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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

1886 



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ogue 



OF THE 



Maryland 




gricultural 







1886-1887 



WASHINGTON : 
JUDD & DETWEILER, PRINTERS, 

1887. 



ge- 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



CSLENDflR FOR 1887-'88. 



September 20, Tuesday, Fall Term begins, 8.45 A. M. 

November 24-25, Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 21, Wednesday, Vacation begins, 3 P. M. 

January 4, Wednesday, Vacation ends, 8.45 A. M. 

January 31, First Term ends. 

February i, Second Term begins. 

March 28, Wednesday, Easter Vacation begins, 3 P. M. 

April II, Wednesday, Easter Vacation ends, 8.45 A. M. 



June 19, Wednesday, Commencement. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Board of Bi^itor^. 



Prof. M. A. Newell Baltimore. 

Hon. Lloyd Lowndes .*. Alleghany. 

Col. H. Kyd Douglass Washington Co. 

Hon. E. H. Steiner Frederick Co. 

Frank Brown Carroll. 

Hon. William Clark, of T Howard. 

T. Alex. Seth Baltimore Co, 

John Moores Harford. 

E. J. Hall Montgomery. 

Hon. Nicholas Brewer Anne Arundel. 

Patrick Hamill Garrett. 

Geo. H. Calvert Prince George's. 

Col. J. F. Dent St. Mary's. 

Dr. R. C. Mackall Cecil. 

Hon. Wm. D. Burchinal Kent. 

Hon. Edward C. Legg Queen Anne's. 

Hon. Paul Winchester Talbot. 

Danl. M. Henry, Jr Dorchester. 

Henry Page Somerset. 

Hon. Lemuel Malone Wicomico. 

Hon. Andrew G. Chapman .Charles. 

Hon. G. W. Goldsborough Caroline. 

Hon. James T. Briscoe Calvert. 

Hon. Geo. W. Covington Worcester. 

AT LARGE. 

W. W. Corcoran Washington, D. C. 

Dr. C. M. Smith Franklin, La. 

Dr. I. L. Adkins... Talbot. 

Hon. John Randolph Tucker Lexington, Va. 

Hon, Henry G. Davis Deer Park, W. Va. 

Hon. James A. Gary Baltimore Co. 

Robert Garrett Baltimore, 

Gen. F. C. Latrobe " 

Judge Edward Duffy " 

Judge W. A. Stewart «' 

Hon. Jno. L. Thomas " 

Gen. Bradley T. Johnson *' 

Right Rev. A. M. Randolph, D.D Virginia. 

Hon. Edward Stake Washington Co. 

Hon. E. L. F. Hardcastle Talbot. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



?ruAtced. 



REPRESENTING THE STATE EX-OFFICIO. 



Hon. henry LLOYD, 

Governor of Maryland. 
President. 

Hon. E. E. JACKSON, 
Pres't of the Senate. 

Hon. JOSEPH B. SETH, 
Speaker of the House of Delegates. 

Hon. CHAS. B. ROBERTS, 
Attorney General. 

Hon. STEVENSON ARCHER, 
State Treasurer. 

Hon. J. FRANK TURNER, 
Comptroller. 



Hon. NORMAN J. COLMAN, 
IT. S. Com. of Agriculture. 



REPRESENTING THE STOCKHOLDERS. 



Hon. J. CARROLL WALSH. 
Hon. WILMOT JOHNSON. 
F. CARROLL GOLDSBOROUGH. 
ALLEN DODGE. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



^acultij. 



ALLEN DODGE, 

[^7'rusfee for the District of Columbia. '\ 
President pro tern, 

J. A. CHAMBLISS, A. M., 
Professor of English and Latin. 

G. S. FELLOWS, M. A., 
Professor of Chemistry. 

THOS. N. CONRAD, A. M., 

[Late President of Va. Agricultural and Mechanical College.'] 
Professor of Agriculture. 

* 



Professor of Mathematics and Commandant. 



