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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

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catalogue: 



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©ollege, 



Thirtikth year. 



BALTIMORE : 

THE MARYLAND LAW JOURNAL CO. 

1889. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



CALENDAR FOR iSSg-'go. 



September 17, Tuesday, Examinations for admission. 
September 18, Wednesday, Fall Term begins, 9 A. M. 

Thirteen Weeks. 
December 18, Wednesday, Fall Term ends at noon. 
January 2, Thursday, Winter Term begins, 9 A. M. 

Thirteen Weeks. 
April 2, Wednesday, Winter Term ends at noon. 

(Easter, April 6th.) 

April 9, Wednesday, Spring Term begins, 9 A. M. 

Ten Weeks. 

June 18, Wednesday, Graduation Day. 

Spring Term ends at sunset. 

June 19, Thursday, Examinations for admission to the college, the 

following Autumn. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



Members Ex-Offlcio, under State I<aw^: 

His Excellency E. E. JACKSON, Governor, 

President of the Board. 

Hon. GEORGE PETER, President of the Senate. 

Hon. GEORGE M. UPSHUR, Speaker of the House of Delegates. 

Hon. WILLIAM Plf^KNEY WHYTE, Attorney General. 

Hon. L. victor BAUGHMAN, Comptroller of the Treasury. 

Hon. STEVENSON ARCHER. State Treasurer. 

*HoN. NORMAN J. COLMAN, U. S. Corn' r of Agriculture. 

Members Elected by the Stockholders : 

Hon. J. CARROLL WALSH, Jerusalem Mills, Harford Co. 
Hon. WILMOT JOHNSON, Catonsville, Baltimore Co. 
CHAS. B. CALVERT, Esq., Agricultural College, P. G. Co. 
ROBERT A. DOBBIN, Esq., St. Denis, Baltimore Co. 
ALLEN DODGE, Esq., Washington, D. C. 

Members by Executive Appointment: 

Terms Expire. 
Col. F. CARROLL GOLDSBOROUGH, Easton, Talbot Co. 1894 

DAVID SEIBERT. Esq., Clear Spring, Washington Co.- 1894 

GEORGE R. WILLIS, Esq., 213 Courtland St., Baltimore. 1892 

DR. CHARLES A. WELLS, Hyattsville, Prince George's Co. 1892 

JEREMIAH P. SILVER, Esq., Glenville, Harford Co. 1890 

fDR. A. P. SHARP, Rock Hall, Kent Co. 1890 



♦Vacant. Office expired by Constitutional limitation, February, 1889. 
tResigned. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



FACULTY. 

HENRY E. ALVORD, C. E., 
Presideni and Lecturer on Agriculture and History. 

THOMAS N. CONRAD, A. M., M. Sc, 
Professor of the Principles and Practice of Agriculture. 

*JOS. F. JAMES, A. M., M. Sc, 
Professor of Natural History. 

JOHN D. HIRD, A. M. 
■ Professor of Chemistry. 

J. A. CHAMBLISS, A. M., 
Professor of Language and Literature. 

W. H. ZIMMERMAN, A. M.,: 
Professor of Physics and German. 

ALBERT B. SCOTT, Lieut., 13th Infantry, U. S. Army, 
Professor of Mathematics and Commandant. 

tPAUL COMBS, A. B., 
Assistant Professor of English and Latin. 

JULIUS B. WEEMS, B. S., 
Instructor in Mathematics and Chemistry. 

W. HORACE SOPER, Registrar. 

Prof. CHAMBLISS, Secretary of the Faculty. 

Prof. COMBS, Librarian. 



Resigned Feb. 1889. t Died Dec. 27th, 1888. 




LECTURERS, 



F. L. KILBORNE, B. V. S., 
U. S. Bureau of Animal Industry. 

Lecturer on Comparative Anatomy of Domestic Animals and Veterinary Science 

and Practice. 

M. G. ELLZEY, M. D., 

Proprietor of Earns cliff e Stock Farm, Woodstock, Md.; formerly 

Professor of Agriculture, Virginia Agricultural College. 

Lecturer upon the Principles of Breeding Domesticated Animals. 

