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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

COLLEGE LIBRARY, 




REGISTER 



OF THE 



MARYLAND 



Agricultural College, 



FOR 



SESSIOA^ EJVBIMG JUJYE 28, 



1881. 



BALTIMORE: 

Printe!) at the Office of the "Makyland Fakmer.'" 

141 West P]-att Street. 

1881. 



■'■^ 



T :- .. \-y. 









REGISTER 



OF thp: 



MARYLAND 



Agricultural College, 



FOR 



SESSIOJV EJYDIJVG JUJYE 28, 



1881. 



BALTIMORE: 

Printed at the Office of the "Maryland Farmer," 

141 West Pratt Street. 

1881. 



REGISTER 



OF THI-: 



MARYLAND 



Agricultural College, 



FOK 



SESSWA' KA'DLm! ^UKM'E 2S, 



1881. 



HAi;riM<)i{K; 

PRTNTEO AT TIIK OKFK i: OK TIIK " .M.\ UYr.AXD FARMr<:R," 

141 Wcsl I'rati Slivcl. 

issi, 



TRUSTEES. 

Representing the State Ex -Officio. 

HON. WM. T. HAMILTON, 

Oocernm- af Maryland. 

PRESTDEXT. 

HON. HERMAN STUMP, 

President of the Senate. 

HON. HIRAM McCULLOUGH, 

Speaker of the Houxe of Delegates. 

HON. CHAS. J. M. GWINN, 

Attorney General. 

HON. BARNES COMPTON, 

2'r€a:^iirer. 

HON. THOS. J. KEATING, 

Comptroller. 

HON. GEO. B. LORING, 

U. S. Comrniss'ioner of Agricultiire. 

Representing the Stockholders. 

ALLEN DODGE, Esq., HON. J. CARROLL WALSH, 

E. WHITMAN, Esq., HON. JOHN MERRYMAN, 

F. CARROLL GOLDSDOROUGH. 



FACULTY. 



WILLIAM H. PARKER, Pbesident, 

PTofe»»m' of Engineering and Astronomy. 

R. E. NELSON, 

ProfeHSor of Phyi4cs and Applied MatJiematics. 

.]. D. WARFIELD, A. M., 

Professor of Englinh Literature, MenPd Science and History. 

F. VON BROCKDORFF, LL. D. 

Professor of Ancient and Modern Jjiuguages. 

Prof. A. GRABOWSKII, M. A. S., Ph. D. 

(OF WIESBADEN ACAj)EMY OF AGRICULTURE) 

Profesmr of Agricnltare and Natand History. 

WM. P. HEADDEN, Ph. D. 

ProfesKor of Chennstry. 

Lieut. C. DEEMS, U. S. A. 

Instructor in Military Science, and Comnuindant of Cadets. 



Military Organization 



Lieut. CLARENCE DEEMS, 4th ArtUlery., U. S. A., Commanding. 



The terms of the United States appropriation require military instruction. 

For the better instruction in Infantry Tactics and military practice and dis- 
cipline, the cadets have been consolidated into one company, under the com- 
mand of the Commandant of Cadets. The officers and non-commissioned 
officers are selected from those cadets who have been most active and soldier- 
like in the performance of their duties, and most exemplary in their general 
deportment. This department is in charge of an U. S. army officer. 

CAPTAIN, 

W. H. THOMAS, 



WM. R, PORTER, 



LIEUTENANTS, 

C. W. WOOD, 



R. S. MERCER. 



1st SERGEANT, 

J. J. KADY. 



R. L. PORTER, 



SERGEANTS, 

H. FREELAND, 



J. H. STONESTREET. 



CORPORALS, 

M. D. SANDERSON, . C. A. SAUNDERS, 

N. A. ACKER, C. K. LUZENBERG, 

P. A. BOWEN. 



6 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

-^Gale, H. E Baltimore, Md. 

/Mercek, R. S Anne Arundel Co,. Md. 

/ Porter, W. R Baltimore, Md. 

