(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

List of Irregularities 

1 . Original documents include very faint text that 
may be difficult to read. Some text is also 
slightly blurred. 






T^ 







iRi" I'sfjiynill 



Pfi, Stat3 Collep. 



Imii 



^ 



REGISTER* 



& 



-: OF THE :- 





1878. 



^'A^j)_^^(§^ 



HACIADORN BROTHERS, Printers, 

5 South Calvebt Street, 
1878. 



§ 

i 

i 

I 

m 

§ 

m 

I 

Hi 

i 



P 

I 
I 

I 
i 



HHHlSiliiiillliiliiilis 



g# 




o 

o 
o 

< 

D 

h 

3 i 
U I 

a: - 
o ^ 

< i 





z 

< 
s 

h 



g 



I 






IREGISTERI 



OF THE 



MARYLAND 



&';?Tg) 





: FOH :- 



\ SESSION ENDING JUNE 25. 



1878. 



-^^^I^V.©- 



BALTIMORE : 

HAGADORN BROTHERS, Pkinters, 

5 South Calveut Street, 

1878. 




IIpI'pI!--^ ijL^^^i 



!;;i!ii;.-^^':;ilil|iiift^^ f 



IREGISTER* 



-: OF THE :- 



IMARYLAND: 



,^ (d^'5^ 





FOH 



-: SESS/O/y ENDING JUNE 25, i 



1878. 






a<;ai)(h;.\ I'.Ko'riiKiis. Pimntkks, 

5 SoiTii <'aivi.i;i' SrK]:i;T, 

1 s r y . 




rmiees. 



Represontingr tbe State Ex-OfBc-io: 

Hon. JOHN LEE CARROLL, 

Governor of Marylaiid, 
President. 

Hon. EDWARD LLOYD, 

Presklent of tfie Senate. 

Hon. fetter S. HOBLITZELL, 

Speaker of the Home of Delegates. 

PiioF. M. A. NEWELL, 

Principal of State N&rinai School. 

Representing the Ktocklioltlers: 

Hon. .tames T. EAKLE, ALLEN UODGE, Esq., 

Majou J. P. LEE, Hon. .JOHN MEliltYMAN, 

E. WHITMAN, Esq., J. HOWARD MoHENRY, Esq. 

CARROLL GOLDSBOROUGH, Esq. 



Hon. E. J. Henkle U. S. House of Bcpresentntkes. 

Mr. J. H. McHenby Pikemlle, Md. 

Mr. James L. McLean Baltimore, Md. 

Hon. Henry Snyder Bidthnore, Md. 

Hon. James A. Bond Prlnre Frederick, Md. 

Hon. Daniel Field Denton, Md. 

Hon. J. K. LoNGWELL Wextininxter, Md. 

Hon. C. Mackall, M. D Klkton, Md. 

Major Wm. B. Matthews Port Toharro, Md. 

Hon. Francis P. Phelps • Vmnhridi/e, Md. 

Hon. E. H. Steiner Fredevick, Md. 

Hon. John Daily , Oakland, Md. 

Henry D. Farnadnis, Esq Belair, Md. i 

Hon. A. P. Gorman Laxrd, Md. (-■ * -'-^ 

Col. Edavard Wilkins Chcstertown, Md. 

Hon. Nicholas Brewer, M. D Rork/u'Ue, Md. 

Hon. DeWitton Snowden, M. D Laurel, Md. 

Hon. B. F. Ford GcntrenUe, Md. 

Hon. George R. Dennis L\ S. tienate. 

Hon. J. F. Dent Leonardtotcn, Md. 

Hon. Edward Lloyd Faston, Md. 

Hon. Z. T. Claggett lfa</erstown, Md. 

Hon. Humphrey Humphreys ^'idiHlnirii, Md. 

Hon. William J. Aydelotte Snoin Hill, Md. 

Hon. T. G. McCullough . . .Cinnberland, Md. 




WILLIAM H. PARKER, Presidei^t, 

ProfesKor of Ciml Enginesriiig and Astronomy. 

THOMAS M. JONES, 

Professor of Agriculture, Areliiteetxre and Drawing. 

R. E. NELSON, 
Profeasor of P/ti/sics and. Applied Matlmnatics. 

J. D. WARFIELD, A. M., 

Professor of English Literature, Ment<d Sciencs and History. 

WM. D. MORGAN, A. B., 

Professor of CMniutry arid Natnral Histoi'y. 

F. VON BROCK DORPF, LL. D., 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 



Professf/r of MatJiematics. 

C. J. SHIPLEY, 

Superintends lit of Farm and, Instructor in Practical Agriculture. 



MILITARY ORGANIZATION. 



COL. T. M. JONES, Commandant. 



The terms of the United States appropriation require military instruction. 

The course consists of regular drills and lectures upon tactics and the 
organization of armies. Military discipline is enforced, and cadets are 
required to appear in uniform when not engaged on the farm. 

For the better iustruction in Infantry Tactics and military police and dis- 
cipline, the cadets have lieen consolidated into one company, under the 
command of the Conmiandant of Cadets. The ofhcers and nini-commis- 
sioned are selected from those cadets who have been most active and soldier- 
like in the performance of their duties, and most exemplary in their general 
deportment. This department will next year be in charge of an army officer 
of the U. S. 

CAPTAIN, 

T. TKUXTUN HOUSTON. 

LIEUTENANTS, 

E. G. BENSON, ------- Adjutant. 

SAML. CISSEL. JAMES JOHNSON. 

