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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

1904 




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THE 



MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



College Park, Maryland 




CATALOGUE. 



-•-!+-•- 



YEAR 1904-5. 




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THE 



MARYLAND 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



College Park, Maryland 




CATALOGUE. 



-•-!!-^ 



YEAR 1904-5. 



' /" 



Persons wishing to receive the College Catalogue, or 
desiring any information concerning the College or its 
work, may address 

R. W. SILVESTER, President, 

Maryland Agricultural College, 
College Park, Md. 

C. & P. Telephone, Hyattsville 43. 

Telegraph Station, Hyattsville, Md, 

Express Office, College Station, B. & O. R. R. 



Board of Trustees. 



Members Ex-Officio. 

Hon. Edwin Warfield, Governor, President of the Board. 

Hon. Gordon T. Atkinson, M.D., Comptroller of the Treasury. 

Hon. Wm. Shepard Bryan, Attorney-General. 

Hon. Murray Vandiver, State Treasurer. 

Hon. Spencer C. Jones, President of the Senate. 

Hon. George Y. Everhart, M.D., Speaker of the House of Delegates. 



Members Representing Stockholders. 

Dr. Richard S. Hill, Upper Marlboro, Md. 
Charles H. Stanley, Esq., Laurel, Md. 

E. Gittings Merryman, Esq., Cockeysville, Md. 
J. Harold Walsh, Esq., Upper Falls, Md. 

F. Carroll Goldsborough, Esq., Easton, Md. 



Aembers Appointed by the Governor. 

C J. Purnell, Esq., Snow Hill, Md. Term expires 1906 



Hon. David Seibert, Clear Spring, Md. 
Charles W. Slagle, Esq., Baltimore, Md. 
Charles A. Councilman, Esq., Glyndon, Md. 
J. M. Munroe, Esq., Anne Arundel Co., Md. 
Hon. Charles H. Evans, Baltimore, Md. 



T906 
1908 
1908 
1910, 
1 9 10. 




Standing Committees of the Board of Trustees. 



Committee on Agriculture. 

Messrs. Stanley, Vandiver, Slagle, Seibert, Councilman, Goldsborough and 

Everhart. 



Committee on Finance.^ 

Messrs. Vandiver, Stanley, Walsh, Munroe and Atkinson. 



Committee on Education. 

Messrs. Evans, Walsh, Atkinson, Jones and Purnell. 



Committee on Facilities for Instruction. 

Messrs. Munroe, Bryan, Hill and Purnell. 



Committee on Auditing. 

Messrs. Vandiver, Stanley and Slagle. 



Committee on Eastern Branch, 

Messrs, Slagle and Merryman. 



Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 
Messrs. Councilman, Hill, Slagle, Stanley and Evans. 



Executive Committee, 

Messrs. Hill, Goldsborough and Merryman. 



Officers and Faculty of Instruction. 

Faculty. 

R. W. SILVESTER, 
President and Professor of Mathematics. 

THOMAS H. SPENCE, A.M.. 
Vice-President and Professor of Languages. 

Si: 
Commandant of Cadets. 



H. B. MCDONNELL, B.S., M.D., 
Professor of Chemistry and State Chemist. 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, A.B., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

JAMES S. ROBINSON, 
Professor Emeritus of Horticulture. 

SAMUEL S. BUCKLEY, M.S., D.V.S., 
Professor of Veterinary Science. 

HENRY LANAHAN, A.B., 
Professor of Physics and Civil Engineering. 

F.^ B. BOMBERGER, B.S., A.M., 
Professor of English and Civics. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, 
Director of Physical Culture and Instructor in Public Speaking. 

J. HANSON MITCHELL, M.E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 

J. B. S. NORTON, M.S., 
Professor of Vegetable Pathology and Botany and State Pathologist. 

T. B. SYMONS, M.S., 
Professor of Entomology and State Entomolog^ist. 



Professor of Horticulture and State Horticulturist. 



HENRY T. HARRISON, 

Principal of Preparatory Department, 

Secretary of the Faculty. 



Assistonts in College Work. 

J. C. BLANDPORD, M.E.. 
Assistant in Mechanical Department. . 

C. F. DOANE, M.S., 
Instructor in Dairying. 

A. B. FOSTER, M.S., 
Assistant in Chemistry. " 

E. P. WALLS, B.S., 
Assistant in Agriculture. 

E. F. GARNER, M.E., 
Assistant in Mechanical Department. 

Assistants in State Work. 

J. B. ROBB, M.S., 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

FREDERICK H. BLODGETT, M.S., 
Assistant in Vegetable Pathology, Botany and Entomology. 

R. H. KERR, B.S., 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

WILLIAM R. WHARTON, A.B,, 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

a: B. GAHAN, B.S., 
Assistant in Entomology and Vegetable Pathology. 

Other Officers. , 

JOSEPH R. OWENS, M.D., 
^ Registrar and Treasurer. 

W. O. EVERSFIELD, M.D., 
Surgeon. 

, " MISS M. L. SPENCE, 

' Stenographer and Typewriter. 

MRS. L. K. FITZHUGH, 
Matron. 

E.T.HARRISON, 
Librarian and Executive Clerk. 

The arrangement of heads of departments is in order of seniority of service; 
assistants in college work in the same order, and State work likewise. 



X 



Calendar for 1904-1905. 



First Term. 

September I3tli and 14th, Entrance Examinations. 

Thursday, September 15th, i P.M., College Work Begins. 

Friday, October I4tli, Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Friday, December 9th, Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Thursday, December 22d, 4 P.M., First Term Ends. 

Thursday, December 22d, 4 P.M., to Tuesday, January 3rd, noon, 
Christmas Holidays. 



Second Term, 

Tuesday, January 3rd, noon. Second Term Begins. 
Friday, March loth, Meeting of Board of Trustees. 
Friday, March 24th, Second Term Ends. 



Third Term. 

/ 
Monday, March 27th, Third Term Begins. 

Wednesday, April 19th, 4 P.M., to Tuesday, April 25th, i P.M , 
Easter Holidays. , 

June 5th to loth. Final Examinations. 

Friday, June 9th, Meeting of Board of Trustees. 

Sunday, June nth, Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday, June 12th, Class Day. 

Tuesday, June 13th, Alumni Day. 

Wednesday, June 14th, 11 A.M., Commencement Day Exercises. 



Historical Sketch. 

The Maryland Agricultural College was incorporated by an Act 
of the General Assembly of Maryland, dated March 6, 1856, at a 
time when but one other such institution existed in the United States. 
Its express purpose was defined to be, "To instruct the youthful 
student in those arts and sciences indispensable to successful agricul- 
tural pursuit." Under the charter thus granted to a party of public- 
spirited private individuals, the original college building was erected, 
and its doors opened to students in the fall of 1859. For three years 
it was conducted as a private institution, but in 1862 the Congress of 
the United States, recognizing the valuable work in the cause of 
practical education which such colleges could achieve for the country, 
passed the "Land-grant Act," providing for the establishment and 
maintenance of agricultural colleges, by applying for that purpose a 
proportionate amount of unclaimed Western land, in place of scrip, 
to each State and Territory in the Union. This grant having been 
formally accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the 
Maryland Agricultural College being named as the beneficiary of the 
grant, the College thus became in part, at least, a State institution, 
and such it is at the present time. 

In 1887 the Federal Congress passed a second important Act in 
aid of the agricultural interests, appropriating $15,000 a year for the 
establishment and maintenance of agricultural experiment stations. 
The Maryland Station was located on the College farm, and was made 
a department of the College. In 1892 the Board of Trustees, so far 
separated it from the College as to put it under a special Director, 
who is immediately responsible to the Board. The function of the 
Experiment Station is the investigation of those agricultural prob- 
lems of most interest and concern to the farmers of the State, and 
the publication and dissemination of the results of such experiments 
in the form of bulletins, for the information and guidance of those in- 
terested in agriculture. Since the organization of the Experiment 
Station, its influence has steadily increased, and its sphere of useful- 
ness has constantly widened, until it is now a well-recognized factor 
in the agricultural development of Maryland. 

Once more, in 1892, the Federal Government came to the aid of 
the agricultural and mechanical colleges. By the Act of Congress 
of that year an annual appropriation of $15,000, to be increased by 
$1,000 each year until the sum of $25,000 was reached, was granted 
each State, to be applied to the further equipment and support of 
these colleges. The primary object of this legislation was the de- 
velopment of the departments of agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
and the branches kindred thereto. Maryland, as was the case in all 



9 

the States of the South, in order to comply with the terms of the Act 
of Congress, divided this fund between the State Agricultural College 
and a somewhat similar institution for the education of colored 
students located at Princess Anne, on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. 
During the last twelve years the history of the College has shown 
a record of steady growth. This fact is evidenced by the increased 
number of students availing themselves of its facilities; by the erec- 
tion of many new buildings — the library and gymnasium building, 
the chemical laboratory, the mechanical engineering building (re- 
cently enlarged), Morrill Hall, the college barn, the sanitarium and 
the new administration building and barracks, as well as by the es- 
tablishment of the Department of Farmers' Institutes and the State 
Departments of Entomology and Vegetable Pathology. Under such 
favorable auspices the institution must continue to grow, and ulti- 
mately reach the status of being the most important factor in the 
agricultural and industrial development of the State. 

Location and Description. 

The Maryland Agricultural College is located in Prince George 
County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington Branch of the B. & 
O. R. R., eight miles from Washington, and thirty-two miles from 
Baltimore. At least nine trains a day, from each city, stop at Col- 
lege Station, thus making the place easily accessible from all parts of 
the State. The telegraph station is Hyattsville, connected with the 
College by a telephone line. 

The College grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington 
turnpike. The suburban town of Hyattsville is two and one-half 
miles to the south, and I^aurel, the largest town in the county, is 
thirteen miles to the north on the same road. Connection with 
these towns and with Washington may be had by steam and electric 
railway. 

The site of the College is particularly beautiful. The buildings 
occupy the crest of a commanding hill, covered with forest trees, and 
overlooking the entire surrounding country. In front, extending to 
the turnpike, is a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground and athletic 
field of the students. In the rear are the farm buildings and barn. 
A quarter of a mile to the northeast are the buildings of the Experi- 
ment Station. The College farm contains about three hundred acres, 
and is devoted to the gardens, orchards, vineyard and to general 
farming. 

The College barracks is a five-story brick building containing 
student quarters and the Domestic Department. The dormitories are 
large, well-ventilated and provided with fire-escapes, bath and water 
rooms. All the buildings are lighted with . gas and iieated with 
steam from central plants on the College grounds. 



: ■: - . 10 ".---^^ ■..■.:-..■/•■- 

The Mechanical Engineering Department is located in a two- 
story brick building, completed in 1896, and now thoroughly equipped. 
It contains workshops for woodwork, machinery rooms well furnished 
with modern equipment, a drawing room, library and office, together 
with a large annex designed to afford additional facilities in forging 
and foundry work which has been erected and equipped during the 
past year. It is a model building of its kind. 

The chemical building was completed in 1897 and is now thor- 
oughly equipped. It contains several lecture rooms, laboratories for 
practical work and for the analysis of fertilizers and feeding material 
for domestic animals. This work is assigned to the Professor of 
Chemistry at this College by an Act of the General Assembly. He is 
thus the State Chemist. 

In 1893 the present building of the gymnasium and library was 
erected. The gymnasium, on the ground floor, is well furnished with 
modern athletic appliances. The library and reading room is on 
the second floor and is large, well-lighted and convenient for the 
purpose. 



.. " . . ' . Sanitarium. 

Among the recent additions to the group of College buildings is 
Morrill Hall. This building provides ample accommodations for the 
Departments of Agriculture, Horticulture, Physics, Entomology, 
Vegetable Pathology and Veterinary Science, thus relieving the 
pressure of close quarters from which these departments have suf- 
fered, and greatly extending their opportunities for the development 
of high grade scientific work. A greenhouse for work in Entomology 
and Vegetable Pathologj' is now being added. 

The College Sanitarium, completed in 1901, has proved a most 
efficient means of isolating infectious diseases which might otherwise 
have become epidemic, thus seriously embarrassing College work. It 



11 



contains ample room for all emergencies, and is furnished and 
equipped with modern hospital facilities. . J 

An experienced nurse is in constant attendance, and the College 
surgeon is present every morning at a fixed hour to prescribe for any 
cadet requiring his services. 

The general appearance of the College grounds is exceedingly 
attractive. They are tastefully laid oflF in lawn and terraces, with 
ornamental shrubbery and flower beds, and the view from the grove 
and campus cannot be surpassed. 




East Elevation of the Administration Hall and Dormitories. 

The location of the College is healthful; the sanitary conditions 
are excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there 
has been no really serious case of illness among the students for ten 
years. . . 



10 



The Mechanical Engineering Department is located in a two- 
story brick building, completed in 1896, and now thoroughly equipped. 
It contains workshops for woodwork, niachiner}' rooms well furnished 
with modern equipment, a drawing room, library' and office, together 
with a large annex designed to afford additional facilities in forging 
and foundr}' work which has been erected and equipped during the 
past year. It is a model building of its kind. 

The chemical building was completed in 1897 and is now thoi- 
oughly equipped. It contains several lecture rooms, laboratories for 
practical work and for the analysis of fertilizers and feeding material 
for domestic animals. This work is assigned to the Professor of 
Chemistry at this College by an Act of the General Assembly. He is 
thus the State Chemist. 

In 1893 the present building of the gymnasium and library was 
erected. The gymnasium, on the ground floor, is well furnished with 
modern athletic appliances. The library and reading room is on 
the second floor and is large, well-lighted and convenient for the 
purpose. 



'■WK 



tl^t *l^'- 









.Sanitarium. 



Among the recent additions to the group of College buildings is 
Morrill Hall. This building provides ample accommodations for the 
Departments of Agriculture, Horticulture, Physics, Entomology, 
Vegetable Patholog\' and Veterinary Science, thus relieving the 
pressure of close quarters from which these departments have suf- 
fered, and greatly extending their opportunities for the development 
of high grade scientific work. A greenhouse for work in Entomology 
and Vegetable Pathology is now being added. 

The College Sanitarium, completed in 1901, has proved a most 
efficient means of isolating infectious diseases which might otherwise 
have become epidemic, thus seriously embarrassing College work. It 



11 



contains ample room for all emergencies, and is furnished and 
eqiiipped with modern hospital facilities. ; 

An experienced nurse is in constant attendance, and the College 
surgeon is present ev^ery morning at a fixed hour to prescribe for any 
cadet requiring his services. 

The general appearance of the College grounds is exceedingl}^ 
attractive. They are tastefully laid off in lawn and terraces, with 
ornamental shrubbery and flower beds, and the view from the grove 
and campus cannot be surpassed. 








,«."- . ■«^^Bwt„ 



East Klevation of tlie Administration Hall and Dormitories. 



The location of the College is healthful; the sanitary conditions 
are excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there 
has been no really serious case of illness among the students for ten 
years. 



Recent Improvements and Repairs. 

Appreciating the needs of the institution, the State I^egislature has 
from time to time appropriated funds wherewith buildings could be 
erected or renovated, and equipments secured. 

^Among recent improvements additional dormitories, accommo- 
dating twice the number of students; an auditorium and offices in the 
Administration Building, now nearing completion; a complete renova- 
tion of the original College barracks; a water supply from drilled 
wells of considerable depth; a modern steam heating plant; gas and 
electric lighting; lavatories; forced ventilation, etc., all of which es- 
tablishes quarters and class-rooms of unusually good sanitary ar- 
rangements. 




, North Elevation of Administration Hall and Dormitories. 

General Aim and Purpose. 

.The Agricultural College is the State school of science and 
technology. While seeking, first of all, to perform the functions of 
an agricultural college, its sphere of work has been widened to em- 
brace all the sciences akin to agriculture and all the arts related to 
mechanical training. To these special and prominent lines of work 
have been added such branches of study as are necessary for a liberal 
education, for the development of the intelligent citizen and the 
making of the man of general culture. The purpose of this College 
is to give to young men anxious to prepare themselves for the active 
duties of life such training in the sciences or in the mechanical work- 



13 

shop as will enable them to take their places in the industrial world 
well prepared for the fierce competition of the day. 

Recognizing that such an education, in order to be of practical 
advantage to the many, must be offered at a cost within the means of 
all, the expenses for the year to the student have been reduced to the 
point where his college dues are not in excess of his ordinary daily 
expenses. It is to be remembered that the College is a State institu- 
tion, in part supported by the State, in part by the Federal Govern- 
ment, through its several endowment Acts, and that it is in no sense 
a money-making institution, but simply a medium of disbursement by 
the Government to those classes upon whom the safety and prosperity 
of the State so largely depend. 

While the College provides, as will hereinafter be explained, 
several distinct courses of instruction looking to the special training 
of the student in agriculture, mechanical engineering and the natural 
and physical sciences, the fact is clearly kept in view that a sound 
foundation must be laid for each and every course. Successful spe- 
cialization is only possible after the student has been prepared for it 
by a thorough training in the essentials. All education must be nar- 
row and one-sided which does not provide for the general culture of 
the student, and which does not look first to the natural and normal 
development of the individual. The general working plan of the 
College may be thus described: 

It begins with the student in his first, or Freshman, year with a 
systematic and carefully adjusted scheme of work, differing but little 
in the several courses, and looking to his general development in 
mental strength, range of information and power of expression and 
thought. At the beginning of his second, or Sophomore, year the 
differentiation may be said to begin along those lines in which he 
shows most natural aptitude. This gradual specialization continues 
during his third, or Junior, year, until in his last, or Senior, year his 
work consists wholly of a few closely-con-nected topics, in which he 
is thus able thoroughly to prepare himself. With the present equip- 
ment of the laboratory and mechanical workshops a student is able to 
be become so proficient in his chosen line of work that when he leaves 
the College a successful career is open to him if he chooses to avail 
himself of it. 

The Agricultural College is, legitimately, the crowning point of 
the public school system of Maryland. Its aim is to provide a higher 
education for the graduates of the county schools. To this end its 
curriculum is adjusted to meet the preparation of such students. It 
is this class of young men that the College is especially desirous of 
reaching. Experience has shown that our most satisfactory students 
come as graduates from the county schools, and no efforts will be 
spared to make the transition from the high school or grammar school 
to the College a possible one for all those actuated by an earnest desire 
to complete their education. 



12 



Recent Improvements and Repairs. 

Appreciating the needs of the institution, the State Legislature has 
from time to time appropriated funds wherewith buildings could be 
erected or renovated, and equipments secured. 

-i^Among recent improvements additional dormitories, accommo- 
dating twice the number of students; an auditorium and offices in the 
Administration Building, now nearing completion; a complete renova- 
tion of the original College barracks; a water supply from drilled 
wells of considerable depth; a modern steam heating plant; gas and 
electric lighting: lavatories; forced ventilation, etc., all of which es- 
tablishes quarters and class-rooms of unusually good sanitary ar- 
rangements. 




Xorth Klevation of Administration Hall and Dormitories. 

General Aim and Purpose. 

The Agricultural College is the State school of science and 
technology. While seeking, first of all, to perform the functions of 
an agricultural college, its sphere of work has been widened to em- 
brace all the sciences akin to agriculture and all the arts related to 
mechanical training. To these special and prominent lines of work 
have been added such branches of study as are necessary for a liberal 
education, for the development of the intelligent citizen and the 
making of the man of general culture. The purpose of this College 
is to give to young men anxious to prepare themselves for the active 
duties of life such training in the sciences or in the mechanical work- 



13 

shop as will enable them to take their places in the industrial world 
well prepared for the fierce competition of the day. 

Recognizing that such an education, in order to be of practical 
advantage to the many, must be offered at a cost within the means of 
all, the expenses for the year to the student have been reduced to the 
point where his college dues are not in excess of his ordinary daily 
expenses. It is to be remembered that the College is a State institu- 
tion, in part supported by the State, in part by the Federal Govern- 
ment, through its several endowment Acts, and that it is in no sense 
a money-making institution, but simply a medium of disbursement by 
the Government to those classes upon whom the safety and prosperit}- 
of the State so largeh' depend. 

While the College provides, as will hereinafter be explained, 
several distinct courses of instruction looking to the special training 
of the student in agriculture, mechanical engineering and the natural 
and physical sciences, the fact is clearly kept in view that a sound 
foundation must be laid for each and every course. Successful spe- 
cialization is only possible after the student has been prepared for it 
by a thorough training in the essentials. All education must be nar- 
row and one-sided which does not provide for the general culture of 
the student, and which does not look first to the natural and normal 
development of the individual. The general working plan of the 
College maj' be thus described: 

It begins with the student in his first, or Freshman, year with a 
systematic and carefully adjusted scheme of work, differing but little 
in the several courses, and looking to his general development in 
mental strength, range of information and power of expression and 
thought. At the beginning of his second, or Sophomore, year the 
differentiation may be said to begin along those lines in which he 
shows most natural aptitude. This gradual specialization continues 
during his third, or Junior, year, until in his last, or Senior, year his 
uork consists wholly of a few closely-connected topics, in which he 
IS thus able thoroughlj' to prepare himself. With the present equip- 
ment of the laboratory and mechanical workshops a student is able to 
be become so proficient in his chosen line of work that when he leaves 
the College a successful career is open to him if he chooses to avail 
himself of it. 

The Agricultural College is, legitimately, the crowning point of 
the public school system of Maryland. Its aim is to provide a higher 
education for the graduates of the count}' schools. To this end its 
curriculum is adjusted to meet the preparation of such students. It 
is this class of young men that the College is especially desirous of 
reaching. Experience has shown that our most satisfactory students 
come as graduates from the county schools, and no efforts will be 
spared to make the transition from the high school or grammar school 
to the College a possible one for all those actuated by an earnest desire 
to complete their education. 



Departments — Equipment and Work. 

The following is a brief account of the equipment of the several 
departments of the College and the general character of the instruction 
given in each: 

Agricultural Department. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro, Professor. 
C. F, DoANE, Instructor in Dairying. 

E. P. Walls, Assistant. ' 

The Agricultural Department offers four courses — (a) a four-year 
course, leading to the degree of B.S.; (b) a special two-year course, 
for proficiency in which a certificate is awarded (see p. 49); (c) a 
special creamery course; (d) a ten- week winter course (see p. 49). 

Outline of Four-Year Course. 

Course I, Lecture Course in Agriculture. — This course runs 
through the four years, and consists of a series of lectures on agri- 
cultural topics, delivered once 
a week at the College by 
specialists from the United 
States Department of Agri- 
culture and elsewhere. This 
course is a new departure, 
and, it is believed, a most 
important one. The weekly 
presentation of agricultural 
topics by new and attractive 
speakers cannot fail to have 
an excellent eflfect, not only 
by its educational features, 
but by exciting among the 
students a livelier interest in 
agricultural work through con- 
tact with men of prominence in the profession. 

Students taking the agricultural or general science courses are 
required to attend these lectures. With other students attendance is 
optional. 

Course II, Live Stock — Third Term, Sophomore Year — Seven 
periods per week; three theoretical, four practical. This course is 
devoted to the detailed study of farm live stock, including stock 




Scoring Horses. 



^ 



15 



judging and breeds of stock. Prof. Curtiss' "Horses, Cattle, Sheep 
and Swine" is used as text-book, supplemented by the "Breeders' 
Gazette," "Hoard's Dairyman." and other live stock journals and 
experiment station bulletins for collateral reading and reference. 
Practical lessons are drawn from the stock on the Experiment Station 
farm. The United States Cattle Quarantine Station for the port of 
Baltimore is but a few miles from the College, and whenever there is 
an importation of special merit the students are taken to the Quaran- 
tine Station to inspect and study the stock imported. Another 
valuable feature of this course is the taking of the students to the 
county fairs where the best stock is exhibited, and to private stock 
farms of recognized excellence, where not only the animals them- 
selves, but also the methods of handling them, are made the subject 
of careful study and inspection. For this purpose this course is ex- 
tended through the fair season in the fall term of the Junior year. 

Course III, Crop Production— /^^V^/ Term, Junior Year — Ten 
periods per week; four theoretical, six practical. Crop production, the 
study of farm crops 

in detail, as to his- ' - . . 

tory, uses and re- ,. _^ „ „;"::., 

quirements, local 
adaptations, varie- 
ties, fertilization, 
cultivation, har- 
vesting. Morrow 
& Hunt's "Soils 
and Crops" is used 
as a text-book. The 
College farm of two 
hundred and sixty 
acres furnishes the 
opportunity for 
practical work. 

A special feature of this course is the study of crop improvement 
by selection and breeding. The first breeding plot of corn in Mary- 
land was planted on the Experiment Station farm by the College 
students, from seed ears selected and scored by them with the assist- 
ance of the instructor in agronomy. The same system of student 
work is used in all corn breeding work and other crop growing 
experiments whenever practicable. Many students do overtime work, 
for which they are paid hy the hour. 