/Thomas, Wm. H St. Mary's County, Md. 

y Wood, C. W Washington, D. C. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

^ BowEN, P. A., Jr Prince George Co., Md. 

V Pascault, a. G Talbot Co., Md. 

^ Porter, R. L Baltimore, Md. 

'-'Saunders, C. A Montgomery Co., Md. 

^ Stonestreet, J. H Charles Co., Md. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

>« Acker, N. A Washington, D. C. 

/ B0WMA.N, H. S Washington D. C. 

Chew, R. B. B., Jr Prince George Co., Md. 

/Preeland, H Calvert Co., Md. 

V Kady, J.J Baltimore, Md. 

/ Kady, M Baltimore, Md. 

KiRBY, Wm. a Talbot Co., Md. 

•^ Moss, R. M Anne Anindel Co., Md. 

> Rapi.ey, E. E Montgomery Co., Md. 

/UiiMAN, J A Baltimore, Md. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

Bailey, H. O Washington, D. C 

Beirxe, G. O Greenbrier Co., W. Va. 

Benson, J. J Anne Arundel Co., Md 

Benson, S. P. H Anne Arundel Co., Md. 

^ Butler, W. W Prince George Co., Md. 

Camp, L. C .Washington, D. C. 

Cross, T. A Prince George Co. Md. 

'' Graboavskti, C. E Prince George Co., Md. 

Hammond, R. H Anne Arundel Co., Md. 

Hetberger, a. E AVashington, D. C. 



HoBLiTZEiiT., W. W Baltimore, Md. 

Holt, G. B Chittendon Co., Vermont. 

Ingate, C. L. a Mobile, Ala. 

i/Ingate, C. Y Mobile, Ala. 

Keyworth, W. R '. Washington, D. C. 

Lakin, W. T Washington Co., Md. 

LiNTHiCUM, S. Jr Anne Arundel Co., Md. 

LuzENBERG, C. R New Orleans, La. 

Martin, J. V San Francisco, Cal. 

Mills, S. D., Jr Baltimore, Md. 

Redmond, H. S New York, N. Y. 

Richardson, J. W Washington, D C. 

Robinson, CM BaMmore, Md. 

Sanderson, M. D Washington, D. C. 

Scott, N. B .Prince George Co., Md. 

Smith, AVm Calvert Co., Md. 

TiiORN, J Washington, D. C. 

•Clman, J. J Baltimore, Md. 

Washington, W. d' II Hanover Co., Va. 

Wyeth, W. N. Jr Baltimore, Md. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

CarrTngton, W Baltimore, Md. 

Crichton, W Baltimore, Md. 

Greene, C. A New York, N. Y. 

Magruder, F. M Prince George Co., Md. 

Parks, V Norfolk, Va. 



RECAPITULATION. 



35 



Maryland 

District of Cohimbia 10 

Virginia 3 

Alabama 3 

New York 2 

West Virginia 1 



Vermont. . 
Louisiana. 
California. 



Total o5 



8 

BOARD OF VISITORS. 



Anne Arundel E. J. Henkle. 

Garrett John Daily. 

Alleghany Lloyd Lowndes. 

Washington G. W. Hanis. 

Frederick .E. H. Steiner. 

Carroll G. S. Haines. 

Howard H. O. Devries. 

Baltimore Edwin Scott. 

Harford 

Montgomery Arthur Stabler. 

Prince George D. G. Campbell. 

St. Mary's J. F. Dent. 

Cecil G. McGraw. 

Kent George Spencer. 

Queen Anne J. T. Earle. 

Talbot Edw^ard Lloyd. 

Dorchester Dr. Phelps. 

Somerset George R. Dennis. 

Wicomico Lemuel Malone. 

Charles J. Matthews. 

Caroline. Daniel .Field. 

Calvert James A Bond. 

Worcester G. W. Covington. 

Baltimore City C. Morton Stewart. 

Baltimore City W. H. Welch. 



Graduates of 1875. 

JOHN B. GRAY, B. A. . F. B. HYDE, B. A. 

CHARLES E. LERCH, B. S. LORION MILLER, B. S. 

