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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"



REGISTER 



OF THE 



MARYLAND 



Agricultural College 



-: FOR : — 



SESSION ENDING JUNE 24, 



1879. 



NEW YORK : 
T. COTESVVORTH PiXCKNEY, PrJNTER, 30 UNION SQUARE. 

1879. 



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REGISTER 



-: OF THE 



MARYLAND 



Agricultural College 



FOR 



SESSION ENDING JUNE 24. 



1879. 



NEW YORK : 
T. COTESWORTH PlNCKNEY, PRINTER, 30 UNION SQUARE. 

1879. 



REGISTER 



OF THE : 



MARYLAND 



Agricultural Colllge 



-: FOR 



SESS/0/\/ ENDING JUNE 24. 



1879. 



Ni;w vokR : 

T. COTKSWOUril I'l.NCKNEY, 1'rINTEK, 30 U.N'ION Sf^HfARK. 

1S79. 



TRUSTEES. 

Representing the State Ex-Officio : 

Hon. JOHN LEE CARROLL, 

Governor of Maryland, 
President. 

Hon. EDWARD LLOYD, 
President of the Senate. 

Hon. fetter S. HOBLITZELL, 

Speaker of the House of Delegates. 

Prof. M. A. NEWELL, 
Principal of State JVor?nal School. 

Representing the Stockholders : 

Hon. JAMES T. EARLE, ALLEN DODGE, Esq., 

Major J. F. LEE, Hon. JOHN MERRYMAN, 

E. WHITMAN, Esq., J. HOWARD McHENRY, Esq., 

F. CARROLL GOLDSBOROUGH, Esq. 



VISITORS. 

Hon. E. J. Henkle U. S. House of Repi-esentatives. 

Mr. J. H. McHenry Pikesville, Md. 

Mr. James L. McLean Baltifnore, Md. 

Hon. Henry Snyder Baltimore, Md. 

Hon. James A. Bond Prince Frederick^ Md. 

Hon. Daniel Field Denton, Md. 

Hon. J. K. LoNGWELL Westminster, Md. 

Hon. C. Mackall, M. D Elkton, Md. 

Major Wm. B. Matthews Port Tobacco, Md. 

Hon. Francis P. Phelps Cambridge, Md. 

Hon. E. H. Steiner Frederick, Md. 

Hon. John Daily Oaklajid, Md. \ 

Henry D. Farnadnis, Esq Belair, Md. 

Hon. A. P. Gorman Laurel, Md. 

Hon. Nicholas Brewer, M.Xy . . .Rockville, Md. 
Hon. De Wilton Snowden, M..T) . .Laurel, Md. 

Hon. B. F. Ford Centreville, Md. 

Hon. George R. Dennis 

Hon. J. F. Dent Leonardtown, Md. 

Hon. Edward Eloyd Easton, Md. 

Hon. Z. T. Claggett Hagersiown, Md. 

Hon. Humphrey Humphreys .... Salisbury, Md. 

Hon. William J. Aydelotte Snow Hill, Md. 

Hon. T. G. McCullough Cumberland, Md. 



$ 



FACULTY. 



WILLIAM H. PARKER, President, 

Professor of Engineering and Astronomy. 

R. p:. np:lsoi^, 

Professor of Physics and Applied Mathematics. 

J. D. WARFIELD, A.M., 

Professor of English Literature, Mental Science, and History. 

WM. D. MORGAN, A.M., 

Professor of Chemistry and Natural History. 

F. VON BROCKDORFF, LL.D., 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

Prof. A. GRABOWSKII, Ph.D., 

(OF WEISBADEN ACADEMY OF AGRICULTURE), 
Professor of Agriculture.^ Architecture, Cs'c. 

Lieut. DEEMS, U. S. A., 

Instructor in Military Science^ and Comiriandant of Cadets. 

C. J. SHIPLEY, 

Superintendent of Fartn, and Instrtictor in Practical Agriculture. 



Military Organization. 



Lieut. CLARENCE DEEMS, 4th Artillery, U. S. A., Comd't. 



The terms of the United States appropriation require military instruction. 

