 

800 

1,560 

(NA) 

20 

6.400 

16.300 

2.700 

2,500 

3,700 

12,800 

2,590 

8,960 

63,900 

66,455 

3,900 

1, 455 

60.000 

55.000 

60.000 

55.000 

62, 59(1 

63.960 

(NA) 
30 



21, 270 
23.000 
5,900 
5,000 
15,370 
18.000 
7.685 
9,360 



Efodiab and 

A lent i. in 
Islands 



(NA) 
25 



2. 674 

2.329 

74 

49 

45 

20 

15 

13 

12 

13 

2 

3 

2. 600 

2. 280 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(XAl 

(NA) 

1XA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



209, 000 

137, 500 

34. 000 

2, 500 

175,000 

135, OOU 

(NA) 

I.,, -1111 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

35,000 

16.200 



9.000 
8,830 
60.000 
75.000 
30.000 
37,500 



1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 



(NA) 

"2," 400 

2,400 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

1,200 

600 

600 

12. 500 

12,500 

2,500 

2.50O 

10,000 

10.000 

10.000 

10.000 

10.600 

10.600 

(NA) 



50. 000 
66.500 
5,000 
1,500 
45,000 
65. 000 
18.000 
26, (100 



Southeastern 
Alaska 



(NA) 



478 

510 

448 

452 

290 

305 

110 

70 

30 

60 

18 

17 

30 

58 

(NA) 

12 

(NA) 

21 

(NA) 

11 

(NA) 

4 

(NA) 

111 



2, 033, 000 

2, 169, 590 

33,000 

33. 000 

2. 000, 0110 

2, 136.590 

(NA) 

213,659 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1 X A ) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2(10, 00(1 

213,659 



9, 500 
6,004 
7, 500 
4.000 
2.01X1 
2. 000 
( X A 

4 

17, 000 

12. 355 

1.000 

355 

16,000 

12. 000 

12, 000 

9. 000 

101. 0110 

51.000 

1,000 

1.000 

100, 000 

50, 00<l 

100.0011 

50. 0OO 
112.«10 

59,000 

(XAl 
20 



20. 000 
22, 770 
10.000 

2,370 
10.000 
20, t'Hi 

5.000 
10,200 



10 



SPECIAL REPORTS 



Table 3. — Livestock and Livestock Products: Number of Livestock on Hand; and Production and Sales of Livestock and 

Livestock Products: 1954 and 1953 — Continued 



Item 


Alaska, total 


Tanana 
Valley 


Matanuska 
Valley 


Anchorage 
Area 


Kenai Pen- 
insula 


Kodiak and 
Aleutian 
Islands 


Southeastern 
Alaska 


OTHER LIVESTOCK PEODUCTS- 

Farm use 

Sold 

Lamb produced, total 

Farm use 

Sold 


-Continued 

1953. . 
pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 
pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 
dollars 1954.. 

1953. . 
pounds 1954-. 

1953.. 
pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 
pounds 1954.. 

1953.. 
dollars 1954.. 

1953.. 
dollars 1954.. 


110,335 

87,111 

14. 435 

16. 945 

95, 900 

71, 166 

28. 940 

26. 956 

4,250 

6.780 

2,500 

1,360 

1,750 

5,420 

1,050 

3,820 

61.000 

(NA) 


6,750 
5,450 
2,750 
2,750 
3,000 
2,700 
1.800 
1,620 


8,000 

17,611 

7,500 

11,945 

500 

6,666 

300 

3,116 


94,600 
62. 500 
2.600 
900 
92, 000 
61,600 
26, 600 
21, 660 


1,985 

1,550 

1,585 

350 

400 

1,200 

240 

660 


































4,250 
3,510 
2,500 
1,200 
1,750 
2,310 
1,050 
1,800 
(NA) 
(NA) 






3,270 


















160 


















3,110 


















2,020 
(NA) 
(NA) 








(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 


61.000 
(NA) 


1953. . 



NA— Not available. 

i Does not include pack and riding horses in outlying districts. 

Cropland and crops harvested. — An exact comparison of the 
acreage either capable of being used for crops or actually used for 
crops, through the various years, cannot be made. However, the 
acreage harvested for some individual crops can be directly com- 
pared. Table 4 sets forth some of the data for the Territory to 
indicate comparisons for the several years. 

Only a very limited amount of data is available for crops har- 
vested in 1954. Hence, the figures presented in Table 5 for 1954 
and 1950, by judicial divisions ,are restricted to potatoes and vege- 
tables harvested for sale. The acreage of cropland is also pre- 
sented in Table 5; however, much of this acreage was not actually 
used for crops. The 13,215 acres shown for 1954 were distributed 
in the 1954 Alaska report as follows: 



Potatoes '- 1, 160 acres 

Vegetables for sale 305 acres 

Other crops and idle cropland 11, 750 acres 

The 1953 Alaska report gives a more detailed composition of the 
cropland, which totaled 12,334 acres for that year. The detail 
is as follows: 

Potatoes 1, 505 acres 

Vegetables for sale 242 acres 

Home garden 35 acres 

Grains 1, 027 acres 

Hays 5, 334 acres 

Seeded pasture 1, 913 acres 

Idle, fallow, or green manure 2, 278 acres 



Table 4. — Acreage of Cropland and of Specified Crops Harvested: 1900 to 1954 



Item 


1954 


1953 


1949 


1939 


1929 


1919 


1909 


1899 


Cropland harvested, total 

Acres of crops harvested, total 

Wheat ... 


.farms reporting.. 

acres '.. 

farms reporting.. 

acres.. 

acres.. 

farms reporting.. 


(NA) 
13.215 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
1,160 


(NA) 
12, 334 
(NA) 
(NA) 
8,143 
(NA) 
35 
(NA) 

510 
(NA) 

292 
(NA) 

180 
(NA) 
5,334 
(NA) 
1,505 


414 

12, 385 

414 

6,450 

3 6,213 

31 

204 

34 

333 

7 

65 

11 

163 

(NA) 

4,207 

285 

1,030 


(NA) 

11,332 

(NA) 

7,305 

'7,062 

104 

627 

87 

527 

112 

654 

9 

88 

294 

4,626 

370 

388 


(NA) 

8,825 

(NA) 

(NA) 

3.S75 

20 

54 

18 

153 

16 

39 


(NA) 

5.736 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,473 

47 

148 

30 

69 

29 

41 

(NA) 

(NA) 

277 

3,531 

198 

431 


(NA) 
2,660 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1 
(NA) 

2 
(NA) 

5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
118 
(NA) 
181 
(NA) 


(NA) 

159 

(NA) 

(NA) 

104 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

5 

78 

11 

8 




acres. . 
_ farms reporting.. 




acres. . 

farms reporting.. 

acres.. 




acres. _ 




202 

3,010 

257 

271 




acres 3 _ . 

farms reporting.. 

acres. . 



NA— Not available. 

i For 1939 does not include cropland pasture. For years prior to 1939, acreage reported as "Improved land." 

' Excluding home garden. 

a For 1953 Includes tame grass hay, grass silage, oat-pea hay, and oat-pea silage only. 



ALASKA 



11 



Table 5. — Selected Data for Cropland and Crops, by 
Judicial Divisions: 1954 ' and Census of 1950 



Item 


Alaska, 
total 


Judicial divisions 


1 


2 and 4 


3 


Total cropland acres 1954-- 

acres 1949- - 

Potatoes harvested- .acres 1954.. 
acres 1949- . 
tons 1964.. 
tons 1949- . 

Vegetables harvested for sale 

acres 1954.. 
acres 1949.. 

dollars 1954.. 

dollars 1949.. 

All other cropland 9 . .acres 1954.- 
acres 1949- - 


13,215 
12, 385 

1,160 
1,030 

I',. 431 
5,552 

305 

178 

' 198. 832 

99, 179 

11,750 
11,177 


425 
885 

15 

7 

75 

24 

10 

5 

10. 000 

4,205 

400 
873 


2,500 
2.251 

475 

196 

1,684 

775 

60 

49 

36, 980 

27, 044 

1,965 
2,000 


10,290 
9,249 

670 

827 

4.672 

4,753 

235 
124 

151,852 
67, 930 

9,385 
8,298 



1 Part of Judicial Division 3 included with Judicial Division 1. See text. 

> Includes Income from crops except potatoes, divided as follows: Cabbage, $38,578; 
lettuce, $57,470; carrots, $33,122; and other produce, $69,662. 

1 For both years these figures represent the difference between total cropland and the 
total for potatoes and vegetables. 



According to the 1954 Alaska report there were 13,215 acres 
of cropland in the Territory, which was 881 acres in excess of the 
1953 total of 12,334 acres. Much of this increase can be at- 
tributed to 1,038 acres cleared in 1953. In 1954, an additional 
1,035 acres were cleared. 

Feed crops, mostly forage, and potatoes and vegetables com- 
prised nearly all the crops grown in the Territory. Potato sales 
were the second important source of farm income, furnishing 
about one-third of the total farm income in 1953. Reduced 
plantings in 1954 and slightly lower yields resulted in a production 
30 percent less than in 1953. Actual sales were off not more than 
10 percent. Decreased disease loss and improved storage were 
the principal factors in maintaining sales when production de- 
clined. In 1954, 52 percent came from the Matanuska Valley, 33 
percent from the Tanana Valley, 11 percent from the Anchorage 
area, and 4 percent from all other areas. 

Lettuce, carrots, and cabbage were, by far, the most important 
vegetables grown. Vegetable acreage was approximately the 
same for the two years but the production for 1954 brought 13 
percent less due to lower prices. 



Table 6. — Land Distribution and Acres, Production, and Value of Crops Sold: 1954 and 1953 



Item 



Total cropland - - acres 1954. 

1953- 

Idle, fallow, or green manure. ..acres 1954. 

1953. 

Seeded pasture - acres 1954. 

1953. 

Land cleared a acres 1954. 

1953. 

Crops harvested --- acres 1954- 

1953- 

Grain ..acres 1954. 

1953. 

Wheat -- --. acres 1954. 

1953. 

Oats acres 1954. 

1953. 

Barley -.. acres 1954- 

1953. 

Buckwheat acres 1954. 

1953. 

Mlxed grain acres 1954 

1953 

Any hay or forage crops. ..acres 1954 

1953 

Tame grass hay acres 1954 

1953 

Grass silage acres 1954 

1953 

Oat-pea hay.. acres 1954 

1953 

Oat-pea silage__ acres 1954 

1963 

Potatoes harvested for sale acres 1954 

1953 

tons 1954 

1953 

dollars 1954. 

1953- 

Vegetables, other than potatoes, for sale acres 1954. 

1953. 

dollars 1954. 

1963. 

Cabbage..- -- tons 1954- 

1953- 

dollars 1954- 

1953. 

Lettuce - .tons 1954. 

1953- 

dollars 1954. 

1953- 

Carrots _._ tons 1954. 

1953- 

dollars 1954. 

1953. 

Turnips and rutabagas tons 1954- 

1953- 

Greens - pounds 1953. 

bunches 1953. 

dollars 1954. 

1953. 

Beets tons 1954. 

1953. 

dollars 1954. 

1953. 

Celery tons 1954. 

1953. 

dullars 1954. 

1953. 

See footnotes at end of table. 

399909—56 3 



Alaska, total 



13.215 

12, 334 

(NA) 

2.278 

(NA) 

1,913 

1.035 

1,038 

(NA) 

8.143 

(NA) 

1,027 

(NA) 

35 

(NA) 

510 

(NA) 

292 

(NA) 

10 

(NA) 

180 

(NA) 

5. 334 

(NA) 

1,490 

(NA) 

118 

(NA) 

1,770 

(NA) 

1,956 

1,160 

1,505 

6,431 

9,135 

618,025 

928, 020 

305 

242 

198, 832 

227, 929 

282 

263 

38, 578 

43,000 

225 

214 

57, 470 

63,760 

211 

276 

33, 122 

50. 420 

(NA) 

45 

6,428 

1,000 

(NA) 

8,125 

(NA) 

12.9 

(NA) 

2,397 

(NA) 

52.6 

(NA) 

13, 120 



Tanana 
Valley 



2.500 

2,260 

(NA) 

625 

(NA) 

140 

350 

244 

(NA) 

1,495 

(NA) 

205 

(NA) 

5 

(NA) 

75 

(NA) 

90 

(NA) 

10 

(NA) 

25 

(NA) 

635 

(NA) 

80 

(NA) 



(NA) 

280 

(NA) 

275 

475 

590 

1,684 

2,213 

205, 420 

294, 820 

60 

65 

36, 980 

52, 427 

87 

96 

12, 180 

16, 320 

27 

34 

9,600 

11,560 

20 

29 

4,600 

6,625 

(NA) 

20.5 

1,700 

~"CNA) 

3,858 
(NA) 

3.3 

(NA) 

792 

(NA) 

8.6 
(NA) 
3,440 



Matanuska 
Valley 



8.815 
8,425 
(NA) 
1.200 
(NA) 
1,600 

445 

650 
(NA) 
5,625 
(NA) 

805 

(NA) 

30 

(NA) 

425 
(NA) 

195 
(NA) 



(NA) 

155 

(NA) 

3.915 

(NA) 

950 

(NA) 

65 

(NA) 

1,400 

(NA) 

1,500 

560 

760 

3, 7S5 

6,700 

321, 725 

513. non 

185 

130 

124, 793 

138, 237 

130 

130 

18, 298 

20, 800 

190 

156 

46,515 

46, 600 

180 

228 

26. '.111(1 

41,040 

(NA) 

6.5 

4,728 

1,000 

(NA) 

1,297 

(NA) 

9.6 

(NA) 

1.605 

(NA) 

41 

(NA) 

9,680 



Anchorage 
Area 



750 

623 

(NA) 

153 

(NA) 

38 

90 

28 

(NA) 

432 

(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 

2S4 

(NA) 

155 

(NA) 

38 

(NA) 

30 

(NA) 

61 

85 

116 

757 

1,022 

67, 780 

97.700 

30 

32 

19. 544 

22, 250 

65 

42 

8,100 

5.S80 

8 

24 

1,355 

5, 400 

11 

19 

1,622 

2,755 

(XA) 

18 



(NA) 
2.970 
(NA) 

"(NA) 
"(NA) 

7na) 



Kcnai 
Peninsula 



725 

616 

(NA) 

200 

(NA) 

75 

150 

90 

(NA) 

341 

(NA) 

7 

(NA) 



(NA) 

9 

(NA) 

5 

(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 

295 

(NA) 

175 

(NA) 

10 

(NA) 

30 

(NA) 

80 

25 

24 

130 

125 

15,600 

I.",, mi.: 

20 

5 

5,015 

5,015 



(NA) 



(NA) 
"(NA) 



(NA) 
"(NA) 
"(NA) 



Kodiak and 
Aleutian 
Islands 



(') 
(') 

(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 
(') 
(') 
(') 

(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 

"(NA) 

(') 

(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 
0) 

(NA) 
0) 

(NA) 
0) 

(NA) 
(') 



(') 

(') 
2,500 
2,500 



(XA) 

"(NA) 
"(NA) 



(NA) 
"(NA) 
"(NA) 



Southeaster!; 
Alaska 



425 
410 

(NA) 
100 

(NA) 



26 

(NA) 

250 

(NA) 

10 

(NA) 



(NA) 
8 

(NA) 
2 

(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 
205 

(NA) 
130 

(NA) 
5 

(NA) 
30 

(NA) 
40 
15 
15 
75 
75 

7,500 

7, 500 
10 
10 

10,000 

7,500 



(NA) 



(NA) 
"(NA) 



(XA) 
"(NA) 
"(NA) 



12 SPECIAL REPORTS 

Table 6. — Land Distribution and Acres, Production, and Value of Crops Sold: 1954 and 1953 — Continued 



Item 


Alaska, total 


Tanana 
Valley 


Matanuska 
Valley 


Anchorage 
Area 


Kenai 
Peninsula 


Kodiak and 
Aleutian 
Islands 


Southeastern 
Alaska 


Total cropland—Continued 

Crops harvested— Continued 

Vegetables, other than potatoes 
Radishes 

Onions, _ 

Parsnips,. _. 