The practical work of this course will be continued into the 
spring term of the Junior year. 

Course IV, Stock Breeding — First and Second Term, Junior Year. 
Eight periods per week; four theoretical, four practical. The principles 




A Corner in the Alfalfa Field. 



Departments — Equipment and Work. 

The following is a brief account of the equipment of the several 
departments of the College and the general character of the instruction 
given in each: 

Agricultural Department. 

W. T. L. Taliaferro, Professor. 

C. F. DOANE, Instructor in Dairying. 

E. P. Walls, Assistant. 

The Agricultural Department offers four courses — (a) a four-year 
course, leading to the degree of B.S.; (b) a special two-year course, 
for proficiency in wliich a certificate is awarded (see p. 49); (c) a 
special creamery course; (d) a ten-week winter course (see p. 49). 

Outline of Four- Year Course. 

Course I, Lecture Course in Agriculture. — This course runs 
through the four years, and consists of a series of lectures on agri- 
cultural topics, delivered once 
a week at the College b}^ 
specialists from the United 
States Department of Agri- 
culture and elsewhere. This 
course is a new departure, 
and, it is believed, a most 
important one. The weekly 
jiresentation of agricultural 
topics by new and attractive 
speakers cannot fail to have 
an excellent effect, not onl}' 
by its educational features, 
but by exciting among the 
students a livelier interest in 
agricultural work through con- 
tact with men of prominence in the profession. 

Students taking the agricultural or general science courses are 
required to attend these lectures. With other students attendance is 
optional. 

Course II, Live Stock— T/nrd Term, Sophomore Year— Seven 
periods per iveek; three iheoretieal, four practical. This course is 
devoted to the detailed study of farm live stock, including stock 




Scoring Horses. 



15 



judging and breeds of stock. Prof. Curtiss' "Horses, Cattle, Sheep 
and Swine" is used as text-book, supplemented by the "Breeders' 
Gazette," "Hoard's Dairyman," and other live stock journals and 
experiment station bulletins for collateral reading and reference. 
Practical lessons are drawn from the stock on the Experiment Station 
farm. The United States Cattle Quarantine Station for the port of 
Baltimore is but a few miles from the College, and whenever there is 
an importation of special merit the students are taken to the Quaran- 
tine Station to inspect and study the stock imported. Another 
valuable feature of this course is the taking of the students to the 
county fairs where the best stock is exhibited, and to private stock 
farms of recognized excellence, where not only the animals them- 
selves, but also the methods of handling them, are made the subject 
of careful study and inspection. For this purpose this course is ex- 
tended through the fair season in the fall term of the Junior year. 




Course III, Crop Production —/-V/.s/ Ten)), Junior Year — Ten 
periods periveek; foiir theoretical, six practical. Crop production, the 
stud\' of farm crops 
in detail, as to liis- 
torj-, uses and re- 
quirements, local 
adaptations, varie- 
ties, fertilization, 
cultivation, har- 
vesting. Morrow 
& Hunt's "Soils 
and Crops" is used 
as a text-book. The 
College farm of two 
hundred and sixty 
acres furnishes the 
opportunit}" for 
practical work. 

A special feature of this course is tlie study of crop improvement 
by selection and breeding. The first breeding plot of corn in Mary- 
land was planted on the Experiment Station farm ])y the College 
students, from seed ears selected and scored by them with the assist- 
ance of the instructor in agronomy. The same system of student 
work is used in all corn breeding work and otlier crop growing 
experiments whenever practicable. Many students do overtime work, 
for which the}- are paid by the hour. 

The practical work of this course will be continued into the 
spring term of the Junior year. 

Course IV, Stock Breeding — First ami Secojid Term . Junior )'ear. 
Eight periods per week: four theoretical, four practical. The principles 



.\ ConiLT in llie Alfalfa I-'iekl. 



16 



of stock breeding. The wonderful success which has attended the 
eflForts of well-informed and judicious breeders on the one hand, and 
on the other the greater number of practically worthless animals to be 
found in th"^ country, clearly illustrate the need on the part of the 
general farmer for a more intimate knowledge of, and a closer atten- 
tion to, the principles which underlie this important branch of farming. 
Miles' "Stock Breeding" is the text-book in this course, but is rein- 
forced by the study of the breeding and records of noted animals in 
all of the principal breeds. 

Course V, Soils — Second Term, Junior Year — Eight periods per 
week; four theoretical and four practical. The study of the physical 
and chemical conditions of the soil in their relation to profitable agri- 
culture. The soil is the basis of 
all agriculture, and a knowledge of 
its properties and functions cannot 
be too highly emphasized. The 
study of this important subject is 
conducted by means of lectures, 
text-books, laboratory and field- 
work. The text-book used is ' ' The 
Soil," by Prof. King. No State 
in the Union possesses a greater 
variety of soils than Maryland, 
and great attention is paid to the 
study of soil types in their relation 
Scoring Corn. to profitable- agriculturc. 

Course VI, Farm Drainage^ Third Term, funior Year — Eight 
periods per week; four theoretical, four practical. The text-book used 
in this course is Waring's "Drainage for Profit and Health." Prac- 
tical work in open ditching and under drains is provided for the 
students on the Experiment Station farm. Special attention is given 
to the principles and practice of tile drainage. 

Course VII, Fertilizers and Soil Fertility — First Term, Senior 
Year — Ten periods per week. Text-books: Vorhees' "Fertilizers," 
Roberts' "Fertility of the I,and," and Experiment Station bulletins. 

Course VIII, Dairying and Creamery Work — Second Term, Senior 
Year — Ten periods per week; theoretical and practical. Text-books: 
Wing's "Milk and Its Production," Russell's "Dairy Bacteriology," 
Farrington& Wall's "Testing Milk." . 

Course IX, Farm Machinery — Third Term, Senior Year — len 
periods per week. Lectures and practical work. 

Course X, Farm Economics — Third Term, Senior Year. Lec- 
tures. 

Other work in the Senior year will be arranged on consultation 
with the head of the department. 




17 



V-: ' Geology. 

Course I, Geology — First and Second Terms, Freshman Year- 
Four periods per week first term, five the second. This course is 
required in the Agricultural and General Science Courses. Attention 
is chiefly given to physical geology. The latter half of the second 
term is devoted to the geology of Maryland, especially as aflfecting 
the character of the soils, mineral wealth and other economic condi- 
tions of the State. Instruction is given by means of text-book work, 
lectures and field excursions. Shaler's "First Book in Geology" is 
used as a text-book. The reports of the Maryland Geological Survey 
are used for reference. 



Department of Mechanical Engineering. 

J. Hanson Mitchell, Professor. [ 

J- C. Blanford, Assistant. 
K. T. Garner, Assistant. 

This department offers a course to those who desire' to prepare 
themselves to design and construct machinery and superintend engi- 
neering establishments. With this end in view is offered an educa- 
tion based on mechanics, drawing, mathematics, physics and modern 
languages, together with a practical training in the uses of tools and 
machinery. The allied subjects of the course taught outside of the 
department, and the hours allotted to each, will be found in the "Out- 
line of Courses. ' ' 

Equipment — The Mechanical Engineering Laboratories consist 
of a two-story brick building, 45 by 60 feet, containing the wood- 
working and machine shops, drafting room and two lecture rooms; a 

one-story brick building, in 
which is the forge shop and 
foundry, and an annex, 25 
feet by 50 feet, containing 
two 60-horse-power boilers, 
which furnish steam for 
power, heat and experi- 
mental purposes. 

The wood-working shop 
contains accommodations 
for students in bench 
work and wood-turning. 
The power machinery, in 
this shop is a band and 
circular saw, five 12-inch 
turning lathes, and a grind- 
stone. 

view in Shops. 




16 



of stuck Inct'diuj;. TIic woiuk-rful success which has atteiuk-d tlie 
efforts ot well-iiilorinccl and Judicious hrccdcrs on the one hand, and 
on the other the greater nund)er ot practically worthless animals to he 
found in th^ countrw clearl\- illustrate the need on the part of the 
j^eneral farmer tor a more intimate knowledj^e ot, ami a closer atten- 
tion to, the princii)les which uiulerlie this important branch of farmiu*;. 
Miles' "Stock Hreedini;" is the text-hook in this course, hut is rein- 
forced hy the study ot the lueediuL; ami rect)rds of noted animals in 
all ot the principal breeds. 

Course V, Soils — Serom/ /r/w. Junior )'(ar —lu'^hf f^t-y'iods per 
r.v'f'I-.- four ilicorotual ami fouf pi actical. The study of the i)hvsical 
and i-hemical conditions of the soil in their relation to prolitable a»;ri- 

culture. The soil is the basis of 
all aj^riculture, and a knowled<;eof 
its properties and functions cannot 
be too hij^hlN' emphasi/eil. The 
stud\' of this important subject is 
conducted by means of lectures, 
text books, laln)rator> and tield- 
woi k. 'iMic text book used is "The 
Soil," 1)\' Prof. King. Nt) vState 
in the rniou |)OSSesses a greater 
\ariet\' of soils than Mar\land, 
and great attention is paid to the 
stud\'ofsoil t\pes in their relation 
to profitable agriculture. 

lliiid lOm, /uuior )'c'iir — lu\^ht 
pc-riods p<r :o!'c'f[-: f our tltc-oyttioitl , four practical. The text-book used 
in this course is Waring's "Mrainage for Protit and Health." Prac- 
tical work in o|>en ditching and under drains is provideil for the 
students on the [''xperinient Station tarm. Special attention is given 
to the principles aiul practice <.'<{ tile ilraiuage. 

Course VII, Fertilizers and Soil Fertility — ///.v/ J'c'riii, Senior 
)\ar — /\->i periods por :o<-c/c. Text-books: X'orhees' "Fertili/.ers," 
kolierts' "h'ertilitN- of the Land," ami Ivxperiment Station bulletins. 

Course VIII, l)airyiii>» and Creamery Work — Second 'J\rt/t, Senior 
)'eiir — fen periods per :ot'ek: tlieoretical and practical. Te.xt-books: 
Wing's "iMilk ami Its I'roduction," Russell's "Dairy iJacteriology," 
Farrington cK: Wall's "Testing Milk." 

Course l.\. Farm Machinery — 7'liird Term, Senior )'ear — 7 e7i 
periods per u'eek. Lectures and ])ractical work. 

Course X, Farm Economics — Tiiird Term, Senior Year. I^ec- 
tures. 

Other work in the Senior year will be arranged on consultation 
with the head of the department. 




Sci'riut; Corn. 

Course VI, Farm l)raina}>e 



17 



Course 1, (ieoloj*"}' I'itst aiui StuonJ /'rr/zis, /■'iis/ii)ia>i )e\ir- 
l-onr [periods Pc'r .".w// firsi ft'> >n, //:'<•' t/w sc-ionJ. This course is 
tfiiniit'd in till- Agricultural ami C^cnc-ral Si ic lut- Coinscs. Attention 
is cliiellx' j;i\cn to iili\sical i;colot;v. Tlu' l.ittci halt ol the second 
term is dex'oleil to the s^eoloj^x- ol Marxlaiul, espeeiallN a^ allet't iu^" 
the characlei of tlie soils, uiineial wtalth ;nul ot her i.-continiic condi- 
tions ol the State. Instruction isL;i\en l)\ niean> ot text -hook work, 
lectures and field exiairsious. .Shaler's "iMrst liook in (U-t)lo>;> " is 
useil as a li-xt hook. The rej)(>rts ot the Mar\ laud (leolo^ical Survey 
are usi-d lor relerem-i'. 



Depcirtment of Mechanical Ens^ineerinil. 

1. Hanson Mircm:i,i, I'rolessor. 

J- C. Ih.ANr'OKD, .\>sislant. 
\\. T. C'.AKNr:!-:, Assistant. 

This ile]tartnienl offers a course to those who desire to jirepare 
themselves to design and construct machiner\- auil >ui>erintend engi- 
neering estahlishments. With this end in view i> offered an educa- 
tion hased on mechanics, drawiui;, mathematics, phxsics and modern 
lan>;ua<4es, together with a practical training in tlie uses of tools and 
machinerv. The allietl suhjects of the course taught outside of the 
tlepartment, and the hours allotted to each, will he found in the ••«.>ut- 
line ot Courses. 

I:quipnient — Tlie Mechanical hhii^ineeriui; I.alnn atories consist 
of a two-story brick huitdin^;, 45 hy 60 leet, containiiiL; the woi)d- 
working and machine shops, ilral'ting room and two lectin e roi.ms; a 

ttue stor\ hiick huihlin^, in 
which is tlu- loi i;e slu>i> and 
touiulry.and an annex, 25 
teet hy 30 leet, containing 
two (>(>diorse-power boilers, 
which tuiuish >te.ini for 
[tower, heat and experi- 
mental purposes. 

The wood-working shop 
t'ontaius accom modal ions 
lor students m Itench 
work and w oodlurning. 
Tlu- powei m.ichinerv m 
this shop is a handi and 
cMicular saw, ti\e i _'-inch 
lurniui; lathes, .uul a grind- 
stone. 

\is-\\ in Simps. 




In the forge shop are sixteen power forges, one hand forge, a 
pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free of smoke. 
There is a full assortment of smiths' tools for each forge. 

The foundry is equipped with a Whiting cupola, which melts 
1,200 pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace, one Mellet core oven, 
and with the necessary flasks and tools. 

The machine shop equipment consists of one lo-inch Reed speed 
lathe, one 20-inch Fifield engine lathe, with compound rest, one 12- 
inch Reed combined foot and power lathe, two 14-inch Reed engine 
lathes, one 24-inch Gray planer, one 16-inch Smith & Mills shaper, 
one 24-inch Snyder drill press, one No. 4 Diamond emery tool- 
grinder, and an assortment of vises, taps, dies, pipe-tools and measur- 
ing instruments. 

An 8 by 12-inch engine drives the machinery of the wood-work- 
ing and machine shops. It was presented to the College by the City 
of Baltimore, and secured through the efforts of Rear Admiral John 
D. Ford, of the United States Navy. A lo-horse-power Fairbanks 
gasoline engine drives the blowers in the foundry and forge shop. 

The drafting room is well equipped for practical work, having 
suitable benches, lockers and blue print facilities. 

Tours of Inspection — The members of the Senior Class go to 
Baltimore or Washington for the purpose of inspecting well-known 
manufacturing plants. 

Course I, Mechanical Drawing— Three Terms, Freshman Year — 
Six periods per week. Practice in plain lettering, use of instru- 
ments, projections and simple working drawings, the plates upon 
completion being enclosed in covers properly titled by the student. 
Text-book, Rouillion's "Mechanical Drawing." 

Course II, Technical Instruction — First Term, Freshmayi Year — 
Five periods per week. Explanation of the reading of mechanical 
drawings. The proper cutting, angles, care and adjustment of car- 
penter tools. Relative strength of wood joints. Wood: its shrink- 
ing and warping, and how to correct and prevent. Text, Goss'^ 
"Bench-work in Wood." Drill in problems in Arithmetic, Algebra 
and Drawing, by notes and lectures. ' 

Course III, Shop Work — Three Terms, Freshman Year — Six 
periods per week. Use and care of carpenter tools; exercises in 
sawing, mortising, tenoning and laying out work from drawings,, 
wood-turning and pattern-making. 



19 



Course IV, Mechanical Drawing — 

Ihree Terms, Sophomore Year — Six 
periods per week first term; four the 
second; Jive the third. Free-hand sketch- 
ing of details of machinery and drawing 
to scale from these sketches. Tracing 
and blue printing, and representation of 
flat and round surfaces by ink shading. 
Text-book, Rouillion's "Mechanical 
Drawing." 




view in Sh®p. 



Course V, Elementary Applied Mechanics — First Term, Sopho- 
more Year — Four periods per week. Transmission of power by belts 
and pulleys; the results offerees acting upon bodies, bolts, nuts and 
screws, inclined plane, laws of friction, strength of shafting and 
bending movements of beams. Jamieson's "Applied Mechanics" is 
the text used. 

Course VI, Blacksmithing — Three Terms, Sophomore Year — Six 
periods per week. The elementary operations of drawing out, upsetting, 
bending and welding of iron, and making and tempering of steel 
tools; moulding and casting in iron, and the management of the 
cupola. 

Course VII, Descriptive Geometry — Second and Third Terms, 
Sophom.ore Year — Three periods per week second term,; two periods the 
third. Its relation to mechanical drawing, and the solution of prob- 
lems relating to magnitudes in space, bearing directly upon those 
principally used by the mechanical engineer. Text-book, Fauce's 
"Descriptive Geometry." 

Course VIII — Elementary Machine Design — Three Terms, Junior 
Year — Six periods per week. The designing of bolts, screws and 
nuts. Calculations and drawings of a simple type of steam engine. 
Wells' "Engineering, Drawing and Design" is the text used. 

Course IX, Shop Work — Three Terms, Junior Year — Six periods 
per week. Elementary principles of vise and machine work, which 
includes turning, planing, drilling, screw cutting and filing. This is 
preceded by study of the different machines used in the machine 
shops. 

Course X, Steam Engines and Boilers — First Term, Junior Year — 
Four periods per week. The principles of steam and the steam engine; 
the slide valve and valve diagrams; the indicator and its diagram; 
steam boilers, the various types and their advantages, including the 
method of construction. Text used is Jamieson's "Steam and Steam 
Engines." 



18 

In the forge shoj) are sixteen ])()\ver lor<;es, one hand f*)r<;e, a 
pressure Ian and exhauster tor keei)inj;^ the shop free of smoke. 
There is a full assortment ol smiths' tools for each lorj^e. 

The foundry is e(piipped with a Whitinj^ cupola, which melts 
1, 200 ])()unds ol iron per lioiu'; a hrass furnace, one Mellet core oven, 
and with tiie necessar}- llasks and tools. 

The machine shop ei[uipment consists of one lo-inch Reed speed 
lathe, one 2()-inch iMlield en^^ine lathe, with compound rest, one 12- 
inch Reed combined foot and ])ower lathe, two i pinch liccd enj^iiie 
lathes, one 24-inch (lra\- planer, one ih-inch Smith ^ Mills shaper, 
one 24-inch Snyder drill i)ress, one No. 4 Diamond emer\- tool- 
j^rinder, and an assortment ol \ises, taps, dies, pii)e-tools ami ineasur 
ing instruments. 

An S by 12-inch engine drives the machinery of the woodwork 
ing an<l machine shops. It was presented to the College by the City 
of Baltimore, and secured through the efforts of Rear Admiral John 
I), h'ord, of the Tnited States Navy. A lo-horse-power h'airbanks 
gasoline engine drives the blowers in the l()undr\- and forge shop. 

The drafting room is well eipiipped for i)ractical work, having 
suitable benches, lockers and blue print lacilities. 

Tours of Inspection. -The members of the Senior Class go to 
Baltimore or Washington for the purpose of inspecting well-known 
nianu fact u ring plants. 

Ccuirsel, Mechanical Drawinji-^ riiite '/Vfnis, /■^rfs/n/nin )'car — 
-Sy.i [uriods pt> h't'fk. Practice in plain lettering, use of instru- 
ments, ]»rojecticns and sim])le working drawings, the plates upon 
completion being eui'loseil in covers ])rt)perly titled by the stutlenl. 
Text-book, Rouillion's "Mechanical Drawing." 

Course II, Technical Instruction — First Tcrni, Fres/iiiian )\'ar — 
/■/rv prriods f^rr ;cf(k. lixplanation of the reading of mechanical 
drawings. The proi)er cutting, angles, care and atljustment of car- 
penter tools. Relative strength of wood joints. Wood: its shrink- 
ing and warjjing, and how to correct and prevent. Te.xt, (ioss' 
"Bench-work in Wood." Drill in problems in Arithmetic, Algebra 
and Drawing, by notes aiul lectures. 

Course ill. Shop Work — T/trcf Terms, Freshman )\-ar^Six 
periods per ^ceek. Use and care of carpenter tools; exercises in 
sawing, mortising, tenoning ami laying out work from drawings, 
wood-turning and pattern-making. 



li) 



Course IV, Mechanical Drawinj;:- 

llncf Itrnis, Sop/i<>niori- )'rin- — Six 
periods per nwek first /ir/n: four the 
st'coiul: f'li't- t/it- tit'nd. Imlx'-IkiikI skt-tch- 
iiig of details of inachinerv aiul drawing; 
to soak' from these sketclies. TraiMiij; 
and blue i)rintiii.i;, and ie])reseiitation of 
flat and romul snrfaces !>> ink shading. 
Text -hook, Ronillion's "Mechanical 
Drawing." 




\ 1C\\ ill Sllw|i 



Course V, Klementary Applied Mechanics — First 'I\r)n, Sop/io- 
inore )\ar — -l-iuir prriiu/s per r.vv/('. 'l^ansniission of ])o\ver 1)\" belts 
and pulleN'S; the rcsnlts oi forces acting npon bodies, bolts, nnts and 
screws, inclined ])lane, laws of friction, strength of shafting and 
bendinj^ nio\enients of beams. JamieSon's "A])i>lied Meclianiis" is 
the text nsed. 

Course V'' I, Blacksmithinjj-- /"//y ,r, If mis, Sop/ioinori- )'r<ir -Six 
periods prr \cft'L\ The elementar\' operations of drawingont, npsetting, 
bendinj; and welding ol iron, and making and temperini; of steel 
tools; monldini; and casting in iron, and the mana>4enient ol the 
enpola. 

Course VII, Descriptive (ieonietry -St-cond ond Third 'J'r>»is, 
Si>pIioiiior(' )'f<rr — Thret' Ptiiods prr :ect'l,- srcoiid tt)»i: t^eo periods tlie 
third. Its relation to mechanical (.IrawinL;, and t he solnt ion ol prob- 
lems relating to ma>;nitntles in space, bearing direcll\' uju)!! those 
])rineipally used by the mechanical eni;ineer. Text-lH)t)k, Fauce's 
' ' Descri pt i ve O eonietry . ' ' 

Course VIII l:lementxiry Machine l)esij»ii /"///»• '/'f77//.v, luitior 
Year-' Si A periods per ..vv/-. The dcsii;nin<; of bolts, sciews and 
nuts. Calculations and drawin_ij;s of a simple t\'pe »)f steam i'ni;ine. 
Wells' "lui^ineerini;. Drawing and Design" is the text used. 

Course IX, Shop Work — '/'hree 7'ertns, Junior )'ear~Si\ pei/ods 
per7oeek. Ivlenieutary ])rincij)les of vise and machine work, which 
includes turuinj^, i)lauin^, drilling, screw cutting' and hlinj;. This is 
preceded b\' stud\' of the different machines used in the machine 
shops. 

Course X, Steam Engines and Boilers — First Term, Junior )'ear — 
Four periods per week. The principles of steam ami the steam engine; 
the slide valve and valve diagrams; the intlicator antl its diagram; 
steam boilers, the various types and their atlvantages, including the 
method of construction. Text used is Jamieson's "Steam autl Steam 
ICngines." 



Course XI, Power Plants — First Term, Senior Year — Two periods 
per week. I^ectures on the location, construction, equipment and 
engineering of power plants. 

Course XII, Machine Design — Three Terms, Senior Year — Four 
periods per week first tervi, six the seco7id and four the third. The cal- 
culation and design of pipes, belt and tooth-gearing, beams and 
cranes. Text, Low & Bevis' "Machine Drawing and Design." 

Course XIII, Shop '^ox\i— Three Terms, Senior Year— Eight 
periods per week first term,, te7i periods second and third terms. — 
Advanced machine work; the laying out, assembling and construction 
of some piece of machinery, such as an engine lathe or dynamo. 

Course XIV, Testing — Third Term, Senior Year — Six periods 
per week. A course in experimental engineering; oil testing, deter- 
mining the coeflBcient of friction, the calibration of the planimeter 
and steam gauges, slide valve setting and indicator practice, the 
slide rule, and determining the amount of moisture in steam. 



Department of Mathematics. 

R. W. Silvester, Professor. 
Henry T. Harrison, Assistant. 

Mathematics is the basis upon which scientific information rests. 
A knowledge of the study is necessary, as much from the utilitarian 
point of view as from the mental training its acquisition gives. Its 
importance as a factor in our College course takes its rise from the 
former consideration. All instruction in this work is with a view to 
the equipping of students for the more practical work soon to follow. 

The class work in mathematics in the several courses consists of 
arithmetic, bookkeeping, algebra, geometry (plane and solid), trigo- 
nometry (plane and spherical), descriptive geometrj', in its applica- 
tion to mechanical drawing, analytical geometry, differential and in- 
tegral calculus, in their application to mechanics, engineering, 
physics and surveying. 