SekueaxNT Major, ----- G. H. KENNARD. 
Qr. Master Serueant, - - - RICHARD MERCER. 

SERGEANTS, 

J. B. MORALES, 
LOUIS JONES, THOS. SHOCK, 

Q. C. TURNER, JOHN MATTHEWS. 

CORPORALS, 

WM. PORTER, LOUIS PELOUZE, 

CHAS. WOOD, E. BALBIN. 



List of Students. 



Name. Parent or Qvarddan. Residence. 

Alexander, A S. A. Alexander York, Pa. 

Balbin, E. J J. A. Ecltemrria Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bailey, H. O IF. H. Bailey .Washington, D. C. 

Benson, E. G T.R. Benson Washington, D. C. 

Bowman, H Mrs. M. E. Bowman Washington, D. C. 

Bbewer, F General Breicer Baltimore, Md. 

Briscoe, W. C J. F. Bnscoe Calvert Co., Md. 

Brown, C Hon. A. Saunders Washington, D. C. 

Butler, M. C Hon. M. C. Butler Washington, D. C. 

Chabot, H. W Mrs. M. A. Chahot Baltimore, Md. 

Cheston, J., Jr James Clteston A. A. Co., Md. 

Cissel, S. N B. J. Gusel Clarkesville, Md. 

Clarke, P. H Dr. P. Chirks Baltimore, Md. 

Coates, L. E P. Coates Fauquier Co., Va. 

(/Claude, H. D. Glaitde Annapolis, Md. 

Crosby, W S. H. Crosby Catonsville, Md. 

Dean, C. C. J. B. Bean Oakland, Cal. 

Duncan, W. B W.B. Duncan . . .New York, N. Y. 

Durborow, W. F Wm. Strothers, Jr Philadelphia, Penn. 

i/DuYALL, M Dr. M. Dumll Baltimore, Md. 

Easter, A. M J. W. Easter Owingsville, Md. 

Easter, J. M J. W. Easter Owingsville, Md. 

FiTTS, J. H H.D. Bird Petersburg, Va. 

Foster, W. G Dr. M. W. Foster Baltimore, Md, 



8 

Name. Parent or Quardian. Residence. 

GilTjTS, H. a Ca])t. J. II. Gillie U. S. Steamer Franklin, 

Norfolk, Va. 

Griffith, R. S F. L. Griffith Friendship, A. A. Co., Md. 

\ 

Hall, C Avgimtup. Hall A. A. Co., Md. 

Hall, H , Aiigmtus Hall A. A. Co., Md. 

'Colston, A Mr.t. J. J. lIoMon. .... Ilyntlsville, P. G. Co., Md. 

I^HoLSTON, R Mrs. J. J. IToMon Ilyatlsville, P. G. Co., Md. 

HooE, R. E ILM. Hooe Beltsville, Md. 

Horn, J. P B. Horn, Ksq BaUimore, INld. 

Houston, T. T J. IL Saville Washington, D. C. 

Hyatt, A. B C. C Hyatt. Hyattsville, Md. 

Johnson, W. H Capt. C. R. Johnson Bidtiinorc, Md. 

Johnson, J. F ('apt. C. R. Johnson Baltimore, Md. 

Jones, L. R Vol. Roger Jones , Washington, D. C. 

Key, F. S Mrs. V. H. Key Easton, Md. 

Kennard, G. H (ho. Kennard .Ilooversville, Md. 

Legare, a. B Mrs. G. W. Legare Baltimore, Md. 

Looker, H. B 8. II. Looker Muirkirk, Md. 

Matthews, J W. B. Matthews Port Tobacco, Md. 

McCrary, F. E Hon. G. M. McCrary Washington, D. C. 

Meixsel, F. H Mrs. M. Meivsel Washington, D. C. 

Mercer, R. S ,. .. Mrs. E. Mercer A. A. Co., Md. 

Miller, G. F G. Miller Baltimore, Md. 

Moore, F. W Mrs. T. Moore Baltimore, Md. 

Morales, J. B A. G. Menocal Washington, D. C. 

North, E. T Capt. J. North Warrenton, Va. 

Pelouze, L Gen. L. H. Pelouze Washington, D. C. 

Porter, B. B B. B. Porter Baltimore, Md. 

Porter, R. I- B. B. Porter Baltimore, Md. 

Porter, W. R B. B. Porter Baltimore, Md. 

Phythian, C. F Dr. J. L. Phythian Newport, Ky. 



9 

Name. Parent or Guardian. Residence. 

Rapley, R. R W. W. RapUy Washington, D. C. 

»^ Rice, F F.Rice Baltimore, Md. 

RoMEKO, B Hon. F. Romero New Mexico. 

Ross, W. H Mrs. W. 11. Ross Cambridge, Md. 

Sanderson, D Win. Sanderson Washington, D. C. 

Simpson, H G. Sellers Philadelphia, Pa. 

Shock, Thos Com. W. II. Slwck Washington, D. C. 

SoNNENSCHMiDT, A Mvs. G. Sonnenschmidt . . .Washington, D. C. 

SoNNENSCiiMiDT, H Mrs. C. Sonnenschmidt. . .Washington, D. C. 

Ti'UNEK, J. E Titos. J. Turner Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Walsh, G. M Mrs. J. C. Wahh Morristown, N. J. 

Whitney, C. W. . . . G. M. Whitney New York, N. Y. 

WiLLSoN, A. B. M ])r. W. Q. (J. Wilhon.. . .Easton, Md. 