Greenhouse vegetables 

Mixed vegetables 


for sale— Continued 

tons 1954.. 

1953.. 

bunches 1954.. 

dollars 1954.. 

1953.. 

pounds 1954.. 

19.53.. 

bunches 1954.. 

dollars 1954.. 

1953.. 

tons 1954.. 

1953.. 

dollars 1954.. 

1953.. 

dollars 1954.. 

1953- . 

dollars 19.54.. 

1953.. 
tons 1954.. 


(NA) 
6.2 

42, 930 

(NA) 
5,889 
(NA) 
7.036 

57. 375 
(NA) 
8, 159 
(NA) 
2.5 
(NA) 
750 
(\AI 
4,500 
(NA) 

12, 515 
(NA) 
(NA) 

69, 662 

15,294 

(NA) 

35 


(NA) 
2.5 
2.930 
(NA) 
1,193 
(NA) 


(NA) 
3.7 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


40, 000 
(NA) 
3,200 
(NA) 








(NA) 
1,496 
(NA) 
7,036 
57, 375 
(NA) 
8,169 
(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 












(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 

2.5 

(NA) 

750 

(NA) 

1. 200 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

13.3 

10, 600 

6. 689 

(NA) 

(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 
1,800 
(NA) 
(NA.) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
33. 080 
5,560 
(NA) 
15 


(NA) 
1,500 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
8,467 
545 
(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 
5,015 
(NA) 
(NA) 
5,015 
(NA) 
(NA) 
10 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
2,500 
2, 500 
(NA) 
(') 


(NA) 
7.500 
(NA) 
(NA) 
lb. 000 
(NA) 
(NA) 
10 


Home garden __ 


1953.. 

dollars 19.54.. 

1953.. 

_ acres 1954.. 

1953.. 



NA — Not available. 

i No report. 

' Land cleared was not included as such in total cropland for the year in which it was cleared. It may have been utilized as Idle land, cropland, etc. 



Value of agricultural production. — Table 7 gives figures on the 
value of agricultural production of Alaska. Data are shown, 
for both 1954 and 1953, by geographic areas and for farm use and 
commercial production. The commercial production is further 
subdivided into income from vegetables and from livestock sales. 
There is no clear indication, in the available statistics, that any 
crops other than vegetables were sold. For example, in the sta- 
tistics for 1954, "Other produce" was listed under vegetables, 
which could refer to miscellaneous vegetables or possibly to non- 
vegetable crops. 



The value of agricultural production for all of Alaska in 1954 
differed only slightly from that in 1953 with the Southeastern 
Alaska area showing the greatest variation, an increase of over 
40 percent. The value of products used on the farm in 1954 was 
estimated at 8 percent of the commercial production for that year. 
Matanuska Valley, with 54.7 percent of agricultural production 
for farm use in 1954 and 64.9 percent in 1953, was the most im- 
portant producing area. This area also led in commercial produc- 
tion (production for sale) with 54.7 percent of the Territorial total 
in 1954 and 55.3 percent in 1953. 



Table 7- — Value of Agricultural Production for Home Use and for Sale, by Geographic Areas: 1954 and 1953 



Item 


Year 


Alaska, 
total 


Tanana 
Valley 


Matanuska 
Valley 


Anchorage 
Area 


Kenai 
Peninsula 


Kodiak and 
Aleutian 
Islands 


South- 
eastern 
Alaska 




1954 
1953 


$2, 877, 952 
2,819,836 


$380. 565 
449, 332 


$1,573,483 
1, 574, 471 


$223, 462 
222, 465 


$168. 3S0 
169, 304 


$104, 922 
100, 000 


$427, 140 
304, 214 


Farm use 

Commercial, total 


1954 
1953 
1954 
1953 
1954 
1953 
19.54 
1953 


213, 182 
153,652 
2, 664, 770 
2, 666, 184 
816, 857 
1, 155.949 
1, 847. 913 
1, 510, 235 


28, 190 
12, 99S 
352, 375 
; ■.'■,. ::-.| 
242. 400 
347, 247 
109. 975 
89, 137 


116,554 

99, 687 

1,453,929 

1, 474. 784 

446, 518 

651, 237 
1.010.411 

823, 547 


16, 553 

7,037 

206, 909 

215.363 

37, 324 
119,950 
119.585 

95,418 


12.473 
22.115 
155, 907 
147,139 
20. 615 
20. 015 
135, 292 
127, 174 


7,772 
5. 400 
97. 150 
94, 600 
2,500 
2, 500 
94. 650 
92, 100 


31,640 

6, 355 

395, 500 

297, 859 

17, 500 

15.000 

378, 000 

282, 859 




Livestock and livestock products sold 



Comparability of data. — Comparability is affected by factors, 
such as the time of enumeration, the wording of the questions, 
and the definition of a farm. For 1954 and 1953, no mention 
was made as to the date of the mailing of questionnaires, the date 
of the interviews, or to the minimum for area or production to be 
reported. In reference to the minimum area or amount of pro- 
duction for enumeration, the following statement, applying to 
1954, was contained in the reply to the Bureau's request for avail- 
able information: "Our procedure encompasses a mailed ques- 
tionnaire to all persons known to be engaged in any agriculture." 
Since the production data for 1954 are presented with the matching 
inventories as of January 1, 1955, and since these data were 
furnished to the Bureau shortly after July 1, 1955, it seems safe 
to assume that the data were gathered shortly after January 1. 

For the 1950 Census of Agriculture a farm was any place with 
either 3 or more acres and $150 or more of agricultural products 
or less than 3 acres, provided the value of sales of agricultural 
products amounted to $150 or more. Places that did not meet 



these minimum requirements were considered farms only if they 
had sufficient potential to meet these minima. 

The Census enumerators were not required to determine which 
places were farms. They were instructed to enumerate all places 
that the operator called farms, all places of 3 or more acres, and 
certain specialized operations, such as greenhouses. The de- 
termination as to which operations constituted farms was made 
during the office processing in Washington. 

For 1950, the Census of Agriculture was taken as of April 1 of 
that year. Most of the farms were enumerated in April and May. 
Inventory items relate to April 1; data on acreage, production, 
and sales to the crop year 1949. 

The classification of livestock by age and sex for 1954 (January 
1, 1955) varies somewhat from that used in 1950. The differing 
classifications are indicated in the tables presenting livestock data. 
The method of reporting crops also varied. This is indicated 
more fully in the several crop tables. 



AMERICAN SAMOA 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 17 

Censuses of agriculture 17 

Presentation of stat istics 17 

TABLES 

1. — Number of farms and number of specified livestock and poultry on hand: 1920 to 

1954 17 

2. — Acres of specified crops: 1919 to 1954 18 

3. — Number of trees or plants: 1920 to 1954 18 

13 



.2 

c 

O 






S .a 

c 
O 





..il" 



o 



£* 



<y 



15 



AMERICAN SAMOA 



Introduction. — American Samoa, since July 1, 1951, has been 
under the administrative control of the Department of the Interior. 
In response to the Director's letter of April 22, 1955, requesting 
agricultural data for 1954, the Governor of American Samoa 
furnished the available statistics. In making the presentation 
herein, these data have been supplemented by a few taken from the 
1955 and 1954 Annual Reports of the Governor to the Secretary 
of the Interior. 

In order to better understand the present situation of agriculture 
and its future possibilities, parts of a few paragraphs are quoted 
from the Governor's 1955 Annual Report, as follows: 

"American Samoa is composed of 7 islands divided into 3 
groups. Tutuila, and adjacent island, Aunuu, are the center of 
all governmental activities. The Manua group, some 80 miles 
to the east, is the source of the greater part of copra for export 
* * *. Rose and Swains Islands are both coral atolls, Rose being 
uninhabited and Swains being the home of some 75 persons * * *. 
"The population of American Samoa is estimated at 21,500 
as of June 30, 1955. 

"The islands of Tutuila and Manua are volcanic in origin, 
extremely mountainous, covered with dense tropical vegetation, 
and surrounded by fringing coral reefs. Steep-sided valleys 
and narrow coastal plains provide the only area suitable for 
agriculture. Through their practice of shifting cultivation, the 
Samoans have been able to utilize the precipitous slopes of the 
hills for garden plots containing taro, bananas, and tapioca. 

"The Samoan economy is essentially agrarian. With the 
rapidly increasing population, emphasis is being put on increas- 
ing subsistence crops, as well as money crops. Cocoa has been 
introduced during the last year as a source of income, and 
several small shipments have been made recently for export. 
Coffee is also being planted, and information on the care and 
production is being relayed to coffee growers via radio broad- 
casts and informational booklets. Copra still continues to be 
the largest export of the indigenous people. (Exports of copra, 
sun dried, amounted to 1,485 tons for the fiscal vear ended 
June 30, 1955.) 

"Most of the agricultural land is very steep and is used for 
plantations due to the pressure of the population. One church 
organization uses an area for pasture, and the Government- 
operated dairy utilizes an area for pasture. These are the only 
two pastures in American Samoa. 

"Land tenure is mainly the matai or family group * * *. 
Since the bulk of the land is under the matai system, the chief 
or the matai rents land with the advice of his village council and 
the proceeds are divided among the members of the clan " 

The data received from the Governor of Samoa were compiled 
from the reports of Extension Agents working for the Samoan 
Department of Agriculture. The duties of the Extension Agents 
involve the making of crop reports; conducting special crop sur- 
ways, for crops such as banana and cocoa; and the giving of advice 
in general to planters. 

There was no mention made of the exact period to which the 
data relate, the definition of a farm, or the method by which the 
basic data were obtained. However, since the reporting forms 
sent to the Governor requested information for 1954, it is pre- 
sumed that the data furnished relate to some point of time 



between July 1, 1954, and June 30, 1955. This latter assumption 
is strengthened by the fact that several of the quoted data are 
in agreement with those given in the 1955 Annual Report for the 
year ended June 30 of that year. 

Censuses of agriculture. — The first United States Census of 
Agriculture of American Samoa was taken in 1920 in conjunction 
with the Census of Population. Since that date a Census of 
Agriculture has been taken every 10 years up to and including 
the 1950 Census. There was no Census taken in 1954. Instead, 
an act of Congress directed that statistics from various Govern- 
ment sources be used. 

In the 1950 Census of Agriculture, any place that had any live- 
stock or 5 or more poultry on April 1, 1950, or on which any crops 
were harvested in 1949, was considered a farm. The enumerator 
was instructed to obtain a questionnaire for every place that grew 
crops in 1949 or kept livestock or poultry on April 1, 1950. The 
determination as to which reports constituted a farm was made 
during the office processing of the questionnaires in Washington. 

The 1950 Agriculture Questionnaire contained 31 questions 
calling for the name of the operator, the name of the owner of the 
property if other than operator, acres in the property, the area 
and quantity of the individual crops harvested in 1949, the number 
of trees or plants on April 1, 1950, and the quantity harvested in 
1949 for individual fruits and nuts, and the number of the several 
classes of livestock on hand on April 1, 1950. 

Presentation of statistics. — Data are presented herein for all 
Census years and for 1954 when figures are available. In several 
instances, an assumption has been made that the data relate to 
1954 when they could be applicable to 1955 or perhaps to both 
years. Information is shown for several items, for earlier Census 
years, even though no data seem to exist for recent years. Since 
the most recent data can be presented for the entire area only, no 
attempt 1ms been made to show island or county totals. 

Table 1. — Number of Farms and Number of Specified 
Livestock and Poultry on Hand: 1920 to 1954 



Item 


i 1954 


1950 
(Apr. 1) 


1940 
(Apr. 1) 


1930 
(Apr. 1) 


1920 
(Jan. 1) 




. ..number.. 


2,000 

50 

250 

2,900 

m 

11,950 
( ] ) 
( 3 ) 


1,490 

170 

233 

9,080 

15 

28,011 

189 

18 


1,038 

121 

272 

8,641 

34 

22,908 

332 

159 


815 

215 

606 

5,170 

<NA) 

16, 108 

667 

(NA) 


(NA) 

207 

438 

4,243 

(NA) 

13,338 

367 

(NA) 


Horses, mules, 

colts 

Cattle 1 . - 

Hogs and pigs . 

Sheep and lambs. 

Chickens 

Ducks 


and 

number. . 
number _ 
number.. 

number., 
number., 
number.. 





NA— Not available. 

i Probably for some period between July 1, 1954, and June 30, 1955. See text. 
1 Milk production for the Department of Agriculture dairy, for the fiscal vear 
ended June 30, 1954, was 142,426 pounds, according to the 1954 fiscal year report. 
» Not reported. 

17 



18 



SPECIAL REPORTS 



Table 2. — Acres of Specified Crops: 1919 to 1954 



Item 


1954 


1949 


1939 


1929 


1919 


Arrowroot... _ .acres . 

Cacao (cocoa) ..acres.. 

Sugarcane for thatching_.acres.. 

Sweetpotatoes acres.. 

Taro . . . .acres. 

Tobacco.. acres.. 

Yams .. _ acres . 

Other field crops. acres . 