C. HART MERRIAM, M. D., 
Chief of Division of Ornithology , U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
Lecturer on the Birds and Mammals of America in their Belations to Agriculture. 

GEORGE P. MERRILL, M. S., 

Curator, Dept. of Lithology and Physical Geography, U. S. National 

Museum. 
Lecturer on the Practical Aspects of Physical Geography and Geology. 



OFFICERS OF THE 



DyCaryland ^i^^gri cultural E2<^perinieril Stalion 

CONNECTED WITH THE COLLEGE. 



HENRY E. ALVORD, C. E., 

Director. 

HARRY J. PATTERSON, 

Chemist. 

WILLIAM H. BISHOP, 

Horticulturist. 

ALBERT I. HAYWARD, 

A griculturist. 

ERNEST H. BRINKLEY, 
Machinist. 

ELMER M. DUNN, 

Stenographer. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS 



FOR THE 



SESSION OF i888-'89. 



AMMEN, ULYSSES GRANT, 
AMMEN, PRANOIS DUPONT, 
BESLEY, FRED. WILSON, 
BRANCH, CHARLES, 
BROOKS, JOHN DOSHER, 
CALVERT, RICHARD CREAGH M., 
CALVERT, GEORGE HENRY, 
CHEW, FRANK, 
DROOP, CARL ADOLPH, 
GALLOWAY, HOWARD BURGESS, 
GAMBRILL, WILLIAM GORMAN, 
GAMBRILL, STEPHEN WARFIELD, 
GAREY, ROLAND TATE KEENE, 
GOLDSBOROUGH, MATTHEW T., Jr., 
GOODHAND, CHARLES LUTHER, 
GRIFFITH, THOMAS DAVID, 
HARKNESS, DA\^D ANTHONY, 
HOLLYDAY, CARMICHAEL, 
JACKSON, THOMAS LAMAR, 
KEECH, WILLIAM SCOTT, Jk., 
KENNEDY, WILLIAM BYRON, 
LANGLEY, JAMKS CLARENCE, 
LATIMER, JAMES BRAl NER, 



Ammendale, Prince George's Co. 

Ammendale, Prince George's Co. 

Ash Grove, Fairfax Co., Va. 

EUicott City, Howard Co. 

Brookland, D. C. 

Agricultural College, Prince George's Co. 

Agricultural College, Prince George's Co. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Washington, D. C. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Laurel, Prince George's Co. 

Laurel, Prince George's Co., 

Denton, Caroline Co. 

Easton, Talbot Co. 

Kent Island, Queen Anne's Co. 

Redland, Montgomery Co. 

Port Republic, Calvert Co. 

Easton, Talbot Co. 

Burnt Mills, Montgomery Co. 

Towson, Baltimore Co. 

Washington, 1). C. 

Scotland, St. Mary's Co. 

Port Republic, Calvert Co. 



j MANNING, CHARLES CHENEY, 
MIDDLETON, ARTHUR LUTHER, 
NILES, EDWARJJ (JRANT, 
PARKER, THOMAS MILLAR, 
PENN, SU, 

I PINDELL, ROBERT MONTGOMERY, 
RAY, JAMES ENAS, Jr., 

! RUSSELL, ROBERT LEE, 



SAULSBURY, NEHEMIAH RIDGELY. 
SEIBERT, WALTER STEWART, 
SMITH, FREDERICK JOHN, 
SOLES, CLARENCE ELDER, 
STALEY, JOHN EDDIE, 
STEVENSON, BURTON, 
TOWERS, LAWRENCE BARTON, 
VEirCH, FLETCHER PEARRE, 
WILSON, ROBERT GORDON. 
WITMER, FRANK, 



Hagerstown, Washington Co. 

Branchville, Prince George's Co. 

Washington, D. C 

Beltsville, Prince George's Co. 

Seoul. Corea. 

Pindell, Anne Arundel Co. 

Prince George's Co. 

Washington, D. C. 

Ridgely, Caroline Co. 

Clear Spring, Washington Co. 

Washington, D. C. 

McKeesport, Pa. 