WiTMER, J. C G. Witmer Washington, D. C. 

Wool), C. W G. T. Wood Washington, D. C. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Maryland 38 

District of Columbia 19 

Virginia 4 

New York 3 

Pennsylvania 3 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

California 

Kentuck}^ , 

Total 



10 



GRADUATES OF 1875. 
JOHN B. GRAY, B.A. F. B. HYDE, B. A. 

CHARLES E. LERCH, B. S. LORION MILLER, B. S. 

GRADUATES OF 1876. 

W. J. BLAIR, B. S. JNO. L. WO liTHIJS' GTON, B. S. 

T. H. THOMAS, B.S. 

DEGREES CONFERRED IN COURSE. 
Mr. R. SAUNDERS HENRY, A.M. 
Rev. OLIVER 0. MILLER, A. M. 

GRADUATES OF 1877. 
GEORGE THOMAS, B. S. E. G. EMACK, B. S. 
SCOTT TRUXTUN, B.S. R. R. BEALL. 

DEGREES CONFERRED. 
F. C. NORWOOD, Frederick county, A. M. 
L. A. GRIFFITH, Anne Arundel county, A. M. 
HORACE M. DAVIS, Montgomery county, A.M. 



PART FIRST. 



-: THE :- 



^^ARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



^^ 



13 




irnitiirai Mqt 



The College is situated in Prince George County, in full 
view of College Station, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, nine 
miles north of Washington and twenty eight south of Balti- 
more. (Seventeen trains, seven from Washington and ten 
from Baltimore, stop at College Station daily. 

The farm contains 286 acres. 

The soil varies in quality and condition, thus affording good 
opportunity for experiments. There are meadows artificially 
drained, dry hottoni-lands and rolling high-lands. Heavy 
oak timber is in abundance. A large running stream affords 
sufficient water-power. The farm is traversed hy the old 
roail between Washington and Baltimore. Its proximity to 
Wasliington secures for it many advantages in the Agricul- 
tural Department aud scientific institutions and libraries 
connected with the General Government. 

The building is an imposing structure of brick, of Gothic 
architecture, 120 feet long, 54 feet wide, 6 stories high, re- 
lieved by an east and south portico. The basement contains 
the Dining Room, Kitchen, Pantry, Wash Room and Bakery. 
On the first floor are the Laboratory, Museum, Chapel, Bath 
Room, Department of Languages and Preparatory De})art- 
ment. On the second floor, the Parlor, Visitors' Room, 
President's Room, Register's Office, Commandant's Office, 
Officer of the Day's Room, English, Agricultural and Math- 
ematical Lecture Rooms, Society Hall and Libraiy. The 
chambers are large, well ventilated, well heated and lighted 
throughout with gas. 

The fruit and flower gardens are varied, attractive and 
beautiful. A natural forest of oaks gives abundant shade. 
Mounds, terraces, gravel-walks, evergreens flowering buslies, 
shrubs, &c., adorn the grounds. 



14 



iRmt$t of Instruction. 



The branches of study are grouped under the following 
departments : 

1. Civil Engineering and Astronomy. 

2. English Literature, Mental Science, and History, 

3. Pure Mathematics. 

4. Physics and Applied Mathematics. 

5. Agriculture, Architecture and Drawing. 

6. Chemistry and Natural History. 
7 Ancient and Modern Languages. 

The Course of Study embraces the following subjects : 

Irprtnirttt of |ivit Ittginrerittj ittil Igirottoittg. 

Astronomy. — Descriptive and Practical. 

Physical Geography. — Maury and Guizot, with Maps. 

Civil Engineering.— Drawing, Materials, Bridges, Railroads, 
Tunnels, Canals, &c., &c., Running Lines and Curves 
for Common Roads and Railroads, Levelling, &c., &c. 
Explanation of Geodetical Surveys ; practical work in 
Surveying and Plotting, &c., &c. 

Lectures 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Lockyer's Astronomy; Herschel's Outlines; Chauvenet's Practical As- 
tronomy; Loomis' Surveying; Gillespie's Surveying; Mahan's Civil En- 
gineering ; Rankine's Civil Engineering. 



15 



lepiirititeiit of |ttgli^| liieraiitrr; Ijetiki |tirtt(e atti Iflioti. 

English. — The History, Usage, and Grammatical Structure 
of the English Language ; History of English Litera- 
ture ; Rhetoric ; Composition ; Elocution. 

Mental Science. — Mental and Moral Science ; Logic ; His- 
tory of Philosophy. 

History. — History of Greece, Rome, England, United States ; 
Outlines of History ; History of European Civilization. 

Law. — Commentaries on Constitution of United States ; 

Constitution of Maryland. 
Lectures. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

English. — Abbott & Seeley's English Lessons ; Shaw's History of the 
English Language; Taine's English Literature; Hart's Composition and 
Rhetoric ; Marsh's Lectures upon the English Language. 

Mental Science. — Upham's Mental Philosophy ; Seeley's Schwegler's 
History of Philosophy ; Schuyler's Logic ; Hamilton's Lectures ; Haven's 
Moral Philosophy ; Butler's Analogy. 

History. — Freeman's General Sketch ; Hume's England ; Smith's Greece ; 
Liddell's Rome ; Guizot's European Civilization. 

Lavt. — Story on the Constitution ; Constitution of Maryland ; Political 
Economy. 



Sepiirtment of ^^t^ematks. 

Algebra. — Reduction and solution of Equations of the 
first and second degrees ; Proportions and Progressions ; 
nature and construction of Logarithms ; and the theory 
of Equations. 

