(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The universal cook book, pub. by the Ladies' aid society of the First Universalist church of Englewood"

TX715 
1891 



fiMf*fmMf.?^m. 




K%'' 






^^ 



Wi^ 



W^' 






^^ r^A^^'y: 







--/,- 






V' 



"^,. .^ 



c^' . 



z^' 






>' 



v^ .:. 



A*^ / 













0°*; 


7 


H 




\ 




V f ' * "- 


o. 


•^^ ,^^ 
<<"^^ 


:J*jO 


\\ 


•J' 



^^^ 

'f 













-^^0^ 






v^ 



vV 



T'^O 'r->^'-\ 









^ 



<, -' J" ... -^. "•- .0 .. ^<. '"-' -^^^ 




r^' .' 



^^^„ 




*- O. 



* 



A 



,v 






.0' 






^^ 


0^ 






4 


O^ 








-<> 






f ' ' 


" > 


O^ 




.^^ 




% V 








zt ^ 


9 



0' 






<b lT 



>-^ 



.<2^' 



.*#;/■■ 






.^' 















/ ^ '^. •: 






^. 



X 



^^ 









,'^ 






^P, * « o » O,"^ 



^*^^^ 
V 









% \ cP 



'^ 



:•- %,** .-'M^:- \'>^- 



^^\- 



























.v^ 



^^-'^^^ 















. . A <^ 'o . » « 0^ 

-^0^ ^ V . >- 



^^^. 



C 









• <?-' 






.0 



^^-n^. 



\X 



,v 






.0' 



, ^•f> 






A-^^- 



°o 



■f'i^f 





ii 




REV. FLORENCE E. KObbOCK. 

Pastor Hirst Universalist (".hurcli ol Knsli-wooil. 
I wi-ll'tli TiMr. 



\ 



Cf\jcileu.) 






The 

Universal Cook Book 



PUBLISHED BY 



THE LADIES" AID SOCIETY 



The First Universalist Church, 



ENGLEWOOD, 

Chicago: ^^~~- 

Stewart Avenue and Sixty-Fifth Street. 
Copyrighted 1891. 



INDEX. 



^f 

Sofi'S ... . • 5 

FrsH '-^ 



VK('.kt.\bi,i-.s 
Kc.cs 



.S.\I,.\1).S 

F.KIC.VI), liRK.VKI'AST C.\Ki;s, i:Tc 
rASTR\- 

Cakks .... 

PRlCSIUiVl'.S .VNO I'KKI.IvS 

PuoniNC.s vxi) I)]-,ssi-:kt.s 



26 



OVSTKR.S, KTC. 

MR.ATS 

VE.\L '^"^ 

:\IrTT()X .KM) I, AMI! 32 

Pork ... 33 

POl.I.TRV . . . ■ ■ ,->o 



4S 



Wf.i.sh R.\R!-;r.iT 49 

50 



56 
64 
6S 

So 






^ I IMTKODUeTOKg. 

In offering to the public this first edition of the '•Universal 
Cook Book" the ladies in charge of its publication desire to re- 
turn their thanks to the many firms whose advertising patronage 
has assured success to the enterprise. 

We believe we can conscientiouslv'recommend every article 
found advertised herein. 

We gratefully acknowledge a generous donation of Evapor- 
ated Cream and delicious Ice Cream from the Helvetia Milk Con- 
densing Co.; a quantity of "New England" Condensed Mince 
Meat from the manufacturer. T. E. Dougherty, and an elegant 
silver "Self Pouring" Teapot from Paine, Diehl & Co., of Phila- 
delphia. 

Attention is called to the Can Opener advertised by Boothby 
& Co. It is a time and temper saver and renders can opening no 
longer an unpleasant task. 

Our obligations extend to the King's Daughters of Province- 
town, Mass., who have kindlv supplied many excellent recipes 
from their own cook book. 

Especial care has been observed in the selection of recipes^ all op 
which have been closely scanned and revised by the members of Mrs. 
Riley's cooking class who have also added a large number of new and 
valuable formulas. 

We have endeavored to compile a useful, practical, "every 
day" cook book and with confidence in its merits we submit 
the result of our efforts. 

Thh liRDiES' Aid Society, 

Engleu/ood Univ/ersalist Church. 



First U^iVEi^sAiiiST Churgh, 

5teu/art /)ue. 9 6^\:\) St., f r^^^leu/ood, 
CHICAGO. 



Sunday Services, ior,o a. m. 7 ST'RANGB'RS 

Young I'eople's Meeting, 7:00 p. ni. ^ CCRTDIALLL] 

Sunday School, 12:10 p. ni. 7 mVlTE:P. 

Pastor. 

FLOREN'CE E. KOLLOCK, 6565 Harvard Street, 

Trustees. 

JOHN W. MOORE, Preside^-t, 6510 Yale Street. 

' MRS. E. W. TRUE, SEgRETARV, 323 vSixty-first St. 

G. W. CARSON, J. A. STODDARD, 

A. J. HOAGLAND, J. F. OLMSTEAD, 

W. M. BROWN, E. A. RICE, W. W. CARTER. 
Secretary. 

S. S. WILLARD. 6552 Perry Ave. 

Treasurer. 

\V. S. WOOD, 6638 LaP'ayette Avenue. 

Sunday School. 

.\shleigh C. Halliwell, Superintendent. Mrs. S. E. Jennings, Vice-Superintendent. 

S. C. Mason, Secretary. Miss Kittie Baldwin, Asst. Secretary. 
H. P. Ludden, Treasurer. Col. Francis W. Parker, Senior Bible Class. 

L-adies' Aid Society. 

Mrs. J. S. Osgood, President. Mrs. F. Salter, Mrs. A. W. Todd, Mrs. Ervin A. Rice, \'ice- 

Presidents. 
Mrs. I). W. Miller, .Secretary. Mrs. W. S. Wood, Treasurer. 

young People's Christian Union. 

Fred Guthrie, President. Emma Brown, Vice- President. Kufus Scott, Secretary. 

Grace Monroe, Treasurer. 

King's "Daughters. 

Helle Brayton, President. Maggie Weir, Vice-President. Carrie Jennings, Secretary. 
Lilian Dean, Treas. ISIrs. Osgood, Miss lloagland. Miss Brown, Directors. 



THE 



ijniversal Cook Book, 



SOUPS. 



STOCK I. 

Take six pounds of shin of beef ; wipe it and cut meat from the bone 
into small pieces; put bone and part of meat into a kettle and cover with 
four quarts of cold water. Let it soak a half hour. Take marrow which 
was cut from meat and melt in a pan. Slice three onions and fry brown 
in marrow, skim into the kettle and put in remaining meat and fry brown; 
add this to soup, then three tablespoons each of carrot and turnips, two 
stalks celery, little parsley and bayleaf, ten cloves, ten pepper corns and 
three teaspoons mixed herbs, tied in a cloth. One tablespoon salt. 
Simmer eight or ten hours and strain. Cool quickly. Remove the fat, 
allow white and shell of one egg for each quart of stock. Beat egg and 
mix well with cold stock. Then heat and boil five minutes. Remove, add 
one-half cup cold water and let it stand until ready to strain. Strain 
through napkin or double cheese cloth laid over fine strainer. 



THE UNIVERSAL 



STOCK 2. 

Procure a shin of beef. Have it broken in parts, let it boil slowly at 
the back of the range all day in a gallon of water; at night skim out the 
bones and meat, and set the soup away in a cool place, closely covered. 
Next morning you will have a thick jelly covered with fat which should be 
skimmed off, leaving a fine base for soup, which may be weakened if 
preferred. If not, add for soup an onion and a piece of butter, size of an 
^gg, which have been browned in same pan, a tablespoonful of browned 
flour, mixed with a teaspoonful of celery salt, and a tablespoonful of 
Worchcstershire sauce; cut up a carrot, a turnip, a root of celery, 
a little parsley, thyme or summer savory, and to all add a few cloves (half 
a dozen) and pepper to taste. Add all and let them cook till the vegetables 
are done. Then strain and serve. 



SAVE THE BONES FOR SOUP. 

Many housekeepers throw away the stock for good soups. You 
should save the scraps of beefsteak and the bones of a roast. Two or 
three kinds make it all the better. The carcass of a turkey or a pair of 
fowls make excellent soup with rice or barley. Boil the bones for five or 
six hours, let stand over night, then remove the fat and strain. Any kind 
of soup can be made by adding tomato, vermicelli, macaroni or chopped 
vegetables. 

SOUPS. 

All vegetables are available for soup. The favorite vegetable soup 
made from fresh tomatoes, corn and I,ima beans is almost as good when 
the canned vegetables are employed. For chicken soup with rice and 
milk, no herbs but parsley should be used. The shin of veal or beef is the 
legitimate soup-bone; but any other bone may be used. Crack the bones 
before boiling, for the sake of the marrow, and do not put salt in until the 
meat has been well boiled — it has a tendency to harden the fibers and 
prevent the flow of the jviices of the meat. You cannot well boil it too 
long, short of the time when the meat boils into rags and strings. If kept 
where they will not sour, and heated slowly so as not to scorch, most soups 
are better the second dav than the first. 



COOK BOOK. 




OLD VERSION. 

A Stitch in Time Saves 
Nine." 



NEW VERSION. 

To Stitch on Wheeler & Wil- 
son No. 9, Saves Time." 



SONG OF= THE "NO. 9." 



jMy dress is of fine polished oak, 
As rich as the finest fur cloak, 
And for handsome design 
You just should see mine — 

No. 9, No. Q. 

I'm beloved by the poor and the rich, 
For both I impartially stitch; 
In the cabin I shine. 
In the mansion I'm fine- 
No. 9, No. 9. 



I never get surly nor tired, 
With zeal I always am fired; 
To hard work I incline, 
For rest I ne'er pine — 

No. 9, No. 9. 

I am easily purchased by all. 

With instalments that monthly do fall; 

And when I am thine, 

Then life is benign — 

No. 9, No. 9. 



To the Paris Exposition I went. 
Upon getting the Grand Prize intent; 
I left all behind. 
The Grand Prize was mine — 

No. 9, No. 9. 



\/heelef ^ «WiIsoti 
JJeLfidfactarii]^ (Jo. 

185 & 187 Wabash Ave. 



Englewood Agents, 

Gordoti $ JTtidefsoti, 

6221 Wentworth Ave. 



THE UNIVERSAI. 



VEAL SOUP WITH SPAGHETTI. 

Three pounds veal, knuckle or scrag, with the bones broken, and 
meat cut off, three quarts water, one-fourth pound spaghetti. Boil the 
meat in the water alone until reduced to shreds, three hours at least. 
Cook the spaghetti, broken into inch pieces, in water, in a vessel by itself, 
till tender. Add a little butter to the spaghetti, just as it is done; strain 
the meat out of its soup; season to taste; put in the spaghetti and the 
water it was cooked in. Let it boil up once and serve. 

CONSOMME. 

Five pounds of clear beef cut from the lower part of the round, five 
quarts cold water; cut the beef into small pieces, add the water and let it 
come to a boil gradually; skim carefully and set where it will keep at the 
boiling point eight or ten hours; strain and set away to cool. In the morn- 
ing skim off all the fat, pour the soup into a kettle, being careful to keep 
back the sediment. Put into the soup one onion, one stalk of celery, two 
sprigs of parsley, two sprigs of thyme, two of summer savory, two leaves of 
sage, two bay leaves, twelve pepper corns, six whole cloves; boil gently 
twenty minutes, strain through a napkin, first seasoning with salt and 
pepper to taste; tie the herbs together before putting into the soup. 

BOUILLON. 

Two pounds lean beef chopped fine, pour over it one quart cold water, 
put it in a porcelain kettle, cover tight and let it simmer four hours. 
Strain off the tea and let it cool, beat the white of one egg and add to the 
tea, put it on the stove and stir until it comes to a boil; let it 
boil until it becomes perfectly clear, skimming, then strain through a fine 
napkin and season with salt to taste. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Three pints of rich milk, one pint of mashed potato, two tablespoonfuls 
of butter, pepper and salt to taste. Boil the milk, add the potato and boil 
again, stirring frequently that the potato may become thoroughly dissolved, 
and season just before serving, Serve very hot. 



COOK BOOK. 



BEST AND CHEAPEST. 



BooTPY's iMPRsvED c^N Opener 



s: 
+j 

c 
o 






c 
'£ 
o 







m 
< 

D) n 

< Q) 

9-" 



o 



0) 

o 

c 



The above cut represents one of our Openers with a can nearly opened. 
It![sho\vs a clean, smooth hole, with edges turned under so it is impossible 
to get cut by the rough edges. 

The merits of this Can Opener are: 

I. — It leaves no ragged edges to get cut on. 

2. — A can may be opened in one-half the time it takes with an}- other 
opener. 

3. — It is adjustable to different sized cans. 

4. — it is just the Can Opener every family needs. 

Directions.— Oofti all cans on the bottom. Take the handle with points on it in 
left hand, throw the other haTidle around to the left, fitvss or drive the points and knife 
into the can placf thumb of left hand on edge of the can, hold firm and pull with right hand 
only. SS" Remember and do not bear down with the right hand. 

Sample by mail, post paid, 20 cents. 

los Middle St., Portland, Maine. BOOTHBCJ & 



eo. 



10 THE UNIVERSAL 



ONION SOUP. 

Three pints of milk in which six good-sized onions have been boiled 
makes a delicious soup, seasoned to taste with butter, salt and pepper, 
thickened, with two tablespoonfuls of flour made smooth in cold milk. 
Onions are much nicer boiled in milk than in water. 

CORN SOUP. 

Eight large ears; cut off the grains and scrape well the cob; cover it 
with water; boil until perfectly well done. Be careful not to put too much 
water with it. Add two quarts of milk; let it come to a boil; stir in two 
tablespoonfuls of butter rolled in two tablespoonfuls of flour; let it boil 
for lo minutes. Pour the soup on the yolks of three eggs well beaten, 
and serve. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Stew one half can tomatoes until soft, and strain. If very sour add one 
half teaspoonful soda, then one quart of Stock i. before it is cleared; one 
teaspoonful sugar, salt and pepper to taste. If desired thicken with one 
tablespoon each of flour and butter cooked together. 

Butter slices of stale bread, cut in small squares, place in tin pan butter 
side up and brown in a quick oven. Serve with the soup. 

TOMATO SOUP WITH MILK. 

Four very large tomatoes cut up fine; or one can of tomatoes; put on 
the stove with one quart of water and let this come to a boil and add one 
even teaspoonful of soda dissolved in water. Boil three quarters of an hour 
and add one pint of milk, also pepper, salt and butter. When this boils, 
thicken with cracker dust and serve. 

BISQUE OF TOMATOES. 

To one quart of tomatoes, add one quart of water, one small onion, 
twelve cloves; boil one hour; strain; add piece of butter size of an egg; salt 
and pepper to taste; one teaspoon corn starch dissolved in a little milk, one 
half teaspoon of soda dissolved in a little water. Scald one quart of milk 
and add just before serving. 



COOK BOOK. 11 



pvO von Ejp5 BI^Egp? 



■ffih -&- -©• 



If you do, then you are interested in having 
only the Best Flour. This can be secured of any 
first-class grocer by asking for 

^ut)crlativc Flour 

Made in the famous 

Washburn Mills, ® ® 

® ® /WinnealDolis, Minn. 



DAILY CAPACITY 9.000 BARRELS. 



Only the Choicest Minnesota and Dakota 

wheat is used in the manufacture of our Superlative 

Flour. To get the genuine Washbum Milis FlOUr 

see that our firm name z'n full is on each barrel or 

sack 

WASHBURN CROSBY CO. 



12 THE UNIVERSAL, 



OYSTER SOUP. 

