(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

List of Irregularities 



1. Publication from 1885-1886, is missing pages 
31-32. 




i^^5-p.t' 



Its. 










m 



i*^ 



L':::^ ^'j<£.. '■;/■. 



^ 



\\V^.\irv.^v 



C^f^^T-i^IuOO-TJIE] 



OF THE 



OFFICERS AND STUDENTS 



OF THE 



Mill m 



n 



u 



T 



IL ill 



11 

UUli 



1 

i 



ll 



[ 



WITH A 



STATEMENT OF THE DIFFERENT COURSES 



OF 



IlVSTI^TJCTIOiV. 



I886~f8&6. 



PRESS OF "the MARYLAND FARMER." 



Representing the State Ex-Officio 

Hox. IIEXRY LLOYD, 

GOVERNOR OF MARYLAND, 

President. 



HoK. E. E. JACKSOX, 
Pres't of the Senate. 



Hon. JOSEPH B. SETH, 
Speaker of the House of Delegates. 

Hon. CHAS. B. ROBERTS, 

Attorney General. 

Hon. STEYENSOX ARCHER, 
State Treasurer. 

Hon. J. FRANK TURNER, 
Comptroller. 

Hon. NORMAN J. COLEMAN, 
U. S. Com. of Agriculture. 



Representing the Stockholders: 

ALLEN DODGE, Esq., Hon. J. CARROLL WALSH, 

Hon. E. WHITMAN, Hon. WILMOT JOHNSON. 

V. CARIUJLL (lOLDSBOROUGH, Esq. 



'^E'.JL.CTJ-lL.Tir. 



AUGUSTINE J. SMITH, President, 
Lecturer on Political Science. 

J. A. CHAMBLISS, A. M., 
Professor of Latin and English Literature. 

G. S. FELLOWS, B. A., 
Professor of Chemistry and Physics. 

C. A. FESTETITS, C. E., M. S., 
Professor of Mathematics and Civil Engineering, 

♦Vacant. 
Professor of Agriculture. 

WILHELM BERNHAKDT, Ph.D., 

(University of Leipsig,) 
Professor of German, 

CAMILLE FONTAINE, B. es L., 

(DOUAI Facultk,) 
Professor of French. 

B. J. WILSON, B. A., 
Assistant Professor of English and Mathematics. 

Rev. A. J. SMITH, Jr., 
Lecturer on Mental and Moral Science. 

THOMAS TAYLOR, M. D., M. R. S., A. A. S., 
Lecturer on Microscopy. 

^^\ R. SMITH, B. S. A., 
Lecturer on Botany. 



*Pen{ling- Neg-otiations. 



ST^Si.:Fi^. 



Colonel FESTETITS, 
Commandant. 

Professor FELLOWS, 
Librarian. 

Professor CHAMBLISS, 
Sec. of Faculty. 

Key. a. J. SMITH, Jr., 
Chaplain. 

O. EVERSFIELD, M. D., 
Physician. 

Miss LAVINIA ISH, 

Matron. 

E. F. DANIELS, 
Gardener. 

JOHN R. GROVE, 
Farmer. 



COURSE OF LECTURES. 



A Course of Lectures upon Scientific and Literary subjects will be 
delivered during the academic term by the following distinguished 
scholars and scientists : 

Professok M. a. NEWELL, 

Principal State Normal School. 

Peopessor H. W. WILEY, 

Cbief Chemist U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Professor OTIS T. MASON, 

Curator Departuient Of Ethnology, V. S. National Museum. — ETHNOLOaY. 

Professor CHARLES V. RILEY, 

Entomologist U. S. Department of Agriculture. — EirrOMOLOGY. 

Professor F. LAMSON SCRIBNER, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture.— FUNGI. 

WILLIAM SAUNDERS, 

Superintendent of Grounds U. S. Department of Agriculture. — HOHTICULTURE. 

JOHN SAUL, 

The Eminent Florist and Horticulturist.— POMOiiOGY. 

Dr. ROBERT WARD, F. R. C. V. S., 

state Teterinary Surgeon.— ZOOLOGY. 

Professor B. E. FERNOW. 

Chief of Forestry Di-rision tJ. S. Department of Agriculture.— FORESTRY; 

Professor WILLIAM S. YEATES, 

Department of Minerals, Smithsonian Institute.— MiniskaIjOGY. 



BOARD OF VISITORS. 



Prof. M. A. Newell Baltimore. 

Hon. Lloyd Lowndes Alleghany. 

Col. H. Kyd Douglass Washington Co. 

Hon. E. H. Steiner Frederick Co. 