Geometry. — Plane and Solid. 



16 

Trigonometry. — Analytical investigation of Trigonometrical 
Formulas, and their application to the solution of all the 
cases of Plane and Spherical Trigonometry ; the Con- 
struction and Use of Trigonometrical Tables. 

Application of Algebra and Trigonometry. — Mensuration 
of Planes and Solids. 

Descriptive Geometry. — The graphic illustration and solu- 
tion of problems in Solid (Geometry ; Projections of the 
Sjihere. 

Analytical Geometry. — Equations of the Right Line, Plane, 
and Conic Sections ; principal problems relating to the 
Cylinder, Cone, Sphere and S|)heroids. 

IjECTI RE.S on Sliades, Shadows and Perspective. 

Book-Keei'ing. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Looinis' Algebra; Ra>'s Higher Algebju; Todhunter's Algebra: 
Schuyler's Geometry ; Looinis' Geometry ; Chauvenet's Geometry ; 
Loomis' Trigonometry and Mensunition ; Chauvenet's Trigonometry; 
Church's Descriptive Geometry ; Loomis' Analytical Geometry ; Todhunt- 
er's Conic Sections. 

Book-Keeping. — Hanaford and Payson. 



Sepaitment of Fhjsics and Applied Matheaatics. 

The Differential and Integral Calculus. — The princi- 
ples of the Differential Calculus, including Taylor's 
Theorem, application to problems of Maxima and Mina- 
ma, and the tracing of Curves ; the methods of Integra- 
tion, and the a})plication of the Integral Calculus to 
Areas, Surfaces and Volumes, and to the finding of Cen- 
tres of Gravity and Moments of Inertia, and to tfie sim- 
pler cases of Differential Equations. 



17 

Mechanics — Statics ; Dynamics. 

Hydrostatics. — Mechanical Properties of Fluids ; Specific 
Gravity, &c., &c. 

Acoustics. — The production and propagation of Sound ; 
modes of Vibration, &c., &c. 

Optics. — Lenses, Vision and Optical Instruments ; Spectrum 
Analysis ; Color, &c., &c. 

Electricity and Magnetism. — Magnetism ; Voltaic Elec- 
tricity, &c., &c. 

Heat. — Theories of Heat ; Sources of Heat ; Instruments 
used for the Measurement of Heat ; Thermo-dynamics. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Loomis' Differential and Integral Calculus ; Courteny's Calculus ; Buck- 
ingham's Calculus; Wells' Natural Philosophy; Ganot's Natural Philoso- 
phy; Cambridge (England) Course of Elementary Natural Philosophy; 
Todhunter's Mechanics for Beginners; Rankine's Applied Mathematics; 
Smith's Hydrostatics ; Bartlett's Acoustics and Optics ; Jenkins' Elec- 
tricity and Magnetism ; Maxwell's Theory of Heat ; Peck's Mechanics. 



^e^artment of ^gricuUttre, ^rfhiterture and §^rawing. 

Agriculture. — General Agriculture ; Civil Engineering, 
applied to Farm Roads, Bridges, Embankments, Drain- 
age, etc.; application of Chemistry to Agriculture ; use 
of Implements ; Breeding and Care of Stock ; Dairy ; 
Gardening ; Fertilizers ; Botany ; Horticulture ; Geo- 
logy ; Arboriculture ; Exercises on the Farm, &c., &c. 

Lectures on Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, 'and on the 
relations of Agriculture to Commerce, Manufactures, 
Labor, &c. 



18 

Architecture. — Drawing ; Materials, Masonry, Carpentry, 
Foundations, Orders, etc. 

Lectures. 

text-books. 

The Progressive Farmer, by J. A. Nash ; Connection between Science 
and the Art of Practical Farming, by J. P. Norton ; Chemical and Field 
Lectures, by James E. Leschmaker; Farmers' Guide, by H. Stephens 
and Prof. Norton ; Farm and Fireside, by John Ij. Blake ; Allen's American 
Farm Book ; How Crops Grow ; The Plough, the Loom and the Anvil, by 
J. S. Skinner & Sons ; Youatt and Martin on the Horse, Cattle, &c.; Peter 
Henderson on Gardening for Profit ; Architecture and Right Line Drawing, 
by Walter Smith. 



eparfment of ^htn\i8trg and Natural ^ffistorg. 

Chemistry. — Organic and Inorganic Chemistry ; Qualitative 
and Quantitative Analysis ; Detection and Separation 
of the Elements ; Manufacture and Application of 
Manures ; Manufacture and Application of Chemicals ; 
Blow Pipe ; Organic, Volumetric, Microscoj)ic and Spec- 
troscopic Analysis ; Chemistry Applied to the Arts and 
Manufactures ; Agricultural Chemistry; Toxicology. 

Natural History and Science. — Zoology; Mineralogy; 
Physiology ; Metallurgy ; Photography ; Telegraphy 
and Printing. 

Ti:XT-B0OKB. 

Chemistry. — Fownes', Fresnius', Steele's. 
Agricultural Chemistry. — Johnson's. 
Zoology. — Nicholson's Text Book. 
Mineralogy. — Danna's. 
Physiology. — Flint's. 
Metallurgy. — Percy's. 
Telegraphy. — CuUey's. 
Spectrum Analysis. — Roscoe's. 
Microscopic Analysis. — Carpenter's. 
Volumetric Analysis. — Sutton's. 
Blow Pipe Analysis. — Elderhorst's. 
Toxicology. — Taylor's. 