In the applied mathematics, bookkeeping is taught every student. 
No matter what vocation a man intends to follow, a knowledge of 
business forms and methods of systematic accounts is a requisite to 
success. To be able to use an ordinary compass or transit, for the 
purpose of laying out, dividing and calculating the area of land, or of 
running outlines and leveling for the purpose of drainage, is a neces- 
sary accomplishment for every intelligent farmer. 

Course I, Elementary Mathematics — First Term, Freshman 
Year — Three periods per week. General review. 



21 

Course II, Algebra — Three Terms, Freshman Year — Five periods 
per week- Text-book, Wentworth's College Algebra. 

Course III, Plane Geometry — Third Term, Freshman Year; First 
Term^, Sophomore Year — Five periods per week. Text-book, Went- 
worth's Plane Geometry. 

Course IV, Solid Geometry— ^V^r^?//^ Term, Sophomore Year — 
Five periods per week. Text-book, Wentworth's Solid Geometry. 

Course V, Trigonometry — Third Tertn, Sophomore Year — Five 
periods per week. Textrbook, Wentworth's Plane Trigonometry, 

Course VI, Analytical Geometry— /Vr^/ Term, Junior Year — 
Five periods per week. Text-book, Wentworth's Analytics, 

Course VII, Differential Calculus — Second Term, Junior Year — 
Five periods per week. Text-book, Osborne's. 

Course VIII, Integral Calculus — Third Term, Junior Year — Five 
periods per week. Text-book, Osborne's, 



Department of English and Civics. 

F. B, BoMBERGER, Professor. 
Charles S. Richardson, Assistant. 

This department, as its name implies, covers the work of two 
distinct courses of instruction. It seeks to prepare the student by 
systematic training in the historj^ structure and use of the English 
language, for the highest development of his mental powers" and for 
the complex duties and relations of life; and, further, to fit him for 
the active and intelligent exercise of his rights and duties as a man 
and citizen. 

The course in English, of necessity, lies at the base of all other 
courses of instruction, A clear and comprehensive knowledge of his 
mother tongue is absolutely necessarj^ to the student in pursuing any 
line of college work. Nor is this all, for aside from the practical 
value of the English instruction as an aid to other branches of study, 
and as a preparation for business and profession, it is to his training 
in this department, in connection with his study of history and the 
classics and modern languages, that the student must look for the 
acquiring of that general culture that has always been the distinguish- 
ing mark of the liberally educated man. The English work, which 
is common to all courses, consists of the study of the structure of the 
English language, literature (English and American), theoretical and 
practical rhetoric, logic, critical reading and analysis, and constant 
exercise in expression, composition and theme writing. 



The course in civics is especially designed to prepare young men 
for the active duties of citizenship. The first two years are devoted 
to the study of general history, followed by the principles of civil 
government, constitutional historj^ political economy, with special 
reference to current social and industrial problems, and, finally, lee 
tures on the elements of business law. 

English Courses. 

Course I, Language and Composition — T/iree Terms, Freshman 
Year — All students — Five periods per week. English language, review 
of grammar, practical exercise in analysis, synthesis and etymology, 
composition and letter writing. Texts used, I^ockwood's "L/essons 
in English," Buehler's "Exercises in English" and Swinton's "Word 
Analysis," Work in composition consists of the preparation of 
twelve themes as follows: 

First Term — i. Why I Came to the Maryland Agricultural College. 

2. How to Do Something — Hunt, Fish, etc. 

3. How to Make Something. 

4. My Favorite Book. 

5. A Description of Some Place or Thing. 
Second Term — 6. A Character Sketch. 

7. A Personal Experience. 

8. Account of Some Contest. 

9. An Essay — Abstract Subject. 
Third Term — 10. An Essay — Public Question. 

11. An Argument. 

12. An Oration. 

Course II, American Literature — Third Term, Sophomore Year — 
All Students — Three periods per week. A study of the most promi- 
nent writers, with a view to giving the student an exact knowledge of 
their works. Text used, Watkins' "American lyiterature." 

Course III, Rhetoric and Composition — First and Second Terms, 
Sophomore Year — All students. Four periods per week. Principles 
and practice of rhetoric and composition. Text used, Lockwood's 
and Emerson's "Composition and Rhetoric." 

Work in Rhetoric consists of a study of the Principles of Diction, 
the Sentence, the Paragraph, the Discourse, Forms of Prose, and the 
Nature, Form and Structure of Poetry. 

Work in Composition consists of twelve themes, as follows: 

First Term — i. Description of a Place. 

2. Description of a Person. 

3. Narration of Some Personal Experience. 

4. Narration of Imaginative Experience. 

5. Criticism of Some Book. 

6. An Expression of Opinion. 



23 

Second Term — 7. An Essay. 

8. An Argument. 
' ' 9. Criticism of Some Book. 

ID. An Oration. 

11. A Descriptive Narration. 

12. An Argumentative Oration. 

Course IV, English Literature — Third Term, Sophomore Year — 
All students — Three periods per week. Study of the History and Chief 
Writers of English Literature. Text used, Stopford Brooke's "Eng- 
lish Literature." 

Course V, Composition — Three Terms, Junior Year — All stiidents 
— One pefiod per week. Practice in English Composition. Special 
lectures. Work in Composition consists of twelve themes discussing 
English classics studied in class, or subjects involved in the study of 
civics. Special attention is paid to the oration and short story during 
the third term. 

Course VI, English Literature — First Term, Jmiior Year — Clas- 
sical students only — Five periods per week. Text-book, lectures, read- 
ings, composition. Texts used, Pancoast's "English Literature," 
Halleck's "English Literature." and Taine's "English Literature." 

Course VII, American Literature — Seco?id Term, Junior Year — 
Classical students only — Five periods per week. Text-book, lectures, 
readings, composition. Text used, Pattee's "American Literature." 

Course VIII, Logic — Third Term, Junior Year — Classical students 
only — Five periods per week. Principles and practice of logic. Text 
used, Jevon's-Hills "Logic." 

Course IX, English Classics — Three Terms, Senior Year — Clas- 
sical sttidents only — Four periods per week. Critical study of English 
classics, following the outline for college entrance requirements in 
English. 

Course X, Psychology — First and Second Terms, Senior Year — 
Classical students only — Four periods per week. Principles of Psychol- 
ogy. Text-book and lectures. Text used, Dewey's "Psychology." 

Course XI, Literary Criticism — Third Term, Senior Year — Clas- 
sical students only — Three periods per week. Text and lectures. Text 
used, Winchester's "Principles of Literary Criticism." 



History and Civics Courses. ' ^ 

Course I, Ancient History — First and Second Terms, Freshman 
Class — All students — Four periods per week. Outlines of Ancient His- 
troy. Text-book and lectures. Text used, "Myers' "Ancient His- 
tory." 

Course II, English History — Third Term, Freshman Year — 
All students — Three periods per week. Study of Outlines of English 
History. Text used, Montgomery's "English History." 

Course III, Mediaeval and Modern W\s\.ory— First atid Second 
Terms ^ Sophomore Year — Classical students only — Four periods per 
week. Outlines of Mediaeval and Modern History; text-book and 
lectures. Text-book used, Myers' "Mediaeval and Modern History." 

Course IV, Political Science — First Term, Junior Year — 
Classical students only — Five periods per week. Government; special 
lectures on Constitution of Maryland. Text-books used, Wilson's 
"The State" and Bryce's "American Commonwealth." 

Course V, American Qovernment — Second and Third Terms, 
Junior Year — Classical, Scientific and Mechanical stiide?its — Three 
periods per week. Civil Government in the United States. Text- 
books used, Fiske's "Civil Government," Hinsdale's "American 
Government," and Clark's "Outlines of Civics." 

Course VI, Political Economy — First and Second Terms, Senior 
Year — Classical and Mechanical sticdents — Four periods per week. 
Principles of Political Economy and Industrial Development of the 
United States, Economic Science and Current Problems. Text used. 
Walker's "Political Economy." 

Course VII, Business Law — Third Term, Senior Year — Classical 
students only — Three pe^'iods per week. Lectures on "Business Law" 
as used in everyday life. Text used, Parsons' "Commercial Law." 



Department of Chemistry. 

Dr. H. B. McDonnell, Professor. 

- A. B. Foster, Assistant. 

This department is charged with two distinct classes of work: 
(i) the State fertilizer and food control, and (2) the instruction of 
students. The State work necessitates the publication of the 
"Quarterly," which is usually made up of the results of analysis of 
fertilizers and feeding stuffs, and is sent free of charge to all Mary- 
land farmers who apply. Students do no part of this work, the 
assistants invariably being college graduates. 



25 



The Chemical Laboratory Building is devoted entirely to chem- 
istry. It is new and, not including basement, is two stories high. 
On the first floor are the laboratories for the State fertilizer and food 
control work, office, lecture room and balance room. On the second 
floor are three laboratories for the use of students — one for each 
class — a students' -balance room, with first-class chemical and assay 
balances and a supply room. The assay furnaces are in the base- 
ment. Each student is provided with a working desk, lockers, 
reagents and apparatus. Additional apparatus and material are pro- 
vided from the supplj^ room, as needed. 

The department is provided with a small but well-selected librar}'- 
of standard reference books on chemistry, to which additions are 
made from time to time. 

Instruction in chemistry is begun with the Sophomore 5'ear, four 
hours per week being devoted to lectures and recitations, and three 

to four hours to practical 
work in the laboratory by 
the student, under the super- 
vision of the instructor. In 
this way he comes in direct 
contact with the substances 
studied, having at hand am- 
ple facilities for learning 
their properties. Special at- 
tention is given to the ele- 
ments and compounds of 
practical and economic im- 
portance, such as the air, 
water and soil, the elements 
entering into the composi- 
tion of plants and animals; 
the useful metals, etc. The course in the Sophomore year is intended 
to give the student that practical and theoretical knowledge of 
elementary chemistry which is essential in the education of every 
man, no difference what his vocation. It also serves as a foundation 
for advanced work in chemistry, if such a course is chosen. 

Chemistry becomes an elective study in the Junior year, when 
an advanced course in general chemistry is given, together with 
qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, mineralogy and chemical 
technology. Four hours per week are devoted to the lecture room, 
and from twelve to fifteen hours to laboratory work. 

During the Senior year the work consists of organic chemistry 
and agricultural chemical analysis, including analysis of fertilizers, 
feeding stuffs, water, etc., and a short course in assaying. The work 
of the last term consists, mainly, in the preparation of a thesis 
involving original work. 




students' Desk — Sophomore Class. 



24 

History and Civics Courses. 

Course I, Ancient History — l-'i>st a)id Second 7'tr/?/s. Fits/nnan 
Class — All students — /■'our ptriods per week. Outlines of Ancient His- 
tr()>'. Text-hook and lectures. Text useil, ".M\ers' "Ancient His- 
tory.'' 

Course II, English History — Tliird /'em/, /■"reshnicDi )'eiir — 
AI! students- r/iree periods per ;eee/c. Study of Outlines of Ivnglish 
History. Text used, Montgonier\'s ''luiglish History." 

Course III, Mediaeval and Modern History —//;s7 a)id Seeo)id 

'/e>>ns. Sophomore )'('iU' — L'/iissiciiI students only ~]-'our periods per 

'week. Outlines of Medi;eval and Modern Historx'; text-book and 

lectures. Text-book used, Myers' "Mediaeval and Modern History." 

Course l\'. Political Science — /Irst 'I'erni, /unior )'ear— 
C/ci.\sica/ students only — ki-ee periods per :eeek. Go\"ernnienl ; special 
lectures on Constitution o\ Mar\land. Text-books used, Wilson's 
"The vState" ami Hr\ce's ".Viuerican Coinnioiiwealth." 

Course \, American (jovernment — Seeond and Third Terms, 
JuiTtor )'ear — C/assieal, Sc/e//ti/ie a)id Mechanical students — Three 
periods per :eeek. Civil Ciovernnient in the ITnited .States. Text- 
books used, Fiske's "Ci\il Government," Hinsdale's "American 
Government,'' and Clark's "C)utlines of Civics." 

Course VI, Political Economy — /'irst and Seco/id I'erins, Senior 
Year — Classical and Mechanic al students- - /■ou/- periods per iceek. 
Princi[)les of Political ICconomy and lutlustrial Development of the 
I'liitecl v^tates, Ivconomic Science and Current IVoljlems. Text used, 
Walkc-i's "Political hvCononi\-. " 

Ct>urse VII, Business Law — Tiiird Ten/i, Senior )ear -C'lassical 
students o)il\ — Three periods per :cc'ck. Lectures on "Business I, aw" 
as used in L-xerxdav lite. 'I'ext used, Parsons' " 'Conuucrcial Law.'' 



Deparlment of Chemistry. 

1)k. H. p.. McDdxnki.i., Professor. 

A. IL 1'\)STi-:k, Assistant. 

This dejtartnient is charged with two distinct classes of work: 
(I) the State fertilizer and food control, and !J> the instruction of 
students. The State work necessitates the pul)lication of the 
"Quarterlx," which is usually made up oi the results of analysis of 
fertilizers ami feeding stuffs, ami is sent free of charge to all Mary- 
land farmers who apply. Students do no [>art of this work, the 
assistants invariably being college graduates. 



25 



The Chemical Laboratory BuiKliiig is devoted cntiiel\- to cIkmii- 
istry. It is new and, not iiudiuling basement, is two stories lii.uh. 
On tlie first floor are the hd)oratories for the State fertilizer and food 
control work, othce, lectnre room and balance room. On the second 
floor are three laboratories for the use of sttulents — one for each 
class — a students' balance room, with first elass chemical and assay 
balances and a supplx' room. The assa\- t'urnaces are in tlu- base- 
ment. Ivich student is ])ro\ided with a working desk, Uxkers, 
reagents and apjmratus. Additional ap]>aratus and material are j^ro- 
vided from the suppl\ room, as needed. 

The department is proxided with a small but well selected library 
of standard reference books on chemistrx , to which ailditions are 
made from time to time. 

Instnu'tion in chemistry is begun with the Sophomore year, tour 
hours per week being devoted to lectures and recitations, and three 

to tour hours to ]iractical 
work in the laboratory by 
the stutlent, under the sui>ei'- 
xision of the instrmtor. In 
this x\ax he comes in direct 
contact xxith the substances 
studied, liaxing at hand am- 
ple lacilities tor learning 
their j)roperties. Special at- 
tention is gixeii to the ele- 
ments and compounds of 
])ractical and economic im- 
portance, such as the air, 
water anil ^oil, the eienieiits 
entering into the composi- 
tion ol ])lants and animals; 
the usetul metals, etc. The course in the So])homore year is intended 
to give the student that i)ractica! antl theoielical knoxvledge of 
elementary chemistrx' \xhich is essential in the etlucation oi" exery 
man, no dihereiice what his vocation. It also serves as a tonndatiou 
for adxanced xvork in chemistrx', if such a course is cho>en. 

Cliemistrx' becomes an elective stutlx in the j unior \ear, wh.en 
an advanced course in general chemistrx- is given, together with 
qualitative analysis, cpiantitative analysis, mineralogy and chemical 
technologx'. Foiu' hours per xveek are devoted to the lectine room, 
and t'rom twelve to fifteen liours to laboratorx xvork. 

During the vSenior year the work consists of organic chemistry 
and agricultural chemical analysis, inchuling analysis of fertilizers, 
feeding stuffs, water, etc., and a short course in assaying. The xvork 
of the last term consists, mainlx-, in the ])reparation of a thesis 
involving original xvork. 




^tiiileu! 



I Hsk— Siiiilu>iii. irc Cl:i>s. 



26 




students" Desk— Senior Class. 



The object of the full chemistry course is to prepare the graduate 
for positions in agricultural colleges, experiment stations, or the 
United States Department of Agriculture. The demand for our 

graduates for such positions 
is far in excess of the sup- 
ply. 

Each student in chemistry 
is charged $6.00 per year to 
partly cover the expense of 
the material used. This 
does not include breakage of 
apparatus, which is charged 
extra. This charge seldom 
exceeds one or two dollars 
in the Sophomore year, or 
two or three dollars in the 
Junior or Senior year, de- 
pending upon the habits of 
the student. 

Course I, General Chemistry — Sophomore Year — Four periods 
per week. Lectures and recitations. Text-book, Remsen's "Intro- 
duction to the Study of Chemistry. ' ' 

Course II, General Chemistry. — Sophomore Year — Three periods 
per week for the first and third terms; four for the second term. Prac- 
tical course in Chemistry to accompany Course I. The students per- 
form the experiments. 

Course III, Advanced Chemistry — funior Year — Three or four 
periods per week. Text-book, Remsen's "Advanced Chemistry." 

Course IV, Qualitative Analysis — First Term, funior Year — 
Lectures, two periods per week; practical work, twelve periods per week. 
Text-book, Mason's "Qualitative Analysis." 

Course V, Mineralogy — Second Term, funior Year — Lectures, 
two periods per week; practical work, four periods per week. Brush's 
"Determinative Mineralogy." 

Course VI, Quantitative Analysis — Second Term, funior Year — 
Six periods per week, mostly practical work. Quantitative Analysis 
begun; determination of water, iron, magnesium, calcium, the com- 
mon acids, etc. Reference book, Fresenius' "Manual of Assaying." 

Course VII, Assaying — Third Term, funior Year — Four periods 
per week. Reference book, Brown's "Manual of Assaying." 



27 



Course VIII, Volumetric Analysis — Third Term, Junior Year — 
Eight periods per week, mostly practical. Reference books, Fresenius' 
* 'Quantitative Analysis" and Sutton's "Volumetric Analj'sis." 

Course IX, Organic Chemistry — Senior Year — Four periods per 
^eek. Lectures and recitations. Reference book, Remsen's. 

Course X, Organic Preparations — First and Seco7id Terms, 
Senior Year — Four periods per week. 

Course XI, Agricultural Chemical Analysis — First and Second 
Term.s, Senior Year — Eight periods per week. Text-book, "Methods 
of Analysis of the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists." 

Course XII — Third Term, Senior Year — About twelve to eighteen 
periods per week. This course is the preparation of a thesis involv- 
ing original research in some branch of Agricultural or Industrial 
Chemistry. 

Post-Graduate Work. The department will arrange advanced 
courses in Agricultural Chemistry for graduate students. 



Department of Physics. 

Henry Lanahan, Professor. 

The physical lecture room and 
laboratory are located in Morrill 
Hall, in rooms excellently 
adapted to the purpose. The 
department is well supplied with 
apparatus for lecture room dem- 
onstrations and for students' in- 
dividual laboratorj'^ work, and 
new pieces of apparatus are 
added to the equipment each 
year. 

Course I, Elementary Physics 

• — First and Second Terms, Sopho- 
more y^ear — Two periods per 
week. The course consists of 
lectures, recitations and experi- 
mental demonstrations by the 
instructor on the mechanics of 
solids, liquids and gases. The 

Apparatus for Measuring Electrical Resistance, student is required tO WOrk a 

number of problems, and his attention is directed to the practical 
applications of the principles studied. Text, Carhart & Chute's 
^^High School Physics." 




20 




The object of the full chemistry course is to prepare the graduate 
lor positions in agricultural colleges, experiment stations, or the 
Tuiled vStates Department of Agriculture. The demand for our 

graduates for such positions 
is far in excess of the sup- 
ply. 

Each student in chemistr}' 
is charged 556.00 per year to 
partly cover the expense of 
the material used. This 
does not include breakage of 
apparatus, which is charged 
extra. This charge seldom 
exceeds one or two dollars 
in the vSophomore year, or 
two or three dollars in the 
Junior or Senior year, de- 
pending upon the habits of 

Stiuk-iits' Desk— Senior Class. the Student. 

Course I, General Chemistry — Sophomore Year— Four periods 
per week. Lectures and recitations. Text-book, Remsen's "Intro- 
duction to the Study of Chemistry." 

Course 11, General Chemistry. — Sophomore Year — Three periods 
per 7i'eek for tlie first a)id third teri>is: four for the second term. Prac- 
tical course in Chemistry to accompany Course I. Tlie students per- 
form the experiments. 

Course III, Advanced Chemistry — Junior )'ear — '/liree or four 
periods per wectc. Text-bot)k, Remsen's "Advanced Chemistry." 

Course IV, Qualitative Analysis — First Term. Junior ]'ear — 
Lectures, i:vo periods per :eeek: practical leork , tieelve periods per week. 
Text 1)()ok, Mason's "Oualitative Analysis." 

Course V, Mineralogy — Second 'Perm, Junior Year — Lectures, 
t:eo pe) iods per 7eeek: practical :eork, p^''^'' periods per leeek. Brush's 
" Determinative Mineralogy." 

Course VI, Quantitative Analysis — .Second Lerm , Ju)iior Year — 
Six pc) iods per :eeek, mostfy practical 7C'ork. Quantitative AnaUsis 
begun; determination ot water, iron, magnesiiuu, calcium, the com- 
mon ac-ids, etc. Reference book, PVesenius' "Manual of Assaying." 

Course Vll, Assaying — Lhird Lerm, Junior Year — /•\->ur periods 
per :eeek. Referentx- Ixjok, lirown's ''Manual of Assaying." 



27 



Course VIII, Volumetric Analysis — Thiyd '/'ertn, /loiior )'iay — 
Jui;;lit periods per -iceek, mostly praeiiral. Reference books, I'reseiiiiis' 
^'Quantitative Analysis" and Sutton's "X'olunKti ic Analysis." 

Course IX, Organic Chemistry — Senior )'ear — J-'onr pe/iods per 
leeek. Lectures and recitations. Reference l)ook, Renisen's. 

Course X, Organic Preparations — I-'irsi and Seei>nd /'erms, 
Setiior )^ear — J-oiir period.s per :crek. 

Course XI, Agricultural Chemical Analysis — /'irst and Seeond 
7er;//s, Senior )^ear — /Sij^/// periods per reeek. Text-lxtok, "Methods 
of Analysis of the Association of Official A.^ricultnral Clieniists." 

Course XII — Third Term, Senior i'ear — Alhud iieelie io eighteen 
periods per 7eeek. This course is the preparation of a thesis in\olv- 
ing- orig^inal research in some branch of Agricultural or hulustrial 
Chemistry. 

Post=Qraduate Work. The department will arrange advanced 
•courses in Agricultural Chemistr\- for graduate students. 



Department of Physics. 

Henry Lan.mian, Professor. 



The physical lecture room and 
laboratory are located in Morrill 
Hall, in rooms excellenth 
ada])ted to the ])urpose. The 
department is well supi>lied with 
apparatus lor lecture room dem- 
onstrations and tor studeiiis' in- 
dividual laboratory woik, and 
new pieces of a]ii)aralus are 
added to the e<|uipmeiit each 
year. 

Course I, HIementary Physics 

— /■ irst ,r)id Seeo)!d / e/ nr<,S(p//o- 
v/ore )'ear — 7':eo periods per 
leeek. The course consists of 
lectures, recitations and exjieri- 
meiital demonstrations by the 
instructor on the mechanics of 
solids, licpiids and gases. The 

Apparatus f.ir Mtasuriiiv: I-.Uctrical kesi.staiu t . studeUt is rccplired tO Work 3 

number of problems, and his attention is directed to the practical 
a])plications of the principles studied. Text, Carhart ^c Chute's 
''High School Physics." 




Course II, Physics — Three Terms, Junior Year — Four periods per 
week class-room work, and four periods per week laboratory work. The 
course begins with a review of mechanics, after which heat, sound, 
electricity and magnetism and light are taken up sikccessively , by 
lectures, recitations, problems and demonstrations. A knowledge of 
the elements of plane trigonometry is required for entrance. The 
laboratory work consists of a series of experiments, mainly quantita- 
tive, designed to illustrate and verify the laws and principles con- 
sidered in the class-room, and to develop in the student skill in 
manipulation, and accuracy in making precise measurement. Written 
reports of the work done in the laboratory are required weekly. The 
text-books used are Ames' "Theory of Physics," and Ames and Bliss' 
"Manual Experiments in Physics." 

Course III — Three Terms, Senior Year. More advanced work will 
be provided for students who have completed the preceding courses, 
and who wish to continue the study of physics. 



Department of Civil Engineering. 

Henry I^anahan, Professor. 




A Group of Surveying Instruments. 



Course I, Surveying — Three 
Terms, Junior Year — Two periods 
per week class-room ivork; three 
periods per week field practice. 
The course includes the use and 
adjustment of engineering instru- 
ments; the methods of land survey- 
ing; the plotting and computing 
of areas; the dividing of land; the 
theory of the stadia; true meridian 
lines; leveling; topographical sur- 
veying; railroad curves and cross- 
sectioning. If time permits, the 
methods of locating and staking 
out new roads will be taken up, 
and some attention given to road 
construction. The department is 
equipped with two surveyor's com- 
passes, a Gurley transit, with solar 
attachment, and a 20-inch Gurley 
level. Texts, Raymond's "Plane 



Surveying" and Pence & Ketchum's "Field Manual." 