-* 



Professor of Modern Languages. 

J. D. HIRD, A. B., 
Principal of the Preparatory Department. 

'K 



Registrar. 

G. S. FELLOWS, 
Librarian. 

J. A. CHAMBLISS, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



To be filled before the opening of the session. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



^ecturer^. 



Prof. M. A. NEWELL, 

Prluclpal of State Normal School. 

Prof. H. W. WILEY, 

Cbief Cbeinlst XJ. S. Departmeut of^ Agriculture. 

Prof. OTIS T. MASON, 

Curator Department ot £tlxitology-, U. S. National Museum. 

ETHNOLOGY. 

Prof. CHARLES V. RILEY, 

^Entomologist IT. S. Department of Agriculture. 

entomology. 
Prof. F. LAMSON SCRIBNER, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

FUNGL 

WILLIAM SAUNDERS, 

Superintendent of Grounds, IJ. S. Departmeut of Agriculture. 

HORTICULTURE. 

H. E. VANDEMAN, 

U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

POMOLOGY. 

Dr. ROBERT WARD, F. R. C. V. S., 

state Veterinary Surgeon. 

ZOOLOGY. 

Prof. B. E. FERNOW, 

Chief of Forestry Division, V. S. Department of Agriculture 

FORESTRY. 



Prof. WILLIAM S. YEATES, 

Department of Minerals, Smithsonian Institution. 

MINERALOGY. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



gatalogue of ^tudentA 



FOR THE 



SESSION 1886-'87. 



Banks, Morton D Baltimore. 

Brooks, B. L Dorchester Co. 

Carroll, John Baltimore. 

Carroll, Charles -. Baltimore. 

Chambliss, Samuel M Md. Agr'l College. 

Chase, Newell D Baltimore. 

CoNREY, Thomas J Cecil Co. 

Coombs, Roger B. T St. Mary's Co. 

DoRSEY, Hammond Anne Arundel Co. 

DoRSEY, Charles W Baltimore. 

Duval, A. P Harford Co. 

Fitzhugh, S. K Prince George's Co. 

Flack, George Baltimore. 

Gaither, W. R Montgomery Co. 

Garey, R Caroline Co. 

Griffith, Thomas Montgomery Co. 

Hazen, Melvin C Virginia. 

Henning, GeorgeW Washington, D. C. 

Hoge, Arista Baltimore. 

Humphrey, Charles P Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, L. B St. Mary's Co. 

Jones, Thomas O ....Baltimore. 

Keech, William S Baltimore Co. 



8 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Kellogg, Arthur D Washington, D. C. 

Kellogg, Clarence H Washington, D. C. 

Legge, Frank W Washington, D. C. 

Lyden, Fred'k F Dorchester Co, 

Manning, C. C Washington Co. 

Mitchell, D. C Ohio. 

Myers, Hector H Baltimore. 

NiLES, E. G Washington, D. C. 

Offutt, D. E Garrett Co. 

Palfrey, Charles C Louisiana. 

Pindell, Robert M Anne Arundel Co. 

PiNDELL, Augustus Anne Arundel Co. 

Pole, W. S Washington Co. 

Pratt, W. T Virginia. 

Rider, Edward Baltimore Co. 

Robinson, C. J Talbot Co. 

Russell, R. L Washington, D. C 

SiGLER, W. A Caroline Co. 

Smith, R. E Caroline Co. 

Smith, A. J Louisiana. 

Smith, Charles M Md. Agr'l College. 

Soles, C. E Pennsylvania. 

Somervell, Charles S Calvert Co. 

Stacy, A. B Washington, D. C. 

Stanhope, Ed. M Washington Co. 

Stevenson, Allen S Baltimore Co. 

Taylor, W. J Washington, D. C. 

Thomas, Webster Harford Co. 

TOLSON, Albert C » Queen Anne Co. 

Towers, L. B Caroline Co. 