The course consists of regular drills and lectures upon tactics and the organi- 
zation of armies. Military discipline is enforced, and cadets are requued to 
appear in uniform when not engaged on the farm. 

For the better instruction in Infantry Tactics and military police and discipline, 

the cadets have been consolidated into one company, under the command of the 

Commandant of Cadets. The officers and non-commissioned officers are selected 

from those cadets who have been most active and soldier-like in the perform- 

mce of their duties, and most exemplary in their general deportment. This is in 

harge of an army officer of the U. S. 

CAPTAIN, 

T. T. HOUSTON, 



S. N. CISSELL, 



LIEUTENANTS, 



G. H. KENNARD, 



Q. M. SERGEANT, 

R. S. MERCER. 

I St SERGEANT, 

W. H. THOMAS. 



WM. PORTER, 



SERGEANTS, 

R. Q. TURNER, 



C. W. WOOD. 



CORPORALS, 



A. EASTER, W. H. CHILDS, 

W. G. HOFFMAN, J. LOWE, 

R. S. GRIFFITH. 



Catalogue of Students. 

1878—^79, 



Name. Parent or Guardian. Address. 

Acker, N. A Mrs. N. Acker .Washington, D. C. 

Jbenson, ¥j. G Thos. R. Benson Washington, D. C. 

BowEN, P. A., Jr. . . .Z'. A. Bowen Friendship, Md. 

Brooke, W. C S. Brooke West River, Md. 

Brown, C. A Mrs. M. S. McGowen..'$>2\\. Lake City, Utah. 

Bowman, H. S Mrs. M. E. ^^7£/wa«.. Washington, D. C. 

Camp, Lawrence. . . .Mrs. M. E. Camp.. . .Washington, D. C. 

Chabot, G. H Mrs. A. Chabot Baltimore, Md. 

, Childs, Wm. H S. Childs Montgomery Co., Md. 

^Cissel, S. N B. G. Cissel. Howard Co., Md. 

Clagett, H. B., Jr.. .H. B. Clagett Alexandria, Va. 

Clarke, P. H Dr. P. C. Clarke Baltimore, Md. 

Claude Herbert Dennis Claude Annapolis, Md. 

Crawford, F. A Dr. Frank 0«z£^<7r^..Wingfield, Md. 

Crisp, R. O., Jr F. G. Crisp Brooklyn, Md. 

Crosby, W. C 6". K. Crosby .... .... Baltimore, Md. 

Darrell, O. D Dr. J. H. DarrelL. . .Washington, D. C. 

Dent, E. S Hon. Josiah Dent. Georgetown, D. C. 

Duncan, W. B., Jr.. . .W. B. Duncan New York. 

deKrafft, J.C. P.,jR.yi C. P. de Krafft. . .Washington, D. C. 

Durborow, Wm Wm. Struthers Philadelphia, Pa. 

Easter, A. M Mrs. J. W. Easter.. . . O wings Mills, Md. 

Easter, J. M Mrs. M. E. Easter . . . Owings Mills, Md. 

Griffith, R. S Col. F. L. Griffith. . . .Friendship, Md. 

Guy, R. H B. F. Guy Hyattsville. Md. 

Hall, I. C A. Hall, Esq West River, Md. 

Hall, H. A A. Hall, Esq West River, Md. 

Hoffman, W. G., Jr.. W. G. Hoffman Baltimore, Md. 

Houston, T. T J. H. Gaville Washington, D. C. 

Hughes, J. R Miss N. M. Hughes . .Washington, D. C, 

Hyatt, A. B .C. H. Hyatt., Esq Hyattsville, Md. 

Johnson, A. A F. W. Johnson Baltimore, Md. 

Johnson, W. H Capt. C. R. Johnson. .Baltimore, Md. 

Kady, John Mrs. M. Kady Baltimore, Md. 

Kady, Mark Mrs. M. Kady Baltimore, Md. 

Kennerly, p. M Col. D. P. Whiting. . .Washington, D. C. 

Kennard, G. H Geo. J, Kennard. Jessup's Cut, Md. 

