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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"






OF THE 




FOR 



HSE_SSJ0N ENDING JUNE 28,^ 



1883. 



BALTIMORE : 
Printed at the Office o].^ the "Maryland Farmer," 
141 West I'latt Street, 

1883. 





GF THE 




FOR 



HSESSION ENDING JUNE 28, 



1883. 



BALTIMORE : 

Printed AT THE Office of the "Maryland Farmer," 

141 West Pratt Street/ 

'il883. 



E G I S ir E IR 



() F T J J E 



' y^ t_ -'^, 






T' O R 



^SESSION ENDING JUNE 28,h 



1883. 



i;A!/iM.M()i;E: 

i'lUN'I'Kl) AT THR Ol'i-'fCh; ol' TlIK "M\i:VI,ANl) Fa liNfER," 
141 West PniU SliecL, 
■1883. 



3 



TRUSTEES. 

Representing the State Ex-Officio. 

HOH. WM. T. HAMILTON, 

Governor of Maryland, 

rBESIDENT. 

HON. GEORGE H. WILLIAMS, 

President of tlie Senate. 

HON. OTIS KEILHOLTZ, 

Speaker of the House of Delegates. 

HON. CHAS. J. M. GWINN, 

Attorney General. 

HON. BARNES COMPTON, 

Treasurer. 

HON. THOS. J. KEATING, 

Comptroller. 

HON. GEO B. LORING, 

U. S. Gommissioner of Agriculture. 

Representing tlie Stoclcholders. 

ALLEN DODGE, Esq., HON. J CARROLL WALSH, 

E. WHITMAN, Es(i., HON. WILMOT JOHNSON, 

F. CARROLL GOLDSBOROUGH, Esq. 



4 



FACULTY. 

AUGUSTINE J. SMITH, President. , 

Professor' of Mental and Moral Science. 

J. D. WARFIELD, A. M., 

Professor of English Literature and Agricidture. 

WM. P. HEADDEN, Ph. D. 

Professor of Chemistry and Modern Languages. 

C. C. NORWOOD, A. B., 

Professor of Matliematics and Ancibnt Languages. 

Lieut. B. ELDllIDGE, U. S. A. 

Instructor in Military Science^ and Gomrrtandant of Cadets. 

Note — A Professor to be added for tlie Department of Civil Engineering 
and Physics. 



5 



MILITARY ORGANIZATION. 



Lieut. B. ELDRIDGE, 10th Infantry, U. S. A., Commandant. 



The terms of tlie United States appropriation require military instruction. 
For the better instruction in Infantry Tactics and military practice and 
discipline, the cadets have been consolidated into one company, under the 
command of the Commandant of Cadets The officers and non-commis- 
sioned otticers are selected from those cadets who have been most active and 
soldior-like in the performance of their duties, and most exemplary in their 
general deportment This department is in charge of an U S. Army ofl3cer. 
The training in this department is of great value for health and discipline. 

CAPTAIN, 

WM. T. LAKIN. 

LIEUTENANTS, 

WM. R. PORTER, C. W. WOOD, R S. MERCER. 

Ist SERGEANT, 

WM. A. KIRBY, 

2d SERGEANT, 

R. B. B. CHEW, Jr. 

3d SERGEANT, 

J. W. RYON, 

CORPORAIiS, 

WM. B. WEEMS, J. R.fLEYBURN. 



6 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



y ^i-.-^^ 

J. R. Seyburn Louisitiua. 

J. P. Kemper 

* Ci^ARENCE Ingate Mobile, Ala. 

■-' J. V. Mautin San Francisco, CJal . 

Victor Parks Norfolk, Va. 

WoRSHAM HuDdiJSs Ilaniplon, Va* 

Gustavo Menocal Havana, Cuba. 

Mario Menocal " " 

Gabriel M enocal " " 

Edward ^Ioale, Ji Montana Territor.y. 

/ H. S. Bowman Washington, D. C. 

"A A. Sottenschmidt " " 

Thomas S. Bell " 

D. Kauohman " " 

J. Kelley " " 

James Siii ef " " 

Archie Tripler " " 

J. Hahvell " 

Wm. Rotenburo " " 

J. W. BOGGS " 

S. E. Lakin Washington count}'. 

Wm. T. Lakin 

II. Aljsaugh Montgomery (M)unty . 

/ HI E. Rapley " " 

Baker Waters " " 

/C.A.Saunders " <' 

A.W.Martin " " 

L. Elgie Riggs " " 

J. T. Bbaddock " « 

Frank Mabtiu!.,,,,, ,,,,, ,..,,,,,,, « " 



F. S.'Key Talbot county- 

Wm.A.Kikby " 

Donald Bain " 

J. B. Wekms Elkridge, Md 

Harvey Gatttieti Frederick county- 

E. Dudley Wakeield Howard county. 

Wm. E. SCHWEAUING " 

Walter Charles Hammond " 

S. A. Cross Prince George's county. 

R. B. B. Chew, Jr 

P.M. CiiRW... 