Traverse, John C Dorchester Co. 

Turner, E. V Virginia. 

Veitch, P. H Garrett Co. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Weaver, Robt. D Washington, D. C. 

'Weems, J. B Calvert Co. 

W^iLSON, Morgan Washington, D. C. 

Wilson, R. G Caroline Co. 

\ViTMER, Frank Washington Co. 

WooLFORD, F. R Dorchester Co. 

WooLFORD, R. C Dorchester Co. 

' Wyeth, Chas. M Baltimore. 

Yngling, H. a Washington Co. 

Yost, W. B Garrett Co. 

y1 G 



'OCX- 





(^\^ 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



II 



Jjocctli 



I© 



9- 



j|4,HE MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE is loca- 
"■^ ted three-fourths of a mile from College Station, Prince 
George's Co., Md., on the Washington Branch of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad. Numerous trains daily afford easy communi- 
cation with all points. College Hill, on which stand the princi- 
pal college buildings, is a beautiful eminence, overlooking wide 
stretches of country. The surrounding farm embraces two hundred 
and eighty-six acres, forty of Avhich are woodland, and a large part 
of the remainder is under cultivation. The varied conditions and 
qualities of the soil offer excellent opportunities for agricultural ex- 
perimentation, and this, together with the beauty and healthfulness 
of the site, admirably adapts the location to the purposes of an educa- 
tional institution of this character. The city of Washington is 
only eight miles distant ; this proximity to the National Capital 
gives the College exceptional advantages in the valuable aids which 
it derives from the libraries and scientific departments of the Gov- 
ernment. 



jG)uild.l 



S. 



^p;HE main building, standing in the midst of a fine grove of 
"^P forest trees, is a massive brick structure, of six stories, one 
hundred and twenty feet long, and fifty-four feet wide. It pos- 
sesses accommodations for one hundred and fifty students, apart- 
ments for professors, class-rooms, armory, chapel, museum, reading 
room, parlors, dining room, and the necessary offices. The dormi- 
tories are spacious, well ventilated, and heated by steam. Well- 
water, forced by a wind-mill to a tank in the attic, is supplied to 



12 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



the several floors by a system of pipes. Careful provision is made 
for the maintenance of the proper sanitary condition of the build- 
ing. 

The Chemical Laboratory, a separate brick structure close to the 
main building, has been thoroughly refitted during the past year. 
It is furnished with steam-heat and gas, and with all the apparatus 
of a well-appointed laboratory. 

The Gymnasium, another detached building, erected for the pur- 
pose, affords opportunity for healthful exercise and muscular devel- 
opment. 

The President's residence occupies a pretty site a few hundred 
yards from the college. The barns, stables, and other farm build- 
ings are adequate and convenient. 



c=o§«»lo==>- 



'^ 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



13 



jQ)e.p(2[r'lrr)cr)is of ^ludy. 



^HE Act of Congress creating the endowment of State Agri- 
'<«15> cultural Colleges was passed July 2, 1862, and is entitled 
" An act granting public lands to the several States and Territories 
which may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts.' 
as follows : 



The aims of a college thus originated are defined 



" Its leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific 
and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic 
arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the States may, respect- 
ively, prescribe in order to promote the liberal and practical educa- 
tion of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
in life." 

In accordance with this " act " and corresponding legislation of 
the State of Maryland, the trustees of this College recognize their 
obligation to provide here, first of all, for thorough instruction in 
those " branches of learning which are related to agriculture and 
the mechanic arts." They have not yet been able fully to realize 
their hopes and purposes, but they are assured that the plans they 
have now devised will effect during the ensuing session a decided 
advance in this direction. The members of the Faculty are men 
chosen with special reference to their fitness for duties in an insti- 
tution of the character above indicated. The course of studv has 
been changed in certain important particulars to adapt it more 
perfectly to the " leading object ' ' of the College, and so far as means 
are available all appliances which are called for by this ''leading 
objecl: " will be provided. It is not intended that the time of 



14 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



I Students shall be occupied with the ordinary labors of the farm and 
workshop, but that, accompanied by their instructors, they shall 
spend certain fixed portions of the day, at suitable seasons, in the 
fields or in shops, observing and performing such operations as 
may illustrate the teachings of the class-room in the departments of 
agriculture and mechanic arts. 