Pour one pint of water on one quart oysters, stir well and take out 
singly with the fingers and drain in colander. Strain, heat and skim the 
liquor, add another pint of water or milk, season with two teaspoons of salt 
and pepper. When boiling add oysters, stir gently and when ready to boil 
again, remove and serve. 

BISQUE OF OYSTERS. 

One quart oysters, one quart cream, one pint chicken stock, if you 
don't have it use water. One scant pint stale bread free of crust, one bay 
leaf, one sprig of pansley, one stalk of celery, one small slice of onion, a 
bit of whole mace, two tablespoons of butter, one tablespoon flour, 3'olks of 
four eggs, pepper and salt to taste. 

Wash and chop the oysters, .strain, heat and skim the liquid. After 
skimming add one half the chicken stock or water, the 03^sters and season- 
ing. vSimmer twenty minutes; cook bread and rest of chicken stock or 
water until soft. Strain the first saucepan into the bread pressing all juice 
out of oysters then strain it back again. Keep one half cup of cream, put 
the remainder into double boiler to heat, then add two tablespoons of flour 
and two of butter cooked together. Then add the first mixture and just 
before serving add the yolks of two eggs well beaten with the half cup of 
cream. The soup may be prepared some time in advance and then kept 
over hot water until wanted, when the egg and cream should be added. 

PUREE OF SALMON. 

Remove oil. bone and skin from one half can salmon. Chop fish very 
fine. Cook one .slice onion in one quart milk ten minutes or more. Re- 
move onion and thicken milk with one tablespoon each of butter and flour 
cooked together. Season with one tea.spoon of salt, one saltspoon pepper 
add salmon ; when hot serve. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Clean the chicken and separate it at the joints. Remove all the skin 
and fat. Cover the chicken with cold water. Add one tablespoonful of 
salt, one saltspoonful of pepper, one small onion, .sliced. Simmer until the 



COOK BOOK. 13 



^ DOBBINS'*^ 
F LECTRIC SOAP. 

Is for sale everywhere, and has since 1869 been 
acknowledged by all to be 

THE BEST FAMILY SOAP IN THE WORLD. 



Its quality has never been changed since we first made it. We ask 
ever}- lady using it to save all the Outside Wrapj)ers and donate them to the 
Ladies' Aid Society of the Universalist Church of Englewood, 111., as we 
have promised to pa}- this Society cash for all the Outside Wrappers of our 
Soap they will collect and send us. This will give needed financial assist- 
ance to a very worth}- charity at no expense to you. This is a permanent 
oflFer on our part, and we hope to send the Society a large amount of 
money every year. This Soap is for sale by your grocer. 

I. L. CKAGI/N & CO., 

2A6 Lake St., Chicago. 



I wish to say, wholly unsolicited by anyone, that I have used Dobbins' 
Electric So.\p and think I could not possibly do without it. It is not 
only labor-saving, but preserves the fabric from the wear and tear of rub- 
bing. For flannels it has no superior. MRS. D. W. MILLER, 

62 1. S IVIichigan Ave., Chicago. 



14 THE UNIVERSAL 



chicken is tender. Remove the best part of the meat, and put the bones 
and gristle back and simmer until the bones are clean. Strain the broth. 
Remove the fat. Put the broth on to boil again and add to it the rice 
which has been thoroughly washed and soaked in cold water, and the nic- 
est portions of meat cut into small pieces. Simmer until the rice is tender. 
Add seasoning to taste, and serve at once. 



(g\©S\^ 



FISH. 



TO BOIL SALMON. 

Allow twenty minutes for boiling every pound. Wrap it in a floured 
cloth and lay it in the kettle. Make the water very salt. Skim it well. 
Serve it with drawn butter or egg sauce. 



SALMON LOAF. 

Extract the bones from the contents of one can of salmon, and rub to 
a paste with two large spoons of soft butter. Add two-thirds of a cup of 
crumbs moistened with half a cup of milk. Season with salt, pepper and 
lemon juice. Add last four beaten eggs. Place in well buttered quart 
mould or pan, cover and steam one hour. Turn out on platter and pour 
sauce around made as follows: Let one large cup of milk come to a boil, 
then thicken with one tablespoon of corn starch dissolved in a little milk; 
add one tablespoon of butter and season with salt and pepper. Add a beat- 
en egg last. Garnish the edge of the platter with lemon, or parsley. 



COOK BOOKt 



15 




FKBSH EVE-Ry HOUK. 



Assorted Buttercups, 50 cts. per lb. 
Assorted Chips, 50 cts. per lb. 

Washington TaflFv', 50 cts. per lb. 



Assorted Strings, 50 cts. per lb. 
Everton Toffee, 50 cts. per lb. 
New Fash'd Molas's 50 c. per lb. 



Qotne and try odr beliciods 
Ice Qt'ealn Soda 

Branch, 863 Broadway, N. Y. 161 State St., Chicago. 






«FUW 



DELICATE, FRAGRANT, LASTING. 

Its frajrrance Is that of the opening buds of Spring. 
Once used you will have no other. 

If(y«nr dealer daean't keep It (end 10c In 
•tampn for a (ample Dottle tu 

JAS .S. KIRK & CO., Chicago. 

SHANDON BELLS; the only Toilet Soap 




16 THE UNIVERSAI. 



FISH TURBOT. 

Arrange cold fish (either white or trout) broken into flakes, in layers 
in a buttered dish with crumbs, hard boiled egg and milk gravy, using but- 
ter, pepper and salt. Cover with crumbs and bake in moderate oven half 
an hour. 



BAKED WHITE FISH. 

Split a good sized white fish and extract back-bone; lay in a buttered 
dripping pan with skin down, dredge well with flour, add lumps of butter, 
season and pour half a cup of water in the pan; bake about forty minutes 
in moderate oven. 



SALMON ON TOAST. 

Heat thoroughly the contents of a can of salmon; prepare one and one- 
half cups of milk gravy, break fish in flakes and place neatly on slices of 
toast, sprinkle with lemon juice, cover with gravy and serve. 



STUFFED AND BAKED TROUT. 

Make stufl"ing with one cup of cracker crumbs, one-third cup of melted 
butter, salt, pepper and a teaspoon each of chopped onion, parsley, capers 
and pickles. Moisten a little with warm water. After cleaning the fish, 
wa.sh and wipe well; stuff and sew- up. If narrow, skewer in shape of Sand 
fasten skewers in, then place on fish sheet. Rub all over with salt, pepper 
and butter. Cut gashes two inches apart in fish and put in narrow strips 
of fat salt pork. Dredge with flour and place in oven. When flour 
browns add water and baste occasionally. It should bake an hour or more 
and must be removed carefully to a platter well heated; the pork and 
skewers removed and sauce poured around it. 

Hollandaise Sauce. ^ — Cream half a cup of butter, add one teaspoon of 
flour and yolks of two eggs singly, when smooth add salt, cayenne pepper 
and lemon juice gradually. Before serving add half a cup of boiling water 
and stir over water until thickened. 



COOK BOOK. 



"IMPERIAL" is the Standard. 




Beware of Inferior Imitations. 



18 THE UNIVERSAL. 



FISH CHOWDER. 

Take two pounds of haddock or cod, and cut in two inch cubes, and 
also an equal amount of potatoes in thin slices. Soak potatoes in cold 
water then place in boiling water for five minutes, and drain. Cut a two 
inch cube of fat salt pork into dice and fry in a pan; slice a large onion thin 
and fry in pork fat. Pour fat through a strainer into a kettle, put in 
potatoes and cover with boiling water. When boiling again add fish and 
seasoning and simmer fifteen minutes, then add a tablespoon of butter and 
a quart of hot milk. Place six split butter crackers in a tureen and pour 
chowder over. 

TURBANS OF FISH. 

Fillet two fish and season pieces with salt, pepper and lemon juice and 
put in cool place half an hour or more, then dip them in melted butter, 
roll in fine crumbs, egg beaten with water, and crumbs again. Roll these 
up and fasten each with a tooth-pick. Fry in hot deep lard until brown 
and serve with tartare sauce. 

Tartare Sauce. — ^To mayonnaise or other salad dressing add chopped 
pickles, olives, capers, parsley, one or all. 

« 

FISH CROQUETTES. 

Take equal amount of cold flaked fish and white sauce made in pro- 
portions of 2 spoons each of butter and flour to one pint of milk. Season 
with lemon juice and salt and pepper. Shape in croquettes, roll in egg, 
crumbs, and egg again and fry brown in smoking hot lard. 

FISH BALLS. 

Soak half a pound of codfish over night. Place on the stove in cold 
water in the morning, let it come to a boil, remove and drain. Pick it 
over, remove bones and chop fine. Then add a pint of hot mashed pota- 
toes, and a well beaten egg. Mix thorough ly, form into balls and fry in 
part pork fat and part lard. 



COOK BOOK. 



19 



Thistle * Brand 







■Hams and 



• • • 



Breakfast Bacon % 
Are the Best. . . 



International packing (^o. 



Union Stock yards, 



Sold in every 
First-Class 
Meat Ma rket. 



-^Chicago. 



20 THE UNIVERSAL 



OgSTE-RS. 



PLAIN OYSTER STEW. 

Take one pint oysters, add half cup cold water, stir with fork. Take 
out of liquor with fork, one at a time; put in a sauce pan with part of the 
liquor strained through fine sieve; put on the stove and when it comes to a 
boil, add one quart milk and skim carefully. Let it come to a boil again 
but do not boil, add salt to taste, one third cup butter and stir until butter 
is all dissolved; serve. 

OYSTER CUTLETS. 

Soak two tablespoons of bread crumbs in liquor from one cup of 
oysters. Chop 03'sters fine and add crumbs, one cup chopped chicken and 
salt, pepper and lemon juice. Cook one tablespoon each of flour and 
butter until frothy, add the oyster mixture and cook three minutes; add 
two well beaten eggs and stir until it thickens. Spread on a platter to cool; 
then butter cutlet mould well, dip in crumbs, fill with oyster mixture, drop 
into crumbs, and repeat until all are formed. Then dip in one beaten egg 
with one tablespoon of water, and in crumbs again. Fry in smoking hot 
lard until brown. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Open the oysters and put them in a colander for about half an hour. 
They must be as well drained as possible. Then dip them in egg and roll 
in bread crumbs in the following way: Beat one or two or three eggs 
(according to the quantity of oysters to be fried), as for an omelet, turn 



COOK BOOK. 



21 



PACK 




3'ou 
wall 



You would not let your neigh- 
bor at the table help himself 
from your plate; then why to 
your salt ? You would not eat 
from the leavings from his 
plate; then why his salt? Be- 
cause you can't get anything 
that will hold salt and sift it 
out. For 25 cents we will send 

an article that the salt in it may be in^any conceivable condition, it 

pass out as wanted. 



R»INt.DIEHL « CO 



UNIVERSAL SCOOP. 



WITH 



PILLSBURVS/ 
FLOUR 




ATTACH- 
I MENT. 



USING ONE BANC Ol^LiV. 




An Ice Cream Freezer ano 
Keystone Egg Beater. 



Paine, Diehl & Co., 

1430 S. Penn Square, ^ PHILADELPHIA 



THE UNIVERSAL 



the oysters into the eggs and stir gently; then take one after another, roll 
in bread crumbs; place each one in your left hand, in taking them 
from the crumbs, and with the other hand press gently on it. Put them 
away in a cool place for about half an hour, and then dip again in egg; 
roll in bread crumbs and press in the hand as before. While you are pre- 
paring them set some fat on the fire in a pan, and when hot enough drop 
the oysters in, stir gently, take off with a skimmer when fried, turn into a 
colander, add salt, and serve hot. 



ESCALOPED OYSTERS. 

Butter the sides and bottom of the baking dish. Examine the oysters 
carefully and remove any pieces of shell; then cover the bottom of the dish 
with a thick layer of oysters, put lumps of butter thickly over the top and 
sprinkle with salt and pepper. Next lay a layer, not too deep, of bread 
crumbs and pounded crackers, half and half. Fill the dish in this manner 
with alternate layers of oysters, seasoning, bread and cracker crumbs, 
covering the top with crumbs and lumps of butter. Do not add liquid of 
any kind, and if there has not been too large a proportion of bread and 
cracker used it will be sufficiently moist, and will be much better made in 
this way. One-half hour at least will be required in baking. 



OYSTER CHOWDER. 

Wash one quart oysters, pick over, drain and boil the oyster liquor; 
skim; cut a one-inch cube of salt pork into small pieces and fry; fry one 
onion cut fine in the pork fat until yellow; skim out the scraps of pork and 
onion, and put in three-fourths of a quart of pared and sliced potatoes 
which have been parboiled; cover with boiling water and cook until tender 
then add the oyster liquor and the oysters; cook until their edges curl; add 
two tablespoonfuls flour, moistened with a little cold water until a thin 
paste; cook five miniites; add one pint hot milk, one tablespoonful butter, 
salt and pepper to taste; add a few oyster crackers and serve. The onion 
and pork may be omitted from the above rule if desired. The potatoes are 
parboiled to extract any bitter taste they may have. The thickening can 
be omitted if preferred. 



COOK BOOK. 



^jPlSPC- 



YOUR GELOCEIR. 



Mini?) 



FLOUR 



w 



w 




MuIiq) 



FLOUR 



19 



JOHK W. ECK^HflHT & CO 

SObE PHOPRIETO^S, 
Washington & Union Sts, Chicago. 



24 THE UNIVERSAIv 



STUFFED OYSTERS. 

Hash and drain on several thicknesses of cloth some large oysters. 
Season with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Make a forcemeat by chopping 
a quarter of a pound of raw veal, then rub through a seive. Cook a quar- 
ter of a cup of stale bread with half a cup of cream until smooth, add meat 
and cook a minute, remove and add salt, pepper and lemon juice, and 
beaten white of one egg. Mix well and when cool spread on half of the 
oysters. Lay on the other half and press together. Season fine crumbs 
with salt and pepper, roll oysters in them then egg and crumbs again. 
Fry in lard. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 



Make a dozen shells of rich puff paste. Prepare oysters by making a 
pint of rich sauce with part cream. Season this and add oyster liquor 
from a pint of oysters. Then add oysters and cook until plump. When 
ready to serve pour into heated shells. 




COOK BOOK. 



Uelicious ^nd Kefreshin 




62/, AajT»a,l warvf ajxother^zi^ss of 
Aires' Root Bcek." 



J^ires' f^oot geer 



Makes the purest and most delicious drink in the world. Sparkling 
and appetizing. An article of real merit and genuine worth, commanding 
attention by its intrinsic value, purifying the blood, cleansing the system 
of poisonous humors, and making a clear, rosy complexion. 

Do not be put off by dealers telling you that some other kind is just as 
good. Insist upon getting Hires' and see that you get no other. 



26 THE UNIVERSAL 



MEATS. 



ROAST BEEF. 

Lay the meat on a rack in a pan, and dredge all over with salt, pepper 
and flour. Put it in a very hot oven with two or three tablespoon fuls of 
drippings of pieces of the beef fat placed in the pan. Put the skin side 
down at first, that the heat may harden the juices in the lean part. Baste 
often and dredge twice with salt and flour. When seared all over, turn 
and bring the skin side up for the final basting and browning. Bake ten 
miinutes to a pound if liked very rare. If there be any danger of burning 
the fat in the pan, add a little hot water after the flour is browned. 

GRAVY. 

Remove the meat when done to a heated dish, skim the drippings, add 
a little boiling water, a little browned flour, and boil up once, then strain 
it and send to the table in a gravy-boat. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

Beat three eggs very light, add salt and one pint of milk, and one cup 
of flour. Bake in hot gem pans. Baste with the drippings from the beef. 
Serve as a garnish to roast beef. 

POTTED BEEF. 