Oraduates of 1876. 

W. J. BLAIR, B. S. JNO. L. WORTHINGTON, B. S. 

T. H. THOMAS, B. S. 

Desfrees Conferred in Course, 

Mr R. SAUNDERS HENRY, A. M. 
Rev. OLIVER C. MILLER, A. M.* 

Oraduates of 1877. 

GEORGE THOMAS, B. S. E. G. EMACK, B. S. 

SCOTT TRUXTUN, B. S. R. R. BEALL. 

Degrees Conferred, 

F. C. NORWOOD, Frederick County, A, M. 
L. A. GRIFFITH, Anne Arundel County, A M. 
HORACE M. DAVIS, Montgomery County, A. M. 
JNO. W. COFFREN, Prince George County, A. M. 

1879. Degfrees Conferred, 

JOHN B. GRAY, of Calvert County, A. M. • 
W. J. BLAIR, Baltimore County, M. S. 

(Graduates of 1880, 

THOS. T. HOUSTON, B. A. 
R. R. RAPLEV. 

1880 Deg^ree Conferred. 

GEORGE THOMAS, St. Mary's County, M. S. 

Graduates of 1881, 

WM. H. THOMAS, A. B., H. E. GALE, A. B., 

WM. R. PORTER, A. B., R. S. MERCER, A. B., 

C. W. WOOD. 



10 



THE 



Maryland Agricultural College. 



« 

The College is situated in Prince George County, in full view of 

College Station, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, nine miles north of 

Washington and twenty-eight south of Baltimore. Fourteen trains^ 

seven from Washington and seven from Baltimore, stop at College 

Station, daily. 

The farm contains 286 acres. 

The soil varies in quality and condition, thus affording good oppor- 
tunity for experiments. There are meadows artificially drained, dry 
bottom-lands and rolling high-lands. The farm is traversed by the 
old road between Washington and Baltimore. Its proximity to 
Washington secures for it many advantages in the Agricultural De- 
partment and scientific institutions and libraries connected with the 
General Government. * 

The building is an imposing structure of brick, 1 20 feet long, 54 
feet wide, 6 stories high, relieved by an east and south portico. The 
basement contains the Dining Room, Kitchen, Pantry, Wash Room 
and Bakery. On the first floor are the Laboratory, Museum, Chapel, 
Bath Room, Department of Languages and Preparatory Department. 
On the second floor, the Parlor, Visitors' Room, President's Room, 
Register's Office, Commandant's Office, Officer of the D?y's Rooms, 
English, Agricultural and Mathematical Lecture Rooms, Society Hall 
and Library. The chambers are large, well ventilated, well heated 
and lighted throughout with gas. 



11 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 



The branches of study are grouped under the following de- 
partments : 

1. Civil Engineering and Astronomy. 

2. English Literature, Mental Science and History. 

3. Pure Mathematics. 

4. Physics and Applied Mathematics. 

5. Agriculture, Architecture and Natural History. 

6. Chemistry. 

7. Ancient and Modern Languages. 

The Course of Study embraces the following subjects : 

Department of Civil HnsfineerinsT and Astronomy. 

Astronomy. — Descriptive and Practical. 

Physical Geography. — Maury and Guizot, with Maps. 

Civil Engineering. — Drawing, Materials, Bridges, Railroads, Tun- 
nels, Canals, &c., &c.. Running Lines and Curves for Common 
Roads and Railroads, Levelling, &c., &c. Explanation of Geo- 
detical Surveys ; Practical Work ii i Surveying and Plotting, &c. 

Lectures. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Lockyei's Astronomy; Herschel's Outlines; Chauvenet's Practical As- 
tronomy ; Loomis' Surveying ; Gillespie's Surveying ; Mahan's Civil Engineer- 
ing ; Rankine's Civil Engineering. 



13 



Department of Ens^lisli r,iterature, 9Iental Science 

and History. 

English. — The History, Usaj^e, and Grammatical Structure of the 
Enghsh Language ; History of English Literature ; Rhetoric ; 
Composition; Elocution. 

