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— . 1 







'•4 









n 

I 



f 



^ 




TO THB 



REPORTS OP COMMITTEES 



OF THE 



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



FOB THB 



FIBST SESSION OF THE POETT-NnTTH GOFGBESS, 



1885-'86. 



IN TWELVE VOLUMES. 



■^"^^m^"^ 



WASHINGTON: 

OOyESNUENT PBINTIKO OVVIOS. 

1886. 
7149 



^ 



LIBRARY 
LELAND STANiGnO JUNIOR 

U r4 i V E R S I T Y. 



li^ii^BA a^ ^>~^»>>%<<M^a>aa««<w>*<^** 



^ 




'f T'^ 



INDEX TO REPORTS OF HOUSE COMMITTEES. 



Vol. 1 . .KoA. 1 to 373. inclusive. 
Vou 2. .Noc. 874 to 708, iBcloAlTe. 
Vol. 3. .Koe. 709 to 1029, inulusiTe. 
Vou4..Kos. 1030 to 1278. induBive. 
Vou 5. .Ko» 1277 to 1542, incliuiTe. 
Vou 6. .Koe. 1543 to 1687. inolaalTe. 



8 OF THE VOLUB 




Vol. 7. 
Vol. 8. 
Vol. 9. 
Vol. 10. 
Vol.11. 
Vol. 12. 


• 



.No*. 1888 to 2284, incloaive. 
.Nob. 2265 to 2577, incIuBive. 
.Not. 2578 to 2855, inclasive. 
.Kos. 2856 to 3142. inclusive. 
.Koe. 8148 to 3474, inclusive. 
.No. 8476. 



INDEX TO THE REPORTS. 



Snbjeot. 




Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS— i 
Bjf Mr, George E, Adame : \, [ 

Howard, WiUie 8 l..'...u...-. i 

Warder, Lather F 

By Mr, Dockery : 

Clerks for members 

Extra pay to discharged employ^ 

Pettie, WinshipB 

Bf Mr, Charles H. Gibson : 

WiDtersmith, J ames G 

By Mr. Spoomer : 

Lord, William Blair 

Session messeogers, employment of, in House post-office 

By Mr. Sprigga : 

Committees ent itled to clerks 

COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE— 
By Mr. Glase: 

Promotion of agriculture .• 

By Mr. Haiek : 

Agricultural experimental stations 

Appropriation for Department of Agriculture 

Bureau of Animal Industry. (Part 1. ) 

Department of Agriculture 

Esbibiiion of silk specimens 

Illegal sale of imitations of dairy products 

Transfer of a certain appropriation 

By Mr. Sitinbume : 

Bureau of Animal Industiy. (Part2.) 

Commissionerof Apiculture, report from 

Printing reports, bills, dec 

Texas lever or cairle plague 

COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS— 
By Mr, John J. Aaams : 

Deficiency for printing, pensions, and pay of the Army 

By Mr. Bumee : 

Deficiency bill 

Urgent deficiency appropriation bill 

(m) 



310 

489 

364 
29 

48U 

1829 

3052 
3437 



871 

848 
1451 
1234 

203 
2480 
202e 

636 

12:)4 

3413 

3414 

718 



2436 

3109 

3447 

733 



1 
2 

1 
1 
2 



10 
II 

1 



3 
5 
4 
1 
8 
7 
2 

4 
II 
II 

3 



10 

II 

3 



IV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIA.TIONS— Continaed. 
By Mr. Forney : 

Fortification appropriation bill 

Relief of 8afferer8m>m overflow in Alabama 

By Mr. Holman : 

Legislative, executive, and Judicial appropriations 

By Mr, Randall : 

Fees of witnesses and Jurors in the United States courts . . . 

Pension appropriation bill 

Sundry civil appropriation bill 

By Mr. Wilson : 

District of Columbia appropriation bill 

COMMITIEE ON BANKING AND CURRENCY— 
By Mr. G. E. Adams: 

National banking associations <,. 

By Mr. Brady : 

National Bank of Lincoln, Pa 

By Mr. Candler : 

Bellair, First National Bank of 

Commercial National Bank of Marshalltown, Iowa 

National Bank of Bellair, Ohio 

By Mr. Dingley: 

National Bank of Winona 

By Mr. Miller : 

Citizens' National Bank of Louisville, Ky , 

First National Bank of Shakopee, Minn 

Muscatine Bank 

National currency 

Omaha National Bank, Nebr 

Revised Statutes, to amend sections 5191 and 5192 

Revised Statutes, section 5151 

Small bills for circulation 

By Mr. Snyder : 

First National Bank of Minneapolis 

By Mr fFilkins : 

Issue of circulating notes to national banking associations 

Merchants' National Bank of Little Rock 

National Bank, Winona 

COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS— 
By Mr. Hroum: 

Clark, Robert, & Co 

DeAhna, Henry C..^ 

Edward Braden ^Qo 

Fulton, Mathew H * 

Grant,EdwayA 

By Mr, C. E. Brown : 

Huston, R.G.,& Co 

Jacobs, Enoch, to compensate 

Kyle, Lieut. JohnG 

Mathews, Thomas, and others 

Night inspectors ports of New York and Baltimore 

Pattison &, Caldwell 

Phillips. E.J 

By Mr. Buchanan : 

American Grocer Association 

Ashuelot, sufiferersby the wreck of 

Brainard, David L., and others 

Butler & Pitkin 

Conway, Mrs. Fanny 8 

Dawson, E. B 

Denton & Sage 



Report. 



3208 


11 


1566 


6 


2495 


8 


2484 


8 


342 


1 


5 2898 


10 


) 3431 


11 



i 



Vol. 



874 

104 

40 

180 

3411 

108 

38 

71fi 

94 

2377 

371 

49li 
2616 

202 
1455 

• 39 

201 
36 
37 



1903 
1902 
1901 
2369 
1127 
2380 

2840 
3:^94 
2470 
2474 
1433 
2471 
474 
475 

1811 

824 

3128 

1125 

3432 

1375 

299 

1326 

473 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS— Continued. 
jBjf Mr. Buchanan — Continaed. 

DoltoD, William 

Fraser, John 

Jeannertte, sory Ivors of the exploring steamer 4 

Johnson, MaryE 

Moore, Ely, and John W. Whitfield, estates of 

Nebraska and Kansas, purchasers of lands in 

Newman, George T - 

Osborne, Anna W 

By Mr. Buchanan : 

Phelps, Mrs. Lizzie Maynadier 

Phoenix National Bank 

Rose, Malitty : 

Saylor, Augustus D 

Spitzer, Solomon 

Steamship companies, claims of 

Todd, Harry I 

By Mr. Dougherty: 

Belding, H. K 

Brush, J. P., and Martin Gugsley « 

Clarke, Lizzie D 

Florida, claim of State of 

Grand Trunk Railway of Canada 

Hasell, Louisa H 

James, B. S 

Lee, Beaufort, and others 

Mumerlyn, John D 

Neal, Henry 

Roberts, John B 

By Mr. Fleeger: 

Bell, Francis Bl 

Burroughs, Frank J 

Delozier, Terrence 

Hammond, Francis 

Hogan, James F 

Kindall, Maj. William, legal representatives of 

Morrison, William M 

Wightman, John, legal representatives of 

By Mr. Gallinger : 

AUin, Erskine S., heirs of 

Ayres, Htnry 

Ballard Pavement Company 

Barker, Williams and others 

Carroll, Lysander H 

"Chance/' owners of British bark 

Floyd, Rachel J 

Hubbard, Ann B., administratrix /. 

Jones, David W 

Laban, Heath d^Co 

Newton, Mass., First National Bank of 

Skinner, Flora 

Si.rachan, Robert 

Tallapoosa, sufferers by the wreck of the 

Trefethen, William 

Tyson, Bryan 

Washburn, Henry and Thomas 

Webster, David 




1 



VoL 



597 


8 


300 


1 


602 


2 


663 


2 


1547 


6 


2693 


9 


520 


2 


1812 


6 


1430 


5 


823 


3 


2b46 


9 


2504 


8 


1813 


6 


1157 


4 


1294 


5 


661 


2 


1123 


4 


1124 


4 


1551 


6 


3102 


10 


2371 


8 


1128 


4 


303 


1 


1549 


6 


1548 


6 


2278 


8 


2279 


8 


3101 


10 


2280 


8 


1550 


6 


828 


3 


3326 


11 


1295 


5 


2253 


7 


1989 


7 


3327 


11 


303; 


10 


2695 


9 


3032 


10 


1814 


6 


2275 


8 


1552 


6 


28G1 


10 


478 


2 


1431 


5 


3025 


10 


596 


2 


1312 


5 


1C5 


1 


3125 


10 


3126 


10 


3026 


10 


826 


3 


2692 


9 


825 


3 


2002 


7 


1327 


5 


156 


1 


154 


1 



VI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS— Continued. 
By Mr, Howard: 

Beaman, John W., and B. F. Scribner 

Berry, James R 

Blair, Charles R 

Crunbo & Milcher .'. : 

Davis, Jefferson 

Davis, Solomon 

Daane, ('ol. James C 

Ellison, George C 

Erskiue, Dement, Bassett, and Burnett, Doctors 

PMnch, William H., heirs of 

Fulsom, F. E 

Gray, William H 

Greensburgh Limestone Company and others 

Haynie, Mrs. Marian F 

Hobbs, J. M 

Holoyd, Sarah E 

Huntington, William 

InternaTrevenue tax, illegal 

Jones. B. F 

Lyons, Houora V 

Physicians, compensation to certain 

PoWeli, W. H 

Read, John B 

Roberts, George F.cta^ 

Sharretts, George E. W 

Thompson, John C 

Tillman, LaconR 

Tinder, Will iam, estate of 

Wilson, H. B., administrator 

By Mr. Lamham : 

Alunco Cement Company of San Antonio, Tex 

Cranston, fcJ. B 

Culver, Mrs. Catharine P 

Gk)rri8sen, V. F 

Grigsby, James M 

Indian Committee of Friends in Indiana 

Lnnnar, Sarah L 

Mellifout, John, and Ellen Riordon 

Moss, H. J. T 

Norton, A. B 

Furuell, Thomas F 

Rawls, Morgan 

South Carolina volunteer troops 

Trentlen, John R 

Vicksbarg and Meridian Railroad Company 

Walton, Joseph, &Co 

Westmoreland, Thomas P 

By Mr, McEenna: 

Adkinson, D. O 

Caudee, Major G. W 

Clifford, James i 

Co8l)y, John G 

Eight-hour law, adjustment of accounts under the 

Emery, Albert H , 

Kinkiiead, John H., Samuel, Sussman, and Charles O. Wood... 

Leef, Henry, heirs of 

Lobban, J. M 

McLean, James 

Murphy, Charles 

Murphy, Frank P. 

Murphy, Martin and P. B 

Norton, T, II., and James McLean 

Scudder, Charles L 



Report. 


Vol. 


2701 


9 


2893 


10 


3322 


11 


3024 


10 


3196 


11 


2892 


10 


31-24 


10 


1217 


4 


1071 


4 


3323 


11 


1218 


4 


2422 


8 


3325 


' 11 


24(58 


1 8 


2714 


9 


2562 


8 


7M 


1 3 


2693 


1 10 


2674 


i 9 


2248 


7 


2694 


9 


2370 


8 


2733 


9 


1122 


4 


3324 


. 11 


28:)9 


10 


1378 


5 


2492 


8 


3390 


11 


1290 


5 


867 


3 


b(i8 


3 


81 


1 


1545 


6 


2839 


9 


5 1546 
I 2700 


6 


9 


2467 


8 


153 


1 


3021 


10 


297 


1 


2423 


8 


3122 


10 


2424 


8 


1292 


5 


1291 


5 


973 


3 


1864 


6 


827 


3 


472 


2 


3028 


10 


939 


3 


2527 


8 


30:«) 


10 


1865 


r> 


179 


. 1 


3331 


11 


2748 


^ 


3029 


10 


2431 


8 


2381 


8 


2841 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE BEPOBTS. 



vn 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS— Continued. 
By Mr. ifclTeiiRa— Continued. 

Sharp, Abbie 

Shepaid, Alexander 

Sool^ Frank 

United States light-house, twelfth district, employ^ of .... 

Ward, Zeb 

ByMr.Muller: 

Herman, Henry 

McRoberts, Ellie , 

Merritt, Edwin A 1 

Pennsylvania, Judicial proceedings in 

Sharretts, George E.W 

Ward, William, claim of, for services 

Bp Mr. Neal : 

Adams, J. Harry 

Chambers & Brown. 

Cheatham, William A. and Adelicia 

Coronna. Taussig A Co., and others 

De Ix>acn, Claiborne, heirs of 

Ellis, John 

Faulkner, H. H., and Mary Woodlee 

Haxtbanson, Joseph ! 

Henry, Jacob A 

Hubbard, Hiram W 

Jennings, B 

Leathers, John 

Lees, Isaiah W., and E. H. Ellis 

Lowry, James M 

Marshall, 8. T 

McElwee, Thomas B 

Morris, J. A 

Olive Frances, brig 

Raodle, William H 

Ridgway, Richard C 

Seat, Samuel B 

Smith, William J 

Stewart, James, heirs of 

Tallapoosa, sufferers by 

Thompson, E. P 

Triplett, T.H 

Wamack, Susan 

Bg Mr. Shaw : 

Ayre«, James H 

Cougblin, John J .• 

Crawford, James 8 

Edelin, P.Gough 

Etheridge, Emerson, and William B. Stokes 

Fardy.EmilyJ 

Fleming, Samuel H 

Horwitz, Orville, trustee 

Maryland and Virginia, advances made to United States by 

McClintock, John M 

Morgan, Thomas P., Jr 

Mnnroe, Grafton 

North German Lloyd Steamship Company 

Selma and Meridian Railroad Company 

Talbert, William 

Trimble. Isaac R., trustees of 




Vol. 



858 


3 


177 


1 


178 


1 


471 


2 


2564 


8 


3022 


10 


3023 


10 


3317 


11 


3321 


11 


3324 


11 


1008 


3 


1882 


6 


2175 


7 


1009 


3 


2473 


8 


3027 


10 


1000 


3 


301 


1 


2174 


7 


2552 


8 


2274 


8 


158 


1 


479 


2 


1010 


3 


2553 


8 


481 


2 


1159 


4 


856 


3 


157 


1 


1158 


4 


2732 


9 


2891 


10 


1100 


4 


18cf3 


6 


2032 


7 


2273 


8 


2490 


8 


302 


1 


3402 


11 


1328 


5 


480 


2 


857 


3 


1005 


3 


1818 


6 


3328 


11 


2606 


9 


317 


1 


2176 


7 


1006 


3 


1007 


3 


3395 


11 


518 


2 


1553 


6 


1870 


6 


2607 


9 


725 


3 


2563 


8 


2432 


8 


664 


2 


1886 


6 



Tm 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS--Cont]niied. 
By Mr. Sowden: 

Borohard, Jabez 

Mullen, Henry 

By Mr. Springer: 

Cadwalader, John F 

Dillinger, S., Sl Sons 

Ensel, L. S 

Ferris, Eliza M., legal repiesentatiyes of 

Fisk, Harry 

Gray, William 

Henry, Miss Eula E 

Marrs, James R 

Pearce, S. H 

Plocber, Ferdinand 

Post d[; McCord - 

Ryan, David « 

Saint Clair, Dr. F. O 

Schaumbarg, James W 

Scbuchardt, William 

Semon, Bacbe &Co 

Sewell, Coulson Sl Porter, and Harrison A Fishback . 

Sbutt, Frank 

Smith, Thomas 

Stevens, Edwin 

Thome, William P 

United States, claims against 

Webster, Lieut. J. McA 

Wilkey,H. C - 

By Mr, Trigg: 

Haiti more, claim of city of, and certain States 

Beckley, R.D., and Leon Howard 

Bond, William E 

Carter, James R 

Dickey, Thomas C 

Dodge, William C 

Fitzpatrick, Richard 

Fowler, Lafayette 

Leatherberry, P. A 

McCriUis, Milo 

Mears, John W 

Pilkinton, Edwin T., estate of 

Rivers, J.Henry 

Sibley, Henry H 

St. John, A.F.andN.C 

Teed, Theodore 

Tioe, Isaac P., administrators of 

By Mr. W. Warner : 

Arthur, Chester A., and William H. Robertson 

Bailey, E.B 

BayiesSfLott S 

Brice, James 

Chambers, Thomas 

Chicago custom-house, employ^ in 

Collins, William 

Court of Claims to hear and determine certain claims. 

Court of Claims, Jurisdiction of 

Court of Claims, cases in 

Dyer, Francis W 

Faran &. McLean 




Fenlon, Edward 



! 



! 



975 

2472 

974 

1874 
2895 

976 

82 

3033 

482 
1350 
3392 
3103 
3319 
1289 
3391 
2691 
1950 
1376 
3320 
3318 
1375 
2498 
2428 
2429 
1949 
2276 
20 
3123 
2430 

519 
598 
1544 
1872 
2324 
1816 
470 
2469 
1815 
1817 
1885 
1543 
2325 
1722 
1293 
1837 
2491 
3020 

2711 

2712 

2426 

2173 

2014 

2268 

2271 

2171 

2858 

562 

660 

3035 

705 

334 

2368 



3 
6 
3 

6 

10 

3 

1 

10 

2 

5 

11 

10 

11 

5 

11 

9 

7 

5 

11 

11 

5 

8 

8 

8 

7 

8 

1 

10 
8 

t 
2 
6 
6 
8 
6 
2 
8 
6 
% 
6 
6 
8 
6 
ft 
6 
8 
10 

9 
9 
8 
7 
7 
8 
8 
7 

10 
2 
2 

10 
2 
1 
8 



it 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



IX 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS— Continued. 
Bg Mr. W. Warner — Continued. 

Fletcher, A.Brooks 

GleesoD, Andrew 

Goodrich, James W 

Groezinger, Gottlieb 1 

Gunn, Calvin 

Hager, James M 

Hansell, George B 

How, John, estate of 

Insurance and Banking Companies, taxation of certain . . 

Internal-revenue employes 

Iron Mountain Bank, Saint Louis, Mo 

Jan>es, B. S 

Kirk, Highland C, and others 

Lily, ligbt-honse tender 

Low, David W 

Martin, J. R 

McGoldrick, J. R 

Mesler, Charles V ^.. 

Moran, William P * 

Newman, George T - 

Osborne,' Thomas A 

Porter, Richard H. and James 

Postmasters, claims of 

Ramsay, G. Alexander 

Remington, E., &, Sons 

Rowland, E. 8 

Scarborough, 8. E 

Shipley,E. R 

Smiley, Alexander 

Sone and Fleming Manufacturing Company 

Stotesbury, Charles .• 

Taggart, John 

Thomas, A. A 

Tiitt, John A. S., heirs of 

Worden, L. J 

W yoniing, settlera in the Wind Valley of 

COMMITTEE ON COINAGE, WEIGHTS, AND MEASURES— 
Bg Mr. Bland: 

Free coinage of silver (Part 2) • 

Bif Mr. James : 

Free coinage of silver (Part 1) 

By Mr. Lanham : 

The trade dollar 

By Mr. McCreary : 

Snli-treasury at Louisville, Ky 

COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE— 
By Mr. Bynum : 

Astoria and Wihnemncca Railroad Company 

Bridge at Memphis 

Bridge across Mississippi River 

Bridge across the Missouri River ; 

Bridge across Young^s Bay, Oregon 

Water-power at Little Falls, Minn 

Willamette River, Oregon, bridge over 

By Mr. Caldwell : 

Hydrophobia 

Limitation of liabilities of the owners of vessels 

Revenue-marine service, officers of the 

Revenue-marine service 

Sale of goods and merchandise by samples (Part 1) 

B^ Mr, Clardy : 

Beacon lights on islands in Moosehead Lake, Maine 

Bridii^ over the Mississippi River at Saint Louis 




Vol. 



3195 
1216 
2272 
1611 

998 
1810 
3105 
1610 

476 
2269 

999 
3393 
1612 

724 
2270 

854 
2425 
1155 

&^ 
3127 
3104 
2696 
2894 
1432 

477 
3329 
3034 
2475 

899 

298 
3330 
2172 

604 
1156 
1296 
2427 
1884 



524 

524 

2037 

1643 



2025 
3225 
1398 
1617 
1466 
846 
3159 

3462 
1145 
2897 
2896 
1762 

636 
2341 



11 
4 
8 
6 
3 
6 

10 
6 
2 
8 
3 

11 
6 
3 
8 
3 
8 
4 
3 

10 

10 
9 

10 
5 
2 

11 

10 
8 
3 
1 

11 
7 
2 
4 
5 
8 
6 



2 
2 

7 
6 



7 
11 

ft 
6 

3 
11 

11 

4 
10 
10 

6 

% 

8 



X 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sabject. 




COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE- Continued. 
By Mr, Clardy — Continued. 

Bridge across Staten Island Sound 

Fo^-siguals and lights at the passes at the mouth of the Mis- 
sissippi River 

Light-house near Croatan^ N. C 

Light- house) Wicomico River, Virginia 

Light-house districtSi additional 

Light-ship off Cape Hatterss, N. C 

Light-ship off the entrance to Chesapeake Bay 

Pensacola, Fla., channels leading to 

By Mr. Crisp: 

Atlantic and Pacific Ship Railroad (Part 2) 

Bridge over Bayou Barnard, Mississippi 

Bridge across Coosa River 

Bridge at Council Bluffs, Iowa - 

Bridge across the Cumberland, Tennessee 

Bridge across Des Moines and Illinois Rivers 

Bridge across Detroit River 

Bridge at Kiethsbnrg 

Bridge across Lake Champlain 

Bridge over the Menominee 

Bridge across the Missouri River in Montana 

Bridge over the Missouri River at Pierre, Dak 

Bridge over Mississippi River near Alton, 111 

Bridge over the Mississippi River 

Bride over Ohio River, near Cairo 

Bridge across the Ohio at Paducah, Ky 

Bridge across Red River, Louisiana 

Bridge over Red River 

Bridge across Statep Island Sound 

Bridges across Saint Augustine and La Fayette Creeks, Georgia 

Bridge across Saint Croix River 

Bridge at Saint .Joseph 

Bridge acr<»88 Saint Marie River 

Bridge over Tennessee River at Sheffield, Ala 

Bridge across Tennessee River at Chattanooga 

Bridges in Washiugton Territory 

Bridge across West Pascagoula River 

Bridge across Young's Bay 

Bridge across Yellowstone River 

Construction of bridge by Nashville, Jackson and Menfphis Rail- 
road 

Flint River. Georgia, bridge across 

Gulf and Cnicago Railroad bridges 

By Mr. Davis : 

Commercial intercourse, freedom of 

Contagious and infectious diseases 

'Gull Rocks, Newport Harbor, R. I 

Light at New Bedford,' Mass 

Light and fog signals at Castle Hill, R. I 

Light-house and fog-signal at Deer Island, Boston, Mass 

Light-house at Lubec Narrows, Maine 

Light-house on Crabtree's Ledge, Maine 

Light-house supply steamer 

Light-houpe tender for fourth light-house district 

Light-ship on Hog Isla^nd Shoal 

Yellow fever, inoculation of 

By Mr. R, T, Davis : 

Yellow-fever cases 

By Mr, Dunham : ' 

Inspection of live-stock 

Licensing of vessels carrying persons in addition to their crews. 



527 



Vol. 



1 



1465 


5 


1385 


5 


3452 


11 


1147 


4 


1387 


5 


1464 


5 


1386 


5 


717 


3 


1079 


4 


1082 


4 


372 


1 


1354 


5 


3220 


11 


863 


3 


523 


2 


763 


3 


2441 


8 


2440 


8 


2911 


10 


1567 


6 


1307 


5 


522 


2 


3111 


10 


764 


3 


3219 


11 


3218 


11 


1080 


4 


1081 


4 


2573 


8 


24:^9 


8 


1232 


4 


135;^ 


5 


3110 


10 


2912 


10 


2724 


9 


2442 


8 


2913 


10 


2555 


8 


1397 


5 


634 


2 


3107 


10 


1458 


5 


3361 


11 


1230 


4 


1389 


5 


1229 


4 


528 


2 


1461 


5 


1462 


5 


14.0 


5 


1459 


o 


1463 


5 


1388 


5 


2914 


10 


375 


2 


1644 


6 


1146 


4 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



XI 



Subject. 




OOMMITTEE ON COMMERCE— Continued. 
By Mr. Dunham — Con tinned. 

Low bridge at Saint Louis, Mo. (Part 2) 

Mississippi Water-power and Boom Company of Brainerd, Miss 
By Mr. Irwin : 

I'rancis, Joseph 

Life-saving stations, additional 

Minneapolis Industrial Exposition 

North, Central, and Sonth American Exposition , 

Sampson, Thomas , 

Southern Exposition at Louisville, Ky , 

By Mr. F, A. Johnson : 

Hell Gate channel electric li^ht , 

Light at Whitehall NaiTows, Lake Champlain 

By Mr. Morrow : 

Light-house and fog-signal at San Luis Obispo, California 

Purchase of right of way to Cape Orford light-station, Oregon. 

. Shipwrecked seamen, transportation of , 

Testing of chains and anchors 

By Mr. (yFerrall: 

Change of name of Lamberton to Port of Trenton, N.J 

Hartlord, Conn., port of entry 

Limitti of the port of Portlandj Oreg , 

Port of entry at Mount Desert Ferry, Me , 

Port of delivery at Lewes, Del 

Port of delivery at Springfield, Mass 

Sale of goods and merchandise by sample (Part 2} , 

n^j Mr. CharUs CyNeill : 

Inter-State commerce (Part 2) 

Btj Mr. Reagan : 

Atlantic and Pacific Ship Railway Company (Part 1) 

Collection districts of Miami and Sandusky, Ohio; 

Inter-State commerce (Part 1) 

National live-stock highway 

Maritime service 

Regulating commerce 

Transportation of live stock 

Vessel fisheries of the United States 

By Mr. Tarsney : 

Aliens as engineers 

Barge Michigan 

Light-house on Seul Choix Point, Michigan 

Ohio Central Railroad Company 

Revised Statutes, amendment of 

By Mr. A. J. Weaver : 

Bridge at Atchison, Kans 

Bridge near Dubuque, Iowa 

Bridge at Kansas City, Mo 

Bridge across Kansas Kiver j 

Bridge over the Missouri 

Bridge over the Missouri at Nebraska City 

Bridges over navigable rivers 

Bridge over the Ohio River 

Bridge over Saint Louis River 

Bridge over Willamette River 

Bridge at Winona, Minn 

Bridges over Wisconsin, Chippewa, and Saint Croix Rivers... 
COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT OP COLUMBIA— 
By Mr. Barbour : 

Adas Israel Hebrew Association, District of Columbia 

Board of Foreign Missions, Methodist Church 



Vol. 



I 



! 



2341 
105 

529 

1083 

3223 

374 

373 

3412 

1231 
946 

525 
526 

847 
3224 
2845 

i;i96 
3221 
2754 
1085 
1984 
2765 
903 
1983 
1762 

902 

717 
1084 

902 
1228 
3222 
2554 
2638 
2042 

106 
1138 
1568 

765 
1985 

1457 
2485 
1456 
1393 
1392 
1394 
1395 
3403 
1308 
1878 
3469 
3062 
1309 
766 



1732 
2697 



8 
1 



4 

11 

2 

1 

11 

4 
3 

2 
2 
3 
11 
9 

5 

11 

9 

4 

7 
9 
3 

7 
6 



3 
4 
3 
4 
11 
8 
9 
7 

1 
4 
6 
3 



5 
8 
5 



5 

5 

5 

11 

5 

6 

11 

10 

5 

3 



6 
9 



XII 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



Sabjeot. 



COMMITTEE ON THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— Continued. 
By Mr, Barbour — Continued. 

Corcoran Gallery of Art 

Lonise Home ^ 

National Safe Deposit Company, District of Columbia 

Potomac River flats 

School board, District of Columbia 

Saint Mark's Episcopal Church, District of Columbia 

Saint Patrick's Church, District of Columbia 

Uniontown, to change name of 

Toung Men's Christian Association, District of Columbia 

By Mr, J, E, Campbell : 

Denmead, Francis 

Egan, Mary Anna 

Real-estate agents in District of Columbia 

Steam-boiler inspection for District of Columbia 

Taxes in the District of Columbia 

Undrawn poultry 

Toung Men's Christian Association in District of Columbia 

By Mr. Dawdney : 

Protection of property from fire and safety of lives in District 

of Columbia 

By Mr, Ford: 

' American College for the Blind 

Promotion of anatomical science and prevention of desecration 

of graves 

' Reform School, trustees of tiie 

By Mr, Gay : 

Toung Women's Christian Home, District of Columbia 

By Mr, Heard: 

Conveyance of land in District of Columbia 

Washington Cable Railway Company 

Washingtron Traction Railway Company 

By Mr. Hemphill : 

Aqueduct Bridge - 

Bonds of executors in the District of Columbia 

Book-making and pool-selling in the District of Columbia 

Bottlers of the District of Columbia 

Denmead, Francis 

Foreign executors and administrators 

Lottery tickets, to punish selling of, in District of Columbia. . 

Randolph, Cornelius P., and others .' 

Service of process in police courts. District of Columbia 

Steam engineering in the District of Columbia 

Treasurer of the United States to credit the District of Colum- 
bia with certain moneys 

By Mr. Powell: 

Bridge across Eastern Branch Potomac River 

luRurance in th^ District of Columbia 

COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION— 
By Mr, (yDonnell: 

Sale of school lands in Beaufort County, South Carolina 

Studv of physiology 

COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS— 
By Mr, Ely : 

Paget?. Pirce (Part 2) 

By Mr, B, 8. Green : 

Hurd V, Romeis (Part 3) 

Paget?. Pirce (Parti) 

By Mr. Hall : 

Campbell v. Weaver (Part 1) , 

By Mr. Lovory : 

California election cases 



Report. 



3049 


10 


3050 


10 


2705 


9 


172 


1 


2704 


9 


1137 


4 


1136 


4 


171 


1 


1724 


6 


3459 


11 


:^62 


11 


5 3461 
> 3464 


11 


11 


988 


3 


3458 


11 


1383 


5 


3460 


11 



3051 

872 



i 



1623 

1449 
1623 

1622 

2338 



Vol. 



10 



873 


3 


3354 


11 


1726 


6 


729 


3 


1012 


3 


2549 


8 


2299 


8 


2300 


8 


1629 


6 


2645 


9 


1630 


6 


987 


3 


2646 


9 


2373 


8 


1631 


6 


2741 


9 


2301 


8 


2374 


8 


3429 


11 


2703 


9 


3426 


11 


1266 


4 


1765 


6 



6 

5 

6 

6 
8 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XIII 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON ELECTIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, Payne : 

Campbell V. Weaver (Part 2) 

By Mr, Bobertaon : 

Hnrd v, Romeis (Part 2) 

By Mr, Turner : 

CoDtested elections 

Hurd r. Romeis (Part 1) 

COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES IN THE INTERIOR DE- 
PARTMENT— 
By Mr, J, B, Weaver : 

Inveetii^atioD of the Pension Bureau 

COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES IN THE DEPARTMENT OF 
JUSTICE— 
By Mr. En%iace Gibson : 

Bell and Pan-Electric Telephone Companies 

Expenditures in Department of Justice 

COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES IN THE NAVY DEPART- 
MENT— 
By Mr, Sowden : 

Harber and Schuetze, lieutenants 

COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES IN THE TREASURY DE- 
PARTMENT— 
By Mr, Lawry : 

Lancaster, Richard D 

COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES IN THE WAR DEPART- 
MENT— 
By Mr. C, M, Andereon : 

Unlawful expenditures in the Signal Service 

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS— 
By Mr, Belmont : 

American Exhibition in London in May, 1886 

Consular service 

Consuls, reports of 

Diplomatic and consular .' 

Limiting the exaction of fees 

Statue of Liberty 

By Mr, Cox: 

Chinese restriction 

Chinese subjects, indemnity to 

Indemnity to Chinese subjects 

Wharton's Digest of International Law 

By Mr, Daniel : 

Submarine cables, protection of 

ByMr.Biit: 

Jurisdiction of United States in places out of their territory ... 

Potts. John 

By Mr, McCreary: 

American commerce and arbitration 

American customs union 

Attach^ of forei^ legations 

Commercial relations between United States and Mexico, Cen- 
tral and Sooth America 

International American Congress 

By Mr, Phelps : 

Beanboucher, Victor 

By Mr, Singleton : 

United States and Mexico, awards between 

By Mr. Worthington : 

Purchase of work entitled " Port Charges " 

COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AITAIRS— 
By Mr. Baker : 

Penal colony in Alaska 

By Mr. Charlee H. Allen : 

Railroad across Indian Territory 




1622 

1449 

13,V> 
1449 

861 



521 
1132 



3205 



3215 



2023 



VoL 



6 

5 

5 
5 



2 

4 



11 



11 



377 

1938 

2849 

842 

376 

2899 


2 
7 
9 
3 
1 
10 


2043 
2044 
2044 
2618 


7 
7 
7 
9 


3198 


11 


864 
1467 


3 
5 


1648 
1645 
3145 


6 

6 

11 


1047 
1646 




28 




3428 


11 


2716 


- 9 


1685 




1366 


^ 



XIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



Snbject. 




Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AITAIKS— Continned. 

By Mr. Hailey : 

Indian Department, expenses of 

lodian treaties, claims 

By Mr, Hale : 

Indian Territory, railway through 



Indian Territory, right of way through 

• 

Shoshone and Bannock tribes of Indians 

Wichita and Arkansas Valley Railroad, right of way to 

By Mr, LaFolletie: 

Fell, J. G., Hoopesand Barham 

Mission Indians, California 

By Mr. Nelson : 

Indian reservations in Northern Montana 

Sionx Indian Reservation in Dakota 

By Mr, Peel: 

Executive Document No. 82, relative to certain Indian claims 

Kansas City, Fort Scott and Gulf Railroad Company 

Pacific and Great Eastern Railroad, right of way to 

Red Lake Indian Reservation 

Ri^ht of way for railroad purposes 

Saint Louis and San Francisco Railroad Company 

By Mr. Perkine : 

Cherokee Indians, Eastern and Western hands of 

Deceased Kickapoo Indians in Kansas 

Estates of deceased Kickapoo Indians 

Haskell Institute, Lawrence, Kans 



! 



Hiatt<&Co. 



Indian Territory, railway through 

Kansas and Arkansas Valley Railway 

Kansas City, Fort Scott and Gulf Railroad Company 

Prairie baud of Pottawatomie Indians in Kansas 

Sac and Fox and Iowa Indian Reservations in Nebraska and 

Kansas 

By Mr. Sessions : 

Huuing, Franz and Charles, and others 

Maxwell, George, Bulkley, and Newman 

By Mr. Skinner : 

Indians, allotment of lands in severalty to 

United Peorias and Miamis of Indian Territory, allotment of 

lands to 

By Mr. Storm : 

Assistant Commissioner of Indian Affairs 

Bainter, James 

Comstock, George S 

Kickapoo dimiuished reservation in Kansas, sale of 

Pettij^re w, George H , 

Seneca Indiuns, lands of 

By Mr. WtUborn: 

Indian appropriation bill 

Indian Territory, right of wav through 

COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— 
By Mr. Conger : 

Abbott, WilUamN 

Alfrey,A.H 

Apperly, William 

Bailey, Mrs. C. A 

Barber, C 

Barton, Henry 

Benton, Catherine L ^ 

Bollman, Henry 

Bolton, Caroline P 

Boon, Clark 

Boyd, Eliza 



1411 


5 


3117 


10 


769 


3 


2447 


8 


2488 


8 


2767 


9 


1473 


5 


2917 


10 


2556 


8 


2336 


8 


1227 


4 


2614 


9 


840 


3 


1474 


5 


176 


I 


1091 


4 


182 


1 


539 


2 


673 


2 


1992 


7 


1315 


5 


1475 


5 


2916 


10 


768 


3 


2343 


8 


2302 


8 


1476 


5 


850 


3 


3438 


11 


2885 


10 


1835 


6 


1682 


6 


1763 


6 


3193 


11 


3194 


11 


642 


2 


2844 


9 


2344 


8 


386 


2 


849 


3 


2542 


8 


2656 


9 


1061 


4 


2125 


7 


1934 


7 


3272 


11 


440 


2 


1743 


6 


2920 


10 


2123 


7 


2814 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



XV 



Subject. 




COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr. Conger — 

BoydstoDy Elizabeth 

Brarv, Nathaniel 

Brockett, Thomas 

Banker, G.W 

Bashy, Rebecca E 

Callison, Claibom 

Chamberlain . J abez 

Clark, John D 

Clone, Mrs. Margaret R 

Cockram, Albertine 

Collins, Catherine 

Cramblittu George W 

Crocker, Charlotte D 

Cronch, M. V 

Cromnse, A 

Defenbangh, John 

Dial, Samnel 

Dickson, T.J 

Dollhofer, Michael 

Dow, Jennette 

Duke, H. R 

Early, George G 

Eichman, lirs. AnnaD.W 

Elderken, David T 

Fields, Green 

Foster, Mary A 1 

Foster, Samuel 

Garrison, James C 

Garthoeffner, Anton 

Gaylord, John W - 

Gearf Richard 

Gillespie, Robert J 

Gillham, Mary M 

Goofle, Robert F.H 

Gordon, William 

Grav, Robert 

Gray. Wilson G 1 : 

Gray, Aaron P 

Greenfield, Peter 

Hamilton. Mrs. Sarah 

Handy, Whipple 

Harney, Hezekiah 

Harrington, Edward M 

Harvey, Russell 

Haworth, James D -• - . 

Hedrick,Mary E 

Herwick, John 8 

HcA'cr, Henry 

Hiseler, Samuel 

Hook, Mary B 

Horobin, Luke 

Hubbert, John W 

Hudson, William J v 

Johnson, Aaron C 

Johnson, Daniel 

Johnson, Perry 

Jessup, Isabella 

Jones, Jerome B 

Kennedy, Catherine 

Kent, Alonzo Hayward 

King, Leonard 

Kirkhart, Joseph 



3269 
3268 

135 
1936 
3282 
.3273 

133 

260 
3538 

128 

69 

1102 

68 

1062 

2537 

67 

3280 

3276 

3267 

2535 

2124 

2532 

66 

1090 

1099 

3217 

2922 

266 
1415 
1202 
1416 
1103 

435 

131 
2o;« 

264 
1270 
1712 

134 
2539 



Vol. 



11 
11 
1 
7 
11 
11 
1 
1 
8 
1 
1 
4 
1 
4 
8 
1 

11 

11 

11 

8 

7 

8 

1 

4 

4 

11 

10 

1 

U 

4 
5 
4 
2 

1 
8 
1 
4 
6 
1 
8 



3266 


11 


3274 


11 


3277 


11 


1271 


4 


3284 


11 


2306 


« 


2921 


10 


1060 


4 


1201 


4 


2813 


9 


1417 


5 


2B10 


9 


:i271 


11 


1199 


4 


436 


2 


1345 


^ 


439 


2 


2653 


9 


3281 


11 


1200 


4 


;I283 


11 


594 


2 


2809 


9 



x^ 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS-Oontinued. 
By Mr, Conner— Continued. 

Lang, James 

Loomis, Aretus F 

Luce, Elizabeth ^. 

Maloney, Mrs. Honorab 

McCarty, Mrs. Catherine 

McClelland, John H 

McComnmck, Thomas M 

McDonald, H. W 

McNair, Miss Caroline 

McQuaide, JaneR 

Middleton, Ashael 

Moon Edwin 

Morgan, Henry S 

Morgan, James 

Morris, Josbua L , 

Myers, Sarah E 

Noble, Rowland 

Nokes, George W 

Nolte, Wilhelm 

O^Brien, Bridget 

Parsons, Cbarlotte C 

Pattee, Wallis 

Pennell, Emery C 

Pension for deafness 

Pensions, to increase 

Phillips, Ray -.-, 

Points, Abraham , 

Powell, William , 

Prall, Menton , 

Randall, William 

Rehkopf, Mrs. H. B v 

Rians, Richard B 

Richards, Alonzo V 

Romahn, Michael 

Sherwood, Sidney 

Smarzo, Christian 

Smith, Januet E. B ^ 

Smith, Cyrenius W , 

Snyder, Curtis L 

Sparks. Simpson 

Stobangh, James 

Tannahill, Clara M 



Thurston, William 
Trammel!, Winnie .. 
Trimble, Alexander . 
Van Horn, Mary A .. 

Wait, Hiram L 

Walters, John H 

Ward, William E 

Weaver, William H . 
Webb, Mrs. Anna S . 
Webster, William ... 
Williams, Thomas . . . 
Womom, Charles T . 
Wright, Daniel K ... 
Young, Mrs. Sarah .. 
By Mr, ElUherry : 

Arthur, John 

Bradley, Sally Ann.. 
Bradley, Sally Ann.. 

Buck, Charlotte 

Caldwell, DaTid B .*. 



Report. 


Vol. 


132 


1 


1574 


6 


5 1100 
5 3206 


4 


11 


1344 


5 


5 744 
} 3207 


3 


1 


1101 


4 


18 


1 


438 


2 


2808 


9 


2652 


9 


258 


1 


106^ 


4 


261 


1 


130 


1 


745 


3 


2815 


9 


3278 


11 


1204 


4 


1933 


7 


262 


1 


2541 


8 


2651 


9 


441 


2 


593 


2 


1514 


5 


3279 


11 


25*36 


8 


2126 


7 


259 


1 


595 


2 


^265 
^33 


1 
11 


743 


3 


2127 


7 


129 


1 


437 


2 


1515 


5 


1937 


7 


1203 


4 


3275 


11 


1932 


7 


3384 


11 


2655 


9 


3270 


11 


2812 


9 


2540 


8 


263 


1 


1269 


4 


1063 


% 


2654 


9 


2534 


8 


1516 


5 


136 


1 


2811 


9 


267 


1 


2919 


10 


1368 


5 


778 


3 


3420 


11 


1065 


4 


3385 


11 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



# - 
XVII 



Subject. 



Report, i Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON IiNVALID PENSIONS-Oon tinned. 
Bff Mr, £//ffrfTr^— CoDtinned. 

Canode, Henry 

Carey, Abigail H 

Carleton, Isaac 

Cashin, Mrs. Margaret .' 

CoDiBtock, Abel 

Corcoran, Ellen 

Cnrry, Martin V .• 

Denuy, Alfred 

Driacoll, Margaret M 

Ellis, Cornelia W 

Falkner, Peter 

Fergnson, Mrs. M. E. A 

Fisher, Joseph , 

Fitger, Jeremiah M 

Fonght, Simon J. 

Garrett, Samuel F 

Hagerman, Mary J 

Henrys, Sarah E 

Jacks, Daniel 

Jacobs, William B 

Kain, Daniel , 

Keller, Henry 

King, Elizabeth M 

Kinney, Ann 

Kyler, H.L 

Lewis, Merritt 

Lippe, George Anna .* 

Long, James 

McCIaren, James L 

McFarland, Louisa 

McMul ben, James ^ 

Miller, Mary Ann 

Mioshall, Isaac N 

Montis, Libbie C 

Neibling, Elizabeth A 

Noland, Mrs. Louisa 

Pensions to totally disabled soldiers and sailors . 

Poland, Margaret A 

Probert, Anna A 

Rhinehart, Joseph Y'. 

Richmond. Frederick 

Ripley, Mary A 

Schlcyer, Theresa 

SchooDover, Jonas 

Seibold, Frederick 

Shannon, Mary A 

Slack, George 

Snodgrass, Mary C 

Spaugler, Matilda 

Startsman, Eliza 

Stout, George W 

Sutton, A. Schuyler 

Thomas, Sarah A 

Warner, Elizabeth 

W^eitzel, Louisa 

Weldy, Seth , 

Wolft*, James 

JBjf Mr, Halves : 

Adamn, John 

Adams, Joseph H 

Adiey, Mrs. Ruth 

Anderson, James 

Ayer, Zeba S. 

Babb, Josie H 

7149— H. Rep. n 



3387 


11 


1370 


5 


1098 


4 


3386 


11 


2121 


7 


2297 


8 


3099 


la 


2122 


7 


3100 


10- 


7 9 


a 


10:>6 


4 


e<^ 


3 


r90 


2 


1097 


4 


1057 


4 


405 


2 


2662 


9 


2119 


7 


781 


3 


244 


1 


782 


3 


1578 


6 


3097 


10 


2^96 


8 


i:<69 


5. 


:^380 


11 


14-29 


5. 


2661 


9 


466 


2 


5^8 


2 


245 


1 


780 


3: 


1512 


5 


2(>05 





1576 


6 


127 


1 


2830 


9 


589 


2 


2295 


8 


2118 


7 


3098 


10 


586 


2 


2783 


9 


2604 


9 


1577 


6 


1575 


6 


7.^ 


1 


1581 


6 


1579 


6 


15M0 


6 


1054 


4 


877 


3 


2120 


7 


878 


3 


5ft7 


2^ 


3388 


11 


1513 


5. 


2202 


7- 


3203 


11 


2453 


8 


1587 


6 


695 


2 


1585 


6 



XVIII INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. I Report. Vol. 



]42l 5 

3079 10 

J26L 11 

24r>4 8 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS^CoDtinned. 

By Mr. Hayites — Cod tinned. I 1 

Baglev, David W 1790 , 6 

Beldeu, Polly i 801 3 

Bent.SallvB 2544 8 

Bickford, John N I 2687 9 

Blake. CharlesE 

Blancnard, William 

Boyce, James B ; 

Boalter, Sarah E 

Bridges^ Elizabeth' 

Bridges, William, jr t 608 2 

Brooks, Henry ' 1531 5 

Brown, Lizzie l 3258 11 

Buck, WilliamH. H 2129 I 7 

Butler, James i 2133 I 7 

Carr, Mary 2455 | 8 

Caslin, James ! 2084 9 

Carty, Denis , 696 2 

Chandler, Mrs. Ellen M ' 355 1 

Chapman, Alice \ 2261 7 

Chase, Charles A || ,^.^ j ^ 

Cba«e, JohuF I 15:« ' 5 

Choate, Hiram K i 1978 \ 7 

Colby, Mary G 288 1 

Coonej', Betsey 3257 1 11 

Cowan,Ann ' 1732 6 

Davis, John P : 16 I 1 

Davis, Nathaniel W 294 1 

Dennis, J. M 1979 7 

Dodge, Richard • :U>7 1 

Drew, Lucy Ann 1 1384 5 

Driscoll, Timothy 1 HOO 3 

Dunn, Sarah M ' 1279 j 5 

Durgin, Andrew J | 2400 8 

Enlind, Johanna Sofia..: j 3262 ! 11 

Esty, Charles J || ^4f^^ ^ 8 

Flaherty, Margaret I 17 j 1 

Frost. Nathaniel G I lOr.9 ' 4 

Gilrann, Susan 1420 I 5 

Glidden, Sarah J ; 354 | 1 

Gould, Lucinda I 352 1 

Harrington, Harriet R 1198 | 4 

flawlev, George S ' 1106 i 4 

Hill, Alfred J | 2451 • 8 

Hill, Andrew J | 287 1 1 

Hill, Charles C 3264 11 

Hill, HenrvO ' 1419 ! 5 

Hildreth, CharUs F I 1534 5 

Henderson, George I 2673 9 

Holden, James L ' 1105 4 

Holt, Louis ' 147 1 

Hopkins, Thomas S \\ ^?J2 I 

Howland. Evalina I 358 1 

Humes, Mrs. Eliza : 1196 ! 4 

Hutch ins, Mrs. Hannah Babb ! 1058 4 

Knowles, Thomas J , ' 295 1 

Larrabee, Harriott M 694 2 

Lovejoy, Evelyn M 697 2 

Lucfls, Margaret 1,5:J5 5 

Maconiber. Addie L i 289 1 

Magoon, Mary Jane ! 3256 11 

Mi) goon, Nathan I l;i49 



INDEX TO HOUSE REP0ET8. 



XIX 



Subject. 



Report. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS-Continued. 
By Mr. Saynce^Cont'inned. 

Manh, Mary 

Marston, Adeline 

Martin, Mrs. Mary L 

McKean, Patrick 

Milton, John M - . 

Moaltou, Mary A 

Marpby, Mary 

Murray, Florence 

Nelson, Lydia A 

NichoU, N C 

Nottai^e. Mary J 

Parker, Eli B 

Pensions, for depehdent parents 

Phillips, Walter A 

Potter, Ansyl 

Putnam, Mrs. AdalineM 

Randal], Elizabeth A. 

Reedy, Maurice 

Robbins, Amelia F 

Rollins, John E 

Sadler. Ellen 

Sanborn, Mary H : 

Sawyer, John I 

Sawyer, Lucinda 

Sawyer, Mary E 

Scott, Wilson 

Sebastian, Charles N 

Shurtleff, Giles 

Slayton, Thomas J 

Smith, Stephen D 

Snow, Mary E 

Spauldin^, Lesitta W 

Spenanl, Jolia 

Stannard, Emily J 

Stevens, Catherine 

Stevens, Joshua N 

Stickney, Helen M 

Stiles, Stover E 

Snell, Josiah B 

Ward, Charles F 

Ward, Willie F 

Weston, Cyra L 

White, BartlettE 

Williams, Sarah Ann 

Witham, Sophronia 

Wood, Warren F 

By Mr. Louttit: 

Capehart, Col. Charles E 

Donayer, Henry 

Dnnmire, Theodore 

Evans, Fannie E 

Mclntyre, Byron 

Pensions, to officers and men on sick leave 

Ryan, John 

Stutsman, Henry H 

Btt Mr. Lavering : 

Adams, Mary H 

Ambler, Almira 

Babson. EmeliDe J 

Barry. John H 

BasJMjtt, Sarah E 



Vol. 



2130 


7 


353 


1 


292 


1 


15H6 


6 


149 


1 


356 


1 


146 


1 


1422 


5 


1537 


5 


290 


1 


468 


2 


S132 


7 


1280 


5 


1371 


6 


1104 


4 


609 


2 


1418 


5 


603 


3 


2546 


. 8 


351 


1 


2666 


9 


2««> 


9 


1977 


7 


1277 


5 


2128 


7 


291 


1 


1276 


5 


2131 


7 


1789 


6 


1533 


5 


3260 


11 


442 


2 


2260 


7 


659 


2 


3259 


11 


1975 


7 


802 


3 


1536 


5 


1731 


6 


286 


1 


1276 


4 


293 


1 


2671 


9 


1976 


7 


1730 


6 


1530 


5 


2548 


8 


2887 


10 


2528 


8 


2749 


9 


5a^ 


2 


3419 


11 


2500 


8 


2.^82 


8 


72 


1 


2529 


8 


1974 


7 


3074 


10 


3070 


10 


1973 


7 


322 


1 


1972 


7 



XX 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, Lovering — Continued. 

Bi'ckerdyke. Mary A , 

Bixby, Sopnia F* 

Bliss, George 

Bolles, Charles E 

Bulkley, Mabelle R 

Burbank, Abby L 

Byrnes, Daniel J 

Carll, MaryB 

Clappi EuimaL 

Clark, William L 

Ciune, Elizabeth 

Coffee, Margaret 

Cofiiu, Catherine E , 

Connolly, Daniel 

Conwell, Mrs. Ann J — 

Corbett, Mary 

Craven, Commander T. A. M., widow of 

Devereux, Jane W 

Donaldson, Walter A 

Douglas, C'harles 

Eads, Grace F 

Field, William 

Fisher, Ehza A 

Flagg, Algeruon S 

Flynn, Stephen 

Frinkt Austin L 

Gibson, EIlaE 

Gill, Amelia J .• 

Gray, Frank N 

Ilabneman , Charles 

Harris, Waitie F . . . : 

Haynes. Walter S 

Heath, James C 

Hibbert, Rosella E 

Hillman, Benjamin 

Holbrook, Alici" S 

Ingalls, William W 

Kent, Jenuette S 

Kingsbury, Gould 

Kirmay«r, Francis H 

Little, Ann 

Long, George R '. , 

Lucy, Margaret 

Luther, Emily 

Mack, Alexander 

Maynard, Alonzo 

McCarthy, Mary 

McGowau, John 

McMahon. Mary 

Mead, Lorkiu G 

Monroe, Nelson 

Mower, Betsey A 

Mumford, Jane D 

Murphy, Mary Ann 

Murphy, Patrick 

Murray, Betsey M 

Mykins, Mary A 

Nichols, Mrs. Eunice S 

Nolan, PliilomenaE 

Norwood, George *. . . 

Norvell, Mariah E. A. B 

O'Neill, Margaret 

OweUN, Dennis, children of 



Report. 

t 


Vol. 


1C38 


• 
4 


iO:to 


4 


2730 


9 


1031 


4 


1034 


1 4 


4G1 


2 


1035 


4 


341 


1 


l:i4l 


1 5 


1970 


j 7 


1193 


J 4 


1033 


i ^ 


2113 


! 7 


109 


' 1 


458 


t 


2925 


10 


2117 


7 


559 


2 


2932 


10 


1787 


6 


2729 


9 


1337 


5 


10:« 


4 


1191 


4 


1786 


6 


1039 


4 


1493 


5 


\OZ\f 


3 


1339 


5 


2923 


10 


27G9 


9 


561 


2 


2681 


9 


2774 


9 


2679 


9 


108 


I 


1342 


;> 


1492 


5 


2116 


7 


340 


1 


774 


3 


29:n 


10 


1969 




3073 


10 


2115 


7 


459 


2 


1340 


5 


1(>93 


6 


2771 


9 


1573 


<> 


1094 


6 


2816 


9 


2728 


9 


560 


2 


2112 




1036 


4 


5 2929 
\ 2931 


10 


10 


339 


1 


320 


1 


1195 


4 


1971 


7 


2680 


9 


2682 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXI 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
Bg Mr, Loverintj — Continued. 

Owenp, John 

Parrott, Mary 

Paul, Louise 

Perry, Adeliza 

Philiip*, Mary H 

Pinmmer, Judith 

Potts, Joseph H 

RobiuHon, Dileno 

Rodman, Charles Q 

Root, S.\ 1 vester 

Rice, Ashley C ' 

Richards, Augusta M 

Sawyer, Samuel 

Seelev, Grc^JFRe .• 

Shaftoe, William 

Smith, Elbridge 

Somes, Rinaldo R 

Spicer, Emily Louisa 

Sullivan, Elizabeth 

Tolman, Ellen S 

Tracy, Samuel E 

Trask, Horace 

Turner, Laura A 

Turney, Mrs. Martha E 

Vars, Mary Ann 

Washburn, Lucy A 

Warren, George A 

Webster, Mary S 

Weedeu, Amos C 

Welch, Ellen J '. 

Wheeler. William W 

Wiswell, Rebecca 

Yonnjj, James H , 

By Mr, MatBon : 

Alt'ord, Mrs. Lina 

Amanu, Kate 

Anderson. Lucy E 

Ayers, Edward 

Bagh'Vi Mary •. 

Baker, William B 

Barber, Elizabeth 

Battorf, Nancy 

Beezeley, Louisa C 

Billings, Andrew W 

Boone, William 

Brat.ch, Dudley B 

Burrill, John G 

Carmichael, Susannah 

Chandler, James C 

Ciavi'us, Joseph R 

Cnllen, Bpi<lget M 

Dane, Rhoda 

Day, Newton 

Dean, John A 

Die: zi-r, Theodore 

Du;:gett, John E 

Ferguson, Thomas 

Fisher, Samuel C 

Fluhill*, Rosanna 

Frasner, Alt hoa A 

GaincM. Jesse H . - 

Gasi on, Adam 

Ging, Jacob 

Gohs, Enoch 



Report. 


Vol. 


1192 


4 


5^924 


10 


»^773 


9 


3071 


10 


-.9*^8 


10 


3451 


11 


111 


1 


1194 


4 


112 


1 


13.;8 


5 


)me 


10 


4(»U 


2 


2726 


9 


777 


3 


:K)75 


10 


3077 


10 


776 


3 


775 


3 


324 


1 


319 


1 


2770 


9 


1037 


4 


1788 


6 


110 1 


1 


3450 


11 


2772 


9 


2927 


10 


773 


3 


17H5 


6 


2114 


7 


2683 


9 


2727 


9 


;i072 


10 


1766 


6 


401 


2 


3-2:»5 


11 


2053 


7 


1021 


3 


2658 


9 


2050 


7 


176*:^ 


6 


1692 


6 


1571 


6 


771 


3 


2055 


7 


1313 


5 


324 


1 


2052 


7 


1017 


3 


1282 


5 


7 


I 


737 


3 


648 


2 


30.W 


10 


2:i4() 


8 


r.i5 


2 


1014 


3 


lOIH 


3 


llrtii 


4 


1(.15 


3 


UHo 


4 


1022 


3 


738 


3 



XXII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMirrEE ON INVALID PENSIONS- Continued. 
By Mr, Matson — Continued. 

Hamilton, David W 

Hawes, Susan 

Hawhe, Mary 

Hellyer, Josephine D 

HoUikoh, Anna 

Holloway, Emma J 

Hunter, Mrs. Maiia 

Invalid Pensions, business of Committer on 

Johnson, Catharine .' 

Kennedy, Patrick W 

Kessinser, Ann : 

King, James H 

Kiser, Mary 

Lawton, Orrin 

Leatherman, Grant E. (Part 2) 

Little, Mary A ..* 

Luce, Elizabeth (Part 2) 

McAIexander, Robert J 

McCarty . Mrs. Catherine (Part 2) 

McGrayel, Michael 

McKee, Robert 

" McMillan, Joseph 

Morehead, Abner 

Moss, James 

Murray, John G 

. Norman, Mary (Part 2) 

Parks, Jennie M 

Pensions, to widows, d^ 

. Reeves, Marion « 

Rennoe, David M 

Ribble, Nancy L 




Vol, 



Ross, Daniel H 

Schuffert, Gnstav 

Sherlock, Bridget 

Simpson, Thomas 

Stafford, Otis S 

Stephens, Robert E . . 
Sufi'all, William J . . . . 

Tibbetts, Mary A 

Van Arsdel, Joseph . . . 

Voss, Taylor 

Ward, Thomas 

Wilkerson, Isom 

Woodgill, Elizabeth.. 

Woolley, Susan 

By Mr. Morrill : 

Acufl*, William D 

Adams, Peter 

Alfers, Mrs. B 

Allen, Albert 

Andrews, William W . 
Anthony, Charles H . . 
Applegate, William P 

Atchison, John H 

Austin, Lorenso D 

Ayers, Lewis W 

Ballinger, Henry G . . . 
Bamett, Nicholas W. . 

BaiT, Henry 

Barrett, George 

Barry, Mrs. Susan E . . 

Barton, Thomas G 

Beck, William H 



2051 




2:M7 


8 


2049 


• 7 


l.U 


3 


741 


3 


2a'.7 


9 


3214 


11 


244G 


8 


1482 


5 


1019 


3 


2047 


7 


:M49 


11 


148:J 


5 


20 IG 


7 


:«82 


11 


1184 


4 


:I206 


11 


544 


2 


3207 


i 11 


1767 


6 


740 


3 


1281 


5 


2048 


7 


647 


*> 

4^ 


1020 


3 


3203 


U 


3069 


10 


48 


1 


2517 


8 


2348 


8 


47 


1 


739 


3 


2768 


9 


1572 


6 


513 


2 


546 


2 


2518 


8 


1016 


3 


772 


3 


1709 


6 


742 


3 


325 


1 


276 


1 


2054 


4 


2519 


S 


469 


•> 


1738 


6 


x'083 




4iri , 




416 


2 


122 


1 


1774 


(> 


1604 


i> 


.•)W3 


•> 


242 , 


1 


422 


2 


1779 


6 


5f> 


1 


H8:i 


3 


53 


I 


3240 


11 


328 


1 


2090 


7 



INDEX TO . HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXIII 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE OX INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
B$ Mr, Morrill — Continued. 

Bennett, J. W 

Bennett, Robert K - 

^ Benson, John 

Bethureu, William 

Bickerdike, Mrs. M. A 

Black, Mary M 

Blake, William H 

Bollinger, H. G 

Botf jer, Frederick 

Bontwell, Daniel W 

Bowling, Samuel' W 

Bowman, W.H.C 

Brady, Mary 

Brenninger, Jacob 

Brentano, William 

Brinegar, John P 

Broaddua, Mn*. P. E 

Bruce, John L 

Bmuer, Dr. J. F 

Buck, William G 

Burns, Uenriette 

Burrill, Andrew J 

Bnrtz, Ambrose 

Buster, Felix R 

Butler, Aretus 

Butler, Margaret 

Bynuni, John W 

Campbell, Eli W 

Campbell, Jesse .^ 

Campbell. Philip D 

Campbell, Williams 

Cannon, William 

Carleton, A. William P 

Carlin, Bernard 

Camahan, Abigail 

Casteel, Mrs. Sarah 

Chapman^ Mrs. Hannah M 

Chenoweth, Isaac 

Church, William 

Clark, John C 

Collett, Anderson 

ColliDH, Geriah 

Cook, Holden 

Cooley, Eli W 

Cooney, Mrs. Lizzie E 

Corey, Leander W 

Cotton, James D : 

Cotton, T. W 

Cox, George W 

Crawford, Emeline 

Cronk, Sarah M 

Dagley , Stokeley D 

Darling, James H 

Davidson, Clara B •» 

Davis, W.C 

Devol,E 

Dickens, William 

Dodd,H.H 

Domeyer, Henry 

Dorman, Johanna 

Dreesen, B. J 

Dnbach, Benjamin 




Vol. 



412 


2 


25-20 


8 


241 


1 


2399 


8 


9 


) 


2526 


8^ 


118 


1 


:{()86 


\i> 


116 


t 


1425 


5 


1590 


6. 


126 


1 


2945 


10' 


1913 


7 


2666 


9* 


575 


2 


65 


1 


20b-< 


7 


52 


1 


1594 


6 


2405 


8 


2o23 


9 


425 


2 


1593 


6 


2081 


7 


1770 


6 


1909 


7 


04 


1 


1602 


6 


2663 


9 


10 


1 


2109 


7 


582 


2 


1776 


6 


60 


1 


1596 


6 


1702 


6 


225 


1 


115 


1 


3254 


11 


51 


1 


423 


2 


2098 


7 


13 


1 


.3246 


11 


224 


1 


1117 


4 


1707 


6 


1910 


7 


1911 


7 


L'92 


6 


079 


2 


1427 


5 


1736 


6 


1904 


7 


2943 


10 


1115 


4 


2817 


9 


2-S22 


9 


3239 


11 


882 


3 


229 


1 


57 


1 


851 


3 



XXIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, Morr U — Continued. 

Duncan, Susan A 

Dye, James 

East, Thomas B 

Ekengren,C.W 

Evansi Alexander 

Farnnm, Renben 

Farris, John W 

Faust, August 

Feathers, Joseph M — 

Fehrenbach, William E 

Fnicher, John D ... 

Fink, Willis W 

Flint, George W 

Forsyth, Alexander 

Forsyth, Robert M 

Fossett, Isaac 

Fuller, Andrew J 

Gallcyan, Mary M 

Card, Resin M 

Ganse, John H 

Gillespie, William H 

Giastetter, Fridoline -. 

Gooding, J. W 

Graves, Jos^hua H 

Griffith, John 

Green, Henry H 

Grewell, Henry D 

Grissom, Solomon J 

Gross, W. A , 

Gunsales, Nancy 

Guy, Joseph 

Groynne, Nira D 

Hague, Sarah 

Ham. George 

Hambongh, George W 

Hamilton, Charles M 

Hanson, Samuel 

Harden, Simmons 

Harper, Alexander 

Harseil, Anthony 

Havely, W. D 

Havens, Henry B 

Heath, Abbie *B 

Heine, Frederick 

Henry, Samuel 

Hewitt, Porter B 

Hines, Hulda 

Hotield, Philip 

Hollands, Maria 

Holmes, Malinda A 

Hi>l8ey , Robert • 

Holt, Charles H 

Holt, Solomon .. 

Houigan, Richard 

Hoppur, J. Francis 

Hornbeck, Jeptha 

Honser, Andrew 

Hngi^ins, Jennie 

Hughes, Robert R 

Aunt, Evfline and children 

Hunter, John H 

Hurst, Mrs. Amy A 



Report. 


; Vol. 


* 

2407 


1 

1 8 


15 


1 


1424 


5 


24 U' 


8 


123 


1 


2400 


8 


5 14b4 
3216 


5 


11 


2101 




(>79 


2 


3242 


11 


30til 


10 


404 


2 


651 


2 


1116 


4 


58 


I 


2064 


7 


'^'61 


1 


407 


*> 


240&I 


8 


2414 


8 


879 


3 


26v,7 


9 


2397 


8 


142^:5 


5 


2406 


8 


228 


1 


63 


1 


1781 


6 


3092 


10 


2820 


9 


1905 


0m 


578 


2 


1423 


5 


3241 


11 


1908 


7 


17;i7 


6 


402 


2 


J 329 
) 3204 


1 


11 


49 


I 


746 


3 


2396 


H 


1589 


6 


2826 


9 


1003 


6 


11 


I 


121 


I 


1907 


7 


.f>5 


1 


1050 


4 


2:w 


1 


2093 


7 


240 


1 


2107 


4 


1735 


6 


576 


2 


113 


1 


237 


1 


881 


3 


14 


1 


2094 


7 


2085 


7 


117 


I 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS, 



XXV 



Sabject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
Bjf Mr. Morrill — Continued. 

JiU'ksou, Addison A 

Jacksou, Jane 

Jackson, Patsey 

Johnson, Dr. Jackson T 

Kf it b, William B 

Kenumoro, Lizzie 

Kenney, Mrs. Mary B 

Kirk, Martin 

Kirkpatrick, John S 

Kirkpatrick, Robert B 

Kuoblock, Pbilip 

Koebler, Ferdinand 

Kooutz, Levi 

Krumuj, Wendelin ^ 

Rmse, Macdalena 

Larwood, Jacob 

Lasb, John H '. 

Leba, Margaret 

Leckner,'Matthia8 

Le 8, William J 

Leibscbeets, Francis A 

Lester, Daniel 

Lewis, Mrs. Ma 

Ligbtner, Frank 

Locey, T. J 

Loe, Louis 

Logan, Jobn W 

Long, Albert 

Love, Isaiah A 

Lowery, Rebecca J., guardian 

Mack, Daniel F 

Magoffin, Albert E 

Mauhart, Frank * 

Marine, Frederick 

Ma >hall, Frederick 

Martin, Phoebe ; 

Masten, Charles H 

Mathes, James G 

Mathews, Archibald 

Mays, Jo8«'ph 

McArthnr, W. H. H 

McDonald, John P 

McElroy, John P 

McQuire, Joseph A 

Mc Robertson, Anthony .*. 

Mibord, Maria 

Millmme, G. W 

Miller, Jnmes L 

Miller, N. M 

Miller, William F 

Milkr, GeorgeT 

Monroe, Stephen C 

Mooney ban, Elauder M -• 

Moore, Wi Uiam H - 

Moran, Robert 

Morgan, James...... 

Morris, Nancy E. 

Mulholland, Hugh 

Murphy, Thomas 

Naron, Levi II 

Nelson, Noah 

Nelson, William H 

Newman, Thonins G 

Nicholas, John G 



Report. 



Vol. 



2824 


9 


2108 


7 


226 


1 


3250 


11 


8 


1 


406 


2 


2404 


8 


410 


2 


2402 


8 


2080 


7 


3090 


10 


ir:fe9 


6 


230 


1 


151)7 


6 


428 


2 


2100 


7 


2410 


8 


30J-3 


10 


119 


1 


1599 


6 


1490 


5 


2415 


8 


17r<3 


6 


232 


1 


24('8 


8 


424 


2 


6;->0 


2 


1000 


6 


1595 


6 


12 


I 


1739 


6 


54 


6 


1108 


4 


i4a5 


5 


2105 


7 


2:i5 


1 


1915 


7 


3082 


10 


1711 


6 


2828 


9 


3093 


10 


2:^5 


8 


2664 


9 


2111 


7 


2522 


8 


•227 


1 


3245 


11 


2087 


7 


409 


2 


1110 


4 


1426 


5 


421 


2 


1734 


6 


2095 




405 


2 


1112 


4 


120 


1 


nil 


4 


243 


1 


2411 


8 


14^:^ 


•'> 


125 


1 


462 


2 


2403 


8 



XXVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Report. I Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr. i/orn7i-Coulinuetl 

O'Leary, Francis 

O^Neal, Hugh 

Osbury, Frederick 

Owens, Thomas S 

Parkburst, Samuel 

PurkinsoD, Thomas M 

Parks, George W 

Parmer, A. J 

Pay ton, John W 

Pennington, John T 

Pensions to prisoners 

Pensions, payment of arrears of 

Perkins, George H 

Perkins, Ji>seph ^ 

Perkins, Mary Aon..' 

Phelps, Edward D 

Phillips, Louisa A 

Poe, John R 

Porter, Joseph A 

Prewitt, John 

Probert, Anna A 

Pugh, David C 

Randall, Daniel B 

Ransom, Isaac 

Renny, Elijah W 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Reynolds, Martin J 

Reynolds, William 

Rice, Sally W 

Ritter, Maria K 

Robangh, George W 

Robbins, Samuel 

Robinson, Samuel 

Rockwell, F. L 

Romiser, Joseph 

Roosa, Tunis J 

Ross, John B 

Ro88rncker, Franz 

Rotty, Mrs. Emma 

Russell, James B 

Ryan, Bridget 

Sanford, James W 



Schindler, August 

Sohoonover, William G. 
Schrumpp, Frederick . . . 

Sohultz, Bruno 

Sears, F. A 

Sears, Orson W 

Shaner, Adam J 

Shawbell, John G. 

Sheldon, Elvira Bliss . . . 

Shepherd, James 

Sherbooaw. Frank 

Sherwood, WiJsley H 

Sbiue, Denis 

Shively, Henry A 

Shoppa. Martin 

Short, Powbattau B 

Silkey, Martha A 

Smith, Euphemia R 

Smith, George W 

Smith, Isaac 

Smith, Margaret 



1489 


r> 


081 


2 


210G 


i 


413 


2 


1771 


6 


.308r) 


10 


2398 


8 


3201 


11 


•zrv2i 


8 


1049 


4 


1868 


6 


783 


3 


2.34 


1 


1916 




2944 


10 


:)084 


10 


2523 


!< 


22r>4 


7 


418 


•» 


114 


1 


2079 


4 


vjm 


6 


403 


2 


2827 


9 


3248 


11 


550 


2 


1703 


t» 


2401 


8 


32:J8 


11 


785 


3 


2821 


9 


1704 


6 


:«)88 


10 


:«)91 


10 


3213 


11 


1486 


.'» 


581 


•> 


3078 


10 


3089 


10 


880 


3 


1772 


<> 


1778 


r» 


50 


1 


2524 


8 


408 




2:J9 


I 


1775 


6 


3244 J 


11 


1777 


6 


124 


1 


1048 


4 


2829 


9 


3249 


11 


1109 


4 


UK)1 


(*> 


2525 


8 


2092 


7 


1917 


7 


2665 


9 


417 


2 


1114 


4 


f)80 


2 


3253 


11 


2097 


7 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXVII 



Subject. 



Report. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr. Morrill— Coniiuxied, 

Smithy Samantba A 

Smith, Stephen R 

Smitbpeter, Jamee 

Snovely, Jacob 

Snyder, James A 

SquireA, William P 



Starne, Levi M 

Starr, WUliam H... 
Steward, Jackson . . 
Stewart, Elizabeth. 
Stone, Ashford A . . . 
Stouecypher, David 
Stout, Zephaniah .. 

Stockey, John 



Swariz, William M 

Sweety Franklin 

Taylor, Mrs. Arlanta T 

Taylor, Mary J 

Taylor, William 

Thenn, Catherine 

Thompson, Minerva T 

Thomberry, Joseph H 

Thomburg, J. H 

Thornton, John W 

Tibbetts, Joiia B 

Tilhnan, Hezekiah 

Town, M. S 

Tryou, Spencer W 

Tucker, Ralph H 

Twitchel, Leander C 

Underwood, James A 

Vernay, James D 

Wright, Sarah C 

Wagner, Philip 

Walford, Charles H 

Wat-son, James 

Watson, John 

Westerhouse, John H 

Westfall, Abraham 

Wetzel, M , 

Wheeler, William H 

White, John C 

White, SilasS 

Whittaker, John H., guardian 

Weide, August 

Welch, Isaac , 

Wiggins, V. L 

Wilde, James B 

Williams, Henry C .'.... 

Williams, John S 

Williams, John W 

Wood, Mary 

Wood, W. J 

Woodson, Mary S 

Younger, John W 

Zaro, Adam 

Zetterman, Garret D 

Zimmerman, John 

Btf Mr, Neece: 

Anderson, Missouri 

Baker, Emily B 

Barrett, Lucinda 



Vol. 



1701 


6 


2099 


7 


2942 


10 


(il 


1 


1914 




326 


1 


2096 


7 


1113 


4 


1733 


6 


2082 


7 


649 


2 


2103 


7 


420 


2 


2110 


7 


3247 


11 


3465 


11 


1591 


6 


2919 


10 


2886 


7 


1491 


5 


411 


2 


1780 


6 


784 


3 


2091 


7 


3080 


10 


652 


2 


2102 


7 


1782 


6 


414 


2 


1906 




1912 


7 


747 


3 


233 


1 


236 


1 


2rt25 


9 


327 


1 


1710 


6 


1708 


6 


1773 


6 


1705 


6 


3243 


11 


1709 


6 


2104 


7 


580 


2 


577 


2 


584 


2 


56 


1 


62 


1 


427 


2 


1487 


5 


426 


2 


2U89 


7 


3087 


10 


2941 


10 


2416 


8 


1706 


6 


3252 


11 


419 


2 


2818 


9 


2413 


8 


2956 


10 


2267 


8 



2954 



10 



XXVIII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
Bij Mr, AfomZ^Continued. 

Beeler, Sophia 

Beisiuger. Catharine 

Bishop, William 

Bridges, John S 

Bnrki, Elise 

Campbell, George H 

Clark, DanielB 

Clark, Eunice £ 

Coleman, Edward 

Condon, William 

Cooley, Orin P 

Corzatf, Silas 

Cronkhifc, Lewis A 

Decker, Elmer 

Deep, John W ! 

Downs, Murtha 

Duffy, John 

Dutcber, Lucy G 

Fanlk, George 

Forbes, Duncan 

Frosf, Samuel 

Oregg, Sarah 

Haines, Silas K 

Hawley, Giles C 

Jones, C^pt. Elihu 

Kaylur, Mary 

Kirchner. Erdmuthe 

Lafner, Henry 

Lanigan, Catharine 

Lannan, Daniel 

Lents, Jonathan 

Marshall, Anna M 

Mat^ingly, John M 

McLlhiuny, Harvey 

McKay, Elizabeth 

McManus, Rose \ 

MiTrill, Stevens W 

O'Shea, James E 

Otey, Washington T 

Parker, Ne wcorab 

Pratt, Caroline E 

Robbins, Elizabeth A. .., 

Robert Rebecca 

Rider, Harriet M 

Schaefer, George 

Scudder, Jesse B 

Shnll, Joseph 

Schiiltheis, Daniel 

Smith, Nancj' C 

Smithefcj, Thomas T 

Stevens, Augustus Field ^ • 

Sullivan, >Mary 

Tt'gan, Thomas 

Vail Buren, Burnett S 

Vanorder» Andrew J 

Vorhees, Martha A 

Wat« rs, Catharine 

By Mr. O'lJara: 

Amuious, Rufus G 

Ancrum, Mrs. Sallie 

Archer, Mrs. Mary Ringgold 

Askew, Thomas 

Ask ie, Inaac 

Bartholomew, Betsy 



Report. 



2162 


7 


22H5 


8 


1804 


6 


2:^ 


8 


2000 


7 


316 


1 


19 


1 


1539 


5 


2628 


9 


277 


1 


29.-)9 


10 


1541 


5 


2958 


!• 


1806 


6 


2i55 


7 


ir38 


5 


2890 


!• 


2i:8 


7 


2962 


19 


21(30 


7 


811 


3 


1542 


5 


2156 


7 


V78 


. 1 


22(X> 


8 


29:.7 


16 


1803 


6 


29150 


19 


2690 


9 


26;a 


9 


2159 


7 


2961 


10 


1540 


5 


812 


3 


12a5 


5 


li:U5 


4 


1212 


4 


2434 


8 


1755 


6 


2:{l]5 


8 


2-88 


10 


18<)5 


% 


2264 


7 


2001 


7 


10()6 


4 


346 


1 


2367 


8 


2746 


9 


28H9 


10 


279 


1 


23(6 


8 


2157 


7 


1998 


7 


21.30 


9 


2955 


10 


2161 


7 


i^6c9 


9 


2251 


7 


1794 


6 


145 


1 


247 


1 


2834 


9 


1996 


7 



Vol. 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXIX 



Subject. 




OOMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, C^jETara— Continaed. 

Bird, Ann 

Bent, Abbott B. J 

Brant, George W 

Bromaghin, Angeline 

Brookshire, Noab B 

Barcb, Joeepb W 

Carroll, James 

Cbambers, George 

Cbambera^ Green 

CisaeU, Nirius 

Collins, Mrs. Elizabeth 

Deniers, John 

Foreman, Charles 

Franklin, Nancy 

Faobs, Barbara 

Qoogina. Irene 

Guyse, Ueorge W 

Hair, James N 

Hastings, Mrs. Mary 

Hawkins, Isaac N 

Havnie, George C 

Hensley, Elijah P 

Hillberg, Andrew J 

Hoff, Mary ' 

Hooper, Sarah A 

Hanter, Maria. 

Korth, Frederick 

Lake, Gideon C. 

Langley , Jane M 

Locas, Daniel 

Magnon, Marcel 

Malone, Sasan 

Marble, Mrs. Martha A 

McCali, William L 

Merrill, Mary 

Moore, Isaac 

Morris, Rebecca 

Mosher, Frances 

Nix, Jacob 

Norman, Mary 

Odell, Charle^G \ 

Paul, Johanna and Anua Karbella 

Pendergrast, Edward 

Pension, increase of 

Plowden, Walter D 1 

Pruitt, James Madison * 

Ranney, Hiram M 

Ray, Williams 

Rice, Stephen 

Rice, Warren L 

Roberts, George A 

Roberts. Mrs. Edna 

Robinson, James 

Rowe, John 

Rowley, Roxana V., and son 

Sams, Anson B 

Sams, James S 

Sams, Nancy E 

Schnler, Charles 

Seaman, Darius M 

Seaman, Randolph 

Shelton, William P 



i 



Vol. 



1519 


5 


894 


3 


1790 


6 


214*2 


7 


24« 


1 


610 


2 


445 


2 


698 


2 


l/.'iO 


6 


19i5 


•• 
/ 


2948 


10 


2136 


7 


2143 


7 


1517 


5 


1793 


6 


ir»21 


5 


2947 


10 


444 


2 


691 


3 


701 


2 


1698 


6 


144 


1 


890 


3 


1924 


7 


246 


1 


28:J5 


9 


1522 


5 


1520 


5 


2144 


7 


750 


3 


253 


I 


28:^7 


y 


1791 


6 


169 


3 


700 


2 


887 


3 


143 


1 


2946 


10 


2i:i8 


4 


2140 




1107 


\ 


3203 


11 


\\m 




2:)2 


1 


892 


3 


1525 


5 


751 


3 


1749 


() 


19-26 


7 


2141 


7 


22:,2 


7 


2543 


8 


249 


1 


250 


1 


2250 


i 


1995 


4 


8-'8 


3 


141 


1 


2953 


10 


2954 


10 


1695 


6 


8.S9 


3 


161)6 


6 


2139 


7 



yOXL TO aOCSE REP0BT8. 



.'^aiijtMrfi. 



_.l' PB5J?W^'S— Continued. 

^ i<-.' - - - - ~- * 

^ S.^. »- " *" 

^-^^ '4-^ ^ •- * 

>^- -»,-,•> ->-■•»'»». 

;»,. \ 

,.^ .., v^^"* 

^3P ,.^..«. ...• .... .. ...... .... 

^ ^ ^ Wf".rc>^ f ^.^..•. - 

* '^ ' W^ 

^*»vMr^ " 

,. .^ S^^N. •^ 

, . vr ' -^•< 

, ) . r^ "^"^ ': 

^^ , ^v**W« >> 

^. . -, vS>rt 

,^ , N^JWWW 

^, . . .♦Ik J*^n 

.<.. .|» . <'%4W^S ...... ...... .••.■«•••• ........... 

.. .. .^r. Margaret 

S,^, lVS>^^ - 

>.v f'innnjr 

^.Kvo, William 

^,-^M.v v\ Noah S ."'i 

,. *. vv, Elizabeth 

^,.^^«r, Philip 

A v-^iNHly, William 

V. vjvjir, James 

• V ^1. Margaret S 

.*;*.s^ .\aron 

. .cjp*» Abraham P 

S,«iuiltoD, Marcus A 

^^iMttbrant, Nathan •- 

Hill, Edward L 

Hotrman, Noah i 

Hodman, Peter P 

Ilolmt's, Mary B 

llonsell, Amanda 

James, John D , 

Jaycox, George W 

Johnson, Jenet L* 

Johnson, Mary E , 

Mandeville, Susan C - , 

Marchand, Margaret D , 

McAnny, James 

Miller, Mrs. Kate 

Miller, John , 

Obekiah, Benjamin 

Owen, Mrs. Annie C 

Patterson, B. Frank , 

Peck, Samuel C, jr 

Potter, Joseph Al 

Prost, Lieut. Joseph 

Rose, John W 



Report. I Vol. 



446 


1 2 


1518 


5 


443 


2 


1795 


6 


699 


2 


893 


3 


790 


3 


2S33 


9 


15-23 


5 


2836 


9 


251 


1 


2950 


10 


611 


2 


2137 


7 


2949 


10 


1697 


6 


1927 


7 


1751 


6 


1524 


5 


142 


I 


2952 


10 


674 


2 


1210 


4 


2417 


8 


1211 


4 


2418 


8 


2588 


9 


271 


1 


429 


2 


2585 


9 


349 


1 


2419 


8 


3096 


10 


898 


3 


675 


2 


431 


2 


798 


3 


2584 


9 


2589 


9 


2586 


9 


348 


1 


347 


1 


676 


2 


678 


2 


2a->7 


10 


678i 


2 


432 


2 


430 


2 


2021 


7 


799 


3 


1065 


4 


270 


1 


2592 


9 


269 


1 


268 


1 


2587 


9 


2853 


9 


2321 


8 


2:>90 


9 


350 


1 


2854 


9 


897 


3 


433 


2 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXXI 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS-Continued. 
Btf Mr. Pidcock — Continaed. 

Savercool, James ^ 

Sbimcr, Emma M 

Taylor, Martin 

Teits, Jacob 

Todd, Micba^l 

Tompkins, Zebalon S 

Van Billiard, Oliver 

Walters, Joseph B , 

Wolverton, Bei^Amin S 

Wright, Giles 

Bg Mr. Pindar: 

Bffoman, Frederick 

Blake, Mary F.... 

Bamett, Hattie 

Bntler, James H 

Calkins, Newton A 

Carman, Mrs. Fannie 

Carroll, Sarah M 

Crymble, Ellen 

Cullen, Bridget M 

Dilts, Elizabeth E 

Ewing, Franklin R 

Fitzpatrick, Michael 

French, Thomas D 

Fritz, Ferdinand 

Gifford, William H 

Jacobs, Philip 

Jacoby, Mrs. Margaret A 

Jaycox, George W 

Keams, Margaret 

Kile, Maria 

Krebbiel, John D 

Lansing, Edward B ,. 

Laurence, George H 

Leddy, Ann 

Lynch, Mrs. An tonia B 

Madden, Margaret 

Maybam, Margaret 

McCoy, Mary , 

Moran, John 

O'Brien, Sarah 

Potts, Robert 

Purvis, Philemon B 

Renz, Agues 

Roscoe, flenry 

Sattler, Mrs. Catherine 

Saunders, Phoebe 

Schier, Mrs. Anna 

Slamm, Jane E 

Sprague, Mary 

Stapletou, Robert H 

Taylor, John 

Taylor, Mary K 

Taylor, Nathaniel 

Thompson, Mary M 

Todd, Catharine S 

Towers, Peter 

Walsh, Thomas 

Wright, Mary F 

Wyaut, Cbarles 

Btf Mr. Sawyer : 

Bagley, Annie , 

Baker, Newton O - 

Bangham, Eleanor C 



Report. 



Vol. 



2583 


9 


797 


3 


1209 


4 


3095 


10 


2855 


9 


2591 


9 


272 


1 


434 


2 


077 


2 


2850 


10 


752 


3 


2308 


8 


2151 


7 


2307 


8 


2152 


7 


3289 


11 


2:^09 


8 


795 


3 


582 


5 


3288 


11 


3290 


11 


2831 


9 


3292 


11 


3280 


11 


2153 


7 


273 


1 


89() 


3 


2021 


7 


702 


2 


1605 


6 


1283 


5 


2154 


i 


2150 


mi 
1 


790 


3 


1^02 


6 


1740 


6 


1346 


5 


32!i5 


U 


2a32 


9 


2731 


9 


2670 


9 


2.>55 


4 


704 


2 


2531 


8 


2149 


7 


146 


1 


2G89 


9 


I'ZriA 


5 


2J30 


8 


1118 


4 


703 


2 


3-287 


11 


79 


I 


3291 


11 


1741 


(> 


274 


1 


2688 


9 


22:)6 


7 


895 


3 


1526 




138 


1 


70 


I 



XXXII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, Sawyer — Continaed. 

Barnes, William B 

Blood, Col. James H 

Bragg, Sarah L 

Biilman, Samuel 

Caswell, Margaret A • 

Chase, John F 

Christie, William 

Clark, Livingston 

Clark, Phila 

Colbath, Mrs. Margaret 

Cutter, George W 

Eitapeuce, Anthon 

Foreman, Richard. 

Grimes, Mary 1 

Hoscall, Bailey 

Haseozahl, Frances 

Heinemau, Rosiiia 

Hicks, William 

Huggins, Henry N 

Jackson, Sarah B 

Johnson. Mydia S 

Kahler, Elizabeth 

Lewis, Amy A 

Manz, S^irah 

McGlynn, James 

Paige, Timothy 

Randies, Sarah 

Richardson, Amelia C 

Robinson, Cassius H 

Sauer, Stephen 

Sheffield, Dr. William H 

Smith, Abigail 

Stone, Sally 

Taft, Mrs. Clarissa 

Tarbell, Mary 

Tut tie, Joseph 

Van Etten, Mary Ann 

Vaughn, Sarah A i 

White, Eveline A 

Wilson, Andrew J 



By Mr, Swope : 

A Igior, Charlotte 

Allen, Rebecca 

Anderson, Mary 

Armbrust, John D. M .. 

Armstrong, Joshua 

Armstrong, Mrs. Willie 

Arner, Philip ^. ... 

Arnold, George L 

Baker, Jacob 

Barr, Sarah 

Batdorff, Daniel 

Baumhager, Herman .. 
Bt'rnhait. Catharine . . . 

Berry, Eliza E 

Berry, Henry 

Biddio, Jacob S 

Bimoy, Antoinette . 

Black, Marv F 

Blake, .John W 

Blake, Margaret A 

Bossert, Henry M 



Report. 


Vol. 


3094 


10 


2939 


10 


140 


1 


2551 


•? 


463 




275 


1 


653 


2 


2934 


10 


2937 


10 


1699 


6 


24il 


.S 


28:^ 


9 


2935 


. 10 


29*3 


10 


1527 


5 


793 


3 


791 


3 


2147 


7 


1801 


6 


464 


2 


2145 


7 


1:57 


1 


71 


1 


792 


3 


2«t>8 


9 


1:19 ' 


1 


29:Ui 


10 


2550 


8 


2148 


7 


5 794 
\ 2660 


3 


9 


654 


2 


318 


1 


2420. 


8 


1189 


4 


2938 


10 


1529 


5 


2146 


4 


1700 


6 


1190 


4 


S 152H 


5 


) 3J01 


11 


1272 1 


4 


1714 


6 


3430 


11 


2170 


4 


2r>93 


9 


ir.n4 


6 


11 H) 


5 


i3a^> 





2352 


8 


2502 


8 


2()(>0 ! 


9 


27^2 1 


9 


2.'03 


8 


1716 1 


6 


1746 ! 


(> 


26;jr. 


9 


1712 


t> 


24«^2 1 


8 


1747 i 


6 


447 


2 


2659 ■ 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXXIII 



Subject. 



Report. 



Vol. 



COMMITTKE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr. Swopc — Continued. 

Boucher, Minnie C 

Brooks, Sarah 

Brown, Nancy R 

Brown, William 

Bryant, Samuel £ 

BrysoUjMary Ann 

Bunker, Isaiah W 

Burritt, Loren 

Butler, John 

Byers, Mary 

Calluui, Andrews 

Campl>ell. Phoebe ^ 

Carr, Jane 

Carr. Letitia 

Carr, Mary M 

Car))ent«r, Anson G 

Cartin, Henry I 

Caskey , Alexander 

Chalfant, Joseph 

Chambers, Sophia 

Cheney, Fidelia A 

Chronister, Lewis 

Clark, Mrs. Anna M 

Clark, Marion 

Coburn, Harvey 

Colville, Jamea'W 

Connelly, Julia 

Conner, Nancy 

Corning, Edward 

Cunninj^ham, Maria 

Dalzell, James E. B 

Davis, Louis 

Decker, Ellen 

Dietrich, Lottie E 

Diraond, Hannah 

Douiibower, John F 

Doyle, Catherine 

Do bbs, Cyrus 

Danlap, Mrs. Margaret 

Eberlein, Anton 

Eilber, Ciiarlcs F 

Eldridge, Rebecca 

Evans, Mrs. Annie 

Eyster, Saruh J 

Focht, Josiah 



Frees, John C 



Freet. Oliver 

Gallagher, Mrs. E. K 

Gfttis, Sarah A 

Goodwin, Phineas .. 
Gonlon, Morgan 

Graves, Dauiel S 



Green, Amelia M 

Hall, Samuel S 

Hancock. Alraira Russell,. . 

Harkness, A gnes 

Harmau, Henrietta 

Hill. Mrs. Marry E 

Hippie, Henry, jr 

Holder, Jacob 

Horn, Mary 

Honghtelin, Mrs. Anna 

7149— H. Rep m 



3016 
1744 
1715 
2353 
1717 
1922 
1745 
2019 
179d 
2:554 
2:^.55 
2598 
2315 
2002 
2.597 
2594 
2016 

754 

753 
2603 

551 
2483 
2350 
• 657 
2310 

805 
1273 
2481 
2314 
3018 
1919 
1307 
1303 
1800 
23lh> 
1508 

556 
22t^3 
2311 
3017 
22>!4 

ma 

330 

2285 

2109 

1274 

280 

1510 

710 

552 

284 

555 



10 
6 
6 

8 
6 

7 
G 

7 

r> 

8 
8 
9 
8 
9 
9 
9 
7 
3 

9 
2 
8 
8 
2 
8 
3 
4 
8 
8 

m 
7 
5 
5 

6 
8 
5 
2 
8 
8 
10 
8 
3 
1 
8 
7 
4 
1 
5 
3 
2 
1 
9 



1;'07 


5 


HOC 


3 


1315 


4 


ior> 


3 


2357 


B 


1748 


6 


1028 


3 


1501 


5 


2389 


8 


1302 


5 



554 



XXXIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sabject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Contdmied. 
By Mr, ^UHitpe— Contiaaed. 

Howard) Abraham 

Hughes, C. K 

Humphreys, Rebecca Holiingsworth 

Huuter, John 

lughram. Elizabeth H 

Irwin, James T 

Jacobs, JohnL 

Jacoby, Martin 

Johnson, Elizabeth 

Karstetter, Mary 

Kempton, Sydney ♦. 

Kerr, Mary 

Killigan, Daniel 

Kitzmiller, Samuel , 

Klinedinst, Margaret 

Krantz, William H 

KreppSjMrs. Ida O 

Lambert, Frances M 

Lambing, Ann E 

Langwortby, Annie L 

Langworthy, George I ^ 

Larbaugh, Sarah 

Leese, Fred. J 

Lichty, Henry 

Loeb, Henrietta 

Lowery, Charles L 

Marchand, Margaret D 

Marchant, Rebecca 

McConnell, Eliza 

McDermott, David L 

McFalls, Mrs. Lon.Gobright 

McGill, J. M 

McIIvain, Martha 

McKenna, Cecilia C 

Mericlo, Henry 

Miller, Samuel 

Mishler,Abel 

Mitchell, Ellen M 

Monohan, James* 

Morris, Capt. John F 

Neff, Ezra 

Nevil, WilUam H 

Newberry, Norton L 

Nields, Henry Clay, heirs of 

O'Connor, Margaret 

O'Neal, Henry 

Orendorff, John A 

Paugh, William 

Pickett, Manhattan w , 

Pratt, Isaac , 

Putnam, Andrew J t , 

Raiger, P. E 

Reber, Charles T 

Reighter, Margaret J 

Reynolds, Esther A •♦ .... 

Ricards, William 

Robertson, Frederick 

Robinson, Charles , 

Romiser, Joseph -. , 

Rowley, Thomas A , 

Schuler, Samuel 

Seaman, Peter F , 



Report. 



5 1796 
> 1799 


6 


6 


2165 


7 


2779 


9 


804 


3 


2358 


8 


2017 


7 


5 2359 
\ 2360 


8 


8 


1582 


6 


2393 


8 


1497 


5 


2599 


9 


884 


3 


2390 


8 


1498 


5 


1275 


4 


2600 


9 


282 


1 


3015 


10 


2780 


9 


885 


3 


1506 


5 


1920 


7 


1026 


3 


665 


2 


1364 


5 


808 


3 


708 


2 


1214 


4 


2500 


8 


1583 


6 


2394 


8 


1361 


5 


2312 


8 


2313 


8 


3383 


11 


2018 


7 


2627 


9 


331 


1 


2775 


9 


2777 


9 


2361 


8 


1027 


3 


2363 


8 


2362 


8 


2167 


7 


2499 


8 


1213 


4 


448 


2 


1797 


6 


2601 


9 


281 


1 


1494 


5 


1025 


3 


1500 


5 


2168 


7 


2501 


8 


2388 


8 


2351 


8 


2163 


7 


2164 


7 


1360 


5 


553 


2 



Vol. 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXXV 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, 5woj>e— Continued. 

Sees, Caroline 1. 

Sheada, Elias f 

Shearer, Sarah M 

Shuler, Elizabeth 

Simmons, D.P 

Slenbaker, Elizabeth 

Stewart, Samuel B 

Stewart, John A 

StoU, John 

Sturtz, Caroline 

Sweenej, E.B 

Tatem, Thomas M 

Taylor, Benjamin F 

Thomas, Mary A 

Thompson, William R 

Toles, Linas 

Vance, Mayberry 

Van Holt, Joseph .' 

Van Horn, Joseph 

Vincent, John 

Warrington, Katesbury R 

Walzeli, James E. B 

Weber, Christian 

Webster, William B 

Weddingfield, William 

Wemier, William R 

Wertz, AmosC - 

Wesner, Mary Ann 

Wetter, SarahL 

Whitesell, Catharine 

Williams, Ann J 

Wilson, Amanda F 

Wilson, Elizabeth C 

Wise, Charles V 

Whorley, Louis 

WoUenweber, Louis A 

Young, Susan V .•- 

By Mr, Taulbee: 

Anderson, Samuel 

Arthington, Susannah 

Blackburn, Hester V 

Boston, Joseph 

Brown, Mahala , 

Bullock. Isabella 

Caldwell, L H. R 

Campbell, William M 

Chaddock, Alonzo A 

Chandler, Larkin 

Clay, M. 8 

Coonran, Margaret E 

Cohn, Henry 8 

Conrad, Mary Jane 

Creech, Chevlin C 

CuUen, James F 

Davis, William B 

Delph, Larkin 

Dougherty, Sanford M 

Doughty, Robert N 

Dukes, SeraphinaE 

Dunsmore. Franklin R 

Dnyall, Thomas S 

Elliott, Thomas R 

England, Dayid B 



Report. 



8781 


9 


709 


3 


712 


3 


810 


3 


467 


2 


21fi6 


7 


2319 


8 


711 


3 


1366 


5 


1024 


3 


449 


2 


2776 


9 


2286 


8 


1713 


6 


1509 


5 


5 283 
) 1921 


1 


t 


1918 


7 


2364 


8 


807 


3 


2596 


9 


2320 


8 


2020 


7 


1511 


5 


285 


1 


809 


3 


666 


2 


1502 


5 


658 


2 


2317 


8 


1499 


5 


2316 


8 


2318 


8 


2595 


9 


80 


1 


1495 


5 


2015 


7 


2391 


8 


2994 


10 


2971 


10 


2998 


10 


3004 


10 


2966 


10 


2989 


10 


29d7 


10 


2992 


10 


2981 


10 


2512 


8 


557 


2 


683 


2 


685 


2 


786 


3 


3012 


10 


2991 


10 


3013 


10 


2077 


10 


3005 


10 


2996 


10 


2997 


10 


2979 


10 


2623 


9 


2982 


10 


3001 


10 



Vol. 



XXXVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



CGMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, Tai«/6ee— Continued. 

Eve, Williara B 

Feltner, Adam 

Ferguson, Daniel T 

Fisher, Henrietta 

Fondray, Milton Wallace 

Foust, Eleanor 

Fraley, George W 

Francesco, Eliza 

Frcels, Nancy J 

French, Elizabeth 

Frisbee, Joseph 

Garrard, Letitia J 

Goin, Sanford 

Hale, Greenville R 

Hayden, John 

Herd, J. F 

Hicks, Sarah A 

Holland, Robert 

Holland, Samuel V 

Hoskins, Levi 

Hoskins, Thomas 

Howard, Mary 

Husk, James H 

Isenberg, Alha L 

Jones, Joseph 

Jones, Sarah A 

Kelly, Benjamin F 

Leddj' , Ann 

Lowry, William P 

Lucas, Benjamin 

Lynch, Green bury 

Lynch, Margaret 

Mahoney, Josiah 

Main, Lemuel 

Matherly, Hartford 



Mathewson, Christopher H. 

McClure, Samuel 

McFadden, William 

McGary, Margaret A 

Means, Calvin , 

Minix, Charles W 

Mitchell, Lucy J 

Moore, Francis M 

Morton, James , 

Murphy, Sarah Ann 

Nickel 1. Rachel 

Payne, Edgar 

Pcimiugtoii, John 

Pension laws, amending.... 

Phillips, Gilbert A , 

Pickelsimer, Alfrtid 

Policy, Thomas G 

Porter, Cummins 

Prater, Sarah J 

Preuss, Clar? L 

Pugh, C. W. 1 

Reed, Henry P 

Rent Vo, Marv 

Riddle, Charles 

Ridley, Linna.Mi8 W 

Roberts, Cressy 

Ruh, Benjamin 

Salycrs, jy mes F 



Report. 


VoL 


2967 


10 


1188 


4 


332 


1 


68-1 


2 


1509 


5 


787 


3 


75 


1 


1096 


4 


218 


1 


3007 


10 


3000 


10 


2134 


7 


592 


2 


1187 


4 


2506 


8 


2510 


8 


3014 


10 


3002 


10 


222 


1 


2507 


8 


3011 


10 


3010 


10 


2970 


10 


2990 


10 


2965 


10 


2969 


10 


•2978 


10 


29a5 


10 


2995 


10 


2999 


10 


2986 


10 


2950 


10 


2624 


9 


2511 


8 


3003 


10 


5 2508 
\ 2988 


8 


10 


2515 


8 


2973 


10 


2513 


8 


220 


1 


74 


1 


223 


1 


788 


3 


3265 


11 


686 , 


2 


73 


1 


219 


1 


687 1 


2 


2744 


9 


1053 


4 


1347 1 


5 


29()4 : 


10 


1791 ' 


6 


333 ! 


1 


2620 


9 


221 


1 


2998 i 


10 


2625 


9 


2621 


9 


2975 


10 


2983 


IQ 


2984 


10 


2622 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXXVII 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON INVALID PENSIONS— Continued. 
Bif Mr. Tanlhee — Continued. 

Selby, John 

Simpson, William 

Stone, Jameo 

Stone, Cndbert 

Taylor, John P 

Tiller. Carter W 

Thomburv, Lewis A 

ThreadKill, Emily 

Tiller, Carter W 

Tuder, Daniel F 

Wages, Laurena 

Weaver, Henry 

West Virgina troops 

White, Christoper C 

Willhoite. SanfordC 

W^ilson', Owen P 

W.odbury, Mrs. D. P 

Voung, Freemorton 

By Mr. fVinans : 

Abear, Lonis 

All'ock, Thomas 

Anderson, Mary. 

Bailey, William F. D 

Bafden, William 

Barker, William J .' 

Bell, Elizabeth B 

Bingman. Daniel J 

Boice, Samuel 

Hrn*vn, Sanmel J 

Bull, Norman S 

Cnllanan, Patrick A 

Clark, Davids 

Coon, Tobias M 

Coouey, Ann E 

Ciirtin, Patrick 

Duly, Michael 

Davis, Mrs. J. E 

Delano, James 

Demiug, Francis 

Denton, Sidney 

Dobbs, William 

Douglas, Mary S 

Downing, John H 

Dyer, John W 

Furniss, James S 

Garaghty, Elizabeth 

Gardner, Stephen 

Gleason, Thomas 

Hall, Polly 

Ham, John D 

Harrington, Harry B. and Grace A 

H<i8kin8, Rebecca E 

Herriman, J. V 

Hiar, Royal J 

Hunter, John L 

Hatchings, Lydia, O 

Hyatt, Bruner D 

James, Silas 

Kelley, Albert C 

Kennedy, Erastus W 

Knill, Delilah 

Lapham, Samantha R 

Lewis, Abel J t. 

Lovell, Sarah A 



Report. 


Vol. 


2976 


10 


2514 


8 


591 


2 


558 


2 


2963 


10 


3200 


11 


76 


1 


2972 


10 


682 


2 


3009 


10 


1051 


4 


2505 


8 


£447 


8 


2Ki5 


7 


1052 


4 


2974 


10 


3008 


10 


3006 


10 


254 


1 


1287 


5 


2056 


7 


1045 


4 


2796 


9 


2061 


7 


1336 


5 


2005 


7 


1047 


4 


1286 


5 


257 


1 


2068 


7 


1046 


4 


548 


2 


1505 


5 


2305 


8 


2072 


7 


2003 


7 


1042 


4 


1503 


6 


2H06 


9 


2078 


7 


740 


3 


20r,8 


7 


2011 


7 


2801 


9 


2798 


9 


457 


2 


2009 


7 


452 


2 


20G9 


7 


255 


1 


2065 


7 


2010 


7 


2077 


7 


688 


2 


2075 


7 


691 


2 


875 


3 


2795 


9 


2304 


8 


547 


2 


1043 


4 


1040 


4 


692 


2 



XXXVIIl 



DTDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sobjoct 



COMMITTEE ON DHTAUD PENSIONS— Coiitinaed. 
By }tr. ifim^wp CoDtino<sd. 

Loy, Mrs. AdalineP 

MauMNk Marj 

MaiMKi, Nancy 

McFarlm. H. P 

Meicber. Loots 

MilesvMnwM. C 

Mi tcli«U» Isaiah H 

Mooaliao, Robert 

Moarue, Joel D 

Muore, Harrison W 

Newman, Eliza 

Nickert, Katharina 

Parks, Edwin R 

INirBons, Marilla 

Patton, John 

Peak, Harriet 

Pierpont, Rachel Ann 

Pntney, Elijah W 

Raymond, Alonzo 

Reed, Jobn, sr 

Roberts, Enjeline 

Robson, John W 

Rogers, Clayton E 

RoM), Lenford 

Sangston, William J 

Schenck, Cornelia R 

Scntt, Elwin A 

Sebrlng, Charles 

Smith, Ann 

Smith, Snsan 

Snyner, John 

Snyder, JohnH *. 

Sowle, Orlando T 

Swift, Mrs. Emily M 

Titns, George 

Tongue, Levi L 

Travers, Mrs. Alice E 

Tucker, Sarah A 

Tullar, Sidney B 

Warren, John G 

Weightman, William 

Welch, Harriet •. 

Wells, George 

Wilkius, Eliza 

Wines, John 

Wood, Priscilla 

COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY— 
By Mr, Bennett : 

Aliens owning lands in the United States 

Civil and criminal process in Indian reservations 

Internal-revenue laws, amending 

North Carolina, eastam judicial district of 

Pennsylvania, judicial districts of 

By Mr. Caewell : 

Claim agents, fees of 

Colorado, terms of court in 

Eau Claire, Wis., court at 

Judgments of the circuit court of the United States 

Nebraska, terms of court of 

By Mr, ColHne : 

Alabama Claims, Court of Commissioners of . 1 

Bankruptcy, uniform system of .:..... 

Courtof Claims, jurisdiction of 



Report. 


Vol. 


'2802 


9 


1784 


6 


27^7 


9 


74«3 


3 


206(3 


7 


2794 


9 


1504 


5 


1041 


4 


693 


2 


1207 


4 


206*^ 


7 


2004 


7 


2059 


7 


2076 


7 


235y 


8 


2063 


7 


2^00 


9 


87G 


3 


2805 


9 


2799 


9 


1208 


4 


549 


2 


690 


2 


256 


1 


2007 


7 


2073 


7 


2006 


7 


1205 


4 


2064 


7 


2303 


8 


2008 


7 


1206 


4 


1044 


4 


3070 


10 


2067 


7 


2060 


7 


2057 


7 


2349 


8 


2070 


7 


2807 


9 


2071 


7 


2074 


7 


689 


2 


2;i03 


9 


2:^4 


9 


2012 


7 


1951 


7 


1390 


5 


1729 


6 


4 


1 


1887 


6 


632 


2 


571 


2 


762 


3 


2723 


9 


1320 


5 


945 


3 


5 1144 
) 1142 


4 


4 


2383 


8 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XXXIX 



Sobject. 




CX)MMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY— Continued. 
By Mr. Co{/tJi«— Continned. 

Creecy, Charles E 

Dnnlop, William L., trnstee 

Judges United States district courts, salaries of 

Notaries public, oatbs administered by 

Second judicial circuit, additional judge 

By Mr. Culberg&H ; 

Attala, county of, Mississippi 

Court of Claims, right of action in 

Hood County, Texas, to detach 

New Mexico, additional justice of the supreme court in 

Pilcher,J. E 

ReTJsed Statutes, to amend section 533 «. 

Revised Statutes, to amend section 914 

State courts, removal of causes from 

States and Territories, benefit of 

Texarkana, Ark., terms of couits at 

Texas, judicial districts in 

Witnesses, depositions of 

By Mr. Eden : 

Illinois, terms of court in northern district of 

By Mr. Hammond : 

Criminal cases, simplifying 

Hooper, James 

Judgments in Court of Claims, payment of interest on 

New York and New Jersey, boundary line of 

Patents, cancellation of (Part 1) 

Revenue ofiBeenn, actions against 

War taxes, claim of the (Part 1) 

By Mr. Hepburn : 

Bills of lading 

California, judicial district of 

Iowa, dividing into two judicial districts 

Missouri, judicial districts in 

War taxes of 1861 (Part 2) , 

By Mr. Oates : 

Alabama, judge for the southern district of 

• Florida, southern district of 

Land grants, forfeiture of 

.Mobile and Ohio Railroad Company 

Noble, Samuel 

Public accounts and claims 

Revised Statutes, to amend sections 3480 and 47 16 

Rice, Samuel F 

By Mr. Parker : 

Adulteration of food (Part 2) 

New York, terms of court in northern district of. 

Patents, cancellation of (Part 2) 

By Mr. Banney : 

Disputed handwriting, evidence in cases involving 

By Mr, Bogera : 

Evans, Samuel P 

Indian Territory, punishment for larceny in .«. 

Indian Territory, robbery in 

Indian Territory, United States courts in 

Michigan, terms of court in eastern district of 

Mississippi, additional courts In 

Montana, courts in 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Yicksburgy United States oonrts at 



Vol. 



3410 
1334 
1761 
1143 
2290 

2714 

1642 

102 

2908 

2763 

101 

315 

1078 

572 

2637 

633 

103 

344 

2384 

714 

6 

2036 

1003 

3 

35 

901 

313 

2386 

370 

35 

194 
3404 

715 
2027 

312 
1728 
3365 

ia3i 

1641 
2737 

1880 

200 

1003 

1304 

1306 

196 

314 

388 

1318 

2909 

1877 

1454 

2910 

3158 

1317 



11 
5 
6 
4 

8 

9 
6 
1 

10 
9 
1 
1 
4 
2 
9 
2 
1 



8 
3 
1 
7 
3 
1 
1 

3 
1 
8 
1 
1 

1 

11 
3 

7 
1 
6 
11 
6 
6 
9 

6 
1 
6 



5 

1 

1 

2 

5 

10 

6 

5 

10 

11 

5 



MiiX TO HOCSB REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Report. Vol. 



n ^- 



LDlCi.UiY— Continued. 



>x.c....t.; l*;»rt -J) 

-, ->v rxiiiovai of caoses from 

^.h.t> courtsy t<fclariet» of jadges of (Part )i) 

*>. a^leru <li»tnct of 

• Ui: L utteU States, to extend over unorganized territory 






'\ 



'iiwtu >j.iii'rrigt*. 



Vv.! .rtMucioii of food (Part 1) 

A tva is«.»u. Robert H 

A. lu'L^fMU ebitiite 

A>fi4>4;iM t trea^rtirer, duties of 

BiU lou, S 

Biuioij* 5H'th M 

Bucj uv'tss oH the Judiciary Committee 

Butier, Kdwanl G. W 

C»se y. Lewis F 

Cl;»iiii*, Hunting payment of 

Clurke, Mrs. Lizzie D 

Coui^titution, amendment to the 

Criminal proceedings 

K>!:^J***ton, J. H 

Filing in the navigable waters of the United States. 

Flouruoy, J. G 

Htuuiltou, John Randolph 

J udgnients of United States courts, eflfect of 

Lee, William H. F 

McLean, Eugene E 

Mitchell, John K 

Perkins, John McC 

Phillipps, Dinwiddle B 

Poly 



172S 
ia05 
1761 

1391 

389 

1319 

2289 



gamy 



Polygamy in Utah, 8ni)pres8ion of 

Reed, Duff Green 

Revised Statutes, section 3701 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Revised Statutes 

Rosser, Thomas L 

Sorrell, Francis 

Stewart, Alexander P 

Subpoena duces tecum 

Suits against the Government 

United States, protection of, against railroad companies. 

Walbach, J. J. B 

Ware, Thomas R 

Woo(l, John Taylor 

COMMITTEE ON LABOR- 
By Mr. Crain : 

Common schools 

Revised Statutes, section 3738 

By Air. Foran : 

Employes Qf the Government Printing Office 

By Mr. Lawler : 

Labor troubles ^ 

By Mr. Lovering : 

Convict labor 

Mr. J. J. aXeill: 

Arbitration , 

Employes in Bureau of Engraving and Printing 

Employ 6* in United States navy-yards 

Foreign laborers , 

Labor of letter-carriers 



6 
5 
6 



8 



1880 


6 


841 


3 


3407 


11 


387 


2 


3408 


11 


2:i39 


8 


2636 


9 


:« 


1 


203.'> 


#» 

4 


197 


1 


198 


1 


1879 


6 


631 


2 


2:J40 


8 


£:3a5 


8 


1016 


6 


1760 


6 


199 


1 


3157 


11 


2635 


9 


315(1 


11 


1640 


6 


615 


2 


2568 


8 


27;J5 


9 


2677 


9 


1139 


4 


731 


. 3 


34 


1 


2 


1 


2634 


9 


27 


1 


385 


2 


1077 


4 


3409 


11 


3456 


11 


1639 


6 


323 


1 


1993 


7 


368 


1 


1413 


5 


1472 


5 


1359 


5 


1447 


5 


515 


2 


2900 


10 


2901 


10 


2722 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XLI 



Sabject. 



COMMITTEE ON LABOR-Continued. 
By Mr. J, J, (y^Vei/^-Continued. 

NatioDal Trades UuioDs ^ 

Protecting mechaDics aod laborers 

Btf Mr. Tarmey : 

Convict and alien labor 

COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY— 
By Mr, CkarUs (yNeill : 

Abraham Lincoln, monument to 

Columbns, La Fayette, and Garfield, statues of 

Crab Island, monument at 

William Penn and General Anthony Wayne 

By Mr. Singleton : 

Congressional Library building 

Manuscripts belonging to the United States 

Morgan, Maj. Gen. Daniel 

Slater, John F 

Vans Murray papers 

U. S. Orant collection 

By Mr. btaklnecker : 

Monument at Stony Point, N. Y • 

Ulysses S. Grant, monument to .• 

Zachary Taylor, statue of 

COMMITTEE ON MANUFACTURES— 
By Mr. Jacob M. Campbell : 

Commission of experts on test of metals 

COMMITTEE ON THE MILITIA— 
By Mr. Forney : 

Arms and equipments for the militia 

Special and uniform instruction of State militia 

COMMITTEE ON Ml» ES AND MINING— 
By Mr. Clardy : 

McGarrahan, William 

By Mr. Hill : 

Business from the Committee on Mines and Mining 

By Mr. Symea : 

Establishment of a bureau of mines and mining 

COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS— 
By Mr. Anderson : 

Bowies, Thomas 

Caskey, James T 

Cannon for cemetery at Eaton, Ohio 

Condemned cannon, donation of 

Crowder, Robert P 

Disabled soldiers, branch home for 

Disabled soldiers, barracks for 

Faust, Charles W 

Giachetti, Peter 

Gooch, Littleton O 

Hammond, Charles H 

Hardaway, John F. S 

Hedberg, Alfred 

Jobes Post, 157, Grand Army of the Republic 

Johnson, Isaac -..* 

Jones, William C 

Klauser, Emanuel 

Lowther, Charles 

Molen, Charles E 

Rawlins, Bei^amin 'S., and Eugene M. Squires 

Richmond National Cemetery 

Roser Post, Grand Army of the Republic 

Sechrist, Joel 

Shepherd, D. 8 

Southwick, John 



Report. 



2699 
514 

369 



3053 
3054 
:i355 
2793 



Vol. 



508 



9 

2 



10 

10 

11 

9 



173 


1 


1633 


6 


1869 


6 


869 


3 


3356 


11 


1632 


6 


2566 


8 


1727 


6 


3427 


11 



o 



1267 


4 


1268 


4 


1764 


6 


2345 


8 


1.^1 


6 


1676 


6 


952 


3 


27(;6 


9 


492 


2 


455 


2 


493 


2 


495 


2 


496 


2 


494 


2 


1666 


6 


949 


3 


955 


3 


1673 


6 


It 67 


6 


1941 


7 


2029 


7 


1671 


6 


1675 


6 


1669 


6 


1674 


6 


1672 


6 


951 


3 


1249 


4 


2030 


7 


950 


3 


957 


3 


956 


3 



XLH 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subjeot. 



COBiMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS-Continned. 
By Mr, Anderson — Contioaed. 

Sowell, William J 

Sprague, William D 

StoDe, James 

Taylor, Philip 

Walters, John H 

Welle, John 

By Mr. Bragg : 

Ahr, Michael, Sisson, and Hill 

Army appropriation bill 

Alaska reconnaissance 

Anderson, Holman 

Army officers, to correct record of 

Army officers, record of 

Azpell, Assistant Surgeon Thomas F 

Babb, JohnH 

Bacon, James H 

Bailey, John R 

Baird, John F 

Barnes, Frederick B : 

Bayless, Lott 8 : ^ 

Blake, Charles M 

Brank, J. Washington 

Burrell, Samuel 

Campbell, Charles L 

Canady, William N 

Cassedy, George A 

Cavalry and infantry, school of instruction for . . 

Clancy, Joseph 

Cooney, James ^ 

Cott, Christopher 

Crawford, Thomas 

Croys^ David 

Cunningham, Albert P 

Cnnninff ham, James 

Dailey, xiicholas 

Darling, John A 

Davidson, Charles 

Desertion, removal of charges of 

Dewey, Harrison 

Disabled Soldiers, National Homes for 

Douglas, Thomas 

Dancan, Thomas 

Edmunson, Mauley B 

Ellis, Henry 

Evey, Samuel F 

Flynn, Patrick, and John Dienst 

Fort Brown, Texas 

Fort Greene, use of, for public park 

Fort Haves, military reservation 

Green, David A 

Griggs, Alonzo H 

Grumbling, Jonathan C 

Hanies, Eli 

Hanie, Elias 

Hathorn, John H 

Hayes' nitro-glycerine shell 

Heath, J. C 

Hedian, Robert 

Hontz, Charles 

Hess«Ephraim , 

Hogshed,Capt.W.W 

Houser,£li 

Hughes, Ivan 



Report. 



Vol. 



954 


3 


M8 


3 


9i>3 


3 


1068 


6 


1670 


6 


1677 


6 


3364 


11 


662 


3 


1960 


7 


1846 


6 


1844 


6 


1847 


6 


1858 


6 


1407 


5 


910 


3 


2218 


7 


916 


3 


22:« 


7 


1239 


4 


1181 


4 


1242 


4 


1845 


6 


1849 


6 


2231 


7 


2228 


7 


1948 


7 


1408 


5 


917 


3 


2220 


7 


922 


3 


2224 


7 


1168 


4 


2217 


7 


1163 


4 


453 


2 


1177 


4 


1404 


5 


1236 


4 


2639 


9 


1852 


6 


1164 


4 


2226 


7 


2216 


7 


1859 


6 


1957 


7 


5 3148 
) 3051 


11 


10 


2576 


8 


1958 


7 


1851 


6 


3153 


11 


2229 


7 


1171 


4 


1180 


4 


909 


3 


3065 


10 


1860 


6 


1848 


6 


1173 


4 


1176 


4 


920 


3 


906 


3 


1956 


7 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XLni 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS— ConUnued. 
JBjr Mr. Bragg — Continued. 

Huffhes, Edward B 

Hyde, Michael 

Jackaon, Mathew £ 

Jones, John 

Kellogg, John F 

Kelly, Andrew B 

Kemp, Isaac R 

Kennedy, James E 

Kennedy, John 

Kimball, Richard I 

Kincade, Edward - 

King, Marion M 

Kirby, Francis M 

Lake, Lorenzo 

Laundresses in the Army 

Lemon, Greorge 

Louisiana, military history of 

Lud wig, Frank 

Martin, Andrew 

McCabe, Peter , 

McChesney, Martin 

McConnell, A. M 

McCreary, Alexander 

McCuUough, G. W 

McDermott, Michael 

McFarland, John ^ .^ 

McNamara .* 

Memphis National Cemetery road 

• 

Memjphis, rostrum Id National Cemetery 

Middleton, William M 

Miller, Andrew C 

Milligan, Thomas J 

Military Academy (U. S. ), promotion of graduates of 

Military Academy (U. S.); graduates of 

Morris Couuty Railroad Company, right of way to the 

Nawry, John J 

Newmau, Wade H 

Newport, Ky., barracks at 

North Carolina, letter books of the executive department of. 

Oren, Jesse N 

Patterson, James 

Paul, George D 

Pease, Charles B 

Petteys, Charles y 

Phelan, Jeremiah 

Porter, Fitz-John 

Raios, Isaac 

Revere^eorge W 

Rigga, William J .• 

Russey, John M 

Sage, John 

Sanders, George M 

Schaumburg, James W 

Scott, John 

Seventh Regiment, New York 

Sharp, Joseph 

Sht-pherd, Isaac M 

Smith, Jacob 

Smithy Martha 

Soldiers charged with desertion, to relieve 

Spauldingy Columbia 



Report. 


Vol. 


905 


3 


91tt 


3 


19-16 


7 


1406 


5 


1405 


5 


1855 


6 


1843 


6 


1654 


6 


1245 


4 


1241 


4 


1959 


7 


913 


3 


2223 


7 


1857 


6 


204 


1 


2230 


7 


3151 


11 


1240 


4 


1850 


6 


205 


1 


1952 


7 


912 


3 


904 


3 


2221 


7 


194.> 


7 


907 


3 


923 


3 


5 1954 
\ 1955 


7 


7 


1856 


6 


3152 


11 


1179 


4 


1175 


4 


I 1148 


4 


I 1246 


4 


\ 1247 


4 


3147 


11 


1841 


6 


1238 


4 


2225 


7 


3363 


11 


2575 


8 


2227 


7 


906 


3 


1403 


5 


1172 


4 


2219 


7 


1167 


4 


42 


1 


3150 


11 


915 


3 


919 


3 


1165 


4 


1944 


7. 


3149 


11 


1178 


4 


911 


3 


1243 


4 


1244 


4 


1861 


6 


1174 


4 


2222 


7 


914 


3 


1840 


6 



XLIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS— Continued. 
By Mr. Bragg — Continoed. 

Stouffer, Albert D 

S wopo, John P 

TenEyck, Captain (Part 2) 

Thompson, David H 

Tobacco for the use of the Army 

U nited States Army, clerks and messengers 

Upcraft, John 

Wagon-masters, retirement of 

Welsh, William 

Wemplo, Frank 

Wickware, Charles 

Williams, Isaac 

Williams, Robert 

W^inder, Charles 

Young, John 

By Mr. Casey : 

Forts Laramie and Russell military reservations, road across 

Hunt, Frank W 

Montana and the United States, account of arms, &c., between . 

Wyoming and Nebraska, military quarters in 

By Mr. Cutcheon : 

Aunis, Ann 

Arms for the States 

Army oflScers, rank of, in Indian campaigns 

Boxes deposited in the Treasury Department 

Cary, Thomas , 

Christian, William E. 

Colorado, arms account of 

Coulan, Francis J 

Dakota, ordnance account with 

Figley, William 

Government property, sale of 

Hewitt, G. W 

Hill, Albei-t 

Kansas, arms, &c. , furnished by State of 

Kansas, ordnance account with 



Report. 



Vol. 



Knocklemann, John 

McBlair, John HoUins 

Meloy, George M 

Orr, John G 

Parker, George Henry 

Payne, W. P 

Porter, Fitz John (Part 2) 

Reed, William 

Soldiers, to correct record of 

Thompson, Franklin, ali€t8 Seelye 

Thurston, Russell S 

Treen, Lewis A 

Volunteer forces, pay of .. 

Wall, William 

Winner, Jacob 

Woodside, Andrew J 

By Mr. Dargan : 

Insane officers of the Army and Navy, pay of. 