Take a large beef shank and put in cold water. Boil until perfectly 
tender. Remove bone and cartilage, chop meat fine and replace in the ket- 
tle with the liquor which should be one quart. Let it simmer and season 
with salt, pepper and mace. Press and cut in slices. 



COOK BOOK. 27 



Tabasco 



It is simply the Pulp of the 

Ripe Pepper Extracted 

by Pressure. 



Pepper 



OR 
LIQUID PEPPER. 



Sauce, 



The seed of this pepper was obtained from Central America and by 
careful cultivation in Louisiana for many years has been so improved in 
strength, flavor and aroma as to have become a new variety of Red Pepper, 
superior to all others. The pulp is so handled as to retain all the flavor, 
strength, aroma and color of the ripe fruit, and to keep unimpaired in any 
climate. It excites the appetite, promotes digestion, and is pronounced by 
connoisseurs to be the finest condiment in the world. For medicinal pur- 
poses it recommends itself by its purity, strength and difi"usible form. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

E. MclLHENNrS SON, 

NEW IBERIA, 

COR SALE BY ALL , ^. nci axta 

r WHOLESALE GROCERS. LUUlblANA. 



28 THE UNIVERSAL 



BOILED CORN BEEF. 

Put the beef in a kettle, and if very salt, cover well with cold water, if 
only slightly corned, use boiling water, skim while boiling. Boil a piece 
weighing eight pounds five hours. 

MEAT PIE. 

Cut two pounds of beef in inch pieces and stew till tender. Remove 
the meat and add to the water in which it was stewed a little salt, pepper 
and flour. Line a deep plate with nice paste, put in the meat and turn over 
it part of the gravy which you have prepared. Add small pieces of butter. 
Cover with paste; make a gash in the centre, ornament with strips of paste; 
and bake till the crust is done. Serve with srravv. 



STUFFED BEEFSTEAK. 

Prepare dressing as for chicken; take flank steak; trim off' fat, then 
spread the dressing on; roll up; tie, and put in a pan with a little water. 
Bake one hour. 

REMNANTS OF ROAST BEEF. 

Take pieces left from roast beef. Cut in pieces about the size of dice, 
put in deep dish, add gravy, season with pepper and salt. Boil potatoes, 
mash and prepare them as you would for mashed potatoes with the addi- 
tion of an egg. Put this over the meat, cover and put in the oven and bake 
about an hour. A short time before it is done, remove the cover and brown. 

A GOOD BREAKFAST DISH. 

Take small pieces left from roast beef, veal mutton or chicken. Chop 
fine, season with salt, pepper and onion chopped fine if liked. Cook this 
up in enough gravy to moisten. Toast slices of bread, dip them in warm 
water and spread with butter, place the toast on hot platter, spread the 
chopped mixture on each slice of bread and serve. 



COOK BOOK. 



29 



Xbe Best Stafeh in the World! 




p4 
o 

< 



CdEOUALTO DOUBLE THE DUANTITYDF ANY OTHER STARmV) 



A NOVEL INVENTION! 
REQUIRES NO COOKING 

For Collar*, Cuffs, Shirt Bosoms and 
tine Laundry purposes, prepared by a 
New Process. The Celluloid Starch has 
no equal, look for our name and trado 
mark and take no other. 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS, 



^ARCH Company 



fjEw Haven,Conn.U.S.A. 



•AM'L CRUMP LABEL CO., N.Y. 

Trade Supplied by 



o 

> 

CO 

> 



o 
o 



R. M. BIRDS ALL, 27 South Water St., Chicago. 



30 THE UNIVERSAL 



IRISH STEW. 

Cut two pounds of the neck of mutton into small pieces, put it into a 
kettle with one onion sliced and a bunch of pot herbs nicely dressed. Sim- 
mer gently for one hour, then add two tablespoonfuls of rice, simmer ten 
minutes, add two potatoes cut into dice, and while they are cooking ten 
minutes longer, make your dumplings. Put a pint of flour into a bowl, add 
a teaspoonful of salt and a heaping teaspoonful baking powder, moisten 
this with a gill of water; the dough must be soft. Form it lightly into balls, 
drop them on top of the stew, cover the kettle, boil ten minutes, season and 
serve. 



VEAL. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Three and one half pounds of minced veal (the leg is best for this pur- 
pose) three eggs, well beaten, one tablespoonful of pepper, and one salt, 
one grated nutmeg, four rolled crackers, one tablespoonful of cream, two 
tablespoonful of butter; mix these together and make into a loaf, roast and 
baste like other meats. 

BREADED VEAL CUTLETS. 

Wipe and remove bone and tough membrane from a slice of veal, from 
the leg, shape for serving, season with salt and pepper, roll in fine cracker 
crumbs, then egg, and crumbs again. Fry slices of salt pork and brown 
the cutlets in the fat. Then place in stew pan. Make a brown gravy with 
one tablespoon butter or pork fat, two of flour, and one and one half cups 
stock or water. Season with lemon, Worcestershire sauce, horse-radish, 
or tomato, pour gravy over cutlets, and simmer 45 minutes or till tender. 



COOK BOOK. 81 



ROAST VEAL. 

Take a loin of veal, make an incision in the flap and fill with dressing, 
secure it with small skewers and dredge the veal with a little flour, slightly 
salted. Bake in a moderate oven, and baste often; at first with a little salt 
and water, and afterward with the drippings in the pan. When done skim 
the gravy, and thicken with browned flour. Dressing, bread crumbs, 
chopped thyme and parsley; a Itttle pepper, salt, one egg and a little butter. 

MINCED VEAL AND ECCS. 

One quart of cold veal chopped rather coarse, one teaspoonful lemon 
juice, one cup water, two tablespoon fuls of butter, one teaspoonful flour. 
Heat thoroughly and dish on slices of bread toasted. Put a dropped egg in 
the centre of each slice and serve very hot. 

SWEKT-BREADS (Very nice). 

Put the sweet-breads in cold water for a few hours; take them out and 
parboil. Roll in egg and cracker crumbs and fry in butter to a nice brown. 
On a hot platter have butter, pepper and salt, place the sweet-breads on the 
platter and serve. 

CREAMED SWEET-BREADS. 

Place in cold water, remove pipes and membrane, cook in boiling salt- 
ed water with one tablespoon lemon juice, twenty minutes. Drain, cover 
with cold water, and change until cold. Cut in dice, and heat in sauce. 
For one pint, make white sauce with one and one half cups cream and one 
and one half tablespoonfuls each flour and butter. Season with celery salt, 
pepper and salt. 




32 THE UNIVERSAL 



MUTTO/N A/NB LAMB. 



LAMB OR MUTTON CHOP. 

Separate from the bone. Broil like beef steak, or to fry dip each chop 
in beaten egg and cracker crumbs and fry in pork fat. Add salt when half 
cooked. Have pepper, butter and salt in a hot platter. Place on the chops 
and serve. Make gravy by turning off the fat and adding water and flour. 
Let it boil and strain. 

MUTTON TURKEY. 

Have the bone taken from a good plump leg of mutton and fill the cavi- 
ty with turkey dressing; sew it up and put the joint in a pot of boiling water, 
and let boil slowly for half an hour. Take it out with some of the liquor 
and put in the oven to roast for an hour and a half, basting it frequently. 
Serve hot with potatoes, turnips, and cranberry or apple sauce. 

ESCALLOPED MUTTON. 

Cut thin slices of roast meat, free from skin and fat, season with salt 
and pepper. Place a layer of crumbs in baking dish, then one of meat, then 
03'sters strained and seasoned, then tomato, or brown sauce, then repeat, 
finishing with thick layer of crumbs. Bake until brown. 



COOK BOOK. 3S 



PO-RK. 



TO CHOOSE PORK. 

The rind should be thin and smooth, the fat thick and white, the lean 
light of color mixed with little particles of fat. 

ROAST PORK. 

Wash and dredge well with flour. Place in the pan with a little hot 
water. Season when half done. Make gravy as for roast beef. Serve apple 
sauce with roast pork. 

PORK CHOPS OR STEAK. 

Separate from the bone, dip in lieaten egg and cracker and fry as 
lamb chop. 

PORK AND STRING BEANS. 

String and cut in small pieces one half peck of beans. Place one half 
pound of lean salt pork or beef in a kettle of water. Change the water 
after it has boiled up once. Put in the beans and cook slowly for three or 
four hours. Let nearly all the water simmer away. Turn into a dish and 
add milk, butter, pepper and salt, if needed. 

BAKED BEANS. 

Soak one quart beans over night, pour off the water and cook in fresh 
water until they crack open; then put into a deep earthen dish, cover 
with the water, put into the centre of the dish one-half pound of salt pork 
which should be scored across the rind, add one tablespoonful molasses. 
Keep nearl}- covered with water until two thirds done, then allow them to 
brown. Bake in moderate oven all day. 



34 THE UNIVERSAL 



TO BOIL HANI. 

Wash and scrape well. Put into cold water with half a teaspoonful of 
soda. Boil up once, turn off the water. Add hot water to more than 
cover the ham. Keep plenty of water in and boil slowly three or four 
hours. Take out of the kettle and place in a baking pan. Skin and trim 
well. Spread over the following dressing and bake one half hour. 

BOILED HANI DRESSING. 

Eight crackers rolled fine and sifted. Beat two eggs well, add two- 
thirds cup sugar, one teaspoonful mustard, one half teaspoonful cayenne 
pepper. Wet crackers for swelling before adding eggs and seasoning. 
Beat all to a thick paste. 

BOILED HANI AND ECCS. 

Boil two pounds of ham, leaving on the fat till done. Chop fine with 
four hard boiled eggs. Press and slice cold. If one wishes seasoning add 
mustard while mixing. 

FRIED HANI AND ECCS. 

Remove the fat and bone from the ham. Fry the fat to a crisp and 
place on the platter. Put in the ham, cut in pieces and cook quickly. 
Place on the platter. Turn off nearly all the fat to fry the eggs in. Make 
gravy. Fry the eggs and place one on each piece of ham. Garnish with 
parsley and serve. 

HANI AND ECCS. 

Chop finely some cold boiled ham, fat and lean together, say a pound 
to four eggs; put a piece of butter in the pan, then the ham; let it get well 
warmed through, then beat the eggs light; stir them in briskly. 

CREAMED HANI. 

One pint minced ham, one pint white sauce, one and one half cups 
milk, one and one half tablespoons each flour and butter, serve on toast. 



COOK BOOK. 35 



FRIED LIVER. 

Soak the liver in warm water one half hour. Fry slices of fat salt 
pork until brown, take out the pork. Dip each piece of liver in flour and 
fry in the fat. Arid salt and pepper while frj-ing. Place the liver on a 
platter with bits of butter and pour gravy over it. 



<Q\^^^\§) 



POULT-Ry. 



ROAST FOWL. 

Remove pin feathers, tendons and feet; .singe, wash, remove crop, oil 
bag and entrails; stuff and sew. Skewer and tie in shape. Rub all over 
with soft butter and dredge with salt, pepper, and flour. Place in the pan 
in a hot oven, on a rack without water. Baste with one third cup of melt- 
ed butter in one cup hot water. Dredge with flour after basting, turn and 
brown on all sides. Add more water if needed, and cover with buttered 
paper if it browns too fast. 

For the stuffing moisten one and one half cups grated stale bread 
crumbs with one third cup melted butter, season highly with salt, pepper 
and thyme or sweet marjoram, and add a little water. 

CRAVY. 

Stew the giblets till tender. vSave the liquor for the gravy. Thicken 
with browned flour. Add the chopped giblets and butter. Season to taste. 



36 THE UNIVERSAL 



ROAST GOOSE. 

Geese and ducks are better if parboiled before they are roasted. Put 
them in water to cover and simmer two hours. Make a dressing and 
roast as j'ou do turkey. 

CHICKEN LOAF. 

Boil two chickens till quite tender, take out the bones and chop the 
meat, season to taste with butter, pepper and salt, add enough of the liquor 
in which it was boiled to make quite moist, put into moulds, turn out 
when cold and cut in slices. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Cut the fowl in pieces. Fry two slices of pork to a crisp in the kettle. 
Take out the pork and put in the chicken. Cover with hot water and 
stew till tender. Put the chicken away till cold. Save the broth for gravy. 
Put three tablespoonfuls of butter into, a small kettle and when hot add 
three tablespoonfuls of flour. Stir until smooth but not brown, and stir in 
the broth. Cook ten minutes. Beat one egg with one spoonful of cold 
water and add the grav}' to it. Make a good crust of one quart of flour, 
one cup of shortening (lard and butter) two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, 
salt, white of one egg and water. Line the plate. Remove the meat from 
the bone, fill the plate, pour over some of the gravy, add bits of butter and 
season to taste. Bake till the crust is done. 

FRICASSEE CHICKEN. 

Boil till nearly tender, then drain till dry, take half a cup of butter 
and put in frying-pan, fry till brown, thicken the broth that the chicken 
was boiled in, serve in a deep dish, turn the gravy over the chicken. 

CHICKEN AND CREAM. 

Joint one pair of chickens; wash the pieces in cold water, and dry them 
in a cloth; roll them in fine bread or cracker crumbs. Fry the chicken in 
butter until nicely browned, and place on a hot dish. Take a pint of rich 
milk; season with pepper and salt; and thicken with a teaspoonful of flour; 
pour slowly into the frying pan, stirring briskly until the flour is cooked, 
then turn over the chicken, and garnish with chopped parsley. 



COOK BOOK. 37 



USE THE BEST. 

KnickertockBr Roasted Goffees 

Select Fruit Extracts. ... 



Finest Q_licility Ground Spices. 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Thomson & Taylor Spice Co. 

michigan ave. & lake street, 
Qhicago. 



THE UNIVERSAL 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

For one dozen croquettes, use one and one half cups chopped chicken, 
free of bone, skin and gristle. Cook two tablespoons of butter, and 
two heaping tablespoonfuls of corn-starch one minute, then add one 
pint hot milk. Season with one spoonfulsalt, one half spoonful celery 
salt and pepper, one heaping teaspoonful of chopped parsley; two of 
lemon juice, and a very little onion juice. Spread on platter and cool; 
then shape into rolls, and roll in crumbs, egg and crumbs again, and 
fr}^ in hot lard. 



©\©©\J) 



VEGETABLES. 



POTATOES. 

Potatoes are much nicer steamed than boiled. If boiled put into salt- 
ed water and boil till done. Remove from the fire. Turn off the water. 
Sprinkle on salt and let stand on the back of the stove for five minutes. 

CREAMED POTATOES. 

Cut one pint cold boiled potatoes into dice, cover with cold milk; 
when hot add one heaping teaspoonful flour, moistened with a little cold 
milk; cook ten miniites, then add one tablespoonful butter, one tablespoon- 
ful chopped parsley, one half teaspoonful salt and one and one half salt- 
spoonful pepper. 



COOK BOOK. 



39 




>CR0UPI IS4 



COUGH %%i 




^URES 



ROUP, 



OUCHS, 
OLDS. 



HE PixK Croup and 

Cough Syrup is kept 

in stock in all sizes by all 

lb i**^ K 1/ .^t^^^^^^ first-class drug-gists. In 

r I w N •* IovqiTd7 Rn* case your druggist does 

not happen to have it ask 
him to procure some for 
you which he can easily 
do. If for any reason you 
cannot procure it, write 
direct to the Laboratory, 
enclosing 50 cents and 
receive a bottle free of all 
further charges, under no 
circumstances allow yourself 
to be persuaded to take a sub- 
stitute, for no other Syrup 
made possesses the pecul- 
iar properties of the Pink 
Croup and Cough Syrup. 
There are a large number 
of Cough Syrups in this 
country. Some are good. 
Many are bad. The ma- 
jorit}^ are Vv uivThless and positively harmful. In view of this 
fact the numerous letters we receive testifying to the merits 
of this preparation are the best evidence to which cla^s the 
Pink Croup and Cough Syrup belongs. The annual sales 
show an increase from year to year of over 100 per cent., but 
the best testimonial of all will be its effect on yourself and 
your children. 