29 



Course II, Graphic Statics — First Term, Senior Year — Four 
periods per week. Including the theory and practice of the graphical 
methods of determining stresses in frame structures, particularly 
roof trusses, and bending movements and shears in beam. The 
course is based on Hoskins' "Graphic Statics," and many of the 
problems are solved analytically as well as graphically. 

Course III, Strength of Materials — Second Term, Senior Year — 
Four periods per week. Treating of the elasticity and resistance of 
materials of construction, and the mechanics of beams, columns and 
shafts. The text used is Merriman's "Mechanics of Materials," and a 
knowledge of integral calculus is required for entrance to the course. 

Course IV, Railway and Highway Engineering — Three Terms, 
Senior Year. A course in railroad and highway location and construc- 
tion is also offered. Text, Searles' "Field Engineering," Spalding's 
"Roads and Pavements," and the reports of the highwaj'^ division of 
the Maryland Geological Survey. 



Department of Horticulture. 

James S. Robinson, Professor Emeritus. 
, Professor. 

Course I — Third Term, Sophomore Year — Seven periods per week. 
Lectures and practical work, (i) Methods of plant propagation. 

(2) Character of soil as best 
adapted to the different fruits 
and vegetables. (3) Methods of 
management of soils and soil im- 
provements. (4) Manure, com- 
posts and commercial fertilizers. 
(5) Hot-beds and cold-frames. 
The practical work is intended to 
give students a knowledge of the 
operations in the garden and 
orchard. These exercises will be 
supplemented by familiar talks 
on the operations performed. 

Class in Prunins. 

Course II, Small Fruit Culture — First Term, Junior Year — 
Four periods per week. Lectures and discussion on planting, culti- 
vation and marketing of small fruits. 

Course III, Floriculture — First Half, Second Term, Junior Year — 
Six periods per week. Lectures and practical work. Management 




28 



Course II, Physics — /'/irtu' It) )iis , Jiotior )'<■<!/ — l-\uiy f^ttiods prr 
-.^•fi-L- i-/tiss-r<>o//i ,"<•(';/.•, iiiid I our f^ti tods f^cr :oock liihoitttory :ooyh. The 
coiiisf het^iiis with :i icxicw ol iiR-ch;inics, alter whicli hrat, sound, 
elcctricit\ and niaj^iictisin and lii;lit arc taken wy si'iccessivel y , l)y 
lectures, recitations, problems and tlenionstrations. A kno\vled_t;e of 
the elements of plane tri^onoinetrx' is retpiired lor entraiu-e. 'iMie 
laboratory' work consists of a series ol experiments, mainl\' (piantita- 
ti\e, desi^^ned to illustrate and verity the laws and princijiles con- 
sidered in the class room, and to develop in the student skill in 
manipidation, and ac-curac\- in making precise measurement. Written 
reports of the work done in the laboralorx' are re(piiri.d weeklw The 
text-books used are Ames' "'I'heory ol I'hjsics," and Ames antl Bliss' 
"Manual I{x])erinunts in l'li\sics." 

C<»iirse III rin,(' /',>iiis, Siiii(>r }',in. Abne advanced work will 
be provided lor students who have completed the i)recedinj4 courses, 
and who wish to continue the stud\ of pliNsit-s. 



Deparlmeni of Civil Enilineering. 

Hlv.N'KN' I.ANA MAN, TroleSSor. 




A OiDUiiiiI Survciiiy lii-,tiuiiii Mts. 

Surve\in<.'" and Pence iV Ketchum's "JMeld Manual." 



Course I, Sur\eyinii rinec 
I onus, Juuioi ) i ar Ti^o j^oiiods 
/>f7' ,(Vf/i- iloss-iot>)u :ot>>/:: llttoo 
^t'liods f^oi :ootk lit LI f>)iutiro. 
The course includes tlie use and 
adjustment ol enj^ineerinj; iustiu^ 
meiits; the methods of land sui\'e\- - 
ini;: the idollinj.; and computiui; 
ol areas; the dixidinj; of land; the 
lheor\(>f tlu- stadia ; true meridian 
lines; lexelin^; topoj^i aphical snr- 
ve\in!4; railroad curves and cross- 
sectionini^. If time ptrmits, the 
methods of locating.; and stakini; 
out new roads will be taken up, 
and some attention i;i\en to road 
i-onstrui-tion. The department is 
e(piipi)ed with two siuvevor's com- 
passes, a Ciurle)' transit, with solar 
attachment, and a 2()-inch Gurley 
le\el. Texts, Raymond's "IMane 



''11 



Course II, (iraphic Statics /'irsi l\i))i, Soiior )'ear - I'oio- 
poiiids pti :<.'!<■/:. Iiu-Imliiij; tlu- tlu-or\ and i>i art i^r ol' llu- i^iapliical 
iiiL'lliods ol lU-lc-rniiiiiui; stirssc-s in Iraiiu- ^iriiclui cs, partimilai 1\- 
rool Irusscs, and lieiidiiii; nio\i-iiu-iit> and slRai> in hi-ani. Tlu- 
coniSL- is l)as(--d on lloskins" "(iiajihir Static^,'' and nianv ol llic 
])r()l)lcnis arc soKfd anal \ticall\ as wrll as i;i aiilncallx'. 

Course III, Strength of Alaterials S,-toihi /',ri//, Soiior )'ear — 
Jour />(■) /litis fui ,iV( /'. Tii-atinL; ol llic tdasticitx and ix'sistance of 
inatciials of (.-onstrui't ion, anil Xhv nK-cdianics ot hcanis. i-olinnns and 
slialts. Tin- tfxl ns(,-d is NK-rrinians ' ' Mnlianics ot Matci ials, " and a 
knowK-dj^L' ot intc's^ral i-alcniiis is ic(|uiii'd lor onlranix- to tin.- t-oursc. 

Course IN , Railway and lliiih\\a\ l^nuiuceriiiji - I'ln cr /'tiiiis, 
Sfnio) )(■(!/. A con ISO in lailroad and liiL;h\va\ location amK-onstruc- 
tioli is also olToit'd . 'l\-xl, SoarU-N' '■JMcld Ivn^inrc! int;, ' ' Si)aKlin_i;'s 
''Roads and l'a\cnuails," and llu- reports ol the liii^hway division ol 
the Mar\ huul ( icolo>' it-al Sni\c\ . 



Department of Horticulture. 

JAiMKS S. koiiiNSoN, rrolessoi I'hnciiins. 
, I'lok-ssor. 

Course I — Tltiid rrrni, SopIio>/h'rt- )\ay St itii pr^iiods ptr :, ■<■(■/:. 
L,ecUiics and practical \vt)rk. (i) Methods ol ]>lant pr()])ai4ati<>n. 

i J t Character ol soil as !)cst 
aihipted to the diUerent Irnits 
and \-e_L;elal)les. (,^ » Methods ot 
inanai^enient of soils ;ind s(m1 ini 
pro\enient^. 14) Mannie, com 
]>osts and coinnu-rcial tertili/ers. 
tS'i IIotd)ed> and cold Iranies. 
The practical uoik is intended to 
!lM\ e st ndents a know ledi;^- ol the 
operati()ns in the s^ardeii and 
orcliaril. 'iMieSe exercises will be 
snpiMcnientt-d li\ laniiliar talks 
on the opciatii.'ns pcrloinied. 

CUi'^s ill I'l imiiii;. 

Course II, Small l-ruit Culture — ///,/ '/'t-nii, /unioi )',iir — 
Fimr pt-yiods ^(•r :t't(k . I.eotnres and disiaission on ]>lantini;, cnlti- 
vation and niarkolin_>; <i\. small Irnits. 

Course III, Floriculture J'ii >t Hall\ Stcotid 7\f ni. Junior )'rar — 
Six periods per loook. Lectures and practical work. Manaj^ement 




m 



and care of green-houses; plant propagation, heating and ventilation. 
Landscape Gardening — Second Half , Second Term, Junior Year — 
Six periods per IV eek. I^ectures and demonstrations. Special atten- 
tion is given to rural ornamentation, together with a brief study of 
ornamental trees and shrubs. 

Course IV, Oleri- 
. . ^ -.-v-,. . „ .. . c u 1 1 u r e — Th ir d 

Term, Junior Year — 
Six periods per week. 
Lectures; a discus- 
sion of the princi- 
ples of vegetable gar- 
dening, packing and 
marketing. 




Market Gardening. 



Course V, Pomol- 
ogy — First Term, 
Senior Year — Two 
periods per week. 
Text-book and lectures. A discussion of the principles underlying 
the growing of orchard fruits. Selection of location for the orchard, 
orchard management, handling and marketing of the fruit. 

Course VI, Forestry — Secoiid Term, Senior Year — Two periods per 
week. Lectures. Discussion of the general principles of forestry. 
The effect of forest upon soil and climate. A brief study of forest 
trees and silvicultural methods. 

Course VII, Plant Breeding and Plant Evolution — Third Term, 
Senior Year — Two periods per week. Lectures. The principles of 
plant breeding, plant variation; the effect of soil, climate, cultivation 
and other ameliorating influences upon plants. The crossing and 
hybridizing of plants. Heredity, selection and origin of domestic 
varieties. A brief history of plant evolution. 

Course VIII, Special Research Work — Three Terms, Senior Year. 
Time and work to be arranged with each student individually. The 
course will be given only to Seniors, and must be preceded by 
Courses I to IV. It may be taken by Seniors as their major subject, 
or as one of their minors. 



Department of Veterinary Science. 

Samuel S. Buckley, Professor. 

Course I, Microscopy — First Term, Sophomore Year — For stu- 
dents in agricultural and scientific courses — Four periods per week. 



31 



I^aboratory exercises. The study of simple, compound and dissect- 
ing microscopes. lyaboratory methods and microscopical technique. 
This course is designed to equip students for the more technical work 
in advanced courses. 

Course II, Bacteriology — Second Term, Sophomore Year — For 
students in agricultural and scientijic courses. Five periods per n'eek. 
I^ectures and laboratory exercises. The study of bacteria, methods of 

propagation. Culture media, mounting and 
staining specimens. Disinfection, ster- 
ilization, pasteurization, etc. 

Course III, Bacteriology — Third Term, 
Sophomore Year — For students in scientific 
and regular agricultural courses. Five 
periods per week. I^ectures and laboratory 
exercises. Completion of course in bac- 
teriology as outlined in Course II. 

Course IV, Comparative Anatomy and 
Physiology — First Term, Junior Year — 
For students in biological-scientific cotirse. 
Six periods per week. Lectures and labora- 
tory exercises. The comparative anatomy and physiology of the 
domesticated animals, with special reference to the processes of 
nutrition. 

Course V, Comparative Anatomy and Physiology — Third Term, 
Jwiior Year — For students i?i biological, scientific and regular agricul- 
tural courses — Six periods per week. Lectures and laboratory ex- 
ercises. 




A Post"Mortetn. 



Course VI, Veterinary Science — Senior Year. For students of 
the agricultural course this is a required study throughout the year. 
It embraces nursing, emergency treatment, administration of medi- 
cines, means of restraint, the common diseases, and general care and 
management of the domesticated animals. 

Short Veterinary Courses. — Students in the Short Winter Course 
in Agriculture are required to attend the twenty lectures given on 
veterinary subjects and to examine patients in the stables. Students 



30 



and care ofgreen-lioiisc-s; plant propa^j^ation, heating- and ventilation. 
Landscape Qardenin^—Scco/u/ /^a//\ Sicofid Tcyvi , Jioiior Year — 



Six periods per : 



i't'C 



Lectures and demonstrations. Special atten- 




Market ( lanitiiiiu 



tion i> given to rural ornamentation, together with a brief study of 

ornamental trees and shrubs. 

Course IV, Oleri- 
c u 1 1 u r e — 77/ / r d 
Jcrni, Junior Year — 
Six periods per 7 reek. 
I^ectures; a discus- 
sion of the princi- 
ples of vegetable gar- 
dening, ]iacking and 
marketing. 

Course V, Pomol- 
ogy — /•'irst 7'er>n, 
S e )i i (> r ) ear — 7 n 'o 
periods per week. 
Text-book and lectures. A discussion of the principles luiderlying 
the growing of (jrchard fruits. Selecti(jn of location for the orchard, 
orchard management, handling and marketing of the Iruit. 

Course VI, Forestry — Seeoud 7) r?//, Senior }ear — r:co periods per 
week. Lectures. l)iscussit)n ol the general principles of forestry. 
The effect <;f forest U))on soil aiul climate. A brief stud>' of forest 
trees and sil\icnltural metlKnls. 

Course VII, Plant Breeding and Plant Evolution — Third '/]))//, 
Senior )'ear — I ;eo periods per :oeek. Lectures. The principles of 
plant Ineeding, plant variation; the effect of soil, clinuile, culti\ation 
and other ameliorating inlliiences upon j)lants. The crossing and 
Inbriili/.ing of ])lants. Heredity, selection and origin of domestic 
varieties. A brief history of plant evolution. 



Course VIII, Special Research Work — '/yiree Terms, Se)iior }'ear. 
Time and work to be arranged with each student individually. The 
course will be given onl\' to Seniors, and must ])e preceded by 
Courses I to IV. It nuiy be taken b}' Seniors as their major subject, 
or as one of their minors. 



DeparlmenI of Veterinary Science. 

Samuel S. Bucklkv, Professor. 

Course I, Microscopy — First Term, Sophomore Year — T'or stu- 
dents in agricultural and seientifie courses— Four periods per week. 



31 



I,aborator\- exercises. The study of simple, compound and dissect- 
ing microscopes. Laboratory methods and microscopical technique. 
This course is designed to equip students for the more technical work 
in advanced courses. 



Course II, Bacteriology — Sccoid Ttrin, Sophomore )'ear — For 
sti(dt-}tts i)i a^^ricultural ami sr/en/i/u- co/irst's. Five periods pt^r 7^-eck. 
Lectures and laboratory exercises. The study of bacteria, methods of 

propagation. Culture media, mounting and 
„_____ staining specimens. Disinfection, ster- 
ilization, pasteurization, etc. 

Course III, Bacteriology — Tiiird Tertu , 
Sop/iomore \'ear — For siudents in scientific 
and res^uiar aorieultural courses. live 
periods per 7cee/^:. Lectures and laboratory 
exercises. Completion of course in ]:>ac- 
teriology as i^mtlined in Course IL 



Course l\ , Comparative .Anatomy and 
Physiology — I'irst l\r>n. Junior Year — 
For siudents in biological- scienti fit course. 
Six periods per leeek. Lectures and labora- 
tory ext-rcisfs. The comparative anatomy and physiology of the 
domesticated animals, with special reference to the processes of 
nutrition. 



% '• 






■ /r^. 


"^^ 


- ■ ■■ 


us* 


<> . . 

_ .^ _^£.^ „ 



.\ ru-.tMortiiii. 



Course \, Comparative Anatomy and Physiology 'Fliird Femi, 
Junior )ea/' — /(>r students in biological, sciotti/ic a)id regular agricul- 
tural courses — .SV r periods per leeek. Lectures and laboratory ex- 
ercises. 

Course VI, Veterinary Science — Senior Year. Lor students of 
the agricultural course this is a recpiired >tudy throughout the year. 
It embraces nursing, emergency treatment, administration of medi- 
cines, means of restraint, the common diseases, and general care and 
management of the domesticated animals. 



Short Veterinary Courses. — Studerits in the Short Winter Ct)urse 
in Agriculture are required to attend the twenty lectures given on 
veterinary subjects and to examine patients in the stables. Students 



32 



of the two-year agricultural course receive during the first year one 

lecture and four practical periods 
per week for the first term; two 
lectures and six practical periods 
per week for the second term. 
During the second year the}^ re- 
ceive two lectures and four prac- 
tical periods per week for the 
three terms. The character of 
the work is such as to enable a 
stock owner to care for animals in 
health and disease in an intelli- 
gent manner, to appreciate symp- 
toms of disease, and to treat the 
commoner disorders and diseases 
of the domesticated animals. 




Class in Veterinary Science. 



Department of Entomology and Zoology. 

T. B. Symons, Professor. 
A. B. Gah AN, Assistant. 

The instruction in this department is given by means of lectures, 
laboratory practice and field work. In the lectures the more general 
questions are discussed, with a view of giving the students as broad 
a knowledge of the subject as practicable in the time devoted to it. 
In the laboratory, attention is given to methods of investigation, 
insect anatomy, and preparation and classification of collections made 
in the field. The work of this department is open only to Juniors and 
Seniors in the Agricultural, Chemical and General Science Courses, 
unless by special arrangement. ' 

Course I, Zoology — First and Second Terms, Junior Year — Six 
periods per week; lechires and laboratory exercises. This course in- 
volves a study of representatives of the principal groups of animals, 
together with lectures on their structure and classification. 

Course II, Entomology — Third Term, Junior Year — General 
Course — Eight periods per week. Lectures and laboratory exercises. 
The lectures treat of the zoological position of insects, the charac- 
teristics of the orders, sub-orders, and the more important families; 
the habits and life history of insects, with special reference to those 
species that are of economic importance. The laboratory and field 
work includes the study of the more general features of insect anat- 
omy, the determination of general species, and the collection and 
preservation of insects. 



• 33 

Course III, Entomology — Senior Year. Advanced course. ^Open 
only to students who have completed Courses I and II or their equiv- 
alents. This course consists of special work in morphology or classi- 
fication, or working out the life history of insects. Students making 




Class iu Entomology. 



entomology their major will be required to devote at least ten hours 
per week, throughout the year, to this course, and prepare an origi- 
nal thesis upon the subject chosen or assigned. 



Department of Botany and Vegetable Pathology. 

J. B. S. Norton, Professor. 
Frederick H, Blodgett, Assistant. 

The courses in Botany are intended to give such knowledge of 
the vegetable kingdom as is a proper element in general culture;'to 
train the student mind in observation, comparison, generalization 
and other mental processes essential to true scientific methods in any 
work, and to furnish a basis for practical studies directly connected 
with agriculture, for since plants in the field and garden are the sub- 
jects dealt with, the study of plant life must be one of the funda- 
mental sciences on which such work is based. No course can be 
taken unless those preceding it or their equivalent have been pursued. 

The equipment and means of illustration and demonstration con- 
sist of a reference library containing the principal botanical works 
needed by students, charts and maps, compound and dissecting 
microscopes, preserved specimens for illustration, a representative 



32 



ol tile t\vc)-\ear agricultural course receive during the first year one 

lecture and tour practical periods 
])er week lor the first term; two 
lectures and six i)ractical jieriods 
])er week lor the second term. 
During the second \ear the\- re- 
ceive two lectures and four i)rac- 
tical ]>eriods per week lor the 
three terms. The character of 
the work is such as to enable a 
stock owner to care for animals in 
health and disease in an intelli- 
gent manner, to ap})reciate symp- 
toms ol disease, anil to treat the 
commoner disorders and diseases 
of the domesticated animals. 




Cla'^s ill Vrtirinary Siieiice. 



Department of Entomology and Zoology. 

T. li. SvAioxs, Professor. 
A. ]i. (i.\n.\N, Assistant. 

Tlie instruction in this department is given by means of lectures, 
laboratory practice and field work. In the lectures the more general 
questions are disctissed, with a view of giving the students as broad 
a knowledge of the subject as practicable in the time devoted to it. 
In the hd)oratory, attention is given to methods of investigation, 
insect anatomy, and preparation and classification of collections made 
in the field. The work of this department is open only to Juniors and 
Seniors in the Agricultural, Chemical and General Science Courses, 
unless 1)\- special arrangement. 

Course I, Zoolojjjy — l-lrst a)td St-cO)id Tt)-»is, Jioiior Yeay — Six 
periods piT hwe/c: itciurt's a)id liihoraiory exercises. This course in- 
volves a stud\' of reiireseutatives of the princij^al groujis of animals, 
together with lectures on their structure and classilication. 

Course II, I^ntomoIoj>y — Third 7^cr»i, Junior Year — General 
Course — I-^iii/if piiiods por :oeek. I^ectures and lal)orator\' exercises. 
The lectures treat of the zoological position of insects, the charac- 
teristics of the orders, sub-orders, and the more important families; 
the habits and life history of insects, with special reference to those 
species that are of economic importance. The laboratory and field 
work inchules the study of the more general features of insect anat- 
omy, the determination of general species, and the collection and 
preserxation of insects. 



33 

Course III, Entomology— 6'^;//<;;- )\ar. Advanced course. ;Open 
only to students who have completed Courses I and II or their equiv- 
alents. This course consists of special work in morpliology or classi- 
fication, or workin*,^ out the life history of insects. Students making- 




Class ill Entoiiiuloi^y. 



entomology their major will be required to devote at least ten hours 
per week, throughout the year, to this course, and prepare an origi- 
nal thesis upon the subject chosen or assigned. 



Department of Botany and Vegetable Pathology. 

J. B. S. Norton, Professor. 
Fredkrick H. Ulodgktt, Assistant. 

The courses in Botany are intended to give such knowledge of 
the vegetable kingdom as is a proper element in general culture;'Jto 
train the student mind in observation, comparison, generalization 
and other mental processes essential to true scientific methods in any 
work, and to furnish a basis for practical studies directly coiniected 
with agriculture, for since plants in the field and garden are the sub- 
jects dealt with, the study of plant life must be one of the funda- 
mental sciences on which such work is based. No course can be 
taken unless those preceding it or their equivalent have been pursued. 

The equipment and means of illustration and demonstration con- 
sist of a reference library containing the principal botanical works 
needed b}' students, charts and maps, compound and dissecting 
microscopes, preserved specimens for illustration, a representative 



34 



collection of Maryland plants, microtome and other instruments, 
reagents and apparatus for histological work and physiological experi- 
ments; a culture room , sterilizers, incubators and other facilities for 
the study of plant diseases. 

Course I, Elementary Botany — Third Term, Freshman Year — 
Two theoretical and four practical periods per week. I^aboratory and 
field work, with supplementary reading, using principally Leavitt's 
"Outlines of Botany," or Bergen's "Foundations of Botany," and 
taking up the fundamental facts regarding structure and elementary 

physiology of the common 
plants with a systematic 
study of the spring flora. 
Each student begins a col- 
lection of plant specimens 
to illustrate a subject in 
which he is specially in- 
terested. 

Course II, Ecxi\o%y— First 

Term, Sophomore Year — 
Two theoretical and four 
practical periods per week. 
The work of Course I is 
continued with the wild 
and cultivated fall plants, 
and special attention given 
to the associations of plants 
and their relations to environment, light, water, soil, etc. In con- 
nection wit'' these exercises the reproductive organs of plants and 
their work is studied. Suitable literature for reading is used to sup- 
plement the field and laboratory work. 

Course III, Morphology and Life Histories of Plants — Second 
Term., funior Year — Three theoretical and three practical periods per 
week in the Agricultural Course; three theoretical and four practical iyi 
the Biological Course. A comparative study of the structure and life 
histories of the principal types of plants from the lowest to the highest 
is pursued, special attention being given to those group of plants of 
particular economic interest. The exercises consist of lectures and 
microscopic work in the laboratory. In addition a series of lectures 
on economic plants is given, in which the structure, geographical dis- 
tribution, classification and uses of the principal economic plants, in- 
cluding food plants, grasses, timber, fruits, weeds, poisonous plants, 
parasitic fungi, etc., is studied. 




Field Class in Botany. 



■m-./-.\: -■■-'■ - . , .- 35 

Course IV, Plant Physiology — Fzrsi Term, Senior Year — Two 
lectures and a minimum, of eight periods of experimental laboratory 
work. This course may be elected as a minor. 

Course V, Plant Pathology — Second Term. Senior Year — Two 
lectures and a minimum, of eight periods of laboratory and field work 
per week. This course embraces a study of the causes, symptoms and 
means of control of plant diseases. It may be elected as a minor 
following Course IV, or the two courses may be pursued together. 

Course VI, Original Research — Third Term, Senior Year. The 
student's time during this term is spent in completing a thesis on some 
botanical subject on which he has done original work during the year. 

Courses in Dendrology, Economic Plant Histology, Special Sys- 
tematic Work or Studies relating to Plant Breeding, may be arranged 
for those who wish, to take the places of Courses IV and V. 

Senior students selecting Botany as a major study must have had 
Courses I to IV inclusive, or their equivalents. An outline of the 
work and hours will be arranged upon consultation with the Professor 
in charge. 

