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Full text of "Circular of the Maryland Agricultural College"

Missing Front Cover 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES. 



MEMBERS EX-OFFICIO. 

HON. EDWIN WARFIELD, Governor, 
President of the Board. 

HON. GORDON T. ATKINSON, M. D., 
Comptroller of the Treasury. 

HON. WM. SHEPARD BRYAN, 
Attorney-General. 

HON. MURRAY VANDIVER, 
State Treasurer. 

HON. JOSEPH B. SETH, 
President of the Senate. 

HON. CARVILLE D. BENSON, 
Speaker of the House of Delegates. 

HON. JAMES WILSON, 

Secretary, United States Department of Agriculture. 



MEMBERS REPRESENTING STOCKHOLDERS. 

HON. RICHARD S. HILL, M. D., Upper Marlboro, Md. 
CHARLES H. STANLEY, Esq., Laurel, Md. 

E. GITTINGS MERRYMAN, Esq., Cockeysville, Md. 
J. HAROLD WALSH, Esq., Upper Falls, Md. 

F. CARROLL GOLDSBOROUGH, Esq., Easton, Md. 



MEMBERS APPOINTED BY THE GOVERNOR. 

C. J. PURNELL, Esq., Snow Hill, Md. Term expires 1906. 

HON. DAVID SEIBERT, Clear Spring, Md. " " 1906. 

ROBERT GRAIN, Esq., Baltimore, Md. " " 1908. 

CHARLES A. COUNCILMAN, Esq., Glyndon, Md. " " 1908. 

J. M. MUNROE, Esq., Annapolis, Md. " " 1910. 

HON. CHARLES H. EVANS, Baltimore, Md. " " 1910. 



REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. 



October 12, 1906. 
December 14, 1906. 



March S, 1907. 
June 14. 1907. 



STANDING COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD OF 

TRUSTEES. 



COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE. 

Messes. STANLEY, VANDIVER, SEIBERT, COUNCILMAN 
GOLDSBOROUGH and CRAIN. 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE. 
Messes. VANDIVER, STANLEY, WALSH, MUNROB and ATKINSON. 



COMMITTEE ON EDUCATION. 

Messes. EVANS, WALSH, ATKINSON, SBTH and PURNELL. 



COMMITTEE ON FACILITIES FOR INSTRUCTION. 
Messes. MUNROE, BENSON, HILL and PURNELL. 



COMMITTEE ON AUDITING. 
Messes. VANDIVER and STANLEY. 



COMMITTEE ON EASTERN BRANCH. 
Messes. MERRYMAN and GOLDSBOROUGH. 



COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS. 
Messes. COUNCILMAN, HILL, STANLEY and CRAIN. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Messes. HILL, GOLDSBOROUGH, MERRYMAN, EVANS and MUNBOS. 



OFFICERS AND FACULTY OF INSTRUCTION. 



FACULTY. 

R. W. SILVESTER, 
President and Professor of MathematiCB. 

THOMAS H. SPBNCB, A. M., 
Tice-President and Professor of Langoagea. 

EDWARD LLOYD, MAJOR, U. S. A., 
Commandant of Cadets. 

H. B, MCDONNELL, B. S., M. D., 
Professor of Chemistry, State Chemist 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO, A. B., 
Professor of Agriculture. 

JAMBS S. ROBINSON, 
Emeritus Professor of Horticulture. 

SAMUEL S. BUCKLEY, M. S.,D.V. S., 
Professor of Veterinary Science. 

HENRY LANAHAN, A. B., 
Professor of Physics and Civil Engineering. 

F. B. BOMBERGEB, B. S., A. M., 
Professor of English and Civics, Librarian. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, 
Director of Physical Culture, Instructor in Public Speaking. 

J. HANSON MITCHELL, M. E., 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering.* 

J. B. S. NORTON, M. S., 

Professor of Vegetable Pathology and Botany, 
State Pathologist. 

T. B. SYMONS, M. S., 
Professor of Entomology, State Entomologist. 

W. N, HUTT, B. S. A., 
Professor of Horticulture, State Horticulturist. 

HARRY GWINNER, M. E., 
Acting Professor of Mechanical Engineering. 



HENRY T. HARRISON, 

Principal of Preparatory Department, 
Secretary of the Faculty. 

F. W. BESLEY, A. B., 

Director State Bureau of Forestry, 
Lecturer on Forestry. 



*0n leave of absence. 



ASSISTANTS IN COLLEGE WORK. 

E. F. GARNER, M. B., 
Assistant in Mechanical Engineering Department. 

B. E. PORTER, B. S., 
Assistant in Animal Husbandry. 

JEROME J. MORGAN, B. S., 

Assistant in Ctiemistry. 

P. M. NOVIK, B. S., 
Lecturer In Horticulture. 

C. A. REED, B. S., 
Assistant in Horticulture. 



Assistant in Mechanical Engineering Department. 



ASSISTANTS IN STATE WORK. 

FREDERICK H. BLODGETT, M. S., 
Assistant in Vegetable Pathology, Botany and Entomology. 

WILLIAM R. M. WHARTON, A. M., 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

A. B. GAHAN, B. S., 
Assistant in Entomology and Vegetable Pathology. 

R. C. WILEY, B. S., 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

J. J. PALMORE, M.S., 
Assistant in Chemistry. 



OTHER OFFICERS. 

JOSEPH R. OWENS, M. D., 
Registrar and Treasurer. 

W. O. EVERSFIELD, M. D., 
Surgeon. 

MISS M. L. SPENCE, 
Stenographer. 

MRS. L. K. PITZHUGH, 
Matron. 

E. C. GREEN, 
Steward. 

W. HARRISON, 
Executive Cleric. 



CALENDAR FOR 1906-1907. 



FIRST TERM. 
September 18th and 10th — Entrance Examinations. 
Thursday, September 20th, 1 P. M. — College Work Begins. 
Friday, December 21st, noon — First Term, Ends. 

I'riday, December 21st, noon, to Wednesday, January 2nd, noon — Ohristm'as 
Holidays. i 



SECOND TERM. 
Wednesday, January 2nd, noon — ^Second Term Begins. 
Wednesday, March 27th — Second Term Ends. 



THIRD TERM. 

Wednesday, March 27th, noon, to Tuesday, April 2nd, 1 P M. — Easter 
Holidays. 

Tuesday, April 2nd, 1 P. M. — Third Term Begins. 

June 3rd to 8th — .Final Examinations. 

Sunday, June 9th — Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Monday, June 10th — Class Day. 

Tuesday, June 11th — Alumni Day. 

Wednesday, June 12th, 11 A. M. — Conraiencement Day Exercises. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

An act to establish and endow an agricultural college in the 
State of Maryland was passed by the legislature of the State in 
1856 (see Laws of Maryland 1856, Chapter 97). At this time no 
other such institution of a similar character existed in the United 
States. Its express purpose was defined to be, "To instruct the 
youthful student in those arts and sciences indispensable to success- 
ful agricultural pursuit." Under the charter thus granted to a 
party of public spirited private individuals, the original College 
building was erected, and its doors opened to students in the fall 
of 1859. 

For three years it was conducted as a private institution, but 
in 1862 the Congress of the United States, recognizing the valuable 
work in the cause of practical education which such colleges could 
achieve for the country, passed the "Land Grant Act," providing 
for the establishment and maintenance of agricultural colleges, by 
applying for that purpose a proportionate amount of unclaimed 
Western land, in place of scrip, to each State and Territory in the 
Union. This grant having been formally accepted by the General 
Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland Agricultural College be- 
ing named as the beneficiary of the grant, the College thus became, 
in part at least, a State institution, and such it is at the present time. 

In 1892 the Federal Government passed a second act for the 
benefit of the agricultural and mechanical colleges. By the act of 
Congress of that year an annual appropriation of $15,000, to be in- 
creased by $1,000 each year until the sum of $25,000 was reached, 
was granted each State, to be applied to the further equipment and 
support of these colleges. The primary object of this legislation 
was the development of the departments of agriculture and the 
mechanic arts,, and the branches kindred thereto. Marjdand, as was 
the case in all the States of the South, in order to comply with the 
terms of the Act of Congress, divided this fund between the State 
Agricultural College and a somewhat similar institution for tVe 
education of colored students located at Princess Anne, on the 
Eastern Shore of Maryland. 



In 1887 the Federal Congress passed an important act in aid of 
the agricultural interests, appropriating $15,000 a year for the es- 
tablishment and maintenance of agricultural experiment stations. 
The Maryland Station was located on the College farm, and was 
made a department of the College. In 1892 the Board of Trustees 
so far separated it from the College as to put it under a special Di- 
rector, who is immediately responsible to the Board. The function 
of the Experiment Station is the investigation of those agricultural 
problems of most interest and concern to the farmers of the State, 
and the publication and dissemination of the results of such experi- 
ments in the form of bulletins, for the information and guidance of 
those interested in agriculture. Since the organization of the Ex- 
periment Station, its influence has steadily increased, and its sphere 
of usefulness has constantly widened, until it is now a well recog- 
nized factor in the agricultural development of Maryland. 

In 1906 Congress passed the Adams Bill, a measure of further 
assistance for the experiment stations of the several States. By 
this act there is granted a gradual increase in Federal support 
to the working funds for the experimental work of the stations 
(amounting to $15,000 additional in ten years). 

During the last twelve years the history of the College has 
shown a record of steady growth. This fact is evidenced by the 
increased number of students availing themselves of its facilities; 
by the erection of many new buildings — the library and gymnasium 
building, the chemical laboratory, the mechanical engineering build- 
ing (recently enlarged), Morrill Hall, the college barn, the sani- 
tarium and the new administration building and barracks as well 
as by the establishment of the Department of Farmers' Institutes 
and the State Departments of Horticulture, Entomology and Vege- 
table Pathology, and of Chemistry (Fertilizer Control). Under 
such favorable auspices the institution must continue to grow, and 
ultimately reach the status of being the most important factor in 
the agricultural and industrial development of the State. 

The State Bureau of Forestry, recently created, will cooperate 
with the College, the Director being Lecturer on Forestry at the 
Agricultural College, by the terms of his appointment. 

LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION. 

The Maryland Agricultural College is located in Prince George 

10 




MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF 

MARYLAND ACRICULTURAL COLLECE. 



Ailaen&Co.Bahtniare. 



8765^321 



U U I 



i 



8 miles > one inch. 



B. & O. R. R., eight miles from Washington and thirty-two miles 
from Baltimore. At least nine trains a day from each city stop at 
College Station thus making the place easily accessible from all parts 
of the State. The telegraph station, Hyattsville, is connected with 
the College by a telephone line. 

The College grounds front on the Baltimore and Washington 
turnpike. The suburban town of Hyattsville is two and one-half 
miles to the south and Laurel the largest town in the county ^'3 
thirteen miles to the north on the same road. Connection with these 
towns and with Washington may be had by steam and electric rail- 
way. The site of the College is particularly beautiful. The build- 
ings occupy the crest of a commanding hill, covered with forest 
trees and overlooking the entire surrounding country. In front ex- 
tending to the turnpike is a broad, rolling campus, the drill ground 
and athletic field of the students. In the rear are the farm buildings 
and barn. A quarter of a mile to the northeast are the buildings 
of the Experiment Station. The College farm contains about three 
hundred acres and is devoted to the gardens, orchards, vineyard 
and to general farming. 

The general appearance of the College grounds is exceedingly 
attractive. They are tastefully laid oflf in lawn and terraces, with 
ornamental shrubbery and flower beds, and the view from the grove 
and campus cannot be surpassed. 

The location of the College is healthful ; the sanitary conditions 
are excellent. No better proof of this can be given than that there 
has been no really serious case of illness among the students for ten 
years. 

COLLEGE BUILDINGS. 

The College barracks is a five story brick building containing 
student quarters and the Domestic Department. The dormitories 
are large, well ventilated and provided with fire escapes, bath and 
water rooms. All the buildings are lighted with gas and electricity 
and heated with steam from central plants on the College grounds. 

In 1892 the present building of the gymnasium and library was 
erected. The gymnasium, on the ground floor, is well furnished 
with modern athletic appliances. The library and reading room Is 
County, Maryland, on the line of the Washington Branch of the 

II 



on the second floor and is large, well-lighted and convenient for the 
purpose. 

The Mechanical Engineering Department is located in a two 
story brick building, completed in 1896, and now thoroughly 
equipped. It contains workshops for woodwork, machinery rooms 
well furnished with modern equipment, a drawing room, library and 
office, together with a large annex, designed to afford additional 
facilities in forging and foundry work, which was erected and 
equipped during 1904. It is a model building of its kind. 

The chemical building was completed in 1897, and is now 
thoroughly equipped. It contains several lecture rooms, labora- 
tories for practical work and for the analysis of fertilizers and feed- 
ing material for domestic animals. This work is assigned by an 
Act of the General Assembly to the Professor of Chemistry at this 
College, who is thus the State Chemist. 

Another addition to the group of College buildings is Morrill 
Hall, erected in 1898. This building provides ample accommoda- 
tions for the Departments of Agriculture, Horticulture, Physics, En- 
tomolog}'. Vegetable Pathology and Veterinary Science, thus re- 
lieving the pressure of close quarters from which these departments 
have suffered, and greatly extending their opportunities for the 
development of high-grade scientific work. A greenhouse for work 
in entomology and vegetable pathology was erected in 1904. 

The College Sanitarium, completed in 1901, has proven a most 
efficient means of isolating infectious diseases which might other- 
wise have become epidemic, thus seriously embarrassing College 
work. It contains ample room for all emergencies, and is furnished 
with modern hospital facilities. An experienced nurse is in constant 
attendance, and the College surgeon is present every morning at a 
fixed hour to prescribe for any cadet requiring his services. 

Appreciating the needs of the institution, the State Legislature 
has from time to time appropriated funds wherewith buildings 
could be erected or renovated and equipments secured. 

Among recent improvements are additional dormitories, accom- 
modating twice the number of students; an auditorium and offices 
in the Administration Building 1904; a complete renovation of the 
original College barracks; a modern steam heating plant; gas and 
electric lighting; lavatories; forced ventilation, etc., all of which 



12 



establish quarters and class-rooms with unusually good sanitary 
arrangements. 

Under tht provisions of the acts of the last State Legislature a 
modern steam laundry will be added to the equipment and other 
needed improvements as required. 

GENERAL AIM AND PURPOSE. 

The Agricultural College is the State school of science and 
technology. While seeking, first of all, to perform the functions of 
an agricultural college, its sphere of work has been widened to em- 
brace all the sciences akin to agriculture and all the arts related to 
mechanical training. To these special and prominent lines of work 
have been added such branches of study as are necessary for a lib- 
eral education, for the development of the intelligent citizen and the 
making of general culture. The purpose of this College is to give 
to young men anxious to prepare themselves for the active duties 
of life such training in the sciences or in the mechanical workshop 
as will enable them to take their places in the industrial world well 
prepared for the fierce competition of the day. 

Recognizing that such an education, in order to be of practical 
advantage to many, must be offered at a cost within the means of 
all, the expenses for the year to the student have ibeen reduced to 
the point where his college dues are not in excess of his ordinary 
daily expenses. It is to be remembered that the College is a State 
institution, in part supported by the State, in part by the Federal 
Government, through its several endowment Acts, and that it is in 
no sense a money-making institution, but simply a medium of dis- 
bursement by the Government to those classes upon whom the safety 
and prosperity of the State so largely depend. 

While the College provides, as will hereinafter be explained, 
several distinct courses of instruction looking to the special training 
of the student in agriculture, mechanical engineering and the natur- 
al and physical sciences, the fact is clearly kept in view that a sound 
foundation must be laid for each and every course. Successful 
specialization is only possible after the student has prepared for it 
by a thorough training in the essentials. All education must be 
narrow and one-sided which does not provide for the general cul- 

13 



ture of the student, and which does not look first to the natural and 
normal development of the individual. The general working plan 
of the College may be thus described : 

It begins with the student in his first, or Freshman, year with 
a systematic and carefully adjusted scheme of work, diifering but 
little in the several courses, and looking to his general development 
in mental strength, range of information and power of expression 
and thought. At the beginning of his second, or Sophomore, year 
the differentiation may be said to begin along those lines in which 
he shows most natural aptitude. This gradual specialization con- 
tinues during his third, or Junior, year, until in his last, or Senior, 
year his work consists wholly of a few closely connected topics, in 
which he is thus able thoroughly to prepare himself. With the 
present equipment of the laboratory and mechanical work-shops a 
student is able to become so proficient in his chosen line of work 
that when he leaves the College a successful career is open to him if 
he chooses to avail himself of it. 

The Agricultural College is, legitimately, the crowning point 
of the public school system of Maryland. Its aim is to provide a 
higher education for the graduates of the county schools. To this 
end its curriculum is adjusted to meet the preparation of such stud- 
ents. It is this class of young men that the College is especially de- 
sirous of reaching. Experience has shown that our most satisfac- 
tory students come as graduates from the county schools, and no 
efforts will be spared to make the transition from the high school 
or grammar school to the College a possible one for all those actu- 
ated by an earnest desire to complete their education. 



14 



DEPARTMENTS— EQUIPMENT AND COURSES OFFERED. 

The following is a brief account of the equipment of the several 
departments of the College and the general character of the instruc- 
tion given in each: 

i 

AGRICULTURAL DEPARTMENT. 

W. T. L. TALIAFERRO. PROFESSOR. 
B. E. PORTER, ASSISTANT IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

The Agricultural Department offers three courses — (a) a four- 
years course leading to the degree of B. S. ; (b) a two-years course, 
for proficiency in which a certificate is awarded; (c) a ten-weeks 
winter course. 

The four-years course in agriculture is the same for all stu- 
dents through the Freshman, iand Sophomore years. In the Junior 
begins a differentiation between those students who wish to special- 
ize in agronomy and those who desire to specialize in animal 
husbandry. 

Following is an outline of the work of the two sections : 
OUTLINE OF FOUR-YEARS COURSE. 

I. Lecture Course in Agriculture. This course runs 
through the four years, and consists of a series of lectures on ag- 
ricultural topics, delivered once a week at the College by specialists 
from the United States Department of Agriculture and elsewhere. 
This course is a new departure, and it is believed, a most important 
one. The weekly presentation of agricultural topics by new and at- 
tractive speakers cannot fail to produce an excellent effect not only 
by its educational features, but by exciting among the students a 
livelier interest in agricultural work thrtough contact with men of 
prominence in the profession. 

Students taking the Agricultural, Horticultural or Gieneral 
Science courses are required to attend these lectures. With other 
students, attendance is optional. 



DIVISION OF AGRONOMY. 

I. Farm Crops. In this course the production of farm crops 
is considered in detail, as to history, uses and requirements, local 
adaptations, varieties, fertilization, cultivation, harvesting. The Col- 
lege farm of two hundred and sixty acres furnishes opportunity for 
practical work. 

A special feature of this course is the study of crop improve- 
ment by selection and breeding. The first breeding plot of corn in 
Maryland was planted on the Experiment Station farm by College 
students, from seed ears selected and scored by them with the as- 
sistance of the instructor in agronomy. The same system of stu- 
dent work is used in all corn breeding and other crop grow- 
ing experiments whenever practicable. Many students do overtime 
work, for which they are paid by the hour. 

Morrow & Hunt's "Soils and Crops" is the text book used. 

Sophomore Year, Third Term; 3 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

II. Soils. The study of the physical and chemical conditions 
of the soil in their relation to profitable agriculture. The soil is 
the basis of all agriculture, and a knowledge of its properties and 
functions cannot be too highly emphasized. The study of this im- 
portant subject is conducted by means of lectures, text books, lab- 
oratory and field work No state in the union possesses a greater 
variety of soils than Maryland, and great attention is paid to the 
study of soil types in their relation to profitable agriculture. 

The text book used is "The Soil" by King. 
Junior Year, Second and part of the Third Term; 4 theoreti- 
cal and 4 practical periods per week. 

III. Farm Drainage. Practical work in open ditching and 
under drains is provided for the students, on the Experiment Sta- 
tion farm. Special attention is given to the principles and practice 
of tile drainage. 

The text book used in this course is Waring's "Drainage for 
Profit and Health." 

Junior Year, Third Term ; 4 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

16 



IV. Farm Crops. This course is intended for those students 
only who are speciaHzing in agronomy. It consists of field and la- 
boratory work in the study of the handling of fall sown and fall 
harvested crops. Great attention is given in this course to a care- 
ful note-taking and study of the results obtained in breeding work 
in corn and other fall maturing crops on the Experiment Station 
farm. 

Senior Year, First Term; 4 practical periods per week. 

V. Fertilizers. Of vital interest to the, eastern and south- 
ern farmer of the present day, is the fertilizer question. Between 
it and the profit and loss account is a very close connection and fre- 
quently a lack of knowledge of the subject entails upon the farmer 
both the loss of money paid and the possible increase of the crop. 
In this course the subject is developed logically from the needs of 
the plant and the efficiency of the soil to the selecting of the proper 
plant foods for each crop under varying conditions of soil and 
climate. Special attention is given to the home mixing of fertilizers. 

Senior Year, Second Term; 3 theoretical and 4 practical pe- 
riods per week. 

VI. Farm Machinery. Lectures and practical work. 

Senior Year, Third Term ; 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

VII. Fakm Management. Lectures. 
Senior Year, Third Term ; 2 periods per week. 

VIII. Advanced Work in Crop Production. 

Senior Year, Third Term; 3 theoretical and 6 practical pe- 
riods per week. 

IX. Advanced Work in Soils. 

Senior Year, Third Term ; 3 theoretical and 6 practical periods 
per week. 

X. Thesis and Research Work, to be arranged for with the 
head of the department. 

Senior Year, Second and Third Terms; 2 theoretical and 4 
practical periods per week. 

17 



DIVISION OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY, 

I. Live Stock and Score Card Practice. This course is de- 
voted to the detailed study of the breeds of live stock. In the prac- 
tical work especial attention is given to the relation of form to 
function. Market types are studied. Judging occupies three double 
periods, three afternoons per week. 

"Horses, Cattle, Sheep and Swine" by Curtis and "Judging 
Live Stock" by Craig are used as text books. 