Used .continuously for 30 years iu our 
private practice in East Saginaw. 

Especially Adapted to Children s 
Ailments. 

This remedy will positively prevent 
croup if given in time. 

Drs. FARNSWORTJU. Saginaw, Mich. 

SOLE PROPKIETOllS 

FOR SALE BY 

ENGLEWOOD DRUG STORE. 

DR. CHAa'R NORTH, 

Pkopkietor, 

6256 Wentworth Av. 



T' 



Always Keep a Bottle in the House. 



40 THE UNIVERSAL 



POTATOES A LA ROYAL. 

One pint of hot boiled potatoes, a generous half-cupful of cream or milk, 
two tablespoonfuls of butter, the whites of four eggs and the yolk of one, 
salt and pepper to taste. Beat the potato very light and fine. Add the 
seasoning, milk and butter, and lastly the whites of the eggs beaten to a 
stiff froth. Turn into a buttered escallop dish. Smooth with a knife, and 
brush over with the yolk of the egg, which has been well beaten. Brown 
quickly and serve. It will take ten minutes to brown. The dish in which 
it is baked should hold a little more than a quart. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES. 

Cut up cold boiled potatoes until you have about a quart. Put in a 
pan a generous cup of milk, one teaspoonful of flour and one tablespoonful 
of butter. Set on the stove and let it thicken, then put a layer of potatoes 
in a pudding dish, season with salt and pepper, and pour on a little of the 
grav}'. Continue until all is used. Cover the top with rolled cracker 
crumbs and bits of butter. Bake twenty minutes. 

LYONAISE POTATOES. 

Six potatoes, parboiled, and when cold, sliced or cut into dice; one 
half onion, chopped; butter or dripping from frying; chopped parsley, 
pepper and salt. Add seasoning and serve dry. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Shave thin, soak in ice water thirty minutes, fry in boiling lard to 
light browir, dry and salt. Serve hot in folded napkin. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Mix well one pint hot mashed potatoes, with one tablespoon butter, 
one half teaspoon of salt, one half saltspoon of pepper, a little onion juice, 
and one teaspoon of chopped parsley, then add yolk of one egg. Shape 
in smooth balls, roll in fine bread crumbs, then in beaten egg and crumbs 
again, place in basket and fry in smoking hot lard. 



COOK BOOK. 



41 




/ ^ f-^ » XTl^A/l A "^ r^ fO" COUGHS, COLDS, 

CjRANDMA.S \^,^^,. ::::::... 

':*9*.'?S.E.NES»... . . 

AND ALL OISEASES OF 
T.tlf?.°.*T..*?'.P..WN.?.S: . 

., Cou;^h 
^yrup 

PREPARED BY 

CHEERYBLE BROTHERS. 

CHICAGO, ILLS. 

ENGLEWOOD . 
UNIVERSALIST 
CHURCH. . . 

Endorsed by the beading Clergy o? Englewood. 



42 THE UNIVERSAL 



SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Boil, peel and mash four good-sized potatoes, add two ounces of butter, 
a half-teaspoonful of salt and a dash of cayenne; beat until smooth; form in- 
to cylinder-shaped croquettes. Dip in egg and then in bread crumbs, and 
fry in smoking-hot fat. 

POTATOES A LA MAITRE DE L'HOTEL. 

Use raw potatoes cut in dice, or scooped with potato scoop, cook until 
tender in salted water, drain and spread the butter over them hot. 

Dressing: Mix one tablespoonful of butter with the yolk of one egg; 
add one teaspoonful lemon juice, and one teaspoonful chopped parsley; one 
half teaspoon ful salt, and one salt-spoonful of pepper. 

SMOTHERED POTATOES. 

Slice raw potatoes very thin, soak in cold water and squeeze dry. Make 
three layers in a baking dish, seasoning each layer with salt, pepper, butter 
and a little minced onion. Pour over each layer a thin white sauce, two 
tablespoonfuls of flour and one tablespoonful of butter. Bake an hour, or 
until potatoes are tender. 

STEWED ONIONS. 

Boil two or three large Spanish onions till verj^ soft; then put them 
in the oven in a dish with a little butter; bake till brown; taste and turn; 
and then put them in your dish; dredge flour over the butter left in the 
dish; add some hot milk. Stir well. 

BEETS. 

Boil them from one to two hours; take off the skin when done, and put 
over them pepper, salt and a little butter. Beets are very good baked, but 
require a much longer time to cook. 

PARSNIPS. 

Boil parsnips till tender; cut lengthwise and add butter, pepper and salt. 

FRIED PARSNIPS. 

Cut boiled parsnips lengthwise. Dredge with flour and fry in butter. 



COOK BOOK. 4;} 




CA1.LUSTR0 



J. B. Schissler & Co. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

Gaiiustro Company of Chicago, 

TT 5th Avenue. 
Second Floor. CHICAGO, ILL. 



THE CALLUSTRO PREPARATIONS 

Have revolutionized the cleaning, polishing and brightening of the thousand uten- 
sils, ornaments and adornments of homes everywhere. 

Wherever there is glassware, silverware, mirrors or finished surface of any de- 
scription, or wnerever people delight in cleanliness and brightness, Callustro is 
proving itself indispensable. Any of the preparations are simply unequalled for the 
purposes for which they are recommended. Quick, harmless and effective, they 
save time, money and labor. 

One Box Callustro Triple Refined Polish, - - 25c. 

For extremely fine, plain, highly finished surfaces of silver and gold. 

One Cake Callustro Palm Soap, for the toilet, - 25c. 

For so'tening tiie hands, beautifying the nails and polishing rings, etc. 

One Cake Callustro Metal Soap, - - - 25c. 

Especi;i!y adapted for cleaning and polishing all kinds of jewelry, gold, 
silverwire, precious stones, etc. 

One Bottle of Callustro Tooth Powder, - - 25c. 

Quick, effective and always gives satisfaction. 

One Bag Callustro Window and Mirror Polisher, - 25c. 

Simple, luick and effective. Does away with sloppy pails, sponges, in 
fact, THE housekeepers' delight. For cleaning and polisliing plate glass, 
mirrors aid show-cases, it is truly the marvel of the loth century. Try 
one and you will never do without it. 

One Cake Callustro Mechanics' Soap, - - 10c. 

An excdlent iiand soap designed for mechanics, machinists, mill men 
printers, painters, etc. Will remove all stains from the hands, remove 
paint spots, grease and oil from the clothing and fine fabrics. 

One Cake Callustro Brick, - - - - 10c. 

An unexcelled soap for scouring and cleaning zinc, steel, iron, marble and 
wood-Afork; cheapest and most effective cleanser in the world. 
Address all orders to 

J. B. SCHISSLER & CO., 

77 5th Ave., Chicago. 

Testimonial: — I have used Callustro for the past three years and consider it has no equal. 
Callustro Metal Soap for cleaning silver needs only to be tried to be appreciated. 

Mrs. D. W. Miller, 6218 Michigan Ave. 



44 THE UNIVERSAL 



GREEN PEAS. 

Take one half peck of peas and put in boiling water and cook until soft. 
Let the water cook nearly away. Remove from the fire and add milk, but- 
ter and salt. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Boil in salted water till tender; toast bread, and dip in the water in 
which the asparagus was boiled. La}- the asparagus on toast and turn on 
cream sauce. 

SPINACH. 

Wash thoroughly, and boil in salted water, or corned beef liquor 
Press the water out and chop fine. Serve with vinegar and pepper. 

TOMATOES. 

Turn boiling hot water on and peel, then slice and serve with vinegar, 
salt and pepper, or sugar. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Cut ripe tomatoes in halves, and sprinkle the cut side wth salt, pepper, 
and cracker or fine bread-crumbs. Place in a double broikr and broil ten 
minutes over a clear fire, keeping the outside next the fire. Slip carefully 
on a dish, put a bit of butter on each piece, and place in the oven for ten 
minutes. Garnish with parsley, and serve. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Get them as large and firm as possible; cut a round place in the top, 
scrape out all the soft parts; mix with stale bread crumbs, onions, parsley, 
butter, pepper and salt; chop very fine, and fill the tomatoes carefully; bake 
in a moderately hot oven; put a little butter in the pan, and see that they 
do not burn or become dry. 



COOK BOOK. 4.") 



^-^ PURE ^ 




PICE 




Choicest Importalions. 



GROUND AND PACKED BY 



prap^lip /T\ael/ea(5l7 9 ^o. 



CHICAGO. 



46 



THE UNIVERSAI, 



STEWED CORN. 

Scald the corn just enough to harden; slice oflFthe ear so as to divide the 
kernel three or four times; scrape the chits (the sweetest part) from the 
cob, add sweet milk, a little water, a little butter and salt — simmer ten min- 
utes. Beat one egg and add, stirring in evenly just before taking off the 
fire. A very little sugar improves it for the taste of most people. 

CREAMED CORN. 

To one or more cans of corn, add a cup of milk, salt and pepper to 
taste, and a piece of butter the size of an egg. When nearly ready to serve 
make a teaspoonful of flour smooth with a little cream, and stir in very 
graduall}'; when it is thoroughly heated, it is ready to serve. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

One pint grated corn, one half cup milk, one half cup flour, one small 
teaspoonful baking powder, one tablespoonful melted butter, two eggs, one 
teaspoonful salt, a little pepper, fry in hot lard. 

MACARONI OR SPAGHETTI WITH CHEESE. 

One quarter pound or twelve sticks of macaroni or spaghetti broken 
into one inch lengths, and cooked in three pints boiling salted water twen- 
ty minutes. Turn into a colander and pour over it cold water, drain. 
Make a sauce of one tablespoonful flour and one tablespoonful of butter, 
and one and one half cups of hot milk, salt. Put a layer of grated cheese 
in bottom of bake dish, then a layer of macaroni and sauce, cover the top 
with fine bread crumbs with bits of butter dotted over, and a little grated 
cheese. Bake, until brown. 

FRIED SWEET POTATOES. 

For a nice breakfast dish, parboil sweet potatoes on the day before. 
When cold cut them in lengthwise slices, and fry to a nice brown in butter 
or beef drippings. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. 



COOK BOOK. 47 



TURNIPS A LA CREME. 

Take small new turnips, peel and boil them in salted water; drain them 
thoroughly. Melt one ounce of butter in a saucepan, add to it a dessert- 
spoonful of flour, pepper, salt, and a small quantity of milk or cream; put 
in the turnips; simmer gently a few minutes, and serve. 

BOILED ONIONS. 

Remove the outer skins from a sufficient number of small yellow onions, 
parboil them with water, which should be put on cold, and when tender, 
but not broken, add to them a cup of cold milk, some salt, pepper, and a 
piece of butter, then let them boil up gently in this mixture, and serve. 



CAULIFLOWER. 

Soak the cauliflower in very salt cold water for two or three hours. 
Have four quarts of boiling water in which has been added a small table- 
spoonful of salt, and a saltspoonful of soda. Take the cauliflower out of 
the cold water, break into sections. Tie it in a twine bag while boiling, 
put it into the kettle of boiling water, and let it cook rapidly for an hour, 
drain, and serve with butter, salt and pepper, or cream sauce. 

ESCALLOPED ONIONS, CAULIFLOWER OR ASPARAGUS. 

Boil either vegetable until tender, then put in baking dish, and pour 
over sauce made of one tablespoonful butter rubbed into one and one half 
tablespoonfuls of flour, pour over it one pint hot milk and cook until like 
custard. Bake half an hour. Cut cauliflower or asparagus into small pieces 
before pouring over the sauce. 



IM^ 



48 THE UNIVERSAL 



EGGS. 



ESCALLOPED ECCS. 

Make a minced meat of chopped ham, fine bread crumbs, pepper, salt, 
and some melted butter. Moisten with milk to a soft paste, and half fill 
small patty pans with the mixture. Break an egg carefully upon the top 
of each. Dust with pepper and salt, and sprinkle some finely powdered 
cracker over all. vSet in the oven and bake about eight minutes. Eat hot, 
they are very nice. 

ECCS ON TOAST. 

Put one half pint of milk in spider. Toast six slices of bread. Dip the 
crusts in the hot milk. Place each slice on a platter and butter well. Beat 
five eggs, add to the hot milk and stir till it thickens. Season with salt and 
pepper, add a large piece of butter and serve on the toast. 

SCRAMBLED ECCS. 

Nine eggs, not beaten, butter, pepper and salt. Have butter in the 
spider, and when the' butter is hot, put in the eggs and begin at once to 
stir them, scraping the bottom of the pan from the sides toward the centre, 
until vou have a soft, moist mass just firm enough not to run over the bot- 
tom of the heated dish on which you turn it out. 

ECC VERMICELLI. 

Cook six eggs twenty minutes, separate whites and yolks. Chop whites, 
and add one and one half cups white sauce, season, cover a platter with 
small squares of toast, cover with the white sauce, and strain the yolks over 
i t, through truit-press. Garnish with parsley. 



COOK BOOK. 49 



ECC OMELET. 

Separate the whites from the yolks of four eggs, beat the whites stiff, 
then beat the yolks stiff, add salt-spoonful of salt, and one half salt-spoonful 
of pepper, four tablespoonfuls of milk; mix them with spoon, pour this mix- 
ture over the whites and mix them, by using knife, butter your pan and 
have not too hot a fire. 



WELSH RAREBIT. 

Break a quarter of a pound of cheese in small pieces, or if hard, grate it, 
and put in double boiler with quarter of a cup of rich milk or cream. Mix 
one teaspoon of mustard, half a spoon of salt and a little pepper. Add one 
egg and beat well and when the cheese is melted stir this in with a teaspoon 
of butter. Cook until it thickens and pour over slices of hot toast. vServe 
immediately. 



50 THE UNIVERSAI^ 



SALADS. 



POTATO SALAD. 



Cut cold boiled potatoes in dice or thin slices; make about three layers 
of potatoes in salad disli, seasoning each layer with a little minced parsley 
onion and beet dice and boiled dressing. 



BOILED DRESSING. 

One tablespoon flour, one teaspoon each of mustard and salt, two table- 
spoons of sugar, one fourth salt-spoon red pepper, one half cup vinegar, 
three fourths cup water, one tablespoon butter and yolks of three eggs. Mix 
the dry ingredients and carefully add vinegar and water and heat boiling 
hot. Have yolks of eggs well beaten and slowly pour on the boiling hot 
mixture, beating all the time; add the butter in small pieces. 



FRENCH DRESSING. 

One saltspoon salt, one half saltspoon pepper, three tablespoons oil, 
one tablespoon vinegar, a little onion juice. Mix in the order given and 
pour over the salad. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Use equal quantities of chicken and celery cut fine, season with salt and 
pepper and mix with 



COOK BOOK. 51 



NIAYONAiSE DRESSING. 

Have dish, oil and eggs, cold. For one large bottle of oil, use four or 
five yolks of eggs. Stir or beat with souiething that will mix rapidly, a 
wooden paddle is preferred. Be careful not to pour oil any faster than eggs 
take it up. When thick enough to take up on the beater like a ball, use a 
little vinegar or lemon juice to thin it. When nearly done season with one 
teaspoon each of mustard and salt, and one half saltspoon of Cayenne pep- 
per to one pint of oil. Use enough acid to taste well and make the right 
consistencv. 



TARTARE SAUCE. 

To Mayonaise dressing add capers, chopped cucumbers, pickles, olives, 
and parsley, one or all. 

SALAD DRESSING WITH BUTTER OR OIL. 