Missouri Home Guards 

Ordnance, unserviceable 

Ten Eyck, Tenodor 

Vicksburg National Cemetery road 

By Mr. Ermentrout : 

Fort Selden Military Reservation 

Hall, Williams 



1235 


4 


1169 


4 


2915 


10 


ia53 


6 


207 


1 


1947 


7 


1237 


4 


206 


1 


1166 


4 


1170 


4 


1953 


7 


1248 


4 


1409 


5 


921 


3 


1842 

• 


6 


( 2486 


8 


I 2647 


9 


213 


1 


2747 


9 


3112 


10 


2242 


7 


2574 


8 


ll)(>7 


7 


1250 


4 


2245 


7 


1251 


4 


3230 


11 


1654 


6 


2291 


8 


19(i8 


7 


497 


2 


' 2236 


7 


2241 


i 


3113 


10 


5 2235 


7 


I 3113 


10 


1657 


6 


43 


1 


1656 


6 


2237 


7 


1658 


6 


1659 


6 


42 


1 


2239 


7 


1655 


6 


929 


3 


2244 


7 


2240 


7 


640 


2 


1252 


4 


2243 


7 


'2238 


7 


2045 


7 


498 


2 


7086 


4 


2915 


10 


2246 


7 


501 


2 


991 


3 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XLV 



Sabject. 




Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS— Continued. 
Bjf Mr. £rmen trout — Continued. 

Kensington andTaoony Railroad Company, Philadelphia . 

Leavenworth, Northern and Southern Railroad Company 

Lookabauffh, John 

Millspaneh, J. L 

Murphy, Martin 

Prall, Johnson S 

Rawlins, Maj. Gen. John S., removal of statue of 

Rio Grande and El Paso Railroad Company . . .- 

Rio Grande, Mexico and Pacific Railroad 

Saint Augnstiue, Fla., purchase of lot in 

Schuylkill River East Side Railroad Company, Philadelphia . . 
Bif Mr, Findlay : 

Artificial limbs, renewal of 

East. Henry , 

I^ast Side Railroad Company, Philadelphia 

Fortress Monroe, iron pier at , '< 

George, Wilson B 

McClure, Col. Daniel 

Morgan, A. C 

Small, Maj. Michael P 

South Carolina Volunteers, board of field officers of 

Uuited States barracks, transfer of 

Walker, Moses B 

By Mr. Houk : 

Armstrong, William C 

Arnold, Seymour F 

Barlow, George 

Chalmette, La., National Cemetery road 

Condemned cannon 



Dillow, George W 

Doig, Patrick S 

Duncan, John W 

Greenwood, Cvril 

Knoxville, Tenn., national cemetery at 

Kritzer, David 

McKauney , James 

Murphy, Slarshal I N ^ 

Natchez. Miss., national cemetery at 

Poormau, William 

Stone, Cudberth 

Worts, M.iunister, and others 

By Mr. Laird : 

Land near San Antonio, purchase of 

New Mexico and Arizona, cavalry in 

Rockwell, John | 

Shaw, Capt. Francis j 

Volunteer Army, officers of I 

Wighaman, William A I 

Bjf Mr. Negley: \ 

Ayres, Alvin A iJ 

Bailiflf, Silas D ! 

Badges of personal distinction 

Baldwin, Silas D 

Barringer, Martin 

Benefield, Hiram A 

Betterton, Lee L 

Branson, Nathan. .^ 

Brennan, Catherine 

Chamberlin, John F 



1650 

1990 

1991 

992 

490 

1H51 

16r)2 

107 

3067 

3143 
1649 

499 

3366 

1399 

1110 

3191 

208 

1981 

947 

1150 

4oU 

637 

638 

1964 

1569 

1965 

345 

im\ 

1662 
1401 
1400 
ll«;2 
l(k>4 

5:i0 

19. .3 
16{)0 
16(15 
209 
1961 
14(12 
1663 

1410 
531 

22(»9 
210 

17;. 6 

2210 

3370 
3:i71 
337() 

533 
2K<)2 

959 
3377 
2^74 

961 
3378 
3436 



6 
7 
7 
3 
2 
6 
6 
1 

10 
6 

11 
6 

2 
11 
5 
4 
11 
1 
7 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 

7 
6 

7 
1 
6 
6 
5 
5 

4 

6 
2 

7 
6 
6 
1 
7 
5 
6 

5 
2 
7 
1 

6 

7 

11 
11 
11 

2 
10 

3 
11 
10 

3 
11 
11 



XLVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS— Continued. 
By Mr. yealetf — Continaed. 

Chumfj, Mary E 

(Jlaucy, Michael 

Cole, Clement A 

Conglin, James 

Danuer, Samuel W ^ 

Devore, John M 

Dotson, James W 

Duulap, Myron £ 

Edeus, Jesse 

Fnciose, Richard 

I'iibeck, Nicholas 

Foster, Asher W 

Gates* Frederick 

Guy, Levy 

Haley, William D 

Kune, James; 

Kansas, Fourteenth Caralry 

Kunitz, Jacob, alias Walters 

Layton, Willis 

Lyon, John 

Miller, William 

Morrison, John A 

National Home for Soldiers, reimbursement of . . . 

Romine, Alfred G 

Silbernagel^ John J 

Thomburff, J. H. 

Trasper, Lewis J 

Tryon, Clarkson 

Worthington, C. A 

Bn Mr. Steele: 

Anderson, Capt. Allen L 

Army, efficiency of the 

Army, medical depart ment of the 

Assistant Secretary of War 

Bates, James A 

Business of the Committee on Military Affairs ... 

Burke, Orville 

Byrne, Edward 

Campbell, Charles H 

Carpenter, Thf*mas H 

Carrick, Robert 

Chickering, John W 

Coughlin, Mai-tin 

Crawford, I^aac 

Diehl, Elizuh .• 

flastmond, Oscar, and James W. Atwill , 

Fech^t, Capt.EdmondG 

Getty, Col. George W 

Gile, George W 

Grierson, Col. B. H 

Humphreys, Capt. Henry H 

Ingails, General Rufus 

Lewis, John F 

Little, Thomas 

Mackliu, James E 

Montgomery, Robert H * 

Miilvey, William J 

O'Connor, Stephen 

Parry, Henry C 

Pope, Benjamin F 

Rile^, Thomas F 

Robinson, S.S 

Rousseau, D. Q 



Report. 



Vol. 



9«4 


3 


2872 


10 


2868 


10 


2873 


10 


2863 


10 


963 


3 


2876 


10 


671 


2 


2c«4 


10 


3369 


11 


958 


3 


3373 


11 


3:172 


11 


3374 


11 


962 


3 


3:160 


11 


3360 


11 


960 


3 


2866 


10 


2867 


10 


2871 


10 


211 


1 


500 


2 


2875 


10 


2870 


10 


3375 


11 


2877 


10 


2869 


10 


28t»5 


10 


3167 


11 


1408 


5 


2883 


10 


928 


3 


3171 


11 


1618 


6 


3165 


11 


3161 


11 


3183 


U 


3190 


11 


3168 


11 


3184 


11 


1930 


7 


3115 


10 


3108 


10 


.^i:j2 


2 


316:3 


n 


3176 


11 


3186 


11 


3180 


11 


3I8S 


11 


3170 


11 


3179 


11 


3173 


11 


3177 


11 


31G4 


11 


• 3114 


10 


3162 


11 


3174 


11 


3189 


11 


3187 


11 


3172 


11 


3182 


11 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XLVn 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON MILITARY AFFAIRS— Continaed. 
Bjf Mr. iSfeeJtf— Continued. 

Spencer, T.J 

Spencer, William C 

Territoriee, two reffiinente in the (Part 2) 

Von Luettwitz, A.H 

Webb, William W 

Wells,£ugene 

Whiting, Charles J 

BjfMr. Fide: 

Cain, James 

OisBon, J. F 

Cowan, JameeH 

Cowens, James P 

Beechner, Ernest 

Fanning, James 

Grant, General U.S : 

Hood, David F 

Hunt, ThomasB 

Kost, Rudolph 

KuDipf, Peter 

Military telegraph line 

Pleasanton, Alfred 

San Antonio, Tex., to release ground to 

Telegraph operators during the war 

By Mr, Wheeler: 

Army, restoration of officers to the 

Bone, Capt. James H 

Cemetery near Danville, Va 

Condemned cannon to G. A. R. at Avoca, Iowa.. 

Durkce, Henry 

Harper, Samuel D 

Hunt, Col. Henry J 

Kingon, James W 

Logan, David M 

Military Academy.^ 

Military telegraph line 

New Berne National Cemetery, interment in 

Steuber, Bemhard 

Tents, loan of, to soldiers 

Wardwell, Emery 8 

West lod ia Islands, signal stations in 

By Mr. Wolfard: 

Chambliss, William P 

Cousins, George W 

Paus, Henry A 

Payne, T. J ^ 



Roach, James. 



Report. 



Shields, General James, swords of 

COMMITTEE ON NAVAL AFFAIRS— 
By Mr. Ballenti/ne: 

Amendment of naval appropriation act of 1883 

Navy, retirement of officers of the 

By Mr. Bimtelle : 

Removal of charge of desertion from men of the Navy and Ma- 
rine Corps 

NavyDepartment, consolidating Bureaus of (Part 2) 

By Mr. Herbert : 

Appropriations for the naval service 

Business of committee, H.R.6664 

Consolidating Bureaus of Navy Department (Part 1) 



Naval Establishment, increase of 



3166 


11 


3169 


11 


b31 


2 


3178 


11 


3185 


11 


3175 


11 


,3181 


11 


454 


2 


926 


3 


1255 


4 


1183 


4 


1182 


4 


924 


3 


181 


1 


925 


3 


1256 


4 


1258 


4 


1257 


4 


3058 


10 


927 


3 


1253 


4 


16771 


• 6 


189 


1 


3227 


11 


3380 


11 


3379 


11 


2881 


10 


3466 


11 


212 


1 


3226 


11 


1254 


4 


719 


3 


639 


2 


2013 


7 


3228 


11 


3160 


11 


2882 


10 


1836 


6 


44 


1 


1838 


6 


1980 


7 


2879 


10 


S 2878 
) 3367 


10 


11 


3229 


11 


1678 


6 


96 


1 


1866 


6 


1462 


5 


2497 


8 


2648 


9 


1469 


5 


r 1470 


5 


J 993 


3 


i 2619 


9 


1 2648 


9 



Vol. 



XLVIII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON NAVAL AFFAIRS— Continued. 
By Mr. AIcAdoo : 

Construction of naval dry -docks 

By Mr, J. jR. Thomas : 

Randall. Lieut. William P 

By Mr. WUo : 

Navy, assistant engineers in the 

Navy, officers of the 

Hopkins, Mary E 

COMMITTEE ON PACIFIC RAILROADS— 
By Mr. Bliss : 

Northern Pacific Railroad Compan y 

Spokane and CoBur D'Alene Railroad Company 

By Mr. Crup : 

Pacific Railroad Committee 

Telegraph line from Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean 

By Mr. Dunn : 

Arkansas, New Mexico, and Pacific Railroad Company 

By Mr, Outhwaite : 

Railroad and telegraph line from Missouri River to Pacific 

Ocean 

By Mr. Richardsofi : 

Investigations of books and accounts of Pacific railroads 

Northern Pacific Railroad Company 

Pacific Railroads 

COMMITTEE ON PATENTS— 
By Mr. Atkinson : 

Amending section 4887 Revised Statutes 

Marsh, Eluu A., and Menard, Lafever 

Potts, MarvF 

Ward, W.H 

By Mr. Cowles : 

Bonsack, James Albert 

By Mr. FUher : 

Colo, Henrietta H 

Jennings, Frederick S 

By Mr. Giljdlan: 

Creecy , Charles E 

By Mr, Hal sell : 

Dederick, Peter K 

By Mr. Lehlhach : 

Brooke, William E 

Colo, Mrs. Henrietta 

Harrington, John R 

Insulating submarine cables (Part 2) 

Lewis, William and WilliamH 

Smith, Stephen N 

By Mr. Martin : 

Gaines, Sauinel M 

Johnston , James J 

By Mr. Mitchell: 

Jones, Charles W 

Patent!?, trade-marks, and copyrights 

By Mr. Morgan : 

Frances, Samuel 

Fees in patent cases 

Insulating submarine cables (Part 1) 

Mitchell, C.ll 

By Mr. riumb: 

Burton, Dr. W. Leigh 

Gaudy, Maurice 

By Mr. Townshend: t 

To limit jurisdiction of United States courts in patent cases ... 
By Mr. West: 

Erpelding, John 



Report. 


Vol. 


2208 


7 


95 


1 


3064 
3146 
3231 


10 
11 
11 


2567 
971 


8 
3 


2033 
607 


7 
2 



2582 



1929 



169 


1 


1002 


! 3 


2387 


, 8 


2725 


9 


736 


3 


1414 


5 


3057 


10 


900 


3 


517 


2 


2753 


9 


1986 


7 


1095 


4 


2751 


9 


3237 


11 


645 


2 


2650 


9 


2750 


9 


646 


2 


3236 


. 11 


400 


2 


516 


2 


2445 


8 


1966 


7 


767 


3 


2S52 


9 


2650 


9 


98 


1 


1570 


6 


839 


3 


1862 


6 


1134 


4 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XLIX 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON PENSIONS— 
Bjf Mr. Brady : 

Armbrecht, Loaise 

Baker, Samael 

Barbank, Abby L 

Cellar, Racbel Fleming 

Heard, Rachel W 

Jacobs, Allen P 

Mcintosh, Mrs. Mary 

Marphy, Mary 

Mnzzey, Milton R 

Panllns, David C 

Ramsdell, Inabella J 

Shubrick. Edward R 

Stocksdale, Elizabeth 

By Mr, CowU$ : 

Elliotr, A. J 

Mingoji, John 

Waters, Bryant 

By Mr, Eldridge : 

Disabled persons, pensions to . 



Mexican war, soldiers and sailors of 



Miller, Mrs. Rebecca 

Navy and Marine Corps, disabled persons in 

Pavy , Mrs. Octave 

Smith, Parmelia 

Bg Mr. Uutton : 

Benham, Mrs. E. A 

Boggs, Ellen M 

By Mr, James T. Jones : 

Potter, Frances McNeil 

Vigus, Cyras 

By Mr. Laitdes : 

Bellion, Henry 

Billings^ Kennedy G 

Deery. William H 

Egan, Mary Ann 

Farqnhar, Mary Howard 

Scbotield, Joseph, and Sarah N. Qiese 

War of 1812, widows of 

By Mr, Scott : 

Crimmins, Mary E 

Farqohar, Mary Howard 

Hadlock, Lydia 

Hardie, Marj^aret Hunter 

Hunt, Mrs. Henrietta M. Drum 

McKinncy, David 

Owen, Alfred M 

Semmes, Mary Mortimer % 

By Mr, Strubte : 

Barnes, Rachel 

De Krafft, Elizabeth S 

Donnelly, Archbell 

Falconer, Alf^xander •. 

Heist er, William H 

Hook, MaryB 

Lynch, William 

McKean, Sarah P 

Messf^r, Solomon 

Roberson, Liflns 

Scanland, Lewis W 

Shockley, Milton P 

7149— H. Kep.. iv 



Report. 


Vol. 


3120 


10 


944 


3 


2459 


8 


2458 


8 


813 


3 


1607 


6 


1C09 


6 


1(508 


6 


366 


1 


3C5 


1 


814 


3 


3205 j 


11 


367 I 


1 


3435 


U 


1988 


7 


3434 


11 


3294 


11 


( 972 


3 


2 151 


2 


I :i293 


11 


1606 


6 


1720 


6 


3121 


10 


1119 


4 


93:^ 


3 


3144 


11 


150 


1 


1372 


5 


2461 


8 


2323 


8 


1721 


6 


3297 


11 


2460 


8 


3296 


11 


3313 


11 


2449 


8 


9:i5 


3 


2234 


7 


2450 


8 


3019 


10 


1120 


4 


934 


3 


2448 




2572 


8 


2571 


8 


3155 


11 


2249 


7 


3472 


11 


2569 


8 


2406 


8 


2570 


8 


1374 


5 


3314 


U 


1808 


1 ^ 


3315 


i 11 



1. 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS 



Sabject. 




COMMITTEE ON PENSIONS— Continued. 
By Mr, Zaohary Taylor : 

Armentrout, J. J , 

Balch, Quincy A 

Battee, A. H 

Bnrkett, Mary 

Caker, Newton 

Carey, Arnold 

Chapman, Elizabeth 

Foster, Mary I 

Foy.B.F 

French, Micab 

Harrell, Helen H 

Heady, William J... ^ 

Hendley. Pernetta 

Hentie, Mrs. Laura 

Humphreys, Rebecca Hollingsworth , 

Hutchinson, Valencia C 

Kebler, I^na 

Kelley, General Benjamin F 

Lemon, Malinda 

Martin, Betsey 

Martin, Elyah 

Owen, Thomas J 

Owin^s, William J 

Smith, Betsey A 

Soldiers and sailors of the war of 1812 

Stanley, Josepli 

Stone, Elizabeth D 

Stnrg^s, John 

Vail, Sarah 

Vandorhoff, John A 

Van Nort, James A 

By Mr. Thomp$on : 

Kearney, Louisa 

Revolutionary soldiers, payment to surviving children 

McEee, Rebecca Reese 

Sarsfield, David 

Tracy, Dwyer 

Weeks, Eliza A 

Winans, Isaac , 

By Mr. White: 

Adams, Lemuel 

Blakely, Nathaniel H 

Drummond, Sarah O 

Fillebrown,Mary E , 

General Twigg's command, i)ension to soldiers of 

Harwood, Marc^aret B 

Hutchison, William 

Leffman, Elizabeth 

McFadden,E. A '. 

Meech, Phoebe H 

Moody, Josephs , 

Rodgers, Amanda 

Rose, Malitly, estate of 

Waters, Col. James 

Wondrak, Mathias 

Worth, Miss Margaret Stafford 

By Mr, WoJford : 

Fort, Robert D , 

Randall, Virginia Taylor 

. Thomas, Josephine De Costa 

Tyus, Lewis 

Walker, Maria 



3312 
3298 
3309 

8*22 
3304 
1719 
3207 
2464 
2465 
3308 
3300 
1807 
1288 

819 
2643 
2462 
3310 
2715 

3:^1 

821 
3302 
2644 

820 
3299 

296 

3.305 
1718 
3300 
3311 
*i463 

2720 
2719 
1873 

853 
2718 

852 
2717 

1373 

360 

936 

815 

618 

817 

2756 

938 

2757 

1809 

2758 

2709 

:^9 

816 

937 

2710 

2759 

l.-i2 
2561 
1121 
1154 
1943 



Vol. 



11 

11 

11 

3 

11 

6 

11 

8 

8 

11 

11 

6 

5 

3 

9 

8 

11 

9 

11 

3 

11 

9 

3 

11 

1 

11 

11 

6 

11 

11 

8 

9 
9 
6 
3 
9 
3 
9 

5 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
9 
3 
9 
6 
9 
9 
1 
3 
3 
9 
9 

1 
8 
4 
4 



S 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LI 



Sabjcct. 



COMMITTEE ON THE POST-OFFICE AND POST-ROADS— 
By Mr, Barry : 

Mail contract, sublettiog 

Poflta^on foarth-claas matter 

By Mr. Bingham : « 

Postmasters, salaries of (Part 2) 

By Mr, Blount: 

Basiness of tbe Committee on the Post-Offloe and Post- Roads. . . 

Lottery, gift enterprise, or other circnlars 

Post-office appropriation bill 

Railroad companies, comi)ensation to 

Railway postal cars ^ 

By Mr, BwrrowB : 

Ignited States mails, obligation to carry (Part 2) .? 

By Mr. Docker y: 

Free-delivery system, extension of 

Letters, immediate delivery of 

By Mr. Jamet H, Jonfs: 

Grant, Julia D 

Postal notes, payment of 

Wallace, Rosa 

By Mr, Merriman : 

Obscene matter through the mails '. 

Postmasters, salaries of 

By Mr.Petert: 

Money-order system, receipts of the 

Postmasters, clerk hire to 

Postmasters, adjusting claims of , 

By Mr, Bigg§ : 

Foreijoi mail 

United States mails, obligation to carry (Part 1) 

By Mr, J, M. Taylor : 

Postal Service, employ^ of the 

By Mr. Ward : 

Mail matter, delivery of 

Mail Service, messengers in the 

Mail Service, to regulate 

Nevada, legislature of 

Postmaster-Oeneral, Annual Report of 

Postmasters, people to name 

Post-offices, naming of 

By Mr, A, J. Warner : 

Postal money orders 

Post-Offlce Department, organization of 

COMMITTEE ON PRINTING— 
By Mr,Bark9dale: 

Binding census schedules 

Commissioner of Education, Report of 

Congressional Record, copies of 

Distribution of Report of Public Land Commissioner... 

Government Printing Office employ^ 

Greeley expedition 

International polar expedition to Lady Franklin Bay . . 

Ordnance and war-ships 

Postal laws and regulations 

Removal of material from Government Printing Office . 

Reports of United States consuls on cattle-bre€3ing, Ac 

Smithsonian Institution, last annual report of 

United States Statutes and Congressional Record . . 

By Mr, Farquhar: 

Alaska 

Astronomical and meteorological observations 

Digest of International Law 

Navigation and customs collection laws 





Report. 


Vol. 




507 
1355 

2376 

1839 
2678 
720 
2484 
3202 

534 

2215 
1259 

5 5r3 

} 735 

641 

1471 

2676 
2376 

:m 

179 
2494 

1087 
534 

535 

5 506 

) 503 

2207 

502 

536 


3 




5 

8 


ds... 


6 
9 




3 




11 
3 






7 




4 




2 




3 
3 




5 




9 




8 




3 




2 




8 




4 




2 




2 




2 




2 

7 




2 


. . . • . 1 


2 




2342 
504 


8 




2 




505 

378 
2743 

2*206 

1635 

942 

99 

188 

834 

1634 

567 

568 

384 

943 

941 

174 

3060 

837 

3140 


2 
2 




9 




7 




6 




3 


• 


1 




1 




3 




6 




2 


* * * t 


2 


::::; 


2 
3 
3 




1 
10 




3 




10 


• • . • « 


612 


2 



LII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 




COMMITTEE ON PRINTING— Continued. 
By Mr. I'VirguAar— Continued. 

Printing and distribution of documents of the monetary con- 
ferences 

Printing of statement of awards under treaties between France 
and Spain 

Report of Naval Constructor HicUbom , 

Union Pacific Railway Company 

By Mr, Reid: 

Bureau of Ethnology, Annual Bulletin of 

^ Compilation of reports 

Geological Survey publications 

Int-ernational sheep and wool show 

Official Register of the United States 

Printing of committee reports 

COMMITTEE ON PRIVATE LAND CLAIMS— 
By Mr, Croxtan : 

Crosby, Mary C 

Deunread, Francis 

Smith, Mat hew 

By Mr. Dorsey : 

Casey, Mary E 

Martin, Henry 

By Mr. Eldredge : 

Land grants in Arizona 

Land warrant, isnue of 

Roman Catholic Church at Oswego, Kans 

By Mr. Ely : 

Fillmore, John S 

Perkins. Edward T 

Private laud claims in New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado 

Tibbits, W. H 

Torbert, James A., legal representatives of 

By Mr. B. S. Green : 

Gee, Henry 

Sanlt Sainte Marie, lands in 

Simpson, Benjamin M 

** Tres Alamos " land grau t 

By Mr. HaUell: 

Private land claim in New Mexico 

By Mr. James: 

Contract prison labor 

By Mr, Osborne: 

Chaves, Ignacio, and others -. 

By Mr. O. B. Thomas: 

Lands in Platte County, Missouri 

Private land clai:ii in New Mexico 

By Mr. Thompson : 

Giierin, Emile, and Cheri, P. Major 

Gaines, My ra Clark 

Private laud claims 

Talmadge, Theodore W 

By Mr. Sadler : 

Confirmation of privat-e land claims 

By Mr. St. Martin : 

Cramer, Jacob, heirs of 

COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS— 
By Mr, IV. H'. Brown : 

Jackson, Tenn., court-house and post- office at 

La CrosHO, Wis., public building at 

Lancaster, Pa., public building at 

Louisville and Portland Canal basin 

Norfolk, Va., public building at 

Paterson, N. J., public building at 

Scrautoii, Pa., public building at 

WilKcs-Barre, Pa , public building at 

Williamsport. Pa., public building at 



Vol. 



835 

1302 
570 
d36 

1330 
3:{l)*2 
1331 
13«2 
56U 
989 



2565 
3352 
3353 



'^ 



5 



3 
5 

li 

5 
5 
2 
3 



8 
11 
11 



1075 


4 


450 


2 


192 


1 


3i;{9 


iO 


3139 


10 


229« 


8 


3421 


11 


13H0 


5 


1379 


5 


3399 

« 


11 


309 


1 


3048 


10 


97 


I 


187 


1 


184 


1 


217 


1 


186 


1 


860 


3 


451 


2 


lOll 


3 


1381 


5 


1942 


7 


ia5 


1 


1314 


5 


603 


2 


1152 


4 


3453 


11 


3235 


11 


1725 


6 


3457 


11 


1807 


6 


1333 


5 


3454 


11 


397 


8 



IKDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LIII 



Sabject. 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS— Cont'd. 
By Mr. toU : 

Anuupolis, Md., pnblic building at 

Yuukers. N. Y., pablic bailding at 

By Mr, DibbU' : 

Bixioklyn, N. Y., pablic building at (Part 2) 

Bu»>iDei>8 of the Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds. . . 

Chicago, market valuo of property in 

Const ruction of public buildings 

Dallas, Tex., pnblic iniilcling at 

El Paso, Tex., public building at 

Foit Smith, Ark., pnblic bijjlding at 

Oreeuville, S. C, pablic building at 



Jacksonville, Fla., public building at 

Logansport. Ind., pnblic building at 

Opelousas, La., public building at 

Oxford, Miss., pnblic building at 

Reading, Pa., public buildirgat 

San Antonio, Tex., public building ar. 

Santa ¥6, N. Mex., pnblic building at 

WaMhiugtou National Monument 

By Mr. Ue».ley: 

Cheyenne, Wyo 

l>e> Moines, Iowa, pnblic building at 

Dulnih^Minn., public building nt. 

East Saginaw, Mii'h., public building at 

Helena Munt., pablic building nt 

L(iN Angeles, Cal., pnblic building at 

Madison, Ind., pnblic building at 

Marine City, Mich., pnblic building at 

Of*hkash, WIh., public building at 

Portland, Oreg., public building at 

San Francisco, post-office and court-house building In 
By Mr. T, D, Johnnlon : 

Asheville,N.C., pnblic building at , 

Chattanooga, Tenn., United States ground in 

Frankfort, Ky., public buihiing at 

GreenHborough,N.G., public building at 

Petersburg, Va., improvement of public bailding at .. 

8ta<eHville,N.C., public building at 

Wilmi»ifl:ton,N.C., public building at 

By Mr, MiUtken : 

Beliant, Me., extension of public building at 

By Mr, Oiren ; 

Indianapolis, Ind., post-office at 

La Fayet te, Ind., public building at 

By Mr. lieene : 

August a, Ga., pnblic building at 

Flowers for pension building 

Galveston, Trx 

San Antonio, Tex., pnblic building at 

Monroe, La., pnblic building at 

Sivannah,Ga , public building at 

Vicksburg. Miss., puhlic building at 

By Mr. I.'ocktnll : 

Brooklyn, N.Y., land for pnblic building in 

New York, marine hospital at port of 

Springtield, Mass., public building at 

By Mr. Suiider : 

Abin;;clon, Vrt., public building at 

Camden, N. .1., pnblic bnildiui; ut 

Carrollton and Lock N«>. 1, Turnpikr- Rowd Company 

CIiarleHton, W. Va., public l» IMing at 

• • <'luitrancM>g», T«'»»n., public hull' ing at 

n 'kHliurg, W. Va., pnblic bni'diiig ar 

Echo 8, John 



Report. 



Vol. 



r,i3 

U6'i 

3418 

2496 

1)70 

1757 

oil 

096 

510 

509 

669 

969 

613 

1:J57 

32^3 

$^95 

614 

27.39 

1758 

1883 
1832 

399 
3406 
1689 

932 
3416 
3417 
1013 

:mo5 

542 

:^l 

13ort 
967 
3063 
1690 
28H6 
1153 

392 

1311 
19ft) 

1262 

46 

19rt7 

394 
V2iM 

393 
1412 

3418 

512 

2745 
3381 
14dl 

64 
1324 
1094 

770 



2 
4 

11 

8 

3 

6 
•* 

3 
♦ 2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
5 
11 
3 
2 
9 
6 

6 
6 
2 

11 
6 
3 

11 

11 
3 

11 
2 

2 

5 

3 
10 

H 
10 

4 



5 
7 

4 
1 
7 
2 
4 
2 
5 

11 

11 

2 

9 
11 
5 
2 
5 
4 
3 



LIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Report. 



Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS— Cont'd. 
Bjf Mr. Snyder — Continned. 

Fortress Monroe, Va., post-office building at 

Newport, Ky., public building at 

Owensborough, Ky., public building at 

Staunton, Va., public building at 

By Mr, Wads: 

Atchison, Kans., public building at 

fiirmingnam, Ala., public building at 

Fort Scott, Kans., public building at 

Helena, Ark., public building at 

Hnntsville, Ala., public building at 

Jefferson, Tex., public building at 

Sedalia, Mo., public building at 

Springfield, Mo., public building at 

Wichita, Kans., pnblic building at 

By Mr, Wilkina : 

Akron, Ohio, pnblic building at 

Annapolis ana Baltimore Short Line Railroad Company 

Dayton, Ohio, public building at 

Dover, N. H., pnblic building at 

Honlton, Me., public building at 

Lynn, Mass., pnblic building at 

Montpelier, Vt., public building at 

Vewburg. N. Y., public building at 

New Yonc Arsenal, officers' (]|narters at 

Portismouth, Ohio, p^lic building at 

Providence, R. L, lutditional land for custom-house in 

Rochester, N. Y., public building at 

Springfield, Mass., milling shop at : 

Troy, N. Y., pnblic building at 

Worcester, Mass., public building at 

Zanesville, Ohio, public bnilding at 

By Mr. WortJUngtan : 

Detroit, Mich., public building at 

Keokuk, Iowa, public building at 

Peoria, III., public bnilding at 

Sioux City, Iowa, pnblic building at 

COMMITTEE ON THE PUBLIC LANDS— 
By Mr. J. A. Anderwn, : 

Lands for park purposes in Michigan 

Railroad land grants in Kansas 

By Mr. Cobb : 

Lands granted Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company, to forfeit 

Land granta, forfeiture of certain 

Right of way through United States lands in New Jersey 

Timber-cnltore and desert-land laws, repeal of 

By Mr. Dar$ey : 

Hall, Elezier B 

By Mr. Foran : 

California, St>ate University of 

Lands to Territories for university purposes ^ 

By Mr. Laffoon : 

Fresh water on the Colorado Desert 

Nebraska, additional land offices in 

New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Vicksburg Railroad 

Wyoming, new land district in 



I 



By Mr. Landes : 

Michigan, State of 

By Mr. MeRae : 

Cherokee Reservation, Arkansan 



Homestead settlers^ 

Public lands, pre-emption of. 



r 



\ 



2559 


8 


2558 


8 


3119 


11 


2642 


9 


2851 


9 


3359 


11 


2850 


9 


2762 


9 


1265 


4 


2918 


10 


1688 


6 


541 


2 


2022 


7 


1687 


6 


2V42 


9 


966 


! 3 


1994 


7 


1480 


5 


997 


3 


1871 


6 


1686 


6 


2379 


; ® 


1093 


4 


1263 


4 


398 


2 


2233 


7 


2721 


9 


1325 


5 


540 


2 


1264 


4 


3448 


11 


395 


2 


396 


2 


968 


3 


2706 


9 


1619 


6 


193 


1 


45 


1 


1928 


7 


605 


2 


1679 


6 


728 


3 


1863 


6 


1088 


4 


965 


3 


606 


2 


2698 


9 


538 


2 


3199 


11 


2292 


8 


1004 


3 


215 


1 


3212 


^ 11 


1260 


4 



INDEX TO HOUSE BEPOKTS. 



LV 



Sobjeot. 




COMMITTEE ON THE PUBLIC LANDS— Continued. 
B$Mr. Pai$mm: 

AlabftmA and Chattanooga Bailroad Company, grant of land to. 

Cinnabar and Clark's Fork Bailroad Company 

Dea Moines Blver lands 

Flcoida, grant of lands to railroads in 

Illinois, lands in Bandolph County 

Michigan, lairds in, to aid Ontonagon and State Line Bailroad. 

Beal estate In the Territories • 

By iff. W.J.SUme: 

Short Creek Lake, to donate, toMissonn • 

Southern Pacific Bailroad Company, lands granted to..... 

By Mr.StraU: 

Dakota, land districts in ;. 

Dakota, reform school in 

Nebraska, additional land districts in 

Otis, George K 

Steele, WilburF 

White, John E 

By Mr. Van Eaton : 

Alabama, mineral lands in.... 

Act of June, 1844 

Fresh water on Colorado Desert 

Gila Biver ludiau Beservatiou, right of way through 

Jackson, A. P 

Marquette and Ontonagon Bailroad. (Part 2) 

Marsh landft. Lake Saint Clair, Michigan 

Mobile and Girard Bailroad Companv 

Pablic lands, right of way through the 

Saginaw Bay, title to lands in 

Sioux City and Saint Paul Bailroad Company 

Swamp and overflowed lands 

Wyoming, lands to .;.... 

By Mr, Voarhetu: 

Homestead rights, relative to 

By Mr. HmUy : 

California and Oregon Bailroad, forfeiture of lands granted to . 

California, mineral lands in 

Desert lands, reclamation of 

Lands in Sau Francisco, interest of tho United States in ceilain. 

Northern Pacific Bailroad, forfeited grants to 

Public lands, proceeds of sales of ^ 

Besenrations of lands on account of live oak 

San Francisco, interest in lands to 

San Francisco, relinquishing certain lands to 

San Francisco, granting Seal Bocks to 

Seal Bocks 



2443 
672 
491 

2437 

1681 
721 

3455 

2040 
706 



Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON BAILWAYS AND CANALS— 
By Mr, Aikimon: 

Kaunas City, Fort Scott and Gulf Bailroad Company ..••.., 

Ship-canal connecting Delaware Biver with Atlantic Ocean 

Water-route to connect Lake Michigan with Detroit Biver. 
Bp Mr. Cole: 

Maryland and Delaware Free Ship-Canal 

By Mr, Irion : 

Bayou Teche 

By Mr. Murphy : 

Illinois and Michigan Canal 

Illinois and Mississippi Biver Canal 

By Mr, Weber: 

Improvement of the Erie and Oswego Canals 



{ 



643 



8 
2 
2 
8 
6 
3 
11 

7 
2 



707 


2 


2039 


7 


1680 


6 


1151 


4 


214 


I 


2211 


7 


865 


3 


537 


2 


1321 


5 


3192 


11 


2435 


8 


1928 


7 


2752 


9 


2640 


9 


2038 


7 


1090 


4 


3116 


10 


2487 


8 


1089 


4 


2293 


8 


3211 


11 


930 


3 


931 


3 


870 


3 


18HH 


7 


3056 


10 


1226 


3 


994 


3 


2754 


9 


2755 


9 


2707 


9 


2649 


9 


3415 


11 


730 


3 


2708 


9 


390 


2 


2294 


8 


723 


3 


2378 


8 


2031 


7 


574 


2 



LVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sabjeot. 




VoL 



COMMITTEE ON RIVERS AND HARBORS— 
Bp Mr. Blanohard: 

Channel at South PaM 

By Mr. WUlis: 

River and harbor appropriation bill 

COMMITTEE ON RULES— 
Bjf Mr, Morri9on : 

Amondments to the Rules 



1233 



Hour of meetine of the Honse of Representatives 

Index to Journals of Congress 

Payment of pensions 

Rulesof the Honse of Representatives 

COMMITIEE ON THE TERRITORIES— 
By Mr. Boyle: 

Federal offioials in the Territories 

Legalized insurance companies of Dakota 

By Mr. Cooper : 

Bonds, Columbia County, Washington Territory, to issue 

By Mr. Hill : 

Alaska, homestead laws in .., 

Montana, artesian wells in , 

Oklahoma, organization of the Territory of , 

.Utah, special session of the legislature of 

Washington Territory, legislative assembly of , 

Wyoming, legi^ative assembly of 

By Mr. Joseph : 

Artesian wells in Mew Mexico 

By Mr. Ptrkine : 

Reservation of the Otoe and Missouria Indians in Nebraska and 

Kansas, sale of 

By Mr. Perry : 

New Mf'zico, reapportioning of.... 

Revised Satutes, amending 

By Mr. Sadler: 

Artenian wells .- 

Liquors, sale of, in Territories 

By Mr. Spriggs : 

Insane asylum, Arizona 

By Mr. Springer : 

Arizona, courts in 

Dakota Territory, a bill dividing 

Dakota, admission of 

Dakota, admission of southern half 

Idaho and Washington 

Laws in the Territories 



i 



Wyoming, probate courts in 

By Mr. Symes: 

Arizona, diseased cattle in 

New Mexico, diseased cattle in 

COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS— 
By Mr. Campbell : 

Christian Brothers' College of Saint Louis. 

Lee, Lucy Ann and Allen G 

Wheeler, William H 

By Mr. Cometock : 

Brott, OeorgeF 

Cliflfr, Col. William 

Loy, Daniel 8 

McMillin, Andrew F., heirt» of 

By Mr. Geddes: 

Adamson, F. W '. 

Alexander, William J 



I 



1448 


5 


1565 


6 


1452 


5 


1621 


6 


2212 


4 


3475 


12 


2213 


7 


1 


1 


2581 


9 


722 


3 


1323 


5 


3232 


11 


3118 


10 


1322 


5 


1684 


6 


2641 


9 


1310 


5 


25 


1 



1092 



1683 



2489 


8 


2557 


8 


1470 


5 


2444 


8 


2034 


7 


1478 


5 


2579 


9 


2V0 


9 


2577 


8 


2:>78 


9 


216 


1 


1477 


5 


1875 


6 


1876 


6 


2335 


8 


2334 


8 


3332 


11 


1130 


4 


&i 


1 


2702 


9 


106 


1 


981 


3 


87 


1 


21o7 


7 


487 


2 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LVII 



Sabjeot. 




Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS-Continned. 
By Mr. Gfddes—Continxied, 

Atlttotio Works 

BacoD, Jamee M 

BarnSyG. W 

Blackwell, Mary A 

Bnrkharr, Capt. John 

Boskirk, Urias 

Byers, Amzi W., executor 

Campbell, JohD M 



Campbell, Wasbington 6 

Carpenter, Fendall. 

Carpenter, Samnel E 

Claims rejiorted by officers of the Treasury 

Cogswell, Anna M - 

Colombia Bank, of Colnmbia, Pa 

Conrad, Ebenezer J., etal 

Culbertson, Joseph 

Davis, John P. T ., 

Demory, John W .* 

Duties paid by the State of New York 

Dyer, Elizabeth P ^ 

Dyer, Jane C 

£lk Branch Chnrch of Jefferson County, West Virginia 

Farley, John 

Faulkner, Asaetaf 

Fitzpatrick, Patrick 

Goodwin, Capt. HoUisterE 

Gossom, Thomas B 

Gray, Thomas P 

Griggs, Elizabeth 

Harris, Hewitt 

Uaire, Milton S 

Hatfield, John, heirs of ^... 

Hefleblo wer, John 

Hendricks, W. P 

Higgins, John M 

Hildebrand, David H 

Hill, W.H 

Hinman, Wilbur P 

Hobson, Horace P 

Hopkins, Arvah 

Hughes, Indiana E 

Hutchinson, Rane C 

Ir^'in, John 

Isaacs, Solomon 

Jenkins, James C 

Johnson, Hiram, and others 

Laury , William 

Laurence, George W 

Li vermore, Fidus 

Marck, Peter, Thomas J. Wright, and others 

McAnnlty, Joseph 8 

McClellan. John 

McDowelVs, W. W., administrator 

McFerrin, Sarah 

McKay, Nathaniel, and others 

Mendenhall, Sarah E 

Micklc, Harmon 

Molloy, Ellen P 

Moore, James G 

Morris, George W 

Mulvehill, Elizabeth 

Myers, H. A 

Newman, James C 



34^4 


11 


308 


1 


1436 


5 


1826 


6 


1555 


6 


2178 


7 


1895 


4 


2180 


7 


2201 


7 


1897 


7 


1222 


4 


21 


1 


3036 


10 


a3:» 


1 


2197 


7 


18J3 


6 


381 


2 


2192 




1297 


5 


1H^7 


6 


601 


2 


829 


3 


1^89 


•» 
i 


629 


2 


1221 


4 


2372 


8 


1219 


4 


978 


3 


2185 


7 


2792 


9 


2199 


7 


84 


1 


159 


1 


2781 


9 


1220 


4 


600 


2 


2:i26 


8 


2.'02s 


7 


UM 


5 


1825 


6 


509 


2 


2791 


9 


3H2 


2 


1890 


7 


2*^00 


0^ 
* 


2182 


7 


30*38 


10 


27-8 


9 


3425 


11 


979 


3 


1613 


6 


2186 




219H 


4 


1898 


i 


2183 


7 


3039 


10 


2181 


4 


2195 


4 


3037 


10 


2196 


4 


2190 


4 


2179 


4 


h:^o 


3 


2188 


7 



LVIII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS— Continued. 
By Mr, Geddes — Continued. 

Nolan, Peter, heire of 

Norton, G^rge A 

Perkins, Newton C 

Porter, William 

Portlock, Mahala H 

Reeves^ William C 

Reid, John B 

Robinson, John M., representatives of ... 

Rumiangh, Martha J. A 

Schoefnocker, Christopher 

Seizure of property in Louisiana 

Settlement of claims of States 

Shaw, J. Q 

Sherrill, Samuel 



Smith, Charles B., heirs of 

Smith, Robert 

Snowden and Mason 

Spah, Fidel 

St. Andrews Lodge, of Cynthiana, Ky 

Tavemer, Eli 

Tironit, Eugene 

Tucker, James 

Vantreese, John 

Walton, Robert H 

Warr, Americns V 

Watkins, John R., administrator 

Whitted. William H 

Willoughbyj William H 

Wood, James D 

Worrall, Alexander 

By Mr, Hiettand : 

Black, Daniel 

Carrol, James P 

Clift, William 

Ferry, James D 

Gilbert, Abijah B 

Henderson, Elizabeth 

Kennedy, Mrs. Florida 

McBride, Thomas 

MoMnrtrie, Alfred 

McNangliton, John 

Rose, Alexander P 

Shoenfelt, Andrew 

By Mr, J. T, Johnston : 

Baptist Church of Crab Orchard, Ky 

Bates, Elizabeth 

Bradshaw, John Joseph 

Catholic Church at Chattanooga, Tenn 

District of Columbia, bounty to volunteers . . 

Female nurses, payment of 

Goodrum, Turner C 

Herbert, Eliza E 

Higgins, John M 

Jones, Jesse M 

l/ca, Pryor N 

Loyd, Enols r 

Maddox, Joseph H., (7 d/ 

Millinger, James 

Moer, Samuel H 

Patton, John 

Price, James 

Protestant Orphan AHvlum of Natchez, Misd. 

Robb, William N ' 



ReportJ Vol 



626 


2 


1822 


6 


2189 


7 


1891 


7 


2191 1 


7 


1900^ 


7 


1824 


6 


' 727 


3 


1556 


6 


307 


1 


616 


•> 


977 


^ 


1892 


7 


1899 


7 


5 1435 
\ 1040 


5 


4 


2789 


9 


3397 


11 


1696 


7 


980 


3 


2193 


7 


1893 


7 


2327 


8 


1894 


7 


2181 


7 


2^ 


8 


2790 


9 


2194 


7 


627 


2 


1557 


6 


761 


3 


3439 


11 


3047 


10 


92 


1 


3441 


11 


3442 


u 


1626 


6 


1834 


♦> 


1G5 


1 


164 


1 


91 


I 


3440 


11 


1329 




757 


•» 


483 


•> 


2784 


9 


1224 


4 


3336 


U 


1940 


7 


3338 


11 


3a^ 


I 


1131 


4 


1067 


4 


93 


1 


363 


1 


3137 


11 


2675 


•> 


755 


:\ 


756 


:; 


190 


I 


756 


3 


831 


3 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LIX 



Subject. 



Report. 



COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS -Continiied. 
Bjf Mr. J, T. Johnston — Con tinned. 

Seay , John H 

Shropshire, R. H 

Steamer De Suto 

Ward, Mrs, P. L 

White, JoeephR , 

White, Nicholas 

Wright. WilUam H 

Wauff h, Henrietta M 

By Mr, Kleiner : 

Baldwin, George W., Charles L., and Dora Thompson 

Breinniss, Reinhart, and others 

Brookbanks, Eleanor T., and others 

Brown, Robert 

Coan, John A 

Cohn, Henry S 



Vol. 



Donahoe, Mrs. M. J., J. A. Henry, and others. 



Klor, Frederick 

Marcinkowskiy Felix .1 

Marshall, Mrs. Frances 

McCool, Wells C 

Middleton, Richard 

Montgomery, John 

Montgomery, Robert H 

Nailey, Samnel M 

Pike, William 

gnackenbnsh, Silas 
yan, Margaret F 

Smith. Sidney R 

Strickland, Jesse H 

United Brethren in Christ, of Tyrone, Pa 

Ware, Lient. Francis, heirs of 

Wilcox, OrhindoB 

By Mr. Lyman : 

American Board of Commissioneis of Foreign Missions. 

Anderson, William 

Ballard, Augnst W 

Baptist Female College, Lexington, Mo 

Belden, Dr. O. S 

Bowers, Charles F 

California, State of 

Carter, Robert 

Clark, Silas H 

Davis, Dr. Samnel 

Dickinson, Perez 

Diehl, Joseph 



Dudley, George T 

Dnncan, Andrew I., estate of 

Easten, William A 

Eddy, John M , and others 

Engle, John M 

Fitzgerald, Edward 

Fish, Emma H 

Flynn, Patrick 

Foster, Thomas, and E. Leonidas Smith 

Gilbean, Francis 

Gillett, Theodore J 

Goble, Alexander 



Goyanx, Lncien 

Haldeman, Francis W 
Harris, Ransom L 



\ 



1068 


4 


1069 


4 


B33 


3 


3337 


H 


3:i.% 1 


11 


2433 


8 


1225 ] 


4 


832 ! 


3 


565 1 


•> 


160 


1 


0U2 ; 


2 


306 ! 


1 


88 1 


I 


982 1 


3 


1299 1 


5 


1300 


.'> 


983 


3 


3106 


10 


3046 


10 


4S6 


2 


566 


2 


2177 1 


7 


3334 ' 


11 


1301 1 


5 


.5()4 1 


2 


56:^ 


•2 


1554 


6 


'm\ 


2 


1754 


6 


2617 


9 


984 


3 


940 


3 


2612 ; 


9 


2609 


9 


2786 


9 


3135 


11 


3138 ! 


10 


2332 


8 


1298 




626 


2 


1074 1 


4 


3132 


10 


3344 


11 


2330 


8 


621 


2 


1351 




2331 


?* 


666 


2 


1440 


r» 


726 


3 


1828 


6 


169 


1 


760 


•» 


2610 


9 


1072 


4 


3343 


11 


665 


2 


2:{29 


.2 


3136 


10 


:»7 


I 


2026 


4 



I 



LX 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sabjeot. 



COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS— Continued. 
By Mr. Lyman — Continued. 

Higgins, Thomas L 

Hill, Georse, jr 

Holloran, John ■ 

Humes, Thomas W 

lowalnfantry, Fourth Regiment 

Jackman, Mrs. Louisa, and legal representatives of Mrs. Martha 

Vaughn 

Kendall, M^j. William, representatives of 

Kouns, John 

La Grange Sydnodical College, Tennessee 

Leebrick, Elizabeth 

London, John A 

Lynch, William B 

McClurc, Joseph W 

McLaughlin, Ammou 

Montgomery^ Alexander 

Morhiser, William H 

Parish, Joseph W 

Parvin, W. L., and Henry A. Greene 

Pendleton, Edward G 

PI ummen, Frances H 

Pulliam, J. J., estate of 

Ramsey, John 

Robinson, Julia A 

Ruggles, Frederick W 

Saulpaw, George W 

Schadel, Henry A ^ 

Schuylkill County', Pennsylvania 

Signer, Charles B 

Smith, Mrs Benjamin 

Swift, Alexander, & Co 

Thompson, William 

Victor, Mathilda 

Vouchers, examination of 

Wardwell, Ernest H 

Whitehead, Mary E 

Wis^gins, Thomas L 

Wright, David L 

By Mr, I'erry : 

Black, Thomas, heirs of 

Boxes in the Treasury, delivery of 

Catholic clergymen of MarylfiUd 

Do Leon, Agnes and Maria 

Downing, D. E 

Lee, R.H 

Milliuger, James 

Onrsler, John A 

Parish, B. M. M 

Perkins, Thomas F., administrator 

War loans, interest on 

Wilson, William D 

Wolfe, Miss Ann, ttal 

By Mr. and: 

Adams, O. F 

Bangs, Brownell & Co 

Cleere, Robert H 

Hammond, William K 

Jones, Levi ^ ^ . . 

Jndson Female College 

Martin, Mrs. Hetty 



Report. 



VoL 





• 


3341 


11 


2611 


9 


1441 


5 


1439 


5 


1437 


5 


3345 


11 


170 


1 


3348 


11 


3348 


11 


623 


2 


2785 


9 


14:?8 


5 


859 


3 


3347 


11 


1073 


4 


(:20 


2 


J 24 
i 167 


1 


1 


7:>9 


3 


2205 


7 


019 


2 


5 156 
) 1561 


1 


C 


14«2 


5 


2204 


7 


5 2477 
) 2478 


8 


8 


3134 


10 


3:542 


11 


1615 


6 


624 


2 


025 


2 


3a'i9 


10 


2008 


» 


a346 


11 


3133 


10 


3:« 


1 


168 


t 


3341 


11 


622 


2 


1753 


6 


1558 


6 


3043 


10 


ir»59 


6 


89 


1 


1070 


4 


90 


1 


3041 


10 


1443 


5 


3042 


10 


1560 


6 


2277 


8 


3129 


10 


3339 


11 


OIH 


2 


102 


1 


362 


1 


1752 


6 


2476 


8 


361 


1 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXI 



Snbject. 



Report. Vol 



COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS— Continued. 
By Mr. 6toi»»— Continued 

Poland, Margaret, administratrix 

Stewart, John F., heirs of 

William B.Isaacs ^ Co 

By Mr, Sickard34m : 

Ayres, Samuel 

Bazainksy, Henry, administrator 

Bivins, Mrs L 

Blackmau, Luther M 

Brown, Joab 

Claims reported by officers of the Treasury 

Conor, B. B 

Conway, George 

Ervin, William 

Graham, George W 

Griggs, Elizat^th 

Hater, Sebastian 

Hill,^. H., administrator of 

Jarrat r, Gregory, estate of 

Johnson, Hiram, and other? (Part 2) 

Kendrick, John S 

Kenofsky, Martin, heirs of 

McMinnville and Manchester Railroad 

Merrill, Katharine C B., executrix 

Moffitt, Alexander 



Ferine, Sarah E. E J 

Pitzer, Thomas J 

Roby, Henry 

Sbinkle, Josiah 

Stewart, Frances E 

Wasson, Richard F., legal representatives of 

Wheeler, Francis I 

By Mr, SnuilU: 

Bandy, Mart in L ' 

Bart on, Joseph 

Davis, Mark, heirs of 

Dickson, Davidson, ei al < 

Grimes, Melinda 

Hennor, J 

Hosack, Dr. W . 

Hutche«on,W. C 

Moore, Elias B -i 

Phillips, W.C 

Stockst ill, David W I 

Strickland, Jesse H (Part 2) ' 

Weaver, John C , 

Wright, William 

By Mr. Stone: I 

Bloom, A. S I 

Brig^,J.A I 

Frazicr, JoflC i 

Glassie D. W., and Minnie H. and Joseph C. Nash 

Higgins, John M (Part 2) 

Howse, John C, heirs of 

James S. Clark & Co 



Jones, John H., and Thomas D. Harris. 

Lee, A. Gates 

McNeal, E.P..... 

Mobile and Girard Railroad 

Murphy, Dennis 



2761 1 


9 


161 


1 


484 

1 


o 


2259 ' 


4 


1819 , 


G 


3351 


11 


3398 ' 


11 


1444 




1129 


4 


2257 


7 


1626 


6 


1821 


6 


23:l:j 


,4 


2613 


9 


1820 


6 


2*^.'>'"^ 


7 


16^:4 


6 


986 


3 


:{03H 


H> 


3:J() 


1 


3i::o 


10 


304 


1 


1(.27 


6 


2843 


9 


3' KM 


10 


3131 


10 


XGS^'y 


6 


ir)62 


6 


48:. 


') 


23 


1 


3400 


11 


2479 


8 


2842 


9 


1614 


(> 


3333 


11 


2203 


4 


2734 . 


9 


28G0 


10 


12*>3 


4 


668 


•) 


3422 


11 


667 . 


't 


1161 , 


4 


985 , 




1754 


i> 


:M23 


11 


1445 


5 


85 


1 


•22 


I 


191 


1 


3045 


10 


(>00 


•^ 


2.'>16 


8 


2738 


9 


2880 


10 


1564 


6 


86 ; 


1 


183 


1 


15(>3 


6 


:.396 


11 



LXII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 




Vol. 



COMMITTEE ON WAR CLAIMS—Continaed. 
By Mr, S^ona— Continued. 

Man«y, Francis M., estate of 

Pearlman, L.M 

Richardson, Ida, and others 

Shaoklitt, Harriet W 

Wood, Sarah H 

Woodford, Samuel A. B 

COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS— 
By Mr, Cl^ton B. Breckinridge : 

Catholic Church in Lafayette, La 

Immediate transportation of dutiable goods 

Importation and landing of mackerel 

Vinegar made from wine 

Internal revenue officers 

By Mr, W, C. P. Breckinridge : 

Distilled spirits from fruits, reduction of tax on 

Revised Statutes, to amend section 3357 

Revised Statutes, amendment of section 3336 

Tobacco, cigars, and snuff, inspection of 

Tobacco taxes, repeal of 

By Mr. Harris : 

Cigar manufacturers, bonds of 

Distilled spirits, entry of 

Export tobacco manufactories 

Tobacco, patking and selling 

Wine free from internal-revenue tax, fortification for exporta- 
tion of 

By Mr, Hetcitt: 

Lehmann, L - 

Revised Statutes, sec. 3058 

Revised Statutes, amendment of 

Transportation of dutiable goods 

Warehousing and collection of the revenue 

By Mr, Hiscock : 

Saint Luke's Church, Kalamazoo, Mich 

By Mr, Mayhury : 

Mexican treaty of 1883 

By Mr, McMillin : ' 

Bottlers' Protective Association •. . 

Crooke, John J 

Fisher, William 

Minneapolis Industrial Exposition 

Ray, Eliza J 

Wilber, H. Graef & Co 

Morrison, J. D 

By Mr, MilU : 

Hawaiian treaty, notice to terminate 

By Mr, Morrison : 

Distilled spirits 

Distilled spirits, commissions on taxes collected on 

Immediate transportation of dutiable goods, statistics in rela- 
tion to 

Revenue, collection of the 

Revenue taxes .-.* 

Surplus in the United States Treasury, payment of 

Wool, restoration of duties of 1867 

Wool, retaining present rates on 

By Mr, T, B. Reed : 

Hall, Dudley & Co 

Hunt, GeorseS. &Co 

Phinney &. Jackson 



3350 


11 


3349 


11 


!«:{ 


7 


3061 


10 


1446 


5 


1923 


7 


1453 


5 


843 


3 


844 


3 


845 


3 


343 


1 


3154 


11 


2024 


7 


3:^^ 


11 


1352 


5 


1140 


4 


2633 


9 


3210 


11 


2438 


8 


2288 


8 


1141 


4 


2760 


9 


2632 


9 


713 


3 


3066 


19 


16l9i 


6 


2041 


7 


3446 


11 



2287 
2615 



8 



a357 


11 


3444 


11 


3445 


11 


1384 


5 


3443 


11 


2375 


8 


3401 


11 


195 


1 


1759 


6 


100 


1 


2282 


8 


2736 


9 


1620 


6 


3209 


11 


630 


2 


2847 


9 


2848 


9 


32 


1 


30 


1 


31 


1 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXIU 



Subject. 




Select CommiiteeB and Commieaians. 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON ALCOHOLIC LIQUOR TRAFFIC— 
Bjf Mr, Frederick : 

Alcoholic Liqaor Traffic 

8£L£CT COMMITTEE ON AMERICAN SHIP-BUILDING AND 
SHIP-OWNING INTERESTS— 
BgMr,Bli$$: 

Yachts, amending dtatates relative to 

By Mr. Dingley : 

Abolishing certain fees for official servicee 

American ship-baUdiof; and ship-owning interests 

Skeam vessels, inspection of 

Bg Mr, Dunn : 

Caroline Miller, steamship 

Caroline Miller, steamship 

Foreign-bnilt ships, purchase of 

PiloUge (Part 1) 

B$ Mr. Hammond : 

Pilotage (Part 2) 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE ELECTION OF PRESIDENT AND 
VICE-PRESIDENT— 
Bg Mr. D'Mle : 

Amendment to the Constitution creating and defining the office 

of Second Vice-President of the United States 

Meeting of the electors of President and Vice-President (Part 2) . 
Bg Mr. Caldwell: 

Election of President and Vice-President (Part 1 ) 

Election of President and Vice-President (Part 2) 

Meeting of the electors of President and Vice-President, (Part I) 
Bg Mr. Cooper: 

Election of President and Vice President, Part 2 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON EXPENDITURES FOR INDIANS AND 
YELLOWSTONE PARK— 
Bg Mr. Holman : 

Indians and Indian affairs, condition of 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON REFORM IN THE CIVIL SERVICE— 
Bff Mr. Clements: 

Classification of labor and equalization of pay of employes 

Bg Mr. Cox: 

Appropriation to Jeffersonville, Ind. , levee 

Assistant Civil Service examiner 

Classification and compensation of United States civil officers. . 
Bg Mr. Pulitzer: 

Reform in the civil service 

Bg Mr. Storm: 

Amending the Revised Statutes 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON VENTILATION AND ACOUSTICS- 
Bg Mr. SwwnJmme: 

Examination of public buildings, District of Columbia 

SELECT COMMITTEE ON PAN-ELECTRIC TELE PHONE STOCK— 
Bg Mr. Boule: 

Pan-Electric telephoue stock 

COMMISSION ON ORDNANCE AND GUNNERY— 
Bg Mr. Randall: 

Ordnance and war-ships i 

COMMISSION ON SIGNAL SERVICE, GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 
COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY. AND THE HYDRO- 
GRAPHIC OFFICE OF THE NAVY DEPARTMENT— 
Bg Mr. Herbert : 

Geological Survey, work and publications of the 

Bg Mr. Lowrg : 

Geological, Coast and G^eodetic Survey, &c , printing for 



Vol. 



2281 



1637 

3035 

175 

3141 

670 

311 

1332 

838 

838 



24d3 
1638 

26 
2493 
1638 

26 



1076 

1636 

2337 
1133 
1303 

1001 

1830 

990 

3142 

1450 



2214 
2740 



6 

10 

1 

10 

2 
1 
5 
3 



8 
6 

1 

8 
6 



6 

8 
4 
5 

3 

G 



10 



7 
9 



SUBJECT INDEX. 



INDEX TO THE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



A. 

Abbott, WilliamN 

Abear, Lonis 

Abingdon, Ya., poblic baHding at 

Abolishing certain fees for official services , 

Abraham Lincoln, monument to 

Act of Jane, 1844 

Acuff, William D , 

Adams, John 

Adams, J. Harry 

Adams, Joseph H 

Adams, Lemuel 

Adams, Mary H '. , 

Adams, O.F , 

Adams, Peter 

Adamson, F. W 

Adis Israil Hebrew Association, D. C 

Adkinson, D. O * 

Adley, Mrs. Ruth - 

Adulteration of food (Part 2) 

Do. (Parti) 

Agricultural experimental stations 

Agriculture, promotion of 

Ahr, Michael, Sisson,and Hill 

Akron, Ohio, public building at 

Alabama, mineral lands in , 

judge for the southern district of 

and Chattanooga Railroad Company, grant of land to 

claims, court ot commissioner of 

Alanco Cement Company, of San Antonio, Tex 

Alaska 

homestead laws in • 

reconnaissance 

Alcoholic liquor traffic 

Alexander, William J , 

Alfers, Mrs. B 

Alford, Miss Lina , 

Altrey,A. H 

Al^er, Charlotte 

Aliens, as engineers 

owning lands in the United States 

Allcock, Thomas 

Allen, Albert 

Allen, Rebecca.... 

Allin, Erskine S., heirs of 

Amann, Kate 

Ambler, Almira 

American Board of Commissioners of Foreign Missions 

Amencan College for the Blind 

7149— H. Rep v 



Report. 



Vol. 



2542 


8 


254 


1 


2745 


9 


3055 


10 


3053 


10 


537 


2 


1738 


6 


2262 


7 


1882 


6 


3263 


11 


1373 


5 


1974 


7 


3339 


11 


2083 


7 


2187 


7 


1732 


6 


1864 


6 


2453 


8 


1880 


6 


1880 


6 


848 


3 


871 


3 


3364 


11 


1687 


6 


865 


3 


194 


1 


3404 


11 


2443 


8 


945 


3 


1290 


5 


3060 


10 


3232 


11 


1960 


7 


2281 


8 


487 


2 


415 


2 


1766 


6 


2656 


9 


1272 


4 


106 


1 


1951 


7 


1287 


5 


416 


2 


1714 


6 


1814 


6 


401 


2 


3074 


10 


3076 


10 


2612 


9 


872 


3 



Ixv 



LXVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Report. Vol. 



American commerce and arbitration , 

American customs union 

American exhibition in London in May, 1886 

American Grocer Association 

American ship-building and ship-owning interests 

AmmoDs, RufusG 

Anatomical science and prevention of desecration of graves. 

Ancrum, Mrs. Sallie 

Anderson, Capt. Allen L : 

Anderson, Holmau 

Anderson, James 

Anderson, Lucy E 

Anderson , Mary 

Anderson, Mary 

Anderson, Missouri 

Anderson, Robert H 

Anderson, Samuel , 

Anderson, William 

Andrews, William W 

Anin, Henry.. 

Annapolis and Baltimore Short-Line Railroad Company 

Annapolis, Md., public building at 

Annis, Ann 

Antes, William 

Anthony, Charles H 

A pperly, William 

Applegate, William P 

Appropriation for Department of Agriculture 

Aqueduct Bridge 

Arbitration 

Archer, Mrs. Mary Ringold 

Arizona, courts in 

diseased cattle in 

Arkansas, Eastern District of 

Arkansas, New Mexico and Pacific Railroad Company 

Arlington estate 

Armbrecht, Louise 

Armbrnst, John D. M 

Armentrou t, J.J 

Arms for the States ^ 

Arms and equipments for the militia 

Armstrong, Joshua 

Armstrong, Mrs. Willie 

Armstrong, William C * 

Armyi clerks and messengers 

efficiency of the 

Medical Department of the 

restoration of officers to the 

appropriation bill 

officers, rank of, in Indian campaigns 

record of 

to correct record of 

Axner, Philip 

Arnold, George L 

Arnold, Seymour F 

V Artesian wells 

in New Mexico 

Arthinj^n, Susannah 

Artificial limbs, renewal of 

Arthur, Chester A., and William H. Robertson 

Arthur, John 

Asheville, N. C, public building at 



Ashnelot, sufferers by the wreck of 

Askew, Thomas 

Askie, Isaac 



1648 


6 


1645 


6 


377 


2 


1811 


6 


175 


1 


2251 


7 


873 


3 


1792 


6 


3167 


11 


1846 


6 


1587 


T) 


3-255 


11 


2056 , 




3430 


11 


2956 


10 


841 


3 


2994 


10 


2609 


9 


122 


1 


674 


2 


2742 


9 


573 


2 


2242 


4 


1210 


4 


1774 


6 


1061 


4 


1604 


6 


1451 


5 


2300 


8 


1447 


5 


145 


1 


1478 


5 


2335 


8 


1391 


5 


2582 


9 


3407 


11 


3120 


10 


2170 


7 


3312 


11 


2574 


8 


1267 


4 


2593 


9 


1584 





1964 


7 


1947 


7 


1468 


5 


2883 


10 


189 


1 


862 


3 


1967 


4 


1847 


6 


1844 


6 


1496 


5 


1365 


5 


1569 


6 


1479 


5 


1092 


4 


2971 


10 


499 


2 


2711 


9 


V36S 


5 


391 


2 


824 


3 


3128 


10 


247 


1 


2d34 


9 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXVII 



Sabject. 



ABBiBtant civil-service examiDer 

AnifttAnt Commissioner of Indian Aflfairs 

Assistant Secretary of War 

AssiBtAnt Treasnrer, duties of 

Astoria and Winnemucca Railroad Company 

Astronomical and meteorological observations 

Atchison, John H 

Atchison, Kans., public building at 

Atlantic and Pacific Railroad Company to forfeit land grant, &,c 

Atlantic and Pacific Ship Railway Company (Part 1) 

Do • (Part 2) 

Atlantic Works 

Attach^ of foreign legations 

Attala, county of, Mississippi 

Augusta, Ga., public building at 

Austin, Lorenso D 

Ayer, Zeba S .^. 

Ayers, Edward *. 

Ayers, Lewis W 




Ayres, Alvin A 

Ayresy Henry 

Ayres, James H 

Aym, Samuel 

Azpell, Assistant Surgeon Thomas F 

B. 



Babb, John H 

Babb, Josie H 

Habson, Emeline J 

Bacon, James H 

Bacon, James M 

Badges of personal distinction 

Bagiey, Annie 

Bagley, David W 

Bagiey, Mary 

Bailey, Mrs. C. A 

Bailey, E. B 

Bailey, John R 

Bailev, William F. D 

Bailiff, Silas D 

Banister, James 

Baird,JohnF 

Baker, EmilyB 

Baker, Jacob 

Baker, Newton A 

Baker, Samuel 

Baker, William B 

Balcb, Quincy A 

Baldwin, George W., Charles L. and Dora Thompson. 

Baldwin, Silas D 

Ballard, August W 

Ballard Pavement Company 

Ballinger, Henry G 

Baltimore, claim of city of, and certain States 1. 

Bangham, Eleanor C , 

Bangs, Brownweil «&Co 

Bankruptcy, uniform system of 

Baptist Church of Crab Orchard, Ky 

Baptist Female College, Lexington, Mo 

Barber, C 

Barber, Elizabeth 

Barden, William 

Barge Michigan 



Vol. 



iLTa 


4 


1763 


6 


928 


3 


387 


2 


2025 


*• 
t 


837 


3 


58:3 


2 


2851 


9 


193 


I 


717 


li 


717 


:\ 


3424 


11 


3145 


11 


2714 


9 


1262 


4 


242 


1 


695 


2 


2053 


7 


422 


2 


3370 


11 


3371 


11 


2275 


8 


1005 


3 


2259 


7 


1858 


6 


1407 


5 


1585 


6 


1973 


7 


910 


3 


308 


1 


533 


2 


1526 


5 


1790 


6 


1021 


3 


212.-i 


7 


2712 


9 


2218 


7 


1045 


4 


3376 


11 


3193 


11 


916 


3 


2267 


8 


2352 


8 


1:38 


1 


944 


3 


2658 


9 


3298 


11 


565 


2 


2862 


10 


2786 


9 


1552 


6 


1779 


6 


519 


2 


70 


1 


618 


2 


1144 


4 


1142 


4 


757 


:3 


3135 


10 


1934 


7 


2050 


7 


2796 


9 


1138 


4 



LXVIII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sabject. 




Barker, William J 

Barker, William, and others 

Barlow, George 

Barnes, Frederick B 

Barnes, Rachel 

Barnes, William B 

Bams, George W 

Bametf, Nicnolas W 

Barr, Henry 

Barr, Sarah 

Barrett, George 

Barrett, Lucinda 

Barringer, Martin 

Barron, S 

Barry, John H 

Barry, Mrs. Susan E 

Bartholomew, Betsy 

Barton, Henry 

Barton, SethM 

Barton, Thomas G 

Bassett, Sarah E < 

Bates, Elizabeth 

Bates, James A 

BatdorflF, Daniel 

Battee, A. H 

Battorf, Nancy 

Baumhager, Herman j 

Baumau, Frederick 

Bayless, Lott S ^- 

Baylor, James R 

Bayou Teche 

Bazsiuksy, Henry, administrator -. . 

Beacon lights on islands in Moosehead Lake, Maine 

Beaman, John W., and B. F. Scribner 

Beard, Robert 

Beauboucher, Victor 

Beck. William H 

Beckley, R. D., and Leon Howard 

Beechner, Ernest 

Beeler, Sophia 

Beezeley, Louisa C 

Beisinger, Catharine 

Belden, Dr. 0. 8 

Belden, Polly 

Belding, H.K... 

Belfast, Me., extension of public building at 

Bell and Pan-Electric Telephone Companies 

BeU, Elizabeths 

Bell, Francis M 

Bellair, First National Bank of 

Bellion, Henry 

Benefield, Hiram A 

Benham, Mrs. E.A 

Bennett, J. W 

Bennett, Robert K 

Benson, John 

Bent, Abbott B. J 

Bent, Sally B 

Benton, Catharine L 

Bernhart, Catharine 

Berry, Eliza E 

Berry, Henry 

Berry, James R 



VoL 



2061 
2861 
1965 
2232 
2572 
3094 
1436 
59 

88*3 

2502 

53 

2954 

959 
3408 

322 
3240 
1996 
3272 
2339 

328 
1972 

483 
3171 
2660 
3309 
1768 
2782 

752 
1239 
2426 
2417 
2378 
1819 

635 

2701 

1211 

28 

2090 

598 
1182 
2162 
1692 
2265 
3138 

801 
1551 
3102 

392 

521 
1336 

828 

180 
2461 
3377 

933 

412 
2520 

241 

894 
1796 
2544 

440 
2503 
1716 
1746 
2893 



7 
10 
7 
7 
8 

la 
f. 
I 

3 

8 
1 

10 
3 

II 
1 

II 
7 

11 
8 
1 
7 
2 

II 
9 

11 
6 
9 
3 
4 
b 
8 
8 
6 
2 
9 
4 
1 

4 

2 
4 
7 
6 
8 

10 
3 
6 

10 
2 
2 
5 
3 
1 
8 

11 
3 
2 
8 
1 
3 
6 
8 
2 
8 
6 
6 

10 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXIX 



Subject. 



Bethuren, William • 

Betterton, Lee L 

Bickerdike, Mrs. M. A 

Bickerdyke, Mary A 

Bickford, John N 

Biddle, Jacob S 

BUUiigs, Andrew W 

Billings, Kennedy G 

Bills of lading 

Binding Censns schedolea 

Bineman, Daniel J 

Bird, Ann 

Birmingham, Ala., public building at 

Bimey, Antoinette 

Bishop, William 

Bivins, Mrs. L 

Bixby, Sophia F 

BlacK, Daniel 

Black, Mary F 

BUck, Mary M 

Black, Thomas, heirs of 

Blackburn, Hester V 

Blackman, Luther M 

Blackwell, Mary A 

Blair, Charles K 

Blake, Charles E 

Blake, Charles M 

Blake, John W *. 

Blake, Margaret A 

Blake, Mary F 

Blake, William H 

Blakely, Nathanel H 

Blanchard, William 

Bliss, George 

Blood, Col. James H.... •. 

Bloom, A. S 

Board of Foreign Missions^ Methodist Church , 

Boggs, Ellen M , 

Boice, Samuel 

BoUes, Charles E....: , 

Bollinger, H. G 

Bollman, Henry , 

Bolton, Caroline P 

Bond, William E 

Bone, Capt. James H 

Bonds, Columbia County, Washington Territory, to issue 

Bonds of executors in the District of Columbia , 



Bonsack, James Albert 

Book-making and pool-selling in the District of Columbia 

Boon, Clark 

Boone, William 

Bossert, Henry M 

Bostin, Joseph 

Bottjer, Frederick 

Bottlers of the District of Columbia 

Bottlers' Protective Association 

Boucher, Minnie C 

Boulter, Sarah E 

Bontwell, Daniel W 

Bowers, Charles F 

Bowles, Thomas 

Bowling, Samuel W 

Bowman, W.H.C 



Boxes deposited in the Treasory Department. 
Bojoe^ James B , 



Report. 


Vol, 


2399 


8 


2874 


10 


9 


1 


1038 


4 


2687 


9 


2626 


9 


1571 


6 


2323 


8 


901 


3 


2206 


7 


2005 


7 


1519 


5 


3359 


11 


1712 


6 


1804 


6 


3351 


11 


1030 


4 


3439 


11 


2482 


8 


2526 


8 


1753 


6 


2998 


10 


3398 


11 


1826 


6 


3322 


11 


2263 


7 


1181 


4 


1747 


6 


447 


2 


2308 


8 


118 


1 


3G0 


1 


1421 


5 


2730 


9 


2939 


10 


aj 


1 


2697 


9 


3144 


11 


1047 


4 


1031 


4 


3086 


10 


1743 


6 


2920 


10 


1544 


6 


3227 


11 


1323 


5 


5 1629 


6 


) 2645 


9 


900 


3 


1630 


6 


2123 


ft 

4 


771 


3 


2659 


9 


3004 


10 


116 


1 


987 


3 


3357 


11 


3016 


10 


3261 


11 


1426 


5 


2332 


8 


1676 


6 


1590 


6 


126 


1 


5 1250 
) 1558 


4 


6 


3079 


10 



LXX 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sobject. 




Boyd, Eliza 

Boydston, Elizabeth 

Bradley, Sally Ann 

Bradshaw, John Joseph 

Brady, Mary 

Bragg, Sarah L 

Brainard, David L., and others 

Branch, Dudley B 

Brank, J. Washington 

Branson, Nathan 

Brant, George W 

Brary, Nathaniel 

Breinniss, Reinhart, and others 

Brennan, Catherine 

Brenninger, Jacob 

Brentano, William 

Brice, James 

Bridge at Atchison. Kans 

Council Bluffs, Iowa 

near Dubuque, Iowa 

at Kansas City, Mo 

Kiethsburg 

Memphis 

Saint Joseph 

in Washington Territory 

at Winona, Minn \ 

over navigable rivers 

Bayon Barnard, Mississippi 

across Coosa River 



the Cumberland, Tenn 

Des Moines and Illinois Rivers 

Detroit River '. . 

Kansas River 

Lake Champlain 

over the Menomonee 



Missouri River 



across tbe Missouri River in Montana .. . 

over the Missouri at Nebraska City 

Missouri River at Pierre, Dak . , 

Mississippi River 

Mississippi River near Alton, 111 

the Mississippi River at Saiut Louis 

Ohio River 

Ohio River near Cairo 

across the Ohio at Paducah, Ky , 

Eastern Branch Potomac River ... 



1 

I 



Red River, Louisiana 

across Saint Augustine and Lafayette Creeks, Georgia 

across Saint Croix River 

over Saint Louis River 

across Saint Marie River 



\s 

1 



Staton Island Sound 



Tennessee River at Cbattanooga. 
over Tennessee River at Sheffield, Ala.. 

across West Pascagoula River 

over Willamette River 



Vol. 



2814 


9 


3269 


11 


778 


3 


3420 


11 


2784 


9 


2945 


10 


140 


1 


1125 


4 


3432 


11 


2055 


7 


1242 


4 


961 


3 


2142 


7 


3268 


11 


160 


1 


3378 


11 


1913 


7 


2666 


9 


2173 


7 


1457 


5 


1354 


5 


24H5 


8 


1456 


5 


763 


3 


3225 


11 


1353 


5 


2442 


8 


1309 


5 


1308 


5 


1079 


4 


10H2 


4 


372 


1 


3220 


11 


8G3 


3 


523 


2 


1393 


5 


2441 


8 


2440 


8 


1392 


5 


1394 


5 


1395 


5 


1617 


(> 


2911 


10 


3403 


11 


1567 


G 


522 


2 


1398 


5 


1307 


5 


2341 


8 


1878 


6 


3111 


10 


764 


3 


3il9 


11 


2703 


9 


1080 


4 


lOt^l 


4 


:wi8 


11 


2439 


8 


1232 


4 


3469 


n. 


3110 


10 


527 


2 


2.-»73 


8 


2724 


9 


2912 


10 


2913 


10 


3062 


10 



INDEX TO HOUSE BEPOBTS. 



LXXI 



Subject. 



Bridges over WiscoDsiD, Chippewa, and Saint Croix Bivers 
Bridge across Yellowstone Biver 

Young's Bay, Oregon 

Bridge-s, Elizabeth 

Bridges, John 8 , 

Bridges, William, jr 

Briggs, J. A 

Brinegar, John P , 

Broaddns, Mrs. P. E 

Brockett, Thomas 

Bromaghin, Angeline 

Brookbanks, Eleanor T., and others 

Brooke, William E 

Brooklyn, N. Y., land for public bnUding in 

public building at 

Brooks, Henry 

Brooks, Sarah 

Brook^re, Koah B 

Brott, GeorgeF 

BrowDy Joab 

Brown, Lizzie 

Brown, Mahala 

Brown, Nancy B 

Brown, Bobert 

Brown, Samuel J 

Brown, Thomas 

Brown, William * 

Bruce, John L 

Brunner, Dr. J. F 

Bryant, Samuel E 

Bryson, Mary Ann 

Buchanan, John 

Buck, Charlotte 

Buck, William G 

Buck, William H.H 

Bulkley, MabelleB 

Bull, Norman S 

Bullock, Isabella 

BulmaUf Samuel , 

Bundy, Martin L 

Bunker, G.W 

Bunker, Isaiah W 

Burbank, Abby L 

Bnrch, Joseph W 

Burchard, Jaboz 

Bureau of Animal Industry (Part 1) 

Bureau of Animal Industry (Part 2) , 

Bureau of Ethnology, annual bulletins of 

Bureau of Mines and Mining, establishment of 

Burke, Orville 

Burkett, Mary 

Burkhart, Capt. John 

Burki, Elise 

Burnett, Hattie 

Bums, Henriette 

Bnrrcll, Samuel , 

Burrill, Andrew J 

Burrill, John G — . 

Burritt, Loren 

Burroughs, Frank J 

Burton, Joseph , 

Burton, Dr. W. Leigh 

Burtz, Ambrose 



Bei>ort. 


Vol. 


766 


3 


1397 


5 


5 1466 
> 2555 


5 


8 


2454 


8 


2322 


8 


608 


2 


22 


1 


575 


2 


65 


1 


135 


1 


248 


1 


602 


2 


2751 


9 


3418 


11 


3418 


2-11 


1531 


5 


1744 


6 


610 


2 


2702 


9 


1444 


5 


3258 


11 


2966 


10 


1715 


6 


306 


1 


1286 


5 


2418 


8 


2353 


8 


2088 


7 


52 


1 


1717 


6 


1922 


7 


2588 


9 


1055 


4 


1594 


6 


2129 


7 


1034 


4 


257 


I 


2989 


10 


2551 


8 


2842 


9 


1936 


7 


1745 


6 


( 461 
\ 2459 


2 


8 


445 


2 


$ 975 
) 2472 


3 


8 


1234 


4 


1234 


4 


1330 


5 


1881 


6 


3165 


11 


822 


3 


1555 


6 


2000 


7 


2151 


7 


2405 


8 


1845 


6 


2823 


9 


1343 


5 


2019 


7 


3:^26 


11 


1614 


6 


1570 


6 


425 


2 



nrpEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Sabject. 



7* -.. j*.-*-i 

.... . V ^ 

1, V .^^^^ 

V v»-.^* ■v*.^^* «•«• •»•• ■«•«>• •••••• •■••■• assa •>■• *•>•** *a ••«• 

c. 

>v, ^..^iv^Ci, Joitltt F. ..--.---- 

<■ •. "^iLK^ ..««.••••••••••••.•..•.....••.•••......•... ...... ...... 

-, . . Nc«vcou...... ^ 

,. ., OhvuIB 

. .w:,J.H.R 

^ V. KjxUiik olection oases 

judicial district of ....^ 

uiiD«raIlands in 

Stateof 

State University of 

^:tl 1101 Ilia and Oregon Railroad forfeitnre of lands granted to 

CjCkiua, Newton A 

C.^Dauan^ Margaret 

CHllaiian» Patnck A 

OHliisoQ, Claibom 

Callum, Andrew S 

Cauideu, N. J., public building at 

Campbell, Charles H 

Campbell, Charles L 

Campbell, Eli W 

Campbell, George H 

Campbell, Jesse 

Campbell, JohnM 

Campbell, Philip D 

Campbell, Phcebe 

Campbell, Washington G 

Campbell, William M 

Campbell, William S 

Campbell V. Weaver 

Canady, William N 

Candee, MaJ. G. W 

Cannon, William 

Cannon for cemetery at Eaton, Ohio 

Canode, Henry 

Cax>ehart, Col. Charles E 

Carey, AbigailH 

Carey, Arnold 

Carleton, Isaac 

Carleton, William P 

Carlin, Bernard 

CarliD, James 

Carll, MaryB 



Report. 



3282 
2371 
3178 
1593 
2081 
33 
271 
2133 
2307 
1798 
1770 
1375 
1895 
2354 
1909 
3161 
1035 



Vol. 



I 



1 



1874 
2895 

454 
3304 
3385 
29.S7 
2338 

313 

870 
l'29f^ 
18t)3 

930 

931 
2152 

429 
20(58 
3'i73 
2:i.'5 
:i381 
3183 
1849 
64 
1602 

316 
2663 
2180 
10 
2598 
2201 
2992 
2109 
1622 
2231 

827 

582 
2766 
3:587 
2887 
1370 
1719 
1098 
1776 
60 
2684 

341 



11 

8 
11 
6 
7 
1 
1 
7 
8 
6 
6 
5 
7 
8 
7 
11 
4 



6 

10 

2 

11 

11 

10 

8 

1 

3 

5 

6 

3 

3 

2 

4 
11 

8 
11 
11 
6 
1 
6 
1 

9 

#^ 

1 
9 
7 
10 
7 
6 
7 
3 
2 
9 
11 
10 
5 
6 
4 
6 
1 
9 
1 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXIII 



Sabject. 



Carmaiii Mrs. Fannie 

Carmichaely Sasannah 

Camahan, Abigail 

Caroline Miller, steamship 

Carpenter, Anson G • 

Carpenter, Fendall 

Carpenter, Samuel £ 

Carpenter, Thomas H 

Carr, Jane 

Carr, Letitia 

Carr, Mary 

Carr, Mary M 

Carrick, Robert 

Carrol, James P 

Carroll, James 

Carroll, Lysander H 

Carroll, Sarah M 

Carroll ton aad Lock No. 1 Turnpike Road Company 

Carter, James R 

Carter, Robert - 

Cartin, Henry I 

Carty, Denis 

Cary, Thomas 

Case, Jacob 

Casey, Lewis F 

Casey, Mary E 

Cashin, Mrs. Margaret 

Caskey, Alexander 

Caskey, James T 

Caaseav, George A 

Casteef, Mrs. Sarah 

Caswell, Margaret A 

Catholic church at Chattanooga, Tenn 

church in La Fayette,La 

clergymen of Maryland 

Cavalry and infantry, school of instruction for 

Cellar, Rachel Fleming 

Chaddock, Alonzo A 

Chains and anchors, testing of 

Chalfant, Joseph 

Chalmette, La., national cemetery road 

Chamberlain, Jabez 

Chamberlin, John F 

Chambers, George 

Chambers, Green 

Chambers, Sophia 

Chambers, Thomas 

Chambers & Brown , 

Chambliss, William P 

Chance, owners of British bark 

Chandler, Mrs. Ellen M 

Chandler, James C 

Chandler, Larkin 

Chapman, Alice 

Chapman, Elizabeth , 

Chapman, Mrs. Hannah M 

Charleston, W. Va., public building at i 

Chase, Charles A 

Chase, John F 

Chattanooga, Tenn., United States ground in 

public building at 

Chaves, Ignacio, and others 



Report. 



32c9 


11 


324 


1 


1596 


6 


5 670 
) 311 


2 


1 


2594 


9 


1897 


7 


1222 


4 


3190 


11 


2315 


8 


2602 


9 


2455 


8 


2597 


9 


3168 


11 


3047 


10 


698 


2 


478 


2 


2309 


8 


1481 


5 


1872 


6 


626 


2 


2016 


7 


696 


2 


2245 


7 


2585 


9 


2035 


7 


1075 


4 


3386 


11 


754 


3 


952 


3 


2228 


7 


1702 


6 


463 


2 


1224 


4 


14,'>3 


5 


3043 


10 


1948 


7 


2458 


8 


2981 


10 


2845 


9 


753 


3 


345 


1 


133 


1 


3436 


11 


1750 


6 


1925 


7 


2603 


9 


2014 


7 


2175 


7 


44 


1 


5 1431 
) 3025 


5 


10 


355 


1 


2052 


7 


2512 


8 


2261 


7 


3307 


11 


225 


1 


644 
5 1197 


2 
4 


> 2672 


9 


5 275 


1 


) 1532 


5 


1358 


5 


1324 


5 


186 


1 



.VoL 



LXXIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Cheatham, William A. and Adelicia 

Cheney, Fidelia A 

Cheuoweth, Isaac 

Chennily, Mary E 

Cherokee IndiaDS, eastern and western bands of. 

Reservation, Arkansas 

CheyennCj Wyo 

Chicago, market value of property in 



custom-house, employes in 

Chickering, John W , 

Chinese restriction 

subjects, indemnity to 

Choate, Hiram K 

Christian Brothers* College, of Saint Louis 

Christian. William E 

Christie, \Villiam 

Chronister, Lewis..-. 

Church, William 

Cigar manufacturers, bonds of 

Cinnabar and Clark's Fork Railroad Company .. 

Cissell, Nirius 

Cisson, J. F 

Citizens* National Bank of Louisville, Ky 

Civil and criminal process in ludian reservatious 
Claims, limiting payment of , 

reported by officers of the Treasury 

Claim agents, fees of 

Clancy, Joseph 

Clancy, Michael 

Clapp, Emma L 

Clark, Mrs. Anna M , 

Clark, Daniel B 

Clark, Davids 

Clark, Eunice E 

Clark, John C 

Clark, John D 

Clark, Livingston ...! 

Clark, Marion 

Clark, Phila 

Clark, SilasH 

Clark, WilliamL 



Clarke, James S., & Co 



Clarke, Mrs. Lizzie D 

Clarke, Robert, «fe Co , 

ClarksburfT, W. Va., public bnildinc: at 

Classification and compensation of United States civil oflBcers. 

of labor and equalizatiou of pay of employ<58 

Clay, M. S '. 

Clee ve, Robert H 

Clerks for members 

Clifford, James 

Cliffc, William 

Clune, Elizabeth 

Cluue, Mr8. Margaret R 

Coan, John A 

Coburn, Harvey 

Cochran, Margaret E 

Cockrqm, Albertine 

Coffee, Margaret 

Coffin, Catherine E 

Cogswell, Anna M 




Vol. 



1009 
551 
115 
964 
5:^9 

1004 

l»s:? 

970 

3184 
2043 
2044 
197H 
33:V2 
1251 

653 
2483 
3254 
2438 

072 
2948 

926 

716 
1390 

197 

21 

1129 

6:52 
1408 
2872 
1341 
2356 
19 
1046 
15.39 



3 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
6 
3 
8 
8 
11 
7 
/ 

/ 
11 

4 
2 
8 

11 
8 
2 

10 
3 
3 
5 
1 
1 
4 
2 
5 

10 
5 
8 
1 
4 



51 


1 


260 


1 


2934 


10 


(i57 


2 


2937 


10 


1074 


4 


1970 


7 


27:58 


9 


2N?0 


10 


198 


1 


1128 


4 


1903 


7 


1094 


4 


1303 


i> 


1636 


e 


557 


2 


162 


1 


364 


1 


472 




Mi* 


92 


1 


16() 


1 


1193 


4 


25:58 


8 


88 


1 


2:510 


8 


6K5 


2 


128 


1 


10:5:5 


4 


2113 


7 


3036 


10 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXV 



Subject. 



Report. Vol. 



Cohn, Henry S 

Colbatb, ^frs. Margaret. 

Colby,Mary G 

Cole, Clement H 



Cole, Henrietta H 

Coleman, Edward 

Collection districts of Miami and Sandusky, Ohio 

Collet, Anderson 

Collins, Catherine 

Collins, Mrs. Elizabeth 

Collins, Fanny 

Collins, Geriah 

Collins, William 

Colorado, terms of court in 

arms account of 

Columbia Bank, of Columbia, Pa. 



Columbus, La Fayette, and Gartield, statues of 

ColviUe, James W 

Commercial intercourse, freedom of 

Commercial National Bank, of Marsballtown, loWa 

Commercial relations between United States and Mexico, Central 

and South America... 

Commissioner of Agriculture, report from 

Commissioner of Education, report of 

Commission of experts on test of metals 

Committees entitled to clerks.... 

Common schools 

Compilation of reports 

Comstock, Abel w 

Comstock, George S 

Condemned cannon (woCannon) 

donation of 

to G. A. R. at Avoca, Iowa 

Condon, William 

Confirmation of private land claims 

Congressional Library building 

Congressional Record, copies of 

Conlkn, Francis J 

Connelly, Julia 

Conner,* Nancy 

Conner. William 

Connolly, Daniel 

Conor, B. B 

Conrad, Ebenezer J., et al 

Conrad, Mary Jane : 

Consolidating Bureaus of Navy Department 

Constitution, amendment to the 

creating and defining the office of Sec- 
ond Vice-President of the United 

States 

ConBtmction of bridge by Nashville, Jackson and Memphis Railroad . 

naval dry docks 

public buildings 

Consular fees, limiting exaction of 

service 

Consuls, repoits of ^ 

Contagious and infectious diseases 

Contested elections 

Contract prison labor 

Convict and alien labor 

labor .».. 

Conway, Mrs. Fanny S 



685 


2 


982 


3 


1699 


6 


288 


1 


2866 


10 


517 


2 


3237 


11 


2628 


9 


1084 


4 


423 


2 


()9 


1 


2136 


7 


349 


I 


2098 


7 


2171 


7 


571 


2 


3230 


11 


335 


1 


3054 


10 


805 


3 


3361 


11 


3411 


11 


1647 


6. 


3413 


11 


16:J5 


6 


508 


2 


5 


1 


1993 


7 


3362 


11 


2121 


7 


3194 


11 


1661 


6 


1662 


6 


492 


2 


3379 


11 


277 


1 


1314 


5 


173 


1 


942 


3 


ia-)4 


6 


1273 


4 


2481 


8 


2419 


8 


109 


1 


2257 


7 


2197 


7 


786 


3 


1401 


5 


1879 


6 


2493 


8 


6:J4 


2 


22U8 


7 


1757 


6 


376 


2 


1938 


7 


2849 


9 


1230 


4 


1335 


5 


217 


1 


369 


1 


1359 


5 


299 


1 



LXXVl 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Conway, George 

Con well, Mrs. Ann J - 

Cook, Holden 

Cooley, EliW 

Cooley, Orin P - 

Coon, Tobias M 

Cooney, Ann E 

Cooney, Betsey 

Cooney, James 

Cooney, Mrs. Lizzie E 

Corbitt, Mary 

Corcoran, Ellen 

Corcoran Gallery of Art 

Corning, Edward • 

Coronna, Taussig &, Co. and others 

Corzatt, Silas : 

Cosby, John G , 

Cott, Christopher 

Cotton, James D 

Cotton, T.W 

Conglin, James • 

Coughlin, John J 

Coughlin, Martin 

Court of Claims, to hear and determine certain claims 

cases in 

jurisdiction of 

right of action in.-. 

Cousins, George W 

Covey, Leander W 

Cowan, Ann 

Cowan, James H 

Co wens, James P 

Cox, George W 

Crab Island, monument at 

Cramblitt, George W.-.- 

Cramer, Jacob, heirs of 

Cramer, Noah S 

Cranston, S. B 

Craven, Commander T. A. M., widow of^ 

Cravens, Joseph R 

Crawford, Emeline 

Crawford, Isaac 1 

Crawford, James S 

Crawford, Thomas 

Creech, Clevlin C 

Creecy, Charles E 

Criminal cases, simplifying 

proceedings 

Crimmins, Mary E 

Crocker, Charlotte D 

Crooke, John J 

Crouch, M. V 

Crosby, Mary C 

Cronk, Sarah M 

Cronkhite, Lewis A 

Crowder, Robert P 

Crowley, Elizabeth 

Crounse, A 

Croys. David... , 

Crumbo &> MilcHer 

Crymble, Ellen , 




Vol. 



1626 

458 

13 

3246 

2959 

548 
1505 
3257 

917 

224 
2925 
2297 
3049 
2314 
3018 
2473 
1541 
3028 
2220 
1707 
1910 
1911 
2873 
1818 
1930 
2858 

660 

562 
2383 
1642 
1838 
1117 
1732 
1255 
1183 
1592 
3355 
1102 

603 
3096 

867 
2117 
1017 

679 
3115 
3328 

922 
3012 
1986 
3410 
2384 

631 
2449 
6S 
3445 
3444 
1062 
2i>65 
1427 
2958 

455 

898 
2537 
2224 
3024 

795 



6 

2 

1 

11 

10 

2 

5 
11 

3 

1 
10 

8 
10 

8 
10 

8 

5 
10 

7 

6 

7 

7 
10 

6 

7 
10 

2* 

2 

8 

6 

6 

4 

6 

4 

4 

6 
11 

4 

3 
10 

3 

7 

3 

2 
10 
11 

3 
10 

7 
11 

6 

2 

8 

1 
11 
11 

4 

8 

5 
10 

2 

3 

8 

7 
10 

3 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXVII 



Snbject. 



Cnlbertson, Joseph 1 

Collen, Bridget M 

Cullen, James F 

Culver, Mrs. Catharine P 

Conniiighaniy Albert P 

CmmiDgham, James 

Canningham, Maria 

Cuiry, Martin V... 

Cartin, Patrick 

Catler, George W...* 

D. 

Dagley, Stokeley D 

Daney, Nicholas 

Dairy Prodncts, illegal sale of , 

Dakota, admission of 

admission of southern half 

a bill dividing 

reform school in 

land districts in 

ordnance account with 

Dallas, Tex., public building at 

DaUy, Michael 

Dalzell, James E. B 

Dane, Rhoda 

Danner, Samuel W 

Danville, Va., cemetery at 

Darling, James H 

Darling, John A 

Davidson, Charles 

Davidson, Clara B..; 

Davis, Jefferson 

Davis, John P 

Davis, Mrs. J. E 

Davis, John P. Y 

Davis, Louis 

Davis, Mark, heirs of 

Davis, Nathaniel W 

Davis, Dr. Samuel 

Pavis, Solomon 

Davis, William B 

Davis, W.C 

Dawson, £. B « • 

Day, Newton 

Dayton, Ohio, public building at 

DeAhna, Henry C 

Dem, John A 

Deceased Kickai>oo Indians in Kansas 

Decker, Ellen 1 

Decker, Elmer 

Dederick, Peter K 

Decry, William H 

Defenbaugh, John 

Deficiency bill 

Deficienc.v for printing, pensions, and pay of the Army 

De Krafft, Elizabeth S 

Delane, James 

DeLeon, Agnes and Maria 

De Loach, Claiborne, heirs of 

Delozier, Terrence 

Delp, John W t 

Delph, Larkin 



Report. 



1823 


6 


5 582 
I 1282 


2 


5 


2991 


10 


868 


3 


1168 


4 


2217 


7 


1919 


7 


3099 


10 


2305 


8 


2421 


8 


1736 


6 


J 163 


4 


2028 


7 


2577 


8 


2578 


9 


5 2579 
) 2580 


9 


9 


2039 


7 


707 


2 


2291 


8 


511 


2 


2072 


7 


1367 


5 


7 


1 


2963 


10 


3:J80 


11 


1904 


• 7 


453 


2 


1177 


4 


2943 


10 


3196 


11 


16 


1 


2003 


7 


381 


2 


1363 


5 


3333 


11 


294 


1 


3132 


10 


2892 


10 


3013 


10 


1115 


4 


1326 


5 


737 


3 


966 


3 


1902 


7 


648 


2 


663 


2 


1800 


6 


1806 


6 


1095 


4 


1721 


6 


67 


1 


} 3109 
< 3447 


10 


11 


24H6 


8 


2571 


8 


1042 


4 


1559 


6 


3027 


10 


1295 


5 


2155 


7 


2977 


10 



Vol. 



Lxxvni 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Deming, Francis •.* 

Demory, John W 

Denmead, Francis '- 

Dennis, J. M 

Denny, Alfred 

Denton, Sidney 

Denton &Sage 

Department of Agrioolture 

Deremer, Philip , 

Dermody, William 

Desert lands, reclamation of 

Desertion, removal of charges of 

Des Moines, Iowa, public building at 

Des Moines River lands 

Detroit, Mich., public building at 

Devereux, Jane W 

Devol, E 

Devore, JohnM - 

Dewey, Harrison 

Dial, Samuel 

Dickens, William 

Dickey, Thomas C - , 

Dickinson, Perez 

Dickson, Davidson, et al 

Dickson, T. J 

Diehl, Elizah 

Diehl, Joseph .- , 

Dietrich, Lottie E 

Dietzer, Theodore 

Digest of International Law 

Dillinger, S. & Sons 

Dillow, George W 

Dilts, Elizabeth E , 

Deniers, John 

Dimond, Hannah : 

Diplomatic and consular 

Disabled soldiers, barracks for 

branch home for 

national homes for 

pensions to 

Disputed handwriting, evidence in cases involving 

Distilled spirits 

entry of 

commissions on taxes collected on 

from fruits, reduction of tax on 

Distribution of Report of Public Land Commissioner 

District of Columbia appropriation bill 

bounty to volunteers 

conveyance of land in 

insurance in the , 

protection of property from fire and safety of 
lives in 

Dobbs, William 

Dodd, H. H 

Dodge, Richard 

Dodge, William C 

Do^gett, John D 

Doig, Patrick S 

DoUhofer, Michael 



Report. 



1503 


5 


2192 


7 


) 264G 


9 


> 3352 


U 


) 3459 


11 


1979 


7 


2122 


7 


2806 


9 


473 


2 


203 


1 


675 


2 


431 


2 


1888 


7 


1404 


5 


1832 


6 


491 


2 


5 1264 
\ 3448 


4 


11 


559 


2 


2817 


9 


963 


3 


1236 


4 


3280 


11 


2822 


9 


2:^24 


8 


3344 


11 


5 2203 
> 2734 


7 


9 


3276 


11 


3108 


10 


2330 


8 


2392 


8 


3068 


10 


3140 


10 


976 


3 


1401 


5 


3288 


11 


2143 


7 


1508 


5 


842 


3 


494 


2 


( 493 


2 


< 495 


2 


( 496 


f 


2639 


9 


3294 


11 


1304 


5 


100 


1 


2288 


8 


2282 


8 


3358 


11 


99 


1 


874 


3 


3336 


11 


5 729 
I 1012 


3 


3 


3426 


11 


3051 


10 


2078 


7 


3239 


11 


357 


1 


1816 


6 


2346 


8 


1400 


5 


3267 


11 



Vol. 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOKTS. 



LXXIX 



Subject. 



Dolton, William 

Domeyer, Henry 

Donabower, John F 

Donaldson, Walter A 

Donahoe, Mrs. M. J., J. A. Henry, and others 

Donnelly, ArchbeU 

Dorman, Johanna 

Dotson, James W 

Dougherty, Sanford M 

Doughty, Robert N 

Donglaa, Charles 

Douglas, Mary S 

Douglas, Thomas 

Dover, K. H., public building at 

Dow, Jennetto 

Downing, D. E 

Downing, John H 

Downs, Martha 

Doyle, Catherine 

Dreesen, B. J 

Drew, Lucy Ann 

Driscoll, Margaret M 

Driscoll, Timothy 

Drammond, Sarah O .^ 

Duane, Col. James C 

Dobach, Benjamin 

Dobbs, Cyrus 




Dudley, Greorge T. 



Duffy, John 

Dnke,H.R 

Dukes, Seraphina E 

Dulnth, Minn., public building at .. .. 

Dunbar, James 

Duncan, Andrew J., estate of 

Duncan, John W 

Duncan, Susan A 

Duncan, Thomas 

Dunlap, Mrs. Margaret 

Dunlap, Myron E 

Dnnlop, William L. , trustee 

Danmire, Theodore 

Donn, Sarah M 

Dnnsmore, Franklin R 

Durgin, Andrew J 

Dnrkee, Henry , 

Dntcher, Lucy G 

Duties paid by the State of New York. 

Davall, Thomas S 

Dyer, Elizabeth P , 

Dyer, Francis W 

Dye, James 

Dyer, JaneC 

Dyer, John W 



1 



E. 



Eads, Grace F 

Eariy^GeorgeG 

East, Henry 

East, Thomas B 

Easten, William A 

Eastmond, Oscar, and James W. Atwill. 
East Saginaw, Mich., public building at 



597 

882 
2528 

556 
2932 
1299 
1300 
3155 

229 
2876 
3005 
2996 
1787 

749 
1852 
1994 
2535 
89 
2058 
1538 
2283 
57 
1384 
3100 

800 

936 
3124 

a">i 

2311 

621 

1351 

2890 

2124 

2997 

399 

798 

2331 

1%*2 

2407 

1164 

3017 

671 

1334 

2749 

1279 

2979 

2456 

2881 

2158 

1297 

262:H 

1827 

.3035 

15 

601 

2011 



2729 
2532 
3366 
1424 
666 
532 
3406 



2 
3 

8 
2 

10 
5 
5 

11 
1 

10 

10 

10 
6 
3 
6 
7 
8 
1 
7 
f) 
8 
1 
5 

10 
3 
3 

10 
3 
8 
2 
5 

10 
7 

10 
2 
3 
8 
7 
8 
4 

10 
2 
5 
9 
5 

10 
8 

10 
7 
5 
9 
6 

10 
1 
2 
7 



9 
8 

11 
5 
2 
2 

11 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



'v.. I 



I i\Kul Company, Philadelphia 

\ -v\ NVis,, court at 

V ..., Autou ---.. 

'.!>., \>hu., 

vs. v'V'hu M.>aDd others .' 

1« v.;uj k\ Oough 

\ -vac^ vUvit)0 

^>. .uuuM>n, Manley B 

^.uwanK Braden^Co 

K^dU) Mary Ann 

^');an, Mary Anna 

Kj;j;loston, J. R ^.. 

Kichman, Mrs. AnnaD. W , 

Eight-hour law, adjustment of accounts under the 

Ekengrcn, C. W 

Eilber, Charles F , 

Eitapence, Anthon 



Elderken, David T 

Eldridge, Rebecca , 

Election of President and Vice-President (Parts 1,2,2) 




Vol. 



Electors, meeting of the (Parts 1,2) 

Elk Branch Church, of Jefferson County, West Virginia 

Elliott, A. J 

EUiott. Thomas R 

Ellis, Cornelia W 

Ellis, Henry 

Ellis, John 

Ellison, George 

El Paso, Tex., public building at 

Emery, Albert H 

Employes in Bureau of Engraving and Printing 

Employes of the Government Printing Office 

Employes in United States navy-yards 

England, David B 

Engle, John M 

EnUnd, Johanna Sofia 

EnseljL. S 

Erie and Oswego Canals, improvement of the 

Espelding, Jolm 

Erskine, Dement, Bassett, and Burnett, Doctors 

Ervin William 



Estates of deceased Kickapoo Indians. 
Esty, Charles J 



Etheridge, Emerson, and William B. Stokes 

Evans, Alexander 

Evans, Mrs. Annie 

Evans, Fannie £ 

Evans, Samuel P 

Eve, WiUiamB 

Evey, Samuel T 

Ewing, Franklin R 

Examination of public buildings, District of Columbia 

Executive document, No. 82, relative to certain Indian claims. 

Eschibition of silk specimens 

Expenditures in Department of Justice 

Export tobacco manufactories •••..... 

Extra pay to discharged employes 

Eyster, Sarah J 



1399 

762 
2284 

770 
1440 
2606 
2864 
2226 
1901 
.^J297 
3462 
2340 
66 

939 
2412 

886 
28:58 
1090 
1099 
3217 

330 

26 

26 

2493 

1638 

1638 

829 
3435 
2982 

779 
2-216 
1000 
1217 

996 
2527 

515 
1413 
2900 
3001 

720 

3262 

82 

643 
1134 
1071 
1821 

23:g 

1992 
2452 
2457 

318 

123 
2285 

585 
1306 
2967 
1859 
3290 

990 
2614 
24?^) 
1132 
1141 
29 
2169 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXXI 



Subject. 




F. 

Facion, Richard '. 

Fain, Margaret S 

Falconer, Alexander ... 

Falkner, Peter 

Fanning, James 

Faran and McLean 

Fardy, Emily J 

Famnm, Renben 

Farley, John 

Farqnhar, Mary Howard. 

Farria, John W 

Frank, George 

Fanlkner, Asa, etal 

Fanlkner, H. H., and Mary Woodlee 

Fanst, Angost 

Faust. Charles W 

Feathers, Joseph M 

Fech^t, Capt. Edmond G 

Federal officials in the Territories 

Fees of witnesses and jurors in United States courts. 

Fehrenbach, WUliam E 

Fell, J. G., Hoopes and Burham 

Feltoer, Adam 

Female nurses, payment of 

FenloD, Edward 

Fergoson, Daniel T 

Fergnson, Mrs. M. E. A 

FergnsoD, Thomas 

Ferris, Eliza M., legal representatives of 

Ferry, James D 

Field, William 

Fields, Green 

Figley, William 

Filbeck, Nicholas 

FiUibrown, Mary £ 

Fillmore, JohnS 

Finch, William H., heirs of 

FiDcher, John D i 

Fink, WillisW 

First National Bank of Minneapolis 

First National Bank of Shakopee, Minn 

Ywhf Emma H 

Fisher, Eliza A 

Fisher, Henrietta 

Fisher, Joseph 

Fisher, Samuel C 

Fisher, William 

Fishiuf; in the navigable waters of the United States 

Fisk, Harry 

Fitger, Jeremiah M 

Fitzgerald, Edward *. 

Fitzpatrick, Michael 

Fitzpatrick, Patrick.... 

Fitzpatrick, Richard 

Fiagg, Algernon S 

Flaherty, Margaret 

Flahiff, Rosanna 

Flemming, Samuel H 

Fletcher, A.Brooks 

Flint, George W 

Flint River, Georgia, bridge across 

7149— H. Rep. vi 



Vol. 



3369 


11 


2584 


9 


2249 


7 


1056 


4 


924 


3 


705 


2 


2176 


7 


2400 


W 


lHc«9 


7 


935 


3 


2460 


8 


1484 


5 


3216 


11 


2962 


10 


629 


2 


301 


1 


2101 


7 


1666 


6 


579 


2 


3163 


11 


2581 


9 


24^4 


8 


3242 


11 


2917 


10 


11^8 


4 


1940 


7 


334 


1 


23t>8 


H 


332 


1 


866 


3 


545 


2 


3033 


10 


3441 


11 


1337 




29*^2 


10 


1968 


7 


958 


3 


815 


3 


2298 


8 


3323 


11 


3081 


10 


404 


2 


39 


1 


94 


1 


169 


1 


1032 


4 


684 


2 


590 


2 


1014 


3 


1384 


5 


2385 


8 


4.S2 




1007 


3 


1828 


6 


2H31 


9 


1221 


4 


470 


2 


1191 


4 


17 


1 


1018 


3 


1006 


3 


3195 


11 


651 


2 


3107 


10 



T .-TtJ. ^"^ 

rr^i. ^ .. .......ii...^ ............................ «.. 

v,«-M ^'^^ ^^« lUtt I uMmTit the moath of the Mississippi 

i,C^!^***"^ ^' - 

^^^, 

r ^ T>m»'^ .**.-* Ills' 

c^-*;:r-*"' ll,!^^ .^iitJitisiaBitore 

V--. ' ., ..^^.««.. ...................... 

^''"^ 'JU-'^ - -^ 

""^ 5>,»- 1^ -•• 

»^^/0 '. • 

^v«. o<r !taWi« park 

^^jnTv ^*^^ :^cv^on 

^^ ^: . %^ i*t8S»it Military Beserrations, road across 

^"""^'y^Z.^ ^^><VandiT^gt^t 

Fnrt>7,' T, .««.. U^wrtrvation 

fV^^^** n%*s. Ki:>.^o building at ^ 

^'''^W- v>*.v»r«t^5i^ bill 

.^V'*^^- iv^i^wat - 

^ ' !fv«4-oince building at 

^'^^ If^^ ; 

F-- ;;:. ; 

r*^"*"' K «..«►>* ^^^^^ K, Leonidas Smith 

F<*^ vvv;* Wallace 

r'^ v;.»vi* v" ^'»%%'. 

Lv Vt^v* 

.t\ V AV^V'^ ^^' *••• 

;^,..Nsss t U.A 

{^.n;^=«>i^^ 



{ 



X 



I 



1786 
1274 

1465 
2160 
1332 
2373 
2901 
1037 
1517 
2935 
1116 
58 

152 
3148 
3051 
2576 
1958 
2486 
2647 
2850 

501 
^510 
3208 
1149 
3191 
2559 
2084 
3373 
2464 

266 
1415 
2610 
2509 
1057 

787 

2469 

2465 

75 

1C96 

529 



6 
4 

5 

7 
5 
8 

10 
4 
5 

10 
4 
1 
1 

11 

10 
8 
7 
8 
9 
9 
2 
2 

11 
4 

11 
8 
7 

11 
8 
1 
5 
9 
8 
4 
3 
8 
8 
I 
4 



INDEX TO HOUSE REP0KT8. 



LXXXIU 



Subject. 



Frink, Aastin L 

Frisbee, Joseph — 
Fritz, Ferdinand. . 
Frost, Nathaniel 6 

Front, Samuel 

Fochs, Barbara . . . 
Fuller, Andrew J . 

Fiilsom, F. E 

Fulton, Mathew H 
Fumiss, James S. . 



G. 



Oaines, Jessie H 

Gaines, Myra Clark 

Gaines. Samuel M 

Gallagher, Mrs. E. K 

Galleyan, Mary M 

Galveston, Tex 

Gandy, Maurice 

Garaghty, Elizabeth % 

Gard, Resin M 

Gardner, Stephen 

Garis, Aaron 

Gamird, Letitia J 

Garrett, Samuel F 

Garrison, James C 

Garthoeffner, Anton 

GastOD, Adam 

Gates, Frederick 

Gaose, John H ^ 

Gaylord, John W 

Gear, Richard.... 

Gee, Henry 

George, Wilson B 

Geological, Coast, and Geodetic Survey, &,c., printing for 

Geological Survey publications 

Geological Survey, work and phblications of the 

Gettia, Sarah A 

Getty, Col. George W 

Giachetti, Peter 

Gibson, Ella E 

Gifford, William H 

Gila River Indian reservation, right of way through 

Gilbean, Francis 

Gilbert, Abijah B 

Gite, George W 

GiU, Ameba J 

Gillespie, Robert J 

GiUeepie. William H 

Gillett, Theodore J 

Giliham, Mary M. / 

Gilmaa, Susan 

Ging, Jacob 

Glaeaie, D., Ward, Minnie H., and Joseph C. Nash 

Glastetter, Fridoline 

GieaaoD, Thomas 

Gleeson, Andrew , 

Glidden, Sarah J 

Goble, Alexander 

Goin,8anford 

Gooch, Littleton O 

Goode, Robert F. H 

Gooding, J. W 

Goodrich, James W 

Goodruni, Turner C 



Report. 



1039 


4 


3000 


10 


3286 


11 


1059 


4 


811 


3 


1521 


5 


231 


1 


1218 


4 


2369 


8 


2801 


9 


1015 


3 


1381 


5 


400 


2 


710 


3 


407 


2 


1987 


7 


839 


3 


2798 


9 


2409 


8 


457 


2 


2589 


9 


2134 


7 


465 


2 


1202 


4 


1416 


5 


1185 


4 


3372 


11 


2414 


8 


1103 


4 


435 


2 


309 


1 


208 


1 


2740 


9 


1331 


5 


2214 


. 7 


552 


2 


3176 


11 


949 


3 


1493 


5 


2153 


7 


3192 


11 


1072 


4 


3442 


11 


3186 


11 


1029 


3 


131 


1 


879 


3 


3343 


11 


2533 


8 


1420 


5 


1022 


3 


3045 


10 


2667 


9 


2009 


4 


1216 


4 


354 


1 


665 


2 


592 


2 


955 


3 


264 


1 


2397 


8 


2272 


8 


333d 


11 



Vol. 



Li:^jciv 



jvnKx t;^ house reports. 



^>^"i«pct* 



-* n! T^mII?*!*^; V-.'. 






< .». 



«.w)<v«k«^«iv $iAit> of ...... ... 

.s<.4 r^«< 



>....ly UuiiwjAy of Canada 
. : »H:uci 5i^ 



\.uua F .. 






>,' 



laa 



k N 



\\ I ilium ... 
WUlmm H 
WjUouO .. 
^.au.it collocliou.. 

Uiaat, Edway A 






Uiuut, Julia D 

(hunt, Qenotal U. 8 ,--. 

(ivuut, UlyaneaS., monument to 

(Iicoloy oxptAdition 

I Jioou,* Amelia M 

Uioou, David A 

Uieoufiold, Peter 

liiooutiboro, N. C, public building at 

(Uoimville, S. C, public building at 

iheeuwood, Cyril 

iticeu, Henry H 

iht)euaburgU Limestone Company, and others. 

llioxjg, 8arah 

Orewell, Henry D 

OrierHon, Col. B. H 

Griffith, John 

Griggs, Abraham P 

Qrigga, Alonzo H 

Griggs, Elizabeth 

Grigsby, James M 

Grimes, Mary 

Grimes, Melinda 

Grissom, Solomon J 

Gross, W. A : 

GroeKin|]^r, Gottlieb 

Grumbling, Jonathan C 

Guerin, Emile, and Cheri P. Migor 

Gulf and Chicago railroad bridges 

Gull Rocks, Newport Harbor, R. I 

Gunn, Calvin 

Gunsales, Nancy 

Guy, Joseph , 

Guy, Levy 

Guyse, George W 

G Wynne, Nira D 



Report. 



! 



2372 

284 

2947 

2778 

1270 

81 

73« 

1219 

352 

188 

497 

2329 

3136 

2613 

1549 

555 

1507 

1428 

2539 

1339 

1742 

978 

1350 

2422 

134 

1632 

1127 

2380 

573 

735 

181 

1727 

834 

806 

1851 

19:J5 

3063 

509 

1664 

228 

3:i25 

1542 

63 

3180 

2406 

2586 

3153 

1820 

2185 

154"> 

2933 

2«60 

1781 

3092 

1611 

2229 

1011 

1458 

1389 

9l>8 

2820 

1905 

3374 

444 

578 



Vol. 



8 
1 

10 
9 
4 
1 
3 
4 
1 
1 
2 
8 

10 
9 
6 
2 
5 
5 
»8 
5 
6 
3 
5 
8 
1 
6 
4 
8 
2 
3 
1 
6 
3 
3 
6 
7 

10 
2 
6 
1 

11 
5 
1 

11 
8 
9 

11 
6 
7 
6 

10 

10 
6 

10 
6 
7 
3 
5 
5 
3 
9 
7 

11 
2 
2 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXXV 



Subject. 



H. 

Hadlock, Lydia 

HAgar, James M 

Hagerman, Mary J 

Hagne, Sarah ^ 

Habneman, Charles 

Haine, Elias 

Haines, Eli 

Haines, Silas K 

Hair, JameeN 

Haire, Milton S 

Haldeman, Francis W 

Hale, Greenville R 

Haley, WiUiam D 

HaU, Dudley & Co 

H^ Elizur B 

Hall, Polly 

Hall, SamaelS 

Hall, WiUiam S 

Ham, George 

Ham, John D ^ 

Hambough, George W 

Hamilton, Charles M 

Hamilton, David W 

Hamilton, John Randolph 

Hamilton, Marcus A 

Hamilton, Mrs. Sarah 

Hammond, Charles H 

Hammond, Francis 

Hammond, William K 

Hancock, Almira Russell 

Handy, Whipple 

Hansell, George B 

Hanson, Samuel 

Harberand Schnetze, lieutenants 

Hardaway, John F. S - 

Harden, Simmons W 

Hardie, Margaret Hunter 

Harkneas, Agnes 

Hannan, Henrietta 

Haraey, Hezekiah 

Harper, Alexander 

Harper, Samuel D 

Harrell, Helen H 

Harrington, Edward M 

Harrington, Harry B. and Grace A 

Harrington, Harriet R 

Harrington, John R 

Harria, Merritt 

Harris, Ransom L 

Harris. Waitie F 

Harsell, Anthony 

Hartford, Conn.', port of entry 

Harvey, Kussell , 

Harwood, Margaret B 1 

HascalL Bailey 

Hasell, Louisa H 

Hasenzahl, Frances 

HaakeU Institute, Lawrence, Eans 

Haskins, Rebecca £ 

Hastings, Mrs. Mary 

Hatfield, John, heirs of 

Hathom, John H 



Report. 



Vol. 



2234 


7 


1810 


6 


2662 


9 


142:j 


5 


2923 


10 


1180 


4 


1171 


4 


2156 


7 


891 


3 


2199 


7 


337 


1 


1187 


4 


962 


3 


32 


1 


728 


3 


452 


2 


1215 


4 


991 


3 


3241 


11 


2069 


7 


1908 


7 


1737 


6 


2051 


7 


1760 


6 


348 


1 


3266 


U 


1673 


6 


2253 


7 


362 


1 


1023 


3 


3274 


11 


3105 


10 


402 


2 


3205 


11 


1667 


6 


? 329 
5 3204 


1 


11 


2450 


8 


2357 


8 


1748 


6 


3277 


11 


49- 


1 


3466 


11 


3300 


11 


1271 


4 


255 


1 


1198 


4 


645 


2 


2792 


9 


2026 


7 


2769 


9 


746 


3 


3221 


11 


3284 


11 


817 


3 


1527 


5 


1548 


6 


793 


3 


1315 


5 


2065 


7 


701 


2 


i 84 
5 159 


1 


1 


909 


3 



LXXXVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REEORTS. 



Subject. 



Havely,W. D 

Hayens, Henry B 

Hawaiian Treaty, notice to terminate. 

Hawee, Snsan 

Hawhe, Mary 

Hawkins, Isaac N 

Hawley, Oeorge S 

Hawley Giles C 

Haworth, James D 

Hazthausen, Joseph 

Hayden, John 

Hayes' nitro-glycerine shell 

Haynes, Walter S 

Haynie, George C 

Haynie, Mrs. Marian F 

Heady, William J 

Heard, Rachel W-..' 

Heath, Abbie B 

Heath, J. C 

Heath, JamesC 

Hedberg, Alfred - , 

Hedian, Robert 

Hedrick, Mary £ ^ 

Hester, Sebastian 

Hefleblower, John 

Heine, Frederick 

Heineman, Rosina 

Heister, William H 

Helena, Ark., public building at 

Helena, Mont., public building at .... 

Hell Gate Channel Electric Light 

Hellyer, Josephine D 

Henderson, Elizabeth 

Henderson, George 

Hendley. Fernetta 

Hendricks, W. P 

Henry, MissEula E 

Henry, Jacob A 

Henry, Samuel 

Henry, Sarah E 

Hensley, Elijah P 

Hcntig, Mrs. Laura 

Hentz, Charles 

Herbert, Eliza E 

Herd, J. F 

Herman, Henry , 

Herriman, J. V 

Herwick, John S 

Hess, Ephraim 

Hennor, J 

Hever, Henry 

Hewitt, G. W 

Hewitt, Porter B 

Hiar, Royal J 

Hiatt& Co 



Report. 



Vol. 



Hibbert, Rosella E 

Hicks, Sarah A 

Hicks, William 

Higgins, John M (Parts 5, 1 and 2).,, 

Higgins, John M 

Higgins, Thomas L 

Hildabrunt, Nathan 

Hildebrand, David H 

HUdreth, Charles F 



2396 


8 


1589 


6 


1759 


6 


2347 


8 


2049 


7 


1698 


6 


1106 


4 


278 


1 


2306 


8 


2174 


7 


2506 


8 


3065 


10 


561 


2 


144 


1 


2468 


8 


1807' 


6 


813 


3 


2826 


9 


1860 


6 


2681 


9 


1941 


7 


1848 


6 


2921 


10 


2258 


7 


2787 


•9 


1603 


6 


791 


3 


3472 


11 


2762 


9 


1689 


6 


1231 


4 


732 


3 


1628 


6 


2673 


9 


1288 


5 


1220 


4 


3392 


11 


2552 


8 


11 


I 


2119 


7 


890 


3 


819 


3 


1173 


4 


305 


1 


2510 


8 


3022 


10 


2010 


7 


1060 


4 


1176 


4 


1223 


4 


1201 


4 


22:^6 


7 


121 


1 


2077 


7 


< 1475 
> 2916 


5 


10 


2774 


9 


3014 


10 


2147 


7 


600 


2 


1131 


4 


3341 


11 


347 


1 


2326 


8 


1534 


5 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXXVII 



Subject. 



HiU, Albert 

Hill, Alfred J 

Hill, Andrew J 

Hill,CharIe«C... 

Hill, Edward L 

Hill, George, jr 

HUl, Henry O : 

HiU, Mre, Mary E 

Hill, 8. H., adininistrators of. 

Hill,W. H 

Hillberg, Andrew J 

Hillman, Benjamin 

Hinee, Holda 

Hinman, Wilbur F 

Hippie, Henry, jr 

Hiseler, Samuel 

Hobbe, J.M 

Hobson, Horace P 

Hoff, Mary 

Hoffman, Noah 

Hofiinan, Peter P 

Hofield, PhiUp 

Hogan, James F 

Hogshed, Capt. W.W 

Holbrook, Alice S 

Holden, James L 

Holder, Jacob 

Holland, Robert 

Holland, Samuel V 

Hollands, Maria 

Hollikob, Anna 

Holloran, John 

Holloway, Emma J 

Holmes, MalindaA 

Holmes, Mary B 

Holroyd, Sarah E 

Holsey, Robert 

Holt, Charles H 

Holt, Louis 

Holt, Solomon 

Homestead rights, relative to 

Homestead settlers 




Vol. 



Honigan, Richard 

Hood County, Texas, to detach. 
Hood, David F 

Hook, Mary B , 



Hooper, James 

Hooper, Sarah A . . . 
Hopkins, Arvah . . . . 
Hopkins, Mary E . . . 

Hopkins, Thomas S 

Hopper, J. Francis . 