But while these branches of learning will be thus strongly em- 
phasized, "other scientific and classical studies" will be included in 
the course as heretofore, so that a " liberal" as well as a " practical 
education" may be within the reach of the " industrial classes" 
to fit them for " the several pursuits and professions in life." In- 
struction in military tactics also will be given, as by law required. 
The course of study exhibited in the following pages leads to the 

I degree of Bachelor of Science, the diplomas being signed by the 

I Governor of the State, who is ex officio president of the Board of 

! Trustees. 



^ 



Ifx 



pioullurc. 



Instruction in agriculture, practical and scientific, claims the 
greatest possible attention and should command the highest mtelli- 
gence. In all its varied features, the cultivation of the soil interests 
the million, not only those whose efforts are solely directed towards 
obtaining from their scanty acres a sufficient support for the house- 
hold, but the retired merchant, the inheritor of large estates that 
have been impoverished by undue usage, and the enthusiast from 
every profession of life. Enlightened agriculture, pursued with 
the purpose of economical production, and illustrating the benefits 
derived from experiments in the field and in the laboratory, must 
result in improvement, must direct the novice or the fogy to more 
remunerative methods, must enlarge the return whilst it lessens the 
area, must exemplify the adage of making *' two blades of grass 
grow where one grew before." 

To the end, therefore, of preparing the youth of to-day for the 



^ 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



15 



improvement of what may be their patrimony to-morrow, agricul- 
tural instruction, by object lessons and text-books, will henceforth 
be our first consideration. How crops grow and feed, the pabulum 
or plant food requisite for their perfection and maturity, the con- 
stituents of food for milk or beef production, the protection of 
crops from injury by insects or parasites, the mechanical improve- 
ments for field or barn, the cultivation beneficial or hurtful to the 
growing plant, the problem of labor commensurate with fair rewards 
and fair returns, are all studies which lead to success and the attain- 
ment of a high position iii enlightened agriculture. 

In the effort to realize these aims and purposes, the laboratory, 
museum, and farm will supplement work in the lecture and class- 
room — practice and theory will go hand-in-hand, the one verifying 
or refuting the dictum of the other. The physiology of the vege- 
table and the animal kingdom, climatology, organography, and mor- 
phology, will be pursued as studies intimately related to agricul- 
ture. 

The principal text-books will be Martin's Physiology, Miles' 
Stock Breeding, Johnson's "How Crops Grow and Feed," Stover's 
Agriculture, Winston's Agricultural Mechanics, Gray's Botany, 
Loomis' Meteorology, &c. 



SIt)crr)islry. 

The Chemical Department has been thoroughly reorganized, 
and equipped as never before in its history. Its new quarters 
afford excellent facilities for practical work. Each student is pro- 
vided with a laboratory desk, together with all needful apparatus 
and reagents, for the condition of which he is held responsible. 

Inorganic Chemistry. — The facts and principles of general chem- 
istry must be mainly acquired in the study of the non-metallic ele- 
ments, hence special attention is paid to this introductory work before 
proceeding with the no less important study of the metals and their 



i6 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



I application in art and industry. Daily experiments illustrate the 

subjects under discussion. 

I 
I 

j Analysis. — Qualitative analysis of both simple and mixed sub- 
stances is taken up in the beginning of the Junior year, and includes 
blow-pipe analysis with determination of minerals and ores. Quan- 
titative analysis, both gravimetric and volumetric, is begun in the 
latter part of the Junior year. Agricultural chemical analysis is 
made an important feature of the course, and comprises the analysis 
of commercial fertilizers, feed-stuffs, water, milk ; also the detection 

! of adulteration in farm and manufactured products. 