Junior Year, First Term; 3 theoretical and 6 practical periods 
per week. 

II. Principles of Breeding. This course takes up the prin- 
ciples of breeding, including selection, heredity, atavism, variation, 
fecundity, in-and-in breeding, cross breeding and a historical 
study of their results. 

Text book: "Stock Breeding," Miles. 

Junior Year, First Term ; 3 theoretical periods per week. 

III. Live Stock Management. The housing, feeding, care 
and management of dairy cattle and hogs (Second Term). The 
housing, feeding, care and management of horses, beef cattle 
and sheep (Third Term). The practical work in the spring term 
takes up the drawing of barn plans and other stable conveniences. 

Junior Year, Second and Third Terms; 2 theoretical periods 
per week. 

IV. Dairying. Text books: Wing's "Milk and Its Produc- 
tion," Russell's "Dairy Bacteriology." 

Junior Year, Third Term; 3 theoretical and 4 practical pe- 
riods per week. 

V. Stock Judging. Special attention is paid to the judging 
of groups of animals, similar to county and state fair work. 

Senior Year, First Term ; 2 double periods per week. 

VI. Herdbook. The herdbooks of the breeds of live stock 
are studied with a view of becoming acquainted with the pedigrees 
of the leading families of live stock, and the methods of recording 
the same. 

18 



Senior Year, First Term; 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week. 

VII. Animal Nutrition. The course embraces the purpose 
of nutrition; the process of digestion and the theory and practical 
economy of rations for growth, fattening, milk or maintenance. 
Students should have completed courses in Agricultural Chemistry 
and Comparative Anatomy. 

Senior Year, Second and Third Terms ; 4 practical periods per 
week. 

VIII. Thesis and Research Work, Upon lines and sub- 
jects to be arranged with the Department. 

Senior Year, Second and Third Terms; 4 theoretical and 4 

practical periods per week. 

GEOLOGY. 

I. Attention is given chiefly to physical geology. The latter 
half of the second term is devoted to the geology of Maryland, es- 
pecially as affecting the character of the soils, mineral wealth and 
other economic conditions of the State. Instruction is given by 
means of text book work, lectures and field excursions. 

Shaler's "First Book in Geology" is used as a text book. The 
reports of the Maryland Geological Survey are used for reference. 

Freshman Year, First Term; 4 periods per week; Second 
Term ; five periods per week. 



DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE. 

W. N. HUTT^ PROFESSOR. 
C. A. REED, ASSISTANT. 
P. M. NOVIK, lecturer. 

The Horticultural Department offers a four-year course in 
practical horticulture, designed to train young men in the principles 
and practice of fruit and truck growing. In this work the orchard. 
nursery and vineyard of the Experiment Station are fully utilized, 

19 



being of special value on account of the number of varieties repre- 
sented. The work in floriculture is supplemented by trips to the 
establishments of successful greenhouse men in Baltimore, Wash- 
ington, and vicinity. Similar trips to supplement the work on land- 
scape gardening and truck growing are made from time to time. 

Additional facilities and equipment are added annually to make 
the instruction and practice in horticulture thoroughly practical, 
efficient and up-to-date. 

I. Principles of Plant Culture. A discussion of elemen- 
tary horticulture; the plant, its germination and growth; the tree, 
from root to fruit; the underlying principles of plant culture. In- 
struction and practice are given in the propagation of plants by 
budding, grafting, layering, and by cuttings. 

Text book: "Principles of Plant Culture," Goff. 
Sophomore Year, First Term; 6 periods per week. 

II. Pomology (Fruit Growing). Text books and lectures. 
A discussion of the principles underlying the growing of orchard 
fruits. The work begins with the origin of our cultivated fruits 
and the practical methods of propagating them. Next follows the 
study of locations for orchards and the planting of trees. General 
care and practice are given in the proper pruning of all classes of 
fruits. In the College nursery, the students will propagate all 
classes of nursery stock. The trees propagated become the prop- 
erty of the students. 

Text book: "The Principles of Fruit Growing," Bailey. Ref- 
erence: "American Fruit Culturist," Thomas. 

Junior Year, First and Second Terms; 4 periods per week. 

III. Floriculture, Lectures and practical work. The con- 
struction and management of greenhouse structures. Instruction is 
given in the making of soils and in the propagation of foliage and 
flowering plants. Students are given practice in the various opera- 
tions of commercial floriculture. They are required to name and 
propagate all varieties of plants in the College conservatories, the 
plants so produced becoming the property of the students. 

Text book: "Practical Floriculture," Henderson. Reference: 
"The Nursery Book," Bailey; "Greenhouse Management," Taft; 
"Greenhouse Construction," Taft. 

20 



Junior Year, Second Term ; 6 periods per week. 

IV. Olericulture (Vegetable Gardening). The origin, 
history and botanical relations of garden vegetables. From econo- 
mic points of view, a careful study is made of the location of gar- 
dens and truck farms, the requisites of soil, fertilizers and general 
cultivation. Study will be made of special truck crops for market 
and canning purposes. Instruction will be given in the forcing of 
early and tender vegetables and in the making and management of 
hotbeds and cold-frames. 

Text book: "Vegetable Gardening," Green. Reference: 
"Truck Farming in the South," Oemler; "Vegetable Gardening in 
the South," Rolfs. 

Junior Year, Third Term ; 5 periods per week. 

V. Fruit Harvesting^ Storing and Marketing. A discus- 
sion of the profitable marketing of fruit products. How to pick, 
pack and grade fruit for domestic and foreign markets. A dis- 
cussion of market methods, the middle man, pools and shipping as- 
sociations, refrigerator cars and cold storage of fruit, the utili- 
zation of waste and by-products. 

Text book: "Fruit Harvesting, Storing and Marketing," 
Waugh. 

Senior Year, First Term; 3 periods per week. 

VI. Systematic Pomology. An advanced study of pomology, 
including classes, varieties and types of economic fruits. Work is 
given in comparing, noting, and identifying varieties in all classes 
of fruits. This course is designed to take up the scientific rather 
than the practical side of fruit growing and to train students for 
the work of identifying and judging fruit and to fit them, for taxo- 
nomic work in pomology in Colleges, Experiment Stations or in 
the United States Department of Agriculture. 

Text book: "American Fruit Cttlturist," Thomas. 
Senior Year, First Term; 5 periods per week. 

VII. Plant Breeding. The underlying principles of plant 
improvement by breeding. The effect of favorable culture and en- 
vironment in producing beneficial variations. The fixing of char- 
acteristics by selection, crossing and hybridization. Students will 

21 



be given practice in the greenhouses and College orchards in the 
production of new and useful varieties. 

Text book: "Plant Breeding," Bailey. 

Senior Year, Second Term ; 3 periods per week. 

VIII. Small Fruit Culture. Lectures and practice in the 
propagation, planting, care and working of small fruits. 

Text book: "Bush Fruits," Card. 

Senior Year, Third Term; 4 periods per week. 

IX. Landscape Gardening. The study of the principles of 
ornamental gardening, planning of lawns and grounds, making of 
lawns, laying out of walks and drives, use of ornamental trees and 
flowering shrubs, the designing of beds and borders, grouping of 
shrubbery, use of bulbous plants and hardy herbaceous perennials, 
beautifying of home grounds. Students on the completion of this 
course, must be familiar with all the trees, shrubs and plants used 
on the College lawns and campus. 

Text book : ."Principles of Landscape Gardening," Waugh. 

Senior Year, Third Term; 2 periods per week. 

X. Special Research Work. Time, subject and work to be 
arranged with each student individually. This work is given to the 
student to test his power of thought and initiative along the line of 
horticultural work. 

Senior Year, Three Terms. 

FORESTRY. 

I. The study of trees under forest conditions. Methods of 
propagation and management. Wind breaks, shelter belts and for- 
estry plantations. Trees in relation to water supply. Practical farm 
forestry. The government forestry policy in relation to irrigation, 
ranges, mines and timber supplies. 

Text books: "First Book of Forestry," Roth; "Primer of For- 
estry," Pinchot. 

Senior Year, Second Term ; 3 periods per week. 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND VEGETABLE 

PATHOLOGY. 

J. B. S. NORTON, PROFESSOR. 
FREDERICK H. BLODGETT, ASSISTANT. 

The courses in Botany are intended to give such knowledge of 
the vegetable kingdom as is a proper element in general culture ; to 
train the student mind in observation, comparison, generalization 
and other mental processes essential to true scientific methods in any 
work, and to furnish a basis for practical studies directly connected 
v/ith agriculture; for since plants are the subjects dealt with in the 
field and garden, the study of plant life must be one of the funda- 
mental sciences upon which such work is based. In addition to the 
courses in pure botany, others of special economic trend are given 
especially for students in the agricultural and horticultural courses, 
taking up such botanical studies of cultivated plants, plant diseases, 
etc., as may be useful in practical life to the professional farmer or 
gardener. 

The equipment and means for illustration and demonstration, 
consist of a reference library containing the principal botanical 
works needed by students, charts and maps, compound and dissect- 
ing microscopes, preserved specimens for illustration, a representa- 
tive collection of Maryland plants; microtome and other instru- 
ments, reagents and apparatus for histological work and physiolo- 
gical experiments; a culture room, sterilizers, incubators and other 
facilities for the study of plant diseases. 

Advanced students have opportunity to observe the work being 
done in the laboratory of Vegetable Pathology and greenhouse of 
the State Horticultural Department and, if competent, to assist in 
the same. Special attention is given to students who wish practice 
in the treatment of plant diseases, as it is the desire of the Depart- 
ment to encourage young men to engage in this work as a business. 

I. General Principles. An elementary course in the general 
principles of anatomy, morphology and physiology of the higher 
plants. The structure and types of seed, root, stem, leaves, 
flower and fruit are studied in the laboratory, with a brief consid- 
eration of the functions of the different plant organs, a more com- 

23 



plete course in plant physiology (III) being given later. This 
course is a necessary preparation for course 11. 

Leavitt's "Outlines of Botany" is the principle text book used. 

Freshman Year, Second Term; 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

II. Systematic Botany and Ecology. Principally field 
work with the manual on the native flora, and designed to give a 
knowledge of the names of the common Maryland plants and their 
position in the classification of the vegetable kingdom. The ecolo- 
gy of the plants examined in the field is also taken up, considering 
their relation to soils, water supply, light and other factors in their 
environment, cross pollination, dissemination of seeds, plant so- 
cieties, etc. Each student makes a collection of at least fifty plants 
from some part of the State. 

Reference books used: Britton's "Manual," Gray's "Manual" 
Britton & Brown's "Illustrated Flora." 

Freshman Year, Third Term; 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

III. Plant Physiology. Lectures and experiments on the 
life processes of plants; absorption and transfer of water and food 
materials, photosynthesis, respiration, growth, mxOvement, repro- 
duction, etc. 

Sophomore Year, Second Term; 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

IV. Plant Histology. Laboratory work with the compound 
microscope, studying the minute structure of the tissues and or- 
gans of the various types of plants. Each student prepares a series 
of sections for study with the microscope from which he makes a 
set of outline drawings. 

Junior Year, Second Term; 8 practical periods per week. 

V. Comparative Morphology and Classification. A com- 
parative study of the structure and life history of the principal 
types of plants from the lowest to the highest. The exercises con- 
sist principally of lectures and microscopic studies in the laboratory. 
The outline of classification of Engler's Syllabus is followed in 
general. 

24 



Junior Year, Third Term ; 2 theoretical and 6 practical periods 
per week. 

VI. Economic Plants. Lectures on the names, classification, 
nativity and uses of the useful and detrimental plants of the world 
with field and laboratory studies of the common cultivated plants 
with a view of enabling the student of horticulture or agriculture to 
know the scientific names and relationship of the plants with which 
he comes in contact in his chosen work. 

Reference works: Bailey's Gray's "Field, Forest and Garden 
Botany," Bailey's "Encyclopedia of Horticulture," etc. 

Junior year. Third Term; 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

VII. Mycology. Lectures and laboratory work upon the com- 
mon forms of fungi, with special reference enabling the student 
to recognize those causing plant diseases, and preparatory to VIII. 

Text book: Underwood's "Molds, Mildews and Mushrooms." 
Senior Year, First Term ; 2 theoretical and 2 practical periods 
per week- 

VIII. Vegetable Pathology. The causes, symptoms and 
means of control of plant diseases are studied by means of lectures, 
microscopic work in the laboratory and experiments in infection 
and treatment in field and greenhouse. 

In addition to the lectures numerous reference books are used. 
Senior Year, Second Term ; 2 theoretical and 4 practical pe- 
riods per week. 

IX. Research. Students electing Botany as a major in the 
Senior year devote one term to a completion of an original study of 
some botanical subject upon which they prepare their graduation 
thesis. 

Senior Year, Third Term ; not less than the equivalent of 10 
theoretical periods per week. 

X. Elective courses for students of the General Science 
Course or for post-graduate students are offered in Methods in 
Plant Pathology, Botanical Microchemistry, Histology of Trees, 
Taxonomy or advanced work in any of the under-graduate courses 
before mentioned. 

25 



General Science students in Botany pursue their elective courses 
in the first and second terms of the senior year for not less than 
the equivalent of lo theoretical periods per week and those pursuing 
Entomology as a major devote the equivalent of 3 theoretical pe- 
riods per week throughout the year to Botany. 

DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY AND ZOOLOGY. 

T. B. SYMONSj PROFESSOR. 
A. B. GAHAN, ASSISTANT. 

Instruction is given in this Department with a view of giving 
the student first, a general knowledge of invertebrate and verte- 
brate zoology, which is necessary as a foundation science for an 
agricultural education. Second, to fit the student in elementary 
and advanced entomology, both economic and systematic in order 
that he may pursue this specialty after graduation. A course in 
economic entomology is given to provide those students who are 
specializing in any of the allied agricultural sciences with that in- 
formation which is necessary to their ideal development. 

Students wishing to take advanced work in invertebrate zoolo- 
gy here are advised to select some subject in entomology. As the 
State and Experiment Station entomological work is conducted 
through this department there are special advantages for students 
in applied entomology. 

The department library contains the majority of the principal 
entomological publications which is a great help in advanced 
work. The laboratory is supplied with a large collection of insects 
for the use of students, and is fairly well equipped with microscopes 
and other apparatus necessary for practical work in entomology. 

The Insectary of the State Horticultural Department and the 
Maryland Experiment Station which is joined to the laboratory, 
affords facilities to a limited number of advanced students for spec- 
ial investigation. 

I. Entomology. Lectures, laboratory and field work. This 
course is designed as an introduction to all the other work in the 
department. The lectures treat of the zoological position of in- 
sects, the characteristics of the orders, sub-orders and the more im- 

26 



portant families^ the habits and life histories of insects with 
special reference to those species that are of economic im- 
portance. The laboratory and field work include the study of 
the more general features of insect anatomy, the determination of 
some common species and the collection and preservation of insects. 
Sophomore Year, Third Term; 2 theoretical and 4 practical 
periods per week. 

II. Zoology. Both invertebrate and vertebrate zoology are 
discussed in this course. For the time allowed, a very thorough study 
is made of the classification, anatomy, physiology, characteristics 
and habits of animals from the lowest to the highest forms. A rep- 
resentative of each of the larger groups is dissected in the labora- 
tory. This course is designed to give the student a general knowl- 
edge of zoology. 

Junior Year, First and Second Terms; 3 theoretical and 6 
practical periods per week. 

III. Systematic Entomology. Open to students who have 
taken course I or equivalent. A thorough study of the struct- 
ure, habits, life histories, and classification of insects. Intended for 
students wishing to make entomology a specialty. 

Junior Year, First and Third Terms ; 2 theoretical and 4 prac- 
tical periods per week. 

IV. Economic Entomology. Lectures on applied entomolo- 
g}^ Discussion of the more important insect pests and the meth- 
ods of combating them. 

Junior Year, Third Term ; 2 theoretical and 4 practical periods 
per week. 

V. Advanced Entomology. Open only to students who have 
completed II, III or equivalents. Morphology, and ecology of in- 
sects. Special and research work will depend upon the ability and 
special object of the student. This course is given for those who 
wish to pursue entomology as a profession. Students making bot- 
any their major subject will be required to take the equivalent of 3 
theoretical periods per week in entomology. 

Senior Year; 10 periods per week. 



27 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY SCIENCE. 

DR. SAMUEL S. BUCKLEY, PROFESSOR. 

I. Microscopy. For students in Agricultural and General Sci- 
ence courses. Laboratory exercises in the use and care of the mi- 
croscope. Methods of examination of fresh and permanent pre- 
parations. 

Sophomore Year, Second Term,; 4 periods per week. 

II. Histology. For students in the agricultural and general 
science courses. The study of cells, and tissues and organs of the 
animal body. This course is preparatory to course III given in the 
Junior year. 

Sophomore Year, Second Term; 8 periods per week. 

III. Comparative Anatomy and Physiology. For students 
in the agricultural and general science courses. The elements of 
physiology with special reference to nutrition. Particular attention 
is given to the study of classes of animal foods and their digestion. 

Junior Year, Second Term ; 10 periods per week. 

IV. Veterinary Elements. For students of the agricultural 
course, this is a required study. 

Senior Year, Second Term; 12 periods per week. 

Note A. Students of the first year in the Two Year Agricul- 
tural Course will receive instruction under III with the Junior Class, 
and those of the second year in this course will receive IV with the 
Senior Class. 

Note B. Students of the Short Winter Course in Agriculture 
will receive instruction in practical veterinary matters and attend 
lectures upon diseases of animals, 2 periods per week. 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY. 

DR. H. B, MCDONNELL, PROFESSOR AND STATE CHEMIST. 

ASSISTANT IN COLLEGE WORK, 
J. J. MORGAN. 

ASSISTANTS IN STATE WORK. 
WM. R. WHARTON, R. C. WILEY, J. W. PALMORE. 

This department is charged with two distinct classes of work: 
(i) the State fertilizer and food inspection, and, (2) the instruction 
of students. The State work necessitates the publication of the 
"Quarterly" bulletin, which is usually made up of the results of 
the analyses of fertilizers or feeding stuffs, and is sent free of charge 
to all Maryland farmers who appl3^ Students do no part of the 
State work, the assistants being invariabh^ college graduates. How- 
ever, this work serves as a valuable object lesson to the advanced 
students. 

The Chemical Laboratory Building is devoted entirely to chem- 
istry. It is new and, not including basement, is two stories high. 
On the first floor are the laboratories for the State fertilizer and 
food control work, office, lecture room and balance room. On the 
second floor are three laboratories for the use of students — one for 
each class — a students' balance room with first class chemical and 
assay balances and a supply room. The assay furnaces are in the 
basement. Each student is provided with a working desk, lockers, 
reagents and apparatus. Additional apparatus and materials are 
provided from the supply room, as needed. 

The department is provided with a small but well selected li- 
brary of standard reference books on chemistry to which additions 
are made from time to time. 

Instruction in chemistry is begun with the Sophomore year, 
four hours per week being devoted to lectures and recitations, and 
three to four hours to practical work in the laboratory by the stu- 
dent, under the supervison of the instructor. In this way he comes 
in direct contact with the substances studied, having at hand ample 
facilities for learning their properties. Special attention is given to 

29 



the elements and compounds of practical and economic importance, 
such as the air, water and soil, the elements entering into the com- 
position of plants and animals, the useful metals, etc. The course 
in the Sophomore year is intended to give the student that practi- 
cal and theoretical knowledge of elementary chemistry which is 
essential in the education of every man, no difference what his vo- 
cation. It also serves as a foundation for advanced work in chem- 
istry, if such a course is chosen. 

Advanced work in chemistry begins with the Junior year, if 
the course in chemistry is selected, and the larger part of the stu- 
dent's time is devoted to some branch of theoretical or practical 
chemistry during the rest of his course, as outlined elsewhere. 

The object of the full course in chemistry is to prepare the 
graduate for positions in agricultural colleges, experiment stations, 
the United States Department of Agriculture or in various indus- 
tries that require the services of trained chemists. The demand for 
our graduates for such positions is far in excess of the supply. 

I. General Chemistry. Recitations and practical work in 
the laboratory where the student performs the experiments under 
the direction of the instructors. Qualitative analysis is started in 
this course. 

The text book is Remsen's "Introduction to the Study of 
Giemistry." 

Sophomore Year, Three Terms; 4 recitations, and 3 to 4 
practical periods per week. 

II. Agricultural Chemistry. Text book: Snyder's "Chem- 
istry of Plant and Animal Life." 

Juniofi Year, First Term ; 4 periods per week. 

III. Qualitative Analysis. Text book: Seller's "Qualita- 
tative Analysis." 

Junior Year, First Term ; 2 periods, lectures and recitation and 
12 periods practical work per week. 

IV. Inorganic Preparations. The preparation and purifica- 
tion of inorganic compounds, fractional crystallization, etc. 

Junior Year, First Term; 4 practical periods per week. 

30 



V. Quantitative Analysis. Easy analysis, such as the de- 
termination of water in gypsum, iron in wire, iron oxide from heat- 
ing reduced iron, analysis of marble, etc. The work is selected to 
illustrate general principles. 

Reference book: Fresenius' "Quantitative Analysis." 
Junior year, Second Term; i lecture and 12 periods practical 
work per week. 

VI. Mineralogy. This is a course in determinative miner- 
alogy. The most important minerals are identified by their most 
characteristic physical and chemical properties, the blowpipe being 
an important aid. 

Text book: Brush's "Determinative Mineralogy and Blow- 
pipe. 

Junior Year, Second Term; i lecture and 4 periods practical 
work. 

VII. Organic Chemistry. Text book: Remsen's "Organic 
Chemistry." 

Junior Year, Second and Third Terms; Senior Year, First 
Term. The first two terms will be mostly recitations and lectures 
while the last term will be mostly practical work in the laboratory. 

VIII. Volumetric Analysis and Assaying. This course will 
be mostly Acidimetry and Alkalimetry, the determination of iron, 
chlorine, silver, etc., by volumetric methods; and the fire assay of 
gold, silver and lead ores. 

Reference books: Sutton's "Volumetric Analysis" and Brown's 
"Assaying." 

Junior Year, Third Term; 2 lectures and 16 periods practical 
work per week. 