Horn, Mary 

Horobeck, Jeptha.. 
Horobin, Luke 



Horwitz, Orville (trustee) 

Hosack, Dr. W 

Hoekins, Levi.^ 

Hoskins. Thomas 

Houf^htelin, Mrs. Anna 

Honlton, Me., public building at 

Hour of meeting of the House of Representatives , 



I 



2241 


7 


2451 


8 


287 


1 


3264 


11 


676 


2 


2611 


9 


1419 


5 


1028 


3 


1624 


6 


2202 


7 


1924 


7 


2679 


9 


1907 


7 


1434 


5 


1501 


5 


2813 


9 


2713 


9 


1825 


6 


246 


1 


678 


2 


2857 


10 


55 


1 


1989 


7 


920 


3 


108 


1 


1105 


4 


2389 


8 


3002 


10 


222 


1 


1050 


4 


741 


3 


1441 


5 


26.57 


9 


238 


1 


6781 


2 


2,'>62 


8 


2093 


7 


240 


1 


147 


I 


2107 


7 


3211 


11 


215 


1 


3212 


11 


1735 


6 


102 


1 


925 


3 


1417 


5 


2569 


8 


714 


3 


2835 


9 


599 


2 


3231 


11 


2545 


8 


2547 


8 


576 


2 


1362 


5 


113 


1 


2810 


9 


1007 


3 


3395 


11 


668 


2 


2507 


H 


3011 


10 


554 


2 


1480 


5 


2212 


7 



LXX XVIII 



mDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 




Honsell, Amanda 

Houser, Andrew 

Hoiiser, Eti 

How, John, estate of 

Howard, Abraham 

Howard, Mary •. 

Howard, Willie S 

Howland, Evalina 

Howse, John C, heirs of 

Hnbbani, Ann B., administratrix 

Hubbard, Hiram W 

Hubbert, John W 

Hudson, William J 

Hnggins, Henry N ^ 

Hnggins, Jeonie 

Hughes, C.K 

Hughes, Edward B 

Hughes, Indiana E 

Hughe^, Ivan 

Hughes, Robert R 

Humes, Mrs. Eliza 

Humes, Thomas W 

Huming, Franz, and Charles, and others 

Humphreys, Capt. Henry H 

Humphreys, Rebecca Hollingsworth 

Hunt, Eveline and children 

Hunt, Frank W 

Hunt, George S. &Co 

Hunt, Mrs. Henrietta M. Drum 

Hunt, Col. Henry J 

Hunter, John H 

Hunter, Mrs. Maria 

Hunt, Thomas B 

Hunter, John 

Hunter, John L 

Hunter, Maria 

Huntington, William 

Huutsville, Ala., public building at 

Hurd V8. Romeis (Parts 1, 2, and 3) 

Hurst, Mrs. Amy A 

Husk, James H 

Huston, R. G. &Co i 

Hutcheson, W. C 

Hutchins, Mrs. Hannah Babb 

Hutchings, Lydia O 

Hutchinson, Rane C 

Hutchinson, Valencia C 

Hutchison, William 

Hyatt, Bruner D , 

Hyde, Michael 

Hydrophobia 

I. 

Idaho and Washington 

Illegal sale of imit&tionsof dairy products 

Illinois, lands in Randolph County '. , 

Illinois and Michigan Canal 

Illinois, terms of court in northern di5trict of 

Illinois and Mississippi River Canal.. 



Vol. 



432 

237 

908 

1610 

1790 

1799 

3010 

310 

358 

2516 

1312 

2274 

3271 

1199 

1801 

a-^1 

2Ui5 

905 
2791 
1956 
14 
1196 
1439 
3438 
3188 
2643 
2779 
2094 

213 

M) 

3019 

212 
2l>85 
3214 
1256 

804 

688 
1522 

734 
1265 
1449 
1449 
1449 

117 
2970 
2840 

3:m 

3422 

1058 

2075 

382 

2462 

2756 

691 

918 

3462 



216 

2028 

1681 

2031 

344 

574 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



LXXXIX 



Subject. 




Immediate transportation of dutiable goodn , 

Indemnity to Chinese subjects 

iDdian committee of Friends in Indiana .., 

Indian appropriation bill '.. 

Indian Department, expensesof 

Indian Territory, punishment for larceny in 

Indian Territory, railway through 

Indian reservations in Northern Montana 

Indian Territory, right of way through 

Mian Territory, robbery in 

Indian Territory, United States courts in 1 

Indian treaties' claims , 

Indianapolis, Ind., post-office at 

Indians, allotment of lands in severalty to.. ., 

Indians and Indian affairs, condition of '. 

Ingalls, General Rufus 

lngall9.William W._^ 

InghraiD, Elizabeth H 

Insane Asylum, Arizona J.. 

Insane officers of the Army and Navy, pay of 

Inspection of live stock ., 

Insulating submarine cables (Parts 1 and 2) 

Insnrance and banking companies, taxation of certain 

Insurance in the District of Columbia 

Internal-revenue employes , 

Internal- revenue laws, amending 

Internal-revenue officers 

Internal-revenue tax, illegal 

International American Congress 

International polar expedition to Lady Franklin Bay ..« 

International sbeop and wool show 

Interstate commerce (Parts 1 and 2) 

Invalid Pensions, business of Committee on 

Investigation of the Pension Bureau 

Iowa, dividing, into two judicial districts 

Iowa Infantiy, Fourth Regiment 

Iron Mountain Bank, Saint Louis, Mo 

Irvin, John !.... 

Irwin, James T 

Isaacs, Solomon 

Isenbeig, Atha L ^ 

lasne orciroulating notes to national banking associations 

J. 

Jackman, Mrs. Louisa, and legal representatives of Mrs. Martha 

Yanghn 

Jacks, Daniel 

Jackson, Addison A 

Jackson, A. P 

Jackson, Jane 

Jackson, Mathew E 

Jackson, Patsey 

Jackson, Sarah B 

Jackson, Tenn., court-house and post-office at 

Jacksonville, Fla, public building at 

Jacobs, Allen P 



843 

844 

845 

2736 

2044 

2839 

386 

1411 

196 

768 

769 

2336 

849 

2447 

2488 

314 

388 

3117 

1311 

18:i5 

1076 

3170 

1342 

2358 

2034 

2045 

1644 

2650 

2650 

476 

3426 

2269 

1729 

2024 

2893 

1646 

1634 

1382 

902 

902 

2446 

861 

2386 

1437 

999 

1890 

2017 

2200 

2990 

201 



1 



Vol. 



3 
3 
3 
9 
7 
9 
2 
5 
1 
3 
3 
8 
3 
8 
8 
1 
2 
10 

6 

6 
4 

11 
5 
8 
7 
7 
6 
9 
9 
2 

11 
8 
6 
7 

10 
6 
6 
5 
3 
3 
8 
3 
8 
5 
3 
7 
7 
7 

10 
1 



3.345 


11 


781 


3 


2824 


9 


2435 


8 


2108- 


7 


1946 


7 


226 


1 


464 


2 


1152 


4 


669 


2 


909 


3 


1607 


6 



I 



xc 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Jacobs, Enoch, to compensate 

Jacobs, John L 

Jacobs, Philip 

Jacobs, William B 

Jacoby, Mrs. Margaret A 

Jacoby, Martin 

James, B. S 

James, John D 

James^ Silas 

Jarratt, Gregory, estate of 

Jaycox, George W 

Jeannette, survivors of the exploring steamer 

Jefferson, Tex., public building at 

Jefferson ville (Ind. ) levee, appropriation to 

Jenkins, James C 

Jennings, B * 

Jennings, Frederick S .^ 

Jessup, Isabella 

JobesPosC, r>7, G. A. R 

Johnson, Aaron C 

Johnson, Catharii^e 

Johnson, Daniel 

Johnson, Elizabeth 

Johnson, Hiram, and others (Part 2) 

Johnson, Isaac ; 

Johnson Dr., Jackson T 

Johnston, James J 

Johnson, Jenet L 

Johnson, Lydia S 

Johnson, Mary E 

Johnson, Perry , 

Jones, B.F ^. 

Jones, Charles W 

Jones, David W 

Jones, Capt. Elihu 

Jones, Jerome B 

Jones, Jesse M 

Jones, John , 

Jones, John H., and Thomas D. Harris 

Jones, Joseph ..,, 

Jones.Levi 

Jones, Sarah A 

Jones, William C 

Judges, United States district courts, salaries of 

Judgments in Court of Claims, payment of interest on 

Judgments of the circuit courts of the United States 

Judgments of United States courts, effect of 

Jndson Female College 

Jurisdiction of United States in places out of their territory 

K. 



Kahler, Elizabeth 

Eain, Daniel 

Kane, James 

Kansas, arms, d^c, furnished by State of. 

ordnance account with 




I 






Fourteenth Cavalry I 

and Arkansas Valley Railway 



2470 

2359 

2360 

273 

244 

896 

1582 

2278 

3393 

430 

875 

986 

2021 

662 

6G3 

2918 

2337 

2182 

158 

2753 

2653 

2029 

4:^ 

1482 
1345 
2393 
3038 
3038 
1671 
3250 

516 

799 
2145 
1065 
1547 

439 
2674 
2445 

155 
2266 
3281 
1067 
1406 
1564 
2965 
1752 
2969 
1675 
1761 
6 
2723 

199 
2476 

864 

137 



782 
3360 
3113 
> 22:35 
( 3113 
3368 
2343 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XCI 



Sabject. 



Kansas City, Fort Scott |uid Golf Railroad Company 

Kiwtett^r, Mary i 

Kaylor, Mary 

Kearney. Louisa 

Kearns, Margaret 

Kebler, Lena 

Keith, William B 

Keller, Henry ..,. 

Kelley, Albert C 

Kelley, Gen. Benjamin F 

Kelly, Andre w B 

Kellogg, John F 

Kemp, Isaac R 

Kempton, Sydney 

Kenamore, Lizzie 

Kendall, liaj. William, representatives of 

Kendrick, JohnS 

Kennedy, Catherine 

Kennedy, Erastns W 

Kennedy, James E 

Kennedy, John 

Kennedy, Patrick W 

Kennerly, Mrs. Florida 

Kenney, Mrs. MaryB 

Kenofaky, Martin, heirs of 

Kensmgton and Tacony Railroad Company, Philadelphia 

Kent, Alonzo Hay ward ^ 

Kent, Jennette S 

Keokok, Iowa, public building at 

Kenr,Mary 

Keasinger, Ann 

Kickapoo diminished reservation in Kansas, sale of 

Kile, Maria # 

Killigan, Daniel 

Kimball, Richard I 

Kincade, Edward 

King, Elizabeth M 

King, James H 

King, Leonard * 

King, Marion M 

Kingon, James W 

Kinggbury, Gould 

Kinkhead, John H., Samuel Sussman, and Charles O. Wood 

Kinney, Ann .- 

Kirby, Francis M 

Kirchner, Erdmuthe , 

Kirk, Hyland C, and others 

Kirk, Martin..... 

Kiikhart, Joseph 

Kirkpatrick, John S 

Kirkpatrick, Roberts 

Kirmayer, Francis H 

Kiaer, Mary 

Kitaniller. Samuel 

Klanaet, Emanuel 

Klinedinst, Margaret 

Klor, Frederick 

KniU, Delilah 

Knobloch, Philip 

Koocklemann, John :.......,... 



Report. 



f 730 


3 


1 840 


3 


1 2302 


8 


L 2708 


9 


1497 


5 


2957 


10 


2720 


9 


702 


2 


3310 


11 


8 


1 


1578 


6 


2795 


9 


J 2715 
\ 2978 


9 


10 


1855 


6 


1405 


5 


1&13 


6 


2599 


9 


406 


2 


5 170 
X 3327 


1 


11 


336 


1 


1200 


4 


2304 


8 


1854 


6 


1245 


4 


1019 


3 


1834 


6 


2404 


8 


3130 


10 


\ 1650 
5 1990 


6 


7 


3283 


11 


1492 


5 


395 


2 


884 


3 


2047 


7 


642 


2 


1605 


6 


2390 


8 


1241 


4 


1959 


7 


3097 


10 


3449 


11 


594 


2 


913 


3 


3226 


11 


2116 


7 


3030 


10 


2296 


8 


2223 


7 


1803 


6 


1612 


6 


410 


2 


2801) 


9 


2402 


8 


2080 


7 


340 


1 


1483 


5 


1498 


5 


1669 


6 


1275 


4 


983 


3 


547 


2 


3090 


10 


1657 


6 



Vol. 



XCII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



KnowloSy Thomas J 

Rnoxville, Tenn., National Cemetery at 

Eoehler, FerdinaDd 

Koontz, Levi 

Korth, Frederick 

Eost, Rudolph 

Kouns, John ,. 

Erantz, William H 

Erehbiel, John D 

EreppSy Mrs. IdaO 

Eritzer, David 

Erumm, Wendelin 

Eruse, Magdalena 

Eumpfy Peter 

Eantz. Jacob. a/uM Walters 

Eyle, Liieut. John G 

Eyler, H. L 

L. 

Laban, Heath dcCo 

Labor of letter-carriers 

Labor troubles 

Lafner, Henry 

La Croase, Wis., public building at 

La Fayette, Ind., public building at 

La Grange Synodical College, Tenn 

Lake, Gideon C 

Lake, Lorenzo ....• 

Lambert, Frances M 

Lamberton to port, of Trenton, N. J., change of name of 

Lambing, Ann E 

Lancaster, Pa., public building at 

Lancaster, Richard D 

Land grants, forfeiture of certain 

Land grants in Arizona 

Lands to Territories for University purposes 

Laud warrant, issue of 

Lang, James 

Langiey, JaneM 

Langworthy, Annie L 

Langworthy, George I 

Lanigan, Catharine 

Lannan, Daniel 

Lannar, Sarah L 

Lansing, Edward B 

Lapham, SamanthaR 

Larbaugh, Sarah , 

Larrabee, Harriet M 

Larwood, Jacob 

Lash, John H 

Laundresses in the Army 

Lasery, William 

Laurence, George H 

Laurence, George W 

Laws of the United States to extend over unorganized territory . - 

Laws in the Territories 

Lawton, Orrin 

Layton, Willis 

Lea, PryorN 

Leatherman, Grant E. Q 

Leatherberry, P. A 

Leathers, John 1 



Report. 


Vol. 


2^ 


1 


530 


2 


1588 


6 


230 


1 


1520 


5 


1258 


4 


3348 


11 


2600 


9 


1283 


5 


282 


1 


1963 


7 


1597 


6 


428 


2 


1257 


4 


960 


3 


2474 


8 


1369 


5 


3125 


10 


2722 


9 


1472 


5 


2960 


10 


3453 


11 


19'39 


7 


3340 


11 


2144 


7 


1857 


6 


3015 


10 


1.396 


5 


27H0 


9 


32'35 


11 


3215 


11 


( 45 


1 


< 1928 


7 


/ 2027 


0m 
i 


192 


1 


1088 


4 


3139 


10 


132 


1 


7r.o 


3 


885 


3 


1506 


5 


2690 


9 


2631 


9 


C 1536 
) 2700 


5 


9 


2154 


7 


1043 


4 


1920 


7 


694 


2 


2100 


7 


2410 


8 


204 


1 


27ri'8 


9 


2150 


7 


3425 


11 


389 


2 


1477 


5 


2046 


7 


2866 


10 


93 


1 


3382 


11 


1815 


6 


479 


2 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XCIII 



Subject. 




LesTen worth, Northern and Soathem Railroad Company 

Leba, Margaret 

Leckner, Matthias 



Leddy, Ann 

Lee, A. Oates 

Lee, Beaufort, and others 

Lee, Lucy Ann and Allen G 

Lee,R. H 

Lee, William H. F 

Leebrick, Elizabeth w 

Leef, Henry, heirs of 

Leee, Isaiah W. and E. H. Ellis : 

Lees, William J 

Lee8e,Fred J 

Leffman, Elizabeth 

Legalizeid insurance companies of Dakota 

Legiriative, executive, and judicial appropriations 

Lehman, L 

Leibecheets, Francis A 

Lemon, George ^ 

Lemon, Malinda 

Lester, Daniel 

LettetB, immediate delivery of * 

Leats, Jonathan 

Lewis, AbelJ 

Lewis, Amy A 

Lewis, John F 

Lewis, Mrs. Bi.A 

Lewis, Merritt 

Lewis, William and William H 

Licensing of vessels carrying persons in addition to their crews 

Lichty, Henry 

Life-saving stations, additional , 

Light and fog signal at Castle Hill, R. I 

Light at New Bedford, Mass 

Light at Whitehall Narrows, Lake Champlain 

Light-house on Crabtree's Ledge, Maine 

Light-house near CroHtan, N. C 

Light-house and fog-signal at Deer Island, Boston, Mass 

Light-house at Lubec Narrows, Maine 

Light-house and fog-signal at San Luis Obispo, Cal 

Light-house on Seul Choix Point, Michigan 

Light-house, Wicomico River, Virginia 

Light-house districts, additional 

Light-house supply-steamer l 

Light-house tender for fourth light-house district 

Light-ship o£f Cape Hatteras, North Carolina 

Light-ship off the entrance to Chesapeake Bay 

Light-ship on Hog Island Shoal 

Lightner, Frank 

Lily, light-house tender 

Limitation of liabilities of the owners of vessels 

Lippe, George Anna 

Liquors, sale of, in Territories 

Little, Ann 

Little, Mary A 

Little, Thomas - 

livennore, Fidus 

LohbsD, J. M .• 

Locey,T.J 

Loe, Louis 

Loeb, Henrietta 

Logan, David M 



Vol. 



1991 
308:i 

119 

796 
2985 
80 
2-279 
1130 
1070 
3157 

623 
1865 
1010 
2553 
1599 
1026 

938 

722 
2495 

713 
1490 
2230 
3301 
2415 
1259 
2159 
1040 
71 
3179 
1783 
3389 
2750 
1146 

655 
1083 

528 
1229 

946 
1460 
1385 
1461 
1462 



526 
1568 
3452 
1147 
1459 
1463 
1387 
1464 
1388 

232 

724 
1145 
1429 
2444 

774 
1184 
3173 

979 

179 
2408 

424 
1364 
1254 



7 
10 
1 
3 
10 
1 
8 
4 
4 
11 
2 
6 
3 
8 
6 
3 
3 
3 
8 
3 
5 
7 
11 
8 
4 
7 
4 
1 

11 
6 
11 
9 
4 
2 
4 
2 
4 
3 
5 
5 
5 

«» 

o 
2 
2 
6 
11 
4 
5 
5 
5 

r> 

5 
1 
3 
4 
5 
8 
3 
4 
11 
3 
1 
8 
2 
5 
4 



XCIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Snbjeot. 



Logan, John W " j 

liOgansport, Ind., public bnilding at 

Long, Albert 

Long, George R 

liOnff, James 

London, John A "I 

Lookabangh, John 

LoomiB, AretnaF 

Lord, William Blair 

Los Angeles, Cal., public building at 

Lottery, eift enterprise, or other circulars 

Lottery tickets, to punish selling of, in District of Columbia. 

Louise Home..^ 

Louisiana, military history of 

seizure of property in , 

LouisTille and Portland Canal Basin 

Love, Isaiah A ^ 

Lovejoy, Evelyn M 

LovelL Sarah A --. 

Low, David W 

Low bridge at Saint Louis, Mo. (Part 2) 

Lowery, Charles L 

Lowery, Rebecca J., guardian 

Lowry, James M 

Lowry, William P 

Loy, Mrs. Adallne P 

Loy, Daniels 

Loyd, EdoIs 

Lucas, Benjamin 

Lucas, Daniel 

Lucas, Margaret 



Luce, Elizabeth 

Luce, Elizabeth. (Part 2) 

Lucy, Margaret 

Lad wig, Frank 

Luther, Emily 

Lynch, Mrs. Antonia B 

Lynch, Greenbury 

Lynch, Margaret 

Lynch, William 1 

Lynch, William B 

Lynn, Mass., public building at 

Lyon, John 

Lyons, Honora Y 



M. 



Mack, Daniel F 

Mack, Alexander 

Mackerel, importation and landing of 

Macklin, JamesE 

Macomber, Addie L 

Madison, Ind., public building at .... 

Madden, Margaret 

Maddox, Joseph VL,ti,al 

Magoffin, Albert E.: 

Magnon, Marcel 

Magoon, Nathan , 

Magoon, Mary Jane 

Maboney, Josiah 

Mail service, messengers in the 

to regn Tate 

matter, delivery of , 

contracts, subletting 




VoL 



\ 



650 

613 
1600 
2930 
2661 
27^ 

9il2 
1574 
3052 

932 
2678 
1631 
3050 
3151 

616 
1725 
1595 

697 

692 
2270 
2341 

808 
12 

481 
2995 
2802 

981 

363 
2999 

253 
1535 
1100 
3206 
3206 
1969 
1240 
3073 
1802 
2986 
2080 
2466 
1438 

997 
2867 
2248 



1739 

2115 

343 

3177 

289 

3416 

1740 

3137 

54 

2837 

1349 

3256 

2624 

2207 

502 

506 

503 

507 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



XCV 



Subject. 




Kain, Lemuel 

Malone, Sasan 

Maloney, Mrs. Honorah 

MandeTille, SiiBanC 

Manes, Mary 

Manhart^ Frank 

HanoBcnpts belonging to the United States 

Manx, Sarah 

Marble, Mrs. Martha A... 

Marchand, Margaret D 

Marchant, Rebecca 

Marcinkowski, Felix 

Marck, Peter, Thomas J. Wright, and others 

Marim, Frederick 

Marine City, Mich., pnblic building at 

Maritime service 

Marquette and Ontonagon Railroad. ( Part 2) 

Marrs, James R 

Marsh lands, Lake Saint Clair, Michigan 

Manh, Elon A., and Menard Lefever 

Marsh, Mary 

Marshall, Mrs. Frances 

Mazshall, AnnaM 

Maishall, Frederick 

Marshall, 8.T 

Marston, Adeline 

Martin, Phoebe 

Martin, Elijah 

Martin, Henry , 

Martin, Betsey 

Martin, Mrs. Mary L 

Martin, Andrew ^ 

Martin, J. R 

Martin, Mrs. Hetty 

Maryhmd and Delaware Free Ship-Canal 

Msiyland and Virginia, advances made to United States by 

Mason, Nancy 

Maston, Charles A 

Matherly, Hartford 

Mathes, James Q 

Mathews, Archibald 

Mathews, Thomas, and others 

Mathewson, Christopher H 

Mattinely, John M 

Maxwell, George, Bnlkley, and Newman 

Mayham, Margaret 

Maynard, Alonzo 

Mays, Joseph : 

McAlexander, Robert J 

McAnny, James ...., 

McAnnlty, Joseph S 

McArthnr, W. H. H 

McBlair, John HoUins 

McBride, Thomas 

McCabe, Peter 

McCall, William L. . 

McCar^, Mrs. Catherine * 

McCarthy, Mary 

MeCarty, Mrs. Catherine 

McChesney, Martin 

McClaren, James L 

McClellan.John 

McCleUarid, JohnH..'. 



2511 

1794 

1344 

270 

1784 

1108 

1633 

792 

789 

2592 

708 

1214 

3106 

1613 

1485 

3417 

3222 

1928 

3103 

2752 

736 

2130 

3046 

2961 

2105 

1159 

353 

235 

3302 

450 

821 

292 

1850 

854 

361 

723 

518 

2797 

1915 

3003 

3082 

1711 

1433 

2508 

2988 

1540 

2885 

1346 

459 

2828 

544 

269 

2186 

3093 

43 

165 

205 

700 

3207 

1340 

744 

3207 

1952 

466 

2198 

1101 



Vol. 



8 
6 
5 
1 
6 
4 
6 
3 
3 
9 
2 
4 

10 
6 
5 

11 

11 
7 

10 
9 
3 
7 

10 

10 
7 
4 
1 
1 

11 
2 
3 
1 
6 
3 
1 
3 
2 
9 
7 

10 

10 
6 
5 
8 

10 
5 

10 
5 
2 
9 
2 
1 
7 

10 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2-U 
5 
3 

11 
7 
2 
7 
4 



:^CTt 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



IbA^jizfliMt;. Jo^M 

X*,-0-'tt^ $»«wl 

Ux^V-JijWw Ow^ Dttoiel 

mvO:ui:x:v J^^s^i^ W 

\tt.0.rt»aj:«v^k. Tliomae M 

Vv^/ttinf V. KUiai • 

"^♦,v^,«ttwUv A. M 

V,ViA/w WeU* C 

XL.xVvv Matt 

V,x>fcfcr^. Alexander 

%.cv> ^Milo 

>.,vV,:s««iuG. w 

V ;VcuK<i, Michael 

V i.V«»m, David L 

>E^ ;Vn)dast John P 

>4s;v*Akl, H. W... 

V.lVwvirs, W. W., administrator 

V, v:tiuiUT, Harvey 

V, V.>A»y> JohnP 

>av V^wt^ Thomas B 

\t>^^*aa«>n, E. A •-- 

>fc.^VUWn. William 

Vvt^ill*, Mrs. Lou Gobright 

>tv^^wrUud, John - 

)jts»ia^)aiid, Louisa 

>jlv'K*rUn, H.P 

VcVVrrin, Sarah 

\)tN^;*rrahan. William 

Mv^Ury, Margaret A 

MvV^iU, J. M 

MvHUvnn, James 

M^H.)oldrick, J. R 

MoUowan, John 

McGrayel, Michael 

Mo 1 1 wain, Martha 

Mcintosh, Mrs. Mary 

Molutyre, Byron 

McKamey, James 

MoKay, Elizabeth 

MoKay, Nathaniel, and others 

Mo Kean, Patrick 

McKean, Sarah P 

MoKee, Rebecca Reese 

McKee, Robert ., 

McKenna, Cecilia C 

MoKinney, David 

McLaughlin, Ammon 

McLean, Eugene E 

McLean, James .'... 

McMahon, Mary 

McManus, Rose 

McMillan, Joseph 

McMlllin, Andrew F., heirs of 

McMinnville and Manchester Railroad 

McMullen, James 

McMurtrie, Alfred 

McNair, Miss Caroline 

McNamara 

McNaugh ton, John 

McNeal, E. P 

McQaaide, Jane R 

McQuire, Joseph A 

McRoberts, Ellie 

McRobertson, Anthony , 

Mead, Larkin 6 



Report. 



Vol. 



5 1553 
) 1870 


6 


6 


2515 


8 


1981 


7 


659 


3 


18 


I 


2500 


8 


912 


3 


486 


2 


3>85 


U 


904 


3 


1817 


6 


2221 


7 


1945 


7 


15b3 


6 


2395 


8 


438 


2 


1898 


7 


812 


3 


26G4 


9 


a% 


3 


2757 


9 


2973 


10 


2394 


8 


907 


3 


588 


2 


748 


3 


2183 


7 


17G4 


6 


2513 


8 


1-361 


5 


2668 


9 


2425 


8 


1693 


6 


1767 


6 


2312 


8 


1609 


6 


3419 


11 


1660 


6 


1285 


5 


30:» 


10 


1586 


6 


2570 


8 


1873 


6 


740 


3 


2313 


8 


1120 


4 


3347 


11 


2635 


9 


3;oi 


11 


2771 


9 


1135 


4 


1281 


5 


h7 


1 


304 


1 


245 


1 


164 


1 


2808 


9 


72:? 


3 


91 


1 


183 


1 


2652 


9 


2111 


7 


;^23 


10 


2522 


8 


1573 


6 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



XCVII 



Subject. 




Means, Calvin 

Meais, John W 

Meech, Phcebe H 

• 

Melcher, Louis 

Mellifont, John, and Ellen Riordon 

Mek>y, George M 

Memphis, rostrum in national cemetery... 

Memphis National Cemetery road 

Mendenhall. Sarah E 

Merchants' National Bank, of Little Rock 

Mericle, Henry 

Merrill, Mary ; 

Merrill, Katharine C. B., executrix 

Merrill, Stevens W 

Merritt^ Edwin A 

Mealer, Charles V, 

Mefiser, Solomon 



Mexican war, soldiers and sailors of 



Mexican treaty of 1883 

Mibord, Maria 

Michigan, State of 

Michigan, lands in, to aid Ontonagon and State Line Railroad 
Michigan, lands for park purposes in 

Michigan, terms of court in eastern district of 

Mickle, Harmon 

Middleton, Richard 

Middleton, WilUam M 

Middleton, Ashael 

Milbum, G. W 

Mile8,Mrs. M. C 



Military Academy (U. S.), promotion of graduates of 



Military Academy 

Militaj^ Academy (U. S.)» £^aduates of 

Military telegraph line 

Militia, instruction of 

MiUer, WiUiam 

Miller, James L 

Miller, N.M 

MiUer, WiUiam F 

MiUer, Mary Ann 

Miller, John 

Miller, Mrs. Rebecca 

Miller, Mrs. Kate 

Miller, Samuel 

Miller, Andrew C 

Miller, George Y 

Milligan, Thomas J 

Millinger, James 

Millspangh, J. L 

Milton, John M 

Mingus, John 

Minneapolis Industrial Exposition 

Minix, Charles W 

Minshall, Isaac N 

Misbler, Abel 

MiBsissippi, additional courts in 

7149— H. Rep. Vii 



I 



s 



s 



Vol. 



220 


1 


1885 


6 


1809 


6 


2758 


9 


2066 


7 


2467 


8 


1656 


6 


1856 


6 


1954 


7 


1955 


7 


2184 


7 


.?6 


1 


3383 


11 


887 


3 


1627 


6 


1212 


4 


3317 


11 


11.^5 


4 


1374 


5 


972 


3 


151 


1 


3293 


11 


2615 


9 


227 


1 


2292 


8 


721 


3 


2706 


9 


1318 


5 


2909 


10 


2195 


7 


566 


2 


3152 


11 


258 


1 


3245 


11 


2794 


9 


1148 


4 


1246 


4 


1247 


4 


719 


3 


3147 


11 


639 


2 


3058 


10 


1268 


4 


2871 


10 


2087 


7 


409 


2 


1110 


4 


780 


3 


2587 


9 


1606 


6 


268 


1 


2018 


7 


1179 


4 


1426 


5 


1175 


4 


90 


1 


2675 


9 


490 


2 


149 


1 


19SS 


7 


3443 


11 


3223 


11 


74 


1 


1512 


6 


2627 


9 


1877 


6 



xcvm 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS, 



Subject. 




Mississippi Water-Power and Boom CompaDy,of Brainerd, Minn 

Missoan Home Guards 

Missouri, judicial districts in 

Mission Indians, California 

Mitchell, Lucy J 

Mitchell, John K 

Mitchell, Isaiah H 

Mitchell, Ellen M ^ 

MitcheU, C. H.... 

Mobileand Girard Railroad Company 

Moer, Samuel H 

Mobile and Ohio Railroad Company 

Moffitt, Alexander 

Molen, Charles E 

Molloy, Ellen P 

Monahan, James 

Monahan, Robert 

Money-order system, receipts of the 

Monroe, Nelson 

Monroe, Joel D ••••. 

Monroe, La., public building at 

Monroe, Stephen C 

Montana, artesian wells in 

Montana and the United States, account of arms, &c., between 

Montana, courts in 

Montgomery, Alexander 

Montgomery, John i 

Montgomery, Robert H 

Montis, Libbie C 

Montpelier, Vt., public building at 

Monument at Stony Point, N. Y 

Moody, Joseph S 

Moun, Edwin 

Mooneyhan, Elander M 

Moore, Ely, and John W.Whitfield, estates of 

Moore, Elias B 

Moore, James G 

Moore, Isaac 

Moore, Harrison W 

Moore, Francis M 

Moore, William H...... 

Moran, John •. 

Moran, Robert 

Moran, William P 

Morehead, Abner 

Morgan, A. C 

Morgan, Henry S 

Morgan, James • 

Morgan, Maj. Gen. Daniel ; 

Morgan, Thomas P., Jr 

Morhiser, William H 

Morris County Railroad Company, right of way to the 

Morris, George W I 

Morris, Joshua L 

Morris, Rebecca 

Morris, Nancy E ^ 

Morris, Capt. John F 

Morris, J. A '. 

Morrison, John A , 

Morrison, William M 

Morrison, J. D 

Morton, James ^^.|^, 



Vol. 



! 



105 

498 

370 
2556 

223 
3156 
1504 

331 

96 

2640 

1563 

755 

312 
2843 
1672 
3037 
2775 
1041. 

380 
1G94 

693 
1161 

421 
5118 
2747 
14.54 
2910 
1073 
2177 
3164 
3334 
2605 
1871 
2566 
2709 
1064 
1734 
2693 

667 
2196 

143 
1207 

788 
2095 
2832 

405 

855 
2048 

947 

261 

130 
1112 
1869 
2607 

620 
1841 
2190 

745 
2946 

120 
2777 

157 

211 
3031 

195 
3265 



INDEX TO HOUSE BEP0BT8. 



XCIX 



Subject. 




Mosher, Frances 

Mott, James 

Mo6S,H.J.T 

MonltoD, Maiy A •• 

Mower, Betsy A 

MnlhoUaod, Hugh 

MoUen, Henry 

MolTey^ William J • 

Malvehill, Elizabeth 

Mamerlyn, JohD D 

Mamford, Jane D.... 

Monroe, Grafton 

MQrpby,Mary • 

Morpby, Marshall N 

Murphy, Martio 

Morpby, Sarab Ann 

Morpby, Thomas 

Morpby, Mary Ann 

Morpby, Patrick , 

Morpby, Mary 

MorpbT, Martin and P. B 

Morpby, Frank P 

Morpby, Charles ^ 

Mo^by, Denois • 

Moacatine Bank «. 

Morray, John G.... 

Momy, Betsey M , 

Morray, Florence 

Mamy, Francis M., estate of 

Mozzey, Milton B 

Myera, H. A , 

Myers, Sarah E 

Mykins, Mary A , 

N. 

Kalley, Samuel M , 

Karoo. Levi H , 

Xatcbez, Miss., national cemetery at • , 

Xational banking associations 

National Bank of Bellaire, Ohio 

Xational Bank of Lincoln, Pa 

Xational bank, Winona •. 

National Bank of Winona 

National currency 

National Home for Soldiers, reimbursement of 

National live-stock highway 

National Safe Deposit Company, D. C 

National trades unions 

Naval appropriation, act of 1883, amendment of 

NaTal establishment, increase of 

Naval service, appropriation for 

Navigation and easterns collection laws 

Navy, assistant engineers in the 

Navy and Marine Corps, removal of charges of desertion from men of 

the 

Navy Department, consolidating bureaus of 

Navy, officers of tbe 

Navy, retirement of officers of tbe 

Navy and Marine Corps, disabled persons in 

Nawry, John J 



i 



2138 

647 

15:i 

356 

2616 

1111 

974 

3114 

2179 

3101 

2728 

725 

1608 

1665 

1651 

686 

243 

560 

2112 

148 

2431 

3029 

2748 

3396 

2377 

1020 

1036 

1422 

1537 

3350 

366 

830 

2815 

2929 

2931 



1301 

2411 

209 

104 

108 

40 

37 

38 

371 

500 

1228 

2705 

2699 

1678 

1470 

993 

2619 

2648 

2497 

612 

3064 

1866 
1462 
3146 
96 
1720 
1238 



7 
2 
1 
1 
9 
4 
2 

10 
7 

10 
9 
3 
6 
6 
6 
2 
1 
2 
7 
I 
8 

10 
9 

11 
8 
3 
4 
5 
5 

11 
1 
3 
9 

10 

10 



5 

8 



2 
4 
9 
9 
6 
5 
3 
9 
9 
8 
2 
10 

6 
5 
11 
1 
6 
4 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Neal, Henry 

Nebraska, additional land offices in 

Nebraska, terms ofcoart of : 

Nebraska and Kansas, purchases of lands in 

Nebraska, additional land districts in 

Neflf, Ezra 

Neibling, Elizabeth A 

Nelson, Lydia A .' 

Nelson, William H 

Nelson, Noah , 

Nevada, legislature of 

NeviL Wilfiam H 

New Berne National Cemetery, interment in 

Newberry, Norton L 

Newbnrg, N. T.. public building at 

New Jersev, right of way through United States lands in . . j 

Newman, James C 

Newman, Wade H 

Newman, Eliza 

Newman, Thomas G 

Newman, George T 

New Mexico, additional Justice of the supreme court in 

and Arizona, cavalry in 

reapportioning of 

diseased cattle in 

New Orleans, Baton Rouge and Yicksborg Railroad 

Newport, Ky., barracks at 

public building at 

Newton, Mass., First National Bank of 

New York Arsenal, officers quartered at 

marine hospital at port of 

terms of court in northern district of 

and New Jersey, boundary line of 

Nicholas, John G 

Nicholas, N.C 

Nicholas, Mrs. Eunice S 

Nickell, Rachel 

Nicke^, Katharina 

Nields, Henry Clay, heirs of 

Night inspectors, ports New York and Baltimore 

Nix, Jacob 

Noble, Samuel (Part 2) 

Noble, Samuel : 

Noble, Rowland 

Nokes, George W 

Nolan, Peter, heirs of 

Nolan, Philomena E 

Noland, Mrs. Louisa 

Nolte. Wilhelm 

Norfolk, Va., public building at 

Norman, Mary 

Norman, Mary (Part 2) 

North Central and South American Exposition 

North Carolina, letter books of the executive department of 

eastern judicial district of 

North German Lloyd Steamship Company 

Northern Pacific Railroad Company 

forfeited grants to 

Company 

Norton, George A 

Norton, A. B 

Norton, T. H., and James McLean 

Norwood, George 




I 



s 



2280 

606 

1320 

520 

1680 

2361 

1576 

290* 

125 

1488 

536 

1027 

2013 

2363 

1686 

605 

2188 

2225 

2062 

462 

3127 

1812 

2908 

531 

2489 

23.34 

2698 

3363 

2558 

3126 

2:J79 

3234 

200 

2036 

2403 

468 

339 

73 

2004 

2362 

2471 

2140 

1728 

1728 

3365 

3278 

1204 

628 

320 

127 

1933 

.3457 

1107 

3203 

3203 

374 

2575 

4 

2.563 

1002 

1226 

25G7 

1822 

3021 

2381 

1195 



Vc 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



CI 



Sabjeot. 



Norrell, Mariah E. A.B 

NotarieiB public, oaths administered by 

Nottage, Mary J 

• 

O. 

• 

Obekiah, BeDjamin. 

O'Brien, Bridget 

(VBrien, Sarah • 

Obscene matter throagh the malls 

O'Connor, Margaret 

O'Connor, Stephen 

Odell, Charles G , 

Official Register of the United States 

Ohio Central Railroad Company 

Oklahoma, organization of the Territory of < 

Oljeary, Francis 

Olive Francis, brig , 

Omaha National $ank, Nebraska 

O'Neal, Hngh 

O^eal, Henry 

Ocelli, Margaret 

OpeloQsas, La., pnblic bnildingat 

Ordnance and warships 

nnservicablo ^..... 

and war ships , 

Oreo, Jesse M , 

Orendorff, John A 

Orr, John G , 

Osborne, Anna W 

Osborne, Thomas A 

Osbary, Frederick 

O'Shea, James E 

Oshkosh, Wis., pnblic bnildingat 

Otey, Washington T 

Otis, George K . 

Oaralcr, John A 

Owen, Mrs. Annie C 

Owen, Alfred M 

Owen, Thomas J 

Owens, John 

Owens, Dennis, children of 

Owens, Thomas S 

Owensborongh, Ky., public building at 

Owings, William J 

Oxford, Miss., public building at , 

P. 

Pacific railroads 

Committee 

iuTestigation of books and acconnts of 

Pacific and Great Eastern Railroad, right of way to 

Pager. Pirce (Part 1) 

Page r. Pirce (Part 2) 

Paige, Timothy 

Pan-Electric Telephone stock 

Parish, B.M.M 

Pariah, Joseph W 

Parker, EUB 

Parker, George Henry 

Parker, Newcomb 

Parkhurst, Samuel 

Parkinson, Thomas M .► 



Report. 


Vol. 


1971 


7 


1143 


4 


2132 


7 


2853 


9 


262 


I 


2731 


9 


2676 


9 


21G7 


7 


3 162 


11 


1997 


7 


569 


2 


765 


3 


1322 


5 


1684 


6 


1489 


5 


1158 


4 


491i 


2 


681 


2 


2499 


6 


2680 


' 9 


1357 


5 


567 


2 


1086 


4 


1450 


5 


2227 


7 


1213 


4 


2237 


7 


1430 


5 


3104 


10 


2106 


7 


2434 


8 


1013 


3 


1755 


6 


11.51 
3041 


4 


10 


2321 


8 


934 


3 


2644 


9 


1192 


4 


2682 


9 


413 


2 


3119 


10 


820 


3 


3233 


11 


2387 


8 


2033 


7 


169/ 


1 


1474 


5 


1623 


6 


1623 


6 


139 


I 


3142 


10 


1443 


5 


5 24 

) 167 


1 


1 


12-0 


5 


1658 


6 


2365 


8 


1771 


6 


3085 


10 



Cli 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 




Piwkjs Edwin R 

Ptirka, GeorjBce W 

Parked Jennie M -■ 

Parmer, A. J *. 

Parrott, Mary 

Parry, Henry C ' 

Parsons, Charlotte C 

Parsons, Marilla 

Parvin, W.L., and Henry A. Greene 

Patents, canceUation of (Part 1) 

(Parts) 

trade-marks, and copyrights 

Patent cases, fees in *. 

to limit jurisdiction of United States courts in 

Paterson. N. J., public building at 

Pattee, Wallis 

Patterson, B. Franl^ 

Patterson, James 

Pattison & Caldwell 

Patton, John '. 



Pangh, William 

Paul, George D 

Paul, Johanna, and Anna Karbella .. . 

Paul, Louise 

Paullus, David C f 

Paus, Henry A 

Pavy, Mrs. Octave 

Payment of pensions 

Payne, Edgar 

Pavne, T. J 

Payne, W. P 

Paytou, John W 

Peak, Harriet 

Pearce, 8. H 

Pearlman, L. M 

Pease, Charles B 

Peck, Samuel C, jr 

Penal colony in Alaska 

Pendergrast, Edward 

Pendleton, Edward G 

Penn, William 

Pennell, Emery C 

Pennington, John 

Pennington, John T 

Pennsylvania, Judicial districts of 

Judicial proceedings in 
Pensacola, Fla., channels leading to. 

Pension appropriation bill 

Pension laws, amending 

Pensions, payment of arrears of 



to increase 



to prisoners 

to officers and men on sick-leave 

to widows, &c , 

to totally disabled soldiers and sailors. 

for dependent parents 

for deafness 

Peoria, 111., public building at 

Perine, Sarah E. E 

Perkins, Edward T 

Perkins, George H 

Perkins, John McC 

Perkins, Joseph , 



2059 
2398 
3069 
3251 
2924 
3174 
2541 
2076 

759 
1003 
1003 
1966 
2852 
1862 
1867 
2651 
2590 

906 

474 

758 
2350 

448 
1403 

252 
2773 

365 
1980 
3121 
2213 

219 
2879 
1659 
2521 
2063 
3319 
3349 
1172 

350 
1685 

892 
2205 
2793 

441 

6fe7 
1049 
1887 
3321 
1386 

342 
2744 

783 
1514 
l.^>25 
1868 
2560 
48 
2830 
1371 

598 

396 
3044 
2131 
3421 

234 
1640 
1916 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



cm 



Sabject. 



P^rkina, Mary Ann 

Perkins, KewtonC 

Perkins. Thomas F., administrator 

Perry, Adeliza 

Petersburg, Va., improvement of poblic building at 

PettTS, CharlesV 

Pettie, Winship B 

Pettigrew, Georse H 

Pbelan, .leremian 

Phelps, EdwardD 



Phelps, Mrs. Lizzie Maynadier 

Phillipxm) Dinwiddle B 

Phillips, E. J 

PhiUipSjGUbertA 

Phillips, Louisa A 

Phillips, Mary H 

Phillips, Rav 

Phillips, Walter A 

PbiUips, W.C 

Phinney & Jackson 

Phoenix National Bank 

Physicians, compensation to certain 

Physiology, study of 

Pickelsimer, Alfred 

Pickett, Manhattan « 

Pierpont, Rachel Ann 

Pike,WiUiam 

Pilcher, J. E 

Pilkinton, Edwin T., estate of 

Pilotage (Part 1 

(PaTt2) 

Pitzer, Thomas J 

Platte County. Missouri, lands in 

Pleasonton, Alfred 

Plocher, Ferdinard 

Plowden, Walter D 

Plommer, Frances H 

Plommer, Judith 

Poe, John R 

Points, Abraham 

Poland, Margaret A 

Poland, Margaret, administratrix 

Polygamy 

Polygamy in Utah, suppression of. 

Polbey, Thomas G 

Poorman, William 

Pope^ Benjamin F 

"Port Charges," purchase of work entitled < 

Porter, Cummins 

Porter, Fitz-John 

(Part2) 

Porter, Joseph A 

Porter, Richard Hand James 

Porter, William, 




Vol. 



Portland, Greg., public building at 
Portlock, Mahala H 



Port of delivery, at Springfield, Mass 

Port of delivery , at Lewes, Del 

Port of entry, at Mount Desert Ferry, Me 

Port of Portland, Oreg., limits of the 

Portsmouth, Ohio, public building at.... 
Post d: MoCord 



2944 


10 


2189 


7 


3042 


10 


3071 


10 


1690 


6 


2219 


7 


488 


2 


2854 


9 


1167 


4 


3084 


10 


823 


3 


2846 


9 


615 


2 


475 


2 


1053 


4 


2523 


8 


2928 


10 


3279 


11 


1104 


4 


1161 


4 


31 


1 


2504 


8 


261)4 


9 


1765 


6 


1347 


5 


1797 


6 


2800 


9 


564 


2 


2763 


9 


1543 


6 


838 


3 


836 


3 


1625 


6 


860 


3 


927 


3 


1289 


5 


751 


3 


619 


2 


3451 


11 


2254 


7 


2536 


8 


589 


2 


2761 


9 


2568 


8 


2735 


9 


2964 


10 


1961 


7 


3189 


11 


2716 


9 


1791 


6 


42 


1 


42 


1 


418 


2 


2696 


9 


2894 


10 


1891 


7 


3405 


11 


2191 


7 


903 


3 


1983 


7 


2705 


9 


1085 


4 


1984 


7 


27(U 


9 


1093 


4 


3391 


11 



CIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



ReportJ Vol 



Postage, on fourth-class matter 

Postal laws aud regulations 

Postal money orders 

Postal notes, payment of 

Postal service, employes of the 

Postmaster-General^ annual report of 

Postmasters, adjusting claims of 

claims of 

clerk hire to 

people to name 

salaries of (Part 1) 

(Part 2) 

Post-ofiQce appropriation bill 

Fost-OfBce Department, organization of 

Post-offices, naming of 

Potomac River Flats 

Potter, Ansyl - • 

Potter, Francis McNeil 

Potter, Joseph M 

Pott«, John 1 - 

Potts, Joseph H 

Potts, Mary F 

Potts, Robert 

Powell, William 

Powell, W.H. 

Prairie band of Pottawatomie Indians m Kansas - 

Prall, Johnson S 

Prall, Menton ..-. 

Prater, Sarah J 

Pratt, Caroline E 

Pratt, Isaac 

Prenss, Clara L i 

Prewitt, John 

Price, James •. 

Printing and distribution of documents of the monetary conferences 

Printing of committee reports - 

Printing of statement of awards under treaties between fiance and 

Spain 

Printing reports, bills, &c 

Private land claims 

in New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado 



New Mexico 



Probert, Anna A 

Prost,Lieut. Joseph 

Protecting mechanics and laborers 

Protestant Orphan Asylum of Natchez, Miss 

Providence, R. I., additional land for custom-house in 

Pruitt, James Madison 

Public accounts and claims 

Public lands, for pre-emption of 

proceeds of sales of 

right of way through the 

Pogh, C.W.I 

Pugh, David C 



Pulliam, J. J., estate of 

Purchase of right of way to Cape Orford Light station, Oregon 

Pnmell, Thomas F 

Purvis, Philemon B 

Putnam, Mrs. Adaline M 

Putnam, Andrew J 

Putney, Elijah W 



s 



1355 


5 


668 


2 


378 


2 


641 


2 


535 


*» 


2342 


8 


2494 


8 


1432 


5 


379 


2 


504 


2 


2376 


8 


2376 


8 


7-20 


3 


2743 


9 


505 


2 


172 


1 


609 


2 


150 


1 


2S54 


9 


1467 


5 


111 


1 


1414 


5 


2670 


9 


2126 


7 


2370 


8 


1476 


5 


1652 


6 


259 


1 


333 


1 


2888 


10 


2601 


9 


2120 


7 


114 


1 


190 


1 


835 


3 


989 


3- 


1302 


5 


3414 


11 


1942 


7 


1380 


5 


184 


1 


451 


2 


2079 


7 


2295 


8 


897 


3 


514 


2 


756 


3 


1263 


4 


1749 


6 


1831 


6 


1260 


4 


994 


3 


2038 


7 


221 


1 


1598 


6 


156 


1 


1561 


6 


847 


3 


297 


1 


2255 


7 


1418 


5 


281 


1 


876 


3 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



CV 



Subject. 



R. 

Raiger, P.E .•. 

Railroad across Indian Territory 

Railroad companies, compensation to 

Railroad land grants in Kansas 

Railroad and telegraph line from Missoari River to Pacific Ocean — 

Railway x)ostalcar8 

Rains, Isaac 

Ramsay, G.Alexander 

Ramsey, John 

Randall, Daniel B 

Randall, Elizabeth A 

Randall, Virginia Taylor 

Randall, William 

Randall, Lien t. William P 

Ramsdell, Isabella J 

Randle, William H 

Randies, Sarah 

Randolph, Cornelius P., and others 

Raoney, Hiram M 

Ransom, Isaac 

Rawlins, Benjamin S., and Eugene M. Squires 

Rawlins, Maj.-Gen. John S., removal of statue of 

Rawls, Morgan 

Ray. Eliza J 

Ray, Williams 

Raymond, Alonzo 

Read, John B 

Reading, Pa., public building at 

Real estate agents in District of Columbia I 

Real estate in the Territories r. 

Reber, Charles T , 

. Red Liake Indian Reservation 

Reed, John, sr 

Reed, Henry P 

RAed, Dnff Green 

Reed, William 

Reedy, Maurice 

Reeves, Marion 

Reeves, William C 

Reform School, trustees of the 

Reform in the civil service 

Regulating commerce 

Rehkopf, Mrs. H. B 

Reid, John B 

Rei^hter, Margaret J ', 

Rebef of sufferers from overflow in Alabama 

Remington, E., & Sons 

Removal of material trom Government Printing Office 

Renfro, Mary • 

Rannbaugh, Martha J. A 

Rennoe, David M 

Renny. Elijah W 

Renz, Agnes 

Report of Naval Constructor Hicbborn 

Reports of United States consuls on cattle breeding, &c 

Reservation of lands on account of live oak 

Reservation of the Otoe and Missouria Indians in Nebraska and Kan 

sas, sale of 

Revenue, collection of tho 

Revenue Marine Service 

Revenue Marine Service, officers of the 

Revenue officers, actions nguiust 



Report. 



Vol. 



1494 


5 


1356 


5 


2884 


10 


1()19 


6 


1929 


7 


3202 


11 


3150 


11 


477 


2 


1442 


5 


403 


2 


803 


3 


2561 


8 


595 


2 


95 


1 


814 


3 


5 2732 

\ 2891 


9 


10 


2936 


10 


2741 


9 


1926 


7 


2^27 


9 


951 


3 


107 


1 


2423 


6 


2375 


8 


2141 


7 


2805 


9 


2733 


9 


995 


3 


5 :^6i 


11 


) 3464 


11 


3455 


11 


1025 


3 


176 


1 


2799 


9 


2968 


10 


2677 


9 


2239 


7 


2546 


8 


2517 


8 


1900 


7 


3354 


11 


1001 


3 


2554 


8 


265 


1 


1824 


6 


1500 


5 


1566 


6 


3329 


11 


384 


2 


2625 


9 


1556 


6 


2348 


8 


3248 


11 


704 


2 


570 


2 


943 


3 


2753 


9 


1683 


6 


1620 


6 


2896 


10 


2897 


10 


3 


1 



CVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Revenue taxes ■ 

Revere, George W 

Revised Statutes, amendtng section 4887 

Revised Statutes, amendment of 

Revised Statutes, section 3058 

Revised Statutes, to amend section 3357 

Revised Statutes, amendment of section 3336 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Revised Statutes, section C738 

Revised Statutes, amending the 

Revised Statutes, section 3701 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Revised Statutes 

Revised Statutes 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Revised Statutes, to amend sections 3480 and 4716 

Revised Statutes, to amend section 914 

Revised Statutes, to amend section 533 

Revised Statutes, amending 

Revised Statutes, amendment of 

Revised Statutes, section 5151 

Revised Statutes, to amend sections 5191 and 5192 

Revolutionary soldiers, payment to surviving children 

Reynolds, Esther A 

Reynolds, Martin J 

Reymolds, William 

Rhinehart, Joseph Y -. 

Rians, Richard B , 

Ribble, Nancy L 

Ricards, William 

Rice, Ashley C 

Rice, Sally W •. 

Rice, Samnel F 

Rice, Stephen 

Rice, Warren L 

Richards, Alonzo V 

Richards, Augusta M 

Richardson, Amelia C 

Richardson, Ida, and others 

Richmond, Frederick 

Richmond National Cemetery 

Riddle, Charles 

Rider, Harriet M 

Ridgway, Richard C 

Riggs, William J 

Right of way for railroad purposes 

Riley, Thomas F 

Rio Grande and El Paso Railroad Company 

Rio Grande, Mexico and Pacific Railroad 

Ripley, Mary A 

Risley, Linnaeus W 

Ritter, Maria K 

River and harbor appropriation bill 

Rives, J. Henry 

Roach, James ^ 

Robaugh, George W 

Robb, William N 

Robbins, Amelia F 

Roberson, Lifurs 

Robert, Rebecca ...., 

Roberts, Cressv 

Roberts, Mrs. Edna 

Roberts, Emeline 

Robertson, Frederick 



Report. 



3209 


11 


915 


3 


2725 


9 


1619i 


6 


3066 


10 


1352 


5 


1140 


4 


2557 


8 


368 


1 


1830 


6 


1139 


4 


731 


3 


34 


1 


1319 


5 


3158 


11 


1641 


6 


• 315 


1 


101 


1 


550 


2 


1965 


7 


202 


1 


2616 


9 


2719 


9 


2168 


7 


1703 


6 


2401 


8 


2118 


7 


3433 


11 


47 


1 


2501 


8 


2926 


10 


32:18 


11 


2737 


9 


2252 


7 


2543 


8 


743 


3 


460 


2 


2550 


8 


163 


1 


3098 


10 


1249 


4 


2621 


9 


2091 


7 


1160 


4 


919 


3 


1091 


4 


3187 


11 


3067 


10 


1653 


6 


586 


2 


2975 


10 


785 


3 


5 1448 
\ 1565 


5 


6 


2325 


8 


5 2878 
> 3367 


10 


11 


2821 


9 


831 


3 


351 


1 


3314 


11 


2264 


7 


2983 


10 


250 


1 


1208 


4 


2388 


8 



VoL 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



CVII 



Subject. 



Roberts, Qeorge A 

Roberts, George F.etal ^'" 

Roberts, John B 

Robinson, Jnlia A.... 

Robbins, Elizabeth A 

Robbins, Samoel 

Robinson, Cassins H 

Robinson, Charles 

Robinson, Dileno 

Robinson, James ..••• • 

Robinson, John M., representatives of 

Robinson, Samuel ^ 

Robinson, S.S 

Robson, John W 

Rochester, N. Y., public bnildinflr at 

Rockwell, F.-L 7 

Rockwell, John , 

Rodgrers, Amanda 

Rodman, Charles 6 •• i 

Rogers, Clayton E 

RoUins, John E , 

Romahn, Michael * 

Roman Catholic church at Oswego, Kans 

Romine, Alfred G 

Romiser, Joseph 

Romiser, Joseph 

Roosa, Tunis J 

Root, Sylvester - 

Roscoe, Henry 

Rose, Alexander P #. 

Ro8e,John W 

Rose, Lenford 

Rose, Malitty 

Rose, Malitty, estate of 

Roser Post, G. A. R 




Ross, DanielH : 

Ross, John B 

Rosser, Thomas L 

Rossmcker, Franz ^ 

Rotty, Mrs. Emma 

Itonssean, D. Q 

Rowe, John 

Rowland, E.S 

Rowley, Roxana V., and son 

Rowley, Thomas A 

Roby, Henry 

Ruggles, Frederick W 

Rah, Benjamin ?. 

Rnles, amendments to the 

Rales of the House of Representatives 

Russell, James B 

Russey, John M 

Ryan, Bridget 

Ryan, David 

Ryan, John 

Ryan, Margi^ret F 



8. 

Sac and Fox and Iowa Indian Reservations in Nebraska and Kansas.. 

Sadler, Ellen 

Sage, John 

Saginaw Bay, title to lands in K 



VoL 



349 


1 


1122 


4 


1560 


6 


2204 


7 


1805 


6 


1704 


6 


2148 


7 


2351 


8 


1194 


4 


2250 


7 


727 


3 


3088 


10 


3172 


11 


549 


2 


398 


2 


3091 


10 


2209 


7 


359 


1 


112 


1 


690 


2 


2686 


9 


2127 


7 


3139 


10 


2875 


10 


2163 


7 


3213 


11 


1486 


1) 


13:» 


5 


2531 


8 


3440 


11 


433 


2 


256 


1 


1813 


6 


816 


3 


2030 


7 


739 


3 


2768 


9 


581 


2 


2 


1 


3078 


10 


3089 


10 


3182 


11 


1995 


7 


8034 


10 


888 


3 


2164 


7 


156^ 


6 


2477 


8 


2478 


8 


2984 


10 


1452 


5 


1621 


6 


1 


1 


880 


3 


1165 


4 


1772 


6 


9691 


9 


2372 


8 


1554 


6 


a50 


3 


2685 


9 


1944 


7 


1090 


4 


3116 


10 



cvm 



INDEX TO HOUSE BEPOETS. 



Sabject. 



Saint Andrews' Lodge, of Cynthiana, Ky 

Saint Angustine, Fla., purchase of lot iu 

Saint CUir, Dr. F. 

St. John, A. F. andN. C 

Saint Loais and San Francisco Railroad Company 

Saint Lnke's Church, Kalamazoo, Mich 

Saint Mark's Episcopal Charch, District of Columbia... 

Saint Patrick's Church, District of Columbia 

Sale of goods and merchandise by samples (Part 1} 

Sale of goods and merchandise by sample (Part 2) 

Salyers, James F 

Sampson, Thomas 

Sams, Anson B 

Sams, James S 

Sams, Nancy E 

San Antonio, Tex., public building at 

purchase of land near 

public building at 

to release ground to 

Sanborn, Mary H 

Sanford, James W 

San Francisco, interest of the U. S., in certain lands in 

granting Seal Rocks to 

relinquishing certain lands to 

interest in lands to 

post-o£Bce and court-house building in . .. 

Sangston, Wm. J 

Sarsfield, David 

Sanlpaw, George W 

Sanders, Greorge M. . .^ 

Santa F6, N. Mex„ public building at 

Sattler, Mrs. Catherine 

Saner, Stephen 

Sault Sainte Marie, lands in ; 

Saunders, Phcebe '. 

Savannah, Ga., public building at 1 

Savercool, James 

Sawyer, John I 

Sawyer, Lucinda 

Sawyer, Mary £ 

Sawyer, Samuel 

Saylor, Augustus D 

Scauland, Lewis W 

Scarborough, S. E 

Schadel, Henry A 

Schaefer, George 

Scliaumburg, James W 

Schenck, Cornelia R >.... 

Schier, Mrs. Anna 

Schindler, August 

Schleyer, Theresa 

Schoefnocker, Christopher 

Schofield, Joseph, and Sarah N. Giese 

School board, District of Columbia 

School lands in Beaufort county, South Carolina, sale of 

Schoonover, William G 

Schoonover, Jonas 

Schrnmpp, Frederick 

Schuchardt. William 

Schuffert, Crustav 

Schuler, Samuel .* , 

Schuler, Charles 

Schultheis, Daniel 



Report. 



980 


3 


3143 


11 


1950 


7 


1293 


5 


ie2 


1 


2287 


8 


1137 


4 


1136 


4 


1762 


6 


1762 


6 


2622 


9 


373 


1 


141 


1 


2953 


10 


2951 


10 


394 


2 


1410 


5 


614 


2 


1253 


4 


1977 




1778 


6 


3056 


10 


2649 


9 


2707 


9 


2755 


9 


642 


2 


2007 


7 


a53 


3 


3134 


10 


3149 


11 


2739 


9 


2149 


7 


5 794 
I 2669 


3 


9 


3048 


10 


146 


1 


393 


2 


2583 


9 


1277 


5 


2128 


7 


291 


1 


2726 


9 


ini 


4 


1808 


6 


2475 


8 


3342 


11 


1006 


4 


5 1376 
> 1178 


5 


4 


2073 


7 


2689 


9 


C 50 
) 2524 


1 


6 


2783 


9 


307 


1 


3296 


11 


2704 


9 


1266 


4 


408 


2 


2604 


9 


239 


1 


3320 


11 


1572 


6 


1360 


5 


1695 


6 


2746 


9 



Vol. 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



CIX 



Sabjeot. 



Sehnltz, Bmno 

SchayUuli Company, PennsylTania 

River Eadtaide B^ailroad Company, Philadelphia. 

Scott, John 

Scott, Wilson 

Scranton, Pa., pablic building at 

Scndder, CharleeL 

Scudder, Jesse B 

Scntt, Elwin A 

Seal Rocks 

Seaman, Peter F 

Seaman, Sarins M .' 

Seaman, Randolph 

Sears, F. A 

Sears, llrson W 

Seat, SamnelB 

Seay, John H 

Sebastian, Charles N 

Sebring, Charles 

Sechrist, Joel 

8econd judicial circuit, additional jadge 

Sedalia, Mo., pnblic building at 

Seeley, George - 

Sees, Caroline 

Seibold. Frederick 

Selby, John — 

Selma and Meridian Railroad Company 

Semmes, Mary Mortimer 

Semon, Bache &Co 

Seneca Indians, lands of 

Service of process in police courts, District of Columbia . . . . 

Session messen^rs, employment of, in House post-office 

Settlement of claims of States 

Seventh Regiment, New York 

Sewell, Coulson &, Porter, and Harrison & Fishback 

Shacklett, Harriet W 

Sbaftoe, William 

Shannon, Mary A 

Sharp, Abbie 

Sharp, Joseph 

Sbarrer, Adam J 

Sharretts, George E. W 

Shaw, J. Q 

Shaw, Capt. Francis 

SbawbclL John G 

Sheads, Elias 

Shearer, Sarah M 

Sheffield, Dr. William H 

Sheldon, Elvira Bliss 

Shelton, WiUiam P 

Shepard, Alexander 

Shepherd, Isaac M 1... 

Shepherd, D. 8 

Shepherd, James 

Sherbonaw, Frank 

Sherlock, Bridget 

Sherrill, Samuel 

Sherwood, Wesley H 

Sherwood, Sidney 

Shields, General James, swords of 

Shimer, Emma M 

Shine, Denis 

Shinkle, Josiah 

Ship-capal coqnectiog Delaware River with Atlantic Ocean 



Report. 


Vol. 


1775 


6 


1615 


6 


1649 


6 


911 


3 


1278 


5 


1333 


5 


2841 


9 


346 


1 


2006 


7 


3415 


11 


553 


2 


8h9 


3 


1696 


6 


3244 


11 


1777 


6 


5 1883 
I 2032 


6 


7 


1068 


4 


2131 


7 


1205 


4 


950 


3 


2290 


8 


1(>H8 


6 


777 


3 


2781 


9 


1577 


6 


2976 


10 


2432 


8 


2448 


8 


3318 


11 


2344 


8 


2.301 


8 


3437 


11 


977 


3. 


1243 


4 


5 1377 


5 


} 2498 


8 


3061 


10 


3075 


10 


1575 


6 


858 


3 


1244 


4 


124 


1 


3324 


11 


1892 


7 


210 


1 


1048 


4 


708 


2 


712 


3 


654 


2 


2829 


9 


2139 


7 


177 


1 


1861 


6 


957 


3 


3249 


11 


1109 


4 


543 


2 


1899 


7 


IGOl 


6 


Hi) 


1 


1^29 


11 


797 


3 


2525 


8 * 


4a5 


2 


390 


2 



ex 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



Subject. 



Shipley, E.R •- 

Shipwrecked seamen, transportation of 

Shively, Henry A 

Shocklev, Milton P 

Shoenfeit, Andrew 

Shoppa, Martin 

Short Creek Lake, to donate to Missouri 

Short, Powhattan B 

Shropshire, R. H 

Shoshone and Bannock tribes of Indians 

Shnbrick, Edward R 

Shnler, Elizabeth i 

Shull, Joseph 

Shurtleff, Giles 

Shutt, Frank 

Sibley, Henry H 

Signor, Charles B 

Silbemagel, John J 

Silkey, Martha A 

Simmons, D. P 

Simpson, Benjamin M 

Simpson, William 

Simpson, Thomas , 

Sionx Indian Reservation in Dakota 

Sionx City, Iowa, public building at 

Sionx City and Saint Paul Railroad Company 

Skinner, Flora * 

Slack, George 

Slamm, Jane E 

Slater, John F 

Slayton, Thomas J 

Slenbaker, Elizabeth 

Sloan, William L 

Small bills, for circulation 

Small, Maj. Michael P 

Smalley, Eugenia A 

Smarzo, Christian 

Smiley, Alexander 

Smith, Abigail 

Smith, Ann 

Smith, Mrs. Benjamin 

Smith, Betsey A 

Smith, Mrs. Bridget 

Smith, Charles B., heirs of 

Smith, Cyrenius W « 

Smith, Elbridge 

Smith, Euphemia R 

Smith, George W 

Smith, Isaac 

Smith, Jannet E.B 

Smith, Jacob 

Smith, Snsan^ 

Smith, Margaret ; 

Smith, Martha 

Smith, Mary B 

Smith, Mary Grace , 

Smith, Mathew 

Smith, Nancy C ^ 

Smith, Pannelia , 

Smith, Robert 

Smith, Samantha A , 

Smith, Sidney R 

Smith, Stephen, jr 

Smith, Stephen D 



Report. 



899 


3 


32:M 


11 


2092 


7 


3315 


11 


1329 


5 


1917 


7 


2040 


7 


2665 


9 


1069 


4 


2767 


9 


3295 


11 


810 


3 


2367 


8 


1789 


6 


2428 


8 


1722 


6 


624 


2 


2870 


10 


417 


2 


467 


2 


97 


1 


2514 


8 


546 


2 


12^7 


4 


968 


3 


2487 


8 


3026 


10 


78 


1 


1284 


5 


869 


3 


1533 


5 


2166 


7 


446 


2 


1455 


5 


1150 


4 


1518 


5 


437 


2 


298 


2 


318 


1 


2064 


7 


625 


2 


3299 


11 


699 


2 


K 1435 
) 1040 


5 


10 


1937 


7 


3077 


11 


1114 


4 


680 


2 


3253 


11 


1515 


6 


1174 


4 


2303 


8 


2097 


7 


2222 


7 


443 


2 


1795 


6 


3353 


11 


2889 


10 


1119 


4 


2789 


9 


1701 


6 


3«3 


2 


5 G46 
) 3236 


2 


11 


3260 


11 



VoL 



INDEX TO HOUSE KEP0RT8. 



CXI 



Sabject. 



Smith, Stephen R . . . 

Smith, Thamas 

Smithers, Thomas T 



Smith, WiDiam J 

Smithpeter, James 

Smithsonian Institacion, last annual report of 

Snodgraas, Mary C 

SnoYely, Jacob — 

Snow, MaryE 

Snowden and Mason 

Snyder, Cnrtis L : 

Snyder, James A 

Snyder, John H 

Soyder, John 

Soldiers charged with desertion, to relieve 

Soldiers, to correct record of 

Soldiers and sailors of the war of 1812 

Somes, RinaldoR 

Bone and Fleming Mannfactnring Company 

Sorrell, Francis 

8oq16, Frank 

SoweU, WiUiam J 

Sowle, OrlandoT 

Sowther, Charles 

Sooth Carolina Volnnteers, board of field officers of ,, 

Sonth Carolina Volnntecr Troops 

Channel at Sonth Pass 

Soathem Exposition at Louisville, Ky 

SoQthem Pacific Railroad Company, lands granted to. 

Soothwick, John • 

Spah, Fidel 

Spangler, Matilda 

Sparks, Whitfield 

Sparks, Lewis M 

Sparks, Simpson 

Spanlding, Columbia 

Spanlding, Lisetta W 

Spenard, Jnlia 

Spencer, T.J 

bpencer, William C 

Spicer, Emily Louisa 

Spitzer, Solomon 

Spokane and CoBnr D'Alene Railway Company 

Spragne, William D 

Spragne, Mary 

Sprain, Mrs. Sophia 

Springfield, Mass., public building at 

Springfield, Mo., public building at 

Springfield, Mass., milling shop at 

Squires, William P 

Strickland, Jesse H 

Stafford, Otis S 

Stanley, Joseph 

Stanuard, Emily J 

Stapleton, Robert H 

Stame, Levi M 

Starr, William H 

Startsman, Eliza 

State courts, removal of causes from 

State courts, removal of causes from 

States and Territories, benefit of 

Statesville, N. C, public building at 

Statue of Liberty 

Staunton, Va., ptibllc building at 



Report. 


Vol. 


2099 


7 


2429 


8 


279 


I 


5 2273 

) 2490 


8 


8 


2952 


10 


911 


3 


1581 


6 


61 


1 


442 


2 


3.'«i7 


11 


1203 


4 


1914 


7 


1\^06 


4 


2008 


7 


914 


3 


1655 


6 


296 


1 


776 


3 


3330 


11 


2634 


9 


i:8 


1 


954 


3 


1044 


4 


1674 


6 


456 


2 


3122 


10 


1233 


4 


3412 


11 


706 


2 


956 


3 


1896 


7 


1579 


6 


790 


3 


893 


3 


3275 


11 


1840 


6 


2260 


7 


659 


2 


3166 


11 


3169 


11 


775 


3 


1294 


5 


971 


3 


948 


3 


25:W 


8 


2833 


9 


512 


2 


541 


2 


2233 


7 


5 326 


1 


I 2096 


7 


1754 


6 


2518 


8 


3306 


11 


3259 


11 


IIH 


4 


1113 


4 


1733 


6 


1580 


6 


1078 


4 


1305 


5 


572 


2 


2886 


10 


2899 


10 


2642 


9 



cxn 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



Sabject. 



Steam boiler inspection for District of Colambia 

Steam engineering in the District of Columbia 

Steamer De Soto 

Steamship companies, claims of 

Steam vessels, inspection of 

Steele, Wi)bur F 

Stephens, Robert E 

Steuber, Bernhard 

Stevens, Edwin 

Stevens, Joshua N 

Stevens, Catherine 

Stevens, Angastns Field 

Steward, Jackson 

Stewart, Elizabeth 

Stewart, John A 

Stewart, Samuel B 

Stewart, Alexander P 

Stewart, James, heirs of 

Stewart, Frances E. 

Stewart, John F., heirs of 

Stickney, Helen M 

Stiles, Stover E 

Stobaugh, James 

Stotesbnry, Charles 

Stout, George W 

Strachan, Robert 

Stocksdale, Elizabeth 

StockstiU, David W 

StoU, John 

Stone, Elizabeth D 

Stone, Cudberth .--, 

Stone, James 

Stone, Cudbert 

Stone, Sally 

Stone, Ashford A 

Stonecypher, David 

Stouffer, AlbertD 

Stout, Zephaniah 

Strickland, Jesse H 

Stnckey,John 

Stngo, Aslang O 

Sturgis, John 

Sturtz, Caroline 

Stutsman, Henry H 

Submarine Cables, protection of 

SnbpcBna duces tecum 

Sub-treasury at Louisville, Ky 

Suell, JosiahB 

Sundry civil appropriation bill 

Suffall, William J 

Smt« against the Government 

Sullivan, Mary 

Sullivan, Elizabeth 

Surplus in the United States Treasury, payment of. 

Sutton, A. Schuyler 

Swift, Alexander & Co 

Swamp and overflowed lands 

Swartz, William M i 

Sweeney, E. B 

Sweet, Franklin 

Swift, Mrs. Emily M 

Swope, John P ,.... ,.. ,, 




VoL 



988 


3 


2374 


8 


833 


3 


661 


2 


3141 


10 


214 


1 


1016 


3 


3220 


11 


1949 


7 


802 


3 


1975 


7 


2366 


8 


2082 


7 


649 


2 


711 


3 


2319 


8 


27 


1 


302 


1 


23 


1 


161 


1 


1536 


5 


1731 


6 


1932 


7 


2172 


7 


1054 


4 


826 


3 


2692 


9 


367 


1 


985 


3 


13G6 


5 


3305 


11 


1402 


5 


953 


3 


591 


2 


558 


2 


2420 


8 


2103 


7 


420 


2 


1235 


4 


2110 


7 


1754 


6 


3247 


11 


3465 


11 


1523 


5 


1718 


6 


1024 


3 


72 


X 


2529 


8 


3198 


11 


385 


2 


1643 


6 


286 


1 


2898 


10 


3431 


11 


772 


3 


1077 


4 


2157 


7 


324 


1 


630 


2 


877 


3 


3059 


10 


1089 


4 


1591 


6 


449 


2 


2819 


9 


3070 


10 


1169 


4 



INDEX TO HOUSE BEP0BT8. 



CXIII 



Babject. 



T. 



Tmiif Mrs. ClariflSft 

Taggart, John 

Ttelbert, William 

Talmadge, Theodore W 

Tallapoosa, aafferers by the wreck of the 

Do 

TanBahill, Clara M 

Tarbell^Mary 

Tatem, TbomaB M 

TaYemer, Eli 

Taxee in the DUtrict of Colombia 

Tajlor, John 

Taylor, MarvK 

Taylor, Nathaniel 

Ttylor, Martin 

Taylor, Mary J 

Ttylor, Mrs. Arlanta T 

Taylor, Mary M 

Taylor, Benjamin F 

Taylor, John P 

Taylor, Philip 

Taylor, William 

Taylor, Zachary, statneof .'. 

Teed, Theodore .- 

Te^an, Thomas 

Teits, Jacob , 

Telegraph operators daring the war 

Tel^raph line from Missoml Biyer to the Pacifio Ocean 

TenEyck, Tenodor 

Ten Eyck, Teoodor. (Part 2) 

Tents, loan of, to soldiers 

Territories, two regiments in the. (Part 2) 

Texarkana, Ark., terms of conrts at 

Texas fever or cattle plague 

Texas, judicial distriotsin 

Thenu, Catherine 

Thomas, Josephine De Costa , 

Thomas, Sarah A 

Thomas, Mary A 

Thomas, A.A 

Thompson, John C 

ThomiNion, William 

Thompson, Franklin, aZkwSeelye , 

Thompson, DaYid H 

Thomas, William B 

Thompson, Mary M 

Thompson, Minerva T ^. 

Thompson, E. P 

Thomberry, Joseph H , 

Thomburg, J.H 

Thombnrg, J. H 

Thombary, Lewis A 

Thome, William P 

Thoniton, John W 

Threadgill, Emily 

Thnrston, Bassell S 

Thnrston, William 

Tibbits, W. H 

Tibbetts, JohnB 

Tibbetts, Mary A 



Tioe, Isaac P., administrators of. 



Tiller, Carter W 

7149— H. Eep.. 



Beport. 


Vol. 


1189 


• 

4 


604 


2 


664 


2 


185 


1 


825 


3 


3402 


11 


3384 


11 


2938 


la 


2776 


^ 


2193 


7 


3458 


11 


703 


2 


3287 


11 


79 


1 


1209 


4 


1491 


5 


2086 


7 


2836 


9 


2286 


8 


2963 


10 


16f>8 


6 


411 


2 


3427 


11 


1837 


6 


1998 


7 


3095 


10 


lG77i 


6 


607 


2 


2915 


10 


2915 


10 


31G0 


11 


530 


2 


2637 


9 


718 


3 


633 


2 


1780 


6 


11-21 


4 


2V2i) 


7 


1713 


6 


1156 


4 


2H59 


10 


2608 


9 


9.9 


3 


1853 


6 


1509 


5 


3291 


11 


784 


3 


1328 


5 


2091 


7 


3375 


11 


3080 


10 


76 


1 


2276 ' 


8 


652 


2 


2972 


U) 


2244 


7 


2655 


9 


1379 


5 


2102 


7 


1760 


6 


5 2491 


8 


: 3020 


10 


3200 


11 


; 682 


2 



Tin 



GXIV 



INDEX TO HOUSE EEPOETS. 



Subject. 




Tillmaa, Hezekiah 

Tillman, Lacon E 

Timber culture and desert land laws, repeal of 

Tinder, William, estate of 

Tircuit, Eugene , 

Titus, George 

Tobacco, packing and seUing 

Tobacco taxes, repeal of 

Tobacco, cigars, and snuff, inspection of 

Tobacco for the use of the Atmy 

Todd, Catharine S 

Todd, Michael 

Todd, Harry I 

Toles, Lioas 

Tolman, Ellen S 

Tompkins, ZebulonS 

Tongue, Levi L 

Torbert^ James A., legal representatiyee of 

Towers, Peter 

Town, M. S 

Townshend. Mary 

Tracy Dwyer 

Tracy, Samuel E 

Trade-doUai 

Trammell, Winnie 

Transfer of a certain appropriation 

Transportation of dutiable goods 

live stock 

Trask, Horace 

Trasper, Lewis J 

Travers, Mrs. Alice E.... 

Treln, Lewis A 

Triplettj Moses 

Tryon, Spencer W 

Treasurer of the United States to credit the District of Columbia with 

certain moneys 

Trefethen William 

"Tres Alamos'' land grant 

Treutlen, John E 

Trimble, Alexander 

Trimble, Isaac E., trustees of 

Trlplett, T. H 

Troy, N. Y., public building at 

Tryon, Clarkson 

Tucker, James 

Tucker, Ealph H 

Tucker, Sarah A 

Tuder, Daniel F 

Tullar, Sidneys 

Turner, Laura A 

Tumey, Mrs. MarthaE 

Turvill, William 

Tutt, John A. S., heirs of. 

Tuttle, Joseph 

Twigcs' command, pensions to soldiers of 

Twitcnel, Leander C 

Tyson, Bryan 

Tyus, Lewis 

U. 

Underwood, James A t 

Undrawn poultry 

Union Pacific Bail way Company 



Vo 



1782 
1378 
1679 
2492 
1893 
2067 
2760 
3210 
2633 

207 
1741 
2855 
1123 
1124 

2^:i 
1921 

319 
2581 
2060 
3399 

274 

414 

251 
2718 
2770 
2037 
3270 

636 
2041 
2638 
1037 
2877 
2057 
2240 
2950 
1906 

3429 

2002 

187 

2424 

2812 

1886 

480 

2721 

2869 

2327 

1912 

2349 

3009 

2070 

1788 

110 

611 

1296 

1529 

818 

747 

1357 

1154 



233 

1383 

836 



IKDEX TO HOUSE REP0BT8. 



CXV 



Subject. 



Uniontowiif to change name of 

United Brethren in Christ, of Tyrone, Pa 

United Peorias and Miamies of Indian Territory, allotment of lands to 

Unlawful expenditures in the Signal Service 

Uperftfb, John 

United states barracks, transfer of 

claims against 

courts, salaries of ludj^es of 

light-house, twelfth district, employes of 

mails, obligation to carry 

mails, obligation to carry 

and Mexico, awards between 

Srotection of, against railroad companies 
tatntes and Congressional Record 

Urgent deficiency appropriation bill 

Utah, special session of the legislature of 

V. 

Vail, Sarah 

Yan Arsdel. Joseph 

VanBiUard, Oliver 

YanBaren, Barnett S 

Yance, Mayberry 

Yanderhoff, John A 1 

VanEtten, Mary Ann 

Yan Holt, Joseph ', ,.... 

Yan Horn, Mary A 

Yan Horn, Jodeph 

YanNort, James A • 

Yanorder, Andrew J 

Yans Murray papers ,... 

Yantreese, John.. 

Yan, Mary Ann 

Yanghn, Sarah A : 

Yemay, James D 

Yenel fisheries of the United States 

Yicksburg, Miss., public building at 

National Cemetery road 

United States courts at 

and Meridian Railroad Company 

Yictor, MathUda 

Yigus, Cyrus 

Yinceot, John 

Yinegar made from wine 

Yolanteer Army, officers of 

forces, pay of 

Yon Lnettwitz, A. H 

Yorhees, Martha A 

Vofls, Taylor 

Yonchers, examination of 

W. 

Wages, Lanrena , 

Wagon-masters, retirement of 

Wa^er, Philip 

Waite, Hiram JL 

Walbach, J. J. B 

Walford, Charles H 

Walker, Moses B 

Walker, Maria 

Wall,Wimam / 

Wallace, Rosa 

Walsh, Thomas 

Walsh. Thomas B 



Report. 



171 


1 


2617 


9 


Ky52 


6 


2023 


7 


1237 


4 


637 


2 


20 


1 


1761 


6 


471 


2 


534 


2 


5;m 


2 


3428 


11 


3409 


11 


174 


1 


733 


3 


2641 


9 


a303 


11 


742 


3 


272 


1 


2630 


9 


1918 


7 


3311 


11 


2146 


7 


2364 


8 


2540 


8 


807 


3 


2463 


8 


2955 


10 


3356 


11 


1894 


7 


3450 


11 


1700 


6 


236 


1 


2042 


7 


1412 


5 


2246 


7 


1317 


5 


1292 


5 


3346 


11 


13?2 


5 


2596 


9 


3154 


11 


1756 


6 


640 


2 


3178 


11 


2161 


7 


325 


1 


3133 


10 


1051 


4 


206 


1 


327 


1 


263 


1 


3456 


11 


1710 


6 


638 


2 


1943 


7 


1252 


4 


1471 


6 


2688 


9 


2137 


7 



Vol. 



CXVI 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Walters, John H 

Walters, Joseph B 

Walters, John H 

Walton, Joseph d^ Co 

Walton, Robert H 

Walzell, James £.B 

Wamack, Sasan 

War of 1812, widows of 

Ward, W. H 

Ward, William, claim of, for services 

Ward, Thomas 

Ward, William E 

Ward, Charles F 

Ward, Willie F 

W^rd, Mrs.P.L 

Ward,Zeb 

Warder, LntherF 

Wardwell, Ernest H 

Ward well, Emery S 

Ware, Thomas R 

Ware, Lien t. Francis, heirsof 

Warehoasing and collection of the revenue 

War loans, interest on .-. .. 

Warner, Elizabeth 

Warr, Americas V , 

Warren, John G 

Warren, Georee A 

Warrington, Katesbnry R 

War taxes of 1861 

War taxes, claim of the 

Washburn, Lucy A 

Washburn, Henry and Thomas 

Washington Cable Railway Company ^. 

Traction Railway Company 

National Monument 

Territory, legislative assembly of 

Wasson, Richard F., legal representatives of 

Water-power at Little Falls, Minn 

Water-ionte to connect Lake Michigan with Detroit River 

Waters, Bryant 

Waters, Col. Jame« 

Waters, Catharine 1 

Watson, John 

Watson, James 

Watkins, John R., administrator 

Waugh, Henrietta M 

Wayne, General Anthony 

Weaver, Henry 

Weaver, John C 

Weaver, William H 

Webb, William W 

Webb, Mrs. Anna S 

Weber, Christian • 

Webster, David • 

Webster, Lieut. J. McA 

Webster, William 

Webster, Mary S 

Webster, William B 

Weddingfield, William 

Weeden, AmosC 

Weekley, Thomas 

Weeks, Eliza A 

Weide, August 

Weightman, William 

Weimer, William R 

Weltzel, Louisa 




1670 

434 
1269 
1291 
2181 
2020 

857 
3313 
3057 
1008 

276 
1063 
1276 

293 
3337 
2564 

489 
3338 
2882 
1639 

9d4 
3446 
1560 

878 
2328 
2807 
295?7 
2320 
35 
'35 
2772 

156 
2549 
2299 
1758 
1310 
3400 

846 
2294 
24M 

937 
2629 
1773 
1708 
2790 

832 
2793 
2505 
3423 
2654 
3185 
2534 
1511 

154 
3123 
1516 

773 

285 

809 
1785 
2949 

852 

56 

2071 

656 

587 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



cxvn 



Sabjeot. 




Welch, Harriet 

Welch, Isaac 

Welch,Ellen J 

Weldy,8eth 

WelUjEogene 

Wells, George 

Wells, John j 

Welsh.William 

Wemple, Frank 

WertZfAmos G 

Wesner, Mary Ann 

We8t,Callie 

Westerhoose, John H 

Westfall, Abraham 

West India Islands, signal stations in... 

Westmoreland, Thomas P 

Weston, C^ra L 

West Virgmia troops 

WetherelT, George W 

Wetter, SarahL 

Wetiel, M 

Whsrton's Digest of International Law 

Wheeler, William H 



Wheeler, Francis I 

Wheeler, William W 

Wheelock, Jared D 

White, Bartlett E 

White, John E 

White. Nicholas 

White, Joseph R 

Whil«,Silas8 

White, John 

White, Stephen 

White, Evahne A 

White, Christopher C 

Whitehead, Mary E 

Whitesell, Catharine 

Whiting, Charles J 

Whittaler, John H., guardian 

Whitted, William H 

Whorley, Louis ! 

Wichita and Arkansas Valley RaUioad, right of way to. 

Wichita, Kans., public building at 

Wickware, Charles 

Wifff^ns, Thomas L 



i 



njggii 
Wigha: 



man, William A 



Wightman, John, legal representatiTes of. 

Wiffgins, v. L 

Wilbcr, R.Graef, ACo 

Willcox, Orlando B 

Wilde, James B 

Wilkerson, Isom 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., public building at 

WUkey, H. C 

Wilkins, Eliza 

Willamette River, Oregon, bridge oyer.... 

Willhoite, SanfordC 

William B. Isaacs d^ Co 

Williams, Thomas 

Williams, Sarah Ann 

Williams, John W 

Williams, John 8 

Williams, Henry C 

Williams, Joseph 



2074 
62 
2114 
3388 
3175 

689 
1677 
1166 
1170 
1502 

658 
1697 
1705 
3243 
1636 

973 
2671 
2447 
1927 
2317 
1709 
2618 
83 
2104 
2479 
2683 
1751 
1976 
2211 
2433 
3335 

577 

580 
1524 
1190 
2135 

168 
1499 
3181 

584 
2194 
1495 
1473 
2022 
1953 
3341 
2210 
2695 
3032 

427 
3401 

940 
1487 
2054 
3454 
2430 
2803 
3159 
1052 

484 

131 
1730 
3087 
2089 

426 

142 



7 
1 
7 

11 

11 
2 
6 
4 
4 
5 
2 
6 
6 

11 
6 
3 
9 
8 
7 
8 
6 
9 
1 
7 
8 
9 
6 
7 
7 
8 

11 
2 
2 
5 
4 
7 
1 
5 

11 
2 
7 
5 
5 
7 
7 

11 
7 
9 

10 
2 

11 
3 
5 
7 

11 
8 
9 

11 
4 
2 
1 
6 

10 
7 
2 
1 



i 



CXVIII 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



Subject. 



Williams, Ann J 

WilliamB, Isaac 

Williams, Robert 

Williamsport, Pa., pnbllo building at . 

Willoughby, William H 

Wilmington, N. C, pnblic bnilding at 

Wilson, William D 

Wilson, H. B., administrator 

Wilson, Owen P 



Wilson, Andrew J 

Wilson, Elizabeth O 

Wilson, Amanda F • 

Winans, Isaac • 

Winder, Cbarlee 

Wine free from internal-rerenne tax, fitvtifloation for exportation of.. 

Wines, John 

Winner, Jacob .,., 

Wintersmith, JameeG 

Wise, Charles V 

Wissvell, Rebecca ^•••..... 

Witham, Sophronia 

Witnesses, depositions of 

WoUenw^ber, Lonis A 

Wolverton, Be^jamfii 8 

Woman saffrage 

Wood, James D. 

Wood, Jqhn Taylor 

Wood, Priscilla 

Wood, Mary 

Wood,W. J 

Wood, Sarah H 

Wood, Warren F 

Worden, L. J 

Wolfe, James 

Wolfe. Miss Ann, etal 

Woodbury, Mrs. D. P 

Woodford, Samnel A. B 

Woodgill, Elizabeth 

Woodside, Andrew J 

Woodson, Mary S ^ i 

Wool, retaining present rates on 

Wool, restoration of duties of 1867 

WooUey, Susan 

Wondrak, Mathias 

Worcester, Mass., public building at 

Wornom, Charles T 

Worrall, Alexander 

Worth, Miss Margaret Stafford 

Worthington, C. A 

Worts, Mannister, and others 

Wright, David L 

Wright, William H , 

Wright, Mary F 

Wright, Giles 

Wright, Sarah C 

Wright, William 

Wright, Daniel K 

Wyant^ Charles 

Wyoming, settlers in the Wind Valley of 

and Nebraska, military qniu*terB in 

new land district in 

lands to 

legislative assembly of 

probate courts in 




1 



J 



2316 
1248 
1409 

397 

627 
1153 
2277 
3390 
2974 
1528 
3201 
2595 
2316 
2717 

921 
2632 
2804 
2243 
1829 
80 
2727 
1530 

103 
2015 

677 
2289 
1557 

323 
2012 
2941 
2416 
1446 
2548 
2427 
1513 
3129 
3008 
1923 
2519 
2238 
1706 
2848 
2847 

469 
2710 
1325 
2811 

761 
2759 
2865 
1663 

622 
1225 
2256 
2856 
2825 
1445 

267 

895 

1884 

3112 

S 538 

)3199 

2293 

25 

1876 
1875 



INDEX TO HOUSE REPORTS. 



CXIX 



Sabjeot. 



Y. 

Yachts, ftmending Btatates relative to 

Yellow-fever cases 

Yellow-fever, iDDOcnlation of 

Yonkers, N. Y., pablio bnilding at ... 

YonDg, Anderson W 

YooDg, Freemorton 

Yoang, James H 

Young, John 

Yottttger, John W 

Young Men's Christian Association, District of Columbia 

Do 

Young, Snsan V 

Young, Mrs. Sarah 

Young Women's Christian Home, District of Columbia . . 

Z. 

ZaneBviUe, Ohio, public bnilding at 

Zirn, Adam 

Zetteiman, Oarret D 

Zimmerman, John 



Report. 



1637 


6 


375 


2 


2914 


10 


1162 


4 


2952 


10 


3006 


10 


3072 


10 


1842 


6 


3252 


11 


1724 


6 


3469 


11 


2391 


8 


2919 


10 


1726 


6 


540 


2 


419 


2 


2818 


9 


24ia 


8 



Vol. 



4»TH O0N6BX8S9 1 HOUSE OP EEPRESENTATIVB8. ( Ebpoet 
1st Session. f \ Ko. 1543. 



ESTATE OF EDWIN T. PILKINTON, DECEASED. 



April C, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to 

be printed. 



Mr. Trigo, from the Gommtitee on Claims, submitted the following 

EEPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. E. 2517.1 

The Committee on Claims^ to whom was referred the bill {H.R. 2517) for the 
relief of the estate of Edwin T. PiUcinton, deceased^ stibmit the following 
report: 

The Committee on Ways and Means of the Forty-seventh Congress 
bad this case under consideration, and unanimously reported as follows, 
viz: 

[Forty-seventh Congreas. first session, Report No. 645.] 

Tke CommxUee on Ways and Means, to whom was referred the petition of E, T, Pilkinton^ 

of Virginia J respectfully report : 

SaidPllkinton was a inanufactarer of tobacco in Manchester, Va., and had affixed 
the proper stamps to a large qnantity of tobacco still in his factory, and not yet put 
on the market. His factory was burned on the night of May 3, 1869, and tobacco was 
eoDsnnied on which he bad put stamps to the amount or $'2,684.96, which stamps had 
beeo purchased on that day. . The tobacco and stamps were a total loss. 

He applied to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, in 1874, for relief, but it was 
refased, because then barred under the act of Congress. 

PetitioDer has made his application to a former Congress, but no action was taken. 

The proof of loss is complete and clear, and, though much time has elapsed, the 
eomiDittee see no reason to refuse to refund the amount of taxes paid on propertv 
borped before it was nut upon the market. The tax was collected on property which 
perished before it could be used. 

The committee report a bill for relief of petitioner. 

Tonr committee fully concur in this report, and recommend that bill 
H. B. 2517, for the relief of said Pilkinton, which they have had under 
oonsideration, do pass. 



49th Gongbebs, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Repoet 
l9i Session. ) ) No.ir44. 



WILLIAM E. BOND. 



▲fril6, 1886. — Coiuiiiitte<l to the Committee of the Whole HoiiBe and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Tsiaa, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1741.] 

The Committee on Claims^ to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 1741) /or 
the relief of William E. Bondj have had the same under consideration, 
and beg leave to report : 

The claimant, William E. Bond, was collector of internal revenue for 
the first district of North Carolina, from November, 1866, to June, 1869. 
Daring that time one McMahon, a licensed distiller in said district, be- 
came insolvent. There was a bill against him in favor of the Govern- 
ment for $1,014.59, which was not assessed on the list, it being for fines, 
penalties, and extra charges on his distillery. If it had been assessed 
on the li^t, it would have been a prior lien to the executions in the hands 
of the sheriff of the county, which absorbed all of McMahon's property. 
There was no blame to be attached to the claimant for this. In order 
to secure something for the Government, claimant accepted from 
McMahon, who was then and has thence hitherto remained insolvent, 
certain checks or drafts, on sundry parties, for the full amount of 
$1,014.59. This amount was charged against claimant in the settlement 
of his accounts, and he paid the full amount thereof into the Treasury. 
These checks or drafts were all paid by the parties upon whom they were 
made, except one for $398.50, which was protected, and which has never 
been paid, and has therefore been a total loss to claimant, who has paid 
that amount into the Treasury. It seems but for the action of claimant 
the whole amount of $1,014.59 would have been lost to the Government. 
Your committee, whilst strongly adhering to the doctrine that public 
officers should be held to the strictest accountability, and not afforded 
relief where there has been a plain neglect of duty, are clearly of opinion 
that relief should be granted in this case, and they therefore report 
said bill favorably, and recommend its passage. 

They submit the accompanying letter from the Commissioner of In- 
ternal Revenue as part of this report. 



TuRASCJRY Dbpartmknt, Opfick of Internal Rkvknuk, 

Washington, February 14, 1884. 

Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the letter of William E. Bond, 
late collector in temal revenue, first listrict North Carolina, referred by you to thia 
office, relative to his claim to have refunded to him the sum of $398.50, being the 
UDonnt of a draft received by him as collector in payment for taxes, and accounted 



2 WILLIAM E. BOND. 

• 

for to the Government in cash, which was sabseqaently returned to him unpaid. In 
your reference you ask me to examine the claim, and advise you whether I would 
recommend the passage of the bill to pay Mr. Bond the amount claimed. 

In reply, I would state that this claim was considered by the House of Representa- 
tives of the Forty -third Congress and adversely reported on (see House bill No. 283 
and Report of Committee on Claims No. 374, of April 3, 1^74), and it is presumed all 
the papers relating to the matter are with the files of that committee. 

WhiljB it is a fact that the receipt of Mr. Bond in payment of taxes of checks or 
drafts or any other funds than current money was without authority at law, and en- 
tirely at his own risk, yet in this case it is claimed that he accepted these drafts att 
the only means of collection practicable, and in the hope of securing payment of taxea 
that would otherwise have been lost to the Government, and tnat as part of the 
drafts were paid his action did result in benefit to the Government. 

In view of these statements, the correctness of which I have no reason to doubt, I 
am of the opinion that his claim is entitled to a favorable consideration. 

The letter of Mr. Bond is herewith returned. 
Respectfully, 

WALTER EVANS, 

CammiaHaner. 

Hon. Thos. G. Skinner, 

House of Repre$entaiive8, « 



ttTH GoNaRESS, \ HOUSE OF BEPBESENTATIYBS. f Rbpoet 
Ut Seuian. f ) No. 1545, 



JAMES M. GRIGSBY. 



Apul 6, 1686. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to b« 

printed. 



Mr. LiNHAMy from the Oommittee od Claims, submitted the folio win|^ 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6312.] 

The Committee on Olaims, to whom was referred House bill 6312, for 
the relief of James M. Grigsby, find that the said Grigsb^^^ was post- 
master at Montague, Tex. ; that on the 26th of October, 1883, said 
postmaster transmitted $25, money-order funds, to the postmaster at 
Sherman, Tex., in registered package Ko. 46. The deputy ppstraaster 
testifies under oath that he placed the money in the registered package, 
properly sealed and directed to the postmaster at Sherman, Tex., and 
placed the same in the mail pouch, locked it, and delivered to the mail- 
carrier OD the route. These facts are testified to by another witness, 
who swears the same ,was done in his presence. 

The postmasters at Saint Joe and Marysville, the next two offices on 
the route, swear that the package No. 46 passed through their offices 
in good condition. The postmaster at Gainesville swears that the pack- 
age was not received at that office, and further certifies that the United 
States mail was robbed on the evening of the 26th of October, 1883, 
between Marysville and Gainesville. The postmaster at Sherman cer- 
tifies that the registered package No. 46 and funds were not received at 
his office. 

The postmaster at Montague swears that at the time of his next 
weekly statement after the robbery he notified the Superintendent of 
the Money-Order Bureau of the PostOffice Department of the loss, and 
asked a credit for the same. He gave the Department no further no- 
tice. 

The funds in this case were properly transmitted, and that the United 
States mail was robbed is abundantly sustained by the evidence, and 
the claim would have been allowed under the act of March 17, 1882, 
if the postmaster had notified the Postmaster-General within three 
months after the loss ; but, instead, the postmaster notified the Super- 
intendent of Money-Order Offices at the Department at his next weeklj 
statement, which was in time, but directed it to the wrong authority. 
Although the sum is small, in view of all the facts, we believe th« 
olaimant should be relieved. 
Therefore the committee recommend the passage of the bill. 



i 



4»TH Congress, ) HOUSE OF UEPUESENTATIVES. • Kepokt 
l«t SesHxan. ] \ No. 1546. 



SARAH L. LARIMER. 



April 6, 1686. — Coiinnitted to the Couimittee of the Whole House and ordered to h% 

priuted. 



Mr. Lanham, from the Committee ou Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6051.] 

The Committee on Claims^ to ichom was referred the hill (H, R. 6051) to com- 
penmate Mrs, Sarah L. Larimer for important services rendered the mili- 
tary authorities in the year 1864, at Deer Creek Station, in Wyoming 
TenHtory^ and for loss of property taken by the Sioux Indians, report as 
follows: 

It appears from the evideijce that in July of the year 1864 Lieutenant 
Larimer and his wife, the claimant, Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer, and their 
child, Frank E. Larimer, left their home in Kansas to cross the plai^is 
for the restoration of said Lieutenant Larimer's health, he having been 
a commissioned oflScer in the Union Army and honorablj- discharged 
because of his health having given out through hard service in the war; 
that they took with them horses, and wagons, and goods, and some 
money; and that when they were in Wyoming Territory, and in com- 
pany with several other traveling persons, they were surprised by a band 
of Sioux Indians, who murdered three of the party, wounded two, and 
captured claimant, Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer, and her child, and one other 
lady and child. 

Claimant, Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer, and her child, Frank E. Larimer, were 
carried far into the mountainous hills, a distance of 75 miles or more. 
That she finally escaped from her savage captors in the darkness of 
night, carrying her child in her arms, and with great hardship and much 
suffering, being unaided and alone, they traveled on foot over the wild 
and dangerous hills, arriving at the emigrant road in almost a nude con- 
dition, their clothing having been torn from their persons. At this em- 
igrant road, and at a place called Deer Creek Station, claimant met 
Captain Shaman and Captain Marshall, of the Eleventh Ohio Cavalry, 
then moving against the Indians, and communicated to these officers 
much valuable information as to the designs of the Indians. 

These two commanding officers, Captains Shumanand Marshall, swear 
that if it had not been for the information given by Mrs. Sarah L. Lari- 
mer the command with which they were about to start out at that hour 
would have be^n massacred and destroyed, but by acting under her in- 
formation, dismounting and arming the teamsters, and gathering in all 
the available and additional forces within immediate reach, and by fol- 
lowing the directions given by Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer they were able to 
avoid the great destruction to the command and to citizens that other- 
wise would have happened. 

It further appears that claimant, as well as citizens, testify to the fj^ct 
of claimant's captivity and to her loss of property by the Sioux Indiana 
at said time and place. 



Z SARAH L. LAEIMEB. 

It seeuis that, by acts of CongreRs, in the year 1870 aud in the year 
1872, the lady. Miss Fannie Kelly, who was captured at the same time 
and place and by the very same Indians who captured Mrs. Sarah L. 
Larimer, has been allowed payment for valuable information and loss 
of property. 

The affidavits of Captain Shuman and of Captain Marshall, two of 
the witnesses offered in support of this claim, are herewith attached and 
made a part hereof. 

The committee recommend that the bill be amended by striking out 
" fifteen "and inserting ** five,'' in line 5, and with that amendment that it 
do pass. 



State of Illinois, Cauntif of Clay, m: 

In the claim of Mfh. Sarah L. Larimer, for Indiau depredations, and pay for informa- 
tion furnished United States troops, personally came before me, Levi G. Marshall, of 
Clay City, county of Clay, State of Illinois, who being first duly sworn, declares in 
relation to the aforesaid claim, as follows: 

On or about the lUth day of July, 1864, property belonging to the said claimant 
was taken and destroyed by Indians of the Sioux tribe at or near Box Elder Creek, 
ID Wyoming Territory, under the following circumstances: I was captain of Com- 
pany, Eleventh Regiment Ohio Cavalry Volunteers, and with my command was sta- 
tioned at Fort Laramie, Wyoming, at the time (later being mustered out as major). 
That on or about the KHh day of July, 1}!?64, 1 was ordered to move against the Sioux 
Indians with 200 mounted men ; Captain Shuman, being the other captain, was ordered 
with me ; that when 115 miles out and at Deer Creek Station, we were met by Mrs. 
Sarah L. Larimer, who had been carried off by a band of Sioux Indian warriors, but 
had escaped in the darkness of night from their camp with her child in her arms, 
and climbed the hills for a distance of 75 or more miles on foot aud alone. As com- 
manding officer 1 procured of Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer very valuable information 
about the movements of the enemy, as well as of their number and arms and how 
mounted, so. that being forewarned, I was able to avoid the ambushes an<l surprise 
that otherwise would have happentul, to the death and destruction of my command. 
A few of my men, acting contrary to orders, fell into one of the ambushes where 
their. leader, Lieutenant Brown, lost bin lifo, Mrs. Lari?uer was now destitute, bare 
of head and foot. All her property, which I understood had amounted to about (can 
not tell how much) having been taken or destroyed by the Indians when she and her 
child were carried off by said Indians. Her husband had been a commissioned offi- 
cer of a Kansas regiment, but was discharged and m poor health aud now had the 
addition of a severe aiTow wound near the gmiu. I know that ail of her property 
was destroyed by the Indians ; I do not now reuirmber jw to the value of said property. 

I have no interest in said claim aud am not concerned in \Xa prosecution. 

LEVI G. MARSHALL, 
Late Major Eleventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this day, by the above-named affiant ; and I certify 
that I read said affidavit to said affiant, and acquainted him with its cont-ent^* before 
he executed the same. I further certifv that I am in no wise interested in said claim, 
nor am I concerned in its prosecution. 

Witness my hand and official seal this VZt\x day of March, 1886. 

[SEAL.] ' E. McGILTON, 

Sotary I^ublic. 



State of Missouri, 

County of Pettis, ss: 

In the matter of the claim of Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer for Indian depredation, and^ 
for information furnished to the United States troops after her escape from the Sioux* 
Indians, by whom she had been captured and her property destroyed, personally came 
before me, B. H. Ingram, clerk of the circuit court of Pettis County, Missouri, Jacob 
S. Shuman, of S*dalia, in said Pettis County, Missouri, who, being first duly sworn, 
on his oath states that on the 13th day of July, 1''^, this affiant, Jacob S. Shuman. 
was captain of and in command of Company — of the Eleventh Ohio Cavalry, and, 
with my command, was stati<med at Fort Laramie, Wvoniing, and that on or about that 
date, having information that the Sioux Indians had made a raid on the emigrant 
road, captured aud destroyed a train of emigrants, and had carried into captivity 
the said Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer and her little child, I iumie<l lately moved against the 
Indians up Platte River in a northwesterly direction about 115 miles to a place called 



SARAH L. LAKIMEB. 6 

De«r Ci«ek Station. I there learned that the cap tare of Mrs. Larimer and her child, 
lodthe destruction of her property, and the mnrdering of several persons who were 
with the train, had taken place on Box Elder Creek, and as I was aboat to move 
igftinst the Indians with the force I had, which consisted of my own company and a 
foree oader Captain Marshall, the said Sarah L. Larimer came into camp carrying 
Iker little child in her arms, she having escaped from the Indians, after having oeen 
carried by them aboat 75 miles, and returned on foot to the emigrant road, where she 
met my command. 

Whin she came into onr camp her condition was most deplorable ; her clothes had 
been nearly all torn off her body ; her arms and limbs were lacerated from making her 
way throaeh the thorns, bushes, and cactus, on her way after her escape, and she and 
berlittle child were nearly famished. As soon as she could be resuscitated by nour- 
ishmeot, which was only a very short time, she gave me a detailed account of the posi- 
tion of the Indians, their plans and movements, and designs against my command, 
ind also their numbers and the position they occupied, and the ambuscades they had 
prepared. So that by taking proper precaution my command was enabled in a short 
time to move forward and thwart their designs, not only against the pursuing troops, 
hot against other exposed points and trains that were on the emigrant road. 

And I do most positively and solemnly swear that if it had not been for the infor- 
matioo received m>m the said Mrs. Larimer that the command with which I was about 
to start oat at that hour would have been massacred and destroyed ; but by actins 
onder her information, dismounting and arming the teamsters, and gathering in afl 
the available and additional forces within immediate reach, and by H)llowing the di- 
rections given by the said Mrs. Larimer to avoid an ambuscade, I was enabled to ob- 
tain the advantage of the Indians and drive them north, not only saving part of my 
eommand from being massacred, and saving the lives and property of others who 
wonld certainly have been captured and murdered if it had not been for the valuable 
information given to me by the said Mrs. Larimer. 

I fonnd the information that she gave as to the position and movements of the 
Indians exactly as she had given it. 

And further from my own scout's personal observation, and from the further fact 
that when Lieutenant Brown disobeyed orders a few men fell into an ambuscade, 
described by Mrs. Larimer, and was killed by the Indians. I also learned at that time 
that the property taken from Mrs. Larimer consisted of a fine collection of pictures, 
photograph apparatuses, and stock for that kind of business, and wagons and mules, 
all of which, as near as I can now recollect and estimate, was of the value of over 
tlO,000. I further learned at the time and afterwards, also, that Mrs. Larimer was 
a photographer and artist herself, and that the property was hers ; and I learned the 
fact that her husband was with her and was wounded and left for dead by the Indians, 
bnt afterwards partially recovered ; and that he had been a coipmissioned officer honor- 
ably discharged from the Eighth Kansas Volunteers, which I learned froiti Mr. Larimer 
himself, whom I saw, and I saw arrow wounds upon his person. And this affiant farther 
says that the above and main facts that I have stated herein as to the information 
received from the said Mrs. Sarah L. Larimer as to the position, location, and designs 
of the Indians came under my direct and personal observation ; and that I have not 
the slightest interest in any claim she may have ; but that if she has a claim for prop- 
erty \mt and for the information furnished me, I can and do say that it is just and 
deserving. 

Owing to th« fact that I am suffering from a severe nervous ailment, I am nnable 
to write this affidavit myself and am compelled to dictate it to a stenographer and 
have it printed on a type-writer for me. 

And this affiant further states that I have read this affidavit over carefully, and 
had the same read over to me, and that it, the same, is true in substance and in fact. 
So help me God. 

his 

JACOB 8. -k- SHUMAN, 

mark. 

Affiant 
Attest: 

J. G. Lindsay, 
Johnson Orr. 

Sabscribed and sworn to before me this the 15th day of March, 1886, and I further 
certify that I have been personally acquainted with the above-named affiant for 
about fifteen years last past and know from such acquaintance that he is the iden- 
tical person he represents himself to be, and I farther certify that for several years 
he has been afflicted with some nervous disease or trouble, thereby inoapacitatiug him 
of writing his name. I also certify that I am in no way interested in this claim. 

[8KAL.] B. H. INGRAM, 

Clerk of the Cirouit Court of Pettis County, MiasouH, 



rHCONGRSSS,! HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ui Sestum. ] \ No. 1547. 



MARY B. JOHNSON. 



Aprcl 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to b« 

priuted. 



Mr. Buchanan, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7:J97.] 

A bill was introduced at this session granting a pension to Mary E. 
Johnson, and also providing for the payment to her of the pension 
accrued at the time of the death of her husband, who was at the date of 
his death on the pension-roll. 

The bill was reported favorably by Mr. Pidcock, from the Committee 
on Invalid Pensions, at the present session. The following is his report : 

[HooseKeport No. 1065, Forty-ninth Congress, first session.] 

Tie Committet an Invalid Pensions, to whom was referred the bill (H, R. 4132) for 
the relief of Mary E. Johnson, submit the following report : 

The claimant, whose maiden name was MaryE. Wilson, married Daniel M. Rose (a 
toldier home on a fnrlongh from some hospital at Philadelphia, Pa.), at Trenton, N. J., 
September 17, 1863. both parties being under age at the time of the contraction of the 
marriage, and the parents of Rose opposed to the nnion. Rose retamed to the hospi- 
tal the following day, and the claimant has seen him but once since, when, while 
home on a furlough some time in IfiOij he called at the house of her father, accom- 
panied by a strange woman, whom he introdnce<l as his wife, and on claimant's in- 
forming both that she was the lawful wife and had a marriage certificate, the woman 
became angry and said the claimant ha<l no ri^bt to claim Rose as her husband, as he 
belonged to her. Rose did not deny the woman's assertions, and soon took her away. 
This interview took place on the doorstep of claimant's father's house, neither Rose 
nor the woman entering the house. The claimant has never seen Rose since, and never 
heard from him until »he rec.eived a letter written by him bearing date August 17, 
1885. 

In letters received by friends of claimant from their soldier relatives and friends in 
the service, it was frequently stated that Rose died in hospital in the service, and it 
loon became common rumor and talk that he was dead. The claimant never hearing 
from him, and not being able to gain any information toccmtradict these statements, 
believed Rose dead and herself a widow, and about this time losing her babe, the off- 
ipring of this marriage, was broken down with grief, and mourned the death of both 
hasband and child. 

She remained with her own family, believing herself a widow, until October 29, 
1867, when she married John W. ,Tohn»on, who also had been a soldier, serving in 
Company G, Tenth Regiment New Jersey Volunteers. Johnson, while in the service 
at Petersburg, Va , in the fall of 1864, contracted nervous and typhoid fever which 
resalt^ in the utter loss of control of the nervous system, caused by severe exposure 
and hardships incident to army life. He returned home a total wreck, and May 24, 
1879, filed a declaration for pensii)n, and his claim was still pending, though proven, 
at the time of his death, April 26, 18*^5. 

The claimant, as the widow of Johnson, filed her declaration for pension May 19. 
1885, aUeging that Johnson's death, April 26, 1885, resulted from disease contracted 
in the service. She admitted the former marriage to Rose, but claimed that^he had 
died in the service a number of years prior to her marriage to Johnson. The records 



2 MAKT E. JOHNSON. 

of the War Department, together with investigatioDB, developed the fact that Rom 
had not died in hospital, but had been discharged from service and was living with 
another wife, and child of about nine years of age, at New Brunswick, N. J., within 
15 miles of the claimant, and was a pensioner. 

Charles T. Pearce, in the interest of the claimant, visited Rose, who spoke very 
lightly of his former marriage to the claimant, and asserted that he did not consider 
the marriage binding, for the reason that at the time of the marriage both Mary 
(claimant) and himself were bnt children and under age, she being about seventeen , 
vears old and he about twenty ; that he had not seen her since returning to the serv- * 
ice after the marriage, though he may have called on her in 1864, when home on a 
furlough, with a strange woman, who ^laimed to be his wife, but that he was not 
married to her. 

Rose further stated that he married his present wife August 9, 1869, and that they 
lived together and had one child, a boy, about nine years old ; that his present wife 
knew nothing of his former marriage, and he did not wish her to know anything 
about it. When told the claimant, nis former wife, was living about 15 milesdistant 
from him at South Amboy, N. J., he seemed surprised, and said he did not think she 
had committed a wrong act in marrying John W. Johnson, as she had a perfect right 
and the best of reasons for believing herself a widow. He seemed bnt little con- 
cerned as to the fate of his first wife and child ; the latter he never having seen, had 
no desire to know what had become of it. A few days after this interview the claim- 
ant receive^l a letter from Rose, a copy of which is given below: 

New Brunswick, August 17, 1885. 
To Mrs. Mary E. Johnson: 

Pardon me for writing to you, but I have just learned that you have lost your hus- 
band. Permit me to offer my sympathies. Mary, it has been a good many long years 
since last we saw each other. Alas! what changes time has made; it is so with me, 
and I suppose it is with you; twenty years, then we both were children; now we are 
both growing old; soon death will call us; but, Mary, things have been done which 
can never be undone. Mary, last week a man by the name of Pearce called at my 
house in reg'ard to your getting a pension ; he told me of your loss ; it was the first I 
had heard of you since the last we met, twenty years ago. I always thought you had 
moved to New York, and it was a surprise to me to bear that you was in South Am- 
b«»y. 

Now, Mary, I would very much like to see you and have a good long talk with yon, 
for the sake of old times. Will you grant me one meeting T On the26tb of this month 
there is to be a temperance picnic at Boy ton Beach, a little ways from Perth Amboy; 
if nothing happens I will come down on the boat; will yon be on the dock when the 
boat lauds at South Amboy f If you will, I will get off. The boat gets there, at Am- 
boy, about 7| or 8 o'clock in the morning ; or could you come up to New Brunswick, 
if I sent you some money, or any other place I can see yon f 

Mary, I do not think you would know me now ; twenty years make great changes. 
I have been sick for four years; for over two years I did not do anything, and for 
weeks I thought I would never live through the night ; bnt by the will of God I am 
now getting better, though not well yet. Mary, many times while lying on my sick 
bed have I thought of you and wondered if you were alive, yet never thinking that 
you were so near nie, and when Mr. Pearce informed me of your whereabouts I was 
very much pleased to hear of yon, but sorry to hear of your loss. Please answer this 
as soon as you can, and let me know if I can see you. 
I remain, yours ever, 

DAN. 

Address: Daniel M. Rose, No. 102 Neilson street, New Brunswick, N. J. 

There is no evidence indicating that a meeting ever took place. 

In an affidavit bearing date August 12, 1885, Rose says : 

''I enlisted in Company I, Eighth Regiment New Jersey Volunteers, September 13» 
1861, and re-enlisted April 28, 1864, and was finally discharged June 19, 1865. I am 
drawing a pension of $24 per mouth for a wound received at Cbancellorsville, Va., 
May 3, 1863, in the left arm, and my pension certificate is No. 61742. I am a married 
man and have one child. Was married the second time August 7, 1869. 

** When I was in the Army, and after I was wouuded and in the hospital (McClellan) 
at Nicetown, Philadelnhia, Pa., I went to Trenton, N. J., and while there married a 
woman named Mary E.Wilson, but never lived with her afterwards. As soon as I 
was married, or within a day or two afterwards, I returned to McClellan Hospital and 
remained there until the following spring, when I was transferred to Veteran Reserve 
Corps, and remained around Washington, D. C, until discharged ; and on mv arrival 
home at Trenton, N. J., my parents were so opposed to my marriage to said Mary E. 
Wilson that I never saw her afterwanls. I learned, however, that she had left Tren- 



t 



MARY £. JOHNSON. 






(00, N*. J.) and bad gone to Easfon, Pa., to her parents' home, and I went there once, 
bat could not tind her, and, in fact, after making Home few iuqniries I gave it up en- 
tirely, and, in fact, believing the marriage wan illegal, as Mary was but seventeen 
years old and I but little older (not twenty one years old), and not beiug well versed 
inlaw, and knowing the continued opposition to said marriage by my parents, I gave 
the whole tbin^ up. One child was born by this marriage, but it died before the war 
vaa over, and I never saw it. 

"It was reported that I died while in the McClelland Hospital, and on my arrival 
homeaDnml>trr of my friends met me and informed me of my reported death, and 
leeiued surprised to see me alive. I think Mary E. Rose, my wife, had good reason 
to believe tnat she was a widow at the time of her marriage to John W. Johnson, in 
the fact, the best of reasons, as I had but little correspondence with her, and may 
have sent her a very little money once or tvice ; then ceased writing to her ; then 
the common report of ray death ; then my never seeing her, nor she me, and in all 
probability never hearing even indirectly from me. I am sure her reasons for believ- 
ing herself to be a widow were excellent, and I do not feel that she had any claim on 
me or I on her after I left her and failed to hunt her up afterwards. I remarried, be- 
lieving as I did my first marriage was illegal ; and never hearing from her, I came 
to the conclusion that I had a perfect right to marry, and did so after being home 
some four years. I only know that she is living as you told me. I think I beard a 
few years ago that she had remarried again, but took no pains to verify it, as I did 
not think it concerned me. 

*'My present wife does not know of my first marriage, nor do I wish her to know of 
it, as ^e has been a very devoted wife ; and during the last four years I have been 
sick nearly all the time, and my wife has been a faithful and loving nurse, and looking 
well after me and our one child, a boy about 9 ye^rs old. 

'*1 did not know John W. Thompson, but may have heard of him. When home on a 
fdrlough there may have been a strange woman with me, but I was not married to 
ber; ime may have said so, but I do not remember that I did. I do not remember 
^at I (^uw the said Mary E. Rose, now known as Mary £. Johnson, at that time. I 
do not remember of ever having seen her since I married her in 18(13. After I mar- 
ried her I returned to the ho8))ital and fail to remember ever having seen her since." 
It is proven that John W. Johnscm, the second husband, contracted typhoid fever 
in the service, which resulted in disease of nervous system ; that from the time of his 
return from the service until death he was a constant itufferer from his disability, and 
doring the latter years of his life was totally incapacitated for work, being weak and 
emaciated, with sunken eyes and feeble voice, and his skin a pale yellow. There 
was a total loss of sensation of the arms and le^s and a loss of co-ordination in walk- 
ing and total inability to walk or stand with his eyes closed. He gradually became 
worse nntil death followed. During his lifetime he was under the treatment of physi- 
cians continuously without any beneficial renults. 
Dr. 8. H. Lewis, of South Amboy, N. J., in an affidavit filed June 9, 1885, testifies— 
*'Tbat he and his brother, W. C.Lewis, have been treating John W. Johnson for about 
three years at various times, and about eightet* n months ago found diminution of 
nerve power, especially the gen i to-urinary organs, and upon examination found him 
very much diseased in the lumbar region, and the spinal column was also very much 
involved and loss of co-ordination bein^ present in the lower" extremities. The dis- 
ease progressed rapidly until the brain and spinal cord were greatly atfected, his 
vision impaired, and in a few days before his death his memory failed him to a great 
extent. His sufferings were excruciating pains, particularly of the abdomen and 
limbs, and toward the last oedema of the limbs and abdomen being very conspicuous. 
Treatment was first cauterizing the spinal cord thoroughly, followed by use of gal- 
vanic battery ; then giving iodide of potassium and ergot; then seeing no improve- 
ment, and believing there was no possible cure, we then put him upon treatment 
with tonics — iron, quinine, and strychnia — and used many other remedies, but with 
no Huccess, and death followed on the evening of the *26th daj of April, l^^, the 
direct cause of death beiug locomotor ataxia. 

"We examined him thoroughly and failed to find any signs or symptoms of any ve- 
nereal disease whatever, not even gonorrhea, ancl do not believe that he ever had 
any disease of this nature. The wife and children are in perfect health." 
Dr. W. C. Lewis corroborates the above. 

Dr. T. B. Hood, of the Pension Office, in an opinion filed in the case, says : 
'*The loss of control of nervous system, or locomotor ataxia, cannot be accepted as 
a result of inflammation of lungs, or of gastritis, but said locomotor ataxia may be, 
and in view of evidence probably was, a result of typhoid or typhus fever of service. 
In view of evidence and the pathological probabilities based on such evidence, syphilis 
should certainlv be eliminated from this case." 

Both claims for pension were considered, and Noveiftber 17, 1885, a certificate was 
issued in the John W. Johnson case, a copy of which is appended. 



4 MARY £. JOHNSON. 

[No. 311889. Original. United States of America, Department of the Interior, Pen- 
sion Bureau.] 

It is hereby certified that, in conformity with the laws of the United States, John 
W. Johnson, deceased, who was a private, Company G, Tenth Regiment New Jersey 
Yolnnteers, is entitled to a pension at the rate of $6 per month, to commence on the 
30th day of May, 1865, and |i8 per month from February 8, 188*2, and |24 per month, 
fbom March 3, 1883, and to end April 26, 1885, date of death. This pension being for 
disease of nervous system, result of typhoid fever. 

Given at the Department of the Interior this 17th day of November, 1885, and of 
the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and tenth. 

L8KAL.] H. L. MULDROW, 

Acting Secretary of the Interior. 

CountersiKued : JOHN C. BLACK, 

Commissioner of Pensions. 

The claim of the widow was rejected by the Pension Office because claimant waa 
not the legal widow of the soldier, but was the legal wife of another man when she 
married him, and no separation in accordance with the law. The widow was also 
debarred from receiving the accnied pension due the soldier, and the same now re- 
mains yet intact in the hands of the Government. 

By her second marriage the widow became the mother of four children, the oldest 
born June 21, 1872, and the youngest May 12, 1882. She bears an excellent reputa- 
tion in the immediate neighborhood in which she lives, and both she and her second 
husband, who appears to have been a strictly sober, honest, and Christian man, have 
always been considered most respectable citizens. From the vast quantity of evi- 
dence on the subject, it clearly appears that Rose married the claimant while an in- 
nocent chihl forliis own selfish purposes (there being no evidence to show it was com- 
pulsory), and then basely deserted her. intending at the time never to return to her, 
and he can be indirectly charged as originating the story of his death in the service 
and superintending its circulation through other soldiers in the service in writing to 
their friends, so as to make more complete the desertion. He returns from the serv- 
ice, makes a few inquiries, and gives up the search because he knew his parents op- 
posed his marriage, and finally married again. 

The claimant, it would seem, had a perfect right to believe herself a widow, never 
hearing from Rose, and rumors as to his death in hospital being confirmed by letters 
from persons in the service and supposed to be near him. He married her in 1863, 
and immediately deserted her; bnt, true to him, she remained with her parents as 
his widow until 1867, when she contracted the second marriage. 

Rose knew her whereabouts, and also that his scheme as regards the story of his 
death had worked well, and that she believed herself a widow. He Intended that she 
should remain forever in ignorance as to his being alive, and by his continned stay 
from her confirm the rumor of his death. He was at that time, and is now, undoubt- 
edly, a man of base iQtentions. 

The claimant was the victim, and the error she committed by the second marriage 
was nndoubtedly done innocently; and therefore your committee are of the opinion 
that she should be recognized as the widow of Johnson, and under that name and aa 
his widow receive, not only the accrued pension due her second husband at his death 
on said pension certificate No. 3ll><89, but also be placed on the pension-roll, with her 
fonr children, and draw a widow's pension. 