19 



gje^artmeni of ^nchni and Rodent fanguages, 

Latin. — Grammar, Reader, Caesar, Ovid, Virgil, Cicero, 
Horace, Salliist, Livy, Tacitus, 

French. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 
German. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 

TEXT-BOO K^,S. 

Fasquelle's Grammar; De Fivas' Grammar; Collott's Dramatic French 
Reader ; Erkmaun-Chatrain's Le Coascrit ; OUendorf 's German Course ; 
Cajsar ; Ovid ; Cicero, &c., «S;c. 



The Course of Instruction extends over four years, and the 
course for each year is as follows : 

Freshman Class. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Physical Geography. 

School of English Literatuke, &c. — English Lessons ; Composition ; 

Rhetoric; Outlines of Histor}^; Elocution; History of England. 
School of Mathematics. — Algebra ; Geometry ; Plane Trigonometry ; 

Mensuration ; Book-Keeping. 
School of Physics, &c. — Elementary Natural Philosophy. 
School of Agriculture. — Botany; How Crops Feed and How Crops 

Grow, and Gardening for Profit ; Exercises on the Farm. 
School of Chemistry. — Organic and Inorganic Chemistry ; Zoology. 
School op Languages. — Latin, (optional,) French or German. 

iSophoinore Class. 

School op Astronomy, &c. — Field Surveying. 

School op English, &c. — Rhetoric ; Composition ; Elocution ; History of 
Greece ; History of Rome. 

School op Mathematics. — Spherical Trigonometry; Descriptive Geome- 
try ; Analytical Geometry. 



20 

School of Physics. — Todhunter's Mechanics for Beginners; Optics; 
Acoustics ; Hydrostatics ; Electricity and Magnetism. 

School op Agriculture, &c. — Geology ; Exercises on the Farm ; Allen's 
Farm Book ; Stephen's Farmers' Guide. 

School of Chemistry, «&c. — Qualitative Analysis ; Detection and Separa- 
tion of the Elements ; Agricultural Chemistry ; Manufacture and Appli- 
cation of Manures ; Mineralogy. 

School of Languages. — Latin, (optional,) French or German. 



Junior Class. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Practical Astronomy. 

School of English Literature, &c. — Mental Philosophy ; History of 
the English Language; History of English Literature: History of 
Civilization in Europe ; Essays and Declamation. 

School of Mathematics. — Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 

School of Physics, &C'. — Diflerential and Integral Calculus. 

School OF Agriculture, «&c. — General Agriculture; Horticulture; Ar- 
boriculture ; Laud>cape Gardening ; Lectures on Veterinary Anatomy ; 
Physiology aad Surgery ; Exercises on the Farm. 

School of Chemistry, &c.— Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis; Or- 
ganic Analysis ; Blow Pipe Analysis ; Manufacture and Application of 
Chemicals; Physiology; Metallurgy; Toxicology. 

School of Languages.— Latin, (optional,) French or German. 

Senior Class. 

School of Astronomy, &c.— Civil Engineering. 

School of English Literature, &c.— History of Philosophy; Moral 
Philosophy; Logic, Essays ; Original Declamation. 

School of Physics, «fcc. — Rankine's Applied Mathematics. 

School of Agriculture, &c.— General Agriculture; Civil Engineering 
applied to Farm Roads, Bridges, &c., «fcc.; Architecture; Lectures on the 
relation of Agriculture to Commerce, Manufactures, &c.; Exercises on 
the Farm. 

School of Chemistry, &c. — Chemistry applied to the Arts and Manufac- 
tures ; Quantitative Analysis ; Volumetric, Microscopic and Soectro- 
scopic Analysis ; Assays— Teiegraphy ; Photography. 

School of Languages. — Latin, (optional,) French or German. 



21 

^efidrtment of Agriculture. 

Students, without exception, will be drilled in the uses of 
implements and machines ; in feeding stock, harvesting, 
driving ; in grafting, budding and pruning ; in planting, 
cultivating and harvesting ; in road-making, bridging and 
surveying ; in buying, selling and book-keeping. A green- 
house will be instituted ; a museum of all productions of the 
State will be collected ; experiments, testing the accepted 
theories of agricultural science, will be undertaken and the 
results fully published. Professors and eminent practical 
farmers will deliver regular lectures upon the theory and 
practice of agricultural science. Class-lectures and recita- 
tions in scientific agriculture will be accompanied by a regu- 
lar course of lectures upon agricultural chemistry. 

Special lectures in veterinary science will be given. 

A work-shop will be erected, and students encouraged to 
master all the reiiuirements of farmers. 

Students in charge of the Professor of Agriculture will 
have opportunities for visiting the Agricultural and other 
Departments at Washington. 



DEGREES. 

I. The Degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon 
those who graduate in all the Schools. 

II. The Degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred 
upon those who graduate in the Schools of Astronomy and 
Civil Engineering, English Literature, Mathematics, Physics, 
Chemistry and Languages. 

III. Students who pass satisfactory examinations in the 
Schools of English, Mathematics, Agriculture and Chemis- 
try, will be declared graduates in Agriculture. 

IV. Those who take the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science, and devote themselves to study for three 
years thereafter, will be entitled to the Degree of Master of 
Arts or Master of Science. 



22 
EXAMINATIONS. 

A semi-annual examination, in the presence of the Faculty, 
is held the last week of the first term. 

Monthly examinations at the blackboards are required in 
all the departments. 

The Annual Examination begins about June 15th, and 
ends June 25th, and is both written and oral. 