IX. Theoretical Chemistry. This course will cover the 
most important elements of this branch of the science, such as 
atomic and molecular weights, valence, solutions, etc. 

Text book: Remsen's "Theoretical Chemistry." 
Senior Year, First Term; 2 periods per week. 

X. Agricultural Chemical Analysis. This is a thorough 
course in the analysis of fertilizers and fertilizing materials, feeding 
stuffs, butter, milk, sugar, starch, etc. 

31 



Text book: "Methods of Analysis of the Association of Offi- 
cial Agricultural Chemists." 

Senior Year, First and Second Terms; 8 periods per week 
first term and i6 periods the second term. 

XI. Industrial Physical and Electrolytic Chemistry. 
This course is intended to broaden the foundation of the student in 
chemistry and the parts of the subjects covered will be selected 
with special reference to the bearing on agricultural chemistry. 

Reference books: Thorp's "Industrial Chemistry," Jones' 
"Physical Chemistry" and Smith's "Electrolytic Chemistry." 

Senior Year, Second and Third Terms ; 6 periods, lectures and 
recitations and 4 periods of laboratory work per week the second 
term, and 5 periods lectures and recitations during the third term. 

XII. Research. This will occupy nearly all of the student's 
time in the laboratory. The results will be embodied in the gradu- 
ating thesis. 

Senior Year, Third Term; 20 periods per week. 

The hours mentioned for practical work in the laboratory are 
intended to be the minimum. The best students put in considerably 
more time than this, the laboratories being open to advanced stu- 
dents till five o'clock in the evenings and on Saturdays till 12 o'clock. 
Energetic students are glad to avail themselves of these op- 
portunities. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS. 

henry lanahan, professor. 

The physical lecture room and laboratory are located in Morrill 
Hall, in rooms excellently adapted to the purpose. The department 
is well supplied with apparatus for lecture room demonstrations and 
for students' individual laboratory work, and new pieces of appara- 
tus are added to the equipment each year. 

I. Elementary Physics. The course consists of lectures, 
recitations and experimental demonstrations by the instructor on 
the mechanics of solids, liquids and gases. The student is required 

32 



to work a number of problems, and his attention is directed to the 

practical applications of the principles studied. 

Text : Carhart & Chute's "High School Physics." 

Sophomore Year, First and Second Terms ; 2 periods per week. 

II. Physics. The course begins with a review of mechanics, 
after which heat, sound, electricity and magnetism, and light are 
taken up successively by lectures, recitations, problems and demon- 
strations. A knowledge of the elements of plane trigonometry is 
required for entrance. The laboratory work consists of a series of 
experiments, mainly quantitative, designed to illustrate and verify 
the laws and principles considered in the class-room, and to develop 
in the student skill in manipulation, and accuracy in making precise 
measurements. Written reports of the work done in the laboratory 
are required weekly. 

Text books used: Ames' "Theory of Physics," and Ames and 
Bliss' "Manual Experiments in Physics." 

Junior Year, Three Term.s ; 4 periods class-room work, and 4 
periods laboratory work per week. 

More advanced work will be provided for students who have 
completed the preceding courses, and who wish to continue the 
study of physics. 



DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

HENRY LANAHAN, PROFESSOR. 

The scope of the work of this department is indicated by the 
courses outlined below, which include theoretical and practical sur- 
veying, certain branches of applied mathematics, drawing, de- 
signing of structures, and engineering construction. Fundamental 
principles are emphasized, and an effort is made to develop in the 
student a habit of self reliance in the application of these princi- 
ples. Opportunity is given for considerable practice in the use of 
surveying instruments and in drafting. At present the instruc- 
tion in drawing, graphic statics and structural designing is given by 
the Mechanical Engineering Department. The subjects named be- 

33 



low form a part of the required work in the course in Civil Engineer- 
ing and the complete curriculum of the course is to be found in the 
Outline, page 6i of this catalogue. 

I. Surveying. The course includes the use and adjustment of 
engineering instruments; the methods of land surveying; the plot- 
ting and computing of areas; dividing of land; the theorjy of 
the stadia; true meridian lines; leveling; topographical surveying; 
railroad curves and cross sectioning. The department is equipped 
with two surveyor's compasses, a Gurley transit with solar attach- 
ment, and a 20 inch Gurley level. 

Texts : Raymond's "Plane Surveying," and Pence & Ketchum's 
"Field Manual." 

Junior Year, Three Terms; 2 periods per week class-room 
work, three periods per week field practice. 

II. Topographical Drawing. Practice in free-hand lettering, 
maps, profiles, topography, etc. 

Junior Year, Three Terms; 6 periods per week first term; 
4 periods per week, second and third terms. 

III. Graphic Statics. Including the theory and practice of 
the graphical methods of determining stresses in frame structures, 
particularly roof trusses, and bending movements and shears in 
beams. This course is based on Hoskins' "Graphic Statics," and 
many of the problems are solved analytically as well as graphically. 

Senior Year, First Term; 4 periods per week. 

IV. Structural Designing. Including roofs and bridges. 
Text book: Thompson's "Bridge and Structural Design." 

Senior Year, Three Terms ; 6 periods per week. 

V. Strength of Materials. Treating of the elasticity and 
resistance of materials of construction and the mechanics of beams, 
columns and shafts. 

The text used is Merriman's "Mechanics of Materials." A 
knowledge of integral calculus is required for entrance to the 
course. 

Senior Year, First Term ; 4 periods per week. 



34 



VI. Hydraulics. Text book: Merriman's "Hydraulics." 
Senior Year, Second and Third Term ; 2 periods per week. 

VII. Railway Engineering. Preliminary and location sur- 
veys, cross sectioning, calculation of quantities, etc. 

Text book : Searles' "Field Engineering." 

Senior Year, First Term; 2 periods per week class-room work, 
8 periods per week field work. 

VIII. Highway Engineering. Location, construction and 
maintenance of roads. 

Texts: Spalding's "Roads and Pavements" and the reports of 
the Highway Division of Maryland Geological Survey. 
Senior Year, Third Term ; 3 periods per week. 

IX. Practical Problems in Surveying and Engineering. 
In i904-'o6 the work was as follows : Location of a spur track from 
the B. & O. R. R. to the College; design of a drainage system for 
agricultural purposes for a portion of the College farm ; location of 
a true meridian line by several methods ; location of electric railway 
to College ; plan for athletic field. 



DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 

J. HANSON MITCHELL, PROFESSOR.* 

harry GWINNER, acting PROFESSOR. 

E. F. GARNER, ASSISTANT. 

This department offers a course to those who desire to prepare 
themselves to design and construct machinery or superintend en- 
gineering establishments. With this end in view an education is 
offered based on theoretical mechanics, drawing, mathematics, phy- 
sics and modem languages, together with a practical training in the 
uses of tools and machineny. The allied subjects of the course 
taught outside of the department and the hours alloted to each will 
be found in the outline on page 59. 

The course leads to the degree of B. S. in Mechanical En- 

*0n leave of absence. 

35 



gineering upon the satisfactory completion of the work of the four 
years as outHned. 

Equipment. The Mechanical Engineering Laboratories con- 
sist of a two story brick building, 45 by 60 feet, containing the 
wood-working and machine shops, drafting room and two lecture 
rooms; a one story brick building, in which is the forge shop and 
foundry, and an annex, 25 feet by 50 feet, containing the boilers, 
which furnish steam for power, heat and experimental purposes, and 
the electric lighting equipment. 

The wood-working shop contains accommodations for students 
in bench work and wood turning. The power machinery in this 
shop is a band and circular saw, five 12-inch turning lathes, and a 
grindstone. 

In the forge shops are sixteen power forges, one hand forge, a 
pressure fan and exhauster for keeping the shop free of smoke. 
There is a full assortment of smiths' tools for each forge. 

The foundry is equipped with a Whiting cupola, which melts 
1,200 pounds of iron per hour; a brass furnace, one Mellett core 
oven, and with the necessary flasks and tools. ' 

The machine shop equipment consists of one lo-inch Reed 
speed lathe, one 20-inch Field engine-lathe, with compound rest, 
one 12-inch Reed combined foot and power lathe, two 14-inch Reed 
engine-lathes, one 24-inch Gray planer, one 16-inch Smith and Mills 
shaper, one 24-inch Snyder drill press, one No. 4 Diamond emery 
tool grinder, and an assortment of vises, taps, dies, pipe-tools and 
measuring instruments. 

An 8- by 12-inch engine drives the machinery of the wood- 
working and machine shops. It was presented to the College by the 
City of Baltimore, and secured through the efforts of Rear Admiral 
John D. Ford, of the United States Navy. A lo-horse-power Fair- 
banks gasoline engine drives the blowers in the foundry and forge 
shops. 

The drafting room is well equipped for practical work, having 
suitable benches, lockers and blue-print facilities. 

I. Mechanical Drawing. Practice in plain lettering, use of 
instruments, projections and simple working drawings, the plates 
upon completion being enclosed in covers properly titled by the 
students. 

36 



Text-book: Rouillion's "Mechanical Drawing." 
Freshman Year, Three Terms; 6 periods per week. 

la. Freehand Drawing. Straight and curved Hnes, letter- 
ing, leaves, plants and ornaments. 

Freshman Year, Third Term; 6 periods per week. 

II. Technical Instruction. Explanation of the reading of 
mechanical drawings; the proper cutting angles, care and adjust- 
ment of carpenter tools; relative strength of wood joints; wood, 
its shrinking and warping, and how to correct and prevent. Drill 
in problems in Arithmetic, Algebra and Drawing by notes and 
lectures. 

Text book: Goss' "Bench Work in Wood." 

Freshman Year, First Term; 5 periods per week. 

III. Wood Work. Use and care of carpenter tools, exercises 
in sawing, mortising, tenoning, laying out work from drawings, 
wood turning and pattern making. 

Freshman Year, Three Terms; 6 periods per week. 

IV. Mechanical Drawing. Free hand sketching of details 
of machinery and drawing to scale from these sketches. Tracing 
and blue printing, and representation of flat and round surfaces by 
ink shading. 

Text book: Rouillion's "Mechanical Drawing." 

Sophomore Year, Three Terms; 6 periods per week first term, 
4 the second and 5 the third. 

V. Elementary Applied Mechanics. Transmission of 
power by belts and pulleys ; the results of forces acting upon bodies, 
bolts, nuts and screws, inclined plane, laws of friction, strength of 
shafting, and bending movements of beams. 

Jamieson's "Applied Mechanics" is the text used. 

VI. Blacksmithing and Foundry Work. The elementary 
operations of drawing out, upsetting, bending and welding of iron 
and making and tempering of steel tools, moulding and casting in 
iron, and the management of the cupola. 

37 



Sophomore Year, Second and Third Terms; 3 periods per 
week. 

VII. Descriptive Geometry. Its relation to mechanical draw- 
ing and the solution of problems relating to magnitudes in space 
bearing directly upon those principally used by the mechanical en- 
gineer. 

. Text book: Fauce's "Descriptive Geometry." 

Sophomore Year, Second and Third Terms; 3 periods per 
week, second term, 2 the third. 

VIII. Elementary Machine Design. The designing of 
bolts, screws and nuts. Calculations and drawings of a simple type 
of steam engine. Notes and lectures. 

Junior Year, Three Terms; 6 periods pen week. 

IX. Machine Work. Elementary principles of vise and ma- 
chine work, which include turning, planing, drilling, screw cutting 
and filing. This is preceded by study of the different machines used 
in the machine shops. 

Junior Year, Three Terms; 6 periods per week. 

X. Steam Engines and Boilers. The principles of steam and 
the steam engine, the slide valve and valve diagrams, the indicator 
and its diagram; steam boilers, the various types and their advan- 
tages, including the methods of construction. 

Text used is Jamieson's "Steam and Steam Engines." 

Junior Year, First Term; 4 periods per week. 

XI. Power Plants. Lectures on the location, construction, 
equipment and engineering of power plants. 

Text book: Hutton's "Mechanical Engineering of Power 
Plants." 

Senior Year, Second Term; 2 periods per week. 

XII. Machine Design. The calculation and design of pipes, 
belt and tooth gearing, beams and cranes. 

Text book : Low & Bevis' "Machine Drawing and Design." 
Senior Year, Three Terms; 4 periods per week the first term, 
6 the second, and 4 the third. 

38 



XIII. Machine Shop Work. Advanced machine work; the 
laying out, assembling and construction of some piece of machinery 
such as an engine-lathe or dynamo. 

Senior Year, Three Terms; 8 periods per week the first term, 
10 the second, and lo the third, 

XIV. Testing. A course in experimental engineering; oil 
testing, determining the coefficient of friction, the calibration of the 
planimeter and steam guages, slide valve setting and indicator prac- 
tice, the slide rule, and determining the amount of moisture in steam. 
The members of the class go to Baltimore or Washington for the 
purpose of inspecting well-known manufacturing plants. 

Senior Year, Third Term; 6 periods per week. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS. 

R. W. SILVESTER, PROFESSOR. 
HENRY T. HARRISON, ASSISTANT. 

Mathematics is the basis upon which scientific information 
rests. A knowledge of the study is necessary, as much from the 
utilitarian point of view as from the mental training its acquisition 
gives. Its importance as a factor in our College course takes its rise 
from the former consideration. All instruction in this work is with 
a view to the equipping of students for the more practical work soon 
to follow. 

The class work in Mathematics in the several courses consists 
of arithmetic, bookkeeping, algebra, geometry (plane and solid), 
trigonometry (plane and spherical), descriptive geometry, in its ap- 
plication to mechanical drawing, analytical geometry, differential 
and integral calculus, in their application to mechanics, engineering, 
physics and surveying. 

• In the applied mathematics, bookkeeping is taught every stu- 
dent. No matter what vocation a man intends to follow, a knowl- 
edge of buisness forms and methods of systematic accounts is a re- 
quisite to success. To be able to use an ordinary compass or transit, 

39 



for the purpose of laying out, dividing and calculating the area of 
land, or of running outlines and leveling for the purpose of drain- 
age, is a necessary accomplishment for every intelligent farmer. 

I. Elementary Mathematics. General Review. 
Freshman Year, First Term; 3 periods per week. 

II. Algebra. Text book: Wentworth's "College Algebra." 
Freshman Year, Three Terms; 5 periods per week. 

III. Plane Geometry. Text book: Wentworth's "Plane 
Geometry." 

Freshman Year, Third Term, Sophomore Year, First Term; 5 
periods per week. 

IV. Solid Geometry. Text book: Wentworth's "Solid 
Geometry." 

Sophomore Year, Second Term ; 5 periods per week. 

V. Trigonometry. Text book: Wentworth's "Plane Trigo- 
nometry." 

Sophomore Year, Third Term ; 5 periods per week. 

VI. Analytical Geometry. Text book: Wentworth's "An- 
alytics." 

Junior Year, First Term; 5 periods per week. 

VII. Differential Calculus. Text book: Osborne's. 
Junior Year, Second Term ; 5 periods per week. 

VIII. Integral Calculus. Text book: Osborne's. 
Junior Year, Third Term; 5 periods per week. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH AND CIVICS. 

F. B. BOMBERGERj professor. 
CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, ASSISTANT. 

This department, as its name implies, covers the work of two 
distinct courses of instruction. It seeks to prepare the student by 
systematic training in the history, structure and use of the English 

40 



language, for the highest development of his mental powers and for 
the complex duties and relations of life ; and, further, to fit him for 
the active and intelligent exercise of his rights and duties as a man 
and citizen. 

The course in English, of necessity, lies at the base of all other 
courses of instruction. Clear and comprehensive knowledge of his 
mother tongue is absolutely necessary to the student in pursuing 
any line of college work. Nor is this all, for aside from the prac- 
tical value of the English instruction as an aid to other branches of 
study, and as a preparation for business and profession, it is to his 
training in this department, in connection with his study of history 
and the classics and modern languages, that the student must look 
for the acquiring of that general culture that has always been the 
distinguishing mark of the liberally educated man. The English 
work, which is common to all courses, consists of the study of the 
structure of the English language, literature, English and American, 
theoretical and practical rhetoric, logic, psychology, critical reading 
and analysis, and constant exercise in expression, composition and 
theme writing. 

The course in civics is especially designed to prepare young 
men for the active duties of citizenship. The first year is devoted to 
the study of general history, followed by the principles of civil gov- 
ernment, constitutional history, political economy, with special ref- 
erence to current social and industrial problems, and, finally, lec- 
tures on the elements of business law. 

ENGLISH COURSES. 

I. Language and composition. English language, review of 
grammar, practical exercise in analysis, synthesis and etymology, 
composition and letter writing. Work in composition consists of the 
preparation of twelve themes upon assigned topics. 

Texts used: Lockwood's "Lessons in English," Buehler's "Ex- 
ercises in English" and Swinton's " Word Analysis." 
Freshman Year, Three Terms ; 5 periods per week. 

II. American Literature. A study of the most important 
writers with a view to giving the student an exact knowledge of 
their works. 



41 



Text used: Watkin's "American Literature." 
Freshman Year, Third Term ; 3 periods per week. 

III. Rhetoric and Composition. Principles and practice of 
rhetoric and composition. Work in rhetoric consists of a study 
of the principles of diction, the sentence, the paragraph, the dis- 
course, forms of prose, and the nature, form and structure of poetry. 

Work in composition consists of twelve themes, illustrating 
special processes. 

Text used: Lockwood's and Emerson's "Composition and 
Rhetoric." 

Sophomore Year, First and Second Terms ; 4 periods per week. 

IV. English Literature. Study of the history and chief 
writers of English literature. 

Text used: Stopford's Brooke's "English Literature." 
Sophomore Year, Third Term; 3 periods per week. 

V. Composition. Practice in English Composition. Special 
lectures. Work in composition consists of twelve themes discuss- 
ing English classics studied in class, or subjects involved in the 
study of civics. Special attention is paid to the oration and short 
story during the third term. 

Junior Year, Third Term ; i period per week. 

VI. English Literature. Text books: Pancoast's "Eng- 
lish Literature," Halleck's "English," and Taine's "English Lit- 
erature. 

Junior Year, First Term ; 5 periods per week. 

VII. American Literature. Text book, lecture and com- 
position. 

Text used: Pattee's "American Literature." 
Senior Year, Second Term ; 5 periods per week. 

VIII. Logic. Principles and practice of logic. 
Text used: Jevon's Hill's "Logic." 

Junior Year, Third Term ; 5 periods per week. 

IX. English Classics. Critical study of English classics, 
following the outline for college entrance requirements in English. 

Senior Year, Three Terms ; 4 periods per week. 

42 



X. Psychology. Principles of Psychology. Text book and 
lectures. 

Text used : Dewey's "Psychology." 

Senior Year, First Term; 4 periods per week. 

XI. Composition. Advanced work in English Composition. 
Special lectures. Eight themes illustrating special processes. 

Senior Year, Three Terms; i period per week. 

HISTORY COURSES. 

I. Ancient History. Outlines of ancient history. Text book 
and lectures. 

Text used : Myers' "Ancient History." 

Freshman Year, First and Second Terms; 4 periods per week. 

II. English History. Study of the outlines of English 
history. 

Text used: Montgomery's "English History." 
Freshman Year, Third Term; 3 periods per week. 

CIVICS COURSES. 

I. Political Science. Government; special lectures on Con- 
stitution of Maryland. 

Text books used : Wilson's "The State," and Bryce's "Ameri- 
can Commonwealth." 

Junior Year, First Term; 5 periods per week. 

II. Civics. Civil Government in the United States. 

Text books used: Fiske's "Civil Government," Hindsdale's 
"American Government," and Clark's "Outline of Civics." 

Junior Year, Second and Third Terms; 3 periods per week. 

III. Business Law. Lectures on "Business Law" as used 
in everyday life. 

Text used: Parson's "Commercial Law." 
Senior Year, First Term; 3 periods per week. 

IV. Political Economy. Principles of political economy and 
industrial development of the United States, economic science and 
current problems. 

Text used: Walker's "Political Economy." - 

Senior Year, Second and Third Terms; 4 periods per week. 

43 



DEPARTMENT OF LANGUAGES. 

THOMAS H. SPENCE^ PROFESSOR. 

The Department of Languages embraces the study of three 
branches: Latin, French and German, All students are required to 
take the courses in German; only students of the Classical Course 
are required to take Latin. Students in the General Science Course 
may elect to take Latin in the Freshman and Senior years. 

The course of study in Latin is given with two ends in view — 
first, to train the mind into accurate and close methods of 
reasoning ; second, to give the student a more thorough and compre- 
hensive knowledge of his own language than he could otherwise ac- 
quire. Especial attention is paid to Latin forms and terminations. 
The translation work of the course consists of selections from Sal- 
lust, Virgil, Cicero, Horace, Caesar, Ovid, Livy, Juvenal, Tacitus and 
Terence. 

So large a proportion of modern scientific literature is in Ger- 
man and French that a reading knowledge of these languages has 
become almost essential to the student pursuing advanced courses in 
the various spheres of scientific research. Instruction in these 
branches is given therefore, to enable the student to translate in- 
telligently the works of French and German masters in the domain 
of science, for, frequently there are no English versions of their 
works. As the student becomes more familiar with foreign scien- 
tific terms and construction, he is required to translate treatises bear- 
ing upon the special line of work, which he may be pursuing. The 
study of French (I, II) is oflered as an option in the Senior year. 

LATIN COURSES. 

I. Grammar axd Composition. For students of the Freshman 
class who elect Latin in place of History. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a familiarity with 
Latin forms and terminations, and enable him to read simple Latin 
prose. 

Text books: Gildersleeve's "New Latin Primer," Collier and 
Daniel's "First Year Latin, or Bingham's "Latin Grammar." 

Freshman Year, Three Terms. 



44 



II. Translation and Composition. Text book: Chase and 
Stuart's "Livy." Latin Prose Composition based on text read. 

Senior Year, First Term ; 6 periods per week. 

III. Translation. Lectures on Latin grammar. 
Text book : West's "Terence." 

Senior Year, Second Term; 6 periods per week. 

IV. Translation. In this course an essay on "Roman 
Morals" or some hke subject written in Latin is a part of the re- 
quired work. 

Text book : MacLeane's "Juvenal." 