(') 

2,500 
' 2, 250 

115 

0) 

600 

50 
100 
W 


20 
(NA) 
(NA) 

118 

4 

1,576 

13 
59 
8 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 

3 13 

(NA) 
714 

168 

67 

(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA— Not available, 
i Not reported. 

- Approximately 2,000 acres planted in new cocoa between July 1954, and July 
1955, according to 1955 fiscal year report. 
3 Sugarcane. 



Table 3. — Number of Trees or Plants: 1920 to 1954 



Item 



Alligator pears 

(avocados) number.. 

Bananas number.. 

Breadfruit number. _ 

Cacao (cocoa) number. . 

Coconuts number.. 

Copra tons.. 

Coffee number.. 

Lemons number 

Limes number.. 

Mangoes number.. 

Oranges number.. 

Papayas number.. 

Pineapples number. _ 

Citrons number.. 

Grapefruit number. 

Other fruits and 
nuts number. 



1954 



(') 

m 

34, 000 
< 360, 000 

(') 

1,680 

0) 

6,500 

8,000 
(') 
0) 
(') 

46, 900 
(') 
(') 

(') 



1950 



924 

(NA) 

637, 408 

3,172 

(NA) 

(NA) 

55 

2,336 

2,304 

2,152 

5,173 

47, 843 

53, 601 

(NA) 

78 



1,275 
459, 000 
3 46, 000 

1,515 

245, 000 

•858 

211 

709 

2,383 

3,203 

4,699 

37, 488 

48, 273 
560 
203 



1930 



918 

262, 590 

25,230 

(NA) 

275, 000 

1,889 

(NA) 

259 

279 
1,615 
2,080 
18, 494 

18, 006 

72 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1920 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
868 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NAi 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



NA— Not available. 

• Not reported. 

• Plants not reported; 2,500 acres (see Table 2); 2,500 tons as shown in 1955 fiscal year 
report. 

» Estimated, data incomplete. 

• Approximately 2,000 acres planted in new cocoa between July 1954, and July 1955, 
according to 1955 fiscal year report. 

' Exports from American Samoa to the United States in 1939. 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 



Agricultural production has been declining in the District of 
Columbia, particularly since the turn of the century. Land 
formerly used for the production of crops or the pasturing of 
livestock has been utilized largely for residential and office con- 
struction (public and private) and for parks, streets, etc. 

The approximate land area, in 1950, comprised 39,040 acres. 
At that time, only 1,265 acres were in farms. Two of the largest 
farms were institutional, belonging to the Federal Government. 
Neither of these were in operation in 1954. The following table 
portrays the trend in the number of farms and in the acreage of 
farmland and cropland harvested since figures were first gathered 
in a Federal Census of Agriculture. 



Year 


Number 
of farms 


Land in 
farms 


Cropland 
harvested ' 


1950 


28 

40 

65 

89 

104 

139 

204 

217 
269 
382 
435 
209 
238 
267 


(Acres) 
1, 265 
1,854 
2,341 
2,801 
3,071 
3,813 
5,668 

6,063 
8,489 
11, 745 
18, 146 
11,677 
34, 263 
27, 454 


(Acres) 
266 
867 
1,017 
1,495 
1,737 
2, 197 
2,230 

2,982 
3,396 
2,522 
4,568 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


1945 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1925 


1920 


1910 


1900 


1890 


1880 


1870— 


1860 


1850 





NA— Not available. 

1 Prior to 1925, the data relate to the total acreage of crops 
for which figures are available. 



Since the act of Congress providing for the 1954 Census of 
Agriculture expressly excluded the District of Columbia from the 
area for enumeration, an effort was made to ascertain if there were 
any data available from official sources. Agricultural activities 
most likely to be carried on in the National Capital area would 
be plant nurseries, greenhouses, vegetable gardens, and keeping 
of domestic animals and poultry. The Assessor's Office, particu- 
larly the Real Estate Tax Division, the Personal Tax Division, 
the Sales and Use Tax Division, and the Income and Franchise 
Tax Division, had no information identifying lands and other 
forms of property used for agricultural production. 

The Health Department makes inspectional visits to dairy 
farms, dairy plants, etc., for sanitation purposes. A license is 
needed to raise livestock but none had been issued for 1954 with 
the exception of a livery stable that keeps riding horses for hire. 

A horticulturist of the National Capitol Parks Division of the 
United States Interior Department named four establishments 
in the District of Columbia that were growing flowers or plants 
for sale. The Trees and Parks Division of the District Govern- 
ment confirmed the information concerning the raising of nursery 
and/or greenhouse crops for sale. An official reported he had 
observed no places raising vegetables or other crops for sale. In 
the 1950 Census of Agriculture 2 establishments reported nursery 
products grown for sale, 16 reported sales of flowers and/or flower- 
ing plants, and 10 reported sales of vegetables grown under glass 
and/or vegetable plants. Four farms reported vegetables grown 
in the open for sale. An establishment may be represented more 
than once in the above counts. 

The 1950 Census of Agriculture recorded $569,621 as the total 
value of sales of all farm products for 1949. Of this total, $429,311 
was represented by crops, $139,810 by livestock and livestock 
products, and $500 by forest products. The crop total comprised 
$1,998 for field crops, $3,575 for vegetables, $206 for fruits and 
nuts, and $423,532 for horticultural specialties. 

19 



3B9 8 0&_B9- 



GUAM 



CONTENTS 

Pagt 

Introduction __ 25 

Censuses of agriculture 25 

TABLES 

1. — Number of farms, land in farms, and number of livestock on farms: 1920 to 1954- 25 

2. — Field crops — Area and quantity harvested: 1920 to 1954 25 

3. — Fruits and nuts — Number of trees or plants and quantity harvested: 1920 to 

1954 26 

4. — Specified vegetables — Area and quantity harvested: 1954, 1950, and 1940 26 

5. — Number of farms and number of cattle, swine, and poultry, by municipalities: 

1954, 1950, and 1940 27 

21 



GUAM 
Municipalities and Towns 




i*m^ 



ICLES IHDfCATC r»tO HAV1MO 
IM THAN POD INHABITANT* 



23 






GUAM 



Introduction. — The most recent data, in this report, for Guam 
were secured from the Office of the Governor. Some of the 
figures were entered on statistical tables which the Bureau of the 
Census had supplied. The following sentences appeared in the 
Governor's letter to the Director of the Census: "The data are 
for the year ending June 30, 1954. They were obtained by our 
Farm Advisers who collected production figures from individual 
farmers during the year." The attention of the Bureau was 
called to additional data which were contained in the Governor's 
1954 Annual Report to the Secretary of the Interior. For com- 
parative purposes some data from the 10-year Censuses of Agri- 
culture, beginning with 1920, are also presented. 

A few excerpts are quoted from the 1954 Annual Report, for 
the fiscal year ended June 30. 

"This was a challenging year for Guam farmers * * *. The 
distribution of rainfall, so important to agriculture, was some- 
what unfavorable, there being 62.3 inches August to October 
and only 12.5 inches February to June. Typhoon Nina in 
August destroyed or retarded an estimated two-thirds of the 
growing corn, bananas, papayas, and vegetables; and the same 
proportion of fish weirs. On the favorable side, the farmers 
found a strong demand for tneir produce. They saw more 
evidence that better care of crops and livestock contributes to 
better harvests, and were challenged to better fanning. 

"Rice planting was revived by three Talofofo farmers with 
great success. 

"Guam's climate permits pasturing of cattle all seasons of 
the year. Because of such inexpensive feed, cattle should be 
the most important kind of livestock in Guam. Large sections 
of the Island consist of rough and arid lands, suitable only for 
grazing. Very little grain is readily available for cattle fodder 
in Guam. 

"Guam is well adapted to hog production; there being 
enough readily available swill to maintain at least 20,000 head. 
"* * * The number of farm animals in Guam has passed 
that of prewar days." 

Censuses of agriculture. — The first United States Census of 
Agriculture was taken in 1920 in conjunction with the Census of 
Population. A Census of Agriculture has been taken every 10 
years since that date. 

Most of the comparative data are understandable without 
explanatory text. However, because of the large difference in 
the number of farms for 1954 and 1950, the definition of a farm is 
given for the 1950 Census. For the 1950 Census of Agriculture, 
places were counted as farms if any crops were grown in 1949 or 
if any livestock or 5 or more chickens or other poultry were kept 
in April 1, 1950. However, the Census enumerator was not given 
that definition of a farm. He was instructed to obtain an agri- 
culture questionnaire for every place on which crops were grown 



in 1949 or on which any livestock or poultry were kept on April 1, 
1950. 

Table 1. — Number of Farms, Land in Farms, and Number 
of Livestock on Farms: 1920 to 1954 









Census 


Census 


Census 


Census 


Item 




1954 


of 19 ".n 


of 194(1 


of 1930 


of 1920 








(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Jan. 1) 


Farms 


. -number - - 


' 1, 380 


2,262 


2,529 


2,104 


(NA) 


Lund in farms 


_ hectares. . 


'814 


10, 025 


26, 264 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Carabaos... 


.. number- - 


898 


679 


1, 560 


3. 253 


1,160 


Cattle 


---number. - 


5. 33b 


2,847 


5, 845 


6,948 


4, 535 


Goats and kids 


..number - 


2,924 


748 


1,353 


1,003 


543 


Hogs and pigs 


..-number.. 


12, 79(1 


7,056 


14, 089 


7,616 


4,365 


Horses and colts. .. 


... number.. 


ISO 


58 


126 


147 


73 


Chickens 


...uumber.- 


171, 79(1 


132,781 


209, 465 


154,784 


(NA) 


Ducks 


IIUNlliiT . 


2. 639 


399 


1,027 


1,025 


(NA) 


Other poultry 


number. . 


(NA) 


529 


932 


(NA) 


(NA) 



NA — Not available. 

1 Pasture and range areas not included. 

Comparability of 1954 statistics. — The totals given in Table 1 
differ slightly from the totals, distributed by municipalities, in 
Table 5. Those in Table 1 were submitted to the Bureau in the 
Governor's transmittal in May 1955, while those in Table 5 were 
taken from the 1954 fiscal year report (year ending June 30, 1954.) 

Table 2. — Field Crops — Area and Quantity Harvested: 
1920 to 1954 









Census 


Census 


Census 


Census of 


Item 




1954 


of 1950 


of 1940 


of 1930 


1920 








(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Jan. 1) 


Arrowroot 


.hectares 


(NA) 


(NA) 


38 


30 


13 




pounds.. 


(') 


3,461 


136, 640 


48, 836 


34, 256 


Cassava 


.hectares 


(NA) 


4 


74 


67 


32 




pounds.. 


142. 275 


15,710 


472, 657 


195,511 


103, 513 


Corn 


. hectares. . 


(NA) 


279 


881 


1,443 


880 




pounds. _ 


065, 140 


571,413 


2, 033, 528 


2,110,416 


2 28, 947 


Sugarcane 


-hectares.. 


(NA) 


9 


33 


21 


5 




pounds . 


33. 040 


23, 152 


408, 000 


248, 078 


24, 200 


Sweetpotatoes. 


. hectares . - 


(NA) 


22 


128 


220 


217 




pounds. - 


63. 030 


107,1144 


756,415 


587, 895 


2 13, 671 


Taro 


-hectares-- 


(NA) 


77 


293 


41$ 


191 




pounds. . 


196, 440 


280, 742 


(NA) 


1,824,967 


1 1,281,861 


Tobacco 


.hectares . 


(NA) 


(NA) 


12 


21 


32 




pounds . 


(') 


965 


20, 260 


27, 965 


36, 261 


Yams 


.hectares- . 


(NA) 


15 


80 


163 


64 




pounds. . 


32, 895 


87, 2*3 


840, 015 


1, 160, 280 


! 12, 104 






4.5 




517 


197 


58 




pounds . . 


13, 735 




» 10, 860 


' 4, 096 


'615 





NA — Not available. 
' Very little. 
' Bushels. 
> Number. 



25 



26 



SPECIAL REPORTS 

Table 3. — Fruits and Nuts — Number of Trees or Plants and Quantity Harvested: 1920 to 1954 



Item 



1954 



Census or 

I960 
(Apr. 1) 



Census of 

1940 
(Apr. 1) 



Census of 

1930 
(Apr. 1) 



Census of 

1920 
(Jan. 1) 



Alligator pears (avocados) _ __ _ trees. 

number. 
Bananas plants. 

bunehes. 
Breadfrult ..trees. 

nuniber. 

Coconuts trees. 

number- 
Coffee _ _ ___ trees. 

pounds - 
Kapok. trees. 

pounds. 

Mangoes trees. 

number. 
Papayas - -- .plants. 

number- 
Plneapples plants. 

number. 

Citrus, total.... trees. 

number - 
Grapefruit trees. 

number- 
Lemons trees. 

number- 
Limes _ trees. 

number. 
Oranges trees. 

number. 
Tangerines — trees. 

number. 

Otber fruits trees. 

number. 



(NA) 
' 37, 270 
(NA) 
I 550, 661 
(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 

(') 

(NA) 
(«) 

(NA) 
(') 

(NA) 
l 42, 335 
(NA) 
1 258, 340 
(NA) 
24,680 

(NA) 
> 8, 350 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,870 
67,064 

142,222 
65, 266 
12,405 

371, 589 

241,816 

3, 172, 106 

7,968 

2,465 

418 

1,131 

1,758 
428, 072 

2,211 
10,504 
35,603 
10, 726 

4,470 

163,619 

51 

975 

1,330 

54,987 

234 

7,941 

860 

25.003 

1,995 

74,713 

52 
1,153 



10, 220 
959, 881 
535, 240 
301, 264 

36, 615 
2, 855, 606 

885, 424 
20, 849, 546 
90,254 
42,686 
9,629 
18,283 

4,602 

1, 933, 761 

7,719 
78, 153 
134, 263 
87,025 

24, 101 

2, 274, 441 

760 

19, 726 

11,270 

868,684 

2,643 
373, 239 

5,477 
365, 073 

3,951 
647, 719 

162 
5,013 



7,407 
287, 991 
250,521 
196, 327 
36, 493 
3,671,190 

1,021,884 

17, 431, 589 

101,488 

54,718 

6,380 

14,856 

6,263 

1, 184, 248 

6,847 

96,712 

157, 628 

118,233 

14,710 

1, 423, 065 

225 

8,036 

8,496 

882,233 



139, 749 

4,891 

393, 047 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



5,832 

158,142 

117,298 

15, 970 

1,003,700 

404, 581 
7, 643, 200 
32, 191 
19,553 
(NA) 
(NA) 

284 
32,652 
1,247 
15,288 
42,637 
29,928 

5,180 

689, 192 

33 

1,392 

1,992 

205,100 

367 

88,000 

2,788 

394, 700 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



NA — Not available. 
' Pounds. » Plentiful. 