Mental Science. — Mental and Moral Science ; Logic ; History of 
Philosophy. 

History. — History of Greece, Rome, England, United States ; Out- 
lines of History ; History of European Civilization. 

Law. — Commentaries on Constitution of United States ; Constitution 
of Maryland. 

Lectures. — 

TEXT BOOKS. 

English. — English Lessons; Shaw's History of the English Language; 
Hart's Composition and Rhetoric; Marsh's Lectures upon the English Language. 

Mental Science. — Upham's Mental Philosophy; Seeley's Schwegler's 
History of Philosophy; Schuyler's Logic; Hamilton's Lectures; Haven's 
Moral Philosophy ; Butler's Analogy. 

Htstoby. — Freeman's General Sketch ; Hume's England ; Smith's Greece ; 
Liddell's Rome ; Guizot's European Civilization ; Quackenhos' History of the 
United States. 

Law. — Story on the Constitution; Constitution of Maryland; Political 
Economv- 



Department of Mattiematics. 

Algebra. — Reduction and Solution of Equations of the first and 
second degrees ; Proportions and Progressions ; nature and con- 
struction of Logarithms, and the theory of Equations. 

Geometry. — Plane and Solid. 



13 

Trigonometry. — Analytical investigation of Trigonometrical Form- 
ulas, and their application to the solution of all the cases of Plane 
and Spherical Trigonometry ; the construction and use of Trigo- 
nometrical Tables. 

Application of Algebra and Trigonometry. — Mensuration of 
Planes and Solids. 

Descriptive Geometry. — The graphic illustration and solution of 
problems in Solid Geometry ; Projections of the Sphere. 

Analytical Geometry. — Equations of the Right Line, Plane and 
Conic Sections ; Principal problems relating to the Cylinder, Cone, 
Sphere and Spheroids. 

Lectures on Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 

Book-Keeping. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Loomis' Algebra; Ray's Higher Algebra; Todhunter's Algebra; Loomis' 
Geometry ; Cliauvenet's Geometry ; Loomis' Trigonometry and Mensuration ; 
Church's Descriptive Geometry ; Howison's Analytical Geometry ; Todhunter's 
Conic Sections. 

Book-Keeping. — Hanaford and Payson. 



Department of Pliysics and Applied Mathematics. 

The Differential and Integral Calculus. — The principles of 
the Differential Calculus, including Taylor's Theorem, application 
to problems of Maxima and Minima, and the tracing of Curves ; 
the methods of integration, and the application of the Integral 
Calculus to Areas, Surfaces and Volumes, and to the finding of 
Centres of Gravity and moments of Inertia, and to the simpler 
cases of Differential Equations. 

Mechanics. — Statics ; Dynamics. 

Hydrostatics. — Mechanical Properties of Fluids ; Specific Gravity, 
&c., &c. 

Acoustics. — The production and propagation of Sound ; Modes of 
Vibration, &c,, &c. 

Optics. — Lenses, Vision and Optical Instruments ; Spectrum Analy- 
sis; Color, &c., &c. 



14 

t 

Electricity and Magnetism. — Magnetism ; Voltaic Electricity, 
&c., &c. 

Heat. — Theories of Heat ; Sources of Heat ; Instruments used for 
the Measurement of Heat ; Thermo-dynamics. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Loomis' Differential and Integral Calculus; Courtenay's Calculus; Buck- 
ingham's Calculus ; Wells' Natural Philosophy ; Ganot's Natural Philosophy 5 
Cambridge (England) Course of Elementary Natural Philosophy ; Todhunter's 
Mechanics for Beginners ; Rankine's Applied Mathematics ; Bartlett's Acoustics 
and Optics ; Peck's Mechanics ; Tyndall's Lessons in Electricity ; Deschanel's 
Natural Philosophy. 



Department of Ag-rieulture and Natural History. 

The instruction in this Department embraces both theory and 
practice. 

THE THEORY COMPRISES : 

General Agriculture. 

General and Agricultural Botany. 