Senior Year, Third Term ; 6 periods per week. 

GERMAN COURSES. 

I. Grammar and Conversation. Text book: Otis' "Elemen- 
tary German." 

Sophomore Year, Third Term; 6 periods per week. 

II. Translation. Text books selected from the following: 
Hauff's "Das Kalte Herz," Schiller's "Der Neffe als Onkel," Hil- 
lern's, "Hocher als die Kirche," Grandgent's "AH Baba and the 
Forty Thieves," Sybel's "Die Erhebung Europeas," Walther's 
"Algemeine Meereskunde," Northrup's "Geschichte der Neuen 
Welt," Brant and Day's "Scientific German," and others. 

Junior Year, Three Terms ; 3 periods per week. 

III. Translation of Scientific German. Selected readings 
from various texts and periodicals. 

Senior Year, First and Second Terms ; 4 periods per week. 

FRENCH COURSES. 

I. Grammar and Composition. Text book: Whitney's 
"French Grammar." 

Sophomore Year, First Term ; 4 periods per week. 

II. Translation. Text books: Super's "French Reader," 
Rougemont's "La France," Fenelon's Telemaque," Herdler's 
"Scientific French Reader," also French scientific periodicals. 

Sophomore Year, Second and Third Terms; 4 periods per 
week. 

45 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON^ PROFESSOR. 

The object of this department is to give a thorough training in 
pubUc speaking. The work is begun with easy lessons in Elocution, 
and this is continued until the student has acquired a mastery of 
vocal expression, and a pleasing and forcible delivery. The student 
is then required to deliver both extempore and prepared speeches, 
covering a wide range of subjects, in this way not only securing 
practice in delivery, but also developing the power of logical thought. 

I. Articulation, accent, modulation, force and elocutionary 
pause; expressive management of the body, attitude and motion. 
Selections of poetry and prose are read and declaimed by students. 

Freshman Year, First Term; i period per week. 

II. Simple lectures on orators and oratory. Methods of an- 
alysis and subjects for orations. Original orations by students, both 
extempore and prepared, on simple abstract subjects and speeches 
before the class on the less complex public questions. Subjects for 
onations requiring research in different departments of knowledge. 
Lectures on parliamentary law. 

Freshman Year, Second Term ; 2 periods per week. 

III. A review of all the work of the Freshman Year. More 
advanced selections for declamation (Shakespeare, Macaulay, Web- 
ster, etc). Lectures on ancient and modern orators, with readings 
and declamations, by students, from orations. 

Sophomore Year, First Term ; i period per week. 

IV. Extempore speeches by students on various subjects. 
Prepared original orations by students on abstract subjects. Pre- 
pared original orations by students on subjects requiring careful 
and intelligent research, including the important public issues of 
the day as Tariff, Currency, Territorial Expansion, Trades Unions, 
Trusts, Isthmian Canal, etc. Lectures on parliamentary law. 

Sophomore Year, Second Term ; 2 periods per week. 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, DIRECTOR. 

The physical culture of the students is provided for by a regu- 
lar course of instruction in the Gymnasium. The course is carefully 
planned, so as to develop gradually and scientifically the physical 
powers of each student. Beginning with the simplest calisthenic 
exercises, the instruction covers the whole field of light and heavy 
gymnastic and field and track athletics. 

The equipment and arrangement of the Gymnasium is very 
complete, and the interest manifested by the students is a sufficient 
proof of the success of this department. While desiring to make the 
work in the Gymnasium of practical value to all the students, the 
required work only extends through the Preparatory, Freshman and 
Sophomore years. Three periods per week. Preparatory, Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years. 

One of the most valuable features of this department is a com- 
plete anthropometry outfit, by means of which measurements and 
strength tests of students are taken at the beginning and also at the 
end of each scholastic year. By means of these measurements and 
tests the exact physical condition of each individual student can be 
ascertained, and such special exercises given as will produce a sym- 
metrical development of the body. 

A valuable adjunct to this department has been the College 
Athletic Association, of which mention is made under the head of 
"Student Organizations." 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT. 

EDWARD LLOYD, MAJOR, U. S. A., COMMANDANT. 

The Military Department is a distinctive feature of the College. 
By special Acts of Congress, provision is made for the maintenance 
of a Department of Military Science and Tactics in each of the land- 
grant colleges. An officer of the United States Army is detailed to 
act as instructor in military tactics and as commandant of cadets. 

47 



The Military Department of this College is in a most flourish- 
ing condition. All students upon entering, unless physically in- 
capacitated, are enrolled in one of the companies of the cadet battal- 
ion. Students are required to wear the prescribed uniform at all 
times when on duty. The discipline in barracks is entrusted to 
cadet officers, under the supervision of the Commandant, and the 
discipline of the College is generally military in its nature. The 
practical instruction of the cadets consists of daily drills in the 
"School of the Soldier," "School of the Company," "School of the 
Battalion," and outpost duty. The study of tactics and lectures on 
military science, with practical lessons in procedure of military 
courts, constitute the class-room work of the department. 

The Military Department is a decided factor in the moral and 
physical development of the student body. By encouraging habits 
of promptness, obedience and neatness, and by its beneficial effects 
upon the carriage and general health of the students, it adds mater- 
ially to the usefulness of the College as an educational institution. 

DISCIPLINE. 

The discipline of the College, as has been stated, is generally 
military in its character. Students are under the control of cadet 
officers, subject to the direction of the officer in charge, who makes 
a daily report to the Commandant of Cadets. The final authority, 
however, in all cases, is the President of the College. 

All students are expected to conduct themselves as young gen- 
tlemen worthy of respect and confidence, and to be zealous and loyal 
to duty under all circumstances. Upon entrance, each one is re- 
quired to give his word that he will comply with all the rules and 
regulations of the institution. A copy of the rules is then given 
him, and he is held responsible for all acts in disregard thereof. 
Cadet officers in receiving the honors zvhich promotion implies, ac- 
cept with them obligations and duties which they are hound to re- 
gard. This is the keynote of student government. Failure in duty 
means, necessarily, forfeiture of coniidence and rank. 

Punishment for trivial breaches of regulations consists of de- 
privation of privileges, confinement to grounds or rooms, or special 
military duties ; for aggravated offenses punishment ma}^ be suspen- 
sion or expulsion, at the discretion of the Faculty and the President. 

48 



If an excessive number of demerits be given to any student 
during one term, marked deficiency in conduct is apparent, and his 
parents or guardian must at once remove him from the College. 

MILITARY PROMOTIONS. 

The awarding of commissions of warrants to officers and non- 
commissioned officers of the battalion is based on soldierly bearing, 
observance of the rules of the College and scholastic attainments. 
The facts on which the final standing is made for recommendation 
for promotion are obtained from the Commandant's record of sold- 
ierly bearing and conduct, and from the recorded reports of the 
Faculty as to conduct, recitations and examinations. Commissioned 
officers are selected from the Senior Class. These officers are re- 
quired to serve for the year, performing all duties imposed by the 
regulations of the College as a part of their regular course of train- 
ing. Their conduct as officers will be rated as a study, having a 
value of five (5) theoretical periods per week, and a quarterly grade 
will be given. Failure to perform such duties shall constitute a de- 
ficiency, causing forfeiture of both diploma and commission. All 
members of the Senior Class will be required to perform these 
duties. All seniors with quarters in barracks will be required to 
drill either as officers or privates. Sergeants are selected from the 
Junior Class, and corporals from the Sophomore Class. Excep- 
tions will be made to this order, only when the number of men in 
any one class qualified for promotion is not sufficient for the quota 
of officers required. The standing of a cadet at the end of the 
year will be the basis of recommendation for his promotion. The 
possibility of his working off conditions during the summer cannot 
be considered, this being a very uncertain factor. 

UNIFORM. 

The cadet uniform, which is required to be worn by students at 
all times, is made by contract with the tailors at a much lower price 
than it could be furnished to individuals. The student's measure is 
taken after he arrives at the College, and the fit is guaranteed. For 
fall and winter the uniform is of substantial cadet-gray cloth, while 
in spring and summ.er a uniform of light khaki is used. 

49 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 

HENRY T. HARRISON, PRINCIPAL. 
CHARLES S. RICHARDSON, ASSISTANT. 

This department was organized in 1892, and is designed to 
meet the requirements of those students who have not had the ad- 
vantages of a thorough grammar school training, with a view lo 
equipping them to enter the regular collegiate department. 

Only such students are desired as will be able to enter the 
Freshman Class within a year, and who are fifteen years of age. 
This course is recommended especially to students who have not been 
to school for several years; for their progress in the regular collegi- 
ate course, by virtue of such a drawback, would be seriously im- 
peded. It is to be remarked that as a rule the students who have 
taken this course make excellent progress in their later college 
work. Students in this department are subject to the same mili- 
tary regulations as other students. 

I. Arithmetic. Wentworth's "Grammar School Arithmetic," 
completed. 

First and Second Terms ; 10 periods per week. 

II. Arithmetic. Advanced work. 
Third Term ; 5 periods per week. 

III. Algebra. Wentworth's "Algebra" as far as quadratics. 
Three Terms; 5 periods per week. 

IV. History. United States History, completed. 
Three Terms; 5 periods per week. 

V. Geography. Descriptive Geography, completed. 
First Term ; 5 periods per week. 

VI. Geography. Davis's "Physical Geography." Completed. 
Second and Third Terms ; 5 periods per week. 

VII. English. Spelling, technical grammar, parsing, and 
analysis, composition, letter writing and elocution. 

Three Terms ; 8 periods per week. 

50 



VIII. Book-keeping. Single Entry. 
Third Term, 5 periods per week. 



THE COLLEGE LIBRARY. 

F. B. BOMBERGER, LIBRARIAN. 

The College Library may properly be regarded as one of the 
departments of the institution, as its aid for purposes of reference 
and its influence upon the mental development of the students must 
always be felt throughout all courses. The present quarters of the 
Library, while adequate for its immediate needs, will necessarily be 
too limited in the course of time. The reading room is well ar- 
ranged and lighted, and is in all respects comfortable and con- 
venient. 

While the Library is not large, the collection of works has 
been carefully chosen, and the shelves contain a fair supply of 
works of reference, history, biography, essays, poetry and the stand- 
ard works of fiction. Several hundred volumes of bound United 
States Government Reports comprise an important addition to the 
reference works of the Library. Most of the leading magazines 
and a large number of newspapers are subscribed for ; technical 
periodicals and works of reference relating to specific branches are 
deposited in the libraries of the various departments. 

Grateful acknowledgment is made to the following for valu- 
able additions to the College Library: Johns Hopkins University — 
Reports of Geological Survey, Weather Service, and Highway Com- 
mission; the United States Department of Agriculture, Bulletins, 
Year Books and daily Weather Maps; and the county press for 
copies of their publications. 



51 



COURSES OF STUDY. 



In order to systematize the work of the different departments of 
the College, and as far as possible arrange for specialization within 
limits consistent with the normal development of individual stu- 
dents, six distinct courses of study have been prepared, one of which 
the student is expected to choose upon entering the regular college 
work. 

These courses are Agriculture, Horticulture, General Science, 
Chemistry, Mechanical Engineering and Civil Engineering. 

A continuous and progressive course of work, beginning in the 
Freshman year with a nearly uniform course for all students and 
gradually separating in the three succeeding years until the class- 
work is almost wholly specialized has been found to be most satis- 
factory. A broad and liberal foundation in English, fundamental 
mathematics and history is first laid in the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years, and then the particular line of study desired is em- 
phasized more and more until the end of the course. 

In the tabular statement of the courses the hours per week 
are given, the numbers in parenthesis denoting practical or labora- 
tory periods, others theoretical or recitation periods. 

AGRICULTURAL COURSE. 

The agricultural course is designed to fit the student for con- 
ducting practical operations on the farm or should taste or circum- 
stance so direct to successfuly prosecute advanced scientific research 
along the lines of agronomy or animal husbandry. With this end 
in view the course has been made at once comprehensive and techni- 
cal, comprehensive enough to include whatever is necessary for the 
complete development of the work yet technical enough to make the 
student feel that he is a specialist and equipped for special work. 

The agricultural course is the result of development. While a 
fflan must specialize to attain any eminent success, yet in agricul- 

53 



tural science it is not possible to specialize to the same degree as in 
some others, because it is itself made up of many sciences. Ex- 
perience has clearly shown also that in agriculture the practical 
must keep even pace with the theoretical, that true education trains 
the eye and hand as well as the intellect and should give to the stu- 
dent the ability not only to acquire and originate ideas but also to 
express them in words and deeds. 

Throughout the Freshman year and the first two terms of the 
Sophomore year the course is non-technical. 

At the beginning of the third term of the Sophomore year, ag- 
ronomy, the production of farm crops is taken up by all students of 
agriculture. The work of the course up to the close of the Sopho- 
more years is as follows: 



54 



AGRICULTURAL COURSE, FIRST TWO YEARS. 
Numbers In parentheses denote practical or laboratory periods. 



FRESHMAN 



Eng. Lan. & Comp. (Eng. I) 

Amer. Lit. (Eng. II) 

Elemen. Math. (Math. I) 

Algebra (Math. II) 

Plane Geom. (Math. Ill) 

Ancient Hist. (Hist. I)t 

Eng. Hist. (Hist. II) 

Drawing (M. E. I) 

Geology (Geo. I) 

Agricnlt. Lect 

Elocution (Pub. Sp. Ill) 

Phys. Cult 

Woodwork (M. E. Ill) 

Botany (Bot. I, II) 



TERMS 



(6) 

4 
I 
1 
(3) 



II III 



5 
1 
1 
(3) 

■2(4)' 



(6) 
2(4) 



SOPHOMORE 



Rhetoric (Eng. Ill) 

Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 

Plane Geom. (Math. Ill) . 
Solid Geom. (Math. IV) . . 
Trigonometry (Math. V) . 

Chem. (Chem. I) 

Gen. Physics (Phys. I) 

Plant Cult. (Hort. I) 

Microscopy (Vet. Sci. I). 
Histology (Vet. Sci. II)... 

Farm Crops (Agr. I) 

Plant Phys. (Bot. III).... 

Drawing (M. E. IV) 

Ele. of Ento. (Ent. I) 

Eloc. (Pub. Sp. in. IV)... 

Agr. Lect 

German (Ger. I, II) 



TERMS 



4(3) 

2 

4(2) 



(6) 



II 



4(4) 

2 



(4) 
(8) 



2(4) 



III 



5 
4(3) 



3(4) 



2(4) 

i" 

5(1) 



•Hours per week. 

tLatin may be substituted for history, same number of periods per week. 

In the Junior year the course is divided into two sections 
known as the Division of Agronomy and the Division of Animal 
Husbandry, This arrangement enables the student to specialize 
along which ever line accords with his interests or desires, while 
at the same time he is taught the fundamental facts of both. This 
enables him to see most clearly and to harmonize his work to the 
relations which must exist between these great branches of 
agriculture. 

The detailed work of the Junior and Senior years in each divi- 
sion follows. 

AGRICULTURAL COURSE, LAST TWO YEARS. 
AGRONOMY SECTION. 





TERMS 


SENIOR YEAR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR YEAR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Surveying (C.E.I) 


2(3) 
4 

4(6) 


2(3) 


2(3) 


German (Ger. Ill) 


4 

3(4) 

2 

4 

4 

3 


'3(4)" 




Agr'l Chem. (Chem. II) 


Organ. Chem. (C. VII) 

Theoret. Chem. (C. IX) 

Eng. Classics (Eng. IX) 

Psychology (Eng. X) 




Qual. Quant.. Anal. (Chem. 

in. IV. V) 


3(4) 


3 


4 


Volumetric Anal. & Assay 




(Chem. VII) 


Bus. lyaw^ (Civics III) 




Animal Breeds (A. H. I) 


3(6) 
3 




Pol. Econ. (Civics IV) 


4 


Principles, Breeding(A. H .11) 






Farm Crops (Agr. IV) 

Fertilizers (Agr. V) 


2(4) 




Stock Manag. (A. H. Ill) 


2 


'2(4)" 
2(4) 
2(2) 
2(2) 
3 
3 
1 
1 




Ec. Ento. (Ent. IV) 


Farm Machin (Agr. VI) 




?(4) 


Econ. Plants (Bot. V) 






Farm Manag. (Agr. VII) 






2 


Soils (Agr. II) 




4(4) 


Crop Product. (Agr. VIH) or. 
Soil Work (Agr. IX) 








Drainage (Agr. Ill) 




^(6) 


Civics (Civ. II) 




3 
3 

1 
1 


Plant Breeding (Hort. VII) . . 
Plant Path. (Bot. VIII) 


.... 


3 

2(4) 
3 
2(4) 

1 
1 




German (Ger. II) 


3 

1 
1 




Eng. Compos. (Eng. V) 


Forestry (For. I) 






Agr. Lect 


Research 




?(4) 




Agr. Lect 


1 
1 


1 




Eng. Comp. (Eng. XII) 


1 



55 



AGRICULTURAL COURSE, LAST TWO YEARS. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY SECTION. 





TERMS 


SENIOR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Breeds. Scoring (A.H. I) 


3(6) 
3 






Stock Judg. (A.H. V) 


(4) 
2(2) 


■4(8)' 
3 




Princs. Breeding (A.H. ID... 






Herdbooks (A.H. VI) 




Stock Manag. (A.H. Ill) 


2 


2(2) 
3(4) 


Anim. Nutri. (A.H. VII) 


4(4) 


Dairying (A.H. IV) .... 




Org. Chem. (Ch. VII) 


3(?) 




Zool. (Ent. II) 


3(6) 
4 

(6) 




Vet. Elem. (V.S. IV) 




Agr. Anal. (Chem. II) 






Plant Breed. (Hort. VII) 






Qual. & Quant. Anal. (Chem. 


3(4) 
4(4) 


3 
2 
2 

'2(4) ■ 
3 
3 

i*'" 


Farm Manag. (Agr. VII) 




2 


Ill, IV, V) 


Bus. Law (Civics III) 


3 


'3" 

4(4) 
1 

1 




Sofls (Agr. II) 


Pol. Econ, (Civ. IV) 


4 


Drainasre (Aarr. Ill) 




Eng. Classics (Eng. IX) 

Forestry (F. I) 


4 


4 


Comp. Anat.& Phys.(V.S. Ill) 


.... 


(10) 




Ec. Ent. (Ent. IV) 


Research 




4f4) 


German (Ger. II) 


3 


3 
3 

1 
1 


Eng. Comp. (E. XII) 


1 

1 

4 


1 


Civics (Civ. II) 


Agl. Lect 


1 


Eng. Comp. (Eng. V) 

Agl. Lect 


1 
1 


German (Ger. Ill) or Psychol. 
(Eng. X) 











TWO YEARS COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

The two-years course in agriculture is intended for young men 
who have definitely determined to devote themselves to farming, 
but not having the time to take the four-years course wish to gain 
the greatest possible amount of such instruction as will give the 
most assistance in their chosen profession. 

It embraces nearly all of the strictly technical work of the 
four-years course and in addition other work which will aid the 
practical farmer, as for instance a course in blacksmithing and in 
vegetable culture. 

Upon completion of this course a certificate is granted, taking 
the place of the diploma for the four-years course. 

The details are indicated in the following schedule. 

TWO YEARS COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 





TERMS 


SECOND YEAR 


TERMS 


FIRST YEAR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Arithmetic (Math. I) 


5 
4(2) 






Farm Crops (Agr. I) 


(4) 
2(2) 
3 

2(6) 


'2(2)' 
■3(4)' 




Plant Culture (Hort. I) 






Pomol. (Hort. II) 




Farm Crops (Agr. I) 


2(2) 
4(4) 


2(4) 
2(2) 
2(2) 
4(3) 


Princ. Breeding (A. H. II) . . . . 

Stock Judg. and Herd Book 

(A.H. V, VI) 




Soils (Agr. II) 






Drainage (Agr. Ill) 






General Chem. (Chem. I.) ... 


4(3) 
3(6) 


4(4) 


Fertilizers (Agr. V) 


W.) 


Breeds and Scoring (A. H. I) . 


Farm Mach. (Agr. VI) 




?.(4) 


Stock Manag. (A. H. Ill) 


2 


2(2) 
3(4) 


Floricult. (Hort. Ill) 




2(2) 




Dairying (A. H. IV) 




Ft.Har.. Sys. Pom.(H.V,VI).. 
Veg. Gard. (Hort. IV) 




4U) 


Lang. & Comp. (Eng. I) 


5 








3(2) 


Anat. & Phys. Anim. (V.S. Ill) 


(10) 


'2(4)' 

'i'"' 


Animal Nutr. (A. H. VII) .... 






4(4) 


Botany (Bot. II) 


Entom. (Ent. I, IV) 


2 


(12) 
2(4) 

1 


?(4) 


Blacksmith. (M.E.VI) 




(6) 

1 


Vet. Sci. (V. S. IV) 




Agr. Lect 


1 


Veg. Path. (Bot. VHI) 








Agr. Lect 


1 

(6) 
1 


1 




Woodwork (M. E. Ill) 

English (Eng. V) 













56 



HORTICULTURAL COURSE. 

The horticultural course is designed to give practical and 
scientific instruction in the great productive occupation of horticul- 
ture. Practical work in orchard, garden, field and greenhouse is 
made a prominent feature of the course, especially in its early part 
which is designed to train young men in all the practical details of 
general fruit and truck growing. In this work the orchards, nur- 
sery, and vineyard of the College and Experiment Station, which 
contain a wide list of varieties of all hardy commercial fruits, are 
used for practice and demonstration. 

In the Freshman year the work is not materially different from 
that of the Agricultural and General Science courses, but in the 
Sophomore year the subjects of the course become more specialized, 
this emphasis upon horticultural work continuing through the Jun- 
ior and Senior years, culminating in a thesis upon some horticultural 
topic. 

The advanced work in horticulture is built on the practical 
work before outlined, but tends to the scientific side, and the train- 
ing of men for scholastic and experimental work in colleges, ex- 
periment stations, or in the Department of Agriculture. Excursions 
are made by the students to floral establishments in Baltimore and 
Washington to note and study the commercial aspects of floricul- 
ture. Models in landscape architecture and treatment are fur- 
nished by the parks and government grounds in and about the na- 
tional capitol. The State Horticultural Society, by its meetings and 
exhibitions, affords the horticultural students of the College excel- 
lent training in the work of identifying, noting and judging fruit 
and vegetables. 