Key, F. S Mrs. C. H. Key Easton, Md. 

Kingsbury, H. W. . . .Airs. H. F. Clarke Baltimore, Md. 

Legar^, J. B Mrs. Geo. W. Z^^^r^.. Charleston, S. C. 



Name, Parent or Guardian. Address. 

Lowe, Howard Mrs. Sophia Lowe. . . . Omaha, Neb. 

Lowe, Jesse Mrs. Sophia Lowe. . . . Omaha, Neb. 

J Matthews, John. . . .IV. B. Matthews Port Tobacco, Md. 

VMiller, Geo. F Geo. F. Miller, Esq. .Baltimore, Md. 

MiLBURN, R. C Mrs. M. V.Milburn. .Georgetown, D, C. 

McCeney, George . .A. S. McCeney Montgomery Co., McP. 

Magrath, VV. a . . . . N. A. Magrath Macon, Ga. 

McCreary, Wort. . . . Gen. D. B . McCreary..^.ne, Pa. 

Moore, G. H W. W. .Upton Washington, D, C. 

^Mercer, Richard. Mrs. E. G. Mercer. . . West River, MoL 

Pascault, a. G A. A. Pascault Easton, McL 

Pigott, P\ S L. W. Pigott Charlotte, N. C. 

/Porter, B. B B. B. Porter, Esq. . . . Baltimore, Md. 

/Porter, R. L B. B. Porter, Esq . . . .Baltimore, Md. 

/Porter, W. R B. B. Porter, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

Rice, F. M. E. Rice, Esq Baltimore, Md. 

' Rapley, R. R W. W. Rapley Washington^ D. C. 

Randall, E. G Mrs. Sarah OLeary . .Washington, D. C. 

RosT, George Mrs. S. Post Baltimore, Md. 

\^ Sanderson, M. D Wm. Sanderson Washington, D. C. 

Skerrett, J. T Capt. J.S.Skerrett^U.S.N?N2j^\x^^\.ox\, D. C. 

Stonestreet, J. ^^...B. G. Stonestreet Port Tobacco, Md. 

Sprague Wm Hon. JV?n. Sprague. . .Washington, D. C. 

Thomas, W. H Mrs. E. Thomas St. Mary's Co., Md. 

Truxtun, G. H Capt. W. P. Truxtun.. Norfolk, Va. 

Thompson, P. W Mrs.M. G. Thompson.. Wdishmgtoxi, D. C. 

Taylor, Oscar J. G. Taylor Baltimore, Md. 

(Turner, Q. E T. E. Turner Upper Marlboro, Md. 

.Whiting, J. S Mrs. J. H. Whiting . .AVashington, D. C. 

AVhitney, C. W., Jr. .C. W. Whitney New York. 

Wenner, C. M C. F. Wenner Berlin, Md. 

WiLLSON, A. B. M. . .Dr. H. G. G. Witlson.. Easton, Md. 

Walke, W Richard Walke Norfolk, Va. 

Wood, C. W C. T. Wood Washington, D. C. 

Yohn, William Mrs. Richard R. K7/i«.Wingfield, Md. 



-• • ♦- 



RECAPITULATION. 



Maryland 42 

Washington, D. C 18 

Virginia 3 

Georgetown, D. C 2 

Pennsylvania 2 

New York 2 



Nebraska 


2 


North Carolina 


I 


South Carolina 


I 


Georgia 

Utah 


I 

I 


Total... 


75 



JOHN B. GRAY, B. A. F. B. HYDE, B. A. 

CHARLES E. LERCH, B. S. LORION MILLER, B. S. 

W. J. BLAIR, B. S. JNO. L. WORTHINGTON, B. S. 

T. H. THOMAS, B. S. 

§^tm (^mUvvtA in i^mxM. 

Mr. R. SAUNDERS HENRY, A.M. 
Rev. OLIVER C. MILLER, A. M. 

CxEORGE THOMAS, B. S. E. G. EMACK, B. S. 
SCOTT TRUXTUN, B. S. R. R. BEALL. 