Fairfield, 111. 

Rider, Baltimore Co. 

Denton, Caroline Co. 

Laytonsvllle, Montgomery Co. 

Denton, Caroline Co. 

Hagerstown, Washington Co. 



GRADUATES OF 1889. 



THOMAS D. GRIFFITH, B. S. 
ROBERT M. PINDELL, Jr., B. S. 
NEHEMIAH R. SAULSBURY, B. S. 
FRANK WITMER, B. S. 



GRADUATES OF 1888. 



SAMUEL M. CHAMBLISS, A. B. 
MELVIN C. HAZEN, B. S. 
LEONARD B. JOHNSON, A. B. 
WILLIAM A. SIGLER, B. S. 
ROBERT E. SMITH, B. S. 
ALBERT C. TOLSON, A. B. 
JULIUS B. WEEMS, B. S. 



HISTORY. 



THE MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Was the second of its kind, still in existence, in America, to open its 
doors to students, and the first and only one established by the vol- 
untary contributions of public-spirited citizens. The charter, "to 
establish and endow an agricultural college in the State of Mary- 
land" * * * "in which the youthful student may especially be 
instructed in those arts and sciences indispensable to successful 
agricultural pursuits," was granted in March, 1856, being more than 
six years before the first Federal legislation for a similar purpose. 

As a foundation, about five hundred liberal residents of Mary- 
land, most of them directly interested in the agricultural property 
and progress of the State, together with a few non residents, sub- 
scribed the amount necessary to purchase the farm and erect the 
first buildings. Subsequently the State made special appropriations 
to the College, which are still continued, and this institution re- 
ceives the benefits of the Congressional land grant to Maryland, 
under the act of July 2d, 1862 ; also the appropriations under the 
act of Congress of March 2d, 1887. 



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LOCATION. 



HE COLLEGE is located three-fourths of a mile from College 
Station, Prince George's Co., Md., on the Washington Branch 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Numerous trains daily 
afford easy communication with all points. College Hill, on which 
stand the principal college buildings, is a beautiful eminence, over- 
looking wide stretches of country. The surrounding farm embraces 
two hundred and eighty-six acres, forty of which are woodland, and 



a large part of the remainder is under cultivation. The conformation 
of the farm and diversity of its soil offer excellent opportunities for 
varied agricultural operations, and this, together with the beauty and 
healthfulness of the site, admirably adapts the location to the pur- 
poses of an educational institution of this character. The city of 
Washington is only eight miles distant ; this proximity to the National 
Capital gives the College exceptional advantages in the valuable aid 
which it derives from the libraries and scientific collections of the 
different Departments of the Government. 



POST OFFICE. 



I HE post-office address is Agricultural College, Prince George's 
Co., Md. Telegrams and express matter should be sent to 
College Station (B. and O. R. R.) 



BUILDINGS. 



I HE main building, standing in the midst of a fine grove of forest 
trees, is a massive brick structure of six stories, one hundred 
and twenty feet long and fifty-four feet wide. It possesses ac- 
commodations for one hundred and fifty students, apartments for 
professors, class-rooms, chapel, museum, library, reading room, 
armory, parlors, dining room, and the necessary offices. The dor- 
mitories are spacious, well ventilated, and heated by steam. Well- 
water, forced to tanks in the attic, is supplied to the several floors by 
a system of pipes. Careful provision is made for the maintenance of 
the proper sanitary condition of the building. 



The Chemical Laboratory, a separate brick structure close to the 
main building, has been recently thoroughly refitted. It is furnished 
with water, steam and gas, and with all the apparatus of a well ap- 
pointed laboratory. 

The Gymnasium, another detached building, erected for the pur- 
pose, affords opportunity for healthfnl exercise and muscular develop- 
ment. 

The President's residence occupies a fine site a few hundred yards 
from the college. 

The farm buildings are simple and inexpensive, but adequate and 
convenient. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station has its offices and working 
quarters in the substantial brick structures, formerly known as " Ross- 
burgh," now completely renovated, and situated about a hundred 
rods from the college buildings, in the midst of the fields especially 
assigned to experiment purposes. 