Advanced Work. — Courses in advanced work in Botany and 
Plant Pathology will be open to all students who have completed the 
six undergraduate courses or their equivalents. This work is 
designed for students who wish to specialize in Botany or in Plant 
Pathology. An outline of the courses and subjects for original inves- 
tigation will be arranged upon consultation with the Professor in 
charge. Students specializing in the above courses may often gain 
further knowledge by assisting in the work of the department. 
Special attention is given to students wishing practice in the treat- 
ment of plant diseases. 



Department of Lan^ua^es. 

Thomas H. Spence, Professor. 

The Department of Languages embraces the study of three 
branches: Latin, French and German. All students are required to 
take the courses in German; only students of the *Classical Course 
are required to take Latin. Students in the General Science Course 
may elect to take Latin in the Senior year. 

The course of study in Latin is given with two ends in view — 
first, to train the growing mind into accurate and close methods of 
reasoning; second, to give the student more thorough and compre- 
hensive knowledge of his own language than he could otherwise 

•The Classical Course, established in 1893, was abolished in 1904. Instruction in Latin, there- 
fore, is offered only to students of the Sophomore, Junior and Senior Years. 



34 



collection of Maryland ])laiits, microtome and other instruments, 
reagents and apparatus for histological work and physiological experi- 
ments; a culture room, sterilizers, incu])ators and other facilities for 
the study of plant diseases. 

Course I, Elementary Botany — Third Tovi, l-'^n-sliDUDi Year — 
Ta'o theoretical a)id four practical periods per iceek. Laboratory and 
field work, with sup])lementary reading, using principally Leavitt's 
"Outlines of Botany," or Bergen's "l-'oundations of Botany," and 
taking up the fundamental facts regarding structure and elementary 

]>hysiology of the common 
]>lants with a systematic 
study of the spring Hora. 
Kach student begins a col- 
lection of plant specimens 
to illustrate a subject in 
which he is specially in- 
terested. 

Course II, Ecology —/'/yv/ 

'leriH, Sopliomore Year — 
T'n'O tlieoretical and four 
practical periods per iceek. 
The work of Course I is 
continued with the wild 
and cultivated fall plants, 
and special attention given 
to the associations of plants 
and their relations to environment, light, water, soil, etc. In con- 
nection vvit'^ these exercises the reproductive organs of plants and 
their work is studied. Suitable literature for reading is u.sed to sup- 
plement the field and laboratory work. 

Course III, Morphology and Life Histories of Plants — Second 
'J^ervi, Junior Year — Three theoretical and three practical periods per 
week in the Aoricultural Course; three theoretical and Jonr practical in 
the Bioloiiical Course. A comparative study of the structure and life 
histories of the principal types of plants from tlie lowest to the highest 
is pursued, special attention being given to those group of plants of 
particular economic interest. The exercises consist of lectures atul 
micro.scopic work in the laboratory. In addition a series of lectures 
on economic plants is given, in which the structure, geographical dis- 
tribution, classification and uses of the principal economic plants, in- 
cluding food plants, grasses, timber, fruits, weeds, poisonous plants, 
parasitic fungi, etc., is studied. 




Field Class in liotaiiv . 



35 

Course IV, Plant Physiology — /-'irsf '/'nin, St')ii(>r )'t'a) — J'lro 
lectures and a viinimiun of eii^lit periods of expeyiiiu)ifa/ lahiiyatory 
it'ork. This course may be elected as a minor. 

Course V, Plant Pathology — Second 'Jerm. Senior )'ear — T'iCO 
lectures and a mi)iimum of eight periods of laboratory and field :^-oyk 
per 7C'eek. This course embraces a study of tlic causes, sym])toms and 
meaus of coutrol of ])laut diseases. It uiay be elected as a minor 
following Course I\', or the two courses may be j)ursued together. 

Course VI, Original Research — 7'liiid 7'rrn/, Soiior )'rar. The 
student's time during this term is spent in completing a thesis on some 
botanical subject on which he has done original work during the year. 

Courses in Dendrology, ICconomic Plant Histology, Special S>s- 
tematic Work or Studies relating to Plant Breeding, maj' be arranged 
for those who wish, to take the places of Courses 1\ ami \". 

Senior students selecting Botany as a major study nuist have had 
Courses I to W inclusive, or their equivalents. An outline of the 
work and hours will be arranged upon consultation with the Professor 
iti charge. 

Advanced Work. — Courses in advanced work in Botany and 
Plant Pathology will be ojien to all students who have completed the 
six undergraduate courses or their equivalents. This work is 
designed for students who wish to specialize in Botany or in Plant 
Patholog}'. An outline (jf the courses and subjects for original inves- 
tigation will be arranged upon consultation with the Professor in 
charge. Students specializing in the above courses may often gain 
further knowledge by assisting in the work of the department. 
Special attention is given to students wishing practice in the treat- 
ment of plant diseases. 



Department of Languages. 

Thomas H. Spknci-;, Professor. 

The Department of Languages eml)races the study of three 
branches: Latin, French and German. All students are required to 
take the courses in German: only students of the ^Classical Course 
are required to take Latin. Students in the General Science Course 
may elect to take Latin in the Senior year. 

The course of study in Latin is given with two ends in view — 
first, to train the growing mind into accurate and close methods of 
reasoning; second, to give the student more thorough aiul compre- 
hensive knowledge of his own language than he could otherwise 



*Tlie Classical Co\irse, cstahlislKil in 1S''.\ was abolished in I '"■*. Iiistnulion in Laliii. ihere- 
fore, is ofTcred only t<> students of the Sophonion-, Jnnior and Senior Years. 



- ---::■. \ 36 : ;_; :^ 'ri-'^'r- 

acquire. Especial attention is paid to I^atin syntax and idioms. The 
translation work of the course consists of selections from Sallust, Vir- 
gil, Cicero, Horace, Caesar, Ovid, Livy, Juvenal, Tacitus and 
Terence. 

So large a proportion of modern scientific literature is in German 
and French that a reading knowledge of these languages has become 
almost essential to the student pursuing advanced courses in the 
various spheres of scientific research. Instruction in these branches 
is given, therefore, to enable the student to translate intelligently the 
works of French and German masters in the domain of science, for^ 
as a rule, there is no English version of their works. As the student 
becomes more familiar with foreign scientific terms and construction, 
he is required to translate treatises bearing upon the especial line of 
work which he may be pursuing. The study of French is offered as 
an option in the Senior year. 

Latin Courses. 

Course I, Translation and Composition — Ftrsf Term, Sopho- 
more Year — Six periods per week. Text-books, Harper and Tolman's 
"Caesar." Chase and Stuart's "Sallust." Latin Prose Composition 
based on text read. 

Course II, Translation, Composition, Mythology, Prosody — 

Second Term, Sophomore Year — Six periods per week. Text-books, 
Harper and Miller's "Virgil," Gay ley's "Classic Myths;" Allen and 
Greenough's "Latin Grammar." Latin Prose Composition based on 
text read. Lectures on Ancient Geography, etc. 

Course III, Translation, Composition, Mythology — Third Term, 
Sophomore Year — Six periods per week. Conclusion of Course II. 

Course IV, Translation and Composition — First Term, Junior 
Year — Six periods per week. Text-books, Allen and Greenough's 
"Cicero," Daniell's "Latin Prose Composition." 

Course V, Translation and Prosody — Second Term, Junior 
Year — Six periods per week. Text-book, MacLeane's "Horace." 

Course VI, Translation and Composition— Third Term, Junior 
Year — Six periods per week Text-book, Chase and Stuart's "Tacitus." 
Latin Prose Composition based on text read. 

Course VII, Translation and Composition — First Term, Senior 
Year — Six periods per week. Text-book, Chase and Stuart's "Livy." 
Latin Prose Composition based on text read. 

Course VlII, Translation — Second Term, Senior Year — Six 
periods per week. Text-book, West's "Terence." Lectures on Latin 
Drama. 



A- - 



37 

■ ■'/ • 

Course IX. Translation — Third Term, Second Year — Six periods 
per week. Text-book, MacLeane's "Juvenal." In this course an 
essay on "Roman Morals" or some like subject written in Latin is 
a part of the required work. 

V. German Courses. 

Course I, Grammar and Conversation — Third Term, Sopho- 
tnore Year — Six periods per week. Text-book, Otis' "Elementary 
German." 

Course II, Translation — First Term, Junior Year — Three 
periods per week. Text-books selected from the following: HauflPs 
"Das Kalte Herz," Schiller's "Der Neffe als Onkel," Hillern's 
"Hocher als die Kirche," Grandgent's "Ali Baba and the Forty 
Thieves," Sybels "Die Erhebung Europas," Walther's "Algemeine 
Meereskunde," Northrop's "Geschichte der Neuen Welt," Brant and 
Day's "Scientific German," and others. 

Course III, Translation — Second »Term, Junior Year — Three 
periods per week. Continuation of Course II. 

Course IV, Translation — Third Term, Junior Year — Three 
periods per week. Conclusion of Course III. 

Course V, Translation of Sc'entific German — First Term, Senior 
Year — Four periods per week. Selected readings from various texts 
and periodicals. 

Course VI, Translation of Scientific German — Secoftd Term. 
Senior Year — Four periods per week. Conclusion of Course V. 

French Courses. 

Course I, Grammar and Composition — First Term, Senior Year 
— Five periods per week. Text-book, Whitney's French Grammar. 

Course II, Translation — Second Term, Senior Year — Five 
periods per week. Text-books, Super's French Reader, Rougemont's 
"La France," Fenelon's "Telmaque," Herdler's "Scientific French 
Reader," including French scientific periodicals. 

Course III, Translation — Third Term, Senior Year — Five 
periods per week. Conclusion of Course II. 

Military Deparlment. 

, Commandant. 

The Military Department is a distinctive feature of the College. 
By special Acts of Congress, provision is made for the maintenance of 



a Department of Military Science and Tactics in each of the land-grant 
colleges. An officer of the United States Army is detailed to act as 
instructor in military tactics and as commandant of cadets. 

The Military Department of this College is in a most flourishing 
condition. All students upon entering, unless physically incapacitated, 
are enrolled in one of the companies of the cadet battalion. Students 
are required to wear the prescribed uniform at all times when on duty. 
The discipline in barracks is entrusted to cadet officers, under the 
supervision of the Commandant, and the discipline of the College is 
generally military in its nature. The practical instruction of the 
cadets consists of daily drills in the "School of the Soldier," "School 
of the Company," "School of the Battalion," and outpost duty. The 
study of tactics and lectures on military science, with practical lessons 
in procedure of military courts? constitute the class-room work of the 
department. 

The Military Department is a decided factor in the moral and 
physical development of the student body. By encouraging habits of 
promptness, obedience and neatness, and by its beneficiar effects upon 
the carriage and general health of the students, it adds materially to 
the usefulness of the College as an educational institution. 

Discipline. 

The discipline of the College, as has been stated, is generally 
military in its character. Students are under the control of cadet 
officers, subject to the direction of the officer in charge, who makes a 
daily report to the Commandant of Cadets. The final authority, how- 
ever, in all cases, is the President of the College. 

All students are expected to conduct themselves as young gentle- 
men worthy of respect and confidence, and to be zealous and loyal to 
duty under all circumstances. Upon entrance, each one is required 
to give his word that he will comply with all the rules and regulations 
of the institution. A copy of the rules is then given him, and he is 
held responsible for all acts in disregard thereof. Cadet officers in 
receiving the honors which promotion implies, accept with them obligations 
and duties which they are bound to regard. This is the keynote of 
student government. Failure iyi duty means, necessarily, forfeiture of 
confidence and rank. 

Punishment for trivial breaches of regulations consists of de- 
privation of privileges, confinement to grounds or rooms, or special 
military duties; for aggravated offenses punishment may be suspension 
or expulsion, at the discretion of the Faculty and the President. 

If an excessive number of demerits be given to any student 
during one term, marked deficiency in conduct is apparent and his 
parents or guardian must at once remove him from the College. 



39 

Promotions. 

The awarding of commissions and of warrants to officers and non- 
commissioned officers of the battalion is based on soldierly bearing, 
observance of the rules of the College and scholastic attainments. 
The facts on which the final standing is made for recommendation for 
promotion are obtained from the Commandant's record of soldierly- 
bearing and conduct, and from, the recorded reports of the Faculty 
as to conduct, recitations and examinations. Commissioned officers 
are selected from the Senior Class; sergeants from the Junior Class, 
and corporals from the Sophomore Class. No exception will be made 
to this order, unless it be that the number of men in any one class is 
not sufficient for the quota of officers required. The standing of a 
cadet at the end of the year will be the basis of recommendation for 
his promotion. The possibility of his working ofi" conditions during 
the summer cannot be considered, this being a very uncertain factor. 

Uniforin. 

The cadet uniform, which is required to be worn by students at 
all times, is made by contract with the tailors at a much lower price 
than it could be furnished' to individuals. The student's measure is 
taken after he arrives at the College, and the fit is guaranteed. For 
fall and winter the uniform is of substantial cadet-gray cloth, while 
in spring and summer a uniform of light khaki is used. " 



Department of Public Speaking. 

Charles S. Richardson, Professor. 

The object of this department is to give a thorough training in 
public speaking. The work is begun with easy lessons in Elocution, 
and this is continued until the student has acquired a master^' of vocal 
expression, and a pleasing and forcible delivery. The student is then 
required to deliver both extempore and prepared speeches, covering a 
wide range of subjects, in this way not only securing practice in 
delivery, but also developing the power of logical thought. 

Course I — First Term, Freshman Year — One period per rceek. 
Articulation, accent, modulation, force and elocutionary pause; ex- 
pressive management of the body, attitude, and motion. Selections 
of poetry and prose are read and declaimed b)'^ students. 

Course II — Secoiid Term, Freshman Year — Two periods per week. 
Simple lectures on orators and oratory. Methods of analysis and 
subjects for oration. Original orations by students, both extempore 
and prepared, on simple abstract subjects and speeches before the 



class on the less complex public questions. Subjects for orations re- 
quiring research in different departments of knowledge. I^ectures on 
parliamentary law. 

Course III — First Term, Sophomore Year — One period per week. 
A review of all work of Freshman Classes. More advanced selections 
for declamation (Shakespeare, Macaulay, Webster, etc). Lectures on 
ancient and modern orators, with readings and declamations by stu- 
dents from orations. 

Course IV — Second Term, Sophomore Year — Two periods per week. 
Extempore speeches by students on various subjects. Prepared 
original orations by students on abstract subjects. Prepared original 
orations by students on subjects requiring careful and intelligent re- 
search, including the important public issues of the day (tariff, cur- 
rency, territorial expansion, trades unions, trusts. Isthmian Canal, 
etc). Lectures on parliamentary law. 



Preparatory Department. 

Henry T. Harrison, Principal. 
Charles S. Richardson, Assistant. 

This department was organized in 1892, and is designed to meet 
the requirements of those students who have not had the advantages 
of a thorough grammar school training, with a view to equipping 
them to enter the regular collegiate department. 

Only such students are desired as will be able to enter the Fresh- 
man Class within a year, and who are fifteen years of age. This 
course is recommended especially to students who have not been to 
school for several years; for their progress in the regular collegiate 
course, by virtue of such a drawback, would be seriously impeded. 
It is to be remarked that as a rule the students who have taken this 
course make excellent progress in their later college work. Students 
in this department are subject to the same military regulations as 
other students. 

Course I, Arithmetic — First and Second Terms — Ten periods per 
week. Wentworth's Grammar School Arithmetic, completed. 

Course II, Arithmetic — Third Term — Five periods per week. 
Advanced work. 

Course III, Algebra — Three Terms — Five periods per week. 
Wentworth's Algebra, as far as quadratics. 

Course IV, History — Three Terms — Five periods per week. 
United States History, completed. 



41 

Course V, Geography — First Term — Five periods per week. De- 
scriptive Geography, completed. 

Course VI, Geography — Second and Third Terms — Five periods 
j)er week. Maury's Physical Geographj^ completed. 

Course VII, English — Thre^ Terms — Eight periods per week. 
Spelling, technical grammar, parsing and analysis, composition, 
letter- writing and elocution. 



Department of Physical Culture. 

Ch ARISES S. Richardson, Director. 

The physical culture of the students is provided for by a regular 
-course of instruction in the Gymnasium. The course is carefully 
planned, so as to develop gradually and scientifically the physical 
powers of each student. Beginning with the simplest calisthenic 
-exercises, the instruction covers the whole field of light and heavy 
gymnastics and field and track athletics. 

The equipment and arrangement of the Gymnasium is very com- 
plete, and the interest manifested by the students is a sufl&cient proof 
-of the success of this department. While desiring to make the work 
in the Gymnasium of practical value to all the students, the required 
work only extends through the Preparatory, Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. Three periods per week, Preparatory, Freshman and 
Sophomore years. 

One of the most valuable features of this department is a com- 
plete anthropometry outfit, by means of which measurements and 
strength tests of students are taken at the beginning and also at the 
end of each scholastic year. By means of these measurements and 
tests the exact physical condition of each individual student can be 
ascertained, and such special exercises given as will produce a sym- 
metrical development of the body. 

A valuable adjunct to this department has been the College 
Athletic Association, of which mention is made under the head of 
"Student Organizations." 



The College Library. 

E. T. Harrison, Librarian. 

The College Library may properly be regarded as one of the de- 
partments of the institution, as its aid for purposes of reference and its 
influence upon the mental development of the students must always be 
felt throughout all courses. The present quarters of the Library, while 



•V v ■ ^2 ■;.,-'--. \' ^^: ■- V :■■>; 

adequate for its immediate needs, will necessarily be too limited in the 
course of time. The reading room is well arranged and lighted, and 
is in all respects comfortable and convenient. 

While the Library is not large, the collection of works has been 
carefully chosen, and the shelves contain a fair supply of works of 
reference, history, biography, essays, poetry and the standard works 
of fiction. Several hundred volumes of bound United States Gov- 
ernment Reports comprise an important addition to the reference 
works of the Library. Most of the leading magazines and a large 
number of newspapers are subscribed for; technical periodicals and 
works of reference relating to specific branches are deposited in the 
libraries of the various departments. 

, Donations to Library. 

Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following for valuable 
additions to the College Library: Johns Hopkins University— Re- 
ports of Geological Survey, Weather Service and Highway Commis- 
sion, Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C, and the county 
press for copies of their publications. 



Courses of Study. 

In order to systematize the work of the numerous departments of 
the College, and as far as possible arrange for specialization within 
the limits consistent with the normal development of individual 
students, three distinct courses of study have been prescribed, one of 
which the student is expected to choose upon entering the collegiate 
department. These courses are the Agricultural, Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Scientific. A continuous and progressive course of work, 
beginning in the Freshman year, and gradually narrowing in the 
three succeeding years until the class-work is almost wholly special- 
ized, has been found to be most satisfactory. A broad and liberal 
.foundation is first laid in the Freshman and Sophomore years, and 
then the particular line of study desired is emphasized more and 
more until the end of the course. 

In the Agricultural Course the main study is scientific agricul- 
ture in all its various branches. The detailed statement of the 
arrangement of the course is given on another page. The object of 
the course is to acquaint young men who propose to engage in farm- 
ing with the results of recent investigation and research, in order to 
enable them to engage in practical general farming, dairying or stock- 
raising, in accordance with the best known methods of modern times. 
The course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

The Short Winter Course in Agriculture is especially designed, 
for those who have neither time nor the opportunity to take the regu- 
lar four-year course. In fact, it is really designed for those actually 



43 

engaged in farming, and who can spare a few weeks during the winter 
to attend lectures, and to follow the practical work of the College and 
Experiment Station. The course embraces the following subjects: 
Farm crops, drainage, stock-breeding, stock-feeding, manures, 
tobacco, dairy husbandry, chemistry, horticulture, entomolog}^ 
plant physiology and pathology, farm accounts, road construction, 
carpentry, blacksmithing, pipe fitting, veterinary science, the princi- 
ples of citizenship and the elements of business law. The entire 
expense, including board, need not be over fifty ($50) dollars. The 
course extends through the months of January and February. All 
details are in charge of W. T. L^. Taliaferro, Professor of Agricul- 
ture, and H. J. Patterson, Director of the Experiment Station. 

The details of the Mechanical Engineering Course will be found 
on another page. The practical work of this course is most thor- 
ough. The student is familiarized from the first with the use of 
tools and implements of wood and iron work. He is given daily 
practice in the shops, and is encouraged to develop whatever inventive 
talent he may have. It is believed that students completing this 
course will have no difficulty in securing employment after gradua- 
tion in the field of mechanics or mechanical engineering. The course 
leads to the degree of Mechanical Engineer. 

The Classical Course was instituted in 1893 to meet a demand on 
the part of the patrons of the College for a course of study which 
should prepare young men to enter the so-called learned profes- 
sions. The establishment of the Mechanical Course and the additional 
facilities ofifered in the various scientific courses have, to a large ex- 
tent, done away with the necessity of the Classical Course; and the 
Board of Trustees at their annual meeting in June, taking these facts 
into consideration and having also in mind that the true mission of 
the College was to afford instruction in the agricultural sciences 
and mechanic arts, passed an order abolishing the Classical Course. 
Those students already pursuing the Classical Course or those 
who may enter the Sophomore or Junior Classes will be allowed to 
complete the course and thereby receive the degree of A.B. There 
will, however, be no instruction offered in Latin to students of the 
Freshman Class, nor will the degree of A.B. be conferred after 1907. 

The Scientific Course is designed for those who desire to secure 
the advantages of a general liberal education, with the opportunity of 
specializing in some line of modern science — chemistry, zoology, 
botany, vegetable pathology, entomology, veterinary science, physics, 
civil engineering or political science. The basis of the course is a thor- 
ough training in mathematics, English and the principles of citizen- 
ship and government. Owing to the number of departments repre- 
sented in this course, it is found necessary to begin differentiation 
with a view to specialization in the Sophomore year. In the Senior 
year, as will be seen in the detailed outline of the course on another 



page, the work is arranged in a series of groups and studies, each 
group containing one major study and several minors. This is the 
plan adopted by most of the prominent and successful colleges of the 
present day, and presents the twofold advantage of concentration of 
the student's labor and opportunity for ample laboratory work. The 
degree conferred for all branches of this course is Bachelor of Science. 
The following tables will serve to illustrate in a succinct manner 
the subjects offered in each item of every session, with the number of 
periods allotted to each. The subjects for the Senior year are not 
tabulated for the Agricultural and General Science Courses, as they 
are mostly elective. Numerals in parenthesis indicate practical work. 
Two periods of practical work are regarded as equivalent to one 
period of recitative work, the College day being divided into eight 
periods of recitative or class work of forty-five minutes each. 



45 



Freshman Year. 



First Term. 
September 15 — December 22. 



1^ 


u 


cd 


3 


3 
"•5 





Si 


s 


C6 


u 


a; 




•c 







bo 


(O 


< 





Mathematics 8 

English 5 

History 4 

Klocution I 

Drawing 

Physical Culture 

Geology.... 4 

Woodwork 

Lectures on Agriculture 

Technical Instruction 



(6) 
(3) 



8 

5 
4 
1 



(6) 
(3) 



8 

5 
4 
I 



(0 



(0 



Second Term. 
January 3 -March 24. 



Algebra >. 8 8 8 

English 5 5 5 

History 444 

Elocution 222 

Physical Culture (3) (3) 

Geology 5 5 

Drawing 

Woodwork 

Lectures on Agriculture (i) (i) 



Third Term. 
March 27 — ^June 10. 



Algebra 3 3 

Geometry 5 5 

English 5 5 

History 3 3 

Literature , 3 3 

Drawing , (6) 

Woodwork (6) 

Botany 2 (4) 2 (4) 



3 
5 
5 
3 
3 



(6) 
(3) 



(6) 



(3) 



(6) 
(6) 



(6) 
(6) 



Note. — Numerals in parenthesis indicate periods of practical work. 



46 
Sophomore Year* 



First Term. 
September 15 — December 22. 



cd 

u 

a 

■1-t 

u 
< 



c 
to 



ce 
u 

c 



(3) 

(4) 
(6) 



5 
4 

2 

4 

I 
2 



(4) 



(3) 
(4) 

■(6J' 
(4) 



5 
4 
2 

4 

I 



(3) 



Plane Geometry 5 

Rhetoric 4 

Physics 2 

Chemistry 4 

Elocution , I 

Botany 2 

Forging or Foundry 

Drawing 

Microscopy 

Applied Mechanics 

Lectures on Agriculture ! (i) (i) I 

Latin 5 

History I 4 



(6) 
(6) 



cd 
o 

CO 
ui 

c« 



Second Term. 
January 3 — March 24. 