Your committee recommend that the bill do pass. 

When the bill came up for action in the House on what is known as 
" pension night,'' the portion of the bill referring: to the accrued pension 
was struck out on the point of order that it did not come within the 
special order setting that evening apart for the consideration of bills 
" granting pensions," and the remainder of the bill passed unanimously. 

Thereupon the present bill granting to the claimant this accru^ 
pension money was introduced. For the reasons set forth in the above 
report, your committee recommend the passage of the bill. The second 
marriage was in good faith. Had the first husband been dead as sup- 
posed, this money would have been paid without question under exist* 
ing law. The bill simply gives the benefit of existing law to a much- 
wronged woman. 



49th Cowobess, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
lit 8emon. ] \ No. 1648. 



LOUISA H. HASELL. 



f April 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to 

be rint^d. 



Mr. Dougherty, ft'om the Gommittee on Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

fXo accompany bill H. R. 2223.] 

The Committee on Claims, to whom was referred the bill {H. B. 2223) for 
the relief of Mrs. Louisa H. Hazelly have had the same under considera- 
tion, and report : 

The bill proposes to pay Mrs. Hasell $350 in full compensation for the 
use, by the United States Army, of her house and other buildings in 
Sammerville, S. C, in the years 1865-'66, and for all damages to said 
property incident to said occupancy. 

From the papers accompanying it appears that the property consisted 
of a dwelling of six rooms, a wooden building for servants, and stable. 
These buildings were in good order and habitable when they were taken 
possession of by Colonel Beecher, United States Volunteers, and used 
as a small-pox hospital, from the 6th day of July, 1865, to May 6, 1866. 
Petitioner was paid $50, or at the rate oi $5 per month, for this use, 
there being no contract at the time possession was taken. The kitchen 
aod stable were almost, if not quite, destroyed, and the property other- 
wise very much injured. Those dying of small-pox were buried in and 
upon the lot, and since the surrender petitioner has been unable to rent 
or ase the premises. The testimony is abundant that, for the use of the 
premises and the damages sustained, petitioner would be entitled to as 
noch and probably more than she claims. 

These facts are shown by several affidavits of parties cognizant of the 
circumstances, and all of the correspondence of the Army officers to 
whom the claim was referred, and they are fully corroborated in the re- 
port of a board of Army officers especially detailed to examine this claim, 
said report concluding as follows : 

First. That the property was occupied by the Government as a small-pox hospital 
from Jnly 6, 1865, to May 6, 1866, a period of ten months, and that $50 in currency was 
paid, at the rate of $5 per month, as rent for the same. 

Second. That the amonnt of damages sustained is all and probably more than set 
forth in the accompanying affidavits (which was $350, as now claimed). 

Therefore the board do recommend that the sum claimed ($350) be awarded a!hd 
paid to the said Louisa H. Hasell. 

This report was returned by the acting assistant adjutant-general 
(Louis V. Caziarc) to the chief quartermaster, approved, and payment 
was suspended until Congress should remove restrictions on the pay- 
ment of claims which arose in States lately in rebellion. 



i 



Z LOUISA H. HASELL. 

It also appears that the rent of this property was the only income of 
the petitioner, who has herself and two daughters to sapport. 

And it may be added that the matter was at one time referred to 
Surgeon W. H. Eldridge, U. S. A., who reported that the house, after 
its use as a hospital, was not habitable, and ought to be burned to pre- 
vent small-pox contagion ; and also that the chief quartermaster of the 
department found the recommendation of the board to be reasonable 
and approved the same. 

We have in these facts a strong case of actual and uncompensated 
injury. A stronger one could hardly be made. When we consider the 
unquestioned and undeniable hardship of the case, that it was occupied 
for a while and injured somewhat after the proclamation declaring the 
insurrection at an end in South Carolina, as also the strong indorse- 
ment of the justice of the claim by the Army officers, and, after looking 
at the facts, we conclude to report the bill back, and recommend its 
passage. 



49TB, CoNGBBSS, ( HOUSB OF BBPBESENTATIVES. / BSPOBT 
Ut 8e$si4m. | ) No. 1549. 



GRAND TBUNK RAILWAY OF CANADA. 



April 6, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. DouoHSBTT, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany biH H. B. 1011.] 

The committee has had under consideration the bill (H. R. 1011) for 
the relief of the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada, and recommend that 
id bill do not pass. 



49th CoNaREss, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut SeMion. i | No. 1550. 



JOHN B. ROBERTS. 



April 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

orinted. 



Mr. DouoHBRTT. from the Committee on Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To acco];npaDy bill H. R. 251.] 

The Committee an Claims^ to whom was referred the bill (H. B. 251) for the 
relief of John B. BobertSj postw aster at Sandersvilley Oa,j have had the 
$ame under consideration^ and report : • 

We find that John B. Roberts, as postmaster at Sandersville, 6a., dar- 
ing the week ending February 14, 1885, $28.10; that said postal notes so 
paid were inclosed by him, as required by law, in an official envelope 
and addressed to superintendent money -order office, Post-Office Depart- 
ment, Washington, D. C. ; that this package was destroyed by fire on the 
occasion of the wreck of train No. 51 , which occurred on the night of Feb- 
ruary 19, 1885, between Alexandria, Ya., and Washington, D. C, result- 
ing in the total destruction of the postal car and its contents. Under 
existing law there is no authority for crediting the postmaster with the 
loss which he has sustained. 

We therefore recommend the passage of said bill. 



49th qoNOBtess, » HOUSB OF BBPBEdENTATIVES. | Bbpobt 



Ut 8e$non. f \ No. 1551. 



H. K. BBLDING. 



Apkil 6, Id^ — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoaae And ordered to be 
• printed. 



Mr« DouoHBRTT, from the Committee on Claims, sabmitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1258.] 

The committee to whom was referred the bill (H. B. 1258) /or the relief of 
H. K. Belding^ have Aad the same under oonsiderationj on^ respeetfuUf 
report : 

• 
This claim was reported upon favorably by the Committee on Claims 
of the House of Bepresentatlves at the first session of the Forty-fifth, 
Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh, and Forty-eighth Congresses, and passed 
the Hoase of Bepresentatlves at the Forty-sixth Congress, and was re- 
ported upon favorably by the Senate Committee on Claims and passed 
the Senate at the first session of the Forty eighth Congress. The re- 
port is as follows : 

They find that said U. K. Belding was contractor on mail-route No. 13585, from 
Brovvneyille, Minn., to Carimona, in the same State; that the contract was for foor 
Tean from Jnly 1, 1858. The contract price for carrying the mail on this rente was 
|l,80O per annnm. Mr. Belding performed the service under the contract nntil Mi^, 
1859, and was paid the contract price therefor. In 1859 there was a failnre of suffi- 
cient appropriation for this route, and an order was issued by the Post-Office Depart- 
ment reducing the service on the same one- third. 

There was some correspondence between the contractor and the Post-Office Depart- 
ment about continuing the full service, and the contractor was informed there was 
no objection, except there was no money to pay until Congress convened and made 
an appropriation. 

Mr. Belding did perform full service from May 1, 1859, to October, 1860, and has 
reeeived but two-thirds of the contract price therefor, and claims that having ren- 
dered the service in good faith he should receive the full compensation named in his 
contract. 

This full service was performed for seventeen months after the order of reduction, 
and at the contract rate Mr. Belding should have received, |150 per month. He did 
receive but $100 per month, and he asks to be paid f50 per montn additional, or $850 
for the service so performed. 

The service having been performed with the knowledge of the Department and for 
the manifest benefit of the community, the committee think it just and equitable that 
Mr. Belding should be paid for the service actually performed the contract price for 
the same. 

They therefore recommend the payment to Mr. BeUling of the nnm of $850 for the 
seventeen months of service as above stated. 

Mr. Belding makes an additional claim, and the committee find the following facts : 

Prior to the 1st of October, 1860, the route from Brownsville to Carimoua was ex- 
tended, and the contract with Belding annulled. Mr. Belding complained to the De- 
partment that he had left a good business and made large investments to perform his 
oontract, and would suffer very great injury if compelled to give it up. He was in- 
formed that he would be reinstated and his contract renewed. The service at thia 
time was lessened five miles at one end of the route and increased twelve miles at the 
other, and the compensation was increased $110 per year. 



3 H. K. BBLDtNO. 

NegotifttiODs ooutiDned between Hr. Belding sod tbe Poat-OffiM DepartucDt (ram 
October 1, 1860, to Febmar? M, 1S61. fonr moiitbH and foarteen dmjB. when tbe con- 
tract was renewed with Mr. Belding. Darin)^ tbis four inoDttu and fbDrt««ii dsya 
Mr. Beldiog performed the service and bos received no pay tberefor. Thiaront« orer 
which Mr. Bi-lding perfonued tbe service bad been incladed in a mnch larger one 
and let to other parties. They never performed any service ddod it, but colleotnd (!>• 
pay under their contract for the service performed by Mr. Beldinj;. 

It clearly appearing that the orifiinal contract with Mr. Belding waa aDDolled for 
DO fanit or omiaaion on his part; that he continued to perform ine aerricc in good 
faith nnder the asanrance that he would be reinstated; that his doing so was jrell 
known to the Poat-Offlce Department, and that he was sabaeqaently reinstated, we 
are of the opinion that the payment to other parties for this serTiec. nnder th« eir- 
onmetancea, ahonld not relieve the Government from paying Hr. Belding tberefor. 
We therefor report back tbe bill withont amendment, said bill inelnding payment of 
tha two anniB allowed by the committee, and recommend that the bill paaa. 

?oar committee concur in the above report and recommeodstioos, 
and reoommend that the bill do pass. 



i9TH CowGRESS, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
1st Session, ) ( No. 1552. 



BALLARD PAVEMENT COMPANY. 



Apbil 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Honse and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Gaulinoer, from the Committee on Cl^fims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompaDy bill H. R. 7642.] 

The Committee on Claims^ to whom teas referred the bill (H. R, 591) for 
the relief of the Ballard Pavement Company, having considered the same^ 
regpectfully report a^ follows : 

The facts in this case appear to be that on the 10th day of December, 
1872, the Ballard Pavement Company, composed of W. W. BaUard, T. 
E. Brown, and E. L. Marsh, made a proposition to the Board of Public 
Works of the District of Columbia, in these terms : 

The Ballard Pavement Company hereby makes proposals for the following work, 
with accompanying conditions : 

We will put down preserved wood pavement , as follows : The Ballard block, the 
Perry block, or the wedge-shaped block, such as laid by Filbert &. Taylor in this city, 
M the contractors may elect, either to stand five inches high, for $3.50 per square yard; 
and we hereby ask for75,000 square yards,contractorstohaveduring the year 1673 within 
which to complete this work, the Board not to stop the work without a gross violation 
of the contract on the part of the contractors. The streets to be designated by the 
Board at such times as the company shall be ready to commence work. Said work to 
be paid for as the same progresses. 

we also hereby apply for a separate and a further contract for so much of the 
grading, hauling, ana filling as is not embraced in the contract for paving, and for 
■etting the curbing on the streets to be paved by us, at Board prices, subject to *the 
conditions of the paving contract. 

It farther appears that on the same day, namely, December 10, 1872, 
ft letter was addressed to the Ballard Pavement Company, dated 
"Board of Public Works, District of Columbia," in which the proposi- 
tion of said company was copied and these words added : 

Is this day accepted. By order of the Board. 

CHAS. 8. JOHNSON, 

Assistant Secretary. 

Upon the strength of this letter the Ballard Pavement Company pro- 
ceeded to prepare the requisite material to pave 75,000 square yards, 
that being the quantity named in their proposition to the Board of 
Pttblic Works. The process of preparing the material IncludM burnett- 
izing or creosoting the blocks after they were reduced to the proper 
size. After more or less delay the company were instructed to pave 
certain portions of streets, and it appears in evidence that when they 
applied for their pay the Board required them to enter into another con- 
tract before their work would be measured. This seems to have been 
repeated every time a payment was made. These subsequent contracts 
(or specifications, as the company calls them) named the same rate of 
compensation as in the first contract, namely, $3.50 per square yard, but 



2 BALLARD PAVEMENT COMPANY. 

no meutiou was made of the amouut of paving to be done. It was 
further specified that the contract should include 2 feet of grading, and 
that tiie company would guarantee the i)avemeut to continue in good 
condition for the period of three years. The company were required to 
give bonds, and they claim that these additional contracts or specifica- 
tions were made under the original contract, and upon the distinct 
understanding that they were to have 75,000 square yards of paving to 
do, the chairman of the Board of Public Works, Mr. Shepherd, person- 
ally giving them that assurance. No evidence appears that the i)ave- 
meut laid did not in every particular meet the requirements of the con- 
tract. 

After numeious vexatious delays it iippears that the company secured 
instructions to pave 37,128 square yards, after which, notwithstanding 
they had the material ready and men and horses in waiting to do the 
remaining 37,872 square yards, they failed to secure any further au- 
thority to proceed with the work. For the amouut actually done the 
company did not receive a single dollar of money, but were ])aid in cer- 
tificates, which they disponed of for about 50 cents on the dollar. 

About this time the Board of Public Works ceased to exist, and by 
acts of Congress of June 20, 1874, and June 16, 1880, a District of Co- 
lumbia loan was authorized of $15,000,000 to pay outstanding claims 
for work performed in the District. The Board of Public Works was 
succeeded by the Board of Audit. The Ballard Pavement Company 
applied to the Board of Audit for relief, claiming the difference between 
the lace value of the certificates issued to them and the amount they 
realized from the same, and also the amount they had actually ex- 
pended on the material prepared and in readiness to complete the con- 
tract. The Board of Audit declined to consider their claim, when they 
in turn wentTto the Court of Claims. 

The court also found against the company, on the ground principally 
that as the law required ''the parties" to a contract to sign the same, 
the original contract ought to have been signed by the individual mem- 
bers of the Board of Public Works, instead of by the secretary. There 
were other technical points urged against the company, but this was 
the chief ground upon which the court dismissed the case, it being held 
thift the Ballard Pavement Company never had a valid contract with 
the Board of Public Works. 

In this emergency the Ballard Pavement Company comes to Congress 
and asks to be paid $1.50 per square yard for the material they had in 
readiness to complete their contract, with interest on the same from the 
1st day of January, 1874, they having abandoned their claim for the 
balance due on the certificates in which they were paid for work actually 
completed. 

Your committee have given this case a most thorough and searching 
investigation. They believe that the Ballard Pavement Company acted 
in good faith in supposing that they had a valid contract to put down 
75,000 square yards of paving ; that they prepared the material for the 
same, the cost of which was substantially $1.50 per s(|uare yard; that 
they sustained heavy losses, which resulted in their financial ruin, and 
that they are justly entitled to some measure of relief from Congress. 
We therefore report a substitute bill, which disallows the payment of 
interest, and provides that the claim shall be paid out of the $15,000,000 
3.65 District of Columbia loan, above alluded to. 

Your committee recommend that the substitute reported for House 
bill 591 do pass, and that the original bill lie upon the table. 



49th Congress, I HOUSE OF EEPEBSENTATIVE8. i Kepobt 
1st Session, f \ No. 1553. 



JOHN M. MoCLINTOCK. 



Aphii^ 6, 1866. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Shaw, from the Committee on Claims, sabmitted the following 

R K P R T : 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1044.] 

• 

The Committee an Claims^ to whom was referred the hill {H. JR, 1044) for 
the relief of John M. McClintock, having liad the same under considera- 
tion^ beg leave to report : 

That the facts connected with the claim of Mr. McClintock are fally 
set out in the report made to the House, first session Forty-eighth Con- 
gress, which report your committee adopt and hereto append, and rec- 
ommend the passage of the accompanying bill. 

The Committee on Ways and Means, to whom was referred the (tl/ (ff. B, 2259) for the re- 
Uef of John M. McClintock, having h4id the same under consideration, heg leave to re- 
port: 

John M. McClintock, of the city of Baltimore, Md., was engaged in the business of 
city and local expressageof baggage and merchandise in said city during the years 
1664, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, lo69, and 1870, and for and during these years he has been 
a89e8»ed and has paid to the collector of internal revenue of the United States for the 
third district in the State of Maryland the sum of $3,600. The said collector of in- 
ternal revenue assessed and collected the above-described amount under the alleged 
authority of section 104 of the act of June 30, 1864, which provides as follows : 
*' That any person, firm, company, or corporation carrying on or doing an express 
business shall be subject to and pay a duty of three per centum on the gross amount 
of all the receipts of such express business." 

Owing to the want of uuiformity in the construction of this section of the statute 
among tbe different collectors of interniU reveuue — ^siucti it appeared that in a ** large 
number of cities the officers of the revenue did not construe this law as applicable to 
persons engaged in local expressasce merely, and that the carrying of passengers and 
baggage on no continuous or fixed route was not *an express business within the in- 
tent of the statute^'' — the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Hon. J.W.Douglass, 
on the 6th of April, 1870, instructed S. B. Dntcher, supervisor, New York, that ** it is 
only those who do their business on regular routes that should be regarded as engaged 
in an express business and liable under section 104. • • • jf taxes under section 
104 have been assessed contrary to the above rule, * • « yoa will see that col- 
lection is suspended and claims for abatement prepared." 

Under the above ruling of the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, the claimant in 
this case, in the form and manner prescribed by the rules of the Cominissioner, filed 
his application for the refunding of the said amount of internal tax, but his claim was 
rejected by the said Commissioner of Internal Revenue without formal opinion con- 
taining the rrasons for such reiection being ^iven by that officer. 

Subsequently, it appearing that the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Hon. D. D. 
Pratt, was reopening the claims of Dodd's Express Company of the city of New York, 
and Parmelee's Local Express of Chicago, for the reason that these claimants had ob- 
tained a judgment of the circuit court of the United States construing the law (sec. 
104) in their favor, application was made to the Commissioner, Hon. D. D. Pratt, by 



2 JOHN M. m'cLINTOCK. 

i 

the claimant to have his claim reopened and the former ruling set aside, and the amoant 
of tax, as alleged to have been erroneonsly or illefi;ally collected, refunded to him ; 
,bnt the Commissioner of Internal Revenue decided tnat, inasmuch as his predecessors 
in office had rejected this claim, he had no authority to act in the premises as requested 
by claimant. The official record of the Internal Revenue Office shows that the sum 
of |3,600 was paid by the claimant as alleged and set forth in his said application. 

In view of the facts stated, and for the reason that several similar prayers for re- 
lief have been favorably considered by Congress, your committee recommend that the 
bill be passed. 



49th Congress, ) HOUSE OF KEPRESENTATIVES. i Report 
1st Sefs^ion. \ \ No. 1554. 



MAKGARET F. RYAN. 



Aprtl 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. EkXEiNER, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1249.] 

The Committee on War Claims, to whom was refeired House bill 1249, 
find the facts in this case fully set forth in the accompanying report 
made by the Committee on Military Affairs in the Forty-sixth Congress, 
which rejmrt they adopt a« their own. 



That Margaret* F. Ryan is the widow of George F. Cole ; that there were no re- 
maining children of the marriage ; that said Colo wan a private in Company F, Fifty- 
first Regiment New York Volnnteors ; that in an engagement which took place at 
Poplar Grove Church, Va., about the 30th of September, 1864, he was made a prisoner 
of war, and so held until about the close of the war, when he made his escape and 
reported to the provost marshal at Raleigh, N. C, and was sent to hospital; that 
he applied for his distcharge, pay, and bounty, but was informed that he was borne 
on the rolls of the War Department as missing in actiojj, and he was directed to sub- 
•tantiate the fact of his imprisonment by the testimony of his comrades in confine- 
ment. Ab these were strangers, this was difficult to do, and before he could do this 
he died from the efifects of disease contracted in prison ; that as he had not his dis- 
charge, his widow could not draw the money that was justly due him. 

Yonr committee find that the evidence sustains the claim that Cole was taken and 
held as prisoner of war ; and that his pay and bounty and other allowance§ were justly 
doe the petitioner, his widow. The War Department ought to be able under the law 
to adjust such cases as this, but slu the case is referred to Congress, your committee 
recommend that the bill do pass. * 



General Headquarters, State of* New. York, 

Adjutant-Gbneral^s Office, 

Albany f January 5, 1874. 

Sir : In reply to your communication of the 3d inst-ant, I have to fornish you the 
following information from the records of this office: George F. Cole, private Company 
F, Fifty-first New York Volunteers, who enlisted August 15, 1S64, for one year as a 
substitute, is reported on the muster-out roll of hiscompany ** missingin action ; cap- 
tured at Poplar Grove Church, Va., September :W, 1864." 

Application for a discharge should be made to the Adjutant-General, United States 
Army. 

Very respectfully, 

JNO. F. RATHBONE, 

Adjutant-dvntTal. 
E. North, Esq., 

Watertown.N, Y, 



I MARGARET F. RYAN. 

* 

War Department, 
WashingUm City^ January 4, 1881. 

Sir: In response to your request therefor, contained in your letter dated the 15th 
ultimo, I have the honor to transmit herewith the military record of George F. Cole, 
late private Company F, Fifty -first Regiment of New York Volunteers. 
Very respectfully, vonr obedient servant, 

ALEX. RAMSEY, 

Secretary of fVar, 
Hon. W. A. J. Sparks, 

Chairman Cammittee on Military Affairs, 

Houee of Representatives. 



War Department, Adjutant- General's Office, 

Washington, D. C, December 27, 1880. 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th day of 
December, 1880, requesting a "statement of service" of George F. Cole. 

The following information has been obtained from the files of this office, and is re- 
spectfully furnished in reply to your inquiry : 

It appears from the enlistmenV papers on file in this office that Greorge F. Cole was 
enlisted and sworn into service as a private substitute on the 15th day oi August, 1864, 
at Watertowu, N. Y., in Company F, Fifty-first Regiment of New York Volunteers, to 
serve one year. On the muster-roll of Company F, of that regiment, for the months 
of September and October, 1864, he is reported absent ; missing September 30, 1864; 
joined since last muster; subsequent rolls to June *¥), 1865, absent; missing in action 
September 30, 1864 ; muster-out roll of compamy, dated July 25, 1865, reports him a 
private missing in action ; captured at Poplar Grove Church, Va., September 30, 1864. 
Investigation fails to elicit further information. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. P. MARTIN, 
Assistant Adjutant-General. 
To Committee on Military Affairs, 

House of Representatives, 



CONGBESS, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
1st ScMsion. I \ No. 1555. 



CAPT. JOHN BURKHART. 



April 6, IW6. — Committal to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to b© 

printed. 

Mr. CtEDDES, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R.7643.] 

The Committee on War Claims^ to whom was referred the bill {H, R, 446) 
far the relief of Oapt. John Burkhart, having considered the same and 
accompanying piperSy submit the folloteing report : 

John Burkhart, the claimant, enlisted as a private, Company F, One 
hundred and forty-sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, March 1, 1865^ 
at Greensburg, Ind., to serve one year. 

On regimental returns for March, April, and May he is reported as 
captain Company F of said regiment, present ; he was mustered out with 
hLs company as private, August 31, 1865, at Baltimore, Md. The mili- 
tary history of said claimant obtained from the War Department further 
shows that Barton W. Cole was mustered in as captain of said Company 
F, to date June 23, 1865, to fill original vacancy. 

The claimant organized Company F at Camp Carrington, Indianapolis, 
Ind., and was commissioned as captain by the governor of said State on 
the 1st day of March, 1865, and had charge of the company from that 
time until the 22d day of June, 186.1, during which time he was recog- 
nized and obeyed as such, and performed all the duties as captain of said 
company. Merrett C. Welch, the colonel of said regiment, in his testi- 
mony says : 

During the time said Burkhart was in command of said company he was one of the 
most efficient company commanders in the regiment, a good disciplinarian, and the 
best drill officer in my regiment. He v-^as always pleasant, yet prompt to duty, and 
after he ceased to command said company his bearing and conduct as a private soldier 
unexceptional ly good. 



Your 'committee find from the exhibits and testimony in the case that 
claimant performed all the duties of a captain of said Company F from 
the date of his commission by the governor of Indiana, March 15, 1865, 
to the 22d of June, 1865, and failed to be mustered in on a purely tech- 
nical ground. On February 24, 1865, the governor of Indiana, requested 
of the War Department the removal of the disability occasioned by the 
resignation caused by John Burkhart as of the Sixty eighth Indiana Vol- 
unteers with a view of his accepting a new commission in the One hun- 
dred and forty-sixth Indiana V lunteers. Anticipating a favorable reply 
the governor on March 1, 1865, issued a commission to said Burkhart 
as captain of Company F, One hundred and forty sixth Indiana Volun- 



2 CAPT. JOHN BURKHAKT. 

teers, bat said disability was uot removed, and claimant was not there- 
fore mastered in as captain, and his commission as sach was on that 
accoant canceled by the governor of Indiana, and the said Barton W. 
Cole commissioned in his stead. 

Your committee therefore recommend that claimant be allowed the 
pay and emoluments of a captain of said company from said 1st day of 
March, 1865, to said 22d day of June, 1865, deducting therefrom the 
sums of money that have been paid to him for military service during 
that period either as a private or otherwise, and for that purpose repo^ 
the accompanying bill as a substitute for bill H. B. 446, and recom- 
mend the passage of the same. 



GOMGBB88, ) HOI SB OF REPRESENTATIVES. ) Rep(»bt 
iMt Session. ] ) No. 1556, 



MARTHA J. A. RUMBAUGH. 



6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hpase and ordered to b6 

printed. 



Mr. 6BDDB8, from the Committee od War Claims, sabmitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6336.] 

Hie Committee on War Claims^ to whom was referred ike bill (H, 22. 6336) 
/or the relief' of Martha J. A. Rumbaughy administratrix of Oeorge H. 
Runibaughy beg leave to report: 

That the Committee on Military Affairs of the Forty-eighth Congress. 
not being clearly and fally advised of all the facts in the case, referrea 
it to the Court of Claims for a finding under the provisions of an act 
entitled ^^An act to afford assistance and relief to Congress and the 
Executive Departments in the investigation of claims and demands 
against the Government," approved March 3, 1883. 

Said claim has been returned by said Court of Claims with the fol- 
lowing findings of fact, filed January 25, 1886, which findings have 
been referred to the Committee on War Claims of the present Con- 
gress, to wit : 

I. 

The claimant, Martha J. A. Rnmbangh, is the administratrix of George H. Rum- 
Iwogh, deceased. 

II. 

Bftid George H. Rnmbangh was captain of Company K, Twenty-fifthReglmeht Mis- 
souri Infantry Yolnnteers, and at the battle of Shilob^ April 26, 1862, was serving as 
aetin^ assistant snrgeon of said regiment (being a physician) by order of the oom- 
■JUiding officer of the regiment. 

III. 

His duties as snrgeon required his attendance at varions places several miles dis- 
tant. To discharge these dnties promptly and properly, it was necessary that he 
should be mounted. To this end he used a horse and equipments belonging to him- 
self; by whose order or by what authority does not appear. 

IV. 

While thus serving at said battle in the line of his duty, his horse and equipments^ 
oonaiatiqg of saddle, bridle, and martingale, were captured by the enemy, without 
fiuili or negligence on his part. They were never recovered. 

V. 
Hie horse was worth $225 and the equipments |60. 

Your committee therefore recommend the payment of the amount 
found by said court, and recommend that the accompanying bill c^o 



49th Congress, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Rbpoet 
Ut Session. ( \ No. 1557. 



JAMES I). WOOD. 



6^ 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Obbdes, firom the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6:^37. ] 

The Committee on War Claims,' to whom /r/w re/erred the bill {H. R. 1265) 
for the relief of Jameti JJ, Woody beg leave to report: 

That the Committee on Military Attairs of the Forty eighth Congress, 
not being clearly and fally advined of all the facts in the case, referrea 
it to the Coart of Claims for a hndiug ot the facts, ander the provisions 
of an act entitle<l '^ An act to afford assistance and relief to Congress 
and the Executive Departments in the investigation of claims and de- 
mands against the Government,'' approved March 3, 1883. 

Said claim has bf en returned by said Court of Claims with the follow- 
ing findings of fact, filed December l4, 1885, which findings have been 
referred to the Committee on War Claims of the present Congress, to 
wit: 

The claimant, James D. Wood, whih? captain and assistant a<ljutant-general of the 
Fourth Brigade, First Division, First Corps, Army of the Potomac, lost a horse and 
eqaipmenta purchased by himself, which he had lawfully in the service of the United 
StateB. nnder the following circumstances: During the battle of Chancellorsville, 
Y»., May 3, 1863, the claimant, after crossing the. Rappahannock River at or near 
that place, received a verbal order from the general commanding the corps ordering 
the extra horses of all officers back across the river. In compliance therewith claim- 
ant sent hiB extra horse back to the other side of the river in charge of his colored 
aervant. The servant was forcibly dispossessed of the horse by a bearer of dispatches 
from the general in command, and the claimant has never been able to recover the 
•ame. The loss was without any fault or negligence on the part of either the claim- 
ant or his servant. The horse was worth 1 115, and the equipments, $18.50; total, 
$133.50, 

Toar committee therefore recommend the payment of the amount 
fonnd by said court, and recommend that the accompanying bill do 



4»TIL CoNGBBSS, } HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut 8es9i4m. ] \ No. 1558. 



DELIVERY OF CERTAIN BOXES IN THE TREASURY. 



Aprii. 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Perry, from tbe Committee on War Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 2239. J 

The Committee an War Claims^ to whom teas submitted the bill (H. B. 
2239) authorizing the Secretary of the Treasury to deliver to tJie rightful 
owners the contents of certain boxes deposited in the Treasury Depart- 
ment by the Secretary of War^ submit the following report : 

Tour committee having carefnlly considered the same, beg leave to 
sabmit a favorable report thereon, and therefore recommend the pas- 
sage of the bill. 



4»TH CoNGBESS, ) HOUSE OB" EEPRBSENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Session. ) \ No. 1559. 



AGNES AND MARIA DE LEON. 



6, l®i6. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Pebby, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3758.] 

The Committee on War Claims^ to whom was re/erred bill H. B. 3758,/or 
the relief of Agnes and Maria I)e Leon^ heirs at-law of Rebecca L. De 
Leon, having considered the same and accompanying paperSj make the 
following report : 

This is a claim for injury to the buildings of the said Rebecca L. De 
Lieon, in Albuquerque, N. Mex., and for the destruction of stores therein 
contained. 

A board wa« organized by Special Order 159 to assess the damages 
doBe to the buildings of claimant and others. The board met and re- 
ported as follows : 

The board then proceeded to examine the conditions of and assess the damage upon 
a hoase and premises, the property of Mrs. R. L. De Leon, for whom C. B. Clark is 
agent, which honse and premises were rented by the Quartermaster's Department of 
the United States Army, and were occnpied as storehouses and quarters for Assistant 
Surgeon Baily up to the 2d of March, 18H2. 

The board after careful examination find the nature and money value of the dam- 
sustained by said house and premises to be as follows, viz : 



For damages to window and doors $100 

Roofs to two rooms destroyed 110 

Plastering and incidental expenses 50 

Total damages 260 

The board is further of opinion that said damages ty said house were consequent 
upon their abandonment by the United States troops on the 2d of March, 1862, and 
their subsequent occupation by the enemy, two rooms of said building having been 
destroyed by fire by order of the assistant surgeon in charge of the hospital. 

In a letter of Joseph C. Baily, assistant surgeon, U. 8. A., are stated 
the circumstances under which the property was destroyed, to wit: 

In reply to your communication, just received, I would state that in the spring of 
18G2 I was in charge of the medical supplies at Albuquerque, N. Mex. On the ap- 
proach of the enemy* such stores as could not be taken were set on fire by myself and 
the building containing them burned. 

The proof clearly shows the fact of the destruction of the building and 
stores. 

Your committee therefore recommend the payment of the amount 
found due by the board, and recommend the passage of the accompany- 
ing bill, as amended: In line 7 strike out the words "two thousand," 
aftd insert in place thereof the words ''two hundred and sixty." 

O 



4ftra GONGKESS, ) HOUSE OF BEPBESENTATIYES. j Bbpobt 



Ut Senim. i \ No. 1660. 



a; 



EEIMBUESING INTBBBST ON WAR LOANS, 



Apbii^ 6, 1686. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Pebby, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 152.] 

The Committee on War ClaimSy to whom was re/erred the bill (H, B. 152) 
to reimburse the several States for interest paid on war loansj and for 
other purposes^ having carefully considered the same and accompanying 
papersy submit the following report : 

By the act of July 27, 1861, and the joint resolution of March 8, 1862, 
the Secretary of the Treasury was directed to pay to the governor of 
any State or his duly authorized agents '•^ the costs, charges, and ex- 
penses properly incurred by such States for enrolling, subsisting, cloth- 
ing, supplying, arming, equippiiig, paying, and transporting its troops 
employed in aiding to suppress the present insurrection against the 
United States, to be settled ui)on proper vouchers to be filed and passed 
upon by the proper accounting officers of the Treasury.'' 

By the joint resolution of March 8, 1862, payments were directed to 
bQ made for expenditures made subsequent to, as well as before, the 
passage of the act. 

Under this act disbursements have been made to the States amount- 
ing to the sum of $43,296,938.22, and there yet remain unsettled or 
disallowed claims amounting to several millions of dollars. 

Many, if not all, of the States were obliged to borrow money to pay 
the^xpenses incurred, but in adjusting and allowing their claims the 
accounting officers of the Treasury have rejected all claims' for interest 
paid out by the States, holding that the law did not authorize such pay- 
ment. An examination of the evidence leads us to the conclusion that 
the decision of tlie Department was correct. Your committee there- 
fore recommend that the bill do not pass. 



BEIMBUBSING INTEREST ON WAS LOANS. 



VIEWS OF THE MINORITY. 

A similar bill was introduced in the Forty-eighth Congress, and re- 
ferred to the Committee on War Claims, which, through Mr. Rowell, 
presented the following report, to wit: 

Bv the act of July 27, 1861, and the joint resohition of March 8, 1862, the Secretary 
of tne Treasury was directed to pay to the governor of any State, or his dnly anthor — 
ized agents, ** the costs, charges, and expenses properly incnrred by such States foi — 
enrolling, subsisting, clothing, supplying, arming, equipping, paying, and transport— 
ing its troops employed in aiding to suppress the present insurrection against th^ 
United States, to be settled upon proper vouchers to be filled and passed upon by th» 
proper accounting officers of the Treasury.^ 

By the joint resolution of March 8, 186^, payments were directed«to be made for ex^ 
penditnres made subsequent to as well as before the passage of the act. Under this 
act disbursements have been made to the States amounting to the sum of" 
$43,296,938.22; and there yet remain unsettled or disallowed claims amounting to sev-> 
eral millions of dollars. 

Many, if not all, of the States were obliged to borrow money to pay the expenses 
incurred, but in adjusting and allowing their claims the accounting officers of the 
Treasury have rejected all claims for interest paid out by the States, holding that the 
law did not authorize such payment. 

The bill under consideration provides for reimbursing the States for interest paid or 
lost on account of expenses incurred and repaid under the act of July 27, 1861. By 
its provisions, interest is only to be paid on such sums as have been refunded or may 
hereafter be refunded under the authority of the act of Congress and explanatory res- 
olution ; no interest is to be paid, unless it was actually paid out or lost by the States, 
and then only up to the time of repayment by the Government, and limited to 6 per 
cent. 

Claims for interest have been filed amounting to $3,188,887.25, but these claims are 
based upon a higher rate of interest than that provided in the bill ; other States have 
not filed interest claims, owing to the ruling of the Department, but if the bill be> 
comes law they will have proper claims. 

Your committee are of opinion that these interest claims, at a rate such as the Gen- 
eral Government was obliged to pay, are a just and proper charge against the Gov- 
ernment. Immediately alter the passage of the acts, Mr. Chase, then Secretary of 
the Treasury, in a communication to the auditor of the State of Ohio, gave assurances 
that interest would be paid. Laws were passed after the war of 1812 to reimburse 
the several States for moneys expended in that war, with similar provisos to the law 
under which the payments herein considered have been made. 

Subsequently Congress passed laws to pay interest, as is provided in this bill. 'A 
similar bill was passed by Congress to reimburse States for expenses incurred on ac- 
count of the Indian wars, with like necessity of subseqiieut legislation to authorize 
the payment of interest. 

It seems to be the history of all the legislation of Congress for the reimbursement 
of States for war expenditures that the initial statutes have always failed to provide 
for the payment ot interest, but in every instance, previous to 1861, subsequent acts 
provided for the payment of interest. • 

It may therefore be regarded as the settled policy of Congress to repay to the sev- 
eral States, not only the princix)al sums expended by them in aid of the General Gov- 
ernment in times of war, but also to repay interest actually paid out,- not exceeding^ 
the rate paid by the General Government during the same period. 

Your committee therefore recommend that the bill do pass. 

The miDority cannot but think that, in view of the niimerous prece- 
dent8 set out in the foregoing report of Mr. Rowell, and in view of the 
well-established policy of the Government, and in view of the assar- 
ances of the governmental authorities when the States assumed these 
obligations, and in view of what the minority believes to be but equal 
justice to all the States, the bill should pass. 

This was as much a necessary expenditure as though the money had 
been paid for arms or ammunition. Had the States, generally the new 
Western States, which had not plethoric treasuries, refused to borrow 



f 



REIMBURSING INTEREST ON WAR LOANS. 3 

themoDej with which to organize and equip their quotas of troops, the 
Federal Government must necessaril}' have done so; and since these 
new and financially poor States came patriotically to the rescue of the 
depleted national Treasury in the hour of the nation's peril, and pledged 
their own credit for its salvation, no good reason exists why they should 
not be reimbursed their whole exi>enditnre, the same as has been done 
for the more fortunate and wealthy States. Equal justice to all should 
be onr motto. 

But uot only has the Government made similar reimbursements after 
all wars previous to the last civil war, but this Congress ha« evinced a 
determination to perpetuate the same policy. The bill H. R.3877 was 
on the 18th day of January, 1886, introduced in this House, and re- 
ferred to the Committee on Claims. This is an act for the relief of the 
State of Florida, and among other things authorizes the repayment of 
interest paid by Florida on interest-bearing securities issued by said 
State ior the purpose of raising money with which to equip troops for 
different Indian wars. On the 3d of February last said committee re- 
ported said bill back with the recommendation that it do pass, and the 
same is now on the Calendar of this House. The report is ISo, 303, and 
is as follows : 

Ike Committee an Claims ^ to wliom uxu refeiTed the hi1l{H. B. 3877) to authorize ihs SeC' 
rtianf of the Treasury to settle the claim of the State of Florida on account of e-xpend- 
itftret made in suppressing Indian hostililieSf beg leave to suhmit the following' report : 

Id accordance with the reqniroments of the joint resolution of Congress approved 
March 3, 1881, the Secretary of War has investigated, audited, and made a report to 
Congres8, May 22, 1882, of the amount due the State of Florida for expenditures 
made in suppressing Indian hostilities in that State betweeu the Ibt day of Decem- 
ber, 1855, and the 1st day of January', 1860 (Ex. Doc. 203, Forty -seveuth Congress, 
firet session ). 

The expenditures grew out of the Seminole war of 1855, 1856, and 1857, the State 
anthorities being compelled, in the presence of uu auticipated and subsequently 
actaal outbreak of the Indians, to call forth the militia of the State, the force of the 
United St-ates troops then on duty being inadequate to the protection of the people. 
The report of the Secretary of War (Ex. Doc. 203) fully sets forth in detail the items 
of expenditure allowed and disallowed, the total amount found due the State being 
the sum of $224,648.09. 

It is established that the funds at the comuiand of the executive of the State of 
Florida in the years referred to were insuflficient to equip, supply, and pay the troops 
in the field, and relying upon the approval given by the President of the United 
States, through the Secretary of War, on the 21st day of May, 1857, of the services of 
these volunteers, the State legislature, in order to provide their equipment and main- 
tenance, authorized the issue of 7 per cent, bonds. 

A portion of the bonds, amounting to $132,000, was sold by the governor to the In- 
dian trust fund of the United States, and the proceeds of such sale were disbursed by 
the^trasurer of the State for the **expeuses ot Indian hostilities,'' as appears from his 
report to the legislature for the year ending October 31, 1857 (Ex. Doc. 203, Forty- 
seventh Congress, first session). Another portion was hypothecated to the banks of 
South Carolina and Georgia as security for a loan of $222,015, and $192,331 of this loan 
was disbursed directly by a disbursing agent of the State in payment of **expeusesof 
Indian hostilities," including pay of volunteers (Ex. Doc. 203, Forty-seventh Con- 
gress, firbt sebsion). 

This case is one where the Government, through the President of the United States 
by the Secretary of War, promised to pay these troops when mustered into the United 
States service, and they would have been long since paid by the Govemmeut if so 
mustered, but the mustering officer arrived in the State after they had been mustered 
out, and the State was compelled to borrow ^loney with which to pay them (see let- 
ter of Secretary of War hereto appended). 

Congress has universally paid interest to the States where they have paid interest. 
We cite the cases where interest has been allowed and paid for moneys advanced dur- 
ing the war of 1812-'15, as Ibllows: Virginia, act March 3, lri25 (4 Stat, at L., p. 
132) ; Maryland, act May 13, 1826 (4 Stat, at L., p. 161) ; Delaware, act May 20, 1826 
(4 Stat, at L., p. 175); New York, act May 22, 1826 (4 Stat, at L., p. 192); Penusyl- 



4 REIMBURSING INTEREST ON WAR LOANS. 

▼ania, act March 3, 1827 (4 Stat, at L.,p.241) ; Sonth Carolina, act March 22, 1832 (4 
Stat, at L., p. 499) ; Maine, act of March 31, 1851 (9 Stat, at L., p. 626) ; MassachiiMtts 
and Maine, ace of July 8, 1870 (16 Stat, at L., p. 198). 

Fur advances for Indian and other wars the same rale has heen observed in the 
following cases: Alabama, act January 26 (4 Stat, at L., p. 344); Geori^ia, act March 
31, 1851 (9 Stat, at L., p. 626); Georgia, act March 3, 1879 (20 Stat, at L., p. 385) ; 
Washington Territory, act March 3, 1859 (11 Stat, at L., p. 429); New Hampshire, 
act Jaunary 27, 1852 (10 Stat, at L., p. 1) ; California, act of August 5, 1S54 (10 
Stat, at L., p. 582) ; -California, act August 18, 1856 (11 Stat, at L., p. 91); Califor- 
nia, act June 23, 1860 (12 Stat, at L., p. 104) : California, act July 25, 1868 (15 St»t. 
atL., p. 175) ; California, act March 3, 1881 (21 Stat, at L., p. 510) ; and in aid of the 
Mexican war (see statute of June 2, 1848). 

Attorney-General Wirt, in his opinion on an analogous case, says: 

** The expenditure thus incurred forms a debt against the United States which they 
are bound to reimburse. If the expenditures ma^e for such purpose are supplied 
from the treasury of the State, the United States reimburse the principal without in- 
terest; but if, being unable itself, from the condition of its own finances, to meet the 
emergency, such State has been obliged to borrow money for the purpose, and thus to 
incur a debt on which she herself has had t.o pay interest, such debt is essentially a 
debt due by the United States, and both the principal and interest are to be paid by 
the United States (see Opinions of Attorneys-General, vol. 1, p. 174).'' 

Thus it will be seen that the precedent for the payment of interest, under the rule 
adopted for the settlement of claims of war of 1812-'15, and Indian wars above cited, 
is well established. 

The committee are of the opinion that the urgent necessity for the services of these 
troops, and the action of the President and the Secretary of War, are well established, 
and create an equitable obligation on the part i*f the General Government, and as it 
is clearly shown by Ex. Doc. 203, Forty-seventh Congress, that the State of Florida 
not only borrowed money from the Indian trust fund, but also from the banks of the 
States of Georgia and South Carolina, for their payment, upon which the State has 
since paid interest, your committee have concluded to recommend the passage of the 
bill, with the following amendments: 

In line 18 of section 1, after the word 'Mt,'' insert the words '* upon said claim or 
dainiM." 

In line 8 of section 2 strike out the words ** and to pay such sum so ascertained due 
the said State,'' and insert the words, '*and shall adjust and settle the claim of the 
State therefor, and shall pay such sum as may be ascertained to be due the 8tat<e 
thereon." 

War Department, 
Washingtony D. C, May 21, 1857. 

SiR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 8th instant, 
asking an approval of the services of certain voluntet-rs called out by you, and in 
reply to inform you that the explanations as to the necessity of their services is sat- 
is^ctory, and orders have been issued to the officer commanding in Florida to muster 
them in and out of the service of the United States. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

JOHN B. FLOYD, 

Secretary of War. 
His Excellency James £. Broome, 

Governor of Florida. 

But again, on March 3, 1886, a bill (S. 1729) of substantially the siiine 
import as the last-mentioned House bill was introduced into the Senate 
and referred to the Committee on Military- Afiairs, which committee has 
since made the following report, to wit: 

The Committee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred the hill (S. 1293) ** to authariMe 
the Stcrttary of the Treasury to settle and pay the claim of the State of Florida on tuy- 
oonnt of expenditures mude in suppressing Indian hostilitieSf and for other purposes^** have 
considered the Bame, and they beg leave to report : 



REIMBURSING INTEREST ON WAR LOANS. 5 

[Seottte Beport No. 109, Forty-eighth Congress, first sessioii.l 

The Commitfee on Military Affairs^ to wluym was reffrred the bill {S. 230) to authorise 
ike Secretary of the Treasury to settle the cldim of the State of Florida on account of ez- 
pendituree made in suppressing Indian hostilities j beg leave to submit the following re- 
port: 

In accordance with the requirements of the joint resolution of Congress approved 
March 3, 18>Jl, the Secretary of War has iuve8tigat.ed, audited, and made a report to 
Con|:re88, May iti, 1882, of the amount due the State of Florida for expenditures made 
in suppressing Indian hostilities in that State between the Ist day of December, 1855, 
and the Ist day of January, 1860. (Ex. Doc. 203, Forty-seventh Congress, tirst session. ) 
The expenditures grew out of the Seminole war of 1855, 1856, and 1857, the State 
authorities being compelled, in the presence of an anticipated and subsequently ac- 
tual outbreak of the Indians, to call forth the militia of the State, the force of United 
States troops then on duty being inadequate to the protection of the people. The re- 
port of the Secretary of war (Ex. Doc. 203) fully sets forth in detail the items of ex- 
pendinre allowed and disaUowed, the total amount found due the State being the sum 
off224,64H.09. 

It is established that the funds at the command of the executive of the State of 
Florida in the years referred to were insufficient to equip, supply, and pay the troops 
in the field, and, relying upon the approval given by the President of the United States 
aud the Secretary of War, on the 2lst day of May, 1857, of the services of these volun- 
teers, the State legislature, in order to provide their equipment and maintenance, au- 
thorized the issue of 7 per c«nt. bonds. 

A portion of the bonds, amounting to $132,000, was sold by the governor to the In- 
dian tmst fund of the United States, and the proceeds of such sale were disbursed by 
the treasurer of the State for the ** expenses of Indian hostilities," as appeal's from 
his report to the legislature for the year ending October 31, 1857. Another portion 
was hypothecated to the banks of South Carolina and Georgia as security for a loan 
of |ifi^,015, and 1192,3^)1 of this loan was disbursed • directly by a disbursing agent of 
the State in payment of '* expenses of Indian hostilities,'^ including pay of volnnteers. 
The portion of the bonds sold to the United States for the *^ Indian' trust fund " is 
still held by that fund and accrued interest since 1857. 

The State of Florida paid out through a disbursing agent, as shown by 

War Department report |193,3:)0 16 

And through warrants from State treasurer 78, 056 11 

Total 271,386 27 

Interest on this sum from January 1, 1857, to April 1, 1883 498,672 27 

Total cost to the State to date 770,058 54 

We quote from a statement made by the United States Treasurer of the 
State indebtedness to the *^ Indian trust fund/' June 12, 1882, as follows : 

Loan on 7 per cent, bonds of the State of Florida. $132, 000 

Coupons due and unpaid January 1, 1857 138, 040 

Interest to July 1,1882, from January 1,1857 50,820 

Interest from July 1,1882, to April 1,188:^ 6,930 

327, 790 00 

Due the State 442,268 54 

There appears, therefore, lawfully due the State of Florida, according to the State 
treasurer's account, the sum of $770,058.54, being the principal and interest of the 
sunui which she borrowed and expended on behalf of the United States. 

If from this sum be deducted the amount loaned the State by the Indian trust fund, 
principal and interest, $327,790, there still remains due the State the sum of $442,268.54. 

In auditing the accounts of the State, however, the Secretary of War has disallowed 
many items under the rules and regulations governing payments to the regular forces, 
and yet, with all his disallowances, after an exhaustive examination, he finds due. 
$224,648.09. Now, if we add the interest on this sum from January 1, 1857, to April 
1, 188:^, to wit, $412,790.86, we have $637,438.95. Now, if we deduct the amount due 
the Indian trust fund, to wit, $327,790, there is still due the State the sum of $309,648.95. 

This case is one where the Government, through the President of the United States 
and Secretary of War, promised to pay these troops when mustered into the United 
States service, and they would have been long since paid by the Government, if so 
mastered, but the mustering officer arrived in the State after they had l)een mustered 
out, and the State was compelled to borrow money with which to pay them. 

Congress has universally paid interest to the States where they have paid interest. 

8. Eep. 1560 2 



6 REIMBURSING INTEREST ON WAR LOANS. 

We cite the cases where interest has been allowed and paid for moneys advanced du- 
ring the war of 1812-'15, as follows : Virginia, act March 3, 1825 (4 Stat, at L., p. Ki2) ; 
Maryland, act May 13, 1826 (4 Stat, at L., p. 161) ; Delaware, act May 20, 1S:£6 (4 Stat, 
at L., p. l?.*)) ; New York, act Mav 22, 1826 (4 Stat, at L., p. 192) ; Pennsylvania, act 
March 3, 1827 (4 Stat, at L., p. 241) ; South Carolina, act March 22, 1832 (4 Stat, at L., 
p. 499) ; Massachusetts, July 8, 1870 (16 Stat, at L., p. 198). 

For advances for Indian and other wars the same rule has been observed in the fol- 
lowing cases: Alabama, act January 26. 1849 (4 Stat, at L., p. 344); Georgia, act 
March 31, 1851 (9 Stat, at L., p. 626) ; Georgia, act March 3, 1879 (20 Stat, at L., p. 
385) ; Washington Territory, act March 3, 1859(11 Stat, at L., p. 429) ; New Hampshire, 
act January 27, 1852 (10 Stat, at L., p. 1). 

Thus it will be seen that the prece<lent for the payment of interest under the rule 
adopted for the settlement of claims of war of 1812-*15 is well established. 

The committee are of the opinion that the urgent necessity for the services of these 
troops and the action of the President and the Secretary of War create an equitable 
obligation on the part of the General Government; and as the State of Florida not 
on\y borrowed monejr from tbe ludiau trust fund, but also from the banks of the 
States of Georgia and South Carolina, for their payment, upon which the State has 
since paid interest, your committee have concluded to recommend the sum of 
$92,648.09 as a full payment to the State of all Indian war claims, this being the dif- 
ference after deducting the sum borrowed by the State from the Indian trust fund 
(1132,000) from the amount found due the State by the Secretary of War ($224,648.09), 
and to further recommend the delivery to the State of all bonds and coupons held by 
the trustee of the Indian trust fund. 

The committee have amended the bill in accordance with the views expi-ossed in 
this report, and they recommend the passage of the bill as thus amended. Accom- 
panying the report is a communication from the Secretary of W^ar, explaining the 
origin and the present condition of the claim of the State of Florida against the Gov- 
ernment of the United States. 

This bill is now on the Senate Calendar. 

It does not now seem just, or in accordance with tbe requirements of 
national honor, that after so treating all tbe States making expendi- 
tures in all our previous wars, such as are hereinbefore set out, that now 
we should refuse such reimbursement to the loyal States who came to 
the rescue of the Government at a time when it was more in need of 
aid and support than at any other period of its history. 

J. LYMAN, 
For Minority of Committee on War Claims. 



4»TE CONOEESS, \ HOUSE OF KEPKESBNTATIVES. i Eepobt 
U SeuiofL § \ No. 1561. 



RELIEF OF THE ESTATE OF J. J. PULLIAM. 



April 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to be 

prioted. 



Mr.LYMAN, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill S. 605. J 

The Committee on War Claims, to whom was referred the bill {S. 605) for 
^e relief of the estate of J. «7. Pulliamj deceased, having had the same 
under consideration, report a^ follows : 

This claim was originally for quartermaster's stores amounting to 
17,323.35, alleged to have been furnished the United States Army during 
the civil war, by J. J. Pulliam, deceased, who was a resident during the 
war of La Grange, Tenn. The claim was first presented to the Quar- 
termaster's Department in 1876, and after a thorough and exhaustive 
investigation, the Quartermaster- General allowed and reported to the 
proper accounting officers of the Treasury the sum of $1,223, which 
was duly reported to the Forty seventh Congress, and the necessary ap- 
propriation made for the payment of the same in what is known as the 
4th of July bill of that year. Claimant applied to the Forty-eighth 
Congress for further relief, and also to this. The application to the 
present Congress has thus far resulted in the passage of the bill now 
under consideration by the Senate. 

The further facts necessary to a full understanding of this claim are 
stated in Seuatfe lie[)ort No. 347, of the Forty-Seventh Congress, as 
follows: 

On the 4th of July, 1804, Congress passed an act to restrict the jurisdiction of the 
Court of Claims, and to provide for the payment of certain demands for quartermas- 
ter's stores and subsistence supplies furnished to the Army of the United States (LJ 
Statutes at Large, page 381). 

Section 2 of this act provides ** that all claims of loyal citizens in States not in re- 
bellion for quarter mast ei-'s stores actually furnished to the Army of the United States, 
and receipted for by the proper officer receiving the .same, or which may have been 
taken by such officers without giving such receipt, may be submitted to the Quarter- 
master-General of the United States, accompanied witiisuch proofs as each claimant 
can present of the facts in his case, and it shall be the duty of the Quartermaster- 
General to cause such claim to be examined, and if convinced that it is just, and of 
the loyalty of the claimant, antl that the stores have been actually received or taken 
for the use of and used by said Army, then to report each case to the Third Auditor of 
the Treasury with a recommendation for settlement." 

Section 3 of the same act provides '' that all claims of loyal citizens in States uot 
in rebellion for subsistence actually furnished to said Army, and receipted for by the 
proper officer receiving the same, or which may have been taken by such officers 
without giving such receipt, may be submitted to the Commissary- Gen era! of Subsist- 
ence, accompanied with such proofs as each claimant may have to offer, and it shall 
^ the duty of the Commissary-General of Subsistence to cause each claim to be ex- 
amined, and if convinced that it is just, and of the loyalty of the claimant, and that 
the stores have been actually received or taken for the use of and used by said Army, 



2 ESTATE OF J. J. PULLIAM. 

then to report each case for payiuent to the Third Auditor of the Treasury with a rec- 
ommendation for settlement." 

The provisions of these two sections were snhseqaently extended by act of Conji^reas 
to embrace the State of Tennessee and the counties of Berkeley and Jefferson in the 
State of West Virginia. Until 1K74 these claims thus audited were paid directly oat 
of the appropriation for the Army ; but by section 2 of an act entitled ''An act mak- 
ing appropriations for the support of the Army for the fiscal year ending Jane 30, 
1875, and for other pnrposes," approved June 16, 1874, Congress provided that the< 
Secretary of the Treasurv should thereafter make report of each claim allowed bj 
the accounting officers of the Treasury at the commencement of each session of Con- 
gress to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, who should lay the same befon 
Congress for consideration. 

In compliance with section 2 of the said act approved June 16, 1874, the Secretary 
of the Treasury, on the 10th day of January last, transmitted to the Speaker of th« 
House of Representatives lists of 1,359 claims arising under the act of July 4, 1864^ 
and the various acts amendatory thereof, which claims were examined and allowed^ 
by the proper accounting officers of the Treasury since December 4, 1880. Thes^- 
claims amount in the aggregate to $291,148.04. They arose in the States of Illinois, 
Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Penn^ 
sylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and in the District of Columbia. The letter o^ 
the Secretary of the Treasury was referred by the House of Representatives to tho 
Committee on War Claims. The bill was prepared by that committee, report€»d to the 
House, and recommitted to the committee. After the bill was so recommitted it waa 
carefully compared by the clerks of said committee, aided by a clerk of the Treasury 
Department, under the direction and supervision of said committee, with the papers 
and records of the cases allowed, and all errors apparent on the face of the same noted 
and subsequently corrected. The Committee on War Claims of the House did not 
add to or take from any claim which had been allowed by the accounting officers of 
the Treasn<ry. In the report made by Mr. Houk, the chairman of said committee, he 
states that " the committee assume the equity and justice of the allowances miide, 
as well as the judicial impartiality and correctness of the action of the officers by 
whom such allowances were made.'' 

Your committee have compared the House bill with the claims allowed by the 
proper accouuting officers of the Treasury. They lind the names and amounts cor- 
rectly stated in tbe bill. The claims seem to have been examined with great care, 
and particularly in the Treasury Department, and your committee are satisfied that 
the awards made by the accounting officers of the Treasury are fully sustained by the 
evidence in each case, and that the award is made to the proper party in each case. 

John J. Pulliam, of Fayette County, Tennessee, is allowed in this bill the sum of 
$1,223. We are satisfied that Mr. Pulliam ought to have been awarded a larger sum 
by the accounting officers of the Treasury, but your «ommittee do not feel justified in 
delaying the passage of this bill by amending it, even for the purpose of doing justice 
to Mr. Pulliam. 

If Mr. Pulliam hereafter makes a claim for the balance equitably due him, and such 
claim is referred to your committee, as we now understand the matter, we will favor 
the payment to him of some additional amount. 

Your committee do not agree with the coDcluding statements of the 
above-quoted Senate report, to the effect that Mr. Pulliam ought to have 
been allowed a larger sum by the accounting officers of the Treasury. 
This committee believe that the evidence shows that the claimant had 
a fair and patient hearing before the officials of the Quartermaster- 
GeneraPs Office upon the -ground, and by personal examination of the 
witnesses, and do not think that manifest injustice has been done him, 
or that the action of the accounting officers of the Treasury should be 
overruled. 

Your committee recommend that the bill do lie on the table. 



49th CoNaBESS, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. J Repobt 
Ut Seuian. | { No. 1562 . 



HENRY RUBY. 



April 6, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. BiCHABDSON, from the Ck>mmittee on War Glaims, sabmitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany b^ H. R. 5448] 

The Committee on War OlaimSyto wham was re/erred the hiU {H. 22. 5448) 
for the relief of Henry Buby^ submit the following report: 

The committee have carefully examined all the proof in the case, and 
are of opinion that there is an atter failure to show any delivery of the 
stores and supplies upon which the claim is based to the Oovemmenty 
or to any par^ authorized to receive them for or on behalf of the Gov- 
tfnment. 

Your committee therefore direct that the bill of the House 5448 be 
reported to the House with the recommendation that it do lie on the 
table. 



19th CoNQRifiSS, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Sewon. f ( No. 1563. 



MOBILE AND GIRARD RAILROAD. 



April 6, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Honse and ordered to 

be printed. 



Mr. Stone, of Eentacky, from the Gommittee on War GlaimSy sab- 

mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 4924.] 

Tlu Committee on War Claima, to whom was referred the bill (H. B. 4924) 
for the relief of the Mobile and Oirard Railroad Company j nave conHd- 
ered the same, and respectfully report : 

This is the claim of the Mobile and Girard Railroad Company, a body 
corporate, organized and incorporated nnder the laws of Georgia, for 
services rendered to the United States for the transportation of 2,128 pa- 
rol^ Confederate soldiers, in the months of May, Jane, and Jnly, 1865, 
from Union Springs, Ala., to Columbus, Ga., a distance of 54 miles, at 
the Government's then tariff rates of 2 cents per mile, amounting to 
$2,298.24. 

On the 4th of May, 1866, Lieut. Gen. Richard Taylor, Confederate 
States army, entered into a '^ memorandum of the conditions of the sur- 
render of the forces, munitions of war, &c., in the Department of Ala- 
bama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana," to Maj. Gen. R. S. Canby, 
United States Army, Article VIII of which is as follows: 

Transportation and bubsistence to be furnished at public cost for the officers and 
RK^n after surrender to the nearest practicable point to their former homes. 

On the 5th day of May, 1865, General Canby issued "General Field Or- 
ders No. 36," to carry this cartel into effect, which contains the following : 

Transportation and subsistence will be furnished at public cost for the paroled 
officers and men to the nearest practicable point to their homes. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Stockton, of the Seventy second Illinois Infantry 
Regiment, was in command of the United States troops at Union Springs, 
Ala., in May, June, and July, 1865, and on application made to him for 
transportation of Confederate paroled soldiers to their homes, addressed 
a letter, dated June 1, 1865, to Lieutenant-Colonel Hough, acting assist- 
ant adjutant-general of the Sixteenth Army Corps, asking for instruc- 

tiODS. 

On this letter Colonel Hough made the following indorsement, and 
returned it to Lieutenant-Colonel Stockton : 

Headquarters Sixteenth Army Corps, 

Montgomtry^ Ala., June 3, 1865. 

Respectfully returned. For all persons traveling over the road under your direction 
yon will give transportation, and for paroled sotdiera going to their homeSf but trans- 
portation will only be furnished to persons in the military, naval, or civil service of 
the United States. 

J. HOUGH, 
Asiiatani Adjutant- General. 




2 MOBILE AND QIRARD RAILROAD. 

When this letter was received OoIoDel Stockton swears — 

He handed it to the officer of the company (railroad company) with the stateme^^ci^ 
that as the language was rather vague ne did not feel warranted in giving vooch^^r^ 
or orders covering transportation or any ontside of those in the Government serviez^^^ 
but that they had better keep an account of such service rendered, and if the Qf^ y 
emment was responsible, he had no doubt but that it would eventually be paid ft 
Subsequently affiant remembers that several conductors of the road appeared oefc 
him and made affidavits covering accounts for the transportation of paroled soldiei 

These accounts showing the number of paroled soldiers transport^^^, 
sworn to by the conductors before Colonel Stockton, are presented ,^gs 
the basis of this claim. The accounting officers rejected the claim ^ipn 
the ground that no orders were issued by the proper officers for sa€3ii 
transportation, and, therefore for want of privity of contract between 
the United States and the company. 

The Comptroller adds : 

That the company may have an equitable claim against the Government, I am dis- 
posed to admit, but Congress alone can afford the necessary relief. 

The Quartermaster-General states : •. 

The Quartermaster's Department has, by direction of the Secretary of War, paid 
the bills of railroad companies for the transportation of rebel paroled prisoners to 
their homes at the close of the war, but there is no record in this office of any such 
payment to the Mobile and Girard Railroad. It is believed that transportation of 
this character was furnished by this railroad, but that no written requests vf ere made 
for such service by United States officers. 

The liability of the Government to the company for this service can- 
not be doubted. The cartel, the order of General Canby, and the pay- 
ment of all other accounts for this character of service, so far as the 
committee are informed, are sufficient ground on which to grant the re- 
lief prayed for. 

The evidence as to the number of persons transported and their char- 
acter as paroled soldiers, entitled under the terms of the cartel to trans- 
portation and subsistence at public cost, is the best, under the circum- 
stances, which could be presented. The company took the precaution 
to require their conductors to keep an accurate detailed daily account 
of the number transported, and these accounts were sworn to before the 
officer whose dut3" it was to issue the required orders, but who appears 
to have objected to issuing orders, as he was directed, for the transpor- 
tation of ** paroled soldiers going to their homes," because they were not 
persons in the " military, naval, or civil service of the United States.'' 
The hastily written indorsement of Colonel Hough could not have in- 
tended such an absurdity. 

The liability of the Government for the services rendered is admitted^ 
and the facts alleged by the claimant being clearly established, your 
committee recommend the passage of the bill, with amendment. 






19 < 



Urn O0NOBB88, ) HOUSE OF BBPftBSBNTATIVBS. 4 Report 
lit Bmion. | ) No. 1564. 



JOHN H. JONBS AND THOMAS D. HARRIS. 



Apiil6, 1H86. — Committed t<o the Committee of the Whole Honse and ordered to be 

printed. 



Jfr.STONS, of Kentucky, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7644.] 

The Committee an War .Claims^ to whom was referred the hill (JJ. B, 4216) 
for the relief 0/ John H, Jones and Thomas D, Harris^ having cofisia- 
ered the same^ submit the following report : 

The said John H. Jones and Thomas D. Harris, doing business under 
the firm name of Jones & Harris, were the owners of and were operat- 
ing a certain rolling mill property, fixtures, and interests at Loudon, 
TeDu.,and were engaged in the manufacture of iron at the breakingout 
of the war, April, 1861. That said John H. Jones and Thomas D. Har- 
ris were loyal citizens to the United States Government, and that in 
obedience to the proclamation of President Lincoln issued in 1861, for- 
bidding any aid to be given to the Confederate Government, they 
ceased operating said mill and were forced to leave said locality. 

Id March, 1863, all of said property mentioned in the affidavit of John 
H. Jones was taken by the Confederate army under the command of 
General Kirby Smith, and said rolling-mill, together with the fixtures, 
ores, and iron, were removed to Knoxville from Loudon, and at that place 
the mill was re-erected and put in shape for operation. 

In August, 1863, General Burnside, in command of the Federal forces, 
entered Knoxville and took possession, and among other property 
which fell into the control of the Federal force was this property of the 
claimants. For nearly two years the Federal forces, under a detail from 
Bumside's army, occupied and operated said rolling-mill and used and 
enjoyed the product of the same fw the benefit of the United §tates 
Government. The proof is not clear as to the amount, but it seems cer- 
tain, however, that a considerable amount of supplies were receiv^ed 
and used for the benefit of the United States Government. 

Under all the circumstances the committee deem it proper to recom- 
mend the passage of a bill referring the claim to the Court of Claims for 
final adjudication. 

Therefore your committee report the accompanying bill as a substi- 
tote for House bill 4216, and recommend that it do pass. 



49rH Congress, \ HOUSE OF KEPKESENTATIVE8. i Eepobt 
Ui Session. f (No. 1565. 



BIVEE AND HAEBOR APPROPRIATION BILL. 



April 7, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Willis, from the Committee on Rivers and Harbors, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7480.] 

The Committee on Rivers and Harbors beg leave to report back to 
the Hoase the accompanying bill (H. R. 7480) '^ making appropriations 
for the construction, repair, and preservation of certain works on rivers 
and harbors, and for other purposes," with sundry amendments, and to 
recommend the passage of the same. 

The last river and harbor act, which was passed 5th July, 1884, as it 
left the House appropriated $12,619,100, upon estimates by the engineers 
that $35,301,885 could be "profitably expended in the fiscal year," or 
33^ per cent, of the estimates. The bill reported herewith appropriates 
$15,120,700, upon the engineers' estimates of $42,332,100. 

PRINCIPAL ITEMS OF THE BILL. 

The following is an itemized statement of the appropriations recom- 
mended in this bill : « 

165 rivers $9,932,700 

124 harbors 4,380,500 

5 channels and inlets 262, 500 

2 ice-harbors 35,000 

5 breakwaters 215,500 

4 special surveys 139, 50o 

1 dry-dock 65,000 

Examinations, sarveys, and contingencies 100, 000 

15, 120, 700 

Of this total amount the sum of $1,018,000 covers items not carried 
upon the Book of Estimates. Deducting this last sum from the total, 
as given above, leaves $14,102,700 as the amount appropriated upon 
the regular estimates, which is less than 33^ per cent, thereof. 

NUMBER OF ITEMS REJECTED — NEW ITEMS. 

The estimates called for appropriations for 201 rivers (including 8 
channels and inlets). Of these the committee rejected 40. They also 
called for appropriations for 138 harbors (including 5 breakwaters and 
2 ice-harbors). Of these the committee rejected 15. Thus, out of a 



, 2 RIVER AND HARBOR APPROPRIATION BILL. 

total of 339 items for which appropriations were asked by the e 
gineers, 55 have been refused by the committee. The principal ne 
item is an appropriation of $250,000 for the construction of a new lo(^lc 
on the Saint Mary's River, which is the outlet for the great lake sys- 
tem. The immense increase of commerce on the lakes and the in^. 
creased draught of vessels passing through this river fully justify ttm^e 
proposed work. 

THE MISSrSSCPPI RIVER AND ESTIMATES. 

The largest appropriation in the bill is for the Mississippi Riv^r. 
The committee hav^e ap{)ropriated to that river, from its mouth to its 
source, $3,725,000. This amount includes $50,000 for the reservoirs £tt 
its headwaters. An itemization of this aggregate sum is as follows : 

Reservoirs at headwaters $50, OCO 

Snag boat on Upper Mississippi :W» iWO 

From Saiut Paul to Des Moines Rapids 510, OOO 

At Des MoiDHS Rapids, to complete modi Hed project :te, OOO 

From Des Moines Rapids to mouth of Illinois River 200, OOO 

From month of Illinois River to mouth of Ohio River .^0, 000 

From Cairo to* the Head Passes, including Red River at and below the 

head of the Atchafiilaya 2,250,000 

Survey of Mississippi River between Head Passes and headwaters 75,000 

To remove obstructions, &c 75,00(1 



• 



Total 3,725,000 

' The estimates for above items were as follows : 

Reservoirs at headwaters 150,000 

Snag-boat on Upper Mississippi - tiO, 000 

From Saint Paul to Des Moines Rapids 1,500,000 

At Des Moines Rapids, to complete modified project ...- 101,700 

From Des Moines Rapids to mouth of Illinois River 500,000 

From mouth of Illinois River to mouth of Ohio River 1,000,000 

From Cairo to the Head Passes, including Red River at and below the 

head of the Atchafalaya 5,000,000 

Survey of Mississippi River, between Head Passes and headwaters 100,000 

To remove obstructious, &c ..^ 161,000 

Total 8,542,700 

In addition to the Mississippi, other great rivers in the country re- 
ceive the following amounts : 

Missouri River $610,000 

Ohio River 500,000 

Columbia River 460,000 

Saint Mary's River and Hay LakeChannel 400,000 

Tennessee' River 357.500 

Kentucky River 250,000 

Delaware River 240,000 

James River . . 15U, 000 

Qreat Kanawha River 150,000 

Cape Fear River 125,000 

Monongahela River 121,500 

Cumberland River 112,500 

IHinois River 10(»,0<iO 

Red River 95«000 

Arkansas River 75,000 

Fox River 75,000 

3,831,500 



RIVER AND HARBOR APPROPRIATION BILL. 3 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR SMALLER RIVERS. 

There are in the present bill recommendations for other rivers, as 

follows; 

20 at $5,000 each $100,000 

IH St $10,000 each 180,000 

7at $15,000 each 105,000 

30 between $20,000 and $50,000 8rJ7,500 

2at $50,000 100,000 

1,372,500 
iPPBOPRIATIONS FOR HARBORS AS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL. 

For harbors, &c., the recommendations of the bill are as follows : 

2 ice-harbora, at $35,000 

Sbreakwatera, at 215, 500 

124 harbors, at 4,380,500 

The following are the leading appropriations for harbors : 

New York Harbor (Hell Gate, &c.) 

Galveston Harbor 

Sabine Pa^, Tex 

Charleston Harbor 

Mobile Harbor 

Baltimore Harbor 

Norfolk Harbor ! 

Cumberland Soand , 

Toledo Harbor 

Savannah Harbor 

Cleveland Harbor 

Chicago Harbor 

Aransas Pass 

Sand Beach Harbor 

Hnmboldt Harbor , 



4,631,000 


$435,000 


400,000 


265,000 


250,000 


120,000 


X00,000 


150, 000 


150, 000 


150,000 


125,000 


125,000 


100,000 


135,000 


100, 000 


100,000 



Total for 15 harbors 2,705,000 

The following harbors are recommended for appropriations ranging 
from 950,000 to $100,000: 

Oswego $95,000 

Milwaukee 80,000 

Oakland 80,000 

TaqninaBay 80,000 

Wilmington 75,000 

Boston 75,000 

Newburyport 50,000 

Erie 50,000 

PasaCavallo 50,000 

Brazos Santiago 60, 000 

Dolutb 50,000 



Total amount for 11 harbors 735,000 

In addition to the above there are 15 barbors, for which recommenda- 
tions have been made, ranging between (20,000 and (50,000, amount- 
ing in the aggregate to (420,000. 

SUMMARY OF HARBOR APPROPRIATIONS. 

Fifteen harbors, at $100,000 and upwards $2,705,000 

Eleven harbors, from $50,000 to $100,000 735,000 

Fifteen harbors, at and above $20,000 420,000 



4 RIVER AND HARBOR APPROPRIATION BILL. 

TWO RIVER AND HARBOR BILLS IN ONE. 

Yoar committee think it proper to call attention to the fact that the 
present bill carries appropriations for two years. The last appropria- 
tion for rivers and harbors was by the act of July 5, 1884, which was for 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1885. In the last session of the Forty- 
eighth Congress the Committee on Eivers and Harbors reported a bill 
recommending the appropriation of $12,323,700. This bill was discussed 
for several weeks, when another bill, appropriating $5,000,000, was sub- 
stituted for it and passed the House, but failed in the Senate from want 
of time to consider it. The deliberate judgment of the representatives 
of the people was thus placed upon record, that at least $5,000,000 was 
actually needed "for the construction, repair, and preservation of cer- 
tain works on rivers and harbors for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1886.'' 

The failure to secure this or any amount for such purposes excited 
great complaint, and when this committee commenced their work at the 
beginning of the present session they were confronted with ni^merous 
demands for immediate appropriations. The committee did not think . 
it proper to yield to these demands, but they embrace in the present 
bill the total amount to be expended for the next fiscal year. The 
failure of the last House to make any appropriation has thrown on yoar 
committee the duty of combining two river and harbor bills in one. 

Dividing the present amount recommended between the two fiscal 
years will give $7,500,000 as the^amount of the present bill properly 
chargeable to this Congress. 

No appropriation has been made for the improvement of the Potomac 
Biver and flats for the reason that the title to the reclaimed land is in 
dispute; and, until some satisfactory information on that subject has 
been furnished, it was not thought prudent to expend money in that 
direction. 

GENERAL LEGISLATION. 

The general legislation of the bill is confined to three or four provis- 
ions, touching the control, administration, use and navigation of rivers 
and harbors. A report is required as to locks and dams now improved 
under authority, upon which tolls are charged, and as to the advisa- 
bility of purchasing said improvements by the Government; and in 
one instance that of theMonongahela Biver, the Government is author- 
ized, if necessary, to acquire by condemnation the works of the Monon- 
gahela Navigation Company, to the end that the navigation of the river 
may be made free. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS AND THE MISSIS- 
SIPPI KIVER COMMISSION. 

The report of the Mississippi Biver Commission, together with the 
annual report and maps of the Chief of Engineers, are required to be 
made on or before the 1st of December in each year. In the annual 
report of the Chief of Engineers he is directed to report — 

All the instances in which piers, breakwaters, or other stractures or works, bnilt or 
made by the United States in aid of commerce or navigation, are nsed, occupied, or 
injured by a corporation or an individual, and the extent and mode of such use, occu- 
pation, or injury, and the facts touching the same. He shall also report whether any 
bridges, causeways, or structures, now erected or in process of erection, do or will 
interfere with the free and safe navigation of the rivers and other public works herein 
appropriated for, and if they do or will so interfere, to report the best mode of altering 
or constructing such bridges or causeways as to prevent any such obstructions. 



BIVER AND HABBOR APPROPRIATION BILL. 



CONTRACT SYSTEM PEBMISSIBLE. 



"?^ ^ Mi 



^1 



OiJO 



1 T^ 



Another provision makes it the — 

Dntj of the Secretary of War to apply the moDey herein appropriated for iinprove- 
meots, other than enrveys and estimates, in carrying on the various ^orks, by con- 
tract or otherwise, as may be most economical and advantageous to the Government. 
Where said works are done by contract, such contract shall be made after sufficient 
public advertisements for proposals, in such manner and form as the Secretary of War 
siiall prescribe; and such contracts shall be made with the lowest responsible bidders, 
accompanied by such securities as the Secretary of War shall require, conditioned for 
the faithful prosecution and completion of the work according to such contract, and 
for the prompt payment of all liabilities incurred in the jirosecution thereof for labor 
and material. 

OBSTRUCTING BRLDGES AND CAUSEWAYS. 

Yonr committee have also recommended legislation touching the re- 
moval of bridges, causeways, and other structures which interfere with 
the free and convenient navigation of rivers and harbors, and providing 
that hereafter the drawings and description of such proposed works 
shall first be submitted to the Secretary of War for his approval. 

SURVEYS AND EXAMINATIONS. 

Your committee have directed the Secretary of War, at hfs discretion, 
to cause examinations or surveys, or both, and estimates of costs of im- 
provement proper, to be made of 56 rivers and 28 harbors. The wise 
provision of the act, placing these esaminationsand surveys under the 
supervision of the Secretary of War, and prescribing the conditions 
precedent therefor, have been adopted and made fuller and more specific 
in the present bill. 

Before any money is ordered the local engineer is required to make 
a prelimiLary examination, and report to the Chief of Engineers — 

Whether, in hia opinion, aaid river or harbor is worthy of improvement, and shall 
state in i»nch report Inlly and particularly the facts and reasons on which he bases 
such opinion, including the present and prospective demands of commerce ; and it 
shall be the duty of the Chief of Engineers to direct the makine of such survey, if in 
his opinion the river or harbor proposed to be surveyed be worthy of improvement by 
the General Government, and he shall report to the Secretary of War the facts, and 
what public necessity or convenience may be subserved thereby, together with the 
fall reports of the local engineer. 

Such reports will place Congress in possession of all the facts, and 
prevent either partiality or prejudice. 

Your committee finally recommend that such reports of preliminary 
examinations and surveys shall be made to this House and shall be 
printed. At present these reports are sent to the Senate, and the com- 
mittee primarily charged with their consideration are thus frequently 
deprived of important and necessary information. 

Your committee confidently believe that Congress will adopt these 
several legislative recommendations, as they are all approved by the 
Engineer Department and have for their sole object the honest, faith- 
ful, and economical administration of the public moneys, and the proper 
regulation, maintenance, and construction of those great public works 
whose importance to commerce and navigation has been recognized 
from the foundation of our Government. 

CONCLUSION. 

Your committee, in bringing this report to a conclusion, cannot re- 
frain from briefly referring to the unusual and embarrassing circum- 

H. Eep. 1566 2 



b RIVEtt AND HARBOR APPROPRIATION BILL. 

stances under which the bill now reported was framed, and the efforts 
which they have made to discharge acceptably the ardaoas and respon- 
sible duties devolved upon them. The fact, already alluded to, that two 
river and harbor bills are embraced in the present bill, will suggest the 
increased responsibility, difficulty, and embarrassment in apportioning 
this small amount among a large number of works of improvement 
equally meritorious and important. 

In discharging this duty your committee have availed themselves of 
all the information within their reach. Not only have the committee 
twice carefully considered all the facts contained in the special and gen- 
eral reports of the War Department, but every member and delegate 
was invited to appear, and over nine tenths of them did appearand 
present additional facts touching the improvements within their re- 
spective districts. Numerous delegations, representing different works, 
were also heard. 

Conscious that in the investigation of so many hundred public works, 
new and old, that they may have in some instances done injustice, bat 
trusting that in the main the conclusions arrived at will be found to be 
correct, the committee submit this bill as the result of their labors, 
with the hope that it will meet with the approval of Congress and of the 
country. 



49th Ck>NGR£SS^ ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 

) ) No. 1566. 



iMt Session. 



^M BELIEF OF SUFFERERS FROM OVERFLOW IN ALABAMA. 



April 7, 1886. — CoiniuiUe«l to the Committee of the AVhole ITouse on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Forney, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7645. ] '^ 

The Committee on Appropriations, to whom was referred the joint 
resolation (H. Res. 155) appropriating $300,000 for the relief of the suf- 
ferers by the overflow of the rivers in Alabama, having considered the 
same, recommend the passage of the accompanying bill, which appro- 
priates $150,000, as a substitute therefor. 

The following telegrams were submitted to the Committee on Appro- 
priations during their consideration of the question of relief to the suf- 
ferers by the overflow of the rivers in Alabama : 

Montgomery, Ala., Apri^yy 18H6. . 

Hod. H. a. Rerbbrt, Borne of liepreaentatives : 

City and county aathorities unable to cope with the distress from overflow ; princi- 
pally colored people. Can't you help us with the Government? 

C. L. MATTHEWS. W. L. CHAMBERS. 
JOSHUA MORRIS. W. W. ALLEN. 
F. C. RANDOLPH. JOS. GOETTER. 
H. C. MOSES. E. B. JOSEPH. 

•K. M. P. LEGRAND. 



I 



MONTGOMKRY, Ala., April bf 1896. 

Hona. J. L, Pugh, Jno. T. Morgan, H. A. Herbert, A. C. Davidson, and J. M. 
Mabtin : 

Oar information is that suffering from flood is so great impossible for local authori- 
ties to relieve. 

H. R. SHORTERS. 
W. C. TANSTALL. 
H C. TOMPKINS. 



Sblma, Ala., April 5, 1886. 

Tks Senators and Representatives of Alabama, Washington, D. C: 

This flood has been more destructive than any we have ever heard of in Alabama. 
Thousands of people along the river are without food, clothing, orshelter, mostly col- 
ored people. We are supplying all we can. This is a case of extreme necessity. 
Cannot tne Government am tnese helpless people f 

E. W. PETTUS, 

H. 8. D. MALLARY, 

F. BOYKm, Jr., 

i Committee of Citizens' Meeting, 



2 RELIEF OF SUFFERERS FROM OVERFLOW IN ALABAMA. 

Montgomery, Ala., April 5, 1886. 
Hon. H. A. Herbert, 

WashingUmf D, C: 

The distress amongst the colored people in the overflowed district is terrible to 
contemplate, and while the coanty and municipal authorities and the citizena gener- 
ally are responding nobly, they eannot relieve the necessities of the unfortanate. 
Please, therefore, urge an immediate appropriation by Congress. 

W. R. WESTCOTT, 
W. D. BROWN, 
A. H. HUBBARD, 
Members Board Rerenuej Montgomery County, 



[Copy of Telegram to Governor of Alabama.] 

Washington, D. C, April 5, 1886. 

Gov. E. A. O'Neal, Montgomery , Ala. : 

Does the situation in Alabama require relief for the people injured by the flood 
which the State cannot furnish T 

What is needed — rations or money ; at what points and what quantities? 
Will the State undertake to distribute if Congress grants relief? 
I telegraph by direction of the delegation. 

WM. H. FORNEY. 



Montgomery, Ala., April 6, 1886. 
Hon. William H. Forney, 

House of Bepresentatives : 

There is distress and destitution in all the river counties of the State. The State 
cannot give relief without a special session of the legislature, which cannot be had 
in time to meet the emergency. If Congress makes an appropriation let it be in 
money, and if thought best I will undertake its distribution^ as at present advised. 
My opinion is that $150,000 will be sufficient. 

A. E. O'NEIL, 

Governor, 

During the year 18S4 similar aid was granted to the sufferers by the 
overflow of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, and $500,000 was appro- 
priated therefor. See Statutes at Large, volume 23, pages 267, 268, 
269, and 273. 

O 



49th Congress, ( HOUSE OF EEPKESENTATIVES. i Report 
1st Session. ] \ No. 1567. 



BRIDGE ACROSS THE MISSOURI RIVER AT PIERRE, DAK. 



April 9, 1886. ~ Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Crisp, from the Committee on Commerce, sabmitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7646.1 

The Committee on Commerce^ to whom was referred the hill (JJ. JR. 6683) to 
authorize the construction and maintenance of a bridge by the Dakota 
Central Railway Company across the Missouri River at Pierre^ Dak.j 
have had the same under consideration^ and report as follows : 

Your committee report a sabstitate for said bill, which substitute con- 
tains all the reservations and restrictions usual in such cases ; and 
year committee recommend the passage of said substitute. 



49th Congress, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
1st Session. ] \ No. 1568. 



LIGHT-HOUSE ON SEUL CHOIX POINT, MICHIGAN. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

UnioD and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Tarsney, from the Committee on Commerce, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

rXo accompany luH H. R. 7647.] 

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred House bill No. 
3492, making an appropriation for establishing a light-house at Seul 
ChoLz Point, Michigan, have had the same under consideration, and re- 
port a substitute and recommend the passage of the same. 

The necessity for the establishment of this light-house is clearly made 
apparent by the report of the Light-House Board for the year 1885, 
which reads as follows : 

Seul Choix Pointj northern ah<yre of Lake Michigan, Michigan, 

Daring the prevalenoe of northwest winds, this coast is followed by many vessels 
from Chicago and MUwankee, and Seal Choix offers a ffood harbor of refuge in these 
winds, with good anchorage in from 3^ to 4 fathoms of water. There is no light on 
this northern shore between Poyerty Island and Saint Helena, a distance of about 100 
miles. On February 15, 1882, the Board made a favorable reply to a request received 
through the proper channels from the Committee on Commerce of the Senate for its 
views as to the necessity for establishing a light at or near Point Patterson, on the 
northern shore of Lake Michigan. On May 4, 1882, the Senate passed a bill appropri- 
ating $15,000 therefor, bnt the bill did not pass the House. A motion to add tmsitem 
to the sundry civil appropriation bill of that year was ruled out on a point of order. 
Point Patterson and Seul Choix are within a few miles of each other. The Board is 
now of opinion that of the two Seul Choix is the better place for a light, and that 
there is an urgent necessity for its establishment. It is estimated that its erection 
will cost $15,000. 



40TH CoiraBESS, I HOUSE OF BEPBESENTATIYEB. I Bspobt 
Ui Semon. ] t No. 1569. 



SEYMOUR F. ARNOLD. 



April 9, 1886.— Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. HouK, firom the Committee on Military ASsirBj submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To aooompany bill H. B. 2170.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred House bill 
3170, have considered the same, and rei>ort It back to the House ad- 
verselyf with the recommendation that it lie on the table, for the reason 
ibmt the relief sought thc^by has heretofore been granted by the War 
Department, 



Congress, > HOUSE OF REPKESENTATIVBS. / Keport 
Ui Section. I ) No. 1570. 



DE. W. LEIGH BURTON. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to 

be printed. 



Mr. Plumb, from the Committee on Patents^ submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 2524.] 

The Committee on Patents^ to whom was referred the bill (JJ. R. 2524) for 
the relief of Dr. W. Leigh Burton^ having considered the same^ make the 
following report: 

m 

Od the 12th and 23d days of March, 1869, patent was granted by the 
Commissioner of Patents to Dr. W. Leigh Barton, of Richmond, Ya., 
for improvement in electro-heating, which invention appears to be a 
Trainable one for the purposes for which it is designed. 

Tour committee farther find that the patentee. Dr. Burton, was pre- 
vented by his financial disability, growing out of the condition of his 
section of the country after the close of the war, from taking the neces- 
sary steps to introduce his invention and secure to himself any benefits 
tiierefrom. 

It further appears that circumstances have now so changed that means 
can be obtained to introduce said invention for general use, on condi- 
tion that the extension of seven years asked for can be secured. 

In view of all the circumstances of this case your committee are of 
the opinion that the interests of the public will be advanced^ and the 
proper benefit to the inventor be secured by granting the extension 
asked for. 

It is therefore ordered that the bill be reported to the House, with 
the recommendation that it be passed. * 



CoNGBESSy ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, j Report 
1st SesHan. f ) No. 1571. 



ANDREW W. BILLINGS. 



April 9, 1886.— Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Matson, Arom the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 572.] 

Tike Committee an Invalid PenHanSj to whom was referred the bill (H. B. 
Id 572) /or tJ^ relief of Andrew W. Billings j submit the following report : 

Tbat claimant is now receiving the highest pension provided by law 
for the disability £rom which he suffers (rheumatism). The committee 
therefore report adversely. 



4dTH CONGBESS, j HOUSE OF EBPRESENTATIVBS. f Report 



Ut Session. f J No. 1672. 



GUSTAV 8CHUFFERT. • 



April 9, 1886. — Laid od the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Matson, from the Oommittee on Invalid Pensions, sabmitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3850.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the bill (H, R. 
3850) granting a pension to Oustav Schuffert, submit the follovnng re- 
port : 

Gustav Schnffert enlisted in Battery K, First Michigan Light Ar- 
tillery, at the commencement of the war, and served with that command 
nntil the Atlanta campaign, when he was transferred to the Thirteenth 
New York Independent Battery, and remained with the latter until the 
fall of Atlanta, when he was again transferred to his former command 
and served faithfully to the close of the war. 

He participated in many of the important battles of the war, includ- 
ing Hesaca, Kennesaw Mountain, Fort Mountain, Pea Ridge, Peach Tree 
Creek, and Atlanta. On July 4, 1867, claimant, with others, were en- 
gaged in firing a cannon in celebration of the day, when he met with a 
severe accident, the loss of his right arm, by the premature discharge 
of the cannon. Since that time he has been struggling along trying to 
support his family, consisting of wife and eight children, by manual 
labor. To-day he is broken in health and unable longer to contribute 
to their support. He is endorsed as a man of excellent character and 
a good citizen, and as one deserving the generous assistance of the Gov- 
ernment. 

This man is an object of sympathy and pity, but this^mmittee can- 
not afford to pension men for disabilities not incurred in the service, 
in special-act cases, and therefore report adversely. 



49th Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Repokt 
1st Ses,sion. S \ No. 157.^. 



LARKIN G. MEAD. 



April 9, 18b6. — Committed to tbe Committee of the Whole House aud ordered to bo 

printed. 



Mr. LiOVERiNG, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 5283.] 

The Committee an Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the hill (JBT. JB. 
5283) granting a pension to Larkin G. Mead^ have had the same under 
consideration^ and respectfully report : 

Larkin G. Mead was appointed by Governor Randall, of Wisconsin, 
as a^isistant surgeon of the Eighteenth Wisconsin in December, 1861; 
was severely ruptured at the battle of Pittsburg Landing, and at Cor- 
inth was prostrated with rheumatism and fistula. Dr. William Ste- 
vens, of Boston, certifies that *^he has a large inguinal hernia on the 
right side, which is apparently irreducible. I also find evidence in the 
stiffened and enlarged joints of his toes and fingers that he has suffered 
from chronic articular rheumatism." G. L. Park, who was adjutant of 
the Eighteenth Wisconsin, states that the contract under which Mead 
acted as surgeon of that regiment was not in formal compliance with 
law, but that General Grant, upon a personal interview with Park, ap 
proved it. This legal informality prevents Dr. Mead from obtaining 
the benefit of the general law. George M. Miller testifies as follows: 

That he was well acquainted with said Mead before the civil war of 1861, and that 
said Mead was of good and sound health ; that since the return home of said Mead 
froDQ service in the civil war he has known Mead well, and that since his return he 
hAs not only been wholly unfit for manual labor and self-support, but has been fre- 
quently confined to the house ; that he is at all times, and has been since his return 
from service in the war, a sufferer with rupture, fistala, and rheumatism, and that 
be is supported by the charity of his friends. 

Adjutant Park's affidavit ^ as follows: 

State of Wisconsix, 

County of Wood, 88 : 

Gilbert L. Park, beiuj^ first duly sworn, upon oath says : 

I reside at iitevens Poiut, Portage County, State of Wisconsin, and am over fifty 
years of age, and am tbe identical Gilbert L. Park who was adjutant of the Eight- 
eenth Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry in the war of 1861 ; that I knew per- 
sonally Larkin G. Mead, formerly of Madison, Wis., and who was by the governor of 
Wisconsin appointed an assistant surgeon for said regiment; that soon after the bat- 
tle of Shiloh I was taken sick aud sent to hospital at Saint Louis, Mo., aud remained 
there until I rejoined the regiment at Corinth in the last of July or first of August, 
1862. That at my return to camp near Corinth I found said Mead sick, utterly helplesn, 
incapable of walking or attending to any business whatever, and iu the camp of said 
regiment at Corinth. Also, that he had been engaged in attending as a physician aud 
Borgeon to the sick and woanded of the Eighteenth Regiment Wisconsin Volanteer In- 



2 LARKIN G. M£AD. 

fantry ander a written contract, bat which contract, from some informality in its exe- 
cution or omission of some approval, was [not] legally made or absolotely bindiog. 
There was then due Mr. Meaa on the contract severHl hundred dollars. I took thu 
contract and went to General Grant's headquarters and obtained from General U. 8. 
Grant an or<ier indorsed on the contract and signed by him, ordering the money doe 
on the contract to be paid to Mead. This order, I think, was directed to M^or Rej- 
nolds, a United Stat<*s paymaster. With this contract and order I received a sum of 
money, which I paid over to Dr. L. G. Mead the same day. I do not now recollect 
what that snm amounted to, nor whether it was in full satisfaction of Dr. Mead's serr- 
ices or not. Nor do I now remember what amount was due hiai. This money was 
paid alone by virtue of General Grant's order, and the application for the order SDd 
the making of it bv General Grant was solely because of Dr. Mead's health, as a ne- 
cessity to save his lire by sending him North. I had, and still have, a faint inipreseioo 
that the amount paid was $345 and some cents, but do not recollect it as a fact ; oor 
can I from memory tell what sum was paid. Dr. Mead's services under the contrtct 
were commended by nearly if not every commissioned [officer] in the Eighteenth 
Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, in writing, signed by the officers and attache to the 
contract, as services skillfully, satisfactorily, and faithfully rendered. This was done 
at Corinth, Miss., on or about the 1st of August, 1862. 

G. L. PARK. 
State of Wisconsin, 

County of Wood : 

Before me, the undersigned, clerk of the circuit court for the county of Wood, on 
the 9th day of May, 1882, came G. L. Park, to me well known to be the identical per- 
son named, and who signed the above affidavit and made oath before me that the 
same is true. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal 
of said court this 9th day of May, 1882. 

[SEAL.] R. P. BE0N80N, 

CUrk of Ike Circuit Court in and for Wood County, Wiscontin. 

In view of his well-attested services on the battle-field, his injuries re- 
snltiug therefrom, and his present crippled condition, yoar committee 
are of opinion that he deserves the pension he asks. They therefore 
report back the bill, and recommend its passage with the foUowio^ 
amendment : Strike out, in the sixth line of the bill, the following words: 
<*at the rate of dollars a month," and substitute therefor the fol- 
lowing : << subject to the provisions and limitations of the pension laws." 



49th Congress, \ HOUSE QF EEPRESENTATIVES. j Report 
Ui Session. i ) No. 1574. 



ARETUS F. LOOMIS. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Conger, from the Comraittee od Invalid Peoaions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7018.] 

The Committee an Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the bill {H. R. 
7018) granting a pension to Aretus F, Loomis^ beg leave to report: 

That Aretus F. Loomis enlisted in Company K, One hundred and 
twenty-fifth Regiment New York Volunteers, on the 9th day of Au- 
gUHt, 1862, and was discharged June 5, 1865. 

He filed his application for pension September 30, 1882, alleging dis- 
abilities contracted while a prisoner of war in Andersonville and other 
Confederate prisons. The fact of present disability, of its incurrence 
during his prison life, and of its continuance since, is clearly and con- 
clusively established, but his claim was rejected " on the ground that 
claimant was not in line of duty when captured, hence the disabilities 
resulting from his imprisonment did not originate in line of duty." This 
decision seems to have been based wholly upon the records furnished 
by tbe Adjutant-General's OflSce. 

Claimant claims to have been captured at SpottsylvaniaMaylS, 1864. 
Tbe company morning reports for May and June, 1864, show him '* ab- 
sent without leave since May 9, 1864." July and August same report; 
but September and October report him ^'absent sick since May y ; sup- 
posed to be captured." March and April, 1865, "present, exchanged 
prisoner of war." 

Prisoner of war records show him captured at Spottsylvania May 13, 
1864. His regiment is reported to have been in action May 8, 9, 12, and 
13, 1864. Loomis claims that the records are wrong ; that he was never 
absent without leave, and that he was with his company from the 9th of 
May to the 13th, when he, with about thirty five others, was captured 
on the skirmish line. This is also proven by a comrade who was cap- 
toml with him. 

This case appears to have been very thoroughly and carefully ex- 
amine<l at the Pension Office, twice finding its way to the table of the 
Commissioner himself, at one of which times he indorses them: **The 
very point ciotheil in doubt is captured while in line of duty. • • • 
I am satisfied with the other points in the case," and at the other, *' Why 
should not the case be admitted, captured in line of duty, disability as 
alleged at and since discharge? I think it a meritorious case." To 
flol?e this doubt four special examinations were made by four difl'erent 
examiners, and every one after a careful examination of the case certi- 
fies to its merit and recommends its admission. 



I 



I ARETUS F. LOO^nS. 

All the evidence taken by the special examiners tends to establis 
the tnith of claimant's statement. The only testimony that could poj 
sibly be construed otherwise is a statement of claimant's mother thi 
her son, told her that he with othei^s of his comrades were capture 
wi)ile fora^jiufT. All the other proof is that they were captured whil 
skirmishing, and this is probably what the soldier told his mother. 

The Pension Office evidently took this statement of the mother asco 
rol)oratin|c the "absent without leave " record, and so rejected the clain 

The special examinatons show that the claimant is a man of the bigl 
est chacacter, an<l his statements are implicitly relied u|K)n by ail h 
neighbors. 

It is not an uncommon thing to find discrepancies and errors ni tl 
Army records, especially in company reports made during active cai 
paign, and your committee cannot understand how^ this case could ha^ 
been rejected upon this record, which seems clearly to have been an errc 

We believe the claimant wa« captured in line of duty, that his rigl 
to a pension is conclusively established, and therefore recommend tl 
passage of the bill, after inserting in line 4, after the name *' Loomis 
the words*' late a private in Company K, One hundred and twenty fif 
Kew York Volunteers." 



mH<'ONGRESS, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i 
]itt ikmon. I \ 



Report 
No. J 575. 



MARY A. SHANNON. 



AtrilO, 1886. — Comuiitted to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered \o be 

priuted. 



Mr.ELi.SBERRY, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

followinjf 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1766.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the bill {H, R. 
1766) granting a pension t/) Mary A. Shannon^ widow of Criner C, JShayi- 
non, late a private in Company Gj One hundred and eighteenth Ohio 
Volunteers J report : 

The claim of this widow was rejected in the Pension Office on the 
groand that her husband died of a disease which originated after dis- 
charge. 

The committee concede that the erysipelas which caused the soldier's 
death did not originate in the service, but we think it is cleariy shown 
that the erysipelas did result from diseased eyes contracted while in the 
service and for which he was receiving a pension at the time of his 
death. 

In sapport of this view of the case we quote the evidence of Dr. Wat- 
son, who testifies that he attended the aoldier in his last illness for about 
one week prior to his death ; that the immediate and remote cause of 
soldier's death was intianimation of the eyes, during the progress of 
which erysipelas set in, and resulted in his death ; that the disease of 
eyes was the immediate cause of the inflammation. In a subsequent 
affidavit Dr. Watson states that the inflammation in the eyes took an 
acute form, probably from exposure, and was so great as to cause much 
redness of the eyes,. and while in this condition erysipelas set in and 
spread all over the face and reached the throat, causing his death in 
aboat six days after erysipelas commenced. 

The only material question involved in this case is. Did erysipelas 
result from inflamed eyesf Your committee think it did, and recom- 
mend the passage of the bill. 



49th Gongbess, > HOUSE OF REPEBSENTATIVES. | Ebpobt 
Ut Session. § ) No. 1676. 



ELIZABETH A. NEIBLING. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. £lx.sbebbt, from the Oommittee on Invalid Pensions, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1764.] 

OTke Committee on Invalid Pensions, to whom was referred the hill {H. R. 
1764) granting arrears of pension to Elizabeth A. Neihling, report: 

That the claimant is now receiving a pension of $30 per month nnder 
special act approved March 13, 1876, from which date her pension was 
made to commence nnder the provisions of the general pension laws. 
This bill provides for arrears Jrom the date of husband's death, in 1869, 
to the date of the commencement of pension under special act. As it 
is not in conformity with the practice of Congress to grant arrears, your 
oommittee recommend that the bill do not pass. 



48^ii CoNGBESS, ) HOUSiU OF EEPRliiSENTATIVBS. | Rbpobt 
Ut Session. J \ Yo. 1677. 



FREDERICK SEIBOLD. 



April 9,1886.— Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. EIllsbbbby, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions^ submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1769.] 

The Oammittee on Invalid Pensions j 4o whom was referred the bill {R. B. 
1769) granting a pension to Frederick Seiboldj r^art : 

That the evidence fails to show that the disabilities for which pension 
is claimed are the results of claimant's military service, and the com- 
mittee therefore report adversely. 



49th GoNGBESS, ) HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVBS. | Ebpobt 
1st Session. ) \ No. 167& 



HENET KELLEE. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. EllsbebbYi fiK>m the Committee on Invalid Pensions^ submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. B. 1761.] 

The Committee on Invalid PetisionSj to whom was referred the bill {R. B. 
1761) granting a pension to Henry Keller^ report: 

That claimant, when he sustained his alleged disabilities, was on 
veteran furlough ; and your committee fail to find that said alleged 
disabilities are a legitimate result of his military service. 



49th Oongress, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 4 Rbpokt 
Ut 8e89ian. ( \ No. 1579. 



MATILDA SPANGLER. 



April 9, 1886. — X^aid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. ELL8B£BBY,from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1759.] 

The Committee an Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the bUI {H. R. 
1759) granting a pension to Matilda Spangler^ report: 
• 
That this claimant i*eceived a pension of $d per month from Novem- 
ber, 1862, to October, 1872, under the act of Jaly 14, 1862, when she for- 
feited her pension by remarrying. Upon what grounds she bases her 
claim for pension by special act yoar committee is unable to compre- 
hend, and re]X)rt adversely. 



49th Congress, \ HOUSE OF KEPEESENTATIVES- i Rbpobt 
Ut Session. J ) No. 1680. 



ELIZA STARTSMAN. 



April 9, 1866.— Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. EixsBEBBY, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions^ submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1760.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the bill (J7. £• 
1760) granting a pension to Eliza Startsmanj report : 

That the testimony shows conclasively that the son of cl aimant, for 
whose death pension is claimed, was not a soldier at the time of his 
death, nor is it claimed or shown that the disease from which he died 
resulted from disabilities contracted in the service. Yoar committee 
can see no just claim against^the Government, and report a Aversely. 



1^ 



OoNOBESS, > HOUSE OF REPEESENTATIVES. ( Repoet 

] ) No. 1681. 



MARY 0. SNODGRASS. 



Arril 9, 1886. — ^Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. EixsBEBBY, £rom the Committee on Invalid Pensions, sabmitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1771.] 

The Committee on Invalid PensionSj to whom was referred the bill {H. B. 
1771) granting a pension. to Mary C. Snodgrass^ report: 

That npon examining the papers in the case we find that claimant 
has never applied to t£e Pension Office for relief; and also that her 
husband was killed in 1882, for which his service as a soldier during the 
war was in no manner responsible. Yonr committee report adversely. 



49th Coi^gress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
1st Session. ] < No. 1582. 



MARTIN JACOBY. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed lo the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. SwoPK, from the Coniniittee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

TTo accompany biH H. R. 4699.] 

The Cttmmittee on Invalid Penaionit, to whom was re/erred the bill (if. R* 
4G99) granting a pen H ion to Martin Jacoby^ respectfully report : 

Martin Jacoby is the dependent father of David Jacoby, late of Com- 
pany C, Seveiiteefith Refjiinent Pennsylvania Cavalry, and of .Martin 
Jac4»by, jr., of the Seventy-ninth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
both of whom were lost in the service of their country. 

The basis of the claim is that David Jacoby contributed to his par- 
entis' support, and, in corroboration of the same, jMartin Winger and 
James Ream, December 21, 1870, testify thnT soldier worked for them 
during 1859, 18G0, and 1862, and they paid his earnings lo his mother 
lor support of herself and family. 

David Jacoby enlisted September 17, 1802, and d'e«l of typhoid fever 
at Chestnut Hill General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., July 7, l.SG.X 

Soldier's mt)ther,Elizabeth Jacoby, tiled application forpensi(m in the 
Pension Office, for the loss of this son, but the Uureau rejected her 
claim on the ground that she was not dei>eiident upon the soldier for 
support. 

The mother died January 30, 1879. The father, for whose benefit this 
bill was introduced, tiled his application for pension Sej)tember3, 1806, 
and the claim was rejected by the Pension Office on the i: round that 
the soldier's mother was living wiien said claim was made and filed. 

There is no question or doubt as to the lact of soldier having been 
treate<l for and having died in the Government hospital of ty])hoid 
fever. The records are very clear as to that. As the soldier's mother 
18 now dead the grounds upon which the fathei-'s claim was rejected 
are virtually set aside, and the claim rests upon the fact of dependence 
or non-dependence of parents, and the following evidence touching 
those points is presented. 

Dr. A. O. Bare testifies : 

Claimant disabled by heart dineaHe and unable to perform any labor in 1863; and 
siDc«;. 

James Ream and C. M. Quaid testify: 

The claimant has been in ill-health since before the soldier enlisted, and his earn- 
ings since the year 1863, and before that time, have been so small that they are of no 
accouDt. 



Z MARTIN JACOBY. 

The assessment records of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania^ show 
assessments aj^ainst the claimant for each year from 1863 to 1876, in- 
clusive, as follows: 

18«3, $550 ; 18G4, same ; 1H65-T)C, §400 ; 1867, $400 ; 1868-'(59, $245 ; 1870, $46*2 ; 1871, 
t > and inc'uding 1873, $4-^5; 1874, to and incliidiDg lfe76, $1,000. No subsequent assess- 
ment. 

John G. and Eliza Root testify : 

Claimaut is poor, and no means of support ; that the house and lot lie owned in 
Vogausville, Pa., has been Hold for the payment of his debts; he is sickly and unable 
to make a living. 

E.S. Zook, Octobers, 1881, testifies: 

I purchased from claimant on March 1^=, 1876, his lions** and lot in Vogausville, Pa., 
and paid him for the same $1,187.50. 

C. O. Hotfman testifies: 

On September 4, 1878, Isaac Vogan, of Vogausville, Pa., made an assigniueut to me for 
benefit of creditors. At that time Martin Jacoby, claimant, occupied preini.se8 be- 
longing trO said Vogan, the rent of which was $194 per annum. In addition to the 
rent, affiant found that claimaut was indebted to said Vogan on a judgment bond for 
$2,100, and the claimant made to affiant, as assignee of Vogan, the. following pay- 
ments, to wit: During 1879, $1,2:^4. 6*.i ; in 1880, by cash and credit, $979.67; in all, 
$2,204.43. 

The pnblic records, Lancaster Connty, show that Martin Jacoby, 
claimant, made an assignment on April 16, 1880, of his property in 
favor of his creditors, and that no balance was left. * 

This is one of the instances in which the holding the deed to a proi)erty 
is frequently accepted as a proof that the party holding the deed may 
be considered to be worth as much as the property would bring if sold. 
Unfortunately for this claimant, he all along owed more money than the 
property was worth, and its possession cost him more in the way of 
taxes and so forth than the income brought him. In addition, it is 
hitherto acted as a barrier to claimant receiving a pension as a depend- 
ent father. An examination of this ca«e has satisfied your committee 
that this claimant had been in receipt of an income from the services 
of his son whilst living ; that he has had a hard struggle to get along 
ever since his son's death. It is altogether probable that had his son 
lived he would not only have contributed to the support of his parents, 
but that also having been raised .o habits of industry and economy, 
he might have saved for his parents the little property which was sacri- 
ficed to their necessities. Your committee, for these and other reasons, 
believing this to be a meritorious case, report the bill favorably and 
recommend that it do pass. 



49th Congbess, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ut SesHon. ] \ No. 1583. 



DAVID L. McDERMOTT. 



April 9, 1886.— Committed t^ t.b<* Committee of the Whole House anil ordered to he 

priuted. 



Mr. SwoPE, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 54:i5.1 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to ichom was referred the bill {JS.R, 
5435) granting a pension to David L. McDermott, respectfully report : 

David L. McDermott was enrolled on the 23d dn^^ of February*, 1802^ 
in Company K, of the One hundred and seventh Regiment of Pennsyl- 
vania Volunteers, and was discharged on the 7th day of June, 18G2. 

He claims a pension on the following basis ; VA^hilo a member of the- 
organization aforesaid, in the service, and in the line of his duty, at 
Washington, D. C, on or about the 4th day of March, 1862, he was ia 
the act of harnessing a mule and was kicked on the left leg above the 
ankle, causing a fracture of the said limb. That since he received the 
saidiujury several bones have come out of the leg, and it is now open 
and Wome a chronic sore, depriving him of the use of it, and having 
to use two crutches. 

The Pension Office has notified claimant that his claim cannot be 
farther considered until certain evidence is furnished. As claimant 
cannot possibly at this late day comply with the requirements of the 
Department, the claim stands almost a rejected one, hence his appeal 
to Congress. 

The board of examining surgeons of Harrisburg, Pa., in report dated 
September 21, 1881, state : 

Id oar opinion the said applicant is total two grade incapacitated for obtaining hi» 
0ab8i!»t4;Dce by manual labor from fracture of left leg caused by kick of mule. It i» 
onr opinion that the said disability did originate in the service in the line of duty, 
and the dinability is permanent. At present the leg is one mass of disease, due to- 

carions bone. The whole tibia seems to be involved, as the fistulous openings extend 

from kee to ankle joint. 

The Assistant Surgeon-General, United States Army, states ^< there 

are no records of the regiment named within on file in this office," in 

rep]y to the usual letter of inquiry from the Commissioner of Pensions. 

As to the soldier having incurred the sore leg in the Army service, 

Adam Bloom, comrade, testifies : 

That he has been personally acquainted with claimant for about thirty-five years. 
That he enlisteil witn him in Company K, One hundred and seventh Regiment Penn- 
■jlvania Volunteers. That he, in company with claimant, was detailed to post duty 
ml Washington, D. C, ip the capacity of driver or teamster. That on the morning 
of March 4, 186*.^, deponent and claimant, in the line of duty, were driving Govem- 
meDt teams through the said city of Washington, D. C, and somewhere along Twenty- 



2 DAVID L. m'dERMOTT. 

second street claimant was in the act of hitching up or harnessing a mule, to 1 
substituted for one that was disabled in his team, and the mule becoming refractoi 
and unmanageable kicked and knocked claimant down, and tramped him in afrigh 
ful manner. Deponent, assisted by others, carried claimant back to his tent, ai 
upon examination found his left leg badly bruised from the ankle to the knee. Tv 
weeks after he saw claimant again in the hospital, in bed, unable to stir or walk. ] 
June, 1862, deponent took so?dier from hospital and hauled him home ; he wait st 
seriously disabled and totally unable to walk. He has frequently been with claima 
since discharge, and knows tliat he (claimant) was always unable to do any hard phj 
ical labor by reason of his sore leg. 

David Miller testifies to sabstaDtially the same as above qaoted. 

Thompson Anderson also testifies similarly. 

From the evidence as above detailed it appears that this soldier i 
ceived an injury to his leg while in line of duty, that this injury wa8 
great severity at the time of its incurrence, and has continued ever sim 
in an increasing degree. The board of examining surgeons state th: 
the leg is in a very bad condition from caries of the bone, portions 
which are discharged from time to time, and eventually its ampntatic 
may become necessary. The case was delayed in the Pension Bures 
for lack of evidence as to the incurrence of the injury a« claimed. Tl 
claim was grossly neglected by reason of want of diligence on the pa 
of the person having it in charge, otherwise it is clear that the aoldu 
would have long since been in receipt of the pension to which it is tl 
opinion of your committee he is justly entitled. The lacking evidem 
has been furnished this committee, duly certified to, as quoted abov 

They, therefore, deeming this to be a meritorious case, recommeD 
th^ passage of the bill. 



4»rH C0MOEB88, > HOUSE OF EEPRBSENTATIVBS. 
lit 8e$9ion, \ 



I 



Report 
No. 1584. 



? : br TV 



jarT¥* 
1 evae 



ion Bir-J 
imed 

on tkd 
the Rib 
ch \ti?^-\ 
g evida?! 
ted abpf 



MRS. WILLIE ARMSTRONG. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table aud onlered to be prioted. 



Mr. SwoPR, from the Committee Oil Invailid PttU8ioD8, Hubmitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3635. 1 

The Committee on Invalid iensions, to uolioni was referred the bill (H. B. 
3635) granting a pension to Mrs, Willie Armstrong^ widow of John 0. 
Armstrong^ decea^sed^ late of Company A, Twenty-fifth Regiment Ohio 
Volunteers^ respectfully report : 

John C. Armstrong enlisted ander the name of Drewe C Iveson (and 
iskDOwu by the latter name at the Department), June 5, 1861, and was 
discharged October 1, 1862, The widow of soldier applied to the Pen- 
sioD Bnreaa for a pension, but the claim was rejected, on the ground 
that the origin of the fatal disease is not accepted as due to hernia, for 
which soldier received a pension up to the time of his death. The De- 
partment granted the soldier a pension from October 17, 1862, at $4 i>er 
moDtb, for scrotal hernia. Tour committee deem it unnecessary to 
quote the evidence adduced in reference to soldier's application, which 
was granted, as the question to be decided is whether the fatal disease 
was a consequence or the result of injury received in the service in 
line of duty. The medical referee, Dr. T. 6. Hood, January 16, 1884, 



Death in this case was probably due to confj^estion of the brain. Certainly not a 
nwli of the hernia for which soldier was pensioned. 

The physician who attended soldier in his last illness. Dr. Ellis Phil- 
lipe, in affidavit dated April 5, 1883, testifies: 

. I never treated soldier nntil a short time before his death in his last and fatal 
lUoeas. About June 3, 1881, he was in a stupor, from which he soon revived to ap- 
Pvently fair health. In two days afterwards he sank suddenly into a profound 
stupor, from which he never raUied. He never became conscious until deatlGi. I re- 
sumed his disease as apoplexy. He died on June 7, 1881. I kept no record of his 
^^, and cannot give exact dates of proscriptions or treatment. He took very little 
■Ktedicine, if any. The only wound or scar or blemish of any kind I was able to dls- 
««Ter on examination of his body was a scrotal hernia. 

Your committee fail to trace any connection between apoplexy, the 
disease from which claimant's husband died, and hernia from which he 
^as a sufiferer, and for which he was pensioned. There are many cases 
presented to this committee in which the general deprivation of health, 
^naequeut upon injury or disease contracted in the Army, may be re- 
garded as predisposing to fatal disease. But in this instance there 
seems to be no connection whatever between the hernia and apoplexy. 
Your committee therefore sustain the decision of the Pension Depart- 
ment, and recommend that the bill lie on the table. 



49th Conobbss, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut 8e89ion. | \ No. 1585. 



1 



JOSIE H. BABB. 



April 9, lt:H3. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to 

be printed. 



Mr. Haynes, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7:W0.] 

The Committee on Invalid Penaiouff^towhomwas referred the bill {H, R. 
ISiO) granting a pension to Joaie H, Babb, submit the following rt^ort : 

John W. Babb, amasician in Company I, Fifteenth New Hampshire 
Re^ment, was pensioned for malarial poisoning and effects. He 
claimed also for disease of langs, but was unable to prove the incur- 
rence of this disability to the satisfaction of the Department, and dis- 
[ ease of lungs not being admitted as due to malaria, claim for increase 
on account of this disability was rejected. The testimony of Lieu- 
tenant Wallingford and Assistant Surgeon Jauvrin shows that Babb's 
sickness was of a most severe and protracted nature, culminating in a 
remittent typhus fever. Physically sound on entering the service, he 
was discharged badly wrecked in health, and secured a pension for a 
portion of his disabilities, as stated above. The disability for which 
he nnsuccessfuUy claimed was the immediate cause of his death, which 
occurred October 26, 1879. 

The same reasons which had operated against his claim on account 
of lang disease caused the rejection of his widow's claim. 

Babb's own statement, while endeavoring to establish claim for lung 
trouble, was as follows : 

IcaDDot get medical testimony, on account of my not having employed a i*egular 
phfsiciao, havin); employed several different ones. I contracted a bronchial trouble 
while in the United States military service, in the year 1883, at Port Hudson, La. It 
began with a tickling in the throat and increased continually, and finally settled in 
mj Inngs. Since 18(58 ray lungs have been a little sore, especially the right one, but 
nothing that I considered ba<l until July 1, 1876, when I had a severe heuiorrhage, 
and in the sprint of 1867 I had another hemorrhage (I cannot remember the exact 
<l*te). On Apriri9, 1879, 1 had another hemorrhage. Since the year 1863 1 have beeu 
»ble to work but a part of the time. Since July 1, 1876, I have been unable to work 
at all. I never have had an attack of pneumonia in my life. None of my family were 
or are consumptive. 

The evidence in this case leads to these conclusions: That Babb en- 
tered the service a sound man physically, contraxjted a disability of a 
most serious character, which continued with him until his death, and 
which rendered him incapable of performing any but the lightest labor, 
and that only a part of the time ; that about 1868 a disease of the 
lungs had developed to such an extent as to attract serious attention, 
Baid trouble increasing until hemorrhages occurred, and he died as a 
result of then). 



2 JOSIE H. BABB. 

Without qaestioning the correctness of the decision of the Pension 
Office, we are convinced from the testimony on file that bat for the 
proven wreck of his health in the United States service, he might to- 
day be living as the support of her who comes to Congress with this 
petition for relief. She is a poor woman, dependent upon her own labor 
for support. 

We accordingly report the bill back to the House, and recommend 
that it do pass. 






49th Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ui Session. J ) No. ir.86. 



PATRICK McKEAN. 



April. 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hou8e and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Haynes, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany biU H. R. 7329.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was re/erred Hovne bill /329, 

beg leave to sub^nit the following report: 

Patrick McKean enlisted as a private in Company K, Eighth New 

Hampshire Regiment, November 15, 1861. and was discharged January 

17, 1865. In his claim for pension he alleges that about August 30, 1862, 

near Camp Parapet, Louisiana, he became night- blind, and that in the 

spring of 1864 he contracted rheumatism. 

His claim for rheumatism was rejected on ground that claimant can- 
not fnrnish necessary testimony, and for night-blindness on ground 
that he has not been disabled in a pensionable degree. 

Frank McManiman and Martin Bohen testify to his soundness and 
freedom from either of these disabilities prior to enlistment. The latter 
worked in the same room with him and saw him every day. Cornelius 
Moriarty worked with him for two years before enlistment, and testifies 
to his soundness, and that after his return from the Army he knew him 
to be troubled as he alleges. 

There is great abundance of most competent evidence to show these 
disabilities in the service. 

Capt Thomas Connolly testifies that night-blindness first appeared 
at Camp Parapet in 1863, and McKean could not be detailed at that time 
forgnard duty on account of said disease. 

Lieat. John J. Nolan testifies that McKean contracted rheumatism 
^t Franklin, La., in 1864, and was left behind in New Orleans in spring 
OD account of said rheumatism and night-blindness, and was sent to 
&iDt Louis hospital; that claimant was a faithful soldier, and a man 
^hose statements are worthy of belief. 

Assistant Surgeon Clark that, some time in year 1862, claimant was 
afflicted with night-blindness; that in April, 1863, while on march in 
J^r of Port Hudson this disability wa^ so troublesome that he (Clark) 
ordered a man to inarch on each side of McKean to guide him, as he 
^tisfied himself by observation that his difficult^' was real and not 
ftigned; that McKean's disability continued during his (Clark's) con- 
Jiection with the regiment, to August, 1864. 

Sergeants Lawrence Foley and Michael Kenney, Privates Michael 
Pinnegan, Thomas Brennan, and William Mclntyre furnish evidence In 
J^gard to claimant suffering from these disabilities, some stating cir- 
cumstances and incidents occurnng in connection with claimant's night- 
blindness. 



2 PATRICK m'kEAN. 

Dr. John Ferguson treated him for rheumatism in spring of 1872; 
prescribed frequently, and advised McKean to go to Sohiiers' Home. 
Dr. Buck; who treated him at other times, is dead. 

There are also about a dozen affidavits, which we deem itunnecessary 
to quote in detail, all tending to show that from the time of his dig- 
charge he has been more or less disabled by both troubles. Some of 
these knew him as free from them prior to his enlistment, and noticed 
their effects upon his return from the Army. 

Edwin R. Jones, an overseer in the Manchester mills, says claimant 
worked for him in 1867 and 1868, and was at times unable to work on 
account of trouble with eyes, which claimant said he contracted in the 
service. He was a good man aud a good workman. 

It appears that at times McKean has been disabled four or five weeks 
at a time on account of night-blindness and rheumatism. 

The sick report of regiment shows that claimant was treated in 1864 
for intermittent fever, a fact which we consider in connection with the 
report of the Manchester board, hereafter given. 

A si)ecial examination was ordered by the Department with a special 
view to determine "whether as a matter of fact this man now has or 
has had night-blindness," and examination in regard to rheumatism was 
only incidental. This special examiner expressed opinion that claim- 
ant's *'eyes are nearsighted and weak, but not night-blind;" but, ia 
order to fully determine the question, recommends a further examiua- 
tion, which, however, does not appear to have been had. 

F. S. Peters, reviewer, special examination division, says upon this re- 
port: 

Th( re is iiuqueHtionably Boine lesion of Hight, but whether it has impaired sight in 
a ]iei)8ioi]able degree will probably have to be decided by medical reference. 

Dr. Canelle, a specialist, made examination of ejes, under direction 
of the Department, March 29, 1884, and reported as follows : 

Op) thalmoBcope rxamination shows a small optic disk, with a large ring of choroidal 
atrophy surrounding it, in each eye. The blood-vessels appear smaller than normal. 
Otherwise the choroid and retina look normal. Field of visicm normal in extent. 
Color-blind for green; other colors perceived. Diagnosis: Sclerochoroiditis pos- 
terior both eyes ; both disks look small, but should not call them atrophied ; they don't 
look pale, but vessels seem smaller than normal. His vision is not so good at uighl 
for distance, without glasses, as in the day-time, if his statement can be believed; 
but with convex glasses he saw quite as good at night as in the day-time. I cannot 
say that he is not night-blind. There are no physical signs by which it can be de- 
tected. The applicant has the appearance of being much older than 44 years of age. 
I cannot say wliether his Army service had anything to do with the trouble in hiseyei 
or not. 

The Manchester board report as follows, date June 16, 1880: 

Conjunctiva slightly iujected ; eyes apparently weak ; winks frequently, is myopic ; 
reads Snellen's No. X at 2i feet. He says he is unable to do any work after twilight 
We are not satisfied that he suft'ersfromhemeralopia ; but if sufficient evidence to e6tab< 
lish that fact is in possession of Department, would rate his disability at one-fourtb 
total, or $2 per month. No evidence of rheumatism. Says he has chills and fevei 
frequently. Do not recommend pension for rheumatism. He says he has at timet 
severe pain in joiuts, disabling hiro from labor. We believe this may be neuralgia, 
due t(» malarial poisoning, and would rate disability from this cause at one-half total 
or $4 per month. 

From the history of the case disclosed in the evidence, which is verj 
direct and voluminous, we arrive at the conclusion that McKean did 
contract a disease of the eyes in the service, and also a further disabil 
ity, whether it be rheumatism or neuralgia, and that he should be al 
lowed pension for the disabilities for which the Manchester board rated 
him. 