" Very little. 



Table 4. — Specified Vegetables — Area and Quantity Har- 
vested: 1954, 1950, and 1940 



Item 



1954 



Census 
of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



Census 
of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



Beans (green) hectares.. 

pounds. _ 
Cabbage hectares.. 

pounds.. 
Eggplant hectares., 

pounds.. 
Peppers hectares.. 

pounds. . 
Tomatoes hectares.. 

pounds.. 
Melons hectares.. 

pounds.. 

Bittermelons pounds.. 

Muskmelons pounds.. 

Watermelons pounds.. 

Cucumbers hectares.. 

pounds.. 
Peplnos hectares.. 

pounds. . 
Pumpkins hectares.. 

pounds. . 
Squash hectares.. 

pounds.. 
Onions. hectares.. 

pounds.. 
Radishes hectares.. 

pounds. . 



(NA) 
56, 426 
(NA) 

l 37, 800 
(NA) 
47,911 
(NA) 
10. 139 
(NA) 
21, 770 
(NA) 

198, 870 
555 

162, 040 
36, 275 
(NA) 
57, 820 
(NA) 
11.830 
(NA) 
2,650 
(NA) 
13,810 
(NA) 
17, 595 
(NA) 
25, 933 



10 
33, 072 

(NA) 
615 
(NA) 
2,869 
(NA) 
3,686 
13 

13,628 
15 

61,764 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
5 

20, 475 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
2 

15, 150 



2 
3,271 



(NA) 

295 

(NA) 

55 

1 

3,530 

5 

36,840 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

25 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA — Not available. 
1 Chinese cabbage. 



GUAM 

Table 5. — Number of Farms and Number of Cattle, Swine, and Poultry, 



27 



by Municipalities: 1954, 1950, and 1940. 



Municipalities 



Total 

Agana 

Agat 

Asan 

Barrigada.. 
Dededo 

Inarajan . . . 
Machanao- 

Merizo 

Pit! 

Sinajana. . . 

Sumay 

Talofofo.... 

Umatac 

Yigo 

Yona 



Farms 



i 1.380 



CNA) 
140 
33 
65 
113 



m 



130 



110 
20 
248 



m 



ISO 
61 

177 
133 



Census 
of 1050 
(Apr. 1) 



4 
205 

95 
561 

87 

183 
21 

120 
86 

496 

1 
94 
68 
101 
140 



Census 
of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



281 
169 
80 



200 
81 
240 
140 
241 

127 
81 

139 
80 

123 



Cattle 



6,130 



S3 

353 

252 
384 
205 

1.711 

( ! ) 
532 
134 
712 

w 

574 
364 



Census 
of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



2.S47 



450 

81 
89 
703 
53 

326 
11 

218 
29 

410 

1 
32 
89 
131 
224 



Census 
of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



5. 845 



735 
274 
182 
839 
119 

703 
275 
200 
291 
477 

413 

200 

67 

272 



Swine 



11,895 



147 

1,450 
575 
778 
945 

1,231 

442 

315 

1,220 

( 2 ) 
475 
582 

3,000 
735 



Census 
of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



61 

507 

302 

1,890 

299 

634 
152 

257 

237 

1, 114 

6 
194 
215 
581 
607 



Census 

of 11140 
(Apr. 1) 



14.0S9 



1,759 

607 

298 

2,429 

1,783 

872 
583 
489 
680 

1,181 

631 
478 
317 
949 
1,033 



Poultry 



1954 



171,840 



5, 000 
17,000 

8,000 
23,600 
20, 500 

14,300 

m 

9,100 
2,000 
29, 550 

W 

8,500 
4,600 
16,000 
13,790 



Census 
of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



133, 709 



275 

7,230 

4,440 

30,681 

8, 583 

8,049 
3, 125 
4,732 
3,720 
25, 442 

122 
6,002 
3,430 
12, 127 
9,751 



Census 
of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



211,424 



25, 025 
9, 326 
3,402 
40,854 
25, 568 

8,345 
11,961 
9,389 
9,493 
16, 108 

10, 707 
6, 409 
2,635 
18,630 
13, 872 



NA— Not available. 

1 Pasture and range areas not Included. 

' No data shown for these areas in 1954 fiscal report. 



HAWAII 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 33 

Censuses of agriculture 33 

Land utilization 33 

Livestock and poultry 33 

Crops 33 

Farms reporting 36 

Value of marketings 36 

TABLES 

1. — Agricultural land utilization: 1954 and 1950 33 

2. — Specified livestock and livestock products: 1900 to 1954 34 

3. — Livestock and livestock products: 1954 34 

4. — Livestock and livestock products, by Islands: 1954 34 

5. — Acres and production of specified crops: 1900 to 1954 35 

6. — Acres, production, and value of specified crops: 1954 35 

7. — Acres and production of specified crops, by Islands: 1954 36 

8. — Number of diversified commercial-size enterprises, 1954; and number of farms 

reporting, Census of 1950; for selected items of production 36 

9. — Value of agricultural marketings: 1954 36 

29 



< 

< 




31 



HAWAII 



Introduction. — A request was made to the Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service, University of Hawaii, for the agiicultural statistics 
for Hawaii which were required for incorporation in the Reports 
for the 1954 Census of Agriculture. The nature of the data desired 
was indicated in a set of tables furnished by the Census Bureau. 

In the reply to the Bureau's request, it was stated that the 
available data did not fit well into the outline that had been fur- 
nished. The following statement was contained in the corre- 
spondence: "In many cases our estimate base is radically different 
from yours. For example, our crop values are calculated at the 
wholesale level — yours at the farm level. Our poultry and hog 
population estimates do not include those kept principally for the 
owner's household use." 

A copy of the annual report entitled "1954 Statistics of Hawaiian 
Agriculture" was submitted. This and a similar report for 1955 
have supplied the most recent factual material given in this section. 
The 1954 report sets forth the source of the statistics and several 
of their limitations, as follows: 

"The statistics of production and value in this publication 
relate principally to 'diversified' agriculture, diversified being used 
in the sense of nonplantation crops. Statistical material on the 
two plantation crops, sugar and pineapples, was furnished by 
the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association and the Pineapple 
Companies of Hawaii. 

"Data on diversified agriculture are for 'commercial' produc- 
tion, which excludes very small farm enterprises, some of the 
minor crops, and products consumed on farms. A few crops 
for which production or acreage data are unreliable, e. g., 
Chinese squash, Chinese peas, yam bean root, peanuts, mangoes, 
lychee, passion fruit, guavas, plums, grapes, persimmons, and 
pineapples for the fresh fruit market are not included. Com- 
mercial production of livestock products is defined as the portion 
originating from beef cattle herds of 20 or more head, dairy and 
swine herds of 10 or more, and poultry flocks of 100 or more 
layers or meat birds. 

"Basic livestock data are collected in August or December by 
mailed questionnaires and enumeration by county agents. 
Monthly estimates of dairy, poultry, and hog production are 
obtained from stratified samples of enterprises, supplemented 
by slaughter records. Production of fruits and vegetables is 
estimated from recorded wholesale marketings, adjusted for direct 
sales to retail stores or to consumers, and for field losses of 
mature crops resulting from market gluts. Coffee, rice, and 
taro production is estimated from milling records. Acreage of 
diversified crops is obtained by monthly enumeration." 

Censuses of agriculture. — The first Census of Agriculture in 
Hawaii, by the United States, was taken in 1900 in conjunction 
with the Decennial Census of Population. Since 1900, a Census of 
Agriculture has been taken in conjunction with the Census of 
Population in each decennial enumeration. 

Because of the restricted comparability of the available data 
for Census years with the statistics for recent years, only a few 
items are included in the historical tables. In order to understand 
the limitations in the comparability of the data for the two series, 
the definition of a farm, as used in 1950 only, is given herein. If 
there is need for contrasting the exact comparability of data for 
1950 and earlier years, reference should be made to the 1950 
Report for this Territory. 

For the 1950 Census of Agriculture, places of 3 or more acres 
were counted as farms if the value of agricultural products in 1949, 
exclusive of home gardens, amounted to $150 or more. The agri- 
cultural products could have been either for home use or for sale. 
Places of less than 3 acres were counted as farms only if the value 



of sales of agricultural products in 1949 amounted to $150 or 
more. Places operated in 1949 for which the value of agricultural 
products in 1949 was less than these minima because of crop 
failure or other unusual situation and places operated in 1950 for 
the first time were counted as farms if normally they could be 
expected to produce these minimum quantities of farm products. 

All the land under the control of one person or partnership was 
included as one farm. Control may have been through owner- 
ship, or through lease or rental arrangement. 

The Census enumerator was not given the definition of a farm. 
He was instructed to obtain an agriculture questionnaire for every 
place that the operator considered a farm, for every place of 3 or 
more acres whether or not it was considered a farm, and for places 
of less than 3 acres from which agricultural products (vegetables, 
flowers, orchids, eggs, poultry, hogs, etc.) valued at $100 or more 
were sold in 1949. Thus, agriculture questionnaires were filled 
for more places than those that qualified as farms. The determi- 
nation as to which reports were to be included in the tabulations 
as representing farms was made during the processing of the 
questionnaires in Washington. This procedure was followed in 
order that uniform criteria could be applied. 

Land utilization. — Table 1 is presented to show the natural re- 
sources available for agricultural production and how these 
resources were utilized in 1954 and 1950. 



Table 1. — Agricultural Land Utilization: 1954 


AND 1950 


Use 


1964 


Census of 
1950 


Total land area 

Cultivated area, total 


(Acres) 
4, 099, 840 

307.200 
220, 138 
73,200 

U3.900 

4,320 

2,721 

205 

608 

6,043 

1, 384, 000 
1, 045, 000 
1, 363, 640 


(Acres) 
4, 099, 840 

1 296, 752 

2 210, 047 




' 51,018 




(NA) 


Coffee 


3,403 




1,161 


Rice - 


170 


Taro 


591 






i 12, 962 






» 1,361,446 




(NA) 




(NA) 









NA — N ot available. 

1 Total of cropland harvested, cropland for future harvest, and crop failure. 

» Acres in the crop, Dec. 31, 1949. 

3 Acres in the crop. Apr. 1, 1950. 

* Acreage data of diversified crops for Molokai not included. 

' Land in orchards, groves, coffee plantations, planted nut trees, vegetables for sale, 
Irish potatoes, and sweetpotatoes. 

• Land In farms, pastured in 1949. 

Livestock and poultry. — Comparative figures for livestock and 
poultry, for 1954 and for Census enumerations, are given in Table 2 
for a limited number of items. The 1954 data are for the dates 
shown in Table 3. Table 4 presents a few of the data for Islands 
for 1954 only. 

Crops. — Tables 5, 6, and 7 present the data for crops. W ere 
possible, the acreage, production, and the wholesale value of 
marketings are given. Whenever historical data are shown, 
footnotes have been used to point out any seeming lack of com- 
parability. Historical comparisons and the distribution of data 
by Islands are limited to those crops with approximately 200 
acres or more. 

Honey and beeswax are included with crops to conform with 
the statistics in the 1954 Report. Likewise, the order of arrange- 
ment and the classification of the crops are consistent with those 
in the 1954 Report. 

33 



34 



SPECIAL REPORTS 

Table 2. — Specified Livestock and Livestock Products: 1900 to 1954 



Item 



Horses and mules on hand number. 

Cattle and calves on hand. — number". 

Milk sold - gallons. 

Hogs and pigs on hand number. 

Sheep and lambs on hand.. number. 

Wool shorn pounds. 

Chickens on hand » -. number. 

Chickens sold. _ — number. 

Eggs sold dozen. 



(NA) 

152, 300 

10, 126, 250 

68,580 
13,550 
69, 000 

843, 000 

972, 000 

5, 994, 600 



Census of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



7,664 

155, 739 

7, 483, 142 

65, 435 
13, 513 
80, 256 

472, 183 

610, 346 

3, 134, 347 



Census of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



10, 044 

139, 078 

4, 442, 013 

31,684 
26, 207 
129, 964 

272, 590 

166, 545 

(NA) 



Census of 1930 
(Apr. 1) 



12, 030 

138, 316 

3, 064, 240 

30, 563 
32, 137 
159, 004 

270, 523 

(NA) 

» 1, 009, 866 



Census of 1920 
(Jan. 1) 



15, 947 

137,091 

1, 166, 531 

24, 248 
43,494 
260, 529 

65, 45S 
15,250 
91, 135 



Census of 1910 
(Apr. 16) 



15, 856 
145, 029 
740, 184 

20,484 

76, 710 

349,711 

64,136 

4 67, 616 
« 240, 408 



Census of 1900 
(June 1) 



12, 932 
102, 908 
84, 451 

8,057 
102, 098 
424, 228 

31, 888 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA— Not available, 
i For date, see Table 3. 

a For 1954, c e hick*ns e o™all I ages; r 'for l 1950 and 1940, 4 months old and over; for 1930 and 1920, age not specified; for 1910, over 3 months old; for 1900 over 3 months old, including 
guineas. 

4 Poultry of all kinds. 
* Eggs of all kinds. 

Table 3. — Livestock and Livestock Products: 1954 



Item 


Date or period 


Unit 


Number 


Cattle: 
On hand— Beef cattle on ranches '. 
Mature dairy cows 2 __. 


Dec. 31 

Aug. 31 

12 months. .. 
12 months... 
12 months. .. 
12 months... 
12 months... 
12 months... 
12 months... 

Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
12 months... 
12 months. .. 

Dec. 31 

12 months. .. 
12 months... 
12 months... 
12 months.. . 

Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 

Aug. 31 

Aug. 31 
Aug. 31 
12 months. .. 
12 months... 
12 months... 
12 months... 
12 months.. _ 
12 months... 


Head 

Head 

Head 

Head 

Dollars 

Dollars 

Dollars 

Quarts. __ . 
Dollars 

Head 

Head 

Head 

Head 

Head 

Head. 

Head 

Dollars 

Head 

Head 

Dollars 

Pounds . 

Dollars 

Birds 

Birds 

Birds 

Birds - 

Birds- 

Birds 

Birds 

Dollars 

Cases 

Cases 

Dollars 


152, 300 

11, 120 

34, 350 

2,030 

7. 255, 000 

6, 965, 000 
290, 000 

40, 505, 000 

7, 500, 000 

68, 580 
53,790 

890 

7,950 

44, 950 

14, 790 

76, 400 

3, 980, 000 

13, 550 

1,775 

26, 000 

69, 000 
36, 000 

843,000 
416, 000 
179, 000 
109, 000 
139, 000 
972, 000 
924, 000 

1, 809. 000 
199, 820 
194, 600 

4, 121, 000 


Dairy » 




Beef 


Dairy' 






Swine (hogs and pigs) : 
















Sheep: 










Poultry : 




Pullets, 6 weeks to laying 

Other chickens over 6 weeks 

Chickens under 6 weeks. 