57 



HORTICULTURAL COURSE. 





TERMS 


SOPHOMORE 


TERMS 


FRESHMAN 


I 


n 


III 


I 


II 


m 


Elem. Math. (Math. I) 


3 
5 






Plane Geom. (Math. Ill) 

Solid Geom. (Math. IV) 


5 


■5 ■■■ 




Algebra (Math. II) 


5 


5 
5 
5 
3 
.„... 




Plane Geom. (Math. III). 


Trigonometry (Math. V) 




s 


Langr. and Comp. (Engr. I) . . . 
Am. Liter. (Eng. II) 


5 


5 


Rhet. & Comp. (Eng. Ill) .... 

General Chem. (Chem. I) 

Plant Culture (Hort. I) 

Plant Phys. (Bot. Ill) 


4 

4(3) 

4(2) 


4 
4(4) 

'2(4) ■ 


4h) 


Anc. Hist. (Hist. I)* 


4 


4 




Eng. Hist. (Hist. II) 




Eloc. (Pub. Sd. I. II ) 


1 
(6) 


2 


Farm Croos (Asrron. I) 




^(4) 


Mech. Drawing (M. E.I) 


Entomol. (Ent. I) 






?(4) 


Freehand Draw. (M. E. la) . . 




(6) 
■2(4)' 


Microscopy (V. S. I) 

Physics (P. I) 


2" 


(4) 
2 




Botan. Prin. (Bot. I) 




2(4) 




Systematic (Bot. II) 




German (Ger. I) 


Sd) 


Geol. (Geol. I) 


4 
3 

1 


5 
3 

1 


Agr. Lect 


1 


1 


1 


Phys. Cult 






Agr. Lect 









*Latin may be substituted for History in Freshman and Sophomore years. 





TERMS 


SENIOR YEAR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR YEAR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 


5 
1 

4(6) 
2(2) 






Eng. Classics (Eng. IX) 

Eng. Comp. (Eng. XI) 

Fruit Harvesting (Hort. V)... 

Syst. Pomol. (Hort. VI) 

PI. Breeding (Hort. VII) 


4 
1 
3 
3(2) 


4 

1 

'3"" 


4 


Eng. Comp. (Eng. V) 

Agr. Chem. (Chem. II) 


1 


1 


1 


Fruit Grow. (Hort. II) 

Floricult. (Hort. Ill) 


2(2) 
4(2) 


■3(2)" 
2(3) 

■4(4)' 
2(4) 


.... 


Veg. Gard. (Hort. IV) 




Sm. Fruit (Hort. VIII) 




?(4) 


Drawing (C. E. II) 


2(3) 


2(3) 
4(4) 


Landsc. Gard. (Hort. IX) 






? 


Soils (Agron. II) 


Mycology (Bot. VII) 


2(2) 


'2W 
3 
3 
4 




Drainage (Agron. Ill) 




Veg. Path. (Bot. VIII) 




Syst. Ent. (Ent. Ill) 






Civics (Civ. II) 




1 


Pol. Sci. (Civics I) 


5 




Bus. Law (Civ. Ill) 


3 




Histol. Plants (Bot. IV) 


(8) 


'2(4)' 
3 
1 


Pol. Econ. (Civ. IV) 


4 


Econ. Plants (Bot. VI) 


Farm Croos (Aaron. IV) 






German (Ger. I, II) 


3 

1 


3 
1 


Forestry (For. I) 




3 

(4) 
1 




Agr. Lect 


Research (Hort. X) 


(4) 
1 


(4) 




Agr. Lect 


1 









GENERAL SCIENCE COURSE. 

The General Science Course is designed for those who desire +0 
secure the advantages of a general liberal education, with the op- 
portunity of specializing in some line of modern science. The basis 
of this course is a thorough training in mathematics, English and 
the principles of citizenship and government. 

The scientific work of this includes Agriculture, Horticulture, 
Botany, Physics, Chemistry, Entomology, Zoology, and Veterinary 
Science. In his first two years the student receives a general in- 
troduction to the several sciences, one of which in his Junior and 



58 



Senior year becomes his choice for more detailed work. A thesis 
upon some topic in the selected field completes his course and en- 
titles him to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 



GENERAL SCIENCE COURSE. 





TERMS 


SOPHOMORE 


TERMS 


FRESHMAN 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Mathem. (Math. I) 


3 
5 






PI. Geom. (Math. Ill) 


5 


■5"" 




Algebra (Math, II) 


5 


5 
5 
5 
3 

■3"" 


Sol. (Jeom. (Math. IV) 




PI Geom. (Math. III). 


Trigonom. (Math. V) 




5 


Lang. Comp. (Eng. I) 

Am. Lit. (Eng. II) 


5 


5 


Rhet & Comp. (Eng. Ill) .... 
Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 


4 


4 


,V" 


Anc. Hist. (Hist. I)* 


4 


4 


Gen. Chem. (Chem. I) 

Physics (P. I) 


4(3) 

2 

4(2) 


4(4) 
2 

■■(4)' 
(8) 


4(3) 


Eng. Hist. (Hist. II) 




Mech. Draw. (M. E. I) 


(6) 




Plant Cult. (Hort. I) 




Freehand Draw. (M. E. la).. . 




(6) 
■2(4)' 

'i'"' 


Microscopy (V. S. I) 

Ani. Histol. (V. S. II) 




Geology (Geo. I) 


4 


5 
2(4) 




Bot. Princls. (Bot. I) 


Entomol. (E. I) 




?.(4) 


Svst. Bot. (Bot. II).. . . 




German (G.I) 






SC\) 


Phys. Cult 


(3) 

1 
1 


(3) 
2 
1 


Farm Crops ( Agrr. I) 






3(4) 


Elocution (P. Sp. I) 


Elocution (P. Sp. Ill, IV) 

Agr. Lect 


1 
1 


2 

1 




Agr. Lect 


1 








*Latin may be substituted. 




TERMS 


SENIOR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 


5 






Eng. Classics (Eng. IX) 

Psychology (Eng. X) 


4 

4 

1 

10 

2(2) 

2(2) 

10 

3 


4 

'i'"' 
10 

2(2) 
2(2) 
10 

4 
5 
1 


4 


Logic (Eng. VIII) 




4 




Agl. Chem. (Chem. II) 


4 

(4) 
4(4) 
5* 




Compos. (Eng. XI) 


1 


Chem. Anal. (Chem. III. V).. 


4(4) 
4(4) 


4(4) 
4(4) 
3* 
2(4) 


Adv. Ent. (Ent. V)t 


10 


Physics (Phys. II) 


or 
Adv. Bot, (Bot. VII. VIII. IX) t 

or 
Bus. Law (Civ. Ill) 


?(?) 


Syst. Ent. (Ent. Ill) 


?(?) 


Econ. Ent. (Ent. IV) 


10 


Zool. (Ent. II) 


3(6) 
3 






German (Ger. II) 


3 
3 

1 

(10) 


3 

1 

■2(6)' 


Pol. Econ. (Civ. IV) 


4 


Civics (Civ. II) 


German (Ger. II) 


4 


4 


Composition (Eng. V) 


1 
1 


French (Fr. I) 


IS 


Agr. Lect 


Agr. Lect 


1 


1 


Anat, & Phys. Ani. (V. S. HI) 
Morpho. & Class. (Bot. V) . . . 















*Elective alternative with Literature or Civics, 

t Students taking (10) hours in Entomology take 2(2) in Botany and vice versa. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE. 

The course in Mechanical Engineering is prepared for those 
desiring to do practical work in the mechanical industries, designing 
and building machinery or supervising similar work. To this end 
both practical and theoretical instruction is given the student, who is 
thus equipped for the problems he may be called upon to solve 
in his regular work after graduation. 



59 



The work of the several years differs from the preceding 
courses (Agricultural, Horticultural and General Science), mainly 
in the omission of those subjects of a biological character and in- 
clusion of mathematics and shop work. The shop work supple- 
ments the mathematical, especially in the last two years when prob- 
lems in machine design are worked out, so far as' time allows in the 
actual construction of the parts designed. The practical work of 
this course is most thorough. The student is familiarized from the 
first with the use of tools and implements used in wood and iron 
work. He is given daily practice in the shops, and is encouraged 
to develop whatever inventive talent he may have. It is believed 
that students completing this course will have no difficulty in secur- 
ing employment after graduation in the field of mechanics or mech- 
anical engineering. 

The arrangement of the studies for each of the four years 
follows. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING COURSE. 





TERMS 


SOPHOMORE 


TERMS 


FRESHMAN 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Elem. Math. (Math. I) 


3 

5 






Plane Geom. (Math. Ill) 

Solid Geom. (Math. IV) 


5 


■5""' 




Algebra (Math. II) 


5 


5 
5 
(6) 




PI. Geom. (Math. Ill) 


Trigon. (Math. V) 




,■) 


Mech. Draw. (M. E. I) 


(6) 
5 

(6) 
1 
5 


(6) 


Rhetoric (Eng. Ill) 


4 


4 




Tech. Instr. (M. E. II) 


Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 


3 


Woodwork (M. E. Ill) 


(6) 
2 
5 


(6) 

's'" 

3 
.„... 


Physics (Phys. I) 


2 
4(3) 

(6) 
4 

(6) 


2 

4(4) 
(4) 

■■(6)' 
3 
2 


4 


Elocution (P. Sp. I. II,) 

Lang. & Comp. (Eng. I) 

Amer. Lit. (Eng. II) 


Gen. Chem. (Chem. I) 

Mech. Draw. (M. E. IV) 

Appl.Mech. (M. E.V) 

Forge & Foundry (M. E. VI) . 
Descr. Geom. (M. E. VII) .... 


4(3) 
(4) 


Anc. Hist. (Hist. I)* 


4 


4 


(6) 


Eng. Hist. (Hist. II) 


3 


Phys. Cult 


(3) 


(3) 


Elocution (P. Sp. III. IV). 
German (G. I) 


1 






5(1) 













•Latin may be substituted. 





TERMS 


SENIOR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Physics (Phys. II) 


4(4) 
5 


4(4) 


4(4) 


Power Plants (M. E. XI) 




2 

2(4) 
(10) 




Anal. Geo. (Math. VI) 


Mach. Design (M. E. XII) .... 

Mach. Shop (M. E. XIII) 

Testing (M. E. XIV) 


2(4) 
(8) 


2(4) 


Dif . Gale. (Math. VII) 


5 


'5'" 

2(4) 
(6) 


(10) 


Integ. Gale. (Math VIII) 




(6) 


Mach. Design (M. E. VIII)... 

Mach. Shop (M. E. IX) 

St. Engine (M. E. X) 


2(4) 
(6) 
4 
3 


2(4) 
(6) 


Graph. Stat. (C. E. Ill) 

Streng. Mat. (C. E. V) 

German (G. Ill) 


(4) 
4 
4 


"4"" 
4 

1 


4 ■■ 


German (G. II) 


3 
3 

1 


3 
3 

1 


Pol. Econ. (Civ. IV) 


4 


Civics (Civ. II) 


Composition (Eng. XII) 


1 


1 


Composition (Eng. V) 


' 





60 



CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE. 

The Civil Engineering course offers a young man an oppor- 
tunity to obtain a preliminary training in civil engineering that will 
enable him to engage in practical engineering work in the field or 
in the drafting room with the assurance that he has the necessary 
preparation to profit by the experience thus afforded; or if he de- 
sires to pursue a more extended course at a technical school of 
higher grade, he will be entitled to advanced standing. The curri- 
culum, which is outlined below, includes studies of cultural value, 
the fundamental sciences which form the basis of engineering, and 
work of a technical character. Students who have found them- 
selves deficient in ability to learn mathematics are not advised to 
enter an engineering course. Upon the satisfactory completion of 
this course the degree of Bachelor of Science, in Civil Engineering, 
is conferred. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING COURSE. 





TERMS 


SOPHOMORE 


TERMS 


FRESHMAN 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Elem. Math. (Math. I) 


3 




Plane Geom. (Math. Ill) 

Solid Geom. (Math. IV) 


5 


...... 




Algebra (Math. II) 


5 


5 

5 

5 

3 

3 
(6) 
(6) 




PL Geo. (Math III). 




Trigonom. (Math. V) 




5 


Lang:. & Comp. (Eng. I) 


5 


5 


Rhetoric (Eng. Ill) 


4 




4 




Amer. Lit. (Eng. II) 


Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 


3 


Anc, Eng. Hist. (Hist. I. ID* 
Mech. Draw. (M.E.I) 


4 
(6) 


4 
(6) 


Gen.Chem. (Chem. I) 

Physics (Phys. I) 


4(3) 
2 
(6) 

4'" 


4(4) 
2 

(4) 
3 


4(3) 


Woodwork (M. E. Ill) 


Mech. Draw.: (M. E. IV) 

Descr. Geom. (M. E. VII) .... 

Appl. Mech. (M. E. V) 

German (G. I) 


(4) 


Geol. (G.I) 


4 
(3) 

1 


5 
(3) 

2 


3 


Phys. Cult 




Eloc. (P. Sp. I) 


S(1) 




Eloc. (P. Sp. Ill, IV) 


1 


2 











*Latin may be substituted. 





TERMS 


SENIOR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR 


I 

5 


II 


III 


I 

4 

2(4) 
4 
2(8) 


II 

'2(4) ■ 

'2'" 

(8) 


III 


Anal. Geo. (Math. VI) 


Graph. Stat. (C. E. Ill) 

Struct. Design. (C. E. IV) ... . 

Str. Materials (C. E. V) 

Railway Engin. (C.E.VII) .. 
Hydraulics (C. E. VI) 




Diff . Gale. (Math. VII) 


5 


"5" 

2(3) 
(4) 
4(4) 
3 
3 
1 


?f4) 


Int. Calc. (Math. VIII) 






Surveying (C. E. I) 

Topog. Draw. (C. E. II) 


2(3) 
(t.) 
4(4) 
3 


2(3) 
(4) 
4(4) 
3 
3 
1 


?'" 


Physics (Phys. II) 


Civ. Engin. (C. E. IX) 




(12) 


German (G. H) 


Highway Engin. (C. E. VIII) 

Eng. Comp. (Eng. XII) 

Pol. Econ. (Civ. IV) 




1 


Cixncs (Civ. II) 


1 


1 
4 
4 


1 


Eng. Comp. (Eng. I) 


1 


4 




German (Ger. III). 


4 


.... 



61 



CHEMICAL COURSE. 

The Course in Chemistry is essentially the same as the Gener- 
al Science Course until the beginning of the Junior year, though any 
of the four-year courses would prepare for this, as the amount of 
chemistry is the same in all courses to the end of the Sophomore 
year, and the demands on the agricultural or technical chemist are 
now so varied that a foundation with more of the essentials of the 
agricultural or the mechanical courses is often desirable. 

Beginning with the Junior year the major part of the stu- 
dent's time is devoted to chemistry, the practical work in the labora- 
tory occupying approximately half of his time. The course is es- 
sentially a course in agricultural chemistry fitting the gfraduate for 
positions in agricultural colleges, experiment stations, or the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

The details of the studies are shown in the following table. 

CHEMICAL COURSE. 



FRESHMAN 



Elem. Math. (Math. I)... 

Algebra (Math. II) 

PI. Geom. (Math. III).... 
Lanff. & Comp. (Eng. I). 

Anc. Hist. (Hist. I)* 

Eng, Hist. (Hist. II) 

Mech. Draw. (M. E. I) . . . 

Geol. (G.I) 

Phys. Cult 

Princ'ls Boty. (Bot. I) . . . 
Syst. & Ecol. (Bot. II) . . . 

Eloc. (Pub. Sp. I) 

Agr. Lect 



TERMS 



6 
4 
(3) 



II 



5 

(3) 
2(4) 



III 



2(4) 

i"" 



SOPHOMORE 



Plane Geom. (Math. Ill) . . 
Solid Geom. (Math. IV) . . . 
Trigonometry (Math. V) . . 
Rhet. & Comp. (Eng. Ill) . 

Eng. Lit. (Eng. IV) 

Gen. Chem. (Chem. I) 

Physics (Phys. I) 

Plant. Cult. (Hort. I) 

French (Fr. I) 

German (Gr. I) 

Eloc. (P. Sp. m. IV) 

Agr. Lect 



TERMS 



4(3) 
2 

4(2) 
4 



II III 



4(4) 
2 



3 
4(3) 



4 
5(1) 



•Latin may be substituted. 







TERMS 


SENIOR 


TERMS 


JUNIOR 


I 


II 


III 


I 


II 


III 


Physics (Phys. II) 


4(4) 
4 

2(12 
(4) 






Organ. Chem. (Chem. VII) .. 
Theor. Chem. (Chem. IX) ... . 
Agl. Anal. (Chem. X) 


3(12 
2 
(8) 


"(i6) 

6(4) 




Agl. Chem. (Chem. II) 








Qual. Anal. (Chem. Ill) 








Inorg. Prep. (Chem. IV) 






Indust. Ch. (Chem. XI) 


s 


Quant. An. (Chem. V) 


1(12) 

1(4) 

2 


.„... 

2(16) 
3 

1 
3 
1 


Research (Chem. XII) 




^(?.o 


Mineralogy (Chem. VI) 




German (G. II, III) 


4 
3 


4 

"4 ■■■ 

1 


4 


Org. Chem. (Chem. VII) 


.... 


Bus. Law (Civ. Ill) 




Vol. Anal. (Chem. VIII) 


Pol. Econ. (Civ. IV) 


4 


German (G. II) 


3 

1 


3 
1 
3 

1 


Eng. Comp. (Eng. XII) 


1 


1 


Civics (Civ. II) 




Agr. Lect 




Eng. Comp. (Eng.) 


1 









62 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 



Math. I. II 

English I 

History I, (or Latin I) 

Eloc. I 

Drawing 

Phys. Cult 

Geology I 

Mech. Eng. II. III.... 
Agricultural Lect 



Agr. 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C. E. 


M. E. 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


(6) 


(6) 


(6) 


(6) 


(6) 


(3) 


(3) 


(3) 


(3) 


(3) 


4 


4 


4 


4 


5(6) 


1 


1 


1 







G. Sc. 



(6) 
(3) 



SECOND TERM. 



Math. II 

English I 

History I (or Latin I) 

Eloc. II 

Phys. Cult 

Geology I 

Drawing 

Mech. Eng. Ill 

Agricultural Lect 

Botany I 



Agr. 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C. E. 


M. E. 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


(3) 


(3) 


(3) 


(3) 


(3) 


5 


5 


5 


=<« 


(6) 
(6) 


1 


1 


1 






2(4) 


2(4) 


2(4) 







G. Sc. 



(3) 



2(4) 



THIRD TERM. 





Agr. 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C. E. 


M. E. 


G. Sc. 


Math. II III 


8 
8 
3 

6 

2(4) 
1 


8 
8 
3 

(6) 
6 

2(4) 
1 


8 
8 
3 

2(4) 

1 


8 
8 
3 

(6) 
6 


8 
8 
3 

(6) 
6 


8 


English I. II 


8 


History II (or Latin I) 


3 


Drawing 


(6) 


Mech. Eng. II 




Botany II 


2(4) 


Agricultural Lect. I 


1 







63 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



FIRST TERM. 





Agr. 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M.E. 


G. Sc. 


Math. Ill 


5 
4 
2 

4(3) 

1 
(6) 

4(2) 
1 


5 
4 
2 

4(3) 
1 
(6) 

4(2) 

1 


5 
4 
2 
4(3) 

1 

4(2) 

1 
4 


5 
4 
2 

4(3) 
1 
4 
(6) 


5 

4 
2 

4(3) 
1 

4(6) 
(6) 


5 


English III 


4 


Physics I 


2 


Chemistry I 


4(3) 


Eloc. Ill 


1 


Mech. Eng. V, VI 




Drawing 




Hort. I 


4(2) 


Agricultural Lecture 


1 


French 









SECOND TERM. 



Math. IV 

English III 

Physics I 

Chemistry I 

Eloc. IV 

Vet. Sci.I. II 

Drawing 

Mech. Eng. VI. VII.. 
Agricultural Lecture 

Botany III 

French 



Agr. 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M.E. 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 


2 , 


2 


2 


2 


2 


(12) 


(4) 


(4) 


(4) 
3 


(4) 
3(6) 


1 


1 








2(4) 


2(4) 


4 







G. Sc. 



5 

4 

2 

4(4) 

2 

L(12) 



THIRD TERM. 



- 


Agr. 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M.E. 


G. Sc. 


Math. V 


5 
3 

4(3) 
5(1) 

2(4) 
3(4) 

1 


5 
3 

4(3) 
5(1) 

2(4) 
3(4) 

1 


5 
3 

4(3) 
5(1) 

4 


5 

3 

4(3) 
5(1) 
(4) 
3 


5 
3 

4(3) 

5(1) 

(4) 

3(6) 


5 


English IV 


3 


Chemistry I 


4(3) 


German I, II 


5(1) 


Drawing 




Mech. Engineering VI. VII 

Entomology I 


2(4) 


Egronomy I 


3(4) 


Agricultural Lecture 


1 


French 









64 



SYNOPSIS OF CX)URSES. 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



Mathematics VI 

English V, VI 

Physics II 

Chemistry II. III. IV 

Drawing 

Horticulture II 

Mechanical Eng. VIII, IX. X 

Civil Engin. I, II 

Civics I 

Entomology II, III 

Ani. Husbandry I, II 

German II 

Agricultural Lecture 



Agr. I* 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M. E. 










5 


5 


1 


1 


6 


1 


1 


1 








4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 


4(6) 


4(6) 


4(6) 


6(16) 




2(4) 


2(2) 


2(2) 


2(2) 






6(10) 


2(3) 


3(6) 
6(6) 


2(3) 
5 




2(9) 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


1 


1 


1 


1 







G, Sc. 



6 

4(4) 

4(4) 



8(6) 

3 
1 



SECOND TERM. 



Math. VII 

English V 

Physics II 

Chemistry V. VI, VII 

Drawing 

Horticulture II. III. . . 