Solid Geometry 5 

Rhetoric I 4 

Physics ...; 2 

Chemistry ' 4 

2 
I 



(4) 
(4) 



Elocution 
Bacteriology 

Descriptive Geometry i *3 

Drawing 

Horticulture 

Forging or Foundry 

Lectures on Agriculture 

Latin 

History 



Third Term. 
March 27 — June 10. 



(3) 
(i)' 



5 
■3 
5 
4 
I 



(I) 
(3> 
(4) 



Trigonometry 

Literature 

German 

Chemistry 

Bacteriology 

Descriptive Geometry 

Drawing 

Forging or Foundry I 

Agriculture I 3 (4) 

Lectures on Agricul'ure | (i) 

Latin ' 



(4) 

*(4) 

*(4) 
*(3) 



5 
4 
2 

4 

2 



(4) 



(I) 



5 
3 

5 (I) 

4 (3) 

I *(4) 

I *(4) 



(4) 
(6)' 



5 
3 
5 
4 



(0 
(3) 



3 *(4) 
(I) 



(4) 
(6) 



(3) 



(I) 



5 
4 

4 (4) 

2 



5 (I) 



5 
3 

5 (I) 
4 (3) 



5- (I) 



Note. — Numerals in parenthesis indicate periods of practical work. 

♦students who intend to pursue the Physical Course in the Junior Year shall substitute 
Descriptive Geometry for Bacteriology and Drawing for Agriculture and Horticulture. 



Junior Year. 



First Term. 
September 15 — December 22. 



'u 

be 
< 



Scientiiic. 



ee 
y 

o 

'o 



, 




aj 


^iH 


, 





CS 


f^ 


•»^ 





ee 


M 


•»- 


u 


cS 


S 


a: 




%< 


>^ 

















C-i 


PL, 


S 



3 

4(4) 
2(3) 



3 
4(4) 



2(4) 



•German 3 3 ' 3 

Physics 4(4) 4(4) 4(4) 

-Surveying 2(3) 

-Chemistry 4(4) 4(4) 4 (12) 

Drawing 2(4) 

Zoology..; 2(4) 2(4) 2(4) 

Agriculture 4(6) 

Horticulture 2 (2) 

English Ill I I 6 

Analytical Geometry I : 5 5 

Machine Work (6) 

Steam Engine 

Physiology 2(4) 4 

Lectures on Agriculture (i) (i) 6 

Latin ' 5 

Cousiiiution 

Second Term. I 

January 3 — March 24. 

Oerman 3 3 3 3 3 

Physics 4(4) 4 '4) 4(4) 4(4) 

Purveying 2(3) 2(3) 

Chemistry 4 (4) 4 (12) 

Drawing (4) 2(4) 

Zoology 2(4) 2(4) 2(4) 

Agriculture 4 (4) 

Horticulture 3(3) 

Civics 3 3 3 3 3 

English II I I I 6 

Dif. Calculus 5 5 

Machine Work (6) 

Botany 3(3) 3(6)! 

Lectures on Agriculture (i) (i) 

Latin 6 



I 



0! 

_o 

'id 

03 

u 

3 
2(3) 



3 
2'(3) 



Third Term. 
March 27 — ^June 10. 

German 3 3 3 

Physics 4(4) 4(4) 

-Surveying 2 (3) 

Chemistry 4(12) 

Logic 



3 

4(4) 
2(3) 



3 

4(4) 



2(3) 



2(4) 
3 



Drawing (4) 

■Civics 3 3 3 

Horticulture 3(2) 

English I I I I I 

Integral Calculus 5 5 

Machine Work (6) 

Latin 



3 
6 



Entomology .....'. 2 (6) 2 (6) 

Agriculture 4(4) 

Physiology 2(4) 4(8) 2(4) 

Lectures on Agriculture (i) (i) 



Note. — Numerals in parenthesis indicate periods of practical work. 



r-^ 



48 



Senior Ycat. 



First Te;rm. 
September 15— December 22. 



'2 

at 

o 



(2) 



German 4 

Graphic Statics 4 

Power Plants ; 2 

Machine Design ' 2 

Machine Work 8 

Latin 

French I 

English 

Literary Criticism 

Business Law 

Second Term. j 

January 3 — March 24. 

German i 4 

Strength of Materials 4 

Machine Design ; 2 (4) 

Machine Work | (10) 

Economics 4 

Latin 



French 

English 

Psychology 



Third Term. 

r 

March 27 — ^Juue 10. 

Machine Design 2 (2) 

Machine Work (10) 

Testing (6) 

Economics 4 

Latin 

French 

English 

Psychology i 



cd 
o 

10 
tn 



5 
4 
3 
3 



4 
6 

5 
4 
4 



4 
6 

5 
4 
4 



Note. — Numerals in parenthesis indicate periods of practical work. 

The work for the Senior year in * Agriculture and General Science 
shall consist of a major subject and two or more minor subjects. This 
work will be elective upon consultation with the Professor in charge 
of the major subject. 

The student will be required to elect an amount of work, the 
minimum of which shall be an equivalent of twenty (20) periods 
recitative work, at least ten (10) periods of which shall be devoted to 
the major subject, and ten (10) to the minor subject. 

♦veterinary Science is a required subject in the Senior Year for students of the Agri- 
cultural Course. 



49 



Two-Year Q>urse in Agricoltufc, 

FIRST YEAR. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


Agriculture 

Chemistry 

Woodwork 


7 (6) 
4(3) 
(6) 
5 


Agriculture 3 (4) 

Chemistry 4 (4) 

Horticulture 4(4) 

Blacksmithing (6) 

Veterinary Science. 2 (4) 


Agriculture 

Chemistry 

Botany 

Veterinary Science. 


7 (6) 
4 (3) 
2 (4) 
I (4) 


Arithmetic 





SECOND YEAR. 



First Term. 


Second Term. 


Third Term. 


Agriculture 


6 (6) Agriculture 

2 (4) Horticulture.. 

2 (6) Veterinary Science. 
% (6) iEntomolop'v 


5 (6) 

3(3) 
2 (6) 

2(4) 
I (4) 


Agriculture 2 (4) 

Horticulture 3 (3) 

Veterinary Science. 2 (6) 

Entomology 2 (4) 

Stock Feeding 4(4) 


Horticulture 

Veterinary Science. 
Botany 






Dairying 



Short Winter G>urse in Agricttlture — G^nunencing; Janttary 4, J904. 

A ten-week course designed for those who are unable to take 
one of the longer courses, and including the largest amount of purely 
practical information about farming in all its phases. This course is 
invaluable to the young man desiring that information on agricultural 
topics so^necessary to meet the sharp competition of the present day. 
The College authorities have removed the nominal charge of $5.00. 
We are anxious to have the young men of Maryland, who intend to 
remain on the farm, embrace this opportunity. Many cannot afford 
a four-year course. This solves the problem for them. 

Outline of the Course. 

The work of the course consists of lectures and practical exer- 
cises in the laboratories, shops, greenhouses, barns and creamery. 
The subjects handled and the allotment of hours are as follows: Farm 
crop? and cultivation of tVi*» ooil^ 10; plant production, 10; farm live 



50 ,;•,■,■■;, .^■.^...,, . 

stock, 20; tobacco, 6; stock feeding, 9; agricultural chemistry, 10; 
manures, 10; farm accounts, 12; dairying, 40; veterinary science, 20; 
carpentry, blacksmithing and pipe fitting, 50; plant physiology and 
pathology, 15; economic entomology, 20; horticulture, 30; road con- 
struction, 5; principles of citizenship, 10. 

No Expense for Tuition, Use of Laboratories or Supplies. 

Good board at moderate rates can be secured in the neighboring 
villages of Berwyn, Lakeland, Riverdale and Hyattsville — all within 
short distance of the College and Experiment Station. Electric cars 
make frequent connections. A limited number can be accommodated 
at the College for $4.00 per week. 

Apprenticeships in Agticultutc* 

The Agricultural Experiment Station, instead of having all the 
work in the dairy and horticultural divisions performed by regularly 
paid laborers, has some performed by apprentices. The apprentice- 
ships in these divisions have been established with five objects in 
view, viz, : ist. — In order to ofier to young men who have a good com- 
mon school education, and who have not the means for taking either a 
regular college course, or even a short course, an opportunity to be- 
come trained and skilled laborers in the dairy or some class of horti- 
cultural work. 2nd. — In order to enable young farmers to take up 
and engage in some of the specialties in farming on their own farms 
in an intelligent manner. 3rd. — In order to supply some of the numer- 
ous applications that come to the College and Station for skilled help 
of the character indicated. 4th. — In order to give the College and 
Station a nucleus for the extension of their work and a more appre- 
ciative constituency. 5th. — In order to have some of our labor per- 
formed by persons who have more interest in what they are doing 
than the money they are to receive. 

These apprenticeships are open to farmers' sons on the following 
terms: The Station will board and room the apprentice or pay the 
equivalent in money as preferred. The Station will furnish the in- 
struction and facilities for instruction given in the several branches 
pertaining to the specialty taken up. 

Those serving a dairy apprenticeship will be expected to devote 
from three to five hours of each day in receiving class-room instruc- 
tion, and in study, besides the time devoted to practice in the skilled 
operations. It is expected that apprentices shall become thoroughly 
familiar with the scientific feeding of dairy stock, and with all the 
modern practices pertaining to dairy and creamery management. The 
plan pursued is to divide the work which would ordinarily be per- 
formed by one laborer among three apprentices. A dairy apprentice 
is expected to stay at the Station for six months. 



51 

The horticultural apprentice is to serve for one year on the 
same terms as the dairy apprentice. The instruction taken in this 
division will be given at the same time, and with short course 
students of. the College. The horticultural apprentice will be ex- 
pected to take part in all classes of the work of this division, but he 
may specialize, so as to become specially skilled in either large fruits, 
small fruits, truck crops, floriculture, nursery management, green- 
house management or spraying. The apprentices shall have access 
to the libraries and reading rooms of the Station at all hours. 

The Station can accommodate but a limited number of appren- 
tices, and vacancies will be filled in the order in which applications 
for the same are received. 

After an apprentice has served his time, should a position be 
desired by him, we will take pleasure in recommending him to a 
place whenever we have a request for skilled help in that particular 
line, provided that such apprentice has proven himself worthy. So 
far we have had more applications for skilled help on farms and in 
creameries than we have been able to supply. Make applications and 
requests for further information to 

H. J. PATTERSON, Director of the 

Maryland Agricultural Experiment Station, 

' College Park, Md. 
J 

Decrees. : 

Bachelor's Degree. 

As a requisite for graduation, the candidate for this degree must, 
in addition to satisfactorily completing the work previously outlined, 
submit a thesis which meets the approval of the Faculty. 

The subject for this thesis must be approved by the head of the 
department in which the investigation is to be pursued prior to Feb- 
ruary ist, and the thesis completed must be submitted not later than 
May 15th. .. ' 

Master of Arts. 

The degree of Master of Arts may be conferred upon graduates 
of this College holding the Bachelor of Arts degree, and who conform . 
to the following rules: 

I. The candidate must apply for the degree in writing at least 
one scholastic year before the degree will be conferred. The applica- 
tion must contain a description of the extra work, by virtue of which 
the candidate expects to receive the degree. 



2. The candidate must submit one or more theses on subjects 
assigned by the Professor of English and Civics; said thesis or theses 
must be approved by the President of the Cpllege, Professor of Eng- 
lish and Civics and the Professor of lyanguages of this College. 

3. The candidate must be prepared to submit to an examination 
in the works of the following authors: Caesar, Nepos, Sallust, Virgil, 
Cicero, Ovid, Horace, Livy, Tacitus, Plautus, Terence, Juvenal. 

Master of Science. 

The degree of Master of Science may be conferred by the Faculty 
as follows: ., ^ . 

1 . Upon students who have completed the undergraduate course, 
and in addition have pursued a successful course of graduate study 
for one year at this College, consisting of a major and two minor sub- 
jects, not more than one of which shall be taken in the same depart- 
ment of the College, and to occupy not less than thirty hours per 
week. The course of study to be outlined by the professor in charge 
of the major subject, and approved by the Faculty. 

2. Upon College graduates of not less than two years' standing, 
who are employed in any of the departments of the College, and 
who have completed the equivalent of the above course of study. 
Candidates under this clause must have their applications approved 
by the Faculty eighteen months before they contemplate receiving 
their degree. 

3. Upon graduates of this College of not less than three years* 
standing, who having been connected with institutions of learning or 
research, where adequate facilities for advanced work are available, 
have completed a course equivalent to (i) and who have passed in the 
required examinations and have presented a satisfactory thesis. 




TherCadet Encampment at St. I/iuis. 



General Information. 

Requirements for Admission. 

For admission to the College Department Freshman Class, an 
entrance examination is required. This examination will be held at 
the College on September 13th and 14th, 1904. Theapplicant will be 
expected to pass a satisfactory examination in the following subjects: 
English grammar, composition and analysis. United States history, 
arithmetic (_complete), algebra (as far as quadratics), political and 
physical geography. A mark of seventy per cent, is necessary to 
pass. For entrance to the Preparatory Department the requirements 
are: English grammar, arithmetic (as far as percentage), United 
States history and political geography. However, applicants having 
completed the eight grades of the grammar school course upon pre- 
sentation of a certified copy of the final report showing record of work 
completed and certificate of satisfactory deportment from the teacher 
in charge, may be admitted on trial to the Freshman Class without 
further examination. It must be understood that such assignment is 
made conditional upon the applicant's demonstrating his fitness to 
bear the responsibilities assumed. Promotions and reductions will be 
made in six weeks after the resumption of the regular exercises, as 
the individual cases may require. 

Applicants for admission to higher classes than the Freshman 
must be prepared to take an examination equivalent to that given at 
the College for promotion to such classes, or must present certificates 
from county or city schools covering the work of the lower College 
classes as hereinbefore stated. Experience has proven that it is 
almost impossible for a new student to succeed in the work of the 
mechanical course as a Sophomore; and such assignment will be made 
only upon the candidate presenting satisfactory evidence of profieiency 
in drawing and woodwork. 

Every applicant for admission to the College must bring satisfac- 
tory testimonials as to moral character and from one or more persons 
qualified so to speak, his former teacher, pastor or neighbor, acquainted 
with his general reputation. This will be absolutely insisted upon. 
No student need apply for entrance who cannot furnish such credentials. 

Students from newly acquired territory or any foreign country 
must have a guardian appoifited with parental powers y with whom the 
President can deal in any case of emergency. Students who cannot 
speak English are undesirable, and are advised that satisfactory 
progress at this College on their part cannot be expected until they 
have familiarized themselves partly, at least, with the English 
language. 



52 

2. The candidate must submit one or more theses on subjects 
assigned by the Professor of English and Civics; said thesis or theses 
must be approved by the President of the College, Professor of Eng- 
lish and Civics and the Professor of Languages of this College. 

3. The candidate must be prepared to submit to an examination 
in the works of the following authors: Caesar, Nepos, Sallust, Virgil, 
Cicero, Ovid, Horace, Livy, Tacitus, Plautus, Terence, Juvenal. 

Master of Science. 

The degree of Master of Science may be conferred bj- the Faculty 
as follows: 

1 . Upon students who have completed the undergraduate course, 
and in addition have pursued a successful course of graduate study 
for one year at this College, consisting of a major and two minor sub- 
jects, not more than one of which shall be taken in the same depart- 
ment of the College, and to occupy not less than thirtj^ hours per 
week. The course of study to be outlined by the professor in charge 
of the major subject, and approved by the Faculty. 

2. Upon College graduates of not less than two years' standing, 
who are employed in any of the departments of the College, and 
who have completed the equivalent of the above course of study. 
Candidates under this clause must have their applications approved 
by the Facult}' eighteen months before they contemplate receiving 
their degree. 

3. Upon graduates of this College of not less than three years' 
standing, who having been connected with institutions of learning or 
research, where adequate facilities for advanced work are available, 
have completed a course equivalent to (i) and who have passed in the 
required examinations and have presented a satisfactor\- thesis. 




TlieXadet l{iicainpment at St. I.oiiis. 



General Information. 

Requirements for Admission. 

For admission to the College Department Freshman Class, an 
entrance examination is reqnired. This examination will be held at 
the College on September i3tli and 14th, 1904. The applicant will be 
expected to pass a satisfactory examination in the following subjects: 
English grammar, composition and analysis, United States history, 
arithmetic (^complete), algebra (as far as quadratics), political and 
physical geography. A mark of seventy per cent, is necessary to 
pass. For entrance to the Preparatory Department the requirements 
are: English grammar, arithmetic (as far as percentage), United 
States history and political geography. However, applicants having 
completed the eight grades of the grammar school course upon pre- 
sentation of a certified copy of the final report showing record of work 
completed and certificate of satisfactory deportment from the teacher 
in charge, maj- be admitted on trial to the Freshman Class without 
further examination. It must be understood that such assignment is 
made conditional upon the applicant's demonstrating his fitness to 
bear the responsibilities assumed. Promotions and reductions will be 
made in six weeks after the resumption of the regular exercises, as 
the individual cases may require. 

Applicants for admission to higher classes than the Freshman 
must be prepared to take an examination equivalent to that given at 
the College for promotion to such classes, or must present certificates 
from county or city schools covering the work of the lower College 
classes as hereinbefore stated. Experience has proven that it is 
almost impossible for a new student to succeed in the work of the 
mechanical course as a Sophomore; and such assignment will be made 
only upon the candidate presenting satisfactory evidence of profieiency 
in drawing and woodwork. 

Every applicant for admission to the College must bring satisfac- 
tory testimonials as to moral character and from one or more persons 
qualified so to speak, his former teacher, pastor or neighbor, acquainted 
with his general reputation. This ccill he absolutely insisted upon. 
No student need apply for entrance 7cho cannot furnish such crede?itials. 

Students from newly -acqiiired territory or any foreign country 
viust have a giiardian appoi)ited 7vith parental powers, with whom the 
Preside7it can deal in any case of emergency. Students who catniot 
speak English are undesirable, and are advised that satisfactory 
progress at this College on their part cannot be expected until they 
have familiarized themselves partlj^ at least, with the English 
language. 



54 ' - . 

Examinations and Promotions. 

In order to pass from one class to the next higher class a student is 
required to pass an examination in each study pursued by a mark of at 
least sixty per cent, and to have a combined mark in each branch (daily 
and examination) of at least seventy per cent. A failure in not more 
than one branch will enable a student to pass to the next class with 
condition in that study in which he has failed; but in every case the 
student is required to make good such failure during the next year. 
However, no student in the Mechanical Course will be promoted to 
the Junior Class, who is deficient in Sophomore Mathematics. 

For rules for military promotions see Military Department. 

Scholarships. 

The College ofifers a number of scholarships — four for Baltimore 
City, and one for each county of the State. These scholarships are 
awarded to the successful candidate in competitive examinations, con- 
ducted by the Superintendent of Public Instruction of Baltimore City, 
and in the counties by the County Examiner. All scholarship stu- 
dents must be prepared for entrance to the Freshman Class, and are 
required to take the regular entrance examination. Each scholarship 
is good for four years, or for such part thereof as the holder remains 
at the College. It is then again open for competition. The cost per 
year for scholarship students will be found under the head of "Student 
Expenses. ' ' The following is an extract from the requirements of the 
Board of Trustees, relating to scholarships: 

"Persons holding certificates of scholarship must present them- 
"selves at the College, or other designated place, at the date which 
"may be named, in the September or January next following the 
"award, and be examined by College authorities for entrance to the 
"Freshman Class. Alternates are to be thus examined, as well as 
"principals, and in case of a failure of the principal to secure or hold 
"the scholarship, the alternate will have the first right to the place, if 
"within a year from date of the certificate of award. 

"Persons holding certificates of scholarship must, in order to se- 
"cure the same, pass the entrance examination of the College, and (if 
"entering in January) such other examination as may be required to 
"join the Freshman Class. Every one must declare his intention of 
^^ completing the prescribed course of study of the College, in either Agri- 
*Uulture or Mechanical Engineering, provided he retains his scholar- 
"ship, and must make an advance payment of $i^ on the year's account. 
*^And to hold a scholarship, the student must make the subsequent pay- 
**ments and meet such requirements of the College as to scholarships and 
'^^ deportment as may be prescribed by the President and Faculty. By 
'^passing special examinations, candidates for scholarship may be per- 
**mitted to enter the Sophomore Class, or by presenting satisfactory 
** certificates.*^ ••..•• 



Experiment Stotion Scholarships and Fellowships. 

In order to further investigations relating to agriculture or horti- 
culture, the Experiment Station has arranged to offer scholarships 
not exceeding one hundred dollars in amount to students pursuing 
such investigations. Those competing for scholarships shall com- 
mence their investigations not later than the second term of the Junior 
year, the awards of scholarship to be paid on satisfactory completion 
of the Senior year's work. The amount of such scholarships shall 
be determined from time to time and depend upon the character of the 
work in hand. 

When investigations begun under scholarships are not completed, 
or where further work is deemed advisable, fellowships have been 
established to be awarded for such time and amount as may be deemed 
necessary for the completion of the work, but will not exceed three 
hundred dollars per year. Further information may be obtained from 
the Director of the Experiment Station. 

' General Rules and Regulations. 

The attention of parents is earnestly called to the following rules in 
force at this College: The College authorities can succeed in conferring 
the maximum amount of training upon the student only with and by 
the active support and earnest co-operation of the parent. The Presi- 
dent of the College is always ready and willing to discuss any fail- 
ures of a student's record with his parent or guardian, and corre- 
spondence on this subject is always welcome. 

Three reports are sent to each parent during the year, showing ^ 
the student's progress in class work, and his general standing, as to 
conduct, etc. At the end of the year a detailed report of the year's 
work is made. 

No student will be accepted as a matriculate until the contract card f, 

containing the following agreement for matriculation is signed by li' 

parent or guardian and received by the President of the College: • ■ ■!' 

"It is understood that the President of the College, as the execu- |i! 

tive of the same, and acting for the Board of Trustees, a party to this i'. 

contract, has the right to ask the withdrawal of a student at any time, i 

when in his judgment such withdrawal may be necessary either for ; 

the interest of the young man or the institution which he attends. 
It is further understood that a parent or guardian can at any time '; 

withdraw his son or ward, subject to regulations hereinbefore set 
forth." 

A cadet manifesting an indifference to the observance of the rules 
and regulations of the institution or wanting in proper attention to 
the preparation of his work, will be cautioned to improve in these 
particulars. Failing to do so, his parents, upon notice given by the 
President, must withdraw their son. 



A special pledge to refrain from what is popularly known as 
"hazing," and from taking unfair means in examination, is required 
of every applicant for entrance, before he will be allowed to matricu- 
late. Parents should impress upon their sons that a failure to live up 
to this pledge is a dishonor which unfits them to be longer inmates 
of the College, "//aztng^" is invariably punished by instant dismissal. 

Frequent absences from the College are invariably of great disad- 
vantage to the student, in breaking in upo'rt the continuity of his work, 
and in distracting his mi7id from, the maiti purpose of his attendance at 
the institution. Parents are therefore earnestly asked to refrain from, 
granting frequent requests to leave the College. 

Students will not be permitted to leave classes or quarters during 
study hours to answer telephone messages, unless the latter are very 
urgent. 

Students will not be permitted to make contracts to sell any 
article to their associates without the approval of the President. 

New students are particularly cautioned not to buy any article 
of a second-hand nature without consulting with the Commandant of 
Cadets or the officer in charge. 

- RUIZES OF COMMITTEE ON COI<I<EGIATE ROUTINE ENDORSED BY THE 

FACUI/TY. 

1. A student may not change his course of study, unless at the written re- 
quest of his parent or guardian, and after said request has been endorsed by the 
dean of the course abandoned, and the dean of the course requested, and ap- 
proved by this committee. 

2. Examinations to make up conditions will be given only at times set apart 
by this committee. These dates will be just before the regular quarterly ex- 
aminations in December, April and June; also the day before the resumption of 
college work in September. 

3. To attain proficiency a student must make an examination grade of 60 per 
cent., also a term average of 70 per cent. In case of failure, upon re-examina- 
tion, a grade of 70 per cent, is required. 

4. A student may not be promoted if conditioned in more than one study. 

5. A student may not be promoted if he has any condition of more than a 
year outstanding. 

6. No student may be promoted from the Preparatory Department with any 
condition. 

7. Any student who uses unfair means in examination will (i) receive no 
further examination in same subject; (2) receive zero for examination grade; (3) 
receive no commission; (4) receive no diploma. 

8. A student is subject to an oral examination at any time within ten days 
after a written examination. 

9. An examination paper, containing erasures or showing alterations, may 
be rejected at the discretion of the Professor in charge, and a new examination 
ordered by this committee. 