" " " Zoology. 

'* " " Geology and Mineralogy. 

Animal Anatomy and Physiology. 
Horse Raising. — Shoeing of Horses ; Science of Teeth. 
Cattle Raising. — Guenon's System. 
Animal Therapeutics. 
Diseases of Animals. 
Animal Obstetrics. 
General and Special Plant Culture. 
Climatology, Agronomy, Manuring. 
Raising of Swine. 

" Sheep. 

Poultry. 
Bees. 
Horticulture. 
Vegetable Gardening. 
Meadow Culture and Drainage. 
Agricultural Implements. 
'*" Technology. 

" Architecture. 

Arboriculture and Landscape Gardening. 



TEXT BOOKS. 

"Allen's American Farm Book." 

" Youatt on the Horse." 

" Russell on Scientific Horseshoeing." 

"Allen's American Cattle." 

" Guenon on Milch Cows." 

" Gangee's Vade Mecuni." 

"Laws' on Practice." 

"Fleming on Obstetrics." 

" Grasses and Forage Plants," E. L. Flint. 

" Pendleton's Scientific Agriculture." 

" Steele's Fourteen Weeks in Botany." 

" Elements of Zoology," Wilson, Edinburgh. 

" Elements of Geology," Dana. 

" Comparative Anatomy of Domestic Animals," Chcvaux. 

•' Jennings on Sheep, Swine and Poultry." 

" Quimby's Bee-keeping." 

" Bary's Fruit Garden." 

" Gardening for Profit," P. Henderson. 

" The principles and practice of Land Drainage," John H. Klippart. 

"Allen's Rural Architecture. 

" Smith's Landscape Gardening." 

The Text-Book work is supplemented by lectures and the illustrations 
afforded by cabinets, skeletons, charts, &c. 

THE PRACTICE COMPRISES. 

Work on the farm and in the laboratories. 

For the first, students are divided into a garden, field, yard and 
grounds detail, and, under competent supervision, are instructed in 
whatever work the season may offer in these divisions of a farm. At 
the commencement of each week the respective details rotate, thus 
changing the work to each class. 

The special Agricultural Class is on practice detail daily, from 2 
to 4 P. M. All Freshmen on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2 to 4 
P.M. 

A suitable compensation is paid to students on Special Volunteer 
detail on Saturdays, during vacations and during the hours of 4 to 6 
P. M. 

THE LABORATORY work comprises work in the Chemical 
Laboratory (Agricultural Chemistry) ; work in the Microscopic De- 
partment of Botany and Zoology ; work in the Geological, Mineral- 
ogical and Osteological Cabinets ; work in the Veterinary Dissecting 
Rooms, &c. &c. 



m 

Department of Clieiiiistry. 

Chemistry. — Organic and Inorganic Chemistry; Qualitative and 
Quantitative Analysis ; Detection and separation of the Elements ; 
Manufacture and Application of Chemicals ; Organic, Volumetric 
and Spectoscopic Analysis ; Agricultural Chemistry. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Chemistry. — Fowne's, Fresniiis', Steele's. 
Agkicultural Chemistry. — Johnson's. 
Mineralogy, — ^Dana's. 
Spectrum Analysis, — Roscoe's. 
Volumetric Analysis. — Sutton's. 
Blow Pipe Analysis. — ^Elderhoi'st's. 
Toxicology. — Taylor's. 



Department of Ancient and Modern l^angnages* 

Latin. — Grammar, Reader, Caesar, Ovid» Virgil, Cicero, Horace, 

Sallust. 
French. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 
German. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 

TEXT BOOKS. 

Fasquelle's Grammar — Sauveur Entretiens sur la Grammaire ; Voltaire His- 
toire de Charles XII ; Toepfer Nouvelles' Grenevoises ; Pleissner German Gram- 
mar ; Sheldon German Grammar ; Dr. Smith's Principia Latina ; Arnold's Latin 
Prose Composition, 

The Course of Instruction extends over four years, and the course 
for each year is as follows : 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

ScJwol of English Literature, d'c. — English Lessons ; Composition ; Rhcthric ; 
Outlines of History ; Elocution ; History of England. 