Sold 


Value 




Sold. - 







1 Herds of 20 or more head. 

2 Herds of 10 or more head of mature cows. 

3 Marketings, including calves. 

' Flocks of 100 or more layers or meat birds. 



Table 4. — Livestock 1 and Livestock Products, by Islands: 1954 



Item 


Unit 


The Territory 






Island 






Hawaii 


Maul 


Molokai, 
Lanai 


Oahu 


Kauai, 
Niib.au 


Cattle: 


Head 


152, 300 

11, 120 

4 40, 505, 000 

6S.5S0 

13,550 
69, 000 

843, 000 
972, 000 
199, 820 


104, 900 

(NA) 

2, 883, 000 

6,460 

(NA) 
57,000 

162, 200 
182, 000 
41,800 


24,900 

(NA) 

2, 345, 000 

4,080 

(NA) 
(NA) 

42, 300 
47, 000 
15,760 


3,450 

(NA) 
44,000 

990 

(NA) 
(NA) 

1,700 

5,000 

630 


8,000 

(NA) 

34, 060, 000 

64, 770 

(NA) 
(NA) 

590, 800 
671,000 
129, 630 


11,050 

(NA) 

1, 373, 000 

3,390 

(NA) 
12,000 

56, 100 
67, 000 
12,100 




Head 


Milk sold, total 




Head 




Head 






Poultry: 


Birds - 




Birds 











NA— Not available. 
' For dates, see Table 3. 

3 Herds of 20 or more head. 

» Herds of 10 or more head of mature cows. 

4 Detail does not add to total. 

• Flocks of 100 or more layers or meat birds. 



HAWAII 

Table 5. — Acres and Production of Specified Crops: 1900 to 1954 



35 



Item 


Unit 


■1954 


Census of 

1950 
(Apr. 1) 


Census of 

1940 
(Apr. 1) 


Census of 

1930 
(Apr. 1) 


Census of 

1920 
(Jan. 1) 


Census of 

1910 
(Apr. 15) 


Census of 

1900 
(June 1) 




Acres 

Tons 


220. 138 
(NA) 
73,200 
(NA) 

194 

920,000 

924 

6, 400, 000 

(XA) 

(XA) 

652 

10, 885, 000 

533 

204 

493 

275 

376 

284 

276 

74 

4,600 

173 

15,900 

481 

4,320 

8, 264. 000 

2,721 

930, 000 

205 

6.150 

(XA) 

(XA) 

(XA) 

(XA) 

608 

105, 750 


'210,047 

7, 888, 526 

'51,018 

654. 915 

299 

531,016 

1,137 

5, 363, 791 

279 

281,394 

907 

3, 809, 371 

596 

381 
672 
353 
353 
326 
376 
106 
4,956 
279 

12, 177 
582 

3,403 

4,648,155 

1,161 

703, 931 

170 

6,585 

752 

9,639 

1,216 

13, 050 
691 

104, 897 


239, 451 

8, 535, 023 

48, 598 

614, 484 

(XA) 

1,084,612 

705 

8, 382, 000 

(XA) 

220. 673 

(XA) 

5, 232, 000 

204 

301 
553 
285 
129 

(XA) 
121 
4X7 

19,916 

180 

9,271 

449 

4,136 

8, 546, 783 

(XA) 

181, 159 

509 

19,018 

1,862 

16, 320 

468 

> 16,902 

622 

115,800 


(NA) 

7, 471. 452 

(NA) 

354,940 

(NA) 

•308,314 

(XA) 

• 278, 063 

(XA) 

« 485. 192 

(XA) 

< 1,388,989 

520 

139 

694 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 
(XA) 

214 
6,054 

336 
18, 777 

309 

5,360 

19,949,521 

(XA) 

5. 272 

2, 045 

75, 821 

1,532 

20, 080 

(XA) 

(XA) 

772 

239, 020 


(XA) 

4, 862. 707 

(NA) 

149. 991 

(NA) 
'68,575 

(NA) 
> 160, 953 

(NA) 
< 353. 398 

(XA) 
• 739, 556 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 

405 
13,654 

232 
13.008 
(XA) 

5,687 

19, 883. 650 

(XA) 

(XA) 

5.801 
295,718 

6,027 
64,473 
(XA) 
(XA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
4, 240, 238 

(NA) 
'12,361,695 

(NA) 
G3, 247 
(NA) 
'333,069 
(XA) 
• 2, 265 
(XA) 
' 22, 078 
(NA) 

(XA) 
(XA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 
(XA) 

353 
9,732 

270 
12,104 
(XA) 

3,727 
9, 834. 026 
(NA) 
(XA) 
9,425 
418,279 
3,190 
46.917 
(XA) 
(XA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
2. 239, 376 

(NA) 
« 116, 560 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
« 141,653 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 
166 

5,545 
135 

5,106 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(XA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 

9,130 
334, 424 

3,238 
64,900 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(XA) 
(NA) 






Fruits and melons : 


Tons 












Pounds 

Acres 




Acres 

Pounds 

Acres 




Vegetables for sale : 








Acres. 










Acres - 






Hundredweight 

Acres 

Hundredweight 




Miscellaneous crops: 
Coffee .. 




Macadamia nuts 

Rice 


Pounds. 

Acres 

Pounds 

Acres 

Hundredweight 






Hundredweight. 


Taro 


Tons 






Hundredweight 



NA — Not available. 

' Molokai not Included. Production for 1954 was estimated from recorded marketings, with adjustments for direct sales to retailers or consumers by farmers, 
resulting from market gluts are included In the production estimates. 
3 Acres in the crop, December 31, 1949. 
' Acres in the crop, April 1, 1950. ' Boxes. 

• Number. * Bags. 

* Bunches. 8 Green weight. 



Field losses 



Table 6. — Acres, Production, and Value of Specified Crops: 1954 ' 



Item 



All crops, total . 

Sugar 

Pineapples 

Fruits and melons, total 
Avocados: 

Bearing 

Nonbearing 

Bananas: '" 

Bearing 

Nonbearing 

Oranges: 

Bearing 

Nonbearing 

Papayas: 

Bearing 

Nonbearing.. 

Tangerines 

Cantaloups 

Watermelons 

Vegetables, total 

Beans, snap 

Broccoli 

Burdock. 

Cabbage, head 

Cabbage, Chinese — 
Cabbage, mustard... 

Carrots 

Cauliflower.. 

Celery _._ 



Acres ! 



307, 926 

220, 138 

73, 200 

2,385 

164 
30 

862 
62 



24 
464 



36 
533 

3.658 

204 

62 

41 

493 

275 
71 

90 
35 



Production 3 



Pounds 
(NA) 
(XA) 
(XA) 

22,310,000 

920, 000 



6, 400, 000 



240, 000 



10, 885, 000 

"'370,' 666 

265, 000 

3, 230, 000 

42, 630, 000 

1,925,000 

350, 000 

665, 000 

8, 175, 000 

2,710,000 

920, 000 

905. 000 

300. 000 

1,225,000 



Value ' 



Dollars 
260. 974. 000 
141,000,000 
108, 000, 000 

1,585,000 

76, 000 



459, 000 



12, 000 



56. 000 

47, 000 

306, 000 

.158,000 
290, 000 
67. 000 
113,000 

315.000 
286, 000 
86, 000 

53, 000 
43, 000 
144, 000 



Item 



Vegetables— Continued 

Corn, green 

Cucumbers 

Datkon 

Dasheens. .- 

Eggplant 

Ginger root 

Lettuce 

Lotus root -- 

Onions, dry 

Onions, green 

Peppers, sweet 

Potatoes 

Pumpkins 

Squash, Italian 

S weetpotatoes 

Tomatoes 

Watercress 

Miscellaneous crops, total 
Coffee: » 

Bearing - 

Nonbearing.. 

Macadamia nuts: T 

Bearing... -- 

Nonbearing - 

Rice' 

Taro - 

Honey and beeswax 



Acres > 



376 

292 

284 

16 

35 

11 

276 

60 



35 

80 
74 

33 

12 

173 

481 

21 

8,545 

3,546 
1,465 

1,326 
1,395 

205 



Production ' 



Pounds 
1, 245. 000 
3, 360, 000 
3, 535. 000 
365, 000 

5S0, 000 

505, 000 

2, 730, 000 

440,000 

740, 000 
480, 000 
810,000 
460, 000 

285, 000 

215,000 

1.590,000 

5, 670. 000 

2. 445. 000 

20, 384, 000 

8, 264, 000 



930, 000 



615, 000 
10, 575, 000 



Value • 



Dollars 

96, 000 

363,000 

148, 000 

59, 000 

54,000 
107, 000 
329, 000 
109, 000 

46, 000 
66, 000 
131,000 
27, 000 

7,000 

28,000 

125, 000 

822, 000 

244, 000 

6,209,000 

5, 537, 000 



159, 000 



105,000 
40S, 000 
• 22. 000 



NA— Not available. 

i Data for Molokai not included. 

a Acreage of tree fruits, lotus root, taro, and water cress is average acreage for year. 
Acreage of melons, other vegetables, and rice is plantings harvested during the year. 
Acreage of coffee and macadamia nuts is that at end of year. 

3 Productiou is estimated from recorded marketings, with adjustments for direct sales 
to retailors or consumers by farmers. Field losses resulting from market gluts are included 
in the production estimates. 



• Value is calculated at average wholesale prices of marketings on the Island of origin. 
No value is included for the following quantities of crops not harvested because of market 
conditions (1,000 pounds): 15 avocados, 50 oranges, 170 papayas, 10 tangerines, 270 head 
cabbage, 55 carrots, 30 cucumbers. 5 dry onions, 155 pumpkins, 60 sweetpotatoes, and 
75 tomatoes. Value of sugar and pineapples includes processed products and byproducts. 

5 Includes cooking bananas. 

• Crop year ending June 30 for production and value; green basis. 

7 Production and value are in-shell basis. 

8 Production and value are milled basis. 

• Revised figure is 37,000. 22,000 was retained to maintain internal consistency. 



36 



SPECIAL REPORTS 

Table 7- — Acres and Production of Specified Crops, by Islands: 1 1954 



Item 


Unit 


The Territory 


Hawaii 


Maui 


Oahu 


Kauai 






220,138 
(NA) 
73,200 

(NA) 

194 

920,000 

924 

6, 400, 000 

652 

10, 885, 000 

533 

3, 230, 000 

204 
1,925,000 

493 
8, 175, 000 

275 

2, 710, 000 

376 

1,245.000 

284 

3, 535, 000 

276 
2, 730, 000 

74 

4,600 

173 

15. 900 

481 

5, 670. 000 

4,320 

8, 264, 000 

2,721 

930, 000 

205 

6,150 

608 

105, 750 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

156 

746,000 

47 

390.000 

159 

2, 500. 000 

18 

160, 000 

32 
230,000 

84 
1,380,000 

63 
640,000 

18 

80, 000 

236 

2,600,000 

185 

1,530,000 

13 

1,000 

43 

4,000 

76 

870,000 

4.280 

8, 264, 000 

2, 055 

670,000 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

32 
135,000 

53 
310.000 

11 
100,000 

99 
550,000 

27 

240, 000 

315 

5.715,000 

46 

630, 000 

18 

70,000 

5 

85.000 

25 

285,000 

61 

3, 600 

9 

860 

87 

1, 130, 000 

15 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

6 

40,000 

8 

85,000 

5 

85,000 

16 

300,000 

22 
160,000 

30 
365, 000 

12 
90,000 

20 
95, 000 




Tons 




Fruits and Melons: 


Tons 












816 
5, 615, 000 

477 
8. 200. 000 

400 
2, 220, 000 

123 

1.295,000 

64 

715,000 

154 

1,450,000 

320 

1.000,000 
43 

850,000 
66 

915,000 










Pounds 


Vegetables for sale : 




Acres... _ 






Cabbage, Chinese 






Pounds 


































27 

1,650 

65 

640,000 

25 




94 

9,400 

253 

3, 030, 000 


Tomatoes 

Miscellaneous crops: 


















273 

15,000 


150 

no.ooo 


243 

135, 000 

205 

6,150 

155 

34,300 


Rice _ 












250 
33, 900 




126 
22,000 


77 
15, 5.50 









NA— Not available. 

' Data for Molokai not included. Production for 1954 was estimated from recorded marketings, with adjustments for direct sales to retailers or consumers by farmers. Field losses 
resulting from market gluts are included in the production estimates. 



Farms reporting. — Table 8 shows the number of diversified com- 
mercial-size enterprises for which 1954 data are presented. (See 
Introduction for size of enterprise included.) These are con- 
trasted with the number of farms reporting the like item, as 
obtained in the 1950 Census of Agriculture. 

Table 8. — Number of Diversified Commercial-Size Enter- 
prises, 1954; and Number of Farms Reporting, Census of 
1950; for Selected Items of Production. 



Item 



Total farms 

Sugarcane 

Pineapples 

Coffee 

M acadam ia nuts 

Honey 

Rice 

Taro 

Fruits and vegetables 

Cattle.... 

Sheep -.- 

Swine 

Poultry _ 



1954 



(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

906 

112 

27 

52 

259 

1,899 

J 933 

3 

419 

335 



Census of 
1950 



5,750 



1,163 

55 

686 

407 

42 

45 

'325 

(=) 

1.048 
27 

1,710 
< 3, 072 



NA— Not available. 

1 87 reporting upland and 238 reporting wetland. 

J 1,222 reporting vegetables harvested for sale and 1,134 reporting tree fruits, nuts, 
and coffee. 
3 847 beef cattle enterprises of all sizes at the end of 1954, 86 dairy enterprises. 
* Reporting chickens 4 months old and over on hand. 

Value of marketings. — Table 9 brings together the value of 
marketings for the principal commodities which enter into com- 
mercial channels. The values were calculated at the wholesale 
or processing plant level for products consumed in the Territory, 
and free alongside ship, island port, for diversified export prod- 
ucts. Values of diversified crops and livestock are for marketings 
and exclude the value of products consumed on farms or not 
harvested because of marketing factors. 

Agricultural products in 1954 were valued at $285,737,000. Of 



this total $141,000,000 was represented by sugar. The value of 
processed pineapple products was $108,000,000. Livestock 
products contributed $24,763,000 and diversified crops accounted 
for nearly $12,000,000. The value of processed fruits, other than 
pineapples, and of flowers and foliage was not estimated. 