Frank Brown Carroll. 

Hon. William Clark, of T Howard. 

T. Alex. Seth Baltimore Co. 

John Moores Harford. 

E. J. Hall Montgomery. 

Hon. Nicholas Brewer Anne Arundel. 

Patrick Hamill Garrett. 

Geo. H. Calvert Prince Georges. 

Col. J. F. Dent St. Mary's. 

Dr. R. C. Mackall Cecil. 

Hon. Wm. D. Burchinal Kent. 

Hon. Edward C. Legg Qneen Anne's. 

Hon. Paul Winchester Talbot. 

Danl. M. Henry, Jr Dorchester. 

Henry Page Somerset. 

Hon. Lemuel Malone Wicomico. 

Hon. Andrew G. Chapman Charles. 

Hon. G. W. Goldsborough Caroline. 

Hon. James T. Briscoe Calvert. 

Hon. Geo. W. Covington Worcester. 

AT LARGE. 

W. W. Corcoran Washington, D. C. 

Dr. C. M. Smith Franklin, La. 

Dr. L L. Adkins Talbot. 

Hon. John Randolph Tucker Lexington Va. 

Hon. Henry G. Davis Deer Park, W. Va. 

Hon. James A. Gary Baltimore co. 

Robert Garrett Baltimi »re city. 

Genl. F. C. Latrobe " 

Judge Edward Duffy '• 

Judge W. A. Stewart " 

Hon. Jno, L. Thomas , " 

Genl. Bradley T. Johnson " 

Right Rev. A. M. Randolph, D. D Virginia. 

Hon. Edward Stake Washington Co. 

Hon. E. L. F. Hardcastle Talbot. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS. 



Banks, Morton D Md. 

Bergevin, Walter Byron Washington, D. C. 

Carroll, John Md. 

Chambliss, Samuel M Md. 

Conrey, Thomas J Md. 

Dallam, Arthur Rush Md. 

Pitzhugh, Smith Keech Md. 

Plack, George Md. 

Gadd, Herbert W Md. 

Hazen, Melvin G Virginia. 

Holloway, Harold P Indiana, 

Johnson, Leonard B Md. 

Kellogg, Arthur D I^ew Mexico. 

Kellogg, Clarence H New Mexico. 

Legge, Prank W Washington, D. C. 

Legge, Harry D Washington, D. C. 

Lount, William R Md. 

Lyden, Prederick Pountaine Md. 

Merritt, Percy Blaine Washington, D. C, 

Moulton, Irvin B Washington, D. C. 

Palfrey, Charles Conrad, Jr Louisiana. 

Pindell, Robert M., Jr Md. 

Sigler, William A Md. 



CATALOGUE. 9 

Smith, Charles Magill Md. 

Smith, llobert E Md. 

Somerville, Charles S Md. 

Stevenson, Allen S Md. 

Taylor, William J Kentucky. 

Tolson, Albert C Md. 

Travers, John C Md. 

Ware, Thorn as I) O hio. 

Weaver, Eobert D Washington, D. C. 

Webster, Clarence Washington, I). C. 

Weems, Julius B Md. 

Wickes, Henry W Pennsylvania. 

Willis, Charles E Md. 

Wilson, J. Morgan Washington, D. C. 

W^oolford, F. Rees Md. 

Woolford, R. Cator Md. 

Wyeth, Charles M Md. 

Wyville, Walter D ...Washington, I). C. 

Yingling, Harvey A Md. 

Yost, Walter B Md. 



10 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

LOCATION. 



The Maryland Agricultural College is situated in Prince George's 
county, Md., on the Washington Branch of the Baltiniore and Ohio 
Railway. College Station is distant thirty-two milee from Balti- 
more and eight miles from Washington. Fourteen trains daily, afford 
easy communication with all points. 

The main building is a substantial brick structure, one hundred 
and twenty feet long, fifty-four feet wide and six stories high, sur- 
rounded by a beautiful grove of forest trees, and possesses ample 
accomodations for one hundred and fifty cadets, besides offices for the 
President, Registrar and Commandant, Professors' quarters. Chapel, 
Museum, Library, Reading-Room and the requisite class rooms. 
The Cadets' quarters are large and roomy, well heated, lighted and 
ventilated, and ample provision is made for the maintenance of the 
thorough sanitary condition of the building. 

The Chemical Laboratory is a separate brick structure close to 
the main building. The Gymnasium is another detached building 
erected for this special purpose, as is also the President's residence. 