§ttixm (EmUxxtL 

F. C. NORWOOD, Frederick County, A. M. 

L. A. GRIFFITH, Anne Arundel County, A. M. 

HORACE M. DAVIS, Montgomery County, A. M. 

nn. §t^xm (i!>muxxtti. 

JOHN B. GRAY, of Calvert County, A. M. 
W. J. BLAIR, Baltimore County, M. S. 



10 



THE 

Maryland Agricultural College. 



» ♦ » 



The College is situated in Prince George County, in full view 
of College Station, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, nine miles north 
of Washington and twenty-eight south of Baltimore. Seventeen 
trains, seven from Washington and ten from Baltimore, stop at 
College Station, daily. 

The farm contains 286 acres. 

The soil varies in quality and condition, thus affording good 
opportunity for experiments. There are meadows artificially 
drained, dry bottom-lands and rolling high-lands. Heav)'- oak 
timber is in abundance. A large running stream affords sufficient 
water-power. The farm is traversed by the old road between 
Washington and Baltimore. Its proximity to Washington secures 
for it many advantages in the Agricultural Department and 
scientific institutions and libraries connected with the General 
Government. 

The building is an imposing structure of brick, of Gothic 
architecture, 120 feet long, 54 feet wide, 6 stories high, relieved 
by an east and south portico. The basement contains the Dining 
Room, Kitchen, Pantry, Wash Room and Bakery, On the first 
floor are the Laboratory, Museum, Chapel, Bath Room, Depart- 
ment of Languages and Preparatory Department. On the second 
floor, the Parlor, Visitors' Room, President's Room, Register's 
Office, Commandant's Office, Officer of the Day's Rooms, English, 
Agricultural and Mathematical Lecture Rooms, Society Hall, and 
Library. The chambers are large, well ventilated, well heated and 
lighted throughout with gas. 

The fruit and flower gardens are varied, attractive and beautiful. 
A natural forest of oaks gives abundant shade. Mounds, terraces, 
gravel-walks, evergreens, flowering bushes, shrubs, &c., adorn the 
grounds. 



11 



Course of Instruction. 



The branches of study are grouped under the following 
departments : 

1. Civil Engineering and Astronomy. 

2. English Literature, Mental Science, and History. 

3. Pure Mathematics. 

4. Piiysics and Applied Mathematics. 

5. Agriculture, Architecture, and Drawing. 

6. Chemistry and Natural History. 

7. Ancient and Modern I^angiiages. 

The Course of Study embraces the following subjects : 

ffe^itrtment of ^ivil ^ngmeet[mg mtd ^stiianamff. 

Astronomy. — Descriptive and Practical. / 

Physical Geography. — Maury and Guizot, with Maps, 

Civil Engineering. — Drawing, Materials, Bridges, Railroads, 
Tunnels, Canals, &c., &c.. Running Lines and Curves 
for Common Roads and Railroads, Levelling, &c., &c. 
Explanation of Geodetical Surveys ; practical work in 
Surveying and Plotting, &c., &c. 

Lectures. ■ • 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Lockyer's Astronomy; Herschel's Outlines; Chauvenet's Practical As- 
tronomy ; Loomis' Smveying ; Gillespie's Surveying ; Mahan's Civil En- 
gineering; Rankine's Civil Engineering. 



12 



English. — The History, Usage, and Grammatical Structure of 
the Enghsh Language ; History of EngHsh Literature ; 
Rhetoric ; Composition ; Elocution. 

Mental Science. — Mental and Moral Science ; Logic ; History 
of Philosophy. 

History. — History of Greece, Rome, England, United States ; 
Outlines of History ; History of European Civilization. 

Law. — Commentaries on Constitution of United States ; Consti- 
tution of Maryland. 

Lectures. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

English. — Abbott & Seeley's English Lessons; Shaw's History of the 
English Language ; Taine's English Literature ; Hart's Composition and 
Rhetoric; Marsh's Lectures upon the English Language. 

Mental Science. — Upham's Mental Philosophy; Seeley's Schwegler'*; 
History of Philosophy/ Schuyler's Logic; Hamilton's Lectures; Haven's 
Moral Philosophy ; Butler's Analogy. 