EucENE Duffy " " 

J. W.Ryon " u 

A. Marshall Marrury " " 

tj^ P. A. BoWEN, Jr " " 

t Chas. E. Grabowskie " " 

Richard Ryon " " 

Wm. Hoblitzell Baltimore county. 

Louis Stein " 

Wm. H. Wyetii " 

C. S. Bansemf:r " 

E. SCHROEDER " 

^' Harry Freeland Calvert county. 

Wm. L. Smith " 

\<r. H. Stonestreet Charles county. 

■^' GRADUATES OF 188J?-88. 

HARRY FREELAND, A. B. t^ J. H. STONESTREET, A. B. ^ ^^ 

P. A. BONE, A. B. "? ^^ E. E. RAPLEY, A. B. 1'^ 
»A- ^^JUn^^r^- B. B. CHEWrl?^ i^.hXo^\<^-^}^^^^ ^ 

RECAPITULATIOM. 

Maryland 35 Virginia 3 

District of Columbia , 10 Alabama 1 

Havana, Cuba 3 California , l 

Louisiana 2 Montana Ter 1 

55 






8 

feOAiRb OF VISITORS. 

C. Morton Stewart Baltimore City 

Hon. Lloyd Lowndes Alleghany 

Col. H. Kyd Douglass Washington 

Hon. E. H. Steiner Frederick 

Col. John K. Longwell Carroll 

H O. Devrles ^ Howard 

Edwin Scott Baltimore (Co.) 

Hon Stephenson Archer Harford 

Arthur Stabler Montgomery 

Hon. E. J Henkle Anne Arundle 

G. 8 Hamill Garrett 

D. G Campbell Prince George's 

Col J. F. Dent St. Mary's 

G. McGraw Cecil 

George Spencer Kent 

Dr. S. T. Earle Queen Anne 

Hon. Edward Lloyd Talbot 

Danl. M Henry, Jr . Dorchester 

Henry Page Somerset 

Hon. Lemuel Malone Wicomico 

Hon. Andrew G. Chapman Charles 

Hon. Daniel Field Caroline 

Hon. James T Briscoe Calvert 

Hon. Geo. W Covington Worcester 

AT tAMeBa 

W. W. Corcoran ; .Washington, D. C. 

G«nl. J. H. Gilman " « 

Dr. C. M. >mith Franklin, La. 

Dr. L L. Adkins Talbot Co., Md. 

Hon. John Randolph Tucker Lexington Va. 

Hon Henry G. Davis Deer Park, W. Va. 

Hon. James A. Gary Baltimore County. 

John W. Garrett Baltimore City. 

Genl. F. C. Latrobe " " 

Judge Edward Duffy " " 

Judge W. A Stewart " " 

Genl. John S. Berry " «' 

Hon. Jno. L Thomas " <* 

Hon. Robert M McLane " «■ 

Genl. Bradley T. Johnson " <i 

Jlev. A. M. Randolph, D. D " " 



THE 



MIRYLHND RGRICULTURflL COLLEGE 



The College is situated in Prince George's Co., Md., on a com- 
manding eminence overlooking a beautiful landscape, in full vnew 
of College Station, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which is eight 
miles north of Washington, and thirty-two south of Baltimore. 
Fourteen trains, seven from Washington and seven from Baltimore, 
stop at College Station, daily. 

The farm contains 286 acres, the soil of which varies in quality 
" and condition, thus affording good opportunity for experiments. 
There are meadows artificially drained, dry bottom lands and 
rolling high-lands. Its proximity to Washington secures for it 
many advantages in the Agricultural Department and Scientific 
Institutions and Libraries connected with the General Government. 

The building is an imposing structure of brick, relieved by an 
east and south portico, and besides artificial adornment with trees 
and shrubbery, is surrounded by a beautiful grove ot forest growth, 
and is capable of accommodating 150 students. On the first floor 
are the Dining Room, Laboratory, Museum, Chapel, Bath-room, 
Department of Languages and Preparatory Department. On the 
second floor, the Parlor, Visitor's Room, President's Room, Reg- 
istrar's Office, Commandant's Office, English, Agricultural and 
Mathematical Lecture Rooms, Society Hall and Library. The 
chambers are large, well ventilated, well heated and lighted through- 
out with gas. The sanitary regulations are complete, and all the 
surroundings are pleasant and healthful. 