10. In computing term averages, the daily grade is computed at 2, the ex- 
amination grade at i. 

11. The yearly average in all studies is computed by giving each subject a 
weight according to the mean number of hours per week involved; theoretical 
periods being given a value of 2, practical periods I. . ^ 



12. Senior students in the agricultural and general science courses must sub- 
mit a schedule of elective work, to be approved by this committee, prior to the 
resumption of college work in September. 

13. Senior students must submit subjects for graduating theses prior to Feb- 
ruary I, and all theses for graduation must be completed prior to May 15. 

14. No special courses are permitted save by consent of this committee. In 
case consent is granted for a special course, the certificate awarded attesting 
work will not have the college seal nor the Governor's signature. 

15. No student may take work in more than one class during any one term. 

Student Expenses. 

The expenses of the College year for the several classes of 
students are as follows: No reductions are made for regular vaca- 
tions. No charge is made for tuition, books, or diploma. 

Regular Students. 

Board, heat, light and room $150 00 

*Laboratory fee 6 00 

f Physician's fee 4 00 

Breakage fee 5 00 

Total cost $165 00 

Scholarship Students. 

Board, heat, light and room $ 70 00 

*Laboratory fee 6 00 

fPhysician's fee 4 00 

Breakage fee 5 00 

Total cost $ 85 CO 

Day Students. 

Room and heat $ 24 00 

*Iyaboratory fee 6 00 

Breakage fee 5 00 

Total cost $ 35 GO 

Students entering College after November ist in each year or 
leaving before the end of school, except when dismissed or because 
of illness, will be charged as follows: 

Boarders at rate of. $18 00 per month. 

Scholarship students 10 00 

Day students 3 00 



( < 
< ( 



*For students in Chemistry only. 

fThis covers only such attention as arises from ordinary sickness. It is 
payable on entrance, and is not refunded. Cost of consultation and trained 
nurses extra. 



No allowance will be made for absence on account of illness of 
less than one month's duration, and then the rebate shall be at the 
rate of $14.00 per month for boarders, $7.00 per month for scholarship 
students and $2.00 per month for day students. 

Table board is $12.00 per month; less than a month, 25 cents 
per meal. 

Except in cases of extended illness, no money will be refunded 
for long-continued absence or enforced withdrawal from the College, 

Students entering late in the session will be charged from the 
date of entrance at the rate of $18.00 per month and fees. No allow- 
ance will be made for less than one month. 

Short Winter Course Students. 

Board, heat, light and room $4.00 per week 

Associotion Fees. 

The annual charges for the support of Student Associations are 
as follows, payable monthly in 10 installments: 

Athletic Association $4 00 

Rossbourg Club ..... 2 50 

No student is compelled to afl&liate with these societies; however, 
in case he becomes a member he is morally liable for the payment of 
his dues. It is therefore recommended that parents who desire their 
sons to have the advantages which these organizations offer, leave 
these sums on deposit with the College Treasurer, who will see to 
their proper disbursement. In this way parents may avoid the 
annoyance of bills from these organizations after the close of College. 
The accounts of all Treasurers of student organizations are audited 
monthly by a committee which consists of the Professors of Physics, 
Botany and Veterinary Science. This committee also supervises all 
expenditures based upon the apportionments authorized by the com- 
mittees of the organizations. 

' Uniform. 

Dress Uniform (coat, trousers and cap) $15 75 

Khaki Uniform (coat, trousers, hat and leggins) 7 75 

Payments for uniforms must be made on delivery. This is 
required by the firm manufacturing them. 

Time of Payment. ' ' _ _ 

For Regular Students: 

$40.00 (and the fees) on entrance; $4000 on November rsth; 
$40.00 on February ist; $30.00 on April ist. 



y 



59 

For Scholarship Students: 

$35.00 (and the fees) on entrance, and $35.00 on February ist. 

For Day Students: 

$12.00 (and the fees). on entrance, and $12.00 on February ist. 
Promptness in Payment is Insisted Upon. 

Explanotion of Fees. 

The laboratory fee is intended to cover the cost of the materials 
and apparatus used by the student in practical laboratory work. 

The physician's fee is to provide for the attendance of the regular 
College physician in all ordinary cases of sickness. 

The breakage fee is to cover all losses to the College caused by 
careless breakage or other damage to property by the students. Each 
loss is divided proportionately among the students, and the unused 
balance of each fee refunded at the close of the year. In case the 
loss is known to be caused by any particular student, the whole 
amount is charged to his account. 



Articles Necessary to be Provided. 

All students are required to provide themselves with the follow- 
ing articles, to be brought from home or purchased from the College 
Park store on arrival: ^ 

J dozen white standing collars. 

6 pairs white gloves (uniform). 

6 pairs white cuflFs. 

1 pair blankets (for single bed). 

3 pairs sheets (for single bed). 

4 pillow cases. 

2 white dimity bedspreads (three-quarters size). 
6 towels, ^^ 

I chair (uniform). '^ _- 

I pillow. .. ' -"'■ y 

I mattress (shuck), cotton top (uniform). 

The room-mates together purchase the following articles: 

I set of lamp fixtures (uniform). 

1 pitcher and basin (uniform). 

2 tablecloths (uniform). 
I broom. 

I looking-glass. 

I slop-jar (porcelain). 

All the articles marked uniform in the foregoing list can best be 
purchased after the student arrives at the College. The cost of the 
entire list should not be more than $15.00 for the year. This should 



m \:^' ■■-'-■'■- 

be paid to the Treasurer on entrance, as the College has no fund from 
which it can make advances, and failure to comply with this require- 
ment will subject the student to much inconvenience. Any excess will 
be returned promptly. 

The College will not be responsible for articles left in the barracks 
during vacations unless by special arrangement. 



Student Opportunities. 

A limited amount of money can be earned by students by taking 
advantage of the opportunities arising from time to time to do clerical 
work, tutoring, and such other labor as may not interfere with regular 
scholastic duties. Those in need of help to continue their work, and 
whose course is marked by an earnest desire to succeed, are always 
given the preference. The compensation in all cases is fixed at ten 
cents per hour. 

Letter from Department of Agriculture. 

The following letter and circular will be of interest to young men 
entering this institution. It gives an excellent opportunity for them 
to advance themselves in the line of their special work, at the same 
time receiving a compensation which will enable them to pay all ex- 
penses. This oflFer on the part of the Department of Agriculture is 
greatly appreciated, and will, no doubt, be availed of by many attend- 
ing the land-grant colleges — the best instructors and the most com- 
plete facilities are the advantages attending the opportunity: 

"Department of Agricui,ture, Washington. D. C, 

"June 27, 1899. 

"Dear Sir — In my annual report to the President for 1898 I announced my 
intention of affording opportunities for graduates of agricultural colleges to 
pursue post-graduate studies in connection with work in the scientific division 
of this Department, as far as practicable. In pursuance of this policy I have 
made an arrangement with the Civil Service Commission for the registration of 
the graduates of colleges receiving the benefits of grants of land or money from 
the United States, who may desire to enter the service of the Department as 
'Scientific Aids,' on the terms stated in the notice of the Commission herewith 
enclosed. 

"It seems to be entirely appropriate that the National Government should 
aid the institutions to which it has already so largely given financial support in 
the preparation of their graduates for posts of usefulness in this Department, or 
in the States from which they come, especially as investigators and teachers 
along scientific lines. I hope, therefore, that the effort which I am now making in 
this direction will be but the beginning of the opening up of opportunities for 
graduate study at the National. Capital to those of your graduates who are 
especially fitted to do high grade scientific work. It will, of course, be under- 
stood that under present conditions the Department can only admit a very 
limited number of scientific aids. Our purpose is to choose from the eligible 



i- 



register those persons who furnish the best evidence of having peculiarly good 
qualifications for aiding in the work of the Department now in progress. 

"In extending this notice will you kindly explain to your graduates the 
necessity of making a clear and full statement of their attainments and 
qualifications in special lines of science? Correspondence regarding application 
blanks and other matters connected with registration should be had promptly 
with the Civil Service Commission. 

"Very respectfully, 

"JAMES WILSON, 

"Secretary of Agriculture. 
^'ToR. W. Silvester, President, College Park, Md." 



Scientific Aid, Department of Agriculture. 

■ August ist, 1899. 

The United States Civil Service Commission announces that it 
desires to establish an eligible register for the position of Scientific 
Aid, Department of Agriculture. 

The examination will consist of the subjects mentioned below, 
which will be weighted as follows: 

Subjects. Weights. 

1. College Course with Bachelor's Degree 50 

2. Post-graduate Course and Special Qualifications 25 

3. Thesis or Other Literature 25 

Total 100 

It will be noted that applicants will not be required to appear at 
any place for examination, but will be required to file with the Com- 
mission prior to the hour of closing business, on August ist, 1900, 
their statements and other material which will be required as specified 
in a special form which will be furnished them by the Commission, 
together with application blank (Form 304), in order to have their 
names entered upon the register, which will be made immediately 
after the date mentioned. Persons who are unable to file their appli- 
cations prior to August ist, 1900, may file them at any subsequent 
time, when they will be rated, and the names of those attaining 
eligible averages will be entered upon the register. 

For the information of applicants the following statement is made, 
as received from the Secretary of Agriculture: 

1 . An application will be limited to graduates of colleges receiv- 
ing the benefits of grants of land or money from the United States. 

2. Each applicant must file with the United States Civil Service 
Commission, Washington, D. C, a properly certified statement as to 



62 

- ' ' ' ■ .' ■ -' . ■ ' . - - ^ 

the length of time spent in College, the studies pursued, the standing 
in these studies, the special work it is desired to take up, and the 
special qualifications for such work, and finally, a thesis upon such 
scientific subjects as the applicant may select, or, in lieu of this, any 
literature on scientific subjects, over his own signature. 

3. The length of time any scientific aid may serve in the Depart- 
ment is limited to two (2) years. 

4. The salary shall not exceed forty dollars ($40.00) per month. 
The minimum age limitation for entrance to this examination is 

twenty (20) years; there is no maximum age limitation. 

This examination is open to all citizens of the United States who 
comply with the requirements. All such citizens are invited to apply. 
They will be examined, graded and certified, without regard to any 
consideration, save their ability as shown by them in the exami- 
nation. Persons desiring to compete should at once apply to the 
United States Civil Service Commission, Washington, D. C, for 
application blanks (Form 304) and special forms. 



Student Organizations. 

Student clubs for religious, social, literary and athletic purposes 
are encouraged as a means of creating class and College pride, and 
developing an esprit de corps among the students. Each class has its 
own organization, in which matters relating to class work are dis- 
cussed and directed. OflScersare elected and the unity of the class 
preserved. This has been found to be a decided aid to discipline, and 
tends to raise the standard of student honor. \ 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

G. Sturgis, President. E. R. Sasscer, Vice-President. 

A. A. Parker, Secretary. H. D. Williar, Treasurer. 

Most encouraging work has been done by this organization dur- 
ing the past year, and much interest has been shown in both the 
private and public meetings. 

Athletic Association. 

W. R. Mitchell, President. R. P. Choate, Vice-President. 

J. P. Gray, Secretary. L. W. Cruikshank, Treasurer. 

Literary Societies. . . 

"new mercer" LITERARY SOCIETY. v, 

ly. W. Cruikshank, President. J. A. Anderson, Vice-President. 
W. R. Mitchell, Secretary and Treasurer. ) 



I 



63 



> > 



-- . ' MORRII,!, LITERARY SOCIETY. 

E. W. Stoll, President. H. S. Watts, Vice-President. 

E.W. Merryman, Sec'y andTreas. A. 1,. Pouleur, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

These societies are invaluable adjuncts to College work. Through 
them a good knowledge of parliamentary law is gained, as well as a 
readiness of expression and activity in thought — qualities particularly 
valuable to the American citizen. 

The Literary Society work is under the general supervision of the 
Instructor in Public Speaking, who is always ready to advise with the 
members in matters of parliamentary law and train them in the de- 
livery of their orations and debates. 

The Oralorical Association of Maryland Colleges. 

The Maryland Agricultural College is a member of this Associa- 
tion, which is composed of St. John's College, Washington College, 
Western Maryland College and Maryland Agricultural College. Con- 
tests are held annually at these colleges, in rotation, and a marked 
improvement is to be observed as a result of its organization. 

Editorial Staff of "Reville." '04. 

T. B. Mullendore, Editor-in-Chief. 

H. W. Burnside, . • 4. t^j-,. 

-cv „,. ,, ' Associate Editors. 

E. W. Merryman, 

Departmental. 

Athletics, E. W. Stoll, E. R. Sasscer. 

Literary, L. W. Cruikshank, R. P. Choate, W. R. Mitchell. 
Humorous, E. C. Mayo, F. O. Webster. 
-' Rossbourg Club, H. D. Watts, S. B. Shaw. 
Class and Historical, J. P. Gray. 

Board of Managers. 

G. L. Wentworth, Business Manager. 

J. A. Anderson, 

J. G. Ensor, Associate Business Managers. 

J. M. Street, 

The "Reveille" is the College Annual, edited entirely by the 
Senior Class; it is the successor of the "Cadet's Review." Eight 
editions of the "Reveille" have appeared, and each has been charac- 
terized by a gratifying improvement in the standard, both of origi- 
nality and expression. 

Rossbourg Club. 

H. D. Watts, President. W. R. Mitchell, Vice-President. 

R. P. Choate, Secretary. E. W. Stoll, Treasurer. 



The social man is a necessity — hence, this organization is encour- 
aged and supported by the President and Faculty. The entertain- 
ments of the same have been marked by a spirit which emphasizes the 
wisdom of its continuance and encouragement. 

The Alumni Association. 

The growth of the Alumni Association during the past year is a 
source of great satisfaction to the ofl&cers of the College, and of the 
Association. Through the eflForts of its ofl&cers a smoker was held at 
the College in June, this year. Renewed interest was shown by the 
e"xisting members of the Association, and the occasion was marked by 
a large increase in the membership. 

All indications point to a great advance in the growth of the 
organization, and now it is felt that the Association may begin to 
exercise its influence along the lines of its avowed purpose and object. 
By restricting the competition for the medal to be awarded by the 
Association for the best paper on "Agricultural Science" to those 
students pursuing original research, it is intended and hoped, by the 
Association, to stimulate scientific investigation by the students in 
the various scientific departments of the College. With the improved 
and more adequate facilities which have been provided, it is thought 
that the College is well able to promote this class of work to a greater 
extent than has been possible in the past; and the competition hereby 
instituted should tend to elevate the standard of scholarship in the 
College. 

It will be a source of gratification to the members of the Associa- 
tion to note the action of the Board of Trustees of the College with 
reference to the holding of scholarships in the College. Four years 
ago the Association passed a resolution looking to the restriction of 
the holders of the State scholarships to the Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical courses in the College. This was with the idea of carrying out 
more completely the ideas of the founders of the College in establish- 
ing a school for instruction in Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts. 
The Board of Trustees later passed an order putting the restriction 
in full operation. It is along this and similar lines that the Associa- 
tion has a broad field provided in which to exert its eflForts, and as it 
increases in strength it may be expected to make its influence felt for 
the advancement of the interest and welfare of the College. The 
oflficers of the Association for the ensuing year are: President, S. S. 
Buckley, '93; Vice-President, H. H. Holzapfel, '93; Secretary- 
Treasurer, M. N. Straughn, '99; Executive Committee, members-at- 
large, N. H. Gill, '97, and J. D. Cronmiller, '97. 

Graduates and members of the Association are requested to keep 
the Secretary -Treasurer, M. N. Straughn, College Park, Md., in- 
formed of any changes in their addresses. Any information concern- 
ing the older graduates, which will enable the ofl&cers to locate and 
communicate with them, will facilitate their eflfbrts and wiH tend to 
further the success of the Association. 



Degrees and Medals. 



Degrees Conferred 1904, with Subjects of Theses. 

Master op Science. | 

Arthur Brookhouse; Foste;r,B.S., Prince George's County, Md. V 
"Method for Determination of Butter Fat in Condensed Milk." ' | 

R. W. B. Mayo:, A.B., Prince George's County, Md. I 

"A Study of Aspergillus Fumigatus." 

T, B. Symons, B.S., Prince George's County, Md. 
"Additional Investigations on the Mouth Parts of the San Jose Scale." ^ 

• " Mechanical Engineer. (' 

J. A. Anderson, Somerset County, Md. 
"Factor of Safety of Electric Railway Bridge over Paint Branch. ' ' J 

R. P. Choat^ Baltimore County, Md. ^, | 

"Construction and Testing of a 3 x 3 Gasoline Engine." | 

il L. W. Cruikshank, Cecil County, Md. 

"Modern Foundries and Their Products." 

E. C. Mayo, Prince George's County, Md. 
"Turret Lathe and an Attachment for Cutting Irregular Pieces." 
, r' . E. W. Merrym AN, Baltimore County, Md. 

- V ' ; ■ "Annealing Processes." . . 

/. W. R. Mitchell, Charlesr County, Md. 
"Lubricants and Lubrication — Their Value and Applications." 

:. E. W. Stoll, Anne Arundel County, Md. [ •■ . . ) 

"Construction of the Cupola." , i 

, \ G. L. Wentworth, Chicago, Illinois. 

"Apparatus for Determining the Heat Value of Bituminous Coal." 

Bachelor of Arts. 

H. W. BurnsidE, Prince George's County, Md. 
'Development and Decline of the English Drama." , ^,j 

T. B. MullEndore, Baltimore County, Md. 
"The Evolution and Development of the English Novel." 



66 

: Bachelor of Science. 

M, A. Calderon^ Lima, Peru. • 
"The Cattle Industry in Peru." 

E. R. Sasscer, Charles County, Md. ' 
"Some Scale Insects of Economic. Importance in Maryland." 

S. B. Shaw, Somerset County, Md. 
"Comparative Results of Muriate and Sulphate of Potash on Green- 
■ . • , house Tomatoes." 

' Certificates Awarded. ->';:; 

- Clay Pennington Whiteford, Jr., Harford County, Md. i 
Joaquin Walker, Santiago, Chile. •' f ^' ; ^ 
■\ For Completing the Two-Year Course in Agriculture. : - 

Medals Awarded — Commencement J904. 

• ... Edward Cooper Mayo, - - . - 

Senior Medal; for highest standing for four years. Awarded by the 
President. Average for four years, 87.4. 

Wellstood White, 

Junior Medal; for highest standing for Junior year. Awarded by the 
President. Average for Junior year, 95.5. 

Ernest Wilbur Stoll, 

Gold Medal; for best debate in competitive debate. Awarded by 

the Alumni Association. 

George Lansing Wentworth, 

Gold Medal; for best thesis in Mechanical Engineering Department. 
Awarded by the Alumni Association. 

' Stewart Baker Shaw, - -.'--^ ■-_:'■;-_'":':'■ v-^^.^ 

Gold Medal; for best essay in Agricultural science. Awarded by 

Alumni Association. 

... : Edmund Cooper Mayo, ^ ^' : '\ x '-:':'. .--C-^'-^m 

Gold Medal; for best essay on "American Citizenship." Awarded 

by the Board of Trustees. - ; ;- 



';■ 



■ s 

._ - . . - . . . - - . f 

. r - • .■ ^ 

,_■-",.. ■ j; 

• ■ ■ " . »■«■ 

■ '■■- '" '■ " . 1; 

Military Department Roster. 

Cadet Battalion. 

Commandant of Cadets. 
. ^ . Field and Staff. 

W. White, Major. 

G. Sturgis, Lieutenant and Battalion Adjutant. 

K. D. Diggs, Lieutenant and Quartermaster. 

Non-Commissioned Staff. 

J. J. T. Graham, Sergeant Major. 

E. I. Oswald, Color Sergeant. 

W. B. Harris, Quartermaster Sergeant 

C. S. Ridgway, Chief Trumpeter. 

Company "A." 

• - 

W. R. Roberts, Captain. 
' J. C. Cockey, First Lieutenant. 
W-.-H.~JByron, Second Lieutenant. 
R. D. Nicholls, Third Lieutenant. 
H. J. Caul, First Sergeant. 
L- Bassett, Sergeant. R. H. Dixon, Sergeant. , 

H.D. Williar, Jr., Corporal. C. L. Lippincott, Corporal. ' 

A. D. Cockey, Corporal. F. E. Linnell, Corporal. 

E. P. Haslup, Corporal. ^ i 

Company "B." 

A. A. Parker, Captain. | 

, First Lieutenant. 

E. H. Snaveley, Second Lieutenant. 
E. T. Hayman, Third Lieutenant 
L. F. Zerkel, First Sergeant. 
R. Goodell, Sergeant. S. P. Thomas, Sergeant. 

B. H. Storm, Corporal. E. S. Halloway, Corporal. 
H. O. Williams, Corporal. J. L. Iglehart, Corporal. 

C. H. Harper, Corporal. 

Company "€.•• 

J. J. A. Krentzlin, Captain. 

-, First Lieutenant. * 



J. W. P. Somervilie, Second Lieutenant. 
M. Duckett, Jr., Third Lieutenant. 
G. M. Mayer, First Sergeant. 
A. M. McNutt, Sergeant. ' ; 
R. W. Rice, Corporal. J. P. Mudd, Corporal. 

W. B. Fluharty, Corporal. H. H. Owings, Corporal. 

G. W. Firor, Corporal. 



»■ 



68 



Roster of Matriculates. 

Session 1903- 1904. 

Groduate Students. 



Foster, A. B., 
Mayo, R. W. B., 
Symons, T. B. , 
Walls, E. P., 
Wharton, W. R., 



Anderson, J. A., 
Burnside. H. W., 
Calderon, M. A., 
Choate, R. P., 
, Coll, R., 
Cruikshank, L. W., 
Gray, J. P.. 
Mayo, E. C, 
Merryman. E. W., 
Mitchell, W. R., 
Mullendore, T. B., 
Sasscer, E R., 
Shaw, S. B., 
Stoll, E. W., 
Watts, H. U., 
Went worth, G. L. 



Brown, D. E., 
Byron, W. H., 
Digges, E. D,, 
Duckett, M., 
Hayman, E. T., 
Hines, T. L., 
Krentzlin, J. J. A., 
Mackall, J. N., 
Nicholls, R. D., 
Parker, A. A., 
Roberts, W. P., \ 
Smith, W. T., 
'Snavely, E. H., 
Somerville, J. W., 
Sturges, G., 
White, M., , ' 



POSTOFFICE, 

College Park, 
Hyattsville, 
College Park, 
Barclay, 
Stockton , 

Senior Class. 

Deal's Island, 

Hyattsville, 

Lima, 

Randallstown, 

Buenos Ayres, 

Cecilton, 

Glyndon, 

Hyattsville, 

Baltimore, 

La Plata, 

Hagerstown, 

La Plata, 

Rehoboth, 

Brooklyn Station, 

Belair, 

Chicago, 

Junior Class. 

College Park, 
Williamsport, 
Port Tobacco, 
•Hyattsville, 
Stockton, 
Baltimore, 
Washington , 
Mackall, 
German town, 
Pocomoke City, 
Landover, 
Ridgely, 
Orange, ~ 

Cumberland, 
Snow Hill, 
Dickerson, 



COUNTY. 



Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Queen Anne. 
Worcester. 



Somerset. 

Prince George. 

Peru. 

Baltimore. 

Argentine Repicblic . 

Cecil. 

Baltimore. 

Prince George. 

Baltimore City. 

Charles. 

Washington. 

Charles. 

Somerset. 

Baltimore. 

Harford. 

Illinois. 



Prince George. 
Washington. 
Charles. " 

Prince George. 
Worcester. 
Baltimore City. 
District of Columbia. 
Calvert. 
Montgomery. 
Worcester. 
Prince George. 
Caroline. 
Baltimore. 
Allegany. . > 
Worcester. 
Montgomery. ' l 



69 



^ngle, W. H., 
Bassett, I/., 
Bay, J. H., 
Blair, E. A.., 
Caul, H. J., 
Cockey, A. D., 
Crone, W. M., 
Davis, F. E.,. 

v<Dixon, R. H., 
Goodell, R. , 
Graham, J. J. T., 
Hunter, J. M., 
lyippincott, C. L., 
Mayer, G. M., 

{^cNutt, A. M., 
Plumacher, E. H., 
Plumacher, M. C, 
Pyles, R. G., 
Ridgway, C. S., 
^Shaffer, D. M., 
Shepherd, E. L., 

V Showell, J. Iv., 
Storm, B. H., 
Tate, J , 
>^homas, S. P. , 
Thompson, J. G. , 
Towner, L. F., 
Vrooman, C. A., 
Waters, F., 
Watts, H. F , 
Whiting, L. W., 
Williar, H. D., 
Wright, R. V. Iv., 
Wood, R. v., 
Zerkel, L. F., 



Bateman, C. F., 
Bowland, A. N., 
Brooks, J. D., 
Bryan, R. C, 
Bryan, W. E., 
Clagett, C, 
Clark, F. P., 

*Died April. '04. 