School of MathematicH\ — Algebra ; Geometry; Plane Trigonometry; Mensuration ; 
Book-Keeping. 

ScJwol of Agricidtnre. — General Agriculture. 

School of Lcirignageit. — Latin, (optional) French or German. 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

School of Atftroriomy, dtc. — Field Surveying. 

School of English, Sc. — Rhetoric ; Composition ; Elocution ; History of Greece i 
History of Rome. 

Sclwol of Math£nuitics. — Spherical Trigonometry ; Descriptive Geometry ; Ana- 
lytical Geometry. 



17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

School of Physicn. — Elementary Natural Philosophy ; Optics ; Acoustics ; Hy- 
drostatics ; Electricity and Magnetism. 

Scfiool of Agriculture, &c. — Geology ; Animal Anatomy and Physiology ; Bot- 
any and Zoology. 

School of CUiemistry. — Second Term : Inorganic Chemistry ; Steele's 14 Weeks- 
Scliool of Languages. — Latin, (optional) French or German. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Second Term : — Inorganic Chemistry — Thorpe — Metals, with illustrative lec- 
tures ; Laboratory Practice, two afternoons, weekly ; Qualitative Analysis, 
detection of acids, separation of Bases, examination of complex inorganic 
substances and fertilizers ; Practice with the blow-pipe. 

Sclhool of Axtromnny, &c. — Descriptive and Practical Astronomy. 

School of English Literature, &c. — Mental Philosophy ; History of the English 
Language ; History of English Literature ; History of Civilization in Eu- 
rope ; Essays and Declamation. 

ScJiool of Phyaics, &c. — DiflFerential and Integral Calculus. 

Scfiool of Agriculture, &c. — Horse and Cattle Raising, Animal Therapeutics; Cli- 
matology ; Agronomy and Manuring ; General and Special Plant Culture ; 
Diseases of Animals ; Animal Obstetrics. 

Scliool of Clienmtry. — First Term : Inorganic Chemistry — Thorpe — Non-Met- 
als, with illustrative lectures ; Laboratory practice, two afternoons, weekly ; 
Qualitative Analysis ; Examination of Solutions for one base. 

School of Languages. — Latin, (optional) French or German. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Second Term: — Agricultural Cliemistry; Laboratory Practice; Quantitative 
Analysis of Comjilex Substances ; Elementary Analysis ; Estimation of C. 
H. and N.; Analysis of Fertilizers. 

School of Astronomy, &c. — Civil Engineering. 

School of E/u/lixh Literature, dec. — History of Philosophy; Moral Philosophy; 
Mills' Political Economy ; Ccmstituiion of the United States , Logic, Essays, 
Original Declamation. 

School of Phytiics, dec. — General Physics — Theoretical and Experimental. 

Sc/iool of Agricvlttm'e, dtc. — Raising of Swine, Sheep, Poultry and Bees; Hor- 
ticulture, Vegetable Gardening; Agricultural Implements and Machines; 
Agricultural Technology and Architecture ; Arboriculture and Landscape 
Gardening. 

School of Clietnistry. — First Term ; — Organic Chemistry ; Laboratory practice, 
two days, weekly ; Manufacture of Chemicals ; Sp. gr; Determination of 
Solids and Liquids ; Quantitative Analysis ; Estimation of Fe. Cu. Al. Ca. 
Mg. Co. Sio. 

Scliool of Ijdnguagex. — Latin, (optional) French or German. 



18 



THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

This is in charge of Prof. A. Grabowskii, M. A. S., Ph. D. of 
the Royal Prussian Institute of Agriculture, at Weisbaden. 