The farm is amply provided with the necessary farm buildings. 
It contains two hundred and eighty-six acres, of which forty acres 
are woodland and the greater portion of the remainder is under culti- 
vation. The varied conditions and qualities of the soil afford excellent 

opportunities for agricultural experimentation, and this, together with 
the beauty and healthfulness of the site, render the location eminently 
desirable for an educational institution of this character. 

The proximity of the College to the National Capitol, gives it 
superior advantages in the valuable aids which it derives from the 
scientific and literary departments of the Government. 



CATALOGUE. 11 

COURSES OF STUDY. 



The act of Congress, creating the endowment of State Agi-icul- 

tural Colleges, was passed July 2, 18G2, and is entitled "An Act, 

gi-anting public lands to the several States and Territories, which 

may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 

arts." The aims of a college thus originated are defined as follows : 

"Its leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific and 
classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such branches of 
learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, in such manner 
as the Legislatures of the States may respectively prescribe, in order to pro- 
mote the liberal and practical education of the industrial classes in the several 
pursuits and professions in life." 

Hence, while the curriculum makes thorough provision for agri- 
cultural education, which, besides being of practical value, is recog- 
nized among scholars as an accomplishment, it embraces also literary 
and scientific courses, equal to those of any college of respectable 
grade, thus fitting its graduates for any of the occupations or pro- 
fessions of life. 

The principal branches of study comprised in these several courses 
are the following : — Agriculture, Chemistry, Mathematics, Surveying, 
Topographical and Mechanical Drawing, Civil and Mechanical Engi- 
neering, English Literature, Ancient and Modern Languages. 

Each of the diflFerent Courses of Study pursued, covers a term of 
four years and leads to an appropriate degree, which will be conferred 
upon those only who complete an entire course. The diplomas 
are signed by the Faculty and the (governor of Maryland, who is the 
President of the Board of Trustees. 

There are three systematically arranged courses of study, viz : 
1st. The Agricultural Course, leading to the degree of Bachdur of 

Scientific Agriculture — B. S. A. 
2d. The Scientific Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 

Science — B. S. 
3d. The Literary- ScieMific Course, leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Fhilosophg — B. Ph. 



12 MAPtYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



^ 



a-I^ICTJXJTTJI^E_ 



As the foundation of scientific agriculture rests upon the natural 
sciences, such as Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Botany and Geology, 
these sciences occupy a prominent place in the agricultural course, and 
are studied with special reference to their application in agriculture. 
The special agricultural studies are, as follows : 

Freshman Year. — Elements of Scientific Agriculture; Cereals, 
their history, cultivation and varieties; Grasses, establishment of 
pastures and meadows ; other Forage Crops ; Special and Local Crops. 

Sophomore Year. — Horticulture: propagation of plants, fer- 
tilization, hybridization, improvement of varieties; plant food; dis- 
eases of plants ; the orchard, the vineyard, the nursery, their proper 
soil and management; budding, layering, grafting, pruning; vege- 
table garden, the hot bed and cold frame, market gardening. Flori- 
culture : landscape gardening, trees and shrubs for ornamental plant- 
ings. Forestrv. 

Junior Year. — Manures : preparation from waste materials of 
the farm, composting and application ; commercial fertilizers ; field 
and feeding experiments. 

Senior Year. — Selection and care of animals, soiling, feeding 
for meat production, dairying, stock-breeding; farm implements; 
entomology — insects injurious to vegetation, their habits, their modes 
of life and methods of checking their ravages. Agricultural chemistry, 
•embracing origin, formation and composition of soils ; analysis of soils 
and their adaptation to purposes of production ; chemistry of plant 
growth and plant food ; chemical composition of the various crops ; 
chemistry of the dairy. 



(S>: 



CATALOGUE. IS 



EHIElvdriSTI^'^- 



The study of Chemistry begins in the Sophomore year and extends 
through tiie remainder of the college course. 

Sophomore Year. — The work of this year is devoted to the 
acquisition of the facts and principles of General Chemistry, to allovv 
students who do not further pursue the subject to get a good, general 
knoAvledge of the field, and also to serve as a basis for the special courses 
following. There will be daily experiments, illustrating the subjects 
under discussion together with a course of lectures on the practical 
application of Chemistry in the arts. 

Junior Year. — Qualitative analysis : — each student is recjuired 
to make analyses of at least one hundred subtances ; blow-pipe analysis 
with determination of minerals and ores ; Organic Chemistry ; lectures 
on Chemical Physics. 

Senior Year. — Quantitative analysis, both gravimetric and 
vol u metric methods. Agricultural Chemistry wi 11 be made a prominou t 
feature of this year's work, especially analyses of fertilizers, milk, 
water, feed-stuffs. 