The fact, that in addition to the ordinary college curriculum, it 
adds the school of Agricultural Science, should commend it the 
more strongly to public favor ; and the liberal and useful education 
which it gives at so moderate a sum should not be the less prized 
because the endowment of the United States Government and the 
State aid enables the Board of Trustees to confer this great boon 
upon those who are its fortunate recipients. 



Id 

To accommodate those patrons at a distance who wish theif 
sons to remain at the college during vacation months, the privilege 
will be granted them, if desired, to board at the institution upon 
reasonable terms. This should be esteemed a rare advantage, as a 
more delightful summer residence could scarcely be found either for 
pleasure or health, there being upon the place and within a few 
moments reach near by, mineral waters which are widely known 
and valued for their medicinal virtue. In addition to this, the beau- 
tiful and healthful surroundings of the college ; its proximity to the 
Capital with its numerous objects of interest, and its nearness to 
the seaboard should make it an attractive place to spend the sum- 
mer months. To members of Congress, public officials, and those 
persons sojourning temporarily at Washington, who wish their 
sons to receive a useful and practical as well as a liberal education 
under their own supervision.this institution offers rare inducements, 
beini:; within twenty minutes reach from that city. Indeed we do 
not sec; how any institution could possess greater advantages than 
this College for building up a prosperous and useful educational 
work, either for entrance into the professions or for engaging in 
the independent and ennobling occupation of agriculture. 



€3DrUIlSK OF IMSTMUCTIdK, 



^m^ 



The branches of study are grouped under the following de- 
partmants, and embrace the subjects named : 

1. Agriculture, Scientific and Practical 

2. Civil Engineering and Physics. 

3. English Literature, Mental and Moral Science and His- 
tory. 

4. Mathematics. 

5. Chemistry. 

6. Ancient and Modern Languages. 



11 

Department of Civil Eugineet ing and Physics. 

Civil Engineering embraces a course of study by which the 
student will learn surveying, to map farms, run ditches and 
drains, construct roads and bridges, and learn the general prin- 
cipals of digging canals, building rail roads, &c. 

Physics. — This embraces a liberal course in Natural Philosophy 
and Natural History, Astronomy, and Physical Geography 
illustrated by maps. 



Department of English Literature Mental and Moral Science, 

and History. 

English. — The History, Usage, and Grammatical Structure of 
the English Language ; History of English Literature ; Rhet- 
oric ; Composition ; Elocution ; Logic and Moral Philosophy- 

History. — Ancient and Modern. 

Lectures. — 



Department of Mathematics. 
Algebra. — Reduction and Solution of Equations of the first and 
second degrees ; Proportions and Progressions ; nature and 
construction of Logarithms, and the theory' of Equations. 

Geometry. — Plane and Solid. 
Trigonometry. — Analytical investigation of Trigonometrical 

Formulas, and their application to the solution of all the cases 

of Plane and Spherical Trigonometry ; the construction and 

u.«e of Trigonometrical Tables. 
Application of Algebra and Trigonometry, — Mensuration 

of Planes and Solids. 
Descriptive Geometry. — The graphic illustration and solution 

of problems in Solid Geometry ; Projections of the sphere. 

Analytical Geometry. — Equations of the Right Line, Plane 
and Conic Sections ; Principal problems relating to the Cyl- 
inder, Cone, Sphere and Spheroids. 

Lectures on Shades, Shadows and Perspective. 
Book-Keeping. 



13 
Department of Chemistry. 

Chemistry. — Organic and Inorganic Chemistry ; Qualitative and 
Quantitative Analysis ; Detection and separation of the Ele- 
ments ; Manufacture and Application of Chemicals ; Organic, 
Volumetric and Spectroscopic Analysis; Agricultural Chemistry* 

In this department analysis of soils and manures will be made for 
a nominal fee for farmers. 



^« ♦ 



Department of Ancient and Modern Languages. 

Latin. — Grammar, Reader, Caisar, Ovid, Virgil, Cicero, Horace, 

Sallust. 
French. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 
German. — Grammar, Reader, Classics, Colloquial Exercises. 
Text Books relating to all the Departments will be furnished 

at publishers rates. 



Department of Agriculture — Scientific and Practical. 