Sophomore Class. 

Clear Spring, 

Cambridge, 

Jarrettsville, 

Baltimore, 

Buffalo, 

Owing's Mills, 

St. Michael's, 

Hyattsville, 

Cambridge, 

Frederick, 

Ingleside, 

Roe, 

Baltimore, 

Frostburg, 

Berkeley, 

Maracaibo, 

Maracaibo, 

Barnesville, 

Beltsville, 

Laurel , 

Bristol, 

Berlin, 

Reisterstown, 

Washington, 

Ednor, 

Landover, 

Ferryman, 

Hyattsville, 

Washington, 

Belair, 

Hyattsville, 

Ruxton, 

Williamsport, 

Barnesville, 

Luray, 

Freshman Class. 

Luray, 

Kingston, 

Westminster, 

Centreville, 

Baltimore, 

Upper Marlboro, 

Keep Tryst, 



Washington. 

Dorchester. 

Harford. 

Baltimore City. 

New York. 

Baltimore. 

Talbot. 

Prince George. 

Dorchester. 

Frederick. 

Queen Anne. 

Queen Anne. 

Baltimore Cit}'. 

Allegany. 

Harford, 

Venez7iela. 

Ve7iez7iela. 
Montgomery. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Anne Arundel. 
W^orcester. 
Baltimore. 
District of Columbia. 
Montgomery. 
Prince George. 
Harford . 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia. 
Harford . 
Prince George. 
Baltimore. 
Washington. 
Montgomery. 

Virginia. 



Virginia. 
Somerset. 
Carroll. 
Queen Anne. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
Washington. 



aaoei 



n 



Coale, J. A., 
Copeland, T. C, 
Crisp, A. B., 
Corridon, R., 
Diller, C. W., 
Firor, G. W., 
Fluharty, W. B., 
Gait, D. B., 
Gait, F. S., 
Gill, J. v., 
Graff, T. T., 
Groves, W. D., 
Hall, R. H., 
Harper, C. H., 
Haslup, E. P., 
Holloway, E. S., 
Holmead, J. H.. 
Halterman, E. , 
Iglehart, J. L., 
Jones, J. E., 
lyinnell, F.E., 
Long, W. B. , 
Mackall, T. B., 
Mattingly, J. D., 
Maxwell, G. C, 
McCandlish, E. G., 
McKim, D. C, 
Merry man, N. B., 
Milburn, C. P., 
Mudd, J. P., 
Owings, H. H., 
Pyles, R. A. W., 
Riddick, B., 
Robey, W. T., 
Silvester, R. I,., 
Smith, C. E., 
Somerville, W. A. S., 
Thrasher, H. C, 
Thweat, C, 
Tilson, R. J., 
Turner, E. M., 
Vocke, S. T., 
Whiting, H. R., 
Williams, H. O., 
Zouck.J. T., 



Upper Marlboro, 

Washington, 

Brooklyn Station, 

Washington, 

Double Pipe Creek, 

Thurmont, 

Greensboro, 

Hyattsville, 

Hyattsville, 

Boring, 

Derwood, 

Ellicott City, 

Barstow, 

Baltimore, 

Laurel, 

Rosaryville, 

Washington, 

Columbus, 

Simpsonville, 

Davidsonville, 

Falmouth, 

Westover, 

Mackall, 

Laurel, 

Baltimore, 

Piedmont, 

Luray, 

Timonium, 

Leonard town, 

Washington, 

Simpsonville, 

Camp Springs, 

Warren, 

Berwyn, 

College Park, 

Bowie, 

Cumberland, 

Deer Park, 

Baltimore, 

Davis, 

Lassiter, 

Baltimore, 

Hyattsville, 

Nanticoke, 

Glyndon, 



Prince George. 
District of Columbia, 
Baltimore. 
District of Cohimbia. 
Carroll. 
Frederick. 
North Carolina. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore. 
Montgomery. 
Howard. 
Calvert. 

Baltimore City. ,' 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
District of Columbia. 
Ohio. 
Howard. 
Anne Arundel. 
Massachusetts . 
Somerset. 
Calvert. 
Prince George. 
Baltimore City. 
West Virginia. 
Virginia. 

Baltimore. "^ 

St. Mary. 

District of Columbia. 
Howard. 
Prince George. 
Ohio. 

r - 

Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Allegany. 
Garrett. 
Baltimore City. 
West Virginia. 
Virginia. 
Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 
Wicomico. 
Baltimore. 



71 



Two- Year Special Students in Agriculture. 



SECOND YEAR. 



Gassoway, J. H., Jr., Germantown, 
Walker, J., Santiago, 

Whiteford, C. P., Whiteford, 



Montgomery. 

Chile. 

Harford. 



Albrittain, L-, 
Arnold, T. J., Jr., 
Bennett, B. C. S., 
Benson, R. H., 
Candamo, J. V., 
Cannon, C. L., 
Carroll, E. F., - 
Friend, J. T.,* 
Harris, W B., 
Lyon, W. J., 
Oswald, E. I., 
Rice, R. W., 
Street, A. D., 



Califoria, A., 
Cockey, J. C, 
Ensor, J. G , 
Marin, H. J., 
Mas, J., 
Pouleur, A. L., 
Power, E., 
Salinas, J., 
Street, J. M., 
Webster, F. O., 



Ager, R. M-, 
Allen, R. S., 
Beasman, F. B., 
Carr, A., Jr., 
Cliappelear, J. E., 
Cooper, B. R., 
Delano, S. E., 
Dickey, P. S., 
Hall, J. M.. 



FIRST YEAR. 

Washington, 

Beverley, 

Stevenson, 

Grifton, 

Lima, 

Bridgeville, 

Belair, 

Lydia, 

Coleman, 

Hughesville, 

Chewsville, 

Baltimore, 

Fallston, 

Special Students. 

Puerto Principe, 

Owings Mills, 

Philopolis, 

Puerto Principe, 

Puerto Principe, 

Windsor, 

Derwood, 

Lima, 

Rocks, 

Baltimore, 

Preparatory Class. 

Hyattsville. 

Rising Sun, 

Sykesville, 

Hyattsville, 

Hughesville, 

Worton, 

Bath, 

Baltimore, 

Hyattsville, 



District of Columbia. 
West Virginia. 
Baltimore. 
Montgomery. 
Peru. 
Delaware. 
Harford. 
Washington. 
Kent. 
Charles. 
Washington. 
Baltimore City. 
Harford. 



Cuba. 

Baltimore. 

Baltimore. 

Cuba. 

Cuba. 

Co7inecticut. 

Montgomery. 

Peru. 

Harford. 

Baltimore City. 



Prince George. 
Cecil. 
Carroll. 
Prince George. 
Prince George. 
Kent. 
Maine. 

Baltimore City. 
Prince George. 



72 



Han way, M. B., 
Felty, G. P., 
Herpeck, G. R., 
Hays, L., 
Hoen, J. M., 
Kuhry, H. C, 
Ivinkins, E. R., 
I^yddane, J. R., 
Lockie, L. G. , 
Porter, H. L., 
Russell, B., 
Sanford, J. W., 
Shipley, W. G., 
Southard, P. C, 
Toadvine, G. C, 
Valdes,J. M., 
Waggner, G. M., 
Walker, B. S., 
Wilson, G. W., 
Woodson, A. R., 



Baltimore, 

Connellsville, 

Connellsville, 

Barnesville, 

Baltimore, 

Moravia, 

Washington, 

German town, ,:'';■ 

Altoona, ' 

Oakland, 

Washington, 

Washington, 

College Park, 

Colonial Beach, 

Tyaskin, 

Puerto Principe, 

Baltimore, 

Mitchellsville, 

Simpson ville, 

Washington, 



Baltimore City. 
Pennsylvania. 
Peyinsylvania. 
Montgomery. 
Baltimore City. 
New York. 
District of Columbia. 
Montgomery. 
PennsylvaJiia. 
Garrett. 

District of Columbia. 
District of Columbia. 
Prince George. 
Virginia. 
Wicomico. 
Cuba. 

Baltimore City. ., 
Prince George. 
Howard. 
District of Columbia. 



Short Winter Course Students. 



Beard, H. J., 
Cobey, E. A., 
Cohill, I.. O., 
Gifford, C. M., 
Hance, F., 
Herr, R. E., 
Johnson, T. B., 
Lewis, S. H., 
Rhodes, C. N., 



Feagaville, 
Gray ton, 
Hancock, 
Rising Sun, 
I/aurel, 
Boonsboro, 
Elvaton, 
Glendale, 
Queen Anne, 



Frederick. 

Charles. 

Washington. 

Cecil. 

Prince George. 

Washington. 

Anne Arundel. 

Prince George. 

Queen Anne. 



Summary of Students, v ^ - ' .; : 

Graduate Students 5 

Senior Class 16 

Junior Class 16 

Sophomore Class 35 

Freshman Class 52 

Two- Year Students 16 

Special Students..... 10 

Preparatory Students 30 

Short-Course Students 9 

Total .: '. 189 



73 

: - List of Graduates, with Degrees and Addresses* 

The following members of the various graduating classes have 
been located. Any information leading to further additions and ad- 
dresses and occupations of Alumni will be gratefullj' received: 

Class ot '63. 

Calvert, C. B., A.B., College Park, Md. 
Sands, W. B., A.B., Lake Roland Md. 

' .■ ■ ^ Class of '64. 

Franklin, J., A.B., 306 San Pedro Ave., San Antonio, Texas. 
Todd, W. B., B S. 

Class Of '66, 
Hall, E., A.B. 
Roberts, L., Ph.B. 

Glass Of '67. 
Soper, F. A., A.B. (M.A. '74), Baltimore, Md. 

Class of '73. 

♦Henry, R. S., A.B. (M.A. '75). 

Miller, O., A.B. (MA. '75). 

Regester, A., A.B 

Waters, W. F., A.B. 

Worthington, D., A.B. 

Worthington, W., A.B. _- - ' ' 

Classof'74. '^ .__ 

CofEren, J. H., A.B. (M.A. '77), Croonie, Md. * " 

Davis, H. M., A.B. (M.A. '77), Poolesville, Md. 

Griffith, L. A., A.B. (M.A. '77), Marlboro, Md. 

Hall, D., M.A. 

Norwood, F. C, A.B. (M.A. '77), Frederick, Md. 

Class Of '75. 

Cray, J. B., A.B., Prince Frederick, Md. 
Hyde, J. F. B., A.B., 110-114 Hanover St., Baltimore, Md. 
Lerch, C. E., B.S., 110-114 Hanover St., Baltimore, Md. 
Miller, L., B.S., Albuquerque, New Mexico. 

Class of '76. 

Blair, W. J., B.S. (M.S.), Custom-House, Baltimore, Md. 
Thomas, T., B.S., Maddox, Md. 
♦Worthington, J. L., B.S. 

Class of '77. 
*Beall, R. R., B.S. 

Emack, E. G., B.S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 
♦Thomas, G , B.S. 
Truxton, S., B.S. • 

Class Of '78. 
Thomas, W., B.S. 

♦Deceased. 



74 



Hemsten, T. T., A.B, 
Rapley, R. R., B.S. 



Class Of *80. 



Class of '81. 



Gale, E., A.B., Hoffman st. and Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

Mercer, R. S., A.B., New York, N. Y. 

Porter, W., A.B., R. B. Porter & Sons, S. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 

Thomas, W. H., A.B., Westminster, Md. 

Wood, C. W., A.B. ■ 

Class Of '82. 

Bowen, P. A., Jr., A.B., 1410 G St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 
Freeland, H,, A.B. 
Saunders, C. H., A.B. 

Class Of '83. 

Chew, R. B. B., A.B., 512 F St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Kirby, W. A., A.B., Trappe, Md. 

Lakin, W. A., A.B., Talbot County, Md. 

Rapley, E. E., A.B., 628 Louisiana Ave., Washington, D. C. 

Stonestreet, J. H., A.B., Barnesville, Md. 

Class Of '84. 

Martin, F., B.S., Montgomery County, Md. 
Lakin, W. T., B.Ag. 

Class Of '8S. 

Chambliss, S. M., A.B., Times Building. Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Hazen, M. C, B.S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, L. B., A. B., Morganza, Md. 

*Sigler, W. A., B.S. 

Smith, R. E., B.S., Ridgely, Md. 

Tolson, A. C, A.B., Daily Record Building, Baltimore, Md. 

Weems, J. B., B.S., Ames, Iowa. 

Class Of '89. 

Griffith, T. D., B.S., Redland, Md. 

Pindell, R. M., B.S., Civil Service Commissiou, Washington, D. C. 

*Saulsbury, N. R., B.S. 

Witmer, F., B.S., Hagerstown, Md. 

Class Of '90. 

Calvert, R. C. M., B.S., General Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Keech, W. S., B S., Towson, Md. 

Manning, C. C, B.S., 194 High St., Portland, Me. 

Niles, E. G., B.S., Washington, D. C. 

Russell, R. L., B S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Soles, C. E., B.S., McKeesport, Pa. 

Class Of '91. 

♦Branch, C, B.S. 

*Langley, J. C, B.S. 

Latimer, J. B., B.S., Broome's Island, Md. 

*Penn, S., B.S. 

Veitch, F. P., B.S., Agricultural Department, Washington, D, C. 

*Deceased. . 



r I 



75 

Class of '92. 

Besley, F. W., A.B., Ash Grove, Va. 

Brooks, J. D., A.B., Medical Department, U. S. A. 

Calvert, G. H , A.B., College Park, Md. 

Chew, F., B.S., 1737 N. Twenty-first St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Childs, N., B S., Highland, Md. 

Gambrill, S. W., B S., Fidelity and Deposit Co., London, England. 

Johnson, E. D., A.B., Portland, Me. 

Ray, J. E., A.B., 406 Fifth St., Washington, D, C. 

Class of '93. 

Alvey, C, B.S., Hagerstown, Md. 

Buckley, S S., B.S., (M.S. '99*, College Park, Md. 

Graff, G. Y., B.S., Brookland, Md. 

Holzapfel, H. H.,Jr., B.S., Hagerstown, Md. 

Lawson, J. W., B.S., Urbana, Md. 

Sherman, H. C, B.S., Columbia University, New York, N. Y. 

Class of '94. 

Best, H., B.S., Birdsville, Md. 

Bomberger, F. B., B.S., (M.A. '02), College Park, Md. 

Brown, A. S., B.S., Washington, D. C. 

Cairnes, C. W., B.S., United States Revenue Cutter Service. 

Dent, H. M., B.S., Townshend, Md. 

Foran, T. E., B.S., Port Deposit, Md. 

Key, S., B S. (M.S. '02), 1733 H St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

*Pue, R. R., B.S. 

Sudler, M. T., B.S. (M.S. '02), Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. ' ' 

Weimer, C. H., B.S., Cumberland, Md. 

Class of '95. 

Bannon, J. G., B.S., Baltimore, Md. 

Clagett, G. H., B.S., Marlboro, Md. 

Compton, B., B.S., Baltimore, Md. 

Crapster, W. B., B.S. , Washington, D. C. 

Edelen, G. S., B.S., Piscataway, Md. 

Graham, H. R , B.S., Chestertown, Md. 

Harding, S. H , B.S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Harrison, R. L., B.S., Geological Survey, Washington, D. C. 

Jones, H. C, B.S., Pocomoke City, Md. 

McCandlish, L., B.S., Reading, Pa. 

McDonnell, C. C, B.S., Clemson College, S. C. 

MuUiken, C. S., B.S., Episcopal Theological Seminary, Alexandria, Va. 

Skinner, W. W., B.S., Arizona Agricultural College, Tuscon, Ariz. 

Sliger, R. E., B.S., Oakland, Md. 

Timanus, J. J., B.S., Towson, Md. 

Wilson, G. W., Jr., B.S., Marlboro, Md. 

Class of '96. 

Anderson, J., B.S., Rockville, Md. 

Beale, R. B., B.S., General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y. 

Crapster, T. C, B.S., United States Revenue Cutter Service. 

Dirickson, C. W., B.S., Berlin, Md., 

Eversfield, D., A.B., College Park, Md. "• . 

Heyser, H. H., A.B., Hagerstown, Md. 

Laughlin, J. R., B.S., 1460 Corcoran St., Washington, D. C. 

Rollins, W. T. S., B.S., Seat Pleasant, Md. 

Walker, C. N., B.S., Hyattsville, Md. 

* Deceased. 



Class of '97. 

Calvert, C. B., Jr., A.B , College Park, Md. . . 

Cronmiller, J. D., A.B., Laurel, Md. 

Gill, A. I., B.S., 215 St. Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Gill, N. H., B.S., Glyndon, Md. 

Graham, J. G. R., A.B., 115 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Reward, H., B.S., 262 Water St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lewis, G., B.S., Kanawha Falls, W. Va. 

Nelligan, B. S., B.S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Posey, F., A.B., La Plata. Md. 

Queen, C. J., B.S., 56 Livingston St, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schenck, G. H. W., B.S., 343 Boulevard, Hollands, L. I. 

Watkins, J. B., Jr., B.S., Rutland, Md. 

Welty, H. T., B.S., 771 Doon St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Weeden, W. S., B.S., (M.S. '98), Give Electric Co., Schenectady, N. Y. 

Whiteford, G. H., B.S., Glen Morris, Md. 

Class Of '98, 

Allnutt, C. v., A.B., New York, N. Y. 

Barnett, D. C, A.B., Cambridge, Md. 

Burroughs, C. R., B.S., Harris' Lot, Md. 

Cameron, G. W., B.S., Birmingham, Ala. 

Dennison, P. E , A.B. War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Dickerson, E. T., A.B , (M.A., '03), Baltimore, Md. 

Houston, L. J., Jr., A.B.. Canadian Pacific Railroad, Winnipeg, Canada. 

Lillibridge, J. G., A.B., Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Mitchell, J. H., M.E., College Park, Md. 

Nesbitt, W. C, B.S., 201 West Fifty-sixth St., New York, N. Y. 

Peterson, G., A.B., Adjutant General's Office, Washington, D. C. 

Ridgely, C. H., B.S., Sykesville, Md. 

Robb, P. L., B.S., Baltimore City College, Baltimore, Md. 

Whitely, R. P., A.B., Georgetown University, Washington, D. C. 

Class of '99. 

Blandford, J. C , M.E., College Park, Md. 

Collins, H. E., A.B , Princess Anne, Md. 

Eyster, J. A. E.. B.S., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

Gait, M. H., A.B., Taneytown, Md. 

Gough, T. R., B.S., Columbian University, Washington, D. C. 

Hammond, W. A., A.B., Bank of Baltimore Building, Baltimore, Md. 

Kenley, J. F., M.E., Aberdeen, Md. 

McCandlish, R. J., B.S., Gypsy, W. Va. 

Price, T. M., B.S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Robb, J. B., B.S., College Park, Md. 

Sedwick, J. O., B.S. 

Shamberger, D. T.. M.E., Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Shipley, J. H., B.S., Manila, P. I. 

Straughn, M. N., B.S., College Park, Md. v., 

Whitehill, I. E., A.B., Unionville, Md. 



Class Of '00. 

Choate, E. S., M.E., Mt. Clare, Baltimore, Md. 

Church, C. G., B.S , Department of Agriculture. Washington, D. C. 
Ewens, A. E., B.S., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 
Grason, A. S. R., B.S., Towson, Md. 



77 

Gro£E, W, D., B.S., P. O. Box 544, Baltimore, Md. 
Jenifer, R. M., B.S., Loch Raven, Md. 
Kefauver, H. J., A.B. (M.A., '01), Frederick, Md. 
Peach, S. M., A.B , Mitchellsville, Md. 
Sappington, E. N., B.S., Darlington, Md. 
Sudler, A. C, B. S., Westover, Md. 
Talbott, W. H., A.B., Willows, Md. 
Weigand, W. H., B.S., Argentine, Kansas. 

Class of '01. 

Cobey, W. C, B.S., Windsor, Conn. 

Hardisty, J. T., A.B., Collington, Md. 

McDonnell, F. V., M.E., 409 E. Wash St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Whiteford, H. C, B.S., Whiteford, Md. 

Class of '02. 

Bowman, J. D., M.E., Rockviile, Md. 

Couden, J., B.S., Perryville, Md. 

Darbv, S. P., B.S., Washington, D. C. 

Fendall, W. S., M.E., U. S. Navy Yard, Washington, D. C. 

Hirst, A. K., B.S., Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md. 

*Lansdale, H. N., B.S. 

Mitchell, R. L., B.S., La Plata, Md. 

Mackall, L. E., A.B., 715 West Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. 

Symons, T. B , B.S. (M.S., '04), College Park, Md. 

Wisner, J. I., B.S., Baltimore, Md. 

Class of '03. 

Cairnes, G. W., M.E., Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Calderon, M. A., M.E- (B.S. '04), Peruvian Legation, Washington, D. C. 

Collier, J. P., M.E., Ellicott City, Md. 

Dunbar, E. B., B.S., Springville, N. Y. 

Garner, E. F.. M.E., College Park, Md. 

Matthews, J. M., B.S., Dulaney's Valley, Md. 

Mayo, R. W. B., A.B. (M.S. '04), Hyattsville, Md. 

Peach, P. L., M.E., Ruston, La. 

Walls, E. P., B.S., College Park, Md. 

Class of '04. 

Anderson, J. A., M.E., Deal's Island, Md. 
Burnside, H. W., A.B., Hyattsville, Md. 
Cruikshank, L. W., M.E., Cecilton, Md. 
Gray, J. P., B.S., Glyndon, Md. 
Mayo, E- C, M.E., Newport News, Va. 
Merryman, E. W., ME , Baltimore, Md. 
Mitchell, W., M.E., La Plata, Md. 
Mullendore, T, B., A.B., Hagerstown, Md. 
Sasscer, E. R., B S., La Plata, Md. 
Shaw, S. B, B.S., Rehoboth, Md. 
Stoll, E. W., M.E., Brooklyn Station, Md. 
Wentworth, G. L., M.E., Chicago, 111. 

*Deceased. 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Agriculture, Apprenticeships in. 50 

Agriculture, Four-Year Course 14 

Agriculture,Short Winter Course 49-58 

Agriculture, Two-Year Course 49 

Alumni 64-73 

Alumni Association 64 i 

Apprenticeships in Agriculture.. 50 ' 

Appropriations 12 i 

Articles to be Provided 59 ; 

Assistants 6 

Athletics 62 

Bacteriology 31 

Board of Trustees 3,4 

Botany 33 

Buildings 9-12 

Business Directions 2 

Calendar 6 | 

Certificates 66 ■ 

Chemistry 24 

Civics 24 

Civil Engineering 28 

Classical Course 35 

Committees 4)59 

Courses of Study 42 ; 

Dairying 16, 49, 50 

Degrees 51.65 ; 

Departments 14 

Discipline 53.55 

Donations to Library 42 

Drawing 18 ■■ 

Economics 24 

Elocution 39 

Endowment 8 

Engineering 17 

English.. 21 

Entomology 32 

Equipment and Work 14 

Examinations 54 

Expenses of Students 57 

Experiment Station 8,55 

Explanation of Fees 59 i 

Faculty 5 | 

Farmers' Courses 49 ; 

Fees 57 j 

Forestry 30 ' 

French 37 ! 

General Aim and Purpose 12 \ 

General Information 53 i 

Geology 17 

German 37 

Graduates and Degrees Con- 
ferred 65, 66 



Page. 

Historical Sketch 8 

History 24 

Horticulture 29, 51 

Languages 35 

Latin 36 

Letter from Department of Agri- 
culture 60 

Library 41 

Literary Societies 63 

Location and Description 9 

Logic 24 

Mathematics 20 

Matriculation 53, 55 

Mechanical Engineering 17 

Medals Awarded 66 

Military Organization 67 

Military Work 37 

Ofl&cers and Faculty 5 

Organizations .. 58 

Outline of Courses 42 

Pathology, Plant 33 

Physical Culture 41 

Physics 27 

Physiology 31 

Pledges 53, 55 

Preparatory Work 40 

Promotion 54 

Psychology 23 

Public Speaking 39 

Regulations 55 

Requirements for Admission 53 

Reveille 63 

Roster of Students 68 

Rules 55 

Sanitarium 10 

Sanitary Advantages 11 

Scholarships 55 

Scientific Courses 43 

Short Winter Course in Agricul- 
ture 49 

State Work 9, 25 

Student Opportunities 60 

Student Organizations 58, 62 

Text-Books 14, 57 

Theses 51 

Time of Payment 58 

Uniform 58 

Veterinary Science 30 

Y. M. C. A 62 

Zoology 32 



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