]Mix well two tablespoons sugar, one level one of mustard and a tea- 
spoonful of salt. Add one and one half tablespoons of Olive oil or two and 
one half tablespoons melted butter. Then add three well beaten eggs grad- 
ually, then three fourths ctip of vinegar and one cup of milk. Place in 
farina kettle over boiling water and stir until thick. This keeps nicely in a 
cool place and is equally good for a nice salad or for lettuce and cold slaw. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Wash and parboil one pint of large oy.sters. Prepare an equal amount 
of celery as for chicken salad, mix together and add 

CREAM DRESSING. 

Beat four whole eggs or eight yolks, add one teaspoon corn starch wet 
with a little cold water, and one half cup vinegar. Cook in double boiler 
until thickened. Then add one large tablespoon of butter, one teaspoon of 
mustard, one half teaspoon salt, one eighth tea.spoon pepper; when cold, 
dilute with thick cream plain or whipped. 



THE UNIVERSAL 



STRING BEAN SALAD (Very nice.> 

Cook one can string beans as for the table, but ponr off the liquor when 
done. Cut two good sized beets, boiled tender, into half inch dice. Cut 
the w^hites of four hard boiled eggs into neat pieces. Mix carefully without 
breaking, the beets, whites of eggs and string beans (which should be cut 
not more than one and a half inches long), add the "Salad Dressing with 
Butter or Oil" and when arranged in dish rub through a sieve the yolks of 
two of the eggs on the salad. A few of the beet dice may be reserved to 
add last in garnishing. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

One head of lettuce is sufficient for a c*n of lobster. Break the meat 
carefull}% reserving the coral for garnishing. Cut up fine one half of the 
lettuce and mix with lobster, adding the dressing at the same time. Ar- 
range on the remaining lettuce and garnish. 

The Tartare sauce is very nice to use with the fresh lobster when it can 
be obtained. 

CAULIFLOWER SALAD (Very nice). 

Boil the finest head of cauliflower until tender. Cut into individual 
pieces, very carefully, dipping each in melted butter, containing a little 
onion juice, if liked. Let the pieces drain until cold. Then mix with 
hard boiled eggs and dressing. 

SALMON AND SHRIMP SALADS. 

These can be prepared like lobster salad. 

CABBAGE SALAD. 

For two quarts chopped cabbage, one half pint cider vinegar, one tea- 
spoon salt, one teaspoon mustard, one half teaspoonful black pepper, one 
tablespoon sugar, one tablespoon butter. When it comes to a boil, stir in 
two well beaten eggs until thickened. Pour over cabbage. Garnish with 
slices of hard boiled eggs. 



COOK BOOK. 



MAaK AYRES, PflEsio^NT 



STECK 

PIANOS, 

IVERS & PQND 
PIANOS. 

Ayres &, Wygani 
Pianos. 




AUONZO WYGANT, SEC' V and Treas. 



Conover Bros. 
Pianos. 

Smith & Barnes 
Pianos. 

Jewett 

Pianos. 



Reed's Temple of Music. * AYRES & WYGANT CO. 

182 & 18A Wabash Avenue. 



Ma/ndel B-ros. 



117, 119, 121, 123 State St. 



Ill, 113, 115 Wabash Ave. 



Don't fail to visit our new and greatly enlarged 
departments for 

HiE CARPETS furniture. 

We show an assortment by far the largest in 
the citv. 



PKie&S TO SUIT KVKRY PU-RSE. 



54 • THE UNIVERSAL 



LOBSTER SALAD. 

Chop a good sized lobster very fine, reserving the small claws, and 
coral for garnishing, into this lobster chop a head of lettuce, saving a few 
leaves to help garnish. Mix lobster %vith salad dressing on a platter, plac- 
ing coral, leaves and claws around the edge. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can of salmon, or the same quantit}^ of any cold fish, preferably 
boiled or baked, from which the skin and bones have been removed. Chop, 
when cold, three large boiled potatoes, and mix them with the fish. Rub 
smooth the yolk of three hard-boiled eggs, season to taste with mustard, 
pepper and salt, add two tablespoonfuls of cream and one gill of vinegar. 
Pour this dressing over the fish and potatoes. This may either be served 
b}' itself, or a nest can be made of leaves of lettuce and the fish and pota- 
toes placed in it, or the lettuce leaves can be placed around the edge of the 
dish and served witli each portion. 



COOK BOOK. 



A FEAST OF GOOt) THIMGS. 



One Poun«l «>f ClevelaiKl's Itakiii^ Powder will Make 
Kverythiiiff in the Followiiijj List. 




20 Tea Biscuit, 
I Chocolate Cake, 

20 Batter Cakes, 
I Orange Cake, 
I Ice Cream Cake, 
50 Cookies, 
I Coffee Cake, 
I Cocoanut Cake, 
I Loaf Ginger Bread, 
I Minnehaha Cake, 
I Apple Pudding, 
8 Snowballs, 



I Cottage Pudding, 
12 Apple Fritters, 
6 Crumpets, 
1 Suet Pudding, 
12 English Muffins, 



12 Corn Muffins, 
6 Baked Apple 

Dumplings, 

I Hig Cake, 

I Roll Jelly Cake, 



1 Strawberry Shortcake, 20 Scotch Scones, 



15 Egg Rolls, 
I Boston Pudding, 
I Chicken Pie, or 

Yankee Potpie, 
1 Spice Cake, 
I Dutch Apple Pudding, 



I Pound Cake, 
15 Waffles, 

I Lemon Cream Cake 

and 
12 Crullers. 



Recipes for the above and over three hundred other choice recipes are in our cook book which is 
mailed free to any lady sending two-cent stamp, with name and address, to Cleveland Baking Powder 
Co., 81 & 83 Fulton Street, New York. Please mention this book. 

CLiEVEliflHD'S BAKING POWDEfJ. 

MOST ECONOMICAL AND ABSOLUTELY THE BEST. 



remeIber |/^ I I p^ Q^ I^Em 



NAME 



OF THAT 



WO/NDE-RFUL KEMElDg 

That Cures Catarrh, HAY FEVEK, Cold in the Head, 
Sore Throat, Canker and Bronchitis. 

The Testimonials to these kacts are numerous and strong, similar to tiie following: 

From the Hon. Harvey D. Colvin, Ex-Mayor of Chicago: 

Chicago, July 24th, 1890. 

S. H. Klinck, — Dear Sir: I am pleased to say that I consider your remedy the best medicine in ex- 
istence for the human afflictions you claim to cure. I suffered from catarrh with bronchitis for many 
years. During that time I employed physicians and faithfully tried many so-called remedies advertised 
to cure this disease, without any material benefit, when a friend induced me to try your remedy, claim- 
ing others had been cured by it. The first bottle gave me the most pleasing results. I have continued 
its use and cannot say too much for it. It found me too near the grave for comfort and restored me to 
health again. It adorns my toilet stand and by using it occasionally I am kept well. 

I would not be without it if it cost $2S per bottle. I earnestly recommend it to all my afflicted 
friends. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING DRUGGISTS. PINT BOTTLES $1.00. 

82 Jackson St., Chicago. KLINCK CATARRH & BRONCHIAL REMEDY CO. 



56 THE UNIVERSAL 



B-RBAB, Etc. 



BREAD. 

Put one tablespoon of sugar, one tablespoon of lard and one teaspoon 
of salt, in a large bowl. Scald one cup of milk and poiir over them. When 
dissolved add one and one half cups water; dissolve one half cake yeast in 
one half cup of water and add when the mixture is lukewarm. Add sifted 
flour until stiff enough to mold. Mold until smooth, cover well and set to 
rise; cut it down and mold from fifteen minutes to half an hour; shape into 
loaves, put in pans, rise and bake. 

CRAHAM BREAD. 

One cup milk, two cups water, one tablespoon lard, three tablespoons 
of sugar, one teaspoon salt, one half cake yeast. Treated the same as white 
bread without molding. 

ROLLS. 

One cup milk, one fourth cup butter, one half teaspoon salt, one table- 
spoon sugar one fourth cake yeast dissolved in one fourth cup water, white 
of one egg. Treat like white bread. When risen light cut down with a 
knife, roll on molding board one half inch thick, cut with a biscuit cutter. 
Butter one half and fold the other half over; let rise and bake. 



COOK BOOK. 



57 



Jf^e Qual^er's Qpol\i9(^ I^eeipe. 

FOK B-REAKFAST. 

1st.— Be sure that thee gets QUAKER OATS. 

They are sold only in two-pound packages. 
2d. — After lighting thy fire, put two tin pans full 

of water in a liot place forthwitii, and mix a 

handful of dry QUAKER OATS, with a pinch 

of salt in another tin pan. 
id. — When both pans of water he boiling — not 

before— place the pan of dry QUAKER OATS 

in one of them. Pour the contents of the 

other pan on the QUAKER OATS to more 

than cover them, place a tin cover over both 

pans and boil thirty minutes or more. 

MOTE. 
The old gentleman was born in Philadelphia 
and is never in a hurry. Shorten his time for 
cooking if necessary. Ed. i^^TRAD^MARK 




G. W. DUNBAR'S SONS, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA., 

PACKERS OF 

FHESH SHKIMP, for Salads and Mayonaise, 
GKBE/N TU-RTLEl, for Soup. 

F-RESH OK-RA, for Soup. 
A-RTICHOKES, for Entrees. 

P-RESE-RVED FIGS, for the Tea Table. 
CREOLE PEPPE-R SAUCE. 
SUGAH CA/SE Sg-RCIP, for Table Use. 



58 THE UNIVERSAL 



FINGER ROLLS. 

Having cut down the dough, take small pieces and roll with the hand 
into finger shapes not over two inches long and quite small around. Place 
on pan leaving space enough for rising without touching; rise and bake. 

SOUP STICKS. 

Roll the dough out quite thin and cut in narrow strips, rise and bake. 

SWEDISH ROLLS. 

Roll out thin; brush over with butter, sprinkle on granulated sugar, a 
little grated lemon peel, a little cinnamon, dried currants; then roll slowly; 
cut into inch slices and bake. 

POP OVERS. 

One cup milk, one cup of flour, a pinch of salt, two eggs. Sift flour 
and salt together. Add the milk .slowly to make a .smooth batter. Beat 
the eggs very light and mix carefully. Cook in hot buttered gem pans or 
cups half an hour. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Sift together one cup of corn meal and one of flour with a teaspoon of 
salt; add two thirds of a cup of molasses and water to make a medium bat- 
ter; add last two thirds of a teaspoon of soda dissolved in water. Place in 
two well greased pint cans or one large one and cover tight. Steam two 
hours and bake half hour or more if in one can. 

DROP BISCUIT. 

Sift one pint of flour with a heaping teaspoon of baking powder and 
and a pinch of salt. Rub in one half tablespoon each of lard and butter. 
Make a dough with milk until nearly as stiff as for regular biscuits and 
drop from spoon into greased muffin pans. Bake in a hot oven about fif- 
teen minutes. 



COOK BOOK. 



59 



PLOWS 



• i>- 



Bon Bons. *■ Chocolates . 

Pure, Fresh, Delicious. 



TRY OUR IGE GREP SODj^, 

The Finest in the City. 

McVICKER'S THEATRE BUILDING, 
CHICAGO. 



The Mutual BBqefit Life Iqsurance Gompany 



OF INEWAKK, N. J. 



Paid Policyholders since Organization in 1845, $112,911,500.18. 



In a Mutual Life Insurance Company every dollar saved in expenses is a dollar added to dividends, 
and a dollar saved in the actual cost of insurance. The Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company is 
conspicuous iov \X% econonomical xn3,r\3,%tme-a.\.. iox \\\e^ magnitude oi'Wi dividends, for the liberal- 
ity of its Policy Contract, and for Wsfair dealing with its members. No policy can be forfeited 
after the second year as long as any value remains to continue the insurance. The Full Reserve value 
of a lapsed Policy computed on the 4 per cent, standard is applied to keeping the insurance in force; or, 
if preferred, to the purchase of a Paid up Policy at the Company's regular published rates. After the 
second year Policies are incontestable, except against intentional fraud, and all restrictions upon travel 
or occupation are removed. The Company loans up to one-half of the reserve value of its Policies 
when satisfactory assignments can be made as collateral security; and its practice as to the purchase of 
Policies for cash values has always been extremely liberal. Losses are paid immediately on com- 
pletion and approval of proofs; and in all essential features a Policy in the Mutual Benefit offers advan- 
tages egual if not superior to those of any other Company. 

CHARLES LEYENBERGER, 

Tribune Building, Chicago. State Agent for Illinois. 



60 THE UNIVERSAI, 



MUFFINS. 

Mix a tablespoon of butter and two tablespoons of sugar, add a cup of 
milk and two large cups of flour sifted with a heaping teaspoon of baking 
powder. Then add a small cup of water and last two beaten eggs. Bake 
about twenty-five minutes in muffin pans. 

FRITTERS. 

To one and a half cups of milk add beaten yolks of two eggs and one 
large teaspoon baking powder sifted with flour to make a stiff batter. Beat 
the whites stiff with a pinch of salt and mix in lightly. Fry by spoonfuls 
in hot lard. Serve promptly. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Cut apple in s]^ces, dip in the batter and fry in boiling fat. Sprinkle 
well with sugar. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

Beat an egg with two tablespoons of sugar, add one tablespoon soft but- 
ter, a little salt, one and one half cups milk, two cups graham flour and 
one of white sifted with three tablespoons baking powder. Bake in a hot 
oven. 

DUMPLINGS. 

Sift two cups of flour with one large teaspoon baking powder, one tea- 
spoon sugar, one teaspoon salt, wet with milk until just soft enough to 
handle. Roll one half inch thick, cut out and cook ten minutes in boiling 
liquid closely covered, or steam twenty minutes in steamer. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

Two teaspoons baking powder sifted into one pint of flour, one large 
spoonful of butter or lard and salt. Rub the shortening into the flour until 
smooth. Mix with milk or water until stiff enoiigh to handle. Roll one 
half inch thick and cut. 



COOK BOOK. 61 



STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Mix a little softer than baking powder biscuits using more butter. 
Divide the mixture into two parts, roll out half an inch thick, place in pan 
with melted butter between the layers. Bake in a hot oven; divide and 
fill with mashed berries sweetened witli powdered sugar. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

One pint of flour, one and a half teaspoonfuls of baking powder and 
salt sifted with it. One fourth cup of butter, one egg, one scant cup of 
milk. Bake in a hot oven. Remove from the pan, cut in half with a warm 
knife. Take out some of the soft bread and fill with mashed berries 
sweetened with powdered sugar. Put a layer of berries on top and serve 
with sauce. 

SAUCE. 

Stir one tablespoonful of corn starch in one pint of boiling water. 
Add sugar and salt. Pour into tureen, over two spoonfuls of mashed 
berries and a small piece of butter. 

ORANCE SHORT CAKE. 

Take a dozen good small, juicy oranges, peel and put in a cold place. 
INIake a shortcake of a pint of prepared flour, a tablespoon of lard and the 
same of butter rubbed well together and made into a dough with a cup of 
sour milk. Roll out about an inch thick into a sheet, put into a well 
buttered pan and bake in a quick oven a light brown. Take out of the pan, 
and with a sharp knife divide in two as a biscuit. Spread the oranges, thinly 
sliced, between the cake, sprinkling well with sugar, put the rest on top, 
and cover with sugar just before sending to the table. Eat with sauce 
made from the juice of three oranges and two lemons boiled in a pint of 
water and seasoned with sugar and nutmeg. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One cup molasses, one cup of sour milk, two cups sweet milk, three 
cups graham flour, one and one half cups corn meal, one half teaspoon 
soda. Take graham flour add corn meal, then add sweet milk, then sour 
milk Avith soda dissolved in it, then molasses, pinch of salt; steam three 
hours and bake twentv minutes. 