DEPARTMENTS OF STUDY. 



I HE Act of Congress creating the endowment of State Agricul- 
tural Colleges was passed July 2d, 1862, and is entitled "An act 
granting public lands to the several States and Territories which 
may provide colleges for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic 
arts." The aims of a college thus originated are defined as follows : 

" Its leading object shall be, without excluding other scientific 
and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic 
arts, in such manner as the Legislatures of the States may respec- 
tively prescribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical educa- 
tion of the industrial classes in the several pursuits and professions 
in life." 

In accordance with this "act" and corresponding legislation of 
the State of Maryland, the trustees of this College recognize their 
obligation to provide here, first of all, for thorough instruction in 
"those branches of learning which are related to agriculture and 
the mechanic arts." They have not yet been able fully to realize 
their hopes and purposes, but they are assured that the plans they 
have now devised will effect a steady advance in this direction. The 
members of the Faculty are men chosen with special reference to 
their fitness for duties in an institution of the character above indi- 
cated. The course of study has been changed in certain important 
particulars to adapt it more perfectly to the "leading object" of the 
College, and so far as means are available all appliances which 
are correspondingly called for, will be provided. It is not intended 
that the time of the students shall be occupied with the ordinary 
labors of the farm and workshop, but that, accompanied by their in- 
structors, they shall spend certain fixed portions of the day, at suit- 
able seasons, in the fields or stables, observing and performing such 
operations as may illustrate the teachings of the class room in the 
department of agriculture and instruct in their proper execution. 



But while these branches of learning will be thus strongly empha- 
sized, "other scientific and classical studies ' will be included in the 
course as heretofore, so that a " liberal" as well as a "practical edu- 
cation" may be within the reach of the " industrial classes" to fit them 
for "the several pursuits and professions in life." Instruction in mili- 
tary tactics also will be given, as by law required. 

Experience has proved that the course of instruction offered at 
this and kindred institutions, forms an exceptionally good prepara- 
tion for those desiring to pursue later professional studies for law or 
medicine, often saving a full year of time at the expensive professional 
schools. And the range of study here is so broad, truly liberal and 
and thoroughly practical, that the giaduate is well-fitted for general 
business. 



AGRICULTURE. 



Agricultural property in the older States has depreciated in value 
in recent years and it is generally admitted that the successful and 
profitable pursuit of farming is more difficult than in former times. 
The changed condition of affairs is recognized by everyone. Active 
and increasing competition, lower prices for products and higher rates 
for labor, compel greater economy on the farm and a closer study of 
the markets. A greater diversity in crops and stock is found advisable 
as a rule. The owner, renter or manager of agricultural land needs 
to apply less phsyical strength, but more brain-work, than in years 
past. In short, it is now almost universally recognized that the busi- 
ness of farming and gardening requires a special preparation and 
training, or in other words a special education for its successful pur- 
suit, just as is found necessary for other gainful occupations. 

The Maryland Agricultural College aims to supply this particu- 
lar line of education. It does not expect one of its students or grad- 
uates to perform the manual labor of the farm any better than if he 
had never attended college. But it does enable him to understand 
better the reasons for such labor, and the right time and method of 
its application, — to judge of skilled and unskilled labor and manage 
it economically and wisely, — to understand the principles of the con- 




struction and use of labor-saving appliances so as to select and ope 
rate them with judgment, — to know the natural laws and their 
modifications, which should govern the cultivation of the soil, the 
production of crops and rearing of domestic animals, — and the 
many ways in which modern science can be brought to the aid of 
agriculture, by preserving the natural fertility of the earth, restor- 
ing the productiveness of worn lands, and by improved methods 
enlarging the returns, while lessening the area and cost of produc- 
tion. 

This class of instruction is not only becoming a necessity to those 
who must obtain a livelihood by farming, but it is equally useful and 
profitable to the retired merchant or professional mam, the inheritor 
of large estates which have been impoverished by long continued 
cropping, and the lover of nature and country life, whatever may 
be his special occupation. It is a training in the observation of natu- 
ral objects and practical affairs which proves useful in all the walks 
of life, although especially adapted to those who have the ownership, 
use or management of agricultural land and country property. 