Mech. Engin. IX 

Civil Engin. II. I 

Civics II 

Vet. Science III 

German III 

Botany IV 

Agronomy II 

Ani. Husbandry III. . 
Agricultural Lecture. 



Agr. I 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M. E. 










5(5) 


5(5) 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 








4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 


3(4) 


3(4) 




4(16) 




2(4) 


2(2) 


2(2) 


6(4) 






(6) 


2(3) 




2(3) 




2(7) 


3 


(10) 




3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 
(8) 


3 


3 


3 


4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 








2 


2 










1 


1 


1 




1 





G. Sc, 



1 

4(4) 

4(4) 



(10) 



THIRD TERM. 



Math.Vm 

English V. VIII 

Physics II 

Chemistry III. VII, VIK. 

Drawing I 

Horticulture IV , 

Mech. Engin. IX 

Civics II 

Civil Engin. I. II 

Entomology 111,1V 

Botany V. VI 

German III 

Agronomy II, III 

Ani. Hus. III. IV 

Agnicultural Lecture 



Agr.I 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M. E. 










5(5) 


5(5) 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 








4(4) 


4(4) 


4(4) 


3 




3(2) 


5(16) 




2(4) 
(6) 


3 


3 




3 


3 


3 


2(3) 




2(3) 




2(7) 




2(4) 


2(4) 


2)4) 








2(4) 


2(4) 


2(4) 








3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


8(8) 


4 
5(6) 


4(4) 








1 


1 


1 









G. So. 



5 

4(4) 

4(4) 



5(4) 
2(6) 
3 



*Agr. I is Agronomy; Agr. II is Animal Husbandry. 



65 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



English IX, X, XI 

Chemistry IX. X. XI. XII 
Horticulture V. VI. X. . . . 
Mech. Engin. XII, XIII.. 
Civa Eng. III. IV. V, VII 

Entomology V 

Botany VII. IX 

Civics III 

German III 

Agronomy IV 

Ani.Hus. V.VI 

Agricultural Lecture 



Agr.I 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M.E. 


9 


5 


10 


1 


1 


1 


3(4) 


3 


8(2) 
2(2) 


5(20) 


12(12) 


2(12) 
8 


3 


3 


3 


3 






4 


4 




4 


4 


4 


(4) 


2(6) 










1 


1 











G. Sc. 



10 or 2(2) 
2(2) orlO 
3 
4 



SECOND TERM. 



English IX. XI 

Chemistry IX. X. XI 

Horticulture VII. X 

Mech. Eng. XI. XII. XIII 
Civil Eng. IV. VI. IX.... 

Entomology V 

Botany VIII, IX 

Civics III. IV 

German VI 

French 

Forestry I 

Vet. Sci.IV 

Agronomy V 

Ani. Hus. VII 

Research 

Thesis 

Agricultural Lecture 



Agr.I 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C.E. 


M.E. 


5 


1 


5 


1 

6(20) 


1 


1 


3 


3 


5 




4(12) 


4(14) 


2(4) 


2(4) 










2(4) 




2(4) 








4 


4 


7 


4 


4 


4 








4 


4 


4 


3 


3 
4(8) 


3 








3(4) 


4 


3 








2(4) 


2(4) 










2 


2 










1 


1 











G. Sc. 



10 or 2(2) 

2(2) one 

4 

4 

5 



THIRD TERM. 



English IX. XI 

Horticulture VIII. IX, X 

Chemistry XI. XII 

Mech. Engin. XII, XIII, XIV 
Civil Eng. IV. VL VIII. IX.. 

Entomology V 

Botany IX 

Civics III. IV 

German VI 

French 

Agronomy VI. VII. VIII, IX. 

Ani. Hus. VII 

Agrricultural Lecture 

Research 

Thesis 



Agr.I 



8(16) 

1 

2(4) 

2 



Agr.II 



2 

4(4) 
1 

2(4) 
2 



Hort. 



Chem. 



1 

5(20) 



C.E. 



7(16) 



M.E. 



1 
2(20) 



G. Sc. 



10 or 2(2) 

2(2) orlO 

4 

4 

5 



66 



SPECIAL WINTER COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

COMMENCING JANUARY 8, IQO/. 

A ten-weeks course designed for those who are unable to take 
one of the longer courses, and including the largest amount of 
purely practical information about farming in all its phases. This 
course is invaluable to the young man desiring that information on 
agricultural topics so necessary to meet the sharp competition of 
the present day. The College authorities have removed the nominal 
charge of $5.00. We are anxious to have the young men of Mary- 
land, who intend to remain on the farm, embrace this opportunity. 
Many cannot afford a four-years course ; this solves the problem for 
them. 

OUTLINE OF THE COURSE. 

Every student will be required to take not less than two hun- 
dred and fifty hours of work. Two hundred of these must be de- 
voted to the following specified studies: 

Soils, 22 hours. Agricultural Chemistry, 20 hours. 

Farm Dairying, 40 hours. Farm Live Stock, 18 hours. 

Manures, 20 hours. Stock Feeding, 15 hours. 

Plant Production, 25 hours. Horticulture, 40 hours. 

The other fifty hours will be devoted to such topics as the stu- 
dent may elect from the following: Veterinary Science, 40 hours; 
Tobacco, 5 hours; Plant Physiology and Pathology, 15 hours; 
Economic Entomology, 20 hours ; Carpentering and Blacksmithing, 
45 hours; Farm accounts, 12 hours; Road Construction and Level- 
ing, 5 hours ; Civil Government, 10 hours. 

Tuition and room free. No expense for use of laboratories or 
supplies. Good board at moderate rates can be secured in the neigh- 
boring villages of Berwyn, Lakeland, Riverdale and Hyattsville — all 
within a short distance of the College and Experiment Station. 
Electric cars make frequent connections, A limited number can be 
accommodated at the College for $4.00 per week. Students will be 
expected to furnish their own bed clothes, pillows, towels, napkins 
and overalls for dairy work. Short course students are not re- 
quired to drill or wear uniforms. 

^7 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES. 

SENIOR YEAR. 

FIRST TERM. 



English IX. X. XI 

Chemistry IX. X. XI. XII 
Horticulture V. VI. X. . . . 
Mech. Engin. XII. XIII.. 
Civil Eng. III. IV. V. VII 

Entomology V 

Botany VII. IX 

Civics III 

German III 

Agronomy IV 

Ani.Hus. V.VI 

Agricultural Lecture 



Agr.I 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem. 


C. E. 


M. E. 


9 


5 


10 


1 


1 


1 


3(4) 


3 


8(2) 
2(2) 


5(20) 


12(12) 


2(12) 
8 


3 


3 


3 


3 






4 


4 




4 


4 


4 


(4) 


2(6) 










1 


1 











G. Sc. 



10 or 2(2) 
2(2) one 
3 



SECOND TERM. 



English IX. XI 

Chemistry IX. X. XI 

Horticulture VII. X 

Mech. Eng. XI. XII, XIII 
Civil Eng. IV. VI. IX.... 

Entomology V 

Botany Vni. IX 

Civics III. IV 

German VI 

French 

Forestry I 

Vet.Sci.IV 

Agronomy V 

Ani. Hus. VII 

Research 

Thesis 

Agricultural Lecture 



Agr.I 


Agr.II 


Hort. 


Chem, 


C. E. 


M. E. 


5 


1 


5 


1 
6(20) 


1 


1 


3 


3 


5 




4(12) 


4(14) 


2(4) 


2(4) 










2(4) 




2(4) 








4 


4 


7 


4 


4 


4 








4 


4 


4 


3 


3 
4(8) 


3 








3(4) 


4 


3 








2(4) 


2(4) 










2 


2 










1 


1 











G. Sc. 



10 or 2(2) 

2(2) one 

4 

4 

5 



THIRD TERM. 



English IX. XI 

Horticulture VIII. IX. X 

Chemistry XI. XII 

Mech. Engin. XII. XIII. XIV 
Civfl Eng. IV. VI. VIII. IX.. 

Entomology V 

Botany IX 

Civics III, IV 

German VI 

French 

Agronomy VI. VII. VIII. IX. 

Ani. Hus. VII 

Agricultural Lecture 

Research 

Thesis 



Agr.I 



8(16) 

1 

2(4) 
2 



Agr.II 



2 

4(4) 
1 

2(4) 
2 



Hort. 



Chem. 



1 
5(20) 



C. E. 



7(16) 



M.E. 



1 
2(20) 



G. Sc. 



10 or 2(2) 

2(2) orlO 

4 

4 

5 



66 



, SPECIAL WINTER COURSE IN AGRICULTURE. 

COMMENCING JANUARY 8, I907. 

A ten-weeks course designed for those who are unable to take 
one of the longer courses, and including the largest amount of 
purely practical information about farming in all its phases. This 
course is invaluable to the young man desiring that information on 
agricultural topics so necessary to meet the sharp competition of 
the present day. The College authorities have removed the nominal 
charge of $5.00. We are anxious to have the young men of Mary- 
land, who intend to remain on the farm, embrace this opportunity. 
Many cannot aflford a four-years course ; this solves the problem for 
them. 

OUTLINE OF THE COURSE. 

Every student will be required to take not less than two hun- 
dred and fifty hours of work. Two hundred of these must be de- 
voted to the following specified studies : 

Soils, 22 hours. Agricultural Chemistry, 20 hours. 

Farm Dairying, 40 hours. Farm Live Stock, 18 hours. 

Manures, 20 hours. Stock Feeding, 15 hours. 

Plant Production, 25 hours. Horticulture, 40 hours. 

The other fifty hours will be devoted to such topics as the stu- 
dent may elect from the following: Veterinary Science, 40 hours; 
Tobacco, 5 hours; Plant Physiology and Pathology, 15 hours; 
Economic Entomology, 20 hours; Carpentering and Blacksmithing, 
45 hours; Farm accounts, 12 hours; Road Construction and Level- 
ing, 5 hours ; Civil Government, 10 hours. 

Tuition and room free. No expense for use of laboratories or 
supplies. Good board at moderate rates can be secured in the neigh- 
boring villages of Berwyn, Lakeland, Riverdale and Hyattsville — all 
within a short distance of the College and Experiment Station. 
Electric cars make frequent connections. A limited number can be 
accommodated at the College for $4.00 per week. Students will be 
expected to furnish their own bed clothes, pillows, towels, napkins 
and overalls for dairy work. Short course students are not re- 
quired to drill or wear uniforms. 

67 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

For admission to the College Department, Freshman Class, an 
entrance examination is required. This examination will be held at 
the College on September i8th and 19th, 1906. The applicant will 
be expected to pass a satisfactory examination in the following sub- 
jects: English grammar, composition and analysis, United States 
history, arithmetic complete, algebra, as far as quadratics, political 
and physical geography. A mark of seventy per cent, is necessary 
to pass. For entrance to the Preparatory Department the require- 
ments are: English grammar, arithmetic, as far as percentage, 
United States history and political geography. 

Applicants for admission to higher classes than the Freshman 
must be prepared to take an examination equivalent to that given 
at the College for promotion to such classes, or must present certi- 
ficate from county or city schools covering the work of the lower 
College classes as hereinbefore stated. Experience has proven that 
it is almost impossible for a new student to succeed in the work of 
the mechanical course as a Sophomore ; and such assignment will be 
made only upon the candidate presenting satisfactory evidence of 
proficiency in drawing and wood work. 

Every applicant for admission to the College must bring satis- 
factory testimonials as to his character and scholarship from his 
former teacher. This will be absolutely insisted upon. No student 
need apply for entrance zvho cannot furnish such credentials. 

Students from nezvly acquired territory or any foreign country 
must have a guardian appointed with parental powers, with whom 
the President can deal in any case of emergency. Students who 
cannot speak English are undesirable, and are advised that satis- 
factory progress at this College on their part cannot be expected 
until they have familiarized themselves partly, at least, with the 
English language. 

EXAMINATIONS AND PROMOTIONS. 

In order to pass from one class to the next higher a stu- 
dent is required to pass an examination m each study pursued by a 

69 



mark of at least sixty per cent, and to have a combined mark in 
each branch (daily and examination) of at least seventy per cent. 
A failure in not more than one branch will enable a student to pass 
to the next class with condition in that study in which he has failed; 
but in every case the student is required to make good such failure 
during the next year. However, no student in the Mechanical or 
Civil Engineering Courses will be promoted to the Junior Class, 
who is deficient in Sophomore Mathematics. 

For rules for military promotions see Military Department. 



REPORTS. 



Detailed reports are sent to parents and guardians at the end 
of every quarter. These give the grade of the student in every 
branch of study, his attendance record, and his conduct record with 
comment by the President upon each item. 

In addition to this, monthly reports are issued for October, 
November, January, February and April. These give general in- 
formation as to scholarship, conduct, attendance and health, and 
call attention to deficiency in any one of these particulars. 



GRADUATION AND DEGREES. 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

As a requisite for graduation, the candidate for this degree 
must, in addition to having satisfactorily completed the work pre- 
viously outlined, submit a thesis, which meets the approval of the 
Faculty. 

The subject for this thesis must be approved by the head of 
the department in which the investigation is to be pursued prior to 
February ist, and the thesis completed must be submitted not later 
than May 15th. 



;o 



MASTER OF SCIENCE. 

The degree of Master of Science may be conferred by the 
Faculty as follows: 

1. Upon students who have completed the undergraduate 
course, and in addition have pursued a successful course of gradu- 
ate study for one year at this College, consisting of a major and two 
minor subjects, not more than one of which shall be taken in the 
same department of the College, and to occupy not less than thirty 
hours per week. The course of study to be outlined by the professor 
in charge of the major subject, and approved by the Faculty. 

2. Upon College graduates of not less than two years' stand- 
ing, who are employed in any of the departments of the College and 
who have completed the equivalent of the above course of study. 
Candidates under this clause must have their applications approved 
by the Faculty eighteen months before they contemplate receiving 
their degree. 

3. Upon graduates of this College of not less than three years' 
standing, who having been connected with institutions of learning 
or research, where adequate facilities for advanced work are avail- 
able, have completed a course equivalent to (i) and who have 
passed in the required examinations and have presented a satis- 
factory thesis. 

MASTER OF ARTS. 

The degree of Master of Arts may be conferred upon gradu- 
ates of this College holding the Bachelor of Arts degree, and who 
conform to the following rules: 

1. The candidate must apply for the degree in writing at least 
one scholastic year before the degree will be conferred. The appli- 
cation must contain a description of the extra work, by virtue of 
which the candidate expects to receive the degree. 

2. The candidate must submit one or more theses on subjects 
assigned by the Professor of English and Civics; said thesis or 
theses must be approved by the President of the College, the Pro- 
fessor of English and Civics and the Professor of Languages of 
this College. 

71 



3- The candidate must be prepared to submit to an examina- 
tion in the works of the following authors: Caesar, Nepos, Sallust, 
Virgil, Cicero, Ovid, Horace, Livy, Tacitus, Plautus, Terence, 
Juvenal. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS. 
COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The College offers a number of scholarships — four for Balti- 
more City, and one for each county of the State. These scholar- 
ships are awarded to the successful candidate in competitive ex- 
aminations, conducted by the Superintendent of Public Instruction 
of Baltimore City, and in the counties by the County School Super- 
intendent. All scholarship students must be prepared for entrance 
to the Freshman Class, and are required to take the regular en- 
trance examination. Each scholarship is good for four years, or 
for such part thereof as the holder remains at the College. It is 
then again open for competition. The cost per year for scholarship 
students will be found under the head of "Student Expenses." The 
following is an extract from the requirements of the Board of 
Trustees, relating to scholarships: 

"Persons holding certificates of scholarship must present them- 
selves at the College, or other designated place, at the date which 
may be named in the September or January next following the 
award, and be examined by College authorities for entrance to the 
Freshman Qass. Alternates are to be thus examined, as well as 
principals and in case of a failure of the principal to secure or hold 
the scholarship, the alternate will have the first right to the place, 
if within a year from date of the certificate of award. 

"Persons holding certificates of scholarship must, in order to 
secure the same, pass the entrance examination of the College, and 
(if entering in January) such other examination as may be re- 
quired to join the Freshman Class. To hold a scholarship, the stu- 
dent must make all payments promptly and meet such requirements 
of the College as to scholarship and deportment as may be pre-' 
scribed by the President and Faculty. By passing special examina- 

72 



tions, or by presenting satisfactory certificates, candidates for schol- 
arship may be permitted to enter the Sophomore Class." A stu- 
dent who fails of promotion, thereby forfeits his scholarship and the 
School Board which granted such scholarship will be notified ac- 
cordingly. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOLARSHIPS. 

There are also offered by the College a limited number of "In- 
dustrial Scholarships." The holder of such a scholarship is required 
to work as a waiter or janitor a definite number of hours per day; 
these hours are so arranged as to conflict as little as possible with 
his time for study or recitation. Industrial scholarship students 
are not required to drill. 

In consideration of their work a rebate of $150 a year is 
granted each of these students. 

A selection is made from applicants for this scholarship on the 
basis of mental preparation, physical ability and moral character. 
Preference will be given to the sons of citizens of Maryland, Ap- 
plications for this scholarship specifying age, weight, mental ad- 
vancement and enclosing testimonial of moral character must be 
made in writing to the President of the College prior to September 
1st, and the successful applicants for this scholarship will be notified 
to report in person at the College on September the 17th. 



STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES. 

A limited amount of money can be earned by students by tak- 
ing advantage of the opportunities arising from time to time to do 
clerical work, tutoring, and such other labor as may not interfere 
with regular scholastic duties. Those in need of help to continue 
their work, and whose course is marked by an earnest desire to 
succeed, are always given the preference. 

FACILITIES FOR RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 

The College is undenominational in character. The daily ex- 
ercises of the College are opened with worship in the College 
Chapel. 

73 



Every Sunday afternoon services are conducted by a minister 
of some Christian denomination, an effort being made to have all the 
more prominent churches represented in the pulpit. There is an 
Episcopal Church at College Park, and at Berwyn one mile north 
and at Riverdale one mile south are Presbyterian churches. In Hy- 
attsville, two miles south, may be found Catholic, Episcopal, Pres- 
byterian, Baptist and Methodist churches. Students are encouraged 
to attend the church with which they desire to worship. 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS. 

The attention of parents is earnestly called to the following 
rules in force at this College: The College authorities can succeed 
in conferring the maximum amount of training upon the student 
only with and by the active support and earnest co-operation of the 
parent. The President of the College is always ready and willing 
to discuss any failures in a student's record with his parent or 
guardian, and correspondence on this subject is always welcome. 

Three reports are sent to parents during the year, showing the 
student's progress in class work, and his general standing, as to 
conduct, etc. At the end of the year a detailed report of the year's 
work is made. 

No student will be accepted as a matriculate until the contract 
card containing the following agreement for matriculation is signed 
by parent or guardian and received by the President of the College : 

"It is understood that the President of the College as the exe- 
cutive of the same, and acting for the Board of Trustees, a party 
to this contract, has the right to ask the withdrawal of a student at 
any time, when in his judgment such withdrawal may he necessary 
either for the interest of the young man or the institution which he 
attends. It is further tmderstood that a parent or guardian can at 
any time withdrazv his son or ward, subject to regulations hereift 
set forth" 

A cadet manifesting an indifference to the observance of the 
rules and regulations of the institution or wanting in proper at- 
tention to the preparation of his work, will be cautioned to improve 



74 



in these particulars. Failing to do so his parents upon notice given 
by the President must withdraw their son. 

A special pledge to refrain from what is popularly known as 
"hazing," and from taking unfair means in examinations is required 
of every applicant for entrance, before he will be allowed to ma- 
triculate. Parents should impress upon their sons that failure to 
live up to this pledge is a dishonor which unfits them to be longer 
inmates of the College. "Hazing" is invariably punished by instant 
dismissal. 

Frequent absences from the College are invariably of great dis- 
advantage to the student, in breaking in upon the continuity of his 
work, and in distracting his mind from the main purpose of his at- 
tendance at the institution. Parents are therefore earnestly asked 
to refrain from granting frequent requests to leave the College. 

Students will not be permitted to leave classes or quarters dur- 
ing study hours to answer telephone calls, unless they are urgent. 

Students will not be permitted to make contracts or to sell any 
article to their associates without the approval of the President. 

The sale of second hand furniture or clothing to new cadets is 
prohibited unless the sale be approved by the commandant of cadets. 

BULKS OF COMMITTEE ON COIXEGIATE ROUTINE, ENDOBSED BY THE FACULTY. 

1. A student may not change his course of study unless at the writ- 
ten request of his parent or guardian, and after said request has been en 
dorsed by the dean of the course abandoned, and the dean of the course 
requested, and approved by this committee. 

2. Examinations to make up conditions will be given only at times set 
apart by this committee. These dates will be just before the regular quar- 
terly examinations in December, April and June; also the day before the 
resumption of college work in September. Should, for any reason, a special 
examination be requested at any other time a charge of $2.00 will be made 
for each subject on which the applicant is examined. 

3. To attain proficiency a student must make an examination grade 
of 60 per cent also a term average of 70 per cent. In case of failure, upon 
re-examination, a grade of 70 per cent, is required. 

4. A student may not be promoted if conditioned in more than one 
study. 

5. A student may not be promoted if he has any conditions of more 
than a year outstanding. 

6. No student may be promoted from the Preparatory Department 
with any condition. 

75 



7. Any student who uses unfair means in examination will (1) re- 
ceive no further examination in same subject; (2) receive zero for ex- 
amination grade; (3) receive no commission; (4) receive no diploma. 

8. A student is subject to an oral examination at any time within 
ten days after written examination. 

9. An examination paper, containing erasures or showing alterations, 
may be rejected at the discretion of the Professor in charge, and a new ex- 
amination ordered by this committee. 

10. In computing term averages, the daily grade is computed at 2, 
the examination grade at 1. 

11. The yearly average in all studies is computed by giving each 
subject a weight according to the mean number of hours per week in- 
volved; theoretical periods being given a value of 2, practical periods 1. 

12. Senior students in the general science course must submit a 
schedule of elective work, to be approved by this committee, prior to the 
resumption of college work in September. 