The value of coffee production (green basis, f. o. b. mill) for the 
crop year ending June 1954, was $5,537,000. Macadamia nut 
production amounted to $159,000; rice, $105,000; taro for poi 
manufacture, $408,000; and honey and beeswax, $22,000. 

Table 9. — Value of Agricultural Marketings: 1954 ' 



Item 



All agricultural products 

Sugar products a 

Processed pineapple products : 

Diversified crops, total 4 ... 

Coffee, green s 

Macadamia nuts (in shell). . 

Honey and beeswax fl 

Rice (milled) 

Taro (for manufacture) 

Fruits and vegetables 7 

Livestock products, total ' 

Beef 

Dairy, meat, and milk 

Mutton and wool 

Swine 

Poultry, meat and eggs 



Value of production 



Total 



Dollars 
285, 737, 000 



141,000,000 
108, 000, 000 

11,974,000 
5, 537, 000 
159,000 
22,000 
105,000 
408.000 

5, 743, 000 

24, 763, 000 

6, 965, 000 

7, 826, 000 

62.000 
3. 980, 000 
5. 930, 000 



Percent 
of total 



49.3 
37.8 

4.2 
1.9 
0. 1 
(Z) 
(Z) 
0.2 
2.0 

8.7 
2.4 
2.8 
(Z) 
1.4 
2.1 



Z— Less than 0.05 percent. 

i Calendar year unless otherwise specified. 

1 Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association data; includes raw sugar 96° delivered at 
coast refinery; molasses, bagasse and other byproducts. 

' Pineapple companies of Hawaii data; crop years ending May 31; includes canned 
fruit, juice, and industry byproducts. 

* Wholesale value, island of origin. 

* Value f. o. b. Kona Mill, crop year ending June 30. 

* Value f. a. s. island port. 

' Wholesale value, island of origin; fresh pineapples excluded. . 
1 Value at. slaughterhouse, bottling plant, or wholesale. 



PUERTO RICO 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction . — - 41 

Censuses of agriculture.. _ — 41 

Presentation of statistics 41 

TABLES 

1. — Number and area of farms: 1910 to 1954 42 

2. — Farms reporting and number of livestock on farms: 1910 to 1954 42 

3. — Farms reporting, area, and quantity harvested for selected crops: 1909 to 1954.. 42 
4. — Farms reporting, number of trees or plants, and quantity harvested, for the prin- 
cipal fruits and coconuts: 1910 to 1954 43 

5. — Estimated farm value of production of agricultural commodities: fiscal year 1953- 

1954 43 

37 



o 

y 

of 



O 
h- 



z 

i 



H 

Q 
Z 
< 



1- 

U 

in 

u 



< 

a. 



z 

5 



u 

cr 
i- 
H 



< 

O 

(- 
< 
z 

UJ 

V) 
I 

W 

o 



D 
111 

UJ (L 






<n 
w 
Q 
< 

Q 

D 





in 

UJ 

a 
< 

a 

< 

a. 

O 

z 

I/) 
111 

< 

IX 

o 

I- 
< 
z 

U) 

If) 

o 

t 

cr 
i- 
U) 




39 



PUERTO RICO 



Introduction.— The Department of Agriculture and Commerce 
of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico supplied the 1954 data which 
are incorporated in this section. The reply to the Bureau's request 
for information contained this pertinent paragraph: 

"* * * we are returning the tables with all the available data 
for 1954. The data in the tables have been adjusted to make 
them comparable to the 1950 census figures; that is, we have 
eliminated from our estimates all the information related to the 
parcelas or farms of less than 3 cuerdas." 

The reply also made reference to a report entitled "Gathering of 
Agricultural Basic Data in Puerto Rico" for a detailed description 
of the methods used in the collection of agricultural data in Puerto 
Rico. This descriptive report refers to initiation of a sample 
survey in 1950. During that year, four surveys were conducted in 
which 1,000 to 3,000 farmers were interviewed in a sample of areas 
(generally "barrios") scientifically selected to represent the entire 
island. There is no clear indication whether or not this seasonal 
sampling plan has been continued. 

There are certain check data which can be used advantageously 
in making estimates for the Commonwealth. A few paragraphs 
from that Repoit are quoted to bring out the nature of the problem 
of making estimates and what was covered in the initial survey. 

"This small island is predominantly agricultural, with a large 
percentage of the population dependent, either directly or in- 
directly, upon agriculture as a means of livelihood. There are 
on the Island about 55,000 farms ranging in size from 3 acres 
up to 15,000 acres or more and a similar number of parcelas of 
0.25 to 2.99 acres. The average size of farms is about 35 acres 
(median value of 9 acres) and of parcelas, about 1 acre. Approxi- 
mately one-half of the 2,000,000 acres of land in farms is culti- 
vated. However, because of the year-round growing season, 
land may produce 2, 3 or even 4 crops during a year. 

"On the basis of findings thus far it would appear desirable 
and feasible to inaugurate at once a regular and continuing 
program of reports on acreage, condition and progress, yield 
per acre, production, price, and value for crops; namely, 
sugarcane, tobacco, cotton, pineapples, coconuts, and coffee. 
A high percentage — 85 to 100 percent — of each of these crops 
is sold by the growers, either for export or for consumption on 
the Island. Furthermore, each tends to follow a regular seasonal 
pattern rather than being harvested in small quantities through- 
out the year. Independent check data are available through 
cane mills, cooperative associations, processors, coffee roaster, 
etc. These data can be used to check on the reliability of the 
information obtained from respondents by whatever method 
that might be used. * * * Livestock inventories, milk and egg 
production, plantains, flames, dry beans, avocados, bananas, 
oranges, and sweetpotatoes appear to be the items that should 
be given next priority, since 40 to 75 percent of these crops are 
estimated as being sold. Also, most of these crops are grown on 
a sufficiently large number of farms to permit the use of sampling 
techniques already known. Other crops, of which less than 
one-third are sold, should be tackled only after the regular 
program is established and working smoothly for the items 
appearing in the first 2 categories. 

"There remain many problems still to be solved in relation 
to the formulation of questions and the obtaining of accurate 
answers from farmers. To this end, we are continuing our 
analysis in conjunction with the Census and utilizing other data 
in our files. We are on the lookout for new check data and for 
new methods of checking the reliability of the estimates derived 
from our surveys." 



The definition of a farm, of a farmer, and ot a parcela, as used in 
the early surveys, are as follows: 

"A farm consists of land of not less than 3 'cuerdas' on 
which agricultural operations are performed or directed by a 
person, partnership, or corporation (condensation of Census 
definition). 

"A farmer is the operator of a farm. The farmer may own 
the land that he farms, he may have control of the land under a 
rental agreement, or he may have been employed as a manager. 
In this paper the term 'farmer' is used also in a general sense in 
reference to anyone who has an agricultural operation, no 
matter how small the amount of land that he farms. 

"A 'parcela' consists of land of from % to 3 'cuerdas' which 
comprises an entire agricultural operation." 

Censuses of agriculture. — The first Census of Agriculture taken 
in Puerto Rico by the United States was made as of April 15, 1910. 
Since that time, a Census of Agriculture has been taken in con- 
junction with the Census of Population in each decennial enumera- 
tion. In 1935, a special Census of Puerto Rico was taken by the 
Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administration. 

The 1950 Census of Agriculture was taken as of Apiil 1, 1950. 
Inventory items relate approximately to that date. Data relating 
to areas and quantity of crops (except sugarcane) harvested and 
to sales of agricultural products aie for the crop year extending 
from April 1, 1949, to March 31, 1950. Data on the area and 
quantity of sugarcane harvested are for the crop year extending 
from December 1, 1948, to November 30, 1949. 

For previous Censuses, the inventory items relate to the date of 
the Census and the production items, with the exception of 1935, 
to the preceding calendar year. For 1935, the production items 
relate to the calendar year 1935. 

For the I960 Census of Agriculture, places of 3 or more cuerdas 
were counted as farms if any agricultural products other than 
vegetables for home use were produced in 1949 or if any livestock 
or 15 or more chickens or other poultry were kept on the place. 

All the land under the control of one person or partnership was 
included as one farm. Control may have been through owner- 
ship, or through lease or rental arrangement. 

In the 1950 enumeration, the Census enumerator was not 
given the definition of a farm. He was instructed to obtain an 
agriculture questionnaire for every place of 3 or more cuerdas, 
whether or not it was considered a farm. Thus, agriculture 
questionnaires were filled for more places than those that qualified 
as farms. The determination as to which reports were to be 
included in the tabulations as representing farms was made during 
the processing of the questionnaires in Washington. 

The numbei of questionnaires which were retained in 1950 as 
representing farms was 53,515. Tracts of less than 3 cuerdas, 
with agricultural production, were not counted as farms in 1950. 
These places were enumerated as parcelas. They totaled 51,157 
for that enumeration year. Most of these small tracts kept 
poultry and produced a variety of crops. 

Presentation of statistics. — Data are presented only for the 
Commonwealth, as a whole. Comparative data are usually 
given for all Census enumerations. In a few instances, Census 
data are presented even though no recent data are available. 

41 



42 



SPECIAL REPORTS 

Table 1. — Number and Area of Farms: 1910 to 1954 



Item 


1954 


Census of 

1950 
(Apr. 1) 


Census of 

1940 
(Apr. 1) 


Census of 

1935 
(Dec. 1) 


Census of 

1930 
(Apr. 1) 


Census of 

1920 
(Jan. 1) 


Census of 

1910 
(Apr. 16) 




62, 096 

1, 783, 985 
79.1 
34.2 


53, 515 

1, 844, 886 
81.8 
34.5 


55, 519 

1, 885, 874 
83.6 
34.0 


62, 790 

1,913,047 
84.8 
36.2 


62, 965 

1, 979, 474 
87.8 
37.4 


41, 078 

2, 022, 404 
89.7 
49.2 


58, 371 

2, 085, 162 
92.4 
36.7 











' The total land area is 2,255,684 cuerdas. A cuerda is equivalent to 0.9712 of an acre. 

Table 2. — Farms Reporting and Number of Livestock on Farms: 1910 to 1954 



Item 


1954 


1950 
(Apr. 1) 


1940 
(Apr. 1) 


1935 
(Dec. 1) 


1930 
(Apr. 1) 


1920 
(Jan. 1) 


1910 
(Apr. 16) 


Farms reporting 




} 15, 000 

33, 000 
34, 000 
(NA) 
11,000 
39, 000 


/ 19, 126 

I 1, 794 

32, 852 

30, 607 

500 

11, 505 

1 47, 241 


1 16, 239 
(NA) 
■31,031 
» 31, 542 
3 698 
' 13, 799 
» 44, 849 


20,801 
(NA) 
29,978 
32,085 
354 
15, 189 
42,865 


23, 257 
(NA) 
(NA) 

27, 748 
603 

13, 421 

44,307 


22, 681 
(NA) 
25, 208 
27, 854 
604 
11.901 
36, 273 


24, 367 
(NA) 
30.647 
33, 247 
866 
17, 717 
44,601 






Hogs and pigs. 


Sheep and lambs _ . ... 








Number 


} 37, 000 

314, 000 
53, 000 
(NA) 
16, 000 

451, 000 


f 36, 390 

\ 6, 419 

289, 389 

91, 069 

3,121 

39,311 

<■ 799, 363 


'33,688 
i 6, 199 
1 299, 734 
> 97, 306 
' 3, 488 
» 42, 861 
• 769, 934 


35, 976 
7,734 

266, 154 
79, 508 
3,363 

36, 478 
667, 749 


42,120 
7,683 
296, 235 
69, 266 
3,259 
34, 269 
684,448 


46,922 

7,911 

263, 710 

98,760 

3,755 

32, 971 

699, 352 


55, 225 

6,554 

313, 886 

103, 041 

5,625 

45, 982 

699, 070 






Hogs and pigs.. 


Sheep and lambs ._ . 


Goats and kids _ 


Chickens 





NA — Not available. 
' Over 3 months old. 
» Over 4 months old. 
8 Over 6 months old. 
< Chicken hens only. 



Table 3. — Farms Reporting, Area, and Quantity Harvested 
for Selected Crops: 1909 to 1954 





Fai 


ms 


Cuei 


das 


Quantity harvested 


Item and 


reporting 


harvested 






















year 




Per- 










Average 




Num- 


cent of 


Total 


farm 
report- 
ing 


Unit 


Quantity 


per 




ber 


all 
farms 








cuerda 


Pine- 
















apples : 
















1954 


10 


(') 


2,300 


230.0 


Tons 


26, 000 


11.2 


1949 


140 


0.3 


3,553 


25.4 


Tons.... 


33, 462 


9.4 


1939 


268 


0.5 


1,912 


7.1 


Tons.... 


11,971 


6.3 


1935 


847 


1.6 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Tons.... 


14,236 


(NA) 


1929 


1,438 


2.7 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Tons 


16, 365 


(NA) 


1919 


445 


1.1 


(NA) 


(NA 
(NA) 


Tons.... 


6,940 


(NA) 


1909 


590 


1.0 


(NA) 


Tons 


16,388 


(NA) 


Sugarcane : 
















1954 


16, 000 


30.7 


362, 500 


22.6 


Tons 


10, 880, 000 


30.0 


1949 


11,204 


20.9 


344, 067 


30.7 


Tons 


10, 699, 147 


31.1 


1939 


9,896 


17.8 


229, 750 


23.2 


Tons 


7,237,717 


31.5 


1935 


7,089 


13.4 


245, 154 


34.6 


Tons.... 


8, 299, 977 


33.9 


1929 


7,103 


13.4 


237, 758 


33.5 


Tons 


5, 602, 451 


23.6 


1919 


8,839 


21.5 


227, 815 


25.8 


Tons.... 


3,961,98-1 


17.4 


1909 


6,816 


11.7 


145, 433 


21.3 


Tons.... 


3, 180, 750 


21.9 


Coffee : 
















1954 


20, 700 


39.7 


159,300 


7.7 


Pounds. 


19,280,000 


121 


1949 


24, 657 


46.1 


176,386 


7.2 


Pounds. 


25,661,626 


146 


1939 


22, 407 


40.4 


181,106 


8.1 


Pounds. 


32,662,044 


180 


1935 


21,125 


40.0 


182,316 


8.6 


Pounds. 


25, 855, 543 


142 


1929 


17, 295 


27.5 


191,712 


11.1 


Pounds. 


7,331,877 


38 


1919 


22, 704 


55.3 


193, 561 


8.5 


Pounds. 


53, 209, 362 


275 


1909 


25, 433 


43.6 


186, 875 


7.3 


Pounds. 