62 THE UNIVERSAL 



GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One pint of flour, salt, one teaspoonful soda, one scant pint of sour 
milk, two eggs well beaten. 

CALIFORNIA MUSH. 

Take one part California Breakfast Food and stir into two parts boiling 
water which has already been salted. Cook ten minutes, serve with cream 
and sugar. 

FRIED BREAKFAST FOOD. 

To two teacupfuls of mush made from California Breakfast Food add 
one egg, when cold slice it and roll in flour. Fry to a nice brown, serve 
hot. 

CALIFORNIA PUDDING. 

Take two teacupfuls of the California Breakfast Food cooked as for 
mush, one pint of milk, two eggs, a little nutmeg, a few raisins, sweeten 
to taste and bake twenty minutes. Serve with sauce. 



COOK BOOK. 



63 







©llllfr© 



A -T ^ E can cheerfully recommend Pet- 

VV tijohn's California Break- 
fast FOOD as a first-class article for 
making Mush, Griddle Cakes, Gems and 
Pudding. 

Yours truly, 

C. Wolf, Chief Cook, 

Grand Pacific Hotel. 

W. H. Phillips, Cook, 

Auditorium Hotel. 
J. B. Smith, Cook, Thomson Restaurant. 
J. Baker, Cook, - Tremont House. 
J. Hoff, Cook, - Sherman House. 



pEttijolins Califorqia Breakfast Food 

Is California White Wheat, 

Pearled, Steamed and Rolled through Heated Rollers, it is Packed and 
Sealed at once so that it Retains all its Freshness. It is a very desirable 
change irom Oats for breakfast. Makes .splendid Gems, Griddle Cakes 
and Pudding. It contains the same properties as Graham, so that we all 
know that it is very wholesome. Try a package and you will be convinced 
that it is just what you have been wanting. Costs no more than Oats and 
is much better. (See recipes in this Cook Book and on packages.) 

FOR SALE BY ALL GROCERS. 

RAMER I LAW, General Agents, 47 W. Washington Street, Chicago. 



64 THE UNIVERSAI^ 



PAST-Ry. 



ROUGH PUFF PASTE. 

Have both materials and ntensils cold. Take one pound of pastry 
flour and three quarters of a pound of butter and chop together. Make a 
hole in the centre of this in which place the yolks of two eggs, a pinch of 
salt and two teaspoons of lemon juice, also two tablespoons of water. Break 
the egg with a knife and lightly mix it all with the fingers, using more 
water if necessary to form a stiff paste. Handle lightly and keep hands 
and board well floured. Pound and roll the paste into an oblong sheet 
half an inch thick, fold the outer edges in to meet and the ends to nearly 
meet; then double, toll and fold three or more times. Chill on ice. 

PLAIN PASTE. 

Use one and one half rounded cups of unsifted pastry flour and half 
a cup of lard, half a teaspoon of salt and cold water enough to made a stiff" 
paste. Mix dry together lightly with tips of the fingers and mix in water 
carefully with a knife in warm weather or fingers in cold. 

• 

ANOTHER PLAIN PASTE. 

To one and one half cups of flour take one third of a cup each of lard 
and butter; rub in all the lard and half of the butter and roll the remainder 
of the butter into the upper crust. 



COOK BOOK. P5 



Crystal Kice 



THE BEST OF ALL 



CEREjlL FOOD PRODUCTS. 

PUHE .... ^^ 



HEALTHFUL 



eO/NVE/N IE/NT 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Crystal Kice ^lilling Company, 

MARION. INC)IA]SIA. 

JAMES B. ALBACH, Agent, 

26 RIVER ST., CHICAGO. 



Cincinnati, O., Nov. 12th, 1890. 
The Crystal Milling Co., Marion, Ind. 

Dear Sirs: — Please ship us at once two barrels of Crystal Rice. We find it 
the most popular, with our guests, of any of the new cereal preparations ever placed 
on our bill of fare, as well as the most econonomical for use; we have tried it in all 
kinds of plain cooking and pastry with eejually satisfactory results. Wishing you 
the success your Crystal Rice so well merits, we remain, 

Yours truly, THE PALACE HOTEL CO. 



66 THE UNIVERSAL 



LEMON PIE. 

Use three-fourths of a cup of sugar, two teaspoons of flour, mix well 
and add three beaten yolks and one beaten white. Then add juice and 
grated rind of one lemon with half a cup of cold water. Bake in an open 
crust of pastry until it shakes like jelly. L,et it cool, before adding 
meringue made by beating the two remaining whites till dry and gradually 
beating in two tablespoons of powdered sugar. Brown in a hot oven. 

FRUIT PIES. 

Pile fruit high in the center leaving a space around the sides uearly 
bare. When the cover is on press the piste gently into this grove, then 
make several deep holes in the groove. The juice will run in the groove 
instead of wasting through the edges. Rhubarb should not be peeled, but 
washed, sliced fine, scalded half an hour, drained and well dredged with 
flour. 

NEW ENGLAND MINCE PIES. 

Stew on^ pickige of Dougherty's New England Condensed Mince 
Meat with a quirt of witer for twenty minutes. Sugar, fruit syrup, 
vinegar or any preserves miy be added to suit the taste, in this case use 
less water. 



MINCE MEAT. 



Two and one half pounds meat. 

Five pounds of apples. 

Two pounds sugar. 

Half pound b utter. 

One pint molasses. 

Four teaspoons cinnamon. 

Three teaspoons cloves. 

Five teaspoons nutmeg. 

One quart cider. 

Two pounds raisins. 



--Dl 



COOK BOOK. 



67 



Delicious Mince Pie 

In 20 Minutes 



ANY TIME OF THE YEAR. 



DOUGHERTY'S 

HEW ENGLAHD^=^INCE MEAT. 




In paper boxes; enough for two large pies. 
Always ready; easily prepared. 

GLEAN, WHOLESOME, CONVENIENT. 

SOLD BY ALL GROCERS. 



6S THE TNIVERSAL 



CAKE. 



POUND CAKE. 

Beat half a pound of butter to a cream, add three fourths of a pound 
of sugar gradually, beating until all is light. Measure half a pint of eggs, 
whites and yolks separate. Beat the yolks well and add to sugar and 
butter, then the stiff whites. Beat again and add three-fourths of a pound 
of flour. In using fruit, sprinkle with flour, warm and add last. Bake in 
moderate oven. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Beat yolks of four eggs until light colored and thick, gradually beat 
in one cup of powdered sugar, add juice and grated rind of a lemon and 
beat again. Beat the whites stiff and dry and cut in lightly, then sift 
in one cup of flour and cut and fold carefi^lh'. Bake in very moderate 
oven about forty-five minutes. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Creaiu one-third of a cup of butter, beat in two cups of sugar, add a 
spoon of vanilla and stir in two and one half cups of flour sifted with a tea- 
spoon of baking powder. Mix in lightly the stiff whites of eight eggs. 
Bake in a moderate oven until done. Test with a broom splint. 

LAYER CAKE. 

Cream half a cup of butter, add two cups of sugar, and milk enough 
from a cupful to mix easily. Flavor with vanilla, then sift in three cups 
of pastr3^ flour with three spoons of baking powder, alternately with the 
rest of the milk. Add last the stiff whites of four eggs. Bake in 
four 1 avers in rather hot oven. 



COOK BOOK. 



69 




E. B. Millar & Co. 



IMPORTERS & GRINDERS. 



(s^<S>i<S^-=--S 



REFORM, 

LIKE CHARITY, 

BEGINS AT 

HOME. 



^">^S^»I<S>:-S 




TO STOP 
ADULTERATION 
STOP BUYING 

ADULTERATED ,j^,^fi^ 
GOODS. 




~^^T'~1I^ 



CHlllj ' 

JOHflTOQlSUP 




/SO •DEMAMB, /NO SUPPLg. 

jE assert that there is no difficulty whatever in procuring 

Wjb pure spices, ground from plantation grown and highly 

cultivated stock. Buyers and consumers should become 

familiar with the trade marks of reputable manufacturers. We 

will mail our 

"Housekeeper's List of Fine Spices and Aids to Good Cooking" 

to any address sent us, and will pay any competent chemist one thousand dollars 
for every ounce of adulteration he can find in any article mentioned in the list. Our 
"Penang Spices" packed in glass bottles (the only scientific way to pack spices rich 
in essential oils) can be found at all first-class grocers. 



• MILLAR'S GENUINE ROASTED COFFEES. ••• 

LONG BE-R-Rg MOCHA, MOUNTAIN JAVA, 

MANDHELING JAVA, EXCELSIOH JAVA, 

eU-RACOA, A-RABg, ETC. 

41 AND 43 WABASH AVE., CHICAGO. 



70 THE UNIVERSAL 



CARAMEL FILLING. 

Use two cups of sugar, two thirds of a cup of milk and a tablespoon of 
butter. Boil seven minutes, cool and spread. Asquareof melted chocolate 
may be added. 

FIG FILLING. 

Boil until thick one cup of water, one cup of sugar and half a pound 
of chopped figs. 

BANANA FILLING. 

Chop fine or mash nine large ripe bananas, sweeten with powdered 
sugar and spread between layers. This must be eaten while fresh. 

LEMON FILLING. 

Beat the whites of two eggs stiff, add one large cup of powdered sugar 
and the grated rind and juice of two lemons. Thicken in a double boiler. 

PLAIN FROSTING. 

To the white of one egg add one tablespoon of water and a few drops 
of vanilla extract, or lemon jtiice. Then stir in powdered sugar until thick 
enough to spread. This is sufiicent for a large layer cake. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

Use above recipe and add one square of melted chocolate. 

NUT FILLING. 

Double the rule for plain frosting and add half a pound of English 
walnuts chopped fine. Use between the layers and on top. 



COOK BOOK. 



Inventors have long sought a suitable method of canning fruit and 
other foods tvithotit cookimj or the use of chemicals. Hundreds of 
dollars and years of patient labor have been expended, but it has been re- 
served for a woman — Miss Amanda T. Jones, of Chicago — to be the inven- 
tor of this hitherto undiscovered process. The practicability of the process 
being established, a company has been incorporated with '|i, 000,000 cap- 
italization under the name of 

THE WOMAN'S CANNING i PRESER VING CO. 

Manufacturing was begun in January of this j-ear. The first 
product — lunch tongues — (for the process is applicable to cooked foods as 
well), has produced the verdict from wholesale dealers, that with such im- 
provements the whole canning industry wull be revolutionized. Three 
factories, besides the one now in operation, will be established before 
autumn. 

The new process consists of j^lf^cing the cans in a hollow 
chest from which the air has been expelled by hot steam and 
that in turn condensed by sjyraying cold ttfater without. This 
produces a vacnmn and the cans are then sealed by delicate machinerj'. 
As every particle of gas is thus expelled from the canned goods, tleconi- 
position is impossible. The process further is so simjile that 
its cost is relatively less than the ordinary methods. 

The following are officers and prominent stockholders: 
HELEN M. Hood, Secretary 111. W. C. T. U. 
Mary Allen West, PMitor "Union Signal. 
Mrs. J. B. HoBBS, Chicago, 111. 
Mrs. Senator Dolph, Washington, D. C. 
Miss Phoebe Couzins, Ex-Secretary Board Lady Managers 

World's Fair. 
Mme. Demorest, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stock is now being sold at 

.... $25.00 PBH SHA-RB .... 

but is bound to increase in value. It is absolutely non- assessable. 
Send for circulars and information. Mention cook book in writing us. 
Call on or address, 

WOMAN'S CAXXIXG & PRESERVLXG CO. 
42 Portland Block, Chicago. G. L. Wilson, Agl. 



72 THE UNIVERSAIv 



CREAM FILLING. 

Place in double boiler a pint of milk. Beat together the yolks of four 
eggs, two tablespoons of flour and four of sugar. When milk is scalded 
add the beaten mixture and a pinch of salt. Stir until smooth, then cook 
fifteen minutes, stirring frequently. When cool flavor with vanilla and 
spread on two laj'ers. 

PINE-APPLE FILLING. 

Take the juice from one can of grated pine apple, which wull be about 
a cupful; thicken on the stove with one tablespoon of corn starch, then add 
one beaten yolk to the hot mixture and one third of a cup of sugar. Re- 
move from the stove and stir in half of the remaining pulp. 

HOT TEA CAKE. 

Beat two eggs well and add three-fourths of a cup of sugar. Then 
add alternately one cup of milk and two of flour sifted with three teaspoons 
of baking powder. Beat well, add two tablespoons of melted butter and 
bake in a shallow pan in a rather hot oven for half an hour. 

GINGERBREAD. 

Mix one cupful each of sour cream and molasses, add two small spoons 
of ginger and a pinch of salt. Dissolve two level teaspoons of soda in a 
table.spoon of water and stir into the mixture. Add a well beaten egg and 
two cups of flour. Beat well and bake twenty minutes in a hot oven. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Beat one egg very well; add one cup of sugar, half a teaspoon of salt 
and one cup of sour milk. Then sift in nearly a quart of flour with a small 
spoon each of cinnamon and cloves. Add three tablespoons of melted but- 
ter and a teaspoon of soda dissolved in water. Roll half an inch thick. 
Fry in hot lard. 



COOK BOOK. 



Do You Wish Perfectly Cooked Food? 

IF SO, YOU SHOULD AT ONCE SUPPLY YOUR KITCHEN WITH A 



LEACH 
R OASTER (^m'' 



^isa 




AND 
BAKER. 



They Save Health, They Save Food, Tliey Save Time, Tliey Save Labor, They 
Save Worry, They Save .'Money, 

Vour Roasts, and Fowls will come from the oven rich, tender and juicy, and with 
all their nutriment and flavor retained. Your Bread and Cakes will be simply perfect. 
No article cooked in the Roaster and Baker can burn. 

It is a self-baster and requires no watching. It will do its work while you are busy 
about your household duties or at church. 

description: — It is not a comoln ated affair, but is merely two pans of equal size 
so arranged thai the heat and steam is retained inside, so that the article, whether roast- 
ing or baking, will not become dry and hard, as it does in an open pan unless the cook 
keeps a constant watch on the article being baked. 



Oak Park, Sept. 9, 1890. 
]V1r. T. E. Hocce, Sir: — Your Leach Roaster 
is all that can be desired in this line. Meat 
baked in it has a much finer flavor than in the 
old way, and with little or no trouble or atten- 
tion. Resp'y, Mrs. W. E. Hughs. 

WooDLAWN Park, Sept. 12. 1890. 
Mr. T. E. Hogge, Sir: — I fully endorse the 
above statement. It also makes the meat ten- 
der without waste by shrinkage. 

Very Resp'y Mrs. R. E. Rapp. 

Chicago, III.. Sept. 9, 1890. 
Mr. T. E. Hogge, Sir: — I fully endorse the 
above statements, and furthermore say it will, 
with proper use. make "tough meat tender" and 
fine flavored. I would not be without one for 
many times its cost. 

Yours Resp'y, Mrs. A. W. Sweet, 

6929 Dickey Street. 



Chicago, Sept. 22, 1599 W. Madison St. 
Thos. E. Hogge; — As you requested I tested 
the Leach Roaster on quality and shrinkage of 
the roast. I weighed the roaster and meat to- 
gether; it was 12'/^ lbs I then at 8 o'clock put 
it in the oven with ^ pint water. At 12 o'clock 
I took it out and found to my astonishment 
that it still weighed iiX lbs., and was the best 
roast I have tasted for 40 years. 4t is certainly 
the best thing to roast meats I ever saw. 

Resp'y, J. E. Davis, M. D. 
For cooking meats the "Leach Roaster" is 
most satisfactory. Mrs. J. L. Sherman. 