Each student is provided with a laboratory desk, equipped with 
all needful apparatus and re-agents for the condition of which he is 
held responsible. 

The Department of Chemistry is enabled to offer unusual 
inducements to students the coming year. A recent State law requires 
the College to analyze samples of all fertilizers manufactured or sold 
in the State, and thus the duties of State Chemist now devolve upon 
this department. In order to meet fully the requirements of the law, 
an invoice of the latest and most improved chemical apparatus has 
been ordered from Europe. The more advanced students, who will 
be permitted to share in the work, will thus have an opportunity of 
learning the most practical methods of analysis. 



14 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Q). 



iL-TSZEHv^^zL-TIOS- 



The study of Mathematics is pursued during the first two years 
of the Agricultural, during three years of the Literary-Scientific, and 
during four years of the Scientific course. Considering the excellent 
mental discipline the study of Mathematics affords, and that a sound 
knowledge of the same is a pre-requisite for the successful study and 
practice of the mechanic arts, exceptional attention is paid to this 
branch of instruction. Its importance as an aid in all mechanical 
investigations is kept constantly in view, and therefore the course is 
so arranged as to lead most directly to the practical application of the 
theoretical knowledge acquired. The course is as follows : 

Freshman Year. — During the first term Algebra is reviewed 
from the beginning to quadratic equations. In the second term 
Algebra is finished, the work of the term comprising Series, Binomial 
Theorem Logarithms, Higher Equations, Rule of Des Cartes, Cardan's 
Rule, Sturm's Theorem. 

Sophomore Year. — Plane and Solid Geometry, Plane Trigono- 
metry, Astronomy, Elements of Surveying. 

Field work : Chain and Compass Surveying, 

JuN^iOR Year. — Spherical Trigonometry, Conic Sections, Ana- 
lytical Geometry, Triangular Surveying, Levelling. 

Field work : Transit and Theodolite Surveying. — Running lines 
of levels. 

Senior Year. — Theory of Functions, Differential and Integral 
Calculus, Calculus of Variations, Trilinear Surveying, Geodetic Sur- 
veys, Triangulation, U. S. Land Surveys. 

Fielfl Work : Measuring Base lines, Plane 1 able work, Railroad 
Curves and Railroad Spirals, Cross-Sectioning and Computation of 
Earth-work. 



CATALOGUE. 15 



(9 




0iNra-in>TEEi^i::bTO_ 

In order to afford the graduates of the ScientijSc Course oppor- 
tunity to obtain the degree of Civil or Mechanical Engineer by means 
of a post-graduate course of two years, particular attention is paid to 
these branches of study. 

Shop-work is required of all students in this course, and includes 
work in the wood-shop, at the forge and in the machine-shop. 
The wood-shop is equipped with benches, vises and tools. Special 
attention will be given to joinery as the most important branch of 
practical Carpentry, 

Civil and Mechanical Engineering is taught in the junior year of 
the Agricultural Course and in both the junior and senior years of the 
Scientific Course. It comprises : 

Junior Year. — Mechanics: Statics and Dynamics of Solids, 
Liquids and Gases. Prime Motors : Water Wheels, Wind Mills ; the 
Boiler and its Appendages ; Strength of Materials, Graphic Analysis 
of Trusses; Agi'icultural Machinery ; Land Drainage; Irrigation, 
House and Town Sewerage. 

Shop Practice : Work in the Wood-Shop, comprising all the 
more common forms of joints, viz : halves, mortise-and-tenon, miter, 
dowel, open and blind dove-tail, etc. The principal object sought to 
be attained, is to secure gi'eatest accuracy with least expenditure of 
time and labor. 

SEifiOR Year. — Thermodynamics : Steam Making and Manage- 
ment of Steam; The Steam Engine; Practical Examples; Designing 
Bridge Details in Wood and Iron ; Eailway Construction. 

Shop Practice : Forge work, including the welding and tem- 
pering of steel ; Vise work, including the various methods of shaping 
and fitting metals by the use of chisel, hack-saw and file. 



16 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Knowledge of DraAving is inseparable from technical training. 
The constant invention of new machinery and the new adaptjitions of 
old, render it necessaiy for any one interested in the Mechanic Arts, 
to be not only a good draftsman, but also to be able to readily grasp 
the meaning of a drawing. The practice of graphically representing 
mechanical ideas inculcates habits of systematic study and thought 
which can not fail to be of value to all, in whatsoever profession. 