History. — Freeman's General Sketch ; Hume's England ; Smith's Greece ; 
Liddell's Rome ; Guizot's European Civilization. 

Law. — Story on the Constitution ; Constitution of Maryland ; Political 
Economy. 



gepaiiitrieni of ^Htfieni^iiiiH, 

Algebra. — Reduction and Solution of Equations of the first 
and second degrees ; Proportions and Progressions ; nature 
and construction of Logarithms ; and the theory of Equations. 

Geometry. — Plane and Solid. 



13 

Trigonometry. — Analytical investigation of Trigonometrical 
Formulas, and their application to the solution of all the cases 
of Plane and Spherical Trigonometry ; the Construction and 
Use of Trigonometrical Tables. 

Application of Algebra and Trigonometry. — Mensuration of 
Planes and Solids, ' 

Descriptive Geometry. —The graphic illustration and solution 
of problems in Solid Geometry ; Projections of the Sphere. 

Analytical Geomi try. — Equations of the Right Line. Plane, 
and Conic Sections ; principal problems relating to the 
Cylinder, Cone, Sphere and Spheroids. 

Lectures on Shades, Shadows, and Perspective. 

Book-Keeping. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Loomis' Algebra; Ray's Higher Algebra; Todhun ter's Algebra; 
Schuyler's Geometry; Loomis' Geometry; Chauvenet's Geometry; Loomis' 
Trigonometry and Mensuration; Chauvenet's Trigonometry; Church's 
Descriptive Geometry ; Loomis' Analytical Geometry ; Todhunter's Conic 
Sections. 

Q Book-Keeping. — Hanaford and Payson. 



^e^nrtment of ^1{U^ic§ mtd ^:^^Ued ^ni}{enmtk§. 

The Differntial and Integral Calculus. — The principles 
of the Differential Calculus, including Taylor's Theorem, 
application to problems of Maxima and Minima, and 
the tracing of Curves : the methods of Integration, and 
the application of the Integral Calculus to Areas, Surfaces, 
and Volumes, and to the finding of Centres of Gravity and 
Moments of Inertia, and to the simpler Cases of Differential 
Equations. 



14 

Mechanics. — Statics ; Dynamics. 

Hydrostatics. — Mechanical Properties of Fluids ; Specific 
Gravity, &c., &c. 

Acoustics. — The production and propagation of Sound; Modes 
of Vibration, &c., &c. 

Optics. — Lenses, Vision and Optical Instruments; Spectrum 
Analysis ; Color, &c., &c. 

Electricity and Magnetism. — Magnetism ; Voltaic Electri- 
city, &c., &c. 

Heat. — Theories of Heat ; Sources of Heat ; Instruments used 
for the Measurement of Heat ; Thermo-dynamics. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Loomis' Differential and Integral Calculus ; Courteny's Calculus ; Buck- 
ingham's Calculus; Wells' Natural Philosophy; Ganot's Natural Philosophy; 
Cambridge (England) Course of Elementary Natural Philosophy; Todhunter's 
Mechanics for Beginners; Rankine's Applied Mathematics; Smith's Hydro- 
statics; Bartlett's Acoustics and Optics; Jenkins' Electricity and Magnetism; 
Maxwell's Theory of Heat ; Peck's Mechanics. 



Agriculture. — General Agriculture ; Civil Engineering, applied 
to Farm Roads, Bridges, Embankments, Drainage, etc.; 
application of Chemistry to Agriculture ; use of Implements ; 
Breeding and Care of Stock ; Dairy ; Gardening ; Fertilizers : 
Botany ; Horticulture ; Geology ; Arboriculture ; Exercises 
on the Farm, &c., &c. 

Lectures on Veterinary Medicine and Surgery, and on the 
relations of Agriculture to Commerce, Manufactures, Labor, 
&c., &c. 



15 

Architecture. — Drawing; Materials, Masonry, Carpentry, 
Foundations, Orders, etc. 