13. Senior students must submit subjects for graduating theses prior 
to February 1, and all theses for graduation must be completed prior to 
May 15. 

14. No special courses are permitted save by consent of this com- 
mittee. In case consent is granted for a special course, the certificate 
awarded attesting work will not have the college seal nor the Governor's 
signature. 

15. No student may take work in more than one class during any 
one term. 

STUDENT EXPENSES. 

No charge is made for tuition, books or diplomas. No reduc- 
tions are made for regular vacations. 

The expenses of the College year for the several classes of stu- 
dents are as follows: 

Boarding Students. — Board, heat, light and room $200.00. 

Scholarship Students. — Board, heat, light and room $100.00. 

Day Students. — Room, heat and tuition $40.00. 

Short Winter Course Students. — Board, heat, light and 
room $4.00 per week. 

Students entering College after November ist, or leaving the 
same prior to the close of the scholastic year will be charged for 
the time they are here as follows, viz : 

Boarding students at the rate of $25.00 per month. 

76 



Scholarship students at the rate of $13.00 per month. 

Day students at the rate of $5.00 per month. 

Students withdrawing after entrance, must pay the charge for 
at least one month's attendance. 

Table board for students not rooming at the College will be 
$14.00 per month, or 25 cents per meal. 

TIME OF PAYMENT. 

For Boarding Students $50.00 on entrance, $50.00 November 
15th, $50.00 February ist, $50.00 April ist. 

For Scholarship Students, $25.00 on entrance, $25.00 Novem- 
ber 15th, $25.00 February ist, $25.00 April ist. 

For Day Students $10.00 on entrance, $10.00 November 15th, 
$10.00 February ist, $10.00 April ist. 

Promptness of payment is essential. 

FEES. 

No fees of any character will be charged by the College. 

Students will be admitted free of cost to membership in the 
College Athletic Association. 

Damage to College property by students will be promptly re- 
ported to parents or guardians and prompt payment expected. 

UNIFORM.* 

Dress Uniform (coat, trousers and cap) $15.60 

Khaki Uniform (coat, trousers, hat and leggins) 5.50 

Shirt and belt 1.25 

Payments for uniforms must be made on delivery. This is re- 
quired by the firm manufacturing them. 

Coaching for backward students will be provided by the Presi- 
dent upon application. 



*Price quoted on basis of last year's contract. 

77 



ARTICLES NECESSARY TO BE PROVIDED. 

All students are required to provide themselves with the follow- 
ing articles, to be brought from home or purchased from the College 
Park store on arrival: 

I dozen white standing collars. 

6 pairs white gloves (uniform). 

6 pairs white cuffs. 

1 pair blankets (for single bed). 

2 pairs sheets (for single bed) 
4 pillow cases. 

2 white dimity bedspreads (three quarters size). 

6 towels. 

I chair (uniform). 

I pillow. 

1 mattress (shuck), cotton top (uniform). 

The room-mates together purchase the following articles: 

2 table cloths (uniform). 
2 clothes bags (uniform). 
I broom. 

All the articles marked (uniform) in the foregoing list can 
best be purchased after the student arrives at the College. The cost 
of the entire list should not be more than $15.00 for the year. This 
should be paid to the Treasurer on entrance, as the College has no 
fund from which it can make advances, and failure to comply with 
this requirement will subject the student to much inconvenience. 
Any excess will be returned promptly. 

The College will not be responsible for articles left in the bar- 
racks during vacations, unless by special arrangement. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

Student's clubs for religious, social, literary and athletic pur- 
poses are encouraged as a means of creating class and college pride 
and developing an esprit de corps among the students. Each class 
has its own organization in which matters relating to the class are 

78 



discussed and directed. Officers are elected and the unity of the 
class preserved. This has been found to be a decided aid to disci- 
pline and tends to raise the standard of student honor. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. i 

S 

President, E. I. Oswald. 
Vice-President, C. H. Harper. 
Secretary, R. H. Dixon. 
Treasurer, J. P. Mudd. 
Much encouraging work has been done by this organization 
during the past year, and much interest has been shown in the 
meetings. ^ 

i 

LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

These societies are invaluable adjuncts to college work. 
Through them a good knowledge of parliamentary law is gained 
as well as a readiness of expression and activity in thought quali- 
ties particularly valuable to the American citizen. '^ 

The Literary Society work is under the general supervision of j 

the Instructor in Public Speaking, who is always ready to advise 
with the members in matters of parliamentary law and train them ^ 

in the delivery of their orations and debates. ' 

NEW MERCER SOCIETY. 

President, L. Bassett. 
Vice-President, R. H. Dixon. 
Secretary-Treasurer, A. N. Bowland. 
Sergeant-at-Arms, G. G. Becker. 

MORRILL SOCIETY. 

President, L. F. Zerkel. 
Vice-President, G. M. Mayer. 
Secretary-Treasurer, J. J. T. Graham. 
Sergeant-at-Arms, A. M. McNutt. 

79 



ROSSBURG CLUB. 

President, R. H. Dixon. 

Vice-President, G. M. Mayer. 

Secretary, L. F. Zerkel. 

Treasurer, L. Bassett. 
The social man is a necessity — hence this organization is en- 
couraged and supported by the President and Faculty. Its enter- 
tainments have been marked by a spirit which emphasizes the wis- 
dom of its continuance and encouragement. 

"REVEILLE." 

The "Reveille" is the College annual, edited entirely by the 
Senior class ; it is the successor to the "Cadet Review." Nine edi- 
tions of the "Reveille" have appeared and each has been charac- 
terized by a gratifying improvement in the standard both of origin- 
ality and expression. 

EDITORIAL STAFF, I906. 

Editor-in-Chief, L. F. Zerkel. 
Associate Editors, H. J. Caul, R. H. Dixon. 
Business Manager, F. R. B. Waters. 

Associate Business Managers, A. M. McNutt, C. S. Ridgway, J. L, 
Showell. 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS. 

Athletic, J. J. T. Graham. 
Humorist, G. M. Mayer. 
Rossburg Club, R. H. Dixon. 
Class History, S. P Thomas. 

THE ORATORICAL ASSOCIATION OF MARYLAND COLLEGES. 

The Maryland Agricultural College is a member of this Asso- 
ciation which is composed of St. John's College, Washington Col- 
lege, Western Maryland College and Maryland Agricultural Col- 
lege. Contests are held annually at these colleges in rotation and 
a marked improvement is to be observed as a result of its or- 
ganization. 

80 



INTER-COLLEGIATE DEBATE. 

In 1904 an arrangement was made for an annual contest in de- 
bating between students rfepresenting Delaware College and the 
Maryland Agricultural College. 

This contest has aroused much interest and enthusiasm, a 
marked improvement may be observed on the part of the partici- 
pants from year to year. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION. 

"The Alumni Association is steadily growing in two ways; 
that is to say, recent graduates almost invariably become active 
members, and the graduates of the earlier days of the College are 
becoming more active and more interested in all that pertains co 
the welfare of our Alma Mater. 

The semi-centennial celebration which occured March 6, 1906, 
had for one of its results the bringing together of a larger gather- 
ing of the Alumni than on any previous occasion, and this re-union 
is probably the fore-runner of larger Alumni gatherings in the 
future. 

The association has continued the offer of three medals for 
worthy students in the several collegiate departments, and there is 
no doubt regarding the wisdom of stimulating in this way the ener- 
gies of the students. The enrollment of the Alumni Association is 
now reaching a point where some definite accomplishment can be 
effected, and each individual should be ready to suggest a desirable 
project, at the same time to assist in the execution of that object 
which is most feasible and popular with the Association at large. 

The entire institution as viewed from the Alumni standpoint is 
worthy of the confidence of its patrons and the public. Each of us 
should feel that every step in advance of that achieved in our day, 
should give us a feeling of pride, that it is in a manner the result of 
the successful completion of the work then offered and should bind 
us more closely to the work of the present and the broadening of 
its future. 

The officers for the year are: President, S. S. Buckley, '93; 
Vice-President, W. S. Keech, '90; Secretary-Treasurer, M. N. 

81 



Straughn, '99 ; Executive Committee, members at large, F. B. Bom- 
berger, '94 and W. W. Skinner, '95. 

Graduates and members of the association are requested to keep 
the Secretary-Treasurer, *M. N. Straughn, College Park, Md., in- 
formed of any changes in their addresses. Any information con- 
cerning the older graduates which will enable the officers to locate 
and communicate with them will facilitate their efforts and will 
tend to further the success of the Association." 

An Alumnus. 



♦Secretary-Treasurer for 1906-7. E. F. Gamer. '03. 



82 



DEGREES CONFERRED 1906, W^ITH SUBJECTS OF 

THESES. 

MASTER OF ARTS (HONORARY) 

ISAAC LOBE STRAUS, 

J. ENOS RAY, JR., 

HENRY T. HARRISON, 

CHAS. S. RICHARDSON. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AGRICULTURE. 

ALONZO MOULTON MCNUTT, 

"A Study of Pollen." 

CHARLES SYLVESTER RIDGWAY, 

"The Distribution of Plants with respect to Reforestation." 

SAMUEL P THOMAS, 

"The Situation of Orchards with respect to Frost and Air 
Currents. 



j> 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY. 

JAMES JESSE THOMAS GRAHAM, 

"The Determination of Nitrogen." 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

RICHARD HOOPER DIXON, JR., 

"Plan for a Proposed Athletic Field at the Maryland Agricul- 
tural College." 

JOHN WALLACE MITCHELL, 

"The Location of a Spur Track from the City and Suburban 
Railway to the Maryland Agricultural College." 

FREDERICK RANSEL BROOKS WATERS, 

"The Location of a Spur Track from the City and Suburban 
Railway to the Maryland Agricultural College." 

83 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING. 
LEONARD EDWARD BASSETT, 

"Development, Application and Growth of Gas Engines." 

GEORGE MILROY MAYER, 

"The Economic Production of Steam." 

HAROLD JOHN CAUL, 

"Road-bed and Rolling Stock of Railroads." 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE. 

JOHN LETCHER SHOWELL, 

"Some notes on the Macrosporium of Canteloupe Blight," 
BENJAMIN M. CHiswELL, 1904 (in abscntia). 

BACHELOR OF ARTS. 

LEMUEL FERDINAND ZERKEL, 

"The Development of Early English Prose." 
MEDALS. 

JAMES JESSE THOMAS GRAHAM, 

Senior Medal: for highest standing for the entire course; of- 
fered by the President. Average 92.2. 

JOHN WALLACE MITCHELL AND LEMUEL FERDINAND ZERKEL. 

Honorable mention, average over 90. 

WILLIAM T. MAHONEY, 

Junior Medal : for highest standing in Junior Year ; offered by 
the President. Average 98. 

H. C. BYRD, 

*Gold Medal for best debater in commencement competition; 
offered by the Alumni Association. 

JAMES JESSE THOMAS GRAHAM, 

Gold Medal for best Thesis on Agricultural Sciences; offered 
by the Alumni. 

84 



HAROLD JOHN CAUL, 

Gold Medal for best work in Mechanical Engineering Depart- 
ment; offered by the Alumni Association. 

LEMUEL FERDINAND ZERKEL, 

Gold Medal for the best essay on "American Citizenship;" of- 
fered by the Board of Trustees. 

LEMUEL FERDINAND ZERKEL, 

Intercollegiate Oratorical Association Medal, for second best 
oration in competition with four colleges. 

Schley Prize for best oration, treating Maryland History, to 
be delivered on Maryland Day, 1907; offered by Hon. B. H. 
Warner. 

♦Regulations governing competition for Alumni Medals : Competition for the medal for 
best thesis on Agricultural Science is open to members of the Senior Class and Second Year 
of the Two- Year Agricultural Course; and two copies of the thesis must be deposited with 
the Chairman of the Science Section of the Faculty at least one week before Commence- 
ment day. 

Rules governing the competition for medals for commencement debate and for best work 
In the Mechanical Engineering Department are provided by the departments of English 
and Public speaking, and the Professor of Mechanical Engineering, respectively. 

Competition is open to undergraduate students only. 



J 



85 



MILITARY ROSTER— CADET BATTALION. 

EDWARD LLOYD^ MAJOR. U. S. A. 

COMMANDANT OF CADETS. 

FIELD AND STAFF. 

Major, H. D. Williar, Jr. 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant, A. D. Cockey. 

Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster, S. T. Vocke. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

Sergeant-Ma j or, C. L. Lippincott. 
Quartermaster Sergeant, N. L. Warren. 
Color Sergeant, R. Brigham. 



COMPANY A. 

J. P. Mudd, Captain. 
H. H. Owings, First Lieutenant. A. N. Bowland, Second Lieutenant 

C. H. Harper, Third Lieutenant R. B. Ckwper, First Sergeant 
C. Sylvester, Second Sergeant H. W. Lippincott, Third Sergeant 

H. W. Stinson, Fourth Sergeant H. B. Hoshall, Fifth Sei^eant 

E. H. Plumacher, Quartermaster Sergeant 
C. F. Mayer, First Corporal. A. L. Stabler, Second Corporal. 

B. M. Paradis, Third Corporal. A. R. Todd, Fourth Corporal. 

R. M. Ager, Fifth Corporal. J. P. Grason, Sixth Corporal. 

COMPANY B. 

E. S. Holloway, Captain. 
M. H. Adams, First Lieutenant G. W. Firor, Second Lieutenant 

U, W. Long, First Sergeant J. L. Iglehart, Second Sergeant. 

J. P. Shamberger, Third Sergeant. E. J. Byron, Fourth Sergeant 

J. W. Firor, Fifth Sergeant 
S. M. Lowry, Quartermaster Sergeant 
W. W. Heyser, First Corporal. J. Jarrell, Second Corporal. 

A. C. Turner, Third Corporal. L. Jarrell, Fourth Corporal. 

P. E. Burroughs, Fifth Corporal. 

COMPANY C. 
F. E. Linnell, Captain. 

87 



H. A. Blair, First Lieutenant H. S. Hattan, Second Lieutenfmt. 

T. B. Mackall, First Sergeant J. D. Darby, Second Sergeant 

R. Silvester, Third Sergeant G. W. Wilson, Fourth Sergeant 

H. C. Byrd, Fifth Sergeant 
M. C. Plumaeher, Quartermaster Sergeant 
S. L. Neal, First Corporal. J. F. Allison, Second Corporal. 

R. A. Judd, Third Corporal. N. E. Osborne, Fourth Corporal. 

J. Holloway, Fifth Corporal. 



88 



ROSTER OF MATRICULATES. 

SESSION 1904-190S. 
GRADUATE STUDENTS. 



Gahan, a. B. 
Shaw, S. B. 



Bassett, L. 
Caul, H. J. 
Dixon, R. H. 
Geaham, J, J. T. 
Mayeb, G. M, 
McNuTT, A. M. 
Mitchell, J. W. 

RiDGWAY, C. S. 

Showell, J. L. 
Thomas, S. P. 
Watees, F. R. B. 
Zebkel, L. F. 



Adams, M. H, 
Blaie, E. a. 
Rowland, A. N. 
Capestany, R. L. 
cockey, a. d. 

FiBOE, G. W. 
Haepeb, C. H. 
Hatton, H. S. 
holloway, e. s, 
Hudson, M, A. 
Lewis, M. C. 
Lin NELL, F. E. 

LiPPINCOTT, C. L. 
Mahoney, W. T. 
Mudd, J. P. 
owings, h. h. 
Plumachee, E. H. 
Plumachee, M. C. 
Vocke, S. T. 

WiLLIAE, H. D. 
ZOUCK, J. F. 



Beckeb, G. G. 
Beice, N. E. 
Beigham, R. 
Beome, J. P. 
Bboughton, L. B. 
Bybd, H. C. 



POST OFFICE. 

College Park 
Rehoboth 

SENIOR CLASS. 

Cambridge 

Buffalo 

Cambridge 

Ingleside 

Frostburg 

Berkley 

Brookline 

Beltsville 

Berlin 

Sandy Spring 

Seat Pleasant 

Luray 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Princess Anne 

Baltimore 

Kingston 

San Juan 

Owings Mills 

Thurmont 

Baltimore 

Piscataway 

Rosaryville 

Stockton 

Crisfield 

Falmouth 

Grafton 

Leeds 

Washington 

Simpsonville 

Maracaibo 

Maraeaibo 

Baltimore 

Ruxton 

Glyndon 

SOPHOMORE CLASS. 

Baltimore 

Annapolis 

Marlborough 

Wallville 

Pocomoke City 

Crisfield 



COUNTS'. 

Prince George 
Somerset 



Dorchester 
'New York 
Dorchester 
Queen Anne 
Allegany 
Harford 
Massachusetts 
Prince George 
Worcester 
Montgomery 
Prince George 
Virainia 



Somerset 

Baltimore City 

Somerset 

Porto Rico 

Baltimore 

Frederick 

Baltimore City 

Prince George 

Prince George 

Worcester 

Somerset 

Massachusetts 

West Virginia. 

Cecil 

District of Columbia 

Howard 

Venezuela 

Venezuela 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 



Baltimore City 

Anne Arundel 

Massachusetts 

Calvert 

Worcester 

Somerset 



89 



Btbon, E. J. 
Chew, L. C. 
GooPEB, B. R. 
Dabbt, J. D. 
Day, G. C, 
DneicKsoN, J. B. 

FiBOB, J. W. 

Gbiffin, J. P. 
Hasltjp, J, E. 
Lamfkin, W. E. 
hoshall, h. b. 
Iglehabt, J. L. 

LiPPINCOTT, H. W. 

Long, U. W. 
lowbey, s. l. 
McCabe, W. W. 

McSOBLEY, F. C. 

Mackall, T. B. 
Myeb, C. F. 
Obt, F. C. 

i:*ABADIS, E. M. 

Reedeb, W. C. 
Rtjmio, F. E. 
Sanfobd, J. W. 
Saundees, O. H. 
Shahbebgeb, J. p. 
Silyesteb, R. L. 
solabi, c. s. 
somebvilxe, w. a. s. 
Stableb, a. L. 
Stinson, Jd. W. 
Stott, R. a. 
Sylvesteb, C. W. 
Thomas, W. H. 
Wabben, N. L. 
Wabthen, C. a. 
Wilson, R. A 
Zelaya, a. 



Williamsport 

Washington 

Worton 

Buck Lodge 

Dublin 

Berlin 

Thurmont 

Highland 

Savage 

Houston 

Parkton 

Simpsonville 

Grafton 

Selbyville 

Rossville 

Selbyville 

Stevensville 

Mackall 

Frostburg 

Frostburg 

Stockton 

Rising Sun 

College Park 

Washington 

Lankford 

Parkton 

College Park 

College Park 

Cumberland 

Brighton 

Columbia 

Taneytown 

Denton 

Cross Roads 

Selbyville 

Kensington 

Cumberland 

Nicaragua 



Washington 

District of Columbia 

Kent 

Montgomery 

Harford 

Worcester 

Frederick 

Howard 

Howard 

Texas 

Baltimore 

Howard 

West Virginia 

Delaware 

Baltimore 

Delaware 

Queen Anne 

Calvert 

Allegany 

Allegany 

Worcester 

Cecil 

Fringe George 

District of Columbia 

Kent 

Baltimore 

Prince George 

Prince George 

Allegany 

Montgomery 

Howard 

Carroll 

Caroline 

Charles 

Delaware 

Montgomery 

Allegany 

Nicaragua 



FRESHMAN CLASS J 



Ageb, R. M. 
Allen R. S. 
Allison, J. W. F. 
Baden hoop, H.W. H. 
Besa, a. 
Besa, C. 
Bishop, C. C. 

BOSLEY, J. 
Boyle, W. 
bubgess, a. e. 
BuBBOws, p. E. 

COSTEB, H. M. 

Cbapsteb, J. O. 
Deakyne L. S. 



Hyattsville 

Rising Sun 

Washington 

White Marsh 

Santiago 

Santiago 

Snow Hill 

Baltimore 

Brightwood 

Hyattsville 

Croome 

Solomons 

Taneytown 

Denton 



Prince George 

Cecil 

District of Columbia 

Baltimore 

Chile 

Chile 

Worcester 

Baltimore City 

District of Columbia 

Prince George 

Prince George 

Calvert 

Carroll 

Caroline 



90 



Picket, P. S. 
DuPUY, P. E. 
Emmeet, F. D. 
England, W. R. 
Gbason, J. P. 
Geoves, W. D. 
Hayden, O. N. 
Heysee, W. W, 
holloway, j. q. a. 
Jabeeix, L. O. 
Jaeeell, T. J. 

JUDD, R. A. 

Kloppmeyee, C. 
koening, f, 
Mansfield, K. L. 
McCeney, H. C. 
McCeney, S. C 
McCluee, A- B. 
McEnany, R. 

MiLLEE, E. W. 

Mitchell, J. F. 
Neal, S. L. 
osboxjen, n. e. 
Otis, H. 
robeets, m. 

ROBEY, V. 

Rxtssell, W. J. 
Sayee, J. p. 
Shipley, W. S. 
Stablee, S. S. 
Thomas, C. E. 

TiMANUS, W, 

Todd, A. R. 
tuenee, a. c. 
Whiting, W. W. 



Baltimore 

Passamayo 

Hagerstown 

Washington 

Towson 

Ellicott City 

Maddox 

Hagerstown 

Rosaryville 

Greensboro 

Greensboro 

\ Washington 

Norwood 

Washington 

Jonesport 

Silver Spring 

Silver Spring 

Washington 

Clearspring 

Baltimore 

Aberdeen 

Hurlock 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Pomfret 

Falston 

Washington 

Sykesville 

Brighton 

Cross Roads 

Laurel 

Mt. Washington 

Sollers 

Hyattsville 



Baltimore City 
Peru 

Washington 
District of Columbia 
Baltimore 
Howard 
St. Mary's 
Washington 
Prince George 
Caroline 
Caroline 

District of Columbia 
Montgomery 
District of Columbia 
Maine 

Montgomery 
Montgomery 
District of Columbia- 
Washington 
Maryland 
Harford 
Dorchester 
Maryland 
Maryland 

District of Columbia 
Anne Arundel 
Virginia 

District of Columbia 
Carroll 
Montgomery 
Charles 

Prince George 
Baltimore 
Calvert 
Prince George 



TWO YEAR AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS. 