Since the ulterior purpose of the art of surveying is to determine 
the relative position of points on the surface of the earth, in such a 
manner that a map of that portion of the earth's surface may be 
constructed, it is self-evident that a knowledge of Topographical 
Drawing is absolutely indispensable to the surveyor. 

The course in drawing begins in the Sophomore year, and is 
intended to lay a good foundation for work in any pursuit of life where 
drawing is required. 

Sophomore Year. — Elements of Mechanical and Topograph- 
ical Drawing. Plotting Farm Surveys. 

JuNiOK Yeak. — Orthographic Projection, Spherical Projections, 
Shades and Shadows; Plotting Eailroad surveys; Topographical 
Sketching ; Designs for Wooden Structures ; Agricultural Machinery. 

Senior Year, — Linear Perspective, Isometric Projection; Stone 
and Iron Construction ; Designs of Machines ; Working Drawings ; 
Topographical Mapping. 



CATALOGUE. 17 

English Language and Literature. 

It is intended that graduates of this College, whatever else they 
may have learned or failed to learn, shall be able to use their mother- 
tongue, both orally and in writing, with correctness, ease and force. 
It is designed, also, that they shall obtain a useful acquaintance with 
the history of the language and of the treasures of its literature. 

To meet the necessities of those who may enter without havir^g 
enjoyed very good ojtportunities of preparatory instruction, the course 
in this department begins almost at the bottom. Students unpre]">ared 
for the Freshman Class may have a year's work in Englisli Grammar, 
with constant practice in analysis and parsing, and daily exercise!? in 
expression and criticism. 

In the first College 3'ear, Englisli Structure is taken up — words 
and their elements, roots, stems, jirefixes, suffixes — and familiai- lectures 
are given on the history of the language. This is followed by 
a thorough study of the i)rinciples and methods of English Compo- 
sition, apjilied by frequent exercises in which neatness of manuscript, 
correctness of spelling, of punctuation and of paragraphing, as well as 
clearness of thought and expression, are persistently required. 

From this point the course proceeds through the study of Higher 
Rhetoric and the Elements of Logic. 

Systematic instruction in Elocution is given. High value is set 
upon the art of Expressive Reading, and in this direction much effort 
is expended. Frequent exercises in Declamation are required, for the 
purpose, chiefly, of correcting marked faults of manner and cultivating 
self-possession in public address. Original essays and orations are 
called for in the Junior and Senior vears. 



18 MARYLAXD AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

In conjunction with the Language, the Literature of our tongue 
is studied, first, by means of text-books on the subject, covering in a 
general way the ^vhole ground from Chaucer to the present time ; and, 
second, by critical examination of a considerable number of specimens 
from the writings of the more famous authors, English and American. 

The work of this department is the same for each of the three 
degree-courses, and is apportioned among tlie classes as indicated in 
the Courses of Studv. 



Latin Language and Literature. 

The importance of this department is emphasized by at least tAvo 
undisputed facts : 1. — The Latin of all languages possesses the highest 
value for grammatical discipline ; it is known among scholars to be a 
sort of universal key of language; it affords in its S3mtax so excellent 
a preparation for linguistic work in general, that "the student who has 
mastered it has learned one-half of what he has to learn in acquiring 
any Continental language." 2. — Xext to the Anglo-Saxon the Lutin 
is the principal element in the structure of the English language, 
and the source — directly and through the French — of about thirty per 
cent, of our vocabulary. It is, therefore, almost indispensable for one who 
would know English critically and use it with assured exactness. 

It has been found that many students who seek the peculiar 
advantages offered by the Agricultural Colleges must enter, if at all, 
without having begun the study of Latin. They are fitting not for 
orie of the "learned professions," but for one of those spheres of labor 
in which a knowledge of the physical sciences is of chief importance. 
Yet they cannot without disadvantage omit altogether the study of 
Latin. A short course in this department has been arranged to meet 
the requirements of this class of students, wliile a more extended 



CATALOGUE. ig 

course is provided for others. In the former, the language is begun 
here and continued two years. In this course, after a thorough drill 
in the Grammar with daily Latin-English and Englisli -Latin exer- 
cises, two or three authors are critically read, and by the faithful 
student some of the chief benefits of Latin study are realized. 

The regular or full Latin course, leading with other studies, ^i=? 
specified in Courses of Study, to the degree of Bachelor of 
Philosophy, extends to the middle of the Senior year, embracing in 
addition to the work of the shorter course, the following authors : 
Livy, Horace, Tacitus, Juvenal, Terence and Plautus. Other authors 
may be substituted in the last year. 

The History of Rome is one of the studies common to all of 
the degree-courses and is made of especial value to Latin students. 



Modern Languages. 

Both German and French are required in each of the degi-ee- 
courses. The fact that these languages are spoken to a great extent 
in various portions of this country and that much of the highest 
scientific thought of the age, and records of the most skillful work in 
the mechanic arts are found in their current literature, makes them 
very useful subjects of study. 

French is taken up in the Sophomore year, German in the Junior 
and both are continued in the Senior year. The instruction is by the 
Natural Method until the pronunciation has been acquired and some 
readiness gamed in [the colloquial use of the languages, after which 
systematic^granmiatical work is done. 



20 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

AGRICULTURAL COURSE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

Algebra. Algebra. 

Physiology. Botany. 

English Structure. History. 

Latin. Latin, 

Agriculture. Agriculture. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

SOPHOMORE TEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

Oeometry. Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Physics. Chemistry. 

History. Rhetoric. 

French. French. 

Floriculture. Floriculture. 

Drawing. Drawing. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Compositit^i. 

JUNIOR TEAR. 

First Term. Second' Term. 

Analytical Geometry. Geodetic Surveying. 

Civil Engineering. Mech. Engineering, (Shop Practice.) 

Chemistry, (Qualitative Analysis.) C]ieraistr\-, (Organic.) 

Zoology- Zoology. 

Logic. English Literature. 

German. German. 

Drawing. Drawing. 

Agriculture. Agriculture. 

Elocution and Composite >n. Elocution and Composition. 

SENIOR TEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

Agriculture. Agriculture. 

Chemistry, (Quantitative Analysis.) Chemistrj', (Agricultural.) 

Mineralogy. Geology. 

Mental Science. Moral Science. 

Political Science. Political Science. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 



CATALOGUE. 21 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

FRESHMAN YEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

^^gebra. Algebra. 

Physiology. Botany. ; 

English Structure. History. 

I^atin. Latin. 

Agriculture. Agriculture. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

SOPHOMORE TEAR, 

First Term. Second Term. 

Geometry. Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Physics. . Chemistry. 

History. Rhetoric. 

French. French, 

Drawing. ^ Drawing. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

First Term. Second Term. 

Analytical Geometry. Geodetic Surveying. 

Civil Engineering. Mech. Engineering, (Shop Practice.) 

Chemistry, (Qualitative Analysis.) Chemistry, (Organic.) 

Logic. - English Literature. 

German. German. 

Drawing. Drawing. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

SENIOR YEAR, 

First Term. Second Term. 

Differential and Integral Calculus. Calculus of Variations. 

Civil Engineering. Mechanical Engineering. 

Drawing. Drawing. 

Mental Science. Moral Science. 

Political Science. Political Science. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. \ 



32 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

LITERARY-SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 

FBESHMAN TEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

Algebra. Algebra. 

Physiology. Botany. 

English Structure. History. 

Latin. Latin. 

Agricalture. Agriculture. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

First Term. Second Term. 

Geometry. Trigonometry and Surveying. 

Physics. Chemistry. 

Latin. Latin. 

History, Rhetoiic. 

French. French. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

JUNIOR TEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

Latin. Latin. 

Anahi;ical Geometry. Geodetic Surveying. 

Chemistry, (Qalitative Analysis). Chemistry, (Organic). 

Logic. English Literature. 

German. German, 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 

SENIOR TEAR. 
First Term. Second Term. 

Mineralogy. Geology. 

Chemistry, (Quantitative). Chemistry, (Quantitative). 

German. French. 

Mental Science. Moral Science. 

Elocution and Composition. Elocution and Composition. 



CATALOGUE. 



23 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



For tliose who are not sufficiently advanced to enter the Fresh- 
man Class, a Preparatory Course is provided with the following plan 
of study : 



First Term. 

United States History. 

English Grammar. 

Arithmetic. 

Latin. 

Penmanship. 

Elocution and Composition. 



Second Term. 

Physical Geography. 

English Grammar. 

Arithmetic. 

Latin. 

Penmanship. 

Elocution and Composition. 






34 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Military Organization. 

Military organization is made a distinctive feature in compliance 
with the Endowment Act of Congress of 1862. While always held 
subordinate and secondary to the higher educational objects of the 
College, it extends to every department, as the most effective means of 
maintaining good discipline. 

All students, unless physically disqualified, are required to parti- 
cipate in the prescribed military exercises. 

In order to enforce habits of personal neatness, as well as to insure 
a proper sanitary condition of the College, the Commandant makes 
daily inspections of quarters, and weekly inspections of all the College 
buildings, arms, accoutrements and equipments. Cadets are held to 
a strict accountability for the orderly condition of their rooms. 