Lectures. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

The Progressive Farmer, by J. A. Nash ; Connection between Science and 
the Art of Practical Farming, by J. P. Norton ; Chemical and Field Lectures, 
by James E. Leschmaker; Farmers' Guide, by H. Stephens and Prof. Norton ; 
Farm and Fireside, by John L, Blake; Allen's American Farm Book; How 
Crops Grow ; The Plough, the Loom and the Anvil, by J. S. Skinner & Sons ; 
Youatt and Martin on the Horse, Cattle, &c. ; Peter Henderson on Gardening 
for Profit ; Architecture and Right Line Drawing, by Walter Smith. 



^Bpnrimmi of ^fiBtni^k^ mtd ,ffdh^^t ^isiarg. 

Chemistry. — Organic and Inorganic Chemistry ; Qualitative and 
Quantitative Analysis ; Detection and Separation of the 
Elements ; Manufacture and Application of Manures ; Manu- 
facture and Application of Chemicals ; Blow Pipe ; Organic, 
Volumetric, Microscopic and Spectroscopic Analysis ; Chem- 
istry Applied to the Arts and Manufactures ; Agricultural 
Chemistry ; Toxicology. 

Natural History and Science. — Zoology ; Mineralogy ; 
Physiology; Metallurgy; Photography; Telegraphy and 
Printing. * - 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Chemistry.— Fownes', Fresnius', Steele's. 
Agricultural Chemistry, — Johnson's. 
Zoology. — Nicholson's Text Book. 
Mineralogy. — Danna's. 
Physiology. — Flint's. 
Metallurgy.— Percy's. 
Telegraphy. — CuUey's. 
Spectrum Analysis. — Roscoe's. 
Microscopic Analysis. — Carpenter's. 
Volumetric Analysis. — Sutton's. 
Blow Pipe Analysis— Elderhorst's. 
Toxicology. — Taylor's. 



16 



Latin. — Grammar, Reader, Csesar, Ovid, Virgil, Cicero, Horace, 
Sallust, Livy, Tacitus. 

French, — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 
German. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Fasquelle's Grammar ; De Fivas' Grammar ; CoUott's Dramatic French 
Reader ; Erkmami-Chatrain's Le Conscrit ; OUendorrs German Course ; Caesar ; 
Ovid; Cicero, &c., &c. 



The Course of Instruction extends over four years, and the 
course for each year is as follows : 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Physical Geography. 

School of English Literature, &c. — English Lessons; Composition; 

Rhetoric; Outlines of History ; Elocution; History of England. 
School of Mathematics. — Algebra ; Geometry ; Plane Trigonometry ; 

Mensm-ation ; Book-Keeping. 
School of Physics, &c. — Elementary Natural Pliilosophy. 
School of Agriculture. — Botany ; How Crops Feed and How Crops 

Grow, and Gardening for Profit ; Exercises on the Farm. 
School of Chemistry. — Organic and Inorganic Chemistry ; Zoology. 
School of Languages. — Latin (optional), French or German. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Field Surveying. 

School of English, &c. — Rhetoric; Composition: Elocution; History of 

Greece ; History of Rome. 
School of Mathematics, — Spherical Trigonometry ; Descriptive Geometry ; 

Analytical Geometry. 



17 

School of Physics. — Todhunter's Mechanics for Beginners ; Optics ; Acous- 
tics ; Hydrostatics; Electricity and Magnetism. 

School of Agriculture, &c. — Geology ; Exercises on the Farm ; Allen's 
Farm Book ; Stephen's Farmers' Guide. 

School of Chemistry, &c. — Qualitative Analysis ; Detection and Separation 
of the Elements ; Agricultural Chemistry ; Manufacture and Application 
of Manures ; Mineralogy. 

School of Languages. — Latin (optional), French or German. _ 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Practical Astronomy. 

School of English Literature, &c. — Mental Philosophy ; History of 
the English Language ; History of English Literature ; History of Civiliza- 
tion in Europe ; Essays and Declamation. 

School of Mathematics. — Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 

School of Physics, &c. — Differential and Integral Calculus. 

School of Agriculture, &c. — General Agiiculture ; Horticulture; Arbori- 
culture ; Landscape Gardening ; Lectures on Veterinary Anatomy ; 
Physiology and Surgery ; Exercises on the Farm. 

School of Chemistry, &c. — Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis ; Organic 
Analysis ; Blow Pipe Analysis ; Manufacture and Application of Chemicals ; 
Physiology ; Metallurgy ; Toxicology. 

School of Languages. — Latin (optional), French or German. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Civil Engineering. 

School of English Literature, &c. — History of Philosophy; Moral Phil- 
osophy ; Logic, Essays ; Original Declamation. 

School of Physics, &c. — Rankine's Applied Mathematics, 

School of Agriculture, &c. — General Agriculture ; Civil Engineering 
applied to Farm Roads, Bridges, &c., &c.; Architecture ; Lectures on the 
relation of Agriculture to Commerce, Manufactures, &c.; Exercises on 
the Farm. 

School of Chemistry, &c. — Chemistry applied to the Arts and Manufac- 
tures ; Quantitative Analysis ; Volumetric, Microscopic and Spectroscopic 
Analysis ; Assays — Telegraphy ; Photography. 

School of Languages. — Latin (optional), French or German. 



18 



§e^arittieni of JtgriiittUtt^e, 

This department is in charge of Prof. A. Grabowskii, Ph.D., 
of the Wiesbaden Academy of Agriculture. 

Special students is received for instruction in practical and 
theoretical Agriculture. 

Class lectures and recitations embrace a regular course in 
Agricultural Chemistry. 

Eminent practical farmers are invited to deliver lectures in the 
several departments. 

Opportunities for visiting the Agricultural Department of 
Washington are offered. The growing demand for Veterinary 
Science is met by special lectures in that department. 

Some valuable additions of Agricultural and Mineral produc- 
tions have been made to the Museum. Recent improvements 
have also enlarged the hot-house productions. 

Laboratory and field experiments, looking to the most econom- 
ical fertilizers and crops, are made. 



DEGREES. 



I. The Degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon 
those who graduate in all the Schools. 

II. The Degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon 
those who graduate in the Schools of Astronomy and Civil 
Engineering, English Literature, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, 
and Languages. 

III. Students who pass satisfactory examinations in the Schools 
of English, Mathematics, Agriculture, and Chemistry, will be 
declared graduates in Agriculture. 

IV. Those who take the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science, and devote themselves to study for three 
years thereafter, will be entitled to the Degree of Master of Arts 
or Master of Science. 



19 

EXAMINATIONS. 

A semi-annual examination, in the presence of the Faculty, is 
held the last week of the first term. 

Monthly examinations at the blackboards are required in all 
the departments. 

The Annual Examination begins about June 15th, and ends 
June 25th, and is both written and oral. 

Students who fail to pass satisfactory examinations at the end 
of each term, are not allowed to continue with their classes. 



MARKS. 



The scale of marks for recitation and exercises ranges from 
4 to o. A mark of 4 indicates thoroughness ; o, a total failure ; 
the intermediate numbers indicate absolute values. 

A mark of 2.5 represents the minimum of proficiency. 
Students whose final average for the term or year in any branch 
falls below that number, are liable to be turned back to the next 
class. 



GOLD MEDAL. 



The highest scholarship will next year be rewarded by a gold 
medal. 

A gold medal will also be presented by the President for the 
best essay on Agriculture. 



MERIT -ROLLS. 

At every annual examination, the Faculty forms a merit-roll of 
each class in the following manner : 

The final average of each student in each branch for which a 
coefficient is assigned in the table of coefficients, is multiplied by 
such coefficient, and the sum of the products, after making the 
deduction for conduct, is the final multiple for the year. 



20 

The names of the students are arranged according to the final 
multiple, the highest multiple being placed first on the list, and the 
others in their order ; but no class number is assigned to any 
found deficient. 

Monthly Reports, showing the progress and standing of students, 
are sent to parents. 

Attention is respectfully called to these Reports. 



VACATION AND TERMS. 