52,717,727 


282 


Tobacco : 
















1954 


11,900 


22.8 


39, 000 


3.3 


Pounds. 


32, 757, 000 


840 


1949 


14, 937 


27.9 


26,834 


1.8 


Pounds- 


22, 254, 260 


829 


1939 


16,918 


30.6 


28,684 


1.7 


Pounds. 


19, 886, 377 


696 


1935 


17,686 


33.5 


45, 720 


2.6 


Pounds. 


31,254,288 


684 


1929 


17, 106 


32.3 


52, 947 


3.1 


Pounds. 


30, 358, 149 


673 


1919 


9,561 


23.3 


39,068 


4.1 


Pounds. 


19, 362, 826 


496 


1909 


8,329 


14.3 


22, 142 


2.7 


Pounds. 


10, 827, 755 


489 



See footnotes at end ol table. 



Table 3. — Farms Reporting, Area, and Quantity Harvested 
for Selected Crops: 1909 to 1954 — Continued 





Farms 


Cuerdas 


Quantity harvested 


Item and 


reporting 


harvested 














Aver- 








year 




Per- 








Average 




Num- 


cent of 


Total 


farm 
report- 
ing 


Unit 


Quantity 


per 




ber 


aU 
farms 








cuerda 


Rice: 
















1954 


3,200 


6.1 


10, 800 


3.4 


Pounds. 


5, 939, 000 


550 


1949 


4,299 


8.0 


5,342 


1.2 


Pounds. 


2, 480, 080 


464 


1939 


8,716 


15.7 


13,753 


1.6 


Pounds. 


7, 915, 600 


676 


1935 


6,233 


11.8 


9,386 


1.5 


Poimds. 


4, 890, 600 


521 


1929 


3,277 


6.2 


5,244 


1.6 


Pounds. 


2,212,600 


422 


1919 


6,232 


12.7 


11,749 


2.2 


Pounds. 


5, 359, 400 


456 


1909 


8,882 


15.2 


16, 138 


1.8 


Pounds. 


6, 962, 300 


431 


Dry beans : 
















1954 


15,600 


29.9 


15, 600 


1.0 


Pounds 


10,300,000 


660 


1949 


18,372 


34.3 


19, 962 


1.1 


Pounds. 


6, 808, 972 


291 


1939 


31, 543 


66.8 


48, 363 


1.5 


Pounds. 


19,248,800 


398 


1935 


25, 202 


47.7 


31,470 


1.2 


Pounds. 


13,501,200 


429 


1929 


25, 165 


47.5 


40, 902 


1.6 


Pounds. 


19,420,300 


476 


1919 


16, 095 


39.2 


34,907 


2.2 


Pounds. 


16,339,400 


468 


1909 


11,693 


20.0 


20, 652 


1.8 


Pounds. 


7, 533, 200 


365 


Corn: 
















1954 


18, 600 


35.7 


39, 100 


2.1 


Pounds.. 


25, 424, 000 


650 


1949 


24, 344 


45.5 


39, 497 


1.6 


Pounds.. 


23, 122, 102 


585 


1939 


32,236 


58.1 


59, 350 


1.8 


Pounds.. 


36,811,000 


620 


1935 


25, 298 


47.9 


49, 820 


2.0 


Pounds.. 


31,659,300 


635 


1929 


32, 309 


61.0 


70,217 


2.2 


Pounds.. 


44,901,600 


639 


1919 


21,656 


52.7 


68,785 


2.7 


Pounds.. 


37, 307, 000 


635 


1909 


27,400 


46.9 


66,640 


2.1 


Pounds.. 


30, 701, 200 


642 


Cowpeaa: 
















1954 


6,500 


10.5 


4,400 


0.8 


Pounds.. 


2,125,000 


483 


1949 


4,804 


9.0 


3,701 


0.8 


Pounds.. 


1, 079, 467 


292 


1939 


10,314 


18.6 


12,373 


1.2 


Pounds.. 


5, 048, 000 


408 


1935 


2,852 


5.4 


3,379 


1.2 


Pounds.. 


3,748,200 


1,109 



See footnotes at end of table. 



PUERTO RICO 



43 



Table 3. — Farms Reporting, Area, and Quantity Harvested 
for Selected Crops: 1909 to 1954— Continued 





Farms 


Cuerdas 


Quantity harvested 


Item and 


reporting 


harvested 














Aver- 








year 




Per- 




age per 






Average 




Num- 


cent of 


Total 


farm 


Unit 


Quantity 


per 




ber 


all 
farms 




report- 
tog 






cuerda 


Pigeon 
peas: 
1954 
















19,900 


38.2 


17,900 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


6, 962, 000 


389 


1949 


23, 744 


44.4 


20, 436 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


6,938,152 


340 


1939 


27,332 


49.2 


34, 301 


1.3 


Pounds.. 


15, 722, 200 


458 


1935 


18, 450 


34.9 


15,954 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


8, 714, 800 


546 


Cotton: 
















1954 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA)... 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1949 


880 


1.6 


2, 736 


3.1 


Pounds.. 


1,175,677 


430 


1939 


992 


1.8 


3.3S1 


3.4 


Pounds.. 


1,637,067 


484 


1935 


400 


0.8 


934 


2.3 


Pounds.. 


498, 706 


534 


1929 


2,723 


5.1 


10, 282 


3.8 


Pounds.. 


5, 482, 462 


533 


1919 


942 


2.3 


2,760 


2.9 


Pounds.. 


1,052,037 


381 


1909 


655 


1.0 


1,425 


2.6 


Pounds.. 


630, 400 


442 


Sweetpo- 
















tatoes: 
















1954 


20, 400 


39.1 


16,000 


0.7 


Pounds.. 


42, 362, 000 


2,824 


1949 


25, 552 


47.7 


23,818 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


32, 485, 183 


1,364 


1939 


35, 990 


64.8 


49, 565 


1.4 


Pounds.. 


103,160,000 


2,081 


1935 


31, 759 


60.2 


36, 947 


1.2 


Pounds.. 


81,687,800 


2,211 


1929 


33,913 


64.0 


47,616 


1.4 


Pounds.. 


115,244,300 


2,420 


1919 


22,313 


64.3 


31,457 


1.4 


Pounds.. 


59, 400, 900 


1,880 


Yams: 
















1954 


14,000 


26.9 


7,000 


0.5 


Pounds.. 


21,904.000 


3,129 


1949 


12, 506 


23.4 


6,125 


0.5 


Pounds.. 


18,631,169 


3,042 


1939 


12.311 


22.2 


8,827 


0.7 


Pounds.. 


25, 852, 500 


2,529 


1935 


11,468 


21.7 


7,966 


0.7 


Pounds.. 


20, 098, 400 


2,523 


1929 


7,049 


13.3 


5,186 


0.7 


Pounds.. 


16,211,800 


3,126 


Irish po- 
















tatoes : 
















1954 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) . . . 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1949 


54 


(') 


45 


0.8 


Pounds.. 


45, 072 


1,002 


1939 


496 


0.9 


579 


1.2 


Pounds.. 


1,381,000 


2.385 


1935 


597 


1.1 


680 


1.1 


Pounds.. 


1,368,300 


2,012 


1929 


798 


1.5 


1,061 


1.3 


Pounds.. 


2, 479, 000 


2,336 


1919 


308 


0.7 


498 


1.6 


Pounds.. 


459, 500 


923 


Tamers: 
















1954 


21,000 


40.3 


29,500 


1.4 


Pounds.. 


63, 042, 000 


1,798 


1949 


21,009 


39.3 


14,693 


0.7 


Pounds.. 


24, 105, 774 


1,641 


1939 


24, 189 


43.6 


22, 080 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


42, 707, 200 


1,934 


1935 


20, 686 


39.2 


17, 596 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


34,129,400 


1,940 


1929 . 


17,834 


33.7 


16,683 


0.9 


Pounds.. 


35, 094, 700 


2,104 



NA — Not available. 
' Less than 0.05. 



Table 4. — Farms Reporting, Number of Trees or Plants, 
and Quantity Harvested, for the Principal Fruits and 
Coconuts: 1910 to 1954 



Item and year 


Farms re- 
porting 


Percent 
of all 
farms 


Bearing trees 
or plants 


Quantity harvested 


Unit 


Quantity 


Coconuts : 
1954 


12, 400 
16, 490 
11,898 
8,821 
11,141 
4,712 
3,809 

13, 000 
8,236 
2,365 
1,249 
1,681 
599 
308 

18, 800 
23,883 
19, 032 
17, 624 
21,368 
11,501 
10,087 


23.8 
30.8 
21.4 
16.7 
21.0 
11.5 
6.5 

24.9 
15.4 
4.3 
2.4 
3.2 
1.5 
0.5 

36.1 

44.6 
34.3 
33.2 
40.3 
28.0 
17.3 


415,000 
650, 185 
595, 125 
639, 243 
471,032 
478, 054 
228, 351 

137, 000 
161,194 
335, 036 
646, 802 
364, 489 
219, 193 
117, 557 

948, 000 

1, 204, 361 

1,022,545 

1,240,269 

930,153 

735, 751 

620, 266 


Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 

Number . 

Number 

Number 

Boxes 

Boxes 

Boxes 

Boxes 

Number 
Number 
Number 

Boxes 

Boxes 

Boxes 


19, 200, 000 
26, 498, 475 
21,776,289 
27,901,000 
12, 003, 000 
24, 608, 000 
15,567,914 

12,000,000 

14,149,961 

24, 829, 531 

883, 38S 

604, 943 

345,340 

47,013 

140. 800, 000 

178,934,691 

116, 273, 562 

1,003,988 

871,370 

1,354,411 

690, 716 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1920 


1910 


Grapefruit : 
1954 


1950 


1940 _. 


1935 


1930 


1920 


1910 


Oranges: 

1954 

1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1920 


1910 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Table 4. — Farms Reporting, Number of Trees or Plants, 
and Quantity Harvested, for the Principal Fruits and 
Coconuts: 1910 to 1954— Continued 



Item and year 


Farms re- 
porting 


Percent 
of all 
farms 


Bearing trees 
or plants 


Quantity harvested 


Unit 


Quantity 


Avocados: 
1954 


28,000 
25, 834 
27, 182 
17, 587 
12,082 
7,129 

12,800 
11,923 
16,350 
12,200 
16,046 
4,057 
2,793 

20, 000 
31,821 
28,865 
35,882 
36, 705 
15.306 
(NA) 

33. 000 
16, 770 
13, 833 
11,969 
8,894 
4,618 
(NA) 

(NA) 
5,864 
1,174 
1,621 
2,088 
831 
471 

(NA) 
2,072 
1,475 
1,890 
2,739 

(NA) 
481 

1,013 
795 

1,248 
714 

(NA) 


63.7 

48.3 
49.0 
33.3 
32.3 
17.4 

24.6 
22.3 
29.4 
23.1 
30.3 
9.9 
4.8 

38.4 

59.5 
62.0 
68.0 
69.3 
37.3 
(NA) 

63.3 
31.3 

24.9 
22.7 
16.8 
11.2 
(NA) 

(NA) 
11.0 
2.1 
3.1 
3.9 
2.0 
0.8 

(NA) 
3.9 
2.7 
3.6 
5.2 

(NA) 
0.9 
1.8 
1.5 
2.4 
1.7 

(NA) 


302, 000 
283, 768 
279, 004 
151,325 
92, 875 
95, 254 

119,000 
135, 553 
176, 504 
167,799 
190, 652 
79, 200 
88, 785 

0) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
25,162,261 
35, 930, 838 
21,485,617 
22, 425, 201 

(') 

(NA) 
(NA) 
3, 067, 468 
2, 335, 259 
2,405,471 
5,261,073 

(NA) 
25,843 

9, 596 

9,549 
11, 658 
10, 672 

9,874 

(NA) 
124, 939 
117, 663 
349,844 
309,587 

(NA) 
12,205 
25. 278 
46, 493 
66, 076 
58,869 
61,325 


Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number 
Number ... 

Number 
Number . . 
Number 
Number 
Number 

Boxes _ 

Number 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Number 

Number 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Bunches 

Dozens 

(NA) 

Number 

Number 

Boxes 

Boxes 

Boxes 

Boxes 

(NA) 

Number 

5-gal. can 

5-gal. can 

5-gal. can 

(NA) 
Pounds 

Pounds 

Pounds 

Pounds 


29, 800, 000 
28, 583, 262 
33, 049, 941 
14,121,900 
10.093,600 
10,211,928 

32, 700, 000 
43,331,102 
68, 423, 586 
108,860,000 
118,940.000 
237, 661 
232, 223 

754, 939, 000 
12,032,378 
16.014,474 
19, 938, 082 
25, 825, 656 
19,079,495 
16,992,258 

122,756,000 
100,401,070 
6. 166, 226 
2, 600, 683 
1,951,633 
3,512,358 
4, 163, 623 

(NA) 
5, 43S, 464 
1,163,562 

8,294 

9.028 
16, 5S2 

3,698 

(NA) 

17,774,390 

29,957 

101,705 

139, 822 

(NA) 
79,290 
85, 607 
76, 478 
92, 967 
113, 794 
117,253 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1920. 


Mangoes: 
1954 


1950.... 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1920 


1910.... 


Bananas: 
1954 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930.. 

1920 

1910 

Plantains : 
1954 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 

1920 


1910 


Limes: 

19,54 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1920 


1910 


Guavas: 

1954 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 


Cacao : 
1954 


1950 


1940 


1935 


1930 


1920 


1910 





NA— Not available. 

' 27,800 cuerdas harvested. 

■ 18,600 cuerdas harvested. 

Table 5. — Estimated Farm Value of Production of Agri' 
cultural Commodities: Fiscal Year 1953-54 



Item 



Value of production i 

Principal crops 

Sugarcane. - 

Tobacco 

Coffee. 

Livestock products, total 

Milk 

Eggs 

Beef.. -. 

Pork 

Poultry 

Goats and other meats. 

Legumes 

Fruits.. ---- 

Vegetables (starchy and yellow, green and leafy) 

Corn - 

Rice 

Other farm products --- 



Farm value, 
1953-54 



Dollars 
218,847,000 



130,631,000 

104, 009, 000 

10, 242, 000 

16, 380, 000 

59,812,000 
31,377,000 
4, 600, 000 
7,114,000 
6, 402. 000 
9, 877, 000 
442, 000 

2, 476, 000 
4, 500, 000 
16,461,000 
514,000 
674, 000 
3,779,000 



Source: Statistical year book, Puerto Rico, 1955. 