At the beginning of the term, issues of such arms and equipments 
as they require, are made to all cadets. 

The drills occupy about four hours per week during the entire 
session, and include Infantry and Artillery Tactics. 

Infantry Tactics: The Schools of the Soldier, Company, and 
Battallion; Skirmish Drill ; Target Practice j Ceremonies and Field 
Service. 

Artillery Tactics : The Schools of the Soldier, Detacnment, and 
Battery, (dismounted.) 



CATALOGUE. 25 

The College is provided by the United States Government with 
the requisite number of breech-loading rifles, (cadet model,) and 
accoutrements, and two three-inch rifled-cannon with equipments. 

Theoretical instruction is given in Infantry Tactics, (Upton's),. 
and United States Army Artillery Tactics, For the Senior Class,^ 
lectures are provided on military engineering, construction of tem- 
porary bridges and j5eld fortifications, and kindred subjects of military 
science, which are of general interest, and constitute useful, practical 
knowledge. - 

The daily drill is an important factor in the physical culture of 
the cadets, insures a sufficient amount of healthful out-door exercise, 
especially to those inclined to sedentary habits, and gives vigor to the 
body, and grace and dignity to the bearing. 

For instruction in Infantry Tactics and purposes of discipline, 
the cadets are for the present organized into a company. A battalion 
of at least two companies will, however, be organized at the beginning 
of the next term. The officers, commissioned and non-commissioned, 
are selected from those cadets who are most exemplary in their con- 
duct, proficient in their studies and soldier-like in the discharge of 
their duties. As a rule, the commissioned officers are taken from the 
Senior, and the non-commissioned officers from the Junior and Sopho- 
more Classes. 



26 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

COMPANY ORGANIZATION FOR 1885—1886, 



CAPTAIN: 
Julius B. Weems. 



1st LIEUTEIS^ANT: 2d LIEUTENANT; 

C. 0. Palfrey. R M. Pindell. 

OEDNANCE SERGEANT: 
W. A. Sigler. 



SEEGEANTS: 

1st Sergeant: L. B. Johnson. 
2d '- E. D. Weaver. 

3d " C. M. Wyeth. 

4th « C. E. Willis. 

5th « M. C. Hazen. 



COEPOEALS. 

1st Corporal : T. J. Conrey. 
2d « E. E. Smith. 

3d « A. C. Tolson. 

4th " F. F. Lyden. 



CATALOGUE. 27 

MUSEUM. 

In the Museum is an excellent study collection of minerals and 
ores well classified, and thus of important service as a guide in the 
science of mineralogy. 

For use in the study of crystallography, there are models illus- 
trating all the systems of crystallization, with the most important 
modifications of typical forms. 

A compact, but by no means unimportant collection is one, pre- 
sented to the College by the U. S. Bureau of Forestry, containing 
specimens, labeled and indexed, of more than four hundred varieties 
of woods, grown in the United States, 

The collection of seeds contams many specimens of more than 
passing interest. 

Worthy of notice is the large number of models of agricultural 
machinery, furnished through the courtesy of the U. S, Patent Office, 
a collection embracing the latest models that have been allowed to 
leave the Department. Every variety of agricultural machinery is 
represented in the collection, and the classification and arrangement 
is such as to facilitate inspection and study. 

Other aids to the study of science included in the Museum are an 
herbarium, illustrating the flora of Maryland and the District of 
Columbia, also, a good collection of physiological charts and anatom- 
ical specimens. 

LIBRARY AND READING-ROOM. 

The College Library and the Library of the Mercer Literary 
Society together contain nearly two thousand volumes. 

The Reading- Room is supplied with a careful selection of news- 
papers, magazines and reviews. At present, thirty-three daily, weekly 
and monthly publications are regularly placed on the files. For the 
following magazines and papers, we are indebted to the publishers: 
Breeders' Jourfial, Gardners'' Montlily, Industriah'sf, Maryland 
Farjner, Massachusetts Plowman, Anne Arundel Advertiser, Centre- 



28 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

ville Record, Free QitiU, Harford Democrat, Laurel Revievj, Marlboro^ 
Gazette, Prince George's Enquirer, Rejjuhlican Citizen. Besides these^ 
all the U. S. Government Departments furnish their publications. 

MERCER LITERARY SOCIETY. 

The Literary Society was founded by Dr. Mercer, of New Orleans,, 
whose name it still bears. 