The facilities for illustration, &c., in this department, consist of a 
Farm of 286 acres, with meadows artificially drained, dry bottom 
lands and rolling highlands. The farm is well stocked and has a 
number of herd-book animals. The vegetable garden occupies 10 
acres, and there are extensive fruit and flower gardens. Cabinets 
of mineralog^cal, geological and botanical specimens are provided ; 
skeletons, anatomical preparations and a therapeutical collection assist 
in the illustration of veterinary science. The School of Chemistry 
is provided with a well arranged Laboratory, offering ample facilities 
for chemical analysis, &c. The vicinity of Washington and Balti- 
more permits the department to avail itself of the superior advan- 
tages for investigation to be found in the Agricultural, Smithsonian 
and other Governmental departments at Washington, and in the fer- 
tilizer, machine and implement manufactories in Baltimore. 

Distinctions, &c. — The President's prize of a gold medal will 
be presented for the best essay on agriculture. The Professor of 
Agriculture's Prize of a gold badge (scroll) to the best record and 
examination on General Agriculture of a student of the Freshman 
Class. A gold badge, (agricultural implement) to the student of the 
Freshman Class having the best record and examination in Farm work. 
A case of veterinary instruments for the student of the Junior Year, 
offering the best anatomical preparation. 

The Degree of Bachelor of Agricultural Science, (B. 
A. S.) will be conferred on Students passing satisfactorily the Course 
in Agriculture. 

The Lectures, &c., of the Collegiate Course of the College are 
open to the Students of the Agricultural Course. Special Agricultu- 
ral Students are admitted at any time dut ing the session. 



DEGREES. 

I. The Degree of Bac|ielor of Arts will be conferred upon those 
who graduate in all the Schools. 

II. The Degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon those 
who graduate in the Schools of Astronomy and Civil Engineering. 
English Literature, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and Languages, 

III. Students who pass satisfactory examinations in the Schools of 
English, Mathematics, Agriculture and Chemistry will be declared 
graduates in Agriculture. 

IV. Those who take the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science, and devote themselves to study for three years thereafter, 
will be entitled to the Degree of Master of Arts or Master of Science. 



EXAMINATIONS. 

A Semi-annual examination in the presence of the Faculty is held 
the last week of the first term. 

Monthly examinations at the blackboards are required in all the 
departments. 

The Annual Examination is held during the last week in June, 
and is open to the public. 

Students who fail to pass satisfactory examinations at the end of 
each term are not allowed to continue with their classes. 



MARKS. 



The scale of marks for recitation and exercises ranges from 4 to o. 
A mark of 4 indicates thoroughness ; o, a total failure ; the intermedi- 
ate numbers indicates absolute values. 

A mark of 2.5 represents the minimum of proficiency. Students 
whose final average for the term or year, in any branch, falls below 
that number are liable to be turned back to the next class. 



2ft 
GOLD MEDAL. 

The highest scholarship will next year be awarded by a gold medaL 

A gold medal will also be presented by the President for the best 
essay on Agriculture. 



MERIT-ROLLS. 

At every annual examination, the Faculty forms a merit-roll of 
each class in the following manner. 

The final average of each student in each branch for which a co- 
efficient is assigned in the table of coefficients, is multiplied by such 
coefficient, and the sum of the products, after making the deduction 
for conduct is the final multiple for the year. 

The names of the students are arranged according to the final 
multiple, the highest multiple being placed first on the list, and the 
others in their order, but no class number is assigned to any found 
deficient. 

Monthly rejxjrts, showing the progress and standing of students, 
are sent to parents. 

Attention is respectfully called to these reports. 



VACATION AND TERMS. 

The scholastic year is divided into two terms, with but one regu- 
lar vacation, beginning the last week of June, and closing about the 
middle of September ; and a short intermission at Christmas and Easter. 

No other furloughs will be granted, except in urgent cases. 

The first term opens on the 20th of September, and closes with 
the month of January. The second term begins the istof February, 
and ends with the college year, the last of June. 



M 



EXPENSES. 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

For Sttidents from the State of Maryland and District of Columbia. 

First Session.— Board, Lights, Washiug, Fuel and Room rent $137 50 

Matriculation Fee 5 00 

Total $142 50 

Second Session. — Same as the first, less the Matriculation Fee. 