Students who fail to pass satisfactory examinations at the 
end of each term, are not allowed to continue with their 
classes. 



MARKS. 

The scale of marks for recitation and exercises ranges from 
4 to 0. A mark of 4 indicates thoroughness ; 0, a total 
failure ; the intermediate numbers indicate absolute values. 

A mark of 2.5 represents the minimum of proficiency. 
Students whose final average for the term or year in any 
branch falls below that number, are liable to bo turned back 
to the next class. 



GOLD MEDAL. 

The highest scholarship will next year be rewarded by a 
gold medal. 



MERIT-ROLLS. 

At e^ery annual examination, the Faculty forms a merit- 
roll of each class in the following manner : 

The final average of each student in each branch for which 
a coefficient is assigned in the table of coefficients, is multi- 
plied by such coefficient, and the sum of the products, after 
making the deduction for conduct, is the final multiple for 
the year. 



23 

The names of the students are arranged according to the 
final multiple, the highest multiple being placed first on the 
list, and the others in their order ; but no class number is 
assigned to any found deficient. 

Monthly Reports, showing the progress and standing of 
students, are sent to parents. 

Attention is respectfully called to these Reports. 



VACATION AND TERMS. 

The scholastic year is divided into two terms, with but one 
regular vacation, beginning the last week of June, and 
closing about the middle of September ; and a short inter- 
mission at Christmas and Easter. 

No other furloughs will be granted, except in urgent cases. 

The first term opens on the 20th of September, and closes 
with the month of January. The second term begins 1st of 
February, and ends with the college year, the last of June. 



f 



EXPENSES. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Fw Studenia from tlie State of Maryland and District of Columbia : 

First Term. — Board, Lights, Washing, use of Furniture and 

Room Rent $100 00 

Matriculation Fee 5 00 

Total |105 00 

Second Term. — Same as the first, less the Matriculation Fee. 

For Non-Residents of the State of Maryland and District of Colunibia: 

First Term.— Board, Tuition, &c $137 50 

Matriculation Fee 5 00 

Total $142 50 

Second Term. — Same as first,' less the Matriculation Fee. 



24 

Students from the State of Maryland and District are 
received free of charge for tuition. They are allowed, also, 
the use of books ; but it is recommended that they should 
purchase the same, if in their power. 

Day scholars are charged two dollars a month for use of 
rooms, fuel, &c. 

Students having a constant fire in their rooms are charged 
two dollars a month extra,. 

Prepayment in every cn.se is required, unless satisfactory 
arrangement be made with the President of the Faculty for 
settlement by note at short date. 

No deduction will be made for absence, except in case of 
protracted illness ; nor will money be refunded in case a 
student be withdrawn or dismissed during the term, unless 
at the discretion of the President. 

Special damages are assessed on those who unnecessarily 
injure or destroy College property. 



STATE FAIR. 

Students will be taken to the State Fair to be held Sep- 
tember 2'7th. Early applications are, therefore, necessary to 
secure uniforms in time to attend. 



UNIFORM AND OTHER CLOTHING. 

As the students are required to wear a prescribed uniform, 
it is only necessary to bring a suit for farm work. Arrange- 
ments are made with a competent tailor who supplies the 
uniforms. The cost, with cap, is from $21 to $24.50. 

Students must bring a supply of toivels, napkins^ bed-linen 
and white Berlin gloves; all articles of clothing must be 
marked. 



25 
REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION, &c. 

Students will he received, examined and assigned to their 
proper classes at any point in the College course ; those 
who cannot pass good, examinations in Reading, Writing, 
Arithmetic, Grammar, Geography, and History of the 
United States, will not be allowed to begin the course. All 
not so qualified will be entered in the Preparatory De[)art- 
ment. A room having been fitted up for this purpose, 
special instruction will be given all those who wish to pre- 
pare for the Freshman Class. 

Applications for admission, or for further information, 
should be addressed to the President of the Maryland Agri- 
cultural C<dlege, College Station, Prince George County, 

Maryland. 

. ^ 

FIRE BRIGADE. 

The Fire Brigade includes in its organization every person 
connected with the College and Farm. Students, at the fire- 
alarm, proceed to such stations as are designated in the fire- 
bill. Exercises in fire-drill will take place at such time as 
the President may direct. 



DISPENSARY. 

The Professor in charge of the Dispensary will visit, report 
and attend all cadets unfit for duty by sickness. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Daily morning prayer and Divine Service, on Sunday, are 
regularly held in the Chapel Students are required to 
attend unless a wiitten request to the contrary be made. 
Students shall observe the Lord's day with decorum. 



36 
DISCIPLINE. 

The following laws will be strictly enforced by the officer- 
in-cbarge : 

1. Students shall not go beyond the limits of the farm ; 
use fire-arms : sit up after taps ; use the south portico ; hold 
any general meeting ; visit the dining-room or kitchen, 
without permission from the President. 

2. Profane language, card playing, gambling, intoxica- 
tion, or any of their attendant vices, will not be tolerated by 
the Faculty. Any student known to indulge in habits inju- 
rious to the morals of the College, or calculated to destroy 
its established order, shall be immediately dismissed. 

3. Destruction of property, disorderly conduct, in the 
halls, on the grounds, on furlough, or any other violation of 
the published orders of the President, or officer-in-charge, 
will be punished by tasks, demerits, guard duties, and such 
other punishments as the Faculty may decide. 