6615 Perry Avenue. 
I am delighted with the "Leach Roaster" as 
a bread baker. Mrs. E. A. Rice, 

6646 Perry Avenue. 
We recommend the Leach Roaster and Baker 
to our friends. 

Mrs. Geo. H. Bates, 6804 Lafayette Ave. 
Mrs. I. A. Hennessey, 6651 Michigan Ave. 



All orders .sent to T. E. HoCGE, 100 Sacramento Ave., Chicago, 111., 
will be promptly attended to and bakers delivered to any part of Chicago 



or suburbs. 



•>>• PRICB LIST -r-K- 



No. 1. Small Family 5100 1 No. 3. Large ■?! .50 

No. 2. Medium 1.2.5 | No. 4. HoardingHou.se '1.75 

No. 5. Hotel |2.25. 

For further information address 

The Leach Roaster & Baker Co., Paxton, 111. 



THE UNIVERSAI, 



NUT COOKIES. 

Beat two eggs light, add one cup of sugar, and a cup of flour sifted 
with a small spoon of baking powder and a pinch of salt. Mix in one cup 
of finely chopped walnuts or hickory nuts. Drop by teaspoonful an inch 
apart in large pan and bake in a moderate oven. 

ALMOND COOKIES. 

Cream half a pound of butter, add same amount of powdered sugar, 
two well beaten eggs, half a pound of grated almonds and the same amount 
of flour. Spread the cookies with beaten egg and it is well to reserve part 
of the sugar and nuts to sprinkle on top. 

BOILED ICINC. 

Boil one cup of granulated sugar and one third of a cup of water until 
it hairs. Do not stir. Have the white of an egg beaten stiff" and when the 
sugar is ready beat it into the egg, pouring in a small stream. Beat until 
ready for the cake, flavor with a teaspoon of lemon juice and spread. If it 
thickens too quickly add hot water, a teaspoonful at a time. 



COOK BOOK. 



75 




Nelson Morris & Co. 

O* LARD REFINERS >►♦ 




■R 



EASONS WHg . 



Nelson Morris & Cos 
IJettle I^endefed pdfe Leaf Lafd 

Should be used in preference to all others: 

1st. Because it is made from the best quality of Leaf Ivard. 

2d. Because it is absolutely pure and free from all adulterations. 

3d. Because it is the most economical for the consumer on account of be- 
ing perfectly pure and unadulterated, and thus going 
the farthest. 

4th. Because it is recommended before all others by cliefs in the largest 
and best hotels in the country, who look for absolutely pure 
gfoods as the most economical, and will liuy no other. 

5th. Because from the foregoing you cannot fail to see that it "will 
pay you to use our lard. So give your butcher or gro- 
cer a trial order. 

NELSON MORRIS & CO., 

Union Stock Yards, Chicago. 



76 THE UNIVERSAL 



P-RESE-RVES AMD PICKLES. 



JAM. 

Strawberries, blackberrie.s or raspberries make good jam and if put up 
air tight three fourths sugar is sufficient, but put in glasses like jelly it is 
it is best to make it pound for pound. It should be cooked three quarters 
of an hour and must be carefully watched to prevent burning. The best 
way to cover jam and jelly is with melted parafine, which excludes all air. 

PINE-APPLE. 

The best way to retain the natural flavor is to put equal quantities of 
granulated sugar and grated pine-apple in small jars and cover tightly. It 
is delicious for ices, creams or puddings. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

For five pounds of currants use four of sugar, a pint of vinegar and two 
tablespoons each of cinnamon and cloves. Simmer two hours and place in 
jars. Gooseberries or grapes may be done the same. 

PIE PLANT ^PRESERVE. 

Use equal amount of pie plant cut fine and sugar. Place pie plant in 
the kettle with a little water and cook until the juices come, add the sugar 
and simmer an hour. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Put in kettle nine large tomatoes, two cups of vinegar, one tablespoon 
of salt and four of sugar. Add a large onion chopped with three green 
peppers, then a teaspoon of each of the spices. Boil one hour, fill bottles 
and seal. 



COOK BOOK. 



TENNESSEE BAKE PAN. * 




No Burning, No Scorching, 

Sclf=Basting, 

No Parboiling, 

Bakes 

Meats, Fowl, Fish, Game, 

Puddings, Cakes 

and Bread. 



There are many other bake jjans which claim to do all the Tt- nnessee 
Bake Pan does, but wherever this bake pan is introduced it immediately 
crowds out all others and at once establishes itself with the people for the 
following reasons: 

1. Because it retains all the juices and flavor of the meat. 

2. Becau.se it cooks quicker and more evenly. 

3. Because almost any sort of tough beef and fowls can be cooked 

done and tender in it. , , , •, 1 • • -4. 

4. Because nothing can be burned or .scorched wiiile cooking in it. 

5'. Because two or more different articles can be cooked in the same 
pan at one time, and each retain its distinct taste and flavor. 

6. Because it saves time, trouble, worry, and even fuel, and makes any- 
thing cooked in it more plea.sant to the taste and more nutritious. 

We ask vou only to give our invention an examination and fair trial and 
you will be convinced of its merits. It does more than we claim for it. 



From wife of Gov. W.J. Northen, of Ga.: 
The (Tennessee) Bake Pan reached me in safe- 
ty. Accept my thanks. It gives me pleasure 
to testify to its merits. 1 am much pleased 
with it. Respectfully. 

Mrs. W.J. Northen, 

Atlanta, Ga. 



From the wife of ex-Gov. Robert L. Taylor. 
ofTenn.; I take pleasure in saying that the 
Tennessee Bake Pan is all that you claim for it. 
and will recommend it to all who wish a. good 
pan. Respectfully, 

Mrs. Robert L. Taylor. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 



Buy the Tennessee Bake Pan. Try it thoroughly, following di- 
rections CLOSELY. Then if it fails, notify us, and we WILL REFUND YOUR 
MONEY. Thus far we have never had a pan returned, nor had to refund 
the money, because they are the best on earth. 

Send for descriptive circular and price list. Agents wanted. 

0. A. TIPTON, Jr., Loudon, Tenn. 



THE UNIVERSAI, 



PiCALLILi. 

Chop fine one peck of green tomatoes, and two small onions, add one 
cup of coarse salt and let this stand over night. In the morning drain, 
and cook one hour then drain dry. Prepare half a gallon of vinegar, half 
a pound of mustard seed, two chopped red peppers, two pounds of brown 
sugar, one tablespoon of cinnamon and half a one each of ground cloves, 
allspice, ginger and whole cloves; add a horse radi.sh root cut in pieces. 
Let this all boil ten minutes, pour it over the pickle, stir well and place in 
jars. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Take a quart each of berries and water and boil until very soft; spread 
a cheese cloth over colander and strain to get all the juice. Return to the 
kettle and to each pint of juice add one cup of sugar. Boil until a drop 
held in the air a few moments will congeal, then pour into moulds. 

CHOW CHOW. 

Cut up one peck of tomatoes, six small peppers and four onions. Add 
one cup of salt and soak all night. Drain in the morning add one table- 
spoon each of cloves, allspice and cinnamon, two pounds of sugar and half 
a cup of grated horse radish. Cover with vinegar and boil until tender. 



COOK BOOK. 



IT is an old saw that "Tlie"Lord furnishes 
""the /<?<?</ and the^. Devil the ^cool's." ^But 
that was before this book was published 
and if its recipes are closely followed and 07dy 
the best material used, the saying will pass into 
'■'^innocuous desuetude,'' and this leads us to sa}' 
that fhe place to pu/rhase the best groceries is that 
place where quality is the first consideration in 
the selection of stock. vSuch a place is John 
D. Jones', 6159 Wentworth i\. venue. Stock com- 
plete, choice and fresh, honest goods, honest 
prices, honest weights. Give him a trial 
order. 



ILVER CLOUD . . . 

* FA]^CY PflTEHT FliOUEj 



MANUFACTURCO BY 



eOTTO/N 3c HAMILTO/N, 

OTTAWA, ILLS., 

I.S guaranteed equal to any flour made, being WHITE, STRONG and 
NUTRITIOUS. They also manufacture the 

Celebrated Otta^va Graham, 

Granulated Corn Meal, 
Corn Flour and Old Fashioned Buckwheat. 

All for sale at the Grocery of 
6159 WKNTWORTH AVE. J. D. JONES. 



80 The universal 



PUBDI/NGS A/ND DESSEKTS. 



FIC PUDDING. 

One cup suet, one cup of bread crumbs, one cup of sugar , one half 
pound figs, three eggs, one cvip of milk, one teaspoonful vanilla, nutmeg, 
two teaspoons baking powder. Steam three hours. 

SAUCE. 

One cup sugar, one tablespoon of butter, one teaspoonful flour, one 
cup water, one teaspoon lemon extract. Boil until thick. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One egg, one cup of sugar, two spoonfuls melted butter, one pint of 
flour, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Bake quickly and eat with 
sauce. Serve with chocolate sauce. 

PUDDING SAUCE FOR COTTAGE PUDDING. 

One cup sugar, one-third cup butter, one tablespoon cornstarch, beat 
all together then pour over it two cups boiling water. After taking from 
the stove add one egg well beaten, stir quickly and add one half lemon 
sliced. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One half cup of sugar, one egg, one cup of milk, two squares of melted 
chocolate, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder sifted with two cups of flour. 
Steam two hours. Serve with sauce. 



COOK BOOK. 81 



EVERY WOMAN SHOULD HAVE IT 



u 



WOMANKIND" 



A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER FOR AND ABOUT 

WOMEN. 



-1-^ WOMANKIND is a consolidation of Woman and 
» V Home, a monthly magazine of high character, 
for many years published at Philadelphia and New 
York City, and the Woman's News, a weekly news- 
paper devoted to general and important news con- 
cerning women all over the world. 

The policy of the new publication, WOMAN- 
KIND, will be, so far as possible, to combine the 
best features of both papers into one, thus making 
one of the best woman's papers ever published. 



PRICE ONLY $1.00 PER YEAR. 

Send for sample copy and see our magnificent 
premium offers. 

Address, 

The Hosterman Publishing Co., 

Springfield, Ohio. 



THE UNIVERSAL 



INDIAN PUDDING. 

To one half pint hot water add two-thirds cup Indian meal, stir until 
it thickens. Add large piece butter, salt, one half cup brown sugar. When 
cool add one quart milk, two well beaten eggs. Place in the oven and add 
one cup of cold milk. Bake slowly, when partly done add one half cup 
raisins. As it dries away add more milk. Bake five or six hours. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

One egg, one cup sugar, piece of butter size of an egg, two-thirds cup 
of milk, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cream of tarter, )4 teaspoon 
soda, a little salt, one large cup of sliced apples, flour to make a batter. 
Bake as a cake. Serve hot, with butter or sauce. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

Remove the skin and stone of a quart of peaches and cover with one 
cupful of sugar. One pint and a half of milk heated, two table- 
spoonfuls of corn starch, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, yolks of three eggs, 
stir until it thickens. Use the three whites for frosting. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One cup pearl tapioca, one quart boiling water, let stand one hour, 
add two teacups sugar, a little lemon or vanilla, put in six apples quartered 
or peaches if preferred. Bake one hour. 

STRAWBERRY FOAM. 

One box of strawberries pressed through a sieve, add two-thirds cup 
of sugar and beaten whites of three eggs. Beat well and serve with boiled 
custard. 

LEMON JELLY NO. 1. 

Pour two cups of boiling water on one sheet of isinglass; let it dissolve. 
Add the juices of two lemons to one cup of sugar, then stir this into the 
water and strain. 



COOK BOOK. 83 







IJR BABY HOW TO KEEP THE 

^ ' . LITTLE ONES WELL. 

What will a mother give to save the life of her child ? 
All that she has. 

And yet it is such a sinii)le thing to keep the bab^- well, when you 
know how. 

If the nursing mother is weak and out of, health, the babe will vomit its 
food and soon be seriously ill. Or if improper food is used, dangerous illness 
will result. 

Thousands of intelligent mothers and careful physicians have found Lac- 
tated Feod the best one they could use. It is pure, nourishing and strength- 
giving. 

" I have thoroughly tried the other infant foods on the market, and speak 
advisedly when I sjiy there is no other food that so thoroughly agrees and nour- 
ishes as Lactated Food. I feel that it saved the life of my own fourteen 
months old boy. JST. P. Tvleu, M.D.. New Rochelle, N.Y , Oct. 14, 1890. 

Lactated Food is sold by druggists, or mailed on receipt of price, 25 cents, 
50 cents, $1.00. Interesting book of "Prize Babies" and handsome birthday 
card free to any mother sending baby's name and age. 

In writing us, mention Cook Book. 

WELLS, RICHARDSON & CO., Burlington, Vt. 
DO YOU OWN TOKOLOGY? 

A BOOK FOR EVERY WOMAN. 

Mrs. M. S. Eamsey writes: Tliree years since I procured Tokology, a 
complete Ladies' Guide in healtii and disease. I followed its teaclung in two 
instances witli happiest results. I cannot say enougli in its praise I ask 
every woman: Have you read Tokology — if not. then get it at once — its value 
cannot be estimated in money. 

N. R. ]\Ic('. writes: "Dear Dr. Stockham: I shall not attempt to express 
how thankful I am that you wrote Tokology. I caimot tell you how much 
it has done for me. Our son came almost without warning. I most heartily 
rejoice when I hear of tlie advent of a " Tokolo'iy Baby." 

Mrs. K. writes: " Send me an outfit for Tokology. My aunt in Dakota 
says, 'If you must sell books, sell Tokology, as it is, next to the Bible, the best 
book I ever read.'" Sample pages free. Agents wanted. Prepaid $2.75. 

ALICE B. STOCKHAM & CO., 277 Madison St., Chicago. 

THE KINDERGARTEN. -^ monthly magazine for home and 
school, science lessons, stories games, occujiations, etc. Invaluable for 
primary teachers and mothers. E\ery home is made brighter and sweeter by 
the aids tliis magazine gives in the training of little children. $1.50 a year. 
On trial, 3 months, 30 cents, 

ALICE B. STOCKHAM & CO., 277 Madison St., Chicago. 



84 THE UNIVERSAL 



LEMON JELLY NO. 2. 

Soak one box of gelatine in cold water an hour, then add one pint boil- 
ing water, two cups sugar, three lemons with skin and pulp. Let stand 
a while then strain through napkin into moulds. 

COFFEE JELLY. 

One and one half pints of nice, clear coffee, strong and hot, poured on 
one half box of gelatine, one cup of sugar, strain into a mould. 

ORANGE BASKETS. 

Orange baskets are just the things for children's parties and delight 
the little people. Trace the lines for the handle of the basket before cut- 
ting through the skin. Remove the pulp carefully and use it in making 
jelly. Keep the baskets in water or in a cool place until wanted, then fill 
with cubes of the jell}^ To add to the effect squares of bright red jelly, 
like crabapple or current, may be mixed with the other, or a spoonful of 
whipped cream placed on top. 

ROCK CREAM. 

Boil one teacupful of good rice in sweet milk till soft. Sweeten it with 
powdered sugar and pile high on a dish. Lay on it here and there pieces 
of currant jelly or any kind of preserved fruit. Beat up ver}' stiff the 
whites of three or four eggs and a Httle powdered sugar. Flavor with 
vanilla and drop over the rice, giving it the appearance of a rock of snow. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

One and one-half cups graham flour, one cup milk, one half cup 
molasses, one cup currants or raisins, one half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon 
soda. Sift the graham flour to make it light, dissolve soda in one table- 
spoon milk, add the remainder of the milk, salt and molasses; pour this 
mixture on the graham and beat well; add fruit which is floured a little; 
put in biittered mould and steam four hours. Serve with foamy sauce. 