The instruction in this Department includes both theory and 

practice, and on account of the great importance attached to it as 

the greatest of the industries, is intended to embrace the widest 

field of knowledge, and to impart the most thorough course of 

instruction of which it is capable. It comprises the study of the 

nature and cultivation of plant life in all its forms, and also in its 
relation to the uses and purposes of mankind. This would em- 
brace the study of Botanv, Physiology ot Plants, their diseases 
and remedies, Zoology, Entomology, Geology, Mineralogy, Ag- 
ricultural Chemistry, Raising of Cattle, Sheep and other animals. 
Poultry, Bees. &c.: Drainage and Surveying are included in this 
course, as well as Political Economy. 

THE PRACTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Comprises work on the farm and in the laboratories. 

For the first, Students are divided into o-a7^den, JieM, jard and 
grojuids detail, and under competent supervision are instructed in 
whatever work the season may offer in these divisions of a farm. 

The special Agricultural Class is on practice detail daily. 

A suitable compensation is paid to students on special volun- 
teer detail on Saturdays and other days'^uring vacation, which 
would materially reduce their expenses. ' 



13 

THE LABORATORY work comprises work in the Chemi- 
cal jL^aboratory ; work iii the Microscopic Department of Botany 
and Zoology ; work in the Geolocrical, Mineralow'ical and Osteo- 
lo^ical Cabinets ; work in the Veterinary Dissectincr Rooms, &c- 

The lacihties for ihustration, &c., in this department consist of 
the farm of 286 acres, under varied experimental cultivation. The 
ve^^etable garden occupies 10 acres, and there are extensive fruit 
and flower gardens. Cabinets of mineralogical. geological and bo- 
tanical specimens are provided ; skeletons, anatomical preparations 
and a therapeutical collection assist in the illustration of veterinary 
science. The school of chemistry offers facilities for chemical 
analysis, &c. The vicinity of Washington and Baltimore permits 
the department to avail itself of the superior advantages for investi" 
gation to l)c found in the Agricultural, Smithsonian and other 
Governmental departments at Washington, and in the fertilizer, 
machine and implement manufactories of Baltimore. 

Special A^ricitlho'al Students are admitted at any time during 

the session. 

DEGREES. 

I. The Degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those 
who graduate in all the Schools. 

II. The Degree of pjachclor of Science will be conferred upon 
those who graduate in the- Schools of Astronomy and Civil Engi- 
neering, I^nglish Literature, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry and 
Languages. 

III. The Degree of Bachelor of Agricultural Science 
(B. A. S.) will be conferred on students passing satisfactorily the 
Course in Agriculture. 

IV. Students who jjass satisfactory examinations in the Schools 
of P^nglish, Mathematics, Agriculture and Chemistry will be de- 
clared graduates in Agriculture. 

V. Those who take the Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bache- 
lor of Science and devote themselves to study for three years there- 
after, will be entitled to the Degree of Master of Arts or Master 
of Science. 

PRIZES AND MEDALS 

Are given for Scholarship, Essays and Declamation. The 
Mercer Literary Socict--/ also gives a medal. 



14 

EXAMINATIONS. 

A Semi-annual examination in the presence of the Faculty is 
held the last week ot the first term. 

Monthly examinations at the blackboards are required in all the 
departments. 

The Annual Examination is held during the last week in June, 
and is open to the public. 

Students who fail to pass satisfactory examinations at the end 
of each term are not allowed to continue with their classes. 

MARKS. 

The scale of marks for recitation and exercises ranges from 4 
to o. A mark of 4 indicates thoroughness ; o, a total failure ; the 
intermediate numbers indicate absolute values. 

A Mark 2.5 represents the minimum of proficiency. Students 
whose final average for the term or year, in any branch, falls below 
that number are liable to be turned back to the next class. 

MERIT ROLLS. 

Are kept by the Professors of each class, and the final average 
of each student is determined by the Faculty at the annual exam- 
inations. Reports showing the progress and standing of students 
are sent to parents monthly. 

MUSFUM. 

A collection of anatomical, jjhvsiological, geological and min- 
eralogical sfiecimens, with a \ariety of seeds, «S:c., has been ar- 
ranged as a nucleus of an agricultural museum. 

LIBRARIES. 

The College library embraces laws and enactments of both 
Maryland and the United States, extending over a long period, 
and reports of the Agricultural, Educational and other departments 
of the Government, covering many years back, as well as other 
valuable and useful works. 

The Mercer Literary Society Library contains over one thous 
and volumes of histories, biographies, poetry, choice novels, ency- 
clopedias and miscellaneous works. This society was organized 
by the late Dr. Mercer, of New Orleans, and holds weekly meetings 
for discussion, declamation and reading. 



15 
VACATION AND TERMS. 

The scholastic year is divided into two terms with but one reg- 
ular vacation, beginning the last week of June, and closing about 
the middle of September; and a short intermission at Christmas 
and Easter. 