In the effort to realize these aims and purposes, the laboratory, 
museum, library, stable and fields are used to supplement work in 
the class and lecture room. Practical illustration or object lessons go 
hand in hand with theory and the teachings of science. The Agricul- 
tural Experiment Station, provided for this State by the Act of Con- 
gress approved March 2d, 1887, has been established upon the college 
farm, and although a distinct branch of the institution, it adds greatly 
to the facilities for agricultural instruction. Finely equipped, with a 
corps of scientific workers, the operations of the station, in original 
investigations and practical tests and experiments, prove interesting 
and instructive alike to the students of the college and to all engaged 
in the progress of agricultural and horticultural affairs. 

In short, the Maryland Agricultural College will be conducted in 
accordance with its name and original object, as described in its com- 
prehensive charter, and the subsequent legislation, both State and 
National, which so clearly defines its special purpose. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, I5 



NATURAL HISTORY. 

The various branches of study which are embraced in this gene- 
ral title are of the first importance to one who is constantly subjected 
to the laws of nature in the operations of farm and garden. Among 
these branches are climatology, geology, mineralogy, botany, zoology, 
and comparative anatomy, and entomology. It is the purpose to teach 
these according to the latest researches of modern science and by the 
most approved and practical methods. A knowledge of these sub- 
jects is equally essential to the physician and of great value to the 
lawyer and the business man. 

The unsurpassed collections in Washington, at the Smithsonian 
Institution, the National Museum, and the Department of Agricul- 
ture, all easily accessible, are of the highest value in connection with 
the instruction in this department. 

CHEMISTRY. 

The Chemical Department has been thoroughly reorganized 
and equipped as never before in its history. Its new qiiarters afford 
excellent facilities for practical work. Each student is provided with 
a laboratory bench, together with all needful app;iratus and re-agents, 
for the condition of which he is held responsible. 

Inorganic Chemistry. — The facts and principles of general chem- 
istry must be mainly acquired in the study of non-metallic elements ; 
hence special attention is paid to this introductory work before pro- 
ceeding with the no less important study of the metals and their ap- 
plication in art and industry. Daily e.xperiments illustrate the subjects 
under discussion. 

Ana/ysis. — Qualitative analysis of both simple and mixed sub- 
stances is taken up during the Sophomore year, and blow-pipe 
analysis with determination of minerals and ores at the beginning of 
the Junior year. Qualitative an ilysis, both gravimetric and volumet- 
ric, is also included in the Junior year. Agricu tural chemical analy- 
sis is made an important feature of the course, and comprises the 



analysis of commercial fertilizers, fodders, feed-stuffs, water, milk ; 
also the detection of adulteration in farm and manufactured products, 
and the examination of soils. 

Organic Chemistry. — A few series are studied exhaustively, a 
general survey of the field following, special attention being paid to 
compounds of interest on the farm. The laboratory work of the 
Senior year consists of the practical application of chemistry to agri- 
culture. 

MATHEMATICS. 

The study of mathematics is pursued only so far as the distinc- 
tive aims of this institution require, the course conforming in general 
to that adopted in the most approved Agricultural Colleges. The 
Freshman year begins with a review of Arithmetic, special attention 
being given to its application to the daily affairs of life. This is ac- 
companied by a brief course in single entry book-keeping. Algebra 
is then taken up and completed by the middle of the Sophomore year. 
Geometry, Mensuration, Trigonometry and Surveying follow in the 
Sophomore and Junior years. The field work in surveying will afford 
much practice in the use of chain and compass, transit and theodolite, 
surveying and leveling. This practice is continued in the Senior year 
witii application in running old farm lines, mapping farms, dividing- 
lands, highway surveying and road-making, with cuts and fills, drain- 
ing and water works. During this year, also, the elements of Civil 
Engineering are taught with a consideration of the strength of mate- 
rials and the general principles of building and construction. 

• Drawing is, for the present, assigned to this department, and ex- 
tends through three years, being taught in its practical aspects, rather 
than as an artistic accomplishment. 