1 Does not Include P. M. A. boneflt payments (except sugarcane). 



VIRGIN ISLANDS 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Introduction 49 

Censuses of agriculture 49 

Presentation of statistics 49 

TABLES 

1. — Farms, farm acreage, and value of land and buildings: 1917 to 1954 49 

2. — Livestock on farms — Specified livestock and livestock products: 1917 to 1954 49 

3. — Specified field crops — Acres and quantity harvested: 1917 to 1954 50 

4. — Vegetables — Acreage and value: 1917 to 1954 50 

5. — Specified fruits and nuts — Acreage, number of trees or plants, and quantity har- 
vested: 1917 to 1954 50 

45 





Vt 

O 




«- 


<n 


U 


Q 




Z 


TJ 


«4j 


c 
o 


-J 




w> 




■™ 


<A 




<u 


Z 




e> 


"o 


Qg 


O. 


> 


u 




e 

3 




47 



VIRGIN ISLANDS 



Introduction. — The 1954 statistics for the Virgin Islands were 
submitted by the Department of Agriculture and Labor through 
the Office of the Governor. In the Department's transmittal, the 
Commissioner stated: "Since we have not yet been able to collect 
such statistical data * * *, I have had to depend entirely upon 
the kind cooperation of the Virgin Islands Corporation and the 
Federal Experiment Station for such information as they collected 
during the last four-year period." 

Censuses of agriculture. — The figures given in the tables for 
this report for 1950, 1940, 1930, and 1917 are from the Censuses 
of Agriculture taken under the supervision of the United States 
Bureau of the Census. The first United States Census of Agri- 
culture of the Virgin Islands was taken in 1917, a special Census 
authorized by the Secretary of Commerce. The next Census was 
taken in 1930 in conjunction with the Census of Population. A 
Census of Agriculture was also taken in 1940 and 1950 in conjunc- 
tion with the Censuses of Population. 

The questionnaire used for the Census of Population contained 
one inquiry which was designed to help the enumerator to obtain 
an agriculture questionnaire for every place for which one was 
required. The inquiry read: "Is this house on a farm?" This 
inquiry was to be answered for every family. If the reply to this 
question was "Yes," the enumerator was to fill an agriculture 
questionnaire for the place. He was instructed to fill an agri- 
culture questionnaire for every farm, for every place of 3 or more 
acres whether or not it was considered a farm, and for every place 
of less than 3 acres on which agricultural products valued at $100 
or more were produced in 1949, whether or not it was considered 
a farm. 

For the 1950 Census of Agriculture, places, regardless of size, 
were counted as farms if the value of agricultural products in 
1949, exclusive of home gardens, amounted to $100 or more. The 
agricultural products could have been either for home use or for 
sale. Places operated in 1949, for which the value of agricultural 
products in 1949 was less than this minimum because of crop 
failure or other unusual situation, and places operated in 1950 or 
1949 for the first time were counted as farms if normally they 
could be expected to produce these minimum quantities of farm 
products. 

The Census enumerator was not given the definition of a farm. 
He was instructed to obtain an agriculture questionnaire for every 
place that the operator considered a farm, for every place of 3 
or more acres whether or not it was considered a farm, and for 
every place of less than 3 acres if the agricultural products pro- 
duced in 1949 were valued at $100 or more. Thus, agriculture 
questionnaires were filled for more places than those that qualified 
as farms. The determination as to which reports were to be in- 
cluded in the tabulations as representing farms was made during 
the processing of the questionnaires in Washington. 

The 1950 Census of Agriculture was taken as of April 1, 1950. 
Inventory items relate to approximately that date. Data on 
acreage of crops and quantity harvested are for the crop year 
1949. The special Census of 1917 was taken as of November 1. 
Inventory items relate to November 1 and production items relate 
to the year ended October 31, 1917. 

Presentation of statistics. — Data are presented only for the 
area, as a whole. Comparative data are usually given for all Cen- 
sus enumerations. In a few instances, Census data are presented 
even though no recent data are available. 



Table 1. — Farms, Farm Acreage, and Value of Land and 
Buildings: 1917 to 1954 







Census 


Census 


Census 


Census 


Item 


1954 


of 1950 


of 1940 


of 1930 


of 1917 






(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Nov. 1) 


Farms number,. 


(NA) 


755 


828 


329 


430 


All laud in farms.. ..acres.. 


73,000 


63,753 


55, 219 


68,322 


69, 892 


Cropland, total acres.. 


35, 780 


16, 461 


13,404 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Harvested acres . 


6.340 


6,594 


4,964 


' 6, 895 


' 39, 448 


In growing crops not 












harvested acres 


600 


603 


2,952 


(NA) 


(NA) 


On which crops failed 












and Idle land acres.. 


200 


4,132 


5,488 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Pastured acres.. 


28,640 


6,132 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Pasture other than crop- 












land .. .acres. 


15,720 


30,663 


30, 521 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Non-crop open or brush 












pasture.. acres 


8,265 


21,046 


15, 496 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Woodland pasture. acres.. 


7,455 


9,617 


15, 025 


(NA) 


(NA) 


All other land.. ..acres 


21. 500 


16,629 


11,294 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Woodland not pastured 












acres. . 


15,000 


13, 473 


7,935 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Other land (house lots, 














6,500 


3,156 


3,359 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Irrigated lands ... acres . 


26 


13 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Value of land and build- 












ings dollars.. 


10. 000, 000 


6, 492, 720 


2, 398, 546 


2,400,711 


3,017,341 


Average value per farm 












dollars.. 


(NA) 


8,600 


2,897 


7,297 


7,017 


Average value per acre 












dollars. _ 


■225 


101 


43 


35 


43 



NA— Not available. 

1 Acres of crops harvested In 1929. 

1 Acreage reported as improved land on the Census date. 

' As reported. Does not correspond with land in farms and total value reported. 



Table 2.- 



-Livestock on Farms — Specified Livestock and 
Livestock Products: 1917 to 1954 







Census 


Census 


Census 


Census 


Item 


1954 


of 1950 


of 1940 


of 1930 


of 1917 ' 






(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Nov. 1) 


LIVESTOCK 
























reporting. _ 


(NA) 


671 


695 


261 


381 


Horses and colts . _ .number. 


760 


1,077 


'954 


862 


1,827 


Mules and colts.. ...number.. 


60 


268 


*623 


994 


1,668 


Asses and burros number. 


300 


399 


2644 


523 


748 


Cattle and calves, total 












number.. 


12.000 


11,355 


' 8. 796 


12, 252 


12, 187 




6,000 


5,331 


> 7, 306 


> 4, 726 


(NA) 


Calves under 3 months of age 












number.. 


4,800 


1,082 


(NA) 


' 2, 770 


(NA) 


Heifers and heifer calves, 3 












months old and over 












number.. 


(NA) 


2,617 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Bulls, bull calves, steers, 3 












months old and over 












number.. 


1,200 


2,325 


U.490 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Hogs and pigs, total.. number.. 


850 


978 


• 1, 124 


860 


2,145 


Under 4 months number.. 


(NA) 


498 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


4 months old and over 












number.. 


(NA) 


480 


266 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Sheep and lambs number _ 


2,000 


2,786 


'819 


1,533 


1,046 


Goals and kids. number 


2,000 


3,876 


« 2, 134 


1,476 


1,684 


Chickens 4 months old and over 












number.. 


15,000 


10, 074 


8,046 


'3,331 


• 6, 137 


LIVESTOCK PRODUCTS 












Chickens sold number.. 


5,000 


10, 533 


• 2, 817 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Chicken eggs sold dozens.. 


44.000 


22, 807 


20,812 


4,363 


(NA) 


Turkeys, ducks, geese, and 












other poultry number. 


1,100 


665 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



NA— Not available. 

1 Age classes included not specified. 

a Over 3 months old. 

8 Included in total for cattle and calves over 3 months old; no other mention of t 

* Cows and heifers 2 years old and over kept mainly for milk production. 

8 Under 1 year old. 

8 Over 4 nths old. > Poultry of all kinds. 

7 Over 6 momonths old. • Poultry sold. 

49 



50 



SPECIAL REPORTS 



Table 3. — Specified Field Crops— Acres and Quantity 
Harvested: 1917 to 1954 

[Except for 1954 and 1917, the figures on acreage and production relate to the crop har- 
vested preceding the Censuses. For 1930 and 1917, production relates to 12-month 
period ending Sept. 30] 



Item 



Specified field crops, total 
acres. 

Corn acres. 

pounds. 
Beans, dry acres. 

pounds. 
Cassava acres. 

pounds- 
Irish potatoes ..acres. 

pounds. 

Sugarcane acres. 

tons. 
Sweetpotatoes acres. 

pounds. 
Tanya acres. 

pounds. 
Yams. acres. 

pounds. 



1954 



(NA) 



25 

14, 666 

120 

92, 000 

25 

15, 000 

(NA) 

(NA) 

5,339 

135, 000 

90 
80, 000 

40 
25, 000 

50 
75, 000 



Census 
of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



4,416 



49 
29, 330 

24 
12,441 

23 
14, 790 
6) 

140 
4,142 
49, 091 

85 
81, 186 

33 
24, 853 

52 
72, 930 



Census 
of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



4,406 



25 
17, 200 

17 
8,343 

21 
15, 653 



4,097 

42,641 

83 

104, 900 

85 

102, 100 

43 

75,200 



Census 
of 1930 
(Apr. 1) 



6, 523 



20 

13, 900 

3 

430 

2 

2,690 



5,823 

66, 405 

22 

67, 700 

15 

31,300 

6 

15, 400 



Census 
of 1917 
(Nov. 1) 



16. 574 



25 

17, 700 

1 

90 

(NA) 

(NA) 



8,685 
84, 129 

m 
m 

(NA) 
(NA) 

« 

( 2 ) 



NA— Not available. 

1 Reported in small fractions. 

2 Included in total for all vegetables harvested. 



Table 4. — Vegetables — Acreage and Value: 1917 to 1954 

[Except for 1954 and 1917, the figures on acreage and value relate to the crop harvested 
during the year preceding the Census. Figures for 1954 relate to the calendar year, 
while those for 1917 relate to the 12-month period ending Sept. 30] 



Item 



Vegetables harvested for 
sale (other than Irish and 

sweetpotatoes) acres. . 

value-dollars.. 

Beans (green) acres.. 

Cabbage acres.. 

Carrots acres.. 

Celery acres.. 

Cucumbers acres.. 

Eggplant acres.. 

Okra acres.. 

Onions acres.. 

Peppers acres.. 

Squash acres.. 

Tomatoes acres.. 

Other vegetables .acres.. 



(NA) 
(NA) 

10 

15 

20 

5 

2 

1 

5 

2 
10 

1 
20 

5 



Census 
of 1950 
(Apr. 1) 



209 
52, 022 

9 
20 
32 
5 
1 
14 

26 
3 
12 
14 
118 
10 



Census 
of 1940 
(Apr. 1) 



156 
16, 050 

14 
11 
17 
5 
3 
7 

21 
2 
9 
11 
30 
26 



Census 
of 1930 
(Apr. 1) 



50 
2,090 

2 
4 
3 

(NA) 
(NA) 



Census 
of 1917 
(Nov. 1) 



U68 
i 6, 637 

( 2 ) 

m 

(?) 

m 

R 

< 2 ) 

(-) 

m 

(=) 



NA— Not available. 

' Includes potatoes and yams. 

2 Included in total for all vegetables. 



Table 5. — Specified Fruits and Nuts — Acreage, Number of 
Trees or Plants, and Quantity Harvested: 1917 to 1954 







Census 


Census 


Census 


Census 


Item 


1954 


of 1950 


of 1940 


of 1930 


of 1917 






(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Apr. 1) 


(Nov. 1) 


Avocados acres.. 


118 


118 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number.. 


5,000 


5,563 


2,051 


247 


(NA) 


Trees not of bearing age 












number. . 


1,000 


2,193 


1,827 


202 


(NA) 


Quantity harvested 












number. . 


120. 000 


124, 597 


163, 751 


14, 700 


(NA) 


Cacao acres.. 


(NA) 


2 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number. . 


(NA) 


126 


1,474 


325 


6,574 


Trees not of bearing age 












number.. 


(NA) 


2 


2,117 


970 


(NA) 


Quantity harvested 












pounds.. 


(NA) 


410 


2,681 


160 


6,265 


Coconuts... .acres. . 


110 


110 


84 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number. . 


5,000 


5,146 


4,291 


1,152 


1,070 


Trees not of bearing age 












number 


1,000 


1,813 


3,087 


472 


1,214 


Quantity harvested 












number. . 


60, 000 


83, 843 


120, 521 


27, 008 


12, 180 


Grapefruit acres. . 


9 


9 


4 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number.. 


500 


521 


41 


12 


(NA) 


Trees not of bearing age 












number. 


250 


181 


255 


4 


(NA) 


Quantity harvested 












pounds. . 


20,000 


22,762 


1,680 


1,280 


(NA) 


Limes and lemons.. acres 


60 


50 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number. . 


2,500 


3,274 


1,251 


322 


(NA) 


Trees not of bearing age 












number. . 


500 


732 


927 


121 


(NA) 


Quautlty harvested 












pouQds.. 


80, 000 


86,068 


88, 080 


11,640 


(NA) 


Mangoes... acres. . 


190 


190 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number. . 


6,500 


7,313 


4,436 


2,335 


966 


Trees not of bearing age 












number 


1,500 


1,244 


2,157 


1,068 


680 


Quantity harvested 












number.. 


500, 000 


959, 903 


442, 656 


407,683 


2,750 


Oranges acres.. 


19 


19 


19 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number. . 


1,000 


959 


175 


61 


176 


Trees not of bearing age 












number. . 


500 


301 


1,311 


127 


64 


Quantity harvested 












pounds. . 


25, 000 


24, 178 


4,800 


3,840 


9,480 


Bananas acres. . 


369 


195 


140 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number. . 


12, 512 


21,013 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees not of bearing age 












number.. 


5,351 


13, 560 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Quantity harvested 












bunches. . 


9,806 


16,424 


46, 645 


6,790 


818 


Plantains acres.. 


17 


12 


23 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number.. 


963 


1,259 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees not of bearing age 












number. . 


580 


1,225 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Quantity harvested 












bunches. . 


958 


1,223 


9,130 


823 


(NA) 


Pineapples acres. . 


15 


15 


10 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees of bearing age 












number.. 


6,000 


6,601 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Trees not of bearing age 












number.. 


1,000 


1,960 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


Quantity harvested. .. boxes. . 


600 


570 


303 


1 2, 404 


■300 



NA— Not available. 

■ For 1930 and 1917 production of pineapples shown as number of fruits. 



II. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE: t9B6