Organic Chemistry. — A few series are studied exhaustively, a gen- 
eral survey of the field following, special attention being paid to 
compounds of interest to the agriculturist. 



r¥)crlbc 



.rr)i 



ifi 



QlICS. 



The study of mathematics is pursued only so far as the distinctive 
aims of this institution require, the course conforming in general 
to that adopted in the most approved Agricultural Colleges. The 
Freshman year begins with a review of Arithmetic, special atten- 
tion being given to the metric system and the operations of com- 
mercial arithmetic. This is accompanied by a brief course in 
single-entry book-keeping. Algebra is taken up at the opening of 
the second term, and completed by the middle of the Sophomore 
year. Then follow, through the Sophomore and Junior years. 
Geometry, Trigonometry, and Surveying. The field work in sur- 
veying will afford much practice in chain and compass surveying, 
transit and theodolite surveying, and running lines of levels. 

The related studies of Physics, Mechanics, and Drawing are for 
the present assigned to this Department. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 



17 



In the Department of English the first aim is to train the student 
to use his mother tongue, both in speaking and in writing, with 
correctness, ease, and force ; the second is to give him a useful 
acquaintance with the history of the English language and the 
treasures of its literature. Several cognate subjects, particularly 
Mental Science and Political Economy, are for the present assigned 
to this chair, the professor being assisted as far as necessary by one 
or more of his colleagues.. 

Text Books. — Swinton's Word Analysis, Kellogg's Rhetoric and 
Composition, Anderson's History of England or Leighton's His- 
tory of Rome, Shaw's New Manual of English Literature, Welsh's 
Essentials of English, Hale's Longer English Poems, Peile's 
Philology, Lownsbury's History of the English Language, Hill's 
Jevon's Logic, Chapin's Wayland's Elements of Political Economy, 
Hopkins' Outline Study of Man, Cooley's Principles of Constitu- 
tional Law. 

Exercises in Composition and Elocution are required througliout 
the course. Original essays and orations are called for in the Junior 
and Senior years. Critical readings from the great masters of 
English supplement the course in Literature. 

The study of Latin is optional. The course is open to those 
students only who enter with sufficient knowledge of the language 
to pass an examination on the first four books of Caesar de Bello 
Gallico, or an equivalent amount of other prose. 

Freshman. — Virgil, .^neid, Books I, II, III, IV ; Cicero, Ora- 
tions; Exercises (Jones); Roman History and Geography. 

Sophomore. — Livy, Selections ; Horace, Selections; Reviews and 
Reading at Sight ; Composition ; Roman Antiquities. 

Junior. — Tacitus ; Juvenal ; Reviews and Reading at Sight ; 
Composition ; Grammar, Allen «& Green ough, with reference to 
Gildersleeve ; Lexicon, Harper's or Andrews'. 



1 8 . MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



iTJoaepr) iietr)qu(Hraes. 
German and French. 



In view of the fact that these languages are spoken to a great 
extent in various portions of this country and that much of the 
highest scientific thought of the age, and records of the most skill- 
ful work in the mechanic arts, are found in their current literature, 
they must be regarded as useful acquirements. 

French is taken up in the Sophomore year, German in the Junior. 
The instruction is by the Natural Method until the pronunciation 
has been acquired and some readiness gained in the colloquial use 
of the languages, after which systematic grammatical work is done 
and various authors are read. It is not expected that students will 
be prepared to converse fluently in either French or German, but 
that they will obtain a good working knowledge of both languages. 




MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



19 



OUFSC 



f glud 



©7 



J>resr)rr)0r) V 



GQF. 



First Ter7H. 

Arithmetic, reviewed. 

Book-Keeping. 

Physiology. 

English. 

Latin — (optional. ) 

Freehand Drawing. 



Second Term. 
Algebra. 