PHYSICS AND MECHANICS. 

The course of Instruction in Pliysics and Mechanics aims to make 
clearly understood the principles of tiie different mechanical powers 
and the physical forces of nature and their industrial applications. 



The method of instruction is by means of recitations and lectures 
accompanied by experimental demonstrations. 

The students of the senior class are required to take notes of the 
lectures and experiments and illustrate them by suitable drawings. 
These notes are examined at intervals and marked according to their 
value. 

The course embraces the general properties of matter ; laws of 
falling bodies ; hydrostatics, hydro-dynamics, and pneumatics ; also 
the principles of sound, light, heat, electricity, magnetism and electro- 
magnetism. 

Great care is taken throughout the course to array the various 
branches of science in natural groupings, in order to emphasize their 
intimate relations. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

An Accurate and a refined use of the mother tongue is the chief 
aim of the course in the department of English. In the earlier stages 
there is persistent drill in analysis of sentences, in word-building 
and derivation, and in the elements of style, with constant practice in 
expression, oral and written. The history of the language is then 
taken up, with respect to its vocabulary, grammar and different 
periods. This is followed by the historical and critical study of Eng- 
lish literature. Throughout the course, the text books used are 
supplemented by conversational lectures and parallel readings. 

To this department have been assigned the related subjects of 
Logic, Mental Science, Constitutional History and Political Economy 
— most of these in the Senior year. 

LATIN. 

The study of Latin will be offered in a continuous course of four 
years and optional with the student, benig accepted as a substitute for 
French or German, or some of the scientific branches of Junior and 
Senior years. If Latin is elected at the beginning of Freshman year, 
it must be pursued the whole year, and must also be taken a second 
year, unless a substitute be arranged satisfactory to the Faculty. Only 
those will be admitted to the advanced Latin classes who are quali- 
fied to hold a good position in them. 




FRENCH AND GERMAN. 

Two years of instruction will be offered in each of these modern 
languages, and if either is taken it must be pursued that length of 
time. These languages will be optional and accepted in place of 
Latin or some other studies of the course, to be designated. The 
ability to read the language will be sought as the end of main impor- 
tance, but the course will be such as to include attention to pronuncia- 
tion and ordinary conversation. 

MILITARY. 

The Act of Congress which contributed the greater part of 
the endowment of the College, was accepted by the State under con- 
ditions which make instruction in military tactics imperative. The 
students are, therefore, organized as a corps of cadets under the com- 
mandant, who is an officer of the Regular Army, detailed for this 
duty by the War Department, and is, for the time, a member of the 
faculty. They are uniformed, and every one, unless physically de- 
barred, is required to attend such exercises as are prescribed and 
is subjected to military discipline to a certain degree. 

These exercises are believed to be decidedly beneficial and the 
tactical instruction is thoroughly given. The drills, which occupy 
three or four hours a week, furnish excellent physical culture, insuring 
regular and heakhful exercise at all seasons and out of doors when- 
ever possible. Neatness in dress, graceful carriage of the body and 
dignified bearing, are secured by the drill, and habits are acquired 
of prompt obedience and self-control and the power to command. , 

The excellence of the instruction in this department was shown 
in May, 1886, when, at the National Drill at Washington, the Corps 
of Maryland Agricultural Cadets received the second cadet prize in 
the competitive drill. 

The members of the upper classes who show attention to duty 
and proficiency in drill are detailed in rotation to perform the duties 
of commissioned and non-commissioned officers of the company and 
battalion. 



MIS 
PAC 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 23 

As Stated in the Calendar, the regular examinations for admission 
are held at the College on the day following the annual Graduation 
Day, in June, and in September on the day next preceding that for the 
opening of the fall term of the institution, beginning at nine o'clock 
A. M. on these days; but candidates may, be examined and admitted 
at any other time in the year. 

DEGREES. 

Those who complete the prescribed course of study and maintain 
the required standard of scholarship will receive the degree of Bache- 
lor of Science, the diploma being signed by the Governor of Mary- 
land, who is ex-officio, president of the corporation. In case the 
student, by taking the optional studies and substitutes of the Junior 
and Senior years, makes his course more literary in character, the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts may be conferred. 