For Non-Residents of tJie State of Maryland and the Distinct of Columbia. 

First Session.— Board, Tuition, «&c $137 50 

Matriculation Fee 5 00 

Total $142 50 

Second Session. — Same as the first, less the Matriculation Fee. 

Day Scholars are charged three dollars a month, for tuition, use 
of rooms, fuel, &c. 

Prepayment in every case is required, unless satisfactory arrange- 
ment be made with the President of the Faculty for settlement by 
note at short date. 

No deduction will be made for absence, except in case of pro- 
tracted illness ; nor will money be refunded in case a student be with- 
drawn or dismissed during the term, unless at the discretion of the 
President. 

Special damages are assessed on those who unnecesarily injure 
or destroy College property. 



23. 

UNIFORM AND OTHER CLOTHING. 

Arrangements are made with a competent tailor who supplies: 
the uniforms. The cost, with cap, is from $21 to $22.50. 

Students must bring a supply of towels, napkins, bed-linen, blank- 
ets and white Berlin gloves ; all articles of clothing must be marked. 



REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. 

Students will be received, examined, and assigned to their proper 
classes at any point in the College course ; those ^who cannot pass 
good examinations in Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Grammar^ 
Geography, and History of the United States, will not be allowed to- 
begin the course. All not so qualified will be entered in the Prepar- 
atory Department. A room having been fitted up for this purpose, 
special instruction will be given all those who wish to prepare for the 
Freshman Class. 

Applications for admission, or for further information, should be 
addressed to the president of the Maryland Agricultural College. 

N. B. — Students will not be received before the twentieth day 
of September. 



FIRE BRIGADE. 



The Fire Brigade includes in its organization every person con- 
nected with the College and Farm. Students, at the fire-alarm, pro- 
ceed to such stations as are designated in the fire-bill. Exercises in 
fire-drill will take place at such time as the President may direct. 



DISPENSARY. 

The Professor in charge of the Dispensary will visit, report, and 
attend all cadets unfit for duty by sickness. 



23 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Daily Morning Prayer and Divine Service, on Sunday, are reg- 
ularly held in the chapel. Students are required to attend, unless a 
written request to the contrary be made. Students shall observe the 
Lord's day with decorum. 



DISCIPLINE. 

The following laws will be strictly enforced. 

1. Students shall not go beyond the limits of the farm ; use fire- 
arms ; sit up after taps ; use the south portico ; hold any general 
meeting ; visit the dining-room or kitchen, without permission from 
the President. 

2. Profane language, card playing, gambling, intoxication, or 
any of their attendant vices, will not be tolerated by the Faculty. 
Any student known to indulge in habits injurious to the morals of the 
College, or calculated to destroy its established order, shall be im- 
mediately dismissed. 

3. Destruction of property, disorderly conduct, in the halls, on 
the grounds, on furlough, or any other violation of the published orders 
of the President, or officer-in- charge, will be punished by tasks, 
demerits, guard duties, and such other punishments as the Faculty 
may decide. 

4. Members of the Faculty and all officers-in-charge are re- 
quired to report any violation of these regulations. 

5. Upon matriculation, each student will be furnished with a 
copy of these and other regulations, and will be required to obey 

them. 



Ml 

CALENDAR 1881,-1882. 
1881. 
Friday y June 24th. — Contest for Declamation Medal. 



Sunday y June 26. — Baccalaureate Sermon, Rev. John B. Williams. 



Monday, June 27th. — Contest for Agricultural Medal. Exercises of 
the Mercer Literary Society. 



* ■•• » 



Tuesday, June ^«?M. — COMMENCEMENT DAY. Conferring 
Degrees and presentation of Medals. Address to the students 
by Hon. Wm. T. Hamilton, Governor of Maryland. 



Tuesday, September 20th. — Session commences. 

Thursday, December 22nd. — Christmas Holidays, (13 days.) 



1882. 



January jist. — Close of First Term. 

February ist. — Second Session Commences. 

Sunday, June 25th. — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Tuesday, June 2yth. — Commencement Day.