4. Members of the Faculty and all officers-in-charge are 
required to report any violation of these regulations. 

5. Upon matriculation, each student will be furnished 
with a copy of these and other regulations, and will be 
required to obey them. 



PART SECOND 



"eport of Sarm Iuperintendent. 



^^■^M^^^^ 



29 



lefiort off ^ttfierintendent off ^Htm. 

Maryland Agr. College, 

June 26, 1878. 
President Win. H. Parker: 

Sir : — As requested by you, I give this, my first annual 
report, as Superintendent of Farm. June 13tli, 1877, 
1 was appointed. It being mid-summer, all crops were 
planted, and 1 will proceed to give results. I propose to 
open an account with each field ; credit the same with crops 
produced and charge it with cost of culture, seed and 
manures used ; then state results, giving the crops now in 
the ground, with their prospects. 

Field No. 1 contains twelve acres ; is worked more as a 
truck-patch than for regular farming. Two acres and a half 
were in potatoes ; product, 300 bushels. Two acres, in corn ; 
product, 12 barrels. Three acres, in clover ; product, 2 tons 
hay. One acre, in sugar-beets ; product, 145 bushels. 
Remainder of field, in swamp and pines. 

CR. 

By 300 bus. potatoes, 75 cts. per bus $225 00 

12 brls. corn, $2.50 per brl , 30 00 

145 bus. sugar-beets, 25 cts. per bushel 35 25 

2 tons hay, $12 per tou 24 00 



$314 25 
DR. 
To Ploughing and after-culture, 8^ acres, at $5 per acre. . .$ 42 50 

Manures used 43 77 

25 bus. seed, $1 per bus 25 00 

Harvesting hay 4 00 

$115 ^r; 



lii I 



$198 98 



30 

This field is now all under culture, except a small lot of 
pines. The swamp has been drained ; ditching tiles have 
been successful in drying the land The same is now sown 
in broad-cast corn, to be fed to cattle while green during 
the summer. 

An apple and peach orchard of one hundred and fifty-four 
trees was planted on three acres of the lot, all of which are 
growing and look thrifty. 

Two and a half acres are now in potatoes ; ^ acre in peas ; 
two acres in oats, seeded down in clover and timothy ; two 
acres were sown in rye last fall. It was thoroughly ma- 
nured, cut and fed to cattle while green this spring, except 
a small portion left to mature. 

Field No. 2 contains about three^acres. ()n it is a young 
orchard of apple, peach, cherry and pear trees, all of which 
need much care to reclaim them ; the land was poor, and trees 
much neglected. This orchard has been thoroughly ma- 
nured and one-half of it planted in potatoes. 

Field No. 3 contains forty-eight acres, about one-half in 
wood. Is now a pasture, and has apparently been idle for 
some years. It is badly washed and needs attention. 

Field No. 4 contains twenty-six acres This field I found 
planted in corn It did not promise well ; the field lays flat 
or dish shape ; it was too wet for the corn to grow ; — in con- 
sequence, about eight acres produced a short crop. 

CR. 

Product of Field. 

150 brls. com at $2.50 per brl $375 00 

Value fodder per acre, $4.00 104 00 

25 cart-loads pumpkins @ $1.00 25 00 

$504 00 
DR. 

Plowing and after-culture, $5.00 per acre $130 00 

Fertilizers 125 00 

Seed com 6 00 

2 tons plaster 30 00 

Husking and lofting corn 40 00 

$321 00 

$183 00 



31 

This field had one thousand bushels of lime applied on 
about ten acres after being plowed in the spring. 

The above field was sown in oats this spring, except four 
acres. Three acres were sown in barley. One acre was sown 
in wheat last fall, in experimental plats, under direction of 
the Professor of Agriculture, in whose report it will appear. 
The oats were drilled in, one bushel per acre, with two 
hundred and seventy-five pounds "Raw Bone" per acre. 
The crop looks well at this time. 

This field, after harvest, will be plowed and sown in wheat. 
It is very desirable that it should be drained before seeding ; 
it will well repay cost and is essential to successful culture. 
~ Field No. 5 contains twenty-five acres ; was in grass last 
year. On about one-half the grass was thin, and all of it 
more or less filthy. Our grass fields are full of the weed 
known as white blossom or Carolina pink. This whole sec- 
tion of country is filled with it. Twenty tons of rough hay 
were harvested from this field. 

CR. 
By 30 tons hay, $13.00 per ton $340 00 

DR. 
To harvesting and stacking $ 40 00 



^ $300 00 

Tile above field was plowed last fall and planted in corn 
this spring. Two hundred pounds of dissolved bone, per 
acre, were applied in the hill. The corn came up well, and, 
although very grassy at this time, caused by continued wet 
weather, will soon be remedied when the land is in order to 
work. 

Field No. 6 contains 48 acres in front of College building. 
In grass, last year, it had well nigh run out and was very 
filthy, but was all mown over. 

23 tons hay (rough) were saved. The weeds and other 
filth were hauled to bare places in field No. 3 and stacked 
up ; the cattle were allowed to run to it in fall and early 
winter ; the remainder was burned to prevent the spread of 
seed. 



33 

CR. 
By 23 tons hay, |12.00 per ton |276 00 

DR. 
To harvesting and securing $ 46 00 

$230 00 
The crop in field No. 6, for this year, is as follows : 25 
acres in wheat, on which three varieties were sown, namely ; 
10 bushels of Clawson, 10 of Amber, 10 of Fultz. Manures 
applied: 1 ton "Bone Ash," two tons "Flour of Bone," 1 
ton ''Phosphate of Bone ;" 4 acres in rye, on which Turner's 
"Excelsior" was used On both wheat and rye, 300 pounds 
to the acre were applied, and 1 bushel of grain. The wheat 
promises well thus far ; 10 acres were ploughed for corn last 
fall and planted this spring, on which "dissolved bone" was 
applied in the hill at the rate of 300 pounds per acre. Corn 
came up well and promises a good crop. 