Blake J. D. 
Chuech, L. M. 
Feenandez. 6. 
Feantz, F. B. 
Galt, F. T. 
Gameeo, a. 
»e Hostos, B. L. 
Jamison, G. 
Ruffneb, R. H. 
Stanton, C. E. 
Williams, A. W. 



Baltimore 

Washington 

Costa Rica 

Smithsburg 

Hyattsville 

Honduras 

San Juan 

Hughesville 

Opal 

Grantsville 

Washington 



Baltimore City 

District of Columbia 

Costa Rica 

Washington 

Prince George 

Honduras 

Porto Rico 

Charles 

Virginia 

Garrett 

District of Columbia 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Caldebon, E. 
Chambebs, W. H. 
Oswald, E. I. 



San Pero 

Washington 

Chewsville 



Peru 

District of Columbia 

Washington 



91 



1 



STUDENTS IN SHORT WINTER COURSE. 



Beock, J. W. 


Princess Anne 


Somerset 


ECKEBT, R. K. 


Taneytown 


Carroll 


FOBD, W. Lu 


Still Pond 


Kent 


Garnee, R. B. 


Taneytown 


Carroll 


Hfapes, T. J. 


Street 


Harford 



STUDENTS IN INSPECTORS COURSE. 



Babnhabt, D. H. 
Deaneb, T. p. 
Dbuby, 6. R. 

GOODSELL, R. F. 

Massey, S. J. 
Tbundle, a. D. 



Denton 

Boonsboro 

Chaney 

Frederick 

Sudlersville 

Poolesville 



Caroline 
> Washington 
Anne Arundel 
Frederick 
Queen Anne 
Montgomery 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT. 



Alexandeb, W. E. 
Allen, W. B,, Jb. 
Beale, a. J. 
Bebby, R. B., Jb. 
Bowman, G. 
Bback, E. 
Bbeeden, a. C. 
Bbooks. T. R. 
Canby, W. N. 
Chubch, C. B. 
DoAK, H. D. 
Dudley, C. T. 
Evans, H, C. 
Johnson, B. T. 
Lynn, F. W. 
Mabtin, J. 
Meeceron. H. J. 
Morgan, F. L. 
Newman, E, P. 
Newman, L. C. 
Parker, A. J. 
Pabkee, J, P. 
Price. E. H, 
schafter, e. w. 
Smith, W. C. 

bWANN, C. W. 

Trimble, V. 

TUENEE, W. C. 

White, H. J. 
White, J. H. S. 
Williams. C. W. 
Wilson, M. D. Jb. 
Young, B. 



Washington 

Baltimore 

Fort McHenry 

North Keys 

Charlestown 

Baltimore 

Soller 

Hyattsville 

Colesville 

Washington 

Philadelphia 

Easton 

Lonaconing 

Morganza 

Washington 

Fairfax 

Sykesville 

Vv ashington 

Washington 

Washington 

Berwyn 

Berwyn 

Washington 

Laurel 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Mt. Savage 

Wicomico 

College Park 

Fruitland 

Selbyville 

Finksburg 

Washington 



District of Columbia 

Baltimore City 

Baltimore City 

Prince George 

West Virginia 

Baltimore City 

Calvert 

Prince George 

Montgomery 

District of Columbia 

Pennsylvania 

Talbot 

Allegany 

St. Mary 

District of Columbia 

Virginia 

Carroll 

District of Columbia 

District of Columbia 

District of Columbia 

Prince George 

Prince George 

District of Columbia 

Prince George 

Baltimore City 

District of Columbia 

Allegany 

Charles 

Prince George 

Wicomico 

Delaware 

Carroll 

District of Columbia 



92 



SUMMARY OF STUDENTS. 

Graduate Students 2 

Senior Class 12 

Junior Class 21 

Sophomore Class 44 

Freshman Class 49 

Two Year Agricultural 11 

Short Winter Course 5 

Special Students 3 

Inspectors 6 

Preparatory Students 33 

Total 186 

LIST OF PRESIDENTS AT THE MARYLAND 
AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

L Prof. Benjamin Hallowell, President of the Faculty ..1859—1860 j 

2. Rev. J. W. Scott " " " " ..1860—1860 ^ 

3. Prof. Colby " " " " ..1860—1861 

4. Prof. Henry Onderdonk " " " " ..1861—1864 

5. Prof. N. B. Worthington " " " " ..1864—1867 

6. Prof. C. L. C. Minor, President of College ..1867—1868 

7. Admiral Franklin Buchanan " " " " ..1868—1869 

8. Prof. Samuel Regester " " " " ..1869—1873 

9. Gen. Samuel Jones " ' ..1873—1875 

10. Capt. W. H. Parker " " " " ..1875—1883 

11. Gen. Augustus Smith " " " " ..1883—1887 

12. Allen Dodge, Esq., Pro Tem. " " " " ..1887—1888 

13. Major Henry E. Alvord " " " " ..1888—1892 

14. Capt. R. W. Silvester " " " " ..1892 

LIST OF GRADUATES, WITH DEGREES 
AND ADDRESSES. 

The following members of the various graduating classes have been 
located. Any information leading to further additions and addresses and 
occupations of Alumni will be gratefully received. 

CLASS OF '63. 

Calvert, C. B., A. B., College Park, Md. 
Sands, W. B., A. B., Lake Roland, Md. 

CLASS OF '64. 

Franklin, J., A. B., 306 San Pedro Ave., San Antonio, Texas. 
Todd, W. B., B. S. 

CLASS OF '66. 

Hall, E., A.B., Millersville, Md. 
♦Roberts, L., Ph. B. 

CLASS OF '71. 
Soper, F. A., A.B. (M.A. '74), Baltimore, Md. 

93 



CLASS OF '73. 

♦Henry, R. S., A.B. (M.A.'75). 
Miller, O., A,B. (M.A.'75). 
Regester, A., A. B. 

Waters, W. F., A. B., West River, Md. 
Worthington, D., A. B. 
Worthington, W., A. B. 

CLASS OF 74. 

Coffren, J. H., A. B. (M.A.'77). 

Davis, H. M., A. B. (M.A. '77), Poolesville, Md. 

Griffith, L. A., A. B., (M.A.,'77), Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Hall, D., M.A. 

Norwood, F. C, A.B. (M.A. '77), Frederick, Md. 

CLASS OF '75. 

Gray, J. B., A. B., Prince Frederick, Md. 
Hyde, J. F. B., A. B., 110-114 Hanover Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Lerch, C. E., B. S., 110-114 Hanover Street, Baltimore, Md. 
Miller, L., B. S., Albuquerque New Mexico. 

CLASS OF '76. 

Blair, W. J., B. S. (M.S.), Custom House, Baltimore, Md. 
Thomas, T. H., B. S., Maddox, Md. 
•Worthington, J. L., B. S. 

CLASS OF '77. 

♦Beall, R. R., B. S. 

Emack, E. G., B. S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

♦Thomas, G., B. S. 

Truxton, S., B. S. 

Thomas, W., B. S. 



CLASS OF '78. 



Houston, T. T., A. B. 
Rapley, R. R., B. S. 



CLASS OF '80. 



CLASS OF '81. 



Gale, Henry E., A. B., 260 W. Hoffman St., Baltimore, Md. 

Mercer, R. S., A. B., New Tork, N. T. 

Porter, W. R., A. B., R. B. Porter & Sons, S. Charles St, Baltimore, Md. 

Thomas, W. H., A. B., Westminster, Md. 

Wood, C. W., A. B. 

CLASS OF '82. 

Bowen, P. A., Jr., A. B., 1410 G St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Saunders, C. A., A. B. 

Stonestreet J. H., A. B., Barnesville, Md. 

♦Deceased. 

94 



CLASS OF '83. 

Chew, R. B. B., A. B., 512 F St, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Freeland, H., A. B., Mutual, Calvert Ck)., Md. 

Lakin,W. A., A. B., Talbot County, Md. 

Bapley, E. E., A. B., 628 Louisiana Ave., Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF '84. 

Martin, F., B. S., Montgomery County, Md. 
Lakin, W. T., B. Ag. 

CLASS OF '88. 

Chambliss, S. M., A. B., Times Building, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Hazen, M. C, B. S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, L. B., A. B., Morganza, Md. 

♦Sigler, W. A., B. S. 

Smith, R. E., B. S., Ridgely, Md. 

Tolson, A. C, A. B., Daily Record Building, Baltimore, Md. 

Weems, J. B., B, S., Carew, Va. 

CLASS OF '89. 

Griffith, T. D., B. S., Redland, Md. 

Pindell, R. M., B. S., Civil Service Commission, Washington, D. C. 

*Saulsbury, N. R., B. S. 

Witmer, F., B. S., Hagerstown, Md. 

CLASS OF '90. 

Calvert, R. C. M., B. S., India. 

Keech, W. S., B. S., Towson, Md. 

Manning, C. C, B. S., 194 High Street, Portland, Me. 

*Niles, E. G., B. S. 

Russell, R. L., B. S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Soles, C. E., B. S., McKeesport, Pa. 

CLASS OF '91. 

*Branch, C, B. S. 

*Langley, J. C, B. S. 

Latimer, J. B., B. S., Broome's Island, Md. 

*Penn, S., B. S. 

Veitch, F. P., B. S., Agricultural Department, Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF '92. 

Besley, F. W., A. B., Johns Hopkins University. 

Brooks, J. D., A. B., Medical Department, U. S. A. 

Calvert, G. H., A. B., College Park, Md. 

Chew, F., B. S. 

Childs, N., B. S., Millersville, Md. 

Gambrill, S. W., B. S., Fidelity and Deposit Co., London, England. 

Johnson, E. D., A- B., Portland, Me. 

Ray, J. B., A. B., 406 Fifth St., Washington, D. C. 

*Deceased. 

95 



CLASS OF '93. 

Alvey, C, B. S., Hagerstown, Md. 

Buckley, S. S., B. S., (M.S. '99), College Park, Md. 

Graff, G. Y., B. S., Brookland, Md. 

Holzapfel, H. H. Jr., B. S., Hagerstown, Md. 

Lawson, J. W., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

Sherman, H. C, B. S., Columbia University, New York, N. Y. 

CLASS OF '94. 

Best, H., B. S., Birdsville, Md. 

Bomberger, F. B., B. S., (M. A. '02), College Park, Md. 

Brown, A. S., B. S., Washington, D. C. 

Cairnes, C. W., B. S., United States Revenue Cutter Service. 

Dent, H. M., B. S. 

Foran, T. E., B. S,, Port Deposit, Md. 

Key, S., B. S., (M. S. '02), 1733 H St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

*Pue, R. R., B, S. 

Sudler, M. T., B. S., (M. S.'02), Cornell Medical College, Ithaca, N. T. 

Weimer, C. H., B. S., Cumberland, Md. 

CLASS OF '95. 

Bannon, J. G., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

Clagett, G. H., B. S., Marlboro, Md. 

Compton, B., B. S. Charlottsville, Va. 

Crapster, W. B., B. S., Washington, D. C. 

Edelen, G. S., B. S., Washington, D. C. 

Graham, H. R., B. S., Chestertown, Md. 

Harding, S. H., B. S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Harrison, R. L., B. S., Geological Survey, Washington, D. C. 

•Jones, H. C, B. S., Poeomoke City, Md. 

McCandish, L., B. S., Reading, Pa. 

McDonnell, C. C, B. S., Clemson College, S. C. 

Mulliken, C. S., B. S., Alaska. 

Skinner, W. W., B. S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Sliger, R. B., B. S., Oakland, Md. 

Timanus, J. J., B. S., Towson, Md. 

Wilson, G. W., Jr., B. S., Marlboro, Md. 

CLASS OF '96. 

Anderson, J., B. S., Rockville, Md. 

Beale, R. B., B. S., General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. T. 

Crapster, T. C, B. S., United States Revenue Cutter Service. 

Dirickson, C. W., B. S., Berlin, Md. 

Eversfleld, D., A. B., College Park, Md. 

Heyser, H. H., A. B., Hagerstown, Md. 

Laughlin, J. R., B. S., 1460 Corcoran St., Washington, D. C. 

Rollins, W. T. S., B. S., Seat Pleasant, Md. 

Walker. C. N., B. S., Hyattsville, Md. 



♦Deceased. 



96 



CLASS OF '97. 

Calvert, C. B., Jr., A. B., College Park, Md. 

Cronmiller, J. D., A. B., Laurel, Md. 

Gill, A. I., B. S., 215 St Paul St., Baltimore, Md. 

Gill, N. H., B. S. Glyndon, Md. 

Graham, J. G. R., A. B., 189 Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

Heward, H., B. S., 262 Water St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lewis, G., B. S., Beckley, W. Va. 

Nelligan, B. S., B. S., District Building, Washington, D. C. 

Posey, F., A. B., La Plata, Md. 

Queen, C. J., B. S., 56 Livingston St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Scheneck, G. H. W., B. S., 34.3 Boulevard, Hollands, L. I. 

Watkins, J. B., Jr., B. S. Rutland, Md. 

Welty, H. T., B. S., 771 Doon St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Weeden, W. S., B. S., (M.S. '98). 

Whiteford, G. H., B. S., Millersville, Md. 

CLASS OF '98. 

AUnutt, C. v., A. B., New York, N. Y. 

Barnett, D. C, A. B., Cambridge, Md. 

Burroughs, C. R., B. S., Harris' Lot, Md. 

Cameron, G. W., B. S., Birmingham, Ala. 

Deunison, P. E., A. B., War Department, Washington, D. C. 

Dickerson, E. T., A. B., (M. A., '03), Baltimore, Md. 

Houston, L. J., Jr., A. B., Baltimore, Md. 

Lillibridge, J. G., A. B., Sparrows Point, Md. 

Mitchell, J. H., M; E., La Plata, Md. 

Nesbitt, W. C, B. S., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Peterson, G., A. B., Washington, D. C. 

Ridgely, C. H., B. S., Sykesville, Md. 

Robb, P. L., B. S., Baltimore City College, Baltimore, Md. 

Whitely, R. P., A. B., Hyattsville, Md. 

CLASS OF '99. 

Blandford, J. C, M. E., Manila, P. I. 

Collins, H. B., A. B., Princess Anne, Md. 

Eyster, J. A. E., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

Gait, M. H., A. B., Taneytown, Md. 

Gough, T. R., B. S. 

Hammond, W. A., A. B., Baltimore, Md. 

Kenley, J. F., M. E., Aberdeen, Md. 

McCandlish, R. J., B. S., Hancock, Md. 

Price, T. M., B. S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Robb, J. B., B. S., Richmond, Va. 

*Sedwick, J. O., B. S. 

Shamberger, D. T., M. E., Sparrow's Point. Md. 

Shipley, J. H., B. S., Manila, P. I. 

Straughn, M. N., B. S., Ph. D., College Park, Md. 

Whitehill, I. E., A. B., Unionville, Md. 

CLASS OF '00. 

Choate, E. S., M. E., Mt. Clare, Baltimore, Md. 

Church, C. G., B. S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Ewens, A. E., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

97 



Grason, A, S. R., B. S., Towson, Md. 

Groff, W. D., B. S., 25 N. Broadway, Baltimore, Md. 

Jenifer, R. M,, B. S., Loch Raven, Md. 

Kefauver, H, J., A. B„ (M.A., '01), Frederick, Md. 

Peach, S. M., A. B., Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Sappington, E. N., B. S., Darlington, Md. 

Sudler, A. C., B. S., Denver, CJol. 

Talbott, W. H., A. B., Willows, Md. 

Weigand, W. H,, B. S., Argentine, Kansas. 

CLASS OF '01. 

Cobey, Wl C, B. S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. 0. 
Hardisty, J. T., A. B., Collington, Md. 

McDonnell, F. V., M. E., 409 E. Wash St., Fort Wayne, Ind. 
Whiteford, H. C, B. S., Whiteford, Md. 

CLASS OF '02. 

Bowman, J. D., M. E., Rockville, Md. 

Couden, J., B. S., Perryville, Md. 

Darby, S. P., B. S., Washington, D. C. 

Fendall, W. S., M. E„ Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Hirst, A. R.. B. S„ Maryland Geological Survey, Baltimore, Md. 

*Lansdale, H. N., B. S. 

Mitchell, R. L., B. S., La Plata, Md. 

Mackall, L. E., A. B., 715 West Fayette St., Baltimore, Md. 

Symons, T. B., B. S., (M.S., '04), Ck)llege Park, Md. 

Wisner, J. I., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

CLASS OF '03. 

Caimes, G. W., M. E., Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Calderon, M. A., M. E., (B. S., '04), Lima, Peru. 

Collier, J. P., M. E., Ellicott City, Md. 

Dunbar, E, B., B. S., Springville, N. T. 

Gamer, E, F,, M. E., College Park, Md. 

Matthews, J. M., B. S., Dulaney's Valley, Md. 

Mayo, R. W. B., A. B., (M.S., '04), Hyattsville, Md. 

Peach, P. L., M. E., Ruston, La. 

Walls, E. P., B. S., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. 

CLASS OF '04. 

Anderson, J. A., M. E., Deal's Island, Md. 

Bumside, H. W., A. B., Hyattsville, Md. 

Cruikshank, L. W., M. E., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Gray, J. P., B. S., New Haven, Conn. 

Mayo, E. C, M. E., Richmond, Va. 

Merryman, E. W., M. E., Baltimore, Md. 

Mitchell, W., M. E., La Plata, Md. 

MuUendore, T. B,, A. B., Hagerstown, Md. 

Sasscer, E. R., B. S., Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C. 

Shaw. S. B., B. S., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

StoU, E. W., M. E., Manila, P. I. 

Wentworth, G. L., M. E., Chicago, 111. 

98 



CLASS OF '05. 

Byron, W. H., B. S., Williamsix)rt, Md. 

Digges, E. D., B. S., Port Tobacco, Md. 

Duckett, M., B. S., Hyattsville, Md. 

Hayman, E. T., B. S., Stockton, Md. 

Krentzlin, J. J. A,, B. S., 1718 N. Capitol St., Wiashington, D. C. 

Mackall, J. N., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

Nicholls, R. D., B. S., Germantown, Md. 

Parker, A. A., B. S., Baltimore, Md. 

Smith, W. T., B. S., Rifely, Md. 

Snavely, E. H., B. S., Grange, Md. 

Somerville, J. W., B. S., Hyattsville, Md. 

Sturges, G., B. A., Charlotte Hall, Md. 

White, W., B. S., Diekerson, Md. 

CLASS OF '06. 

Bassett, L., B. S., Cambridge, Md. 
Oaul, H. J., B. S., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Dixon, R. H., B. S., Cambridge, Md. 
Graham, J. J. G., B. S., Ingleside, Md. 
Mayer, G. M., B. S., Frostburg, Md. 
McNutt, A. M., B. S., Berkley, Md. 
Mitchell, J. W., B. S., Brookline, Mass. 
Ridgway, C. S., B. S., Beltsville, Md. 
Showell, J. L., B. S., Berlin, Md. 
Thomas, S. P, B. S., Sandy Spring, Md- 
Waters, F. R. B., B. S., Seat Pleasant, Md. 
Zerkel, L. F., B. A., Luray, Va. 

♦Deceased. 



99 



INDEX. 



Page. 

Agriculture, Courses 15 

Agricultural Course 53 

Agricultural Department 15 

Agriculture, Four Year Course. 15 
Agriculture, Short Winter 

Course 67 

Agriculture, Two Year Course. 56 

Agronomy, Courses 16, 55 

Alumni 81, 93 

Animal Husbandry, Courses ..78,56 

Articles to be Provided 78 

Assistants 7 

Board of Trustees 4- 5 

Botanical Department 23 

Botany, Courses 23 

Buildings 11 

Business Directions 2 

Calendar 8 

Chemical Department -^39 

Chemical Course 62 

Chemistry, Courses 30 

Civics , 43 

Civil Engineering Department. 33 

Civil Engineering, Courses 34 

Civil Engineer, Course 61 

Coaching 77 

Committees 5 

Courses of Study 53 

Degrees 70, 83 

Departments 15 

Discipline 48 

Drawing 36, 87 

Economics 43 

Elocution 46 

Endowment 9 

Engineering 33- 35 

English and Civics Department 40 
English and Civics, Courses. .41, 50 

Entomological Department 26 

Entomology, Courses 26 

Equipment and Work 15 

Examinations 69 

Expenses of Students 67,76 

Experiment Station 10 

Faculty 6 

Farmers' Courses 67 

Fees 77 

Forestry 22 

French 45 

General Aim and Purpose .... 13 

General Information 69 

General Science Course 58 

Geology 19 

German 45 

Graduates and Degrees Con- 
ferred 83 

Graduation 70 



Page. 

Historical Sketch 9 

History Courses 43,50 

Horticultural Department 19 

Horticultural Course 57 

Languages Department 44 

Latin 44 

Library 51 

Literary Societies 79 

Location and Description 10 

Logic 42 

Mathematics, Courses ...34, 39, 50 
Mathematics, Department of . . 39 

Matriculation . . , 69 

Mechanical Engineering Course 59 
Mechanical Enginering De- 
partment 35 

Medals Awarded 84 

Microscopy 2S 

Military Organization 87 

Military Work 47 

Officers and Faculty 6 

Oratorical Association 80 

Organizations 78 

Pathology, Plant 23 

Payments 77 

Physical Culture 47 

Physics Department 32 

Physiology 28 

Pledges 75 

Preparatory Work 50 

Presidents of College 93 

Promotions 49, 69 

Psychology 43 

Public Speaking 46, 81 

Regulations 74, 85 

Religious Opportunities 73 

Requirements for Admission. . , 69 

Reports 70 

Reveille 80 

Roster of Students 89 

Rules 74 

Sanitarium 12 

Sanitary Advantages 12 

Scholarships 72 

Short Winter Course in Agri- 
culture 67 

Student Opportunities 73 

Student Organizations 78 

Surveying .35 

Synopsis of Courses 63-66 

Text-Books 

Theses 76, 85 

Uniform : 49, 77 

Vegetable Pathology 23 

Veterinary Science Department 28 

Zoology 26 



'/