Physical Geography. 
History. 

Latin — '^optional). 
Agriculture. 
Freehand Drawing. 



)pr)orr) 



ore. 



First Tei'in. 


Second Term. 


Algebra. 


Geometry. 


English. 


English. 


Latin — (optional.) 


Latin — (optional. ) 


French. 


Chemistry. 


Mechanical Drawing. 


Mechanical Drawing 


Stock-breeding. 


Botany. 



Jur)ioi' y 



cap. 



First Term. 
Trigonometry. 
Surveying. 
Physics. 
English. 
German . 
Biology. 
Agriculture. 
Laboratory work. 



Second Term. 

Mechanics. 

English. 

German. 

Zoology. 

Entomology. 

Agriculture. 

Surveying. 

Laboratory work. 



20 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 


1 


First Term. 


Second Term. 


Agriculture. 


Agriculture. 


Mineralogy. 


Geology. 


Mental Science. 


Political Economy. 


Moral Science. 


Constitutional History. 


Com. Anat. of Dom. Animals. 


Veterinary Science. 


Chemistry. 


Agricultural Mechanics. 


Shop work. 


Chemistry. 


j Laboratory work (optional. ) 


Shop work. 


j 


Laboratory work (opt'l.) 


I 




-^•Prepara'Eopg 


61agg.-^J^-^ 


; First Term. 


Second Term. 


Arithmetic (advanced ) 


Arithmetic (completed.) 


, Political Geography (compl'd.) 


History of U. S. 


Language Lessons. 


Language Lessons. 


Reading. 


Reading. 


Spelling, 


Spelling. 


Penmanship. 


Penmanship. 


Drawing. 


Drawing. 







i , 


MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL 


college. 


21 : 




^etffctlior) (S/pq(Z[r)i^0:li0r). 






, Commandant. 






ftaff. 








Cadet Lieut. S. M. Chambliss, 


Adjutant. 






Cadet Lieut. F. Rees Woolford, Quartermaster. 






Cadet R. D. Weaver, Q. M. Sera^eant. 




• 
i 


^oMipan-i^ ^. 






j 


W. A. Sigler, 


Captain. 






M. C. Hazen, . 


. 1st Lieut, 




t 


T. J. CONREY, 


2d Lieut. 






R. C. VVoolford, 


I St Sergeant. 




1 

i 


T. D. Griffith, 


2d- Sergeant. 






C. P. Humphreys, 


Corporal. 






^OWMpCXVVX^ §)|. 








L. B. Johnson, . 


Captain. 






R. E. Smith, . 


1st Lieut. 






A. C. Tolson, 


. 2d Lieut. 






C. S. Somervill, 


. ist Sergeant. 






P. H. Veitch, 


2d Sergeant. 




i 


R. B. Coombs, 


Corporal. 


1 



22 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



jIlili'Earg 5^aefieg and Digeipline. 



The act of Congress providing endowment for colleges in which 
" the leading object shall be" "to teach such branches of learning 
as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts," requires that 
military tactics be included in the course of study. In order to 
meet honestly this requirement all students in this College, except 
those who may be physically disqualified, are enrolled in military 
companies, and well instructed in military tactics. The drills, 
which occupy about four hours a week, constitute an important 
means of physical culture, insuring a sufficient amount of healthful 
out-door exercise, giving vigor to the body and grace and dignity 
to the bearing. The excellence of the instruction in this Depart- 
ment was evinced at the late National Drill (Washington, May, 
1886), when the company from this College obtained the second 
Cadet prize. 

As a rule the commissioned officers are appointed from the Senior 
and Junior classes, the non-commissioned from the Sophomore and 
Freshman. Promotions are made in consideration of good con- 
duct, proficiency in studies and military accomplishment. 

The military system is applied also to the discipline of the Col- 
lege. The Commandant makes it his care, as directed by the Pres- 
ident, to secure compliance with the established regulations. In 
the discharge of this duty he is efficiently aided by the cadet 
officers, who show an honorable pride in sharing the responsibility 
for the good order of the establishment. 