The scholastic year is divided into two terms, with but one 
regular vacation, beginning the last week of June, and closing 
about the middle of September ; and a short intermission at 
Christmas and Easter. 

No other furloughs will be granted, except in urgent cases. 

The first term opens on the 20th of September, and closes 
with the month of January. The second term begins ist of 
February, and ends with the college year, the last of June. 



EXPENSES. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

For Students from the State of Maryland and District of Columbia : 

First Session. — Board, Lights, Washing, and Room Rent $10000 

Matriculation Fee 5 00 

Total $105 00 

Second Session. — Same as the first, less the Matriculation Fee. 

For Non-Residents of the State of Maryland and District of Columbia : 

First Session. — Board, Tuition, &c $137 50 

Matriculation Fee 5 00 

Total $142 50 

Second Session. — Same as the first, less the Matriculation Fee. 



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Students from the State of Maryland and District of Columbia 
are received free of charge for tuition. They will be charged two 
dollars per year for use of books, and two dollars for use of 
furniture, payable in advance. 

Day scholars are charged two dollars a month for use of rooms, 
fuel, &c. 

Students having a constant fire in their rooms are charged 
two dollars a month extra. 

Prepayment in every case is required, unless satisfactory 
arrangement be made with the President of the Faculty for settle- 
ment by note at short date. 

No deduction will be made for absence, except in case of 
protracted illness ; nor will money be refunded in case a student 
be withdrawn or dismissed during the term, unless at the discretion 
of the President. 

Special damages are assessed on those who unnecessarily injure 
or destroy College property. 



UNIFORM AND OTHER CLOTHING. 

. As the students are required to wear a prescribed uniform, it 
is only necessary to bring a suit for farm work. Arrangements are 
made with a competent tailor who supplies the uniforms. The 
cost, with cap, is from $21 to $24.50. 

Students must bring a supply of toivels, 7iapki?is, bed-lineji 
and ivhite Berlin gloves • all articles of clothing must be marked. 



REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION, &c. 

Students will be received, examined, and assigned to their 
proper classes at any point in the College course ; those who 
cannot pass good examinations in Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, 
Grammar, Geography, and History of the United States, will not 
be allowed to begin the course. All not so qualified will be 



22 

entered in the Preparatory Department. A room having been 
fitted up for this purpose, special instruction will be given all those 
who wish to prepare for the Freshman Class. 

Applications for admission, or for further information, should 
be addressed to the President of the Maryland Agricultural 
College, College Station, Prince George County, Maryland. 



FIRE BRIGADE. 

The Fire Brigade includes in its organization every person 
connected with the College and Farm. Students, at the fire- 
alarm, proceed to such stations as are designated in the fire-bill. 
Exercises in fire-drill will take place at such time as the President 
may direct. 



DISPENSARY. 

The Professor in charge of the Dispensary will visit, report, 
and attend all cadets unfit for duty by sickness. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Daily Morning Praj'er and Divine Service, on Sunday, 'are 
regularly held in the Chapel. Students are required to attend, 
imless a written request to the contrary be made. Students 
shall observe the I^ord's day with decorum. 



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DISCIPLINE. 

The following laws will be strictly enforced by the officer- 
in-charge : 

1. Students shall not go beyond the limits of the farm ; use 
fire-arms ; sit up after taps ; use the south portico ; hold any 
general meeting ; visit the dining-room or kitchen, without per- 
mission from the President. 

2. Profane language, card playing, gambling, intoxication, or 
any of their attendant vices, will not be tolerated by the Faculty. 
Any student known to indulge in habits injurious to the morals of 
the College, or calculated to destroy its established order, shall be 
immediately dismissed. 

3. Destruction of property, disorderly conduct, in the halls, on 
the grounds, on furlough, or any other violation of the published 
orders of the President, or officer-in-charge, will be punished by 
tasks, demerits, guard duties, and such other punishments as the 
Faculty may decide. 

4. Members of the Faculty and all officers-in-charge are 
required to report any violation of these regulations. 

5. Upon matriculation, each student will be furnished with 
a copy of these and other regulations, and will be required to 
obey them. 



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