The first term opens on the 20th of September and closes with 
the month of January. The second term begins the first of Feb- 
ruary and ends with the college year, the last of June. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICE. 

Daily morning prayer and Divine Service on Sunday, are 
regularly held in the chapel. Students are required to attend, un- 
less a written request to the contrary be made. Students shall 
observe the Lord's day with decorum. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The following laws will be strictly enforced. 

1. Students shall not go beyond the limits of the farm ; use 
fire-arms ; sit up after taps or hold any general meeting without 
permission. 

2. Profane language, card playing, gambling, intoxication, 
or any of their attendant vices, will not be tolerated by the Fac- 
ulty. Any student known to indulge in habits injurious to the 
morals of the College, or calculated to destroy its established disci- 
pline will not be taken or retained. 

3. Destruction of property, disorderly conduct, in the halls, 
on the grounds, on furlough, or any other violation of the publish- 
ed orders of the President, or officer-in-charge, will be punished 
by tasks, demerits, guard duties, and such other punishments as 
the faculty may decide. 

4. Members of the Faculty and all officers-in -charge are re- 
quired to report any violation of these regulations. 

5. Upon matriculation, each student will be furnished with a 
copy of these and other regulations, and will be required to obey 
them. 



1^ 

— 1EXPENSES>— 

PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. 

Ftkst Session — Board, Tuition, Liglits, W:isliina:, Fuel :iud 

lioom rent "'. $100 00 

Malriculation Fee 5 00 

Tola! $10r> 00 

Seconb Session. — Sanic astlic iii>t, less the Malriculation Fee. 

Day Scholars wiii be taken on reasonable terms. 

Prepayment in every case is required, unless satisfactory ar- 
rangement be made with the President of the Faculty for settle- 
ment otherwise. 

No deduction will be made for absence, except in case of pro- 
tracted illness ; nor will money be refunded in case a student be 
withdrawn or dismissed during the term, unless at the discretion 
of the President, who will be guided by equity. 

UNIFORM AND OTHER CLOTHING. 

Arrangements are made with a competent tailor who suppliesj 
the uniforms. The cost, with cap. is from $21.00 to $22.50. 

Students must bring a supj^ly of towels, napkins, blankets and 
two pair each of sheets and pillow cases. All articles of clothin*. 
must be marked. 

A gymnasium is connected with the College for physical exercise 
REQUISITES FOR ADMISSION. 

Students will be received, examined and assigned to their pro 
per classes at any point in the college course ; those who canno 
pass good examinations in reading, writing, arithmetic, grammaij 
geography and history of the United States, will not be allowed t 
begin the course. All not so qualified will be entered in the Pr 
paratory Department. 

Applications for admission or for further information should 
addressed to the President of the Maryland Agricultural Colleg 

DISPENSARY. 

The Professor in charge of the Dispensary will visit and rep' 
all cadets unfit for duty by sickness. 



\ 



ADD EN D A . 



The complete collegiate course is comprised in the Freshnidn 
Sophomore, Junior and Senior cXdiSses with their appropriate text 
books. 

PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

A Preparatory Department for youths over 12 years of age is 
provided. ^ 

ELECTIVE SYSTEM. 

Students who do not wish to become farmers may ovmt prac- 
tical agriculture, '^and take the ordinary classical and scientific 
course, whicn wnll embrace certain branches of instruction in scien- 
tific agriculture. Or, if they desire to fit themselves for farmers, 
they may take the complete agricultural course, which will em- 
brace, besides scientific and practical agriculture, certain branches 
in the classical department ; the object being, besides graduating 
educated farmers, to disseminate as widely as possible a knowl- 
edge and appreciation of the importance and capabilities of agri- 
culture among all professions and vocations by interweaving agri- 
cultural science with the classical course. 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 

The charter of this college, besides prescribing a liberal clas- 
sical and scientific collegiate education, and a thorough course in 
scientific and practical agriculture; also provides iiistruction in 
the mechanic arts, and it is the intention of this institution to de- 
velop technical education to the extent of its ability. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

The buildings will be refurnished and undergo repair during va- 
cation w ith the view of providing thoroughly for the comfort of 
the students 

OMISSION. 

The names of William A. Lakin, of Talbot county, and C. A. 
Saunders, of Montgomery county, Md., were unintentionally 
omitted among the graduates for years '82 and '83. They both 
earned and received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 



\ 



" An enlightened agriculture is th * basis of all national wealth." 

^ — Daniel Webster. 

Presented with the compliments vA the President and the Board of 
Trustees of the Maryland Agricultural College. 

Address all communications to tie President of the Maryland 
Agricultural College, College Citation, Prince George's Co., Md.