1. All disciplinary regulations are established by the Faculty, 
subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees. 

2. The President is the chief executive officer of the College 
and supervises all departments. 

3. The Commandant makes daily inspections of quarters and 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 23 

weekly inspections of all the College buildings, arms, accoutre- 
ments, and equipments, and reports regularly to the President any 
infractions of regulations. 

4. Students are forbidden to leave College limits without per- 
mission of the Commandant, and leave to go beyond one mile from 
the College will not be granted except by order of the President. 

5. Forbidden under penalty of expulsion are : Hazing, gambling, 
habitual profanity, the use of intoxicating liquors, including wine 
and beer, and the possession within College limits of powder or 
other explosive, or firearms of any description. The use of tobacco, 
also, within College limits, is strictly prohibited. 

6. An unexcused absence from class-room is reckoned as a failure 
in recitation, and for five such absences within a month in any one 
department a student will be subjected to a special examination in 
the neglected study, and may be reduced to a lower class. 

7. All students, unless excused by request of parents or guar- 
dians, are required to attend daily morning prayers and Divine 
service on Sunday in the College chapel. The Sunday services 
will be conducted by clergymen of different denominations. 

8. In general, every student is expected to render prompt and 
cheerful obedience to all requirements, to maintain a respectful and 
gentlemanly demeanor towards the Faculty, and such orderly con- 
duct in quarters, in class-room, and elsewhere as will protect each 
one in his right to derive all possible benefit from the educational 
advantages offered. 




24 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



In the Museum is an excellent study collection of minerals 
and ores, well classified, and thus of important service as a guide 
in the science of mineralogy. 

For use in the study of crystallography there are models illus- 
trating all the systems of crystallization, with the most important 
modifications of typical forms. 

A small, but by no means unimportant, collection is one pre- 
sented to the College by the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
containing specimens, labeled and indexed, of more than four 
hundred varieties of woods grown in the United States. 

Worthy of notice is the large number of models of agricultural 
machinery furnished through the courtesy of the U. S. Patent 
Office. Other aids to the study of science included in the 
Museum are an herbarium, illustrating the flora of Maryland and 
the District of Columbia, also a good collection of physiological 
charts and anatomical specimens. 



lEibraricA. 



The library of the College, which is mainly for reference in the 
departments of agriculture and general science, contains several 
hundred valuable books. The library of the Literary Society has 
probably fifteen hundred volumes, and the private libraries of the 
professors as many more. All of these are accessible to students 
under proper conditions. The great libraries of the National 
Capital also are within almost as easy reach as if the College were 
located in Washington. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



25 



Seadinq-Poom ^66ociation. 

The students, assisted by the Faculty, support a reading room 
which is amply supplied with newspapers, magazines, and reviews. 
At present forty-seven daily, weekly, and monthly publications are 
regularly placed on file, including leading papers of Baltimore, 
Washington, New York, Louisville, Atlanta, and other cities ; 
Harper's Monthly and Weekly, The Century, The Forum, North 
American Review, Scientific American and Supplement, Popular 
Science Monthly, Frank Leslie's, Golden Days, Youth's Com- 
panion, etc. 

For the following magazines and papers the Association is 
indebted to the politeness of the publishers : Breeders' Journal, 
Gardeners' Monthly, Industrialist, Maryland Farmer, Massachusetts 
Plowman, Anne Arundel Advertiser, Centerville Record, Cambridge 
Chronicle, Democrat and News, Denton Journal, Federalsburg 
Courier, Free Quill, Harford Democrat, Marlboro Gazette, Penin- 
sula Farmer, Prince George's Enquirer, Republican Citizen, 
Travelers' Record, Appleton's Bulletin, Patent Office Gazette. 