We recommend the passage of the bill. 



4^H Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
l8t Sessiatu I | No. 1587. 



JAMES ANDERSON. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Haynes, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 



'tr» 



REPORT: 

FTo accompany bill H. R. 7088.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom teas re/erred the bill {H. 2?. 
10^) granting a pension to J awes Anderson^ submit th^e following re- 
port: 

Michael Dunn, alias James Anderson, enlisted October G, 1863, as a 
private in Company B, Fourth New Hampshire Regiment; was trans- 
ferred to the United States Navy April -* <", 1864, and discharged there- 
from October 3, 1864. 

lu his claim for pension he alleges that about October 1, 1864, oo 
the James River, while serving on the Mackinaw, while fixing the 
awning, he fell from the poop to the gun-deck, severely injuring hi» 
spine and lower extremities, causing paralysis of back and lower ex- 
tremities and varicose veins of legs. He is unable to furnish any evi- 
dence of the incurrence of this disability. 

To establish his soundness prior to naval service he files affidavits of 
three comrades in the Fourth New Hampshire, stating in general term» 
that 80 far as they knew he was a sound and able-bodied man white in 
that 8er\ice. The numerous letters of the claimant on file addressed 
to the President, the Secretary of War, and the Commissioner of Pen- 
sions, place great stress upon the testimony of the surgeon who exam- 
ined him, as showing his soundness at enlistment. The certificate of 
this surgeon (Dr. Robert B. Carswell) is as follows: 

I hereby certify that a roan (claiming to be Jainen Anderson, late private in Com- 
pany B, Fourth Regiment, New HampMuire Vohinteern, and that I examined birni in 
October, ld6C{, as a substitute for Daniel C. James, of Manchester, N. H., and passed 
him to be enlisted in the service of the United States) presented himself to me tcvday 
for the pnqmse of getting a certiticate to show that he was an able-bodied man at the 
time of bis enlistment. In answer to his request I have to say that if his statement 
is true (which I have no special reason to doubt, and I did examine and accept him 
fttthe time stated), he must have been aii able-bodied man, elt>'e I should not have ac- 
cepted him. 

But whatever weight we might be disposed to give such testimony in 
favor of claimant, we could not ignore the record in the United States 
naval hospital at Norfolk, from which he was discharged, viz: 

The hospital ticket, signed J. Stevens, acting assistant surgeon, United States Navy, 
isindi^rsed as follows: •' James Anderson, L.; native of Wales; aged twenty; hasbeea 



1 



2 JAMES ANDERSON. 

on the sick-list two or three weeks; says he had a fall some years since from the 
topsail-yard of a ship in the merchant service; has complained of pain in the back, 
side, and lower limbs; has been cupped and blistered, &c., and taken mercury, iodide 
of potaasinm, &c., together with tonics, «fec., but he does not seem to improve. He has 
just been transferred from the Army. Dii^ease did not originate in line of duty." 

His own statement, on file, shows that previous to his enlistment he 
was in the merchant service, and made several long voyages. 

We report adversely on the bill, and ask to be discharged from its 
further consideration. 



49th CONGBBSS, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. \ Repokt 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1588. 



FERDINAND KOEHLER. 



April 9, 1886. — Coroiuitted to the Committee of the Whole HoiiHe and ordereil to be 

printed. 



Mr. MOBRILL, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompao}' bill H. R. 6770. 1 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions, to whom wns referred the hill ( H, R. 
6770) granting a pension to Ferdinand Koehlerj submit the following 

report : 

It appears from the files in this case that claimant enlisted in Com- 
pany C, Second Missouri Cavalry, November 22, 1861, and was dis- 
charged March 16, 1863, upon surgeon's certificate of disability. In 
March, 1879, he applied for a pension, alleging internal bleeding hemor- 
rhoids. This application was rejected on ground of no record and no 
medical treatment in service. He claims thHt he was treated in regi- 
mental hospital, and no records of that regiment are on tile. The cer- 
tificate upon which he was discharged says he was unfit for duty six 
months before discharged. 

Dr. Edward Mayer and several neighbors testify that claimant was 
an uunsually sound man when he enlisted. The former also testifies 
that claimant was very sick while the regiment was stationed at Saint 
Louis. 

Sergeant Pousch, of the same company, testifies to his sickness in 
service, and that at the time of his discharge he was suffering from his 
back and spells of bleeding at his bowels, and that he testifies to this 
from personal knowledge. Christian Ott, a comrade, corroborates this. 

Dr. Mayer testifies that he became his family physician when he re- 
turned from the Army, and that from time of his discharge to the pres- 
ent claimant has been a diseased and disabled man. 

B. Warsenger, Wilson Mills, and Andrew Frasier testify as to con- 
tinuance. Dr. L. Dyer testifies as to treatment for hemorrhoids in 1805. 
The examining board of surgeons report him totally disabled with Ikmu- 
orrhoids and asthma. His inability to procure medical evidence in 
service at or immediately after discharge seems to have been the cjiuse 
of rejection. He served sixteen months, entering the service an un- 
usually strong man, and came out completely bnjktMi down. The ex- 
istence of the disease in the service soon after dischapge and ever since 
seems to be established. 
Your committee recommend the passage of the bill. 



19th Congrbss, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, j Report 

\ No. 1589. 



lit Session 



mass, ) 
ian. f 



HENRY B. HAVENS. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

priuted. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6780.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was re/erred the bill (H. R. 
6780) granting a pension to Henry B. Havens^ submit the following re- 

prt: 

We find that claimant enlisted December 1, 1861, in Company I, 
Twenty-third Missouri Volunteers, and was discharged June 7, 1862, 
npoD surgeon's certificate of disability, showing disease of lungs. In 
July, 1864, he filed application for a pension, which was rejected, on the 
groand that the disease existed prior to enlistment. A large amount 
of evidence has been submitted in this case. Two special examiners 
have thoroughly investigated it. 

Several witnesses testify that claimant was apparently a well, strong 
maD at enlistment. His father, a physician, swears that he was free 
from lung disease when he entered the service. Several witnesses tes- 
tify that they did not regard him as a strong man, but considered that 
be was disposed to disease of lungs. 

Lieut^ George W. Easley, commanding the company, certifies June, 
1862: 

That claimant was not very healthy when he enlisted, but was able to do good duty, 
^Qt the exposure to which he was subjected has hurried on consumption, which has 
tendered him unfit for duty for two months. 

The surgeon also certifies that the disease existed in an incipient 
stage prior to enlistment. All the witnesses unite in speaking of the 
high character of the soldier. 

From a careful examination of the evidence your committee conclude 
that claimant was a man of weak constitution, though in the enjoyment 
of fair health at the time he entered the service; that under the expo- 
sure and hardship incident to camp life he broke down and became a 
confirmed invalid. If he had been a robust man, with an iron constitu- 
tion, he probably would have endured the hardships without physical 
injury. If he had remained at home it is equally probable that he 
might have enjoyed for years a fair measure of health. He is now un- 
able to labor, and can live but a few months. 

Your committee recommend the passage of the bill. 



i^nn Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ) Report 
Ut Se98um. i \ No. 1590. 



SAMUEL W. BOWLING. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to 

be printed. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Committee ou iDvalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6797.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom icas referred the bill (H. R. 
6797) granting a pension to Samuel W, Bowling^ submit the following 
report : 

We find that a similar bill granting a pension to claimant passed the 
House daring the Forty-eighth Congress. 

Your committee, after an examination of the papers, adopt the report 
of the Committee on Invalid Pensions of the Forty-eighth Congress, 
which is as follows: 

Samuel W. Bowling was a private in Company D. Eleventh Kansas Cavalry, and 
served with credit during the war up to August 31, 1864, when he was discharged on 
account of disability growing out of a lame and ulcerated leg. The claimant before en- 
listment received a gunshot wound above knee. The claimant shows that he had an 
ulcerated leg below the knee, and has now, and that same from injury received in the 
lervice in line of duty. The ulceration and enlargement of veins is at least 10 inches 
below the wound. It may be that the gunshot wound predisposed to some tender- 
ness, bat it is clearly shown that it is not the cause of the disability. The claimant, 
on the contrary, shows that he was sound at date of enlistment. 

Department op the Interior, Pension Office, 

Washington J D. C, May 19, 1884. 

Dear Sir: Touching the claim of S. W. Bowling, Company D, Eleventh Kansas 
VolnnteerB, of which you requested me to officially certify, I have the honor to state 
that the evidence is that he incurred a gunshot wound of the left lee prior to enlist- 
nent, in consequence of which the calf of that leg is now considerably enlarged, and 
the lee the subject of ulceration, due to venous congestion. These conditions dis- 
able the claimant quite seriously, certainly entitling him now to a ^^ total" rating. 
Very truly, Ac, 

T. B. HOOD, M. D., 
Medical Referee. 
Hon. C. H. Morgan, 

House of Bepresentaiives. 

The above letter is made part of this report. 

Wherefore your committee report the bill back, with the recommendation that it do 
pass. 



49th Conobess, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. | Report 



U^ Session. 






\ No. 1591. 



WILLIAM M. SWARTZ. 



April 9, 1886.— Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6725.] 

The Committee on Invalid PensionSy to tchom was referred the bill (E. R, 
6125) granting a pension to William M. Swartz^ submit the following re- 
port: 

We find that claimant enlisted in Company F, Forty-sixth Regiment 
Ohio Volunteers, October 1, 1861, and was discharged July 22, 1865. 

Id June, 1876, he applied for a pension, alleging that he received a rup- 
tore while in battle at Kenesaw Mountain, June 22, 1864. The Depart- 
meut refuses to allow the claim without more evidence of incurrence 
and continuance, and the claimant declares himself utterly unable to 
obtain any further evidence. 

Dr. J. W. Lewis testifies that he examined claimant at time of enlist- 
ment, and pronounced him a sound man physically and mentally. Will- 
iam T. Stewart and James W. Smith testify that they were present at 
the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, and that while engaged in charging 
the enemy they had to jump across a small stream : that immediately 
after said Swartz complained of an injury to his left side; after the 
battle was over, the surgeon examined him and said he was ruptured in 
the left side ; that they continued in the service with said Swartz until 
close of war in June, 1865, and that he frequently complained of pain 
from the rupture. . Affiant Smith says he lived near claimant for a 
year after their discharge, and that he was frequently partially dis- 
abled from labor on that account. The standing of these witnesses is 
report^ed good. * Henry Swartz corroborates the above as to incurrence 
of injury. 

Dr. E. G. Su^Tley testifies to treatment in 1877 for strangulated her- 
nia. Jerry Neibling, a gentleman of unquestioned veracity, testifies 
that be knew claimant before and after service; that he was a sound 
man when he went into service, and when he came out he complained of 
hernia and a weak back ; that in 1875 he had a severe attack and they 
were obliged to call a physician to reduce it. The medical examining 
board at Saint Joseph, Mo., report oblique inguinal hernia of left side. 
It would seem as though there could be no doubt that claimant was in- 
jured as claimed and that the disability has continued ever since. 

Your committee therefore recommend the passage of the bill. 



^ 



\ 



\ 



s 



49th Congress, ( HOUSE OF REP i<ESENTATIVES. (Report 
Ut Se.ssion, J \ No. 1592. 



GEORGE W. COX. 



April 9, 1^^6. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Coininittee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

R E P R T : 

[To accompany bill H. R. GGf)!.] 

The Committee on Tnralid Penmons^ to tchom was referred the hill (H. R, 
6<>.j1 ) granting a pension to George W. CoXj submit the following report : 

The file« in this case show that daimant enlisted August 14, 1862, 
remaiued in camp until Septembers, when he was examined by the sur- 
geon for muster, and rejected on account of disease of the hip. He 
claims that the disability was contracted during the twenty days prior 
to muster, and asks a pension. The evidence submitted does not es- 
tablish the claim, and your committee therefore report adversely, and 
ask that the bill lie on the table. 



49th Gongbess, \ HOUSE OF REPEB8BNTATIVB8. / Eepobt 
l8t Senion. ) ( No. 1593. 



FELIX R. BUSTER. 



Apbil 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBiLL, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

foUowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6765.] 

The Committee on Invalid Fensionsj to whom was re/erred the bill (H. R. 
6765) granting a/n increase of ^pension to Felix R. Bustei*^ submit the fol- 
lowing report : 

Claimant is receiving a pension of $8 per month for single inguinal 
hernia. The medical examining board at Macon, Mo., who made the 
last examination, report : ^' His present rating is quite sufficient." No 
evidence is submitted to prove that his disability is any greater than 
the thousands of his comrades who were injured in the same manner. 

four committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the table. 



i 



4»TH CoNaifcEss, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Session. i \ No. 1594. 



WILLIAM G. BUCK. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBiLL, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6785.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions, to whom teas referred the bill {H, B. 
6785) restoring William O, Buck to the pension roll, submit the follow- 
ing report : 

• 

The claimant, who was a i)rivate in Company K, Seventeenth Iowa 
Volunteers, was granted a pension at $2 per month, to date from June, 
1865, for chronic diarrhea. He was dropped from the roll to date March 
22, 1882, upon the report of the examining board of surgeons that the 
disability had ceased. If this is true, there is no reason for the passage 
of this bill, and it would confer no benefit on claimant. If it is not true, 
he ought to establish the fact before the Pension Department, which 
would promptly restore him, giving him a rate according to his present 
disability. 

Your committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the table. 



49th CoNaEESS, ) HOUSE OF EBPEESBNTATIVES. j Ebpobt 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1596^ 



ISAIAH A. LOVE. 



April 9, 1866. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBiLL, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted Ibe 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6717.] 

The Committee (yii Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the biU (IL R, 
6717) granting an increase of pension to Isaiah A, Love^ submit the fbl- 
lounng report: ^^^;^ ^^ ,^^ -^ —.ojilCE 



Claimant is now receiving a pension of $16 per month for scrotal her- 
nia. The Pension Department has full power to increase this pension 
iiXK>n proper evidence that the disability has increased. Your commit- 
tee are unable to discover any reason why this case should be made an 
exoeption to the general law. 

Tour committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the table. 



V 



49th Conobsss, \ HOUSE OP EBPEEBENTATIVES. i Report 
l$t SesHan. I ) No. 1596. 



ABIGAIL GABNAHAN. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Hr. MouBiLLj firom the Gommittee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

rXo accompany bill H. R. 6767.] 

l%e Committee an Invalid Pensions^ to tohom tons referred the bill ( JT. B. 
67©7)ybr the relief of Mrs. Abigail Camaha/ny submit the following report: 

This bill asks that claimant be paid the sum of $1,152 as arrears of 
IieiisionB, on the ground that an application was filed in 1872. The 
Pension OfQce reports that '^ a thorough search fails to show any claim 
prior to April 14, 1884 ; also that declaration states that she had made 
no prior application." No evidence has been submitted to prove filing 
of prior dedaration. 

Tour committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the table. 



4»rH Congress, > HOUSE OP EEPRESBNTATIVES. ( Ebpoet 
Ui Session. ] \ No. 1597. 



WENDELIN KRUMM. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBLLL, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6796.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was re/erred the bill (H. R. 
6796) to pUice the name of Wendelin Krumm on the pensum-rollj siibmit 
the following report : 

Claimant, who was a private in Company H, Second Kansas Cavalry, 
asks for a pension for gunshot wound received about May 1, 1803. The 
medical board of examiners at Kansas City, Mo., report, March 7, 1883: 

It was only a scratch, to begin with, and nothing remains of injury to the limb. 

Toor committee report adversely, and ask that the bill lie on the 
table. 



I 



19th CoNaBBSS, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Senion. i \ No. 1598. 



DAVID C. PUGH. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBiLL, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

LTo accompany bill H. R. 4099.] 

The Chmmittee an Invalid Pensions^ to wham was referred the bill {H. R. 
40M) granting a pension to David C, Pugh^ submit the folloiving re- 
part: 

Tour committee find, apon an examination of the papers, that claim- 
Ant, who was late lieutenant of Company G, TwelH^h Ohio Volnu 
teers, filed an application for pension December 9, 1882; that on the 
29th of April, 1885, he was examined by the medical board at Chilli- 
oothe, Mo., who reported no symptoms of disease and gave no rating. 
September 16, 1885, he was again examined by the board, at Princeton, 
Mo^ and they reported no disability. 

Toar committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the table. 



49th Congmsss, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ut Session. ) ) No. 1599. 



WILLIAM J. LEES. 



April 9, 18ti(5. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Morbux., from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted tbe 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6768.] 

The Gammiitee an Invalid Pensions, to whom was referred the hill (E. R, 
6768) granting a pension to William J. Lees, submit the following re- 
port : 

Claimant, who was acting ensign in the United States Navy, asks 
for a pension for gunshot wound of spine and leg, and splinter wound 
of back. The medical board of examiners report October 22, 1885, that 
they find no disability whatever, and give him no rating. Your com- 
mittee report adversely, and ask that the bill lie on the table. 



Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
1st SesHon. ) ( No. 1600. 



ALBERT LONG. 



April 9, 1886. — Eaid ou the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Committee ou Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany biU H. R. 6119.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions, to whom was referred the bill (H, R, 
6119) to increase the pension of Albert Long, submit the following re- 
port : 

An examination of the papers in this case shows that claimant, a 
private in Company C, Eleventh Missouri Cavalry, was pensioned for 
disease of liver and dropsy, commencing in 1864, at the rate of $4 per 
month. He has three times applied for an increase, and each time the 
application has been rejected. It seems to be purely a question for the 
medical officers of the Pension Department to decide, there being noth- 
ing in the case to take it out of the line of the general law. 

Your committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the table. 



49m eoNGBBSS, } HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ui Seuian. i \ No. 1601. 



WESLEY H. SHERWOOD. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Committee on luvalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 4916.] 

Hie Committee on Invalid Pensions, to tchom was referred the hill (H. R. 
4916) granting a pension to Wesley H, Sherwood^ submit the follotving 
report: 

Claimant filed an application for pension February 13, 1880, alleging 
double hernia, caused by a kick of a horse, September, 1865, while in 
Fifth United States Cavalry. December 14, 1866, he was discharged 
from the service for another disability, and the words '^not entitled to a 
X>en8ion'' are added. 

This soldier is doubtless a great sufferer, and is in needy circumstances, 
bnt with the record unchanged he is not entitled to a pension. 

Your committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie 
on the t^ble. 



49th Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRBSBNTATITES. i Repobt 
1st Session. i . ) No. 1602. 



ELI W. CAMPBELL. 



April 9, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBiLLy from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6723.] 

Tke Committee on Invalid Pensions j to whom was referred the bill (H. JB. 
Oompany A, Thirty- third Wisconsin Volunteers, but offers no proof of 
6723) /or the relief of Eli W. Campbell^ submit the following report: 

Claimant asks a pension for paralysis, contracted while a private in 
incurrence. In his own affidavit, filed March, 1886, he says: 

Said paralyns came on gradually, noticed it perceptibly first in 1876. • • • 
That he has no knowledge of any officers or comrades who have any information in 
regard to to the origin or existence of said paralysis in the service, as it did not make 
its appearance on til the year 1876, as before stated. 

Upon his own statement there would appear to be no merit in the 
case, and your committee therefore report adversely, and ask that the 
bill lie on the table. 



49th Congbess, ( HOUSE OF BBPRBSBNTAflVES. ( Kbpobt 
Ut Session. i \ No. 1603. 



FREDERICK HEINE. 



April 9y 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MoBBiLL, from the Oommittee on Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany H. R. 6806.1 

The Oommittee on Invalid Pensions, to whom was referred the bill {H. R. 
6806) granting an increase of pension to Frederick Heine, submit the fol- 
lowing report: 

Claimant is now receiving a pension of $50 per month for total help- 
lessness, the resnlt of rheumatism. This is the rate fixed by law in 
caaes requiring the constant aid and attention of another person. 
Every pensioner on the roll who is suffering as claimant is receives the 
same pension that he does. 

Your committee see no reason why an exception should be made in 
this case, and therefore report adversely, and ask that the bill lie on the 
table. 



49th Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ut Session. ( ) No. 1604. 



WILLIAM P. APPLEGATE. 



April 9, le^6. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printe<l. 



Mr. Morrill, from the Committee ou Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

fTo accompany bill H. R. 7072.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom teas referred the bill (S. 
R. 7072) granting a pension to William P. Applegate^ submit tJie foltotc- 
ing report: 

Claimant, who was a member of Company D, First Missouri State 
Militia, claims a pension on account of injuries received in the service. 
The medical board of examiners at Lexington, Mo., report January 2, 
1884: 

We find no objective symptoms or signs of injury to right breast. There seem« 
to hATe been no injury to the ribs; I'espiratory murmur and resonance normal ; nodis- 
sbility. 

It would be useless to put him on the pension-roll, subject to the con- 
ditious and limitations of the pension laws, if no disability now exi sts. 

This committee have uniformly refused to grant pensions for disabili- 
ties which have ceased to exist. They therefore report adversely, and 
ask that the bill lie on the table. 



49th Congbbss, ) HOUSE OF BEPBESENT ATIVES. / Beport 
htSeman. J > No. 1606. 



MA EI A KILE. 



April 9, 1886.— Committed to^the Committee of the Whole Hoose and ordered to »e 

printed. 



Mr. PiNDAB, from the^Oommittee od Invalid Pensions, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. B. 4145.] 

The Committee on Invalid Pensions^ to whom was referred the bill [H. B. 
4145) panting a pension to Maria KiU^ submit the following report : 

NatliaDiel Kile enlisted as a private in Company K, Fifty-sixth Begi- 

ment New York Volunteers, on the 23d day of October, 1861, and died 

while iu the service September 25, 1862, leaving no widow or child 

sarviving. 

His toother, Maria Kile, filed her claim for a pension, and it was re- 
jected April 17, 1883, on the ground that she was not dependent upon 
the soldier for her support at the time of his death. 

The evidence on file in the Pension Bureau gives rise to a serious 
doubt as to the correctness of this rejection. It appears that at the 
time of the soldiei^s death (1862) Simeon Kile, the father, was in the 
occupation of some rugged land in the wilds of Sullivan County, New 
York. It was stony, unproductive, and poor enough. He did not own 
it He leased it. The Hon. H. B. Low, at present a senator of the 
State of New York, testifies that he was the owner of the land in ques- 
tion and leased it to Kile; that Kile could not and did not pay tire rent, 
small as it was. 

On this so-called farm he had a half dozen cows, a few sheep, and a 
team of horses. But even these were mortgaged to one Cyrus Gray, 
who testifies that the chattel mortgage was given in 1862, and after four 
annual renewals he was, in 1866, obliged to foreclose and sell out the 
property. 

The evidence plainly shows that the son, before he went to the war, 
was in the habit of working for his parents on the farm, and when em- 
ployed elsewhere he contributed to their support by bringing his earn- 
ings home. It also app^rs that he sent money to his parents whilst he 
' was in the Army. The mother is now seventy -four years old, feeble, 
childish, and in very destitute ciipcumstances. 

Yoar committee is of opinion that she should be placed upon the 
pension-roll, and therefore recommend that the bill do pass. 



i 



49th Congress, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 

\st Session. \ \ "No. Jf>06. 



MISS REBECCA MILLER. 



April 9, 1^86. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Eldeedoe, from the Committee on Pensions, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill S. 813.] 

^^e (Jammittee on Penswns, to whom was referred the bill {S. S13) granting 
a pension to Miss Rebecca Miller^ make the following report: 

I^he father of the lady for whose benefit this bill is introduced was 
^^ Oolonel Miller who, at the battle of Luudy's Lane, in Canada, in the 
^'^t' of 1812, wheJt asked if he could capture a certain batt.ery of the 
enemy that was doing great damage to our forces, replied, "I'll try, 
^^y^ and instantly charged the battery with his regiment, a most des- 
perate undertaking, and in an almost incredibly short space of time 
^^^^\ and silenced the battery, and the battle of Luudy's Lane was won, 

fiis laconic as well as patriotic reply has ever since been the battle- 
c^ of our soldiers, and has inspired many a heroic deed by officers aud 
nien. 

Colonel Miller became a general, and performed faithful and gallant 
Service until the conclusion of peace with Great Britain. 

He died leaving two maiden daughters, with no property but a home- 
stead, a small farm, which afforded them but meager support. Congress 
I>assed an act granting to these two sisters a pension of $15 per month 
each, some years since. 

In September, 1885, the younger sister died,^ leaving Rebecca Miller, 
the one mentioned in this bill, now 72 years old and terribly crippled 
by rheumatism, entirely unable by age and disease to perform any 
kind of work, and without any means of support except the small pen- 
sion heretofore granted her and the little (and which is very slight, 
often not paying expenses of cultivation) which she receives from the 
little farm which she occupies. 

It is true that when her father performed the gallant acts as a sol- 
dier which made him famous throujihout the whole civilized world, she 
was but an infant, and had nothing to do with her father's grand sol- 
dierly conduct or the benefits he gave his country, but your committee 
deem it no more than just, at least magnanimous in a great country as 
this has now become, to give this only surviving child — now old, de- 
crepit, and needy — of a soldier who performed such gallant service to 
his country, a sum sufficient to render her life comfortable during the 
short time she will be likely to live. 

Attached hereto are two petitions, signed by men of high standing. 

The committee are also in possession of several affidavits of leading 
citizens, including medical evidence of her enfeebled condition. 

The committee do therefore recommend it43 passage. 



Z MISS REBECCA MILLER. 

[Senate Report No. 161, Forty-ninth CongroH, firat teeAion.! 

Miss Miller is the ODly surviTing daughter of General James Miller, whose respoi 
when called upon, to charge the battery, 'Til try, sir," has become the watchwon 
the forlorn hope, and in great emergencies enconraged the American soldier to sc 
of the most illustrious de^s of arms known in our history. Many years ago Coofi 
pensioned the daughters of General Miller, but all are now dead but Rebecca, wb 
now in want and extreme old age. We appeud her petition, which is sustained 
many affidavits of leading citizens, including medical evidence of her enfeebled c 
ditioD, and recommend the passage of the bill. 



To the honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the United States in Cong 

assembled : 

We, the undersigned, respectfully represent to your honorable bodies that k 
years since a pension of $15 each per month was voted by Congress to Rebecca Mi 
and Augusta Miller, of Temple, N. H., daughters of General James Miller, a die 
guished soldier of the United States in the war of 1812 ; and that in aid and furthen 
of the granting by Congress of these pensions a memorial was presented to thi 
signed by several prominent citizens of New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachnsett 
copy of which memorial and of the signatures to the same is hereto attached. 

While in receipt, both together, of the sum of $30 per month from the Govemnu 
these ladies, occupying the old farm inherited by them from their distinguished fail 
and practicing the most rigid economy, sharing the expenses of the household betw 
them, and the younger and stronger sister also bearing a part of the burden of 
daily duties and of the caro of her invalid sister, who is leeble and decrepit,^ 
thereby enabled to live just beyond the limit of actual want. Miss Augusta Mil 
the younger sister, died in September, 1885, and Miss Rebecca Miller, tne elder ', 
feebler, survives at the advanced age of seventy-two years, an invalid, badly 
formed by chronic rheumatism, almost helpless, and requiring constant attends 
and service, and deprived in her feeble old age of the faithful care and watchful o 
istrations of her devoted sister and life- long companion. She is compelled to eiD{ 
a roan to care for the farm and perform necessary out-door service, which largely < 
snmes the income from the old farm, and it is well-nigh impossible for her in hers^ 
of health to subsist, not to say live comfortably, on her income of $15 a month, 
sides, she is likely to become more helpless and dependent as she grows older. 

Miss Miller has no near relatives with means to render her assistance, and we 
deeply impressed with the duty and obligation that is laid upon the nation to se 
it that this iuvalid daughter of one of the noblest and bravest of our country's 
fenders in time ol peril be not left lo suffer or become an object of charity in her b 
less old age. 

All that was so forcibly urged in the memorial above referred to in favor of gr 
ing these ladies their original pensions applies now with greatly added force to 
surviving one, aged, lonely, helpless, deformed; stricken with bereavement and 
dened with disease and iutirmity, and suddenly deprived of one-half the small 
hitherto received from the Government for the sustenance of her household. 

We believe the American people would gladly, out of regard to the memory of 
honored father, place this lady during her few remaining days beyond the r^ac 
chance of actual want, and above the harassing anxiety and &ar of possible coi 
penury and suffering ; and we earnestly urge upon Congress, for the reasons al 
stated, and by all the considerations contained in and suggested by the abovo-i 
tioned memorial, that the pension now paid to Miss Miller be increased to su 
sum as will suitably and amply provide for the necessities and comfort of Gei 
Miller's surviving daughter during the short time she has to live. 

Moody Cunikr. Joseph Cillry. 

James A. Weston. J. F. Brigos. 

Lewis W. Clark. A. F. Stevens, Nashu 

Dan'l Clento. Geo. D. Robinson. 

S. N. Bell. B. Wadleigh. 

David Cross. B. P. Cheney. 

John H. George. John H. Morison. 

John M. Hill. Leveref Saltonstal 

A. B. Thompson. Daniel Hall. 

J. E. Sargent. J. B. Mott. 

P. C. Cheney. Marshall P. Wildeh 

J. S. H. Fink. Wm. Gaston. 

A. A. Hanscom. Chas. Levi Woodbub 
Charles H. Bell. Leopold Morse. 
John J. Bell. Thos. Mack. 
GiLMORE Marston. William Claflin. 

B. F. Prescott. N. P. Banks. 



MISS REBECCA MILLER. 5 

Senate and Houee of Btpreeeniaiwee of the United Statee of America in Congreee 

aeeembled: 

the nndersigned, do incNit obeerfolly reoommend that a pension be granted by 
Dgreaa of the United States to Rebeooa Miller and Augnsta Miller, daughters 
enil James Miller, of such a sum to each of them as in your wisdom vou may 
The country owes a debt of gratitude to General James Miller for his long, 
iSy and heroic services rendered on our frontier in the war of 1812, and as yet 
oneration has ever been made pecuniarily, for, although he lost his health in 
rice of his conntry, he never received anything but the ordinary pay of officers 
rank. He died leaving but little property. It was a saying of his that ** No 
kved much money from his salary in his times.'' These daughters have occu- 
le farm left by him in Temple, N. H., which, in their earlier days, when the^ 
uth and strength, afforded them a comfortable support, but now that age is 
»ping on, and one of them already is almost disabled by rheumatism, and the 
as been stripped of its valuable timber for immediate support, and deteriorat'Cd, 
f inadequate culture, the buildings all in a decaying and dilapidated condition, 
sfarm to be carried on by hired labor — these altogether take away almost their 
support. * 

le ladies are worthy descendants of their noble father, of whom every man and 
1 in New Hampshire are justly proud. They have delayed to the last inoment 
[6 any request for a pension, but necessity has no law. They feel that their 
npon the liberality of the country are well founded. Their father's services 
war of 181i2 were faithful, arduous, and unremitting. He was always at his 
jkd he was never sufficiently remunerated for the great danger and hardship 
Hired. 

io most sincerely recommend to Congress the careful consideration of the re- 
of these ladies. It is in fact but paying off a debt long since contracted, but 
heless binding on a nation always ready to reward all valuable services ren- 
and proud of her sons when they enact in her service such deeds of gallantry 
sroism as were exhibited by Geneval Miller. 

B. F. Prescott. J. E. Sargent. 

E. A. Straw. A. B. Thompson. 

Dan'l Clark. Joseph F. Wiggin. 

James A. Weston. Ichabod Goodwin. 

Ira Cross. W. H. Y. Hackett. 

P. C. Cheney. Alexander H. Rice. 

S. N. Bell. Henry K. Oliver, Mayor of Salem. 

Frederick Smyths. Levi Stockbride. 

Levi W. Barton. Joshua L. Chamberlaine, Maine, 

Walter Harriman. Aaron F. Stevens. 

f.-Oovemor Lucius Robinson, of New York, also signed the same memorial. 



MiBs 
when 
the fo 
of tb 
pens 

DOW 

dit 



/CoNGBBSS, J HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
flt Session. ( ( 



No. 1607. 



ALLEN P. JACOBS. 



April 9, 18-^. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Brady, from tlie Committee on Pensions, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 562*2. J 

The Committee on Pension^^ to whom was referred the bill (R, R,5622) grant- 
ing a pension to Alien P. Jacobs^ having had the same under consider- 
ation^ Hubmit the following report : 

That Allen P. Jacobs, of Owen County, Kentucky, before he was 
sixteen years of age was sent by his father to attend his sick brother, 
Elijah — . Jacobs, who was a soldier in Captain Williams's company, 
Colonel Whistler's regiment, in the war of 181i; that upon his arrival 
at Dayton, Ohio, where the United States troops were then located, he, 
the said Allen P. Jacobs, finding that his brother had recovered from 
his sicknei^s, joined Col. K. M. Johnson's regiment in its pursuit of 
the Indians and British, and that on the 5th day of October, 1813, this 
command was engaged with the enemy at the battle of the River 
Thames ; that young Allen P. Jacobs was conspicuous for his bravery 
in said battle, in which he was severely wounded by a bullet shot through 
the thigh, about midway between the hip joint and the knee. It does 
not appear from the records of the War Department that he was regu- 
larly mustered into the service of the United States, and therefore the 
Pension Office have not act^d upon his application for pension; but that 
as a boy he volunteered, served gallantly in the field with the United 
States Army, and was severely wounded, as above stated, is clearly 
shown by the testimony filed with the papers in the case and examined 
by the committee. 

This veteran is now nearly 89 years of age, he is almost helpless, 
and still a great sufferer from the wound he received in his country's 
service seventy-three years ago, and now in his old age he is compelled 
to live on the charity and kindness of friends. 

Your committee recommend that the bill be amended, and as amended 
that it do pass. 



49th Congress, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1608. 



MARY MURPHY. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole HouHe and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Brady, from the Committee ou Pensions, 8ubmitte<1 the following 

REPORT- 

[To ttocompany hill H. R. 4730.1 

The CanimitUe on Pensions^ io xchom iras referred the bill ( H. R. 4730) 
granting a pension to Mary Murphy^ having had the Home under consid- 
eration^ respectfully nubinit the following report : 

That Mary Murphv Is the widow of Xhonias Murphy, late a private 
of the United States Marine Corps, and her application for pension was 
rejected by the Pension Office on tlie ground that the innnediate cause 
of her said husband's death was typhoi<l fever and gastritis, as shown 
by the death certificate of the health officer of Washington, D. C. 

It a|>|>ear8 from the evidence that the said Thomas Murphy, while in 
the service of the United States as a marine in the year 1866, contracted 
pDenmouia from which he never recovered. 

Abbie Paul and Anna Parker, who knew him well, swear: 

That from the time Murphy came home he coughed badly ; that the cough never 
left him; that the difficulty in his chest seemed to gr(»w worse; he became weaker 
ontil he finally died. 

Arthur Flynn, a brother marine, swears: 

« 

Marpby was disabled in service; that on account of illness he was sent to hospital, 
and Dever recovered his health, and during all the time had a bad cough, and raised 
a lar^e quantity of phlegm. 

Or. G. S. Magruder, of Washington, D. C, swears: 

That be attended Thomas Murphy for pneumonia about March, 1873, and attended 
him through the attack. 

Dr. J. E. Bracket, of Washington, D. C, swears: 

That he attended Murphy; that his condition was bad, having contracted pneu- 
moDia in the Hervice, from which he never fully recovered, and that he died from the 
effects of said dinease. 

Dr. Bracket, at the time of Murphy's death, gave a certificate for 
burial to the efteci that he died of typhoid fever, and upon this and the 
certificate of the health officer, the Pension Office rejected the widow's 
application for pension. 

Ill a letter dated March 4, 1886, to Hon. W. H. Perry, Representative 
in the present Congress from the State of South Carolina, Dr. Bracket 
frankly acknowledges his error in issuing said death certificate, and is 



Z MARY MURPHY. 

clear and positive in stating that Murphy died of consumption con- 
tracted in the United States service. The records of the Washington 
naval hospital show that he was there treated for '* pneumonia ; duty 
exposure.'^ 

From the testimony herein given, the committee is of the opinion that 
Thomas Murphy died of disease contracted while in the service of the 
United States as a marine ; and therefore they report back the bill, 
with amendments, and as amended recommend that the same do pass. 



49th Conobess, ( HOUSE OP REPBESENTATIVES, ( Kepobt 
1st Session. i \ No. 1609. 



MES. MARY Mcintosh. 



April 9, 1886.— Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Bbadt, firom the Committee on Pensions, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1445.] 

The Committee on Pension8j to whom was referred the bill H. B. 1445^ 

submit the following report: 

Mrs. Mary Mcintosh, it appears, is now receiving the pension allow^id 
bj law as the widow of Lieut. Donald Mcintosh, Seventh Cavalry^ 
United States Army. 

No safficient reason being shown why exceptional increase should be 
made in this case, your committee make adverse report, and recommend 
that the bill lie on the table. 



49th Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 4 Report 
Ut SesHan. ( \ No. 1610. 



ESTATE OP THE LATE JOHN HOW. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to he* 

printed. 



Mr. W. Warner, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany hill H. R. 7648.] 

The Committee an Claims^ to whom was referred the hill H, R. 1353, 
having carefully considered the samCj submit the following report : 

John How was appointed agent for the Indians of the Western Sho- 
shone Agency, Nevada, in July 1878. Mr. How was an old and re- 
spected citizen of Saint Louis, Mo., and for thirty years had been one 
of the leading merchants of that city. He was a man of unimpeachable 
integrity, as the testimonials of such citizens as General W. T. Sherman, 
Hon. F. M. Cockrell, Hon. G. G. Vest, and others abundantly testify. 
In fact, it seems that through a long and active business life none ever 
questioned the integrity of John How. 

On tbe acceptance of his office he entered into a bond in the penal 
sam of $10,000 for the faithful performance of its duties, his sureties 
bein^ James O. Broadhead, Samuel T. Glover (since deceased), and 
Gerard B. Allen. He at once entered upon the performance of his du- 
ties as sach agent. He served his term of four years, which expired in 
Jnlj, 1882, though for a short time in the latter part of his term the 
agency was in charge of an inspector of the Indian Office. 

Certain questions having been raised by the inspector in regard to 
his accounts, he tendered explanations of them, which were considered 
by the Indian Commissioner to be full and satisfactory except as to 
a very small number, which were suspended mainly on account of tech- 
nical informality, as shown by the following letter of the Commissioner 
of Indian Affairs. • 

Department of the Interior, 

Office of Indian Affairs, 

Washington, April 7, 1884. 

Grmtlkmen : Herewith inclosed yon have a copy of a schedule of certain suspen- 
noDS mftde in the examination in this office of thd accounts of John How as Indian 
sfcgent, which the explanations, certificates, affidavits, &,c., submitted by him are 
deemed sufficient to remove ; the Treasury Department having been so advised, and 
below is a list of suspensions still remaining against said accounts during the time 
Tefcrred to. 

cash accounts. 

Fourth quarter J 1878. 

[Abstract A.] 

Voacher 2. Pay of police, $162; receipted by marks ; the marks not witnessed. 
Yoncher 5. Freight paid, $366.25 ; no authority referred to for the disbursement. 



Z ESTATE OF THE LATE JOHN HOW. 

Youoher 6. Fare paid C. P. R. Road, $20; this is a subsidized road. 
Yoaoher 8. Paid to settle dispute between an Indian and white man ; no aathority 
referred to. 

First quarter^ 1879. 

Voucher 3. Meals to Indians, $48 ; no authority referred to. 

Voucher 5. For various items of expenditure, $67 ; no authority referred to. 

Third quartet^ 1879. 

Voucher 1. Paid Pah Ute Bill, Indian, $75, for which his receipt by mark is not 
witnessed. 
Voucher 3. Disallowance for error in calculation, 62 cents. 

Supplemental : 

Voucher 3. Authority wanted for expenditure of $788.19 for various purposes, prin- 
cipally freight, which cannot be properly identified. 

Fourth quarter^ 1879. 

Voucher 1. Disallowance for error in calculation, 80 cents. 

Voucher 4. Authority wanted for How's exceediufl: the amount of beef he was au- 
thorized to buy, 2,805 pounds, and for paying for drayage, $4.75, and boarding em- 
ploy^ $132. 

First quartery 1880. 

Voucher 1. Robert, McCullough, employ^, $225. Not receipted for by self; name in- 
correctly spelled. 

Voucher 4. Expenses of Rodeo, $153. The various employ te have not receipted. 

The reason why this office has not recommended the approval by the Department 
of the several amounts suspended for want of authority is that the vouchers sub- 
mitted by Agent How are either informal or sufficient data is not given on which to 
determine the necessity and propriety of the expenditure. 

PROPERTY ACCOUNTS. 

Fourth quartery 1878. 

Abstract A. One thousand pounds beef to-be accounted for. 
Abstract C. Not certified to bv employ^. 

Abstract D. The issues per this abstract are neither properly receipted for, wit- 
nessed, or certified to. 

Medical property : 
Eight ounces chalk, 32 ounces chloroform, an() 1 thermometer, not accounted for. 

First quarter y 1879. 

Abstract C. Not certified by employes. 

Abstract D. Remarks to same abstract with fourth quarter, 1878 (just above), 
apply here also. 

Medical property : 

Four ounces magnesia, 8 ounces ammonia, 8 ounces potassa, and one cork-screw, to 
be accounted for. 

Second quarter^ 1879. 
Abstract C. Not certified to by employes. 

Third qnartWy 1879. 

Abstract C. Not certified to by employes. 

Abstract F. The following articles dropped per this abstract, improperly, remain 
charged to Agent How : 7 axes, 2 hoes, 2 hatchets, 2 hammers, 3 mattocks, 7 rakes, 
5 shovels, G spades, 2 wrenches. 



ESTATE OF THE LATE JOHN HOW. 3 

Fourth quarter, 1879. 

One stove, one saw-eet, and five oords wood, on Abstract A, not carried to property 
retarn, and 360 pounds In^ef on hand last quarter not brought forward. 
Abstract C. Not certified to by employ &. 

Firtt quarter, 1880. 

AVstract D. Only a part of the goods dropped as issued per this abstract are re- 
ceipted for, the othersr emain charged to the agent. 

Medical property : 

Certain supplies bought from J. McKesson, July 29, 1879, not accounted for. 
All of the foregoing suspensions have been fully explained in statements sent Agent 
How at the time his accounts were first examined, to which statements you are referred. 
In thin connection you are informed that the action of this office being merely ad- 
ministrative, you must look to the Treasury Department for statement of the actual 
statns of Agent How's accounts. "^ 

Respectfully, 

H. PRICE, 
Cammisaioner, 

MeesTs. Jeffries & King. 

1420 Xew York Avenue, City. 

It appears that the disallowances or suspensions in the cash account 
are about $2,000. The property not properly accounted for wa« of little 
value. 

That the expenditures were made, and that for the benefit of the In- 
dians, your committee are fully satisfied. 

The accounting officers of the Treasury disallowed other expenditures 
largely for similar informalities. 

Snit has been commenced on the official bond. Shortly after the in- 
stitution of said suit Mr. How died. Previous to his death he had col- 
lected a large amount of evidence. (Senate Ex. Doc. 78, first session Forty- 
ninth Congress.) The sureties relied upon Mr. How in obtaining evidence 
ou the trial of the case. He alone could explain the expenditures sus- 
pended, &c. 

This rendered an application to Congress for relief necessary, and the 
committee are convinced from the evidence that Mr. How never de- 
frauded the Government out of a dollar, and that all disallowances 
arise from want of compliance with technical forms on the part of Mr. 
How. 

In this connection the committee quote from the report of the Com- 
missioner of Indian Affairs for 1882 (p. v) : 

One great cause of embarrassment and disco aragement to Indian agents is the 
tioable and annoyance they find in keeping their accounts so as to comply technically 
vith all the regulations and rulings in reference to the final settlement of their ac- 
eoonts. As the matter now stands, an ag^nt may execute to the letter an order given 
him bj the Secretary of the Interior for the payment of money, and yet that item in 
bis a43coant may be suspended against him, and he and his sureties be compelled by 
law to pay the money again. 

The result is, if he refuses to obey the orders of his superior he loses his position, 
and if he obeys he loses his money. 

Also from the report of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs for 1883 
(p. IX) : 

Sometimes such men are found who are willing to undertake this work for the good 
that they hope to accomplish, but they soon find themselves surrounded with diffi- 
culties and hampered and embarrassed by regulations and rulings that are not to be 
found in any other business or any other department of the Government; and in place 
of the support and sympathy which they expected from the Government, they are 



4 ESTATE OF THE LATE JOHN HOW. 

harassed and annoyed by technical rnlings in conducting the affairs of the agency to 
such an extent that they become disheartened, despondent, and disgnsted, and aban- 
don the work upon which they entered with high hopes of doing good. One agent, 
who was appointed upon the earnest solicitation of a United States Senator fromhis 
State, wrote me a few weeks since, after being in the service about One year, aang 
this lansnage : 

'* If I had Known at the time of my appointment of the heavy responsibility, trouble, 
sleepless nights, and agony of mind J nave had to underge, $5,000 salary would not 
have tempted me to accept the office. I would now resign if I could in justice to 
myself and bondsmen." 

Another of onr agents, a live, wide-awake, energetic man, in tendering his reeigoa- 
tiou for the second time a few weeks since, uses the following language : 

** I respectfully beg leave to renew the tender of my resignation. It is needless for 
me to add any reasons to the ones already given, but I will say this : I am thoroaghly 
convinced, after digesting all that was said to me by the chief of the Indian divisioD 
of the Second Comptroller's Office, that no care, no honesty, will prevent a man in 
this position from being robbed by legal process, and further, that the Indian Bnrean 
is powerless to protect its officers. I am satisfied that no agent can perform the 
higher duties for which he was placed here without sooner or later being compelled 
to spend his own money to defend himself from some unjust charge. I have the 
assurance of this same chief of division in the Second Comptroller's Office that Id caae 
an agent, actinia on his own judgment did, by an expenditure of five dollars, save the 
Government a million, he would compel him tb refund that five dollars if he conld. 
I cannot afford, after doing my whole duty, to spend a thousand dollars to prove it, 
and I don't propose to spend my money on claim agents either.*' 

The Indian service loses very many of its best agents because of the unnecessary 
and vexatious manner of keeping and settling their accounts. No mercantile or 
manufacturing business could be carried on one year on the same system. I am com- 
pelled to say that it is wrong in principle and in practice, and is in effect discounting 
good men and offering a premium on bad or incompetent ones. 

In addition to this, many of the Indian agents have to live in houses which are in 
wretched condition, much less comfortable than stables for horses and mules in civ- 
ilized communities. At least $100,000 should be appropriated this year for constrac- 
tion and repair of buildiiigs at agencies. 

Mr. How is dead. His estate is insolvent. Whatever amoant is re- 
covered, if any, must be paid by the sureties on Mr. How's official 
bond. The principal being dead, they have no means of showing how 
the irregularities in the accounts of Mr. How occurred. 

The committee, from a careful examination of the facts in this case, 
are of the opinion that the Government sustained no loss by any act of 
dishonesty on the part of Mr. How. 

The committee report back the accompanying substitute for bill H. 
B. 1353, and recommend its passage, and that the original bill do lie 
upon the table. 

Statements of General W. T. Sherman, William H. Bliss, and others 
are herewith submitted in the appendix to this report. 



APPENDIX. 



Saimt Louis, January 12, 1862. 

Sir : I understand that certain charges have been preferred against Mr. John How, 
Indian agent. Although I have not seen the charges and have not had an opportu- 
nity to investigate them, yet an acquaintance of many years with Mr. How fully jus- 
tifies me in believing that though he may have committed irregularities, he would 
not commit dishonorable acts. I believe that none can be found in this cit^, where 
he spent -most of his life, who will say that his integrity has ever been questioned. I 
cannot help feeling that when Mr. How's side of the matter is presented and the facts 
fully disclosed, it will be found that he has not intentionally committed anv wron^. 

As his sureties have requested that he may be retained for the six months of his 
unexpired term, in order under his own suspension to clear up this matter, I hope 



; 



ESTATE OF THE LATE JOHN HOW. 5 

that such request will be ip^Dted. His sureties are meu of undoubted standing here, 
lod their indorsement of bim is entitled to gjeskt weight. 
Hoping that my request in this behalf may not be deemed officious, 
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, 

CHESTER H. KRrM. 
The Indian Commissioner, 

Washington, D, C. 



[District attorney of the United States for the eastern district of Missouri. | 

Saint Louis, January 12. 1882. 

gis: I am informed by the friends of John How that he has been suspended from 
his office as Indian agent at Elko, Nev., upon charges affecting his official integrity. 
I have no knowledge of the exact nature of the charges; but I venture to say that 
from my long personal acquaintance with Mr. How and from his high standing in this 
oommunity, where he was for many years one of its most honored and respected citi- 
leDS, I am confident he has not knowingly wronged the Government or any of its 
wirds placed under his charge. 

With this belief I take the liberty of asking that if consistent with your sense of 
justice and propriety he may be allowed a full opportunity to meet and defend himself 
igtinst the charges mentioned, which opportunity, I am informed, was denied him 
by the officer who investigated bis affairs and relieved him from duty. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. H. BLISS. 

Hon. Hiram Price, 

Ciimm%99\<mtr of Indian AjfairSy Washington, Z>. C 



Hon. A. O. Cochran : 



Saint Louis, Mo., January 12, 1882. 



DiiR Sir: I have Just seen our mutual friend, Mr. John How, who has for some 
jean past held the place of Indian agent at Elko, Nev. 

Some evil-minded persons, who, in my opinion, seek mostly the gratification of their 
bad feelings, have made complaints against Mr. How, touching the administration of 
his office. The testimony of these persons, taken by Inspector Smith, has been sub- 
mitted to me and I have read it with some care. I suppose you can see it at the 
proper office in Washington. I think yon will find it quite vague and non specific in 
ntpect to charges, but full of insinuation, leaving the reader to guess what is the 
particular matter complained of. I have known Mr. How intimately more than thirty 

{ears. During all that time he has sustained the reputation of a strictly honest and 
OQorable man. I have found in the mass of testimony submitted to me nothing to 
■iiake my perfect confidence in Mr. How's integrity, and if the testimony of the wit- 
oeises was clearer and more specific, and that of respectable men, I should hesitate 
to believe that John How would commit a dishonest act on the testimony of any man 
or men. In fact I believe Mr. How incapable of it. There is not. in all the evidence 
taken before Inspector Smith, as shown to me, a particle tending to show a corrupt 
motive or an inten * • * act of wrong against the (Government that * * * to 
show irregularities and neglect of * * * may be true I do not know that such 
is * * ^ for I do not know what forms are prescribed, but I am satisfied that a 
perfectlv faithful administration of office is entirely consistent with some neglect of 
forms which it is impossible to follow under all circumstances, especially in a country 
like Nevada. Now, having said this much, I wish to add that I wish to see the com- 
plaints asainst Mr. How tnorougbl^ investigated ; and this of course, after what I 
nave said of him, is his earnest wish. If opportunity is allowed him, I believe — I 
tUnk I may say I know — he can and will explain everything to the satisfaction of 
the GU>vemment. 

As one of his securities I wish him to vindicate his conduct from every reproach, 
and I am perfectly willing, notwithstanding what has been said against him, to see 
him aerve out his term, for I am sure he will do nothing wrong, and I am confident he 
can and will conduct the residue of his term better tor the Government and better 
for his seonrities than anv other person can. 

I onderstand Mr. How has obtained permission to come to Washington and see Sec- 
retary Kirkwood. 

H. Rep, 1610 2 



6 ESTATE OF THE LATE JOHN HOW. 

I am rejoiced to know it, for I believe a persoual explanation by Mr. How in re- 
spect to everything will do more to remove suspicion against him, if any ezi8ta,thaQ 
a hundred depositions. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, 

S. T. GLOYER, 

I have an abiding confidence in Mr. How's integrity, and fully concur in all that 
Mr. Glover has here said. 

GERARD B. ALLEN. 

I have not read the depositions referred to, but I have entire confidence in Mr. 
How's integrity, and fully concur in all that Mr. Glover has said. 

JAMES O. BROADHEAD. 
Hon. S. J. KiRKWOOD, 

Secretary of the Interior : 

I knew Mr. How well at Saint Louis in war times, and he was then one of the rieh- 
est, most loyal, and most responsible men there. I have met him often since, and 1 
never heard a word to his discredit. The above indorsers, Glover, Broadhead, and 
Gerard B. Allen, are personal friends of mine, and are men of the highest integrity. 
I beg you will treat Mr. How with special favor, as I believe him most wortby. 

W. T. SHERMAN. 



«9th Congbbss, • HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Kepokt 
m 8e8$ian. ] \ No. 1611. 



GOTTLIEB GROEZINGER. 



April 9, 1886. — ComDiitted to the Committee of the Whole Honse and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. W. Warner, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany hill H. R. .380)3.] 

The Gtmmittee on Claims^ to which was referred House bill 38G3, having 
conMdered the same, submits the following report : 

That Gottlieb Groezinger, of Yountville, was the proprieter of distillery 
No. 193, located in said^towu, in the county of Napa, California, and was 
engaged in the business of fruit distiller in 1876. 

That on the night of September 22, 1876, his distillery was accidentally 
destroyed by fire ; the brandy manufactured by him, being about 1,164 
proof gallons, was stored in his said distillery and was then and there 
consumed by the flames. 

That there was no insurance upon the distillery or the brandy, but 
that each was a total loss. 

That the fire was accidental, without fault or negligence on the part 
of the claimant. 

That on 19th of February, 1877, he was assessed by the Government 
an internal-revenue tax of $1,047.60 upon the brandy that had been 
destroyed by fire, as aforesaid, in September, 1876; which sum the 
claimant paid the United States collector. 

Mr. Groeziuger in 1877 made application to the Treasury Department 
for the refunding of said sum of $1,047.60, but the application was re- 
jected upon the grounds set forth in the letter of the Commissioner of 
Intenial Revenue of October 31, 1877, hereto attached and marked Ex- 
hibit A. 

Your committee is of the opinion that the amount paid by the claim- 
ant as internal-revenue tax after the destruction of the brandy upon 
which the tax was assessed should be repaid, and therefore recommends 
the passage of the accompanying bill. 



Exhibit A. 

Treasury Department, 
Office of Internal Revenue, 

Washington, Ocloher 31, 1877. 

Sir: In the matter of the claim of G. Groezinger for the refunding of i$l, 047.60, tax 
paid on grape brandy alleged to have been destroyed by fire, I have to say that the 
qnestion as to the authority of the Secretary to remit this tax was carefully consid- 



2 GOTTLIEB GROEZINGER. 

ered by him at tbe time of the examination of the claim for its abatement. The con. 
lusion was reached that there was no antboiity of law for the abatement of the tax. 
The case does not appear to fall within tbe provisions of section 3220 or 3221, BeviMd 
Statutes, and the claim is rejected. 
Respectfully, 

GREEN B. RAUM, 

CiMumiuioner. 

A. L. Frost, Esq., 

Collector Fourth Districtf SacramentOf California, 



49th CoNGBESS, ) HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES. (Report 
Ut Session. f \ No. 1612. 



HYLAND C. KIRK AND OTHERS. 



April 9, 188G. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



.Mr. W. Warner, from the Committee on Claims, submitted the fol- 

lowinff 



'O 



REPORT: 

[To accon^pany bill H. R. 7649.] 

The Committee on ClaiinSj to ichom ican referred House bill 3145, having 
fully coumdered ihesame^ submit the following report: 

This bill and the claim Involved therein refer to a *' perforated, tax- 
paid sinrit stamp,'' adopted by the United States Government, under 
tbe act of July 20, 18G8, and used in the collection of internal reve- 
nue diiriug the years 18G8, 18G9, 1870, 1871, and 1872. (See Exhibit A, 
specimen of the stamp.) 

According to the deposition of W. S. Andrews, a former internal-rev- 
enne collector (see Fletcher r. United States, p. 5), Fletcher's desi;u;^u 
was carried to Washington by him and deposited in the Internal Reve- 
nue Department about the 1st of November, 18G7. The same device 
with the written specifications thereto appended was "returned to in- 
ventor bv Internal Revenue Department August 17, 18GS. Witness, 
W. M. Smith." (Id., p. 33.) 

It appears from the records of the Patent Office that the title to this 
invention was originally claimed by four inventors. (See Exhibit I?.) 
In thp interference which was declared, the primary examiner deci(k»d 
in favor of Spencer M. Clark, at that time chief of the Bureau of Trint- 
inj^aud Engraving. 

The three examiners-in chief, on appeal, reversed this decision, and 
decided in favor of Addison C. Fletcher. 

Clark appealing, the Commissioner of Patents reversed the decision 
of the examiuers-in-chief and decided in favor of Clark. 

On appeal to the supreme court of the District of Columbia, Judge 
George P. Fisher reversed the decision of the Commissioner of Patents 
and awarded priority of invention to Fletcher. (See Exhibit C, opinion 
of the court.) 

From this decision there was no appeal. But Clark's original claims 
and specilications were moditied and a j)atent was granted to him for 
substantially the same device and issued to Adolphus S. Solomons as 
assignee. (See Exhibits D and E, Fletcher's and Clark's patents.) 

Fletcher made demand for compensation and brought suit against the 
Government therefor in 1872. The Court of Claims found in 187G, when 
t\m case was dismissed, that there had been two '^inventors of the same 
mechanical contrivauce in the form of a stamp," and disclaimed jur.s- 



I 



2 HYLAND C. KIRK AND OTHERS. 

diction in patent cases; tLe defense cliiefly resting on the use of Clark's 
patent and not Fletcber's. 

Solomons, Clark's assignee, brought suit in the Court of Claims, Sep- 
tember 17, 1875, for compensation for the use of this stamp, which is 
still pending. The court's decision in favor of the petitioners' patent^ 
Hyland C. Kirk and others, assignees of Addisou C. Fletcher, is now 
being used in the case by the Government as one of the defenses against 
Solomons. (See requests for findings of facts by the Attorney iGeueral, 
Exhibit F.) 

The petitioners' claim, being barred by the statute of limitations, 
they ask to be restored to court, on the ground that they are the right- 
ful owners of this stamp jjatent, and entitled to compensation. 

Your committee have received a copy of a report dated February 18, 
1885, from the Internal lievenue Department, addressed to the Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, which recommends the reference of this claim to 
the Court of Claims. (See Exhibit G.) 

In view, however, of the fact that this claim seems to involve a con- 
siderable sum of money, and that the passage of an act placing the 
matter in court to be tried upon its legal and equitable merits might 
seem to restrict the court to the finding of a judgment and to imi>ose 
upon the Government the payment of a large sum of mouej' in liquida- 
tion tkereof, this bill provides simply that the claim be referred to the 
Court of Claims for a judicial investigation and finding of the fact8, 
subject to the future action of Congress. The committee return the 
accompanying bill as a substitute for bill H. K. 3145, and recommend 
its passage, and that the original bill (H. li. 3145) do lie ui)on the table. 



Exhibit A. 
Exhibit A is a specimen of a x^erforated tax-paid spirit stamp. 



E^CHIBIT B. 
DUPARTMEKT OF TUB INTERIOR, UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE, 

Washingtonf February 9, 1886, 

To the Committee on Claims, 

Hoiue of Bepresentatives : 

Gentlemen : In the matter of the interference between Abraham, Fletcher, Clark, 
and GosneU — 

Abraham filed application in this office May 28, 1868. 

Fletcher filed application in this office August 10, 1868. 

Clark filed application in this office September 1, 1868. 

Gosnell filed application in this office September 3, 1868. 

On the 18th of September, 18(58, an interference was declared between these parties. 

Abraham being the senior applicant took no testimony, but rested on his record 
date. Fletcher took t^istimony, which he filed November 14, 1868. Clark took testi- 
mony, which he filed November 10, 1868. GosneU toe k some testimony, which seems 
to have been irregularly taken, and the same was filed November 3, 18r>8. 

The question of priority was submitted to the primary examiner (there was then 
no examiner of interferences), who on the 23d of November, 1868, awarded priority 
to Clark. 

Abraham and Gosnell seem to have acquiesced in this award, as neither of them ap- 
pealed. Fletcher, however, appealed to the examiners-iu-chief, \vho, upon hearing, 
reversed tbe decision of the examiner, and awarded priority to Fletcher on the 1st oi 
February, 1869. 



HYLAND C. KIKK AND OTHERS. 6 

From this award of tbe board Clark appealed to the Conimipsiouer, who, on the 18tb 
of May, 1869, reversed the iiudiog of tbe examiners-in-chief and awarded priority to 
Clark/ 

From this award of the Commissioner, Fletcher appealed to the supreme court of 
the District of Columbia, which court, on the 10th of July, 1^69, reversed the Com- 
Djissioner, and awarded priority to Fletcher. 

Copies of these several decisions are herewith inclosed. Of course the testimony 
vhiih was taken is quite voluminous. Should the committee desire a copy of tbe 
testiniony, or any portion thereof, I will gladly furnish it, or I will lend the tiles that 
refereuoe may be made to the original testimony, if it is really desirable; or, perhaps 
vbat would be better, tbe party steking the legislation can have access to the tiles 
and can prepare copies of such portions of tbe testimony as be thinks best to submit 
to your committee. 
1 alpo heiewitb inclose an abstract of title relating to tbe patent of Mr. Fletcher. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

M. V. MONTGOMERY, 

CommUiiioner. 



Exhibit C. 

Judgment of &)urt in the mattei' of the interference between the application of Spenrer M, 
Clark and the application of Addison C. Flticher for a patent for stlf-cancelintj revenue 
ttampft. Appeal from the dcciaion of the Commisniontr of Patints awarding priority of 
invention to Clark. 

The invention is a very simple one, though, doubtless, it is useful as well as novel. 
Fletcher, being remote from the Treasury Department and lutemal Revenue Ba- 
read, is attracted by a notice from that Department and Bureau inviting the invent- 
ive genius of tbe country to propose a proper self-canceling stamp about the close 
of the mouth of December, 1867. In the previous moulb of August he has made his 
discovery, which consists of a perforated stamp covered with a fragile tissue paper. 
The Bureau had been in want of just such a stamp. Clark was at the time of the 
imblication of tbe notice and had then long been tbe superinti udent of the printing 
establishment of the Trcasui-y Department, and in almost daily intercourse with the 
I iDteroal Revenue Bureau, and must have known the need of the stamp in contro- 
versy. Although he professes to have got upon the track of inveuting this stamp 
Mveral years before Fletcher had perfected his invention, yet he does not communi- 
cate any of bis ideas to the Internal Revenue Bureau, and does not even tile biscaveat 
until February 10, 1868, some six months after the invention had been perfected by 
Fletcher. He seems to have iucubated his embryonic invention for three or four 
yean, but fails to produce it in a tangible shape until November, 1867. The stamp 
he speaks of having produced in 1865-^6 is not the same as that now in controversy, 
viz, one with a thin tissue covering over the perforation, so that the stamp cannot be 
removed from the surface to which it has once been fastened without destroying the 
tissue covering and thus canceling the stamp. He does not produce this stamp until 
several mouths after Fletcher had produced it ; nor does he nor any other of his wit- 
Deases describe any such stamp as having been produced by Clark, as described by 
him, before Fletcher's invention had been perfected. The real invention is so simple 
that the commonest intellect could have aescribed it just as it is now described in 
the application, when once the idea was conceived. The conception, had it existed 
in Clark's mind in 1865 or 1866 or in 1867, before Fletcher had perfected it, could hufre 
been easily described by him to Buckland, or to the officers of the Bureau, an<i just 
IS readily comprehended by him or them, and there would have been no need of wit- 
neases speaking, in their testimony, about a stamp having two pieces of paper at- 
tached together, one perforated and tbe other covering the perforation, or of a i»iece 
of bank-note paper covered, as to its perforation, by a piece of common writing-pa- 
per, or of a stamp which should be canceled by a separation of the two pieces of 
Saper composing it ; which two pieces of paper, by the by, when separated, might 
e readily joined and used a second or third time. 

' If Clark's earlier experiment bad produced the stamp in controversy, his witnesses 
could have sxvorn squarely that be had shown or described this identical statnp. After 
a careful consideration of the evidence I am led to the conclusion that Fletcher is 
tbe prior inventor. 
The decision of the Commissioner is reversed. 
[SEAL.] GEO. P. FISHER, 

Justice of the Supreme Court D, C. 
July 10, 1869. 
A true copy. Teste : 

R. J. MEIGS; Clerk. 



4 HYLAND C. KIRK AND OTHERS. 

Exhibit D. 

[United States Patent OflSce. Addiuon C. Flotclier. of New Tork. X. Y. TmproTenient inadbeiir* 
pontal and revenue RtanipH. Specification fomiing part of Letters Patent Ko. 101604. dated ApiQ 
5. 1870; antedated October 5, 1869.] 

To all whom it may concern : 

Be it known that I, Addison C. Fletcher, of the city, county, and State of New York, 
have invented a new and useful improvement in adhesive stampfi, applicable for postal, 
internal-revenue, and other purposes, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact 
de8cri'»tion, reference being bad to the accompanying drawing forming part of this 
specification, in which — 

Fipjnre 1 represents a face view of a series of adhesive stamps made in accordan« 
with my improvement; and Fig. 2, a section of the same, takeu as indicated by th« 
line X X in Fig. 1. 

Similar letters of reference indicate corresponding parts. 

My improvement in postag*?, intornal-revonne, and other adhesive stamps involvei 
or inchides a new method of canceling them, whereby, in any attempt to remove them 
from the docnmentsor surfaces to which they have been applied, they are s: effectnallj 
mutilated and destroyed as to make it an impossibility to use them a second time 
without a detection of the fraud. My invention consists in constructing the stamp} 
with a hole or boles through the body of them, and covering or backing the .sam( 
with thin tissue or other bibulous paper, made to firmly adhere to the stamp, andth( 
rear surface of the stamp, with its bibulous paper ( overing to the hole, coated oi 
backed with mucilage or other adhesive substance, while the front surface or fane o: 
the stamp, together with the bibulous paper seen through the opening therein, hai 
any suitable figure or vignette print«'d thereon. Thus constructed the stamp cauDO! 
be remove<l from the surface to which it has been stuck without the destruction oi 
tearing of the tissue or bibulous portion of it. 

The following further description, reterring to the accompanying drawing, will snf 
fice to explain how this my invention is or may be carried out. 

Thus, I take a sheet of stanij)s, A, and punch through the body portions of each stam] 
one or more perlbrations, a, after which the backs of the stamps are covered by ashee 
of tissue or any thin bibulous paper, B. firmly cemented thereto by mucilage or othei 
wise, so as to cover the holes a in the stamps, and subsequently mucilage or other soil 
able adhesive sul)stance applied to the exterior surface of the tissue-paper and bacli 
of the stamj)8, to secure the adhesion of the stamps by moistening them on their back 
or otherwise moistening the surfaces to which said stamps are designed to be applies 

The stamps A have any suitable vignette or figure engraved or j»rinted on them, i 
also has the tissue or bibulous paper B, covering the iierforations o in them. Tk 
printing on the two surfaces or ])ortioiis A and B of the stamps may either be doi 
He]>arately auv] before applying the bibulous paj^er to the backs of the stamps, or 
may be done after the bibulous paper has been secured thereto, the perforation a 
th»' stamp admitting of such a general and simultaneous impression of the twos* 
faces or portions A and B. 

When a stamp as thus constructed has been applied to a sheet of paper or otl 
article or surface, it not simply bccouus adherent thereon throughout or over itsent 
surface, but more especially or tenaciously so on that part of its surface or back cov 
ing the ])erforations a in the stamp, by reason of its thinner construction at that pa 
as produced by the tissue or bibulous-paj)er covering to the perforations a, so th 
and by reason of the delicate and peculiar character or [U'ojx'rty of said paper, a 
attempt to remove said stamp without defacing it by first moistening it will ben 
1«#, for the bibulous-paper covering the oi)ening a will be so washed or torn as th 
in the endeavor to remove the stamp, it will have its design more or less destroyed 
defaced, and thus prevent a second use of the stamp. 

What is here claimed, and desired to be secured by letters patent, is — 

An adhesive stamp made up of a thick portion or body, A, having a perforation 
perforations, a, throtigh the face of it, and thinner portion, B, composed of tissue 
any suitable bibulous paper, and applied as a covering to said perforation or perfo 
tions, both ])ortions being securely connected or incorporated to make up the cc 
l)lctc stanij), and the latter being suitably engraved or printed on its face, and h. 
iiig adhesive material applied to its back, substautiallv as specified. 

'ADDISON C. FLETCHER 

Witnesses : 
A. Li-: Clkhc, 

A. KlNNIKK. 



^ 



HYLAND C. KIRK AND OTHERS. 5 

Exhibit E. 

United States Patent Office. Spencer M. Clark. ofWashlngton, D. C, assignor to Adolphns S. Solo- 
' mons. of same place. Self-canoeling postal and revenue stamp. Specification forming part of Let* 
ten Patent Xo. 98,031, dated December 21, 1869 ; antedated June 21, 1869. J 

To all whom it may concern : 

Be it known that I, Spencer M. Clark, of Washington City, in the District of Co- 
lumbia, have invented a new and useful self-canceling postal and revenue stamp, of 
irhich the following is a specification. 

The oature of iny invention consists in the production of a postal or revenue stamp, 
composed of two layers, one of which is perforated, the two being united and printed 
on the perforated side and gummed on the imperforate, so that when the stamp thus 
made is affixed to paper or other material the two layers shall separate, or the im- 
perforate layer break in the part thereof uncovered by the perforate layer in any at- 
tempt at removing the stamp from the surface to which it is attached. 

In mauufacturing uiy improved stamps I first puuch'ooe or more holes in the sheet 
of paper which shall constitute the outer layer of the stamp. I then cover this per- 
forated paper with a second imperforate sheet, and uuite the two by means of a suit- 
able adhesive gum or cement, in the usual manner. The sheet thus prepared is then 
ready to receive the proper design, which is imprinted upon the perforated side thereof 
in such manner as to extend over and include therein sooie portiou of the inner or im- 
perforate layer disclosed by the perforations in the outer layer. 

Wheu the stamp has been duly printed, the imperforate layer or under side thereof 
is coated with gum, in the ordinary manner, so that it may be made to adhere to any 
desired surface. 

A number of subjects may be imprinted, as usual, upon one large sheet prepared for 
the purpose, as herein set forth, and the linished stamps be afterward separated, in 
the customary manner. 

I claim as mv invention — 

A postal or revenue stamp composed of two layers, one of which is peiforated, the 
two being united and printed on the perforate side, and gummed on the imperforate 
lide, substantially in the manner and for the purpose herein set forth. 

S. M. CLARK. 

In presence of— 
David A. Burr, 
A. A. Bkookk. 



Solomons 
vs. 
Jhe United States 



Exhibit F. 
UNITED STATES COURT OF CLAIMS. 

> No. 1(H$97. (Filed September 17, 1875.) 



The defendant^ considering the facts herein set forth to be proven, and deeming 
them material to the due presentation of this case in the findings of fact, requests the 
^oort to find the same as follows: 

I. 

That during the time this stamp was used by the Government it was not used by 
my one else, or for any other purpose than designating the tax paid. 

n. 

That neither the patentee, Clark, nor his assignee, Solomons, manufactured for sale 
ipy articled containing this device, nor have such articles been manufactured under 
lus patents, nor have Hcenses to manufacture been sold by them or either of them. 

III. 

That there was no priority of invention by the assignor of this claimant, but that 
\ similar device had been described and exhibited by others. 



6 HYLAND C. KIRK AND OTHERS. 

IV. 

That the device is so simple and natnral that it wonld snggest itself to the orilU 
narily endowed inventive mind, and was, therefore, not patent-able. 

V. 

That in a proceeding before the supreme conrt of the District of Colombia in a 
matter wherein the assignor of this claimant and one Addison C. Fletcher were parties 
couceruing the priority of invention of this devict*, the same was decided against the 
said Spencer M. Clark, assignor; that these stamps were firstprinted and delivered to 
the office of Int«'rnal Revenue on August 25, 1868 ; that they commenced to be used on 
November 2, I'l^H; that no patent was issued on the same until December 21, 1(^, 
and that the asnigument of Clark to the claimant was that not made until December 
6, 1869 ; that prior to ihis assignment the United States had had the free, undistarbed, 
and unchallenged nse of this device. 

VI. 

That prior to the adoption and nse by the Government of this stamp, and dnriog th^ 
entire time of its continuance, by express contract with Clark, the Qovemment wa.a 
entitled to use the same free from any claim for royalty compensation. 

VII. 

That Clark never in any manner or any form made application to the Governmen ^ 
for compensation; that the claimant and assignee herein was well aware of that fact^ 
and that the assignment was colorable and fraudulent. 



Exhibit G. 

Trkasuky Department, Office of Internal Revenue, 

fVashingtoHf February 18, 1885. 

Sir : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the petition of Hyland C. Kirlc: 
attorney, making claim for clients, the successors to Addison C. Fletcher, theallegec^ 
inventor of a device for perforating tax-paid spirit stamps, &c., referred by you t« 
this office under date of the 16th instant, with the request that I furnish you withsncb 
information relative to the claim as 1 may possess or as the records of this office maji 
exhibit, and in reply to state that the paper marke<l Exhibit A in the petition m 
a copy of a publication dated December 24, 1867, signed **E. A. Rollins, Commissiouei 
of Internal Revenue," to be fouud in the Internal Revenue Record of December 28^ 
1887, volume 6, JNo. 26; that Exhibit B accompanying papers is a true copy of g 
letter addressed to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Addison C. Fletcher, July 
1, 1872, and also a true copy of letter of Commissioner Douglass, July 3, 1872, to Mr- 
Fletcher, in reply to hislelterof the 1st, with theexceptionof the word "Washington' 
at the heading, which is not in the original, and the word "RespV" is written out 
** Respectfully" in full in the original. From this last letter it will appear that the 
quantity of stamps used corresponded with Exhibit C accompanying the papers. 

As there is no appropriation applicable to the payment of such claims, and as a case 
analogous thereto is now pending in the Court of Claims, which it is claimed by the 
present petitioner is an interference, I have the honor to suggest that it might be well 
to refer the within papers to that court uuder section 10t>3 of the United States Re- 
vised Statutes, in order that it may be judicially determined which, if either, of the 
said claimants is entitled to a remuneration from the Government for the use oi the 
stamps in question. ' 

The papers in the case are herewith returned. 
Very respectfully, 

WALTER EVANS, 

CommUaioner, 

Hon. Hugh McCulloch, 

Secretary of the Treasury. 



4Sm CONGBESS, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. 
\ri Seuian. f 



i Repoet 
) No. 1613. 



PETER MARCK, THOMAS J. WRIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR, AND 

OTHERS. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

jiriDted. 



Mr. Geddes, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 6203. J 

Ik Committee on War Claims^ to whom was referred the bill (H, R, G203) 
for the relief of Peter Marck, Thomas J, Wright, administrator, and 
othersj beg leave to report : 

That the Committee on War Claims of the Fortj'-eighth Congress, not 
bt'iiig clearly and fully advised of all the facts in the ease, referred it 
to the Court of Claims for a finding under the provisions of an act en- 
titled "An act to afford assistance and relief to Congress and the ex- 
ecntive departments in the investigation of claims and demands against 
the Government," approved March 3, 1883. 

Said claim has been returned by said Court of Claims to the com- 
mittee, with the following findings of fact tiled by the court February 1, 
1886: 

I. 

The steamboat Prima Donna was chartered November 22, 1864, by Capt. J. V. 
Lewis, assistant qaartermaster, United States Army, at Cincinnati, to transport a 
cargo from Cincinnati to Nashville, and to brins back such freight and troops as tb<) 
officers of the Quartermaster's Department might send. It was to be a round trip, 
from Cincinnati to Nashville and return. 

n. 

There was no written contract or charter-party between Captain Lewis and the 
owners for the service of the boat. The terms of the agreement were that the Govern- 
neot should pay $200 per day for the services of the boat and crew and management, be- 
sides furnishing coal for its running, and the owners were to furnish the boat, manned, 
equipped, victualed, and officered, and operate and navigate the same, the movements 
and carffo only being under the direction of the officers of the Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, while the owners had the entire and absolute possession of the boat, one of whom 
was on board and navigated the same. 

III. 

The steamboat while so chartered carried a cargo from Cincinnati to Nashville, ar- 
riring at Nashville November 28, 1864. In pursuance of the original orders given by 
Captain Lewis for the vessel to return to Cincinnati after delivering the cargo at Nash- 
ville, the captain, on December 2, 1864, was ordered by the quartermaster at that place 
to take on board as many unserviceable mules as she could accommodate, and proceed 
with the same to Louisville. The captain objected to leaving, and protested against 
doing so, a report having come up that the Confederate forces were on the bank be- 



2 PETER MARCK, T. J. WRIGHT, ADMINISTRATOR, AND OTHERS. 

low Nashville in great numbers, and fnlly armed and equipped, but the qaarterm: 
reiterated the order to leave. The captain requested a military escort, bat th 
quest was refused, and the qnartennaster threatened that the captain and crew sh 
be arrested if they did not immediately comply with the order ; thereupon the st 
boat yielded compulsory obedience and left Nashville under these orders. Aboi 
miles below Nashville, on the Cumberland River, at a place called Bell's Milk 
was captured b^ Confederate forces armed with field pieces, and the captain and 
were held as prisoners of war. The vessel herself was shortly afterwards recapt 
and taken back to Nashville, and on December 17, 1864, was sent to Cincinnati, ? 
she was discharged December 31, 1864 and the owners were paid in fall for her ser 
to that date. 

IV. 

Joseph Scott was captain of said steamboat, and his wages at the time of cs] 
were ^50 a month ; Isaac M. Clement was chief engineer, and his wages were | 
mouth ; David Yaughn was carpenter, and his wages were |75 a month; Barn 
Schooley was steward, and his wages were $75 a month ; Frederick Kimmerly i 
watchman, and his wages were $50 a month ; Peter Marck, Frederick Smith, ( 
McNabb, and Thomas Miller were deck-hauds, and the wages of each were $40 a uu 
All of these persons were captured as aforesaid on December 3, 1864, and remaio 
captivity till the 15th of April, 1865, when they were paroled and released, wit 
exception of Captain Scott, who was released on the 11th of April, 1865; Barn 
Schooley, who escaped December 25, 1864 ; and Peter Marck, who was paroled Fi 
ary 22, 1865, and reached his home at Cincinnati March 4, 1865, though notfiaall 
changed till April 15, 1865. They have received no wages for the time they w( 
captivity, nor any commutation of rations. 

The claims set up in this case were allowed by the Third Auditor, bat disall 
by the Second Comptroller on the ground that such payments were not warrant 
law. 

V. 

The claimants' wages and commutation of rations for the period of their capi 
would amount to the following : 

Joseph Scott, captain, at $250 a month, December 3, 1864, to April 11, 1865, 

four months and nine days $1, C 

Commutation of rations, 25 cents a day 

1.1 



Isaac M. Clement, chief engineer, at $150 a month, December 3, 1864, to 

April 15, 1865, four months and thirteen days ( 

Commutation of rations 



( 



David Vaughn, carpenter, at $75 a month, December 3, 1864, to April 15, 

1865, four months and thirteen days 

Commutation of rations 



Barney J. Schooley, steward, at $75 a month, December 3, 1864, to Decem- 
ber 25, 1864, twenty-two days 

Commutation of rations 



Frederick Kimmerly, watchman, at $60 a month, December 3, 1864, to April 

15, 1865, four months and thirteen days 

Commutation of rations 



Peter Marck, deck-hand, at $40 a month, December 3, 1864, to Maroh 4, 

1865, three months and one day 

Commutation of rations 



a MARCK, T. J. WRIGHT, ADBilNISTRATOR, A^D OTHERS. 3 

imith, deck-hand, at $40 a month, December 3, 1S64, to April 15, 

months and thirteen days (177 33 

Dn of rations 33 25 

210 58 

Uer, same rate and time 177 33 

on of rations 33 25 



uiscript of record, 
day of Febmary, 1886. 



210 58 
By the Court. 



JOHN RANDOLPH, 
AiiUtant CUrk Court of ClaifM. 



3mbers of the crew of said steamer first filed their claim with 
nting officers of the Treasury Department, by whom some of 
ns were settled and paid, while for some reason not known to 
tnittee the claims comprised in this biU were not paid, and a 
leir relief was presented to the Forty-seventh Congress, and 
•ted on favorably by the Committee on War Claims, passed 
e of Bepresentatives, and failed to secare consideration in the 
r want of time. A bill for their relief was presented to the 
hth Congress and was disposed of by reference to the Coart of 
s heretefore stated. 

ommittee therefore report the bill (H. B. 6203) providing for 
ent of the amount found due said several claimants by said 
Claims, and recommend that it do pass. 

O 



I 



49th Congbess, > HOUSE OF KlBPRESENTATIVES. j Report 
Ut Session. J i No. 1614. 



JOSEPH B. BURTON. 



April 9, 188H. — Committ^^d to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

priuted. 



Mr. Smalls, from the Coinmittee on War Claims, submitted the followiii|^ 

R E P iri^ : 

[To accompany bill H. K. (JTOr).] 

The Committee an War Claims, to whom teas referred hill H, R. 6705, for 
the relief of Joseph B, Burton^ having carefully considered the same and 
accompanying papers, nubmit the follovcing report: 

That on or about the 21st clay of July, 1862, the claimant was duly 
sworn into the service of the United States at the city of La Fayette, 
county of Tippecanoe, State of Indiana, as a private in Company A^ 
Seventy -second Regiment Indiana Volunteers; that he was regularly 
enlisted by Capt. Nathaniel Herron, commanding said company; that 
the said company and regiment left tlie city of Indianapolis, State of In- 
diana, on or about the 17th tlay of August, 1862, for the seat of war la 
State of Kentucky ; that this claimant was detailed from said company 
to follow said regiment with the camp and garrison equipage and am- 
munition, which he did on the night of the 17th of August, 1862, and 
went with said regiment into camp at Lebanon, Ky.; that he continued 
to serve a« such private soldier, with musket ami other accouterments, 
until on or about the 8th day of January, 1863, when said regiment was 
mounted and served as mounted infantry; that at the tjme of the mount- 
ing of said regiment this claimant was detailed in the Commissary De- 
partment, where he was variously employed, part of the time as courier 
between the division and corps headquarters; that he participated as 
such private with his gun in the following battles: 

(1) Supporting the column of General Buell in his march from Corinth 
to Louisville in September, 1862, skirmishing with enemy Irom Eliza- 
bethtown, Ky., to said river. 

(2) Frankfort, Ky., October, 1862. 

(3) Skirmishing with Morgan's cavalry, January, 1863, at Lavergne, 
Teun. 

(4) Battle of Hoover's Gap, Tenn., June 24, 1863. 

(5) Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September, 19* 20, and 21, 1863. 

That in all the foregoing engagements he performed all the duties re- 
quired of enlisted men under similar circumstances, and faithfully and 
honorably all other duties to which he was assigned by his superior 
officers. 

He further says that after said regiment left the State of Indiana, 
they were in the service of the United States some nine months before 
they received their first installment of pay ; that when this affiant pre- 
sented himself to the paymaster of the Army for his pay said paymas- 



2 



JOSEPH B. BURTON. 



ter refused payment for the reason that his name, thppagh the neglect 
of his officers, had been omitted in making out the pay-rolls. That after 
said payment had been refused this affiant proceeded to the quarters 
of said officers and inquired as to why his name had been omitted from 
said rolls, and wa< informed that it was an oversight in making oat 
the muster-in-roll previous to the regiment leaving Indianapolis; that 
a brother of this claimant, Jeremiah C. Burton, appearing on the rolls, 
they also supposed this claimant, Joseph B. Burton, was also on said 
rolls until the said company had been mustered for pay while in Ken- 
tucky. 

The said officers further informed this claimant that it was too late 
to correct said rolls or to add his name to the next roll, claiming they 
had no power to make such correction. 

That this claimant used every effort in his power to have such cor- 
rection mad^, and laboring under the belief that at the time of the 
final muster-out of the service of said regiment he would receive jus- 
tice; that he continued to perform faithfully all the duties of such sol- 
dier and did faithfully and honorably discharge such duties during the 
entire term of service of said regiment, about three years. 

Lewis Gros, late captain of Company A, Seventy-second Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, testifies a« follows : 

I was mustered into the service of the United States as third sergeant of Couipany 
A, Seventy-second Regiment Indiana Vohinteere on the 16th day of July, 186i. I was 
present at the muster-in of Joseph B. Burton, July 21, 1S6'2, and saw said Burton 
8wom into the service as a private in said company and regiment. I was with said 
Burton more or less from the date of said must«r-in until the final must-er-ont of said 
regiment. That this affiant was promoted first, lieutenant of said company February 2, 
1863, and captain December 3, 1864. That said Burton was, during his term of en- 
listment, a faithful and honorable soldier. That he discharged all the duties re- 
quired of him to the entire satisfaction of his superior officers; that said Burton par- 
ticipated in several engagements with the enemy and honorably acquitted himself 
upon each and every occasion ; that when said i-egiment was mustered for pay some- 
time durins the month of April or May, 1863, it was found that b^ some oversight his 
name had been omitted from the muster-in roll of said company ; that the officers of 
said company (before the promotion of this affiant) claimed tnat owing to the lapse of 
time before the error was discovered that they had no right to correct said rolls, con- 
sequently his name was never added thereto. 

He further states that said soldier is as much entitled to be borne upon the rolls of 
said company and to his honorable discharge as any enlisted man in the command.'' 

Your committee therefore recommend the passage of the bill with the 
following amendment: In line 10, after the word ** aforesaid" add the 
following: *' Deducting therefrom any sum of money heretofore paid 
him on account of said service." 



4»TH CoNaBESS, \ HOUSE OP EEPRBSBNTATIVE8. i Bepobt 
1^ Se98ion. f | No. 1615. 



SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 



9, 1886. — Coniniitted to the Coiuinittee of the Whole Honse and ordered to be 

priuted. 



r. LiYMAN, from the Committee on War Claims, sabmi tied the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompauy biU H. R.*2001.] 

The Cmnmittee on War Claims^ to whom wcbst referred the bill (H. B. 2001) 

to authorize the proper accounting officers of the TreaHury to audit and 

pay the claim of the county of Schuylkill, in the State of Pennsylvania, 

for money advanced by it under allotmentH made by soldiers of said county, 

during tfte late rebellion, by virtue of section, 12 of the act of Congress 

entitled ^^An act to authorize the employment of volunteers to aid in en- 

forcing the laws and protecting public property,^ approved July 22, 1861, 

ha'ee had the same under consideration, and submit the following report : 

July 22, 1861, Congress passed an act entitled ^^An act to authorize 
the employment of volunteers to aid in- enforcing the laws and protect- 
ing public property." The twelfth section of said act is as follows : 

Sec. 12. And he it further enacted^ That the Sec^tary of War be, and he is hereby, 
aDthorized and directed to introdnce among the volunteer forces in the service of 
the United States the system of allotment tickets now nsed in the Navy, or some 
e<^uivalent system, by which the family of the volunteer may draw such portions of 
his pay as he may request. 

In pursuance of said act, September 19, 1861, an order was issued 
from the War Department, of which the following is the second para- 
graph: 

II. In accordance with section 12 of the act of Congress of July 22, 1861, entitled 
"An act to authorize the employment of volunteers,'^ the following method of ena- 
bling snch of the volunteer lorces of the United States as may desire it, to assign 
portions of their pay for the benefit of their families is herebv adopted : 

(1) The assignment of pay will be made on a separate roll, similar to the annexed 
form, to be executed under the supervision of the captain or immediate commander of 
the recruit at the time of enlistment, or of the soldier in camp. 

(2) When completed, the allotment-roll is to be transmitted to the Paymaster-Qen- 
eral, by whom the deductions will be made on each subsequent pay-roll, and the ag- 
gregate amount of each company's assignment will be transmitted by him to the 
distributor named in the roll, together with a copy of said roll. 

On December 24, 1861, Congress passed an act entitled '^An act to 
provide for allotment certificates among the volunteer forces," the first 
section of which act is as follows : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and Houee of Bepreeentdtivee of the United Statee of Ameriea 

in Congrese aseemhled, That the President of the United States shall apx>oint, for each 

' State having volunteers in the United States service, not exceeding three persons, 

who shall he authorized by the President's commission to visit the several Depari- 

ments of the Army in which volunteers from their respective States may be, and there 



8 SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. 

procure fiom said Tolnnteers from time to time their respective allotments of their paj 
to their families or frieDds, daly certified in writing, and by them, or by some com- 
missioned officer of soch Department, attested in porsnance of snch orders as oisy be 
made for that pnrpose by the Secretary of War, and npon which certified allotmeDt 
the several paymaisters shall, at each reenlar payment to troops, ^ve drafts psyable 
in the city of New York, to the order or snch persons to whom said allotments were 
or may be made. 

In compliaDce with the foregoiDg provisioDS of law certain Tolanteers 
finom thecoonty of Schuylkill assigned or allotted portions of their pay 
to coanty commissioners of that connty, or to the SchaylkiU GooDty re- 
lief boards for the benefit of their families, and said county advanced 
to fiunilies of such soldiers the sums thus allotted when for any reason 
the troops were not paid regularly, and awaited reimbursement from the 
paymasters when the troops should be paid. It is now claimed that all 
these sums ko advanced have not been reimbursed to the county. The 
committee think, from the evidence before them, that this claim is correct 
It is claimed by the county that in some instances the Government 
officers paid to the soldiers money which had been thus allotted, and 
which the county had already advanced to the soldiers' families ; this 
the committee also believe to be true. 

But some of the evidence tends to show that the county may have 
been negligent in some regard, and to throw around the bill the proper 
safeguards, the committee report the following amendment, and recom- 
mend that as so amended the bUl do pass : 

Add at the end of the bill the following : ^^ Provided j That no sum shal 
be so refunded when it shall appear to said accounting officers that the 
soldier making such particular allotment or allotments shall have been 
also paid by the United States, unless it shall also appear that such 
double payment was not through any negligence in reference thereto on 
the part of the officials of said county charged with the duty of making 
snch advances." 



4&rH Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. } Bbpobt 

i ) No. 1616. 



lit Seisian. 



J. G. FLOURNOY. 



April 9, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to he 

printed. 



Mr. Tucker, from the Committee ou the Jadiciary, sabmitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To acoompany hill H. R. 7650.] 

The Committee on the Jadiciary have had under consideration the 
bill (H. B. 7a03) for the relief of J. G. Flonmoy, of the State of MisslB- 
sippi, and ask leave to report the accompanying bill in lieu thereof, and 
append the petition of the said J. G. Flouruoy to this report. 



Meridian, Miss., March 25, 1886. 
Tb ike honorable Senate and Houee ef Repretentatives of the United States Congre$$ : 

Tonr petitioner, J. G. Flonrnoj, of Median, Miss., respeotflillv asks that his dis- 
Bbilities incnrred as a Sonthemer in the late wkr he removed, and that he he restored 
to all the riffhts and privileges of a citizen of the United States. 

Respectfully snhmitted. 

J. G. FLOURNOY. 






4^H CONGRE 

Ut Sesxian 



CSS, > HOUSE OF RtePRESENTATIVES. j Report 
) ) No. 1617. 



BRIDGE ACROSS THE MISSOURI RIVER NEAR CHAMBER 

LAIN, DAK. 



April 9, l'5>iH.— Referred to the House Calendar aud ordered to be printed. 

Mr.BvNUM, from the Committeeon Corauierce, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7H51.] 

The Committee on Commerce, to whom was referred the bill (H. R. 
4793) for the construction of a bridge by the Chicago, Milwaukee 
•M Saint Paul Railway Company, across the Missouri River, near or in 
the vicinity of Chamberlain, in the Territory of Dakota, having duly 
considered the same, reports a substitute therefor. The substitute is 
ii) conformity with the recommendations of the War Department, tiled 
herewith, and made a part hereof. 

The committee recommend th«it the original bill lie upon the table, and 
that the sut>8titute do pa^s. 



War Department, 
ffashington City, ApHl 7, 1886. 

Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a letter of the 25th of Jannary 
lut, from the clerk of your committee, inclosing for such suggestions as I may desire 
to make, Senate bill 1123^ authorizing the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint Paul Rail- 
way Company to construct, operate, and maintain a pile ponton railway bridge 
across the Missouri River near or in the vicinity of Chamberlain, in the Territory of 
Dakota. 

Id reply I beg to inclose a letter of the 6th iostant, on the subject, from the Acting 
Chief of Engineers, and its accompanying copy of a report of the Ist instant from Maj. 
€. R. Sater, Corps of Engineers, who considers the span of 400 feet long, as proposed 
Id the bill, ample for all purposes, but is of opinion that it would be entirely inadmis- 
sible to construct the balance of the superstructure on short spans resting on pile bents 
as is done in the case of the bridge at Prairie dn Chien, for the reason that these nar- 
row spans would soon be so choked up with drift and .silt as to unduly contract the 
waterway. 

The views of Major Suter are concurred in by the Acting Chief of Engineers and by 
this Department. 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. C. ENDICOTT, 

Secretary of War. 

Hoo. S. J. R. McMillan, 

Chairman Committee on Commerce^ United States Senate. 



Missouri River Commission, 

1415 Washington Avenue, 
Saint LouiSf Mo,j April 1, 1886. 

General: The copies of House bill 4793 and Senate bill 1123, herewith returned, 
have been submitted to the Missouri River Commission for an expression of their 
views thereon, as requested in your indorsements on the inclosures. 



2 BRIDGE ACROSS THE MISSOL'RI RIVER. 

Passiog by for the present some minor criticisms on the hills nn<hT Cf»n!*i<leratioD, 
the CommissioD decide that for bridges above Kansas City no spans of less width than 
'.iOO feet shonkl be allowed over the waterway of the river. In the casi' of a low . 
bridge a clear opening of this width is imperative, and nnless it can he givi-n no Inw 
bridge shonid be allowed. A clear height of 50 feet, measured from extreme high- 
water mark to the lowest part of the snperstructure, is required in the case of a hieh 
bridge and 10 feet for a low bridge. Tlie piers in all cases shouhl be parallel to the 
cnrreut, and the axis of the bridge &s nearly as p<»ssible at right angles thereto. The 
channel opening in low bridges and the channel span in high bridges should have the 
required width of 300 feet at all stages of the river. No riprap]>iiig :in>und pien* should 
be allowed in any case, or any other substitute for imperfect foundations which will 
sensibly contract the waterway. 

These requirements, es|>ecially as regards the width of spans, are <lictated hy a con. 
sideration of the peculiar characteristics of the Missouri River. The velocity of it* 
current is so great at all stages as to render unusual precautions necessary to prevent 
bridges erects over it from unduly obstructing navigation. Any undue cx)ntractloD 
of waterway not only materially increases the velocity of current through the 
bridge, but also gives rise to eddies and cross currents which render its passage haz- 
ardous as well as difficult. In the various bridge charters passed by Congress the 
fact seems to have been lost sight of that the greater or less elevation of the super- 
structure of a bridge does not alter its relation to the free tlow of water between it* 
piers. Yet, in the case of high bridges, widths between all piers of :J00 feet or more, 
are invariably required while in low bridges widths of 160 feet, or less, are allowed 
and only one or two of the spans are required to be from 200 to 300 feet wide. Eveu 
in this last case the provision was only introduced to allow the passage of rafts and 
bad no reference to the clear waterway. Moreover, on the Missouri River, bridge 
sit^s are invariably chosen at narrow sections, where the contraction of waterway 
becomes a matter of great importance. Again, in the case of high bridges all 
spans over the waterway are generally required to give clear widths of :W0 feet 
and 50 feet clear height. In case of necessity any of these openings can be used 
by boats, but in the case of a low bridge only two openings are available, having 
widths of but 160 feet, and as a matter of fact it is very rare that more than one of 
these can be used. Hence, if a boat fails to enter one of these narrow oi>eniDgii diii- 
aster is certain. A moment's reflection will show that the distinction thus set up i» 
entirely arbitrary, and has no support in reason or fact. These recommendations of 
the Commission are designed to make the requireuit'nts in all case« harmonious and 
snfficient for the purpose intended, viz : The protection of the navigation interest*. 

I pass now to a special consideration of the bills themselves. 

• « • • • • . • 

S. 1123 and H. R. 4793 are identical, and authorize the Chicago, Milwaukee and Saint 
Railway Company to build over the Missouri River at Chamberlain, Dak., a pilepon* 
ton bridge similar to the bridge over the Mississippi River at Prairie du Chien, Wis. 
The only material specitications are that that the ponton drawer shall be4H0feet 
long if practicable, and that the location shall be approved by the Secret^iry of \S'ar. 
In this case a wide opening is provided for boats ample for all puriKises, hut if the 
Permission here given be literally carried out the balance of the superstructure will 
i>e carried on short spans resting on pile bents. At least such is the construction 
of the bridge at Prairie du Cbieu. Such a structure would be entirely inadmissible, 
as these narrow spans would soon be so choked up with drift and silt as to undnly 
contract the waterway. If the bridge can be made to conform in this respect to the 

general requirements previously noted no objection could be made to its construction. 

• • • • • * i» 

Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

CHAS. R. 8UTER, 
Major of Engimers, Cnitvd StuUs Armyf 
President Missouri lihur C'oMmmton, 
Brig. Gen. John Newton, 

Chief of Entjint'trSf C S. Army, Washington y D. C. 



4^TH Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
lit Sesiion. § \ Ko. 1618. 



REPORT ON RESOLUTION MAKING BILLS FROM MILITARY 

COMMITTEE SPECIAL ORDER. 



April 9, 1886. — Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Itr. Steele, firom the Commit te« on Military Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To acoompany Biis. Doc. 202.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs report back favorably the resola- 
tioD referred to it for consideration setting apart Tuesday and Wednes- 
day (May 4 and 5 next) for consideration by the Honse of bills reported 
from this committee after the morniug hour on each of such days, and 
recommend its adoption by the House, for the following reasons : 

The committee have upon the Calendar, and will have at that time, 
several bills of importance affecting the Army and its efficiency : sev- 
eral bills making provision for the construction of military roads for 
the approach to national cemeteries, and a bill providing for the en- 
lai^ement of soldiers' homes. Also bills affecting the status of cadets 
at the Military Academy and their assignment to the Army, and other 
bills, none of which involve large increased expenditures of public 
money. 

These bills have been carefully matured by the comnrittee, involve no 
extravagance, and in the opinion of the committee will accomplish much 
needed reform and improvement in the military service. Unless some 
time be given the committee for consideration other than is provided 
for by the Rules of the House our labor will be lost, and the office of this 
committee for affirmative action will be wholly destroyed. 

The committee therefore recoipmend the passage of the resolution. 



49th Conqbbss, ) HOUSE OF REPEESENTATIVES. i Bbpobt 
Ut 8e9Hon, ] \ No. 1619. 



ADJUSTMENT OF RAILBOAD LAND GBANTS IN KANSAS. 



April 10, 1^6. — ^Recommitted to the Committee on the Public Lands and ordered to 

be printed. 



Mr. J. A. Anderson, from the Committee on the Pablic Lands, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7021.] 

The Committee on the Public Lands, to whom were referred the bills 
(H. R. 3076 and H. R. 7021) to provide for the adjustment of land grants 
made by Congress to aid in the construction of railroads within the 
State of Kansas, and for other purposes, having given the subject care- 
ful consideration, respectfully submit the following report, and recom- 
mend the adoption of the accompanying bill (H. B. 7021) as amended. 
The bill provides for the adjustment of said grants by the Secretary 
of the Interior, and, if in such adjustment it shall be found that lands 
have been certified to or for the benefit of said railroad companies, or 
dther of them, in excess of the amount to which they were lawfully en- 
titled, or that lands have been certified which were reserved from the 
operations of said grants, or settled upon under the homestead, pre- 
emption, or timber-culture laws, by bana-fide settlers, within granted 
limits, prior to the definite location of said roads, or settled upon under 
said laws within indemnity limits, prior to the selection of said lands 
by the railroad companies, or that lands not granted or lands not earned 
by said companies have been so certified, then, and in all such cases, the 
bill makes it the duty of the Attorney-General to commence and prose- 
cute, in the proper courts, the necessary proceedings to cancel all pat- 
ents, certifications, and evidence of title so found to have been unlaw- 
fully issued, and to restore the title thereof to the United States, 

The bill protects the rights of all bona fide settlers within the limits 

of railroad grants in all the States and Territories,, whose entries have 

heretofore been erroneously canceled, or their applications denied, on 

account of any railroad grant or the withdrawal of public lands for 

i^ilroad purposes, except such as relinquished possession of their lands, 

^nd such as acquired other lands uuder the public land laws, where 

they had remained in possession of the land, claiming right thereto 

Qoder any claim uuder the general land laws of the United States, 

The bill also protects the rights of persons who purchased wrongfully 
^rtified lands fromthe railroad companies, except such tracts as law- 
fully belong to bonafi^e settlers. 

It requires the railroad companies to pay the money received from 
'he sale of said lands, not exceeding t'i.50 per acre, to the United 
States, and authorizes suit to be brought for the recovery of the same 
n case of refusal. 



2 ADJUSTMENT OF RAILROAD LAND GRANTS IN KANSAS. 

It provides that patents shall issue from the United States direct to 
the purchasers of said lands, upon their making proof of the fact of 
such purchase, at the proper local land office, within one year after the 
adjustment of said grants respectively. 

It also provides that all lands wrongfnlly certified or patented, and 
not sold by said companies, or either of them, shall be immediately re- 
stored to market under the public land laws; and that any lands here- 
tofore claimed by said companies, or either of them, under their 
respective grants, but not certified or patented, which, upon a proper 
adjustment, shall be found not to belong to said companies, shall be 
restored to market under the public land laws, and bona-fide settlers 
residing tiiereon shall have priority of right under said laws. 

Also, that no more lands shall be certified or conveyed to or for the 
benefit of either of the railroad companies, within the State of Eansas, 
until the grants therein shall have been adjusted, as required by said 
bill. 

The bill is believed to be just and equitable in all its provisions. 

It protects the lawful rights of all parties in interest, as far as It is 
possible at this late date to protect such rights, and will, if enacted 
into a law, be the means, it is hoped, of settling speedily complicated 
questions iuvolviug vast interests, which otherwise are liable to lead to 
endless litigation. 

It secures to settlers, whose entries have been wrongfully cauceled, 
or their applications denied, their rights under the homestead and pre- 
emption laws. 

It protects the interests of the State and United States. 

That a large amount of public land has heretofore been erroneonsly 
certified to and for the benefit of railroad companies is not aud cannot 
be disputed, as has been repeatedly shown by the Commissioners of 
the General Land Office. 

The amount of such certification can only be determined by an ac- 
curate adjustment of said grants, as contemplated by the bill herewith 
submitted. 

Your committee accordingly recommend the adoption of the bill H. 
B. 7021, with the following amendments: 

In section 3, line 1, after the word " grants," insert the words " or any 
other railroad, wagon road, or canal grant." 

In line 9, after the word " laws," insert " where he has remained in 
possession of the land claiming his right thereto under any claim under 
the general land laws of the United States." 

At the end of line 18 add the words, '* Provided also^ This section not 
to apply to any tract of land in possession of any party deriving title 
under any of said railroad grants, where such possession is in conflict 
with parties in possession under claim under the general land laws of 
the United States, as contemplated in the first clause of this section 
down to the first proviso." 



Kr. Van Eaton, from the Committee on the Pablic Lands, submitted 

the following 

VIEWS OF THE MINORITY : 

The undersigned fally concar in all measures which provide for the 
recovery by the United States of all lands heretofore granted for the 
eoDStmction of railroads which have not been heretofore earned by 
such construction. But they cannot so concur in the majority report 
upon the present bill, because they are unable to discover any existing 
necessity for such proposed legislation. 

Grants to aid in the construction of canals and railroads cover a pe- 
riod extending from 1828 to 1871. More than 50,000,000 acres of land 
have been conveyed to States and corporations in satisfaction of grants, 
wherein tlie condition of seasonable construction has been fully met. 
The principles of measurement and rules of construction applied in all 
SQch grants find their basis established at the very commencement of 
the system, and under such principles and rules these millioDs of acres 
have been conveyed. Many of the grants for the construction of rail- 
roads have been entirely adjusted in accordance with these long-estab- 
lisbed rules and principles, and it is very certain that the titles thus 
coDveyed thereunder have passed Into the hands of thousands of inno- 
cent ^purchasers for value, whose labor and investment have largely 
enhanced the value of such lands. Titles throughout the settled por- 
tions of the West rest largely upon the integrity of these ancient adjust- 
ments which it is the declared purpose of this bill to now reopen and 
disturb. 

Whatever changes in the construction of the law may have occurred 
in recent years, it is now proposed to apply to all railroad grants and 
to reopen as an original matter questions determined by the proper ad- 
ministrative officers of the Government many years since, and on the 
foith of which determination these titles have been created and put 
forth upon the world. 

The assumed basis for this threatened destruction of property rights 
jprings from the declaration of the present Commissioner of the General 
Land Office, who finds an established basis of measurement determin- 
ng the lateral limits of these grants which has been in force for nearly 
brty years not in accord with his construction of the law, and who 
Jiereu^u announces the determination to readjust all such grants, and, 
)f necessity, to produce new results, regardless of all that has been 
utberto done and in disregard of all its executed consequences. There 
las been no argument before nor consideration by the committee as to 
he soundness of this new method of measurement as matter of law, nor 
:he propriety, from either a legal or equitable standpoint, of thus at- 
^mptiug to change the construction and practice of forty years in order 
to accomplish results which may disturb titles long since vested and 
which have become the basis of community property rights. 

Titles to reality in all settled communities which bave stood the test 
of time, and often of judicial scrutiny in controversities between private 



4 ADJUSTMENT OF RAILROAD LAND GRANTS IN KANSAS. 

litigapts, should not be clouded by attack through the judicial tribona 
or otherwiBe. And certainly legislation which compels adjustment 
these railroad grants where the titles have stood for many years q 
questioned, and passed from hand to hand as the representative 
values, should not be had upon a mere assumption of error in the pri 
ciples and practice of the adminstrative officers extending throagh 
many years. 

From the establishment of the Government to the present time t 
power and duty of the Attorney General to invoke the aid of the com 
in recovering lands assumed to have been erroneously conveyed by t 
Government has stood unquestioned. As matter of practical admin 
tration he acts daily in this direction upon the request of the officers 
the Land Department, who are under the law directly charged with t 
duty of protecting the Government in this regard. But the performan 
of that duty does not need the incentive of legislation, nor should the w 
of Congress control the judgment of the highest law officer of theGovei 
ment in determining the existence or non-existence of a remedy in fav 
of the United States, nor compel him to institute and carry forwa 
litigation which, in his judgement, cannot succeed upon either legal 
equitable grounds. 

The present bill makes it obligatory upon both the officers of the Lai 
Department to adjust all grants however ancient and the AttorueyGk 
eral to commence proceedings for recovery regardless of the justice, w 
dom, or policy of such proceeding. While all of these grants have be 
adjusted in whole or in part by the officers of the Land Department, a 
ing in accordance with settled precedent and long-established rules 
measurement which the railroads did not inaugurate nor control, this I 
seeks to punish the Government's grantees for the assumed mistakes 
its own officers, and to put in litigation titles which were obtained with< 
fraud and in accordance with such long-established precedents. Bec< 
nizing the existing fact that the lands so conveyed have in large p 
passed into the hands of innocent purchasers for value, the bill ho 
out to such purchasers the glittering promise of a new title by gift ft 
the United States after their existing titles have been clouded forms 
years with litigation and tinally set aside. As this promise is a m 
gratuity upon the part of the Government, it can be rescinded at a 
future time. But assuming its integrity for the present, the bill tl 
provides for suits against the railroad companies to recover the G 
erument price per acre for all lands to which its purchasers may 
ceive such gift of title from the Government. The futility of si 
legislation must be apparent to every legal mind. Upon the recov 
of these titles by the Government the purchasers from the railro; 
stand without legal or equitable remedy against the United Sta 
thereon. The assumption of the obligation by the Government to im 
a new title to such purchasers cannot create a legal or equitable obli 
tiou from the railroad companies to the Government in turn to rec4 
to it the value of such lands. The sole responsibility of the railn 
companies would be upon the warranty of title, if any, given their i 
chasers. No obligation to the Government can be created beyond t 
point by legislation or otherwise. 

And, finally, the minority protest that the only result of such legii 
tion as this is to cloud and embarrass the titles of thousands of innoc 
men, who, during the pendency of litigation which this bill directs, i 
find themselves unable to handle their property by sale, mortgage, 
otherwise. The evil results flowing from such condition of affa 
whether of long or short duration, is so great that it manifestly can 



ADJUSTMENT OF RAILROAD LAND GRANTS IN KANSAS. 5 

tify Congress in thus legislating. It is precisely the case where un- 
: the existing circamstauces it is far better to stop with ascertainin g 
At the law has been constrned to be and what forms of measurement 
re been adopted through so many years by the officers charged with 
) administration of these grants and bound by an official oath, than 
seek to rescind what has thus been done in order to recover a few 
)a8and acres of land at the end of long and widespread litigation, 
ich must carry in its train all the evils which flow from the general 
heaval of real titles in settled communities. 

H. S. VAN EATON. 

ISAAC STEPHENSON. 
H. Bep. 1619 2 



49th Congress, J HOUSE OF REP11BSENTATIVE3. ( Report 
lit Session. ] \ No.l619^. 



AMENDMENT OF REVISED STATUTES. 



April 10, 1886. — Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Hewitt, from the Committee on Ways and Means, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 5769.] 

The Committee oh Ways and MeanSj to whom teas referred House bill 

5789, submit the following report : 

That the change provided for in the bill has been rendered necessary 
by the opening of a new railway which has its terminus at Cape Charles 
City, to which the business formerly done at Cherrystone is thus trans- 
ferred. The Secretary of the Treasury has approved the proposed 
change, as will appear by his letter of April 5, 1886, hereto annexed. 



Treasury Department, Office of the Secretary, 

Washttigton, D. C, ApHl 5, 1886. 

Sir: 1 Iiave the honor to acknowledge receipt of House bill No. 5789, entitled "A 
bill to amend section 2552 of the Reyisefl Statutes of the United States," trausraitted 
in letter from your committee, dated the Slst ultimo, for an expresiiion of my views 
thereon. 

The ol»ject of the bill is to make Cape Charles City the port of entry, instead of 
CherrystoDC, for the district of Cherrystone, in the State of Virginia. 
I see no objection to the passage of said bill. 
Respectfully, yours, 

C. S. FAIRCHILD, 

Acting Secretary. 
Hon. William R. Morrison, ^ 

Chairmau Committee on Ways and Meant, House of Representatives. 



'^^ BILL to amend section twenty-five hundred and fifty-two of the Revised Statutes of the United 

States. 

. Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America 
*•« Congress assembled f That paragraph one of section twenty-five hundred and fiffcy- 
t'^oof the Revised Statutes of the United States be amended by striking out *' Cherry- 
stone," in the sixth line, and inserting in lieu thereof *' Cape Charles City," so that it 
"^vill read " Cape Charles City shall be the port of entry," and so forth. 



49th Congress, i HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. « Report 
l9t Session. ) ( No. 1620, 



DEDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES AND COLLECTION OF THE 

REVENUE. 



^.PRit. 12, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Morrison, from the Committee 6\\ Ways aud Means, submitted 

the followiugf 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7652.] 

The Committee on Ways and Means, to which was referred so much of the 
Presidents message and aecompanying documents a« relates to the revenue 
and the methods of its collection^ respectfully submits the following report : 

The ifate of dut}' or tax on imported goods subject to duty is as low 
as 5 ou some and higher than 200 per cent, on others. The average rate 
for the fiscal year 1885 a little exceeded 47 per cent., or $47 of tax on 
$100 worth of imported goods. This is the highest rate paid in any 
year since 1868, and above the average rate of the war period from 1862 
to 1868. In his first annual message after the tariff revision of 1883^ 
President Arthur gave to the Congress information that the reduction 
^ of unnecessary taxes intended and calculated by the tariff commission 
and the previous Congress had not been verified, and said : ^< So the 
question still presses. What legislation is necessary to relieve the people 
of unnecessary taxes!" 

While recommending measures by him deemed necessary and expe- 
dient, the President, in his first message to this Congress, says : 

The fact that our revenues are in excess of the actual needs of an economical ad- 
ministration of the Government justifies a reduction in the amount exacted from the 
people for its support. « • * The proposition with which we have to deal is the 
reduction of the revenue received by the Government and indirectly paid by the peo- 
ple from customs duties. 

The Treasury receipts for the fiscal year 1885 were $323,690,706.38. 
The increased receipts from customs and internal taxes, the principal 
sources of revenue, for the months of the fiscal year of 1886 already 
past, over the receipts of the same months of last year, justify the 
estimate that the receipts for the present fiscal year will exceed 
$335,000,000. Nor may our annual Treasury receipts be expected again 
to fall below that sum without reduced taxation, inasmuch as these re- 
ceipts result chiefly from the taxes on articles of necessity aud comfort 
to be consumed in continually increasingquantities with our ever-grow- 
ing population. 

The expenditures for the fiscal year 1885, including pensions and the 
legal requirements of the public debt, were $305,830,970.54. Neither 
^' the actual needs of an economical administration of the Government" 



2 REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 

nor the patriotic expectations of the people justify any increase of ibi^t 
enormous annual expenditure, and we may safely estimate the annua.) ! 
surplus to exceed $30,000,000. 

The reductions to result from the proposed bill are within this esti- 
mated surplus and a little exceed $25,000,000 on the basis of last year^^ ^ 
importations. (See table of estimates submitted with this report.) C^:^^ 

Secretary of the Treasury Manning, in his first annual report on tho^ 
condition of the customs service, says : m 

Many rates of duty bep;un in war Lave been increatied since. ♦ • * They have ' 
been retained, although the long era of falling prices, in the case of specific duties, gl 
has operated a large increase of rates. They have been retained at an average ad w 
valorem rate for the last year, » * * nearly 4 per cent, more than the rate be-^ 
fore the latest revision. The highest endurable rates of duty, which were adopted 
in 1862-'64 to offset internal taxes upon almost every taxable article, have in moet 
cases been retained now from fourteen to twenty years after every such internal tax 
has been removed. * » • Thej' have been retained upon articles usetl as mate- 
rials for our own manufactures (in 1^84 adding $:?0,000,000 to their cost), which, if 
exported, compete in other countries against similar manufactures from untaxed ma* 
terials. Some rates have been retained after ruining the industries they were meant 
to advantage. Other rates have been retained after effecting a higher price for a do- 
mestic product at home than it was sold abroad for. All changes have left nncbangftd, 
or changed, for the worse, by new schemes of classification and otherwise, a compli- 
cated, cumbrous, intricate group of laws which are not capablcof being administered 
with impartiality to all our merchants. • • • Nothing in the ordinary course of 
business is imported unless the price here of the domestic, as well as of the imported, 
article is higher by the amount of the duty and the cost of sea-transit than the price 
abroad. 

• •*••• 

As for duties affecting articles that are also produced in the United States, .the first 
to be safely discarded are those upon materials used by onrown manufacturers, which 
now subject them to a hopeless competition at home and abroad, with the manufact- 
nring nations, none of which taxes raw materials. 

These views of Secretary Manning as to the existing condition of 
the customs service and tariff taxation are not partisan, but are in 
accord with the views pressed on Congress by his predecessors, Secre- 
taries Folger and McCulloch. 

It is the purpose of the bill reported to correct some of the classi- 
fications, rid the customs laws of the complications of which the Secre- 
tary complains, and so change these laws for the better that they will 
be ''capable of being administered with impartiality to all our mer- 
chants." 

The duties intended to be removed by the bill are chiefly those which 
tax articles used by our own manufacturers, which now subject them 
to a hopeless competition at home and abroad with the manufacturing 
nations, none of which taxes such materials, that our own manufactur- 
ers may successfully compete, both at home and abroad, with manu- 
facturing nations which do not tax such materials, thus securing mark- 
ets for the products of hands now idle for want of work to do. Some 
of the materials upon which great industries are built, such as wood, 
salt, hemp, and wool, are placed on the free list. 

In the past twenty years we have obtained from tax on imported wood 
an amount estimated at less than $20,000,000, to encourage felling our 
trees and destroying our forests. In a much shorter period we have 
given more than 35,000,000 acres of land in bounty to encourage the 
planting of other trees. The tax on imported salt is remitted to those 
who catch and trade in fish, and to those who pack meats for the for- 
eign market. It is believed this tax should be remitted to all. 

After a century of failure to make hemp either a profitable crop or a 
successful industry through protective taxation, farther effort should be 



il existence, wool, with everything imported, was taxed. From then 
now some qualities of wool have paid some rate of duty. For 
r years last past the rate on imported wool has been more than 
le that imposed on other products of the pasture, field, and farm, 
e other lower tax-protected products have outrun or kept far in 
nee of the wondrous growth of our population. Wool protected 
le as much has fallen further behind. Wool finds its market at 
>, and its price is increased by a tax, part of the burden of which 
be borne by the grower of other farm products, whose surplus in 
^n markets fixes his price at home, and to the increase of which 
ool-growing neighbor contributes nothing. 

e price of wool has been downward for many years; it declined 
I the tax was highest and ])rotection greatest, 
om the statements of the Ohio and other wool growers' associations 
Senate Ex. Doc. 72, pp. 224-227) it appears that the market price 
K)l is not three-fourths of the actual cost of production ; that with 
xisting protective rate of ten cent« on the pound the price is still 
ents l^low the price at which it can be profitably grown in the 
; wool-growing States of Ohio and Pennsylvania, 
appears, therefore, that the attempt to make wool growing profit- 
by the use of the taxing power has not been successful, while the 
\QS been the great national hindrance to the woolen manufaetur- 
idustr^^, as well as a most grievous burden upon all buyers of 
m clothing. 

the tariff* commission scheme of 1883 to make both wool growing 
wool manufacturing profitable by taxing both, the plan of 1867 
idopted, as described by the late President Garfield, who said of it : 

basis of that legislation was this: That upon the several grades of imported 
* duty should be imposed sufficient to promote the growth ofsheep husbandry in 
lited States. A specific duty was then imposed on woolen goods as near as 
le eqnat to the duty put upon the wool which entered into the manufacture, 
ras not protection, but simply an equivalent duty, which placed the wooieu 
acturer on the free- trade level. To this specific duty was then added a duty 
^T centum ad valorem on woolen goods, as a protection to the manufacturer 
it foreign competition. 



4 REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 

ospecially woolen and flax, hemp, jute, or linens, the industries are left j 
with substantially the same if not greater advantages than under exist- ^ 
ing laws. Other articles, the rates on which are so to be reduced, as 
cotton yarns, thread, and coarser cotton cloths, and sugar, are now dati 
able at unnecessarily and unreasonably high rates. These will find 
compensation in the burdens of taxation sought to be removed for re- 
iluctions far greater than any proposed by the hill. We get from duties 
on cotton goods $10,900,000. The rates on goods from whfch we collect 
$2,100,000 of these $10,900,000 are slightly reduced, while the rate^on 
w^hich we collect the other $8,800,000 are unchanged. Sugar with the 
present low price is left at the high, but still revenue, rate, equivalent 
to 66 per centum ; at the present higher rate we collect on sugar more 
than one fourth of all- revenue derived from customs. 

With the still existing high, if not unwarrantable, scale of current 
ordinary expenditure, and the one-half of the money obligations of the 
late civil war yet to be paid, a high rate of taxation must be long main- 
tained; and in submitting the proposed bill affecting the cost of shelter, 
of i>art of the food, sind of all the clothing of the people, it has been the 
effort of your committee to adopt such rates of taxation as will be im- 
manent and as will only need to be disturbed by unforeseen national 
emergency, and at the same time to exempt necessary articles from tax- 
iition, and thereby promote domestic industries. 

The bill as reported also contains numerous provisions in reference 
to the administration of the customs laws. The changes recommended 
have been rendered necessary in part by the provisions of the tariff 
act of March 3, 1883; in part by the growth of business and the modi- 
fications incident to progress. The necessity for this remedial legisla- 
tion was brought to the attention of the last Congress by the theu Sec- 
retary of the Treasury, Judge Folger, and a bill was framed by the 
committee, and reported to the House, em^bodying n^any of the provis- 
ions of the bill herewith submitted. No action, however, was taken 
upon this bill. Meanwhile, a new administration came into power, and 
new and additional questions of great importance had arisen, which 
were brought to the attention of Congress, and referretl to this commi^ 
tee, in a special report upon the collection of duties, submitted by the 
present Secretary of the Treasury at the beginniner of the session. Very 
many of the matters referred to in that report are dealt with in the bill 
now reported, and reference is made thereto for such detailed informa- 
tion as it is impossible to give within the compass of this report. 

On the 10th of February the Secretary of the Treasury, in response 
to a resolution of the House calling for information upon questions 
arising under the tariff act of 1883, addressed a letter to the Speaker^ 
which will be found in House Ex. Doc. No. 68 of the present session of 
Congress. Reference to this document will explain the necessity of the 
legislation herewith proposed, defining more clearly the rates of duty to 
be imposed upon articles in regard to which protests have been made 
and litigation is pending. 

On the 16th day of February the Secretar^^ of the Treasury trans- 
mitted to the House a report on the revision of the tariff, with accom- 
panying documents, which is t^ be found in Senate Ex. Doc. No. 
72 of the first session of the present Congress. In this report the 
Secretary thoroughly discusses the question of frauds upon the rev- 
enue and makes general recommendations as to the necessity of leg- 
islation for the prevention ot dishonesty in the importation of for- 
eign goods and their entry for consumption. In the bill herewith sub- 



REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 5* 

mitteil some of tbe embarrasaraents suggested by the Secretary are^ 
eought to be removed, and whatever is formulated for this purpose has 
received the approval of the Secretary •of the Treasury. It is uot pre- 
tended, however, that the committee has dealt exhaustively with the 
evils which have excited the condemnation both of the mercantile 
classes and of the officers whose duty it is to enforce the law. So long 
as the present complicated tariff shall exist, and duties are imposed up- 
on more than four thousand articles largely subject to ad valorem rateSy 
these evils will continue. All that Congress can do, in the absence of 
a general revision of the tariff with new and simple classitications, is; 
to provide for each cause of complaint as it arises. In the bill pro- 
posed the most pressing and prominent of the grievances are dealt 
with. 

In addition to the settlement of such controverted questions, an at- 
tempt has been made to relax the provisions of the law which interfere 
with the freedom of ex<;hange, more particularly with reference to the 
warehousing of goods in bond and their withdrawal for consumption 
or re-exportation. A provision has also been inserted for the allowance 
of drawbacks to the full extent of the duty paid upon any iiii])ortod 
materials which have entered into the production of articles exjmrted. 
The object of this provision is to remove an impediment to the growth of 
oar foreign commerce. Already, to a considerable extent, we are able 
to compete in foreign markets with other nations in cousi»quence of su- 
perior advantages in some particulars possessed by this country, but so 
long as we impose taxes upon raw materials we cannot hope to estab- 
lish a market for our commodities and competition with nations possess- 
iug the great advantage of free raw materials. Nevertheless, by the 
drawback system, which can do no injury to any domestic interest, a 
partial remedy is afforded in some cases which will enable us to pro 
cure and maintain a foreign trade otherwise rendered imjmssible by 
oar own customs laws. 