Field No. 7 contains 33 acres of cleared land, with about 
15 of wood and swamp ; 21 acres in wheat last year and 12 
acres in oats yielded as follows : 

CR. 

By 418 bus. wheat at $1.46 per bus $610 28 

25 tons straw, $4 per ton 100 00 

430 bus. oats, 33 cents per bus 141 90 

8 tons oat straw, $4 per ton 32 00 

DR. $884 18 

To Ploughing and seeding 33 acres at $3 per acre $ 99 00 

Manures applied 251 44 

Costofseed 45 00 

$395 44 

$488 74 
The above field was seeded in timothy and clover, but did 

not take well ; it will have to be ploughed this fall ; crop of 

grass will be light. 

We have been using fertilizers liberally and depend largely 

upon them for our crops. It is my opinion that lime, though 

not so quick in its action, is just what our low lands need. 

The quantity already used has been decidedly beneficial. 
Field No. 8 is a garden and contains 10 acres, 3 acres of 

which are in a peach orchard, seven years old, — leaving but 

7 acres therefore for garden vegetables. 



33 

Following is the report of Gardener : 

CR. 

Peaches, 118 bushels, 50 cts. per bushel $ 59 00 

60 bushels sweet potatoes at $1.00 per bushel 60 00 

57 bushels tomatoes at $1.00 per bushel 57 00 

1,400 head of cabbages, 3 cts. per head 42 00 

19 bushels canots, $1.00 per bushel 19 00 

6 bushels onions, $1.00 per bushel 6 00 

150 egg-plants, 5 cts. apiece 7 50 

14 bushels peas at $1.00 per bushel 14 00 

80 dozen corn at 10 cts. per dozen 8 00 

6 bushels okra, $2.00 per bushel 12 00 

Cucumber pickles, 6 bushels, $1.00 per bushel 6 00 

900 pounds grapes at 3 cts. per pound 27 00 

150 bunches radishes, 2 cts. per bunch . . 2 00 

31 bushels parsnips at $1.00 per bushel 31 00 

800 bunches celery at 10 cts. per bunch 80 00 

Lettuce, beets, cucumbei*s, melons, cantaloupes, string beans. Lima 

beans, total 50 00 

50 bushels potatoes, 75 cts. per bushel 37 50 

150 bushels turnips at 35 cts. per bushel 37 50 

DR. $555 50 

To plowing and after-culture at $8.00 per acre $ 80 00 

New sash 45 00 

Seeds 20 00 

i ton Poudrette 6 00 

$151 00 

$405 50 

Five hundred loads of manure have been made on farm, 
which have been applied to the garden, orchard and potato 
crop, leaving a balance of 150 loads in barn-yard yet to be used. 

Field No. 9 contains 24 acres, more than half of which 
is in wood ; the balance is a peach orchard not bearing. The 
whole is used as a hog pasture 

The grove around the College needs attention. The old 
wagon roads, long used, have washed, and need filling and 
grading. 

Our stock of hogs is 38 heacl— 4 brood sows, 1 boar, 20 
head killing hogs and t3 shoats. 11 hogs slaughtered last 
fall made 1,740 pounds pork, which was carefully put away ; 
lard, &c , delivered to Colleg* " meat salted and smoked in 

due time. 

CR. 
1,740 pounds pork, 6 cts. per pound $104 40 

DR. 
Value of corn used in feeding 50 00 

$54 40 



34 

DAIRY STOCK AND PRODUCT. 

September 1st, 1877, .13 cows, l jaaI£,JL-yi)Jiag.Jiull, com- 
prised the stock. The cows gave but little milk ; the greater 
part were old and not of improved stock. After consulting 
with the President, 9 cows and bull were sold and four fresh 
cows purchased. 

Stock sold— 10 head at #20 per head..' $200 00 

Four fresh cows at $55 each 220 00 

Expense above receipt , $ 20 00 

Later in the fall, 2 additional cows were purchased at $55 
each — fllO, — making our herd at this time 9 in number, all 
of which are giving milk. The three selected from old herd 
came in fresh early in the winter, and our supply of milk, 
averaging 10 gallons per day, is sufficient. 

Product of cows for 9 months, 2,700 gallons milk at 20 
cents per gallon, $540. 

Our small flock of sheep is the only portion of stock in 
which there has not been a gain. One was killed by dogs, 
one died, — leaving only five head. All are good specimens 
of the Cotswold. 

Our live-stock consists of 4 mules and 2 horses. The 
mules are old, but do their work well, and are in good con- 
dition. The horses are used for the college work, and will 
n >t much longer be able to do it. 

Much attention and labor have been given to repairing 
roads, cleaning ditch-banks, grubbing and cleaning fence 
rows, — all of which required much time. The avenue, alone, 
received six hundred and fifty loads of gravel, and is now in 
good order. 

Early in the year, I was supplied with harness and farming 
implements. 

Permit me, in closing this report, to return thanks to 3'^ou, 
sir, for your confidence and interest taken in the success of 
mv department. 

C. J. SHJPLEY, 

Superintendent of Farm. 



f 



\ 



i 



t