Phc gerccr gitcrary gocicty 






Holds weekly meetings, affording its members excellent oppor- 
tunities for practice in oratory and debate. The advantages of this 
sort of training are not to be overlooked in estimating College 
life. Occasional public meetings are held. The Society library, 
which is open to members, is especially rich in history, biography^ 
and the works of great statesmen. 



26 MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



(?<^^i 



ISSI©] 



Students are not received under fourteen years of age. The 
entrance examination for the Preparatory Class covers the follow- 
ing subjects : Reading, spelling, elements of English grammar, 
political geography, the fundamental operations of arithmetic, and 
penmanship. 

For admission into the Freshman class applicants will be exam- 
ined in the studies laid down for the Preparatory class (see page 
20) or their equivalents. Applicants for a higher class must pass 
examination on any part or the whole of the course below the point 
at which they would enter. 

Students from other colleges authorized to confer degrees, or 
from the High Schools of Maryland and Washington, D. C, may 
present a certificate of proficiency in any subject as an equivalent 
of examination here in a corresponding subject. 



§:cpen6e6. 



A SINGLE charge of ^200 covers all expenses for tuition, board, 
with furnished room, heat, lights, and washing. Text books (about 
^10 per session) and stationery will be furnished by the College at 
cost prices, provided cash is paid ; otherwise regular retail prices 
will be charged. Text books in good condition may be returned 
after use at fair valuations. 



gcholar6hip4. 



A NUMBER of scholarships have been provided which materially 
reduce the expenses of students who secure them. They are con- 
ferred as a reward of merit, not as a dole to poverty, so that rich 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 27 

and poor share alike in the advantages. Appointments are made 
by the school examiners of the several counties of the State, prefer- 
ence being given to students of most correct deportment and most 
studious habits. Applicants for scholarships should address, '' Sec- 
retary of Faculty, Agricultural College, Md.," who will give them 
all needful information. 



Jagmcnt6. 

The session is divided into three fiscal terms, and all dues for 
each of these terras must be paid in advance, viz : On the day of 
entrance, one-third ; on January 4, 1888, one-third ; on April 5, 
1888, one-third. In special cases arrangements may be made to 
pay in smaller installments at shorter dates, but in such cases "^^j- 
va.Qni's, ifiust stilt be in advance for the time agreed upon. The low 
rates at which students are received can only be maintained by pur- 
chasing all supplies at wholesale for cash, and this is rendered 
possible only by insisting upon advance payments in every instance. 
The three payments for those who hold scholarships will be ^50 
each ; for all others, ^66.66 each. All students must also be pro- 
vided with means to pay cash for books and stationery, say ^4 each 
term, most of which will be refunded if books are returned. 
Damage to furniture or building within a bedroom will be assessed 
against the occupants of the room ; other damages to College prop- 
erty against the students as a body. 

Day scholars will be received at ^10 for each of the three fiscal 
terms, payable in advance, when not in recitation they will occupy 
the study hours in the library. 



Iniform, S^c. 



The uniform worn by the students is of gray cloth, cut accord- 
ing to the pattern adopted at the U. S. Military Academy. Every 



28 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



Student is required to procure immediately after entering a fatigue 
suit, costing, with the cap, about ^15. A little later he will need a 
full-dress coat, and by midwinter a second pair of pants. The 
total cost of the uniform for the year should not exceed ^35. To 
insure economy as well as uniformity in quality and pattern, the 
military suits must be purchased from the College and payment 
must accompany the order. The uniform is required to be worn 
at all College exercises and whenever a student leaves College limits. 
Each bedroom is furnished with two single beds, a clothes-press, a 
table, a washstand, with bowl, pitcher, &c., and two chairs. All 
articles of bedding, except the mattress, must be furnished by the 
student ; also, a study lamp, towels, table-napkins, clothes-bags, and 
proper toilet articles, all to be marked with the owner's name. 

B@°" Address all communications to — 

President of Md. Agr. College, 

Agricultural College, Md. 



gM" ^ 




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