The underlying consideration with the committee in formulating the 
proposed legislation, both as to warehousing and as to drawbacks upon 
exports, has been to enlarge, as far as possible, the area for the employ- 
ment of our own labor and capital, and to make useful the natural re- 
sources of the country in its products and geographical position, so as 
to aid in the maintenance of our shipping interest, now, and for some 
years past, in a state of depression and decay. 

The Secretary of the Treasury also addressed a letter to the Speaker 
of tbe House of Representatives, which was duly referred to this com- 
mittee, in reference to protests, appeals, and suits against tlie exaction 
of duties, which is contained in House Ex. Doc. No. 43, of the tirst ses- 
sion of the present Congress. The law recommeniled by the Secretary 
has been adopted by the committee and will be found in sections 13, 
14, 15, and 16 of the bill herewith submitted. The reasons for this leg- 
islation are fully set forth in the document referred to, and reference 
is made thereto for such information as may be necessary in ordc^r to 
understand fully the bearing and effect of the legislation recommended. 

The most important matter dealt with in this portion of the bill is 
that which relates to the duties upon coverings and packages, which 
has been the subject of innumerable protests, many thousands of suits, 
and of partial adjudication in the case of Oberteuffer r. Robertson, 
which has been recently decided by the Supreme Court of the United 
States. This. decision makes it imperatively necessary that legislation 
shall be had in order to define the question of dutiable value upon which 



6 REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 

depends the collection of tbe customs, in all cases where ad valorem 
duties are applicable. The provision inserted in tbe proposed law has 
had the careful consideration of the committee and the favorable scru- 
tiny of tbe ofBcers of the Treasury. It cannot be asserted that the pro- 
posed legislation will settle every question which may hereafter arise, 
but it is believed to be a com i)lete remedy for the questions now in dis- 
pute. It will certainly simplify very much the complications which 
have caused general dissatisfaction as well among the officers of the 
customs a« the merchants, w hose business has been deranged by the 
uncertainties of construction incident to the existing law. 

In order to relieve both the merchants and the customs officers from 
annoying exactions and unnecessary labor, it is proposed to abolish all 
oaths and fees, and to substitute in lieu thereof, as in other commercial 
countries, the declarations of the imi)orter, but preserving the same 
penalties as are now imposed by law for false statements. 

A limitation of $500 has been imposed upon the value of wearing ap- 
parel and other property which may be brought in free of duty by a 
passenger arriving in the United States from abroad, but provision has 
been made by which foreign tourists, theatrical companies, and profes- 
sional lecturers, may bring in a larger amount of property without the 
payment of duty, upon giving bonds, when required so to do, for their re- 
exportation within six months, with power to grant a further extension 
of six months in the discretion of the Secretary of tbe Treasury. This 
provision, taken in connection with tbe i)rai)osed sections making it a 
crime either to give or receive any money for the passage of baggage 
through tbe custom-bouse, will, it is believed, bring to an end a great 
abuse in regard to the excessive amounts of baggage brought in free 
in competition with the merchandise of importers, who have to pay du- 
ties. The complaints in regard to the passing of baggage have become 
«o serious as to amount to a scandal, which demands tbe enactment of 
such i)unitive legislation as will deter passengers and customs officers 
alike from violating tbe plain provisions of the law. 

Within the compass of this report it is not possible to go into any 
greater detail as to the nature of the specific legislation intended to 
simplify and give efficacy to tbe laws existing for tbe collection of 
duties, but tbe effort of the committee has been, in all cases, to settle 
existing controversies, and to provide, as far as possible, against future 
ones arising out of ambiguous language or conflicting provisions of law. 
In this effijrt the committee has been governed by the policy of remov- 
ing, wherever practicable, artificial and unnecessary obstructions to 
tbe free interchange of commodities under the natural and healthful 
laws of trade, so that tbe country may continue to grow in wealth and 
prosperity. 



REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 7 

Table showing the ar Holes, valuer, amount, and rates of duty on importations for the fiscal 
gear ended June 30, 18:^5, and the rates and estimated amount of duty on the same im- 
portations under the proposed bill to reduce tariff taxes. 



Articles. 



ImportAtions of 1885. 



Quantities. 



Valuee. 



Duties re- 
ceived 1885. 



FBEB LIST. 

Timber, hewn and sawed, uid timber used for spars and in 
baildiflg wharves C feet. . 

Timber, sqnared or sided, not specially enumerated or pro- 
vided for ... .. Cfeet.. 

Sav'ed boards, plank, dealn, and other lumber of hemlock, 
white-wood, svcamore, and baas- wood, and all other arti- 
cles of sawed lumber Mfeet.. 

Hobs for wheels, posts, last-blocks, wason-blocks, oar- 
blocks, gun-blocks, heading-blocks, and sll like blocks or 
9ticks. rough-hewn or sawed only 

Stares of wood of all kinds 

Pickets and palings M . . 

Laths do. . . 

Sbiii;:Ies do... 

Pine rlsp)>oards do. .. 

Spnire rUpboards do . . . 

Wood, unmanufactured, not specially enumerated or pro- 
vided for. 



6, 158. 00 



$1, 285 00 
10,427 00 



67, 132. 00 

I 

408, 682. 48 I 6, 148. 060 45 



4. 608. 50 

154. 812. 50 

611, 753. 75 

120.65 

2, 875. 77 



59. 038 61 
253,703 00 

51. 027 26 

190, 818 52 

158,042 78 

1,261 GO 

40, 566 00 

38, 060 00 



Total wood and lumber 



$257 00 
071 32 

763, 768 71 



11, 807 72 
25. 370 30 
10. 205 45 
23. 221 87 
24.413 83 
I 241 30 
4,313 68 

I 7, 792 00 

1,072,063 18 



Fronded, That if any export duty is laid upon the above- 
UfDtioDi-d articles, or eitht^r of them, by any country fi*om 
wbeut-e imported, all said articles imported from said ' 
cooDtry shall be subject to duly as now provided by law. i 

Salt ia bags, sacks, barrels, or other packages pounds. . 351, 276, 969 

&U in bulk do .. 412, 322, 341 



1, 030, 028 72 
386, 796 85 



Total salt 



421, 532 39 
329, 857 85 

751, 390 24 



4, 917, 814 



Heoip tons . 

Uauilla, and other like substitutes for hemp, not specially 
eouroemted or provided for tons. 

Jute butts do. • 

Jute do.. 

Sunn do . . 

Si*il gras.s do . . , 

And other ve(retable substances, not specially enumerated 
or providea for tons. 

Flax straw (hempseed) : 

Flax, not hackled or dressed i 3, 869, 282 

Flax, hackled, known as dressed line > 1, 014, 726 

Towofflax 1,699,882 

Towofhemp ' 709,767 



25. 308, 433 
78, 230, 677 
14, 922, 348 
100, 430 
31, 796. 531 

1, 594, 853 



122, 945 34 

632,710 87 
391, 153 38 
157, 101 40 
1,506 46 
476, 048 00 

23, 922 70 

77. 385 66 

40.589 00 

16. 998 82 

7,097 67 

Total textile fibers 1. 947, 459 39 



778, 327 00 

3, 898. 275 00 

2. 304, 553 00 

785, 507 00 

10,271 00 

2, 245, 020 00 

140, 538 00 

862, 975 00 

599,453 00 

270, 239 00 

84, 957 00 



Herringn. pickled or salted bbls. 

Mackerel 

Salmon : 

Pickled 

Preserved , 

Other tinh : 

In barrels 

Not in barrels , pounds.' 

Prepared or preserved 



49, 088. 09 
21.75 

9.77 



2, Oil. 46 
4, 414. 798 



543, 697 68 
100 00 

93 00 
00 

14,411 00 

157, 767 54 

31.495 32 



Total fish 



-All wools, hair, Sec 

Wools on the skin 

^7oolen rags, shoddy mungo, waste, and flocks 



68. 146. 652 
789 046.56" 



9. 474, 263 87 
323,522 66 



Total wools, & c 

Total duties remitted by free list. 



49, 068 09 
43 50 

19 55 
2 25 

4, 022 91 

22,074 04 

7,873 84 



83, 124 18 

3, 164, 295 06 

"78,964'66 



3,243,200 01 



7, 097, 237 00 



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Mr. McKiNLEY, from the Committee on Ways and Means, submitted 

the following as the 

VIEWS OF THE MINORITY. 

« 

The niidersigued, dissenting from the report of the majority of the 
committee on House Bill 7652, present the following objections to its 
passage: 

The substitute reported by the committee differs widely from bill No. 
5576, which was introduced by the chairman of the committee and re- 
ferral to the Committee on Ways and Means on the 15th day of Feb- 
ruary last. 

The substitute is a new creation and embodies little which was in the 
original bill. It takes from the dutiable and places upon the free list 
the following articles : 

All wools, hair of the alpaca, goat, and other like animals, unwashed, washed, or 
Beoored. 

Wools on the skin. 

Woolen raffs, shoddy, ninngo, waste, and flocks. 

Fish: MacKerel, herring, salmon, and all other flsh, fresh, smoked, dried, salted, 
pickled, or preserved, except anchovies and sardines or other tish preserved in oil. 

Timber, hewn and sawed, and timber used for spars and in building wharves. 

Timber, squared or sided, not specially euumerat>ed or provided for in this act. 

Sawed boards, plank, deals, and other lumber of hemlock, white-wood, sycamore, 
aod bass-wood, and all other articles of sawed lumber. 

Hnbiitfor wheels, posts, last-blocks, wagon-blocks, oar-blocks, gun-blocks, heading- 
blocks, and all like blocks or sticks, rough-hwen or sawed only. 

Staves of wood of all kinds. 

Pickets and palings. 
Latbs. 
Shingles. 
Pii^ clapboards. 
Spnice clapboards. 

^ood, unmanufactured, not specially enumerated or provided for in this act. 
Hemp, manila, and other like substitutes for hemp, not specially enumerated or 
provided for in this act. 

Hemp seed for agricultural purposes. 

Jute-butts. 

Jute. 

Sunn. 

Sisal grass, and other vegetable substances, not specially enumerated or provide<1 for. 

^It in bags, sacks, barrels, or other packages. 

Salt iu bulk. 

It reduces the duties upon manufactures of wool to 35 per cent, ad 

Valorem, and the duties on hemp, jute, and flax goods to 30 per cent, ad 

valorem. It deals with about one-fifth of the cotton schedule, and 

makes a reduction thereon of about 18 per cent, from the present law. 

The majority assert, that in the year 1885, the average rate of dntj^ 

npon imported goods a little exceeded 47 per cent., but thisouly means 

that prices and values were unusually low, and furnishes no justifi- 

cjition for this bill. What the average ad valorem rate of duty will be 

niider our tariff laws, if amended by this bill, is left to conjecture, for 

tiie majority report does not disclose even an estimate, but whether 

H. Eep. 1620 2 15 



16 BEDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 

it will be higher or lower than the present will depend upon values. 
Nothing is more unsound and fallacious than to assume that a reduc- 
tion of duties is demanded when average ad valorem rates show a 
high percentage. In times of business depression and low prices, the ad 
valorems corresponding with the specific duties show increased perceut- 
ages over periods of high prices, because, as everybody knows, or 
ought to know, a given specific duty is a larger percentage of a low 
value, than it is of a high one. ' 

The ad valorem equivalent upon sugar for 1885 was 73.(]6 and in 1882 
it was 65.37, while the duty was lower in the former year than in the 
latter. The argument that when values are low and a specific rate of 
duty becomes a high ad valorem the specific rate should be reduced, if 
sound, then when values are high, and the ad valorem necessarily low, 
tlie same reasoning would increase the duties. 

The home producers require in times of exceptionally low prices 
higher protection against foreign producers than when exorbitant 
prices prevail. At such times foreign competition is healthful, to keep 
prices within reasonable limits. To base a reduction of taritf duties 
upon the present business condition, and the present low values and un- 
profitable prices, is to assume that the present unsatisfactory condition 
IS to continue and ought to. 

The majority says : 

The rate of duty * * " od imported goods subject to duty is as low as 5 on 
some, and higher than 200 per cent, on others. 

Is it not a remarkable fact after this statement that the bill of the 
committee does not correct these glaring inequalities, but leaves the 
articles dutiable at 200 per cent, where it finds taem, and of those 
bearing the lower rates of duty, some are placed upon the free list, 
while others are slightly reduced. 

There is no attempt m this bill to equalize the duties upon imported 
goods on any just principle, or to make equitable reductions through- 
out the tariff list. Of thirty-one or more articles dutiable at from lOU 
to 358 per cent., not one is dealt with in this bill, while other articles 
upon which is imposed a duty from 10 to 20 per cent, are cut down or 
transferred to the free list. 

The recommendations of the Secretary of the Treasury for tlie sub 
stitution of specific for ad valorem rates is wholly disregarded b^ the 
majority, an^ the system condemned by the Secretary as inviting fi-auds 
upon the revenue and injurious to home producers and honest importer 
is suffered to continue without eftbrt at a remedy. 

This bill goes into operation on the 1st of January, 1887, except as tc 
hemp and flax, which are exempted until July 1, 1887. Why these pro 
ductions should have six mouths of license not accorded to other indus 
tries equally deserving may be manifest to the majority, but is surely 
not based upon any principle ot fair play or sound statesmanship. 
Again, may we inquire upon what principle or theory of revenue reform 
is hemp-seed for agricultural purposes made free, and tiax-seed for » 
like puri)ose left on the dutiable list ! 

The free list is peculiarly an assault upon the agricultural interests 
of the country, seeking out from the four thousand articles in the tariti 
their leading products to be driven out by ruinous competition from 
abroad. 

The original bill (No. 5576), which has been before the committee and 
the country for nearly two months, proposed to reduce the duties oe 
the metal, the glass and earthen ware, and woolen schedules an average 
of about 20 x>er cent., and a like reduction upon sugar and rice; to place 



REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 17 

• 

coal and iron ore upon the free list, and to reduce the duties upon chemi- 
(^Isand very slightly on the lowest grades of wools used for making 
carpets. The interests throughout the country affected by that bill had 
due notice, and realizing the injuries which would result to them from 
its adoption came before the committee with earnest protest. 

The well organized associations of the iron and steel, the pottery and 
gla«8 ware manufacturers ^nd the workingmen engaged in these in- 
dastries appeared before the committee and these schedules are dropped 
from the bill. The coal and iron producers of the North and the South 
were heard by the committee, and these great products of the mines 
are taken from the free list, where the bill had placed them, and restored 
to the dutiable list without amendment or reduction. The sugar in- 
terests of Louisiana i)ressed upon the committee the importance of be- 
ing let alone, and the ])roposed reduction of 20 per cent, has given 
place to a compromise reduction of 10 per cent. The rice growers were 
also heard, and this valuable and staple product of the South, which, 
under existing law, is dutiable at 106 per cent, on certain grades, was 
saved from the destroying hand. 

The wool growers of the country were led to believe from the bill first 
before the committee, that no adverse action would be had touching 
their interests. They were, therefore, not before the committ.ee in any 
oflScial way, and those who were heard spoke for the restoration of the 
dnty ot* 1867, without dreaming that the inadequate protection they now 
enjoyed was to be swept from them, and their vast interests left to the 
mercy of a competition with wool growers in Australia, New Zealand, 
and the South American States, where the principal cost of production 
is the herding required by shepherds, where labor is cheap, and where 
feeding, either in winter or summer, does not enter into the cost of 
sheep husbandry. 

The first effort, therefore, in the direction of free trade is aimed at the 
unorganized farmers of the country, who, removed from the centers of 
^de, busy on their farms and plantations, unused to meeting commit- 
tees of Congress, and unadvised thattheir interests were to be dealt an 
unfriendly blow, they are to be the first victims of the British policy, 
through the agency of the American Congress. Theirs is a large inter- 
est; few in the country are larger; it is found in every State of the 
Union, and indeed in most counties ; it is in the hands of the many, not 
the concentrated few. The flock-masters and their workmen number at 
least two million persons; the number of flocks will reach one million 
one hundred thousand, and the capital invested has been estimated by 
competent authority at more than $500,000,000, and the annual product 
of 1883 was valued at $128,000,000. Under the duty of 1867 the industry 
has grown to large proportions. 

In 1860 the sheep in the United States numbered a little over 
22,000,000 ; in 1883 the number had reached 50,600,000. In 1860 the clip 
was 60,200,000 pounds ; in 1883 it reached 320,000,000 pounds. The duty 
of 1867, which gave to wool growing its greatest encouragement and in- 
duced the farmers to increase their flocks and expend their means for the 
finest varieties of sheep, and for their care and improvement, and which 
finally made the American wools the best in the world, adapted to all 
the uses of manufactures, even the highest grades of woolen and worsted 
cloths, has added nothing to the cost of wool to the manufacturer or 
consumer; on the contrary, that cost has been greatly cheapened. In 
1867 the price was 51 cents; in 1870 it was 46 cents; in 1875, 43 cents. 
There has been a steady reduction, with occasional fluctuations, since 
the act of 1867, until now it is so low as to be temporarily unprgfttable. 



18 REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 

Free wool will be of no permanent benefit to the mannfactnrer or con- 
sumer, bat positive loss to both, and great loss to the flock-masters and 
those depending npon them for employment. The decay of sheep hus- 
bandry in the United States would be a national calamity ; it wonld 
place our manufacturers at the mercy of the foreign producers. This 
is an industry which cannot be built up in a day ; it has required years 
of care and cost to reach its present development, and sound policy 
demands its continuance and encouragement. 

The minority endeavored to meet the reasonable expectations of this 
large class of their fellow citizens and restore the duty of 1867 upon 
wool, but were prevented by the votes of the majority, and from the 
same cause are unable to maintain even the existing rates. We could 
not believe that the majority would take from the dutiable list wool 
which had been kept there since 1824, and which even the free-trade 
law of Robert J. Walker, framed in 1846, had not made free, but the 
majority of the committee has done it so far as it can, and nothing 
is left for this great interest, which enriches every State in the Union, 
but to appeal to Congress and to the country to repudiate the work of 
the committee. 

Hemp, another agricultural product of growing importance, is placed 
upon the free list. True, this was one of the interests affected by the 
chairman's original bill, but, less fortunate than others, the appeals which 
came from Kentucky and other sections were not heeded by the com- 
mittee reporting this substitute. This is not so large an interest as that 
of wool or salt, but it is a promising one, and gives diversity of produc- 
tion to the soil and variety of occupation to the farmer, which at this 
time, with our production of cereals increasing beyond the demands of 
our home markets and the cheap India wheat meeting us everywhere, 
is of the highest importance to the agriculturists of every State in the 
Union. It should have and receive fair and adequate protection, and not 
be crippled at this time, when the outlook for its profitable development 
promises so much. 

The report of the Hon. J. R. Dodge, statistician of the Agricultural 
Department (report No. 27), issued in March of this year, gives the fol- 
lowing interesting statement of this production, which would seem to 
controvert the views of the majority concerning this industry: 

Mr. C. £. Bowman, commissioner of agriculture of Kentucky, and agent of the 
United Stat^^s Department of Agriculture for that State, estimates the hemp croperown 
there in 1884 at 5,000,000 pounds, that grown in 1885 at 8,000,000 pounds, and that to 
be grown the present season — assuming the yield to be an average one — at 10,000,000 
to 12,000,000 pounds. The figures for 1884 are larger than those returned by the as- 
sessors and published in the report of the State auditor; but the auditor himself (Mr. 
Russell Macreary) agrees with Mr. Bowman that a true return would confirm the esti- 
mate just given. The price of hemp is now quoted at from $5.60 to $5.75 per 100 
pounds, and engagements for the crop to be grown this year are being made at the 
rate of $5.25 to $5.50. At these figures Mr. Bowman considers this crop the best pay- 
ing one now grown in the State, and anticipates that the area devoted to it will this 
year be from 30 to 50 per cent, greater than in 1885. 

Of flax, which is taken from the dutiable and placed upon the free 
list, the flax growers and spinners of America protect against this un- 
just and unreasonable action upon the part of the committee: 

At a convention held in Chicago on February 25, 1886, of persons 
interested in the flax and hemp industry, the following resolutions were 
passed unanimously, as showing the spirit of coopemtion manifested 
at said convention: 

Resolvedy That we, as growers and manufacturers in convention assembled, agree 
to use every endeavor to advance the interests of the fiax and hemp industry in the 
United States; that as growers we will use every effort to raise and prcpace the fiber 



REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 19 

with reference to the wants of the man a fao torero, and that, as manufacturere, wo 
will co-operate with the growers and give preference to American flax and hemp. 

Whereas any reduction of the tariff at this time on foreign fibers, including jnte, 
flumila, sisal flax, and hemp, would, in our opinion, be disastrous to important do- 
Destic industries, both a^icultural and mannfactoring: Therefore be it — 

Bttohed hy IkU oofiveiinon, representing both producers and manufacturers j Tliat our 
Senators and Representatives in Congress be urged to oppose any such reduction, 
whether by direct legislation or indirectly by reciprocity treaty. 

f This industry, it will be seen, is receiving a fresh impetus, and the 
growers believe that if fair duties are continued they will be able to 
increase their production and make this a profitable feature of agricul- 
ture. 

Patting fish on the free list is an unexpected blow at the fishing in- 
terests of the country. It comes, also, at a time when it will be most 
severely felt. Under the treaty of 1871 free fish had been the price the 
United States paid for the right of fishing in provincial waters. A 
little more than a year ago it had become evident to everybody that the 
price was too high, that free-fish importation from Canada, even cou- 
pled with the right of fishery on tbe colonial coast, was steadily and 
surely ruining American fisheries. Fully convinced of this fact, the 
fishermen of the northern coast, with the unaminity born of thorough 
JDformation, demanded the abrogation of the treaty of 1871, so far as 
it related to fisheries. Congress responded promptly by ordering notice 
of abrogation, and the treaty ceased to operate last July. The Presi- 
dent bad the misfortune to be so misinformed as to propose a conven- 
tion with Great Britain on the subject, but the indignant remonstrances 
of all interested has been so potent in reason, and so sound in founda- 
tion, that by common consent the recommendation of the President has 
dropped out of every man's thought. This bill proposes to enact the 
very outrage the fear of the possibility of which so aroused the indig- 
nation of the whole New England fishery interests without distinction 
of politics. It does more, it proposes to give to Canada for nothing 
vhat the Dominion is longing to pay a high price for. The bill pro- 
posed by the majority could hardly afford to have in it so striking an 
example of the folly of theories which pay no attention to existing 
&cts. 

The committee, by the bill reported, fails to grasp and deal with the 
great question of tbe taxation of imports, either on tbe principle for 
revenue only or for revenue with incidental protection to our industries. 
This is illustrated throngbout their bill, and in no case more marked 
than in placing salt on tbe free list. This article is manufactured in 
fifteen States and Territories, and exists in others. As raw material, it 
is as cheap as sand, gravel, or clay for building purposes, and equally 
with them prepared for use, represents labor, and is only the more costly 
to the extent it is prepared for higher uses. It w«1s protected in 1849 
at the rate of 2 cents on each bushel; the price to the consumer was 
then $1.35 per bushel. Under the protection policy of 1861, by the de- 
velopment of the industry at home, tbe price has fallen to 8 cents a 
bushel, and neither as a measure of relief to the consumer, or to reduce 
revenues, can the proposed action be justified. Seven thousand wage- 
workers employed in this industry are assaulted without justification 
or reason. 

The minority cannot too earnestly protest against the passage of this 
bill. They view its presence here, sanctioned as it is by the unanimous 
vote of the majority, as the first step toward a reversal of a revenue 
system founded by tbe fathers, and tbe substitution of tbe British system 
of tariff for revenue only. Tbe large free list which it proposes, com- 



20 REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 

prising so many important productions of home make and growth, warn 
us that the evident ultimate purpose is to make dutiable only such ar- 
ticles as we cannot produce in the United States, and release from cus- 
toms duties such foreign products, whether of the field, the forest, or the 
factory, as compete with our domestic products. We see in this the 
beginning of a system of levying duties upon foreign imports, pernicious 
as it is unpatriotic; borrowed from our foreign rivals, whose interest in 
destroying American tariffs has never been concealed ; a system de- 
structive of our productive industries and the home market for agri- 
cultural products and degrading to American labor, and which, when 
it has been tried in the Government, has eventuated in falling revenues, 
a tarnished credit, and a depleted Treasury. 

The meaning of this measure cannot be misunderstood. Secretarj- 
Manning, in his report to Congress, made in December last, outlined 
the coming policy when he said : 

The preference of the tax-payer for duties upon articles not produced in the 
United States is justlHed by the fact that such duties cost him no more than the 
Treasury of his country gets. As for duties atfecting articles that are also produced 
in the United States, the first to be safely discarded are those upon niat-erials used bj 
our own manufacturers. ♦ • • 

The committee have accepted and adopted the Secretary's political 
creed, *» that the first to be safely discarded are those upon materials 
used by our manufacturers," and its free list discards wool, lumber, 
flax, hemp, and all the fibers. The second step will be to discard all 
duties upon imported articles competing with our own, and then at last 
duties only will be levied upon articles not produced in the United 
States, among which are tea and coffee. 

We must dissent wholly from this doctrine and its conclusions and 
insist that the true method of levying duties upon imports to raise the 
requisite revenues for the Government is to impose them upon the im- 
ported articles which compete with the products of our own industries 
and labor, and while such duties will secure the necessary revenues, 
they will at the same time encourage home productions, create a home 
market, and furnish employment for American workiugmen, without 
increasing the burdens of the people. All articles other than luxuries 
not produced in the United States, except in case of great national ne- 
cessity, should be^admitted duty free. 

The bill is opposed to this principle ; in fact it recognizes no just 
principle, and proceeds upon no system of equitable revision or reduc- 
tion of the tariff. It singles out a group of interests because believed 
to be the weakest, yet some of them the most deserving and least able 
to bear this unreasonable discrimination, and strikes them down. The 
committee feels impaled to do something, and this bill is the result. It 
is born of party necessity ; there appears to be no other reason for it. 
It is here because the Democratic party is here in control. The people 
of the country are not asking for it. It is in response to no public 
sentiment or national requirement. In the judgment of the minority 
it will increase rather than diminish our customs receipts so that it 
will answer no sentiment for a reduction of the surplus. It will help 
no American interest; it will cripple, if not destroy, all it touches. 

With salt at 8 cents per bushel, and the highest grade of wool selling 
at 32 cents per pound, the worn-out cry of cheap food, and cheap cloth- 
ing will fail of its force and deceive nobody. The industrial classes ol 
this country know from sad experience that cheap goods, so called, 
means cheap labor, and that things are the dearest when they are^with 
out the means to buy them. 



REDUCTION OF TARIFF TAXES. 21 

The people are tired of Congressional interference with the business 
of the country, tired of legislative '' nagging," and the laborers are rest- 
less under the constant threat to reduce duties, which they realize means 
to them reduced wages and diminished comforts. 

In our opinion, this is a most unfortunate time to disturb the tariff, when 
prices are abnormally low, when business is in the unsatisfactory condi- 
tion we find it, and worthy laborers without employment. The present 
industria], agricultural, and labor depression should not be extended, as 
it inevitably will be, by a measure like the one proposed, which if passed 
will only widen and intensify the distress. All have been looking for 
better prices and better times, and it was confidently believed they were 
to be realized in the very near future but for the presence of this bill, 
and the agitation already had and yet to come. 

If there be an honest desire upon the part of the committee and the 
House to reduce taxation, avoid a surplus in the Treasury, and leave 
that surplus with the people, we respectfully invite their attention to 
the internal-revenue laws, which last year collected in taxes from its 
own citizens more than $112,000,000. H^re it will find a field for labor 
where it can diminish the revenues and reduce *^ war taxes'' without 
hurt to any American interest. 

If they would give attention to one single suggestion alone, which con- 
cerns the use of untaxed alcohol in the industrial arts, they would find 
ample field for all the reduction the revenues of the United States would 
bear, would release some manufacturers of great burdens, and much 
encourage home industry. Such encouragement, however, would so 
militate against the real purpose of the bill that any attention to this 
suggestion could hardly be expected. 

WM. D. KELLBY. 
FRANK HISCJCK. 
THOMAS M. BROWNE. 
T. B. SEED. 

WM. Mckinley, Jr. 



49TH Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPEBSBNTATIVES. i Report 
Ut SesHan. f \ No. 1621. 



RAILROAD COMPANIES AND THEIR EMPLOYES. 



April 12, 1686.— Ordered to be printed. 

Mr. Morrison, from the Committee on Rules, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

The Committee on Rules, to which was referred a House resolution 
proposing to create a select committee of five members to investigate 
the disturbed condition of the relations now existing, between the rail- 
road companies engaged in carrying on interstate commerce and their 
employes, has had the same under consideration, and reports herewith a 
substitute for the said resolution. 

In the opinion of the committee the resolution referred to it was too 
comprehensive in its terms to enable any committee appointed under 
it to make the proposed investigation and report during the present 
session of Congress, and therefore the substitute proposes to confine the 
investigation exclusively to the existing disturbances in the five States 
of Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Texas, an investigation 
which it is believed can be made within a reasonable time and at reason- 
able expense to the Government. 

The substitute also proposes to authorize the committee to visit or 
send a subcommittee to any of the States named if it shall be consid- 
ered necessary to do so in order to facilitate the investigation. 

It is proposed that the expense shall not exceed the sum of $3,000, 
w^bich shall be paid out of the contingent fund of the House. 



Retolved, Tbat a select committee, to consist of seven members, be appointed by the 
Speaker to investigate the cause and extent of tbe disturbed conditions now exisiting 
in tbe relations between railway corporations engaged in carrying on inter-State 
oonunerce and their employ^ in tbe States of Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, 
^d Texas. Said committee shall have power to send for persons and papers, examine 
"Witnesses under oath, sit dnring the sessions of the House, and may visit or send a 
8Qbcommittee to snob places in said States as may be necessary in order to facilitate 
OQch investigation. It shall report to the House durine tbe present session, with such 
lecommendations as it may deem proper to make ; and tbe expenses incurred, not to 
exceed the sum of |R3,000, shall be paid ont of the contingent fund of the House upon 
TOQchers certified by the chairman and one other member of the committee. 

In case said committee shall visit or send a subcommittee to any of tbe States afore- 
^id, the Clerk of the House is hereby authorized to advance to the chairman such 
sum as may be necessary to defiaj the expenses of such visit, not to exceed $1,000 at 
any one time, and not exceeding in the aggregate the said sum of |3,000. 



49TH CONORKSS, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ♦ Repowt 



14 Sesnian, 



1 



) Xo. 162J. 



CAMPBELL V. WEAVER. 



Apkil 12, 1886. — Lai<l over and <»rdered to Ik» i»rinte<J, 



Mr. Hall, from the Committee on Elections, submitted the tbllowinfi: 

REPORT: 

The Can^mittee on Elections^ having had under consideration the r^ntested 
election ca^e of Frank T. Campbell v. J. B. Weaver j from the sixth Con- 
(jresnional district of lowa^ make the following report : 

The Congressional district from which this election contest comes is 
composed of seven connties, and the official returns show the vote for 
Congressman to have been as follows: 



DarU County 

Jaawr County 

Keokak County 

Mabuka Coiuity . . 

Monroe County 

Powrfbiek County 
Wapelio County ... 



Weaverii minority 



For For \j i ^a- 

Weaver. Campbell. M«Moriti©8, 



2,071 
2,763 
2.707 
2,866 
1.403 
1.038 
2,936 



1. 149 1 


9-'2 


2,978 


215 


2,497 


210 


8,397 , 


531 


1,370 1 


38 


2,257 1 


319 


2.975 , 


39 



67 



In the notice of contest, and in the evidence taken in support of it, 
the contestant charges and seeks to establish the following facts: 

(1) That at said election seventy -one persons not possessing the legal 
qualifications of electors voted for contestee, the alleged disqualifica- 
tiou consisting of non- residence, alienage, nonage, mental incapacity, 
eonviction of felony, &c. 

(2) That at Newton Township, Jasper County, three ballots were, by 
niiutake of the judges, deposited in the amendment box, two being for 
contestant and one for contestee. 

(3) That at Baxter, Independence Township, Jasper County, three 
other ballots were by mistake deposited in the amendment box, two 
being for contestant and one for contestee. 

(4) That two tickets for contestee, folded together as one, were not 
wholly rejected, but counted as one. 

(5) That one ticket for contestant was by mistake deposited in the 
amendment box at Lynn Grove Township, Jasper County, and not 
counted. 

(6) That the vote of one Henry Rheine, an elector of Davis County, 
was wrongfully refused and rejected, his vot-e being offered for contest- 
ant. 

(i) That the vote of one John Brier, sr., was in like manner refused 
and rejected at Clear Creek, Keokuk County, his vote being for con- 
testant. 



I CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

(8) That tour votes were, erroneously couu ted against contestaut at 
Jefferson Township, Mahaska County. 

(9) That 152 illegal votes for contestee were received by the judges 
at East and West Oskaloosa precincts, in Oskaloosa Township, Ma- 
baska County, frotu electors whose names were not npoQ the registra- 
tion lists, and who did not comply witb the law in furnishing the affi- 
davits in manner and I'orm as required. 

(10) That 00 illegal votes for contestee were in like manner received 
by the judges in violation of the registry law at Center Township, 
Wapello County. 

These several facjts are denied by the contestee, who in turn brings 
the following countercharges of illegal votes cast for the contestant, 
errors and omissions, &c. : 

(I.) That there were cast and counted for contestant 35 illegal votes 
by persons who were not qualified electors, by reason of their alienage/ 
uon-residence, minority, or imbecility. 

(2.) That by mistake of the judges in making out the returns of Rich- 
land Township, in Kex)kuk County, contestee received Ove less votes 
than entitled, as shown by the returns themselves. 

(3.) That two ballots for contestee, deposited by mistake in tbe 
amendment box, were not counted. 

(4.) That the vote of James Owens, for contestee, at Prairie City, In 
Jsisper County, was wrongfully refused and rejected. 

(5.) Colonization of 9 negroes into Mahaska County, and 18 into 
Wapello County. 

I. — The contestants claims. 

There is no serious question as to the votes found in what is called 
the amendment box. The people of Iowa were at the same election voting 
upon several constitutional amendments, and for such votes a separate 
1 ballot box was kept. Occasionally, by mistake, a general ticket would 
be deposited in the amendment box, and in consequence not be counted. 
Neither party controverts the propriety of counting snch votes where 
the factii are established. The same thing may be said of the several 
cases where an elector's vote was improperly refused. Also where two 
or more votes were found in the ballot-box folded together. They should 
both be rejected and indorsed, ^^ rejected as double,'^ under the statutes 
of Iowa. Your committee therefore allow the 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 
7th claims of the contestant as hereinbefore set out, and these are here 
disposed of, out of their order, as the more serious contest relates to the 
other specifications. 

(1) l^he illegal votes, — Of tliese, without giving other reason than that 
the evidence justified it, in the opinion of your committee, the following 
are rejected, and the contestee is charged with them in the count : 

Chris. Bokenthein, alien, contestant's brief 2 

Herman Olrich, alien, contestant's brief 4 

John Kinzebach, alien, contestant's brief 5 

J. H. Meyer, alien, conlestant's brief 6 

Henry Rliinie, rejected, contestant's brief 22 

W. G. D«mar, convict, contestant's brief 27 

John G. Walthier, alien, contestant's brief 23 

Thomas Bnrchley, alien, contestant's brief 28 

Caleb Vert, non-resident, contestant's brief 35 

J. E. Vert, non-resident, contestant's brief 36 

Thomas Mon^land, alien, contestant's brief 42 

Michael Gallagher, alien, contestant's brief 55 

B. Budde, non-resident, contestant's brief .^ 57 

Amos Guthrie, insane, contestant's brief C 

Making 14 votes which are rejected. 



CAMPBELL V8 WEAVER. 6 

Of the remaining illegal votes, there are 36 objected to as non-resi- 
dents, 12 as aliens, 5 as minors, and 4 as idiots or imbeciles. Each par- 
ticalar case depends upon it-s own peculiar facts, but a consideration 
of each would require more time and space than is believed to be neces- 
sary. Your committee has gone over each separately and carefully f 
and it appears, with reference to each class of cases, that the evidence 
ig insufficient to exclude the vote, in some instances, where the vote 
18 shown to be illegal, there is an entire absence of evidence as to the 
candidate for whom the vote was cast. 

In cases of alleged non residence, where it is shown for whom the 
vote waa cast, the evidence fails to show the actual fact of non resi- 
dence. The question of residence being one of intention largely, the 
evidence quite fully and satisfactorily establishes the qualifications of 
the several voters in this class of cases. In other cases the evidence 
offered is wholly hearsay or otherwine incompetent. Your committee 
have, therefore, disallowed the seveml objections made by the contestant 
to these remaining 57 votes. 

(2) The four votes alleged to have been erroneously counted against contest- 
ant at Jejfferson Township^ Mahaska County. — This presents a case where 
a single witnest^, a bystander at the counting of the votes by the judges^ 
whu never saw the official vote except as reported in the papers, states 
as a matter of memory "the returns as reported gave Campbell 77 and 
he was entitled to 78; Weaver 115; he was only entitled to 112.*^ 
This is alt the evidence to support the claim to the four votes. As against 
tl/is there is produced the official return, which is presumed to be cor- 
rect, and the testimony of the judges of ele<;tion, who verify the returns 
asbeiug in faetcorrect. Your committee disallow this claim of the con- 
testant. 

(3) The illegal votes in Oskalootta Township in Mahaska County^ and 
Centre Tincnship in Wapello County. — This presents the more serious 
and important question in the contest, and involves a construction of 
the Iowa election statute relative to the registration of voters. The ob- 
jection made by the contestant to all this class of votes is that the 
voters were not registered by having their names placed upon the regis- 
tration list of the township in which they offered their votes; and that 
the affidavits, required by the statute to authorize the reception of the 
ballotsof unregistered voters, and upon which these votes were received, 
did not contain and set forth ail the data and facts required. The ob- 
jections may be more particularly and specifically stated as follows: 

(1) Thirty-eight voters, not registered, who were vouched for by one 
Chas. Blatner, who himself was not a registered voter, as required. 

(2) Thirty-one voters in whose affidavits no reason is assigned for not 
being registered. 

(3) Thirteen non-registered voters in whose affidavits'^ neglect" is as- 
signed as the reason for not being registered. 

(4) Some of the voters are vouched for by J. R. Eckerc, and others by 
1. B. Bolton, who swear that they live in both EastSLnd West Oskaloosa. 

(5) One hundred and three voters whose affidavits give '-left off the 
register" as the reason for not being registered. 

(6) Forty-six fail to state their residenC/C ; three affidavits have no 
jurat signed. 

(7) Fred. Bolinger vouches for Wm. Pitt and Pitt for De Witt, neither 
bemg registered ; Wm. West vouches for the residence of Wilson and 
DeWitt. 

The total number of votes thus attacked is 212. 



4 CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

THE REGISTRATION LAWS CF IOWA. 

Prior to 1808 there was no refjist ration of* voters reqnire«l in Iowa. 
In that yenr the ])re8ent repstrafion statnte was enacterl, but it is ex- 
ceptional and not nuiform in its operation. It applies only to town- 
ships and ineorimrated towns and cities having a ])opulation of 6,«H)0 or 
over. B3' this is meant, tliHt in prenernl and county elections a registry 
is required in su(*h townships, and in municipal elections such towns anil 
cities must have a registration. 

It is only in municipal elections that the provision of the statute 
requires any public posting of tlie registration list, or requires the reg 
istry to show the residence of the voter " by number of the dwelling, if 1 
there be a nufnber, and the name of the street or other location of the I 
dwelling place of i-ach person." (Code of Iowa, sec. o99.) Hence it ^ 
must be borne in mind that the registration for general election, and in f! 
the townships and rural parts of townships containing cities, does not "^ 
come under the above provisions. Consequently, the general provisions 
of the statute, such as regulate the method of registration, and the 
.mode of voting, &c., Ripply to tw > cla'»83S of registration lists— ane iu 
cities, where great particularity of description, street, number, &c., are 
required, and another where this particularity is not required. 

It is made the statutory duty of the board of registration to enter the 
names of all qualified electors on the list. 

The township trn.stees »ud clerk shall constitute the board of registry, and sball 
meet annually : * * and sIihII make a list of a// qualitied electors in their town- 
ship, which sliall be known as the re^iHter of elections. — Code^ $ ^5. 

This duty on the part of the board is not obviated by section 596 of 
the code, which provides, in effect, that the register shall be made from 
the assessor's list and the poll books of the previous election. This is 
made clear by the general and controlling language of the preceding 
section, that "they shall mjike a list of all the qualified electors," as 
well as the succeeding sections, 597 and 599, wherein is prescribed the 
methods of amending, adtling to, and striking from, the register list, so 
as to secure all the names of qualifi<Hl electors. The board may enter 
on the list any additional names. It is not necessary that there sh^U 
be oath or affidavit, if the board is satisfied a name has been omitted or 
should be entered on the list. They are to '* revise, correct, and com- 
plete the register of elections.'' There is no provision requiring or com- 
pelling the elector to appear and personally see that his name is entered 
on the list, or affixifag any penalty or condition for not doing so. The 
whole duty is expressly devolved upon the board of " making a list of 
all qualified voters." 

The fact that the affidavit prescribed for the uon -registered voti-r i^e- 
quires a '* satisfactory reason for not appearing at the board of registry" 
(in city elections) is not as a penalty for not appearing, but only to aid 
in showing with still greater certainty that the elector is qualified, aud 
that there is no attempt at fraud or imposition in his offering to vote. 
Indeed, Mr. Cooley, in his work on Constitutional Limitations, page 016, 
holds — 

That one entitled to vote cannot be deprived of the privilege by the action of the 
anihorities is a fnudameutal principle. 

In other words, the electqr cannot be punished by forfeiture of his 
privilege of voting by failure to appear before the board of registration. 
He has a right to infer that the board will discharge its duty, aud that 
on the day of election his name will appear on the list. If it is not there 
he can present the affidavit, not as a penalty, but as a right. 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 5 

The ioiportant and controlling provision of the statute is the follow- 
ing: 

Skc. 618. The jodges in election precincto where the registry law is iu force shall 

(Irsignate one of their nnniher to check on the register the name of every person voting; 

iDtl no vote shull be received Irom any person >vhose name does not appear there, un- 

lerabe shall furnish the judges his affidavit showing that he is a qualified elector, 

iDd ft sufficient reason for not appearing before the hoard on the day for correcting 

tbe register, and shall aiKo prove by the affidavit of one freeholder or householder 

wbo8e name is on the register, that such affiant knows him to be a resident of that 

election precinct, giving biMettidence b> street and number, if in a city or incorporated 

town, as the same is in such cases required to appear on the register. Said affidavits 

fiball be kept by the judges, and by them filed in the office of the township clerk, and 

■li buch affidavits may be administered by either of the judges or clerks of election. 

Skc. 60!). At the general elections each township shall ite an election precinct, and 

I poll shall be opened at the place of election therein. But the board of supervisors 

mj^y, in their judgment, divide any towusliip in their county into two or moi*e pre- 

:incta. 

It is to be noted, however, that, iu <ia8e of such division into two or 
more precincts, there ran be lait one geuei al register list for all the pre- 
nufts. There can be but one board of registration, and its duty is to 
prepare a list for the whole township. 

The question then presents itself whether the provisions of section 
518 are directory or mandatory or partly both. It is not a case in which 
the vote of a non- registered elector was received without any affidavit or 
proof whatever, as directed in the statute. There is no claim or pre- 
teuhe that the elector was not in* all other re^pects qualified. There is 
acclaim or pretense that any of the alleged defects or imperfections in 
the affidavit were the result of design or of any intt ni to evade or de- 
feat the statute. 

But the case is where the elector finding himself omitted from the 
registiatiou list, resorts iu good faith to the second method of qualify- 
hg himself as to the method of voting; attempts to prepare, subscribe, 
md swear to an affidavit in compliance with the statute ; presents it to 
be judges for inspection and examination to satisfy them of the exist- 
ence of the leqnisite qualifications and a satisfactory reason for not 
ippeariiig before the registration board ; the examination is made bona 
ide; the judges are satisfied, and the vote received. Are ^W of these 
»rovisiou8 mandatory; and can such a ballot be rejected because the rea- 
M)n for not being registered is omitted, or may not afterwards be satis- 
factory to some court or person who was not a judge of election, or 
)ecau8e of some technical mistake, or clerical omission, which, if no- 
ienl at the time could at ouce have been corrected, and all question as 
the legality and regularity of the vote obviated! 

Little aid is derived from decisions in Iowa or elsewhere. In the case 
)f Edtnunds r. Banburry, 28 Iowa, 2(57, the plaintiff, insisting that the 
egistry law was unconstitutional aucl voicl and beiug uuregistered, 
leiidered his vote without any attempt to make the required affidavit, 
^hich being refused, he sued the judges of the election. The court held 
the law constitutional, and that the judges were justified in refusing 
his vote. This was correct whether the provisions of section 018 are 
directory or mandatory. 

In a later case, Nefzger v. R. R. 36, Id., 642, at a special township 
election to deteroiiiic whether property should be taxed to aid in build- 
ing a railroad, held without any pretense of registration; the court 
held that the law, requiring all elections to be conducted under the 
registry system was mandatory, and that the election was void. But 
this does not reach the question, for there can be no doubt that a gen- 



6 CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

eral statute wbich declares that all elections shall be held under a reg- 
istry sj'stem is raandatorj' in its general sense. 

The question has arisen as t^ the character of the statute, wherein it 
provides that no vote shall be received from any person whose name 
does not appear on the list, unless he shall furnish an affidavit, or proof, 
&c. In the cases of Doerflin^rer v. Helmantel, 21 Wisconsin, 566; in re- 
election of McDonough, 105 Penn., 490, and cases in one or two courts of 
interior jurisdiction, provisions of this character have been held man- 
datorv. It has been held directly otherwise in Illinois. (See Dall r. 
Irwin, 78 Ills., 170; Clark v. Robinson, 88 Id., .504) 

This identical question arose in the contested-election case of Curtiu 
V, Yokum in the Forty-sixth Congress. It was a case where there was 
in many precincts a practical disregard of the registration law, and ban 
dreds of nqn registered electors were allowed to vote without producing 
the proof required. A most elaborate and learned report was made by 
the majority, Mr. Springer being the chairman, holding that the statote 
.was mandatory, and such votes should be excluded. The minority held 
the doctrine that the law was directory, and that any other rule would 
make the law a fraud upon the voter. 

The constitution of Pennsylvania expressly declares that uo registry 
law shall deprive the elector of his vote. There can be no doubt thata 
registry law which would enable the elector to deposit his ballot in 
good faith, believing himself registered, an<l which would subsequently 
reject his ballot because it should api>ear he was unregistered, would, 
in effect, defeat that constitutional provision. It may be well said tie 
constitutional clause alluded to is only declaratory, and that it is funda- 
mental law in all States where the ballot obtains and citizens exercise 
the right of suffrage. 

The constitutional provision in Iowa is the same in substance: 

Art. 2, Sbc. 1. Everv male citizen of the Uuited States of tbe a^e of 21, who ohall 
have beeu a roHideDtoi this State six months next preceding the election, and of the 
county in which he claims his vote sixty days, shall be entitled to vot^eat all electionb 
which" are now or hereafter may be authorized by law. 

In the case of Edmonds v. Banbury, ante^ while it was held that a reg- 
istry law which permitted all to vote was not obnoxious to the Constitu 
tion, it was also held that the right to vote, thereby conferred, could not 
be impaired by any legislature. 

In Wheelock's case, 1 Norris, 297, the highest court of judicature in 
Pennsylvania has declared as follows : 

The State constitution gives to every citizen possessin); the qualifications pre- 
scribed the right Xjo vote ; and section 7 of the same article provides that no elector 
shall be deprived of the privilege of votioK by reason of his name not being registered. 
To disfranchise all tbe voters of a township, as we are asked to do in his petition, 
the facts on which we are asked tb act should show a case free from legal doubt. If 
we by our decision should pi^rmit the carelessness or even the fraud of officers, whose 
duty it is to funiinh a list of voters at the elections, to defeat the election and deprive 
the people of the county of the officer who was elected by a majority of their votes, 
we would thus make the people suffer for an act in which they did not participate 
and which they did not sanction. In so doing, instead of punishing an officer for the 
violation of the election law, we practically punish the vo'^ers of the county by de- 
feating their choice of a county officer as declared at an election. A decision of this 
kind would be fraught with danger by inviting unscrupulous and unprincipled per- 
sons on the eve of an important election to secrete or destroy the list of voters or 
other important papers in a township in which the niajoritv may determine the result 
in the countv 

It cannot be seriously contended that the right of a single individual 
citizen to vote is not as securely guarded by the constitutional guaranty 
as that of the electors of an entire township. And it must be held that 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 7 

if tlie fraud, mistake, or omissions of a board of registry or of the judges 
of election could not deprive the electors of a whole preciuct of their right 
to vote, so it could not that of a single elector. Accordingly, after much 
ooDsideratiou in the Curtin Yokum case, the House, whose decisions 
ID matters of such high privilege and affecting the constitution of the 
House itself ought be the highest authority in the world, decided in 
lavorof the sitting member, and in effect held the registry law to be 
directory. 

The same action was ha<l by the House in the later case of Lowe vs. 
Wheeler, in the Forty seventh C'ongress, where it was held that when 
electors who are not registered are permitted to vote without challeiigi*, 
their votes cannot afterwards be rejected, becaus-e to do so would per- 
petrate a fraud upon the elector and deprive him of his vote. Thus it 
will be seen that the question is not a settled one, and it may be very 
doubtful as to the weight of authority one way or the other. But may 
not this conilict be reconciled in a manner entirely satisfactory and in 
recognition of a just rule of interpretation I 

It is difficult to escape the conclusion that where a registry hiw re- 
quires the production of an affidavit by an unregistered elector as the 
ooudition for his voting, it is mandatory to a certain degree and for n 
ceriain pur|K>se. It is mandatory so far as to require good faith in its 
obiter vance and to prevent its willful evasion. But the whole scope and 
purpi)se of such a law is to <lefeat fraud, subterfugi*, and evasion, and to 
enable every lawful an<l qualified voter to vote and have his vote 
(Muiuted in a canvass purged of all illegal votes. The moment ihe oper- 
ation of the registration defeats itself, operates to defraud the legal 
elector and defraud him of his voti^ it not only ceases to be mandatory, 
bat is quoad hoc void. 

To illustrate this more fully : The law requires the registry board to 
enter the names of all the electors on the list. The elector, when he 
approaches the polls to vote, has the right to presume omnia recte acta, 
and that his name is properly on the list. Be cannot know that it is or 
is uot there. Even though he may have appeared before the board of 
re^stry and seen his name registered, it may have been subsequently 
erased upon showing or fraudulently. Hence, when he comes to vote, 
bis offer to vote is itself an inquiry whether he is registered. 

The \\Ht is in the possession of the judges, and an inspection of it 
alone can give answer to the inquiry. The elector cannot inspect it, 
and the law makes it the duty of the judges to answer whether the 
elector is registered. They may answer '* yes '^ verbally, or silently by 
aigns and acts, in receiving the vote. It matters not whether the elector 
makes the inquiry aloud, or simply by tendering the ballot; or whether 
the answer is aloud or by silently receiving the ballot, the effect is the 
same. Thejudges may have been mistaken in the name, or may have 
made the answer in fraud, intending to cause the subsequent rejection 
of the ballot for want of registry. There can be no question that the 
elector in such an instance, if correctly informed that he was not regis- 
tered, could still rectify that omission and secure his vote by presenting 
the requisite affidavit. Atid the failure to give him the true information 
as al>ove 8Ui)po8ed, would not only be a diiect violation of law, and a 
fraud on him, but deprive him of that right, and, consequently, of his 
vote; and the result would be the direct ami immediate con^'equenceof 
the conduct of the judges. 

It would be a gross fraud upon the elector and deprive him of the 
very right which it is the whole purpose of the law to protect and sub- 
serve. The law should not bear a construction which would iiermit 
such consequences. Indeed to that extent the law would be unconsti- 



8 * CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

tational. For it may be safely asserted that where the Gonstitation af- 
firmatively confers the right to vote upon the citizen, the legislatarehas 
no power to prescribe regulations that would thus entrap him and de- 
prive him of that right. 

Not any of the eases cited go to this extent. The Wisconsin case— 
Doerflinger v. Hilmantel — and the Pennsylvania case, in Re-election of 
McDonough, simply hold the general doctrine that in its general sense 
the statute is mandatory. They simply assert that where the elector is 
not registered and votes as a non-registered voter without the additional 
affidavit or proof, his vote must be rejected. If they are to be deemed 
as going farther than this they are obiter dwta and of no authority. 

The elector cannot be deprived of his vote except by conviction of 
felony. A registry law is only reasonable when it puts the elector, who 
does not comply with it, in the attitude of remaining away from the polls 
or refusing to vote. To register or furnish a!i atHdavit is a reanonable 
regulation acciompanying the act of voting, if this act is omitted or 
refused it is equivalent to remaining away and refusing to vote. But 
when this same statute deprives ol his vote an elector who comes in 
good faith and is advised b^* the authorities, and believes he is regis- 
tered, and whose vote is received in such manner as to deprive him of 
his right to re(!tify the omission by affidavit, it violates directly the con- 
stitutional clause conferring the right, and is to that extent void. 

Hence we insist that a vote deposited in goo<l faith by the elector, 
supposing himself to be registered, cannot be rejected upon siibsequent 
discovery that he was not. But where the elector is advised or knows 
that he is not registered, no such consequences will follow. No such, 
fraud can be perpetrated upon him. He is not deprived of any locum 
penitentice in ]»rocuring an affidavit. He knowingly violates the law^ 
and his vote is a fraudulent one. 

This your committee believe to be the true rule, and announce it as aa^ 
principle. Where the elector, acting in good faith and honestly suppos- 
ing himself to be registered, deposits his vote, and the same is receivedL 
\}y the judges, it is a valid vote. But where the elector does not act vcm. 
good faith and knows he is not registered his vote should be rejected- 

It is worthy of consideration that the statute in question is only so 
far mandatory as U^ control the action of the judges of election. White 
it is a negative statute it applies to an<l affects the judges only. '' No 
vote shall be received" by the judges, uidess the elector is registered- 
But suppose they do receive it! The judges might be punished. But 
there isnoproviMou affecting the elector. He is not to be punished or 
bis vote cast out. 

Under the rule or principle announced above, it may sometimes be a 
matter of some difficulty to establish the watit of gocxl faith on the part 
of the nou registered elector whose vote has been rei'eived by the judges. 
But most unquestiotiably, in the absence of other evidence, the presump- 
tion of innocence and omnia reete acta prevails in such case. The bur- 
den of 8h< wing want of good faith must necessarily rest upon the one 
challenging the vote and asking its rejection. 

It is quite well settled that when the elector offers his vote he must 
establish all legal qualifications to justify its reception. But the act of 
the judges in receiving it is judicial. VVhenit has been received every 
presumption is in favor of its regularity and legality. Whoever seeks 
to cause its rejection must assume the burden of establishing the dis- 
qualifications, even to proving a negative. 

''£vid«Dc« which mi^ht have heen siifficient to pat the voter to his explanation if 
challenged at the polls is not deemed sufficient to prove a vote illegal after it has been 
admitted." (Gooding r. Wilson, 42 Congress.) 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 9 

"Of coarae some weight is to be given to the decision of the judsee of election, 
vhoee proyince it is in the first instance to admit or exclude votes. Their action is 
to be presumed correct until it is shown to have been erroneous." (MeCrary on Elec- 
tions, sec. 372; see, also, Id,, sec. 294, New Jersev Cases, 1 Bartlett,24; People v, 
Peare, 13N.Y.,74.) 

There can be do doabt that if the foregoing views are maintained 
they are conclusive of the question involved in the present case. For 
if a ballot received from an elector who in good faith believed himself 
registered as required by law would be voted, still more so would it be 
the case where he in good faith presented an affidavit in supposed com- 
pliance with the law and the judges accepted it as sufficient. 

The distinction between the essential qualifications of the elector and 
the mere methods or machinery of election must not be confounded. 
The judges of election cannot by receiving a ballot give qualifications 
to one who is not a qualified elector. The elector, when challenged, 
may take the required oath as to his qualifications, and the judges then 
admit his vote. This will not prevent his vote from being subsequently 
thrown out when it is shown he was not qnalifie<l. But suppose in •ad- 
ministering the oath by mistake some* important line or sentence of the 
oath ^an omitted by the judge, would that alone cause a rejection when 
it appeared the oath was taken in good faith f 

So, too. if regularly registered, acceptance of his ballot does not es- 
tablish his real qualification. Neither does it when he votes upon affi- 
davit. All these things are mere preliminary proofs to enable him to 
deposit the ballot. They are not part of his real qualifications. Hence 
an error or mistake in the preliminaries, when the ballot is received, 
will not cause its rejection. 

Bat the statute, iu so far as it provides what declarations shall be set 
forth in the affidavits, is directory only. And in this [mrticular the as- 
sauiption, hereinbefore rebutted, that a vote received without registra- 
tiou is illegal, would not control the actual queslion in this <*.ase. It 
may well be held that an affidavit is necessary, and also that a failure to 
comply in respe<?tof all the statements requircMl woulil not render the 
affidavit void. There is no prescribed formula for the affidavit. It shall 
show that the elector is qualified and a sufficient reason for not appear- 
ing before the re::i8try. He shall also prove by one freeholder who is 
on the register that he knows him t«» be qualified, giving residence, &c. 
Suppose there are errors or omissions in the statement, but the vote 
is received by the judges. What shall the proof be that will subse- 
quently reject the vote? That the elector was not in fact a qualifie<l 
elector or that he tailed to '*say in his affidavit" that he was a quali- 
fied elector! Shall the substance give way to the sh.idowf There is 
uo doabt thiit the affidavit is to be submitted to the judges. They are 
to pass upon its compliance with the statute. Here again we find the 
same method of perpetrating a fraud upon the elector. The judges are to 
aid the elector by carefully inspecting the affidavit in the discharge of 
their duty, and if it does not contain the necessary allegations to so de- 
cide and by pointing out the imperfections enable the elector to rectify 
and perfect his proof. The law providing for affidavits was intended 
as a means of securing the vote, not <lefeating it. 

In other words, the judges of election have no power to pass upon 
the legal and essential qualifications of the elector. They have no right 
or power to hear evidence or pass upon that question ; but as to whether 
the affidavits comply with the statute, whether they show a satis- 
factory reason for not appearing at the registry board and contain the 
necessary statements, is a matter addressed to their iudgment and ex- 
amination ; and when that judgment has allowed and received the vote 



10 CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

it is final. The proof has been sufficient to justify the reception of the 
ballot, and thenceforward the only question that can be raised most 
relate to the essential qualifications of the voter. Of course it is not 
necessary to add that this proposition may be modified by the proviso 
that the paper offered as an affidavit is intended as such in good faith, 
and is not palpably an eVasiou or subterfuge. 

Turning now to the several classes of affidavits and the respective 
objections to them, the following disposition of them is made: 

(1) The 38 votes vouched for by Charles Blatuer, who was not himself 
registered as required. There is no legal evidence that this Chas. Blat- 
ner was not registered. The register list is not produced, nor is a 
copy of it, which is the only legal and competent evidence as to who 
was registered. (Harris r. Whitcorab, 4 Gray, Mass., 433.) But among 
the affidavits appears one made by O. Blatner, who was not registered, 
and he is vouched for by Chas. Blatner. Upon this the contestant as 
sumes that C. Blatuer vouches for himself and that Chas. Blatner was 
not registered. There are 37 other affidavits vouched for by Chas. Blat- 
ner; and the contestant assumes that this Chas. Blatner was not regis- 
tered and the affidavit not valid in consequence. 

The rule already announced would deny the soundness of the claim. 
But an inspection of the signatures on the above affidavit, which was 
before the committee, shows that they are in different handwriting, 
and there must be two Charles Blatners. It is stated outside of the 
record that there are two, an uncle and nephew. Certainly in the ab 
senceofthe register list there is no competent evidence of the claim 
made. 

(2) The 31 voters in whose affidavits no reason is assigned for not 
appearing before the register board. Here a large batch of affidavits 
are produced, out of which 31 are selected. They are not identified by 
the voter, the notary public, or the judges. They are simply produced 
by the township clerk, into whose hands they were placed after the 
election. Where or how they have been kept, or who had access to 
them, what changes, substitution, or manipulation, is not shown ; yel 
they are, in view of the present claim to reject them, the ballots of the 
electors. What would be thought of the count of the ballots of a bal 
lot-box that had thus been thrown about without more proof as to the 
identity and genuiness of the ballots! The very necessity of the case 
shows that these affidavits are required, and are used and preserved, 
not as a means of enabling the subsequent rejection of illegal votes, but 
as evidence in criminal procedure in the courts where all the facts can 
be adduced and the genuiness of the paper shown. In any event the 
omission to fill the blank was oversight or inadvertence, and the law 
requiring it is directory. Besides, as will be seen, the number of this 
class of votes is not sufficient to change the result in any event. 

(3 and 5) Thirteen cases where '^ neglect" is assigned, and 103 where 
'*left off the register" is assigned for not appearing before the registry 
board. With one or two exceptions these affidavits were presented and 
used in the two Oskaloosa precincts in Mahaska County. The evidence 
shows very conclusively that the registry list in that township was not 
an honest one. In its preparation it was found in unauthorized hands 
and at unauthorized places. Out of a voting population of about 800, 
about 200 names, nearly all Democrats, were omitted. Old citizens 
who were property-holders, and had voted there for many years, found 
themselves unregistered, although their names must have been upon 
the poll lists and assessment lists. On election day the fact that 25 
per centum of voters' names was omitted, and nearly all of one political 
part^"^, must have created a profound impression of neglect or fraud on 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 



11 



the part of the registry board. The evidence shows that some of the 
electors were so iudignant and humiliated that they refused to furnish 
the necessary affidavit and declined to vote. In such a state of affairs 
the words "neglect^ and "left oflf the register" are pregnant with mean- 
ing, and furnish "suflflcient reason." to any unbiased mind. Those terms, 
as thus used, do not imply "neglect" on the part of the elector, but on 
the part of sworn officers^ in whose honesty and efficiency the electors 
were authorized by law to depend. These objections are overruled. 

(4) Affidavits of J. B. Eckert and J. B. Bolton, who, in vouching for 
electors, swear they live in East Oskaloosa and West Oskaloosa. The 
statute does not require the one vouching for the elector to state that he 
lives in the precinct. As hereinbefore shown, the registry is made for 
the whole township. Oskaloosa Township was divided into two pre- 
cincts — East and West. In a legal sense these citizens did live in both. 
It was only required they should be freeholders and electors. 

(6) Forty -six failed to state their residence, and three affidavits have 
w jurat. As already shown, the requirement applies only to residents 
of cities and towns in municipal elections. This was a general election, 
and there is no proof that these electors resided in any city or town. 
A8 to the three affidavits without jurats^ the judges of election are 
anthorized to administer these oaths, and it is probable the voters were 
swum and subscribed the affidavit l>efore them, and the judges received 
them, but in the hurry omitted to write out the jurat. Their reception 
by the judges under the statute is presumptive that they were sworn 
to, but that the jurat was omitted. 

(7) There is no legal and competent evidence that Boliiiger or Will- 
iam Pitt were not registered. Harris v. Whitcomb, 4 Gray, 433. 

(8) As to the objectio!i that the sixty affidavits received at Centre 
Township, Wapello County, failed to state that the voucher was a free- 
holder, the statute does not require it. Section 618, Code of Iowa. It 
is sufficient if the judges of election know the fact. 

This disposes of the case as made by the contestant. 



II.— r^c contestee's counter-claim. 

(1) An examination of the evidence will satisfactorily show that the 
following illegal votes were cast for contestant. There is no method of 
clearly stating each particular case, except by setting forth the evidence 
respectively in each, which is not deemed necessary. 



yame. 



County. 



NOX-KK8IDBNT8. 

HMTy MUler I Poweaheik 

i. 8. Preaton... I do 

John AndersoD do — 

Marion S. Gordon , do — 

William Poindexter | Mahaska . 

IVank Ferirnaon do — 

Mattbew Edroondtton do — 

Andrew Koon de 

Kontus M lillbach do 

J. Harry Rodgert do 

B. C. Coleman j do 

S. Dee ; do.... 

J. T. Spencer do — 

Peter Anderson do — 

Lincoln Bitiny do 

George Heavfe i . do . . . 

W. H. Smith do ... 

M. Tresoott do .... 



"*""• brief. 



401-6 


24 


418 


24 


418-21 


25 


412-18 


25 


422-484 


26 


485 seq. > 


27 


493 


28 


496 1 


28 


409-10 ! 


28 


532 


29 


534 


30 


542-50 


30 


547 


30 


500 


31 


464 ; 


31 


569 : 


31 


572 


32 


577 • 1 


33 



12 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER* 



Name. 



Coanty. 



Paiceof 
record. 



PH*! 

onntoiti 

brief. 



NoM RUiDBirre— ConUnaed. 

F. Lint Wapello 

Samnel Reed do . 

F. H. Webber i do . 

George W. Dewitt ; do . 

J. P. Campbell * do . 

David DeHart | do 

John W. Forderawalt i do . 



ALIBKB. 

1 

I 

Charles Deal ; Powesheik. 

Georfce Sampson j . do — 

David Snedon Keokuk ... 



MIKOR8. 

John Martin I Wapello 

BRIBED. ' 



William Blake j Keokuk 

John Baker Wapello 

Harrison Baker I do . 

Parkson Peters do . 



IMBBCILU AND IlfSANB. 



Patrick O'Connor 
Joseph Padgett . . 



Mahaska 
Davis.... 



5M 

502 

806 

645 

600 

618>43 

66&-« 



414 

415 
570 



639 



575 

507-610 
608-5 
625 



448-8 
651-601 



In all, 35. 

(2) A mistake of 5 votes in the count of Richland Township, in £ 
kuK County. It is made plainly to appear that the judges of elec 
first counted the votes, ascertained the number cast for the contes 
and contestee, and entered the true number on the returns, and fi 
out the tally-list afterwards and omitted 5 votes. The county canv 
ers acted on the tally-list and not the return, and in this manner 
mistake was made. 

(3 and 4) As to these there is no serious question. They are pr 
cally conceded. 

(5) The colonization of these colored men is quite clearly establis 
and the proof is very satisfactory that they voted for the contest 
There were three of the nine at Mahaska County (Record, 438 et seq.) 
eighteen at Wapello County (Record, 523 et seq.) traced to the p 
Six of them could not be' traced. Of the number of illegal votes clai 
by contestee the contestant concedes 16, but he does not specify t 
all. 

In conclusion your committee make the following statement of 
result: 

Votes cast for Weaver V 

Deduct illegal votes allowed '. . . . 

1< 

Votes cast for Campbell 16, 617 

Dedact illegal votes: 

Illegal votes 35 

The 5 at Richland 5 

The 2 in Araendment box 2 

One rejected 1 

Colonization 21 

64 

V 

Weaver's majority 



IL 



PH Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. • Kept. 1622, 
lit Session. \ \ Part 2. 



CAMPBELL vs. WEAVER. 



April 19, 1686. — Laid over and ordered to be printed. 



r. Payne, from the Committee on Elections, submitted the following 

as the 

VIEWS OF THE MINORITY: 

[be minority of the committee dissent from the views of the majority 
the following grounds: 

rbe minority of the committee do not think it profitable to present 
i evidence, or even a statement of the facts, on which they dispose 
the individnal votes, challenged on either side of this controversy, 
such a coarse would prolong this report to such an extent that it 
old not be read by many members of the House, and at the same 
le would not affect the result; for there are not enough of such votes 
overturn the majority of contestee independently of the non-regis- 
ed votes cast in Oskaloosa Township, Mahaska County, for con- 
tee, and which we shall show hereafter were illegally received under 
^ laws of Iowa and returned for him. 

^e do wish to dissent most emphatically from the assumption in the 
ijority report, that more of such illegal votes were proved to have 
en cast for contestant than for contestee, and that the result increases 
e majority for contestee from 67 to 117. On the other hand a careful 
new and weighing of the evidence in the case leads inevitably to the 
Dclasion that the balance of illegal votes outside of Oskaloosa Town- 
ip is against contestee, and would reduce his alleged majority as re- 
rned. 

Fbe attempted proof of colonization was a failure, composed largely, 
it was, of hearsay evidence, and any assumption of any intentional 
oDg-doiug on the part of the contestant or his supporters in this case 
entirely gratuitous, and is not warranted by the evidence. ' 

THE NON-BEGISTEBED VOTERS IN OSKALOOSA TOWNSHIP. 

JV^haft^r view may be taken of the status of the individual votes 
illenged upon either side, the whole case turns upon these non- 
istered votes cast in Oskaloosa Township, and the flisposition that 
nade of them. If the views of the minority are correct as to these 
i-registered votes, then there must be deducted from the majority of 
sitting member at least 134 votes, and these would overbalance even 
117 majority claimed for him in the majority report, as well as the 
' majority claimed for him in his brief filed with the committee. 

THE BEGISTBT LAWS OF IOWA. 

Che following are in substance the sections of the Iowa code, which 
tscribe the manner in which the registry shall be made for each elee- 
Q : 

he towDMhip trustees and clerk shall constitute the board of registry, and shall 
;t annually, • « • g^j^^i ghall make a list of all qualitied electors in their town- 
), which shall be known as the register of elections. (Code, sec. 5U5.) 



\ 



2 CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

The register of elections shall oontain the Dames of the voters at fall length, alpha- 
betically arranged, with residence set opposite. It shall be made from the attawr 
list, and the poll-books of the previous electioiif and shall be kept by the township clerl^ 
and shall at all times be open to inspection at his office without charge. He shall, 
also, within two days after the adjournment of the board, post up a certilied copy 
thereof in a conspicuous place in his office, or in such other place as the board may 
direct. (Code, sec. 596.) 

Tbe board shall meet od Tuesday preceding general election to com- 
plete registry. Must give previous notice by publication ; at time of 
meeting " tbey shall revise, correct, and complete the register of elec- 
tion, and t<hall hear any evidence that shall be brought before them m 
reference to such correction." It further provides that uame« may be 
added or stricken from the register at this meeting. (Code, sec. 597.) 

These sections seem to contemplate,' what would appear to be a most 
natural result from such a method of making up the lists in the fint 
instance, an incomplete list of the voters in a large precinct, unless tbe 
board were aided in their duties by the appearance before them of the 
voters themselves, who had neglected to vote at the last election, and 
who were not taxpayers in the district. But this registry law does not 
even require the presence of the voter at the place of registry, but his 
name may be placed on the register if any person shall make it app^ 
to the registry board that he is a legal voter in that precinct. 

But if the name of a legally qualified voter is left off the list he still 
is not deprived of his vote. The following section of the statute affords 
him an ample and a simple remedy : 

Skc. 618. The judges in election precinct-s where the registry law is in force shall 
designate one of their number to check on the register the name of every person votiog; 
and no vote 8?iail be received from any person whose name does not appear there, tm^ 
he shall furnish the judges his affidavit showing that he is a qualified elector, and a 
sufficient reason for not appearing before the board on the day for oorrectinff the register, 
and shall also prove by the affidavit of one freeholder or householder whose name it 
on the register, that such affiant knows him to be a resident of that election precincl, 
giving his residence by street and number, if in a city or incorporated town, as the 
same is in such cases required to appear on the register. Said affidavits shall be kept 
by the judges, and by them tiled in the office of the township clerk, and all such 
affidavits may be administered by either of the judges or clerks of election. 

In Oskaloosa Township, it seems that the Republican committee 
were diligent on the days for correcting the registry and saw that the 
voters belonging to their party were all registered. On the other hand, 
it appears that the committees for the Democratic and Greenback par- 
ties made no attempt to correct the registry, or to see that the names of 
the voters of their party were put u]K)n the lists before the election. 
The result was that about two hundred of the members of t^|D^ parties 
were not registered. The assumption that there was any dishonesty in 
the making of the registry in Oskaloosa is not warranted by the evi- 
dence. Neither the poll-list of the last election or the assessment lists 
were oflfered in evidence. There is nothing in the case to show, or 
from which it can be inferred, that a single name was left off the list, 
which appeared on either the poll list or the assessment list of the pre- 
vious year. Nor can this be inferred, from the fact that some old citi- 
zen, who ha^l been a resident for twenty-five years, was not registered. 
The laws of Iowa do not require a man to be a taxpayer in oider to be 
a voter; and it cannot be assumed that the ^'old citizen" voted in 1883 iu 
Oskaloosa Township. This assumption on the part of the majority of 
the committee only illustrates how easy it is for eminent lawyers to 
forget that fraud cannot be found from mere suspicion, but that it must 
be proved. 



! 






- V 

" r 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 3 

These names being off the repstry, on election day these parties could 
vote only upon complying with section 618 of the statute quoted above. 
This section provides, so far as it is applicable to this case, that— 

No vot« shall be received from any person whose name does not appear there [on 
the register] nuless he shall famish to the judges his affidavit showing that he is a 
qnalified elc^ctor, and a sufficient reason for not appearing before the board on the 
day for correcting the register, &c. 

The first question arising upon this statute is, is it mandatory t 
In answering this question it should be borne in mind that the only 
object of the statute is to prevent illegal voting. If these plain words, 
80 plain that they do not admit of construction, '< no vote shall be 
received " are to be construed as directory, and not mandatory upon 
every oue affected by the provision, then the statute by its own inter- 
pretation defeats itself. The law becomes a dead letter and wholly in- 
operative. But we are not left wholly' to our own interpretation of this 
law. In the first place the highest court in the State of Iowa has de- 
clared this law constitutional. (See Edmunds V8, Barnburry, 28 Iowa, 
2^7.) The question of constitutionality was the only question litigated 
in that case. 
The constitutional provision of Iowa is : 

Abt. 2, Sec. 1. Every male citizen of the United States of the age of twenty-one, 
who shall have been a resident of this State six mouths next preceding the election, 
aod of t)ie county in which he claims his vote sixty days, shall be entitled to vote 
stall elections which are now or hereafter may*be authorized by law. 

This registry law deprives no voter of his vote; it only provides a 
method of proving his right to vote. » 

We Tire not without direct judicial authority for the position that this 
law is mandatory. (See Nefzgar vs. R. R. Co., 36 Iowa, 642.) 

We deem it nuneressary to consider only the second ground of relief, viz, the en- 
tire disreganl of the provisions of the registry law, for it seems to us, upon that 
groand, if none other, the action of the court is fully sustained. Section 8, chapter 
171, 12 General Assembly, the act provides : 

» * ^ • « • • 

(The act previously quoted.) 

"The object of the act, as declared in it« title, is to prevent fraudulent voting. Ii$ 
language u mandatory.' It reads : *No voir, shall bt received from any person whose name 
does not appear on the register.' To hold that an elector may voto whose name is 
not on the legister would render an observance of the law merely optional, and its 
provisions merely nugatory." 

The court then refer to and quote 16 Mich., 342; 21 Wis., 566; ** Dwarris' Statutes, 
715, and cases cited." 

Congress has never reversed the decisions of a State court as to the 
constitutionality or force of its own enactment. 

A law similar in all respects has been held mandatory in other States, 
and also it has been held that no vote could be received under it from 
a non registered voter, unless he furnished the affidavit required by the 
terms of the law, and that this, too, is mandatory. (See in re Election of 
McDonnough, 105 Penn., 490, and the exceedingly well considered case 
of Doerflinger vs. Helmantel, 21 Wis., 566.) We quote from the opinion 
of Dixon, Chief J. : 

It is furthermore alleged that of those 544 votes 145 were received from persons, no 
one of whom proved to the inspectors receiving bis vote by the oath of a householder 
of the district that he knew such person to be an inhabitant of the district, nor did 
sny one of them furnish the inspectors any proof upon oath that he was a resident of 
the election district. It will be seen from these statements, not that there was a total 
want of proof, or an attempt to evade the requirements of the act, but onlv that the 
proofs were, in some particulars, defective. It is not, therefore, a question whether 



4 CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

the statatemay be wholly disregarded or dispensed with by the inspectors, bat whether, 
wheu an attempt is made in good faith to execnte it, a mistake in the executiouorany | 
departure, however slight, from the terms of the Htatnte will vitiate the proceedings 
and annul the votes so irregularly received. In other words, it is a qnestion whether 
the voters are disfranchised by any such mere irregularity or error in the proceedings. 

This is the precise question, as I understand it. I say the precise question, becaaseno 
fraud or intentional misconduct on the part of any one is alleged ; nor is it alleged 
that there was any inherent disqualification in the persous who gave the votes. They 
were qnalitied electors of the district, entitled under the constitution and laws to vote 
at the election, except that their votes were not received in the form prescribed by 
the statute. As to one huudred and forty-five of them, the fact that they wereinbab^ 
itants of the district was not proved before the inspectors; and as to the others, their 
particular places of residence within the district were not given. As to all of them, 
the inspectors may have acted upon their own knowledge of the facts, and thoaght 
that pi oof was unnecessary. 

Such being the technical, and, as it seemed to me, purely formal nature of the ob- 
jections, I must say that I was surprised to hear counsel at the bar insist that those ' 
votes must now be rejected. 1 had not then examined the act, and it was contrary 
to all my notions of the intention and cft'ect of election laws, derived from the decis- 
ions of this and other courts upon other statutes on the same subject. I supposed the 
qnestion before the courts always was, who received the greatest number of votes for 
tne office from the legally qualified voters, without regard to any matter of mere form 
or want of form in the receiving, eanvasning, or return of the votes ; and that to hold 
the contrary would be, as has been very pertinently said, to place a higher valoeoo 
the statute regulation than on the right it«elf— to sacrifice substance to form. 

This construction of former statutes, that they were directory and not imperative, 
and therefore not jurisdictional on the part of the officers« conducting the elections, is 
well known. For the sake of justice upon the facts here pleaded, I regret that this 
act does not admit of the same construction. It s^ems certainly a very severe rego* 
lation which excludes the votes of lef^ally qualified voters under such circurastaDces. 
But, on examining the act, I am satisfied that it cannot bo so construed. It is ebsen- 
tially^ an imperative statute, and deprives the inspectors of all jurisdiction to receive 
the votes of unregistered voters, unless the conditions as to the affidavit and oath are 
fully complied with. • 

And first it is to be observed that there is a material difference between this and 
former statutes. They were regulations of the time and manner of conducting elec- 
tions, designed for the government of the officers having charge of the polls. No 
duty was imposed upon the voters except that of going to the polls and depositing 
their votes. It was considered that the voters ought not to forfeit their privilegesor 
lose their votes by reason of the mistakes or misconduct of the off-cers, which it was 
out of the power of the voters to remedy or prevent. 

By this act, however, every voter is made or may become an agent in the executiou 
of the law. Copies of the register, as made by the board, are filed in the office of the 
town, village, or city clerk, and posted in some conspicuous place in the room in which 
the meeting is held, so as to be accessible to any elector who may desire to examine 
the same or make copies thereof. On Tuesday preceding the general election a meet- 
ing of the board of registry is held at the place designated tor holding the polls of 
election, for the purpose of revising, correcting, and completing the lists. Any elector 
of the district whose name has been omitted may appear at such meeting and cause 
the same to be entered upon the register. If he does not so appear, and still desires 
to vote, he must furnish the inspectors at the polls his affidavit, giving his reasons for 
not appearing on the day for the correction of the register, and likewise prove by the 
oath of a householder of the district that he knows hmi to be an inhabitant of the dis- 
trict ; and, if in an incorporated village or city, give his residence within the district. 

In this matter of a voter whose name has been omitted, and who has not appeared 
on the day for the correction of the register, the burden of answering the require- 
ments of the law, by furnishing the affidavit and proof, is thrown upon the voter 
himself. He is presumed to know the law, and must go to the polls prepared to com- 
ply with its conditions; and if he does not, and his vote is lost, it may, so far as it 
18 the fault ot any one, with justice be said to be his own fault. It is in the nature of 
a penalty imposed by the law for his neglect to do what in required of him. The in- 
spectors cannot receive his vote, and if they cannot, it cannot afterwards be received 
and counted by the courts. 

And next it is to be observed that it is a negative statute. It has been said on 
very high authority that negative words will make a statute imperative. (Dwarris 
on Statutes, 715 ; 7 Law Lib., 55, and cases cited.) The words of the act are : ** No 
vote shall be received at any annual election in this State, unless," &c. It is diffi- 
cult to conceive of any language more strongly imperative than this. (21 Wiscon- 
sin, pp. 568-571.) 



I V4 



. m 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 5 

The position that this law is raandatory is indorsed by Democratic 
aathority in the contested election case of Gartin v%. Tocnm, in the Forty- 
sixth (Congress. The mtyority report was most elaborate, made by Mr. 
Springer, the chairman of the committee, and was concarred in by all 
the Democratic members. This report is grounded upon the opinion 
that the statute precisely similar to the Iowa statute is mandatory. The 
minority of the committee, however, considering the peculiar constitu- 
tional provision in the constitution of Pennsylvania, held that this law 
was either nnoonstitutioual or directory in its character, and the House 
adopted by a close vote the views of the minority. The provision in the 
oonstitatiou of Pennsylvania is as follows : 

/ : . ■ No elector shall be deprived of his privilege of voting by reason of bis name not be- 

i*^ *^ registered. (Sec. 7 of the Con.) 

^/^ Bat the case of McDonnough, in the 105 Penn. cited above, is a later 
ease, and of course was not before that committee. However, it con- 
firms the views of the majority in the Curtin case. 

It is true that the courta in the State of Illinois have held a contrary 
coDstmction of a similar statute (see 78 111., 170, and 88 111., 504), but 
in tho8e cases it w&s held that the statute was merely directory, and 
not mandatory. 

After a review of all the cases we find it impossible, as it seems to be 
"diflficolt^ for the majority (page 7, majority report) to escape the con- 
dusion that this registry law, requiring the '^fhmishingof an affidavit" 
by an unregistered voter as a condition for his voting is mandatory. 
Aud we believe that it is mandatory upon all. It is the condition pre- 
cedent — "no vote shall be received,'^ &c. There is no middle ground. 

It is not denied that this rule may sometimes work hardship and even 
deprive the honest elector of his right of suffrage. What law is there 
which is not obnoxious to the same charge f Ignorance will pervert 
and set at naught the most perfect laws. If the plea of ignorance were 
allowed as an excuse many salutary laws would be practically annulled. 

Id Oskaloosa township 31 voters presented affidavits, in which there 
were no reasons given for not appearing before the board on the day 
for correcting the registry. These affidavits are all in the same form 
and the following is a sample of the whole : 



; «-• - 

%r ' 

r ^XSr 

i \2^ 

ItQAmL. 
[t !«•% 

til ^' 

id fmn 



in •! 

n a a. 

t^ ^;^. I 9rATX OF low A, Mokoaka County ^ m : 

^ r4>l I, Walter Mitchell, on oath do say that I am a resident of West Oskaloosa Town- 

^ ^-'^l sliipt cooDty of Mahaska and State ot Iowa : that I am a citizen of the United States; 

^ocsirl that I am twenty-one years of age; that 1 have resided in the State of Iowa six 

'*;v ::im months, and connty of Mahaska sixty days last preceding this election ; that I have 

^ c>l Bot Toted in this election, and the reason my name does not appear on the register 

'^^tI liitia, . Walter C. Mitchell. 

-a^tl C. BLATTNER. 

'-'HT ■ Sabscribed and sworn to before me by said affiant this 4th day of November, A. D. 

^*^ ■ 1684. 

' n I [AAi.] J. B. BOLTON, 

4r I Xoianf Public. 

^ I In the same township 103 gave as a reason '^ left off the register.^ 

^ I This is a sample of these affidavits : 

^ I 8TATK OF loWA, Matuuka County, m: 

I, Walter Hunter, on oath do say that I am a resident of West Oskaloosa Town- 
ship, oonnty of Mahaska and State of Iowa ; that I am a citizen of the United States ; 
I am twenty -one years of age ; that I have resided in the State of Iowa six months, 



1 

6 CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 

and oouDty of Mahaska sixty days last preceding this election; that I have Dot 
voted io this election, and the reason my name does not appear on the register list ii 
left oft" registry. 

WALTER HUNTER. 

Suhscrihed and sworn to before me by said affiant this 4th day of November, A. D. 
1834. 
[SEAL.] J. B. BOLTON. 

Notary PuhUe. 

It is conceded that all these affidavits were presented by Democrats, 
and upon tbem the affiants were permitted to vote. We 'maintain that 
all these votes should be deducted from the count of votes for the sit- 
ting member. If we are right in our conclusions that this statute i» 
mandatory, there can be no doubt as to the rejection of the 31 votes, 
where no excuse is given. But is it not equally true of the 103 voters 
who say that the reason they did not appear is*' left off the register" t 
Can this, by any process of construction, be made to furnish an excuse? 
We will not go into the question as to who is to judge of the sufficiency^ 
of the excuse, or whether it is competent for .the House to reverse a de- 
cision of the judges, where any excuse is furnished ; but in this instance 
we maintain that the words *'left off theregister^' fdrnish no excuse fo^ 
the non-appearance, and that there is nothing for the judges of electioor 
to act upon. It appears to us impossible to spell out an excuse froirm. 
these words. 

The majority of the committee, in their report, after a labored argu — 
meut, at page 8 say: 

This your committee believe to be the trne rale, and anDOunce it as a principle ^ 
Where the elector, acting in good faith and honestly supposing himself to be regi» — 
tered, deposits his vote, and the same is received by the Judges, it is a valid vot^^ 
But where the elector does not act in good faith and knows he is not registered hl^^ 
vote should be rejected. 

But that principle if correct does not affect this contest. In thi^ 
case the voter knew that he was not registered ; hence his affidavit^^ 
He knew the law and that it was necessary to furnish the affidavit^^ 
presenting all the facts essential for the judges of election to act upoQ^ 
He was not deceived by the judges as to any fact peculiarly within their 
knowledge; he knew that he was not registered as well as they; he 
knew that he must present a reason as well as they, for he was bound 
to know the law.. And hence the reasoning in the majority report, as 
in the Illinois cases, is inapplicable to this ca«e. It is impossible to 
work out any deception or fraud in this case from the evidence. 

It is trne that the unbiased mind must come reluctantly to a conclu- 
sion that would disfranchise a voter for the single reason that he had 
failed to comply witli the registry law. And yet it is our duty to up- 
hold the laws. Even were we convinced that the law was a bad one, 
our duty would be the same. But there are no more commendable laws 
upon the statute book than these same registry laws. No laws have 
done more to guard the purity of the ballot-box than these same laws. 
In every State where they are in force they have thrown up a bulwark 
against fraud and dishonest voting that human ingenuity has seldom 
been able to compass. Any construction that weakens their force or 
construes away their mandatory character is a st«p backward, and 
should not be adopted, unless plainly required by the well-settled rules 
of construction. It should be our aim to enforce these salutary meas- 
ures to their full intent and meaning. If we enforce them in this case 
we can reach no other conclusion than that the contestant is entitled 
to the seat now held by the contestee. And we therefore recommend 



CAMPBELL VS. WEAVER. 



loption of the following resolations as a sabstitate for those rec- 

ioded by the majority : 

\olvedy That James B. Weaver was oot elected to a seat in the 

r-uinth Congress as a member from the Sixth Congressional district 

g^a, and is not entitled to a seat. 

folved, That Frank T. Campbell was elected and is entitled to a 

in the Forty-ninth Congress as a member from the Sixth Cougres- 

\ district of the State of Iowa. 

SERENO B. PAYNE. 

FREDERICK D. ELY. 

A. H. PETTIBONE. 

O 



4»rH Congress, ) HOUSE OF KEPRESENTATIVES. i Beport 
l8t Session. ] \ No. 1623. 



PAGE V. PIRCE— LEAVE TO TAKE TESTIMONY. 



April 14, 1886. — Laid over and ordered to be priDted. 



Mr. R. S. Gbeen, from the Committee on Elections, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

The Committee on Elections j to whom was referred the contested-election 
cau of Charles H, Page agaitist William A. Pirce^ from the second 
Congressional district of Rhode Island, svbmit the following statement : 

The contestee claims not to have been represented at the examina- 
tion of the witnesses of the contestant, relying on the fact that the tes- 
timouy was not taken within the time prescribed by statute. The con- 
testant, on his part, testifies to a verbal agreement between himself 
and the counsel of the contestee waiving the taking of such testimony 
within such time. The counsel of contestee, while admitting an agree- 
ment with contestant, denies that it had such extent or effect. While 
the committee would be inclined, in ordinary cases, to require that par- 
ties should strictly observe the directions of the statute, the testi- 
mony presented in this case by the contestant discloses such wholesale 
and open bribery, implicating even the contestee personally, that the 
House, in justice to its own dignity, must, in the opinion of the com- 
mittee, take notice of the same. As the contestee, relying on his un- 
derstanding of the agreement, abstained from the cross-examination of 
the witnesses and from the production of evidence to contradict the 
case made by contestant, we recommend that time be given as provided 
in the accompanying resolution : 

Resolvedj That William A. Pirce, sitting member from the second 
Congressional district of Rhode Island, be allowed thirty days from the 
passage of this resolution within which to resubpcena and cross-exam- 
ine witnesses heretofore examined by Charles H. Page, the contestant, 
and to take any testimony he may desire, and that ten days thereafter 
be allowed to said Page to take evidence in rebuttal. 



49IH C0NGBB8S, ( HOUSE OF EEPEE8BNTATI VES. j Report 1623, 
l9t8e$8ian. \ } Part 2. 



PAGE V. PIRCE— LEAVE TO TAKE TESTIMONY. 



April — , 1886. — ^Laid over aDd ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Ely, from the Committee on ElectioDS, sabmitted the following 

tbe 

VIEWS OF THE MINORITY: 



The undersigned dissent from the opinion of the majority in this case, 
aod submit the following as the views of the minority : 

This contest concerns the second Congressional district of Rhode 
Wand. The election returns legally made show that Pirce received 
7,746 votes; that Page received 5,995 votes; that Alfred B. Chadsey 
received 1,500 votes; and that other persons received 235 votes. Pirce 
received 1,751 votes over Page and 10 votes over all. Page does not 
appear in this case as a citizen claiming that the election was void, but 
as a contestant, claiming that he was duly elected in Congress from 
said district. At the date of the November election, 1884, Page was a 
member of the senate of Rhode Island, and continued to hold his seat 
in said senate and act and vote as a member of said senate after the 
4th day of March, 1885, and after that date, in April, 1885, became a 
candidate for re-election, was elected a member of said senate, accepted 
Uie office, and has been since his said election, and during this session 
of GoDgress, acting and voting as a member of said senate, all in con- 
travention and violation of the constitution of the State of Rhode 
bland, if he is and has been, since the 4th day of March, 1885, as he 
now claims and asks this House to declare, a Representative in Congress 
from his State. 

It appears that Page served his notice of contest on Pirce within the 
time required by law, to wit, on the 5th day of February, 1885, and 
Pirce answered on the 5th day of March, 1885, and on that day served 
hia answer on Page. Page took no testimony within the time required 
bylaw, but on the 12th day of June, 1885, did notify Pirce that he should 
begin to take testimony on the 25th day of June, 1885, and did between 
said date and the 20th day of July, 1885, in the absence of Pirce and 
against his written protest, examine certain persons, and the questions 
asked and answers given have been printed in this case, with the under- 
standing and agreement that it should not affect, impair, or prejudice 
Pirce's rights. Said 25th day of June was seventy- two days after Page's 
time for taking testimony under the statute had expired, being one 
hundred and twelve days from the day on which the answer of Pirce, 
the returned member, was served upon Page, the contestant. 

The law limiting the time for taking testimony in contested-election 
cases in the House of Representatives is found in section 107 of the 
Revised Statutes and section 2 of chapter 119 of the Statutes of 1875. 



2 PAGE VS. pmcs. 

Section 107 of the Revised Statutes is as follows, viz: 

In all cootested-election casea the time allowed for taking teatimony shall be ninety 
days, and the testimony shall be taken in the following order : The contestant shall 
take testimony during the first forty days, the returned member daring the sacoeed- 
ing forty days, and the contestant may take testimony in rebuttal daring the renutin- 
Ing ten days of said period. 

SectioD 2 of chapter 119 of the Statutes of 1875 is as follows: 

That section 107 of the Revised Statutes of the United States shall be constroed m 
requiring all testimony in cases of contested election to be taken within ninety dayi 
from the day on which the answer of the returned member is served upon the ood« 
testant. 

Page alleges and makes oath that he made an oral agreement with 
Stephen A. Cooke, jr., the attorney of Pirce, on the 9th day of March, 
1885, to the effect that the testimony might be taken at any time before 
the meeting of Congress in December, 1885. Said Cooke, under oath, 
denies that be made said agreement. Page supports his affidavit by 
the affidavit of Frederick C. Hull, and Pirce, in reply to Hnll's affidavit, 
files the affidavit of Charles C. Gray, to the effect that Hull had for some 
years made his headquarters at Page's office, had been employed by Page 
in vaiions capacities, and derived therefrom most of his support, and 
that prior to the election for Congress, 1884, Hull presented at the 
printing office of which Gray is superintendent a written copy of a 
furious ^Republican ticket to be used at said election; that said ticket 
-was set up at Hull's request, and the form taken away by Hull, the 
name of the candidate on said spurious ticket being William H. Piroe. 
These affidavits are attached to the printed record in this case. It also 
appears that in a correspondence between Page and Cooke, Cooke in- 
formed Page on the 28th day of April, 1885, that he never made tlie 
agreement now claimed by Page, and yet Page allowed fifty-three uays 
thereafter to elapse before he attempted to take any testimony. 

After Page served his notice to take testimony on Pirce, Pirce served, 
on the 23d day of June, 1885, his protest against and objection to taking 
such testimony on Page, and notified him that he should not appear 
during the taking thereof in person or by attorney. Pirce seasonably 
appeared before the Committee on Elections and moved that this con- 
test be dismissed, because th«^ testimony was not taken in time. 

In our opinion this motion should be granted. Even if the agreement 
were made as claimed by Page, he has no standing before this Honse- 
Whether we regard the statutes concerning contested elections as ab. 
sohitely binding on the House, or as rules of procedure, neither Page 
nor Pirce, nor both could waive or abrogate them. The House alone 
can do that. If Page desires the time tor taking testimony to be ex- 
tended or that testimony already taken be received and considered as 
if taken in time, it is his duty to apply to the House, and this he has 
not done or attempted to do. He should also allege and prove a suffi- 
cient reason for such indulgence to him on the part of the House. This 
he has failed to do. If any agreement, founded on mere convenience of 
coonsel, be sufficient, which we deny, certainly an oral agreement is not. 
This was decided in O'Hara v. Kitchin, in the Forty-sixth Congress, five 
years ago, and has never been overruled or even questioned. We make 
one or two brief quotations from the able report of the Committee on 
Elections in that case and earnestly approve them as wise and just. 
Democrats and Kepublicans all join in saying: 

The evils resnltiu^ from permittiug the parties, at their own convenience, to regu- 
late the time of taking testimony without regard to the statutes or public interest, 
are too serious and obvious to require comment. In any case, if such agreement's are 
to be regarded, they should be in writing and signed by the parties or their attorneys. 



PAGE VS. PIBCE. 



Aud again — 



The misanderetandiDgs that often honestly arise from oral agreements are alone 
saffleieot to justify courts in insisting that none but written agreements will, if ques- 
tiooed, be recognized. We think it of great importance in election cases that partiea 
flboaJd understand absolutely that all agreements in contravention of the statutes of 
the Uuited States in regard to the taking of testimony, to be considered at all, should 
be Id writing, properly signed, and made a part of the record itself. 

The case of O'Hara v. Kitcbin is directly in point. There aifidavits 
alleglDg an oral agreement to take testimony out of the time limited by 
the statute to have been made, and counter affidavits denying the mak- 
ing of such agreement, were filed. But the committee ^^decline to de- 
termine on the affidavits the question whether or not any such oral 
agreement as the contestant sets up was made, and consider the case 
M if there were no such agreement," and say : 

Tbe committee, therefore, are of opinion that this contest should be dismissed, on 
the ground that the testimony was not taken in time. 

Mr. Page does not claim that he was ignorant of this report. We 
think that he should not be allowed to disregard it and knowingly vio- 
late it. 

We repeat that the convenience of counsel or parties is not a suffi- 
cient reason for postponing the time for taking testimony beyond the 
statute limit, and emphatically not for the unprecedented length of post- 
ponement contemplated by the agreement alleged to have been made 
in this case. Under this agreement a year from the election might 
elapse before a word of testimony should be taken. As a fact, seven 
mouths did elapse. In the interval witnesses may have died or disap- 
peared. The recollection of others concerning the facts may have be- 
come indistinct or imperfect. Such delays endanger the rights of the 
people to be represented by the man of their choice. 

We believe that Page abandoned his contest intentionally before he 
attempted to take testimony aud then coucluded to renew it after the 
time for taking testimony had expired ; that in no aspect of the case can 
we find that he was elected ; that the argreement which he claims is not 
proved to have been made; Ihat his claim in his brief to have been 
elected by 4,260 majority is so preposterous and absurd as to be an in- 
sult to the intelligence of the committee to whom it was presented. We 
therefore find that this contest should be dismissed, aud we recommend 
the passage of the following resolution : 

Resolved^ That Charles H. Page is not entitled to a seat in this House 
as a Representative in the Forty-ninth Congress from the second Con- 
gressional district of Bhode Island. 

It does not follow, however, from the passage of this resolution that 
the investigation shall be discontinued. It is claimed by the majority of 
of this committee that the affidavits which have been printed disclose 
a state of facts in this election which require investigation. If such 
be the fact, we claim it has no bearing on the question which we have 
discussed or the conclusion to which we have arrived. But to such in- 
vestigation we interpose no objection. On the contrary, we will vote 
for it, and recommend every member of the House to vote for it. We 
will also do all in our power without delay to make it thorough, search- 
ing, and complete. If the result of the election was procured by brib- 
ery or intimidation the election should be declared void. 

But we solemnly protest that in a matter affecting, not only the right 
to a seat in this House, but the character of the sitting member, charg- 
ing him with offenses wicked, criminal, and infamously degrading, it is 
his right to meet all the witnesses face to face when they give their tes- 



4 PAGE VS. PIECE. 

timony -in-chief. This is a right not founded in fancy or sentiment, bat 
is of tihe highest importance in reaching right conclusions in such an 
investigation. Such right is so clear and just that it is recognized 
everywhere and by every court. In depositions (so called) taken in the 
absence of the sitting member, he has no opportunity to object to ques- 
tions or answers, however objectionable they may be in form or sub- 
stance. The presence of the opposing party restrains the examiner 
from putting leading questions. Indeed, the entire tone of the deposi- 
tion becomes abnormally favorable to the contestant when his presence 
is not counterbalanced by the presence of the contestee, and, of course, 
makes its impression on him who reads the deposition. 
We recommend the passage of the following resolution : 
Resolved J That this contest be recommitted to the Committee on 
Elections, with instructions to investigate all cases of intimidation and 
bribery alleged or charged in the i)rinted record in this case in or con- 
cerning the Congressional election 1884, in the second Congressional 
district of Rhode IsLind, and for that purpose to appoint a sub-com- 
mittee of three of its members, who shall be authorized to proceed 
to Rhode Island and take testimony there, to send for persons and 
papers, to administer oaths, to employ a stenographer, and incur such 
necessary and reasonable expenses as may be required for the puriK)8e 
of conducting s^id investigation, not exceeding $2,000, which shall be 
paid out of the contingent funds of the House upon proper vouchers 
certified by said subcommittee; and upon the testimony so taken the 
Committee on Elections shall determine the validity or invalidity of thfr 
right of the sitting member to a seat in this House. 

FREDERICK D. ELY. 

SERENO E. PAYNE. 

GEO. W. E. DORSBY. 

J. H. ROWELL. 



4STB Congress, \ HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVES. i Bbpobt 
lit Session. ) ^ No. 1624. 



ADMINISTRATOKS OF 8. H. HILL, DECEASED. 



iPBiL 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Honse on the Private 

Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. BiCHABDSON, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H, R. 5849.] 

The Committee on War Claims^ to whom teas referred the petition for the 
relief of 8. H. Hillj of ColumbuSj Ga,^ having considered the same^ re • 
port: 

That the claim is for rent of buildings for military purposes for 
different periods included between April 16 and December 1, 1865, 
amounting to $1,212.50, for which vouchers are given. These buildings 
were located in Columbus, Ga. The vouchers were presented to the 
Third Auditor for settlement, by whom th ey were rejected, for the rea- 
son, as assigned, that as '^ Georgia was a State in rebellion during the 
late war, payment of the same is prohibited by the act of Congress of 
February 21, 1867." 

Two of the vouchers are in d ue form, unconditional, and are indorsed 
by the proper officers, as follows: 

The within account will be paid bn presentation at the office of chief quarter- 
master at Augusta, Ga. 

Tbe remaining two are signed by the same officer as the former, J. B. 
Winslow, captain and assistant quartermaster, but are not approved 
by tbe colonel commanding. 

Tbe signatures of these two officers are certified to as genuine by the 
Tbird Auditor, and the omission of approval in the last two is merely 
a defect in form, and they are evidences of a contract equally with the 
two which are perfect in form. 

The act of February 21, 1867, is declaratory of the act of July 4, 1864. 
Neither of these acts are intended to afifect contracts made by the proper 
officers or agents of the Government. These vouchers are undoubted 
evidences of a contract. The parties were competent to contract, a 
consideration has been given by the petitioner, and the Government 
sbould undoubtedly pay the vouchers. 

The committee report the accompanying bill appropriating the sum 
of $1,212.50 in full payment of said vouchers, and recommend that it 
do pass. 



»m CONOBESS, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
hi Session. f \ No. 1625. 



THOMAS J. PITZER. 



April 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to be 

printed. 

t 



Mr. RiOHABDSON, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 932.] 

Tht Committee on War Claitns^ to whom teas referred the bill (H, B. 932) 
for the relief of Thomas J, Pitzer^ submit the follomng report : 

The claimant, Thomas J. Pitzer, of Knox County, Kentucky, brings 
this claim for $400, the price of two good mules taken from him in 18^, 
ator near Barboursville, Ky. The proof is conclusive that claimant was 
a loyal citizen, and it is equally as well shown that the two mules were 
taken and used by the Army of the United States. The witnesses 
differ a little as to the value of the mules, one witness fixing the value 
at 1150 each, and the other at $200 each. The committee fix the value 
at the sum of $200 each, making $400 for the two, and this sum they rec- 
ommend be paid claimant. The committee think there is nothing in the 
statement of the agent of the Quartermaster-General that claimant 
purchased these mules from some men residing in a State in insurrec- 
tion, there being absolutely nothing in the record to show any collu- 
sion or bad faith in any part of the transaction. 

The committee are of opinion that the claim should be allowed, and 
therefore recommend that the bill do pass. 



lOoNGEBSS, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. (Report 
$t Session. f . (No. I6!i6. 



GEOkGE CONWAY. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Richardson, from the Committee od War Claims, submitted tho 

following 

REPORT: 

fTo accompany bill H. K. 4141.] 

Committee on War Claims^to tthomwas referred the bill {H.RAl^l) 
for the relief of George Conway, stibinit the follotmng report : 

e claimant in this case is 6eorge Conway, who was captain of the 
Voltigeur. It appears that on or about the 2oth day of April, 
bis vessel was at New York City ; wns loaded with hay belong- 

the Government, and was about to sail for Fortress Muuroe. 
vessel belonged to the Government. While waiting for orders 
essel in some way caught on fire, and the captain being unable to 
guish tho. flames deemed it wise to run the bark to the shallow 
•on the Jersey shore and scuttle her. This he did. The vessel 
ifterwards raised, and was sold for $7,500 bj' the Quartermaster- 
ral. The captain had his supplies on board, together with his 
cal instruments, all his own personal property, and some were lost 
lestroyed. It appears that the captain might have saved his prop- 
but he alleges that he was so intent upon protecting the interests 
B Government that he gave no attention to his own. 

3 claimant now asks that the United States make good his loss, 

1 he says occurred to him on account of his devotion to the interests 
B Government he was serving, and the neglect of his own personal 
)st8 and property. He insists that he was damaged to the amount 
,934.24 by the losses he sustained. The committee think the 
ict of the captain was unselfish and praiseworthy, but they do 
aink he did more than was his duty. The safety of the vessel and 

had been confided to him. He was employed and paid to navi- 
the bark, and take care of and protect the property intrusted to 
antrol and custody. To have forgotten his trust, or permitted 
3e imperiled, to look after his private property would have been 
)fessional and unbecoming an officer. His first duty in such a case 

save the property of the Government — a duty and responsibility 

1 he assumed when he hired himself to take charge of the vessel. 
3 committee, in coming to this conclusion, do not mean to say that 
son in the service of the Government may not go beyond the line 
ict duty, and the requirements of his position, and save public 
Tty at a loss to himself, for which compensation should be made; 



1 



2 GEORGE CONWAY. 

but in this case, considering all the facts, the committee think the claim 
should be rejected. In saving the property on the vessel, the captain 
acted as agent for the Government, and what he saved was saved for 
the Government alone. The Government lost more property by the fire 
than its agent, the captain, lost, and might make some question against 
him that proper care was not taken by him to prevent the fire. 
The committee recommend that the bill do lie on the table. 



JTH Congress, { HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ) Repori'^ 
Ut Session, I ( No. 1627. 



KATHARINE C. B. MERRILL, EXECUTRIX. 



kPBiL 15. 18^. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to ba 

printed. 



Mr. Richardson, from the Committee ou War Claims, submitted tbe 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7878.1 

The Committee on War Claims^ to whom teas referred the report and accom- 
panying papers in the case of Katharine C. B. Merrill^ executrix of 
Ayres P, Merrill, deceased, late of Natchez, Miss,, have considered the 
fame, and respectfully report : 

That during the Forty eighth Congress a law was passed directing- 
be Qaartermaster-General to investigate and report the amount and 
aloe of stores and supplies taken from the plantations of said Ayres 
\ Merrill, in the vicinity of Natchez, Miss., and used by the Army of 
!ie United States during the late rebellion, and also to report all the 
lets and evidence for the consideration of Congress. 
Congress appears to have been entirely satisfied from the testimony 
1 file, consisting of statements by Generals Grant, Gresham, Ransom^ 
*ocker, and others, that said Merrill was loyal during the rebellion^ 
id for that reason did not direct the Quartermaster-General to in- 
tire into his loyalty. At the instance and request, however, of the 
ecntrix the investigating agent took additional testimony touching 
fealty, fully establishing to the satisfaction of the Quartermaster- 
meral that said Ayres P. Merrill was loyal to the Government during 
e entire rebellion. 

Ihe agent designated to make the investigation was one of the most 
refnl, experienced, and trusted agents of the Department. From his 
[)ort it appears that he went uiK)n the plantations and had the fields 
^asured, and the sites of the cribs, some of which have been since de- 
x)yed, also accurately measured, and their size and capacity proved 

fully as it could be done. The number of mules was proved by 
aimony showing the number of single and double plows used on 
ch plantation, as well as by the evidence of the blacksmith by whom 
e mules were shod. The agent reported that the witnesses examined 
peared to be in nearly every instance honest and truthful. Fourteen 

the witnesses named by him, he says, are in intelligence above the 
erage of their race and condition in life, and that their statements 
D, he believes, be relied on. He mentions some as being particularly 
ight and trustworthy. 

Stores and supplies were taken from four plantations. The home 
ftoe or residence of Mr. Merrill, called Elms Court, was 2 miles from 
itchez and contained 200 acres. Six miles from said city was a planta* 



2 KATHARINE C. B. MERRILL, EXECUTRIX. 

tion called Hedges, containing 1,081 acres. In Louisiana, 5 and 6 miles 
below Natchez, were two plantations called Scotland and Saint Geue- 
vieve, each containing from GOO to 800 acres of land cleared for cultiva- 
tion. Only proi)ert.v taken and used by the array and embraced iu the 
term "stores and supplies" was investigated by the agent, and bisiu- 
vestigation appears to have been thorough and exhaustive. Tbeageut 
reported that he was satisfied he had gone under rather than above the 
quantities and numbers taken by the army. 

It appears from the evidence that Mr. Merrill was on friendly and in- 
timate terms with the Federal officers in command at Natchez, and that 
liis house was a place of resort for them while he remained there. 

The army reached Natchez about July 15, 1863. and about Septeinljer 
15, following, Mr. Merrill left with his wife for New- York City. It ap- 
pears also that he voluntarily offered to the officers iu command auy 
8tock, grain, or other property he had, anticipating that payment would 
be made him, which would i)robably have been done had he remained 
in Mississippi. Possessed at that time of considerable means, he did 
not press the matter of his claim, but rather left it in the hands of the 
officers at Natchez for settlement. 

About 1871 or 1872 the health of Mr. Merrill became bad, and partl5 
on this account, and partly on account of financial reverses, he could doi 
prosecute his claim before the Southern Claims Commission. Undei 
the law he would have been required to bring his witnesses to Wasli 
ington from four plantations, besides witnesses to prove his loyalty 
which would have involved an expense of several thousand dollang 
For the re^ason that he could not incur this expense, and his healtJ 
rendering him unable to undergo the labor of bringing his witnesses t 
Washington, Congress passed the law refeired to for his relief, direct 
ing the investigation. 

About ten years after the property was taken, and when Mr. Merril 
was in the city of New York, and in bad health, he dictated to one o 
his daughters the items of his losses as then remembered by him. Free 
the testimony this paper was not intended to be an accurate statemen 
of his losses, nor could he possibly know, as he left Mississippi befor 
much of the property was taken. Some of the property taken and use 
by the army, as appears by the report of the agent and the accompany 
ing evidence, was omitted entirely from the memorandum, being eithe 
forgotten or overlooked at the time. When the executrix and execute 
presented their petition to Congress by their attorney, they aUeged ths 
a large quantity of stores and supplies was taken, and they prayed thf 
the Quartermaster-General be directed to investigate the amount of lo( 
snstained by said Ayres P. Merrill by the taking and use of his pro] 
erty. 

The investigating agent, who appears to have been one of the moi 
faithful and competent in the service, after a thorough and exhaustii 
investigation on the ground, reported the value of the stores and sa] 
plies so taken at $67,536. From this he deducted the sum of $1,010, tl 
jioHHint of a voucher paid said Merrill, as appears by the records of tl 
Treasury Department, leaving the sum of $66,526, and for which sa 
he recommends payment. When he transmitted his report and tl 
evidence to the Quartermaster-General that officer was of the opinic 
that the memaromdum referred to was the elaim^ and that no item coui 
be considered unless embraced in the memorandum. In his report i 
Coogress he therefore omits the items of hogs, fencing, molasses, and 
part of the com on the Hedges place, for the reason only that they ai 
iMt Darned in the memorandum, though they are ^^ stores and supplies 



KATHARINE C. B. MERRILL, EXECUTRIX. 3 

Tom tbe report and accompanyiDg evidence of the agent their 
g and use appear to have been as fully proved as the other prop- 
Omitting these items the Qaartermaster^General recommends the 
)f 951,392.50, less the $1,010 previously paid, making $50,382.50. 
er the report was made by the investigating agent additional testi- 
was taken, not within reach of the agent, but under directions of 
Quartermaster-General, and this testimony appears to establish an 
ional amount of property taken and used to the extent of $1,200, 
amount being admitted by the Quartermaster-General and being 
dLced in his report. If this sum is added to the amount reported 
e agent it will make $67,726. 

ar committee, however, being divided upon the question of allow- 
le whole amount of "stores and supplies" established by the evi- 
j, or limiting the allowance to the sum reported by the Quarter- 
)r-General, have concurred in reporting the latter sum. 
By therefore report the accompanying bill, appropriating the sum 
0,382.50, and recommend its passage. 



J 



49th Congbess, ) HOUSE OF REPEESENTATIVES. i Rbport 
1st SesHon. f \ Ko. 1628. 



ELIZABETH HENDERSON. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. HiESTAND, from the Committee on War Claims, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 2178.] 

The Committee an Claims j to wham was referred the bill {JS, B. 2178) far 
the relief af Elizabeth Render san^ submit the fallavoing repart : 

Your committee have considered this bill, and have directed that it 
be recommended to the House that it do not pass, and that it be laid on 
the table. 



4»rH Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENT ATIYBS. ) Report 
lit 8e$Hon. f \ No. 1629. 



BONDS OF EXECUTORS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 



April 15, 18H6.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Hemphill, from the Committee on tbe District of Columbia, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bin H. R. 7879.] 

The Committee on tbe District of Columbia, to whom was referred 
tbe bill (H. R. 3189) to amend tbe law relating to executors in the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, respectfully report that they have had the same 
UDder consideration, and.recognizing the necessity for such a provision 
of law as is aimed at, submit the following substitute for said bill, with 
tbe recommendation that the House bill lie on the table and the sub- 
stitute do pass. 



A BILL to amend the law relating to the bonds of execatore in the District of Colombia. 

Be it enacted bjf the Senate and House of Sepreaentatives of the United States of America 
M Congress assembledy That if henever hereafter a testator shall, by last will and t66- 
tufient; request that his executor or executors be not required to give bond for the 
performance of his or their duty as such executor or executors, then and in such case 
the bond required of such executor or executors shall be in such penalty as the court 
may consider sufficient to secure the payment of the debts due by said testator ; and 
•aid bond shaU be conditioned accordingly, and shaU be in no other or greater penalty : 
Prwided, however j That the penalty of this bond shall not exceed double the value of 
the estate ; and when less than this sum, may be increased, or an additional bond be 
reoaired, whenever it shall be made to appear to the court that the bond as given is in- 
sufficient to secure the payment of the debts of the testator : And provided further. 
That whenever any creditor or distributee or legatee entitled to take under the saia 
^11 shall make it appear to the court that any executor who has given such bond 
only as is herein provided for is wasting the assets of the estate, or that the assets in 
the hands of such executor are in danger of being lost, wasted, or misappropriated, 
then and in such case the court shall have power to remove said executor or require 
him to give additional bond, with security in penalty sufficient to secure the interests 
of all the creditors and distributees or legatees entitled to take as aforesaid, and 
conditioned accordingly; and on hisjfailure to give bond or bonds as aforesaid, as re- 
qnired by the court, within a time named by such court, his letters testamentary shall 
be revoked forthwith. 



ttra CoNOBESS, > HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
1st Session. § \ No*. 1630. 



BOOKMAKING AND POOLSELLING IN THE DISTRICT OP 

COLUMBIA. 



April 15, 1886. — Referred to the Hoase Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Hemphill, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. &044.] 

The Committee on the Distrwt of Columbiaj to whom was re/erred the bill 
r£r. R, 5044) to prohibit book-making of any kind and pool-selling in the 
IHsirict of Columbia^ for the purpose of gaming j have had the said bill 
under consideration^ and respectfully report : 

They propose certain amendments to the bill confining the operation 
of it to the District, extending its terms to embrace boat-races, races of 
any kind, and contests of any kind, and fixing the minimum penalty for 
ite violation at $25, instead of $100, and recommend that the bill, as 
amended by the committee, do pass. 

The bill, with proposed amendments, is herewith appended as part 
of this report. 



A BILL to prohibit book-making of any kiad md pool-selliDg in the District of Columbia for the pur* 

pose of gftmiog. 

Be it enacted hy the Senate and Havse of Representatives of the United States of America 
in Congress assembled. That it f^hall be unlawful for any person or persons, or associ- 
ation of persons, in tne District of Columbia, to bet, gamble, or make books and pools 
00 the result of any trotting-race or running-race of horses, or boat-race, or race ot any 
kind, or on any election, or contest of any kind. 

Ssc. 2. That any nerson or persons, or association of persons, yiolatiug the provis- 
ions of this act, shall be fined not exceeding |500 nor less than $25, or be imprisoued 
not more than ninety nor less than thirty days, or both, at the discretion of the court . 



t 



^H Congress, \ HOUSE OF KEPRESENTATIVES. i Eepoet 
lit Sesiion. i \ No. 1631. 



TO PUNISH THE SELLING AND ADVERTISING OF LOTTERY 
TICKETS IN THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 



April 15, 1866. — Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Hemphill, from the Committee on the District of Columbia, sub- 
mitted the following 

EEPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7880.] 

The Committee on the I>i8trict of Columbia^ to whom was referred the hill 
{H, R. 2294) to punish the selling and advertising of lottery ticlcets in the 
District of Columbia^ have considered the same, and respectfully report : 

They are informed by the District Commissioners that the sale of lot- 
tery tickets is already prohibited in the District by existing law ; but 
that the police complain that it is difficult to enforce the law, in con- 
sequence of the continued publication of lottery drawings, and that 
by use of the mails and express companies much business is carried 
on, to the detriment of many persons, and especially of the ignorant 
poor. The committee recommend that the words "selling and" be 
stricken from and that the words " and for other purposes " be added 
to the title of the bill; that another section, looking especially to the 
prevention of advertising all lottery schemes and devices, be substituted 
for section 1 ; that section I be stricken out, as covered by existing law, 
and that the penalties denounced by the bill be somewhat modified, all 
of which amendments fully appear in the accompanying bill; and that 
the bill so amended do pass. 



»rH Ck>i!fOSE8S, > HOUSE OF EEPRESENTATIVBS. / Bepobt 
iMt 8e99ian. f ) No. 1633. 



MANUSCRIPTS BELONGING TO THE UNITED STATES. 



IntiL 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase on the state of 

the Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. SiNGLETONy from the Joint Comuittee on the Library, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill 8. 1851.1 

The Joint Committee on the Library, to whom was referred the bill 
(S. 1851) establishing a commission to report to Congress on mana- 
ficripts belonging to the Government, have had the same under consid- 
eration, and report the same back with a recommendation that it do 
pass. 

The bill does not provide for any expenditure of money, but only 
looks to the raising a commission whose duty it shall be to inquire into 
the character and value of manuscripts belonging to the Government, 
and propose some plan for editing and publishing the same. We have 
many valuable manuscripts, some of which have been acquired by pur- 
chase and others by donation. Among them are the Franklin, the 
Bocbambeau papers, and a copy of the records of Virginia made the 
first year or two after her settlement. The bill provides that the Sec- 
retary of State, the Librarian of Congress, and the Secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institution shall constitute the commission, and report to 
Congress their opinion as to the best means of giving publicity to these 
historical manuscriptet. 



I Congress, \ HOUSE OP EEPEBSENTAlTV^o^ . __ 
it Session. ) ( No. 



BTERNATIONAL POLAE EXPEDITION TO LADY FRANKLIN 

BAY, 



iPRiL 15, 1886.~Coii]mitted to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Babksdaxe, from the Committee on Printing, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

FTo accompany Senate concurrent resolution.] 

The Committee on Printing, to whom was referred Senate concurrent 
resolution providing for the printing of the Bei>ort of the International 
Polar Expedition to Lady Franklin Bay, Grinnell Land, as herewith 
submitted, report the same favorably, and recommend its passage. 

The cost of printing the 4,500 copies is estimated at $8,877.37. 



49th Congress, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 

\ No. 1636. 



Ill Session, 



! 



REPORT OF COMMISSIONER OP EDUCATION. 



AnuL 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committer of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Babksdalb, from the Committee on Printing, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany Hoase concurrent resolution. J 

The Committee on Printing, to whom was referred Honse resolution 
providing for the printing of the report of the Commissioner of Educa- 
tion, have had the same under consideration, and report it back to the 
House with an amendment, as follows : Strike out ^^20,000" in the sev- 
enth line and insert ^< 25,000," so that it will read: 

^^Besolved by the House of Representatives {the Senate conourring)^ That 

cf the Report of the Commissioner of Education for 1884r-'S5 there be 

printed 6,000 copies for the use of the Senate, 12,000 copies for the 

ose of the House, and 25,000 copies for distribution by the Commis- 

sioner." 

The estimated cost of printing the 43,000 copies is 927,023.50. 



ttTH CoNGEESS, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
1st Sessian. f ( No. 1636. 



CLASSIFICATION OF LABOR AND EQUALIZATION OF PAT 

OF EMPLOYES. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Hr. Ulemsnts, from the Committee on Reform in the Civil Service, 

submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. E. 5135.] 

The Committee on Reform in the Civil Service^ to whom was referred the bill 
IH, B. 5135) to classify and equalize the pay of the emphySs under the 
Government of the United States j beg leave to report : 

That they have had the same under consideration, and, having al« 
Teadj, re])orted with a favorable recommendation a bill with a similar 
object in view, they do recommend that this bill do not pass, and that 
it lie npon the table. 



i 



ONOKESS, ) HOUSE OF BEPBESENTATIVES. ( Bepobt 
Session. f ) No. 1637. 



*n I 



NDING THE EBVISED STATUTES RELATING TO 

YACHTS. 



L 15, 1886. — Beferred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



[ss, from the Committee on American Ship-Bnilding and Ship- 
Owning Interests, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1602.] 

3ommittee on American Ship-Building and Ship-Owning Inter- 

whom was referred the bill (H. K. 1602) amending the Revised 

s relating to steam yachts, having had the same nnder consid- 

f report it back to the Honse, with the following amendments : 

1 line 13, after the word ^^ yachts," insert ^^ of ten tons measore- 

• over." 

1 line 14, after the word "models," insert the word "and." 

1 line 17 strike ont the word "licensed," and insert in lieu thereof 

issioned only." 

1 line 20 strike ont the word "license," and insert in lieu thereof 

•d "commission" 

.lao strike out the words "the Secretary of the Treasury may 

3e," and insert in lieu thereof the words " that already prescribed 

identiiication of yachts and their owners." 

.fter the word "owners," in line 23, insert the word "exclu- 

trike out all after the word "to," in line 24, down to and includ- 
I word "Treasury," in line 28, and insert in lieu thereof "apply 

take out an official number of, and such steam yachts as are 
en tons measurement to be allowed to sail nnder the certificate 
L by the inspector-general of steamboats." 
a line 29 strike out the word "license," and insert in lieu thereof 
•d "commission," 

a line 34 strike out the words "enrolled and licensed," and in- 
lieu thereof the words " commissioned or certificated." 
In line 37 strike out the word "licensed," and insert in lieu 

the word "commissioned." 

Strike out all after the word " pilotage," in line 38, down to and 
ig the word " oflT," in line 39, and insert in lieu thereof the words 
s a pilot be employed or port duties not levied under." 
After the word " launches," in line 49, insert " used exclusively 
isure purposes." 

In line 50 strike out the word " thirty-five," and insert in lieu 
the word " fifty." 

Ln line 50 strike out the words "the master," and insert in lieu 
" a competent person." 



2 AMENDING THE REVISED STATUTES RELATING TO YACHTS. 

(15) In line 61, after the word " engineer," insert the following : "And 
shall not be included with the provisions of section 4481, except that 
such launches shall be provided with sufficient life-preservers as the 
local inspectors shall in each case, in their judgment, deem just and 
proper, in proportion to their tonnage and persons allowed by the in- 
spection certificate to be carried, such launches when attached to steam 
yachts shall be inspected as a portion of the equipment of such yachf^ 

(16) After the word " State,'' inline 58, add: ''Provided^ That nothing 
in this act shall be so construed as to exempt yachts from inspection by 
health officers as required by law." 

This bill is for the relief of owners of steam yachts solely used for 
pleasure, and has the approval of the officials of the Treasury Depart- 
ment, including the supervising inspector of the steamboat inspection 
service of the second or !N^ew York district. 

It will also, it is expected, stimulate to a great degree the building 
of steam yachts and launches by American ship-builders. The relief 
from port charges in coastwise trips will increase the number of visits 
to the various ports, all of which will have a tendency to increase the 
trade of the ports so visited, and thereby conduce to the pecuniary 
interests of such places by the encouragement of traffic on shore. 

Yachting is not only a matter of international importance and interest 
and worthy of consideration, but the passage of this bill will do mach 
also to encourage a very important industry, and will exert a large and 
favorable influence on ship-building and naval design in America. 

Your committee believe that this bill will furnish the relief desired and 
accomplish all .that is stated in the above report, and therefore recom- 
mend its passage. 



19th Congress, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. / Report 
Ut Session. f ( No. 1638. 



MEETING OF THE ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE- 
PRESIDENT, ETC. 



April 15, 1886. — Referred to the House Calendar and onlered to be printed. 



Mr. Caldwell, from the Select Committee ou the Election of Presi- 
dent and Vice-President, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill S. 9.] 

The committee has had under consideration Senate bill No. 9, to fix 
the day for the meeting of the Electors of President and Vice-President, 
and to provide for and regulate the counting of the votes for President 
iDd Vice-President and the decision of questions arising thereon, and 
report the same bac^ to the House with amendments, as follows: 

(1) A verbal amendment in the third section, line 22, insert, after the 
vords '* state of," the word "a," so that it shall read, ''state of a contro- 
versy or contest," &c. 

(2) A material amendment to section 4, lines 38, 39, is as follows : 
Strikeout after the words ''shall be rejected," the words "except by the 
Ifirmative votes of both houses," and insert after the word "one," in the 
anie line, the word "lawful," so that the clause shall read "and no 
lectoral vote or votes from any State from which but one lawful return 
las been received shall be rejected." 

The majority of the committee were of opinion that where there was 
iQt a single return from a State the two houses should not have the 
ower to reject the vote of the State. 

(3) A material amendment is to the same section (No. 4), lines 61, 62, 
3, after the word "which," to and including the word "State," at the 
3d of the sentence, strike out the words " the two houses, acting sepa- 
ktely, shall concurrently decide to be the lawful votes of the legally 
^pointed electors of such State," irid insert the words " were cast by 
lectors whose appointment shall have been duly certified under the 
jal of the State, by the executive thereof, in accordance with the laws 
r the State, unless the two houses, acting separately, shall concur- 
intly decide such votes not to be the lawful votes ot the legally ap- 
ointed electx)r8 of such State," so that the clause will read, "and in such 
ise of more than one return, or paper purporting to be a return, from a 
tate, if there shall have been no such determination of the question in 
le State aforesaid, then those votes, and those only, shall be counted 
hich were cast by electors whose appointment shall have been duly 
3rtified under the seal of the State, by the executive thereof, in accord- 
Dce with the laws of the State, unless the two houses, acting separately, 
aall concurrently decide such votes not to be the lawful votes of the le- 
ftUy appointed electors of such State." 

The bill as it passed the Senate provided that where there was more 
lan one return from the State, and no tribunal established in the State 



2 ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT, ETC. 

to decide the question between the contesting electors, only those votes 
should be counted which the two houses, acting separately, shoald con- 
cur in deciding were the lawful votes of the State. 

The committee were of the opinion that where there was more than one 
return from a State, and but a single State government, the vote of 
the State, legally certified by the executive to have been cast by the 
legally appointed electors should be counted, unless both houses con- 
cur in rejecting the vote. 

Should these amendments be adopted by the House and the bill pass, 
the mode of counting the electoral vote may be thus briefly stated. In 
those States where a tribunal has been established, under the laws there- 
of, for the determination of contests concerning the appointment of 
electors therein, and such tribunal has decided what electors were duly 
appointed, the determination of the State tribunal shall be conclusive. 
Where there is but one return from a State the vote so returned shall 
be counted. 

But in case there should arise the question which of two, or more, of 
such State authorities determining what electors have been appointed, 
is the lawful tribunal of such State, the votes of the electors of such State 
shall be counted, whose title as electors the two houses, acting separ- 
ately, shall concurrently decide is supported by the decision of such 
State so authorized by its laws. 

Under the amendment, where there is but one State government and 
two sets of returns, purporting to be the vote of the State, then that 
return shall be counted which is supported by the certificate of the ex- 
ecutive of the State, under the seal thereof and in accordance with its 
laws, unless both houses, acting separately, shall concur in deciding 
that the vote so certified and returned is not the lawful vote of the 
State. 

The bill provides the means of determining what is the vote, how it 
shall be counted, its count, and the authoritative declaration of the re- 
sult. 

The two houses are, by the Constitution, authorized to make the count 
of electoral votes. They can only count legal votes, and in doing so 
must determine, from the best evidence to be had, what are legal votes; 
and if they cannot agree upon which are legal votes, then the State 
which has failed to bring itself under the plain provisions of the bill, 
and failed to provide for the determination of all questions by her own 
authorities, will lose her vote. 

Congress having provided by this bill that the State tribunals may 
determine what votes are legal coming from that State, and that the 
two houses shall be bound by this determination, it will be that State's 
own fault if the matter is left in doubt. 

The power to determine rests with the two houses, and there is no other 
constitutional tribunal. 

Congress prescribes the details of the trial and what kind of e\'idence 
shall be received, and how the final judgment shall be rendered. 

The interests involved are too precious and the dangers too great to 
be left longer without adequate provisions against trouble and discord. 



»m CoNaBESS, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Rbp't 1638, 

) Part 2. 




f 



MEETING OF THE ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE- 

PRESIDENT, &C. 



April 30. 1886. — Referred to the House CaleDdar and ordered to be priut-ed. 



Mr. Dibble, from the Select Committee on Election of President and 
Vice-President, submitted the following as the 

VIEWS OF THE MINORITY: 

[To accompany bill S. 9.] 

The undersigned agree with the majority as to the constitutional pre- 
rogative of each State to appoint in its own way its electors for Presi- 
dent and Vice-President,* and determine and certify the result of such 
election, and are of the opinion that the two houses of Cougress simply 
act in a ministerial manner in securing an accurate count of the votes 
ftnd computation of the result. They therefore concur with the majority 
in supporting the amendment of the committee to strike out in section 
4, lines 38 and 39, the words "except by the affirmative vote of both 
houses." They do not concur in the amendment proposing to insert 
the word "lawful" after the word "one" in line 38, so that the expres- 
sion shall be "one lawful return" instead of "one return." They con- 
ceive that the word " lawful " may afford a pret>ext for usurpation by 
Congress of the very power which the committee intends to repudiate 
in striking out the words in lines 38 and 39. 

The undersigned cannot agree to the proposition embodied in the 
latter clause of the amendment proposed in section 4, lines 61, 62, and 
63, whereby in case of more than one return or paper purporting to be 
a return from a State, whenever' the State has failed by any determina- 
tion of its own to designate and certify which is its real vote, of the two 
or more thus coming before the two houses and claiming to be counted, 
after providing by the amendment that " those votes and those only 
shall be counted which were cast by electors whose appointment shall 
have been duly certified under the seal of the State, by the executive 
thereof, in accordance with the laws of the State," the majority, by the 
concluding clause of the amendment, provide that by the concurrent 
vote of both houses even this lawfully certified vote may be rejected, 
thus disfranchising a State, when there is a certificate under its seal^ 
duly certified by its executive, according to law. We cannot subscribe 
to a recognition of such power in the two houses. 

The Constitution prescribes that Congress may determine the day 
when the several electoral colleges shall cast their votes, which day 
shall be the same throughout the United States. Possibly votes cast 
on any other day by the electors are not lawful votes. But, up to the 
time of casting the votes in the electoral colleges, each State has the 
right, in cases of contest, of determining which are its lawfully chosen 
electors. Congress has no power to interfere with this right of deter- 
mination, by requiring it to be made at least six days prior to the cast- 



2 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS. 

ing of the electx)ral vote, as proposed in the second section of the bill. 
And in case a contention shall arise in a State as to who are its law- 
fnlly-chosen electors, and it should happen that no State law exists 
which will meet the emergency thus arising, we contend that Congress 
has no Constitational power to prescribe that such State may not pro- 
vide for the determination of such contention at any time prior to the 
day for casting the electoral vote. 

For these reasons the undersigned suggest a further amendment re- 
moving the restrictions of time upon the action of a State in making 
provision for determination of controversy concerning her choice of 
electors. 

The undersigned, therefore, submit the following additional amend- 
ments to the bill : 

(1) In section 2, lines 1, 2, and 3, strike out the words ^^ laws enacted 
prior to the day fixed for the appointment of the electors," and insert 
the word *^ law" ; and in line 8 of the same section strike out the words 
" so existing on said day." 

(2) In section 2, lines 5, 6, and 7, strike out the words '^ and such de- 
termination shall have been made at least six days before the time fixed 
for the meeting of the electors " ; and in line 9 in same section strike 
out the words ^' at least six days," and the word '^said" in same line. 

If the amendments are adopted, the section' will read as follows : 
" Seo. 2. That if any State shall have provided by law for its final 
determination of any controversy or contest concerning the appointment 
of all or any of the electors of such State, by judicial or other methods 
or procedures, such determination made pursuant to such law, and 
made prior to the time of meeting of the electors, shall be conclusive," 
&C. (the rest of the section being without amendment). 

(3) Amend the amendment proposed by the majority of the committee, 
numbered (3), by striking out from the said amendment the words ^^ un- 
less the two houses, acting separately, shall concurrently decide such 
votes not to be the lawful votes of the legally* appointed electors of sach 
State." 

A copy of the bill, as it will read if these amendments be adopted, is 
annexed hereto. 

DANIEL ERMENTROUT. 
. LEWIS BE ACE. 
JNO. T. HEARD. 
THOS. D. JOHNSTON. 
SAMUEL DIBBLE. 



[8.9.] 

A BILL to fix the day for meeting of the electors of President and Vioe-P resident, and to provide for 
and regulate the counting of the rotes for President and Vice-President, and the decision of qiies> 
tions arising thereon. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Eepreeentatives of the United Statee of Jmerioa 
in Congress assembled^ That the electors of each State shall meet and give their Totea 
on the second Monday in Jannary next following their appointment, at snch place in 
each State as the legislatnre of snch State shalldirect. 

Sbc. 2. That if any State shall have provided by law for its final determination of any 
controversy or contest concerning the appointment of all or any of the electors of 
snch State, by Judicial or other methods or procedures, and such determination shall 
have been made before the time fixed for the meeting of the electors, snch determina- 
tion made pursuant to snch law,, and made prior to the said time of meeting of the 
•lectors, shall be conclusive, and shall govern in the counting of the electoral votes a* 



PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS. 6 

in the Constitution, and as hereinafter regulated, so far as the ascertain- 
fehe electors appointed hy snch State is concerned. 

That it shall he the duty of the executive of each State, as soon aspractica- 
the conclusion of the appointment of electors in such State, by the final 
iment under and in pursuance of the laws of snch State providing for snch 
iment, to communicate, under the seal of the State, to the Secretary of State 
nited States, a certificate of such ascertainment of the electors appointed, 
orth the names of such electors and the canvass or other ascertainment under 
of such State of the nnmher of votes given or cast for each person for whose 
aent anv and all votes have been given or cast ; and it shall also thereupon 
ity of the executive of each State to deliver to the electors of snch State, on 
) the day on which they are required by the preceding section to meet, the 
tificate, in triplicate, under the seal of the State ; ana such certificate shall 
led and transmitted by the electors with and at the same time and in the same 
as is provided by law for transmitting by snch electors to the seatof Govem- 
i lisle of all penTons voted for as President and of all persons voted for as Vice- 
it ; and section one hundred and thirty-six of the Revised Statutes is hereby re- 
and if there shall have been any final determination in a State of a contro- 
contest as provided for in section two of this act, it shall be the duty of the 
e of such State, as soon as practicable after such determination, to communi- 
der the seal of the State, to the Secretary of State of the United States, a 
te of such determination, in form and manner as the same shall have been 
md the Secretary of State of the United States, as soon as practicable after 
ipt at the State Department of each of the certificates hereinbefore directed 
insniitted to the Secretary of State, shall publish, in such public newspaper 
all designate, snch certificates in full ; and at the first meeting of Congress 
er he shall transmit to the two houses of Congress copies in full of each and 
ch certificate so received theretofore at the State Department. 
I. That Congress shall be in session on the second Wednesday in February 
ng every meeting of the electors. The Senate and House of Representatives 
tet in the Hall ofthe House of Representatives at the hour of 1 o'clock in the 
n on that day, and the President of the Senate shall be their presiding officer, 
ers shall be previously appointed on the part of the Senate and two on the part of 
se of Representatives, to whom shall be handed, as they are opened by thePresi- 
the Senate, all the certificates and papers purporting to be certificates of the 

I votes, which certificates and papers shall be opened, presented, and acted 
the alphabetical order of the States, beginning with the letter A ; and said 
having then read the same in the presence and hearing of the two honses, 
lake a Mat of the votes as they shall appear from the said certificates ; 
votes having been ascertained and counted in the manner and according to 
s in this act provided, the result of the same shall be delivered to the Presi- 
the Senate, who shall thereupon announce the state of the vote, and the 
f the persons, if any, elected, which annonncement shall be deemed a sufficient 
ion of the persons, if any, elected President and Vice-President of the United 
ind, together with a list of the votes, be entered on the journals of the two 

Upon such reading of any such certificate or paper, the President of the 
ihall call for objections, if any. Every objection shall be made in writing, 

II state clearly and concisely, and without argument, the ground thereof, and 
signed by at least one Senator and one member of the House of Representa- 

fore tlie same shall be received. When all objections so made to anv vote or 
x>m a State shall have been received and read, the Senate shall thereupon 
.w, and such objections shall be submitted to the Senate for its decision; 

Speaker of the House of Representatives shall, in like manner, submit such 
ns to the House of Representatives for- its decision ; and no electoral vote 

from any State fh>m which but one return has been received shall be re- 

If more than one return or paper purporting to be a return from a State 
ive been received by the President of the Senate, those votes, and those 
all be counted which shall have been regularly given by the electors who 
wn by the evidence mentioned in section 2 of this act to have been appointed, 
3termination in said section provided for shall have been made, or by such 
irs or substitutes, in case of a vacancy in the board of electors so ascer- 
as have been appointed to fill such vacancy in the mode provided by the laws 
tate ; but in case there shall arise the question which of^two or more of such 
ibnnals determining what electors have been appointed, as mentioned in sec- 
f this act, is the lawful tribnnal of snch State, the votes regularly given of 
ectors, and those only, of snch State shall be counted whose title as electors 

houses, acting separately, shall concurrently decide is supported by the de- 
f the tribnnafof such State so authorized by its laws ; ana in such case of 
an one return or paper purporting to be a return from a State, if there shall 
en no snch determination of the qaeetion in the State aforesaid, then those 



4 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS. 

votes, aud those only, shall be counted which were cast by electors whose appoint* 
ment shall have been duly certified under the seal of the State, by the execativQ 
thereof, iu accordance with the laws of the State. When the two houses hare ?oted, 
they shall immediately again meet, and the presidinji^ officer shall then annonocethe 
decision of the questions submitted. No vot<3s or papers from any other Sta'e shall 
be acted upon until the objeotious previously made to the votes or papers from aoy 
State shall have been finally disposed of. 

Sec. 5. That while the two houses shall be in meeting as provided iu this act the 
President of the Senate shall have power to preserve order; and no debate shall be 
allowed and no question shall be put by the presiding officer except to either home 
on a motion to withdraw. 

Sec. 6. Then when the two houses separate to decide upon an objection that may 
have been made to the counting of an electoral vote or votes from any State, or other 
question rising in the matter, each Senator and Representative may speak to soch 
objection or question five minutes, and not more than once ; but after such debate 
shall have lasted two hours it shall be the duty of the presiding officer of each hoofie 
to put the main question without further debate. 

Sec. 7. That at such joint meeting of the two houses seats shall be provided as fol- 
lows : For the President of the Senate, the Speaker's chair ; for the Speaker, imme- 
diately upon his left ; the Senators, in th« body of the hall upon the right of the pre- 
siding officer ; for the Representatives, in the body of the hall not provided for the 
Senators; for the tellers. Secretary of the Senate, and Clerk of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, at the Clerk's desk ; for the other officers of the two houses, in front of 
the Clerk's desk and upon each side of the Speaker's platform. Sach joint meeting 
shall not be dissolved- until the count of electoral votes shall be completed and the 
result declared ; and no recess shall be taken unless a question shall nave arisen in 
regard to counting any such votes, or otherwise under this act, in which case it shall 
be competent for either house, acting separately, in tie manner hereinbefore pro- 
vided, to direct a recess of such house not beyond the next calendar day, Sunday ex- 
cepted, at the hour of ten o'clock in the forenoon. But if the counting of the electo- 
ral votes and the declaration of the result shall not have been completed before the 
fifth calendar day next after such first meeting of the two houses, no further or other 
recess shall be taken by either house. 



«TH CONOBESS, ) HOUSE OF EEPRESEJTTATIVBS. ( Bspobt 
Ut Senion. | ) No. 1639. 



THOMAS E. WARE. 



April 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. TucKEB, from the Gomtnittee on the Judiciary, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. B. 7881.] 

The Committee on the Judiciary have had under consideration the 
petition of Thomas R. Ware, of Virginia, for the removal of his x>olitical 
disabilities, and respectfully recommend the passage of the biU which 
is herewith rei>orted. 



49th Congress, \ HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES. / Report 
lit Sesmn. ) ) No. 1640. 



JOHN McO. PERKINS. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. TuGKEB, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

21^ Committee on the Judiciary^ to whom has been referred the memorial of 
John McClay Perkins^ of Massachusetts^ praying for the impea^chment of 
Thomas L. NelsoUj judge of the district court of the United States for the 
State of Massa^^husetts^ have duly considered the samCy and beg leave to 
report thereon : 

The charge made is substantially as follows : 

In a patent case, under the style of Andrew B. Hendryx et aL v. 
John B. Fitzpatrick, the defendant was adjudged guilty of contempt in 
eqnitj for willfully violating an injunction granted in said case, and 
va« fiued therefor June 4, 1883. The memorialist alleges he was one 
of the petitioners in said case. 

The memorial states that the fine was imposed by virtue of the pro- 
^sions of section 725 of the Revised Statutes of the United States. 

The first fine,asstated by the memorialist, was for the master's charges, 
f t218, which the defendant refused to pay ; whereupon an attachment 
^ ordered against him, to confine him in jail until he paid the same, 
be defendant paid said sui^ of $218, as ordered by the court. 
On the 12th of June, 1883, defendant again refused to pay another sum 

money, $892.06, as ordered by the court on June 4, 1883. 
The memorial states, further, that on the 13th of June, 1883, Thomas 

Nelson, judge of the district court, acting as circuit judge, on motion 

the petitioners, ordered a process of attiichment against said defend- 
it, and that he be confined in jail until he ^aid the said sum of (892.96. 
Dder this process defendant was confined m jail by the marshal of the 
>urt. 

Memorialist then states, as his conclusion from the facts and the law 
>plicable to them, that defendant could only be released upon a pay- 
entof the said sumor by a pardon from the President. Hecharges that 
a was one of petitioners, and also attorney for them, and was absent 
L the city of Washington, as the court and its clerk well knew, when 
homas L. Nelson, judge as aforesaid, on the 26th of June, 1883, un- 
iwfully, willfully, and corruptly ordered, in the name of the President 
P the United States, the marshal to remove and release the defendant 
t>m jail ; upon which order the defendant was released by the marshal. 

Memorialist charges that, in so ordering the release of defendant, the 
|id judge violated his oath of office to obey the Constitution and laws 
' the United States, and, practically, and in effect, usurped a peroga- 
^e of the President of the United States, and that he did this with- 



2 JOHN M'C. PERKINS. 

out any attempt to ^ive memorialist any notice of his intention to ri> 
lease said defendant. 

Such is the charge made by memorialist, upon which the House o 
Representatives is asked to impeach Judge Thonuis L. Nelson. 

The charge that it was done unlawfully, willfully, and corruptly ha 
no averment of the memorial to sustain it but the facts already men 
tioned. No corrupt motive is shown ; nor wherein any corruption c 
the judg^was attempted or was exercised. The willfulness and unla? 
fulness of the action must be tested by a reference to the law cited b 
the memorialist and by the record. 

Your. committee, because the memorial was imperfect in citing tl 
record of the action of the judge, thought it best to obtain the reoor 
and examine into the question fully upon its merits, as disclosed by tl 
record. That record is herewith appended and marked A. 

By the record it appears, ^' in the matter of complainant's petition I 
have said defendant adjudged to be in contempt," on the 13th of Jan 
1883, that Nelson, J., alter reciting that on the 4:th of June, 1883, sa 
defendant was adjudged in contempt, and was ordered to pay, ou t1 
12th of June. 1883, a tine of $892.96, «' for the use of the petitiouen 
and that saia money was not paid as ordered ; that for the content] 
&c., a warrant to commit said defendant to jail be issued, and there 
to keep him '' until said sum of (892.96 is paid, or until the furtli 
order of the court.'' 

By reference at this point to the Revised Statutes of the United Stat 
section 725, it will appear that — 

The said courts shall have power to impose and administer aU necessary oaths, i 
to puuish by tiae or imprisonment, at the discretion of the court, ontempts of tli 
authority. 

And under the proviso of said section, this power extends ^^to 1 
disobedience or resistance by any party, juror, witness, or other pers 
to any lawful writ, process, order, rule, decree, or command of the si 
courts." 

From this section the courts derive their power to imprison for c< 
tempt of their authority and the power is to imprison at the disoretion 
the court. The authority granted is for the enforcement of judic 
orders, and is limited by judicial discretion. The penalty, of imprisi 
ment is the means provided to secure the enforcement of the judic 
order, and is expressly to be limited as to time and mode of imprist 
ment by the discretion of the court ; when that discretion limits the ti 
beyond which the imprisonment cannot extend the term of imprisi 
ment is tixed by judicial power, and requires no executive interventi 
to secure a release. If the term of imprisonment was fixed at ten da. 
imprisonment after the ten days expii*ed would cease, because it woi 
be illegal. 

By recurring to the terms of the order for the imprisonment of tl 
defendant, it will be seen there are two limitations as to the time 
imprisonment. It shall continue until he pays the sum of $892.96, ^* 
until the further order of the court." The court reserved to itself, in 
order for the imprisonment, in the discretion with which it was invest 
by the law, to terminate the imprisonment when it willed to do i 
When the court thereafter decided to order his release it usurped 
executive prerogative; it only exercised its own discretionary po^ 
according to the terms of its original order for imprisonment under tl 
section of the Revised Statutes. 

Pursuing the examination of the record, it will be seen that the w 



JOHN m'c. PERKINS. 3 

raot of commitment followed the language of the order, '* until said sum 
of $892.96 is paid, pursuant to said order, or until the further order of 
the courf 

On the 21st of June, 1883, an order was entered upon the petition of 
the imprisoned defendant, in which it was averred by him that he had 
so property, and could not pay the sum of $892.96, as ordered ; that he 
may be examined as to his means, &c. ; that a commission of the court 
be specially appointed to examine said defendant on oath as to his es- 
tate and effects, the disposal thereof, and his ability to pay said sum of 
money, '^ and to hear any legal and pertinent evidence that may be in- 
troduced relating thereto, by said John B. Fitzpatrick or said Hendryx 
it al.j the original petitioners or their attorneys.^ The commissioner 
was authorized to administer the oath under chapter 162, section 39, of 
the public statutes of Massachusetts, if he shall be satisfied he can 
trothfully take it; and commissioner was ordered to report and to give 
notice of the proceedings befoi:e him to said Hendryx et a/., and it was 
expressly provided that though defendant was to be brought before the 
commissioner by habeas corpus^ it wa^ not to operate a discharge of the 
defendant. 

Sabsequeutly defendant, under order of the court, gave bond with 
security conditioned for his appearance from day to day before said com- 
missioner. 

On the 3d of November, 1883, defendant purged himself of his con- 
tempt by averring his total inability to pay, and refers to the poor debtor's 
oath taken by him before the commissioner under the previous order of 
the conrt, and to the report of the commissioner made under said order. 

On the 9th of November, 1883, upon his personal recognizance to ap- 
pear from day to day of each term of the court until the entry of final 
decree in the cause, and to answer such matters as shall be alleged 
against him in the matter of said alleged contempt, and shall do what is 
enjoined on him by the court, &c., the said defendant was discharged. 

Subsequently, in April, 1884, this matter of contempt came to be heard 
before Lowell and Nelson, J J., in the circuit court of the United States, 
district of Massachusetts, upon the motion of the plaintiff to recom- 
mit the defendant under the original order. 

Lowell, J., delivered an elaborate opinion, in which he reviews a num- 
berof authorities, and the court, under the sanction of his opinion, denied 
the motion to recommit. Judge Lowell, in his opinion, maintains as 
the result of the cases he cites that a fine as in this case, for the ben- 
eiitof the plaintiffs, was not a criminal penalty, not a compensation by 
civil remedy, a conclusion which your committee think is justified by 
reason and the authorities. (See Appendix B.) 

Upon this review of the record the committee state their conclusions : 

(1) The original order of commitment limited the term of improve- 
ment until the further order of the court, and no pardon of the Presi- 
dent was' needed to release the prisoner when the court ordered his 
discbarge in its judicial discretion ; that determined the imprisonment 
according to the conditions upon which it was originally ordered. In 
this view the discussion in Judge Lowell's opinion is unnecessary to 
vindicate the propriety of the release. 

(2) That discretion was properly exercised to release the defendant 
when he purged himself of his contempt by satisfactory proof that he 
could not do what the court ordered, and that his failure was from in- 
ability and not from disobedience or resistance. To have refused the 
discharge on such proof would have been judicial cruelty, and is not 
judicial usurpation of executive prerogative. 



4 JOHN m'C. PERKINS. 

(3) There is DothiDg to create even a suspicion of corraption in this 
case. The action of Judge Nelson has the sanction of the opinion of 
Judge Lowell, and the charge of corruption is as plausible against the 
one as the other, and is groundless as to both. 

(4) Your committee do not think for the reasons above given, that 
the discharge of the defendant was either unlawful or willful. Bat if 
your committee thought the order of discharge wrong in point of law, 
the error imputed would neither lesKcn respect for the ability of the 
court nor awaken a suspicion of the honorable and conscientions mo- 
tives which controlled the judges comprising it. Impeachment by ar- 
ticle 2, section 4, of the Constitution can only be for " treason jbribery^ 
or other high crimes and misdemeanors." A mistake as tx> the law 
must be made by some of the judges of every court wherein a differ- 
ence of opinion occurs. If such mistakes were high crimes and mis- 
demeanors, impeachment would be of daily occurrence and the judi- 
cial term of office would be for short terms. Judges cannot therefore 
be impeached merely for errors of judgment nor are they civilly liable 
to a party injured for them. (Randall v. Brigham, 8 Wall., 523.) The 
error imputed must indicate either gross incapacity for the office or 
flagrant prejudice or a. corrupt purpose. Kothing of either of these 
appears in this case. 

Your committee therefore report back the memorial, to be filed with 
and as part of this report, with a recommendation that it do lie on the 
table. 



A. 

[Circnit court of the United Staten, district of Maasachnaetts. In eqaity. No. 1812. Andrew B. 
■ Hendry X et al., coroplainanta, v. John B. Fitzpatrick, defendant. In the matt«r of c-ompUinftoU' 
petition to have aaid defendant adjudged to he in contempt. Order of courL June 13, 1883.] 

Nei^ON, I. : 

Whereas on the 4th clay of June, A. D. 1883, said John B. Fitzpatrick was a<ijudged 
to be in contempt, for which offense it was on said 4th day of June, ordered, adjudged 
and decreed by said court that said John B. Fitzpatrick, among other thinj::^, pay a 
, fine of ^92.90 and the costs of the proceeding against him, the said sum of $892.96 
to be paid into the registry of said court for the use of the petitioners, on or before 
the l*>^th day of June, A. 1). 1883. 

And whereas the said sum has not l)eon paid into court pursuant to said order, 

It is now, to wit, June 13, ordered thav. for tlie contempt aforesaid by the non-pay- 
ment of -said sum, a warrant to commit said John B. Fitzpatrick issue t« tht* marshal 
of said district commanding him to arrest the said Fitzpatrick, and to convey and de- 
liver into the custody of the keeper of the jail in Boston, in said district, the said 
John B. Fitzpatrick, to be kept in said jail until said sum of $892.96 is paid, or until 
the further order of court. 

By the court. 

ALEX. H. TROWBRIDGE. 

Deputy Clrrk* 



[Warrant io commit.] 

United States of America, 

Masaachuaeits District^ 88 : 

To the marshal of our district of Massachusetts, or either of his deputies, and t^ 
keeper of the jail in Boston, in the county of Suftolk, in our said district, greeting 

These are in the name of the President of the United States of America tocominaO^ 
you, the said marshal or deputies, and each of you, forthwith to arrest, to convey, aO^ 
deliver into the custody of the keeper of our said jail the body of John B. Fitzpatrick* 
of Boston, in said di8trict,who hath been convicted in our Circuit Court of the Unit*?^ 
States for the first circuit, now holden at Boston, within and for the district of Ma^ 







J be Did 

t do Iter iC 






lie- 



1 >aiii til *^.i' 
® P«i<i or jr 



JOHN m'c. PERKINS. 

BMhoaetts, of the crime of a contempt of the order and decree of this conrt made 
the 4th day of June, A. D. 1883, ordering among other things that said John B. Fi 
]>atrick pay the anm of $892,96 into the registry of said court for the nse of the p< 
tiooers in the canse of Andrew B. Hendry x, Nathan S. Johnson, Lockwood Hotchk 
aod John McC. Perkins, petitioners, in contempt against said John B. Fitzpatrick, 
or before the 12th day of June, A. D. 1883, and for the contempt aforesaid, by the n 
payment of which said sum, ordered by our said court to be arrested, and to be c( 
mitted to the jail at Boston, in the county of Suifolk, in said district, until said s 
of ^2.96 is paid, as appears of record in said court. 

And yon, the said keeper, in the name of the President of the United States afc 
laid, are hereby commanded to receive the said John B. Fitzpatrick into your cusU 
in onr said jail, and him there safely to keep until said sum of $892.96 is paid, pui 
tnt to said order, or until the further order of court. 
Hereof fail not, at your peril. 

Witpees the honorable Morrison R. Waite, at Boston, this 19th day of June, in 
year of onr Lord 1883. 

ALEX. H. TROWBRIDGE, 
Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court of the Untied States 

for the District of Maaeachusetti 

Unftkd States of America, 

Maaeachusetts Dietrictf 88 : 

Boston, June 13, 188? 

Ponnant hereunto I have this day arrested and committed the withiu-named p: 
oner to the jail in Boston. 

WM. D. POOL, 
Deputy Marshal of the Unittd States for the District of Massavhuseitt 

(Circait ooart of the Unit^ Slates, district of hf^ssachnsetts. In equity. No. 1812. Andrein 
Hendryx el aL, |>eiitioners, v. John B. Fitzpatrick, defendant. Order of' ooart. Jnne 21, 1883. 

Nelson, J. : 

U|)()D the. filing of the petition of the defendant this day, and upon an er pc 
bearing; on said petition, it bein^ stated in said petition that the ilefeudant *' has 
property and cannot pay" the $H<J2.9() which he was ordered to ]):iy into the regis 
of this conrt for the use of the said Hendryx et al., and the said defendant ask 
"that he maj' be examined by the conrt or by snch person as the conrt may appn 
tomakesnch examination and report the same to this court as to his property h 
DieauH and ability to pay the sum aforesaid : " 

It is ordered that Henry L. Hallett, esn., a commissioner of this court, be a 
cially appointed to examine the said John B. Fitzpatrick on oath coucerninfjj his 
tale and effects, the disposal thereof, and his ability to pay the said S'^O^.yB which 
waM ordered to pay as aforesaid, and to hear any legal and pertinent evidence tl 
niaj be introduced relating thereto by said John B. Fitzpatrick or by said Hendi 
et ai, the original petitioners, or their attorney. In the said examination the s 
commissioner shall conform to the re(|iiirements of section 38 of chapter 162 of 
PubHc Statutes of Massachusetts, and, n])on snch examination, if said commissio 
"hall be satisfied that the said John B. Fitzpatrick can truthfully take the oath 
forth in section 39 of said chapter 162 he may administer to him said oath. 

The clerk of this court is directed to issue a writ of habeas corpus to bring the s 
John B. Fitzpatrick before the said commissioner, but the cost of said writ and 
service thereof and the proi)er fees of the commissioner shall be paid by the said F 
Patrick if be shall require such writ and service and action by the said commissioi: 
This order is not to be construed as discharging the said Fitzpatrick from arr< 
hnt the said commissioner is required to report his action under this order of 
conrt, when the ctmrt will take such action as may be deemed proper thereon. 

Such notice shall be given to the said Andrew B. Hendry x et al., the original pi 
tioners, of all proceedings before the said commissioner, as the said commissioner n 
^ieem sufficient and direct, according to chapter 162 of the Public Statutes of Mas 
^hiisetts. by which in all respects said examination is to be conducted. 
By the court. 

JOHN G. STETSON, Clerl 



CCHrcnit conrt of the United States, dintrict of MansachasettH. In equity. No. 1812. Andrev 
Hendryx et al., petitioners, v. John B. Fitzpatrick. Order of court, June 26, 1883.1 

Kelson,*/.: 

Ordered, upon application of defendant, be brought forthwith before said court 2 
^ve security for his appearance from day to day before said conrt and before He 



6 JOHN m'c. PERKINS. 

L.Hallett, esq., commissioner, to be examined as prayed for and as required by the 
order of the court made herein on the 19th day of June, A. D. 1883. 

It is further ordered that Alexander H. Trowbridge, deputy clerk of tsaid court, 
examine such securities as may be offered and approve that bond to be given as sach 
security if the same shall be sufficient to secure the sum of $2,000, in which samsud 
bond is to be given. 
By the court. 

ALEXANDER H. TROWBRIDGE, 

Deputy Clerk, 

[Mkmorandum —Habeas corpus issued, and Johi^ B. Fitzpatrick being bronghi be- 
fore the court, gave bond required by the above order or June 2<i, 18rt3.--JoHN G. 
Stetson, clerk.] • 

[Circait court of the United States, diatriot of Maasachaaette. In equity. No. 1B12. A. B. Hen- 
dryx et al. v. John B. Fitzjuitriok. In contempt Motion for discharfi^e of defendant. Fikd No* 
vemberS, 1883.] 

And now the said respondent, John B. Fitzpatrick, comes and moves this honor- 
able court that he be adjudged to be purged and free from contempt, and that he 
be finally discharged from all possible consequences of such contempt in the aboTe- 
named action and matter; and his bail to appear from day to day in this court sod 
before the commissioner to examine him as to his property, Ac, be albo discharged. 

Because he says that, iu disobeying the injunction for which ne was adjudged to be 
in contempt and imprisoned, he did not intend any disrespect or contempt of this 
court, and for this he refers to the report of the master.* upon which the respondent 
was ordered to pay into court certain sums of money for the use of the plaintifls. 

And the respondent further, upon this branch of 4he said contempt, offers to sabmit 
himself to further examination, and submit himself to the order of this court thereon. 

And this respondent further says that, in excuse for not obeying the order of this 
court to pay the aforesaid sums of money for the benefit of the plaintiffs, be ▼« 
wholly unable, and without means or property, to pay such sums or any som as 
aforesaid. And under the discretion of this court he lias been examined by a com- 
missioner appointed by the same, for the purpose, as to his property and means to pay 
such sums, and the poor debtor's oath was duly administered to him. And this re- 
spondent respectfully refers to the report of said commissioner in this behalf. 

JOHN B. FITZPATRICK, 
By his attorney. A- H. BRIGGS. 



[Peraonal recognizance of defendant.— Memorand am.] 

United States of America, 

Massachusetts Dtstricty as : 

At a circuit court of the United States begun and holden at Boston, within and for 
the district of Massachusetts, on the 15th day of October, in the year of our Lord 1883, 
to wit, Novembers, 1883: 

[In the caae of Andrew B. Hendryx et al., petitioners, v. John B. Fitzpatrick. In the matter of al- 
leged contempt. No. 1812 equity docket. 

^Personally appeared John B. Fitzpatrick, the above-named defendant, and acknowl- 
edged himself to be indebted unto the United States of America in the sum of $2,000, 
to ne levied on his goods or chattels, lands or tenements, and in want thereof upon 
his body, to the use of the said United Stat.es, if default be made in the performance 
of the condition following : 

The condition of this recognizance is such that if the said John B. Fitzpatrick shall 
personally appear before the circnit court of the United States, now holden in Boston, 
within and for the district aforesaid, from day to day during the present term, and 
from term U) term and from day to day of each term until entry of final decree in the 
equity cause No. 1684, pending in this court between the petitioners herein and the 
said Fitzpatrisk, to answer to such matters and things as shall be objected against 
him in the matter of the said alleged contempt, and under the said complaint, No. 
1812, now pending in said court, and shall do and receive that which by the said conrt 
shall be then and there enjoined upon him and not depart without license, then the 
above obligation to be void and of none effect ; otherwise to abide in full force, power, 
and virtue. 

Attest: 

JOHN G. STETSON, Clerk. 

[Memorandum. — Upon filing the foregoing personal recognizance John B. Fits- 
patrick was discUarged.— John G. Stetson, Clerk.'i 



JOHN m'c. PERKINS. 7 

B. 

{Circuit oooTt of the United States, district of Massftchasetts. No. 1812 eqaitr docket. Andrew B. 
Eendrrx 0taL v. John B. Fitxpatrick. In the matter of contempt of court. Before Lowell and Nel- 
•00, JJ. Opinion of the court. April 2, 1884.] 

Lowell, J. : 

Id this case the defendant was enjoined from infrin^in^; a patent^ pendente lite, be- 
eaoM, though the court had serious doubts of its validity, the defendant had himself 
•old the patent to the plaintiffs for a considerable sum of money, and it was thought 
no more than justice tnat he should refrain from violating his own implied warranty 
until the final hearing. 

Afterwards proceedings for contempt for a violation of the injunction were prone- 
eatod by the plaintiffs, and after evidence taken and a hearing the defendant was 
ordered to pay the fee« of the master by a certain day, the costs of the proceedings 
And certain profits assessed by the master by certain other dayf>, and in default of 
payment to be committed. These last two sums when paid in were to be paid out to 
tbe plaintiffs. 

The defendant failed to make the last two payments, and was committed to prison. 
After be had been in confinement for. about two weeks, the district judge, with my 
approTal, though I was unable to sit in the case, permitted the defendant to go before 
the master, and prove, if he could, in proceedings like those under the. poor debtor 
law of Massachusetts, that he bad no property which he could apply to the payment 
of his debts. The plaintiffs were duly notified of the hearing before the master and 
did not attend, and the master adcaitted the defendant to take the poor debtor's oath, 
iod thereupon the court discharged him upon his own recognizance. 

The plaintiffs now move that toe defendant may be recommitted under the original 
order. They argue that every order since made in the cause is ultra vires and void. 
becanae the first order was a final decree in a criminal case and could not be varied 
after the term, and because the defendant could ouly be dischargeil from arrest by 
thi* pardon of the President. 

It would be a sufiicient answer to this argument that if the order was a criminal 
one, having the consequences contended for, the fine shouhl have been made payable 
to the United States, and the plaiutifib would have no concern with it; but we will 
explain why all the orders are, in our opinion, proper. 

The original order was an interlocutory civil order for benefit of the plaintiffs, and 
tbe commitment was for failure to pay the money, not for the original contempt. 
While, therefore, the imprisonment may uo> have been strictly and technically within 
oor poor debtor law (Rev. Stats., sec. 991), which, however, we think it was, yet it 
sbonld.at all events, be governed by similar rules. It was made iu this way becanse 
the master found that the contempt was not willful, and I thought that no punishment 
was necessary. 

The process of contempt has two distinct functions, one, criminal, to punish dis- 
obedience; the other, civil and remedial, to enforce a decree of the court and indem- 
oifj private persons. 

In patent canses it has been usual to combine the two, and to order punishment if 
it is thought proper, or indemnity to the plaintift' if that is all that justice re- 
qaires, or both. (Be Mullee, 7 Blatch. , 23 ; Doubleday v, Sherman, 8 Blatcfa., 45 ; Shil- 
lingerr. Gnnther, 14 Blatch., 152; Phillips v. Detroit, 3 Ban. <& A., 150; Duuks v. Grey, 
3 lied. Rep., 86*2; Searls r. Wordeu, 13 Fed. Rep., 716; Matthews v. Spaugenberg, 15 
Fed. Rep., 813.) 

We are awaru that it was, at one time, the opiuion of Judge Blatchford that a sum 
of money ordered to be paid to a plaintiff in a cause of this kind was a criminal fine, 
which could only be remitted by a pardon ; but we are of opinion that such a fine for 
the benefit of a private person canuut be remitted bv the President, and is a debt of 
a civil nature, and that Judge Blatchford has so treated it in the latest case which has 
come before him. His first opiuion la slated in Mullee's case (7 Blatch., 23, and 
Fischer r. Hayes, 6 Fed., Rep., 6:3), but when the latter case came before the Supreme 
Court they expressed a significant doubt whether the order to pay money for the use 
of the plaintiff was not an interlocutory decree in a civil cause (Hayes v. Fischer, 
102 U. S., 121); and when the case came back Judge Blatchford admitted the defend- 
ant to bail (Fischer r. Hayes, 7 Fed. Rep., 96), which he could not have done if the 
judgment were criminal iu its nature. 

The doubt of the Supreme Court might well have oeen even more strbngly ex- 
pressed. An order upon a defaulting trustee, assignee in bankruptcy, or other per- 
son subject to account, to pay money into court, is civil, and may be waived by the 
party adversely interested, and is a debt to which a bankrupt law, discharging the 
debt, and an insolvent law., discharging the i>erson, are applicable. (See Baker's 
Case, 2 Strange, 1152; ex parte Parker, 3 Ves., 554, and the decisions hereinafter 
cited.) 



8 JOHN m'c. PEBKIN8. 

In McWilliaus'scase (I Sch. 6l Lef., 169), a defendaQt in contempt fornot payingi 
lefjracy into the court of chancery in obedience to its order, was attached while attend- 
ing the commissioner to be examined as a bankrupt. His arrest was lawfalifthe 
contempt was a criminal offense. That very learned chancery lawyer, Lord Redes- 
dale, said that it was merely a mode of enforcing a debt ; that if it were not«),he 
had no Tight to make the • riginal order ; that the substance and not the form of the 
proceeding uinst govern, ami its substance was not criminal. The petitioner was 
discharged. The same point was decided in the same way in ex parte Jeyea (3 Dea. 
& Ch., 764) and ex parte Bury (3 M. D. <fe DeG., 309). 

The remark of the lord chancellor in McWilliams's case that he had no right to 
make an order of this sort for the benefit of a private person, excepting as a eivil 
remedy, is highly pertinent to this case. 

Where a person had been committed to prison for nine months for contempt in not 
paying money into a county court, sitting in bankruptcy, James, L. J., said : 

*'The order, ou the face of it, is wrong, for it is an absolute order jf commitmeiit 
for contempt of court for non-payment of money. This is a penal sentence. The 
court of chancery never made an order in this form." 

And again : 

*' The order of commitment was such as had never been made in the court of ehso- 
eery, and was justly characterized by the chief. Judge as novel and surprising." {Ex 
parte Hooson, L. R. H, Ch. 231.) 

This distinction is pre*»erved in onr Revised Statutes. The^courts have power to 
punish for contempt, section 725; but all forms and modes of proceeding which are 
usual in equity may be followed in cases in equity, section 913. By virtue of we 
tion 725, the district court may punish contempts. Like power is given the district 
judge when sitting in chambers in bankruptcy by section 4973, and the cognate bnt 
distinct power of enforcing liis decrees '*by process of contempt and other * remedial' 
process^' is reoognissed by section 4975. (See In re Chiles, 22 Wall., 157.) 

Some of the older cases hold that, in contempt in civil cases at common law, the 
proceedings, after the order of attachment, should be on the crown side of the coort; 
that is, in the name of the sovereign. (The King r. The Sheriff of Middlesex, 3 T. R., 
133; Same v. same, 7 T. R., 439; Folger «. Hoogland, 5 Johns.. 235.) This is still the 
better practice, or, at least, a good practice, if punishment is asked for. (Cartwright's 
case, 114 Mass., 230; Durant v. The Supervisors, 1 Wool worth, 377; U. S. ex rel. r. 
A. T. <fe S. F. Ry. Co., 16 Fed. Rep., 853.) 

If this was ever the rule of chancery it has long since ceased to be so, when the sole 
purpose of the attachment is to enforce a decree or order, such, for instance, as to sign 
an answer, to make a conveyance, to pay money, &xi. All such orders may be waived 
or condoned by the private person interested in them, and are civil and remedial. {Ex 
parte Hooson, *L. R. 8, ch. 231; ex parte Eicke, 1 61. &. J., 261 ; Wall r. Atkinson, 2 
Rose, 196; Wyllie v. Green, 1 DeG. & J., 410 ; Buffum's case, 13 N. H., 14 ; People v. 
Craft, 7 Paige, 325; Jackson v, Billings, 1 Caines, 252; anon, 2 P. W'ms, 481; Conit 
V, Ebers, 1 Mad., 530; Smith r. Blofield, 2 Yes. Sl B., 100; Brown v. Andrews, 1 Barb., 
227; ex parte Muirhead, 2 Ch. D., 22; Lees v. Newton, L. R., 1 C. P., 658: re Rawlins, 
12L. T. (N. S.), 57.) 

In patent cases it has been usual to embrace in one proceeding the public and the 
private remedy; to punish the defendant if found worthy of punishment, and at the 
same time, or, as an alternative, to assess damages and costs for the benefit of the 
plaintiff, as is seen by the cases cited in the beginning of this opinion. A course an- 
alogons to this has been said, obiter, to be proper by Miller, J., in re Chiles, 22 Wall., 
157, 168. *' The exercise of this power has a twofold aspect, namely, first, the proper 
punishment of the guilty party for his disrespect of the court and its order; and, the 
second, to compel his performance of some act or duty required of him by the court 
which he refuses to perform, '^ citing Stimpson v. Putnam, 41 .Vt., 238, where a defend- 
ant was, at the same time, fined |50 for the benefit of the State, and |1,170 and inter- 
est and costs, for that of the party injured by breach of an injunction. The chancel- 
lor, in that case, said : *'Thls proceeding for contempt is instituted not only to pnnisl] 
the guilty party, but also, and perhaps chiefiy, to cause restitution to the partj 
injured." 

Such, we repeat, has been the practice in patent causes. It is used in other cases, 
as in the familiar one of a witness neglecting to answer a summons, who may be fined 
for his disobedience and also be required to testify. 

If the proceedings should be criminal in form it would make no difference. A 
criminal sentence, lor the benefit of a private person, is to be treated as civil to all in- 
tents and purposes. It is beyond the King's pardon and within the equitable juris 
diction of the court at all times. (4 Bl. Com., 285. ) At this place the author, speaking 
of disobedience to any rule or order of court, of the sort we are considering, says 
** Indeed, the attachment for most part of this species of contempts, and especially foi 
non-payment of costs and non-performance of awards, is to be looked upon rather ai 
a civil execution for the benefit of the injured party, though carried on in the shapi 



JOHN m'c. pebkins. 9 

of ft criminal process for a contempt of the authority of the couit. And therefore it 
bath heen held that such contempts, and the process thereon, being properly the 
civil remedy of an individual for a pri vat ^Injury, are not released or affected by the 
general act of pardon." 

Where a defendant had been convicted of an offense against the laws prohibiting 
lotteries, and had been sentenced to a term of imprisonment which had expired, and 
to pay costs for the use of the prosecutor, and had not paid them, he was discharged 
from custody under the lord's act, which was an early insolvent law, like our poor 
debtor laws, so far as the discharge of the person is concerned. (Rex ». Stokes, Cowp., 
136.) Aston, J., after saying that an attachment is an execution for a civil debt, and 
that the public offense had been purged by the imprisonment, added : 

♦* This stage of the cause, therefore, is merely of a civil nature., and a matter solely 
between party and party, unconnected with the offense itself;" that it comes within 
the insolvent debtor's act. '*If not, the consequence must be imprisonment for life; 
for a general pardon would not extend to him," that is, would not release him from 
co9ts due a private person, or from imprisonment on account of them, ''as was agreed 
in Rex r. Stokes, 23 Geo., 2." 

So, where a penalty was inflicted by a criminal proceeding, but for the benefit of a 
private person, and an attachment was issued for want of a sufficient distress, Bnller, 
J., said that the proceeding was like a civil action, and that ex parte Whitchurch. 
(1 Atk., 54), where attachment for not performing an award was held to be criminal, 
was no longer law. It was held, therefore, that tlie defendant could not be attached 
on Sunday. (The King i-. Myers, 1 T. R., 265.) 

We do not mean to be understood that the court has a general discretion to annul 
orders passed for the benefit of a party to the suit ; but that where inability is shown 
to comply with the order, as, for instance, insanity, if the decree requires an act to 
be done, or poverty, if the decree is for the payment of money, it is according to the 
course of the court, and of all courts, to discbarce the imprisonment, of which the 
end is proved to be unattainable. (See, besides the cases already cited, Wall v. Court 
of Wardens, 1 Bav, 635 ; re Sweatman, 1 Cow.. 144 ; Kane v. Haywood, 66 N. Car., 1 ; 
Galland r. Gallaod, 44 Cal., 478; Pinckard v. Pinckard, 23 Ga., 286.) 

Where an attorney of any court fails to pay over money to his client, the court may, 
after due proceedings, commit him for a contempt. This was formerly considered to 
be criminal, and is fully explained in 2 Hawkins, PI. Cor., 218, et seq. But it has long 
since been settled that it is of a civil character. (Ex parte Gallingford, SB. & C, 
220; Rex v. Edwards, 9 B. & C, 652.) The lord chief justice in the latter case said 
that it had ** always" been held that attachments for non-payment of money were in 
the nature of civil process. 

In Regina r. Thornton (4 Ex., 820) and The Queen r. Hills (2 E. dc B., 175) costs in 
a criminal case were in question, aud the defendant was discharged, in one, because 
the prosecutor had proved for the amount in bankruptcy, and thus waived the attach- 
ment; and in the other, because the defendant had been discharged as an insolvent. 
In the former of these cases, it was said by Pashley, arguendo, that the courts had 
exercised the power to discharge a defendant in such a case, on account of poverty, 
as early as 29 Edward I. 

It was admitted, in argument, in the ease before us, that the court would not have 
been justified in imposing a pecuniary fine upon the defendant if he had proved his 
poverty before the order was made; but tbat afterwards it was too late. We are of 
opinion that no such distinction can be maintained ; but that the defendant should 
be released from imprisonment in such a case, though his evidence is produced while 
the order is in process of enforcement against him. 

Petition denied. 



[Memorial for the inipeacbraent of Thomas L. Nelson, district judge of the United States for Massa- 
chusetts ] 

To the Hou8e of liepreaenlaiiveH of the United States in Cong reaa aesemhlefi : 

In conformity with the provisions of the Constitution, which gives you jurisdiction 
for the impeachment of civil officers of the United States, your memorialist prays that 
yon may take such measures as may seem proper and meet to you for the impeach- 
ment of Thomas L. Nelson, district judge of Massachusetts, for the following reasons : 

In the circuit court of the United States for the district of Massachusetts, in case 
No. 1812, of A. B. Hendryx et al.j petitioners, r. John B. Fitzpatrick, defendant in 
contempt, in equity, for willfully violating an injunction in a patent case (in which 
8nit I am one of the petitioners),' the defendant had been found guilty of violating the 
injnnction order of tnis court, and was fined therefor on June 4, 1883. 

H. Eep. 1640 2 



10 JOHN m'C. PERKINS. 

The fine was imposed by virtue of the provisions of section 725 of the Revised Stat- 
utes of the United States. Said fine was divided into three parts, .^nd was nivle pay- 
able at intervals of a few days thereafte^. namely, on Jane 8, June 12, and Jane 15, 

Defendant, Fitzpatrick, refused to pay the master's charges of $218, which waa the 
first part of the fine, and due on June 8, 1883. 

Thereupon, on the next day, on motion of }>etitioners, June 9, IHoS, the court iaaoed 
process of attachment against said defendant, John B. Fitzpatrick, and ordered bim, 
said defendant, to be confined in the Charles street jail, in the city of Boston, in said 
district of Massachusetts, until said defendant, Fitzpatrick, paid into the regiati; 
of said court said fine of |218, that being the first part of said fine imposed on June 
4,1883. 

Upon the issuing of said process of attachment, said defendant paid said first part 
of the fine, being $218, as ordered by the court to be done. 

On June 12, 1883, said defendant, Fitzpatrick, again refused to pay into the regia- 
try of said circuit court the second part of said fine, being the sum of $89'<J.9H. 

Thereupon, on June 13, 1883, said court (Thomas L. Nelson, said district judge, act- 
ing as a circuit Judge of the : United States), on motion of petitioners, ordered proem 
of attachment ac^ainst said defendant, Fitzpatrick, and that he be confined in tbe 
Charles street jail, in said city of Boston, until he paid into tbe registry of said circoit 
court said second part of said fine, being the sum of $892.96. 

Accordingly said process of attachment was issued against said Fitzpatrick, and he 
was confined by the marshal of the district of Massachusetts, in said Charles street 
Jail, in said Boston, until he had paid into the registry of said oircnit court the aaid 
sum of $892.96, that being the second part of the nne. 

At this point the law is well settled, and has been uniformly acted on by all Fed- 
eral tribunals since the formation of the Constitution. That defendant, Fitzpatrick, 
could not, under these facts, lawfully obtain release from his imprisonment, except 
by a payment of said fine of $892.96 or by a pardon from tbe President of the Unitid 
States. 

Said defendant, Fitzpatrick, has never paid said fine of $892.96 into the regiatry 
of this circuit court, as he w'as ordered by this circuit court to do, and he has never 
been pardoned by the President of the Unit<ed States, as the Constitution providea. 

I need not remind the House of Representatives that the power of pardoning per- 
ons convicted of crimes against the United States is confided by the Constitntion to 
the Presidnet alone. ^ 

It is hardly necessary for me to cite cases to support my statements of the law, be- 
cause it has been so well settled and uniformly acted on by all Federal tribunala. 
But I will, from many cases, cite In re Mullee, 7 Blatch., 23 ; Fisher v«. Hayes, 30 
G., 601 ; 3 Opps. Att'ys-Gen., 622, Feb. 27, 1841 ; 4 ^Opps. Att'ys-Gen., 317, April 15 
1844 ; 4 Opps. Att'ys-6en., 458, Nov. 28, 1845 ; 8 Opps. Att'ys-Gen., 281, Jan. 1, 1857 
I am the attorney for the petitioners in this case, as well as one of the petitioner! 
myself; and I am the only one of the petitioners that is pecuniarily and directly ia 
terested in this fine. 

In my absence from Boston, being then in the city of Washington, where my family 
then resided, as was well known by the court and its clerk here in Boston,in my abseno 
I say, Thomas L. Nelson, United States judge for the district of Massachusettn, oi 
June 26, 1883, unlawfully, willfully, and corruptly ordered, in the name of the Preai 
dent of the United States, the marshal of the district of Massachusetts to remove an 
release said defendant, Fitzpatrick, ffom said Charles street jail, in said Bostoi 
where said Fitzpatrick had been confined as a prisoner in the name of the President < 
the United States on said June 13, 1883. 

Whereupon said marshal for the district of Massachusetts, in compliance with sai 
illegal and void order of said District Judge Nelson, did illegally and without ai 
lawTul authority remove and release said Fitzpatrick from said Charles street Jail,; 
said Boston. 

In so doing, said district judge, Thomas L. Nelson, not only violated his oath 
office, to obey the Constitution and laws of the United States, but he practically ai 
in effect usurped a prerogative of the President of the United States, specially i 
trusted to the President alone by the Constitution. 

It should be noted here that said District Judge Nelson made no attempt whatev 
to give your memorialist any notice of his intention to release said defendant, Fil 
patrick, from said Charles street jail, although said Judge Nelson well knew th 
your memorialist was then iu Washington. 

Such a reckless and outrageous assumption of power by a Federal judge, in defian 

of both law and justice, and also in defiance of vested rights of citizens, will be t 

death-knell of both law and liberty in the United States courts, if allowed to pa 

unnoticed by the House of Representatives. It will mean revolution. 

When a Federal judge is allowed to assume despotic powers at his own arbitn 



I 



^H Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
ht Session. J ) No. 1641. 



REPEALING REVISED STATUTES. 



April 15, 1886. — Referre<l to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr.OATES, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany biU H. R. 7882.] 

The Committee on the Judiciary^ to wliom was re/erred House hill 3184, 
kring kad the same under consideration^ report thereon as follows : 

The measure herewith reported is intended to dispense with proof of 
lojalty in behalf of a few old men in the Southern States of two classes 
md ill two respects, to wit: Those who, for service in the Army of the 
Jnited States or active militia, are entitled to bounty land, but who 
annot obtain the same under section 3480 of the Revised Statutes ex- 
ept by proof of outspoken loyalty to the Union during the late war. 
[ence, a man resident in a Southern State whose sympathies were 
ith the Union, but who remained inactive and silent, cannot make 
le proof required. 

The other class is composed of those invalid pensioners who were 
ropped from the roll for disloyalty, and those old soldiers who received 
ounds or other disability in the Mexican or Indian wars and who 
ever received any pension, but who are entitled under the law, but 
mnot prove their loyalty by loyal witnesses, as required by the prac- 
ce of the Pension Office under section 4716 of the Revised Statutes, 
ome of those men when disabled were men of fortune or means suffi- 
ent to enable them to live in comfort, and hence never applied to the 
overument for pensions. But now that thej' are old and poor they 
quest the Government, in whose service their disability was incurred, 
' remove the only bar which excludes them from receiving its bounty, 
hich it so generously provides for all of its faithful servants. 
Very few, if any, of these old men were ever in the Confederate serv- 
B, but they had sons or other relatives who were, and, as a matter of 
►urse, sympathized with them and gave some aid and comfort, which 
•ecludes them as honest men from proving loyalty to the Union during 
lat period. 

Tour committee are of the opinion that the time has come whea the 
quirement of proof of loyalty upon the part of the classes of men in 
lis report referred to should be dispensed with, and hence report here- 
ith a substitute for said bill, and recommend its passage. 



49th CoNaEESS, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Session. f ) No. 1G42. 



'i 



EIGHT OF ACTION IN THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 



iPRjL 15, 1886. — Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Culberson, from the Committee on theJudiciary, submitted the fol- 
I lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bilJ H. R. 7882.1 

TIjo Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred House bill 
4305, have considered the same and report it to the House with the rec- 
ommeniiation tbat it lie upon the table, and that the substitute for said 
bill herewith reported do pass. 

The committee submit the following reasons for the foregoing recom- 
mendation : 

A large apiount of property in the States in rebellion or insurrection 
was seized during the war and immediately after the cessation of hos- 
tilities, without regard to the ownership of sucli property, or the politi- 
cal status of its owners, or the possession of the i)roperty at the time of 
tbeseizure, by the military and other Federal authorities. The seizure 
and sale of this property were made under the acts of March 12, 1863, 
and July 2, 1864, known as the captured and abandoned property acts 
and other measures amendatory and supplementary thereof. 

The law required the property to be sold and the proceeds placed 
in the Treasury to the credit of the property. 

The third section of the act of March 12, 1863, under which the bulk 
^f the property was seized, provided as follows: 

Any person claiming to have been the owner of any snch abandoned or captured 
E^ioperty may, at any time within two years after the suppression of the rebellion, 
prefer his claim to the proceeds thereof in the Court of Claims, and on pi oof to the 
^tisfaction of said court of his ownership of said property, of bis right to the pro- 
ceeds thereof, and that he has never given any aid or comfort to the present rebellion, 
to receive the residue of such proceeds, after the deduction of any purchase-money 
which may have been X)aid, together with tlie expense of transportation and sale of 
said property, and any other lawful expenses attending the disposition thereof. 

Under this provision of the statute many suits were instituted in the 
Court of Claims by persons claiming to be the owners of property seized 
under the acts referred to, and when the proof required by the statute 
was made judgment was rendered in their favor and the money paid. 

Over $'50,0(K),000 were placed in the Treasury on account of sales of 
property under the act of March 12, 1863, and other kindred acts. 

The amount now on hand of this fund is $10,512,007.96. 

The following statement is believed to be substantially correct, and 
«^ill show the whole amount of money received into the Treasury on iv! 



^ RIGHT OF ACTION IN THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 

count of captured aud abandoued property, aud the amounts pa 
from time to time : 

Whole amount of abandoned aud captured property salcH |3l, 722 

Cost of collcctiugf sale, aud other expeuses $6, 551, 000 00 

Transferred to Freedraau's Bureau 243, 000 00 

luternal-revenue taxes and commercial intercourse fees. 1, 406, 000 00 
Released to claimants by Secretaries Chase, Fesseuden, 

andMcCuUoch 2,5r»0,b75 24 

^ 10,75C 

Balance covered into Treasury under resolution of March '10, 

1872 20,971 

Paid on special acts of relief $290, 90H 32 

P«id on judgments against Treasury agents 64, 557 27 

Paid on judgments under act of March 12, 1863 9, 833, 42.*^ 16 

Paid by Secretary of the Treasury under act of May 18, 

1872 195,896 25 

Disbursed for expenses under joint resolution of March 

30,1868 75,000 00 

10,451 

Balance in Treasury 10, 51' 

The Government has had the use of this money for more than 
years, and if it is ever to be distributed to its owners some add 
legislation is required. Congress, at every session, is asked to 
individual claimants to bring suit in theCourt of Claims to establis 
rights in this fund. This privilege has been accorded to some i 
nied to others. 

Further legislation is necessary in order to distribute this fu 
cause the limitation of two years from and after the close of the 
which claimants of this property were required to prefer their 
has long since expired, and there is now no means provided by 
which the claimants of the fund can enforce their rights. 

Formerly there was much contention upon the status of this 
the Treasury, especially that portion of it derived from the sale o 
erty belonging to those who adhered to the rebellion. It is evidei 
the terms of the act of 1863 that it was not the intention of C( 
that the title to the property seized under it should be divested ft 
loyal owners. They were allowed two years from and after the ( 
the war in which to prefer their claims to the property, and bees 
provision was made by which persons who had been disloyal coulc 
their claims in the property and enforce their rights, it was con 
that the seizure and sale ot so much of this property as belonged 
loyal persons worked a divesture of title and absolutely transfer 
proceeds to the Government. On the other hand, it was contend 
such seizure and sale of property of disloyal persons did not div 
title of the original owners and that the fund derived from sue 
was placed in the Treasury to be kept there to await the determ 
of the Government whether it should be i-eturned to the owners 
property or not. 

Your committee believe that this contention has been settled 
Supreme Court of the United States in the case of Klein r. The 
States, reported in 13 Wallace, page 138, and the following quo 
are made from the report of the case : 

1. That it was not the iutcjitiou of Congress, by the euactuieut of that stat 
tho title to property seized under it should be diverted from the loyal ownen 

2. That the proceeds of the property should go into the Treasury without 
of ownership. 

3. That the same intention prevailed in regard to the property of owut 
though then hostile, might subsequently become loyal. 



RIGHT OF ACTION IN THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 3 

4. That it was for the Qovernment itsolf to determine whether those proceeds should 
be restored to the owner or not. 

5. That the President's proclamations of pardon and amnesty, with restoration of 
rijjhtsof propert3', and particularly that of July 4, 1^68, was a decision on the part of 
ike Goremment tchich detidedaffirmaliveli/ the right of all the owners of such property to the 
froceeds thereof in the TreasHry ; and the restoration of the proceeds became the absolute 
right of the persons pardoned. 

6. And that *Hhe Government constituted itself the trustee for those who hy that 
ict were declared entitled to the proceeds of captured and abandoned property, and 
for those whom it should ihereaftir recognize as entitled," 

And in its opiniou the court uses tbis language: 

That it was not the intention of Congress that the title to these proceeds should 
be divested absolutely out of the original owners of the property, seems clear upon a 
comparison of different parts of the act. 

We have already seen that those articles which became by the simple fact of capt- 
nre the property of the captor, as ordnance, munitions of war, and the like, or in 
which thii-d parties acquired rights which nii^ht l)e made absolute by decree, as ships 
tod other vessels captured as prize, were exiiressly excepted from the operation of 
(he act; and it is reasonable to infer that it was the purpose of Congress that the 
proceeds of the property for which the special provision of the act was made should 
ge into the Treasury without change of ownership. Certainly such was the intention 
in respect to the property of loyal men. That the same intention prevailed in re- 
gard to the property of owners who, though then hostilej might subsequently become loyal^ 
appears probable from the circumstances that no provision is anywhere made for con- 
fiscation of it, while there is no trace iu the statute book of intention to divest owner- 
ship of private property not excepted from the effect of this act otherwise than by 
proceedings for confiscation. 

It is thus seen that, except as to property used in actual hostilities, as mentioned 
in the first section of the act of &larch li, 1S63, no titles were divested in the in- 
rargent States, unless in pursuance of a judgment rendered after due legal proceed- 
ings. The Government recognized to the fullest extent the humane maxims of the 
modem law of nations, which exempt private property of non-combatant enemies 
from capture as booty of war; oven the law of confiscation was sparingly applied. 
The coses were few indeed in which the property of any not engaged in actual hostili- 
ties was subjected to seizure and sale. 

We conclude, therefore, that the title to the proceeds of the property which came 
to the possession of the Government by capture or abandonment, with the exceptions 
already noticed, was in no case divested from the original owner. It was for the 
Government itself to determine whether these proceeiL) should be restored to the 
owner or not. The promise of the restoration of all rights of property decided that qufs- 
tion affirmatively as to all persons who availed themselvts of tl\s proffered pardon. • * * 
Tkt rrstoratioH of the proceeds became the absolute right of the persons pardoned^ on appli- 
catioQ within two years from the close of the war. It was, in fact, promised for an 
equivalent. *' Pardon and restoration of political rights'' were *^in return" for the 
oath and its fulfillment. 

Aud theu the court adds this strong language : 

To refuse it would be a breach of faith not less cruel and astounding than to aban- 
dou the freed people whom the Executive had promised to maintain in their freedom. 

It will be observed that the court decides that the title to the pro- 
ceeds of the property which came to the possession of the Governraeut 
by capture or abandonment, with the exception of property used in act- 
ual hostilities, was in no case divested from the original owner. 

The question therefore arises whether the Government ever deter- 
mined that the proceeds of the sales of property under the captured 
and abandoned property acts which belonged to disloyal persons should 
be restored to them. 

Whatever of occasion for dispute there may have been upon this 
question at one time there seems to be none now. 

Under the act of July, 1862, known as the confiscation act, the Presi- 
dent was authorized at any time thereafter, by proclamation, to extend 
to persons who may have participated in rebellion in any State or part 
thereof pardon and amnesty, with such exceptions and at such time and 
on such conditions as he should deem expedient for the public welfare. 



4 RIGHT OF ACTION IN THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 

Ou the 8tb da}' of December, 1863, the President issued his proclama- 
tion, in which he referred to the act of* 1863, relating to captured and 
abandoned property, and offered pardon and amnesty, with rentoratiou 
of all rights of property, except as to slaves and property to which 
third persons had acquired rights, to all persons who had participated 
in the rebellion who would take an oath to support the Constitution 
and the laws. Certain classes were excepted from the benefiis of par- 
don and amnesty under that proclamation. 

On the 29th of May, 1865, another proclamation was issued extending 
pardon and amnesty, with a full restoration of all property rights, ex- 
cept as to slaves, &c., to all persons who had participated in the rebel- 
lion. A similar oath was required, and fourteen classes of persons were 
excepted from the benefits of the proclamation. 

On the 7th of September, 1867, another similar proclamation of par- 
don and amnesty was issued, which reduced the excepted classes from 
fourteen to seven. Finally, on the 4th day of July, 1868, a proclama- 
tion was Issued by the President extending pardon and amnesty to all, 
with some exceptions, who had participated in the rebellion, with res- 
toration to all rights of property except in slaves, and on the 25th of 
December, 1868, without exception, unconditionally, and without res- 
ervation. No oath was required. 

The legal effect of the proclamations to which reference has been made 
was to wipe out all disability by reason of disloyalty and to present the 
offender before the law as a new man, as innocent as if he had never 
been charged with treason. These proclamations also serve to show 
that the President of the United States, authorized by the Constitution 
and by statute, determined to restore the proceeds of the sales of capt- 
ured and abandoned property' belonging to disloyal owners to them 
upon condition that the^' would comply with the requirements of th« 
proclamations. Those who complied with the conditions of those proc- 
lamations were instantly rehabilitated as citizens, restored to equality 
before the law, and to all rights of property. In the language of the 
Supreme Court before quoted : 

The ]>rotnise of the restoratiou of all rights of property decided that question 
affirmatively as to all persons who availed themselves of the proffered pardon. • • *• 
The restoration of the proceeds of captured and abandoned property became the al>- 
solute right of the persons pardoned, on application within two years from the clostf 
of the war. 

Those who had failed to avail themselves of the proffered pardon 
extended b}' the proclamations containing conditions (if there were any 
such) were covered and embraced by the proclamation of July 4, 1868 ^ 
which extended pardon and amnesty to all, without condition, with full 
restoration to property rights. 

Your committee submit the following, taken from the decision of th6 
Supreme Court in Padelford's case, reported in 9 Wallace: 

In the case of Garland this court held the effect of a pardon to be such ** that in 
the eye of the law the offender is as innocent as if he bad never committed the of- 
fense ; " and in the case of Armstrong's foundry we held that the general pardoc 
granted to him relieved him from a penalty which he had incurred to the Unitec 
States. It follows that at the tune of the seizure of the petitioner's property he 
was xmrged of whatever offense against the laws of the United States he had com- 
mitted by the acts mentioned in the tindings, and relieved from any penalty whiob 
he might have incuned. It followt) further that if the property had been seized be* 
fore the oath was taken the faith of the Government was pledged to its restoration 
upon the taking of the oath in good faith. We cannot doubt that the petitioner's 
right to the property in question at the time of the seizure was perfect, and that i1 
remains perfect, notwithstanding the seiznre. 

But it has been suggested that the property was captured in fact, if not lawfully : 
and that the proceeds having been paid into the Treasury of the United States, the 



RIGHT OF ACTION IN THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 5 

petitiouer is without remedy in the Court of Claims nnless proof is made that he gave 
DO aid or comfort to the rebellion. The snggestiou is ingenious, but we do not think 
it sound. The sufficient answer to it is that after the pardon no oflense connected 
viih the rebellion can be imputed to him. If, in other respects, the petitioner made 
the proof whi«h, under the act, entitJed him to a decree for the proceeds of his prop- 
erty, the law makes the proof of pardon a complete substitute for proof that he gave 
no aid or comfort to the rebellion. A diflferent construction would, as it seems to us, 
defeat the manifest intent of the proclamation and of the act of Congress which au- 
thorized it. Under the proclamation and the a<;t the Government is a trustee, hold- 
in);tbe proceeds of the petitioner's property for his benefit; and having been fully 
reinilmrsed for all expenses incurred in that character, loses nothing by the judgment, 
which simply awards to the petitioner what is his own. 

But for the bar made by the statute of limitations of two years it 
seems that all persons, loyal and those who had been disloyal, might 
prefer their claims to this property, and upon proof of their right to the 
property obtain the proceeds. 

Pardon and amnesty relieved claimants of captured and abandoned 
property from proving their adhesion to the Government of the United 
States during the late war. 

The following is the whole of the opinion of the court in Pargoud's 
case, 13 Wallace: 

We have recently decided in the oftse of Armstrong against the United States that 
the President's proclamation of December 25, 1868, granting pardon and amnesty un- 
conditionally and without reservation to all who participated directly or indirectly 
in the late rebellion relieves claimants of captured and abandoned property from 
proof of adhesion to the United States during the late civil war. It was therefore 
nnnecessary to prove such adhesion or personal pardon for taking part in the rebel- 
lion against the United States. The judgment of the Court of Claims dismissing the 
petitiou is reversed. 

It follows, from what has been said, that this fund in the Treasury 
does not belong to the Government, but is the property of citizens of 
the United States, and held in trust for them by the Government. 
Ought the Government longer refuse to distribute this fund among the 
owners of it ? 

Your committee believe that it is true, as alleged, that the bulk of 
tbis fund yet remaining in the Treasury belongs to persons who par- 
ticipated in the late rebellion, but in view of the fact that under the 
Coustitution and the laws of the United States, as declared by the Su- 
preme Court, the restoration of the proceeds of this property became 
the absolute right of the persons pardoned, the former political status 
of the owner can afford no just reason for withholding the money. 
Ko laches can be imputed to this claims of claimants. 
The statute authorized claims to the proceeds of sales of captured and 
abandoned property to be preferred in the Court of Claims at any time 
within two years from the suppression of the rebellion. When was the 
rebellion suppressed ? That became a question for thei courts in order 
to apply the statute of limitations. In December, 1869, the Supreme 
Court decided, in Anderson v. United States (9 Wallace, page 66), 
that the rebellion was suppressed on the 20th of August, 1866, the date 
of the President's proclamation declaring the final and complete sup- 
pression of the rebellion. The limitation of the right to commence suit 
therefore expired on the 20th day of August, 1868. 

Some claimants who had participated in the rebellion filed suits in the 
Court of Claims before the bar of limitation was complete, but a large 
majority of that class of claimantsdid not commence suit because it was 
generally understood that, notwithstanding the proclamations of pardon 
and amnesty, the claimant would be required to prove his loyalty before 
he could have a standing in the court. 

H. Rep. 1642 2 



6 RIGHT OF ACTION IN THE COURT OF CLAIMS. 

It wa« a matter of doubt among the members of the legal fraternity 
as to what effect would be given by the Supreme Court to the proclama- 
tions of pardon and amnesty. In 1869 the Supreme Court decided that 
the necessity of proving loyalty in order to recover the proceeds of cap- 
tnred and abandoned property had been removed by the proclamations 
of pardon and amnesty. 

This decision come too late to benefit that class of claimants. Tiie 
limitation had already expired, and the bar was complete. 

In view of the law and the facts as above stated, your committee deem 
it unwise for the Government, and unjust to the claimants of this fund, 
for Congress to decline longer to make some provision by which they 
may establish and enforce their rights. 

Your committee therefore recommend the passage of the substitute 
herewith reported. 



Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPKESENTATIVES. i Eeport 
t Semen. } ( * 



No. 1643. 



iTABLISHING A SUBTREASUUY AT LOUISVILLE, KY. 



. 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House ou the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



McCiiEARY, from the Committee on Coinage, Weights, and 

Measures, submitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 902.] 

e Committee on Coinage, Weights, and Measures, to whom was 
red the bill (H. R. 002) establishing a sub treasury at Louisville, 
have had the said bill under consideration, and report the same, 
ecommend its favorable consideration and passage by the House. 
3 whole monetary transactions of the Government are now con- 
d through the office of the United States Treasurer and forty-one 
lal-bank depositories and nine sub-treasuries, located atKew York, 
•u, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Saint Louis, Chicago, Cincin nati, New 
DS, and San Francisco. 

far back as 1882 the report of the Secretary of the Treasury 
$that there were in the sub-treasury at New York about 19,000,000 
andard silver dollars, while the sub-treasury and mint at San 
;isco had nearly 41,000,000. 
5 Secretary assigned as his reason for not bringing over a part of 

silver dollars from San Francisco that there was no unsatisfied 
)r them elsewhere, and the expense of coinage is great, never 
lan one per cent. 

sub-treasury has been established by act of Congress since 1873, 
o one can deny the necessity for another sub treasury. 
) question is, then, where shall the sub treasury be located? The 
material points to consider are geographical position, accessibility 
rounding countr3', distributing power, amount and character of 
it and prospective collections and disbursements of public money, 
pplying these tests, we believe Louisville, Ky., is the proper place 
ite the sub-treasury. 

isvilie is the metropolis of Kentucky, and is located on a beautiful 
»u at the falls of the Ohio River, 338 miles from its mouth. It 
population of nearly 200,000, and is increasing in numbers and 
1. It occupies a central place with reference to the valle3^ of the 
isippi, and has great advantages on account of its extended con- 
vith the river systems of that valle3\ It is by water 132 miles 

Cincinnati, 598 miles below Pittsburgh, 368 miles above Cairo, 
liles above Memphis, 1,337 miles above Kew Orleans, and 558 
from Saint Louis. 

lated midway between the Gulf of Mexico and the Northern Lakes, 
Iso between the eastern and western ranges of the North Ameri- 
louutains, Louisville is the the great focal point of the Missis- 



2 SUB-TREASURY AT LOUISVILLE, KY. 

sippi Valley. It is also in the heart of the valley of the Ohio, wliich 
comprehends an area of 201,720 square miles, which is about double the 
area of France, and nearly equal to Germany. Louisville has a river 
frontage of 12 miles, and a river trade in- the south and in the west 
combined of over 12,000 miles. 

Thirty navigable rivers are accessible by steamers from h^r wharves, 
and she has opened avenues of trade to a vast and wealthy domain, 
comprising 16 States with a po|)ulation of many millions. * 

Of the 117 counties in the State of Kentucky, 108 can be reached by 
water or railroad connections. 

The railway connections of Louisville give her direct communication 
with all parts of the country by the following trunk lines: Chesapeake 
and Ohio Railroad; Louisville Short Line Railroad; Ohio and Missis- 
sippi Railroad; Jeffersonville, Madison, and Indianapolis Railroad; 
Louisville, Evausville, and Saint Louis Railroad, and the Cincinnati 
Southern by way of the Louisville and Knoxville Railroad. 

The last census shows that in the United States the center of jwpula 
tion is in the State of Kentucky, and Louisville is near that center. 

Within 300 miles of Louisville, or a half day's journev, there an 
11,000,000 of people. 

As adistributing point Louisville is unexcelled. While at many citie 
the coin of the Uuitel States would be distributed at an expense to tli 
Government, the products of the State of Kentucky and the exteusiv 
business and manufacturing interests of the city of Louisville would s< 
cure its distribution through the natural channels of trade witlioc 
much expense. 

There are in Louisville 1,352 manufacturing establishments in sictiv 
operation, which have a capital of about $40,000,000, and employ ov< 
24,000 workinen, and put in the market annuallv finished wares amoun 
ing to more than $60,000,000. 

Louisville is the second city in the United States in the manufactu: 
of furniture, and is also one of the leading pork-packing cities of tl 
country, having a capital invested in the pork and ham trade of near 
$3,0O0,'0O0. 

It is, perhaps, the largest plow-manufacturing city in the world, tl 
united capacity of its plow manufactories being over 1,500 per da 
Over 200,000 plows and 50,000 cultivators are annually manufactiiD 
in that city, and there are in and around Louisville 23 tanneries, repi 
senting an invested capital of $2,500,000. 

Louisville furnishes the largest supply market in the world for so 
leather. In the article of jeans and jeans clothing the annual sales 
that city are 5,005,000 yards, representing over $1,000,500. One hn 
dred and twenty tons per day of cast gas and water pipe are man 
factured, or 30,000 tons per annum. The largest plate-glass works 
the United States arc located around the falls, one being at Louisvi 
and the other at New Albany, just opposite Louisville. The paper mi 
of Louisville occupy a capital of $1,000,000. The boot and shoe tra 
amounts to $6,000,000 annually, and the capacity of the flour mills 
the city is 1,000 barrels pei' day. The sales of tobacco from January 
1885, to Januarv 1, 1886, amounted to over 127,000 hogsheads, the val 
of which was between $12,000,000 and $13,000,000. 

Louisville is also the largest market on the continent for flue wh 
kies, and millions of dollars are invested in its manufacture. 

In the following industries Louisville leads the world: Tobac- 
jeans and jeans clothing, cast gas and water pipes, plows, liv(B sto 
cement, fine sole-leather, plate glass, and tine whiskies.- 



SUB-TREASURY AT LOUISVILLE, KY. 3 

Aside from being a commercial and industrial center of acknowledged 
size and importance, eqaal to other cities where sub -treasuries are now 
established, Louisville is a very important financial center. Its bank- 
ing institutions number twenty-four, employing $8,871,300 in capital. 

The internal revenue collected in the State of Kentucky during the 
year 1885 was $14,482,476, being the largest amount collected in any 
State in the.Union, excepting Illinois. 

Last year only two of the sub-treasury cities — Chicago and Cincinnati 
-collected more internal revenue than Louisville, and the aggregate 
receipts of the sub-treasuries at Baltimore, Han Francisco, Boston, and 
New Orleans did not equal the receipts at the city of Louisville. 

The disbursements at Louisville on account of the pension laws of the 
United States la«t year were $1,815,926. In this respect Louisville will 
compare favorably with a majority of the sub-treasury cities. 

Of the nine sub-treasury cities, only five — New York, Boston, Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, and San Francisco — have pension agencies. 

The foregoing facts are not original with the committee, but they have 
heretofore been prepared and made public in various ways, and are 
DOW again presented as valuable information to show that the bill should 
he passed and a sub-treasury established at Louisville, Ky. 

The annual cost of conducting the sub-treasury at Louisville, Ky., is 
t9,560, and the sum of $5,000 is appropriated to make such repairs and 
alterations as may be necessary, and to put suitable rooms, offices, 
vaalts, and safes in the custom-house in said city in proper condition, 
and to purchase such furniture and fixtures as may be needed. 



fj 



msL Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
hi Session. f , (No. 1644. 



INSPECTION OF LIVE STOCK, 



April 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Wliole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. Dunham, from the Committee on Commerce, sabmitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3899.1 

Your committee adopt the report from the Committee on Commerce 
in the Forty-eighth Congress, which is as follows: 

The bill empowers the President of the United States to appoint, for such customs 
districts of the United States as may be necessary, inspectors of live stock, dressed 
meats, and ho^^j pnxhicts intended for foreij;n 8hipment, not to exceed tifteen in num- 
ber for any one customs district, who shall l»e designated as *' United States inspectors 

of live stock, dre8>ed meats, and hog products of the customs district." It re- 

qaires that such inspectors »ihall ^ive bond, in such penalty and with such security, 
to be approved by the collectors of customs of the district, as may be required for the 
promptaud faithful jierformanceof their duties. It is made the duty of such inspectors, 
opou application made to them therefor, to promptly and faithfully inspect livestock, 
bogprtxlucts, or dressed meats submitted to them for examination and inspection; and, 
npoD payment to them b3' the persons making such application of such reasonable 
fwjj and charges as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury, to furnish 
written certificates of such inspection and examination, to be signed and sealed by the 
inspectors in their official capacity ; and in case such product intended for foreign 
shipjuenc is in packages or in such shape that the same may be stamped, the inspector 
shall Htampsuch packages or fix a memorandum showing that the same haa been in- 
spected, examined, and approveil. The cerliticateof inspection thus furnished is re- 
Jnireil t^) accompany, and be produced with, the shipment of such live stock or pro- 
Qct to which such iuspeetion or examination relates. 

This bill makes it unlawful to import into the United States any adulterated or un- 
wholesome food, or vinous or spirituous or malt liquors, adulterated or mixed with 
any poisonous or noxious chemical drug or other ingredient injurious to health. 

It makes the person importing into the United States any such adulterated food or 
drink guilty of a mis<lemeanor an J liable to prosecution therefor iu tho district court 
of the United States, and punishable, on oonvictioii, by a tine not exceeding $1,000 
for each separate shipment, or by imprisonment by the court for a term not exceeding 
one year, or by both of these penalties, at the di'^cretion of the court. 

It provides that any article iiesigned for c<msuinption as human food or drink, and 
any other article of the classes or description mentioned in the act, wki<^h shall be 
ioiported into the United States contrary to its provisions shall be forfeite J to the 
United States, and shall be proceeded against under the provisions of chapter 18, of 
title 13, of the Revised Statutes of the United States; and if declared forfeited may 
be destroyed or returned to Mie importer tor exportation from the United States, after 
payment of all costs and expenses. And the Secretary of the Treasury is authorized 
to cause such imported articles to be inspected or examined in order to ascertain 
whether they have been unlawfully imported. 

The bill also provides that whenever the Presiilent is satisfied that, any importation 
is being made, or is about to be made, into the United States from any foreign coun- 
try of any article used for human food or drink that is adulterated to an extent dan- 
gerons to the health or welfare of the people of the United States, he may issue his 
proclamation suspending the importation of such articles from such country for such 
period of time asVe may think necessary to prevent such importation, and making 
it nnlawful during said period to import into the United States from the countries 



Z INSPECTION OF LIVE STOCK. 

desiguated in the j)roclaiiiatiou of the Pn'sident any of the articles the importation ( 
wbich is f^o sll^pended. 

Sections one, two, threr. four, and tivt^of the hill have for their ohjeet to provid 
by proper ins]>4'ction, and hy fnruisliing tin* official evidence of snch iuspeetion. againi 
the exportation of dine'asod or nnwholeson»e livestock, hojj prodncts, or dreKsed ineati 
so as to provide against all reasonable objections to ibeir purchase and cousuiiiptio 
in foreign markets and countries, and so as to secure to our own penplc such pri« 
tberefor as an' ]>aid for sound and healthy live stock, hog jirodncts. and dresseil moatj 
This is due alike to the interest of those who export such artieh s and to pei-jvons wh 
purchase or eonsunie them in foreign countries. 

Sections six and sevtn of the bill have for tlnir ohjeet the jirotection of the ptK)pl 
of the United States against the evil effeets of adulterated or unwholesome fiwHl, ore 
vinous, spirituous, or malt liquors imported into the Unit^^d States from foreign cotit 
tries. This is made necessary by a proper regard of the hcaltb and well-being of tb 
people as well as for the iul»*rest <»f honest deab^rs in such articles. 

The eighth section of the bill enables the President to protect the health and w« 
fare of the pro])le of the United States against the importation of articles used f< 
human fooil or drink which are adulterated to an extent dangerous to health, b 
the issuance of this [iroclamation prohibiting such importation. 

Such a law as the one ]»roposed is rencb^red necessary as well by the conditioQ , 
our foreign trade as for the promotion on sound and just principles of the interes 
and welfiire of our own peo[)le and of thosti of other countries with whom theyenj* 
trade relations. 



49th Gonobess, \ HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVES. / Bepobt 
lit SeMtan. f \ No. 1645. 



AMBEIOAN CUSTOMS UNION. 



Apbil 15, 1866. — ^Laid on the table and ordered to be.printed. 



Ur. MgObeabt, from the Oommittee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT : 

[To acoompany H. Res. 14.] 

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to whom was referred joint res- 
olution (H. Bes. 14) requesting the President to invite the co-operation 
of the Governments of American nations in securing the establishment 
of free commercial intercourse among those nations and an American 
cnstoms union, have considered said resolution, and report the same 
vith an adverse recommendation. 



I 



I 



I 



m Congress, \ HOUSE OF EBPBESBNTATIVES. ( Eepobt 
Itt Session. I \ No. 1646. 



INTBENATIONAL AMEBIOAN CONGEESS. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered t>o be printed. 



MgCbeabt, from the Oommittee on Foreign Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany H. Res. 94.] 

he Committee on Foreign Affairs, to whom was referred joint reso- 
)ii (H. Ees. 94) to authorize the President of the United States to 
te the autonomic Governments of America to send delegates to an 
rnational American Congress to arrange for the arbitration of all 
Doal differences, have h^ the said resolution under consideration, 
report the same with an adverse recommendation, and ask that it 
D the table. 



ttTH CON0BSSSy I HOUSE OF BEPBESENTATIYES. / Bbpobt 
UtSeuion. f (No. 1647. 



COMMBECIAL EBLATIONS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES 
AM) MEXICO AND CENTRAL AND SOUTH AMERICA AND 
BMZIL. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. MgCbkabt, firom the Committee on Foreign Afiairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 5444.] 

The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (H. 
B5444) for the encooragement of closer commercial relationship, and in 
the interest of and the perpetuation of peace between the United States 
and the Republics of Mexico and Central and South America and the 
Empire of Brazil, have had said bill under consideration, and report the 
same with an adverse recommendation, and ask that it lie on the table. 



§ * 



«TH Congress, | HOUSE OF BBPRBSENTATIVBS. ( Report 
l8t Session. ] \ No. 1648. 



AMERICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 



Apkil 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. McGreary, from the Committee on Foreign Affairs, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7884. J 

The Committee on Foreij^n Affairs, to which was referred the bill (H. 
B. 7267) authorizing the I^esident of the United States to arrange a 
conference for the pnriK>8e of promoting arbitration and encouraging 
reciprocal commercial relations between the United States of America 
and the Republics of Mexico, Central and South America, and the Em- 
pire of Brazil, have had the same under consideration, and respectfully 
report the accompanying bill, and recommend its passage. 

This bill, as far as is deemed proper and practicable, is for the ac- 
eoinplishment of the same results sought in Joint Resolutions 14 and 
94 and House Bill 5444, to wit, the establishment of more intimate com- 
mercial and other international relations between the United States and 
other autonomic States of the American continent. 

The subject of establishing closer international relations between all 
)he Republics of the American continent and also the Empire of Brazil, 
containing in the aggregate one hundred millions of people, for the 
>Drpose of improving the business intercourse between those countries 
md securin'g more extensive markets for the products of each is both 
Dteresting and important. Sixty .years ago this subject was discussed 
rud a conference was suggested between representatives of our (Sov- 
mment and theotherGovernments,andPresidentJohnQuincy Adams 
ppointed representatives to the Congress held at Panama to consider 
iieasures for promoting peace and reciprocal commercial relations be- 
ween said countries. This conference was beneficial, but at that time 
»Qr people were looking more to Europe for business and commerce than 
the countries south of us, and no action was taken by our Congress. 
Jow the United States is at peace with all the world and our j)opula- 
;ion and wealth make this the foremost Republic of the world, and our 
Government should inaugurate the movement in favor of an American 
ionferense. 

The present depression of business and low price of farm products 
ire caused, to a considerable extent, by a limited market for our sur- 
plus products. Some of the best markets we can look to are not far 
►eyond our southern border. They are nearer to us than to any other 
ommercial nation. The people of Mexico and of Central and South 
America produce much that we need, and our abundant agricultural, 
Qanufactiired, and mineral productions are greatly needed by them. 
?he8e countries cover an area of 8,118,844 square miles, and have a 



2 AMERICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 

population of 42,770,374. Their people recognize the superioritj* of oar 
products, and desire more intimate business intercourse with our peo- 
ple, but the great bulk of their couimerce and trade is with Europe. 
The Argentine Republic has from forty five to sixty steamships ruDDing 
regularly between Buenos Ayres and European ports, and no regular 
line between that country and the United States, and our commercial 
facilities with the other republics of Central and South America are 
about the same. 

In 1884 our exports were valued at $733,768,764. 

Of this amount we exported but $64,719,000 to Mexico and Sonthand 
Central America. 

Our annual mechanical and agricultural products are valued at fifteen 
thousand millions of dollars, while we seldom have sold more than 
seventy-five millions of dollars worth of these products to our nearest 
neighbors, who buy in Europe at least five times as much as they get 
here. 

The total commerce of the countries named in 1883 was as follows: 

Imports |331,100,fi99 

Exports 391,294,781 

Of the $331,100,599 of merchandise sold to those countries, the share 
of the United States was only $42,598,469 ; yet we are their closest 
neighbor. 

The disparity of our trade with Peru, Chili, Aigentine Republic, and 
Brazil is both amazing and humiliating. 

Last year the imports of merchandise were as follows : 



To— 



Peru 

Chili 

Arsentine Bepnblio 
BnwU 



From Oroftt 
Britain. 



$6,3U.685 
11. (MO, 880 
29,009,205 
83,040,215 



Prom United 

StfttM. 



f74l,10l 
2,211.«r? 
4,817.298 
7.317,291 



The following tables exhibit the population of the countries named, 
and the relations of trade carried on by them with the United States 
and Great Britain during the last year: 





Argentine 
Bepablic. 

2,408,000 


Brazil. 
10,108,291 


Central 
America. 

2,900,000 


CbiU. 


Colombia. 


PopalAtion 


2.400 306 


9 OM Mt 






Exports to Great Britain 

Imports lyom Great Britain. . . 

Bxports to United SUtea 

Imports from United States. . . 


$5, 793, 965 

29, 092. 295 

4, 828. 510 

4, 347, 293 


$23,607,165 

83, 946, 215 

45,263.660 

7, 317, 298 


$6, 526, 950 
4, 624, 560 
6. 409, 001 
2,762,531 


$12, 977. 465 

11. 060. 880 

604,525 

2, 211, 007 


$2. 166, 389 
6,107,645 
2,342,0^7 




Mexico. 
9, 389, 461 


Peru. 


Veneanela. 


Umgnaj. 


Dominion of 


Popnlation 


3, 050. 000 


2. 075. 242 


447.000 


4.750,000 


ExjMjrts to Great Britain 

Imports from Great Britain ... 

Bxports to United States 

Imports from United States. .. 


$3, 502, 500 
5,415,765 
9, 267, 021 
8, 840, 784 


$10,414,170 

6, 235. 685 

1. 764. 890 

742, 105 


$1,300,565 
3. 02H, 680 
6. 309. 580 
8,043,609 


$3,28:1,625 
8, 131, 640 
2, 784, 617 
1,682,443 


$4V55e~555 

44,727.095 
39.UOO.OUO 
60,000.000 



AMERICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 



THal values of free and dutiable merchandise imported into the United States from Mexioo 
simd Central and South America during the year ending June 30, 1835, with the estimated 
amounts of duty collected on such imports. 



Countries from which ioipoited. 



Arceotine Bepoblio 

ChUl 

Mnico 

C«Btnl American States. . 
United States of Colombia 

Yeoesaela 

Psni 



Brufl 

Uragiuij . . 

Soliria, Ecoador, Paraguay, and Patagonia. 



Total 



Valae of merobuidise. 



Free of daty^ 



|3,1M,837 
300. 4G4 
5.173,441 
e. 140.873 
2, 335, 083 
6, 207. 887 
1. 740, 632 

38. 136. 101 

2,317,131 

753. 321 



66, 486, 368 



Dutiable. 



Total. 



$1, 174, 173 

2ii5, 061 

4, 00:{, 580 

250. 142 

6,004 

41,608 

15,258 

7, 127, 460 

417,478 

280 



$4, 328. 510 
604,525 
0. 267. 021 
6, 4U0, 015 
2, 342, 077 
6.300,580 
1.764,800 

45. 263, 660 

2, 784 617 

753,601 



18,841,128 1 70,777.406 



Estimated 
amounts 
of duty col- 
lected. , 



$364,033 28 

68.386 89 

635,060 72 

140, 750 88 

1.714 68 

20,207 40 

5, 148 06 

6.607,377 15 

255,4H) 80 

140 00 



8, 100, 108 80 



Per cent 

T«tal Tslne of merchandise free of duty 88.28 

Total value of merchandiHC subf ect to duty 16. 72 

Iqnivalent ad valorem rate of duty on — 

Dntiable merchandise 10.15 

Free and dutiable merchandise 60.72 

The coDSuinptioD of cotton goods in Central and South America and 
in Mexico amounts to nearly one hundred millions of dollars annually, 
and although they are so near our cotton fields, England furnishes about 
% per cent, of these goods. 

Cotton fabrics constitute the wearing apparel of nearly three-fourths 
of those people, and they have to import all they use. 

England monopolizes this trade because of her cheap transportation 
facilities, ana because her mills furnish goods especially adapted to t4ie 
wants and tastes of the consumers, which our mills have never attempted 
to produce. 

It is very important that transportation facilities between the United 
States and her southern neighl>ors should be improved ; for as long as 
the freight from Liverpool, Hamburg, and Bordeaux is $15 a ton, they 
cannot be induc«Hl to pay $40 a ton to bring merchandise from the 
United States. 

There is not a commercial city in these countries where the manu- 
facturers of the United States cannot compete with their European 
rivals m every article we produce for export. 

The report of the South American Commission shows, by the testi- 
mony of the importing merchantsof those countries, that aside from the 
diflerence in cost and convenience in trans])orting, it is to their advan- 
tage to buy in the United States, betiause the quality of our products 
is superior, and our prices are usually as low as those of Europe. In 
this connection it may be important to consider whether a common 
standard of gold and silver coins equal in value, weight, and fineness in 
all of the countries named, and current in all of them, would help to in- 
crease commerce and friendly relations among them. 

The bill does not seek to control the conference or determine what it 
shall do, but simply to bring representative men of each Government 
together, to discuss and recommend for adoption to their respective 
Governments some plan of arbitration for the settlement of disagree- 
ments and disputes that may hereafter arise between them, and to con- 
sider questions relating to the improvement of business intercourse be- 
tween said countries, and to encourage such reciprocal commercial rela- 



4 AMERICAN COHMEBCE AND ARBITRATION. 

tions as will be beneficial to all, and secmre more extensive markets for 
the products of each. 

While ro scheme may be devised by which all and every disagree- 
ment and dispute may be submitted to arbitration in such manner as to 
always avoid international war, it certainly will be in acoordaEce with 
the civilization and Christianity of this age to seek to establisu a pUn 
of arbitration by which questions of difference may be arranged and 
settled peaceably. 

The Amphictyonic council of Greece, composed of delegates from 
each of its states, and empowered to examine and decide all their dis- 
putes, did much to preserve peace between them for many years, and 
the AchaBan league did the same, and was often solicited even by for- 
eign nations to act as arbiter of their disputes, and the recent adjast- 
meiit of the coalroversy over the ^^ Alabama claims " shows that the 
Government of the United States favors arbitration. 

While we have great respect for those who advocate a reform of oor 
laws on currency and taxation, we believe that the great questions 
presented in the bill under consideration should not be delayed, bat 
should receive prompt action, so as to keep pace with the other impor- 
tant snbjects referred to. 

It is not proposed to intrust to the conference the power to make 
final and definite treaty arrangements — that would be in opposition to 
our Constitution ; but it is believed that all will be benefited by a con- 
ference held under the invitation and auspices of the most prosperous 
and powerful nation of the American continent, from which assemblage 
rei)ort« of the proceedings shall be made to the respective Governments 
for proper nction. 

The bill provides that the commissioners shall report the proceedings 
thereof to the President, who shall transmit the same to Congress, and 
it is believed that nothing but common good can grow oat of such a 
conference. 

At no time since the organization of our Government has there been 
a deeper conviction of the propriety of connecting in closer relations 
our Republic and the Bepiiblics of Mexico, Central and South America, 
and the Empire of Brazil. 

Whatever tends to bring into kindly accord the interests and aims of 
our country and those of our neighbors will be beneficial. 

The report of the commissioners, appointed under the act of 1884, 
shows that the i)eople of these countries are anxious to encourage more 
intimate commercial relations with the people of the United States. 

They say in their report : 

Unless we have been completely miMled by the expressions and prot^estatiODs of the 
rnling powers of each and every one of the Governments we have visited, the only 
estrangement possible between them and as will flow from our own indiffereDce and 
neglect. Indeed, we have already lost mach that naturally belongs to us from thia 
cause. Every President and cabinet officer, every leading and thoughtful citizen we 
met, joined in the sentiment of gratified surprise that our country had taken the ini- 
tintive by this embassy in bringing about more cordial and hearty commnnication 
between the Tarious Republics and our own. In our effort to reach more iutiniAte 
relations we have, then, this basis of kindness and desire upon the part of thoee we 
seek to reach as a foundation for our action. We shall plant seed in a genial soil, 
beneath a propitious sky. 



AHERICAN COMMEBCE AND ABBITRATION. 



VIEWS OF THE MINORITY. 

I regret extremely that I am anable to concur with my associates on the 
Foreign Affairs Committee who advise the House to accept and pass the 
bill H. E. No. 7267, which requests the President to invite t4ie several 
Governments on this continent therein named to join this Government 
in a conference, and authorizes the President to appoint three commis- 
sioners who shall attend the conference on behalf of this Government, 
and appropriates $20,000 therefor. The objects an(}i«ims pf the con- 
ference, as vaguely mentioned in the bill, are three fold. Otie is to dis- 
cuss and recommend for adoption by this Government, and each of the 
other Governments, some plan of arbitration for the settlement of dis- 
agreements and disputes hereafter arising between them. Another is 
to consider questions relating to the improvements of business inter- 
conrse between "said countries.^ A third is to encourage such peace- 
ful and reciprocal commercial relations as will be beneficial to all, and 
secure more extensive markets for the surplus products of each of said 
countries. 

if the bill shall become a law this Government will, as befits its dig- 
nity and power on this continent, be the initiator of the conference, and 
will naturall.y be considered by the participating nations as the one to 
take the lead in formulating the propositions to be considered by the 
conference. I have seen no indication that the President has suggested 
pr advised the proposed conference, and if such a conference is to be 
convened by his invitation, on the request of Congress, then the pro- 
moters in Congress should, as it seems to me, define, with reasonable 
precision, not only the objects to be sought by those representing this 
Government in the conference, but the ways and means by which those 
objects are to be obtained, including, in the outline, the concessions 
which our law making power, as distinct from our treaty-making power, 
might be willing to make. If the conference were proposed by other 
Governments, as was the congress at Panama in 1826, or if the Presi- 
dent had initiated the conference now proposed, and had asked the sanc- 
tion of the Senate by the confirmation of commissioner:^, and of the two 
Houses by an approprjation of money therefor, then the President could 
be assumed to be in possession of, or to have formulated, the measures 
to be proposed at the conference, and the stipulations which, if inserted 
in a treaty, he would be willing to sign and transmit to the Senate for 
its action. But, in the present case, the initiation of negotiations to be 
carried on by the President comes, so far as I am informed, entirely 
from the House. If the conference should convene under the proposed 
bill, and the assembled powers were to ask our commissioners for an 
outline of their plan as regards the three topics, what reply should the 
President instruct them to make! 

ABBITBATION. 

The first topic in the bill is arbitration. It proposes that the confer- 
ence shall discuss, and recommend, '^some plan." What plan? Which 
^^disagreements and disputes" are to be submitted to arbitration? 
What sort of arbitration ? Those are problems concerning which the 
President should, by the bill, be advised, or else most inconvenient 



6 AMERICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 

consequences might flow from a rejection by the Senate, or Congress, 
of a plan or system of arbitration which had been adopted by the con- 
ference on the initiation aud advocacy of our own commissioners. 

What is abitration, as understood in international intercourse! Vat- 
tel defines it to be " a reasonable and natural mode of deciding such 
disputes as do not directly affect the safety of the vation,^^ The exclusion 
contained in this definition is most important. It is beljeved that du- 
ring the century and a quarter which has intervened since this defini- 
tion was written, no i)Owerful govern nient has consented, or indicated 
its willingness to consent generally to the reference to an arbitration, 
either by neutral governments, or by commissioners, of any but second- 
ary questions, such as claims for pecuniary compensation for injuries, 
questions of boundary lines, disputes over the interpretation of treaties, 
and other similar questions. Wars have been prevented by the medi- 
ation, or good offices, of some friendly government or governments, but 
the exercise of mediation, or of g(»od otfi<!es,is rather a method of concil 
iation than of arbitration^ wJjich last implies the ]>ower of definite and 
final decision. 

The United States, ever since the organization of their national Gov- 
ernment, and notably in the treaty of peace of 1783, have frequently 
used with great success arbitration as a method for the settlement of 
secondary questions. The plenipotentiaries to the Congress of Paris of 
1856, in their twenty-second ]>rotocol, express in the names of their 
Governments the wish that the States, between whom serious difficul- 
ties may arise, would, before appealing to arms, have recourse, as far 
as circumstances will admit, to the good offices of a friendly power. 
But there again the exceptions '• as far as circumstances will adiuit,^ 
and the employment only of good offices (which last is often a simple 
formality to bring the contending parties together), as distinct from 
arbitration, which pronounces a real obligatory judgment, are signifi- 
cant. 

It may be said that the international tribunal at Geneva was the sub- 
mission by this Government of a question too important to be called a 
secondary question, but it is to be remembered that it was by the re- 
sult of negotiations by the Joint High Ctmimission at Washington that 
the '* three rules" were formulated, which left little to be done at Geneva, 
excepting to aiscertaiu the facts,apply the rules, and assess the damages. 
It was the decision of the British Government that war ought not to 
come out of the '* Alabama claims " whi<*h led up tp the Joint High Com 
mission, which in turn created the tribunal at Geneva. 

The bill reported to the House gives no indication of the class of *' dis 
agreements and disputes" which this (ioverument will consent to refer U 
arbitration. Will the United States consent to confer on any tribunal th< 
power to adjudge the cession of territory b^^ us, or the demolition of oa 
fortifications, and to decree anything and everything to be done by ui 
which, according to the presentusages of international law, may be im 
posed upon a defeated nation by its victors in war ? Probahly not, and 
if not, then precisely what class of questions will the United States sa; 
may be referred to arbitration ? If arbitration is to be a complete suli 
stitute for war, then it would seem essential that the jurisdiction of th- 
arbitrators shall cover all "disagreements and disputes" which ma; 
possibly lead to war. When a commotion or insurrection or civil wa 
is, to the great possible injury of a neighboring nation, on the point o 
breaking out within any one of the nations to participate in the confer 
ence, shall the origin of the outbreak, and the claims of the contendinj 
parties, be submitted to arbitration, or shall the sphere of arbitratioi 



AMEBICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 7 

be limited to qnestions wbicb, according to existing international usage, 
are capable of constituting legitimate causes of warf Will the United 
States consent to submit to arbitration a decision of tbe question whether 
or not this Government shall make an apology to some other nation f 

Assuming theproposed bill to be so enlarged and amended as to declare 
definitely the class of questions which this Government may declare to 
the conference that it is willing, in behalf of itself, to submit to arbitra- 
tion, then what international machinery shall be provided on this con- 
tinent to ascertain the facts which underlie the dispute, and give judg- 
ment f Shall this international organization, for the settlement of " dis- 
agreements and disputes," be of a permanent character, with authority 
to take immediate jurisdiction without waiting until the parties con- 
cerned mutually agree to submit to arbitration I Is there to be on this 
continent a i>ermanent Congress of Nations, or a new international Na- 
tion! Are the several independent nations on this continent to form 
themselves into a federation for the purpose of arbitrating disputes be- 
: tween themselves ? If this Congress of Nations is not to be in perpetual 
» session, then by whom is it to be convened in order to deliver its judg- 
i mentupon *' disagreements and disputes" tending t6 disturb the peace 
I of tbe continent? As our own thirty-ninth Government, which is the 
I Fedeml Government at Washington, clasps and enfolds the thirty-eight 
State governments in the union of States, and as is intended to settle 
? disputes and prevent war between them, shall there be a new inter- 
national Nation on this continent, with a Congress, a court, and an ex- 
ecutive, to settle disputes and prevent war between the several nations t 
What limitation shall be placed upon the nature of the award and 
judgment which this international tribunal may make? 

And when the proposed bill has be^n amended so as satisfactorily to 
answer these questions, then will' come the other question, whether the 
decisions of this new international tribunal on this continent shall have 
only a moral authority, or provision shall be made for the physical en- 
forcement of the verdict. Is the new contrivance to be, in the first 
place, an ap)>eal from force to reason, and then, if reason does not pre- 
vail, an appeal back again from reason to force? If there is to be 
armed force behind the decision of this new board of arbitration, how 
shall this force be maintained, who sha*l command it, and what shall 
be the limit of international expenditure therefor ? 

If it be said that the proposed bill only contemplates an effort to con- 
cert measures between the independent Governments on this continent 
to exercise a moral authority between nations where '* disagreements 
and disputes " unfortunately arise, and thus settle them in an amicable 
and satisfactory manner, it may be said that this Government has dl- 
ready given ample indication that such is its wish. But if, on the other 
hand, a chief object of the proposed bill is to urge the several Govern- 
ments of the Bepublics of Mexico, Central and South America, to agree 
on ^^some plan of arbitration for the settlement of disagreements and 
disputes that may hereafter arise between them^^ but which do not di- 
rectly concern this Government, then it will deserve consideration 
whether uninvited by those Governments or either of them, it will be 
prudent for this Government to thus attempt to participate in the 
mutual relations of other independent Governments on this continent, 
and whether, if we do thus endeavor, we shall not thereby enter upon 
a field of effort fix>m which hitherto our well-established polic3% and the 
warning voice of Washington, have excluded us. 

Arbitration as a means in the affairs of individuals of obviating the 
necessity of recourse to courts of law, or in the affairs of nations of pre- 



8 AMERICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 

ventiDg the arbitrameDt of the sword, has much to commend it. Gonrts 
of conciliation are scarcely less effective and benevolent than conrta of 
arbitration^ whether in individual or international affairs. But before 
the proposed bill shall become a law, ought not Congress to define the 
circumstances and conditions under which the decision of the arbi- 
trators shall not be binding f Surely an independent government can- 
not be expected to be bound if the arbitrators are incapable (as per 
haps this Government had reason to suspect in its latest arbitration of 
the fishery question) ; or if the arbitrators acted in bad faith ; or if the 
contending parties have not been misunderstood ; or if the award shall 
have been in excess of the terms of the reference ; or if the decijjioa 
shall have been contrary to natural justice. These questions and oth- 
ers like them will naturally come to the front on the assembling of the 
proposed conference, and our commissioners will naturally ask for io- 
structions from the President. The law which initiates the Congreas 
should, as it seems to me, clearly intimate to the President it« opinioiL 
In July, 1873, Mr. Gladstone said in the House of Commons that a 
general and permanent system of arbitration would make practical prog- 
ress, not by attempting permanent international concert, which would 
then be premature, but by '^a steady adherence on the part of those 
powers who are readily inclined and convinced and persuadeii, on the 
subject to principle, first governing themselves by justice and modera- 
tion, and next losing no opportunity of recommending a peaceful settle- 
ment of disputes between nations." 

IMPROVEMENT OF "BUSINESS INTERCOURSE." 

The second topic to be discussed by the conference concerns " the im- 
provement of business intercourse betweens aid countries." And here, 
again, what is to be accomplished by the President in that direction seems 
rather vague and difficult to practically deal with. Does the "im- 
provement of business intercourse between said countries" imply and 
include the improvement of the means of transportation by land and 
by sea? Does this Government intend to commit that large problem 
to an international conference, and to hold out the expectation to the 
Governments participating in such conference that this Government 
will be bound by the result of the deliberations f Or, if not, then should 
there not be in the bill a limitation and definition of the subjects re- 
lating "to the improvement of business intercourse between said coun- 
tries," concerning which a conference is invited! 

MARKETS FOR SURPLUS PRODUCTS. 

The third object of the proposed conference is declared in the bill to 
be the encouragement of **snch peaceful and reciprocal commercial re- 
lations as will be beneficial to all and secure more extensive markets 
for the surplus products of each of said countries." It is to be inferred 
from this language that one of the objects which this Government seeks 
to promote is the obtaining of '' more extensive markets for the sur- 
plus products of Mexico, Brazil and the States of Central and South 
America." It is not to be assumed that this Government will initiate 
a conference between themselves and the other Governments on this 
continent in order to monopolize /or ourselves the purchase of '* the sur- 
plus products of each of said countries." It is not to be aasuiued that 
either of those countries will undertake to sell its surplus products to 
none else but ourselves. The purpose is, on the contrary, declared to 



AMEBICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 9 

Iwsach *^ reciprocal commercial relatdoDs" as ^ill secure more exten- 
sile markets for the surplus products of each. Whether or not all who 
dvell on this Western Hemisphere, or even we of the United States of 
America, would be more prosperous and better off if all commercial re- 
ifttions with the Eastern Hemisphere were prohibited or prevented, is of 
fionrse a very large question. But so long as the people and the gov- 
ernments on this continent which are at the south of us shall find on the 
i»ther continent, and not find on this continent, the surplus capital and 
DDoney which they need, it will not be reasonable for us toho[>e that Mex- 
ico, Brazil and the Republics ot Central and South America will cease to 
hold commercial intercourse with Europe, or that European holders of 
the indebtedness of those states will cease to exercise very potential in- 
fluence in their affairs, and in the end control, it is feared, any conference 
to be assembled under the proposed bill. There is no danger that the 
pnniacy of the United States of America upon this continent, which 
eomes of their situation, population, wealth, enterprise, energy and de- 
termination to assert their rights, will be questioned or denied. But it 
is true, nevertheless, that we seek an outlet for the surplus product of 
oar skill and our prosperous labor, and for that reason we should wel- 
come the enlargement of '^such peaceful and reciprocal commercial re- 
lations " between us and the Spanish races to the south of us. For the 
same reason we should encourage similar ^^ peace^l and reciprocal com- 
mercial relations" with the five millions and more of people of our own 
race, speaking our own language, reading our newspapers, and living 
under laws and political institutious similar to our own. And for the 
same reason we should encourage ^^ peaceful and reciprocal commercial 
relations'' with the peoples who inhabit the islands of the Gulf of Mex- 
ico, and the surrounding seas, which islands are now the colonial de- 
pendencies of European governments. But the Dominion of Canada to 
the north of us and the islands of the Gulf to the south of us are excluded 
from the arrangements contemplated in the proposed bill. 

Nothing is now so desirable for our own (>eople as a free and recipro- 
cal interchange of products between ourselves and the people of other 
nations on this continent. But what now hinders such free interchange 
so much as our tariff* laws! If this Government shall invite Brazil, 
Mexico and the republics of Central America and South America to 
join us in a conference to promote such free and reciprocal interchange 
of products, what concessions in our tariff schedules is the President to 
be anthorized to instruct our commissioners to propose on our part ? 
The question of oar own tariff' will naturally and immediately come up 
for discussion and consideration. Shall, for example, our commission- 
ers be authorized to offer to the Argentine Republic to admit its wool 
into our ports free of duty t 

No one can be more sensible than I am of the great advantages which 
in our country flow from that free commercial intercourse, unvexed by 
tariffs or customhouses, which the Federal Constitution secures. I wish 
by some possible and wise contrivance, those advantages now enjoyed 
by and between Maine and California, Florida and Alaska, could be real- 
ist by and between every nation and every producer on this hemi- 
sphere from Baffin's Bay to Cape Horn. But is this Government now 
in a condition to successfully ask in a diplomatic way the accomplish* 
ment of such a result ? To use Mr. Gladstone's language, should we not 
first of all begin to govern ourselves in tariff matters with '^ justice and 
moderation f " And then, too, does opinion in this House tend to toler- 
ate a reform or protective system by treaties f What is to be the fate 
ot the Sandwich Islands treaty and Mexican treaty f Is there not a 



10 



AMERICAN COMMERCE AND ARBITRATION. 



disposition against the sugar arrangements of the Hawaiian Islands 
treaty to even sacrifice the great political and naval advantages which 
that treaty gives to us, situated as these islands are in the track of 
traffic between California and China, Japan and Australia t 

And if we cannot successfully compete in our own jurisdiction with 
foreign manufacturers, excepting by the aid of prohibitory or impeding 
tariff' rates, I am at a loss to understand how our commissioners to the 
proposed conference can convince Mexico or Brazil or the Republics of 
Central and South America that we can, in their jurisdiction, compete 
successfully against those same manufacturers and offer our prodacts 
at cheaper prices than European manufacturers can oifer similar articles. 

So far as this bill (7267) endeavors to accomplish an increase of trade 
by the exchangeof products between the people of our own United States 
and the people living under other governments on this continent (in- 
cluding the colonies hereon possessed by European governments) the 
object is one which deserves encouragement and success, but it may 
well be doubted whether such an object can be bfest promoted by inter- 
national conferences and treaty stipulations. So far as the welfare of 
our own Government is concerned, it is to be feared, as I have already 
said, tbat the deliberations of an international conference between the 
representatives of this Government and of t)ther independent govern- 
ments established and having tbe seat of authority on this continent, 
would be in danger of injurious interference, so far as this government 
is concerned, by the intrigues of those in Europe who are the holders 
of so large a part of the indebtedness of Central American or South 
American States. 

It is true that the trade and commercial intercourse now existing be- 
tween foreign peoples on this continent and other peoples are not alto- 
gether carried on with ourselves. The following statements will exhibit 
the population of the independent states on this continent, including 
the colonial Dominion of Canada, and the relation of trade carried on by 
them with the United States to the trade carried on by them with Great 
Britain, and the vessels in which it is carried on : 






A.rgeotine 
Kepnblio. 



Population 



Exports to Great Britain 

Imports from GreHt Britain . . . 

Exports to United States 

Imports from U nited States. . . 



2,406.000 



$5, 793, 965 

29, 692, 295 

4. 328, 510 

4,317,293 



Mexico. 



Brazil. 



10, 108, 291 



$23, 507. 165 

33.946.215 

45,263,660 

7,317,293 



Pern. 



Central 
America. 



$6,526,950 
4, 624, 560 
6, 409, 001 
2, 762, 531 



Chili. 



2,900,000 2,400,396 



$12, 977, 465 

11,060,880 

604.525 

2.211,007 



Venesenla. j TTrngnay. 



Colombia. 



2,951,321 

$2,166,380 
6,107,645 
2.842.007 
5,583,80 



Dominion of 
Canada. 



Popnlation ' 9, 389, 461 

Exporta to Oreat BriUin i $3,502,500 

Imports from Great Biitain . . * 5, 415. 765 

Experts to United States j 9, 267. 021 

Imports from United States. . . 1 8, 340. 784 



3.050.000 2,075,245 



$10,414,170 

6. 235. 685 

1, 764, 890 

742,105 



$1, 300, 565 
3.028,680 
6, 309, 580 
3,043,609 



447,000 



$3,283,625 
8, 131. 640 
2, 784, 617 
1,682,443 



4, 750. 000 

^&5H.556 
44.727,085 
39,000.000 
50,000.000 



ABIEBICAN COHMEBCE AND ABBITBATION. 



11 



Ttta{ values of /ree and duHahle merchandise imported into the United States from Mexico 
and Central and South America during the year ending June 30, 1885, unth the estimated 
amounts of duty collected on such imports. 



CooBtries from which imported. 



InrentiDA Republic 

Chili 

Mciico 

Ceotrtl American Statea . . 
United States of Colombia. 

T^ezoela 

Pern 

Biaril 



Yalae of merchandise. Estimated 

amounts 

I of duty col* 

Free of duty. Dutiable, j Total. lected. 



rraguay .• 

Bolivia, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Patagonia 

Total 



13.164,337 , 


$1, 174, 173 


$4, 328, 510 


$364. 933 28 


399,464 


205, 061 


604.525 


68. 886 89 


5, 173, 441 


4, 093, 580 


9,267,021 1 


635, 960 72 


6, 149, h73 


259, 142 


6.409,015 


140, 759 88 


2,33.%0i53 


6,994 


2,34^,077 1 


1, 714 68 


6,267,8«7 


41,693 1 


6,309,580 


20,297 40 


l,7i9,(B2 


15,258 


1,764,890 


5. 148 06 


38,136,191 


7,127,469 1 


45,203,660 1 


6,607,377 15 


2, 317, 139 


417,478 


2,734.617 


255, 480 80 


753,321 


280 ; 


753.601 


140 00 



66, 436, 368 13, 341, 128 79. 777, 496 8, 100, 198 86 



Total ralue of merchandise free of duty ... 
Total value of merchandise subject to duty. 
Eqaivalent ad valorem rato of duty on — 

Dutiable merchandise 

Free and dutiable merchandise ■ 



Per cent, 

83.28 
16.72 



10.15 
60.72 



Statement showing the value of imports and exports of merchandise carried in American 
and foreign vessels j respectively y in the foreign trade of the United States with Mexico ^ 
Central America, the West Indies, and South America during the year ending June 30, 
18t£>. 



Import^ 



Exports. 



Total. 



Countries. 



; In Ameri- 
! can ves- 
i sels. 



Mexico* $3,748,890 



In for- : In Ameri- ^ In for- 
eign ves- canves- ei^n ves- 
sels, sels. I sels. 



$2, 841, 707 $4, 799, 254 $1, 560 359 



In Ameri 

»n v€ 

sels. 



In for- 



can ves- eijrn ves- 
' sels. 



Central American States and ' 
British Honduras j 4,915.347 I 1,712.028 . 2,877.733 I 754,551 



THB WIST IliniKS. I 

Cuba ,28,975,822 

British West Indies { 2,560,874 



Porto Rico 

Hayti 

San Domingo 

French West Indies 
Dutch West Indies . 
Danish West Indies 



2, 590, 135 
626,464 

1,311,746 
419,654 
233, 479 
169, 275 



13,330,271 


8, 074. 752 


7. 802, 507 


2, 589, 694 


3, 514, 128 


691,113 


\ 1.844,972 


1, 080, 286 


i 149,673 


937. 560 


1 727, 861 


752, 205 


153. 181) 


440,463 


167, 028 


435. 836 



$8, 548, 144 I $4. 402, 126 



7,293,080 I 2,466,579 



931, 
4,621, 

878, 

2,227. 

49. 

660. 

226, 

150, 



408 
185 
092 
021 
135 
768 
379 
323 



37. 050, 574 
5, 150, 568 
3,281.248 
1, 706. 750 
2,249,312 
1. 171. 859 
673,942 
60r>, 111 



14.261,679 

12. 423. 692 

4, 392, 220 

4.071,998 

198,808 

1,394,629 

379.568 

317, 351 



Total 36.887,449 27,689,029 jl^OOl.OI.-i 9.750.311 51,889,364 37,439,940 



SOUTH AMBKICA. I 

i 

BrasU 10,108,298 

United S totes of Colombia i 774. 1^7 

Yenesnela . ' 4, 357, 892 

Argentine Republic ' 3, 338, 446 

TTmguay { 496.5JH 



Chili 

British Guiana 

Peru 

Dutch Guiana 

French Guiana 

All other South America 



290. 342 
390. 309 
811, 245 
258, 212 
1.803 
558,224 



35.155,362 

1,567.480 

1,951,688 

MO, 064 

2, 238, 023 

314, 183 

531.045 

953,645 

7,127 



Totol 21.885,962 



Grand total 66.937.648 



195,377 



3, 681, 883 

4,917,069 

?. 128.394 

2, 54.3, 716 

382. 402 

1,581,687 

875,886 

511, 585 

277.364 

81.184 

383,740 



3, 635. 410 

666,300 

915. 215 

2. 132. 786 

1, 300, 041 

629, 320 

764,771 

280,5*20 

21.654 

29,660 

44.271 



13, 790, 181 
6.691.666 
6, 486. 268 
5. 882. 161 

878,996 
1,872,029 
1.266,195 
1, 322, 830 

535. 576 
82,987 

941,964 



38, 790, 772 

2. 233, 780 

2,866,903 

3. 122. 850 

3,538.064 

943, 5C3 

1,295,816 

].184,16i 

28, 781 

29,660 

239,648 



43,903.904 117,364.909 10.369,948 38,750.871 54,273,042 



76, 147, 418 36, 725. 728 22. 435. 169 102. 590, 850 , 98, 582, 587 



* In addition to the merchandise stated as imporlt d and exported in vessels, merchandise to the value 
of $2, 676, 864 was imported, and merchandise to the value of $1,981,171 was exported "in cars and other 
laad Tebidet." 



12 AMEBIC AN COMMEBCE AND ARBITRATION. 

Until there shall be a reform of our own laws of cnrrency and taxa. 
tion, and a plan adopted that promisen permanency, there will be, it is 
feared, little hope of a snccessful result of diplomatic negotiations with 
the neighboring governments on this continent looking to an increase 
of trade and commercial intercourse by them with ourselves. What 
reply could our representatives make to-day when asked what ourpolicy 
about currency and taxation is to bet The theory of our existing tariff 
legislation is that our own manufacturers can only be saved alive 
against foreign competition by preventing, through a custom-house tax 
on nearly every completed manufacture our own people from buying a 
similar fabric in a foreign country. That tariff legislation has, it is be- 
lieved, created the very evil which the proposed bill and one of the 
proposed joint resolutions would endeavor to remove. 

One of the difficulties with which we in the United States have now 
to contend is that, by reason of our present tarifif laws, we cannot ixk 
our own workshops compete with European manufacturers, notwith- 
standing the great advantage we have from the efficiency of better paid 
and better educated labor. So long as such tariff laws shall be mait^- 
taiued, it is not believed that any diplomatic negotiations will enable 
the United States to do in the Dominion of Canada, or in Mexico, or ii:i 

Central America, or in South America what we cannot do at home 

which is to compete with European manufacturers. Freedom to bm^^^ 
in these communities we now have, and we can enlarge! its use to at^^^ 
degree, but freedom to sell to those communities we can only enlarg^e 
by producing equally good articles which we will sell at least as cheaply 
a« our European competitors. All schemes whatever for retaining a 
protective system and gaining foreign markets are impossible of sno- 
cess, no matter how many railways we may build or steamships we msty 
subsidize. It will be seen from the statistics already given that alargr^ 
part of the products of our neighbors to the south of us are now ad- 
mitted at our custom-houses free of duty, but the difficulty of increas- 
ing the exports of our manufactured products to those countries re- 
mains, because our protective tariff inflicts what, owing to the increased 
cost of manufacture, is in effect an export tux upon our products, which 
frustrates the efforts of our enterprising and inventive people to have 
more complete possession of the neighboring markets upon this con- 
tinent. 

The annual report of Secretary Manning to Congress, and his subse- 
quent communications on currency, taxation and tariff' reform, together 
with the recent report of tbe Bureau of Labor, clearly indicate ho^ 
and when a removal of the existing business depression is to com^* 
A rehabilitation of silver, and a restoration of the ojd price of that met^ 
by opeu mints for all comers bringing gold or silver ; free coinage cjf 
full legal-tender coins of both metals on an international ratio contecso* 
plated by the second section of Mr. Bland's law of 1878, and endeavor^^^ 
to be promoted by Secretary Bayard ; a sound system of finance ; ac^-d 
a wise adaptation of the burden of taxation to the back that must be^^^ 
it, will do more to open markets for our ])roducts in South America* 
than will any diplomatic negotiations to be carried on by the Presidets ^ 
and should precede such attempted negotiations. 

PERRY BELMONT. 



c 



49th Congress, ) HOUSE OF EEPRESEUTATIVES. i Report 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1649. 



SCHUYLKILL RIVER EAST SIDE RAILROAD COMPANY, 

PHILADELPHIA. 



Afbil 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Bbmentrout, from the Couaniittee on Military Affairs, sabmitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill S. 880. ] 

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred Senate bill 880, 

have considered the same, and report: 

A bill similar to this (H. R. 2017) has already been favorably reported 
upon by the House. The report in the case ( House Report No. 1399) and 
also Senate Report No. 419 are hereby made part of this report, and your 
committee recommend that Senate bill 880 do pass, and that House bill 
2017 lie on the table. 



[House Beport No. 1309, Forty-ninth Congreas, first session ] 

^« Committee on Military Affairs, to trhoin was referred the ttill {H, B, i^Ul7) granting the 
right of way to the Schuylkill Uiver East Side Railroad Company through the Arsenal 
ttndlk'aral Asylum grounds at J'liiladelphia, Pa., having had the same under considera- 
tion^ beg leave to submit the following report: 

The location of the line of this railroad throngh theproperty of the arsenal, in the city 

of Philadelphia, covers a space of *i0r).57 feet in length by 60 feet in width. The line 

occnpies ground between high and low water marks, which is wholly unused by the 

Goveriiinent. A pmvision of the bill requires the railroad company to extend a snb- 

^fjintial bnlkhend along the port- warden's line in front of the arsenal property. This 

Will n(»t only materially benefit and extend the property of the Government, but will 

titso impr(»ve the sanitary condition of the location by filling in the marshy ground 

between the proposed track and the port-warden's line. This will give the Qovern- 

^eut a good landing for shipments by the river should it be desirable at any future 

time for such purposes. 

The location of the railroad line thmngh the property of the United States Naval 
^yliini covers a space on the Schuylkill River of 376.09 feet in length by (>0 feet in 
^idth, with the exception of a space of 85 feet in length. The entire location is be- 
tween high and low water marks, the space of 85 ffct is occupied b^*^ a wharf, with 
•vhich the location of the railroad line does not interfere, thejfront being 100 feet out- 
ride of the railroad limits. None of this property is used by the Government for any 
parpose. By the filling in and construction of this railroad line, and the filling in 
^nd grading of the property outside of this line to the level of tUo wharves on the 
iver front, similar improvement in the sanitary condition of the neighborhood aud 
Bidvantagea to the Government will be secured. 

This bill has been submitted to both the Secretary of War and the Secretary of 
Che Navy for their approval, and has been returned with letters containing the 
^▼iews of these officers as to the propriety of granting the right of way on the Gov- 
ernment property, both of which letters are printed with this report. The Secretary 
^f War expresses the opinion that the right can be granted without serious injury to 



i 



I 



. Aftrr the word " l'liilade1|ihia," Jii liiiu •£>, iDSKrt the followin 



Navy DBl•ARTl^E^ 

tt'MkinytoH, Mttrrk » 

Sm: I hftvt tbe limior to uoknowlndge tlie receipt of your lett«r or.lHnaAr 

closing nnpv i>rHnriKP hill 'J0I7. covering iilm thttreqiieNtuf the Schuylkill Ki 

Side H»ilroad Company Ui a right of w»t thi-oush the grocndi of liio Nnval 

' "■ " '-' • - --1 -- '- ■- ^ _...-■.. . . t_.. ..■.^. „f ,j,^ pi^p. 

ailrnud across the Naval Asylum grounds in uudeair) 
vithin 500 feet of the projiosed crossing. Bnt the ot 
are not of mii^h a natnre as, in my jiidguieut, to entitle the Dcpurtmeui to i 
at^ainet piiUic cnt«rp['iHi) of snch a charactL-r as this. It luaj or Dia,v not bo i 
□ul&ilDcB to the hospital and to the adjoining grounds, according as this en 
QHcd. If trains are allowed to stand in (he nelghhorhood, cutting off the vrai 
and switching with the noise of brlls and locomotivea which those things i 
would be of serious inconvenience to the hospital, and perhaps in the end rm; 
removal of the hospital to some other locarity. The valne of the remainiii 
front will alsodepend very largely upon the manner in which the right of wa; 
by the railroad. 

I would, therefore, sngi^eat that in any law that should be pawed with rel 
this matt«r that the boar 1 authorized to pass upon the qnestion of damages 
locBlioii should be entitled to annex conditions to the use of the ricbt of way 
they may deem judicious and proper under the circumstances, to be aeeept«< 
railroad company prior to any entrance upon the land. . 

Very respectfiillv, 

W. C. WHITNE 
Serrrlarg of the 
Hon. Damkl Ermkntrout, 

Cnmmiltre on Mttilarn Affairt, Bauir nf Rtprnrnlalivn. 



I 

t 



SCHUYLKILL RIVER EAST SIDE RAILROAD CO., PHILADELPHIA. 3 

belaid where proposed without serious injury to the public interests in so far as this 
Department is concerned.'' 

'uitse views are concurred in. 

Id this connection it is proper to state that application was made to the Depart- 
ment by the railroad company in question for the richt of way across the Schuylkill 
Anenai grounds; but as such ri^ht of way contemplat^^d a peruianent occupancy, the 
company was advised that application should be made to Congress for the desired 



Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

WM. C. ENDICOIT, 

Seci'ePiry of W(u\ 
Hon. Daniel Ermentrout, 

Of the Committee on Military Affairs, Houee of Representatives. 



[Senate Report No. 419, Forty-ninth CongreAS, first HesHion.l 

T\iit Committee on MHitarn Affairs, to whom was referred the bill (-*>. 8&)) granting the right 
of wan to the Schuylkiil River East Side Railroad Company through the Arsenal and 
iVutw/ Asylum groundfi at Philadelphia, Pa., having had the same under consideration, 
hg kare to report : 

The right of way asked through the Arsenal grounds will, if granted, be a way 
:^.57 feet in length by 60 feet in widtii. That part of the Arsenal grounds intended 
to be thus occupied lies between high and low water marks. It is vucunt ground 
not likely to be applied to any Government use. Under the provisions of the bill the 
nilroa<l company is required to construct a bulkhead along the port-warden's line 
on the Schuylkill River in front of the Arsenal property. The tilling up, thus made 
necessary, will actually enlarge the property of the Government and will remove 
many causes of disease. 

The right of way asked through the Naval Asylum grounds will, if granted, be a 
way 376.69 feet in length by 60 feet in width, with the exception of a space '^ feet in 
length. The part of the Naval Asylum grounds intended to be thus occupied lies 
alio between hl^h and low water marks. The space of 85 feet, to which reference 
has been made, is occupied by a wharf. The location of the proposed railroad does 
not interfere with this wharf in any manner. The part of the Naval Asylum grounds 
through which the proposed railroad will extend is not used by the Government for 
any purposes. The filling up of the marsh laud on the Naval Asylum grounds, which 
will Ije made necessary by the construction of the proposed railroad, will add materi- 
ally to the value and heal thf illness of the Government property. 

this bill has been submitted to the Secretary of War and to the Secretary of the 
Navy by the Committee on Military Affairs ot the House of Ke)treKentatives. (See 
House Report No. 1399.) The Secretary of War suggested an amendment to the bill 
providing for the construction of a proper switch and siding, and of snitable means 
ibr crossing to the wharf for the pnr}iose of shipping and receiving freight by water. 
With this amendment the War Department was of opinion that the proposed track 
eoald be laid through the Arsenal grounds without senous injury. Your committee 
has made this precise amendment to the bill. 

The Secretary of the Navy apprehended that some annoyances might arise if trains 
were allowed to stand in the neighborhood of the Naval Asylum, cutting ofif access to 
the water front, or from the noise of bells upon the trains, or from the steam-whistles 
on the locomotives. He suggested that such conditions should be annexed to the 
grant of the right of way, through the Naval Asylum grounds, as would sufficiently 
obyiate the risk of these Inconveniences. Yourcommittee have annexed such conditions 
by a proper amendment made to the bill. 

i^The form of the amendment made at the suggestion of the Secretary of War has 
been communicated to that officer, as is shown by the Hquse report referred to, and is 
satisfactory to him. The precise form of the amendment annexing conditions to the 
use of the right of way, which was suggested as proper by the Secretary of the Navy, 
haft been more recently submitted to tnat officer and approved by him. ' 

The oommittee, therefore, in reporting this bill in its amended form, are satisfied that 
every proper precaution has been taken to protect the interests of the Government as 
a proprietor. Such precaution having been taken, it is right that the Government 
Mhould grant the right of way asked for without imposing further conditions upon the 
railroad company. The line of railway which will traverse the Arsenal and Naval 
Asylum grounds is a part, and an indispensable part, of a new line of railway extend- 
ing from the city of Washington to the city of New York. 
Your committee therefore recommend that the bill as amended should pass. 



Congress, \ HOUSE OF KEPRESENTATIVE8. ( Report 
Ui Semon. J ( Fo. 1650. 



KENSD^GTON AND TACONY RAILROAD COMPANY, PHILA- 

DELPHIA. 



iU'RH 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



tfr. Ebmentrout, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7885.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred House bill 
^, granting the right of way to the Kensington and Tacony Railroad 
ompaoy through the grounds of the Arsenal at Bridesburg, Philadel- 
bia, have had the same under consideration, and beg to report a sub- 
itnte therefor. 

From the evidence submitted to them they are satisfied that the in- 
rests of the Government would be subserved by the construction of 
e KeDsington and Tacony Railroad through the Arsenal grounds as 
oposed, as in this manner the property of the United States at that 
iDt would have direct rail communication with the Philadelphia and 
entOQ Railroad, and through that line with the entire system of the 
Dosylvania Railroad Company, so that not only the transportation of 
wder, arms, and other military supplies would be greatly facilitated 
d rendered less dangerous and expensive than by wagon transporta- 
D, but in such emergencies as happened during the riots of 1877, 
en large quantities of arms and ammunition had to be. promptly 
nsported to all parts of the country, the possession of such facilities 
aid be absolutely indispensable. The location of the proposed Ken- 
^n and Tacony Railroad does not interfere in any manner with any 
he improvements of the Government upon the Arsenal grounds, and 
tead of damaging its property, adds materially to its value. 
?he committee, therefore, recommend the passage of the proposed 
>8titute, the location of the said railroad to be approved by the Sec- 
ary of War and to follow the general route laid down upon the ac- 
apanying map. 





I 



49rH CoNGBBSS, { HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES, i Repobt 
Ut Session. f \ No. 1651. 



MARTIN MURPHY. 



APKtL 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. Ebmentsout, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 2156.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs j to whom teas referred Rouse bill 2156, 

beg leave to submit thefolloioing report : 

That having examined the testimony in this case and duly considered 
the same, they are led to the conclusion that Martin Murphy was a faith- 
fal soldier, with a good record up to the date of leaving the hospital in 
1864, which constitutes the charge of desertion. The evidence shows 
; that said Murphy was wounded on the 8th day of May, 1864, at SpottsyL 
I Tania, Ya. He was first sent to Carver Hospital, and afterwards to 
I the General Hospital, Albany, N. Y., where he was on the 28th July, 
when he was taken to his home, 9 miles away. It appears that he left 
the hospital without leave and never returned ; but, in mitigation of 
his offense, it is shown by his own testimony and that of his brother 
Michael, and supported by Patrick O'Neil and John Neagle, that at no 
time prior to the muster out of his company was he sufficiently recovered 
from the effects of his wound to do duty. It also appears in evidence 
that prior to the date of the application to the War Department for 
a discharge, the doctor who attended him in his sickness had died. 
This testimony is only rebutted by the conclusions of the Surgeon-Gen- 
era], whose opinion was asked <^ whether on the wound received the case 
was made out, and who replied that ^^ the gunshot wound was not of 
sufficient gravity to prevent the soldier from completing his enlistment." 
The committee are of the opinion that a charge which must affect a sol- 
dier's standing through life and his name after death should not be 
permitted to stand simply because a Surgeon-General gives it as his 
opinion that the healing of a gunshot wound should not require the 
time claimed by the testimony in this case. They therefore recommend 
the passage of the bill. 



t9TH Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ) Report 
Ut Ses9ioft. ( \ No. 1662. 



JOHNSON S. PR ALL. 



IPRiL 15, IH86. — Coniuiitted to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to 

he priiit^^d. 



If r, Ermentrout, from the Committee ou Military Affairs, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

TTo accompany hill H. R. 329.] 

Tfc€ Coinmittee fm Military Affair m^ to whom was referred House hill 329, 

beg l^ave to submit the following report : 

An examination of this case, and of the evidence hereto appended, 
satisfies yonr committee that the application'deserves favorable consider- 
atioD, and they therefore recommend that the bill do pass. 

The affidavit of the beneficiary and letter of the Adjutant General of 
the Army are annexed hereto and made a part of this report. 



Stati of Illinois, 

Cook County f sa : 

Johoson S. Prall, heing duly sworu, on oath HayH that he is forty-eight years of atfe ; 
a resideot of Highland Park, Lake County, Hlinois, and a native-horn citizen of the 
United States. That in the month of Ootoher, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, First 
Rf|;iment Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, with his brother, Lieut. Theo. H. Prall, 
since deceased, and was duly mustered into the United States service on or about Octo- 
ber29, 1861. Soon after he received fromCapt. Spencer Mather, of Company K, First 
United States Sharpshooters, a personal friend in civil life, a promise of a lieutenancy 
if be would ^et transferred and would recruit for his, Mather's, company. Through 
bis brother, Lietit. Theo. H. Prall, he obtained a ten da^s' furlough with the express 
understanding and promise, given, as afiiaut believes and was informed, with the con- 
seat of the colonel of the regiment, that upon furnishing a substitute affiant could be 
transferred without other formality. Affiant went to Pontiac, Mich., and within six 
tlays sent into camp by one Phillip Meyers, since deceased, a substitute and after- 
wards received a letter from Lieutenant Prall inform lug him that the said substitute 
bad come to camp and been duly eu rolled as affiant's substitute, and that affiant 
'^'as released from service with said regiment of Engineers and Mechanics. 

Affiant states that he was tot;ally ignorant of any wrong action on his part in the 
^tion taken by him above, and trusted entirely to his officers and their representa- 
tions; that he has forgotten the name of the substitute by him furnished, but re- 
E&embers that he paid some seven dollars to send him to the camp of the Engineer 
^giment at Marshall, Mich. 

Affiant began recruiting for the First United States Sharpshooters November 5, 
B61, and recruited in several counties in Michigan until March 20, 1862, and was then 
ordered with the company under Captain Mather, to Washington, D. C, and was with 
laid company as a sergeant through all the engagements of the Peninsula campaign, 
n which the company and regiment (the First United States Sharpshooters) took 
>art, until June, 1862, just previous to the seven days' fights. Affiant took part as 
^hove in the siege of Yorktowu, the battles at West Point and Hanover Court House, 
^nd various skirmishes. That in June 1862, affiant was sent with Captain Willetta, 
of Company B of his regiment, to Michigan, to recruit for the regiment and was sta- 
tioned, by Colonel or General Smith, commanding at Detroit, at Pontiac, and began 
recmiting but was soon after taken sick with typhoid fever, and finally discharged 
at Detroit in July, 1862, on account of disability from said sickness. Affiant never 
knew until within the last few years that he was carried on the rolls of the First 



2 JOHNSON 8. PRALL. 

Michieaa Englueers and Mechanics as a deserter. Never had any intention to desett 
from the service and in all respects, while in the said service, tried to do his duty m 
a good soldier. 

JOHNSON S. PltALL 

Sworn to and suhscrihed before me this 23d day of March, A. D. 1886. 
[8KAL.] ' WM. ELIOT FIRNESS, 

yotary PHhlk. 

State of Kansas, 

MoPherson County^ as : 

Clement F. Miller, being dnly swoiu, on oath says that he was first lieuteuaot and 
adjutant of First Regiment Michigan Engineers and Mechanics ; that he has read th« 
foregoing affidavit of Johnson ^. Prall, and that he believes that the part of said affi- 
davit relating to the enlistment of the said Johnson S. Prall in Company I of said 
First Regiment of Michigan Engineers and Mechanics and of his leaving saidc«»m- 
pany and regiment are true, and that he distinctly remembers of said Prall obtaiuinK 
a leave of absence, and that, to the best of his recollection, a substitute was procure 
by said Prall, and said substitute was mustered into service. 

CLEMENT F. MILLER. 

Sabscribed and sworn tx> l)efore me this 30th dav of March, A. D. 1886. 
[SEAL.] " E. L. LOOMIS, 

Countjf Clerk. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office. 

ffaahington, February 11, iHf:!6. 

Sir : I have the honor to return herewith House bill No. 329, Forty-ninth Congre» 
first session, for the removal of the charge of desertion against Johnscm S. Prall, Ute 
of Company I, First Regiment Michigan Engineers and Mechanics Volunteers, referred 
by the chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs under date of Jannary 
12, 1886, for whatever the records of this office may aftbrd, and the views of the De- 
partment relative to the case, and in compliance with your instructions on letter of 
transmittal tx) report as follows : 

Johnson S. Prall was enrolled October 1, 1861, and mustered in October 29, 1861, to 
serve three years in Company I, First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics. There is 
nothing on muster-roll of company from date of his enrollment to December 31, 1861, 
to indicate either his presence or absence, but on nnist«r- rolls from December 31, 1861, 
to June 30, 18(52, he is reported ^'Absent since December 17, 1861,'' cause of absence 
not stated. On rolls covering from June 30, 1862, to October 31, 1862. he is borueas 
**Ab8ent without leave from August 1862," with remark ** Enlisted in Berdan's Sharp- 
shooters." He was dropped from rolls December 31, 1862, and on muster-out ndl of 
company dat^'d September 22, 1M65, he is reported *' Deserted December 17, 1861. at 
Marshall, Mich., enlisted subsequently in Berdan's Sharpshooters." There isno record 
that he furnished a substitute or received a leave of absence, as alleged by him. 

Johnson S Prall was enrolled November 12, 1861, and musten^d March 15, 1862, to 
serve three years in Company K, First United States Sharpshooters and served in that 
organization until July 16, 1862, when he was discharged for disability while holding 
the grade of sergeant. 

In application for removal of the charge of desertion presented to this office by the 
soldier, he states that after enlisting in Couipany I, First Michigan Engineers aDd 
Mechanics, he was offered a lieutenant's commission if he would assist in recruiting 
a company for Berdan's Sharpshooters; that his captain went with him to the colo- 
nel of his regiment, who told him if he would furnish a substitute he could go and 
it would be all right; that he wa-i given verbal leave of absence by his colonel, to 
enable him to recmit for the Sharpshooters on condition that he furnish a substitute, 
which condition he complied with ; that his company commander and first sergeant 
were knowing to the consent given by the colonel, but that both are now dead ; that 
lie assisted in recruiting men for Company K, First United States Sharpshoot-ers, was 
made sergeant of that companv and served therein until discharged, September IV 
1862. . 

On March 19, 18"<5, the application was denied by this office on the ground that hi' 
enlistment in the First United States Sharpshooters without a discharge from th 
First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics constituted him a deserter by operation < 
law (22d now 50th Article of War), and the Department was, consequently, powerl^' 
to aflord relief in the premises. 

I am, sir, verv res]>ectfullv, vour obedient servant, 

R C. DRUM, 
Adjutant-General ' 

The Sfx'rktary of Wak. 



JoNGRBSS, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Sesnan. ] \ No. 1653. 



RANDE, MEXICO AND PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY, 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



iMENTROUT, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 670.] 

mmittee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred the bill {H. R. 
to authorize the Rio Grande^ Mexiw and Pacific Railroad Company 
irchase certain lands j beg leave to submit the following report : 

r due examiuatiou by the War Departmeut, said Department 
Ivised against passage of the same, in which conclusion your 
ttee concur, and report the bill adversely, and recommend that 
pen the table. 

O 



9th Congress, \ HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Session. | (No. 1654. 



FRANCIS J. CONLAN. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



r. GxjTGHEON, from tbe Committee on Military Afi'airs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 2125.] 

[^ Committee on Military Affairs, to icliom was referred the bill {H* 
R. 2125) for the relief of Francis J. Oonlan, report as follows: 

This bill is to direct the Secretary of War to issue an honorable dis- 
charge to Francis J. Gonlan, from Light Battery G, Fifth United States 
Artillery, as of date October 15, 1867, and to amena the military record 
of said Gonlan to show that he was not dishonorably discharged, and pay 
him all pay, bounty, and allowances that may be due him without refer- 
ence to said dishonorable discharge. 
The military record of this man is shown by the following report from 

tbe Adjutant-General's Office : 

i War Dkpartmknt, Adjutant-Qbneral's Opficb, 

I WashingtoAf D, C, March 6, 1886. 

1 Francis J. Gonlan enlisted on the 15th day of October, 1864, and was assigned to 
I Battery G, Fifth Regiment of United States Infantry. The mnster-roll of said bat- 
[ tery for March and April, 1866, reports bim, ** absent in confinement awaiting sen- 
[ tence of a general conrt-martial.'' He was tried for violation of the ninth Article of 
War, viz, '*Any officer or soldier who shall strike his superior officer, or draw or lifb 
np any weapon, or offer any violence against him, being in the execution of his office, 
on any pretense whatsoever, or shall disobey any lawful <;ommand of his superior 
officer, shall suffer death, or such other punishment as shall, according to the nature 
of his offense, be inflicted upon him by sentence of a conrt-raartiaT ; '^ ^as found 
guilty and sentenced to be dishonorably discharged tbe service of the United States 
and to be confined at hard labor for the period of two years at Columbus, Ohio. Pro- 
ceedings of court promulgated in general court-martial order No. 22, Department of 
Arkansas, April 30, 1866. The mnster-roll of company for May and June, 1866, shows 
that he was discharged May 2, 1866, at Little Rock, Ark., iu accordance with sentence 
of the general court-martial, a private. 

J. C. KELTON, 
A89istant A ^uianU General. 

There has been furnished the committee, in support of the bill, the affi- 
davit of Thomas Young, formerly of Light Battery G, to which Conlan 
belonged. He says : 

I remember the facts of the case, as they were known to all the members of the bat- 
tery. Private Conlan had been absent from the quarters on a pass, and was return- 
ing under the influence of drink. He met Colonel Arnold, who ordered him to the 
guard-house. lustead of complying, Private Conlan stood, and he and Colonel Arnold 
nad some words, which ended by Colonel Arnold striking Conlan, and after a strug. 
gle between them assistarce came to Colonel Arnold, and Conlan was taken to the 



2 FRANCIS J. CONLAN. 

ffuard-boase and tied np to a cart-wheel. After bciugtiod np for a time, he was pot 
in one of the cells and kept until mornings when he whs taken before the coart-m&r- 
tial, which was then in session. He was not allowed to return to his company qaar- 
ters after his trial. He was conveyed immediately to the Arkansas prison, outside the 
city of Little Rock, Ark. • * • 

When the sentence of the court-martial was read to the members of the battery, 
we all were surprised at the severity of it, pnrticularly in the case of ConlaD.who 
was considered one of our best men, and we all thought that the most he wonld fret . 
would be about a mouth in the guard-house, with perhaps a ball and chain or a fioe < 
of 15. 

The affidavit of Gonial) himself does not differ materially in itsstateroent 
of the occurrence out of which his arrest arose from thatof Thomas Yoang, 
as above ; but he charges that Colonel Arnold, after he had, with assist- 
ance of Lieutenant Post, overcome him, beat him inhumanly. That he 
had no opportunity to prei)are for his trial, which came on (he next day, 
and that his accuser, Colonel Arnold, was the president of the court 
that tried him and sentenced him, although, as affiant states, he bad 
himself excused from sitting in this case, yet he remained in the room 
" until they had fixed up everything to suit.'' The sentence of the court 
was that he should be *' dishonorably discharged from the service of the 
United States, and be confined at hard labor for two years at such mili- 
tary prison as the proper authority may direct." 

The sentence was approved b^^ the department commander, and the 
Ohio State prison, at Columbus, was selected as the place of confine- 
ment. 

Conlan was dishonorably discharged, and served out his time in the 
Columbus prison, making a hundred days *' good t^me " for good con- 
duct, ami was discharged February 8, 1868. 

James F. Gregory, lieutenant colonel and aide-de-camp, certifies, un- 
der date of December 21, 1883, in a letter to Conlan, as follows: 

From the time I joined the battery (December, 1865) until the day you were placed 
under arrest (I think in the early summer, 186H), yon were conrndered, I believe, by aU 
the officers-T-certainly by myself— one of the best men in the battery. 

It appears from an unsworn statement of said Conlan, addressed to 
Hon. John A. Logan, and filed with the committee, that subsequent to 
his discharge from confinement Conlan enlisted in the Navy of the 
United States, and served an entire term of enlistment on board the 
steamer Benicia in the Chinese waters, and was discharged with what 
is known as a ** big discharge ^ and a »* good-conduct badge,'' in Octo- 
ber, 1872. 

Since t^eu he was for some years a commissioned officer in the Penn- 
sylvania National Guard. From the evidence before the committee the 
unfortunate affair for which he was court-martialed seems to be the one 
blot upon his record, and having regard to both his previous and his 
subsequent life, the committee must deeply regret that it should have 
occurred. 

It is a very ^rite saying that men do in a moment what they regret 
for a life-time. 

Nor can w& resist the conclusion that his trial took place too near to 
the offense and under circumstances that rendered it probable that his 
punishment was more than commensurate with the offense. 

But no amount of sympathy can change the fact. He was guilty of a 
violation of the ninth Article of War, the extreme penalty of which is 
death. 

He disobej'ed the lawful command of his superior; he did "offei 
violence'' to his superior officer; he was convicted by due course oi 



FRANCIS J. CONLAN. O 

y prooedure; he was dishonorably discharged the service, and 
rve a term of two years in the State prison at Colambus for 
in civil life, woald have been considered a trivial offense, 
cannot certify to the contrary. We cannot now put an honora- 
charge in place of a dishonorable one, however much we may be- 
hat his punishment was an excessive one. 
think that it is too late now to change this record of twenty years 
dd so recommend that the bill do lie upon the table. 






igbAml I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Rbpobt 
^sian. f \ No. 1655. 



CORRECT THE RECORD OP CERTAIN SOLDIERS. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid no the table and ordered to be printed. 



HEON, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sabmitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1777.] 

nittee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred the bill {H. JB. 
To authorize the Secretary of War to correct the record of cer- 
ritorious soldiers of the late trar, and secure to them an hon- 
lischarge from the service^ and to provide for the payment of 
try and bounty withheld from such soldiers by reason of their 
desertion^^ have had the same undtr consideration^ and submit 
jwing report : 

\t section of said bill provides — 

''olunteer soldier who served in the late war faithfully according to the 
k enlistment until the 9th day of April, A. D. 1865, shall be deemed or held 
n a deserter from the Army, &c. 

y difference, in effect, between this provision and the existing 
t the latter Axes the date for the termination of hostilities at 
[>5, while this bill places it at the date of Lee's surrender, April 

nmittee is of the opinion that no change in that respect ought 

le. 

tie date of Lee's surrender the army of Johnston in the Caro- 

lined for some time intact, and other forces of the Confederates 
with unbroken organizations, and for aught that any man in 
could know hostilities might continue for months. We are of 

on that no man was excusable for leaving Jiis colors and his 
until a more definitive close of hostilities. We think that 

the earliest date which could properly be fixed for the close 

r. 

lond section provides that — 

)tary of War be, and he is iiereby, authorized upon such proof as he may 
lent, taken and presented under and in accordance with such regulations 
prescribe, to correct the record of any soldier who served in the war of the 
so. 

OSes to vest in thtf Secretary of War the same discretionary 
it is now vested in Congress for the removal of the charge of 

act of 1884, the Secretary of War was authorized and directed 



2 TO CORRECT THE RECORD OF CERI'AIN SOLDIERS. 

to correct the record of soldiers belon^ng to all the general cla 
which it was believed coald safely and properly be relieved in that 
We are not prepared to say that there is any other general class w 
relief should be made a matter of right; and to repose a discretic 
cases not within the general classes, would in effect open up every 
not included in such general classes, which the committee do not t 
would be wise, and therefore report said bill adversely, and recomn 
that it do not pass. 



Wth Congress, M HOUSE OP REPRESENTATIVES. ( Rbpobt 
Ut Session. ] \ No.. 1656. 



GEORGE H. MELOY. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. CuTCHEON, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted tho 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 5428.] 

The GoMtnittee an Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill {H. JB. 
5428) /or the relief of Oeorge H. Meloy, report as follows: 

• 

George H. Meloy was drafted into the service of the United States 
September 4, 1863, to serve for three years, and was assigned to Com- 
pany C, One hundred and forty -third Pennsylvania Volunteers. 

Angnst 18, 1864, hie was tried and convicted of desertion, and was 
sentenced ^< to forfeit all pay and allowances now due, and to forfeit (10 
per month of his monthly pay for the period of eighteen months, and to 
make good all time lost by his desertion.'^ 

No evidence is presented to the committee to show that this finding 
and sentence was incorrect. The only evidence before the committee is 
the accompanying report of the Adjatant-General, dated March 5, 1886. 

The committee cannot recommend the reversal of the judgment of a 
general court-martial in a case of this kind, and recommend that the bill 
do not pass. 



War Department, 
Adjutaxt-General'8 Office, 

Washington, March 5, 1886. 

Sir: I have tbe honor to return herewith House bill 5428, Fort}' -ninth Congress, 
^rst session, authorizing the setting aside of the sentence of a general conrt-martial 
the case of George H. Meloy, late private Company C, One hundre<l and forty-third 
Pennsylvania Volunteers, transmitted by the chairman of the House Committee on 
Military Affairs, and in compliance with instructions thereon to report as follows : 

George H. Moloy was drafted into the service of the United States September i, 
863, to serve for three years, was assigned to Company C, One hundred and forty- 
bird Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served therein until May 10, 1864, when he is re- 
ported (on muster rolls covering from that dat« to August 31, 1864) as ''absent; 
rounded in action." He was present for duty with his company from on or about 
•eptember 1, 1864. to June 12, 1865, when he was mustered out with it. (There is no 
ecord of the captui-e of this soldier by the enemy.) 

On or about August 18, 1864, he was tried before a general court-martial, convened 
t Alexandria, Va., on the following charge and specification, to wit: Charge, deser- 
ion ; specification, '* in this, that he * * * did, without proper authority, ab- 
ent himself from his company and regiment, and so remained until apprehended at 
r near Edward's Ferry, on ^he Potomac River, on or about the 2:{d day of May, 1864. 
:*hi8 at or near Fredericksburg, Va., on or about the 17th day of May, 1864." He 
ras found guilty of both the charge and specification, and sentenced to be returned 
o his regiment for duty, ** with loss of all pay and allowances now due, and forfeit $10 
»er month of his monthly pay for the period of eighteen (18) months, and make good 



2 GEORGE H. MELOT. 

aU time lost by desertion.'' The proceediDgs, findings, and sentence of the conrt were 
approyed by the military governor of Alexandria, Va., and duly promulgated Aogiut 
lo, 1864. 

There is no evidence touching the case of this soldier now on file in this ofilce, an 
application for removal of the charge of desertion having been returned to him with 
the information that there was no provision of law under which the Department 
oould reopen the case of a soldier convicted of desertion by a general court-martial, 
the sentence of which had been carried into execution. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R, C. DRUM, 
Adjutant-General 
The Hon. Secrbtart of War. 



4Sm CONOBESS, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ( Report 
1ft Session. • \ No. 1657. 



JOHN KNOCKELMANN. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. CuTGHEON, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3952.] 

The Committee on Military, Affairs, to. whom was referred the bill {H, JB. 
^ 3952) to remove the charge of desertion from the record of John Knock- 
elmanuj respectfully report : 

That the only evidence presented to the committee in support of said 
bill is the report of the AdjutantGeneral, under date of March 13, 1886, 
appeuded hereto. From this it appears that said John Knockelmann 
enlisteQ February 3, 1862, to serve three years, in Company K, Fifty- 
foQith Ohio Volunteers, and served therein until December 20, 1862, 
when he deserted and never returned. 

It does appear that September 13, 1864, he enlisted in Company B, 
Fifty-third Kentucky Regiment, in which organization he served until 
September 15, 1865, when he was mustered out. But there is nothing 
in the evidence to satisfy the committee that he did not desert his 
first command, and until so satisfied they cannot recommend a change 
in the record. 
They therefore recommend that the bill do lie on the table. 



War Department, Adjutant- General's Office, 

n'ashingtan, March 13, 1886. 

Sir: I have the booor to return herewith House bills 3952 and 5533, Forty-ninth 
Congress, first session, authorizing removal of the charge of desertion agaiust John 
Knockelmann, late of Company K, Fifty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, transmitted by the 
chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and in compliance with in- 
stmctions thereon to report as follows : 

John Knockelmann was enrolled and mustered in February 3, 1^62, to serve three 
years, in Company K, Fifty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, and served therein until Oeoem- 
oer 20, 1862, when he deserted and never returned. A Qareful search of the records of 
this office has failed to elicit any evidence of his discharge from this regiment, or of 
his whereabouts from December 20, 1862, to September 13, 1864, when be was euroUed 
at Covington, Ky., to serve one year in Company B, Fifty-third Kentucky Volunteers, 
in which organization he served until September 15, 1865, when he was mustered out 
of service. 

In an application for removal of the charge of desertion against him as of Company 
K, Fifty-fourth Ohio Volunteers, presented to this office in 18S3, Knockelmann testified 
that he was mustered out at Memphis, Tenn., while in hospital, but never received a 
discharge ; that he proceeded from Memphis to his home, and there remained until 
partially recovered, when he enlisted in Company B, Fifty-third Kentucky Volun- 
teers. 



2 JOHN^KNOCKELHANK. 

The application was denied by this Office on the ground that the enlistment of thi» 
soldier iu the Fifty-third Kentucky Volonteers, without a discharge from the Fiftj- 
fourth Ohio Volnuteers, coniitituted him a deserter from the latter by operation of 
law {twenty-second, now fiftieth, Article of War], and the Department has no power, 
therefore, to remove the charge. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R, C. DRUM, 
Adjutant-Oeunl 
The Hon. Secretary of War. 



hPH Congress, \ HOUSE OF KEPEBSENTATIVES. i Report 
lit Session. | ( 



Ko. 1668. 



MLIEF OF GEORGE HENRY PARKER FROM THE CHARGE 

OF DESERTION. 



Apbil 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. CuTOHEON, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 4613.] 

Tke Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill {H, R. 
4613) /or the relief of George Henry Parker from the charge ofdesertionj 
report: 

That the only evidence submitted to tlie committee in support of this 
t>illi6the accompanying rleport from the Adjutant-General, under date 
)f March 9, 1886, which is maiie a part hereof. 

The committee see no ground in the evidence for granting the pro- 
K>8ed relief and recommend that said bill do not pass. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

fVaahingtoHf March 9, 1886. 

SiB: I have the honor to return herewith House bill 4613, Forty* ninth Coug^ss, 
It iiession, aathorizing removal of the charge of desertion against Greorgo Henry 
rker or Heury Parker, late of Eighth Company, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve 
rps, transmitted by the chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and, 
compliance with instructions, thereon to report as follows: 

Jenry Parker was enrolled October 29^ 1861, to serve three years in Company E, 
lety-sizth New York Volunteers, and served therein until May 10 (or 8), 186*^, when 
is reported as having deserted. On August 22, 1862, he was ^' brought back" (also 
etaken and returned") and served until August 6, 1863, when he was transferred to 
> Veteran Reserve Corps. On March 31, ld64, he deserted from the Eighth Com- 
ny, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, and never returned, 
(o evidence has been presented to this office with a view to obtaining a removal of 
! charges of desertion against this soldier. 

I am, air, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. C. DRUM, 
Adjutant- General. 
The Hon. Secretary of War. 



If 






tab 

Si 



It 



4 
I 



lb 



19th Congress, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
l«t Session. ] \ No. 1659. 



W. P. PAYNE. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on tlie table aud ordered to be printed. 



Mr. CUTCHEON, from the Committee ou Military' Att'airs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 1705.] 

The Committee on Militury Affairs, to whom was referred' the bill (H. R. 
1705) for the relief of W. P. Payne, report as follows: 

This is a bill to enlist W. P. Payne in Company P, Second Tennessee 
Cavalry, as of the Ist day of August, 1862. 

It appears from the report of the Adjutant-General that he is entirely 
unknown to the records of that office. 

It would appear from the annexed affidavit of Elbert Reid, Wyatt 
BoberHon, and George Pickelsimer, that about August 1, 1862, said 
Payne did attempt to enlist, and set out with others to go to Cumber- 
land Gap for that purpose, and on the route was in some way wounded 
and he was thus prevented from enlisting. 

We do not think that we can now commence the work of enlisting 
those who intended to enlist but did not. If at the time he was woundea 
he was actually and in good faith rendering military service to the 
Uniu>d States under any commanding officer recognized by the authori- 
ties thereof, it would be competent for Congress to grant him a pension 
for any disability incurred. But we could hardly say that he was a 
uember of Company F, Second Tennessee Cavalry, when in fact he 
^as not. 
The committee recommend that the bill do lie upon the table. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, March 12, 1886. 

Sir: J have the honor to return herewith House bill 1705, Forty-ninth Conffreas, 
nt seenion, directing the placing of the name of W. P. Payne on muster-nnu of 
Company F, Second Tennemee Cavalry, and his muster from August 1, 1862, trans- 
litted bv the chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and in compli- 
noe with instructions thereon to report that the name of W. P. Payne is not borne 
n any rolls or records of the organization mentioned on tile in this office. 

There is, at present, no evidence having a bearing upon the subject-matter of the 
iU on file in this office, as all the evidence heretofore presented was returned to the 
Ion. R. B. Vance, in 1884, with the information that in the absence of any record of 
he enlistment, muster-in, or service of Mr. Payne, no favorable action could be taken 
ipon the application to have such a record made. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. C. DRUM, 
Adjutani-OeneraL 

The Hon. Secretary of War. 



2 W. p. PAYNE. 

State of North Carolina, 

County of Cherokee : ^ 

On this 27th day of January, 1886, personally appeared before me, a justice of th 
peace in and for aforesaid county, duly authorized to administer oaths, Elbert Reid 
Wyatt Roberson, and George Pickelsimer, who, after being by me duly sworo, sa 
they were members of Company F, Second Regiment of Tennessee Cavalry ; that Will 
iam P. Payne volunteered on or about the Ist of August, 1862, in Cherokee Coontj 
North Carolina, under one John R. Simonds, together with af!iant« and others, forth 
expressed intention of Joining the Union Army, which was then at Cumberland 6ap,ii 
the State of Tennessee ; that while on the way towards Cumberland Gap, on or abon 
August 10, 1862, on Walden's Ridge, Tennessee, said William P. Payne received a sever 

funshot wound, passing through the left shoulder; that affiants, Simonds, and a) 
is men that succeeded in getting to the Federal lines joined the said Company I 
Second Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, and their enlistment dated August 1, 1882 
that they were considered in service and drew pay from the date of their enlistmen 
by Simonds, and that the said William P. Payne is as much entitled to enlistmeo 
dated August 1, 1862. as Simonds and his other recruits, in the opinion of aflSanti 
Affiants further say that they have no interest in any pension or bounty that sal 
Pavne may be entitled to for the said injury or service. 

ELBERT REID. 
WYATT ROBERSON. 

his 
GEORGE + PICKELSIMER. 
mark. 
Attests : 

A. J. KiLPATRICK. 

L. B. Washburn. 

Sworn to and subscribed before me on the day above written, and I oertify th) 
affiants are personally known to me ; that they are respectable citizens of Cherok4 
County, and are entitled to credit, and that I have no interest in this case. 

W. F. BRIANT, 
A Justice of the Peace. 

State of North Carolina, 

Cherokee County : 

I, James C. Axley, clerk of the superior court in and for said county, do hereli 
certify that W. F. Brian t, whose name is signed to the foregoing affidavit, is an u 
ing justice of the peace in and for said county, duly commissioned and sworn, ai 
that the above is his signature. 

Given under my hand and seal of said court at office in Murphy, the 28th day > 
January, A. D. 1886. 

[SEAL.] J AS. C. AXLEY, 

Clerk SuperU^r Cmt 

O 



&BESS, ) HOUSE OF REPEESENTATIVBS. i Report 
non. f \ No. 1660. 



JAMES M. McKAMEY. 



86. — Corumitted to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to Ixi 

printed. 



, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

FTo accompany bill H. R. 5775. j 

ittee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred the bill {H, R, 
vr the relief of James M, McKamey^ submit this following 

the 12th of February, 1862, Mr. McKainey enlisted as a 
Company E, Third Tennessee Infantry, and was mustered into 
! an4l served as such until the 26th day of August, 1862, when, 
:le of Richmond, Ky., he was nuule a prisoner of war. That 
jagement the detachment of his regiment with which he was 
a« so utterly routed it was weeks before a suflBcient number 
ivors of that detachment could be gotten together for the 
• forming a reorganization and rejoining their regiment. 
>rtly after Mr. McKamey's capture he was paroled, and while 
J to join his regiment he was commissioned second lieutenant 
ting officer for the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, under and 
[)f authority of Andrew Johnson, then military war governor 
see. That upon the 1st of October, 1862, he entered upon and 

to discharge his duties as such until the 1st of November, 
1 the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, by consolidation, became 
to the Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, and that in the apportion- 
fficers under the consolidation Mr. McKamev was left out. 
le 8th of November, 1864, he enlisted as sergeant. Company 

Tennessee Mounted Infantry, and faithfully served in that 
ntil the 27th of July, 1865, when he was discharged. That 
' of desertion made against Mr. McKamey, on the 24th of 
^62, was erroneously made; that instead of being a deserter 
msoner of war. 

g Mr. McKamey's commission as second lieutenant and re- 
fficer, although the records in the Department do not show 
ret there is abundant evidence to warrant your committee 

thai he was commissioned, and th it he did serve as such 
itenant rfnd recruiting ojhcer of the Eleventh Tennessee Cav- 
the 1st of October, 1862, to the Ist of November, 1864— evi- 
Hicers and soldiers who saw and inspected his commission, 
of the performance of service by him under that commission, 
t, cou|)led with his imprisonment, no doubt gave color to 
; of desertion which was made of record against him. 
of these facts, your committee beg leave to recommend that 

of Mr, McKamey's petition be granted, and that the accom- 
ill for his relief be passed. 



^H Congress, > HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
lit Session. ] \ No. 1661. 



CONDEMNED CANNON, ETC. 



April 15, 1886.— Committeil to the Committee of the Whole House anrt ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. HoUK, from the Committee on Military Afifairs, submitted the 

following ^ 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3020.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs^ to whom icai; referred the hill {H. R, 
3020) donating condemned cannon and cannon-balls to the village of 
Albion, Orleans County j New York, report asfolloics: 

That in Mount Albion Cemetery, connected with the village of Albion, 
in Orleans County, New York, there has been erected by citizens a 
monument in honor of the soldiers who enlisted from that county and 
lost their lives in the late war, and that without detriment to the Gov- 
ernnieut four condemned cast-iron cannon and twenty cannon-balls can 
bedelivered to the board of trustees of the village of Albion to be placed 
around the monument. 

Your committee therefore report favorably on the bill authorizing 
such delivery provided the Department has them in its possession, and 
recommend its passage. 

C 



^* 



^ 



k>NOBBSS, ) HOUSE OF BEPBESBNTATIVES. i Report 
SesHon. ] \ No. 1662. 



CONDEMNED CANNON, ETC. 



S, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and^ordered to 

be printed. 



>nK, fh>in the Committee od Military Affairs, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3021.] 

mmittee an Military Affairs, to whom was referred the bill {H. JB. 
) donating condeinned cannon and cannon-balls to the village of 
lay Livingston County , New YorJc, reports asfoUows : 

a proper use is to be made of the caoDon and caDnon-balls asked 

the board of trustees of the village of Nanda, in Livingston 

', New York, and that the*same can be delivered without detri- 

the Government. 

* committee, therefore, reports favorably on the bill providing for 
ivery, and recommends its passage, provided the Department has 

1 its possession. 

O 



DONOBBSS, \ HOUSE OP RBPRBSBNTAT1VE8. ( Bspobt 
SeiHon. f \ No. 1663. 



MANNISTBR WORTS AND OTHERS. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



ouKf from the Committee on Military' Affairs, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. .3553.1 

ommiUee on Military Affairs^ to which was re/erred the bill (JT. R. 
J) for the relief of Mannister Worts and others^ reports as follows : 

it the subject-matter of the bill is now pending in the district court 
le northern district of New York, suit having been recommended 
e Solicitor of the Treasury on the 24th of October, 1882 ; that the 
itary of the Treasury has the power under section 3469 of the Re- 
Statutes to compromise the case, should the facts justify it, and 
it is a matter with which Congress should not interfere, 
or committee therefore reports the bill advei-sely, and recommends 
it lie on the table. 



MgXij XU| XUUU»'~~.tJBIU. \fU bUC7 bOrLTIO OiUlA VAUOA^V^A W MM ^t,kUHV%JLa 



louEy from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

LTo accompany bill H. R. 3723. J 

Uommittee an Military Affairs^ to tchich teas referred the bill {H. JB. 
^) directing the Secretary of War to amend the record of Oyril 
eeniooodj having considered the samCj reports: 

at as the committee haa now ready to be reported a general bill 
h will cover the subject-matter of the bill for Mr. Greenwood's re- 
it should be discharged from the further consideration of this bill, 
t therefore reports it with the recommendation that it lie on the 



[ Congress, ) HOUSE OF EEPRESENTATIVES. i Eepobt 
St Session. ) ( No. 1665. 



MARSHALL N. MURPHY. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



HOUK, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the fol- 
lowing 

REPORT: 

[To accompany biU H. R. 3599.] 

Committee on Military Affairs^ to tchom was re/erred House bill 3599, 

report as follows: 

lat this soldier was enrolled April 18, 1861, to serve three months 
ompany A^ Fourth Ohio Volunteers; that he re-enlisted in same 
aany and regiment June 5, 18GI, to serve three years ; that he was 
entwith his company until December 31, 1861; that from December 
861, to April 30, 1862, he was absent. Part of that time, from Jan- 
22, 1862, sick in the general hospital, at Cumberland, Md.; that 
)ll for May and June, 1862, he is marked as ** absent without leave 
5 June 29, 1862;" that on a special muster-roll, dated August 18, 
, he is marked "absent, sick at hospital, Alexandria, Va.; June 29, 
, erroneously reported absent without leave on last muster;'' that 
dl for July and August, 1862, he is marked "deserted from thecom- 
r June 29, 1862, at Alexandria, Va," and that he is so reported on 
nuster out roll of company, dated June 21, 1864. 
)ur committee in view of these facts report adversely on the bill for 
Murphy's relief, and recommend that it lie on the table. 



4drH Congress, ) HOUSE OF EBPRBSENTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Session. i \ No. 1666. 



CHARLES W. FAUST. 



15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to bo 

printed. 



Mp. C. M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 2704.] 

The Committee an Military Affairs^ to whom was referred House bill 2704, 

submit the following report: 

That the report of this soldier's case by the War Department is made 
part hereof, and from the facts before your committee we are of opinion 
that he is entitled to the relief asked. 

Your committee report favorable and ask that the bill do pass. 



War Departmknt, Adjutant-General^s Office, 

Waahington, March 9, 1886. 

8iB: I have the honor to return herewith House bill 2704, Forty-ninth Congress, 

first session, directing the removal of the charge of desertion standing against the 

r^^rd of Charles W. Faust, late a private of Company G, Fourteenth United States 

''^tantry, transmitted by the chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs ; 

'^d in compliance with instruction thereon to report as follows: 

r^Tbe records of this office show that Charles W. Faust was enlisted July 28, 1862, at 

^^lliamsport. Pa., for three years as a private in Company B, Second Battalion, 

^/^Urteenth United States Infantry. He is properly accounted for on all rolls to Feb- 

*j*^ly 27, 1865, on which date he received a furlough to the 18th of March, 1865, in- 

j.-*'isive. On the muster-roll dated April 30, 1865, Tie is reported absent sick, and on 

- J^jtke 13, 1865, he is dropped as a deserter. In March, 1882, Faust having applied to 

kK^^ office for a discharge from the service he was informed that in accordance with 

^^ mles of the Department no action would be taken in his case until he had sur- 

rjjidered to the military authorities. He thereupon surrendered on December 4, 1882, at 

**ilwaukee. Wis., and having been found unfit for service he was discharged Jan- 

E^^iyS, 1883, to date June 13, 1865 (date of his desertion), at Jefferson Barracks, Mo. 

j^^> which post he had been forwarded), per Special Orders No. 303, of December 30, 

'^^:iB2, from this office. 

Xn support of his original application Faust submitted the following sworn state- 
*^^nt: That having been taken sick while on his way home on furlough he placed 
^^inself under treatment of one Dr. Benjamin, who certified to his inability to return 
^^ his command for thirty days after the expiration of his furlough, ». c, before 
^jpril 18, 1865; that Dr. Benjamin further told him that he need not return at all, as 
^^18 time had been extended to the end of his term of service; that Major Brady, 

c)urteenth Infantry, wrote to him (Faust) that there were sick men enough in the 
^giment ; that he ueA not come back, and that his discharge would be sent to him 

£en his time should have expired ; that, relying on this letter of Major Brady and 

> the statement of Dr. Benjamin and continuing sick and unable to travel, he re- 
■*^^ined at home, and was there when his regiment was mustered out. 

With the exception of the certificate of Dr. Benjamin certifying to his inability to 
■'*^vel for a period of thirty days from March 18, 1865, no evidence has been presented 



^ CHARLES W. PAU8T. 

\ii ^^^\^S, ^Mf fMtMif»Miii|l (tin HUtemeut.. The regiment of this soldier being an org» 
^/<Mmh Mf |Im> Mm||hUi' Aniiy, was never mastered out, and is now in existence. 

Ah H|MMl)'tHlMM nti'4hc^ ivmova) of the charge of desertion was denied by the I 
i<HfMf«»'f«l K\ss\\ \y l'^4, on the ground that the chaige i^peared to have beeu ma 

-| !«»• )MMV(4hMiii of Mh<> ac"! of CMigrMS approTed Jnlj S, 1884, eotitled '^ An act 
fnhhVM »«itH(ilM iiobU<^ni <^rom tlie lA a rj p f of d fa rtiom,* da oot carer this case. | 

^J. a KELTON, 



49th Congress, ) HOUSE OF EEPEESBNTATIVES. ( Report 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1667. 



JOHN F. S. HARDAWAY. 



APKiLlSy 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

printed. 



Mr. C. M. Andeb son, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sabmitted 

the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3696.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred House bill 3606, 

submit the following report : 

Your committee And that this man deserted one regiment and imme- 
diately enlisted In another, and served honorably nntil the close of the 
war. There are no reasons before your committee for this strange con- 
doct;, bat it was not desertion to avoid service, as shown by his subse- 
9Q6nt conduct by reenlistiug, and your committee think the charge 
ooly technical, and ask that the bill do pass. 

The following is the military record in this case as shown by War De- 
partment : 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, February 20, 1886. 

Sir : I have the honor to retam herewith House bill 3696, Forty-ninth Congress, 
fint aession, removing the charge of desertion from the record of John F. S. Hardaway, 
late of Company K, Second Tennessee Cavalry, transmitted by the chairman of the 
Hoaae Committee on Military Affairs, and in compliance with instractions thereon to 
report as follows : 

<lohii F. S. Hardaway was enrolled September 1, 1864, and mustered in September 
^) 1864, to serve three years, in Company K, Second Tennessee Cavalry, and served 
therein until November 15, 1864, when he is reported ''lost near Decatur, not know- 
ing how,'' on companv morning report for November 21, 1864, and on muster-out roll 
of company, dated July 6, 1865, "deserted November 21, 1864.'' 

Oq November 20, 1864, he was enrolled and mustered in under the same name, to serve 
one year, in Company I, Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, and served therein un- 
^^ mustered out with company, August 25, 1865. 

Applications for removal of the charge of desertion, which have heretofore been 
Pfeeented to this office, have been returned to the applicant with the information that 
^9 by his enlistment in the Fourth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, became a deserter 
^m the Second Tennessee Cavalry by operation of law (22d, now 50th, Article of 
^ar), and that, consequently, the Department had no power to remove the charge. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. KELTON, 
Assistant Atfjuiant-OeneraL 

The Secretary of War. 



50NGBB8S, \ HOUSE OF RBPBESENTATIVES. i Kbpost 
Session. f ( Ko. 1668. 



PHILIP TAYLOR. 



5| 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House and ordered to be 

^ printed. 



M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 4727.] 

mmittee on Military Affairs j to whom tca^ referred Rouse bill 4727 

submit the following report : 

; the report fnrnished this committee from the Adjntant-Oen- 
)ffice most clearly shows that the charge of desertion against the 
y recortl of Philip Taylor should be removed. The records in the 
department are as follows, to wit: 

War Department, Adjutant General's OI^FICE, 

fFaahington, February 26, 1886. 

lave the honor to retam herewith Honaebill 4727, Forty-ninth Conj^ress, first 
authorizing removal of the charge uf desertion against Philip Taylor, late of 
y B, One Handred and Fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, transmitted by the 
u of the House Committee on Military Affaira, and in compliance with in- 
iH tiiereon, to report as follows : 

Taylor was enrolled S**pteniber 11, 1861, and mnstered in October 23, 1861, 
three years, in Compan,v B, One Hundrrd and lifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, 
ed therein until May 3, *18t>3, when he was ^'wounded in action at Chancel- 
, Va., and sent to general hospital." He is reported on subsequent muster- 
company as "deserted September 21 (and October JO), 1863." On June 17, 
was admitted to Baptist Church General Hospital, Alexandria, Va., and was 
t therein until July 17, 1H63, when he was returned to duty. On July 18, 
arrived at Camp Distribution, Alexandria, Va., and on July 24, 1863, he en- 
nd on Augnst 18, 186:), was mustered in to serve six months, in Captain Hoif- 
9mpany D, Second Maryland Cavalry, and served therein until February 6, 
en he was mnstered out with company. 

application for removal of the charge of desertion, heretofore filed in thisofQce, 
iwore that he was wounded in right knee at Chancellorsville, Va., and was 
baptist Church Hospital, at Alexandria, Vn., and remained there about three 
; that he was then sent to Convalescent Camp (Camp Distribution), where he 
d about three weeks; that he 1 hen went to Washington, D. C, on a pass, and 
)t Captain Hoffman, of the Second Maryland Cavalry, who told him that he 
-red to pick up soldiers to do guard duty, in the emergenc}', as the rebels were 
for Peimsylvania ; that he went with Captain Hotfman and did guard duty 
t six months, and was then discharged with the regiment (Second Maryland 
); that he at once enlisted in Captain Bruoe's company. First Maryland Artil- 
1 served therein nntil the war closed — [The name of Philip Taylor does not 
on any rolls of Capt. J. M. Brnce's Company A, Junior Artillery, Maryland 
srs, on file in this office^ ; that he was prevent.ed from returning to the One 

and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers by being forced into other service by 
Hofi^man. 

pplication referred to was denied by this oflfice on the ground that this sol- 
his enlistment in the Second Maryland Cavalry with6ut a discharge from the 



i 



2 PHILIP TAYLOR. 

One hundred and fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, became a deeerter from the latter 
organization by operation of law (twenty-second now fiftieth Article of War), and the 
Department was, conseqnentlv, powerless to remave the charge. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. C. DRUM, 
Adjutant-Gtmerdl. 
The Sbcsetart of War. 

Your committee therefore report the bill favorably and anaDimonsI^ 
ask that the bill do pass. 

O 



Congress, } HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVES. ( Eepobt 
Sessian. i \ No. 1669. 



EMANUEL KLAUSER. 



15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole House aud ordered to be 

priDted. 



J. M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompaoy bill H. R. 38«7.] 

J Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred House bill 
are of opinion that the report made in this case by the Military 
littee of the Forty-eighth Congress states all the facts fully, and 
eport is hereby adopted and made part hereof, and your cont- 
3 report favorable on the bill and ask that it do pass. 
> report above referred to is as follows: 

committ4?efind all the facts fnlly set forth in House Report No. 617, Forty-sevetith 
S8, first session, by General Henderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, 
session of said Con^rress, and said report, hereto attached, is a^ain adopted as 
ortof this coipraittee; aud in view of fact« therein stated report back oill H. 
258, and recommend that it do pass the House. 



)ill in this case directs the Secretary of War to remove the charge of mutiny 
Emanuel Klauser, late a corporal in Company H, Fifty-fourth Regiment Illi- 
lunteers, and grant him an honorable discharge. 

committee find that bills precisely similar to this were favorably reported both 
louse aud Senate in the Forty -fourth Congress ; that such bill passed the House 
Congress, but no final action was had iu the Senate. And a similar bill ap- 
» have passed the Senate in the Forty-fifth Congress, aud was sent to the House, 
final action was had in the House. And, again, a similar bill was favorably 
1 to the Senate in the Forty-sixth Congress, and passed the Senate, and was 
ly reported from the Committee on Military Affairs of the House, but no final 
^as had in the House. 

committee find all the facts fully set forth in Senate Report No. 49, made by 
amittee ou Military Affairs at the second session of the Forty-sixth Congress, 
npany Senate bill 368, and which is as follows : 

imittee an Military Affairt, to whom was referred the bill (5. 368) for the relief of 
Emanuel Klauser , beg leave to submit the foUoioing report : 

precisely similar to S. 368 was introiluced in the Forty-fifth Congress and re- 
) your committee, and the following report was made thereon by Mr. Cockrell : 

[Senate Report No. 572, Forty-fifth Congress, third session.] 

;krkll, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the following re- 
port, to accompany bill S. 1540 : 

imiitee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred the Inll (S, 1540) /or the relief of 
uel Klauser. late corporal of Company U^ Fifty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteei's, 
uly considered the same, and submit the following report : 

cisely similar bill wa^ pending in the Forty«fourth Congress, and was then re- 



I 



2 EMANUEL KLAU8ER. 

ferred to the Committee on Military Affairs, and the following report was made on 
January 30, 1877 : 

[Forty-fourth Congress, second session. Report No. 620.] 

Mr. COCKRRLL submitted the following report, to accompany bill H. R. 4248: 

The Committee on Military JffairSf to trham tccts refen'ed the bill {H, R, 4248) /or the relkf 
of Emanuel Klausfty late corporal of Company H^ Fifty-fourth Regiment IlHitoii Fohn- 
ff<T9, have duly considered the «atiie, and tubmit the follotcing report : 

This bill directs the Secretary of War to remove the charge of mutiny against Emu- 
uel Klauser, late corporal, &c., and grant him an honorable dischiirge. In the Home 
the following report was made, to wit: 

House of Representatives, 
Washington, D, C, l»ecember 16, 1876. 

The Military Coniuiittee, to whom was referred the petition of Eraannel Klanser, 
late corporal Company H, Fifty-fonrth Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers, report 
the same back to the House, with a bill for the relief of said Emanuel Klauser, ?rith 
the recommendation that it pass. 

Your committee, upon a careful examination of all the facts in this case, find that 
the said Corporal Klauser 6<>rved his country faithfully and honorably in the field from 
1861 to the date of hi« trial by court-martial, on the Slst day of July, 1865, when he 
was found guilty of mutiny, at Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Your committee also find that Corporal Klausor is highly indorsed by the latcoffl- 
cers of bin legimeut and others as being a good soldier and of good moral character. 
The sworn statement of H«'nry Hart, late captain Company H, and H. M. Scarborongh, 
late lieutenant -colonel Fifty-fourth Regiment Illinois Volunteers, show that Emannei 
Klauser was a youn^ man under twenty-one years of age, a good and faithful soldier, 
ever ready and willing to ])erform his duty as a soldier, and that in their opinion said 
Emanuel Klauser did not intend to do any act of mutiny in his said company or regi- 
ment ; and imthis connection your committee call attention to the sworn statement of 
said Emanuel Klauser; and the Jiidge-Advocate-General, in areport as to themenof 
Company H, Fifty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, tried by general cotirt-martial, states 
that *' while the incidents of the offense clearly establish the guilt of a'willful disobe- 
dience of orders, there does not ap))ear in the conduct' of the prisoners the existence 
of that criminal animus which is necessary to complete the crime of mutiny." 

The bill passed the House upon this rejjort. 

Your committee referred the bill totheSecretary of War for information and report, 
and I'eccived, through him, from the Adjutant-General, the following letters andin- 
closures, to wit : 

Adjctant-Qenerai/s Office, 
Washington , D. C, January 2.3, 1877. 

Sir : Herewith I return communication of January 17, 1877, addressed to von from 
Hon. F. M. Cockrell, United States Senate, together with actH. R. 4248 (referred bv 
him), to change the reeord of, and grant an honorable discharge to, Emanuel Klanser, 
late corporal Company H, Fifty-fourth Illinois Infantry, and have the honor to invite 
your attention to a report in the case, dated March 6. i874, from this office to theSec- 
retary of War (copy inclosed), and his action thereon, set forth in his letter of March 
11, 1874, to Lieut. Col. H. H. Scarborough ctal.j a press copy of which is herewith. 
I am, sir, verv respectfullv, vour obedient servant, 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Adjutant- General 
The Skcrktary of War. 

The report thei-ein referred to, dated March 6, 1874, is as follows: 

War Department, Adjutant -General^s Office, 

Washington t March 6, 1874. 

Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War. 

Emanuel Klauser, late Company H, Fifty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, applies for 
removal of the charge of mutiny from his record, with a view to issue of an honorable 
discharge. 

The man's application is indorsed by nearly a hundred late officers and soldiers of 
Illinois volunteers. 

It appears from the records of this office that this man and five others of Company 
H, Fifty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, were tried by general court-martial for mutiny, 
violation of 44tli Article of War, and conduct prejudicial to good order and military 
discipline. This man was found guilty of mutiny only. He was sentenced tobedis- 



EMANUEL KLAUSER. 



Li 



I* & 






BT.' 



O T^ - 

>r To - 






bODorably discharged, from Jnly 4, 1865, and to be coDfined in military prison at hard 
labor for and during the term of five years. - Sentence approved and promnlgated in 
General Orders No. 10, Headqnarten United States forces at Pine Bluff, Jnly 31, 
1965. 

The nnexecuted portion of the sentence in case of this man and the five others men- 
tioned above was remitted by the President upon a petition and a report of the Judge- 
Advocate-General. The order of the President was promulgated in Special Orders No. 
5fil, of September 29, 1865, from this office. 

It appears from the papers that this man and the others, tried for mutiny and fonnd 
gnilty except one, joined company at original organization in 1861, and re-enlisted as 
veterans January, 1864, served honorably until Jnly 4, 1865, when the regiment being 
ordered out on parade to hear an oration, and these men believing their term bad ex- 
pired, refused to obey the order. 

The Judge- Advocate-General, in his report of September 20, 1865, prior to the receipt 
of the record by him of the trial, stated that while the incidents of the offense clearly 
established the guilt of a willful disobedience of orders, there does not appear in the 
coodnct of the prisoners the existence of that criminal animus which is necessary to 
complete the crime of mutiny; that a strong doubt of their intent to rebel against a 
lawfnl order or to combine in a violent resistance against the authority of their com- 
maDders is strengthened by the record of their long and honorable service and by the 
exieteoce among them of a belief that they were entitled to be mustered out and dis- 
ebarged. 

It is presumed that the proceedings of the court are now on file in the Judge- Advo- 
cate-General's Office. 

Any favorable action in case of these six men will necessitate the setting aside the 
proceedings of the general court-martial in their case, in order to enable tliem to re- 
ceive honorable discharges and pay in place of the dishonorable discharges furnished 
ID accordance with their sentence.* 

E. D. TOWNSEND, 

Adjutant-General. 

The letter of the Secretary of War, dated March 11, 1874, therein refeiTcd to, is as 

follows : 

War Department, March 11, 1874. 

Gentlemen : Referring to your petition of the 13tli ultimo, praying that an honor- 
able discbarge be granted Emanuel Klauser, late corporal Company H, Fifty-fourth 
Illinois Volunteers, I beg to inform you that the Judge-Advocate-General, in a report 
as to the men of Company H, Fifty-fourth Illinois Volunteers, tried by general court- 
martial, states that, *' while the incidents of the offense clearly establish the guilt of a 
willful disobedience of orders, there does not appear in the conduct of the prisoners 
the existence of that criminal animus which is necessary to complete the crime of 
mnliny." Still, as the proceedings were regular and the sentence fully executed, the 
Executive is powerless to afford tlie relief desired. 

Application should be made to Congress: and the papers are accordingly returned, 
io order that they may be so submitted if desired. 
Very respectfully, 

WM. W. BELKNAP, 

Secretary of War. 
Lieut. Col. H. M. Scarborough, 
Capt. Henry Hart, and others, 

Shelhyville^ Shelby County^ Illinow. 

Emanuel Klauser was arraigned before a court-martial, charged with mutiny, a vio- 
lation of the present twenty-second Article of Wifr, and with failing to repair at the 
fixed time to the place of parade appointed by his commanding officer, a violation of 
the present thirty-third Article of War (then forty-fourth Article), and with conduct 
prejudicial to good order, i&c., was tried in 1865 and found guilty of mutiny only^ and 
acqaitted of the other charges. His sentence was, 'Ho be dishonorably discharged 
from Jnly 4, 1865, and to be contined in military prison at hard labor for and during 
the term of tive years." This sentence was approved by the commanding officer of 
the United States forces at Pine Bluff', Ark., July 31, 1865. The President, by Special 
Orders, No. 521, on September 29, 1865, remitted the then unexecuted portion of the 
sentence. 

His regiment was ordered out on parade io hear an oration on July 4, 1865, at Pine 
filuff. Ark., and out of this grew these charges, this trial and sentence. Emanuel 
Klauser was sick on July 4, 1865, was excused by bis orderly sergeant from attending 
parade to hear the oration, and was consequently acquitted of this charge. 

The Judge- Advocate-General admits that '* there does not appear in the conduct of 
he prisoner the eristence of that criminal animus which is necensary to complete the irime 



4 EMANUEL KLAUSER. 

of mutiny, ^^ but states that ** the incidents of the offense clearlg e^itablish the gnilt of 
ful disobedience of orders^ The court-martial, however, acquitted him of the chi 
disobedience of orders — refusal to attend the paradt to hear an oration — and foni 

fuilty of mutiny only, thus disagreeing with the Jndge-Advocate-GeneraPsjnd) 
he proof of mutiny consisted of a conversation between this corporal and a ca 
on the evening of July 3, 18<>5, in relation to the contemplated parade on Jal 
the presence of these two persons only. What the oration was, or was to be, 
stated. The necessity of this oration is not shown. 

Klanser had been a noble and faithful and obedient soldier, of high moral chai 
and for this alleged offense was punished with what seemed clearly to be a ^' 
and unusual punishment,'' and an ** excessive fine imposed.'' 

However loth your committee may be to interfere with the proceedings of c 
martial, yet they feel that this case peculiarly demands favorable action oyCoc 
and they therefore report back the bill as it passed the House, without amend 
and recommend that it do pass the Senate. 

The bill in the Forty-fourth Congress passed the House and was favorably re] 
in the Senate, placed on the Calendar, and no final action had. 

Your committee have again duly considered this bill, and fully indorse the f 
ing report, and recommend that the bill be passe<l by the Senate. 

Your committee further report that a petition for the relief of the applicai 
presented in the House of Representatives in the Forty-fourth Congress, and a I 
his relief was duly passed and sent to the Senate, and in the Senate was favoral 
ported by your committee, but no final action was had ; and in the Forty-fifth Co 
the bill similar to the present one was passed and sent to the House of Repre8ent4 
but no final action had. 

Your committee have again given due consideration to this bill, and fully ii 
the foregoing report, and again recommend the passage of the bill. 

Your committee therefore adopt said Senate report, and make it a part of thia 
report; and in view of the facts therein stated, report the bill H. R. 1982 bacl 
recommend that it do pass the House. 



[ CONGBESS, I HOUSE OF HEPEESENTATIVES. i Eepobt 
\t SesHan. i \ No. 1670. 



JOHN H. WALTERS. 



IL 15, 1886. — Committed to tbe Committee of the Whole Hooae and ordered to 

be printed. 



, C..M. Anderson, from the- Committee on Military AfGairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3214. ] 

J Committee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred House bill 3214, 

beg leave to submit the following rqport: 

1)6 facts before the committee fail to show that the party for whose 
efit this bill was introduced deserted to avoid service. His subse- 
Dt re-enlistmeut and service until the close of the war rebuts such 
rge, and your committee ask tbat the bill do pass, 
be following is the military record in this soldier's case: 

War DepaIitment, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, February 26, 1886. 

r: I have the 'honor to return herewith H. R. 3214, Forty -ninth Congress, first 
on, removing tbe charge of absence and desertion from the military record of 
1 H. Walters, late of Company A, First Kentucky Cavalry, transmitted by the 
rman of the House Committee on Military Aflfairs, and in compliance with in- 
stions thereon, to report as follows : 

•hn H. Walters was enrolled August 5, 1861, and mustered in October 28, 1861, to 
e three years, in Company A, Fir^t Kentucky Cavalry. On such muster-rollsof that 
pany as are on file from enrollment to August 31, 1862, he is reported as present 
laty or absent sick ; on rolls from August 31, l^i^ to December 31, 1862, *vAbsent 
oat leave ;" on rolls from December 31, 1862, to April 30, 1863, " Present." There 
10 rolls or records of tbe company covering from April 30, 1863, to August 31, 1863, 
le. On roll for September and October, 1863, he is reported " Deserted," date not 
d, with remark, **Due U. S. one Sharps rifle, one Navy pistol, and one U. S. 
). Dismissed U. S. service by order Majur-General Burnside." (A careful search 
le records of this office has failed to elicit any information relative to this latter 
trk.) On the only muster-rolls of company, viz, for January and February, July 
iugost, 1864, on file subsequent to October 31, 18H3, his name is not borne, but 
luster-out roll of company, dated December 31, 1864, he is reported '^Deserted 

18, 1863, at Somerset, Ky." 

September 19, 1863, he enlisted, and on December 23, 1863, was mustered in, to 
) one year, in Company H, Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry, and on muster-roll of 
company for January and February, 1864, he is reported *' Absent; transferred to 
command, the First Kentucky Cavalry;" for March and April, 1864, ** Absent: 
1 by authorities to First Kentucky Cavalry." On all subsequent muster-rolls of 
>any he is borne as present, and he was mustered out with it January 10, 1865. 
e following is a synopsis of evidence submitted to this office in 18*^, with a view 
removal of the charge of desertion against this soldier: 

liters testified that about July, 1863, when the company was on the march, he 
leized with an attack of measles, and at Albany, Clinton County, Tennessee, was 
)d on his horse by his comrades and sent to his home, about 16 miles distant; 

he remained at home about 60 days, when, fearing to remain longer, lest he 
[d be shot by guerrillas, &c., he left his home, although not entirely recovered, 
proceeded to the Union lines, where he joined the Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry, 
wn regiment not having returned from the South. 



2 JOHN H. WALTERS. 

John Chapman, a former member of Company A, First Kentnoky Cavalry, testified 
that when Walters was left in Clinton Coanty /Tennessee, it was anderstood that he 
had the measles; that in March, 1864, he returned to the regiment at Mount Sterling, 
Ky., but was not allowed to stay with it, as he had been reported a deserter. 

James F. Cames, a former member of Company A, First Kentncky Cavalry, testified 
that while the regiment was on the march from Kentucky to Knoxville, Tenn., in 
1863, Walters was given a written leave of absence, on account of sickness, to visit his 
home; that he did not return for several months, but finally rejoined the regiment at 
Mount Sterling, Ky., but finding that he was marked as a deserter he went into the 
Thirteenth Kentncky Cavalry; that he (deponent) marked Walters as a deserter on 
company rolls by order of Captain Wolford, although other men who were absent 
^vere merely reported as absent without leave. 

The application referred to was denied by this oflfice on the CTOund that the enlist- 
ment of this soldier in the Thirteenth Kentucky Cavalry withont a discharge from, 
the First Kentucky Cavalry constituted him a deserter from the latter organization 
by operation of law (22d, now 50th Article of* War), and the Department was oonao- 
quently powerless to remove the charge. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. C. DRUM, 

Adjutant- General, 

The Secretary of War. 



^H Congress, ) HOUSE OF EBPRESBNTATIVES. j Repobt 
lit Session. f • 1 No. 1671. 



ISAAC JOHNSON. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. CM. Andekson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submit 

ted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3480.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred House bill 3480, 

beg leave to submit the following report: 

The record from the War Department in this soldier's case is as fol- 
lows: 

War Department, Adjutant-General^s Office, 

Washingtofiy February 17, 1886. 

Sir: I have the honor to retnrn herewith Honse bill 3480, Forty-ninth Congress, 
fintse^ioD, authorizing the removal of the charge of desertion against Isaac John- 
soo. late of Companies B and I, Tenth Minnesota Volunteers, transmitted by the 
chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and, in compliance with in- 
atractioDS therein, to report as follows : 

Isaac Johnson was enrolled and mustered in August 14, 1862, to serve three years, in 
Cofflpany B, Tenth Minnesota Volunteers. He was transferred to the Third Minne- 
sota Battery Light Artillery Volunteers May 1, 1863; retransferred to the Tenth Min- 
nesota Volanteers and assigned to Company 1 in May, 1864, and served in the latter 
company nntil September 21, 1864, when he absented himself without leave, and was 
leportei a deserter September 26, 1864. He never returned to his command, which 
vu retained in service until August 19, 1865. 

No application for removal of the charge of desertion against this soldier has ever 
been presented to this office. 

1 am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. C. DRUM, 

Adjutant- General. 

The Hon. Secretary of War. 

From this record year committee are at a loss to see how the relief 
sought can be granted without proof outside the record, which we do 
not have. Therefore your committee request that the bill do not pass, 
bat lie on the table. 



ra CoNGBESS, ) HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ut Session. f ) No. 1672. 



CHARLES B. MOLEN. 



Apkil 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



[r. C. M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted 

the following 

REPORT:. 

[To accompany bill H. R. 4065.] 

ke Committee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred House hill 4065, 

beg leave to submit the following report: 

Yoar committee make the record in this case a part of this report, 
id it is as follows : 

War Department, Adjutant- General's Office, 

JFaMngtaHf February 25, 1886. 

\m'. I have tbe honor to retarn herewith House bill 4065, Forty-ninth Congress, 
it session, directing tbe issue of an honorable discharge, to date June 4, 1864, to 
arles E. Molen, late of Company H, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, transmitted by the 
urman of tbe House Committee on Military Affairs, and, in compliance with in- 
nctions thereon, to report as follows: 

Iharles E. Moleu was enrolled October 26, 1861, to serve three years, in Company 
Fourth Ohio Cavalry, and served therein until December 31, 1863. On January 
1864, he was arraigned before a general court-martial, convened at Pulaski, Tenn., 
the following charge and speciftcatiou, to wit : Charge, *^ Stealing ; " speciticationy 
1 this, that Charles Molen, a private of Company H, Fourth Ohio Volunteer Cav- 
r, iu company with three other men, did enter the house of one Thomas G. Payne, 
tizen, and did forcibly seize and carry away with him, without the consent of tbe 
ler thereof, a large sum of money, viz : $5,000, more or less, in gold. This on or 
nt tbe 8th day of Januarv, 1864, in the county of Giles, State of Kentucky.'' To 
ch charge aud specification the accused pleaded '* not guilty," but submitted no 
lence in support of such plea. He was found guilty of both the charge and speci- 
tion, and was sentenced ''To be drummed through the command of Second Divis- 
Cavalry, under guard, with placard inscribed 'Thief * * to forfeit all pay and 
wances, now due or to become due him, and lie confined * ^ * for the space 



• years." 



he proceedings and findings of the court were approved and tbe penitentiary 
Nashville, Tenn., designated as place of confinement, subject to tbe approval of 
President, by Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, commandiug Department of the 
iberland, on February 29, 1864. The sentence was approved by the President 
il 21, 1864, and the proceedings, findings, and sentence of the court were promul- 
jd in General Court Martial Orders, No. 151, War Department, Adjutant-General's 
ce, dated June 4, 1864. The prisoner was received at the military prison, Nash- 
;, Tenn., July 9, 1864, and was an inmate of said prison and the penitentiary at 
; place until June 28, 1865, when, by Special Orders, No. 5, of that dat«, from 
Iquarters Military Division of Tennessee, he was pardoned, the unexpired portion 
lis sentence remitted, and he was set at liberty. On July 5, 1865, he was mustered 
and honorably disciiarged at Columbus, Ohio, by reason of expiration of term of 
ice. 

1 November, 1864, an application for the release and honorable discharge of this 
ier was received at this office, accompanied by the followiug evidence, to wit: 
kroes Lindsley, a former member of Company H, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, testified 
1 personal knowledge that Moleii and three others were detailed and put under 
somiuand of Corporal McSherry, to examine the premises of oue Colonel Payne, 
' Pulaaki, Tenn., for concealed arms; that said detail found sabers, a shotgun, 
a carbine, and upon its return the men were charged with stealing money from 
Colonel Payne ; that a court-martial was organized for their trial, and upon the 



2 CHABLBS £. MOLEN. 

testiDiony of McSherry they were convicted; that he is informed and believes, ^'that 
after conviction, but before sentence, the judge-advocate of the court visited the men 
in jail and proposed that if they would give the money to hiui, he would discbarge 
them, and tliey agreed that if he would place their discharges in their hands, they 
would tell him wnere the money was; that the court would not allow the accused to 
show that Colonel Payne was a notorious leader of *^ bushwhackers'* and a Mcret 
enemy of the United States, and that he is satisfied, from his knowledge of Colooel 
Payne, that such was the case ; that he has been informed that Corporal McSherry 
gave orders to the men to take the money. 

Columbus A. Carpenter, a former member of Company 6, Sixty-sixth Illinois Vol- 
unteers, testified to the disloyal character of Colonel Payne. 

Mason Crabill, a former member of Company H, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, after testi- 
fying to Payne's disloyalty, swore that a smiad of soldiers, composed of Molen and 
three others, commanded by Corporal H. D. McSherr>', was sent out in Jamuary, 
1864, to search Payne's premises for arms ; that it was notorious in camp that they 
found arms upon his premises and also a large amount of gold, say five or six thousand 
dollars; that the corporal and squad divided the money between thera; that immedi. 
ately thereafter Payne offered to Captain Gutwalt, of the Fourth Ohio Cavalry. $5U0 
to recover the money ; that Gutwalt by threatening Corporal McSherry got his share; 
that Captain Gutwalt was a member of the court which convicted the others; that 
these others were visited by members of the court who promised them their discbarges 
provided they would give up the money ; that Molen and one other gave up their 
money, but were not discharged ; that another gave up $600 of his share, but the fourth 
refused to give up his share unless his comrades and himself were, in fa«t, discharged; 
that ^* it was generally believed that those who got the money from the boys either 
kept it or divided with the court." 

J. W. King, late captain Company H, Fourth Ohio Cavalry, certified to Molen's 
high standing as a soldier and to Payne's notorious disloyalty ; that so much of the 
money as was obtained from the soldiers was returned to Payne ; that they were tried 
without the knowledge of their company officers, at a place but one mile distant 
from its camp, and urges remission of sentence on the ground of his (Molen's) good 
qualities as a soldier, and in the belief that he was influenced more by surrounding 
circumstances than from a desire to defraud the Government. 

John H. Bellows, one of the participants in the theft, testified to the circumstances 
•connected with it, fully admits the taking of the money, but says: **I am positive 
that Corporal H. D. McSherry ordered the squad to take the money ; some of the 
court tried to get this money • * • they promised to do all they could if I would 

five them the money in their hands; there is some of the money in Giles County, 
ennessee, yet." 

The foregoing evidence having been referred to Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas, com- 
manding Department of the Cumberland, for investigation and remark, that officer, 
under dat* of February 1, 1865, stated that ** * * * There is nothing in the within 
statements that should tend in any degree to mitigate the sentence of the court, but 
everything to confirm the same, as it appears from these statements that the men were 
guilty as charged and properly sentenced to the penitentiary for robbery ; * * *" 
and this opinion was fully concurred in by the Judge-Ad vocatc-General, United Stat«8 
Army, upon a review of the foregoing evidence in connection with the evidence pre- 
sented before the court-martial. 

This office has repeatedly declined to reopen the case with a view to setting aside 
the findings and sentence of the court. 

I am, sir. very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

B. C. DBUM. 

J djutant- General. 
The Hon. Secretary of War. 

From the facts embodied in the foregoiug record it is evident that 
this soldier was properly convicted of the charge of stealing, and con- 
fesses it himself, and hopes to escape its consequences by attempting to 
blast and blacken the reputation of the officers composing the court- 
martial, and also to excuse the theft on an ex parte statement as to the 
disloyalty of the party robbed. This case was fully revised by General 
George H. Thomas, also the War Department, and fully approved. And 
your committee find no reason or excuse whatever to make the record 
speak a falsehood. If the sentence was wrong his imprisonment was 
wrong, and a very dangerous precedent would be established. 

Your committee are unanimously of opinion that this bill should not 
pass, and ask that it do lie on the table. 



49th Congbess, ( HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES. ; Report 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1673. 



CHARLES H. HAMMOND. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on tbe table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. C. M. Andebson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 4822.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom teas referred House bill 4822, 

beg leave to submit the folloicing report: 

That the party for whose benefit this bill was introduced, in his appli- 
cation to remove the charge of desertion made in the War Department 
in 1884, admits the truth of the charge, and instead of returning to his 
regiment went to California and there remained until the close of the 
war. Your committee feel it is not in their power, if they so desired, 
to change the records in this man's case so that it would show a false- 
hood instead of the truth. There is no reason or proof in this case why 
this record so made by the party himself should be changed, and your 
committee ask that the bill do not pass. 

Records from the War Department are as follows: 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washingion, February 24, IBSf). 

Sir: I have tbe bonor to return herewith House biU 48i2, Forty-niuth Congress, 
first session, removing the charge of desertion from the military record of Charles H. 
Hammond, late of Company F, One hundred and twenty-third Illinois Volunteers, 
traDsmitted by the chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and in 
compliance with instructions thereon, to report as follows : 

The name of Charles H, Hammond is not borne on any rolls or records of Company 
P, One hundred and twenty-third Illinois Volunteers, on tile in this office, but the 
soldier referred to in the bill is believed to be identical with Wesley Hammond, who 
was enrolled August 1, 1862, and mustered in September 6, 1862, to serve three years, 
b Company F, One hundred and. twenty-third Illinois Volunteers, and who served 
therein until November 23, 1862, when he was admitted to No. 12 general hospital, 
Loaisville, Ky., ** with insanity," and deserted December 9, 1862. There is no record 
that he ever returned to the hospital from which he deserted, or to his regiment. 

The following is a synopsis of evidence heretofore filed in this office, with a view 
to securing a removal of the charge of desertion against this soldier, viz : 

Applicant (as Charles W, Hamipond) swore thai soon after his enlistment he was 
taken sick and was sent to hospital at Woodsonville, Ky., thence to Mumfordsville, 
Ky., thence to Hospital No. 12, Louisville, Ky., *' in an unconscious condition, with a 
severe attack of typhoid fever, and I do not recollect anything until I found 
myself at home in the winter of 1S6«$" ; that in the spring he wanted to stay at home 
nntil ho was able to do something, and therefore got the certificates of five physicians 
in ^ood standing (names of physicians given, two now dead) and sent them to his 
regiment [NoTE.-rThere are no medical certificates in the case of this soldier on file 
with company or regimental records] ; that one of the doctors (Rains) advised him 
not to go South, as he would take the Southern fever and die, *' and if I ever got over 
it I had better go West, and I went to Colorado and from there to California, and I 
am not stout and never have been, nor, I reckon, never will be again." 



Z CHARLES H. HAMMOND. 

C. W. Hammond (brother of soldier) swore that, having heard of the sickneagof 
his brother, he proceeded to Louisville, Ky., and found him iu an nncouMcioas coDdi> 
tion, '*or rather a maniac''; he made several attempts to get permission from the sur- 
geon to take his brother home, but failing therein, and believing he would soon die 
if left there, he took him after night from the hospital (after procuring such necessary 
clothing as was needed) and brought him home. At that time, and for a long time 
afterwards, he was not responsible and did not know enough to desert. 

S. S. Wilcox, now a physician, swore that in October, 1862, he was acting hospital 
steward at Woodsonville, Ky., and that Hammond was desperately sick with typnoid 
fever at that time and place, and from his knowledge of his condition he is of opinion 
that the charge of desertion was erroneously made. 

James M. De Long, late sergeant Company F, One hundred and twenty-third Illi- 
nois Volunteers, swore that in March or April, 18613, medical certificates showing 
Hammond's physical disability to return were sent to him ; that he took these cer- 
tificates to the regimental surgeon, who said that Hammond had been reported a de- 
serter. He gives the names and addressee of three of th6 physicians who signed the 
certificates, and says that when Hammond left the regiment he was not responsible 
for his acts, being in an unconscious condition. 

Jonathan Biggs, late lieuteuant-colonel One hundred and twenty-third Illinois Vol- 
unteers, testified as to the illness of Hammond while with the regiment, but that he 
has no personal knowledge of his physical inability to return subsequent to his leav- 
ing it. 

The appHcation for removal of the charge of desertion was, on June 27, I8i^, de- 
nied by tliis office on the ground that the soldier, by his own acknowledgment that 
he did not return to military authority upon his convalescing sufficiently to do so, in 
the spring of 1864, established the truth of the charge, and consequently the Depart- 
ment had no power to remove it. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. c. kp:lton, 

Assistant Adjutant- General. 
The Hon. Secretary of War. 



ONGBBSS, t HOUSE OF KBPKESBNTATIVES. f Rbpobt 
Session. ] ) No. 1674. 



CHARLES LOWTHEB. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

TTo accompany bill H. R. 4676.] jf 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

WashingUmy March 6, 1686. 

[ have the honor to return herewith H. R. 4676, Forty-ninth Confess, first 
authorizing the removal of the charge of desertion of July 31, 1863, against 

Lowther, late of Company G, Sixty-tirst Pennsylvania Volunteers, trans- 
by the chairman of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and in compli- 
th instructions thereon to report as follows: 

es Lowther was enrolled and mustered into service September 4, 1661, to serve 
tars, in Company G, Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served therein 
ay 3, 1863, when he received a guDshot flesh wound of left hand at Freder- 
Ij Va. He was treated in hospitals at Washington, D. C, and New York Har- 
n May 6, 1863, to July 22, 1863, when he entered Satterlee General Hospital, 
Iphia,*Pa., and he deserted therefrom Jnly 31, 1863. On September 5, 1853, he 
ested at Washington, D. C. (|10 reward paid), and was in Stone (military 
General Hospital, Washington, D. C, from September 8, 1863, to March 5, 1864. 
ned his command in March or April, 1864, and served until June 4, 18(>4, when 
again wounded (in side or back) and sent to hospital, and remained under 
nt until September 7, 1864, when he was mustered out of service by reason of 
ion of his term of enlistment. 

>llowing is a synopsis of evidence heretofore presented with a view to removal 
barge of desertion of July 31, 1863: 

)ptember 17, 1865, applicant in a letter to his attorney states that be **re- 
lo the Satterlee Hospital, West Philadelphia, and » * • remained there a 
me, when I (he) left it. This was in August, lb63. On the 5th day of Sep- 
1 (he) was arrested," &o. 

pril 17, J866, he testified that he was admitted into Satterlee Hospital '* about 
of August, » * • where he was arrested about a week after as a deserter 
;en to the provost marshal at Washington, D. C.^" &c. 

agust 9, 1884, he testified that ^' about the last of July, 1863, he got a pass 
itterlee Hospital and went to Washington, D. C, and was put in Stone Gen- 
spital there." 

officers of the Sixty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers testify to the good charac- 
tie eoldier, and ** verily believe" his statements to be true. 

to the passage of the act of Congress, approved July 5, 1884, entitled ^'An 
the relief of certain soldiers from tne charge of desertion," this ofi^ce repeat- 



i< 



mmittee on Military Affairs^ to whom was referred House bill 4676, 

beg leave to submit the follounng report : i^\ 

}^ 

: committee beg to make report from War Department ia this ''f* 

^8 cjise part of this report, which yoar committee think fully ex- *• 

itself, and your committee beg to report adversely and ask that i ^ 

I do not pass. 



2 CHABLES LOWTHER. 

edly denied applications for removal of the charge of desertion against this soldier, 
on the ground that it was not erroneoaslv made ; and since the passage of said act g 
similar application has been denied on the ground of his failare to return from hit 
desertion voluntarily. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

K. C. DRUM, 

Adju tan t- General. 
The Hon. Secretary of War. 



19th Congbess, ) HOUSE OP BEPBBSBNTATIVES. ( Eepobt 
1^ SetHon. ) ( No. 1675. 



WILLIAM C. JONES. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. C. M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany biH H. R. 1909.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs, to whom, was referred House hill 1909, 

beg leave to submit the following report : 

Your Gommitt'ee beg leave to make the report from the War Depart 
ment part of this report, and your committee find from the facts therein 
that Jones did desert and refused to rejoin his regiment, and that the 
charge is correct; and your committee do not see how they can falsify 
the record by reporting that to be true which is not, and unanimously 
ask that the bill do lie on the table and do not pass. 

The following is received in this case from the War Department: 

War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

Washington, February 20, 1886. 

Sir: I have the honor to return herewith Hoase bill 1909, Forty-ninth Congress^ 
first session, removing the charge of desertion against William C. Jones^ late ser- 
seant Company F, Seventy-eighth New York Volunteers, transmitted for information 
by the chairman of the House Committer on Military Affairs, and, in compliance with 
yoor instructions of the 2d instant on letter of transmittal, to report as follows : 

William C. Jones was enrolled October 1, 1861, for three years, in Company I, One 
hoDdredth New York Volunteers, and is reported ** Present" until February 28, 1862. 
On muster-roll for March and April, 1862, he is borne as ''Absent" — date, place, and 
cause not stated. On muster-roll for May and June, 1862, *' Deserted May 9, 1862, at 
WiJhamsbur^, Va." He was discharged the service June 4, 1862, on surgeon's certifi- 
cate of disability. 

Johnathan D. Campbell was enrolled and mustered in January 13, 1862, at Liberty, 
^' Y., for three years, as sergeant Company F, Seventy-eighth New York Volunteers, 
•Dd is reported "Present " on all muster-rolls to June 30, 1862. On muster-roll cov- 
ering from June 30, 1862, to October 31, 1862, he is reported " Absent — taken prisoner 
*t battle of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862; since paroled; now at Annapolis;" on 
■^1] for November and December, 1862, his name is not borne ; for January and Feb- 
'Uary, 1863, " Deserted " — date and place not given. His name is not borne on subse- 
[Uent roUs of company. 

Prisoners-of- war records show that William C. Jones, sergeant Company F, Seventy- 
ighth New York Volunteers, was captured August 9, 1862 ; confined at Richmond, 
[^a., August 11, 1862, and paroled at Aiken's Landing, Va., September 13, 1862. 
bere is no further record of him, and he is considered a deserter from September 
2t, 1862. 

The name of William C. Jones is not borne on any records of Company F, Seventy- 
ighth New York Volunteers, or that o^ Jonathan D. Campbell on any records of 
'ompany I, One hundredth New York Volunteers, on file in this office, and there is 
lo evidence with records of either organization of the alleged interchange. 

On November 21, 1868, an application for an honorable discharge in the case of this 
nan was referred by this office to vhe commanding general Department of the East, 
or his action. -The following is a synopsis of the evidence presented at that time : 



Wi^Ha 



J 



9, tt^2, when ho wiis taken priHOtipr at Cedar Monntaia. Aft« 
to return toeitber regiment iiutil tlip matt«r of bis transFer wji 
to Buffalo aD<l reported to Captain Bulisford, of the Sevent; 
him to stay awa.y nntjl hr had hie rights, which advice was < 
teu ant-Col one 1 Anatiu. He alw wrote to the colonel of tlio Si 
captain of Cuiupan; I, One hnQdredth, and in reply received 
return to their respective roginients, bat he did Dot obey eith 
erod bis tranHfer to the Seven ty-eighlb legal aud binding, Ix 
sergeant in the Seventy. eighth aud merely a ptivale in the Oi 
not leave the country, but worked at bis trade where he wax k 

' ■ 'to orders. He signed the pay-tolls of the One hundred 
n C. .Tones, "and 1 signed it ouce in the Sbenaodoah V 
Campbell." 

James P. Hofliiieu and Thonius C. Cannon certify under oati 
the furegoiug statement of Jones is truf. 

Dauiel D. Nash, " formerly m^or One hnndre<llh New York Vo 
district attorney of Erie County," staled that Hoffman aud C 
ants) were among tbe best men of that retcinieut, and are big] 
that just such an unniililary transaction a» Jones recounts ab 
have taken place; and can say that in my opinion the rema 
regiment wonld be pleased tu have Jones honorablv diiichargei 

U. C. BlanchBTd, late lieatenant- colon el Seventy -eighth t 
stated " that William C. Jones, fonrth seif^eant of Company I 
York Volunteers, answered to (he name of johuatban Cnmpbe 
eevenly'eifthth Regiment, and was never a deserter from said 
but discharged his duty honorably and faithfully." 

G, A. ScroBgs, " autboriied hv Secretary of War to raise and 
N. Otis, lat* lieutenant colonel One hundredth New York Vi 
Cannon, lato fltst ser«>ant, and Fred. Trantmau, late memb 
hundredth New York Vol nnleers, "most respectfully ask thai 
honorably discharged." 

Upon the foregoing evidence the commanding general de| 
under date of Jauuary 19, IH69, issued Special Orders No. l:). Es 
Sergeant William C. Joaes, Company I'. Seventy-eighth New Yo 
in said compary tind regiment under the alias of Jonathan D. 
honorably discharged the service of the United Stales, to date 
loss of all pay, bonnty, and allowances." 

In March, ivSi, Hou. R. C. Paivons. of Cleveland, Ohio, in pr 
stated that Jones is a local preaohir of the Methodist Church 
aud honorable, and strongly urged favnruble action. 

Jones's declaration is mainly a repetition of his former one (1 
greatly elaborated. The new pi>int« are on follows: 

At the time of the transfer iMjtween himsolf and Campbel 
ont transfer iianers niitwithstandine treniiont eftorta on Ul 



J„n,«.n..«ii'i.ll'|»ll ill hi. \mw.., I..,.. 
divlwrtf"-. "(talitiK limli In U.i' i i|,li.il 
, I >ft Cami. I'»r.il'-, 







f 



tc 



It c^ 



1 Ik 






1 



la T 






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Tl 



&m CoNeBESS. ) HOITSiii OF BEPBESBiNlATI^ES. ( Bepobt 
Ut Session. f \ No. 1676. 



THOMAS BOWLES. 



April 15, 1886. —Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. C. M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3965.] 

The Oammittee an Military Affairs^ to whom was r^erred the hill iH. R. 
3965) concerning the military record of Thomas Bowles^ submit the fol- 
lowing report : 

That there is no evidence that the charge of desertion is not properly 
on the record, nor is there any evidence to explain his conduct, and the 
record in the War Department is made a part hereof, for which reasons 
your committee report that the relief asked be refused, and the bill lie 
on the table. 



War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, 

WashingUm, February 19, 1886. 

Sir: I have the honor to return herewith H. R. 3965, Forty-ninth Congress, first 

ission, authorizing the removal of the charge of desertion against Thomas Bowles, 
^te of Company I, Twenty-eighth Kentucky Volunteers, transmitted by the chair- 
>^uui of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and in compliance with instruc- 
tions thereon, to report as follows: 

Thomas Bowles was enrolled and mustered into service August 23, 1862, to serve 3 
^ears as a recruit for Company I, Twenty-eighth Kentucky Volunteers; was captured 
%nd paroled at Mnmfordsville, Ky., September 17, 1862, and on muster-roll of company, 
dated December 31, 1862, is reported '* absent without leave,'' and on roll for January 
^nd February, 1863, '^ deserted January 20« 1863." He was apprehended April 1, 1864, 
ftnd was under arrest until September 12, 1864, when he was restored to duty by the 
idiTision commander with loss of all pay and allowances during his absence. On 
January 20, 1865, he was furloughed for 30 days from general hospital, Jeffersonville, 
Ind., and died at his home, whilst so absent, on February 5, 1865, of erysipelas. 

There is no evidence now on file in tliis office having reference to the charge of de- 
aertion against this soldier, but on August 5, 1884, an application for removal of the 
same was returned to the applicant with the information that inasmuch as the soldier 
did not voluntarily return to his command the act of Congress approved Julv 5, 1884, 
entitled ''An act to relieve certain soldiers from the charge of desertion,'' did not 
eoTer the case. 

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

R. C. DRUM, 

Adjutant-General, 

The Secretary of War. 



{ 



«TH CoNGBKSS, J HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
Ist Session. ] \ No. 1677. 



JOHN WELLS. 



April 15, 1886. — Laid on the table and ordered to be printed. 



Mr. C. M. Anderson, from the Committee on Military Affairs, sub- 
mitted the followioir 



'O 



liEPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 3299.] 

The Committee on Military Affairs^ to whom wan referred tlie hill {H. B, 
3299) concerning the military record of John Wells ^ submit the following 
report : 

Yoar committee beg leave to call attention to the following record 
from the War Department, as it shows in detail all the circumstances 
in this very singular case. It is as follows : 

War Departmknt, 
Adjutant-Genera i/s Office, 
WatihittgtoHj February 'iO, 1886. 

Sir: I have the honor to return herewith H. R. 321*9, Forty-ninth CongresH, first 
»e«wion, authorizing the removal of the charge of desertion from the military record 
Jf John Wells, late of C<>iupany B, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, transmitted' by the 
'hairuian of the House Committee on Military Affairs, and, in compliance with in- 
tructions thereon, to report as follows: 

John Wells was enrolled August 3, 18>»3, and mustered in August 15, 1863, to serve 
bree years, in Company B, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry. On nTuster-roll of that cora- 
any from enrollment to February 29, 18f>4, be is reported, "Absent; left sick in Union 
onuty, Tennessee." On roll for March and April, 181)4, ** Deserted November 10, 
to, at Knoxville, Tenn." For May and June, 1864, "Present," with remark, 
iiteturned from desertion May 16, 1864, at Gallatin, Tenn. Pay <lue from enlist- 
ent." There are no muster-rolls of company on tile from June 30, 1H64, to Feb- 
lary 28, 1865, and the name of this sjldier is not borne on rolls from February 28, 
166, to the date «»f muster-out of company, September 11, 1865. 

In 1872 an application for an honorable discharge in the case of this soldier was 
"esented to this office, accompanied by the following evidence : 
Wells (the soldier in question^ swore that about the middle of November, 1863, 
hile on recruiting service in Claiborne County, Tennessee, he was captured by the 
leriiy, held a short time, and was then recaptured by the Union forces near Morris- 
wn, Tenn. (there is no record of the alleged capture or recapture on file in this 
See) ; that he then returned to his company and continued with it until November, 
64, when he with some others, under the command of Lieut. Thomas S. Northern, 
9re sent to Knoxville, Tenn., to draw ''ations; that while on that duty and at that 
ace the entire party, whil^ under the influence of liquor, became involved in a diffl- 
ilty with the provost guard, and two or three of the latter were slightly wounded ; 
lat the detail then returned to their camp, aud after remaining there two or three 
iys he (Wells) was advised and directed by Ijieutenant Northern, then in command 
' the company, to go to his home to avoid further trouble likely to arise from the 
oresaid difficulty ; that he in company with two others left the company and went 
>me, and he never returned to it afterwards; that the charge of desertion against 
im was, in his opinion, erroneously made, because of his intoxicated condition at 
le time of the difficulty aforesaid ; his ignorance (at that time) of the extent of the 
ijuries inflicted upon the provost guard, and the fact that he would ni>t have left his 
>mmand if he had not the permission of his company commander. 



2 JOHN WELLS. 

Thomas S. Northern, late second lieutenant, Company B, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, 
swore that Wells was permitted to go on recruiting service in September, 1863, and, 
as he (affiant) is informed and believes, was captured by the enemy and recaptured 
by the Union forces in the latter part of 1863, '* after which time he continued with 
his command until some time in November, 1884 '' ; he corroborates Wells in his state* 
ment as to the aftray with the provost guard at Knoxville, adding that he (affiant), 
'* believing that said soldiers would get into some difficulty, advised them to go to 
their homes, and, following his instructions, they did so, and said John Wells never 
returned to his command afterwards'' ; that he does not believe that Wells intended 
to desert, ''but simply obeyed the instructions of his superior officer, on whom the 
blame should rest; that he (affiant) was in command of the company at the time. 
(The signatnre to this affidavit is by mark, whereas Lieutenant Northern signs th^ 
muster-in roll of the company, dated August 15, 1863, by sigu mannal.) 

The foregoing evidence, having been referred to the commanding general, Depart, 
ment of the South, that officer, under date of April 12, 1872, returned the f^ame to thij 
office with the following remark, to wit: *'The evidence shows that (Wells) deserted 
some time in November, 18t)4 (with the advice and connivance of his company com- 
mander), in order to escape the consequences of an alFray with the provost guard of 
Knoxville, Tenn., in which he, with several of his comrades, had been engaged,'' and 
recommended his dishonorable discharge, which recommendation met the approval 
of this office, and the soldier was, accordingly, dishonorably discharged April 24, 1872, 
to date November 10, 1863. 

In an application for removal of the charge of desertion, and for an honorable dis- 
charge, presented to this office in 1880, Wells swore that while on duty guarding 
prisoners from Cumberland Gap, Tenn., to Camp Nelson, Ky., he was taken sick near 
Kock Castle River, was relieved from duty, "and ordered back to Cumberland Gap, 
and to go home if I (he) could get there, by Second Lieut. Thomas Northern"; that 
he laid sick at his home ''from October, 1863. until my (his) company wan discharged 
from the service, not being physically able to report in person to any military poet, 
the fever settling in my (his) eyes, causing the total loss of the left eye and injuring 
the light one- fourth." 

Two former members of Company B, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry, swore that about 
September 12, 1863, while engaged in guarding prisoners from Cumberland Gap to 
Camp Nelson, Ky., Wells was taken sick, and was "permitted to go to a private boaae 
or home" by Colonel Parsons; that he "was legally permitted to go to his home in 
Claiborne County, and was not able to rejoin his company and regiment before it was 
mustered out ot service." 

This application was denied by this office July 13, 1880. 

On April 17, 1884, Hon. C. C. Matson, M. C, forwarded to this office a letter ad- 
dressed to him by Wells, in which ho (Wells) stated that 'about October 1, 1863, 
while guarding prisoners from Cumberland Gap to Canip Dick Robinson, Ky., he 
was ordered home by his company commander, Lieut. Thomas Northern; that on 
his return to his compi^ny in Mav, 1864, the cofnpany was mustered for pay, bat 
he received no pay on account of the charge of desertion against him, and has 
never rectjived any since, "although I (he) served my (his) time ont until the close 
of the war and was mustered out with an honorable discharge " ; that from October 
1, 1863, to May — , 1864, he was confined to his home, but communicated with the 
regiment by surgeon's certificate during that time. 

On April 23, l*j^, Hon. Mr Matson was informed that a carefnl review of the case 
led to the belief that the dishonorable discharge was properly issued to this soldier, 
and that no further action could be had in the premises. 
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

J. C. KELTON, 
AssUtant Adjutant General, 
The Secretary op War. 

Yoar committee find do excuse whatever for this soldier's conduct in 
deserting the service, unless his drunkenness, disorderly conduct, and 
serious affray at Knoxville with the provost guard are offered in mitiga- 
tion of the charge. 

Your committee ask that the bill do not pass, but lie on the table. 



H CoNOitESS, ) HOUSE OF KEPEESENTATIVES. i Report 
Ut Session. ] \ No. 1677^. 



TELEGRAPH OPERATORS DURING THE WAR. 



no. 15, 1886.— Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



r. YiELE, from the Committee on Military Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To accompany bill H. R. 7886.] 

lie Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred House bill 
, after considering the same, report it back, and recommend that it 
lie on the table, and in lieu thereof recommend the passage of the 
)mpanyin^ substitute : 

: is stated that during the war of the rebellion the military telegraph 
)8, consisting of about 1,200 operators and a sufficient force of line 
I, built and operated 15,389 miles of telegraph lines exclusively de- 
'd to military purposes. In addition many lines of commercial com- 
ies were temporarily, from time to time, made use of by the Gov- 
nent. The service was creditably performed. The repdrt of the 
:*etary of War and the commanding generals bear uniform testimony 
leir efficiency, intelligence, and patriotism. Their duties were purely 
tary, and were performed with the same exposure to the dangers of 
field and disease as fell to the lot of the ordinary officer and soldier. 
y constituted an integral and vitally essential part of the Army, and 
ight the system to a 8tate of perfection never before equalled in 
tary science. Their duties required the service of persons of peculiar 
lligence, and its members were picked from among the great num- 
of operators on account of special prominence acquired in this mys- 
)n8 art. Their duties were almost continuous, unrelieved by the 
tements and relaxations of ordinary camp life. It is surprising 
I so important an arm of the service should have been organized on 
nl basis, and its members only regarded as employ6s of the Quar- 
taster's Department. 

tie official record of its service is principally to to be found in the 
•roll and occasional notice in general reports. 
y the efforts of personal friends their history has been collected, and 
known that of the entire number 199 were either killed, died of 
ase, or were captured while in the line of duty. It is estimated 
' more than 100 others suffered from the casualties of the service. 



r 



>TH OONGBBSS, I HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, i Report 
iMiSesrian. f ) No. 1678. 



AMENDMENT OF NAVAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 1883. 



PJUL 15, 1886. — Committed to the Committee of the Whole Hoase on the state of the 

Union and ordered to be printed. 



1. Ballentine, from the Committee on Naval Affairs, submitted the 

following 

REPORT: 

[To aooompany H. R. 2257.] 

^he Committee an Naval Affairs j to whom icas referred the bill (Z7. 2J. 
2257) to. prevent the retroactive operation of that portion of the naval ap* 
propriation act of August 5, 1882, limiting the number of graduates of 
the United States Naval Academy to be retained in the service {print^ 
on page 285 of volume 22 of the United States Statutes at Large) j having 
carefully considered the same^ beg leave to report: 

That upon examination the committee find that a number of the gradu- 
es of the United States Naval Academy, at Annapolis, Md., who have 
mpleted the four years' course at the Academy, and the two years^ 
rvice at sea, prescribed by law, have been discharged under the pro- 
sions of said act. 

Your committee are of the opinion that said law is retroactive in its 
deration, and worked great injustice to the cadets who have been 
ready discharged, and will work great injustice to all the cadets who 
id entered the service prior to the passage of said act of August 5, 
82, for the following reasons, to wit : 

That all the cadets, at the time of their entering said Academy, were 
qnired to sign articles, agreeing to serve the Government for eight 
ars. It is to bo noted in this connection that, before entering, the 
dets tcere required to sign said articles. It was not optional with them, 
it was one of the conditions on which they entered the service, the 
^eement being, on the part of the cadets, that they should be retained 
r at least eight years if they faithfully complied with the rules and 
gulations of the service; and on the part of the Government that 
ey should not be sooner discharged, unless for good and sufficient 
use. This was an express contract, and was equally binding on both 
irties. It has been broken by the Government, for many of these 
mug men have been discharged at the end o^ six years tcithout vause^ 
id after a faithful performance of their part of the contiact. If the 
Dvernment can so wantonly and so regardlessly break its contracts, 
is difficult to perceive how its citizens can be expected to support 
id have confidence in it. 

There was also an implied contract on the part of the Government to 
iDder their position a certain one, in consideration of their devoting 
leir lives and labor to their profession, and giving up all idea of 
aking a livelihood by other means. These young men also performed 



2 AMENDMKNT OF NAVAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 188a. 

their part of this contract faithfully, and were rewanled hy being 
ignominiously discharged from the service. The Academy is no elee 
inosynary institution. The cadets were neither objects of charity nor 
were they pensioners on the Government. The Government itself set 
the work, which they performed faithfully. They entered the service 
as a profession and an honorable calling, to which they both intended 
and expected to devote the energies of a lifetime; and their parents 
bent them to the Academy for that purpose and with that understand- 
ing. It is hardly possible that any father could be so unwise as to send 
his son to the Academy for an education which, while probably the finest 
of its kind in the world, is so essentially technical that it not oidy does 
not prepare, but actually unfits a boy for civil pursuits. Their parents 
did not send them to the Academy for the education, but for the purpose 
of educating themselves for that, their chosen profession ; and they en- 
tered with that understanding and aim. That the idea that a cadet 
who graduated at Annapolis was secured a ])08ition for life, or during 
good behavior, was not only accepted by the cadets themselves and 
their parents, but also those high in public life, is shown by the fact 
that the late President Garfield, in his address to the first class affected 
by the act of August 6, 18>2 (but prior to its passage), at their grada- 
ating exercises at the end of their four years' course, on June 10, 1881, 
said : 

» ^ • The world is open tc» you, and if ncival service does not bring yoii snccett 
then you are lazy or hopelessly incompetent. Gentlemen, as I stand here I almost 
experience a feelinj^ of envy when I think of the possible future b«»fore you. All of 
us on this stand La VM our characters set. There is no curiosity about our fature; 
even the angels would hardly look down upon us. The very gods, if we lived in myth- 
ological times, would look down with interest upon yon. Yon have so much to 
mold, shape, and bnild up. All your friends will follow you so long as 3'ou work for 
this end. The prof easion to which you belong has made this nation. A sailor was the 
first to give tjbis land to you. * * *.• 

Following the remarks of the President, the late Secretary of the 
Navy, Hunt, spoke as follows : 

* * * These diplomas are not mere pieces of parchment. They have a signifi- 
cance. They are not title deeds to sloth and indolence, but rather commissions for a 
performance of high duties and achieving great aims. By them each of youbeotma 
an officer in Iht United States Kavy, a position of dignity and the sentiment of a great 
nation of fifty millions of people. You are members of a select body of not over, per- 
haps, 1 ,000 in number. * » *. 

That this is no new idea is strongly shown by the following letter, 
written by the Hon. Gideon Welles, in 1863, when Secretary of the ! 
Navy, to a candidate applying for admission to the Naval Acaideniy: 

* * * Should you, on examination, show a fair proficiency in the branches of 
knowledge there indicated, and comply with other conditions, yon tcill be r§cmvtda9 
a midshipitianj and become thenceforward an officer of the Navy of the United States, * * • 
In admitting you to the Academy^ it (the Government) secures to you an adequate provision-r 
in a most honorable calling, for your future support^ ofwhiohj while you live, nothing bu^ 
misconduct or incapacity can deprive you, * * * 

In view of the foregoing opinions, it is evident that not only the Sec?^ 
retary of the Navy, but the Chief Executive of the nation, were also o^ 
the opinion that the position was one for life or during good behaviof- 

Your committee also find that the law under which these young gen ^ 
tlemen entered the service entitled them to promotion on the completioc^ 
of their six years' course, according to section 1521 United St^rtes R^ ^ 
vised Statutes, which reads as follows : 

When cadet-midshipmen shall have passed successfully the graduating examini^r^^ 
tion at the Academy tney shall receive appointments as midshipmen, and shall tak 
rank according t-o the order of their merit at graduation. 



AMENDMENT OF NAVAI/ APPROPRIATION ACT OF 1883. 6 

3f the cadets to be affected by this bill complied with the pro- 
) of this section; but iustead of ^^ receiviDg appointments as mid- 
m," they were discharged from the service, 
lew of all the foregoing facts, we are of the opinion that a con- 
sisted with these gentlemen which the Government of right ought 
11. 

r committee fnrther report that in 1878 a similar act to that of 
t 5, 1882, in relation to the cadets at the Military Academy at 
Point, was passed by the House, but was amended in the Senate 
le 8, 1878, so as not to affect those cadets who had entered the 
tny prior to the passage of said act, which amendment was con- 
in by the House. In view of this precedent, we see no reason 
e act of August 5, 1882, should not be similarly modified as herein 
nended. 

iS been said in opposition to this measure that the cases are not 
il, as the course of studies at Annapolis better fits one for civil 
in that at West Point. The reverse of this, however, is the case, 
tmparison of the curriculum of the Military Academy with that of 
ival Academy will show. The last two years of the course at the 
Academy are given entirely to technical studies, and the addi- 
two years at sea are given to the practical application of these 
5al subjects only, thus further unfitting the cadets for civil life. 
J connection we give a list of the subjects on which these young 
ere examined at the expiration of their two years' course at sea, 
ractical navigation, compass deviation, theory and practice of 
y, French, Spanish, seamanship, and naval tactics, and, to a lim- 
tent, practical marine engineering; and we would ask the mem- 
' the House if they have ^und any of the above subjects useful 
'ssary to them in their struggles in civil life, be their profession 
b may. We have never found a knowledge of any of them essen- 
our success. On the other hand, the graduate of West Point is 
b an accomplished civil engineer, and, as such, <;an always find 
3rative employment. 

? committee further report that the annual Board of Visitors to 
iite«l States Naval Academy in June, 1883, made the following 
nendation in their official report to the Secretary of the Navy: 

commend that the act of August 5, 1882, Ue ameuded, us a similar act iu rela- 
te cadtits at West Poiut has been, so as uot to include those cadets who had 
the service before the passage of said act. 

JOHN G. HOWELL, 
Bear- Admiral, Cniied States Najsy, 
E. G. LAPHAM, 
New York ( United States Stnate), 
SAMUEL H. GREEN, 

MaeeachysetU. 
GEO. A. RITCHIE, 

Pennsylvania. 
EDWARD V. KINGSLEY, 

Nnv York, 
JOHN W. DRUMMOND, 

Illinois, 
THOMAS UPDEGRAFF, 
Iowa ( ffotise of Hepreseniatives). 
AN30N G. McCOOK, 
Xeto York {Bouse of Representatives). 
R. Q. MILLS, 
Texas {House of Representativen). 

iRviN Mcdowell, 

Major- General J United States Army. 



4 AMENDMENT OP NAVAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 1883. 

Also, tbat the annual Board of Visitors to the Academy in June, 1885. 
renewed the above recommendation in their report to the Secretary of 
the Navy, in the following language: 

The attention of the Board having been called to the fact that the Board of Vi»- 
itors in Jnne, 1883, recommended that the act of August 5, 1882, be amended, as a 
similar act in relation to the cadets at West Point has been, so as not to include the 
waders who had entered the service before the passage of said act : BeBolred, That 
we concur in this recommendation, and respectfully renew the same for the considerft- 
tion of Congress.'' (Hon. John R. Thomas and Hon. Benjamin LeFevre dissented, and 
asked leave to submit a minority report on this subject, which was granted, bat 
which ttey did not do.) 

ORLANDO M. POE, 

United States Army. 
JOHN R. THOMAS, 
lUinoid (House of Bepresefitaiives). 
BKNJAMIN LE FEVRK, 
Ohio {House of Represeniatittt). 
JNO. O. BaLLENTINE, 
Tennt'Hsee ( House of Beprtnentatires). 
W. G. SUMNER. 

j\>ir Harcn, Conn. 
JNO. N. A. GRISWOLD, 

New York J N, Y. 
WILLIAM REEI>, 

lialtimorey Mi. 
J AS. S. GRINNELL, 

(ireenfieJd^ Man. 
A. M. CRAIG, 

GaUsburg, lU. 

Yonr committee are of the opinion that the above recommendations, 
made by two separateBoanlsof Visitors of the United States Naval Acad- 
emy in tbeirollicial report to the Secretiiry of the Navy,ai)pointed by the 
President for the very jmrpose of investigating and rejiorting on the 
needs of the naval service, and composed of njembers of both branches 
of Congress, of officers of high rank in both the Army and Navy, of 
eminent members of the judiciary, and of representatives of thepeople^^ 
all men of carelnl judgment and wide experience, and who had care- 
fully examined into the matter, are alone sufficient to show that a wrong 
has been done these young men which cannot be too speedily righted by 
Congress. 

Your committee further report that, by three recent, separate, and. 
unanimous decisions of the Court of Chums, tiie cadet-engineers of tho 
classes ol 1881 and 1882 are retained, and have never been out of th^ 
service; while the cadet midshipmen who entered at the same tii4>e,by 
a mere technicality of the law, are dischaiged. Cadet-engineers ar^ 
graduated after four years, while cadet-midship»nen, through the pro- 
visions of a like clause, are graduated only after a six years' course-* 
Cadet-engineers served during a cruise (two years) at sea, after finishing' 
the four years' course and receiving a diploma of graduation, before 
promotion, in the same manner as cadet-midshipmen ; the differenc^^ 
being that the cadet-midvshipmen were finally examined for promotioi^ 
at Annapolis^ while the cadet engineers before were examined for pro-^ 
motion nt PhiUiddphia. In the cases of the classi's of 1881 and 1882^ 
cadet-midshipmen and cadet engineers entered the Academy' together^ 
pursued .nearly the same studies for the same length of time, receive( 
their diplomas of graduation at the same time, went to sea for two yeai 
together, and finally returned to pass the same final examinations^ 
Then, through a difterence of wording of two clauses, intended to con^ — 
vey exactly the same idea, cadet-engineers are retained, while cadet-^ 
midshipmen are discharged. The court decided, on the application o^ 



AMENDMENT OF NAVAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 1883. 5 

sideteDgiDeers, that the good faith of the Government was involved, 
leclared those members of the engineer classes of 1881 and 1882 
flFected by the act of August ^, 1882. We submit that these cadet* 
^ipmen have equitably the same right to be retained in the service 
B cadet-engineers. And in addition to the above decision, the Court 
aims further affirmed, as a proposition of law that — 

• * * The praviHon of the act of August 5, 1882, for the discharge of surplus 
. CADKT GRADUATES %s prospective only J and do esnot apply to the classes of 1881 and 

is clearly indicates that the court is of the opinion that the provis- 
r the act of August 6, 1882, does not apply to the classes which 
completed their four-year's course in 1881 and 1882, had received 
diplomas of graduation, and were then serving their two years at 
rior to their final graduation in 1883 and 1884. The decision of 
Jourt of Claims having been appealed to the Supreme Cour^, that 
affirmed the decision, and the cadet-engineers of those two classes 
reinstated. 

ur committee further find that the act of August 5, 1882, tca^ not even 
ied to apply to the two classes which had completed the four years' 
e at the Academy, and \i ere then at sea, as is shown by the foUow- 
etter written by Hon. George M. Kobeson, the originator of the 
e in question : 

Philadelphia, Pa., November 12, 1883. 

: III reply to your letter of October 21), I 8tate that at the last session of Con- 
[ advocated the repeal of so much of the act of Aupust 5, 18rfii, as afi'r«'ted the 
8 of IHt^l aud iHH'i, ihen berviug at sen. I do not think that the oii;;iiial bill 
itended to atfect these classes, and would again leconnnend that the classes of 
nd \Hf^2 be reinstated to their former positions on J he Naval Register. 
Yours, very trulv, 

GEO. M. ROHESON. 

ur committee furthermore report that, during the Forty seventh 
ress the bill herein i)roi)Osed was introdni-ed in the Senate, and 
»d thai body tmanimovsly, and we believed that it failed to [)aa8 
louse only from lack of time. Also that, in the Forty eighth Con- 
, a similar bill was favorably acted upon by the Senate Naval 
nil tee, and that a similar one was also reported favorably by this 
littee. These bills were not acted upon owing to the press of leg- 
:)n, but these facts are mentioned to show the merits and the fa- 
)le coiisideratioM which the bill under discussion has received. 
\^ committee further tiud that all the classes of 1881-83 and 
•'84 were in actual service when the act of August 5, liS82, was 
^d. Not only had they completed their four years' course at the 
emy and received their diplomas of graduation, but they wi^re then 
iig at sea. Even if desirous of resigning after the passage of said 
heir absence from the United States made it almost impossible for 

to secure any position in civil life; and even if they could have 
so, the cost of returning to the United States would have been so 

that they were forced to remain in the service until the completion 
eir two years at sea. At that time they were discharged, after 
ig devoted six years of their life to fitting themselves for a naval 
ssiou alone, the six years during which all other young men are 
ing themselves to learning some business in civil life. At an aver- 
ge of twenty-two years they were forced, for no fault of their own, 
gin life again, totally unfitted for a life ashore, and with all their 
tions and inclinations for a naval life intensified and made a second 
e to them by six years devoted exclusively to that life. 






6 AMENDMENT OF NAVAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 1883. 

The law was not operative when these young gentlemen entered theservieey 
and five years later was made to affect them^ and is thus retroactive^ anii^ 
in effect^ an ex post facto law. 

The retroactive effect of the application