TUITION AND EXPENSES. 

Tuition is free to all students, whether residents of the State of 
Maryland or not. To cover the necessary expenses of the year at 
College, clothing excepted, a single charge is made of one hundred 
and sixty-five dollars (I165). This includes board, furnished room, 
heat, lights, washing and the necessary text-books. 

Students whose homes are in the neighborhood will be allowed to 
attend the college exercises daily upon payment of forty dollars (I40) 
per annum. They will be assigned rooms to occupy during study 
hours, be supplied all necessary books, and will be on a par with 
other students in connection with all college duties and exercises. 

Fees. — Every student at the beginning of the college year must, in 
in addition to other payments, make a deposit of five dollars (I5) with 
the Registrar as a guarantee fund. This will be placed to his credit, 
and against it will be charged such temporary medical services as 
may seem necessary and, at its cost, all damage or loss of College 
property during the year for which the student admits his responsi- 
bility and his pro rata share of all such damages and losses not assu- 



24 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



med by individuals. During the Junior and Senior years this fee will 
be doubled, to cover the special breakage and consumption of mate- 
rials in the chemical laboratory. At the end of each collegiate year 
the balance due any student on account of fees will be refunded by 
the Registrar; and if any time this fee credit is exhausted the sum 
deposited at the beginning of the year nuust be promptly replaced. 

No other fees or extra charge? will be made by the College, except 
in cases of serious sickness or under extraordinarv circumstances. 



PAYMENTS. 

All charges and fees are due and must be paid, in advance. 
For convenience of patrons the payments are arranged as follows : 

On the day of entrance forty-five dollars ($45) of the annual charge 
and all the stated fees ; and forty dollars (I40) of the annual charge, 
respectively, on the 15th day of November, the 1st day of February, 
and the ist day of April. 

The low rates at which the students are received can only be 
maintained by purchasing all supplies at wholesale, for cash. This is 
only possible when all payments are made in advance. The Registrar 
is specially charged with the duty of making prompt collections, and 
annoyance to all parties will be avoided by a careful observance of 
all obligations in accordance with the terms above stated. 



UNIFORMS, &c. 

The uniform worn by the students during all military exercises 
is of gray cloth of an established grade, cut according to the p.ittern 
adopted at the United States Military Academy. This consists of a 
dress coat, pair of pants, cap and gloves, costing just about twenty 
dollars (I20). Those who desire can obtain a fatigue suit, in addition, 
for about ten dollars (|io) but this is not required. To insure uniform- 
ity in quality and pattern and maintain low rates, the military suits 
must be purchased from the contractor with the college and paid for 
in cash, on delivery. Every student must provide himself with the 
regulation garments before the close of the College term in which he 
enters, and must thereafter keep uniformed to the sati faction of the 
Commandant. 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



25 



Each bed-room is furnished with two single beds, a clothes-press, 
a table, a washstand, with bowl, pitcher and pails, and two chairs. All 
articles of bedding, except'the mattress, must be furnished by the stu- 
dent ; also a study lamp, towels, table-napkins, clothes-bag and proper 
toilet articles, all to be marked with the owner's name. 



DISCIPLINE AND REGULATIONS. 



It is expected that all students attending this College will have 
reached an age when their habits are so fixed and their characters so 
matured as to cause them to appreciate the value of their time and 
the opportunities afforded them at this institution. Without multiply- 
ing rules and regulations, they will, from the day of entrance, be 
placed upon their honor to contribute to the general good order and 
studiousness of the College, to promptly and cheerfully obey all in- 
structions they may receive frcm its officers, pay proper regard to the 
care of its property, refrain from all acts calculated to disturb the 
comfort and work of their fellow-students, and in personal habits, 
conversation iuid conduct, at all times and places, to act as gentlemen. 

In general, exemplary deportment, attention to duties, and the 
maintenance of good scholastic standing, will be required of all. 

Should there be those who cannot be allowed full privileges be- 
cause of immaturity and thoughtlessness, rather than deliberate 
misconduct or intentional neglect, they will be assigned quarters in 
a special part of the building and placed more or less completely un- 
der military discipline, as circumstances may require. 