The society holds weekly meetings during the collegiate year, 
affordmg its members an excellent opportunity for practice in oratory 
and debate, in addition to what is provided in the regular college 
course. The advantages of this sort of training cannot easily be 
overestimated. Occasional public meetings are held. Members have 
access to the Society Library which is especially rich in history and 
biography. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The President is responsible for the government and manage- 
ment of the College, and supervises and controls all the departments^ 
collegiate and military. 

The Commandant is responsible to the President for the military 
organization and the maintenance of discipline in the corps of cadets. 
x\ll appointments of commissioned and non-commissioned officers are 
made on his recommendation, by the President. All infractions of 
rules and regulations, as well as the orderly and sanitary conditions of 
quarters and buildings, are reported daily to the President. 

Correct deportment is required of all cadets, not only within 
college limits, but also when absent on furlough. The use of intoxi- 
cating liquors, of tobacco in any form, of impure or profane language, 
playing of cards or dice, are strictly prohibited. No cadet will be 
permitted to have fire-arms of any description in his possession. 

No cadet shall leave the College limits without permission from 
the President. 



CATALOGUE. 29 

Hazing or personal violence to each other of any kind will not 
'be tolerated m tlie corps. 

While no sectarian influence is exercised or permitted to be exer- 
cised, yet students are required to attend divine service on Sundays, 
as well as the daily morning prayers in the College chapel. 

As the absence of a cadet from his class is not onlv detrimental 

to his own progress, but is also apt to embarrass seriously the work of 

the class and of the professor, and in order to facilitate the maintt 

nance of good discipline, the attention of parents and guardians is 

respectfully directed to that jiart of the College Regulations, Avhich 

governs absences and the granting of furloughs. 

"No student will be permitted to go home or elsewhere at any 
other time than the regularly established vacations, unless the parents 
or guardians explicitly re({uest the President to grant the j^rivilege. 

All furloughs are for a specified time, and any student absent on 
furlough who cannof return at the specified time, must notify the 
President, and give good and sufficient reasons for the granting of an 
extension of his furlough. 

Cadets, who on recommendation of the surgeon are granted sick- 
leave, must report through their parents or physician, within one 
week, the probable time when they hope to return, and in cases of 
prolonged sickness, must report on the state of their health Aveekly, 
or else their names will be dropped from the roils.'' 

.It is the intention to make the discipline firm and impartial, but 
lit .. severe, the chief aim being to insure, with as little severity as pos- 
sible, pr«)mpt and cheerful obedience to orders, respectful and gentle- 
manly demeanor toward the Faculty and towaids each other, and such 
orderly conduct in quarters and class-room, tis will protect each student 
individually in his right to derive all possible beneiit from the educa- 
tional advantages offered him, and as will ensure general comtort and 
a good sanitary condition of the buildings. Military r*' .pl^ue is at 
once the best and siiimlest means to this end. 



30 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

I^equirements for Admission. 

Examinations for admission and assignment to classes are held at 
tlie beginning of the College year, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, the 20th, 21st and 22d of Septmber, 1886, respectively. 

Candidates for admission must present testimonials of good moral 
character, and if coming from another college or school, a certificate 
< 1 honorable discharge. 

Candidates for admission into the Preparatory department must be 
v/ell grounded in the elements of a primary English education. They 
will be examined in Reading, Spelling, Elements of English Grammar, 
Geography, Elementary Arithmetic and Penmanship. 

Candidates for admission into the Freshman Class will be ex- 
amined in the studies laid down for the Preparatory Department of 
this C ollege or its equivalents. The same rule holds good for admis- 
sion into the more advanced classes, viz : Candidates for admission 
must pa?s examination in all the studies of the previous term, as laid 
do\\n in the Courses of Study, on page 11 of this catalogue. A 
student found deficient in any subject, may, however, be received, upon 
condition tiiat he be prepared for examination at some future definite 
time within tJie term he desires to enter. 

Candidates for admission coming from otlier colleges anthoriz ■ ' 
to confer degrees, will, upon presentation of a certificate of stiv a'.j.g 
from the proper officer of such college, be exempt froui extu..inatio.! 
in those studies which are equivalent to those in the Courses of St'al' 
herein prescibed. 

Candidates desiring to pursue a select course iu' Mathematics, 
Chemistry, Agriculture, Literature, or any other branches, may do so 
u]".on passing satisfactory examination for the Freshman year. They 
must, h<»v- er be guided in their selections by the existing arrange- 
ment *■'[■ A- -(i;'-;. They shall not be on titled, at the completion of their 
studie^.- : J -i (*• .jree, but will after passing successfully the final exami- 
isa^ior. in the studies selected, receive a certificate to that effect. 



MISSING 
PAGE(S)