COOK BOOK. 85 



HORLICK' 



(vlaLTED fviiLK 



THE BEvST FOOD FOR 



Infants, Invalids, Dyspeptics, Convalescents, The 
Affed, Travelers and Nursing Mothers. 



REQUIRES NO COOKING AND NO ADDITION OF MILK. 

SIMPLY PREPARED BY DISSOLVING IN WATER. 

A Mother's Greatest Desire is to see her child healthy, strong and 
well developed. 

A Baby's Greatest Need is a perfect food to keep pace with its 
rapid growth. 

Horlick's Malted Milk will satisfy these demands. Babies fed 
upon it grow into robust, healthy children. By its use most of the troubles 
incident to the summer season will be avoided. 

RECOMMENDED BY PHYSICIANS. 

For delicate ladies and for children it makes a most pleasant and nu- 
tritious table drink, either hot or iced, in place of tea and coffee. 



For Sale by All Druggists. 



A sample bottle will be sent free to any mother or invalid sending 
address to 

MALTED MILK CO., 

SOLE MANUFACTURERS, 

London, Eng. ^Racine, Wis. 



8f) THE UNIVERSAL 



FOAMY SAUCE. 

One half cup butter, one cup powdered sugar, one teaspoon vanilla, 
one fourth cup boiling water, white of one egg beaten to a froth. Cream 
the butter, add sugar gradually, then vanilla, and just before serving, add 
boiling water; stir well, then add egg and beat to a foam. 

APPLE SNOW. 

Three large tart apples, whites of three eggs, one half cup powdered 
sugar; pare, quarter and core the apples; steam until tender; strain and rub 
through fruit press; beat the whites of eggs stiff, add the sugar, one table- 
spoon at a time, beating stiff each time; add apples and beat again; pile 
lightly in glass dish and serve with 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

One pint milk, yolks of three eggs, three tablespoons sugar, one halt 
teaspoon vanilla and a pinch of salt. Scald the milk in double boiler, add 
sugar and salt to eggs, then beat all together wdth a spoon, pour the hot 
milk slowl}' on this mixture. When well mixed pour back into boiler and 
cook until it thickens a little; then strain it and when nearly cold, add the 
flavoring. 

ORANGE CHARLOTTE. 

Soak one-third box gelatine in one-third cup of cold water until soft, 
then add one third ciip boiling water; add cup of sugar and juice of one 
lemon; strain this and add one cup orange juice, pulp and little grated 
rind. Set in cool place and when beginning to harden, beat whites of 
three eggs stiff and beat into the jelly, beat all until stiff enough to drop 
from the spoon; pour into plain mould lined with sections of orange. Serve 
very cold with or without w'hipped cream. 

CUSTARD SOUFFLE. 

]Make a sauce of one large tablespoon butter, two of flour, add a cup of 
milk; beat the 3-olks of four eggs, with two tablespoons sugar, add to the ' 
sauce and set away to cool. Half an hour before serving, beat the whites 
of four eggs stiff and cut them into this mixture lightly. Bake in buttered 
dish one half hour and serve immediatelv with creamv sauce. 



COOK BOOK. S7 



BUY THE BEST. 

Williams' Root Beer Extract 

i IN LIQUID. ? 

One bottle costing- 25 cents only, will make six gallons 
of the finest, sparkling Root Beer, a healthy and very cheap 
temperance drink. To be made at home for family use. 
Directions on every bottle. Easy to make— no^boiling. 

FOR SALE BY GROCERS AND DRUGGISTS GENERALLY. 

BE SURE AND GET WILLIAMS\ 



Polish up your Stoves with Parlor Pride Stove Enamel. 

THE FINEST POLISH IN THE WORLD. FOR~SALE EVERYWHERE. 



CHICAGO CORSET CO, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



BALL'S AND KaBO CoRSETS AND 

BALL'S Waists, 

24-7 AND 249 MONROE STREET, 

CHICAGO 



88 THE UNIVERSAL 



CREAMY SAUCE. 

Cream one-fourth cup butter, add gradually one half cup powdered 
sugar, then two tablespoons tnilk and flavoring. Heat over hot water and 
stir until smooth. 



HARD SAUCE. 

Two cups of powdered sugar, a piece of butter the size of an egg, about 
a teaspoonful of hot water to moisten the bxitter; beat well and keep in a 
cool place. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

One cup and a half of boiling water, one cup of sugar, one square of 
chocolate. Let the sugar and chocolate dissolve. Stir into the boiling 
water. Thicken with flour, add salt and flavor with vanilla. 

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD. 

Make same as Coffee custard, using one or two squares grated choco- 
late moistened with part of the milk. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

One cup flour, one tablespoon lard, one-half tablespoon butter, one 
half teaspoon baking powder. Mix with milk until soft enough to handle; 
roll or potnid out like pie crust; cut into round shapes, place three small 
quarters of apple on each, season with sugar and cinnamon, fold and bake; 
serve with 

PLAIN PUDDING SAUCE. 



One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one large spoonful flour. Beat all 
together iintil white and smooth; pour on one pint boiling water; flavor 
with lemon extract. 



COOK BOOK. 



89 



THE IMPROVED PEERLESS STEAM COOKER 



o. 










Q 












O 
O 






u 






li. 







a. 

< 






Q 
Ul 


SI 




u 






?: 


*^ 




T 


s 




ir 


















O 


•; 




01 


-3 
















O 


T 




o 


S 5 




z 


- 


m 


z 


•a = 




< 


:: 


c 




aj tjj 






s 


o 
n 








H 


-) 


— 


^1 




(0 
111 

o 


•5 


o 


(0 


1*0 


tA 


C 


> 


-I 
t- 


X. K 


>, 


III 


i 


w 


til 


-- U 


c 






z 





,'^ 



Will Enable yon to do as iiiucli t'ookiiifj over One I$urner on a Oasoline, Oil 
or Gas Stove, as is usually <lone on ihree Hurners. 

J> 
_D 

2< 

15 

\> 

.m 

?;■ 3- = ,=■ C n -L 

— a-o'-S-Cj: 

o "• ^re"^ = 2 o 

- = S £o-^° 3 1 

7 $ < >i^ S-a 2 



T3.E-5 



S.O V, 



o < 

u 

O X 

z 










g.3 o "• s;o 



: O 3 =• - :^ 






=^=-K"< 



5 O Ul 5-^3 5 r> o 
jru re ^ a.™ o < 



3 -^i;_re c 



;^ ^S-n 



2 m 



^ Q Letter A shows the tube for conveying the surplus steam into the 

i ij sieve. B shoivs the steam whistle that calls when m-re water is g 

^ ^ needed. C is the lube for repleai^^hinj; With water without remov- ^ 

ing the cover. ~ 

Vegetables that always lose much of their flavor and become watery, soggy and indigestible by 

boiling, are made dry. light and healthy. , u • i 

Meats and Poultry, no matter how tough, are made tender and palatable. The usual shrinkage 
is saved and all the health-giving properties are preserved. 

It will Pay for Itself in One Season for Canning Fruit alone. 

Over 200,000 of our Steam Cookers noNw in use. 

Agents wanted in every town. For particulars, address with stamp, 

C. E. SWARX35BAUGH & CO., 

523 MAINE ST., QUINCY, ILL. GENERAL MANAGERS 



90 THE UNIVERSAL 



COFFEE CUSTARD. 

Boil one pint milk with one half cup sugar. Arid one cup strong hot 
coffee and three beaten eggs; then one tablespoon corn starch dissolved in 
milk. vStir until smooth. Serve in cold glasses with meringue or whipped 
cream on top. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Four cups flour, one cup chopped raisins, three-fourths cujj chopped 
suet, one cup half filled with molasses and filled up with sugar, one and 
one-half cups sweet milk, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon salt, steam three 
hours. 

SAUCE FOR SUET PUDDING. 

One cup of sugar and one egg and pinch of .salt beaten well together. 
Just 1)efore serving boil one cup milk and pour over the sugar and egg, 
stirring well. Flavor with A'anilla. 

RICE CUSTARD. 

Two-thirds of a cup of rice, steamed till quite soft in one quart of milk, 
two thirds cup sugar, one teaspoon salt, one teaspoon butter, when taken 
from the .stove add the w-ell beaten 3-olks of three eggs and one tablespoon 
of vanilla. Beat the wdiites of the three eggs stiff with three small table- 
.spoons of sugar, added slowly. When stiff drop by spoonfuls on a plate 
and brown slightly in a hot oven and when the pudding is cold .slip the 
frosting to the top of the pudding with a knife. 



PINE APPLE-JELLY. 

One-half box gelatine soaked in one cup water; add enough 
hot water to make a quart; add one cup sugar, juice of one can pine-apple 
(sliced), juice of three lemons. Strain into dish to cool. When it begins 
to thicken add pine-apple cut in small pieces; also candied cherries or 
sliced bananas. vServe with whipped cream if desired. 



COOK BOOK. 



&1 



HIGH LAMB ® 



pVAPO'RATE'D (JKEA 



M. 



i3)\\m_ 



5178 popular 

lis 




Sable luxury. 



"wm 



IS 



Ice Cream can be made with Highland Evaporated Cream at 
less cost than bv using ordinary cream. Ask your grocer lor it. 

For Sale by the Folio winjr Gio«!eis of Knglewood. 



Howe & Porter, 69th St., 

Tom Hughes, 433 69th St., 

G. L. Hamilton, 605 69th St., 

Lichtenwalter & Co., 611 60th St., 
T. Sbaimtz, Cor. 70th & Sherman 

Streets, 
J. H. Stone, Cor. 68th & Halsted, 
H. Werkman, 6754 S. Halsted St., 
Wiltjer Bros., 6745 S. Halsted St., 
C. Werkman, 6519 S. Halsted St., 
J. Walther. 946 63d St., 

\V. D. Tyler, 12 11 63d St., 

Hildebrand Bros, Cor. Englewood 

Avenue & Halsted Sts. 
Dehl Bros., 63S 63d St. 

FetzlafT & Spalding, 637 63d St., 
C. A. Houghton & Co.. 625 63d St., 
J. Bredin & Co. 615 63d vSt., 

Wm. :NIu.sk. Cor. 63d & Wright vSt., 
iMegarry & Co., Cor. Stewart Ave. 

and 63d St., 
Hutton & Lvnd, 513 63d St.. 



L. & J. S. Claus, 6307 Wentworth. 
J. W. Fender & Bro., 6556 Went- 
worth Ave. 

D. Cunningham, Cor. 69th and 
Wentworth Ave. 

Stemp Bro.s. & Henry. 6722 State, 
Theo. Daul, Cor. 66tli & State Sts., 
Werveke Bros., 67th vSt., near State, 
:\IcEldowney Bros., Cor. 6ist and 

Wright Sts., 
J. D. Jones, 6159 Wentworth Av- 
enue, 
Fred Gilbert, 655 6T.st St., 

E. S. Jacobs, Cor. Chesnut St. and 
Wentworth Ave., 

S. F. vSavers, 6935 S. Halsted St., 
Dahlgren & Co., 68th & Yale Sts., 
P. Dodhngcr, 424 59th St.. 

Fred. Boemer. 5925 Princeton .\ve, 
C. I'rancke, 5719 Wentworth Ave, 
Wall & Co., Cor. 59th St., & Went- 
worth Ave. 



93 THE UNIVERSAL 



FRUIT BLANC-MANCE. 

One and one-half pints hot water, one-half box gelatine dissolved 
in hot water, four tablespoons corn starch (quite rounding). Cook until the 
corn starch is well done, then turn in jam of any kind, stir well, and turn 
into mould. Serve cold with sweetened cream. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Soak one-fourth box gelatine in one-fourth cup cold water until soft. 
Chill and whip one pint cream. Line a three pint mould with lady fingers. 
Sift one third cup sugar over the cream and add one teaspoon vanilla, 
Dissolve the gelatine in one-fourth cup boiling water and strain through 
fine strainer over cream; mix carefulh- and when nearly stiff enough to 
drop, pour into mould. 



COOK BOOK. 



SJi5 



f e yod fotid of Jellies iniide from Gelfiititie ? ^ 
bo yoil hiiVe trouble in theif prepar^Ltiofl ? f^' 



IF SO WHY NOT TRY 



tuxedo ^able cJellij* 



A preparatio9 o? the best French Gelatine, 
\ Sugar apd-purc pruit Flavors pat up in such a 

j^ 'ioT:rr} tl^at it can be very easily iDade ready for 

4 the table without cooking, apd SUI^E to be dUST 

WHAT YOU EXPECT, 

^ Perfect Gelatine Dessert. ® -^ 



Made in all popular flavors, Oraiig^e, L,enion, Raspberry, 
Stra-wberry, Vanilla, Htc, also the plain Calves- 
foot to which by the addition of 'wine you can easily 
and quickly make delicious "Wine Jellies 

without trouble and at very little expense. 



uxedo is the name. 
Take no other. 



Sold by all (Jroeers. 



R. B. BERU]VIOHT CO., 



63 S 65 Murray St. 



Mew yorkCity. 



94 THE UNIVERSAI, 



CE CTIEAMS A/ND ICES. 



NEW YORK ICE CREAM. 



Boil one quart milk, beat together two eggs, one cup sugar, two tea- 
spoons of flour and one saltspoon salt. Add boiling milk and cook in 
double boiler twenty minutes stirring until smooth, then occasionally. 
Strain and when cool add one qiiart of cream, flavoring and sugar to be 
quite sweet. Freeze. 

To Freeze. — Use one measure of coarse salt to three measures of ice 
pounded fine, pack solidly and do not drain off water. A pint of nut 
meats, hickory or English walnuts, or one pound figs may be added to the 
cream while freezing This will make about three quarts. 



ORANGE SHERBET. 



One ])int sugar and one pint water, juice and pulp of .six oranges. 
Soak one table .spoon gelatine in one-fourth cup of cold water and di.ssolve 
with one fourth cup boiling water. Strain and add to above mixture and 
freeze. One can of grated pine-apple may be used same as oranges. 



COOK HOOK, 



CLACE MERINGUE. 

One quart cream, one large cup granulated sugar, one tablespoon 
vanilla, one cup milk one-fourth cup cold water in which is soaked one 
tablespoon gelatine; whites of six eggs, six tablespoons of powdered sugar. 
Let the milk come to a boil and stir in soaked gelatine. Strain into the 
cream, add vanilla and sugar and freeze. When frozen take out the beater 
and pack smoothlj-. Set away at least one half hour. When ready to 
serve, beat the whites of eggs stiff and gradualh- beat in the powdered 
sugar. Turn the frozen cream out on a plate and cover with meringue 
and brown. Serve immediately. 

FROZEN FRUIT. 

Cut up the contents one can peaches or apricots I of cour.se fresh fruit is 
better), add one pint sugar, one quart water; freeze. 

ICE CREAM. 

One quart pure cream, sweeten with one cup sugar, one tablespoon 
vanilla, or one quart strawberries; crushed, strained and sweetened; freeze. 

LUSCIOUS ICE CREAM. 

One half pint can of "Evaporated Cream," pint and a half of milk (or 
one pint pure water), two cups sugar, flavor to taste and freeze slowly. 



yCk^ 



80 ^ 


















• ^^ c 

.V. 



















..^^ 






^0' 



""^ 













.3^"^ 















v^^ 



^ vf' 












<i>. 



.0' 






^0 



4> 


















L v> .r 









'b V" 



' '^.. 



0* 



o V 






'•!^\:^i' 



vO 



,0 



^^-^^^ 
























''-V''''-v 



O. * o « o ' .0 



?.or. 






>,*- ^ ji^ 






vV* 


















^^:r 



'^^ 



-^- 






"-0 






^■"' 



m 



<^^'ic 






.0' 




N. MANCHESTER, 
INDIANA 46962 






• 'r. 






•Or. 






'*Jf:<^