Such regulations as may be necessary will be promulgated from 
time to time, so as to be fully understood, and they must be observed 
and complied with by all. 

Discipline, when required, will be administered in a progressive 
manner, by admonition, formal warning, notice to parents or guard- 
ians, and strict probation, but the Faculty may at any time when such 
action is in the interest of the individual or the College, summarily 
suspend, dismiss, or expel any student, for cause. 



26 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 



RELIGIOUS SERVICES. 

All students are required to attend' the daily morning prayers 
and public worship on Sunday in the College Chapel. Arrangements 
will be made for the Sunday services to be conducted by clergymen 
of different denominations. Upon request of parents, students will 
be permitted to attend religious services elsewhere in the neighbor- 
hood, at hours not conflicting with exercises at the College. 



PRIZES. 

A. PRIZE of ten dollars (|io) is offered by the President of the 
Faculty, to be awarded to that member of the Senior class who sus- 
tains throughout the year, including examinations, the best record in 
the department of agricultural studies. 

Other prizes are being arranged and will be duly announced. 



THE MERCER LITERARY SOCIETY 

Holds weekly meetings, affording its members excellent opportuni- 
ties for practice in oratory and debate. The advantages of this sort 
of training are not to be overlooked in estimating College life. Occa- 
sional public meetings are held. The Society library, which is open 
to members, is especially rich in history, biography, and the works of 
great statesmen. 



LIBRARIES. 

The Librar.y of the College, which is mainly for reference in the 
Departments of Agriculture and General Science, contains several 
hundred valuable books. The Library of the Literary Society has 
probably fifteen hundred volumes, and the private libraries of the 
professors as many more. All of these are accessible to students 
under proper conditions. The great libraries of the National Cap- 
ital are within almost as easy reach as if the College were located in 
Washington. 



MUSEUM. 

In the Museum is an excellent study collection of minerals and 
ores, well classified, and of important service as a guide in the science 
of mineralogy. . 

For use in the study of crystallography there are models illustrat- 
ing all the systems of crystallization, with the most important modifi- 
cations of typical forms. 

A small but by no means unimportant collection is one pre- 
sented to the College by the United States Department of Agriculture, 
containing specimens, labeled and indexed, of more than four hun- 
dred varieties of woods grown in the United States. 

Worthy of notice is the large number of models of agricuLural 
machinery furnished through the courtesy of the United States Patent 
Office. Other aids to the study of science included in the Museum 
are an herbarium, illustrating the flora of Maryland and the District 
of Columbia ; also a good collection of standard agricultural seeds 
and of animal and vegetable fibres. 



READING-ROOM ASSOCIATION. 

The students, assisted by the Faculty, support a reading-room, 
which is amply supplied with newspapers, magazines, and reviews. 
At present forty-seven daily, weekly and monthly publications are 
regularly placed on file, including leading papers of Baltimore, Wash- 
ington, New York, Louisville, Atlanta and other cities ; Harper's 
Monthly and Weekly, The Century, The Forum, North American 
Review, Scientific American and Supplement, Popular Science 
Monthly, Frank Leslie's, Golden Days, Youth's Companion, etc. 

For the following magazines and papers the Association is in- 
debted to the politeness of the publishers : Breeders' Journal, American 
Cultivator, Industrialist, American Farmer, Maryland Farmer, Mass- 
achusetts Plowman, Farm and Home, Anne Arundel Advertiser, 
Centerville Record, Cambridge Chronicle, Carroll News, Democrat 
and News, Denton Journal, Federalsburg Courier, Free Quill, Har- 
ford Democrat, Marlboro Gazette, Peninsula Farmer, Prince George's 
Enquirer, Republican Citizen, Travelers' Record, Appleton's Bulletin, 
Patent Office Gazette. 



28 



MARYLAND AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 




\rr\zz ^warded. 



Tl)e A6rictilbural Pri^e for 1889 



WAS AWARDED TO 



ROBX. IVI. F'INDKIvIv, JR. 



OF ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY,